Skip to main content

Full text of "The Washington Post 1951-08-15: Iss 27453"

See other formats


The Weather 


. oday—Partly 


cloudy 


and more 


humid. High 90. Maryland and Vir- 
ginia—Partly cloudy and continued 
humid. High 8600. Yesterday—High, 


88 at 2:55 p. m.; low 


, 72 at 7:05 a. m. 


Washington Post 


COMPLETE 


CAPITAL 


EDITION 


NO. . « « 27,453 


Phone NA. 4200 


The Wa 


ight 1951 
ington Post Co. 


Cap 


WEDNESDAY, 


AUGUST 15, 19 


- 


od 


1 


WTOP AM (1500) FM (96.3) TV (Ch. 9) 


FIVE CENTS 


— 


U. N. Can’t 


‘Slanderers’ 


As Line, Ridgway Says3In Congress 


8th Army ‘Ready, Fit’ 


Allied Leaders Issue 
Tough Statements 
As Talks Drag Out 
With No Progress 


MUNSAN, Korea (Wednes- 
day), Aug. 15 (4).—Dead- 
locked Korean armistice talks 
appeared headed for a new 
breakdown Tuesday and the 
United Nations supreme com- 
mander made a bristling de- 
mand for a settlement “with 
honor and without appease- 
ment.” 

Allied and Communist nego- 
tiators at Kaesong appeared to 
have almost exhausted their 
arguments on where to draw a 


demarcation line that would stop 
the Korean war. 


Should the talks collapse, the | 


U. N. army is “ready and fit” to 
“clobber” the Reds, its com- 
mander said. 


Another “No Progress” Session 


For the fourteenth time no 
progress was made on the buffer 
zone at Tuesday’s session, which 
lasted two hours and 40 minutes. 
However, the negotiators agreed 
to meet again at 11 a. m. today 


(9 p. m. Tuesday EDT) for the | 


twenty-fifth session. 

Overshadowing the fruitless 
twenty-fourth meeting were the 
remarks Gen. Matthew B. Ridg- 
way made to correspondents in 
Tokyo and Gen. James A. Van 
Fleet, Eighth Army commander 
made to’ newsmen at Munsan. 

Oncé again Ridgway flatly re- 
jected the Communist demand 
that a buffer zone be centered 
on the thirty-eighth parallel. 

He pointed out that twice 
previously—at the start of the 
Korean war and on New Year’s 
Eve overwhelming Communist 
offensives had driven the defend- 
ers back from that old political 
boundary. ; 

“How could anyone ask us to 
go back to the same line,” 
Ridgway asked. “We don’t in- 
tend to.” 


Allies Imply Time Limit 


He described the Allied pro- 
posal for a defensible line based 
on present battle lines as “sim- 
ple, straightforward and reason- 
able.” 

The Communists have rejected 


rageous,” largely because it lies 
for the most part north of the 
thirty-eighth parallel. 

Peiping Radio said Tuesday 


night “by taking such a prepos- | 


terous stand America is refusing 


Charator Assassins 
Denounced in Angry 
Speech at Legion 

Dedication Service 


Five Sons at Bedside 


newspaper titan and one of the 
most controversial figures of his 
time, died yesterday morning at 


his Beverly Hills, Calif., man- 


sion, 

Death came to the 88-year-old 
founder of a newspaper empire 
‘only a day after he sank into a 


coma, the Associated Press re-| 


ported. He died at 9:50 a. m. Mr. 


William R. Hearst, Founder 
Of News Empire, Dies at 88 


William Randolph Hears t, 


' 


Hearst was in ill health for sey-'| 


eral years but retained an active | 


interest in his many newspapers. 


About four years ago he moved |. 


to his last home from his San 
Simeon estate. 
At the deathbed were his five 


sons, William Randolph Hearst, 
_jr., George, John, David and 
‘Randolph Hearst. Also present 
were Martin F. Huberth, chair- 
man of the board of the Hearst 
Corp., and Richard E. Berlin, 
'president of the corporation. 
His wife, the former Millicent 
Willson of New York City, 
joined with her five sons in a 
statement which said in part: 


papers our pledge to continue to 
operate our father’s publications 
‘as he guided us, and our deter- 
mination to carry on in the tra- 
dition of his life which was dedi- 
cated to the service of America 


(Partial Text on Page 7) 
By Alfred Friendly 


et 38th Trem Hits Probers Hear o 


{ lape 


Record 


f Admission That Nelson 


Post Reporter 


speech, President Truman) 
yesterday made his strongest | 
counterattack to date against 
“slandermongers”’ and char-. 
acter assassins in Congress. | 


The President did not mention 
any names, but it was obvious 


In an angry, razor-edged | 


that the speech was aimed at} 


the whole congressional coterie | 


who has espoused mecarthyism. 

The President’s blistering de- 
- |nunciation of those “who have 
attacked the basic principle of 
fair play that underlies our Con- 
stitution” was made in a speech 
dedicating the new American 
Legion national headquarters, a 
splendid building of severe mod- 
ern design at 1608 K st. nw. 

He warned Legionnaires that 
even “you have no way of tell- 
ing when some unfounded accu- 
sation may be hurléd against 
you, perhaps straight from the 
halls of Congress.” 


| No Illustration Needed® 


Detective Ralph Bond (left) testifies yester- 
day before the Prince Georges County Com- 


“Will you please convey to the | 
readers of the Hearst news-| 


i 3 
| Underwood & Underwood 


| many direct words. 


'White House aide commented, 
no one hearing the addres 
‘needed to have it illustrated. 
Obviously, he was 
about Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy 
(R-Wis.). who has engaged in 
name-calling against State De- 
partment and high Administra- 
tion figures ever since February, 
'1950: and about some of the in- 
and the best interests of the | discriminate accusers among the 
American people.” 'members and arot the mtg 
; |\Committee on un-American Ac- 
i Maan de ckeaa tivities and of Senator Pat Mc- 


| WILLIAM R. HEARST 
As he looked at the peak of 
| eareer in the late 1920's. 


War Threat 
At Peak Now, 
Wilson Says 

| Only U. S. Might Can 


Avert It, Businessmen 


Told by Defense Chief 


such a li “abs % 

ine as ‘absurd and out talk,” Wilson said military and 
Industrial strength is the only 
language Soviet Russia really 


EVANSTON, IIl., Aug. 14 (#.— 


| Defense Mobilizer Charles E. 
Wilson today said the danger of 


a third world war is “greater 


than ever” and it can be averted 


only by building America’s 
might. 

Warning the country against 
being lulled by Moscow’s “sweet 


understands. 

Wilson made the statements 
in an address before the National 
Institute for Chamber of Com- 


See TRUCE, Page 4, Column 5 |merce and Trade Association 


Indians Win 
12th in Row 


The league-leading Cleveland 
Indians won their twelfth | 


straight game yesterday, beating 


the Detroit Tigers, 6-5, in 10 in-| 
nings on a dramatic two-out’ 


Single by Jim Hegan. 


Hutchinson, Bearden (9), Bo 
owy (10) and Ginsberg; Lemon 
Gromek (6), Brissie (8) and He- 
gan. Home runs: Detroit—Kry- 
hoski, Wetrz; Cleveland—Boone, 


| wages. 
“The dog keeps chasing his|the measure to conference for! 


'Executives. 


On the domestic front, he said 
that price-control changes re- 
cently directed by Congress may 
mean meat black markets and 
living-cost boosts of five to eight 
percent. 


Housing Bill. 


' 
i 
| 
i 


Carran’s (D-Nev.) Senate In- 
lernal Security subcommittee. 
At the Capitol, McCarran con- 
fined his comment-on the speech 
to the remark, “There are none 
so blind as those who won’t see.” 
Said McCarthy, “I would wel- 


Set to Pass 
House Today 


GOP Proposal Adopted 
To Suspend Credit 


to make McCarthyism an issue 
in the (1952) campaign.” He has 
already hinted he may campaign 
against Sen. William Benton 
(D-Conn.), who has asked the 
Senate to consider expelling Mc- 
Carthy. . 

Theme of the Chief Execu- 
tive’s speech was the “100 per- 
cent Americanism” which the 
Legion, in the preamble of its 


Curbs in Some Areas 


By Edward F. Ryan 


Post Reporter 


‘fight on the defense housing bill 


} 
i 


House léaders yesterday side- 


tracked a threatened ‘constitution, pledges to support. 


school | The essence of that idea, Mr. 

| Truman suggested, is the protec- 

the tion of “the rights and liberties 
of all our citizens.” 


It is just that, 


and prepared to 
measure today. 


By narrow margins, Adminis- | 


pass 


he intimated, 


tration forces also headed off! which is being destroyed by peo- | 
the | 
ost irresponsible kinds of accu- | 
other people.” | 

“loudly pro-' 


all but one of a series of GOP| ple “filling the air” with 
moves to curtail sharply the | Mo: 
proposed program of housing’ Sations against 
and’ commuity services pro-| Those people, 
vided by the bill. | claiming that they are (Amer- 
The one Republican proposal |ica’s) chief defenders,” the Pres- 
which the House adopted, ident said, are the ones who “are 
offered by Rep. Jesse P. Wolcott Chipping away at our basic free- 
(R-Mich.) would suspend hous- doms just as insidiously and fat 


; : 43 more effectively than the Com- 
a in critical de munists have been able to do.” 


He referred to what they were 
To Try Again Today doing as “terrible business.” He 


Wolcott told reporters he will called on the Legion to expose 


He said the ban voted by Con-/|try again today before the House; the ‘rotten motives” of those 


gress in the new defense pro- 
duction act, against Government 
slaughtering controls may con- 
centrate meat supply in large 
packers. This may lead, he said, 


finally votes on the bill to re-| who, he said, are trying to divide 
strict Federally-provided 


| That was as close aS he-camé | 


talking FY 


come it if the President wants |, 


com-| the country, confuse the citizens | 


missioners (at right). Around the table, from 
‘to identifying his target in so) Aeft, are Bond; Mrs. Nannie Wilson, secre- 
But, as a¥ tary of the board of commissioners; Thomas 


Hicks, clerk; 


- bers: 


- 


ouse Group 
Urges Passage 


Of Aid Bill 


Aid by $651 Million 


5 By the UntMed Press 
The House Foreign Affairs 


5 


gress to. approv eign. aid 
bill in the ount of 3$7,848.- 
750.000, warning that “there is 
no time to spare” in preparing 
Western Europe for a possible 
Russian attack. 

It gpproved the bill last Thurs- 
day with a cut of: $651,250,000 be- 
‘low President Truman’s request. 

The committee said the for- 
eign aid it recommended would 
do the job if wisely spent, quot- 
ing General Eisenhower, com- 
mander of the Atlantic Pact de- 
fense force, as saying it “will 
go a long way” toward providing 
the necessary defenses. 

It was disclosed also that 
Lieut. Gen. Alfred M. Gruenther, 
Eisenhower's Chief of Staff, had 
warned the committee in secret 
session that if Russia attacked 
Western Europe it “undoubted- 
ly” would strike simultaneously 
at the United States to “knock 
out a good part” of American 
production. 


Bypass State Department 

The committee also recom- 
mended that the aid program be 
placed under a single adminis- 
trator, independent of the State 
Department. 


munity services to a specific list.| and “tear up the Bill of Rights. ‘The cuts made were 265 mil- 


In its introduction, the Presi- 


He tried yesterday to remove} 
have 


from the bill all authority for) dent's speech could not 


‘to “local meat famines—which|such services and was beaten been more gracious, in that he 
| the customer can avoid only by | by a vote of 125 to 122. 


paid the highest praise to the 


lion dollars in arms, 285 million 
dollars in European economic 
aid, and 150 million dollars in 
economic aid for Asia. 


At the same time, Wolcott pre-| American Legion for “wonderful | Efforts will be made to.trim 


i'the bill still further on the 
| House floor, and some Senators 
| 


See AID Page 9, Col. 1 


Committee Cuts Allies’ 


Committee yesterday urged Con- 


Miss Bentley 
Heard in °40s 
Réds Ran IPR 


By Murrey Marder 


Post Reporter 


Economic and Military’. rlizabeth T: Bentley, former 


Communist espionage agent, tes- 
tified yesterday that she was told 
in the early 1940s that the Com- 
‘munist Party had “control” of 
|the Institute of Pacific Relations. 


She testified to the Senate In-, 
subcommittee | 


ternal Security 
that her underground “boss” and 
‘lover, the late Jacob Golos, 
'warned her not to deal with IPR 
' because Communists in it were 
too well known and “too fum- 
' bling? 

Golos told her, Miss Bentley 
recounted, that: 

“It (IPR) was as red as a rose 
and you shculdn’t touch it with 
a 10-foot pole.” 


Target of Investigation 


Miss Bentley said Mildred 
Price, a “Communist unit 
Organizer for the unit operating 
in the Far Eastern field,” also 
told her that IPR “was one of 
our (Communist) organizations 
in the sense we exercised con- 
trol over it” through Commu- 
/nists in it. 

IPR, Far Eastern 
organization founded 


research 
in 


Americans aS members’ and 
officers, is a principal target of 
Sen. Pat McCarran’s subcom- 
mittee probe of possible 
versive influences on Far East- 
ern policy. Its officers have 


denied the IPR has been moti-| 


vated by Communist influences. 

Miss Bentley’s testimony was 
given in a gush of names and 
identifications similar to those 
‘which were spread across the 
Nation’s newspapers three years 
ago when she appeared as the 
first in a chain of apostate Com- 
munist spy-ring agents. 

Much of her story yesterday 
repeated information which the 
|plump Vassar graduate has 


written in the House, will send 


Presidential Politics 


tail,” Wilson said. “And where it 


Simpson. Winning Baewen | oR nobody knows.” 


sie. Losing pitcher—Borowy. 


New York at WASHINGTON, 
night. | | 


writing of the final version. 


Truman, Told He'll Be on Ballot 


A major feature of the bill is 


| The mobilization chief said the ovision of an additanoil EsAmor | 
| Soviet haggling and quibbling in | provision of an additional $1,500,- | 


Boston at PhildWelphia, night. 
—- scHeduled). ‘Children Warned 
NATIONAL LEAGUE 


Brooklyn at New York, night 
Philadelphia at Boston, night 
Chicago at St. Louis, night. 
(Only games scheduled), 


Hundreds of thousands 
small fish have been killed in 
the last 10 days because of foul 
pollution of the Potomac River. 

The dead fish have lined the 
-\river bank for several miles be-| 
low the District line. 
| Similar conditions on the Ana-| 
icostia have been reported ‘to| 
the Interstate Commision on the | 
Potomac River Basin, and are | 
being investigated by District, 
Virginia and Maryland author- 
ities. 

Dr. Daniel L. Seckinger, Dis- 


trict Health Officer and official 
of the Interstate Commission, 
referred to thé Potomac as an 
“open sewer,” and warned 
parents not to “permit your 
children to swim or play in it! 
at this time of year.” 

“Our first report of the whole- 


Vacation Bound? 


Take your favorite Wash- 
ington newspaper with you. 
When you're on_ vacation 
you ll find the arrival of The 
Washington Post as welcome 
as a letter from home. 
You'll read The Post with as 
much interest as you read 
your. personal mail, for local 
news from the Washington 
area. 


To get Post Vacation De- 


See DEFENSE Page 9, Col. 1 | See HOUSING, Page 9, Column 2 In Minnesota Savs Thank Yo 
| | ear o/ 


‘Potomac Called ‘Open Sewer, 
Small Fish Die By Thousands 


of; were identified as salt water 


perch, small shad and shiners, 
although I also saw some cat- 
fish and several bass.” 

Cotton reported that tests 
have shown that the dissolved 
oxygen in the water where the 
river passes Washington, has 
dropped to two parts per mil- 
lion. Fish require water with 
four parts of dissolved oxygen 
per million to thrive, he de- 
clared, 

Samples of the water were 
taken last Wednesday by Ralph 
E. Fuhrman of the District Sew- 
age Disposal Plant and A. H. 
Paessler, executive Secretary of 
the Virginia Water Control 
Board. Fuhrman said the river, 
from Three Sisters Island to 
Hallowing Point, two miles be- 
low the District line, was lined 
with dead fish. 

Yesterday similar conditions 
were reported from below Fort 
Foote, and dead fishes were be- 


By The Associated Press 


| President Truman got word! Douglas asked withdrawal\of 
yesterday that his name would petitions being circulated jn 
be entered in the Minnesota Oregon to place his nan in 
presidential primary which ..+ May's presidential pfimary. 
comes March 18—second among Monroe Sweetland/ Oregon 


the 16 States which choose con- | Lesa. cop BE 
vention delegates at the polls. (State Democratic Chairman, had 


But the President said to Sen. |revealed after a White House 
Hubert H. Humphrey (D-Minn.) | conference with President Tru- 
that his decision about his can- | man on Monday that the Doug- 
ididacy was a bridge to _ be | jas petition was being circulated. 
crossed “when we come to it.” | Sweetland said he told Mr. 

For his part, Sen. Paul H./tryman that there was “over- 
Douglas (D-Ill.) sent a wire to his | whelming” sentiment among 
supporters in Oregon asking/Qregon Democrats for him to 
them to withdraw their petition | cgaek reelection. 
on his behalf, reiterating that| SGweetland said Mr. Truman 
he would not be a presidential |jjstened” but gave no hint of his 
/ candidate. | plans. 
| Humphrey told a reporter he | This byplay brought 
‘had informed Mr, Truman dur-jsertion from Senator 
ing a White House call that his|Brewster (R-Me.) 
name was to be entered in Min- 
nesota. 

Humphrey reported that the 
President thanked him. “When I 
told him, ‘Mr. President, we are 
expecting you to run and are | : 
hoping that you will,’ the Presi-| us Truman, the Republicans will 
dent replied, ‘We'll cross that | beat him with Taft.” 
bridge when we come to Tg ster’s words. 

Humphrey said he also urged | 
/Mr. Truman to make a tour of | shrugged, 


an as- 
Owen 
that if the 


he wanted the Democratic nomi- 


‘pick Senator Robert 
'(R-Ohio) as his opponent. 


grinned, 


Hl, 


nation, the Republicans would | 
A. Taft) 


Told about the statement, Taft; 


'given to various House and Sen- 
ate committees previously, but 
ithrough it she threaded some 
new details. 

Later, behind closed doors, 
she gave information which sub- 


See INSTITUTE, Page 11, Col. 6 


1925, | 
and including many prominent | 


sub- | 


The Washington Post 


Calvert Lancaster, assistant 


' county attorney, and the five board mem- 
Ned Waters, 
(partly hidden), Thomas E. Latimer, Daniel 
A. Abbott and W. Everett Marton. 


H. Wilson Spicknall 


— 


‘ 


House Votes 
Czech Boycott 
In Oatis Case 


Complete Trade Break 
Called for Till Prague 


' Frees U. 8. Newsman 


The House yesterday declared 
by a 363-1 vote that the United 
States should break off all com- 
mercial relations with Czecho- 
slovakia until William N. Oatis, 
American newsman, is freed. 

The declaration, voicing “pro- 
found indignation” at the 10-year 
sentence given Oatis for what 
the Czechs called espionage, was 
contained. in a cqncurrent reso- 
lution that now goes to the Sen- 
ate. 

Before the vote, Administra- 
tion pressure sidetracked a pro- 
posed clause in the resolution 


that would: have called for the. 


State Department to take steps 
toward severing diplomatic rela- 
tions with Czechslovakia if Oatis 
were notereleased within 90 days. 
Dropped by Armstrong 

The proposal for writing this 
threat into the resolution was 
dropped by ‘its author, Rep. O. K. 
Armstrong (R-Mo.), after Admin- 
istration leaders told him they 
had the votes to beat it. 

Armstrong indicated he want- 
ed to put the issue of severing 
diplomatic relations to a vote, 
but that some supporters of the 
proposal preferred to drop it in 
order to obtain passage of the 
|resolution as a whole 

The section declaring “it is 
the sense of the House” that 
trade relations between this 
country and Czechoslovakia be 
ended at once was the second 
majer part of Armstrong's pro- 
posal and-this was adopted by 
a voice vote. 

The Hause resolution called 
Oatis’ arrest and conviction “a 
shocking violation of the funda- 
mental human freedoms guar- 
anteed in the United Nations 
Charter.” 

It charges that the Czecho- 
slovak government's treatment 
of Oatis is a repudiation of the 
principle of free information. It 
calls this principle “essential to 


' See OATIS, Page 9, Column 1 


Was “Tipped’ on Gaming Raid 


Amateur Detective’s 
Sound Machine 
‘Traps’ Conversation 
Of ‘Official,’ He Says 
Existence of a tape record- 
ing on which a Prince Georges 
County “official” admitted 
that Charles E. Nelson, inves- 


‘tor in the Washington area 
‘numbers racket, was tipped 


off to a police trap, was re- 


vealed yesterday. . 

The disclosure was the high- 
light of daylong hearings before 
| the Prince Georges County Com- 
missioners. 
| The recording was made by 
John William Lewis, electrician 
‘turned amateur sleuth in an ef- 
‘fort to clear his brother of a 
_robbery conviction. 
| Last week, Lewis told Senate 
crime investigators that he #b- 
| served auto movements extend- 
| ing from Nelson's home in 
| Ritchie, Md., to Nelson’s resort, 
Uncle Billie’s, at North Beach. 


Detectives too Late 

He also told of two planned 
raids by Prince Georges County 
police. The first, he “said, was 
called off when detectives 
| showed up late. The other, in 
‘which the suspects showed up 
\late, later than expected, re- 
‘vealed no evidence of numbers 
operations. 

Yesterday, at a hearing grow- 
ing out of the crime committee, 
Lewis told the Prinee Georges 
commissioners: : 

“I have information from one 
of your county officials that the 
fix was in on the day of the 
raid. I was told by the county 
officials that.the numbers were 
started for the beach, headed off 
and brought back to D. C., the 
day of the raid. 

“I have a recording of this 
conversation between men and 
the county official in the hands 
of thé Senate Crime Committee” 

At the request’of county of- 
ficials, Lewis asked Sergt. Mur- 
ray Jackson of the Maryland 
State police, who js now on the 
committee staff, to let the com- 
missioners hear the recording, 

The hearings at Upper Marl- 
boro were recessed to await the 
arrival of the recording, and-a 
county - owned machine was 
brought in to play it back, but 
Jackson said the committee 
would not release the recording. 


‘ 


‘Release Delayed 
} 
) 


Jackson said the recording is 
part of a continuing investiga- 
tion and that the committee will 
not release it until the investi- 
gation is over. 

Jackson said he could not pre- 
vent Lewis from revealing the 
contents of the recording, but 
Lewis did not return to the hear- 
ing room when the session re- 
sumed at 3 p. m. 

Committee sources revealed 
that the “officials” mentioned 
by Lewis is Detective Ralph 
Bond. They said the recording 
mentioned names — some of 
them county officials—who were 
allegedly involved in the tipoff. 

The recording also alleges that 
Nelson knew of a planned raid 
last Wednesday hours before it 
was scheduled to come’ off, ac- 
cording to investigators who said 
they had heard it. 

When the commissioners re- 
sumed their hearings, Bond 


See CRIME, Page 14, Column 1 


Mental Hospital 


‘D.C. Red Among Them 


6 Communist Figures Indicted; 


Judge Reduces 


BALTIMORE, Aug. 14 \#.—Six 
Communist + Party figures ar- 
rested in a roundup last week 
were indicted today on charges 
of conspiracy to advocate the 
overthrow of the Government. 

The indictments were handed 
to Federal Judge W. Calvin 
Chesnut a few minutes before 
he began a hearing on a petition 
for reduction in the $75,000 bond 


; 


of three of the defendants held} 


' 


‘iin Baltimore. | 
President would make it clear} The true bills were returned, 


against: 
Philip Frankfeld of Cleveland, 


“If the Democrats will. give |land. 
| Mrs. 
were Brew-'wife, also of Cleveland, former granted to these latter three a 

party official 


Regina Frankfeld, his 
in District Four. 


Mrs. Dorothy Rose Blumberg 


livery, merely phone NA- 


sale deaths of small fishes came 


ing reported further down-|the country this fall, after Con-| 


“Tt’s a free world,” said he hadn't | Baltimore. | 


Bonds Sizably 


organizer and chairman of the 
party’s District Four. 

Maurice Braverman, Balti- 
more attorney who frequently 
had appeared in behalf of Com- 
munists. . 

Braverman has 
fied himself as a Communist. 
The Government announced, 
however, that it would show that 
Braverman is a member and offi- 
cial of the Communist Party in 
'Maryland. 

Wood, Meyers and Braverman, 
|among six ‘arrested in a Com- 
imunist roundup last week, had 


never identi- 


| 3 ' ibeen held in $75,000 bond each 
former party chairman in Mary-|by United States Commissioner 


|Ernest Volkart. 


| However, Judge Chesnut 


reduction in their bonds. Braveér- 


man had his bond reduced from 
ramarked,jof Brooklyn, N. Y., formerly of |$75,000 to $5000. Meyers and 
|'Wood had their $75,000 bonds 


Patient, 78, Dies; 
Attendant Held 


PERRY POINT, Md., Aug. 14 
(P—A 7Byearold mental 
patient died today at the Vet- 
erans Administration hospital 
here from injuries the hospital 
manager said apparently _re- 
sulted from “mishandling by a 
hospital aide.” 

Dr. Peter A. Pepper, hospital 
manager, said the aide, Leonard 
S. Haywood, 33, of Elkton, Md., 
was taken into custody by the 
FBI after its investigation. The 
United States Attorney's. office 
said Hayweod would be charged 
with manslaughter. 

The patient, Thomas R. Gough 
of St. Louis, died this morning 
of injuries received Saturday. 

Dr. Pepper said Gough, a 
patient at the hospital for about 
10 years, struck Haywood and 
that in The fracas that followed, 
Gough received the _ injuries 
that contributed to his death. 


Today’s Index 
io 


Reshennsensiin 
Federa! Diary 
Financial 
| Obituaries 


Pages | 
B7 
B8.12 
10, 11 


Amusements 
Classified 
Columnists 


Leroy H. Wood of Washington, |reduced to $20,000 each. 
D. C.. Communist chairman for Harold Buchman, Baltimore 
the District of Columbia. ‘attorney, appeared for Meyers 
George A. Meyers of Balti-|and Braverman. Joseph Forer of 


gress completed its work, “and | made up his mind finally wheth- 
take the fight to the opposition.” |er to run, and added that “Sena- 

“He didn’t say he would, but |tor Brewster is entitled to his 
he didn’t say ‘no,” Humphrey jopinion but he is speaking for 


tional 4200 and say, “I want 
The Post delivered to me on 
my vacation.” 


from the Naval Torpedo Station 
a week ago,” Edwin R. Cotton, 
director of the commission said 


‘stream. “We're just in the begin- 
ning of the low water season,” 
Cotton said. “We can expect 


Radio-TV 
| Sports 


Women 


Bi4, 15 
Crossword Puzzle 17 
District Line Bid. 
Wood. Editorials, Cartoon 10 | 


Comics 


I 


> 


reported. 


— 


} 


| al 
‘ 


yesterday. “I observed hundreds|conditions to continue to get 
of thousands of them. —s | 


A 


? 


t himself, not me.” 


d 


more, formerly of Cumbegiand, 


Washington represented 


»~ 


WASHINGTON POST 


THE 
' Wednesday, August 15, 195] 


. 6 - 
Douglas Beaten Again on ‘Pork Barrel’ Slash 
By the United Press could be eliminated and five that they were vital to national 
The Senate yesterday twice de-| which could be reduced. | defense. 


feated by identical 48-to-28 votes; jp ugias said none of his pro-| Douglas did not neglect his 
attempts to slash 50 million dol- | : 
lars off of a $637,278,213 flood|posed reductions -would affect own State, proposing that the 
control and rivers and harbors | flood control projects, only navi- | $300,000 Illinois waterway be 
bill. ‘gation programs. He also said | among those projects to be elim- 


«~* 
, 
. 
— 


Record Military Base 


Senate Group 


Sets Hikes in 
Postal Rates 


By The Associated Press 


‘Squeezing’ Needed 


Must Bills 


Get Priority 


Bill Passes House 


Nearly a Rout 


Dafonders 


Senate leaders yesterday 
stamped “must” on the record 
$5,780,000,000 military public 
works bill after the House ap- 
proved the measure by a vote 


A rise from 3 to 4 cents in the 
postal rate on letters was voted | 
by the Senate Post Office Com- | 
mittee yesterday. It is part of a. By the United Press | 
bill generally increasing postal| The Senate Democratic Policy 
rates to bring in 363 million dol-|\Committee set up a priority 
lars more a year in revenue. schedule of legislation yesterday) 


On ‘The Hill’ 


; 
' 


Air mail letters would go from 


‘effort to cut “fat” 


Sen. Paul H. Dougles (D-IIl.) 
lost out again on his perennial 
out of the 
measure which carries funds for 
projects in many Congressmen’s 
home districts. Douglas said he 
would try to have the bill pared 
by 25 million dollars. 


His unsuccessful effort was | 


he would not oppose any proj- 


‘ects which might prevent a re- 


inated. 


The Senate Appropriations 


currence of recent Mid-Western Committee added 123 million 


floods. 

The stiffest opposition came 
from Sen. Spessard Holland (D- 
Fla). Three of the _ projects 
Douglas proposed to eliminate 
were in Florida and Holland said 
Douglas failed to understand 


dollars to the rivers and harbors 


and flood control bill approved 
by the House. Committee Chair- 
man Kenneth McKellar (D-Tenn.) 


said that $21,215,000 of the in-, 
crease was for new work in the 
Missouri River basin. 


to be acted on before Congress supported by 11 Democrats and | 
adjourns on a date tentatively 17 Republicans opposed it. 
set as October 1. ng Dag = gy a mo- | 
satis ,'tion by Sens. Homer Ferguson | 
Merarpcratic sceder Ernest W. (R-Mich.) and Styles Bridges (R-| 
i ¢, said several bills N.H.)t d the bill back to the | 
lly classed as “major” willl <0 ernona Commitins arith 
normally J vill! Appropriations Committee with | 
have small chance of passing instructions to cut it by 50 mil-| 
this session unless they can be)jion dollars. Douglas’ proposal | 
squeezed between “must” legis- differed from this in that he 
lation. : specified the_projects he wanted | 
The policy group met yester- trimmed. | 
day to put second priority labels{ The Illinois Democrat ap-| 
on such measures as_ Alaskan pealed to the Senate to curb the 
and Hawaiian statehood, tide- “undue appetite for appropria- | 
lands oil, postal rate increases, tions’ of the Army Corps of 
federal pay boosts, abolition of Engineers; which handles most 
the RFC, airmail subsidies, a of the projects in the bill. He 
long-range shipping program suggested 13 projects which 
and a few others. | 
The “must” list comprises ap- 


6 to 8 cents. Parcel post (fourth 
class) charges also would in- 
crease. 

_ The rate rise bill, previously 
approved on July 19, was amend- 
*ed to include an increase in rates 
on fourth-class matter. This, in 
‘effect, restores to Congress the 
| rate-making authority on fourth- 
‘class mail—taking it away trom 
\the Postmaster General and the 
'Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion. 

The committee also approved, 
as a separate measure, a bill to 
‘limit the size and weight of par- 
cel post packages. It was gen- 
erally conceded this might result 
in a loss of revenue to the Post 
Office Department by diversion 
of larger packages to express propriations, foreign aid, mili- 
handling, although no estimate |tary construction and taxes. 
of the amount has been made. | McFarland said the House-ap- 

The postal rate increase Dill! proved resolution to formally 
provides, in general, as follows: | ang the war with Germany will 

First class—Postal cards would be taken up as soon as it is a 
require 2 cents instead of 1 cent,| \-oved by the Senate Poreian 
ew matter by whom sent (as Relations Committee. The for- 


of 352 to 5. 

The -bill calls for a _ billion- 
dollar chain of overseas air 
bases in striking range of Russia 
as well as for development of} 
protective fighter air bases near 
many big industrial cities in this 
country. Location of the over- 
seas bases is secret, but many of 
them are expected to be in and 
around Western Europe. 


Are Mauled 


| e: 
In War Games 


‘WITH “AGGRESSOR”"! 
FORCES IN NORTH CARO- 
* BINA, Aug. 14 “?.—“Aggressor”® | 
armored units with supporting) 
infantry mauled the United 
States infantry badly today and! Nearly one third of a billion| 
if the umpires hadn't stepped in,/dollars of it is for military, 
the Carolina war games might |24val and Air Force works in 
have been turned into a rout. |™aryland, Virginia and the Dis- 


The “Aggressor” was supposed | ‘Ct. ete 
to Jose today, according to the|_ Senate Majority Leader 
Army’s master plan for “Opera- | Ernest W. McFarland (D-Ariz.) | 
tion Southern Pines.” But the told reporters that the bill; 
seasoned troops making up the would certainly be included 
“Invader” units drove forward.|2mong the major -measures 


° 
Utah Convicts 
-In- the day’s major engage-|Which the Senate would clear | 


ment, the 82d Airborne Divi-| before it wound up its business. | 
| originally approved postals sent eign aid bill should be ready for 


sion’s 714th Tank Battalion, sup-| He is aiming at an adjournment | O t 
As H stave 
Dy BOn-Pepet organizations the Senate about next Tuesday, Federal Government says it will 


ported by companies of the 504th | by October 1. ; 
Airborne Infantry, tried futilely| It is a record high in con- 

POINT-OF - THE-MOUNTAIN, | would have remained at 1 cent); Le | | 
Utah, Aug. 14 (#. — Inmates |3-cent letters would be increased o said, and the tax bill August| fight the battle of the Marshall) 
| -housewives every three months 


toseize Gaddy’s Mountain for |Struction bills for this country) 
il | ; air mail letters from 
seized the acting warden and a |‘ 4 cents; a Sacrinét entire % 
een s ses, . 
e seen SUFPTISES,| if. necessary. 


the U. S. forces. The mountain |i" either peace or war, and is to| 
'6 to 8 cents; air mail postal cards 
that would leave less than one 


is about séven miles west of the | oe sor agpnenase the tool 
Fort Bragg cantonment. imi 1i0on-man arme orces p an- _ 
| guard at the State prison today | > 0) 4°16 § cents, and drop let- 


Associated Press Wirephoto 


Wayne Hoobler, a. guard at 
Utah State Prison, holds a 
chain he wrested from an 
inmate there yesterday. Hoob- 
ler said the man struck him 
with it several times during 
fight. 


cen A 


Tax Collectors 
Set for Fight With 


Texas Housewives 
DALLAS, Aug. 14 (. — The | 


~The United States forces were ned. It represents a one-year 
able to beat back “aggressors,” | PTO8ra™ tor. the Army and the 


defenses, which were led by a| \@¥¥; and a two-year program 
battalion of Third Armored pee the Air Force. 

Cavalry, only after the umpire,|,.¢ the Alt Force, $3,543,061,-; 
Col. Horace Charles Parker, | 920 is authorized, mainly to im- 
Hampton, S. C., ordered the Sodithie rang : ae Srey | 
4 acilities mee e needs of'| 
en ener OF the hill. jet aircraft. The Army authori-| 


He got stiff protests from 
Aggressor units commanded zation totals $1,423,791,028; and | 
be ded. by the Navy authorization $801,-| 


Capt. Felix Garcia. Mercedes, | 560 000 
Tex,. but Parker was adamant. setednds 
° Projects authorized would be 


Brig. Gen. Henry J. D. Meyer, | . 
former twenty-fourth division covered by separate appropria- 
tions. | 


artillery commander in Korea ‘ a ' 
who is now commanding the| Funds for the, Washington 
area authorized in the bill in-, 


aggressor, ordered an immedi- 
clude $890,800 for the Army) 


ate counter-atack within an : one 
hour. the aggressor had bumped Medical Center to install utili- 
ties and other improvements; 


; 


and unlocked cells of a score of 
other prisoners. 

About 25 prisoners, protesting 
against being confined in a segre- 
gation cellblock, held Weston E. 
Haslam, acting warden since last 
Friday, and Guard Edward A. 
Schmidt as hostages. 

State Highway 
Joseph E. Dudler told reporters: 

“T am really alarmed. We have 
a couple of boys in there who are 
pretty dangerous, and they are 
letting it be known, 

“They feel they want to be 
hard for the reason they are in 
grade (segregation). They want 


‘a promise of no reprisal for this | 


incident now. They want the 


Patrol Supt.) 


month for the other “must” 
measures—and the betting was 
about 2 to 1 Congress would not 
meet the October 1 target date. 
the third year, or a total of 30, McFarland said he was not too 
percent over three years in-;members in Washington after 
stead of 100 percent as originally |the “must” list goes through, so 
proposed. | ‘there appeared to be small 
Third class—Two cents for. the chance this session for the sec- 
first two ounces and 1 cent for ondary bills. Congress will re- 
each additional ounce up to eight assemble in early January, when 
ounces, except that the rate on the measures may. again be 
books, catalogs, seed, cutting, scheduled for consideration. 
_bulbs, roots and plants not ex-| While the Senate is bogged 
ceeding eight ounces would be down from the many investiga- 
2 cents for the first two ounces tions held this year, the House 
and 142 for each additional two js jn good shape: Speaker Sam 
‘ounces. For bulk mailings the Rayburn, (D-Tex.) said the House 
|present $10 annual fee is re- <hould be able to take a two- 
' tained. week recess starting late next 


ters from 1 to 2 cents. 

Second class—Rates would be 
raised 10 percent the first, 10 per- 
cent the second and 10 percent 


“We'll go back again if necés- 
sary,” Ellis Campbell, jr., head 
of the Dallas office of the United | 
States Internal Revenue Bureau, | 
said today. 

Earlier this month, Treasury 
agents, armed with seizure war- 
rants, levied against bank ac- 
counts of 13 Marshall house-; 
wives who had refused to collgct | 
and pay social security taxes on 
their servants’ wages. | 

They collected the taxes, plus 
penalties, due April 30 for the 
first quarter of 1951. Since then 
another deadline—July 31, for'| 
the second three-month period—, 
has passed. | 


THE 


Real summer shirts of fine quality imported 
batiste, and a new sheer open weave. The 
comfortable low slope collar wears neatly 
with a tie at the office, opens smartly for 
off hours sports wear. 


Halj-Sleeves, 6.00 
Long-Sleeves, 6.50 and 7.50 


Sole Agents for Hickey-Freeman Clothes and Cavanagh Hats 


‘Signature of the Governor, my- | 


Fourth class—Rates would be 


The housewives have said they | 


the United States forces off the 
$4.075.200 for the Naval Re- 


hill again. - Finally, Meyer re-| ‘week to let the Senate catch up. 


: pe neil self and one member of the j sed llv to vield 
tired his forces to the line seven |Search Laboratory; $605,000 for | °° Fir increased generally to yield an 
miles west of Fort Dears, Sm pes the Naval Caauemaieniann Sta-| Board of Corrections on such a estimated 63 million dollars ad- 
Pune tnand Peeaelle Nava] | Promise.” ditional revenue. | 
> sera bhi sd nase wee bee a for the Naval | Today’s outbreak—the third in| The bill to readjust the size contended that under present 
did ao. two ‘of his tank forees| If ‘eae $54 290.265 for | three months at the multimillion- | and weight limits on fourth-class | weight and size regulations the 
had chewed up the eighty-|Army installations, includi dollar prison — started when a | (parcel post) mail downward was | postal service was actually in the 
second’s line eatiae a es in $9,547,000 at Aberdeen Proving |Conviet attacked a guard with a| epee hg sed by Bi | ahem hagrecrs ar Senn 
ee ee ee : _enes 7 | ae ray Express Company whi o private enterprise. 
the diwision’s attack to the west.|Ground and $9,387,500 at Fort |°22!n- ees —— —*, . die et ps ive 
|Meade; $22,853,800 for Navy in-|, ) rough a four-by-six-inch hole 
stallations including $1,650,000 | DUs'er talked with the prison 
for the Naval Medical Center “"* messenger—convict William 
|at Bethesda, $2,480,500 for the|7Onn Randall formerly of Cal 
| ‘ ‘<4, _| fornia. 


David Taylor Model Basin at’ : 
| Dudler said the loose prison- 
| Carderock; and $68,405,000 for ‘ers could not get out of the maxi- 


RUCKER LUMBER ‘Fed Force improvements of | mum security section. They held 


1320 Wilson Blvd. JAckson 4-1234 ppmon nes eta wourt: 92> the keys to cells of a half-dozen 
, Andrews Field and $43,478,000 ; 

| “ar ape men in death row, but Dudler 
to Friendship National Airport. tk when of tie Adana aie 
| In Virginia, the Army authori- | a. adie 
zations total $69,101,600 of which : oP 
& $26,761,200 is for Fort BeWOMt| a congo cr tert Dunles 
Mee DAILY THROUGH | Navy improvements $94,058,050, | -onorted ee ees 
P¢ SLEEPER SERVICE 'the bulk in the Norfolk area, but |*©P 


| The three leaders of the out- 


with $2,499,300 for the Marine | 
‘Corps School at Quantico: and break were Alwin Strauss, armed 


for improvements at Langley |°e!ls; Wayne Johnston and Lee 

with a knife, said of today’s 

A OT grabbed my shirt front and said: 
NEW YORK AVE., between 


West. 
Field. Guard Wayne Hoobler, who 
trouble: | 
| “I saw Johnston and Strauss | 
‘T am going to kill you, you | 
IT COSTS NO MORE 
TO PARK AT THE 
{3th and (4th 

“Every Auto Service” 


will continue to refuse to pay’ 
the tax. They claim it is uncon- 
stitutional to ask them to serve| 
as tax collector for the Govern-| 
‘ment. They claim they have pe- 
‘titioned for a hearing in letters 
to Secretary of Treasury Snyder. 


GOLDHEIMS 


1409 MH SERS? 


ae we ee 


room, Section or Berth, and 
sleep to the restful glide of 
Diesel-electric power all the 


way. 


i 
ours 


Standard Time) 
lv. Woshington ....... 4.30 PM 
Lv. Silver Spring....... 4.44 PM 


{on B&O's ail-Pulimen Strote- 
Dome Streamliner—The Capitol 
Limited) 

Phone STerling 8100 or SHepherd 4343 


BALTIMORE 
& OHIO 


RAILROAD g | 


,, SHOES FROM THE WORLD'S 
DURING THE NEXT TEN DAYS 
IS YOUR 
LAST CHANCE! 
TO BUY 
FALL AND WINTER 


English Shoes 
20% DISCOUNT 


THESE SHOES ARE NOT OLD STOCK BUT FRESH SHIPMENTS 
OF 195! FALL AND WINTER STYLES IN ALL OUR FAMOUS 
BRANDS. 


J. M. STEIN & CO. 


1416 For Hand Boned English and ME, 
H St. N.W. Domestic Shoes of Distinction 5445 


! 


‘was attacked in June by Strauss 
come out of their cells. Strauss | 
Strauss struck the guard with | 
the chain (used with a padlock | 
on cells). ee 
Hoobler. who “got out of | 
there” after knocking down 
‘Strauss, escaped serious injury. | 

Bonn Measures 


Outlaw Bullying 
FINEST MARTS Storm Trooper 


BONN, Aug. 14 ().—West Ger- | 
many has outlawed the bullying | 


Storm Trooper. 

Wide new measures against 
polictal extremists prohibit par- 
ty uniforms, advocacy of armed 
force and the possession of | 
weapons without government 
authority. 

The measures are directed at 
the Communist and new Nazi'| 
strong-arm squads that have 
made an alarming appearance 
recently. 

The new Nazis had a force of 
jack-booted whiteshirts, called 
the Reichtsfront in bold imita- 
tion of the Storm Troopers who) 
clubbed and murdered to give | 
Hitler power. | 

The Communists organized 
their youth movement, the Free | 
| German Youth, and gave them) 
blue shirts. These young toughs | 
fought pitched battles in the'| 
street with German police. | 

Both organizations were 
banned as “unconstitutional” 
and now the German penal code | 
gives police full power to pre- 
vent their rebirth. | 


Standard equipment, accessories and trim illustrated are subject to change without noticte 


other cars may be had so readily—while there is -some 
delay in delivery of a Cadillac. 

It is because so many wonderful people, like yourself, 
want on/y Cadillac—and will accept no compromise. 

If we already have your order—turn a deaf ear to those 
»who would have you compromise your preference for the 
sake of earlier delivery. 

And if you want a Cadillac, but have not yet placed 
your order, come in and do so. We will talk with you 
frankly about delivery, so se may know about what to 
anticipate. » 

Remember—there is only one car which is recognized 
wherever highways lead as the Standard of the World— 
and that car is Cadillac. 


4, ‘1M jp 


In all the world of manufactured products, there is nothing 
more difficult to wait for—once you have decided to own it 
—than a Cadillac car. 

If it is to be your frst Cadillac, it is doubtless the ful- 
fillment of a long-cherished dream—and it is hard to wait 
for one’s heart’s desire, once it is so close at hand. 

And if it is to be a replacement for your o/d love—well, 
experience has taught you how consistently and completely 
the good things come from Cadillac—and your curiosity 
is a force to reckon with! 

To make it worse, temptation is all about you. Down 
the street and around the corner are cars to be had almost 
as soon as your signature is on an order blank. 


But be patient and be firm—for there is a reason why 


HALLER'S 


VERY RARE 


90 PROOF 


Nis wr Ae Hs 
\. Nos A Jy) Ir Jr, 


AKERS OLDSMOBILE-CADILLAC COMPANY 


CAPITOL CADILLAC-OLDSMOBILE COMPANY 
OVerlook 0350 Fairlington Shopping Center, Alexandria, Va. 


- $Terling 2600 1222 22nd St, N.W. 


»* : 
+? S 
J 
ad > 
SON 
Nae 


Se 
* AS - Sey SORE Nk 


ne ee Ss es e 
ery Rare, Blend 90 Proof, 60% Grain Neutral Spirits 
W. A Haller Corp., Philadelphia, Pa. 


¥ 


ers 


Hall License 
: Dealer Ne. 798 


——————— 


—— as 


BK 


U. N. Force Escapes 
o-Day Flood Trap 


ON THE WESTERN FRONT, 
Korea, Aug. 8 (Delayed) (®#.—A 
major American and British 
Commonwealth force escaped to- 
day after being trapped by high 
water for five days behind enemy 
lines. 

In the past most of the Allies’ 
trouble has come from Commu- 
nists. This time the enemy was 
he we athe r—torrential rains 
and raging floods. 

The operation began the night 
of August 3, when the American 
force began moving over the Im- 
jin River bridge. 

Since last November, when the 
Allies retreated from North Ko- 
rea, this region across the Im- 


We had a foot of water running 
over our area, yet the mines 
kept exploding every time the 
lightning hit. They were throw- 
ing shrapnel all over the edge of 
the camp. It was like nothing 
else on earth. We took to our fox: 
holes up to our necks in. water. 
One man even slightly wounded 
in the head by shrapnel from one 
of the mines. 

“Before it was over, 30 to 40 
mines must have blown up. It! 
was fantastic.” 

By that time the water was'§ 
running wild. | 

The ground, soaked by the. 
rainy season, could absorb no’ 
more. The torrent from the skies | 


jin has been little more than a/rojied down the steep hillsides, | 
wide no-man’s land. Twice the | across the narrow flat lands and 


Chinese used it as an assembly 
area for offensive, New Year's 
and last April. 


: 
| 
| 


paddies, and into 
streams and rivers. 
“There was a foot of water 


the raging 


Recently there were reports of running over our feet,” one sol- 


another huge Red buildup. The dier said later. 


Allied command wanted to know 


The water also was washing 


what was going on across the old rafts, trees, houses, wooden! 


Imjin. 


| 


foot bridges, Korea 


The task force was sent to find , masses of foliage downstream to. 


out. 


To the south there was a Brit- 


It was big enough to fight | batter apie 
its way in and big enough to | linked the task force with the 
fight its way out of necessary. ; Main‘ U. N. lines. | 


the bridges 


One by one the 


barges,| 


that “still! ™ 


bridges began | . 


ish Commonwealth force of the |to go. The first broken were the) § 


Soviet ‘Ready’ 
As Nazis of *39, 
POWs Report 


BERLIN, Aug. 14 (P).—Russia 
‘lis devoting its industrial ca- 
pacity to vast military prepara- 
‘tions that have made the coun- 
try “as ready for war now as 
Germany was in 1939,” a group 
of war prisoners who returned 
here from seven years’ captivity 
- in the Soviet Union said today. 
%| “But Russia’s people,” they 
said, are “deathly afraid of an- 
fother war.” 
se Russian factories, they re- 
®\ported, are humming day and 
® | night turning out artillery, tanks 
®\and jet planes, which glut the 
railway sidings across Russia. 
Freight trains of flat cars roll 
endlessly through the country, 
they said, loaded with war ma- 
terials. 

Beneath the feverish, —state- 
directed war preparations, the 
- | returned prisoners said, there is 
ma | widespread discontent—especial- 
om | ly in the Ukraine. 

“The people are deathly afraid 
of another war,” they said. “They 
openly doubt whether Russia 
has an atom bomb. But they are 
certain the West does, and they 
fear it will be dropped on them.” 

All the prisoners requested 


Japan Fears Delay of Peace — 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
W ednesday, August 15, 3 


With Russians at Conterence 


TOKYO, Aug. 14 @®.—Prime |alternate peace treaty draft 
Minister Shigeru Yoshida called seeking to discredit the United 


: : States by espousing changes de- 
a special cabinet meeting today | a nded a the Philippines, India 


to discuss Russia’s decision tO | anq Burma. Japanese observers 
attend the San Francisco peace |suggested that some Soviet 
treaty conference. ‘terms might try to attract Japa- 
‘nese support by making conces- 
Most Japanese appeared ” ve »sions on territorial demands and 
deeply perturbed, and it WAS insisting on Japan's neutraliza- 
feared that peace once again tion. 
would be delayed. | 3. That Russia will sign the 
Yoshida met with Gen. Mat-| Peace treaty but seek to delay 
putting it into effect by prolong- 
thew B. Ridgway at in a. m. ‘ing ratification. 
today. Subject of their confer- | 
ence was not revealed, but |Grom 
Ridgway’s public information | si 
officer said the conference was | Opposition to Treaty 
scheduled before Russia’s de- : 
cision was announced. MOSCOW, Aug. 14 (®.—Dep- 
Some government officials sug- | Uty Foreign Minister Andrei 
gested Soviet acceptance of the |Gromyko was expected here to- 
ap Francisco acts sal eo ‘day to restate at San Francisco 
a “sincere” effort on the par ; eee 
of the Kremlin to solve the east- | the Soviet Union’s unalterable 
opposition to a Japanese peace 


« 


yko to Restate 


Pravda Blasts 
Love of Poet 
For Ukraine 


MOSCOW, Aug. 14 (®.—Pravda 
once again today took up the 
,cudgels against appearances of 
what it calls “bourgeois national- 
ism” in Soviet literature. 

(This has been a frequent 
theme lately, particularly with 
regard to the Ukraine, where the 
Soviet Communists appear intent 
upon suppressing any possible 
recurrence of Ukrainian sepa- 
ratist feeling.) 

Pravda, official newspaper of 
the Communist Party, demanded 
more party criticism in certain 


west cold war around the treaty 
table. ,But few Japanese be- treaty without (Communist) 
lieved it. China. 

There appeared to be general | : = 
agreement that the peace con-| Observers believed Gromy 
ference would last more than WS most likely to muster all the 
the scheduled four days. ‘many previously published Rus- 

A veteran Japanese neWS-|sian objections to the treaty 
paperman said. the Japanese | draft to be taken up at the forth- 


welcome the fact of Russian 
participation but question the |C°™ims conference in San Fran 


motives behind it. /cisco. — | 
“It boils down to a question of | Nothing discernible has hap- 


; ; ; 99 : ‘sé j i i at- 
Russian sincerity,” he said, “and | Pemed in recent weeks indic 


“brotherly literature.” It singled 
‘out the party press in several 
|republics for criticism for having 


|published recently some reviews 
praising “nationalistic” verses by 
Ukrainian poet V. V. Sosyura. 
Sosyura was sharply criticized 
for his poem, ‘‘Love the 
Ukraine,” and was reminded that 
he should not speak of loving 
the Ukraine as an entity sepa- 
rate from the Soviet Union. 
Pravda said more “backslid- 


King’s own Shropshire Light In- | light spans made from plywood | 


fantry, Royal Australian Rifles,; Pontoons. Then the bigger | ja ‘Ing any change in the Soviet at- 


that their names and national ? ieve | 
che Japenede Nay Gait! harm ‘titude of opposition to the Amer- 


ing” now has been discovered in 


the Royal Ulster Rifles and the | bridges, the semi-permanent one | Re 
built on poling, with steel. girders| % 3 ee 


This group had crossed the |#92d heavy beams washed out. 


attached Belgian battalion. 


Imjin from the seuth to block 
the roads and shield the Ameri- 
cans from any attack from the 


i 
' 
> 


| 


~ The last to go were the rubber 
pontoon and_ steel ~treadway 
bridges. 


identities be suppressed. They 
plained they feared publicity 
might jeopardize the chances 
for release of other war pris- 
oners still held in Soviet camps. 

They said they had worked in 


the Russian leaders have it.” 
He said the Russians would, be 
expected to yse the conference 
as a sounding board for their 
propaganda arf an opportunity 
to exploit the differences be- 


lican draft. Many observers had 


inot expected Russia to accept 
'the American invitation to,.San 
| Francisco. 

Foreign observers who had 


the literature of the following 
republics: Kazakhstan, Azerbai- 
jan, Armenia, and Estonia. 

The occasion for this reminder 
was the fifth anniversary of the 
Communist Party decree that 


‘forecast the refusal of the invi- 
tation were at a loss for an ex- 
planation of the acceptance. 
They saw two possibilities: 

1. It is another of those ges- 
tures of conciliation toward the 
west that the government began 
making in June. 

2. t is based on the principle 


ee iy ek eee & | Soviet factories, alongside Rus- 
es io rence sian workman, for several years. 
The factories in which they 
worked, they said, were not war 
plants. Other prisoners, how- 
ever, were put to work in war- 
production industries, 

There was much grumbling 


By dawn, all but one of these! a 
were gone—the last one holding ; 
across the, Imjin west of Yon- 
chon. 

The Commonwealth forces al- 
ready were cut off to the south 
—save for the American’s 
bridge, And at its location the 
Imjin was at an all-time flood 


sharply criticized the magazine 
Zvezda (Star) of Leningrad for 
“ideological” faults. 

“As events of recent months 
have shown,” said Pravda, “the 
leadership of the Writers’ Union 
does not have enough vigilance 
and keenness of vision to note 


tween the Allies on controver- 
sial peace treaty issues. 

The Foreign Office suggested 
the soviet move could mean one 
of three things: 

1. The most obvious motive, 
that the Russian delegates will 
formally register Russia’s op- 


southwest. Shortly after 4 a. m. 
on August 4, the force jumped 
off toward Red hill positions in 
the west, supported by field ar- 
tillery and tanks, Resistance was 
light at first, and the infantry ad- 
vanced 3000 to 4000 yards before 
the enemy stiffened at noon and 


= 


ne 


Associated Press Wirephoto 


Over the Heads of Red Leaders 


Plastic balloons get a last-minute trial in Minneapolis before 
they were released from southern Germany into Communist- 


began to lay down heavy artil- 
lery fire. 

The advance slowed, and dug 
in for the night. 


| undated long ago and the bridge 
'was 


Stage of 28 feet. 


The approaches had been in- 


impassable when the en- 


ruled Czechoslavakia. The balloons—2000 of them—soared 
over the Iron Curtain, scattering leaflets expressing the 
friendship of the West for the Czech people. The messages 


read: “A new wind is blowing. 


The free world is thinking of 


among the Russians with whom 
they worked, against low wages 
and high prices, they reported. 
Many of the Russians with whom 
they struck up acquaintances had 


position to the peace treaty and | 


west. 


use ‘the conference to make | that so long as there is a confer- 
propaganda attacks against the |ence table somewhere, the So- 
| viet Union should be represented | 


by itself and expose a series of 
‘backslidings to bourgeois nation- 
‘alism discovered by -party criti- 
cism in certain brotherly litera- 
iture of the union.” 


2. The Soviets will bring an to present its point of view. 
seen the West during the war i “ 


.}and expressed a desire to return, RALEIGH HABERDASHER == 


they said. 


—- 


Double Duty 
Pajamas 


The men had just’ finished 
evening chow when it began to 
rain hard. And before 8 p. m. 


| gineers decided, about 4:30 a. m. 
of August 5 to cut it loose from 
‘the western shore. They hoped 
© to were caught in a ,it would swing to the other. bank 

veg ‘and hold there until it could be 


“It was hell and high water | 
all at the same time.” one artil- Pang when the water went 


lery officer said. “The lightning!” But at 4:58, just as they were 


was so intense it was like artil-| yout to cut the west cables, the 


lery coming in a continual drum-!_.- . as 
' ‘river did it for them, There was | 
fire, not just a stroke here and |, splintering crash, the steel | 


there. cables snapped and the 100-yard 


you daily and keeps contact with you.” The project is spon- 
sored bv the American Crusade for Freedom. (See Drew 
Pearson’s column, Page B-15.) 


4500 of Missing U.S. Troops 
Reported in Red Prison Camps 


SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 14, (? 


Shop in Air-Cooled Comfort Closed Saturday 


“Then we began to hear explo- has carried over a period of 


%, 


sions that weren’t thunder. It 
took us a few._minutes to realize 
wHat was hapbening. The light- 
ning was striking in a mine field 
and detonating the mines. 


then held against the east bank. 


long bridge swung away and 


That it held at even one end 
was one of two pieces of luck 
in the whole five-day operation— 


—Unofficial estimates indicated 
today that, of the 10,624 Amerfi- 
cans officially listed as missing 
in action in Korea, as many as 
4500 probably are being held in 


months the names of approxi- 
mately 1000 Americans it has 
said were being held in Korea. 
The Red radio. released the 
names a few at a time in propa- 


IMPORTANT 


for it meant reconstruction 


All hell was breaking -.loose. could be hastened. 


Communist war prisoner camps. 
This figure comes from Allied 


The other piece of luck was; <—. ; 
that the Chinese—for some rea- | Military sources which cannot be 
‘named but which are in as good 


son—di un ttdck. For os 
son—did not counteratt | position as anyone on the Allied 


from that moment until 3:55 | side to know the score on this 
'p. m. yesterday, there was no |° hes | 
p yes y hush-hush matter. 


bridge between the task force | - , 

‘and the U. N. Army. The prisoners are said to be. 
Meanwhile, the rain continued |Cfined near Kanggpe, deep in-| 
ito fall. Foot soldiers, soaked, |Side North Korea about 20 air 
‘found themselves living in |miles from the Manchurian fron- 
| | tier. 


ganda broadcasts from January 
through early July. There have 
ben numerous duplications. 
Invariably the broadcasts, pur- 
porting to be massages written 
by the prisoners themselves, 
stressed that the men were being 
Ma — well treated. Most of the “mes- 
; sages” urged that foreign troops 
< ROUND TRIP be withdrawn from Korea so the 
- war could end. 
SPECIAL ‘swamps and eating cold C-ra- | ; _.|_ Since the Kaesong military 
; >a tions—when they could find| . Reliable information reaching armistice conference opened 
| Ithem. The insects and pests | Allied authorities said Chinese|July 10, and the question of 
‘Red leaders do not want Allied troop withdrawals was deferred 
CALIFORNIA 


SALES! 


eservations 


'were bad. Bye 
| | prisoners transferred to Chinese 


| pri until a later conference- at a 
— ‘soil. To do so would destroy the 


higher level, the Red radio has 


PLUS TAX 
$94.76 10°. viscount return 
NORTH AMERICAN 
AIRCOACH 
“1346 F St. W.W. (Cor. Path) 
National Press Building, Suite 1194 
(Fares Plus Tax) 


SINCE Ie = Communist contention that only 
Chinese “volunteers” are fight- 
ing in Korea. 

The number of American and 
other U.N. prisoners never has 
been announced by the Reds. Al- 
lied sources estimate the total at 
approximately 10,000. 

The Communist Peiping radio'| 


IS 
SERVING 


Hard Shell Crabs 


1107 Connecticut Ave. N.W. 


+ 


MODERY SECTIONAL 


TERRIFIC BUY ! ! ! 


This exquisite modern three-piece sectional has 
beautiful new serpentine styling. Its many func- 
tional uses make this sofa very practical. Avail- 
able in solid or two-tone decorator colors of reds, 


greys, greens and limes, 


[S BROTHERS GALLE: 


i 


» WAMEDIATE DELIVERY OR 96 DAYS FREE STORAGE 


Free Parking on 
Our Paved and Lighted Lot 
at V St. Entrance to Store 


Open Daily 9 to 9 
Closed Saturdays During August 


Nichols Ave. at V St. 
in Anacestia 


Phone | 
LU. 4-3471 


made no broadcasts of prisoner 
messages. 

Allied authorities have said. 
litle about the treatment of pris-| 
oners for fear that a chance re-| 
mark might anger the Reds and’ 
make life harder for the yprison-| 
ers. | 
However, a group of 18 Ma-. 
rines who escaped last April on! 
the central front confirmed that| 
prisoners were fed the same food 
as Communist troops and were 
given medical attention. ! 

Marine Maj. Andrew Geer ¢@f| 
San Francisco, who conducted) me >? 
the freed Marines back to the | <2 
U.S. from Korea, said in an in-| : $ 50 
terview that the men reported | . 
they were well cared for, by| 4 
Chinese standards. | 

The apparent purpose for this 
god care was to weaken the re- 
sistance of hard-fighting Allied | 
troops and make them surrender | 
more easily. | 

Before releasing a group of 
men, the Communists require | 
them. to attend “school” eight 
hours a day for indocrination | 
courses on cOmmunism. | 

The technique of releasing in- 
doctrinated prisoners is not new 
to the Chinese Red army. During’ 
World War II it was tried against. 
the Japanese and again during) 
the civil war against the Nation-| 
alists. 

The Communists feld the pol-| 
icy. paid off. One “indoctrinated” | 
Nationalist soldier was thought | 
capable of weakening the fight-| 
ing spirit of 100 loyal National-' 
ists after he returned to Nation- 
alist lines. | 

The Allies have announced’ 
they hold 164,766 counted prison- 
ers of war. 


~~ ONLY 


Cleverly designed rayon 
tricot that doesn't need 
ironing! Elasticized neck- 
line scoops discreetly or 
daringly bares your 
shoulder. Elasticized 
sleeves and waist for 
lounging comfort. Coral 
or black trousers; white 
print tunic overblouse. 


SIZES 42 to 52 


Srpur 


We Slenderize the Larger Woman 
716 (1TH ST. NW. RE. 9732 
Between G and H Sts. 


z Open Saturday 4 


oa 
4  ...DISCOUNT 
DAYS MORE! SALE 


LAST CHANCE TO BUY SUITS and TOPCGATS 
AT THESE GREAT SAVINGS 


SALE ENDS AUGUST 18 
367.50.. NOW = °5G% 
$92.50 .. NOW _ 574" 

$107.50.. NOW cE ‘8 si 


EVERY GARMENT WE MAKE ‘Ts IN-: 
DIVIDUALLY TAILORED TO MEASURE 


KAHN TAILVRING (WV 


OF INDIANAPOLIS 
1420 H STREET N.W. NA. 0536 


N ‘ ; ‘f 


STRAW HATS 


1/; 2 PRICE 


f 


were S59 i ia4 ss 
werd: 7. ds webar 


f 


a 


reer 
ones 0sdeune mene 


were SIO ics sdcivkeceeesinen eee 


were Sia a awk cs 


wpe 


were Si) ics csc ccdcabe cs cues 


Nunn-Bush 


19* to 18°° SHOES 


REDUCED 


1587 


Here are fine year-round quality shoes by Nunn-Bush... 


at a savings that warrants your 
Choose from wing and straight tip 


immediate attention. 
models ... all in rich 


shades of tan. Enjoy Ankle-Fashioned comfort... that 


heel-hugging miracle of perfect fit. 


Seen 


7 


Sizes 6 to 12, AA to D... 


RALEIGH HABERDASHER 


= 32 


a 
- ae 


1310 F ST. * WASHINGTON’S FINEST MEN'S STORE * MA. 9340 


- 


Summer Hours: 9 A. M.-5 P.M., Incl. Saturday 


A 


TRUCE—From Page I 

Allies Won’t Accept Parallel 
GENEVA, Switzerland,. Aug. As Tr uce Line, Ridgway Says 

14 (#».—Czechoslovakia protest- 


ed today that three Western ra- | 0 end the Korean war on any |Our first proposal was presented 

Just and reasonable terms.” It|to you on a map. It was a de 

;acecused the United States of at-| militarized zone and demarca- 

tempting to “expand aggression” | tion line which represented our 

and save face. best judgment of the present 
There was an implied time | overall military realities. 

limit on Allied patience in the| “Second, we proposed that you 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
Wednesday, August 15, 1951 


Czechs Object 
'To Broadcasts 


4 


a 


Hongkong Cargo Ban Seen Eased 


Hongkong consignee. Permits 
for the shipment were said to 
have been issued by the United 
States Office of International 
Commerce. 

The newspaper said Hongkong 
officials assured this country 


518 9TH 
ST., N.W. 


Around the Corner Fron, 
Jth BF Stezems NOW 


SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 14 (?. | laxed its embargo on .goods 
The Chronicle today said the/ shipments to Hongkong. 
United States—at the request of The newspaper said _ three 


the British government—has re-/shipments of very thin steel 
-' plate, usable as tinplate substi- 
tute, have departed from here 


dios are broadcasting “instruc- 
tions for espionage and terrorist 
activity” to agents on Czech soil. 

Czech Delegate Zdenek Trhlik 


Next Door te 
Woethington Loan & Trust Cc 


and 


PHOTO 
SUPPLIES 


Time Payments 
SOMMER’S «cxchance 


714 14th St. N.W. ME. 0992 


CAMERAS | 


for the British crown colony. 
Some 150 tons of the metal, 
sold at $100 to $150 a ton, were 
jm the first shipment, which left 
here about two weeks ago, the 
/ paper said. 
' Decision to relax the seven- 
month-old goods ban was 
reached, the paper said, after a 
study of the “reliability” of the 


L— eS 


EX LES LEVIED ELE LES LES, y y 


% cup Franklin Extra Fine 
Granulated Sugar 
1 tbsp. grated lemon rind 
% cup lemon juice 1% cups milk 
% cupheavycream few grainssalt 


Combine Franklin Svibar, lemon 
rind and juice, stirring until sugar 
is almost dissolved. Combine milk, 
cream and salt. Gradually add 
sugar mixture, stirring constant- 
ly. Pour into freezer tray with 
control set for freezing ice cream. 


.*) 
A Page From The FRANKLIN Cookbook 


Low fo make Smooth, Flavorful 
LEMON CREAM SHERBET 


CLIP THIS RECIPE FOR YOUR ease 


turn to tray. Freeze firm, stirring 
several times. Yields 4-5 servings. 
You'll find Franklin Sugar gives 
sherbet just the delicious flavor 
you want. Whenever you're Cook- 
ing or baking, use smooth-blend- 
ing Franklin Sugar for: 
FRANKLIN'S 

“EBAMOUS FIVE” ADVANTAGES 

. 100% Pure Sugar Cane Suger 

. Extra-Fine Granulated 

. Fast-Dissolving 

. Free-Mixing 

. Enriches Food Flevors 


FRANKLIN 
Pure SUGAR CANE Suger 


none of the metal would slip 
into Red China. The British said 
they had weeded out dummy 
corporations “fronting” for Red 
China. 

The Chronicle said two San 


Francisco export firms, Lastreto- U 


Phillips Commercial Co. and 
Bond Bros. and Co., handled the 
shipments. Seymour Phillips, a 
spokesman for Lastreto-Phil- 
lips, was quoted by the paper as 
saying: | 

“If this stuff were going to 
get into Communist hands, I 


wouldn’t have any part in 
moving it. But I believe the 
British have things pretty! 
tightened up in Hongkong, and 
they need this for their fac-| 
tories.” | 


named the United States State 
Department’s Voice of America, 
the privately sponsored Radio 
Free Europe and the British 
Broadcasting Corporation in de- 
bate on freedom of information 
here before a committee of the 
N. Economic and Social 
Council. 

At the same time in Rome, 
Italy protested to Czechoslovakia 
against a Prague radio program 
called “Today in Italy,” saying 
the program was “methodically 
false and defamatory, ... of- 
fensive in tone and language. 
Premier Alcide de Gasperi, 


acting as his own Foreign Min-|would happen if 


ister, handed the protest to the 
Czech Legation there. 


official statement released by 
Ridgway’s headquarters. 

Ridgway declared the Allies 
have been patient, firm and 
reasonable in the talks and 
added: 

“We shall continue to be so, 
so long as the negotiations hold 
out any hope for eventual 
success.” 

The talks have been stalled 
on the buffer issue since July 
27. 

In an apparently coordinated 
statement, Van Fleet told cor- 
respondents in Korea what 
the talks 


failed. 


| He said his Eighth Army 


The feature of the Prague pro-|troops were ‘ready and fit” to 


'gram is Italian dialogue which|smash the Communist armies 


illi aid his company ex- regpe- 
Phillips said 00 tons| Presents criticism of De Gas-|which have been building up 


pects to ship another 100 tons 
soon, with further orders await- | 


‘|ing the granting of necessary | 


permits by Washington. 


as to make it appear the pro- 
gram originates in Italy, 


AMERIeA 


To CHICAGO 


5 NONSTOP FLAGSHIPS 


oe 
4. a 


* 
“ 
/ 


| peri’s government in such a way |frontline power while the truce 


‘talks were in progress. 
Van Fleet said: 


“I don’t know of a better way | 
ms to get it over faster.” 


He said “the enemy is hurt- 
ing. He is in bad shape. He 
needs peace.” 
| The Eighth Army commander 
‘commented: “The military feels 
‘we would like to have the op- 
'portunity to meet the Com- 
munists if they attack. It would 
be a real clobber.” 

At the Tuesday meeting 
Lieut. Gen. Nam II] spent an 
‘hour and 13 minutes in an at- 
‘tempt to discredit the “inde- 
‘pendent effectiveness of Allied 
‘air and naval power,” A U. N. 
‘spokesman said. 
| The spokesman, 
‘William P. Nuckols, released for 
the record the official reply of 
‘Vice Admiral C. Turner Joy, 
senior U. N. delegate. 
| Joy told the Reds: 

“We have made two proposals. 


' 
' 
' 
| 
! 
' 
' 
' 
' 
’ 
‘ 
' 
' 
' 
‘ 


a v4 
oe fey 
- -< — ; s 7 
* va 
HAjyneees We 
Fa baa 
i, 2 &, 
*# “-# 
, Ast ht 
a ‘\ AL, 4 
| 
' Y ¢ 
se s ’ *“s 
P f 
e 


e*,? i] 
ad if} ‘h 


(tor 
Ui f Y 


‘ ‘ 


\ 


jul 
st, 


fé 
P 

ssi 

; 


( i ! 


DA \ NREL EIRP 
AYA bare Miers. . 


ROAM qty) 
SS amu g 


\ss\\ 


: 
Ss 


Li. 
/ 


) / 
If/ 


yy 


i 
‘\ 


+4, . 

SIZE on 4 
PAA SF. a 
“nis, 
Whe 

*’ 
Wither Wy 
Yi, 


y+! AS YtE A + ‘ hy éq - 
At Meg MCA Ate 


. 
\ 

W\ ~ 
\ \> ; 


“Why... that’s the kind of food they eat on 


"Nice thing to serve a guy after ahard day’s work! 


the other side of the iron curtain. 


Then I caught on to why Mabel did it. I'd com- 
plained we’d had baked ham twice that week. 
So this black bread business was her way of 
teaching me a lesson in thankfulness. And I 


admit I needed it. 


oe ae = O4 ber 
“ssw eeemoesoce 
7] : 
+2 Ose ese OSCE eee 
oe -? PRSSe + Sete meses 
= 


SP + ee Oe eee ene-see = on 
vvtntiadedelak th | Tee eee ee Tee 
-<—- = ~ 
‘"<—=— sees de 
eos ; J 


~~ 
ee ee wee eee 
pdt Ae deted ied ek ee 


Z - 2 SS ee a 
~_ <= + + tr ae. eo trina: 
—— —s= +@e0ee e+ 


- --ere< 4 
- + “$e eee eee ee eee 


“Here I am living in a democratic America. 
And we've got plenty else besides good food 
to be thankful for. We’ve got Freedom... and 
that’s the tastiest dish any people could ask for! 


“Freedom of worship... that’s important. So’s 
free speech. So’s the secret ballot. What’s more, 
we can travel wherever we please, own a house 
or a farm or a business or get a job like I have 


with Republic, turning out the steel this country 


~A AA 


\ ~~ aT needs. We can put our hard-earned bucks into a 

\S 4 | bank account, stocks and bonds, or a weekend 
fishing trip. Freedoms like these are all old 
stuff to us. 


“Trouble with us is we take it for granted that 
we'll always have these Freedoms. But, come to 
think of it, many of those oppressed people used 
to have Freedoms, too. They got careless, though, 
and let a lot of power-hungry dictators ‘plan’ 


\\ \ “A 1. 4 
re. 


AS 


\ 


q 


at: ‘ (7 = 


“meh littlilt 


their Freedom right out from under their noses. 


& 


“Like Mabel was hinting at, I guess it’s smart 
to be thankful for what we have... and to 
take a more healthy interest in which way 
we're heading. 


“By the way ... did you ever eat a meal of 
just dry, hard black bread? Ugh!” 


REPUBLIC STEEL 


Republic Building, Cleveland 1, Ohio 


Republic BECAME strong in a strong and 
free America. Republic can REMAIN strong 
only in an America that remains strong 
and free ...an America looking to the Steel 
Industry for strength both in times of peace and 
in times of war. In today’s national emergency, 
Republic is doing all it can to help meet the huge 
requirements of steel for National Defense. At the 
same time, Republic is making every effort to provide 
Industry and Business, too, with quality steel to meet 
civilian needs as fully as possible. 


» . . 


This message is one of a ‘series appearing in national 
magazines, and in newspapers in communities where Re- 
public mills, mines and offices are located. For a full 
color reprint, write Department NC, Republic Steel, 
Cleveland 1, Ohio. 


i--— -eeeme us ce 
28600 ems ene + =e BF ie me 
- eseoces - _—-= 
se. esse ersenes - <= ——s 2 
¢ See Sette em ee oe _ ooo 
= <2 oo += 7-2 “+ ee 
- or 
ri F 
pare 


—- a 
* “2 eee eer eons, 


. ‘ +e ms 
< - - —_ 
OO 66S HOO eee see eee 
---<< Seaanee Send 
Oe ee Oe ees Omen ee “ee 
ae —=2-e0e 
—- +--+ eeee - 


“<<. 
a ann 
x ~ 
i 
2 - ee 
° = “ 
_—~ 
sohe-+ 


Brig. Gen. |; 


recommend adjustments in the 
zone we @qriginally presented. 
We are prepared to consider any 
such adjustments which are 
based on military logic.” 

Nam ignored the plain spoken 
offer. Instead he lapsed into an 
emotional outburst that 18 or 19 
times referred to the U. N. pro- 
posal as absurd. 

Joy told the Communists: 
“Your rail and highway systems 
are continuously under U. N. air 
attack, and United States naval 
forces deny you the use of the 
sea and interdict your land 
routes along the coast. Your per- 
sonnel, supplies and equipment 
are subject to destruction en 
route to front lines. 

we are prosecuting a war be- 
hind your front lines Which is 
not duplicated behind our lines. 
As soon as the armistice be- 
comes effective you will acquire 
a degree of freedom of move- 
/ment now denied you.” 


} 


“yr OUIS ABRAHAMS 
Established 1895 

OANS ON JEWELRY 

PAWNBROKER | 


WA. 3498 AP. 2600 
3225 Rhode Island Ave. N.E. 


(Qi giitneMh=a aw 


1 a 


1 
i 


ii i aon om om 


i 


j 


—_——— 


re aornee = 100" 
Kinloch Dist ier & 


“CENTRAL ALWAYS LEADS } 


AND 


TODAY IS NO EXCEPTION” 


Don’t Miss This 


| Wednesday Special 


YOUR OLD FAVORITE 


SCOTTISH - CREAM 


SCOTCH WHISKEY 


86.8 proof 


AY 


FIFTH 


A 
FOR 


Sis scow 


ONLY 


ABM We Reserve the Right to Limit Quantities (iMRI) 


Call NA. 4200, ask for Circulation and order 
Washington Post Guaranteed home delivery 


:. 


> 


I 


| ae 


a 


RARE BUY 
WEDNESDAY 


i ae 


a 


gp OPEN WED. NITE! 
“SW AL Sous: 
| Bring the Family 


We Te 


| Open To-Nite ‘tl 9 P.M 


| 


New Relaxed 
CREDIT TERMS: 
15% Down, 

18 Months to 

Pay Balance. 


17 Years of 
Dependability 


RADIOS e 


Washers $1 elroners 
Ranges ‘1-Freezers *1 


3 and Take Advantage of Our Big 
STORE-WIDE 


TELEVISION *1 
| REFRIGERATORS ‘1 


$1 


Let the whole family decide! . . . Pick out the 
TWO Appliances you most need in the household, 
pay for just ONE, and get the second one for $1 
more. Our famous ONE DOLLAR SALE is so 
wonderful, it'll be a family “Pick-Nick.” Get 2 
brand new appliances for the price of ONE, PLUS 
ONE DOLLAR! For instance, purchase a TV set; 
then, from the list of appliances tagged on that 
set, choose a refrigerator or other appliance for 
just $1. Or purchase a refrigerator and get a 
TV set for ONE DOLLAR! That’s the way it 
works on all appliances in the store; everything 
is brand new, all are Famous Makes . . . come 
down tonight for sure! 


THE ORIGINAL--THE ONE &, ONLY 


TELEVISION e« 


414 10th ST. N.W. 


A Few Doors Above Penna Ave. @ Our Only Location 


THE WASHINGTON POST 


Jranians Find Fault — , eicre 


With British Offer 


TEHRAN, Aug. 14 (®. — The expected to make a final decision 
Tranigm Cabinet found fault to- | Wednesday night. 
day with British proposals for; W. Averill Harriman, personal come 
joint operation of the national-|envoy of President Truman, who 
ized oil industry—but did not brought the negotiators together | 
scuttle the negotiations. oe aa i closed — giant 

The fact the Cabinet did not¢ rennery, Went {0 see h 
reject British Lord Privy Seal Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlevi C oose a 
Richard Stokes’ plan out of hand, |'0¢@Y- It was believed Harriman 
as Premier Mohammed Mossa-|¥2S ‘ying to keep the negotia- 

tions afloat as long as possible. 


degh turned down a similar Tw | ; 

Anglo-Iranian Oil Co. plan last|,, +*¥° Crucial points were be- 

June, was seen as a sign the ne- | /eved cate asp g the Stokes , 

gotiators had successfully passed plan. a a ’ 

one of their first hurdles. One is t p operations under 
Stokes presented the plan yes- British management, with some 

terday, but made no details pub- |/7@an participation. The Iran- 

r lans, on the other hand, do not 


, . is : : 
lic. The Iranians considered it | 37) 4, back’ down troux thats winter coat coe See 


Jast night and again today. nationalization law, which would 


At the end of a Cabinet meet- give them complete control of op 
ing, Deputy Premi sei on 
a puty Premier Hossein erations and use British tech- 


Fatimi said the government had 


om | 66 ° ° ° $9 , fae 7. es a “3 . . : a 
expected a better deal and add. |"icians as employes of the Iran. | fashions In fabrics yee, hs iz a 
ed, “My hope for a settlement is |“*"” 80vernment. ee i i ek R D R 


less. But I have not lost hope.” | 


Abdullah Moazami, a member 5 be = mig highlights of ° 1] 

of the Parliamentary Oil Board, |'4SMlons for the coming season? inf od d od os ae : hi ae ee 

said further clarification would See The Washington Post's Fall orma y 7m ele t ay a ae Pgh ek oe  — 

be sought from Stokes in in-\FaShion Section tomorrow. es ce ee _ = ‘ safe help 


formal ; * ’ : -. Phone NAtional 4200 for Post 
meetings. The Cabinet is ‘Home Delivery, 


Exciting new textures... styles... me ei poe a a 7, ees o, for excessive 
with Shagmoor’s famous down-to-earth : mT TT Rae a ba ~ 

fashion sense. The Shagmoor woolens hes ae a. oe perspiration 
give you warmth without weight... . a. 

light suppleness. <A patented process 
unconditionally mothproofs your Shag- 
moor coat through its lifetime. Choose 
from rich wine, red... sparkling amber, ee ae me <@ 
beige, serene blue, green . . . popular Kee : 4 ss - . oS Eltve dev. 56 
gray, black or navy. 3 Ee a _ Quick Ever-Dry, 1.00> 
Shown: velvet-collared Shagmoor, 69.95 Cream Ever-Dry, 59¢ 


Misses’, women’s and brief sizes. - ) hh ‘@ _ ~~ 
’ | ae pare es SS | add 20 % Feder al tax 


Fabric safe, too; Ever-Dry’s 
welcomed by men as well as 
women. 


Unfurred Shagmoors, 59.95: to 69.95 sue “€ ._— = ie i Cpe 

Fur-trimmed Shagmoors, 98.95 to 149.95 | % Es 4 se ‘e ee. % 59c size onlv at Bethesda-Chew Chase 
W&L—Coats and Suits, Third Floor 2 lM : - 

2 . oS you are invited to come we 
“ROCKET” PANORAMA 
Oldsmobile’s high-compression 
engine display in our llth and G 
Streets window, August 13 to 18 


You are invited 
meet Mr, Linder 
Creator of Shagmoor 
t him give you expert 
advice on the coat for you. 


Sere 4 . ‘ we". as a 
See ee . e a . ~s fe 
° eS ee ee Ee ee ee Ss el 


Lethiop 


for campus or career 


carefree nylon TRI COT 
BLOUSES, 7” 


You'll be thrilled over the way 

nylon tricot stays smart, .. 
wrinkle-free . . .the way it 

snubs ironing. “Two styles, sizes 32 to 38. 
front-buttoned classic with convertible 
neck, white, pink, blue, ecru. 
jewel-necked blouse with 

pin tucks, back buttons, 

white, gray and gold. 


W&L—Blouses, First Floor, 
also Bethesda-Chevy Chase and The Pentagon 


“Like most girls, I had my own idea of 
what makes a good job, To begin with, I 
walnted a good salary, with regular raises as x a ie 4s 
I'd go along. I wanted a nice place to work fa fe 
cheerful surroundings—nice people to work & fF ff " ; 4 NEW LOCATIONS 
with—and a friendly atmosphere. f Z a : 7 ¢ i : : 

“T wanted work that’s interesting and im- e . A *% ) natalia yy 


tant—where I'd have the satisfying feeling a > £ ae | ‘di 
ot hehas needed. Well, I have all those things Zz 4S 66 OS H | Pp’ ? (formerly North’ Building) 
—and more—with the telephone company. a | 3 Fs q ‘ s = wack pacers — furnishings 


please note these 


women’s and children’s shoes 


“] started right in with full pay, even while _ , . @ ° underwear, robes, housecoats 
I was learning. Everybody made me feel wel- j 3 4 . ie é deep-toned version of ogg oP ™~ 
come, and at home, and part of a friendly } wee y = s ; 1 | elouseg, hosiery 
ing family. And, of course, I'm doing i= bias fashion’s dupliquette hee flowers, handkerchiefs 
working amny ‘ . : es eos ee 9 costume jewelry, umbrellas 
important work, because telephone service 1s i= ve snehiinte’. Savubedneek cam taaeek Gecaiiiiaion 
so vital to national defense. It’s a wonderful i‘. JZ aa pair 1 95 TOYS (now main building, 8th floor) 
* ° ; »5 . 

thing to know that I’m helping in a big task = 9 now NORTH BUILDING 
like that. bak sais , Eee Ps Your fall nylons take on a richer accent (formerly Main Building) 
come in and see for yourself? Make it soon - £ ee heel shoes. ; 15-denier, 60-gauge Dupont ah rae beige 

, in fact!” eo ON nylon in: six shades, sizes 8Y2 to 11, radio and television, Ist floor 
today : y ’ 


eS as | eS housewares, lst and 2nd floors 
Get _a telephone job—help speed a . ¢ mesa navajo geronimo unfinished furniture, nd feoe 
the production and defense of Americal * . ponderosa canyon tumbleweed dinette sets, 2nd floor ; 


W&L—Hosiery, First Floor, now NORTH BUILDING 
DOWN STAIRS STORE 


The Chesapeake & Potomac Teloghane Comper? - * also Bethesda-Chevy Chase and The Pentagon 
(formerly upstairs, North Building) 


. Street, N. W. : 
Employment Office: 725 13th cosmetics, notions, luggage, rugs. lamps, 
’ . linens, bedding, dress fabrics, patterns. 


Closed Monday—OLiver 7600 


Main and North Buildings, 9:30 to 6—Closed Saturday—District 5300. Bethesda-Chevy Chase. 9:30 to 6 except Thursday. Friday 12:30 to 3 


, 


THE WASHINGTON POST 


6 


Wednesday, August 15, 1951 


a 


Worst Mobilization Crisis Seen in Threat 
Of Strike in Copper Industry Set for August 20 


By Sam Stavisky 
Post Reporter 


The Nation yesterday ap- 
peared to be heading for its 
worst mobilization crisis to date 
—a strike and shutdown of the 
vital copper industry. 

Federal mediators, headed by 
Federal Conciliation Chief Cy- 
rus S. Ching and his No. 1 
trouble-shooter, Clyde Mills, are 
working intensively to avert the 
walkout. 

Nonetheless, mobilization offi- 
cials are frankly alarmed at the 
imminent possibility of the 
strike, and are already bombard- 
ing the Office of Defense Mobili- 
zation with recommendations 
that, if necessary, the White 
House be prepared to step in. 


Deadline August 20 


The deadline appears to be 
August 20, when 11 AFL metals 
trades unions are reported to 
be ready to walk out to win 
their demands for contract im- | 
provements. 

The Mine, Mill, and Smelter 


ai 


Workers Union, independent 
left-wing union, which is the 
dominant union in the minerals 
industry, is seeking similar new 
contract benefits, and is con- 
sidering walking out at the 
same time. 

Altogether, some 100,000 men 
who work in the copper mines 
and smelting mills are involved 
in the wage and contract dis- 
pute with seven major com- 
panies. 

Should the walkout come off, 
America’s mobilization effort 
would be hard hit, because even 
now, at full-capacity production, 
the United States is unable to 
get enough copper to meet all 
requirements for 1951. 


Prospects Are Dismal 


Of the three major materials 
in scarce supply—steel, alumi- 
num and copper—we are worst 
off in respect to copper. There’s 
steadily increasing production 
of steel and aluminum, with an 
end to the shortage in sight 
within a year or two. But the 
prospects for getting more cop- 

e dismal. 

fact, during 1951 our 
copper supply has diminished at 
the very time that defense re- 
quirements have shot upward. 


month-long strike of 1350 em- 
ployes of the American Smelting 
and Refining Co., at Garfield, 
Utah. Overall American copper 
production dropped to 62,000 
tons in july against a normal 
production of 85,000 tons. 

The Utah strike, incidentally, 
was conducted by a local of the 
CIO Steelworkers Union, which 
has been making some inroads 
into the former bailiwick of the 
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, 
ever since the latter union was 
kicked out of the CIO in 1949 on 
the charge of being Communist- 
dominated. 

This walkout was called off, at 
least temporarily, when the 
President certified the dispute 
to the Wage Stabilization Board, 
and a special panel was set up to 
look into the controversy. 

With the increasing need for 
copper in defense—800 pounds 
go into a Superfortress—Na- 
tional Production Authority has 
been decreasing the amount to 
be made available for so-called 
strictly civilian items, such as 
autos, which use 40 pounds of 
copper per unit; trucks, 50 to 
400 pounds; refrigerators, 20 
pounds; vacuum cleaners, 4.5 
pounds. 


By Marshall Andrews 
Post Reporter 


Franklin F. Russell, Washing- 
ton lawyer, yesterday began an 
investigation into the dismissal | 
of West Point cadets for 
cheating on examinations. 
Russell was named to conduct 
the investigation here by the 


Committee on Justice of the New | 
York Criminal and Civil Courts | 
Bar Association. He is a mem-. 
ber of the firm of Canter, Stern, 


D. C. Man Probes Cadets’ Case for N .Y. Bar 


WEST POINT, N. Y., Aug:! 
14 w@—Some 35 cadets ousted 


for cheating left West Point for 
civilian life today and the re- 
mainder of the 90 facing expul- 
sion expect to be on their way 
home before the end of the 
week. 

It was a somber scene as the 
youths—many of them members 
of the football team—staged re- 
unions with their families just 


i 


Although the cadets were au-|_ 


thorized to wear their uniforms 
home, most preferred civilian 
clothes. Their inconspicuous 
exit was in sharp contrast to the 
furore caused by the greatest 
scandal in the 150-year history 
of the military academy. | 

Romance blossomed from the | 
scandal. A _ estimated hal-f | 
dozen of the ousted cadets 
planned to be married “as 


‘the office of Coach Ear] Blaik 
\whose own son. anticipates his’ “choose your coll 


the ousted cadets, told them to 
not -only 
in the week.|for football, but for the educa 
supporter ofitional opportunities.” 


EXCLUSIVE 


NEW WASHING ACTION | 


‘ehers 
eS 


discharge later 
Blaik, a staunch 


Urow and Canter. | 
The committee, Russell said, 
is interested in the procedures 
followed in interrogating the 
cadets rather than in their guilt 
or innocence. His investigation, 
he explained, would seek an- 
swers to such questions as: 

1. Did the procedure followed 
accepted American concepts of 
justice? 

.2. Were any confessions or ad- 
missions obtained by improper 
methods? 

-8. What rights, if any, do the 
cadets have to a review? 

4. Were any cadets tried with- 
out being called personally be- 
fore the authorities? 

5. To what extent were the 
cadets advised of their rights? 

6. Were the officers who 
passed upon the guilt or inno- 
cence of the cadets entirely im- 
partial? 

7. Were these officers inter- 
ested in defending the present 
system to an extent which might, 


inside the ivy-draped main gate 
before starting their final fur- 
lough. While on leave they will 
receive their Army discharges 
by mail. 


quickly as possible” and their | 
coed fiancees were on the acad- | 
emy grounds as the boys started | 


leave. 
' The football men trooped into 


—- 


| from 


standard 
with the 


An uncompromising 
Marks Co. synonymous 
| This enviable reputation for 
our most treasured asset 
satisfaction. 


To continue to in 


privilege. 


serve you 


“qvestment Building 


A Personal Messa ge 


| LOUIS A. MARKS 


fl To the Many Friends and Clients of the Late Fred D’Elia ... 


through 
finest 


unsurpassed 
and has 


D’Elia & Marks Co, 


the 
in 


D'Elia & 


vears has 
custom tal 


mace 
oring 


and 


your 


workmanship is 
assurance of 


quality 
always been 


. , © | 7 ? 
same proud tradition will 


District 6875 


| 


} 


Centric-Agitation 
“Shampoos” Clothes 


New 


wasnin } 


cleaner 


clothes 


COMPLETELY 
AUTOMATIC 


perhaps unconsciously, interfere | 
with a fair determination of the | 
guilt or innocence of the cadets? | 
The Army Department re- 
cently announced that all the 
cadets concerned were advised | 
of. their rights before being. 
questioned and that each case 
would be reviewed. Some cadets | 
have charged they were threat- | 
ened to gain their confessions, a | 
charge West Point authorities 
have denied. : | 
‘Russell said last night that he 
had already conferred with Maj. | 
Gen. E., M. Brannon, Judge 
Advocate General of the Army, 
at the Pentagon. He said he ex: | 
pected to see General Brannon | 


During 1950, the United 
States managed to get 125,000 
tons of copper a month, 85,000 
tons through domestic produc- 
tion and 40,000 tons through 
imports. 

This year, however, imports 
have fallen off. Excess accumu- 
‘lations of Japanese and Nor- 
‘wegian copper, available in 1950, 
have been cleaned up. Also, our 
ceiling price of 24% cents a 
‘pound for copper has diverted 
some foreign copper into non- 
American markets. 


Setback in Strike 


| Domestically, despite all-out 
=| production, our copper supply 
=| suffered a setback through a 


Mobilization officials already 
have stated, more than once, that 
as the pinch for copper in- 
creases, every effort will be 
made to supply enough copper 
for defense and defense-support- 
ing industries. The squeeze’ will 
then be on the civilian products. 


an 
. . 
California $75 
Direct from D.C. : 
@ hostess service 
@ reclining sects 
@ lunches aloft 


MIAMI 39-74 


CINCINNATI .....$29.50 
MEMPHIS .......397.00 
TULSA ........ 00 8QQ0 
EL PASO ........$57.00 


All Flights 
Direct from D.C. 


_ 


Plus Tax 


JU 


ik 
WANTED 


NEWSPAPERS 
Magazines & Books 
- FEDERAL JUNK CO. 


1125 FIRST ST. N.W. ST. 3636 


Unions Up Membership 


OTTAWA, Aug. 14 (®.—Labor 
union membership rose to 1,029,- 
000 in Canada during 1951, the 
Federal Labor Department re- 
ported today. The increase dur- 
ing the year was 23,000, continu- 
ing an upward trend since 1939. 
The 1939 total was 359,000. 


~*~ 


938 F ST.N.W.-11th® ESTS. NW. 


Pius Tex | 


= 
-_— 


UU 


again today. | 


for absorbing moisture . 


ly ‘’breathe”’ with you! 


A. ‘Nylon taffeta 


B. 
trol . 


elastic front panel. (Available 


stretch. 
Small, medium, large 


ne NEO = 


~ EF OS ns 
SSN eS SP 


"eee = 
TRS a 3 
SX 


ENTIRE STORE 


panty.) Small, medium, large. 
6.50 


C. Broadcloth stitched cup Bra. 
32 to 38. A, B or C cups, 2. 


D. Unpaneled Nylon Elastic Net 
Girdle featuring long, easy: down 
(Available in panty too.) 


help your figure stay 


Jantzen’s marvelous new “’nylonizing”’ 
process gives nylon a special new talent 


- » keeping 


you more comfortable than ever before! 
Of nylon power set, Jantzen “pull on”’ 
garments slim hips and tummy’ by 
“redistribution” . . . waistbands actual- 


Lansburgh'’s—Corsets and Bras—Third Floor 


stitched cup 
Bra. 32 to 38. A, Bor C cups, 
3.95 


Pull-on garment of light con- 
. of nylon net with satin 


in 


50 


Other Jantzen girdles, $5 te 8.50 


‘ EARS RT Se 
. RO RE 
SS ea Nags ~ 
> i RQ: Sh SRS . 
at . x See , 
ae % Sy > : : 


’s in a name? 


: eA aoe 
- re ae cif 4 
n * — te & - 


Re oe 
x 


a ae 


< 
% aye ts 
bei tke ce OS 


vr - 9 
« . 
ds @ Py 


ary er 
i v- . 

Dae aie - 
. PU oF " 


neh 


~ 


< 
ve 


LOWS means: 


“famous in battle.” Not 
every Louis lives up to 
hie name, but ask any- 
one who has tried it and 
hell tcll you Bourbon 
de Luxe does live up to 


a hs 
so Bae. oe’ 

Se 

ee 


Text of President’s Speech at Dedication of New Legion Building 


The partial text of President 
Truman’s address dedicating the 
Washington headquarters of the 
American Legion: | 

I am happy to be here this 
afternoon to dedicate the new 
Washington headquarters of the 
American Legion. I wish the 
legion every success in its new 
home. 

I have been thinking back to 
the early days of the American 
Legion, right after World War I. 
You know, I was pretty active in 


legion affairs, back in those 
days. I helped to establish four 
legion posts in Missouri. 

We didn’t start this organiza- 
tion just to look out for our 
own interests as veterans or to 
give us an excuse for reminiscing 
about what heroes we had been. 
We started this organization so 


that we could work together as 
patriotic citizens for the good of | 
all Americans... 

The keystone of our form of) 
Government is the liberty of the 


‘we will 


individual. The Bill of Rights, 
which protects our individual 
liberties, is the most funda- 
mental part of our Constitution. 


Rights and Liberties 


When the legion pledged itself 
to uphold the constitution, and 
to foster 100 percent American- 
ism, it pledged itself to protect 
the rights and liberties of all our 


‘citizens. 


Real Americanism means that 
protect freedom of 


speech—we will defend the right/fair discrimination and preju- 
of pegple to say what they think, | dice. 
regardless of how much we may; Real Americanism means fair 
disagree with them. play. It means that a man who 
Real Americanism means free-|is accused of.a crime shall be 
dom of religion. It means that! considered innocent until he has 
we will not discriminate against been proved guilty. It means 
a man because of his religious| that people are not to be penal- 


faith. _ \ized and persecuted for exer- 
Real Americanism means fair | ojsing their Constitutional liber- 


opportunities for all our citizens. tips. 
It means that none of our cit-;| Real Americanism means also 


izens should be held back by un- that liberty is not license. There | 


‘is no freedom to injure others. 


Easily, Quickly Installed in 


your home or office 


‘SA .d0 


Includes normal installation 


and One Year's Service 


Keep cool, calm and collected with this 
conditioner that filters dust, dirt, pollen 


Enjoy Cool Weather day & night with a 


FRIGIDAIRE 


Room Air Conditioner 


The Constitution does not pro- 
tect free speech to the extent of 
permitting conspiracies to over- 
throw the Government. Neither 
does the right of free speech 
authorize slander or character 
assassination. These limitations 


} together in one great community. 
_ Real Americanism includes all 
|these things. And it takes all of 
‘them together to make 100 per- 
cent Americanism—the kind the 
Legion is pledged to support. 
I’m glad the Legion has made 
that pledge. For true Ameri- 
canism is under terrible attack 
today. True Americanism needs 
defending—here and now. It 
needs defending by every decent 
human being in this country. 
Americanism is under attaok 
by communism, at home and 
‘abroad. We are defending it 
‘against that attack. We are pro- 
‘tecting our country from spies 


up the Communist conspiracy in 
the United States. We are build- 
ing our defenses, and making our 
country strong, and helping our 
Allies to help themselves. 

If we keep on doing these 


the. job—we can protect our- 
| selves from the attack of com- 
| munism. 
| But Americanism is also under 
another kind of attack. It is be- 
ing undermined by some people 
in this country who are loudly 
proclaiming that they are its 
chief defenders. These people 
claim to be against communism. 
But they are chipping away at 
our basic freedoms just as in- 
sidiously and far more effectively 
than the Communists have ever 
been able to do. 

These people have attacked 
the basic principle of fair play 


They are trying to create fear 


are essential to keep us working | 


‘and saboteurs. We are breaking 


things—if we put our best into} 


‘that underlies our Constitution. | 


hysterical that no one will stand | 
‘up to them for fear of being’ 


‘called a Communist. 
Now, this is an old Communist 


‘trick in reverse. Everybody in 
‘Russia lives in terror of being 
\called an anti-Communist. For 
/once that charge is made against 
| anybody in Russia—no matte 
‘what the facts are—he i§ on the 
| way out, 


Fear and Terror 


| In a dictatorship, everybody 
lives in fear and terror of being 
denounced and slandered. No- 
body dares stand up for his 
rights. 

We must never let such a con- 
dition come to pass in this coun- 
try. 

Yet this is exactly what the 
scaremongers and hate-mongers 
are trying to bring about. Char- 
acter assassination is their stock 
in trade. Guilt by association is 
their motto. They have created 
sueh a wave of fear and uncer- 
tainty that their attacks upon 
our liberties go almost unchal- 
lenged. Many people are grow- 
ing frightened—and frightened 
people don’t protest, 

Stop and think. Stop and 
think where this is leading us. 


acter assassination is already 
curbing free speech and it is 
threatening all our other free- 
doms. I daresay there are peo- 
ple here today who have reached 
‘the point where they are afraid 
| to explore a new idea. How 
‘many of you are afraid to come 
‘right out in public and say what 
you think about a controversial 
‘issue? How many of you feel 
that you must “play it safe” in all 
_things—and on all occasions? 

I hope there areynot many, 
‘but from all that have seen 


‘your answers might be. 


-accusation may be hurled at you, 


perhaps straight from the halls | 


of Congress. 
Pitiless Publicity 


Some of you have friends or 
‘neighbors, who have been sin- 
gled out for the pitiless publicity 
that follows accusations of this 
kind—aceusations that are made 
_ without any regard for the actual 
guilt or innocence of the victim. 

That is not playing fair. That 
‘is not Americanism. It is not the 


The growing practice of char- | 


‘and heard, I am afraid of what 


For I know you have no way 
of telling when some unfounded 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
Wednesday, August 15, 1931 


On Sale Wednesday thru Saturday 


NEY'S 


4 BARGAIN DAYS 


OPEN DAILY 10 A> M. 


= WOES BO 


THE MOST SUPERB 
WHISKEY BUY 
IN OUR HISTORY 
-e- | TOWN CLUB 
Straight Bourbor 
Whiskey 


Broriiog one & * 
The American |) ¢ 
rears 


+ 
+ 
-_ 
, 


VERMOUTH 


Sweet Vermouth—alcohol 16% 
by volume. Dry Vermouth— 
alcohol 19% by volume, 


i + 86 Proof 


imported from Italy 


CHIANTI 


Aicohol 12.5% by volume, 


oS c Full 


QUART 


. « » removes excess moisture, Clean, 


Call DI. 7200 for a 5-day 


free trial in your home 


invigorating air is circulated throughout 
the room in an unbelievably quiet way ... 
with. the famous Frigidaire Meter-Miser 
mechanism. Smoke and room odors are 
pulled outside. This room air conditioner 
will help make better working conditions. 


Amazing Velen / 


DISTILLED IN FRANCE 
3 STAR SAINT GERMAINE 


GENUINE 


FRENCH 
COGNAC 


Only 15% Down--- 
18 Months to Pay 


4 


sictnauete Nw Appliance Store 
8th and D Sts., N.W. 


- 
i. EEE —_—-—— = = 


| <auenien 
ere ye 
j 


Cee. —_ 
~ aa. 


LEGION—From Page I 


, 
ef 
. 


: 
’ 
: 


7 
; 


Bottled in Bond 


OLD RAMPART 
STRAIGHT BOURBON 


99 


FIFTH 


End-of-Summer 


4 YEAR OLD 
KENTUCKY CLUB 


BOURBON 
49 


FIFTH 


KENTUCKY ae 


ée5.Liis 


Ae miilAd 
STRAIGHT BOURROM 
whHisKey 


<a5* 


3 FOR 
$10 


86 Proof 


With Summer nearing an end, your hair will need 
extra care }.. rid it of dryness from the sun. For 
hair reconditioning . .. soft, lustrous appearance, 
use these beauty aids. You'll be delighted with the 


results. 


Richard Hndnut’s Children’s Home Per- 
manent. For baby-fine hair. Has special creme 


lotion *@-s ~iésavneee 80.6 


Proof 


eee e@eernreeeeee ‘* *- eee 


Pam Shampoo Goggles for 
youngsters. To keep soap out of 
their eyes ..%... 


Mehawk Brush Set, 2-piece. 
Comb, brush in blue, pink or 
white ere Peeesbeseeseeeoss 81.50 


‘and suspicion among us by the|American way to slur the loy-| 
use of slander, unproved accusa- alty and besmirch the.character | 
tions, and just plain lies. of the innocent and the guilty 
They are filling the air with alike. We have always consid- | 
ithe. most irresponsible kinds of ered it just as important to pro-. 
| accusations against other*people. | tect the innocent as it is to pun-| 
They are trying to get us to be- — guilty. | 
‘lieve that our Government is| We want to protect the country | 
‘riddled with communism and against disloyalty—of course we 
‘corruption—when the fact is that|d0. We have been punishing 
/we have the finest and most people for disloyal acts, and we 
‘loyal body of civil servants in | 4re going to keep on punishing 
‘the world. These slandermon-|the guilty whenever we have a 
igers are trying to get us so/|Case against them. But we)don’t 
| want to destroy our who} SyS- 
tem of justice in the ocess. | 
yi We don’t want to injure Mnocent 
‘+people. And yet the scurrilous | 
| twork of the scandal mongers’ 
T Hi ‘tBravely threatens the whole idea | 
ruman its \ f protection for the innocent in 
) Res. -;@ur country today. 
SI d } jei-Perhaps the Americans who 
| an erers “tdivel outside of Washington are. 
| ig’ 4 S aware of this than you and) 
join’ with him in exposing theI, If that is so, | want to warn) 
‘scandal - mongers, hate - mongers |.them all. Slander, lies, character | 
and character assassins, and in:}/@ssassination—these things are | 
raising their voices against hys- |'@ threat to every single citizen | 
‘teria, Mr. Truman was deliber-;)everywhere in this country. | 
‘ately backing a cause apparently, When even one American—who | 
‘not too popular in Legion circles,|has done nothing wrong — is 
Talking to réporters after the},forced by fear to shut his mind 
‘ceremony, Earl Cocke, jr., of and close his mouth, then all 
‘Dawson, Ga., ‘national com-|Americans are in peril. | 
_mander of the Legion expressed | the Challenge We Face 
‘his pleasure that the President : 
had made the dedication and}. !t is the job of all of us—of 
‘had commended various Legion|¢¥ery American who loves his 
programs. But by carefully re-| country and his freedom—to rise 
‘comment on the civil rights and | >usiness. This is one of the 
* « ‘civil liberties theme of Mr.|&reatest challenges we face today. 
air | are ee ~ 'Truman’s speech, he made it, We have got to make a fight for 
7 clear enough that he is unlikely ‘Tea! 100 percent Americanism. 
, to lead his organization in any|,; You Legionnaires, living up to 
such crusade as the President Yur Constitution as I know you 
called for. want to do, can help lead the way. | 
For in the past, the Legion} You can set an example of fair 
has done some super-patriotic (play. You can raise your voices | Pk. ae 
name-calling on. its own. against hysteria. You can expose ee | 
The President spoke from a the rotten motives of those people a a 
platform in front of the new|Who are trying to divide us and) -Uu 
building to about 2500 people.|¢confuse us and tear up the Bill 
About half were invited guests a are mapearte gE Pe 
| others homeward bound 0 organizall “ - 
| Washingtonians wh paused to{@pportunity to do a greater serv- ee imported from West Indies 
hear the a speech. ice for ——- sib A a SHERRY, PORT BELLA VISTA 
Cabinet, diplomatic and Le-} Was ever Detter sul 
gion notables were on the plat-| equipped to do the job. OR MUSCATEL He U Vi 
form behind the President.| I know the Legion. I know what | FULL 
District Commissioner F. Joseph} a tremendous force for good it can | 1 S 
Donohue, chairman of the dedi-#be. | GALLON . m 
cation committee, was master of} Now go to it. Alcohol 20% | 
ceremonies. 1 And God bless you. by Volume FIFTH 
Breck Shampoo, 3 types for f ern 
dry, oily, normal. hair $1.25 f ex d, / 
- es | 4 Se ef Es OUS. 
DUNFIFE 
DISTILLED IN SCOT- 99 
LAND. 100% SCOTCH 
WHISKEYS. FIFTH 
86 PROOF 
CHILEAN RIESLING 
BUY IT BY THE CASE 
BOcr: 11.8% by vol. 
23 oz. Bottle 


Shampoo-Carl. An oil, creme 
shampoo that curls hair .$1.00* 


o yee 
Half fill a glass e = 
with eur feat Se r : 
red or white California WINE. 


Heme Hand Hair Dryer 
with control for four heat .tem- 


peratures .....es.0000--SL4,.95 


*Plus 70% tax 


rere? FSR Coe - 


These popular sparkling WINE 
COOLERS are so cool...so | 
flavor-full...so nice and easy '** 
to make. Yet they cost only a °. 
few cents a glass to serve. En-, 
joy them often. And ask your. 
storeman for stil! other recipes 
for delicious, refreshing WINE 
“The Avera” COOLERS made with the fine 
THOR. Sw wines of California. Wine 


| Advisory Board, San Francisco. AIR CONDITIONED 


va eto ete ' ay; 1013 PENNSYLVANIA AVE. N.W. WA. 7951 


Kann’'s—T oiletries—Street Floor 


Pe POPS t TS er? 


—% 

and a soda 
or spar ing water... 

0, ™ 


9 


ak el 


ie | 


a 


} or ere t*v 


yesterday that his brother, David 


me THE WASHINGTON POST : | : Ocean City, Md. 
S : Wednesday, August 15, 1951 |\Food Prices Fell Lawyer Has Been Mentally Il, Brother Says | tn. * 
fae told a Municipal Court jury, f0rward_from the audience a berated the judge, Andrew J. |p. .cty on Boardwalk, ree 
itc |S. Polier, had numerous in- her if I d t and th t- inted def | delicio Is = day. 
Allegedly Put Atomie Twist to Old Racket scamiate way. ob Rane seectiet stances of mental illness since | i aoe er faaver; Meredith Coffman. sa agement. Mr. and Mrs. Jamee BD. 


'1% in Second 
pretty Gallinger Hospital nurse' Howard, jr., Assistant United ey 
: 
*la decline of one percent in re- | 1930. Cape May, N. J. 


: | Shad Polier, a New York law-| At one point, David called| David alternately praised and RIDEAU HOTEL J 
| 
Glib New Yorker Indicted for Larceny, Half of July revi 
erd said, “Isn't she nice? I may’ States Attorney Alfred Hantman fr 
Samuel D. Mason, a glib New testimony, he told them he would; Mason, who has a long crimi-|tail food prices during the last David Polier, a 56-year-old’ 


: re eek 18 ar : vaiealt ' two weeks of July, the Bureau Washington, and New York law-) ; 
Yorker with a fast line, was in- use his “influential connections” |nal record, told the Senators _ igre ‘Statistics -zeporte dyer, with a onetime successful) McCarthy Loses Letters In Office Theft 


dicted here yesterday on nine here to get them leases on Fed-| much of the se turned sestarday practice, is fighting Government By The Associated Press | 
j ix Of er ildi ‘n-| over to a man named “Eungart” i | 

— = tt m9 erpt Saicings ‘when.we Severs estan iB ese : ply| The index for July 30, esti- Pane ha ssamiaek Sou eraan | Senator Joseph R. McCarthy, they would be returned so I - Min 1.8 

SS ment moved “underground” to, WHO Mason said was probab’y mated on the basis of an eight- ~ ‘R-Wis.) told a reporter today| answer them.” = _ : so caaeks «Gun Qouatie OO 


rges filed by the Dis- , : s : is . ment. 
Sr aient all “ot «Heyer Dis- escape an atomic attack. |in Australia. Mason said the locity survey, was about 226.5 per: The jury throughout the day|that 20,000 letters from con-| McCarthy said the stolen let-|Tenmes Bowing» Doncing» Sart Bat» Cocad Leung» Bgp 


° . o > > i . : - eRe 

: M. Bas-| The indictment accuses Mason |COmplainants gave him much |cent of the 1935-39 average, and)... .|Stituents and other correspond-|ters were in tw hich | Salt Fishing « Bicycling » Theatres « Riding + Finest Food 
trict Court de os ot yas ek “ ene teen -« | less money than they stated. about 11% percent above the a ath Eni eaten Sanna: pei ‘ents were stolen from his offices} w : sing Pape WHICH | om $4.00 smgle. 36.00 double » American sad Exrogenn plone 
tian could send Mason to prison of “wilfully and contrary to his ers’ love for each other and of|< were taken from his offices OVE) cycscity eo0. Twelfth year under some management Write fag 


for as much as 150 years. oath” falsely stating his income! Irvin Goldstein, Special As-|Pre-Korean index. scorn. in the Senate Office Building|2 weekend. ‘literature + Phohe Cape May 4-411. 

Mason is accused of. giving and its sources between 1948 and / sistant to the Attorney General, | The cities surveyed were’ Shad Polier said that he had about 10 days ago. | hiuetinniand ip 
nine lying answers recently to 1951 by claiming that he never| who prepared the indictment, |Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, often tried to help his brother,|. “They really weren't of much | | ia 
the subcommittee on Senate In- got more than $5000 at one time | said Mason may be arraigned | Columbus, New York, Rich- | but now David had: threatened importance, he added, except | Pt. Lookout, Md. | 
vestigations, and of having per- in connection with any proposed | today. ‘mond, San Francisco and Wash-/| him and others. that it’s embarrassing because | | emma * =| 

: : | i | in. |can’t answer the letters. I wish ie 2 eno | 
notrated $71,760 in swindles in Government transactions. Also, | ington. ' The defendant constantly in- ©4 S Chesapeake Bay & Potomac Meet® 


1949. he is accused of falsely saying that | . terrupted his brother and called vs « h 
The subcommittee was investi- much of his income came from Seltzer Puts Out Fire sees names. David shouted that’ a Saaeen | t en I found Pazo 


gating complaints that Mason, race track adventures. _RIDDLESDEN, England, Aug.| Daughter Born to Auers (ne had helped educate his} vate Bitrae- | brings amazing relief!” 
also known as Samuel D. Muss-| He is charged with stealing|14 (».—Innkeeper Harry Foulds) LONDON, Aug. 14 (#.—Mrs. | brother. i | tive || says Mrs. M. W. Los Angeles, Calif. 
man, put a new twist to an old|$40,560 from the Order of St.|knew what to do when he found |Suzanne Auer, 22, wife of Holly- | ‘Ss ing relief from mi of simple piles, 
confidence racket to get $250,000 Basil the Great, Inc., through two|a fire in a bedroom of his inn|wood actor Mischa Auer, gave| See top fashions for going| 710 MUTH ST. t ; 


from gullible victims here and|Greek Catholic priests, and of|last night. He lugged in a case | birth today to a daughter. Auer| back to college in The Washing-/§ | 6323 | 
elsewhere. taking the rest from Bohdenjof soda water syphons from the|is making the movie “Clemen-jton Post Fall Fashion al 4200 ~~ Hours From 


4 

Wash. Goo Boasés 
According to the complainants’'Katamay of Philadelphia. bar and squirted out the blaze. tine” for a British studio. tomorrow. Phone NAtional 4200 P. Martin, Host, Point Lookout, B= 
for Post Home Delivery. 


The Styleline De Luxe 2-Door Sedan 
(Continvetion- of standard equipment and trim 
itlustroted is dependent on availability of meteriol.) 


VSNL 

KYM 
Vij; y 
Kh 
Mth J 
MMs 
Yyy 


Yj 
“iy Vi 
oY Ys, Uy “Wy 
Yj Yy 
Y Y, Wy, y 


4s, J 
ay ty WU 
Mipsis , 
Yh fg 44 y 
VIALS SY 
Yip tps 
4; Vid 


Longest of all low-priced cars—197 4-5 inches from bumper 


LLL LSS 
Wy. 


to bumper! ... Heaviest of all low-priced cars—3,110 pounds 


of solid quality in the model illustrated.f ... Widest tread SY SS finest styling 
'Y . with extra-beautiful Bodies 
! by Fisher . . . found elsewhere 
rear wheels! Chevrolet /ooks and rides better... it’s built ATR only on higher-priced cars! 


to be stronger and last longer . . . than others in its field. Se Se, : : e a a i 
+Styleline De Luxe 2-Door Sedan— ee) I 4 s¢ finest thrills with ine in i Ss ie * 
ship pir g weight, A ve | : ar , “ | 

’ oe aon neo thrift ,+.«. only low-priced 
< | SRSRERaRS Siro Se ae car with Valve-in-Head Engine 


AS .. trend-leader for the industry! Not only does Chevrolet excel in size and quality—not 
ee and finest no«shift driving —_ di: ets — only does it bring you feature after feature of the finest 


at lowest cost with 1 WY | cars at the greatest savings—but it’s also the lowest- 
| 5 priced line in its field! Yes, here are the world’s lowest- 


* . ett ties 
finest riding ease —.A@e 7a > : j | : 
.. «thanks to its Knee-Action [MA Ld sega priced full-size cars . . . extfemely economical to buy, 
Gliding Ride . . . exclusive to , Za ; c operate and maintain ...so why pay more, why accept . 


. ’ > » 
Chevrolet and costlier cars! less? Come in, place your order for America’s largest 


AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION* = =— AWe7, and finest low-priced car—now. 


of all low-priced cars—5834 inches between centers of the 


Chevrolet’s time-proved Powerglide Automatic Transmission, coupled 
with the 105-h.p. Chevrolet Valve-in-Head Engine and EconoMiser 
Rear Axle, forms a peerless Power Team that is exclusive to Chev- 
rolet in its field and that gives finest no-shift driving at lowest cost 
» « » plus the most powerful performance in its field. 

No clutch pedal! No gearshifting! No power steps or surges! | st 
Only hitherto undreamed of driving-ease and velvet velocity... ae ALS YY | 
a smooth, unbroken flow of power at all engine speeds! +sA MS ed) OI finest safety 

. . with Safety-Sight Instrument 


*Combination of Powerglide Automatic Transmission and 105-h.p. Engine optional | < Uti eek ~~. ; ’ Brae “i a 
on De Luxe models at extra cost. | > Panel, Fisher Unisteel Body 


= ee oe 
finest vision 
.,. with Curved Windshield and 
Panoramic Visibility . . . exclu- 
sive to Chevrolet in its field! 


Construction, and Jumbo-Drum 
Brakes—largest in its field! 


MORE PEOPLE BUY CHEVROLETS THAN ANY OTHER CAR! 


SEE YOUR CHEVROLET DEALER FOR ALL YOUR AUTOMOTIVE NEEDS! 


‘Conveniently listed under “Automobiles” in your local classified telephone directory é 
i A. A 


House Group Urges Speed on Aid! 


AID—From Page I 


are talking of reductions rang- 
ing up to two billion dollars. 
The House committee warned, 
however, that rejection of its) 
program “would not save the | 
American taxpayer any money.” 
The cost “inevitably” would be 
far greater, it said, if the United 
States was forced to fight Rus- 
sia without any allies. The fall 
of Westerh Europe would turn 


over to Russia an industrial po-| 


tential second only -to that of 
the United States. 


Breakdown By Countries 


The committee gave this 
breakdown of conditions in coun- 


tries which its members visited: | 


Freni¢ e—“The situation is im- 
provil ’ Morale is strengthen- 
ing sfeadily as a tesult of eco- 
nom recovery and “an increas- 


Ry 


a successful collective defense’ 
against invasion,” | 
reat Britain—‘“General mo- | 
-|rale is high.” There is “no neu- 
'tralism or defeatism,” ‘Teeling"| 
there is some “popular feeling” 
that the United States should | 
treat Britain more as an equal | 
partner “and less as a junior | 
member of the firm.” 


The Netherlands—The Dutch 
are “slowly becoming. more and 
more conscious of the menace.’ 
They first felt a little hopeless | 
and were not at all sure that the | 
United States would not pull out | 
and make a stand in Britain or 
south of the Pyrenees. 
Belgium — Morale has “been | 
mounting by the month.” 


Italy—lIts soldiers have a “new | 
The arrival of Eisenhow- | 
er and American equipment have | 


spirit.” 


-_ 


DEFENSE—From Pg. I 


Saalitenemeeeeneenll 


HOUSING—From Pg. I 


War Threat 
Seen at Peak 


the Korean peace talks, coupled 
with other developments, plainly 
indicates the Kremlin is not 
matching its declared desire for 
peace with deeds. 


Nowhere in the world, said 
Wilson, is the struggle between 
communism and the free world 
abating. 


‘Youth Fed With Hatred’ 


“The Communists,” Wilson 
said, “are still continuing their 


campaign in Malaya and Indo-. 
astern Berlin, the) 


China. In 
German youth were being fed 
with hatred of the United States 
at the same time that the Krem- 


lin was proposing a fi ¢-power | 


peace pact. 

“In eastern Europe the Com- 
munists are increasing their 
pressures against the free dis- 
semination of news and have’ 
just closed down our informa- | 
tion center in Warsaw—the last 
we had remaining in any satel- 
lite country. 

“Many other examples could 
be cited to point up the contrast 
between Moscow’s words and 
Moscow’s deeds. ... It is per- 
fectly plain that when Moscow 
takes snuff, its satellites sneeze.” 

Faced with this situation, Wil- 
son said, this country must go 
ahead full blast with its mobili- 
zation job and keep the domestic 
economy strong without permit- 
ting inflation. 


OATIS—From Page I 
House Votes 
Czech Boycott 


peaceful cooperation and friend- 

OP etc among the people of 
world.” 

It declares that Oatis got a 


sham trial and an unjust convic- 
It calls for United States ' 


tion. 
Government agencies to take all 


possible action for Oatis’ release. | 
the resolution calls 


Finally, 
for transmitting its contents to 
United Nations and Czechoslo- | 
vakian officials. 

The yote against the resolu-| 


tiion was cast by Rep. John T. | 
He said he’ 


Wood (R-Idaho). 
voted as he did because the reso- 
lution calls for taking the issue. 
up with representatives of the 
United Nations. He said ~ he| 
would not vote to recognize the 
United Nations either directly 
or indirectly ‘ ‘except to kick it ' 
out of this country.” 


Housing Bill 
Vote Is Near 


000,000 in authority for Federal 
insurance of mortgages to carry 
out an announced aim of the 
measure to encourage private in- 


dustry to build housing in criti- 
cal defense areas. The bill also 
carries authority for 75 million 
dollars for Federal housing in 
these areas if needed, and for 
100 million dollars in Federal 
funds for community facilities 
and services. The Senate fixed 
the housing figure at 50 million 
dollars and the facilities figure 
at 60 million dollars. 

On the school question, Bank- 


ing Committee Chairman Brent) 
‘Spence (D-Ky.) in charge of the) 


bill, agreed to go along with a 
strong demand for removing 
from the measure a provision 


for Federal aid to schools. 
Schoob Fund Idea Hit 


| The demand was raised by 
‘Rep. Graham A. Barden (D- 
|N. C.), Tom Steed (D-Okla.), and 
‘others on the ground that the 


of religious schools, and to pos- 
sible Federal operation of non- 
segregated schools in segregated 
areas. 

Barden, chairman of the House 
Education and Labor Committee, 


going to write legislation to pro- 
vide funds to go to church 
schools.” Spence then told the 
House he will move to take out 
of the housing bill authority for 


to Barden’s committee to write 
legislation on that subject. 
Steed said he favors amending 
laws now on the books providing 
for Federal aid to schools in 
|areas of a heavy defense impact 


vide for a future impact. 


FOR IMPROVED 


KIDNEY 
FUNCTION 


This delicious na 
ural water from Hot 
Springs. Arkansas, 
improved subnormal 
Kidney Punction in 
a ma yt of ob- 
served case Tt is 
delivered right to 
you. 


| 


Phone ME. 1062 


Write 904 
12th St. N.W. 


| MOUNTAIN 
VALLEY 
| WATER 


ing belief in the possibility of greatly strengthened the will 


to fight. 

Norway — “One of the most | 
ardent supporters of NATO ob- 
\jectives, despite its common 
frontier with the Soviet Union.” 
It has “excellent military man- 
| power and has completed forma- 
tion of certain smaller units” but 
still needs technical advice and 
material aid.” 


‘bill opened the way to. use of |f 
Federal funds for construction | 


told his colleagues “we're not || 


Federal school aid, and leave it | 


What’s the important coat for 
’|fall? See The Washington Post 
Fall Fashion Section tomorrow 
for the answers to your fashion 
questions. Phone NAtional 4200 
for Post Home Delivery. 


For added bouquet — 
a more distinctive 
flavor—insist on 
deliciously different 


'by letting the Government pro- 7 


For your next Martini 
ask for Lejon 
Vermouth by name! 


DRY OR SWEET 
A PRODUCT OF U.S.A 


ens “4 spent ay 


; eh Pe | #%, 09 030 » 

. shies! iis stilts “a _" % tery tae t 

Mas yee te. ** ' Sh eal LOWY be ‘*. 
cals! ott 4 farina a Prd AAAS 


BRANCH 
801 G St. N. W. 
Washington, 
9 to 6 Daily 
STerling 4311 


Stock—Not 


pio 40 


From Our Regular Dec., 1950, Price List 


All-Wool—9, 12 & 15-f. Widths 
TWISTS, WILTONS AND AXMINSTERS 


From the Looms of 


AUGUST SALE 


BROADLOOM 


CARPETS and RUGS 


STORE WIDE 


Your Choice from a 350,000 
ng Withheld—at . 


en 


- 


O,* 


Savings 


MOHAWK — GULISTAN — BIGELOW 
LEES — HOLMES — PHILA. CARPET CO. 


BUDGET TERMS AV AILABLE—3°. a Year 


Arlington Store 
640 N. Glebe Rd. 
Arlington, Va. 

9 to 9—Sat. 9 to 6 

“GLebe 421] 


g, 


BOTH STORES AIR CONDITIONED 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
Wednesday, August 15, 195] 


" — 1A * 7 waerrre’ ys © —- "7s — _- —* —-* : “sa ots" _ > es — 4.66 6 6 eee oe 8 » £2.68 06e58 66 ORES o .< re. & : _. 
. ad a a _ . . 7 : ¥ ._¥ . ~s ~ © xa = Ax Mae YY ¥ ¥ ¥ i>» ayy _swn + a _y* ¥ »® * _»* : . . . . » 
. - € . . ¥ : _ “x * “es * . “* - - ‘ ® <n * ~~ > ‘ . ~¥ » —s 6 o ~ ~ . 
" “ “ . os > a . a ax “a - “ . a ase > <n ee ee 
. ~* * <x * , on™ . vs . “ss es he »'> <> x =. 2 . . “— 
. . 4 “ < CO OD “— — de a el > ys — x ee ‘ ee x “see “Vasa ee es) oe” a a ee se. dx ° 
“* “caves se xy = . . . _to . «a xe * a's se ee ee Ye ow se ce ee ee ee <u xy es We wee eR YY RE ee «™ <* * 
- 


3 SPEED AUTOMATIC RADIO-PHONO- 


PLAYS 

45 RPM 

33 1/3 RPM 

78 RPM RECORDS 


New 1951 discontinued model 6812 


‘NEW REGUL 
merson 


3-SPEED-TV 
RADIO-PHONO 


A superb 3-way instrument 


_ a 


. . » a world of pleasure at 
your fingertips . . . mag- 
nificent Emerson Radio en- 
gineering with superb 3- 
speed automatic phonograph 
and crystal clear, crisp black 
tube television in a chastely 
styled mahogany veneer 
cabinet at almost half its 
original price. Immediate 
delivery at only 15% down. 


Price includes tax pias warranty. 


15% DOWN 


TAKE A FULL 


18 MONTHS 


TO PAY 


' 


“At the Circle” 


Corner 
ond Irving Street 


No phone, mail or C.O.D. 
orders will be accepted, none 
will be sold to dealers. These 


prices in effect_ Wednesday 
only! | 


( 


Wilson Blvd. 


Open "Til 9 PM. 


COMBINATION 


Features one tone arm! 
one spindle! one needle! 


You don’t have to buy an expensive console 
to enjoy 333, 45 and 78 RPM records. 
You can own this amazing new Admiral table 
set for only $49.95. It plays ‘em all... in 
all sizes (7, 10 and 12-inch) ... with only 
one tone arm, one necdle, one spindle! 
Plays up to 14 records automatically with 
the lid open or closed! Includes powerful 
AM radio complete with triple sensitive 
built-in \Ferro-Scope antenna. Simple con- 
trols . .\. superb tone. ‘On-off’’ jewel 
light. Another great George's value ...a 
wonderful bargain! 


NO MONEY DOWN | 


NEW, REGULAR *449-°° 


ZENITH 19° 


ee 


. | 


801 KING 
ST. 


Open ’Til 6 PM. 
Friday ’Til 9 PM. 


CLARENDON ‘ ALEXANDRIA | DOWNTOWN | NORTHEAST 


816 F ST. ! 
NW. i 


Open "TU 6PM. § 
Thursday Til 9 P.M, 5 


CONSOLE 


Imagine, at this low price you get all the 
famous Zenith Quality fully guaranteed, 
factory new, complete with built-in an- 
tenna and in its original factory carton af 
a savings of almost $225! Complete with 
2-in-1 ‘‘Selecto Screen” to give you rec- 
tangular-type or “Giant Circle” pictures, 
built-in provision for ultra-high frequency 
television and connection for Phone-vision 
in addition to many other Zenith exclu- 
sives. Immediate delivery for only 15% 
down. 


Price Includes Tax 
Plus Warranty . « « 


nn 


a SOUTHEAST 


629 Penna. 
AVE. S.E. 


Open *Til 9 PM. 


1111 H ST. 
N.E. 


Open "Til 9 PM. 


The Washington Post 


Registered in U. 8. Patent office 


An Independent Newspaper 


Published every day in the year by 
The Washington Post Company 


EUGENE MEYER, Chairman of the Board 
PHILIP L. GRAHAM, President and Publisher 


Managing Editor 
: .Secretary 
" Business Manager 
Advertising Director 


CHARLES C. BOYSEN. oeeees 
JOHN W. SWEETERMAN,. eeeeseepe 
DONALD M. BERNARD 


The Associated Press is entitled exclusively to use for 
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or 
not otherwise credited in this paper and local news of 
spontaneous origin published herein. Rights of repub- 
lication of ail other matter herein are also reserved. 


1515 L Street N.W., Washington 5, D. C. 
Telephone NAtional 4200 


Offices of National Advertising Representatives 
ven 60 East 42nd Street (17) 
333 North Michigan Avenue 
..1400 South Penn Square 
i 1430 Guardian Building 
ay 8 .22 Marietta Street 


g 
Philadelphia 
Detroit 
Atianta.. 


CARRIER DELIVERY 
District of Columbia and Suburbs 
Sunday Only Daily Only 
$ 40 One week...$ .10/One week. $ 
1.75;One month... .45/One month.. 
Elsewhe? e 
Sunday Only 
..$ 40 One week..$ as] 
Oe month.. 1.75 One month.. .65 


BY MAIL—PAYABLE IN 


Daily and Sunday Sunday Only 
Ome year. ..$21.00|One year... .$7.80)/One year.. $15.60 
Six months 10.50' Six months. ; 3.90 | Six months... 7.80 
Three months 5.25 Three months 1.95!Three months 3.90 
One month.. 1.75,;One month .65'One month.. 1.30 


Rates to Foreign . Countries 
will be furnished upon request 


Entered at the Postoffice, Washington, D. C., 
as second-class mail matter 


Daily and Sunday 
One week 
One month 


30 
1.30 


Daily and Sunday 
One week. 


Daily Only 
One week... § 
One month 
ADVANCE 
Daily 


30 
1.30 


Only 


Wednesday, August 15, 1951 


Spellman’s Lead 


Cardinal Spellman has sounded precisely 
the right note in regard to the 90 cadets 
who are being dismissed from West Point. 
Saying that “to err is human; to forgive is 
divjne,” the cardinal announced that any 
of the dismissed studehts may apply for 
admission to Fordham University and Man- 
hattan and Iona Colleges. The tendency of 
some to regard these young men as beyond 
the pale because they cheated in their 
examinations and the opposite tendency to 
Jook upon them as victims of injustice are 
equally out of order. The discipline admin- 
istered was essential, but it is also highly 
desirable to get the disciplined individuals 
back on the educational track with a mini- 
mum of damage to their careers. The lead 
of the three Catholic colleges may well be 
followed by others. Meanwhile those col- 
leges which tend to make education an 
adjunct to football need to be surveying 
their systems to make certain that they are 
not contributing to the delinquency of prom- 
ising young men caught in the squeeze be- 
tween athletic activities and scholastic 


demands. ° 


Name Of A Name 


No McCarthy list of allegedly dubious 
characters in the State Department is alike, 
and the current list contains some unfa- 
miliar names, doubtless picked up from 
gossip about the feview procedure that is 
now going on in the State Department. This 
game can be maintained endlessly. It’s 
simple to keep the list freshened up. All 
that Senator McCarthy has to do is to have 
a charge presented—any old charge—and, 
presto! the wheels of inquiry are put in 
motion, and McCarthy then has his name 
for the public pillory. You can get an entry 
into the McCarthy Treason Stakes as easily 
as that. Even after you are cleared, you are 
not dropped, as witness the reappearance 
on the McCarthy list of Mr. John P. Davies, 
jr., within a couple of weeks of his 
clearance. 

However, there is one name which ap- 
pears and reappears way up the McCarthy 
list with unfailing regularity. And that is 
the name of Mr. John Carter Vincent. Mr. 
Vincent was head of the Far Eastern divi- 
sion of the State Department when, in the 
current jargon, “we lost China.” Having 
done his tour of duty in the Department, 
he went to Switzerland as Minister, and 
from then on has been vilified without cease. 
Senator McCarthy, not content with having 
half-hanged him, even had his own sleuths 
harrying him at his work lest, presumably, 
he lose Switzerland. Now he is at Tangier, 
and he was hurriedly switched there as 
consul-general when the State Repartment 
heard McCarthy licking his chops over the 
prospect of Mr. Vincent coming before the 
Senate for confirmation as Ambassador to 
Costa Rica. 

The State Department don’t know their 
man if they think they can cajole Senator 
McCarthy into forgetting Mr. Vincent. 
Appeasement of this sort merely whets the 
appetite. And it has done so in the case of 
Senator McCarthy—at Mr. Vincent’s ex- 
pense. He has been subjected—presumably 
without any inquiry—to victimization, de- 
motion, and sidetracking. He is compelled 
to watch from afar his name become a by- 
word as a result of the damning reiteration 
of McCarthy and his crowd and the tacit 
support of the State Department. He ap- 
pears to the public as having been shelved 
out of harm’s way. Surely he is entitled to 
better treatment from his superiors. To be 
sure, hearings don’t seem to mean anything 
in the light of the McCarthy technique, and 
for that reason more than a hearing is 
necessary in all fairness to Mr. Vincent. 
Clearly the public, too, is entitled to-get 
from the State Department some notion of 
the record of Mr. Vincent. 

As to this, Mr. Vincent in his message 
from Tangier, in reply to the latest attack 
from McCarthy, says he is proud of his 
27-year-old record. Mr. Vincent is not with- 
out colleagues who share his pride—as Mr. 
Kennan publicly shared the pride of the 
persecuted Mr. John S. Service in his record. 
Surely, then, it is his due as well as the 
due of the public that what he did should 
be made available. Why has it been with- 
held so long? Has it got something to do 


with Yalta? It is whispered around that . 


Mr. Vincent, so far from having anything 
tp do with the Yalta “deals,” knew nothing 


é A 


about those deals for three months after 
the parley, and then wrote a critical memo- 
randum on them. It would be embarrassing, 
no doubt, to the defenders of Yalta, includ- 
ing Secretary Acheson, to print this memo- 
randum, but there are decencies involved 
which rise superior to considerations of 
“face.” : 


Japan And Russia 


What will the Japanese think of the Soviet 
decision to come to the peace conference at 
San Francisco? Clearly they must be of 
two minds. As soon as possible they want 
to recover a status of peace with every one 
of the 49 countries with which they are still 
in a technical state of war, including Soviet 
Russia. But, if the Moscow decision means 
a delay in arriving at pd@e with any of its 


former enemies, then the Japanese are. 


bound to be troubled. “Japan,” said Premier 
Yoshida, in a recent article in Foreign 
Affairs, “prefers a peace treaty with as many 
nations as possible to no peace at all.” And 
the Japanese have reason to believe that 
the Soviet Union will be so obstructionist 
that they are in a danger of getting no 
regularization of their status from any 
country. It is for this reason that we must 
determine in advance to restore normal re- 
lations with Japan with as many nations 
as will agree. 

The draft treaty owes its composition to 
virtually all nations with the exception of 
Soviet Russia. All were canvassed in the 
extensive and on-the-spot diplomatic nego- 
tiation conducted by Mr. Dulles. Russia 
objected to this multilateral procedure, 
demanding that the instrument be worked 
out by the Big Four of the Far East, who 
in the Soviet interpretation are composed of 
the Soviet Union, Communist China, the 
United States, and Britain. So she has con- 
tributed nothing to the provisions of the 
draft treaty. Indeed, as we said yesterday, 
most of the clauses are in direct conflict 
with the observations which she has made 
from time to time while she has been argu- 
ing over procedure. It is to these observa- 
tions that the Japanese will now turn for 
some guidance as to Soviet action at San 
Francisco. 

Upon only one point, with the possible 
exception of reparations, are the United 
States and the Soviet Union in apparent 
correspondence in regard to the future of 
Japan. That point is trade. Both Russia and 
America want to see maximum freedom for 
Japan in respect of her commercial policy. 
Foreign trade is vital to the Japanese from 
the standpoint of survival. Under General 
MacArthur’s ministrations, which have pro- 
duced a Western death rate and left an 
Oriental birth rate, Japan’s war losses have 
been more {han made up, and she is adding 
to her population at the rate of a million a 
year. Japan is, however, a poor country. She 
must therefore support her population on 
the proceeds of her foreign trade, especially 
with the countries of Asia. Here there is 
the basis of a complementary exchange to 
the benefit of all parties to these trans- 
actions. Here is the only means which 
would enable Japan and southeastern Asia 
to dispense with the subsidization to which 
we are rapidly getting the Asian nations 
accustomed at the expense of the American 
taxpayer. 

However, the Muscovite profession in this 
matter has nothing to do with an anxiety 
to provide markets for the Japanese in Asia 
and to encourage what the Japanese used 
to call “coprosperity.” Not in the slightest. 
Russia’s position is dictated by the desire 
to see Japan and Communist China in trad- 
ing relations, and this, in spite of our de- 
Sire to enable Japan to trade freely, is just 
what we don’t want. It is taken for granted 
by our Government that the Japanese would 
boycott Communist China when they get 
their freedom. The hope is tenable only on 
the basis of the continuance of the American 
subsidy of Japan. Thus, it is only on the 
surface that one can find a community of 
view between Washington and Moscow on 
commercial policy for Japan. 

The situation in this respect might change 
if the meeting in San Francisco coincides 
with a cease-fire in Korea. Our only 
policy in this respect ought to be to 
resist any use of San Franciseo for dis- 
cussion of the China problem. San Francisco 
is not the place for it. The venue must be 
the United Nations, but we must face the 
fact that the Japanese may be expected, 
inséfar as they will have any voice in the 
matter, to throw their influence on the side 
of a Far Eastern settlement on the basis 
of realities, not hopes. They like Ameri- 
can money, but they fike their own inde- 
pendence more, and, unlike the United 
States, they can live independently only by 
the recognition of the realities of interna- 
tional life. 


Arms Standardization 


It is disturbing to realize that despite all 
the efforts to produce a truly joint defense 
of the North Atlantic area, the United States 
and Britain have not been able to get to- 
gether on a standard infantry rifle. The 
United States has stuck to its Model M-1. or 
Garand semiautomatic rifle, although par- 
tial tests indicate that the new fast-firing 
British rifle is superior to the Garand in 
several important respects. 

For example, the stockless British rifle 
is reported to be substantially lighter than 
the Garand—and any soldier who has lugged 
an M-1 around knows what this means. It 
is of slightly smaller caliber than the Gar- 
and—.280 as opposed to .30—and has some- 
what less penetrating power. However, it 
is considerably faster-operating than the 
Garand and is acknowledged to be sitperior 
in effective fire power. All of this .makes 
a good case, in theory at least, for exhaus- 
tive consideration of the British rifle as a 
Standard for the North Atlantic Treaty 
nations. 

The trouble is that the British themselves 
admit that it would probably take 18 months 
to get the new weapon in quantity produc- 
tion, and the same time-lag would apply to 


production in this country. Moreover, the 
new rifle has not undergone combat tests 
to discover possible flaws. Meanwhile, the 
United States has an immense capital in- 
vestment in the Garand, which: incidentally, 
has now been accepted by Canada as stand- 
ard. Since time is one of the controlling 
factors in Western rearmament, practical 
considerations may dictate that it is better 
to go ahead with the Garand, which many 


“Now 


NATO countries seem to favor, anyway. 
But while this is am argument for d 


ring action on the British nifle, thereAs no 
argument for looking down\our néses at 
British technology. Arms stahderdization 
has proceeded fairly well in several hundred 


_items, but there is no one stickier than the 


ordnance expert when it comes to changing 
an item that has once been placed in pro- 
duction. Once before, the United States 


declined to accept a superior British rifle; 


during the First World War this country 
equipped its expeditionary troops with the 
Model 1903 Springfield. The Springfield did 
not stand up under trench conditions, how- 
ever, and large numbers of Americans in 
France finally had to be outfitted with the 
British Lee-Enfield. The British have pio- 
neered in many important military develop- 
ments, as, to mention recent illustrations, 
radar, jet engines, and penicillin. 

In arms standardization it is important 
to select items of demonstrated worth which 
can be produced quickly and in mass. But 
it is also important -not to become so 
wrapped up in current production that we 
are not receptive to new ideas. 


By The Numbers 


Enough leads have come out about the 
numbers racket on the fringes of the Dis- 
trict to point to a very smelly situation in- 
deed. We have a good deal of sympathy with 
the complaint that the Senate Crime Investi- 
gating Committee did not dig deeply enough 
in its one-day hearing on: crime in Prince 


Georges County, Md. Disclosures during and _ 
since the hearing indicate extensive inter- 


state numbers operations. They also lend 
some merit to the protest of the new Re- 
publican sheriff and State’s attorney of 
Prince Georges County that the investiga- 
tors have not given sufficient attention to 
past responsibility for crime in Prince 
Georges. Nor, for that matter, has there 
been any real exploration of the ample trail 
leading to Calvert County. 

How Mr. Charles E. Nelson of Ritchie, 
Md., was, by his own admission, able to 
pryamid an “investment” in numbers opera- 
tions of $5000-$15,000 to $255,000 in four 
years without some kind of police inter- 
ference is extremely hard to understand, In- 
deed, the many charges of police tipoffs to 
gamblers in advance of raids, and of payoffs 
to police, are enough to warrant the most 
searching investigation. Mr. Nelson’s con- 
nections with Robert L. Nowland and Asso- 
ciates of Alexandria, Va., whom he named 
as the numbers operator, needs to be probed 
a great deal more fully. The same holds for 
Mr. Nelson’s connections with Mr. Blight 
Lee of Arlington. Any relationship to the 
numbers racket of Mr. Nelson’s “business” 
establishments—the P & N Amusement Co, 
of Capitol Heights, Md., and Uncle Billie's 
at North Beach, Md., in Calvert County— 
also needs to be developed. 

Because of the many links with Virginia 
and the District; the Senate committee 
would have ample reason to complete what 
so far has been a hit-and-run performance. 
The committee deadline of September 1, 
however, makes such a return unlikely. In 
any event, the Senate committee cduld only 
do what Maryland and Virginia State and 
local authorities should have been doing all 
along. 

The Prince Georges County Commis- 
sioners have made a start, and their inquiry 
ought to be paralleled by local action on the 
Virginia side. More encouraging is the de- 
cision of the special crime investigating 
committee of the Maryland Executive Coun- 
cil to hold a hearing in Annapolis on August 
24 on crime in Prince Georges and four 
other southern Maryland counties—though 
we hope that the committee will not be 
content with merely listening to law enforce- 
ment officers but, instead, will proceed with 
a comprehensive investigation. .Inevitably 
the gambling interests have got their foot in 
the door by virtue of the fact that slot ma- 
chines are legal in four Maryland counties 
—Calvert, Charles, St. Marys and Anne 
Arundel. But the numbers racket, which in 
many ways is the most insidious and seduc- 
tive part of organized gambling, is not legal 
anywhere. 


pe 
4 


Russian Referees 


It is an interesting commentary on the 
self-confidence of the Russians that their 
soccer team visiting the Communist World 
Youth Festival in East Berlin brought its 
own referee with it. What could be more 
natural, in such circumstances, than for the 
valiant Moscow Dynamos to triumph over 
the satellite East Germans? It always helps 
to have the referee on your side, and one 
somewhat unrestrained East German news- 
paper observed that the Moscow referee 
went to work “like one of the Dynamo 
family.” The only thing the visitors forgot, 
apparently, was the black-is-white propa- 


‘ganda line designed to make defeat for the 


East Germans seem like victory. The result 


was that the Dynamos—and the referee— 


were roundly booed. 

' There seem to us to be two heartening 
conclusions to be drawn from this episode. 
The first is that the moralizing dutifully 
undertaken by a Communist newspaper— 
that the East Berliners were beastly to the 
Russians and had not lived down their “evil 
old nationalistic arrogance’—shows some 
thing less than a full understanding of 
human nature. The second is that the East 
Germans should not be sold short. There 
is a lot of hope for any people that has the 
courage to boo the referee when the plays 
are stacked. : 


PEK BLocK 
CI9N TRE VIACHIMGTIOD POST co. 


To Cut Down On Those Damn Democracies’ 


FOREIGN RELATIONS 
COMMITTEE 


\Letters To The Editor 


License Runaround 


In June, after working in 
Washington for ope and a half 
years, I returned }to Montana, 
my legal residence, where I pur- 
chased a new car price—$1600. 
The dealer, a _ well-informed 
friend, told me that as I was 
coming directly to Charlotte— 
where I now reside—I-could de- 
lay purchase of license until I 
arrived here. _ The bill of sale 
and other papers; he said, would 
suffice in case anyone ques- 
tioned the absence of tags. 

Suffice they did for State 
troopers in Illinois and Virginia, 
and a policeman in Tennessee. 
Immediately on arrival in Char- 
lotte last month, on a Saturday 
afternoon, .I called the court- 
house, planning to get tags then, 
but the traffic department was 
closed for the week end. 

Sunday I went to Washington 
to pick up personal effects. A 
Metropolitan cop stopped me 
and, after I told him my by-now- 
familiar story and showed him 
my papers, he suggested I call 
the Vehicle and Traffic Depart- 
ment, which I did. I talked at 
length with three different par- 
ties there, and they concurred 
that I was outside their jurisdic- 
tion. They could not, they said, 
give me tags or even a permit, 
4s I was not a resident of the 
District. 

Tuesday afternoon, July 10, I 
went to a parking meter where 
I had left my car and found it 
gone. The police had towed it 
away. At the District Building, 
to make a long story short, I re- 
ceived tags all right—to the tune 
of $61.13. My choice was to pay 
the $61.13 or leave the car im- 
pounded indefinitely. 

Breakdown on my receipt is as 
follows: Excise tax—$32; Title 
Fee—$1; Registration Fee—$5; 
Inspection Fee—$1 (there was no 
inspection, incidentally);. Per- 
sonal Tax—$22.13. 

So—after being informed by 
the Traffic Department that they 
could not sell me a license, they 
do license my car, and charge 
$54.13 as excise tax and per- 
sonal tax. 

I don’t know what excise tax 
I paid. I paid all Federal excise 
taxes when I purchased the car 
in Montana. I don’t know what 
personal property tax I was 
charged. I will have to list my 
car for taxation in Charlotte, and 
will pay personal property taxes 
here. Moreover, in entire cost 
for a North Carolina license— 
had I been permitted to return 
—would have been $10, consid- 
erably less than the $61.13 they 
soaked me. 

VICTOR REINEMER. 

Charlotte, N. C. 


McCarthy’s Tactics 


{1 wonder if Senator McCarthy 
has ever considered how much 
his recent actions have resem- 
bled those of the Communist re- 
gime which he so vigorously op- 
poses. 

In his statements concerning 
the Maryland senatorial race. 
the Senator has takcn the stand 
that théte was no wrong in using 
deceitful methods to aid Senator 
Butler’s election because the re- 
sults were of the nature Senator 
McCarthy believed to be desira- 
ble- The Communist government 
of Russia has believed it proper 
to liquidate forcibly families or 
even segments of society which 
were in opposition to their pro- 
gram on the grounds that the re- 
sulting “harmonious” society 
would justify these actions. 
Mest, if not all, Americans op- 


pose this philosophy which fa-” 


vors the use of foul means to an 
end which one individual or 
group of individuals has decided 
to be the desired one. 

It is my belief that our coun- 
try now faces far greater danger 
from such lack of integrity on 
the part of its leaders than it 
has ever faced from internal 
communism. Americans have a 
sufficiently clear picture Of the 
Communist threat to be ready to 
meet any serious advance with 
the required force. On the other 


ty 


Communications must. be ad- 
dressed to the editor and must 
carry the. complete name and 
street address of the writer, 
though pen names will be per- 
mitted at the editor’s discre- 
tion. Letters of less than 200 
words will be given preference, 
and all letters are subject to 
condensation. No communica- 
tions can be returned, 


hand if the moral fiber of a peo- 
ple decays, the best form of gov- 
ernment ever devised will no 
longer hold them together as a 
great nation. 
GEORGE R. TILTON. 
Takoma Park, Md. 


West Point Scandal 


The tragic scandal at West 
Point exemplifies two traditional 
American characteristics — hys- 
teria and hypocrisy. 

Having established a system of 
staggered examinations which in- 
vites cribbing, and having ignored 
cribbing for years, the Brass sud- 
denly erupts in an outburst of 
moral indignation against cribbing 
and blights the careers of 90 se- 
lected American youths, who are 
not really immoral. . 

As for the hypocrisy—the acad- 
emy professes to be an institution 
of mental training in the twelfth 
century tradition, whereas in real- 


ity the undergraduate body, the 
alumni, and the faculty all attach 


prowess. 


District Home Rule 


It is quite reasonable that 
Congress should have final con- 
trol over the scene in which it 
functions. Also it is certainly 
reasonable that residents of the 
District of Columbia _ should 
have at least as much democracy 
as any other part of the Nation. 
That these two reasonable con- 


ditions should exist concurrent- 
ly is incongruous only to tight 
minds, unable or unwilling to 
recognize alternatives. 

There could be set up a Dis- 
trict-State of Columbia with a 
full complement of State execu- 
tive officers, two Senators, three 
or four Congressmen (as the 
population warrants), a District 
assembly with power to initiate 
all District legislation, the same 
to be subject to final approval 
by Congress as the Constitution 
requires. The District judiciary 
could remain as it is, until 
altered by proper legislative ac- 
tion. 

Congressional control of the 
District would be unaltered. All 
the local trivia would be re- 
moved from Congress at a time 
when its full attention is re- 
quired for national and world 
affairs. The District, which is 
larger than 12 present States of 
the Union, would have represen- 
tation in both houses of the Con- 
gress which would pass upon 
all measures approved by the 
assembly. Where the _ incon- 
gruity lies is hard to see. 


this concurrent cooperation of 


paramount importance to a the greatest advantage of 


Why not frankly recognize /th- 
letic proficiency ras,.entitling the 
student to credits whic essen 
the insupportable strain of keep- 
ing pace with the bookworms? The 
Nation would safer with an 
army officered by athletes than by 
school men. 

Moreover, what is the real value 
of an honor system that depends 
for its success upon informers? 

JOHN R. WALKER. 

Washington. 


the District-State assembly and 
of Congress in legislative con- 
trol of the District-State of Co- 
lumbia, is that this setup would 
provide a splendid opportunity 
for experimental extensions of 
democracy under the immediate 
supervision of Congress. I be- 
lieve that the result would be a 
higher order of democracy here 
than elsewhere in the Nation. 
DAVID DARRIN. 
Washington. 


Cadet Speaks 


1 am one of the 2400 cadets at 
West Point and, the motive for 
writing this is to be found in the 
multitude of newspapers that 
spread thrgughout this great 
country of ours and reach the 
eyes of all our people. 

It seems to be somewhat mis- 
understood what has happened 
at West Point and. some of the 
statements of our distinguished 
Senators have really caused me 
worry; éspecially those who 
suggest “the abolishment of 
West Paint.” It seems to me that 
these men wish to extinguish 
one of the greatest lights that 
burns for democracy and free- 
dom, and has lighted the way for 
us in times of peril, by the pro- 
duction of some of our fine 
‘and greatest military ees 
for many decades. 

We at West Point feethat 
the honor system is ond of the 
bulwarks that has suppo ed and 


have graduated from the 

my. It has not produced 

good men, but the be 

all know this system and have 
lived by it. We have had com- 
plete faith in our fellows and 
never once doubted them or 
their actions. It certainly was a 
blow to us all, but we do not feel 
prejudiced in any way. We know 
and like these men. They are 
fine fellows, but, and I emphasize, 
they violated what we all upheld 
and so they must pay as others 
have. (Here I wish to pose a 
question: Why don’t people 
judge West Point by the 2300 
men remaining instead of the 
90 who have erred?) 

They should not be entitled to 
violate this code and receive 
some sort of punishment differ- 
ent than those who have been 
dismissed in the past. It seems 
that if these men had been firm 
in their respect for West Point 
and its ideals and had really 
wanted to be the kind of mah 


A 


that graduate, they would not 
have committed themselves to 
what they did. 

I imagine that it is somewhat 
hard for you to understand why 
we feel the way we do, but I 
ask you to look at our shield 
and emblem where you see 
DUTY, HONOR, AND COUN- 
TRY. These are not words only, 
but they really mean what they 
say, and what they stand for is 
what we stand for. There is no 
“glory” mentioned there and 
men do not and should not come 
to West Point for glory in any 
one form or another. 

I feel that the thousands of 
men that have graduated feel 
the same as I do. I, myself am 
only an average cadet, with av- 
erage marks, and am from an 
average American family. There 
are hundreds like myself that go 
to school there and we work 
hard and we play hard. 

It simply boils down to the 
fact that these cadets violated 
our honor code. Cadets, other 
than these, learned of these vio- 
lations and investigated these 
men and found that they had 
done wrong. As I heard men- 
tioned by another man. “Black 
is black and white is white and 
no light gray lines can be drawn 
in between.” These men did 
wrong, and they must pay fully; 
if I did wrong I would pay the 
same penalty; and if amy man 
does wrong he also is expected 
to pay the same penalty. 

Again I say that West Point 
and her honor system is one 
of the greatest educational 
bulwarks in this world. If people 
wish us to produce as we have 
done in the past, then I feel that 
they should respect us and our 
honor system and I'm sure that 
West Point never has or never 
will fail the American people 
when called on for military 


leadership. 
A CADET OF '33 
West Point. 


A 


New Hate 


Offensive 
By Malvina Lindsay 


, 


Boomerang Hazard~ 


NEWS FROM the hate fronts 
of the world seems frightening, 
Chinese Communists by cold- 
blooded ‘techniques, said to sur- 
pass those of other totalitarian 
states, are creating a mass hate 
hysteria against the United 
States. Soviet leaders, by the 
familiar devices of Adolf Hitler, 
have whipped up frenzy of feel- 
ing against “American imperial 
ist dogs” at the World Youth 
Festival in Berlin. Soviet his- 


tory teachers are being prodded 
into building fear and contempt 
of America through fantasti 
distortions of facts. 

Thus is more hostility re 
leased in a world already seeth- 
ing with it. Yet there is another 
side to this ominous picture. 
This step-up of hate may well 
be a clue to totalitarian weak- 
ness. What’s more, there has 
never been a time when there 
was so much scientific and pop- 
ular awakening, at least in the 
Western world, to the power of 
hate’s opposing force, love. 

It is an old trick of dictators 
to direct to an outside enemy 
the dissatisfactions and aggres- 
sions of their groups. It is tradi- 
tional forethought on their part 
to see that a rival is hated for 
fear he may be envied. Food 
shortages and insanitary camp 
conditions in East Berlin for 
many of the youth delegates 
might be even more resented 
than they are, were youthful 
energy not diverted to hating 
what the comparative prosperity 
in West Berlin represents. 

But whatever all these hate 
rampages may signify, they- can- 
not frighten as they once did. 


For science has brought a better ° 


understanding of what they 
mean, of their relation to guilt, 
to fear, to inner weakness. It 
is also increasingly warning’ of 
how hate, in man or nation, car- 
ries the seeds of self-destruction. 
cw 

THIS brings up love—taboo 
word outside song and fiction. 
“The average person,” says Dr. 
Karl Menninger in Love Against 
Hate, “has a curious aversion to 
words that treat of love as a 
constructive scientific force.” It 
is considered dignified and sci- 
entific, the author points out, 
to speak of hate, but sentimental 
and weak to mention love. 
‘ Yet in this country, despite all 
the hate now running amuck, 
there is growing open and un- 
abashed talk about love—and 
not in the Tin Pan Alley sense 
either. It is most obvious in 
relation to children. On all sides 
is heard the child rearing for- 
mula of the day—give children 
more love and openly express 
that love to them. Nearly every 
survey of delinquency crime, 
and even of adult maladjust- 
ment and unhappiness, traces 


the roots of the problem back | 


to childhood lack of love. 

Medicine, in its psychosomatic 
phases at least, has gone in for 
love. It is stressing the value 
to health of expansive emotions, 
warning that disagreeable ones 
cause muscle tightness, other 
harmful bodily reactions, and lie 
back of many diseases. 

It warns that carrying even a 
grudge or a dislike can have 
disastrous bodily effects. And 
it is prodding many of its pa- 
tients into more active and 
friendly social relationships with 
their fellows. 


cows 


IN FACT there is growing 
among Americans generally a 
new recognition of the value of 
friendly human association. On 
every hand introverted and so- 
phisticated urbanites are treke 


king to small communities, join- 
ing civic groups, becoming chair- 
men of committees, members of 
boards. Babbitts are not ridi- 
culed as they once were. Too 
many of the worldly wise are 
emulating them, consciously 
seeking, as they put it, the “outs 
going feeling of being part of 
a group.’ 


These developments may seen? \ 


weak little dams against the 
tidal wave of hate sweeping the 
world. And the danger of totalie 
tarian nations fostering the nate 
ural primitive aggressive in« 
stincts in youth cannot be mini-+ 
mized. Some may even fear that 
failure to keep barbaric instincts 
functioning in Americans may 
weaken this Nation in a world 
predominantly educated in hate. 

Yet there are the inner haz- 
ards of hate, as science is show- 
ing, and of which prophets and 
poets long ago warned. “A man 
in. a passion,” said Benjamin 
Franklin, “rides a mad horse.” 
Moreover, usually fused with 
hate is irrational, crippling fear. 

Whatever w, the universal 
battle betwe hate and love 
may tend the ultimate out- 
come is not in doubt. As Dr. 
Menninger emphasizes, love is 
the expression of the life in- 
stinct, hate that of death. And 
here is a_ scientist—not ~ a 
preacher—who stoutly maintains 
that “love is the medicine for 
the sickness of the world.” 


Baseball Justice 


Why give Gil Coan such a 
hard time because of one ball 
game? How many catches has 
he made this season that have 
saved us many a run? Plenty of 
them. But just as soon as he 
makes two mistakes, costly of 
course, everybody wants to 
“blow up” about it. Why not 
soften it some and remember 
the good catches he’s made? As 
for Cass Michaels, he deserves it. 

Maybe some day Clark Grif. 
fith will break loose and get rid 
of Sherry Robertson and Cass 
Michaels and get some good ma- 
terial in their place. Bucky Har- 
ris does a swell job with what 


he has. 
“NAT”. FAN, =? 
Washington. 


4 


’ 


Atomic 


Weapons 


By Marquis Childs 


~ New Possibilities And New Strategy 


BETWEEN now and October 
1 the civilians and the soldiers 


responsible for planning Amer- 


ica’s military policy. must try 
to agree on some 

of the most far- 

reaching deci- 

sions ever taken 

at a time when 

“5 country was 

east nominal- 

ly at peace. They 

: can almost liter- 


- Survive as a free 
| people. 

The Depart- 
ment of Defense 
has assured the military com- 
mittees of Congress that by the 
October deadline a fairly pre- 
cise plan will be ready showing 
how the mounting volume of 
strength in men and materiel 
will be divided in the future as 
between: Army, Navy and Air 
Force. While. that may sound 
at first glance fairly simple, it 
is in fact the root of the matter 
and for a variety of reasons un- 
believably complicated. The 
problem and its complications 
will be considered in this and 

several following columns. 
An obvious complication is 
the inter-service row with the 
three forces competing for men 
and money, ridden in many in- 
stances by loyalties and tradi- 
tions out of the past. Another 
and almost equally important 
complication, about which only 
a very few people at the high- 
est level know anything, is the 
atomic weapon and how it is to 
be integrated into the war plan. 
That it has not been fully inte- 
grated means this most potent 
weapon and powerful resource 
in the American arsenal has not 
been given the consideration it 

deserves. 


It does not follow that any- 
one has been lax or indifferent 
so much as it indicates the 
revolutionary nature of the 
new weapon which has already 
cost seven billion dollars. This 
was illustrated forcibly last 
‘week when the final evaluation 
of the experimental atomic 
blasts set off at Las Vegas, 
Nev., in January and February 
were placed before the military. 


cos 


THE RESULTS of those high- 
ly secret tests indicate the pos- 
sibility of still another revo- 
lution in warfare. They raise 
brand new questions about the 
size of the three forces and how 
each force shall be equipped. 
So extraordinary are these 
findings that thus far the mili- 
tary men who have studied 
them find it difficult to take in 
their full significance. 

They certainly necessitate a 


revision of the long-term war, 
plan if not the emergency plan. | 
From civilians at the top there | 


Wind Storm in Caribbean 
on the Chiefs of Staff to apply | 


imagination and | 
& '14, #—The Weather Bureau an- 


'nounced a small tropical disturb- 
,ance was located today in the 
| Caribbean, 
|east-northeast of Trinidad, it was’ 
‘moving 


has been increasing pressure 


all possible 
ingenuity in utilizing the atomic 
weapon. This means, of course, 
breaking through traditional 
concepts. 

One of those directly con- 
cerned in the effort is Deputy 
Secretary of Defense Robert 
Lovett. Lovett, who has been 


acting Secretary while Gen. 
George C. Marshall has. been 
getting a rest at a vacation 
hideout, feels keenly on the 
subject. 


The chief responsibility for 
pushing rests, however, on 
Robert LeBaron, chairman of 
the Military Liaison Commit- 
tee of the Atomic Energy Com- 
mission. As originally con- 
ceived, this post was to be held 
by a military man selected by 
the Department of Defense and 
the first chairman was Lieut. 
Gen. Lewis Brereton. The De- 
fense Department decided later 
a ‘civilian would be preferable 
and Brereton was succeeded by 
William Webster, a New Eng- 
land utilities executive, from 
whom LeBaron took over. 


He was formerly head of a 
science equipment company 
and later with Standard Oil of 
California. Those familiar with 
his work, all of which goes on 
behind the screen of top 
secrecy, rate him highly for 
ability and drive. 


cw 


AT LEAST two valid reasons 
can be given why the potentiali- 
ties of the atomic weapon have 
not been planned to the fullest. 
The most obvious one is the 
fact that until fairly recently 
the stuff of which bombs are 
made was so limited that plan- 
ning was concentrated on a 
few vital targets in the Soviet 
Union, the objective being to 
try to cripple Russia’s indus- 
trial capacity. That phase is 
now over and there can and 
must be experimentation in the 
light of the ‘Las Vagas findings 
looking to the destruction of 
mass armies through atomic ex- 
plosions of a kind and on a 
scale hitherto considered im- 
possible. 


The second reason is a hesi- 
tancy on the part of some mili- 
tary men to put too much re- 
liance in a war plan on the new 
weapon. They are feaful that if 
the Russians should abruptly 
reverse their policy and agree 
to complete atomic inspection, 
as called for in- the Baruch 
Plan, the weapon might be out- 
lawéd while the Soviet would 
still have massive land armies. 
It seems, however, most un- 
likely that the United States 
would enter any agreement 
which did not include the out- 
lawry of other means of waging 
mass warfare. 


An unhappy commentary on 
the great decisions now being 
taken is that they must for the 
most part be made in secret. 
The average American can 
know so little about the words, 
the signatures on a piece of 
paper, that shape his destiny. 


rreuwid AND BEAR IT 


CC ———————— 


gentlemen! .. 


“We've talked and talked and talked about inf 


ion, 


. it’s high time we give some thought to it...” 


‘Faith Can Master Fear’ 


Help In Knowing Life 


This is the fourth of six articles 
taken from Dr. Thomas’ new 
book, Faith Can Master Fear. 


CHAPTER FOUR 

THE FEAR of facing life is 
the thief that steals more 
worthy dreams and high ideals 
than any criminal who ever 
waiked the earth. 

It frequently destroys the 
chance of a happy marriage. A 
bachelor uncle came to speak 
to a radiant young couple at 
their wedding reception. 

“So you are going to live in 
one room and both work?” I 
overheard him say. 

“Yes,” replied (the bride, 
“we'll get along somehow.” 

“Of course, you will,” contin- 
ued the uncle quickly and posi- 
tively. Then he became wistful. 
The young couple were too ab- 
sorbed in their own happiness 
to notice the change in his 
voice. 

“IT once had the chance for a 
day like this,” he told me, “but 
I was afraid to go ahead on my 
small wage and what seemed a 
poor opportunity for advance- 
ment. It was the biggest mis- 
take I ever made.” 


SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico, Aug. 


Centered 500 miles 


west-northwest with) 
|winds of 25 to 30 miles an hour. 


In Congress 
TODAY 


SENATE 

Meets at noon. 
Committees: 
fing Committee,.10 a. m., open: hearing on 
New York City gambling: Caucus Room, 


Special Crime nisimmins tt 


3a 10:30 a. m., exec.: calendar: 

SOB. Appropriations Subcommittee, 
a. m.. exec.: armed service bill: Room 
ay SOB. Conference on Agriculture Bill, 

10 a. m.. exec om F 3%. Capitol. 

Armed Services Subcommittee. 10:30 a. m., 

open; H.R. 1764, claims for damages and 


Room | i< a common cause of the fears 


Senate Office as. Banking and Cur- | 
rency. 10:30 a. m., open; to hear W. 8t tu. | 
art Symington ort to A committee on | 
RFC activities: SOB. District | 


for salvage and poweee! Room 212, SOB. 
OUSE 
Meets at 11 a. 
Committees: 


» Ore a. 
75. flight training in D. *C 
. ©. Room, Capitol. Joint | 


the Economic Report, 12:30) able agricult 
.; economic outlook; Vanden- | Bldg : ure commodities; 


‘Room. Capitol. Finance. 
; tax bill; Room 312, 


10 a 
SOB. Agricul. 


| Judiciary, 
/committee on H.R. 4514 provides for a 


@ DESIGNERS 
© MANUFACTURERS | 
@ IMPORTERS J 


DISTINCTIVE 
JEWELRY 


©1105 CONNECTICUT AVE. 
© PHONE NATIONAL 666) 
Registered Jewelers American Gem Society 


‘ans’ Affairs, 
| increases payment of pension for dis- 
een or death not the result of service, 
} an 


‘eligible for pensions. 


| Burton 
/small business under the controlled ma- 4 


| their testimony; 1301 New Bide. 


= 
Agriculture, 10 a.m.. 
| full committee on H.R 
(the improvement and development 


exec.: | 
. 39 to encourage | 
of | 


marketing facilities for handling perish- | 


Atmed Services, 10 a. m., open; 
Brooks subcommittee on H.R. 4660 re- 
lating to the reserve components of the 
armed forces; 313-A Old Bide. 

Services, 10 a. m., open: Kilday : 

mittee on survivors’ benefits; 304 Old 
Bidg. Interior and Insular Affairs, 10 
a. m. open: Bentsen subcommittee on 
| Bublic lands on various bills; 1324 New 
Bide. Interstate and Foreign Commerce, 
kr a. Mm., exec. .R. 3669 amending the 
| railroad retirement act; 1334 New Bidg. 
10 a. m., exec.; Bryson sub- 


jury commission for each United States 
district court. to regulate its compensa- 
tion and to prescribe its duties: 345-A 
Old Bidg. Merchant Marine and Fish- 
eries, 10 a. m., open: Hart subcommittee 
on H.R, 4480, permits return to former 


Owners, when they are no longer needed 


by the United States, of certain special- 


| Purpose vessels purchased or requisitioned 
by the United wnaeens — Os 
| lie Works, 


committee on pabiie > hadidiaes and grounds 
on pending bills; New Bidg. Veter- 
10 a. m., exec.: H.R. 3193. 


. 3549. provides that certain un- 
remarried widow of veeernne shall be 
(Note: 
were passed and vetoed by the President 
on August 6, 1951); 356 Old Bldg. ee 
Small Business Committee, 10 a. m.., ~ 
subcommittee on problems 
terials plan officials will continue | 
Ways | 
and Means, open; H.R. 1535, 
customs ~~ AL act of 1951; Com- 
mittee Room. New Bidg. Rules. 2 p. m. 


‘open; 8.J. Res. 42, oil compact resolution: 
| Committee Room, gallery floor, 


Capitol. 


ne Sabibury Harnahuag Bradford.» Now York Philadelphia “~~; 


(on 


Atlagtic City 
Asbury Park 
Ocean City 
siltelwzelere 
Cape May 
eaalelolelag 


AIRWAYS 


Phone STerling 4500 y 


Wilkes-Barre tHe TOWN AND COUNTRY ROUTE. VTE Con bol 


ome a ee ee 


a 


S11 15th St. N.W, 


Mortgage Representative-Travelers Insurance Co. 
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT—SALES—LOANS—INSURANCE 


Office Building Management 


| We would welcome the opportunity of bringing to 
you the same sure, competent service which we 


are rendering many Washington property owners. 


H. G. Smithy Company 


1310 New 


Both bills | 


i 


ST. 3300 


ces 


A PHYSICIAN stepped into 
a hospital corridor with me 
after we had stood together at 
the bedside of a business ex- 
ecutive. 

“That-man would not be here 


if his secretary had destroyed’ 


the morning paper every. day 
before he had a chance to see 
it. He is one of the thousands 
of casualties in this post-war 
world.” 

This man of affairs is bril- 
liant, intelligent, admired by a 
host of friends, but his fear of 
facing the world, and the criti- 
cal international situation, had 
poured poison into his body. 

Continued emotional pressure 


which 
tional 
suffer. 

During the tense days of the 
1948 baseball season a player 
with a Boston team was sent to 
the hospital suffering from 
ulcers of the stomach. He was 
reported to be 12 pounds under 
weight.and a victim of intense 
emotional strain. Day after day 
the load increased as the season 
progressed. Every play became 
important; every time at bat 
was a severe test. He was aware 


result. in many func- 
ills from which men 


that a single mistake might, 
not only of a. 


game, but of a season’s work. | : 
‘Sweden Grants Asylum | 


‘To 16 Polish Refugees 


may be called upon to pay who | 


mean the loss, 


His illness was an evidence of 
the price which any individual 


lives under such pressure. 
ow 
THE FEAR of facing life may 
cause not only disappointment 


By Ernest Thomas 


acknowledged his weakness, he 
was able.to dip into available 
spiritual reserves, and to go out 
confidently to meet the chal- 
lenge of adversity. 


ceo 

THE MOST satisfying power 
to heal minds which are afraid 
to face uncertainties is fourid 
in right thoughts about the 
meaning of life. git is derived 
from the ability™to see life 
whole. 

Such an understandjng is best 
found in the christian point of 
view. For those engaged in 
ordinary, every-day activities, 
who are finding the pressure 
more than they can bear, no 
other system of thought offers 
a comparable hope. 

Christianity is an affirmation 
concerning God. But it is more 
than that. It is a way of tri- 
umphant living. For the Chris- 
tian, God is not alone the Cre- 
ator who supplies the energy 
by which the sun, the moon, 
and the stars are kept in their 
courses. He supplies also the 
energy which is the source of 
all life on the earth. 

Life is not a destiny. which is 
rigid and unshakable. It isa 
series of glorious possibilities 
out of which we are privileged 
to shape our future. 

Not all individuals have been 
endowed with talents by which 
they can win high honors or 
public acclaim. Many people 
achieve their desires while ren- 
dering faithful service in lowly 
positions. The important con- 
sideration is the willingness to 
accept and carry out such obli- 
gations as are given to us. The 
fear of facing life has little 
power to disturb those who are 
consumed with a desire to 
serve others. 

Fear to face life hampers a 
countless host of men. They 
have ideals and dreams, but 
their fears make the realiza- 
tion of the dreams impossible. 
They allow opportunities, and 
friendships, and faith to. slip 
away because they are afraid. 
The answer to such fears is 
within the reach of all those 
who desire it. 

Face up to your fears; dis- 
cover the possibilities which 
God has entrusted to you; and 
then make use of His power to 


live victorsously. 

(Copyright. 1950. by Flemine H. Revell 

Co. Distributed by United Feature 
Syndicate. Inc 


Thursday: Fear of ‘the Unex- 
pected. 


and failure, but, accompanying | 
‘in a makeshift plane on Au-! 


them, such physical symptoms 
as ulcers, colitis, high blood 
pressure, and even heart ail- 
ments. The price is too great. 
This conclusion is inevitable 
when we realize that fear is a 
parasite which can be con- 
quered. 

Studies have recently been 


| completed which indicate that 
| many industrial, household and 


traffic accidents are caused by 
the unconscious desire to es- 
cape from a situation regarded 
as dangerous or unpleasant. 
Fear of facing life forces the 


/ mind to seek methods to avoid 


that which is a hazard to self or 
to society. 


By Joseph and 
Stewart Alsop 


THE KEY fact that explains 
the strange doings at Kaesong 
is not the headlines. What is 
going on in Korea is the first 
real, face to face showdown— 
the first face to face test of in- 
tentions and will—that has 
occurred in the cold war. As 
these words are written, no one 
can possibly foresee the out- 
come. But it is at least pos- 
sible to examine the issues, and 
to explain why this is a show 
down, whereas the Berlin crisis 


THE WASHINGTON 


POST 
Wednesday, August 15, 1951 


tl 


a 


——*; Matter Of F act 


————_ 


Miss Bentley gars She Heard Reds Ran IPR 


INSTITUTE—From Pg. I 


' 


committee members said in- 
volves 


“friendly country.” 


Morris said the testimony. will 


a high official of a 


Story To Be Checked 
Subcommittee Counsel Robert 


be checked through “diplomatic 
channels” before it is released. 
‘ At the open hearing, Miss 
Bentley repeated her charges 


that many Government em- | 
ployes supplied information to | 
‘the Communist underground! 


and the original Korean crisis | qyring World War II. 


last year were not showdowns. 

The issue which has turned 
the Kaesong meetings into a 
showdown. between the free 
world and the Soviet empire is 


the issue of the cease-fire line. 


Its importance cannot be under- 


_ stood, except against the back- 
| ground of its history. 


In brief, late in April or early 


_in May, the National Security 
Council reviewed the situation | 


| 
| 
| 
| 
| 
| 


STOCKHOLM, Aug. 14 (#.—| 
Sweden granted political asylum! the cease-fire line will thus be | 


‘today to four young Poles who! the permanent line of demar- 
_eation in Korea, the Kremlin is 


fled their Communist homeland | 
gust 3. 


gave political refuge to 12 Polish 


‘Navy mutineers who overpow- 


ered their officers and brought | Soviet empire—an acknowl- 
their minesweeper to the Swed-| edgement of defeat, 


ish port of Ystad_on August 2. 


'_down for three reasons. 


in Korea and formally decided 
that this country would accept 
an armistice if the enemy had 

been driven from South Korea. 


Among them, she charged 
anew, were onetime White 
House’ aide Lauchlin Currie; 
Michael Greenberg, an assistant 
in his office; the late Harry 


‘Dexter White, Assistant Secre- 


| 


' 


| 


This Security Council decision | 


led, in turn, to Secretary of | 
State Dean G. Acheson’s testi- 
mony at the MacArthur hear- | 
ings, that the “military objec- | 
tive of the United Nations” | 
would be attained if “we 
stopped them at the thirty- | 
eighth parallel ...andé “re- 
stored peace and security in 
South Korea.” On the basis of 
Acheson’s remarks, the Kremlin 
then instructed Jacob Malik to 
propose a cease-fire on the basis 
of “mutual withdrawal from the 
thirty-eighth parallel;”’ and so 
the armistice negotiations be- 
gan. 


cw 


THE IMPORTANT point to 


note in the foregoing is that the 
Kremlin was given good reason 
to believe, and almost certainly 
did actually believe, that we 
would be satisfied with a 
straight return to the Korean 
status quo ante. Between Ache- 
son’s testimony to the Senators 
and the opening of negotiations 
at Kaesong, however, the posi- 
tion in Korea had altered radi- 
cally. Gen. Matthew B. Ridgway 
had captured the Iron Triangle, 
placing U. N. forces at some 
points as much as 30 miles north 
of the thirty-eighth parallel. The 
question therefore arose at 
once, whether to be guided in 
the Kaesong negotiations by the 
letter of Achéson’s Senate testi- 
mony, or by the realities of the 
military picture. 

The question was put to 
Washington by General Ridg- 
way, initiating prolonged, anx- 
ious and exhaustive discussions, 
both between the State and 
Defense departments, and be- 
tween the American and Brit- | 


| 


tary of the Treasury under 
Henry Morganthau, and Duncan 
Lee, a wartime lieutenant 
colonel in the office and aide to 
‘Maj. Gen. William J. Donovan. 
White denied the charges at 


the time, as did Lee, and also. 


Currie, who is now an economic 


i 


adviser to the government of | 


Columbia. Greenberg 
‘said to be in England. 


Thomas Corcoran, another for- 


‘mer White House aide, now en-: 
gaged in law practice here with) 
Lee, told reporters he and Lee) 


lare counsel for Gen. Claire L. 


| 


Chennault who has operated air- 
lines in the Far East and who is 


‘an intimate of Chinese Nation- 


alist leader Chiang Kai-shek. 

Greenberg, for a time, was 
managing editor of the IPR pub- 
lication, “Pacific Affairs,” and 
both Currie and White corre- 
sponded frequently with IPR of- 
ficials. 


Says Reds Put Lee in OSS 


Miss Bentley said it was the 
Communists who succeeded in 
getting Lee moved into OSS, 
after he had been active in what 
she said was the Communist unit 
in IPR. 

Because of the warning given 
by Golos—whom she said she 
“succeeded” when he died in 
1943—-Miss Bentley said she had 
no direct relations with IPR. 

She said she did not know 


Owen Lattimore, a trustee of 


ish governments, The argu- | 


ments for sticking to the letter 
of Acheson’s testimony were ob- 
vious enough. The arguments | 
for the other course’ were, 
broadly, two in number. 
First, a cease-fire in theory 
ought to occur without changes | 
of troop positions, with ulti- 
mate territorial settlements be- 


ing left to subsequent political - 


negotiation. Second, letting the 
Kremlin launch a bloody, costly 
war, and then agreeing to res- 
toration of the status quo ante at 


The President’s 
Calling List 


is NOW | Testifies again on Capitol Hill. 


President Truman had the fol- 
lowing scheduled appointments 


at the White House yesterday: 
10 a. 


m.— President attends 


Stephen T. Early funeral serv- 


ice. 


11—Rep. Franklin D. Roose- 


velt, jr. (D-N. Y.). 


11:15—Secretary of Commerce 


Charles Sawyer. 
11:30—John Reilly, 


Washing- 


‘ton banker, with Capt. B. W. 


| 
i 
i 
} 
i 


the Kremlin’s pleasure, is an | 
obvious ginvitation to another | 


Kremlin aggression on the 
same pattern. 


In the State-Defense and An- | 


glo-American talks, these two 
arguments were found to be 


convincing. Hence General | 


Ridgway was instructed, with 
concurrence from London, 
insist on a cease-fire on the 


‘Hogan and others. 


11:45—Sen. Hubert H. Hum-! 


phrey (D-Minn.). 


12— Delegation from World 


Assembly of Youth. 


12:30 p. m.—Deputy Defense 
‘Secretary Robert A. Lovett. 


1—Lunch. 


| Miss Bentley also gave a new 
: ‘piece of testimony on Alger 
‘Hiss, former State Department 
‘official convicted of perjury for- 
‘denying he gave documents to 
‘spyring courier Whittaker 
Chambers. 
| She said she was once told 
‘that Harold Glasser, a former 
| Treasury employe whom she has- 
‘named as a source of informa: 
tion for the Communist ring, 
‘was once “turned over” to Hiss 
to work with him. 
Golos, told her, she had, to 
“Lay off the Hiss thing, he’s ou. 
|of ours.’ 


| Gave Orders to Browder 


_ When she became an under# 
‘ground “boss,” Miss _ Bentley 
‘Said, she was able to . give 
“orders” to Earl Browder, then- 
head of the Communist Party in 
' this country, to transfer Com- 
i'munist “agents.” 

| She said she once attended a 
/'meeting with Browder in the 
home of left-wing millionaire 
‘Frederick Vanderbilt Field, 
|when Field was not present. 

| Field, now jailed in New York 
‘on a contempt charge involving 
bail for top Communists, was in 


- 


7 


nn oe aiid 
¢ ‘ “ 
© Oe a ee 
CIP OS 


*. 4» 


WL 


oes 


* »¥ ¢ "> 

; 6. 6 eo ex 
ee ee ie ee ae 
GD Wem 
ee » 


+ 
} 


Associated Press Photo 


ELIZABETH BENTLEY 


effect a “political commissar” in 


IPR and head of the Walter 
‘Hines Page School of Interna- 
tional Relations at Johns Hop- 
kins University, and a central 
target in the subcommittee 
probe of IPR. 

Miss Bentley said, when ques- 


tioned about Lattimore by Sen. 
James O. Eastland (D-Miss.), that 


she had no way of knowing 


whether Lattimore is or is not 
a Communist. Seated beside 
Eastland was Sen. Joseph R. Mc- 
Carthy (R-Wis.), a frequent ob- 
server at the hearings and the 
chief attacker of Lattimore. 


Morgenthau Plan Cited 


In testifying about Harry 


Dexter White, who died in 1948, | 
Miss Bentley charged that Secre- 


tary Morgenthau was unwit- 
tingly “used” by White to 
further Communist ends. 

She contended that it was Rus- 
sian policy to support the so- 
called Morgenthau Plan for the 
“nastoralization’ of Germany 
after the war, and “on our in- 
structions” White “pushed hard” 
but unsuccessfully to get the 
plan adopted. 


‘which 


the Far Eastern unit of Com- 


munists for which Mildred Price” 


was organizer, Miss Bentley 
testified. 

Miss Bentley said Mildred 
Price was then executive secre- 
tary of the China Aid Council, 
she tharged was “com- 
pletely controlled” by Commu- 
nists. 

Field in the 1943-44 period 
which Miss Bentley mentioned, 
was an official of the American 
Council of IPR. 

Other persons Miss Bentley 
mentioned included: 


Gen. Megee Assigned 


. 7 
To Carolina Command 


Maj. Gen. Vernon E. Megee, 
51, yesterday became the com. 
manding general of the Marine 


‘Corps Air Station and Marine 


Corps Air Base at Cherry 
Point, N. C. 

Hitherto, General Megee, who 
has lived at 2311 Connecticut 
ave. nw., with his wife and 
daughter, was Deputy Director 


of the Joint Staff for Intel 


ligence, of Defense. 


Lewis & Thos. Saltz... 7409 CG 


-6:15—President speaks at ded-| 


ication of American 


building. 


a a ee 


will be very hard for the Krem- 
lin to make. 

None of the leaders of the 
American or British govern- 
ments believe that the Korean 


to | 
est. 


basis of the existing fighting | 


line. The’ instruction § repre- 
sents a hard decision, which 
will not be receded from in any 
important way. 

cw 


IT HAS led to a real show- 
First, 
the Kremlin knows as well as 


' the State and Defense depart- 


ments that the cease-fire and 
armistice, if they are ever 
agreed upon, will be all the 


| peace the wretched Koreans 


can hope for. Second, since 


not getting the kind of deal it | 
hoped for when Malik made his 


| radio talk. And third, and most 


The government yesterday) 


important, 
existing fighting line as the 
cease-fire line will involve an 


| actual loss of territory by the 


an open 
admission of failure, which it 


war can be prevented from 
| spreading and becoming a gen- 
eral war, if the fighting in Ko- 
rea begins again in bloody earn- 
Thus, in effect, something 


Legion | 


is happening at Kaesong that | 


has never happened before. We, 


on our side, Rave said to the 


Soviets, “If you don’t give way 


. on this point, you must accept 
_the risk of general war, which 
we have already considered.” 


'fusingly confronted and mutu- 


acceptance of the __ 


and very right fashions for fall. 
‘See the whole fashion picture 


The Soviets, on their side, must | 
either prepare to fight us, or | 
make a kind of sacrifice which, | 
small though it may seem in | 
this instance, they have never | 


yet made. 

In the circumstances, 
the two great world groupings 
thus nakedly if somewhat con- 


ally measuring their strength, 
it is odd that the crises at Kae- 
song are taken as such a mat- 
ter of course. 


The fitted coat... the feath- 
ered hat, are just two of the new 


for the coming season in The 


Washington Post Fall Fashion | 


Section tomorrow. 


with | 


—-~—- — 


To be involved in an automo- | 


| bile accident, or to be struck by 
a streetcar, or. to maim the 
hands in a machine, is a poor 
kind of escape from life, even 
if it is done unconsciously. 
How much better it 
learn to understand the fear 
which is driving us, and to culti- 
vate the means by which that 


| fear may be channeled toward 


- was not easy for him. 


constructive ends. 

In ._meeting the stern chal- 
lenge which comes from a fear 
of facing life it is first neces- 


is to. 


sary to admit that we are afraid. | 


Wo good 
hiding from the truth. 


is accomplished by 


Jeremiah stands out as one of | 
_the noblest figures in the Old | 
Testament. The role of prophet | 


When he | 


| felt the call to go before the | 


people he 


compared his | 


strength and ability to those of | 
a child. | 
, Jeremiah many times indi- | 
cated in his writings that he. 
was troubled by fears. But the | 


) 


very fact that he admitted that 


| he was afraid gave him a foun- 
i dation on which he could build 
| a life of faith. After he had 


be 


A COCKTAIL POTION OF 
BLACK RAYON CREPE DE SOIE 


» « « its sleeves an optical illusion 
(they are attached)... its stole 
the kind of black lace 
that's been doing things 

for bare shoulders since 
Marco Polo hit the sea-lanes. 


French Room, Second Floor, F Street 


elleifs 


$35. 


) 


SALE 


of Summer Slacks 


just when you need them! 


WE TIMED THIS sale to come to your rescue at 
Summer’s climax—just in time to take up the 
slack in your slack collection. 

Quality dominates—as always. And the variety 
of fabrics is fabulous. All topflight cool weaves: 
linen-weave rayons, rayon sharkskins; hairline 
rayon sharkskins, rayon tropicals, cotton gab- 
ardines, crisp cords, bengalines, irridescent 
gabardines. Most with pleats; some with Cal- 
ifornia extension waistbands. Full cut, smartly 
draped, nicely tailored. All the colors now 
fashionable. Sizes: 28 to 46. Your favorite 
slacks are here! 


were $10.95 & $11.75 


7.95 


First Floor, Sportswear .. New Building 


NOTE: There Is @ great Sale fow going on thrucu? 
our entire store. Furnishings Goods, Hats, Shoes, Men's 
Summer & Fall Clothing, Sportswear ond Women's Weer. 
Anticipate your needs for now ond for the future of 


CGD 
LEWIS & TH°S. SALTZ- 


1409 G Street, N. W. EXecutive 4343 


Not connected with Saltz Bres., Ine. 


; } 


HE WASHINGTON POST ° ; - . 
Mratein, to's 5 "'|Quotations on New York Stock Exchange|Stocks Close N. Y. Curb Quotation 
a Total sales, 1,180,000 shares; |[“E” BOND SALES LAG|"" me oro a Gai o.- 431 23%) 31%) 22 JM On Minus Side Total” sales, 210,000" shares; | zasamae— ae eee 


7 ; | previous day,'1,320,000; week ago, : . mp-. 4 28%! year ago, 262,880. Holl C Gold., 4/ 13 | 12%! 13 i...-. 
P eo les Dr u 1,813,180; month ago, 1,281,950; Drop behind redemptions In Slow Trade Humble Oil ,. 13/125%/125 1125 2 

1.330.920: t for 15th straight month. Imp Oil ..se0s 7] 34%! 34%] 34% [2.05 

6 ass, 834,920; January i to ‘aan | NEW YORK, A A Ad 00) Bigham | Close ches Kaiser Prats. 16 el Gale 

Taxes Up 6 %G 290,643,600; 1950 to date, 315,. NE » Aug. 14 (M.—lABC Vend ... 7 7%) 7 +1 TH. co re vee 


| : 590,161; 1949 to date, 143,859,149. 
But Net Gains 
Dow-Jones Stocks 


There was little trading enthusi-| Aero Sup .... 19/ 3%! 3%! 3%/+ % 
By S. Oliver Goodman NEW YORK, Aug. 14 WP). 
Close Net *. 


asm today in the stock market,|Aimsworth ... 3! 12%@/ 12%! 1252 — %) 
and prices ended lower despite a| 4™ Ben Cer ga a a Pag 
last minute try at a rally. 3 7 , kein 
L u hour and gave a boost to the list, | 4:2 Ply ... 5! 23%| 2334) 3 
Despite a 66 percent increase 30 Ind. 15 263.98 261.57 262.88 —o.18 wae ag bag not enough to 37. | 3 
in Federal taxes, Peoples Drug i 45. eS 4a: - eep the whole market ahead. 
Stores, Inc., showed a gain in/ 65 Stks. 94.62 1 . 27 
. ; utilities, 22,700; total, 196,100. Univ-Pict .... 10 1, | 
months this year. 2 : "oun be! 2 Sy 2313 | sei f 
Net totaled $625,143 or $1.46 Myers & Bro., 2 ) WHAT STOCKS DID 
$564,419 or $1.32 a share in the | ABBOTT L .. 12) 60. | 60, | 60, | a Algo Nat co. | al See Se 1434 (— i 4 : 
same 1950 period. Acme Stl... 3) 313 Se ' 1944\— Y% y Ch “ «| 24% Ye | Total issues ........1093 
8} i 
] 
] 


. 


7 


ew 3 
PLitlil+++ 


O-2-IO AWD 
1+] 


gc 


oo 
acaqacaaaadca 
aaelnnenare 

+fTi te tt: 


8 
AS ASSES Fr 


~ 


DR O@ 


FHSEL TF 


onarch Mch. 


O46 6 44444444444 
oo 
— 
~ 


me 


oe 
PH OIPPDBOAH HHO 


~ 
Wwe! 


3 


~ oe 


: | +++++ 
w 


ne 
+E i+i+l+l+ 


ee 


Saunt Saue 
SFE SEF EES 


a 


ee 


hoe 
— 
* 
; + 
* 


w 


Steels came to life in the final | 16%) 
net income for the first six today: Industrials, 113.400; | railroads, \- “5 0 } , \ ees | tees Ts ** $3) o8 7! obs?) ons? a;| around midway of the session 
. : 
a share in the first half, against Add 00! High | Low | Close|Ch’se NASH KELV . yee 6 el otal 
. { 


rp 
OW WHO 


LEFT FLEFES SSS SE FRE FF 
ews Wwe 


mieed 1) 


eF 


Lii+T+i++l+ 


{+ 
FEESSLPELEREEE. FO BSSEEEESEESE. FETE 


Ih Ar De WO eS 


A 


— 
- 


ve* 


~* 3 
oe 


Ark N Gas 2| 15%| 
Transactions a ae Railroads started an advance 
tA 16 '%4| 16% \— ¥ Advances .... 
Gross revenues amounted to Adams Exp .. 4| 26%) 2844! 28%2|..... || Date: U.S Treasury Dept. Morris Kats 19% — * 


wore 
wo 
AN 


9 
| 3234+ Me 1 . 
$94,397,751 compared with $22,-|4f G ga’: '3| 7 o| 8 | 8 L- % Add 00| High | Low | Close|Ch’ge aan thee Al stl st i wl Y 21 | d0%| 3 and did fairly well. But the|Fairch Gem :: 
593,447 a year ago, or an in- | Aly Reduet ** £3| “oit| -o3¢| -aatl* | De Vilbiss ... 1] 16%! 18%| 18%I— Ya -. 2) 10%! 10% 4| Virg Ry : 2) 27%| 278| 27% \— 14] group was given a bad appear-|Feich Baa -. 3 
crease of 8 percent. Operating . 5| 21 Siow. roe 2 | , 2 ance when Nickel Plate just be-| Ford M Fran. 18 
costs of $23,103,087 were about Glen Ald Coal. 18 


fore the close dropped 4% at! Gray 
7 percent higher. 


Mfs .... 13) 

204%. Gtlak O&cC 7 

Provision for Federal taxes ag- a yl Today the Associated Press 

gregated $694,475, a jump of 66 average was down 20 cents at 

percent over $417,179 in the first Amal 1 $96.00 with the industrial com- 
half of 1950. 


ponent off 20 cents, rails off 30 
After payment of regular divi- 


cents, and the utilities un-j 
dends for the first two quarters, changed. | 
earned surplus as of June 30 was The volume of trading fell to/| 
$9,469,451 as compared with 


the lowest level since July 19. | 
$9,273,298 at the start of the It came to 1,180,000 shares. Yes- | 
year. 


terday it amounted to 1,320,000) 
Current assets on the latest | 


17% | 27 491,27 9%) 89% shares. | Common St 
date amounted to $11,333,969) 4 */104% 108 |... Al P| 3 American Telephone closed up | om 
against current liabilities of 


1 at 159% after hitting a new/| Share 
$3,634,388 or a ratio of 3.12 to 1. Price 20 Cents per 


high for the year at 15936. It} 
, was the tenth most active issue. : : from i 
TENDERS ASKED: Capital Offering Circaler Offering 
Transit Co. yesterday set the 


28%6/.... National Power & Light, now | ; ecler own investme 
Wileox Oil .. | 192%| 19ag_ 12 |the holding company for a New}  acond aye Oe esd ees the undersig 
wheels in motion to reduce its Willys Over .. . “| York and East Coast restaurant | 7 
debt by a million dollars. Hold- 
ers of its first and refunding 


Wilson we Go.’ | $8%2| 8852! 2 | chain, lost % at 2% and was the| obinne yette ae a. co 
mortgage bonds, bearing 4 per 
cent interest and due Decem- 


Wilson & Co pf 2| 77%, 77'4| 7744\— %\|day’s most active issue with | 
Hoge : we 1 47% 4\— % | 43,000 shares traded. TELLIER 
ber 1, 1964, were asked to sub- 


st easel ant . 4. ¥. 
32%! 32%\l— M% 7 - | 26%, 7) 32 s| In the most active list it was Y | 42 zen Vor 4, 
52%| S34el+ %iWrigley ...... ai 74%|..,.. | followed by Fedders-Quigan up| : 4-4500 Tel. Digby 
: 28%4/ 2 sae ng , : 
mit tenders at 2 price not ex- ‘a | | 99% /100. f..../ w $1 $1* % at 12, Union Oil of California 
ceeding $101 for each $100 in | 72 | Satest ul stl aul & foes ga w | 35 33 5 -# % at o ay sage Oil of 
face amount. Deadline is 4 6 ‘ > 2 o up 4 , Virginia- : 
p. m. on September 13 at the ia 2 A Rriah tem! 18%'— % | Carolina Chemical unchanged at pepe nn crt ep epi 
American Security & Trust Co. 
Of 12 million five hundred Am We 


15% BOY, 

30%|+ % Bonite Pa SL CG] “Lal Syiss.%4] 15%, and Benquet Consolidated] MR» SHERLEY COLBERT || MR. SHERLEY COLBERT 
Mining unchanged at 1%. 707 20th St. N.W. | 707 20th St. N.W, 

thousand dollars such- bonds | Anacon ‘cop’: 

issued in 1944, the company | 4™#c Cc 


N Y B d Washington 6, D. C. Washington 6, D. C. 
District 1292—King 8-5171 District 1292—King 8-S5171 

currently has outstanding ’ e on S Motorola TV Sets 

eight million dollars worth. ne ne 


Total sales, 2,340,000; year ago, Are $50 to $100 Less 
WHO’S NEWS: Carl N. Wein- 


$3,341,800. 
CHICAGO, Aug. 14 ()).— - | 
stein, Washington, has attained set eam. atin we hace | “62 Years” 
“Top Star” production honors for Sales in thousands (High | Low | Close , + y is ine | 


; , —————— of television receivers ‘will run. 
the sixth successive year, Pacific | 475?9.17" | em Bard suas: laeett late | 
ae «¢ Mutual Insur-| Atchison pf.. 


LHS E 
BSoaw» 


~ 
Soe 
oa 


eS 


rs 
S8aasisdnuadS Seuss 


Statiise.2 
rer Fre 


Breese 
ah 
Onwuen 
Pat 

rrr PT 
+{ | 


t Dairy ... , ) 
we § oe aa ° “e, 17 fé Welker ay 
a 8 eee ! 
Elgg a Walworth 
Wat Lead ..... 10 : n 
fat 5 *.. nae 2 : . : he 
a TS és jfaukes 
~.. 16) 48%! 48 : jayne Rg 


38 


Oe 


SL Ouse Seces 


iD dino. w @ 

Doehler Jar... 25 

Dome Min... 35) 

Doug Airc ... 6 

Dow Chem ... 

Dow Ch 2 pf. | Ma! 

Duplan Cp .... 8) 125%) 

du Po x . 

du Po 1119%%!120 i+ 

EAGLE PICH.. 5) 24%/ 24 24\e\— % 
i 25 24% | %\. 

tai 

46% 


wr 
322 


=) 
0 nosh me 
bt 


~ 
-~ 


ee 
sh ng 


hor 
“S308 
- 


tb 
+ 


bp 
- 


IAN DARL £09 AH OW-I 


ne 


to 


wo 


as pe et 
ANU eBOIWO hs WUNNHDH 
en 


-—— 


AM&FP2pf 
Am G & EI 
Haw &S 


Norf & West.. 
Norf & Westpf 
No Am Avia.. 


nN 
Tr) 


. 
ot > 
J) — 


Eversharp 
Ex-Cello-O 
Exch Buf 
PAIRB MOR 
Fedders Quis 
Fed Mogul . 


“~*~ Oe ~~ 


‘(ss 2 2 @ 22 + 2 ew” 


Northw A pf.. 


OHIO EDIS... 
Ohio Oil 


Aw t9-109-1W ~3 
o a 
AWN HDOMWWe- re Dew 


ee 
~ 
a 


AM MER -c...MESB., 
mow 
Aow 


Vie BD 


~~ oF 
one 


Bonroenaooes 


titan 


.-- 


~o ee Be 


_) 


WtAWhWwrer 
Tr 60S 


Cl COE Ore-WwWNnOU@® 


a : 


. * 


8g 
3 
3 
68 
1 
15 
6 
7 
3 
1 
4 
4 


9! 

9 

2 

; 

8 , a 
7 

5 

1 J 

92 


‘ 
] 
] 
] 
] 


be 2) 


Pr TD OFND + CIGD OD 9S ~~ COW ~ 3B D 


— 


ns 


nO Nae 
2S ~TINI WD LI Diptera 
1) 


Frueh Tra 
GABRIEL 


<) 
Peeps 


to 


to wewo 
OW A ~) et 
es oe eo sa 


7 


oO pe. 6D. ed pepe Wee 


ern 


sets in last January’s line. The 
_|company exhibited 16 new sets | 
9 ‘| at its annual convention of dis- | 

,,| ibutors and salesmen. ; W at HIBBS & CO 
; | Optional equipment includes | 7 ~ - 


built in ultra high frequency all- 725 15th St. N.W. NA, 0540 


2010. . : | 60%4 | channel reception and tuner | 
13|B&OPLE&WV 4 ’80/] 8 , “14 3 at 
7. units. Built in the extra cost is | 


N E 23 | ° ° 
om: Rito adapter the | Our Clients Are Invited to Make Use of , 
cost Is $49.95, it was added. ; Our Extensive Financial Library } 


Gar Wood pf 
Gaylord Cont 
Gen A Inv 


98 . | . . . 
1.118% 120% | $50 to $100 lower than similar | Continuous Service to Washington Investors 
Atl City Fl | | 
ance Co. an-/a: 


1 Cst Line. 
nounced = yes-| 4! Ge WI of 


terday. He is Atlas Cp .... 
associated with | 4:co wig ** 
the Raymond | gagerrr 


A. DuFour' aay Lima H . 
Bit & ‘ 

Agency here Balt & Oh pf 
and has been) Bangor & ar 
Barber Oil .. 

a member of Barker Bros. 


the Million Bath Ty We... 

Dollar Club) Beaunit se 

a ae since 1948 ..., pacch Aire ... 
Weinstein James C. Bur-! Beaunit mw 

kett, Washing- 

ton sales representative of Amer-/ Bell Airc 


m- a da Ben di: “Byte 
ican Airlines, has been elected! pene 1." 


national vice chairman for avia- Benguet M 
tion of the United States Junior | Bes: “ras ° 
Chamber of Commerce ... E. A. a Stl... 
Dunham jr. has been made east-| Black & Dec |; 


: | Bliss & La 
ern contract sales representative | Bliss 1E W) ses 


for Servel, Inc. . . . Harry J.| Boeing airp , 


Greenwald has been. promoted | eer Fy 


to vice president and executive Book of Mon.. 
n 


assistant to the president Of Borg warm’: 
Melrose Distillers, Inc.... Henry | Boston & Me., 


: Braniff Airw , 
X. Salzberger, former merchan-| Bridg Brass . 
dise manager of Bloomingdale | Brisss Mfg 
. es & St. 
Bros. in New York, has been ap-| Bristol my ..° 
pointed president of Sanger | Bx'¥ U Gas .. 
Bros. in Dallas. | Brun Balke .. 
| ucy rie 
TYR? ; |B te 
EARNINGS: Standard Oil Co.) Bulsva Wat 
: 2 : Burl Mills 
(Ohio) reported net income of Geer Aaa’ oe 
$8,235,772 or $2.14 a share for | Bush Term .. 
first six months of 1951, com-| pytler Bros... 
pared with $7,313,338 or $1.92 a| Byron Jack ,, 


share in same 1950 period. Other Cal PACK... 
earnings statements: Calum a _ : 
Six Months Ended June 30 Campbell Wy 
1951 1950 Can Dry .... 
Aluminum Ltd $18,171 $15.230.579 | Caned Brew.., 
Per ire 48 409; Canad Pac... 
Greyhound Corp., 663,12 3,864,815; Cannon M .., 
Per share 40;Cap Adm A.., 
$4,223.199 | Capital Air] ., 
22; Carey (Phil).. 
; 31.846.713) Caro P&L .. 

share . 3.5 + 3.53) Carpen St] 

& Johnson 5, 0 5.567.000 | Carrier Cp 
2.45 2.70! Carr & Gen.. 

, Case (J I) 

3.97 | Cater 

904.770; Celanese ..., 
Per share si 1.44 1.65|Celan cv pf.. 

Nat. City Lines .. ; 682 .228.134 | Celotex .... 

fis: $2 | Cen Aguir 

, sacetuaats 61 916,000 | 6 ee 


2.341.941 
2.14 


oe 


~~ 
bes) 


OO ea lh lh et tA 
i ee 


Penn Salt 
| Peoples Gas 


Ne De torent 
Dr OO +3 -1W hb 


w 
INW =e DOnU 


te ed 
eww ee 


Pfizer pf . 
BRAS tana 
eres Dod .. 


C&l. 

ilip Mor .., 
Phillips Pet . 
Phoenix Hos.. 


1 16 ] vé& > | ; 1 ° . | 
Pills Mills ... | 32%). 33 ¥ | oo ee «| Chi G | 3 
Pitney Bow’.: 3! 1634, 16%) 1686) + "i CC 777 "111 66?| 6533! 68 cago Uralin || New York curs excwance” WASHINGTON STOCK EXCHANGE 
it : . 4 18 ’ 


Mr 


me SI) -1W Oto -3 ~) eh S 7 When UVUoWwwwWe De HII WHIIWHD Go CI rs bd I 
Lo | 
DUM SNOWY s-1We Ow 
ete > 


8 ~~ 

w 

~ Www 

Ps Sore oe a 


. 
Se ee ee ee 


. - : 
' ££ uws 2 es ao oe 


es 
o ww 
CD ae Cm hn a BD BD eS 0 Ld wT 


.. .|101 %}10034 
5 1108 4/109 % 109% 
73, 


heer eh ~ 
LD OD et ATS 309 DW ODP ~1G 19 Oe 3 D GD 
~ 


99 


. ie > 
ae 
PS 
ter Or I 
~ 
BasS0 


Caw pe 
—s 


Glean Harv 
Glidden ..... 
| Glidden cv pf 
| Goebel Brew.. 
| Goodrich 

| Goodvear Pe 
| Goodyear wi 


" to Norway. Oats | 
wane = gas the decline in 
Ww é. ut Vv 
‘OAt the ahs igen tN 
e nis wh at w 7 3 . 
corn was %%, “ag k ae to 1% lower. 


.) 
wQe 
watts 


Sr 


ibe ~ = 


B. 
Poto El Pw... 
Press Stl Car.. 


—— 
. 


" 
mn 
a teaew 


se) 
° Pod 


oR Re Re 


bs 

. *-* 
bt 
ray 


2% lower, soybeans were 13% 2% 


and lard was 25 to 
pounds lower to 35 cents a hundred 


Range follows: 
Wheat— Open 
41 


. 7 ee ee ee ee 
.+ @&o 24 @ @ 2 @ 


vu yy’ 


Ps 


~— 
FF en cncnentn 


Specialists in 
WASHINGTON 
SECURITIES 


es 


< 
°° 
“t 
R 


Publick Ind 
Pullman 
Pure Oil 


QUAK OATS. 
Quak St Oil.., 


RADIO C 
R 


he TEN OI IO OR PDIP MO-rO NW ONWUD-WWwO 
@ 
QD 
™m 
ay 


i» 


Lo Close 


— 


NH ine 4'2 55 | 

NHH 4 2007....| 68%) 

OW 4 °92......| 8%! 
'65 . |100 4/100 
"BI.| 9442) 94 | 94 


~ 
o—---— © OY et 


ass 2S?” eR” OS @ 2 we ee 
BS ES. 


~ 
uw 
& to] 


Rayonier . 
Reading Co 


se lante Su 
| Soeaten (Sus Real Silk H 


17 | Gulf Mob & O 
*' Gulf ail ‘ 
|Guif Sta Ut 


— %%/ HALL PRINT. 
Halliburton 
7 re 


+ 
pert pere NIM aans 


~~ 
IRDHeA-ILOWDIVIiWw 
~~ 


7 
Na oa eee aa eee oad 
2 ae as ao @ 


GOODWYN & OLDS 


903 American Security Building 
Telephone NA. 8166 


Ma 


ite th ORR (OE OO 
DH CRONOD OM BW UI ADO O-10WO-1D-1MNH 


Vv vi 

5 103 | Oe a Now oteie 

, iy 1 r'e—Ne@w style 

Cen 4 49../ 85%| 85 4a 85% Sept. Das 4% 
Dec. . ‘2 
4 


ar MOY sides 
#|D. C. Securities [cia i. 
2 €pD =" 


24\4i— 
205% 


~1.3 
Ww 


Jia. 
OWnn 
~2.3: 


will os 


Hewitt Rob... 
Wevden Chem. 


a 


— 


~~ 
— 
wa 


Members Washington Stock Exchange 


-~I~3 


o~suwn@w why 


fe 34! 

s| 187 
| 33%) + 

4) v2) Mai+ 

$4, 154 | +145 


~ 


es 


DWODOHMWWD SHIH TOW WYN DN WONODH RMWNOOVNN Bw 
t t 


t> 
Segond 
nw” 


AVWOoOR YN Of 
> 


NINN Me Rte 
NNNNN HR Php 
JI-I-3.40 -3-3 : 


~3-~3~31.310 


h 75 at 32. 
5 a eet com, 100 at 13%. 44 at} March , 
8. a 4 


t ; 

t nig 54 | 54 5 Wash Gas 4.50 pf. 27 at 102%. 
‘ Garfinckel com, 25 at 19%. 

Ruppert .... 2 Wash Gas 4.25 pf. 18 

SAFEWAY ST 5 , Columbia Titles Inc., 

St Jos Lead, | 4 y tE r 


nm Goouce Fa 5 


~—*t 
ao: 
Ch ie 


Howe Sound 
Hudson Moat 
Hunt Foods , 
Hupp Corp .. 
Hussm Refr 


IDAHO P 
| ie 


a | 
oBorwowu 
FoooU"u 


tid pea 

at 13 at 13%.| March ... 

Hen eS , 1 Rees * 13%. Cash Grate 

wr com, *. THEAT——Cash: No. : No. 

Publie Utility Bonds . - | ‘ . 

AmTel&Telconv deb2% 1967 44) No. 3, 2.31%; "4 SaNiL- onmeane | he holders of Capital Com 

AmTel&Teiconv deb2%, 1961 2.28%: No. 2 hard. 3 34i,: tees | To t pt Transit pary 

AmTel&Telconv deb 3% 1959 V bedi hard, 
' ‘ Cc 


ORNNo, 1 ye . 1.82% @1.83: No. | First and Refunding Mortgage Bonds, 


~n 


Screnton 
Seao ! 
Sean ‘ 
fSeab Oil 
Seagrave 
Sears Roeb 


80@1.81%: No. 


s; Sample grade. ° 
| te. 1.80. | Series A, 4%, Due December 1, 1964 
Washington Gas 5 1960 nae 4 Be h ag seh peimes.. 84°32: No. 1 | 

; . oe . VV 7] ly; : | 
Miscellaneous Bond eav MS rage 2 @85 4 ®. 2 heavy) 
ls 


Ter Rf & W Cp ist 4 1958. ; W BARLEY —-Nominal: Malting, 1.24@ | Pursuant to resolution of the Board of Directors of 
erin ie wa... | SOUR eee Capital Transit Company written tenders for the sale 
Capital Transit (23.00). -.. 26% 38% to said Company of the above described Bonds will be 

El P 3.60% 4 : received until 4:00 P.M. Eastern Daylight Saving Time 
Commodity , ndex on Thursday, September 13, 1951, by the Trust Depart- 
satiated Detar’ Gonbtel  wedese ate ment of American Security and Trust Company, 15th 
|index of 35 commodities today declined Street and Pennsylvania Avenue, N. W., Washington 13, 


National Bank Stock eth evious day | 0 D. C., subject to the following other terms and conditions: 


~ 


Per share — 2.3! 206 C ES 
Van Raalte Co. .. 34! .332.400 | Cer de Pas... 
Per share 2.40 2.86 | Cert-teed 
Warren Foundry., 402.3 240.374 | 
sh: 2.36 1.41 | ; i t Mere... 
409.944 038) C ‘al 55) 3! -)"**** | Int Hyd El A 
2.30 2.00 iC Soe least a So oe 
n 


~ 
tN 


Pit leeto wreWwr, 


Sharen Sti .. 
| Sharp & Doh, 


tp 


~S 
NODONHNONAI1N-IR Gee OND Oe he» 


ss 


_ 
' 
ae 


s Ended July ! 
. 5.840.0: 


— 


Paper . 
Rv Cen Am 
t Salt .. - 


} 
4 


—D 
4) 


e€ - ‘i 
*® Weeks Ended Inviv 14 
Tilo Rorfine 310,362 
share ..ec-« 


me WD bo eee Cy 


o -- 
ne ONION Om JO BRAUN IS UH DEW DOWD BNE OAHWIVW-1UN 


‘or Vv o~ 2 


ss? * Sa NS 


Liberty Ol vadedkaded nadine o 25 a a . ¢ * . 

Lincoln, 38522002 2000200001 3a "| sigh ee a eee 5 Ee 1. Each tender shall be signed by the bondholder or his 
j gs Tae &taceheé e*eeeeere ‘4 ] 7 7 " ; 

Wassinstes “ieee 252°" iG har A SE eo nig AO. dE edict duly authorized agent, shall state his address, and 


—— ee og Stocks | shall state the price at which the bonds are offered 


Natl Say Tr (18.00) cece 483 wees, , | not to exceed $101 for each $100 in principal face 
vac tusk dae ame a 
Rank of Bethesda, ('1.0) .. tres PRINTER The bonds offered must accompany the tender. 


Fire Insurance Stocks The method of delivery of the bonds to said Trust 
‘pe aypramyths ae _...| SPECIALIZING IN : 
Piremen's “1865 sbtseseee ttl al Coe ig 9 Pobre Department is at the option. and risk of the bend- 
Mile ition Seka s mene ey ‘Silica : holder, but if sent by mail, registered mail should 
Columbia (+30) -....s ice so basin aw | be used for the bondholder’s protection. 
Miscellaneous Stocks me case att tee sae The assignments of the certificates for registered 
Feet, N. Ww. bonds must be signed in blank by the registered bond- 
| holder (where jointly held, by each joint owner) and 
| the signature or signatures thereto must be witnessed 
Century Natural by an individual and guaranteed by a national bank 
or trust company having an office or correspondent 
Gas & Oil Corp. | in Washington, D. C., or by a firm of brokers having 
33 Connesin: Qin , membership on the Washington Stock Exchange or 
to © ied anied” ae atteds é on the New York Stock Exchange. 
oat Tae SS ee a ea CS) ees. Price 25c Per Share | In case the signature on the tender or on the assign- 
Pee ; | Offering Circular on Request @ ment of the bond is executed by an attorney, executor, 
. 3% 22%! 2241+ Sl Beeets Con Ain Dividend Actions Cc. J. BLIEDUNG administrator, trustee, guardian, or other fiduciary, 
TINMON "1 RT! ore of pa’ | NEW YORK. Aug, 14 ().— | : | or by an officer of a corporation, the person signing 
tife fav 94141 2% | Sym Gould ... ' 3.) 7%! Pe- Stock of Pay- Member of National Association | the d , : : . 
eg OX ' 914! Sym . | Enittal ‘sta Rate rio 1 abl of Securities Dealers, Inc. | tender OF assignment must give his full title in 
Eick Mpelt 1 1 aRthl ete! ahtgi- ta [Texas Ooon.. 31] 50%] $0% < | Regular i a 2300 {8th St. N.W. such capacity, and proper evidence of his authority 
tdeoul4 Carb .. | 4! 2235! 22%! 4 { Pdi. 9 2614) 26%0| 2640... ; | Am Hospital Syp. .30c Washi 0. ¢ | to act in such capacity in this matter must be for- 
aa! 16M jet + + is! 44 ashington 9, D. 6. warded with the bond. A corporation should affix 


iToew's Inc } 

vane, Ye "ay Fase ol Naas sw | ee o B 108." ) meth Webster Chicago «- 2 Telephone ADams 7098 | phere) 

serteare gt Bl Ml BPS) Bel i& Pood Fair Strs Purchases will be made of those bonds first tendered 
at the lowest prices to the extent of an aggregate 
amount of One Million Dollars ($1,000,000) in prin- 
cipal face value of bonds. For bonds tendered at 


7 
Lowenstein ‘ } 2044) 2% ™ Textrno pf - ! | y } 
N FS | identical prices, consideration will be given aceording 


Chicago Livestock 


CHICAGO, Aug e 
ABLE HOGS—Receipts. 11.000: fairly 
active: butchers under 240-ib.. steady to 
25 cents lower: weights over 240-Ib. and 
sows, steady to 25 cents higher: top, 
23.15: most choice 190-250 Ibs.. 22.75@ 389! Jones & 
93.10: 250-270 lbs.. 22.25422.85; heavier | -,,; a Soe 527s ese | Joy Mfg 
weights, scarce; few 280-310 lbs., 21.25@ v Bl 28%! 2854) 287% /- ™4ISFR ALUM 
22.25; odd lots up to 275 lbs. down to | | 46 ops SA * t. 
19.75; choice sows, 400 lbs. and down. |-ja. Gr pr ,.. ' 943,! ; » os ee ren C e5u pf. 
19.00 to 21.00: few under 300 Ibs.. 21.25: |Cliimax Mo "ron Pw & Lt. 
a 19.25: § Clinton Fd ..< 13! 30%' 29%! 29%|..... | F*vser * 
most 400-500 Ibs., 18.004719.25: 300-600 Clint Fda pf . | B}« » atgue Sten 
lbs.. 17.25@18.25: good clearance. ‘Clopay C | on 66e Ml... | Remterott .. 

SALABLE -CATTLE—Receipts, ; (Cluett : 2: 398, *s bead Cand 
salable calves—400; general market slow: | os 4) 10: ee ~ 72 | was 


o 
WwW 
> 


2 
» o> Bee 
= = 


».s 


a 


215 


Iowa P A I , - ° 
3475 34% 


Isl Crk Coal — 
JACOBS FL.. 


OO & SID Sto 


ot) 


— re & 
*? oo 
ee 


| mn! | | Spear 
| 24% 2 ‘.+ee | Spencer 
s 34% ; 


WW) le -I CAI wr DOR OOWO SH 


ts 


Beis ORD Hh HONE D RIE. 
~ 
J 


yw 
v 
a 
Oe 8 
B.D OW MORON III TH me 
~ 


= 


DONWHAwWwwe 


me 


Ar 
tlw 


W119 Do: 


~~ wW 


D -] Dh Te RDB 
O@e-/VENONNH-IWIODM 


oe ~).. 


.,.. | <oppers Co ai 
slaughter steers, over 37.00. steady: |Col! : Aik 3} 1! ! ;, | presse © ; 

* la > Ss.) 991 ress ee 
others, uneven, steady to 25 cents lowe! I “gi 9 a7 O73, Kroger Co 
other slaughter classes. largely steady LACTEDF GAS : 


around six loads prime steer 33.75% Oa, oP 
) I igh-choice and inom Ser. 
ne an gy yearlings. 36.75 @ 38.25 rane Wells 
chioce steers and yearlings, 
~ - commercial to low-good 
steers and yearlings. . 
good to prime heifers 2.00037 
prime around 1100-lb 
27.25: commercial 
r commercial cows 
canner to utility grades. ham ¢ 
utility to good bulls. 25.50@30.50 at 
' s. 31.00: good to prime . 
vealers. 3: 37 ‘+ few prime. 38.00 . 
SALABLE SHEEP—Receipts. 1000; no) Go. Grocers . 
siaughter lambs or vearlings sold; asking Con N Gas 
steady. bidding 25 to 50 cents lower on ;,., 
other classes; ewes scarce. steady: most | ¢,,, 
slaughter kind. 11.00@15.00;, odd choice ¢.. T- 
handyweights, 15.50. | Gon Vultee... 


— 


ss 


w 
Roe 
wom 

e~ 


+O Wr bdr 
mw 


= 
Ww 
~ 
= 


- 
- 


w 
NWA oM—- BOSOM ON 


ee ee 
.‘ ee nner 2 * @ 


~ 
wow 


4:5 


HwWAwWoOowwowvsso 
AW -“QNAN Dior 


_— 


el 
-- 


unsh Mn... 
Superior Sti.. 
*‘|Suther Pap 


iCons Citar 
9 ans) 

19.0 pperm 
Gis 


~ 
DD DID Co ht 9 POI £1209 oe OD 


- 
7. a 


Maryland Tobacco ont 


Cc 
Average prices were lower Tuesday for! Gont 
f tobacco auctioned on the con 
and market Con 
from $1 to $6 a hundred | con 


~ 
>» ; ’ 


Se DOO2OW6rN410o Dw 
FF z 
- 22:0 o:- 


Dot et oe ee WB OOW 
=. 


* te | Ras ‘ Thermoid Co ad 
VAM WD WE ' Third Ave Tran 2! 3% | 37 3% Virginian Rr .. 

: | Hammond Instrum.. 
Bie ee & Cart a 
\fanati . 4 . ' | Aspinoo 
pa mn sd 1 3.1 a: de W ae j y Miamond Alkali .. 
Werethcn eo ‘a ue | C | ee eo P sce 
; ef . ; 7 7 Na andar 
Marine Mid rt 1a 9 te Ree re Oat Se: -"* | Richfield Oi 

ry ; t . "| Robertson H HF... 

Rochester Transit.. 


Stock 
Publicker Ind ,...2°2% 
eased 


‘ 
pt et Dt st mt ht te BD PO et BD ee ee OD 


OPN -0 ke 1H SOK THK VKH WOW 2-4 
OoOwcawvD FOU 


. > 
tee Tre 


pw Stil... 
n Prod 


4 
Tukens Stl 2! | 41541 41%4)— Thacth Gl Mf 
to priority of receipt of the offer. 


= EMG | 46's i 
Intl 


Payment for accepted bonds with accrued interest te 
| and including September 19, 1951, less the amount 
Peasoned, hotles | needed for Federal transfer tax stamps, will be foe 
: rown Co Ps ae warded bef 

Auction dred Ibs. | Crown 7 ods x ' Bes. ; * | Twent C Fox 20%! 20 20%) Iner ,, on or ore September 19, 1951. 
on a limited number of representative | Gruc st! a» 10) 3S (ay Dept St. 9 : > Sart > nay 2) toa! 10%! 10%, 1 | Apex Smelt .......50e Promot ervicé jected bonds will 
v. 8. grades were a ellows: se Seal Cub Am Sug.. 2 F 28 Mevtas ot ; 4 | Twin City R T 10%! 10%) 10%)— Year End a - Re be returned on or before Septem 

Heavy Cro ood cherry-red, ; fair dahy Pk ... an! 49 7 \“fevtee pf .. ; 1! 14%) tel....,. | Dayton Ma ron... 73¢ ' 

p—G Cudahy 7 2 | UDYLITE 14%! 14%! 14%! We will buy Second Trust ber 19, 1951. 


cherry-ted., we. ee Boh th ae Ad Cunn Drug he | no eal i “ae 2%! $ nares 
. 15.50. s. . 16.50: Hs Pub .. jMecord .. see! 238) 2a) 2! Un Asb & Rubi 1! i The right is reserved to reject ich does 
ition a.) atawel anal | ” 2 | . New York Cotton Notes Secured on lmproved not strictly conform to the ade ma Pence pdm 


wa 


sven. eo 2 2 & 


000 


ao ne iw & oS = 
= 


= 


a. . | 
ss? 2 8 * 


air green. 15.50; low green, 14. Thin-j Curtiss Wr 
crop, good cherry-red, 74; fair cherry-red, | Cutler H 
reed. : = 


’ 

- 

' 
* 


PaRRWALY 


19%/ 19 | 


. 7 ** ow . - . . 
it Dye & ; ; 3 
4) 43%! 42%) . ms re} ait + set a2 3240 Shan? 1312 H. Y. AVE. 0.W. MA, 5833 
Decem 
ae it Eng & 48 | 25. 


Mian #H 6’ § 


an eae 
Minn Hon pf. 


A " 


: fair red, 66; low cherry-red. 65.  Sec- MeGraw-H 2+ 7 . : <a ' 
onds, fair cherry-red, 60; low chocolate,| DANA GP... ; + cIntyr P ... 8! $93! : Pa “ a ota) eek NEW YORK. Aug. UP\.—Cotton | Property . 
Davison Ch 39a, 39 2 ‘ : lower today. Trading Ame Secu d T Co 
vase HB Ss, Rt + Mi Mead > wt wl. tl eT 7 | Unit Air Li | 2|\ slow, but recurrent | TIONAL ORTGAGE rmcan rity an rust mpany 
pert Pe th § 3 | Boalt a | 23%! 235,! 23% i+ . Bat 8 29% ba Si tion and hedging found only limited) - 
Decca Rec ... | | “al aa Open High Low Close Net ch. | As Purchasing Agent 
SAVANNAH. Ga. Aus. 14 (*.—TUR-! Deep Rk Oil.. 3439 —23! 
s. 342: shipments, 83: stocks. 4460.| Del & Hud... 
eR OSIN—Offerings and sales. 100 drums:| Del Lack & W. Wasnmecron 13, DE 
21.344, Derby eeee 
Quote: % ane D, 7.00; F. 7.50;} Det Edis 
G. H. 1. K, M, 
x. 8.20. 


c 14 
16.50; low green, 15. paveta St o+s Ft soar! sattt apa it. a eee N .. $44! 15%! 1! Be ee ace eit | goacia i2| futures closed 95 cents to $1.40  bale| 
Naval Stores Dayton Rub., 1 Unit Aire .... 18) 29%! 32 | buying orders 
PENTINE. 67%: offerings and sales. none; | Deere & CO.r% aoe =. ect 34.54 34.56 ; 34.35 — | ; 15ta STREET AND PEN NSYLVANTA A x w. 
mt Slcees | Be 3286 3258 3438 303 NVESTMENT GORP. sa ag 

Teceipts, 832; shipments, none; ie & RGW.. 

; E and Ey 

8.10: N. WG, WW and; Det Mich Stv. 

Det Sti Cp... 


——— 


— 
Pre THIF DO 
to 


Baruch Holds We Must Get Masses on Our Side 


“(Marguerite Higgins, former 
war correspondent in Korea for 
the New York Herald Tribune, is 
traveling around the world to re- 
port on key persons and places in 
the cold and hot war against 
Communism.) 


continue to permit inflation to 
weaken our mobilization program, 
doubling and sometimes even 
trebling the price of planes, tanks, 
bazookas and other key weapons. 
Differences in Approach 
Although there may be differ- 
ences in details of approach, both 
Baruch and Gen. Dwight D. Eisen- 
hower agree on the importance of 
speed in our mobilization effort, 
As General Eisenhower recently 
Curtain Marxists the intellec-|'0!d visiting Senators: “A sure 
tual jim-jams. Here is an invest-|¥@Y of getting half the result for 
ment specialist, who has had) 'Wice the cost is to make Western 


great success in the business, "earmament a longer effort than 


world, who demands higher taxes, it need be.” : ae 

in the name of national welfare) Baruch explains his ideas of 
and crusades. total mobilization this way: 

He is against the -profiteers | 
who exploit the common danger | the nation so that every factory 
for _personal enrichment. | 
other blow to the doctrinaire|¢Very bit of material be put to 
portrait of the big bad capitalist |USe where it will strengthen our 


F By Marguerite Higgins 
~ PARIS, Aug. 14 (NYHT).— 
Bernard Baruch, adviser to six 
American Presidents, is just the 
kind -of man to give the Iron 


is Baruch’s campaign for what) defenses and fill the most essen- 
he calls a recognition of the | tial needs first. This means a gen- 
“erek of the masses.” eral ogi. = oe ee 

‘s omy to prevent further inflation 

The masses everywhere are and an all-embracing system of 
on the trek and cannot be|priorities to strengthen our de- 
stopped,” Baruch says, “for the|fenses and minimize dislocations. 
common man has learned that) /axe 
he is essehtial to modern total|@liminate profiteering and to 
war. The democracies must turn cover all defense costs.” 

" At present rates of progress, 
their backs on the era when the Baruch is by no means certain 
masses were exploited and that time is on the side of the 
downtrodden. It must be sec Pernt world in its cold-war 

struggle with the Soviets. 
crusade to get the g soisamonptie — “We dare not blind ourselves 
side everywhere in the world. to the fact that we are in a race 
Checking Up on Our Side against the enemy and that so 
agi far we are lagging in that race,” 
| wAmerica’s renowned elder! Baruch warns, “When the recent 
statesman and I were boat com-| war ended, we scuttled and ran, 
panions on the transatlantic ee fer owreg vol tt 
me was won. e Soviet Union 
rg: OF me a me leg ” . my kept sieandie tallies men under 
trip around Russia’s curtain. We} ,-m<>” 
had a confmon denominator for} “While we were stocking our 
discussions: that lasted many|homes with refrigerators and 
hours since we were both plan-| peat hoes dam. the Fam eo 
- | stocking tanks and radar. An 
ning to check up on how the | today, a if the Korean affair 
people on our side in Europe are | does blow over, we still would 
doing in the cold war. have to mobilize or invite ag- 
As adviser to President Wilson | gression elsewhere.” 
and later to President Roosevelt, | 
Baruch had an unprecedented | er by Statements 
close-up of two great World| . It has thoroughly annoyed Ba- 
Wars. His background for assess- | ruch in the recent past when vari- 
ing what ought to be done is of /Ous politicians and even generals 
course without parallel. ‘and admirals joined in a chorus 
After visiting Germany, France |of statements saying that the 
and England, Baruch sailed for | American economy couldn’t stand 
home “more convinced than ever”|the degree of rearmament “ex- 
that his program of all-out mobili-| tremists” such as Baruch advised. 
zation was an urgent necessity.| “American officials who say that 
As he observed in talks with me: | Our economy can’t stand all-out 
“When America is really strong,| mobilization are just talking 
she will not have hesitant} bunk, and what’s more, danger- 
friends.” ous bunk,” Baruch insisted. “I 
Baruch has had a hard time|will be glad to go before Con- 
trying tq@ blast away the bogeys/ gress any time in the future as I 
that haunt Americans at the’ have in the past and demonstrate 
thought of full mobilization for | how, with a little self-discipline 
rearmament. He would like to put | and direction, we can regain a 
across the idea that temporary | position of adequate armed 
imposition of wartime economic | might.” 
controls now would in the long; Baruch is accustomed to being 
run make the total defense bill | called “extremist.” He is also ac- 
smaller. customed to seeing policies that 
Baruch believes his system of | have been labeled extremist. be- 
eontrols would save the average |come in due time accepted na- 
citizen front the long-term eco-|tional policy. But usually the 
nomic wallop he will suffer if we|acceptance of Baruch’s ideas 


“Our aim should be to organize | 


An-| and farm, every man, every dollar, | 


| 


comes after his dire predictions of 
rising costs and strains are al- 
ready realities. 

For instance, the program of 
economic controls that Baruch 
outlined before Congress in July, 
1950—proposals duly denounced 
as extreémist—have this summer 
in large measure been incorpo- 
rated in Mr. Truman’s economic 
program. ‘ ’ 

And the generals who in the 
spring of 1950 were telling the 
country that the economy couldn't 
stand such strain as a 70-group 
Air Foree—a figure far below 
what Baruch considered safe—are 
now pleading with Congress for 
a 150-group air fleet, or more 
than twice as much. 


Allies Moving Too Slowly 


In reply to a _ transatlantic 
query from me, Baruch supple- 
mented our deck-chair confer- 
ences on the Ile de France with 
a brief cable summarizing his im- 
pressions of Europe. I have prom- 
ised not to quote the cable di- 
rectly. But in general terms it can 
be said that Baruch found our key 
allies over here are at least begin- 
ning to move ahead cautiously but 
certainly not fast enough to meet 


the situation. 


Taxes must be high enough to) 


; 
| 
’ 


; 
’ 


; 


Baruch feels that the European 
countries are still plagued consid- 
erably by a wait-and-see attitude. 
Politics—abroad as at home—still 
often takes precedence over mili- 
tary and economic considerations, 
But to Baruch, as to most Ameri- 
cans visiting Europe, General 
Eisenhower’s leadership has been 
a big source of encouragement. 
As Baruch stated, this leadership 
seems to be a real source of in- 


spiration in all the key ‘North 
Atlantic pact countries. 

General Eisenhower’s big job, 
of course, is to replace the wait- 
and-see mentality over here with 
a real sense of urgency. Although 
Baruch’s visit was purely unoffi- 
cial, he has many friends in high 
places in the countries he visited. 
And Baruch, who, despite his 
years, has amazing energy, cer- 
tainly did his best to help his 
friend “Ike” spread this sense of 
urgency by warning against un- 
necessary military and economic 
delays. 

Baruch and I have never talked 
politics in any way, shape or form. 
Baruch has purposely stayed away 
from politics as such because he 
has desired to be of service to his 


| 


country no matter what party was 
in power. 

His differences with Mr. Tru- 
man, which were lately patched 
up a bit, arose out of the Presi- 
dent’s reluctance a few years back 
to build up our defenses to the 
degree Baruch thought necessary. 
The emergency has shown that 
Baruch was right and time has 


changed the President’s attitude. 
The differences are no longer so 


ig. : 

But I will bet a French gold 
piece that if Eisenhower is nomi- 
nated for President, Baruch will 
break long years of self-imposed 


precedent and come out in strong | 
support of his old and good friend, | 
General Ike. 


(Copyright, 1951. New York Herald 
Tribune, Inc.) 


National Research Council, 
Georgetown Get Cancer Funds 


lected by Dr. Andrew Marchetti | 
director of the Department of 


National Cancer Institute | 
grants totaling $19,925 have been 
made to the Georgetown Univer- 
sity School of Medicine and the 
National Research Council here, 
the Federal Security Agency 
announced yesterday. 

The two Washington institu- 
tions are among 25 recipients of 
special grants totaling $336,621, | 
approved by Surgeon General | 
Leonard A. Scheele following | 
recommendations of the National 
Advisory Cancer Council. | 

A survey of the relationship | 
of cancer of the uterine cervix 
to race, marriage, diet customs 


and other factors will be made. 
by the Georgetown School of. 


Medicine with data being col- 


Obstetrics and Gynecology. 


THE WASHINGTON POST 


Georgetown, receiving $9925, 
will be ‘one of six institutions | 
considering cancer of the cervix 


from various approaches. It is 


one of the most common types 
of caneer among women and a 
type frequently cured. 

The grant of $10,000 to the 
National Research Council's Sub- 
committee - on Cancer Cures, 
under Dr. Isabel M. Wasson, 
professional associate in the 
division of medical sciences 
there, will be used in an evalua- 
tion and investigation of the 
numerous so-called cures of 
cancer, 


Wednesday, August 15, 195] 


Personal 


To Women With 
Nagging Backache 


end i aenmeietememenatl 

Nagging backache, loss of pepandenergy, 
headaches and dizziness may be due to slow- 
down of kidney function. Doctors say good 


‘kidney function is very important to good 


health. When some everyday condition, such 
as stress and strain, causes this important 
function to slow down, many folks suffer nag- 
ging Soalincinns-deak Eabammaiies Minor bla 
der irritations due to cold or wrong diet may 
cause getting up nights or frequent passages. 
Don’t neglect your kidneys if these condi- 
tions bother you. Try Doan’s Pills—a mild 
diuretic. Used successfully by millions for 
over 50 years. It’s amazing how many times 
Doan’s give happy relief from these discom- 
forts—help the 15 milesof kidney tubes and fil- 
ters flush out waste. Get Doan’s Pills today! 


a 


Call NA. 4200, ask for Circula- 
tion and order Washington Post 
guaranteed home delivery. 


Mountain 


AT THE HOMESTEAD 


HOT SPRINGS, VIRGINIA 


«Metecrologists say that 300 
feet of altitude is the equivalent of 
100 miles of northing in modifying 
climate. The office floer of The 
Homestead is 2,300 feet above 
sea level, the equivalent of 800 
miles north of Washington, D. C., 
so far as temperature is concemed. 
All sports are enjoyable in this 
lovely, bracing summer climate, 
Write or telephone for reserva- 
tions or for our illustrated folder, 


; 
; 
| 


, 
' 


Above: “ Rocket 98” 4-Door Sedan. * Hydra-Matie Drive optional at extre 
cost. Equipment, accessories, and trim subject to change without notice. 


Powered by the Famous 


"ROCKET ENGINE 


135 Horsepower * Eight Cylinders * 9%0-Degree 


Bank Type 
Valve Lifters 


Overhead Valves 


$-Bearing Crankshaft * 


Hydraulic 
Auto- 


Thermic Pistons * 7.5 Compression Ratio * Rein- 
forced Crankcase and Cylinder Block Design 


PAUL BROTHERS, INC. 


5220 Wisconsin Ave. N.W ., Washington 


MANN MOTORS, ING. 


1222 22nd St. N.W., Washington 


OLMSTEAD MOTOR CO. 


925 Jesup Blair Dr., Silver Spring, Md. 2000 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, Va. 


— On Television! 


SEE YOUR 
GAPITOL GADILLAC-OLDSMOBILE CO. 


B16 VALUE OF THE 
BIG GAR FIELD ! 


COLONIAL OLDSMOBILE CO. 
1241 6th St. N.E., Washington 


COMMUNITY MOTORS, INC. 


4800 Hampden Lane, Bethesda, Md. Fairlington Shopping Ctr., Alex., Va. 5600 Baltimore Ave., Hyattsville, Md. 


NEAREST OLDSMOBILE 


——_——- a 


BIG ...in size! BIG... . in power! BIC... in all-around 
value! That’s the leader of Oldsmobile’s famous 
“Rocket” fleet—the glamorous “Rocket 98”! 


Interiors are ultra-smart and spacious . . . tailored for 


your driving comfort and riding luxury, And above 


OLDSMOBILE: 


all, Oldsmobile’s superb new “Rocket” Engine teams with 
Hydra-Matic Drive* to give you magnificent per- 
formance plus a full measure of true high-compression 
economy. See and drive Oldsmobile’s beautiful 

“98”, . . the standout value in the big car field! 


DEALER 


ALBER OLDSMOBILE, INC. 
1630 14th St. N.W., Washington 


AKERS OLDSMOBILE-CADILLAC CO. 


POHANKA SERVICE, INC. 
1126 20th St. N.W., Washington 


LUSTINE-NICHOLSON OLDSMOBILE 


CBS News With Douglas Edwards — Monday Through Friday at 7:30 P.M. WTOP-TV, Channel 9—COURTESY OF YOUR OLDSMOBILE DEALER — 


‘ 
. = . ¢ ee 
N >. 
. ee . . . « ho 


2 


PEL TA 


. ee 


j rere newest flight! Geared to the fast tempo of 
international travelers! 
line’ service to South America...via Miami, luxurious, 
straight as an arrow, and at no extra fare. Be in 
Panama the same day, Lima in the morning—Rio or 


It’s Braniff’s 


Buenos Aires tomorrow afternoon! 


eee 


In-Flight With Braniff: The friendly attentiveness of 
lovely Braniff hostesses. Cocktails and full-course meals. 
Bed-size berths and luxurious comfort all the way! 


Fly your favorite connecting airline non-stop to Miami. 
Then come aboard Braniff’s E] Conquistador, DC-6 lux- 


new “‘straight- 


your Braniff office or travel agent now! 


ury liner, pride of two continents. Or, board Braniff’s 
El Intercontinental — 4-engine Tourist-Liner with fare 
savings up to 25%! Either way, you'll ride with million- 
mile pilots...enjoy the confident comfort of Braniff’s 
23 years flying experience...thrill to the most spectac- 
ular scenery in flight you’ve ever experienced. Call 


FOR RESERVATIONS AND FULL DETAILS CALL BRANIFF BNTERNATIONAL AIRWAYS °* PHONE METROPOLITAN 3054 © OR SEE YOUR TRAVEL AGENT 


> 


+ 


) 


), 


K 


‘ 


Is 


BET gulgdt each ede A Sd i, eNelson Sued for $50,000 By His Alleged Former Numbers Man\ tir sic Sity vous ne to 


his headquarters in North Beach, 
He’d have it here.” 


| ays “If Burkley, Laughlin, or any- 
was sued yesterday for $50,000|phatic instructions that if the} Nelson accused Burkley of dis-|ington since the alleged attack|one else has any information 


e 2 ¢ Re Sok RN Se 4 Be : P . ‘ ; 
s f f . «+ (9 ‘assault damages by a man/police in the District of Colum-|obeying orders, and then at-|wasin Maryland. | os a payor, let them give us 
CeCOrT In? O 1po | f ssi Fam ‘described in the suit as one of|pja, in Prince Georges County,| tacked him, according to the| Laughlin told reporters Burk- © tacts. We wil take imme- 


his former “numbers operators.” Md., or Alexandria, Va., molest | Suit. The Maryland sports figure] ley is willing to tell his story to diate action. 


CRIME—F P 1 | 4 Charles E. Nelson, Maryland|my operators with a certain nections with certain other po-,was told that criminal prosecu- 
vrai imeioir melt Pica a | ii. horse breeder and racing figure,|serial number. They have em-|lice officers there.” tion wastnot possible in Wash- 


The District Court action Alexandria Police Inspector 


° ° hs x i * . ee against Nelson was brought by them they are to acquaint the iniheting peg ne Pe Torus Pz Federal grand juries here or in| Russell A. Hawes said, “I don’t 
Admission @C@Vea e <5 =f ~~ SCMilford Burkley, 1807 Capitol|police officer with the serial|tnen he ordered Burkley at gun| Maryland and also would appear | know of any such arrangement. 
ee i eA ‘ ~ " \ave, ne. through Attorney/number and that I am to be; point to leave and “not bother before the Senate Crime Com-|I know there’s none such here.” 


Sapa : = re , “4 | James J. Laughlin. Burkley, who contacted and there will be no any of the police out here,” the mittee. - : ae goa ee oon 
came forward. None of the wit-;tion and reminded the commis-|*> © 3 fae f ‘claims he was_pistol-whipped | ¢,-thor difficulty.” suit says. Major Robert J. Barrett,/ What's the shape of fashions 


i | a i ah oe seo ae | iso February 28, also ' Areordi Burkley’ ., | Superintendent of Metropolitan | for the coming season? See The 
ses were under oath. sioners he had been asleep’ just; . { Ae ; . = |by Nelson on The suit quotes Nelson as add- ccording to Burkley's suit, ee ee : 
nesses we hefore Lewis artived. | a b> asks a court order to prevent ing: two Prince Georges officers tol bmi denied any protection) Washington Post’s Fall Fashion 


Bond said he assumed he was ied anid tt ean tel ia 4 Beg, fe 3” ‘Nelson from molesting him. “There is only one police of-| him that Nelson was “so power-| were sea — oF ee era poccay tHe Bi 
the “official” referred to when! ding device was in the Lewis) & m ~' > | <Accotding to the suit, the) ficial I cannot pay off. That is|ful they could take no action t's all Greek to ue,” Boreett Phone NAtional 4200 for Post 
Lewis appeared before the com-| car, and added, “I didn’t know he) ~ é f * jalleged assault occurred after/the head of the vice squad in| against him.” Home Delivery. 

missioners earlicr in the day. | was trying to crucify any police; ~ ‘ F 4. 4 |Nelson declared he paid 10 per-| arjington, Va. You are to go| Burkley says he pointed out 


He said Lewis came to his| officer or the Republican party, . 4 *) leent of his “gambling” income} cjpw jn Arlington County, but/his wounds to an assistant 


home about midnight last Sat-|which is apyurently what he was} }. Pe fj \for police protection in the/ plight Lee has made some con-| United States attorney here but > ; 0, | 
urday. Part of their conversa-|trying to do.” | eee oa. 6 eee oe : lage 2 Washington area. rs : 
tion. he said. was on the front S Base 3 . Poa Pes Although Nelson in recent 7.3 F) 


4 
¢ 


‘ 


? | The detective said he spoke to) 4). | de | . siete” tae amath 
steps of his house, and part was; ewis after the latter’s appear-|jme f pg. . | testimony 


ae? ee ; » §$#..| Crime Committee admitted only 2 A d 4 R h f ian OS 

in Lewis’ car. , . | i $5. 

"Good said be might have men-|20ce, before the commissioner's roe washnston Post |that he has suspected some of rrested in Resort Theft 3 ab SEABOARD 

tioned something about a tipoft| nothing to worry about—you're| | JAMES PUMPHREY __ |/is income comes drom gam held without) ight, Washingt LAR 
rae ing enterprises here, the suit; Two men were held without! Monday night, Washington po- 


a - he himself pound in the Slear! Kina Wii Partner of Nelson’s in Capitol | ays flatly: “Defendant is en-|bond yesterday in connection lice picked up the second man, VR ‘ey AIR LINE RAILROAD 
He told the commissioners that| was the first to be heard by the| Heishts eee. ae gaged Pr wel og eae emma cage with the theft of $51 from Uncle | Se ee stots bo Fg FOR DE LUXE COACH OR PULLMAN 
oe at tetcar il Bor wa oo, | Commissioners. Bg said roe vs Burkley declared that on the | Billie’s resort at North Beach,/tion and was being held at Cal- e RESERVATIONS—PLEASE PHONE 
lice had been tipped off about | sacs, aaron hearer “ss aah day of the assault, he went to Md., on Sunday. __|vert County Jail. a Be ~ NAti 10636 
Nelson’s operations : bypreige 7 oe briefed and| ther investigation, Crothers said|Nelson’s home in Ritchie, Md.,| North Beach Police Chief} Calvert County States At-| Bac”. —; Sak iona 
At that oint Lewis’ statement| «wh: nonlge te = sill b yesterday. and that Nelson said: |George Kellam identified the|torney Arthur Dowell said no| (¥\-¢)™ “Qi } 5 : ECONOMICAL 
was vagal and Bond said: “nos-| shyg-ocb a he tells you will be The hearings, as currently} “I have no patience with first as Harry R. Ball of 115 12th|charges have been placed yet) Ji WA _ ROUND TRIP FARES 
athiy there was some Galatia tices tioni by State’s scheduled, will be limited to one|dumb numbers operators. You/st. se., picked up in Calvert) against either man pending! ge i 
Se ee eran tn Ty Pre er ae + cannes day, and only law enforcement|}know I pay 10 percent of my County shortly after the robbery) further questioning. The $51 was | "Es co 
in our commerantion. Pereread ssid seat o paragraph ofhcials will testify, Crothers}income from gambling for police | and — in North Beach Jail ag a cashier's back was BV Veysy4-1,\, S 
va angel oe questioning, | in The Washington Post of said. protection, and I furnish all of since then. turned. | 
ond said he did not remember} Aygust 11, which he construed | 
all the details of he conversa-| a, implication that Nelson’s 


_wife made regular trips to 3 ; NORTHW FST 
- ‘ e 7 Richards’ office, was an “ab- 
OLDER ‘FOLKS solute vicious lie.” cs. 
He said he had never met the iia pain 
eS woman. Mrs. Nelson was identi- 1 4 , _ Aevstane Liquor Store 
| : fied by Lewis as one of the Please Your Wallet— | ‘Aa <a om oe / sanaytvanio Av 
Ps ‘ : | * 
—— i aati trips. babenan Mane late | \ gi 
a ep is 9 ag ‘the daily trips betwe | : ) 
TIRED, BLOOD 2.32.22 post ve age gob al ved wot nd a) 7 Jefferson Liquor Store 
bal A | > : | W. 
as oa gee older, when your color is bad and porter, told the commissioners the Thrifty Beverage Way! e. EY FRAG E E aaa gy Me ” 
ae ioe eid, “all in,” che chances are as high; he checked with the writer of TO Re & RAndoiph 1010 
ss 8 in 10 your blood is below par. Then it's} the article in question and was : 
rant Ayam ey mega hr Ay wm fon‘c| assured the writer intended the | | 


blood leaves you-“‘logy,””’ tired and “blue.”| sentence to refer to Nelson's 
(Red, healthy blood goes with dynamic eneray| office, not to Richards’ office. 


eS Sed 


TREAMLINERS — COURTEOUS SERVICE 


The Calvert Shop 


invi ‘milli ” feel; 3 2312 Wisconsin Avenue 
_ “million dollar” feeling. Gerital’s 
scion fs amaring—owithin 24 hows Gerital| Farquhar pointed put that} fi , wes Ger. fom: falter ket 
aroa appears in your blood. Geritol also con-/ The Post carried an explana- | | 


tains - remarkable Vitamia Biz/tion in the following day’s 


described by Reader's Digest. If; paper. 


‘j ORdwav 8888 


sce bo Tokay Liquors, Inc. 
blood tonic—get Geritol at your) 


jy age | | ! LIVE 

Pesait@ied drugstore today. See how much| Lewis first came to him on July i # cal : | LD D A DS N You a. ee 
Geeame| bener you ae oe yout ouree im-' 30, “I placed my entire depart- 3 a NEAR A District 2242 
Pesce, Proves a0 . ment at his disposal and as- 


ae , G E R iT 0 L signed three detectives to work 3: | THRIFTY , : 
oe : Stes hin * S : ie = STORE! Clifton Liquors 
He denied allegations that se 2502 Fourteenth Street N.W, 


Mrs. Nelson's usual trips stopped Corner 14th & Chapin Sts. 


as soon as Richards’ office was st f % COlumbia 2090 
informed, pointing out that her so3 — : 
trips continued regularly for ep 1 : Produced in . Y Dox Liquors 
eight days after his men began oa -F Ri Exceptional py ahe noted for “e or: Ith & $ Sts. N. W. 
'working on the case. ies: rer, district © _ “Etoile 3 ’ 

| A further contradiction in re- 3 eas fine wine _ aeeney BOTTLED-IN-BOND Fe rig ~ Gey 
‘ports of county police action in ag Bleue’. -- TRICT LINE STORE : 

the case came when Bond gave : TREGER’S DIS | 


BOTTLED IN BO 
his version of the two raids ty Meee us erent Waldorf Liquors 
|\which Lewis described to the shieits: 0) GRAIN . i118 Connecticut Ave. H.W. 
a |Senate Crime Committee. 100°%o ADS | Ska ae 
-| Bond told of the daily obser-| § S i a NAtional 5670 


& your doctor says youneedaniron-| Richards said that when 


vations. “We saw what we : 
‘thought was numbers work for| & : | FIFTH Mudrick’s 
}eight days, but we actually saw| § 
‘no numbers slips,” he declared.| 14th pe Aeiey Sx N.W. 
| Last Tuesday, Bond continued, 33 = ze 2 
a search warrant was sworn out ite = Kaend. by 
for a car operated by Mrs. Madge ste: Jon + iy, : ° 

I Af nish 


Phone STerling 9400 | Nelson, Nelson’s wife. The po- 


Dramatically low-priced Kentucky Dixie Liquor Store 


JORDAN'S lice, he said, went to their ap-| ii | Ses" itron0 oisnuttt®" § straight bottled-in-bond whiskey. | $429 M Street N.W, 


pointed position Tuesday but See rain neutral Wore memeoe" ° | Opposite Key Bridge 
the subject never showed up| # sill i 3 oon see ee gg” 100 proof. ADams 7713 
Corner 13th and G Sts. N.W. that day. According to Lewis’ sy “ d 80.6 3 Lemmmsncnuag, centric” 


Se ————— testimony before the Senate| fam |\P=——% , mes a Of COMET LIQUORS Comet Liquors, Ine 
Taam committee, this raid was called| fam | | proof. my ° 
wewcosr i. sg: PS , ea 
- late. a: —- } ss . 


ACams 7439 
| The following day another 
KITCHEN trap was laid and Mrs. Nelson’s 


au rrive j Gircle Liquors 
no shah touel Rew aaa ce f From West Indies , Money-Back Chateau Thiery Lady Beth 8500 Connecticut Ave. N.W. 


TT REL testified that Mrs, Nelson's. ante Guarantee Ch Fine WOodles 0600 
. was an hour iater than usua 5 

i} wwe N day and upon soarehing te a. 4 IMPORTED | iSO T I A e ampagne ‘ 

'police found only chickens and , | and California 


“Lewis tod the commissioners | RU vi : Vermouth , } SPARKLING WI RS a i 
ot ts feheon cam rose ae BURGUNDY = Rose's Liquor Store 


| | 4 . - i ©=»s«8 30: Bladensburg Rd. NE. 
Call or visit Kitchen Center. Learn ards’ office. The chief, Lewis > Cc & ' 4 


how to cut costs on any Kitchen . 9 ATlantic 7777 
59 19 | 
se ‘ 


Remodeling job—a single cabinet or |f | Said, is “a fine man and has done ; 
complete kitchen. a tet everything he could to cooper- ’ . 97 
Free ce = * ase ate. as 4g . FIFTH : cat. a Weltman’s Liquor Dept. Store 
pen | All P eae ee ex: | FIFTH Sweet or dry. If it FIFTH — | 3935 Minnesota Ave. N.E. 
[tempo renee por in the hon- | VEE 7; isn't as fine as any eartay rat , Pure California wine , : LUdh to 5000. 
BEAIITUCRAF] enters Rot gsi. = ae if das alley: dadeiaemaael f | imported vermouth ay Te Natural fermentation fem =ofrom=«superb, select 3 ow 4- 
: "Ss J ster sai Ne 


peop ye me you have tasted, we'll Wendling Wis in bulk makes this a 2 grapes. Sherry, port, 
Craadamm f bcdoama Richards’ integrity is “above re- Geronimo rum for mixed refund your money. Memon vee fine sparkling bever- + Tabi muscatel. 


' proach.” se= drinks, punches and for ates 18% to 20% by wuaerss* I age. Alcohol 12% by ane 20% by vol. ¥ Hamlin Liquor Co. 
Thomas E. Latimer, president =: use in foods. 80.6 proof. ag volume, wierasnne 99 volume. ee COLUMBIA WINE ™ @€©=.: 1812 Rhode Island Ave. N.E. 
ia Mauene *t aaae ee GLOBE LIQUOR Co. ANACOSTIA THE CALVERT SHOP & LIQUORS ‘ pier aciraes 
weve got the answer here,” and THRIFTY STORE ‘9 . 4° 
with everything you’ve got to 7 | 405 Gist Street N.E. 
get the right answer.” Toye Uneew eR LU. 2-4232 
Commissioner Ned Waters al- | 
- epee a at £ 
the end of the hearings. “There 3 | | | 
is still a cloud hanging over the a L bolumbia Wine é Liquor 
subject,” he said. He called for ———< ! | FRanklin 6666 “e 
another appearance by Lewis. ; = = s | 
| Richards promised to deliver | | 
a complete report at the next 
own . “ Ree gi 
which is due Friday. : | . >’ 
: Meanwhile, Senate  probers, 3 \ \W 4 CASE | 
Grilled and _[ preparing to hear testimony on| fam ANB 2 FULL PINTS FOR WHAT YOU'D * fore...” THOW-AWay Bettie m Anacostia Thrifty Store 
; y |the situation in New York, have | A\ \ \ Na ceo’ —— 5 1205 Good Hope Road S.E. 
gril led foods! not yet answered a request by \ Y return ° Mt an | ToCe Gene 2 ee 
Lancaster and Sheriff Carleton tea \ » i : ‘non the ‘i LUdlow 4-3610 
F Beall that they be permitted to . _\— N= \\- AVENUE WINE : 
(4- testify before the committee. \ ;, \ ri ‘al S355 . LiQuoRs 
} ' \ ' 


ma: te r< 


NORMALLY PAY FOR ONE PINT : Ee bottle Ost, no 


A Yee, * 


Cee - 
3 


-. 


Avenue Wine and Liquor 
2318 Pennsylvania Ave. S.E. 


The two county _ officials on 


Monday challenged the commit-| (aaa : fh 
AMBASSADOR HOTEL tee to prove that county law en- 3 = ; LUdidw 4-6300 


’ IL Free Parking Lot in Rear 
, forcement officers are lax in| & o | 
eé Oop their oven hem a the | rg “i! | Al ’ F rt 0 : tj r C 
é | committee to “dig deeper” t “Mh : 3 ie | 
Me and K Sts. discover the causes behind a oy s Fo VIS LIQUOT UO 


county gambling operations. | ———— a} : $847 Alabama Avenue $.E. 


oF Ton of Pa Hili SE 
Senator Herbert R. O’Conor ————— ” " ae 1 Victor 2400 
(D-Md.), chairman of the crime| § ff = Famous “Garden Club omen iH 
committee, was not in town yes- | | | ‘ : , 
terday, but an aide said the | : Nat Gandel’s 


; a Ave. S.E, 
Senator would have to meet with | : 48 123 independence 
other committee members be-| Your Choice of , ; , Ove. ‘Library of .Comsress 


a Th m n 2 
Wh: . 5 fore a decision on further hear- | 7 Bie Lincoin 3-1000 
ra rs | ings on Washington area crime! @ ) 


$ 
‘could be reached. _ || W4\t whey Sina ms : ; 
CCOTCH t Committee staff members how-! HH \\ A : | ° Apricot 3 : _ STOR SOUTHWEST 
ever said. they have been: fol-| Hi . a | 3 i ee 
ya | lowing up the “ramifications” of | Hi -° Blackberry is : , 

_the testimony of Lewis and Nel-| HH 1 8 F 0 y Wohl , Inc. 

|son before the committee last| Hi im @ Rock ‘n Rye : m yee 624 Fourth Street S.W. 
week. “It makes a right interest-| Ported NAtional 6666 
ing stomy,” said one staff mem- ~Year-Olg 


ber. i im You actual! et 2 CKB : 
Meanwhile, the Maryland| & : fll’ pints i the aie ant Globe Liquors 
State Crime Committee headed! # "s Pp ~ 


‘ peer 620 Seventh Street $.W, 
by State Senator Omar D. Cro- oe usual pint price: (2 Pints) as MEtropolitan 3796 
thers of Cecil County, announced ‘ : im” And the quality is 


| no 
T 2 . . BI fine 
» ‘CO that it will look into the South-| # ¥ | SCOTCH eS. 
VW h I { ( 101 S¢ —as ern Maryland crime picture at = sean " yp Koati it excellent. 60 proof. aA H Hi oKY 


Seal -—-s 


ss 


Rey Pe oe 


“eg 


oT Sr ee us 
ee a public hearings in- Annapolis on | # MADE AND BOTTLED By if Oe dad at : Cash and Carry 
of COUTSE f August 24. | GREEVBROS.INC. cxorman one i TOKAY LIQUORS : Coc Only. Quantity 
Lew enforcement officers from / Hi Hf Cn il cai 
Prince Georges, Calvert, Anne HF RS 
: Arundel, St. Mary’s and Charles | \ 
Also Avolloble in 4/Sth Pints & Molf Pi | : “8 | 
Blended Scotch Whisky 86.8 crea _ Counties will be asked to de- 
Srowne-Vintners Co., Inc, New Yorg | CTibe the situation in their juris-| 
Sole Distributors dictions, and will be permitted to 
: make recommendations for fur- 


' 


Tribe Wins Twelfth in Row on Hegan’s H 


a 


Che Washington Post Sports 


Wednesday, August 15, 1951 iD 


And He Doesn’t Mean Musie 


McCormick Tells 
How.to Play by Ear 


CAN’T PLAY THE PIANO by ear? Don’t fret, just tune in 
on Mike McCormick who tells you how to play the outfield 
by ear. 


“I judge the distance of the ball by the sound of the ball 
ains the Nats’ veteran flycatcher. “Been 
a doing it for years, and I’m sure I’m not 
= the only guy who does. 
i “Gets to be a habit after a whale. Just 
notice the next time you see a guy take 
a uiqck look at a ball hit to the outfield, 
then turn his bacg on it, run back about 
15 or 20 yards, turn around and, presto, 
the ball lands in his glove. That guy is 
playing the outfield by ear. He’s judged 
the distance of the ball by sound.” 
McCormick, one of the most capable 
retrievers in the majors, finds Yankee 
Stadium a tough park for an outfielder to 
play the ball by sound. 
“Air currents never remain the same 
there. They seem to change every second. 
ss I'd wager that there are more errors 
- Mike made on fly balls in the outfield in that 
stadium than in any other park. It’s 
tough to hear out there, that’s all.” 

McCormick reckoned that a number of outfield idlers got 
their ear drums punctured when Babe Ruth was in his hey-day. 
“That guy could really blast ‘em. Guess I would've stuffed 
cotton in my ears to muffie the sound of the ball hitting the 
bat when the Babe cranked up and blasted away. Must’ve been 
deafening.” 


“ae 


MaCovaiek 


NOTES OF NOTE: Navy sports publicist Johnny Cox weighs 
in with the first football brocpure of the season. It’s a neat job, 
done up with the usual Cox efficiency and with something new 
added this season, a prophecy by Army Coach Earl Blaik. 
Commenting on Army prospects for next fall, Blaik, who 
uttered these words before the cribbing scandal wiped out his 


‘Columnist Shirley Povich on Vacation 


Shirley Povich, The Washington Post’s Sports Cojumnist, 
is on vacation. His column, This Morning, will be resumed 
upon his return. 


squad, says: “A good spring practice uncovered a few replace- 
ments for a thinned out Army squad... We should have rugged 
but interesting going this fall” ... Jim Tatum, whose Mary- 
landers brush up against the Middies in Baltimore, November 
10, pulls out all the stops when talking about his Old Liner 
squad. “This should be my best team at Maryland,” Split-T 
Tatum would have you know ... Irv Noren, although Racked 
with pain when he got his jaw broken last Saturday, had 
presence of mind enough to call “time out” before keeling 
over ... Couple of hundred youngsters from the Harrisonburg, 
Va., Little League gang will be at Griffith Stadium Thursday 
to watch the Nats and Yanks skirmish ... Roosevelt and Wilson 
High Schools are TV pioneer. Two years ago, their inter-high 
football game was color televised as a test show for the Fed- 
eral Communications Commission . .. The Redskins have 
suffered two bad breaks with players on the College All-Star 
suqad. ‘Tackle Jim Staton, their No. 3 choice, and Fullback 
Leon Heath, No. 1 draft selection, banged up a shoulder and 
leg, respectively, scrimmaging for Friday night’s game against 
the Cleveland Browns. MORRIS SIEGEL. 


Bradley ‘Fix’ 
~Players Testify Touchdowners 


_ NEW YORK, Aug. 14, —Five H onor Yanks 


Bradley University basketball 
players were questioned by the 
district attorney’s office today 
about an alleged attempt to 
bribe them to lose a game to an 
Ohio College two years two. 

The five players came here vol- 
untarily from Peoria to give in- 
formation in the current probe of 
game-fixing. 

They are Gene Melchiorre, 
William Mann, George M. Chia- 
nakas, Aaron Preece and Charles 
Grover. An attorney, John D. Sul- 
livan, of Peoria, accompanied 
them. 

In March, 1949, the five pur- 
portedly were offered bribes to 
throw a game to Bowling Green 
State University, of Bowling 
Green, Ohio. 

Following today’s questioning, 
the five are scheduled to appear 
Thursday before @ New York 
grand jury investigating game- 
fixing by gamblers. 


At Lunch Today 


The New York Yankees get 
the Touchdown Club’s red 
carpet treatment today at a 
12:30 p. m. luncheon for the 
World Champs in the Statler’s 
Presidential Room. 

Manager Casey Stengel and 
Clark Griffith, who organized 
them as the’ New York High- 
landers in 1903, will be the 
top speakers. 

Touchdown Club affairs for 
major league teams have been 
strictly top-drawer, and one of 
the stipulations is that every- 
body on the team turn out. 
Thus the big-name Yankee 
cast will be headed by Joe 
DiMaggio, Phil Rizzuto, Yogi 
Berra, Vic Raschi, Ed Lopat, 
Allie Reynolds, Johnny Mize, 
with all the rest. 

Gen. Clifton B. Cates, United 
States Marine Corps com- 


mandant, will be guest of 
honor and Barnee Breeskin’s 
music will enliven the affair. 

Plates for the luncheon still 
are available at $3.25, and may 
be purchased either at the 
club, 1414 I st. nw., or at the 
Statler. 


Channel Tries Delayed 


WISSANT, France, Aug. 14 (?. 
Bad weather today forced an- 
other postponement of the mass 
attempt to swim the English 
Channel. A group of 13 men and 
seven women are entered in the 
swim, sponsored by the London 
Daily Mail. 


=> 


Joe May Be “Underweight” 


25,000 May See Louis Fight 
Bivins in Baltimore Tonight 


By Jack Hand 


BALTIMORE, Aug. 14 (#.—|trusts in a well-conditioned ath- 
The magic name of Joe Louis is | lete and the string of 1951 fight 
expected to lure some 25,000 fans | upsets. Pointing to Randy Tur- 
and $100,000 to Baltimore Memo-|pin’s victory over Sugar Ray 
rial Stadium tomerrow night to; Robinson and Jersey Joe Wal- 
see the 37-year-old former champ j|cott’s knockout of Ezzard 
go 10 rounds—or less—with | Charles he argues “anything can 
~ happen.” 


Louis-Bivins on Theater Who can say he’s wrong after 


the last few weeks? 
TV at Keith’s Tonight Among the ringside spectators 
The Joe Louis-Jimmy Bivins 


will be Champion Walcott him- 
self, presumably scouting this 

heavyweight fight tonight in 

Baltimore will be telecast ex- 


'“If a boy is told he can go away 
from school and still receive 


|;to the case of Star Halfback Ed 


‘every suspicion of wrong doing.” 


, 


W-M Players 
Given Credit 
For WorkNot 
Fully Done 


By Larry Laurent 
Post Reporter 

WILLIAMSBURG, Va., Aug. 
14.—Dr. John Pomfret, presi- 
dent of the College of William’ 
and Mary, today admitted some | 
of the school’s athletes “received | 
academic credit for work which 
they did not fully earn.” 

Dr. Pomfret’s statement came 
as the College’s Board of Visi- 
tors prepared to meet in Rich- 
mond tomorrow to investigate 
charges. of grade fixing and 
transcript altering. Football 
Coach Rube McCray and Bas- 
ketball Coach Barney Wilson 
suddenly resigned their jobs 
over the weekend. 

Both are expected to attend 
the Richmond hearing, as is Al 
Vandeweghe, former W&M end 
coach who brought the latest col- 
lege sports scandal into the open 
by revealing he had been cleared 
of “academic malpractice.” Van- 


deweghe received a letter from 
Dr. Nelson Marshall, dean of 


the college, absolving him of 
any blame in the irregularities. 


Somebody Is to Blame 

Dr. Pomfret, cutting short a 
vacation to return to Williams- 
burg, refused to name names of 
any of the athletes whose grades 
were fixed. 

“Who’s to blame?” he asked. 


credit for work while he 
away, who is to blame?” 
He .was apparently referring) 


is 


Weber and Fullback Johnny 
Conners who received credit for 
a physical education class two 
summers ago while working on 
summer jobs in New Jersey and 
Pennsylvania, their home States, 
respectively. 

In Richmond, Governor Battle 
said that the “craze for athletic 
victory, which is well nigh Na- 
tion-wide, cannot be permitted to 
undermine our sense of honor in| 
Virginia. 

“Upon the basis of press re- 
ports, the good name of the fine 
and honorable college of Wil- 
liam and Mary has been brought 
into question. 

“There can be no temporizing 
with these conditions. 

“IT am sure ‘the rector and 
board of visitors will spare no 
effort to get to the bottom of 
this matter and will take such 
appropriate and decisive action 
as may be necessary to eliminate 


Beware Your Language 

Oscar L. Shewmake, rector of 
the board, said the board would 
hear anybody who can “shed any 
light on the situation” as long as 
he “uses parliamentary lan- 
guage,” at Wednesday’s meeting 
in Richmond. 

“We expect to get to the bot- 
tom of this matter,” Shewmake 
said, “as expeditiously as pos- 
sible.” 

Pomfret said in a statement 
yesterday McCray and Wilson 
resigned rather than face a 
faeulty hearing: McCray strong- 
ly denied that was the case. So 
did Walter Hoffman, a Norfolk, 
Va., lawyer, who will attend to- 
morrow’s meeting with McCray 
“not as an attorney—but as a) 
friend and,advisor.” 

“Dr. Pomfret’s statement is 
incorrect the way it is worded, 
and he knows it,” Hoffman said. 

McCray said he was certain 
the “facts will be revealed at the 
board meeting.” 


Students Started It 

Dean Marshall said the inves- 
tigation started after “comments 
by students” that grade tamper- 
ing was going on, that some stu- 
dents were getting credit for 
work they weren’t doing. | 


“As a result, it lowered the 
morale of the other students to-' 
ward doing their own work. Sat- 
urday’s football games didn’t! 
keep their morale up all week.” | 

Dean Marshall added that 
some of the facts of the investi- 
gation were supplied by Mrs. L. | 
J. Gordon, who was a secretary | 
in the department of physical 


ad 


it in LOt 


2 Homers Hit 


Nats Trail 
Yanks, 3-1, 
In Fourth 


By Morris Siegel 
Post Reporter 


Tom Morgan, kayoed the 
other day in Philadelphia, was 
on the mound for the Yankees 
last night as the world champs 
opened a three-game series with 
the sixth-place Nats before 
21,000 Griffith Stadium fans. 

Home runs by Hank Bauer 
and Gene Woodling gave the 
Yankees a 3-1 lead in the fourth 
inning. 

Morgan, three-time master of 
the Nats this season, was op- 
posed by former Yankee Bob 
Porterfield whose latest accom- 
plishment was a 4-1 victory over 
ae a last week in New 

Ork, 


Morgan Starts 


Lefty Ed Lopat, originally 
named to open the series for 
the Yanks, was sidetracked at 
the last moment by Manager 
Casey Stengel in favor of Rookie 
Morgan, who won nine straight 
after losing to the Nats here 
Aprvfi 20. 


The Yanks needed a victory 


to make up for the half-game 
the pennant-mad Indians picked 
up on them earlier in the day 
by whipping Detroit. The Yanks 
were also trying to shake off a 
three-game losing streak, only 
one less than their high for the 
season, 


No Trouble in First 

Gene Woodling was the only 
Yankee to hit a ball out of the 
infield against Porterfield in 
the first inning as he retired the 
visitors in 1-2-3 order. Woodling, 
after Pete Runnels tossed out 
Rizzuto, flied to Sherry Robert- 
son in deep right-center. Porter- 
field then got Bobby Brown on 
an easy pop fly to Yost. 

Morgan had an even easier 


time with the Nats. He fanned | 


Eddie Yost, personally tossed 
out Gil Coan and finished the 


inning by making Runnels hig’ 


second strikeout victim. Morgan 
was blowing his fast ball by the 
Nats who offered very little op- 
position. 

Gil McDougald became the 
first baserunner of the ball game 
when he drew a walk with two 
away in the second, but he died 
on first when Gil Coan hauled 
in Joe Collins’ long fly ball. Joe 
DiMaggio and Yogi Berra lifted 
to Coan also. 

For the second straight in- 
ning the Nats were unable to 
hit a ball out of the infield 
against swiftie Morgan. Brown 
tossed out Mickey Vernon 
while McDougald took care of 
Sam Mele and Runnels on easy 
grounders as the game remained 
scoreless. 

With one swoosh of his big 
bat, Hank Bauer ended the 
Stalemate by driving Porter- 
field’s first pitch of the third 
inning deep into the left center- 
field stands for a home run and 
a 1-0 Yankee lead. The ball 


landed about the twelfth row of | 
the stands, some 450 feet from) 


home plate. It was his ninth 
homer of the season. 

Two. outs later, Gene Wood- 
ling got into the home run act 
by hitting one over the right- 
field wall to make it 2-0. Al- 
though not as far as Bauer’ 
massive wallop, there was noth- 
ing tainted about Woodling’s. It 
cleared the wall, 335 feet from 
the plate and 35 feet high, by 10 
feet. 

It was his ninth homer of the 
year. 

\ 


Browns Start Cole 


For Motley Friday 


BOWLING GREEN, Ohio, 
Aug. 14 (».—Coach Paul Brown 
said today he will start Emerson 
Cole as offensive fullback when 
his Cleveland Browns meet the 
College All-Stars in Chicago Fri- 
day night. 

Cole will replace hard-driving 
Marion Motley, who got back 
into uniform for drills today 
after a six-day layoff. Motley had 
some fluid drained from his ail- 


ing knees over the week-end.!F. B. (Freddie) Rees, one of the ber 29, 1948, when Saddler scored | (11.14). 
The Browns’ physician, Dr. Vic| greatest steeplechase jockeys of \a tremendous upset by knocking | 
‘all time, died at his home to- out Pep in four rounds. It was 


Ippolito, believes Motley will be 
able to play in the game, but 
the big back has missed a lot 
of practice. 


“SEE CHAMP, MUSCLE”—Seven-year-old 
George Carl Jackson, 2308 9th st. nw., 
was thrilled no end when Jersey Joe Walcott, 
world’s heavyweight champ, showed proper 
respect for his muscle. Walcott was here 


and Citizens’ 


by the boys’ 


yesterday at a meeting of the Junior Police 


will be back Thursday for the Walcott 
Variety Show at Uline Arena sponsored 


| 


Tigers Bow 
Again, 6-9, 
Lou Brissie 


Gets Credit 


CLEVELAND, Aug. 14 #.— 
With the help of groggy Catcher 
Jim Hegan, the Cleveland In- 
dians continued breezing pen- 
nant-ward today by defeating 
their favorite baseball team, the 
Detroit Tigers, 6 to 5. 

Stunned twice in collisions at 
the plate—in the sixth and 
eighth innings—Hegan stepped 
to the batter’s box in the tenth 
inning with two out. He stroked 
a single to left field off Hank 


Borowy, and scored Harry Simp- 
son from second. 

That was the ball game, and it 
extended the Indians’ consecu- 
tive win streak to 12, longest in 
nine years. 

It also was another blow to the 
poor Tigers, who now have lost 
15 out of 16 games to the Indians 
this season. 

‘Lou Brissie ended the game 
“jand got the victory, pitching 
three scoreless innings to extend 
his streak of goose eggs to 19 1/3 
innings, 

That made an even dozen 
games Lou has saved for start- 
ing pitchers. 


Hutchinson Chased 

The tension among the players 
was so pronounced that Detroit's 
starting pitcher, Freddy Hutch- 
inson, was thrown out of the 
game at the end of the eighth 
for arguing with Ed Hurley, the 
plate umpire. Hurley ordered 
Detroit’s Don Kolloway off the 
bench and into civvies in a sixth- 
inning argument. 
| Today’s contest started out as 
ia duel of home runs. Ray Boone 
opened the scoring with his ninth 
homer of the season in the sec- 
ond, that scored Al Rosen ahead 
of him. 

The Tigers caught up on bases- 
empty homers in the third and 
fourth innings, respectively, by 


By Bob Burchette, The Washington Post 


Corps at 720 Barry st. nw. He 


group. 


‘Ken Hershfield, Bob Marreno 


} 


2 Basketball Stars Suspended 
At GW Over Test Results 


Marrero, center-forward, saw 


George Washington Univer-) _ 
sity’s basketball team won't have | little action. 


: ; | Asked if the suspension meant 
the services of Ken Hershfield | 41, players couldn’t practice, a 


and Bob Marrero at least until) c¢-hoo] official said he didn’t 
after next February 1, it was| think so. The punishment in- 
revealed yesterday. volved, he explained, means they 
Both juniors, and from the| can't represent the school pub- 
Bronx, they have been put on|licly for the stated time. _ 
probation by a faculty disciplin-| What the suspicions entailed 
ary committee which became Was not made public, but it was 


suspicious. of the results of a Pointed out that if it had been 
'test last May. ‘eribbing or cheating, the athletes 
| Other students besides the would be expelled from the uni- 
basketball players were said to versity. 
be involved but they are the} The athletes will not be able 
only two who have been sus- to participate in any games until 
pended from extra-curricular ac-| after February 1, when the fall 
tivities for the fall period. ‘term ends. Games with N. C. 
Hershfield turned in some/| State, Virginia, Duke, Wake For- 
fine play late last season. and est and West Virginia included 
was being counted upon as one in over half of the university's 
of the mainstays of Coach Bill schedule will have been played 
| by that date. 


leases Colonial squad. 


Dick Kryhoski and Vie Wertz. 
Harry Simpson, the young Ne- 
gro who still has not demonstrat- 
ed his advance billing in San 
Diego, hit his fourth homer in 
the fourth to put the Indians 
B ahead again. 
Mitchell Hits 
It was in the sixth inning that 
> |the Tigers spurted into a 5-to-3 
191 lead on three singles, a double 
eth and an error by Al Rosen. But 
389 +8 peat agra tied se score with 
| . * single runs i 
‘St. Louis ... 34 312 36% eighth es ce 
YESTERDAY’S RESULTS The sixth inning also was when 
Cleveland, 6; Detroit, 5, 'Hegan was first knocked sprawl- 
New York at WASHINGTON, ng. 
Boston at Philadelphia, night.,; Rosen threw high to Hegan 
(Only games scheduled) ‘and Wertz hit him, charging in 
TODAY’S GAMES from third. Again in the eighth, 
Now Wak a WASHINGTON |Hoot Evers crashed into him, 
(night)—Lopat (15-6) vs. Moreno trying to score under Bob Avila’s 
(4-8). \ row. This time Hegan held 
Cleveland at St. Louis (night) |/‘2¢ Dall and Evers was out. 
—Wynn (12-11) vs. Garver (14-6).|,, ale Mitchell also got in on 
Boston at Philadelphia (night) |1"° streak” parade, hitting safe- 
_Kiely (3-2) vs. Fowler (4-8). y today for his twenty-second 
Detroit at Chicago (night)— | Consecutive — 
Srncks 646) ve Rogovin (7-1). etroit A Cleveland AB 


Priddy.2b 5 Mitchell, if 
NATIONAL LEAGUE 


K'hoski.1lb 2 Avila.2b.. 
o eneck. 18 0 Doby.cf ., 
" WL Pet. GB 
.667 


The Marors 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Cleveland .. 71 
New York .. 68 
Boston 
Chicago 
Detroit 51 
WASHING'N 47 
Philadelphia 44 


645 
618 
091 
545 
468 
431 


39 


6 


> 
wy 
jo 


el).3b... 

Wertz.rf.. 
Mullin. lf.. 
'Groth.cf 


Brooklyn .... 


Calvert, Clemson /|Saddler Defends 
End, Dies of Polio Title Against Pep 
SPARTANBURG, S. C., Aug. | In N, in Sept. 96 


14 (».—James (Jim) Henry Cal-| 
vert, 23-year-old end on a ee — Hera a 
é' ll Orange | Featherweight champion Sandy 
3 gg nee oe rt ngs ts Saddler and Willie Pep agreed to 
Bowl football team, J] a| terms today for a 15-round title 
of polio, He had keen 1 ‘match September 26 at the Polo 
week. Grounds. 
Both Saddler will get 37% percent 


he and his. brother, 


Clemson team. Jackie was @ although they once signed on a 
star halfback last season. 30-30 basis for a February fight 
| that didn’t come off. 

| . This will be the fourth cham- 
| Ex-Jockey Rees Dies pionship bout between these two 


| LEWES, England, Aug. 14 \®.| 126-pounders who first met Octo- 


day. He was 57. Rees won the |the first time the peppery Hart- 
1921 Grand National on Shaun /ford, Conn., fighter had been 
Spadah. stopped. 

Pep regained the title Febru- 


90, 


000 May See L. A. Game 


ary 11, 1949, on a 15-round deci- 
sion, but lost it to Saddler Sep- 
tember 8, 1950, when he dislo- 


education headed by McCray.' 
Marshall said he requested the 
information from Mrs. Gordon, 
who is no longer employed at 
William and Mary. | 

Meanwhile, with the start of, 
football practice less than three | 


weeks away, this college commu-' 
nity was wondering who will fill) 


Rams Favored 3 to 6 Points 
In Redskins’ Opener Tonight 


LOS ANGELES, Aug. 14.— 
More than 90,000 fans are ex- 


McCray’s shoes. The likely can-|pected to crowd into the Los 
didate is Marvin Bass, a former! Angeles Memorial Coliseum to- 
William and Mary gridiron great} morrow night when the Wash- 
and McCray’s line coach. ‘ington Redskins and the Los An- 
“There is nothing I can say! geles Rams play the seventh an- 
now,” Bass said. It was believed| nual Los Angeles Times Chari- 
Bass may turn down the post if' ties Inc. football game. 
too many strings are attached—! Although it’s the seventh an- 
such as declaring ineligible any|nual game, it will be the sixth 
of the players whose high school| meeting of the teams as one of 
irsnscripts or grades were in-jthe contests featured wartime 


volved in the reported “irregu-| service clubs. 
larities.” Local oddsmakers have estab- 


See LOUIS, Page 16, Column 2 
clusively in Washington to 


RKO Keith’s Theater, 15th 
and G sts. nw. The fight will 
not be on general televis TV 
for the general public in 
Washington and Baltimore. 


See, 
-_— 


Jimmy Bivins, Cleveland vet- 
eran. 

The old Bomber, waiting for 
the day when he'll get a chance 
to make ring history by regain- 
ing his title, is a lopsided fa- 
vorite over his 30-year-old foe. 
The price hung around 4-5 to l 
with few takers. : 

« Bivins’ manager, Allie Zack, 
, 


CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA., 
Aug. 13 ‘—If any of the 
U. S. Military Academy foot- 
ball players involved in the 
cribbing 


ginia, they probably will be 
turned down. 
A report from West Point 
said that at least three of the 
Army athletes—two backs and 
a guard—were eyeing Virginia. 


Virginia Closed to Ousted Cadets 


at the University. He added: 
scandal attempt to | 
enter the University of Vir- 


been received. 

“They may be eyeing us,” 
said football coach Art Guepe, 
“but I feel that those bays’ 
chances of being admitted at 
the University of Virginia are 
very slight. I certainly haven't 
sought them and they haven't 
contacted me. I feel that a 
school would be making a mis- 
take in accepting any of them 
unless their status is clarified.” 


“I think our catalog states | 
our position,” said Richard R. 
Fletcher, dean of admissions 


“A student who was sus- 
pended or dropped from an- 
other college for scholastic de- 
ficiency or for any other rea- 
son will not be admitted.” 

Fletcher said he was well up 
on his correspondence, and 
that no such applications had 


' 


cated his shoulder and was 
unable to come out for the 
eighth round of their Yankee 
Stadium battle. 


Night Games 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
York 002 1 


‘lished the Rams as anywhere 
from three to six-point favorites, 
a situation that suits Coach Her- |— 
man Ball and his Washington | New 
Redskins just fine. WASHINGTON 001 


In their five meetings, the un- | a 
derdog has always won. The| Morgan and Berra; Porterfield 


’Skins have taken three of the and Guerra. 
games to the Rams’ two. Last’ Home runs: Bauck (N. Y.) 3rd; 


‘'year Washington upset the Woodling (N. Y.) 3rd. 
eventual National Conference : 


Jackie Calvert, were on the) of the gate and Pep 22% percent | 


| Ginsberg.c 
| Evers,cf, lf 
| Berry.ss 


‘New York ... 
Philadelphia. 
St. Louis .... 
Boston 
Cincinnati ... 
Chicago 449 23% 
Pittsburgh 402 29 
YESTERDAY’S RESULTS 
Brooklyn at New York, night. 
Philadelphia at Boston, night, 
Chicago at St. Louis, night. 
(Only games scheduled) 
TODAY’S GAMES 
Brooklyn at New York— 
Branca (10-3) vs. Hearn (10-7). 


1 Faster.1b. 
549 12% 
509 17 88 
495 18% | Bearden.p 
467 21% | Borows.p. 
AG4 22 


0 Boone.ss.. 
3 Hegan.c.. 
1 Lemon,p . 
1 Gromek.p. 
0 bMcCosky 
0 Brissie.p.. 


COOOL SWUM AAR AD 
CO OO OP ID 

COCOKMKHUGONNOHONDO 
| mOneaaumoenanen 

OFM OR UHH HOO; Rr 
| CoomwH~2weSoe se ewd 
| Commonmosconno> 


Totals. 4012x2913 Totals..41 13301 

xTwo out when winning run scored. 
aWalked for Bearden in tenth. 
bSingled for Gromek in seventh. 
cRan for Easter in eighth, 


| Detroit 1 108 000 
| Cleveland 0 100 110 1—6 


nr 


Doby. Rosen. Simpson 
Errors — Hutchinson, 
Brissie. 
hoski, Wertz, Simpson. Evers, 

Rosen, Hegan, Ginsberg, Mitchell. 
base hits—Doby, Priddy 2 

Boone, Kryhoski, Wertz, Simpson. 
bases—Rosen, Kell, Simpson. Sacrifice— 
|Berry. Double plays—Berry to Priddy to 
Philadelphia at Boston (night) | Kryhosk!; Boone to Avia one Simpson: 

i osen to 


. Avila to Simpson. Left on 

|\—Heintzelman (6-8) vs. Spahn|bases—Detroit, 11; Cleveland, 9. Base on 

| balls—Hutchinson 2. Borowy 1. Lemon 2, 

(13-11). — q+ ag yee Oy pee 2, 
P : . | Bearden 1. Borowy 2. Lemon 1. its of 

| §t. Louis at Pittsburgh (night) | w"Hutchinson, 10 in'8: Bearden. 2 in 1: 

\—Staley (13-11) vs. Friend (5-8). 

| Chicago at Cincinnati (night)— 

‘MecLish (3-6) vs. Raffensberger 


Stolen 


| Borowy. 1 in 74; Lemon, 7 in 5 (no outs 
in sixth): Gromek. 2 in 2: Brissie. 3 in 3. 
Hit by pitcher—Brissie {Kell}. Wild pitch 
— on. finner—Brissie (3-4). Loser- 

Borowy (2-2). Umpires—Hurley, Passa- 
rella. Berry and Rommel. Time—2:45. 
Attendance—15.505. 


| 
t 
i 
} 


-" 


At the YF St. Store 


FINAL 
CLEARANCE 


of famous make men’s sportswear 


$15 Famous Make Cotton Cord Sport Coats. Washable 
in sizes 36-46 broken lots . 


$22.50 Famous Make, Lightweight Sport Coat. Rich-look- 
ing small checks, plaids in sizes 36-46 broken lots. 


) 
} 


‘champions, 17-14. | Boston 391 
| It’s been a thrilling series! ppijad’phia 001 

‘since both teams play much 

harder than you'd expect for a| McDermott and Rosan; Zol- 
professional exhibition. Redskin | gak Coleman (2) and Tipton. 


‘Owner George Preston Mar-| 
'shall’s home is in Beverly Hills}. Hore runs: Williams (Boston) 


‘and he’s always eager to have his | Ist, one on; Williams (Bos.) 4th; 
club perform well for his neigh- Majeski (Phila.) 4th. 


bors, a fact he does not attempt 
to disguise from the players or | NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Brookyin ..00 


coaches. 
New York ..3 


The Rams, of course, go all out 

in an attempt to win. Since this | 

first appearance has a decided | shor Seman ae oo 

effect on the season ticket sale, | P@neaml Spencek an estrum. 
Home runs: Mueller (N. Y.) Ist, 

one on; Lockman (N. Y.) Ist. 


the Los Angeles National League 
entry beats its brains out to 
make a nice impression on the 
prospective customers. 

Coach Joe Stydahar’s Rams 


See REDSKINS, Page 17, Col. 6 


‘and St. Claire. 


Roberts and Wilber; Nichols | 


At YMS F Street and Clarendon, Va., stores only $15.99 
$3.95 Short Sleeve Sport Shirts 
$5 to $5.95 Long Sleeve Sport Shirts. Large and extra 
large only $2.99 
$9.95 Casual Jackets. Large and medium only ...++++-$7.99 
$7.50 Famous Cord Slacks. Broken lots ......eess0%--$5.99 
$17.95 Plaid Lined Jackets seneéesacagantseneee 
$4.95 Washable Denim Slacks $3.99 
$17.50 Wool Tropical Slacks. Broken lots ....+++++++-$S12.99 


\ 


AMONG Mens Suop 


DOWNTOWN: 1319 F Street N.W. 
NORTHEAST: 3942 Minnesota Ave. N.E. 
CLARENDON, Va.: 3030 Fairfax Drive 


= h, Sah egbiat’s 


Mulloy Carries Injured Talbert 


in Double Win Over Bogley, Devoe 


a 


Losers Take 
First Set, 
Drop Three 


BROOKLINE, Mass., Aug. 14, 


(?.—An injured right ankle and 


a twisted left knee hampered =; ~ 
Bill Talbert of New York, as he © 
and Gardnar Mulloy of Coral ; 


Gables, Fia., 
paigns for their fifth team title 
today in the National Doubles 
Tennis championship  tourna- 
ment at Longwood. 
After drawing a bye, 
veterans, 
-port Casino Sunday, gained the 
third round with a 5-7, 7-5, 6-2. 
6-4 win over Gil Bogley, of 
Chevy Chase, Md., and Charlie 
Devoe, of Indianapolis. 
Mulloy’s brilliant all-round 


opened their cam- : 


ee . ie» Ps ‘ 


ie eae ce. 


j 


those) ~ 
winners at the New- 


A 


Ww 


play carried the full load after ee od : 


Talbert was forced to slow down 
early in the second set. 


The New Yorker injured his * vs 


ankle Sunday and, while favor. 


ing it, took a toss and wrenched ,,; - 2 | 
the knee of his other leg. He was & 
confident, however, he would be kac® 


able to continue in the title com- 
petition. 

Meantime, their top rivals, 
Frank Sédgman and Ken Me- 


Gregor, of Australia’s Davis Cup m 


defending forces, 


passage into the third round 


had an easy Mee 


with a 6-2, 6-3, 6-3 triumph over § 


Longwood’s Sumner Rodman) 
and Harrison Rowbotham. 

Edwin Weseley, Chevy Chase, 
Md., and David Mesher, Boston,; 
teamed to defeat Mel Gallagher, 
Los Angeles, and William Max- 
well, Bakersfield, Calif., 6-2, 46, 
6-1, 6-2. 

Another Washingtonian, J. 
Burke Wilkinson, lost with Rob- 
ert Freedman, Springfield, 


RUGGED ACTION—D. C. Fireman Hal Krug goes into third 
hard in the fifth Inning of the game with Washington Royals 
on the Ellipse yesterday. At the time, the teams were tied, 
1-1, and the Royals’ Warren Austin made sure he put Krug 


- 


ee a 


By William Elemm-The Washington Post 


out after taking a throw from Leftfielder Milton Lundy. It 
all became academic when the Firemen broke loose for nine 
runs in the eighth to win, 10-1. and advance in the City 


Sandlot Championship Series, 


| 


| 


| But It Hurts 


v 


Mass., to Jerry DeWitts, San 
Francisco, and Whitney Reed, 
Alameda after taking "ee first 
two sets, 3-6, 5-7, 6-1, 6-1, 

Budge Patty, of Los an | 
and Tony Trabert, of Cincinnati, | 
who were second-seeded, romped 
against Alan Herrington, of Los | 
Angeles, and John Sisson, of San 
Moreno, Calif., for a 6-2, 6-1, 6-1 | 
triumph. 

As the other favorites forged 
ahead, Herb Flam, of Beverly | 
“Hills, Calif., and Vic Seixas, of | 
Philadelphia, defeated Califor- | 
nian youngsters Jaque Grigry | 
and Larry Huebner, 6-1, 7-5, 6-2. | 

The second-round action in the | 
women’s division was even more | 
formful. | 

The favored Doris Hart, of 
Coral Gables, Fla., and Shirley | 
Fry, of Akron, Ohio, refused to | 
yield a game to Carolyn Liguori, | 
— Brooklyn, and Diana Mcll-| 
“vaine, of New York, and the | 
SBritish Wrightman cup’s aces, 
= Mrs. Jean Quertier and Kay 
*Tuckey, brushed aside Mista’ 
- Kerr, of Belmont, Mass., and | 
“Vera Dwight, of Cambridge, 
po. 6-1, 6-2, 


Youre So Smart 
to smoke 


oxy 
ria ait | 


es. ‘tet, — atiat? oe ue * 


| day. 


: | 
Firemen Score 


Not Worried About British Champ 


9 In 8th, Win 
In Series, 10-1 


By Martie Zadravec 


The D. C. Fire Department 
scored nine runs in the eighth | 
|inning to break a 1-1 tie and de- 
feat the Washington Royals, 
10-1, in their opening game in the 
‘City Sandlot Championship Se- 
ries on the South Ellipse yester- 


The Firemen, Departmental 
League champs, got at least one 
hit in each inning, but couldn't 
score their second run until the 
last half of the eighth inning, 
‘when 14 men went to bat against 
three Royal pitchers. 

Pitcher Dytch Schaefer and 
Playing-Manager George Larrick 
registered the big blows in the 
nine-run eighth with a two-run 
single and double respectively. 
The inning included six hits, two 


walks, two hit batsmen, a sacri-| 
fice and a double steal. 

The Royals, Metro League 
titlists, tied the score at 1-1 in| 
the third inning on a single by 
Skippy Neverson, a sacrifice, and | 
a run-producing single by Milton | 
Lundy, after the Firemen scored | 
an unearned run in the first in- 
ning: The score came when Ben 
Harrell doubled, went to third on 
an error and scored when Royal 
catcher Ed Cooper threw past 
‘the pitcher while returning the 
ball, 

Today the Trader Glassers| 
with Jim Beasley scheduled to, 
pitch will face the defending | 
champions, the Metropolitan Po- | 


= lice, who will start Geae ae! 


Frank Mahon. The Glassers de- 


| Stewart.p. 
|Medley.p. 
Evans.p.. 
aBullock.. 
bMayo... 


| 


|'outs—Schaefer 9. Stewart 1. 


feated Ole Olson in the opening) 
‘game of the double elimination 
tourney Monday. 


iW. Royals ABH 
N’erson,rf 
'Prue,cf.. 
'Douglas,2b 
Cooper.c.. 
ws Austin,3b 
'FPoster.1b. 
Harris.ss. 


oO 4 Fire Dept. AB 
0 Cady,cf 


5 
0 Harrell, 3b 


ee 


| mNNMOmn nw 
WNWOOSCONSY 


7? 


! —s 
a 8 CWwWNOOCWOWSD 


| 
© | 


Totals. .38 15 


OK OCOWS & 1D e NS 
SOOCSCF-1IWUINNe 


ococOorwr};F}HO}HO}H 


oe 


Totals..31 62412 
aPlied out for Cooper in ninth. 
bRan for Austin in ninth. 


Washingten _ to: 001 000 
Fire “Department 


o00—— 1 
ent . 100 000 09x-—10 


Runs—Cady. Lamon, Harrell] 2, Never- 
son, Shine. Vaughn, Larric 9 Zancer. 
Schaefer, Krug. Errors—Austin, Cooper. 
Harris, Zanger. Larrick, Lamon, Stewart. 
Runs batted in—Lundy, Zanger, Schaefer 
2. Cady. Harrell. Lamon 2, Larrick 2. Two- 

hits—Harrell, Larrick. Stolen bases 
Lamon. Sacrifices—Lundy. Zan- 

. Double plays—Larrick to Zan- 

ger to Shine: Zanger to Larrick to Shine: 
Douglas to Harris to Foster to Cooper. 
| Left on bases—Fire Dept., 11: Royals, 7. 
|Hits off—Stewart. 10 in 7: Medley. 5 in%s: 
Pvans, in %: Schaefer, 6 in 9. Base 
on balls—Schaefer 1. Stewart = rike- 


Med 2 
Hit by pitcher—Schaefer (Cooper): Med. 
ley (Krug) Winner—Schaefer. Loser— 
Stewart. Umpires—Powell and Bailey. 


LOUIS—from Page 15 


You’re smart indeed to smoke | 
Parlianients. For Parliament's | 
superb tobaceos bring you the 
utmost in smoking enjoyment. 
And Parliament’s fresh, clean, 
individual filter mouthpiece 
gives you filtered smoking at its 
smartest and best ! 


it, “xg, \’ = 


Le ge 


+.% 


‘kid Louis who might be 
‘lenger if he keeps up the good 


Louis Fights 
Bivins Tonight 


a chal- 


work. 

Oddly enough there has been 
concern in the Louis camp about 
underweight. That’s right. Un- 


derweight. Joe scaled only 202 |~ 


pounds after working in the 
sticky heat of last Sunday. Man- | 


ager Marshall Miles laid him off E | 


Monday and today, hoping to | 


bring him into the ring at 208. | © 
Bivins will be about 181, his = 


usual fighting weight. 


Louis weighed 216 last Sep- F 
‘tember when he fought Charles. =" 
Since the Charles fight, 


has fought seven times. 


course, he won them all. 
} 


BASEBALL TONIGHT 
WASHINGTON 


vs. 8:30 P.M. } 
NEW YORK | 
GRIFFITH STADIUM 


_ 


Maxim Says ‘Guy Over There 


Will Be Easy ‘If I Beat Murphy’ 


By Whitney Martin 


SUMMIT, N. J., Aug. 14 (#. 
“If I beat Murphy, that guy 
over there won't be nothin.’ ” 

These deathless words were 
voiced today by Joey Maxim, 
the thawing world light-heavy- 
weight champion who is being 
brought out of a deep freeze to 
defend his title against Sailor 
Bob Murphy August 22 at 
Madison Square Garden. 

The “guy over there” he was 
referring to is Don Cockell, 
British light - heavyweight 
champion, and the significant 
part of the comment was that 
he said “if I beat Murphy.” 

He didn’t say “when I beat 
Murfphy.” In fact, you rather 
gathered that he had grave 
doubts, particularly when he 
added thoughtfully: “I think 


I’ll beat him. Iot got to. This is 
i 


JOEY, a handsome person- 
able fellow quite big for his 
size, meaning he’s a big man 
for a light heavy, lolled on the 
porch of what the sign said 
was Ehsan’s Training Camp, 
where for the first time in his 
29 years he is risking fresh 
air poisoning by preparing for 


| a fight in the country. 


“The first week I was here, 
the silence nearly drove me 
crazy,” he says. “Now I like it.” 

Maxim knows he was no 
bargain in losing to Ezzard 
Charles in a heavyweight title 
fight not long ago. 

“T was sick,” he says defen- 
sively. “I don’t know what was 
the matter, but when I went 
in the ring I was sweating like 
a pig and my skin was pale. 
By the ninth round I had blis- 
ters on my feet.” Just what 
that had to do with his illness 
he failed to explain.” 


“ANYWAY, Charles didn’t 
look so good against Jersey 
Joe Walcott,” he said. “I was 
watching the fight. and a ball 
game on television, switching 
back and forth from one to the 
other. My wife said: ‘Leave 
the fight on. I’ve got a funny 
feeling Walcott’s going to win.’ 
You know how women get 


those hunches about things. 
She was right.” 
Doc Kearns, 


son Joey had been idle so long. 
“Joey eats well at home,” 


tion. 

“When we won 
there weren't any light heavy- 
weights around to fight. 


here to fight Charles. 


up bouts before he met Maxim. 


“Then some good light 
phy, and Harry Matthews, and 
Bob Satterfield. But then I was 
committed to fight Charles. 
Now we’re taking on Murphy. 


keep Joey idle as I did before.” 
A little later, after the 
steaks had disappeared, 


ping shepe, calves, mountain 
goats, kittens, 


| 
y) | 


ws 


dogs en route, to an outdoor 
ring where Joey went through 
his daily chores. 


Eddie Slams Yanks 


Stengel Right 
About Joost, 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
Wednesday, August 15, 195] 


16 


Women Play 
For Post Cup 
On Friday 


| 45 
Ninety-four women—the ice | oan 
||} est field in the history of class 
B golf in Washington—will com-.| 
pete for The Washington Post : 
“B” trophy Friday morning at 
the Prince Georges Country || 
club. 

Pairings and starting times: 


STARTING FROM NO. 1 TEE 
Beri . a rag ttf Manor: Mrs 
on . G. -34—Mrs. n . 
P.G: Mrs. E. Bean. ew ¥ Matt Schrenk, - Kenwood: Mrs. Geo. Diffen- 
Conover, P. G.: s. ; 9:36 — Mrs. Audrey 
g-42—Mrs. “> - "Waehs wee . J. D, Ward, Ken.; 9:40 
Ez Dut  §:46—Mrs. ma —Miss Mat jorie Hull Ken.; Miss Betty 
R. L. Hutchiso Nuttman, Ken.; 9:44—-Mrs. Ad Howard, 
- Miles, Was h.:} ‘| Me Mrs. E Craig Wilt on, Ken.: 9:48—~ 
: 
e 


TD 


Prank epee Beth.; 10: agrees J. 
Geea ae: ve Cc 2evaiies, 
Con 10:10—Ars. Jc a W. Piatley. Cons.; 
| Miss Myrna Reese. Con 
STARTING FROM ‘NO. 10 TEE 
Mrs. Wm, 
> 48—Mrs. vem * Wilson, 
: 5 _N. Brawner, Col. ‘ 
Thos. Brough. Col.: Mrs. H. 
: 8:56—Mrs. Thos. Beavers. Col.: 
J. DardDy. Col.: 9:00—Mrs. 
-; Miss Bernice Baker. r. 
U Sk! I. S.;: Mrs 


PHILADELPHIA, Aug. 14 
(.—Casey Stengel pointed to 
a slim, bespectacled guy who 
looks more like an account- 
ant than a shortstop and com- 
mented, “there, fellows, is a 
mighty fine bail player.” 

The New York Yankee skip- 
per referred to Edwin David 
Joost, smooth shortstop of the 
Philadelphia Athletics. That 
was on Friday when the Yanks 
came to town for a five-game 
series. 

Much to Stengel’s discomfi- 
ture, Joost picked this Yan- 
kee series to prove that Casey 
knows a ball player when he 
sees one. The 35-year-old Cali- 
fornian, who contrary to base- 
ball custom, gets better with 
age, slaughtered Yankee pitch- 
ing. He made 14 hits as the 
A’s took three of the five 
games and knocked the Yanks 
out of first place. 

ALREADY this year, Joost 
has 15 homers, four triples, 
20 two - baggers and 57 runs 
batted in. 

In the Yankee series here, 
it seemed that everytime you 
looked around there was Joost 
on base. In the Sunday dou- 
bleheader sweep, Eddie rapped 
out seven hits and drove in 
three runs. 

Joost’s antics are nothing 
new to the Shibe Park faith- 
ful. They've been accustomed 
to it ever since the likeable 
father of four boys first joined 
the Athletics in 1947. He batted 
only .263 in his best season 
for the A’s (1947), but as the 
leadoff man most of the time, 
Joost knocked in 81 runs. In 
his four seasons here, Eddie 
cracked a total of 80 home 


g 16 ‘Mr : 
| Rozansky, I. ; ~Mrs. Al Swaine, 
Edna Janes, I. S.; Mrs. John McCarthy, 
; 9:28—Mrs. Geo. Freeman, Kendwood:; 

I Y Mrs Max Gershen I. &.; 9 
®. Fairchild, P. G.: 


"tee. ‘Ben 


catons 
ash.; ‘ i 
J. R. Graves. 
agg : : 
8: :38—Mrs. David Stone; Mrs 
hb hh ood, 
9:02—Miss Barbara Amiel, Wood: Mrs. 
B. 8. Coo A.-N.: 9:06——-Mrs. Richard E 
a ae Miss Helen Molnar, Arg.: 
9: . C. B. Howard, Arg.: Mrs. Virgil 
, Aré.: 9:14—Mrs. V. J. Erken- | 
; Mrs. Nelson Leclair -N 
W. pocereen. A.-N.; Mr 
A.-N.; ~Mrs. K. C. John- 
"Mit s. J. a. *Phillins. A.-N.: 9:26 
. Ww. PS aoe f B. H.: Mrs. D. W. 
.. 9:30—Mrs. M. C. Pers ison, 
: R Upton Haley, B. H.;: 9:34— | 
Mrs. L. 8. Crane B. H.: Mrs. —. Wheat, | 
B. H.: 9:38—Mrs. E. G. 
Mrs. A. D. = ; ae 
Dallas mene. : Mrs. 
Beth.: a6 hrs. Harry Haight, Beth.: 
Mrs. R. S Goodridge, Beth.; 9:50—dMrs. | 
Rayner Gaillard, Beth.: Mrs. Fred Curley, 
Wash.: 9:58—Mrs. Victor Deinlein Beth.; 
Mrs. Nelson Foley, Beth 
10:02—-Mrs. Carl Armfelt, Beth.; 


Raiph Wood. Ken.: ! E. C. Kreutz- 
Ken.: 9:52—JMrs. ewis Markus, 
- Miss Patalie Pyser. Woodmont: 9:36 
|—-Mrs,. John Spearman. Cong.; Mrs. George 
|Rosen Cong.; 10:00—Mrs. Robert Creasey, 
Cong : Mrs. R. W. Danischefsky, Cong.; 
04——-Mrs David Weir, Cong.; Mrs. 

Dwi ght Avis, Cong 


Trade BOATS Terms — 
Wood, Metal & Fiberglass 


Prices Start $97.50 fer 14’ Boats 


A few Page ones at 
0% 0% discount. 


Albert 


New ball: Outboards in Stock. 

r, |) Life Preserver Cushion Sale $2.98 ea. 
a 

S. King Fulton, tc. 


803 Maine Ave. &.W. EX. 3406 
Open 7 to 7 Daily; Sunday 10 te 8 


Mrs 


ede Airways to Fairways! 


All-Expense Golfer’s Holiday via All-American Airways 
to famed Bedford Springs Hotel, Bedford, Pa. 
Only $51.50 (plus tax) for: 

@ Golf on a cool, breeze-swept, @ Sy 
championship course including 

greens fees and 2 lessons 


imming—indoor and out- 
door pools 

@ Horseback riding 

e Flying All-American Airways 
and limousine service to the 
Springs 


e 3 days and 2 nights at historic 
Bedford Springs Hotel. 7 deli- 
cious meals 


See Your Travel Agent 


BEDFORD SPRINGS HOTEL  “A““-AA*ER/CAN, | 


BEDFORD, PA, AIRWAYS al 


runs, 11 triples and 81 doubles. STerling 4500 


— 


who pilots | 
Maxim, was explaining the de- | 
feat by Charles, and the rea- | 


he was saying, “and he got so | 
big while he was idle so long 
he just couldn’t get in condi- 


the title, | 


4 
mean, any you could draw $30 | 
with. So they brought us back | 
Then | 
Charles came up with that | 
heart condition, and when he | 
got well he wanted some tune- | 


heavies came along, like Mur- | 


We'll fight Matthews any time | 
when we can see we can make | 
some money. I’m not going to | 


the | 
group was herded up the side | 
of Orange Mountain, sidestep- | 


chickens and | 


| 


Expert Repair Service 
L. S$, JULLIEN, Inc. 


1443 P St. N.W. NOrth 8075 


PHILO AUTO RADIO} 


em ae 


——- 


—= 


SCOOP! EXCLUSIVE ! 


TONIGHT » 105%; 


RKO KEITH'S. 
THEATRE TELEVISION 


(CANNOT Of SEEN ON ANY OTHER 
PUBLIC OR PRIVATE TY SET) 


JOE LOUIS vs 


HEAVYWEIGHT BOUT 


Pius SCREEN FEATURE 


JIMMY BIVINS | 
| 


Louis | By 


pe 


enjoyment. 


f rue Sour Mash 
bourbon is slow-made, 
slow-aged for deeper, 
richer, fuller flavor. 
Make it your 

Key to true bourbon 


OLD HIZGERALD 


Genuine SOUR MASH Bourbon 
OLD FASHIONED. Arstlcn stl 


_ STITZEL-WELLER DISTILLERY, lst. Lovisvilie, Kentucky, 1849 
100% Bonded Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whisks y—100 Proof 


+ arta , pena a - einen 
ao — ——— ee ee ee ee ee ee eee eee eee eee eee Gee eee ce: 


Gef your 
free T RUCK SAVER /aspection Here 


International Truck owners- 


if you want to save time, trouble and trucks in the un- 
certain days ahead, come in and get your free Truck 
Saver Inspection now! 


How can you afford to pass up a no-charge, no-obli- 
gation opportunity to save you real money im the 
months ahead? You know the answer to that one—so 
you know why there’s no time like the present to beat 
truck trouble to the punch! 


Come in and get your free Truck Saver Inspection. 
The sooner you do that, the sooner you'll get all the ben- 
efits that are yours in our eomplete Truck Saver Plan. 


Put the complete International 
Truck Saver Plan to work for you now 


The complete International Truck Saver Plan has been 
developed by experts, after a thorough study of today’s 
truck operating problems. It offers these benefits to 
International Truck operators: 


1. Better performance over a longer truck life: trucks 


--------- INTERNATIONAL TRUCK SAVING STATIONS 


ZN Uc SAVING 
w STATION 


]. Get your trucks ready for uncertain days ahead 


2. Get a 99-point checkup at no cost, no obligation y i 


/ 
are kept in shape to do the most efficient job possible 
until they can be replaced by new units. 


2. Delays in getting new parts are minimized: by antici- 
pating future requirements, the demand for needed 


parts can be accurately estimated. 


3. Maintenance costs cut, down time reduced: by pre- 
venting major breakdowns, a big saving is effected in 
both time and money. 


4. Truck value is maintained: trucks kept in the best 
possible cogdition are worth more when it’s time for 
replacement. 
Remember — our free 
inspection offer has a time limit 

September 30 is the deadline for our free Truck Saver 
Inspection. So make arrangements to get yours now, 
and see how our complete Truck Saver Plan can be put 


to work to keep your trucks rolling at peak efficiency 
through any emergency. 


: FACTORY BRANCH 
901 coheer coat Road, N.E., Washington, D. C. 


DEALERS 


ALEXANDRIA, VA.—Prevo Automotive Service 
ARLINGTON, VA.—Bauserman’s Service 
LEESBURG, VA.—Bishop’s Service Station 
MANASSAS, VA.—R. J. Wayland 
MITCHELLVILLE, MD.—John L. Ingalls 
MEMBERS OF AMERICA’S LARGEST EXCLUSIVE TRUCK SERVICE ORGANIZATION 


INTERNATIONAL 


PURCELLVILLE, VA.—Whitmore & Arnold 

PRINCE FREDERICK, MD.—Prince Frederick Mtr. Co. 
SILVER SPRING, MD.—Maloney’s, Inc. 

TREMONT, VA.—Lee Highway Service 

WALDORF, MD.—Maryland Tobacco Association 


THE WAS HINGTON POST 17 


Bel Air Track Opens 10-Day Race Meeting Tid 


ore Produce and Livestock 
o . t ’ UP) (USDA).—}| 22-inch and ~‘ Sy ee Wealthys, 
| | CATTLE Receipt, (100, cette, 004 |? net ge a iad Tact unger 
| lots tly cow teady with Monday s . 
Angles for Anglers + t Gla ce Bill rade, 1 load. 821-1 
irs n ' | lit 25.00@ | Halehavens, U. 8. 1, 2%-inch and up, 
] . . ‘ © B Bennings 26:00; canners and cutters, largely 19 006 | Jersey, 1 mee aad ue. 5 geo new 
i | 23.00; small lot medjum and £0 - - & 5, 
Bluefish Make First Appearance in Bay; Pays $10.30 | BSc a se as eae Sh aleeh tae 
ays 


| te load. 821-lb. Braham steers to/| tone; bushel baskets, Maryland, Goldene 
ee at 28.00. odd head commer- ‘east, U. 8. 1, 2-inch and up, 2.25@2. 50; 
. CALVES—Receipts. 150, steady, mod-/| _,,’ de ize mark, 1.25: South H 
DEAR FOLKS: erately active. choice and prime vealers. ka orade “or eine mark. 1.40; Geltemeaet’ 


‘eath 
eatiner man 
9 
: : S iia e largely 40.00@41.00, latter price the top af : = 
|Trout Pant for Breath in Virginia Drought When this track opens for | srdstved tise So sowSt 0, ei Soa| itt Sera Wari, Dmen aad 


: | nes the Wednesday program many utility, 20.00@ , is ATOES—Barely steady v. s. 1, 
In Inaugural By Ralph Murdock devils should show over the | Commission, as approved by At Saratoga customers will note the ab- | quits under 260 Ibs. steady but some tnd | Seale tae Danae ete? er 


WE NABBED OUR first | Weekend. At least, it’s a start. | the United States Fish and rangéd 25 cents lower. over 260-lb.| 1b. sacks, Cobblers, 90 cents. Pennsy)- 


: sence from the entries of Miss ights generally 25 cents oft: sows, | Vania, 100-lb. sacks, Cobblers, 1.5061 75; 
: : ! Wild Life Service. , : peter ea Bans 4 170-2 0 ib ) . ks, 85@90 cents. New Setiew 
By Walter Haight | bluefish Saturday with trolling | y VIRGINIA, considerable | The .open season on Sora | SARATOGA SPRINGS, N. Y.,| Prime, by N Barnes, of Ale |$isepae te 300 Ibs 39. 200, Joe. | 100, sacks, Ralandins. 1 7901.90, Vir 
, | ‘ il ai ' : » IN. ’ * | 22.7354023.5 2 DS.. B2U.2002 marry: ~ oe orcinary 

st t | : ; :j . — , m;: 12 Ibs. | @Ui 00. 
Post Reporter | lures. A mixed school of blues | concern has been occasioned (Carolina Rail) starts Septem- {|Aug. 14 (PP. Alfred Gwynne | exandria. Her trainer, Mrs. over, 300 Ibs.. 20. n; lbs — tA, Se et 


BEL AIR, Md., Aug. 14—Mary-| and stripers appeared off | by the extreme heat and dry- | ber 1 and continues through | Vanderbilt's homébred First) Georgea Saportas, jr., reports | sows under 400 Ibs. *ostiv 18 50a 19 00; | North \riwashea oes baskets, Golden, 
land’s minor track season, far) Sharp's Is- ) | mess of the current summer | October 20. The daily bag | Gjance, rated smartly by Eric! Miss Prime has run her last | $9%°9, 25°, toraine to weleht and con- | Peyltry ‘and a 

, land in the : —™ thus far, and the effect upon | limit is 25. The shooting sea- ay ‘ : , dition | ULTRY—Market™s t ead y: receipts 

ahead of last year in both crowds | | | ; Guerin, chalked up his fifth| race, having been permanently | : ; trading rather slow. Pryers. 31. 


j ieee . 4 . . : — s. $0: hi i last ‘ 
and betting, reaches the half-| 2fternoon, © OS | fresh-water game fish. Some of | son on other rail and gallinules triumph of the current season| retired after bowing a tendon. | yonday. small lot choice and prime| 32) 5. Hens, hovay tree. Soa 32, fe 
way mark here tomorrow with| Just at sun- & eee | the trout streams in the Old will be the same dates as the as he outran a crack field of| Next spring she will be bred to | around | 85- Ib. spring lambs. 1.00 hisher : lisht type thease 7 

34 es ) cont . , ; r j iotiie . , : , at 34 truck lot choice S.. OSTLY | EGGS—Mark 3 
the opening of a 10-day meeting Rew SE ee _apeemnion . State mave been | above, WH. one. exeeption speed horses in the Broadalbin}| Tailspin, one-time Greentree | ewes feeding lambs, 31.00; package good | offerings moderate | wholesale prices 
under the auspices of the Har- surfacing +9 be | perilously low, and if the the limit will be only 15. The Classified Handicap today horse now standing on the | *"4 choice shorn breed ewes, 17.00 | large, 66468: A mediums, 60@63: B laree. 


, TORS aR . , 564 r s 
ford Countv Fair Association. fish o nly . >  - e: 3 drought should continue, there shooting hours are one-half Making his move when Janon Fisher. ir.. farm. Miss ively 8 Veustalien cee es merece, use, necrton to eal 
Racing Secretary Ty Shea has | stayed up # (gee gue ¢| is danger of loss of fish in the hour before sunrise to sunset straightened in the home lane,| Prime won 10 races on the | _,APPLES—Dull: offerings moderate: de-| an ere ital ee 
, ‘1. | in- Mixer” % 2 s. | (EST). The detailed regula- , , | mane we Se ait tee tad Gal toe: (See cane 
gathered the best sprinters avail-| £0T 20 min mk 5 mapouncieG waters | the 4-year-old son of Discovery-| minor tracks last year, and 
able on the circuit for tomor-| Utes, but it a Ponds have been low almost | tions for migratory waterfowl | p-iqe Elect disposed of the fal-| either holds or has held track +————— 


row’s feature. the Bel Air In-| WS lots of or all over the State, with very hunting in Maryland will not tering leaders near the eighth! records on all the Maryland , + 
augural Handicap at five fur-| fun while it oe, eo little fresh water coming into | be issued until the latter part | marker and was hustled to a Fair circuits ovals as well as THE WISHING WELL 
longs. The event means the third lasted. We ERM eS them. So far, there have been | of August. rather decisive decision. Hava.- | Charles Town. Former Jockey 
clash in a month of the Clatter-; ended up Murdock | no reports of extensive losses Hunting for mourning doves | home Stable’s Blinker Light was! Johnny Tammaro is consider- 
buck Stable’s Weatherman and| Withfour of fish. Excessive heat in the starts October 5 and £0€S |second, beaten 2% lengths by| ing another saddle comeback. 
Francis Ulrich’s Nerve. blues and five rockfish. The summer has a tendency to through November 3. The daily | the Vanderbilt colt, while Philip| He is galloping horses again 

Each of these fleet horses| bluefish were one-and-three- | drive out the dissolved oxygen | limit is eight, shooting hours | Schwartz’s Charleston was a! and says he weighs 137 pounds, 
holds a victory. Weatherman out-| quarter pounders, all taken on | in the water, and fish are un- 12 noon to sunset. driving third, a neck farther} which means he has at least 20 
classed: Nerve at Cumberland,| Lusby bucktails. able to breathe. perneses away. more to go. Tony Russo wound 
but on the faster Hagerstown Several schools of small ations THE MARLIN scoreboard at Favored in the field of nine| up the Hagerstown meeting as 
oval, Nerve made amends. As| blues were also sighted a mile HUNTING REGULATIONS | Ocean City, Md., shows only 62 | was Greentree’s Guillotine, the} the leading jockey with 11 vic- 
usual, Weatherman will give| west of Sharp’s, but the little | which will be in effect during marlin brought to dock and | Belmont Futurity winner of} tories. He rode 18 here last 
away weight, carrying 19 pounds| “jacks” refused to give us a | the 1951-1952 season for the | nine released during the cur- | 1949. After running with Jan| year to top the riders. See you 
to 107 for his rival. ' tumble when we dragged | shooting of doves, rails and | rent season. Last year, at the | Burke’s Squared Away and! on the rail—BILL. 

However. there’s no assurance| through them. There’s plenty | gallinules in Maryland have | same time, 109 were landed, | showing on top to the 3-furlong en a inant Maen 
thet these two will dominate the’! of surface bait in the upper been announced by Ernest A. | with only two releases. Obvi- | marker, the son of Bimelech °—Chal-Glas, High Note, Gilded Fox. 


Sere ; ; mam UF a : a F setae 3—TAGEL, Way sirl, Four West. 
$1600 running. The lineup in-| bay at the present time, and | Vaughn, director of the Mary- | ously, the marlin season is | backed up sharply. Through the| {—American’ Cross, Fleeting. Rese, 
ciudes such fast ones as Gain A| larger schools of these blue | land Game and Jnland Fish | lagging—but good. stretch, he shortened stride to} Sleek Silk. ee weal ee 
| a } aloi, ocus , . 

Foot. Chaffee-Dee. Bee A. H.. PSS. {such an extent that he barely| vanes | To set Rey pumas count setters in tires name. Subtract 6 % pumter & ¢ 
Nadie Elkins, Thin Dime, Bluff beat two others to the wire. "E—Nerve, Weatherman. Bee | a eee 


S. H. 
7—Wawfern, Sea-O-Dee. Equipoisette. | 
Hal and others, all in with com- 


. e . —~ : s . Squared Away, at the same time, | &—Bourbon, Third Avenue, Helen 
parative light weights. |Atlantic City Entries, Results At Selections ultimately finished last. 


ear. 
Maryland’s only six- furlong | AT ATLANTIC CITY aka was Wha fiir tia olnien 


|, Maryland's only | six- furlo | _REDSKINS—from P. 15 Daily Crossword Puzzle 
/ 4 Y 4 iVLISS meee “year-olds wu ing. Pe; + Save Ids Ss. | — v ; shot. G 
1—1,',: $2500; 4-year-olds up; claiming 6 ; $4000; 3-year-olds up;.all mat" | i—Demavend, Transhot. Gingham. the meeting opened that Green- | 


Vivian Elise Thayer, executive | villase Boy .,. 117 Even Ls ai Chloe eee 122 antermittent 3 _2—-Velark, Sergeant Monk, Bruni’s ACROSS YESTERDAY'S ANSWER 


; val base .. *aChoralier .. lf Assurance... 115 | 
secretary and acting general |!scqqara.:'! 103 Count Steel... 1 Bratgn Beat faLoran os... Bid meri Nate Herzfeld, Dr. A skei ere * pasha ieatize Meno Rams I avol ed. 1 MRTHERING ~~ * CONDITIONS 
i }.| King’s Coup ,, J7) 103 | Sea Fan ...../ 115 Val’s Kid ...++ 110} 3—Imurguy, Nate Hersfeld. Dr. A. skein having been seven in seven | GATH : 
manager, in the absence of G./ King’s Coup .. 113 1Gingham -.++ | Gorgeous: | dealin Setaamn Waeaeeta va g 40 PROGRAM 


Ray Bryson who is convalescing | Miva! 110 Transhot ....+ aS | 5—Super-Salesman, Sandy Alan, Music 


’ $tiS 41 PART OF A 
: va ada ... oe Lh, ; 4-year-olds UD; claiming. | y J ve S * MAN’ 
from a recent illness. (cuted = ve mate dace gerelap:caimig,| Ssame Seman dane” Alun, Meat | “First Glance, which completed (Dyer Redskins | «iis Saami 


A special Baltimore and Ohio| schedule .... 20" git Agail bares » 1s Khyber Pais .. ie 7—Mary Barr, Burt’s Reward, Navy | @ riding double for Guerin, paid | 5 ; FACTOR 42 FIREARM 


race train will leave Washington | tice Brat 32 : ae eee Ss een ee oe gp Eee ae ea PATE ED & $10.30, $5.10 and $4.00. Blinker | yin send a veteran backfield <3 USE NEEDLE 
at 11:45 a. m. each racing Gay" |Serseani Soak’ 3 fer nod bib eur e-em i | - Seap-| Light was $10.70 and $6.80, » wna | starting against the Skins. At _ L ABRIC AND THREAD 
and special busses will be Op-|*Bruni’s Star.. 1 ee mg yeni 29 *Linda’. ly.. 10% pig ee aces: Saat 9—Manchac, Gambler, Thasian Hero. Charleston returned $6.30 show ‘quarterback will be Bob Water- |“ orf INTENSIVE 49 PRICE 
erated by the Capital Transit Co. | Best Dream ... nine ae ig iWh'pered News ceapulas...... 114) AT SARATOGA From a time standpoint, the | seid. recently elected captain of ,, WORK, 50 CAPUCHIN 
Post time for the first race|~ 3_2,: $3000; 2-year-old: RE. Guirious : 118 Paddock Gold. S| pplz Screaming Mimi, Hilka, Liberty| TaCe Was fast, the 7 furlongs) ‘the team. Tommy Kalmanir will 23 ALPHA BETI- 51 FORESTER’S 
each day is scheduled for 2 p. m., | Nate Herzfeld. . 10 ease Bay cos. 120 | Poor’ (turf), $3000; 3-year-olds up-| 2—ADAMANT. Abbie Co.. Luring. being covered in 1:24. ‘start at left half, Jerry Williams | 24 2¢ NORTHERN 52 WIFE 
with the daily double on the! tmureuy .....: 120 Invurey “2122 Muzale./////1 111 Manchac..\. 115| 42 Be Modest, Boston Gray, Timeiy mee}, nC® again the attendance | + right and Deacon Dan Towler, 83 PRUIT 
first and second races closing 15 | 52% hug tt... 128 Beesanbe”. 138 Gambler ; Stike Move i 3 showed an increase over 1950, | ’| fullback. MAINTAINED ; MALEDICTION 
minutes earlier. | Sener Sign ... 120 , +New Oxford .. 111 Thasian Hero ee d--Mesess, Sine Enis. Lowel ‘Sana ds. when 12,413 patronized the an "| From tackle to tackle the Ram AP gt 2 A 33 CA ee L 
PARDON 


4— 44; secogeie 3-year-olds; claiming *5 lbs., t7 lbs. allowance claimed. 7—Swanky, Powwow, Little Falls. cient Union Avenue track. A/| 61 BACCHANAL- 
line will consist of newcomers as IAN 
‘opposed to the veteran wall the |. COMMAND 3 a 


signori 'Challcote ...... I! ots en . j _ &—Gatita HH, Sea Deiense, whiskey 

*Halmahera ... 23 cia 1—%,: $2500; 4-year-olds up; claiming. | Sour. year back the count was 11,146. | 

King Bud .... il shy P eas sree : oy * 

) Infaith, 11% (Bone). ... 21.20 10.00 4.80 —— A , 32 ; 

Zagging »e 122 Individuate .... : i ; } 9 , ‘ 13 : 

Save 10¢ Out of Every Sweep Miss ... 109 Paddy's Hat”... 119) Ming's Leer. 156 eens: sen: See. See | Skins will field. The seven for RNOC 63 TAs PIRATED nein 
-++« 110 Jungle Wind .. cent: Macnee Oyo Rk ne a wards, from left end across, in- | 37 mMenictNAL 65 COMPRE- 5 
WASHES HENDS 28 EAGER 45 Ber INDIAN 


| 'P! ae '..5,, Bae My Lucky Joe, Fulgor Ii. Bombeate. lude T ie C . 
al | 5—%: 8: } 4-year-olds up: claiming. | warinikin, Blazing Silver, Will I also ran B / Ai E f d clude Tom Fears, Rookie Charley 29 PROVIDE RUIT 
aS0 ine 0 , Lucky Ned .... 110 Supcr-Salesm'n 103) Time, 1:12" 0 8 e ur on ries ai OC ran 'Toogood, Rookie Dick Daugh- DOWN CAPITAL FOR 49 HEAVY STAFF 
| - 118 Tionnes -34; $2500: 4-year-olds up: claiming , 30 CONCEAL INE 
‘* . ee 107 ee#eeee y ' val aA rn , . 
GIVE YOUR CAR | ened 114 sain Jolirab, 7 8.80 5.20 3.20 erty, Rookie Leon McLaughlin, OARS Valen 1 Ame 32 INDIAN 


117 (Givens) . 


sj eae ge FIRST RACE—Five furlongs; purse, Idion (Sorrentino) 8- j z : JRNEY MATED 4IN 

| Spindle, pilg, (Turner)... . 10.10 5.80 | ¢1100: 2-year-olds: claiming. | 3 Beck Buk ane + 109 8-1 | Rookie Bill Lange, Rookie Tom | 3 intens: “5 taawenee 14 EORIGINE 

| Apache Trail, 2 (Lyon: , Soe ; American Cross (Dosher) . Dahms and Elroy (Crazy Legs) bY ey D BEING GRATUITY 
Prince, Riar Black. Sassy’ } 


sy's Northman II (Holland) ; . : - 13 CHARGER 
gbting Fair, Sospiro, Rodney R Hirsch. 1 2 - 35 SMALL FANCY 
4 


| gg . Senteted ites... Periwink (no boy) 18 WRITING 
rf a sn Time, 1:11%s 4 Frieda C (Runyon | seeses 
‘“ a sal } vait i { (h rt} 5.2 ° 
N Es DAILY DOUBLE PAID $105. | } Sassy Heel (Br acciale) 
IMMEDIA 3— $2500; maiden 4-year-olds up | Umberiing (Russo) see 


few 


eres, 


el wd ol O wl Kool ol Kian 


AA CaGapDal OaiO «a 
Za Zot Zool dri cf wal > 
OnvdanwiCald~adnina 
Ol onl dal ool O al tod el Sco 
GA Mal Qual Aare OaldOe 

C2] mt 00} CS mal OS col 4 onl PO col J oo 
0) oo] ey oy C89] OQ on] 4 ml & 00] WI no 
ol O col a eC cal Ct cal Ct nl es 
ald ol UD ~3) Bl oo] 2 ~a ed ol aw 
Zainal Oci Mal Sal alZa 
tn onl & oo} Fl cn] & ~al O ol CF wl oy 
al DAG al> all> laa 


Zz 


ee re re ee TT rr 


checks form message. 


CIC 


A 
N 
0 
A 


11> 


—d 


Viz l(Oi4|z i> izre 


ipl — 


b= p~ 
SBwwwrmowMDornsars 
' 
to 


—s 


os 


ts 
COOWMDOADANI4LOBDD 


Nightingale (Clark) Coach Ball’s number ohe of-| 6 sILK wor! phos 36 IMPRESSION 
Sapling (Runyon+ 


Chirrup (Edwards) 22 SUPPRESSES 
Camp Rhymer, 122 (B'ttt) 8.40 4.20 2.80 +Evenesta iMcGonigal) ... 


Pep Up (Runyon) fensive team, with Harry Gilmer -< 25 TROUBLES 
Suebarh (Dosher ) T ¢ 3 yA DING 39 PREHISTORIC 
at the T spot, is composed en- NC tt. 7. 
Fox Challenge, 122 (Bon ; 4.40 2.80/19 Dolly M. (Regalbuto)...... 
Providence, 117 fA, Fernandez) 2.80 | 11 Miss Ardmore (Grant? a 
Picture Lady, Above Normal, Miss | 2 Pass Book (Russo) 


Herods Moose (no boy) . 
“} | tirely of vets. His 5-3-3 defensive | ~ Tecror NTIN 41 RETICENCE 
-1 
Ronned, Aboo also ran. Time. 1:13! Sound Spankin (Downs). 
195 DeSOTO 4—-3,: $2500; maiden 2- Son met -olds: elng | 14 Ethel Away (Wood) . pees 


’ ’ 
ee et et et et et et bt bt pt et pt pe pt 


> AD 
i 
' 
noe) 


Beavertown (Clark) 
Sweet Rocket (McIvor) unit includes two rookies, Defen- “TIMBER TREE _ 4490 a 
M. (Wright).. 


Virginia Gent (Wright) 
FIFTH RACE—Seven furlongs: purse. | <j,, » : 
$1300; for 3-year-olds up; claiming. sive Halfbacks Bill Dechard of 
Vera Connelly (no neg? . size 20 -1\ Holy Cross and Jack Dwyer of A 9 10 jt 13 
PLYMOUTH Singing R’uty, 111 (S’t) 12.00 5.20 3.80) 16 A. (Eversole) . : , > 
Trefoil, 114 (Culmene)..... 1.00 3.60 SECOND RACE—Seven furlongs: o 
Ganja, 113 (Rogers) Sines adele 13.00 000: 3-vear-olds up: c aiming 


Mi Scandal (Russo). , 
tCockpit (Fitzgerald) ‘i Loyola. The 5-4 eagle-type de- | 
16 
Most Models— : Colleen Bawn, Nodella. Sava. Dainty) } Sod hag he (‘Sowns! 
Company Official Cars ‘| Dish, Countess Lea, Christie Helen, Irony, SOUSY _ KESCEvOE | 19 
23 


a] 


po en Aletta fense calls for three rookies, 1S 
Winter Passes (Kirk) 

Listen Lover (no boy)... 
Race Tandem (no vend se 


| Tackle Jim Ricca, Halfback Ray | 
|'Parks and Guard John De Lau- | 
2 | rentis. 


-- 


Little Hatchet (Downs) 
Aunt Dinah also ran. Time, 1:13 *Chal-Giass (no boy 


LIBERAL DISCOUNT || $—%4; $2500: 4-year-olds wp: claiming.| 4 Sky Roamer (Holland) 
.1N. ‘| Cockofthewalk, 113 (Rob's) 7.00 4.20 2.80) 

TRADE-| ., It Gtrl, 112 (Culmone) 5.20 4.00 

. Listen Tiger, 111 (F. Detsinndiee’ 1. 

MAR LAND ; Newtown, Dash for Cash, Hi-Pi. In My 

Bones, Scoop, Quick Cure, Lucky Devil 


MOTORS INC ‘|  6—%; $3500: 2-yr.-olds:allowances 
4 ~ ' 


at your favorite | ,| No Profit, 116 (C. Rogers) 30.80 11.60 6.00 
PROOFING Service Station, Garage 219 E. MONTGOMERY AVE. | Knights Reward, I 117 (W. Mann) cin +20 
or New Car Dealer CCL ALLL ALLE OL. 6500 | Garamona, Yama, 4 Form, Fraud 


/also ran. Time—1:12 3 
7—1,'s: $4000: 3-yr.olds up: claiming. 


‘Attention Mark. 118 (3.C’e) 1.60 3. on 7 a0 
Arthur Pilate. 115 (N.Shuk) ., 8.40 4 RO 
Golden Bull, 12 ‘ _4(, Stout).. 2.40 


Cuttine Edge. Jitters Pict ure Card. 
Wright Angle. Option also ran 
R——3,: $3000: 4- year-ol lds up claim! 


| Joiner, 14 (Smith) $4.20 16.80 10.2 
| Penson, 112% (Bon ..¢ oe. 2 
West Milton, 117 “(Roxers) 5 a4 


Prince Ransome. Reborn. Kanza, Galla- 
Time 1] 


1, <yraegy! als ) 
l's 500 pra ag claiming 


SPAAOWSD 


Salient (McGonigal) 


(Gran 
King Hal Wood) o idee 
5 tear Bue (no boy) ®. .. . snie 
*Eag peed (MclIvor) 
SIXTH RACE—Five furlongs ; — maiden 2-year-olds; cle. | 
' $1600; for 3-year-olds up; ~ gg a osee "s +36 Sally Butto .. 23 
Chaffee-Dee (Carrillo) .... 110 
Gain A'Foot aig neds 
Swamp Rat épe boy 
"Bee A. H. (MeGonteail 
Judge Elkins (Downs). 
‘hin Dime (Russo) 
(Sorrentino) 
Indian Ballad (Eversol e). 116 
u al (Russo 
Weatherman (Clark) aLuro and Bryce entry. 
Gray _Brand (Lauer) 105 | 2— ; $3000; 4-year-olds up; claiming. 
HEN ENTH | RACE—One mile and o terseee I ; Competing Beau +t 
miles urse y : 
up; claiming. 3-vear-olds |Luchador ...,. Abbie Co + oe 
Sea-O-Dee (Russo) . * 13 
White Stripe «(no bov) .... : , 1 + S5000; <-year-olds | 
Dixie Ynak (Holland) .... - : ++» 137 aMy Good Man 
Equipoisete (Root) ] 2A Kipper 


tw 


(Sorrentino).... 
Strolling Don {no boy) 
Timetodust (Herman) 
Tuppence (Grant) 

Gilded Fox ‘Law) 
Welaunie (Clark) 

Audible (Root! oer 
Valdin la Goblin {mo boy) .. 


— 


— 
AARAOUODUW 
’ ’ 


ne et et me bt DD bt et Bd et bt Pe et et 


ssereientncsiuat ie, »siceaMEAEE 


bh pe he pe pe 


Oo 
NOUDUAON & VW) 


tt et pt et he ne bet b+ be 
mr OW SW OW AWW 


Galore Galore 116 | 
Hyphen 116 | 


tt ee et eet st bt ps 4 


es + 
me 
-- 
nH 


| Flushing Dusk... 

'aWild Wisdom. 

| ?Relic Queen ,. Razzberry 

| Cross Swords .. "Sea Bed lll | 
jaSnowfilake II. Screaming Mimi 116 
Br gp 7. Swordet ll 

a 


3 
4 
. 
b 
7 } 
g 
9 
0 
3 
4 
5 
6 


© 


“— 


to 


S Sa ORONO ORO 


furlongs purse. 
1000: on the cart: claiming; 3-year-olds 


mw et et et bt et ee et 


Ce LORD ee oy 
2. 


up 

‘Royal Smile (no boy).... 
Stee! Beam (McGonigal’.. 
Tagel (Wright) 

Irenic { rlark ) 

*Ec on e? 

Four Wes 

Waysood Girl 

Little Hussy ‘ 

Park Lane (Ru 

*Blunderbu 

*Floodgeate (Ff 

renenees 


-- 


-- 


IWOBRBOCADLAUWWO 
’ ’ ’ ‘ ] 
fl ERAGE RD 


rOOD-IPUbWhe 


es ee 
es 


’ 


- 
- 


’ 
tpt a et we pt ew re 
nNuw.- 


— 


ae 


~ 4 
mm GO 
‘ ‘ 


37 
Fightine Harry ino boy) .. ] ‘ é ‘aTrepid 
Dixie Sweep ino bov? rhe : ank : 137 Port Raider 
: aWayfern (Sorrentino) ... 5.' Astronome! ee 
Brown Chief, 115 (Nash).. 6.80 4.80 3.40 We: no b Dimps (no boy) ne ten , aClark and Perry entry. 
Gro-Up, 114 (Lynch) 7.80 5.20 a FOUR’ TH RACE maven aSaints Rest (Root) -——“%; $3900; ~-year- olds: allowances 
Wily Willie, 115 (Shuk) 3.20 | $2200. ‘Plat ‘es Mec anieath ae aNicodemus and Boerner entry ia. wet ky: poe de Two.. 
Superba. Shadow Shot, Gino Gray. Pine’ 2 Fleetine Reck WSs. a0 )** : 00: 3. seventy | Timely Reward. 114 Boston Gray 
Vision, Luxuriant, Vertigo HM, Sun Buda 3 Jack's ‘Annie (Root) eeeree a4 , year-olds = up; Blue Moon ,.., 109 Chivalrous 
117 


| Four Shoes 
The Bagel (Braccaile)..... 11: 5—Mile; $4500: 


Valdina Find (Root) » ii Marta tgp ae me Ts 
*No Melody (MeGonieai ; » 2 Leadine Home.. Ruddy ..... 112 65 
1 | 


Pu sl WK Ow D-! 
' 
gen énle beth 


et et bed et et ee i * 
OD-IT UW SW 


Ganelon ‘no 

Unruled (Martinez) 
*Bevsboy ‘(McGonigal) 
Helen Dear (Grant) 
Bourbon (Herman) 
Afire (Downs) : 
Third Avenue (Baksh)...«.« 
Pougbay (Russo) 

Black Warbler (Russo;}.... 
Bonnie Bones (Downs).. 


oOoO~ ew 
De» 


ns 


ee ¥ eee | | Aciaiel Kiddie Swim Aug. 25 


aRecess .. 
2 


toto 
ee tt et et et et eet eet et pe 


SBADDOONOHMADD 


The third annual Kiddie swim- | opened to Yanik all over the 
country, Baltimore and Phila- 
delphia will send many entries. 


OHMOOM Ree 
eWwoOUaVe-re-w: 
’ 


_BEImerest Farin, and Circle M Farm en- ming meet for boys and girls 
d. Chaiiarian.... +e I ae from 4 to 12 years ms age >> 
itch Song Ww ereees e ugus a p. mM. a ’ 1 Ceres 
Solid Gain ,,. : sveeebas 2 : cs m 4 
Little Falls 1 N *** Jog Indian Spring Country Club. ste help a a Rene fall 
AUGUST 15 TO 25 INCLUSIVE § |?" Te: AF Trophies will be awarded for Warerobe, see. gton . 
8—1%s; $3000; 4-year-olds up; claiming. Post Fall Fashion Section tomor- 
—— Acorn 109 Intaglio . . 109 \ five places. The meet has been 
‘Flash. of “Light 109 Whiskey Sour.. 108 row. 
*Space Ship .. 107 *Dear Boots 
Sea Defense 114 Goof Off 
Gatita I 112 


1—5%; $3000; 2-year-olds claiming. g 
omer AIRLINE RESERVATIONS 
I March, 119 (B’ hardt) 8. 10 5.90 | 
Cykie, 109 (Atkinson) . ie 11.10 | 

Repudiate, 5 en ig Bon Victoire, | e 
Rob Crusoe, Ski Slope, Sinn Fein, Spa, | Luxury Liners 


SDT > Z Williamsburg, Star Billing. Eternal’ Light | 
Se roae . 2—3 $300 0; 3-year-olds; claiming 


ae BE L A | R E Satartia, 119 (Boland).. 28.90 9.30 4.90 | NONSTOP 


et et ee et 
DUSWNMKHODD-IPUV aww 
et et ee ae ed et ed bt ped be ts Bet 


‘atetheninat. 
*5 Ybs.. 7 Ibs. allowance claim 


| Teaneck Flash, 120 (Corolla).. 4.70 - 70 
(BEL AMR, AD.—U.S. ROUTE NO. 1) Miss Topic, 114 (Arearo).... 4.20 MIAMI $39.74 
G Lady's Delight, Iamarelic. Northamp- | 


("0h “About 142; $200: 3-year-olds up. | i CALIFORNIA $94.76 


bEscarp, 152 (Riles) ..... 5.40 3.60 3.06 10% Discount on Return Trip 
Monterrey, 143 (McMoerrow) 7.30 4.00 | 


No Wonder It’s Kentucky's | _ Mhithy . 3 EPR ny | | : : Round Top, 139 (Adams).......... 3.30 binmabeis 
7 | | | an NG ctereiendes, boned, Ue, iehty an CINCINNATI 


= 2 i : — ee | pSherwin an x mona, entry. 

= he age an ushman ent ry 
Favorite Straight Bourbon|@ =f pee mus | See 
f 4 . ae 3 ee - BANLY DOUBLE CLOSES 1:45 P.M. Flying Mane, 107 (R.V’eal) 15.20 7.10 3.40 | 


ruew | Ready Answer. 103 (N.Wall) 
EAGTERR DA ¥ Gomes HE Keep _Wateh, 107 (Ss. Cole) mA 2.60 


. : SPECIAL TRAM , Skin Tonic, Joie De Vivre, Busy Evening | 
Your first taste will tell you . oN fre Fa | "~~ aaa: es $—5', $3500 2-yr.-olds; allowances 
| shit : : Lv. Weshingter . . . . - - 11.45 AM faadian Land, 122 (0.S’lo’k) 14.30 5.90 3.70 
why Early Times has been named ad ey Seo 8 Whither. and: (E. sore | re. o0 8S 3.58 
. = : : Aw Conditioned Coaches > Lumoh Service _ Master Fiddle, 114 (D. Gorman)... ‘ 2. 90 


ot OP Oe 


we 


ae one 


the No. 1 Straight Bourbon in 

Kentucky! It’s every ounce a 
’s whisky... hearty, full® ; ~ | 

man’s whisky | y Ne | | 1 rou IN 

bodied, yet delightfully smooth. Sd a | BST ote 

Ask for Early Times, tonight! 


Pree bes service trom weinside direct zx aGreentree Stable « entry. aClosed Sea- 


|} son. aPicnicker. Golden Gloves. Top Com- 
te grendetend. Returning offer lest race mand. Rail Creek. Roman Secret, Prize 
Ring also ran. Time—1-:06 2 
6—*.: $4000 added, Broadailbin Handi- 
cap: 3-year- -olds up 


| First Glance, 119 (Guerin) 10.30 5. 10 4. oo 
| Blinker Light. 102 (Stuart).... 10.70 6. RO 
| Charleston, 110 (Colaneri) 30 
patmeneas eee TaN ‘ Pampas cas . Eee Page, Squared Away, Brenton 
THis 16 eae ! > ieee |S a es h ', Big If, Guillotine, Steel Blue also 


k THE es : ‘ __7—%; $3000; 3-year-olds; claiming 
‘met sean THAT MADE ‘: a Pasa eee ~— ee / f , ieeres 110 (Cole) i , & 20 4.38 2.70 W 
’ | eS eR Ss ~ ae My y. 115 (Weoodhouse).... 3. » 2.60 
- eg me sesnee mea at : eS 3 &- % aes | Friday Night *° Tena, iso (Atkinson am 2.50 E can move 
) AGO Aug. 17 namoal on ise rane Time, V2 in your treasured house 
‘a: * maidens -year-olds up: . 
Guillet, Tit (Roland). 18.10 7.60 5.60 hold possessions any- 
Janie’s Beau, 116 ( Combest) . 4 


_Ish-Kabbie, j09 (Villarreal)......... 5. oe where in the U. .. 


~ @-LaCrima, Barbs Pirst, Ramax , Runyon eténe 
Fund, Gallant Ride. Alanth, Iehtam,| ic through the facilities 


a-Command Play and Gaelic Il also ran. 


See: tee of Allied Van Lines’ 
) Bé 0 | ee Nation-wide Services. 


(Wert & SPECIAL TRAIN TO 
Estimates of Moving Costs Cheerfully 


"tise, § ss TELEVISION BEL AIR RACES 4 sf Eb Pn Given on Request 
> WMAL-TV Weekdays Aug. 15-25 bt 


Tse meD - 
ey STLLERY court CHANNEL 7 Dovighe T 


EARLY TIMES DISTILLERY COMPANY 3 TIME 9:38 tv. Washington 1145 AMV ak ideli ity Stora ge 


LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCKY | At Lemtiewet Cosches *\ sect Service 


a _-_ —-— 


THIS WHISKY IS 4 YEARS OLD + 88 PROOF , ™ ae ante Beeag Admiral ‘= §3* ame | nar 20 You St. N.W. NOrth 3400 


194.4 PROOF « 100% HEUTE’ SPIRITS DISTILLED FROM GRAIN * GORDON'S DRY GIN CO. LTD.. LINDEN. #. ). DEALES Sb ane, alana i 
a: treme be ey 


) Ce eS 
{ : , 


18 THECWASHINGTON POST 
Wednesday, August 15, 195] 


LACY’S 6 STORES OPEN THURSDAYS 9A.M.t09 P.M 


BRAND NEW 1951 “BALANCED BEAM” 


at eed ee > ° aegis . a aiPy"s SO 
“ an) Se, ~ a a3 ie, eo oe ne ig: ie PSRs one “ 4 
.* Fane . o . * - ~ 7 ' a 7 ~~ 
> P ex . * Soe “ . : Tnetelas . “ Pe ae oe ee : 
* > . A ay oe “3 SexN ae OO er ss Ray <n on : : ‘sy wee 
Lotdp My tan hota’ siar inte” stwieh Mare cele dyn nge a ee . Peles ™ iy aI » 
ce s tet ee ero, “v ety . —s a wnat ota oye aunir inns = 
Nest op a : oe ; Sirens ‘ . Sen rene . Weyce> 
ee < Sete eee Sore tetra ethan “ 2 eee eR RE RA I Same” Se ; ‘ 
es nie 2 oe “se Ss 3 . ie: m y > > . : Ty cd 4 . : So 
id Sie! = wes ae . By Poe < se * : . : . . . : * oA”, 5 ». 
ae “ “ . : 
6 SD ot cp aie . 
< “a ‘ HX ODIO 0 . - mR oy SE AARPRRN ARR ee na Sw RS So id oS iin > ERS EOS Soon: SRE RES son ae 
or ea parr = Poe et rs *.% . A eee . ’ ” ’ ‘, vse 
eas : : . 
; s ‘ a 
. ”" ~ 
. ; - ; Ses —— : . = > : A “4 , 
Se ane. baat tate ones ma a Dy 2 : 
ete ° Dk, ge < 
Sei ee ‘3 6 : 
“ oe So ; 
y : a ee Se we , 
acres Rae tees mas 
, oS ala ates , ~ 
« ee oN ee Ss ‘> ae 
Rae Oa HNP ene SiMe Ne eh 
a vee ms : .. . —- 7 oe 5 prt ier 
| C0 ‘ ’ - —_ ‘ A => ae _ - von v~ 
x, oe On Be Ot: ce) ee ee a . , ag ’ 
. : oy . eres eee ee “ ES ie oe) ° PA A et ‘ : 
. I SRN Pronk vad ‘ “ ie OSES Tete ss "eigives sles a ates OP es . ea TR Sor. , aad x 
oh ey . . < » —e ~ — “ 3 , 
5 | d B | 2 f : < ! - — ’ : 7 "Ae 
ON Be 
: , x) 
, » . " Pe) 
an 
, *< Y 
x 
. » ’ Es 
/ e me ’ 
% 5 ’ >, 
< P @ -_ 
“ ; y, Boe , 
~ f - . 
’ > . = 
<* ‘ 
. 
: 


Vision 


} as — [ wa ® ‘ ms Thousands Sold F or *1 99" 
a ) — 4 ] LACY’S ALL-TIME Low PRICE 


Newest 12 1/2” 


Picture Tube 


Built-in 
Filter 
Screen . 


Money-saving 
Antenna /. Qc — : on 
ae ah, mo No Charge for Delivery 
or Installation. Federal 
tax incl. Plus warranty. 

Model 1207, 


| HOME DEMONSTRATION J 


Prove to yourself that this Philco Tele- zs gw % S 
Vision, at Lacy’ s sensationally low price, : BE _ 
is the set you've been waiting for. Call cc se ‘ ( CS 
Lacy’s, to see this PHILCO perform in ait r,| so oe 
your own home, at your convenience. ; Pe ° \ | a 
j ALL LACY’S Stores 


There’s absolutely no obligation to on 


no cost whatever, of course... at Lacy’s ) ASK ie MISS TRENT | f 
did, OPEN THURSDAYS 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 
BRANCH STORES OPEN EVERY EVENING ’til 9 


Washington's as Chain of Television & Appliance Stores! ——— 


Clarendon, Va. Silver Spring, Md. 


3100 N. Wash. Blvd. 8511 Fenton Street 


Free Parking Lot 


At Ellsworth Drive 
SL. 1100 


Open 9:30 to 9 
Mon. and Fri. ‘til 9:30 PM. 


Be ih. | 


= ry . bs ar r gy 
Downtown . Northwest + Southeast ‘ Northeast é. 
‘ st ; 9 


Main Store 


" Georgia and New 139 Good mm (1207 H Street N. E, 
h and E Sts, NW. Hampshire ee : Road S.E. : "eo jaa 


EX. 2300 . : . : Clarendon (Ari.), Ve. 
. : ; . LI 7-8262 
TA. 4627 LU. 4-6900 ; OW. 7400 
Open 9 to 9 


Open 9:30 to 9 Optn 9:30 to 9 Open 9:30 to 9 


\ 


Thursdays, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 


-_ 


Open 9:30 to 6 


t 


" The 
“s Federal 


Kluttz 


SECTION 


B 


Women’s, Amuse, Radio, 


LOCAL NEWS 


Comics, Classified 


. 


f 


The Washington Post 


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15, 1951 


Tonight on WTOP 


Background and analysis 
“Story Behind the 


Bill Shadel 


6:15 p.m, 


for today’s big 


News.” 


House Likely to Pass 
Job-Cutting Rider 
Compromise Today 


The compromise Jensen-Fergu- 
son job-cutting rider is almost 


certain to be approved today by 
the House when it takes up the | 
conference report on the Inde-| 
pendent Offices budget bill. | 
The report also carries the 
leave rider to cut leave to 20) 
days beginning July 1, and to re- 
quire Federal employes to take | 
annual leave as they earn it. | 
There’s a rumbling of opposition | 
in the House over the 20-day pro- 
vision. 
Rep. Ben Jensen (R-Iowa), | 
author of the House job-cutting | 
rider, described the compromise # 
as “very fair” which he and other #@ 
members of the economy bloc @& 
had agreed to. He said no at- ge 
tempt would be made to return 3 
the report to conference be- 
cause of the compromise rider | 
which will cut jobs about | 
10 percent in the more than a 
score of agencies covered by the 
bill. | 
Jensen revealed that the con-| 
ferees had inserted a provision 


Rule Bill Put 


q 
q 


“WH On Senate 


Democratic Leaders 
Plan Floor Action 
Between Passage 
Of ‘Must’ Measures 


The District home rule Dill 


- B | yesterday was put on the 
= | “sandwich-in” list by the Sen- 


; ys 


By Bob Burchette, The Washington Post 


ate Democratic Policy Com- 


| mittee, meaning it likely will 
be brought up on the Senate 


floor if and when there are 


major bills. 
est W. McFarland (D-Ariz.) 
named 11 bills of secondary im- 
portance, including the com- 


Senate Majority Leader Ern- 


: 4 “ee ‘ / 
| eae 
KIN Sts, vbtdthbdd uh ad taba 


to tighten up on his rider. The 


amendment, proposed by Jensen promise version home rule meas-| 


DANIEL NUSSBAUM ure, which the Democratic lead- 


MRS. GEORGETTE MAYNARD 


himself, will require the Treas- 
ury to impound funds to pay the 


Survived “with the help of God.” 


salary of any job abolished un- 
der the rider. P 

The lowa Legislator also called 
on agency heads to use the 
formula carried in his plan of 
abolishing vacant jobs to reduce 
their staffs. 


“I hope they won’t take a meat- 
ax and start to cut off employes,” 
he said, “when they can meet 
the situation in a human way 
through the simple process of 
abolishing 3 out of every 4 of 


German Refugee, 81, Becomes U.S. Citizen 


An 81-year-old German native | 
who survived three years in a| 
Nazi concentration camp became | 
an American citizen yesterday | 
in District Court. 

He was among 50 people—in- 
cluding two war. brides—who 
took the oath of citizenship be- 
fore Judge Walter M. Bastian. 


| 


French war bride of Yank captain. 


get out of the country, but Nuss-' was flown to this country, arriv-: 
baum remained to become a con- | ing just 48 hours before his en- 


script laborer working on the’ : ah 
streets of his town. | trance permit expired. 


In 1942. he and the other iets He now lives with his son, Dr. 


of Suhl were called to the po- | Hans Nussbaum, business man- 


lice station there. Some were! #8er of the American Associa- 
sent to the Buchenwald extermi-| “on for the Advancement of 
nation center, but—because of | Science. 

his age—Nussbaum went into!) One of the two war brides| 


ers hope can be passed before 
the Senate recesses, possibly 
around October 1. 
McFarland said he thought it 
take “two or three days” 
to pass the local bill: that he 
felt it would pass, but that there 
is “some opposition.” 
McFarland said he had talked 
to Sen. Olin D. Johnston (D- 


i apponent of the home rule 
ill. 


But chances of a. Southern 
Democratic filibuster, which 


seemneel 
would 


Miss Washin 


; 


By Tom Kelley—The Washington Post 


their jobs that are vacated.” 

If his rider is used, the agen- 
cies could abolish vacated jobs 
until they had reduced staff to 
90 percent of their July 1 em- 


ployment at which time the rider | 


would cease to operate. Some 
agencies, however, plan to make 
immediate lay-offs to get within 
the 90 percent as soon aS pos- 
sible. 


PAY: The Senate Post Office 
& Civil Service Committee yes- 
terday formally reported out its 
bill to give postal employes an 
8.8 percent increase in their sal- 
aries. Also, the bill would abol- 
ish the first two postal grades 
and reclassify the salaries of 
postmaster and supervisors, with 


an $800 limit on any individual | 


pay boost. 


SEC: Mike Mooney has re- 
signed from the staff of the Se- 
curities and Exchange Commis- 
sion to become assistant to the 
president of the New York Curb 
Exchange. Leonard Helfenstein 
has been promoted to his old 


Daniel Nussbaum, of 5109 il- 
linois ave. nw., said he managed 
“with the help of. God” to exist 
at the Theresienstadt, Czecho- 
slovakia, concentration camp 
while his wife and brother died 
of hunger there. 

And so, said Nussbaum, the 
advent of his American citizen- 
ship could not erase the memory 
of the Nazi years. 

“I don’t know how the Com- 
munists are,’ he said, “but there 
could be no human beings worse 
than the Nazis.” 

Nussbaum came to this coun- 
try in 1892, but returned to Ger- 


Theresienstadt. 
He lived in a stable, fought 


of garbage cans, and was happy 


He lost 45 pounds during his 
imprisonment. 

First his brother died, and 
then his wife. Nussbaum said 
he was not allowed to see her 
before she died, but was per- 
mitted to view the cardboard box 
which held her cremated re- 
mains. 

In 1945, a group of Americans 
obtained permission to take a 


| 3912 Burns pl. se., | 
other inmates for the contents|the Sudetenland. In 1947 she ern bloc which opposes civil 

‘Tights legislation, 
for even a potato to eat, he said. | Flannery, an UNRRA official and | Porter. 


|Herta Elisabeth Flannery, 24, of 
a native of 


‘married Maj. James Edwin F. 
‘former honor student at George- 
town University. 

Shortly before the marriage, 
she said, her fiancee helped her 
escape from the Sudetenland at 
a time when the Communists 
were conscripting workers en 
masse. She sai dshe left the re- 
‘gion for Bavaria disguised in 
‘Army uniform. 
| The other war bride is Mrs. 


the “show window” camp at Maturalized yesterday is Mrs. | would kill the bill, appeared slim: 
| yesterday. Sen. Richard B. Rus- 


Sell (D-Ga.), leader of the South- 
told a re- 


If it (the new home rule 
bill) is substantially the same as 
the ‘other bill (passed by the 
Senate in 1949), my attitude 
would be the same. But I 
haven’t read the bill.” 

In 1949, Russell let it be 
known he didn’t consider the 
bill a civil rights measure, and 
hence there was only token 
Southern opposition, c hiefly 
from Johnston, a District Com- 


were impressed by her beauty, 
brains and statistics—five feet 
6%4 inches tall, 123 pounds, bust 
37, waist 27 and hips 37. 

Miss Klein was reluctant. She 
had never entered a beauty 
competition. She was more in- 
terested in her major—biology— 
and a string of hobbies includ- 
ing cooking and sketching. 

One of the classmates anony- 
mously sent her an entry blank. 


‘She bowed to their wishes—and 
‘won. 


Beverly Klein, entered the Miss 
Washington contest on a dare. 
Yesterday the dare was paying 
off with noisy adulation. Be- 
sieged by photographers, report- 
ers and telephone calls, still 
dumbfounded by her new “Miss 
Washington” title, confronted 
with three radio shows in one 
day, she had little time to think 


about her chances in the na- 
tional Miss America contest next 
month. 

“But I. suppose anything is 


‘many seven years later. 


|mained there to prosper in the 


| 


‘number of inmates of the con-|Georgette Maynard, 25, of 1404 
centration camp to Switzerland.|Arlington ter. Alexandria, a 


He re- 


mittee member. But that bill 


town of Suhl, Thuringia, mar- 
ried and became president of the 


However, most of them refused 
to go, fearing it was a ruse that! 


Frenchwoman. 
Mrs. Maynard met her hus- 


| 


city’s Jewish congregation. 

His wholesale shoe business 
was wiped out by post-World 
War I inflation and then again 
when the Hitler regime confis- 
cated the property of Jews. 

His three children managed to 


might send them to an extermi-| band, Air Force Capt. Robert 


nation center. 

“I figured I would die where I 
was or I could die in their 
‘Switzerland, so I took the 
chance,” hé said. 

From Switzerland, Nussbaum 


job as chief of opinion writing 
and Joseph B. Levin has been 
moved up to assistant chief. 


TRAVEL ALLOWANCE: New 
York State has increased the 
maximum allowance for its em- 
ployes who travel on official 
business from $9.50 to $11. 


Meantime, some Federal em- 
ployes are reported to have re- 
fused to travel to conduct the 
business of their agencies be- 
cause they would be unable to 
pay their expenses from the $9 


them. 


adopting a more liberal trave 
allowance. 


LOYALTY: The latest report 
of the Civil Service Loyalty 
Review Board shows 185 have 
been fired on loyalty charges 
since the President’s loyalty 
program has been in effect. The 
board cleared and ordered re- 
stored to their jobs 126 other 
employes, and FBI full field in- 
vestigations are pending in 992 
other cases, 


JOB NEWS: Nearly 8000 resi- | 
dents here and nearby will be. 
given a general clerical exam 
Saturday by Civil Service. Ap- 
plications are still being ac- 
cepted for the GS 1 through 4 
jobs. Get details at Civil Serv- 
ice . . . Civil Service reports 
that during the first year of the 
defense program the number of 
blue-collar workers in Govern- 
ment increased by 65 percent 


I 


compared to only 25 percent for | 


white-collar employes. But it’s 
a rare occasion when anyone 
criticizes the laborers and me- 
chanics in the blue-collar cate- 
gory; it’s always the white-col- 
lar employe who catches it... 
Civil Service has lifted its 62 
age limit on geologist jobs that 
pay from $4600 to $7600 annually. 


|juveniles in July, compared to 
top daily allowance available to | rio were recorded in statistics 
iT renil 
it’s about time that the | c, easel yesterday by Juvenile 
Administration and the Congress | 


follows New York . State by 


Sharp Rise 
In Delinquency 
Noted in July 


Sharp increases in the number | 


‘of delinquent acts charged to 


Court. 

Complaints involving house- 
breaking or unlawful entry rose 
from 45 in June to 78 in July and 
those involving unauthorized 
use of autos rose from 14 to 37. 

Sex offenses jumped from 8 to 
23; tampering or taking prop- 
erty, from 71 to 92; acts of care- 
lessness or mischief, from 23 to 
65, and robbery, from 8 to 14. 

Traffic violations dropped 
from 15 to 12 and assault or at- 
tempted assault decreased from 


29 to 21. One violation of liquor 


or drug laws was reported for 
both June and July. 

In July, the court received 
complaints on 279 children, of 
whom 22 were dependent and 


257 delinquent. June complaints | 99 caliber pistol he kept at his | 


totaled 264, of whom 32 were 
dependent and 232 were delin- 
quent. 

The 279 included 118 children 
between 13 and 16, 82 between 
16 and 18 and 79 who were 12 or 
under. The 264 included 109 who 
were 13 to 16, 75 between 16 and 
18, and 80 who were 12 or under. 
| Most complaints ‘came from 
‘police, Board of Public Welfare 
'and parents. 


‘Rooms Being Listed 


; 


For Service Families 


| Mrs. Gene Beggs, director of 
the 


ST 


FEDERAL 


Invites you to save the 
sure way—a little every 


Lounge, 
‘agency, said last night she 


families. 


such accommodations to 
phone her at Alexandria 7585. 


Cross-Country 
Arrest Ends 
‘Career In 
Banditry 


| 
| 


| 

A whirlwind career of banditry 
that started in July at Phoenix, 
Ariz., ended abruptly here yes- 
i'terday when police arrested a 
25-year-old man and charged him 


with the recent holdup of the 
Cherry Blossom Cafe, 912 14th 
st. nw. 

Guns drawn, they entered a 
rooming house at 1126 16th st. 
nw., about 5:45 a. m. Advance 
information led them to believe 
their quarry might be the slayer 
of Samuel Cooperman, liquor 
store proprietor who was mur- 
dered here August 5. 

Detective Sergt. Wilbur Coffey 
pushed open the door, knocking 
the suspect off balance as he 
sprang nude from his bed. Police 
believe he was trying to reach 


bedside. 
| Seeing Sergt. Coffey, he said, 
“You're the police, I guess.” 

At police headquarters he was 


‘identified as Jules Edwin Larue, 


‘jr. He denied any connection 
‘with the Cooperman slaying. 
Police said he was a suspect since 
he eame to Washington from 
Baltimore the night before the 


fatal shooting. 


cash register August 10. 


ous criminal record here. 


1 


However, he freely admitted | 
holding up the Cherry Blossom | burgh & Bro., 
Cafe and taking $241 from its | shortly. 


He also told police that since | ment 
July 4, he held up a bakery in store’s executive staff since it 
‘Phoenix, a food shop in Detroit, 
Alexandria Servicemen’s|a dairy bar in Pittsburgh, had | 
a Community Chest/ taken $180 from a club at Long| 
iS|Island, N, Y., and had stolen. 
compiling a list of inexpensive three radios and a wrist watch 
rooms and apartments available |in Baltimore. He said he was on} 
for rental to servicemen’S/a 16-year parole from the West- 
/ern Pennsylvania State Prison. | 
She urged persons knowing of | Police said they have not verified | 
tele-' his statements. He has no. previ- 


| Maynard, while he was stationed 
in Chambrai, France, in 19465. 
With their two children, Maryse, 
5, and Allen, 3, she’ll now join 
her husband at his station in 
Panama, 


-™ 


died in the House District Com- 
Mittee. 

- McFarland indication yester- 
day he felt time would be found 
to “sandwich-in,” as he put it, 
several of the 11 bills he named. 
But he didn’t list them in order 
of priority, and he added that 
he would make the choice when 
opportunity appeared. 


- 


Three Charged 


In Theft of 
Clothes, Wallet 


Three men were charged with 

robbery in the theft of a pair 
of pants, shoes and a wallet con- 
taining $15.36 from John A. 
‘Roach, 20, 5431 Connecticut ave. 
inw., early yesterday. 
- Roach told police he was 
standing at 6th and K sts. nw., 
‘about 2 a. m. yesterday when 
three men forced him into an 
alley and took his pants, shoes 
and wajlet. 

Thomas Doyle, 38, 460 H st. 
nw., and Calcin C, Barnes, 24, 
of Triangle, Va., were arrested 
near the scene. Victor W. 
Owens, 24, was arrested in the 
1300 block of P st. nw., yester- 
day morning. 

Barnes and Doyle were ar- 
raigned in Municipal Court and 
held fow grand jury on $2500. 
Qwens has not been arraigned. 


' 


possible,” said the brown-eyed, | 
brown-haired 21-year-old college 
senior who won over eight con- 


Thrust suddenly into a world 
of fame, photographers and pos- 
sibly fortune, Miss Klein is re- 


June Beveriy Klein, 2l-year-old “Miss Washington,” catches up on some homework, 


gton Entered Contest on a Dare 


The beauty with brains, June |the District beauty title. They jon receiving her tile, because “I 


just couldn't believe it.” 


The pleasure of crowning Miss 
Washington in the Capitol The- 
ater finals cost Commissioner F. 
Joseph Donohue a slight tab 
of $3. 

There was undeniably a park- 
ing ticket on his car when he 
left the coronation of Miss June 
Beverly Klein Monday night, 

The commissioner was not gur- 
prised. He arrived belatedly for 
the beauty contest finals; could 
find to place to park, and yielded 
to the temptation of an empty 
alley behind the theater. 

Police Pvt. B. A. Mattingly 
yielded to duty, unimpressed by 


'the commissioner's license tag 
‘No. 8. 


testants in the District finals |markably self-possessed, 


Monday night. 

Her ascendancy to the title be- 
gan in a tennis class at Wilson 
Teachers College, where she is 
an honor student. 


He ambition is to sing pro- 
fessionally. But she still plans 
to join the staff of Roosevelt 
High School, where she was 
valedictorian in 1948, as a stu- 


Admiring classmates—all men, 
nicidentally—insisted she try for 


a 


dent teacher this fall. 


| 


) 


Said Donohue approvingly: “I 
have no more right to violate 
the law than anybody else.” 

But unlike most parking vio- 
lators, he sent his chauffeur 
down to Police Headquarters to 


The soft-spoken winner wept! post collateral of $3. 


The sandwiching, if any, will 
be done between consideration 
of appropriation, foreign aid and 
tax measures. McFarland hopes 
i complete these “must” bills 
by October 1, then ‘have Con- 
gress recess until January. 


Seven D. C. Bills Approved 


| By Senate Committee 


The Senate District Commit- 
tee yesterday approved seven 
minor bills and voted favorably 
on the nomination of Francis F. 
|Healy to be a member of the 
District Redevelopment Land 
Agency. 

The bills would give policemen 
and firemen double pay on holi- 
days, authorize the District to 
cancel or settle claims against 
estates of old age assistance re- 
cipients, permit the District to 
redeem mutilated or damaged 
tax stamps, allow charitable, re- 
ligious and educatioh, groups to 
invest funds in common stocks, 
transfer supervision of \building 
and loan associations from the 
Comptroller of the Currency to 
the Home Loan Bank Board, 
broaden terms of the boiler in- 
spection act, and authorize a me- 
morial to former Minnesota Gov. 
Floyd B. Olson. 


| Mark Lansburg announced 
iyesterday his retirement as vice 
resident and secretary of Lans- 
| “to take effect 


This marks the second retire- 
from the department 


'was announced last July 5 that 
Lansburgh’s would be marged 
with City Stores Co., nationwide 
chain. 
old president, has indicated he 
would terminate his 63-year mer- 
chandising career. 

Mark Lansburgh, 62, has been 
associated with the Washington 
store since 1913; when he grad- 
; 


Pennsylvania. 


| Completion of the permanent 


pay day. 
Your account can be 


| 


‘District air raid warning system, |t 


which was expected to be ready | 
for operation this month, may) 


Lack of Equipment Delays 
New D.C. Air Raid System 


Until the horns are installed, 
he city will continue to rely on) 
fire department and police 
sirens to sound an alert. A test) 
of these sirens last spring 


/ 


‘tary in 1923 and vice president 
‘in 1938. 

Prominent in retail circles, he 
has served on the board of direc- 


Mark Lansburgh to Retire 
Soon From Department Store 


| 
| 


} 


Sol Lansburgh, 85-year-' 


‘uated from the University of. 
He became secre- | 


tors of the National Retail Dry) 


‘Goods Association and as chair-| 
man of its store management 


group. 


100 Teachers 


- 


; 
‘ 


Unaware of It 


In D. C. Under: 


By Martha J. Hall 


Post Reporter 


Exchange Plan 


County Finds 
| Million Fund 


As Surplus | 


i 
| 
i 


Washington’s heat probably 
has made more impression than | 
anything else on Miss Dorothy 
E. Gardner, English exchange 
teacher who arrived here yes-| 
terday. | 

“I’m afraid it is going to take | 
us a long time to get used to’ 
it,” she sighed as she met re- 
porters at American University 
where more than 100 teachers 
will take an orientation course 
this week. 

Miss Gardner and Mlle. Ger- 
maine M. Y. Bodenan of France 
will teach in Washington this 
winter. Two Washington teach- 
ers, Miss Maxine E. Daly of Car- 
dozo High School and Miss Mar- 


The Prince Georges County | 


Commissioners, who have been | 


hewing the economy line claim- | 
ing lack of sufficient funds, are | 
apparently one million dollars | 
richer than they think they are. | 

When county heads signed the | 


1951-52 budget, they estimated | 
bank balances as of July 1, start 
of the fiscal year, at only 
$175,000. 

But County Treasurer Julian 
B, McKay told reporters yester- 
day that actual interest-free 
bank balances on that date were 
$1,516,987. He said he did not 


ion W, Stevens of Woodrow 
Wilson High School, will teach | 
in England and France, respec-| 
tively. | 

Dr. 


trict, will meet with the-British 
and French teachers soon to 
discuss their placement. 

Coming to the United States, 
Miss Gardner said, “is not at all 
like being in a foreign country.” 
It is all quite different from 
traveling in Europe, she ex- 
plained. 


ter and the Capitol, she said, 
are “just what you expected” 


| In England, Miss Gardner 
‘taught at Wrisley Modern School 
in north London. A “modern 
‘school,” she explained, is one 
for those students who go 
neither to grammar schools “for 
the academically inclined” nor 
to technical schools. 

Miss Gardner hopes to live 
with an American family, since 


| “that is the best way to get to 


know people.” 


Hobart M. Corning, super: | 
'intendent of schools for the Dis- 


know what portion, if any, of 
that amount was earmarked in 
the 1951-52 budget. 


’ 
| 


| 


Council Vetoes 
Parking Plans 


For Bethesda 


Amendments to the Bethesda, 
Md., public parking lot bill were 
¢etoed yesterday by the Mont- 
gomery County Council in the 
wake of community-wide objec- 
tions to many of the clauses. 

In an effort to determine 
which businesses—in Bethesda 
and other county communities— 
shall be exempt to parking lot 
taxes, the council announced the 
creation of a parking technical 
advisory committee which will 
study: 

1, The types, amounts and 
determination of tax exemptions 
to be provided commercial prop- 


erties offering off-street parking 
facilities. 

2. Whether exemptions should 
be granted establishments hav- 
ing parking space for customers 


McKay said that of the total 
bank ‘balance shown in his book 
on July 1, approximately $828,000 
was in unused money accumu- 
lating since the 1947-48 budget. 

He said there was an apparent 
1950-51 surplus o f at least a 
‘million dollars on July 1. He 
‘explained that the $1.5 million 
shown in bank balances would 
| be whittled by possibly $500,000, 
which included some 1951-52 re- 
‘ceipts as well as money ear- 


} 


' 
’ 
! 


tricts and incorporated towns. 
| The McKay statement came as 


missioners who have denied 
‘knowledge of such a surplus in 
the county treasury. 

The all-Republican group 
which took office last December 
has been openly criticized for 
the denials by two former Demo- 
‘eratic office-holders—Jerrold V. 
'Powers, who was attorney for 
the preceding Democratic board, 
‘and his assistant, Robert B. 
‘Mathias. 


only. 

| 3. The type and general loca- 
‘tion of new facilites needed in 
|Bethesda and elsewhere. 


| New Amendment Planned 


| The committee will report to 
the council by next February 1, 
so that a new amendment may 
be drawn up by next May. Also 
to study the committee’s findings 
|will be one or more lay groups 
‘of citizens representing the coun- 


Many famous buildings in the | marked, but not yet expended, | try’s parking districts, 
States, such as Rockefeller Cen-| 5; snecial improvement dis-| present at its monthly meeting in 


With six of seven members 
‘the county courthouse at Rock- 


and look like “familiar friends.” |, surprise to the County Com-| ville, the council took the follow- 


ing additional actions: 

Adopted a zoning ordinance 
amendment, which, in effect, will 
‘require that all homes built after 
next January 1 in the suburban 
/areahave facilities for off-street 
vehicle parking, either on drive- 
Ways or in garages, 


Fire Audits Upheld 


Refused to veto a bill requiring 
audits of funds received by the 


' 


D. C. Acts to Give Craftsmen * — 
Refunds for Unused Permits 


“Mr. Mark,” as he is familiarly 
known, said he expects to devote | 
much of his time in the future} 
to his many civic activities. He} 
is chairman of the District Rede-| 


“Mr. Mark” to retire soon. 


vy ahd J 
pt 
he 

-— se 


The District Commissioners 
yesterday agreed to seek legisla- 


ling permits are entitled to re- 

funds under the law, he said. 
Commissioner F. Joseph Don- 

amazed to 


county’s fire departments—includ- 
ing money the individual depart- 
ments raise without outside help. 

Announced appointment of Col. 
|Robert B. Ransom, USA retired, 
to the new post of deputy direc- 
tor of civil defense at an annual 
salary of $3280. Ransom, 56, has 
been Gaithersburg’s civil defense 
officer. He was graduated from 
West Point in 1917. 


opened with as little as 
$5. Why not begin today? 


be held up until the end of the 
year for lack of vital equipment. 
District Civil Defense Direc- 


District 2370 


FIRST FEDERAL 
SAVINGS 2c, ASSN 


Conveniently Located: 
G10 13th St. N.W. (bet. F & @) 
{No Branch Offices) 


: 


; 


tor John E. Fondahi said yes-| 
terday he was told by the Radio. 


Corporation of America-that it | Fondahl’s 


is unable to obtain relays to) 
activate the 34 electronic horns 
it is installing here. Unless. 
given priority, the relays would 
not be available for about four 
months, he said. 

Fondahl sai dhe will ask the 
Federal Civil Defense Admin- 
istration to help speed delivery. 


ha 100,000 volunteers needed 


| Showed almost no one could 


hear them even when expecting 
ithe drill. 

Delay in completing the warn- | 
ing system would also crimp 
plans to  lounch 
another recruiting drive for 
volunteer workers. He had 
planned a practice drill with the 
new horns shortly after Labor | 
Day and intended it to be the | 
kickoff for a recruiting program. 
So far only about one fourth of 


ve signed up. , 


velopment Land Agency, 
slum clearance operation, having 


local | 


University; a director of Group 


ition permitting the city to make, ohue said he was Appointed James Bernard 
‘refunds to craftsmen who pay jearn that if a plumber paid an Davis, of 205 Timberwood ave., 
for work permits, but then for|inspection fee and there was Silver Spring, as taxicab inspec- 


been appointed by President Tru- 
man in 1947. 

He is a past president of the 
Merchants & Manufacturers Asso- 
ciation and of the Washington 
Kiwanis Club, and past chairman 
of the Keystone Automobile Club 
advisory board. 

He is a treasurer of Recreation 
Services, Inc.; a member of the 
D. C. Motor Vehicle Parking 
Agency; a trustee of Amerigan 


‘Hospitalization, Inc., and member 
‘of the boards of Children’s Hos- 


pital, Instructive Visiting Nurse 
Society, the National Bank of 
Washington, Acacia Mutual Life 


Insurance Co., and National Cap-|permit and later inspecting the | 
‘ital Housing Authority. 


some reason don’t do the ‘job. 
Under existing law, a plumber 
or electrician hired to do a job) 


nothing to inspect he couldn’t| 
‘get his money back. “This makes | 


me feel like Jesse James with- | 
out a horse,” he said. “We should 


tor at a salary of $3632. 
Appointed seven men to the 

police force at a base salary of 

$2800 annually. All will attend 


obtains a permit and pays a fee have legislation permitting re- training school beginning Sep- 


which includes processing the 


work. If the project is cancelled, | 


funds in all cases.” | 
The Commissioners followed | 


District Auditor Arthur R. Pil-' 


tember 1. 
When the United States en- 


His retirement, Lansburgh said,/he is unable to get back from |kerton’s suggestion and sent the tered World War I, the Aviation 


will also give him time to pursue 
his hobby of making colored film 
travelogues. ‘ 


ithe city any of the money paid, 
Corporation Counsel Vernon E. 
West said. Only holders of puild- 


| 
: 


| 


matter to the department of in-, 
spection for a recommendation | 
on needed legislation. . 


Service, as it was called then, 
had 55 planes and 65 officers, 
only 35 of whom were, fliers. 


THE WASHINGTON 
Wednesday, August 15, 1951 


) 


B 


POST 


a 


vovigovwnne | Mrs. Edith Mae Jenifer; 
. =6=Ss—"_ Prominent Marylander 
BALTIMORE, Aug. 14 (#.— 


Mrs. S. B. Freed 


Douglas Downie, 


New York Newsman 


NEW YORK, Aug. 14 9.— 


‘Douglas Downie, 51, New York 
‘Post copyreader, died at New 
‘York Hospital yesterday of a 


Mrs. Edith Mae Jenifer, member 
of prominent Maryland families, 


Dies; Retired 
died in Union Memorial Hos- 


President Attends 


Funeral for Early | 


At Terminals 


President Truman and Mrs. 
Eleanor Roosevelt were among 
hundreds of mourners who yes- 


: 


; 


ee ieee Statistician 


| She was born 82 years ago at!’ ‘ ; 
'La Plata, Md., the “denantar of . Mrs. Sina B. Freed, 61, a resi- 
‘Mr. and Mrs. William H. Mitch-| dent of Washington for 41 years, 
‘ell, and was the second wife| died Monday at her home, 3808 
of Thomas. Risteau Jenifer, 4th st. nw., after a brief illness. 
prominent in Baltimore County. Born in Lu- Sia 

- Survivors include a_ son,/Tay, Va., Mrs. e 
‘Walter Mitchell Jenifer, an at- Freed lived in 
torney; a stepson, H. Courtenay | Newport News 


‘heart ailment, 


Downie, a veteran of two 
world wars, was born in Cleve- 
land. 

He covered Capitoél Hill for 
the Washington Times-Herald at 
one time. 


Mrs. Maynard Orndorff; 


Jenifer, a member of the Mary- 4nd Lynch- 
land Racing Commission, and a| >urg, Va., be- 
‘brother, Walter J. Mitchell, a fore coming to 


terday paid final tribute to/ 
Stephen T. Early for his “un- | 
selfish devotion to his country.” | 


Frederich County Native 


WINCHESTER, Va., Aug. 14— 
Mrs. Maynard Orndorff, 69, a na- 


Ban Sought 


On Soliciting 
By Cabmen _ 


The District Commissioners 
were asked yesterday to tighten 
regulations td prevent taxi cabs 
from soliciting passengers at bus 
and railroad terminals. 

Spokesmen for bus companies 
said they are losing money to 
cab drivers who take fares out of 
their stations. In many cases 
riders had already bought bus 
tickets and then obtained re- 
funds, they said. 

Police Captain Howard V. Co- 
vell of No. 1 Precinct, said one 
company reported that in one 
evening it had lost to “poaching” 
cabs four busloads of service 
men who had bought bus tickets 
to their camps. 

At Union Station where Dia- 
mond Cab has the taxi conces- 
sion, other cab drivers line up 


on the Plaza to solicit riders and * 


sometimes do more _ business 
than Diamond Cabs, Covell said. 

A Public Utilities Commission 
order prohibits licensed cab driv- 
ers from soliciting passengers at 


to the burial 


The President attended the | 


Washington Cathedral funeral 
services for his former press 


secretary and Undersecretary of | 


Defense who died Saturday at 
George Washington University 
Hospital after being stricken 
with coronary thrombosis. 

At the Cathedral, Canon G. 
Gardner Monks extolled Early 
for his “clear vision, his saga- 
‘ciousness of counsel and the 
-warm-heartedness of his friend- 
ship.” 

Mrs. Roosevelt, along with 
scores of high-ranking officials, 
went on to Arlington National 
'Cemetery to see laid at rest the 
‘man who served as press secre- 
tary and confidant to her hus- 
band during the 12 years of the 
Roosevelt administration. 

Upon entering Arlington 
Cemetery, the flag-covered cas- 
ket was placed on the traditional 
horse-drawn caisson to be taken 
plot below the 
Tomb of the Unknown Soldier 
in-law, George R. Holmes, who 
died in 1939. 

The procession, led by Maj. 
Gen. Thomas W. Herren, in- 


and next°to Mr. Early’s brother- | 


i 
, 


President Truman walks from his car to him are, 
Washington Cathedral yesterday to attend 
the funeral of Stephen T. Early, his former 


press secretary who died Saturday. With 


from left, 
Leahy, Maj. Gen. Harry Vaughan, Admiral 
Sidney Souers and Canon G. Gardner Monks, 
who conducted the service. 


‘former member of the Maryland Washington. 

Court of Appeals. She worked 
Funeral services will be held 2S 4 Statisti- 

at her home in Baltimore — in the in- 


County Thursday. ernational 
| postal service 


division of the 
|'Postoffice 
Department 

/'ment in 1940. 


| & ee 
| Mrs. Freed 
‘Charles Town Woman 


‘Succumbs to Polio 


| CHARLES TOWN, W. Va., 
Aug. 14 (‘#.—Miss Phyllis Bris- 
'eoe, 28, stricken only Sunday | 1526 Live Oak dr., Silver Spring; 
with polio, died today. ‘Mrs. Emmett Shea, of 5208 3d 
Miss Briscoe resided here with| st. nw.; and Mrs. Mary E.| 
her mother, Mrs. J. Straith Bris-| Wysong, of Baltimore, and a son, | 
coe. She was a granddaughter / Stuart H. D. Freed, of the 4th 
of the late Davis S. Briscoe, Bal-| st. address. 
'timore attorney. The family! She is also survived by two 


until her retire- 


Associated Press Photo 


Admiral William D. 


Had Fabulous Career in 65 Working Years 


By Frank R. Kent, Jr. ‘things as the eight-hour day,| 
Post Reporter /woman suffrage, and the elec-| 

Born to riches, William Ran-|tion of senators by direct vote. | 
'dolph Hearst was an individual- He opposed entry into World 
‘ist of tremendous energy and/| War I so vigorously that some) 
‘soaring ambition. In a working | accused him of German sympa- 
‘career of nearly 65 years he|thies. As late as February, 1944, 


W. R. Hearst, Hard-Driving Individualist, 


| formerly resided in Baltimore. | sisters, Mrs. J. Burket Batman, 

| of Luray, Va.; and Mrs. James 

'I. Rice of Kimball, Va.; a bro- 

' ther, Benton C. Kibler, of Shen- 

_andoah, Va., and two grandsons 
Fr 


Boy Flees Doctors 
For Grandad And 


estimated at 25 million dollars. | L Obacco Chewing 


offered him everything from the | HUNTINGTON. W. Va. Aug. | 
Homestake mine to a Mexican | 14 (?®—Jimmy Sloan is back with | 
ranch, out Mr. Hearst had his|his grandfather and chewing | 


eye on the San Francisco Ex-| tobacco again. The 14-year-old, | W K 
| , "1 
Wm. Kenny; 
& 


and a great granddaughter. 

uneral services will be held 
at 11 a. m. Thursday at the Hines 
Funeral Home, 2901 14th st. nw. 
Burial will be at 2:30 p. m. at 
the Beahms cemetery, Luray Va. 


aminer, circulation 5000. He got | Who disappeared from Hunting- 
it. Mr. Hearst his San Francisco | ton Orthopedic Haspital last! 
Thursday, turned up at his| 


tive of Frederick County who 
died Sunday at her home in Lin- 
colnia, was buried today in Mt. 
Hebron Cemetery. 

In addition to her husband, 
survivors include three brothers 
and two sisters. 


She leaves three daughters, Arthur Charles Margetson 
Mrs. William T. Tmomasson, of | : 


LONDON, Aug. 14 (#.~Ar- 
thur Charles Margetson, 54, 
British actor well known to 
Broadway audiences, died Sun- 
day. Margetson last appeared 
on Broadway in “Clutterbuck.” 


Four Coal Miners Die 


As Water Pours Into Cut 


BECKLEY, W. Va., Aug. 14 ®. 
Four miners. perished * today 
when water gushed into the 
passageway where they were 
digging coal. Apparently they 
cut into an abandoned tunnel 
full of water. 

The accident was in the 
Buffalo mine of the Laurel 
'Creek Coal Co., about 15 miles 
north of here. 

A mene employe listed the 


cluded an honor guard of four|amassed a chain of newspapers, Mr. Hearst was the subject of an 
90-men companies representing|28 magazines, eight radio sta-|jattack in “Pravda,” official So-) 
the branches of the Armed Serv- | tions, feature and news services,, At one time during World 


dead as James Flint, about 40; 
his brother, Bobby, about 27; 
Woodrow Redden, 27, and Ted 
Vandall, about 50. 


bus and street car terminals. 
George E. Hamilton jr., at- 
torney for the Washington Ter- 
minal Co., proposed this regula- 
tion be amended to include any 
person soliciting fares in termi- 
nals. 

Covell said this would help but! 
wouldn’t get to the root of the 
trquble. The chief difficulty, he 

’ said, is getting convictions, be- 
cause the courts have held that! 
police investigators must actual- 

Aly hear the driver solicit a pas- 

\_/ senger. Fines should be made 
stiffer, he said. 

The Commissioners asked Co- 
vell to put his recommendations 
in. writing and deferred action 
until he makes his report. 


journalism like a tornado. Head- | ° | 
grandfather's home in the Logan | ac PC mith 
ives. Behind the casket was a One of the world’s greatest art/War I, International News Serv-| phe Hearst empire was sprout-. | 
soldier carrying Mr. Early’s per-| Collections, a newsreel, a Holly-/ice was barred from Great'ing founding some papers, buy-| “! just got homesick,” he said, 
, spewing tobacco juice. 
¢ 7 , testa Po es rk : | Radio Theft, Numbers 
bearers also. represemted. the|and the fabulous San’ Simeon, |with an official request to leave |ton, Deteat, Pittsbusehe Beses| limbs and stumbled eight miles) A¥E- 4 ®—William F. Kenny, Gi), aid tg Woman 
P ° ? lee dies oe OO: OS eee Mt over country roads to look for a | 68, millionaire New York build- |~ aps, 2.a8G 00 oman 
Salute and three volleys of rifle | tures, Mr. Hearst formed Inter- After Britain and France went! A man who lived in medieval | . 
fire were sounded for Mr. Early, |ational Films in the early 1920s }4. ya. with Germany for the’ splendor, Mr. Heafst did not stint’ the hospital he learned to read paseball club, died yesterday Court yesterday, waived pre- 
|and write and gave up his to-| while vacationing in the Pocono |liminary hearing on a larceny 
tor of Northminster Presby- and artist’s model. She became dent Roosevelt and Mr. Hearst revolution cost $500,000. He hired | ,4-1)- | . | was one of A] ona second charge of possessing 
terian Church and Maj. James @ Star of the silent films and re-|5.e, this country’s foreign talent, sometimes whole depart. Million Bonds Approved | smith’s chief backers in the 1928 numbers slips. She was released 
ANNAPOLIS, Aug. 14 (#.—An | Democratic 
Besides Mr. Early’s family,| Forced Liquidation | aa Si ita ) those he hired was the late Ar-) estimated he made 227-A P st. nw., was arrested 
‘mourners included Chief Justice _ Ivey ve ggetlaoma B sx thur Brisbane who remained|issue of one million dollars for|nearly 30 million dollars in the Monday in Hecht Co., Silver 
A ] , ty ee sewer and water systems in the 
’ + “se ss . ° ° “e 9 : 
Man, 72, CCUSEE ‘tary of Defense Robert A. Lov-|Pression .years of the 1930s Fi citaee teu ani demic: In 1903 Mr. Hearst married the| million dollars in bonds will be|Giants’ stock but sold it two said she attempted to slip the 
Of Hitting Another ’ former Milicent Willson of New/issued shortly for the area,| years later after allegedly quar- alleged lottery slips beneath a 
Staff Hoyt S. Vandenberg, Air |VeTSal Service was folded into | 4nd hanes e Fg a 
Force Secretary Thomas G Fin. |international News Service, and |‘#¢ freedom of the President to 
R. Duncan yesterday ordered a | As he approached 75, Mr. | Blamed for Assassination 
72-year-old man held under $1000 ‘Hearst established a sort of At the turn of the century, Mr. 
another man with an iron pipe. |(» Appointment of Mayor M. and in 1938 he announced he was | editorials in his papers that he [FA RAN( c SALE | 
* 


The defendant, listed in court BR Clowe, jr., as chairman of the/giving up active management of | was accused in some quarters of 
records as Madison Johnson, of Savings (Defense) Bonds Com-jhis vast holdings. His editors, | having incited his assassination. 
521 N. Henry st., Alexandria, was | mittee for Frederick County was, however, continued to receive | Mb - Hearet’s first New York | 
accused of attacking Eddie Davis, announced today by Colgate W.\the famous messages from his | paper ia Seurnel. espoused th 
of the same address. ‘Darden, jr., state chairman of secretary, beginning, “The Chief , cieprramtee SP - 

si ‘ae | :° ,cause of the revolutionary party 

In another assault case, Paul the Savings Bonds Committee) says—. in Cuba in the pre-Spanish-Amer- 
B. Bennett, 38, a laborer, of 302 and president of the University) When President Truman fired|ican War days. Mr. Hearst had 


N. Alfred st., Alexandria, plead- 


Heflin, 222 N. Royal st., with a 
scale weight. Bennett also was 
held under $1000 bond for grand 
jury action. 


‘of Virginia. ' 
ed innocent of attacking Maurice | 


Academy Teacher Moved 


ANNAPOLIS, Aug. 14 
Cornelius 


General Douglas MacArthur, a 


‘great Hearst favorite, this spring, 
denouncing | 
ithe act was dictated personally 
‘\.— by Mr. Hearst. It was entitled 


the lead editorial 


sent Richard Harding Davis and 
a half dozen other reporters to 
Cuba. Legend has it that Artist 
Frederic Remington messaged 
Mr. Hearst he wished to return 


Capt. S. Seabring, | “Made in England” and appeared 
since 1947 head of the Naval on front pages of all Hearst 
Academy’s Department of Ma- newspapers. | 


stéaling the applause this fall? ‘ine Engineering, has been re-. 
_ Read The Washington Post Fall | assigned. He will report for duty | 
Fashion Section tomorrow for|to the Navy’s Bureau of Chips 

the answers to all your fashion in Washington. He is a native 
' quesetions. iof Spencer, N. Y. 


because everything was quiet and 
there would be no war. | 
| Mr. Hearst reputedly wired | 
In September of 1949 and_ back: “You furnish the pictures 
agair in October of that year, and I'll furnish the war.” 
Mr. Hearst received decorations |, a 
from abroad. In September Pope } Remember the Maine | 
Pius XII made him a Knight of} On the urging of the Journal, 
the Order of St. Sylvester. The| the battleship Maine was sent 
decoration was granted in recog-|to Cuba. It blew up in Havana 
nition of Mr. Hearst’s contribu-| Harbor on February 15, 1898. 
tion to the restoration of old| When war followed, Mr. Hearst 


mission churches in California. | turned his yacht over to the 
: A : Navy. He was commissioned an 
Cuba’s Highest Decoration /ensign. Later he went to Cuba 
The next month the Cuban! 4S 4 correspondent and wrote 
government awarded him its | the story of a bayonet charge 
highest decoration, the Grand) While bullets sang over his head | 
Cross of the Order of Merit Car-| and one of his own correspond- 
los Manuel de Cespedes, for his! €™ts lay wounded beside him. 


part in the campaign for Cuban, , Mr. Hearst always was intense- | 
independence. ,ly interested in politics. His fa- 


~ ‘ther was a United States Sena- 
In a sense, Mr. Hearst can be|tor wr Hearst was elected to 
said to have revolutionized jOUT-| the Fifty-eighth and Fifty-ninth 
nalism with his blazing head-| Congresses (1903-1907), but was 
lines, sometimes printed in red.| defeated for Mayor of New York 
He lived through periods of na-| in 1905 and again in 1909. He lost 
tional popularity and animosity | the race for the governorship to 
as he waged his various ¢am- Charles Evans Hughes in 1906. 
paigns. Some regarded him as a; Jn 1920 he was an unsuccess. 
genius, others as “yellow jour-| fy] candidate for a presidential 
nalist” and a “rabble rouser. nomination. That venture report- 
viet newspaper. He was charged edly cost him $1.400.000. 
with trying to destroy the al-| He also engaged in a feud with 
| liance'of the Soviet Union, Great the late Al Smith. In 1922 Mr 
Britain and the United States. Smith, taking the floor of the 
| Some denounced him as a;|Democratic convention at Syra- 
‘radical. He championed such Cuse, succeeded in keeping Mr. 
Hearst off the ticket for the 
United States Senate. In 1932 
Mr. Hearst drew last blood. Mr. 
Smith was trying to block the 


a 


Do you know which fabrics are 


lines, red and_ sensational, | © 
County mountains, 70 miles 
In ’28 Election 
sonal flag as Undersecretary of wood producing outfit, 38 million | Britain, France and Canada. ing others, Mr. Hearst spread his| : 
In March, Jimmy made him- | 
Armed Services. _275,000-acre seat of his empire.|the country and branded him a more. Seattle, Milwaukee and : 
, ; _doctor. He had broken a leg/|ing contractor and a former part; A District mother of three, ap- 
Services there were conducted |t0 make a star out of Marion | . i ras - on expenditures. It was estimat- ; 
second time there was an ex P “ | bacco chewing. Mountains d asked.for jury trial 
H. Terry, Army chaplain at Wal-|Mained Mr. Hearst’s friend and policy. ments away from rivals, such as’ presidential cam- on $500 bond in each case. 
; ordinance was passed yesterday | paign. 
Fred M. Vinson, Army Secretary | The Hearst empire was at its | high in the councils of the Hearst | contracting business. In 1928 he Spring. on a charge of larceny 
ett, Army Chief of Staff J. Law-|C@used some consolidation. Sev- | 
York City. She and five sons| which was annexed the first of | reling with the club’s president, desk while being questioned on 
With Tron Pipe | 1 Bin? 1 wos, SE RE 
I letter, George E. Allen and W.|Part of his 15-million-dollar art take a few fireside shots occasion- 
bond for the grand jury on a Named Bond Of ficial iregency to take over the business | pearst criticized President Wil- 


bloomed and so did circulation. 
away. 
Defense, a post he left in Sep-| dollars worth of New York real; Jn 1930 the French govern-| network into key cities, Washing-| EAST STROUDSBURG,’ Pa., 
self a pair of crutches from tree 
At the graveside, a 19-gun| Among his motion picture ven- | «Francophobe,” others. hy. Stan | mentee ce tad 
three weeks earlier. While in| owner of the New York Giants | Pearing in Silver Spring Police 
by the Rev. William Kepler, pas-| Davies, a Ziegfield Follies beauty | .,ange_ between the late Presi-,ed the coverage of the Cuban. cnarge, an 
Mr. Kenny 
ni | : =e ; , Mrs. ¢ Belle Y , 33, of 
ter Reed Hospital. confidante until the end. Mr Hearst stated his position as the late Joseph Pulitzer. One of. , Irs. Anna Belle Young oO 
for a 20-year-old serial bond! It was 
Frank C. Pace, jr.. Undersecre- | height in the 1920s, but the de- | German Nazism and English and enterprises until his death. |city’s annexed area. Another|purchased 20 percent of the of a 360 radio. County police 
ene ; 1 liquidated. Uni- | American freedom of the press 
ton Collins, Air Force Chief of |©T@! Papers were liquidated, Uni- | 
survive him. |the year. the late Charles A. Stoneham. the first charge. 
. : Tr ‘eollecti , ld ally. 
Alexandria Police Judge James | Stuart Symington. couection was sold. 
charge of feloniously assaulting) wfINCHESTER, Va, Aug. 14,,)management of his enterprises, |jam McKinley so severely through 
= Ee, } 


' 


Take The Washington Post 


with you on your vacation 


No matter where you go on vacation, you'll 
enjoy getting daily delivery of The Washington 
Post. 


You'll welcome the news from home, and 
your favorite columnists and comic sips. And 
you'll have more time to read and digest stimu- 
lating Post editorials. 


. mat he ain 
SE me 


Soeasy to store.Cleaner hangs 
flat against wall. Does not 
take an inch of floor space. 


No foot-pedal acrobatics. 
Adjust handle to any position 
with trigger on handle. 


Housing unit only Sinches high. 
Has headlight for easy seeing. 


reels in and out of handle auto 
matically. No tripping over 
cord. 


Phone NA. 4200 for © 


Vacation Delivery of 
The Washington Post 


in Memortam | 


. booklet of 101 “In Memoriam” SEBASTIAN, 
. tributes suitable for publication is now! 12, 1951, 
* available without charge. Remembrances | 
for all members of the family and for | 
* friends are included. The booklet may | 
pe obtained at the front counter in The) 


Get the most revolutionary modern cleaner with 
all these SINGER advantages! 


x 


Payments as low as 


$ 


after minimum down payment. 
Liberal allowance on your pres- 
ent cleaner. 


® Dual Suction—two fans—meus 
greater dirt-getting action. 


Bird Bird 


PAUL A. On Sunday. August WOOLSON, GLADYS EVA. On Sunday 


PAUL A. SEBASTIAN of 624| August i2, 1951, at Washington Sani-;MO0Mination of Franklin D. 
Powhatan pl. nw., husband of Helen M tarium, LADYS WOOLSON of 512) Roosevelt. 


\DYS Mr. Hearst swung 
, -? a i Quintana nw.. Washington. D. C.. ' : : ' 
eos a, ate PR Ad Heme | beloved wife of F.C. Woolson, daughter | the California delegation against | 


Sebastian, brother of Pather Jerome.| Of Mrs. Fannie Fenwick and sister of yr 
Post Building by telephoning your re-|; William, Harry, and John_ Sebastian.| re Lf W. peas, Mrs. H. M. Mahr, Smith. 
> quest, or by writing to The Washington; and Pauline Hamilton. Prayers at) Me’ Pa Mr. Hearst was born April 29. 


kins, Mrs. J. A. Jenkins. | 
: dvertising Department,| Chambers Funeral Home, 1400 Chapin) and John Fenwick. Friends | , 
; Post Classified | Adver | eS Weeder, Sunes 1 Mee may call at the Ives Puneral Home, 2847 1863 in San Francisco. He was 
| Bod : gy ee ee the| neral services will be held on Wednes- the only son of the late George 
Nativity, 6 st. ; . Mm. “ : 
Bird | Interment Arlington National Cemetery.| a, aR, R, RG pereieg:” and Phoebe Apperson Hearst. 
SMITH. ARMA BING. On Sunday, August He began his journalistic career 
. AY, ARLES EDWARD. On Sun 12, 1951. at Georgetown University Hos- : : 
ay ae at his residence. pital ARMA BING SMITH, wife of the —= as business manager of the 
B20 oS : late James Clyde Smith, daugbter of | DEATHS Harvard Lampoon. In his senior 
rs. John E. Bimg and the late Mr. _— \ 
year Mr. Hearst was expelled 
Announcements of from the university for a practi- 
Services by Chambers cal joke. 
Emshwiller. John P. . Chambers Co. 
Hardie. David W. Chambers Co. 


. mother of James Eugene Smith, 
His father, worth a fortune 
nyt teeny Paul A. . Chambers Co. 


Graham T. Northup and Miss 
Barbara Bing Smith: sister of Arden | 
E. Bing. Friends may call at the 
atterson. ; 4 
|Special Masses 
Set Today For 
Federal Workers 


] ) 
Birch Funeral Home, 3034 M st. nw. 
Services at the Georgetown Presbyte- 

rian Church, on Wednesday, August 15. | 
: Interment Arlington 

Catholic churches will mark 

the Feast of the Assumption 

| today with the usual holy day. 

FUNERAL DESIGNS schedule and additional masses | 


Mon 
GEO. C. SHAFFER, INC. hee’ government workers. 


Expressive florai tributes. Moderate | The following masses will be 
rices. Open daily, Sunday, holidays. Said in six downtown churches: 
St. Matthews Cathedral, 12:10 
p. m.; St. Patrick’s Church, 12 
noon, and 12:05, 12:15, 12:30 and 
1 p. m.; St. Stephen’s, 12 noon | 
and 12:15 p. m.; St. Aloysius, 
12:05 p. m.: St. Dominic’s, 12:15 
p. m., and St. Mary’s, 12:05 p. m. 
The Feast of the Assumption 
commemorates the Blessed Vir- 
_gin’s attainment of Heaven with- 
/out the corruption of the grave. | 
The Dogma was proclaimed last | 
 ‘himanerel 2 by Pope Pius XII. 


A MONTH 


® 2-speed switch for heavy or 
light cleaning. Controls within 
fingertip-reach on handle. 


© Midway Handgrip enables you 
to carry cleaner with ease 


Park. . 
*A Trace Mark or 
THE SINGER MANUFACTURING COMPAN:s 


day, . 
4004 


14th 
GRAY. 
father s. 
icks of Fernandina, Fia.; } 

Byron, Washington, D. C.; Brother of 
Rey. Prederick H. Baker of Hendérson- 
ville. N. C. Priends may call at Gaw- 
lers Chapel, 1756 Pennsylvania ave. nw. 
where services will be held on Wednes- 
day. August 15. at 2:30 p. m. Interment 
Cedar Hill Cemetery. 


HARDIE. David, on Sunday August 12. 
1951, of 3241 N st. nw., apt. 8 DAVID 
HARDIE. busband of Margaret Hardie 
and brother of Mrs. Henrietta Thomp- 
son. Services at Chambers Funeral 
Home 3072 M st. nw. on Wednesday. 
August 15. at 2:30 Pp. m Interment in 
Washington National Cemetery. 


HAYES CHESTER C.. of 3815 ° 25th p! 
ne.. CHESTER C. HAYES.‘ hugband o 
Mary C. Hayes and father off Pvt. ls 
Ciass Chester C. Hayes jr.. brother of 
Russell and Howerd Hayes and Mrs. 
Edna Winfield. Services at Chambers: 
FPuneral Home, 517 1lth st. se. on Thurs-) 
Gay. August 16, 1951, et 11:30 4. m.; 
Interment Cedar Hill Cemetery. 


ON SALE ONLY AT THE 


_ SINGER SEWING CENTERS 


Your Key to Satisfaction 


. Chambers Co 
. Chambers Co 
ers Co 


Cc ers 
. am aa 
bers Co 


: Chambers Co 


da Russell E. 
-. J#urney. William L. 
* Hayes, Chester C. 


{ Mrs. Samuel A. Dashieil. 
Robert E. Acorn. services 
Hines Co. Funeral Home. 
nw.. om Wednesday. August 
10 a. m., interment Gien- 


on 


o 


ROAD. sister o 
aunt 


int OL Mrs 
at the S. H 
>] 14th st. 
1d. 19S). at 
wood Cemetery 
VIOLETT. Rosie E. Suddenly on Sunday, 
August 12. 1951, at her residence, 61 
42nd Place Hyattsville. Md.. ROSIE E.| 
VIOLETT,. nee Cassell. beloved wife of! 
the late Randolph T. Violett and mother) 
of Robert T. Violett. Services at the 
above residence on Thursday, August 
16th at 8:30 A.M.. thence to St. Jerome's 
Catholic Church, Hyattsville, Md.. where 
mass will be offered at 9 a. m. Rela- 
| tives and friends invited. Interment at 
PRICE, JANIE S. On Sunday. August 12,). Mt. Olivet Cemetery. | 
1951. at George Washington University | WENDEPL, MARY E. On Sender, ANG |e : inday, | holidays 
Y E. WEND Phone orders also accepte to = | 


Hospital. JANIE S. PRICE. beloved wife 12, 1951. at Ph | 
of Irvine Price and sister of Mrs. J. 8.| P . Md. AR “ LL, sot | week nights. 900 14th st. nw. NA. 01 
Cheste 


Michener. She is also survived by aj Accokeek, Md., beloved wife Snare 
lowell Dear. Puneral services owill be | Wendell. Mr rs, Lillie} GUDE BROS. CO., FLORISi 
Herndon Friends may, call” at tbe |_2922 F 8t_ FLW. NA. 4276 
CIRCLE FLORISTS 


CREMATORIUM 


J. WILLIAM LEE SONS CO. 
PUNERAL DIRECTORS 
4th and Mass. Ave. N.E. LI. 3-5200. 


EM, 4244 
LU. 4-013! 
OL. 7015 


3421 Conn. Ave. N.W, 

3919 Minn. Ave. N.E. 

7015 Wiscoasin Ave. (Bethesda) 
4905 Almapetif oA d. (Bladensburg) 


” et 


WA. 0184 RE. 7200 
GE. Gili 
OX. 3600 


AL. 5615 


609 7th St. W.W. 
3107 M St. NW. Mi, 6677 
Shirlington Shopping Center OV. 2827 
8417 Georgia Ave. H.W. (Silver ——- 


1340 G St. WLW, 

6/1 Georgia Ave. W.W, 

3107 Wilson Bivd. (Clarendon) 
702 King St. (Alexandria) 


i 


UN, 7600 


FREDERICK, MD. i No. Market St. 2473 


— 


ANNAPOLIS, MD. 139 Main St. 3181 


§ 


ryville, Va., 


For our protection Singer sells and services its sewing machines and other products only 
through Singer Sewing Centers, identified by the Red “S” trademark and the “Singer Sewing 
Center” emblem on the window, and never through department stores, dealers, or other outlets. 


» 
= 


On Monday. August 
1109 6th 
beloved 
Sanders. 


Mattingly FPuneral Home, i3!1 1lith 

Where services will be held on 

August 16th. at 2 3 m. 

friends invited. ter- 

ment, Cedar Hil] Cemetery. 
« 


on Wednesday. August 15. 
Ave. ne.. where services will be held 
AN S, IDA §&. Charge accounts invited. City. 
Se 138° WHITE, rages A. On Sunday, Aug & 
wits af the late William &. Oregon aye. nw. beloved husband of | 
Home, 2007 Nichols ave. se.. on Wednes- 
discounted for cash. See mine. AD. 0060. 


held at her home. Irvinedaie. near Ber- 
at 2». m. Interment Greenhill Ceme- Lee Funeral Home, 4th st. and Mass. 
tery. Berryville. Va. 
on Wednesday, August 15. at P.™m.| Exclusive floral tributes; moderate 
Interment Cedar Hill Cemetery. , | Prices 
at her residence gust | elivery. 5634 Conn. ave. EM. 6465 
IDA S._ SANDERS. 12, 1951, LEONARD A. WHITE, of 5700 | ide: delivery 
mother of Vivian Fones and Ruth the late Alice H. White. Funeral serv- | 
Davis. Friends may call at the Robert ices at the mmons Bros. Funeral CEMETERY LOTS 
A 
day, August 15, a 2 p.m. Relatives, and My 100 attrac. Cedar Hill choice sites. 
friends invited. ntermen oc ee 
LOT—$265 credit on lot at 
. Greendelt 5909. | 


Cemetery. Remains may be viewed after CEMETERY 
12 noon Tuesday, August ~14. Port Lincoln 


” “= 


Frank Pace Tells One 


FRANK PACE, one of the 
current Administration’s best 
raconteurs, tossed off a story 
of childhood, one that is sure 
to appeal to all narents who 
are having troubles with the 
biggest word in the diction- 
ary, the little word WHY. 

A father and son were sit- 
ting in front of the fire! one 
night, the youngster with a 
speculative look in his eye. 

“Pops,” said the boy. “How 
high is the Empire State 
Building?” 

“You know, son, I’m no en- 
gineer or architect .. - I 


don’t know.” 
“Well, Pops, why- does the 


grass grow?” 

“Son. I can’t telP you .« « 
I’m no scientist.” 

“But, Pops, what makes the 
grass so green?” 

“Son, you know perfectly 
well I’m no physicist.” 

The youngster looked at his 
father in considerable sur- 
prise, and then said, seriously: 

“Father, you don‘t mind if I 
ask questions, do you?” : 

“Of couse not, son,” his 
father replied expansively. 
“How do you ever expect to 
learn anything if you dont 
ask questions?” 

ow 


ALL KIDS go through the 
block-building stage, piling 
blocks into castles on the 
floor. But 18-year-old Wood- 
bridge Morley has carried that 
childhood buildup right into 
reality. After graduating 
from McDonough Schoo! and 
before going to Western Mary- 
land College this fall, he de- 
cided to get a job. Something 
outdoors. Something construc- 
tive that he could do with 
his hands. 

He found a job all right at 
Gibson Island. He’s helping 
to build his own house. He’s 
working for the builder who is 
constructing the new all-year- 
round home of Felix and Isa- 
bel Morley. Woody’s Dad, one- 
time president of Haverford 
College and now with Barron’s 
Weekly, hopes Woody in his 
exuberance isn’t misplacing 
any bricks or driving in any 
nails crooked. Especially since 
the Morleys expect one of 
these days to leave their 
Westmoreland Circle home 
and retire to the new house 
on Gibson Island. 

ow 


We THINK, incidentally, 
we can match that story of 
Frank Pace’s with one told us 
by a relative recently. She was 
busily writing a letter when a 
young cousin came in from 
Sunday school. 


“Cousin Kate,” said the lad, | 


“who made me?” 

“Bobby,” said his relative, 
“vou have just come from 
Sunday school. You certainly 
must know the answer.” 

“But, Cousin Kate, you tell 
me ... who made me?” 

“Why, God made you, Bob- 


y. 

“But what did he make me 
out of, Cousin Kate?” 

“Now, Bobby, do run off 
and play. You know prefectly 
well that the Bible says He 
made you out of dust.” 

The youngster thought 
about that for awhile and then 
burst forth: “But, Cousin 
Kate, if He made me out of 
dust, why don’t I go to mud 
when I wash myself?” 

ces 

IT sounds glamorous to be 
an American Ambassador at 
the Court of King So.and-So, 
but an Ambassador’s life is 
not all gravey. 


Take the story recently told | 
here about one of our Ambac- | 


sadors in a European country. 
Seems a prominent American 
journalist was due, and so our 
Ambassador sent him a cordial 
invitation to stop off at the 
American Embassy. 

The young man, who is a 
columnist with one of those 
more astringent pens, arrived 
on a day when the Ambassador 
was out. But he was greeted 
warmly by the Ambassador's 
lady, who had never met him 
before. 

“You are Mrs. X, I presume,” 
Said the journalist in a business- 
like manner, 

“Why, yes,” she began... 

“Well, I would like to be 
shown right up to my room. 
On the second floor, I hope.” 

(Te 2. Sere. 

“Well, I'll go up,” said the 


visitor, and then added briskly, ° 


“and I'd like a scotch and soda 
sent up right away.” 

The Ambassador’s wife, dis- 
mayed by the abrupt efficiency 
of the young man, called a serv- 
ant to show him to his reom. In 
a few minutes the servant stag- 
gered back down under the bur- 
den of six suits. 

“The gentleman says he wants 
them all pressed and back 
within the hour,” the servant 
said. 


That Little Word ‘Why 


Worries Many a Parent 


By Dorothy McCardle 


Just there the ambassador ar- 
rived, His wife greeted him 

“Just who does this young 
man think he is!” she de- 
manded, and she related what 
had happened. “And just where 
does he think he im. .. at an 
American embassy or a 
hotel?” . 

Next day the young man 
found out where he was—and 
it wasn't at the embassy any 
more. 


Service Dances 


The Unifieation Society is 
giving a dance for officers of 
the armed forces at the Shore- 
ham. Hotel this evening at 
9:30. 

The society also is giving 
an all-day beach party and 
dance today at the Rose Haven 
Yacht Club for members of 
the armed services, Govern- 
ment employes and new- 
comers to the city and their 
families. An identical party 
will take place Thursday for 
area school teachers in appre- 
ciation of aid they have given 
in the past to handicapped in- 
dividuals in which the society 
has an interest. Call Columbia 
0735 for further information. 


Canadian Trip 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Kaufman 
left Sunday for a _ vacation 
cruise in Canada of several 
weeks. 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
W ednesday, August 15, 1951 


_ Portraits 


Circus Days 


By James J. Metcalfe 


and seal... The clowns and 
bareback riders afid . . . The 
tricks that look so real... I 
smell the golden popcorn and 
. ++I taste the lemonade .,.. 
And wish that I could buy up 
all . . . The souvenirs dis. 
played ...I want to see the 
cowboys and ... The acroba- 
tic men ... 1 want to sit be- 
Side the ring ... And be a kid 
again. 


(Copyright, 1951, Pield Enterprises, Inc, 
All Rights Reserved.) 


The circus days are here 
again ... With acts of daring 
new ... To make me laugh 
and clap my hands . . . The 
way I used to do... I want 
to see the big parade ... And 
listen to the band... And 
watch the greatest show on 
earth . , . That ever held 
command ,.. The lion and the 
tiger and... The elephant 


elleff's 


F Street 
Shirlington 

Silver Spring 
4473 Conn. Ave. 


A Jelleff-exclusive! 


ya 8630 COLESVILLE RD., SILVER SPRING, MD mau, 


SALE! $25 Famous 
Repel-O-Tized SUITS 


4s 


Here are the coolest, most crisp sum- 


mer suits we know! 


Fine rayon suit- 


ings tailored on soft lines for traveling 


or career... now and [ater. 


Pastels 


and mixtures in sizes 10 to 20. 


HABERDASHER 


1310 F Sy. 


NA. 9540 


‘Royal Fan Practices 
f With Gene Kelly — 


< 
-. res ys 
; aes . _ ‘ ¢ 
; oe yy . 
. 23 : : 
: Eee Ss Ske. 8 “ : 
. i Ws —~ y 
. 5 BS ey & . 
. 7 - 7 \ 
‘ aN , , 
. Ve ee SR 
PROV RS 
~ >a 


Dancing with versétile GE | 
‘ NE 

KELLY* demands jots of energy from | 
his young partne+. But she is more | 


than equa! to the task. She 
. ohe gets extra 
food-energy from Royal Puddings. 


Every package of Royal Puddin 


contains more food-energy than a full | 


een of sweet, fresh milk! Mothers 


now the magic in milk—so rich in | 
proteins, vitamins, minerals—food- | 
energy, too. And youngsters love the | 


creamy-smooth goodness of Royal 


Puddings. Try all 7 wonderful flavors, | 


“Currently starring in MGM’s 
“AN AMERICAN IN PARIS” 
Color by Technicolor 


) 


elleffs 


F Street 


Misses’ ribbed rayon basic, fully-skirted and narrowly silhou- 
etted above ... In, of course, CHARCOAL, and black and 


Fashion 


takes a 
ribbing 


. in its new, thickly-textured fabrics 
for fall .» + in the rich way they feel 
... in the luxurious way they look! In 
the subtle way they drape and flow in 
this season's dresses! 


purple. Sizes 12 to 20. 


Misses’ Dress Shop—Second Floor, F Street 


Woman’s finely-ribbed rayon faille suit-dress. s 


tabs and rhinestones. 


Women’s Dress Shop—Second Floor, F Sircet 
Both dresses also at Bethesda, Shirlington, 4473 Conn. Ave. and Silver Spring 


| | . : | martly long- 
jacketed, with diagonal interest at collar and hip, with self 
Black or navy; sizes 1414 to 22). 


$19.95 


$22.95 


Yeagers 


SUMMER DRESS | NYLON 


girdles 
by 


ule! 


341 DRESSES 
Reg. 8.99, 10.95 & 12.95 


Dorothy — 


Bickum 


Mn i ge oe iii 


ht 
er ay 
lee Te em 
hee Cee a. often : 
he ee eee Sac.” , a PS 
te Fn A 
Loe 4 


th, 


_ » ay. 
a 


Lily-white double-sheer nylon, with firm Talon 
opening; cool, sturdy support! 14-inch length, 


sizes 25 to 32 88 50 


. | $10.95 
Nylon net bra by Hollywood ... sizes 32 to 36 


D $3.50 
Jelleff's—Corset Shop—Second Floor—F Street 


@ 98 Silky Broadcloths'! 
@ 69 Cool Chambrays! 
@ 47 Dimity Sheers! 


@ 71 Print Lawns! 

@ 5! Crisp Shantungs! 

@ Junior and Misses Sizes! 
Large Selections of Sizes 7 and 9 16-inch length, sizes 26 to 32 


ALL SALES FINAL—NO C€.0.D.’S—NO WILL-CALLS 


Open Mon. & Fri. Till 9:30 PM 


Also at Shirlington, 4473 Conn. Ave. and Silver Spring 


Call NA. 4200, ask for Circulation and order 


Washington Post Guaranteed home delivery 


ais. 


elleffs 


F Street 
Silver Spring 

Bethesda 

4473 Conrecticut Ave 
Shirlingtoe 


~ . Our College Fashion 
Rey, Show is TONIGHT! 


| Bring your beau... your Mother and Father to 
| the Main Ballroom of the Shoreham Hotel tonight 
F at 8:30. No... you don't need tickets! You'll 
fF’ see so many wonderful things... flannels, greys, 
+. burry woolens, crinoline-supported meéelry -go- 

rounds ...Come see, tonight. 


An R, and K. Original 
in fine worsted woolen 
for Juniors. The 

ness in its skirt so de- 


signed to look like a 
Dution-on apron, and 
note the new curve of 
collar, curve of cuffs. 
In purple or red, sizes 
9 to 15, $22.95, 


From our College Shop Collection... 
news to make you news whether you're 
a freshman, a senior or the star of the 
Civil Service Commission. 


Also in Jelleff’s Junior 
Deb Shop, Fourth Floor 
F Street and at Shirling- 
ton, 4473 Conn, Ave. 


...@Qnd its a big, big year for HALF VELVET...HALF PRICE 


Our rayon tissue faille choir-boy blouse in white, magnolia or gold: sizes 10 to 18, $10.95, 


oe gor at slacks in handsome black, violet or dark green cotton velveteen: sizes 
to 16, OU, ae # 


Sheer nylon in a romantic Byron Blouse with glittering rhinestone buttons on white cham- 
pagne, light blue, avacado green; sizes 32 to 38, $12.95. | 


The swirl below, the skirt news of the season: a really tremendous swirl of glamorous cotton 
velveteen (that can take many crinoline petticoats) with a tiny waist: black. violet honey 
gold in sizes 10to 18. $14.95. | ‘ee 


Jelleff’s College Shop, Fourth Floor, Velvets and Nylon Blouse at F Street and Branch Stores. The Choir Boy Blouse only 


at F Street 


THE WASHINGTON POST 


_4B 


Wednesday, August 15, 1951 


Town Topics 


Pakistan Has Annual Holiday 


By Elizabeth Maguire 


PAKISTAN’S fourth anni- 


versary since Partition was 


celebrated yesterday at an 
embassy garden fete. An 
annual tradition, the party has 
become one of Washington’s 
favorite summer entertain- 
ments. From six to eight 
hours in which guests were re- 
ceived by the Ambassador and 
Mme. Ispahani, the velvet 
lawn of the garden was the 
gathering spot of diplomats, 
officials, and their wives and 
residential friends. 

Mme. Ispahani chose a gold 
gharrara for the occasion, and 
the gold drawing room where 
she stood was air cooled and 
decorated with long stem 
yellow roses. Wives of em- 
bassy staff members added a 
pretty note in their native 
chiffon costumes in colors of 


ruby red, mint green, straw- 
berry, flame and white. 


Two long buffets, ladened 
with palatable delicacies were 
set up on either side of the 
garden, while inside in the 
dining room another buffer 
was centered with a giant 
white cake, on which was iced 
the white and green flag of 
Pakistan. Salmon, _ turkey, 
hot seafoods, cold _ lobster, 
hors d’oeuvres, assorted nuts, 
cakes, ice creams, everything, 
tempted the lean and the fat, 
the old and the young. 


Sen. Homer Ferguson, one 
of the fgst to arrive, said Mrs. 
Ferguson was out of town for 
a while. Sir Carl Berendsen, 
Ambassador of New Zealand, 
and Lady Berendsen, in town 
for a few days, dropped by, 
saw countless friends, includ- 
ing the Ambassador of Ceylon 
and Mme. Corea, Economic 


—_ 


(FREE Portrait of Baby 


TO ALL NEW CRIB CUSTOMERS 


by Laurel Studios 
of Washington 


/ 


Baby Patricia Ruth Hefferan 
of 3511 Martha Custis Drive, 
Alexandria, Virginia, at the 
age of 5 months. Photo- 
graphed by Laurel Studios 
of Washington. 


MORE THAN 800 NAMES FOR BABY 
IN OUR FREE “WHO ME?” BOOKLET — 


The problem 6f your new-baby’s name is solved .. . 
just send for Crib’s attractive booklet, ‘“Who Me?” 


You'll find more than 1,8 
horoscope, zodiac signs, birthstones, 


choose .. 


names from which to 


flowers and hundreds of new suggestions for baby. 
Mothers -to-be in Washington and surrounding 
areas can have this valuable booklet FREE. Just 
fill out and mail the attached coupon today! 


ay 
7 
i 
i 
i 


| 

MAIL TODAY 5 
CRIB DIAPER SERVICE 

DEPT. B | 

| 

1 


21-31 Pierce St. N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 
Paste on Penny Postcard 
or enclose in envelope. 
Please send me 
“WHO ME?’ 


HO } 
booklet FREE 


NN fis aus od 
Phone No.... 
Approx. Date Exp. 


CALL ME. 1452 
FOR DIAPER 
SERVICE 


4 


| Ambassador of Korea and 
| Mme. Yang, the Ambassador 
+, of Portugal and Senora de 


_tache of Canada, 
Taber, John Laylin,; assistant 


DIAPER SERVICE 


Zi Prerce St RW - Washongton D € 


Stabilizer Eric Johnston, the 
Minister of Syria and Mme. 
El-Khouri, and the Ambassa- 
dor of the Philippines, Joaquin 
M. Elizalde. 


The military, including 
Lieut. Gen. and Mrs. Charlies 
L. Bolte, had chats together, 
and one lieutenant colonel, 
who shall be nameless, told a 
new one. An embassy attache 
at lunch that day had said to 
him, “At U.N. we no longer 
say ‘honi seit qui mal y pense,’ 
we say ‘honi soit qui Malik 
pense.’ 99 

Mrs. Baig, wife of the Pakis- 
tan Minister, was a picture in 
a sari of hand woven silver 
tissue with white silk blouse 
edged in crystal embroidery, 
and her little bag of gold 
mesh was set with diamonds. 
Pride of the Baig family are 
their two sons, Munir, 19, who 
is a student at Trinity College, 
Cambridge, and Taimur, 16, 
who is entering George Wash- 
ington this fall. Both boys 
attended the garden fete. 

The Ambassador of Yugo- 
Slavia, Vladimir Popovic, the 


Esteves Fernandes, Lieut. Col. 


_M. A. Sheikh, Pakistan at- 
tache, and Mrs. Sheikh, Brig- 


adier H. E. Taber, military at- 
and Mrs. 


chief of protocol, Raymond 


Muir, and Mr. and Mrs. Ana- 


tole were among the many 
guests. 


In past years the embassy 
of India, the other part of Par- 
tition, celebrated her national 
holiday simultaneously with 
the Pakistani. 
the Commonwealth and be- 
coming a Republic, however, 
India will celebrate on Janu- 
ary 26, the date in '51 on which 
the Republic was born. 


PARTY PARADE: 

Brimstone Hill in Fairfax 
was the scene of a lawn party 
last, evening. Judge and Mrs. 
Paul E. Brown entertained at 
what probably will be their 
last party in their historic 
home. Honor guests on this oc- 
casion were their son, Cadet 
Paul J. Brown, and his fiancee, 
Miss Patricia Elizabeth Killo- 
ran, who will be married upon 
Cadet Brown’s_ graduation 
from West Point in 1952. 

Miss Killoran has been visit- 
ing the Browns from Newark, 
N. J., for about a week. Last 
evening she was introduced to 
the Fairfax friends of her 
fiance’s family. 

Friends of Mrs. Brown as- 
sisting at the punch bowl were 
Mrs. Henry Ludwig, Mrs. 
Ilderic J. La Bell, and Mrs. 
Jean Partier. 


SERVICE SET: 

A reunion dance for officers 
in and around Washington will 
be held at the Officers Service 
Club, 1644 2ist st. nw., Fri- 
day, August 17, from 9 to 12. 
Daughters of officers of the 


Army, Navy, Marine Corps and 


Cheese Recipes Make Sturdy, 


Savory Main Course Dishes 


GOOD, sturdy meals made 
with cheese are suggested by 
Marjorie Griffiths in the Aug- 
ust McCall's. Here are a few: 


DANISH CHEESE DISH 
! Stuffed Eggs 

4 eggs 

4% lb. mushrooms 

6 sprigs parsley 

1% tablespoons butter or 

margarine 

1 teaspoon salt 

% teaspoon pepper 

Sauce 

1 tablespoon butter or mar- 
garine 

2 tablespoons flour 

1 cup milk 

1 cup grated American ched- 
dar cheese 

42 teaspoon salt 

Hard-cook the eggs, and 
when cool enough to handle, 
cut lengthwise and scoop out 
the yolks. Mix mashed yolks 
with very finely chopped mush- 
rooms and parsley. Add melted 
butter or margarine, salt and 
pepper. Fill egg whites with 
yolk mixture and put in a 
greased baking dish. 

Start your oven at 375 F., or 
moderate, then make up this 
sauce: Melt butter or marga- 
rine, stir in flour smoothly and 
add milk gradually, stirring 
constantly. Add cheese and 
salt and cook slowly until 
sauce is smooth and slightly 
thick. Pour over stuffed,.eggs 
and bake 35 minutes, or until 
surface is golden. Enough 
for 4. 

QUICK CHEESE PIE 
cups soda-cracker crumbs 

4% cup butter or margarine 

4 medium onions 

1 3%-0z. can sardines 
1% cups milk 
3 eggs 
2 tablespoons green pepper 

chopped 


\% teaspoon tarragon 

¥% teasoon dry mustard 

1 teaspoon salt 

% teaspoon pepper 

1% lb. Am. Cheddar cheese, 

grated 

Start your oven at 325F or 
slow. Roll crackers fine and mix 
thoroughly with 6 tablespoons 
of melted butter or margarine. 
Pat mixture into bottom and 
around sides of a deep 9-inch 
plate. Chill. Chop onion fine 
and brown slightly in remaining 
butter or margarine. Cut Sar- 
dines in half and put sardines 
and onions over chilled crust. 

Heat milk until a film wrin- 
kles over the surface, add slowly 
to slightly beaten eggs. Then 
combine with’ green pepper, tar- 
ragon, mustard, salt and pepper. 
Finally, add the cheese. Then 
pour this mixture into cracker 
crust and bake 40 to 45 minutes. 
Serve immediately to 6. 


CHEESE-STUFFED PEPPERS 


4 medium green peppers 

3%4 cup blue cheese 

34 cup bread crumbs (2 slices) 
%4 cup mayonnaise 

4% cup milk 

1 tablespoon butter or 

. Margarine 

Start your oven at 350F or 
moderate. Now cut off a %-inch 
slice from top of peppers and 
take out seeds, core and mem- 
brane carefully. 

Make up the filling like: this: 
crumble cheese into little pieces 
and mix with bread crumbs, 
mayonnaise and milk. Fill 
peppers up to % inch from top 
and dot with butter or marga- 
rine. Set in baking. dish, pour 
¥% inch hot water in bottom of 
the dish and bake 30 to 40 min- 
utes or until peppers are ten- 
der when pierced with a fork 
but still slightly crisp. Serve 
to 4. 


Former Overseas Workers to Meet 


Mrs. Marjory Hendricks al- 
ternate director for this area of 
the American Overseas Assoc- 
iation, organization of former 
Red Cross overseas workers, 
will entertain three AOA 
officers at her country home 
in Bluemont, Va., for the week- 


With U. S. Lacrosse Team 


Miss Jane Vache, director of 
physical education at Mount 
Vernon Seminary and Junior 
College, will sail for England 
on August 22 with the United 
States Women’s’ Lacrosse 
Touring Team. The United 
States team will meet compe- 
tition in the British Isles, play- 
ing Welsh, Scottish and Irish, 
in addition to English teams. 

Miss Vache plays left attack 
wing on the team and is a 
former All-American player. 


In Florida 


Miss Helen Simmons of 
Washington is a guest at the 
Roney Plaze Hotel, Miami 
Beach, Fla. 


end. Miss Ruth Puffington of 
Charlottesville, Va. Miss 
Audrey Meitzold of Philadel- 
phia and Miss Virginia Davis 
of Pittsburgh will be her 
guests. On Monday, August 20, 
Mrs. Hendricks will have a 
meeting of officers of the |~ can NA, 4200, ask for Circula- 
AOA from this territory at {4:,, and order Washi eaten Pest 
her home. guaranteed home delivery. 


CLUB CRACKERS 
by KEEBLER. 


4 Sta-Fresh Paquets in each Package 


Since leaving - 


Kngagements 


GRETTA LOU HANBACK—INGOLFUR THORS 
Mr. and Mrs. Bryant L. Hanback of Washington announce the 
engagement. of their daughter, Miss Gretta Lou Hanback, to 
Ingolfur Thors, son of the Minister of Iceland and Mme. Thor 


Thors. 


Miss Hanback is the granddaughter of Mrs. Frank W. 


Collier and the late Mr. Collier, who was Postmaster of the 


House of Representatives for many years. 


Mr. Thors was 


graduated from Sidwell Friends School, and he is now attending 


American University. 


SALLIE BACON FORT—JOHN LEWIS KITTLE 


Mrs. James Lynn Fort announces the engagement of her daugh- 
ter, Sallie Bacon, to John Lewis Kittle of Bel Air, Md., son of 


Mr. and Mrs. Harry Brodnax Kittle of Tunica, Miss. 


Miss Fort 


is a graduate of George Washington University and the Univer- 


sity of North Carolina. 


Mr. Kittle attended the University of 


Mississippi and was graduated from George Washington Univer- 


sity. 


The wedding is planned for October 12. 


ELISABETH ANNE REID—FORREST K. SAVILLE, JR. 


Mr. and Mrs. Lance F. Reid of Riverdale announce the engage- 
ment of their daughter, Elisabeth Anne, to Forrest Klein 


Saville, jr., 
planned for September 8 


son of Mr. and Mrs. 


Air Force, will act as hostesses. 
The dance is sponsored by Mrs. 
Clyde B. Parker. 


Saville. The wedding is 


“SPA” 


Spring Valley. 


Bath Foam 


Enjoy the double luxury 

of a refreshing foam 

bath and sparkling shampoo 
out of the same large 
economy:sized bottle. 
Muguet and other 

floral fragrances. On 

our First Floor and at 


1.00, 1.75, 3.50 plus tax. 


© 
oO 


.e) 


c“ 


ulius Garfinckel & Co. 


F STREET at FOURTEENTH « MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE at 49th 


Se 


— 


Look whats new... 


SATIN on Suede 


Wl suse 


The wink of black satin follows tapered 


toes in tiny ribbons of light. 


the new 


open-toe pump, 16.95... 


“soft touch” 
the matte black of suede. 
crafted in the Martinique manner. 


Satin is 
very flattering to 
Exquisitely 
The 
the opera pump 


and sandal, each 18.95. 


HATIN 


Exclusive with Hahn at 
1207 F Street .. 


4483 Connecticut . 


. OPEN THURSDAY ‘til 8:30 
. Open Evenings ‘til 9 


—_—-— 


Saye u up to 40% on 
HELENA RUBINSTEIN’S © 


Pay for one—get one free! Limited time only! 


Combination value, 1.88. 


Combination value, 1.70. 


Jelleff’s 
Aisles of Beauty 


Street Floor, F St. 


2 for dry skin—“pasteuRIzED” FACE CREAM SPECIAL plus 
SKIN LOTION SPECIAL. Together they banish that dry, drawn look. 


Both for only 1.25 


2 for oily skin —“pasteuRizED” FACE CREAM plus BEAUTY 
GRAINS. Famous cleansing pair that cleans and texturizes skin. 


Both for only 1.25 


2 for aging skin—“pasTEuRIZED” NIGHT CREAM plus 


skin lotion special. Night and day beauty treatment for taut, 
tired skin. Combination value, 2.38. 


Both for only 1.50 


2 for all-day make-up —siLkK-TonE FOUNDATION plus 
SILK-SCREEN FACE POWDER. Use together for a flawless, silken 
complexion. Combination value, 2.00. Both for only 1.50 


2 for daintiness —HEAVEN-sENT EAU DE TOILETTE plus 
HEAVEN-SENT DEODORANT CREAM. Everyone needs these per- 
fumed aids for protection! Combination value, 1.85. 


Both for only 1.25 


elletfis 


F Stree 


2 for eye glamour — WATERPROOF CREAM MASCARA plus 
EYE PENCIL. You need both to dramatize your eyes! Combination 


value, 1.50. Both for only 1.00 


2 for sensitive skin —“waATER LILY” CLEANSING CREAM 
plus “HERBAL” SKIN LOTION. Gentle pair to cleanse, smooth and 
refresh. Combination value, 1.75. Both for only 1.25 


2 to highlight hair —si1k sHEEN CREAM SHAMPOO plus 
COLOR SHEEN. Use both for beautiful, colorful hair. Combina- 
tion value, 1.70. Both for only 1.00 


2 for fragrant freshness —PreRFruME SPRAY DEODORANT 
plus WHITE MAGNOLIA COLOGNE STICK. This pair keeps you fra- 


grant, tidy and cool. Combination value, 1.60. 3 
Both for only 1.25 


2 for perfuming—comMAND PERFORMANCE EAU DE PAR- 
FUM plus COMMAND PERFORMANCE COLOGNE STICK, One to use 
at home—one to carry with you! Combination value, 2.10. 


Both for only 1.75 


Also at Branch Stores 
—Shirlington , Bethesda 
—Silver Spring 
—4473 Conn. Ave. 


Silver Spring 
Bethesdo 


4473 Conrecticut Ave 
Shsri, 


— All prices plus Fed. tax except Silk Sheen Cream Shampoo 


é 4 


THE WASHINGTON 


POST 


Wednesday, August 15, 1951 


DEAR MARY HAWORTH: Why is it 
that I can never have an honest laugh, or 
feel sincere friendships, or say some- 
thing I truly mean? Why can't I know 
what it is to love, or to experience sex 
satisfaction? Why haven't I the power to 
appreciate things as they are? Please 

help me, because I know that I am en- 
dangering the happiness of those close to 
me. 


From the surface view, I should be 
happy. I have a good husband (whom I 
have never loved); nice children and a 
comfortable home. Yet I never can enjoy 
the present moment. 1 am always hoping 
that the next moment, or next season or 
next year will bring what I am looking 
for. I have no respect for my parents, 
and I feel happier away from my brothers 
and sisters, as our mode of living differs 
greatly. 


My childhood was unhappy and inse- 
cure, because at times we were wealthy 
and at other times poor. My mother 
nagged continually and I didn’t like my 
father’s martyred attitude. There was 
constant arguing among us children. I 
made sacrifices beyond my age to bring 
peace to the family, but in vain. Things 
are still the same. 


I wanted to give my children a peace- 
ful, well organized home, so that they 
would become well adjusted, happy indi- 
viduals, but unfortunately my home is be- 
ginning to resemble that of my parents, 
and it is getting worse from day to day. 
It is not my wish to be temperamental and 
even, I must say, cruel. What can I do? 
Is one born to be this way, regardless 
of efforts and wishes to change? I don’t 
admit any resemblance to my mother, 


Mary iesonth's Wha 


Woman Has Fine Husband, Nice Home, Good Children, 
But She Doesn’t Know What It Is to Love, Laugh or 
Enjoy Friendships Sincerely; Feels Lost, Asks Help 


but if someone says, in a, complimentary 
vein, that a likeness exists, I suffer de- 
pression for days. 

Is my mind unsound? How can I curb 
my reactions? I have disciplined my mind 
ever since I can remember. What 
myself? How can I discover what colibs 
are my wishes, manners, ambitions? Il 
am lost; please tell me what todo, F.P. 


DEAR F. P.: I have discussed your 
recital with a specialist, whose insight 
affords valuable clues to the pattern of 
your difficulty, I think. First, he notes 
that your compulsive addiction .to “dis- 
cipline’”—your conviction of need to “curb 
your reactions’”—is a principal obstacle to 
knowing yourself and arriving at a real 
experience of good feelings in human re- 
lations. 

Next, he remarks that you are given 
over to a false, futile drive towards the 
future, as the only season in which you ex- 
pect to be happy. Pursued in such terms, 
the future never delivers, he reminds. But 
why are you always looking to the future? 
The answer is, because you are always 
frustrated now. This state of affairs be- 
gan in a sorely frustrated, insecure child- 
hoed, from which your only hope of 
escape was “in the future.” Actually, 
the frustrations of that time have fallen 
away; but in consciousness you still 
wrestle with them. 

Although you are long since a woman 
grown, you are Still, in thought and feel- 
ing, the thwarted child—encased in an 
emotional strait jacket of repressive ideas, 
supposedly issued by “Highest Authority.” 
You have adult stature, but no ease in the 
role. Nowadays you are so tensely com- 
mitted to the proposition of overreaching 
your limits, trying to be the Ideal Wife, 


Thus you've 


Mother, Lover, Friend, Sister, etc., that 
you never have any respite for being 
simply human, and comfortably alive, and 
passively receptive to your honest feel- 
ings. Thus you “never enjoy the present 
moment,” and never experience a sense 
of sincerity in your dealings. 


“Hoping for happiness is a form of 
dying,” the specialist says.. “It is an at- 
tempted escape from the discomforts of 
now.. Blaming others is also an attempt 
to ‘get out from under’.” Instead of 
facing reality, which is always today, you 
try urgently to move into the morrow, 
imaginatively. But the morrow won’t be 
better, except as you learn how to enjoy 
today. To understand your tensions, that 
cause you to seem temperamental and 
even at times cruel, you must look to the 
meaning of your “controlled, disciplined” 
activities—which have to do with trying 
to achieve presumably “ideal goals.” 

Because your parents furnished so poor 
an example of how to live on the adult 
plane, you've tried to “escape” them by 
being entirely different and _ superior. 
taken off into dreamed-up 
specifications of lovely womanhood, good 
parenthood, etc., a flight of fancy which 
largely divorces you from humanity, and 
from your own roots and potentials. It is 
a terrific strain trying to succeed, and 
the specialist’s advice is—Relax; give up 
the air castles; accept your first feelings 
about things; gain a sense of relief from 
continuous “self control.” Then you will 
be able to cope more flexibly with every- 
day life and people's shortcomings, your 
own included. aa M. H., 

Mary Haworth counsels through her col- 
umn, not by mail or personal interview, 
Write her in care of The Washington Post. 


a 


Curtains Can Do Wonders for Windows 


might hang sheer or opaque 
glass curtains over the wine 4 
room? That's reason enough to dow. If your view is downright 


people’s eyes tend naturally 
to shift to the. windows of a 


is just so-so, you. clear to the floor, 


cornice, 
cover the 


to make a 
short window appear tall. Let 
valance, 
bare wall that shows 
above the windows 


your room is plain, take your 
choice of dozens of exciting 
prints in colors to suit your 
scheme. Generally, small pat- 
terns suit small rooms; big 


or blind 


and be- 


make your windows an attrac- 
tive part of your decorating 
scheme. 

Style of window treatment 
will be determined by the 
number, size, and placement 
of your windows—as well as 
by the kind of furniture that 
you have. The world outside 
makes a difference, too. The 
view is yours to enjoy when 
you hang traverse draperies 
on ‘the wall so they'll pull 
clear of the window by day. 

To soften light, or to blur a 


bad, cover the windows with 


decorative draperies or blinds. 


CURTAINS CAN work won- 
ders with your windows. They 
can change a window's size, 
and they can seem, to match 
up windows of different sizes 
or framing. 

Some suggestions from Bet- 
ter Homes and Gardens: 

Hang curtains or draperies 
on the wall at either side of 
the window to make it look 


wider, Hang them from above, 


tween the draperies. Two or 
three windows together should 
be treated as one to become 
the focal point of your room. 
The ‘article points out that 
you will want draperies or cur- 
tains to repeat one of the 
colors in your floor covering, 
walls, or upholstery. And if 
you have a bold pattern some- 
where in the room, your dra- 
peries can either be the same 
pattern, or a color-matched 
stripe or plain material. If 


patterns belong in big rooms. 

If you match draperies or 
curtains to wall paint or the 
background color of the wall- 
paper, they will merge unno- 
ticeably with the walls. This 
will make a small room seem 
much larger. But when you 
have no space-making prob- 
lems, and your windows are 
well placed, here’s an idea: use 
contrasting draperies or cur- 
tains to dramatize your color 
scheme. 


F 


it We "3 


f| li ial 
fits eidineaivalh 


aK 


my 


b. fee eet 


i 


Topaz-beige ... Light in tone. Subtle in 
flattery. Wear it with black, beige, gold, 
wine and all the olive greens... as-well as 
with shoes of maple, black, or Balenciaga- 
tan. From a trend-setting series of “frost 
and fire fantastics” in. sheer nylon, 1.95; 
66-guager 2.50. 
On our First Floor and at Spring Vafley 


¥ 


MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE AT 49TH 


STREET AT FOURTEENTH 


“~e 


200000000000 DIOOOIION DOIN IOI ts 


 GPRO00000OR 2900” OOO 


" 
: ect 
vy Tit Ht 


eranngay®? 


; | Ht _ 
‘= HIN 
* veganegagttl 19% 


a rs Ih 
Han ary bas &. GtusochGPibeies 
? $45 ana i 
% 


i faut 


s¢ 
% 
ai 
: 
; 


it ie a earanseasesgiep haggis 
| MiaLbbibgbit lige | ety, 


H ll 
I eae a mt ‘ un 


Vy HEM peg: itn Ny 
Se ie HH 


see Hi ee ut Mh 


1 
! 


£233, 

; 

é 

$$ Fi: 

TEL 
248 
x " 


itl 
t 


»® 
PX ROO 


am 
— wren 
Aw 


nisl! pit pane? te bani ina 
tla al Mi hi 


, ing _ hy it mH 


ih Meal 


a ae 


Nita 


oe 
Om * oo 
(Ad x * oe 
ee es el LN VOU, 
ers 


giffTlitrry 


4% “chs. iy 


a 


Pen ceee <4 


fiih had, peagget tll 


sey 
Sear ht 
i. f ist 


- SLOOP OLE 
+ “qoeees. i“ 
ceded 


oat 
gs8? ¥ “on ET 


itt Ayihetts raul ih hy 
ij Mara ional 
thie Sy tt aftttee: runt 
‘il ii 4 ouirtatlinangaetl 
tens. Hseeteagtt inf 


Wy? ts te if ne 


iF tgnegt 
“iy " " Ny HH ey c 


. * 
e232. 3% ° 
; 
. y . 
ts 
” $3 
4 a af 
. q . 
i: 


new fashion; role af black and white tweed 


ou 
y 


as forecast in doance Paris cables... 


} ; E aie : 

Now, hefore the nett French collections have even 

touched out shores — yor may capture the trend in our 

* own new Arica coletis. Note the sudden emphasis 


‘on ba acy white...on the ne hetic — of — 


9 


THE WASmissGiON POST 
Wednesday, August 15, 195] 


0 castile shampoo 
. Saves waves! 


Shampoo as often as you like with Laco 


NEW HIGH LUSTRE SHAMPOO 


WHAT A WONDERFUL WAY to protect your permanent ....wash your hair with 
New LACO 100% Pure Castile Shampoo. LACO contains imported olive 
oil, no harsh synthetic ingredients. 
Cannot dry out your hair, Leaves hair silky soft, 
gleaming with highlights...and LACO 

saves waves! Get LACO 100% Pure 

tile Shampoo, today! For all types 

of hair—dry, oily and normal. 

At cosmetic counters everywhere, 


‘wes 
Fomovs for over 50 yeors | W Me 


a 


| All Angels Need Wings, 
} Even Though They Be 
s §6Of Paper and Tinsel 


WHO WAS IT SAID: “Wings for angels, but 
feet for men?” Anyway, he was wrong, because 
he reckoned without pageants and plays. Mrs. 
L. G. W. wants to make wings for members 
of a cast: 


DEAR ANNE: 

I am having a pageant which calls for wings 
and I would like to make them. Have you any 
suggestions as to how they should be made 
and how to put them on the wearer. I would 
appreciate any information you can give me. 

Mrs. L. G. W. 


Crepe paper and sparkling tinsel are impor- 
tant angel wing ingredients. These may be pur- 
chased at a novelty shop (STerling 1586). The 
paper is easily cut and shaped and if you wish 
to give them extra firmness wire them around 
the edges. To keep them on, either use the wire 
or tie them on with thread to make them ap- 
pear more ethereal. The sparkling tinsel can 
be either ground glass, pasted on, or long silver 
tinsel, sewed or pasted on. Art paper may also 
be used or thin netting. 

DEAR ANNE: 

I would like to know how I can remove marks 
on my electric console ironer, which were left 
on it by the rubber cushions on the bottom of 
a fan. I have tried chlorine bleach and scouring 
powder but to no avail. -The marks still remain 
on the enamel. F. N. 


The Home Service Department of the Poto- 
mac Electric Power Company suggests, but does 
not guarantee, the following: Use scratchless 
cleansing powder on a wet cloth, but de not rub 
very heard. Also you might try acetone. 


DEAR ANNE: 

I am growing gourds and would like to know 
when they are ready to pick and the procedure 
used in preserving them for decoration to pre- 
vent drying and shriveling. To decorate them, 
what type of paint should be used and, if left 


natural, what is best for them, shellac or wax? 
Mrs, G. W. M. 


The gourds are ready for harvesting when 
they become hard and either a light tan or 
yellowish color. They should not be picked 
when they are too young or they will shrink 
and dry up. Cut them with long stems and let 
them hang in a well-ventilated room to dry out. 
When you are sure there is no moisture left in 
them, clean and polish them. Use either steel 
wool or sandpaper, then wipe with a soft cloth. 
Oil paint, brushing lacquer, or shellac may be 
applied. For further information, you may 
wish to obtain the Farmers’ Bulletin 1849, en- 
titled “Useful and Ornamental Gourds,” by 
sending 5 cents to the Superintendent of Docu- 
ag 5 apo Printing Office, Washing- 
ton, DG. . 


Child Behavior 


Keep Reminding Him if He’s 7 


By the Gesell Institute 


“How can I make my 17-year-old mind me? 
He's really impossible, He doesn’t hear what 
I tell him. He forgets that I say: and even if 
he starts to do what I ask, as likely as not he 
gets way off the track before he’s finished.” 

This description is, unfortunately, a beauti- 
fully accurate summary of the difficulty that we 
normally meet in getting a 7-year-old to carry 
out our commands. This is not a description 
of just some one careless little boy. 

But we know also that it is hard for the 
T-year-old to 8top what he is doing. It is espe- 

: cially difficult for him to stop doing something 
which is fun, in order to do something else 
which is not fun. We can make things easier 
for him, if a task does not have to be carried 
out immediately, by giving him a warning in 
advance: “When you've finished that program 
(or that story) then I'd like to have you empty 


the trash.” 
He will, as a rule, accept such a command 
cheerfully and will carry it out, 


HOWEVER, if you are sure that he hears 
your command, if you have warned him in 
advance, and if you then remind him when the 
time comes, he will almost certainly carry out 
your command, except for one thing.—He is 
apt to get into a detour-on the way. 

Not all children fall into all these pitfalls 
whenever there is a task to be done, but all of 
these behaviors described are normal weak- 
nesses of the child of seven. In all fairness 
to the immaturity of the child, they should be 
met with patience and understanding. It takes 
considerable self-discipline and more maturity 
than the average 7-year-old can muster to be 
able to drop what he is doing, carry out a given 
command, and stick to it until it is finished, 

(Copyright 1951, Gesell Institute. Inc.) 


el 


ee 


ttt 


— 


Call NA. 4200, ask for Circulation and order 
Washington Post Guaranteed home delivery 


Clean Well 


Never slip-cover furniture 
that has not been thoroughly 
cleaned. If not removed, the 
dust and dirt will be rubbed 
in and caked down, seriously 
injuring the upholstery and 
soiling the slip-covers besides. 
Thorough cleaning by the 
proper tool of your vacuum 
cleaner equipment is the best 
way of getting the fabric dust- 
free and moth-free. 


Just shake 3 heaping teaspoons of 


WALTER BAKER’S 4 in 1 Instant Sweet 
Cocoa Mix with a glass of milk 


easy-to-make summer drink 


your kids can cool off with! 


BAKER'S 
| W@ED" Chocolate 


MADE WITH MILK AND 


for the most delicious, energy-rich, 


J 


Product of 
Generol Foods 


Fashion F ind 


STARRING STRIPES — Wide 


RICA: 
THE HOUSEWIVES OF AME 


ee 


with the caption: 


these lett 
y of me bran 


e country 
ment shows 
*ReturnD 


uS 
have WROLDS WRAP* packse°s 
ng 


Flight Guaranteed !* 


ut gouging 
foil... often of 
a quality and widths» 


P -- deserves 


horizontal stripes claim the 
| spotlight in this junior-size 
dress by Doris Dodson. Big- 
gest news is in the fabric, a 
blend of 80 percent wool and 
20 percent nylon which is said 
to be finer, lighter, and longer- 
wearing than all-wool material. 
Colors are either brown, tan 
and beige or dark gray, me- 
dium gray and light gray. At 
Jelleff’s. 


Make Your Own 


yen, BEST & CO = 
OPEN MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY, 9:30 A.M. TO 5:30 P.M. 


Mail ond phone orders filled « 


eo 


Teen Storm Coat. 


with alpaca pile lining 


25.00 


Cozy? You bet she is in our 


rayon gabardine topper that keeps 


her snug through sleet, snow, 


and strongest winds. Smartly styled 


with Mouton-dyed lamb collar, 


100% alpaca pile lining (on cotton 


back) from neck to hem, quilted 
rayon sleeve lining with wool 
knit wristlets. 
Red, navy, dark green. 


Teen sizes 10 to 16, 


Postage prepaid 


BEST & CO. 


4433 Connecticut Avenue, N. W.8 
Emerson 7700 


t-2 L-4 BUSES STOP AT THE DOOR 


= = = 


f accep 


an 
REYNOLDS WAe ie Aluminum Foil? 
full accordance 


aistribut- 


CM ETS ee Tt 


, win plete . Pon tle ; le . Oe - Palen s Wk a” 
s SA syt : ‘ : 
. . : ’ : 
, > 
im reat PAPA J 
« 
. 


oe ee. ee _ 


BARNES & KIMEL COMPANY © ARLINGTON & ALEXANDRIA 


Cheery Cherry! Never Ages, But Mellows 


From the rich forests of Pennsylvania comes 
the elegant wood used in producing Pennsyl- 
vania House Solid Cherry, designed to carry 
on the tradition of Early America, which fits 
so smoothly and so rightly into the homes you 
are making today! 
Cherry, you can be sure you are displaying 
excellent taste. And, when you select Penn- 
sylvania House Solid Cherry, at the Barnes and 
Kimel Company, you can be sure of true quality 
throughout. In magnificent Mt. Vernon finish 
. . . at Modest Prices. 


Gracefully Throughout the Years 


When you select Solid 


REYNOLDS WRAP in 
ent directives: 
9 increase iD 

ontain 

same high qualit 


We are i : 
. t ; ; 
prece- oe By Alice Brooks 
ie Pattern C-7200; transfer two 

motifs 542x13; one 8x16 inches. 

Send 25 cents in coins for 
this pattern to The Washing- 
ton Post, 102 Household Arts 
a Dept., P. O. Box 168, Old Chel- | 
of the huge sea Station, New York 11, 


las sells only N, 


price: 


Reynolds is 
ions 
the Limitat 
pe egtey amount evenly, 


The package 


45 pure aluminum s WRAP...for keep 
same It side rely on 
: 


D les". 
millions of hem haking. «fF 1001 Kit 


for cooking» trouble 
You may ohne is only 


-limited SUP 
government : do find it, ls at 


de te channe 
deman itima ~ por everybody as 


REYNOLDS WRAP, the original and 


*1001 Kitchen Miracles"- ! 


Ss COMPANY 


Mt. Vernon Finish 


CANOPY BED 

DOUBLE DRESSER and MIRROR.. 219.95 
NIGHT STAND 39.95 
(A) VANITY 187.50 
(B) SPOOL BED ...cccoccecss 99.95 


(C) DOUBLE CHEST .. 164.50 
MIRROR 43.95 


(D) BOUDOIR CHAIR ..cececes 39.50 
() WKSHOOY .- 2... 199.00 
(F) LINEN CHEST .. 99.95 


- — Dine ond donce under the stors 


GS Wem 
Pa 
a 
“ ~ 
e 
> 
; 
> 
% 


featoring DICK BAILEY 
his Accordion and Orchestre 


CONVENIENT TIME-PAYMENT PLAN 
OPEN DAILY, including SATURDAYS, from 9 A. M. to 9 P, M, 
FREE PARKING 


BARNESsKIMEL C0. 


ARLINGTON ALEXANDRIA 
1916 Wilson Blvd, 2419 Mt. Vernon Ave. 


REYNOLDS METAL 
° e NO COVER CHARGE 
a ~% Min. 1.30 


Chairman of the Board 


seville 1, Kentucky- 
ot oy for Reynolds Wrap by nome! 
pockos 


ee One On the Aisle 


Playhouse Offers 
3-Language Film 


By Richard L. Coe 


66. ¢7OMEN WITHOUT NAMES” is too sensationalized and 
souped-up to be worthy of its humanitarian idea. 
The new three-language film at the Playhouse suffers severely 


from a lack of sincerity. It shows us a group of women in a dis-' 


placed persone camp in Trieste, victims of man’s inhumanity to man, | 


wreckage of the war but tragedies of “peace.” 

It could have been a worthwhile film, but when insincerity raises 
its unmistakable head in a picture that purports to be “honest,” all 
is lost. One does not quarrel with tragedies as subject matter. But 
the crowded collection of incidents, so evidently devised for sen- 
sationalism merely fills one with distaste. What one could so easily 
sympathize with is lost in‘a series of strident sceness. 

The characters include: a Yugoslav woman whose husband has 


been killed before her eyes for political reasons and whose only 


longing is to have their child born outside the camp; a cynical Gallic 


vixen who-finds a way out of the camp by marrying a lecherous | — 


Albanian: a Polish girl, struck dumb by events she has seen, who 
finally sees one of her tormentors in a Nazi woman who is coldly 
murdered by her barracks-mates; an aging Belgian once married to 
a German and now without any nationality. These arid lesser cases 
contribute their stories to me 
flow of the picture. 

But the scenes include as many 
sexed-up moments as can be 
imagined, not the least unpleasant 
of which is a lesbian moment iIn- 
cluded because the girls are stag- 
ing “Romeo and Juliet,” a choice 
clearly made just to allow that 
angle. The camera insinuates itself | 
into a spicy view of the Gallic 
number bartering herself for a re a 
nationality and a hootchy-kootchy | 
dance is included just for the sake 


of hootchy-kootchy. We watch the 
Yugoslav woman as she gives tinues with “Alice in Wonderland” 


birth to her child. at Keith’s, the former being a 


These moments and many like Short adventure I can't recom- 
them are objectionable solely on mend highly enough . +» This es- 
the grounds that they do not ada @¥ by lo of Disney's cameramen 
to the dramatic structure of the °" the miracles of the seasons on 
screen play by Geza Herczeg and ot insects _ a Is tas 
Rene Barjavel: indeed, they im-| ‘Ue sem . . . several years ago 
pede the movement and destroy the Dupont had the closest thing 
the impact I recall to it, “Farrebique,” 

For there should be impact in 'ecord of a French farm during 
this view of insensate human ‘he four seasons . . . If this is the 
cruelty. Ho whorrible it is that 2€W, Disney, resulting from his 
people should be herded away Similarly appreciated “Beaver 
like animals purely for the lack | Ya"ey anh on s 
of “official papers.” This could | 7#V more © = oes» Bee ° 
have been an intensely moving | /echnicolor work is fascinating 
whole instead of just scattered |“. at ~ ; 
bits and pieces: one ce from | Night sounds in this little slice of 
the coniderable English dialogue, !#0¢ longer than any of his more 
that it and its sensationalism were | Stereotyped recent cartoon fea- 
created for American audiences | ‘'®S- 
not as a statement, but as a/ 
shocker. 

The performances are as ade-. 
quate as the script and studied 
camera angles permit. Valentina | 
Cortesa, who furthers her interest- | 


“WOMEN WITHOUT NAMES.” Lopert 
Films release written, -produced and di- 
rected by Geza Radvanyi Filmed in 
Italy at the Cinacitta studios, the Faria 
Sabina and Bart women’s MDS 
in Trieste. Photographed by Gabor Po- 
gany. Original story by Geza Herczeg 
and Rene Barjavel. English dialogue by 
Jesse Lasky, jr. At the Playhouse. 

THE CAST 
Girl ... 


co 


The French 
he Bavartan 
The Countess 
The Brigadier 
The Polish G 
The Albanian 
The Dentist . 


Simone Simon 

; Vivt Gtotl 
Francoise Rosay 
Gino Cerpvi 
Inasema Ditian 
Carlefto Sposito 

. Umberto Spadaro 
Mario Ferrari 


Woman. Valentina Cortesa 


Monday night’s “Faith of Our 
Fathers” performance drew over 
3000 to the Carter Barron amphi- 


and | 


‘record for 


the | 


FRANCIS X. BUSHMAN’S ap- 
/pearance as Thomas Jefferson in| 


Boy’s Best 


B 
>} 
4 


| Earnent’ 


Friend 


Rudy Lee has many imaginary friends in “The Gossamer 


World,” but the most faithful 


is with him here. It’s from a 


Faith Baldwin story, one of three short films in the Little’s 


new feature, “Horsie.” 


theater in Rock Creek Park... 
Not only a record Monday, but a 
any night... His 


studied entrance was something 
only experience could provide and 


one wonders again, without any 
‘reflection on the present players, 


whether it wouldn’t be a wise 
idea for “FOOF” 
star performers both as a draw for 
the attraction and for the steady- 
ing influence the experienced pro- 
fessionals can have ... By employ- 


ing perhaps an alternating star 


the Paul Green venture 
find the expense 


system, 
mightwell 
worth while. 


MARTIN AND LEWIS, 
reigning knock-about team’s ar- 


rival at the Warner tomorrow in a | 
football yarn, prompts big 13th’ 
There'll be late i}: 


street plans... 
showings of “That’s My Boy” 
Thursday, Friday and Saturday 
nights. 


HELEN HAYES has sent a 
congratulatory message to Arena 
Stage, to be read at its first 
birthday party tomorrow night 
‘following the performance of 
“The Importance of Being Ear- 
nest” before an audience which 
will include Commissioner F. Jo- 
and numerous 


and I daresay you'll remember the | 


| seph Donohue 


‘notables. 


| Medical Course by Army 


The first leadership school for 
enlisted men in the history of 
the Army Medical Service will 
be conducted at the Medical Re- 


‘at Fort Meade, Md., 
to employ a few | 


the | 


ing face with interesting perform- 
ances, is the Yugoslav widow and 
Simone Simon bitterly amusing 
as the French girl. Francoise 
Rosay gives one of those perform- 
ances we've had from her increas- 
ingly of late, a sure, solid touch to 
a flimsy, inadequate role. 


“HORSIE,” at the Little (origi- 
nally released as “Queen for a 
Day” in honor of that radio pro- 
gram) is but a middling collec- 
tion of three short stories by 
Faith Baldwin, John Ashworth 
and Dorothy Parker ... The first, 
“The Gossamer World” concerns 


DRU 
Z t os © 


HUGH 


MARLO ‘ 


MOSTEt 


an only child who dreams up an 
imaginary playmate to cover his 
loneliness . . . Ashworth’s “High 
Diver” works in the “Queen for a 


MARGARET PHELAN Saucy Sophisticate 


Day” program in a story about 
a young man who tries his luck | 


DON RIC E. Screamiined Jestor 


at a 110-foot dive for a touring | 
carnival , “Horsie” is the story 


CORINNE & TITO VALDEZ ™ 


ncing Stars of 
Broadway 


of a homely nurse who surprises | 
an unappreciative employer by | 
remembering him when she’s | 
“Queen for a Day.” ... The play-| 
ers aren't well known, but they’re | 
completely able and likeable. 


“NATURE’S Half Acre” 


Starts Cy or 
TOMORROW (@a“Ze.7 


Ends Today On Stage—LES 
CAPITOL On Screen—‘THE 


con- 


KANAZAWA TRIO  orientat Dexterity 


of \ +) b go) Mpes Open 10:45) 


PAUL & MARY FORD 
SECRET OF CONVICT LAKE” 


placement Training Center here 
for eight 
weeks beginning August 27. Men 
‘in medical units who show poten- 
tial leadership qualities will be 
selected for the school. 


‘| Show Time For Wednesday 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
Wednesday, August 15, 1951 


7b 


27 2 brilliant rane 

dance.’ a gay 

Bong: 7 sober retreat 
12:15. 1:55 


STAGE Piasa—“L.s R 

rene eee oe Importance of Beins | 3° be. ; 
(16th 8 therefrom, 10: 

th of en -35. 5:15. 6:55, 8: 30 and "16: 10 p. m, 


Dupont—‘“‘Kon-Tiki.” that unique & . 
" Gioconda Smile.” Basil pedition across ‘the Pacific, “ 1:05. 
Meg ndy in ° melo- 15, 6:30, 8:20 and 0:10 


m. 
us uxiey. at 8:4 Metropolitan— On sasauten Bay.” 
SCREEN 11:25 1:25. 


3:30, 5:30. 7:35 
ogmen,” rte fi es 7 
a & 1:2 


Carter Se "Amphitheater 


+ 
Rathbone oa 
drama by Al at 
and 
9:35 ha <—" 
ae ar oY Boat,.”? at 11 a. m. 
1:10, 3:2 5:35, pret ond ag m. 
<7 = Bo 7 2:04. 4:48, 7:32 and 
10:16 pv. m, Shnamed.” at 3:16. 6 and 
8:44 Dp. m. 
‘Little—* ‘Horsie.’ 


] 

P Cc. 8. Porester’s s 
pular es ¥4 . to life. at 11 a. m. 
715, §:25 . 7:35, 9:45 “ana 11:55 p 
— “The Secret of Convict Lake. at 


1 1:45. 4:30, and 10 p aa 
Stage shows at 12:45, 3:30, 6:15 and iM Cqll 


“Goodbye My 
“RKO-Keith’s—"Alice National—‘* ‘That 
>; 55 


a. ‘Television at to: 3 
Piayhouse—“Women Withou 
female DP camp in iaota 
a. m., 1:30. 3:30, 5:35, 7:35 and 9:4 

Trans-Lux—‘‘Four 
a. m. 730, 3:35, 


at 11:45 a. m.. 1:40, 
m 
8:30 p. m. 


Pp. m. 
Kiss." 


Pp. 
* 
9:55 
inianight 


at 


in Wonderiand” 


5:40, 7:45 and 9:5 


aa For a Nig 
2. 


1, 4:25 and 7:45 m. “Toast of New 
Orleans.” at 2:40, $ and 9:20 p. m. 
Ambassador—‘‘Captain Sanntte Horn- 
 peemet” at 1. 3:06. 5:10. 7:20 and 9:30 
. m. 


NATIONAL 


E BETWEEN lith G@ 14th 


Open Air DetveZe, Grenacns Righ way) 


at 8:35 and 10: 


Airport Drive-In—‘ ‘Desert ee 7 
8:55 DB “Good Sam,” at 10:3 
Beltsville a... sia My Dust. ae | 


at 8:45 and i.10:40 p 
Warner Bros. COOL  ‘ . 
METROPOLITAN Conte 
poris DAY corpon MacRAE 
in Warner Bros. Lovin’est Musical 


"ON MOONLIGHT BAY 


color ty TECHNICOLOR 


— 


TECHNICOLOR 


Oscur Wilde’s Witty Benety) 


Db. 
SUMMER “THE IMPORTANCE) 


MICLEAN | tacarae 


5 Miles from Chain Bridge on Rt. 123 f 
STAGE SHOWS *% NEW YORK CAST 
Tom 


“Delectable comedy ... Arena should have} 
one of its biggest hits’”—COE | 
“A glossy job on Wilde's pure nonsense”’— 
CARMODY. 

‘“EBlegant Satirical Nonsense”—SCHIER. 


Eves., aa thru Sun., | 8:30 P.M... $1.90 
Sat. Mat., 2:30 P.M., $1.50 DI. 8592 


| AIR-CONDITIONED Hippodrome; 9th & N. Y. 


KON-TIRI 


TONIGHT AT 8:40 
mmy Brent & Jim Garwood present 
“THE ANIMAL KINGDOM” 


Poe | Barry's gay comedy hit! 
, $1.50 (plus tax) Elmwood 3990 


= 


OF BEING EARNEST”! 


.2nd HIT WEEK 
"WORTH YOUR ATTENTION 


2 ~8ill Leonerd, C8S 

> ie highly original and 

at ianificont theme.— wewrweet TRANS-LUX 

ee ee 3 : 14th at H N.W, 
_. “It moves with speed to open 10:45 A.M, 
<> its thrilling climax.” 


News 


Air Conditioned 


Popular Prices 


A MUST 


COE—WASH. POST 
“A fascinating motion picture. An ad- 
venture thot stirs the blood and the 


=—Crowther, N.Y. Times 


e 
| Van 
soul.” 


KON TIKI 


aie-COmoiTionto 


EXTRA ADDED ATTRACTION 1332 CONN AVE 


Completely Air-Conditioned! 


OLNEY vcs: 


ASHTON 6868 
Olney, Md. 
NOW PLAYING 
BASIL RATHBONE 
n “THE GIOCONDA SMILE” 
with mes MUNDY 
s. at 8:40 
. Sat 
Washington gb 
& “G"’ Phone REpub- 
l No Mo ve Seder 
Theatre Phone: 


DUpont 7300 


oe sai 


The Guest 20 


AHO ~~ paths 
SS Sen 


RTE RR 


LOPERT FILMS DISTRIBUTING CORPORATION 
presents 


SIMONE SIMON 
FRANCOISE ROSAY 
VIVI GIO} 


f AT 
1374 


PALAC 


Sev vcs earn 
_eCUNdNr Yow Seas 


JOHN GARFIELD 
SHELLEY WINTERS 
“HE RAN ALL THE WAY” 


ee 


COLUMBIA *. 


Starts TOMORROW Open 10:45 


AS RECKLESSLY DARING! 
AS GLAMOROUS AND SEDUCTIVE! 


as an Arabian Nights 


pHRODOR! 


ted who 
je nas THIEF 


Ends ead ‘SHOW E Boar 
COLUMBIA * _ Crackitzihe 


sé 
TONIGHT «103, 


(CANNOT BE SEEN ON ANY OTHER 
PUBLIC OR PRIVATE TV SE ie 


Worthy Contender for the 
Academy Award! / 


"HORSIE”} Shade 


AN AMERICAN TRILOGY 
wy 


“« 


by the combined tolents of 
FAITH BALDWIN @ DOROTHY PARKER 
JOHN ASHWORTH 


‘Rows titre rs) By Re 


| 9TH ST. ATF — ME 1326) | 


The Greatest, Most Subtle, 
Most Béautiful Screen Play! 


— Honors at Venice, Cannes 
nd Brussels Film Festiwals! 


“La Ronde 


from the play by Arthur Schnitzler 


music by Oscar Strauss 
ANTON WALLBROOK 
SIMONE SIGNDORET SERGE REGGIANI 
SIMONE SIMON DANIFL GELIN 
DANIELLE DARRIEUX FERNAND GRAVEY 
ODETTE JOYEUX JEAN-LOUIS BARRAULT 
ISA MIRANDA GERARD PHILIPE 
“EXQUISITE” —Coe, Wash. Post 

BRILLIANT" —Donnelly, Daily News 

“WICK EDLY WITTY''—London Daily Mail 


Adults Only! 
Roth’s PLAZA "6 Yor ave 
Delightfully Air-Conditioned 


a ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee 


ee ee ee ee 


* epeneeeepeeses es ®* 
Ce ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee oe ee ee ee ee 


*eeneeeeeeee a 


By Paul Green 


ORCHESTRA 


CAST, CHORUS 
BALLET—150 


TONITE AT 8:40 
CARTES BARROA 
AMPHITHEATRE 
féth St. & Colorado Ave. H.W. 
Tickets 75c 


Res. Seats, $1.50 
Call ST. 0700 or TA, 1875 


RKO KEITH'S 


Ad 


ras a" 
= ras 


 Disect from Baltimore as it actually takes place! 


RKO KEITH’S| 


COMFORTABLY COOL 


ALL WASHINGTON 


AGREES IT’S WALT DISNEY’S 


ISTH AT G 


THEATRE TELEVISION 


Pius SCREEN FEATURE 


} 0 . 
. 
ee 
xe % 
> 
¢ ° 


red 
a a 


} DOORS 
OPEN 


2 ri 


MOST WONDERFUL 


Color by 


4 


OF ALL! 


WAIT DISNEYS 


cal 
TECHMICULOK: / 


©W.O.P. OISTRIBUTEO BY AKO RADIC PICTURES 


SPECIAL FEATURETTE! es 
Than “SEAL eng 4 and “BEAVER VALLEY"! ~ 


Miracles not to be seen with 
4 the naked eye! 


VALENTINA CORTESA ' 


Also — Lamberto (eerie ! 
Maggiorani, the sad- 3%. | : 
faced father of “The ee . 

Bicycle Thief"; Um- 
berto Spodaro, the 
pathetic father of 
“The Difficult Years”. 


Washington 
Premiere 


Winner of the 


AIR-CONDITIONED MAT. ‘TIL 5 * 55¢ Golden Laurel Award 


The PLAYHOUS 15th AND H STREETS ST. 8500 


DOORS OPEN 10:30 AM 
GE Iss coming! “BRIGHT VICTORY” 


starts TOMORROW 


Now Theyre Going to College 
And Its Gettin Funnier by Degrees 


ower fF w= 
ao? - = 


Ph 
~ 
~ 


That zany pair is 
studying the student 
body...from every angle! 
’ 


DEAN JERRY *' 


MARIN 


Mus 


Me 


s 


Last Times Today 


Gregory Virginia 
Peck Mayo 


“CAPTAIN HORATIO 
WORNBLOWER “ 


Warner Bros. miso 


WARNER |": 
AMBASSADOR pens 1 


iT Pa 


ee 


eo WE WILL FULFILL 
OUR CONTRACT WITH THE PUBLIC 


Denied at the Atlas 
Sertre’s Powerful Hit Play 


THE RESPECTFUL PROSTITUTE 


With a Brilliant Broadway Cast 
Open Thursday, fang sor 30 P. M, 


SHIRLINGTON THEATRE 
2800 S. Randolph St., Arlington, Va. 


OV. 2500 Air-Conditioned 


Tickets on Sale Downtown at 
STABLER’S TICKET MART 
Mail Orders Aocepied on Bex Office 


Parkin 
FIRST TIME IN WASHINGTON! 


13th & G N.W. Sterling 7307 


; | 


* 3:05, 


| Avalon © Kennedy e Sheridan 


* AVE. GRAND 


| 8:05, 


: ’ CENTRAL : Joan Crews ford, 


oe 


7 NEIGHBORHOOD MOVIES 


[ANACOSTIA _ , 1415 Seed Hope 

Rd. S.E. AX. 2424 
| Robert Ryan. Claire Trevor. Robert 
| Preston and Walter Brennan in ‘ BEST 
|OF THE BADMEN” iz a nicolor at 
iicce. §:35., 7:35 9:3 


ATLANTIC ,, Nichols han & 


Atlantic Si. JO. . _— 
Red Skelton. Sa! ly Forrest & 
Donald Carey in ‘ ‘EXCUSE My DU ST 
| in Technicolor at 6 15, 8 00. 9:50 


C tol Heigh ° 
CAPITOL = eight ma. 


uble Feature: “FABIO OLA” 
ai 8:10. lus the Goldbergs in 


2931 Nichols Av $.£, 
CONGRESS Pope nee 


anny Kaye. Gene Tierney & ‘nl 
raivet in “ON THE RIVIERA,” 
Technicolor at 6:20. § 20. 00, 40 


GHLAND 


donald O*Connor, 
e Talking Mu! le 
To THE RA ACES 


ag WARNER BROS. THEATERS 


For Information, Phone RE. 0800 


All Warner Bros. Theatres 
Comfortably Air- -Conditioned = 


AMBASSADOR Gregory Peck, Vir- 


ginia Mayo, “CAP- 
TAIN MO. 7:20, 9:90 — LOWER,” 1:00. 
5:10. 7:20, 


5. 


; 
} 


5 


‘“FABIOLA,” 6, 7:45, 9:3 35 ore 
Bob ‘Hope. = ‘LEMON 
DROP KID,” 6:15, 


at 6 15, 
“MOLLY’ 


oe 


Frew Amusement Co. fiesta ay conaine 


9:55. 


RL FREE PARKING 
ten Greene, Barbara 
POP sem DOONE,.’ 


Technicolor, 
: 9:50. An - ~seenacemee “WOMAN ON 
| THE RUN, 8:10 


‘ CALVERT 


FR s/ » © 


nne 
in 


“FABIOLA” 
6:15, 7:55, 9:50 


“Paras 
5 § 
i oye Ws oat . ‘WAR “OF THE WILDCATS,’ 

~ { . 7:4 


COLONY 


6:30, S21) 
PENN ° TIVOLI 
SAVOY VAtiANn, ets, 


ING DEAD,” 


SECO silver Spring, Md. FREE PA 

Joan Crawford, Wendell 
Corey, cMARRIET CRAIG.” 6:15, 9:40. 
Dana Andrews, Susan Hayward, “MY 
FOOLISH HEART,” 8. 


Spring. of re 
KING. * FABIOLA, ae > 
4. : 4: 50.” Pa: 0 9:38. 


ge 


TAKOMA a | a Brien, Lieabe et 
Scott, a F A KIND,” 8:15: “FIVE 


6: 25 
Red Skelton, “EXCUSE MY. 


UPTOWN DUST,” 2:30, 4:15, 6. 7:40,| 
9: 30. 
hd DR I Beltsville 


| Open 8 P. M.~—Red Skelton, Sally For- | | 
rest in “EE wrt tags? DUST” (Techni- 


color) at 8:45 
Donald O'Connor, | 


HYATTS Piper Laurie 


In 
ork ¢: GOES TO THE RACES,” at 


CHEVERLY Red Skelton Sally Fo 
XCUSE M 


+ (Technicolor) i 6:30, 8:10, 


MARLBORO Y-¥ ; aie crane | 


CARE OF MY =i} GIRL” (Tech- 
nicolor) at 7:18. 9:09 


KAYWOOD Red Skelton, Sally asd 

| rest in “EXCUSE MY 
UST” (Technicolor) at 6:30 8:05. 
0 


2533 Pa. Ave. ve. 5.2. 
LU. 4- ae 

P' per Laurie and 

“FRANCIS GOES 

6:15. 8:00. 9 43. 


Md. 
Laure! 113 

_Humphrey Bogart in_“SIROCCO.” 
Mariboro Pike at District 
Line Hi. 5151 Free ——_ 

d Skelton. Saliv Forrest & 

Carey in “EXCUSE MMY 
Technicolor at 6:20. 8:05. 


oe 


An 
at 


eer ~ O’Brien, Lizabeth Laurel, . 


ao “TWO OF A KIND,” 


' “FABIOLA,” | 


2 
4:0. 38:35. 7: 


-15,| 
45, 


“ONLY 


9:25; WALK 


1723 & King S$. 
Phone Alexandria 3445 


Curtis, Piper nate. “ 
RINCE WHO WAS THIEF.” a 


VIRGINIA ernon 


Pow Vernon Blvd, 
s? Si. . 6133 
‘Doris Day. Gordon MacR: * 
MOONLIGHT Tr BAY,’ * in Rae. “ON 


Ton 
>| P 


Fairlington TE. 1000 


AIR” <aiSGEe 
| For aatermetion _ Call OV. > ps | 


J CARE OF MY ULITTL 
RL,” Jeanne Crain, Jean Peters. _ on 


Sun cTan; Porkfairfox 


Z Veriook 
Ei bergs- LY. Radio's DVericot = d- 
eTEs. . Gertrude — Berg, Phillip Loeb. 


, . | VE LAGE 1307 Rhode is. Ave. N.E. 
one Mich. 9227 
Lizabeth Gents “ 

KIND” 6:00. 530 7 * 


NEWTON 23. 9:46 


12th & b Newton Sts. N. E. 
Robert yan in 


Phone LA. 6-4114 
*s Ss 
BADMEN” wee We. Cee 
nicolo 


7:48, 9:35 (Teche 


JESSE 


Balto. Bivd. TO. , 5800) 


Theaters) | 


—— 


18th nr. r. Rhode Is. Ave. NLE 

Pho one DUpont 986) 

gzrene sve in “RAWHIDE” 
17 } 9:33 


| Mercedes M. C 7 
SCARF” Cc a ldge 


VERNON 


Pier An 
E 20. geli in 


Bernheimer’s 


SIDNEY ee ranks — A a 


at 


in “THE 


oe eee cae a 


3707 Mt. 
Alex., Va. 
“TERESA” 


Vernon Ave. 
AL. 2424 
at 6:55, 


d =) Louis 


> el 
aie 
eva 


ABS Me Mass. "Ave. NW. 
600 __ Cont. 1-11 
Red Skelton, 
2:35, 4:14, 5:55, 


“EXCUSE MY DUST.’ 


M.—Tyrone Bally Porest at 1:00, 


Open 5:45 P. 
Power, Susan Hayward in 
“RAW HIDE” and George Raft in 


BF “s % NICK CAIN.” Last complete 


1331 H SA. NE 
an pas _ o 8300. Cont. 1-11 
ews ] 
SEALED CARGO. Pivs pouns ,. in 


lus 
yen. Ar lene Dahil, “NO QUESTIONS 


paenglali Piney | Br. | Rd. & Flower A Ave. 
a a ps: JU. 7-7017 

Red Skelton 

“pI ST” (Techni- 
7:55, 9:50. Also Four 


New Homp. Ave. 
& E.W. Hiway SH. 3322 
Robert Ryan. Clafre Trevor in “BEST 
OF Re Ae — (Technicolor) at 
6: 


BETHESDA Dons i¢ oconnor, 8 


Fi- 
Laurie in 

ste TO THE RACES” at 6: 20. 
Red " Skelton, 


VIERS M Forrest in “E 


¥ DUST” (Technicolor) at 6:1 


30. 
Danny Kaye, Gene Tierney in 


mmo “ON TUE El RIVIERA” (Tech- 


'micolor) ¢ at 7:33 


STATE-WILSON 


“FRANCIS GOES TO THE RACES,’ 
Donald O'Connor,  _ 
\wa 231 x . Glebe Rd. e] 


le 
3 
oe 

=z 


Theaters 
eens Alr Conditions 


K-B 


6:00, 


All 


| Matinee “Tomorrow Children 9c 
ac acARTHUR 4859 MacArthur Bivd. 
Free Parking OR, 4600 
oors Open 6:15—Two Hits—Revival 
ight “THE LADY EVE." 
“wor ‘ck, Henry 
DS _— Tech 
n 
4. yo ® Cc icolor ) 


m NAYLOR 28th and Alo. ~ Ave. Se. 
Doors open 6:00 Vi. 4000 
lye “FRANCIS GOES TO THE RACES.’ 
| Donald O'Connor, at 7:20 Bhd 9:40, 
| Also “THREE- STOOGE ‘COMEDY: 


Loew's OPEN AIR DRIVE. IN 


Mt. Vernon 
Rt. One, So. of Alex. AL. 7050 
ed Ss 8 :30 oS Joan Crawf ord, 

4 OoDByE My FANCY.’ Loveioy 
Gran ? 
KLONDIKE. %  ‘Childres 
playground, po: 1 

yp ta 0°83 Fides. ar end Monkey 


i city” “BEWARE. OF BLON- 


AIRPORT DRIVE- IN Arlington 


“DESERT HAWK” ‘Tech on 
eres! iO, Richard Greene at 9 “rene 
Shere, a 30 up Fs og eS 
ington on U. 8S. Rout © Tisas Arl- 
sout gh of one 14th Es 


x 
0, 


a EATERS 


BUCKINGH O44 


FRANCIS Goss. To oan ‘RACES, ” 
| Donald O’Conn 


104. ae, Wayne St. 
OX. 1733 
“STRANGERS ON A TRAIN” 


es Farley Granger 
GLEBE 2130 Mike Bh 
“LORNA DOONE” in TECHNICOLOR 
ARLINGTON <*\S3"yp5" 
“KIND LADY” with Ethel Barrymore 


: IDDIE MATINEE 
SPECIAL K EBECCA OF 


2 SCUNNY BROOK |! FARM” 
JEFFERSON 600 Lee Bivd., Falls 

Church, FA. 8040 
a — > STRAIGET™ with 


a 


ARLINGTOH-FALLS CHURCH 


Por Information Call OX. 4266 


ree! 


SUNSET D DRIVE-IN ‘= Leesburg Pk. 


a bh ef Pike and aniston” * 


m Joe! M 
STARS a aa — on len 


d Briar 


“BPECIAL ; KIDDIE MATINEE 
“NORTHWEST STAMPEDE” 


Air-Conditioned 

|HOWARD Doors Open 12 Noon 

" Bs ag 18 N & 

eOWN - Big Sore 
ois Day in ‘ idtt LABY OF I BROADW AY” 
“ ~ Air- Conditioned 

2 LINCOLN Doors opens 12: 30 BB: 
; 0 Peck. Virginia Mayo, AP- 
3 od  PaH% ;HORATIO HO ORNBLOWER.” _ 


= 3 REPUBLIC., r-Con 


. Air-Conditioned 
of ‘John Treland. 


Doors open 12:30 bo. m. 
Mercedes McCam- 

bridge in “THE SCA 

aiITe——————— 


KER RT Air-Conditioned 
B00 Doors open 12:30 bD. m. 
Walt Disney's Technicaor Pa. Ly. 
“ALICE IN WONDERLAND” & 
“NATU RE’ 5 HALF ACRE. 
LANGSTON Air-Conditioned 
Doors open 12:45 hag 
David Brian. Steve Cochrah, “IN- 
| sa Bone WALLS OF FOLSOM 


' 


“avi rare 


iO MAN ce 
“BRIDE OF VENGE. 
3 00 plus tax a carful! 


~ CAROLINA" 11th & Cor Carolina 8. 


Air - Conditioned fthour Dext 
in “yy ALENTINO. " Cha ag ~ 
“13TH LETTER.’ oy aang glee 


STANTON 


Air- Conditioned 


FORE YOUR 
RIC CE.” 
PARK Savannech ot 13th S.E. 

1 Block off Alc. Ave. JO. 2-2233 
Air-Conditioned. Red Skelton in “EX- 
__}CUSE MY DUST,” at 6:15. 8:10, 10 


CIRCLE 2105 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W. 


Air-Conditioned R€.0184 
Last day. Ethel Barrymore. Maurice 
Evans. Angela Lansburs in “KIND LADY,” 
at 6:25. 8:10 and 9:55. 


GUILD 2402 Mt. 


Alexeandric, Va., OV 
ARIE 


srt C St. N.E, 
4-9468 
“PIETY 'yrARS BE - 
EYES.” and “BITTER 


ti 


—_ 


ROTH suenTond 


: DBTRICT 


For aetetme 


vn enen 13-30 8 

Doors open Dd. m. 

ON TELEGRAPH HILL” 
plonard, Beegnets 


___—-« Ethel Waters, William Lundigan 


"Mel 
1351 pages NW BOUNI 
GEORGETOWN roa FAIR 
“The Community Art oe 
AIR CONDITIONED 


LAST 2 DAYS! 


Exclusive Washington Showing! 


JULIEN DUVIVIER’S 


Widely Acclaimed Drama 


“ESCAPE FROM 
YESTERDAY” 


featuring 


“HOUSE 
wi Vernon Ave. 


er >. is outstanding role, “LOST 


Foirfax, Va 

“THE STEEL HELMET.” Robert Hutton, 

Steve Brod: Brodie. 
| Liste ten in! Dous Bailey “MUSIC 
| SHOP. * 9 a. m. to 12 daily. WBCC 


SYLVAN 


Henry Fonda in “THE LONG NIGHT’; 
Macdonald Carey in “MYSTERY SUB. 
MARINE.” Show Starts at 11 A . M. 


ee 
—_ —— oo 


7414 Wise. Aves 


JEAN GABIN 4 Wise 
ANN ABELLA t stage stare—thel Barrym 


Two eres sta 
Open = a Peature at\raurice py A in “KIND LADY.” a 
and 9:60 7:60 and 9:45 p. m. ‘ 


104 R. |. Ave. N.W, 
9689 


7:35 


Doors 
8:08; 


THE WASHINGTON 


SONGSTRESS C. J. Holly, 
less romantically known as 
Clariel J. Weikart, was among 
the finalists of the “Miss Wash- 
ington” of 1951 contest, hav- 
ing come through the early 


FESTIVAL 


(Nmateds 


Wednesday, August 15, 1951 


By Pau] Herron 


contest preliminaries with fly- 
ing colors. 

For the past couple of 
months Miss Holiy, or Weikart, 
whichever, you prefer, has 
been singing at the Embassy 
Room of the Statler Hotel and 
the fact that the room’s vocal- 
ist is also a beauty contestant, 
brings to mind several other 
added dividends, so to speak, 
that the: Embassy Room will 


POST 


for dancing, that alone guar- 


_antees a pleasant evening; 
| Miss Holly sings, the orches- 
| tra features a five-man violin 


section, a rarity among hotel 
orchestras, and twice weekly 


_the guests of the Embassy 
| Room are part of a coast-to- 
| coast radio program broadcast 


' from the bandstand. 


When 


| the other entertainers are rest- 
ing, Ted Alexander and his 
_ quartet take over to present 


continue to present to its pa- | 
| comedy that is quite refresh- 


trons until the middle of Sep- 
tember. 


IN THE FIRST place, Dick 
LaSalle and his orchestra play 
SMASH 
- 


* 2nd WEEK 
The World Famous 


CHARIOTEERS 
BLUE MIRROR 


824 14th ST. N.W. 


RESTAURANT 
1336 GC St. N.W. 
Dt. 8235 
Our Private Dining 
Rooms Are Air 
Conditioned 


| 


Old Nem 


PROUDLY PRESENTS 


HELENE 


New Parisian Singing Star 
In Her Inimitable Presentation of 
French and English Songs 
PLUS 


CARLOS MONTOYA 


Celebrated. Concert Guitarist 


TRIANITA LES WILLIAMS 


Sensational Spanish Pianist & Song 
Dancer Stylist 


2 Great Shows 
9 :30—12 :00 
FRANK COVIELLO’S 
Orchestra For Dancing 


6000 0 20S CIO 


© Conccticut Ave. at 18th 
orio 


FRANCOIS” & 


FOR 
RESERVATIONS 
©] 


presents 


$20 Cenn. Ave, 


Soo oor oro) 


Orleans 


Air Conditioned 


CALL RE. 7284 
or 0 OR 


- _ a 
. 
a 
2 “4 
_ ~ 7 * 
» a is oy * 
oN, PFs re 
7 iM." fen 
; Se, 
x> . by ota 
s eo ee * Nyiete ate ‘ 
‘ — a , > al v9 Sas 
= oO 
. ¥ — _ - . / 


OPEN HOUSE TONIGHT 


FREE ADMISSION—NO COVER—NO. MINIMUM 


Featuring That Sensational Exotic Dancer 


TRUDINE 


HELD OVER 


EXTRA ADDED ATTRACTION 
MURRAY WOOD & JEAN LANIER. 


The World's Smatiest Comedians 


BABY LAZAR—Character Dancing 


Dancing 9:30-2 


2 Shows 10:15 and 12:45 


». KAVAK 0 S[ [otis 


FR. 6393 | 


Sth & H Sts. 


an active interlude of musical 


' ing. To quote a_ well-worn 


cliche: “There’s never a dull 
moment.” 
ow 
When ygu¥e playing music 


_ for more than a half thousand 
| diners 


every night you're 


bound to get requests for 


| about that 
| songs. So we take our hats off 
_ to Ethel Gundersen who has 
| worked under such a load for 
| Many months. 


|| ferent and delightful. 
Marilyn O'Shaugnessy f 


ee 


many different 


This talented 
pianist has worked out a sys- 


_ tem of grouping request num- 


bers into categories, then play- 
ing tune medlies that are dif- 
That's 
known as making the best of a 
situgtion and we do mean best. 


cws 


Two or three weeks from 
now Mayor Albert C. Scott of 
Olmsted Falls, Ohio, expects 
to gather together most of 
the high school children of the 
town and bring them to Wash- 
ington on a sightseeing tour. 


«|Guard of Honor, $25. 


E= ties. Officers will be elected and 


St 
of Television & Ra die 
COCETAIL HOUR 


7:15 Nightly 
No Tar, Cover, 


DRINKS 45 Minimum 


HOTEL ANNAPOLIS 


12th & H Sts. N.W. 


| Flays Reds at 


MGM Recording Artists 


Plus The Ray Marshall Trio 
Steaks—Chicken, a Treat 


Delicious Food, Excellent Bar 
Open Daily 11-2 A.M. 


OLIVIA Davis 


Thou fe 


terested in 
ree E ‘School Department, NAtional 


EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORY 


advertising in this 


ectory are requested to call 
4200, ye et 293, regarding rates. 


Accountancy 


a 
* ~ 3 accounting. law. 
. A. examinations. 


ENJAMIN FRANKLIN UNIVERSITY 


Two-eNs or three-year evening program leads to B. C. 8S. degree 
pana 8 Soy training for accounting and auditing positions 
is for advancement to wpecerve posts requiring 


C. 8. degree. Pace curriculum. Co-educational. 
Book. Register now for Fall day and evening classes. 


1100 Sixteenth 
St. N.W. 


ance and taxatio 


One-year sostarsduate. course lea 


Ask for 44th Year 


Evening classes, small sections. 
n Commercial Science. 

leading to BCS a 
Administration leading to MFA 


OLUMBUS UNIVERSITY 


nd MCS degrees. 


F325 pete ee. N.W, 
5 
Undergraduate and Graduate Studies 


Balanced schedules with collateral subjects 


Graduate courses in Federal Pisca} 
degree. Phone fop catalogue. 


Gegrees are conferred. C. 
evening, begin Sept. 5 and 18. 
counting, C. P. A.. Government 


for graduates. Apply now fo 


accountant or executive, business owner-manager. 


GTRAYER COLLEGE OF ACCOUNTANCY Jp 4 178 


Business Administration and Accounting Courses, B. C. S. and M. C. 
A.. Preparation. Fall classes, day saul 


Employment objectives: Public ac- 
accounting and auditing. corporation 
Employment service 
r fall classes. 


Basiness and 


Secretarial 


REFRESHER and INTENSIVE. 
Typewriting, Comptometer. all e 


veteran 


Berxd's SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 


ie, New classes starting. 


700 12th St. N.W., Cer. G 
Over Zilot ry 
Beginners’ courses in SHORTHAND. 
lectric calculators. Vocabulary build- 


. Bnglish. Bookkeeping. Accounting. Save % to ‘5 usual time. 


Est. 26 years. Positions 
me vening sé@ssions. 


g. Director is a 
Register EARLY 


Accredited. 


for beginners in shorthand and 
tion for speed building. Comp! 


for fall courses. Thirteenth and 


plomas. Cal] and interview experienced counselors. 


TRAYER COLLEGE OF SECRETARIAL TRAINING 


Open all the summer day and ev 


ening. New classes August 20. Courses 
typewriting, refresher training, dicta- 
ete secretarial courses—approved di- 
Apply in advance 
F Streets. NAtional 1748. 


National Press Bldg. 


HE WASHINGTON SCHOOL FOR SECRETARIES 
For Those Who Want the Best 


District 2480 


Civil Service 


Specialists. Resident and, home 


BexD's CIVIL SERVICE 


700 12th t NW 
SCHOOL. “6 i Gai6 
study courses. 


Comptometer 


ASHINGTON COMPTOM 


ea 
vidual instruction pod competent 
fhe. sates mode) mptometer. 


Rie e only authorized 
0 


. Tey, sc aoe 
Borat by 
2 eM Manager. 238 Munsey Bidg.. 
Facran tate. br ‘0503. I. 3209. 


High School Courses 


ETER SCHOOL 


~—Established 43 Years 


It is not too late te enroll for our next class. Prepare yourself NOW to 
mm more money. Moderate tuition. 


Free placement service. Indi- 
Each student ig furnished 
and evening classes. You are 
omptometer School 
vision oO it & 

1329 E 


\ ye 


mptometer 


MERSON INSTITUTE 


College preparatory and 
v for veterans. 


me “an” 


igh school subjects. Day and evening classes 
gistration now o 


Languages 


for spring term. 


Be SCHOO A 
Est. 1878. . cy, Sages Soo. 


arene SCHOOL 


MERSON INSTITUTE 


839 17¢t -¥ NW. 
NGUAGES at Eye)” ST PF 0016 
an a  * omer mo 

n EVERY eApING CITY of the WORLD 


1324 18th St. N.W. 
4877 


ADams 
Intensive courses in Spanish. French and German for high schoo 
abr and for college entrance. Small 


method Registration now open for spring term. 
Mathematics 


classes. Conversationa 


NERSON INSTITUTE 


I ay amar” Approved’ for 
term. 


sprin 


rule and loga 


1324 — St. 
A 


Avenue’ nich senee and sunior college mathematics. 
slide ithm 


and calculus. 


BH i istration now open for 


Speech Improvement 


THE PARKER SCHOOL 


Improvement; Public Speaking. 


ag 1138 18th St. N.W. 


The Power to Succeed-Personality Analysis and Development; peech 


Approved for Veterans. 


Secretarial 


FXMERSON INSTITUTE 
Qomstete sarees in secretarial 


day and ‘lable 


E R SC 
s Building, Silver Sprin 
attentio 


po, Bow fos Pall cl 
ers. Phone JU. 7- 


Co-educational 


1324 ae St. "NW. 
ADams 4877 


Registra tration open 


any oes oe Placement 


bjects 
Veteran approved. 


L OF B Es , Ines 


us € 0. Box 54. ag > 
wat otch \ Smeg fon prac practical application! wihoste is upon pei 
ual Som ortable, air-condition classrooms. Free 4. rk 
es, day or even beginners, 
for catalog and rates. 


4) tions on lack of public under- 
#4 | standing of aid to dependent 
| children programs, also on at- 
S titudes of individual case work- 
= ™, ers who, he said, fail to operate 


Be case work.” 


= sion of a four-day meeting of 


i jof the North Carolina State 
2 -/Board of Public Welfare. 


tion of the Virginia Department 
sof Welfare and Institutions, dis- 


JACK COREY'S ORCA. 
BUDDY SHANER 
Your Singing M.C. 
a Dancing 6:45-1:15—No Cover 
Floor Shows 7:20-10-12 P.M. 
NA. 4766 


Lunches T5e Dinners $1.50 
Air Conditioned 


Restaurant |, Restaurant of Distinction | Distinction 


14 th.& New York rey ey 


™| grams have been thought of too 

F:; much as financial assistance and 

#.|not as “feasible child welfare 
=| projects.” 


| Prin Orleans 


‘Legal Adviser 


Seating Plan 


yesterday deferred action on a 


SUMMER GLASSES 
AUGUST 20. 


Guidance in plannins a 
career in business. 


Approved diploma courses 
in Secretaria! Training. 


Refresher courses—dictation 
transcription, and type 
writing. 


Training for upgrading— 
excellent marks in com- 
petitive examinations. 


|] Employment Service—supe- 


| 


rior positions for graduates. 


STRAYER 


College of Secretarial Training 
13th and F NA. 1748 


Rep. Harrison | 


+ * 

Legion Session 

ROANOKE, Va., Aug. 14 (A.— 
Communist and subversive ac- 
tivities continued to hold the 
attention of Virginia Legion- 
naires, meeting here today, as 
Rep. Burr P. Harrison (D-Va.) 
called for a housecleaning of 
“Communist carpetbaggers” in 
the United States. 


About 1000 of the Legionnairs, 
holding their thirty-third an- 
nual State convention here, 
already have signed anti-Com- 
munist oaths. And they have 
heard several speakers de- 
nounce Communism and urge 
Legion members to lead the 
fight against subversives. 

Harrison, speaking this mor- 
ning, sai dthat Communists— 
in the guise of political refugees, 
persons active in the arts and 
professions and diplomatic rep- 
resentatives of iron curtain 
countries—have gained entrance 
to this country to carry out 
missions of espionage, sabotage 
and subversion. 

“Here is our problem—one of 
carpetbaggers who pose as as 
diplomats or other personages 
‘of consequence and of scalawags 
who aid them through active 
collaboration, blind acceptance 
of Communist fronts or indif- 
ference that borders on trea- 
son,” he asserted persecuted at 
every opportunity “without hys- 
teria, but with common sense 
and patriotic resolution.” 

The top feature of the con- 
vention this afternoon was a 
parade’ through downtown 
Roanoke. The top units in the 
parade were: Best band,Bedford, 
$100 prize; best drum and bugle 
corps, Bluefield, Va., Post 122, 
$100; best Negro drum and bugle 
‘corps, Danville, Post 29, $75: 
best color guard, Richmond 


Wednesday morning the 
Legion will conclude its activi- 


action will be taken on all reso- 
lutions, including one that will 
put the Legion on record as 
favoring or opposing a state 
bonus. A committee already has 
‘voted strong disapproval of any 


t Child Welfare 
= Pro grams Held 


Not at Fault 


CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va., 
Aug. 14 (#).—A public welfare of- 
ficial today noted an “increasing 
attack on aid to dependent chil- 
dren programs throughout the 
country,” and called for the pub- 
lic to be better informed on such 
projects. 

Arthur B. Rivers, director of 
the South Carolina Department 
of Public Welfare, told a meet- 
ing of public welfare personnel 
here the aid to dependent chil- 
dren programs have been 
charged with “destroying initia- 
tive and ambition.” 

These programs also have been 
charged, he said, with contribut- 
ing “to desertion, increases in 
the divorce rate, building a so- 
ciety of dependents.” 

Rivers blamed these accusa- 


within “the philosophy of social 


Ellen Winston, another 


public welfare superintendents 
and staff workers, charged that 
aid to dependent children pro- 


Dr. Winston is Commissioner 


Miss Inez M. Baker, supervisor 
lof the Children’s Division of the 
Department of 
%/Public -Welfare, and Paul W. 
4Keve, chief of Juvenile Proba 


cussed foster care, adoptions and 
other children’s services. 


Vetoes Armory 


The = District Commissioners 


controversial request to duoble 
legal seating capacity of the 
National Guard Armory after 
their legal adviser vetoed a pro- 
posed compromise. 

To make better use of the big 

drill hall, the Armory manage- 
ment asked that capacity be in- 
creased by a change in the build- 
ing code. District Building and 
fire officials oppose the plan in 
the name of safety. 
_ Engineer Commissioner Bern- 
ard L. Robinson asked Corpora- 
tion Counsel Vernon’ E. West 
yesterday if the city heads could 
solve the problem by leaving the 
code unchanged, bu ptermitting 
violations when they thought it 
safe to do so. West said they 
could not. 

Apparently faced with the 
necessity of saying yes or no to 
the request, Commissioner F. 
Joseph Donohue then asked that 
action be deferred. He said he 
was in an “amazing statae of in- 
decision.” 

The Armory management had 
haid an increase to 10,620 ca- 
pacity would take less than 30 
percent of the floor space. But 
under the building code capacity 
‘is limited the number of emerg- 
ency exits. District technicians 
said it would be unsafe to in- 
crease capacity without in- 
creasing exits. Construction of- 
ficials said it would be architec- 
turally unsound to make exits 


for 10,000 capacity. 


' 


++ GyerYy lay Is @ working 
day for a Washington Post 


WANT AD/ 


The very day that you decide to sell, buy or 
rent is the right day—_the best day—for you 
to place your classified ad. That's because 
people answer want ads in The Post every 
single day — and we have thousands and thousands of 


result stories to prove it! 


So, no matter what you have to sell, let an action- 
getting Post want ad do it for you — and do it easily, 
effectively and economically, any day in the week, 


All you have to do is call NAtional 4200 and ask for 
Classified .An experienced ad writer will help you word 
your ad for maximum results, if you are a telephone 
subscriber, you can just say, "Charge it.” 


CALL NATIONAL 4200 494@ 


The Washington Post 


- 


THE WASHINGIUN POST 


- 


Fill out and mail this coupon for your Post vacation subscription 


(Or phone NAtional 4200 and ask for Circulation") 
| y 


+ 
a. 
= 
‘’ 


| Circulation Department, The Washington Post, Wash. 4, D.C. 
SS Se a ae ee 


Send me The Post while I'm on vacation from 


(vacation address) 


DAILY ONLY (J 


10B 


W ednesday, 


THE WASHINGTON POST 


August 15, 195] 


Controversy 
Rages Over 


Jewish MSS 


Scorpions 
‘Milked’ 
For Serum 


| 


JERUSALEM (P.— An in- | 


quisitive 
that srtayed away from the | 
herd a little over four years | 
ago not far from Jericho has 
set off a controversy. 
Historians and _ biblical | 
scholars are on one side and 
archeologists on the other. 


The dispute has been go- 
ing on for some time but it 
has flamed more bitterly 
after a debate at the Jeru- 
salem University between 
the chief exponents of both 
views. 

The dispute concerns the 
authenticity of 17 ancient 
scrolls, most of which are 
said to be the earliest He- 
brew texts of several books 
of the Old Testament. 


When the goathered saw 
one of his charges going up 
a rocky hillside, he ran after 
the animal. 

On the way up, he passed 
a circular opening in the 
rocks. The rock he flung at 

‘the goat went into the small 
cave entrance. 

He heard the sound of 
something cracking and 
called help. 


Jars Found Intact 


Two Arab lads wriggled 
inside the cave and discov- 
ered one broken jar and 
other jars intact. In the un- 
broken jars they found sev- 
eral rolls of parchment. 


Each Arab took four rolls. 
“One sold his share to an 
antiquities dealer in Bethle- 
hem, who resold them to the 
Hebrew University in Jeru- 
salem. The other four were 
sold to the Monastery of St. 
Mark in Jerusalem, from 
where they were sent to the 
United States. 

Prof. E. F. Sukenik of the 
Hebrew University, who di- 
ciphered most of the scrolls, 
is sure they are authentic 
texts written during the sec- 
ond century B. C. Dr. O. R. 
Sellers and Dr. J. C. Trever 
of the American School of 
Oriental Research are also 
certain there can be no 


doubt as to the authenticity | them 
' them alive. 
as | Can’t Be Mailed 
Albright and | 
Millar Burrows sup- | Department’s failure to co- 
‘operate has S | 
| work. | 
“The department refuses to | 
_approve any type of shipping | 
containers we've offered,” he 


of the scrolls. Such scholars 
of world-wide reknown 
Prof. W. F. 
Prof. 
port this thesis. 

Those experts believe ,the 


scrolls are genuine manu- | 


scripts dating back to the 
pre-Christian era. They 
claim that the script and 
style of writing are indis- 
putably convincing when 
compared with other ancient 
documents. 


Called Trivial 


Prof. Solomon Zeitlin, edi- 
tor of the scientific Jewish 
Quarterly Review, however, 
is quite sure that the scrolls 
date back only as far as the 
Middle Ages. As such, he 
contends, they have com- 
paratively little value for 
either biblical scholars, his- 
torians, linguists or students 
of religion. 


Some of the scrolls come | 


from old Jewish libraries in 
Hebron which had been 
sacked after the masacre of 
80 Jews there in 1929, Prof. 
Zeitlin said. 

Although Prof. Zeitlin had 
no. opportunity to study an- 
cient scrolls in Hebron dur- 
ing his visit there in 1925, 
he believes they were all 
written in the Middle Ages. 

He thinks the Arabs who 
stole the scrolls during the 
pillage of Hebron’s Jewish 
quarter in 1929 got together 
with dealers in antiquities 
and staged the find to en- 
hance the value of the manu- 
scripts. 

Consequently, Prof. Zeitlin 
urges the setting up of a 
commission of scholars to 
investigate the authenticity 
of the scrolls. 


Professor Criticized 


Prof. Sukenik and other 
archeologists maintain that 
Prof. Zeitlin never read the 
Hebron scrolls and _ has 
never compared their form 
of writing with the type of 
characters used in_ the 
scrolls discovered by the 
goatherd. 

Among the scrolls investi- 
gated by Prof. Sukenik is a 
complete, almost undamaged 
text of the Book of Isaiah 
nearly identical with the au- 
thorized texts fixed by Jew- 
ish tradition, 1000 years ago. 
This 22-foot long scroll is 
said to prove how carefully 
the traditional reading of 
the text was preserved over 
a 2000-year-old period. 

An early commentary of 
the Book of Habakuk, chap- 
ters from the Book of Gene- 
sis and Leviticus in ancient 
Hebrew, Phoenician charac- 
ters, chapters from Deuter- 
onomy and Judges, a. tiny 
fragment from a book of war 
hymns and the hitherto un- 
known text of a book called 
by Prof. Sukenik “The War 
+ of the Children of Light and 
the Children of Darkness” 
are included in the scrolls | 
valued by students of lan-| 


guage. Bible scholars and his- | 


torians alike cherish them. 


Women Preferred 


CHICAGO U,P).—If the Chi- 
cago Motor Club has its way, 
women will replace men at the 
city’s school crossings. The 
motor club’s plan would re- 
lieve 200 policemen for other 
police duty at no increase ma 

’ salaries paid out. 


75 Nations on Campus. 


BERKELEY, Calif. (U.R).—A 
total of 840 foreign students 
representing 75 countries are 
enrolled on the Berkeley cam- 
pus of the University of Cali- 
fornia this semseter. 


,. 


| 


| 


TEMPE, Ariz. ®.—Here’s 


Palestinian goat aman who is on the prowl 


for a poisonous child- killer, 
the Southwestern scorpion. 
He doesn’t want them dead, 
however. He welcomes the 
brown crawlers with their 
stingers ready for action. 

He is Dr. Hebert L. 
Stahnke, head of the biologi- 
cal science department at 
Aizona State College. 

Dr. Stahnke “milks” his 
scorpions to produce anti- 
venom serum. 

The poison is injected into 
cats in small quantities. Cats 
are especially invulnerable 
to the scorpion sting, be- 
cause of an ability to pro- 
duce a neutralizing fluid. 
The cat’s blood is converted 
into anti-venom serum and 
is injected into children who 
suffer scorpion stings. 

The treatment is one hun- 
dred per cent perfect if vic- 
tims are treated soon after 
the sting, Stahnke reports. 
Adults rarely die of a scor- 
pion sting but they suffar ex- 
tensively through painful 
swelling. 


Deaths Cut Down 


The new serum and public 
education in first aid has cut 
down scorpion-sting deaths in 
Arizona from around 25 per 
year to two or three per year 
during the past decade. 
Stahnke says, though, that 
more serum is needed this 
year due to an abnormally 
large scorpion ‘crop.” 

The doctor wants every hos- 
pital in the State to. have a 
supply of the serum. 

Biggest problem in serum 
manufacture is obtaining 
“milker” scorpions in a steady 
supply. The insect doesn’t 
breed in captivity and speci- 
mens must be gathered in the 
field. Stahnke has neither 
money nor,the personnel to 
collect them. 

“We've Appealed to the citi- 
zens of the Southwest to 
bring scorpions to us,” the 
doctor said. Gathering them 
alive is dangerous, though. 
Also, people have such an 


the 
‘they attended 


aversion to them they'd kill 
instead of capturing 


‘? 


Stahnke said the Postoffice 


hindered his 


explained. “I guess they don't 
want to lose any of their post- | 
men. If we could get a cheap | 
container and give it wide | 
circulation, 
many of our problems. The 
way it is now, those who 
gather specimens have to 
bring them to the college in 
person. 

Commercial scorpions are 
available in Mexico, Stahnke 
says, but they cannot be 
mailed and 
through customs.” 

Stahnke recently enlisted 
the interest and aid of Gov. 
Howard Pyle in efforts to ob- 
tain more funds for the lab- 
oratory. Pyle offered his co- 
operation and said he would 
submit recommendations to 
the next regular legislative 


session, 


Canadian Firm 
Area Is Looking 
For Land Rush 


PRINCE GEORGE, British 
Columbia (P.—A land rush 
is expected to hit this lightly- 
populated area of central 
British Columbia, where rich 
undeveloped farmland still 
sells for $5 an acre. 

The sudden interest in the 
coastal and intermountain 
areas stems from the an- 
nouncement that the Alumi- 
num Co. of Canada wiil 
construct a light-metals 
plant, at nearby Kitimat, 
British Columbia. 

Alcon officials expect a 
city of 50,000 persons to 
spring up near the site of 
factories and power plants 
which will be built at an 
eventual cost of more than 
500 million dollars. The 
aluminum city will provide 
the first major. “home 
market” for farm products 
of this district. 

The provincial lands de- 


| partment reported in a book- 


let that nearly 200,000 acres 
of “arable” land can be 
bought for $5 an acre near 
here. At Terrace, British 
Columbia, just 60 miles from 
the aluminum plant site, 
some 12,000 acres are avail- 
able. 


They Have Faith 


JACKSONVILLE, Fla. a. 
Members of the Riverview 
Methodist Church proved 
their belief that Florida is 
“Sunshine State” when 
services in 
their new building before 
‘the roof was on. 


Pet Ox Preferred 


JACKSONVILLE, Fla. 
J. A. Browning, 70, doesn't 
bother with horses or mules 
when plowing time 
around. He prefers his pet 
ox, Joe. “He doesn’t eat too 
much and he’s healthy,” 
Browning said. 


Pret Surgeon Victimiz 


BINGHAMPTON, N, _Y. 
U.P)—Add ungrateful  pa- 
tients: A young tree surgeon 
here was taken to the hospital 
after being struck by a fall- 
ing tree limb. His left eye was 
cut by the branch. 


The Washington Post 


LOCAL RATES 


Por Washington and Poiuts Within 
50 Miles of the District of Columbia. 

The one-time rate applies on skip 
ads or irregular er Minimum 

ad is two lines. e 7 
following rates are for con- 
secutive insertions 


Rates 
ad 

e 
words 


{ 
$36 


SITUATION WANTED ads are 3 
cents per line less than regular rates 
cash with order 


OUT-OF-TOWN RATES 


Ads from points more than 50 
miles from the District of Columbia 
ee time, S3c per line; 3 times. 


line. Minimum 3 


CANCELLATIONS 


When canceling an ad. it is im- 
portant that you request and make 
@ note of cancellation number to 
insure proper credit. 

Claims for errors must be made in 
time for correction before the. second 
insertion. 


Phone NAtional 4200 


DAILY. 8 A. M. TO 7 P. M. 
SATURDAY, 8 A. M. TO 3:30 P. M. 
Sunday, 11 A. M. TO 7 P. M. 


Ask For an Ad. Writer 


CLASSIFIED 
INDEX 


Auction Sales 8| REAL ESTATE 


Loan 
Motoreycles 


ae sept 
Service 
Trailers 


Ww’ shenene 
Waterfront 


oop 


46A 
Uufurn. .45. 47 


A 


51A 


oe "Garece 4 83 
Parm Mach 
Mach, avon ash 
Found .. 110A i 
Suburban 3 
Table Board 43 
nfurn. ....36 
Misc. ——- 


Bus. Prop.. 
ea {Space a 
Fa 


tesanes .58 
Offices ....55 
Out of Town vt 
Stores 
V'c’tion P}. a0 
W'houses. .60C 
W’terfront 75B 
wanes 


eee 
Mise. Bale “48 
Misc. tale 4 ae 
spones to Loan 3 

Motor Travel: 11A 
Moving ne 
Off. Notices ary 


48 

Hse. ae apt. 3 

Roo S 
Room, "Board 
Trailer Surbe” 


Prop. Mang. 53A 
Storgae 

Sum. Camps. 75D 
Trust Notes.630 


'LEGAL NOTICE 


it would Retr iod, 


| continuing 
“we can't get them | 


) July 


rolls | 
| of Columbia and postene=s as and 


| Columbia in 
| TERMS: 
i$ 

| which will 


| vevancing. 


ROBERT E. LYNCH. ATTORNEY 
821 Fifteenth St., N.W. 
Washington 5, D. Cc. 
a OF ag ged OF PART- 
NERSHIP. No. 157. tice is here- 
by given that under a certificate filed 
on the 3lst day of July. 1951. in the 
office of the Clerk of the United 
States District Court of the District 
Of Columbia the undersigned have 
renewed a co-partnership under the 
firm name of ROBERT C. JONES 
AND COMPANY for the purpose of 
transacting a genera! brokerage busi- 
ness in the buying, selling and deal- 
ing in commodities. stocks, bonds and 
other securities in the City of Wash- 
ington, District of Columbia. and 


elsewhere, having offices in the Ca- | 


fritz Building. 1625 Eye Street, N.W. 
in the said city. said renewal agree- 
ment being dated July 25, 1951. and 
for a period of one year 
commencing August 1], 1951, and ex- 
— on the close of business on 
31, 1952 and that Charles Car- 
roll Morgan of 1 Quincy Street, Chevy 
Chase, Maryland, continues as a spe- 
cial or limited partner. having con- 
tributed Twenty- -five Thousand (#25,- 
000.00) Dollars to the capital of said 
Partnership. The business of the 
partnership will be transacted by the 
undersigned general partners only. 
Charles Carroll Morgan, as a special 
or limited partner, shall not be liable 
for or subject to any loss or liability 
beyond the amount of his aforesaid 
contribution. pOstes ©: JONES. eT 


J ’ 
CHARLES CARROLL MORGAN. Spe- 
cial or Limited Partner. (Seal) A true 
| M. HULL . Clerk, 
. Flannery, Dep Clerk 
Aug.6.8.10.13, 15. 17. 20.22 34. 37 29,31 


BIDS AND PROPOSALS 6 


aan SERVICES ADMINISTRA- 
Public Buildings Service 
wareinelne D. C.. Aug. 9, 1951 
Sealed bids in duplicate for ventilat- 
ing transformer vaults. 
beth’s Hospital, f 
will be received 
Standard Time, 
in Room No. - General 
Services Building. Washington, >. ©. 
and then publicly opened in Room 
No. G-341-D. Bid guarantee is re- 
quired. If the amount of the con- 
tract exceeds $2000. U. S. Standard 
Form No. 23. Construction Contract. 
will be used and performance and 
Payment bonds wil) be required. 
Upon request one set of Prebid 
Documents and two sets of drawings 
and specifications will be supplied 
without charge to each general Con- 
tractor interested in bidding on the 
complete project. all of which must 
be returned. Not more than 
ditional sets of drawings and specifi- 
cations may be obtained by general 
Contractors at a charge of $5.00 per 
set. which will be refunded for each 
set returned in good condition with- 
in 10 days after the bids are opened 
Checks offered as payment must be 
made payable to the order of the 
Treasurer” U. S. Upon request and 
in the discretion of the undersigned 
one set of drawings and specifica- 
tions will be furnished to builders’ 
exchanges. chambers of commerce 
and other similar organizations. 
with the understanding that the set 
will be retained on their premises 
and made available for inspection 
by any interested sub-contractor or 
material firm. Bidding material may 
be 6btained at Room No. 1304, Gen- 
eral Services Building. 19th and F 
Streets, W.. Washington 25. 
. C.. Phone yexecut! ve 4900, Ex- 
tension 2397. E. Reynolds, Com- 
missioner of public Bui) dings Serv 
ice. General Services Administra- 


tion. 
Aug. 13, 14, 15. 


GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT 
of Columbia, Director of Construc- 
tion, D. C., August 13, 1951. Sealed 
proposals will be received in Room 
509. District Building. 14th and E 
streets nw. Washington 4, D. 
until 2:00 p. m.. 5. T., August 
20. Ii! and then pub! icly opened 
and read for Grading and Sodding 
Slopes at ouglas wJunior High 
School, Douglas Road, between Stan- 
ton road and Douglas Place, se., 
Waslrineton, D. C. Proposal Iorms, 
drawings and specifications may be 
obtained in the Office of Chief Clerk, 
Engineer Department, Room 427, 
District Building (Telephone NA- 


tional 60 ), Ext. 2378.) 
acorn SALES 8 


$2 | LOST 


7|FOUND 


AUCTION SALES 8 


A Ae a. ect 
THOS. J. OWEN & SON, Auctioneers 
435 Southern Building. 


TRUSTEES’ 


SALE OF VALUABLE 
BRIC 


.of the party 

the undersigned 

trustees will sell, at public auction, 

in front of the premises. on TUES- 

DAY. HE TWENTY-FIRST DAY 

OF Peg A. D. 1951. AT THREE 
O'CLOCK M 


. the following-de- 
scribed a and 


in the District of 
Gesignated as and being 
feaver’s subdivision 
Square 674, as per plat recorded 
in the Office of the Surveyor for 
the District of Columbia in Liber 
16 at sotto 169. 
TE 5S OF SALE: ALL CASH. 
PR Sn oe $500.00 will be required 
at time of sale. All conveyancing, 
recording. revenue stamps. etc.. / 
cost of purchaser. Terms of sale re) 
be complied with within thirty days 
from day of- sale. otherwise the 
trustees reserve the right.to resell 
the property at the risk and cost of 
defaulting purchaser, after 
days’ advertisement of such resale 
in some newspaper published 
Washington. D. C. 
THORNTON W. OWEN 
ROBERT W. KIDWELL 
ugust 10.13.15.17.20. 

BUSINESS SERVICE 


CAMERA ALERT tnd 

FULLER & d’ALBERT. IN 

_ 815 10TH ST. N EX. 8120 

CAMERA REPATRA 

Cameras, movie equipment repaired 
by experts: all foreign. U. makes. 
BRENNER, 933 Pa. ave. nw. RE.2434. 
Open Sat. 9 a. m. to 6 | Pp. m 
CARPENTER WORK. 
home repairs: Painting; 
rates. JO. 2-3165. 
CLOGGED DRAIN 1 PIPES electrical- 
ly Razor-Kleened or no chares. Roto- 
Rooter. RA. 8888, day or night. 


Specialists in Roof 
Repairing 


Satisfaction cuaranteed. 


premises. 
.) 


roofiing: all 
reasonable 


Genera! 
repairs, painting and papering. No 
job too smal] or too large. Free esti- 
mates. Financing assistance. No. 
5807—eves., HU. _ 8776. 

UPHOL STERING, | repairing done in 
your home or my shop. All work 
guaranteed. W. Ross, "DI. 4 

A-1 CARPENTRY & painting. ine 
terior & exterior. free 
white, sober workm 


in- 
estimate, 
. 9248 


eee! BULL— White ‘nea brin- 
dle, white feet: tag No. 30559. 
Child's pet; please return: reward. 
1608 Monroe st. nw. CO 1051. 


DACHSHUND., } part beagle 
black with tan. Last seen Belview 
shopping center, New Alex., Friday. 
OV. 1833. Reward. 


LOST—Cat. orey. and white. Ans. to 
name Boots rd.. near 
Eastern ave. SH. 
PIN—Piatinum — among circle. 
August 86: fleur-de-lis design  be- 
tween stones. Liberal rew. wo. 1050 


POC KETBOOK, navy blue, on phirley 
hwy. __ Reward. __ ME. 5669, 9 5. 


TUBE aluminum | playpen: 
Blvd.. Aug. 13. JE. 3-8766. 


WALLET—Man’s brown leather con- 
training driver's license, gas credit 
card, etc. Reward. RA. 5355. 
WIRE- HAIRED fox terrier. female. 
coat recently clipped. vic. Rockville, 
Md., carnival, Sat. eve Very gen- 
erous reward No questions asked. 
Rockville 4381. 


vie. = 


10A 
Woodside, 
07. 


BOXER—Male, vic. 
Silver Spring, Md. JU, 


DOG—Brownish-black. white 
Sse See paws. white-tipped 


PERSONALS 


BED WETTING 
STOPPED 


Approved by Doctors—No Drugs. 

KING ENURTONE LABS. RE. 2295 

MATTIE EDINBU RG—Please cal] 

Mrs. Sterrett, WO. 3309. 

MINOR alterations on suits, 

DE 2664 Mane 

| SILVER SPRING Recreation Center 
m. t ma 6S 


re 
7-75 


chest. 
tail. 


LE 


reas 


. m 
pong and 
1143 


) nda 1 
| Play eokes Hilliards. ping 
| snooker. Also, tables reserved. 
| Bon lifant st. U. 8-5205. 
WILL DO typi ng- -gen. clerical serv- 
ices in my x M-208, Post. 


INSTRUCTIONS 


AUTO DRIVING tae tate’ cage 79 
lessons. road test: $2 91. 


eee 


AUTO DRIVING Tera CFIGNE “Ar 
lessons, road test. $35. Easy Method 
Driving School. NO. 1794. 
‘COLUMBIA Driv’ ng School—7 le: 
sons and road test; $25. UN. 2461. 
OUR | COMPLETE thor ough course in 
dental technology qualifies you for an 
interesting career in this field. Free 
placement upon graduation. Call or 
for further information. 
SCHOOL OF DE! 


TECHNOLOGY. 820 it 
ST. 8840. 


nh st. Aw. 


HELP, MEN 15 


Accounting Clerk 


If you are looking for an in- 
teresting position wit t 
pleasant working 
congenial associates, 
air - conditioned 
equipment. Insurance and hos- 

leave and good 


Pitalization plan. 
Salary, and have knowledge of 
KACKLEY 


nh & Sanders. Inc. 


1114 VERMONT AVE. N.W. 


six ad- | 


AMBITIOUS MAN WITH 
CAR 


21 to 38. for excellent paying job 
with old line company; part or full | 
time; .wonderful opportunity for ad- 
vancement: excellent income while 
training. Call Mr, 
257 


+ 


Assistant Funeral! Director 
White, experienced: D. C. license 

and driver's permit: salary 

|| Yom. Call J. T. Ryan, Inc., 
70 


ASSIS 


Young man with knowledge 
double-entry bookkeeping to assist in 
maintenance of cost system Won- 
derful opportunity for a recent ac- 
counting schoo] graduate or one at- 
tending night school to begin his 
career with the area's largest auto 
body shop. Call Mr. Keys, CH 2535. 


~ ASST. BKKPR.—$50-$60 
nome. 


Rand tabulator, 12 p. m.. 
S60 


Sat AS AGC ¥ 1420 N. ¥ Ave. 
ATTORNEY, patent expe 

t4 060-810. 000 
college 


AT. 


of 


NW 


Trainees, insurance, 
degree pref 
Head accountant 
Openings for topographical 
and méchanical draftsmen. 
Stenographer experienced 
Checker. foods 
Sales. car furnished. beverage 
Stock clerks. to 40 years 
Messengers. white. young 
Clerk. general office 
Laboratory technician 
Electromatic typis! 
Slow steno... apt. at figures 
AMERICAN EMPL OY MENT SERV. 
1319 F ST. N.W NA. 4142 


S 3600 
$3900 


A ’ 


five | 


in | 
'g@t some souvenirs of our 


~ (Pritz). 


VIEWPOINT 


eg mg cE, OLD"DOBE 
Curios 


INDIAN Bu BLANKETS 


4 
© 1951 by John F. Bille Co. 


“Oh, look, Ethel! We can 


rip. I must get some 
1ings for the children and 


Y jay folks!” 


By Dave Gerard 


15) 


HELP, MEN 


15, HELP, WOMEN 


O88, | | pay. 


“Here. 
more junk to store in th’ 
attic, Ed!” 


here we pick up | 


Hinky Pinky 
By Allen Stewart 


Find two rhyming words which mean 
the same thing as those given. The new 
rhyming words must exactly fit the 
squores. ‘“‘HINK PINK" means they 
ore words of one syllable; “HINKY 
PINKY,” two syllables; “HINK&ATY 
PINKETY,” three syliablee 


Example: Wily Insect (Hink Pink)—SLY FL’ 
1. Petticoat Tear (Hink Pink) 


OOOO OOO 


2. Lie Exchanger (Hinky Pinky) 


OOOO 
OOUUUUO 


3. Prettier Trapper (Hinky Pinkety) 
OOUOUUO 
OOUUOOUOO 
ANSWERS 


UZBVNSNI BIBivi C 
WiddVMS BIddGOHM ZF did dil$ ‘t 


Copyright 1951 Mirror Enterprises Syndicate 
HELP, MEN 15 
AUTO ELECTRICIAN 


Generator and Starter Man 


Wanted for large auto service 
garage Excellent salary and 
good hours. 


CALL MR. WOOD 
DE. 4800 


L. P. STEUART, 
AUTO 
LUBRICATION MAN 


(WHITE) 


INC. 


For large auto service department 
Good salary, hours and usual em- 
ployee benefits. 


CALL MR. RUSSELL 
DE. 4800 


L. P. STEUART, INC. 


1410 P Street N.W. 


(3) 


section 


AUTO MECHANIC 


Work in pleasant 
northwest, near Silver 
Spring. Good pay. plus com- 
mission. Hospita li zation 
plan, vacation with pay 
after one year. Experi- 
enced only. This may be 
what you are looking for. 


SEE MR. THOMAS 
SERVICE MANAGER 
10 A. M.-3 P. M. WKDAYS & SATS. 


| dealer has openings for 
NTAL | 


Swicegood, HO. | 


and | 
| experience: 


TANT BOOKKEEPER | 


| preferably 
| experience 
—=i ditions, 


to | 


| AD 


. .$3500 | 


| BARBER—Ist class. 
i st. nw. 48. 
| BARBER—$60 guarantee 


| BARBER—1738 Pen 


Bowman Motor Sales, Inc. 
7530 Georgia Ave. N. W. 


AUTO MECHANICS 


Washington's oldest Chevrolet 
2 experi- 
enced Auto mechanics. Top earnings 
for good men. Plenty of work; 5'2- 
day week. 
SEE MR. HAMILTON 
Barry-Pate Chevrolet 
1130 CONN. AVE. N.W. 


» ne i 


- AUTO MECHANICS _ 
FORD 


Here is a chance to connect with 
one of the fastest growing Ferd 
dealers in Northern Virginia. 
Straight salary; vacation with pay. 
hospitalization insurance: modern 
service + gaa m ily sober men 
need appiy Mr. Sutherland. 


ERWIN-FORD CO. 


FAIRFAX. VA. 


Auto Mechanics (2)| 


We think we have the best pay 
plan in the city. Taik with our 
present men, Pag see Mr. Stevens, 
service mana 


| BENN ING. ‘MOTORS, INC 
| 1600 Benning Rd. N.E. _ FPR. 9926. 
AUTO PAINTER'S 
HELPER 


TA. 2000 | 


We have an opening for Painter's | 


Must have some auto paint 
ae? week. 


LINK 


ADDI SON CHEVR OLET 


__ 24th St and Florida ave N . ae 


AUTO PARTS MAN 


We have an opening in our new 
stock room for a parts counterman, 
with General Motors parts 
working con- 


helper 


Pleas ean | 
5'o-day 
APPLY MR. *CARNIE 

himan Chevrolet, 


33d and M Sts. N.W. 
Phone & MI. _ 1646 


AUTO PARTS MAN | 
Chevrolet. Experience desirable. good 
working conditions. 5'e-day week 

to Mr. Spicer 
urisman Chevrolet, In 

610 H ST. NE 
BARBER—Steady employment. J. & 
J. Barber Shop, 1804 M st. nw. 
Apply 1323 E 


Inc. 


Sto 


on 
we 


ME. 7648 


and com- 
Avply 924 93 h nw 

ave. nw, . $60 
with camemntaaiaa 


mission or 70% 


guarantee 


BUS-STREET CAR OPERATORS 
AGES 21-55 


AVERAGE FARNIN 


GS AFTER QUALIFYING 


OVER $70 PER WEEK 


No Experience Needed—Paid While Learning 
Steady Work—Paid Vacations—Sick Leave 


CAPITAL TRANSIT CO. 


APPLY MONDAY THROUGH 
Sts. N.W. Take No. 80 Rosslyn Car 


Bh and M 


FRIDAY 


THOS. OWEN «@ SON, —— 
iss Southern Buildin 


TRUSTEES’ SALE OF VALUABLE 
TWO-STORY SEMIDETACHED 
BRICK DWELLING BEING 
KNOWN AS PREMISES NUM- 
ar 660 E STREET SOUTH- 

By virtue of a certain deed of trust 
duly recorded, in Liber No. 9230. Folio 
340 et sea.. of the land records of 
the District of Columbia. and at the 
request of the party secured thereby, 
the undersigned trustees will sell, at 
public auction in front of the prem- 


P. M.. the following-described land 
and premises. situate in the District 


being Lot 44 in uare 876 in the 


| subdivision made by Lemuel Gaddis. 
| as per 


plat recorded in the Office 
of the Surveyor for the District of 
Liber 33 at Folio 117. 


particulars 
be announced at time 
the purchase price above 
st to be paid in cash. A 
of $500.00 required. Con- 
recording. etc.. at pur- 
chaser's cost. Adjustments made as 
of date of sale. Terms to be com- 
plied with within thirty days, other- 
wise deposit forfeited and the p 
erty may be advertised ans reso 
at the discretion of the trustees. 


Etald Pao 


Aug.4.7.10.13.15 


STOCK MAN 


Raw Materials 


Are you experienced in the receiving, 


persing of ferrous and non-ferrous metals 


investicate this opportunity. 


This is a permanent job with 


company. 


lt you are this man, and really know raw materia 


us about yourself in your first 
confidential. i 


Write Box M-222, 


letter. 


stocking, and dis- 


: plastics; etc.? Then, 


a good salary, in an expanding 


tell 
replies will be held 


} 
4S, 


All 


Washington Post 


| 


HELP, MEN us 


BARBER—Steady. Salary and tom.: 
9-6:30. Air-con. 


_Alr- 320 Kennedy st. nw. 
BARBER—Steady job; sober only; no 
license req.; gd. pay; air-cond. shop. 
322 King st., Alex.. Va. AL. 1284 
BARBER—Colored: steady 65c | 
on $1.00. 1332 U st. nw. 
BOOTBLACK ‘Petworth Barber 
Shop, 845 Upshur st. nw. 


BARBER—Steady: 544 % days: $80 
guar. and comm. Also one for every 
Sat. 5417 Georgia ave. nw. RA. 9664. 


BARBER—First class: $65 guarantee 
and commission. 2035 Rhode Island 
ave. ne. 

BARBER—Reaular part time: 
D. C. license not needed: 5600 
Edmon ay ave., Bast Riverdale, Md. 
WA. 9577 

BARBER—600 guar. and on com- 
mission. 134] 19th St. 


~ BENDIX SERVICEMEN — 


Outside: no experience necessary; 
5-day week: g0o Pay: vacation. 
For furt pat information, call 

J PINO, LA. 6-5500 
MID- MID-ATLANTIC APPLIANCES, INC. 


~ BOOKKEEPER 


Experienced, some typing. 
open. Air denatitened office. 
tact Mr. Buck, JA. 5-6662 


pos. , 


or 


Salary 
Con- 
. § @& mM. 


to 6 PD. mM. 


CLERK-TYPIST, $50-$60 


Age 19 to 25: SE.: 5 “ar sah 
Clerk-typist: prnetee: » d. 
ry ow zoom clerk: you 4 
ATLAS AGCY., 1420 N. Y. _Ave. NW. 


CARPENTE RS—Apply 3658 Upton st. 
nw. or 7205 Longwood dr., Bethesda. 
ake Newhouse work. Call OR. 


HELP, MEN 
spotter and 


COMBINATION _ silk 

production man. Give detailed in- 

en and salary expected. Only 
long experience who can 

ferniah best of references need ap 

ply. S. Ray Barrett. 2123 Colonia) 

ave.. Norfolk, Va. 


| ary, 
} 


"_ DRAFTSMEN 


Have openings 
tronics drafting for 
perienced men. 5-day. 40- 
hour week. Good opportunity 
for experienced men. 


CALL —— 9000 


APPLY IN PER ‘SON 
1713 KALORAMA .RD. N.W., 


in 


DRAFTSMAN 


Mechanical, at least 2 years’ experi- 
ence, pleasant surroundings. Vaca- 
tion with pay. Call the Loftstand 
Co., Rockville 3933. Mr. Canaris. 
DRIVER—Retail | light delivery: base 
$40: opp. or advancement. 
Nearby Md. area. AP. 5500. 


DRIVERS (2) 


Must be experienced. Good sal- 
vacation with pay, bonus, sick 


HOMES OIL CO. 


6225 Blair Rd. N I 


DRIVER-SALESMAN 


Estab. laundry and dry cleaning 
route; excellent earnings, commission 
basis with guarantee: $50 salary 
during short training period. HUB 
LAUNDERERS, Eastern ave. at 37th 
St., Mount Rainier. Md 


ELECTRICIANS HEL PER— At least 1 
yr. experience. Apply rear 717 6th 
st. ne. 0395. 

For large air-conditioned office 
building. Must have previous experi- 
ence on air-conditioning and oil 
burner operation. Salary with 
vacation, or?) oma Ze other em- 


ployee ne Apply building 
| superintendent, "1625 Eye st. 


ENGINEER, Sth Grade 
(WHITE 
THE CARLYLE HOTEL 


500 N. CAPITOL ST. 


eave 


FLOOR SANDING MECHANICS—Ex- 
perienced, only steady wrok. Call be- 
tween Ja.m.and5p.m. WA. 8534. 


‘GAS STATION, mechanical positions 
hourly Mr. Bell, BOYD'S SERV- 
<r 700 12th, cor. G st. nw. NA. 
. 


GROCERY CLERK 
EXPERIENCE 


APPLY 
723 11TH ST. N.W. 


JANITOR, exper.; must know stoker 
operation; Southeast Wash.: 1-bed- 
rm. modern apt.: couple, no chil- 
dren. Call JO ~7417. 


CARPENTERS — Experienced only. 
34th and R sts. nw. see Mr. Wood. 


CHEF for private gag =F ve leave 
city; good checker: ho Miss 
Morgan at ae Fag C5 “SERVICE. 
1311 G st. _ nw. . 2117 


DESIGNERS 
DRAFTSMEN 


for work in Baltimore, or immediate 
Vicinity. in consulting engineering 
office. Design. layout, drafting and 
tracing. Positions open for ex- 
perienced men, recent graduates and 
drafting beginners. 
CIVIL—Designers for water supply, 
Sanitation. storm drainage, air- 
strip construction, roads. 
STRUCTURAL—Designers for build- 
ings and miscellaneous struc- 


tur 
MECHANICAL—Draftsmen for steam 
and steam distribution, 
nel plumbing. heating, ven- 
tilating and other building serv- 


ices 
ELECTRICAL—Draftsmen for power 
and lighting services. 
Apply by letter giving particulars 
about education and experience. 
Salary commensurate with ability. 


WHITMAN, REQUARDT 
AND ASSOCIATES 


1304 St. — Balti i 2, 
ocak 34 


~ DRAF TSMEN 


TRUCTURAL 

Concrete oie steel 

17 E 

iV. ** ed 
process equipment 
piower ete 

PIPING 
Exper. process., oil refinery, chemical] 
etc. 


o $7200 
PRESSURE VES 


Experienced boil ers, 
asitat ion, etc. .. 
SPECIF. OR ADMIN. ENGR. 


Qualified to pass on proper specifica- 
tions of process, 
ment used in process ind., to $7200 |} 
The above positions for drafts- 
men include 5 hours overtime per 
week on extended work-week basis, 
amounting to approx. 18% above 
base rate Out of town 

NO EMPLOYMENT FEE 
Employer will interview in 
offices August 15. Please contact us 
prior to that date for further details. 


SALES ENGINEER, 


Degree desirable but not essential. 
local. car allowance: start $4800 


JR. ACCOUNTANANT 
3 yrs” experience, degree: start $3000 
WALTER H. KESSLER 


Personnel Services. 612 Wash. Blidge. 
15th and N.Y. Ave. N.W ST. 9442 


Md. 


to $7200 


| Exper 
reirig 


Bg 
0 $7200 


SEI 
ae 


stor ‘age tank S, 


our | 


JANITOR 


Colored for apartment house. 
Must be experienced and have know!l- 
stoker. Apply Resident 
ig! WISCONSIN AVE. 
S 9 TO 12 NOON 
ister today with Mr. Bell at BOYD’ 
700 12th, corner G st. NA. 2340. 
LABORERS colored}, report | to Mr. 
Sali, warehouse office. Hechinger 
Co.. 15th and sts. né., between 
8 and 9 a. m. 


‘HOTEL POSITIONS—All kinds. Reg- 
Ss 


MACHINISTS 


FIRST & SECOND CLASS 
GOOD PAY 


ERCO 


ENGINEERING & RESEARCH 
CORP. 


Riverdale, Md. WA, 4444 


MAIL CLERK 


Permanent position for 
a young man with ambi- 
tion. Experience not nec- 
essary. Excellent chance 
for advancement; 5-day 
week; pleasant working 
conditions. 


APPLY 


4702 14th St. N.W. 


' 
} 


' 


| ganization. 


| 


national or- 
Knowledge 


office of 
Permanent 


In small 


| of typing and bookkeeping essential. 
4803. 


mechanical equip- | 


, 
| 
| 


NA. 


MEN 


Sell famous insecticide. We train 
you. High commission paid daily. No 
discrimination. E. 8239. 


MAN UNDER 40 


PAINTERS 


Steady work, apply 2310 Rhode 
Island ave., N.E.. 7:30 a. m. 


PBX SWITCHBOARD 
OPERATOR AND TYPIST 


Young Man, by lumber and mill- 
work co. in Bethesda. Experience 
not required. Salary $55 per week. 
Phone Mr. Vane. _ Wl 6300. 


PLUMBERS 


needed for new construction, 
remodeling. Apply 84li 2d 
Silver Spririg, Md. ee 
PLUMBERS, ist class mechanics, for | 
jobbing and oe ey : be yt ys 

7:30 and 9:30 a. m. or ‘a 
1011 East Capitol st. Albert *: Ed: | 


Meee. ae 


Washington's oldest chev rolet | 
dealer has an opening for a young, 

energetic man to do general work 
around pervice department: must 
have D. =< driver's pee t 

MR HAMIL 


BARRY- PATE "MOT TOR CO. 


1130 CONNECTICUT AVE. NW. 


PRESSER 
Experienced on silks and woolen, 
Part time. good pay. Apply Fair- 
mont Cleaners. 1506 You st. 


and | 
ave., 


Real Estate Salesmen 
Splendid r 

for men with 

perience, to sell 2 

old property. 

nished. Must hav 

Apply in person. 

Chesapeake Realty Corp. 


1338 Eye St. N.W. 


~~ ee LL TRI 


ROOM CLERK 


Must be experienced on fast 
desk Able -to urnish good 
references from past employers. 


Apply Personnel Office 


AMBASSADOR 
reheat 


1404 K ST. N 


b | 


REPRESENTATIVE 


2 men to be employed at once 
to earn $5000 or better for 
representing our nationally 
known publishing firm in the 
metropolitan area. Qualifica- 
tions 
1—Neat appearance. 
2—Ahbility to deal 
well-to- do eo ople. 
3—Native intelligence. 
4—Hard worker. 
5—Car helpful 
SEE MR Wine Bhp 
(OOM 639, WARNER BL 
13TH 0 


AND E ST. N.W. 9.1 


with 


ne 
LA. 


, 
aa 
es 


PR 
. 
a 14 
A avian 


EAL ESTATE SALESMEN 
Pull or part time. We will train 
you if willing to work. ST. 3520 


SALESMEN (2) 


We want 2 qualified salesmen to 
represent us on a salary-commission 
basis. in the Washington market: 
our line has national distribution 
and is heavily advertised in the 
District: car necessary. Call OL. 
5588 for appointment. 


Statistica 


ADVERTISING 
RESEARCH ASST. 


With imagination and initiative, 
| eptitude essential. Knowle 
Pevernment information 
typing ability valuable. 
in own handwriting giving 
age, experience, and salary require- 
ments. 


BOX 
WASHINGTON POST 
De 


BOOKKEEPER 


ariences. some typing. 
Air conditioned —. 
in ek, JA. 5-6662 


Salary 
Con” 


assistant, experi- 
5 day week, air cond. office. 
al. $215 per mo. 2111 E St. N.W., 


BUSINESS OFFICE 
SERVICE 


REPRESENTATIVE 


‘THE 
*TELEPHONE 
COMPANY 


OFFERS 
Unusual! Opportunities 
FOR 
The Right Girl 
in Public Contact Work 


Good Salary 

—Regular Increases 

w~SDay Week 

— Interesting, 
Responsible Work 

Pension, Sick 
Benetits 

—Other Advantages 


CHEERFUL, FRIENDLY 
ATMOSPHERE 


MANY CHANCES 
TO ADVANCE 


LET US TELL YOU 
MORE ABOUT IT 


EMPLOYMENT OFFICE 
725 13th St. N.W. 


OPEN 


SERVICE STATION 
SALESMEN 


SUN OIL COMPANY 


4940 CONN. AVE. 


SERVICE STATION 
SHIFT MANAGER 


$65 per week, | commission 
Experienced hones and reliabie 
Local ref erences necessary 

‘ ent 


~ rec 


7 eo r™m* 
: 4 
WILLOUGH BY Ls 


244 ‘Wisconsin | “Ave. 


SHEET METAL 
FABRICATORS 
AND 
MACHINISTS 


Experienced in radio chas- 
Sis, panel and cabinet work. 
Permanent position for men 
who are able to do a first- 
class job. > 


APPLY 
NATIONAL 


MESSENGER BOY 


To perform general office duties 
in aviation communication 
he i? MR BOYLE position. 

BOYLES, ME. 3600. 
WATTOKAnEY KNOWN financia! 
institution offers an opportunity for 
the right man to earn a substantial 
current income whilk training for 
advancement. Qur expansion pro- 
gram is limited enly by our need 
for qualified personnel. If such a 
proposition appeals to you why not 
stop in for an interview at Suite 
303. Kass Bidg.. 711 14th st. nw. 


MECHANICS 


OR 
MEN MECHANICALLY INCLINED 
MUST HAVE D. C. DRIVER'S PERMIT 


Good hours and salary 
plus excellent working conditions 


APPLY AT ONCE! 


WASHINGTON COAL CO. 


1421 NORTH CAPITOL ST. 


YOUNG MEN 


We are looking for several young, am- 


bitious men, who wish to secure a permanent 


job with a future... No experience necessary 


High school education is required 


Veterans given preference. 


APPLY IN PERSON 
MONDAY-FRIDAY, 9 A.M.-3 P.M. 


MELPAR, Inc. 


52 SWANN AVE., ALEXANDRIA, VA. 


SALESMAN-ACT NOW 


The selling profession 


has always made 


the most money! 


? } ? } } . fy ‘ 
WEATHERGUARD SALESMEN have always been in the $8,000 to 


$10,000 a year bracket. 


SEE ‘FOR 


COT 
YOURSELF 


We will teach you how and provide leads from newspaper, radio, 


WEATHERGUARD HAS 


and television. 


Pe 


PRODUCT FOR 


IMMEDIATE DELIVERY ., 


ALSCO, the worlds 


Se}! 
-#F' 


largest 


selling aluminum ‘ene win- 


dows and doors, plus the top line in storm window coverage of 


cosmos wihdows. 
Subst anti al 
euiie Car help 


drawina account against earnings to 


those men who 


SPEND THAT 15 MINUTES THAT 
MAY BETTER YOUR ENTIRE WAY OF LIFE! 


Apply to MR. BRUNING 
1321 14th St. N.W. 


WEATHERGUARD CORPORATION 


; 


) 
= 


firm. | 


' nr 
ADDI 


ELECTRONICS LABORATORIES 
1713 Kalorama Rd. N.W. 


TEACHERS—Adams Teachers Agcy.. 
| Colorado Bg., 14th & GRE. 3938. 


TYPIST 


Age 18-35, type at least 50 w.p.m. 
Accuracy essential, position with ex- 
panding organization extending all 
modern employe benefits Excellent 
salary for qualified person. Call 
ME. 6471. 


TV TECHNICIANS 


2 experienced 
cians for outside 
ice. Car necessary. Sal- 
ary commensurate with 
experience. Liberal com: 
pany benefits, paid vaca- 
tion, etc. 


SEE MR. M R 


MUNTZ TV 


$16 8th St, S.E. 


‘ern nNie 


Serve 


777 ] Tt 
~ Loloie 


UNION BRICKLAYERS 
WANTED 


for industrial buildings, hospitals. 
schools, apt. houses, etc.: 22 jobs 
under construction: 5 ry and out- 
side aE $3.50 per ; NC. 


LIEB BROS., 1 
7 Sry . 


1100 McCarter Hwv., Fo 
Call Mitchell 3-7420, 


MEN (WHITE) (3) 
Shipping Clerks and Stock Men 
40- ae 5- aes 46 WEEK 
APPLY aC ANAGER 


Garrison Toy & Nove 
1215 E St. N.W 


lty Co. 


YOUNG MAN 


To learn electrical 


service 
Colonial Ice Cream Co. 
S Capit 0] & E St. S.E. 


YOUNG MAN or  DOY po to work 
in an auto body shop. Ask for Mr. 
Lapkoff. Apply in person, 2035 Geor- 
gia ave. nw 


"PART-TIME WORK 


Especially suitable for Govt. 
ployes to supplement income 
about $45 per week Apply in 
son, 7 


ern Bidg., 15th and H sts. nw 


A-1 SECRETARY . Start, "$325 | 
Mail room clerk, young man. 
Shipping clerk start, — wk 
Credit clerk. pref 
Messenger. knowledge ty 
Bookkeeper. some exper 


em- 
Earn 
per- 


open 
Accountant start 
Hundreds of others DAILY. 
yrs. See Miss Gs ay, or Miss slen. 
NA, 2116 or NA 
PERSONNEL. ‘SERVICE 
131 


Epiphany Ch 
HELP, WOMEN 16 


Accounting Clerk 


If you are looking for an in- 
teresting position with security, 
pleasant warns conditions, 
congenial asso 
air - con ditioned 
equipment. Insurance and hos- 
pitalization plan. leave and good 
salary. and have knowledge of 
typing. Then 


SEE MR. KACKLEY 
Hill & Sanders, Inc. 


1114 VERMONT AVE. N.W., 


al a 

ING MAC OPERA? TOR 
Young lady ag salés audit depar' rt. 
ment: must have experience wits 
machine operation and figures: per- 
manent position. opportunity 
advancement air-conditioned of- 
fice company benefits include group 
insurance, free hospitalization. pe: d 
vacations “and 6% paid holidays. 
ok leave. , Te. Me Phone AT 
400 for ORNGER : 
100 HEC GER COMPANY 
oT AND H STS. N.E. 


GOOD PLACE TO SHOP 
rt GOOD PLACE TO WORE 


HINE 


sain | Monday, 830 A. M.-8 P. M. 
Tuesday Through Friday, 
8:30 A. M. to 5 P. M. 
Saturday, 9 A. M. to 5 P. M. 


The Chesapeake 
& Potomac 
Telephone Company 


CASHIER 


For front office of 
commercial hotel. 
oughly experienced 
NCR 2000 machine. Good 
starting salary with nu- 
employe benefits. 


large 
Thor- 
on 


: merous 


APPLY 
PERSONNEL OFFICE 


~ |Ambassador Hotel 


1404 EK 8ST. N.W. 


CLERICAL 
(SILVER SPRING AREA) 


Internatio nel firm open- 
ing office in Silver Sprin« 
Experience. helpful, but 
not necessary. Permanent 
position. Liberal employe 
its; paid vacation; 

week; excellent 
chance for advancement. 


FOR INTERVIEW 
APPLY IN PERSON 


ren ,arrr Seal aT Tar 
4702 Se AV. WV 


' 
atiai Di. 


. 
Ns ; 
pene: 


- 
=~ 


aay 


; 
| 


| plant 


cleaning 
personal- 
good Sale 
working cone 
Rinaldi, NA, 


CLERK—Experienced. for 
must have pleasant 
ity Permanent position. 
ary and pleasant 

ditions. Ask for Myr. 


0454 aa 
CLERK 
Por Park-way Cleaners and Dyers. 
Ne t at Che evy Chase 
pret. Apply 


80002 Conn ave. 
CLERK 
18 to 30 yrs.: general office duties 


in accounting division of seronautie« 
cal firm. Call Mr. Boyle, ME. 3600. 


CLERKS 


(ARLINGTON) 


ONE FULL TIME 


and Phone Work. 


For Clerical 


Permanent position, Good 
starting salary with excel- 
chance for advance- 
ment in America’s fastest 
growing industry. 


} 
sent 


INTERVIEWS 
9:30 A. M.-10 P. M. 
SEE MR. JAKIMIER 


MUNTZ TV 


3143 N. WASHINGTON BLVD. 
ARLINGTON, VIRGINIA 


refrigeration | 


CLERK-TYPIST 
Claim Department. large casualty 
insurance company. Permanent posi- 
tion. S-day week. 
APPLY IN PERSON 


The Home Indemnity Co. 


1522 K ST. N.W. 


~ CLERK-TYPIST 


Excellent opportunity in life in- 


j Accuracy 


Wednesday. 417 South | Economical cafeteria 
Pp. m ~. i * 


surance company. ping speed not 
essential. 5-day. oe eur week. 
scilities, Ap- 


| ply om 300. 816 14th st. nW.. 
| between 9 3. m. and D. m. 


~ CLERK-TYPISTS 


more essential than 


speed. permanent positions with na 


| With oppo! 


tional aut omobi! e finance compan’ 
for good future: 
many employe 


Universal CI T Credit Corp. 


518 Standard & Bidg 
2961 Constitution Ave. NW 


CLERK-TYPIST 


Our direct mail promotion 
department has anh opening 
for a person who can rrandle 
details and likes to be re- 
sponsible for a definite job. 
You will share in our liberal 
employe benefit plans while 
learning this interesting field 
of work and building to & 
sound future. Plessant air- 
condi tioned surroundings. 
Call 8:30-4. ss ~ seams 
DI. 2915, ext. 


v 


CLERK-TYPIST 
(SILVER SPRING AREA) 


International firm open- 
ing office in Silver Spring. 
Permanent position; 5-day 
week, paid vacation; lib- 
eral family hospital bene 
fits. Excellent chance for 
advancement. For inter- 
view 


Apply 
4702 14th Street N.W. 


CONTINUED ON FOLLOWING PAGE 


ATELP, WOMEN 


Continued From P 


CLERK-TYPISTS TO $60 


Interesting Position 
— * t0 o” s880 


° tyDE) oon stone eee 330 
hers ... to $75 
tenographers "40" $850 

borator technician . wer , 
"MA -D H 


on Wee as in a MW 
ooawar g.. ° P 
Wome 5979 oF RE. 0286. 


, Comptometer Operators 
Experi operators to wo 
in inninocera ottice 4 in Northeast 
on 


Fey according to abili 
Pleasant working co 
d vacations 
roup insurance 


ck benefits 
Siren employe benefite 


tions 


SAFEWAY STORES, Ine. 


1845 4th Street N.E. 
Or 1404 M St. N.W. 


CREDIT 
INVESTIGATOR 


rge finance company, in Silver 
eapestencs preferred 
en working 
arting salary. 


tion Go 
Call Mr. Britt, Sisco. $400 for appt. 


COLORED } BEAUTICIANS (2), ), and 
- a rent, full or part time. 


EL EES OS See 
‘DIETITIAN, full maintenance and 
salary. — Reed, 1311 G st. nw. 


DRAFTSWOMAN 


Mechanical, at least 2 years ex- 
perience, pleasant surroundings, va- 
cation with pay. Call the Lofstrand 
Co., Rockville 3933, Mr. Canaris. 


FILE CLERK 


h school graduate, 17 to 23, 
work experience preferred. 
opportunity for advancement. 
Convenient location, air conditioned 
office. 5-day week. 8 to 4:30. Please 
callt for appt. Miss Hopkins, | ST. 4611. 


~ KITCHEN MANAGER — 


For large guest house. Must have 
experience in food preparation, buy- 
ing —_, supervision of help. Hours 
1} to m.; Sunday off. HU. 3624. 


MARRIED WOMAN 
Over 25. pleasing personality who 
meeds to add $45 $75. per week to 
family income in dignified type of 
work locally. Flexible working hours. 
Permanent position. Car essential. 
For interview. phone 5-0790 be- 
tween 9 and 11 a. m. Ask for Mr. 

Tavenner. 


NURSE, R.N. 
For medical clinic; per 
year: 40-hour week; 542 days; leave 
provisions; medical coverage. Call 
EX 0007. 


H 
som 


» 


OFFICE CLERICAL 


Girls with high school 
education, 18-30 years of 
age for general] office work. 
Group insurance, paid vaca- 
tion and other emplovee 
benefits: 5-day, 40-hour wk. 


APPLY 
SAFEWAY STORES, INC. 


1845 4th St. N.E. 
Or 1404 M St. N.W. 


~ Practical Nurses (White) 


8-hour duty. good salary and 
main sepenes. Apply 3720 Upton 
st. 


PBX SWITCHBOARD 
OPERATOR AND TYPIST 


Young lady. by lumber and mill- 
work co. in Bethesda. Experience 
mot required. Salary . per week. 
Phone Mr. Vane. WI. 


ee “OPERATOR 


Must be able to type: for national 
automobile finance company: per- 
manent position with good future 

manhy employe benefits. 


Universal CIT Credit Corp. 


518 Standard Oil Bldg. 
eet Constitution Ave. N , eas 


~~" PBX OPERATORS 
(WHITE) 
Needed at laree apt. development 
4p Arlington. Va. Please call 


oe 2 eee 
~~ PHYSICAL THERAPIST 
cerns oe conan” pears pre: 


visions, pleasant 
working conditions. EX. 0007. 


Call 


HELP, WOMEN 16 
oan ee 


Pl te hhh 
PBX-RECEPTIONIS 
course, typing included, Bu sy board; 
ad ay od Job assist- 


America ness School, 
1319 F st, nw. NA. Feet 


py SA gg hey course, 

Excel. positions: oldest, 
schoo brds.: 
oOo 


wks. 
rgest 
new 
L, 700 


tees i Monday. "BOYD scx 
SALESLADIES 


— FOR — 


HOSIERY & BAG 
DEPARTMENT 


EXPERIENCED 


Permanent position with good 
salary. Many employee benefits. 


APPLY 


Hahn Shoe Stores 


8601 Georgia Ave. 
Silver Spring, Md. 


1348 G St. N.W. 
3113 14th St. N.W. 


RESIDENT ig for boys’ board- 
ing school: 
salary, 
quarters, 
non B. Kel 
St. James, 


St. ase School, 


SALESWOMEN 

Experienced only, for large chil- 
dren's apparel store in Arlington. 
is-cane. Steady position, and chance 
for advancement. Better than 
age salary and commission to 
fied person. Jerry’s Shirlington 
ping Center. Call TE. 7000. 


SECY.—$300 


Prominent sturdan central down- 


town. No § 
ADMIN. SECY. 


27 to 34 yrs. 
typing. Will 
prents. ill have 
direct oll M with professional peo- 
ple: oppt. in progressive org. for 
young woman to advance to execu- 
tive level. Salary to Et $3000. 


DMIN. CLERK 


In publication office, handle own 
correspondence: average typing. Will 
have direct public contact. No Sats. 
30 to 45 REC Start $50. 


EPT $55 


Work os “s ensinesrs: good typ- 
ing. No Sats. Und 


FIELDS AGCY., EX. 2008 


720 Kass Bidg., 711 14th St. N.W. 


Some nies indy 
Average paerenane. 


supervise to 5 


SECRET ARIES—TO $4,000 
SELECT POSITIONS IN PUBLIC 
RELATIONS, CAPITOL HILL. L 
EDUCATIO EMBASSIES 
COMMERGT AL OFFICES. | 


ANNETTE 
230 weeswars pas. ae Aa N.W. 


SECRETARY-STENOG. 


Bright personable young lady 
under 30, permanent position, good 
con png 5-day, 35-hr. 

mee necessary. Apply 

709 Woodward Bidg., 733 15th st. nw. 


SECY., 


Ave. NW. Room 


mee —STENOS.—TYPISTS 

A RUT? TIR YOUR 
PRESENT JOB? HOW ABOUT A 
C WE HAVE INTEREST- 
ING AND EXC. ee IN THE 
FIELDS OF EMBASSIES, AVIATION 
RESEARCH TRADE ASSOC. LAW, 
INSURANCE, ENGINEERING. MPFG., 
ALL 5-DAY WK. SOME SALARIES 
ow | a." TOP SALARIES FOR 


LLOYD'S EMPL. SERVICE 
1420 N. Y. Ave. Room 809. ST. 2207 


25-30 years, attractive. for 
prominent executive; air cond.; plenty 
of overtime at time and half: expe- 
rienced on elec. sypemstter base, 
¢ : Ave. NW. Rm. 809. ST. 2207 

$275. LLYODS EMPL. sevice “1420 
‘SECY.., aviation; exp. pf.: © $70 
LLOYDS EMPL : SERVICE, {330 RY. 


SILK “FINISHER | 


Must be experienced. Good pay 
day week. Holidays with pay. 
port ready for work. 
HUB LAUNDERERS 
Eastern Ave. at 37th St. 
WA. 1100 


- =e! i. 


S. 
Re- 


STENOGRAPHER-TYPIS) 
perience not coqeneiat, 
4 week, vacation. 


— bBEX- 
7'e-hr., 5- 
Peterson 


Mr. 
1180 Mutual 'Pire Ins. Co., 130 of 
i rae 


BOOKKEEPERS 


Experience preferred, but not necessary. 


ON THE JOB TRAINING 


Pleasant working conditions; 


liberal company benefits. 


APPLY MR. MARTIN 


SUBURBAN 


TRUST CO. 


SILVER SPRING, MD. 


SECRETARY—ALSO 
A RECEPTIONIST 


One of the leading construction companies in the area seeks the 
gervices of 2 neat appearing young ladies who are looking for 
permanent positions with excellent opportunities for advancement. 


Pleasant working conditions; 


air-conditioned office; congenial as- 


sociates, Good starting salary with rapid increases. 


QUALIFICATIONS: MUST BE ADAPTABLE, 
AND HAVE PLEASANT PERROMALITED 


APPLY TO MR. GEE, PERSONNEL OFFICE, SUITE 5 


THE GELMAN CONSTRUCTION CO. 
2730 WISCONSIN AVE. N.W. 


Bookkeeping Machine Opr. 


20 to 35 for 


Accounts Receivable Department 
Typing essential 
Many employee benefits 
Call Mrs. Shelton for Appointment 


CHAS. G. STOTT CO. 


1310 New York Ave. N.W. 


NA. 418] 


GIRLS 


BEFORE YOU TAKE ANY JOB 
INVESTIGATE 


TELEPHONE WORK 


—Good pay, right from the start 


—Frequent raises 


—Friendly folks to work with 
—Pleasant working conditions 
—No experience needed 


Vacation with pay 


=Earn while you learn . 
Plenty of opportunities for advancement in 
really important work. 


A CAREER WITH A FUTURE 


Apply Employment Office 
—- 725: 13th St. NW. 


OPEN MONDAY, 8:30 
* TUESDAY THROUGH FRIDAY, 8: 
SATURD 


A M—8 P. M 
30 A. M.—5 P. M. 


AY OA. M—OP. Mm 


THE CHESAPEAKE AND 
POTOMAC TELEPHONE CO. 


HELP, WOMEN 
STENOGRAPHER 


8-35. G typist and able to 
take average dictation, as secretary 
to manager of large fire and casualty 
insurance branch office. Insurance 
claim experience helpful, but not 
necessary. 37%2-hour week. Apply Mr. 
Shannon, 812 ‘Woodward Bidg. 


STENOGRAPHER 


General, major oil company, 5-day 
week, air-conditioned office. Excel- 
lent opportunity for advancement. 
Call NA. 5188 for for appointment. 


STENO.-CLERK — Small insurance 
office; 5-day week; $190 to start: 
h italization. Variety in work; 
under 35. DI. 2700. 


TEACHERS—Adams Teachers Agcy., 
Colorado Bidg., 14th & G. RE. 3938. 


TYPIST-RECEPTIONIST 


For new fast-growing office con- 
- pleasant working 
enial 
speed, 
5-day, 40-hours. ME. 5123 


TYPIST 


Age 18-35: type at least 50 wpm.: 
accuracy essentia): position with ex- 
panding organization extending all 
modern employe benefits: excellent 
salary for qualified person. Call 


ME. 6471 
TYPIST 


erd. Pleasast knowledge of switch- 
post Pleasant working conditions, 
ree @e and hos- 


SHIRLINGTON 
MOTOR CO. 


2790 SO. ARLINGTON MILLS DR. 
ARLINGTON, VA. OV. 4000 


TYPIST 


With some experience in Dictaphone 
or Ediphone transcription. Interest- 
ing work in convenient location. 
conditioned offices. 


atmosphere. 
wpm, 


4:30. Please call for appt. Mrs. 
Terry. ST. 4600. 


1951, King Features Syndicate, Inc 


, World mghts reserved. 


“One thing you gotta give her credit for ..«.« she’s. 


versatile! 


p?? 


ROOMS, FURNISHED 34 


CHILD CARE 41A 


TYPIST 


Watts, for full-time typ- 
letters, envelopes, 

pn Py HE, "abnhanant posi- 
tion in air-conditioned. of- 
free. 5-day. 40-hour week. 


Call Personnel Office 
HO. 5805 


TYPIST 
NEWS MAGAZINE 


A recent high school graduate, 


n 
our executive offices exremely 
re grew go uties are va- 

conditions are 


TYPIST-CLERK 


Permanent position | for 
experienced typist. Group 
Insurance, paid vacation 
and other employe benefits. 
5-day, 40-hour week. 


SAFEWAY STORES, INC. 


1845 4th St. NE 
Or 1404 M 8t. NW. 


TYPIST-recept., pub. rel. .... $2860 
Typist-PBX receptionist seo see 
Typist, emba ; 
Bookkeeper, sxpericheed’ 
File clerk. hsg. 
Telephone receptionist, N.E. er 
Slow typist-clerk. research .... 
See Miss Stanley. college-trained 
specialist in personnel guidance. 
An eo EM Seat eaee SERV, 
1319 F ST. N.W. NA. 4142. 


TYPIST CLERK 


Wanted for engineering 
office. Only fast and ac- 
curate typist considered. 5- 
d r week. Good 

capertaneed 


for 
CALL HUDSON 5000 


or 


APPLY IN PERSON 
1713 KALORAMA RD. N.W. 


WAITRESS—Experienced. Apply Mun 
yune _ pestaurent, 1317 Rhode Island 


BILTMORE ST. NW., 1953—Comf, 
furn. room; conv. tramsp.; reas. 


BRIGHTWOOD, 5504 7th St. N.W 
Lee: dble. rm. in apt.; ident for 3 
persons: kit. privils. TU 


CAIRO HOTEL 


1615 st. nw.—Special weekly 
rates, aneie from $14,per week up; 
double from $21 week up; spacious 
rooms. 

APPLY TO MGR. ‘POR MO. RATES 


CATHEDRAL AVE., nr. Conn. and 
Wardman Park. Nicely furn. rm., Ige. 
closet, semipvt. bath; lovely pvt. 
home; man; $40. CO. 5486 


CHASTLETON HOTEL 
l6th.and R Sts. N.W. 


Special weekly rates: sgle. and dble. 
Tms., all with pvt. baths. DU. 1000. 


‘CLEVELAND PK.—Cheerful frt. 
newly dec.;: nr. bus, shops: must se 
refined person. OR. 6572 bef. 2 p. m. 
RD. NW., 1763 — Man; 
cor. studio: high ceil., cross ven., ad). 
bath, in lge. apt.; desk and phone; 
conv. , 15 min. town. C CO. 2955. 


ee 


CONN. & S., 1910 § ST. _—Single or 
double. Mt. Pleasant car or L-4 and 
L-2 bus transportation. 


‘CONN. AVE. VIC.—Large studio rm. 


rm., 


———_ 


COLUMBIA 


for 2 girls: lay mo. 1838 Conn. ave. 
_ Apt. 21. See bet. 7 and 9 p. m. 
“VIC.—Newly dec- 
orated single and double rooms; 
privileges; reasonable. 7 
1, front, 
Sele rms.: $1 7.50 semimo.; ev 
¥F N.W., 2147—Sm. sgle. >. studio rm.; 
0. 
H NW., 2000—Apt. 9. Near Govt. 
bldgs.. rm. nx. bath: man. EX. 5551. 
rm. and sun parlor; SB > omy pvt. 
home; bus at door, 15 min. Rs st. 
bedrm., single or double. DL 0537 
1224, downtown— 


ae CIRCLE swly dec- 
HO. _ 6227. 
EYE " Sf. . NW., 1723—Clean, 
7 elev. 
relria. radio or TV: EX. 0653. 
KANSAS AVE. 909—Share 
MASS. AVE. N.W.. 


Clean. comf. single room; $7 wk 
MT. PLEASANT VIC.—Attractive 
rooms; run. water in rms.; home 
privis.; men only. NO. 0430, aft. 6. 
N.W.., aps . Pleasant carline—Clean, 
lge. twin bedrm.; also sgle. room; 
pome atmosphere. HO. 7515. 

H. AVE. NW., 1308—Clean, single 
oeene: $20 to $32.50 month. 
NST . NW... 2140—Room: girl: bkfst. 
priv.: $10 wk. _EX. 1440, ME. 8987. _ 
N.E.—Large room for 1 or men; 
some privileges. LA. 6-6182. 
OGLETHORPE ST. NE., - 517—Bright, 
airy rm. - pvt. adult home; gentle- 
man. RA. 8289 aft. 6. 


QUE ST. NW.. — 435i--Newly deco- 
rated single rm.. next bath; $30 mo. 
QUINCY ST. NW., 1226—Two adjoin- 
ing bedrms.. near bath: pvt. home 
two-way transp. RA. 4460 after 5. 
SILVER - §$PRING—Cool 

bedroom, private bath: 


. 9 


a 


well- furn. 
to transp.: $12 


convenient 
SLigo 81 

VARNU M ST. NW.. 

semipriv. bath: pvt. 


. 1503—Single rm., 
home: conv. to 
transp.: $30 month. <fa. 6788. 


WARDMAN PK. VIC.—Sgzle. & dbls.: 
newly decor.: bik. bus. NO, 1747. 


~ WATTRESSES 
(White), experienced 


Earle Restaurant, Inc. 
eee ao and E Sts. N.W. 


~ WAITRESSES (2) _ 


White, neat, day or night work, 
salary $20. 


Coffee Royal Restaurant 


231 No. Capitol 8! 


— 


“WOMAN UNDER 40 


In small office of national or- 
ganization Permanent cnowledge 
of typing and bookkeeping essential. 
NA. 4803. 


ATLAS AGCY. N EEDS 


Secy.-steno., mfg. oy shee 

Typist, trade asso ° 

Steno.. puBlic selatione ree 

Research —? assoc. . 

Asst. bkkp n.e., 

pErcvere eile. A 
BX typist, 5 days 

Rem- Rand tab., 

eg he typist, co «soe 
MANY OTHERS, “MOSTLY 5-D. WK. 
1420 N. Y¥ VE. . W., RM. 506 


5 days 
le 


show ers; 


12TH ST. N.W.., 


1121—Clean large 
running water, maid 
service; _$7 and $8 week. aa 9676. 
13TH ST. N.W., 3211—Cool. conv., 
large front rm.. $10 week. Cant after 
5 Dp. m.., 594 

A BLOCK — 7con BLAIR HOUSE— 
Single and double: younc men: $87 
week. 1815 H st. nw. RE. 9543. _ 
HOTEL HAWTHORNE (2124 G Bt. 
N.W.)—Single. double rooms, all wit 
ae aaa 


single rooms, 


run alan water: plenty 
reasonable rent 4027 


PRINCE KARL HOTEL 
AIR CONDITIONED 
1901 K ST. N.W.. RIGHT DWNTWN. 
Newly decor., twin bedrms.; also 
s. Phone. 24-hour switchboard. 
Reasonable rates, EX. 7725. 


CARLYLE HOTEL 


500 NORTH CAPITOL ST. 
Special wkly. rates; boautiuiy. ap- 
pointed sgle. & dble. rms EX. 7670. 


REFINED COU NTRY ’ HOME, = mi. 
from Bladénsburs a. m. i.; bkfst. 
opt.: empl. man Road Bowie 3402. 

Ww ARDMAN PARK VIC. —Clean. at- 
tractive rooms for girls, single or 
double: home privile seS MI. 6834 


£100 SS ONTHLY ar “wearing lovely 
dresses given to you as bonu 
show fashion frocks to your friend: 
No canvassing. investment or expr 
ence necessary Pashion Frocks, 
Dept. H. 2828, Cincinnati. 


Ohio. 
HELP, MEN & WOMEN 


GROCERY CHECKER 
EXPERIENCED 


17 


APPLY 
723 11TH ST. N.W. 


TYPISTS (2) 

Old established firm. Hospital 
benefits. 40-hour week. Apply be- 
tween 9-4 peeheay heovee Friday. 
sien 


1éth § 
HELP, DOMESTIC 18 


ust | 
| COLORE D—Fre 
Tr@iae 


| ; 
i privile: 


days ae ¢ 7840 eveni —S 


bedroom: 
home 


twin 
or cple.; 


suitable 2 


RA 29 Pe 
—1831 Kal ora ma ra nw rooms 
for married couples or 2 $&i ngle girls 
Kit _laundry privileges. CO. 1. 49 49. 
COL. —M st. nw., nice sleeping | rm. 
$20 mo MI 4851. 


conven. leona : 
COL.—N.W., empl. sgle . man, woman 
or cple.; good trans.; reas. DU. 8945. 
COL.. 1421 Belmont NW.—Dbdle. rm.; 
couple; near_ carline. NO. 2037. 


COL.—Front | twin bedrm.:; 2 empl. 
girls; pvt. home; car line. "AD. 8729 


COL.. 65 R ST. N.W.—2 adj. rooms, 
for or 2 Will fara to suit 
desirable tenant. LI. 76 


COLORED, 42d St. NE.., ee pe 
room for refined couple or man; 
privileges; reasonable. 22. 


eee — 


COL., 1445 Florida Ave. 
nicely furn. rms. for quiet, 
men; privs.; ae a DE. 8 


COL. 


N.W.— 
empl. 
370. 


ARL.—Day care, children, 3-10 yrs.; 
fenced yd.; hot ‘meals; planned pro- 
gram. JA. 5-7257. 


TOTY’S NURSERY — Fenced play- 
ground; outdoor activities. ~~ 
and delivery service. FA. 
24-HR. CARE Mon ~— Fri. f 

infant pre-school child: in home; 
fenced yard: by mother. LO. 5-3256. 


COL., Mildred’s Day Nursery—Spa- 
HOU DIATE. grounds: trained nurse 
ance , . 4-742). 


APTS., FURN. or UNFURN. 45 


| WE HAVE APTS.. HOUSES. 
ETS: . 


815 KING ST.., ALEX.. VA. 6 DA AYS. 


APARTMENTS, FURNISHED 46 


ARLINGTON—Bedrm., comb. living 
room and kitchen; conv. Pentagon; 
semiprivate bath; $75 59-7006. 


ees 


CAPITOL HILL—Liv. 
den, kit, aah odaite: 
incl. LI. . 3-300 
COLLEGE | PARK 
comb. and kit. Priv. 
Sh. bth. with own’: 


. bedrm.. 
$125, util: 


rm, and bdrm. 
ent. Utils. incl. 
1. With own'r. $45 mo. TO. 6158. 
DUPONT CIRCLE AREA—2-rm. apt., 
ft. bath, 120” Yass style, complete 
fireplace, front windows, 
electric washer; *319 and $15 wk. 
Back yard for 


CHILDREN 


1331 21st St. N.W. DE. 9601. 


GEORGETOWN — Basement apt., 
separate entrance. pine-paneled liv- 
ing ~ 8 A fireplace, 

kitchen droom, full 
$125 ed : “$130 for 2. 
HO. 0253. 


l-year lease. 


‘GENTLEMAN—Nicely furn. bedrm., 
liv. rm., bath; nr. Welter sneed and 
16th | st. bus. $95. RA 

MT. | PLEASANT—1629 Nevins st. 
nw.; studio apt., kit. and shower: 
priv., quiet: $75 to responsible per- 
son; — furnished: after 6 p. m., 
HO. 436 

TAKOMA’ 1 PARK—3 + 
share with 2: $70; incl. utils.: no 
objection 1 child. 7122 Sycamore 
ave. Apply after 6. Apt. 1. 


rms. and bath, 


HOTEL 1440 


1 rm., kit., bath, 24-hr. phone and 
elevator service; $24.50 to $31.50 
weekly. 1440 Rhode Island afte. n.wW. 


aoe ah SE FOR’ YOUR 


CONDITIONED 


APARTMENT KIT 
SERVICE IN WASHINGTON'S 
NEWEST. 


THE HEDIN HOUSE, 
3000 R. I. AVE. AT Sala ST. 


6 
IT’S YOURS FOR OVER NITE OR 
LONGER 


~~ 4115 STH ST. N.W, 


Apt. 1. Two rooms (1 bedrm), 
kit.. 24 bath: $85; utilities in- 
aC wn Call Boss & Phelps. NA. 


‘COLORED—Parily furn. — apt.; 
2 rooms and bath. MI. 8304 


OL nd kit.. snare bath; 


COoOL.—2 
cple. or 2 ladies. $75. RA. 4174 


3) APARTMENTS WANTED 


{| MOVING & STORAGE 


-| HOUSES, FURNISHED 


APTS., HOUSES to SHARE 46A|° 


BETHESDA—Girl share 1-bdrm. or. | 
with another, $10 wk. WI. 3709 af 


APTS., UNFURNISHED 47 


ALEXANDRIA—Second floor of re- 
stored Colonial, consisting of a spa- 
cious living room, a de luxe bath, 
» @ cozy dining room, 
, 3 fireplaces, random 
ideal for business 
mo. Avail. immed., 
oe a utilities. _ Call TE 2256. 


GEORGETOWN 


Attractive, large living room with 
fireplace, bedroom, Recnen and ba 

35 mo R. TENCHER Co.., 1622 
Wisconsin ave. AD. 


HUNTING 
TOWERS 


Mt. Vernon Blvd. and Potomae 
River in Alexandria, Va. 


The Capital Area’s Only 
Waterfront Apartments 
PRESENTS 
Studio efficiencies 

from 
One-bedroom, Living Room 
from 
ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED 
IN RENT 
. Yacht 


Garage 
Basin... . Shop 
ping Center Superb River View 
.. « Secretarial Bwitchboard Service. 

Ren fice on gs ay 
Inspection Daily, 9 a. m. to 9 p. m. 


TEL. KI. 8-8484 


. Elevators . 
Radiant Beas 


G.H.W.—Fond of eeleren.. able to 
cook. Live in. ocal references. 
TA. 0734. 


-_- 


GIRL—Thursdays. 
with children. OL 
HOUSEKEEPERS. exp 
modern equip.. ref. req. 
and pay. Falls aes area. 
3- “9252 | after 1 LD. 

MAID. saw 

plain cooking, assist 
dren: live in __ BH. 3 8753 


MIDDLE- AGED white ‘Jady to live 
in. care for one child: no cooking. 
Call after 6 p. m., LI. 6-5328 
NURSEMAID. permanent live-in po- 
sition with NW. family: other help. 
Must be thoroughly experienced with 
children and have local references. 
Some domestic duties. $150 per mo. 
Box 822. Washington Post. 


WOMAN OR COUPLE 


(White). (Consider colored wom- 
an). Practical nurse; care for 
elderly man: do some housekeeping 
in. return for home, private room, 
good salary: working daughter only 
other occupant; good Silver Spring 

: mi. from Ga. and Alaska 

. Write Box 856. asb. Post, 
or phone DI. 8747 daytime or SLigo 
2756 after 


SITUATIONS, MEN 19 


FOR any type of janitor x eall 
LI. 3-5547 from 1 p. m m. 
Janit ervice. 


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 29 


BARBER SHOP FOR SALE — $1.00 
hair cut: 4 chairs: reasonable. For 
information, call ME. 5986. 


~ GOING BUSINESS 
OLNEY BEAUTY SHOP 


Wonderful immediate oppor- 
tunity for licensed operator. 
Excellent clientele. Former own- 
er's family transferred suddenly. 
7% immediately for details. 

5-0609. 


ironing and help 
. 7025. 


g.h.w.: y: all 
Good hrs. 
JE. 


ode in - home, 
with 2 chil- 


aEewine ~ BUSINESS for 
Grocery store and filling station 
with living quarters. Nice front- 
age for cabins. All stock and equip- 
ment ready for work. ~- Route 
8% miles from Fredericksburg 
Have to see to appreciate. 
raee, school, church 

Call Berea 3-K-13 or 
Virginia Harding, Hartwood, 


sale. 


write 
Va. 


LAUNDER 


ETTE for sale: doing fine 
business. For interview. OWNER. 
NO. 6515 or | DE. $310. 


PARTNER ‘NER WANTED. with or wit h- 

out services. In an active. profitable, 

going business. Substantial weekly 

salary plus interest in the. Dusiness 

commensurate with investment. Up- 
to $50,000 needed. For de- 
information write Box 843. 
ton 


ROOMS, FURNISHED 


34 
A ST. S.E.. 314—Nicely furn. rm., 
shwr.: owner's home; conv. trans.; 
restaurants ¢ close by: $40. aa <3 
ALEXANDRIA Large or 
gentieman: nx. bath: Seard @: —~ WE 
on bus line. OV. 0649 0849. 


| 
| 


see ome: gentieman: $40. TE. 2109 


ARL.—<Attrac. front rm., next bath: 
on bus ans, man only. OW. 3549. 


‘E. ~ CAPITOL. nr. 


DUNBAR HOTEL 
2015 ‘Sth STREET N.W. 


Hotel rooms at reasonable rates. 
All hotel conveniences and accom- 
modations. Under new management. 
Select clientele. PE NS 
COLORED—Single rm, for refined 
man; privileges. AX. 2936. 


—_ me 


COL.—Szle. & dbie. 
trans.; reas. HU. 5338. 


col C.—Ssgle.: 
kK 


e rms.; conv. 
3 to 8 p. Mm. 


COL., N.E. LO aiso front 
able. rm. ; privis. : $8 wk. LI. 3-4824 
COLORED—2 furnished bedrooms for 
couple with penool-age girl; privi- 
leges. LI. 7s 

‘COLORED—Sele. and dbie. rms.: 
privileges: refined home. LI. 6-3790. 
COL., 75 ST. N.W.—Single room; 
kitchen privs.: $8 week. DI. . 58 629. 
COL., 251 ROCK CR. 

Single rogma empl. person; 
privs.; $12 wk. GE. 1285 
‘COLORED, Upper 13th 
Lee. comf. furn. dble. fr 
for 2. gentile, sober adults, 
refined me. 


ROOMS, UNFURNISHED 


FT. DUPONT PK. AREA, Knotty pine 
rec. rm.. *2 bath. in new home; priv. 
entr., 3838 Nash st. se. LU. 1-3561. 
COLORED. 1446 Belmont St. N.W.— 
Unfurnished large front room with 
kitche ivileges. MI. 5143 

37 


HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS 


F N.W.. 2147—Small single studio 
rm. Refrig.. radio or TV. EX. 0653. 
N.W.—Lovely large front bedroom... 
dble. bed: equip., pvt kit.: 2 girls or 
married cple.. empl. RA. 8536 

6TH ST. 8.W.. 1205—Nr. 
Gov't. bldgs., 2 Lh.k. rms.: 
COL... “LILL’s” ', AGENCY. 
rms,.: 1920 9th st. AD. 


ROOMS WANTED 38 


COL.—14th Euclid Sts NW. 
Large. att recs room; priv- 


ileges 
ROOMS WITH BOARD 39 | 
exc. 


ARL.. qe: in Clarendon. Rms., 
meals. days: near bus. GL. 2106. 
6th—Rooms. 2 del 
cious meals daily: $20 wk. ‘LI. 3- 1700. 
BR. LL NW 1517—Double and triple 
Tms.; good food; reas. DE. 9645. 


|, WESLEY HALL 


ee double rooms _ remod- 
redecorated  bids.: 

a. in seers room: 

dances: recreation 

washer: selective menu: $30 

1426 Zist st. nw. . 3624 


THE JOHN KILPEN HOTEL 


2310 ASHMEAD PL. N.W. 
Double and single rms.: some with 


~ home 


. town and 
elec. refs. 


pee H.E 
2520. 


and 
‘re, front 
20 


osphere. 


ROOM, BOARD WANTED 40 


FATHER and i5-year-old son desire 
room and board with private —: 


eals: 


50 
to high > give full particulars 
ash. 


soe | phone number. Box 855, W 


private bath; American plan; excel. 
ree home atmosp HO. 3566. 


SHIRLEY DUKE APTS.) 


; rm 


| Spl 
| 
| 
: 
i | 


| bedroom. 


KENT VILLAGE 


1-bedroom apts., from $71.50 | 

2-bedroom apts.. from $89.50 
Utilities Included in Rent 
EUGENE B. ROBERTS 

Kent Village. Landover. Md a aed 


1 AND | 2 BEDROOM | APTS.— 

$86.50 includes utilities Available | 
immediately. See resident man- | & 
ager, Apt: B-l. a 2607 Southern | 
ave. se., between 4 and 7 p. m., or 
call LO. 3-7979 


APTS., UNFURNISHED 47 


m and kitchen, semibath, 
. incl. wutils.; refined couple: 
e; co ‘ 


48 


HUSBAND, wife and daughter, 7 
mos., desire 2 or 3-rm. apt. on 16th 
st. or Conn. ave. and vicinity. Refer- 
ences. Call WI. 6815. 


co 
$ 


MARRIED COUPLE desire unfurn. 
bedrm. apt., @ref. nw. séc., max. $75 
HO. 4291 after 6. 


PSYCHOLOGIST and wife desire 1- 
bedrm. wy , aa, conv. to Okla- 
homa and E sts. LO. 3-3681. 


eee landlords | list your | 


rms., apts. and house 
ice. Logan alty 


COLORED LANDLORDS — Want to 
rent your apts., Ag * 19 a hurry? 


Gall Mr. Cherry, NO. 
49 
ALL MOVING — exe eignost. polite 


ick serv~- 
u. 4 420. 


men; low rates. 
ot aD HEAVY; 
oe SURDAS ancl 


A-1 MOVING 
24-HOUR. SERVI 
“ LIDO TRAN! 


BROWNER  M MOVERS—Ful or part 
load; min. $3; insure. LI. 7-3121. 


SALE INVEST. PROPERTY 62 


"T801 BELMONT ST. N.W. 


62-foot frontage on Columbia 
Road. Property consists of 3 


P. arge coeeeae on street level. 
yy <2 for store. Priced at $25.- 
000. May be Soues? on terms. Call 
for appt. to see. 

R. A. HUMPHRIES, REALTOR 


12-67) 
REAL ESTATE LOANS 63A 
MONEY. ON SECOND TRUST 


r Va. Reas. rates. 
NATIONAL MORTG AGE & 
INVESTMEN 


T co 

1312 New York Ave. N.W. NA. 5833. 
“CASH for lst and 2d trust notes. in- 
cluding list trust on acreage: quick 
pevrsomens. ge qe, notes 

D. Va. ulton R. 
Gorden, Colorado "Bldg. 1 14th and G 
sts. nw. DI. 5230. Brokers. attention. 
her AND SECOND TRUST LOANS 
‘s mg § = d —_ LTY Co. 


SALE, D. C. HOUSES 64 


5 


MOVING | at any time, aso Sundays. 
: Call Edelin . 23-5047. 


50 


GEORGETOWN 


2-story town house, attractively fur- 
nished with antiques and Baby Grand 
piano. 3 bedrooms, small garden, ex~- 
cellent location. er] $237.50. Call 


rs. McKee, ‘ 

! DUNLOP, INC. 
Realtors 4608 Wisc. OR. 6 6715 
‘16TH ST. NW. ; rg ree rm., n., din. 
rm., 3 kitchens, 6 bedrms., 2 baths: 
2- car garage: in excellent condition; 
$300; immediate occupancy. Eves., 

WI. 0296. LEO KOLB CoO., INC.. 
MI. 2100. 


— 


BEAUTIFUL gearores historic estate, 
under 25 miles. Small main house, 
zuest ouse, servants’ quarters, etc. 
$200. Phone Fairfax 714-J. 
EXCHANGE—I have fine 3-bedroom 
home in excellent New York suburb, 
Will exch. for similar in Wash. or vic, 
6 mos. or waee. ST. re Rg s SERS, 
Mr. Ra r eves.. NA. 


HOUSES, rare 


51 
ALEXANDRIA—3-bedroom hou 
available Sept. 1: cool, with sone 
view of river: $200 per mo. Mcec- 
Elhinney, & Mechling, OV. 


‘ARLINGTON—New 2- co aees ram- 
bier: adults only; $120 per month. 
_— & Mecbling, Inc., OV, 


2200. 


‘BETHESDA—New krick rambler, 3 
bedrms., 2 baths, comp. equipt.. inc. 
Disposall, dishwasher. auto. washer. 

age. Locust ills Estates, near 
Naval gs een $200 mo. HO. 5100, 


21 


BETHESDA 


New 6 room rambler. 3 bedrooms, 
2 athe. dining room, electric kitch- 
en. screened porch. $225 mon 


NORTHWEST REALTY 


OL. 6867 OL. 7555 


HISTORIC ESTATE 


$275 MONTH 
transferred, offers spa- 
cious, historic country home near 
Mount Vernon, fully restored and 
medcerniaed: 4 bedrooms on 2d floor, 
2 3d, 2 modern baths, oil heat, 
od garage or barn: on 5 beautiful. 
well-kept acres of lawn and trees; 
grounds kept by professional without 
cost to tenants; seclusive but easily 
accessible to D. C. via scenic Mount 
Vernon Memorial hwy.: l-year lease 
with option to renew. Bernice Porter 
Davis. KI. 8-4095. 


General 


RAMBLER 


Chevy Chase Circle area: 4 bed- 
rms., 2 baths, huge living and din- 
ing rooms; maid’s room, bath: ga- 

rage; $3 Also Kensington, 6 
na. ms. 

- CLYDE C. sag ta 
383. 


5048 6TH PL. NE. 


Two ‘bedrooms, living room. dinin 
room, kit. and bath; $115. Call Mr 
Smith. DI. 1411 with - S. PHILLIPS. 


WANTED TO RENT 53 


ARMED FORCES need 
houses, apts., rooms. 


urgently 
vee 


S.E. 

BRITISH Embassy ¢ official requires 
furn. house in Georgetown, 3-4 bed- 
rms., 2 baths, living rm.., dining rm., 
kit.. usual x ene garden. Ph. HO. 


_and Md., HI. 3100, Ext. 


ne ae 


1345, ext. 


BRITISH NAVAL OFFICER — Re- 
quires furn. 3-bedrm. house in nw 
aréa; max. $175 month, long lease. 
well-discipli ned daughters, 
and 3, in family Call. | OL 


peo - 


COMMANDER needs u —, Se 
or 4-bedroom home, near grammar 
school; 2 well-behaved children. 6 
and 8: occupancy anytime to Sept. 
15: good care. KE. 69. 
DIPLOMAT reguires unfurn. rambler, 
3 bedrooms, N.W. area, as of Sept. 
Phone » HU. 6000. ext. : 
FRENCH “diplomat, 3 bedrms.. 
maid’ S Quarters or basement ; 
D. 0990, ext. 


a5 es ‘f 
763. 


ished ; 3 


. 8 


bed- 
dh: NW. 
_ care. get 
se 


IF YOU WILL Cx INSID 
renting your furnished hone in 
Virginia for about 30 days to an 
incoming officer, please call 


CLY A ATX N & 


OrLAIN IN 
NORTHERN VIRGINIA OFFICE 
2055 Wilson Bivd JA. 5-6800 
___ Open Until 9 P.W ERE 
NAVAL | OFFICER desires” -3-bedrm. 
house in Suitland, Md.. area or with- 


in 6-mile radius; will sign lease. FA, 
8763. 


" excel. 


PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 53A 


GEORGETOWN—Memt. a specialty. 
NELLE LOWE CASSEL, REALTOR. 
1512 Wis. ave. AD. 2118. WI. I. 3135. 


ee 


} LEO KOLB CO. 


1237 Wis, Ave NW. MI. 2100 
CFFICES, DESK SPACE RENT 55 


EDMONDS BUILDING 
917 15TH ST. N.W. 


Approximately 600 square feet of 
mezzanine front office space facing 
McPherson Park. Wired for air-con- 
ditioning. fluorescent lighting, as- 
phalt tile floors. Available August 
3088. Superintendent on premises. ST. 


2d & KENNEDY STS. N.W. 


Single or suite of rooms in the 
area's most modern office bidg.: 
from $35 per mo. and up. Call Mr. 
Holland, H. G gs hy co., 811 
15th st. nw. § T. 3300 
DOWNTOWN—Will divide. 
ft. of eee in modern building. 
ng vee. INC, 
912 ath St. RE. 1566 
2 LARGE Srvices and reception 
rm. At 1415 K st. nw. Air-cond.; 
carpeted; $275 per mo. D 5941. 
RIGGS BLDG., 14TH & PARK RD. 
2d fi. frt.,. 400 sq. It., is. pri- 


vate office. Low rent. NO. 1235. 
GARAGES, SALE—RENT 58 
| COLUMBIA RD. NW., 1754—Dble. 


a: roll-up doors: Ist comm.: 
age or business. AD. 0341 aft 4. 


7 “Goals. ~ 4900 sq.. Ga. ave; 
oups, sale, trade. RYON, GE. 


4000 sq 


BUSINESS PROPERTY, RENT 59 


429 DONMANTON BLVD. 
ALEXANDRIA, VA. 


APPLICATIONS ACCEPTED FOR 
FUTURE RENTALS 


1 BEDROOM 


1ST io 
2D 


1ST FLOOR . 
2D FLOOR ...cee-sccece 
3D PLOOR ..ccseceseess $75.50 


INCLUDES ALL UTILITICS 
EXCEPT ELECTRICITY 


Office hours: ~ § = 
Mon ik Fri. ™s 
12 noon Sat. 


m. 
to 


1116—Liv. 
for emp. 


s.W.. 
bah apt.. 
251. 


VIRGINIA AVE. 
bedrm., kit.. 
$05 


CARILLON HOUSE 
2500 WISCONSIN AVE. 


cpie. 


wu? 
N. 1¥ « 


aes Be eet 2 oe tg op 


fice. $35. . 8671 5 p.m 


BUSINESS PROPERTY, SALE 60 


There are a few studio and l1- 
apts. still availabdie in 
Carillon House, one of Washington's 
finest elevator-type apt. bidgs.; just 
being completed: decorated by Dor- 
othy Draper, Inc. The studio apts. 
contain a combination living room 
and bedroom, dressing room, Death, 
dining alcove and kitchen, or din- 
ing space and kitchenette and rent 
from $85 to $100. The one-bedroom 
s, have a separate bedroom: year- | 
oe ate and rent 

$150: secretarial tele- | 

phone : * public dining room 
and entertwining rooms; packag¢e- 
receiving room; roof sun deck, am- 
plified master television antennae 
system, ground floor laundry. Your 
inspection is invited daily from 
a. m. to 10 p. m. Management is | 
on the premises. 


Waverly Taylor, Inc. 
4602 4TH ST. N.W. 
First floor, 3 rooms (1 bedrm.), 


kit. and dath; “ys utilities A a 
gm Call Boss & Phelps. N 


oer 


COLORED—Liv. bedrm.. kit. & 
bath; empl. cple. re aT 13th st. nw. 


AT 
Shirley Highway, 
and 
Duke Street 


12 Acres With a Great 
Business Future 


Nearly level and smooth as 

your lawn, with over 1400 
ft. of frontage on 2 roads. 
Business grows where people 
Pass and thousands pass 
this land every day. It is a 
natural location for @ well- 
Pianned business center 
with plenty of room for 
arking. The price now is 
ess than 20 cents per square 
foot, so you can get in on 
the ground floor. For further 
details, call 


| MASON HIRST 


EXCLUSIVE AGENT 
Annandale. Va. Phone FA. 7447. 
Closed Sundays. 


‘WAREHOUSES, SALE 


ONE ro AND PART BASEMENT, 
000 . 0: |F, siding: office 


add'l | will 
divide and consider jease: no reason. 
able offer refused. all Mr. Knapp, 
ME. Lies. J. WESLEY BUCHANAN, 


STORES, RENT 61 
SHOE STORE WANTED 


HAVE TWO OUTSTANDING SUB- 


WITH AGGRESSIVE OPERATORS. 
WEINBERG & BUSH, INC. 
REALTORS 
1707 H St. N.W. NA. 5500 
VACANT—Beautiful store, suitable 

in one of the — 


centers in Ar 
ashington Post. 


M-212, 


608 


AMERICAN UNIV. PARK 


$10,000 Dn., Bal. Ist Trust 4%% 
Immaculate 3 


m and ba a level 
lot with beautiful landscap- 
ing. Center hall plan. rece 
Teation room with semi- 
circular bar. Call 


Button & Fletcher, Realty 


WO. 5200 + Eves., HO. 7000 


~ CHEVY CHASE—$19,950 


This immaculate and attractive 
older home, close in. nr. Wilson High 
School. is one of today’s Loos | be - 
recep. war” liv. rm. with f 


: rms. : por 
— and lovely chvalbarr See to- 


Billingsley & Korzendorfer 
OR. 2326. Office Open ‘til 9 P. M. 
CHILLUM AREA 
Several desirable homes in this de- 
Sirable section, including 5-room 
prick bungalow, 5 end -room de- 


tached colonial bric 
AUERBA CH & Co. GE: 6552, TA. 0471 


“FOXHALL VILLAGE” 


mares Gehodl. 
y m 


Near 
bedrooms. 


on e. re 
yard DRURY 
MALTY. CORP. MT. 4000, 
Eves. OR. 5761. 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
Wednesday, August 15, 1951 


11B 


GEORGETOWN 
NEW LISTING 


Beautifully remodeled brick 
house, full of Georgetown 
charm and with all modern 
comforts, in excellent condi- 
tion. Lovely old floors and 
mantels. 


Large drawing room with fire- 
place opening onto terrace and 


3 baths. Excellent dry basement 
with jounery and fant bath, 


ITH 
]. -. INC, 
1606 20th St, NW. 
Call Mr. Sprague, DU. 2480 


HAMILTON ST. NW., 601—Vacant 
semidet. brick. wner must sell, 
make offer. Louis Rudden, EX. 5707. 


WALTER REED 


We currently have for sale 4 
homes near Walter Reed from 
$17,000 up. Each has 3 bedrooms. 
and possession can be yours before 
school starts. For further details, 
please call 


Waggaman-Brawner Realty Corp. 
1700 Eye St. N.W. ME. 3860. 


423 INGRAHAM ST. N.W. 
BY APPOINTM AENT ONL 
Hal! entrance, Tow brick 

3 bedrooms n be de 
atin 


room with 2 

off master bedroom with 
linen closet in bath, center 
bedroom with dressing al- 
cove. lavatory and shower 
off 32d bedroom, large living 
room, dining room, kitchen 
with plenty closet space, 
range and refrig.: television 
den; full basement with out- 
side entrance: oi! h.-w.h.: 
front and rear windows in 
beautifully land- 


Many other 
features must be seen. Ex- 
cellent buy at $17,500. 

JAMES A. HEWITT PROP, CORP. 


1720 Eve St. N.W. 
Call ST. 2363 or JU. 77-9135 


Ty 


closeia ti 


basement: 
scaped yard. 


"THE PALISADES, D.C. | 


Detached masonry home: 6 
rooms and bath: oil h.-w. hk 
summer- winter hookup: goo 
size level lot; priced to sell. 
Terms. 


A. D. CRUMBAUGH 


4908 Wis. Ave, Realtor, WO. 1-3-6-4. 


TAKOMA PARK, D. C.—By owner, 
lovely, spacious 6 rooms and den, 
detached, oil h. -w. heat: Rpg 
a quick sale. 221 Whit W 
Open 5 p. m. to 8 p. m. Phone SLi zo 
3282. 


Open Evenings 


lec th St N.W. 


5125 Wl. 


Pe eB Realty oe 
ST. 4520 Eves., GE. 3780 


“4 BEDRMS—1'2 BATHS 
$18,950 
WARDMAN PARK AREA 


Comfortable row brick with large 
front porch. , Dye room with fire- 
= gas h.-w. aoe t: 1 block to 

Conn. ave > and transp. 


REALISTIN NGS CORP, 


. 5333 Day or Nite 


COOL UP HERE—Hich elevation; 
conv. to bus: N.W. residential: ad- 
jacent Rock Creek Park: very good 
solid birch. 2-storv., 6 large rms., 
tile bath, 2 porches fone inclosed}, 
large kit. and pantry: — poss. 
can be arranged: nice 
price, only $13,950: good t 
consider some discount for all cash. 
Inspect thru Dixie Realty Co 
Agts.. NA. 8880. After 6 Dp. m., 
Mrs. Ciccone, DE.. 2848 
Cathedral-Westchester Area 
$28,500 
retired admiral leaving Washine- 
ton is offering his most livable home 
in this Gontrante section for sale. A 
very spaciou semi-detached home. 
with entrance hall, fine living and 
dining rooms, sun room, and excel- 
lent kitchen on Ist flooor. Four 
bedrooms and 2 baths on 2d, and 
bedroom with wash basin on 3d 
floor. Open porch. Basement can 
be developed as recreation room. 
Hot water heat, 2-car garage, excel- 
jent opportunity. To inspect, cail 
AMES EE. SCHV VAB, OR. 5800. 
After 6 Pp. m. I. 1409 or OL. 7693. 


~ ROOMING HOUSE 


Maryland Ave., nr. Stanton Sq. 
English basement residence, 
contains 11 large rooms and two 
baths Oil h-w heat Property 
is immaculat e and in excellent 
Convenient to 
_ shopping transporta- 
and churches. Offered at 
bargain price, $19.500, with very 
easy terms Comet Me B 
NA. 9300: pres, 42! 
appointmen ba tows) 


BOSS AND "PHE LPS, INC. 


1413 K St. N.W 


——— —_——_——-_-— 


VaCEne se WALTER HEED 
OSPITAL 
Lovely det pee brick. 
ulate condition: livin : : 
rm.. electric kitcben, pantry. 
rooms ‘and bath | ist. floor: 
dormitory-style finished rm. 
floor: ample ventilation: full base- 
ment, lavatory, West inghouse wash ier 
and drver, gas H.-W. Oo beautiful 
landscaped, fenced lot garage 
on soar + & pane. 9200; 


A 


in immace- 
ins 


SH. 
eves.. 


"NEW" 
Semidet. house on wide avenue in 
section ; 


fs iH basement 
lent value and immediate possession. 
reg low. Call ME. 1143 until 


9 DP 
J. ¥ WESLEY BUCHANAN, REALTOR 


—————— —————— 


~ 1-ST FLOOR BEDROOM 


12-year-old det. brick preme in de- 
sirable Wakefield; ist f a re- 
ception ball, = rm wit te banmed 
ceiling and fireplace ai mn. rm. 
equipped kit.. bedrm and { full bsmt 
rear porch: 2d fi.. 2 nice bedrms. 
ane dat h: lecar garage: lovely 

ew of public park. Call W. 
WRIGHT. EM. 5600. 
COLORED—1241 Morse. NE.: 7 rms., 
bath: vacant; ne gy ork.: 
ne heat: Murchison. RA. 9000. 

OLORBED—510 L N&E.: 6 rms.. bath; 
Getacted: fruit trees, shrubbery: 
hot-water heat: Murchison. RA. 9000. 


COLOBRED—1813 A SE.: 6 rms.. bath; 


B. 


COLLEGE PARK—By owner. 


rear | 


newly decorated: oi] heat; seeing is 
believing; Murchison, RA, 9000. 


SALE, D. C. HOUSES 64 


COLORED 
NEWLY DECORATED 
442 RANDOLPH ST. N.W. 


n 


6-room row brick. gas hwh, 2 
screened porches, detached garage, 
ready to move in, Terms. 


AVON SHOCKEY, Realtor 
TU 2100 


LORED—Choice ‘4. Ne 


5Onis0 ft.; Murchison, 
COLORED 
MAKE THIS HOUSE 
YOUR HOME 


Independence Ave. comfortable 8 
rm. brick. On the Ist fir. there Is 
a large liv. rm., cozy den, large sunny 
din. rm. and modern kit. 3 spacious 
bdrms.,. 1 smai] bdrm. and a complete 
bath comprises 2d flr. Each bedrm. 
has its own closet The full base- 
ment is partitioned into 2 finished 
héated rms., with haif bath. Oil 
h.w. heat completes the comfort and 
a flower-bordered back yard witn 
metal garage completes the picture. 
Just $2000 down. Call Henry H. 
Hill for details. 

MURCHISON, RA. 9000, eves. VI. 5431 


COL., Shepherd 8t.—s$1500 down. 
Spacious 3-bedroom brick home, 
reception hall. lge. dry basement, 
front porch; beautiful kitchen. W. 
CLIFFORD SHERTZER,. RE. 2201. 
SLigo 7747. 


COLORED, 5i8T ST. N_E.. 
cash, balance like rent, 
Rudden, EX. 5707. 


Colored—Possession 
GIRARD ST. NE... OFF N. CAPITOL 
Beautiful 2-story tapestry brick 
home; 6 lovely rooms, 1% baths, Co- 
lonial front porch. 2 screened-in rear 
porches, full basement. gas h.-w. h.. 
full attic, garage: convenient to 
everything: priced to sell, with reas- 
onable down payment. Call till 9 
DP. m. weekdays; Sunday, 12 to 5. 
m. Calomiris Inv. Corp. 
___2012 i7th St. NW. DI. 1655. 


eee eee ae 


COLORED—$1500 DOWN 
14TH ST. NE.—MOD. BRK. 


Bewutiful Colonial brick in this 
pine section. 6 rms... full ean.» ott 


det brk. garage 
FIRST NATIONAL REALTY, URE. 


., 840—$1000 
Louis 


—_———— 


‘COLORED—$1000 cash will handle 
this lovely 6-room brick. Louis 


Rudden. EX. 5707. 


HOUSES WANTED to BUY 65 
APPRAISAL SERVICE AND SALES 
Wm. E. Daugherty 
1404 N. Y. Ave. N.W. ST. 7573 
~ DIRECT FROM OWNER > 


Highest cash for your pr op. Mr. 
Kitchens. a xia ree LI, _7-5695. 


you NTED 

in a sections a the city. 

THOS. W. RES CoO. DE. 11 1162 

TI) WILL pay you cash today for your 

home in anv location: immediate 
. 2201 or SLigo 7747. 


WE HAVE CASH BUYERS 


for houses in all sections of the 
city and nearby Md. and Va. No 
charge for a appraisal. Over 
years’ servic 


FLOYD E. DAVIS CO. 


1629 K St. N.W A. 0352 
Ev ves., , NO. @ 9021 
1 PAY CASH for houses or we Free 
RAs B. , Scott Sones ers, 5121 Mac- 
Arthur blvd. OR. 567 


Buyers Waiting 


ST YOUR HOME WITH 
_youls P. SHOEMAKER-—--NA. 1166 _ 


~ MAY - WE SELL YOUR . HOUSE? 
Our alert sales department has 
peen chalking up mutually satisfac- 
a sales for many buyers and sell- 
houses to sell. 


R. HRIES. 
808 No. *Sapitol Realtor, NA. 6370. 


FOR YOUR HOME 
COX & C 
RE. 1633 SLigo 0775 UN. _1526 
uP > TO } $15,000 for @ nice 2-bedrm. 
1iome. Ready to buy. OL. 7922. 


SALE or EXCHANGE 


IF RETIRED, or moderate income, 
wish increase, buy this cor. br. big 
store, frame bldg. on side: ideal for 


66 


close-in: 
few ‘groups sale-trade, 
N. E. RYON CO. 


garages rent, 
clear, add cash. 
GE 6146 
nearer sermenes 


SALE, SUBURB, HOUSES 
MARYLAND 


‘BETHESDA 
$24,950 

‘modern brick home has 3 
ths, living room, din- 
patio, recreati on 

garage and mi 
res. Sounds like a lot of 
the money Let's look at 

today. BID LING ogg & KOR 
ZENDORFER. OR. 2326 TILL 9 P M. 


~ BETHESDA RAMBLER 
$193 500 


New brick home with %% acre 
ground. large living room, fireplace. 
>to L, well-equipped kitchen and 
breakfast nook, nice bedrooms, 
1% baths, stairs to storage attic. 
An excellent buy, BILLINGSLEY & 
KORZENDORFER, OR. 2326 ‘til 9 

m. 


ro 
BETHESDA 

Charming 3-bedroom, 2-bat Hh brick 
Colonia! located in excellent com- 
munity, near Naval Ho: pital “Yi 
large l room dining room, de 
luxe n odern kitchen. screened porc! 
A tached brick garage with storage 
space and workshop. Full basement 
oi] h.-w. heat: lavatory. Situated on 
a shaded lot. Owner must 


$@i : : 
WOODSIDE REALTY CO. 
SH. 6440 


BRADMOOR—$21,500 
Prewar constructed brick with 
part frame containing 6 rooms: 3 
bedrooms, 2 baths on 2d fl.: full dry 
basement with recreation room and 
ireplace: built-in garage: lot, 
60x125: immaculate condition: 
honestly believe this is the 
value on today’s market at 
unusual low price and terms: 
block transportation and elementary 
school A. TWEE co... Inc. 
5504 Conn. ave. nw EM. 1290 


BRADLEY pBLVD. AREA —7 7 - room 
on over an acre of 

liv ‘ing room, sepa- 

large electric 

size bedrooms, 2 

den: recreation room in 

basement (with picture 

garage. and many 

custom built features. Eves.. 

WI ade. SAMUEL E. BOGLEY, INC. 


67 


i. 


rn 


Brig viene 500 Down 
622 EFFERSON ST. N.W, 


age, ROOM 
‘2 ' ~/ és 

im, TTT 
OPE N TODAY, | 6 ‘TIL 9 
his charming Colonial brick 
fers 6 large rooms. 1's baths, 
basement with lavatory, 

an ~ gas h.-w. fh 
with garage. 
950. 


Nice deep 

Full price 
ae 4 140 

SLigo 2976-aVI. 462 0 


or 
wer) i 


Eves. 


CHEVY CHASE, MD, _ 


on large 


$26.9 
Lovely older brick home. 
qd v 


> 
: a 


bedrooms ‘and ‘bath 


2 nice bedrooms SO, 


Slate 
a nice 


2-car built-in garage 
i ri ly insulated and 
onditi See this home tod 
BILLINGSLEY & 
326 TIL 9 P. 


CHEVY “CHASE RAMBLER 


$26.950. Brand-new det. 
rambler in lovely Somerset 
for occupancy within a short time. 
Ist ff contains a recep. area liv. 
rm. with firepl ~ = ure winter, 
separat e din ey =» 
kit. with dishwasher “an - aA, 
lovely a. 1 A. aay" tiled “Oy 
patio, store A wonderful 
buy. Call W. 3 AV RIGHT. EM. 5600. 


CHEVY CHASE 


Ready 


4) 

a cen and lav» 
floor? 

a screened 
porch and fenced lot? 

Do you want a good neigh- 
borhood, close to schools and 
buses? 

Can ~~ pay _ $00? 


NORTH ‘WEST REALTY 


OL. 6867. Eves.. WI. 1494. OL. 5211. 


ist 


> 
won» 


brick 


50 ; 


' will like the advantage 


KORZENDORFER 
brick | 


| lonial, 


| bath, 


7 “ 


2 bedrms. and bath Ist 
', bedrms. 2d fir. comb. liv. | 
equipped kitchen. full | 
ith f replace Aluminum | 
storm viadawe: $14,750. TO 6176 


Flower an 1d Piney Branch 
brick home. 2) 

ms. a tr ; fre- 
place in livrnmt.. separate dinrm., rec. | 
rm.. built-in garage. siate roof. oll 
y ~ _ reas. priced. 6H. i011 ‘ontil | 2 


° ¥GUNG & BOWERS CO. | 


iat s 


PHONE 
NA. 4200 


Classified Ad In 
To Place Your 
The Washington Post 


SALE, SUBURB, HOUSES 67 


MARYLAND 
settle estate 5-rm. 
home, lige insulated attic, 
Dsmt., oi] h.-w. heat, front and bac 
porches; dble. garage. s i 
fence; trees ae shrub . Excel, 
location $12,600. Substantial down 


LOUIS MILLER, REALTOR 


UN. 2723. Eves., UN. _ 4526. 


KENSINGTON .— 
$13,950 
4-bedrm. Cape Code with full base- 
ment and gas hot-water heat, in nice 
residential neighborhood: walk to 
school _Dlayground, stores and bus, 
HUGGINS AND HARRISON 
Realtors, LO. 5-2800 


316.950 

Charming det. home in an excel. 
sec.. consisting of 6 nice rmse and 
a bath Owner will take back a 2d 
trust for a lge. organ which can be 
sold with the house; rear screened 
porch; vd. fenced. Call W. B. 
WRIGHT, EM. 5600. | 


MASS. AVE. EXTENDED 
DEN OR BEDRM.'ON IST FLOOR 


3 bedrooms, 2 baths on 
the 2d floor: basement: 
built-in garage: fenced lot; 
restricted community. 

$25,500 


NORTHWEST REALTY 
OL. 6867, OL. 7555. Eves. WI. 7338, 


MacArthur Blvd, Area ~ 


sap = GENTLEMAN'S ESTATE 
oms. 22 baths, completely 
renovated: $5°000. For directions, 
WI Rockville 2130. 


543. 
GEO. W, ROBE RTSON, Realtor 


~ MANOR CLUB AREA 


ROCKVILLE RAMBLER _ 


Custom-built rambler with charm 
and taste. Located on 
Knoll, surrounded by 3 acres. 
desirable brick has center 
step-down living room, to screened 
living porch; full-sized dining room, 
unusual kitchen. large closets thru- 
out: full basement. THOMAS lL. 
PHILLIPS, WO. 7900 till 9 p. m. 
3420 Conn. ave. nw. 


SILVER SPRING 
WHEATON HILLS 


6 OR 7 ROOMS 

Attractively designed three or four 
bedroom brick colonial. Contains 
many features, such as: Full dining 
poem, breakfast space in kitchen, 
built-in Vanity in bath. First floor 
bedrecs Close to schools, shopping, 
and transportation. 


WOODSIDE REALTY 


SH. 6440 "TIL 9 P.M. 


brick rambler; large living room, 
family-size dining, extra large well 
equipped kitchen; level lot: immed. 
occupancy: $14,950. Terms. CLAUDB 
Wwoopnp, _REALTOR, SLigo 4500. 


SILVER SPRING—Br’ nd new 3-bdrm, 


SILVER SPRING—2-bdrm. bungalow 
with finished expansion; shaded lot; 
in fine neighborhood near Four 
Corners. $12,950. Terms. CLAUDE 
WOOD, REALTOR, SLigo 4500. 


Saas 


SILVER SPRING 


Conveniently located 3-bedroom 
brick colonial. full kitchen. dining 
room with dining area; large full? 
fenced lot: 1 block to bus withi 
walking distance schools, shops an 
recreation center. Fairly priced. 


WOODSIDE REALTY 


SH. 6440 __til 9 p. m. 
SILVER SPRING 
3-BEDRM. BRICK RAMBLER 


Three large bedroom, 
porch, 1% baths, deluxe kitchen, 
automatic washer: large level lot. 
Many other excellent features. Cone 
venient to schools, shopping and 
transportation. 


SILVER SPRING 
EW BRICK COLONIALS 


6 OR 7 ROOMS—$16,500 


Located in the heart of Wheaton. 
Attractively designed 3 and 4 bede 
room brick homes. Pine-paneled 
fireplace wall. Family size dining 
room, deluxe equipped kitchen with 
breakfast ;- beautiful ceramic 
tiled bath; basements: level 
lots, completely sodded: near shope 
ping, schools and transportation. 


WOODSIDE REALTY CO. 


SH. 6440 til 9 p. m. 


screened 


ai 
MERSET 
(OUT WISCONSIN AVE., 
JUST BEYOND D. C. LINE) 
Attractive 5-bedroom brick 
house in excellent condition, cone 
taining large living room with fire- 
place, dining room, breakfast nook, 
kitchen and powder room;) maid's 
room and bath in basement, 2-car, 
built-in garage. Oil h.-w. h, Nicee 
ly landscaped let, 100x100. Close 
to elementary school and good 
transportation. 
PRICE $39.500 
For appointment to inspect, 


call Miss er. DE. 4101, 
office hours. EM, 3928 eves. 


Frances Powell Hill 
1608 20th St. N.W. DE, 4101 


TAKOMA PARK 

Excellent location of this immace- 
ulate brick home; Ist floor has liv- 
ing room (12x28), 2 bedrooms, den 
and bath, ,kitchen (12x12): 2d-floor 

2 bedrooms and bath, live 

rm, . kitchen (12x12 
rented ie 3 rece _——— bath, aoe 
reation acious back yard. 
LOWERY. ‘ ‘MARTIN. SH. 9200. 


YOU, TOO 


es of living in 
Montgomery County. Drop in and see 
our many listings In Silver Spring, 
Bethesda, Chevy Chase. Our time is 
yours. Call us at your.convenience, 
Open ION SH. 8010 till 9 p. m. 


MONTGOMERY 


INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE CO. 
#055 13th S8t.. Bilver Spring 
(One Sinck from Hot Shoppe) 


——_— 


“LOVELY SMALL HOME — 


In Silver Spring. A choice 2-bed- 
room property for a discriminating 
Pies For complete information 
cal r. Ki 


| Failte B. ‘Key Co., Realtors 


SL. 3010 "ti Sp. m 


NEW HAMPSHIRE EXT. 


Larger than average. 6 room brick 

and shingle home, fireplace in 20 
living room. large 

3 bedrooms, screened po 

753x150 ft. lot and beautifully ‘plarted, 

priced $15,550, call WA. 3900 till 


ROBERT S. DAVIS & CO. 


ee 


FOR SALE BY Y OWNER—Brick Co- 
located near ny and 
shopping center: 3 bedrooms, tile 
equipped kitchen with table 
larce living room with fire- 
uest-size dining room; level 


space, 


SH 6660, or evenings. SH. 8220. 


$4000 CASH 
NO 
MO. PAYMENTS 


i bik. off Carroll Ave., neer the 
bank—Live on one floor. 


HOME REALTY co. = LTO 
_ 1726 Penna. Ave. 


1337, 
“NR. NAVAL HOSPITAL” 


Sparkling new brick rambler! 3 
good bedrms., ceramic tile bath; 33- 
ft. liv.-din. room with Greplace 
handy kit. with de luxe range and 
ref storage attic and fu 
larse level lot; excellent neighbore 
hood. Priced to _ we 4 
1.000 on easy ter See this 
one pot Call ME 1143 wal Oo. a. 
| J. WESLEY BUCHANAN. REALTOR 
POTOMAC, assume GI lan. low 
down payment. acre farmetie 
ee conde anked 17a te 

condition, pric a 
eves, WI. 9346. E. . 
INC... . OL. 1266. 


CONTINUED ON FOLLO OLLOWING PAGE 


. 


THE WASHINGTON POST — SUBURB, HOUSES _ 67 SALE, SUBURB. HOUSES _67 Dennis the Menace |SALE, MISCELLANEOUS 78, AUTOMOBILES, SALE AUTOMOBILES, SALE 
Eb se Ric a pee VIRC! VIRGINIA saainciin | | | 


12B Vednesl 
~ B ednesd pth miss Kitt’s Summer; CADILLAC ‘46—r, & -h.; fros.: | NASH, 1947 “600 Clean and pow < 
Cle: ouS make planos, | auto. dr.: spot light: nylon se use most no g 

f I new w.w. tires: — ] 
erefully driven prt n 


‘ ‘ i . ‘ 
VIRG INIA. Ter Vir, LA ri LA BLIN | " ; , 1330 G. n, Daianc an “y yrs. Ltt H L 8219. af ter 5 30 p.1 
- . wy . ** ™ : : ‘ a4 c 
‘ 


PHONE Y°LLS CHURCH AREA HEVROLET—1949 ch 
a ‘ | me f AS i] orig Ow? 
NA. 4200 . 
. , oe ; } 


To heage Your ) , 4 . ‘ * . . ' : j / . j PIANO—K) ‘5 ict . - 51s ae : F $2600 igi a * a ho Ex - ov 
| ¥ } 14 i ~ y finish new snd 825. 7 ps os +73 — 


| O706. WO “REx eee TE hn a PAC KARD—! 40 


a} go a7T « é 2 ‘ 7 
al etions on new, 
~ +4 } rt — a4 " ert " 


er; 


| OLDSMOBILE —1930, 


| CHRYSLER—1949 New 


. ; RA? r 
( lassi fled om | : Lf eV LLL 7 Zz | PIANOS—We have on sale dozens | ronet Gyro 4-door: | o_O 
. , ) } 2 a J ine net *{ nsoles sty 4 ; bd » Fe Sans Se ona i ll . - | PLYMOU TH 37 


PL ¥ MOU Th 194: 


SALE. SUBURE, 


" Oo 
_ . ae * re r 


M/. 


PIANO 


Pi A4NO 
RANGE— 
RANGF 


REFRIG.— 


REFRIGC., §& é ft STANLEY 


olier. Ra ; | HI DSON 
REFRIG.—Serv: | — 


>VOH il the kitchen, 1] And 


MOUTH 
68) SALE, eee, 78 


Al ro Z. Io 


BABY CARRIAGI 

; lex iz \ ri DERAKE! 
MERCURY—'49 4 n. $1205, | 4 
n. GRADY MOTORS, INC 


re 
309 Wis. av EBAKER 
MERCURY 7 


NASH—] 


a’ 


ry LY hes 
bared 


DEBRAKER 


— 
. 


—_-~ 


BAKER 


S - > + 
“Sa <> oe? 


__VIRGINIA _ | See rere | | ss HM at Green~ | BED, box a ianersprin 210, perfect cond. | MOTORS, 901 Prince st. Alex., Va LINCOLN—1951 
AY ry ANDRI: : . . | . e. | | | ue Ci BANE RS = \- 48 p ; zt br a mack sedan, radis neater. 
; Past new car 


LL ASAIN I 
; priced 


OLDSMOBILEI 


OLDSMOBILE 


" i : f f wel ownel 


MISCELLANEOUS W WANTED 79) Call WV. 3633 nd ve “come. Uieed Met or Co 


aT er 


i j i e 
AM INTERESTED in buy 1g SlVeT- | O1 DSMOBILE—194 danett Corners. Falis Church, Va 


4, PA thie 


_ 2309 Mt. Vernon Ave., Ak | a | | CONSIN 4 | . ) H. B. LEARY, JR.. & BROS., INC : 
ALEXANDRIA Da Rav rc : fe Mo ciamener” ch QUE, china, farm, 2eselsr gy: | Washineton's Oldest auto QUALITY 


galow $12000. Substantial ca l | 1 i teen 
6900 til 9 p. 3 a4 | AQt EWELRY, silver .- | Sr : N s! 
YTON —™ RYT Tt ’ pT @<« | 
{OTON REALTY, Inc. |: 7 { feet . LER'S £ st. at 9th nw. || 49 WILLYS 
} ' é ; ¢ 1a ; When vou buy a TSED PACK- 


Werte Ave Alex Va ay 
ca . bet : ; _s - STATION WAGON ARD veu get ALL of the new 
j ae o- car PRESTIGE—MOST of the 

$1225 new car MILEAGE. 


cylinder with overdrive 


home to sell now. Livine- oe ae he | : bE Da vis 5 | ; ter and whitewalls, Posi- & 1 '5{ Packard .. Save $400 
‘ , " ‘ ’ | i i | ; . De Luxe Sed T itr drive 


combination BOUL ‘ 
breakfast corner: larce 0 MAING DL YLE : : : , WILLYS-OVERLAND KH. Low. mith 
room, gar: nisl “wooded | , ) + | BURNED 7 . DISTRIBUTOR, IN 
appointment, ca ? . ) a. fy ’ ; A : , ie ; ‘ 1824 i ST N VV RI 1673 5 Packard ' 8s ’ : $2195 

KF} ER 2 : Be. 4 ' , 3 MY ‘ } , i — . ms upper secan { : irive ‘ 
G. CO. : I ae , 4 . A] T v = ' , . ie k oH. poranon ww yy tees : 


*“Synecis in Beverile: t i ‘ ' &, bin Sey. , 
2018 Mt. Vernon Avs 2760 ) 3 : rF Ts ag BUICK ($50 | 
"ALEXANDRIA . ) and ) ‘ ! e Se anyt , ; 50 Packard..... $1895 

ge ad . Ry iare ! PU rURi nted ¥ SPECIAL SI DANE 1 rk | Sedan. R.AH. 
low. $12.000 1 a mid-week bare a 
for a retired couple. Numbe1 : Y ie inisl ex ires. 
OV 9900 i E “Ogee 3 , n O yd Pp: a ce ae 7 mechanically perfect ie Pagkard eee e@ g $1495 
23 09 2 M got | : PiVil. me fae ) tees 1¢. S. E. Furn. | eee ack ~* epgtan lita te Super Sed. Equipped. 

3 t. & rn mn { t 4 ‘ . * ' ; weit ‘ : , ; 

IFYANDRIA | 5 Ss : | N REA . ie | = , ) 4 | . 
iy Sy are’ 4 V4 ‘ n ’ nay = v : os ‘ een . . . id ; - » e Packa rd ] ” ’ , $1295 

pees Sg os e posi Bs nti 6. E J d. I - Ron I ontiac. Ine, ; Supe edan;: r, and h. and 
9 - We { ey a ral ‘ ~ > ’ - . , ° : . ; q were vi 
ca _— “— hes oe ‘ ' : : nv 7320 Wisconsin Ave. (Beth.) overar 
tunity in a 2-yeal ic, al ol : r eled . EDPaPt , so Tie OL. 8000 
ooanias ¢ ee : ‘ | I HAM 1] : :, eocerd , ff phew 5, —w se We have some “41 & °42 one- 
full beds biied . ‘ : h , , + aie -,,. | owner Packards priced from $250. 

peereet n ec 


th ~ in ae lesirab! 5 See : ) | . | . , house rags, high- | - 3 Cou 6 AGT ORS) 
for only $22.5¢ ‘4 root t pri paid ) c : 4 
f $5.000 down with the best of | ' , Pe: elle, oe. | ACE J | N oa bran aa d ; 
inancing =% . , | s it ; ee eS ' att x ‘ew car pearanc an 
Rt. | negate : | : nd sign, | ¥OUr choice, $4.35 | 0.442111 performance. One- owner, ||| 1991 Wise. Ave. EM. 0141 


SWEITZER 
: KI 8-7] , 
dint eo rma. Wi gt ? ce Of ” : : Bp: mise. he ATS, PA RTS, _SERVICE 811% Very, very low mileage! 
ALEXANDRIA. m4 ZOU ROM be AY) yy | | Bereeper many many other item ‘tod | POR sitar $1895 
he, | ISQN'S FAR, AND. GA .RDEN 
: : mo 30-DAY WARRANTY 


eae 228516, eves, COLONIAL 


¥ whee. ae 
ee ne SLES, _ETC. OLDSMOBILE Co. 


¥ ayer . : rr 
: ‘ . "a8 ii 7 


Open Datlvy 9-9, Sun. 10-6 
Pe See. & ONE eR > i, Nit HOLS 4Vi ‘ BE. 


TRAILERS. SALE : Lt -BI00 


\LEXANDRIA | tied b\w at ' ' 
ALEXANDRIA ‘ran | BUILDING MATERIA ERS 
, ' ' : aay ' | VRER SEU wT) 7 Fla. Ave.. Sth to Gth N.E. AT. 6164 


BRAD PR oe ae r | fra : . Saismee + hg A OE her ACE, LU. 4-0500, WEEKDAY \merica) r WO. 3231 , ie) Oldsmobi le .$2295 


lere Is Everyt wv. ; . ; ; ; ‘ . | mostiv wit rze e« ar TT a = ag A > aaa tli ar _ aho Day , aerate: 
. . ‘ : - - ‘ miies;., 


1 x new Db! METER “ - ifT BI , 
ih bedroom mong SS on | RETOMOSN LOAN ‘50 Buick $2095 


th 4 bedrooms at - | : ) ) hey are clear | ~ | | . 
~~ on ' | : ] | waAwes ‘INA armen | bs . oO : iA RIVIERA, 4-door. 
‘] n ‘fireviac i \ a , 4 : ' Li , ‘4 . ‘ i “ 7 ry' , ) | a a - ‘ Til! : 0 . % 595 
er, _ Disposal, : | | | | . nth. To get a lot for e for 8: ser ishes in- |’ ECONOMY FINANCE CO. LS 50 Buick . 1 ; 
, ee oa | t » o* SPECTAt sedanette 


es, amnesic Re tg ae ne | MASON HIRS’ | CHATR ° rose dam | » : “WARRANTED” 50 Ford ..... $1395 
i Ts \ LAIR ; e. ro, udor iver’ 
Used Cars ||| ize he om 

r a0ta om Divs | 50 Chevrolet . $1645: 

nave the radio for vour car $ 11'S Buick ... $2195 eee ae ae 

ncluding luxe t{-doonr ‘a9 Ch Lavrolet $1245. 


Eve: OV. 6677. TE. 191 TI ; ' t , } moun! “a , " 
f ] ‘ n & — = 4 a¢ miles: full» . . 
; ‘ . _ % P it YP. s ue 
. ; 5 7, iipped -tene FLE! +. | d } 


Chevrolet $1685 1} | ‘48 Pontiac $1195 
Powerglide. de tmxe °-d ‘Hens ; 


liate Inst sedan. fully equipped ‘AT Pontiac 
laity 0 Mash | 
iv @el~ As g a “ae ; , 
RERSOR Custom mbhaxsador ‘ 48 G50! 
ur : As door ery low mileas 
OM SUITE—10 pieces, « ng " at going, omg he Hydra Matt = ‘47 Chevrolet 
i iO Studebaker $13 95 P Bu = coupe, . 
Champion 2-door fully 42 Buick : . 
AUT OS, , CASS. TRUC KS HR RE 95 equipped CENTURY 1-deor radio, 


é ” ’ , ; » _ “Ty . heater ‘yer ciean 
DT INGTON . ; say Fy | eee mien 6 Nord Tractor. for lease 11°60 Buick $1795 
ARLINGTON : . . AL TY | } oor | her Qt, UPHOLSTERED | furniture 1 Cramer dette “iin won Sith Raestel sodensttex tulle A Complete Selection of 


x R | 1 } , d ’ : ee j pas ie ; ; re: r \ 4 see WOOG 2515. ect mead ote whee 
RAMBLE! : : d BUICKS and Other Makes 


RS > : | 
2 pene Do | | OCEAN CITY, N. J~ ANY QUANTITY avails AUTOMOBILES WANTED 96 
3-BEDROOM, $19,950 | ) SDECTE : apts.. $30 Seaside. i piged eusnions oF im sheets by the | “Soe caener price for 100 Hic Oldsmobile $1595 || | and Models, 1950 to 194f 
Choice N. Afington io t ; ai -aiemetnanientess : rey ae enrareter~ne ‘eo é; ’ sen new H 
blocks to schools hoppir rn \} ; : WATER ERON’ 7” Lr ae oT. aa y lire ofthe ae radio, heater; 
transportatio: ' euthenes : eeu —_ — oe aM riginal paint 


pla lit ne ! om, fi vely } : 40 : . as Tre ' — . . oe < i 2 : | ; CO YT TT RIE RA . 
fal icimctt™ «thea FS an = : sgn Lo. Feces “nptealchbec 9 cca IRE aes gs <td axel ected Chevrolet $1295 w A PAIR & 
as nt. niv ft , : : ‘ : : } Wi iA Svan ©! : rtii- = woe Ay “ ‘ ‘o " - 0) 4 > ' ~te , ote 
Nr. Washington Golf Club} _° | : : ee x 353 or AD. 95. SQUARE FOOT for dinette | ALL MAKES! CLE A aeot radio, ‘heater. TWO 1950 
Your dream rambler, having : a “s SOGS. PE HENNELS ter oe Se enc! aN PARK\VJAY-F RT) ) F 
diccam seta, Mest vig | a OGS, PETS, KENNELS 76) Gusierity "Prices adj to cose PRK WAY-FORD ord... 9119 PONTIAC 


ye » 
vette teeetter* SS 


4763 I Lee mae Of ¢ 


yara. 


i-door eustem 
dio, heater CONVERTIBLES 


4 LELIAM hs ADKIN } | : +3 r vy n ° : 100 n “yg Sin. a re “Bt : é ‘¢). ; : One has 11.8300 ) aoe sne other 
Sm BOS . . . 17 . . 7318 Q ; ; ; fy ; Ae " S97% mits Rath * are 
S awattpas “tq $'- 13 ‘ ; ‘ ) ‘ ; RN ~ sei x . ise — —_ ~~ & = Jb wl “pas if? eauipred ona have 

. BUICK, INC. $4835 


—— . : 
RI TRIS TT . * ‘* x * a) i : | 
A} LING 1 UI! *> ri a : . . 7 . - ik : | } s~ : -F “ 
; , ' ga seeest TO! eos : , 18 months te paw with good 


f-room brici ui . . ‘ zt . 
3 «Ce 1 bi ’ a : TE. J yr : ' will guarantee. First come, fret 
; i ; . j ; ' ‘ ; ; ' , : a 
rr 7 é “ \ 


RON PONTIAC" 


Open Evenings | | 7320 Wisconsin Ave. (Beth.) 


OL. BOO 


ARI thud IG > TON 
Beautitnl §-room 


WE HAVE 


- : e ° 7 “ ; 7 - > 
. \ . 7 : ’ ¥ ‘ . ‘ .T) iit 
~ | : 
. ‘ ' . ; ‘ : : } : , 
‘ ‘+e ? , ' 4 . ‘ ee ‘ ; > vy 4-% ‘co as 
rm ¥ - . ° / " 4 . | . ; 
1 , ’ ; : ; - re 
; ; » . . . 
i Ja te - eB ai¥i3 eS 
. y $44 ' 
~< » . ey? " ' ‘ : . . . ‘ : ‘ 
*, .- i | 
~ | . . : d ; we 
sited . = o¢ --— 7 F : 
, ‘ “rol » vo 
: ar ae i eG ; 7 : : ’ ahais : - 
rite . ‘ : i ‘ ‘ : : : : ; an cr ae : ™ 
it pany : wire rf aT rr . 4 as «4 , . , 
**% aA + * a5 : ° : : - : : _ Baw 2 a h« : 
. ‘ i> L¢ - . 4 | 
5 ry : or 1 : } ; . > : . . . . Aa - J > * es 
i , -* , : : - 
ND ’ Fr » . i» : 3 ‘ r ; 7 > | 
’ aa ‘ aa by : j n | 
REA ; ; Se . a " Tr £ocy 5 ; | ‘ 
7] ; atts i * ow « | ° 4 , . + +4 
; . | | 
; } 7 7 = 7 et 
2212 WILSON BLVD. OW. $ n 1 cat.1 6 8 Aieee. new, and dable used cars for Southern 
J . + [ - . ; “i ick ; ‘ : >s" MA . 
4Li16 ¥ . i i ’ | : . > A . . eaaie , . ~~ = TAA Ore coanaAgw 
. ; 7 *) ; : _ « ~- : ww 
i ck | " . ; . ‘ : > ; 
' ‘ ; : —— — ” ‘ » nd + . So 7 
. vr ae 73, f ~ 4 Se 


AUROR 


n SRA “HILLS | : : , : | ols ee Bd Dice MOE HORSES, IVESTOCK ANGES. all “pg ie we | 
MUST BE SOLD | : | CE... ee ee oe bf reait installations. PEERL Ess | AUTOMOBILES, SALE | 1950 OLDSMOB 
! ee : :, — A JL ] rg folmont rm ee . : <3 . = RUICK i947 | : r 4-doo: 


Well built 3-bedroom brick fh j 
' 1 GAS RANGI 


with powder room and 2 tiled bat! rt ies eet j i . : W ash j ; DD e. 4-bul (ce) ge} ne black : 
Jarge screened porch, knot . :R0-8 eet re . ». JA i DETIOGy IROLOT & wie 46 j 99 
recreation room many extras i . ' : SALS USCELLANEGU RON . Kes ire | heal : 7S 7 spasm prints cs S 


cluded , for sale: immedi ee, a a , 
ossessi a See s lovel hom b 4 CCORDION—Tta 4) Leu Ar es yor ne} is , ims @ DaGaci-——iNasil 
: 7 ay nd new, $178. KE. | LA matching blue a : sige gm ig 2 doors — 4 doors 


RIGHT. REA] yY INC f 7 , Baths amo rR a e station | mnick rs 50 mils riz. | (one owner cars) 
e, . ’ . au «sii ; ‘ : . i ey ’ r a 
2301 So. | : RD). Wie 5 ner: extra : oie! 1 @ just traded on 1951 “Rockets” @ 30-day guarantee 


ented Fenced 8s! 0% ra — A eet ; | oon n ca . a i se 34 i wt re ‘ —_ hy 


included: below 17.000. " Gis ; : 
No agen its please ae gu ; | : ie i. ae Fe SO ‘ . : 3 i >) , : nvite : ne. ' a ' red yy. BRYSE i! New WVorker Club 
SHURCH | set ede nehets Sta yaa fil | A rYQuie niavble:Tophadeboard 800. | PARTE POM PRODSCIE CO | Coupe: lew” mileage, one owne COLONIAL OLDSMOBILE 


FALLS CHURCH | and Bex | 

Large rambler, breezeway l eioset and storage Iso many! a». o> “oo oe ae Fea GO ok OW 3 a NR in didleaticia aie | 1UMUTY 4 mobile at a budget price. 1241 6th st. n.ec. toff Fla. ave.) 

age on lot 100x150; weil s! Li | " fen ‘tal price, | £4 ES dese ibaa cy , e OO 4 mm. da >} ANTIOTF SW e-bae jlank TANO, Story & Clark apt. upright $20 See thc one a! : Poy beg , ’ 

Wig room. fireplace, dining pg gy i: terms 2 By; ee ae ag Py ia : 6g oe boitom | zs; O81 aa ration. | cel. CONG. , Sacr., 33550 L. 64! i. B.- LEAR JR. & BROS.. INC. open daily, 9-9; Sundays, 10-6 
_ ~ <8 eres s' A >7 ; bai ' ' 4 6 isd : ~% | ; . ; . ar) ‘a rote . Ti 0 — >A de a N . " - inet tevie t ed r | W sf} ne - : Auto Dea ier a - , 4 sad 

and pantry, 2 becrooms “ , - ? wigisisemas WL, La ; pCa. LSta * = ¢ | ASSORTE D householc ten int ench, perf. cond. 50. | “DISPLAY LOT Li. 7-9340 Li. 7-9346 


bath. wilit room; hone ns. tiled is 7 “aT . gi . - - . seh) i iS. : 
JE. 23-7485. . — ~ V¥ a : vu ‘vi SN 3420 ison Bivd, L.. 432 oS75 763 Lee Hwy. . lebe. Ww. 900. ‘ further details, call OV. 3795 6. 5120 Wiseocasin Ave. HO. 6012. 
‘ 


eee 
Pe ne 


a ere ere oo oe 


So a cee tater nenry mee RED: . 


eee we 


Theme Song Is ‘Whoosh’ 
3 Countries Covered 
In Flight of 4 Hours 


By Earl Wilson 


Nice, France—‘Whoosh!’— 
that’s our theme song. 

We're going so fast on this 
round-the-world hop that we’ve 
flown over three countries in 
four hours. In another hour, we 
should be in a fourth country— 
Italy. 


A couple of hours ago we' 


soared high over Madrid. 

Looking down, we could see 
the bullfight arena where, two 
years ago, we got a little ill 
watching a bull get killed. 

On we tore 
Salvador Dali’s home town, and 
made an airport stop there, but 
now... 

Now we’re happy. We've got a 
bottle of red wine in front.of us. 
And an “entrecote,” or small 
steak. Some Nicoise salad, mostly 
ripe tomatoes. We’re at a little 
outdoor restaurant at the Nice 
airport. 

Monte Carlo Casino’s a few 
miles away, and so is Aly Khan’s 
villa at Cannes. Aly ain’t home. 
I just called up. 

So we sit here thinking about 
the fact that we’ve flown over 
Portugal, Spain and France in 
an afternoon. We believe Lisbon 
is about the most spotless city 
we've seen. 

“Tt’s so clean!” we remarked to 
friends there. 

“We were waiting for you to 
say that,” they said, smiling. 

On the back streets, on the 
waterfront, you see the barefoot 
fishwives carrying tall baskets 
of fish on their heads—and so I 
became a fishwife for a while. 

I persuaded one of them to let 
me balance her basket of eels on 
my head. 

“Canasta” is the Portuguese 
word for these baskets. 

Some of them carry six or 
eight boxes stacked 5 feet high 


on their heads. They wear a little | 


circular roll of cloth about an 
inch thick on top of their heads 
for the burden to rest on. 

I had to take off my Texas 
sombrero—which 


the whole! 


On the table were some little 
yellow cardboard boxes which 
advertised some stomach medi- 
cines. 

“Doesn’t speak very well for 
the joint,” the B. W. said. 

I investigated and found that 
the boxes contained complimen- 
tary toothpicks. They put them 
before you on the table in the 
ibest restaurants in Lisbon. 
Nothing shy about the Portu- 
guese. 

Incidentally, at the restaurant, 
'I remembered that waterfront 


to Barcelona,' scene when I spilled the lady's 


basket. I DIDN’T order eels. 


| THE MIDNIGHT EARL: L. B. 
|Mayer’s looking for a _ horse 
farm in the San Fernando Valley 
.-- London’s newest romance in- 
volves Orson Welles and Eliza- 
beth Taylor... Arlene DeMarco 
of the sisters is being wooed 
_by Peter Lawford on the Coast 
...+. Esther Williams threatened 
| to leave “Skirts Ahoy” if Vivian 
|Blaine is given the big produc- 
tion number. 

Las Vegas is spending five mil- 
lion this year to build new 
hotels and add to the old ones 
—hbusiness is that good ... Luba 
Malina and Myron Sulzberger 
celebrate their first anniversary 
this week. 


' TODAY’S BEST LAUGH: 
_Anon. quip: “All her sweater 
does for her is make her itch.” 


B’WAY BULLETINS: Jackie 
Gleason’s due in from the Coast 
| with Joe Bigelow, his new writer 
|...» Producers of the new highly- 
_touted film, “The’ River,” made 
in India, are flying in several 
/maharajas for the premiere Sep- 
tember 10 at the Paris Theater 
. » « The Honduras government, 
in cooperation with the United 
States, is checking a steamship 
line flying the Honduras flag and 
| Shipping to Red China... To- 
| day’s Daily Double: Jimmy Ryan 
'and beauty Polly Aaron . 
'Chandler and wife rec 


Doris Duke off to Europe 


bers of an interim legislative 


: Potomac Paragraphs 


Model Charter Urged For Virginia Towns 


_ RICHMOND, Va., Aug. 14 (4).—Support for an abbrevi- | 
ated model charter bill, specifying the general power of 
localities of various classes, drew support today from mem- 


committee. The proposed bill 


|also would provide a “reservoir” ” 


'of power that a specific locality 
could dip into, if it desired, with- 
out getting a charter change 
through the General Assembly. 

Support for such a bill was ex- 
pressed at a public hearing of 
the committee of the Virginia 


Advisory Legislative Council 
4 ‘ten in Denmark” and couid “ 


| 


plode a bombshell.” 


studving methods of cutting the 
number of local, special and pri- 
vate bills presented to the Gen- 
‘eral Assembly each session. 

W. F. Stone, Martinsville City 
Attorney and member of the 
'VALC committee that first pre- 
sented the model charter »!9n, 
said the pronosed legislation 
would not “take away any of 
‘ealities under their existing 
charters.” 

The model charter, he ex- 
plained, would not contain any 
specific governmental set-up that 
‘would have to be followed. It 
‘would merely set forth such 
‘basic items as taxing powers and 
‘leave the rest of the local rules 
to be enacted by ordinances. 
| The obiections to the model 
charter plan were drawn up by 
'a committee composed of E. N. 
| Wilkinson, Suffolk City Man- 
ager: John Donaho, Richmond 
‘Budget Director: Mrs. Florence 
Cannon, Arlington Board Chair- 
‘man: Richmond City Manager 
Sherwood Reeder: J. J. Nichols, 
'Mayor of Vienna: Elliott Drin- 
‘ard, Richmond City Attorney, 
‘and John -B. Oliver, Bedford 
Town Attorney. 

A statement of this objecting 
committee said: 

“We sincerely doubt the wis- 
dom of enacting model charters 
for cities and towns of certain 
‘sizes, expecting those within 
each population group to con- 
form thereto. One community 
may differ widely from another, 
‘the needs may be almost com- 


| size.” 


waterfront was staring at—to/| for two weeks, will submit two) 


make room for the basket of eels | original songs to Milt Ebbins| Aerial 


on my head. 
Children Cry ‘Escudos’ 
Ragged little’ kids 
whining, “Escudos, 
(the Portuguese coin, 
about 3% cents). 
My Beautiful Wife was in the 
background whining, too. 
“You're holding the basket 
with your hands. No fair!” she 
shouted. 
I took my hand from the 
basket. I held it on my hip as the 


worth 


were|. . 
escudos!”| Swan Lake entry for the an-| didn’t start flying until he was 


when she returns for the musical 
| being written for Billy Eckstine 
. Rusty Kenmore is Paul’s 


nual “Miss Sullivan County” 
_ beauty contest. 


EARL’S PEARLS: Donald 
Richards explained to Taffy Tut- 
| tle that a double-jointed fellow 
|isn’t one who owns two night 
clubs. 


| 
| WISH I'D SAID THAT: “A 


‘Quickie’ 


| MARTINSBURG, W. Va. AUB: Wo) Winchester Doctor 


14 (®—Arlo (Buddy) Parker 
42, but he learned fast. Today 
ihe was credited with a solo 
flight on his second day of in- 
struction. W. L. Zebley, manager 
of the Martinsburg Airport, said 
he taught the Patuzent, Md., 
pubil over the weekend. The 
| pair crammed 7% hours of in- 


' struction into that period. Par- 


clared the firemen should be| 


men recommended by him for, 


firemen posts should not be re- 
jected by the council. 
Alderman Carl 


blem on the Governor’s es district, the United States Mar- traffic toll. 


‘Span of Years Ends 


|meeting in Annapolis, immedi- 


i 
; 


who opposed 


be. 


| 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
Wednesday, August 15, 1951 


13B_ 


| 121103, and Thad Stevens. They 


te Is ‘Slicker’ | 
State Is é said the businessman had 
GRAFTON, W. Va. Aug. 14,0 asted of his numbers opera: 


College and the Medical College , Dennis Molden, 9, son of Ed L. (®.—W. A. Coffman of Grafton, ;:.,, iso testifying today in- 


of Virginia, has opened a medi- | Molden, 


cal office in this city. His father, | 
the Rev. Edgar G. Hill, has been | 
pastor of the Market Street 
Methodist Church here for 
almost two years. 


Winchester businéss- 


pital, Richmond. He is the fifth 


‘local person to be striken with 


|infantile paralysis this summer. 


paid higher salaries and that Cadets Immune 


WINCHESTER, Va., Aug. 14— 


|Rep. Burr P. Harrison (D-Va.) 


T. Stephen, of Winchester states that none 
the resignation, of his appointees to the United 


said he “smelled something rot- States Military Academy were 


Growers Name Governor 


BALTIMORE, Aug. 14.—Gov. 
Theodore R. McKeldin has been 
chosen an honorary member of 
the National Junior Vegetable 
Growers Association. Miss Bar-' 
‘bara Dean of Ridgley, 1951' 


a member of NJVGA, pinned a 
'special jeweled membership em- 


“in recognition of Gov. McKel- 
din’s interest in and support of 
the state’s young vegetable 
growers.” 


PASADENA, Md., Aug. 14 (#. 
Daugherty’s Bridge outdid Lon- 
don Bridge today. After 30 
years, it really fell down. The 
little plank bridge crumbled | 
into a stream on Magothy Beach | 
rd. just after a tank truck 


crossed and drew abreast a sign 


the powers now held by the lo-| Maryland Vegetable Queen and 44 PT 


ex- involved in the cheating scan- 


dal there. His appointees now 
at the Academy are George W. 
Miller and Hugh J. Hall, jr. of 


| Winchester, William H. Clark of 


Harrisonburg and Morris T. 


Warner, jr..of Staunton. 


Peach Sales Light 


MARTI 


j 


Picnic For Boys | 


NSBURG, W. Va., Aug. ‘appeared before 
he first week of the Advisory Legislative 
peach season brought very light yesterday to ask an inquiry into) yy, 
offerings in. this Appalachian ‘the cause of the state’s rising) 


WINCHESTER, Va., Aug 14— 
The Rev. William H. Hanckel, 
rector of Christ Episcopal 
Church, Winchester, heads the 
Exchange Club committee in 
charge of the auunal boys’ picnic 


to be held Thursday at the 
Willow Lawn swimming pool. 


Battle Asks Toll Study 


RICHMOND, Va., Aug. 14, (. 


Counci 


Several weeks ago 
ket News Service here reported the Governor asked the council 
today. Scarcity of the crop re- to study the traffic fatality situa- 
sulted from a lull between varie- tion and prepared recommenda- 
ties. Jubilees, Triogems and tions for the General Assembly 
other earlier varieties are being which meets next January. 


cleaned up while Hale Havens ‘ 
are starting to market. From the $500 Fine for ‘Slots 
BEL AIR, Md., Aug. 14, (®.— 


southern end of the belt, there 
was only fair demand as picking Anthony Moscato was fined $300 
‘at a Magistrate’s hearing on 


of the Elberta crop began. 
| charges he permitted slot-ma- 


announcing its 5-ton limit. Anne 
Arundel County Commissioners, 


ately authorized a new bridge. 


Honesty, 32 Years Old 
ROANOKE, Va., Aug. 14 (4).— 


ei 
licious 


Thirty-two years ago when he 
was in the Navy, A. M. Renick, 
now a Roanoke auto dealer, | 
loaned $5 to a friend while wait-| 
ing for a train in the Pennsyl-| 
vania Station in New York. Last | 
week, Renick heard from the 
friend for the first time since 


.. Jeff pletely different—and yet the 'then. The friend, who now lives | 
onciled ‘tommunity may be similar in!in Rochester, Pa., wrote that he | 


will repay the $5 as soon as 
Renick gives him a correct. 
address. 


WINCHESTER, Va., Aug. 14— | 
Dr. Douglass O. Hill, a native of 
Norfolk County and graduate of | 
Thomas Jefferson High School | 
in Richmond, Randolph-Macon | 


i 


Crops Believed 


Boy Has Polie ‘chine gambling at a restaurant 
WINCHESTER, Va., Aug. 14— in Edgewood. 
That SHRIMP is Fresh! 
All Seafood is Fresh at Kushner’ 
SPECIAL SEAFOOD PLATTER 
Crab cake, fish, scallops, chicken fried 
shrimp, French fried potatoes, cole $ |] 25 
bun, rolls and butter. ip 
Fresh steamed Hard Shell Crabs 
Served nightly 8:30 to 12 P.M. 
| RESTAURANT ~ ~~ 
8523 Piney Branch Rd., Silver Spring. Md. SH. 3800 
3815 Georgia Ave. N.W. RA. 9700 


¢ j ; so) that’s what makes our food so de 
Slaw, tartar sauce, home-made rum 
LAMA BEL RAR A AUDELA RERATCCA CECCTULERELELLLUN CCL cette a 


retired Baltimore & Ohio Rail- cluded City Sergeant R. E. Eger- 


man, is a polio patient in the road conductor, has vainly ap- ton; W. L. Goodwin, state serv- 
Medical College of Virginia Hos- pealed to the State Auditor for! 


ce officer for the Veterans of 
Foreign Wars, and Councilman 


refund of $66.75. He said he punve Layne. 


paid this sum to the State at a 
tax sale for a piece of property, 
later found to be 70 feet under 


the waters of Tygarts Dam. How- BALTIMORE, Aug. 14, (A— 
ever, State Auditor Edgar B. 


. . ire sw hrough a grain ware- 
Sims declined to refund the og. a 1B 1 the K 
money, saying, in effect, “let the M0US€ and feed mili on the Aey 
buyer beware” whether buying Highway waterfront today, snarl- 


from a state or from an individ- ing the morning rush hour traf- 
ual stranger. fic in that busy industrial area. 


Gaming Proge Goes On _—_ Soldier Guilty in Deaths 


HOPEWELL, Va., Aug. 14, (®. BERCHTESGADEN, Germany, 
—Two union leaders who linked Aug. 14, (?—Pvt. Woodrow Ellis 
the name of a businessman with of Redwood, Va., in Franklin 
numbers gambling here, were County, was sentenced to three 
among witnesses appearing to- years in prison for the traffic 


Fire in Baltimore 


—Gov. John S. Battle personally day before a special grand jury deaths of two Germans, the 
the Virginia 
1 


investigating gambling in Hope- Army annuonced today. Ellis 
well. The two were W. A. Wal- was driving an Army truck. He 
gren, president of the United also was ordered dishonorably 
ine Workers’ District 50, Local’ discharged from service. 


' 


; 


® Vacation Special ® 


|REUPHOLSTER 


SOFA & CHAIR §9 00 


Including labor and materials—new springs 
and filling where necessary—pick-up and de- 
uD 


livery—3-year guarantee. 
up 
‘UPHOLSTERERS—INTERIOR DECORATORS 


SLIP COVERS 
2 Pieces, sofa and chair. Large selection of 
Estimates Cheerfully Given Within a 50-Mile Radius 
2447 18th Street N.W. Co. 5116 


material—plain and floral. 
Open Evenings Until 9 P.M. EASY TERMS. FREE PARKING 


re re ee 


~~ - 


Not Required 


WOL—10:05 a. m. Music 


Panel People 


Now Don't 
Think at All 


WWDC—11. Author Harold 


WMAL—11:30. 
appearing at Olney Theater, is 


guest. 


___ By John Crosby 


Wednesday’s Aves 


Scene” with Ann Jeffreys and Brian Sullivan. 


ton is guest of Radio Man Happy Felton. 
Basil Rathbone, currently 


WMAL—1:15. Arthur Quentin Reynolds is 


WWDC—12:15 p.m. Mrs. John Kee, newly 
elected Congresswoman from West Virginia 


adio Programs 


Yogi Berra is guest. 

WCFM—6. .“How Has the Teaching Profes- 
sion Organized for Leadership?” ‘Panel dis- 
cussion. 

WCFM—9:30. Medley of music from Act 
One of “Faith of Our Fathers” and an inter- 

view with the composer, Richard Wayne 
Dirksen. 

WASH-FM—9:30. “The Court House Bat- 
tle” stars Mona Freeman and Rory Calhoun. 

WTOP—10. John Foster Dulles discusses 


from “Street 


“Happy” Fel- 


guest. ~ 


fishwives do as they walk. | . “| ker immediately began working 
Crash! The basket slipped off, "sage ee who reso for his license as a private pilot. | 

my head. The eels spilled out), .. sing. —fal | 

of the basket and down on my) 


is guest. 
WEAM—1:30. 

York Giants. 
WTOP—2. How women can better condi- 


I CELEBRATED national Brooklyn Dodgers vs. New 
vegetable week much too strenu- 


ously and have been put on a 


the San Francisco Conference and the Jap- 
anese Peace Treaty. : 
WTOP—10:30. Senate Crime Committee 


Setting Peak 


shirt. 

‘Everybody laughed. Person- 
ally, I had to bend down and 
pick up the lady’s slippery eels. 

Afterward we rode the ferry 
across the Tagos River—just 
like going to Staten Island—to a 
seafood restaurant. 


- 
~ 


| Dorothy Greener, comedienne 
|of the Don Ameche TV show, 
tells of a female vocalist who 
|married a recording engineer 
| and they lived in an echo cham- 
_ber happily ever after ... That’s 
earl, brother. 


| (Copyright, 1951. 
Post-Hall Syndicate, Inc.) 


Gunshot Kills Boy 


BUCHANAN, Va., Aug. 14, (. 
— A l4-year-old Botetourt 


Filed as a friendly test case by 
Attorney Ridgely P. Melvin jr., 
the suit contends Maryland’s 


County boy died of a gunshot constitution sets up a lengthy 
wound received today in a scuffle legislative procedure to approve 


with a friend over a .38-calibre 


pistol. 
Broughman, son of Mr. and Mrs 


The victim was Cecil 


_bond issues for a private organi- 
zation. A 1951 act authorizing 


Forrest Broughman, living near county aid is not sufficient, Mel- 


here. Jack Fowler, 19, told of- 


‘vin said. 


ficers that Broughman grabbed : 
for the pistol while they were Car Wrecks Bridge 


lying in the yard of the Fowler 


home, 


Suit on Hospital Bonds 
ANNAPOLIS, Aug. 


'A 90-foot steel truss bridge on 
| Secondary Route 42, over Linville 
Creek, in Rockingham County 


| RICHMOND, Va., Aug. 14, P—! 


Heads Legion Auxiliary 


| CHARLESTOWN, W. Va. 
Aug. 4—Mrs. S. H. Stane, this 
city, was named president of the 
at the annual meeting held in 
West Virginia Legion Auxiliary 
Charleston. She succeeds Mrs. 
W. E. Eskew of Weston. Mrs. 
Stone had been first vice presi- 
dent. Mrs. Katherine B. Holley, 
of Hedgesville, Berkeley county, 
was named second vice presi- 
dent. 


Auxiliary Being Formed 


| GORE, Va., Aug 14 — L. G. 
| Carter, president of the newly 
| organized Gore Fire Company, 


purchasing fire fighting 
ment. 


Fire Marshal Quits 
| ANNAPOLIS, Aug. 


equip- 


14, (A.— 


14, (®—/ was demolished yesterday when;|The City Council has accepted 


Anne Arundel County Commis-|an automobile struck the span.|the resignation of: Fire Marshall) Fred 
| yieias, 


sioners have asked for dismissal | The bridge wil be restored to use| Robert G. Beall, who also works 


of a suit to block sale of $600,000 


‘within four days. Traffic has 


for the Naval Academy. Beall 


in bonds for improvements to! been detoured over Route 804 via said he did not have sufficient 


-Anne Arundel General Hospital. ' 


Daphan. 


time for both jobs. He also de- 


Today on 


WTOP-TV 


7:00 PM 
Channel 9 


Mark Evans and Elinor Lee 


Mark and Elinor are searching for Washington's Alice in 
Wonderland. Full details will be given this evening. 


aS 


SLABS SHES SEEREEERERER ESEEEREREREREREER EERE EEE ERE EEE EERE EEE SE EERE ERE EE E'S & 


SS 


8:00 PM 
Channel 9 


_ Arthur Godfrey’s Friends 


Arthur is still on vacation but comedian Billy Gilbert 
will be on hand to guarantee plenty of laughs. 


2A BERBER ESESESE|EEEEREERERE EEE EEREEREREEE ES EEE EEREERERERERE EER EE EREEERERERERESE EEE SREESER EEE EER ES S'S 


9:30 PM 
Channel 9 


'damage to crops in Maryland’s 


In Maryland 


By The Associated Press 
Dry weather has done some 


three western counties, the 
State’s corp observers reported 
yesterday. But growing condi- 


tions have continued to be fine: mY po’ 
The to-| : @- 
bacco crop, particularly, prom-' * si 


in the other sections. 


| ises to be one of the best in 
| years, 


|ern counties. 


says women of the community | &xPerts said Maryland’s corn, 
are forming an auxiliary and ts, barley, tobacco and hay 
will hold a yard party next| Crops will set new records, or 
month to keep raising funds for|@pproach new records, 


00,000 
PAS 
t 
i 


The State’s truck crop indus- 
try is hitting its harvest peak 
under ideal conditions. 

The Federal-State reporting 


unless | 
severe weather develops. | 

The official crop report, is-'| 
sued at the University of Mary- 


land, gave these summaries: 


CORN—Despite dry weather west of 
Chesapeake Bay, the crop continues to 
hold good color except in the three west- 
Some Japanese beetle dam- 
has been reported in Howard and 
erick Counties. Indicated 1951 
21.840.000 bushels, 15 percent 
above last year. 

SOYBEANS — General crop conditions 
continue in early fields. 

POTATOES—Harvest of the early com- 
mercial crop on the Eastern Shore is 


completed. 

SWEET POTATOES—Prospects _ still 
very good and first harvest of smgil ean- 
ning sizes expected about September 1 in 
Salisbury area. with yields above average. 

TOBACCO—Nearly all the tobacco areas 
received an inch of rain during the week 
and it was badly needed in some locali- 
ties. Harvest has started on some farms. 
Present indications are for large leaf 
size, uniform growth, good stands and 
high yields. Generally, the crop appears 
to be free of disease. Production of 45.- 
900, pounds now indicated. with an 
average yield of 900 pounds an acre. 

RES AND HAY—Second cutting 
alfalfa and clover continues west of 
. Sunny weather has helped cur- 

re} the bay again 
nevis the effects of insuffici 


| 


ent rain. | 

EANS—General field conditions still | 
very good. 
CANTALOUPES—Earliest fields plowed | 
up, harvest about three quarters complet- | 
ed in Salisbury area. Prices have en | 
discouraging and some of the remaining | 
crop may not be picked. 
SWEET CORN—Harvest of the canning | 
crop continues on the Eastern Shore and | 
peak volume is expected in Queen Annes | 
County this week. 
OMATOES—Hot, humid weather near | 
the end of the week incressed consider- | 
ably the volume of the Eastern Shore 
crop gOing to canners., ut the fogg 
mornings have been responsible for th 


e| 
spread of late blight. 


—_—__—_— 


TV REPAIRS 


IN YOUR HOME—ALL MAES 


$3.00 te Pare 
SIDRAY TELEVISION 


111] 7th Street N.W. 


AD. 0668 


“WIGHT SERVICE | 


DORSEY’S TV REPAIR | 


We'll be at your home withig 2 hours! 
ALL 


All Makes CALL Ww 


they have made a real he-man 


tions in their local schools is 


strict diet—nothing but whisky 
Clara Blitzer, educator. 


eae and water. 
And panel 
shows. Noth- 


WWDC and WASH-FM—=5:55. 


Hearing (recorded.) 
WGMS-FM—11:05. Music by Johann Strauss 
and Serge Prokofiev. 


discussed by 
Catcher 


# ing like a 
; panel show to | Programs printed here conform 


to the latest information furnished by stations at time of publication 


| cut down your | WMAL (ABC) 630 | WRC (NBC) 


980 


WWDC (MBS) 1260 /WOL (LBS) 1450 WTOP (CBS) §=1500 


vitamin in- N 6, 7%, 7:45, | Timekeeper 
ews, , , > bd ° 
: take, 8:30. sete Creek | 5:55. 7:00, 7:3 
| wit im G ns, 
It was John ; Weather, 6:30. 


6:50; News, 


Bill ‘Herson, 6:00, 9:30; 


Art Brown. 6, Voice of | Frank Blair. 6-9. News, | Mark Evans, 5:20; 
Washington, 7:30; Art| 6:30, 7, 7:30, 7:45, Claude Mahoney, 7:301 
Breen, 7:48. Eddie Gallaher, 7:455 
News, 6. 6:30, 7, &. 


0, 8°00; 


4 6:05, 7:10, 8, 8:35. 
Royal, the eld- eer ' 


-00 Breakfast Club_ 
er sage of | 0 
N. B. C., who! 


Bill) Herson 
Rill Herson 
Bill Herson 


News; Bill Herson 


News pf America 
You’re the Top 
Home Service Daily 
Nancy Dixon 


Art\ Brown 
Art Brown 
News; Ford and Parrot 
News: Ford and Parrot 


News, Dick Roll 
Musle 


Keyboard Melodies 
Franklin Kennedy 


‘15,.Den McNeil 
:30' Breakfast Club 
-45' Breakfast Club 

some years) . 

back declared 

that television 


Welcome Travel 


Crosby 


-30\Betty Crocker 
:45 Mod. Romances 


Welcome Travelers 
Double or Nothing 
Double or Nothing 


News; Show Time 
Show Time 
Show Time 
Show Time 


—— -——- 


Arthur Godfréy 
with Robert 
Q. Lewis 
Variety 


Milton Q Ford 
and Parrot 
News; Ford 


Ford: News 


ers 


Break the Bank 
Break the Bank 
Jack Rerch 

Dave Garroway 


was in the “I think” stage. A lot. 


00 My True Story 


-00\New Way ’ Life 
215) Cc. Fredricks 
:30 Ruth Crane 


:15 Story; Arnold 
of people sat around a micro- 
:45'Crane; News 


phone and thought deeply about, 


Felton; Ford 

and Parrot 
Queen for a Day 
Queen for a Day 


Arthur Godfrey 
Arthur Godfrey 
Grand Slam 
Rosemary 


News, Boll 
Hollywood Editor 
Love Songs 
Love Songs 


= :00/Robert Mills 
5' Headline News 
0 Back to =. 


News: Godwin 
Here’s Archer 
Here’s Archer 


71 
3 Archer 


Here’s 


News, Berger 


w ; 
Dr. Crane endy Warren 


Aunt Jenny 
Helen Trent 
Our Gal Sunday 


Curt Massey Show 
Hazel Markel . 
News; Prizes Seng Shop 


Conn. Ave. Shopper 


5| ible 
00 P. Harve News Here’s Archer 
4 Nancy Oscood 
Nancy Osgood 


— 


Live Like a 


Look te This Day 


Double or Nothing 
Double or Nathing 


Millionaire: News 


Tune Test; News 

All Spores Parade 
Milten Q. Ford 

News: Sports Parade 
Milton Q. Ford 


News: District Matinee 
District Matinee 
George Crawford 
District Matinee 


News: District Matinee 
District Matinee 
George Crawford 
District Matinee 


Big Sister 
Ma Perkins 
Dr. Malone 
Guiding Licht 
Second Mrs. Burten 
erry Mason 
Nore Drake 
“| Brighter Day 


Ali Sports Parade 
Milton Q Ford 
Nows; Sports 
Milten Q Ford 


——_ —- ———— 


Life Beautiful 
Road of Life 
Pepper Young 


Right te Happiness 


fiilltep House 
Kings Row 

House Party 
House Party: 


News; District Matinee 
District Matinee 

George Crawford 
District Matinee 


All Sports saga 


News 


Backstage Life 
Stella Pallas 
Widow Brown 


Woman in House 


Strike It Rich 
Strike It Rich 
Mark Evans 

Mark Evans: News 


News: District Matinee 
District Matinee ° 
George Crawford 
District Matinee 


1260 Club 
Willis Conover 
News: 1260 Club 
Willis Conover 


Just Plain Bill 


Lorenzo Jone 


Front Page Farrell 
$s 
Civil Defense Talk 


News: Punch. Judy 
Punch and Judy 
Daily Hit Parade 
Daily Hit Parade 


1260 Club Mark Evans 
Willis Conover 
News; 1260 Club 


1260; Mel Allen Curt Massev 


News; Leif Eid 
Earl Godwin 
Extra 


745! (Adventure) | 3-Star 


News; Sports. B’ 


News: Background 
ireasure Crest 

Seminary Vespers 
Wallace Deuel 


Bob Wolff 
Dance Date 
News: Melody 
Melody Lane 


News: Jackson 
Shadel; Factfinder 
News: McDonald 


m'n 
Ron Cochran 


:00'Cong. Today 
/15'Elmer Davis 
:30 Lone Ranger 
-45'Lone Ranger 


:00/American 


Bs 


Music; Weather 


ttt 


ent 
The Falcon (My 


“15> £ 
o | 
:30'The Fat Man the Falcon (My 


-45\Fat Man; News 
f 


:00|Rogue’s 


15 

:39' Quiz o 

745| Two Cities 
00:News. lawrenrre 
715 Welk Orch. 
-29'News of To row 
-45\News: Music ra 


-00'News, J. Henry 
-15'Hour of Dreams 
R00! Lee Dayton 
:45|Hotel Orchestra 


————$——— 


—-- 


Gallery 
District Attorne 
. The Pig Story 
The Bic Story 
Private Files of 


PR SIE om 
News: Sports 
Richard Harkne 


-00|\News; Nocturne 
:15 Nocturne 
:30' Nocturne 
:45 Nocturne 


WMAL (ABC) 630 | WRC 


(NBC 


Batters’ Platters 
News of the World 
One Man’s Family 


Pete Kelly’s Blues 
Pete Kelly's Biues 


It Pays to Be Ignorant 
It Pays to Be Ignorant 
District Attorneys 


Rex Saunders 
ED 


: Cloutier 
— Orchestra 
News: Cavalier Hotel 
News; Cava orchestra 
Riverside Bae 


930 


Spotlight on UN 
The Weatherman 

J. W. Vandercook 
Liberty Scoreboard 
News; Lat. Rhyth. 
Marine Corps 

Broadway Encores 


Fulton Lewis, ir. 

Morgan; Berger 

Gabriel Heatter 

Newsreel 

1260 Club 

Dusout Chatter 

Baseball: New York 
at Washington 


Baseball 
Baseball 
Baseball 
Baseball 


Baseball 
Baseball 


Eddie Gallaher’s 
Summer Show 

Eddie Gallaher 

Don Hollenbeck 


Rocky Jordan 

George Raft 
Dr. Christian 
Pr. Christian 
Escape 
Escape 
Yours Truly, 
Johnny Dollar 


stery) 


stery) Broadway Encores 


News: [yay eg 
Tv. 8. A. Unlimited 
U. 8. A. 


Unlimited 
(Charlie Bright) 


Frank Fdwards 

House That Jack Built 

News: House That 
Jack Built 


House That 
Jace Built | D. C. News: Sports 

Sports; House That | Meondial 

Jack Bullt | (Eddie Gallaher) 
News: Harold Jackson | News: Meondial 
House That Jack Built | (Eddie Gallaher) 
House That Jack Built | Gene Kiavan 
Harold Jackson 


WoL (LBS) 1450 | WTOP 


y 


10th Inning: News 
Frank Edwards 


$100 Massey 


News: 


$100 Massey 
$100 Massey 
News: £1090 Massey 
$100 Massey 


WwWOC (MBS) 1260 


(until 
) 1500 


—_ 


0 
rchestra m. 


(CBS 


TELEVISION HIGHLIGHTS 
WMAL-TV — 3. William 
Nordvedt displays miniature 
chairs, tea service and musil- 
cal instruments; Royal Toner, 
oyster expert, shows how to 
spare an oyster. 
Pe TOP-TV1. Mr. and Mrs. 
Walter Willman, here for the 
Angling and Casting conven- 
tion, are guests. 
WTOP-TV—8. Comedian 
Billy Gilbert is guest. 
WNBW—8. British art and 


say, high prices, or should a 
girl kiss a man on the first 
time out. Then they emitted 
opinions. It wasn’t the humidity, '15'Gloria Swanson 
it was the density of these! | art ep Neng 
answers which made life un-|—— piprenx Harden 
comfortable in those days. 7 15) — 
Well, the panel show has come eeiteences bouliy 
a long way sinee then. The panel |~ gq _:00\Evelyn Winters 
members don’t think at all; the 3 Ee acirl Marries 
answers are carefully rehearsed | :45\Lone Journey _ 
and seem at times to have been -00|Dean Cameron 
written. by someone else, and a sinter pew 
man can relax and perhaps even |___~_:45' ——— 
catch a nap during a panel show gues bay Fen 
without feeling that he is miss- :30\Fun Factory 
ing _ profound thoughts on serene “or 
animal husbandry. | 15 ¢ 
Panel shows have even ac- 
quired enough renown to at- 
tract a show specifically de- 
signed to satirize them. There is 
no higher compliment. The pro-| 
gram is “How To,” a Hollywood 
operation that arrives here by | 
Kinescope. 
“HOW TO” is presided over) 
by Roger Priee, a former script 
writer for Bob Hope and the 
author—so help me Hannah—of |* *_ 
a book called “In One Head and 
Out the Other.” . 1] 
“This show has been on the air. 
for only a month,” he’ll tell you, | 2 
“and already it has attracted 
thousands of enemies. Here’s a 
letter from a reader. ‘I’ve been | 
following your health hints and | 
out of me. I’m suing you for 
$100,000 because six months ago | 
I was a girl.’ ” | 
The panel members include 
Anita Martell (Mrs. Price) and/| 
a couple of other Hollywoodites, 
Huntz Hall and Leonard Sterm, 
and their task—to quote directly 
from Price—“Is to help people 
with an inability to cope with’ 
life—or copelessness.” The prob- | 


A 


Today’s Television Program 


ee 


| WNBW (NBC) 4/WITG (DuM) 5|WMAL-TY (ABC) 7 WTOP-7V (CBs) 9 


I me 


iw estern Theater 
(cowboy film) 
| Strike It Rich 
Re (quiz) 
| Steve Allen Show 
(comedy) 
(music) 
(guests) 
| Steve Allen Shew 
Steve Allen Show 
Garry Moore Show 
Garry Moore Show 
Hollywood Matinee Garry Moore Show 


Headlines 

For Your Infe. 

Johnny Olsen's 
Rumpus Room 


Take the Break 
(quis) 


15! 
:30 Naney Ossood 
:45 Nancy Osgood . 


— ——— — 


(0) Peoples Pi'yh'se 


Memory (De It Yourself 


| :15)""Blae 
| M. Medwin Midday Chapel 
‘News, Harkness ev 


lems they cope with are as in-| a mare 
consequential or just plain silly 
‘| as possible. How to snare a hus- 
band, for example. (Keep your 
gowns low and your standards 
high, advised Miss Martell. 
Price agreed with her 50 per- 
cent.) | 

These remarks are about as 
ad lib as a presidential address | 


and, in some cases, no sillier. | 
(Copyright. 1951. New York Herald 
Tribune, Inc.) 


FM Radio Stations 


WRC-FM (Channel 230—93.9 mc)—5S:30 
am. te a. m. 
WTOP-Fm (Channel 242—96.3 mc)— 
5:30 am. te 2 a. m. 
-F) (Channe] 244—96.7 mc)— 
10:30 a. m.; 4 Dp. m. 
(Channel 246—97.1 mc)— 
2:30 p. m. te AS m. 
WOL-FM (Chann 252—98.7 me)—6¢ 
a. m. to 1 a. m. 
ween (Channel 258—99.5 mec)—5 p. m. 
eo D>. ™. 
WFAN (Channel 260—100.3 mec)—5 
a. m. te 9 p. m. 
WWDC-Fw (Channel 266—101.1 mc)— 
7 a. m. to 2 a. m. 
WGMS-FM (Channel %78—103.5 mc)— 
6:30 a. m. to midnight. 
(Channel 286—105.1 mec)— 
a. m. te 9 p. m. 
WBCC-FM (Channel 292—106.3 mc)— 
6 a. m. 9 bp. m. 
WMAL-FM (Channel 297—107.3 me)—9 
a. m. te midnicht. 


music is featured from Na- 
tional Gallery of Art. Mary 
Howe, composer, is inter- 
viewed during intermission of 
program which includes selec- 
tions from Purcell, Byrd, Brit- 
ten, Elgar and William Boyce. 
Mrs. Howe’s “Agreeable Over- 
ture” will also be played. _ 

WMAL-TV—38:30. Paul Dix- 
on Show makes its debut. 
Artist Wanda Lewis and Dot- 
tie Mack join Dixon in the va- 
riety show. 

WNBW—9. “John Wilkes 
Booth,” stroy of Lincoln's as- | 
sassin, stars John Baragrey | 
and Oliver Thorndike. 

WTOP-TV—10. Film of Ray 
Robinson-Jake Lamotta fight 
Rocky Graziano and Robinson | 
are interviewed. 


OTHER STANDARD 
ke.—6: 


oe 00 
:15\Mostly Music Lamb) 
:30 Matinee Shep the Town 
-45 Theater (Dianne Cameron) 
oo 8 
Hat 


News: Dise Jockey 
4 15 
4 Matinee 


TV Dise 
Art Lamb 
:30 Straw 
:00' Hawkins Falls 
:15:C’bey Playhse. 


TV Dise Jockey 
:30 Hewdy Doody 


News: Dise Jockey 
TV Dise Jockey 
Lamb 
745 Howdy Doody 
:00|""Machine Shep the Town 
15) Gun Mama” Dianne Cameron 
: Fi 


“Police Bullets’ Garry Moore Show 
John Archer First 100 Y 
Joan Marsh) Vanity Fair 
Ruth Crane | Vanity Fair 
Ruth Crane ‘Vanity Fair 
Across the Counter 
Jack Henry, News 


Bailey Goss Show 
Bailey Goss Show 
Railew Goss Show 
Balley Goss Show 


Baliey Goss Show 
Bailey Gess Show 
Bailey Gess Show 
Bailey Goss Show 


Frontier Theater 
“Young Blood 
Bob Steele Weather; 
Burn 'Em Up B'es. News: Cro 
Telenews 
rts 
ance ef 


$4.99 
4 
Be sure to see 


THE NEWS TODAY 


with 


WALTER CRONKITE 


for a complete review | 
of the day’s news 


6:45-7:00 tonight on 


An enemy agent employs a ruse that brings a 
talkative security officer to the “Edge of Error.” 


10:00 PM 
Channel 9 


iRay Robinson vs. LaMotta 


Discussing the film of this famous Robinson-LaMotta fight will 
be Rocky Grazino and George Gainford, Robinson's manager. 


WIOP-TV 


Homemakers’ 

Exchange 

Top Kindergarten 

Top Kindergarten 
bt eee meh a 
Cowboy Playhouse 
Cewbovw Playhouse 
“Wild Country™ 
Eddie Dean 


Matinee 


5 T. Wakeman, Spts. 


o_o 


Art 

TV Dise Jockey i 
News: Dise Jockey 
Sagebrush 
8 * Theater 

30, Im | Space Cadet Sports 
745) Film: News Time for Beany nkite 
:00 Willis bag nat 4 Captain Vid 


315) ues Captain Video 
-30' Twilight Sens nH” Newsreei 
:45 News Caravan | Stase Entrance 
-00 Heritage Documentary Th. 
:15 Mary Howe Decumentary Th. 
‘30 Richard Bales | Decumentary Th. 
745) (music) Decumentary Th. 


| Whats the Story 
ts the Story 
w of 

the Cleak 


Adult Education 
piel Sfvcaticn he" 
aul xon ow 

Paul Dixon Show _/!____Frank Parkes 
‘Bill Gwinn Shew | Strike It Rich 

(talent show) Th Quiz 

Quiz of The Web 
Two Cities The Web 
Wrestling 
Wrestling 
Wrestling 
Wrestling 
G. Back; Sports : 

Sign Off 


00'TV Theater ) 
‘15: “John Wilkes | Wha 
:30 Booth” | § 
:45' John Barogrey 
00 Break the Bank 
:15\Baddy Rogers 
:30:Stare Over 
245) Hellyw 


Pin-up Wife 
Pin-up Wife 
Te Be Announced 
Te Be Announced 


Night Owl Th’ter. 
“Little Abner’ 


channel 9 


: C€ re % 


STATION 


- 


ood 


’ 
’ 


| WIOP-TV channel 


of 
-|WMAL-TY (ABO 7. WTOP-TY (CBS) 9 


THE WASHINGTON POST 


Wednesday, August 15, 1951 


The DISTRICT LIN 


Telephone Manners 


Need Revamping 


AMONG THE THINGS that 
burn me to a rich brown are 
the telephone manners some 
people develop. Mannerisms, 
I guess is a better term. 

There’s the dolly who dials 
a number, ‘then swivels her 
chair and starts a conversation 
with you. , 

“Say, who was that lady I 
seen you with?” she'll say. 

The helpless victim, a man 
of course, can only stammer. 

At which point, she gets her 
party on the phone, carols 
“Hello-o,” and leaves the man 
bewildered, his mouth work- 
ing like an old bellows. 

And there’s the guy who is 
already in conversation when 
his phone rings. Does he 
complete his sentence, say ex- 
cuse me, and answer it? No. 
He takes the phone off the 
cradle, holds it somewhere 
near his head, and loudly 
continues his previous conver- 
sation. . 

Finally, there’s the party 
who cr-"- «-- rm ond whose 
first words are a petulant, 
“Who's this?” 

We need a rule change cov- 
ering all these infractions. 


cw 


GIVE-AWAYS 

Beautiful tiger-stripe cat; 
$1 enclosed for Children’s 
Hospital (Lockwood 5-1729). 
Four kittens, will deliver (Trin- 
idad. 2453). Mother cat and 
four ‘kittens; $3 for Children’s 
Hospital (Woodley 8840). Three 
part Persian kittens; also old 
Congressional Directories 


day. Three six-weeks-old kit- 
tens, will deliver (Owens 0270). 
Four lively kittens, all males 
eight weeks old (North 2942). 

Also: Box of costumes, gay 
nineties and special holiday 
garb, for school group or any 


organization (Overlook 0326). 


Five cute kittens; $1 for Chil- 

dren’s Hospital enclosed 

(Woodley 8835). 
ee) 

QUOTE: ; 

“Some Georgetown folk who 
have been trying to beat the 
weather by relaxing in the al- 
together in their gardens be- 
hind high fences after dark 
ought to be warned that (1) 
it isn’t that dark, and (2) the 
fences aren’t that high.” 

ow 
PIANO 

Got a spare piano? The 
Dranesville (Va.) Camp Meet- 
ing Association is holding a 
confabulation Augu-* 17 to 26 
and needs a music box. It 
would like somebody, prefer- 
ably in the Leesburg or Falls 
Church areas, to donate or 
lend a piano‘for the meeting. 
The association will pay the 
moving charge. Call Dora E. 
Kuhlmann at Hamilton (Va.) 
2973, or write her at Box 35, 
Hamilton. 

ow 


THANK YOU ; 

A reader who wishes to re- 
main anonymous sends $5 to 
be turned into copies of the 
District Line book for the 


2 


By Orval Hopkins 


(Substituting for Bill Gold) 


benefit of Children’s Hospital, 
the books to be sent to GlIsin . 
hospitals. 

Check for $2.40, apparently 
a refund from a grocery store, 
is sent in for Children’s Hos- 
pital by Mrs. Thomas E. Wig- 
glesworth of 4447 Albemarle 
st. nw. I’m working on get- 
ting you a book, Mrs. W. 

Check for $12.50 for Chil- 
dren’s Hospital from Eric I, 
Weile of 2217 Washington ave... 
Silver Spring. Your message 


STEVE CANYON 


rv 


By Milt Caniff 


+ 


SO FAR. A TOUR OF DUTY 
ON EEL ISLAND PROMISES 


1} DO YOU HAVE ANY NON~SECRET 


+ 


- 


JAPANESE € 


de 


DOPE ON THE HISTORY OF EEL JIT IS VERY SECRET, |’ 
ISLAND WHILE IT WAS STILL / MAJOR CANYON/ 1 


WHAT WOULD ANYBODY ¥ MEBBE HES TRYING To” 
WANT TO KNOW ABOUT | FIND OUT WHO WON THE 
THAT ROCK FOR FS & 


WAR ! J 


Ving 
yi ao\ ree, 


sent on the way, Eric. 

Dollar bills for Children’s 
Hospital from Norman Davis 
of 9117 First ave., Silver 
Spring, and from Beatrice 
G. Klein of 1819 G st. nw. 


ow 


PUN 

Fannie Fogelman of 1437 
Rhode Island ave. nw., writes 
in to say: 

“I understand The District 
Line will be off the Gold 
Standard for about’ two 
weeks.” 

This its an example of the 
simple insult, Miss F., and 
I'll take it with my usual 
churlishness. 

ows 


SIGNS 


JOE PALOOKA 

SITTING ON HIS LAP... AND THEY 
KISSEO...IF SUCH SHOCKING GOINGS - 
ON CONTINUE 7 SNIFF 34 I SHALL 


cto a on ‘i MY : 
| ION. I KNOW ~. 


A GENTLEMAN OF 

YOUR FINE Gib eRe 

IDEALS WOULD A \ 7 
ah f) 


7 & 2 — — = ——— 
BE BELATED LLORLIGIERE OIG OPO, ELIE PR LOI KILLS, s ("Ss ee = ~ 


By Ham Fisher — 


AN‘ THIS ISABIZNESS “g/ GOOD FOR THEM? > 
OFFICE... AN” DON'T 
FORGET IT... AN‘ DON'T 


LEMME EVER HEAR 
A THIS KINDA ,.+» 


(oe Fox LEEMY YS 
| 4AANICE PRESIDENT, 
a AND 


Dyaetpe Spe Se 


jon 


: WOULDN'T TOLERATE 


<4 I KNEW A GENTLEMAN. 
OF MISTER WALSH'S — 
“> HIGH STANDARD S 


IT.” 


vy VA) 
Yi 
HY) 

bf 


PUG SS, 

hi); ij , 

t*) Wy 
if, 


Ah, Cape Cod! Mrs. Jolan 
Lovinger Fellman of 4702 
Fort Totten dr. ne:, says she 
and her husband spotted on 
the Cape a roadside display of 
birdhouses for sale and the 
sign: 

“Birdhouses for a Song.” 


| | ; 
Baltimore to Open Alexandrians 


OZARK IKE 


r 
eo 


HES DASHIN FER 

HOME WHILE ¢ 
GUS GASHUH 

S/S A -JAWIN’ 


TH BUGS TAKE 


» A I-O LEAD 


By Gotto | 


HATES TO DO THINGS -.-- 


ANY MAN |S A PROBLEM, AUNT-t 
ELLEN. |= HE’S THE TYPE WHO'E 


Crosstown Blvd. 
Link Thursday 


BALTIMORE, Aug. 14 (} —| 


On Ragweed 
‘The first leg of Baltimore's 


‘erosstown freeway will be! Alexandria householders may | 
‘opened Thursday when Mayor have their last chance today to | 
'Thomas D’Alesandro, jr., Cuts 4 | rid their property of ragweed be- 
|ribbon opening the mile and a ' fore the plant pollinates, causing 


‘third of four and six-lane ex-|"~. 
'pressway running from Russell | misery to hayfever sufferers. 


,st. in Westport to the south-| Dr. T. B. McGough, city health 
'west city limits. ‘officer, said yesterday he was | 


There it connects with the) ,ieased with Alexandrians’ re- 
long-dreamed-of Washington-Bal- | : 
timore expressway, a super- | sponse to his department’s drive | 
highway now open only as far|this summer to clear away as 
as Baltimore’s Friendship Inter- ‘much ragweed as possible. | 
national Airport, nine’ miles Boy Scouts and members of | | 
southwest of the city. the Alexandria Boys Clubs aided | 

The State hopes to complete the drive by circulating mime-| 
the -Washington-Baltimore ex-|ographed descriptions of the. 

pressway as far as Fort Meade| weed and information about) 

by late next summer, and then how to eliminate it. Household- | 
connect it with the present | ers were advised to chop it down, 
Washington - Baltimore boule-| burn it, douse it with a weed- 
| vard. The Federal Government, killing spray or uproot it. 
? which is building the express-- The health officer said he re- 
| way from near Fort Meade into ceived requests for 1000 of the 

sheets from the National Cap- 
‘'ital Park and Planning Commis- 

sion and for 1500 from Cameron 

Army Quartermaster Depot in 

Fairfax County. 
| The weed is scheduled to start 
| pollinating soon, perhaps today. 
Relief for hayfever sufferers is | ' 
| not expected until the first frost | 
early in October. | 

McGough said he hoped next | | 
year he would be able to enlist 
_District and nearby county offi- 

cials’ aid in a concerted drive 
against the weed. 


BASE BALL [inies, cates tore 
9 0 % f f LOS ANGELES, Aug. 14 9.— 


Orvile Rambo, who has no arms 
Bats—Gloves—Suits 


or legs, is to stand trial Aug. 29 
Reach—Spaulding—Rawlings—MacGregor—Goldsmith 


on charges of writing three bad 
YEATMAN’S 


checks. Police said Rambo held 
Ow. 7300 b 
livery. 


a pen between his chin and 
shoulder. 

3021 WILSON BLVD. ARLINGTON, VA. | 

open ‘til 9 p. m. Friday | 


from Fifty-Ninth Congress to 
Seventy - Second (Michigan 
5763). . Mother cat and three 
kittens (Randolph 8426). 

Also: One 78rpm record 
player, attaches to radio (Alex- 
andria 4868). Two female 
beagle pups, seven weeks old 
(Lockwood 5-4556). Undeter- 
mined number of kittens, 
trained to catch mice (Falls 
Church 0411); don’t call Fri- 


Press Fight EE K 


Lfoger 
' Kime Comm Sen dwene tae 


aenennieie T 
By Fisher | 


Myrtle’s antics will amuse you on vacation. Phone NAtional 4200 for Post Vacation Delivery. 


PUT YOUrP? 
MOUTH HARP 
RIGHT IN 


GOSH, SAMPSON / 
I'D RATHER 
PLAY THAN 


A MOUTH-HARP SANDWICH? 
THEN YOU CAN PLAY | 
ANO EAT, BOTH. 


AFTER MEALS AND 
IN BETWEEN 
CHEWING HELPS TO 


KEEP TEETH CLEAN...6ET 
WRIGLEYS SPEARMINT- 


| 


WELL, THAT'S ONE WAY - ; 

WE AMERICAN GIRLS... AND IF HES THE KIND WHO 
Ry poe Way ft ADORES TO OO THINGS AND 
ie PR Washington. WAIT ON YOU HAND AND FOOT: 


ee ‘>... 
YW eoge 
 -* aw} 
# 4", 
es én” 


a 


a 


t -4 
f 
: ™ ( fF 
§ 4 


aA IANCE f 
4 


H! BEAUTIFUL? 
| GOTA UTTLE 
PRESENT FOR: Jl) 
Sage > 


Be Sure te get genui 
Wrigley’s Spearmint sont 
Look for The Green 


By Buford Tune 


Burorp 
- TUNE 


Sey 


YOU'RE ALWAYS AFRAID YOU’ | 
LOSE HIM BY NOT MAKING 
HIM CO ENOUGH. 


on team 
prices 


oo 84 2) Bea Ke 
VAs FAOUMH (G44 “1SEl 4 ’ 


Reading The District Line while 
you're on vacation is like getting 
a letter from home. Phone NA- 
'tional 4200 for Post Vacation De- 


SX sy 
. f 


n 
Me 
[a 
vee 


“PEANUTS 


DO YOU MEAN TO GAY F 
THAT ILL GET ANYTHING 
I WISH FOR 2 


Build Your Dream Kitchen 


Around This Handsome Sink 
S4-INCH STAINLESS STEEL 


GENEVA SINK 


Cabinet 


aa 
NE 


"ION SHAMPOO 


ie fei 


by TONI 


WHITE RAIN leaves your hair bright as sunshine, soft 
as a cloud, sparkling clean ... and easy to care for >> | [7 wisn l MAT wise 
like naturally curly hair. Not a soap, not a creme, | | T MIGHT, HAVE THE WISH 
not a liquid—but a gentle, new lotion shampoo that | Na wei TONIGHT / ” 
soothes and smooths your hair. WHITE RAIN | \ y 

gives rain-water results—floods of fragrant, foamy 


lather—even in hardest water. Rinses out easily, 
completely, no after rinse needed, 


all-steel 


2 installation 


$26.50 Down—3 Yrs. to Pay 
Your sink will be completely 
installed by our own expert 
plumbers. We are licensed 
Plumbers in D. C., Md. and Va. 


CALL ST. 6100 


with 


ALL YOU HAVE 
TO DO IS SAY 
THE RIGHT 
WORDS 


“STAR LIGHT, 
STAR BRIGHT, 
FIRST STAR I 
SEE TONIGHT... 


KITCHEN SPECIALISTS 


627 F St. N.W. Open Saturdays 


“Ou r 39th Year”: = 


oe 


Stop Drafts! ,, IME 
only $4.9 , a ° fi) | 8 125 8 4) || 


per window /\ = 4 “ 
installed ‘ a i a ) 
P . mk 
Draftite insulation for 
CASEMENT WINDOWS 


NA. 4151 | 
AMCO PRODUCTS CO., 1812 M ST. H.W. ie 


I WISH fT WAS 
DAYTIME / 


—— 


Peanuts’ quiet humor is good for 

laughs on your vacation. Take all 

the comics along by calling NA- 

tional 4200 for Post Vacation De 

livery. t 
‘ 


REX MORGRRN, M. D. 


By Dale Curtis | THE WASHINGTON POST 


Wednesday, August 15, 1951 


\Freedom Balloons Require Skill 


ountrvside sufficiently to| it does when the Czechs have 
peecclpee ot farmer in “the | imprisoned American newsman 
This column was written by Mr.| neighborhood but not sufficient- | William Oatis on trumped-up 
Pearson in Europe which he is|ly to give as much light as need-| charges. It also comes at a time 
now touring. ‘ed for the delicate operation of | when unrest in Czechoslovakia 
Somewhere Near the Czecho-| tying the nozzles of 2000 balloons | _ pi ge ogg intensity 
slovak Border—Anyone who! and doing it in record time. it an ever e. 
thinks it’s easy to launch free- | The reason for night launch- | However, this balloon bar- 
dom-friendship balloons across |i"8S 1S that the balloons are | rage Is merely a test—a test of 
the Iron Cur- @& vga | Scheduled for arrival at 6 to 8 what individual Americans 


The Washington Merry-Go-Round 


THE BELL HOP HE SAW A VERY 


SAW LOR! IN YOUR. | DISTRESSED GIRL CRYING} 
ARMS IN THE CAR! 


‘WA R/T SEST, THIS ILLNESS 1S NOT). 
} , GOING TO BE EASY FOR YOU, 
ON THE SHOULDER OF. AA. GREG! YOU'VE GOT TO STOP ¥ 

MAYBE YOU'D wa A FRIEND / I'M YOUR - }? Ya 7. TORTURING YOURSELF WITH 
BETTER START Bf * FRIEND TOO... AND 


TALKING / ZA INSIDE YOU KNOW IT! 
gi, 
Sy 2 Yj i'g } As 


I CAN’T BEAR TO 


YOu’D BETTER GO, 
LOOK AT EITHER 


LOR! / I WANT TO 
4-OF you/ GET OuT/ J SPEAK WITH GREG 
= GET OUT! yd 


eels Te & 
al SS oe -_ 


“ 
: By Drew Pearson 


A* VICIOUS DELUSIONS / 


; 
ue 


A 


Publishers Syndicate 


i, 


Pn 4 


Trail while you’re on vour vacation. 


— 


=“ DAARK TRAIL Follow Mark 


SCOTTY AND AS SOON FP YES, DARLING... LATER | 
WILL TAKE ME BACK TO LOST BA AS YOU'RE I HOPE PSO LONG, 
FOREST, MARK... JE7 BACK PERHAPS }) WE CAN SET EVERYBODY.’ 
) WE CAN BE THE DATE 4 Z 
MARRIED / Fe SOON? 


. 
. 
- 
; 
: 
. 


i 
i: 
! 


. 
. 
. 
- 
« 


Phone NAtional 4200 for Post Vacation Delivery. 


tain has an- 

other guess ¢@ 
coming. Once § 34 
the balloons ja 


/ 
» 


aus \ By Ed Dodd — 


4 
GOSH, WHAT A @ YES, REG, SWELL 
SWELL GUY / 4...BUT I WONDER 
? AND ALWAYS ) IF HELL EVER 
ON THE GO’ SETTLE DOWN! 


4 


“) 


) 
\d 


se” 
; 

a 

4 
-_— 
‘= 
_ 

a 
a 


< 
e 
v 
z 
x 

‘ 
= 


are in the air, ® 
nature and the §* 
fact that #2 
“winds of free- © 
dom blow from 


x 
a 


> < Pid 
ae Seg 3 
Seay Sa 


west to east” 
\takes care of 
‘the rest. But 


the real job is 
getting them 
into the alr. 
And that boils down to assem- 
bling hydrogen, tanks to put it 
in, trucks to haul it in, German 


PEARSON 


hydrogen and, on top of all this, 
keeping the operation § secret 
from the curious German popu- 
lation which loves intrigue. The 
man who deserves the chief 
credit for overcoming these 
headaches is Harry Andrews 


i coaxed and wheedled nearly one | 
‘thousand hydrogen tanks from) 


and the Dewey and Almy Rub- 
ber Co. who, without knowing 
a word of German, cajoled, 


workers to fill the balloons with | 


‘a. m., just as the Czech people 
are going to work. Two types of 
balloons are being used. One 


, Ls ‘regular rubber balloon, manufac- 
* ‘tured by Dewey and Almy, car- 


Trying a load of about 3% pounds, 
or 2200 leaflets. 


Special Balloons Used 

| The other is a _ pillow-type 
‘balloon made by General Mills, 
‘which also contributed gen- 
erously of its experts and time 
‘to help this operation. The 
'pillow balloon, while carrying a 
‘lighter load, comes down to 
earth and bounces along the 
‘ground in an eerie fashion, 
| bound to excite curiosity. Across 
|its side, in large red letters is 
| written “Svoboda,” which means, 


'freedom. Incidentally, Svoboda 
is the name of Harold Stassen’s 


grandfather and it is especially 
_appropriate, as an American of 
|part Czech descent, that he is 
| attending this launching. 

| Nobody should get the idea 
that this friendship balloon bar- 
rage to the people of Czechoslo- 


vakia is going to free that coun- 


‘working separately from their 
Government can do to promote 
‘people-to-people: friendship and 
_to make the Iron Curtain a lace 
“curtain. 


Propaganda Raises Doubt 
| It’s aim also is to raise doubts 
in satellite minds as to the why 
of the Iron Curtain. Why does © 
their government refuse them 
contact with the free peoples of 
the West? What has Stalin got 
to fear from contact between 
them and the free peoples of the 
world? What is he ashamed of? 
In brief, why the Iron Curtain? 


Moscow, of course, will prob- 
ably scream that this is a viola- 
tion of international law or that 
we are dropping poisonous 
candy to the children of Czecho- 
slovakia or disseminating an- 
thrax, wheat rust, potato bugs or 
other germs in bacteriological 
warfare. However, there's no in- 
ternational law forbidding one 
country to launch balloons in 
another country, if the winds 
carry them into certain other 
countries, that’s a law of nature 


try over night. It isn’t, though | —not international law. 
it is especially timely coming as! copyright. 1951. The Bell Syndicate. Inc.) 


Wa" firms all over Germany, collect- | 
: ed them all in one place and got | 
STEVE ROPER : Read Steve Roper’s adventures on your vacation. By Saunders and Woggon | got | 


'them filled with hydrogen. It| 


) | takes so much hydrogen to carry | 
|1|415 million pieces of literature 
across the Iron Curtain into 
With a shriek Jike a vast chorus of souls in 
torture, the ful] fury of some terrifying force 
strikes the rotting walls of the ojd mansion! 


Czechoslovakia that Andrews 
= SS 
oe aa oT 
: WHOO0O eee, : 


collected just about every tank 
in West Germany. 
a ae LN 
\ ee 


THT 
OPEN 


FRIDAY 
NITE 


tig 


WINKIE/ --IT'S GETTING 


AND LOOK’ ‘THE VIBRATION HAS 
LIGHTER iN HERE / 


BROKEN THE MASONRY LOOSE /—- * 
AROUND THE DOOR FRAME WHERE 
1 WAS. DIGGING / sil 


NG 
Le Th 


— 


(ess ~ 
? 

f 

f 


BSS 
(CS. 
S) /\ 


(( 


e You can imagine the curiosity 
3 of the local tank distributors 
wondering why one man was 
going around picking Up this co- 
lossal number of hydrogen con- 
tainers. They popped the ques- 
tion to Andrews every time he 
brought in a new load, and he 
deserves a diploma in career 
diplomacy for expertly ducking 
these questions. 


Curiosity Aroused 


It was a little harder for him 
to duck the questions from the 
40 men recruited to fill the bal- 
loons. 

They were to be taken near the 
Czech border every night, a 5- 
hour drive from Munich, begin 
launching balloons at about mid- 
night, finish work at four a. m., 
then get home at 9. Naturally 
they wanted to know where they 


TITTLE 


at 


+ | Loo Fe \ 
z | ',” Ponderosa Pine 


Combination Doors 


For Summer—For Winer 


\ 


( 


4 


eee ee + 


i 
| 
innit} 


SS 


MARY WORTH By Ken Ernst 


Don’t miss Mary Worth while you’re on your vacation. Phone NAtional 4200 for Post Vacation Delivery. 


% 


‘tue, amare 

1 THANKS,MRS.WORTH!:-- 

HFOR CARRYING THAT 
LITTLE CHUNK 


All These Sizes 
Now in Stock! 


esas et I —/5 |. Sf 

Be sane MONU/a amy Onesy | 4 1{e ton ans aGuse eye ZZ 

I SHOULD THANK YOU, YOUNG LADY---1F | EV “THE ONLY ONES WHO KNOW M aot : 

MRS.CARTER!:=HOLDING A THERES ANYTHING NEW NUMBER! : 

-( SLEEPING CHILD IS ONE OF _ | going to do Lee eee 
LIFE'S GREATES Q} *. : : | However, after getting them a 
PRIVILEGES? Y - ‘nice new bus in which to ride 

|to the Czech border every day, 

|they finally signed up for this 

‘mysterious assignment. | 

Another problem involved in| 
sending balloons into Czechoslo- 
vakia is that it is such a narrow 
|country you can easily overshoot 
ithe mark. In other words, if the 

| balloons drift too far, they land 

'in Poland where Poles can’t read 

'the Czech leaflets. Therefore it 

‘has been necessary to balance a 

’ | payload of pamphlets against the 

| wind currents in order to get the 

yballoons to travel the right dis- 
tance. It has also been neces- 
sary to shift the launching site 
every night, depending on the 
winds, For this reason, we never 
know until our meteorologist 
gives the word around noon each 
day which way to head our truck 
caravan. The caravan totals nine 
trucks two of them 20-tonners | _ 
carrying hydrogen cylinders, bal- 
loons, two million leaflets, and 
one motor generator which lights 


28°x8i"* ......+-$20.30 
30°x6i"...+....+-$20,65 
32°x81" ....00..820,78 
$21.70 
$21.85 
$22.50 


iZ 
s 


Everlasting Aluminum Screen Inserts 
*28"'x81" size with bronze wire insert 
Be sure you get the best when you buy a combination 
door . . 2 Be sure you get the finest mesh, heavy gauge 
aluminum screening. Be sure you get the finest grade 
of clear white pine. Price includes interchangeable 
glass for winter and aluminum screen panel for summer. 


COME—WRITE—PHONE ATlantic 1400 


NORTHEAST 
5th & H Sts. 
At Bladensburg Rd, 


- 


- — 


TERRY AND THE PIRATES By George Wunder 


Keep up with Terry and Hotshot on your vacation. Phone NAtional 4200 for Post Vacation Delivery. 
o>4 if. — —S 
ai Bere! I— ONE OF 'EM SHOULD SHAKE AY OH, OH! FREEZE, a Vi 
7 DOWN THIS HUT, WE'VE HAD IT, TERRY... \CHAZZ. WEVE 722 


"a MORNING, CHAZZ. \FEW MORE REDY CHOPSTICK JOE HAD BETTER BE LEVELING \ GOT COMPANY, 
SP ANYTHING STIR naman 


° =< 5 ee ~ *, x* “AD i 
ie ON AS 
o “>_ , =r —S 


- 
ss 


N 


\ 


| \\ \y 
\ 


NORTHWEST ANACOSTIA 
- §925 Ga. Aye: 1905 Nichols Ave. 
At Military Re. At Good Hope Rd. 


VIRGINIA 
Falls Church, Lee Hwy. 
At Hillwood Ave. 


- a ae 


Mh 
| 
\} 


bey, 


Get inside information about 


Washington, even while you’re on | 
vacation. Take Drew Pearson with | 
you by calling NAtional 4200 for | 


Post Vacation Delivery, | 


pears GAS HEAT 
By Lank Leonard bryant: CONVERSIONS 
a Furnaces, Boilers 


: ' onths to Pay on Gas Bill 

 sut courow't vou { on, ves,inpeep! | 2? Months te Pay 
WALK AROUND THAT I'LL BE E.L. POE 
THE COURSE WITH \\ VERY HAPPY cogs | ge 
ME - AND GIVE ME ° TO po! for Our Low Prices 
Why Not Learn the Best? 
SIMPLIFIED GREGG 
SHORTHAND 


& Intensive Course in 4 Months 
| || Day, Eve. and Sat. Morn. Classes 


Just for laughs read Mickey Finn on your vacation. Pho ne NAtional 4200 for Post Vacation Delivery. 


~ ee eee 


WELL-AH-THAT WOULD SURELY BE 
A PLEASURE, MRS. DUBLISTER 
‘BUT-AH~I'M AFRAID 1 WON’T 
BE ABLE TO D0 IT—FOR~AH= 
QUITE SOME TIME? 1 
FELL AND HURT MY WRIST! 


— ee 


OH, THAT'S A SHAME, 

PHIL! AND THE LEFT 

WRIST 1S SO IMPORTANT 
IN GOLF? 


: TA. 3036 TA. 3396 Draperies, Slip Covers, Curtains 
THAT'S RIGHT 


SHERIFF! AT 


=SHE WANTS YOU TO 
OL AY A ROUND OF GOLF 
= WITH HER ! 


5213 
Pormerly 17 
Call 


and Blankets are expertly 


cleaned, and stored if you 


wish, Picked up in just 
forty-eight hours. 
Returned bright and 
beautifully clean. 


‘ A 
~ ee a ee ee eee 


4 V4 4 Yy 
, . 4s y 
Y / 
Li UY Hg Ui 4 
Ff, sf 
bi A/S /, 
‘A pf 4 7 7 ff 
s 
f 


la 
’ 
. 


Co-educational 
Approved for Veterans 
NO AGE-LIMIT 


Emerson Institute 


{324-26 i8th St. M.W. ADams 4877 | 


\that 4 y 
WW 


WHY, YOU BIG 
EGOTISTICAL .... 
GET OUTTA 
HERE BEFORE 


y 

se, 
= WH] 
ee 


. oe a 
Xe Fe woe 
4 A wow. Ors SASS 


==WINNIE WINKLE By Branner | 


oe I a 
4 
FMERE, SKIP...) PHHT...IM ALL 


Take Winnie with you on your vacation. Phone NAtional 4200 for Post Vacation Delivery. 


YEAH... SKIP... ITS 
A DAME...SHE 
WAS NUTS ABOUT 


WHY, YOU BIG 
GALOOT..... YOU 
MEAN A DAME 
IS RESPONSIBLE 
FOR YOUR SLUMP 
AND IS GOING 


EASY, CHARLIE... 

THIS IS SERIOUS, 

AND YELLING AT 
THE BIG SAP 
ISN'T GOING 
TO HELP/ 


WATCH TH’ 
PRESSURE , 
SKIP / 


LU 


% 


FTIAKE A SWIG/ | RIGHT..DID YOU 
by FAINTED / SAY YOU HAD 
HEART 


RAndolph 8000 


ARCADE-SUNSHINE 


“Complete Cleansing” 


AMES 
P 


- IMMEDIATE 


@ EXPERT 
@ GUARANTEED 
Call Any'Time From 


9 A.M. to MIDNIGHT 


AT SPECIAL 
SUMMER RATES 


your favorite 


CLUB CHAIR 


: Made Like New! 
YOur television 


\Be en Aw NS 6 AENEAN \ <<, " > = Ree | “ 
| BLOOD- A fy —~ ~  < ! re ASS ee a : — § c. ar pe 
curoLine | peereen! (Ree = onh’ pad an hee | Es - F , 


By McEvoy and Striebe 


a 


mee 
tod 
ag 
«© 7 
. 
4 
a" ; 


a. 
, : ——— | * 
beg. UN, Pat, € —~— ae 
MoNovzht Syndicate, Ine JV sate —_ 
: * . 


No interry 


"Gil | OEADLOCKED / 


Prion ¢ 


Included are labor, choice of fab- 

rics, polishing, pickup and deliv- 

IS ABOUT ery. A phone call will bring an ex- 

TO SINK perienced decorator to your home. 
INTO THE 


SLIMY 
| DEPTHS OF 
QUICKSAND 
AND 
OBLIVION / 
8-15 


an ‘as 
. 7 . he Pe Ps 4: 
, i. Snap, er" 


SPECIAL 
2-PC. 
LIVING 


vine SUITE *69 


Estimates cheerfully given in 
Mearby Virginia and Maryland 


drapers 


Com tauy 


DE. 5159-60 
1733 Wisconsin Ave. N.W. 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
16B Wednesday, August 15, 1951 


IN THE HECHT CO. HALF-YEARLY SALE. 
OF FURNITURE AND HOMEFURNISHINGS |_.gpflt®™ 


SSopae't 
"f TRF Ro 


Beautifully Tailored Rayon Taffeta, Taut on Well-Shaped 8-Rib Frames! 


For Floor Lamps: 12, 14, 16, 19-in. 
Bridge Lamp: 12-in. Swing Arm Bridge, 14-in. 


These shades are right at home/with the costliest furnish- 


ings! Their classic proportions are admired everywhere, 
So superbly simple, you can use them tastefully in rooms 
in any period decoration. Narrow braids are typical of 
those widely used on the most expensive lamp shades, 
Rayon taffeta is sewn, not glued (for washability) on 
staunch metal frame, 8-ribbed for rigidity. Won’t buckle 
nor wrinkle. Completely lined to soften the light. Egg- 
shell, touched lightly with gold, wine or green. | 


The Hecht Co., 7th Floor, Washington; 4th Floor, Silver Spring HALF YEARLY SALE PRICED 


SWAG-DRAPED 


Lamp Shades in 7 Glowing Colors . + 9 Different Sizes! 


Bell Shape: 12, 14, 16, 18-in. 
Drum Shape: 14, 16, 19-in. 
Bridge Lamp: 12-in. Swing Arm: 14-in. 


Those 3-tier swags are carefully shaped by hand! That 
bottom binding is hand-perfected, too!. Does that sound 
like 2.99 shades? No indeed, but 2.99 is all you pay 
for these lush beauties in The Hecht Co.’s Half-Yearly 
Sale! Measure your present lamp shades across the bot- 
tom. Then come pick replacements from all these: rayon 
taffeta or rayon satin in eggshell, white, rose-beige, 


gold, green, red. 


The Hecht Co., 7th Floor, Washington; 4th Floor, Silver Spring 


HALF YEARLY SALE PRICED mae i tt ee ee i bin | 


ae TS ee 


~CORD-RUFFLED 


. Upper-Bracket Shades, elaborately decorated by Hand! 


Table Lamp Size: 12, 14, 16, 17-in. 
Swing Arm: 14-in. Floor: 19-in. 


No ordinary ruffles these . , . they’re corded to dip and 
rise in perfect symmetry! There’s not just One ruffle, 


either, but two... for un-ending shadows and highlights , 
when you switch on your lamp. Bottom-binding is two- 
tier, too, and hand-shaped so never a stitch mars its . 
smooth edges. All for only 3.99 ... a shade value you'd 
be hard put to find, except in an event as big as The & 
Hecht Co. Half Yearly. Rayon taffeta in solid white, » 
eggshell, gold, wine; two-tone white-wine, white-green. 


The Hecht Co., 7th Floor, Washington; 4th Floor, Silver Spring 


HALF YEARLY SALE PRICED 


‘RHE HECHT Co. oe a. 


WASHINGTON AND SILVER SPRING messure across bottom of old shade 


+