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The Weather 


Monday—Partly cloudly with the high- 
est temperature near 80 degrees. Tues- 
day—Fair and warmer. Sunday's tem- 
perature range: High, 82 degrees at 
3:35 p. m.; low, 70 degrees at 6:56 a. m. 


Pollen count, 48. (Details on Page 20.) 


-* 


imes 


>” 


7 


_———- 


The Washington Post rin 


erald 


AL 


————-— a 


— 


78th Year—No.. 267 


. 


Phone RE. 71234 <u wi®®Zift'eitiaer MONDAY, AUGUST 29; 1955 


WTOP Radio (1500) TV (Ch. 9) 


FIVE CENTS 


ADDICT GRILLED IN D.C. KILLING 


4. 


Faure Says 
His Cabinet 
Backs Plan 
On Africa 


Premier Announces 
Acceptance After 
91\/,-Hour Session 
To Restore Peace 


PARIS (Monday), Aug. 29 
(U.P)—Premier Edgar Faure 
announced early today that 
the French Cabinet has ac- 
cepted his plan for solving 
the bloody North African 
question after a marathon, 
early-hours meeting. 

The 9%-hour Cabinet session 
came after a week which has 
seen the worst uprising in North 
Africa in 20 years. More than 
1800 persons were killed in Mo- 
rocco and neighboring Algeria 

“The Cabinet has accepted 


my plan,” Faure said after the) 


Cabinet session. Authoritative 
sources said the agreement was 
still far from complete, however, 
especially on the question of the 
return of exiled Moroccan Sul- 
tan Sidi Mohammed Ben Yous- 
sef to his homeland. 


The sources said that the Cab-' Japanese Party Arrives 


Inet will name a new Resident 
General in Morocco to replace 
liberal-minded Gilbert Grandva! 
at a meeting scheduled for 9:30 
a. m. today. 

Grandval’s resignation is part 
ef the compromise plan ap- 
proved by the to restore 
peace to the strife-ridden North 
African protectorate. 

There was danger that fight-' 
ing would be renewed if the 


Cabinet failed to agree on a/affecting the United States and Japan, will confer this into 


plan acceptable both to Moroc- 
can Nationalists and to French 
political parties opposed | 
loosening French contro] ove: 
the protectorate 

While the Cabinet was in 
session, French authorities re- 
ported a two-day battle be 
tween rebel and security forces 
in Tunisia in which at least 23 
persons were killed and 11; 
wounded ; 

Officials said a rebel band! 
of some 200 fighters had! 
crossed into Tunisia from Al-| 
geria to battle the French. 

Premier Faure has been 
fighting for the life of his own 
government, with members of 
his ghicenter coalition 
threatening to bolt the Cabinet 
over the Moroccan issue. 

Faure met with his ministers 
late yesterday at the Elysee 
Palace residence of President 
Rene Coty, who came “from 
his weekend chateau at Ram- 
bouillet to preside. » | 

The Cabinet faced a sertes of 
problems, each of which could 
endanger the gradually mate- 
rializing “new deal” for Mo- 
rocco, blocked at the Aix-les- 
Bains talks 

The rightwing government 
members oppose Moroccan Na- 
tionalist demands. that Ben Yous- 
sef be returned from exile to 
France to participate in the new 
Moroccan setup 


to 


’ 
’ 
' 
' 
' 


’ 
* 


; 


; 


Gunman Is Slain 
In 3-Hour Siege 


DETROIT, Aug. 28 #—A 
gunman who held off more than 
200 policemen in a three-hour 
siege was shot and killed to- 
night as he sought to flee a 
burning tear-gas-filled house. 

Twelve policemen pumped 
shots into the man's body as he 
emerged from the building. 

The man turned and fired 
wildly, slightly wounding a 
policeman, before he fell under 
police fire 

The man was not immed- 
fately identified. 


’ 


Ad Brings In 
200 Replies 
For 1 Washer 


“My phone rang so much, | 


\shrapnel 


Thirteen-year-old Ralph Hunt 


By Menry Rohiand. Staff Photographer 


Ralph and His Life Saver 


Alexandria, has a smile and a handshake for Capt. Licyd 
B. Shone, a Navy physician, whe saved Ralph's life when 
he performed a dramatic operation as the youth was chok- 
ing after swallowing an ear plug. (Story on Page 3.) 


Outbreak 


Israel-Arab War 
Fear Expressed; 
Egypt Accused of 
Many ‘Aggressions 


(Related Story on Page 5.) 
Rewlers 

GAZA, Aug. 28—A new 
outbreak of fighting along 
the smouldering Israeli- 
Egyptian frontier left at least 
six dead here today and 
raised fears that full-scale 
war may flare up again 
between Israel and Arab 
armies. 

Western diplomats in Cairo 
expressed “grave concern” over 
the latest Gaza clash and said 
determined intervention by the 
United States, Britain 
France may be necessary to 
stave off full-scale hostilities. 


of 2909 Old Dominion bivd.., 
in a series of clashes that began 
last Monday, when three Egyp- 
tians were reported killed in 
fiehtine with an Israeli patrol 

In Jerusalem, Israel tonight 
accused Egypt of “aggression” 
on a scale unprecedented since 
the 19498 armistice agreement 


Shigemitsu to Confer 


' 


With Dulles Today 


Japanese Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu, her 


for a series of talks with top 


afternoon tary of 


ee @ 


with Secre 


Souvenir Shell 
Blast Kalls 3, 
Wounds 9 


Children Are Victims 
At Corn Roast in 
E] Paso Yard 


EL PASO, Tex.. Aug. 28 * 
\ military souvenir shell éx- 
ploded over a picnic fire in a 
tenement yard tonight killing 
three children and injuring 
nine others. 

Seven of the 
children under 10 

Police said several 
wounds from the 90 
millimeter shell. All suffered 
serious flash burns and some 
were termed in critical condi- 
tion. The injured were taken 
to El Paso General Hospital 

One of the victims, Velma 
Morales, 4, died at the scene 
as the explosion ripped through 
the yard, cracking the wall of 
the apartment building An 
other, George Valdez, 6, Was 
dead on arrival at the hospital 
and Ricardo Lujan, 10, died 
later at the hespital. 

Police quoted Carlos Valdez, 
father of George, as saying he 
had built a fire in the yard and 
all the children were around 
it roasting ears of corn when 
the shell exploded. 

The shell, Valdez said, had 
been lying around the yard for 
a couple of months. Everyone 
thought it was a dead shell, 
he said: The family had pic 
nicked near Fort Bliss about 
that long ago and they may 
have picked up the shell then, 
he said. 


injured were 


suffered 


Weeper in Church 


Veiled Mystery Woman Creates Stir 
At Service Attended by Kisenhowers 


(hina 


‘world nations, should welcome 
‘any 
| tensions 


between the two countries 

An Israeli Foreign Ministry 
spokesman charged Egypt with 
ll attacks in a 3day period! 
since talks between the two 
countries on reducing border) 


Egypt last week. 


: 
’ 


e not only attacks Israel security 
patrols moving alorg the armis- 
tice line, but penetrates deeply 
israel territory, mining 
State John Foster Dulles.'roads, attacking vehicles and 
The Japanese delegation of destroying wells, with a rising 
15. rested after a weekend at toll of dead and wounded.” 
Hot Springs, Va., arrived last EgypUan reports said the 
night. fareup today began when 
The United Press quoted in-|/sraeli troops and heavy artil- 
rmed sources as saying Dulles |/¢TY _ Simult. neously attacked| 
« |five Egyptian outposts at dawn 
getting too friendly with Ked Egyptian troops returned the) 
fire and a hot duel raged for 
about two hours until United) 
Nations truce observers | 


officials on various problems 


, 
would warn Shigemitsu again 


These said Dulles, in 
view of new “Geneva 
spirit,” would tell Shigemitsu 
that Japan, like other free 


sources 
+) 


ine 


ar- 
ranged a cease-fire, the Egyp- 
tians said. | 
An Egyptian army statement 
reduction in East-West|/5@4 four gyptian soldiers) 
but should’ not drop “ere killed and six wounded 

guard too quickly. In Tel Aviv, an Israeli spokes 
a man said Egyptian artillery 

a the week Shigemitsu started the clash by firing on 
scheduled to talk over Japanese |22, °8el! patrol in the Beera 
defenses. The 68-year-old dip area, scene Of frequent Clashes 

é lately 


lomat who signed Japan's sur-| Today's casualties brought’ 
notice his aation wants to start |ie, Teported death toll in the 
shouldering a greater share of last four days alone te seven 
its defense burden E ‘yptians and 15 Israelis 

Since close of the was z . 

Japan has relied principally Red (ross Flood 
upon the United States forces 
ior protection. Recently there 
has been increasing friction 
over the presence of American 
troops in Japan. 

Shigemitsu ‘is scheduled fo 
an early start today. At 9 a. m 
will visit Mount Vernon to 
place a wreath at the tomb of 
George Washington. He has a 
luncheon date at the Sheraton 
Park Hotel with Deputy Under 
secretary Robert Murphy. In 
the evening he will dine at the 


its 


ice 


the 


Drive Continues 


The Washington aréa’s flood 
relief drive, which has gone) 
over the top, still is open for 
contributions to help in the 
task of rehabilitation, Red 
Cross officials emphasized yes- 
lerday 

Danie! W. Bell, chairman of 
the District Red Cross Chap- 
ter, predicted mail-in contribu- 
Bebe tions will push the disaster | 
Sheraton-Carlto . , 
guest retary Hotel as the) fund over $85,000 today. By 

. imidweek, he added, the drive 
During his weekend at the|may reach $100,000. 
H Omestead Hotel at Hot) The original goal was $75,000. 
springs, Shigemitsu polished|topped in less than a week. Bell 
two speeches he will make this|said “any extra amount” is 
week—one before the National|/ urgently needed because losses 
Press Club Tuesday and the|are mounting as six North- 
other in New York Thursday|eastern states dig out from the! 
before a joint luncheon meeting!disaster. Gifts may be sent to 
of the Far East Council, the! the District Red Cross Chapter, 
Japan Society and Japanese|2025 E st. nw. or suburban) 
Chamber of Commerce. chapters | 


a ee ee ee 


he 


_— ee se eee 


and | 


Today's battle was the latest) 


| 


When 3 Cars Crash in M 


(Other traffic stories on Pg. 19.)* 


Four young Washington area 
residents died early yesterday 
in flames touched off by a three- 


car crash on Maryland's Route) 


416 near Bristol in Anne Arun- 
del County. Two others were 
injured and physicians gave one 
of them only a slight chance to 
survive 

The dead were Oscar Bowen 
Stallings, 26, and his brother, 
Hamilton, 30, of Friendship, 
Md; Joan Joy, 20, of 1421 G 
st. ne., and Phyllis Ann Leech, 
15, of 219 15th st. ne 

In Prince Georges General 
Hospital 
entire body 


5 | 


| 
) 


was Mrs. Joseph 


with burns over her: 


Sullivan Jr.. 20, of 1524 F st.' 


ne 
| Im Jess serious condition at 
‘Anne Arundel County General 
Hospital in Annapolis was Bea- 
trice Corry, 29, of 6307 G0*h ave.. 
Hillside. She suffered head cuts 
and shock. 

Anne Arundel County Police- 
man John Barge said all of the 
casualties, with the exception 
of Miss Corry, were passengers 
in the car driven by Oscar 
Stallings, a sailor on leave since 
Friday from the U.S.S. Newport 
News, berthed at Norfolk. 

Miss Corry was a passenger 
in a car operated by Richard 
G. Masoka, 30, of 3913 Jefter- 
son st., Hyattsville, who escaped 
unhurt. as did a third passen- 
ger in his car, Robert Nagel, 
of 5305 Taylor road, Riverdale. 

Policeman Barge said the 
Stallings car rammed the Ma- 


soka car shortly after it had/F. 
tension were broken off by| pulled over to the edge of thea 10th grade student at Eastern | appearance 
immediately Junior High School next month. | charge 


road. Bath cars 


He said: “The Egyptian army burst into flames, the Stallings’ 


6 Are Killed 7#stx-2n Route 10 


In New Gaza 4 Die in Flames, 2 Others Hurt 
aryland 


Cress locates crash scene 


ee 


car veering across the highway | 
to sideswipe a third car driven) 
by Harry N. Eagle Jr., 26, of 
1842 Burke st. se. He and five 
passengers in his car escaped 
injury | 

Only other survivor of the 
Stallings car was 16-year-old 
Key Sullivan, o° 2020 Shepherd 
st. ne. sisterinldaw of the 
critically i.jured woman, She 
suffered a singed ear 

Police said the Stallings 
brothers were sons of Mr. and 
Mrs. Crosby H. Stallings of 
Friendship, a southern Mary- 
land community located near 
the crash scene. 

Miss Joy, a warehouse em- 
ploye of Raleigh Haberdashers, 
is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. | 
John J. Joy. The Leech girl,| 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis! 
Leech, would have been 


Mrs. Sullivan, wife of a gas 


. > > 
os 


—=—@® 


JOAN JOY 
. «+ Ges with three others 


— _ 


station manager, is the mother 
of two small children 

Police said so intense were 
the flames that nothing but the 
chassis framework and springs 
remained of the Stallings car, 
whose occupants were burned 
almost beyond recognition de 
spite a half-hour battle by the 
Deale Volunteer Fire Depart. 
ment. The Masoka car also was 
badly gutted by the fire, appar- 
ently touched off by sparks and 
the penetration of Masoka’s 
gas tank. 

Barge said Masoka, an elec. 
trician, was released for court 
on a technical 
of manslaughter in 


$1000 bond. 


Hall Assails 
Truman for 


Attack on Ike 


Says Ex-President 
‘Sounded Like Bitter, 


Frustrated Man’ 


’ 
| 


(Related Story on Page 2.) 
Associated Press 


Republican National 


i 


Chalr-\this afternoon but did not ex- 


Expected to Burn a Day More 


New Tank Blast Feeds 


WHITING, Ind., Aug. 28 ¢ 


Raging Oil-Plant Fire 


/P)—Flames fed by millions 


‘of gallons of oil and gas continued to rage at the huge 


Standard Oil Co. (Ind.) refinery here at nightfall—nearly 


37 hours after they were tou 
ja hydrofgrmer unit. 


\ storage tank erupted late 


man Leonard W. Hall said yes- tend the area covered by the 


terday that former President 


Harry S. Truman “sounded like);,5) although the 
a bitter, frustrated man” in his\ably will 
latest blast at the Eisenhower another 2 


Administration. 

“It's a good thing Truman 
khew when to quit his office 
but it's unfortunate he can't 
take retirement with dignity 
and grace,” Hall said. 

The GOP chief put out a 
statement criticizing both Mr. 
Truman and Democratic Na- 
tional Chairman Paul M. But- 
ler for what he called their 
“intemperate” remarks at a 
meeting Saturday at French 
Lick, Ind. 


blaze. 


eary firemen remaincd 


confident the fire is under con- 


sons 


¥ said it prow 

| game, for at least 
hours. 

None of the several thousand 


firemen fighting the blaze were 


injured in the latest explesion. 

A 26-story tall hydroformer 
cracking unit—used to increase 
the octane of gas—exploded at 


6:14 a, m. yesterday. A flying 


chunk of metal pipe from the 
blast crashed into a nearby 
home, killing a 3-year-old boy | 


in his bed. A Standard employe 


suffered a fatal heart attack 


while fighting the blaze. 


Company officials said 14 per- 
were hospitalized with 


“With no real issue to take pune and other injuries, three 


to the people, it’s obvious they) .-¢ +, 


em in serious condition. 


are going to rely on smears and At least 70 others were treated 
personal attacks on President\r.. minor injuries during the 
Eisenhower and Vice President ¢..4 94 hours, Red Cross rec- 


Nixon,” Hall said 
“But the hate-mongers will 


ords showed 


No accurate estimate of the 


have a tough assignment tO aamage has been made. Robert 


make their attacks stick.” 


E. Wilson. chairman of Stand- 


In his speech, Mr. Truman arq, said the damage to Stand- 


> . : , ; 
accused President Eisenhower ard’s 


of “misprepresentation 
demagoguery” 


ic President. 


Hall's statement. said 


property would be at 


and jeast $10 million.. He said all 
and declared piant damage in excess of $1 
the country needs a Democrat- piltion is covered by insurance. 


Refinery Manager A. F. En-| 


the 'dres said “there is no wide- 


former President ts “jealous of spread damage outside of the 
President Eisenhower's ac- refmery.” He said a few homes’ 
complishments and can’t stand were destroyed, but most of the 


er’s tremendous popularity.” 
Declaring Mr. Truman “doesn’t 
present a pretty picture with 
his name-calling and  brick- 
bats,” Hall added: | 

“That may be the technique 
he learned in the Pendergast 
school of politics, but it hardly 
fits the role of elder statesman 


| 
| 


itold a news 


which he tries to assume.” 
Hall said Butler had made a 

“vile attack” on Nixon. Butler 

conference in 


the comparison with Eisenhow- others 


sustained only minor) 


Held for Alexandria 


ee 


ched off by the explosion of 


damage, such as broken win- 


dows. 

Endres said the fire so far 
had consumed more than 42 
million gallons of crude oil and 
oll products. 

Danger to the town, some 16) 
miles southeast of Chicago's 
Loop, was largely abated. Flush- 
ing of the sewers localized the 
threats from gas accumulations 
that had caused Whiting Public 
Works Commissioner John J 
Standish to speak of living “on 
a virtual powder keg.” 


i her 


‘day what 


> 


New Clues 


Reactivate 
Preinkert 


Death Probe 


Suspect Brought 
From U. S. Hospital 
In 1954 Slaying of 
Md. U. Registrar 


Alfred FE. Lewis 
Stall Reporter 
| A 86-year-old house- 
breaker and narcotics addict 
\was held by police yesterday 
as a liot suspect in the vicious 
murder of Miss Alma Prein- 
‘kert 18 months ago 

Miss Preinkert was stabbed 
10 times about 2 a. m. in her 
| bedroom at 1436 Chapin st. nw. 
‘by a housebreaker who also 
slashed her sister. Miss Alvina 
Preinkert. 60. as he hacked his 
iway out of the women’s home 

The suspect was hrought to 
Washington secretly from the 
Federal Narcoties ‘fospital in 
Lexington, Ky., Friday for ques- 
tioning over the weekend 

He was returned here as a 
result of new information two 
robbery squad detectives, Sal- 
vatore J. Greco and J. C. Wil 
son, gained from the suspect's 
former girl friend during a rob- 
bery investigation recently 


Information From Gir! 


The girl said the suspect 
‘came to her home on the night 
of the murder of the 58-year-old 
Maryland University registrar 
—February 28, 1954—and asked 
to destroy some bioody 
clothing he brought with him 

The girl also led police to a 
pair of bloody trousers which 
she said she had not destroyed 
after her boy friend told- her 
that he had “killed someone.” 

The woman also has identi- 
fied a yellow-metal tie clasp 
found at the murder scene as 
similar to one the suspect 
owned. 


4 Leong, Thin Kuaife 


and Wilson worked 
with Homicide Squad Detec- 
tive Sets. Joseph D. Donahue 
and Patrick Deenihan under 
direction of Capt. Richard Fel- 
ber, chief of the homicide 
squad, and Lt. Lawrence Hart- 
nett. They learned that the 
suspect once owned a tiong, 
thin knife similar to the weap- 
on believed to have been used 
by the murderet 

The , murder 
has been found 

Police refused to say yester- 
their questioning of 
the suspect disclosed 

It was learned, however, that 
the suspect—serving consecu- 
live one-to-three-year terms im- 
posed in May, 1954, in three 
cases of housebreaking here— 


By 


(reco 


weapon never 


| was questioncd in the Preinkert 


Nats Win Two. 
Yankees Divide 


Washington's amazing Nats 
stunned Cleveland's embattled 
Indians, 8 to 2 and 13 @® 4, at 
Cleveland yesterday to knock 
Cleveland into third place in 
the hot American League race 

The New York Yankees, 
meanwhile, divided a double- 
header with Chicago's White 
Sox. Home runs by Mickey 
Mantle and Yogi Berra won the 
opener for the first place Yan- 
kees, 6 to 1 and a home run by 


,Bob Kennedy with two on won 


the nightcap for the Chisox, 3 
to 2. The split enabled Chicago 
to move up to second, half a 
game back of New York. 


(Details on Page 10.) 


eee 


iclasp 


‘breaking and 


slaying in March, 1954 

At that_time, police had but 
two clues the Hickok tile 
containing a dd ast 
and a stepladder 
killer stole from 
1451 Belmont st. and used to 
gain entry into the Preinkert 
home through a side window. 

On the strength of the 
mation furnished by the 
pect’s former girl friend, police 
decided to return the prisoner 
here from Lexington, 

To allay suspicion he was be- 
ing brought back for question- 
ing about the murder, the sus- 
pect was not returned until a 
group of prisoners was sched- 
uled for transfer to the District 

Police sai the suspect has a 
long record of arrests and. con- 
victions for larceny, house- 
narcotics viola- 


--- 


which the 
the rear of 


: » 
infor- 


sus- 


tions. 


Ex-Convict Wallace Hart Jailed. 
But Cleared in Watchman’s Killing 


, French Lick that Nixon is “the «4 35-year-old former convict; was arrested in a room he had) Hart was given a conditional 
least popular” Vice President in 


ia Ni sought for questioning in the, Tented at 1338 T st. nw. lrelease from Atlanta Peniten- 
peti Ay el py gy een of Bago L. Armhold Jr.,' He told police he borrowed|tiary in July. He was brought to 


; | money from an aunt to rent/Alexandria Aug. 1 to face two 
campaign speeches. last Wednesday, was arrested/ithe room and “get a fresh|1946 indictments charging him 
by Metro 


litan police yester-|start” after his freak release|in Alexandria safe jobs totaling 
day and’cleared of any connec-|from jail on Monday. | $8790, police said. He was freed 
tion with the 78year-old; Felber said Hart Was never| Monday in an identity mixup by 
watchman’s death. a “good” suspect, but had been) jail officials. 

Capt. Richard J, Felber of|convicted of a $4300 safe job; Police pressed their hunt for 
the Homicide Squad, said Wal-|at the Airsto plant in 1945, In| Armhold’s slayer, or slayers, 
7 \lace Hart, sought since he was'that case, Felber said, twojyesterday as they questioned 
released from an Alexandria|/ guards were tied up and the/five more suspects. More than 
jail by mistake last Monday,| job carried out “professionally.”|230 persons have been ques- 
was being held on a fugitive; It bore no similarity to the| tioned so far, Felber said, and 
warrant from Alexandria break-in Wednesday that re-|five were being held for investi- 
o9 | authorities. ‘sulted in Armhdld’s death. The gation. 

Hart, who police believed, watchman was found early; Felber said detective ‘team4 
might shed light on the slayjng; Thursday, strangled with two/would continue the search to- 
of Armhold at the Aristo Clean-| neckties knotted around’ his|day although police had mo hot 
ers plant at 1226 S. Capitol st.,' face and neck. suspects in the slaying. 


‘from the church about 10 min-jattitude of. fervent prayer 
DENVER, Aug. 28 W—A utes before the Eisenhowers ar-| tears rolled down her cheeks. 
-t 1g. | rived. ) She stared intently at} Ushers noticed her at that 
weeping, mysterious woman in ae point d es ’ 
é; the créw@ assembled in front|/?°™* © escorted the hyster 
black with closely shorn hair| 


| a ical woman to a small room off 
created a bit of a stir at church|° ‘he church awaiting the ar|to the side of the main church 
services which President and 


thought everybody in Washing- (Related Story on Page 2) 
ton was calling me!” said Mrs 
A. W. of Alexandria, Va, ““My 
small classified ad in The Wash- 
ington Post and Times Herald 
to sell an automatic washing ma- 
chine produced miraculous re- 
sults—over 200 replies. i'm 
simply flabbergasted over this 
response and immediate sale.” 


: 


Index 


he 
AG cé vane 
Amusements .17 
Classified .23-28 
Comics ..30-33 
Crossword ...33 
District Line .32 
Dixon ......15 
Editorials ...14 
Events Today 20 
Goren ......3) 
Herblock ....14 
Horoscope .. .30 


Kilgallen . 
Movie Guide 
Night Clubs 
Obituaries .. 
Parsons 


Convert. your no-longer-need- 
ed items into quick cash the 
same easy, low-cost way Mrs. 
A. W. did. Use the fast-action 
classified section of the BIG 
Washington Post and Times 
Herald. 


It's so easy to place an ad. 
Simply call Miss ‘Lawrence, 


rival of the President and his ynit | 
s wife. | One Secret Service agent on| 
Mrs. Eisenhower attended to-| She wore a black dress, san-|routine assignment at the rear 
day. io. — 1 ocogg fl ge ago be the church then took up 1 
read ack vell over hair that ap-| station at the door to that room. 
Fig the President nor ty (peared to be crudely cut very|Another moved close by. Later 
first Lady was aware of the close to the scalp. during the'service the woman 
‘incident, but her appearance at} 4 few minutes after the|moved of her own accord ‘to 
the Corona Presbysterian Fi senhowers had been seated| another anteroom at the rear 
Church caused Secret Service | well up near the front of the|of the church. The agents kept 
agents to take routine precau-| church, the woman entered the|a close eye on her, but she 
tions, ts building and knelt on the floor| caused no trouble. 
The unidentified woman,'hehind the last row of pews.| She made no attenipt to get 
REpublic 7-1234. probably about 25 years old, | Then she hegan sobbing quietly.| anywhere near the Eisenhowers 
turned up first across the street;She clasped her hands in ‘an|as they left the church. 
. 3 ¢ 


Weather .. 


20 
4 i yt 


* 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
2 Monday, August 29, 1955 


—s< 
Wife With Him 


George Scorns Suggestion He Retire 


Eee 


"5 


By Jack Bell 
Associated Press 


Senator Walter F. George (D- 


has great strength in the rural;on a county unit basis some- 
areas which often determine|what similar to the national 
the outcome in contests decided| electoral college system. 


>= 


Benson Off 
To Europe to 


= dees 


International News Bervice . 


‘Risk’ Case Probes Open 


The public gets a close look! 


at the Government's employe) 
security program this week as 
two congressional investigating | 
committees dig into different 
aspects of the issue. 

The House Un-American Ac 
tivities Committee plans to 
question “today Mrs. Deborah | 
Landy, whose son has been de- 
nied a Naval Reserve commis 
sion on grounds she was once 
a Communist. 

The Committee's interests 
are largely in her past Red 
affiliations, but the subject of 
how her son was denied his 
commission on the eve of grad- 
uation from the King's Point 
Maritime Academy will doubt- 
lessiy be explored. 

Also today, a Senate Civil 
Service Subcommittee headed 
by Sen. Olin D. ‘ Johnston 
(DS. C.) begins a series of 
hearings into abuses of the 
“security risk” procedures. 

This group plans to look into 
Administration fumbles on the! 
cases of Agriculture Depart-| 
ment land expert Wolf Lade-) 
jinsky and Navy hygdographic) 
expert Abraham Chasanow. It! 
will also investigate other se-| 
curity cases which have had 
less publicity. ) 

Mrs. Landy rejected the 
House Committee's first re-| 
quest for her testimony on 
grounds she did not want to 
say anything while her son was 
appealing the Navy ruling de-| 
nying him a commission. 

A three-man Navy board ‘of’ 


Thomas. will 
to consider 


tary Charlies S 
convene Sept. 5 
Landy’s case. 

On Saturday, Air Force Sec. 
retary Donald Quarles settied 
a case similar to Landy's by 

rsonally clearing Air Force 

eservist Stephen Branzovich. 
whose father was accused of' 
membership in the Communist 
Party. Quarles’ decision saved 
Branzovich from a dishonor- 
able discharge. 


Brian Butler, 13-veareold son of «National 
Democratic Chairman Paul Butler (right), 
snaps a picture of his father with Frank E. 


Truman Ties Ike’s Rule to ‘Business’ 


MACKINAC ISLAND, Mich.,} words. of praise for Gov. G.|senhower was too old to run, 
review, named by Navy Secre-/ Aug. 28 (#—Former President' Mennen Williams of Michigan.|ne replied: | 


Harry S. Truman arrived on/| Saving his major attack for 


this historic island today and 
set out immediately to hack’! 
away at what he called an Ad-| 
ministration dominated” 100 
per cent by business.” 

At a news conference, Mr.’ 


Truman scotched reports of| about Democratic chances in 
his own candidacy for Presi-| 1956. He said he did not think 
dent, commented on Democrat-| the South would be split again 
ic chances in 1956, and had! because “it has learned its les 


President said: 


ness is 100 per cent and it) 
starts here in Michigan.” 


Ike Attends 
Sees His Gif 


DENVER, Aug. 28 (\—Presi-: girl. 


dent and Mrs. Eisenhower wor- the home of her mother, Mrs. 
John & Doud, where the Eisen- 


shiped today at the new Cor- 
ona Presbyterian Church here 


and saw for the first time their) 
handsome gift for the edifice— 
the pulpit of limed oak. ) 

The pastor, the Rev. Robert 
S. Lutz, referred to it as an 
Eisenhower gift during the serv- 
ices and said it would be dedi- 
cated at a special evening cere-| 
mony. Sept. The Eisen-| 
howers plan to attend. | 

The new building replaces 
the one in which the First Lady 
attended Sunday School as a 


son.” 

Asked about chances that he 
himself would become a candi- 
date for President he replied: 
“Of course not. I've spent 
enough time in the service of 
‘my country and I'm definitely 
not a candidate.” 

Mr. Truman reaffirmed his 
support of Adlai Stevenson for 
the Democratic nomination. 

“I am in favor of nominat 
ing a man who will win the 
howers are staying during their eration, | Be nie. " Siscanewer 
omeee einld if nominated, cannot beat any 

_ | Democratic candidate. 

After the services the Presi; Asked if he thought Mr. Ei- 
dent and his wife drove to Fair- 
mount Cemetery to place flow-' 
ers on the grave of her father. | 


This morning the President | 
Studied a flood relief report 11,000 Scouts End 


submitted to him by E. Roland 8th World Jamboree 
Harriman, Chairman of th 
American Red Cross. | NIAGARA -ON-~-THE-LAKE, 
Harriman reported the Red Ont.. Aug. 28 —More than 
Cross has raised $3,866,000 in 11,000 Boy Scouts broke camp! 
relief funds towards its goal of today at the end of the eighth 
$8 million. | World Boy Scout Jamboree. 
| Officials said it might take 


Services, 
t to Churel 


It is just two blocks from 


Red Air-Arm Buildup 


In Far East Worries U. 8, “2° 2° Ow’ 


By Ansel FE. Talbert 


‘Coovriaht. 1955. New Ya 


Rapid progress of the Com- 
munist drive in Asia to over- 
come air and logistical weak- 
nesses has the Pentagon wor- 
ried. 

Communist China alteady is 
the fourth-ranking air power of 
the world after the United 
States, the Soviet Union and 
Britain, according to Gen. Na- 
than F. Twining, Chief of Staff 
of the VU. S. Air Force. 

Moreover, Red China's power 
has helped build the North 
Korean Air Force, which hardly 
existed at the time the truce 
talks began, into upwards of 
700 planes, including some 300 
MIG-15 interceptors. 

In Iindochina, the Communist 
Vietminh forces are getting 
their first planes to back up 
the 350,000 battle - hardened 
troops. 

As the Communists increase 
their air power, the biggest 
western advantage in the Orient 
will go by the boards. It was 
precisely in air power and logis- 
tics—the science of military 
supply—that the West's advan- 
tage lay, as the Communists 
have long enjoyed superiority | 
in manpower. 

The buildups in Korea and! 
Vietminh, are, of course, viola- 
tions of the truce pacts prevail- 
ing im each country. Further, 
while the assistance of the Red 
Chinese is more apparent, in| 
the long run the chief supplier | 
is the Soviet Union. | 

The first Vietminh squadron 
trained in Red China is be- 
lieved to have moved across the 


oe ---— + — 


LAST CALL! 


Soft Shell Season 


| two or three days to get all the 
'Seouts onto trains, buses, and 
|boats with airline and ship con- 
‘nections for overseas points. 


IT PAYS TO SHOP 
DOWNTOWN 


re Herald Tribune. Ine} 
border. Air Force strategists be 
lieve the Communist aim is to 
create a Vietminh air force 
about equal in size to that of 
North Korea 

Exact numbers of planes are 
not too important, for as 
Twining and his deputies point 
out, the Communist capabilities 
for moving combat aircraft 
“overnight from the enormous 
pool of close to 8000 in eastern 
Siberia cannot be ignored or’ 
doubted.” | 

What counts even more is the] 
rapidly expanding system of! 
Communist #t air bases which, 
during the last few months, | 
have been rushed to completion’ 
in North Korea and along the 
China Coast opposite Formosa. | 


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McKinney (left), former Democratic chair- 
man, and former President Harry Truman, 
during a light moment at French Lick, Ind. 


a speech at a Democratic ban-| hat. You would have to ask 
quet Monday night, the former wr Fisenhower’s doctor.” 


“The domination of the pres-\speeches as 
ent Administration by busi-\talks, Truman said: 


iT tell the truth and if they think 
Truman radiated optimism (that’s hell, that’s too bad.” 


speaking tour in Georgia which ) 
indicated he intends to run|| 
/|again next year. | 
George, dean of the Senate in |} 
service and chairman of its For- 


eign Relations Committee, was} iii 
T. Benson left yesterday for asked in a telephone interview!|| 
-| Western Europe to try to ex-\if he plans to retire as sug-|iij 
plain United States policy on|gested by the Savannah Morn-’jji) 
farm surpluses. ns News. | 
“I believe there's nothing like}, <7 ag I don’t have to,’ was | 
s reply. | 
sitting down together and talk-| 11. confirmed he plans about! |i 
ing things over,” Benson said\, dozen speeches in Georgia||ii 
at National A tHis fall. He said he will speak | iii) 
The Secretary said he has no|only once outside the state, at) ij 
plans to see about selling any'}an American Legion conven-| 
surpluses to Russia. 


tion in Miami, Fla., on Oct. 10.) 
“Russia can come in here on 


Kay Sica geod 


Associated Presse 
Secretary of Agriculture Ezra 


Hickou-Freeman 


CUSTOMIZED" CLOTHES 


The strenuous tour outlined) jij 
the market and buy almost any-|by the 71-year-old Senator was Hit 
thing” he said. To get around|interpreted as his reply to the| ij 
the restrictions against selling) Savannah Morning News edi-|; 
Government-held commodities|torial suggestion there were|/ 
to Communist countries, the|“practical considerations” of| |i 
Russians would need a license,|age and health why George) 
Benson said, adding “I’m sure|should not run again despite 
they could get a license end the “stature in statesmanship” 
buy on the open market.” the paper said he had attained. 

Benson has not been in Fu-| Previously. the News had been 
rope since 1946. Mrs. Benson|® strong supporter of George. 
went along for her first 24 George, who was in a hospital 


Enns 


to Europe. for treatment of a respiratory! 


with agricultural attaches from “Just fine. 

United States embassies at| The Savannah newspaper re- 
Paris Sept. 7 and & On Sept. Ported it was a “virtual 
9 he will speak in Rome at a cerfainty” that former Gov.|/ 
session of the International] "Smination for Geers seek oy {I 
Federation of Agricultural Pro- mn for Georges seat. iil 
ducers, an om a he|It added Talmadges defeat) iii) 
helped found in 1946. His itin-| WOuld be highly unlikely, iit 
erary includes visits to England,| George's friends hope Tal-| ij 
Holland, Denmark, France, ™#4ée will not run, Talmadge i] 
Italy and Switzerland before he | HH] 
returns Sept. 14. 


Hickey-Freeman clothes are 


part of the impact that makes a 


man more impressive, more 


highly regarded. $120 up 


Polio Hits Hebrides Agents for Cavanagh Hats and Bronzini Neckwear 


Reuters | 
NORTH UIST, Hebrides,'/ 


Aug. 28—Polio has brought life) jij 
to a standstill on this rocky| iii 


island north of Scotland. Four|| 
cases out of a population of| ii) 1409 H STREET 
Established 1875 


6 Die in Tenant Fight 
| Reuters 

BHAGALPUR, India, Aug.’ 
28—Six persons were killed and 
15 injured in a gun battle be- 
tween supporters of a landlord 
and his tenants Saturday in a 
village near here, according to 
reports today. The dispute was 
over cultivation rights on a 
ismall field*nearby. 


“I don't know anything about 


To a reference about his 
“give -'em - hell” | about 2500 have been con-|iij 
firmed. All public activities) jj 
have been banned. Schools have) HHI 
been closed and no one went! ii) 
ite ehurch today. ; 


We 
- 


“IT never gave anybody hell. 


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And no other airline can match the quality of American’s Aircoach 
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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HE 


RALD 
oooon Monday, August 29, 1955 3 


\Ex-Convict and Wife Held — 
In Town Official Murder 


Actress Recovering 
From. Pill Overdose 


Melinda Markey: Takes an 


e 


: jfrom Hollywood after talking 


United Press 
overdose of sleeping pills. 


Bandit Queen Suspected 
‘Brain’ in 100 Robberies 


Chicago Tribune Press Service 


CHICAGO, Aug. 28—Police | 
have launched a wide search for 
Margaret O'Connor, 30,-a gun- 
woman with a flair for dis 
guises, in the oelief she may 
have engineered about 100 rob- 
beries in'the last year, it was 
revealed today. 

The bandit queen's role was 
uncovered in the questioning of 
three men arrested in connéc- 
tion with the $400 robbery of a 
chain grocery. They told police 
Mrs. O'Connor had been re- 
cruiting men for holdups,doing 
the planning, and directing the 
jobs. 

They implicated her in nine. 
robberies and told of meeting) 
other robbers employed by the) 
woman and seeing them get di-| 
rections for the crimes. Other 


’ 


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information has led police to 
believe her activities may have 
extended downstate and inte 
Wisconsin. 

Mrs. O'Connor has a record 
as a narcotics seller but is not 
believed to be an addict. She 
has left her North Side apart- 
ment and a sister is taking care 
of her two young children. 

Her husband, Robert, is serv- 
ing a term for robbery in Joliet 
Penitentiary. 

Mrs. O'Connor was described 


‘jthe custody of her husband, 


+ NEW YORK, Aug. 28 #—Me- 
linda Markey, actress daughter 
of movie star Joan Bennett, re- 
covered enough today from 
what police said was an over- 


recy 
lease of the pretty 2l-yearold 
brunette from the hospital in 


Donald Ilayden. 

A short time before her de- 
parture became known, the hos- 
pital had reported Miss Markey 
in critical condition and still in 
a semicomatose condition. It 
could not be learned where the 
couple went fr-m the hospital. 
Her father, Hollywood writer- 
director Gene Markey, flew in 


with Miss Bennett, who is now 
married to screen producer 
Walter Wanger. Miss Bennett 
and Wanger remained on the 
West Coast. 

Miss Markey, an actress 
model, was found unconsciogs) 
Saturday afternoon in a friend's 
ogee by Hayden and po- 

2 


Hayden, an actor, said they 
had quarrelled—the cause was 
not disclosed—but he thought 
she was joking when some time 
later she handed him a half- 
empty bottle of sleeping pills 
and quietly said: “I just took 
12 of these.” 

She then left their mid-Man- 
hattan apartment. About 20 
minutes later, Hayden told po 
lice, he became alarmed and 
went to the nearby home of 
Beverley Sailie, a friend of 
Miss Markey. Miss Sailie is 
away on vacation, but had left 
a key with Melinda. 

Police were called when Hay- 
den received no answer to 
poindings on the door. The 
young actress was found 
slumped agross a bed. 

Friends said Miss Markey has 
been upset noticeably since the 
sensational episode in Holly- 
wood four years ago when her 
stepfather, ‘Vanger, shot and 
wounded agent Jennings Lang 
for allegedly “trying to break 
up my h Ne 

Wange a short prison 
term for the shooting. Melinda 
stood by Wanger, but denied 
there had been any romance 
between Lang and her mother. 

Melinda, born Feb. 27, 1934, 
was Joan Bennett's second 


detectives as a tough, smart, 


by 
elusive foe. She likes to dis-|piana was the daughter of her 


guise herself, especially by 
changing her hairdo for each 
holdup, and may have been the | 
dishwasher blonde who staged | 
a holdup spree here last year, | 


police said. | , 


Her hair naturally is chest-| 
nut. She has blue eyes, is about | 
5 feet 6 inches tall and weighs 
132 pounds. 

The arrests in the food store 
robbery were made as a result | 
of the intervention of police 
man William Schupolski, who 
chased the bandits as they were 
trying to get their car started. 
Eugene Kozenko, 19, a new re-| 
cruit to the gang, was captured. | 
He named Mrs. O'Connor and 
two other men, seized later, as 
members of the gang. 


Ike’s Plane Gets 
F actory Checkup 


@. Y. Herald Tribune News Service 

DENVER, Aug. 28—President 
Eisenhower's Super - Constella- 
tion, Columbine III, has been 
flown to the Lockheed plant at 
Burbank, Calif. for a two-weeks 
inspection so that “every inch” 
of the plane may be thoroughly 
examined by factory experts. 

During the President's flight 
east last Tuesday, the pressuriz- 
ing system in the Columbine’s 
cabin failed temporarily. 


- 


daughter. The star's first child, 


first husband, John Marion 
Fox, son of a west coast lumber 
king. * | 

Miss Bennett divorced him) 
in 1928, and married Markey 
n 1932. The couple was di-| 
vorced five years later and she! 
wed Wanger in }940. 

Hayden was previously mar- 
ried to Carol Ann Beery, 
adopted daughter of the late’ 
Wallace : 


Pro-Duce 
Plot Arrest 
Is Upheld 


ROME, Aug. 28 ®—A court 
ruled yesterday that the arrest! 
of members of the family of | 
the late Benito Mussolini's 
mistress in 1946 was justified. 

The father of Clara Petaccl, 
who died with Mussolini in 
1945, was ordered to pay legal 


suit against the Ministry of In- 
terior charging the arrest was 
illegal. 

Member of the Petacci fam- 
ily were arrested on the basis 
of rumors that they had plotted 
to liberate Mussolini while he 


Fireworks Blakt Kills 9 


MEXICO CITY, Aug. 28 # 
An explosion in an unlicensed 
fireworks factory today killed 
nine persons and injured 
others. Police said the blast oc- 
curred after the owner arrived 
drunk. 


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‘tain, in central Italy. 


' 
| 
‘Cause for Complaint 
DESENZANO, Italy, Aug. 28 
\#®—Tourist Hejnrich Dietrich, 
23, of Vienna, complained of 
jan Upset stomach. X-rays 
ishowed the cause—a two-inch 
water snake. He said he must 
have swallowed it drinking 
water from a stream while 
camping. 


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The four young children, whose parents 
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for the photographer as they wait in the 


in Kingman, Ariz. Children 


range in age from 1 te 5. | 


3 ‘Surgeon’s Tools’ Handy, 
So Choking Youth Lives: 


United Press 


Trigger Captured 


Elmer (Trigger) Burke, want- 
ed in a New York City mur- 
der and fer questioning in a 
series of other killings, was 
arrested by FBI agents at 


Folly Beach, S.C. Burke es- | 


caped fram a Boston jail a 
year ago yesterday when two 
accomplices, dressed as 
guards, broke inte the jail 
and freed him. 


ee 


) 
33 Cars Jump Track 


Young Ralph Hunt, breathing 
through a tube in his throat, is 
alive because a Navy physician 
always keeps his medical bag 
nearby. | 

“A physician without his bag 
is something like a carpenter 
traveling about without his) 
tools.” said Capt. Lioyd B. 
Shone, USN, who saved the 13- 
‘year-old youngster’s life. “I al- 
|ways take it with me no matter 
‘where I go.” 

Shone, of 2025 Huidekoper 

pl. nw., performed a.dramatic 
operation Saturday night at the | 
Army Navy Country Club after 
Hunt had swallowed an ear 
‘plug while swimming in the 
pool there. 

The plug lodged in the boy’s | 
windpipe, shutting off the air) 
supply. 
| After Ralph dragged himself 
‘from the pool and called a life-| 
guard's attention to his plight, | 
|am emergency announcement | 
| brought Shone, who was attend- 
‘ing a club party. ) 
. By then, Ralph, who lives at 


By Wes Barthelmes ) 
Staff Reporter 


was lodged. This let air into 
the boy's tortured lungs, with 
the aid of a scissor-like hemo-| 
stat that kept the incision 
open. Because he was uncon- 
scious, there was no need for 
anesthesia, Shone said. 

“It's really a simple opera- 
tion, a tracheotomy,” said | 
Shone yesterday at Alexandria | 
Hospital. “But it was the first 
one I had ever performed.” | 

Later, at Alexandria Hos- 
pital, a tube was inserted in 
the windpipe. 

Yesterday noon, Ralph was 
rated in “good condition.” The | 
tube probably will be removed | 
in a few days, Shone said. The 
eighth grader ‘at Jefferson | 
School couldn't talk, however. 
He also couldn't smell because 
of the new air passage. | 

Ralph had bought the plugs) 
only a few hours earlier for 
underwater swimming. He be-| 
came dissatisfield with them | 
while swimming, removed them 
and plopped them into his 
mouth until he had completed 


ORANGEBURG, S. C., Aug 2909 Old Dominion bivd., Alex-|his swim to the other side of 


28 W—Thirty-three cars of a 
1i30car Southern Railway 
freight train jumped the tracks 


‘five miles south of here today. 


No injuries were reported. Rail 
traffic was completely blocked. 


andria, was choking and uncon- 
scious on the clubhouse floor. 

Shone dashed for his car con. | 
taining his bag. He made an in-| 
cision in the boy's throat and) 
windpipe below where the plug 


Davy and Friend 


Davy the woodchuck (named for you know whom) shares 


Internationa! News 


the pool. While breathing he 
made the near fatal swallow. 

A minor mystery was the ab- 
sence of the second plug. It’s 
either inside Ralph or was 
ejected unnoticed. 

Ralph's parents, retired Navy 
Capt. and Mrs, Ralph B. Hunt, 
met their son's savior yesterday 
at the hospital for the first 
time. Shone, absigned to the 
Bureau of Medicine and Sur- 
gery, also holds a degree in 
dentistry from Harvard Univer- 
sity. 

“Dr. Shone,” said Mrs. Hunt, 
laying a white-gloved hand on 
the physician's arm, “you'll 
never know how I'll feel toward 
you all the rest of my life” 


Veronica Lake Is Wed 


To Music Publisher 


TRAVERSE CITY. Mich.’ 
Aug. 28 ‘®—Film star Veronica 
Lake and Joseph McCarthy, 
New York writer and music| 
publisher, were married today | 
in a quiet ceremony at the) 
First Congregational Church 
here. | 

The wedding took place short- | 
ly hefore Miss Lake's final per- 
formance in a week-end engage- | 
ment of “Affairs of State” at'| 
the Cherry County Playhouse, 
summer theater here. | 


A former convict 
were arrested here today in 
eae oem wit 


@, wealth Palm Spring Calif. 
buildi 


and his attractive wife, Betty, 
26, were captured in their car 
on Highway 93 following a 
day, 


chi 


to death in his home last Fri-.. . 
day night. His car was found 
abandoned a short distance 


+-—-—- -— 


away. A revoked driver's li- 
cense issued to Miers was found 
in Graham's cat, touching off 
the searc 


their modest home in a Los 
Angeles suburb following the 
incidnet 


Graham in a Palm Springs bar 
and then gone to his home for 
more drinks 
Miers as saying the building in-| 
spector showed undue attention 
to his wife and that he then hit 
him several times. 


KINGMAN, Ariz., Aug 28 (INS); ..... 
and his wife; | 
h the rob 
Donald E. Graham, 


ng inspcetor 
Robert Kenneth 


Miers, 29, 


two-| 
three-state search. With’ 
were their four young | 
n ) 
Graham was brutally beaten 


Associated Press 


Mr. and Mrs. Robert Miers 
held on murder warrant 


taking some money from Gra- 
ham after first tying his hands 
and feec with a bedsheet while 
he was unconscious. 

Miers said he would not 
waive extradition to California, 
He said he did not know Gra- 
ham was dead until he read it 
in the papers He became 
panicky over the newspaper re- 
ports and fled the former con- 
vict said 

On the day he was murdered, 
‘Graham's fiancee, Mrs. Marie 
Everett. 47, arrived at Interna- 
tional Airport to complete final 
wedding plans. 


h. 
Miers and his family fied 


They told police they had met 


Police quoted 


They said Miers also admitted 
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a banana with ll-yearold Henry Goldwasser of Brooklyn, 


at the American Museum 


of Natural History's Natural 


Science Center in New York where Davy just moved in. 


’ - 2. — - —~—— - 
> 
’ 
) 


4 


Training Institute 
Write: 500 Walker Bldg. 
734 15th St, N.W. 
Phone: EX; 3-0942 


\a 


~ | Ba 
: ‘ oryh “> 
*) . =#) 


: 5). 
% > == 
- ay 

0 Beye 


——_ - 
* 
»* os 
7 
7 
A) 
- 
en . 


Costin’s 


~~ ¥ 


My 


S infoir-Tooom 


would 
have 

y dined 
here 


On the occasions 

when he took leave 

of the bounteous 

board set at the 

White House, President Mon- 

roe would have choseo ‘the 

Sirloin Room for his tevorite 

cut served from the Roast 
Beef Cart. 

From a truly 


NATIONAL PRESS BLDG. 
For reservations call EX. 3-3080 « Closed Sundays 


Fourteenth Street entrance 


SH 


Choir 


SUN 


Tickets for admission te 


‘Tickets and Applications 


Cemple Sinai 


REFORM JEWISH CONGREGATION OF WASHINGTON 
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES 


In the Air-Conditioned New Sheraton Hall 
at 


the 
ERATON-PARK HOTEL 


Connecticut Ave. & Woodley Rd. N.W. 
RABBI BALFOUR BRICKNER 


Will Officiate 
and Music Under the Direction of 


CANTOR ABRASHA ROBOFSKY 


Bosh ®ashoual; 


FRIDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 16, 8 P.M 
SATURDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 17, 


10:00 A.M 


You Kippur 


DAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 25, 8:00 P.M 


MONDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 26, 10;00 A.M. 


CHILDREN’S SERVICE, SEPTEMBER 26, 1:30 P.M. 
MEMORIAL SERVICE, SEPTEMBER 26, 4:00 P.M. 


the High Holy Day Services and Applications for Membership 


in Temple Sinai may be obtained by calling or writing the Tempie office, 1730 Eye Street 
N.W., REpublic 7-0579. Office hours—Monday thru Thursday——-9:00 A.M, to 9:00 P.M.; 
Friday and Sunday until 5:00 P.M. ... 


for Membership may also be .cbtained at 2521 Connecticut 


Ave. N.W., at Calvert’ Street (ground floor), Monday thru Friday from 10:00 A.M. to 


4:00 P.M, 


Armed Forces Personnel on active duty will be welcomed at the services. 


, September 11. Registration of pupils— Wednes- 


‘ classes begin Sunday 
day, Thursday and Friday, September 7, 8 and 9, at the Temple office, 1730 Eye Street 


Senday, September 11, at 9:30 A.M, at the Jewish Communit) Center, 16th and 


RELIGIOUS SERVICES EVERY FRIDAY EVENING “except Friday, September 16) at the 
ashington National Cathedral, 


Bethichem Chapel ef the W 


Woodley Road and 36th St. N.W. 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
4 Monday, August 29, 1955 e9e 


Around the World 


BREAK YOUR MATCHES: 
CRUSH YOUR SMOKES! 
DROWN YOUR FIRES! 


BE CAREFUL 
EVERY FIRE: 


WitH 


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Remember— Only yoy can PREVENT FOREST FIRES! 


a 


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for the long, 
long winter 


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~ 


Headquarters for Frozen Food 
Packaging Supplies 


Polyethylene Bags and Containers, Kordite Freezer Containers, 
Heavy-Weight Locker Foil, Wrappers and Locker Tapes 


Janitor Supplies for Immediate Delivery 
Mapping Units, Soaps, Detergents, Deodorizing Blocks & Sprays, 
Waxes, Ostrich Dusters, Brooms, Brushes & Mops, Paper Towels, 
Polishes 


Sorays— Soaps. 


RAndolph 3-2880 


Whatever yeur reauirement fer 
PACKAGING MAINTENANCE RE. 
SALE er ether weeds. WE HAVE IF 
IN STOCK 


POR MATLING: Cerregeted cartons. 


*® compiete tine of saper. twines 
tenes. tece. Immediate delivery. 


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Tissues and Napkins; 


Call RE. 7-1234, ask for Circulation, and order The Wash- 


ington Post and Times Herald guaranteed home delivery. 


PP —— 


NATIONAL’s 


EXCURSION 
FARES 


—_— ——_-. — 


LONDON, Aug. 28 #—Brit- 
ain officially expressed “grave 


Tconcern” tonight over the re- 


jection by the United States of 
an English manufacturer’s bid 
to provide equipment for an 
American hydroelectric project. 
The Foreign Office said the 
action was taken on instruc- 
tions from Foreign Secretary 
Harold MacMillan. The United 
States Embassy was asked to 
jrelay the complaint to Wash- 
ington. 
| The dispute centers around 
‘bids to provide transformers 
‘and generators for the giant 
Chief Joseph hydroelectric 
| power project in Washington 
\state. The English Electric Co. 
| submitted the low bids, but the 
|U. S. Government has said the 
jorders, nevertheless, would go 
to two American firms. 
| The English firm submitted a 
bid of $5,460,361 to provide six 
generators and $470,965 for 
.three transformers. 
Westinghouse Electric Corp. 
got the contract for the gener- 
} ators on a bid of $6,338,491. The 
Pennsylvania Transformer Co. 
_got the transformer contract on 
a bid of $556,868. 
| The VU. S. Defense Depart- 
ment announced the rejection 
of the English bids on Friday. 
| It said the action was taken 
because the American firms 


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_ - —_ — ——— 


U. S. Bid Rejections 
Protested by Britain 


have plants in the Pittsburgh* 


area which has been designated, , 


jas an area of “substantial un-. 


employment” by the Labor De- an + 


partment. 
Defense Secretary Charles F. 
Wilson said rejection of the low 


was not to be construed as es-| 
tablishing a precedent. ) 


English Electric has made | 


‘three tries, one successful, to | 


\supply generators or trans 


formers for the Chief Joseph) 


Dam. The dam is being built 
by the U. S. Army Corps of 
Engineers as part of a multiple 
purpose project for develop- 
ment of the Columbia River 
Basin. 

In 1953 English Electric got 
a contract for transformers for 
| the Chief Joseph Dam, but a 
generator order went to West- 
inghouse. 
| Concern was voiced in British 
governmental and business cir- 
cles in the earlier cases. It was 
stated in London that Britain 
cannot hope to keep alive a 
policy of “trade, not aid,” in her 
financia] dealings with the! 
United States if her firms are! 
excluded from chances to get 
business of this sort. 


-_ 


foreign bids was “based on the, | # 
particular facts presented” and) | 


United Press 
Lays Down Arms 


A well armed Morecean 
tribesman advances to lay 
down his weapons, slong 
with hundreds of his com- 
rades, to the French. (Stery, 
Page 1.) 


Cyprus Meetings Protest 
Parley; Policeman Slain 


: Rew" 


| MICOSIA, Cyprus, Aug. 28 


A Cypriot policeman was shot 
down in broad daylight here to- 
day as mass meetings were 
held throughout the island to 
protest 3-power talks on Cy- 
prus opening in London Mon- 
day. ' 

The policeman, a member of 
the anti-terrorist criminal in- 
|vestigation branch, was shot 
three times in the back as he 
watched the crowd disperse 
from a protest meeting here. 
The youth who fired the shots 
‘and a companion vanished in 


. 


ithe throng. 


) 
‘British colonial island on the 


The murder underlined the 
political turbulence on this 


eve of talks among Britain, 


ROK Accused of Putting 


Tax Serews on Americans 


SEOUI Aug. 28 #—The 
Ameria Chamber of Com-| 
merce Korea charged today 


the South Korean Government 


to 17 Florida Cities 


SAVE 407 


on return portion of your round-trip ticket! 


MIAMI 


3 hrs. 25 min. non-stop 


—_— 


TAMPA 


ST. PETERSBURG 


jrectors issued a bitter written/only three days ago and “it is) 


\Ou Tieups | 


/nessman “a virtual prisoner” 
land serving ultimatums on 
‘United States firms to pay 
“greatly exorbitant” taxes 

The Chamber's board of di- 


' 


blast against the Government 


jafter taking their protest di- 


U. S. Business 


Peron Faces 


Big Fight on 


Bw. Y. Herald Tribune News Service 


‘87°° 


16-day round-trip 
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Alse low summer excursion fares te 13 other Floride cities 
CALL NATIONAL FOR RESERVATIONS ANYWHERE... STerling 3-5454 


“x NATIONAL 


AIRLINE QF THE STARS 


BUENOS AIRES, Aug. 28) 
‘The Peron Government's con-' 
jtracts with American big busi-| 
ness are becoming a hot polit-' 
lical igsue in this country. ) 
| Principal target of attack by 
opposition parties is the con-' 
itract signed recently between 
ithe Argentine Government and 
ithe Standard Oil Co. of Cali- 
fornia. This agreement gives 
the American company. the 
right to explore and exploit the) 
joil potential of 49,800 square| 
kilometers in southern Pata-' 
gonia. | 

Opposition politicians are 
‘making the most of this deal| 
in an effort to whip up Nation-| 
alist sentiment agains t the 
Peron regime. The opposition is! 
led by the Radical Party, which 
‘maintains that the contract is) 
\onesidediy in favor of the’ 
|American company and consti-| 
tutes a “sellout’ of Argentina’s| 
natural resources, | 

The contract, though signed, | 
cannot become valid until ap- 
proved by the Argentine Con-' 
gress. Congressional action is) 
expected before the end of 
September. 

Radical party leaders have. 
warned that even if the con-! 
tract is ratified by the Peronist 
majority in Congress, they will 
denounce it and re-examine it) 
should they ever come into 
power, ? 


; 


‘is holding a United States busi-\ 


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rom HOWARD Boy s 


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Greece, and Turkey, over the 
Cyprus situation. 

Leaders of Cypriot Greek 
organizations previously had 
denounced violence as part of 
their campaign for union with 
Greece, and a Communist) 
party spokesman had repeated 
the appeal for non-violent tac- 
tics at the meetings where con- 
stable Herodotus Poullis was 
slain. , 

But mass protest meetings 
were held at major island cen- 
ters today to denounce the 
forthcoming London talks and 
reaffirm Greek Cypriot de- 
mands for enosis (union with’ 
Greece) 

The shooting was believed to) 
have been staged by the Eoka,| 
a terrorist underground organ- 
ization. 


a ee 


rectly to U. S. Ambassador Wil- 
liam S. B. Lacy. 

The Chamber said the Ko 
reans yesterday refused an exit 
permit for businessman Alvin 
J. Milnick of Beverly Hillis, 
Calif., because he had not paid 
his taxes. 


Milnick said he merely 
wanted to leave the country for 
a few days to visit his wife in 


double what it should be.” 

The U.’S. businessmen said 
they objected to the Koreans 
suddenly asking for retroactive 
taxes when the Government 
previously has said there would 
be no taxation on previous busi- 
ness. 

They also complained that 
Korea has begun demanding 
corporation taxes from individ- 
ual representatives who are 
here only as liaison men. 
Tokyo. A reliable source said 
Milnick received his tax bill 


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SKILL ‘sor 
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“no government 
which would fail to safeguard 
at any price the country's bor- 
ders and sovereignty would 
survive.” 

Officially there was no com- 
ment from the gov- 
ernment. Premier Gamal Abdel 
Nasser discussed Arab affairs 
for three hours today with Leb- 
anese Foreign Minister Hamid 
Franjie. They reportedly 
touched on the Dulles pro- 


In Iraq the proposals were 
studied at two cabinet meetings 
Saturday, but no official com- 
ment was made on them. 
| Political and diplomatic quar- 
iters baid the new American 
policy had two main aims: To 
force the Arab governments to 
recognize Israel and to imple- 
ment the project of Eric John- 
ston, ident Eisenhower's 

ear East representa- 
tive, to peol Jordan and Yar- 
mouk River waters for an 
Arab-Israeli irrigation project. 


Plan Will Satisfy Noné, 
London Times Declares 


Reuters 

LONDON, Aug. 29 (Monday) 
The London Times today criti- 
cized the Palestine peace plan 
of Secretary of State John Fos- 
ter Dulles as one “likely to sat- 
isfy nobody in the Middle East.” 


a Model 535 4” 


The London Daily Telegraph 
and the Manchester Guardian, 


tiers of Israel by formal treaty 
and help by means of a loan in 
the resettlement of Arab ref- 


ugees. 

The Independent Times said 
Dulles’ “assumption that Arab 
refugees can be resettled out- 
side Israel will infuriate Arabs: 


a) the hint that Israel's boundaries 


may not be permanent will an- 
noy Israel. 

“The offer of a security pact 
after Israel has come to terms 
with her neighbors goes no 
further than Sir Anthony Eden 
went in April. It meets none of 
Israel's current requests.” 

The Times went on to say 
that an alliance now between 


: 


> 


«pitt 
"| ell 
govern cated 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
oo0 Monday, August 29, 1955 5 


This jet pilet’s helmet was a 
te New York Gev. Aver- 
Harriman after he dedi- 
the New York Alr 
Guard base at Syra- 
He said the gift was “of 
practical value te «a 
politician.” 


Na 
cuse. 
very 


UNITED NATIONS, NWN. 


Big Four’ and 


portant step toward bringing 
closer the positions of the 
USSR and the Western powers. 
The Soviet Union is now en- 
titled to expect that the West- 
ern powers will make a step 
to meet the Soviet point of 
view in the question of ban- 
ning atomic weapons, which is 
of greatest importance for 
solving the whole problem of 
disarmament.” 

Mrscow radio said the So 
viet Union “does not refuse to 
give its serious consideration 


alliance with the Arab states. 
‘They alone, however incompe- 
tent, unstable or unreliable, 
have the oil, occupy the terri- 
tory and provide airfields in 
sufficient dispersion for the 
function they fulfill. 

“No Arab statesman, what- 
ever his private wishes, has 
daredto treat with Israel; none 
could be allied to Israel's ally. 
So long as rejations with the 
Soviet Union are uneasy, the 
defense of the area must be for 
Britain and the United States 
have first Priority. 

The liberal Manchester 
Guardian said the offer of a 
itreaty was a victory for Israeli 
| diplomacy. 


to other proposals imbued with 
the endeavor to find ways to 
solve this préblem.” 

The group meeting here !s 
the Disarmament Subcommit- 
tee of the United Nations, a 
brarch of the i12nation Dis 
armament Commission, made 
up of members of the security 
council plus Canada. Canada 
is included because of her im- 
portant role in atomic energy. 

A-“ter the Disarmament Com- 
mission deadlocked over re- 
duction of armaments and con- 


| first meetings in 


trol of nuclear weapons, the 
‘General Assembly asked the 
|'Big Four to sit down at a con- 
ference table to try to reach a 
reliminary agreement. 
With Canada sitting in at the 
ndon a 


Strauss May 


By Lee 


Chairman Lewis L. Strauss 
of the Atomic Energy Commis- 
‘sion said yesterday he might 
‘favor bringing Russian scien- 
tists here to visit United States 
atomic plants after the October 
Big Four Foreign Ministers 
meeting in Geneva. 


Strauss also reported that 
during the last two years the 
United States has increased by 
“more than 1000 per cent” the 
money and manpower being 
ured into efforts to harness 
he energy of the hydrogen 
bomb for peace. 

Covering a wide range of 
atomic developments on the 
CBS-WTOP television program, 
“Face the Nation.” Strauss 
warned the United States may 
lose its atomic lead over Rus- 
sia “within a generation” unless 
'more young Americans are en- 
‘couraged to become nuclear 
i scientists. 

Strauss was reminded that 
Britain permitted Russian sci- 
its 


‘entists to visit some of 


a 
| thought it would produce re- 


Ask Reds 


To Visit U. S. A-Plants 


Nichols / 
United Press 


\whether the Russian intend to 
follow up recent conciliatory 
talk with deeds aimed at easing 
East-West tenions. 
| Strauss also was asked wheth- 
er he agreed with Chairman 
‘Clinton P. Anderson (D-N. M.) 
‘of the House-Senate Atomic 
|Energy Committee, who called 
|for a massive speedup in efforts 
to harness the H-bomb. 
Strauss said he would favor 
“crash program” if he 


}sults but added that it would 
not. He said the program is 
'“not being stinted in any way” 
‘and “we are spending as much 
money as those engaged in the 
work have asked for.” 

| He added the United States 
|H-power program has been un- 
‘der way ever since former 
| President Truman gave the go- 
lahead on hydrogen develop- 
ments in 1950. 

| §Strauss said there is no re- 
‘lation between the peaceful H- 


Israel and the United States or | atomic’ installations last week.|powér program and H-bomb 


Britain was impossible. 

“Alliance implies a high 
identity of interest and Brit- 
ain’s interest in the Middle 
East can be advanced now by 


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From us, either at our store (1208 Wisc. Ave. N.W.) or at 


THE FAIRFAX AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL FAIR 


Annandale, Va. 
Week of Aug. 29%-Sept. 3, 1955 


Come to the fair and see AMF DeWalt and Stanley 
Power Tools. in action. 


W. T. Weaver & Sons, Inc. 
1208 Wise. Ave. N.W. (Georgetown) DUpont 7-1757 


Free Parking off Prospect Ave. in Rear 
Daily 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 
Member of Nation's Capital Builders Hardware Club== 


He was asked whether he fa- 
vored such steps by the United 
States. 

The atomic chief replied he 
would support such visits “un- 
der certain circumstances.” He 
said any visits now would be a 
“bit premature” and suggested 
“they might wait until after” 
the Foreign Ministers meeting 
in Geneva. 
| President Eisenhower and 
Secretary of State John Foster 
Dulles have said the Geneva 
meeting will be the acid test of 


tests. He also said that as a re- 
sult of the Geneva atoms-for- 
|peace conference there seemed 
'to be a “shrinking” of opposi- 
‘tion to weapons tests. 

| Reiterating that the United 
Strauss still holds an over-all 
‘atomic lead over Russia, 
‘Strauss said there is one field 
in which the Soviet Union is 
ahead. He said Russia has a 
larger atcelerator program and 
that it is “directly designed to 
attract students” into the 
atomic field. 


ica’s roving atomic Ambassador 
‘today warned the world faces 
dangerous delays in harnessing 
nuclear power unless it begins 
immediately to train the new 
kind of specialists needed to 
run atoms-for-peace plants. . 

| Morehead Patterson, the 
United States State Depart- 
ment’s special representative 
for atomic negotiations, said 
the recent’ United Nations 
‘atomle conference merely set 
the stage for a burst of progress 
in the atomic-power field. 

_ But he cautioned that such 
progress cannot take place until 
each nation provides itself with 
the thousands of nuclear tech- 
nicians who will be needed 


within several years. 

“It will take five years to 
train this new kind of special- 
‘ist, so if we don’t start now all 
the big hopes of achieving 
atomic power in five years may 
po meaningless,” Patterson 


d. 

This, he added, is “a very se- 
rious possibility.” 
_ Patterson issued his warning 
after three. weeks of pace-set- 
ting atomi talks at Geneva—a 
‘full-scale 72-nation U. N. con- 


Need for Many Experts 
To Run A-Plants Stressed 


é ] GENEVA, Aug. 28 ®—Ameér-isession of scientists from the 


atomic “Big Six” netions. 

At the first conference, dele- 
gates shared atomic data after 
years of secrecy and suspi ion. 
At the second, United States, 
British, Russian, French, Can- 
adian and Czech experts met 
to lay the groundwork for an 
international atomic pool. 

“These talks convinced the 
world that atomic power can be- 
come a reality, that it works, 
that we can afford it, that we've 
got to have it” Patterson said. 

“But now there is the tempta- 
tion to sit back and wait for 
miracles to happen. They won't 
just happen. They've got to be 
made. 

“Right now governments and 
universities and private com- 
panies must start pushing and 
the first thing they need is not 
uranium or reactors, but the 
men to run them.” 

Patterson said only one col- 
lege in the United States is al- 
Teady carrying op a full-scale 
reactor training program. 

e referred to the 2-year-old 
nuclear institute at the North 
Carolina State College, Raleigh, 
which built its »wn research re- 
actor and now uses it to train 
small classes of technicians. 


NOTICE 


Processing and finishing of } 
Eastman Kodak Color Film 
Kodachrome, Kodacolor, Ektachrome 

may be had at 


‘Sommers’ Camera Exchange, Inc. 
Direct Eastman Kodak Dealer 
714 14th Street, N.W. 
Washington, D. C, 


Herold E. Stasse 
President Eisenhower's specia 


tiadviser on disarmament, the 


opportunity to expand on the 
aerial inspection and exchan 


the Soviet Parliament that the 
plan* was impractical, but 
promised it would receive fur- 
ther study. 

The talks will give Anthony 
Nutting, British Minister of 
State, the chance to expand on 
Eden's proposals for West 
to guarantee West German 
neutrality, the Soviet Union to 

acantee East Germany and 

et satellite neutrality, with 

a demilitarized zone dividing 
East and West in Europe. 

Arkady A. Sobolev, Soviet 


Reds Want Concession on Arms Reduction 


for|posal for a European security 
which was rejected at 


chairman 


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WE'LL HAVE THE SAME 
HELPFUL AGENTS, TOO. 


on September lst the name 


a 


GEMUETLICHKETT 
LUNCH SUPPER 


German Recipes © Free Parking 


1d Curope 


RESTAURANT -:- RATHSKELLER 
2434 Wisc. Ave. N.W. 
Party Rooms EM. 2-7650 


Farm Bureau Insurance of Ohio 
Se ~—s will change to... 


ATIONWIDE 


NATIONWIDE MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY 
NATIONWIDE MUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 
MATIONWIOE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 


HOME OFFICE: COLUMBUS, OHIO 


- 


. 


Sherwin-Williams factory rep- 
resentative will be in the Paint 
Shop this week to explain the 
improvements, show you the 
colors in these new exterior 
paints. 


introducing an improved paint 


for exteriors in velvet flat and gloss 


HOUSE PAINT 


Improved in three important ways: easy 
brush application, time-defying durability 
and wide ranging color choice. Sherwin- 
Williams chemists have developed these 
two paints in 91 exclusive house paint col- 
ors ir your choice of full gloss or velvet flat 
finish. Paint over wood siding, shingle sid- 
ing, shake siding, Stucco, concrete block, 
brick and cement walls or asbestos shingles. 
And with these new: Sherwin-Williams ex- 
terior paints you get house - protecting, 
money-saving durability, fade-resistant col- . 
ors and a white that stays white. See this 
“Cascade of Exterior Colors’’ in our Paint 
Shop. Gloss or Velvet Flat Exterior Paint, 


quart, 1% gallon, 64 


Custom mix colors or deep trim colors 
in gloss finish slightly higher. 


W&L—Paint Shop, Ist Floor, North Building 


THE’ WASHINGTON POST cp TIMES: HERALD 
6 ‘Monday, Augnst 29 


Russians Fear 


A ‘Dust 


Dr. Lambert, dean and director of the University of Ne« 


braska College of Agriculture, 
United States delegation that 
mile tour of Russia. 


By Dr. W. V. Lambert 
World Copyright, 1955 br International News Service 


‘The Soviet Union is taking , 


the biggest gamble in agricul- 
tural history, plunging billions 
of rubiks into an sk Sat to 


Bowl’ 


was chairman of the 12-man 
has just completed a 10,000- 


and planted in 1954 and 1955. 
The plan calls for plowing an- 
other 25 million acres next year. 

To cultivate these tremen- 


PP ner ving Wash 


1UN 
CONTINUED 


ve) 1 


‘ ’ ia le 
‘ i) , u x 
Si lu 

. & 


T ALL THREE CONVENIENT LOCATIONS 


8th and E 
: Streets, N. W. 


BY 


Street, N. E. 


POPULAR REQUEST 
TUESDAY 


(2146—24th 
Place, NM. | i 


NEwr 


E verything New In 


transform the . | d0us areas, huge fleets of trac- 
treebhess 5) *|\tors, implements and combines 
prairies of 3 are needed. Officials in Akmo- 
. |lensk, western terminus of the 
» |mew lands, report 95 per cent 
_ \of the farming in their area is 
already mechanized. 

Most farms on this frontier 
are large, even by Soviet stand- 
ards. Akmolensk area collec- 
tives average 22,100 acres 
(about 35 square miles), state 
farms 29,600 acres (about 46 
square miles). 


a national *% 
granary. 
After flying | 
over vast ex- | ' 
panses a ~~ pi 
area an n- 
pt ee 
the , am convince 
that the Soviet Union will be| Size of Fields Impressive 
able — a nT As I flew across this region, 
quantities of grain here 
But whether the grain can |*ve® though I have flown over 
be produced economically year/OUF Own wheat country many 
after year and without serious | times, I couldn't help being int- 
damage to the land from wind) pressed by the sheer size of the 
erosion are questions only fields. 
time will answer. At the same time I couldn't 
Like Kansas Plains forget that unless the land is 
carefully managed and some 
These socalled “virgin! provision made to check the 
lands” cover some 200,000 
square miles—an area nearly as | 
large as Nebraska, Iowa and| 
Missouri together. | 
The soil is good: meastly a. 
dark silt loam, The growing | 
season is short, but it is pro-| 
ductive when it gets enough’ 
moisture. 
But with an average rainfall 
about the same as our own dust | 
bowl region, wind erosion. it | 
it seems to me, is an enormous | 
hazard. 


Russia Seen Lacking 
Food to Wage War 


Associated Press 
The head of the American 
farm delegation to Russia 
said yesterday he doesn't | 
believe the Seviet Union has | 
the food reserves te wage war | 


now. 

We were told they get an aver- That lack in feod potential, | 
age of about 13 inches of rain a | said Dr. W, V. Lambert of the 
year. This year, however, has, University of Nebraska, may 
been “the driest since 1834"| be ene reason fer Russia's 
only five and one-half inches| new friendly attitude toward ) 
and none at all since May. the United States, and for 

Temperatures range from 80/ its intensive drive te increase 
to 95 degrees during the May 1 . 
to Aug. 30 growing season. 

Fall comes early. They had 
frost during our visit. Winter 
tefhperatures get down to 4 
below zero. 

The Communist Party and 
government announced their 
decision to plow the prairie Siberian winds, this could 
to raise wheat early in 1954.\quickly become a vast dust | 
The program began immediate- | how}. 
ly—under the supervision of| The only efforts so far to 
Nikita S. Khushchev, first sec-|control dust storms have been | 
retary of the Communist Party. ithe planting of rows of corn | 

The Soviets hope to boost or sunflowers across the fields 
food production sharply by |every 100 to 150 feet. This won't 
moving the traditional bread-ihelp much in the winter or 
basket from the Ukraine to the early spring, however. 
new lands. Then the’ Ukraine| Housing and other services 
will be able to produce the corn |fer the virgin land pioneers 
and other fodder crops needed |have been a gigantic problem, 
to step up livestock production. |but authorities hope to have 

More than 50 million acres of |permanent homes for most | 
the virgin steppe were plowed |families by next winter. 

ized homesteading'| 
loses much of its charm when | 
the thermometer drops to 40) 
below. But we were told that | 
despite the primitive liv ing | 
conditions only a small per-| 
centage of young people who | 
answered the call to the new) 
lands have deserted the ven-| 
ture. 


Government Stake ; 


The Government stakes each 
new state farm to 4 million 
rubles a year for the first five 
years to help finance construc- 
tion, road-building and other 
services. ) 

Good rainfall last year gave | 
the Akmolensk region an aver- 
age yield of 169 bushels of | 
wheat per acre. This year’s | 
average, 48 bushels an acre, 
won't pay the cost of planting | 
and harvesting. | 

While the local officials point | 
out that 1955 has been an ex- 
ceptionally dry year, it must be 
kept in mind that yields are 
bound to decrease as the land 
is Gultivated nrore. 


SAVE EVERY DAY 
HE JUG MILK WAY 


74 


HIGH'S 


GRADE-A 
HOMOGENIZED 
VITAMIN D 


FL 


Fly oi 


AIR LINES 


TRAFFIC || 
JAMS 


HEAT AND 
GRIME 


. 41 min. 

86 min. 
77 min. 
Huntington 98 iin. 


VIA 40-PASSENGER 
SILVER FALCON 


Richmond. ..... 
Charleston, W.Va. 
Raleigh-Durham 


Prone . 
3-4000 HAVE A RENTAL 


, CAR WAITING! 


EASY TERMS! 


PRE-LABOR DAY 


¥ asked for jt! 
aq fremendous’cyostt Waited on ‘pec 
Labo Day Sale lest wank 
oy Ven more , oe aioe 
soning! Thank you ne 
. 


TV, AIR CONDITIONERS 


FURNITURE SAVINGS wud MAJOR APPLIANCES 


Whether efer modern or traditional, you'll find it in this gigantic sale event . 
at just the he pres yoo. went to payl . Just teke a look and see what we mean! 


‘ae 
~~» 


a —— 


$399.95 New 1955 


ies $ 


PHILCO. $ 
“% ELF. 


Aly Conditioner 


839° 95 New 1955 


KELVINATOR $ 


PD conditioner w/thermestat 


2790.95 New 1954 
FAMOUS MAKE 


% MP. CASEMENT 
Air Conditioner 


for sleeping. Ovwr Reg. $139.95 . 

2-PC. LIVING ROOM SUITES, King-size sofe and large 
Reg. $219.95 | 

ee Se oe $25 
modern styles. Our Reg. $49.95 

m severe! ottrective colers ‘4 

2-PC. SECTIONAL SOFA. Foam rubber, sturdily 


g289.50 New 1954 


JAMES 
DISHWASHER 


159 


$3270.95 New 1955 $179.95 New 19565 


New 1955 
FRIGIDAIRE 
ELECTRIC 


ume 91222 


JUST ARRIVED! 
New 1965, Reg. 139.95 


THOR 
WRINGER 


WASHER 


‘79 


Rey. $199.95 ...... 
21-in. TV 


$199 ny 


TTRESSES. Pull or 
we den Our Oop. OE TA cee 


2Z1-in TV 
arge table and 4 Console Model 


Se aah. ‘Our Ron. $119.98 


‘79 


HOLLYWOOD HEADBOARD BED. Innerspring mettress, 


SUNK BEDS. Complete with ledder, guerd roll, 2 in- 


memgting sateante pl 3. oe Ene $99 
maple, twin size. Our Reg. $139.95 . 


FOLDING SE ComeeN 98, eae $19 
mattress. Our Reg. $32.95 


LEONARD 
UPRIGHT FREEZER 
18 Cw. Fr. 


“vVicTO New n 
ty 


With 
Pump 


249 


SWIVEL ROCKERS. In. assorted febrics ond $48 
colors. Our Reg. $69.95 ...... bo abe 

. & MRS. DOUBLE DRESSER. King-tize. $58 
ou Reg. $129.95 


RS. Mahe or meople 
ee ae 
er tO 7 


KNEE-HOLE DESK. Choice of earngney 
Twie size only. $19 


DESK er DINING ROOM CHAIRS. Secvtiful $ 
mahogeny finish. Our Reg. $14.95 . 


5-PC. BRIDGE SETS. Lorge table and 4 stanly $20 maple. Our Reg. $49.95 . 


folding choirs. Our Reg. $34.95 . 


CLOSEOUT 


ALL FLOOR SAMPLE 


FANS 
30% to 
50% orF 


HEADBOARD end FRAME. 
Our Reg. $29.95 
PICTURES—LAMPS—MIRRORS 
20% to 60% OFF 
$39 


DECORATOR 2-°C. SECTIONAL 
SONA. Gyr Rep 929098 $140 
LOUNGE CHAIRS. Secvtifully upholstered $ 59 
with rubber cushions. Our Reg. $79.95 


$42.90 HAMILTON BEACH SLECTRIC 
MIXER with jwicer 


CRIB MATTRESSES. tnnerspring Flex-o-Lec construction DECORATOR SREAKFRONTS. er 


8-PC. DESK ENSEMBLE. Desk, chair, blotter, 
pen holder, end desk lamp, Our Reg. $69.95 
veneered 
yesh. ti el was: )  $ 


Furniture on sale at 8th and E Sts., N.W. and 1021 | H ‘io N.E. onl 


Sorry, no mail, phone or C.0.D. orders. Take 
your purchases with you and save delivery costs. 
Installation and service extra, where desired. 


Warehouse Store 


2146—24th 
Place, N. E. 


Open Daily & Saturday 
9 te 6 


Northeast Store 


1021 H 
St., N. E. 


Open Sess Pg pauses 


Downtown Store 


Sth & E. 
Sis., N. W. 
yy ve Mls . Pg ” 


Free Customer Parking 
Adjacent to Store 


oman Washington F For Almost 29 Years! 


HUME ARR 


BAS. 


’ 


iD TA RE 
CUANUENZ 


Free Customer Parking 


Comfortably Air Conditioned 
Adjacent to Warehouse 


For Your Comfort 


f? 
¢ 


, owl 


D 
Prilies ipo 


In Factory Sealed Crates 


MONDAY 
ONLY! 


OPEN 12 NOON to 9 P.M. | 
NEW AIR 


dealers stayed closed yesterday 
despite early avowals to remain 
‘open on Sundays in defiance of 
the Maryland regulations. 
Montgomery unty police 
said the Anthony Abraham 
Chevrolet Corp., 1339 East- ‘West 
hwy., Silver Spring, was “shut 


Georges County police said the 
‘Lustine Nicholson Motor Co., 
Inc., 5555 Baltimore’ ave., Hy- 
attsville, was also closed yes- 
terday. 

Both auto dealers have been 
charged with violating the Sab- 
bath statute. Edward G. Harris, 


‘Auto Dealers Close Sunday 


Two suburban Maryland auto up as tight as a drum.” Prince|43, president and general man- 


‘ager of the Anthony Abraham 
let Corp., has been re- 


leased under $500 bond pending’ 


trial September 13. 

Philip Lustine, of the Lustine 
Nicholson Motor Co., Inc. will 
stand trial September 2 in Mart- 


boro Police Court on a blue law 
‘orm 


) NEW BOSTON, N. H.,, Aug. 
(28 #—The Glenn L. Martin Co, 
announced plans Saturday 

night for a research laboratory 

'to “explore, both theoretically 

and experfmentally, the fron- 
tiers of man's knowjedge.” 

One of these frontiers is the 
| possibility of travel through 
outer space. 

Welcome W. Bender, mana- 
ger of Martin’s Advanced Sci- 
ence Laboratory at Baltimore, 
disclosed the plans in an ad. 
dress to the Gravity Research 


CONDITIONER | 


SPECIALS! 


, IN ORIGINAL FACTORY CRATES! 
Mt NATIONALLY ADVERTISED BRANDS! 


New 1955, Regular $399.95 


WELBILT 1 TON 


—_ seems ~ meee —_= 


~~~ mH. myn ey 
MONDAY ONLY 


New 1955, a $379.50 


VICTOR 2 Hi. P. 


A 2 oe mith. pasn alr 


a ype yo Re a tebe 
lows value. 


MONDAY ONLY 


New 1954, we $249.95 


SERVEL 3 HP. 


Fameus “Wenderaire” 
Casement windew moedel. 


MONDAY ONLY 


New 1954, a. $279.95 


PHILCO 2 H. a 


Philee, famouse for 
ity the world over. & 
tively B..! eA reais 
an amazin 


MONDAY ent y 


New 1955, Regular $399.95 


1. < HP, 


4 


Complete with automatic 
thermostat. and. push- 
butten controls. 


MONDAY ONLY 


4166 


FREE on lot adjacent 
PARKING eo warehouse 


2145 QUEENS 
CHAPEL RD., N.E. 


oe eee ee 


NORTHWEST 


Arcade Pontiac Co. 
1437 irving Street H.W. 
AD. 4-8500 


Crosstown Auto Supply 
14th and $ Streets N.W. 
HO. 2-9565 


Firestone Stores 
T3th and K Streets N.W. 
NA. 8.3323 


Syd Follin Texaco 
Wis. Ave. and @ St. N.W. 
HO, 2.3779 


J. J. Freeman Texaco 
20th and N.Y. Ave. NW. 
ST. 3-2694 


Kennedy Service Station 
5420 N. H. Ave. et Kennedy St. N.W. 
RA. 6-3839 


Merchant's Tire Co. 
1418 P St. WLW. 
DE. 2-3318 


Paul's Tire Shop 
28th end M Streets N.W. 
AD. 4-9682 


| Petworth Shell Servicenter 
| Georgia’ at Ag a St. NW. 


L. FP. Stewart, Inc. 
1440 P St. WLW. 
DE. 2-4800 


HURRY! 


‘Foundation, a privately-sup- 
|ported study organization es- 
‘tablished here in 1948 by econ- 
omist Roger W. Babson. 

He said the plans are “al. 
ready under implementation.” 
The aim, he said, is to “gather 
the most highly skilled scien- 
tists and create an energetic en- 
vironment” in which they could 
explore new frontiers of know}l- 
edge. 

Bender did not say where the 
laboratory would be, but pre- 
sumably it would be at RBalti- 


Martin Backs Research in Wide Fields 


more, headquarters of the Mar- 
tin company. 

Martin's European office has 
signed contracts in the past 
year with “a dozen or more” 
prominent European scientists, 
he added, for a series of studies 
in various fields. 


A few of the unknowns chal- 


lenging science, he said, are 
new problems of propulsion, 


vironmenta! effects on man, and 


relative distance and relative 
speed. 


materials and navigation, en- 


~~ 


French Firemen 


Quit in a Huff 


PONT - L°EVEQUE, 
France, Aug. 28 *R—All 41 
firemen of this cheese- 
making Normandy town 
resigned today because 
local citizens called in “for- 
.eign” firemen to put out a 
blaze in their territory. 
The burnedup firemen 
complained that the fire de- 
partments from Beaumon- 
en-auge and Trouville put 
out the flames Tuesday 
while onlookers peered at 
the efforts of the local men. 

Townfolk said they 
alerted the local firemen 
and then waited for their 
siren to sound. But there 
was no siren Fire Capt. 
Martial Colas said he was 
too busy to sound the siren. 
He complained the local 
citizenry gave his men a hot 
time when they finally ar- 
rived at the scene 


Budget Terms as 


Low as 
a Week 


/9' 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES ~— 
Monday, August 29, 1955 


Disabled Quota $261,755 


The Office of Vocational Re- The city plans to spend a 
habilitation yesterday an- total of $418,000 on the disabled 


nounced distribution of its $32.-/ ¢7¢ during the coming fiscal 
jor he said. 


det whieh the District will * 3 TIMES FASTER 
‘ for GAS on Stomach 


ceive $261,755 for fiscal 1956. 
Maryland was allotted $598,- 
988 and Virginia $976,340 under) 

‘the allocation which support Sertied laboratory tests prove Bell-ans 
jtecal programs to help handi-\iablets ‘necnraios A. AR 
capped persons oversome their jteading etre fast Laois Get Bel ty 
\disabilities, and expands PI enn handonnel Jaane nee 

limproves other services to the | 
\ disabled. 

| The money is alotted on 4. 
' matching formula which in the! 
District's case finds the city 
|putting up 30 per cent of the 
first $205,000 and half of the : 
| balance. Tom G. Rathbone, di- 
irector of the local office ex- 


Advertisement 


More Comfort Wearing 


ortablie, No gumm 
taste or feeling. — ~~ Fuse 
acid). Does 


not sour. Checks +s 
odor” (denture Seeath) Get 
TEETER 


loday Ay oy EB. ~ 


HURRY! LAST CHANCE TO SAVE! 


Firestone 
Champions 


Firestone 
SUPER 
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BE SURE TO ENTER THE Firestone 100,000 CONTEST 


Nothing to Buy-Mothing to Write -Come in Today 


SOUTHWEST 


Wm. A. Barber Esse Service 
10th, 6 St. end Mame Ave. $.W. 
EX. 3.1515 


Bruce's Texaco 


6th and bapey Ave. $.W. 
-4963 


NORTHEAST 


Joe Belle Texaco 
1301 Bladensburg Rd. N.E. 
Li, 4.5442 


Firestone Stores 
604 Rhede island Ave. N.E. 
AD. 2.3533 


Hite’s Shell Service 
18th and Monroe Sts. N.E, 
LA. 6-9740 


SOUTHEAST 


Coral Hills Firestone Store 
4731 Maribeore Pike §$.E. 
30. $4300 


District Home & Aute 
Supply 


iene Coa ee $.E. 


Firestone 


ALEXANDRIA, VA. ,piiNGTON. VA. 


Luckett’s, Inc. 

1642 Ki treet 

Kl. ny By 
Mendelson's Hardware 

1100 Arey Ay tae 


Perrine Bros. Service Center 


1836 W. Braddeck Road 
Ki. 9.2929 


ARLINGTON, VA. 


American Service Center 
585 N. Glebe Rd. 
JA. 17-7722 


Anderson & Tew Sunoco 
5501 Lee Highway 
JE. 2-9610 


noe Anton Esso 
a ngton ing Center 
; ov. Ayr ~~ 


Firestone Stores 
4043 28th St. Seuth, Shirlington 
Ki, 8-6840 


Firestone Stores 
1100 N. Highlend $t., Clarendon 
JA, 4-1191 


echt Co 


Wilson Bivd. and Glebe Rd. 
NA. 8.5100 


Burr Heishman’'s 
1503 Lee . er 
JA. 70012 


Burr Heishman’s 
10th and Nerth Irving Sf. 
JA, 77-7442 


Ray Welch Texaco 
5101 Lee Highway 
Jt, 2-5550 


CENTREVILLE, VA. 


Caton’s Esso Service 
Browning 8-9698 


FAIRFAX, VA. 


Esso Clinic 
Fairfax Circle 
. R. 32-2992 


Fairfax Circle Texaco 
Fairfax Circle 
cr. 3-9800 


FALLS CHURCH, 
VA. 


Wm. A. Barber's 
WILLISTON SERVICE CENTER 


Arlington Bivd & Patrick 
Henry Dr. JE. 4-7300 


SILVER SPRING, 
MD. 


Bobinger's Texaco 


Ge. Ave. and Wayne Ave. 
ju, 9-9889 


FALLS CHURCH, 
VA. 


Burr Heishman’'s 
Seven Corners 
st. 2-2177 


MANASSAS, VA. 


Merchant's Firestone 
716 Center Street . 
Manassas 255 


WOODBRIDGE, VA. 


Mifce Service 


Highway Ne. 1 
Occoquan 52) 


DEFENSE HEIGHTS, 


MD. 


Dickerson’s Atlantic Service 
64th St. and Defense Hwy. 
UN. 4.9735 


LAUREL, MD. 


Red & Mac's Atlantic 
Rt. 1 & German Ave. 


PA. §-9827 
ROCKVILLE, MD. 


Al's Texaco Service 


806 €. Ave. 
one not 
PO. 2-4428 


Firestone Stores 


8521 ‘ero Ave. 
JU. §-2334 


Silver Spring Tire Corp. 
la Ave. 


JU, 9-7738 


TAKOMA PARK, 
MD. 


Glascock Texaco 
N. H. Ave. and East-Weet Hwy. 
JU. 9-2491 


Quimby’s Sunoco 
Carroll & Pg Aves. 


Takoma Park Shell 
Carroll & tthen Allen Aves. 
JU. 9-9575 
WHEATON, MD. 
Whesten, Preston e Store 
| Coors Ave. 

LO. &.- 22 “3 
Wheaton Texaco Service 
a Ave. 


Available at most Shell, Texaco and other stations displaying the Firestone Sign 


7 WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD . i oe oe ee ee ee oe ee 
Monday, August 29, 1955 


They’re All Wet at the Y—New Nurses—Goodies From Miss Gooding 


? 


In addition to couples night out (left), the Y is introducing a “family night out” 
every fourth Friday. Here, Mrs. Lemi Domine, acting as a volunteer baby sitter, en- 
tertains Sharon O'Toole, Ricka Orbeck and Sharon's sister, Maureen (from left). 


By Rob Burchette. Stall Photoerecher 


These frolickers are Mr. and Mrs. David Moore, who are enjoying “couples night out” at the 
YWCA, which will institute the new program an a regular Monday night basis this fall. 


ee es 


/ . 
’ 


° Harry Geodwin. Stall Phetecrenher ». 4 
Tractor driver Pat Patriarca, 16, of Herndon, gets a few pointers from 17-year-old Bobby Blair, 
also of Herndon, at the Fairfax County Junior Fair on the Floris (Va.) School grounds. 


Henry Rohland, Staff Photographer 
At the Capital City School 
of Nursing’s graduation 
yesterday Miss Beatrice E. 
Ritter, school director, 
fixes a class pin on grad- 
uate Mary Pamela Cough- 
lin of 419 Ethan Allen 
ave., Takoma Park. New 
nurse Dorothy Jean Mor- 
ris of 5950 Piney Branch 
rd. nw., is at center, 


— 


Actress Rosalind Russell, 
is rushed for autographs 
by Girl Scouts of Troop 570 
from Nativity School after 
she arrived in town yester- 
day. With Miss Russell, 
who'll boost recruitment 
for volunteers for the up- 
coming Cummunity Chest 
drive, is E. K. Morris, gen- 
eral campaign chairman. 


- 


——= > 


She can cook, too, finds 
§-year-old Mike Murphy 
of Floris, Va., as he sam- 
ples the cvokies that won 
a prize for Jane Gooding, 
10, at the Fairfax County 
Junior Fair. This is Jane's 
first year in competition 
and she won nine prizes. 


ad 


Staff Accuses 


Union; 


NLRB Bars Review 


Richard F. Mooney 

United Press a Portland, Ore., local of the 

The National Labor Relations; AFL Office Employes Union 

Board has refused to take juris-| against the AFL Teamsters 

diction over an unusual case in| Union, two of its Portland locals’ 

which a union was accused of and a joint council of Oregon 
commiting unfair labor prac-|teamsters unions. 

tices. in  wrame with its own 

em 


Trial Examiner Martin S. 
aod was the frst of its Dennett ruled last January that 
kind in the 20-year history of|the labor organizations had il- 
the Board. In a decision an-| legally interfered with their 
nounced yesterday, the Board|employes’ organizing activities, 
voted 3 to 2 against accepting it| discharged four employes be- 
— a trial examiner had/cause of activities in the Office 
rul accused organizations 

ects illegally. 


HAY FEVER? 


sale. elective MAY TEX lm. 

eng testing RAY the 

thet com contre! the 
AVAMABLE AT PEOPLES DRUG STORES 


bargain with the Office Em- 
ployes Union. 

Two Board members, Chair- 
man Gury Farmer and Ivar H. 
Peterson, voted that the board 


cause a rule against taking 
cases which involve nonprofit 
organizations applied to the 
union. Another member, Abe 
Murdock, held that a union is 
jnot legally an “employer” in 
relation to employes whose 
‘work is tied to the union’s nor- 


KATP NTOTTIVY 


PURCHASE REQUIRED 


\ PARKING 
ae with 


for Apex Liquors 
free of parking 
worrtes 


Ine ve. An 


next to ‘the 
ettendant will hs you 
pert. 


ST. 3-3330 


alse prove 
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action , Comers Athlete contact, Pre- 
‘agreed of infection, Aids 


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REUPHOLSTER 
Sofa & Chair $98.00 00 


a Porat) 


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2447 18th "Street N.W. CO. 5-5116 


VISIT OUR SHOWROOM. Open Every Evening Until 9 PM. 
Estimates Cheerfully Given in Nearby Md. and Va. 


The charges were brought by, 


Employes Union and refused to: 


mal collective bargaining activ- 
ities. 

The two dissenters — Philip 
Ray Rodgers and Boyd Leedom 


stands. They said 
Hartley Law violations found 
by the examiner “were not 


fringements upon the rights of 
the employes, but were, if the 
examiner is correct, part and 


ployes who persisted in pro- 


ployes Union. 

“If we accept the trial ex- 
‘aminer’s findings,” Rodgers and 
Leedom said, some of the ac- 
‘cused parties “showed not only 
ja disregard for the guarantees 
‘of the (Taft-Hartley) Act, but 


should not take jurisdiction be- ‘also for the (NL RB) Board's 
judicial processes.” 


Disregard for the Board's, 


| judicial processes was shown, 


they said, in the discharge of 
three employes and a super-| 
visor “because they had been 
subpenaed” by the Board's gen- 
— counsel to testify. 


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Soap Figures 
Are Hobby 


Ever since Mrs. Anna Utz 
has been confined in her apart-| 
ment with a paralytic stroke) 


‘suffered two years ago, she has, ‘study the method 


—disagreed with both majority | " 
the Taft-| > 


mere technical or trivial in-| 59 


parcel of a purge of all em-| @& 


moting the cause” of the Em-| }) = 


United Press 


Stopover 


This is Miss Tennessee of 
1955, Patty Williams of Jack- 
son, who arrived in Washing. 
ton yesterday for a short 
| visit before going on to At- 
lantie City and the forth. 
coming Miss America com- 
petition. 


ec 


Gold Coast Plans 
Lottery Financing 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES mie 
Monday, August 29, 1955 


4cio »Chrysler Raceto Beat Strike Deadline’ 


DETROIT, Aug. 28 ®—Chrys- 
ler and CIO United Auto 
Workers negotiators met in a 
special Sunday session today to 
try to avert a strike by 139,000 
employes scheduled for mid- 
night Wednesday. 

mil Mazey, UAW secretary- 
treasurer, confirmed that a 
union demand for a guaranteed 
wage for unionized office 
workers was one of the main 
issues still to be resolved. 

“But there are at least a 
dozen issues of equal impor. 
tance to us that have to be 
cleared up,” Mazey said. 

The company has charged 
that granting the 8000 Chrysier 
office workers a guaranteed pay 
plan would be departing frém 
the “pattern” contracts granted 
earlier this summer by Ford) 
and General Motors. 

Neither the Ford nor GM 
contracts provide a jobless pay | 
plan for office workers. 


Meanwhile, in New York, the! 
National Mediation Board 
stepped into the deadlocked ne-| 
gotiations between Pan Ameri- 
can World Airways and the CIO 
Transport Workers Union. The 


‘union announced it would take 


a strike vote among 5500 af. 


fected workers Monday. 


| 


ACCRA, Gold Coast, Aug 28, 


‘#—Kobina Ghedemah, 
Coast Minister for Finance, left 


Gold | 


‘by plane today for Malta to! 


found her 15-year-old hobby of niqué the Maltese use to run 
collecting soap figurines * ‘HY | their national lottery. 


greatest joy.” | 


The Gold Coast Government 


“What is a hobby for but to 4.-ided to organize a national 


give you a little pleasure and) 
to give you something to think | 
about other than yourself,” 
retired registered nurse said, 
“especially when you're ill?” 
Mrs. Utz, who now has a spe- 
cial three-shelf cabinet for her 
405- piece collection in her 
epartment at 1114 F st. ne. be-| 
gan her unusual collection 
when she retrieved a former 


the viser 


patient's toy soap lamb he was 
about to discard. 


“For each special occasion, 8 | 


soap figurine comes out,” 
said af her collection which has 
come from,all over the world. 

Mrs. Utz, who has traveled 
extensively during her career 


as = nurse, including a world 


she. 


cruise which took a year and a 
day, said many of her pieces) 


’ 


were sent to her by friends. | 


“They search for items they) 
think J don't have.” Mrs. Utz! 
said: . for instance, I love | 
ice cream ‘and a friend sent me 
this ice cream cone.” 

Her collection, which was) 
started with a menagerie of | 
almost every. animal in the | 
kingdom, has expanded now to! 
include such prize pieces as! 
Prince Machiavelli's crown to 
Snow White and the Seven) 
Dwarfs 

“Just like a child, I'm always! 
interested in the circus, clowns) 
and animals,” she said exhibit-' 
ing her collection. 

Her favorite pieces are Elsie, | 
the cow. and her calf, Beaure-| 
garde, sent to Mrs. Utz by a 
former patient in New York 


“Never heard of anyone else. 


the same hobby.” Mrs. | 
“I'd like to find| 


with 
Utz mused. 


someone to compare collections 


with.” 


a se 
SATE 


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BALTIMORE, MD, 
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lottery after its economic ad. 
estimated it would bring 
in about $85 million a year. 


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The present contract be. 
tween the union and the airline 
expires at midnight Wednesday 

The union demands an 18 
cent hourly pay increase for 


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This 


Morning... 


With Shirley Povich 


CHICAGO, Aug. 28—Some pertinent, and even im- 
pertinent, comment on the baseball scene by Dizzy Dean 
who now vocalizes mostly on television's game of the 
week in the majors: 

“Them three-hour games they're playing now-days is 


a disgrace and they don't make no fans for the sport. You just ' 


Home Run 


more. You 
the whole 


don't go to a ball game no 
“spend the whole day or 
night at the ball park. 
“It's them players who 
it. The hitters are skeered to stay up 
there and the pitchers are skeered to 
let the ball go so they fiddle around 
and take up everybody's time. 
“Those pitchers don't have enough 
stuff to handle those hitters with, so 
they have to throw at each one of 
‘em and that takes up time, too. 
“Used to be that we'd throw at one 
hitter and it would be just like knock- 
ing ‘em all down. I mean they would 
all get respect for you and not try to 


£ 


are doing 


Povich 
get too smart. 


| 


? 


Kennedy's 


Puts Chicago ~ 


Into Second 


By Shirley Povich 
Staff Reporter 
CHICAGO, Aug. 28 — The 
White Sox, stubborn about los- 


oN 


ports 


RACING 
BASEBALL 
GOLF 


10 


MONDAY, AUGUST 29, 1955 


ing two games to the Yankees in) 
a park filled by 50,990 of their) 
‘admirers, brought off a 3-2 vic 


tory for themselves in the sec- 
‘ond game of a doubleheader to- 


“Now they're even thrdwing at the seventh and eighth day to stay solidly in the hectic 
place hitters. Consarn it, we pever used to bother with those | 


kind. All you did to those guys was pitch and get ‘em out. 


“THE UMPIRES DONT help sometimes. They let the hit- | 


ter go up there and call time while he’s digging himself a nice 
hole around the plate so he can get a toe-hold on the pitch. If 
they tried that against me, I'd bury ‘em in that same hole they 
dug 

“Now I see by the papers that Brooklyn has got Andy High 
out scouting the Yankees and Cleveland and Chicago just in 
case they play one of those teams in the World Series. That's 
more time-wasting. 

“That scouting is an overrated thing in baseball Gees for 
football maybe but no good for baseball. | remember High 
has been scouting World Series teams for the Dodgers for 
years. I'm asking you, did the Dodgers ever win a World Series 
in their life and they been in seven of ‘em? 

“They ought to save time and money by cutting out that 
scouting. Cleveland scouted the Giants last year before the 
Series. It didn’t stop the Giants from winning four straight. 

“It's like that 1996 All-Star game I pitched in at Boston. 
I'll tel] you about that 


“WE GO UP TO BOSTON to play those American League 
All-Stars and all the National League manafers come in to our 
dressing room and tell us we don't dare pitch fast-balls to 
those American Leaguers 

“They say it's a fast-hball league they're in and they'll mur- 
der fast balls 

“T told ‘em if that’s the case then they didn't want me to 
pitch because if I can't throw my fast ball those days I'd like 
to be hitting against myself, I'm that bad without it 

“They started me but they teld me to be careful about my 
fast ball, so I pitched the first three innings and I wasn't 


and I knew it and they weren't going to take it away from me 
with their silly scouting reports. 

“Apparently those American Leaguers didn't believe those 
scouting reports we had about them being fast ball hitters 
because I'm out there three innings throwing nothing but 
and they ain't hit me yet. 

“Now you take what's happening now in the American 
League, some of those teams act like they re afraid they might 
win the pennant. 


“LOOK WHAT THEM White Sox did against Washington 
the other day. Lose two straight to them seventh-place Sena- 
tors. That's no geod. When the lambs come to town that's 
when you're supposed to make lamb stew. 

“T see them Brooklyns are catching it from their manager, 


’ 


pennant race. 

They rebounded to a 6 to 1-de- 
‘feat in the first and stayed the 
ifiew of blood from the rent 
hearts of Chicago's largest 


‘crowd of the season. 


It was a full recevery from 
the effects of the home runs of 


American League 
Race at a Glance 


New York 
Chicago 
Cleveland 
Boston 


. ee 


Mickey Manile and Yogi Berra, 
and the seven-hit pitching of 
Whitey Ford, which won the 
first game for the Yankees 
Bob Kennedy, an old cam- 


'paigner who landed back with 


the White Sox recently after 
being rejected by the Tigers, 
Indians and Orioles, gave them 
something to hang onto in the 


final game—a three-run homer | 


in the frst inning. Billy Pierce 
and his relief man, Dixie How- 
ell, made those three quick 
runs stand up 

The Yankees got a bad break 
on Kennedy's homer. Yogi 
Berra slipped and fell chasing 


/a high pop foul off Kennedy's | 
careful about my fast ball at all. It was the best pitch I had bat on the pitch before the 


home run. 

Ordinarily, split doublehead-| 
ers are profitiess for both 
teams. but this one wasn't, 
thanks to the startling double 
defeat of Cleveland by Wash- 


ington that was happening con-| 


currently. 

In the reshufiling of 
standings of the leaders, the In- 
dians dropped out of a tie with 
the Yanks for the league lead 
inte third place, a full game be- 
jhind. The White Sox moved into 
‘second, a half game behind the 
Yanks. 


Yankees Threaten 


the 


Joost Hits 
Pair, No. 25 
For Williams 


Re ers" oa ia a iti 


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NEXT STOP, ST. PAUL—Happy Bunker Aft American 
Legion junior baseball team members wave good-by as they 
depart yesterday from National Airport for the national 
legion championships at St. Paul starting Tuesday. Bunker 
Hill won the D. C.. Sectional and Regional titles. In front 


Bosox 


By Douglas Chevalier. Staff Photogracher 


{reading up the ramp) are: Walt Mahon, Dick Kettner, 
Senny Lindameood, Lee Haislip. John Barrett, Craig Ander- 
son and Bill Sne®@. In back: Hugh Chinn, Jim Pratt, Jim 
Birch and John Wolf. Bunker Hill opens the tourney Tues- 
day night playing Postal Post 216 of Cincinnati. 


Homers Blast A’s, 14-2 


U. S. Beaten, 5—0 


> 


Seixas, Richardson 


Ten Hoff 
Kayo Victim 


| GOTEBORG, Sweden, Aug. 
28 W—Swedish Heavyweight 


‘Amazing 


‘Indian’ Sign 


Continues, 


8-2 and 13-4. 


By Bob Addie 
@tafft Reporter 
Their pennant hopes 
go on the fritz, 
As the Indians suffer 
a double blitz. 


CLEVELAND, “Aug. 27—The 


too. They're in a big losing stregk and he walks into the club 
house and finds his players laughing and joking, and natural- 


ly he don't 


“That's bad timing. You shouldn't laugh when you're losing. 
You gotta save your laughs for after you win the pennant 

“I'm wondering how good the baliplayers are these times. 
Here you got a year when they won't be a 20-game winner in 
the American League. I don't see how anybody, 
Turley, could pitch for the Yankees without winning 25, 

“I saw Mickey Mantle hitting Cleveland the other day. He 
struck out three times, then he hit into a double play and 
then he popped up. The country may be in bad shape, but I 
suspect you couldn't give Mantle back to the Indians because 
they wouldn't take him, seein’ as he's hittin’ only .191 against 


like it 


‘em this season.’ 


HITTING 


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Nats —s Billy Martin 


Winning that second game 
wasn't easy for the White Sox, 
even if they were facing an old, 
and favorite victim, Bob Turley. 
whom they had licked four 
times this season. Billy Pierce 
iout-pitched Turley, but he had 
to leave under pressure in the 
seventh and in the ninth the 
White Sox had to sweat out a 
sudden Yankee threat 

Howell had two out in the 
ninth when pinch hitter Joe 
Collins made a desperate bid 
to get the tying run. He missed 
clearing the rightfield wall by 
a mere foot and had to be con- 
tent with a double. Irv Noren, 
ithe Yanks’ third pinch hitter 
‘of the inning, ended it all with 
a line drive to Minoso, 
| The big blow of the second 

game, Kennedy's, zoomed into 
the upper deck with two out in 
the first inning after Kell had 


specially that 


On Leavy e, Rejoins 


108 
Y ankees T uesday aes and Turley had walked . 
“4 Z 


nnie Minoso 


Retes gave the Yanks back 


KANSAS CITY, Aug. 2 
The Boston Red Sox smashed 
four home runs today, includ 
ing one with the bases-loaded 
by Grady Hatton, as they routed 
the Kansas City Athletics, 14-2 
before 33.165 fans, the third 
largest crowd of the season 
here 

Hatton 


FOREST HILLS. N. Y."Aug 


ed a United States squad 
imbledon 

With the cup already 
marathon doubles victory, 


Cardinals Win 
Over Lions, 17-16, 
In Last Seconds 


ST. LOUIS, Aug. 29 #—Pat 
Summerall’s 27-yard field goal 
with 18 seconds left boosted the 
improved Chicago Cardinals 
past the Detroit Lions, 17 to 16, 
tonight in a National Tootball 
League exhibition game 

The Cardinals had jolted the 


crus 
at 


unloaded his grand- 
slam blast in the first inning 
against Vic Raschi, Kansas 
Citys starting and losing 
pitcher. 

Eddie Joost hit a pair of 
three-run homers for the Red 
Sox. 

The other Boston homer was 
hit by Ted Williams who ran 
his season total to 25. Williams 
also had a double and two 
singles in five trips to lead 
the Red Sox's 13-hit attack. 
‘. KANSAS CITY 


= 


Defeated by Aussies 


Rosewall scored repeat singles victories just for the record book 
today to give Australia a 5-to0 sweep over the United States in 
the Davis Cup Challenge Round. 

It marked the first complete shutout 
since a British team led by Fred Perry 


clinched as the result of Saturday's 
Hoad 
*Slates 


Ingemar Johannsson stopped 
Germany's former European 
champion, Hein Ten Hoff, in 
the first minute of the first 
round of a scheduled 8rounder 
here tonight. 

Two short right hooks ex 
ploded on the point of the Ger- 
man's chin. Ten Hoff's eyes 
went glassy and he lowered his 
guard. A split second later a 
third right hook went in on the 
Germans jaw and he went 


28 ‘*—Lewis Hoad and Ken 


for American tennis 
and Bunny Austin 
headed by Don Budge in 1935 


subdued Vic Seixas. . United 
titleholder, 7—9, 6—~1, 
6—4, 6—4, and the line-split- 
ting Rosewall turned back 
young Hamilton Richardson of 
Baton Rouge, La,, 6—4, 3—46, 
6—1, 6—4, “ 
Richardson was a substitute 
for Wimbledon Champion Tony 
Trabert, who turned yp with 
blisters on his racket hand in 
his losing battle with Hoad on 


the IrisW referee 
reached the count of 10 the 
German was on his knees, but 
unable to get up to his feet. 
He was badly shaken and 
staggered several minutes after 
the knockout. 


most amazing Indian sign of 
|1955 was in full force today as 
ithe Nats seriously damaged 
Cleveland's pennant hopes by 
sweeping a double-header, 8 to 2 
and 134, before 25,131 appalled 
spectators. 

The crushing double defeat 
dropped Cleveland into third 
place, a game behind the league- 
leading Yanks and a half game 
in back of Chicago. 

It was the first doubleheader 
the Indians had lost this season 
and stretched the Nats’ winning 
streak over Cleveland to five in 
a row. Washington now has 
beaten the Tribe nine out of 
the last 10 and 12 out of 19 this 
year. 


Stebbs Does Well 


Dean Stone started the first 
game and was shelled in the 
third. Chuck Shobbs came in 
to do a magnificent job as he 
blanked the Indians for the last 
6 13 innings on only one hit. 

Art Houtteman started for 
Cleveland and was the loser. 
He was followed by Sal Maftie, 
who also was bumped around, 
and Bob Feller, who held the 
Nats too late. The Nats got 
nine hits, featured by Clint 
Courtney's third homer of the 
year. Cleveland wound up with 
five hits. 

In the second game, Mickey 
McDermott and Mike Garcia 
were in a close pitchers’ batUle 
for six innings. Then the Nats 
broke a 1-1 tie in the seventh 
\with eight big runs. Eddie Yost 
got four hits in this one while 
Mickey Vernon drove in four 
runs. 

The Nats got 15 hits in all 
as McDermott limited the Tribe 
to six for his eighth victory of 
the year. Garcia got the joss. 


Smith, Kiner Homer 

| Al Smith hit his 19th homer 
for the Indians and Ralph Kiner 
‘his 15th. It was the latter's 
i\blow that tied the score at 1-7 


*\in the bottem of the sixth. After 


that the Nats went wild. 

The Indians drew first blood 
in the third inning of the first 
game when they scored two 
runs and knocked out Stone. 
Singles by Houtteman, Smith 
and Avila scored one run. When 
Woodling forced Avila, Smith 
came home. Rosen popped up 
but Evers singled. Stobbs came 
in then te strike out Fain. 

The Nats tied it up in the 
fourth when Paula tripled with 
one out and Courtney ham 
mered a home run over the 
rightfield fence. 

Yost doubled with one out in 
the fifth and scored on Runnels’ 
dribbler to center. Maglie ‘re- 
lieved Houtteman at this point. 
Vernon tripled to right sending 
Runnels in then Paula got a 
Texas League double in short 
center when both Evers and 
Avila backed away from the 


See NATS, Page il, Col. 1 


Friday. 


It was the first i haitaea 
round appearance for Richard- 
son, a team member for the last 
four years 


-—_—_—— 
~— -—— 
SSF F—'\*@SweURDHHRY Be Suvvu sev 


be 1 
Fachialvesec sels. 


COLORADO SPRINGS. 
sj COlo.,, Aug. 28 ‘#—Cpl. Billy 
$s Martin will leave here Tues- 
» day morning and rejoin the 
New York Yankees in Kansas 
City that night, he said tonight. 

Martin said he will use up 
34 days accumulated leave 
time due him before his dis 
charge from the VU. S&S. Army 
Oct. 6. 


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tone 3° 
hakales 8 Series star 
while stationed at Ft. Carson 
has been playing and manag- 
ing the post's baseball team. 
It compiled a 15-2 record this 


year with Martin playing near- 


Results 
INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE 


a run in the fourth after Berra >; 
doubled to right. 


dropped 


With the out- 
in the next 
his short fly 
Berra 


fielders playing 
county for Mantle. 
for a single, 
holding up at third. 


Mantle Ignores Signal 


On the throw to third, Man- 


tle took second. Berra scored 
as Skowron grounded out, Man- 


second baseman #'¢5 
ignored 


mand 


The 26-ve w tle holding second. But on How- 
yaareld. 0 orld single to short left, Mantle , 


coach Crosetti's de- 


to stop aft 


dation. I» 
<2peio Th 


pelven Pp 


c. 


Reston 
Keuses City 


third andi 


romped for the plate only to ; 
be tagged out in a run-down. | 


lt cost the Yanks a big run. of rs 


Tetals 
psrouncee | out for Saeehant in 4th. 
anned c 


Lions with long touchdown runs 
by Ollie Matson (77 yards) and 
Dave Mann (100 yards) before 
Summerall's kick Detroit hung 
on and grabbed the lead 
through the kicking of sure- 
footed Doak Walker, who 
booted three field goals. 
| Mann combine’ his speed 
with Cardinal blocking to go 
: 100 yards for the first Chicago 
R-—Kieus 2. Willems 3 Jensen 2. White touchdown. He took the kick- 
ten. Lepe sEpernall, Joost 2, Slsush-\ off after Detroit's first touch- 
. down on his own goal line in 
_ the second. quarter. 


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in 
tween matches 

Vice President Richard Nix- 
on, 
never seen a big-time tennis 
match before, 
trophy to Harry Hopman, Aus- 
tralian captain, but warned: 


Rest assured we'll be back try 
,ing to win the cup next vear.’ 

Hopman, all smiles, accepted, | 
the giant silver bow' and pro- 
: ceeded to say more words than 
o18 3 #16 he's expressed during his entire 
° | *—") American stay. 


The Davis Cup changed hands 


televised ceremonies  be- 


who acknowledged he'd 


presented the 


Don't get over-confident. 


et 


TAKING 


CHANCES 


Nats Knock | Tribe Down Twice; 
Yanks Split With Stubborn Chisox 


He promised his squad would. 
not hg lulled into over-confi- 
dence because “we know—+ 


See DAVIS, Page 12, Col. 7 


When the Yanks chipped the Clo. 
Sox lead to 3 to 2 in the seventh 3! in Buliva 
lief pitching. He hit over 500, °" Skowron’s single, Howard's Farrington a? 
: me i expected to retura to sebble, Cc doomite taaliedae ew ie cone 
Ft. Carson shortly before. Oct. .. 7 : 
Ce eee ae pertiana 4-216 to receive his official dis. on Marty Marion braved 
san Met 3:4 charge from the Army. e fans’ jeers by taking Pierce oe 
vom 
Howell moved in with the (I or Pa Lie tandin Ss 
bases full after Pierce walked 
"Bauer, and got rid of oe 
gald on a long fiy to Busby 
te preserve the thin run mar- American ) 
gin by which. the Sox won the| | | 


game. s ¢ | k ti built, 

Ford Is Sharp Ss ECCENTRIC TYPE sot er saoilee. 

The Yankees’ first game vic-| ; 0 

tory left the big crowd that ' w = : ) 

had come to cheer their White CLUBS CLUBS : 2 2 ae ¥ FREE INSTALLATION 

Sox reacting with a Canece: New York _| Brooklyn __ |. «{RRjE2) iL 12/13 13|10/82)45 .646 . | WHILE YOU WAIT 

eve ae. Ss Me coe Chicago 7? Milwaukee | 6). .|12|\13\10/14| 8| 9/72)58; 554/111. VE MONEY ON 

tlvorkers enforced their su-| Cleveland — ‘Philadelp'ia | 6) 8). | 9(12/20)22/13\69/62).527)15.— SA 

: | 8; ua? Ba art a, pepe 

be &| 7| 9 .| 911)14)64)68).485/20% 
ae 6 6 whe 9). . (EL)11)/62)71|.466)23 
a ‘5 8| 7] 9\10| 5|. .|10|54)73) 425|28 — 
| @i1l) 6 4) 6/10| 7). . |50/79).388\33~ 


®| periority. 
| |58/62/62/68/71| 73)79|..|.<|....].... 


ly every position on the team, 
A including doing occasional re- 
am 
ek . 


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‘Second Game) 
WASHINGTON 
Yount. 


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ernen. 1% 
iitsere. if 

rf 


Courtneys 
' hiett. of 
Valdivieise. 
Stene. & 
Riebhs. © 


Totals 


Cc leveland 


» Deeeee ree 

—323—-—-) s-~.- F 

2 PHKesisenuwsS 
— 

- 
eatin | 
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aera 
. , 
( incinnati 


{10} &| 9(10/12\11/18/78)51'.605 
0): | 8)10(13)20/16/10)77/51).602) 
\12/ 8. .| 9/1016) 7)5/77\52|.597| 1 
Boston | 6 B/11). 12 13/13/11!74/54|.578| 344|New York 
Detroit ___|10| | 6| 8|. .| 7/14)13/65)63|.508|12% | Cincinnati 
Kansas City| 6| 6| 4) 6 ao. h2}21|63)96) A14)24% Chicago 
St. Louis 
Pittsburgh 

_ LOST 


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athlete except 

passed second base. Dropo be- 
came that man of distinction) 
with a lonesome, fourth-inning | 
home run into the lower seats 
in centerfield. 

Goaded no doubt by the 
scoreboard news at Cleve- 
land was losing to. Washington | 
lin the first game of a twin bill, | TODAY'S GAMES 
the Yankees were swinging, Boston at Kansas City—Brewer (9-9) vs, Kell- 
with special vigor. They od ner (9-7). 

a eee nee | Baltimore at Detroit (2)}—Palica (4-10) and’ 
Ce ft rms a little Phil Rizzuto. rk ggg (1-7) vs. Gromek (11-9) and Garver 


DM | (Valdiviaise). WINN mett (§-| Once Rizzutto boldly stale| 
Me! 1 °*' See YANKEES, Page 13, Col. 4; Only games scheduled. 


ore re | 2) 8 3) 5) 5| 9) ri —g9ied) 317 36 
k “LOST |51)51\52|84)63/75\79/84)-.|-.|....|-.. 


YESTERDAY'S RESULTS 
WASHINGTON, 8-13; Cleveland, 2-4. 
New York, 6-2; Chicago 1-3. 

Boston, 14; Kansas Chty 2. 
Baltimore at Detroit, rain. 


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*| Whitey Ford had the White, 


Sox so almost completely 
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS 
Brooklyn 6; St. Louis, 1. 
' Philadelphia, 7-8; Cincinnati, 6-3. 
Chicago 3; New York, 6 
Pittsburgh, 5-2; Milwaukee, 3-4. 


TODAY'S GAMES 

St. Loujs at Brooklyn—Poholsky (7-8) v5. 

Podres (8-9). f 

Chicago at New York—Hacker (16-13) vs. 
Hearn (14-12). 

Cincinnati. at Philatielphia (N)—Black (6-2) 
vs. Roberts (21-9), | 

Only games scheduled. 


~ 


fer Ovravets 


aSingied 
_ toes for _ Saatioge | 


IME?) 
. 


nek 


+ 


- 


Braves Lose Twice to Pirates, Drop 11’ Games Back 


i 


Shutout in 
Nighteap, 2-0 


PITTSBURGH, Aug. 28 # 
The , Pittsburgh Pirates cut 
down the second place Milwau- 
kee Braves twice today. Ver- 
non Law blanked the Braves 
2 to 0 in the second game after 
the Pirates put together a four- 
run eight inning rally to win 
the opener 5 to 3. 


Milwaukee dropped 11 


games behind the league-lead-| 
a Dodgers. eh 
t was only the second time: 
this season the last place) 
Pirates have won a double- 
header. Their other victim was) 
the Chicago Cubs on July 24. 
The Pirates took a first inning 
lead in the second game. 
George Freese doubled off the 


: 


THE. WASHINGTON POST 
and TIMES HERALD 
Monday, August 29, 1955 


Hedges, Campanella Homer 
Dodgers Defeat Cards 
On S pooner’s Six-Hitter 


BROOKLYN, Aug. .28 “—Gil Hodges and Roy Campanelia' 
islammed home runs, and Karl Spooner pitched six-hit ball to- 
day and the leagut-leading Brooklyn Dodgers defeated the St. 


Louls Cardinals, 6-1, 

It was the first time since July 4 that 
two Dodger pitchers had gone the route 
in consecutive days. Yesterday, Sandy 
— shut out Cincinnati, 740, on two 


The only run against Spooner was Rip | 
Repulski’s 2ist homer into the lower 
"9 leftfield stands in the seventh inning. 
§ ran up a 41 lead in seven 
intiings, then added a pair in the eighth) 
™ on two hits and an error. Campanella 
. led off by stroking his 29th homer into 
| the centerfield stands, as Alan Gettel 
* took over St. Louis mound in place 

’ Larry Jackson, the starter. 
| _ Carl Furillo reached first on Alex 
— . Grammas’ error. Stole second and took 
Spooner third on Jackie Robinson's safe bunt. 

He scored on Hodges’ sacrifice fly. 

got his 24th homer to open the Dodger third.) 
iftiam’s single 


i'Cubs a 34o# victory before 


of:ginning with 


Giant Fans Give 
Food for Red Cross 


NEW YORK, Aug. 28 *# 
All ladies donating cans of 
non sable foods were 
admitted free to the Polo 


Cubs Win,’ 
Banks Hits 


Grounds for the game 
between the New York 
Giants and the Chicago 
Cubs today, and 1140 took 
advantage of the offer. 

In adaition, many people 
dropped by the Polo 
Grounds with cans of food. 
The contributions totaled 
more than a 2-ton truckload 
of food. 

The Giants offer was 
made in response to a plea 
by President Eisenhower 
for help to the flood suf- 
ferers of New England. 


Two Triples 


NEW YORK, Aug. 28 — Bob 
Rush shut out the fading New 
York Giants today on six hits 
while three Chicago triples, a 
pair’ by Ernie Banks, gave the 


9121 at the Polo Grounds. 

It was the third time this 
year Rush had shut out New 
York. 

The Cubs pounded three 
Giant hurlers for nine hits, be- 
starter Ramon’) 


Monzant. 


Soltau’s Goal 


| 
‘Big Bill, Town Get an Extra 


A%ers Beat . 


Browns on 


Big Bill Pickering and the town 
of Bloxwich got another divi- 
dend today. 

Pickering’s 14 hours 6 min- 
SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 28) utes channel swim from Eng- 


# — San Francisco's 49ers\jsnqtoFrance, which was fi- 
fought off a desperate two-) . nog by the people of Blox- 


touchdown final quarter rally, 
by the Cleveland B 

to take a 17-14 victory In a Na- 
tional Football League exhibi- 
tion game before 41,604 fans at 
Kezar Stadium, 

The 49ers winning margin’ 
came on Gordy 
field goal in the second period. | 5°C!# 

Two fast third quarter touch-' 
dawns, one as the result of a 
36-yard pass interception, by, 


wich in Staffordshire, was de- 
clared the official record by 


ciation. 
William Floyd, association 
Pickering’s time has been recog- 


tion observers with Egyp- 


—_—— -_—_-—— 


Jim Bolger got a triple in the 
second inning when the ball got 
past Willie Mays, who missed a 
shoestring catch, Bolger seoted 


In Seulls Race 


Kelly Fourth | 


| with a pair of their own in 
GHENT, Belgium, Aug: 28 the final quarter. 


rookie George Maderos, ap-) 
peared to have broken up the 
ball game. But the World 
Champion Browns charged back 


the Chanell Swimminfi Asso- 


secretary, said the 292-pound 


Soltau’s 10-yard) nized because there. were no as- 


Channel Record Set 


DOVER, England. Aug. 28 | tian Abdel Latif About Heif in 


1953 when he claimed to have 
swum from England to France 
in 13 hours 45 minutes. 

The next best time for the 
difficult England-to-France 
swim was by Florence Chad- 
wick of San Diego; Calif., in 
1953. Miss Chadwick churned 
across in 14 hours 42 minutes 
\during an attempt at 4 non 
‘stop round trip swim. The best 
time for a France-to-England 
swim is 10 hours 50 minutes by 
Egypt's Hassan Abdel Rehim 
in 1950. 


~_ ——a ee ee - 


Tremendous savings 


- on Harry Chiti’s sacrifice fly. 
NEW 


top of the score board and & Theodor Kocerka of Poland| Soltau’s field goal climaxed 


scored on. Ramon Mejias 


Consecutive singles by Hodges, Sandy Amoros and Spooner, 


won the sculls title today in 


\a 70-yard drive by the 49ers late 


single to center. Eddie O'Brien 
accounted for the other Pirate) 
rum. He opened the fifth wit 

a single, and scored on Fran 

Thomas’ double to /eft. 

In the first game Ray Crone 
had the Pirates under tight 
control until Dick Groat 
touched off the explosive eighth 
inning with a single after one 
out. Tom Saffell’s pinch single 
and George Freése's run-scor- 
ing single spelled the end for 
Crone. Chet Nichols took over; 
but was replaced by Ernie John-| Phillies, winners of nine of 
son after walking Preston their last 10 games, swept a 
Ward, to Bl the Beeee. ‘doubleheader from the Cincin- 


Frank Thomas, first man to ' 
ce Johnson, connected for a/"4ti Redlegs before 18,067 at inn, 


two-run single and the game- Connie Mack Stadium today. 
winning run They took the first, 7 to 6, and) jem *4 
& Spooner 


Fir | Jack 
G he : 
eater PITTSBURGR ,won the nightcap, 8 to 3 Oettel 
, 2-1 tis 


e2 


ee Ke eusuvVeoeg 


Roeccouvsconu?r 


Phillies Beat 
Cincy Twice 


PHILADELPHIA, Aug. 28 
The high-riding Philadelphia |s~rve 


: —— = 


he ee ere | 


=>—l 


and ; 
& BB 
acksen (3. 
eckson 8 in 7 


-§@ 00800 —--—--w 23-—3--E 


Jim Greengrass led the Phils’) , 
eight-hit attack in the first, PY Doaatell. Ce 
game on four former pitching)*-?*". 4-". 
teammates. He hit a home run. 
and a triple and walked. Stan 


Lopata hit a round-tripper for) Phillies, Reds 
Enn 


the winners and Del 
smashed. his 26th. Box Scores 


Ennis brought his home run 
' First Game 

‘total to 27 in the nightcap with|cmcneary — ™ Pilicanex 
jan eighth-inning blast with rem a ? Ashburn cf 
..\none aboard. It wasn't badly 2's 

= i powune. ago Pg err mn Post. rf 

—— -- = on Negra a e situation Meise i 
Great. Satfelt Ty Nice "hel well in hand after being given ot" 
a. Themes 3 iS... a four-run start in the first in-|Nuxnall. p 
5 OSn* ning when the Phillies chased aLandriik 
Hail little Jackie Collum. Keppel 8.p 


Pairs 
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Duster Class Title 2. “82 


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N. J.. today won his first duster Mever 04, WP_W 
class national sailing title, wind- ball “me ” 
* ing up with 66 points in a 23 
as,, DOat competition CINCINNATI 
The 19-year-old Cooper River | rennie » 
Yacht Club sailor, who placed | ener*s< 
second and third in Saturday's | Post, rf 
races, rolled up the extra points Mele “i 
‘when he led the fleet in the 7. ® 
ithird and final race today. | Mia rein.p 
It was Seidelmann’s sixth try aburgess 
at the national crown in the 3.2" 
little dusters, flat-bottom craft) 


meter ! Mier t-1 
ehnmeter 2 Podbielan 
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Miller (7-4) 


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2B ~ Preese 


Soccer rwnroewnE 
08-48 HH HS 


This Week's 
Fights on TV 


ONT —Gene Pere Niagara 
vy. Ff ria §6=6Charistensen. 

ss ~efterweights, 19 reends. 
j (Channel 5). 


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WEDNESDAY — T eA 


"ewe 

incianea heavy- 

s from Cleveland, 
Cheneel 7) ane AL 
7” 


ms (Merri- 
vs. Eee ~nn 
§-—Harmner. &F —Greengrass 
McMillan end Kiussewski 
be. | Neerey Morgana nd Lopata: Ennis. 

(630 &.e.}. 16 PD Collum 3 
Negra 
Minercin 19 in 
inarcin +44. 
L—Collum (8-4). 


Costa. yh, 


ip, round, trope New 


Tied on points in second were |<. into double 
mont, and Robert Lunstedt of |. *"Wimrs*'. ee 
Semin 
Holloway received the sec-| DP~Minarcis 
Minarcin 50-Minercin «4 
W-—Negray (43) 


}about 16 feet long with one sail. | 
or Me 
Phil Holloway, also of the Coo-/Cisciansti 
per River Yacht Club at West- | "™#s¢e!shie 
fan 2. Hamne 
Riverton, ~". J.. each with 59 | Yree . 
| points. . Ashburn 
ond-place prize, however, ge BW 
eause he came i} ahead of |. Cincinnati & BB —Negray 2 
Lunstedt in two of the three HoO-—Collum 1 in i 
races. im F oiium 44 


' ws. ’ 
* feather 
* Yerk, WRC- 


Nats Crush Indians Twice 


'time. Vernon cleaned house! 
with a double. ' 
In the eighth, Valdivielso, 
beat out a hit to Strickland and_ 
* The Nats still weren't took second when te 
rough. Umophiett epéened the threw wild. Yost singled in 
mtn eich a angie, was sacri-| Val. Groth walked and Run-| * 3-0 1000 against the Tribe 
‘ficed .along and scored on/nels singled in Yost. Singles) - - - ecause of 7 close 
“Stobbs’ line single to center.| by Vernon and Sievers brought; pennant race, +t, nee 
“Yost was hit by a pitch then/in Groth and Runnels. That a —— = aoe aaa 
‘Runnels doubled in both men Made it 13-1. - Swe + “¢ nce wee 
“to make it #2 __. |, Cleveland got two more runs) © r equa yy t pnty roa 
The lead looked more safe|im the eighth when Santiago, | em one ; at 
every inning as Stobbs turned|Who had relieved Narleski,) © ry: agen 2 - 
‘in a superb job. He walked|Walked and Smith rapped a) % ae a Mpa 
: men in the fifth*and sixth with-| homer. reer eT yo ee, MOSER 
damage and had five com-|_Jn the ninth, Cleveland ne A —— ee 
oe ete inning? of hitless ball un-| Pickéd up their fourth and final| g'ven when he homered — . . 
til Evers doubled with two out| ‘U0. They filled the bases on! » Grane Seu Bay me. Set 
‘inthe efehth. Stobbs then got|#ingles by Avila and Strick-| Sve innings oF the opener 
ask aie nant Gear ueen land and a walk to Dente, bat-| 494 {hen the sun came out 
-* , on @ lly brok the| ing for Santiago. Avila scored) - - : This was the Nats’ big- 
Bi tangy “y the sixth in-| 8 Smith's infield hit. a ae 


McDermott was making his 
ning. With two out, Yost,sin-; SIDEBARS—Kiner hit two | first start since July 31. ‘He 
gled and came home on a dis-| balls in addition to his homer | had pitched only 41/3 in- 
puted play at the plate when) wh'ch would have been hom- | nings for the month of Au- 
Oravetz doubled to center.) ers in most National League | gust ... The Nats can’t pos- 
Smith had retrieved’ the ball| parks but they were merely | sibly lose this season's series 

* and had fired to Avila, who) long outs here . . . Stobbs’ | to Cleveland. With a 12-7 
threw to Foiles at the plate.) two other victories were at | edge, the ‘Nats have only 
Just as Foiles grabbed the) the expense of the Yanks and | three games left with the 
ball, about 10 feet up on the} Tigers . . . The lights were | Tribe. 
‘‘third base line, Yost hit him, 


> 


turned on in the third In- 
ning of the second game... 
Stone at least preserved his 


perfect record against the 
Indians this year. He has 


‘NATS—From Page 10 
‘ball. Vernon scored ‘to make 
“it 5-2. 


oo 


OO—wOSoOeP 


bare nea, penelia, Purtl- e 
yy pu . ener * Behoen 
‘iski Campanella ihe. | 4 


keen #3. Gettel 


te koe, Begins Today 


eo~--—-2339~208e0P 


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b. 


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Se es 


eee 111 of8—3 
408 063 @ix—2) 


and Biayiock. Left — Philadelphia 

3. | 
2-3 | 
Negray 


the 
championship as John B. (Jack) 
Kelly Jr. of Philadelphia fin- 
ished fourth. 

Kocerka defeated Jurij Tuka- 
llov of Russia by a length and 
‘a half, and Holland's Robert 
Van Mestdag was third, half a 
length ahead of Kelly, former 
Henley and Olympic diamond 
;iscul champion. 

"| Kocerka was timed in 7:08.3; 

Tukalov in 7712.4: Van Mestdag 
im 5.| im 7:13.7: and Kelly in 7:15.6. 
The Pole was never threat- 
im 1) jened. On the other hand, Kelly 
“Ot |found the opposition too tough 
2:18: for him and he vainly tried an 

endef the-raep effort. 
| Kelly told a newsman: owey 


—~M “ 
L n : @ 
2 Pineili, Gorman, Boesess 


Amateur Series _were ail too fast this year. 
was not fast enough right now 
I do not have any excuse. They 


were the better, they won.” 

| The Washington Amateur, 

|Baseball Association City Se-\Air Foree Tourney 

ties will begin this afternoon; The Northeast Air Force 
jon the Ellipse. Pairings for the 


. ‘tournament will begin this 
joes whey ye gee sng ory PR morning at Andrews Air Force 
pe > come oe pse, and Lin- Base. The first game will start 


Games will begin at 5:15 p. m.| Langley AFB. 


1955 European rowing) 


Southern Division baseba!|) 


in the second quarter. 
| Y. A, Tittle passed 24 yards 
to Billy Wilson midway in the 
third quarter and Soltau con- 
verted for a 100 lead. 

In_ the final quarter, pass in- 
terference gave Cleveland a 
first down on the three. Maurice 
Bassett promptly plunged over 
and Lou Groza converted. 

Later George Ratterman con- 
nected on six successive passes, 
ithe last one to Ray Renfro in’ 
the end zone. 

Cleveland 8 68 6 l4—l4 
‘San. Francisco @ 314 6—I17 
, 
Bradley Paces 
D. C. Polo Club 


The Washington Polo Club 
defeated the Virginians, 9-5, 
at Olmey, Md., yesterday as 
Captain Don Bradley scored six 
goals. Washington Polo Club 
now has a 142 record; the! 
Virginians are 5-2. | 

T. Halter Cunningham scored 
three times for the winners. 
Col. Porter King scored three 
goals and Frank Stalone and 
Buzz Rogers each scored one 
‘for the losers. 


— 


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oo 


Cash in on this deal 


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. fans booed for two innings. 
Kiner’s homer with two out 
in the sixth tied the score and 
then the Nats went crazy in) 
, the seventh as they scored’) 
eight runs. | 
It started with singles by | 
Vernon, Sievers, Courtney and 
Umphiett good for two runs. 
Valdivielso was hit by a pitch, 
Milling the bases, then Garcia) 
was replaced by Mossi. Me-' 
Dermott’s sacrifice fly br@mght 
in Courtney. Yost singled to 
fill the bases again. Paula bat-| 
ted for Oravetz and Narleski) 
relieved Mossi. Paula smashed 
a two-run single scoring Umph- 
tt and Val. Runnels walked 
fill the bases for the third 


Wednesday, Ist Bout 9:00 P.M, 
~ Antonino Rocca 
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ya Set" Louise Brough, Mrs. DuPont Win Doubles Title 


Aroand The Tracks———— 


. >. 


Horses and P cop le Japanese If Aussies Turn Pro, U. S. Has Chance— _|DAVIS—From Page 10 | Replacing Taylor 


By Water Sane Stars T America’s Davis Cup Future Looks Bleak; Richardson, ||Jones Has 
DOWN THROUGH MY RACING YEARS—as amateur and | ‘i ° . 
sae hd Cano waco Sse Canis ars Take |k;amer Wants to Si gn Hoad for Pro Tour | Seixas Lose | ar Pair vd 
matter, ve a yen for Ponder for his come-from- (” 
=n ng Pe far we Canin Teen mtr he and Men’s 0 W n POREST HILLS. N. Y. Aug 28 eo sage santa Richardson, 21 and a cup vet- caliber of the American team ROS to ee ES 
for Milcave for his rise from a cheap | Davis Cup, shining symbol f tuternatonel eran, has failed to prove himself of depend- Sauna” Junior Davis Cup By Jack Walsh 


claimer to a Maryland stakes winner, 
Along the tas there have been BROOKLINE, Mass., Aug. 28) tennis supremacy, is headed back to Australia | able international stature to trust with a Cup Bill Talbert, United States’ Stef! Reporter 


others who have apppealed to me enauak — Sw and it may be years before Americans see it | berth. Other prospects are Eddie Moylan, 31, |.sntain, congratulated the vic-, Now that Bones Taylor has 


ndifferen Cup play; Gil She and ) 
for various reasons, including Walter | pair of veterans, who combine| {S)n. at Forest Hills. Som got as 21. Giammalva Souies’ tile ’ oa le tae % were beaten (decided to do his playing in 
mai, = ve = A po Sony power and cagey tactics, won) 1 ¢ tennis officials the best comer, but may be two years away. by a better rae Canada, Redskin fans soon will 
more than the married women 1 live |(n'.. Ntle today be upsetting} af@ openly pessimis- — Bill Talbert is almdst certain to be retained The same sentiments were ex- learn if Charley Jones is the 
with ‘can say about me,’ if you know | defending chemin "Shirley tic. They realize NE as Davis Cup captain, but there will be a lot pressed also by Seixas and Tra- end his boss thinks he is.__, 
what I mean. . Fry and Doris Hart in the America must rebuild Be Be hecad of changes in the lineup he takes to Australia (bert. Seixas hinted retirement! Ottawa signed Taylor for an 
The real equine object of my-|women’s final of the 75th com-| ‘f tt 4s ever to chal- ia 16 months hence. from, competitive tennis. estimated $13,000 to $14,000 on 
affections was Aneroid and the pass tition at Longwood. lenge seriously again. te FF The staggering defeat this week at Aus- He's 32 tomorrow. Trabert, | 
ing last week of Dion K. Kerr Sr, ary B “ty d Mrs. Du-| ., OUF forces are old. Beas | tralia’s hands was a blow to Trabert as well |With jaw set, warned, “next year Saturday. : 
f racing's real entlemen, apie ow war rs. tired and wracked - oS “ * — a I'll have a couple of days. When Jones was signed last 
brought to mind this gallant git, ed number two be) vith pains. The ne EF ge odcrrate.% ‘month—and Tayler still was a 
rought to min iS gallant son Of ining their old-time opponents. h. RR Professional tour promoter Jack Kramer, | 10,000 on Hand | So M 1 
The Porter and Outburst. back af second Aussies have yout = cae ‘holdout George Marsha 
HAIGHT Kerr, who pronounced his name |°* *-. rg. grend ne! and fire. ie" 4 who was ready to offer Trabert a $75,000 | The matches, although mean- tha 
: : this ho on Se tene the —- ane — Vie Sei wh ‘nl od ak ; pro contract, said, “My plans now have been |ingless, were replete with fine|“##e¢d him “better than any 
ye ah “EE ny Winn Phe igian Einschad awe | pionship ay 6 ~~ be 32 on Temaer hy aye ae sidetracked.” tennis and entertained a crowd | ‘end we have — including Tay- 
reg end * John A. Manfuso at a “culling-out” auction —— K i Mi definitely has proved a alae Today Kramer said he is now interested | of about 10,000, out for an after- jor.” 
of the John Hay Whitney * ; = pr = — _| himself “over the & Hawes in signing Hoad to a contract for a profes- |n0gn of sunshine. | Marshall added: “He has 
horses at.Walnut Hall, Va. A — ‘Davie y ao. y~ hill” as far as Davis sional tour. _ Hoad, bidding to become the | great potentialities. 1 think 
bid of $300—or was it $350? | players of the late 1930s still |Se°°, Sys Uppers won 1's | Cup competition is “At the moment, Hoad looks like the best |W°rld’s best amateur and re-| enough of him to rate him with 
“took him, a doubtful front | remember a Brooklyn Mandi- ee bles championship| concerned. He has announced semiretire- prospect,” Kramer said. “The whole country |Portedly in line for a fat pro-lany of the top ends in the 
wheel being an accessory | cap, I believe it was, in which with & Sve set victory over the! ont, There's Bo replacement in sight has seen him help win back the Davis Cup. {¢510nal! contract, flashed jeague.” 
before the meager price. a — a a ba sad BAD Geulllan — The new team must be built around Tony | He is hot, you might say, publicity wise.” ; bry eget d poy hy end of Ready After Broken Hand 
asn’t until the colt was or stride all of a mile and |° Trabert, 25, who has seen his dreams of a Hoad said he is unable to commit himself - 
a ‘Sypeardld that Kerr had | @ quarter at equal weights, | First Japanese Victory professional career shattered by disasters this | at this time because he has his present tour the second set and start of the! Char ley had the misfortune 
Aneroid shipshape and ready | losing by a photo as tight | samo and Miyagi blew atwo| Past weekend. to complete, but he added: ene meg, a agg ge men to vay! mgd gh 
to run. He was a . time ct Det in bend bie aoe set lead and then came back to eg tr ne te ome nasal ah me ei m If the offer is good enough, how can I pass of cae Sant "points. ah cao coaiy to go. When 
Sed te him "by his The this Aneroid turning hack hw bars rege. 4 pike 5 and getting better Rex Hartwig is 26. Neale iesenes disclosed that the four involving ,, ~~ — one _ meh Se Noamaae mess ey, - _ 
. | te t ' . ; ’ ave the equipment match Baltimore Tuesday night, Jones 
Porter breeding, that sire, - bgp me A age hang ge | It was the first victory by a. halos go 4, and ~ ay aes, already oe two other Australian Davis Cup aces, Frank the blond bombshell when Hoad wij] see action Mogg first 
through his -E. B. McLean time. of some $100.000 in |2apanese team in national dou-| "me players ready for internationa] competi- ape ey and Ken McGregor, netted $170,000 really bore down. time. 
ownership, having been r soruinen ' bles competition. Teams from —— — are more where these a in eight months. The Rosewall - Richardson; Jones is no stranger on the 
sort of fellow — 0 In 1898. Anereié Sle ei only four other countries—the | ait e = aye wg reservoir is thre — ae .. if the United States is to regain the | match was a duel featuring ex- Washington scene. He played 
the old W ashington ost. my greatest horse thrill and United States, Australia, Eng: | ixas piay this Tinieed a age an tan’ avis Cup at an early date, Kramer may be citing backcourt rallies. three years for George Wash- 
ANEROID WON that day | my biggest horse disappoint. |'#"4_ and Germany—have won| form—because the United States couldn't | the man to pull the job—by luring away the | Rosewall is the master of this|ington U. and three more for 
org , » Were tack hi re Cali. |the doubles title. find anyone to contest him for the position. | Australian aces with his greenbacks. technique and he seemed to toy | Bolling Field. 
and thus began a long friend- ceca emgage bk Dror Although Komo and Miyagi RE ie the | entety « seeeine " 3 hak 
ship that lasted several years, Anita Handicap. : were seeded fifth among the! Rhodes “--~ from a Randy ges oo oy } wag Red. 
during which I became the foreign entries, they were given although ardson produce 
Saree’s Boswell, and ended A WEEK BEFORE the big little chance of even advancing| L. WO Records Fall In Essex Tennis Langley Wins enough excellent tennis to — sah my 5 ‘—_ 
race, Aneroid squared off to the final round when com- . make the show interesting. sideline sans P . 
when he was burned to death | 1111) Seabiscuit the S titton began two weeks ago Im Hioh-Power , yesterday ... Norm Nygaard, 
in a Kentucky breeding farm he Handice “ee ee ra ae . 2 Knode Loses e, ; a halfback obtained from the 
Ant Pp e Rernhardt Wins Los Angeles Rams on an if 


fire. half column of type explain- | But heavy rains washed out : , ey | | a 
Aneroid wasn't long in mak- | ing why Aneroid would win— | more than a week of play, forc- I ree Rifle Ey ent . rnin Crashes At Old Dominion og SA camg ‘ ey BH 


fing his presence felt in top- | and he did, many a Washing- jing withdrawal] of American 10 Mortimer ‘ : 
fight stakes company. He | ton bookie biting the dust as (and Australian Davis Cup aces a od PERRY, Ohio, Aug. 28 | UPPER MARLBORO, Md. MANASSAS. V A 28 — a y ehe “3 ~ : 
Mottled his way to notable | a result. end other ten ters. —Two national records fell| MANCHESTER, Mass, Aug AUS. 28--Elmo Langley of A: > Van ASD draft choice if they had kept 
victories in Maryland and in | ‘The Manfuso horse. with iota as high-power, free rifle) 4.9 mn. opty” L’ Essex ¥@shington, D. C. today won Boyce Bernhardt of Arlington,| him ...Nygaard missed two 
New York. Gotham horse | the late Charlie Ressatenten Poqer Beats Ury, Bart competition got under way. Country Club ene invita- the 50-lap Frederick W. Berens|V@, competing in Class E,| weeks of training ~~ the 
up, hung a photo defeat on | Moss is a 19-yearold Univer-| E. O. Franzen of Minneapolis)s.54) tennis tournament filled|T°P2Y race for stock cars ‘crossed the finish line at 77 Se ee 
The Biscuit, ridden by Wash- |sity of San Francisco fresh-| fired 391 out of a possible 400 in}. nnitingl berths in both singles|W%" Bill Morgan was knocked /miles per hour and negotiated) Phalce i ells) Op on ought 
WASHINGTON PARK ington’s Sonny Workman, |man and Quillian, a 21-yearold the 300-meter international free/ 44 doubles today with British |1mto the fence on the 48th lap. | the ee oe Se oe h ; te be “ Gast 
ENTRIES subbing for the then-injured | University of Washington grad-|Tifle prone competition. That) wisntman Cup players featur-|..™organ, running his 121- v8 ents to win the Srag resins oa: ba . ia had 
Red Pollard. uate. — a k of Sy a ing the advance. ae In _: place, was — spemmmnarhs aeemie ory P erying legally to 
; $2000; 2-7r-ids: claiming. Misses Fry and Hart, seeking|s™5 estergaard o iting, noc against the fence on/@4y 
; welog SS oo eggs wed —— their ath straight ‘peulenall lowa, last year. Arthur C. Jack- Beene tar ge Pane meen gg ng the No. 2 turn as he was| David Thompson of Vienna,| restrain Taylor — playing 
C. S. Howard shifted to |d0oubles title, were unable to 80m of Brooklyn, N. Y., followed umph in the French champion-' irammed in the side by Bob|Va., racing a Vincent, estab- for bf mart , * Ag “4 
Georgie Woolf as Seabiscuit’s |cope with the power strokes i" the afternoon with a 383 \chins with 6—4, 6—4 victory White, who went into a spin. lished the best time of 91.27 - ne I di fe th 's 
Santa Anita Handicap rider |and the neat placement of Miss score in the kneeling 300-meter| over the fourth-seeded Mrs. 5#%éley, running second, took ™-.p.h. In wademureatcting: F< Fe istak A 
and the after-the-race dance (Brough and Mrs. DuPont free rifle. Jackson set the old porothy Head Knode of New OV the lead and held on for sion. making a big mistake.”.. . 
committee decorated the ball- | Miss Brough, 32, from Bev- record of 378 here last year York. the remaining two laps to win. | 
room in the red and white |¢Tly Hills, Calif., displayed her Going into the third stage of The other three singles Langley was also behind the) 
Howard colors usual powerful. high-kicking, the competition tomorrow, firing .emifinalists were established “Ce! of a V8 Studebaker 
‘serve and devastating net re ¥ the a position, p-eviously. bay py Se sree ve aad 
: game, while her 37-year-old /ackson tops other entrants) Mi now will f er of Arlington, Va. Bill Wyn-' 
broke forwardly, while S€a- partner from W ilmington, Del. | with a 764 score for the prone ae ee feline koop was third and George 


biscuit was taken back off | Grew applause time and again, and kneeling. Franzen is second | Fig. United States triple cham-|>¥#"son fourth. 


the pacemakers. Aneroid w “ 
free along atte coriatara with her shrewd court tactics! with 758. pion in one semifinal while top-| WHAT DO YOU SUPPOSE IS 


orte eeeel 
Ei J i : PF "si and brilliant drop shots. ) seeded Louise Brough of Bev-| GOING ON 7 FARM BUREA 
Srrinaiits tc | of the likes of Whichcee and [*"5, 00° pov’ 26 "som Akron, pag Sg Fri, EF edon| i Ray’s Terrapin U 
at oy — Woodberry and ran them in Ohio. and St. Petersburg, Fia.. Colonial Defeats champion and third-seeded| W ns Mahlan Bowl INSURANCE 1s CHANGING 


3's: $3800; 2-77 olds. fillies: sllow.| the ground to take the lead > - , ’ 
E Lemonade 110 *Preen is going into the backstretch. end hales arti 0 oan comes Virginia White Sex Shirley Fry of St. Petersburg, paren LANDING, M4. ITS NAME TO *NATIONWICE * 
abies, Fla., were kept on Fla., will meet in the other. Aug. 28 (®—Bob Ray of the Co 


3 ae oe + 30; + 
. ii4 Then along came Seabis- 

io Jeannte’s Pal’.-314) euit Aneroid ran head and om 4 the write ge gh Colonial Restaurant elimin- lumbia Yacht Club won--the| 
i Perm enter head with him midstretch saaes mo Pp ontyet= bag ee ated the Virginia White Sox Burnett Named John H. Mahlan Memorial) 
los pe Oh ge OA ve Sy -sie et'ming | where he faltered, I believed, |jnto errors ree@’ in the third round of the North- s Bowl today by piloting his! 
Mighty Tom . } spon 1 1; from his early usage. But Sea- ern Virginia Old Dominion Sports Director Terrapin to victory in the! 
edu: eh _Wvatt 17 Straton aut biscuit didn’t win tournament, 74, at Forestville ‘comet class of the Indian Land-| 
Optin 7 ura 


‘ ' . ‘ sive ‘\ yesterday. NEW YORK, Aug 28—John ing Boat Club Regatta. The 
STAGEHAND. with Nick Marshall Fires ' Colonial will play Forestville H. “Jack” Burnett, producer. Washington = oe .. won all: 


le 
Little Capta! n 
Fiddiin’ Mac 
eCar! . ADDI - 


—_ 1 -~o - ts 
‘O92 we ~-o© - 
Ove Fw ae od 


In the big race. Aneroid 


~ wse T 
- ~- 
- » 


| Wall up and with 30 pounds . inext week, and a Forestville director of the MBS “General three races in the weekend 
113| the best of the weights, came Perfect Score | win would give them the cham- Sports Time” radio-TV broad-| series. | 
with a late rush on the far | pionship. cast features, has been named _ Chess é—1. Shark, BH. SB 
| outside and nipped Seabiscuit | Robert C. Marshall, Silvery, White Sex. 000 on oos—e 4 ¢ Sports director for the Mutual ae oat 
: -yr.-olds up: el mine at the wire. The victory for (Spring, won the telescopic-' Cel "30 O31 Cla—T 6 2 Broadcasting System succeed- 3, Deliy, George Heide, West ver. 
Diamond Joe 108 aTh —_ 117, @ colt just turned 3 years (sight match today with a per-' mritt, Fegarty (7), and Safer: Gid- ing Paul Jonas, it was an- * fe 1. Melaber, Don Wilson, wht: | 
Red Charger . 106 Master | and trained by Earle Sande (fect score of 400 and captured | #*™* 4 Selérinehoes nounced today by Robert A.| moe ceils: siete: 2- hie < We Geers | 
ountry Ciue ..i22! , ' y vy mere embia , © 
108 Swi vet was one of racing's all-time the season. championship of the/ ‘Monroe, MBS vice president in eg Reb IN THE NEW STATES. 
’ ~ | top upsets Maryland Rifle League with an’ Th Mi : charge of programs. YC, 36%: 2. White ¢ amy: Fa 
D3-78 -ife Se: © Dion K. Kerr Sr. missed | aveage of 308.75. € Inors eich. jirkaten. 865 River ¥.C.. 26 
‘is2 h =. war ...108) the big one with Aneroid and Christopher Wheel 15, of EASTERN LE SORES, Em (3). FOES OF saa 
| ve 1% | f . 
10s Wares gigi S AGUE sibany 3-\tive participation in sport on September Ist the name 


+ | he took it like a gentleman— /Fairlington, Va.. won the metal- Eimires pes ° 
and why not? He was a gen- |lic sight match with a 399. Mrs, | ™=*™ . mijehnsiows eres Senne wee ine Davidson Upsets : 
y g Z s. “Texas LEAGUE network to supervise the broad- | ft Ohi 
tleman rider, gentleman own- |Mary Richards of Washington S*revevert_ 2 a uxacte*"™*"* | cast details of Mutual’s exclu- Rose i in Four Sets Farm Bureau nsurance O Oo 
, er, gentleman breeder and (won the ladies’ championship Tere ry | Seabery 1¢-1t\sive radio coverage of this : o 88h, qT 
Whirttows Culldres iil sweet Joe. tik) gentleman trainer. iwith a 400, ligeckbere “8.770022... Werk, 6 year’s World Series. ISTANBUL, Turkey, Aug. 28 : ; wil change lO was 
oo cee tt ee apprentice #—Swedish ace Sven David- 


lewance claim | | ison scored the second upset in 


| Race Selections Swan: ahaonend an Wieecinn 
AQUEDUCT ENTRIES Paddock Picks "Em at Atlantic | City AP AT AQUEDUCT Rose of “Anetralie . 2 60, AT 4 © vad ae ’ D E 


3-71 -olds: claiming, 1—Halter Lace, Mame Shane, Fieets|*—6, 6—1, to capture the men's) INSURANCE 


singles title in the Istanbul’ @ qrenwi8e MUTUAL INSURANCE GOuPANY 
eas tennis championships today. “nw ogo*” meenahdiand MUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 
“vesl-| The young Swede upset top-| 


seeded Bu ge Patty of Los! MATIONWIORN LIFE INGURANCE COMPANY 
mw, eight, Viscount. Grand Ge- Angeles and Paris in the semi- MOME OFFICE: COLUMBUS, OIC 
sna (Aid. Paper Tiger, Diving! final round yesterday. 
j—~Hesseet Orange, Athabasks. Mar- ’ 


sten Moer. 
&—-GALARCH. Meunt Rendle. King 
Gevin 


AP AT WASHINGTON PARK) 
W inner Lincoln Dns 1—Jecein., Free Fella. Derby John 


eo Bes, HE iki) tals Bice, "Blea, ite. ) Don’t take a chance... 


._ s ; ' 3—Springtike, Wise Swiv,. Geld Medal 
mT year-olds and ep; allowances; ‘HAZE. Pink I sede. Seeek- 


timem. pegny L.. Stretenest. 
Devil, Spert Beets, Deuble 


ne Cheb. Crewe Derby. 


. Wartess, Tn Clover. 
rket Tie. Snerkel, 


. POST TIME 2 Ff. M 2 Nerbobd (Parenti) Must show - 
FIRST RACE—Parse, $3000, é-year-clds and up; (| ® 7 Impulse ooseeane) Hes epeecd Rw 
J six furlengs (16) | 9 Lass (Barnet Not here 
Rega!buto ) Due for brackets - 9 Teddy's olt Morte) o«-+,,Mardly the one 

(Vincent) Ready. go well 1 Stolen First (Shaw) Has | Dien 
Won wee" dangerous . 4 Wartesla ( Batcheller 3 H fares 
never better 
éeed” rider: figures 
7) Rates consideration 
Match Play Adams) Won here: watch out 
Wise Pop (Ne pert ..Bome good races 
Tie Tito ‘Ne Be Training smarty 
Running Chance ‘Beichel ler) Due te wake up 
rensen) Must show more 
Not here 
Close if able start 
Can't recommend 
R Some fair efforts 
Play FPiddie ‘Korte / Hardly the one 


13 *Galites Pride ..} |SECOND RACE—Purse, £3000; 2-year-old; fillies : 9" Gonzales y be good t 
| ‘ Better Goods (Batchetier) night there A 
ir. -olds a, ming Accolad © Beat this field 


Kopes Baby ‘Boulme 
Asthore. (Westrope) nn Dro New York 
Shoe Tree ‘Boulmet TODs 
Gain A Girl (L. Ada 
Cloverlin ‘Parenti) 
Marilyn May iNo y 
Dottie Pie (No Boy) 
Sauare Number (Sorenson).. 
Hedy's Best (Choquette) 
Royal Incline ‘(No Boy) Only start poor 
Inharmony (Barnett) «s+ Late form bad 
Hivalla ‘No Boy sece++»- Closer @ starts 
Tis Better (No Boy) sée8 Hardly the one 
Joy Star (Brumfield) ..... Closer tf goes 
Addie & (No Boy? » .Can't recommend 
Laure Tee (Resa! buto) . Past: stops badiy 


e? 


-- 
x 
~ 
? 
’ ~~ oo 


~ 
£39? 


_—-— me ee ee | 


eo“vVeeuv—@ 


a) 

(Boulmetis) DAYS BEST BET 1 
Pundonor (Shuk) . Good now, contender 
Jr Admiral iNo Boy) Will be right there 
Tireune (No Boy) Chance off best races 
Bill Veit (Sorenten) 

Snooty (LeBlanc)... Clockers 


oe ee 
~Ow ae P-1S4YONUN Vw ZS 


- 
IF D 


—_— 


SS 


hk hh heen’ 
swoae 
senate 
Seeueuewetv ee 
ee ee ee et Oe 


ee ee 
-~-s+ e+ 
SSSSSSSYY OS PS 
>. ; ; ] : ’ ’ : . ’ ’ 
" 
eo 


il 
reett 12 


~ 
~BWwnvoek-Iwv 


sures very close 
Dinner Winner. (ce =) es out recent races 


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" 


Area Golf Roundup 


Dr. Weisberg Wins 
Indian S prings Title 


Ss |S Maury Fitzgerald 


DR. ALAN WEISBERG captured his first Indian Spring 


Coun 


Club championship yesterday, defeating his golfing 


anes s eee in the scheduled 36-hole final, 5 and 4. 
a former member of the varsity golf team at 
Georgetown University and District 
junior champion in 1948, fired a 73 
on Saturday to take a two-up lead. 
Yesterday the lanky dentist was two- 
over var for 14 holes to close out the 
one-sided match on the 32nd n. 
Sam Beek carried off the title in the 
first flight but had to go 21 holes be- 
fore shelving Vernon Thrower. Tommy 
Plowman won the second flight with- 
out having to hit a shot. His opponent, 
Hilly Brickman failed to make an 
appearance. 
Other flights: Third—Sol Amanuel 
defeated Ed Lisner, 4 and 3: fourth— 
Ted Cohen defeated Eugene Horowitz, 


default; 


Dr. 


fifth—-Al Broadsky defeated 


Herman Brodie, 4 and 3: sixth— 


Harry Dodson defeated Harry Engel, 
2 and 1; seventh—Norman Abrams defeated Edward S. Stern, 
4 and 2; eighth—Colby Sandeross defeated Irv Keller, 4 and 3: 
ninth—Arnold Symonds defeated Al Pollan, 3 and 2; tenth—Al 


Gudelsky defeated Dave Kay, default: 


eleventh—Herb Fried- 


lander defeated Louis Watzman, 2 and 1: twelfth—Oscar Sher- 
man defeated Marty Brenner, 4 and 3; thirteenth—Abe Perry 


defeated A. Roseman, 1 up. 


MANOR— Defending champion George Thornton advanced 
to the second round of the club championship with an easy 


6 and 5 victory over Larry Hill. 


The only upset of the day came when Charlies Holmes elim- 
inated Pete Loda in an extra hole match on the 19th green. 


In the other matches: 


R. B. Wharton defeated John Fales, 


Zand 1; William McFerren Jr., defeated D. E. Leahy, 3 and 2: 
Dr. Mike Oristian defeated H. H. Gaddis, 5 and 4; Jerry Me- 
Ferren defeated E. R. Berkeley, 2 and 1; J. F. Whitaker de- 


feated W. L. Hemphill, 


CONGRESSIONAL—C. E. 
Huntley captured the senior 


championship with a round | 


of 77. The new titlist played 
the front nine in 39 and the 
back in 38 to win the event 
by a single stroke. 

T. T. Cotnam finished atop 
the net division of the field 
with 80—9—71. Second net 
went to R, O. Wissinger, who 
barely missed tying for the 
title, with 78—4—74. 


KENWOOD — Defending 
champion Buddy Sharkey 
shot a 2<ver-par-72 to take 
the firstround lead in the 
club championship qualifying 
trials. In second place came 
Ted Rutley with a 73. 

Other leading scorers were 
Nick Hollander, 75; Allen 
Laing, 76; Lou Semia, 78; 
George Borsari, 78, and Wil- 
liam Wolhfarth, 78. 


GOOSE CREEK—John Al- 
derman took the qualifying 
lead in 18fole trials with a 
3-over-par-75, His nearest op- 
ponent in fests scheduled to 
end Sunday is Walter Hardy 
with 76. 

In a mixed Scotch fotr- 
some, Mrs. Bill Wanner and 
F. A. McGonegal, 106—20—76., 
and Mrs. Betty English and 
Lynn Cornwell, 98—22—76, 
tied for the net. 


BETHESDA—While Deane 
Beman floundered around 
down at the bottom of the 
pack with 157, brother Del 
won the qualifying medal in 
the club championship with 
143. Del posted rounds of 72 
and 71 to win the medal by 
a margin of four strokes. - 

The other qualifiers for the 
championship flight were 
Perky Cullinane, 147; Jack 
Rountree, 150; Comdr. Ace 
Johnson, 152; Joe Carpenter, 
155: Bill Henley, 155; Jon 
Gonella, 155: Chicky Culli- 
nane, 155; Bill Dudley, 155; 
Tom Menning, 155; Kay 
Fletcher, 155. Ed MacArthur, 
156: Fred Babb, 157; Bob 
Killen, 158; Spencer Davis, 
160. 


ARGYLE — Pat Martino 
took over the lead in the 
club championship qualifying 
trials with a 147 score. Post- 
ing rounds of 74 and 73, 
Martino displaced Don Sulli- 
van, who had 76, 72—)48, as 
the leader. 

Martino also teamed with 
Stan Kedzierski to fashion a 
best-ball of 61 to tie F- R. 
Bowman and John Turlish in 
a blind partner  obest-ball 
event. 


WOODMONT — Mrs. Mor- 
ton Samler and Sam Schwartz 
won the annual mixed scotch 
foursome championship with 
a 41, 38-—78. 

Dr. and Mrs. Jerry Footer. 
83—11—-72, and Phyltis 
O'Shinsky and Howard Nord- 
linger, 82—10—72, tied for 
the nét. Mrs. Marion Cooper 
and Everett Steinem, 83— 
8—~75, finished third and Mrs. 
H. Fox and Ed Wortman, 
88—12—76, took fourth. 

In the weekly sweepstakes, 
Henry Kaufman, 82—13—469, 
and Aaron Goldman, 98—26— 
72, were the 18-hole winners. 
Il. Libby, 45—13—32, and H. 
Melnicode, 39-732, tied for 
first place in the nine-hole 
event. 

WASHINGTON—Harold H. 
Hair matched par with a 70 
to be the gross winner in the 
Class A division of the points 
tournament. The net in the 
top bracket went to Joe 
Mahoney with an accumula- 
tion of 22 points. 

Ike Warren won gross with 
75 and H. N. Hoffman net 
with 24 points in Class B, 
H. O. Eimers had 86 and C. 
M. Cook 22 points to be the 
victors in Class C 


BORT DUPONT—Fort Du- 
pont won the annual Alpine 
championship by defeating 
the hill climbers from Rock 
Creek, 19%2-%. In the wom- 
en's division the two teams 
battled to 7%-7\% stalemate. 

Trawgott Schmidt fired a 
70 to not only win the Al 
Farr Memorial tournament 
but take the lead in the 


2 and 1; William -McFerren Sr., 
feated Johnny Grubb, 2 and 1. 


de- 


| 
‘Army Navy's ‘cee wiive rin 


| club championship qualifying 


rounds as well. 


PRINCE GEORGES—Eve- 
rett Morris and Don Porter 
posted identical scores of 
81—29—52 to be the winners 
in an alibi tournament. Bill 
Hughes, 91—38—53, took 
third and Bill Wienpahl, 99— 
45—54, and Bill Parent, 83— 
2354, tied for fourth. 

In a sweepstakes event, 
Charles Krips, 80—8—72; Ray 
Waldecker, 79—7—72, and 
John Anderson, 73—1—72, 
tied for net. The gross was 
divided between John Jan- 
kowski and Gil Willett with 
76s. 


BELLE HAVEN—Walt Sim- 
mons hit a 5-iron shot into the 
cup on the first bounce on the 
145-yard 17th hole for a hole- 


in-one. He was playing Jerry 
Jerolaman, Arthur Arm- 
strong and Bill Simmons. 

Paul Beardsiee accumu- 
lated 19 points to be the win- 
ner of Saturday's Points 
tournament. John Scott won 
yesterday's with 20 points. 
Paul Lipps was second with 
19 points. 


BROOKE MANOR — Joce- 
lyn Johns and Al Shorb had 
43 for gross in a mixed scotch 
foursome event. Three teams 
tied for net with 38. They 
were: Catherine Bearer and 
Al Holland, 50—12—38:; Joan 
Leslie and Joe Milford, 
47—3—38, and Mrs. Ann 
Brooks and Earl Thomas, 
43—_5—38. 


WESTBRIAR—Blind bogey 
winners; G. V. Brown, 100— 
30—79; Jack Kenealy, 84— 
13—71. 


COURTHOUSE — Gordon 
Kewer finished 2-up on par 
to be the class A winner in a 
match play against par event. 
C. M. Snow, Bart Fugiler and 
Pierce Bragg finished even 
and tied for second. 

P. B. Easton finished 2-up to 
win in class B, while B. Young 
and R. F. O'Brien finished 
l-up to tie for second. 


NORBECK—Sam Kline up- 
set medalist Lou Horowitz in 


| the first match play round of 


the club championship, 1-up. 


Other first round results in | 


the club championship: Max 
Gershen defeated Al Abram- 
son, l-up; Duke Zeibert de- 
feated Charles Fishman, 4 
and 3: Bob DiMaio defeated 
Ed Blumberg, 2 and 1: Max 
Mudrick defeated Marty 
Flax, lup in 20 holes; Lou 
Chelec defeated Al Press, de- 
fault: Sal DiMaio defeated 
Norm Abelman, 4 and 3; 


| Murry Sagman defeated 


George Mason, 4 and 3. 

Mrs. Ben Rozansky de- 
feated Mrs. Its Laskin to win 
the first women's club cham- 
pionship, 2 and 1. Mrs. Max 
Gershen beat Mrs. George 
Inoff, 2 and 1, in the first 
flight: Mrs. Edward Miller 
defeated Mrs. Melvin Rose 
in the second, 2 and 1, and 
Mrs. Bernard Kilsheimer 
eked out a l-up victory over 
Mrs. Harry Hais in the third. 

Blind bogey winners—Ray 
Weisberg, 83-—~10—73; Sam 
Kline, 78—5—73; Bernie 
Friedman, 88—15-—73; George 
Mason, 83—10—73; Nate 
Klutt, 93—20-—73; Hank Litt- 
man, 92-—-19—73; and George 
Berman, 95—22—73. 


EAST POTOMAC—Earl 
Marcey, Ted King and George 
Toregas posted scores of 73 
to tie for medal honors in the 
East Potomac Park club 
championship, The Women’s 
club championship qualifying 
medal also ended up in a tie 
with both Mrs. Helen Konopa, 
the a champion, and 
Mrs. Joyce ays rae tie 91s. 


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Charlies 8. Davison fired 
a five-iron shot into the 
hole on White Flint’s 150- 
yard third hole yesterday 
for a hole in one. 

Playing with Dr. William 
Hawfield and Lew Jenkins, 
Davison, who had never 
made an ace before, hit 
just short of the pin and 
the ball ran straight and 
true to the hole. 


Col. Nichols 
Loses, sand 3 


Bobby Brownell won sal 
eleven District amateur 
ichampionship in as many tries 
yesterday at Army Navy Coun- 
try Club, defeating Col. How- 
ard F. Nichols, the service club 
champion, in the scheduled 36- 
hole final, 5 and 3. 

The victory over the 43-year- 
‘old Air Force officer was 
Brownell’s 53d without a loss.) 
'He won his first title in 1936 | 
as a 16-year-old high school 
student and didn't play in the 
championship again antil 1946. 

Brownell, an ex-FBI agent 
now in the insurance business, 
fired a threeover par 75 in the 
forenoon half of the final to go 
to lunch fourup on his com- 
lee unknown opponent. 

a faulty putter, 
Brownell missed two putts 
under three feet on the third 
and fourth holes to dissipate a 
twoup lead he had accumu- 
lated on the first and second 


38 on Front Nine 


Brownell won the sixth with 
‘a par and the eighth with a 
‘birdie two to again go two-up. 
He was 38, twoover par, for 
the nine. The Chevy Chase 
Club player won the 13th with 
a birdie to attain a three-up 
margin, but Nichols rolled in 
a curling 30-footer for a birdie 
at 14 to reduce the count again 
to two holes. after Collins walked and Berra 

Brownell then took the 16th|simgled. It blew Johnson out) 
‘and 18th holes with pars to/of the game and brought Dick 
‘increase his advantage to four| Donovan in. Donovan got by| 
holes. The champion and his| ‘until the fifth when Berra im-| 
‘towering opponent both birdied proved on Mantle’s homer by 
the first hole of the afternoon|>anging one into the upper 
round and then settled down|deck of the same sector with 
to matching each other's pars) Noren on base. 
juntil the 27th where both again| First Game 
halved in birdies. NEW TOR CHIC AGO 

Nichols missed his tee shot| Saver. rt 
at 27th but knocked his recov-| 2" }” 
ery 11 inches from the hole. 
Undaunted, Brownell hit his 
second three feet away, holed 
the putt and conceded his op- 
ponent’s short putt to be still 
four-up going onto the last lap 
of the long, weary journey. 


Bogeys Hurt Nichols 
1) 
Nichols won the 28th with a'« 


YANKEES—From P. 10 


Yankees, 
Chisox Split 


second while Pitcher Connie 
Johnson was holding the ball; 
or, rather wandering around 
with it in the vicinity of the 
mound. No Sox infielder was 
bothering to cover the bag, 
either, so Phil lit out and made 
it easily. 

Johnson, a tall, righthanded 
type with a 62 record since 
being called in from Toronto, 
was bruised rather badly by | 
the Yankees. First it was Mc-| 
Dougald getting a single and 
stealing second and scoring on 
Rizzuto’s single for a 14 
Yankee lead in the second, and 
then three more Yankee runs 
in the third. 

Mickey Mantle got those 
runs home with his line drive 
homer into the seats in right 


- 


Bio emow-eusevuses 


be? but sealed his own doom) fer York . 
with bogeys at the 3lst and/——” —— 
‘33d holes when he allowed reese, Bie H re 2, 
Brownell to win both holes —— 2 
with pars. eC 
Both had rounds of 36 on the 
afternoon first nine and Brown-'? 
ell played the remaining six! 
holes to be only one over for | 
that portion of the match. He'|* 
was four-over for the day, while 
Col. Nichols, who had an 80 in 
his forenoon round, was eight' 
over in the morning and three 
over in the afternoon. 


a 


> 


Gene Littler Captures 


Montreal Open in Playoff 


MONTREAL, Aug. 28 (®—Gene Littler of Palm Springs, 
Calif., today won the $26,800 Montreal Open golf tournament 


when he defeated Stan Leonard of Vancouver on the first extra) 
hole after they had finished the 72-hole competition with iden- 


tical 272 scores. 


A great last nine finish by Leonard, in which he cut a two-| 


stroke lead by Littler and Doug Ford of Kiamesha Lake, N. Y., 
forced the competition into a playoff. Ford finished with a 275.; 

Leonard had a 65 on his final round over the Summeriea | 
Club course and Littler a 68. 

Littler got a par 5 on the 530-yard first extra hole while | 
Leonard went one over. A poor chip shot that went only three 
yards cost the Canadian a chance to continue the battle for top| 
money prize of $5000. 

Despite his poor chip at the 
extra hole, with an estimated 
12,000 thronging the fairway 
and draped about the green, 
a had a break on his| Littler’s second stopped on 

cond shot. the left corner or the green. He 

had good drives butichipped, rolling the ball eight 

Leonard hooked his second | feet past the cup. His putt was 

shot. It was headed out of! five inches short. Leonard tried) 

bounds on the left, hit a fence | his seven-foot putt. It stopped) 
and bounced back to within 15/a foot short. 

yards of the green. Leonard walked over and 


chipped again and the ball 
stopped seven feet in front of 
the vin. 


He had a good lie and a clear| shook hands with the «25-year- 


shot for the pin but his chip|old American, conceding the 
lofted weakly and the ball) hole and the Playoff. 

landed 10 feet in front of —. b | 

still short of the green. 


‘The Money Winners: 
Littler 


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Fea 

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Marts Fereel.. 
Max Evens 
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pare | Rarer 
Jimmy Demaret 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Monday, August 29, 1955 13 

Izaak Walton Meeting | America will hold its annual 
FREDERICKSBERG, Aug. 28) ™¢eting here Sept. 23 and 24.. 


@®—The Virginia Division .of Some 250 members are expect 
the Izaak Walton League of ed to attend. 


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Smith Wins 
Golf Playoff 


KANSAS CITY, Aug. 28 ic 
‘Marilynn Smith of Wichita,|*-"%** 4% Larsen In Mh 
Kan., defeated Mrs. Alice Bauer a pers 
Hagge of Sarasota, Fla. on the 
fourth extra hole of a sudden | pee” 
death playoff today for the top Coltin 
$900 prize in the Women’s n°’. on 
Heart of America Invitational |} Prerce't. Mowe 
Golf tournament. 7 oS 

Mrs. Hagge took home $630|\oven"oo laren 32 WP 


Se ee ee | 


© © @--.->+*00 @--w B 
—— 
@ B02 es se Ore 5 


Srv ®-o~--e8owD> 


New 
Chieage all . 
R SkowWron. 

ned 


‘in the 54-hole, $5000 tourna-|[ieree (124). Lo Tur 
men 

Both players fiinished with 
220 totals for three rounds after 
firing two-under-par 70s today 
A new course record of 71 rs 
women was established only 


State Team Title 
yesterday by Fay Crocker, Na- 
tional Open champion from | 


After 21 Holes 
Montevideo, Uruguay. 


In third place at the finish | CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va 
were Betty Jameson of San/Aug. 28 #.—Farmington Coun- 
Antonio and Beverly Hanson\try Club of Charlottesville to- 
of Indio, Calif., with 223 totals.'\day became the first four-time 
Each got $495. winner of the State team golf 

Mary Lena Faulk of Thomas- championship with an unprece- 
ville, Ga., set a women’s course 'dented sudden-death playoff 
record for nine holes today ivictory over. the Hermitage 
with a three-under-par 33 on Country Club of Richmond. 
\the back nine for a 72. She! The host Farmington team 
\shared fifth spot with Betty and Hermitage, who finished in 
'Hicks, Palm Springs, Calif,’ a 4%4% deadlock in last Sun- 
\who also had a 72 for a 224 day's scheduled championship 
‘round, battled 21 holes today 
‘before Farmington’s Frank 
Sutton Ill dropped a 20-foot 
putt that ended the match. 

Just as last Sunday, the two 
teams finished in a tie at 4%- 
4% after the regulation 18 
‘holes. Unlike last Sunday, how- 
lever, when darkness called a 
‘halt to the activity. The teams 


| 
Farmington Wins 


Rowland Sets 
New Record for 


| CHESTERTOWN, Md., 
28 W—Wallace Rowland 

Havre de Grace, Md., drove his| set o pan _ Zoing today. 
136-cubic-inch hydroplane 
Cavalier Il, to a new world| 
record today in the Chester'| 
|\River Yacht Club Power Boat! 
| Regatta. 

Rowland's speed of 62.543) 
miles per hour eclipsed an old| 
mark of 61.941. However, his 
record still must be recognized 
by the American Power Boat 
Association, which sanctioned 
today’s affair. 

The bridge and both banks 
of the river were lined by an 
estimated 7000 to 8000 specta- (( 
itors. The Pacific One Design 
| Class was a sweep for Kent 
Island, Md., drivers. Calvert 
Thompson of Chester was first, 
Garrett Ruth of Grasonville: 
second and Alton Pierson of 
Queenstown third. 


Aug. 


‘ > 


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| BUGENE MEYER, Chairman of the Board 
JAMES RUSSELL. WIGOING, Vice President and Erecutive Editor 
ROBERT H. ESTABROOK Editorial 
ALFRED FRIENDLY 


PERL sb 6 005 ewd ob ce ao 6ds ths bods .Seeretary 
President WTOP Radio end Television 


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AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER Ms 


MONDAY, AUGUST 29, 1955 PAGE 14 


Near East Peace Plan 


Secretary Dulles’ proposal for peace in the Near 
East should not be judged by the cool reception it 
has had. It comes at a time when new clashes are 
inflaming the relations between Israel and Egypt. 
In the tense atmosphere of the Near East it may 
not be possible for the Arab nations or for Israel 
to adjust their thinking to the middle road thus 
offered them. If the Western powers can unite be- 
hind this peaceful way out for the Near East, how- 
ever, war may be averted and time may be expected 
to intensify demands in the hostile countries them- 
selves for a reasonable solution. 

What Mr. Dulles has said in effect is that the 
United States cannot be indifferent to festering 
causes of war in any part of the globe. Renewal of 
the conflict in the Near East could mean wider hos- 
tilities that would end in atomic annilfilation for 
many nations. Every country has a stake in mini- 
mizing this risk. In our opinion, the United States 
has been slow in using its prestige and influence 
to supplant the uneasy truce in the Near East with 
a healing peace. We have an obligation through 
the United Nations and through our concern for 
our own future to join with other countries in 
seeking peaceful adjustment of situations which 
threaten to grow into catastrophes. 

The more dramatic part of the Dulles plan is an 
international guarantee of Israel and the Arab 
states against any effort to change the Israel-Arab 
borders by force. But this would only write into 
specific national obligations pledges that are al- 
ready implicit in the United Nations Charter. Secre- 
tary Dulles has asked the U. N. to sponsor and the 
powers to support a special arrangement for mak- 
ing the Charter effective in the heated atmosphere 
of the Near East. This is a wholly logical extension 
of the Tripartite Declaration of May, 1950, guaran- 
teeing the temporary armistice lines between Israel 
and its neighbors. As such, the Dulles suggestion 
won prompt approval in London. 

Special importance attaches to the price the 
United States is willing to pay for such an elimina- 
tion of force from the Near Eastern equation. 
First, this country would join in an international 
loan to enable Israel to pay compensation to the 
refugees from that country now camped in wretched 
condition near its borders. No real peace can come 
to the Near East until the plight of these 900,000 
refugees has been eased. To facilitate the resettle- 
ment of these people and to raise the standard of 
living in the entire area, the United States would 
also contribute generously to water development 
and irrigation projects. The choice for the Arab 
states and Israel thus becomes a choice between 
relaxation of tensions and economic progress on 
one hand, and fear, continued fighting and possible 

destruction on the other. 

It is not to be supposed that this American ap- 
peal will touch the extremists. They are so thor- 
oughly committed to violence that they may not 
be able to turn back. But to the vast majorities it 
opens a new door of hope toward which they can- 
not be indifferent. They may safely disregard the 
contention that the plan is a bid for votes in the 
United States. Every sound peace plan is good 
politics. The significant fact about this proposal 
is that it points the way toward eliminating another 
potential source of war at a time when humanity 
can no longer afford to resort to violence to settle 
its problems. That will recommend it to the rank 
and file no matter what governments may say. 


No Guilt by Kinship 


Secretary of the Air Force Donald A. Quarles 
acted with commendable promptness in clearing 
Airman 3/C Stephen Branzovich of security charges 
based on allegations that his father had once been 
a Communist or fellow traveler. The Secretary 
lifted the case out of the hands of a hearing board 
for the obvious purpose of laying down a policy that 
would extend beyond this individual case. His 
decision is a pointed direction to Air Force secu- 
rity officers that they should not hereafter bring 
charges based on nothing more substantial than 
“guilt by kinship.” 

If the Navy and the Coast Guard similarly dis- 
pose of the Eugene D. Landy and Norman Pierre 
Gaston cases, there will be at least some clearing 
of the atmosphere. Of course, the services need 
to make a careful check in every case of this sort. 
But every American tradition and every reasonable 
concept of justice cries out for judging an indi- 
vidual by his own actions and not by. the affilia- 
tions, past or present, of his father or mother. It 
should not be necessary for the head of a Govern- 
ment department to reiterate this basic principle 
of fairness, but since it has become necessary the 
responsible heads of agencies cannot act too quickly 
to make their position clear. 


Disaster Relief 


Most citizens probably never heard of the Dis- 
aster Relief Act under which President Eisenhower 
is extending very substantial Federal aid to flood- 
stricken states and cities. Congress passed this 
law in 1950. It authorizes the President to provide 
Federal aid in any “major disaster” resulting from 
a flood, drought, fire, hurricane, earthquake, storm 
or other catastrophe. For this purpose Federal 
agencies may lend or use their equipment, supplies 
and personnel. The statute contemplates coopera- 
tion between Federal and local agencies and 
permits broad use of national: resources for the 
preservation of life and property, the clearing of 
wreckage, the repair and replacement of public 
facilities and so forth. 

Aside from the activities of the American Red 
Cross, the task of administering this disaster relief 
falls to the Federal Civil Defense Administration. 
Civil Defense has authority.to call on other agencies, 
and in this instance it has turned over a very 
farge part of the job to the Army Engineers. One 
reason for this is that the Engineers, upon direction 
from the President, can draw upon funds already 
appropriated for flood control, thus avoiding the 


necessity of calling an extraordinary session of | 


Congress. The use of funds appropriated directly 
under the Disaster Relief Act is more limited. 

As the scope of the disaster has become clear, 
with damage in the Northeast estimated as high 
as $1.6 billion, other agencies have been brought 
into the relief picture.. FHA is making emergency 
loans to replace damaged or destroyed homes, and 


~~ 


up to $900 million is available for rehabilitation of 
damaged plants of defense industries, The Army 
Engineers are expected to spend nearly $100 mil- 
lion in direct relief of the stricken areas. The 
Administration has moved quickly on many fronts 
to minimize suffering and to aid stricken families 
and cities. 

Thoughtful attention needs to be given to Lt. 
Gen. Samuel D. Sturgis’ request for a $750,000 
survey looking to the protection of Atlantic sea- 
board communities from hurricane-caused floods. 
Of course, the country could not afford to build 
dams in every ravine or valley that might be 
flooded by an unexpected downpour. But.the cost 
of this disaster makes increased study of both 
weather and flood preventives imperative. If it is 
true that hurricanes are becoming more frequent 
and are inflicting heavier damages on inland com- 
munities, new ways of affording protection will 
have to be found. 

At the same time, Congress ought to consider 
substantially increasing the Disaster Relief fund 
and enlarging the purposes for which it may be 
spent. It cannot be assumed that the Army Engi- 
neers will always have large unexpended funds that 
can be drawn upon for disaster relief. A country 
as wealthy as ours can afford to keep on hand an 
emergency fund to be used in situations like the 
present without depleting funds appropriated for 
other purposes. 


The Princess and the Press 


We must say that the British press—or that 
part of it which strives, not unsuccessfully, for 
mass circulation—has just about struck the nadir 
of journalistic prurience and vulgarity. Its cur- 
rent behavior in the putative affair of the Princess 
Margaret and a certain Capt. Peter Townsend sur- 
passes anything dreamed of in the heyday of 
Bernarr Macfadden and the late Fred Bonfils, and 
would have doubtless left them gasping with envy 
and chagrin. 

The approach of the Princess’ twenty-fifth birth- 
day anniversary gave the ineffable London tabloids 
all the pretext they needed for working their read- 
ers up to a point of lubricous hysteria. Twenty-five 
is the age at which immediate members of the 
royal family are permitted, according to a statute 
enacted 183 years ago, to marry without the con- 
sent of the sovereign. Thus the Princess is now 
legally free to marry Captain Townsend, assuming 
that she wishes to do so and that he has asked 
her. For neither of these assumptions, however, 
is there any evidence stronger than gossip, much 
of which, we suspect, has been manufactured, in 
the interests of circulation, in Fleet Street itself. 

The Daily Mirror celebrated the Princess’ birth- 
day with the imperative headline, “COME ON, 
MARGARET, MAKE UP YOUR MIND!,” and de- 
voted all of its front page and much of its interior 
contents to speculation about the precise state of 
the royal emotions and to discussion of the various 
dynastic and religious complications that would 
be involved in such a match. About three years 
ago, Captain Townsend was divorced from a former 
wife; the canon law of the Church of England for- 
bids the remarriage of divorced persons, and 
(again assuming that there is any substance to 
the gossip) the opposition of the Anglican hier- 
archy to such a marriage is to be anticipated. The 
Queen herself, as titular head of the church, could 
hardly give formal approval. Again the Princess, 
if she were to marry the captain, would have to 
renounce not only her right of succession—she 
is now third in line, after Prince Charlies and the 
Princess Anne—but also, and more importantly 
from the constitutional point of view, her right 
to the regency in case of Queen Elizabeth's death. 
All this would be certain to raise an embarrassing 
pother in Parliament, similar to that which pre- 
ceded the abdication of Princess Margaret's uncle, 
Edward VIII. 

Still, as far as we can see, the only circumstan- 
tial evidence that there is, or ever was, anything 
resembling an amorous attachment between the 
Princess and the captain is the fact that in July, 
1953, he was suddenly transferred from his post 
as equerry in the royal household to that of air 
attache in the British Embassy at Brussels; though 
one must admit that Captain Townsend did little 
to silence the gossip by his cryptic utterances to 
the reporters who tracked him down in Belgium. 

Privacy, of course, is a luxury that royal person- 
ages and those who become involved with them 
cquid never hope to enjoy. Gossip and even slander 
are inevitable “incidents of the trade,” as King 
Umberto said after an attempt to assassinate him. 
Nevertheless, one shudders to think what might 
have happened to the editors of the London Daily 
Mirror, the London Daily Sketch and Reynolds’ 
Newspaper in the days of Louis XIV. And then 
there was James I of England, who, it is said, seri- 
ously considered having the commoner, John Rolfe, 
attainted for treason for his presumption in marry: 
ing into the royal house of Powhatan! 


Women’s Use of Credit 


Europeans have long taken a disapproving view 
of installment buying. But now this trend is get- 
ting under way in a conservative manner, partly, 
it is reported, as a result of the new status of 
European women. In the tradition of their feminine 
forebears, from cave days on, women in Europe 
are pressing for greater household -conveniences. 
Now that so many of them have their own pay- 
checks, it is easier for them to insist that refriger- 
ators, washing machines, vacuum cleaners and 
other home equipment, as well as television and 
radio sets, be installed in their homes without 
delay—on a pay-later basis. 

If European prosperity continues, the electric 
servants can be counted on to take over in a big 
way. At least the American record would so 
indicate. Of homes here that are wired for. elec- 
tricity, 92.4 per cent have electric refrigerators, 
81.3 per cent washing machines, 27 per cent ranges, 
15.1 per cent freezers. Significantly, buying on 
credit (aside from home mortgages) got under way 
here in the mid-1800s in connection with furniture. 
Despite the comic strips’ gibes, women have gen- 
erally been as levelheaded as men about family 
finances. But everyone Knows that it was grandma's 
prodding that finally got that badly needed rug on 
the. parlor floor—whether by cash or on time. 


b 


a3: 
+ ite 


Letters to the Editor 


Russia and Arms 


There has been an interest- 
ing flow of analyses and im- 
pressions of the U.S.S.R.’s cur- 
rent peace moves and the pos 
sibilities of genuine changes 
in Russian foreign and domes- 
tic policies. 

Here are two examples, one 
an optimistic but cautious im- 
pression and the other, a hope- 
ful suggestion that real change 
is possible: Stewart Alsop, in 
his fourth report on persona! 
impressions from the Soviet 
Union (The Washington Post and 
Times Herald, Aug. 12, 1955), 
writes that while fear has been 
reduced among the Russians, 
there is little if any individual 
thinking on political issues; the 
Russians could quickly be 
geared to an aggressive atti- 
tude against the capitalist 
world. Mr. Alsop warns that 
there has not been a basic 
change in the Soviet anti-West- 
ern attitude, and we will invite 
disaster if we let down our 
guard. 

In the New York Times mag- 
azine July 24, 1955, Prof. 
Toynbee writes that since Rus- 
sia needs to devote more ener- 
gy to internal developments 
and improvements, the goal of 
world domination will give way 
and become a “dead letter.” 
Theoretically. it will remain a 
necessity, but practically it will 


* lose vitality. 


Whatever Mr. Alsop’s form 
of keeping up our guard, I 
would add that if disaster is to 
be averted, we could use some 
positive measures to do it. And 
although we hope that Prof 
Toynbee is right, we know 
that the Russians are capable 
of rapid progress. If their goal 
is world domination, internal 
problems will not permanently 
deter their fulfilling that goal. 

But in our efforts toward 
peace, we can make aggression 
less practical Disarmament 
will require some degree of in- 
ternational enforcement. If 
other measures toward world 
order follow this, the powers of 
a limited world government 
and United Nations forces can 
push aggressive aims into the 
dead letter pile more surely 
than ‘Russia's domestic needs 
or even than the threat of 
atomic annihilation. 

LYNN SNYDER. 

Washington. 


Schmidt and the Press 


Freedom of the press is a 
great American tradition. But 
it surély has been abused in the 
case of the returning prisoner 
David Schmidt. 

His marital problems must 
have seemed almost too much 
to bear after his imprisonment 
e—without the heartless badger- 
ing of the United States press. 
Schmidt was entitled to pri- 
vacy concerning his marriage. 

In matters of national im- 
portance, the press may be for- 
given for sometimes over- 


stepping the bounds of good, 


taste, but in Schmidt's case it’s 
inexcusable. F. G. MINER. 


Newport, R. I. 


Public ase p 


The transit cri may seem 
to be over to a casual observer, 
but it is not over and it will 
boil up again, and worse, if citi- 
zens of Washington do not now 
take measures toward a per- 
manent improved transit sys- 
tem. 

If the citizens of Washington 
want an efficient transit system 
which is run for public service 
exclusively and not for finan- 
cial profit to anyone, they can 
secure such a system by pre- 
paring to take over the can- 
celed franchise of Capital 
Transit as soon as that becomes 
possible. : 

Under public ownership of 
legitimate public property— 
every resource and facility es- 
sential to public welfare and 


there will never 
such transit tieup as we have 


had this summer. And, by elim- 
inating the grotesque financing 
charges, it will be possible to 
pay increased wages to opera- 
tors, while reducing the fares 
to the public! 

An investment of about $15 
apiece by the citizens of Wash- 
ington would provide the nec- 
essary rolling stock and other 
properties. There would be no 
interest paid directly on this 
investment, but investors would 
benefit indirectly by both de- 
creased fares and improved 
service. And I do not contem- 
plate buying out the Capital 
Transit properties. Let them 
have the bother of selling their 
secondhand junk to other com- 
panies and the loss they will 
surely take in that process. 
They need the lesson. 

DAVID DARRIN. 

Washington. 


Commerce President 


The Aug. 24 Washington Post 
and Times Herald published 
a column by Drew Pearson in 
which it is stated that Otto 
Seyforth (sic) is president of 
the “U. S. Chamber of Com- 
merce.” 

Otto Seyferth (correct) ended 
his term as president of this 
organization on May 2, 1951. 
We have had five other presi- 
dents since then, namely; De- 
chard Hulcy, Laurence F. Lee, 
Richard L. Bowditch, Clem 
Johnston and Boyd Campbell. 

EARL B. STEELE, 

Manascer. Information Department 


Chamber of Cosmmerce of the 
United States 


Washington. 


Postage Stamp Tempest 


Parties to the Alexandria 
tempest in a teapot about the 
new Lee stamp seem to have 
entirely overlooked the con- 
trolling factor. This is not a 
commemorative stamp but one 
in a new series of regular 
stamps. 

Commemorative stamps are 
issued for a particular person 
or event: to celebrate the an- 
niversary of birth of a famous 
man, the date of a battle, or 
the establishment of an impor- 
tant industry. Such stamps are 
issued in limited quantities and 
are first sold at some place 
definitely connected with the 
person or thing being com- 
memorated. 

The Lee stamp, not being 
such a stamp, there is no par- 
ticular reason why it should 
be issued in any special place. 

Another related point is the 
complaint that the value (30 
cents) is too high. This again 
overlooks the fact that itis 
part of a regular series, some 
of which have to be high. If 
this were a commemorative the 
point would be justified. If it 
came to the question of putting 
Lee on the 30<ent stamp or on 
none, I think the objections 
would cease. 

The whole thing is really too 
childish for words and seems 
to assume that the issuance of 
postage stamps is primarily for 
the benefit of collectors and to 
give publicity to certain per- 
sons or events! So far as the 
Alexandria councilman is con- 
cerned, the stamp has served 
its purpose and he has obtained 
the publicity he desired. 

G- D. WATROUS JR. 

Washington. 


“Higher-Priced Bikes” 


Your editorial of Aug. 22 en- 
titled “Higher-Priced Bikes” 
raises some interesting ques 
tions. You say that the “pro- 
tectionist amendments that 
have been tacked on to it (the 
Trade Agreements Act) over 
the years make it difficult, if 
not impossible, for the execu- 
tive to administer a trade pro 
gram of the kind so often enun 
ciated by Mr. Eisenhower.” 

It seems to me that you are 
absolutely right. There is un- 
questionably a growing discrep- 
ancy between White House pro- 
nouncements on foreign trade 
policy and United States actio: 
in this field. 

This is not new. It begar 
seven. or eight years ago wher 
Congress first passed the peril 
point legislation in 1948. It was 
given impetus in 1951 when 
Congress enacted the escape 
clause as an amendment to the 
Trade Agreements Act, wilt! 
provisions that tightened thc 
conditions of the power dele 
gated to the President. It was 
carried still further by subse 
quent strictures placed on this 
delegated power, not onl) 
through added amendments to 
the escape clause but to Sectior 
22 of the Agricultural Adjus' 
ment Act. 

In fact, Congress has showr 
increasing impatience and dis- 
satisfaction with the _ trade 
agreements program since the 
General Agreement on Tariffs 
and Trade was.negotiated late 
in 1947. This is not surprising 
since GATT represented a 
means of by-passing Congress 
in a field where Congress has 
complete authority under the 
Constitution. 

What has happened is a very 
simple development. 

The White House, egged on 
by the State Department, has 
steadfastly refused to acknowl- 
edge the facts of life. It has 
acted as if it need pay no heed 
to Congress and has made pro- 
nouncements to the world on 
trade policy over and over 
again that were not within its 
power to make. 

Delegated power can be with- 
drawn when it is abused. The 
White House forgot this. As a 
result it almost lost its power 
under the escape clause when 


has been guilty. 


session of Congress. 
os Sere ee 


only has it run wild with the de- 
legated power; it has tried 
through international agree- 
ments to make it impossible as 
a practical matter for Congress 


to get its hand on the ball i 


any way—seemingly forgettin 
that the Department's posses- 
sion of “it was only on suffer- 
ance in the first place. 

Involved here is .a question 
that cuts very deep. Congress 
has been given certain func- 
tions under the Constitution. 
The regulation of foreign gom- 
merce is one such function: an- 
other is making the tariff. 

It is true that these are eco- 
nomic matters and therefore 
affect international relations. 
The President, it is equally 
true, has in his power the con- 
duct of foreign relations. There 
seems to be an overlap here: 
but-the power of Congress is 
spelled out and no good can 
come of persistent efforts to el- 
bow Congress out of its field 
without going to the Consti- 
tution itself. 

Such efforts will not only be 
resented by those who have a 
stake in the Constitution, which 
means all of us; they are perni- 
cious, If the Constitution, in the 
opinion of some, needs chang- 
ing, there is a proper way of 
changing it. The habit, now 
deeply engrained in the State 
Department, of taking a dele- 
gation of power and disowning 
its source and limitations, 
therefore subjecting it to re- 
neated abuse, will certainly be 
its own undoing as it should be. 

The dilemma which you paint 
of the President, acting on the 
bicycle case under the statu- 
tory escape’ clause, serves to 
bring into clear focus the 
source of his difficulty. 

He dragged his feet as hard 
as he could—and that should 
be comforting to those who 
think that Congress should be 
set aside in any field where 
they disagree with its actions. 
The bicycle industry meantime 
must go ahead without much 
benefit from what Congress un- 
dertook to prescribe in a tield 


of its authority. Executive stub- 
bornness 


is not well advised un- 
der the circumstances. : 
O. R. STRACKBEIN, 


Ww gton. 


Walter Reuther’s ~ 
Growing Influence 


By Roscoe Drummond 


WE ARE going to need to get better 
acquainted with Walter Reuther, because 
we are all going to feel the force of his 
presence and the impact of his leadership 
for some time. 

My guess would be 
that Mr. Reuther is going 
to be more influential 
rather than less in the 
years ahead. 

Some gay, but signif- 
Icantly not his closest 
friends, that he is headed 
for the Presidency of 
the United States. That 
seems unlikely—though 
not impossible—for a Drummond 
variety of reasons, but what is evident Is 
that Mr. Reuther is going to play a large 
part in shaping the economy, even if he 
does not play a large part in shaping the 
politics, of our time. 

He is already doing it—and he has not 
begun to exhaust his ideas or his energy 
or his influence. 

Walter Reuther, a dynamic and tireless 
47, who worked nights while attending high 
school and Wayne University, emerged 
from the campus exuding plans for full 
employment, abundance and higher pur- 
chasing power. As a Ford employe in the 
lean, rough days of the depression, he did 
much to organize, improve the living and 
working conditions and elevate the status 
of the workers of the great automotive in- 
dustry. 

cow 


MR. REUTHER is the most successful 
labor leader in the United States today. As 
the unchallenged head of the 1-million- 
member United Automobile Workers, 
which has won 250,000 new members in the 
past four months, he has negotiated wage 
and umployment benefits from Ford and 
General Motors which increase his author- 
ity and influence in the labor movement. 
He is so confident of his position and fu- 
ture that he has no hesitancy in conceding 
the presidency of the evolving AFL-CIO 
merger to George Meany, head of the AFL, 
thus bringing about the more unified and 
more powerful labor movement he has 
long sought. He can wait to become top 
man. He has plenty he wants to do first. 

Mr. Reuther chose to accept something 
considerably less than a guaranteed annual 
wage in order to get what he deemed the 
principle of the GAW imbedded into a 
labor contract. What Ford and General 
Motors have accepted is the setting aside 
of 5 cents an hour for hourly workers to 
create a fund to pay employes who may be 
laid off somewhere between $2 to $25 for 26 
weeks; this in addition to state unemploy- 
ment insurance. 


cos 


WHAT NEXT has Mr. Reuther in mind 
—next year and after? Have no doubt that 
he has plenty in mind. He will be thinking 
and planning: 

To lay the groundwork, publicly and 
privately, for an extension of this “sup- 
plemental unemployment insurance fund” 
more wage with more guaranty for a 
longer period. 

To campaign for a still shorter work 
week in an increasingly mechanized in- 
dustry. 

To build the case for “expanded put- 
chasing power” (higher wages) as the new 
and yet unforeseen application of “auto- 
mation” means fewer and fewer workers 
can produce more and more goods. 

To work toward an end Mr. Reuther has 
long sought—the creation of industry 
councils on which labor would be rep- 
resented and which would have much to 
say in governing industry. 

Although Walter Reuther’s political and 
economic philosophy appears to have 
changed a good deal in the last 10 years, 
he still tends to look to Government as a 
main instrument in dealing with economic 
problems. His family and intellectual 
background is Socialist and he still tends 
to look upon labor as engaged in a bitter 
class struggle, even though he recognizes 
how fruitful and rewarding labor's part 
is in the American competitive private en- 
terprise. 

One of his current objectives is that the 
Federal Government require employers to 
provide. it with information on their plans 
for further installation of new processes and 
new machines designed to increase pro- 
ductivity together with their plans—“if 
any,” he adds—to assure that such pro- 
ductivity is accompanied by expanded pur- 
chasing power. 

It is not well to assume that what Mr. 
Reuther thinks today may not come to pass 
tomorrow. Walter Reuther does not have 
to be President of the United States to be 
ene of its most powerful citizens. 


————ae—— . - 


Malvina Lindsay is on vacation. 
column will be resumed September 22. 


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mf Monday, August 29, 1955 15 


% 


Matter of Fact... . 


Stassen’s Problem 


SOME TIME AGO, the U.S. 
Am r to Moscow, the 
foraiad the, Shale Mumereiont 
nt 
that the So- —. 


e for disarmament 
was not a symptom of grave 
inner weakness. He said the 
Soviets were unlikely to sacri- 
fice anything they regarded 
as truly vital in order to get 
disarmament. 

But on balance, he declared, 
the Soviets would rather have 
some disarmament than not 
have it. Considerable conse- 
quences have since flowed 
from the carefully qualified 
report of Ambassador Bohlen. 

For iastance, it rather im- 
agen on influenced the mood 
n which the White House 


pared for the summi* meet-° 


ng at Geneva. Without the en- 
couragement given by the 
Bohlen opinion, the President 
might not have made his brave 
gesture of proposing mutual 
aerial inspection to the Rus- 
sians. 


AT THIS MOMENT, .more- 
over, the Bohlen opinion has 
the most lively current sig- 
nificance. With the President's 
personal backing, Harold Stas- 
sen is leading the American 
delegation to the United Na- 
tions Disarmament Commis- 
sion in order to do two things 
at once. He is to resume the 
general disarmament talks 
which the U.N. Commission 
has carried on so long and so 
fruitlessly. And infinitely more 
important, he is to start bi- 
lateral, special disarmament 
talks with his Soviet opposite 
number. : 

Stassen is ordered, in short, 
to see whether the two giant 
powers, working along and to- 

ether, cannot lay a practical 
oundation for further prog- 
ress. If the most expert and 
qualified American observer, 
Ambassador Bohlen, believes 
the Soviets are serious in 


e By Joseph Alsop 


in 


wanting a measure of. dis- 
armament, then these bilateral 
Soviet - American 


t 
regarded as a mere empty 
obeisance to world opinion. 

Such is the favorable side 
of the picture. On the unfa- 
vorable side, alas, there are 
other points to be 
For example, the Kremlin's an- 
nouncement of a cut of 640,000 
men in the Soviet armed 
forces has tately produced a 
perfect orgy of wishful think- 
ing. But the explanation of 
this armed manpower cut that 
is credited in high quarters at 
the Pentagon is the very op- 
posite of hopeful. 

In brief, Soviet military 
journals have given much 
space, in the past three years, 
to the adapiation of atomic 
arms to infantry combat. Al- 
thou the American Army 
was first with its atomie can- 
non, the Red army was well 
ahead in the establishment of 
experimental infantry units 
specially organized and 
trained for atomic ground war. 
Tt is logical to suppose, there- 
fore, that the Soviets are now 
preparing, so to speak, to 
atomize a considerable ele- 
ment of their huge ground 
army of 155 divisions. 


TO GAUGE THE -INVEST- 
MENT involved in such an ef 
fort one need only turn to 
the similar Aserican pro 
gram. This was prepared by 
the operations and plans di- 
visions of the United States 
Army. It is now moldering, 
neglected and forgotten in the 
files ot the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff, because of its cost. 

The troubie is that truly 
atomicizing ground forces is 
not just a matter of adding a 
few atomic cannon. A thorough 
program has to put some 
atomic arms even in the hands 
of the battalion. Far more 
expensive still, a thorough, 
program also demands enor 
mous expenditures on air and 
ground transport. These are 
needed because a truly atom- 
icized army must above all be 
capable of maximum disper- 
sion and must possess maxi- 
mum mobility. 

Yet one of Secretary of De- 
fense Charlies E. Wilson's al- 
leged defense economies has 
been virtually depriving our 
ground forces of any air trans- 
port capability whatever. For 
this and other reasons the 


Washington Scene ... . 


Wolfson Appreciated 


OUR STREETCARS and 
buses are running again but 
we still harbor some feeling 
toward Louis E. Wolfson, the 
most contTo- mus 
versial indi- 
vidual in the & 
52-day transit & 
strike. Being 
W a shingtoni- = 


the rest of the 
country felt 
tbe same way. 

Consequent- 
ly one-of our 
local business- 
men, Allen Thurman, received 
a decided jolt the other day 
when he drove into Jackson- 
ville, Fla. on his way south 
and saw the Florida gateway 
city “festooned with huge 
banners: 

“Wolfson 
Night.” 

Mr. Thurman learned, how- 
ever, that the Jacksonvillians 
were not showing their ap- 
preciation of our transit czar 
for keeping Washingtonians 
on their feet so long. 

The Wolfson whom Jackson- 
ville delighted to honor was 
Louie's brother Sam, who had 
brought the city a first-place 
baseball team. 


EVERYBODY IS still writ- 


Dixen 


Appreciation 


United States 


| for a period of sev- 
eral years, with a heavy 
maintenance charge  there- 
after. 

If the Russians, then, are 
really planning to atomicize, 
say, 30 of their divisions, the 
investment will be very at 
indeed. On the other hand 
atomicizing these divisions will 
greatly increase the Red 
Army's over-all fighting 
strength. If you are multi- 
plying the fighting power of 
30 Mvisions by a factor of 


four or five, what could be. 
more logical than to drop an- | 
other 30 no longer-needed divi- | 


sions from the roster? And 
that is about the effect ef tpe 
Soviet 640,000-man cut. 


TO STASSEN, facts like 
those set forth above must 
mean that the nature of dis- 
armament is all-important. 
Mere armed manpower limi- 
tation, which the Russians 
have recently proposed, is not 
only valueless but even po- 
tentially very dangerous. 

Yet there is no agreement 
whatever within the American 
Government as to the nature 
of the disarmament plan this 

try ought to sponsor. And 
cannot be too often empha- 
sized that what the Russians 
want, if they want anything, 
is not the ingpection system 
that the President talked about 
at Geneva, but the actual dis 
armament that Bohlen dis- 
cussed in his report to the 
State Department. 
FPeced with this dilemma. 


Stassen has apparently tried 
te find a way out by a method | 
not uncommon in the Eisen- 
hower Administration—by call- 
ing In experts and naming a 


high-level committee. Dr. Er- 
nest Lawrence from Berkeley, | 
Benjamin Fairless of U. § 

Steel, former Undersecretary 

of State W. Bedell Smith and 

Gen. Lucian D. Truscott are 

among those who have agreed 

to serve as Stassen’s consult- | 
ants. It rema@ifie te be seen | 
whether all these great minds | 
can find a way around, or over, | 
or under this grim disarma- 
ment problem that human in- 
genuity hag never really solved 
before 


(Coovright 1pes x York 
Herald Tripegne. Ine} 


ee 


By George Dixon 


vf 2 i 


: 


: 
si 


me woe SNE nt) Comte & 
“You wrote beautiful love letters, Fignewton! ... they 


read just like seed-catalog descriptions!” 


Brucker Wants Civilian 
As His Information Chief 


By John G. Norris 
Staff Reporter 


ARMY SECRETARY Wilber 
M. Brucker has approved the 
appointment of a civilian as 
public information chief of the 
Army and a search is bein? 
made for a qualified individual 
to fll this normally general 


| officer billet. 
His action is the only dis- | 
'cernible step yet taken under | 
Defense Secretary Charles E. | 
last | 


" eeping | 
larch, calling for a sweeping other 


| tinue to publish a great deal 


Wilson's directive of 


reorganization of Pentagon 


public relations. 

The Navy and Air Force, 
with Wilson's concurrence, 
have decided to keep a mili- 
tary man at the head of their 
informational activities. None 
of the services has as yet cut 
its information staff by from 
one third to one half, as called 


| for by a Wilson memorandum 


of March 29, and none seems 


likely to do so 
Little is heard today at the 


Pentagon of the famous re 


quirement, also laid down by 
Wilson last March, that news 
releases rhust be 

to be “constructive” to be ap- 
proved for publication. 


DEFENSE DEPARTMENT 
Information Director C. Her- 
schel Schooley says it wouldn't 


| be possible—“even with a mi- 


ing to poor Dr. Franeis\ W. 
Reichelderfer, head of the 
U. & Weather Bureau, about 
the naming of hurricanes. 

Latest to hop into the act 
is Sen. Thomas H. Kuchel, 
of California, whom I had a)- 
ways considered a _ serious 
man. 


The solon has driven Dr. 
Reichelderfer a step nearer 
manic melancholia with this 
letter: 

“Women, I submit, histori- 
cally have symbolized tender- 
ness, devotion, sympathy and 
peacefulness. On occasions 
they may be stirred to fury. 
but their rages seldom last as 
long as Hazel’s in 1954, or 
wreck such vengeance. They 
can be and unpredict- 
able, though rarely as deter- 
minec as Connie this year. 
While now and then excitable, 
few of them show the wrath- 
fulness of Barbara in 1953 or 
Edna last summer. 


*“Before the 1956 hurricane 
season arrives I hope the 
Weather Bureau will have de- 
vised a new system of identi- 
fication, In a spirit of help- 
fulness, T wish to advance a 
few suggestions: 

“How about adjectives 
which would be descriptive 
and meaningful? I suggest 


‘acrimonious’ 
followed by 
‘bilious" and 
‘corrosive,’ etc. 

“Another possibility is the 
use of names from mythology 


‘belligerent’ 
‘capricious’ 


or 
or 


yeer, 


dured similar rigors. 
“I commend to the Weather 


Bureau a system which could | 
start with ‘Achilles’ or ‘Aeolus’ | 


and run through—iif the At 
lantic seaboard should be so 
bedevilled by the weather 
gods)—‘Zeus.’ 

“In resorting to aboriginal 


sources, you might go from | 


‘Algonquin’ t& ‘Blackhawk.’ 
and ‘Canandaigua,’ right up to | 
“Winnepesaukee’ and ‘Winne- | 
bago.’ | 

“The possibilities of an in. 
triguing and impersona 
scheme of meteorological no- 
menciature appear limited 
only by human resourceful- 
ness and imagination. 

“Perhaps the Weather Bu- | 
reau could achieve a dual or 
triple purpose—alert the popu- 
lace in endangered areas and 
simultaneously inspire. a 
search of encyclopedias. or 
even broaden the people's | 
knowledge of geography and 
history.” 


(Coprvright. 1945 7s 
Peatures Syndicate. | } 


These Days 


Presidential Elections 


IN THE PAST seision of 
Congress, seven resolutions 
were introduced proposing 
constitutional amendments 
changing the 
method for 
nominating 
and electing ~ 
the President 
and Vice Pres- ' 
ident of the 
United States. 

What it all 

comes down 

tio is that 

there seems 

to be an ex- 

citement Sokolsky 
about having a more direct 
election of these officers. 

The main objection to the 
electoral system is that an ur- 
fair discrimination exists 
whereby the “individual voter 
in New York State has 15 
times the vote-power in pres- 
idential elections as an equal- 
ly important individual citizen 
in Delaware.” Personally, I 
cannot get excited by the 
arithmetic. 

What is causing the citizen 
profound concern is that he 
actually does not have much 
choice in the selection of a 
President. He is given two 
name, selected by a small 
group in each party, and he 
has to vote for one or the 
other or nqt at all, 


LET ME recount the inside 
story of the Willkie nomina- 
tion as an example of what 
actually happens. 

k Was once associated with 
the National Association of 
Prana rg Ba he that 
time a group of big business 
men decided that they had to 
find a candidate to defeat 
Franklin D. Roosevelt and 
that the ordinary Republican 
would not do because he could 
Bot get electe®. Ga, Wendell 


——_— 


By George Sokolsky 


Willkie, a lawyer for Com- 
monwealth and Southern, 
who had come up from Ohio, 
was studied as one of several 
prospects. He believed in pri- 
vate enterprise and was a top- 
notch public relations man. 
So they decided to test him 
out and they got him, on*a 
session of the Town Meeting 
of the Air, where he did a 
splendid job. Now, I am not 
talking from books because I 
worked on that job along with 
some other wordsmiths.. 


So Willkie made good and a 
special organization .was es- 
tablished and duly financed to 
mobilize American business 
in every town in the United 
States for Wendell Willkie. 
This was highly camouflaged 
and its existence is still de- 


Or we might, in a succeeding | C™**ructive” 


recollect some of the In. | 
dian tribes which have en. 


| Speeches, 


id 


election. Yet experience shows 
that the two-party system, | 
operating om principle, and | 
led by men of political re- 
sponsibility as in Great Brit- 
ain, produces an efficient, 
competent type..of govern- 
ment for a free people. How 
to reestablish that kind of 
political responsibility in this | 
country is really our most | 
pressing problem. 


(Coprvright. 1955 ne 
Features Syndicate. Inc.) 


| gotten 


, croscope”—to detect any dif- 
or ‘ aggressive’ | 


ference between Pentagon ac- 
tion on this score now and 
last February. Right after the 
March order, Schooley con- 
cedes, at least one of the serv- 
ices attempted to use the 
test to kill a 
story or two, but it was ever- 
ruled 

To this, however, newsmen 
would reply that the Depart 
men:—like many other public 
and pi‘vate entities — always 


has been prone to withhold un- | 


favorable news if possible. 


They could cite some recent | 
Whether the situ 


examples 


ation is any worse sinee the 


equipment that 


| 


would have 


must be said that newsmen 
still find their access blocked 
to much wunelassified infor- 
mation. As a result of Wilson's 
March directives and Presi- 
dent Eisenhower's comments 
on security, many officials 


‘continue to be reluctant to 
| see reporters and thus there 


is littie but officially au- 
thorized news coming out of 
the Pentagon. 
Meanwhile, aviation 
trade magazines 


and 
con- 


of the unclassified informa- 
tion about weapons and 
Honaman set 
out to stop. Their staffs are 
able to pick up such data that 
necessarily must be freely 
passed in iadustry circies. 
The Army decision to go 
along with Wilson's civilian 
information chief plan was 


made early last spring by the iley's 


‘ their chances that first, a grand 


then Secretary Robert 
Stevens Aolan was sub 
mitted to Wilson but not 
returned until early August 
“approved in principle.” How- 
ever, by then the Army had 
a new Secretary and it was 
held up until Brucker could 
review it. 


- The plan calls for a civilian 
chief, five executive aides to 
deal with the press, radio, TV, 
movies, magazines, etc. and 
six clerical assistants. They 
“sole contact” 


with the press and media, 


passing on queries to the pres- | 


ent Army military informa- 
tion setup, which would con- 
tinue, under a general of- 
ficer’s command, to do the 
actual work of getting data 


'from the General Staff and 


“constructive” order, is debat- 


able 


of handling news expeditiously 


| also has nullified another Wil- 


son directive requiring that 
material proposed for publi- 


| cation be submitted to his of- 


fice at least three days in ad- 


Schooley says the necessity 


| 
; 


vance of proposed release. | 


articles and 
nouncements generally 


an- 
are 


| Army branches, preparing re- 


leases, etc. 

Only the civilian office and 
not the considerably larger 
military staff would be count- 
ed under congressional! limi- 
tations on the number of pub- 
lic information personnel. 


DEFENSE DEPARTMENT 
information officials have tak- 
en exception to many of the 


key details of the Army. They | 


consider giuch of it “unwork- 
able,” particularly the “sole 
contact” rule. Army Under- 
secretary Charles C. Finucane 
says the Army intends to ap- 
point a civilian chief as soon 


|as a qualified man can be 


submitted by the services and | 


individuals and reviewed for 
“policy” as well as security. 


i that will 


But the three-day advance no- | 


tice requirement Is waived. 

R. Karl Honaman, 
Deputy Assistant Defense 
Secretary, brought in last 
spring to tighten up the 
Pentagon's allegedly lax in- 
formational security program, 
seems to have lost the steam 
that he brought to the job. 
Honaman, publications chief 
of Bell Laboratories on leave 
as a “WOC” (industry man 
serving “without compensa- 
tion”) decided to take his 
usual month's vacation on 
Cape Code during August, 
despite the fact he had barely 
started on his task. 

In addition to these tigns 
of a return to normalcy, it 
may be reported that there 
has been at least one “back- 
ground-only” dinner at which 
a high Pentagon official 
talked to selected newsmen 
with the understanding that 
his name not be used. 


BUT WITH ALL THIS, it 


nied, but I was there. So the 
denials make oo impression 


upon me. | 


So all of a sudden, this com- 
paratively obscure man, who 
had been a Socialist at col- 
lege and a registered Demo- 


crat in New York, and who | 
got his job because he was a | 


Democrat, was made into a 
Republican and was put over 
as a colossal tribune of the 
people, who would defeat 
Franklin D. Roosevelt. 


‘ THE QUESTION of polit- 
ical responsibility and the 
political growth of the indi- 
vidual leader is really more 
important than the amend- 


ments I see before me. Take | 


for instance, the nomination 
of President Eisenhower. 
There are some jn 
country who no longer believe 
in party responsibility and who 
are leading us, step by step, 
toward government by per- 
sonal popularity. The parties 
are losing the reason for ex- 


istence, except as vehicles of | 


FLY SATS To 


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KHOLM - HELSINKI 


% 
specify $ A’S ALSO TO 
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the | 


found, and let him help work 
Out an effective organization 
meet Defense ap- 
proval. 

The Navy has had a Boston 
advertising man, Lawrence 
Pratt, brother of Assistant 
Secretary of the Navy Albert 
Pratt, making a survey of its 
public information setup, as 
Wilson directed. He has made 
his report which is before 
Navy Secretary Charles S. 
Thomas. Details are unavail- 
able, except that it calls for 
continuation of a Navy ad- 
miral in charge. Wilson re 
luctantly agreed to this at 
Thomas’ insistence. 

Former “Air Force Secre- 
tary Harold E. Talbott also 
decided in favor of a general 
heading up his department's 
public information organiza- 
tion and disapproved any sug- 
gestion of cutting its trimmed. 
back staff. So far. 
Secretary, Donald A. Quarles, 
has let thir decision stand. 


: 


What Is Treason? . .°. «3 Murrey Marder 


Maj. Alley Goes to Court 


‘treason arguments swirled, first year of his 33 months im- 
around him. ip 


Attorneys for an Army major 
will go into Federal court here 
pgs with what amounts 
to a challenge of the whole sys- 


A big (6 feet 3% inches tall; 


risonment. 
Alley might be looking at 


present weight, 218 pounds),| these odds in Army court-mar- 
blond, artilleryman, Alley ap-|tial cases to date on collabora- 


tem of court-martialing military | peared as unconcerned as if he tion charges: six enlisted men 


personnel accused of collabo 
rating with the enemy. 


The odds appear to be long 
the attempt, coming on top of 


proclaimed Code of Conduct 
for captured servicemen, has 


were 
‘heard lecture 
tién. 


listening to an often-' convicted, with sentences rang- 
on field sanita- ing from eight years hard la- 
‘bor to life 


mprisonment; two 


| When someone commented officers acquitted; one officer 
ones against such an upset. But'on his outward appearance of dismissed from service. 


\wejl-being, he noted that he 


‘two days,” in a Communist | 
‘prison camp in North Korea) 


The taking of testimony in 


President Eisenhower's newly-|had spent “33 months, lacking his case, before an eight-man 
| board of officers headed by 4 
colonel, has not yet begun. All 


attracted considerable interest./(December 1, 1950 to August discussion so far has been on 


In essence, the argument to 29, 1953); that he weighed 153 legal 
‘be aired is this: Is collabora-| pounds when released; that he | Col. 


tion with the enemy tantamount 
to what the Nation has re- 
garded historically as its most 
heinous crime—treason? 


Military Court Rebuff 
| A military court at Ft. Meade, 


Md., said on Friday, in the 
same case to be argued here 
Wednesday, that the answer is 
“no.” 

Counsel for Army Maj. Ron- 
ald E. Alley claim the answer 
should be “yes.” The accusa 
tions against Alley, they argue, 
are simply other ways of charg- 
ing that he (and athers who 
face similar charges) committed 
treason. 

His attorneys’ present efforts 
to halt his court-martial by 
Federal injunction are techni- 
cally aimed at Defense Secre- 
tary Charlies E. Wilson and 
Army Secretary Wilber M. 
Brucker. United States Attor- 
ney Leo A. Rover has moved 
to dismiss the challenge, on 
grounds that it has no merit 

On its face, a defense claim 
that the charge against a de 
fendant should be stated in 
stronger terms, if at all, may 
seem strange indeed. 


Justifiable Legal Reason 


But there is a justifiable le- 
gal reason for this approach. 
It is to try to quash the court- 
martial, for his attorneys say 
the law is clear that treason 
can be prosecuted only'‘in a 
civilian court. 

If they should 
attorneys 


succeed, Al- 
would take 


jury might not indict him, and 


isecondly, they say if he were 


indicted, they are convinced 
they could win the case in court 
because they say he is inno- 
cent 

It is more difficult to obtain 
a conviction on treason than 
on almost any other crime. 

The gravity which the Found- 
ing Fathers attached to that 
offense is underscored by the 
fact that ji. is the only crime 
specifically defined in the Con- 
stitution, which states: 

“Treason against the United 
States, shall consist only 
levying war against them, or 


in adhering to their enemies, | 
‘giving them aid and comfort. 
‘No person shall be convicted 
of treason unless on the testi- 


mony of two witnesses to the 
same overt act, or on confes- 
sion in open court. 

“The Congress shall have 
power to declare the punish- 
ment of treason, but no attain- 
der of treason shall work cor- 
ruption of blood, or forfciture 
except during the life of the 
person attainted.” 


Another Legal Move 


But if a grand jury were to 
indict Alley for treason, it 
should be noted, his attorneys 
have another legal string to 
their bow 

They say there cannot be an 
indictment for treason growing 
out of the Korean conflict, be- 
cause it was not a “war” as 
stated by the constitutional 
definition, but only a “police 
action.” . 

Alley's counsel maintain that 
a decision to the contrary by 
the Court of Military Appeals 
on the “war” dispute about the 
Korean hostilities was errone- 
ous 

The immediate subject of al! 
this legal activity, the 34-year- 


in| 


ints, before law officer 
urtis L. Williams, who 


'was hospitalized until March 11,/holds' a powerful role in the 
1055: that he had tuberculosis, | case 


and that a portion of a lung 
was removed. 


Food Comes First 


Alley has not been wanting 


| for legal assistance. 


In addition to two military 


attorneys, Lieut. Col. William 


“I made up my mind,” he 7. Logan and First Lieut. James 
said in amplification, “that the |, Brandvik. three Washington 
first thing in my life is £0iM€ civilian attorneys have been 


to be food from now on. 


directing and will continue the 


His home town is Salsbury jurisdictional challenge on the 


Cove, Bar Harbor, Maine, where |* 


‘treason” dispute: Ford OF. 


his mother still lives. With his Young (a colonel in the Army 
wife and two small children— | Reserve and commanding offi- 
‘a girl 7, a boy 6—Alley now'cer of the 306th Armor Group, 
lives at Dorsey, Md., near Ft.'a Reserve unit), Josiah Lyman 


Meade. 
Alley'’s whole adult life has 


and I. William Stempil. 


The prosecution is headed by 


been spent in the military serv-|Maj. Joseph M. Kelly, assisted 
ice. He entered the National by First Lieut Allan A. Pines. 


Guard in 1939. and two years. 
later joined the Army. Two 
years after that, he was com- 


Alley’s Black Friday 


For Alley, Friday was a bad 


missioned a second licutenant. day all around. All defense mo- 


On August 12, 


1950, he was tions were rejected, including 


sent to the Far East. When the an impassioned plea to dismiss 
court-martial began he said he the charges on grounds they in- 


was ready to stay 
years’ service—‘if they 
me.” 

He was still in Valley Forge 


for 30 cluded vague “catch-all” allega- 
want’ tions. 


Prosecuting attorney Kelly 
maintained, and Col. Williams 


Army Hospital at Phoenixville,|/ruled, that there cannot be 


Pa., when he received the first | 
set of “charges and specifi- 
cations” accusing him of violat- 
ing the Articles of War and the 
Uniform Code of Military Jus 
tice 

There have been five more 
changes in the allegations 
against him since that time. 


Specifications 


In their present form, the 
specifications allege that he: 

® Requested several enlisted 
men to give the enemy infor-' 
mation on the “tables of organ- 
ization and equipment of vari- 
ous units of the U. S. Army.” 

® Gave the enemy “data con- 
cerning U. S. Army artillery.” 

® Submitted to enlisted men, 
a questionnaire for informa- 
tion on their religious and po- 
litical affiliations, addresses, 
and other matters. 

® Participated in and led dis- 
cussion groups sponsored by 
the enemy, communicated with 
the enemy, and made state- 
ments to fellow prisoners 
imical” to the United States 
interests 

® Disclosed to the enemy the 
method used by the prisoners 
to “alert against the approach 
‘of the enemy’ when prope 
'ganda studies were scheduled. 

® Gave the enemy “data con- 
cerning the use of and method 
of fire direction of U. 5S. Army 
artillery.” 

© Participated in “committees, 
clubs, parties” sponsored by the 
enemy; accepted quarters near 
enemy headquarters for “facil- 
itating” communication with 


“treason” 


unless there is a 
showing of “animus” toward 
the United States—or “a defi- 
nite attempt to betray the 
United States.” This, they said, 
was not charged against Alley. 

The defense contends this is 
“sophistry.” They argue that 
by their very nature the kind 
of allegations made against Al- 
ley imply an intent to aid the 
enemy's interests, as against 
those of the United States. 

That is where the issue will 
stand on Wednesday when ar- 
tilleryman Alley will get a day 
off from his court-martial to 
hear out in District Court the 
rest of the argument on 
whether he should or should 
not have been charged with 
treason. 


Congressmen Barred 


From Baltic Areas 
MOSCOW, Aug. 28 #—The 


“in. Soviet Government today 


turned down a request by two 
United States Congressmen to 
visit the Baltic republics. This 
area has been closed to Ameri- 
cans since its wartime incorpo- 
ration into the Soviet Union. 

The request was made by 
Rep. Joe Holt (R-Calif.) and 
Rep. John J. Rhodes (R-Ariz.), 
who have just returned to Mos- 
cow from a flying trip to the 
Ukraine. They are trying to get 
their visas extended in order to 

ake a motor trip south of 
Moscow 


them; frequently conversed, cO- Minister to Retire 


operated and associated with 
the enemy, and wrote “articles 
and other materials” for their 
use. 


/ Record te Date 


All of these charges, 


Reuters 


STOCKHOLM, Sweden, Aug. 


28—Finance Minister Per Edvin 
Skoeld resigns Monday after 22 
years as a Minister to go into 
it retirement. It is not yet known 


should be noted, center on the’ who will succeed him. 


SF OO OO OS" } 


_A"® 


Lewis & Thos. Saltz... 1409 


’ 


ev THs 


——_—.- 


| 


old Alley, calmly looked on) 


a ~ 
| ) 
‘ceedings last week while the| hema 


the new | 


curit rise ’ 
ate Omice Bidg 


during the .court-martial pro- 


In Congress 
TODAY 


House 
nent til) Jan. 3 
Pe 
‘m-American Activities Comm 
1 oc. Mra  Debdora 


ittee 
tx Mr Landy 
other, of Busene Landy. Reem 225 
Senate 
adiournment till Jan. 9 
Civil Service Subcommittee —10 «&. ™ 
and 2 5». m. Hearings inte abuses of se- 


procedures. Room 135. Sen- 


MtIMLEMES S137 8M 
SEE YOUR TRAVEL AGENT 


_ , 
., 


z 
i. = 


seem’) 
Sy 
1 ee D. ¢. 


1509 K St. N.W,, 


plieffs 


Serenity 


is here 


. . » draped into a 
column of rayon matte 
jersey in the quiet of 
a new warmed brown 
fashion calls cognac 


$45 


Second Floor F Street and 
at Silver Spring 


Upper Conn, Avenue 


’ 


FINAL 


%, 


WEEK 
NCE 


of our 


CLEARA 


IN A FEW SHORT DAYS, our traditional 
semi-annual! Clearance will come to a close. Re- 
markable savings are now in effect on selected 
groups of fine men’s clothing, furnishing, hats, 
shoes and women’s wear. Sizes may be broken 
and assortments incomplete, but whatever you 
find here that you can use now or for Fall & 
Winter will prove a worth-while investment. 


WHAT DO YOU NEED? 


Selected groups on sale now at remarkable savings. 
Men’‘s Summer & Fall Suits, Topcoats & Outercoats, 


Dresswear, Sports Jackets & Slacks, White & Fancy 
Shirts, English Raincoats, Neckties, Handkerchiefs, 
Robes, Walk Shorts, Sports Shirts, Pajamas, Under- 
shorts & Undershirts; Shoes & Hats; Women’s Fall 
and Winter Suits and Coats, Summer Dresses, 


Sportswear, English Raincoats, Berets, Scarves, etc. 


CTL 


LLEWIS & TH°S. SALTZ 


| L409 G StreetsN. W. 


‘EXecutive 31-4343 


i ae te ee te ie ae ae 


$T 


7 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
ae Monday, August 29, 1955 


Civil Liberties Union 


Probes 


Curb on News 


Anniversary 


Mr. and Mrs. George A. 
Finch, both native Washing- 
tenians, celebrated their 50th 
wedding anniversary yester- 
day at their home, 4000 Vir- 
ginia st.. Chevy Chase, Md. 
All of their five children and 
15 grandchildren were pres- 
ent. Finch is in private law 
practice here. 


More Red ChinaTroops 


Are Reported in Tibet 


CALCUTTA. India. Aug. 28 ® 
Some 2000 Chinese Communist 
troops have arrived at Yatung, 


Tibet. 15 miles from the border }"" 


of India, it was reported today 
The newspaper Statesman 
said in a dispatch from Kalim- 


pong that the Reds are occupy-|* 


ing newly completed barracks 


and improvised tent towns over)" 


a 200-square-mile area. This is 


the closest Chinese Communist... 
come to the "= 


troops have ever 


Indian border, the dispatch 


,are scheduled at 


The American Civil Liberties! 


. 
But it must be kept in mind 
Union has begun an investiga- | that “access to Government 


‘tion into whether Government| news by mass media of com- 
agencies are withholding too!}munications is the heart of 
much information from the pub-|4emocratic government.” 
lic A former foreign correspond- 
rent, Allen Raymond, will con- 
' ACLU’s executive director, |duct the study. 
Watrick Murphy Malin, ex-| His study will spotlight both 
cerned that in the name of | ‘Government agencies and the 
‘security’ the restrictions are so| manner in which these policies 
great that information is de\are carried out. 
nied the mass modia and a sys-| Earlier this month a House 
tem of Government censorship|Government Operations sub- 
may be developed. committee began an inquiry 
Malin said ACLU recognized|into whether the Eisenhower 
the needs of national! security | Administration is keeping too 
‘in a time of tension” may re-|much informaticn from the 
‘quire “certain curbs” i public. 


21 Special Events Listed 
/At District Playgrounds 


special eo-seers) & ad. and water 

‘ le rs aymen 0th and pr ne 
playgrounds) r<« football field day 
tit? ‘baee Terrell ‘. ae 


ages 


Twenty-one events! end crafts display 


by the D. C. Recreation Depart-| 4°," * 

ment this week. The activities ' under, Ghav? ans ‘Com. 
‘ aly er hever ate CO 

follow soot” Connecticut 4 


; see > bul —s. 
n 0 modeling maidens 


MONDAT 
Haves Stn ond = ote, ne. 10 een- agers 
i? and uneer THURSDAT 
sw. 3-30 DP. m.. Sa ~- Pa between N. Capttel ane 
oon '¥ : ave 7 rafte exhib 
years Logan %4 ‘and O sts ne. Spm 
: : _ 4a . 
ades ws? nas and Sherrer av ,. : “ a ae “ Se aoe 
> ™ MO. night pageant acd . 
under 
TUESDAY ; FRIDAY 
' d Washington oe One C MS. 08.. 3 


ges: Kal 2.3 Million Fugitives 
av. 3 D8 mis ° and te BONN, Aug. 28 W—Chan- 


; aee8 ; 
™ «> hh on tee? 1? n.« . ™ ’ 

_ snewer sult contest, 12 8 cellor Konrad Adenauer’s gov-| 

ve av. 6 Dp. exh i dition 1 ” : 

. Park. D6ch and Oats ernment today said 2.3 million | 

crarl a ages East Germans have fled to the! 

; 


eratts Ata 


WEDNESD. ay 
ar ’ ‘ 
“Lanse! < * >. mm. arts West since 1949 


etemed 


Pi 
announces new 


luxury flights direct from Washington 


non-sToP...ST. LOUTS 
one-STOP... KANSAS CIT 


NeVer before have Washington air travelers had such fast luxu- 
rious service non-stop to St. Louis and one stop to Kansas City. 
You board your swift TWA Constellation at 6 pm—enjoy a de luxe 
dinner en route—and land at St. Louis Municipal Airport at 


8:03 pm with 


the whole evening before you. Kansas City-bound 


passengers arrive at 8:42 pm. It’s the newest, fastest, most luxuri- 
ous service ever offered direct from Washington National Airport. 

Make your reservations on this wonderful new service now. 
Service begins September 1. 


FOR IMMEDIATE RESERVATIONS 


your TWA travel agent or call TWA: 
STerling 3-4200 


Or visit one of TWA‘s conveniently located ticket officem 
SMatler Hotel + Willard Hotel * 716 Fourteenth Street 


Fly the Finest s+. FLY- 


TRANS WORLD AIRLINES 
U.S.A. + QUROPE + AFRICA > ASIA 


2 extra years... 
at no extra cost! 


b year Old 
Kentucky Straight Bourbon 


Those 2 extra years .of aging bring out the full. rich bourbon flavor. This is the same 
robust, full-bodied whiskey that has made James E..Pepper bottled in bond so famous. 
Now in an 86 proof STRAIGHT, it’s milder and lighter and wonderfully mellow. Enjoy 


STRAIGHT bourbon. at its finest...James E. Pepper, a great old name at a great new price. 


JAMES E. PEPPER 


|} BOTTLED-IN-BOND 6 YEARS OLD. a eS... + KENTUCKY STRAIGHT BOURBON WHISKEY, SVEARS AO, 86 PROOF, 


. 


ser Monday, August 29, 1955 


P egoy King Keeping) 5% a § Nancy Kelly Tapped for Repeat Job twtr eBay Duhon ss eee 


Nancy Sinatra returned from tomorrow. 


e HOLLYWOOD, Aug. 28 (INS)|Lollobrigida (when it comes tojexactly what an atomic attack 
Heart Throb Secret * cong oop hate. iyedhnd apanascumenggte will do if waged against ourjemoting in “Proud and Pro| yj JClRIzih lI sien 
time. * Roy made to New York was to A FRIEND of lon cities. fane” just in time for Frankie's < a 3 
Ly & F . g standing, ee = ; A ae 
f , A : ie the inotlor out about play- Tony Muto, who helps every-| IF SANDY Lewis should Bow out of “Carousel,” and nis ae 


- a ¢ ‘ t T 
NEW YORK, Aug. 28—Peggy |at the moment concerns the oy at l h one who comes to Washington|telephone and say he’s Lene|* Sry in Time Magazine. | NATIONAL - een 
bili ‘ Big! | i “" role she . ‘But Nancy takes it all in stride! 
King is keeping her new heart |P wend - pe WH icreated on with problems, has done aj|Horne’s son, hang up, because} 4 : : “AMERICA’S FIRST THEA 
throb out of the Jimelight. He's ee York. - Bu Khrush-| Se Broadway ing great, just great CinemaScope it isn’t true. When I talked to| ,, ves ro _ sagen ag iii Sve, S:90, Met Wed. © Set 8:30 
pianist Joe Guercio, who used|chey and Zhukhov > > Se asi featurette called “Survival of|Lena, who is appearing at the, llona Massey, who has been ||MO Tamil. ehiaL. 


Patt! Page and Gated Staten, but President] oe | oem |‘ Fittest” Sands in Las Vegas, she said, “I) so boing ‘to. stay. at her( ian ann 
u ent| >5 See ee eee , | | ATRICIA MURS 

now caresses - on A nny MR mel Sear that : ig aa > \ Tony is 20th’s representative|only have one son and he is) ‘husband, Donald Dawson’s 

che Gite ten Dek Se ienetand'tneah thot On the >. Ca aed ¢ [“ae~~=6—s jim: Washington and supervisor/13 and he and my daughter,| ‘home for another two weeks|} TL | i d | 

jus LaRosa... guests political opponents) (=~ ee ert =. jof Movietone News. Tony’s|Gail, are with me now. I never) before she starts her TV series. A (NG an 

Rubirosa is | would use the invitation as a 3 Jack Warner.t ; featurette was filmed at Yucca|heard of this young man.” Jack Dempsey is the guest 

straying from waa jcampaign weapon. A Big Four ey 4 i Ran *"s |Flats during the recent atomic pele: Myyoe day. Bags - 

%sa Zsa . meeting would be a different] © - Naéthar me tomer ree gs r SNAPS: Freddie Karger has,|opens his new Malibu Pier 

Best bet to be matter ... Red Buttons visited ~ gave his okay for the ania a woe @ United) dimmed the torch he carried 

the next Miss the neighborhood where he was| | — Sieteh’ tn aw tmaltend. s Government believes|¢,. so long for Jane Wyman 

R hei ngold: born (3d st. and Ave. B) for a this is valuable defense prop-|}, dating Victoria Shaw, the 


Carol Toby . picture layout, and was ‘Private War’ NEWS I brought back from aganda because it se 


Famed Holly- mobbed by the neighbors. It . 
wood lawyer Miss Kilgallen |iook two police cars to rescue Suto Aion wed Chartien Europe is that Ernie Borgnine, 


Jerry Giesler is so fascinated |him from the thousands. Menten gehen whose “Marty” is continuing iT" TO 
by the role of the defense at- e Bae tas BS ite sweep the country as no COOL CRUISE HUMP REY 
STOCKHOLDER meetings! “The Private War of Major 


torney in “Deadfall”—the play | >... ssaxhelds the ol » other picture in recent years on wwe SS MT. VERNON 
in which Joanne Dru and John |/°T **8xHelds, the o d-fashioned| Benson.” The comedy con- |. 0 re CRUISES DAILY 
ot we: will appear on Broad-|‘ce cream parlor which Max! ¢inues at the Ontario. will be starerd in “The Baker's CAMs 2PM+ 8.30" BOGART 


| : THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
Dorothy Kilgallen | : ™ Louella Parsons: 7 


Gordon will open on 58th st. Wife.” MOONLIGHT coees CHARTERED vement 


way this fall—he'’s asked pro- 
ducer Martin Goodman to let |*!s autumn, should be fodder This delightful picture, which MOONLIGHT 2A%<! 


\for the feature writers. The 

him take a crack at the pole. « tockholdere include a cuvchie. | We & M. to Boost [om Raimu, the late French DA WANTS TO TALK 
when doin et the Philharmonic | ‘St 2” anthropologist, two . — actor, an Academy Award in TO YOU ..«-« 
plays Houston, Texas, this year. oo ee Seo See Salaries, Tuition a, bas Sewn bonget Wy Dun DIAL 
Norman Granz, the young im. | artists, two newspapermen, an Lancaster and Harold Hecht| | re!WQtnsan LANE 


presario, just made a special oe bm pen son Di col-} WILLIAMSBURG, Va., Aug. | for Borgnine and Sophia Loren,| | #44 Avt. 4 6 st. sw.-wa t-2000 AD. 2-4680 
flying trip down there to get) wrartha Raye has been in Las 28 (‘~The William and Mary|the Italian threat to Gina 
it in. writing. | Vegas, where she flew for her Board of Visitors approved - Seteietetetagetss: EP DOI 
A NEW YORK court has or-|5ahara_ birthday party . + ..|Proposed pay raises Saturday AiR-COMDITIONED to: oor Contort 


dered Lady Iris Mountbatten Gary Cooper, currently deco- night for faculty members at 


to pay of her long-suffering rating the beach at Southamp- the college. Th ) , 
salami vendor at the rate.of $5 tom, won't be there long, girls. — e raises which 44s KEITH § °° 


from $500 to $750 will he 
r week or suffer the dis-/Picture commitments call him range 
shsoaure of the judge. The to-| back to the Coast . . . Cooling for the biennium 1956-58. LAST 2 DAYS 


tal tab owed by her Ladyship is| ‘hbught: Up in Harlem, evan-| Gov. Thomas B. Stanley had Wak Disneys OPEN 10:45 ROW OF Y , ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S | 

$150, or quite a lot of pickles) gelist rege 4 Grace baptizes his | authorized the boagd to present per call “me . i TO CATCH 
. Washington's biggest buzz’ converts with a fire hose. salary hikes to his budget ad- : a | ; | A THIEF mT 
visory committee which will me | as SELECAST . Reener O00* Ov vecrmcovcn | 


. meet here Sept. 9. 
Show Times For Monday James M. Robertson of or | a PALACE 


_ Folk rector of the board, said | exif 5 Spee... puincten 
et 13.3. 4 6 & end 10 ~ the increases would be financed Ti a TLD -- ROW OFS meter pecteret 


BARRON AurgiTibareR— Tee Ce | UTTLe — “Prom Et in 
at 5 7.38. end 9:45 p.m by raising student, tuition at 


am Ps i : ARCHIE he 
eaTio xAc — "xing ad’ an | ™ and 9.50 ». m the Williamsburg, Richmond| “B TECHECOLOR NOT AS A Ff DIF NE FOSTER. DIANA LYNN 
OLNEY — “Time of Your Life.” at | METROPOLITAN R< “ land Norfo branches of the — ">? STRANGER SY: 
4:30 p. m. Tuesday m. 2:06, 4.35. 7.1 college anil Wak tevedtor So = | oe JOHN MCINTIRE - xe wemen . com canner . oe Ure 
agp om, TS) 205.23. |crease in Bppropriations from| MacDONALD 
10 $38 


=. > mm 
— “Not at @ oc? " ot the state. 
1:54, 25. ana 


Ginna Ge HAVILLAND Robert MITOHUM 
Frm SMATRR «6 Gore (PAM 


~~" Noterious.”” ot 6 7:50 and 
ANNE BAXTER 


; 7 Pup Prom Beneath ead 0:01 | , 
4. Ss “2 « “Gteesure while 6 at Rs aaa = | ROCK HUDS NW 
Brain.” at 12:40, pry s jULIE ADAM 


Pie ¢'t° |1 Dead, 22 Hurt in Crash || PLAY TY 
SEOUL, Aug. 28 (#—One!| Oren Fo: 1220. Opn Z 
Korean was killed and 22 


. others Seriously injured last! Sa oo , 
Sanitary Board night when a fight train) = : Lillle 


plowed into the baek end of a — 7 | ) | Cenawmene ~ See Listing under 
Lets 7 Contracts Seoul bound passenger express) & WAK: J | me oe ole | ~ th Per yo KE as 7-3000 ant SaIVE- al Me AN 


at Chonji, 75 miles‘gouth of the Dia ' | “4 | | . 
The Washington Suburban \capital ~~ R BEY |) ae Tat ST 200 1 * Pe 
Sanitary Commission an : FROM HERE - go . Put fe at | Jonn dane. Be sorter plane 
a © yyenend that it has , . . ." gt 8:30 . Marciano. et lg ey 
awarded contracts totaling ‘ ; “a = “MISTER ROBER ‘e 3 ——— ~~ edison 
$205,636 to low bidders on seven . , TO r | » - N ITY Heary . Jemes| - torte fev gh tices, Kids thai the cf 
projects involving construction TOO HOT : im ae ”. S: ion os: | In CinemaScope: “HOUSE OF BAM- = a 
of water and asewer mains, , 7 : He 2 *. | | Stack. Shirley Temeqesal._ wath MT. VERNO} 
house connections and storm | rO HANDLE Jit dai ae — a 49 at BOOKER A... 

ST ve - +, L, 
drains = We is bt ista Vision ae caEVER i : 


Contracts for water anal ~~ ruvure _ Children Under 12 Free with Bob Hope and James uper CinemaScope 
Big Pree Playground Now Open! | Boe by ny Open at 7. Tw 
sewer mains and house connec- _, Sik PrCKue , OF THRE PHAR- ||; : Coeser_26 Georse_M._ Cohen te Fop-Aaction 


tions were awarded in Mont- ee cn tn ok Sea ALLEN 7°. 3:22°%.Jec* exh; || | LANGSTON 22% & bewr'e te Ht fy PRIZE. OF GOLD” 
. - bear.” bs 7 tn e160 OF THE R * CinemaBcope - ema ants Open 2:45 PIM. 

gzomery County for 18 proper-| Fins —"= echnicolor. at 7:08, 9:25 wit POXPIRE i oT S .. 

ties un Margate and Glenwild ZALVERT Pr Park wo. Ol 2.2088 Jack | | ith Jane Russell, Jef? Chandler HEY "RODE vi nee 


. hs 6-45. “LAND “or = BETHES Tt 10°35. Color Cartoon’ Kid. 
rds. and six on Black Oak dr.) n/. ARAGHS” _ (Cinemascope »* t] “LAN v = PHAR. ies | Pree! iracle Pairyiand! 


and Boyer pl. Simifar contracts . | IESG.” Merle Overon, 8:35 oni. __| | SONS,”  Cipemascone + Techaicolor K-B THEATERS ee GARDEN OF EVIL’ 


: a ates t a tt 
were award o4 Prince CENTRAL Perkins Me thousands, Al 7-10, 925. AIR-CONDITIONED | 
Georges County for 458 prop-| 2. on - wos 2B as / 

. . 11°00 CHEVERL UN. 4-0106, | Ernest 4859 MacArthur BLAC ~ 
erties in Palmer Park, 19 in { . -? 28. oer OUTLAWS DAUGH-| | TY at 6-30. mi nine kt’ | | | MacAR b Bivd. EM. 2-4600 | | kK “HORSE 
the Berkshire subdivision, 23. SS eer = aian aa : “WA Geaea || va ene, Some 

ht in the Miller Estat d KENNEDY Siar HYATTSVILLE | Walt Disney's} | THIRD WEEK! 
eight in iller Estates an - Ll] | “DAVY CROCKETT.” | Technicolor ' 
one individual property on Law- io * #46. Y eyihess at 7:20. 9 oe biiterbod Disney pratarente. C. Mine. vis rene r 
rence pl., Industrial City atin avi & Jeateacy? ’ Chariton 00. ye. en ’ t 6:15. fs ROUTE s| RE é- At 

° ° . _——— a —~ wy 75200. | a ai D> m. Short subjects at 7:30 a4 | Chil ree! 

A contract of $67,278 was - +» Come see Free _ Packing. Le KAYWOOD WA. 37-8899. Ernest | | | 22 nf TRASPER” LF RRR DAVY CROCK- 

awarded for construction of a ¢ for ope ’ Borgnine ip nes Coffee, with our compliments, in ae 5 TO EVERY 
warming ¢ ed M T “HILD! Cartoon 
- . : jor . 6°05, EL + € comedy, ARTY . the Piccadilly Lounge 7 to 16 ra Carnival at 8-05! 
1215-foot-long sterm,drain pipe 1} raDY * toe) 1 8:10, 9:55. a ‘a | ncene | | rR IN W Is 
and a concrete box eulvert on 5 4:40 605 || VIERS MILL W™0', se) || COLONY sons". < Sico’ | es 80" Jefieey 
Grafton st. aand Kirkside dr. , SAVOY Sh “coach Ro! | Collins. “LAND OF THE PHAR. The Continental Cinema ‘rb Aiton - “rH KING.“ 10 43 
in Chevy Chase. 7 | {5 9:25. "YEL GON) | 99S ok” Tectatecle LAST 3 DAYS! ‘MOVIE, AND. Tv 
' a: , AIN.” Ma 2, 3:00 : 


WITH PAMOU 
: itehcock’s famotts thriller.| |] STAR DON OUS MOVIE AN 
Us h Cary 


ifred 
RA. 6-2400. “MARTY NOT with tw 
Braeet e+... ine . 35, ingri . reams , Ciaude Rains. 


i) ELLES 
Jeanne ( rain, 8: a APEX 4813 Mass. Ave. WO. 6.4600 


MONTAN 
‘4 —— ~ ——$——_— : nN’ HIt) : 
For The .; STLVER vay i: P REIN , Connes estive Winner! “MARTY” | | ADVA ANCE IN PRICES 


TIME OF , : MATINEES | ny OF THE pam STATE Po! Owen, Va | EVss ee || SUNSET DRIVE- Ik leetburo Pike 
YOUR LIFE | “4 Today & Tom w 2 pm Gites s ing. | 160. 4 as 8:15 P | Eleanor, Parker, Glenn Pord, | LANCLEY x H. ay el lc 
“Tickets Now On tole for 3 Ldbor Dey Shows 


TAKOMA "svi Parkins. RA. 3-4! CtnemaScope. Color on ee ne 
Deri D: po WILSON 1730 Wilson Blvd. maScope. at 1:15 HARAO 20. 7-28 & 
ris 2 | : -.4 
ad RODE, jA. 7-1480 7:30 >. m 


Call Y 
Whitehall 6-8100 «Sot. 5 a fen 2-3 -6:38 Pe. Weer. Donne R ed. 6 o as Ernest Borgnine. Betsy Biair. FLOWER . ‘725 Flower Avene 
TIVOLI] SO. 5:i%e...2°8D _ OF! maeee | free Parking JU. 8-166 
— PHARAONS ic Grand Pri oe wi inner Internationa! |i mrnest Berenia Bets Siaie tn a. HONE | : 
—— LAST 4 sabi Whey Yok Spel tah TA fg 21 Nise ta ||| Sante -E5 %o.030% 10:i5>.m|) | SUPER CHIEF DRIVE-IN 
ERS” Ll gmt BUCKING! ja. 7.0444 NAYLOR. 28th end Ale. Ave. SE. -8700, 8401 Indian Head Hwy. Kid. 
ane Poe ; Marilyn Monroe Tom E PREE PARKING LW 2-4000 OF Por: Cis rk Gable in “BOLDIE 


oe ator 
ovens at 3 mp ren” RTUNE.” ee 
5400 “THE SEVEN YEAR 1 +4 Jack Hawkins. Joan Collins in “LAND | |color et & inemaSco 
3 # WEEKS! UPTOWN 2. Suiee A" Pets) | cancmasctre soy Sercoononie || | SPSHETAMNA AS Ceemokcone | [ie aad leita OP aN Ta ye 
nd 5 10:40 


NA’ 


Borgnine. 216 4 0s 4:00 7 a at 1:00 5D. m.} | 
2 SHOWS TODAY 274 8.30 PM. WINELAND THEATERS | ARLINGTON tts ROCKVILLE DRIVE- In back-to-school ovarty ed 


Kiddies on Friday n ight C 
ancy o 
ark Gad Susan Hayward VU 8&8. Route 240— Rock ie Mad eities and prizes ao 


Clark 
A BAD GIRL! THI» C | N t 1 AM fh || See Te? Par 7100 indies Mecd | SOLDIER OF FORTU uE P Gates Open at 7.30 
ak t ABC Dal VE-I ty 5.8 107.2555 1 | | “imemeseose. Stereophonie Soun “DAVY CROCKET?T” ||PALMER DRIVE-IN CEDAR 
: Open 7 ida} P toot ' 4 : e ( teolor s¢ i~ 
niet Sy TOTS Roman ‘ Yan Herlin, GLEBE oe — Ay Parker nat Eth fos = ire Palmer Hwy.. via Landover Rd te 


-4266 Rt ‘Gg . is p - 704, left 3 miles, or Def one . - te 
STARTS THURSDA RESERVED SEATS HOW ON SALE . Ernest Borgnine Betsy Blair | ZENDA™ ite Enicolor) at 10-457 OF 704. turn right, Kiddies lack Hi 
r e “LAND OF THE] | MA Fx “Dis RIZON J. THE PHARAOHS. . 
For Today & Future Performances PiARAOMS.” Cinemascope Grand Prize Winner International SHEEP pou” af bos b. m in CinemaScope and color, at 9:50 
+ 


Also 


* . 
Bex Office Opens 10 am. te $15 p.m. Technicolor, at 9:55 Festiva! Sore eninomery | in RI DERS OF 
order Oy at Sex Foot st aso — ||| JEFFERSON ** eo arse Coe 
ow ee TOTS Best Food s' m1. Pett ' L dies ck -to- “shoo! Dart r for the 
4 H é Walt Disney's OCKETT. Ss next ay night. Cand 
— ‘CINERAMA HOLIDAY’ ANACOSTIA ‘41? Cnet (orcs "|| | inc Orie Wily PRonriEn novelties sad prises ants 


, ra ETT, in Wai Diners s “DAVY I | Fess Parker ee Matinee 

ept. KIN WILD a m Br ea poe | 

- : A M D a | T SF 7 A T : Q ) wan omens, <A pee Si abs Reps din BYRD 104 South Weyne St VILLA E DU. 7 vaaes,, fact e Hawk. | | | QUEENS CHAPEL 
o> ©T om . ane & » BH 


ja. 7-733 , || THE Paste % Cinemascove and} || DRIVE-IN THEATRE 


— - Academy Award Winner Grace Kelis i | . aot 26. Also Randoiph ; 
Air Conditioned ~~ $533 Pa. Ave SE ‘THE COUNTRY GIRL’ ) : : “CARSON City” (Tech.) WA. 73-3900 Ager Road and Hamil. 


iw. 4-7311 Ring Crosby William Holden 4 | | ton 8: West ratt ' The 
= ——-§% Great Technicolor Mits on wee | on a 64114. Mari yn | | : RGEST SCREEN. ’ 
Pregram!—yomes ON June rye in “SEVE! | 12 speakers to every car. Just | 
py 47 a >) &. * mi 
13th BE Streets HW. Metropolitan a“ _ - ) ROTH THEATRES q Ais 7 ¢ and | i from District line 
N ON . 


Reck 2 IFICE! at 7:54 NOW PLAYING 
OBSESSION,” at 6:15. 9:55 (2S 9.2424 Jeff Mor re ST in the Wasbington Ares 


1336 “a York Ave. N w | : > Be the FIRST to ‘BEE 
ATLANTIC wadiole A “¢" an Atlantic PLAZA 3-4777 | VERN( row in “THIS ISLAND) || THe WORLD'S LARGEST SCREEN 
r Be: 


EARTH” (Tech.} 


ges of =e years Png “hits at Renest Vr \ ae “wn : —— Tues. and Wed.: Danny Kaye in 
THIS WeEK! poms & MARTY.” at 6 13 7:55, “MAGNIF N BSESSION’ “THE SECRET LIFE OF WAL- 
iil y ' Rk ROCK HUDSON TER MITTY” and “JUMP INTO U x 
ADMISSION 50c CONGRESS > Petar ||| Leper th Berween = The Be am a 
. LA. 6-3112. Glenn Ford Imuous from dusk n7:30pm 
hty ee tac] . JESSE '. “THE BLACKBOARD KIDDIES under 12 aleare PRE 
IR nS 0 PreVIGW] | | catdese Under 19 Pree | || nox Fy MBL dr nse Me Se SURGES t,t ig hho Rood 
echn “ i n “THE RE 
OMLY 16 NOON te PMD Ee to eelor. at @:18 . ri THE Cowboy, at 730. 


TICKETS OW 5 at non oqreee ied _ Burt Lancaster, Frank | = —_—_— —- -—- LEE HWY -ARL VD 
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Open Daily, 10:00 A.M. to 16:00 P.M Sundays, 1:00 te 10:06 P.M. And See Both Features Ferlta Husker & The Hast Puppies Pes to-00 and Technicolor. at 6:15, Ernest ree nine, ety Blair |} Shurch America’s most beautifu! 


‘MA § | | Drive-In located between 7 C: 

RADIO BROADCASTS icurel, Md seen Coffee Served in Our Lounge heen Fo fag EY oy va qithes Arline. 

| a Ive ca 

Last Showing : a LAUREL 5.20 PARK “™ oe St. SE BEST THEATERS on Bird. turping at Gallows Rd. ane 
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WEDNESDAY BROS. 9-50 pM and Hie Texas Wildcats Nee is "10:00 arenes, — . Day. James Cs ' SYLVAN ¢x. Cagney | in “RUN POR] || Richard Widmark. in Golor, at 8:27 
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WIN FREE PONIES CAPITOL Capitol Heights, Ma. obe vapebra Baa CovER amend O'Brien in “WAR. “WAKE “OF THE RED 
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GE LADY IN WN,’ “BIEGE AT | RED RIVER" (Color). Continuous From Dusk 


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CANNING CONTESTS =| ROBERT CUMMINGS | ihhiten Sh iovi tae SEE ioe oct ihaas VIRGINIA irs, 5°%, FSi 
BABY & PET CONTESTS Wilkens oat (Technical "ie —— COCHISE” (Color . met a Parkins 


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2 ON CEN TOR I! ° = r 


Bing Crosby. Grace Kelly 


a Z : i. 


THE WASHINGTON 
ae! Monday, August 29, 1955 


POST and TIMES HERALD 


Hurricane Is Expected 


Near Bermuda Today 


“Se a * *\colony earlier, evacuated its 


MIAMI, Fia., Aug. 28 " —** 
Cloudy-eyed hurricane Edith 


Associated Press 

The Civil Service Commission 
announced yesterday that the 
number of Government policy- 
making or confidential posi- 
tions below ‘the Cabinet, and 
sub-Cabinet level dropped. from 
1134 to 1122 during the first 
half of 1955. 

The Commission said only 253 


six — Saturday. They fllew 
arner Robins Air Force 
Base at Macon, Ga., and “at 
flying the storm from there. 
Highest winds in the whirl-' 
‘ing storm are found near the'| 
center and winds ‘of at least 
(75 miles an hour—hurricane 
\force—are found 100 miles to 
the northeast and east and 40 
miles to the southwest. Gales 
‘extend an additional 200 miles 
on the northeast and 100 miles 
to the southwest. 


VFW to Seek Food 
For Flood Victims 


Members of the Veterans of, 
Foreign Wars will canvass the! 
West Lanham Hills, Md., area! 
| Wednesday and Thursday to! 
| pick up canned food supplies 
for shipment to the Wilkes- 
‘Barre area in flood-hit Eastern 
| Pennsylvania. | 

Trucks will make the door- 
to<ioor canvass from 6 p. m. 
turned te the north while $till islands with some to 9 p. m. Organizing the 
about 1000 miles away from the 38,000 persons. drive are members of Free 

The U. 8S. Alr Foree, which State Post No. 8950, of West 


American coastline. It twice 
erdssed the path taken earlier scouted Edith from the British Lanham Hills. 


swung ponderously into a 
northward path today that may 
take its 100-mile winds near | * 
Bermuda and away from the ; | 
United States coast line. tte _ . 

It was 240 miles south of the 
British resort islands and 1020 {_ 
miles east of Daytona Beach, 
Fla., at 5 p. m. (EST). Storm 
forecasters said it was moving 
at 8.miles an hour, a slight in- 
cre in speed. 

“Movement during the next 
12 to 18 hours is expected to be 
between north. and northeast 
at about 8 to 9 miles per hour,’ 
followed by some acceleration’ |’ - 
in forward speed afterward.” > ,* ! 
the advisory said. 

“If this movement is main- 
tained the hurricane should) 
pass to the east of Bermuda! 
Monday.” See 

Edith, fifth tropical storm of let ees 
the year, moved northwest af-| Reute of Hurricane Edith. 
ter its discovery Aug. 27: It --— - | 
slowed to a crawl Saturday and 

360 coral 


wert? ann 


Volunteers End 
‘Stay on Rifle Range 


The District's 
ship Volunteer Training Unit. 
of the Marine Corps Reserve 


has returned from its two- 


week rifle training at Parris 


Island, S. C. 

The unit, the first of its kind. | 
is cosponsored by the National’ 
Rifle Association and com- 
‘manded by Warrant Officer | 
‘Clark e... Baldwin of Annan-| 
dale, 


Marksman- 


of the 1122 jobs listed in that 
category on June 30 had been 


petitive civil service system. 
The remainder of these 
“Schedule C” jobs had been 
created by setting up 336 new 
positions outside the competi- 
tive processes and by shifting 
533 Schedules A and B,\u 
which are the other job cate- 
gories exempted from civil 
service ulrements. 

As of June 30 these were 
more than two million positions 
under the competitive system. 

President Eisenhower set up 
the Schedule C classification by 
executive order March 31, 1953. 
| The Commission said policy- 


— and confidential posi- 


removed directly from the com- to 


Schedule C Policy Jobs Decline 


tions are placed in gprs 
C and exempted ftom civil 

service requirements in order 
make a clear distinction 
between the career service and 
positions which exist primarily |,,, 
to carry out the objectives of|' 

administration. 


any national 

C positions may 
be created by the Commission 
upon request of the various 
Federal agencies. The Com- 
mission said’ it had rejected 
1127 such requests, or five more 
than the net number approved 
as of June 30. 

In the first year after the 
order was issued, the net num- 
ber of approved Schedule C 
jobs. was 980. This total 
increased by 44 in the year 
ended June 30. 


help you with your selection. 
convenient service 


coo. 


Have them custom-made by experts! 
Call NAtional 8-9800, Extension 208 


and an experienced decorating representative will call on you at 
your home. Let him show samples of patterns and colors ané 


onsburgh 


| Custom-Made Slipcovers! | 
| Traverse or Side Draperies! 
: 


No additional charge for this 


coo. coo. 


S 


Chinese Hold Goa Rallies |\U. N. Envoy Arrives 
Reuters NEW YORK, Aug. 26 # 
eons sgn & na. News Herve Alphand, France's newly 
per | reported repre-/appointed permanent delegate 
eetieds various uni ions, | 
youth, cultural and women’s the United Nations and rep- 
organizations held rallies in resentative in the U. N. Secu- 
Canton and Wuhan Saturday rity Council, arrived today by 


£ the liberation of Plane from Paris to assume his 
posts. 


From Washington .. . 
KLM “Pay-later Plan” offers you 
17 DAY AIR CRUISE OF 


EUROPE 
ae sao 


$71.00 down . . . 20 months to pay 


ington 5, 0.C., 
WORLD'S FIRST AIRLINE 


by Diane. ss 
Bermuda, only island in its 
immediate pene e is a group of 


— 


a Kenslaat 
Huge Plant 
For $405,000 —— — 


United Pres« 

The ~Government’s wartime 
chemical plant in Ashtabula 
Ohio, which cost $3.5 million 
has been sold at public auction 
to the Union Carbide & Chemi-| | 
cal Corp. for $405,000 in cash. | 

The General Services Admin-' 
istration said yesterday in an- 
nouncing the sale the best of- 
fer it got in sealed bids last 
year was $200,000. 

GSA Administrator Edmund 
F. Mansure said the sale will) 
not be final until its gets anti-| 
trust clearance from the Justice 
Department. This is the nor 
mal procedure where Govern- 
ment property costing more 
than $1 mililon is sold 

The auction, held at the 52. 
acre plant site, included al] 
machinery, fixtures and equip- 
ment. 

The plant was built in 1941 
to produce 70,000 tons of cal- 
cium carbide annually for the 
war effort. It was leased to pri-| 
vate operators from the end of 
World War II until it was put 
on a “standby basis” in Decem- 
ber, 1952. 


a 


India Buying Red Steel 


MADRAS, India, Aug. 28 
Government sources said here | 
today India will buy 50,000 tons’ 
of Russian steel at a cost of 
45.75 million dollars. The bulk 
will be delivered before Decem- 
ber and the rest early next 
year. 


- 


extra GO of Trigger-Torqu 
Angle-Poised ride. 


needed... 


For brake Service 
Sporting goods 
trailers 


or any other product or 

service you need for the 

home or business, 

look first in the 

YELLOW PAGES of 

your Telephone Directory. 

You save time and trouble 
, when you use this 

handy buying guide. 


THE CHESAPEAKE & POTOMAC 
TELEPHONE COMPANY 


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ask about our long, stretched-out terms! You can tailor your 


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summer Bandwagon Sell-A-Bration 


When you buy Ford you are getting America’s top car value. For, in 
a Ford you get brilliant styling, inspired by the Thunderbird . . . the 
the extra comfort of smoother 


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We've got the hottest deals in town because we've got the hottest car 
in the country. Ford's leadership sales pace puts us in a position to make 
you an extra-good deal right now! Get our top-dollar trade-in allowance 


on a brand-new '55 Ford. But hurry! Come visit us now during our 


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Also see your Ford Dealer for ~4/> used cars and trucks 


a 


Sf 


ms, 


D. C. Co-Op’ 
Suggested . 


due 


ity Life 


ww 


Sisiens Put 
On Sin by 


AREA NEWS 
. OBITUARIES 

WOMEN’S NEWS. 

RADIO, COMICS 


As CTC’s 


MONDAY, AUGUST 29, 1955 


19 


Evangelist 


Successor 


Former Member 
Of PUC Proposes 
Stock Ownership 
By City Residents 


A cooperative transit sys- 
tem, with thousands of Wash- 
ington area residents as te 
stockholders, is a proper suc- To 
cessor to Capital Transit, a aD 
former District Public Utili-| @% eg Se 
ties Commissioner said yes-| & y No 
terday. : * ai - ; : 

Gregory Hankin, who sat on 
the regulatory body during 
World War II, said such a coop- 
erative venture is superior to 
either “another private profit 
enterprise” or municipal own- 
ership. 


On It in Pulpits 
Strongly Backed 


The Rev. Dr. Charles B. 
Templeton, a leading Presby- 
terian Evangelist, yesterday 
defended the increased em- 
phasis evangelical Christians 
have been putting on sin. 

“Why is the church harping 
on sin in this enlightened gen- 
eration when we've learned all 
the workings of the mind? Sure- 


ly you don’t believe all that 
malarkey in the Bible?” are 
questions he is sometimes 
called on to answer,-he said in 
a sermon. 

One reason preachments on 
sin sound strange to modern 
ears is that the word “sin” has 


Planning Grants Due 
This Week to Start — 


Second Slum Project 


RDP ah ce aS a 
SW "Bee a 
, Oe , : i ‘> | 


¥ 
> 
Pe. 
> a 
ww, «8 
RS r 


_ a, 
, 


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x 


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. » 


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= ® \“_ 


BA 


tis 


o> 


Housing Agency 
Ready to Approve 
$700,000 Fund 
For Big NW Area 


By Robert C. Albrook 
Staff Reporter 


A Federal planning grant 
is slated for approval this 
week to launch the District's 


second major slum elimina- 
‘tion project—the “renewal” 


of the 925-acre Northwest 
“Wickedest Precinct” area 
between Massachusetts and 
Florida aves., containing a 
fifth of the city’s slums. 


He discussed the matter of 
finding a replacement for CTC, 
whose lease expires next Aw- 
gust 14, on Radio Station 
WUST. 

There are now “a number of 
groups who would be only too 
glad to take ofer the transit 


a ro. of its meaning, he mA “ae " %? 4 \ Yue ¥ oe 2 > e | James W. Follin, Director of 
Seep York yng ) Pye : ? |the Division of Slum Clearance 
Church. Nowadays sin may jane Urban Redevelopment of 
mean nothing more than a good the Housing and Home Finance 
time, he said, citing the title| Agency, said he expects to ap- 
a, Hy ~~ atechure, prove the advance “before the 
ere to Sin in Cincinnati.” end of the month,” Wednesday. 
“Though we make light of sin, | Follin said he didn’t know 
— yee = “phy , —. the exact amount would 
sus put sin “a e heart o be, but it was learned that it 
re he pointed out; | will approximate $700,000 to 
to Him sin was “the refusal t $800,000, ro-thi f 
walk in obedience to God's a The Federal Government this week will advance the District = iy...” 1; Pa! a gt ee Sag 
poses.” | funds te study and plan slam elimination in the “Wickedest quest, made last January. 
Another reason the idea of | Precinct” area in Northwest Washington. Federally-aided At the same time Follin said 
sin carries less weight today is| projects already are under way or being planned in the he will “reserve” $10 million of 
_ mer doy oo : away,! Southwest, as shown. The Northwest area covers 925 acres, HHF A's capital grant funds 
het the died eae the Southwest projects total 427 acres. toward what may become a 40- 
isagreed with the no-| es A I _____. | million-dollar Federal assist in 
2 ee Reg “results from en- ~~ ‘the purchase and clearance of 
v men experiences, from __ ‘some of the Northwest area's 
economic and social factors.” No Fatalities slum properties. 
My, — are + -ypomgron 3 already has reserved 
e kind of people we are $27,283,000 for the Southwest 
ag emg ee ee | Washington projects now be- 
ske at is e 


Men ated wea oe AK RTVES ANA GuUNs meses ese we 


’ ' The Northwest project, how- 
said he replies, “It’s not adul-| 


By Douglas Chevalier. Staff Photographer 
auto entered their bedroom early yesterday. /} 
Damage to the wall included this hole 
through which the yard is visible. 


Mr. and Mrs. Paul Grannan of 11603 Viers 

system” and operate it in the| lll rd., Silver Spring, sit on the bed from 

customary private enterprise which they were thrown when an uninvited 
> 


fashion, Hankin said. 


to perform # public service, ne GAr Crashes 
Home, Hurts 


said, “the profit motive will’ 
Couple Asleep 


assert itself... . They will seek’ 
to make as great a return as 

Another House 
Is Victim of 


possible.” 
Hit-Run Driver 


-~ 


——$——————— 


Hankin objected to municipal 
ownership on the grounds that 
this approach entails too many 
politica] pitfalls. 

The overriding advantage of 
& cooperative operation, Han-| 
kin said, is that it would be a’ 


ever, will be handled different- 


Jerry Klatz is on vaca- 
tion. His Federal Diary will 
be resumed upon his return. 


» 


system “of, by and for the peo- 
ple"—the best service at the 
lowest possible rates. 

Also, he said, by having thou- 
sands of stockholders “no one 
will be able to throw his weight 
around just because he has a 
financial investment in the 
system.” 

Funds for launching such an 
operation, Hankin said, could 
come by both selling subscrip- 
tions for stock to thousands of 
area residents and by issuance 
of bonds. 

A cooperative transit system 
would, he said, devote any in- 
scome, above that necessary to 
meet operational and mainte- 
nance costs and bring a “mod- 
est return,” to lowering fares 
or improving service. 

Afterward, Hankin said he 
knew of no cooperatively oper- 
ated transit system in this coun- 
try, but did point to the ex- 
istence of electric power and 


A Government specialist in| 


tery or murder. Obviously, it's! 


traffic safety and his wife awoke 
with a crash early yesterday to 
find themselves on their bed- 
room floor and an automobile 
poked into the side of their 
cozy brick-front Silver Spring 
rambler at 11603 Viers Mill 
‘road. 

| Montgomery County police 
said the violent intrusion high- 
lighted a twocar accident 
which hospitalized one driver 
and inflicted multiple bruises 
and shock on the sleeping 
couple. They said their three 
children slept through it all in 
| adoinin)g bedrooms. 

Victims were Mr. and Mrs. 
Paul E. Grannan. Grannan, a 
Labor Department, traffic safety 
‘official, said he and his wife 
were awakened by “what 
sounded like a low-flying jet 
plane. Then there was the ter- 
rific crash. We were dumped 
out of bed and when the bricks 
and mortar stopped dropping, 
there was this automobile.” — } 


In the automobile, police} This is the automobile that upset Mr. and Mrs. Grannan. 


Said, was Mary K. Renfro of 
5923 13th st. nw. Members of) 
the Kensington Rescue Squad two-way radios ran down a 


telephone utilities cooperatively| removeq her to Suburban Hos- suspect whom they identified 


owned. 

On Thursday a group of area 
residents, including business- 
men, will meet at 8 p. m. in the 
Community Room of The Wash- 
ington Post and Times Herald 
to explore the possibility of a 
cooperative, limited-<dividend 
transit system. 


8427 Dogs Given 


Anti-Rabies Shots 


The District Health De- 
partment starts today on 
the second week of its dog 
vaccination program which 
saw 8427 pets “shot” last 
week. 

The anti-rabies inocula- 
tions aré administered Mon- 
days, Wednesdays and Fri- 
days at 4 p. m. by veteri- 
narians staffing 12 depart- 
ment clinics throughout the 
city. 

Health authorities ex- 
plained that since inaugu- 
ration of the program in 
1949 rabies has been found 
in only one District dog, 
although several have been 
reported in animals owned 
in nearby jurisdictions. 
Price of the vaccinations is 
included in the District's $3 
dog license. 


GOVERNMENT 
EMPLOYEES! 


a 


pital. She suffered head and/as Jasper Petrillo, 21, of suse) 
face cuts, shock and an elbow'M st. se. He was released in 
injury. $400 bond for court appearance 
| Police charged John C. Wil-/Sept. 9 on charges of hit and 
liams Jr., 33, 1208 Gallatin st.;\rum, unreasdnable speed and 
nw., with reckless driving and|reckless driving by colliding. 


cheduled a court a arance|... acs 
° ae Hit-Run Killer Hunted 


for Sept. 6. He was uninjured. 
Police said the Williams car! Maryland State and Charles 
County police yesterday were! 


rammed the rear of the Renfro 
on a ag at across the Gran- hunting the hit-and-run killer! 
“T'll take a big ribbing out.of a Waldorf youth whose body 
of this as long as I live, Iwas found beside Route 233 
ong en said. “YOu! near Malcolm. | 
now, go around telling’! 
groups all the time that there’s Police identified the vietim| 
no limit to the safety precau-|#* Morris Arthur Chapman, 21.) 
tions they can take, not only|A motorist, passing shortly after! 
2 the highway, but in every-/he was struck, discovered the 
ay pursuits.” ‘tragedy. ) 
i i 
Drag ~ yobs Ba Ars er Police said Chapman appar-| 
for cuts and bruises. ently had been walking along 
Meanwhile, police cited athe highway when he was | 
second house which fared bad-'sideswiped by a car which ap-| 
A. the day's report of traffic! parently had been traveling at 
mignSpe. high speed. There was no in- 
Mr. and Mrs. Earle P. Clough, | dication at the scene that the 
said they were awakened aboutidriver had paused to give aid, 
3:30 a. m. by an automobile/nolice said. 
which rammed the masonry) 
support of their porch at 1116 
49th ave., Hillside, Md., crashed) Today’s Chuckle 
into their auto parked in the) 
driveway and drove off. 


The only thing that goes as 
said cab drivers equipped with’ dime that rolls under the bed. 


Commandment: ‘Love thy God 
with all thy heart and thy 
neighbor as thyself.” 


failure to love: it’s selfish liv- 
ing; it's living this life as 
though there is no God.” 


Model Airplane Meet 
Slated in Rockville 


Model plane builders from 
Washington and t Eastern 
Seaboard area will pete in 
the a Club of Wash- 
ington’s Model Airplane Meet 
Sunday. 

The meet from 9 a. m. to 6 
p. m. at Congressional Airport, 

ockville, Md. will feature 
icompetition in combat and stunt 


and radio controlled Ylight. 


the breaking of the greatest! 


Mark Weekend 


In other words, he said, “It's: 


Fiashing knives and gunfire 
punctuated the Washington 


weekend, and when police had 


added up the casualties yester- 
day it appeared that all victims 
would survive. 

Adam Coble, 31, of 4911 14th 
st. ne.. was reported in “fair” 
condition at D. C. General Hos- 
pital’ He said a man he was 


unabie to identify or describe, 


at D. C. General Hospital. Po 
lice. on the -trength of his 
story, charged Willie Morris, 
42, of 929 Sth st. se. with 
wounding Thomas in a fight 
near the former's home early 
yesterday. The charge was as- 
sault with a dangerous weapon 
which police listed as a 32 
caliber revolver. 

Joyce Thomas, 25, of 300 56th 


cut him on both arms in the st. ne., was under treatment in 


course of a street fight at 17th 


and E sts. se. yesterday morn- 


ing. 

A shooting victim, Phillip G. 
Thomas, 30, of 1258 Howison 
st. sw. was 


flying, team racing, free flight|treatment for gunshot wounds/condition was 


released after the 900 block of O st. nw. 


Casualty Hospital for a knife 
wound in the left shoulder she 
said was inflicted by a man She 
awakened to find standing over 
her at the home of a friend in 


described as 


in the right hand and stomach '“fair.” 


a 


Victims Are on Increase 


By Rex Ritchie 


=® 


By Harry Gabbett 
Staff Reporter 

News value of the traditional 
man-bites-dog episode will have 
ito be devaluated in the light of 
a recent survey of dogbites over 
a 46-month period in Arlington 
County. 

The survey, conducted by Dr. 
Stanley P. Mayers Jr., now 
health officer of Farmvilic, Va., 
was conducted under the direc- 
tion of Arlington Health Direc- 
tor Ralph G. Beachley and its 
results published in iast 
month's issue of the Virginia 
'Medical Monthly. 

It strongly implies that news 
| editors might give much higher 
rating to woman-bites-dog epi- 
sodes than they have in the past 
to the old reliable rule of thumb 
involving the male of the spe- 
cies. 

Arlington dogs bit nearly 
three men for every one wom- 
an, Mayers found, with last 
year proving to be milady's 
tastiest by several nips. Last 


Mary K. Renfro, driver of 
the auto, is lifted into an 
ambulance after the accident 
in which she suffered cuts 
and shock. 


Tour Andrews Base 


munity Council of Southern) but it proved the highest num- 
Maryland toured Andrews Air ber of women bitten in the four 
Force Base yesterday and hadi years the survey took into ac- 
dinner at the Officers’ Club as'count. In 1951, for instance, 
guests of Col. Marshall Elkins, only 116 women were bitten, as 
commanding officer. The group/ against 256 men. 


of 23 was headed by Fred! A principal finding of the 
Prince Georges County police|far as it did 10 years ago is the ‘Spinks, president of the Inter-| survey was that dogbites in Ar-: 
| lington are on the rise in more per cent of the total number of tember 10. 


Community Council. 


| year 396 men were bitten as’ 
Members of the Inter-Com- compared with only 176 women, | 


'ways than one. Not only are 


more and more people being 
bitten annually in Arlington, 
but the dogs have been eating 
higher on the person every 
year. 

Under a section heading 
rather euphoniously entitled, 
“Site of Bite,” Dr. Mayers dis- 
closed that 98 victims were 
nipped on the head and neck 
in 1954 as compared with only 
65 bitten that high in 1951. As 
may be expected, the lower ex- 
tremities held to their status 
as the favorite bite site through 
the survey. Exactly 234 persons 
were bitten on them last year 
as compared with 161 who were 
bitten in the next favorite bite 
site—the upper extremities. 

What type dogs are doing all 
this biting, the student of Dr. 
Mayer's survey might well be 


‘inclined to ask—and Dr, May- 


ers has the answer—all types. 
Under his “Status of Biting 
Dog,” Dr. Mayers found that 
the “non-family” dog did most 
of the biting throughout the 
period covered by the survey. 
In this classification is the dog 
who was neither owned by the 


‘person bitten or by a member 


of his family—but who was 
owned by somebody. 

Stray dogs, surprisingly 
enough, accounted for only 15.4 


‘Bus Terminal, 11th st. 


~~ 


Arlington Dogs F ind Men Tastier 
Or Much Easier to Bite Than Women 


bites Dr. Mayers encountered 
through all the 46 months. 

Other pertinent findings of 
the survey included: 

® Dogs are at their biting 
peaks in the spring and to a 
lesser degree in the fall. 

© Over 50 per cent of their 
victims were 10 years old or 
under. 

® Dog bites are increasing an- 
nually at the rate of about 25 
per 100,000 population. 

The survey recommended a 
further study looking towards 
the prohibition of licensed dogs 
running at large. With regard 
to the higher incidence of male 
bite victims over female bite 
victims, the report observed: 

“This is probably because the 
male at all age levels is more 
reckless and daring than the 
female.” 


Rose Society Plans 


Pennsylvania Trip 

The Potomac Rose Society 
and friends have been invited 
to attend the Red Rose Rent 
Day celebration on September 
10 in the rose garders of 
ard-Pyle Co., West Grove, Pa. 

The society will sponsor a 
bus trip leaving the Greyhound 
and New 
York ave. nw., at 8 a. m. Sep- 


Big-Hearted John Noonan Sponsor 


By Edward T. Folliard depression years of the Hoover) 
Staff Reporter Administration are now, for the! 

The Scent bus and streetcar) most part, parents of school 
fare for school children has|children themselves. They 
been killed by the District Com might be exeused for not know- 


missioners. Henceforth 


gang in Cincinnati for a time, 
and, in the Horatio Alger tradi- 
tion, returned home with a new 
suit and money in his pocket.’ 
He then went back to school. | 


| 


' 


for as much as $800,000). 


city a united transportation out- 
fit, the Capital Transit Co. | 

Ultimately Neonan sold his) 
stock in WRECO for more than | 
a half million dollars (some say | 


youngsters will pay 7% cents.| 


bey 2 lot of homes! 
Add te your sav- 
ings for that down 
payment on your 


ne 
% 
. 


Ai 
a 
ng BO 
oo ie | 
ae, 
Laas 


VOR, boy : 
“os OEE OES 
7 * i - 
- ev’ Lay: 
& Ass bs Ai” Bas d 
\ a 
: ie 
i ‘ 
: S 
a” 
Sy Jt 


the 


Nobody seems to be surprised 
by the change, or upset by it. 
The surprising thing is, per 
haps, that the 3-cent fare lasted 
as long as it did or ever got on 
the law books in the first place. 

It took effect in 1930 at a 
time when the cash fare for 
adults was 10 cents. In the 
quarter of a century that has 
intervened the regular cash 
fare has doubled and the cost 
of food, rent, clothing and 
amusement has soared. 

This in itself—the durability 
of the 3cent fare for school 
children—probably would be a 
matter of satisfaction to the 
man who fathered it back in 
1930, the late John J. Noonan. 


The youngsters Mr. Noonan’ 
set out to help in those black 


ing much about their benefac- 
tor. 

He was an extraordinary man, 
this John J. Noonan. When he 
first began to haunt Capito! 
Hill, crusading in behalf of the 
city’s children, the newsmen 
then covering Congress for Dis: 
trict legislation—this reporter 
was one of them — wondered 
what his “angle” was. They 
came to learn that he had none, 


that he was simply a well-to-do, 


warm-hearted Irishman who 
aoe a lot of the Samaritan in 


His interest in children—and 
his compassion for those in 
need — doubtless grew out of 
the circumstances of his own 
boyhood, He didn’t have it 
easy. A native of Xenia, Ohio, 
he ran away at the age of 9. 
He worked with a construction 


, 


Years later, after many ad-| 
ventures, he operated an 
amusement park in Cincinnati, 
tried his luck for a while in| 
New York, and then went on to! 
Baltimore. There he laid the 
foundation for a steamboat ex-| 
cursion line, which blew up and 
necessitated his coming to| - 
Washington to confer with at- 
torneys. 

The time was the early 1900s, 
when Theodore Roosevelt was 
in the White House, Through 
the attorneys here, Noonan be- 
came manager of an amuse-' 
ment park then located at. 
Cabin John, Md., one that an- 
tedated Glen Echo, 

Noonan prospered at Cabin 
John, began buying property in 
Washington and _ eventually 
shares in the old Wash 
Railway & Electrie Co. is, 


JOHN J. NOONAN 
« « « fathered 3-cent fare 


WRECO was merged with the 


of course, was Tong before the! Capital Traction Co. to give the 


_ 


began to concern himself with 
transportation for schoo] chil- 
dren. He started lobbying on 
Capitol Hill. His goal in the 
beginning was not a reduced 
fare; he wanted a law permit- 
ting the kids to ride the buses 
and streetcars without paying 
any fare at all. 

Washington fared better than 
other. cities in the depression, 
thanks to the Government pay- 
roll. Even so Noonan, in his 
testimony, told the lawmakers 
that between 25 and 30 per cent 
of the city’s school children 
were dependent upon charity. 

He said that many of them 
were ill from malnutrition. His 
argument was that if parents 
could be spared the cost of bus 
and streetcar fare for the 


3-Cent Children’s Fare Dates From 1930 


youngsters in going to school, 
then the families would be able 
to afford more for food. 

In the end, the House passed 
a bill for 2-cent fares for school 


children. The Senate insisted 


It was about this time that he|on a 3-cent fare, which was, 
adopted. Noonan was willing to 


settle for this, and was prob- 
ably the happiest man in Wash- 
ington the day that President 
Hoover signed the bill into law 
The White House gave him the 
pen the Chief Executive used. 

The depression, unhappily, 
still had not run its course. By 
the time Noonan died on March 


Her 


Con-* 


w. Wherethe Southwest project 
calls for almost total acquisi- 
ition and clearance of some 
'400 acres of slum property, in 
the Northwest the city expects 
to acquire for clearance or 
“major” rehabilitation only 
about 60 per cent of the area's 
15,700 dwellings 

The others will be the target 
of an all-out law enforcement 
program under which the own- 
ers will have $0 bring the prop- 
erties up to at least the mini- 
mum standards of the city's 
new housing code. 

The Federal advance to be 
made this week is for the pur- 
pose of planning what parts of 
the area can be saved through 
code enforcement and what 
parts will require purchase for 
major rehabilitation work or 
clearance and rebuilding. 

(This combined approach is 
called “urban renewal,” as con- 
| trantes with “urban redevelop- 
|ment"—the total clearance ap- 
'proach to slum elimination.) 

Once the area has been stud- 
ied. and plans drawn,.the Dis- 
trict Redevelopment Land 
Agency will contract with 
HHFA for the grant needed to 
help defray the loss the city 
takes in buying and preparing 
property for lease or resale for 
private reuse 

HHFA grants can cover two- 
thirds of this gost. The city 
pays the rest, b@t this can con- 
sist of any capital improve- 
ments that help make the area 
fit for its new use. 

The city’s request was pared 
a third after HHFA convinced 
iocal officials a “sample” type 
survey could be substituted for 
the house-by-house study of the 
area originally planned. 

The planning funds also were 
cut to what the District may be 
expected to require in the next 
three years for the project. It 
is expected that it will take 
nearly that long just to plan 
the area and begin land ap- 
praisals, a major part of the 
preliminary costs, for some of 
the tract. 

John R. Searles Jr., execu- 
tive director of the Land Agen- 
cy, said he would be satisfied 
with the reduced Federal grant 
if he can count on getting addi- - 
tional sums as the project de- 
velops. Every indication at 
/HHFA was that the money will 
be forthcoming as the actual 
need for it develops 

One benefit to the city from 
the -partial, 10-million-dollar 
grant reservation Follin will 
make toward the project is 
that # will leave the District 
in a better position to seek ad- 
ditional planning money and 
reservations for the Foggy Bot- 
tom project launched earlier 
this month by the National 


, Capital Planning Commission, 


STEEL 
Deuble Bunk Bed 


-——= 


Sturdy. dowble ounk beds that 
are excellent tor the children’s. 
room and. the spare room. 
With 2 sterilized 95 
used felt mat- y P| ie 
tresses. Gov iS aheaiee 


3’x8’ Table 


5, 1935, at the age of 70—Justice 
Oliver Wendell Holmes died 
the same day—his fortune had 
been badly dented. ; 

His widow, Mrs. Alice Murray | 
Noonan, lives at 2202 Kalorama 
rd. nw. Here, too, lives his! 
daughter, Mrs. Louise Noonan’ 
Miller, who for many years op- 
erated the Little Theater on 


9th st. and who built the Play 
house. 


ew 19° 


ideal for banquet tables. con- 


struction offices, architect's 
offices, etc. Wholesale cost te. 
Government was $46.00. 


N. FRANK & SON 


414-3r0 St. NW. + EX. 3.8974 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
_ 20 Mondey, August 29, 1955 


New Minimum Pay Act 


‘Affects 


By Robert E. Baker 
Steff Reporter 


The new Federal minimum 
wage law will have little im- 


Nearby Areas 


Uruguay Honors 


pact on the District, but will 


affect thousands of employes in 


Virginia and Maryland. 


The new law provides a $1 


Yankee Skipper 


minimum hourly wage and goes 


into effect next March 1. 


minimum wage 
Throughout the Nation, 


gaged in the production of 
goods for interstate commerce. 
That covers 20 million of the 
Nation's 65 million workers 

In the District, 99,000 em- 
ployes are effected by the law, 
according to Department of 
Labor figures. Vifginia has 
377.000 under it and Maryland 
374,000. 

But the impact of the 25-cent 
increase won't be appreciable 
in the District, the department 
states, because Washington is 
a high-wage area 


Impact in Virginia 


But in Virginia, thousands of 
persons will receive wage 
boosts because they now re- 
ceive less than $1 an hour 
They are in the lumber, ap- 
parel, food and tobacco stem- 
ming and redrying jobs—all 
interstate commerce 

In Maryland, the impact will 
be substantial in the tobacco 
and lumber businesses, where 
many workers now are earning 
less than a dollar an hour 

In all three jurisdictions, of 
course, many thousands of per 
sons don’t fall within the Ffed- 
eral law 

The District has own 
Minimum Wage and Industrial 
Safety Board, which sets mini- 
mum wages for wofhen and 


its 


children regardless of whether | 


they're producing goods for 
interstate commerce. Except for 
hotel and restaurant employes, 
these women and children get 
75 cents or more an hour now 
Most workers in two of the 
District board's categories have 
been classified as engaged in 
interstate commerce and thus 
subjected to the Federal law 
These are wholes@ec and manu 
facturng employes and laundry 
employes, of which there are 
8100. Many of them now are 
getting more than the Fed- 
eral minimum of 75 cents. 


Higher Wage Prevails 


However, when the Federal 
$1 minimum goes into effect. 
these workers will get at least 
that hourly wage, even if the 
local wage board has a lower 
minimum, according to a board 
spokesman 

When workers rae covered 
both by local and Federal 
minimum wage provisions, the 
higher wage prevails 

The Administration asked 
Congress to expand the cover- 
age of employes under the Fed- 
eral minimum wage law, as 
well as increase the wage mini- 
mum. Congress raised the 
minimum a dime more than 
the Administration asked, and 
didn’t expand Qoverage. 

Some Congressmen talked 
about extending coverage in the 
next session. Some Labor De- 
partment officials believe pres 
sure will be increased to do 
just that. They explain thal, by 
hiking the wage minimum of 
those already covered, Congress 
has put an increased burden on 
those not covered 

The bigger spread between 
the two @ a makes it more 
dificult for those workers who 
still receive 30, 50 or so cents 
an hour, they explain, 

Coverage could be expanded 
by a more liberal definition of 


just what interstate commerce | 


is, a department official said. 
There also has been some talk 
of placing the District as a 
whole under the Federal law, so 
that all employes here would 
receive the dollar minimum. 
But previous moves in that 
direction got nowhere in Con- 
gress. 


Strong Earthquake 


Recorded on Coast 

PASADENA, Calif.. Aug. 28 
m™—A strong earthquake 2200 
miles away in an undetermined 
direction was registered today 
by seismographs at the Calli- 
fornia Institute of Technology 

Dr. Charles Richter said the 
quake was 65 magnitude or 
“strong enough to cause con- 
siderable damage in a settied 
area.” 


The 
present law provides a 75-cent 


the 
law covers those persons. en- 


Commander Sheldon H., 
Kinney, an Annapolis resident 
and first skipper of the destro 
er escort USS Bronstein 
World War Il, 
has received a 
‘alute from the 


Commander Kinney, now 
teaching at the Naval Academy, 
i}, thanked the crew in Spanish 

for the honor. The presentation 

was made at Norfolk, Va., 
where the Artigas 
Uruguayan ay 
crew that now going overhaul, 
sails the ship. During Kinney’s two years 

The naval | ‘ aboard the destroyer escort, 
officer was | ithe Bronstein accounted for 
given a bust of four German subs, winning a 
the father of 'Presidential Unit Citation for 
the Uruguayan Commander Kinney and the 

crew. 


Navy, Jose 
Artigas, whose | Though the ship now sails 
Cmdr. Kinney lunder another Nation's flag, 


name ithe 

Bronstein now carries. The the Presidential citation still 
destroyer escort was turned hangs in an honored spot on 
over to the Republic of Uruguay the bulkhead in the stateroom 


in 1952. of the commanding officer. 


49 of 416 Child Wards 
Pass Sixth Grade Tests 


Next month's move of 245/transferred there until its ca. 

children from Blue Plains to pacity - — age 
ow, to accomplish integra-| 

their new $3.5 million institu-| io.” Only 75 of the 210 will re. 
tion at Laurel, Md. ha’ brought main at the trainint school. The 
into sharp focus the education- rest will be shifted to the new 
al shortcomings of the District's section, ». aring cottage and 
delinquent children school life with the 245 Negro 

in preparation for the move, children from Blue Plains. 
the Welfare Department tested) Screening procedures then 
416 children, those currently at will determine who will remain 
Blue Plains and those at the in the new section and who will 
Juvenile Training School in join the younger group of 75 
Laurel. |boys on the other side of the 

Although the bulk of the grounds. 
children were between 14 to 16) As soon as the children get 
years old, 215 tested at the accustomed to their new quar-| 
third grade level or below. Only ters and as soon as staff is re- 
49 tested in the sixth grade or ¢:yited, a delinquents at 
above ‘Junior Village will be trans 

Currently, therefore, the ferred to Laurel. 
Laurel staff is gearing its chil- Jynior Village, which is sup- 
dren's training progrem to posed to be for dependent chil- 
“remedial everything,” accord- dren, is the last of the District 
ing to Miss Winifred Thomp- Welfare Department's dilapi- 
son, superintendent of the dated insti’: tions 
Children’s Center at Laure! Almost immediately after the 

For the first time, the Wel- buses roll out with the chil- 


National Weather Summary 


Washinaton Area Today — Partiy 
eloudy with the = temperature 
near 80. Tuesdar—Fa nd 

Relative humidity 
& a, m.: mini- 


Marviand: Today—Partily ¢! nee and | 
eno) between 78 and de- 
eree: and little 
warmer 

Virginia: 


oe Pair ie 


Db pe 


east 
— Lotteaaen 80 and 85 in 
e sout 


Win a Fir tabie et around i miles ragweed po 


ho 
Prt ssibitity—Cood 


Temperatures and rain for 24 hours ending 7 p. m. EST Sunday: 


oe 


Abilene 
Albany 
penarque 


SSSSFPKSSSSLELS PSSST! SS I 


fare Department will have dren from Blue Plains, work- 
school plants of which any men are supposed to begin 
white collar community would renovating that institution for 
be justly proud. the Junior Village youngsters 
The new $3.5 million plant This shift, expectel some time 
on the Laurel reservation will next summer, will be the final 
have a school building with a\ checkerboard move:nent of the! 
capacity of 500. A similar school; Welfare Department's institu- 
for the Juvenile Training t.onal youngsters. 
School's 210 children also is| Besides housing some delin- 
on the grounds. Both will be quents at Junior Village, the 
in operation when the Blue Welfare Department also has 
Plains shift takes place. held its w ds at the Receiving 
Also, for the first time, the Home which is supposed to be 
Welfare Department is able to for the .etention of court and 
compete salarywise with the police cases. The wards also 
public schools for teachers.| will be moved to Laurel. 
Through a summer-long recias-| This vill alleviate the over- 
sification of jobs, beginning crowded conditions at the Re- 
teacher salaries are at $4080 ceiving Home. Currently, too, 
annually constructio: of new wings at 
Miss Thompson intends to the Receiving Home is under 
start the school year with a way. 
ratio of 22 children to each 
teacher in academic agg 
and 12 to each teacher oi U. S, -Rhine Cities | 
shops 
Some of the new shop ~—! In Sister Fete 
ment is elaborate, such as 
thousands of dollars nate 4, WESEL, Germany, Aug. 28 \*) 
printing equipment. Since the A two-week “sister city” cele- 
Juvenile Training School was bration was opened in this 
opened a year ago, this equip--Rhine river town today by 
ment has been idle because no| Winslow Burhans, mayor of 
teacher could be found. An ex-) Hagerstown, Md. 
perienced teacher, who ran| The ceremony took place in 
his own printing establishment,/the city hall where Burhans 
finally was recruited last week. Was greeted by Mayor Helmut 
Staff recruiting has gone on! Berckel. 
daily. Currently, there are eight; One of the main purposes of 
teaching jobs to be filled andithe celebration is to acquaint! 
three for remedial reading. Wesel citizens with the devel- 
The entire staff of the Blue opment of Hagerstown into one 
Plains institution will move of Maryland’s leading towns. 
with their 235 charges to Laurel; Hagerstown and Wese! (pop 
soon after Sept. 11 dedication ih 000) became “sister cities” by 
exercises. utual consent in 1952, about a 
With ample physical facilities une after Rolf von Boenning. 
to separate the children, the hausen, a Wesel official, paid a 
Welfare Department plans t0/ visit to the Maryland town. He! 
use the new Laurel unit, with a\paq heen invited under the 
capacity of 500, for new admis-||; s exchange program. 
sions and older, aggressive de- 
| linquents. The Laurel center's A HW ’ 
Ps chiatrist, psychological and) 
medical staff will be concen- utopsy ex 
trated there. 
Younger, less difficult chil- In Baby’ 8 Death 
dren wili be housed in cottages a 
on the Juvenile Training School volta et aeacteat Meanie’ 
section which has a capacity Of/4, Raiph Mosse, 10-week-old 
210. .. boy who was found dead in a 
A year ago, the Juvenile crib in his Arlington home last 
Training School absorbed white Thursday. Findings were not 
children who had been housed! available. 
at the now-defunct Industrial | The son of Mr. and Mrs. Ru- 
Home School on Wisconsin ave. dolph Mosse of 909 N. Madison 
‘Also some Negro children were! + “ariingtor? was pronounced 
iced on arrival at the hospital.: 
Mrs. Mosse said she had fed’ 
the child before placing him 
‘in the crib. 


Depart from nermal vesterdar: 
hocumuinsed excess of setepereseusy, snee 
an x 


of precipitation since | 
55 4.28 inches. Excess 
1955. 9.50 inches 
one veer ase-—High, 85 
low. 69 de 


Retin: 
Events 


| January 
isince August 1 
4 Temperature 
i 
meen, . = 


Ken. 
” get 
: 2+ 2 ry 4 
and 6:19 bp 
an 12:45 


Nes "The 
Rive clear at Oreat "Pails. (Ceres of 
En ee 


istrict of Columbia Medical Society 
nm count for the period en 
nye sterday, 48 grains per 


es risen 6:39 


hives events today (asterisk 
indicates event is open to the 
public): rer 
Re gy 


4 


cuble yard of « - . 
Aus -Bep 


nity Pair. Woodstock. 
, opti ist Club, 8 p et 
tes sae Sa Jor 
[emp a 


«++  Dplava, warem 
re atevy Ban 


+f 
peli Druc’ Cor... 


dance, 


evs en-age Jewish Communit 
sae Contes, loth and @ sts. nw.. 61 


8:30 t 


Tame 


Shar Ist sae "OE Upshur ets, 2 


3 ? 
eysessecSesresesseeessegs 8 a 
al i 


is under- 


te 236 enst 2 
s. 
ty Pair. Lorey. Ve. Aug. 


dis- 


concert. 8 Dp. m. Capital 


Leagues. District Recreation 
ae ap 4 2008s 
ners. Rese 


or. THUR and efrmutes 


Mark Gilbert, 9, of 6716 Luzon ave. nw., 
has taken under his protection two baby 
rabbits, which were brought to his house 


Two More Mouths to Feed 


by a stray dog, whe must have known Mark 
would provide for them. Helping is 10-year- 
old Joan Grits, of 6708 Luzen ave. nw. 


Prayer for Today 


O God, thou hast a 
us into this good day. 
us to meet each task wit 
thee. Grant us patience and 
good will. Increase our un- 
derstanding. May we be good 
neighbors and good citizens. 
Bless our homes that they 
may be sanctuaries of thy 
Spirit. When the day is done, 
may it have been spent in 
thy service. We pray in the 
spirit of Christ. Amen. 
—W. Kenneth Pope, Hous- 
ton, Tex., minister, First 
oe Church. 


By Henry Rohian. Staff Photographer 


Catherine D. Howley, 
30-Year D.C, Resident 


Catherine Dwyer Howley, 87,;\and Marion C. Deal, of 3730 D 
a 30-year resident of Washing-| st. st 4 +“ Pgs L. et 
| ley, o e home ress; two) 
iton, died Saturday at her home, sisters, Anna Dwyer and Mamie| 
1422 Massachusetis ave. se.,' Liberty of Burlington. 
after a short illness. ithree grandsons, Robert ooo! 
She was the widow of Thomas'0f Portsmouth N. H.: Vincent’ 
L. Howley who served one term|Coffee of Banning, C ‘alif., and 
in the Vermont House of Rep-| Thomas J. Devine of the home 
resentatives and later worked address; two granddaughters, 
at the Library of Congress. He a D. Smith of 149 S. Spring 
died in 1929 Falis Church, Va., and Bev- 
Mrs. Howley was a member odie Kinsella of 214 N Granada 
of the Sodality of Holy Com- st.. Arlington; “and 12 great- 
forter Church, 14th and East grandchildren 
Capitol sts. She was a native’ A requiem mass will be said 
of West Rutland, Vt. at 9:30 a. m. Tuesday at Holy 
Survivors are two daughters, Comforter Church. Burial will 
Irene T, Lunn, of Eliot, Me.,'be in Congressional Cemetery. 


John H. Walker 
Chicago Tribune Press Service 
CHICAGO, Aug. 28—John H. 


Walker, 83, long time Iinois 
labor leader who once tri- 
umphed over John L. Lewis, 
boss of the United Mine Work- 
ers, in a struggle for control 
of the state's coal diggers, died 
last night in a Denver hospital. 

Mr. Walker died of complica- 
tions after a fracture of the hip 


Tharman D. Kitchin 

WAKE FOREST, N. C., Aug.| 
28 ‘#—Dr. Thurman D. Kitchin, 
69, president emeritus of Wake 
Forest College and a member of 
one ef North Carolina's most 
prominent families, died at his 
home here early today of a 
heart ail 

President of Wake Forest 
from 1930 to 1950, Dr. Kitchin | 
established an administration || 
lwhich guided the Baptist- sup-| in a fall two weeks ago. He had 
ported college through depres-| been living in Denver for three 
sion, war and a series of costly | years with his daughter, Mrs.’ 
‘fires which destroyed and dam-| Esther Hempel, his only imme- 
aged college buildings. ‘diate survivor. 

Funeral services will be held : ‘ i 
at 2 p. m. Monday in the Wake! Mr. Walker's organizing ef- 
Forest Baptist Church and) forts among Illinois coal miners 
graveside services will follow at led to his election as president 
5 in the Scotland Neck, N. C., 
“Or. Ritchin. a physician, is bor in 1913. He held the post 
survived by his wife, the former |¥"t!! 1930 when he was forced 
Reba Clark of Scotland Neck: to resign by Wiliam Green. 
ae ere serene ogee president of the American Fed- 
Clark Kitchin, “ot Oxford, Miss. eration of Laber, for having 
jand Dr. William Walton Kitchin. 
of Clinton, N. C.; a sister, Mrs. 
‘Annie McDowell, of Tarboro, | 
iN. C.: a brother, T. A. Kitchin. | 
lof Baltimore, and seven grand- 


tion of Illinois coal miners in 

/ 1929 
Lewis was credited with hav- 
‘jing brought about the resigna- 
tion. Mr. Walker immediately 


chi Idren 
accepted the secretary-treasur- 
Born in Scotland Neck, Oct. ership of an anti-Lewis wing of 


17, 1885, Dr. Kitchin was the son the Illinois UMW 

of William H. Kitchin and Maria quished pat. ~ denies ite 
Arrington Kitchin. His father | preside 

and one of his brothers, Claude, 4 aay. Seer ante later. 
both served ir Congress and dur-/ Deaths Elsewhere 


ing one period served at the Walter M. Chase, 67. retired 
: » 67, re 


same time. Another brother. | associate director of advert 
W. W. Kitchin, wa whew 
s Governor of ing for Parks, Davis & Co., at 


North Carolina. 
Detroit. 
Arthur Jay Smith Allien G. Palmer, 76, old-time 


| Funeral services for Arthur targets for 
Jay Smith, 39, Veterans Admin- traveled with Buffalo Bill and 
istration statistician, will be!with old Barnum & Bailey and 
held at 3:30 p. m. Tuesday at/Ringling circuses, in Yonkers. 
the Ives funeral home, 2847 Wil-'n. y. 
\son bivd., Arlington. Burial will| Memo Vagaggini, 
in National Memorial Park. painter who is represented i 
_ Mr, Smith died Friday in many foreign galleries, 
Front Royal, Va., three weeks Florence, Italy. 
after he had been injured in &@| Andrew L. Carmical. 51 pro- 
three-car collision near Wash-' motion manager for the 
ington, Va., Aug. 7. Greensboro Daily News and 


A native of LaGrange, Il. Record: at Greensboro, N. C 
Mr. Smith came to the District pan Se Se 


Of Lee’s Aide 


‘moved to Baltimore following 


‘at moon Monday at the Cathe. | 


of the State Federation of La- 


participated in a rump conven-| 


‘group of 


circus man who designed the’ 
Annie Oakley and) 


63. Italian’ 


in| 


Barton Dead 
At 83; Son 


BALTIMORE, Aug. 2 
,Randolph Barton Jr., Baltimore | 
‘attorney whose father was a 


"| member of the staff of Gen.| 


‘Robert FE. Lee, died Saturday. 
He was 83. 

Mr. Barton was a former 
president of the Baltimore City | 
Bar Association, and had lec- 
tured at the University of Mary- 
land School of Law, from which 


he received his law degree in paves. THOMAS 1. 
5 


1893. 

He served for several years | 
as a member of the Uniform 
aw Commission of the Amer- 
icam Bar Association. He was a 
member of the American and 
Maryland Bar Associations. He 
had been in practice until he 
became ill about a month ago. 
Mr. Barton was the son of Ran- 
dolph Barton, an attorney who 


the Civil War. He had served 
as an officer in the Confederate | 
Army and at one time was a 
member of Lee's staff. 
Survivors include his wife. 
the former Eleanor Addison 
Morison; five children, eight 
grandchildren, three brothers 
and two sisters. The children 
are Robert B. M. Barton, of 
|\Marblehead, Mass.: Mrs. Sam- 
uel E. Morison, of Boston: Mrs. 
William I. White, of Riderwood, 
- Mrs. Colin J. S. Thomas, 
of Ruxton, Md., and Mrs. John 
Vv. D. Nield, of Akron, Ohio. 
Funeral services will be held 


dral of the Incarnation. 


Barton A. Myers 


TULSA, Okla.. Aug. 28 
Barton A. Myers, "72, petroleum | 
consultannt and former vice! 
president of International| 
Petroleum Co. Ltd. of To- 
ronto, died today. He under- 
went brain surgery last May 2. 

He was the husband of Mrs. 
Maud Lorton Myers, publisher 
and chairman of the board of 
World Publishing Co., parent 
company of the Tulsa Daily 


World. 
M 

witlf Wtandard Oil Co. of New 
Jersey. He began his career 
in the oil industry as a pumper, 
roustabout and driller ffor a 
individuals at Oil 
He was a native of 
Pa. 


HASKELL, BESSIE LOUISE. Buddeniy 


Myers spent 45 years 


City, Pa. 
Rouseville, 

Survivors include a daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Donald F. McNeil of 
Oklahoma City, and four sis 
ters 


in Memorian 


HORRS. MELISSA. In leving memory of 

A Srane mother MELISSA 
over i3 vears| 
j 


yy | 


ADYS and HELEN 
v Gear father 


ve 
EVELYN G 


IN MEMOR of who 


uch we miss vou But we 


m 
Enew aod knew best 
YOUR ont DAUGHTER. DOT 
AND E GIRLA. 


about 15 years ago to enter Gov- 
ernment service. He attended 
night classes at George Wash- 
ington University and received 
a bachelor’s degree in 1945. He 
was a member of the Arlington 
Methodist Church and active in 
Boy Scout activities there. | 

Surviving are his wife, Cath-| 
erine; one son, Lawrence: his 
|}mother, Grace R. Smith, of the 
| Arlington address; his father, 
Arthur J. Wardwell, of San 
| Diego, Calif.. and one sister, 
Mrs. Raymond C. Mitten, of 
2601 Woodley pl. nw. 


Group Observes 


Magsaysay Birthday 
| Members of the Philippine 
‘American. Society celebrated 
‘the 48th birthday of Philippines 
‘President Ramon Magsaysay’ 
‘at the Hotel Statler Saturday! 
night. 
Philippines Minister Raul T. 
Leuterio talked on the policy 
of President Magsaysay toward 
the United States and the free 
5 | world, 


Chambers offers the 
public unexcelled 
quality and service at 
the lowest possible 
cost, 


For the latest weather. 
Dial WE 6-1212 


For the correct time... 


Dial Tl 4- 2525 — 


For quality that’s 
higher, and price that’s lower 
it’s ulweys been Chambers 


for complete funeral services. 


‘295 


Other complete funerals $95 to $2,000 
Complete grave opened ond closed—$69 


— 


A Chambers complete 
funeral includes cas- 
ket shown, hearse, 
limousine and_ the 
famous sixty service:. 


It’s fast and easy! 


| The Chesapeake & Potomac 
a», Telephone Company 


In 


} 


i g 


ONE OF THE VARGEST UNDERTAKERS IN THE WORLD 


of Death, Call CO, 5.0432 


4 


BURNS, JOHN 


GAFFNEY. ESsie — 


A 
Friday. August 26. 


7 HOWLEY. CATHERINE 


LEECH. PHYLLIS ANN. of 219 15th 
. on August 28. 193 1 da 
e 


urch yeemne. 
Va... Tuesday” 30. 
Interment ational Semorial ‘Park 
Cemetery, near Falls Church. Va. 


Aurust 
e 


“any, A ae ° 
"237 ot Sse" 


arni poet er 
pera! Home rere ate Chapin ss ay. Po. 
28, at 8:39 « ." 
‘ r 


Monday Ausyet 
at st. ul's Church, 15th 

se. av. at 9 6. mm. Interment 
Maverstraw.  - 


T. SR. On Priday. August 


ster nédo. CSB 
are i2 grandchi ren. Mr. 
at the Warn 
Home. 8434 

6. where 


rey Punerai 
Ecovain ave.. Silver 
provers will be 


sta ne.. where 

offered at 10 
for the his al. In- 

Sorunens Port 


BURNS. JOHN T. & Members of St 
Bernadetiecs Holy Name Society will 
s for our late me 

RNS the 

ag 


Lincoln 


Md... 
ar 


IERI 
irector 


Au- 


on 


Georgia ave 
M $8.30 


ncay August 29 ios: 

m 

FATHER VINCENT T 
Spiritual 


On Saturday. 
THOMAS lL. DAVIS 
of 1308 Rittenhouse st. ae. deloved 
pusband of poaber Davis and 

other of Bish 
rom Velne 
sa, ne. 

6 . mm 


aust 27 } 


a, 
ter- 


ugust 

Reaui masa at the 
of - Wwathwity s at 10:30 «. m. 
ment Mount Olivet Cemetery. 


ae this late | ~ crewed 


band © 
i 


rvin. 
Min daughters 
rs. 


Home. Up Dper M 

services W 

Episcopal Chu 
ednesday. 

een church cemete 


o 

Gay. August 27 a at Mantoloking. 
N rr GAFFNEY, 
3131 WN st. nw. beloved wife of ee 
late James FE Gaffney. devoted mother 
of trene Renehan. srandcmother oa! 
Robert and Peter an 
at “The Abbey.” 
— st. New Y . 

Tuesday. August 30, at Church 
~y st > Lerola. Parke ave. at 
s4th «t.. New York. NW. Y¥. Interment 


~~ ’ Please emit flowers. 


enres. Pe hy NEWCOMB. At her . 


firginia Bone PP 
. er of Mrs 


Vv and «1 
I /, 
Ww 
d 


weeday. August 30. 


77 ato 


wy 
160 Ars SEssiE 
+OUIsE HARRELL. _ beloved sister of 


on mw ©: 


l >». m. Interment private 


AYRE. JOSEPH LESTER Gadgenly on 
1955 bis res 


beloved hus an 


Gence Route 3. 
HAYRE 
Maysre 


EPH. On Thursday 

at Mt. Alte Hospital 

seri BEALY of 1000 Perry 

band of Marie A 

Mrs. Patricia 

hardson of Palls, Church. Va . 

ie survived by four srandsons 
rence: from the Timothy Hanlon 


m. 
Anthony's Church. 
13th r~ Monroe sts. ne , a. ™. 

ston Nationa! Come- 
and friends invi 


call at the | 

lison bivd.. | 

; August 29, 

ts m Thence to the Clarendon 
Presbyterian Church rner N 

aon nd Arungton, 

where. ‘funeral 
et li m batocment National Me- 


morta! Park 
TERESA 
27 955. ‘ 
Massachusetts 
A HO 


On! 
her 
ve 
vy 


Saturdat. Aveust 


residence 
e. CA 


- 
Com Church Sa. mm a- 
— = friends invited Interment 

Cemetery. Mattingly 


ABE On’ Friday. 
1955, at Srawitenes Hos- 
HUTCHINGON,. the 


Camp Springs 
tives and friends invited. “Remains may 
be viewed after 12 noon Sunday _ 
gust at the above residence. 
torment church cemetery. 

On Friday 
Raf 


WALTER D. SK 
. 1955. at Bibl 


ormer of 
M 


may call at 
4th st. and 
where services 
5. at 
amily 
made 
Por 
Ge... 


ave. ne. 
Mondas August 


nterment 
(Atia 


PIGMAN. BART 
s 


mber 
Warner BREA. MARY LOTTSEF 
8434 955 


oD vis. FPubera 
mera Home, 3821 ith . 


SCRIVENER. JOSEPH nouns. Ad Sat- 
urday ’ at i 


rs CF AME. a. c 


RY. Sunday. August 
barbs an 

of 4827 
ae ase a vited te 
” Sementes 

thesda. Md. Notice of services later. 


ay. August 30. 
nterment Arnon Ceme- 

tery. Porestviile. Va 

Seturday. Au- 


ust 


J0O0N L. On Friday. Augus! 
"Richmond Hospita Sonn 


Maury Cemetery. richmond 
Saturday 


On 
at her residence 


stepmother 
and Eloise 
Priends may 
4th 


Courtney 
' reper kK. Del 
Lee Puneral Home 
, BF ave 
will be held 
uruet * 30 
Cedar Hills tery 


. Interment 


T. On Friday August 26 
@r residence, 501 Cievel an 


at 
Ceme 


reek Cemete 


5 
. Va jo. 
of RFD 
father 
of Lewis Jackson Scrivener and Mrs 
Mary M. Thompson. He aleo is sur- 
vived by two gerandchildren. Gayle 
Bcrivener 


ar aay iets 
ather a ea! war 3s eames 


te also ‘s rn 


- Arlingt Va. Rot of 
r on. 7 otice 

funera! . hzlington a 

MITH 


" AR Friday, 
August 26 
ARTHUR JA 


~ A Mitten 
at the Ives Funeral 
(ison dbivd.. A t 
here funeral 
held Tuesd Gay August | 
' Interment Nationa! yun 


“8 August 
niversity 
a 3:2) 
gnes 
sitar of 
iene 


Mrs 


1955. 
spital BELL 


on WeGnecsay August 3, 
thence 


or the repose of 
Saterment Mt. Olivet Ceme- 


v 
™M. JOHN . On Friday, August 
te] 


ing 
eight "‘pram@abikdeen 
t the Lee Puneral Home. 4th st. 
RPP ave ©. where 
oes Will be held Tuesday ugus 
at 15 a. m. Interment Art maton Na- 
t 
a= Vovageurs of 
‘Voiture 174 
hereby antl fied of 


holv sacrifice = pre mass 
A the repose of h 
ietormant ‘Cedar Hills Remnanary. 
flow Contributions 


wn. She ls 
1 at Nalley’s Funeral 
mace Island 


ay 300 cal 


t 
s invited. Interment Fort Lincoln 


L. On Saturday, 
at her home, Ster- 
DA. mother 


Augus 
friend 


1 
Interment P arlington ational Ceme- 


ddeniy. on 
"ts Mosh" Ae sd 


iv 
of the oo 
tl ie ‘4 state at 
Tuceds 30. at the R. amie 


a 's 
where ‘services 


We nial. 
att Me 


r 


Lewis, Josevh 
sf Massac wil Ibe hela ‘at at ote 31:36 Beech wood 


Christian T. Sr. 
G rice C. 


=—DEATHS—_ 


Announcement of 
Services by 
1. 


Perey E. 


Hy EA 


i Fak 


‘ ry recede August 


George od Shaffer, 
*% comet flora erate 
Fass Cuca. oe ily ‘Grit, Mori 
- 00 14th st naw wo NA bios” 


Dp. m. Interment edar Hill 


GUDE = BROS, CO., Florists 


we & NA oe 


| Funeral Directors 


sey aervices " ner, 


J. WILLIAM LEE’S SONS CO. 
. CREMATORIUM 


4th and Mass. Ave. NE. LI 3.9200 


SUMMERTIME AT A SUMMER THEATER has been an 
adventure for the three éldest children of Olmey Theater 


star William Prince. 
8 with Calico, his cat; 


From left to right are Nickie, aged 
Jeremy, 14, with Jumpie, and Liza 


Jane, 11, with Barkie. They're down with mother and baby 
Dinah to stay while father Prince finishes the summer 
stock season in William Saroyan's “The Time of Your Life.” 


Town Topics 


Off to Arizona Go 


The Orme Lewises 


WHEN the Orme Lewises 
go back to Scottsdale, near 
Phoenix, Ariz. they'll be 
sorely missed in Washington, 
and some of their good 
friends told them so on Sat- 
gurday at the cocktail-buffet 
“given by the William C. 
Strands at their attractive 
Alexandria home. 

Mr. Lewis is giving up his 
Job as Assistant Secretary of 
the Interior to resume his 
Arizona law practice. Mr. 
Strand _is special assistant to 
Interior Secretary Douglas 
McKay. 

Mrs. Lewis wore a beige 
brocaded cotton dress for the 
party, while hostess Florence 
Strand’s dress was a cool 
pale-blue cotton. 

Secretary McKay was on 
hand, looking neat and dap- 
per despite the heat. He said 
that his wife was in Oregon 
looking after the seven grand- 
children.” 

Former Sen. and Mrs. Guy 
Cordon dropped in, as did 
Presidential Assistant and 
Mrs. Homer Gruenther, Col. 
and Mrs. Nelson Jackson, 
Henry Clark of the Alaska 
Steamship Co. and Mrs. 
Clark, Assistant Attorney 
General and Mrs. Stanley 
Barnes and Assistant Secre- 
tary of Labor and Mrs. Rocco 
Siciliano. 


A LUXURIANT prospec- 
tor-type beard was drawing 


| Weddings 


MARIE BRYAN 
-~EDWIN KERR 
John W. Bryan of Royal Oak, 
Mich.,.announces the marriage 
of his sister, Marie, to Capt. 
Edwin Bartlett Kerr, USA, 
son of Mrs. Edwin V. Kerr 
and the late Col. Kerr, USA, 
on August 19. The bride is a 
graduate of Syracuse Univer- 
sity, and for the past year has 
been a member of the art fac- 
ulty there. Capt. Kerr grad- 
uated from West Point in 
1945 and received a graduate 
degree at Syracuse University. 
He has been assigned to the 
Pentagon. The couple wil] re- 
side in Arlington. 


MARY WILSON 

~ JACK BROWN 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Ryan Wil- 
son of Golden Pond, Ky.. an- 
nounce the marriage of their 
daughter, Mary Jean, to Jack 
Elliotte Brown Jr., son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Jack Elliotte Brown 
of Takoma Park, Md., on Au- 
gust 20 at Golden Pond a | 
tist Church. 


MARION KILSHEIMER 
—JOEL SELBIN 


Mrs. Edmund Kilsheimer an- | 


nounces the marriage of her 
daughter, Marion Flora, to 


compliments for John Man- 
ders, Alaska attorney and 
former mayor of Anchorage. 

Mr. Lewis’ Interior Depart- 
ment compatriots who were 
present included Raymond 
Davis, Assistant to the Sec- 
retary, and Mrs. Davis, Mr. 
and Mrs. A. M. (Moke) Ed- 
wards, Mr. and Mrs. Kirkley 
Coulter, John Farley, Mr. 
and Mrs. Conrad Wirth, 
Floyd Dotson and Mr. and 
Mrs. A. T. Lausi and Mr. and 
Mrs. Sidney Larson. 

Strand family members on 
hand included son-in-law and 
daughter Mr. and Mrs. Ray- 
mond Larrocca, son Dale 
Strand, Mother Mrs. William 
C. Strand Sr., who is visiting 
from St. Louis, and house 
guest La France Malloy, who 
recently arrived from Guam. 


SUMMER vacationing may 
be at its peak, but there's still 
enough party fare in town to 
keep Washington's summer 
colony hopping. 

Those giving parties Satur- 
day evening included Mr. and 
Mrs. George E. Hughes and 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Schnider. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hughes gave 
a cocktail party for their 
daughter and son-in-law, Mr. 
and Mrs. Ralph C. Meima Jr., 
who heave just returned from 
their Canadian honeymoon. 


FRIENDS of the couple 


stopping by to welcome them . 


back included Andrea Mce- 
Donald, Janet Simpson, Mr. 
and Mrs. William Hessick 
with daughter, Sydney; Dona 
Bernard, Judy Gaston, Dana 
Dewey, Ruth Bond and Ailsee 
Jones. 

Also there were Rep. and 
Mrs. E. Ross Adair, Truxton 
Baldwin, Bobby Moran, Alice 
Freer Penaherrera, Betsy 
Miller, Mary Ann Robb 
Jayne Harper, Charlies Hobbs 
and Roger Morrell 

MR. AND MRS. Schnider 
entertained at a cocktail-buf- 
f in the garden of their 
home. 

Guests included the 
bassador of Costa Rica 
Senora De Fournier, Mr. 
Mrs. Edward Baltz, Col. and 
Mrs. Phillip Cranford, Mr. 
and Mrs. Thomas Broyhill, 
Dr. and Mrs. John Edward 
Morris Jr.., 
ley E. Coulter, 
William Deavers, 
Mrs. Herbert H. 
and Mr. and 
Groom. 


Am- 
and 
and 


Mr. and 
Goodman 
Mrs. J. Fuller 


‘eee 


| * Make your hips 
smaller amazing 
Ew 


| REST. Reduces size of 
HIPS, TUMMY, THIGHS. 

| NO EFFORT. Fur! Sensible. 

| Healthful. Economical 


Joel Selbin, son of Mrs. Rose | 


Selbin and the late Mr. Selbin. 
on August 28 at Adas Israel 
Synagogue. The bride, daugh- 
ter of the late Mr. Kilsheimer, 
attended George Washington 
University and will complete 
her studies at the University 
of Illinois. Mr. Selbin was 


| 3" trom hios.”* —AF. 
14 "734" trom bigs.” ~M.A, 

“Firat time since I've 
| hed my 3 children my 
turnmy ts filet “—E_S. 
| “Dress size aves 16, 
now 12”.-CP 
You mey lose leas 

» OF more 


New, Easy 


Mr. and Mrs. Bur- _ 


THREE’S NOT A CROWD for the Prince 
in actor William 
Prince's family retinue. From left are wife 
Dorothy, baby Dinah, aged 13 months, and 
Mr. Prince. The family followed father 


family. There are six 


Your Life.” 


‘ 


Photos by Arthur Ellis. Staff Photographer 
down to Olney Summer Theater when he 
decided to stay on for the end-of-season pro- 
duction, William Saroyan's “The Time of 


Royalty Descends on Olney, Md. 


By Katharine Elson 


FOUR princekine grace the 
actors’ colony at Olney, Md., 
these days, making a total of 
nine Princes with a capital P. 

That royalsounding sum 
simply means that Olney 
Summer Theater actors’ resi- 
dence has recently expanded 
its friendly family spirit to 
include the family retinue of 
William Prince, who stars in 
the current Olney production 
of William Saroyan’s “The 
Time of Your Life.” 

Dorothy Prince, the star's 
wife, arrived on the theater 
parking lot a week ago Fri- 
day with a station-wagonful, 
including Jeremy, 14; Liza 
Jane, 11; Nickie, 8: Dinah, 13 
months; Jumpie, Barkie and 
Calico. The last three named 
are the two family dogs and 
the cat, respectively. The 
children decided to leave the 
parakeet, three fish and a 
snail at home on this trip. 

The Prince family evacu- 
ated their summer home in 
Roxbury, Conn., just before 
the disastrous floods. 

Once “6n location” with ac- 
tor Pop, the three oldest chil- 
dren glued themselves to 
seats in the theater and 
stuck out every one of the 


preliminaries to last Tues 
day's opening night, plus a 
performance or two of the 
Shakespeare play. 

With rehearsals through, 
and the last show of the sea- 


and settled inta a 10-day, and 


the children satisfied that 
everything was going to turn 
out all right (and the critics, 
too), the Prince family have 
taken time to enjoy near-by 
Washington, visits with 


Grandfather Gorman Prince, 


a Washingtonian of some 20 
years. 


“WE'VE TRIED camp and 
this is_a new experience,” 
says eldest Jerry, summing 
up the children’s interest at 
life at Olney. Jerry and Liza 
like to watch the actors at 
work and occasionally help 
with the props. Lively Nickie 
likes to play general house 
boy for stock members and 
found a faVorite in actor Bob 
Dietz. “Can Bob come out to 
play now?” was a question 
director Jim Wafing heard 
frequently during rehearsals. 

None of the three older 
children have decided to fol- 
low in their handsome actor- 
father’s footsteps yet. “We 
just don’t know,” they'll 
chorus. Liza and Nickie go to 


Mr. and Mrs. , 


/ 

the Dalton School in New 
York City, whtfe tne of their 
schoolmates is the son of 
their current actor idol, Kirk 
Douglas. Jerry starts this 
term-et Riverdale school in 
the ninth grade. 

This isn't the first time 
Mrs. Prince has transported 
the family by car cross-coun- 
try. There was a memorable 
trip to California one year 
when Mr. Prince was doing 
“Cyrano de Bergerac.” 

Father Prince finds his 
work schedule, which in- 
cludes a great deal of TV 
work while in New York City, 
lends itself to family living. 
He's at home when the kids 
are at home, probably much 
more than the average busi- 
nessman would be, and finds 
time to enjoy their interests 

Family weekends in Rox- 
bury have resulted in an ad 
dition to their cottage, which 
he and Jerry built by them- 
selves. Before they bought 
their country retreat, camp- 
ing trips to places like the 
park reserve at Montauk 
Point, L. L. were favorite 
family adventures. 


od 
Jor and about WOMEN 


SOCIETY 
FASHIONS 
CLUBS 


MONDAY, 


AUGUST 29, 


1955 21 


National Woman's Party Head 


Alice Paul Hits Proposed 


Presidential Conference 


By Shirley Elder 


ALICE PAUL, honorary 
chairman of the National 
Woman's Party, appealed yes- 
terday for passage of the 
Equal Rights amendment be- 
cause, under it, “the greatest 
of all 


impossible. 

The proposed amendment 
to the Constitution reads: 
“Equality under the law shall 
mot be denied or abridged by 
the United States or by any 
state on account.of sex.” 

In Washington to attend 
the 35th anniversary celebra- 
tion of the passage of the 
19th amendment which gave 
women the right to vote, Miss 
Paul appeared on the NBC 
program, “Monitor.” 

“In today’s paper, for ex- 
ample,” she told the radio 
audience, “we read that the 
President is calling for a con- 
ference to prevent discrimi- 
nation in employment on 4ac- 
count of race, color, creed or 
national origin on all Gov- 
ernment contracts.” 


(THE WHITE HOUSE plan 
for a meeting in Washing- 
ton of industrialists was an- 
nounced in Denver Saturday 
by Labor Secretary James 
Mitcheil..) 

Miss Paul protested that 
nothing was said about em- 
ployment discrimination 
against women even though 
they “suffer more from dis- 
crimination than do any oth- 
er workers.” 

In her public protest to 
Mr. Eisenhower, Miss Paul 
was speaking for the 
Women's Joint Legislative 
Committee for Equal Rights 
which met in a conference 
yesterday in National Wom- 
an’s Party headquarters, the 
Aiva Belmont House, 144 
Constitution ave. ne 

The representatives of 19 
women's organizations 
pledged “all-out efforts to se- 
cure the passage of the Lu- 
cretia Mott or equal rights 
amendment . during the 
second session of the 684th 
Congress.” 

They agreed that while the 
suffrage amendment in 1920 
gave American women politi- 
cal freedom, they still do 
not have economic freedom. 


ORIGINALLY introduced in 
1923 with only two sponsors, 
the Equal Rights amendment, 
under the leadership of Rep. 
Katherine St. George (R-N. Y.) 
and Sen. John M. Butler (R. 
Md.) now has 198 sponsors 
in the House and 29 in the 
Senate 

“Failure is impossible,” Car- 
oline Katzenstein of Philade! 
phia, Pa., said in a statement 
at the conference yesterday. 

“We .2e simply strengthen- 


discriminations—that 
on account of sex” would be 


ing the United States Consti- 
tution to make it protect all 
the people, instead of half of 
them, from unfair discrimina- 
tion,” Miss Katzenstein, Na- 
tional Woman's Party archives 
committee chairman and au- 
thor of “Lifting the Curtain,” 
added. 

Honored guests at yester- 
day's conference were five 


women who particinated in the 
militant suffragette activities 
of the National Woman's Party 
from the tim it was founded 
in 1913 to passage of the 
amendment in 1920. These 
women were part of a group 
which picketed the White 
House and burned Wilson's 
speeches—and went to jail for 
their efforts. 


Statistics Say They’re Progressing 


Women Are Making 
Their Mark, Though 


By Edwin A. Lahey 


Chicago Deily News Service 


AN ANCIENT Greek wi- 
senheimer named Aeschylus 
probably expressed a popu- 
lar thought first when a 
character in one of his plays 
said: 

“Let women stay at home 
and mind their peace.’ 

In modern days this adage 
is about as true as a $3 cor- 
net. 

Last month's report on the 
labor force, issued jointly by 
the Departments of Labor 
and Commerce, showed that 
20,204,000 women are now em- 
ployed. (This is almost one- 
third the total employment.) 

And you find them every- 
where. 

Did you know, for example, 
that there are women rail- 
roaders’” 

The 1950 census found 476 
women switchmen and 304 
girls who were brakemen 

The previous census had no 
record of women in either of 
these occupations 

The girls have become 
sailors and dockwallopers 
(754 in 1950). They are sta- 
tionary engineers, power sta- 
tion operators, meat cutters, 
oilers and greasers, welders, 
laborers and of course, taxi- 
cab, bus and streetcar opera- 
tors 

More than 2 milion of the 
working women are in pro- 
fessional or technical fields. 
Teachers, of course, account 
for about two-fifths of this 
group 


BUT IN 1950 there were 
11,714 women physicians and 
surgeons, an increase of 
about 50 per cent in 10 years 
There were 2045 women den. 
tists, 6256 lawyers and 6475 
technical engineers. 

There's a whole flock of 
women funeral directors and 
embalmers, a pretty good 


handful (946) of woman sur- 


veyors and substantial num- 
bers of women architects, os 
teopaths, radio operators, vet- 
erinarians, pharmacists and 
airplane pilots. 

There are even 6777 wom- 
en clergymen listed by the 
census takers. 

Fifty years ago, five out of 
every 200 married women 
were employed. Today one 
out of every four married 
women is working. 

There are a number of rea- 
sons why ‘romen have be- 
come such an important seg- 
ment of the labor force 

The primary reason, of 
course, is that we have an ex- 
panding economy. The job 
portunities are there for 
women. 

For about 15 years now, 
we have kept millions of 
young men in tniform and 
out of the labor force. This 
has increased the need for 
women in jobs 


THE AGE breakdown of 
the women in the labor force 
is interesting. 

They flood the labor mar- 
ket just before marriage (be- 
tween 20 and 24 years of 
age), then disappear from 
the labor market to keep 
house and rear children for 
10 or 15 years, and then re- 
appear in the market place, 
in search of jobs to supple- 
ment the family income. 

With so many women out 
working, you might expect 
to find a few men keeping 
house, and you would be 
right. ; 

There are about 86,000 men 
in this country described as 
“not in the labor force” be- 
cause they are keeping 
house, presumably while 
their women are out earning 
salaries. Some 12,000 of 
these men are in the age 
group of 45 to 54 years 


MARGARET DARGAN 
~—<GEORGE MacDONALD 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Lee Dar- 
gan of Houston, Tex. an- 
nounce the engagement of 
their daughter, Margaret Eliz- 
abeth, to George Anthony Mac- 
donald, son of Mrs. Frank Mac- 
donald of Silver Spring and 
the late Mr. Macdonald. Both 
Miss Dargan and Mr. Macdon- 
ald are graduates of Catholic 
University. Ah October wed 
ding is planned 


DOROTHY DALY 
—FRANK PESCI 
Mr. and Mrs. James B. Dal) 


of Washington announce the 
engagement of their daughter, 


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MARJORIE WALKER 
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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
+ Monday, August 29, 1955 


Photos by Marry Geodwin, Staff Photographer 


ALL ALONE on an island is the Lawrence Sullivan family 
when they weekend at their summer farm house on 22 
water-surrounded acres in Maryland. “Luxury on a budget” 
describes the place. Here, from left, are the Sullivans’ 
son, Sully, the owners, and house guests Joan Shannon 
and Mrs. Lawrence Roberts. 


i Summer “Estates” 


On a Budget: 


the dining room oat 


the sheraton-carlton 


J I< 


WwW By / 


wi dt 


Sullivans 
Vacation 


On Island 


This-is the nimth in 4 series 
about Washington area famt- 
lies who have created Summer 
‘Estates’ on a Budget. 


By Maxine Cheshire 


MORE IMAGINATION 
| than money went into the 

gray clapboard farmhouse 

where the Lawrence Sulli- 

vans spend their weekends. 
| The family owns Johnson 
Tsiand, which lies inside 
Queen Anne County, off the 
Eastern Shore. And they 
spend every spare minute 
there from St. Patrick's Day 
to Thanksgiving Day. 

Mr. Sullivan, a former 
newspaperman, is informa- 
tion coordinator for the 
House of Representatives. 
Mrs. Sullivan, active with the 
Bethesda Ceramics Guild, | 
an artist. That's evident the 
instant you step into either 
of the wide screened porches 
that surround the house on 
thre: sides. Facing the front 
door is an elaborate and 
graceful “candelabra” con- 
structed of seashelis and 
three types of driftwood 
which are washed up along 
the acres of shoreline: gnar!}- 

| ed, wormy and striated. Little 

————--| glasses filled with wax and 

Call RE. 7-1234, ask for Cir-| -andlewicks are attached to 
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AERIAL VIEW of the Lawrence Sullivan's 
Maryland island would look like the glass- 
enclosed putty model which they are dis 


with twisted pieces of cop 
per. 


THE SULLIVANS aren't 
just being hospitable when 
they tell guests the welcome 


mat is always out. They 
couldn't move it if they 
wanted to. It's painted on 
the floor. So are all the rugs. 

“Saves laundering,” says 
Mrs. Sullivan 

She can't remember where 
she got the idea, so she can’t 
be sure it’s Original. But the 
Pennsylvania Dutch welcome 
mat, the flowery hooked 
rugs in the bedrooms and the 
multicolored braided oval 
in the parlor are paintbrush 
creations in the French 
trompe l'oeil (fool-the-eye) 
style. 

Other work-savers are 
white crepe-paper curtains 
that were put up on most of 
the windows two years ago 
and still billow in the breeze 
like freshly-starched linen. 


THE SULLIVANS 
had the island and ancient 
house for 14 years. Furni- 
ture has been accumulated 
during that time from second 
hand stores on the “main- 
land.” 

An indication of expendi- 
tures is the $150 allotted to 
furnish and decorate the mas- 
ter bedroom, where color and 
cleverness pared costs to a 
minimum. 

“We call the master bed- 


_— 


have 


room the Rosecroft Room,” 
says Mrs. Sullivan with «a 
smile. “That's because I dec- 
orated it with $47 I won at 
Rosecroft (race track).” 


WALLPAPER, which was 
the biggest expense through- 
out the house, is green and 
white in the big upstairs bed- 
room. Drapes and bedspreads 
are inexpensive unbleached 
muslin which Mrs, Sullivan 
dyed dark green. The fire- 
place (there is one in every 
room, incidentally) is dec- 
orated with prints of birdlife 
found on the island. 

“Just calendars that I cut 
out and pasted on the wall,” 
Mrs. Sullivan says. “Instead 
of frames, I just grouped 
them and then outlined them 
with wallpaper border from 
Sears and Roebuck.” 

A Mallard decoy on the 
mantle is a typical example 
of Mrs. Sullivan's ingenuity. 
She found it, broken and 
weather-beaten, floating in 
the water. With mending and 
a new coat of paint, it looks 
like new. 

There is little in the house 
of real value except a few of 
Mrs. Sullivan's paintings and 
ceramics. An airy downstairs 
guest room, Victorian-looking 
with its ruffles and white- 
painted furniture, has two 
Sullivan originals of the 
island. And her clever sculp- 
tures of people and 


— ——— 


animals. 


SHOE REPAIR SPECIAL fer MONDAY 


WOMEN'S TOP LIFTS 


Leather 


tion lifts 


or small Cuban heels. 


While You Wait 


or 


com post- 


for spike 


2) 


or Shop 


Use Your Shopping Plate 


THE HECHT CO, 


Downstairs, W aihington Store Only 


- 


cussing Be The work of a former owner, 
the scale design was made into a coffee 
table by the Sullivans. 


are scattered throughout the 
other rooms. 

Mrs. Sullivan laughs about 
one of the paintings. The sub- 
ject is not one often selected 
by an artist. 

“It's a pig pen,” she says 
“My husband built it and | 
wanted to show what a good 
job he did. We don't have 
pigs anymore. Or _ sheep 
either. We butchered the pigs 
and the sheep swam away— 
which is something no one 
around here ever heard of 
before. 


THE ISLAND is within 
swimming distance of shore, 
but the Sullivans have a big 
sturdy boat that looks like a 
lifeboat with anu outboard 
motor. 

“A little boat came with 
the island, but we finally had 
to get a bigger one,” Mrs. 
Sullivan says. “Furniture, 
groceries, guests—we have to 
bring everything over by 
boat.” 

The island, 22 acres “more 
or less” according to the 
deed, was originally a land 
grant to a soldier of the 
Revolutionary War. More re- 
cently, it was a peach or- 
chard, with 300 trees, owned 
by the late Comdr. Carl von 
Zielinski. 

After renting the house 
from Comdr. von Zielinski 
several summers, the Sul- 
livans bought it. 


A TINY, one-room shed 


“which sets away from the 


house, has been converted 
into a “dormitory” for the 
Sullivans’ son, Sully, a stu- 
dent at Northwestern Univer- 
sity 

“We paid $14,000 for the 
place, which sounds like a 
great deal,” Mrs. Sullivan 
says. 
of it as a luxury, but almost 
a necessity, so we just took 
some money we had saved 
and used that toward buying 
the place.” 

If they decided to sell the 
island now, the Sullivans 
woull have already had 11 
years “free” recreation and 
relaxation if they received 
no more than they paid in 
the first place. 

But neighbors say the is- 
land has almost doubled in 
value, counting the improve- 
ments made by the Sullivans, 
and the fact that the Chesa- 
peake Bay Bridge has made 
the property more accessible, 


Anne’s Trading Post 


Help for Mildew) and Rust? 


IT’S THE humidity—and 
it's ruined my dress, laments 
Mrs. Edna Sansone of Alex- 
andria, Va. One hot, sticky 
day she sprinkled a green 
checked dress for ironing, 
only to find later that the 
white trimming and collar 
had mildewed. 

To multiply her troubles, 
she later hung a blue and 
white acetate rayon dress on 
a hanger to dry. The hinger 
was rusty—she had failed to 
notice—and she later found 
rust spots on the dress. 

“I cannot use a bleach. I 
hope some one of the read- 
ers of Anne's Trading Post 
can help me on these prob- 
lems,” begs Mrs. Sansone. 


TRAVEL WITH TOTS 


MAY I ADD a DON’T to 
your “travel with children” 
suggestions? Don't ever put 
a baby bed or basket on the 
car floor! ‘Medical experts re- 
port that at all times there 
is enough carbon monoxide 
present on all car floors to 
do permanent brain damage 
to an infant. Keep him on 
or above seat level. 

Instead of carrying wash- 
cloths, which sour and can- 
not be used afterward, we 
carry a bottle of rubbing al- 
cohol and absorbent cotton. 
A small ball of cotton damp- 
ened with alcohol will wipe 
away the grime of travel and 
snacks. And then into the 
“litter bag”—no soiled wash- 
cloths to tote. 


A. Gilroy, Indian Head, Md. 


ADULT EDUCATION 


MY WIFE showed me the 
letter of B. O'S of Arlington, 
who wonders how to go about 
studying for a high school 
diploma. I had a similar 
problem when I transferred 
from a college which did not 
require a high school diplo- 
ma to an institution in Balti- 
more which did. The dean of 
this college advised me to 
take the “high school equiva- 
lence” examination instead 
of going back to high school 
for a half-year. I took the 
examination in Baltimore, at 
a high school, 

1 suggest B. O.'s 


=> 


— = 


that 


“But we didn’t think e¢- 


Child Behavior 


School Is 
Fifteen’s 
Big Worry 


By the Gesell Institute 


“WHAT IS your greatest 
problem?” we asked routinely 
of a rather large group of 10 
to 16-year-old boys and girls 
whom we have been studying 
during the last few years. 
And at every age, without 
exception, more children 
answered “school” than gave 
any other answer. Fifteen- 
year-olds, 
enough, made the most com- 
plaints, but the story was 
the same at all the other ages. 

Now all of this isn't too sur- 
prising. School is, obviously, 
the biggest task and the great- 
est challenge which most 
young children meet. Even if 
the school experience is a 
relatively happy and satis- 
factory one, and even if the 
child is well endowed, and 
getting along reasonably well 
in school, & is natural that he 
should, now and then, com- 
plain about it. (And many 
children, unfortunately, «re 
not having a happy and satis- 
factory school experience! 
Naturally they will complain.) 

However, the fact that, 
when given a completely free 
choice to mention anything 
in the world that is their 
problem and their worry, 
children so consistently men- 
tion school, does and should 
make us stop and think. 

We don’t expect that every 
child is going to be con- 
sistently happy and pleased 
with school five days out of 
every week. Some subjects 
will always be hard for some 
children. Some teachers and 
children seem bound not to 
fully appreciate each other. 
But we do believe that with 
a little more knowledge and 
understanding on the part of 
teachers and parents, more 
boys and girls could be happy 
and comfortable in school 
than are at present. 

WE REALIZE that it’s go- 
ing to take more than the 
written word to get all the 
pupils in all the schools cor- 
rectly placed, successfully 
learning, enjoyably partici- 
pating. 

So, now at the beginning 
of another school year, we'd 
like to spend a few weeks 
discussing some of the most 
common problems which 
come up with regard to school 
behavior. We shall particu- 
larly emphasize some aspects 
of the extremes of nursery 
school behavior, and school 
behavior in the teens, since 
these are areas which we 
haven't talked about too 
much before. 

‘Copyright. 1955. Gesell) Institute, Inc.) 


LEARN TYPING 


Typing at Tem- 
ple is taught by 
Paul Stokes, for- 
mer contender 
for the world 
typing cham- 
ionship. Mr. 
tokes, an ex- 
pert teacher, 
persohally in- 
_gtructs all stu- 
PAUL STORES dents. 
Tuition is $24 monthly in day 
school, $14 a month at night. 


TEMPLE SCHOOL 


1338 G St. N.W. = NA. 8-3258 


interestingly | 


inquire at the nearest high 
school or the department of 
education of V about 
such an examination. The ex- 
amination I took is so general 
that I also suggest just 
go and Sage the test. Then, if 
there ee she 
en sone first 

she can study these Selene 
at home and take the ex- 
amination again at a later 
date. Many others have done 
just that, If necessary, the 
local high school could prob- 
ably recommend proper books 
and/or a tutor. Tutoring is 
costly, but if necessary it 
would save time and probably 
be more convenient than 
taking courses. 


John S. Manrodt. 


Orkney Springs, Va. . 


AID WITH BABY ‘ 


AS A happily married wife 
of eight years and the mother 
of four children, all of whom 
were born before the oldest 
had celebrated her fifth birth- 
day, I feel qualified to offer 


some friendly advice to the | 


“| looked... 


new mother of Bethesda who 
is discouraged over the lack 
of help from her husband. 

I think every new motner 
begins to feel depressed after 
the thrill of the arrival of 
the first baby has subsided 
and she is confronted daily 
with the additional tasks of 
caring for the new baby. At 
times they seem mountain- 
ous. But what to expect from 
father in the line of help? 
Frankly, I'd expect nothing, 
then you won't be disappoint- 
ed when he doesn’t conform 
to the magazine's patter of 
the ideal father. Don’t force 
the issue—let him discover 
the joy of caring for his 
firstborn by himself. 

There are-very few fathers 
who relish the idea of making 


formula or washing diapers. 
That should be worked into 
your daily routine, As for 
changing her, there will be 
plenty of time for that—but 
when you're busy with other 
chores, ask him to do K so 
you can finish what you're 
doing. When she 
and can sit and play 
water, he will probably be 
more willing to help bathe 
her and love every minute of 
it. Right now she looks 
pretty fragil. to him. 
Eventually all these things 
will fall into a pattern, and 
the two of you can sit down 
in the evenings and enjoy 


your baby. 
Mrs. H. J. R., 
Silver Spring, Md. 


and looked until I found a 
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Fresh Stick Deodorant. 
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No more worry about odor 
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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Monday, August 29, 1955 23 


: 380,000 
Daily 
Circulation 
means more sales results for 
Washington Post and Times 
Herald classified advertisers. 
To place your ed 


Phone 
REpublic 7-1234 


15 Permits 
Revoked in 
Week Here 


Fifteen drivers’ permits were 
revoked by the District and 29 
others were suspended last 
week, the Driver Improvement 
Section of the Department of 
Vehicles and Traffic reported. 

Seven revocations were for 
driving while drunk, one for 
leaving after colliding (personal 
injury), two for driving after 
revocation, anad five for ac- 
ceimulated record of traffic vio- 
lations amounting to at least 
12 penalty points, the Depart- 
ment said. 

Of the 29 suspensions, 20 WASHINGTON NATL. AIRPORT 
came under the point system 


for accumulated record amount- Zia neahasth a or ie pay, paid vacation, other 


ma- P 
ing to at least eight points,| mate , Se Rcland. Bal | ih benefits. Apply 
four for failure to satisfy judge. DEPEND: 7 | | | ite Insurance and” howitalisatton OLD COLONY 
ment, and five for failure to _h— meals furnis Y 

insurance. LAUNDR 


dle BSS oe 6820 Blair Road, NW. 
p 


FUNERAL CAR DRIVER 


end man 


DR.’S ASSISTANTS 


. 93-9113, 


ROUTE MAN 


Established laundry and 
dry cleaning route. Good 


GENERAL CLERKS (2) 


The list of suspensions and 
revocations as given by the 


Department follows: 


1 
. Re 
Reveked fer 


a 
Pe, oa. Macias, ak 


period of revocation 


>. it 
ler 


= 
r 


we days and 
See, Stews Gracy. 3767 


ne.. 5 day and traific. schooi. 


an 
an Calvin ~ ‘Alexander. 
n 


the Internal 
tien 730 


rop- 
erty must file « claim and deliver 


sewer: 560 lin. ft. 30° 
. cone sewer: an 
lin. ft. 10° 7 ¢ terra cotta 


. . 2378). 
Aug 25.26 27.29.30,31 
N AOWUKBAN ANT. 
tery Commission. Contract No. 
Construction 


n finch "elon concrete or vitri- 
sewers. will > , | 

“a Mutiee of the Secretary o 
the Washington Suburban Sani- 
mreeerne. 


ylieht 
piace and time ‘ 
and fr 
™ and t 
Provisions for this contract 
ed from the office 
of the 


ubliciy 


retu 
r te ose returning. plans ae 


f in 
Fatt . eer Chaitman: 
man N N AGE. Sahis 
Ree. Bat Comagier 
: . o s 
Attest Sou T. BONIPANT: 
N SANT. 


URBA 
Commission. Contract No. 
! and 


an 
Fat teville, gut: 


Peel ome 


ff 5 60 hich 
Poult a ee retu to bidders 
. raediis, Peat 


eerumelated recerd ef 


work. work 
mates, ¢ 
6- 7 


“ing im 


our walls f 
aut a 

ery 
+4 any pestace, 
tertor 


§ Tht i. Pant 
co 


per 
NG—Ibiter aan 
. : eaae, 
PA — Plastering — ° 
rit SP aS ah he 
y t a 
rerese. interior exterior 
PAINTINGS rt. fe. vrs. exp. 
decorate. see Dixon 


Before vou 


types ‘of . 
ve ( 
- NTT’ paberius. rec. rms. 
earpentering. home repairing: {ree 
est quick pervice RA 6-1 0% 
LOST 7 
mack. & moO 


answers » inky * 
330 10th 


DOG—éma)! 
white feet, 
M Be 


years old. 

tah. Cut above 

ea collar. Abewers 

. Straved Gaturday. 
North, pa os. Arline 


ter . 
Sentimental value. Rew. 


i tials LA 
0. Vi Vicinity ts “alse a ve- 
ow wr rin 
band pi] _ 61886 after 
PARAKEET in Lowisdale Ava TB. 
Blue-green. yellow face. Band WN 
’ . 


Vie — te , ~ ih 

f- a well rho fou store 5 my Rfilfeld 

Gon. Please return re 
pean 


ow 
on sicewsa at 
Parking a A 
- — 
wf 
rn P 
car after ¢ . mm. 
on AvG. * at is. 0 D> on K- 
15 adios ieee irimmed 


sultease e rd, nies Mrs. De- 
FOUND Toa 


DOG—PFemaie, white and tan. col- 
~ lla for owner. Vienity 
ena Alexandria KD 


 vieinity 
Wahier pi. 


c le, 
cense, fond of brown 
oieek. Found <7 Wheaton 
PERSONALS 
BABY sitting in my own home: Be- 


thesda area. OL 6-3552. 
CAND Enroll now for 
Sept. classes (white) day ne eves. 
hand-painted in 
ramed. site > | 
_ authenticity 
ne . 

NiO s 
open to mature w 

to "63 Simple train 
spare time. Excellent 


shi hep ale i An. 
ts Ei 4 
ROP At : ¢ ; 
Pr - ? will tal 


to ie enzone for = ab out ac pything. 


1338 E+ ne 
at 5% 
Be. Sent 
ck ttyee) 
wr inside. perm. 


a 


ide ya ‘ pooh 
r. 2s 
Chauffeur. valet ii 3:3 
supervisor $3900 


ma 
technician 


sewer -road. electiteal exD 
beg inners 


SALESMEN 


yatteville $i¢ 
r 40 yre. $-11 om.. 87e 
ve v oad 


k-ty 
(NA. 4- 2340) 


BOYD'S, Cor. 12th & G_ 
Acct. Overseas, to $9600 


ULOYB'S EMPL. ‘SERV. 
-2207_ 


ADJ 


oune me t learn seutomonilc 
inanecing ts is interesting work. 
Use o 
—Vacat 


ae eee 


oop 
See Mr 
ANCE 


exp 
wr trainee rue. 
. que travel 5 
a 
pppire st, lab. 
rep. trainee. car fu 
ter. sub. div. . 
strum man «ub. div 


"O 


1404 


Appliance Salesman 


ounge saesgressi ty man whe 


inne 


ppliance Repairman 


To service automatic wash and 
iri Bows actA 80 
furnished. . 


os Excellent : specsanty to bread. 
e-  F 


ceeds Gore Seas average aa 


in acct. a 
ployment Agency. 


NA 


In iééle 208. Inside salaried 
with unusual oppor- 
ate for a cvancement. Co’. 
oe ee ee — ¥..4 


in 
fis used aust x 
GOVERNMENT EMPLOYES 


LIFE INSURANCE CO. 


laree firm _oaperal 


BILLING CLERK 


r with eute repair orders 

Bet acer necates 
’ A 

1ll4 Vermont ave. nf. 


s 
know 
ca 


sla eta 1G Se 
eee ar 


ae 4 lke. nw 


BARBER Fiderly me ro Pe ~ 75 


ee 435, me ae 
» sendy. no 


ae Regu = 
Coe | ke $75 to tio per 
Cooper's 


ve ome to work 
intone iS Ere tare ak 
ay NEEDED 


sneer tae 


Low tuition. 


School 


Vireinve 


alls 
Air"Conditie Bat ‘se "man regular ene 
u Roy's 


0 5- Sea AppDiy = =. includ - 


jo or «s y. 
ali around barber, 5% dares Wk. AD- 
Barber 4319 


Sruse ha. bet Spe one JU. 
pe 

a: 
Se ny fon Abe 


iY To MR PETER. 


SON 
ROSENTHAL CHEV. CO. 
Corner Columbia Pike and 8. Olebe 


ary ape Commission Apply 
anh Fiate Barber Shop 


BUS BOYS, $35 


and aay meat x pleasant 


ork 
chance. for savenesmeet - 
Ever yoody's gt: 


Mechanics only Merrimact Job 
v * 
ICKLA Re 
westte, + rw Call ro — 
OLIAHER. Jin fob 
Apol 


: arias a aon og ott ier, 
are tat IVERS 


aan OF WOMEN 

you not neve. an identifi 

tien card. we ins ye 2 vs for 
ars test. Takes 


BOB'S STUDIO 
CABINET MAKERS: ~ eigen, 
qaee .- for experienced men. 


: —L@ng hours. steady 
employment ear for 
nf agg 


aay eo Wood 
Old Georgetown Rd. Be- 


AND 


ENGINEERS 
ARE WANTED BY 
NATIONAL ANILINE 


DIVISION 
ALLIED CHEMICAL 
& DYE CORP. 
HOPEWELL, VA. 
Analytical Chemist—Quality 
Control 

Chemists— 
t and Research 

Electrical Engineer— 
Engineering and Services 


Tass terneaees pecoone, 


ti, Vireiniss ne ewe 


working 


ott Sta 19 The 
of 

complete bene os Been. ond 

tr } mew project. 


DRAFTSMEN 
TRAINEES 


OPENINGS FOR YOUNG MEN 
INTERESTED IN LEARNING 
THE HIGHLY LUCRATIVE 


FIELD OF DRAFTING 


REQUIREMENT: 
AT LEAST ONE YEAR OF 
HIGH SCHOOL 
MECHANICAL 
DRAWING COURSE 


EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY 
FOR ADVANCEMENT IN 
AN EXPANDING RESEARCH 


ORGANIZATION 


APPLY IN PERSON 
8 A. M. TO 4 P.M. 


MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 


MELPAR, 
INC. 


3000°ARLINGTON BLVD 
FALLS, CHURCH, VA. 


(Take Arnold 2-V Bus from 
Lith & E Sts. NW. to plant 
entrance) 


Draftsman Mech ——t0 $9000 
ftsmen >... 
Dratteman ars! a. “ 

r 


LLOYDS EMPLY. SERV. 


Cheoles routes opening up due 
men oppor te their studies 
cellen 


trician’s license steady work; good 


eee in in house wir- 


~ ENGINEERS 
HIGHWAYS and 
BRIDGES 


ns 
FIELD SURVEY 
PERSONNEL 
PARTY CHIEFS 
INSTRUMENTMEN 
CHAINMEN 
OTHER PERSONNEL 
HYDROLOGIST 
EQUIPMENT SUPERVISOR 
MASTER MECHANIC 
Domestic and overseas as- 
signments. Knowledge of 
foreign language neces- 
sary in some classifica- 
tions. Write giving full 
particulars concerning 
education, experience, 
gg one and avail- 
ability to: 
RICHARD L. SHAW 
Personel! Director 
Michael Baker, Jr., 
Inc. 
Consulting Engineers 
BAKER BUILDING 
ROCHESTER, PA. 


ENGINEERS (3rd Class) 
RELIEF SHIFT 
for qual 
et a ty 
HOT SHOPPES, INC. 


i341 G &t. NW.. Room 200 


with guaranteed “ 
Apply in eee oe 


We will train 2 men to cottons slshed 


M 
3-2166 from 9$ 


Vv ._ MD 
Opening for A-1i as repairman 
LABO Y CLERK 
Permanent posts ’ a= ee week: 
ene 18-35: 
ens ite ona aetitnde tor  feures. 
ee of tring ip far bie Ap. 


iy Capitol Printing 
Sa cape 
itl smth y. 


for Trai ma will be al Ee 
or  trataine. you will 


ile A 
sith > poventiat "earnings 
ts a tai 
7 Car ne 


Male. AD. 4-07 between 9 30 


* yg 
Machinist 
and 


Machine Operators 


_ For Electronic 
Manufacturing Plant 


APPLY 9 TO 4 


at 
NEMS CLARKE, INC 
919 Jesup Blair Drive 
Silver Spring, Md. 


resteurant equipment, annua! ave 
and other benefits v7 §-6700. 
] * 


AN WITH CAR 


a COME 
Phone 


TTRACTIVE IN 
9e** references 
$-1351 


commission. 
Mr. Young. 905 Eye st. pe, 


MANAGER 
TRAINEE 


Young man between ages 21!- 
30. Must have auto, excel- 
lent future for proper man. 
Good pay, advancement, car 
allowance, company benefits 
Old established firm. . 


JU. 9-4529 


MANAGER SALESMAN — Women's 
eppe store 2 =. | va Permanent 
~ 5 WwW 


Large and fast-expanding finance 
company wishes to employ assist- 
ant managers for local office. Good 
future a eeeressive Foung men 
Many mpany benefits. including 
liberal vaehiien insurance and re- 
tirement pise Car essential. 
ly in rson 
LIN LOAN SERVICE. 
3412 Rhode Isiand Avenue. 


Supplem your retirement in- 
come ty light office work. 8 to 
4 ondayvs through Fridays. 
Martine “alary $45 r week with 
= creases eply in own 
and writing (no ‘typing siease} 
. u ck. 


ground 
pelephene number. Reply Box 678 
st- 


ee ee 


NOTICE 


Recentiy opened factory branch 
of nationa! monusastares of . 
enhance equipment ape pplies 
is interested in filling following 
positions. ’ 


PERSONNEL MANAGER 
SALES MANAGER 


COMPANY RE ENTATIVES (2) 
(Mechanically Inciined) 


Prefer men under 35 with jittie 
or no experience for we h 
own trainin 


xk need apply. Call RA 


MILLING MACHINE 
& LATHE OPERATORS 
TOOLMAKERS 
INSPECTORS 


tuperience preferred: io-hour day, 
mR Xs 
MILLHAND 


nt position 


(odastrious, Young man inceresieg 


OFFICE MESSENGER 


ane 


HO, 2-2476 


REPAIRMAN 
han 


Z J 
know! : of city 
open men okt tk pute 
nent petitions e only. Ty kucollent 
ate advance- 
,- 1. terviews . 
¢petwees &é6o 


“, Service. 
ee ae 


Relofut but i "nol ne oft necemary, Wai 
drycieaning 


route, pyrine “salar? pla plus com 


SALESMAN-EXECUTIVE 


+ hee eons 


oes of is 


“SALESMAN 


rect time. sel] housewives. emeall 
gne more appliances. and wWwys. 
op saiary to io the pens nae Bee 
Mr. Burke, 816 F St. NW q 


SALESMEN—21 to 40 sell end 
poreg bt Tasty ae ucts on 
blished territory — . 

on. and vurroundine 
e., a Be up. 


SALESMAN 


TOP SALES OPPORTUNITY 


re te 

than average in- 

e offer premanent employ- 

ment end excellent vancement 


— A 
SALARY WHILE IN TRAINING 


Weekly Statement of Comm. 

Taetde and otteide selling. ample 

floor time guar an 

by National and loca advertising. 
jen. Books. 


we “isaneiiag bt 
THE HECHT ¢ CO. 
A SER Sey DA. 


FENTON 
PAR OTON 
OLEBE RD. & W ison BL 


ELECTRONIC 
ENGINEERS 


SOUTHEAST VU. S 


Radar System Design 
Technical Writer and Illustrator 
C.1.C. Systems and Planning 


as i od 


Installation Checkout 


Field Engr. (former- E.T. ratings) 
Field Engr. (B.S.E.E.) 


Draftsmen 


EASTERN U. S 


Engineering Coordinator (R&D) 
Field Engineer (former E.T. rating) 
Field Engineer (B.S.E.E.) 


SOUTHWEST U. S. (Min. Ed. B.S.E.E.) 
Field Test and Evaluation 
Installation and Planning 


Project Engineer 


FOREIGN—FAR EAST 
Field Engineer (H.G.R.) 


INTERNATIONAL ELECTRONICS 
ENGINEERING, INC 


MUNSEY BLDG... 


1329 E st. ww 


ENGINEERS 


ELECTRONIC 


MECHANICAL 


HOW DO YOU 
MEASURE SUCCESS? 


Some measure success only by money; others 
by the enjoyment they get out of their work. 
But the true measure of success is a combina- 
tion of both plus the knowledge that your ef- 
forts are recognized and appreciated. 


MELPAR Engineers find diversity and oppor- 
tunity for professional growth; they enjoy being 
part of a highly creative staff without losing 


their individuality; 


and they benefit from 


Melpar’s completely integrated facilities for 


system 
through production. 


responsibility from design concept 


To learn how Melpar measures up to your own 
standards, drop by our employment office at 
3000 Arlington Bivd., Falls Church, Virginia. 


Openings presently exist for men experienced 
in one or more of the following fields: 


*Systems Evaluation 
* Automation 
*Microwave Technique 


* UHF, VHF. or SHF 
Receivers 


*Analog Computers 


*Digital Computers 


*Radar and Counter- 
measures - 


*Packaging Electronic 
Equipment 


*Pulse Circuitry 
* Microwave Filters 


*Quality Control and 
Test Engineering 


* Servomechanisms 


* Subminiaturization 


*Electro-Mechanical Design 


Apply in Person 
Monday Through Friday 
8 A.M. to 4 P.M. 


MELPAR, INC. 


SUBSIDIARY OF WESTINGHOUSE AIR BRAKE 


"3000 ARLINGTON BLVD. 


FALLS CHURCH, VA, 


(Take Arnold V-2 Bus From 13th and E Sts. N.W. 
to Plant Entrance) - 


» 


- Continged O« Following Pace Continued On Following Page 


- 


, 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD) MHP, MAM 15, HEL ; 13)HELP MEN : HELP, WOMEN 

a | Monday, Avgust 29, 1955 | | | : CASHIERS 
410,000 re ee |] SALESMEN ens fa ataalcell ss | T SE/ err | owed. "Biseeta:, emcemen| FRONT OFFICE 

| SALESMEN Seay eee Se en ares 

Sunday DON’T READ THIS VICE STATION ‘A ‘ee ot ee 

Circulation 4s YOU ARE AFRAID to earn ! ‘ Rae : ‘ ut ut + eer ry, . “ >/ LOSER 16TH & K STS. NW. foe Pies Wee. 
means more sales results for up! |} re eee ng Service sta. Attendant Mf while te owe m Y por a CASHIERS co St 

eel. ary pilus comm. t . . 

Washington Post and Times : nom, fields or . fon seth gues Ga, | on = f , oalen. Force" genes Permanent. Position 
Hersld clewifieg advertisers | init not every one con pur- | ie = fe: oe bo ee se. 2 ieee hare "au "OE, “EQHE' Ames| Excellent Opportunity 
To place your ed for Sunday | _ chase. mellapees ner thtri die ee DUNG I MPLOYMENT COUNSELOR for advancement 
py | M pairipx, Manteoun! , : nizat ny we | ; at. 3-0100. Many company benefits 

on pod age ng . te counties, Car reuyired ‘aie dvencement 2111 B @T, NV ae | Pleasant working 

REpublic 7-1234 sa pach Prers phone Mr, Gr : carn clothing % AN ASSISTANT conditions 

: P . 9 we 6. tle } ’ yu ‘| ves ~ in epee m our c rations 

WiUr_ tn Ts} method of creating desir Sheet Metal |soekaunctsscalinancta | & —- paminee o, caesar! Typing Required 


{ by led Work, not 
for our product in 3 out Mechanics a ra we're se peting se oet ae Fr necessary. Barn See MR. OWEN 
of every 5 homes by pre- Those ¢ sis will be be “again fo 1 Nine Hy RENDERS INC. 
SALESMAN | ‘Sirs iemen'ss | SALESMEN 50 Boehm era "FockHEED | SEMAINE (Hees 
Sales Manager Trainee | ry of not less than $200 ove to me soem INSTRUMENT age 860 per werk mended. rer. Hier ms st of good reputa- 3310 Rhode Island Ave, | Shs" . 


men and Sodien rd. ne. 
with clear records . maf Mt. Rainier, Md. 


per week. PEN DEL FARMS KE eT se Ros 40s Y40h| “Monest Men”, if you piesse 
F MA fter @ short but inteniaive an AIRCRAFT CORP. 
You are not afraid to en- FOOD PLAN RS Le core. hs . t Mraini ng. a GEORGIA DIVISION ac aan hy f or, marking te Pathe fous CLERK 


ter a field with unlimited We now have openings for = ; —B es)" aay Ri: Cise pnd 8 
possibilities that will 4 onan wile wert eh eeper and en i Ag hy" sh 000 000- 89.000 00 HAS OPENING FOR (mi ie Pisure app. Ne TY PISTS 
guarantee you en income tunity to associate them- ecensary t cone ; *| per re ag ® a y F maa wees. 5 dave. Generel mpler: 

$25,000 per year... ing Organization and at Electrical . Mr. J.P.) H aling ‘te “pag! An wr CLERK—Por retail jewelry store | He 


To 
eday. pk personal THEN ired. preter 4 experience heipful but not oatriOws "GATED BY 


the time make from at "the tos top, t: There's plenty Sears! abr ek Metallures M - ry. omens wane its _ ANSIO 
ALESMEN Call HO. 2-8844. An ap- $6000 to $10,000 per Testers YOUNG MAN ae desea nd person. Kay seveiry O rk | EMPLOYEE BENEFITS 
SALARY $300 pointment will be ar- year. sede and _Detnen je Mr, Orisrith. eS metal: he ah a 

hes opening for ranged for you to come ~~ Ale 2 te help wiih pask-| 3 tn “division 12 office. required, 


in to get full particulars, | WE OFFER: Apply in Person Bier be Cm ese Sears, Roebuck & Co, | [srhnet“Bneinserine Reoresenta” ry, assignment from © APPLY IX PRRBON 


wer . Paid training program. , 
at which time we invite Monday Through Friday 4500 Wisconsin Ave. N. W, 

; . $90 per sale. p> ¥ ariver hd N 3-6000 duties. 8.4 hour _ week MONDA THROUGH vpapat 
ae Sang eo . Draw against commis- ement. tn. es, Sea | Miepae Upson fay be w a Senate, rie to Aye x " a Civ, 


o | slong. phene , Pe Wola’ . % 

BECAUSE wy §S Weekly and monthly ERCO “ge 0. Box 30. 3046 JR. R. EXECUTIVES | fay Set PA ° 40. ", National Gesgrashie Society deed INC. 
ae OO new aNy bonus plan Engineering & Research Washi: ae | en ee 
choice openings left in the Psid refera! | asnhington, VU. C. Assistant Buyers CLERK sine white. uth te 

TRAINEES one on sid referals A Division of YOUNG MEN me office sie-der wa geet eee wes.) 
Metropol ten = . TV and newspaper ad- ACF Industries Inc busine smith aube, ve Dept. Managers Pleasant f 


YOUNG WAN— Whe Wants te learn pay 
permanent ; . ™ progressive ] T 5 n -~y 
GUARANTEED “post te "we oss sale. 5% tank approves Riverdale, Md. frol werk, Must be a ei superviegre \v ee ae immediate sunéty, ari - 2 ont | ana't ho te vs, roe caltance? 


~ abe willtne se behind him-—amtl PPLY EMPLOYMENT OFFICES eee 
SALARY enines, rv. commis- (You sell—We deliver) talfieent good ref apie . . 3 al a os * cpiie in aed nek fas 
ter —¥ us. . Opportunities » — cern "Ont require- a ‘on “at ‘a we 
ty M r¥ ~ e SHOE SALESMAN MA ‘|THE a HT CO. ments: 4 aporer- cer exp eral Gaviorm 


~~ —— —_--e 


vancement. 
Learn selling on our guaran- 


: ' emp th met : , ° 

teed sa! lan. $85 and) lf you are sincere and aie fine wuality indies. shoes. ization ‘ ’ 5B aes nity for voune lady 
1 welied eats a bree ee SALESMEN would like to work for a Sooorigre ae oo pet are ort LY MAN CLERK Onvhe Tires « variety of inveresting 
tonal company. We sell by sincere company. We re- porns 186 me au WA | 5 TENOGRAPHER peed salary 

appointment only, no canvas- Opportunity quire, A—ages, 2)-50, —tHoOr tALteMAN WEL ser actieed Nira -et Wee EXPERIENCED er 3 BETHESDA, MD. 8 TO 4.30 “He | 

sing. Experienc ot . B—<ar, C—willingness to es er*| teach | ookk sub- 

sory san eae . valuable work. aes fer ue in filting children's ae ~ jecta. bv sore per- .| Immediate SS. oo & 
training course in sales tech-| 25 to 45 years ol4. sincere, Interviews Mon. & Tues. 


= experien ying 
TLE SHOS ~ a he S| vancement Wire or phone airs. 0 MEN — = S| ne spore. | 
| e264 Pp birest en ter an Gnar mes F cia S10h or| Dishwashers -- $20-$3780) to work with sir 
fmiques. Car necessary ' relbabie. mterested hife- PM . usine College. phone 6&2 of) Porters : ‘a : samsenee ottices building. 5- dey. 
tume career in “a oF 10 AM.—4 " ~aa aa Sta. 46. Biueheld. Ww wa- | Bien order sent , 85-800 +3 40-hour week 
Apply in person Mon. and - ; 1 


aremen required. ? . MARKETING TRAINEES por ain m | ereph, work 
T 10 to 12 and | to 4 . Knot ledge Training class to start gincers. Se daily ¥ + | call on fam | Capers | SURCH EMPLOY MENT | Sarled. Sodny's - Loe 
ves. ary o 4, r busin necesse Wednesday, 10 AM | boli Toth + 4 aes Ve. hs : = -tr $..4 ~* ork Ave. ©. W HOT SHOPPES, INC. . National _ fggociation r 
re train you thereughiy ‘o cor. G as. Bw. all or” Barnes ot PED. a c les pecbie, wanied| 1341 G ST, NW. ROOM 200 | | 
onda ND & a anert : j 


SEE TOM DEVINE + soe, ts APPLY OCK CLERK ~~ |-betmenn 2 and “ha oe 


eee prey — pt » 
more 934 Bonifant St. MATURED MEN TARTING LARY of| esiary. earn whi you tt a ¢ have an epenine at our brensi 
ROOM 1027 ; wiiee tim me} Age 40-68 Able to teen public for Won excellent, Apply : tn son be - wifice at 2470 . = ove. 8 Bt. 


i| i Geos ; ' + e benefits| room 10: see Mr Bace: for ‘a. cleri-typtst 
ANNAPOLIS HOTEL ures annusl at o enjend records, Geos penmanship| supe oe essary. rae Sn ee eneald renky by hotter | Bea Balk bin Babeeer, a ba CLERK ne meeting eres caise Wort. 
- , win a = Re Sear Serta See eh ce (a PART-TIME sae he 
Sing Wholesalers, | heel ™”. t f leundry end dry cleaning 


in ~~ ‘ : x ene ; 470 
ue : r- sal TE ‘(ACCOUNTING CLERKS) & ach ere jecotes in vicinity - 
the time. this v be ae ae a 18 tg ab. to a Re "| PART TIME—5: 30- 9: 30 HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES Seca Oe A 

ae : - #- ‘ 


Por tn ’ We oa mas e we Seates Ban ° el es) ian) ) —_— - my oo Dork im the the “lpreary ¢! é} = Experienced or inexperienced Apoiy Personne’ 
ae = 2 ie oa ee en rith : : 187, es =| eee ext x3 } aren = snity pw Ih gh ARCADE 

es cian es as : berteneed ood graph: ie seuipment. 4 , | iseal ene smecpia fours 9 to's SUNSHINE | Yous a fey, le ree fre insur- 

Sor a year 's Apvly & «. m. Savor Valet. ~ l Kine * we cv. | on ala pay ine oposes, at i 713 Lamont 6 | ance tee. insurance ex- 

Deen i n stints : - .. . ha = ; | WESTERN 18-30 " i i oe oe og hosp taal tee and R day 

! . ay Sy Pens. © EMPL EXCHANGE Call NA. 4-9900, Ext. 286 Se peony 

MECHANICAL DESIGNERS OF er beat fe TECHNICIAN | pa ev ELECTRIC Pon APPOMTAAENT CLERK dome se 

‘4 -pb rters boys ~ ACCOUNTING CLERKS 65" STENOGRAPH ER Air-condition 

DESIGN AND LAYOUT bee 2s) a Sie, Hefei tes] Hears" Aes Bren BAIN Interviewing for| See ABBEY First |~ | Brigette bs 
DRAFTSMEN Sandwich ane or Clerk s ’ rr Clerk et | ni Yt & seal real sta 3-01 a ~ ; 

Sia eatere ate peg ts FIELD ENGINEERS | Jpplsi “seme ’Gtiing Ril ove. B50) Immedinte, openine tor # nent ap. 


pearing 
| : phi Fth et. ew Ace es =o zm. trois typine - ty 
We will accept applications from all! lev- VICE | wice— —h se - Be c. TECHNICAL te Mane Ari i foarte! inf es oF 
tet hat Demy topraen a | ERNE SURE BENIN LOCKHEED | ASSISTANTS | BREET 2 TE) hor gis nc 
Layout Draftsmen. area Geoa pay. good nity = erads under 2 costae Al RCRAFT CORP. | a rr cod with eu 1341 O ST. NW... ROOM 200 


or romices opr , 
mm while eerning: § dave. 7 Calculating ‘machine OPT. .<. 


e. 
know 
ressoe 


J 


EL. 1338 Eve 3W 


$0. 
“ye : | GEORGIA DIVISION aoe. MET. ee yess 44 CLERKS ae 
. for appt ABBEY PERSONNEL. 1338 Eve WW Cashier checker cateteria, Sein’ a BY, 
Board experience in design and layout of Offers exceptions! career oppoer- SONAR ae “vases roost me on pane. ys. experiences? c cH RinLS $36 
P t 


tunities im estructural ineering - ' : te work Te} .. Good tips 

_ S to Engineers experienced’ in. ¢ ave { ton - POUNT Al +>, 098, Gps 

email mechanisms containing linkages, ENG] NEER neinerrs expe eres w Stray | welatics . an 2 : Kore. ae YES .* *49 
bearings, etc., and knowledge of applica- APPLIED LOADS RADAR Ousekeeper hotel, live- 4 time sabe oy toma avaliable. 


tions of gearing is desirable. AND Borie heer : casi. Congres tis PERSON LLOYD’ S BR oT Ee SERV. 


, tra : _ Ave 4 


ructural Flight Capabilities | ® COUNTER GML col 455 

. MISSILE ‘os OT. 3-eeee | A ——| Gooks. short order, eel. ..... $38 
PROOF OF CITIZENSHIP REQUIRED Supporting Personne! fr tite & DYNAMICS - ~ r- 3 op miary. yeried duties. | CONWAY'S Emp. Ser. 519 oh Fe. 
~~ otrens. Dever Maen. . a ; ye OO ay ‘uae. gy AM. 

: | Desien and PROJ ECTS end ironer = | Feet bs A BIST DEMONSTRATOR 


ENGINEERING AND RESEARCH We manufacture eur own designs—eirborne arma- + | © Analg & IBM Computing 5 eves, & &. : iq Age 22-35. Home service 
A DIVISION OF ments, flight simulators, machine tools, electronic de- STRESS ANALYSIS un. 0.4 arenny Assist 42 oe per | S-DAY, 35-HOUR WEEK 


ACF INDUSTRIES, INC ion Stress hand Genera! —* 


, ; ' esearch EX. 3.5034 5 Bre Ts | Excellent rtunities for ad- 
Riverdale, Md. WA. 7.4444 ices. We erect them. We maintain them. Because thod Btudies ARLINGTON.ALEX. | vancement Many company uqne- 


’ : 
, FOR AN INTMENT L £-< 
Te ree ee ee ee ee sli ed hginewrina Ror Wor OP at ye “eal. Bera. "'>*** 9330) PEOPLES LIFE INSUR. CO. 40-hour week. Apply 
$50 


almost every technical category. There is @ particular UOSON 3- ad P 


ty. € it 
Mee an for ’ Ne: 73 Inc ~4 -PBX-typ ~ medical fla me manent positions. <err consider be ee | WASH NGTON 
pees Raa : 


need for young engineers who like to get out and do Pees Pie ee Soatter uM leon bivd........ Rss | Taneal ; sick leave. Nonp:oh: GAS LIGHT CC CO. 


cafeteria ly rele tii ov 


P . $2 
things. The well-seasoned old timer will find excel- ten ews confidentis —ae| ae ae +. 34 Noor BoUiTABLE LIFE 


lent opportunities as well. E N G | N iE E RS “We. AL aertteee g | SO. O16 14th si ag —| 1100°29th Ste Street NW, 
MELE AR. INC WHAT ARMA 535 Bio 


At present « few choice openings exist for engineering IF you are « bi ue te echoo! gracusie paces 


~~ aie "e yt 7 DICTAPHONE 


icists and stendards } ~M j  -« / sere Te $s a restin 
CREATED BY THE CONTINUED physicists and st engineers. Many openings exist and “Long Island Living’ Frade teste” Cot We. HE ye set, to do interesting | OPERATORS 
hs exee! t future id " op vane “Soon uld Uke te work With at least € months’ experi- 


EXPANSION OF OUR ENGINEERING for electronics engineers, test specialists, mechanical staxett us| Sib Bt Buc entae span 
modern air con itien office; ence in phone o r 
AND PRODUCTION DIVISIONS designers, design draftsmen and serodynamicists, | can OFFER YOU wah ic’ wi'cn RSG | apni sheerful gurveundings, | {remcription. Interesting work 


0pm rT rr. tall u are frien ty rand would ' 
e to \>4 rk .'. ent working conditions, stea¢d- 
MA For further information send us @ postcard. Include it takes two things to make en engineer thor- Raker yp.” oe ch. . So, rib '2; ETM BY uy expanding organizatio a: 5 
DESIGNER-DRAFTS EN ; oughly satisfied with the position he holds. One t. OE :- pute Lees ah WEAVER BROS., INC Go . 7 

your name and address and the Code E9. We will reply is work with a future. The other is an idea! com- POTOMAC EMPL. AGCY. | . vernment tmpioyees 


Realtors. Morte ners | 
. ere. seer dine nsurance Compan 
MACHINISTS promptly. Send resume for immediate evaluation. munity te ive Mm a geen hc — ema. 3 $- 2000 gion Buildin ena L pany 


—. .— ee ee 


14th « Sts. NW 
ARMA provides both, to an unusual degree. in. to $6 Please Apply st L Ot, Bnirance 


MACHINE SHOP INSPECTORS : : Prominent in ine Seeign neg Orgy pile ing? a CLERK-TYPIST EXECUTIVE SECRETARY — : 
ui 


New Openings at 


Engineering fs Research cision electronic controls, 


expanding into new fields. Here engineers con- 


centrate on assignments calli r Ma fe ACCOUNTING rad. . #43 tho. 
ee A DIVISION OF and technical skill of the ake ti ay ee s ae ete betta tt RO es 


nition of original work is quick, Promotion comes in accounting depart- 


ACF INDUSTRIES, INC. fast to able men. ° aR Rete | Soe workine Satta extt | ; . {fie 


emertanity Se Se 


SHEET METAL MEN Riverdale. Md. ARMA salaries are among the highest paid; pen- - eran. — | Petr a, with an outstanding ane | ~ ront —- ler 


Bal. + maint noupedes of 
many company Senefits 
sion and insurance benefits, favorable. In addi- a pax i gigs Extensive bi Sasksre oer neal. | che, Rite 


SHEET METAL INSPECTORS ae apa aegis ye any ym ag eee ses, won| cg ialese 


oo ont 


Engineers _ cial aid. eget 883 | DI DI. 7- 2900, “Eat 263) who 
PRODUCTION PLANNER ; All the varied ee “Long arene Liv- icfaphone oors, 5 +4 BETWEEN $ AND 5 tase, - 
ing” are mn to ARMA engineers. On the -2 
je dakon: VITRO. LABORATORIES ma" "Gnemea ko, net | aoateFtcian | EBC SE 
PRODUCTION PLANNERS : 20 OLY ISION OF end fine reeds, abound. All the fun of vacation Sa eee tare 
skating, & i , Swimm ae ‘ee Os , “ath. P week. See ABBEY First TR wr i218 . 
STOCK CLERKS TS a Sint Se Ne ones (AMD ace | was a S| Bowden 


York City are only 30 minutes away! 


TECHNICIANS, ELECTRONIC ENGINEERS Wey diet Vd out te etal i 1806 2 ay. OKKEEPERS it 1 im, ee GRARLIXTE 


the many ways that . 855 
y eeping + eee es M in inatitutiona! }, mangge- 


ajor 
ARMA CAN DO MORE FOR YOU I re ‘and i teteease qpint-Dictanp. trainge ’. 5. $2800| Comparable experience. Bucellent 
co. 


2008 Duke st. 


"with fi fias.. $2600 uv 


OPPORTUNITY FOR ADVANCEMENT Career opportunities for the young engineer Immediate openings for: satlO ay i bas 


u . -t 
ADDITIONAL COMPENSATION FOR looking for professional advancement, respon- A fal- mie elves church... 8280) 


hru ideay. 

Ww ype SENIOR ENGINEERS, ENGINEERS, ~ 2 4 : nh ae see s sie 
EXTENDED WORK WEEK sibility and challenge in advaficed weapons and ASSISTANT ENGINEERS beauiy sbap. Call LU. 4-0829.—— OVERNMENT. SERVICES. 
EXCELLENT EMPLOYEE BENEFITS systems, research and development engineer- Experienced in sale tL aete | CLERK-TYPIST |— 


ing. ths > pada COMPONENT tor : : ee ar " ; apaly attractive Tien, 4gor 
| ctype : ffs da adr 
APPLY IN PERSON GUIDED MISSILES—RADAR DEVELOPMENT RELIABLE STUDIES BERC Pascten dese advertisin 


on 


ent °o 


8 A.M. TO 4 P.M. FIRE CONTROL SYSTEMS ANALOG AND heer air-conditianed” office. | | stignel_, News HOSTESS 
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY | UNDERWATER ORDNANCE SYSTEMS ENGINEERING DIGITAL pent Ap See te” setae st: _ or SE years of ase, some, ax: 
he m a“ desired ut wil tre if 
Fer Additional infermation & STUDIES COMPUTER ser CHEV. CO. pa | sualified, ‘Apply ; 
1211 SOUTH FERN STREET LEASE CALL JU. 5-7200 — SERVO MECHANISMS SHOCK este  : ra sw, 
(OFF JEFF. DAVIS HWY.) Personnel Department — THERMODYNAMICS VIBRATION oA : ia so) H st. nw. IR. EXEC U IVES 


Similar opportunities available at x caper, QUEENS EMPL. AGCY. 
ARLINGTON, VIRGINIA |). EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE, FLORIDA WASHINGTON INTERVIEWS mba pa en | ie 361| Assistant Buyers 
3 and WEST ORANGE, NEW JERSEY Monday—Tuesday— Wednesday | ae | : = ee tage take anagers 
3000 ARLINGTON BLVD. | pas “August 29-30-31, 9 A:M. to 6 P.M. CAFETERIA ASSISTANT BETWEEN -M. upervisors 
FALLS CHURCH, VA. | Call Mr. Ralph Morris at EX, 3-5036 Monday: Through Friday Senspel gifice| APPLY. EMPLOTMENT OFFICES 


CHEMICAL ENGINEERING OPENINGS | 40-HOUR WEEK eae) |THE HECHT CO. ( 


rere | | | AT WEST ORANGE LABORATORY pase | | act with i, Smarts 
- Take Arnold 2-V Bus From 11th and E Streets N.W. a eae | : rae ae and oe EDerience. . LASHINGTON 


he to Plant Entrance 962 ici begs RT ase saa mp.| "Division American Bosch Arma Corp. . 


eae , a” id | | . ’ Roosevelt Pleld, Garden City, Long teland, N.Y. . 


h 


‘MEP, WOMEN ts«éG ‘3 | 18, ROOMS, FURNISHED | HED THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
x . . hm. aa). |HOBAR , ’ enne Monday, August 29, 1955 25 


Saleswomen | sfiliNy sighs ith sins ceniee, epeeeet| GEN, Tease | eda ie ab ee Sais AS Ea DONOR | 380,000 
Full Time or Part. Time} CL __| Sottenrens ana fpahion centers | MMioa™B, Bad ty Gar onl Pana Meacheewnnd Pes | Beatin Bosc eae Daily 
Pes Sree Po Rae ye beast tM a Tm, |S OUPL APTS assaann 
Tite MORE IS ISECRETARIES | Stat" | ear Ska Pea eteee | ion aa eG] op HRNISHED | Herald canted adverts 
. . Sgt Ron oe a WY: See ati| periagapmebn ge ee | «OR UNFURNISHED | yn, 
CREDIT INTERV. | | iw" Tire Se or ik Mm a= ie 5 bet E| Bull” bbe :| FROM $102.50 UP : 
— ¥ s.20| Phone 


LADIES (4) APPLY MMPLOTMENT OrPicR | Srenes not overnah, “UM 4) “ARAM Gin ok pow oo | IM IMS ies Te, Care| Oh priclenes, RG . bedeah Rik, bath. back Daren. ee R 
: | . : . cee | pyt vente. | | Otfice Closed Bun Epublic 7-1234 


Seerte Deer .. reso T Tr | nt . ida ave ' . oms. 
aa aren : “aa to men 3 : nau Th bs | Sastre : tes - : e era sr NN 
SALARY es Bae “Adindacs ore aes BraCROGSRT| Kitt Siete ER SHIRLEY DUKE 
Bg neat ise in ie fear athe Sun] Saas oe ees Pai Meee pee ae esate] APARTMENTS lige or. nw... oie 
CALL rs. ire phe somes —s a“ A PNOG ry Pie 3 ~ 4 2 pos : fae ere Pee apt. 4613 DUKE ST. “yy 1168-08tudie , tye: 
Vea a) 5 dave. ral Employment "he nae unil As. “ s Se § "4 ALEXANDRIA, VA. re eeitine te ST: bodew 

AD 2-233! AMO st. Kw. Satie Aen. 101 At PERSONNEL NEEDS ck up- | small, men p "ar school, © ' places, liv, rm. din. rm. ’ 

XEC use . hit bath samc} FREE INFORMATION ae 7 


SEC’Y TO EXEC. $350 TELEPHONE Lcel secre. | * 4360-8380 mo. We BT, ex — om 
os Saag Ty han aa SOLICITORS ec, Alne. vie. Sani |. 43-580 | BLomED We seaeaige | voold water: oe wel fuk na® athina Tt: aster | MAILED YOU TODAY THE 
: . "| fide Bat. ore or WF os in Li.t CALL Ki. 8-5100 


yy. $300 meena yy — 
» tts of nat’ NG » ; g See, oe omb.. h. incle 
f president oh pp. D. C. AND MD. «00d “ ee anhd: ' ic | =. a . ry af rt hi e panty . , Bgeeire ga Ey -+ E 
ECEPT. TYPIST, $65 | Work from Home. Good Salary. r ppcescant ru W E 1-2796.| tif, stove. 910-81) wk. HU. > CATER 8t NW. 365i Single applicants accepted. CORON | 


Rave openings Ficeliem markers 
ne po n law, ofc. on dic- Unlimited Private Phone « OM Es rice — Moore mploy..| ** ; : sh bath . ; ’ . non 
ben. ae ae roast N : > Sapa 3 st. be tA comp. Pa vm. Ki. 6h ‘11 Bedroom, 466.00 to oe 2 f 2ND & “C 
a ont . coll grad pret. | aay  3-4857. we Ca : C .|2 Bedrooms, $75.50 to , FROM CAPITOL 
MILLINERY MGR. pc re "tesa else] CALL MR. TALBERT Bo sed ola are we. | oe ene at gt ae “BRE | St tne Bie ints, “call DO ' ng, ururmee | Save - ansportation 
ields Agcy., EX. + 2508 R Life |! Cc greees =— ‘URNISHEC : by . | weet GRee Si 7 days each wk and Time 
Capabie, of tak complete charge | 720 Sher eserve Lite Ins. —O. . , — . . A ~ OF. a Moa Pri. 6:30 a. m. te 8 @. 
a salar r-Dujced, millinery store. | At SeCRRTARY. 2629 Conn. Ave. NW. | “be ema. . A | Bit. privid.: $12.50 wk. DE. 2-9608 | Sita WY scalps. Bat,_8:90 | BaSQED and UNPURS 
xcellent epportunity, n $90 - } entiema: : 6! : 2 a com a - é, 
—Part ee betes. sen _' oe MON., WED., FRI, . in. } bs udio-liv. . 2-4075. suite bea seek ; , ato. Isun Efti iciency from $ 30 
ripriday only’ PHOTO a fre 10 TO 12 NOON , = be 107, = |SETTEED lec asant. Re- wi a: 7 e 1 Bedroom from $135.00 


— : s4 bath, rm... 

8 eee TEETER 20 te 30, Good apoear- Relat _ ir ota D couple. as | month. T , rm bath: 3 

“ SECRETARIES. 8 lity a Ke r Blenoe. ‘ OLORE — : ‘Ome —. o . nit . fia is Bee 
. : ; . . " : +: - ; | : * _ J rm pt 


= cls 
" ™ ran he ‘eT. 3- 
SECRETARIES at i Bes co COR. G& & | 12TH ouse . = ~~ — 5ae-in + 3417. ) 
t tions a / } aa. 2 1 . : . ~& ) i . = ) ’ So - as rm. . . n ' 
seer mt Ase. So. "Gail shes and «< "Fx Hotel. nicel - v. « oe, are our ome: a fils turn. 8 ee $55 PER MO. 


3517 AMES ST. NE. 


Ww. 2 vely furn. shington a 
¥ air-cond - ining 
ne t £000 nda. bedems~ dthne “. a ing. 902. Newly decorated. Lir- 
space. kit. noe per me room rm. kitehen end 


SECRETARIES-STENOS. | : | oe Bo t-ede. 2493. 
waters sur| See ABBEY First fe oe S| Ee Mad 1 ana Be | COLUMRIA RD, 10S 08 96 vi | “ae — Getita and show. eenier. Oifiee on ée- A ge 


1398 EYE ST. NW. ST 35-0190 
ste 
Lise ~Oatversity : mroshet Admin ssey. ss eeeeee MANAGER 


. home: . , . : ". I sg ie 138 
BURCH EMPLOYMENT ONN. AVE els , <)  — ag Ne. Au | pareve, ee ca wh re [ Piers) sot ne 
DL. 


. pr 
. shert hours. General 


. . ti— sale. rm. modern furs... bus. shops 
ERRILL, CONN Agent 
home “RR °- 4961. ee adults. $7 Ee JA. 6-2634. JA. 23-0138 vestment Bids =. 2002. 


rs... eee c 
r. secy. i- >| Temporary bt Oc. 4 rm. .va74 owe” 1332-—Bingie and -§ if ne answer call 
PANTRY SALES r seer, al of tar tober thru January. Oeve . ) | 2 rms. excel. ‘food. rm. tile| 3-6) elightful 2-dedrm.; |——. 
Se ¢4- dution, 5 day 30. “£2-|" Applications Needed — | ‘barn: 7 2 _, | ORDERWOOE OF, XW, Ey area, over-| MARLENE APTS. 
) aod eS obi ut awsome BF mn Oak st AROMA PARK. Mb 
ROMA PARK. 
vERMO ve 7 dal ‘| Newb > vator. on bus jine. ad- 


CLERKS neds yeion. 5d. 8 awel leave and - We anes a - 
“SECETARIES, TO $75 \ vo: = Cociety ' in y ; in, B34 ‘A. # —Youne peo-| ficiency, $1 week. CO. $5004. ee, Saves cog 
date tk | erm kik x a ef : : lete « shegoin it. 


a le NE a | ae ooeninel. nn fei ola 43 P convenient to 
fee ta 053 Mp rts . é "PO f =} : we ** com/oriabie room Sad | roomne. ia : "3 ARLINGTON | 
tLOYDS ERP <eRV 9 | sete cont is pe eet mt delicious kitehen. : — -|One Month's Re Rent Free'4 t on premises all 


Mi — on 
— - a Y -2594 . $55. 
ine fieq| 2820_N_Y. Ave. NW. GT, 3-2207_ , . ‘ ony. coreted._ , 
a ny epeine carting swine BEGOR. SECT 80. Shorthand. Al R LINES cma SUPONT CIRCLE — “4 fie Willys “hr list * i ” , , modern edgrtmpent |, Sussine 1868 COLUMBIA RD. NW. 


feos ce - Employment Agency. 1207 i whine Reservations Agents is , ~% WESLEY ts --, DYE. ' ‘| jagiees xs de EXCEL. SHOPPING AND TRANSP 
Sir conait tion s starting ; privl Atr Lines hes open ie. —— =e Rete 1426 21ST. NW. ss * —_ rooms s . : 7 a7 Air- Conditioned 


Becinnine 08 vi th opportunity - ree a A 
PROOF W 


Peet "NC. advancemen:. some previous secre- ie past 9? 
tarial ¢ “experie he Int . shert- ; 7 . soo => as i it. —s 

De Garr. aie oe | RE pert iee eepetedt iat ae | Be, regen nme stab oe Me) EXCELLENT HER tw saige Recah] «PHONE Ki. 9-664 =| amPSSEOPED Wieyevoss 

s a \ion- === : s room t ' 
| Broedcest Co.. Ree ine F : | th. — i 
355 Eaoelades 5 e . eran casting sil m we v nec. Ke uitjons » ee phone » Beast | iar | FOODS! ROOMS! SERVICE! | . wh 6399 bide utile inci AL BAKER & SON, INC. NJ ] B 4 

55 Ouse ait te os . < —Hiticies 508 N. Wash. St. Alex. Va. ew i-pedcrm. 
area necessary. Some mer hoot $300 ® gir perk a vY opetin : { Starting vt bath. WO. 6-$ AT AMAZINGLY LOW PRICES + = nw. $6t6 — Efficiency 
eral Employment Agency, 1307 ‘i he ‘private ing exp. General Dane in beuire person. Wei-| 82 S19— Nice : y 70 per mo.; 1-bedrm 

— H “ BOYD'S aed : pass = opts. o73 & per pe. — Apts. from $1 15 


; = | ied vment Agency. 1307 st . ne clude free ’ 8 
— : v . a thes TLANTIC ST. 5E.— re 
PHONE ‘ORDER siturrany = peg . d ret nce Bi . double U. 3-5432 ee ae = —o = - tbetreoes. “ag as SSern (UTILITIES INCLUDED) 
pos : wnioan sand retir : dies. rad om ip picostive  Dfivate $67.50 up, f , 4. 97) 30. ‘| Beautifully equipped home-size 


CLERK capad is Spec * week : 
) 2 ae - Mista Toe ms mownat” 3 30, aa x. iris LWTO: ‘ ; ov bi « ebit “ey ae ae * ’ rm. - -_ ——% and i = “ — : wile baths. ts 
WASH. i ceoneoare 5 ran i . a's Seon od trans. 88 wk DE 2-6768. TAGON 4 a ut , Stok | Seo. BaicdaL E BOOLEY. Gx PREMISES, NO. 7-348 
lceeed. yeens. iil NATIONAL AIRPORT. SRB, Hy pele 4 ip _ close. | 191 ' : | BE ONE ¥ THE LUCKY 
: ’ Who Enjoy ee 


five of nationally known ‘ . oo wl 
“ ua t ——— - HANGAR NO l, Rm. 206 tm wl fm, Pr“ ; ., 5.0346. “ETFO ; “ 
Ee epnn 5 ri ° rane te wk. No Sat. Libe loyee bene wilted: =. wo a i Y. » = - | ROOM! ID 29A ‘ nel. wi ’ SEP Rosemary Apts. 


Se ee, 7 9 ; ’ - : 
shCnEY aah dove. Ge x, = Sir Burcker Mooday and Tuesder me re, vs : p._NO. 7-9988. - ¥ mite, BS: Ted — EPP. Gene ete nad cheese teh. ee _ 
HOT SHOPPES, INC. _| pigvment Aarne "tog? Tt at aH ae 5, wavs Tay gees ae | ee We ate See =| SWIMMING POOL 

141 @ ST. NW ROOM 200) - . ) CLARIDGE Wolo, i Ses = 
PRESSER ti‘ Fae eg gS Ri Ae thay Good | RODMAN” owes $e1é—Nooms he reals chyaren in ar bome atin on, bie Geet Te pie 2 apts. $64.50 pee es) WAD ING POOL 

0 elp supervise : - : : : a >. mm. 
- a ~ -_ ate handicapped. sitls and women in 5 — Part-time While SHIPTS Liy cin. rm... th laundry : i - and tie. : - Jt Carolina ave. a ’ 
- sate, ire Krlineten We] SoBe "InDUusTatES appt heats ania Eat. nw « ae seated srs haus d (tran ae os AVAil-thce Now re Seti a- ONN. AVE APT. MET. WASHINGTON’S 
( Es ‘ ' - i Remodeled and redecorated: jarge FINEST APTS. 


New Ham mer” © ne ‘Zist or new restaurant oan Ke ss ‘4 
exp, steady) and oh ons 12, Monday ring. exp. good salary ua. ferme |e tts to. 5 yrs; fen tom hath Sac show 4 1 AND 2 BEDRMS 
NW. ; ’ 4 saat owers an . 

38 Fae . | Md. UN. 4-5647. | 500 SOUTH “CO ; . aan te 


338 On Qpterio id ns thro 35 a A 
4200. Knowledge sh —_ — , — ‘ up 

5 dave — i ot +s "Shia PRESSER witrehe _ ey _ 6 oye ia fi ’ es = clea | 34 ty My 8 my RE << apts P Ao drape ma : swiichboard S leetrietty. furnished 1929 E W H 
aeevPr re tic Yr ~ “HOT oe ; home f Eee how fastidious you are. this apart- $ “th eth eng an? 


vacations, excel 
. apeiy Hub Laun- q_| CONVALESCENT HOMES 32 ment will on hy vou .. rm full N Apts ' 
. : din. area, kiichen., th. x os 
p=» — ened = RVAnL. SEPT. Kind individual concrete yeaa <y Apt. ‘Ne. 1. ow any 


Ae eens 6 9 ay. — TOBE CALE TA ie . od a not essary. Compicte . "pursing oare for’ bengge | CALL JU. 8-1170 
ee - sale . oe SALES ON en working ight Jobs “ai te goed fren sre, Se shed s Orr th 7 vig t - mane re v1 372 RMS., $63. 2.) mh FREE BROCE 
rs mw yo bs furmighed. Apply Howard Q } =e AVA A he? “1h—Por 2 refined. ro CORY ANT i rm Be vite | | __ ron PRES BROCHURE 
Or . 924 4 Johnson's. Seven Corners. Pails ™ mm i ats ay we 1 y aoe ove, Sm we Ro 45 Vie vee and transp. AV RMS., $75. 00: 
= . . scious livin ne FORT BENNETT 


Receptionist-Typist : Near Metropolitan | WET isy—tor sms| baci pte a lifottane easent OW, S8it—-Wot vinie permil-| Srvunde, $200 moe LA Sts) BET IGHT FULLY t 81.50 
ys Furn, Apts..$ APARTMENTS 


¥ 
work and e train tor . " x Ge organization. No} 10%, } ~~" mn ‘ PTS 
al x soreteees 5 ern UNEURN. 33) furnished apt, in excellent om- | ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED 


errs ““Ymumediate 


‘on Wastern eve. bet Bladensburg 


Eastern ave ne.| Mondays. iy St ; 1341 G ST. NW. 
me awe D Birt. 


—_—_ #.. 


a Gm, ¢ hecessar 
ios Circles c} o he pent -_t ms stine ree, oh J tee. Myera a salary to start.| SSining given. raings while é 4 -4770 
eduats, ‘Regular’ colers| ake b*) but net | training, Srougg"si00 mo. Jiis O| 188 kee WW emtadio oe BRIGHT WOOD : 
i eres D "het i PaxfianSs € ay og semi-private Dp CONCORD GARDENS "BULLY AIR COND. Gontignges Wt. 2 4 bus service | 


sioesaars And s vec strong 
sepornimest. sh & Mrs. OBrien.| siert person to work as ‘st sorter oh. AY. - — . shalt tlie - , . ae | , . 
y. res wrt re, AIR-COOLED HA modern features, reasonable reot.| FOR INPORMATION. CALL | Seine View 
00 | 
| 


poser section located at Meridian 


on moving sorting belt. 5-day wx... ; 
interest! . geod : a en tie | beth, free parking in rear. Tele-| 1 bedrm. liv. rm. dinete. kit. and * - With Hich €! ti 
. J0a8 phone . Hil iep Sigeee. 1479 Euclid st. aw ' ig evation 
WILL tt tis iva yr. pi orking condithena. J oom 2 ate "Sane beth corms am : near churches HU RE. 5 Overlooking Poto 
showers: aed PRX 


° a - ; _ ba : 
SALESLADIES Sri as “S.. Mendey through Hin Hi, GRADUATE ant Aaya mise aprs. “Te be 5. Cap. RICT 2 FIGHTS APTS. and Washington 
Pri Tf you are 21-28 years and inter- = b fe ~ oY * 362 bed judas _¥ Sines U._2-0998 jm en eT in Vir inie 
"CTENOGRAPHER e in 6 sible position in y pith new de- st. ee. oe . + . 
23-40 Sch ll use initiative and FuRGr, — Ye rm. Gin.. Kit.. bath. “EMBASSY SEC iON 9-8, Sat. 9-4. Bun. 1-6 
handling people and sarent ent. 6 pore sarbese disp exhaust fan Evenings by appointment. 
S.DAY, 35-HOUR WEEK le nai ie sas st _ ~ | ,03 roof, $100 inc! util. DE. 2-1506 THE WARWICK RLINGTO 
1412. 9:30 to 5. “he ‘gente par me. feet aoe 13051 IDAHO AVE. NW. | Reina’ terior. tits we Diaries MOST Cnqumumet APTS. 
Excellent opportunity for edvance-| OVER 457--We have employment Quiet. : lobby: TV PREE Excel. selections, al ; | Fah ave. lef te apts. ws 
tie Wailea tibet emia’ ment. Many company benefits. Alr| | of” Call now to help with i redee.: 26 run| parts D. C. Call MANDEL. AD.| , (BET. MASS. & CATH. AVES) upont Circle rea One Block from Key Bridge 
— — 140 onthiy “in apere hrs. St enced . eir-cooled 
ooente,  * nowy deco ew fireproo? apartments. iarge 


st. oe. — .| halle 
PEOPLES LIFE INSUR. CO. ‘ave sy high earnings. Permanent ‘work Pri. Kit BA 3 Rorthas oped trane. Fil, “Sinsite’ bat 
HIPCOVER seamstress. Experienced] © fits. . : ts With 1, 2.3.4 rms, kit | ping Al : with shower ee) efficiency and 1] Tirfag Teoma, “Bientr of, closet 


antenna: osutpore + gy X. with 


uaistred ox Sele Pout Fa oe or. also needed, > tht. = ; washer.) & BW. ne..s¢. sec.; children: apt. fo : eee 4 

Ranerie EN gr PaO CAREER SALESWOMAN pate Senne oF Mr sale at - pri home ‘eave Gis, Mia, eee, S80: cee besees Modern bath. executive, fe terrace. TION © , ae tadllities: mS 
@,,-™ 4 work: S-day <a nest week. lps. $75 WEEK GUARANTEED as. mw. + eas APTS., FURNISHED 34) maid service. Parking facilities. Ba. WARWICK park fenced -! 
_inguranee and vace- a EN & CO. INC..| A genuine career opportunity for WM. HAHN & CO. eb eo TEX AREA Som mn BO. 5. SPs 3051 or — kg sheoping ® min, to bus—S min 


2 a H ave, Rockville. 
we have afternoon well-groomed lady with direct to) , : &c 

evening end Saturday an rt, Typ consumer or relisted sales expe- 16) healthy men 6 ss 0 ST. Nw. ii --} . : peed. pee nicely fure.: wo, Lovely ethic. api pretigate Bert. to streetcar downtown 
Ly 29 Pa SE ST 3-0190 oe’ fa air 


Bunday yg ad svatlabic weitetae rience to assist local manager in NEEDED AT 6 CE Ith Sel. : " r . eat , 9 . nee 
rt supervisor capacity. No canvassin r women Pull or part time. ’ oO m ’ secretarial service; near churches 
COL S| Earnings at start $75 " Fe ta a .—__— good transportation and shopping 1 Bedrm. ....... $90 00 


rties or delivering. Car r ed . 
go| For Eerrriee, waowe RE F-2681| peceeacr. “ABSIT GON THK ak 5.| s449 me Teng ot ase-con-| Se Bi does fun:| AIR-CONDITIONED _ | Hentitotiy- 100. | 2 Beds ..... $110.00 
; 7 : ; rol 1 Bedrm., Furn. ..$125.00 
it mh i Le cireuiating utiis.. 875 te $92.50 Also THE BERKSHIRE ath, am ] : ‘ 
gieeca ra 0.50-$12.25 pished apts. Call TE 6-6670 be- 100 jn | «62 Bedrms., Furn. . $150.00 
7 RGE AD_ +2654. INCLUDING ALL UTILITIES 


a 


and 

you eas about these posi- Fee ats OPERS : 

tion FOUNTAIN GIRLS, $ 
; 


35 
35 
. 5 PRUDENTIAL A CADILLAC 
RUSSELL STOVER COUNTER Gina. 1 $30 BUILDING FOR CHRISTMAS? SPECIAL WEEKLY — ~bedrin : Ti, Purhished Efficiency Apt. ORGETOWN 8 
CANDIES NA FIONA EMPL. eEvice ASSOCIATION on4 os ment aN Spe tex, 2 2-bedrm “at, Attepetive taranme’ een closets, ‘Dreplace: nous CO. 5-4118 Tn MR Eye _ Bestee. 
_719 Lith St. NW. 204 FLOOR | AND MONTHLY RATES 7 Se. Oe "| levator and 2¢-hour secretarial ‘ “bedroom got Onk | st, ecu Pe Pierce st. 
— mors hae nt Fo. mc for edult coup incess Ann ° . 


1343 F STREETS Nw. : ny ne" 7 : i 
CLERK-TYPIST f n : hotel t. JA. 2-334),| et eA GER mat a-4a00| ADM “Convenient elturches_ 669,30 | RES RES MOR. MRS. CUMBERLAND 


t 
STENOGRAPHER =~ ~- Air-Conditioned rm On Rvciy form: in H. G. SMITHY CO per mo. Ay sliabie ist. in- 
SALESLADIES” wantec Refined young lady, capable aL —" a » . Ul wtilit 4 
tare gore, Sor aw Wel] ~=NIEWSPAPER | and intelligent. Hours 9 a.m.| Suslfed mes and gales ran HOTEL : ns x abs eit seh Gt HW. OF. 3-3300 | SENGINGEON, MD“ i-and 3 Deg-| PRES BROCHURE AVAILABLE 
oy ae Pa ton Dr. to 4 p. m. Closed on Saturday. be elected paige it" Bray, TA. ez te bamt im Nicely furn netie: ots an $38.50 inch asfls M. T. BROYHILL & SONS 
osmetics | twhale). Interesting and pasted po In excellent offices. y NEW COLONIAL 4 <3 ond ac . iv oa : a hit. bau ate” s33: | ; : 


sition for «a 
store. books. vm ivenalterg ongy| i. Bewspaper ig Rt were N. a DOMESTIC is + *aesdiibendnadl wilt *| cob Sio6 hk vath “NW — Bed -| Opi S056 en one gy, M28 Lee MRY. Atl. WR JA 4-130 
shorthand skills. Mans ny *. nb on child care. live in (ca}- ISTH : M STS. NW. ad $51 To 7 sis we: sediulian: babar urn. tde- bath: all ‘welt: |— “ ame 5 wee. ir % 
PY renaonn WORLH BOOK ENCY, 5 ami} ation. call AP. ee | O mo. os te Lee-Albemarle 
LESW Y, * mee in ir each yeboot district “for i ned lr 203 & | 


benefits uding 
social thr 
Bork as ations ae req. rea Malate open. RA. 3-3391 afte . 7 3436 19193—}3-rm ood | COL.. om03 18th st bath: all utils: | 
r th. 969.80, iné wil | $10 wk. RA 3-027 7" ao 329941. Apartments 


Zmerey hiy euper a : ands pod ve ,.. onal arte. . J $67. 
” =p SABUAL CORMER ick, Smee HELP, vai < WOMEN 7\ HELP, MEN & WOMEN ve inen 14 y lies Harvard a ey OE: ach, ai ee ee Fart > ENC. | VIC. GLEBE RD. AND LEE HWY 
7. at ~ nN DEPARTMENT - LEY NOTED nicely fi rp. Pa? 2d floor: ' iit path. 878,50 ME f-6668 —— | $43 Ip ‘ -0350 $7 
Glogs. excellent working condi hi art et See Ruclid st. Attrac. 1 Ige. rm. kit..|/ LA . 1791 Lanier p aw 
He Gund aze_Appy MAY. The Was ington Post D. 1 and 2-| pvt. bath, bsmt, apt nicely furn r. c ivert st. "Bridge bedrm ye ' 
Pain A URANT. 13th d Ti H id 2131 @) ST. NW. r 1h 4-91 . mo rere. al wo. Federal ate “<> 18 Incl. utils., laundry facilities: 1 bik. 
5 15 L STREET NW WAITERS NEAR DUPONT CIRCLE | tonal ry, Sepia ; air-cond. op-| Henjal Co, bid N. ¥. ave. Bw. NON PAR ws Br can Pen atagoe. ry So 

: CAPITOL Hi oped: S-rmi K M, T. Broyhil ns 
ber b-day week: Write, saree age AND Oe cE ae ON $0r8135, util inet Parkine. COLOSED, ac Fin: orem es ee OXON TERRACE | 4624 tee Bes. JA. 4-100 
— a eae vee : aes dace. 698 mo. Lt & TH ne WILTSHIRE CRESCENT 


WAFTRESSES Living That You Enjoy |p ya i Sm | on | Peers sa ett] i 2b ASITIGNED 
WOODWARD & LOTHROP | 880 SINGER PER MONTH | sel ain Sg acces Wels eto dl aun acing 
MAS A 18 to 35 ioe HO. 3-9100. eaten Sree rH day Ba course. Oitier. uthera ove.| dressing room, 7 by 9 Large close 


YEAR-ROUND permanent positions. Excellent earnings, plus 2134 G ST. NW. bath, F Refinea i -- dinette. Lichen. erm rms. | v, read ie Gk, BE FURNISHED ar 
' u 


VARIETY OF IMMEDIATE weekly salary. Meals and uniforms furnished. Air-conditioned . 4 ~ 9 dan ome ent, ” ule 3t to q adults RA’ sé: scala hl = = Se SHARE 4 shopping Renter, “208 to 580 Der fir Tieso Cae Speman Mae. 
SELLING OPENINGS % ate ae ie ait AM ee esa Oe PRE ee UPLAND 
shops. Hospitalization and insurance benefits. Ay oet peiurs. ge Aer Page 437 at bora ape “2182. a —— _ 
A 


dec, m urn ; A CAPRITZ DEVELOPME 
one 1 ot, Ew Op Fat ied 66 | cand Hotes 69.50. HE. 4-73:6. inet  ! ‘| gin, sway exposures, scasole. an. ‘> the City—Single Pare 


AT OUR apd ¢ ir. Vic,-—Attrac, tonne 
DAY AND NIGHT SHIFTS whir. ‘Baily, | He vi. bed my bath grill. uh retes. . Oni. sing “OF a sind wt ee jobed- 12 MIN. TO DOWNTOWN 


Main Store—Personnel Office, 9th Floor SOL, 13 is oh, 08 8 vt apt. £0 1 | Rhee apace tela | em, 4 otek 2 Bloghs Prom Nagel Revsassh Lad 

10th, llth, F & G Streets, N.W. be “= : Pesos Nice 3-rm. apt. ort, beth, $70 mo..| Fm. sdf. 5 pret, Govt, 4 med cetlir : : 
Full ‘Time—Regular Daily Part Time MANY LOCATIONS igi peeentad. “A. T-Yaad 7 rok eek tac = ke ot 3 og at $30| LONGFE fii a4 pk oe hy 
Chevy Chase Store—Personnel Office APPLY TO THE OLORED, | toh oe ah 1 Sh ae , ros suid AP. telah , Ri. ” alg, UTILS. AND TV ANT. INCL. 

Wisconsin & Western Avenues HOT SHOPPES DL Empl. lady of, man, lee, a mt, $37.50 each, util. : : he Bs eo eee 
Full Time—Evenings & Saturdays MANAGER 8 \ <= leges = iL AIRFAX. “2. bec Wie ony & bath ger 30 $80, INCL. UT s. 
For Government Workers & Housewives ~ 0s, HU. 9-808). “Cl UR: OH—Privgte NF “apt 88 Ay a4 rms. end "bath 59.38, rr be yg 
rms.. Kit... bath; “util urn., adults , veel ee hese | Gh {ies D.C a ry ave. shee Hiii- 


| 7 or to the ny, rE. 40K 4-~-. {A . wy. 
| ; NVENT: Cite Manan Apts. 


¢ ' tr Wal ‘ Vii ; | 
f ‘a SEORGETOWN..P st. nr. Wis. 
Chevy Chase Personnel Office 1341 G St. NW. ROOM 200| Oto ae irog.| $0, tm. Fun, Water: i 9 py 2 
Full Time OL 313 e -- at 800 y @ at i : s..| Sto > : on 108 AE 208. 3 duet floors: 
: yed person: ! he all ths. te eiris| cluded, “LU. 1-35 P36. ames i te. iyine 


Liberal Discount & Many Other Benefits HOT SHOPPES, INC. 


Men aoe 


36 WASHINGTON post and res HERALD — UNFURNISHED 34 
we Monday, August 29, | racious “Living! 
410000 -.. I= unruennno 3 IN AN ATMOSPHERE 
‘ _ARCHMONT FOUND ONLY AT 
sunday GARDENS | The Woodner 


Circulation : 
means more sales results for penctincacty er ease Air-Conditioned \ot-wa | at tn Ret "i “apts. full 
whic yaeten eet| EFFICIENCIES ct ac rraley eee teat | ala. how cts one 


Washington Post and Times 
Herald classified advertisers. | Siner ar cr Gg wee ane 1-BEDROOM AND 


To place your ad for Sunday | “l:Bedroom” 3 2-BEDROOM APTS. | js, att te Duplex rm ne. | fae me opeenine, canter] 49 ISTH ST. NE 4 . 
Phone ITIES INCLUDED gs. coca a es ota tes i xtures. eae 5 DOWN ees if r brie stone felas Pcie and is 
REpublic 7-1234 ALSO SOME FURN. APTS. pes x att EE esa . Ake | Se Cg FI sche eee fal : re uished room ’ f:| MAGNIFICENT RAMBLER 


«i . 
Resident Mgr., JA. 7-0300 “peck: a Wily furnished. a. sane f bana or _testures.| This de luxe home in Hillepdele 
tucoteeste kee | * cits oo Pia tet eer SSE can ORS ETO "oie se we 
Larchmont Realty, Inc. } wie can you Take Rs . "arcap Gl’s ‘Frstcnsee alas, a Weaked ws. 


YACHT HARBOR Sw | tin “Elen k ee ome “ei St as) ome gyros | ES eee 8 EAR 


is ; 
~i% BATHS treet owner. TIi 


SWIMMING POOL net ; ne 
22 ACRES OF GROUNDS irene § Peate it | JAMES C. CONLEY & CO, 
K 


HUNTING mine, Hunteoed Apts. | Taek a a eee ay agar reml| You must see te beautitt Another Good Buy 


4021 JAY 68T OSE. ij 2 jbedroom. dining 2-atory ¢ olonial 

TOWERS 1 BEDRM.. $71) #22 vue ia| Geechee! is Pees eae oe a eet Sep 3 
aieen AGS. Lane ares. | Efficiencies, from . 2. $80) 0 eo TP x |? BEDRM _ $8] , Sie, emt: r. own to 8 oie eerenes 
dinette, ‘vin ie fe pri- I-bedm, apts, from .. $115 INCLUDES ' t2)—273 # - Trov. off Aig rm 
; ae The Wishver arseee. brick 


, a ri- ava 
en ; semidet ence dest | will tm temporary, rambler ats | intl: ‘own 
mae a deesteasely ae | 9636 16th St. NW. | Site Sites * xt| fla Fyn woe! SRR Fd sels een Kat) FRED A SMITH CO. | werearats| (stg laren bh} Aart 


oo tarsonk. TS is. le Bee |v. 9.0009 aD 62007 BU. cer “COLORED —S$495 DN, | Serr RORaiookrit SL) Berets fein aan ee 
” ped Pan A ~ BELLE VIEW | Seema "dees - dic ae r. 2 APTS., 2D & R. |. |Miere ine pentsne heute wnt has | iter WRT 


s 2. . as te, make @ real home 
es On Mt ¥ vd. in aaaerwy f On Mount Vernon Bivd. _ | ieee Hh 5, ae oot ha pers se o . . em os Pere k . Baer. Of sone ' enter al, 


2 or OL 


, — | uF bork. wit 
o “EN | love BU bentase ! itis aoe Wie ATOR a ww. Sil heat: near ‘Tech 
HILL fave and 10 min. te qason, main . eua 4 ty rot | Fe en 
OFF MT. VERNON Memorial Mey - ENJOY OUR BIG, NEW . B . NO , NA 


Oa apt. ; 
Sree See E .St'l> Bedrooms, From $84.50 SWIMMING POOL || J Fiat | Seon, Westie fiis| Sis Wa, Bue Os EN 

Y ewly apts. with yty S i jon | C# oe 6 weil ’ iy pb. ec. ve ie for} . 
YON bys 35° gc. cs be seperate dinettes. a. tons ae floor be eipent. Seria Ne weaece ce : r MORTO ‘ ae 
= Tod ets a alae pe eae Sane Sian va et er em Bae Gis arias | De Peete pealls| , Terie, Buy, ee 
” é ae.) ; - & Cc ie call HA AL . ey Sat i mt a ee Veter si) Eds sfae room the — features 
tad A. G. , 2 J-bedroom apts: 885-895. : ‘ + ey | —- Pere 38%0 a spacious Se tepin 

| ees FOR SCH SOL 117.50: oll utilities paid. ke. ' | et. . “ Bek 


bo ral.to-wail paspemns. 
er 
° leview v -* + 1. aw ‘ a 
NO. ARLINGTON MOpen “delly | go. Batters ! - py* 1? th. r mae _ cong notes pica igth, Bt. 
2 rg ty ONE 60.-8-8000 - ib $001. | COL... ¢€ *, ?F > one, -- Yeulers.. Front S"Fear aes? arenes "1 = 


ive new. 
Por price and rambler. “ie h a fe ha rick 
. ¥ 
terms. call Mr. Parks Jr. DE. 3- sear at us ¥ wese- t 8 y te 
3.500, Cu gs, & Ger. Ager ra. Up opposite 


room, 18-ft. 
RAL . Au Broyhilton 
ee i WRLC os Apartments on SEALTY. JA. ‘ann MR. J 65s Just Like ew—$500 Dn. bn ee Reema 
Comfortable » nec . . : redesers = ae ak Get 
Wilson Bird _ JA. 1-BEDROOM APT $85 NE. in apt zt i vecene -) — oe , RTY 6 guns garenient gy ger. Ny iets ee ee 
OL. 


. at aw ey Aot. 5 rer te men ho her apts. 
EES Gee ua, weet: Rete. |Z EDRM. APT. —$105| Se on REALTY | Sais dia th ete | 27 UNITS NR CAPTOL | BU aS AT | sean ape ae alto RE 


2238... refri«.. 3 r : sch ; 
Rev. we TR i renee | INCLUDING 


UTILS EXCEPT ELEC 
ey at 5423 One block oppinge and Complete perfect con.| U N 
AIR-CONDITIONED beached ran Fost ay ‘COL’ RD i 69 roperty Manage aes “Sr “kt) - NEED ANY MONEY ss.es » MD. 
a brand- “new ds luxe elevator cule} MA T. Broyhill & Son i * w sre me, vg PHILIP T. ATKINS LEO M M. BERNSTEIN CO. one of bave o heme recondits for Recomary . i and all other 
rae, MOST Sot there er | Laree living teem. southers onpe- | 4624 Lee Bey. JA. 4-1200 vans & A DE. 2-4087 et cs cle wk ne setts 


era. fe Fitehes s separsted by mes. | Te NATL. REA leereerceretacyricuare sa near ment re ote =, ! i eee ' 
GELMARC | Hiern Spit g] BRANDYWINE | 2 Some St ae gran eh ot wee Sho YF tele be ee Pe 
SWNTOWK “Ai 1905-Watae.| _1-BEDROOM—$72.50 up PARKLANDS SALE». €. nous a4 DEFACHED—VACANT ust, od Waster ‘ave. bie et hoa 


Ze 
Comfortable efficiency 2-BEDROOMS—$77.50 up o is} a CAP TOL HIL bed Bok CoP path ww. ° | it ; ; 
O W E R S oy 4 = ahi ke er an mor ait Ditties enatuded ‘ yi ent Buy In Town ue. . ? : 5 TO 8 “ . « tn in an | EA rambler containing tcRen + 3 . m, Erenings— 


1930 COLUMBIA RD. N.W. RR sat aes 201. | Alsbame Ave. and Stanton Ra. om | herd XC, NA, B-210% PPealiadtiee” ise Are, SE =a] full bam ares "Tm.| Stairway erent’! §— JUST COMPLETED 


aF. rea 
a pite : ¥. ; tiled baths lev EXCEEDIN beautiful n 
. ° : units: ely “ t a s i ie G 
' ONLY LIMITED NUMBER AVAIL. rend. bids: ; st z- bitchen steps te sardens. Walk to oh »| rambler rst time sown. 
OL. 7 ARD H. room 


... from $82.50) 
from $127.50| 1 YLER GARDENS! # DAE ets 60. | 34 Rms, $68 to $70 POM uxuriously fuga i-rm : 3 COMPL 
All Utilities th pg 2 ae — ; LAST th at eee Ri 645 : “dea: awaiting. dipts vite ate beautiful Eo 
conta 


: decorating colors SINOLE-FARE F a l area 
Ried 24-be, cpesthartat-evttebbeas Grv tecils —outstde dryt TI IN MODERN Lrvr SHOPPING AND SCHOOL aT My ne. 4 Kits, fn ieee rick Coloni riced Very low et 614.500 on easy 
Package wendry rooms. trunks and | exe fease. chee. a dren Full Aji r- Co - we ebuonE BUILE ING i si a Eve i - ~~ a ba ee bed: | : Ble S. DAVIS CO. 
pec rooms garage facilities ‘ rea. Bi - Sereenea pore — 
? 1 Bedrm. ., $70-72 y 0 RENTAL OFFICE. JO 23-2990 Newly ~ 2 -€2.; ders, RO. se He to gil. ah Py snd 


availa 
garage: 


5 Bs 
Furnished Apts. Aveilable ,|2 Bedrms, ....$89-$93} Ms ie “(oration “at | Open Mon, to at, 9AM, to 9 PA Ser, a ose tag cea =e on ist bedrms. 31 COLORED $495 DN. os. putin gliNgley HRP SO.) bat Be ree oe wae 
ve Wilson G - tne. 


3 Bedrms. . .$105-$109) hoy sonabie trent. Hilite OLORED ae lichen an . Py we Sad ie NO NT AR 
noone Fa co. bea reget pate CALVERT APTS: ber “Sie all! NOW AVAILABLE Wh dia i Lee | HRs vb Bet 
-1749 JE 2-2810 . POR OFS. 
GELMAN __ | Ai fae py Benning Fits. Apts. Ae Some “hy die 


investment Bidg., ST. 3-6572 | ie tune new 2% = ai, rms ; | Bedem $67 ist cape 


in mod. apt. didg.: ajeeg-e 


pte mie 7 es Ses 2 Bedems—$77__ | a."2® QPOROUL ITE Ung we es od “ihe "$395, DOWN ts orbt tt ak gACENT” SCOTT 


ALL, UTU4. INCL. It RENT 


500 South Courthouse Rd. 


‘A 


b, “cant: shepriey ant ans Besant: iia" 
sie "Bas Celene right TBEDRMA S74 80 LLOYDS APTS. $33) Pak t- Be. Eaee Aer, > invatory, neat mm cie\-te ew) NA. 8-0350. "Filin ie zat . is . op teq a fh ny + - a oe ay + me 
0.500 


$77.50—$80.00 3 RIRKWOC 1D epemameren CO hours, 0-5 geliy: 8-12 Sat 3902 PaTR bat lin 208 cent. Be scioss. ts eras gaan DE 


2005 North Fairfax Driv 800 TENN. AVE., ALEX. | Guth” sas range Jos OWN and shopping. refrigera 
r* Rowe. | 2 BEDRM. —$81.50-$85 | OFF SHIRLEY HIGHWAY an Wits Siar Pa ave iol Entire first, lipor: 18 by | ty 66. Cider! 1665 32D ST. NW. CONC, PEN. ON, B-we bath roughed etiss ost 
are . , 7). Pos = 


$85. 

INCLUDES ALL UTILITIES 5 Minutes to Pent 

New. larse and stirective 1-bedrm oo rs OPE T 
at door. shopping & close. | | FURNISHED OR UNFURN, opm aaa a. a's CTICUT AVE. NW : lent - 

Marg tt a s| FREE BROCHURE | Uncayoccomarso | juaedi tua n thaeee| sSCORMETICNS ATRA..| Sed feet coun Detached Brk. 
BEITZELL | 1 Bedrm. from $73.50 | Ap aif st a6. Lt 4-S34) patio. gas heat: $33,500. ar- Vacant atc 


2731 NI w ST 7 EYE ST, NW Mrs. Mai! - = 
- HYA fo 7 oT fis SANDOZ "INC. Ex- 
100l Gon Ave sD. ‘7-300 West HYATTavn LE MD 2 Bedrms., from $87.50 CO-OP. APTS., SAL 37) First oot front. 17 by 36 private! clustve 8 DU. 17-1234" eves. Ems. Ay be baths full ‘pam! cal or 


wat? , “aeee display) 6Windew 


PREFER APT Livi NG ALL UTILITIES INCLADED 1-BEDROOM AFT... in Pals iSTRI onaliy 71 A ty bite as atin is! i: me tsa a! te 16 an . 
$80.00 é .| ee. Monthly pete of in- GtonG Wwa—Lovels “old Federal eT ICT REALTY CO. te. Daroct Prise Se sad joes ty 40086 


ouse rooms. library 
Well-located heae offering specious PRICE $9500 ’ : 


WHY NOT TRY THE BEST | DATES so0ms. pastel decor. ' ine ;, . 5 i - v 
INCLUDES ALL UTILITIES POM AR APTS. facilities. Convente I'S schoo | 7. Thos. J isher & Co., Inc. | fern eatvert. CHA TEL: oar 
u on z* TED 
W.__DI._ 76829 GEORGETOWN Bh ha BEA living with floor-to-ceiling CLOSE-In Riv erdaie | location, 1 near 
ture fireplace huge} #c ls practica)! * new 2 
besutiful garden wide 14ee Decatur Se | . 3 bed and beth on| bungalow on level lot. GI approve 


EMERSON GARDENS sctiminating| OPPICE itnd’ 6.1, MON-SAT. | FOR GOOD (white) tenants iy DC. 


ver) 
4300 EMERSON ST. ws Hs 8 : samtge or pnd Soares conyen furn. or unfurn. epis. reas. fee. Lares. 
| OV. 3-0950 eL, ap_f. “10k - Detached house. | ail 2 f 
HYATTSVILLE, MD. a r. cotout andlords rent your . x By apoint- Reeatttal san +A, : ry _ consist sis = ' “Gecond. ROBERT S. DAVIS | CO. 
Lovely A +4 S EORMS and bh ip & burry. Call cis Eystucive ing of 6 booms Pre rage: WA, 17-3900 "Til 9 P 
Droject. | 20 PO PONIO , NOW RENTING | Cherry, ME. 86-6534. Also property G. Cc. CHATEL DE. 2-1137 connet WOOD ‘COMPANY 4. 
MA AN ADDRESS OF DISTINCTION’ GEORGETOWN n eee it:| 92158 Georgia Ave. Silver Spring cinta aie one 
2828 . ) 99 ear 0) ld with se liv. er 


6 .. Dear ———S = ae 
yard oo aia RVR HIS ARTO EMIT s CRUF cox EES | on “Yoraa “ns 2: +R 1383. ‘| sven . near Pol or | with picture " 
| ol A ° CONNECTICUT one 7 te can be ~ ted on a R’S SUITE of sooregens| wit é: R ? pers - Cris = Fark me 750 ok 


RES, MGR. ON PREMISES | melt ond) Og in a 
: | GARDEN APARTMENTS : : ide AP 1- “Maplor eren and pur : ; raised 
Un +Sere | 3, Sasroqm. sree. Sve ream. BRAND-NEW -be ih 2 ° | " dwellin Sele BACKED BY ACHE ree ie wane a 2 bedrooms, | _7- 4 se Kcsac 
| bat oungstown Kitchen. tie} a1p CONDITIONED fi vi te Vane tc ts: 3 rooms an screened porch HOMES FO FTERAN 
UN. 4-3500 ha Derbosaa’ ax S30tt| catt*bees, TET "| $700 DOWN | Biteielsnet tes anal Se: Tac 
‘ LUXURY APTS. pat MOVERS—Economical. PRIVATE. BOOM, intun. is law OW full “bam, ong beat’ laree jaree jot, ors i lee oa ti aie 
Individual! ge? trols for HAULI An oy ee tre cs bent “aiey, "Wasent Bee w | rieht out BE 5] Semeters: ™ =. chickens Por ss 


cooling and heating Di : D. 4-4037 72 ee , . 
to. dishwashe a diss L Piva te rin > 1 on 7 e bath, | > -| Bolyw beth t 
PRIVATE HOUSES ites - reirigerater with reeuer low ; a , on a "bel: Sheraton — Bldg, pists, 9-60. -p0 gin 1621 H SE ij: br , ur : full Tine: Ms beam Hil! renal Se shop. 
OR Richiy ,carogios gaaseeese. et ra ea ae 22 11 14TH ST ens tn ene? Sail So Just pert. SL and Pe. se Sagem ¥. ~,* oh. RAL . ping center, an ad bus En 2 1 ” 
Ss) ; e : ' ' . , gn 3 ~2>7 H N 
DUPLEX APARTMENTS Be: owls ard anc dese serv. r or heavy moving an noch. yo — of. TOWN nou rick A rooms na — = W— Attractive ~~. | SALE SUBURS. HOUSES 37 VA. 
3%; ROOMS FROM $130] sB&fty-"s.% tian 20-Lalae | “ ROGMS—$98 PER MO, | Benutiful town pouse. Lares tor.| storm ‘wt cal $20..0004-| St G06), RORZENDORFER, OL. VIRGINIA 
Ve RMS. $185 & $190 , 6 ROOMS—$325 PER MO ab bedreome a co. 1 t nw, MA. ALEXANDRIA, VA—NO © 
First Floor: Large Living Room, Dining Room and Kitchen ” Gan. ee ie further formation, apply hue = Tom open- Brick bedrms ip schoo 
rida ave NO. . Late 


Second Floor: 2 or 3 Bedrooms and Bath RENT INCLUDES ALL UTILA. 5 - S ody isl b with 6 rooms, 2 ne center to, 8 
- r ‘tire, = Elev 7 -| try De ercgiient Kitchen and. pen- eeutthil pod en. | = “sbsches ps financing svail * Js mes 
Each House Has Front and Back Yards, Lawn Care, Gar Choice location in SES "AMES. 7 DIXON & CO. >a . fec. rm. ood Acres Constr. Cor. an 


end Trash Removal, Gas, Water, Heat, Laundry os an just 5 min a eened . shen. © b os » 
Sern ot epee Ponti Trop an ay sm at hr | peer Sid aa tae eee ae at oe Pk aes | ont ln PRE tS 
~ : ; prisi 2 Realtor, 15123 Wi ve. AD : ave. an este r 

SCHOOLS AND SHOPPING CENTER ON SITE IEBENE bloke nse = -| Sonal’ or riers ae ret | + r wate aK - | din rm, Rip. big gen ond pant susan 

Rental Of tige 4 Bids ; td ay ‘ edrm 8 established exe pnecutlve rig a Nw N a Sales. Ine oO N- pa an ing ful bemt. rec. tm; mice — 

2 Bedrm., $93——-3 Bedrm., from $109.50 uy oe ee. ue he i osed yard, sere a | See, 2 room. fu Me | Ra. xX Arr oe at 824 "960 Bh i A th RANCHETTE ON 34 ACRE 

also few furnished apts. CAFRITZ we ; comb. fure, $140.) Bone’ "O a oe — VETERAN 

MthakNw. Dt 7-9080 Be TESA —Weay_WTR . BUSINESS PROP. RENT 47 GI APPROVED--$12.500 lot q $-ACI | ESTATE _ mode ! 
JEFFERSON VILLAGE pr) Bret rable oe me = eae $500 Down, $75.92 Mo. | sxibaAtbas. |Heaeer ae Wooded Jot, in'@ 6 

4734 ARL. BLVD., FALLS CHURCH, VA. AIR CONDITIONED “ocptton =, Eo crock Pe. way. Alexandria. Lovely emifet. Wrist heme with HOUSES WANTED, to BUY 65/ water: locaied Rediand re, 2. miles rambler of over 1400 fine 

, 12 t0 4 Ejorary’ er pedro. -and bain on Sat 3 ba gat | SPOT CASH | MOR VET | isnitiledas 


JE. 2-5500 Daily, 9 to 5; Sat., 9 ta_1; Sun., CARILLON HOUSE kitchen. rec. - ; gas heat. Ca H a ST NO 
On Oe. 7% - fovely <a .. ant ete ‘a HICKS REALTY co. 


2500 WISCONSIN AVE. NW. 
-bedroom row 
800 DOWN 


49 orice... 


OR 
house, fu ‘shed v to e - 
EFFICIENCY sy nt ieclnded 8100 per it | arto Wea ine. ‘ aes A aan CO. ins or . @. Co. pore tape, poarnse (ot. ace ant. 
: 1-BEDROOM pu : “of 8f3-7304._| - a. | 
Broyhilton Apts. xy FASE TOTS CORE, | Beta COLORED Gi mitiiape atu setvick| SEE THE HOME| ove RIGHT IN 


3h ine gt NORTH MICHIGAN PARK ‘ 

APARTMENTS Chase, D. hot : . A oe Attractive, semidet. brick home: | to pure me.| OF TOMORROW Lockles St" a sensible price? Love- 

~ - | 20 . 3 bedrms.. ge. tile bath. rec. rm eo pure + rambler at a sensible price’ e- 

Vicinity Glebe Rd. & Lee Highway Luxury living with “every mod SE he | Aritng ton, Va. act tre p's.) eee heat; level foaonl tt Priced «c 2-be¢rm. Rome on 8 iar 
ern ' beautiful : "OD. B i feat eo er, 196 13.000. GI financing arranged, - elose- TODAY 

N. Arlington pena oa Gu: Bo BG) Sy Cpsmsaaree POO NaN) ngpind Sew ‘Some are al oo 


' . binet 
CASp ancy erat ee | ~SPLIT-LEVELS | Sees Price 
Walking distance to all schools and shopping BUYER OR T POST, REALTOR 


5 


antentia. launéry = 
ase 


AL LA Cc 
acilities and «ar Minnesota ave. ne. inr.| EX 413 Eves #5 s-1 149 


SES UNFURNISHED a | nin t 30 COLORED Will sell on terms 6-2000 SILVER SPRING AREA AR 9 
: trick a surrounded by fine 


Your Inspection Invited | Physician or dentist—Fis, ave. & REALTY co... | [IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY 
ay old: generous 


. 
| ' . ave & rms., auto. heat. ‘a trees: 
Plenty of closet and Large living room CALL EM. 2.8800 CAPE cO ris t floor. es. ; cocenerty,  Pareeien s stan. -" : $ ] £, 730 gioeete, ree “ehbehor- wi 
: m . " « . ™ ce orig ; 
storage space. . pT ce ctiies bed-ooms. 4 rec. $23 300 call meat ty. ° xh 7 papect A 


) 3C OLORED 
Off-street parking Equipped kitchen with ot. beim. dome “ ge A rel A - ; M. 7" » Co . aa Built a 3. silar Alte flat. o: * eat VA ae FHA *PINANCING _eves KL 
i Mealited vets 


Fenced-in equipsed garbage disposal, exhaust fan arly a peg omy ’ . , oss. a a. ie p t x d, ppraisal ca down. 30-year loan to A peRPRCP A — 
playground : ern : SEE: : t KO ZEN DORFER 
Laundry facilities tile, .de8L | abe ‘ tall | carpert, : " -| 500 BLOCK A ST. NE. ) RE. 716 
Fireproof $157.50 . YF t. ‘ . ” & laree love- WE & : - OL. 4-811) Tid 9 to traffic Bh... FR Scare 
Master TV antenna 1 block to bus 5 \ ET Akh th; 2 rear Aas PEARS EXPER THE ULTIMATE IN LIVING | can take your vacation in. this 
kit.. dinette, tile! _«& Erade schools, ber , . : Ad | ates 4 me NA 8.5020 
t f, Bas s; Ani and oom ? iy PAYS ay Mr oor + 1, SR 628 a — Due to wife's health, bane- 
1 Bedroom. $85 2 Bedrooms. . $105 excem elec. Bus at Your door. | Bee A 7-18 Being gad | WM. CALOMIRIS ty “CORP. pours. 2 Foci Sie Hi? 
Including All Utilities f en * | wath g openings : ~ COLO NOS CLOSED SUN, | pictu “set ind 
Except Electricity 416. bed baths. tables, ba a re Fear -. OLORED $395 DOWN patter Ril ch lin reek “bak Sliver Teoria 


sporting ye. ped kitche 
pets ear Stanton Park. 7 larse rms. EX pee ou I NCO RP O- and a feeneee Aisne 
: » bath. ofl -w. bh: TED. IN CON eves “9 offerin 
M. T. Broyhill & Sons bs einberg & Bush, Inc. . AP. 1-4606. COMET REALTY Section. All hols, thie weekend. fer 


4624 Lee Hwy., Arlington, Va. JA. 4-1300 ; Lon Se a oy : Ste Be, | aa mEsD s rooms and bath, WAREHOUSE SPA Rent 50 : : ' 
2A 6-800) whe da Py ; 2 Aye Pe roM ths, powder room, iv. | 
req New warebou Cc, Ss WE jn. modern Investment Bae 
ee | Ge ean ane | fet Sree | be Serna 
x location. Soe porch. e oy ctl 
C | d 5128 SHERIFF RD, NE. | iransp. shopping. 6138" mon Se aheeen +e at % rence te he oa nae ee ki 
O ore ' tone SQ. FT. pa are le ing for. , bedrims.. ull bsmt., larse corner lot masts 
NW COLORED WHO WANT: fay : . ' . ay! R th _ Kitch ty Co. tremendous = endria is priced to gell this works 
wW. NES GM + 62. Reval tet, rhe. . ine ear | Foon: formals “aarden in | down and dslance jess than rent. 
. Tops in service where your : ing. f I rear. beaut lan i: 
3, 4 and 5 rooms and bath + ving | einberg & INC.) ne: QUORED Caine 20 P, M tng sn batlt for casual 


erase = poreh. Det. ; 2 a . d room 
from D. uto. heat, fr eal redec. Mr. }. KWA ; odate any social’ function. . | Blk From School 


$52.50 to $90 per mo. Rn careeeT rar | 5 a ry psn | ea ie | perc PRICED AT $75,000 | sears subse Se ee 
Immediate Occupancy : " L0, 2- Pe a - us oad : Bye ree nee ~4 A> te sow i na. 3 spacious ed 
. 1 so) , , a6. Liv. tm. a ‘ . 7-533 f n 
RECENTLY RENOVATED apecuat“Sohgg pon viner | bali. eigen hrek jo his Seki | SAERER OROE” on | phen Ratan, oxtndn."cps| Ent mnaih|  wowsey “enscoe gumar | MSs GO MERE or. 
‘ SATURDA D SUNDAY CURTIS E. MARTIN 

Bo. 


i Pi. we A . 8 . 27; : 
PINTO OTT Tbe h nt or a atl IO ". : oF a. euick, JU. 7-788 


$650 Dn. to Anyone 
Setanta! 


605 -B 


DELRAY 
$725 DOWN—<I 


a-Set, at- 


BRADDOCK ROAD 
$845 DOWN—GI 


ne Ete 


Soe. od bar 
PHONE TE. 6-724 - TH. 6-7344 


NEW A ANDRIA 


$1250 DOWN—GI! 


PRONE TH. 6-7244~- TE. 6-7344 


AL BAKER & SON, INC. 
se Veriss st. 
rR 


Ari... Palis 


k H 


Chureh 
eights 


ick Cape | 2 
strling— 
: 


gh ay in "Sturdy 
Brick on a Level 2 Acre 


sien ~2(with de- 


VERT REALTY, INC 
2007 Mi. Vernon Are. BI. ! 


COLONTAL 
si 


rm. , brick rambier mY 
. th fu 
cope. ' 
t ce in} 
isposal. | 
re(rig Level lot 


aot REALTY 


Close 


INGTON NORTH 


Yorktown School 


$17,500—Sep. D Din. n. Rem. | ; 


lous end roomy thro 
room <cown 
etairs. Pret' 


ighout 
socrooms up- 

an 7 
=a | 
iA- 


ay 
c Move in with ‘deposit 


EDW. R. BRIGGS. at 


Lee Hey. at Glebe Ra. JA. 56-8402 | 


Mannas Rity, JE. 2-3110) 
WOTC 
“PR BABY” 


coer. wR. wd _rambier fm | 


Corey 8 ne lose Ro bus 
oes. 8 gacto = D. 
ce, 


vin 
a8. . 


r 

Puil 
asement | 
petaide neptrance. Let + lots 


ef charm ” ted on safe 
tend street. VA. spproved at 


ARLINGTON REALTY 

wu vd. JA. 7-9300 ‘til 9 
HANDY AND DANDY 
Brick Garage and Bsmt. 


ONLY $13,950 
te bus. school end shop 


RANDY 
. Just minutes te downtown 
Bafor in appearance 
om. ar ' 
sun porch. = 
neing avellabiec.! 
COLONIAL fe R 


Rea)tors- neraent 
ARLINGTO 
eo it ws }-bedrm 
a. 3 Sac for $2000. do 
t G arlyn eres oun 


2 master 
xl 


JA. $-4200 
, 80.—Believe it or not 
mag 
in 
. e all 
c 


ark. | and | 

freer bus Oat 

FE. ~ MACCOLM 
37-3035 

ARLINGTON NORTH 

Forest Hills 

3 BEDRMS.—DEN 


Golf Course View! : 


PREVIEW 
CHOOSE 34 COLORS NOW! 


/ 


ae CELLED OCR Ron! 
LESS : 


ot Ww ; 
+g * a Tr -@ view ne te | 
as 3. 1 Ta. %33i9) | aes, 724h8 | 
hl a elightfiul for enter- 
Edward R. Briggs, Realtor 


Lee Hwy. at Glebe Rd. 
JA. 5-8402 


SELINGTON—A1C 9S. 83000 dn 
L tiece _, Le ! es a picture 
Artingte Cod in earby 


Lauchs Co 


wh ASRTON HEIGHTS 


GI sealavee on ARL. 


4 = r mepertion an 


ouse condition 
“and *“ priced for im- 


MW... JOHNSTON 


34,950 
Goons Mason Green Co. 
4-1400 


m tiful 


BrAU runs. Swit, SULT factory 
| rec’ hor display 


} Here le & Gandy 


mi tra 


746. 
vent beexvers 
| OF 


EALTY CO. | 


0: |GI LOANS—NO. DOWN 


pod | EXHIBIT HOME OPEN DAILY 
h 


67 VA. 


SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67 VA. 
——icia 6 CC 


oS 


HILLS 


$23,990 


tt ge ets ce on 


- 1 Ky ee (xaat 


ce. 
ite en 
ishwasher an 


zines, tte mom, wag, Dev: 


outs . gatrence. nent wilh now fer oy 


“POMPONIO 


CRESCENT HILLS 
NEW BRICK RAMBLERS 


otk Arlington. “Keer aa 
oni ae O and "bal bones 


ane we * 


3!  diahhie. cn 15% Down 
FHA and Conventional 
Financing $/so Available 


EXHIBIT HOME OPEN DAILY 
10 TO 10 


M. T. BROYHILL & SONS 
4624 Lee hwy., Ari. JA. 4-1300 


HIDE: ~A-WAY 


TIRED BUSINESS MAN 
yone yearning for pence. oo 
e that 


; 
hee eg Raton oa f 
ean RA. a Bn oop 
me 
Be winar 
TRRLINGTON REALTY 
FALLS. CHURCH A AREA 
3-Bedrm. rambler with full 
basement. Assume large Gi 


loan, $13,500 
.W REALTY CO 


_ SA, §-1878 


it 
sed im front porch, 
water beat. on « 
B0xi50 ft ot. 
trees ate 


apace. glo 
bem! u 
Tih man 
Batley 


" 
ahace 
alls urch— 


-bedre pungaiow: expansice 2nd 
21 ving tm. with fire 


~ JE. 2-9400 
$12,950 


NEAT & COMPLETE 


THAT CERTAIN SOMETHIN 
or atmosphere "4 


n Real 


tab) rms By 
"ARLI NiGPON REALTY 
~ Wilson Bird. JA. 7-9200 “ih 9 
4 Bedms,, 2 Baths 
LOT 150X190 
$21,950 


This lovely new home will be ready 


SEPT ON REALTY 
2212 Wikon Bird. JA 7-900 "Tu 9 


Small Country Home 
a In Ripos 
LF . 
with tairwar . 


UPSTAIRI 
level acre 


a) 
per mo Price, 


950 

LINGTON REALTY 
12 Wilson Bird... fA. 7-9900 “Ti 9 
WESTLAWS—) ness . bas omens 
trees. ige . “hools 

Fenced POX REALTY JA ey 30 


~ sensean and a, new and 
test designs with esey construc- 
s free from $1594 te 

lot. cata) 
Dial 


De 
ee 


e ivere te 
PAIRFAx VA 


HOUSE—2% ACRES 
$8500 


le place. Golld 
22-ft. li¥- 
ing combinat! ion dining rm 
and kitchen with range, retrig. end 

tility rm rms. © 
Only 3 yrs. oid. O71 
Weking to schools 
Lore y carden —— 
ip the 25-mile- per- 
c Wi 4 ae cept GI con- 

for 10 


DILLON” CAND CO. 


ruction th roughout, 


coust 


rm., 


JE. 4-4040 Open “Til 9 
566—Country Club Soe i in 


Soacious 2- -st ory 
t 


. realtors 
Glebe JA. 
ee ae bh PE ill 
cance brick Colonial on corner Jot. 
' in convenient neishborho 


Move in Before 
School Starts 


$1500 CASH 


SEARS REALTY 


ay 
it Se bath. sepere 


“NO GI NEEDED” 


it 
Arthur L Wahers Co. 
2419 Wilson Blvd. Til 9. JA. 7-5300 


CLASSIC 


Contemporary 
"—Dramat 


“An original 


most exciti 
3-BED -B 
er in this area: -ft 

' - to - celling prick 
‘lare¢ seperete 
with window w 


emer alee 
super eq 
on retrioer 
spoeseall and — in rane. aa 
~ ba onte s- 
a tied baths 
Bitee with vanitics, 
ding sess wer and 


wail. 


oors 
Ba tar ~ eae a seoamnen B, 
v eection ae - b OE 

ecu 7 


feu i 
seth in overeized 


Lg indirect 


fool Or evi naa . 


ses 


wr pearah “te "sngea. ? but 


Arthur L. Walters, me. 
ivd 


~ Family Home 


SDesreems Cape eo. St vite 
ain AM be it 9a caula * a F 
ie Sees shade Sess 


room and bemt 
charming yard wi 
buses, Only 
and buses, On 
coer G6 


i 
DILLON LAND CO. 
1114 Hillwood Aye 


Caner ERe DECOHT. 


ere’'sa the a peast iful yard to! 
ie Church! P tree. 


: \idden 
En 
ik 


brick 
price, ‘i $16 506: already GI ap- 


. Mannas Rity, JE. 2-3110) 


VALUE PLUS! 
LANGLEY, VA. 
pmeck dab in 5 ie choice ares of 
beth custom-built, apiit-level. cite. 
ated on @ ‘)-acre Dining rm 


lus breaxfast neck fn aiteten. 


m 
aegce uarters. 


YEONAS REALTY 

Aa Eee JA. 8- £2109 

LOVABLE —— 
$19,500 


All-brick. 2 years old: 3 
Culmore section 


ms 


patio 
and construction spake this = 


sneed 
Sinks an potter. “m 
. irate 


No Down Payment 
for this 3-bedrm. brick ge = 
at renien| ares acta’ 5 
: from Wa shingto on outhiv 
payment s S79 including taxes and 
insurance 


Mannas Realty JE. 2-3110 


A Pog | wee ves 
vVic&e OPLE 
TRU sts. 


OREN ALA Paaae ANCE, Esra 


8 we 


CORP. K 4000. 
HANDYMAN’S HOUSE 
$12,750 


Only $1100 cash and you will own 
6/10 acre of trees and basically 
fine 4 bedrm. Rouse which needs 
=e little work here and there. It has 
basement, screened porch. large 


* DILLON LAND CO, 
1114 Hillwood Ave. Palls 
Church, Va 


JB. 4-4040 ___ Open Eves “Til 9 


IF YOU LIVE OW EARTHS 


PART OF 
AL BAKER & SON, INC. 
Als @ o an, Saeee Bt ea oi 


Chauncey Realty Corp. 
room brick rambler with sair- 
er, electric kite 
er and diaposa! 
se large - tin No. >. Arlington. Opy 
> in Can be bows 


"HOLLEY pay 


: ». detached garage. and the 

| Ries be is renced one. smallest oi 
is xi2-f 

ke po — , want a 
serecous yard. call us now 


| anda Rity, JE. 2- 31 10 
" CHOICE VIRGINIA 


Artax Realty, JE. 


NEW ALL-BRICK 


3-BEDRM. RAMBLERS 
NOW AVAILABLE AT 


BROYHILL PARK 


All have full basements. complete 
GE piemens, Peautiva weeded te: 


$15 925 


PAYMENT—20 YEARS 
5% DOWN 25 YEARS 
10% DOWN 30 YEARS 
FHA and Conventional 
Financing Also Available 


10 A. M. TO DARK 


Directions: Arlingto 
iReoute m 


50) approx. 
gene 7 Corm to 
urn left ta and 
te Open use 


Out 
follbw signs 


M. T. BROYHILL & SONS 
4624 Lee hwy., Arl. JA. 4-1300 


BELL REAL 
} G2 8-1968 _ 


3, hing GI 


| 
Attractiv a 4 briek colonial, 
5 yr. © . excel x 


OpEeniy 
¢" 4-4900 


‘4 4 BEDRMS. $13,950 


Palls Church area. 
t fir 


vets or nonvets, Immed. poss, 
Leo M. Bernstein & to” 
CO. 5-3533—-9 TL 9 


—_—- 


COOL SHADE TREES 
HOT FINANCING 


wooded to oe ape tt. 


paneling 
rm. or 


Fone $850 Cash GI! 
Total Pymts, Approx. $99 


LURIA BROS. 


bivd. | * 


netan sectio 
like 
a de 
rt 
ot 
ES 


1303 CARROLL’ PLACE 
WESTLAWN 


abo orgie mi 


ving rm, 


ee 
o pownN 
. Colonial 


la SUBURB. HOUSES 67 VA. 


WILL TAKE LOW 
DOWN PAYMENT 


on this teautiful 3-bedrm. brick 
rambier tn country clud area neer | 
Ar meten (“ee Se oh 


in 3 Reahy, J og iv 4900 


7 corners, ie rm. 


‘preal ims ii Pied 20 bi 
bryais rat yet) ane . 


recreation grounds. 
cat 


v SMA 
various highwers 
attractive 


polis - 
Sotre haters, Sete the Sot 
oe nahh Start Seabee 


imm 
rambler 


REAL ESTATE WA 
WILL BUY P 


Brick or ome, | pitts ~ y 
Tors "FOR SALE 73 
Al 

apees. i 


, 2.3. 
Mo ona. M 
a" 


LA 
for subdivision. ad! 
. about ji : 


at _—_ 
Realty 


we. Care MAY — 2 lots. 150 
de each. reasoned 


ALEX. —In vestors or buile rs 
biecks from > pe cen 


Ut-up res ar 

: Alex sim faciuitien a3 

M balid on ei s un 
total 


earket "val ue. 
xe fra: ‘s-acre 
on main bighway te 


N 
NEAR COUNTRY CLUB 


Offering for the first time besutl- 
fuuy wooded bDuliding «sites with 
100-ft. fromtage 


pr ice 


homesite 
r 


ote are surround 
and are reasoned) 
« 


°o this © 
oP and appointment te inspect 


WM. W. JOHNSTON 
Cc - 


eee Wott benntital te-oare 
lots Serocleren test appreved: VA 


approv All surveys 
nel. 


caer drawin t 
arranged. Roads in: ready 
poune construct to begin: 
WATERFRONT, RENT ol 
nO. B 
cony 


Avail abor Da 


rates after Laber 


DOGS, PETS, KENNELS 


room punsalow. All 
Ww tty 


a 
buff rae lovely ainpeaitions 
,. pu ure bred, 7-weeks- 


} ' 7 
merercny coil oat nm 
Ane : amp. stock. TE” 6-7268 
Orr vit ‘ 8 OF NS 

. . Glac 


py with 
.. OF BL: 
ud serv 


4 


} E, tourist ‘courts or 


WEIMA 
and 
sired 


Slee | rte 


Siem 


ies 


~ ftems ogie “as ts.” 
cellent cenditien. Man 
factory samples includ 
Items 


Prior 


Table lamps. 


, +32. 
9.95. Occasional c 


rds. 
ine Harvard bed frames. 66 


Come in 
3 i 


Budget terms. 
Open Fri. 


Furniture Mart 
213-215 217 King St., 


| PORN: Zi” REA Console. dinette 


eet. 


ereen-wom rugs. sewing machine. 


from 


ny 

sieces, very eood cond., 
good 

ange chair, 


: yo Caen, 


ickle bar: 
29 


is 
teed 


rae Ae 


lan 


o-phono 


Row. tulle Love ra seine: Fog 
ar $545: Rave at #4 
*AUSIC" SALES CORP. 


igs 
oe 


‘ ‘ee ae oe  Se4. rv) 


— 


wh 
3-9403 after 


URNITURE 
August Sale 


iNew & Recaieitioned 


ON—Saving pis ts 40% on late 
models returned from rental ee 
KITTS, 1330 0 RE. 7-62 


WOMEN’S LOANS 
Our Specialty! 

WE CAN MAKE 

YOU A LOAN IN 


2 Hrs. ‘x22 


Stell 


lojele 


7 


nih 


WHOSE FAVORITE 
* HOPE IS THE ANCHOR OF Tf SOUL* 


SALE, MISCELLANEOUS 


wa fake tes wey 
= | ea Pld * 


73 


S. corner Kya. sts. DW. 
comb. baby wesh- 


er and other 
6-68 


RANE By en saoies RANGE. elec. 


AKC 


NO 


or rent; brand- 


new. ents day ae may 


app! “a ia parchate, Cah ‘Call 


» OF on. FP) ha 
r. Guar 


ora _ date 


ix 
sold yerment e 
ae rd 
“Al 


LINCOLN LOAN 


7910 Georgia Ave., 
Silver Spring, 
JU. 5-5200 


teed ras. miecttic "Peeres, 

sia Tee re a 
ug rienta Saitern 
14.50: 4x6. 


9x12 822 6x3, 
e750. a vskD 
sizes. MAYFA 
ie 


Other 
12725 © st. aw 


a 


, anes 


_ a = ormies 


$25, $100, $200 
up to $1200 


MONEY in 1 DAY 
ON YOUR NAME ONLY 
er ether plans 
Get money for vecation expenses, 
bille, or other purposes. Spread re- 
oe payment over a number of months. 
4-2069. Come in or, to save time, 

new phene frst 
SAVER SPRING, MD. 
580 Comyn fon... 2 Sao O80 


Reon 6, 
061 Bonitart $:. ta 68-1508 


VW Block east of Georgie Ave. 


ti4e "psceot te st offer 


ture 


ANTIQUES Purni -brac 
sliver, jewelry. piortenta: objects. 
-~1 80) 


dining suites. ice 


DU 7-0513--RA. 6.2977 


Feat TE 8 a 


cos ont refrs.. 
fae etc 


vk Tih St i 


“-s 


Furniture 


but in ex. 
new and 
ia the lot 


See-et-o-Une and subject te 


PUBLIC LOAN 


CORPORATION 


LOANS 


ON YOUR SIGNATURE 
ONLY 
COMPARE! SAVE! 


Baa 


wf entire 


3.95. Step- 


a o* 
r 
Becretary-< desk. 
Bring your dente! gold. pietinum, 
discarded jewelery. We bay ca 


A. KAHN, INC. 
: Sly Fas VASMIONE, EAE EE.. 


ns. 

5 

1 revolvers mace 

before tote: cond. JA. 32-8500, 
ie 


> 
rock lathes 
truck loed 


e., ee 
eben te + sie | 


te 


ae. 


car- Beat or 


yt J 
Abeve rates tnclede tuterest and) 
erincipal. The teterest rate le 8% % | 
ser menth ef the unpaid Balance. | 


PHONE JAckson 5-8885 
for your money today! 


FAMILY 


Finance Core. of Artingtes 


2907 Wilson Bivd. 
Arlington, Va. 


nd browse our 
arge rs of furniture 
Pree delivery. 


& Mon, Nights 
TBOA oro 19 
2. tt hp 
} brand — 
a 
cr 7. oph_ivang 
Ww 

Tralier and 40 h Merc 
mote ‘control 


Alex. 
K1."8-9300 


auto. wesher, desk. dresser 


not furnis 


hy ; 
our, Here. Bmith Storage after 


Ma 
, Chevy Chase. 
FARM — — $2. 

oll. 


a ee d jie ‘Bei red. Bie 
e Moo ain. ver 4 
roen he’ Serries| 
8 Yarm. 5 yds. del 
withis, 5 ai Ted $12. JE. 4-31 i 


~ BLUE GRASS SOD 
aesare, te your tod. P A 
cu bankas ‘wokSin 

. | MACHINERY and TOOLS 83A 


yg ptitchers 
" aalehaes ‘1 TT bree & 


stiteher for tie om, . uate, 
3. unit, l-unit cement mechise of 
ries 


ee Co. 


rm, #u 


85. JA a 


cultivator: ée! 
lowest eriees. 
$20 TO $1000 
without endorsers 

on signoture, car C7 
furniture 

VV Fast, one-day servics 


Lite incurence on all HFC leans 
witheut extre cost te yeu. 


SEHOLD 
FINANCE 


pea Saturdays vatil 1:00 P.M. 
SUITLAND 
He ROME: JOrdan 28228 


cod cond 


single rollaway 


Sa = BE 
FOR SALE OR RENT 
EASY TERMS 
REBUILT— 

A-1 CONDITION 
Caterpillar Auto Patrol No. 12 
Caterpillar D8 Bulldozer 
Caterpillar Scraper, Model 80 
3 Caterpillar DW 10's 
WILLIAMS 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 


5}, “MURDOCK 6-6600 


te | MOTORCYCLES, _ es 
1952 Har 


G—upricht, ¢ 


exc. 


beginne 


. 


BETHESDA 
7444 Wiaconsin Ave. 
PHONE: OLiver 6-7408 


ant, the 
on 


RAI 
3235 Rhode Se Talend Ave., 2nd Fl 
PHONE: UNion 4-6740 


aonesiencaninere™ 
ONE: JAckson 5-6474 


ome 


PURCHAS 
ou move into 


PA AY by build- 
ae Bi dilees 2. So lve your 
on? y. 
ttle as 


Sa hlaarmart 
: post rile Co,, Ine. 
pen 9-b Weekdaye-Ciosed Sun. 


ENGLISN 
fR-2 


Lill i4th (Downtown) Di. 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Monday, August 29, 1955 27 


380,000 
Circulation’ 
Daily 

means more sales results fer 
Washington Post and Times 
bierald classified advertisers. 
To place your ed 


ar Repub 7-4234 


stat iti 


ore ave. Hyvea 


MANDELL 
TRUCKS 


"52 CHEVROLET .$595 
; eee ioe 
12008. 


‘55 BUICK 
SUPER RIVIERA H. TOP 


$350 DOWN 


A palace on wheels. 2-tone finish. 


steerin Pot 


10-wheeler, 

flat bed, 

"S53 CHEVROLET $795 
\e-teon pick-aops clean. Spe- 
cial price. 

5 Va-Ton Panels . $195 


T2441 Nichols Ave. 5.E. 
LU. 83-4051 LU. 4-4400 


AUTO, CABS, TRUCKS Hire 95 


D for 
auling ,~4 or oo 2 inciud- 
an 


nis WA 96 


Cadillacs Wanted 
PENNY MOTORS 


CASH FOR CARS 
BEAK SOYBRS 


ain aneer gn 
oti oa 


to sell high 
prices. ripe your title 4 4 car, 7 
rices queted over phone 


own & Country Sales 
Wise. Art. _ XW. 
r 


Rar etpact 
Fon Trial 3612 ‘Duke i Had 
Will aA ud To: 


im 


en ‘nclnding power; 

wl Co. 
*50 BUICK 
4-DR. SEDAN 
$15 DOWN 


ake 2 over easy R month thiy vareeryy 
for cx credit Eee 


Past,h 
MaOR MOTO 


STOP! LOOK! 


‘S2 BUICK 
SUPER RIVIERA 


Bw DOWN 


> small monthly payments 
reen and ivory with white 


T 
a 


our car We pa 


? ttention mili- 
tary personne) and Government 
employes, officers and ist 3 grades 

as — as $95 down. Ask abdout 
r “ varant 


"MILLE MOTOR CO. 


316 Florida Ave. NE. Li. 4-2306 


ome C PARK 
COR ' CAPTTOL & FLA AVE. can 


CARS 
WANTED | 


ar sages, ts low 9m ~ 


Bet RGPOR ERT ES 


_J717 BR. 1 Ave NE. DU. 17-8300 | Cab 
ne oS Sack -geete, | Sale: f 
Cars Needed for 


— 1680 Specia! de luxe sedan 
like-new ‘ 


equip 

beater. au 
matic transmission power bs 
windows send seat. 


ne He Cadillac-Olds 


=iss wood "eR" 
Special Pisck: a equipped: 
omitsr Cadillac-Olds Co. 


TU. ed 


BILL ROSS 
7400 GA. AVE. NW. 
~~ CASH FOR CARS 


nae sess Shit, “a 
a WOLFE MOTORS 


NW. EM. 3-014) 


s ee MORE 


peié for ‘496 thru ‘S56. all models 
able _— ors 101 New York ave 
NE BA 71 

AUTOMOBILE SALE 


NGL ior Peect 
PORDS 


“wile seats 


eS ffi? ® Pe 


ite . ; 
| ioe ER MOTORS Toth & RF oe 
i aviatene 


- Fe ne. LA. 


‘SS CADILLAC 
$695 DOWN 


Agee uP payments convert- 
bie; 2000 miles: spare’s still -new: 
‘rT: show 
and t 


full pow room eon astien : 

97 | servicemen out -@ 
need. Por credit chec ” call 
MBAS & CLARK 
r. N. Capitel end Pia. Ave 
. si3ee CADTLEAC—ION “ST” sedan 
tractive bBiuwe finish. full _y 

Arlingtes 


including , power steering. power 
>| bra es nted gless and w.-W. 
eke nn 


Capitol Cadillac Olds Co. 


“49 CADILLAC 
SEDAN 
$687.23 Total 
$5 DOWN 


UP De ymen' s to putt you. This 
car is & rem on +4. 


e. ur rain Bor 
credit’ tee's loss be call Th 4 


‘BOB WOODS 


a ave. oY TA) 1132 Bi pen mt Pow NE 


75T CADILLAC 
$95 DOWN 


4- door: beautiful dark blue bods 
with light blue top. Al Sages 
eos ment. Immaculate ¢ 
anically perfect: Enceliont 
ay: i ret En credit appreva) call 
THE AUTO CENTER 
12th & K «ste. nw. Complete sales 
anc service dept. for your con- 
enie 
CADILLAC=1583 ‘tie 
sinlah 


equipped i ine wae oS power, 


Eapitol ‘Cadillac- Olds fa 
St. NW. _4T._ 3-260 


2-dr. owner jleavine for 
right. JU. 9-20) 


_— 


—_.. Gatien 


end truc hae 


SPECIALS 
"S65 Hillman Cal 

o Rp’ 
2501 Columbis ae 


AUSTIN— Bi A-40 Somerset de tf 
, dr. sedan, heat er & extras bxce! 
: UL. KL. §-62960 after | 


NE. 


dition. 
395. ‘JACK } r sh 
VICK — 1946 convertible - :* | 3-2 
‘¥ 6g. no Own | 
RK MO 


$395-$5 DOWN 


Super convertase Syusiew R. & 
H.., oe, new rea! 
for credit Ay 


BLASS & CLARK 


N. Capitol & Fis. Ave. 


bus 
4-988 


Cor. 


pray B, SOREN TE 


ris Ave. NE. at 6th. Li 6-6464 
7-399) 


qd. 
41 


0 low G 
nice Dea | ‘PMER 
Bb M sts ay. ns 
nd 5. 
194 347 bare 7 h. 
my ef 9 eon itlon aso "Terms 
KIRK ave 


7 


b ar ad! 
duals. etc. 6. 4-4058 bef ore 6 30 


3.4800. ee 
55 Century Riviera 
Striking 2-tone red white Anish 
4 uipped, inc dine Dyna- 
io & uae a 3 W.-W. tires. 
oesés ccc su 


Capital Cadillac- Olds Co. 
222.224 St. NW. ST. 93-2600 |~ 


‘Chevrolet Car 


c 
} World's art 


‘s hardto 
<3 Se a 


NEVE 
Blick ms Or Oh at ak 


‘53 BUICK 
Super Convertible ‘52 CHEV. Cl. Cpe. 


REPOSSESSED Total Price, $469 
$195 DOWN NO MONEY DOWN 


Take over «s 
5 Ea Sraut 

PAYMENTS AS LOW AS 
$33 
MONTH 


te Se, 
75 Other Cars to Choose Fro 


75 Other Cars to ch m 
FOR iMMEDIATE PPRovAL | FOR C PROVAL AND 


ai wick) LI. 4-4552 
ceed na ds BURRELL 
BURRELL MOTORS 
- Ou, Ope, a8 
ATTENTION 


lL mo 
L 


MOTORS 


Our . ly ation te financing 
A ' ATE Ft- -of-towners. 
CS a ‘ 


_— —-.} he 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Monday, August 29, 1955 ° 


——— 


| 410,000 
Sunday 


Circulation 


means more sales results for 
Washington Post end Times 
Herald classified advertisers. 
To plece your ad for Sunday 


Phone 
REpublic 7-1234 


Teniinssd Troms Freseding Fees | fain-w 


“52 CHEV. 
ig 12 Total 


‘53 CHEVROLET 
REPOSSESSED 
$586 FULL PRICE 


paint jot and seat 
jon spe- 
wih ne eoyn 


EetyE 
Ae 
rt redress aa & 


No Toa 
237 Bast- 


rae A prar 
= 255 tna! SO a 


Oo. 


‘54 CHEV. 
REPOSSESSED 
Y wake us perments. Coavervivie 


“IRV” MARTIN 
mete 


AUTOMOBILES WANTED 


oronet 
per 


A JOR” 
get ee Motor, Inc. 
; ‘ ‘ade 4! 


romatic drive: 
insp 


‘SS FORD 
$] 295 TOTAL 


month. -d over ee, S00 50 per 


' < am rey 


RES RG 
BOB WILSON 


34 apd K St 
“The Bis Lot on the Corner” 


‘31 VICTORIA 


$379.16 Total! 


finish. 


— ~ ¥F~— at 


a3 if 
call See 7-9 
EMBASSY MOTORS 


4TH ST AND MASS — habe 
Open 9 a. wm UD 


Pordomatic. >-ton 
mie, Ye 


FoOED— "SI V-4 i-door. fa 
pes buy in bewn pt $595 
73 is 
tooo, 


mi 
= payee ae | inc. 


eis test 2 $i we a rela radio, 


oiien eeuit 


$95 DOWN 


"s4 Ford om vertible. Pordomatic 
r&b tires. This is a very 
clean i- oun ear. Leow monthis 
perments avaiiadie. 


DONALD MOTORS 


148 Fi ve. NE &-TLT71 
ben Batts a 0 o -10- P.M 


‘55 FORD 
CONVERTIBLE 


$285 DOWN 


Gr. de luxe 


hanicaliv per- 
offer. Can be | 
rowers 


i 
to, heater, one owner, 


marinate 
rant HE. 4-6203 / 
TECER—1955 New Yorker “se ie- 
sen aye 
}-time er tee rin 
ntais Ay re, areata power 
onkes gincs. we — tires. —f 
car tithe and war 


mi a “INC. 


J+ anal 


uxe 
tone 
Also 


mo Puly equiped. 
Tnspection gtaranteed. NO MONEY 
WN. Small pene payments 
at ADAMS MTRS.. & 
oe. LI. 4-4441 for feat credit ‘=. 
rovai Bun 


orker 
luxe sedan. Light ave o. equipped 
including power steer! ne: #81095 


Capitol Cadillac- Olds Co. | | 


nian” uo Wt Se ware 
| J call AD’ 4 ates 
LASS & CLARK ° 


Cor. BN Oapite! and Fie. Ave. NE 


u 
& h. Pordomatie tf at. 
a 


oh 
| evenings im 9 JU _ &- 


‘S} FORD 
REPOSSESSED 
$266 


PULL PRIC® 


co 5-9511 


Jeff Stacy Motors 


STOP! LOOK! 
‘S53 FORD 
“V-8" 2-DR. 
$695 TOTAL 


And take up emall monthiy po 
ments tk ted 


13 mi oe city driv ving: $180 | 
SEDAN 
$316.12 Totals 
$5 DOWN 


a = peymentse to A 4 ve. | 
ear 4s sem on wh 


great ap St call your, ‘pe 


BOB WOODS 
1112 Biagensbure Rd. NE 


$95 DOWN 


sR fel acanary yellow 


erat A Easy terms 
DONALD MOTORS 


145 » Ave. NE. ME. 8-TILTI 
Dy 6:30 a. m. te 10:30 Db. m 


ustom convertible 


ESOTO | = 


So! ‘$4 PONT. 


PACKARDS }*" 


From “460 te ‘Séa. All 
styles. One-owner cars! 


COVINGTON MOTORS $|; 
7301 Wis. Ave. (Beth. $ | at 


OL. 2-9200 
Area’s Largest Packaré Deaier 


ned? 6 


red base; fr 
heater, Hydra-Matle, Perfect 
condition. 
7 $795 
Mang Others to Choose From 
TERMS OR TRADE 


ARCADE PONTIAC 


Washincton'’s Larcest 
wonmee Bosses 


Y aloft’ a tatidetan 


— 7y re 


#2 
— 
Pe I 


i 


~ 
w 
6 
z 
= 
> 
oO 


| De Lease 4-dr. sedan, 
iheater. defroster, 
| ortstnal finish. 

; 


" Ohiefiain De Lace. 


one bie, UE 


Attention 
an veveraisans 
es. Officers and + 3 grades 
as iow as a gown. Ask about 


MitreR Mh MOTOR CO. 


316 Pierida ave. ne. Li. 4-23906 


military person ne 


I TRIANGLE (Ford) 


/ms0le BR. I. Ave, NE. DE. 23-6508 


- 


ON OUR LOT! 
161i KING ST. 


Alezandrts 


z 8] 695 


Gasetiote De Laxe, 
radio 
Hy dra- 


sedan. 
and. Beater, 
ma 


‘53 PONT. “8” 
Chieftain De Lase, 


ar. sedan, redic 
and ba eneen Brdra- 


*1295 


‘53 CHEVROLET 


*895 


“52 STUDEBAER 
| Commander, %-deor. 
jheater and defroster, 


*595 


‘31 PONT. “8” 
tar seean mac's $950) 
heater, Hydramatte. 


‘47 CADILLAC 


Fleet weed, 4-deer 
sedan, radie & heat- 
er, Bydramatia 


*450 


We Finance Our Own Cara, 


fie 


in 


Terms to Fit Your Budget. 


BENDALL 
PONTIAC 


Timple 6-622) 


* manufactured motor. exc. Kit 


‘| mileage. 
my Lae 


East (TU. 2-4200 


ie oor 
7300 mL. Like new. Owner in 
‘abroad. _Reasonablé, JA. 2-0118 | Siar tise 


; 


a hp. re 


‘54 FORD 


° Custom Line V-8 


Se Ea 
net |e 


BURRELL 
MOTORS 


rubs Bee 


hs Hh ae ae We hss Wis. ore a 
A Hornet sa aor a 
ios si. ‘om = ¥ 4 


= ng JU. _9-4988. _ 
$95 DOWN 


5 Victoria 
cream finish. r. and h.. ~~ M. - 
ion. @-w tires and low 
Lew monthly parments. 


— 7400 Ga. Ave. NW. bret 


‘S3. MERCURY 
REPOSSESSED 


Monter rt Coupe 


$19 WN 


Take we monthiy parments 


m Be sf — ova 


> 552 


bush hoor 


Our One and 


2121 RENNIN wo ho 


te financing 


' Sor servicemen and out-of-towners 


; 
: 
’ 


$95 DOWN 
MERCURY Soe PROM 


ranemias) A 
ow monthly par men's 


toupee. 3 
———— 
we. Ure 


=e | DONALD MTRS. 


evick credit approvel. call 145 


8-717) 


FP) NE 
Oven Baily.” S30 A ea oe M 


iS A.M 


24 months to pay. 
Many Others to Choose From 
TERMS OR TRADE 


ARCADE PONTIAC 


Wachineten'’s Largest 
Pentiae Doster 


Ask for 
. Bia’ rp. tin *hinblars 


saee 14th a Ne 


OLY 


JALAL A\\W\N 
'54 Chev. $1150 


210, 4-dér.. equipped 


'54 Hud. . $1088 


Wasp, club cpe.. BAH, 


‘to $899 


: 153 MERC. 
“ $785 Total 


WG-TV- 1s. dire wheels theater 
soa eer ES, steht Ri 


HARD TOP 


1$987.05 Totall 


een DOWN 
Tet i v-7 =. tire. 


Fade Woods” 


1119 pate NE. 


‘S53 MERCURY 
MONTEREY 


$985 TOTAL 
NOTHING DOWN 


with good and 6 job. Sere 


en 
owners _ 
livery. RE 


fal wa eauipped & 


Monterey 


NO CASH NEEDED 
va GOOD CREDIT 


Best be enywhers. For eredit 
approve! ” call 


BILL ROSS 


ler 


Church, Va 


STOP! LOOK! 


‘53 OLDS 
“88” CONV. 
$295 DOWN 


take 
ts. 


aa 


3.6 Ppride Ave. NE. 


OR CO. 


LL 4-2396 


en Sotiom. with white mileage 
ink? 


on th ne 


& emali 


‘54 OLDS “88” 
$185 DOWN 


seyret pe Art 
basen CCARK 


Gor. MN. Capitel ena Fis. Ave. HE 


eeaces 


€ 
» white tires. fully ecutp 


jas Cadillac ‘Olds So. 


‘53 OLDS 
Super 88” Holiday 


This tmme@culate eutemotile has 
beautiful 2-tone paint with mateh- 
ine @ ow. tires. fr end bh. Hyrdra- 


Mi . 
s. Pow credii 


4-4552 


Immediate Deliveries to 
Servicemen & Out-of-Towners 


Etta Olds Co. | : 


1222 224 St. WW 
— Ss “Se” 


ave | 


Ivory a Se 
Satsncos Co. | 


- —9T._2-2609 | 
“SF ‘ 


Peres & 


BURRELL MOTORS | 


WANTED 


Reliable Parties 


Te Take Over This 
Repossessed 


‘54 CHEVROLET 


$782" rice 
Only $135 Cash Nec 


Oe fer r sarteee ~: te 
Pick You Ue 


REPOSSESSED 


$328 FULL PRICE 
art “ech 


a 


ontene Be orice. 


tit 
eget INC. 


= ae 


rook. A 
Aa pea a 
ovat u Crorys proms 
with peater d detros 
~- ty glass ail 


car title and war. 
opportunity eave 


i INC. 
PL IM 


“PONTIAC MEANS M = 


} 


AUTOMOBILE, SALE 


. Ehieteala de 


STOP! LOOK! 


‘53. PONTIAC 
$195 DOWN 


tren he OR. CO. 


3164 Pieridae ave. ne. 


v4 co 


McNEIL PONTIAC 


7320 Wis. Ave., OL. 4-8000 
“D_TeE _BEART OF | BETHESDA" 


STOP! LOOK! 


‘53 PONTIAC 
$195 DOWN 


thi yments 
Bee iad dtcn "ore 
juss . ¥ 


“over ament 
+4 -&y a 
wien Ma TOR CO. 


_ MERCURY 4 DR; 


Attention! 
Military Personnel 


Gevernment Emplervees 
Tam mediate o~ a —_ 


mii Mw y 
And very emell dewn par- 
ments or ether military 


Ask About Our 3-Day Trial 
and 100% Guarantees 


The Original Discount House 


AUTO DISCOUNT 
HOUSE 


ere Particular Peeple Her 
0 Rhode Island 


TODAY 


Champion 


Lee 


D. Butler, 


Inc. 


—_——_- + 


4-dr., Rad, 


'53 Ford . "$659 


e1 4. ash equipped 


‘STN $423 


‘iii h $597 


Rambler sta. wagon. RAH 


‘50 Chev. . $441 


Cenvert., 


'50 Dodge $213 


; -dr., eauipped 


Ss « 
‘-dr. Ran 


49 Chey. .$387 
49 Chev. $241 
47 Ford $128 
"46 De $'to $137 
'46 Chrys Chrys. $138 
ABRAHAM 


11339 EAST. WEST HGWY. 
COR. COLESVILLE RD. 
SILVER SPRING, MD. 


> NOT! cr + 


‘Til Midn ht 


- 


Co. Official Cars 


Don’t Wait For 
These Tremendous 
Savings 


‘55 Studebaker Sta. Wagon | 


Royal Deluxe, 
Equipped, Company Official Cor 
1121 21st St. NW. 


ONLY! 


Fully 


DI. 70111 


co. 5-8214 ee 


Ave. 4.E. | 


$800 oF | 


Where? 
Why... 


HALEY’S .. . OF COURSE 
DODGE-PLYMOUTH DEALER | 


Ist and M Sts S.E. 


LI, 4-3000 


30 CHEVROLET 2 DR. 


‘52 HUDSON WASP 4 DR. 
‘S) FORD “8” 2 DR. 


‘Ss! CHEVROLET 4 DR. 


‘51 DE SOTO CUST. 4 OR. 
"S) MERCURY 2 DR.; 0.0. 


Mechanics in Our U 


— 


NO CASH NEEDED 


On Credit Aporevel. AN You 


Tour Bille Freomptiy. We Will Handle All Deteiis, 


‘53 PLYM. 


8-Dr. Sedan, coutpped. Why pay moref 


‘53 FORD. 


3-Dr. Sedan. sacipped. Why say more? 


8.Dr. Sedan. Whe say mere? 


‘55 ) FORD. AA5 


'f (237 Baet-Weet Wer. JU. 5-78004 


OD, 7 
‘S) STUDE. STARLITE 2 DR. ...... 


‘S) PLYMOUTH 2 DR. .......... 


83 Others—Open Daily, 9 °*4il 9 


Every Car Serviced by Our Staff of 


Raines Motor Ca. 


'§ 1840 Wilson Boulevard 
JARANTEED CARS===mGUARANTEED CAR: 


‘53 Chevrolet. ‘AAS 


TODAY'S BEST BUY 


*S2 MERCURY Lc gw 
Mtercomatie ach adie 


1. Ne. 


taana "siess. 


Radie and heater. everdrtve Ne. 
596A. £10696. 


‘S2 Mercury Sedan 
Sadie and beater. 
érive, Ne. S094. 81145. 


‘52 Merc, Sport Cpe. 


Radio and heater. overdrive, Ne. 
065A. 81145. 
‘51 Mereury Sedan 


Radie and Mercomatie 
drive, Na. 8 “Shes. 


‘S51 Merc. Club Cpe. 


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is 


THE WAVE of sweetness 
that has engulfed the Rus- 
sians lately has extended 
even to radio, I see by the 
papers. Via 
dimar M. 

Matskevi ¢ h, 
acting Soviet 
Agricultur e 
Minister, had 
3 minutes of 
fairly kind 
words to say 
about our 
agricultur a | 
system, 
which is 
about as 
many kind words as the aver- 
age radio program can stand. 

‘While noc yielding an inch 
to the superiority of the col- 
lective as against the capital- 
ist system of farms, Matske- 
vich admitted that he was 
impressed by the productivity 
of our Iowa farms and be- 
wildered by our price sup 
port system. (He's not alone 
' there, either.) The Voice of 
America broadcast these sen- 
timents to Russia, an almost 
epic exchange of opinion as 
far as the air waves are con- 
cerned. 

> « o 

I DON’T suppose it will 
happen very often, but it's 
a nice note to come home on, 
this idea that the air can be 
used for something besides 
an exchange of insults. Prop- 
eaganda is a tricky weapon 
end, like poison gas, it is at 
its highest efficacy when you 
cant see it, smell Kh or 
taste it. 

By this definition our own 
Armed Forces Network, quite 
unconsciously, has been do- 
ing a splendid job. of prop- 
eganda. Actually, the AFN is 
supposed to be beamed strict- 
ly at American ears, but the 
nature of broadcasting being 
what it is, it strikes a good 
many European ears and 
many Europeans have got 


Seen and Television 
Airwaves Propaganda 


Is Given a New Twist 


By John Crosby 


Riviera and heard Groucho 


Marx in Vienna. Now a prop- 
agandist boasting about the 
enormous wealth and 
strength of America is one 
thing, and Groucho Marx tel- 
ling a joke about a rich Tex- 
an is another, but essentially 
they are both doing the same 
thing, and Marx, by indirec- 
tion, is doing a better job 
of it. 
7 > © 


I WAS in Austria the day 
AFN quit operating—the oc 
cupation being on its way to 
ending—and a lot of people 
are going to miss it. Not all 
of them are Americans, 
either. Many folks along the 
te ube got quite fond of our 

ians and our music and 
oa flat matter-of-fact news 
broadcasts. In a lot of ways 
a Viennese can learn more 
about America by listening to 
broadcasts which are not de- 
signed for his ears at all than 
by listening to the Voice of 
America, which is self<on- 
sciously tailored to his preju- 
dices and his supposed igno- 
rance. 

I think the best as yey 
in the world is simply t 
yourself. 

— > 

IF | WERE a propagan- 
dist, I would flavor my stuff 
with something besides our 
virtues. I recall looking at 
an Italian propaganda mag- 
agine in about four languages 
which told about Italian prog- 
ress in textiles (great), auto- 
mobile production (great) and 
reconstruction (great). 

That night I watehed an 
Italian fireman select with 
infinite care a nozzle to put 
on a fire hose. The building 
was burning down with great 
rapidity, but nothing could 
hurry this man from screw- 
ing it on with infinite deli- 
cacy. Textile production is a 
more impressive statistic, but 
the sight of that Italian told 


Monday TV Preview 


5 p. m—WTTG. Lamb ses- 
sion: Rosalind Russell is Art 
Lamb's guest. 

7 p. m—WRC-TV. Sherlock 
Holmes: Holmes and Watson 


investigate the case of “The: 


Exhumed Client.” 

7 p. m—WTOP.-TV. Stories 
of the Century: “Nate Cham- 
pion” finds himself in a jam 
when the profits of a cattle 
rustling operation are eaten 
by a road building crew. 

7:30 po m—WTTG. All 
Star Theater: A famous crim- 


inal lawyer agrees to defend | 


a young boy after falling in 
love with the boy's sister. 
Steven McNally stars. 

7145 p om. — WTOP-TV. 
Julius LaRosa Show: Eydie 
Gorme fills in for vacation- 
ing Julius and sings “Some- 
times I'm Happy,” “What Is 
the Secret of Your Success” 
and 
You.” 

8 p m—WMAL-TV. TV 
‘Readers Digest: “The Master 
American Master Counter- 
feiters” run afoul of Detec- 
tive William Burns and he 
breaks up their business. 

8 p. m—WRC-TV. Caesar 
Presents: Phil Foster finds 
that his wife, Sandra Deel, 
is losing interest in the mar- 
riage. His romantic moves 

her reactions provide an- 
other chapter of “The Phar- 
macist and His Mate.” 

8 p m—WTOP-TV. Burns 
and Allen (repeat): Gracie 
employs a valet. George looks 
upon him as an intruder 

8’ Dp m—WTTG. Million 
Dollar Movie: “Conflict: of 
Wings” 
revolt by British 
when nearby land is chosen 
as a target for Royal Air 
Force rockets. 

8:30 mu. — WMAL-TYV. 
Voice of Firestone: Jean Fenn 


and Robert Rownseville sing | 
the | 
and “They | 


“You Are Love.” “All 
Things You Are” 
Didn't Believe Me.” 


5:30 p. m—WTOP.-TYV. 


thur Godfrey's Talent 
Scofits: A New Jersey pop 
baritone, a Cuban soprano 
and a California vocal quar- 
tet compete for top prizes. 

o p. m-—WRC-TV. Medic 
(Repeat): “Flash of Dark- 
ness,” story of the destruction 
of a city by an H-bomb. 


“T'll Never Stop Léving 


telis the story of a | 
villagers | 


9 p, m—WTOP-TY. Those 
Whiting Girls: An admirer 
sends costly gifts to the Whit- 
ing girls. They're in trouble 
when they discover the gifts 
are stolen goods. 

9:30 p. m.—WTTG. Studio 
57 (repeat): A young woman 
is separated from her sus- 
picious fiance because of a 
jealous employer. Laura E)- 
liott stars in “Deadly Doubt.” 

9:30 p. m—WRC-TV. Rob- 
ert Montgomery presents 
“The Return of Johnny 
Burro.” Charlies Drake, 
Augusta Dabney, House 
| Jameson and Eric Sinclair 
are featured 

10 p. m.—WTOP.TYV. Studio 
One Summer Theater: Geor- 
giann Johnson and Richard 
Kiley costar in “A Chance at 
Love.” Story centers on a boy 
and a girl from the midwest 
who meet and fall in love in 
New York City. The romance 
nearly fails because of her 
desire to stay in the city for 
a career... 

10 p. m—WMAL.TV. Eddie 
Cantor: A pretty etiquette 
teacher attempts to turn two 
muscle men into polished 
| gentiemen. 

189 p. m—WTTG. Roxing 
from New York: Gene Poirer 
vs. Chris Christensen in a 10- 
round welterweight bout. 

1:15 po. WTOP-TY. 
The Late Show: “Sensation” 
is a story about a newspaper 
reporter and crime. 

11:30 hs m—WRC-TV. To- 
night: rnie Kovacs takes 
over for Steve Allen. Guests 
SCHEDULED are Orson 
Rean, 
Brubeck and trio. 


PM STATIONS 


tea (5.8 me) 6:98 «. =o. tb 
wror-re 3 =we.b—5: 00 oo. =o te 


dua Ste (06.5 eed 0. “ts. o@ 


WASE-Fu (1.1 oo)—* «. = & 1 


get as (11.1. we)—T «. =o te 8) 
| ‘woe. TM (106.5 me.)—645 o = 
| WARL- (106.1 mee)—808 «. me. te 8 


| WUST-7M (10648 me.)—T:06 « o@. te 8 


_creator of comic strips 


| ard Miller 
| Gibbs is interviewed. 


Louis Nye and Dave | 


Radio 


Highlights 


10:05 a. m.—WGMS. Morn-, 


ing 
Leonore Overture Na. 1; 
Haydn, Violin Concerto if A 
“Melk”; Delius, Caprice and 
Elegy; Grieg, Nocturne. 

11:38 a. m—WTOP. Make 
Up Your Mind: Milton Caniff, 
and the Pirates” and “Steve 
Canyon” is guest. 


11:45 a. m—WTOP. How- | 
Show: Georgia | 


2:05 p. m—WGMS. Sym- 


phonic Matinee: Herold, Zam- | WacDonald 
now 
liner! 


pa Overture; Tchaikovsky, 
Piano Concerto No. 2 in G; 
Glinka, Mazurka. 

6 p. m—WWDC. Bob Wolff: 
Latest sports news with. a 
late roundup of major league 
baseball scores. 

& p. m—WTOP. Mr. Keen, 
Tracer of Lost Persons: “The 
Broken Mirror” is tonight's 
case. 

15 p. m—WRC. Berk- 
shire Festival: Boston Sym- 


Symphony: Beethoven, . 


“Terry | 


phony Orchestra under Pierre 


Monteux. Isaac Stern, violin 
soloist, in an all-Brahms pro- 
gram. 

8:38 p. 
of Firestone: Soprano Jean 
Fenn sings “Out of 
Dreams.” Tenor Robert Roun- 
seville sings 
Believe Me.” 

se pm. — WASH-FM. 
Broadway Cop: Story of a 
criminal who tries to foil 
police by constantly chang- 
ing the “Modus Operandi.” 

16:38 p. m—WWDC. Top 
Secret Files: A witness to an 
act of sabotage which causes 
a wreck of “The Washington 
Express,” becomes a target 
for murder. 

16:38 p. m. — WGMS-FM. 
Symphonic Varieties: Nico- 
lai, Merry Wives of Windsor 
Overture: Barodin, Polovet- 
Sian Dances. 

10:38 p. m—WMAL. Red 
Skelton gets a job.at the 
nylon counter of a depart- 
ment store, 


ee —— 


m.—WMAL. Voice | 


a lot more about Italy. ! 
I sometimes wonder if our | 
propagandists wouldn't get a 
jot farther if they'd exploit 
our endearing weaknesses 
rather than parading inter- 
minably the statistics of our 
overwhelming strength. 


COngerit RSE. 


quite fond of it. 
Most of the radio shows 
that we know have been 
broadeast regularly on AFN 
and can be heard with vary- 
ing degrees of distinctness 
In the funniest places. I have 
heard Bill Stern telling his 
tall sports stories on the 


P. 
WOLF (94.7 me.)—<+ o. mm. te ft a. me. 
WFAN (106.5 me.)—6 a. m. 


*Authorized to operate sunup te sundown 


7” 
box TM (lOTS me.)—<6 «. me. te 18008 
STANDARD 8 


ATIONS 
Woon, 240 ke — 


be —5 


Programs printed here conform to information 
furnished by stations at time of ee. 


Monday Television Programs | 
| i ©~—~C~S AC WIT) 
. 5 WMAL.-TV 7|_ WTOP-TV9 _|AM 630 _ FM 107.3|AM 980 FM 93.9 AM 1260 
: °F i ‘ 
7:29 Cpptoen Wea . ae $$ 
ons __§-15-9 36 


Jack Smith! 


Oe ee ee 
= 


Monday Radio Progra rams 


anticleer 
to 


ry 
Biber pe Molly 
|News nning 
iPatty Cavin 
Patty Cavin 
ible Patty Cavin 


a nee Rober: (3 Lewis iz m 00 | 


Eletier " : 


ted 
M: errted | iBerial Tree! Fis - 
. eo, Jester | 
Ladies Home Thtr e 
Auwy Time n| Ladies Home yoo > beeret 
Ga) Poremar lack antom 
Phaptom, News 
Pestiy 


mt a 
wey Werls Gene 
irst Love World) 


, R ; 
Qa" Your Account ) 
On Your Account 

a ee Temple's 
“Pareo 

=. 

Range Rider 

pends Rider 


30 Bpotiight 
Rash Allen - 
Moppet sovies |  nibbans Show Rese Reporte! 


Vien Gibeons Show |Stories © 
: wi Hohe Daly News 
Ste reatest 6pt« 
Stephen MeN Sound 
res te | Mit & Mo ay 
s /“Conirt of Wines” 
Jqhn Go 


| Boone 
__ Movie; Rendell 
y. [town and Country) 
Time 


tls cies 
terns and Allen 


ose oe Oirls 
a : El gi] 
— an r 
Peg_ Lynch 

~ jo 1 Bummer . 
i at ° 
mio" | 


ovis 


Pee Wee King 


| Eddie + 


ewe © ator 


'Boxine 
Gene Pasres Ss. va 


‘Seedte =" 
eG LM. tase 
. te Bho 


Diane Chyrehit 


e Late ty SB 
Late Show 


Soi. Dpets | 
onight with | 
ev , 


4 
15 ‘on , 
30/Ton! ps 
45'Tonight 


Ns 
a1) 


30 i Date in Washing’? 
7 | Det e in Washing’) | 
33 'T nes ude Rains 
rt $Milton P Ford _|gas Piain Bir 
Rash: Sirens (Rt te Happs ness 
. & Jimme| Stella Dall 
+ 6 pi & Jimma! Young W! a "Brown 
Lm ms | | Pepper 2 as 
. trong | Woman = House 
13 Jerry A sme Lorenso 


wd lew 

45 Pord Gibbons Twilight 
00 Star News " eCormick 
15 Allen ore pe Oodwi - 

10 Mitten @ Pordi gs: mnson 

45 son, I 
00 Joha ercooE lone Ran 

5 Bill Stern Ranger 
30: Rédie CBRIOT | Nee: 
45 Eddie Cantor .| Twilight 
00 News 


tr of Musi Henry J Tavier 
30 Voice ° e. 
ae... restome| | Boston Sym 


Music! | Berkshi re 
Malone | Tel evhone our 


Tunes 


7 omen 


as; — cr Uppman 
| mand of Americe 
il Bend of America 


15 Strange 
‘4 Red Skelton | News: McGarry 
News: Be 


:00 News: Cap Jack! 
Bports | Muste 


"15 Late 
"30'Preedom 
45) pines 
00’ Midnight | Howe: Bs usie 
Milton! Musie thru 


45 Mitten @ Ford! Night: 


: Ne 
y Three Ser News. 8 


71 rat ertes + 
at Oe 


“Noy 
News| Music ‘Thre ens 
5 
the Nite 
the News. ’ 
Newsii-4 Shew L. Sand) 


WTOP (CBS) 
6-16 Mark Beans LE 35 
Pvan aboney 


6.30. 7:30 
Rost. Hurkish 
Art Brown Beco re; 

| Brown Uly ohneon 
rown: C. Bro’p| 


red Piske iF 
Pred 


od Piske 5 
| Prise Party ; 
Pred ake 
20 ly 
eck nowae 
i260 Cl 


J 
News 


| 1385 
ck Pine a News Moondial Matinee 
Jack Rowrie er 

pews . Brera | 

Rob 

| Rar > athens News 

11280 


use 
Art Linkletter 


| Sows: Markt Evans 


60 Bandstand’ 
*| Heatter 
Be« ms :- ands 
il Jt 
ck Lawrence Mr. Kee 
Mr. Ke 
iTalent Scouts 


: 
New 

* Sock Rowsle 
Arouna Town 

Cu 15) 
‘3 jos; 30) 
$500 Massey 
ge and Blues! doon 
Rhviher "and Blues 


orld fT 


Massey Wows. 
vthm and Blues 


In Person 


Chris Connor 
with the Gene Harrie Terie 
Gene Boaunike’s Trice 
Matinee Sat. 3-46 p.m. 
Olivia Davis’ 


Patio Leunge 
711 13th St WLW. =| ME. 8.2722 


. —- ee 


merice 
Oallaher 


THe 
Sfp ~ 
LuxuRy tinee 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE 


JEST JOHNNY & JACK 


One of the country’s freshest 
new acts —~ music, songs and 
comedy. 
Appearing nightly, 

except Sunday 

5:15 te 7:15 

9:15 te 1:15 
Never a cover or minimum chargé 


| pened at 


AS 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


Monday, sae 20, 1955 


7 


By Paul 


ANYONE is competition for Art Brown” 
a young singer with three. WWDC from 12 noon wntil 1! 


weeks experience in the night|” ™ 
club business, but youthful Ro- 


berta 
‘ald was up 
against the best 
—the fabulous 
‘Mills Brothers. 


MacDon- 


hap- 
Miss 
is 
head- 


what 
ns” 


Herron 


show aired over; 


all hap- 


the 


It 


Casino Royal 
last week where 


| 


Roberta appeared as 
porting act with 


a sup 
the famed 


| quartet. 


tality of 
started singing and acting at 
age 17 was enough to impress) 
the Casino Royal management | 
so they have hired her to head-| 


vi-| 
who) 


the freshness and 
the youngster 


But 


lline the show this week. 


: 


Miss MacDonald started her! 


inight club career just three 
weeks ago at the One-Two Club’! 
iin Toronto. 
My | pened however, 
formed 
“They Didn't ‘TV 
Street” 


Before that hap-| 
she had per- 
in “South Pacific,” a 
show called “Melody' 
and some radio produc- 


| tions 


| 
| 
' 
| 


z 
’ 


ary 
Amos ‘n’ And 


Big gust 


Dewn 
(ti) 5: 3 a. mm.) 
Roser Fleet 


Business Has 250.000 ‘Veeps’ 


NEW YORK, Aug. 28 * —) they are dealing with a man of 
There are more than 250,000\ appropriate rank,” the article 
vice presidents in United States os Fee form the eae 
business and industrial firms) ® Stryker said the modst reli-; 
and most of them have been | able measure of a vite presi-| 
given the jobs just to flatter the — Fong ed > . <! 

an nus os ° 
pace eo magazine sondiiialia. themselves, found' 

The 500 largest industrial 
firms have an average of about 
7.75 vice presidents each, the 
magazine said. 

But, it added, the number in 
a single company ranges from) 
146 in the Bank of America to’ 
mone at all in the Hershey | 
Chocolate Co. | 

The study of vice presidents | 
was made by Perrin Stryker, 
a member of Fortune's board 
of editors and author of a re-| 
cent business book, “A Guide 
to Modern Management Meth-| 
ods. 


2 HR. SERVICE 


é” 9to 9 7 Days 
Retiasie JO. 1-1352 
Co tesus 5] eae 


) Fou dependable 
1.¥. Radio & Appliance Service 


90-day Parts Warranty 
Baw. & 


LEAR COLOR 
TELEVISION 


Great Demand for Technicians end 


they went right on doing their 
same old tasks after their pro-| 
motions, he said. 

“The greatest privilege of 
the title, according to most! 
vice presidents,” he wrote, “is 
the ability to come and go as/ 
they please and to take an af-| 
ternoon off now and then.” 


17 INCH SCREEN 
Ne charge for pick up 


er delivery 
Di. 7-5941 


PENN TV CO. 


® 1-Heur Service 
* Sete fixed in your home 
* All Werk Guaranteed 


LI. 4-0047 


Stryker classifiies vice presi- 
dents as follows: 
® Real No. 2 men who can 
and do take over for the presi- 
dent. ) 
© The heads of a firm's most! 
important operations or divi-| 
gions. 
® Directors of operations of | 
lesser importance to top man- 
agement— public relations or | 
industrial relations. 
® Those who get the title as 
a kind of pre-retirement pres. 
ent. 
® Those. who have been. 
“knighted” for the sake of cus 
tomer relations. 
are the men who are 
en the title so that impor- 
nt customers will feel that 
: Call KE. 17-1234, ask for Cir- 
WALTER WINCHELL culation, and order The Wash- 
is on vacation. His column ington Post and Times Herald 


| Will, sesmmne oe By returs. teed } dell : 


Servicemen—Shop and Lab.—Evening 
Short Practical Courses 
Starts Sept. 21 


Celembia Technical Institute 
Vt. Ave. at N St. N.W. (Bet. 13 & 14) 
Catalogues ME. 4- 


HONEST SERVICE 


Ne risk when we de it 
FACTORY-TRAINED EXPERTS 


TV SERVICE 


Call LA, 6-5500 
MID-ATLANTIC 


fomes Warrants Honoreé 
se Syloania Tubdes 


RENT TV 


$2.50 Weekly 


2-Week Minimum 
Ne Meter © We Other Cherge 


LI, 7-9317 


RENT 


we ome for Pleteap 
oats ap 


CERTIFIED. TV 


COMPLETE 
DINNERS 


2.29 


Open Daily & Sunday 
11:30 A.M, te Midnight 


Billy Martin's 
Carriage House 


1238 Wiscoasia A veasne 
Rooms CO. 5-5400 


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Parking we. Ave. & HN BA. 


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Orchestras 
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as Shows 7:30—10:30—12:30 
r Conditioned—Open Sunda 


14th & H Sts. N.W. 


‘Most Popular Place in Toun’ 


Your choice of 


any drink listed 
BST J 


5 A.M. te 6 P.M. 
COCKTAILS 
Manhattan 


Bacardi Old Fashioned 
Side Car Whiskey Seur 


Extra Dry Martini 
or 
é YEAR OLD 
Straight Kentucky Bourbon 
7 YEAR OLD 
Straight Maryland Rye 


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CASINO ROYAL 


“THE BIGGEST ENTERTAINMENT 
BARGAIN IN D. C. 


The Star of 


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ADMISSION * 


Sullivan * 


y 


Paul Dixen TV Show 
“Roberta“ MacDonald is'a knockout 
walked off te oe a 


plause — every bit- of it 
served.” DON HEARN, NEWS 


“Folks are talking about Roberta 
“Pa Don't Preach 
¢ sings at the 


jal. 
PAUL HERRON, POST 


NA. 8-7700 


follow Judith Dunkle, 
Washington of 1955” 
City, N. J., and broadcast daily, 
gy of her 


Atiantic City’s 
Hall will be Irv Lichtenstein, | 
publicity director for the sta-' 
tion. 
will be heard Sept 
10 as part of the “Lunch With | 


ow 
RADIO station WWDC will) 
“Miss 
to Atlantic | 


rogress in the | 
iss America Pageant.” 

Handling the broadcasts from) 
Convention 


His Atlantic City reports 
7, 8. 9 and 


eee —_——— ———ee | 


AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FOOS 


Ld Most Misese a wret 4 
echingten's 


COMPLETE DINNERS 


cw 


THE SILVER FOX Restaw- 
rant on Wisconsin ave. has long, 
been noted as a very fancy 
watering spot but I have dis-| 
covered that it's a mighty fine’ 


place to eat, too. 


Vielin and piano music is 


C.8.S. Columbi 
Reg. $99.95; Now 354.95 
New 1955 21” TV 


Only $99.95 


Autematic Toasters 
Reg. $24.95; NOW $9.95 
Whidipest Supreme 
Automatic Washer 
Reg.. $299.95; NOW $149.95 
Deep veeene Freezer 
Reg. $399. 9s: “ow $239.95 


Financing = ® 


WE BEAT 
WAREHOUSE PRICES 


played softly during the din- 
mer hours, the is @x- 
cellent and the food first rate. 
Don't be fooled by the cock- 
tail-lounge-type exterior. The 
dining area is handsome. 


of furniture, 


visit eur SS 


American - Home PFurnil- 
ture Sales Rooms. 


For’the fin- 
est bhrands 


I beecht oll mer 
appliances and fur~ 
nitere fer my entire 
heme frem the WU. ’ 
Merchandise Mert. 
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Electric Appliences 


TV 


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Wesh, 4 Cc. Neat Burtingion Hetel 


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» 


THE WASHINGTON POST ond TIMES HERALD 
30 Monday, August 29, 1953 ° 


How to Keep Well sy pr. 1. n van Detten 


To the limit of space, ques- 
ining to the preven- 
tion of disease will be answered. 
Personal replies will be made 
when return stamped envel 
is inclosed. Telephone inquiries 
mot accepted. Dr. Van Dellen 
will not make diagnoses or pre- 


- geribe for individual diseases. 


TESTING GROUND 
DON'T BE too hard on your 
adolescent son or daughter. 
John is neither boy nor man: 


he wants to be mature but is 
by the thought of 


adult responsibilities. Most of 
these young people are grow- 
ing up but prefer to emanci- 
pate themselves by degrees. 

Teenagers may want their 
parents to enforce limitations 
so that each new experience 
and responsibility can be ab 
sorbed and digested. But do 
not expect John or Mary to ad- 
mit this to their parents. One 
of the best examples of this 
phase of adolescence was de- 
scribed by Dr. C. Knight Al- 
drich in his book, Psychiatry 
for the Family Physician. 


Dr. Aldrich relates the fol- 
lowing incident: “A high school 
girl at a party telephoned her 
mother for permission to ac- 
company her friends on an ex- 
cursion after the party. The 
hour would be late, the dis 
tance considerable, and the 
destination not familiar. The 
mother detected a note of real 
anxiety in her daughter's voice 
as she asked: ‘I suppose you 
won't let me go, will you, 
mother?’ 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


“The mother said she thought 
it might be wiser for the 
daughter to come right home 
after the party. The response 
came back, in a voice resonant 
with confidence and loud to 
prociaim to the party the mar- 
tyrdom its owner suffered: ‘O, 
mother, you're so old fashion- 
ed! You never let me do any- 
thing that’s fun!” 

This girl wanted a negative 
answer even though she gave 
her friends the impression her 
mother was domineering. If 
her mother had answered, “Go, 
if you want to,” our teen-ager 
“would have had to choose be- 
tween attending a party for 
which she felt unready and 
apprehensive and incurring the 
scorn of her associates for not 
wishing to conform.” 

Adolescence is hard on par- 
ents also. The youngster uses a 
variety of ways and means to 
assert his independence and 
establish new rela tionships. 
Dad and mother are likely to 
suffer in the process. Mean- 
while, John may become criti- 


» “They want too much for « room. 
Dennis?” 


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TWO ADMISSIONS AT CITY 

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OUT 
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MUCH AS A TURTLE NEEDS et GOOD DEED FOR Zee 

A GIRDLE, DARLING! aie E DAY: 


When dad meets the situa" 


ition like a mature man it is 
likely to rekindle John’s feel- 
ing of security in his home. If 
father reacts by feeling hurt or 
rebellious, the boy will give 
up his shenanigans temporarily, 
particularily when he is not 
ready to be pushed out of the 
nest. As a result, there is no 
need to be too concerned when 
John is dissatisfied with the 
manners and customs of his 
parents. 

The struggle for emancipa- 
tion may take the form of ideal- 
ism, in which a bold bid for 
freedom is made by breaking 
away from the religious and 
political standards of the fam- 

This may explain why 
many youngsters often regard 
socialism or communism as 
Utopias. Young sprouts can be 
sold on anything that does 


away with parents, “the old- 
fashioned exploiters of youth.” 


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YOUR HEA — 


dy TIGHTLY /// 


« 


Horoscope 


Mendar. Ave. 79 
TENDENCIES: In business 
ont try te fores meues oF 
Gas and. above all. eveld clashes 
|} with coworkers oo 6 hose who 
try te have yoo risk rT money 
ler other essets questionable ven- 
| tures. Try to spen | lets 
'im some auiet form of relaxation rather 
| than teke part in croup activities which 
, me net preve as congen! a FO 
ae cipate 
MARCH 71 TO APRIL 20 (Aries)—A 
euiet day. planetarily speaking. Ne rea- 
tw terge gneae on row own 
over persona! and family effaire 
| News of am wowsua) Dbature Deer ain- 
tain poise 


APRIL..21 TO MAY 20 ‘Teerus)—Viet 
lahee pars. You can spot oepenin 
value and take sedrant f 
De «so lee ~6wwatch 
nents. Start week with @ Dane an 
7 through 


MAY 71 TO JUNE 21 ‘Gemin!)—hen 
erally auspicious vibrations 
play latent talents which n 

ise and which can aid you 
te opportunities. Am evening 
_ tien s fevered. 


atters. 


op 
fo 


a? 
of relaka- 


| JOUNE 22 TO JULY 23 (Cancer)—Care 
tim planning! Opposi forces Rrpdens- 

inate. But with rour Innate abijity and 
shrewdness properly applied, their de- 

| feat is certain. Take care of heal 


JUNE 24 TO AUG. 22 ‘(Lee)-—Den't 
count on achievement sometarety In- 
|completed fobs must Inish “on 
schedule” where poesible he c@latery 
tndfvidual seldom reaches goals. Others 
Dass im en route te success 


| AUG. 23 TO SEPT. 23 (Virgo)—Ex- 
cellent tnfluences should encourage you 
to greater effort Mechanics. medical, 
personnel. civil service employes, clerks 
\atenographers under especially benign 
irays. Try! 


SEPT. 24 TO OCT. 23 ‘Libra)—Make 
riences work fer your 

Past - 

pre ed 
f not 


ex 
epirttual advancement 
|ance should show if you ere 
| Figme and at the proper tempe 
aciust immedistely 


24 TO NOV. 22 (Sceornie)—Pre- 
ceed confidentiy and relentiessiy toward 
'vour objectives 
influences. However. do 
the expense of coordinated effor' 
confusion 


NOV. 23 TO DFC. 22 (Sacittartus) 
| When enthusiasm ruris high and physical 
(effort coil 
| pilshed : 
iidems te to be desired 
the way of true progress 


Avoid 


new 
t stand in 


| PRC 3 TO JAN. Di (Capricern)— 
i\Generaliy auspicious rays for dcealin 

pertaining to literary an 

« lines. education. civic mat- 

: Join the HELPFUL “do-it-yourself” 


| JAN. 22 TO FEB. 20 /Aquartus)—A 
period for cautious adherence to norma) 
iroutine. Changes pot especialiy favored 
}uniess necessary on this s0- . 
Nimbleness. dexterity in execution will 
bring gains 


BF. 21 TO MARCH 70 (Pteces)—Keen 
competition likely. Display your enter- 


jtimes Inclined to be 
opinionated but. as «& 
charitable and tolerant 


. c keep studying. enlarging your scope 
\of knowledge 


(Copyright. 1955. King Features 
Syndicate. inc.) 


YOUR BEST BUY! 
IN GAS scares 


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FLOOD “DUS” EVERYTHING — 
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DEcatur 2-2700 


eut for conniving! 


’ 


| 


' 


SOME COO Looks 
AT DiANER / ONO! 


~ RUSTY RILEY 


J2 Qa see 
| Yes, Sit, 2 ; 
TWN TLL 68 

THE MOVIES WHEN 

| GROw uP, _. 


SILVER SPRING 
HAS 
EVERYTHING! 


b 
BACK TO SCHOOL jisay 
says 


25a, 


Ifa WL 


} 


+ 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES pase + 
. 


Menday, Auguad 29, 1955 


9 
¢ ON BRIDGE 


BRIDGE QUIZ 

Q. 1—As South you hold: 
AKQ 10964 WKI10 675 4K9 

The bidding has : 

What do you bid now? 

Q. 2—As South you hold: 
4KQJ3854¥KI ¢AQ5a AK 

The bidding has proceeded: 


What do you bid now? 


Fase 


a Week Half Yearly Special! 
The Hecht Co. Will Clean 
2 Chairs plus 1 Sofa 


Pork Done in Your 
Hame Same Day, 
Regularly 24.85. 


19° 


Feol Carpet Cleaned, 
Reg. fe o@. ft.... Mew Te 


CALL MA. 8.5100, 
Ext. 5397 
~~ 


THE HECHT CO. 


Washington, Silver Spring, PARKington, Arlington 


—-=— 


Our Name Is Our Policy 


ENNING ROAD N.E. 


|| Partner needs very little to pro- 
=| duce a slam and an effort should 


Q. 3—As South you hold: 
4AQI15 9QI63 © K &AKRSS 


By Harold Gray 


The bidding has proceeded: 
re Nerth 
i mend | heart 


What do you bid now? 

Q. 4—As South you hold: 
4379709 @K108743 &A22 
The bidding has proceeded: 
Tk ee 

ss C® ; 
What do you bid now? 
ANSWERS 


| j—Pass. In view of partner's 
fear response, it is extremely 
unlikely that his hand would 
contain sufficient high cards for 
‘you to avoid the loss of four 
tricks. 
_ 2—Six no trump or six spades. 
| Partner is marked almost to a 


WELL, THATS 
THE ONE 


‘certainty with the king of dia- 
monds and an ace. This is prac- 
tically the only holding which 
would justify a jump response 


to three no trump. 

3—Two spades, forcing to 
igame. A mere jump rebid in 
hearts would be inadequate. 


be made to describe the great 
power of your hand. On the 
following round it will be time 
enough to show your fine heart 
support. 

4—Five clubs. Partner has 
announced a powerful hand on 
which he can win most of the 
10 tricks in his own hand. You 
may have just enough to bring 
the total to 12. The recom- 


MEANWHILE... | YOU'RE A 
CINCH TO 


GET YOURSELF A BUGGY 
LIKE THIS, SISTER! .. COME 


'mended call is five clubs. This 
| will show the adverse suit's ace 


~ LL ABNER _ 


Next te Cerner at 15th & BH Sts. N.E. 


and also a willingness to play! 


Tt 


te AWRIGHT I7- AH’LL 
2 AX HOPEFUL MUDD. 
GAL REFOOZES ) @CYUCALES?-SHE 


at hearts. 


“fs A 
AY Ake SUT IF 
NY ANOTHER 


FRANKLY, SON~ALL | 


Li. 7-1359 we mag te 10-7 P.M. 


WOULD YO" ME, WOULD YO! 


GENERAL @PELECTRIC 


21 Picnicking 
‘Children Drown 


flash flood sent a 9-foot wall of 


HONGKONG, Aug. 28 #—A| 


WE 'S INTERESTED 

IN, 1S THpOOLY- B- TINY ~—WE LL 

DOLLAH WEDOIN LET YO’ OFF 

WE DON'T CARE WHO A. TH HOOK 
MARRIES WHAT” J 


TMARRY YO! 


DOWE PROMISED HER 
PAPPY SHE WOLULONT 
MARRY NOBODY. TILL 
SHE'S 30.AMS 


HOPEFUL? LA 


APPLIANCE SALE 
@ COFFEE MAKER 


[se $16.89 


Fully avtematic 
> cape perfect 
eotee. 


Meéei F3*. 


water roaring down a normally 
placid stream at Taipokow to- 
iday and drowned at least 21 
picknicking schoolchildren. 

| Police said a sudden cloud- 
burst in the hills above Taipo- 
kow In the New Territories sec- 
tion of the British Crown col-' 
ony caused the flood. The chil-' 
dren were playing and swim- 
ming in the stream. Police said 
21 bodies were recovered. 


. 2. 


| wn 


MISTER MUDD?’ 


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IRON 


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FAMOUS-MAKE BICYCLES 


BOYS & GIR'S 
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Res. $54.95 || Reg. $49.95 


Buy 


Bicycle prices will 
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now and save. 


LIFETIME GUARANTEE 
LARGEST DISCOUNT DISPLAY OF TRIKES AND BIKES IN TOWN 


SUNBEAM “REGINA 
ELECTRIC FLOOR 


tAnoe size POLISHER 


FRY PAN BAKER 
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Reg. 95 Reg. $Q. 
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FOR CHRISTMAS—BUY NOW AT AUGUST PRICES 


ELECTRIC IRONS REG. SALE NEW SCHICK 
Sunbeam Steam . 17.95 10.50 

Westinghouse Steam 17.95 

Presto Steam and Dry 17.95 

Casco Steam and Dry 19.95 


MIXERS & BLENDORS 


Sunbeam Mixmaster 
Dormeyer Silver Chef .. 54.95 
Genera! Electric . 43.95 
Sunbeam Hand Mixer .. 19.95 
Oster Osterizer 49.95 


ELECTRIC TOASTERS 


Famous Chrome Toasfer 14.95 
Sunbeam .. tee 2058 
Toastmaster De Luxe .. 23,00 
Toastmaster 3 Slice ... 39.50 
Westinghouse 21.95 


COFFEEMAKERS 


Sunbeam 8-Cup Perc... 
Universal 10 Cup Perc.. 
West Bend Percolator .. 13.95 
Universal 8-Cup Perc... 19.95 
Sunbeam’ 10 Cup Perc 29.95 
Mirra 8-Cup Percolator 12.95 


Juice-O-Mat ...-.. 

Rival “Bucketeer” Ice Crusher 

| Westinghouse Deep Fry . 
Boontonware ...... ee 
All-Aluminum Folding Table, 30x72 


Mea lroning Board, chrome legs 
1955 RCA Table Radio Uhadsws tee 


Presto 4-Ot. Pressure Cooker 
Aluminum ice Bucket 
Aluminum Tumblers, Set of Eight 


A 3 Revere Ware 30% to 40% \off List Prices 


WAFFLE 


. 47.50 


LATEST REMINGTON 


26.95 60 DELUXE 


29.95 


WESTINGHOUSE | 


» WIDE"? WHEN I 
Joma PARMA BUREAU 
INSU I THOUGHT I 
JOINED A NEIGHBORLY GROUP. 


WHY NOW “NATIONWIDE”? 


WE'RE STILL NEIGH- 
BORLY IN SERVICE 
AND SPIRIT. BUT 
SOON THERE'LL BE 
THOUSANDS OF 
GROUPS JUST LIKE 
OURS WORKING 
TOGETHER ALL OVER 
THE COUNTRY / 


on Se ptember lst the mame 


Farm Bureau Insurance of Ohio 
9 ernie wll change re 


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PRICES | DOUBLE HUNG WINDOW. $11.75 
START | CASEMENT WINDOW $20.70 
AT DOOR HOOD 


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WILL BE AS STRONG AS 
ever / —< 


Portraits 
By Jams J, Metcalfe 
As You May Give 


How many are your 
valuables? ... The dia- 
mond. you hold’? ...A 
ton of silver or perhaps 
... A barrel full of gold? 
... Perhaps you have a 
bank account... . In 
figures six or seven... 
And everything that 
makes this earth... 
appear the same as 
heaven .. . Well, all 
your silver and your gold 
... And all your diamonds 
too ... Can only bring a 
worldly sum ... Of com- 
mon joy to you... They 
cannot make your peace 
with God ... However 
you are clever... They 
cannot buy a ticket to 
.. - Your happiness for- 
ever... The richest thing 
on earth is just... The 
time you have to live... 
To use or to refuse it by 
.. . Your willingness to 


give. 


=. Niger is Leeeees. | 


TS A SHAME YOU CAN'T 
GET TIME OFF LIKE OTHER 
MEN~ ITS NO VACATION 
FOR ME TO GO AWAY 
WITH THE CHILDREN! 
I FEEL LIKE A 


4 HE FAMILY 
S0-0-0 BuSy- 
HAVEN'T HAD 
A VACATION 
TOGETHER IN 


CALL THE OFFICE, 
DEAR-I FORGOT: TO TELL EM 
IM SHOVING OFF. ILL BE BACK 


YOU KNOW HOW CONFINING 
My JOB IS! NO LET-UP! GOT / 4 
TO KEEP POUNDING Away! a 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD | 
.* B82 Monday, August 29, 1958 e 


The DISTRICT LI 


Even the -Rich Have 


Their Troubles 


THIS IS supposed to be 
the hurryup age. We walk 
faster, drive faster, eat faster 
—in short, we live faster. In 
most respects, at least. 

But for some mysterious 
reason, playing a round of 

has become an 


Twenty years ago, playing 
on crowded municipal 
courses, we used to breeze 
through 18 holes in a little 
over two hours, stop for a 
sandwich and then play 18 
more. What's more, we'd 
sometimes be through in 
time to make the Sunday 
ball game. 

These days, a three-hour 
round of golf is considered 
fast. And when the course 
is crowded, a 2 p. m. starting 
time is no guarantee that 
you'll be able to finish 18. 

I used to think that it was 
only we poor folks who suf- 
fered these delays because 
we played on public courses. 

But the slowdown has 
spread te even the best of 
private courses. And it is 
taking a good deal of fun 
out of the game. 

Several of the local pros 
tell me that everybody's 
course is more crowded than 
it used to be because the 
game has grown in popularity 
but has not built enough new 
facilities to keep pace. in 


on 


Healthful 
Refreshing 


and so 


fact. in many § instances 
residential areas. have grown 
up around golf links and 
driven up the price of land 
to such an extent that the 
course was closed and sold 
for home sites. 


There is undoubtedly some 
merit to this argument, Yt 
I suspect that t al rea- 


son for the slowdown lies 
elsewhere. 

Even 20 years ago, our pub- 
lie courses started a four- 
some from the first tee every 
5 minutes or so. As soon as 
the players in the fairway 
had hit their second shots, 
another group teed off. 

In other words, the 
courses then were also 

crowded to capacity, and 
you can’t get more crowded 
than that. It seems te fol- 
low, therefore, that today’s 
slower pace is the fault of 
the players themselves. 

The baseball folks grum- 
ble that their professional 
games take longer now be- 
cause pitchers work so slow- 
ly and managers do a lot of 
squawking and mugging for 
the benefit of the TV au- 
dience. 

There's no television cam- 
era trained on the golf 
courses I play, but the pokey 
progress of the players ahead 
of me usually makes me wish 
I had stayed in the club 
house and played gin rummy 
instead. 

Curiously, when you 
meet them in the locker 
room afterward, the guys 
whe were ahead of you 
are usually grumbling 
about the foursome that 
was ahead of them. 

Some day I'd like to come 
out at 6 a. m. and trace the 
line of responsibility right 
back to its origin. Somebody 
out there is certainly lousing 


| wp what used to be a won- 


derful game. 
oo 


| TODAY'S BIRTHDAYS 


Greetings to+* Maurice 


| (Mickey) McDermott, Charles 
| F. Kettering, Theodore Strei- 
| bert, Sen. Henry C. Dwor- 


Quanes 


. you! 


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NE By Bill Gold 


shak, Rep. W. F. Norrell and 
Lt. Gen. Lyman L. Lemnitzer 
ce 

GIVE-AWAYS 

Pretty little female kitten; 
$5 inclosed for Children’s 
Hospital (South 8-8788) Lov- 
able buff<olored male kit- 
ten; $1 inclosed for Children’s 
Hospital (Warfield 17-6311). 
Lovely kittens; $1 inclosed 
for Children’s Hospital (Jack- 
son 2-6262). Healthy, hou 
broken, adorable kittens: $1 
inclosed for Children’s Hos- 
pital (Emerson 3-8304). 


Your Give-Away listing 
will not be published un- 
less it is accompanied by 
your legibly written name, 
address and UNabbreviated 
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People Served Daily 

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FAVORITE STORY 

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the bowling enthusiast who 
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her little girl, the wife said: 
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Daddy tonight.” 

“Oh, no you don’t,” 
growled Joe. “Not on my 

bowling night.” 
cow 
THIS 18 WASHINGTON 
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: rie ae | | THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
The Washington Merry-Go-Round |__* Monday, August 29, 1955 33 


—_———— 


Shivers’ Blast May Be Boon to Adlai 


By Tom McNamara _|\iberal group that doesn’t fol-)rettes, left a quarier on the,revolving fund, I guess, as an 
low the party line of either the| counter, and rushed out again! overage on the day's receipts,” 
(While Drew Pearson is on q| Democrats or Republicans, but before the cashier could give| speculated Mis Ridgely. “The 
brief vacation his usual column often branded as “left wing” |him a penny change. ‘next time Mr. Stassen comes in 
will be written by members of by the conservatives of both) “what are you going to do here, maybe when he’s on his 
his staff.) parties. with that penny?” a news re- — “= ie eee aid, wird 
’ : rter asked Mrs. Edith Ridge-|re!und Him the penny, provia- 

Even his enemies—and he Stevenson’s ADA Ties fy. hostess of the House dinery|ing we can catch him.” 

seems to have a lot of them—| The charge that the ADA Is) “ «on, it will go into a general! ate ie 


Stevenson has rece The charge that Stevenson is 
his saundbashe « on © closely linked up with the ADA 


battle for the is, however, a matter of record ¢ od jy 
Democratic # and many regular Democrats 

preside ntial resent Adilai’s tie with an 

nom ination— independent group. 

and he can use — With an important election .* 


aks— ' icoming up next year, on which » 
han, van Gov. ' ithe Presidency of the United 
ernor Allan States is riding, Democratic BACK-TO-SCHOOL , 
chiefs do not believe in taking 


ropsr a been ) 5 any chances. A short time ago 
against him. the Democratic leader quoted 
earlier in this story was 


e 
on behalf of Stevenson. 
every knock is a boost from This leader, incidentally, is 


the Dixiecrat Texan who sup-|one of the top 1i 
p liberals in the 
ported the Republicans in 1952.| nemocratie party, but he told 


- However, Shivers said 
BY Willard |t eT nigy serie tnt orcaime the ADA representative that be! = READY FOR YOUR PAINT BRUSH 
ef “TH HECK WITH blast that many regular Demo-|nation in 1952 and would be 
’ crats would agree with, much| against Stevenson again at the 
UNCLE wie” as they dislike Shivers. He also 1956 convention in y 5 eo 
To left unsaid a number of things| “Why?” asked his visitor. 


that Democratic leaders, ti « don’t thi 
side the Stevenson comp: bavelte ean bent Ravaente on BUY NOW AT 


been saying privately. partly, to be very frank with 

A prominent Democrat who/you, because he is too closely AUGUST SALE PRICES 
doesn’t want to be quoted sized| associated with your organiza- 
up the 1956 Chicago conven-|tion,” was the reply. 
tion as follows: “If Governor| “Don't tell me that you are 
Stevenson is a candidate, he pry ry that propaganda that 
will be strongly supported in| the A is left-wing,” said the 
the early balloting. He wil]| ADA spokesman. “You know 
have a good many pledged dele-| etter than that. Do you really 
gates, including probably a/|‘2ink we are left-wing?” 
sizable number from the South,| “Of course I don’t think you 
but after the third ballot they/|4Te left-wing or anything of {hat 


will be looking around for the|*%°Tt.” replied the Democratic 
exits.” chief. “I am sure you are not. 


SPS . [oa- . 
) / CLUDING THE “In my opinion, Stevenson's ae ar ah Goes Bt 


v, , ¥ . : ot 
Ws GEE, STEEBS I THINK . problem will be controlling the | 
one —-* —_ . ; 


tle vacations THE UFEGAV) GUARD | . " . 
with his Korean _ WAS RIGHTS 166 CAM itehy feet among his delegates,” Washington Pipeline 


Sot, Steve Roper : os = | Siete) this leader added. “You must} The man who will call the 
racket — smashing | a a Wx ; remember, he made it by only|shots at the 1956 Democratic 
news photo bon, , one and a half votes at the'\-onvention in Chicago is 
fs puzsied by the | mie 4 1952 convention in Chicago.” (Speaker Sam Rayburn of 

y S88 oF mystery that 7. : Adlai’s ‘Drawbacks’ Texas. Rayburn, who would like 

the Democratic nomination ba Big Book Rack $9.89 
=] : a What is the story behind the| himself and deserves it, will ‘ R ice $3.49 )- 

( scot, Ste Fels ami nn sudden allergy to the man whojcontrol the key southern dele- ‘ 4 °9- pr ‘ 


mntitity, ivi NVI) led the Democratic ticket in| gations. A good longshot bet 
OMT, ; y ulk 
i» 


1952? Adlai Stevenson, a plain-|is Kefauver for President and 


‘# |spoken person himself, prob-|Harriman for Vice President. 
Th |ably would like it better if it|Former President Harry Tru- 
« § | were brought out Into the open.|man has been privately plump- 
Here are some of the “draw-|ing for Kefauver. So has House 
backs” that have been dogging! Majority Leader John MeCor- 
By Lank Leonard (his comeback trail. ‘mack of Massachusetts, who is 
® Stevenson was defeated\a potent influence in the party 
decisively once by Eisenhower. and works closely with Speaker 
Even under the best possible| Rayburn both in legislative 
campaign conditions, a defeated| and political matters ... Car. 
candidate has at least one|mine De Sapio, the Tammany 
strike on him. boss and a shrewd politician, 
* Democratic foes of Steven-| apparently jumped the gun in 
son claim he is too much of\advising his own candidate 
the suave, “city slicker” type) for wer vo House, Governor 
to compete successfully against| Avere arriman of New 
the popular and earthy Eisen-| York, to declare openly for|'' End Seokcase 24” Bookcase 
hower. All Democratic leaders, Stevenson. De Sapio had hopes| 9':"x9'"x36" 36” High 
that Stevenson would be able Reg. $8.95 
to swing his delegates to Har- : 
run again. Those againstiriman, if the Illinoisan can't 
Stevenson argue that the party! get the nominatior himself, but 
needs a “new personality” to|the experts say this won't hap- 
lead the ticket in 1056, if it'pen. De Sapio’s advocacy of 
hopes to win. “favorite son” candidates in 
— ® Ant}Stevenson Democrats northern states also may back- 
contend that he couldn't carry fire in favor of Kefauver, not 
the women’s vote—at least, Harriman, according to com- 
in a battle with Eisenhower. | petent observers. 
However, the deadliest am- 
munition being aimed at Steven- Stassen Leaves Change 
son behind the scenes is a| Former FOA Chief Harold 
charge by fellow Democrats/Stassen, the man who expends 
that he has too close a kinship hundreds of millions in foreign 
with the Americans for Demo-| aid, rushed into the House res 
cratie Action, an independent, taurant for a package of ciga- 


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THE WASHINGTON POST ° and TIMES ‘HERALD 
34 Monday, August 29, 1955 


the greater Washington area schools start in September ... . get ready ... get set... 


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