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. s 


Stories 
Page 31 


The Weather 


Today—Partly cloudy, chance of scat- 
tered showers in morning and turning 
cooler in afternoon. High about 82. 
Fair and cooler at night and Thursday. 
Tuesday's temperatures: High, 87 at 
3:20 p. m.; low, 70 at 7 a. m. Pollen 
count—40. (Details on Page 20.) 


Times Herald 


Chisox Take First as Yanks Lose 
nashington 


Jost FINAL 


* 


78th Year — No. 269 


Phone RE. 7-1234 ene walbztatyd 


os 


WEDNESDAY, A 


) 
Compent 


UGUST 31, 195 


5 


WTOP Radio (1500) TV (Ch. 9) 


FIVE CENTS 


RED A 


FOR ARABS HINTED 


Senate Unit 
Accused of 
‘Kid-Glove’ 
Risk Probe 


Chairman Johnston 
Denies Allegations 


Shigemitsu 


Hints at U.S. 
l or Foolproof Data Exchange 


Departure 


Japanese Official 


Says Time Has Come 
To Review Joint 
Defense Plans 


Disarmament Recommendations 


Stassen Calls on Soviet Union 


By Francis W. Carpenter 

UNITED NATIONS, WN. Y. 
Aug. 30 #—President Fisen- 
hower's disarmament envoy to- 
day called for a foolproof ex- 


change of military blueprints ~~ 


and aerial inspections between 


ithe United States and Russia. 


hower'’s plan, but later prom- 
ised to study it. 

Stassen's move was another 
step by the United States in- 
tended to obtain U. N. approv- 
al for the Eisenhower plan 


Romania Announces 


cern that President Eisenhow- 
ers plan may have loopholes 
through which a surprise at- 
tack o eat proportions might 
be wgleashed 

Here are the main points. put 
forward by Stassen to prevert 
such a development: 

“Each nation has recognized 
the need for ground observers 


‘ 


Aid Offer ; 


By Russia 
Is Reported | 
To Dulles 


U. 5S. Urges Israel 
And Her Neighbors 


To Refrain From 
Any Use of Force 


Je Will Cut Its Army 


Romania, following the 
propaganda tead of Russia 
and Crechosiovakia, an- 


By Americans for By Warren Unna 


Fiall Reporter 


Japanese Foreign Minister 


The plan would set up safe- 
‘guarcs against Pearl Harbor- 
type attacks. 

The delegate, Harold E. Stas- 


and these will be stationed at'| 
key locations within the other! 
country for the purpose of al-' 
lowing them to certify the 


Democratic Action 


By Murrey Marder 
Biatt 


Reporter 


A charge that “kid-glove” 
tactics are being used in the 
Senate investigation of the! 
Federal security program 
was made yesterday by 
Americans for Democratic 
Action. It was promptly de-| 
nied | 

Joseph Le Rauh Jr. national 
chairman of ADA, told a Sern 
ate Civil Service Subcommit-| 
tee’ it was Only “shadow-box-| , 
ing” with its promises to make 
an all-out inquiry. 

Rauh said “a kid-gloved and 
polite investigation of a few 
horrible examples does, a present from the 
greater harm than no investi-; -———--——-— 
gation at all. It will 
serve to whitewash the ‘num- 
bers racket and all of the out- 
rages of Nixon-MeCarthy .poli- 
tics.” 

Chairman Olin D. Johnston’ 
(D-S.C.), bristling at the attack. 
said the Subcommittee is doing 
everytitiag within its power to 
get at “the facts.” 
die challenged Rauh to pro 
dure the facts or “tell us how 
i> get them.” . Rauh.said hed 
be glad to suggest that 

Johnston said he 
that testimony already heard) 
has knocked the ground from| 
under Republican claims about’ Area residents pushed their 
the program made in the last gifts to the disaster-stricken 

litieal campaign. Staff mem-' northeastern states over the 
aa <_< pag mae $120,000 mark yesterday—an 
senhower Administration § in —Te BGG per cent of the 

$75,000 they were asked to give 
See SECURITY, Page 9, Col. l only last week. 

| “This remarkable response, 
spontaneous and strictly by 
mail, is no mere token of sym- 
pathy.” said Daniel W. Beil, 
chairman of the District Chap- 
ter of the American Red Cross, 
the organization which is :on- 


e 


Fund 5 


To 160.4 Pet. 


Area’s $75,000 Quota 
Oversubecribed With 


believes $120.000 in a Week 


(Pecture on Page 2) 


Girl in Span Leap 
Rescued, Revived 


Artificial respiration by- a 
Metropolitan Sabreman revived ;Aucting the appeal. 
an unconscious 19-year-old gir!) Bell said the volume of mail 
last night after shé@-eppareptiy being received by the District 
jumped 75 feet from the South chapter, as well as by chapters 
Capito! st, bridge into the Ana-|'" the suburban areas, points 
costia River. to a possible contributions to- 

Motorcycle Pvt. C. EF. Fones|*#* of $150,000 
said the girl, Miss Juanita Car-| The national 
ter, 1121 2d st. se. “was not 
breathing” when he began giv- other $100,000 at 10 a. m. today 
ing her artificial respiration. [when the government of the 

Police said Miss Carter was|Dominican Republic turns over 
Brought to shore shortly before|to Red Cross officials a check 
midnfght by a man who identi-|for $100,000. The check will be 
fied himself as John E. Smith, in addition to $100,000 given a 
31. of 1010 20th st. nw., whoifew days ago by Generalissir.o 
dove trom the riverbank and/Rafael Trujillo, former presi- 
swam to her aid dent of thegation. 

Fones,:off duty and en route. The Dipti Chapter reported 
home. stopped and revived Miss its largest single contribution 
Carter. of the day yesterday from em- 

ployes of the Labor Depart- 
ment. The gift totaled $2789.50 

\ gift of $1280 was recorded 
from Capitol Cadillac(Oldsmo- 
| bile Co.. Suburban Cadillac- 
‘Oldsmobile Co. and Akers 
‘Oldsmobile-Cadillac Co. and 
employes 

Gifts may 
District Red 
2025 § st 
in Alexandria, Arlington, Fair- 
fax, Montgomery and Prince 
| Georges. 


fund, mean- 


> 


Farm Prices Drop 
Another 2 Pct. 


Tnited Prees 

Farm prices dropped 2 per 
cent during the month ended 
August 15 to a level 6 per cent 
below last year's figure, the Ag- 
riculture Department said yes 
terday. 

During the same period, the 


be mailed to the 
Cross Chapter, 


Gloria Lockerman, 12, champion Baltimore speller, decided 
net te try the $32,000 question. The dictionary she holds is 
TV program. (Other photes, Page 23.) 


merely | | 


Flood Relief | 


rs | 


while, will be increased by an-| 


nw., or to chapters! 


‘Shigemitsu yesterday hinted 
‘that his country might like 
to see an end to American 
‘troops on Japanese soil. 
| Shigemitsu'’s carefully 
‘couched remark at a National 
Press Club luncheon was the 
first reference to such an action | 
by a high-placed Japanese of- 
ficial, although the subject has 
been bandied about previously 
in Japans Diet 

The Foreign Minister 
alse his country’s 
i'Prime Minister, simultaneously | 
made reference to “territories 
rightfully ours, which await res- 
titution.” Thie-Was intérpreted 
as meaning that Japan was eve 
ing the return of such prewar 
territories as the Bonin and the 
|Ryukyu Islands, including Oki- 
inawa, which are occupied by 


who 
is 


Associated Prees 


ithe Kuriles, Habomeis and 
Shikotan, which are occupied 
by Russia. ) 
| The 6&yearold diplomat said 
the territorial restitution, plus! 
the repatriation of 210 Japanese 
war criminals, “are two owt-) 
standing issues that so far Rave 
consumed much time” in his 
talks with Secretary of State 
John , oster Dulles 
Dulles was asked about the 
withdrawal of American troops 
from Japan at his press con 
Lockerman, 12- ference yesterday morning but 
yegr-old. “cpell-belle” from Bal. deferred answering the 
) ground that Shige ght 
timore, settled for the $)6,090 bring up the fect withjhim| 
she had already won last nigh®’ that very da} 
in New. ‘* and passed up the \ few hours later at™jhe 
Shigemitsu 
think the time 


Girl Speller 
tops After 
$16,000 Win 


Gloria Plays It 
Safe. Refuses to 
Try for $32,000 


Gihoria the 


$32,000 hurdle to the “$64,000 Press Club, 
Question.” clared: “I 
When Hal March, quiz mas 
ter on the Columbia Broadcast- 
ing System's fabuloMielevision 
show, asked Glorjé’s grand 
moth Mrs. Bertha Key, if she 
had 5 whether 
would try for the $32.000 
Key replied deliberate!s 
“Yes I think I have. I think 
the Lord has been very. very 
good to Gloria and I decided 
that she would stop here.” 
Gloria then presented 
with two checks—one for §15,- 
500 that will be put into a trust 
‘fund for her and another check 
for $500 for Gloria to spend 
“on lollipops, or anything in 
the world you March 
told the smiling, self-possessed 
liathe Négro gir! 
The 


of Gloria's 


tries should review our de- 
fense relationship and put |! 
on a solid partnership basis 
P We “should coordinate 
plans and establish goals for 
our common defense so that 
we may rapidly put an end 
to continued reliance on A 

r our national 


(lor ia 
Mrs 


we have not ex 
hausted our agenuity to find 
ways and means of elaborat 
ing. to our mutual satisfaction, 
a system of defense, based on 
mutuality, that will prove ade 
quate and, at the same time, 
eliminate such frictions as are 
botind to arise from the pres- 
ence of foreign troops on. our 
soil.” 

It was the last part of this 
statement which caught the 
eve of local Far Gast experts. 
The United States now main- 


See JAPAN, Page 7, Col, 1 


‘Edith’ 640 Miles 
Below Cape Race 


was 


want.” 


Governments tax bite 


out winnings will 
amount to approximately $4640 
If she had taken the mext step 
and the $32.000. 
Sam's cut would have amounted 
to approximately $11,910. 
Gloria, who will be a-ninth- 
grade student at the Booker T.| ported last night about 640 
Washington High School in| miles south southwest of Cape! 
Baltimore this fall, also was| Race. Newfoundland. moving! 
given a television set. a bicycle, narth-northeast about 20 miles 
' See GLORIA, Pg. 2, Col.2 ‘an hour. 


won Linele 


Asoociated Presa 


Hurricane Edith Was._re 


eee 


cost of production and living)! 
supplies purchased by farmers 
declined one per cent. 


Einsteinium and Fermium 


i -_ 


Washington's 
Most Complete 
Financial Pages 
Offer You: 


As Result of 


By Rennie Taylor 
BERKELEY, Calif... Aug. 30 
#—The first full-scale hydro- 


ati sobs ; a |gen bomb explosion in the Pa- 
hnimee crint ne make auote., |tifie in the late 1952 produced 
arger pr ° ry a two new chemical elements, 
One Caey 0 (see atomic scienists disclosed to- 
day. 

The researchers recommend- 
ed the new elements be named 
lafter the late Dr. Albert Ein- 
stein and the late Dr. Enrico 
Fermi, who played leading 
roles in the birth of the atomic 
age. Such recommendations 
usually are accepted.” 

The new elements are Num- 
ber 98 in the roster of the 
chemical substances, to be 
named einsteinium, and Num- 
ber 100, to be called fermium. 

Their detection and identifi- 


: 
Any 


Washington 's 
N. Y. Stock Exchange table. 


cromoiete 


Most comprehensive local, na- 
tional and world business news 
by leading authorities. 


Complete record of the day's 
transactions including clos- 
ings, in all editions, on all 
markets covered by this news- 
paper. 


See Pages 27, 28 and 29. 
For Home Delivery, Phone 
REpublic 7-1234 


Elements No. 99 and 100 Discovered 


52 Pacific H-Bomb Blast 


cation were announced by vari- 
ous researchers in February. 
1954, but circumstances of the 
\discoveries were not made pub- sion which uses Uranium 235 
lic. jor plutonium for fuel. | 
| Results of cooperative ex-| The join letter of the re-! 
'periments which yielded the searchers suggests the 1952) 
new elements were described|' bomb consisted of a core of | 
jin a joint letter to the ‘editor| Uranium 235 or plutonium, | 
‘of the Physical Review by 
three. groups—the University 
of California radiation labora- 
tory and two Atomic Energy 
Commission laboratories, the 
Argonne near Chicago and Los 


for atom smashing. They are 
produced in large numbers in 
an ordinary atom bomb explo-' 


an ad- 
ranium 


some form, and finall 
dition of ordinary 
238. 

The two new élements, first 
detected in the Pacific blast, 
Alamos, N. M. ' were produced later in the 

Both new elements, the an-| laboratories and were chem- 
nouncement said, were pro-jically identified and classified. 
duced by the bombardment of The confirmatory work was 
ordinary, Uranium 238 with|done with a cyclotron here, 
neutrons. Neutrons are sub-' with an atomic reactor at Arco. 
atomic particles and are the Idaho, and in the Los Alamos 
,most effective kind of bullets! atom laboratory. - 


f h 


ithe United States: and Sakhalin. | 


j 


then a jocket of hydrogen in| A'sop 


tatreria!s 


sen, nade the recommendations 
to the UL. N. Disarmament Sub 
comniittee now in session 
Stassen, who has carried on 
a study of this proposal for 
months, suggested the safe 
guards would assure the United 
States and Russia against sur- 


try 

There was no immediate re 
action from the Russians At 
the summit conference in Ge. 
neva. the Russians at fret were 


prise attack from either coun.) 
a A 


slightly cool toward Mr. Eisen-' 
deputy; ss. at 


nounced yesterday it will cut 
back its army by 40,000 men 
by Dec. 1. Page 4. 


al 


» 


eee 


United States Chief Delegate 
Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. urged 
the Subcommittee to approve 
it yesterday. 

The Geneva spirit of cordial 
ity carried on today as the dele- 
gates got down to basic prin 
ciples in their search for a dis- 
armament program. 


There has been some con 


40 From U.S. 


Held as Korea 


Tax Hosta ges 


Forbidden to Leave 


Till Companies Pay | 


*Exorbrant’ Levies 


SEOUT.. Aug. 2 m—The 
Am Chamber of Cam. 
merece in Korea complained to 
day that 49 
American husinessmen are 
being held as 
government for failing to pay 
“greatly exorbitant” taxes 

One businessman charged the 
Seoul goverhment refused to 
allow him to fly to Hoggkong 

see hig new-born child until 


n 


approximately 


hostages” by the 


to 
nae, paid his back business taxes 
now come when our two ef 


The Chamber sent 
cables to the United States 
Chamber of Commerce in 
Washington and the National 
Foreign Trade Council in New 
York urging them to file the 
“strongest protest.” 


urgent 


The cables charged that “an. ‘a d 


proximately 49 members are 
held as individual hostages for 
their porations.” The Cham. 
ber AL government “arbi- 
trarilxs has imposed exorbitant 
taxes which were “assessed 
with caprice.” 

It was charged also that cor- 
poration taxes,are demanded) 
from individual representatives 
who are in Korea only as liaison 
men. 

H. E. Renfro, of Louisville, 
Ky., said he received a cable 
yesterday from his wife in 
Hongkong announcing the birth 
of their child. He was denied 
an exit permit to fly there be- 
cause he failed to pay taxes he 
considers excessive, Renfro 
charged " 

He said his firm. the Ameri 
can Trading Co.. of New York. 
has agreed to send another rep 
resentative to Seoul, so he can 
go to Hongkong 

The Chamber said 
American businessman 
was refused "an exit 
under similar 


permit 


accuracy of the forégoing in- 
formation (information dealing 
with military installations) and 
to give warning of evidence of 
surprise attack or of mobiliza 
tion 

“Each country shall permit 
unrestricted, but monitored, 
aerial reconnaissance by visval, 
photographic and electronic 
means by the other country 

“The United Statés and the 
USSR, will exchange all data 

‘Bee ARMS, Page 9, Col. 1 


Bearing Melts 
On Forrestal; 
Test Run Cut 


ABOARD CARRIER FOR 
RESTAL 
A propeller-shaft bearing melt- 
ed today and forced curtail- 
ment of sea trials of the super- 


carrier Forrestal. 


The trouble developed in the’ 


main thrust bearing on the No 
3 shaft as the world's biggest 
warship was building up to full 
power about 100 miles east of 
Cane Henry. Va 


H. T. Bent. vice president 


and works manager of the For- 


restal’'s builders. the Newport 
News Shipbuilding and Dry 
Dock Co., said the melted bear- 
ing would prevent full-power 
runs, planned for Wednesday. 
For this reason, the ship. 
which sailed from Newport 
News, Va. yesterday, will re- 
turn there Thursday morning 
instead of Friday, as originally 
scheduled 
The Forrestal will return to 
sea Sept. 19 to perform the 
postponed full-power runs, Ben! 


! are 
“We still hone to deliver the 
ship to the Navy on Sept. 29, 
as scheduled.” Bent said. Com- 
mresiening ceremonies are 
scheduled for Oct. 1. 

The Forrestal, proceeding on 
her remaining three shafts at 
speeds of 15 to 20 knots, will 
undergo all scheduled tests to- 
night and Wednesday except 
those requiring full power 

ATl hands among the 2300 per- 
sons ard had been eagerly 
awaiting the full-power speed 
tests of this giant $200 million 


op. 
Secretary of the Navy Charles 
S Thomas has said the Forres- 


tal would attain a speed of 
40 miles an hour, 


2 Are Saved 
In Boat Mishap 


Catholic University 


Egypt Agrees 


To Cease-Fire 


Tn (,aza Area 


U. N. Truce Plans 
Accepted; Reply 
Of Israel Awaited 


(Picture on Page 17) 
JERUSALEM (Wednesday). 
Aug 21 WeThe United WNa- 
ti¢ns Truce Mission announced 
last night Egypt has agreed to 
a cease-fire on the Israeli- 
Egyptian from near Gaza. 
Israel's decision is expected to- 
day, it said 
The cease-fire was to become 
effective at 6 p. m. Jerusalem 
time (1 p. m. EDT). 

The crackle of gunfire and 
the roars of wther explosive 
violence went on through - 
terday. 

4 U. N. spokesman, indicct- 
ing optimism that the fighting 


AT SEA, Aug. 30 


~s. 


‘may end shortly, said a cease- 
6 


fire proposa 
both Egypt and Isra y Mai 
Gen. E. L. M. Burns, chief 
truce supervisor for Palestine 

Egypt, he said, had respond. 
éd positively, and Israel's re- 
ply was expected shortly. 

The Egyptian government in- 


en sent to 


Egypt accepted the proposal. 

An American delegation 
spokesman at the U. N. head- 
quarters in New York read the 
Cairo report and said “we hope 
this means an end of ti shoot- 
ing in thie Gaza area.” 

The American and. British 


| Ambassadors at Cairo called on 
ithe Foreign Ministry and urged 


An Israeli spokesman charged 
early today 


spokesman con- 


By Edward T. Folliard 


BSiall Reporter 


Secretary of State John 
Foster Dulles said yesterday 
there have been indirect but 
reliable reports that Russia 
has offered weapons of war 
to the Arab countries. 

He said that if the reports 
were true. the United States 
wouldn't be very happy, since 
such a development would not 
contribute to the easing of 
‘world tension promised at the 
Big Four meeting in Geneva. 

But Dulles acknowledged at 
a news conference that he had 
no official information that Rus- 
‘sia had offered arms tt the 
Ara countries, end no evidence 
that such equipment was in 
Arab hands. He said that since 
they were independent coun- 
tries, they were free to do what 
they wished in acquiring war 
materia! 
| The Secretary said the 
United States had urged both 
Israe) and. Egypt within the 
last 48 hours to refrain from 
use of force in their besder dis- 
pute, hoping to head off a full- 
scale war. He said that this 
country’s next move will de- 
pend on the reaction of Israel 
and Egypt to its. peace-making 
efforts. 

Other observations of Dulles 
at his news conference were: 

® Vice President Richard M. 
Nixon has no intention of visit- 
ing Moscow this fall during his 
‘good-will trip to the Middle 

ast. 


> 

® The question of a treaty 
under which American forces 
would be withdrawn from Ja 
pan has not vet been raised in 
his talks with Japanese For- 
eign Minister Mamoru Shige- 
mitsu, but might come up later. 
© The State Department éx- 
pects to ask Congress for more 
money for maintenance of 
American embassies. If Rep. 
Pat Hillings (R-Calif.), thinks 
our embassy in Moscow is a 


‘formation’ department had an- P's pen,” he ought to see the 
‘nounced earlier last night that 


leaky embassy in Laos, where 
the plumbing is out of order 
and the only available water 
‘overruns the floors. * 
| © German Chancellor Kon- 

‘red Adenauer’s visit to Moscow 
‘ought to prove useful, especial- 
ly in view of an enlarged 
agenda under which German 
unification and the ‘return of 


Wang Ping-nan, 
nvoy. But each 
nearer the time 
when Red China will release 


day brings 


circumstances were rescued from the Poto-|firmed that shooting went on the 41 American civilians it 


was Alvin J. Milnick, of Beverly mac River last night when their| along the Gaza strip armistice |holds, and patience is called 


Hills, Calif. He wanted to visit 


days. 
Another businessman said he 
received a $239,000 tax state- 


ment, covering a period from| 


sailboat capsized 100 


yards| demarcation line. An Israeli for. 
his wife in Tokyo for a few from the Buzzard Point Boat ' spokesman late last night con-| 


© The truce inspection teams 


Yard at the foot of Ist st. sw. |tradicted earlier Israeli state-\in Korea no longer serve a 


Police identified the pair as 
Carl H. Lippold and Jackie 
Dawson. A high wind caused 


‘ments and said 


| 


e day had 
been quiet there. 


Confirm e d/reports said 


useful purpose. The teams, 
made up of Swedish, Swiss, 
Polish and Czech members, 


Sept. 14, 1954. to June 30, 1955,\the 14foot snipe to overturn) heavy shelling agross the line should either be dissolved or 


and including a 10 per centiand crash inta a buoy, police Monday 


fine for negligence in payment. 

chamber sources said if pre- 
sent taxing methods continue 
they will recommend  with- 


said. The students clung to 


the boat until rescued. 


and Tuesday 


night 
Ss and wounded 


killed five Je 
nine. 


‘simply get their reports from 
inside the demilitarized zone 
\between Free and Red Korea, 


= os -_ ee 


ov 


drawal of all foreign business Noq Occasion to Use It in 38 Years 


men from South Korea 

Informed quarters said 
United States Embasay officials 
met today with South Korean! 
tax Officials to discuss the com- 
plaints. 


Index 


Page | 

je 15 | Horoscope . 
Ain’sem'‘ts 24,25 | Keeping Well. 
Childs ......14 | Kilgalien .... 
Classified. 38-45 | Livingston 
Comics ., 56-59 | Movie Guide 
Crossword ..56 | Night Clubs . 
vistrict Line. 58 | Ovituaries 
Dixon. ..15 | Parsons 
14 | Pearson 
Events ay.146 | Picture Page. 
rederal. Diary 19 | Radio-TV 
Firancial .27-29 | S | 


Page 


o¢4 @- 


Herblock. Weather 


x 


Dulles Reveals License to Carry Gun, 


Fingerprinting Every Year to Keep It 


He said he has come to re 
nal conclusion, and that thé 


International News Service 
Secretary of State John 
Foster Dulles, 
s to promote 
peace, disclosed yesterday he is 
licensed to carry a gun. 


| Dulles disclosed his owner- 
‘ship of the revolver in illustrat- 
whose main job ing that being fingerprinted, in 
international, the American point of view, 
‘does ngt carry @ stigma, 

+» He conceded some foreign 


But the Cabinet officer smil-| countries fingerprint only crimi- 
ingly said that in the 38 years| nals, and that some aliens feel 


he has owned a revolver, he stigmatized if they are finger.. 
. ‘printed. He said consideration 


se 


has never had eccasion to u 
t . 


Dulles also reported he cheer- 
fully undergoes Saeeterieting 
every year to obtain a lega 
license for the, weapon, 


is being given officially to ask- 


‘ing Congress to rescind the law 


that requires visitors to the 


Waited States to be finger- 


printed. 


“* 


fi 
{fnal conctus topic probably 
will be discussed at the October 
meeting of foreign ministers 
in Geneva inasmuch as Soviet 
Russia has expressed displeas 
ure over the requirement. 3 
Dulles said the. American 
viewpoint is that fingerprin 
is the one infallible means 
identification, and that 
United States officials a 
fingerprinted as a matter 
routine. 


THE WASHINGTON POST ond TIMES HERALD 
rd Wednesdoy, August 31, 1958 


etee 


FHA Studies Backing 


United Press 


For Flood Insurance 


From the Ocean Floor 


Melvin E. Scott, 22-year-old 


sunken ship armed with brass cannon off Solano Beach, 
Calif., holds a ring he said he took from the wreckage. A 


jeweler told him it was a black 


By Robert F. Morison ~- 


The Federal Housing Admin- 
istration announced yesterday 
it is spearheading a move to) 
work out some form of Govern-) 
men insurance to pre 
vent disastrous financial losses, 
due to 

FHA Commissioner Norman 
P. Mason said the need for 
some such insurafice was 
brought home when it became 
clear that most of the esti- 
mated ~ billion flood damage 
in N astern states was not 
lcovered by insurance. 

Mason noted that the private 
insurance industry claims it 
icannot undertake such insur- 
ance because the risk cannot 
be spread widely enough to sus- 
tain claim payments in hard- 
hit flood areas. 

“There is a glaring need for 
some type of protection, and 
the problems are such that this 
seems to be a field in which 
the Government must take the 
initiative,” Mason said. 

He said at special committee 


Phil Platt, 


Off to Help Flood Victims 


ably assisted by daughters 
Diane, 6, (left) and Linda, 8, loads up a 
trailer outside his White House Cleaners, 
1312 Rhode Island ave. ne., for the trip te 


JOHANNESBURG, 
(‘#—Two books by United States 
authors have been banned b 


2 U. S, Books Banned _ | }ing Noel, first published in 1951 
30 jane now appearing in cheaper 

“My Days of 

y* Anger,” by James T. Farrell. 
‘South African censors. . They No reasons were given for the 
are “I Killed Stalin,” by Ster- order. 


Aug. 


edition, and 


By Arthur Ellis. Staff Photographer 


Cromwell, Conn., where the American Le- 
gion will distribute to flood victims the un- 
claimed clothing, linens, laundry and shoe. 
(Stery on Page 1.) 


has been set up by FHA and 
already is at work on plans 
and ideas to prespnt to confer- 
ences soon with industry and 
Goternment officials. | 
Mason suggested several pos. 
sibiliti such Government-| : 
Sacked Sood insurance. One) By Marvin L. Arrowsmith 
method, he said, might follow | DENVER, Aug. 30 #—Presi- 
the pattern of the present Gov"! sont Bissnhower today bonded 


ernment crop insurance pro) : 
gram which &. shown a sur-/Out another $25 million for 


plus in recent years. flood relief. And the Adminis- 


Another, he said, would be : 
to pattern flood insurance after; @ton arranged a Washing 
a wartime plan that brought/t0n conference for Wednesday 
more than 500 private casuaity|on rehabilitation of the water- 
companies into a program co-\ravaged northeastern regions. 
ordinated by the War Damage; The President allocated ini- 
Insurance Corp. \tial grants of $1 million each to 

“Government re-insurance | Connecticut and Massachusetts. 

—€ the loss >, ee in| and $500,000 to New York for 
surees is one possible Me 
approaching this problem,” Ma.| repair of damage. He previous- 
son said. 
“We shall explore every ave- 
nue in our search for a way to 
prevent the devastating losses 
suffered by so many Americans 
in this latest catastrophe.” 

Mason did not indicate 
whether he hopes to have a 
flood insurance program ready 
for the 1956 legislative session. 


Internationa! News 


skin diver whe reported a 


sapphire, worth $500 to $800. 


Settlement Reunites Pair ‘2282.rnte 


Separated by 


CHICAGO, Aug. 30 7 — An 
indignant housewife and her 
striking husband are together 
again today. ' 


rs. Esther Quigley, 35, was|Fan American World Airways 


reunited with her husband, An- 


: 


drew, a 220-pound steward for working hours. 


the CIO United Auto Workers 
Union, last night after nearly a’ 
week of dispute. 


» that the reunion re-) 
sulte “no kissing, no hug- 
ging, no tears, no nothing.” 

Mrs. Quigley had loudly op-| 


posed the strike of Local 1214|Roard stepped into the dispute out that they will have sizable 
of the CIO-UAW at the Harri-| sunday, however, ahd as long payments to make on 


son Sheet Steel Co. During the, 


work stoppage, she had barred #* it is engaged in seeking a 


Andrew from their home. 

She contended the strike was 
fllegal because the union con- 
tract had not expired when 
the workers struck. 

A wnion spokesman said 
the membership, consisting of 
350 of the company’s 450 em- 
ployes, yesterday unanimously 
approved a contract agreement 
reached Saturday with the com- 
pany 

Mrs. Quigley said she was 
happy about the settlement and 
had been awaiting Andrew’s re- 
turn. 

“Andy is a good guy and I! 
hope we can get back to nor- 
mal,” she said. 

Mrs. Quigley added that her 
husband did not want to talk 
to anyone. | 


Chrysler Negotiators | 


Hope to Avert Strike 


DETROIT, Aug 30 ® 
United Auto Workers (CIO) 
megotiators appeared hopeful 
today they can reach a new 
eontract settiement with 
Chrysler Corp. in time 
avert a strike by 139,000 em- 

oyes at midnight Wednes- 


ay. 

Emil Mazey, UAW secretary- 
treasurer who has been in on 
the talks since they started 
last June 27, admitted that 
both sides still had “a long 
way to go” before reaching 
complete agreement. But 
meetings are still in progress. 

Adding optimism was an ap- 
parent willingness on the part 
of the company to take up a 
UAW demand that unionized 
office workers be covered by 
guaranteed wage provisions. 

Virtual agreement has been 
reached on the “guaranteed 
semi-annual wage" plan for 
lant workers. The plan, sim- 

r to those contained in the) 
Ford and General Motors con-' 
tracts last June, guarantees 
plant workers up to 65 per 
cent of their take-home pay: 
during 26 weeks of layoffs. | 
Airline Union Votes | 
To Authorize Strike 

NEW YORK, Aug. 30 ™ 
The CIO Transport Workers 


ee oe + a gee = ee ee ee 


4221 Connecticut Avenue 


Union announced today thatiary to provide some form of 
members 
whelmingly to strike against) ,occes against financial losses 


negotiating commitee to call 
Mrs. Quigley told newsmen, 4 strike any time after the provide coverage against earth- 
current contract expires mid-| quakes, 
night Wednesday. 


‘settlement a sthike would be tunnels. jewelry, furs and some 
illegal under the Railway La. personal property. But the ma- 


bor Act. 


since Aug. 16, the union wants 
an 18-cent hourly pay increase 
for hourly-rated employes, and 
‘a $45 monthly boost fof flight 


pursers. 


ceive an average of $2.10 an j« 


‘which 


1955 PONTIAC 
Star Coupe Catalina Hardtop 


*2535 | 


Hyd. P. Steering, P. Brakes; All leather Int., 124 
inch, Low miles—New Car Guarantee. _ 


FLOOD. PONTI. 


v 


Several members of Congress 
have expressed interest in such 


suffered by persons who lost 
their homes and belongings in 
‘the recent Northeastern floods. 
| Sen. Herbert H. Lehman (D- 
iN Y.) has announced he will 
introduce legislation in Janu- 


Auto Strike 


Government igsurance to pro- 


oes mteas both individuals and busi-|- 


voted 


from floods, drought or atomic 
explosions. 

Tne insurance industry . em- 
phasized after the recent floods 
the that it has not found a way to 
insyre against flood disgsters 
‘although it has been ate to 


for higher pay and shorter 


The action empowers 


hurri- 
“other 


windstorms, 
‘canes, lightning and 
challenges of nature.” 


The Federal Mediation’ j.austry spokesmen pointed 


| such 
automobiles, mer- 


things as 
transit, bridges. 


chandise in 


\ijor damage to homes, furniture 
‘and other “real property” was 
not eligible for insurance from 
floods and is a dead loss to the 
owners. 

Mason said the flood field “is 
one field where the insurance 
companies and the Government 
working together can really be 
of service to the average Amer- 
ican home owner.” 

He said that while some may 
call flood insurance unwork- 
able. “the least we can do for 
American families facing such 
overpowering loss in the future 
to explore every possible 
‘means of protection.” 


In negotiations under way 


including 
and 


employes, 
stewardesses 


service 
stewards, 


The flight service group now 
receives $375 a month., Mem- 
bers of the other group re- 


hour. . 
—S. 


GLORIA—From P. I 


Gloria Stops at $16,000 


a tape recorder and a year’s\roundly applauded by a sur-| 
subscription to the “Little Lu prised, but sympathetic studio! 
Lu” comic book. audience in New York. | 
Glorig last week whipped; Gloria had said a few days’ 
through a tonguetwiKing Se€N- seo she intended t try all the 
tence to win $16,000 by ling for th 000 | 
every word jn the sentence: “2Y for the $64, question. | 
“The belligerent astigmatic @/0r!@ left it Bp to her ¢-and-| 
anthropologist annihilgted in-| mother, with whom She lives. | 
numerable chrysanthemums.”: |/*¢F parents are divorced and) 
As a television audience|'Ve in Philadelphia. | 
estimated at over 45 million), N° contestant on the show’! 
viewers waited tensely to see| "4S tried for $64,000 since it) 
whether Gloria would try to/9€#@n_ in June, but two have 
double her winnings, Gloria| WO" $32,000 and stopped there 
chatted calmly with March. A_ Marine captain, Richard 
She said she had been a guest|MecCutehen of Worthington, 
at the State Fair of West Vir-|Obio, passed the $16,000 mark 
ginia during the past week and//ast night by correctly giving) 
had been asked to sav “just| the geographical origin and the 
one word” — antidisestablish-|flour used in five varieties of 
mentarianism—the word she|>read named by Quizmaster 
spelled on August 16 to win'March. He'll debate for a week 
. over whether to try for the 
If Gloria had attempted to try | $32,000 question next Tuesday 
for $32,000 and missed last| might in his category: food and 
night,.she would have won a cooking. ; 


Rev. Vivian T. Key, pastor of | 
the Orchard Street Methodist 

Vegetables ond Fruits. .. 
ot the peck of 


consolation prize of $4000,' ie 
also would have been 
held.in trust for her. | 
Gloria’s grandfather, the THE SECRET 
of the Popularity of 
Church in Baltimore, was in) 
the audience when Mrs. Key. | OUR SALADS! 
gave the decision that was| 
ats: We use only FRESH 
ovor... rushed to us 
while they're still brim- 
ming with healtful 
vitamins. 


Perfectly Air-Conditioned 
_ RESTAURANTS 


14th St. at New York Ave. H.W. 
FREE DINNER PARKING 
6 P.M. lo 1AM, at Capital 
Garage, oppesite Longchamps 


; 
. 
; 
6-8400 : 


S wo. 


$2.5 Million Added for Flood Relief 


for Pennsylvania, New Jersey|from the Army, Corps of Engi- 


and Rhode Island. 
To spur the rehabilitation | Finance 


neers, the Housing and Home 
ney, the Small' ij 


|program, which may cost more | Business A 


than $100 million, the Adminis-| Budget Bureau, the 
tration called a conference of | Defense Mobilization, and the 
key officials at the White House 


The Army Engineers Corps ||)ij) 
be represented by one of his | reported to ne President, |)! 
top aides, Wilton Persons. \meanwhile, that it ‘now has he- | jij) 
_At the conference, in addi-|habilitation projects under way ii 
tion to Persons, will be Val Pe-|in 64 communities——11 more’! MN 
terson, Civil Defense Adminis-|than yesterday — in the six/| iii 


trator and chief of the rehabili-/ northeastern states which were |i _ 


tation program, and officials’ hit by floods. 


proving once again that People 


Well done all of you who gave to the urgent a 
financial aid in helping our neighbors in the Northeast States who were rav- 
aged by rain and floods. 


Auntie Sccutity 


& TRUST COMPANY 


Daniel W, Bell, President 
and Chairman 
of the Board 


15th St. aid Pennsylvania Ave. N.W. 
Washington, DB. ¢. 


THE BASIC HAT 
WITH NARROW BRIM 


Increased interest is being shown in 
our basic hat in narrow brim widths. 
Cavanagh continues to make this fa- 
voured hat in five graduated proportions 
of brim and crown. 


t 


Accurate fitting assured by: 
Regular Long 
Ovals Ovals 
$40 


15 
Agents for Hickey-Freeman Clothes and Bronzini Neckwear 


GOLDHEIMS — 


1409 H STREET 
EST. 1875 


Wide Extra 
Long 
Ovals 


Ovals 


9990 ~=— «$30 


God bless YOU! 


..« Mr. and Mrs. Greater Washington, for 


help People! 


. » « YOU who sent your check for the flood relief fund to your local Red Cross 
Chapter. 


. » » YOU who stopped into a bank and gave your bill or coins to a teller. 
. » » YOU who gave when someone came to your office for a donation. 


. } » YOU boys and girls who in your own childish way raised funds by having 
bazaars, pet shows and the like. eae 


., » YOU the business people, who so quickly made substantial contributions. 


al of the Red Cross for 


It’s human nature for all of us to compete against each other in our 
endeavor to make our own way in this land of free enterprise. But let tragedy 
or disaster strike . . . competition is gone and in its stead, in the true Ameri- 
can way of life, is a united front of helping those in need. 


The funds you have contributed will. help the Red Cross to supply food, 
clothing, shelter, medical and other supplies so badly needed by these victims 
of disaster. 


Mr. and Mrs. Greater Washington, you have in this great hour of need 
come to the aid of your fellow man... People helping People. 


Member: Federal Deposit ineurenes Corp, —Member Federal Reserve System 
| * | , wr : > 


a ~~ 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES 
sae , Wednesday, Aiegust 31, 1955 


Judge Settles 
Tiff of Boss 
And Bus Boy 


An altercation between a 17- 
yearold busboy and his boss 
yesterday led to the loss of his 
job and his temporary arrest. 

The youth, employed at the 
Hot Shoppe Restaurant at 
Rosslyn Circle in Arington, 
went across the street without 
getting permission of the as 
sistant manager, Sam Piazza, 
according to the police. 

When he returned and failed 
to “give Piazza a satisfactory 
explanation Piazza fired him, 
it was reported. Arlington po 
lice said an argument de 
veloped while the amount of 
the employe’s pay was being 


HERALD 


- Four Coffee Firms Raise 


Wholesale Price 3 ‘Cents 


| Wholesale coffee prices were. 
‘increased 3 cents a pound) 
yesterday by four of the Na- 
tion's leading coffee roasters 
‘but the price rise is not ex- 
ipected to be reflected in Dis- 
‘trict retail stores for several 
| weeks. 

General Foods Corporation's, 
Maxwell House coffee and 
Standard Brands’ Chase & San- 
born prices were boosted to 61 
cents a pound at the wholesale | 
level. 

Later Beech-nut Packing Co, 
and Albert Ehlers Inc.| am 
nounced similar 3cent whole- 
sale price increases to 90's | 
cents and 91 cents a pound, re- 
spectively. 


~ Associated Press 


One Died in This Accident 


' One passenger was killed and 24 others in- | bus, en route from Knoxville te Chicago, 


jured when this double-decked Greyhound | 


and a truck sideswiped near Lexington, Ky. 


Soccer Pool Opens With 2 Big Winners; 
Briton Wins $210,000, 2d $177,000 


Reuters ' 
LONDON, Aug. 30 — Robert 
Mirtle, a baker and amateur 
baritone, burst inte song and 
joyfully called for a pint of 
wine in Scotland today In 
London, office worker Ernest 
King, picked up the phone in 
his home, called his boss and 
announced: “I'm not coming in 
to work today—or ever egain.” 
Britain has begun its annual 
trek after the pot of at 
the end of the soccer pool form 
and these were the season's 
first two big winners 
Baker Mirtle, won top prize 
of $210,000. King, 34, won $177. 
000. Neither will have to pay 
* taxes since gambling winnings 
here are tax-exempt. 


gold 


FALL COURSE 
STARTING THIS WEEK 


FRENCH 


GERMAN-SPANISH 


Clasecs Average 2 Students 
Por Con venrent 0 " 


“ar Enroll sow 
HE RERLITZ SCHOOL of LANGUAGES 
tee 4&-00) 


Yew KENTILE , 


They were the lucky pool 
players whose success encour 
ages millions of others to pore 
over complicated forms each 
week in the hope of becoming 
wealthy overnight 

The soccer pools are highly 
organized and efficient business 
operations based on the out- 
come of weekly soccer matches. 
The volume of Dusiness of one 
company which operates the 
pools was nearly $43 million in 
the. first seven months this 
vear 

Fach week the nlaver 
receives his forms through (the 
mail. fills them out and returns 
them. The average bet is about 
35 cents 

To win the biggest prize. a 
selector must correctly predict 
the scores of eight games which 
end in ties for a given week. 


’ 
pois 


a anaain 7 
Sake Served in 


SUKI YAK | Siaees 


COOKED AT YOUR TABLE 


1018 Vermont Ave. N.W. 
fer Res. EX. 93-5474 Sun. 5-10 p.m. 


As Mirtle burst into song 
with “Gae (Go) Bring Me a 
Pint of Wine,” his wife, Isabel, 
smiled and said We'll adopt 
a child when excitement 
has died down.’ 

King and his wife are plan- 
ning a visit to two of their 
married daughters. one in Yel 
lowknife. Yukon. the other in 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 


ine 


Ransom Bills Search 
Spurred by Findings 

ST. LOUIS Aug. 30 
Serial numbers of the miss 
ing $303,720 Greenlease ransom 
money are being published for 
the second time by the St. Louis 
Globe-Democrat. 

Two $20 bills jdentified by 


bad 


-\the FBI as part of the ransom 


money were discovered recent- 
ly, the first in Minot, N. D.. 
about three weeks ago, the sec 
ond at the St. Louis Federal 
Reserve Bank last Tuesday 
They were the first 
bills found in almost two years 
and the search for more has 
been stepped up. 


VINYL’ ASBESTOS TILE 


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— 


: 
: 
; 


Spokesmen for local food 
chain stores said a retail price 
raise is not anticipated for sev- 
eral weeks. Stores carrying the 
brands are expected to sell the 
‘coffee at current prices unt! 
‘stocks on hand run out. 

The average /etail price for 
the Maxwell House and Chase 
& Sanborn brands is currently 
9 cents a pound. 
| The wholesale price boosts 
| reflect increases in green cof- 
fee prices during the past 
jmonth. Since late July, both 
Brazilian and Colombian types 
have advanced 4 cents a pound 
in New York 

Trade sources said other cof 
fee roasters will follow suit 
with wholesale price increases 


Bathtub Accident 
Fatal to Baby 


An ll-monthold baby gir! 
apparently drowned yesterda) 
in a freak bathtub accident a‘ 
her home, police reported 

Police said Brenda Fay Wil 
liams, the daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Gordon Williams. 1480 
‘Chapin st. nw., apparently lost 
her balance in a half-full tub 
and fell forward into the wate: 
while her mother was attend 
ing five other children nearby: 

She was pronounced dead a! 
Garfield Hospital. An autops, 
will be performed today to d: 
termine the cause of death 
police said 


Mental Patient 
Is Found Dead 


4 24-year-old mental patient 
at St. Elizabeth's Hospital was 
found dead in his hospital 
room iast night, police fre- 


ransom P0 


He was identified as Robert 
E. Spalding, a patient at the 
hospital since 1953. Police 
said an attendant found Spald- 
ing lving on the floor. a black 
belt tied around his 
neck. He was pronounced dead 
at &:20 p. m 

An autopsy be held’ 
today 


OIL BURNER 
SERVICE? 


iif vou need fuel oil, burner 
service or furnace cleaning 
call RE. 7-5800, the Old. Re! 

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lemon Wedge 


French Fried Potatoes 
Fresh Garden Spinach 
Hot Roll with Butter 


Cheice of Dinner Dessert 


Creme de Rum Sundae 
Chilled Honeydew Melon 
Gingerbread, Whipped 
Cream 
Fudge Layer Cake 
Pineapple Chiffon Pie 


$4.35 


Casserole Specialty 
CHICKEN A LA KING 


in Whole Tomato 
Countfy Potato Salad 


Restevrants & Pantry Hevses 


idetermined. 


$; 
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Internationa! News 


Last Rites for an Illinois Family 


Amid the charred wreckage o 


lil, home, a priest performs last rites over | 
the body of one of three victims of a fire. 


f a Hinsdale, 


~— ——— 


Brother-in-Law Hunted 
In Slaying of 2 Sisters 


| Manpower 


Coffee, Tea or Milk _ 


’ 


Dinner Rell with Butter | 


7 
. 


BUFFALO. W. Va.. Aug. 30 # 
\ 47-year-old crane operator be- 
lieved to be carrying a high- 
powered rifle was tracked 
through dense woods near here 
today by state police investi- 
gating the slaying of his two 
sisters-in-law. 

Lincoln Sayre of Arbuckle, 
W. Va., Was being sought in con-' 
nection with the deaths of 
Phioe Johnson, 49-year-old 
Buffalo scheol teacher, and 
Alice Martin, 60, of Nitro. They 
were shot to death last wight at 
Mrs. Johnson's home 

State “ Police Cpl. FE. C. 
Guthrie led the troopers tramp- 
ng through the rugged, hilly 
terrain which officers said could 
provide innumerable hiding 
piaces 

Guthrie said a shot from the 
darkness, through a window, 
killed, Mrs. Johnson as she sat 
n*a rocking chair in her living 
room. Mrs. Martin. viisting her 
sister, was next door at the 
Time 

Mrs. Martin ran inside when 
she heard the shot. the officer 
said. and was shot in the chest 
as she ran back out onto the 
front porch. She § staggered 
across the porch and fell dead 
on the wn ; 

Gutbri said Sayre was 
married to a third sister. the 
former Hazel Grymes, but she 
left him about three weeks ago 


56 Draft Calls 
Will Increase, | 
Hershey Says 


BOSTON, Aug. 30 \®—Maij. 
Gen. Lewis B. Hershey, Na- 
tional Selective Service Direc- 
tor, says the present draft total 
of 10,000 a month probably will 
increase to 25,000 or 30,000 dur- 
ing-+<he next year. 

He told newsmen in an in- 
terview last night that the ree- 
ently enacted reserve plan will 
increase on the Na- 
tion's draft manpower pool 

Under the reserve plan, men 
who enlist in the active re- 
serve at the age of 18 gain 
credit for military service dur- 
ing a lengthy reserve obligation 

General Hershey came to 
Roston to address the National 
Veterans of Foreign Wars en- 
campment 

Before 
newsmen 
five year: 
“will coma 
tive servi 


pressure 


¢ address. he told 
that during the next 
the reserve plan 
of age” and Selec- 
officials will be 
able to decide how long a 
period of reserve service is 
needed «to maintaim the Na- 
tion's militas strength 

He said reserve and active 
forces can fill about 80 per 
cent of | Nation's emergency 
requirements and 


the standby reserve will supply 


the other 20 per cent 


Associated Press 
PHLOE JOHNSON 
«+.» Slain teacher 


and her whereabouts is not 
known 

“They've been having a lot of 
trouble.” Guthrie added 

Buffalo is on U. S. Route 35 
about 35 miles northwest of 
Charteston. The search area 
was about 6 miles north of here. 
near Sayres home. Sayre’s 
abandoned car. the gasoline 
tank empty, was found 3% 
miles from the murder scene 


@WASHINGTON’S Oy 

: 
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+ 


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- 


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2] 


> 
Fe 
D 
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end Deace 
ctep the 


: Roger S$ 


> Penn. Ave. of 18th $1. 


THICK, JUICY 
SIRLOIN $4975 
STEAK LS 


“The BEST STEAK BUY in tewnl” 


ith 


Delightty! Dence Music by 
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fy OPEN AIR ROOF 


3 O 'S.NOLONIHS 


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rot all zes in each 


From Our Cieil Dredd 
CLEARANCE 


Cotton Mesh Front Zipper Foundations 
15 and 17-inch skirt lengths; Sizes 38 to 54 


7.99 


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ALL REMAINING BATHING SUITS ‘2 PRICE 


Blue, grey; 


regularly $3 


Chamtbray Bermuda Shorts 
waist measure sizes 


38-40; 2.30 


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All Sales Cash and Final—No 
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Chambray Pedal Pushers 
Blue, grey; waist measure sizes 38-40; 


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Wo hea 


RE. 71-9732 


Dead were Richard Maihofer and his twe 
daughters he tried in vain to rescue, Claire, 
5, and l's-vearold Theresa. 


Rep. Bentley, Wife 


Shaken in Plane Skid 


GARY, Ind., Aug. 30 (®#—Rep 
Alvin M. Bentley (R-Mich.) and 
his ye a chartered pilot 
were s en up but uninjured 
in am aircraft mishap at Gary 


Municipal Airport yesterday. 
Bentley said the plane slid off 
the runw:y into the mud on 
larding. One wing was dam- 
aged. The plane had been di- 
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Juvenile Judge Hugh Reid 
said the boy picked up a knife 
and walked out. muttering 
under his breath. Officer James 
P. Connors, who responded to 
a call for help, was told the 
youth had attacked the as 
sistant manager with a knifé.~ 

This was sufficient for Con- 
nors to chase the youth, whe 
had boarded a Streetcar into, 
Washifigton. He was appre- 
hended at Wisconsin ave. and M” 
st. nw. with the assistance of’ 
Washington police Cpl. James 
E. Stargel. 

Shortly afterwards Conners. 
and the Hot Shoppe managefy 
Earle Heffner, appeared before 
Judge Reid and explained the’ 
full story. . 

“I think there may have been: 
some unintentional exaggera-— 
tion,” Reid said. “They cried 
wolf and it turned out to be 
only a lamb.” Reid ruled_ 
there was no basis for a come 
plaint “ 


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State Department. 

In a letter to Secretary of 
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said the home builders want 
to show the Russians the tech- 
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United States the world’s best- 
housed nation. 

The invitation suggested that 
six Russians make the tour 
which would last from three to 
four weeks. It suggested that 
they arrive in New York City 
on Oct. 2. 

From there, the Soviet offi- 
cials would travel the next day 
to Washington for the formal 
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De la Tour to Replace 
Grandval in Morocco 


By Harold King ? 


Reuters 
PARIS, Aug. 30—France will | 
fly one of her toughest veterans | 
of colonial wars into riot-, 


‘racked Morocco Wednesday to | 
‘take over the post of Resident- | 
General vacated by Gilbert | 
Grandval. ) 

The choice is Gen. Pierre 
Boyer de la Tour, 58, Resident-| 
‘General in Tunisia, who 30) 
years ago, as a junior officer, | 
fed French soldiers in a Moroc- | 
can war to subdue rebellious 
Riff trébesmen. ' 

Meanwhile, France an- 
nounced it will mobilize an- 
other 180,000 servicemen in a 
‘buildup of defenses in Morocco | 
and adjoining Algeria, which 
also was rocked by a bloody 
rebellion 10 days ago. To do | 
this the government will delay 
the release from service of 77.-/ 
000 soldiers, 25,000 airmen and 
2000 sailors. ,.. | 

Reinforcements were rushed 
into Casablanca today as new 
terrorist attacks and scattered 
acts of sabotage were reported. | 

Fourteen planes flew in from 
France with troops and equip- 
ment, and the 800-ton cruiser 
Montealm docked with an in- 
fantry battalion. 

In Rabat, terrorists set fire 
to a Moroccan house and two 
bodies were found in the char- 
red ruins. At Port Lyautey, a 
pro-French truck driver was in- | 
jured by a pistol shot. At 
Khenifra, mountain town be- 
leaguered by rebel tribesmen 
10 days ago, French authorities 
arrested 69 more suspects. 

French officials expressed 
hopes tonight Grandval's. re- 
by De La Tour 
would not be taken as a signal 


orocean nationalists. Grand- 


Associated Press 


Acquitted 


Geraldine Terry, 23, was ac | 


quitted in Tulsa, Okla. yes- 
terday of murdering her at- 
torney-husband. Her father- 


. indaw had asked for a. con- 


tinuance of the trial se he 
could obtain more prosecu- 
tion evidence. 


——— 


hearing to Moroccan demands 

De La Tour today flew from 
Paris to Tunis, where he made 
a hurried round of courtesy 
calls preparatory to flying to 
Rabat Wednesday. 

A spokesman for Premier 
Edgar Faure declared De La 
Tour's instructions were to 
have a representative Moroc- 
can government in existence 


Romania Cuts Troops 


VIENNA, Aug. 30 ®—Com- 
munist Romania today got in 
step with the Kremlin's new 
“European disarmament pro- 
gram” with the announcement 
that the army will be cut by 
40,000 men by Dec. 1. 

Romania was the third mem- 


if and when the cutbacks occur. 

The Romanian cut was an- 
nounced today by Bucharest 
Radio, monitored here. But it 
sidestepped any mention of the 
intended return of the 40,000 
imen to civilian life. It said in- 
stead that they w ald be 
“transferred to construction 
and bul cing projects.” 


ber of the Soviet orbit to make | 
such an announcement. Russia) 


and Czechoslovakia were first. Mau Mau General Killed 
Western observers view the Saineas 


moves as a maneuver to put in- > 
creasing pressur on the United; NAIROBI, Kenya, Aug. 30 
Kenya security forces have 


States to remove its forces 
= - —— he . killed Mau Mau “General” 
0 a nformation ever) 

has been released by Russia or Kibati, one of the terrorist 
its satellites on troop stren,h leaders who took part in abor- 
so there is no way of knowing | tive surrender talks earlier this 
whether the cuts actually are | year. an Official communique 
made, or what forces remain said eaeay. 


a 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
ere = 


British Review | Wednesday, August 31, 1955 eo 
Cyprus Issues 


LONDON, Aug. 30 #—RBrit- 
ain w-> reported today to have 
proposed a compromise hom oJ 
rule plan for the di¢puted Medi- | 

ranean colo. y of Cyprus in’ 
talks here with Greek and) 
Turkish leaders. 

Foreign }"'=isters of Britain, 


ee 


Associated Preas 


‘On Leave’ 


Maj. Salah Salem, a member 
of Egypt's Revolutionary 
Council, is “on leave” from 
his duties as Minister of 
State of Sudan Affairs and 
Minister of National Guid. 
ance. Premier Nasser will 
take over the latter duties. 


- _-_- - -_-—-—«@ 


Loser F ights 


Sinn Feiner’s 
Polls Victory 


Reuters 

ENNISKILI.EN, Northern 
freland, Aug. 30—Police guard 
@d courthouse and judges to 
day as action opened to dis 
qualify an Irish nationalist who 
won a British House of Com- 
mons seat from a jail cell 

The winning candidate was 
Philip C. Clarke, 21, now serv- 
ing a 10-vear sentence for an 
armed raid on a British army 
barracks in Northern Ireland 
last year. He was a candidate 
of the Sinn Fein Party, whose 
aim is to break Northern Ire- 
land's political ties with Britain 
and unite it with the Irish re- 
public 

Clarke. who won the seat of 
Fermanagh and South Tyrone 
on May 26 with a 261-volte ma- 
jority, announced he would 
take no part in the hearing to 
disqualify him 

Defeated candidate Lt. Col 
Robert G. Grosvenor of the 
Unionist (conservative) party, 
the petitioner, says Clarke's 
30.529 votes are null and void. 
that hie own 30,268 votes were 
the only valid ballots 

Even if the petition is reject- 
ed. Clarke. would not be able 
to serve, since the House bars 
felons But as a Sinn Feiner 
not recognizing Northern Ire 
land's British ties, he would not 
attend anyhow 

4 similar petition is pend 
ing against Thomas J. Mitchel! 
24, also serving time for an 
army barracks raid and who 
aiso was elecied to the House 


Russia Gains 
High Place in 
World Union 


HELSINKI, Aug. 30 #—The 
Soviet Union became a mem- 
ber of the powerful executive 
committee of the Inter-Parlia- 
mentary Union tonight 

N. A. Mikhailov, leader of 
the Soviet delegation, receifed 
44 of 80 votes to become the 
first Iron Curtain codntry rep- 
resentative In the body. The 
two United States delegates 
voted against his election 

Other new members of the 
nine-member committee elected 
by the Union council were Len- 
nart Heljas, Finland, 65 votes; 
Giuseppe Godacci, Italy, 57; Iz 
zeddin A. Mulla, Iraq, 42; and 
R. G. Sennayake, Ceylon, 37 
votes 

The United States. Swiss 
British and Siamese members 
of the committee will be re 
placed next year according to 
the rules 

The first Russian approach 
to the Western delegations was 
made today: when eight mem 
bers of the Soviet 29-man dele- 
gation invited three Americans, 
three Englishmen and three 
Frenchmen to lunch. a 

Reps. Henry O. Talle (R-Iowa) 
and Harold D. Cooley (D-N. C.) 
attended. Sen. Alexander Wiley 
(R-Wis.) was invited, but did 
not appear. ; 

Cooley said, “there were lots 
of toasts and speeches, but no 
real discussion of political or 
other problems.” 

He said the lunch went on 
for two and a half hours and 
the Russians “were all smiling 
and raising glasses throughout 
the lunch.” 


Astronomers Accept 


Bid to Meet in Russia 


DUBLIN, Aug. 30 ‘#—The 
Soviet Union has put the wel- 
come mat out for the world’s 
leading astronomers in 1958. 
Bed, board and entertainment 
will be on the house, and the 


stargazers’ wives can go Along 


at reduced rates.’ 

The Russians extended their 
‘invitation Monday at the trien 
nial world conference of the 
International Astronomical 


Union. The 500 delegates voted: 


to accept it. An invitation to 
meet in the United States in 
1961 was laid over for consid- 
eration in 1958. 


= 


\ 


Greece and T rk met in the 
second day of a round-tabe 


conference which was convened | 


to try to settle rival claims to 
the key “ritish island base. 


A communique said British 


Foreign Secretary Harold Mac- 
millan reviewed, the Cyprus 
“crisis” in a policy states. t. 
It gave no details. 

Informed sources staid Mac- 
millan appealed for settlement 


of rival claims to the colony) 


and suggested a compromise 
solution to the Greek and Turk- 
ish delegates 


plan would give Cyprus even. 
tual self-goveTnment, but would 
safeguard Britain's rights to 
the key military base 
Greece and Turioy have 
come to the talks with seem-| 
ingly irreconcilable positions. | 
The Greeks want self-deter.' 
minatic . for the island and ex. 
pect full union with it. | 
Turkey has served notice it 
— the present status of 
Cyprus as a British colony to 
|be maintained. In the event of 
‘a change, the Turks want the 
island given to them, basing 
| their cla.m on Turkish sover.- 
i@ignty over Cyprus for four 
jeenturies before it became a 
|British colony 
| Britain has no intention af 
quitting the island now, especi-| 
ally because its importance as 
a Middle East base has in 
creased tremendously since the 
loss of the Suez Canal base 
The British plan would offer | 
the island a new constitution. | 
This would safeguard not only 
the rights of Cypriots of both | 
Greek and Turkish origin. but 
a.so Britain's own right to use 
it as a base 
Greek Foreign Minister 
Stephan Stephanopoulos and 
Turkey's acting Foreign Min-!| 
ister, Fatin Ru tu Zorlu, took! 
part in the talks today with) 
Macmillan. Another session 
was called for Wednesday 
when the Greeks will present 
their case. Turkey will give its 
viewpoint on Thursday. 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
6 | Wednesday, August 31, 1955 ooee 


Icardi Pleads Innocent, 
Released in $10,000 Bail 


Aldo Lérenzo- Icardi, in-Maj. William V. Holohan, 


dicted on perjury charges in the | 
pleaded innocent yesterday in 
bizarre World War IT death ot District Court. 


as Icardi, 34-year-old Pittsburgh 
real estate salesman, su 
dered to United States mar-’ 
'shals and voluntarily came’! 


here to be arraigned before’ & 
Judge Joseph C. McGarra- 
ghey, who set bond at $10,000. 
The one-time lieutenant in the: 
wartime OSS spoke in a low 
voice when he pleaded in- 
‘nocent. He wore a neat tan suit 
and appeared calm. The grand 
jury accused him Monday of 
lying before a House Armed 
Services Subcommittee when 
he said he did not kill Holohan. 
Because of a quirk of the law, 
the grand jury returned onjy a 
perjury indictment against, 
leardi, although it accused him | 
of master-minding the murder. | 
Named as his accomplice by 
the jury was former Sat. Car!| 
LoDolce, 32, another member! 
of the wartime OSS mission 
who now ves in Rochester. 
N. .Y. i 
By the ti the Army began 
investigati the Holohan case, ' 
‘both Icardi gnd LoDolce had 
been honorably discharged 
from the service. A Supreme 
Court ruling held that former 
servicemen could not be tried 
for crimes committed while on 
active duty. United States civil- 
ian courts had no jurisdiction | 
because Holohan died in Italy 
In 1953, an Italian court tried 


to satisfy the discriminating 
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golden drop, because it hoids 
its rich flavor the world over, 
regardiess of climate or sea- 
son. Relax with OB and see! 


; 
the two Americans In absentia 
on murder charges and con- 
victed them. But the sentences 
would apply only if they set 
foot on Italian soil. 


Woaduard Lop 


Bee 7S Veere 2 Sore of the Nowons Coperet 


In March. of 1953, Icardi ac-| 
cepted an “invitation” from the Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy (R- 
House Armed Services Subcom-! Wis.) when the latter. faced 


v— 85 
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In His Trial 


Maj. Alley 
Wins Point 


By Charles Puffenbarger 

FT. MEADE, Md., Aug. 30 
The Army was ordered today to 
be more specific in its charges 
that Maj, Ronald E. Alley mis- 
conducted himself while a pris- 
oner of the Communists fn Ko- 
rea. 

The order from a court mar- 
tial law officer was a victory for 
Alley in legal skirmishing 
against the charges, but fell far 
short of his attorneys’ attempts 
to have all or at least part of 
the charges dismissed. 

The order from a court-mar- 
counts of the indictment came 
from Col. Curtis L. Williams. 
law officer who has been hear- 


; 
’ 


International News 


Venice Fashiohs a 


This gentleman, casually dressed in only a bath towel, is 
Britain's Duke of Windser. Appearing with him on the 
Venice Lido is his more conservatively garbed Duchess. 


mittee to testify, but neither he 
nor LoDolce was subpenaed. 
LoDolce declined to appear. 
leardi appeared yesterday 
with his attorney, Edward Ben- 
nett Williams, who represented 


censure charges in Congress. 
Victar C. Woerheide, special 
assistant to the Atto Gen- 
eral, asked for a $20,000 bond in 
leardi’s case. Williams called: 
that “totally unreasonable” in 
a perjury case. ; 
He described Icardi as “a 
respected citizen” in Pitts 
burgh who always had testi- 
fied freely about his part in the 
case of Maj. Holohan, head of; 
a wartime OSS mission behind 
Nazi lines in Italy. 7 


a treat 


‘charges be dismissed or that 


District Court 


ing the legal arguments since 
the trial opened last week. 

It came on a rculing on 40 mo- 
tions filed yesterday by chief 
defense counsel, Lt. Col. Wil-| 
liam T. Logan, asking that all or 
some Of the words in the 


“appropriate relief” be granted. 

E what this means is 
that the prosecution must spell 
out more specifically what acts 
Alley, 34-year-old artilleryman 
from Salsbury Cove, Bar Har- 
bor, Maine, was su to 
have committed wh a pris 
oner. 

The veteran of 16% years 
service is charged with giving 
the enemy tnformation on ar- 


tilery, requesting fellow pris- 
oners to give information on| 
their units, writing and reciting | 
propa ganda, participation in| 
discussion groups and clubs and 
submitting questionnaires to 
fellow POWs. 

The trial was recessed today | 
until Thursday morning so that 
Alley might be in United States 
in Washington! 
Wednesday, where his civilian 


worth 


repeating 


STRAIGHT BOURBON WHISKEY 


86 PROOF » ECHO SPRING DISTILLING CO., 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 


attorneys will argue for an in-jcan be tried only in a civilian 
. This contention was re- 
Williams 


junction to block the 


Logan also got an admission 


4 


ee 


- —— @ —— ee ° 
> AO eer - : . 


thn 


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LARGE SELECTION For 
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James M. Kelly, chief 
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- a 


_ U.S. Asks Safeguards 
Against Sneak Attacks 


ARM—From Page I 


relative to military forces and 


installations which, coupled’ would be conducted by each | 'sh object that 


key locations. 


‘land, sea and air forces dnd at|wants a system worked out to 
‘put inspectors in key trans 


Aerial reconnaissance then portation points, but the Brit- 


this is not 


with measures for their veri-' inspecting country on an unre- @dequate. 


fication and surveillance, are. 
essential .o provide against the 
possibility of surprise attack. 
“This exchange is to be ac 
complished in progressive steps 
as mutually agreed upon by the 
two governments. 
elements of ginformation con- 


stricted but monitored basis to 
augment the efforts of the 
posted observers. 

Stassen repeated proposals) 
by Lodge yesterday that each | 
country will use its own air- 


Among the'craft and that liaison person- °* 


nel of the country being in- 


Britain has proposed inspec- 
tion by each side of the forces 
and installations facing each 
other along the East-West di- 
viding line in Central. Europe. 
This would be a practice pro 
dure, to see if it would work. 


France wants meney saved 


sidered essential to preclude! spected will be aboard each in cuts in military budgets to 


surprise attack and to be sought) 
by ah exchange between the 
governments and to be veri- 
fied and maintained under sur- 
veillance are: 

“Weapons and delivery sys- 
tems suitable for surprise at- 
tacks 

“Transportation and telecom 
munications. 

“Armed forces, structure and 
positioning of armed forces. 

“Additional facilities as mu-| 
tually agreed upon by the two 
governments.” 

These recommendations were | 
released by the United States! 
delegation. They were made in| 
a closed session of the Subcom- | 
mittee. 

Stassen had said yesterday 
he planned to make his pro-| 
posals later this week but he; 
acted after a huddle with the 
delegates of Britain, France 
and Canada this morning. 

On procedure for carrying 
out this scheme, Stassen stig- 
gested first the exchange of 
blueprints of military estab 
lishments. Then schedules 


reconnaissance aircraft dur- 


ing all overflights. 

The Subcommittee is expect- 
ed to meet for several days to 
study various plans for dis 
armament. The Soviet Union’ 


_ ee 


be used for developing under. 
developed areas. 

Canada is listening to every 
one but is reported favorably 
inclined toward the Eisen. 
hower plan. 


Malone Plans to Visit 
Bulgaria Over Protest 


Chicaso Dall News Gervice 
Sen. George Malone (R- Senator applied for and got a 
'Nev.), who seldom has missed visa to visit Bulgaria. 


an opportunity toclout the Iron », 4. eia 
ppens that the Unyed 
Curtain with a brickbat, has cistes broke diplomatic rela- 


the State ,De- tions with Bulgaria on Feb. 24. 
partment in a 1950 as the result of false ac- 
lizzy. cusations aod torture of Amer- 


Malone and ican Legation employes in So- 
his wife, ike fia. 


dozens of other EA 
Congress folk, - The State Department, trying 


are touring the to head off the Malones, has 
[ron Curtain impressed upon the Senator 
countries this the fact that Washingion does 
summer, appar- | ; 
ently buoyant not recognize the Sofia regime. 
with the 4s Sen. Malone (hut the last word was that. Ma- 
called spirit of Geneva. lone was undeterred and mov.- 
While in Warsaw. according ing on Bulgaria, for better or 


to reports reaching here, the worse. 


\ . 
“THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
"7° W ednesday, August 4, 1955 7 


- elle 


West May Get Soviet Military Data 


| MOSCOW, Aug. 30 (INS),as saying there would be no) Soviet planes off Vladivostok in 
'Acting Soviet Foreign Minister|more American-Russian afr- 1953. The Congressman quoted 
Valary Zorin today told Rep. craft incidents off the northern‘ Zorin as saying Russia Wad pro- 
Patrick J.’ Hililngs (R-Calif.) | Japanese —, oe * vided all available information 
; “ees illings sa t subject on the incident. But Hillings 
that Russia — give the West came up when he asked about added: 
some information on Soviet', Major Teyeda of Pomona. “I am sure he will ron a® 
strength at forthcoming inter-Calif.. whe was aboard. an other check to see if more can 
national meetings. |American, bomber downed by be learned.” 


| Hillings, on a tour of the. So-| | 
viet Union, said Zorin cited the 
recent announcement that Rus- 
sia will cut its armed forces by 

; men before Dec. 15. 
Hillings then told Zorin the cut 


— — ee ee —_ —— Re ee — 


Buzzards May Lead To Missing Man 


HAGERSTOWN, Md., Autig.'people in the mountainous, 
een ab ong By bape he 30 #—Sheriff’s officers had a heavily wooded section were 
oa do. bet. nat. the real size 8tim request to make residents cae glee may rote genta 
of the Soviet forces, we do not of the Rargan and Yarrowsburg tg the body of 73-year-old 
know its significance.” Zorin section of Washington County Joseph T. Brown. feared dead 
then suggested the Wést may today. after he wandered away from 
learn more presently. Watch the any his home in the mountains two 


skies for 


' Hillings also quoted Zorin) unusual numbers of buzzards, weeks ago. 


WO. 3 IN A SERIES BY THE AMERICAN BUILDING ASSOCIATION 


would be drawn up for the ex-| : 


change of similar types of in-| 
formation by each government 
and the completion of verifi-| 
cation by each side before going | 


on to the next phase i 


Then arrangements 
be made for posting on-the-! 
spot observers with operating | 

; 


c 


JAPAN—From Page I 


Shigemitsu 


Drops Hints 


tain 
in Japan 
strength 
500, and a 
team in 
strength 
4000 
Shigemitsu 


division 
witn a troop 
ap] 17.-' 
regimental combat 
Okinawa with a 
of approximately 


Ss a single cavalry 


pro] er. 


roximatly 


that in the 
three years that have passed 
since *the concVision of the 
United States -peace and se 
curity treaties with Japan, an 
“unequal arrangement” has re- 
sulied with the “major burden 
and responsibility” of Japan's| 
own defense being placed upon) 
the United States, 

The Foreign Minister said he 
was “quite sure” Japan would 
be able to amend the arms 
in her Con- 
intended to 
rms mutuality scheme 
ankly and firmly” in 
h Dulles 
declared Japan might 
press for trade with 
f Southeast Asia 
ed sufficiently to 
prime trading afea 


] 


Sa 


m clause 


id 


hi LAIKS Wii 
re al 
not nave | 
Red China 
weré deveior 
me a 


“an over-all plan of 
‘ nomic development of) 
Southeast Asia” with which Ja- 

pan might coordinate 
in that way. Shigemitsu ez- 
plained, Southeast Asia might! 
become stabilized against com-| 
and Japan. througl 
>» might become prosperous 
enough to pay off her wartime 
to the Philippines 


indertake 


ry ry? 
11Ssi7 


Aims at L. N. Seat 


Another objective of his coun- 
try. according to the Foreign 
Mini is “full membership 
n the U. N. in which we could 
participate in international de 
cisions affecting the peace and 
progress of the world.” 

In fluid English, spoken some-| 
what m bically, the For-| 
eign Mil muted his strong 
speech plaining his ab- 
horre ne ual political 
limelig 

“Simple 
he de vou 
ay a ‘ i ail . 1 


: 


tar 
ei, 


monosvila 
ste 
ry ‘ 
fe of the u 
I am,”| 
d rather| 
ing tru-| 
ve ond of 
Ss) +) , : 
Zz 


> 


{or 


tember & 


Envoys to Meet 
On Geneva Plans 


LONDON, Aug. 30 #—Amer-| 
British and French For-| 
eign Ministers will meet in New 
York in late September to pre 
pare for their Geneva confer- 
ence with Russia's Vyachslay 
Molotov on the reunification of 
Germany, British officials said 


tonight. 
rhey 


' 


ican. 


Western min 
isters also will range ove! 
other common probiems in 
cluding the prégress of current 
cisarmament negotiations with 
the Soviets. 


said the 


Fall Under Tractor 
Injures Boy, 14 


Louis Young, 14, of Malcolm, 
Md., was critically injured yes- 
_ terday “when he fell under the 
rear wheels of a tractor he was 
driving near his home, Mary- 
land state police reported. 

Police said the boy lost con- 
trol of the tractor, sideswiped 
a stump and fell off in the 
path of the rear wheel. James 
R, Proctor, 49, also of Malcolm, 
~ Tiding on the fende i the 

\iractor, stopped it an 


backed 


: 
would | | 


— 
bode pheot dod 


- te Soe . 
winte. 


i ’ re 


eg aa 


a Fairchiid Aerial Surveys 


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: \ . : F 
Bi WASHINGTON POST and TIMES one . Musk Ox Calves Domesticated in Wool Research up the musk oxen calves. Mr.\first time musk oxen have been 


Wednesday, August 31, 1955 


and Mrs. Teal run a research domesticated and she added 


Kesselring 
Lists Errors 
By Hitler 


Associated Prese 

Former Field Marshal Albert 
Kesseiring said yesterday Hit- 
ler could have successfully in- 
vaded Britain but that the 
Nazi Fuehrer “did not want to 
destroy the British navy or the 
British Empire.” 

Kesselring declared in a 
copyrighted interview with the 
magazine U. S. News and World 
Report that Hitler “had a curt 
ous predilection for the Brit- 
ish.” Kesselring said that on 
one occasion during World War 
Il when he reported to Hitler 
on British feats of arms, Hitler 
commented, “Of course, they 
are a Germanic people, too.” 

Kesselring, interviewed at 
Bad Oceynhausen, Germany, 
said Hitler kept thinking the 
British would make peace. But 
Hitler, he said, did not really 
understand the British and of- 
fended them with his offer to 
protect the empire. The former 
German officer said: 

“Churchill said ‘No! as only 
Churchill could say it. ‘Nor 
Ha, that was Churchill's big- 
gest mistake. He should have 
made peace at the latest by 
1943. is the only way 
Stalin could have been kept 
out of Europe.” 

In the interview Kesselring 
said a properly prepared in- 
vasion of Britain up to the mid- 
die of August, 1940, would have 
s and that there was a 
fu chance even later. 
(Kesselring listed as other 
mistakes which led to German 


defeat: 

lL. Failure to launch “full in- 
dustrial mobilization immedi- 
ately the war started in 1939.” 

2 Failure to produce a Mes 
serschmidt jet fighter in 1943 
in enough quantity to stop the) 
Allied bombing and to go into; 
early quantity production of a) 
four-engine bomber. 

3. Failure to attack more vig- 
orously the British evacuation 
from Dunkirk to Great Britain. | 

4. Failure to get an advance | 
Japanese commitment to at-| 
tack Siberia when Germany in- 
vaded Russia. : 

5. Failure to permit more 
flexible operations in Russia. 

6. Failure to concentrate 
troeps quickly against the Al 
lied beachhead in Normandy. 

7. Lack of coordination with 
the Japanese and Italians. 

Kesselring criticized Ameri 
can and Allied strategy in Italy, 
saying it “made it easy” to 
fight a long delaying action. 

The former marshal seid the 
muchdebated frontal attack 
acress the Rapido “should never 
have been made.” Without 
naming Gen. Mark W. Clark, 
the American commander. Kes- 
seiring said that if one of his 
subordinates had ordered such 
an attack “I would not have! 
treated him very politely.” 

Genera! Clark, now president 
of The Citadel, South Carolina | 
military college, said at 
Charleston that he had no com- 
ment on Kesselring's observa- 
tions. 


TS 


Music Chief 
‘Sings’ About 
Singing Army 


Cascsie oa Press 

One of this Nation's best-kept | 
military secrets is that the| 
United States has a singing 
Army. And no one regrets 
thig unintentional secretiveness 
more than Dr. Harold WwW. 
Arberg, the Army's soldier’ 
music adviser | 

“People ought h., understand | 
the value of music to any 
army,” Arberg said. “Why, I) 
imagine the first army that ever | 
marched had some kind of a 
chant. I'm sure it didn't march | 
in silence.” | 

So let others describe the 
newest weapons. Every chance 
Arberg gets he explains the 
agesold military value of 
music 

Yesterday, for example, he 
told the Sertoma Club about 
“Uncle Sam's Singing Army.” 
And when asked for an elabora- 
tion, Arberg not only talked 
enthusiastically, but from time 
to time broke into illustrative 
song. 

Arberg has a doctor's degree 
from Columbia University, 
answers to the nickname of 
“Bud,” and must like as many 
varieties of music as any man 
in the world. 

Fortunately, the Army 
spawns variety, too. 

“We have our instrumental 
groups,’ Arberg said, “and we 
have some excellent choruses 
Fort Dix has a splendid one, 
and there are a number of fine 
choral groups in Europe. 

‘We have wonderful singers 
of spirituals, and first class 
country and folk music.” 

Arberg, by the way, is an 
ardent supporter of the Society 
for the Preservation and En- 
couragement of Barber Shop 
Quartet Singing in America. He 


noted — approval that the}. 


society not only has sent prize 
quartets, such as the Kord 
Kings of Oak Park, lll, abroad 
to entertain but-also has helped 
soldiers form their own 


quartets. . 

Arberg thinks there’s nothing 
like group singing to make a 
recruit feel at e, that sing- 


HUNTINGTON, Vt., Aug. 30, experiment to domesticate and the farm of anthropologist John institute specializing in plants that one of the purposes of the 
#—Four young musk oxen »reed them for high quality Teal Jr. who with six other 29d animals suited to Arctic experiment is to learn as much 
‘have been brought here from wool. men spent three weeks in the 4griculture. as possible about the animals 
the Canadian Northwest in an’ They arrived last night at'Northwest Territory rounding Mrs. Teal said this is the and how they live. 


they ge te bed like 
angels in nitey nites 


No coaxing needed, they sleep soundly. 
comfortably, refreshingly in these 
wonderful dreamers. All of downy soft 
cotton knit. Perry-ized for shrink. 
resistance, in pretty pastels. 


Children's Undies, Ind Fl, ¥ asthingion 
and Siloer Spring; Ird Fl. P ARKington 


They Stumped the Judges | ~<a Call MA. 8.5100 te Order Anytime 


Judges in the Miss Drum Point Beach preliminary contest 
Sunday couldn't make up their minds between these twe 


lovelies. Se Betty Jean Brinson (left) and Dianne Tarlton _ : +3 
have both made the finals, to be held at the Beach Monday. the ec co. PARKington, Arlingt 


ing on the mar akes the 
time pass spe , that a bit of} 
song means laxation of 


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— 


4 4 f\ : | 4 
4, 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Wednesday, August 31, 1955 9 


‘Kid-Glove’ Security Inquiry Denied aaa 


SECURITY—Fr. P. I |* PS Dg CPR RG a On On Me *and that other charges were * * * reader was assigned to work CENTER 


untrue, + gi en ae e |with another man, who faced 7 : 
getting | full inermation on the Scher said he had “foolish —  F - ‘a Communist-association charge America’s Largest Manufacturer-Retailer of Foam Rubber Furniture 


program / . ae ae, ) 
In @ day of widely varied de- | | ly” signed nominating peti- ae” ee, and resigned. { 
velopments: eee © ° tions for two Communist Par- Relea ax _ The first man, Je said, then | 0 t e 
Ry Fea aaa gy He Coiy | eH | y — in New bby ag | | fie ~——t—‘téiésfaced« «charge of associating ° 
0 & J. G Cass ae ' Ki | but “had not the slightest in- . ame | = d—and became 
and Milan D. Smith, failed to) “a Foon age y , _ : ” , a... &. i {we the secone—an 
4 ret. for, questionin hey the lll . : ie ei. = g Fh them of, Comme te “hysterical” over that and was , LAST 4 DAYS 
ejinsky security case. > he. The case of the Government ss peg confined to a mental hospita’ 
Agriculture Secretary Esrari - ‘ | Printing Office employe, Ed- f for several months. In turn 


Taft Benson wrote that both , ¥ 
were out of town, and said he| ae ) |waare R. Dixon, was reported.— ’ said Dixon. the first man's wife 


already had provided extensive. : eS Peng tice yearn Any Reha United Presse another GPO employe, wa 
ee oo OO LAN i rl a> Se iat year. Maslow Scher charged with “associating wit! 
© Johnston said the two Agri-' : : ' Be ae, | Dixon, who has been active, ... testify at security probe her husband,” who sssociatec 
et aw will Ra sub- oo a. 4 in American Legion affairs, was -—~ with a man who associated 
naed at a date t eter- ‘ “ ” when ’ — 
mined later. He said, “We want United Press a ee aay gteren tee on Printing, in June, 1954, gag pe samy sO commen) 1320 NEW YORK AVE. 


dilly<ialiying and jumping the 
youd with “pea Rp character} _ .as they appeared before Senate Cw i Service Subcommittee ss attention of GPO. was unjustifiably overturning gress, told the Subcodamities 


| Open Daily, 10-6 
and re — a snake a8 | Ri a ane Wiser aaened al ante , ogg — yesterday that mg —— ~} FOAM ® U BBER Thers., aot Set., 10-46 
war xon, a Gov ; e attenberger - sed, ' Busldi 
ernment Printing Office em- he owes Adninistre which gave agency heads power menage 7 An Be eee held his oveuindl and said the TT ident’ satan of- acts 4 
ploye for 23 years, said the ‘on, said Rauh, “Dut it seems to fire employes in the “na- final authority was his under ‘en arbitrary, often working in- 
senhower security program was,to me in part they have been anny 4 soth_ employes of adultery, 1, security hh od justice.” ms ’ 


used to force him out of the correct.” He said he believes tional interest.” That was just which they denied. Adultry was A / 
GPO on an unjustified charge: the Truman and Eisenhower before the present security pro- he charge stated in their se- Dixon testified he has been Detailed proposals for drastic) ——— 


of adultry, after he gave a con- Administrations were correct gram went into effect. curity charges. a Republican political contrib- =. by oe ain on | 
gressional committee a survey al refusing to turn over such His firing was upheld in Dis The former wife's attorney ce ns comurier ont gh. ye te f open, ‘pemtatent to the New ANTIDOTE for 
n wa to save “millions of “es. ‘| ’ : ) ; F 

0 vs to sav trict Court, and the case now ‘old this newspaper in 1954 a Republican ‘security risk.. .°” president of District 44, Inter- 


dollars” in GPO’s operations. | But Rauh contended’the key|is being appeale that he brought the divorce is 
© Johnston said the Subcom- data on the 8008 cases could be Scher sold it * grew out of sue to GPO “4 compel the GPO _ Dixon said there were other national. Association of Ma 
Smith, security director for the | submitting questionnaires to all a promotion, and then was re. ment on a $2000 judgment aris- a Se 


Commerce Department, to eX-|agencies for information OM the) jected on grounds he was un. ing from the divorce ‘case. 


plain “dilatory tactics” used in|charges in the cases. 
the ouster of Benjamin Scher.’ Johnston, smiling shook his *Uitable from a security stand. When the money was paid. the 


The Jtem ‘below in 
an employe dropped on secur- that Point to handle classified in- \«wyer said, he asked the GPO > wre wee See SS 
ty grounds. after being cleared os ee a formation—which he said he ‘° — the charges but it re- CORRECTION: price is 


loyalty.” Subcommittee Attorney Hen- a ‘eelinen ~ “wr nase 
at ran 
Host at Start ry Edens — me Uetoved ei aaith “Wie Depertieast’s meee Cnet : DIAL SOAP 
Rauh’s appearance before the 10 shown to be without mer- ‘ity Officer, stormed at him! Dixon said a security board, 


Subcommittee began with some jt through testimony by Civil "94 once told him, among Composed of high-ranking per- : | 
hostility, but ended more ami- Service Chairman Philip Young °*>¢T things, “A man like you Sonnel from other Government a GET INSTANT RELIEF WITH 


who can't listen agencies, cleared him and the ;, = | 
ably so far as Johnston was ae een aan dot be considered a security risk” woman employe of the charges. = : 
concerned. “We just think the ©) 00. charges were unre, /f he had received a security But he said Public Printer Ray- ;' jj 


committee can do more than goived hearing—which he said Smith mond Blattenberger overrode 


 _—_— 


the committee thinks it can Rawh insisted that the pres had promised him — Scher that, and ousted them in Feb- 


do,” said Rauh. ent “saner atmosphere” is the 4/4. he would have been able ruary, 1954. ee | oop # DRUG 
time to pin down the issue ° Show that his “chief ac-| Their two cases, Dixon dis-| 

wrt Ade he Phe agee specifically. cuser” had “lied” that he was closed, were in the four cases) ae clean, fresh fragrance. STORES 
Frank Carlson (R- mye al | Otherwise, he said, by “the **S°ciated with Communists, which caused the Joint Commit- 

pressed annoyance that Rauh’s| 1960s." employes of the Eisen-| oles ee Ea aT ES, ~~ 
statement appeared. in after- hower Administration may be 'wwuwwwwwwe wv < ss y "VTVVVVVVVVYV 
noon papers before he testified. facing such unjustified charges 


Rauh said his main.eomplaint | as participating in a “sellout” OPEN DAILY 10 A.M. ‘TILL 8:45 P.M. C Never a Parking Problem! 4 


about the investigation was that at Geneva,” or granting visas 
it had failed to “expose” what “to a group of touring cate a SAT. 10 A.M. “THLE 11:45 P.M. 

was actually represented in the farmers in 1955, which farmers ¢ & 5 PARKING 
Administration's claims at the stole American agricultural se- CLOSED ALL DAY NTOWN 

end of 1954, that it eliminated crets for Soviet economic gain.” ery 

“8008” security risks from Gov- Many employes, he said. now LABOR DAY ~~ oA 

ernment through firings or res- are being ousted for being “far NC = 9h ‘ 4 a. 4 
ignations. less friendly to Russia” than MONDAY SEPT. 5, 1955 \ 


He charged that the political in the 193906 and 1940s. F 
use of “inaccurate and misiead-| The Sube ittee ed :, RF) 40 4 
ing date reached its high point ahead to ‘the oe sutibnaeene ST. 3-5440 318 9th ST. N.W. (9TH ST. NEA ST. 3-54 4 


when Vice President Richard after it found itself tae : BOTTLED-IN-BOND 100 PROOF 


M. Ni 4 n he cel 
or a Republican, Congress in jinsky case. Ladelinsky, a iand ase» Cha g OLD anes & | 39 STUART & WILLIAMS TOM MOORE 99 
state a ousands of reform expert, was cleared on, ORIGINAL 107 PR 
OOF very KENTUCKY STRAIGHT KENTUCKY STRAIGHT 


Communists, fellow - travelers security by the State Depart-! 
and other security risks have ment, rejected by Agriculture. | Years Old |) ° 

been removed from the Federal then cleared and hired by the’ PENNSYLVANIA £2 } 39.75 Case} BOURBON BOURBON 
payrolls by the Eisenhower Ad- Foreign Operations Adminis EES Case } STRAIGHT os : | 86 PROOF 
ministration.” tration. He now holds an im- 


The Subcommittee, Rauh portant post in Indochina. TTLE BON PROOF CENTRAL ee Mee | BSOTTLED-IN-BOND 100 PROOF 
said, has failed to get to the une on > -_ or ew X ‘va + 


said _ fal : .. A request for the apocuranes FOUR SCORE 
om 0 is “eruel numbers o assity, rsonnel securi WES r N ON KENTUCKY STRAIGHT 
game” which haé put “a blot on officer of hdteniiere. and Mil. T R L suerte KENTUCKY STRAIGHT 
the record of our great Civil an D. Smith. executive askict-. KENTUCKY | cr : BOURBON OLD 
41.58 Case 


Service.” ant to a was sent on 
BOTTLED-IN-BOND 100 PROOF 
HARFORD CLUB 


~< 
. 
Me 


He said he was convinced a Aug. STRAIGHT 
thorough examination will oY Not Received 


show that few, if any, of the , 
so ampieyes weie even , Hadlick sad the subcommi 79 CLUB 518 89 ORIOLE MARYLAND 
charged with being Commu- tee was unaware until Monday So. 6 bin my 

D 


not appear. Benson wrote. 


nists. that Cassity and Smith wou “> _— KENTUCKY STRAIGHT @ STRAIGHT STRAIGHT 
Asks About Proof an Aug. 26 letter which the te 


: ou ate 
veans R E t #25 Case } 
farem} BOURBON —~; BOURBON 86 Prost 
Senator Carlson asked if he committee said it never re- > : ees} 


had proof that smost of the ceived, that his two aides were 
cases concerned’ old “associa- oyt of town 
tion” types “of charges of Bens ; 
“drunks. blabbermouths” and ensom 5216 he previously 
other  non-subversive issues. 22%¢ ‘he subcommittee infor- 
- mation on his “cancellation” of = : 


Rauh said only the Administra . ‘og - 
the security finding against 


tion could provide that detail 


Ladejinsky, and said, “I shall 
niGirison countered that Raub se happy to write you <> Imported Bordeaux & Burgundy Wines [THIS IS OUR ONLY STORE! URS FRENCH CHATEAU WINES 


about the Vice President of the *" ‘®> ponse to specific inqui- TED OR 
WE ARE NOT CONNEC Ch. La Providence (Red) 


" ries 
United States.” which -Carison DUVET 


_ P S Carls d th = DV 
Tle these man takers in| wae “short motiee” te Adslomh y 1947 BORDEAUX WHITE , AFFILIATED WITH ANY OTHER Ch. Beauval (White) 
the numbers game,” replied ture on the hearings. He said) REMY STORE OR GROUP Ch. Verdignan (Haut Medoc) 


Rauh, and “I will stand on he was sure the department 1952 BORDEAUX ROUGE . » Co p (St.-Estephe) 
that. would cooperate with the sub- 1952 BORDEAUX BLANC . AUTOMATIC } . Carbonnieux (White Graves) 1.19 


If Secretary of State John committee z p | 
Poster Duties ae nat this eae two specific cases the hee, a. rs ¢ ORK SCREW ary agg veel “aaa | $0 
ie PY o- ‘e . ‘ eee ae 
pumaber wes built up,” said ioe mere re ype gaye rf 1952 . : C . Talbot (Medoc) -ees 1,39 


r d 

Rash er would eet pave licity ps ee se a oer , 1952 MARGAUX zo IMPORTED FROM ITALY . Beychevelle (Medoc) : , yo 
“ er a Scher, who was fired f SAVARY-LECOINTE . Carbonnieux (White Graves 

ee Be eee er in 'an:|the Commerce Department in 1952 BEAUJOLAIS : | ‘Alsatian Wines : LaVille Haut Brion 

ary April, 1953, was ousted on the 1952 MACON laa PE F. E. Hugel & Fils | (White Graves) 1.49 


fairly, 3 believe, vege basis of 2 legislative rider SSR. BOL AIR 4 
about is association wit = | Cove , - 
Alger Hiss.” 1952 CHATEAUNEUF du PAPE COURONNE 99¢ 6 on ms Gruau sey beat Ohe 


Subcommittee Cons u! tant DELAS-FRERES i he | 
Paul E. Hadliek said the invest a COMMS TC 1953 COTES-du-RHONE (RED) | SYLVANER va. we 1,19 24 on ue . Riewssec (Sauterne). 1.79 
igators have been frustrated in : PHILADELPMIA? ws . Cheval-Blanc (St. Emillion) 1.89 
trying to get investigative data — a | RIESLING 39 1 . Bouscaut (White Graves) 1.99 
by subpena. oe L an ‘ . “eee e eee eee . . Vie. 1082 M -Rothschild 
the aiien aan detending| " Comforts saxt | : ; : " - (Pauillac) 1.99 
oN : POUILLY FUISSE a | TRAMINER ‘. ree , Lofeurie-Peyraguey 
Ss oN i METS CHASSAGNE MONTROCHET —- oll Ch. Coutet-a-Barsac P yao 219 
Storms Cost Fairfax i they wee hy ae 4 GEWURZTRAMINER | 1 G0 = CaS SS | 1967 EX FY qc : 


$2165 in Overtime NUITS - ST - GEORGES . By (Peer of all Sauterne) 4.69 
Phitedsiphic 3, Pennsyivente . ; i —— —— 7 

Rain flooded manholes, storm Arter | Mherrey—thenegng Ow ecto EADY AAPA adh 
sewers and home basements re- | Rooms trom $7 vngie a dovele 
sulting from Hurricanes Connie 
and Dianne and subsequent 


showers cost Fairfax County 
$2165.89 in overtime pay for GEMUETLICHKEIT 
employes who battled the over- LUNCH DINNER 


flowing waters. 
Edward L. Kipp, Fairfax | Geman Recipes © Free Parking 


County Director of Public 

Works, said yesterday Sanita- ~ 

tion Department employes itp p 
worked 1283 overtime hours 


from August 13 through 22 to 


relieve flooded manholes and | RESTAURANT -:- RATHSKELLER 


sewer lines in 399 overtime 3 
hours draining basements of 2434 Wisc. Ave. N.W. 


private homes. 


a] 
> 
) 
= 


ee 
PUAN WW mt OHO 
vVuww vVuuwuw 


Ml, he, Me, Ml, Ml, Ly, Ml, Me. My Alin, Ale, nr, 


IMPORTED FROM HOLLAND 


7) WYAND FOCKINK 
} CORDIALS 


CREME de MENTHE 
CREME de CACAO 
Blackberry, Apricot, 


54 te 65 PROOF 


Agee V : CARACCIOLA 
IRGIN (© 1953 LiEBFRAUMILCH 
years |) 1953 NIERSFEINER DOMTAL 
chal RUM 13 “oo op © 1953 RUEDESHEIMER 


t sse.rs { 86 PROOF 1953 PIESPORTER 
IMPORTED | 1953 JOHANISBERGER RIESLING 


= MADRIGAL 
RON CHICO (| 1952 LIEBFRAUMILCH 
= MELZENBACH 
VIRGIN j) 1952 MOSELBLUMCHEN (Stone-Crock) ......... 
ISLAND WALDORF 
| 1949 PIESPORTER STIFTSGOCKCHEN 


97 GRAVES 2 1949 LIEBFRAUMILCH KLOSTERDOCTOR . c 3» RICHARD 
I5 1949 RUDESHEIMER KIESEL a tee ie i ee OZ. DRY CHAMBEREY 
a | 


Sev Rsee LOMEON | 1949 UERZIGER SCHWARZLAY |. 15.90 | OUTH 
iC ii rE wa pres} VERM 


——— 


a LL iT iunenet mii! Ta ict 


ij 


IMPORTED FROM FRANCE 


aye tre Ti cult ett Mareeeernys 


NN es 


DRY GIN 


190% GRAIN NEUT. srIRiTsio —_ 


2 IMPORTED FROM SCOTLAND “BONUS BOTTLE BUYS’ c 99  cieaaiecanven 


YAKS MACKINLAY’S 4 4 IMPORTED FROM CHILE "™ VIN MOUSSEUX 
VINEX s VIN. 1949 


VIN, 1947 nae wt IMPORTED FROM FRANCE 


apt areeeeename oon Se iadins 
38, HOUSE OF STUART FOSSATI CLASSICO | REMY 


SPARKLING 


AIRSTREAM 
cea HARE SCOTCH pox} CHIANTI i _ BURGUNDY 


SAFARI beer 1 7 
D mncricun Trailer Cy, Ine. 59 ROBERTSON’S — DEL BRAVO HOUSE 39 pronnocrna: Mgt ha 


4 > ws SCOTCH faze, ORVIETO =| w= CHAMPAGNE | 


ne 
oe ge st 0 bi Bete RES: 
gee ve, TE Uses “o petee PPP IOP 


Ww 


—— 


TRAVEL WITH AN 


- VIN. 1948 
SECCO & ABBOCATTO PRT SIN 


y 


NOW ON DISPLAY 


5020 Wisconsin Ave., N.W. 


Phones WO. 6-323) | 518 9th St. N.W. For Delivery ThiclautelicliM mitted B + 3440 | 


We Reserve the Risht to Limit Quanitics 


\ 


: 


. ' } 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES 
10 


HERALD 
Wednesday, August 31, 1955 Kiodir 


xwx— 


Senators Get Carton 


Of White’s Papers 


Eastland did say that some of € 
the material will “in part sub-| ~ 
stantiate” certain phases of the| as 
investigation. 

Wyman said White's widow 
has been “very cooperative” 
and he asked Eastland to have 
all the files returned to her! 
when the Subcommittee is fin- 
ished with them. 

The exhibits included several | 
“workers’ song books” one of| 
which contained the phrase, | 
“Lenin, Our Leader.” Some of) 


SCONCORD, N. H., Aug. 30 @Miident Henry A. Wallace; the’ 
Stn. James ©. Eastland (D-|late Chief Justice Fred M. Vin- 
Miss.), chairman of the Senate'son, and Prof. Kirtley Mather 
Internal Security Subcommit-\of Harvard University. 
tée, said today he had ob-| White was Assistant Secre- 
tained “substantial material” itary of the Treasury in the 
in documents of the late Harry Roosevelt and Truman admin- 
Dexter White. ‘istrations, and left it to be- 

New Hampshire's Attorney|come the U. S. director of the 
General, Louis C. Wyman of-|World Monetary Fund in 1946. 
fered in evidence at a brief} Wyman said he found the 
public hearing a big carton of documents, packed as Wf for 
papers and documents taken’ storage, in a search of White's 
from White's summer home in home. 

Fitzwilliam, N. H. He turned over part of the 


s ‘ie 
Catholic Hymnal Includes, “07 Die 70 Burt As Truck Upsets Bus. 
yin LE.. INGTON, Ky., Aug. 30 @,was sideswiped by a truck 
. ‘A woman was killed and 16\ which failed to stop. 

Works of r rotestants inear here today when a South-|/Knoxville, Tenn. was killed 

‘eastern Greyhound Lines scen-;when she was pinned beneath 

‘ie cruiser overturned after it\the vehicle. 
A new Catholic hymnal now be- faith, Advertisement Advertisement 
ing prepared will contain a “As to authorship: we don't 
number of hymns written by | insist that our architects be N ’ 
Catholic saints but in use only () Sur e nee ec ] 

jamine our organ builders. 
in Protestant churches. | “Jt is the result that interests | . 
The hymnal also will contain us, the finished work of art. ’ 7 
tout mone enn eees Reduce swelling of 
Catholic use, reports:the Rev. Trinity whom we adore in com- 
tor of St. Joseph's Church here. |of our Protestant brethren.” 
Father Ginder is a member a 
of a seven-man committee that | 
IN Docrok’s TESTS, NEW STAINLESS FORMULA WITH 

MAZING ANESTHETIC ACTION STOPS PAIN INSTANTLY! 
stainless stainless Pazo' 


‘other passengers were injured; Mrs. Clara Hemphill, 51, of 
PITTSBURGH, Aug. 30 (® against the rule of Catholic | ei 
Catholics, nor do we cross-ex- 
hymns written by non-Catholics Such a hymn is ‘Holy! Holy! 
Richard, Ginder, assistant pas- pany with the great majority . ° ! 
piles at home! 
was organized in 1952 to com- T 


> 


pile the hymnal. The project 
is sponsored by the Confrater. 
nity of Christian Doctrine. Each ” 
hymn will have to be approved 
by a group of 100 musicians be- 
fore it is submitted for final ap- 


5 


* Honored 


i 


Kay Burch, for 25 years exe- 
cutive secretary and adminis- 


nn 


The former Treasury official| material to Sen. Eastland dur- 


died there in 1948, three days\ing a brief executive session, 
after he had denied before the|during which a dozen specta-| 


the words were in Russian with) 
English translations 


Some of the correspondence | 


trative assistant in the Amer- 
ican Legon's national legisia- 
tive division here, was hon- 


proval to the Americar Catholic 
hierarchy. The group hopes to 
have the hymnal ready for pub- 
lication by Noevmber, 1956. 

In explaining how hymns are 
chosen for the new hymnal, 


PAINT COMPANY 
Pw asec Tom] 


HL 


House Un-American tivities|tors and as many newsmen/indicated White had a dinner! 
Committee that he ever\ was a|were barred from ‘the small engagement with a Prof. Bish- 
Communist or engaged in es-|State House hearing room. off from the Soviet Embassy | 
pionage. Eastland first said he had nO| and acknowledged a gift of! 

The White files contained let-;comment on the material, but'wine and cigarettes from the 
tefs from such personages as/he later added: |Soviet Purchasing Commission. | 
former President Truman;| “There is some information 
former Secretary of State, the| here that throws light on the 
late Edward R. Stettinius: Hen-|conduct of one individual who 
ry Morgenthau, who as Secre-|will be under investigation.” 
tary of the Treasury was| He kept secret, however, the 
White's boss; former Vice Pres-' identity of the person. 


EEE 


ered yesterday by fellow em- 
ployes at a luncheon at the 
Army-Navy Club. 


Father Ginder said: = hee §S- Se= 
“Our first test of any hymn 
must be from orthodoxy: the 


ts) & Ms A 
sentiments must be measured) rece PARKING AT ALL 3 STORES 


Lb 


to use. Ointe- 


LO. §-4777 . 
ment also available. 


- 


- Otto Nathan’s Attorney 
Also Denied a Passport 


The attorney who repre-| 
sented Otto Nathan in the lat- 
ter’s successful fight for a pass-| 
port revealed yesterday that 
the State Department has 
denied him a passport after ac- 
cusing him of Communist.ties. 

Leonard B. Boudin, a New 
York lawyer, filed suit asking 
District Court here to make 
the State Department grant 
him the passport. He charged 
that the Department never) 
gave him a chance to confront 
witnesses or to examine evi- 
dence against him 

In his sult, filed by Wash- 
ington Attorney Harry I. Rand, 
Boudin said he asked last Octo- 
ber to have his passport ex- 
tended to permit him to visit 


ports of investigation,” the suit 
said. 

For its reason, the Depart- 
ment cited a passport regula- 
tion ‘headed: “Limitations on 
issuance of passports to per- 
sons supporting Communist 


'movements,” according to the 


suit. 

In attacking the ruling, Bou- 
din's suit declared that the laws 
of this country “do not author- 
ize the Secretary of State to 
impose political conditiong up 
on the issuance of passports 


It was Boudin who represent- 
ed Nathan, executor of the will 
of the late Albert Einstein. Af- 
ter a 2\2-year battle, Nathan got 
his passport last.June when 
the United States Court of Ap- 


legal clients in Western Europe. 

On Feb. 1, Boudin said, the 
Department told him the pass- 
port would be extended. On 
Feb. 24, the Department re- 
versed itself and the passport 
was denied, the suit said 

It quoted a letter from Ruth! ! 
B. Shipley, then director of the | =: 
passport office, in which Bou-| = 
din was told: x 

“. . « Evidence has been ob| -- 
tained that you were a member) *. 
of the Communist Party, and; 
reports of your activities in re-| >. 
cent years indicate that if your 
membership was terminated, it) — 
Was under such circumstances) -- 
as to warrant the conclusion,| --.. 
not otherwise rebutted by the) -.. 
evidence, that you continue to} =. 
act in the furtherance and un-) --- 
der the discipline of the Com-/| *--: 
munist Party.” Boudin said he | oo 
never was told what the “evi- 
dence” was. 


peals ordered State to give him 
a “quasi-judicial hearing.” The 
Department granted the pass 
port without holding any hear- 


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vit swearing he was not a Com-| 
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Mail this coupon TODAY! 


Or call REpublic 7-5000!1 


. BLUE CROSS-BLUE SHIELD 


Transportation Building, Washington 6, D. C., Dept. F-1 


Please send to me, without obligation, full information on Blue Cross- Blue Shield 
protection. I understand you do not send salesmen or solicit by phone. 


4. New Polio Cases Reported in F airfax 


to eight cases at this time Jast 
year. One new case slso was 


Children’s Hospital, health offi- 
cials said 


The new case reported in 
Montgomery County was that 
of a 23-year-old woman of the 
2600 block of Randolph rd., Sil- 
ver Spring. The victim, admit- 


H. Cauley said last night that 
the decision to open the 
schools came after a m 

here with Dr. Martin Spell- 
man, health director; Super- 
intendent of Schools Dennis C. 
Haley and Msgr. Timothy 


to Washington Sanitarium |O’Leary, director of diocesan 


Hillside Street Project A pproved 


a contract for street improve- will be paid through the Sip | Heights Special Improvement 
ments in the Pinecrest Special system. 


A group of Hillside, Md., resi- 
dents who have been trying to 
have their streets improved at 
their own expense since 1952 
yesterday won approval for the 
project from 


mission made & 
drainage 


the W 


pensive for the property owners 
to bear and another 
the Prince bitious, plan was sent to the 


of storm 
needs. storm 
proved much too ex-|; 


. less am- 


Branchville on 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
wee Wednesday, August 31, 1958 i 


—} 


‘District was awarded to the 

A contract for the improve-/Kermit A. Hunt Construction 
ment of the 2800 block of|Co., Cheverly, on its low bid 
Gaither st. in the Hillerest\of $10,063. 


ave., Orchard st.,| 


Georges County Commis-|?* rty owners. 
sioners. | thle apg mer me was @P| Allegheny ave., Westmoreland 


| neiple by resi-| 
The board authorized prep dents this June, he said. ana” Be 4 drive and 3d, 4th 


The oners awarded 


We Will Call, Measure, 
Make and Install... 


“sported in Montgomery. 
One of the new cases, _| Aue: 28, was oot porsiysed. 
T-year-old boy from Holloway Boston Parents 


parochial schools. 


‘At the same time the Mas- 
_|sachusetts Association of In- 


rd., Falls Church, who became | 
ill Aug. 18, recovered from the 


dependent Boarding Schools 
woul 


said it d postpone a de- 
cision on school opening un- 


Face School Decision 


ave. between the Capitol 


aration of plans to save ta 
Heights town boundary and O 


of the 


About one third of the cost! 
roject will be borne 
ounty, since Sli 


AWNINGS 


Mill 


by the 
rd. and part of Cockerille ave. 
rest 


disease once before in Septém-| BOSTON, Aug. 30 @—Par- 


til after Labor ; 
ber 1951, health officials said. ents will make the decision Dey 


Cauley said that the move to 
open the schools on schedule 


st.. and L and N sts. between 


The project also will include 


some storm drainage facilities. To Lay Off 2500 More 


The construction will be f-/ FARMINGDALE, N. Y., Aug. 
nanced through the County’ 35 q@—The Republic Aviation 


Special Improvement District) 

setup, under which residents C°TP., announced today will | 

of an SID may petition for the lay off 2500 employes begin- 

county to do work to be paid ning Sept. 16 because of re- 

for by property owners of the duced fighter plane 

area. | The layoffs will bring to 
Arthur W. Tayman, county about 12,000 the number of 


CANVAS, PLASTIC OR ALUMINUM 


STORM DOORS 


COMBINATIONS, WINDOWS, GLASS JALOUSIES 


are county roads. 


eases reported yester- 
dates of onset were: 
ld boy from Sleepy 
Falls Church, onset 


year because of the police epi- 
demic. 
Health officials said yester- Mrs. Douglas in Moscow 


day Boston schools, both soma MOSCOW, A 30 W—Mrs. 
— pe would open on) William O. Dou wife of the 
schedule Sept. 8 Children kept'|Supreme Court Justice, ar 
‘at home during the early days rived here today to meet her 
ne; and a ¢year-\of the fall session will receive husband. He has been moun-/ 
Sherrow ave., Falls|academic assistance, according tain climbing in Soviet Cen-|engineer, said the project was workers dismissed by the com- 
set Aug. 19. ‘te school heads. ‘tral Asia and is expected in! first delayed while the Washing-|pany this year as a result of 

All four boys are patients at! Health Commissioner John! Moscow within a few days. ‘ton Suburban Sanitary Com- “production adjustments. 


We will send @ representative to your home te show you 
samples and give you «@ free estimate without obligation. 
Call Di. 7-7200, Ext. 247, Washington; Ext. 6248, Arlington. 


7 
wsincon MANIN’S 


SALES BOOM AT NEARBY OCEAN BEACH 
LEAN-HIATH 


WORDS THAT ALWAYS ATTRACT INVESTORS, . 
VACATIONERS AND HOME-SEEKERS! 
OW THE ATLANTEC OCeeNy y dena MARYLAND 
PRESENTS 


ARLINGTON 


NEW YORK 


RODAY, cogatittion of ceushare grapenty fo an tenpenttililiy Sor Chass of avee- 
age means, There is none left to purchase, except that which is occasionally 
purchased from wealthy owners at fabulous prices. For the family of average 
means desirous of owning their own cottage by the sea... in the expectation 
of realizing a substantial profit on their investment as time goes on... there 
is no place te turn, nothing for sale within their means. With one exception 
« «+» OCEAN BEACH IS THAT EXCEPTION. That’s why sales are booming 
at Ocean Beach . . . the last and very best of the great Atlantic beaches. 


WASHINGTON 


OCEAN BEACH 


Maryland 


NORFOLK 


Fe 


Ocean Beach is one of the world’s finest beaches . . . 15 miles of beautiful, 
velvet-smooth, wide, white sand beach sloping gently into the blue Atlantic. 
The surf bathing at Ocean Beach is acclaimed by those who have enjoyed the 
world’s famous beaches to be he of the best on the entire Atlantic Coast 
and unsurpassed anywhere. | all coast bathing, this is the finest. 


Many hundreds of miles of super-highways, including the recently completed 
225 million dollar New Jersey Turnpike, the new 50 million dollar Delaware 
River Memorial Bridge, and the new Chesapeake Bay Bridge, now bring 
fabulous Ocean Beach within easy access of 25 million vacationers in the 
District of Columbia, Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, New 
Jersey and greater New York City areas. 


Investment opportunities are unlimited. A steady increase in Ocean Beach 
values is clearly foreseen. This seashore paradise has already attracted thou- 
sands of far-sighted purchasers who have chosen building sites in this multi- 
million dollar project. Look ahead to a lifetime of vacations at the best- 
planned beach development on the Atlantic Ocean. 


CHARLESTON 


et 
+ 


= JACKSONVILLE 


ACQUIRED LAND 


FOR CHOICE RESIDENTIAL SITES AT 


Pre-Development Prices 


MIAMI 


The developers of Ocean 
Beach have had the fore- 
sight to build a 15-mile 
sea wall that has aroused 
the wonder of beach. de- 


velopers everywhere. You 


910 Seventeenth St. N.W. 


| see this wonderful engi- Barr Building EXecutive 3-0300 
neering feat that has been Open Daily, 9 to 7; Saturday, 9 to 5; Sunday, | to § 
accomplished at Ocean : 


will be amazed when you 


CHOICE RESIDENTIAL SITES 


NEARLY 


ONE-HALF ACRE 


100 FT. WIDE SY 200 FT. DEEP 


Other Sites Propertionetely Priced 


Act Now! Buy Now! CONVENIENT TERMS 


Saal ot 


>. Se <to 


P ’ — - ‘i ao - a 
Ps TE a eS a, 
»* OM Ae ay, a 
ae Te oe, 
at ye 
Rg emis fo5 % 
a 


rd 
- 


" ie 
es 


- : 
- Salisbury™ Berlin 


Drive Down to Ocean Beach Today! Drive over scenic super- 
_ highweys vie the new Chesapeake Boy Bridge. Two routes lead you 
te Oceon Beech . . . continue on Route 50 or, for @ 12-mile shorter 
foute, turn left bn 404 end follow the above map. From both routes, 
turn right on 611 fe Oceon Beoch. 


Representatives on the Property Every Day Until Dark - | 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


2 
; 


Wednesday, August 31, 1955 


Be Quizzed 
In Death ‘of 
Watchman 


Police 12 persons 
six juveniles—yes- 
strangulation mur- 
der of David L. Armhold Jr., 78- 
gn watchman whose 
was last Thursday 

near his post in the 

Aristo rs plant at 1226 S. 

The 


st. 
day-long interrogation 
no new clues to the 
of the slayexs, who bru- 
beat the aged man before 
him and knotting two 
about his mouth and neck. 
also said no trace has 
found of Armhold’s wal- 
te have contained 
$180 in cash and 
employes’ 1OUs taken by 
killers from the plant of- 


i 


i 


ee 


Three of the juveniles ques 


ing, Cape Richard ord Veiber chief 
ef the homicide squad, said. 
Murder Suspect 


Faces New Quiz 


Further questioning of the 


convict and dope 
held as a suspect in the 
slaying of Miss Alma Preinkert 
is scheduled for later this week, 
police disclosed yesterday. 
- Detectives checking the sus- 
peet’s story on his movements 
on the night of the stab slay- 
ing, Feb. 28, 1954, 


have turned up sev- 

eral bits of information which | 

they want to go over again with 
the suspect, it was learned. 

Squads of detectives also are 


rechecking the story told by\chief of detectives, and Capt.| 
the suspect's former girl friend Richard Felber, chief of the’ 


—s resulted in the return of 


of the 58) 
yearold Maryland University 


Internationa) News 


Trouble in Gaza 


An Israeli settler points te damage caused by an Egyptian 
shell fired inte the tewn of Nanal O= in the Gara area, 
during one of the recent clashes there. (Story, Page 1.) 


from the Federal sidsdastes | etteen of the suspect also are 


Hospital in Lexington, Ky., last being rechecked. 


Friday. 
Insp. 


homicide squad, said 


| Miss Preinkert was stabbed 
Aubrey Tolson, acting | 10 times by an intruder in the) 
bedroom of her home at 1430) 
Chapin st. nw. Her sister, Miss) 
state-| Alvina Preinkert, 60, also was 
prisoner to Washington ments made by friends and rel-| wounded by the slayer. 


Judge Charles Rogers Arun- 
dell will re today from the 
Tax Court the United 
States after 30 years” service. 
He was chairman of the Board 
of Tax Appeal from 1937 to 
1941. 

Judge Arundell has been in 
‘Government service for ap 
proximately 52 years, inelud- 
ing terms as chief of Alaska 
Field Division of General 
Land Office and as special at- 
torney and assistant solicitor of 


Loses Bet and 4 Teeth 


) PREBLE, N. Y., Aug. 30 # 
Charles Simmes lost more than 
a bet when he failed to lift a 
\250-pound weight with his 
teeth recently. The weight 
didn't raise. And — thmile 
when you thay thith bruthter 
—out popped four front teeth. 


SHORTHAND’ 
in & WEEKS 


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voll ‘qquge ONE L Low COST 
TYPING OFFERED 
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1406 G Street N.W. 
| Phone STerling 3-2086 


|Judge Arandell Retires 


From U.S. Tax Court 


Revenue Service, has been a 
pointed to fill Judge Arundell’s 
position. 


the Bureau of Internal Reve-|~ ; 
ORAFTING 


PREPARE Now FoR ALLY 


A graduate of George Wash- 
ington University Law School, | 
Judge Arundell began prac- 
tice in Portland, Ore., in 1910. 
a a native bo ay a x u. 

was educat in strict 
schools. sociale =e dion "Year, Brae 


He was the recipient of the | { tical 
Alumni Achievement award for | 4 Sea6, ““aige 
notable achievement in public | 


ee ieee 


SOUTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 


Fall Session Starts Sept. 15 


Programs of Study 
School of Accountancy 

School of Business Administration 
School of Transportation 


Salesmanship 
i — Evening Classes — Practical Instructors 


___ Co-Educational — 
YMCA Building 
1736 G Street, N.W. 
Full Veteran's Benefits 


BENJAMIN 
FRANKLIN 
UNIVERSITY 


SCHOOL OF ACCOUNTANCY AND 
FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION 


Forty-eight yeors ef specializing * eeteuntency mstruchen 
has encbled us te develop on effective end unique methed by 
which thewsends hove been trained for responsible eccounting 
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FOUR CHOICES 


EXECUTIVE LEGAL 
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Secure your future by choosing a career training pro- 
gram at Strayer. Inquire now, consult a counselor. Learn 
about schedules, charges, employment, income, promo 


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FALL CLASSES—SEPTEMBER 12-19 


Leadership in business education for 51 years, 1904-1955. 
merits your confidence. 


Request copy of Fall Catalog now. You are invited to 
call in person, day or evening. 


STRAYER College of Secretarial Training 


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EDUCATIONAL DIRECT ORY 


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ENJAMIN FRANKLIN UNIVERSITY 


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GOUTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 
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Tee of study mecludes all phase 


TRAYER COLLEGE OF ACCOUNTANCY 
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ARDNER SCHOOL OF BUSINESS, INC. 


J0eteer 17-9052. tnd . 641 Coleeriiie Read. Sliver 
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Open all Summer, day nae evening. Apply tn advance for sdmisri 
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122 Eighteenth * x. Ww Phene: AD. 4-727 
Register nov Pall Term <Aporoved for Veterar 


Languages 


ERLITZ SCHOOL OF LANGUAGES 


Getabdlished 1878—French. Spanish German or 
S18 N at. WN. W. 
ME. &- 


AN AMERICAN INSTITUTE i. 


GERM FRENCH. SPANIGH. RU SSIAK er any other ; 
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Australian Army Chief Reviews U.S. Marines 


Gen. Henry Wells (second from left), Aus- 
tralian Army Chief of Staff, reviews an 
_ honor guard durive his visit te the Ma- 


34 Negroes 
Win School 


Transfers 


The Prince Georges County 
School Board last night ap 
proved transfer of 34 Negro 
students to former all-white 
schools. 

Board members referred 52 
ether transfer applications to 
School Superintendent William 
&. Schmidt and gave him the 
authority to rule on these after 
a study of available bus trans 
portation 
two applications 

Under the integration policy 
adopted by the board earlier 
this month, the board reserved 
the right to reject transfer re 
quests because of overcrowded 
conditions or other “valid rea 
sons.” 

Deadline for filing request: 
was last Friday. Up to then, 
93 Negro students had re 
quested transfer 

Five of these were withdrawn 
voluntarily when parents and 
students found certain course 
chiefly vocational, were not of 
fered in the schools to which 
they requested transfer 

Two requests for transfers 
were rejected 

The application of a Fair- 
mount Heights Junior-Senior 
High School senior for en-| 
trance to Suitland High School | 
Was turned down because! 
Board members said their polli- 
cy was not to make transfers 
in the senior year ) 

On another request — for! 
transfer to Cheverly Ele. 
mentary school — the Board 
ruled the shift would not be 
made to avoid double shifts at 
Fairmount Elementary School. | 

The transfers approved, the’ 
Board emphasized, did not in- 
Voive transportation difficul 
ties, either because students 
lived close to the schools or 
adequate bus service was 
available 

Schmidt told the members 
he didn’t feel the other 52 ap- 
plications could be granted 
without some study of trans- 
portation facilities. He termed 
the bus situation “critical.” 

Twenty buses are on order, 
the superintendent said, and 
none has been received. When 
school opens, he added, there 
is a “bare possibility” nine 
buses will be available 

Of the 52 applications on 
which the decision was left to 
Schmidt, 25 applications were 
for transfer to High Point Ele- 
mentary, 24 to Beltsville and 
three to Laurel Junior High 
Schoo! 

The board voted to give the 
transferred students a trial pe- 
riod until November 1. Applica- 
tions for a shift back to their 
former schools will be accepted 


= 


' 


—_—_— 


( ADD A 
“Foretan 3 


TO 


The board rejected” 


By Harry Goodwin. Staff Photographer 


rine Barracks yesterday. Escorting him is 
Capt. Robert Burhans. At left rear is Gen. 
Lemuel Shepherd, Marine Commandant. 


— oe 


a ne ee ee 


Va. Medical School 


. . ; | * | 
Timonium Fair To Open Today 
TIMONIUM, Md., Aug. 30 # opening the 74th Mary- 
A fascinator and a functionary| land tate Fair. 
will snip a black and yellow; The honor will be done co- 
ribbon at noon Wednesday of- operatively of Carol Jennette| 


Westminster, Miss Maryland 
) and Michael J. Birming- 


THE WASHINGTON 
Wednesday, August 31, 1955 


POST end TIMES HERALD 
13 


ham, chairman of the board of 
=, County Commission-| 


o Matt L. Daiger, whom fair|“Mr 


, will be pres 


folk affectionately regard asjent and later take part in a 
r. Timonium special ceremony in his honor. 


ms 


This gets 


as the 


_— oe 


Admits Ist Negro Girl 


Va.jthis year has accepted three 
‘ 30 (Sol) — Anna J.| Negro students—the first on 
ate i) ps eduste of| the undergraduate level since 
TaRSUB, aA Honor gr Gregory Swanson, the first Ne- 
Virginia Union University, will! gro to enter the university, en- 
become the first Negro womanirolled as a graduate student 
student to enter the University e~ yg: than 20 Ne. 
| ince then, more n 
of Virginia Medical School groes have entered the Uni- 
when the fall term opens. versity, but only three received 


CHARLOTTESVILLE, 


almost 


as big a hand 


Charter 
Oak 


years old 


Miss Franklin will join, five|degrees. Most Negro enroll- 
Negro male students in the|/ments have been on the gradu 
School of Medicine. She was|#te level in the School of Ed 


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graduated from Virginia Union westion 
last June with cum laude hon- 
ors and membership in Betta 
Kappa Chi, scientific honor so- 
ciety 


The School of Engineering 


Co patra Pictured 
As Sculptors’ Model 


ROME, Aug. 3 (INS) 
Did the beauteous Egyptian 
temptress Cleopatra pose 
in the nude for Roman 
sculptors more than 2000 
years ago’ 

Prof. Licinio Glori., 
lan historian, claims 
did 

The evidence is now in 
the Rome Museum. Glori 
says. He sent his scientific 
findings today to the Italian 
Historical Academy. 

Giori says there is no 
doubt that a statue in Rome 
Museum—armless like that 
of the Venus de Milo—is 
a likeness of Cleopatra 

The statue is that of an 
amply - proportioned young 
woman with a straight nose 
and plump, sensuous face. 
Experts have always found 
it “unusual.” but Glori is 
the first to advance the 
Cleopatra theory. 


Ital 
she 


w pies ee AGES 


SWITCHBOARD 


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Phone or Visit from 8 AM. te 9 PM 


Xecent’ 


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THE SOMERSET CHEF'S most closely quarded tecret 


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RUSSELL WIGGINS, Vice President and Frecetive Feiler 
Bditorial Page Fditor 

Editor 

Contributing Ratior 

Secretary 

" "President wror Redie ane Television 


AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER 


PAGE 14 


meee ee 


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 31, 1955 


Violence by Video 


About 150 persons are murdered in public each 
week on television screens. They are shot, clubbed, 
garroted, stabbed, thrown out of windows, pushed 
off cliffs, and sometimes tortured to death by 
diverse fiendish means—all in full view of millions 
of American men, women and children. An ad- 
ditional number of persons are Jess fatally beaten, 
gouged, maimed and pummeled in the course of 
any week's TV fare. Crime and sadism are com- 
monplaces of the screen in millions of American 
homes. Because TV commonly seeks a mass audi- 
ence—the largest mass audience possible—it tends 
to appeal to the umiversal impulse toward physical 
aggression. 

Such sights cannot {#1 to leave an imprint on 
the minds of those who see them. The Senate 
Subcommittee to Investigate Juvenile Delinquency 
has been especially concerned with their imprint 
upon children and has presented some thoughtful 
reflections on this score in an admirably restrained 
report released last week. It has little more than 
speculation to offer as to any direct causative re- 
lation between TV programs apd juvenile delin- 
quency. But it raises the most serious questions 
as to the ideas and values inculcated in young 
minds by the TV programs to which they are ex- 

. “There is reason to believe,” says the re- 
port, “that television crime programs are poten- 
tially much more injurious to children and young 
people than motion pictures, radio or comic books. 

. Television, available at a flick of a knob and 
combining visual and audible aspects into a ‘live’ 
story, has a greater impact upon its child audience.” 

There are different kinds of TV violence; some 
of them are perhaps innocuous and may, indeed, 
provide a salutary sort of release of aggressions 
which might otherwise find more dangerous out- 
lets. In some “western” programs, such as the 
Lone Ranger for example, the violence, while ex- 
treme, is so stylized as to seem essentially ludi- 
crous; the hero and villain regularly take turns at 
hitting each other with haymakers which would 
fell even the most robust ox but which generally 
leave them unscathed and unbloodied. These seem 
analogous to the serialized perils of Pauline which 
thrilled an earlier generation of moviegoers. But 
a good many of the gangster shows present vio- 
lence which has much more sinister overtohes and 
must leave much mggre pernicious impressions. 

The subcommittee is quite right in saying, in 
any case, that “the cumulative effect of crime-and- 
horror television programs on the personality de- 
velopment of American children has become a 
source of mounting concern to parents.” It is no 
answer to this concern to say that parents can, and 
should, supervise the TV viewing of their children. 
The children whose TV viewing is carefully super- 
vised—and unhappily they constitute a very small 
minority—must grow up in a world dominated by 
those whose minds may have been warped and 
calloused by excessive exposure to brutality. Psy- 
chiatrists and psychologists who testified before 
the subcommittee were generally of the opinion 
that, however immune to video violence healthy 
and warmly loved children may be, emotionally 
disturbed children are affected by it in a most 
deleterious way. And the percentage of children 
who are emotionally disturbed in one degree or 
another is frighteningly high. 

There are, of course, no easy solutions to the 
problem created by the content of all the mass 
media of communication in America—newspapers, 
movies, comic books and magazines as well as TV. 
Censorship is a remedy more dangerous than the 
disease. In this newspaper's view, the most con- 
structive recommendation made by the subcommit- 
tee is that the President establish a commission of 
outstanding citizens to make a thorough study of all 
the mass media in terms of their impact upon chil- 
dren and youth. Presidential commissions, it is 
true, are being suggested somewhat prodigally 
these days. But in this situation the device Seems 
peculiarly suited to the difficulty; it can do at 
leisure what no congressional committee has the 
time or the detachment to accomplish. We know 
far less than we need to know about a matter that 
cannot fail vitally fo influence the whole shape of 
the American future. 


Business on Saturday 


Downtown Washington department stores, which 
this summer reversed their custom of closing on 
Saturdays, now have some impressive evidence that 
the Saturday openings are popular. Despite the 
transit strike and the ensuing traffic tangles, down- 
town department store sales during July were 3 
per cent higher than a year ago—and higher than 
the average of the first six months of 1955. Un- 
questionably the Saturday openings, which have 
afforded many families a chance to shop together 
at their leisure, have contributed to this business 
growth. In the process, of course, the added 
convenience helped retain in the downtown area 
sales that otherwise would have fled to the suburbs. 

We hope that the department stores will read 
the figures as a demand that the summer Saturday 
openings be made permanent. To be sure, the 
Saturday schedules inflict some hardship on sales 
personnel who otherwise might enjoy long week- 
ends; but it still may be possible to combine days 
off. The important thing is that patrons have 
responded to the weekend sales hours with an 
encouraging increase in purchases. In light of the 
stores’ concern with protecting the downtown core 
of their business, this ought to be inducement ‘for 
them to continue the Saturday openings next 
summer in their own self-interest. 


Unions as Employers 


By a 3 to 2 division, the National Labor Rela- 
tions Board has-decided not to punish a union for 
unfair labor practices against its own employes. 
The Teamsters Union, one of the largest and most 
powerful labor organizations in the country, was 
found guilty by an NLRB examiner of interfering 
in grossly improper ways with rights of its office 
employes who had sought to bargain collectively 
through the Office Employes Union, AFL. The 
Teamsters organization refused to bargain with 
the employes, dismissed some of them for joining 
the Office Employes Union and tried to prevent . 
one member from testifying in the NLRB investi- 
gation. In short, the men running the Teamsters 


E 


7 


‘ partnership. 


Mrifting 


ee ee 


Union emilated the worst labor-baiting and union- 
busting tactics of the economic royalists of a by- 
gone era. 

The question of the NLRB’s jurisdiction is a 
delicate one. Three members of the board (in- 
cluding Guy Farmer whose participation in this 
case ended a distinguished career as NLRB chair- 
man), felt that the agency could not act in the 
case because the. Teamsters Union is not a com- 
mercial firm operating for profit. Two members 
of the board disagreed vigorously, asserting that 
Congress clearly intended in the Taft-Hartley Act 
to forbid unfair labor practices by unions as well 
as by employers. 

Whatever the merits of this difference of expert 
opinion may be, it seems clear that the conduct 
of the Teamsters Union officials was thoroughly 
reprehensible. Unions acting in the capacity of 
employers ought to be especially zealous in respect- 
ing the rights of their employes. When they are 
guilty themselves of unfair labor practices, they 
undermine the foundations of their own existence. 


Shigemitsu at the Press Club 


Mamoru Shigemitsu, the visiting Japanese For- 
eign Minister who addressed the National Press 
Club yesterday, is the first man convicted by a war 
tribunal to make a comeback to high office. Foreign 
Minister on two occasions during the war, he is 
now in the same position in the Hatoyama govern- 
ment, and, in addition, is Deputy Prime Minister. 
This latter position he holds by virtue of his 
leadership of one of the conservative wings of the 
governing coalition. There was about him yester- 
day a mildness of manner which scarcely comports 
with the hurly-burly of politics. 

What he had to say bore out his reputation as 
the leading advocate in Japan of the close ties 
with America. The speech occurred midway in his 
consultations with Secretary Dulles. Accordingly, 
he could scarcely do more than outline the issues 
which call for exploration in the relations between 
the two countries. Mr. Shigemitsu pledged the 
utmost cooperation with America and spoke of the 
unequal defense burden borne by this country, but 
was vague about Japan's specific defense contribu- 
tion. It is said that the six-year-plan which Shige- 
mitsu is explaining to our diplomatic and defense 
officials is not big enough to satisfy their view 
of the defense needs of ihe Japanese-American 
Certainly Japanese defense needs 
must be met adequately. before Yhe_gradual with- 
drawal of American troops, at which Mr. Shige- 
mitsu hinted, can be considered seriously. 

In monetary terms the Japanese contribution 
amounts to about 15 percent of the total budget. 
But there are several subsidiary problems to iron 
out before the exact nature and size of the military 
establishment in Japan can be decided upon. First 
and foremost from the Japanese point of view is 
some revision of the administrative arrangements 
which are provided for in the United States- 
Japan security agreement. These arrangements 
call for approval by the United States of Japan's 
military budget before action can be taken in Japan 
on the general budget. The present procedure is 
irksome to the Japanese. 

Perhaps on this, as on other matters which 
bother the Japanese about their defense contribu- 
tion, Mr. Shigemitsu will get satisfaction before he 
goes back to Tokyo. For there is no reason to 
believe that in the final analysis the Japanese want 
to shitk their responsibility for their own defense. 
If there was one thing that Mr. Shigemitsu was 
insistent upon in his speech yesterday, it was this. 


Holes in the Curtain 


It is refreshing to read in the comments of the 
head of the American farm delegation that visited 
Russia an acknowledgment that this country may 
have a few things to learn from the Soviet Union. 
Americans naturally are proud of their own coun- 
try and its agricultural and industrial prowess. 
Quite apart from the repugnance they share for 
the repressions of the Communist social, economic 
and political system, they are apt to measure Rus- 
sian technical accomplishments against an Ameri- 
can yardstick. Sometimes this pride in American 
superiority assumes an aura of smugness and boast- 
fulness which repels other peoples. Carried too 
far, it not only can blight the possibility of friend- 
ships but also can blind us to the real advances of 
Soviet science and technology. 

Dean W. V. Lambert of the University of Ne- 
braska College of Agriculture evidently is one man 
who does not permit his pride to obscure his vision. 
He praised the Russian system of planting shelter- 
belts of trees as windbreaks and checks against 
snow—a system which, he says, goes far 
beyond what the United States has done. “I am 
certain much could be gained,” he added, “by 
having a few American foresters in Russia for one 
or two years working along with Soviet forestry 
specialists.” Doubtless there are other techniques 
in the Soviet Union which Americans could ob- 
serve to advantage. The Geneva atomic conference, 
for example, increased the respect for Soviet 
nuclear science. 

The kind of objective attitude exhibited by Dean 
Lambert—a refreshing contrast to the supercilious- 
ness sometimes evidenced by others—ought to 
increase the pressure for further exchange of 
technicians and observers. And any marked in- 
crease in such exchange, of course, would Be bound 
to puncture a hole in the Iron Curtain (as well as 
in our own paper curtain). Indeed, the talk at 
the “summit” meeting about lifting barriers, though 
it received relatively little formal attention, could 
ultimately be of the utmost significance. For 
once the process were started in motion, it 
would be extremely difficult for the Soviet Union 
to keep ironclad control over information and 
communications. - 

Free observation, free reporting of things as 
they are, good and bad, would be the best single 
cure for tensions and the distortions of propa- 
ganda. In return for some concessions along this 
line the United States could well afford to waive 
its own fingerprinting. requirements for Russian 
visitors. The extent to which the Soviet Union is 
willing to take practical steps to facilitate such an 
exehange will be a very real test of whether its 
desire for improved relations with the free world 
is more than talk. 


h, wy 


Old Man of the Mediterranean 


Letters to the Editor 


Justice for Landy 


In the Landy case, many who 
would rationalize the Navy's be- 
havior make much of the princi- 
ple that no one has a basic right 
to an appointment in our armed 
forces. They point out that no 
refusal to appoint, even if arbi- 
trary or unreasonable, may ie 
gally be challenged. 

While it is true that the Con- 
gress has given to each of our 
armed services certain discre- 
tionary powers to set qualifica- 
tion standards for officer selec- 
tion, it is also reasonably cer- 
tain that the Congress did not 
intend that these powers be ex- 
ercised in an arbitrary and un- 
reasonable manner. 

The punishment of a child for 
the indiscretions of its parents 
must surely be recognized as an 
arbitrary “and unreasonable ;c- 
tion no matter how one looks at 
it. Surely it is not in accord 
with the “justice” upon which 
our Constitution was founded. 

Our Government was estab- 
lished upon the principles of 
freedom, equality, justice, and 
humanity. In our fight against 
world communism we must 
never sacrifice or compromise 
any one of those vital principles 
in the delusion that we are do- 
ing so to “save ourselves.” for 
in sO “saving ourselves” 
shall have lost that which we 
hold most dear. 

HARVEY H. HEWITT, 
LA. Col. USAF (tret.: 
Falis Church, Va. 


“In Defense of Catholics” 


On May 15, and again on 
Aug. 14, an erroneous advertise- 
ment has reached the readers of 
The Washington Post and Times 
Herald, The advertisement I re- 
fer to was inserted by the Re- 
ligious Information Bureau of 
the Supreme Council of the 
Knights of Columbus in the 
American Weekly on May 15 
and in Parade on Aug. 14, both 
being magazine supplements 
which are included in Sunday 
editions of your paper. Allow 
me, then, to call public attention 
to the following misstatements: 

The title, “Andrew Jackson 

. . im Defense of Cathdlics,” 
en.blazoned the first error upon 
the very masthead of the adver- 
tisement. The quotation attrib- 
uted to Jackson was never ut- 
tered by him, in Congress (as 
the advertisement indicated) or 
anywhere else. 

Something resembling the al- 
leged quotation was included in 
a speech of Rep. Andrew John- 
son (Congressional Globe, Jan. 
21, 1845, p. 221, “appendix). The 
words, however, were not 
Johnson's but those of an 
anonymous political pamphlet- 
eer whom he cited. And the 
quotation has been altered, 
with widely scattered sentences 
brought together, cut up and 
rearranged to suit the adver- 
tiser’s purpose, all without the 
slightest indication that there 
have been any omissions or 
changes. 

These facts have been 
brought out by George A. Cor- 
nish, professor of science at 
the University of Toron‘s, 
who, after seeing the adver- 
tisement some time ago in 
another publication, sought to 
find the speech by “Andrew 
Jackson” in the record, Failing 
to do so, he inquired directly 
of the advertiser, who admitted 
that a “mistake” had been 
made. (See Prof. Cornish’s 
letter in the Christian Century 
of Aug. 10.) 

After its sensational begin- 
ning the advertisement pro- 
ceeds in the following vein: 

“The (Roman Catholic) 
Church is accused, at times, of 
persecution and eg be- 
cause of regulations applied 
by nations in which catholi- 
cism is the established religion. 
There was an angry test re- 
cently, for example, use of 
a requirement that United 
States military personnel ‘in 


Spain apply to the Catholic ’ 


Church for ssion to 
marry. Nobody got excited 
over the fact that our person. 
nel serving in Greenland and 


S 


we 


Saudi Arabia cannot get such 
permission at all. Nor does 
anyone demand a protest to 
Norway because all marriages 
require approval of a fnon- 
Catholic clergyman.” 

Each of these assertions 
about the three countries 
named is false, as I have veri- 
fied by checking with officials 
of those countries and with the 
United States State Depart- 
ment. Norwegian officials, in 
particular, have complained 
directly to the Knights of Co- 
lumbus Religious Information 
Bureau and furnished them 
with a formal statement of 
July 14 by Bishop Jac. Man- 
gers of the Oslo, Norway, Ro- 
man Catholic diocese, affirm. 
ing that Norwegian law places 
no obstacle in the way of 
Catholic marriages (I have a 
photostatic copy of this state- 
ment.) 

STANLEY LICHTENSTEIN, 

Managing Faditor. Church sad State. 


Washington. 


U. S. and Goa 


Because I believe your edi- 
torial policy is generally en- 
lightened I have been deeply 
shocked by your editorials on 
Goa, for your statements tend 
further to build the current dis- 
trust of India. 

I left India a year ago after 
some while as a socalled ex- 
pert consultant. I feel that the 
key to understanding of Indian 
policy is the deep hatred of 
colonialism in all its forms. 
The fact that Goa has been 
held by the Portuguese for 400 
years is no more reason to an 
Indian that it should continue 
to be so held than that India 
should have continued under 
the British. 

One of the most humiliating 
things I had to listen to in In- 
dia was the suspicion by Indi- 
ans of substance and = leader- 
ship that Portugal was being 
encouraged to hold on because 
the United States as a NATO 
partner of Portugal wanted 
the port of Goa in the event of 
war. Since then, our Govern- 
ment has expressed sympathy 
with India’s aspiration to be 
reunited. It is tyme we in this 
country ceased being defend- 
ers of the status quo whether 
right or wrong, and set about 
the task of giving aid and com- 
fort to those who seek their 
freedom from foreign domina- 
tion in Asia and in Africa as 
we do in central Europe. 

AMERICAN. 

Washington. 


Teaching of Communism 


4 few days ago it was pub- 
licly announced that the Amer- 
ican Bar Association had taken 
a stand upon one of the most 
highly deliberated questions of 
the century, “Whether commu- 
nism should be taurcht in our 
American institutions of learn- 
ing.” May I take this oppor- 
tunity to congratulate this au- 
gust body. Americans should 
be thankful that some of their 
most nimble minds have con- 
sidered and discussed this ever- 
delicate question both pro and 
con and decided in the affirma- 
tive. 

Communism has been and 
still is a gripping religion. Not 
in the sense that it unites man 
to God, but.in a manner unit- 
ing man to a totalitarian lead- 
ership, the kind of leadership 
that strangely disunites and 
divides its subjects into a furor 
of belligerent acts which they 
themselves cannot fully ex- 
plain. 

I earnestly contend that the 
most deadly combative weap- 
ons to such a fallacious pbhi- 
losophy is a universally edu- 
cated public. A formal educa- 
tion in the dogma of commu- 
nism will enlighten these minds 
and enable them to cdunteract 
the superficialities that beset 
them. May our pride and con- 
fidence in our system of edu- 
cation continue to grow and 
strengthen. | 

GEORGE T. WEBBER. 

Alexandria. 


ty} 


“Nye Bevan's Doubts” 


Your editorial of Aug. 24 
dealing with Aneurin Bevan 
serves to remind us of a handi- 
cap with which mankind has 
been obliged to contend 
throughout recorded history. 
How much mischief has been 
wrought by men in high places 
who deliberately seek out in- 
cidents for the purpose of 
distorting them to fit precon- 
ceived beliefs and policies! 

A tranquil world being our 
goal, | suspect that in addi- 
tion to such an organization as 
the United Nations we must 
“employ better ju nt in the 
selection of our leaders. No 
longer can any nation afford 
the own of highly partisan 
or prejudiced representatives. 
Such qudlities as openminded- 
ness and sagaciousnhess must 
increasingly ome the rule 
rather than the exception. 

Fortunately there are evi- 
dences of a broader conception 
of individual responsibility in 
our own land these days. Per- 
haps no single instance of 
the change was so strik- 
ing as the reception re 
conUy accorded a Wisconsin 
Senator's attempt to embarrass 
our Chief Executive in his sum- 
mit discussions at Geneva. The 
great majority of our legisla- 
tors quickly recognized the Mc- 
Carthy effort for the unworthy 
thing it essentially was. 

less Mr. Bevan's mode 
of reasoning stems in some de- 
gree from a belief that his 
supporters nurse an active hos- 
tility to the United States and 
our mode of existence. How 
widespread such an attitude 
may is, of course, difficult 
to estimate. A truly sincere 
and dedicated statesman seeks, 
however, not to widen such 
chasms of thought as may exist 
but, instead, tries to assuage 
the irritations and to minimize 
them when and where he can. 

T. G. MORGANSEN. 

Jackson Heights, N. Y. 


Municipal Ownership 


‘Despite all the insults that 
Mr. Wolfson has endured, he 
is quite right in proclaiming 
that his first responsibility is to 
his stockholders. That is the 
function of the director of a 
corporation. It is true that he 
should be expected to hold the 
interest of the public at heart, 
but not at the expense of the 
company. The stockholders 
paid for the buses, and they 
want, and are entitled to, a fai 
return on their money. 

I believe the time has come 
for municipalities all over the 
country. to realize that public 
transportation can no longer be 
profitably operated by private 
enterprise. The past decade has 
seen doubling and redoubling 
of fares in most of our major 
cities, with private companies 
continually on the brink. of 
bankruptcy. Ironically, fare 
raises do not seem materially 
to increase the total revenue 
of transit companies, since with 
every raise more people seek 
alternative means of transpor- 
tation. 

When fewer people ride the 
buses, service is subsequently 
reduced and the public suffers 
twice. Less service for mo 
money. 

There is only one solution. 
Municipal ownership of public 
transportation facilities and 
subsidization from other reve- 
nues, This very logical step, un- 
fortunately, violates a  prin- 
ciple, and “creeping socialism” 
will be the hue and ery, “Creep- 
ing socialism,” however, is a 
relative term. Government op- 
eration of the postoffice has 
never received any serious op- 
position, and public operation 
of the streetcars is certainly no 
worse. 

If the cities, states, and Fed- 
eral Government would adopt 
what the present Administra- 
tion likes to call a “business- 
man's approach,” the problem 
would soon solve itself, since 
evidently this efficiency-con- 
scious attitude would. not tol- 
erate private enterprise where 
it has proved itself unequal to 


sk. 
JOSEPH H. WEBER. 


¢ 


‘ Results of Geneva 


Still to Be Tested 


By Marquis Childs 


EN ROUTE TO AMERICA—During the 
past four months the tide of world affairs 
has been reversed. Centered around the 
summit meeting of the heads of govern- 
ment of East and West, 
a series of dramatic 
changes have taken place 
that seem to promise a 
new era, if not of good- 
will, then one at least of 
peaceful toleration. 

It has, in short, been 
one of those crowded, 
history-making moments 
when after long delay ) 
and uncertainty every- Childs 
thing is dared on a 
course of action. President Eisenhower 
took the step that no one had had the 
courage to take. He decided to try to 
make peace by direct negotiations in 
order to avoid a cataclysmic war. 

But how much does the change mean? 
Is it merely superficial and of brief dura- 
tion? Does this mean the capitulation of 
the West or is it possible for free nations to 
stay strong and resolute in a cold peace 
as in a cold war? This and other articles 
to follow will attempt to summarize the 
significance of the four months that have 
seen such a swift.transformation in the 
climate of the world. 

ow 

FIRST, HOWEVER, a little history is 
relevant. The idea of a top-level confer- 
ence to try to settle the differences between 
the Western and Eastern blocs was cur- 
rent long before the Eisenhower Adminis- 
tration came to power. It had been sug- 
gested informally by Sir Winston Churchill 
and others and the possibility had been 
debated by President Truman and his Sec- 
retary of State, Dean G. Acheson. 

Surely, it was argued, if only the men 
with the real authority could sit down 
around a table they would be able to ad- 
just the outstanding differences in such a 
way that both the free world and the 
Communist world could live side by side 
in comparative confidence. But the deci- 
sion in the Truman-Acheson Administra- 
tion was against a highly publicized meet- 
ing at the summit. 

Partly this may be put down to timidity 
and the fierce attacks on the Potsdam and 
Yalta agreements and the cry that large 
chunks of territory had been handed over 
to the Communists. But the reason given 
for refusing to consider such a conference 
was that the risk was too great 

This may have been an excess of timidity, 
but it can scarcely be denied that the risk 
was areal one. President Eisenhower was 
willing to take a chance. But, that chance 
having been taken, it follows that the dan- 
ger of ultimate failure in arriving at a 
settlement is part of the atmosphere of the 
moment. The world does not rest on a 
comfortable plateau as a result of Geneva. 

This is, rather, the moment when the 
expedition pauses for breath with the 
blank face of a cliff that must be scaled 
just above. The great test will come 
when the Foreign Ministers mect in 
Geneva in late October. 

ow 

IN THE WEEKS that have followed the 
Geneva Conference the Soviets have taken 
an increasingly intransigent stand on main- 
taining two Germanys. This was the ques-. 
tion on which the heads of government 
were farthest apart, the differences be- 
tween West and East being scarcely con- 
cealed by the language of the fina! direc- 
tive passing on the whole bundle of un- 
solved problems to the Foreign Ministers. 
That directive, while stating that reunifi- 
cation of Germany and a European secu- 
rity pact were intertwined, failed to give 
priority to unification as a precondition to 
any pact. 

The position of the two sides the 
German issue appears to be that of the im 
movable object and the irresistible force. 
Perhaps a formula can be found in the in- 
terval that mento: at least the beginning 


on 


of an agreement)possible. It is more likely 
to come from Britain's Foreign Secretary, 
Harold MacMillan, than from either Sec- 
retary of Stste John Foster Dulles or 
French Foreign Minister Antoine Pinay. 
Several times since Geneva the Soviet 
leaders have suggested that Prime Minister 
Eden's proposed security pact was not too 
different from the one they put forward. 
A compromise may prove possible if the 
concept of German unification can be 
fitted into the framework of a European 
pact. 

Many have said since Geneva that re- 
gardiess of whether the major issues aré 
settied or not, the powers at the summit 
meeting did agree to renounce war as an 
instrument of policy, since war would mean 
mutual annihilation. This may be too 
optimistic. Yet there are the first signs, 
to be examined in a subsequent article, 
that the Russians are ending the total 
secrecy which has made a surprise attack 
a fearsome possibility that constantly 
menaces the nations of the West where 
measures for defense are spread on the 
record for all to read. 


“Oye Washington Host 


Times Berald 


Published every day in the year by 
The Washington Post Company 


Assoctated Preas ts entitied exclusively to wee for 
» cation of all news dispatches credited to it or 
wise credited in this paper and ioca! news of 
taneous origin published herein. Rights of repub- 
leation of ali ether matter herein are also reserved. 


The A 
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Matter of Fact .... 


The Bathtub Method 


RABAT, MOROCCO.—What 
is the Moroccan Nationalist 
movement all about? What 
manner of men are its leaders 
BMG WAG DO ee 
they really * | Ne! 
want? “y 

Such 
tions are ‘ 
‘to answer, be- 
cause there | 
are several = 
Morocean | 
N ationalist 
movements 
and each 
movement has 
several — lead- 
ers. But this reporter at least 
had a-chance to catch some- 
thing of the flavor of Moroccan 
nationalism at a luncheon 
meeting with the leaders of 
the illegal “Istiqlal,” much the 
most powerful of the Moroccan 
independence parties. 

In the Moslem fashion, we 
sat on divans around a low 
table, plucking delicious chick- 
en or mutton from a big plate 
in the center. Of the six men 
present, the three most im- 
pressive were Bouabid, Ben- 
Barka and Majoub Seddik. 

Bouabid, a lawyer, is gener- 
ally regarded as the No. 1 man 
in the Nationalist movement 
here. He is very thin, with an 
intense face, mocking eyes 
and an air of authority. Ben- 
Barka is the party's theoreti- 
cian, or idea man. He is a 
mathematies professor, intelli- 
gent and likable—he looks a 
little like a smaller edition of 
Vice Presidént Nixon. 


SEDDIK looks, by contrast, 
like a professional revolu- 
tionary, which is what he is. 
Unlike Bouabid and _  Ben- 
Barka, who are products of the 
small Moroccan middle class, 
Majoub Seddik was an illiter- 
ate railway worker who 
climbed to the top of the 
illegal Moroccan labor move- 
ment by sheer force and pas 
sion. He has a violent man- 
ner and strange, angry eyes— 
the white shows all around 
the pupils. As they talked, 
the contrast between Bouabid 
and Ben-Barka on the one 


: Fs 


inci ea’ 


} 


4 


" 


By Stewart Alsop 


hand, and Majoub Seddik on 
the other, became more and 
more striking. 

They had, of course, much 
in common. All three were 
ready to risk everything for 
the movement. All three had 
already spent. months and 
years in jail. And the expe- 
riénce had left its mark on all 
three men, but especially on 
Majoub Seddik. 

He showed scars on the tops 
of his hands, administered, he 
said, by the French police. 
But, he said, there is some- 
thing much worse than beat- 
ings—the “methode baig- 
noire,” the bathtub method. 


THE BATHTUB method, as 
Majoub Seddik described it, is 
very simple. The police tied 
him on a plank, with his head 
hanging down over one end, 
and then put the plank on a 
sawhorse. There was a bath- 
tub filled with dirty water un- 
der his head. Whenever he 
gave the wrong answer to a 
question, or no answer at all, 
the plank was tipped so that 
his head was immersed in the 
bathtub. A policeman with a 
stopwatch gave the signal to 
tip him back again just short 
of the drowning point. 

When Majoub Seddik had 
finished his description of the 
bathtub method, Theré was a 
short silence around the table. 
Then Bouabid and Ben-Barka 
began talking about the at- 
titude of the Moroccan Na 
tionalists to the French. 

The Nationalist leaders 
knew, they said, that Morocco 
had to have French technical 
help, French capital, French 
political support. There was no 
question at all of pushing the 
French out of Morocco, or 
destroying French interests. 
Moroccans wanted only the 
right to run the affairs of 
their own country. 


WHEN BOUABID and Ben- 
Barka said these things, they 
sounded sincere. Majoub Sed- 
dik said nothing. Then the con- 
versation shifted again to the 
economic exploitation of the 


country by the French, and 
Majoub Seddik became pas- 


sionately eloquent, and the 


whites of his eyes showed. 


The workers were lucky to — 


- 65 cents a day, he said. 
hey could not strike. They 
could not even join a union— 
he himself was not a 
munist, he said, but he had 
first joined a ist 
union becaitise only the Com- 
munists were then doing any- 
thing for the workers. And al- 
ways, there were the police, 
searching workers as they 
left their work, beating them 
for nothing, jailing them for a 
wo 

There was—or so it seemed 
to this reporter—a bitterness 
and a hatred in Majoub Sed- 
dik, mot only toward the 
French but toward the whole 
economic political system, 
that was not In Bouabid and 
Ben-Barka. And this suggests 
the nature of the real choice 
that confronts the French. 


AT PRESENT, the vast 
majority of the Nationalist 
leaders are of the same stripe 
as Bouabid and Ben-Barka— 
products of the middle class, 
moderate men, revolutionaries 
only by force of circumstance. 
If such men are given positions 
of real authority, and a sense 
of pride and participation, 
the essential French interests 
in this tortured country may 
well be preserved. 

The alternative is the bath- 
tub method applied country- 
wide—a campaign of the most 
ruthless suppression. In the 
end, this is sure to produce 
a whole crop of Majoub Sed- 
diks. In the end, it could 
only mean a terrible fight to 
the finish, which the French 
could never really win. 

If the French were the 
cynical and logical people 
they are supposed to be, in- 
stead of the sentimental and 
illogical people they actuall 
are, there is no doubt which 
way they would choose. Mean- 
while, they have been inca- 
caple of choosing at all, and 
it is already very late. 


(Coorrieht. 1955. Ned York 
Herald Tribune. Inc.: 


- 


Washington Scene . . . . 3 George Dixon 


Equal Time, Unequal Laughs 


AS THEY SAY in the politi: Nebraska College of Agricul know what is going on in the 


cal campaigns, we had to give 
equal time to the other side. 
We gave speaking time to the 
Russians who 
visited Ameri- @ 
ca—so, to keep } 4 
from being ac- 57 
cused of parti- | 
sanship, preju- | 
dice, and pro 
Russian- 
ism, we felt 
impelled to ex- 
tend the same 
National Press 
Club facilities 
to.the United 
States farm delegation that we 
did to the U.S.S.R. delegation. 

Call me subversive and deny 
me security clearance if you 
will, but I still say the Russians 
were dunnier! 

The chairman of the Russian 
delegation, Deputy Chief Min- 
ister of Agriculture Viadimir 
Matskevich, drew a boffo a 
minute. The head of the Ameri- 
can delegation, Dean W. V. 
Lambert of the University of 


Dixon 


ture, got his only yak when he 
complained that his Russian 
hosts had served him caviar 
and champagne for breakfast. 

We couldn't understand what 
the hell he was kicking about! 

The Russian farm experts 
were the best dressed. They 
just looked stiff in their store 
clothes. Ours looked bucolic. 

The Russians spoke through 
an interpreter. The Americans 
could haye used one, too, But 
we didn't think of it in time. 
Speaking in English, Dean 
Lambert said: 

“Many times we*would sit 
down to breakfast in the morn. 
ing and the meal would go on 
for four hours. Then more 
food would be brought on. This 
way we got an ‘extry’ meal.” 

Yes, sir, the Dean said “ex- 
try.” And him a B.S. and Ph.D. 
already! 


IN A SERIOUS vein, Dean 
Lambert said the Russians 
“really are on the march agri- 
culturally.” He added, how- 
ever, that “they just don't 


outside world.” 

Russian farmers, he con- 
tinued, were forever asking 
him whether American farm- 
ers owned automobiles. 


JOHN M. JACOBS, an Ari- 
zona farmer (transplated from 
Iowa), said the Russians were 
making strides in cotton. He 
said they have a surplus of 
lint. Judging by the blue 
suits present, so do we. 

Tension seemed to hold the 
head table for a minute when 
Dean Lambert was asked: 

“Some of us got the im- 
pression that the Russian dele- 
gates had been briefed by 
their government as to what 
to say while here. Did our 
State Department attempt to 
brief you on what to say in 
Russia?” 

Assistant Secretary of State 
Carl W. McCardle darted 
anxious looks up and down 
the head table, but drew an 
obvious sigh of relief when 
Dean Lambert said “No”! 


‘Coovriant. 1955. Kime 
Peatares Syadicate inc.) 


These Days .... 


Leninist Foreign Policy 


SOVIET sweetness and light 
has finally come by a name, 
“The Leninist Foreign Policy 
of the Soviet State.” The name 
appears in the no 
speech of the 
chairman of 
the Council of 
Ministers of 
the USSR. = 
N. A. Bulgan- ; 
in, on Aug. 5, 

1955. Bulganin 
said: 

“The Soviet 
government 
delegation at 
the Geneva 
Conference consistently pur- 
sued the peace-loving Leninist 
foreign policy of the Soviet 
state, responding to the vital 
interests of the Soviet people, 
and the interests of preserving 
peace and security 
whole world. 

“The very foundation of this 
policy was, is, and remains the 
great Lenin principle of peace- 
ful coexistence of states be- 
longing to different social sys- 
tems....” 


THE USE of this term marks 
a revolution in Soviet thought, 


in the 


e By George Sokolsky 


instituted a regime of hunger, 
to do by brutality what Lenin 
hoped to achieve by foreign 
trade and concessions to for- 


_eigners. 


SO NOW, under the leader- 
ship of Nikita Khrushchev, 
there is a reversion to the less 
drastic methods of Lenin. Ex- 
cept for one or two public 
Statements in 1941-42, when 
Great Britain and the United 
States went to the rescue of 
Soviet Russia, Stalin never 
said anything like this: 

“Despite different positions 
on the essence of the problems 
under discussion, the heads of 
government of the United 
States, Britain, and France, 
just as we, showed goodwill 
and a sincere striving to find 
a common language and to 
mark paths for the solution of 
international questions which 
are most significant for the 
cause of general peace and 
security.” 


SO, WE ARE to have an era 
of goodwill, but when one 
hears that a sort of voluntary 
censorship is coming out of 


— —_——— —_ -- 


oe 


Washington to the effect 
that nothing unpleasant is to 
be said about Russia or the 
Russians, true or false, is one 
not to gain the impression that 
we are to be brain-washed? 
And are we not to note that 
the resolution of the U.S.S.R. 
Supreme Soviet explains the 
era of sweetness by the follow- 
ing Soviet victories: 

“This easing of international 
tension was facilitated in the 
first place by the cessation of 
the war in Korea, as well as of 
the military activities in Indo- 
china: the concluding of the 
state treaty with Austria; the 
normalization of relations be- 
tween the U.S.S.R. and Yugo- 
slavia which opened the path 
for developing friendship and 
collaboration between the two 
countries; the successful hold- 
ing of the conference of coun- 
tries of Asia and Africa in 
Bandung; and the visit to the 
USS.R. of Prime Minister 


Nehru of India, as a result of | 
which friendly relations were | 
still further strengthened be- | 


tween the U.S.S.R. and India.” 


‘Coprright 1955 ine 
Features Syndicate Ss, 


and activity which needs to be 
studied and analyzed. The 
phrase used to be “Leninist- 
Stalinist,” Both Lenin and 
Stalin are dead. Stalin is not 
only dead, he is obliterated. 
How is it possible to wipe 
away more than 30 years of 
history? 

We are not only to forget 
history, but the psychology of 
a people over this long period. 
Stalin was a tough guy, but 
was Lenin sweet and gentle? I 
used to see Lenin at the Smol- 
ny Institute in Petrograd in 
1917-18. I sat through the ses- 
sions of the Constituent As- 
sembly which was to give the | 
Russian people a constitution | 
—and I saw Lenin smash that | 
meeting as one smashes 4a | 
glass with his heel, / 

Nevertheless, there is a re-| 
minder of something in the | 
current emphasis on Lenin 


} I 
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One-ef-a-kind cottons including prints, chiffon cham- 
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| 
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em a) feereree ee 
ee <A 


“Sitters are getting awfully independent... the last time 
she said she wouldn't sit with them for a thousand 
dollars... NOW, it’s a | million “gal 


New Hybrid Sorghum 
May Alter U. S. Farming 


Associated Press 

The Agriculture Department |the department's research serv- 
announced yesterday develop-\ice and state experiment sta 
ment of a new hybrid grain|tions in Texas, Kansas, Ne 
sorghum which it said may/braska, and Oklahoma. 
bring major changes in United; The department said the hy- 
States farming. brid seed is being produced 
| The new hybrid, or cross-|this year on a s 1all scale by 
‘bred seed, is expected to be about 100 certified seed-grow- 
‘available in limited quantities|ing farmers and at least one 
for the first time next spring.|commercial seed producer. It 
‘Grain sorghums are used for'said these sources should pro- 
| animal feed and in sume human/| vide enough seed to plant from 
food products. | 40,000 to 100,000 acres next 
| Stating enthusiastically that' year. 
\a “new day is dawning for grain; Like corn, grain sorghum is| 
sorghums,” the department|a@ grass. Unlike corn, it grows’ 
said this may become “the next/ grain at the top where the plant. 
important hybrid farm crop in| has its pollen-bearing tassel.) 
America.” Corn now is the out-|Sorghum is" grown mostly in| 
‘Standing hybrid crop. Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Ne-' 

Yields from the hybrid seed/ braska, Colorado, New Mexico 
‘are expected to run from 20 to and California. 
40 per cent more than those of; Both grain and stalks of sor- 
‘the open-pollinated varieties|\ghum are used for livestock 
now in use. feed. The grain is used in 
| The department said that in}mixed feeds, specially for) 
i\five years, most of the more|poultry. In recent years use 

of sorghum grain in the pro 


‘than 10 million acres now 
planted annually to the open-|duction of such food products | 
as starch and dextrose has been’ 


pollinated varieties may be 
planted with new superior hy-|gaining in importance. 
brids. 

The department said the hy- 
brid sorghums have an impor-| 
tant future on semi-arid lands 
now producing other crops, in- 
cluding corn, on a marginal 
basis. 

The new hybrids have re 
sulted largely from work by 


) 


' 
' 


Colombo Meeting Set 


Reuters 
SINGAPORE, Aug. 30 — The) 
seventh Colombo plan meeting 
will be held here Oct. 17-22, a’ 
government announcement said 
today. , 


orous compe 


‘ing whether the Robinson-Pat- 


keeping prices at an artificially 


Lawyer Sees 
Antitrust 
Acts Conflict 


United Press 
A lawyer for the Empire 
State 


inessmen may be prosecuted 
under the Sherman antitrust 
law for doing what is required 


under the Robinson-Patman 
Act. 

William Simon, counsel for 
the Association of Oil Jobbers 
in New York State, said the 
Robinson-Patman Act is being 
interpreted in such a manner 
as to be “in conflict with the 
basic antitrust philosophy” of 
the Sherman Act and “to de- 
prive the economy of more vig- 
tion.” 

Simon testified before a Sen- 


‘ate Judiciary Antitrust Sub-|’ 


committee which is investigat- 
man law has had the effect of 


high level. 

Simon said the act creates a: 
“rigid price inflexibility” with 
a seller's price to his first cus 


tomer becoming “almost an ir-|7 


for his 


” 


revocable yardstick 


Petroleum Association), 
complained yesterday that bus- 


price to all customers. 

The result, Simon said, is a 
basic conflict with the Sherman) 
anti-trust law which is desigfed | 
to preserve competition 
through a flexible price struc- 
ture. 

“Perhaps the most undesira- 
ble part of the conflict is that 
the Department of Justice pros- 
ecutes people under the Sher- 


man Act for doing what the 
Robinson-Patman Act req«tires, 
he said. | 
Cyrus Austin, counsel for the | 
Ruberoid Co... New York City—/| 
one of the Nation's largest man- 
ufacturers of asphalt roofing 
and siding—joined in calli! 
‘or a clearer definition * @| 
more uniform enforcement v/| 
the “rather vague provisions” | 
f the Robinson-Patman Act. 
The Ruberoid Co. presently is | 
operating under a cease and de- 
sist order issued by the Federal 
Trade Commission ih 1950. The 
order resulted from a complaint 
that Ruberoid had given rrice 
discounts to certain customers 
in the New Orleans area. j 


In Congress 
TODAY 


Senate 
Adjourned until Jan. 4. 
ray Se io—10 a m end 2 
» =m Open. Te continue bavestagasion 
with respect te sdministratieon of Govr- 
a ae progren. 
oom aucu 
Antitres —~ Menepety subcomte — 


ihe Revert Pe 
angere hn 

iene 

Se 


Heere 
Adjourned antil Jan. 3. 
Committees: , 


a 1409 G Street, N. W. 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
— Wednesday, August 31, 1955 15 


Lewis & Thos. Saltz... 1409 G 


As Seen in The New Yorker Magazine 


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and the rejection of Stalin. It | 
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Hearing Set Today on Bus Extension 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERA , 
Today’s|  ,.. | 
aring on the request of PUC to approve an operation charged in Maryland. New pro 
be 


16 Wednesday, August 31, 1955 ees.,. Vienna Sewer Plan £ 
e 
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hh n eer a 10n lowing the formal hid opening of water foes i oe “2 - ean Club, 12°15 p. m., Willard PRS aond yiroreng eo Outbound, "District i 
onday night. wh apital Porge. orge E. C. Ha ] | 
y nig en a shortage threatened to ta Assocation. isis is scheduled to preside. 708 a Peto up to be dis-ite intervene in the nearing. 


Pub 
Mrs. Irene Cole, town clerk @¢velop because of the d D. m.. lington 
. An integration controversy members of the City Fire Com- and treasurer. said Rot vo — okie of Commerce, noon.) Thomas Parran Jr., Subur- 
as arisen in the Los Angeles|mission, contend that ‘the fire contract for the job will be let . “ mipunity Chest—Government unit.| 8M president, has asked the 
Fire Department similar to the|chief has been deliberately|some time next month, prob. Drinker Gulps Sa Company Pioneers. —_—___—_ 
one Ci —— 
. reer | CITY 


When you plan 
to heat with 


one in the District. sidw in integration moves. The ably at the first council > 133 

_ ae ng Lg te. once . oe ooo = wnder-| The bids ranged from a low . es 4 Bmbassr of Japan 8 p.m, May 

wo all-Negro fire stations. No| mine morale ‘an ciency in of $106.798 made by M Chi “ha, ; 

Negro has ever advanced be-|the department. Gass of Merrifield, to a high a SYDNEY. Aes “0 4 ‘coro: nots Mcrfower es © % Me neem, hot water ie 

a pe a og maken Dates ‘ = ra " the National $159,208 by Van Art Construc. Def's court here was told about | ,, Mstitute of "Aiton tmortes Rela. es : or vapor—let us show you hows 
ptain. ‘“sssociation for the Advance- tion Corp. of Erlton, N. J, In. @ man who drank himself to Times ‘Weraly bemantin Hon ttt end , this efficient, compact -boiler™ 

tier. . will do the job better and at! 


BFF aren low pate Eero n> og Pag People began between bidders were Tyson death in two minutes. _ revels ustries § Association, § 
4 R " ® end segragation in Construction Corp. of McLean’ The story was told by Jan ite # nierence on Education j , ; 
September when 16 Negro fire-|the Los Angeles department. and Blackwell! Engineering Co. Stransky, the lucky survivor ot| se. k | > sy Sana se po Co better 
Orchestra dance. North Area Service an Duy & Bryant! stimate with- 9 


men were transferred by Dis-/There have been a few token! Warrenton, Mrs. Cole said. a hard-drinking contest _ be-|ciud. Port Myer va ett : 
t Belveir ‘Gar? SNRs Nos } at out obligation. Call Bryan today! 


trict corny mr onan — “~ gory from the all-Negro’ <A contract for construction tween himself and Victor Ra-|' $2¢,): 
to woven Seehennes prev ~~ 4 stations ie of the town's fourth sewage ban. The contest was held to|2,™. menteomer ES es +. an 
yeas oe exclusively by e igs ngton's Fire Chief Mil- pumping station was awarded see if each man could drink .”™ sake if rain, k, maets * antes | AUTOMATIC 
Critics of the Los Angeles the 16 Negro firemen has struction Corp. on a low bid minutes. Ca! a GAS 
- aang EO ty = OR meee. A $102,321. The contract calls Winner Raban downed his Carter arren | 
p ms aris- also for construction of sani- 20 whiskies in two. minutes.| *ahenananee P a. Aw, - ' BOILERS 
a . Call or Come in for FREE ESTIMATE 


Sutton said the integration last week to the Tyson Con- 20 shots of whisky in 10\5 a trom Sout es ect” 
ol WA 6-1363 tor tikes 
* Capaces of 1985 


department, which includes 


Sutton said four Negro firemen waiter | 

; . | ines. then be *“Mary) 

Countv Aide haye been assigned to the fire’ Mrs. Cole said work is to be. later Raban died The eee pe a mone stare DE 
5 eS le - BRYAN 

. 

Quits After 


‘station at 49th and E. Capitol gin immediately on this project the coroner found. was “acute Shoreham Hote! 
| Plumbing and Heating Center 
37 Years 


wots Sociological Society, Shore. | 
2300 Rhode Island Ave. WE Washington 18, D. C.. HO. 2:7800 
Miss Edna R. Jerman, who 


sts. ‘to serve the Murmuring Pines alcoholic poisoning.” a” 
has worked in the Fairfax Cir- 


cuit Court clerk's office for the 
past 37 years, is retiring today, , ) . 
although she'd like to keep . 
right on working there another 
37 years. “a 
Miss Jerman. 67, has failing 
eyesight and her physician has 
told her she might conserve , 


her eyesight if she retired. 

When she first went to work 
in the clerk's office in 1918, aft- 
er she had been employed in 
2 Washington department 
store, Miss Jerman  partici- 
pated in a busy year: the office 
recorded 1900 deeds. So far this 
year, it has recorded 23,000 
deeds. 

But the busiesf‘time was dur- 
ing prohibition. “They were al- 
ways bringing people in for hav- 
ing stills,” she said. “We hard- 
ly have a case like that any- 
more.” 

She has issued many mar- 
riage licenses, which she con 
siders her happiest chore, and 
her long experience in court 
has made her particularly pop- 
ular with young lawyers. 

She was a steward of the 
Fairfax Methodist Church for 
33 years and taught in the Sun- 
day School for 27 years. 

She hopes to take some trips 
after her retirement. Most of 
her leisure hours will be spent 
in tending her flowers, she 
said. 


Drug Store 
History Given 


i Pe OL ‘gut , = —_— «ie Pe ea On Bee 5 
At Exhibit Bare Be ee Ge ‘ct < "Ohler, OR ee Fee 
eZ 4 ss & $5 3 st 3 es e es ve | » tl af ¥ 4 * x ps Fy Oe ae Le od - ei : z ee % 

A picture history of the drug ee re Wh we ee le RR I RR ON Waa oS my Saag 
store from a 13th century OS salle lle ee % a a, 7 ek: ‘atl Sg MR 2 OB. Rh, eh A 
Islamic pharmacy to a modern) > | iC, ; eo eee ss ere ga 
American drug store has been eRe ee eg Bt 
opened at the Smithsonian 6. HE ag ee 
Institution. Lies Sify 

The exhibit consists of 12 : 
hand<colored reproductions, | 
adapted from originals that are) 
contemporary to the times por- 
trayed. The exhibit is located| 
in the Arts and Industries; 
Buildifig. 

The first drug stores—pri- 
vately owned, but govern- 
mentally supervised—were in 
Bagdad about the middle of the 
8th century. They, unlike their| 
modern counterparts, dealt) 
principally in drugs. | 

Pharmacies following the 
Tslamic pattern sprang up in 
Europe, especially after the 
12th century. Like other 
medieva! shops, the pharmacies 
opened to the street. A large 
shutter that closed off the shop 
at night served as a counter 
when open during the day. 

By the 16th century, the, 
pharmacies had become larger 
and more sheltered from the 
atreet. Equipment became 
more elaborate and drug con-| 
tainers more uniform. Com- 
pared to its European counter. 
part, the earliest interior view 
of a drug store in the United 
States had plain fixtures and 
glassware. 

That, of course, has changed 


Dr. George Urdang, director of . ’ : 
the American Institute of the It's here! The week-end you've been looking forward to! Three 


History of Pharmacy, spon : 
sor of the exhibit. seid that “if glorious days of fun and relaxation... three wondrous days 


there is any unique institution : : 
in the United States of Amer for getting in the Golden Mood! 


fea, which in its entirety has Said 
cee song dl al etn And when you're hot and thirsty, what enjoyment you If 
of the very specific way i inn , ’ ‘ 

which the country has ae i sipping dq cool, frosty glass of Golden- Brewed Gunther! 
settled and has been developed. a , ; Tee Ij ae 

then it ip the American Gras n, Gunther treats your thirst right! It’s lighter, livelier. 
store. more refreshing in flavor . . . yet less filling! One taste will tell 


= | you... Gunther’s the finest beer ever brewed . . . the brightest 

Keep your children, best-tasting beer in town! ' ee 

pets, flowers SAFE with . So stock up with plenty of Golden-Brewed Gunther! Get 
enough for three solid days of Golden Mood. thirst- 


CYCLONE quenching enjoyment! Ask for Gunther by the case, or pick 
’ 


FENCE PX up several six-packs. And when you're near a favorite tavern. 


stop in for an extra treat . . . ice-cold Gunther on tap! 


Sar wre 


a ee 

Davis Highw 
Arlington 2, Virgina 
mm Office Open Saturday Mornirtys 7 


’ 
7 es © 


al 


> 


32 ; : Me " ; ee ‘ So eae WASHINGTON post and TIMES HERALD 
Bonds Delayed Corning Detends. His Program | a * a rt en 


School Superintendentiand speech is available in the + apace the fundamental 
5. . 


Hobart M. Corning yesterday|schools and will be expanded 
this term by the addition of; Corning stated: “I believe 


| ‘defended the educational pro- 
nine special instructors, Corn-|parents .have confidence in 
In Anne Arundel] eet sien 8 rear cates, 
oo “The school administration|cize them it is for the purpose 


His public statement stemmed is not complacent about the ed- of making them better. Prog- 

* ANNAPOLIS, Md., Aug. 30 from publicity over a series of ewe mgs ater of = tm i — is made ge way—and to- 
Se  ohies neal ithis community,” Corning de-|gether we will use all means 
For Virginia | Bpl.)— Anne Arundel County icity wide achievement tests clared. All school departments /at our disposal to provide even 
Commissioners today withheld'conducted last year which from his office down, Corning|more effective education for 


Chil / Ment | approval of a school board pro-|showed the were Washing- | said, plan continued emphasis the children of our community.” 


. 
posal to sell $4 million in con-|ton student falling below) 
struction bonds next January wee ree i al | 


H ospital 10, pending receipt of addi-' of a school program is not what W&L Left $250,000 Philippines to Honor 


tional information about the the average score is in a . 
Fun d Ur e d cokh at tiie eateek eneteanh testing program but what each |For Scholarships Late Senator Taft 
, ; ection. Pupil learns in relation to his} LEXINGTON, Va., Aug. 30; Philippine Minister Raul T. 
: & ve] | __ Specifically, the commission |aiity to learn,” Corning said.|(m—A gift of $250,000 from an tee 

ked Dr. David 8S. Jenkins. | : * Leuterio will make a post- 
- ers asked UT. 8 ». #e aa He said the job of the schools anonymous donor has been re- 

humous presentation of h 

2 ee, Se “’ e superintendent of schools, to BT ened pupll an Sy tele by Washington and Lee countes's Leaion of Be “s 
“thildren's mental hospital was giy jp jtunity to learn in accordance) University. | nor to 
: Sve them an annual pet PUPN) eh his ability and his need.| Dr. Preneia P. Gaines, presi-|th@ late Sen. Robert A. Taft 


seen as the “greatest since ' ‘ 
+“ |cost figure which would reflect|“parents may be assured that dent, said the fund is to be used | 4t 6 p.m. today at the Philip 


need in Virginia today” by Dr.) . 

W: T. Thompson Jr., president the value of school buildings high standards will be main-| principally for scholarships \pine Embassy, 2253 R st. nw. 

of the Virginia Association for|and physical property. In out- tained for the brighter pupils} Known as the Robert E. Lee) The Senator's son, Robert Jr.. 

Mental Health. les Jenkins “hile teachers meet the needs/ scholarships, these grarit, will| will receive the award, given 
lining the program, Dr. Jenkins Peete . 

of all pupils,” Corning said. be among the largest the uni-|for Taft's work in sponsoring 


He spoke at a public hearing! ... ) 
gave the figure of $180 as the) > help teachers do a hetter|versity has to offer, carrying|legislation to provide benefits 


in the State Library before a aad 
legislative subcommittee siudy-|°St of educating each pupil job, Corning said the schools|stipends ranging as high as/for Filipino veterans of World 


ing the facilities for handi-|per year, but said the ficure have organized many special | $1500 a year. 
capped children in Virginia. idid not include the cost of classes so that problem learn- serine 
Dr. Thompson declared that/ schoo! property. (o can get more individual 
pn June 30, 1954, there were 236 elp. pes 
‘Pnuldren in Virginia's mental ool the bend Nave y Sig = Me During the term which starts” Announcing the Return Visit of 
institutions and another 500 to!to finance construction of new SeP*ember 12, Corning said HIS HOLINESS 
—e children outside who! schools and purchase of addi- a will te classes oe 
needed hospitalization. | : inom ies earners in elementary schools. | 
Today's pleas for a cpeciol| cnn a nes, Dr. Jenkins nis i an increase of 13. | SANT KIRPAL SINGH JI MAHARAJ 
hospital for children followed a/pians include aine new elemen-| "e™edial work in reading r | 
recent recommendation by the tary schools. four new high | — res oan hi ounder of 
. ieee 


State Capital Outlay Study/ schools and additions to three ¢ 
Commission that the General! existing buildings RUHANI SAT SANG Don RICHARDS 


Assembly appropriate $770,000; Dr. Jenkins cited from school irituali 
for the pn yy eee . the — population statistics to illus. (Hall of Spirituality) 
stage of such a hospital over the trate the need for more build- Realization of the Kingdom of God | 
next six years. ‘ings. He noted that enrollments : , <..' 4 od N DOUGLAS 

yy a peg last year totalied 29.40 com- Through Py er: —— ¢ H 
Boar aske million for pared to a figure of 14,630 10 Bs ie as ‘ 
a children’s hospital, and some years ago. Theory and Meditation Prepares Vz MORRIE STEGEL 
of its supporters have said the Que fer Isitiation 


reduced amount recommended B ti ' ‘ id . Subj Yer So S; , - P M 
by the Capital Outlay Commis- Bastian to Adaress Sub jective, Let So Simple a . " a ¥ 1 

sion would cheapen construc- «, .. — Child May Accomplish | ei at l . ‘ 
tion and curtail its usefulness. National Bar Group 1 4 | nigh y es 


Today’ | Judge Walter M. Bastian, of You Are Invited to C d | ie 
oday’s hearing was before a udge Walter asuian, © oS Are tom 7 | and stay tuned for top files 


: . : 10 week course sterts 
subcommittee of the Virginia'the United States Court of a : » 91 : 
Advisory Legislative Council) Appeals, will discuss “The Re “a wey | Ya vr Bring Others on “The Late Show” 11:15 P.u. 
which prepares proposed legis-|sponsibility of the Lawyer for SEPTEMBER 1, 2, 3 AND 4, 1955 | 

lation for the General Assem-| Public Service” at a luncheon MEMORY 


bly. The subcommittee is to|meeting of the Natioanal Bar rainin nstituge Evening Talks, 7:30 p.m. | = 
consider all phases of handi-| Association at 12:30 p.m. Thurs Tre C inatit Morning Meditations, 7:30 4.m. | W T © Fr a T Vv 
| Write: 500 Walker Bldg. 4411 Forty-Second &., H.W. | i €-) 
of Broadcast House 


caps—physical and mental—/day at the Willard Hotel | 
but the need for a children’s) The luncheon will open a 734 15th Se, NW, Washington, D. C. 
hospital dominated the morning three-day national convention Phone: EX. 3-0942 


session. of some 500 delegates ————aaaa Il 


a 


2111 Florida Ave., N.W. 


The best deal you can get is 


~ The deal built into a Pontiac! 


_ ape BORE i : sa 
PS RS ME MS Ae OR hee) 
Pe. gett a untae Ses 
5 eee ey _ - — 


“ 
P< 


The Spectacular Star Chief Custom Sedan 


There’s something you ought to know before deal that is built right into the car itself, 

you sign up for a new car—something half a Compare Pontiac’s modest cost with that of. 

million owners of the 55 Pontiac have already any other car combining such fine-car size (124 

learned to their profit. inches of road-leveling wheelbase), such blazing 
You get two big money-saving deals when you horsepower (200* eager ‘“‘horses”) and such 

buy a future-fashioned Pontiac. luxury-car stability —and here’s what you’ll find: 
You get the kind of trade-in allowance you'd That combination anywhere else will cost you 

expect from Pontiac’s volume sales. The biggest hundreds of dollars more! 

year in our history pays off for you in appraisals Get the proof that the big, high-styled, 

that won’t be topped! high-powered Pontiac you really want to 
That’s deal number one—and the second is own is actually your éasiest buy. Come 

even better! We're talking now of, the terrific in ‘and talk trading—right now! 


with ¢-berrel carburetor, an extra-cost option. 


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1437 Irving St. N.W. 407-27 Florida Ave. N.E., Washington 2, D. C. 4221 Connecticut Ave. N.W. 1834 L St. N.W., Washington 7, D. C. 1625-31 Prince St., Alexandria, Va. 
Washington 10, D. C. | Washington 8, D. C. Dealer License No. 38 


H. J. BROWN PONTIAC, INC. McNEIL PONTIAC, Inc. | ' STANDARD, PONTIAC, INC. KING MOTOR CO. _ WILSON PONTIAC, Inc. 


1550 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, Va. 4830 Hampden tane 7125 imore Ave. Diamond Ave. 3 7925 Georgia Avenue 
Dealer License No. 34 Bethesda, Md. College Park, Md. Gaithersburg, Md. Silver Spring, Md. 


_\ } 
o | | f, : 4. ~_v 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
18 W ednesday, August 3!, 1955 ° 


Eee 


~ TOP OCTANE SAY CHIEF 
gives you (2.3 POWER! 


1. 


TOP OCTANE Sky Chief gasvline gives 
you all the knock-free power your engine can 
deliver. It’s the highest octane Sky Chief ever 
— and for a mighty good reason: just in the 

t year Texaco spent more than 75 million 
dollars to increase octanes! You'll feel the 
big and powerful difference mile after mile. 


PETROX in Sky Chief protects as it powers 
your engine! Unlike ordinary additives, Petrox 
is an exclusive petroleum-base element that 
can leave no harmfu! engine deposits. In mil- 
lions of test miles, it lengthened valve life, 
tripled spark plug efficiency, cut ring wear, 
extended engine life up to 60°% ...gave greater 
gasoline mileage. 


100% CLIMATE-CONTROLLED 
Sky Chief is the only premium gasoline that is 
specially blended for the prevailing climate, 
and the altitude, wherever you fill ‘er up in all 
48 states ' So — at any time of the year, any- 
where in the U.S.A. — you are assured maxi- 
mum performance: quicker starts, smoother 
getaways, faster and smoother pick-up. 


Your car, new or old, needs this 1-2-8 
power that only Sky Chief givesyou. Keep 
your tank filled—at your Texaco Dealer, 
the best friend your car has ever had. 


Dont foget- 
chive safely! 
TEXACO 
DEALERS 


in all 48 states °— 


GUREE Wh... TERACO STAR THEATER sterring JIMMY DURANTE er DONALD O'CONNOE on felevisten, Saturday mighty, NEC 


The Gallup Poll 
Majority Favors 
Campaign Limit 


PRINCETON, N. J., Aug. 30 changed to permit corporations 
The typical American voter|and unions to make contribu 


Huge Campaign Likely : mee 
Reds Conscious of Erosion Peril| 


(Dr. W. VY. Lambert, ‘the these problems extensively in attention now to solve the prob- 
dean and director of the Unt- |yarious research centers. | lems which can become worse. 


versity of Nebraska College | the. problem causing them) It appears to me that the 

of Agriculture, ts reporting On. \most trouble is salination, or the Russians will. not really start 

what he saw during a five- |scoumulation of excess salts in|... 

week, 10,000-mile tour of Rus- |the soil. Their research which | Putting their full energies into 

sian farm areas.) appears to be efficient, involves COMbating the problems of 
Ry Dr. W. V. Lambert investigation into such aspects soil erosion until they can 

as soil and water management,|raise production and supply 


would keep unchanged the 
present laws whicl forbid bo 

corporations and unions from) 
making contributions to politi- 


fices. 


the American Institute of Pub- 
lic Opinion, virtually two out 
of every three voters (65 per 
cent) questioned said the laws 
now on the books should not be 
changed. . 

For many years, only corpo- 
rations were forbidden by the 
Federal Corrupt Practices Act 
to make any contributions. 
loans, or gifts to any political’ 
campaign involving a Federal 
office. . 

The Taft-Hartiey Act, passed 
in 1947, carriéd an amendment 
to the Federal Corrupt Prac- 
tices Act that forbade labor 
unions, too, from making such 
contributions 

In a case that is to come be. 

fore the United States Supreme 
Court, a CIO union is challeng- 
ing the act. It claims that the 
restriction is an interference 
with the right of free speech 
|as guaranteed by the Constitu-. 
ition. * 
The CIO unit admits it spent 
money directly from union cof- 
‘fers to aid congressional candi- 
| dates in Michigin in the 1954 
elections. 

To sound out public opinion 
ion the issue, the Institute as 
signed its nationwide corps of 
ireporters to put this question 
ito a carefully selected cross. 
isection of men and women 
‘voters in all walks of life and 
irepresenting all part.es and oc- 
| Cupation groups 


“Present laws forbid ‘orpora- 
trons or wnione frén making 
contributions te electron cam. 
paigns for Federal offices, Do 


you think these laws should he 


In a survey just completed by 


tions to campaigns?” 


(World Coperight T6885. he the 
Internationa; News Service) 


The vote: 


» Yes, should be changed 18% | 
cal campaigns for Federal of-| No. should not ........ 6 | 


Don’t know .. 


Analysis of the survey results| 
reveals two interesting facts. 


One is that rank-and-file GOP | 
voters see virtually eye-to-eye 
with Democrats on the issue, as! 
the following vote shows: 

Rep. Dem. Ind. | 
Yes, changed 17% 18% 18% | 
No, notch’s’'d 69 G2 67 
Don’tknow.. 14 2 15 | 


The other fact is that propor- 
tionately more manual workers 
(21 per cent) would favor 
changing the present laws than 
is true in the case of the busi- 
ness and professional group, of 
which 16 per cent would favor 
the change. ) 

The major occupation group 
least in favor is the nation’s 
farmers, of whom only 10 per, 
cent would go along with 
changing the laws. 

It is interesting also to note 
that, in terms of geographical 
regions of the country, least 
approval of the proposal is 
found in the South, where’ 
about one voter in 10, or 11 per 
cent, thinks the laws should 
be changed. The South has 
long fought unionization of its 
industries. 

Some observers predict that 
if big unionism prevails upon 
the Supreme Court to rule 
that unions can spend any 
amounts they please in politi- 
cal campaigns, big corporations 
will then be able to do the 
same thing and the 1956 cam- 
naign could vet come to he 
known as “the battle of bil- 
lions.” 


fCaorriah! (9°58. American 
Institute of Public Opinica) ' 


128 YEaRre 
OF GREAT WHISKIES 
1830-1999 


~elmncsieaa ——— 


we 


> CLU 


co~™ 
BS 


\ BOURBON ) 


Av Newenen Name Sewe® 
eet ee 


as? 
ad 


| progressing in this field. 


The Russians are far behind) 
the United States when 
comes to soil conservation. | 

For one thing, the Russians) 
are not making very much use 
of terracing and contour farm-| 
ing in the regions visited.' 
These are keystones of the 
American conservation  pro- 
gram and I was surprised not to) 
see them used more in Russia. | 

But don't be misled. The) 
Russians are aware of the im-| 
portance of soil conservation. | 
They are making greater efforts. | 
I expect them to continue 


If the idea ever catches fre.) 
perhaps we may see a Russian 
soil conservation program 
which would dwarf the Amer. 
ican program. 

This would be in line with 
the Russian idea of doing 
everything on a large scale. 


Ditch and Sheet Erosion | 


In the hilly region north of 
Stalingrad, we saw much ero-| 
sion, some of it rather severe. | 
There were two types, ditch 
and sheet erosion. ) 

In the Tashkent and Alma) 
Ata (central Asia) regions, we! 
saw more erosion in the hills. 
Since this region varies from, 
desert to semi-desert, proper’ 
grazing control would be one: 
of the most effective means of 
halting erosion here. 

I am certain the state con. 
trolled collective farms will 
be able to handle this prob 
lem adequately. 

In the irrigated section of 
Central Asia, we also noticed 
some erosion. But the Rus- 
sians are well aware of these 
problems on their irrigated 
land. They are investigating 


, ae < 


— oo 


drainage and the use of chemi-|more food, particularly meat, 
cals to reclaim areas already than they are now doing. 
oversalted. | When they have achieved 

But all of these efforts, in my that goal, then they will be able 
judgment, need to be increased.' to devote more time and money 
They are not devoting enough to fighting erosion. 


—— 


FARM BUREAU 
INSURANCE IS CHANGING 
ITS NAME TO “NATIONWIDE” 
WHAT'S THE TRICK 

BEHIND THAT? 


NO TRICK AT ALL. PEOPLE 
IN STATES WHERE FARM 
BUREAU DOESN'T OPERATE 
WANT TO JOIN US. TO 
ANOIO CONFUSION WITH 
COMPANIES IN OTHER STATES, 
WE NEEDED A NEW NAME. 


on Se ptember lst the mame 


Farm Bureau Insurance of Ohio 


4t@y ; 
? "te ull change lo... 


ATIONWIDE 


MATION WIOE MUTUAL (*BUBANCE COMPANY 
BATIONWIORn MUTUAL FIFE 'HOURANCE company 
MATIONWIOE LIFE 'WEURANCE COMPANY 

HOME OFFICE: COLUMBUS. OHIO 


—— 


The Bellows partners chose this as 


BELLOWS 
carer I CLOB BOURBON 


, 
\ Niven, 
‘ ee ed 


£ 
Terme anlnalas foagan wax vhmet 


LLows a COMPANT 


You just canno 


t buy a better-tasting 


straight Kentucky whiskey than 
Bellows Club Bourbon. Enjoy its hearty 
flavor and light-bodied character 


—at home or at 


your favorite tavern. 


Orly the belt td labled BELLO : 


BELLOWS & COMPANY, BALTWADRE, MARYLAND — Q°ISION OF AATIONAL DUSTILLERS PROBUCTS CORP. - CLUB GOURBON, STRAIGHT BOURBON WHISKEY + 06 PROOF 


A 


PICTURE PAGE 
AMUSEMENTS 
FINANCIAL | 


rae: 


aac GH Life 


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 31, 1955 


19 


: agent MAAR AY RAE AD ESS, ARS Se Oe 
ek A Rake OPE Oe Se eee re me A Be bk ork, 
cee wae. eae Sree ek al oy “ 


Ban on Strike Right 
For U. 5. Employes 
Called “Iil-Advised” 


The law which denies Federal 
employes the. right to strike 
“has proved ill-advised and un- 
workabic,” a committee of the 
American Bar Association has 
concluded. 


In a thought-provoking docu- | 
ment, the ABA’s Committee on 
Labor Relations of Govern-| 
mental Employes also reported: | 

® That Government, the larg-| 
est single employer of labor. | 
has failed in many instances to. 
practice what it compels indus- 
try to do; 

® That public employes have 
an “inherent and justifiable 
right to organize among them- | 
Seives to serve their own best 
interests and welfare”: | 

®That effective machinery) 
for handling grievances needs| 


: 


\ 


) 
3d of River 
Is Sewage 


In Dry Spell 


: TV Series Sees 
Area-Wide Plan 
Badly Needed in 
Fight on Pollution 


By Richard L. Lyons 

Staff Reporter 

During the driest season 

of an average year, one-third 

of the flow of the Potomac 

River below the Anacostia is 
pure sewage. 

This easy-to-grasp description 

of a problem most Washington 

area residents are vaguely 


aware of was dredged up by a. 
television team researching a 
series on Potomac pollution | 
problems. “The first ‘of three | 
weekly film programs called 
“Our Beautiful Potomac—Prog-| 
ress Report” was presented on 
Station WRC-TV last night. It 


Internationa! News 


Rebert Rey Elam (left), accused of fatally shooting his 
brother in a tavern near Laurel, Md.. is shown in custody 


Alexandria 
Authority 
Held Legal 
Water Agent 


Mayor Bendheim 
Finds New Group 


Isn’t Necessary to 
Operate City Setup 


The Alexandria Sanitation 
Authority would be legally 
able to operate a city-pur- 
ichased water company, it 
was revealed yesterday. 

The statement was made by 
Mayor Leroy Bendheim after 
a joint mee..ng Monday eve- 
ning of the City Council and 
the Sanitation Authority to ex- 
‘plore findings of the recent 
‘city water survey. The report 
“recommended” operation of a 
city waterworks by an Author- 
ity. 

According te Mayor Bend- 


to be provided to insure em-| 
ployes that public management 
is concerned with their just: 
complaints, and | 


was a follow-up on @n award- 
winning series produced by the 
station last summer. 


heim, it would be unnecessary 
for the city to establish a new 
‘water organization, in the 
levent it should buy facili- 
ities of the Alexand Water 


of Trooper Rebert E. Kuhns yesterday. 


Self-Defense Stery Checked 


® That public employes should 
not be expected to make any) 
“non-essential sacrifices in their) 
conditions of employment be-) 
cause they chose the public 
service rather than the private 
sector of the economy as the 
scene of their labors.” 

The report was prepared by 
a 10-man subcommitiece on la- 
bor law headed by H. Eliot Kap- 
lan, a New York state govern- 
ment official and a leading au-: 
thority on Civil Service. Kaplan 
also was chairman of the com. 
mittee which proposed coordi. 
nation of the Civil Service re. 
tirement system with Social Se- 
eurity’s Old-Age and Survivors 
a. 8 plan which has the 

t of the Administra. 
tion. . 

Serving with Kaplan were - 
Paul M. Herzog, former Chair- 
man of the National Labor Re. 
lations Board: Norman Bierman 
of St. Louis, John P. Curran of 
Boston, Paul F. Douglass of 
Cincinnati, Frederick R. Liv- 
ingston of New York, Robert 
D, MeCabe of New York, Cyrus 
C. Perry of Washington, Alvin 
B. Rubin of Baton Rouge and 
Harvey Walker of Worthington, ' 
Ohio. 


~ 


> 


INP Photo br Al Mute 


Debt of Gratitude 


for help given flood victims in East Pakis- 
tan last year. In the photo, from left, are 
Barbara Epstein of the Red Cross, Saghir 
Zaioi (on table), Mansur Ahmeo, Chrishti 
liahi and Mehammed Khan. 


Pakistan Pays a 


Responding to an appeal by Syed Amjad 
All, Ambassador of Pakistan, members of 
the nation’s Embassy staff here gave bleod 
for Northeast fleed victims. The mass do- 
nation was arranged te repay Americans 


ee 


' 
: 


| 


ee 


_ ' 


Bov Savs He Seine Along With Court 


StoleGunto D.C. Feels I ntegration 
Shoot Chum Works, Study Shows 


Got Weapon After 


One of the last acts of the 
recent Congress was to approve 
unanimously a bill which the 
President has signed to make it 
iegal for a Federal employe) 

strike . 


By Eve Edstrom 
Gambling Quarrel, Bial! Reporter 


: | Washingtonians believe inte-\or into a continued feeling that 
Juveuite Court Told Ca an omhtion’s Capital desegregation connet werk 
A toy, about 15, was com- ;, “going well,” the Society 10T | ane RR. Seomtaintion 

The influential ABA commit-/mitted to the National Train | ne Study of Social Problems 'nas worked.” 

ave its opinion, that the! img hoof yesterday after he told vesterday In their sampling of the stu- 
a ke restrictions “are not admitted im Juvenile Court that ¥#5 ‘o/c ye abet. ent  steiieten’ thd Senaneehene 
satisfactory approaches to soly- he had utlawfully entered a This was a conclusion drawn found that “nothing specific” 
ing the problems of manage-|sporting goods store and had from preliminary research of| seemed 
ment-employe relations in Gov-| taken a rifle on July 9. Robert. TjBower of American strike and that “students par- 
e nt.” Its report continued: _A court ker told sett oniversi 4 Seery Walker /GUeipated mostly because other 

lation attempting to Nadine Gallagher, substituting | ; ) students were in it.” 

outlaw strikes of public em. for Judge Edith Coekrill, that of Howard University. | ) A second repert on Washin 
ployes has proved ill-advised the boy, Who had been gam-| They foynd that prejudicial). integration scene will 
and unworkable. Solution of the bling, said he intended to use ,iiitudes against integration be given by Walker Thursday 
problem rests on sound admin-|the weapon against his gam us come up against) morning. He also will tell about 
istrative policies and proce. dling partner, another youth | Plans for future research, to be 
dures rather than restrictive with whom he quarreied. other basic values—a@ respect) pied out under a National 
statutes. The consequences of In other cases, Judge Galla- for law and for democratic iM-\jnstitute of Mental Health 
individual er collective action ger committed two boys to the | stitutions.” grant. 
in declining to perform services National Training School on ‘Therefore, the professors ‘The Society for the Study of 
must depend on the nature and separate charges. Both boys noted that although “Washing: Sociai Problems, along with the 
justification of the action, its have been known to the court tonians were and still are American Sociological Society 
cause and other surrounding Previously. against the Supreme Court de- and International Sociological 


' 


‘Finley, “is a 


-| lem. 


to. have sstarted the 


Producer and narrator Stuart 
Finley and his team worked 
with the United States Public 
Health Service, Interstate Com- 
mission on the Potomac Hiver 
| Basin and local agencies in pre- 
|paring the series. 
| Their conclusion was that the 
/Potomac as it passes Washing- 
iton is filthier this year Lhan last 
and is almost certain to get 
worse for several years before 
|anti-pollution programs can re- 
iverse the trend. 
| Finley reported continuing 
progress on various Washing- 
ton area anti-pollution projects | 
jand some new steps since last 
year’s series—notably Alexan-| 
dria’s action to start building 
an effective treatment plant.| 
| But he doubted that Potomac 
pollution can be conquered 
/until this area gets together on 
a comprehensive plan. 


“The thing missing,” 


said 
long-range plan 
that is bigger than the prob- 
Each community now 
moves independently in a dif- 
ferent direction. The interstate 
commission sets standards but 
has no authority, and no one 
lives up to them. The need 
is for leadership and enforce-| 
able anti-pollution standards.” 
| Without coordinated iong- 
jrange planning, Finley said, 
jthe danger is that population 
growth and other factors will 
ieancel out benefits of snulti- 
|milliondollar projects now 
under construction. 

Finley's group aiso found 
new problems created in the 
last year—notably plans for a 
McLean Heights sewage treat-| 
ment plant in northern Fairfax 
County. He said the problem 
‘is that treated, but still! 
polluted, sewage would drain 
from the plant down Scott Run 
‘to the Potomac above _Littie 
Falls. where the District is 


spending millions ta build a sec-! 


ond source of drinking water. 
“The Public Health Service 
is alarmed.” said Finley, “that! 


Brother Slayer Released 
In Bail at Writ Hearing 


Robert Roy Elam, 57, accused 
of slaying his brother, Sam 
Elam, 52, in a gun battle at the 
Oakcrest Inn in Laurel on Mon- 
day. was released on $3500 
bond yesterday after a habeas 
corpus hearing in Upper Mar!.- 
boro Circuit Court. 

Judge John R. Fletcher set 
the bond recommended by 
State’s Attorney Blair H. Smith 
after the prosecutor said police 
investigators had been unable 
to find physical evidence to ver- 
ify Robert's story that his 
brother fired the first shot. 

Police said they found under 
Sam's body a pistol made up 
of a 38-<caliber barrel on a 45- 
caliber frame. 

“Our evidence to date is that 
the 38<aliber revolver Sam 
is supposed to have used was 
never fired.” Smith said in 
court 

Smith said Robert told police. 
that Sam, the proprietor of the 
Oakcrest Inn, picked up the 38; Samuel De Blaisis, who repre- 
pistol after the brothers argued sented Robert at the court hear- 
over who was to pay for the ing, said he has requested a 
next drink. preliminary hearing in the case. 

“He told me he wasn't going) The hearing will be held Sept. 
to buy me any more drinks, and 19 in Police Court at Mariboro. 
if I didn’t stop bothering him Mariboro. 
he would shoot me,” Robert De Biaisis told the court Rob- 
told reporters yesterday. ert moved to Baltimore from 

Smith told the court the ac- San Antonio, Tex., four months 
cused man took out his own ago, intending to make his home 
pistol and told his brother: in Maryland. He pointed out 
“Sam, you'de better put that'that Robert is an ‘heir 
down or I'm going to have to'his brother's 
drop you.” estate.” 


Robert's story, according to 
Smith, is that his brother fired 
two shots at him, one of which 
struck a pickle jar near his 
head. 

He said he retaliated by [fir- 
ing once at the pistol held by 
his brother and then the fatal 
shot which struck his brother 
in the head. 


But Smith said police so far 
have n unable to find any 
expended 38 caliber cartridges 
or slugs at the scene. He said 
the pistol has been sent to the 
Federal Bureau of Investiga- 
tion for ballistics tests and to 
determine whether it had been 
fired. 

Maryland State Trooper 1/c 
Robert Kuhns said police are 
seeking a woman seen earlier 
with the two brothers in a gro- 
cery store in Laurel who may 
have been a witness to the shoot- 
ing. 


- 
> 


Rep. Taber’s 


Son Injured 


Pact Signed 


TTT e_—_—_—_—_—_-— 


Mrs. Haynes 


Acts to Drop 


“rather sizeable °! ! 


circumstances, and the merits| One of the boys, 15 years old, cision,” they have not support-| Association, will meet here 
admitted he had stolen a pair ed any move to halt integration. 
of hose from a local department These conclusions were 
store. A court workers’ report based on a survey of Washing 
stated that he had been in and ton attitudes and a small sam 
out of the Industrial Home pling of students involved in 
School since 1952 on attempted!ihe schoo] walkout which oc- 
housebreaking, yoke robbery curfed last October in protest 
and. petty larceny charges. against desegregation. 

The jury found a 17-year-old, The attitude surveys were con- 
youth “involved” in a $50 purse- ducted just after the Supreme 
snatching at a District bus stop Court ruled against segre- 
on June 17, and he was released gation and, again, at the end 
in custody of his mother pend-'of the school year. 
ing disposition of the case The later survey showed opin- 
Sept. 14. ion on the Supreme Court 

Two charges of unlawful decision “had changed only 
entry and attempted unlawful very slightly in a favorable 
entry against a 16-year-old boy direction.” 
were nolle prossed after three But a considerable propor- 
youths, who, police said, previ tion of those who disapproved 
ously implicated the boy, re .¢ the Supreme Court decision 
fused to testify against him. also disapproved of the student 
strike. 
| The largest number of those 
questioned agreed that “there 
‘can be no excuse for children) 
to act that way under any cir- 
cumstances.” 

Furthermore, when asked 
how desegregation was working 


of the controversy involved in 
each case.” 

The committee came out 
strongly for the right of pub- 
lic employes to organize and 
added that they should have 
the right to “affiliate with 
any outside organizations in 
either the public or private 
field, except in such rare cases 
where the -protection of the 
public interest imperatively 
dictates nonaffiliation with 
outside labor unions.” The re- 
port explained: 

“It might be of questionable 
desirability that policemen. 
firemen, or prison guards. for 
example, should be encour- 
aged to affiliate with outside 
industrial labor unions where 
there might be conflict of in- 
terests and loyalties. But even 
im these areas of employment 
restrictions are justifiable 
only where it clearly appears 
that the public interest im.- 
peratively demands limita- 
tion.” ge: 

The committee said it is the 
responsibility of the Govern-| 
ment to provide its employes 
with satisfactory working con- 
ditions. Its report said in part: | 

"Government which denies 
to its employes the right to: 
strike against the people, no 
matter how just might be the 
grievances, owes to its public 
seryants an obligation to pro- 
vide working conditions and 
standards of management-em- 
ploye relationships which 
would make unnecessary and 
unwarranted any. need for 
such employes to resort to 
stoppage of public business...” 


but vacation was 
fun, thanks te 


j +. States illegally. The Maryland 


“ 
2 * My 


rae a, 
5 Se ae a 2:5. alta Nanas ty eae 
= t $ - > 
410 13th St. H.W. Wat F&O) 
\ - a " - 4 x oe y, 
se a» ¥ 


Four Boys Charged 
With Petty Larceny 


’ Four boys—two 10, one 11) 
and the other 12—have been 
charged with petty larceny) 
from an mito and pocketbook 
snatching, police reported yes 
terday. 

The investigators said 
larceny occurred Monday ry 
A FB i andl a and oo eee that opposition to de- 
volved several items. The 11-(Segregation, as expressed on 
year-old was arrested, they said, (the Supreme Court question, 
by a policeman who spotted the professors stated, “is not 
him searching the area where 


necessarily translated into the 
the loot had been cached. icondoning .of extra-legal pro 
The other suspects were 


portion of answers fell in the) 
the well” and “fairly well” cate- 
gories. 

“ .. The conclusion seems 


Sociologists Ponder 


a treatment plant above a water 
intake has been accepted every- 
one wil) want to do it.” 

The District Commissioners 
have opposed the McLean 


through Friday at the Shore- 
ham Hotel. 


“once the principle of wallaing| In Car Crash 


Charies Taber, 35, aide and 


Support Suit 
ined y aid son of Rep. John Taber (K- 


in Washington, the largest pro-' 


Mrs Kathari . N. Y.), was injured early yes- 
arine Ane Haynes, terday when his car crashed 


into a parked auto on Coles- 


Heights project. It is stil) await-| 
ing final Virginia State Water|indicted Aug. 8 on charges 
Control Board approval. The of killing her husband's 19-year- vijie rd. in Silver Spring. 

Commissioners dont think this 5iq mistress, yesterday an- Police said the driver of the 


one small plant would cause ‘adi 
nounced through her lawyers 1955 Cadillac convertible was 
trouble. But they fear it would Francis J. O'Connell, 35, who 


set a precedent for future con- “at she will seek dismissal of °°‘ , 

struction that could foul the the nonsupport suit she filed listed no occupation and no 

city's water supply beyond re- inst H fixed address. O'Connell was 
ir. : — eee: jailed in Silver Spring pending 


pair 
Washington now takes Its Frank Morgan of Arlington, a hearing Sept. 13 on 


water from the river at Great . 
Falls above Scott Run. By the) We are going to ask for dis- 49d having no driver's permit. 
time it reaches Great Falls the missal because he has complied|, T@>er, who lives with his 
river has pretty well err, with all our requests and has awit Aye greg en rnewe 
itself of upstream pollution, . : st. f., Was r 
Finley said. ieee ts here ie” Mert when he was thrown from the 
Another pbdilution problem, | vai} i Pischke of Falis °2" Dy the impact, police said. 
mittee, who spoke to the Society | but not a new one, is caused |Church, representing Willis ute was treated at Washington 
for the Study of Social Prob-|by the District's combination |Haynes, announced yesterday Sanitarium for bruises and 
lems at the Shoreham Hotel,|sewer system, Finley said. This\that an agreement had been #>rasions and released. 
At a provocative opening ses-|old system 


White House ‘Snub’ 


Social scientists yesterday 
were asked whether their con- 
tributions to the delinquency 
prevention field were “so mea- 
ger” that they didn't rate a 
place at President Eisenhower's 
breakfast table when delinquen- 
cy combat methods were dis- 
cussed. 

This question was posed by 
Richard Clendenen, former ex- 
evutive director of the Senate 
Juvenile Delinquency Subc6m- 


carries both sani-|signed calling for Haynes to 
sion of a four-day meeting here,|tary sewage and storm water.|donate nearly 50 percent of his 
Clendenen noted that when the|In theory, it carries sewage to|Income to his wife. 
President recently held a break-|the Blue Plains treatment plant; Mrs. Haynes is 
fast session to discuss delin-|in dry weather. During a rain|jbond awaiting trial | 
quency prevention and lack ofj\it dumps storm water and | charge of murdering Nancy jentering Colesville rd.,_side- 
physical fitness among youth, |s¢wage directly into the river| Penton early on July 19 at the| swiped a tree and crashed into 
he invited “athletes and sports;Where the increased flow is/attractive girl's apartment atthe rear of a car parked in 
writers.” \supposed to carry it away in 4/232 11th st. ne. Police reported front of 8803 Colesville rd. 
Clendenen suggested that hurry. : ste stopped her husbznd as Police estimated the damage 
maybe the reason the psycholo-| The trouble is that partsi\he left the apartment andito the Cadillac at $1000 and 
gists, psychiatrists, social work- | of the overloaded system dis-'forced him to return with her.'to the parked car at $200. 
ers and sociologists were not charge sewage into the river 
invited was that they have|im dry weather. One discharge 
failed to make known what they | point near the Watergate is a 
can offer in the way of help to | notable offender The District 
wayward youth ‘has no present plans to replace 
? the old system 


Calvert Heil reported they 
spotted the speeding vehicle on 


a 


a 


’ 
| 


tests, like the student strike, 
rounded up quickly, detectives, + 
said, and subsequently told of| 


a purse snatching Aug. 23 in , © Police 
the 1500 block Ogden st. nw /Paeans fo 


Finley criticized Arlington 
'County as the “only cémmunity 
tin the area that does not con- 
itemplate a. secondary treat- 


harge?. 
representing Mrs. Haynes, said of speeding, passing a stop sign|#™4 possible control of 


Police Pvt. George Athey and | 
jSeesatiene 
on $5000 Spring st. about 2:30 a. m. They 

on the said it went out of control after | 
County P-TA 
Mrs. Barbara Riches, a house- 


| member 


Co. He explained enabling 
legislation, the Virginia Water 
and Sewer Authorities Act, alk 
ready had empowered the sani- 
tation group to operate such & 
function. 

The conferees reached no 
decision concerning the pur 
chase of the Alexandria Water 
Co 

However, they directed Coun- 
cilman Frank E. Mann to take 
the water question before the 
Northern Virginia Regional 
Planning ana Redevelopment 
Commission for study on an 
area-wide basis. 

Engineering consultants who 
prepared the recent water re- 
port also atiended the session 
and repeated that “it would be 
economically sound” for the 
city to buy the Alexandria 
Water Co. at a price of $8.9 
million financed by 40-year 3 
per cent revenue bonds, They 
emphasized, however, that 
“the city would find it neces 
sary to increase existing water 
rates” if the purchase were fi- 
nanced on shorter term 2> 
year bonds. 


Cox Calls 
Schools Big 


Issue in Vote 


The chairman ofthe Arling- 
ton School Board yesterday 
told the teachers that they will 
hear criticism of their schools 
in the coming election because 
education cannot be kept out 
ocal politics. 

Warren Cox said, “The crit- 
icism will be directed at me 
‘and at the other members of 
‘the School Board and at Mr. 
Rutter, our superintendent of 
ischools, but it will not be di- 
‘rected at you.” 

Cox told 850 teachers assem- 
bled at Washington-Lee High 
School that they would hear 
arguments over grading of 
pupils, teaching reading, and 
other school problems during 
the campaign for the three 
School Board vacancies. 

“You may be led to believe 
that you are not qualified to 
express an opinion on the sub- 
ject in spite of the fact that 
you have spent a large time 
studying them,” Cox said. “But 
you will find that Arlington 


people will support you in ways 
that few communities will su 
/port their teachers.” 


Pp 
The campaign for the seats 
the 
five-man board will be fought 
between the nominees of the 
Arlington School Board Nomi- 
nating Conventicn and those 
of the Arlington Independent 
Movement. 

The candidates selected at 
the June 9 convention of some 
550 representatives of Parent- 
Teacher Associations, civic as- 
ions and other county 
organizations are Barnard Joy, 
an incumbent, James E. Stoc- 
keard, former president of the 
Council, and 


wife. 

The AIM candidates, chosen 
in July by. the nominating 
committee of the group, are 
Willis F, Kern, a real estate 
operator, Susan Waldo O'Hara, 
a former teacher, and Dr. L. 
H. Blevins, an Arlington den- 
tist. Kern has said he is a 
of the Defenders of 
State Sovereignty and Indivi- 
dual Liberties, a pro-segrega- 
tion group with -headquarters 
in Richmond. 


‘The loot in that case, police 
said, included $3. 

Detectives also reported the 
arrest of a 16-year-old escapee 
from the National 
School, and said he was charged 
in six housebreakings. 


Jail Ends Fling 
In Hyattsville 


Murray Relays Praise 


Training | 


Of Leaders to His Force 
| 


iray 
\force th 
er 


Police Chief Robert V. Mur-/ind@fWidual citizens of the Cap- 
has advised members of the ital. A spokesman said letters 
at President Eisenhow- still continue to flow in from 
members of Congress groups and firms, including one 
° and” 100: District organizations|from Gen, Charles L. Bolte, 
| BALTIMORE, Aug. 30 ve written him praising the| USA (ret.), special assistant to 
| David K. Stewart, 24-year-old Renartment for the work it did | the board.chairman of ACF In- 
construction worker from Ca quring the course of the transit dustries. . 
ada, started on a fling at Hyatt}- strike. Washington's : three daily 
ville, Md., last Friday night\eta | In a letter which he directed newspapers will present a 
it landed bim today im the Balti-| 41; commanding officers to read | 
more City Jail for 60 days. ‘to their men, Murray said the|force in October in formal 
Apparently even that will not|jetiers commended the force|thanks for its strike-period 
be the end of his road, however.| not only for its efficient traffic duties. The newspapers are act- 
Federal authorities have filed|pandiing work, but for the|ing at the instance of the citi- 
a detainer against him on/“pleasant, willing and cheerful|zens of the District, who have 
charges he entered the United|-onduct” of the men during! suggested in hundreds of tele- 
the period of the emergency. (phone calls and letters that 
Chief Harold Stewart, of the such a tribute be ge ony 
Park Police, disclosed, mean-| All groups in the city are 
while, that he has received ap-|urged to adopt resolutions of 
proximately. 35 letters—includ-|thanks to the force, and mail 
jng one from the President—| them to Chief Murray at head- 
thanking the Park force for the quarters, 300 Indiana ave., nw. 
job it did during the strike. (Copies of the resolutions will 
In addition to the communi-|be presented formally to the 
cations Murray cited in his let-|force at the plaque-award cere- 
ter to force, his office mony, the date of which has not 
rece scores of letters from uss Yess 


plaque to the -Metropolitan 


State Police have a motor ve- 
hicle theft charge against him. 

A Baltimore Police cruiser 
forced Stewart to the curb early 
Saturday morning after a chase 
through the east part of the 
city at 60 and 75 miles an hour. 

Police said the new sedan he 
was driving had been stolen 
from ‘in front of a dealer's show-| 
reog in Riverdale, Md. |. 


\ 
i 


- — 


FTC Crackdown 
ment plant. Its primary tr 


TV Firm Here Accused 
saimne ates Of False Repair Claims 


; , t owin 
ee ae rl saa Maa sails | The Federal Trade Commis-jare taken to the shop despite 
Run to the river is foul,” he | Sion has charged the Mayflower | advertising claims that “nine 
said. ‘Television Co., Inc., 1150 17th | times out of ten” a set can be 

The District is the biggest St. nw., with making false claims| repaired in the home. 
single contributor to river pol-| about its television repair serv-| © Home repair is discouraged | 
lution. It is going through the | ice. because servicemen receive com- 
lengthy, expensive business of| The FTC complaint said the) missions for sets brought to the 
building secondary treatment/localfirm has been misleading | Workshop. 
facilities which should be inithe public in its advertising, *Servicemen have replaced 

artial operation in two years\about costs, services, qualifica- parts not needed and have 
and in full operation by 1960,\tions of repairman, and how charged service costs despite 
This means that in five years many sets can be repaired in claims that only needed parts 
‘the city should be able to re-|the home. will be replaced without a serv- 
‘move about 80, rather than 35; In typical advertising, the|ice charge. | 
per cent of the pollution from|complaint charges, the company | Raymond H. Bente, president- 
its sewage. will offer to send a serviceman, treasurer of Mayflower, said he 

The District and the Wash-|“each a specialist for a different) has catuioned announcers who 
ington Suburban Sanitary Com-| make,” to the home “to fix your|get a “little extreme . - » in 
mission signed an agreement/TV, set for only $1.50 service; bending over to get leads” for 
last year to try to clean up the| charge.” television repairs. 

Anacostia River by piping more; The facts, the FTC says, are We do go out for a $1 or) 
of nearby Maryland's sewage) these: $1.50 Service charge 3 to the 
to Blue Plains. The connecting) ® Servicemen are not special-| home,” Bente added. “Service- 
links are under corstruction. [ists and have only a “limited|men do only two things in the 

Once the area starts winning | knowledge” of ‘TV repair. home, either install tubes or 
the pollution fight, it will still; © The service charge in most adjust the set. If they take the 
take years, jo get anything re-|instances is far in excess of the |set to the shop, they give an 
sembling a Clean Potomac, Fin-|$1.50 advertised. This amount/estimate «absolutely free and 
ley said. One of the problems,|applies only when repairs are will return it without charge. 
he said, would be to clean the|made in the home, while many; Mayflower has 30 days to file 
river floor which is covered by|sets are taken to the shop with an answer to the FTC com, 
a layer of solid sewage several |a boost in service costs. plaint. A hearing is scheduled’ 
feet se la ° “In - ed instances,” sets! Oct. 4 


L 


@ Snap-Back Alu- 
minum Slats 
@ Long-Wear Nylon 
Cords | 
@ Wipe-off Plastic 


ape 
May We Call & Estimate? 
8 A.M, to 9 P.M. 


* Feee Customer P 
THE SHADE 
and Affiliated Products 
2214 M St. NW. 
6262 


RE. 7 
Serving ee 
Builders Ower 53 Years | 


— 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
20 Wednesday, August 31, 1955 — 


E. Lansing Ray Dies; 
St. Louis Publisher 


RYE BEACH, N. H., Aug. et member of the board of diree-/but he later returned to his 


‘—E. Lansing Ray, editor and 


tors of the Associated Press for desk..He had been editor of the 


publisher of the St. Louis 29 years, sold the St. Louis newspaper for 36 years. 


Globe - Democrat, died 
pectedly at his .. 
late today, his 
Tist birthday. 

Death was 
caused by a 
heart attack. 

For 52 years 
one of the 
newspaper's 
main 

he 


was opening ™*. Ray 


nis at a family pers. The Ray family had con- 

me pw RE of feey.|trolled the Globe-Democr at for 

weak, he retired to his bed. three generations prior to the 
room. A physician was called sale. 

h quickly ebbed. 

Mr. Ray, who had served as and underwent an operation 


but his stren 


Globe-Democrat to S. I. New-|_ An only son, E. Lansing Ray 


house of New York last March. Jr. died 

He began his birthday anni- rhage in 1946 at the age of 35. 
versary today by reading his He was assistant publisher and 
morning mail, He told members secretary of the Globe-Demo- 
of his household he was “feel-|crat at the time. Mr. Ray said 


fling fine” and looking forward at the time he sold his stock in 


birthd in the aft- the newspaper that it had been 
sdk ' borate his hope that his son would suc- 
Mr. Ray continued as publish. 


ceed him. 
er, editor and chairman of the| A native of St. Louis, Mr. 
board of the Globe-Democrat Ray went to work in the busi- 
his stock interest ness office of the Globe-Demvu- 
per to Newhouse,|crat at the age of 18. 

Mr. Ray worked in almost 
‘every department of the nevs- 
paper, becoming cashier in 
1904 and adve manager 
the following year. By 1916 he 
was vice president. Two years 
later he became president. 


after seil 
in the 
‘the owner of 10 other newspa- 


He had been ill last spring 


HOME 


SKILL ‘shor 
V4" Drill 


a Model 535 4" 
Skill Drill 
$19.95 Value 


Orders Accepted 


To the first 25 persons purchasing the fabulous 
Y horsepower “AMF DeWalt Power Shop” 


From us. either at our store (1208 Wisc. Ave..N.W.) or at 


THE FAIRFAX AGRICULTURAL & MECHANICAL FAIR 


Come to the fair and see AMF DeWalt and Stanley 


Annandale, Va. 
Through September 3rd. 


Power Tools in action. 


of a cerebral hemor-| 


taught three generations of 
‘some Washington area families 


W. T. Weaver & Sons, Inc. 


~ 


By Douglas Chevalier Staff Photographer 


Funeral for Embassy Aide 


Soldiers from Fort McNair carry the bedy of Capt. Majed 
Kabbani, Assistant Military Attache of the Syrian Embassy, 


from the Islamie Center of 
Massachusetts ave. yesterday. 


the Washington Mosque on 
Lined along the sidewalk are 


Military Attaches of the Syrian Embassy and other Embas- 


sies here. Capt. Kabbani, 
Reed Hospital Saturday. 
for burial. 


- 


died of leukemia at Walter 
body will be flown to Syria 


William Beall, 
Piano Teacher 


For 50 Years | 


Funeral services will be held 
Thursday at 2:30 p. m. for Wil- 
liam A. Beall, piano teacher to 
Ww ton children for more 
than years, «. » 
who died Mon- 
day. 

The services 
will be held at 
the Lee funeral 
home, with 
burial at Cedar 
Hill cemetery. 

Mr. Beall, 72, 
died in his 
sleep ofa gee 
ailment at his 
apartment, 816 Mr. Beall 
E st. ne. He had been in failing 
health and semi-retirement for 
about three years. 

At the time of his death Mr. 


Beall had cut down to only 
one pupil. But in his younger) 
days he sometimes had more | 
than 100 taking lessons at the) 
same time, his family said. He 


to play the piano. 
Relatives said he was noted 
for his student recitals where 
performed simulta- 

neously on eight pianos. He 
composed a few publishe 


p 
almost exclusively to teaching) 


pupils. ) 

Mr. Beall was born in Prince 
Georges County but lived most 
of his life in the District. Dur- 


Veterinarian 


Beechwood 
Rites Set 
Here Today — 


Funeral services for C. Theo- 


dore Beechwood, 59, veteri-| 
’ |Methodist Church, Dr. H is | 
narian with the International | survived urch, Dr. Hess is! 


Coope ration Administration, | wife, by a sister, Jesse M. Hess | O1esenge. oer. agin foaiy < © 
will be held today at Arlington | Of 1307 12th st. nw., and a broth-| » 


National Cemetery. 


He died Aug. 23 of a heart at- 4+ 2 p.m. Thursday at the Rob- 
tack in Beirut, Lebanon, where ert A. Pumphrey funeral home, 
he was attached to the Ameri. 7557 Wisconsin ave. Bethesda. 


can Embassy. 


Mr. Beechwood was a gradu- of flowers contributions be sent 


ate of the University of Penn- ‘© the Flood Disaster Relief 
Veterinary Medical | 


syivania 
School in 1917. During World 
War I, he served as an officer 
with the Army Veterinary 
Corps in France. 

In 1943, Mr. Beechwood 
joined the United States Public 
Health 


He left the health service with 

a rank of lieutenant colonel. 
Mr. Beechwood was among 

the first group of United States 


Government workers to enter! representative for United Air- 
) craft Service at the time of his 


Korea after the war to admin- 
ister technical aid. 


Surviving are his wife, Ger- 
trude P.; his mother, Mrs. Cath- Aviation Business” and numer- 
d erine Beechwood of Huntingdon! ous magazine articles. He was 
ieces, but ‘his life was devoted| Valley, Pa; three sons, C. T.|\a member of the Daedalians. 

Beechwood III and Jim Beech-| Colonel Dichman is survived by 
‘at his home or at those of his| wood, both of Huntingdon Val-'his wife, Orissa A. of Dayton, 


ley, Pa. and Jack of Lowell, 
Mass., and two daughters, Shir- 
ley-Lou Loftis of Concord. 
Mass.. and Mrs. Pat Bender of 
Hutchinson, Kans. 


Dr. Hess, 
Geologist, 
Dead ‘at 83 


Dr. Frank L Hess, 83, prom- 
inent geologist who became a 
Uranium hunter- in the west 
for the ay yews in World 


greatness. Give us 

seeing for our eyes, that 
may behold the divinity 
beauty in a . men. Give 

thy strength for our 
hands and thy love for our 


pital in Bethes ore, Meats Nixjonal” Coun. 
da. © — Churches of 

Dr. Hess, ad 
who lived at 
5509 Roosevelt 
st. Bethesda, 
had been a7 
resident of the 
Washington 


t in the 


Philip M. Hamilton 


Philip M. Hamilton, 53, Do- 

mestic Relations Commissioner} 
or en oe of District Court here since 
here to join the United States | 1940, died yesterday at Garfield 
Geological Survey. ospital. 

A. native of Streater, IIL, Dr. A native of Remington, Va., 
Hess was a lecturer on geology | Mr. Hamilton had lived in the 
at the University of Maryland | Washington area for 35 years, 
for six years and honorary cus-|anq resided at the time of his 
todian of rare earths and rare| death on Layhill rd. Silver 


metals for Smithsonian Insti- Spring. 
tution. | Holder of a law degree from 


Dr. Hess served with the Geo- National University School of 


logical Survey until 1925, when sity he pie phen oat 
he joined the Bureau of Mines.|time in the United States mar- 
At the time of his retirement in| Sal's office about a quarter 
1944 he was principal miner- 


century ago. He subsequently 
alogist. 


became a deputy clerk of Dis- 
triet Court, and served as trial 

His travels took him into clerk for the late District Court 
Alaska, Bolivia, Burma, Can-| seco Oscar Luhring. Mr. Ham- 
ada, Ceylon, Chile, China, Fed. ‘ton was named to the com- 
| missionership on July 1, 1940. 

erated Malay States, India.) survivors include his wife, 
Italy, Mexico and in nearly all Mae: three sons, Philip M. Jr. 
the mining states of the United | now serving in the Navy; Hugh, 


afte Ate ow 


: 
: 


: 


|Washington Academy of Sci- 


States. with the Air Force, and Edwin 

He also was a member of the | 205¢P2; two daughters, Joy and 
Cosmos Club, the Geological|M@rgaret; two brothers and 
Society of Washington, the | ‘ree sisters. 


ences, the National Research Howard Veit 

Council, the American Institute | EBBLE BEACH lif.. Aug. 
of Mining and Metallurgical of ain wh oe od 
Engineers, American Associa-\ restored the textile industry 
tion for the Advancement of i, Germany after World War 
Science, Petrologist Club andity, died today after a heart 


Service and was as-| 
signed in Salt Lake City, Utah. | 


several other scientific socie- attack. 
thes. ) 
A member of the Bethesda) 


Card of Thanks * 


in addition to his) , 


and appre- 
of 


py By “= _*- 
thy receiwed during their 
Corecrement. 
THE FAMUA 
in Memoriam 
MATTERA. EMILIO &. Remembering 
you, dear “lather, EMILIO G. MAT. 


LOVING DAUGHTER. BUNNIE. 


= 
' 
er, Ralph Hess of Visalia, Calif. recent 
Funeral services will be held | 


The family requests that in lieu | 


Fund. 
Col. Ernest Dichman 


Burial services for Col. Er- 
nest W. Dichman, USAF (ret.), 
63, known internationally in 
aircraft and military circles, 
wil] be held at 2 p. m. on Thurs 
day at Arlington National Cem-| 
etery. ) 

Colonel Dichman. died Satur- 
day of a heart condition in Day- 
| ton, Ohio. He was the Dayton 


Died 
onal SJE, Me 
“st ne. tufiam 
sie ae, 
Sate dr. 

also 
rc 


feig ou. Tpuieday. Bentemetr st 


7 
y 


death. 

He was the author.of “This ‘ssedey, r i. 
| a nm. terment t Lincoln 
PCHWOOD DR. C. 
Beirut. Lebanon. on 


THEODORE. at 
August 33. 1955. 
de P.. 

c. 


rir 


| Ohio. 


| 


t Arlingten National 
tery 


| NALLEY, 
August 


au m. Ariingten. Va. 
PETTIT. Be 
Gay. August ’ ipés at 
bir Perrit 


Man Who Outshot 


armies. 


1 ve. 


ttit 1A 2 
bios le fe 
~~ Meme by ree sren 


-Ch 
ee —" rvices wi!) 

a ae a 
ednesday 31. at 2 Dd. m. 
Interment Prospect ll Cemetery 


~ ore 
rt UA mphrev vie 
<4. where services will be on 
ednesday. August i, em m. 
Interment rnestown riaa 


Church Cemetery 


ad N . 
i w 
ro = q 
Fr r 
a te 3 seerel 
vatter . 
ptem i 
ves and ends in- 


Interment Arlington Nation 
7 


ete 
‘| SAPOZNICK., HYMAN. On Mond 


ing most of his teaching career 
he lived at 600 lith st. ne. 


He is survived by his wife,|\Col. Raymond Colton 
Mabel F. Beall, and three sons, | 


. 4.| Funeral services for Col. Ray- 
ee a oe ve mond Colton, USA (ret.), who! 
idied Saturday in Tampa, Fla. 
iwill be held at 1 p. m. Friday | 
in Ft. Myer Chapel. Burial will | 

be in Arlington Cemetery. 
Col. Colton, whose sister-in- 
law, Mrs. William W. Bovyee. 
lives at 2017 Peabody st., West 
Hyattsville, served at Ft. Knox, 
2 World Pass II kag later 
orea and Japan. He is sur- century and at one time veh. Fails Chareh. Ve. on 
p Gsughter of Tamps. | 24 member of a team Ca Tes | SRARE,, CHRETES 24s 
ar eee Annibicion, | Weary asst Sas Mace] Ee a ap 

gia 
a 


. Va. 
ley. Duri one exhibition, a 
Heck A. Ford +4 ‘ sesent ng yg 2 Fi ie Pitt “ohti oaiher e an 
MARTINSVILLE, Va. Aug. | Foreey 2 ale > awe 


beaten her by a single clay aa ef Peveris ren ~ 
30 w—Heck A. Ford, 69, prom- bet Bic + 
an ie At 
where pri rate 
al 


29. 1955. HYMA 


gust . , 
303 N Capitol st.. 
a BSapoznick an 


1208 Wise. Ave. N.W. (Georgetown) DUpont 7-1757 


Free Parking off Prospect Ave. in Rear 
Saturday 8 A.M. to 3 P.M. Daily 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 


Member of Nation’s Capital Builders Hardware Club 


Bh Ne 
Ariineten, Va. 
of Masten 
timore 
. Me. amd sister of > 
M. Dunkum of 8t. Peters 
and Mrs. Lelia of My 
rvices at the & 
al ©. 2801 14th 
Thursday, September ) 


es 


i 292 
Va. 


Annie Oakley Dead 


FREEHOLD, N., J., Aug. 
29 W—Edgar I. Vander- 
veer, a retired politician 
who is reported to have 
outshot Annie Oakley in 
a constest 39 years ago, 
died today at his home. He 
was 85. 

Vanderveer held _ the 
New Jersey sharpshooting 
championship early in the 


pera) services at the 
sky & Puneral Home, } 


: on | Interment Arlington Na- 
; - , rs >» = Yenal Cemetery. 
nterment Fort Lincoln Cemetery BESSIE t. On Monday. 
BROWN. SARA T. On Monday. Au- 1955. et 1439 Sare 4 
gust 29. p25. at her home. 213 Law. | n ESSIE L. SAUNDERS wile 
al herch. Va... 


st Saunders. mother of . 
WH wife of Ww te Will Hele M. Sutter. RF 
“he ad James 


v 
top NW 


re sister © ra. 


. bei gitare and 
rne en ay call 
neral Home. ee worth 

ails ureh. Va. Pu- 


pigeon. 

inent Henry County business He was also active in 
man and civic leader died at organizing local baseball 
his home here today after a clubs and several of his 
long illness. players later made the 
Funeral services will be held ™ajors These included 
at 11 a.m. Wednesday at Christ, Frankie Hayes (Philadel 
Episcopal Church here, with) phia’s A's) and Al Sabo 
burial in Oakwood Cemetery. 


services Mw at il 6. mm. In 
lerm priva 


| Pages ie ss Cockerill “Jr. | 
Autopsy Ordered For the latest weather. ye ot ra. Mary Kangen of Tht 
eb Sita oes, In Strout Death Dial WE 6-121 u, A,tae ome of ble] | Creek Cemetery 


Ag uoere| | SMITH. LEWIS FRANKL 
t at 4 : rvices Methodist | a Py Oar 
ot he peak of their sunny LOS ANGLES, Calif. Aug. ox Interment, Chestnut Giore | 
way § Own buyers choose the-- 30 1M—Adele Strout, 76, widow ’, Eernees Va - 
nen flavor ig gai ‘ie of the founder of a nationwide 
ic@-chilled air al! the guarded by real estate company, was found 


DEUTERMAN, WILLIAM. On Monday. | 
Ausuet 29 1955. at Atiantic Ci Boe: 
piranttc City XN. J. W AM 
ERMAN beloved husbe 
'@ don’t kn way to our stores dead early today in her down- 
OW &@ more taste-pleasing town hotel apartment. 
- ; Ssiti¢ way 


N h nd of Mrs 
rene Deulterman "Gait ther of Wal- 
I } ; : ¥ 
© slart breakfast (o, tid & damned! Authorities ordered an au 
. i, * 


(Phillies). 


Y Sunday 1965. at! 
hi on. 


These tr wy ’ 
A Tagrant melons are jus: se. of 308 
want them—righ g . 
} 
flavor Safer ee 
on, Dridey , 
mm ermen 


For the correct time... 


Dial TI 4-2525 


It’s fast and easy! 


The Chesapeake & Potomac 
Telephone Company 


Vir *Tipe .. 


lace Deuterman of lifornia. 

of rs i Prinds may 

. t th: e mnerai Home. 4th st 
; : husetts ave. ne. Not of 

topsy to determine eause of) 

death after it was learned 56 

sleeping pills were missing | 

from a bottle of 100 which had | 

been full an Aug. 17. 


ral ima ‘ 
th F*, nv... on nes- 
. 2>._m. Relatives 
nvited. Interment ihe 

tery 


MAY 


nera) 2. 
day. Geptember 2. at 2:36 vp. m. Ine 
terment lis Chapel Cemetery. Camp 
Springs. ; 


—DEATHS— 
AREER 
“H Bhembere 


.-.and cantaloupes 
are just one of the 
inviting fresh fruits 
and vegetables featured 
this week in the 


regia 
’ : ere services Ww 
on u y tember 1. at 
: a mm. terment klawn Ceme- 
ery 


RUBY PEARCE. pudden)y. on 
26. 1955. at a) sf 


National Weather Summary 


Toda 


rea: — Partly Departures from nermal yesterday: 
sppentngsen | -B70e . Accumulated excess of temperature since | BERZER, 
an. 1. 1955 degrees. Excess since unday. August 
Aus. | re 7 Gopress Accumulated 
excess © A en gy ote since Jan. i 
igh. per cont at 4 ‘ aes. oess since Aug. 
t 4; m. . c 
- fend. roday-_Patily cloudy and emperstares ene veer age: High. 76 
« cooler with scattered showers | degrees: low 65 degrees. 
central portions. Thursday un, moon anda : Sun rises 6:36) 46 
ir r. /& m.: sete 7°40 Dp. m. aioe rises $33 
: a a sloedy with Dp. m.: 4:49 «a ay “ae 
wers turnin cooler : ' 
=, & th po tens.” Thursday— and 2: Dp. m. The Potomac River tilear 
t Great Falls. ‘Corps 
District of Colum 
-| ragwee ¢ De 
ending a. m. vesterday 40 grains per 
Visibilits——Mostly good 'euble vard of air. 


in| &. m-and 7:51 Bp. m.: 
aod PBocts 
¢ pollen coun fer th ~ | 
Temperatures and rain for 24 hours ending 7 p. m., Tuesday: 


Pair cooler at 
lative humidity: 
Ss & m.i low, 


r: 

Beech wood, 
Christian T. &r. 
A McKeon. 

4 | MeGaritty, Nel 
; Leech, Phyilis 


A. 
r e 
» Wedn y. Augus Richa . Ch 
Interment Arlington n —_ art. ; — 
: ames 6. : Ww. am 
a Yonts, Charlotte M. | 
Smith, Lewis F. Sr. 
Mattia. Oliver L. 
Chin. Char 
Williams. Brenda F. 


pout wqatenns to 

ter Ww. am 
. W. Cham! 
. W. Cham! 
Ww. ambers Ce. 
W. Chambers Co. 


- —————— 


, yy Ne 8 a— 
ry alt — 

ite, PRF LSPS, STENT 
‘*-| Funeral Designs 

«nrg? Pgh ting in 

Re arian ena gi 


GUDE BROS. CO., Florists. 
NA 6.4276 


On Mondey. Au- 

is ‘Serban oepital 
be 
nd 


the 


All your money’ 
back on any item 
that doesn't please you 


712 * ST NW 


_\Funeral Directors 


| J. WILLIAM LEE’S SONS CO. 
CREMATORIUM 


4th and Mass Ave NE LI ois 


. 


NNER 


ROOM 


iLANNE DOWLING 


Tila A 


| COMPLETE$] * | 
DI ” 


By Paul 


*inew Lotus Restaurant bi 


NOT ONE but three vocal | 
a | 

week. They are the Rhythm- 
ettes RCA Victor recording art- 
ists who have jumped into the | 
limelight from virtual obscu- 
rity in a matter of weeks. | 
About a year ago they won 
a talent scout contest—that 
was followed by a tour with 
the Ralph Flanagan band and 


On the Team, \\ 


Orleans, but no mention was 
made of the new Helene! 
Helene arrive in D. C. sev- 
eral pounds lighter, with a 
short curly hair cut, some 
Spanish songs and a different 
microphone a h. 
What Helene (she’s now 
Helene Francois Darcel) lost 
in the dramatic department, 
she’s made up — a friendlier 


audience a 
Inciden 


eS Md. Road Contract Let 


1, > . ty 7) 
 * ‘swe 
ib: Se eee 
it i 
es 


4 will come from 


BALTIMORE, Aug. 30 (Mm, 

te Roads Commission 
today signed a contract with 
Cumberland for the building of | 
a $10-million expressway across, 
the city and over its down 
town section. 

Cumberland agreed to put 
1$70,000 a year into the proj- 
ect for stven years. The money 
line tax 
redistributed to it by the State. 

The city also agreed to pay 
for the necessary relocation of 


utility facilities, for traffic con- 
— signals and street light- 
ng. 

The six-mile expressway, six 
lanes wide in some sections, 
has been a Cumberland dream 
for at least 25 years. 

It will go across the city 
from the present entry point 
of U. 8S. 40 in the northeast cor- 
ner and bend west across the 
business district to a new con- 
nection with VU. S. 40 west of 
the city. 


—_——— 


~~ 


‘, 
THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
oe Wednesday, August 31, 1955 ~ 21 


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RETURN ENGAGEMENT OF THE 


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Moet Sensational Quartet 
Since The Cherieteers 


intimete chansons 
—hit songs ef the day 


wae e8 th. Ow s 
Di. 17-2108 THURS, 16 P.M. 


Dedicated te the 
“KIVG end fT’ 
Piartee ot the National Theetre 


DIMI CLARKE at the piane and his 


| you'll find exceptionally nice 
. Glamorous SHEEHY 
A , 
wow. & FM. 
Sacete — 2 


— —— 


Definitely “not a sister act,”|ing fer the Community Club! Rural Pedestrian Deaths Stir Stanley 
9 25 all right with their very first/tion WEAM when it gets ur ‘Try This Man’s Recipe Virginia rural areas were deaths recorded in Virginia | 
e 
ard | day by Governor Stanley. | 
ing Association auditorium, ton Mozart Marble, a Harv “Almost invariably,” he said,! 
BACK in the days when the ) live § 
e | Purpose of the awards pro-|Thursday, says the way to Automobile Association, and violating a law or acting 
and goldfish pools, it was.one|cash prizes, donated by the daily bath. —_—— 
‘decor of the room may be very endowing scholarships, financ- | He lifts 5-pound dumbbells over | | | bests nr 
is | 
journing in Europe, sends with the Gene Harris Trie 
all 
SPEAKING of decor, have you | | 
3 se cchuny Goldsten, vacation. | Olivia Davis’ § ||——~ 
tawrant on DeSales street? Char ing in the fabulous Hote! Fon- 


now RCA has them under con- , Helene will be 
tract. on hand te start the bali roll 
COMPLETE the girls—Nadine Small, Jo Awards program—an endeavoi 7 100? RICHMOND. A 30 | C ' 4 
o ’ - ‘ ug. ‘* ty Committee, Stanley note 
DINNERS ‘Craig and Donna Watkins—did| being condveted by radio sta. Want to Live to Pedestrian traffic fatalities in|that 117 of the 161 pedestrian 
‘dise—“Only You.” Sales have der way at 2 p. m. this after os ” ) 
Oven Dsily & Sunday || Passed the 200,00 mark. ‘noon in the Perpetual Build | DETROIT, Aug. 30 #—Mil-/termed “disturbingly high i ' ~~ Rh eralammcanine Mune sary 
11:30 A.M, to Midnight || way ‘1111 E st. nw. ‘alumnus, who will be 100] At @ safety fee mom iegen hs “commie css to ena 
Mayflower Lounge was the old ' gram is to provide a means of long is to eat three bowls of|))) . Rafe-| rash billed.” 
Palm Room with its statuary awarding more than $6000 in’ applesauce a day and take 7 Governor's Highway e- rashly when he is killed. 
of the busiest places in town | radio station to clubs inter. | The retired school teacher 
Rumor has it that the future ested in obtaining funds for|also adviséd regular exercise.) 
‘similar to that of the carly|ing school equipment, or assist- | his head 30 times in a morning) 
| days. ing in local and national char- | workout. t, 
| In Person 
Frank Abbo, owner of the Chri Co 
‘Rema Restaurant, and now seo- s nnor 
fer listenin , ; 
ned = panto tte greetings to sunny Gene Bennike’s Trice 
Italy . . . Another traveler is) Matinee Sat, 3-6 p.m. 
noticed the alterations made on er, Johnny Goldsten, vacation- 
the exterior of the Colony Res-\ing in Miami Beach and stay- Patie Leunge 
coal gray and white paint plus | tsinebdieau. mu 13m o WN ME. 86-2122 | 


fn Pleasant Breese Swept \ ” 
/ Fast Potomac Part . 
LUNCHEON @ DINNER * 

Continental Cuisine 

Genuine Apple Strudel 

1? A.M. Untill 11 PLM, 

PHONE ST. 3-5572 


--- — 


new awnings have transformed 
the facade of restaurant and now 
the diming spot ts just as smart 
outside as inside. 


op 

EVERYONE was told about 
the new name adopted by sing- 
er Helene Francois, now at the 
Sazarac Room of the Old New 


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as touch a tool! 

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Continued use of Shell Premium 
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“Shel! « Trademark for thee unique gaantine additrwe 
developed by Shell Research. Patent applied for. 


uc 


ih i» & few York Ave a 


. « « @verlooking 
the tennis cours. 
This is the pertect 
setting te meet 
with friends end 
ovesis. 


tuxuey inte 
COCKTAN LOUNGE 


JEST JOHNNY & JACK 


One of the country’s freshest |) 
new acts —— music, songs and | 
comedy. 


VW TronNniGcHT 


I 


A brilliant cast of 29 
TWO DELIGHTFUL SHOWS 


“Moods of the Masters” at 9:45 
“Cireus-Time” at 11:30 
BARNEE, his orchestra 

and The Singing Violins 


In caee of inclement weather, 
shows will be moved te the 
air-conditioned Biue Room. 


Only Shell Premium Gasoline - | 
has both TCP and Top Octane! 


A 


. ie 
ALi 


Shoreham Hotel 
"eam ecenesy AVE. at aries : cor amas ADAMS +0700 


vi 


By 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


2 Peteonia, nares i. 108 | __ teee Pu sey Outlin e S | a 2 Owners Gr anted Delay 
NOTICE. es , In Condemnation Cases 
roceing and ig Education Task (i 2 agiRy 2c scm irzse ome 


Eastman Kodak Color Film terday in Municipal Court to|_ 1, ®nother case, Judge Ar- 


Kodachrome, Kodacolor, Ektachrome The biggest problem facing of the advantages of education 2 a charge of failing to either a chor, © deste Bien daar SAVE EVERY DAY 
had at tion. for the beyond high school. ae: if r 

may be American educa me ‘ tear it down or repair it, as re-|son, 505 44th st. ne., until Sept. | THE JUG MILK WAY 

‘next quartercentury is the! “In most European countries | ea: . quired by District law. 13 and ordered her to show ~ 


Sommers’ Camera Exchange, Inc. training of the exceptional or today fewer than 50 out of ee a The plea was entered by Wil-|20™Me progress toward repairing 7 4 ¢ A 


| [ 
Direct Eastman Kodak Dealer bright person, according to Har- every thousand young people ‘ Pe liam H, Beall, listed as living Soni peo ‘Sor deren = 

714 14th Street, N.W. vard University President Na-‘go on to higher education,” | | ae at 1656 32d st. nw. Judge Mil-|nw. by that time. ! 
Washington, D. C. than M. Pusey. ‘Pusey said, “while in the | nici | ; : | 


Writing in the September is- United States we are already 


sue of Fortune magazine, Pusey | — EE ss . : ie ae | a 
| SU ae Hair-Raising Acti ‘Rank Profit Sets Record 
said the continued growth in For every ie stedent HAGERSTOWN, Md. Aug. 30 so : 


quality of civilization depends | on District, Maryland and (®—Barber shops in downtown. | 
Jess on numbers than on aoe Hagerstown agreed today to’ LONDON, Aug. 30—Movie-| GRADE-A 


We Announce With Pleasure insights and novel achieve- charge $1 for a haircut effective Maser J: Arthur Bank's Odeon'| HOMOGENIZED 
ments by a few individuals of Sept. 1. | SRS Ae ns largest o 
; tional abili Present prices vary from 75 movie chain, today declared VITAMIN 
the Opening of a ‘exceptional ability. cents to $1, the average being record profits of $23,935,000 for 
about 90 cents. the year ended last June. 


E 


i 
i 


“It is the exceptional person | 


: ; | might almost say the) 
New Branch Office in Bethesda Beret wether lie Prose: 


has been opening the way to a) 
September Ist fuller life for all of us,” Pusey, 


contends. “We ignore him at ‘ 
= ae ee I Start now to 
_ However, in forecasting | 
Ave., Suite 502 million college students by'| . 
7401 Wi in ‘ 1970, Pusey said it would be un-| Dr. Murphy Boasts 
PERPETUAL BUILDING iwise to try to cut back or re- ; . 
strict the numbers of those per-' I 3th Gr andchild r 
> mitted to make what they can) SLR Bine Fi 8 its a good thing that | 
ra ae . cting District Coroner 
aa gr wn ways fe row ° Pas my approaching the time when one| Christopher J. Murphy is % 
and Settlements at ny @ es pa of every four young Ameri- _ a atathe 
I e ame a grandfather 
THE WASHINGTON TITLE INSURANCE CO. jeans wil 9° On %) some Kind! othe thirtecnth time eee 


}/of college.” Monday when a daughter 
THE DISTRICT TITLE INSURANCE CO. | With all its shortcomings and) was born to Mr. and Mrs. 


difficulties, Pusey said, there; Robert Murphy of 3414 qd ° * 
Wilson bivd., Arli , at 
THE LAWYERS TITLE INSURANCE CO. | ate qunsitarenie Govuntages te) oe Aissentein ented. al Cl YOY | el l) 9 ways 


: 


7 
ii 


rrreoeoe 


eorreore 


: 


the American practice, especi- 
ally for a democratic technolog- ee 


—— 


Bethesda, Md. ical nation, | Sar ” 3 
7401 Wisconsin Ave. Thus, Pusey said, although Virginia Oystermen a eae sk: he 


OL. 6-4300 futur@ educational practice Take Woes to Stanley 
must make place for large num-| 


> «: 
Silver Spring, Md. : bers, it is of even greater im-| RICHMOND, Aug. 30 u—A| 
: er — 3 | portance that educators devel- ane of Pa Srna River | 
° | ‘op an “exciting and demand- °Y*%er planters, accompanied 


. . ling” kind ion, 5¥ State Fisheries officials, 
Vaeenay SS : : pes , pa a ape a conferred at length today with 
1413 Eye Street N.W. | designed fully raw out th@ Governor Stanley on recent 

NA. 8-8885 Aw Conditioned jablest members of each age extreme oyster mortality in 
group. the river. 


75 & 


GREATEST YEAR 


We can afford to be generous because we've had a record-breaking 
year. Chrysler's sales percentage gain for 1955 exceeds any other 
fine car. And now we're cutting you in on our big year with s 


profit-sharing offer. 


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Color transparencies 
to enjoy in a hand viewer OF .+6 


GREATEST CAR _ ) the.big 1955 
CHRYSLER 


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V-8 


Kodaslide projectors, including the su- 
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3 ais jaar ai To show your slides on « home screen 
haf at | ; — Kodak offers a variety of dependable 


brilliant home shows. Other projectors 


Biggest bonus for your car /now!/ = 3° = 


Mere are the Kodak color-slide films—For color 


: of slides, use either Kodachrome Film or the new, 
And you'll be getting all this st « tock bottom price because of the extra-fast Kodak Ektachrome Film. Both come in 


big trade-in allowance our 1955 sales success enables us to 
“dar ost sore, You'll be gouiag « big now Gheyeler ot ao more thes types for use outdoors in daylight or indoors in 


you'd expect to pay next year for a small car. 


Come in— 
see for yourself! 


SEE OR PHONE YOUR CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH DEALER =| gustan Kodak Company 
; ) | , | Rochester 4, N.Y. 
ae eben + ican | Pee © 


7 


eee the Lor d Has Been A 


United Prees 
BRaltimore’s Gloria Lockerman serenades Gino Prate, whe won $32,000 on TV's 


“$64,000 Question,” just before Prato sailed for Italy early last night. Orphan of the Storm 


\ ARION WILLIAMS of Hunting Towers, 
| Alexandria, found a halfdead robin on 
the lawn outside her apartment during the deluge 
that accompanied Hurricane Connie and treated 
him so well the robin, now well and strong again, 
won't leave his new home. 


At right are photos of the robin and Miss Wil- 
liams, medical secretary of the Alexandria Men- 
tal Hygiene Clinic, spending a4 quiet evening at 
home. 


Miss Williams, when shea found the storm-bat- 
tered bird, first placed him in an improvised 
nest over the pilot light of the kitchen range. 
Later she fed him warm milk and soon he was 
able to have solid foods. Now she takes the robin 
outdoors, perched on her finger. Several times 
he flew to nearby trees or a fence, but always 
waited for his friend to retrieve him. 

Miss Williams says she'll keep the robin until 
he really wants to fly away and rejoin other 
robins. “After all, he’s a wild creature and it 
would be wrong to try to keep him in captivity,” 
she says. By Bob Burchette, Staff Photographer 


a ae Re Re Bek ee ie Be 


~ 
=, 


a” ARS SA ee 
ae oe > 2 ee “> 
a ys Se . ae oe  - 
ee we F 9 eee ie ~ Be o 

bate lf z “6 Ag o j 
fen, nee re 8 x . 


i gm ene eon” 


Pos < PE 


Staff Phote Stall Phote 
This is the way millions of TV viewers saw Gloria Lockerman of Baltimore last | Gloria's grandmother, Mrs. Bertha Key, tells 
night just before it was announced she'd stop at $16,000. the TV audience Gloria won't iry for $32,000. 


LED LLL IO 
ee 


~ 


Associated Press 


Meéipbers of Mennenite and BrethSen Churches take a lunch bred at East Stroudsburg, Pa), where they. are helping repairflood damage. 


, 


% 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
24 Wednesday, August 31, 1955 ve. 


Everybody’s Happy 


Down on E Street 


By Leo Sullivan 
LINES, FIGURES AND SPOTS BEFORE THE EYES: The 


iwritten by an 


Dorothy Kilgallen: 


NEW YORK, Aug. 30—Mar- 
lene Dietrich is furious about 
the soon-to-be blished story 
of her life, “Blonde Venus,” 
Pnglish press J "4 
agent. She says 
if she wanted 
her biography 
done she would 
have had Noel 


them in the picture for the sake 
of the story line. 


THE LUCKIEST fellow in 
town has never éven been a 
candidate for “The $64,000 
Question.” He's the laundry- 
man who'll be supplying 
Marilyn Monroe's new apart- 
ment on 57th st.—and this is 
the fourleaf clover bit: he’s 
getting a key to the apartment 


| 


Marlene Should Have Asked Noel 


The newly ordered nightly 
police checkups in the saloons, 
aimed at making sure no minors 
are served liquor, have become 
a double-barreled headache to 
the tavern owners. The cops’ 
report also’ must show how 
many people are in the place 
at the time of the check, and 
how many are males, how many 


Southern Maryland 


C of C Elects Officer 


The Chamber of Commerce 
of Southern Maryland last night 
a ted Ernest L. Hines of 

ly, Md., a vice president. 
Col. Marshall A. Elkins, com- 
manding officer, Andrews Air 
Force Base, was the 
es at the meeting held at 

Up Marlboro Cour? 
house. He narrated a film on 
the H-Bomb entitled, “Opera- 
tion Ivy.” 


PATRICIA MOR fw 


(he King and | 


Box Offies Open 10 A.M. te 9:30 P.M. 


-" 


females, Wherf those li'l ole | 


adding machines downtown) 
start totaling, and one sex pre- | 


Coward dash it 
off... Wealthy 
young Barnard 
Straus is 
steady - dating og 
Texas beauty 

Elaine Bassett," Milgallen 
the best looking gal to hit New 
York in several seasons. Every) 

if i 

"hone number, ws Ke’ het! “Dorothy (Hit Parade) Collins 
There’s genuine’ emotion in|#4 het managers are going 
Jerry Southern’s torch songs|4@"y trying to quell a rumor 
| these days. Her marriage to| that has spread all over Long 


so he can make deliveries with- 
out disturbing anyone! ... The 
TV series “I Spy” is raiding the 
Broadway shows for talent. So 
far the cast includes Florence 
Henderson of “Fanny,” Leon 
Belasco of “Silk Stockings,” 
and Nehemiah Persoff of 
“Damn Yankees.” 


lines of ticket buyers continually taking shape in the National 
Theater lobby these afternoons and evenings somehow seem) 
te belie the announcement on the billboards: “Last Four Days.” 
You'd never guess that “The King and I” will be leaving the E 
ot. house in darkness on Saturday night. 

In the words of the box office staff, more accustemed to pro- 
dent planning and advance reservations, this rather strange phe- 
nomenon is the result of “street sales” and the family trade. 
Some who form these lines at the wicket, especially at curtain) Dianne Foster is Burt Lan- 
time, are those more used to buying their “one for tonight” on| e@ster’s companion on an 
the way into the movies. A great many are fathers or mothers, Se ae grin Say 
forced by the unpredictability of such domestic problems as| © exes &8 © BOe | ice j Island. The whispers have it 
time, germs, baby-sitters for the “too young,” and transporta-| tuckian,” the CinemaScope cot agg ae ee iat Dorothy hes spent the 
tion to reserve their seats at the last minute. | production opening at the (oxecutives are waiting with|*“™mer in the hospital—when, 

And the result of this is that Rodgers’ and Hammerstein's| Columbia today. ‘bated breath for the censors’|#5 4 ™atter of fact, she’s been 


“They told me that 
I was like the 


that little, grey bird, 
so innocent-looking, 
yet so cruel! 

o» that, like a shrike, 

I was rending my victim... 


dominates heavily in one night 
spot, the morals squad walks 


ee ee 


ibe et 


* Kentuckians’ 


Mondoy, Sept. 5 3 Pert 2-5-8.30 Pt 


LAST 4 — 
WEEKS! 


2 SHOWS TODAY 2 & 6.30 P.M. 


Prom Oy TECHMICOL OR 

RESERVED SEATS WOW ON SALE ae mo | ’ 
Fer Today & Future Performances | a . a 
Ber Office Bpens 10 am to &15 pm. oe EVERY SHOCKING EMOTION OF 
or fren By Se THE GREAT PULITZER PRIZE PLAY! 


HOLIDAY’ 
Starts Sept. 28th 
MAIL ORDERS FILLED NOW 


. 
Air Conditioned 
WARNER =: 
s¢. 
te 6 C Siveets BW Metrepotiten 6.4475 


* af8-€Oneiticowis « 


7 th Big WEEK 


WARNER BROS’ joyous filming 
of the happrest play that ever pisyed: 


MISTER 


“The Girl 


CRUISES DAILY 
{QAM 27m g30 Pu 


aAnT-CINEMA 
346. 6 8220. on 
n ~“. t 
. m 
oe 
SP sk Pi nk othe 
> a 
COLONY—“"Notertous.” at 6 7:50 and 


m 
A—"The Eepteckian.” 
m i-3. 23 8°40 


Se 
mmertime.” af 1:30, | 


i 2.4 ash oe hh 
150 3 $0 Fisd. "Pho dna 850 | 


RICHARD L. COE is on va- 
cation. His column will be 
resumed upon his return. 


: } ’ 

2 3. 44. 6 

CariToL— “Te 
s m. 1:18. 2 


love it. This is like it was on ‘ 1% 
the West Coast where everyone 
was bright, alert and picking 
up everything, every nuance, 
all the way through the show. 
Why we have to leave you peo 
le is more than I'll ever know 
fe’'d love to stay. But Pitts. 
burgh is waiting. And will the 


audiences be as good there?” 

Miss Morison, herself prob 
ably greatly responsible for the 
movie fans in the lobby’s lines 
has need for such outspoken 
moral support as she cavorts 
through the role of Mrs. Anne. 
the “I” of the title. Almost 
dainty off-stage, not physically 
strong at all, this lovely lady 
who sings so lightly in her clear 
voice has to toil under the dead 
weight of bamboo hoops, sand- 
bags and acres of material 
which make up her extrava 
gantly beautiful but volumi- 
nous gowns. 


JUNE 
ALLYSON 


JOSE 
Baitita 


= r 
24K 4:38, 


Private Wer 
of 1:15. 3:08 8 


ANNE BAXTER 

BROCK HUDS WN 

JULIE ADAMS 
wets JOY PAGE - KENDALL CLARK - ISABEL BONNER 

Games ty HOSE FERRER - Sermerytey ty KETT! FRINGS - Renato te pay ty JOSEPH KRAMM  Protecnt ty AARON ROSENBERG 


STARTS TOMORROW 
Open 10:45 A. M., 14th St. at H, NL W. 


TRANS-LUX 


LAST TIMES TODAY 
“MAN FROM LARAMIE” 


~ ” such well-publicized pl 
per performance and per week than any show in the 120-year of scraping blades and coins on) a —— + Sone The | the Thunderbird in Uae Yeon 
history of the National the counter . . . And, believe it| Movie sclually features several’ and the Chez Paree in Chicago or Music ‘Store $ 
] | . e mode . 
Not the least gratified by these droves of satisfied customers or not, the Warner has been tt : 
io “teeneee . Gihad i$? | announcement that “This ja Sy insists he’s keeping Greta Garbo’s new villa on the 
ka in the last ‘act. she i .|\Cinerama”™ has only four more) French Riviera have no reason 
a sear ye Mone d ne like go weeks to go before its succes to buy that “I vant to be alone” 
pounds of dress. You can see : ) ime 
staff, even the nightly hand-|that she needs the nightly lift over Sept. 28, has brought a) Show Ti 8 as unglamorous as_ theirs, 
; , ‘new scurrying to the fabulous ' comes out every day and jum 
clapping ushers, are pleased, Washington audiences give her. | tacl F W d 7 Ps 
$n Gom~ imagine what that ispectacle. | or e nesday around the construction crew 
never-failing compensation aft-| Rush.” | : 
do for the actors when it rolls ¢r be has clocked what must which sets forth a Las Vegas a Pda and chumming with 
— = a ~ the “¢ of miles of stomping about, sing-| decorated with songs, Gloria’ 7 wdnaapametisae 
each of the week's eight per- ' . 5 Ae 
Puzziement” and dancin g,|sell, arrives at Keith’s .. . Burt out “rime ot Your Lite.” et #:30 | 3 
“It’s so wonderful,” Patricia SO™Ctimes for several encores|Larecaster’s first bid as a cin-| * SCREEN | 
Morison giows. “Washington, I of the polka. He is in training, | ema director, “The Kentuck- 
3 ena 9 36 
by caste from the Prime Minis-\with actor Lancaster still in- 
ter ; nterpreter in the original |tact, and both Diana Lynn and 
company to the monarchy in| Dianne Foster to abet“him .. . 
cation’ Ks qrewieg, pecteras ame, %, (a, Tare, St, pate 
mime, at 8: Dp m. a ' 
ance not only deserves but Matthew's Court nw. Philippe 
And I like te think that “The clude Bill Barnum. Maris Jones 
a big lift as well to our future Mike Ryan, Zelta Rosenwald, 
— ee ar bess Emily Davis, Marchelle Mat- 
sald nanef ef cunmeet for Geed tret and Annette Garver The} a. a. 
P ppo 5 public is invited to attend, free 0 2m 
An omen of success is passed te ana $a . = 
on by Kirkpatrick. On Thurs eG - ea & 
day. he begins his second year . x — Pros mot Te Muncie.” 
. . : . PLAY sé ummert ime et 
ix signed show contracts in his Decree From Jon Hall = tots 4 amet . @ es 
pocket. | STUART, Fila. Aug © @ = se ae a out 
'The 17-year marriage of actress ne estve. OF 1S. 2 
rhtbst ates HE Baran. 
theater, too, has been having|Jon Hall has ended in divorce.| _ §'s5 ‘ana Tg.20 P > . { | 
sell-outs these nights with “Ice Grounds were not disclosed. An| *2"®5EP—- ins i Cinerama” of & | 
; 5. apa 6:30 D. @. 
Capades.” The combination of attorney said the divorce Was ) 
men on skates is doing the) divided in an agreement. FINEST FOOD ANYWHERE 
trick every bit as successfully’ They were married in June, ef prices you like 
as it did last year. And with 1938, and there were no chil- Old Club Restaurant 
CS SF: 
a 


mlatenien ial 
wondrous gem of melodious magic has played to more people’ reaction to a new film titled) rgd Pee Dp ‘som B- 
| 

is the theater's mgnager, Scott’ ~ pen hone - THE WORKMEN remodeling 
Kirk 

ging along something like 65 ae ” : , 
plish so much. But if he and his sor, inerama Holiday”, takes legend. Gret. in work clo 

Graves, too, has need of that! boss, shou 
thunder bank of applause must TODAY: like a straw » shouting 
manne Es a | 

ng such a taxing number a5\De Haven and Rosalind Rus-| * 41 ' OSL — “King ane 1” 
formances. 2:3 

the present one. But the recep-| Theater Lobby presents a pro- 

needs as well. Lerrain’s —_— appearing in- 

theater life. How can the New Georgia Conlon, Jane Faronson, 

things” of charge. me -y 

Frances Langford Gets) }5i°,*."" *™ 
as the National's manager with 
CARTER BARRON <Amphi- Frances Langford and actor’) Pr 
s2 
starlight, an ice rink and show-'“amicable” and the property CLOSED MONDATE | 
only six performances left on dren. It was the first marriage 


FROM HERE 
TO ETERNITY 


the rink in Rock Creek Park for each. The couple had lived 

When she prances so briskly (through Labor Day night), itiat nearby Jensen Beach for'| 
with costar Leonard Graves look like the amphitheater will | several years and owned consid-| 
through that showstopping pol- be ending its season on a note erable property in this area. 


6 Tr ae, 


’ 


Ae 'fR ee 


= 3 a 
al oe ~- ~~ 


ae. oe ee ee ee ee GS 


> DIANNE FOSTER = DIA 


Screenplay by A. B, GUTHRIE, JR. - Based 


> 
a-T 


te foe Mea Cok, ome 


STARTS TODAY . . . open 10-45 


Loews Columbia 


AIR CONDITIONED FSt.at 12th RE.7-1000 


upon the novel “The Gabriel Horn” By FELIX HOLT « Directed by BURT LANCASTER - 
A HECHT-LANCASTER Production - Released thru United Artists 


, 


Producedby HAROLD HECHT 


4, A 


~~ resident alien for the first! 


a 


Chaplin Balks at Paying 1953 Tax Claim by U.S. 


did not | Oona, and their four children|causes. He was acquitted in 
petiue Serv- were .aboard the Queen Elize-| et ee charges * Rye 
She United States] as es|Jus i y te Baan t Nene the transporting woman across a 
. n tes Justice nt issued an 
“under a cloud as to order barring his return to the |***° line for immoral pur- 


The girl in the case 
he could ever return. |United States until officials| 20% 
could determine whether he| Je? ® paternity suit against 


could legally reenter under im-|/™ and, after two sensational 


migration laws. | 

Under these laws, an alien'| 
can be refused entry. for moral | 
turpitude or for _— af-| 
filiations, among other reasons. | 

Chaplin had lived in this) 
jcountry 40 years but never had) 
become a citizen. His name! 
had been associated with leftist 


a half-milliondollar ine ome )icg 
United States 


urope 
actor doned any intention to feturn 
rnal Reve-| to the United States and made 
_ atte Service clattn that he was plans to reside in Switzerland 


/permanen At the same 
three months of 1953 and was'time, Chap n said, he decided 
a nonresident alien doing busi-|“not ever again" to do any 
ness in the United States for | business in the United States. 
the rest of that year. Cc fourth 


haplin, his wife, 


Louella Parsons 


New Firm 
Formed by 
Lady Expert 


Get Ready for the Big Week-End Ahead |— —J| 


HOLLYWOOD, Aug. 30 (INS)| Washington, Detroit, Philadel- 


My news this morning concerns) 
the formation of an independ-| 


sons, who 
been a 

tract producer 
at RKO for 12 
years. Her first 
announcement 
is ext remely 


trials in 1945, Chaplin was ad- 


j ed the father of her child. 
e Internal Revenue Serv- 


ice tabbed Chaplin as due to 
pay $516,167 in taxes and in- 
terest on this 1953 income. 
The actor’s present address 
was listed as Manoir de Ban. 
Corsier sur Vevey, Switzer- 
land. 


ent company by Harriet Par- 


has) 
con-| = 


interesting in- 

. asmuch as she 

~ has acquired | 

© the life story! 

of Wiekey| 

Miss Parsons Walker, one of 

the most color-| 

ful figures in the sports world. 

She may make the Walker 
story on the RKO lot. 


DORIS DAY, who just fin- | 
ished “The Man Who Knew) 
Too Much.” with Jimmy Stew-| 
art for Alfred Hitchcock, joins 
the brigade of Hitchcock faris. 
“We had a farewell dinner, 
and Hitchy said he wanted me 
to work for him again, and I 
want to,” Doris said, sounding 
like a little girl and exactly 
as if she isn't about the hottest 
actress these days. | 
“Do you.krow Hitchy made 
‘The Man Who Knows Too 
Much’ in England years ago 
and it is the only picture he 
has ever wanted to remake,” 
she teld me. 

Doris and her bridegroom, 
|Marty Melcher, are off to Cor- 
‘onado where she says she is 
igoing to rest and sleep and 
sleep and sleep. Doris and 
Marty have optioned “Quality | 
iof Mercy.” the Robert Carson’ 
story. John Wayne wns it. 


| SNAPS: Out of the mouths| 
of babes—Lana Turner's daugh- 


Sor . =e 
aS Ste “Ey ‘ter, Cheryl, was having lunch 
ee So Rs. with her father, Steve Crane. 
> ‘and announced that she is diet- 
paee Regu $47 95 tekse ~~ |ing—at the age of 10 yet! 
| Groucho Marx finally gave in 
and let his 9-year-old daughter 
have a career in show business. 
So she got herself the William 
Morris office as agents. 

Brod Crawford is lucky. He’ 
has been told he has to.go back 
to Italy for added scenes in 

but he 


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sy cae cremaas Caste peter 
anuary 
Erna rant June Haver and Fred Mac- 
Murray celebrated the date of 
isan? their first meeting with dinner 
at the Gourmet Beverly. 
That's all today. See you to- 
morrow. 


(Cop yriehst. 
Internationa 


er i ee ne a id 


NO MONEY DOWN 


1966. OF 
News Service) 


TONITE 
8:15 P.M. 


We can’t tell the tith. but 
i was produced in post-war 
r 


Store Hourst 
Open Daily 9 to 9 © 9 to 6 Seturdey 
Shop in Comfort in Our Air-Conditioned Showrooms 


7998 Ga. Ave. 
Silver Spring, MD. 


AT EAST-WEST 
HIGHWAY 


JUniper 8-3154 


33 ARLINGTON BLVD. 


At Seven Corners, 
Falls Church, Va. 


JEfferson 4-1040 


2117 Bladensburg 
Road N. E. 


1 Bleck North of 
New York Ave. 


LAwrence 6-3400 


There’s no such thing as a Hard-to-fit car at Raycol We fit any make, any model 


YOUR LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED RAYCO STORE 
1S PART OF AMERICA’S LARGEST CHAIN OF AUTO SEAT COVER AND CONVERTIBLE TOP SPECIALISTS 


————Ee 


Pee “sunTO DAY ww » eh a 


= ar 
<r 


= — 


© ar ee <a PAMArTeAMt 


| ansaid! 7; = A -CURET I PURE. 


- RKO "Le 


CLIMB ON THE 
GIRL WAGON 
-IN GAY 
LAS VEGAS! 


—_— Sawn) 
15th 
at G 


ome vane * 


PZ 
SS 


¥ 


he 


7 


ir 4 


VISTAVISION 


Presen™ 


PAIRPAL 


' 
Trieste Mayor Due Here 


GENOA, Aug. 30 #~—Gianni 
| Bartoli, Mayor of Trieste, sailed 
today to visit the United States. 
Invited by the American Gov- 
ernment, he will visit Italian 
communities of New York. 


'phia, Boston and Baltimore. 


continue both papers. 


2 Papers Consolidate 


THE WASHINGTON 


POST and TIMES 


HERALD 
Wednesday, August 31, 1958 25 


In Williamsport, Pa. 


WILLIAMSPORT, Pa., Aug. 
30 a@—The Gazette and Bulle- 
tin, a morning newspaper here, 
announced today it will eon- 
solidate with the afternoon 
Williamsport Sun. 

Effective Monday, Sept. 12. 
the two newspapers will be 
published as the Williamsport} 
Sun-Gazette, an afternoon 
daily. Final edition of the! 
154-yearold Gazette and Bul- 
letin will be put out Saturday, 
Sept. 10. The publishers said 
it was unsound financially to 


Mike Mansfield (D-Mont.), chair- 


tions Subcommittee, arrived by 


Mansfield in Berlin 
BERLIN, Aug. 30 ‘#—Senator 


man of a Senate Foreign Rela-| #* 


air today for a two-day visit. 
a 


ee a eee 


NOW SHOWING IN BALTO. 
PAT (Amber) 
HALLADAY \ a 
with 
Fred Lewis 
Helen Drake 


ne Ot vase PATI WASGiN 


on é 


New Lower Prices—New Policy 
Special Rates for Theatre 
Next Sundey, WINNIE GARR 


COUNTY 


FAIR 


ALL THIS WEEK! 


ADMISSION Se 
Children Under 12 Free 
DAILY 1@ NOON te 1 PM | 


GRAND OLE OPRY 
Parte "shachey' A The Bah Pappa 
RADIO BROADCASTS 


Oop. Noon wo 1 PM. WARL 
own 10d country Time” 
eu f Ger. J 


imeny Dese 
end Hie Texas Wildcats 


WIN FREE PONIES 
Beddies. Bridies @ Cowboy Owetes 


110-FT. HIGH DIVE 


ince Flaming W acer @ Gasoline 
CHILDREN’S DAYS 
Rides Reduoed 
4H & FFA EXHIGITs 
20-RIDE MIDWAY 


Pesruring Doobte Ferrts Wheel 
LIVESTOCK AND 
POULTRY SHOWS 


GREASED PIG RACES 
CANNING CONTESTS 
BABY & PET CONTESTS 


LINCOLNIA 


VIRGINIA 


hes, Pon a oes 
ea Route 26. Far = 
heocotore 4 Ancendete. 


Story 
A BAD GIRL! 
* & & 
Sensational 


New 
SWEDISH HIT 


Directed by 
Ingmar Bergman 
Maker of 
“Tlicit Interlude” 
+ 
STARTS 
TOMORROW 


Y 


“EYE-FILLING... MAGICAL 


‘Summertime’ gives 


shimmering queen of the Adriatic, the lei- 
surely spirit of its natives and the evanescept 
something which makes any city so per- 
sonally alive to its friends.” 


wm eee Fe Oe 


us, at its loveliest, the 


~ Coe, Post-T. H. 


anm~m- | Ow wm 
f 
t ee 


DAZZLING... 


LIEST SETTINGS CONCEIVABLE 


. Fresh as a summer morning . . 
iegoers are left with no choice but to suc- 
cumb to every amorous sight and sound 


fused into this 


Venice breathes seduction in ‘Summer- 
time’ and director David Lean's cameras 
catch its every pulsation.” 


Svc WEEK! 


Os mae 


Bs, —-* 
_ 


ROSSANO 


(MOW PLAYING oat 


PLAYHOUSE 


OOORS OPEN TO:30 4. M. 
727 ISTH ST. HH. W. ST. 93-8500 


KATHARINE HEPBURN 


ummertime 
Color by Vechnicolor, 


we DARREN McGAVIN ot ISA MIRANDA 


ee 


ONE OF THE LOVE- 


.» MOv- 


romantic tapestry .. . 


- Carmody, Star 


a. 
. ‘ 4 
Ma. w 
LOPERT FILM PRODUCTIONS present 


# David LEAN'S 
PRODUCTION of 


BRAZZI 


BOTH THEATERS 
DUPONT 

SOORS OPEN 12:30 *. A. 
CONNECTICUT AVE. OU. 7-F7306 


——_ 


TOWIGHT! 8:30P% =| 
ten SEPT. 54, 


PRICES: $1.50-—2.00-2.50-—3.00, Tax Inc. 


CITY BOX OFFICE, 1350 F ST. NW. ST. 


SUPER MUSIC any 
Open Daily. 8:30 A.M. to 6:30 
CARTER 


AMPHITHEA . 
Open Daily, 10:08 A.M. to 16:06 P.M. Sundays, 1-00 to 10:00 PM. 


a 


—_— ——e —— 


CARY GRACE 
GRANT KELLY 
ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S 


TO CATCH A THIEF 


Ae Oe 
TecrwcoL.or msTaYfsion 


She was Han Suyin, 
ielomerct-leilat-lilele mm —a0ie->t-it- ls pee 
He was Mark Elliot, the 


PWeal-iales>lametelag-t-1elelalel-ia) oe 


In eagh other's 
arms they 

found a love 
that defied 
5000 


years of 


tradition! 


JENNIFER 


JONES 


WILLIAM 


HOLDEN 


20th Century-Fox presents 


LOVE 
IS A 


THING 


COLOR by DE LUXE 


CINEmaScoPE 


with TORIN THATCHER + ISOBEL ELSOM » MURRAY MATHESON 
PRODUCED BY DIRECTED BY SCREEN PLAY BY 


BUDDY ADLER « HENRY KING « JOHN PATRICK 


in the Wonder of Hi STEREOPHONIC SOUND 


Starts TOMORROW 
AIR y peghin ors 


Loews 


PALACE | 


Lith REpub! j 1000 


TODAY “NOT AS A STRANGER” 
oui de HAVILLAND rosert MiiCHUM FRANK mn . 


or 


$ 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
26 Wednesday, August 31, 1955 * 


3 TIMES FASTER Taxicab Meter Ordinance Hearing 
fur GAS on Stomach T. Scheduled by Montgomery County 


neutralize 3 times - —_— : eet, ~ — 7 | Mi Mi 
fie acid in one minute a | ee \ a % ni $ | 
digestive tablets. Get Beli-ans The Montgomery County! county. \for Thursday in an attempt to) = cs ee 


fastest kn 
haa ne Council agreed yesterday to The hearing was set for iron out some of the expected 


Call RE. 72-1234, ask for Cir- hold a public hearing on an Sept. 27 at 2 p. m. in the Coun problems created by the pro- 


ordinance which would put cil chamber. A _ preliminary L , " 

culation, and order The Wash: oters in taxicabs and limit meeting of taxicab owners and |? eer ents he Council: | mal a ug : sa e qj soun 
ington Post and Times Herald the number of cabs in the a county officials was scheduled) “" O'er Actions, the Vounch:| = | | 

guaranteed home delivery. *® Rejected as too high Sub 


| urban’s Hospital’s offer to care 


stand female; 


ai PpoonLe— 
for indigent patients at a cost co cecnped WASNT, 88 ri int Be- 
of $23.55 a day per patient. i fax Cirele: cnoweve te met 3 


* Approved an ordinance ~ , : Cx or Rowning % 
OLD FASHIONED SERVICE ys’ setting up health and safety wr. , 
< 


4 


standards for nursing homes. | Associated Press 
Ri3 |. © Took under advisement an) 


| | ‘ La. Lovel 
| ordinance licensing and regulat-| y “Our little poodle is home again, thanks to that classified ad,” 


ing gravel and stone quarries. 
with e modern ® Was informed that in the aden me ae at | reports Mr. H. E. C. who advertised for the lost dog in the 


future ros persons aa a blonde, will represent classified columns of The Washington Post and Times Herald. 
= ot . + iil “ie diste ee ol OS ¢: “ane-etapesiod af Reing mentally, | oma ci’: Nay ES Sime Sener Daag ee ts — 
LOAN PLAN , ill would be held in the Miss America contest. is GRE IN FUR ih Fast Ore ay, , alll 


= Cedarcroft Sanitarium until 
a trial rather than in jail. 
; Robert Linowes, assistant to 


between Surburban: Hospital 
the County Att , told the s ° ’ 59 as S 
be County Attorney. tld Whe and the County over the ware “*—\ ~~ MQ, OQQ:ae-Sanday-circulation 
\ 


-. 


told the Council negotiations 


The modern Home Loan Plan ot hackers and cab owners have of indigents have stalled. The 


National Permanent -combines te) indicated they want to be heard cost of hospitalized indigents | 


; ; ; . on the proposed taxi ordinance. ; ‘ 
‘service and friendliness so com The new ordinance provides, borne by the state aad the 


o 
in the “ old days” with the for meter rates of 50 cents for ©OU"Y- 380 000 
P Aisne Mb ae ae the first mile, and 10 cents for. Reese said the hospital in- | f daily circulation 
“pe edge go each additional third of a mile. sists it be given $23.55 per day | 
of understanding completely ihe he = — aalie G ton per patient, which is the aver- 
Weshington orea home buying sit- Linowes said there are approxi-|°8¢ ©®st of all hospital patients. means quicker results at lower cost 
vation. Stop of either eonvenient mately 210 cabs operating. «He said the average cost of ; . 
location and find out how this eco- It also would prohibit hackers maintaining an indigent in a for people who advertise in 
from carrying liquor for per-| waitd is $19. | 


sonal use or delivery and would | | 
ban solicitation of fares except The county upped its offer 


; s $20 t f atient 7 
NATIONAL PERMANENT _ |e'iiicer ss neoe seals riots.co sar The Washington Post and 
the wards are filled, he said. 


If the county accepted the hos-| 


BUILDING ASSOCIATION : Don't ost ask for peal Sy Rd Times Herald Classified 


R. E. BUCKLEY, President The quarry ordinance would | 
| force owners of nog nd 
ies l f t | 
DOWNTOWN: LANGLEY PARK, MD. Nujol Sean Seed with, wee! Phone REpublic 7-1234 


1 i would have to be drained if| 
719 10th Street, N. W. 305 University Lane FINEST MINERAL OIL MONEY CAN BUY the ordinance is approved. 


nomical plan can help you. 


FREER FARKING! |) Per tfermation Cal NO. 1-008 
AD T's STARTING _ = 970s You &. uw 
FRA PPLE MeN DRIVE- LINCOLN 12" 300.95 AIRPORT DRIVE. IW Atuincron 
WARNER THEATERS 6200 Marlboro Pike yy Ae - 
ALL i ih FAR TTIONED s0 8-49 79 Oven 0 John Lund Dorothy Malone = $10. Plus “Gon Plonr. 
- 18th and Col Ra Ou met “viv UNS wes & —o Rarbdara Britton, 
NW CO. 5-5695. Plus : : sa “ Telecast Tickets $3.50 Now On Gale ; out me pS m Ar “a 
a) ‘ : ae : v 
“MISTER ROBERTS CES POnidren Unaer 12, Pree! 1343 You $. NW. iL EARTH and “ALONG CAME 
(Cinemaficone), Henry Fonds. James at Doors Open 12:30 PM. AND, an CAM 
Cagney a’ NE: on Bt am Powell. Big Pree Playground Now Ope oS! i HOUSE OF BAM- ONES 
1:60 . . : obert van obert 
: || BELTSVILLE DRIVE-IN || 52%. cite"fisieckt” *"""||BRANCH DRIVE-IN © qy-= 


Wo. ¢-2000. “THE 


ws ‘Cinem : we, 4 >> MARTY, . At Cilnton, Ma 
a p L 6:60, es nine. : 
Ricpere Widmart. Lauren Baca: +5 Pius Ser Agar, “THE GOLD- In Vistavis: on | “SEVED 5 RE. 6-6666, 
— ] ME TRESS.” Techuicolor, FOYS’ Bob 

10 


BEVERLY Pree Parking, Lt. = Seder 12 Cagney at George M : } w sunenee =n 
rnes ore- ie ~~ . . ‘< aS AWR SY! 
pine. 635. 9:35 “CITY OF SHADOW Big Free Pia Piaveround Open Now! LANGSTON 4 Sean ad. WE. AN DD .. in 
Victor MeLagien. 8:0 ° - re es 245 om Cin maScop 30° rey Hunter | 
EN aw. o-3322, Ernest Borg- “FOX FIR ; * Color and 
"3 te F P 4 a | rias nine, “MARTY.” 25. with Jane Russel! Bete Chandler wide screen. at 10-20 BiG CARTO? IN 
Specia! uwrniieis 10-05 Ete AT 8 05 


A ‘Tonjgh' | ae ~~ 


o 2 Jacki | -Bat.! PAM 

ewer, Maureen O'flara. 6-45. 9:25 BETHESDA %°..;. cx | Pri QUS. MOVIE 
a — | | ine “hanD Stuc'||| -B THEATERS EAE bon MES MOG an? 
atin. rat AND. “or THE CinemaBcope-1 wey, CP ae Air Conditioned HOW er Hi 

syp . , ‘ & SEE HiM ON 
PasRsors, Tie ; ODE. weet. pap. | | At_7:20. 9:25 | MacAR 59 MocArhw =| "GUNFIRE" ON THE oe 1N 
55 Biwe 4 — : mark in JGARDER OP i yi 

ert Prancis y UN. + @168. Denn he Internationa! Cin Cine Ae, 


Y Moar j 
RA. 6.4600. “MARTY.” “PEARL z \gOUTR SNEAK PREVIEW 
re : ; - hi 

-- ss ae : ; ‘ Tonicht at 8:15 om. We can't tell 
iy NORTHS! F - — 20, 6:10, 9:50 — the titi but it was fimed in post- 
WA 3 -O552. riin and Wes acclaimed at th 
7-57008 TTSVILLE Edinburgh Festival! Plus—J. Arthur 

Borgnine in rey tin Rank's CHANCE MEETING” 

Cin ec . 6:30 and 9:50 bp. m. 


Hw DOC 
mn Mayward “Rovert Mitch: im. 
7:36 


Coffee, with our compliments, | : : 
co &- 4968 “ROSE MARTE. TF wa. 7 —e mat the Piccadilly Lounse. 7 to i0 Alex. -Richmond tve-t 
Howarc Keel CROCKETT,” Techn at 7.05 beyond Penn-De a0 
“BAD DAT aT. BLACK ROCK.’ aoeueet 5-5 the, “ARI- s Cineaia&co ° 
a 05 : ies pimey. Peature COLONY Georgie Ave. & Forrogut sop 


—| | SORA OE noni St. N.W. 8A. 3.2200 
"a 6-24 "0, Boece! . 67800. . “Continental A’ » ma 
peel hen VIERS on Sorentnn. ay! Alfred Hitch- 
6. 10 


ow ary * ‘ prnest 00 ler. “NOTORI- ® an, Be ” 
N ME _ IN Roy MARTY.” st ” with Gr ’ Grant. Ingrid] | GA ‘ OF EV IL 
= re, , pe te Davis reman. at 6. 7:50 and 9:40 Dp. m. s Western Action! 


she boner $61 300 APE @13 sen. A wo.c-aie || “BLACK HORSE 
Pree Par king Arlington — Falls Church I CANYON” 


SIL vEr ” Wa VY CROCKETT. | | ~ ) 
“SOLDIER OF FORTUNE oo ee THE WILD FRONTIER Jeet McCrea. 10:35. Color Cartoon! Kid- 
Clark Gable. Gusan Hayward. 2 STATE : vre . Technic ; ot i 3-30 5-30. : nal 
+55 “ATHENA.” Edmund urdom JE. 2-1555 ™m Extra’ Disney's rae . 
Jane Powell. 1:00. 4:30. 8:00 Martivn Mon Tom Ewell hizon SHEEP DOG.” SUNSET DRIVE-IN ean 9 


$4812 “THE SEVEN “YEAR ITCH < 
Pree ng BA. : CinemaScope or At liey's Cross Roa 
TAKOMA "i." COUNTRY ty ll , a LANGLEY " * Axe & Univ. beret | oven 7:50. Starts 8:10. s Range, GABLE, 


. ~ ir 4°40. 9 1730 Wilsen Bivwe : ora 4.5700 vie TEN 7 El ta ; . 
s * 44 59 Bing Crosby. Grace Ke yee WILSON 1 Witenn 8 || wnt Duners “pave Groceerr, | |r ilies H in the picture ecciaimed 
TIVO CO. 5-1800 APPAIR” } : | 
sd | PS OU r L ae Boren ine | $p en “Jonnson ang. Deborah aoe r ¥y tal Bid , Be. sit GONE Ww D” THE 
10°00 “TURN 7, * . io > ° ° My Glebe ad. ry eo Ly ‘* : WIND 
ES . 


‘ 231 A 
WO..6-5400. Near Parking | n Fle. = ver on 
Today Only! “THE LON Morte, Monroe, Tom Exe : = 725 “_ 


a ly 7 
to | (len , te. Col 
Bower i ‘Maur ae Oe 3 bo, 4 30. Cinem aScope—Color Pree Parking. JU. 8-1666 Be e 0 it Entertain- 


Jack Hawkins. Joan Collins in “LAND / | ment the : Pamil : 
| ae art , a AOHS’ sa ’ SUNAET’ mily at the 


nd 3 —_ — | PBR Re 
WINELAND THEATERS NTERRUPTED MELODY’ | | thert cubieets ot 648 and Fey. SUPER CHIEF DRIVE-IN 
401 1 nh 
cmt Mateancecee Oe Bact || | MAYOR 2% srs Ate Arm 88, [iad ice, Bites AER 
ion . — ——— 
ABC DRIVE-IN My S.E. LO.7-2555 CLEBE 2130 North Glebe fa ate Pets M ARI YN BRANDO 


' 
' 
oM ” et 1:30. 3:30, 5:30, 7:35] | 
Art Ve JA. 7.4266 40'p 4 | in “VIVA ZAPATA” at 10:45. 


Stereophonic Sound 


Kiddies Pree. Cartoon Van Johnson orah Kerr ane © 
“END OF Pe APPAIR™ RO DRIVE. _u 

: CRVILLE Kiddies Priday night. Cartoon Car- 

JEFFERSON Ari, Bivd. & donee nival, Bis ft riple Feat ture Pree Grab 


AVE : ‘ 
; dole td fe 7? ana U  pawie 240—Rockvi! i , Md. Bacs-—C N : 
and Technicolor, at 9:45 siiate ts ° tes Open at 7.30 | es dy ovelties and Prizes 


Walt VY cR KETT. 
: IN OF THE WILD FRONTIER” “ Hk 
| Always Best Pood st ABC ” peas Parker—Technicolor ‘LAND OF THE 
ANACOSTIA Soe Rd.) | BYRD CINEMA 104 5. Wayne CinemaScope aS Jock mvtion | Re. 

JA 7 73 2 m. us ilber an ite 704. : 5 
One of the year’s top hite! en) Acadam Aware Winner Grace Kelly : AC WAR SMORE™ at 8 40 iGuy ae in 


in “MARTY. at 1:30, 3:30 E COUNTRY GIRL” Cartoon Carnival” at] | HOUSE 37 Ga 
porsnine in. 40 co Binge Crosby. William Holden 5 Dm "ALONG "CAME JONES" at 


HIGHLAND arte rp $.E. | of Moeinat sm CATTLE eS: 


Big Back To School Party for the 


ONTANA and SEAN'S 


Special early show 5:15 Doors ; IDDEN JUNGLE.” 
S Sess Parker in Walt ROTH TERS || 
AY - CR aa’ 4 ’ ‘ 
7 rT . 
9:35 


i We. ONED 
ain Ke hg | AIR CONDITI : ) DU. 7. 5358. Pesa Parker ig To School P ry for the 


PLAZA 1336 NEW YORK AVE. N.W etn It KR ne y : Kiddies” ide Lh night 
- St, 3-4777 ROC a Featur | 
ATLANTI Nichols Ave. & Atlantic On our new wide screen / ech.) at Also Mau arty, li th idd) s th ist 
10. 3.5000 f . ! ; * 1 i > A arte their summer vacation 
session.’ : “ Don't miss it 
Howard Hawk ghty Spectacie. ' SHEEP poo” see ADDON Ra 
“LAND OF THE PHARAONS * Cin-1 | [eolor. with Julie Adams in color, 
emqwcere, SBS se mies! ap — - ' LA. 64114. F at 
8:05, 9:55 - . and G = Bo orenine | i Bhs LEE HWY.-ARL. BLVD. 
1 Nichole Ave. $2. 1 | ME. 6- picture o ’ 
CONGRESS *' “is".37 | 18 Academy Awards. “ “MARTY” DRIVE-IN THEATRE 


ETERNITY.” Burt Lenceaster, Frank . , JE 
wt 6 7:46. 9 32. . 2 miles west of 
One of the vents, top. | hite' erpent Sinatra 6:00. ' 6. ye gg FN gi. 


Borgnine in at — $$$ mautif 
KY. 9-2424. Bie Double Drive-In, located between t 

6:05, 10 = — SII VER SPRING 8242 Ga. Ave. VERNON peaturs, OF Ww. mare end Pairfax Circle via either Arline 
CORAL 4703 Martboro Pike, Md. WU, 9-112) r ae 4 ah ET Live O L ton Biyd. turning at Gallows Rd 
gg oP, Sn tam ie Dar femse Ceaney. “LOVE Kurt Kasner in “JUMP INTO HELL” | | | 4° 2¥7.—World’s Largest Screen 

CINEMASCOPE! . Marilyn _ Mo ME n” e t 7:58 me... ART oe 

Ren Ewell in “THE SEVEN- YEAR nd 5-50 750 9:55. & tA. 6-6118 

." Technicolor, at 6:15, 8:06.71 | kiddies OP PAN tarting a t2 P- m. . st Borgnine at 

“DOG - big 


| RS JESS é vee 
— |cartoons. Pree coffe served in our GRETA GARBO “AFRICAN QU EEN’ i 
LAUREL Pa s-2113 | wange ond Robert ae y Hepburn, in color, at 10:23 
Richard Widmark in “PRIZE OF | | 13th and Sevennah Sts. 5.2. CAM Friday: “HOUSE OF BAMBOO” 
GOLD," Technicolor at 6. 7:45. 9 35. +... 2- . 4 Free Parking at 6:00. 9:25. Also pov "IS Niven tnd “RIDING SHOTGUN 
Pan «x Fitaeerele os 6—COLOR CARTOONS—6 ae 


ademy ard ag jfarion Pech } at 7 
CAPITOL Copitel Height Md. Br VIVA Zara fA” 6; i. FS " Continuous from Dusk, Open 7:00 
‘ 


ane Anérens. Alice Pare, es Under 12 Always Free 


- 


- leo Anne 
oe e ® at 7:55 i'sroRY | | GEORGETO - Pr aa 1723 King QUEENS CHAPEL 
enjoy tastier * ESCAFE omens HEP cs DRIVE-IN THEATRE 
y The meri Pao Mie Part || a TaSa Mevbcaeen ~* ||| MA fee Aege Rend and amin 


Mt. Vernon wn. The world’s lareest screen. in-car 
“KISS ME KATE” VIRGINIA .“ & First St. Ki. 94133 a, cape, F  eneotars to 


i oe Me nr earns Mil] caruny a mpAYSoN ay oopaneess SA ace’ gens ro Sreaerer 
— nn HOWARD KEEL > CROORE GP BANOS ATERPRON?? 
. | if ° ACADEMY“. - 9616. , 7en Oren ANN MILLER Robert Steck. ley Yamaguchi. Academy Award winner at 10:35 
\ ‘Do ” re 8 peg Bie See ee 0 a eo 2 - Ntscafé “thie? ee ee Tee ee ehs:tvasneccce Meee un deetlee ahd KEENAN WYNN : ue 1000 poe Fk 8 gIQATrLe QUEEN DP, ee 0 A 
n't miss this bafgain’ opportunity to “enjoy ; : sis war eoaamton ng Belin oeirach™ Mont IAL ci OATES QUEED ea 

at 


Two Technicolor ers! A ae: Wid- 
in ~~ HIGH 


iaseaiiiiiedeines mue 
Feature at 6:00, 


tastier modern coffee! It’s all choice coffee, nothing but coffee | ATOR °:, ‘; eae ree Parking wukerson's e “TABZAN'S } RIDDEN JUNGLE 
_...Tich with flaver that truly satisfies your coffee hunger! Be a a a as 


;, ' a CIRCLE 2105 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W. OV. 32-2500 Conzinaoue aie po hy tres. 

sure you get a jar of Nescafé with the 10¢ off label today—and ATLAS ¢!: ieee range Bt RE. 7.0184 — ‘ate Conattioned ae 

save. Only a limited supply at your store—so hurry! . gt ng, Jane ae ae : ' EE , a | HISER-BETHESDA ’<\' yaaa 
: ee re ay oat ARI epee 


All Coffee-Nothing but Coffee! som 3.355 smantimen SEAN ry 


A Ne et 
ee... 
et 


Stockholders Ap prove 
Split by Reliable Stores 


The stock split, which takes 
effect Aug. 31, will increase the 
number of outstanding shares 


to 506,604 shares of 
value each. It is expected that 
the additional shares will be dis- 
tributed to stockholders about 
= 14. 
eliable Stores Corp. oper- 
ates a chain of retail furniture 
stores and a chain of retail jew- 
elry stores in nine states. 


Net of Hilton 
Hotels Rises 
In Half Year 


Gross revenues and net prof- 
its of Hilton Hotels Corp. 
for the first six months of 1955 


iwere substantially higher than 
those for any similar period in 
the company’s history, Presi- 
dent Conrad N. Hilton said 
yesterday in an interim report 
to shareholders. 

Gross revenues for the six 
months, amounted to $092,697,- 
107, compared with $55,741,007 
for the first half of 1954. Of the 
$36,965,100 increase in rev- 
enues, $31,865,981 came from 
Statler properties and $2,925,- 
702 from the Shamrock Hilton, 
none of which was held a year 
ago. The remaining $2,164.417 
was accounted for by Hilton 
properties operated in both 
periods. In the quarter ended 
June 30, 1955, gross revenues 
|were $46,970,930 as compared 


| as © ; ad 
bi thalteaer pusimess 


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 31, 1955 


Warren | uitting 
As Safeway Head 


oe hes 
s board 


BALTIMORE, Aug. 30 ()—A 
two-forone stock split, previ- 
ously voted by the board of di- 
rectors of Reliable Stores Corp., 
was approved by the company’s 
stockholders at a special meet- 
ing here today. 

The stockholders also ap 
proved a change in the total 
authorized capital stock of the 
company from 600,000 of no par 
‘value to 600,000 shares of $10 


Business Outlook . . . . . . Bys.A. Livingston 
Election Customs Are Not Proper in Proxy Fights 


devoid of pie-in-the-sky—for ar 
evaluating the security. ens 
ow | 

NOR .CAN the SEC force 
stockholders to read communi- 
cations in proxy contests. But 
it cam see that the contestants | 
state facts. Investors—inno-| 
cent bystanders—might buy a/| 


stock on the basis of a promise |i’ OF Building 
of an $8 dividend. ) 


The SEC can’t guard a man’s, NEW YORK, Aug. 30 a Se 
tongue. It can't filter his com-/ spite the Federal Governments 
are expected to J. Sinclair Armstrong, chair-;ments at press conferences.|tightened credit controls, the 
separate the man of the SEC, replied at the | But the SEC can insist on s€@-| Nation’s construction boom. will 

“ : 
i n ¢ onsequen- vention in Philadelphia that the more, when the SEC says NO | 5 enki in 1956 
tial, irrelevant, SEC isn’t trying to restrain|dice” to a printed statement, "®**'™€ Pace im 
and invective. speech or act as a censor. How-|then a contestant ought to be ing to Architectural Forum 
ever, if contestants have ad-|barred from making such an building industry magazine. 


Now this question has ] 
before the Ae ricii HAs AS ORG or ZV ‘programs, rtion orally. 
sociation: We kid ourselves by saying 


ated from the University of 
California Law School in 1926 
and joined Safeway as an at- 
torney immediately after his 
admission to the California bar. 
In a short time he became as- 
isistant secretary of the Calli- 
fornia Safeway Co. He was 
lelected assistant secretary of 
Safeway Stores, Inc. (the par- 
ent Maryland corporation) and 
became secretary in 1937. He 
was elected vice president in 
1946 and trea.urer in 1949. 


Nicaragua Gets Loan 


: The World Bank, in partici- 
|pation with the Bank of Amer- 
‘ica, has made a loan of $1.5 
| million for the development of 
3 to act| #sriculture in Nicaragua. The 

loan will finance the importa- 


IN ELECTION campaigns, and Currency Committee. After 
we're accustomed to candidates ‘hat, hands off. 


who declare their “worthy op- iat 6s aa 

nents” to be e-beaters,, STEPHAN feels com- 
proves - from- ato munications mailed to share- 
the-till, black- 7” holders should be submitted to 
guards, coun- (the SEC. But oral statements 
terfeiters, liars, should be untrammeled: It’s 
and adulterers. too much to expect a contender 
That's part of in a heated battle to have full 
the great Amer- control of his tengue in debate, 
ican game of press conferences, or talks to 
politics. Voters financial groups. 


New Record 


. 
Savings Loan 
Predicted in 1956 


Branch Plan 
Stirs Dispute 


willing to com 420 "FS 
tinue as an employe in a con- 
sulting and advisory capacity: 
The stockholders of the com- 
pany will hold a special meet- 
ing in a on Oct. ay 
upon the following recommen ;| tion of machinery, equipment 
ations of the board of directors:| ..4 materials to be used for 
1. An amendment to thé jand clearance, soil erosion con- 


* Saployment contract heres) trol. pasture improvement and 
to provide for his continWance) milk processing, and the impor- 


as a consultant and adviser of | tation of cattle for breeding 
the company. | purposes. 


Associated Press 
Lawyers for more than a 
dozen savings and loan associa- 
tions have until Oct. 3 to file | with $27,440,398 in 1954. 


written views on whether a Consolidated net profit for 
’ Philadelphia association should the first six months of this 


‘be allowed to set up a branch| year totaled $5,434,553, equal to 
$3.12 per share on the common 


Should the same press interviews, or speeches, Construction will become #!beyond the city limits. stock. This figure includes prof- 
standards of freedom to run|then those scripts should be|that proxy fights are like|$ Dillion industry in 1956,, ‘This was one of the chief) it, (atter taxes) of $344,438, or 
; off at the mouth apply in|submitted to the SEC. Theyjregular elections. Congress|spemding more than $170 mil-\ questions raised by opponents|2i cents per common share, 
2. The election of Robert A: proxy contests for control of |are, in effect, written communi-jestablished the SEC as the/lion a day in the Monday-to-Fri- io the application of Colonial| realized from the sale of prop- 
ces with the oe to _be/Pamagra Plans Increase merican corporations? The | cations. They've been drafted to|referee of full disclosure. And day work week, the magazine Federal Savings and Loan) erties. For the first half of 1954, 
i spo the courts have upheld the SEC forecast. This will be six per! association of Philadelphia to net profit was $3,536,654, equal 


Saale der the omerel ond Rnee-| NEW YORK, Aug. 30 #—Pan-|Becurities and Exchange Com- = eee - pee — neg A. ; 
agra (Pan American-Grace Air-Znission says “No.” But Edmund rmstrong cit “a railway|as a eree what's proper | per snare of common 

in proxy communications. cent gain over the $41.8 billion |establish a branch office in the) stock. Included in the earnings 

record for 1955 now anticipated Manoa area of Delaware: 


eial policies of the company. | ways, Inc.) today announ Stephan, a distinguished|proxy contest” in which the 

P--« «ort... he- election of Milton L./that to meet the expected Chicage attorney, who wasichallenger declared that if he| In the current Libby, McNeil were profits from property 

Selby as president with the) crease in travel during the counsel for Louis E. Wolfson in|won, the price of the stock|& Libby contest, the insurgents! by industry experts of the Fed- County ie a ‘sales amounting to $499, 28, or 
responsibility of operations. (and winter months it will i@-|his unsuccessful proxy contest |would rise to $100 a share and|set forth a series of questions| era} Commerce and Labor De. Other questions ost sures | 31 cents per share. 

Warren was born in Norfolk! crease its Douglas DC-7B fligits|of Montgomery, Ward & Co.,|the dividend go to $8. The SEC/in a letter to shareholders:| 4 4. a TOCEN two ay aang oeral| ace cr the second quarter of 

County, Va., in 1889. He began! between Miami and Buenos|says “Yes.” nixed that as part of a letter| “Why isn’t full disclosure of the | ”* , 4. | a Rearing Oftcet Oo sard were, |22> consolidated net profit 

his business career in a news-| Aires from three to five aweek,| “A proxy contest,” says|to shareholders. It was a blue nape’ business made to} | rin mngeug wry ak — are wns be association| wor ea000, 188, equal to or 

office in 1905. Later he effective Sept. 1. Stephan, “is like a itical|s romise. Yet, Robert R.|stockholders? Wh not|ing will pace the fie Of COMMOn soc 

ye ced r a ~ gn ? BE Bonn with a 15 per cent gain, the paying @ 3 per cent divh)against $1,758,550, and $1.03 


f 


3 


engaged in the lumber and 
woodworking business. He be- 
came a new business executive 
for Merrill, Lynch & Co. in 
1931. He has been Safeway 
president since 1934. 


ACF Elects Fee 


Charlies J. Hardy Jr., chair- 
man of the board of directors 
of ACF Industries, Inc., yester- 
day announced the election of 


election—exaggerated denun- 
ciations of the opposition, lofty 
exaltations of one’s self, and a 
tendency to state issues in black 
and white instead of as they 
are—in murky gray.” He 


Young, in the New York Cen- 
tral fight, was able to make 
such a claim orally. 

As I see it, the SEC has the 
iresponsibility of refereeing 
iproxy contests—of seeing that 


stockholders informed of pur- 
chases and sales of capital 
assets’” And so on. The court 
agreed with the SEC that such 
questions were of the Have-you- 
stopped-beating-your-wife’? var- 


rivate residential 
construction will increase 
about two per cent in dollar 
volume, it estimates, although 
the number of new housing 


Forum said. P 


idend be unfair and unwar- 
ranted competition to associa- 
tions paying a 2% per cent 
dividend” nee 
® Are existing savings insti- 
tutions in Delaware 


per common share a year prev- 
iously. 


nings reports follow 
. for six months ended 


6336 $185. 


County 


. for 2 mont 
65. 741.29 Or. S88, 
@ Atreraft Corp. [or six months 
ended July 3 
89.089.000 $10.864.1 


starts probably will .show a 
slight decline 


Magowan was born in Ches 
ter, Pa.. in 1903. After gradua- 
tion from Harvard University 
he was employed by R. H. 


doesn't go so far as William there's fair play. ‘iety and were, therefore, im- 
|\White, who came out of the| The Securities Act of 1933\proper. Injunction granted. 
and secretary. Fee as been sec-|” : : | |Prope sr 
retary of thee ornerdien its | New York Central Railroad and the Securities Exchange | In proay contests, corpora-| 
. predecessor, American Car and|PTOXY contest second best, and | Act of 1934 had a grand design: tion officials and contestants |(+ ulation Sold 
Macy & Co. in New York until|Poundry Co. and subsidiaries * 2° president of Delaware |Full disclosure. When a new for power should be held to the| 2 * Sines 
1934. In 1935 he joined Safe-\<ince 1950. & Hudson. Let the SEC look |security is sold, the SEC can’t|same standards of truth and| WINNIPEG, Aug. 30 #®—Pur-\considers an application of |% $239 
Way, spending six months each over the initial communica-/make an investor read the|materiality as in floating new chase of the Canadian circula-| First Federal Savings and Loan on 
in various departments ending GE to Build 40 Engines (|“°"* of both sides in a proxy|prospectus. But the SEC can/securities. And if there's ANY |sion of the Country Gentleman | Association of Upper Darby to 
in the administrative office as. ERIE. Pa_A The contest, White told a subcom-|see that the prospectus con-'confusion, Congress should’! — . ry ; establish a branch in the same 
an assistant to Warren. He was| , Pa., Aug. 30— Get mittee of the Senate Baking 'tains all the material facts—/‘spell out the SEC's power. by the Country Guide has been area? 

eral Electric Co. will build’ q 

" nounced by Managing Di 

40 diesel-electric locomotives 


= Soe i re = ) 
$ promotion unti . R. C. Brown of the Coun- . 
e for the Manila Railways of Keccer nge 
ae cae po ed Sica the Philippine Islands, it’ was) try Guide, a monthly farm mag- Foreign Excha g 
Selby was born in Ventura \revealed today by Guy W. Wil- agine published here. The | ates tollow: tayo ‘ < 
‘| son, — manger of the com- Country Gentleman, an Amert-| 
panys iocomotive and _car can publication with a Canad} 


Calif.. in 1902. He was gradu- 
‘equipment depart t here. 
* ‘ __ ese a Apes an circulation of about 94,000, 
Export Credit Granted Upjohn Coe. to Build recently was bought by the ~~~ a 
The Export-Import Bank of. KALAMAZOO, Mich, tor agg Pe 2 ae Y UsssIe” 
Washington yesterday an- ~< ae y Sees Ce. lh an a offered for sep- | a | 7 
nounced the authorization of an ™4ceutical manufacturer, an- arate sale. The Country Gen-| 
tleman was published by the § 
Curtis Publishing Co. aod 
| | 
ter ba 
0 


C. Allen Fee as vice president’ able and willing to meet the| cases 2 
service requirements of the'4 
Manoa area’ | 

® Should Colonial’s applica-| 


Net income 
tion be held up until the board) Minate Maid Ceres. for nine months 
en uy 3) 


N. Y. ie 
x, Bond Prices ‘Mutual Fund Prices 


age, 3.501400, =| new vere, - 2 O~On 
(908) Wigh Low Close Chg. Securities Dealers, tec) | 


———_ 


s percent 
costs @ 1/3? 


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million to assist Dresser Indus-|* .>r@mch in Cincinnati. It is 
tries, Inc. of Dallas, Tex., in scheduled _ for completion in) 
financing its export sales of 1956. An Upjohn branch build- 
heavy machinery for the petro-|'"€ Dow under construction in 
leum, natural gas and chemical Washington, D. C., will 
industries, gas-turbine driven|°Pe™e? in January, the com- 
mobile power plants, and rigs P@"y said. 

for oil and water-well service. 


exporter line of credit of $1.3 nounced today it plans to build 
We will buy Second Trust 
its sale Motes Secured on improved 


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Suburban Trust on TV 


The Suburban Trust Co. has 
completed arrangements for a 
program of University of Mary- 
land football highlights over 
‘WMAL-TV at 9 p. m. Mondays 
during the football season. 


; 


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NATIONAL Monrenee 
INVESTMENT Corp. 


1312 WN. ¥. Ave. WLW. NA. 8-5833 


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i Chrysler Plans. Copper in London 
otis im i a 10 Form 4 Groups At All-Time High 


1 3% 
7” @% ‘s 
Of Dealerships LONDON, ~y ee #—The 


11 as Br, ie I 
at ne +s ry or ft - 
| ' pounds ) a ton on | 
DETROIT, Aug. 30 #—Plans\London Metal exchange today, | 


6 117% 117) TT 
1? 127% 122% 127%— %e! 
' 


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y 129 ie a ei for separate dealerships of the the most that dealers have ever 


116 #13 «(14 , 'paid for it. 
* 1% Hie divisions of The price was nearly double 
e opening bids when ponees 
returned to the free trading list 
two years ago. 


«|four automobile 
*iChrysler Corp. have been an-'e, 
‘nounced by L L. Colbert,) 
‘company president. | 
%| Colbert said the new division. | 
al-line dealerships for Plym-| Dividend A 
iouth, Dodge, De Soto and'| 
Chrysler will be developed | 
gradually wherever local COM | seer Car 
ditions make them practical. | 
‘The present system of Plym-|¥e" Airermt 
ouths being sold by dealers | 
handling one of Chrysler's 
other lines began in 1930. 
| The change is being made, 
‘Colbert said, because deeper 
market penetration for each of 
the company’s lines can best be 
achieved through divisional- 
line dealerships. 
TRENTON, N. J., Aug. 30 # 
The management of the Ther-) : 
‘moid Co. today won a proxy|P & R Buys Firm 


‘battle for control of the firm 
a 61 margin over a stockhold-| PHILADELPHIA, Aug. 30 
et Oe oom oa |A Philadelphia & Reading Coal 
| e official results the and Iron Co. spokesman today 
‘election of directors of the firm sential thek tha dam 

| has contracted to purchase sub- 
stantially all of the assets of 


‘the business. of Union Under- 
wear Co., Inc. He said the for- 


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EFFICIENCY 
Among its well known 
tenants are 
@ CRUSADE FOR FREEDOM 
@ GENERAL 
@ PENN RAILROAD 
@ WESTERN UNION 
Call Mr. Everet Scott at 


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Business Property Sales 


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We have « steady demand for stores and shopping centers. 


List your property with us for a profitable contract. 


wba Ae 
if'* : 


H. G. Smithy Company 


ST. 3-3300 


at the closing of the automotive 
parts firm’s annual meeting.|™2! papers would be signed 
‘The voting took place Friday| Wednesday in New York. 
when the meeting opened. The}. Vd 

meeting was adjourned for 
three ays while judges tallied 
ithe vote. 


Sil 15th St. N.W. 


ip 


CALSO Gosolimes ceca ov 
terifitest, most responsive en- 
gine evert 


yew HICH NUTT ay 


GASOLINES 


mm 


| Mortgage Representative—Travelers Insurance Co. 
| PROPERTY MANAGEMENT—SALES—LOANS—INSURANOS 


NOW RENTING 
DFFICE SPACE IN THE 


AIR-CONDITIONED 
SILVER SPRING BUILDING 


8601 GAMERON ST. AT erage 
Newest Building 
Smee Soret Sut Tenants’ Noode 


——--——- 


“CONTINENTAL 


LT Te TS 
ee oe = 


Are You Completely ===. 


= 
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Whether it’s fire insurance, 
oxa#ttpmobile insurance or any 
MOOG ES IOC OE 
the first essen 
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your coverage. 


H.L.RUST CO. 


® rarsae senses vee 
© v00n. tue caironum om cone 


PRODUCTS OF THE CALIFORNIA O1L COMPANY 


~ STEUART PETROLEUM. COMPANY 


2y15 West Virginia Ave. NE. ‘ Seuenes 64313 


a | 


MORTGAGE 


INSURANCE 


4 


> 


)Lincoln 3.4300 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERA 


-Stre Aircraft Stocks Features List 2.2: 


e 
and a member of the 
‘board of directors of Merritt- 
ieee ee ies oe Chapman & Scott Corp., today 
Fs announced his resignation from 
- o 
ee, baste! fe arse t Marks Trad 
Siete fase Hesitancy Marks Tradin 
103,818; 1954 to date, 347.588.. 
632; 1953 to date, 240,693,170. NEW YORK, Aug. 30 (®—Aircrafts spurt- | 
ed to give an otherwise hesitant § stock | 


(100s) High Low Close Chg. 
™% 77% M+ % 


Twent 
Twie 
| Twie 


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lion share level, some market observers saw 
further adjustment from last week's rally 
and anticipated no major change in trend 
until after the Labor Day weekend. 

United Aircraft closed up 5% at 84% in 
the wake of ‘news that it was declaring a 50 
per cent stock dividend and a higher cash 
dividend. 

Phillips Petroleum dropper more than 3 
points at the opening on news that the com- 
pany was calling for redemption of its 3.70 
per cent debentures which are convertible 
into common stock at $65 a share. The stock 
regained some ground later, closing off 1% 
at 72%. The issue led te most-active list. 

The American Stock Exchange was more 
active with price changes irregular. 

Corporate bonds were mixed. United 
_ States Treasury obligations were higher in 
| the over-the-counter market. 


» 
; 


ie 


; 


these posts‘in order to open his 
market a spark of life today. 


own investment counselling. 
. 
Gains in aircrafts ran to as much as 5 


"We Wee * 
™% 3 s, | firm. | 
| Schott joined Ero ng ¥ 
points but other major divisions showed 
only fractional price changes with a few ex- 
ceptions here and there. 

Rails showed signs of going ahead early in 
the session but tapered off later in a mixture 
of plus and minus signs with the group a bit 
off on average. 

The session began with fairly brisk trad- 
ing but it slowed to a walk later on. 

The thoroughly mixed pattern of the day 
was reflected in the Associated Press aver- 
age of 60 stocks which closed unchanged at 
$174.40. with the industrials up 20 cents, 
the rails down 10 cents and the utilities un- 
changed. 

With two straight days under the two-mil- 


aagtee 


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For Continuous 
twenty-four hour 


STOCK MARKET REPORTS 


by automatic telephone 
recording, dial 


ST. 3-5282 
Folger, Nolan—W. B. Hibbs & Co. 


MEMBERS NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 
725 15th Street N.W. 


Oldest Investment Banking Firm in Washington, D. C. 


o_—- 


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, MID MONTH DATA 


Dete 1 & Meet of Laker £55 


Both Cerning Glass and Owens-Illinois are engaged 
in various phases of the glass industry. Both are 
holding companies with interesting investments of 
considerable long-term promise, the most impor- 
tant of which is Owens-Cerning Fiberglas in which 
both own about one-third interest. One, however, 
offers better value in terms of earnings, dividends 
and assets and is the cheapest way to buy an inter- 
est in Owens-Corning Fiberglas. Which would you 
buy? 


For your free copy of our comparative value report 
on Corning Glass Works and Owens-Illinois Glass, 
simply phone or mail coupons below. No obligation, 
of course. 


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| DEAR SIRS: Please send me your Comparison Report No. 6} 


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reorganized wedert be Sanhruptey Act. 
# securities stemmed by 


D. C. Produce 


—-. C. PRODUCE PRICES 
| Yesterdays holesale produce 
in Washinetes for 
|}quentities &s compe 

ates Departme 


mY St t86 2? 
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YOURS .. . for the asking 


If you'd like a regular look at market condi- 


Ma 

187" 

1Sia+ ta Std Bre of 

a = % Ste Ght 3 Ser 

73%+ % Ste OH Cal 
Ste Ori MI 3S 


S 82% 51% Sie % | 
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1 28% 25% % + % ler C PEL pt 4 
jewel Yea ? 

jewet T pf 3.79 , . — : 

la tions together with our opinion of various secur- 

) ities, just phone or write us. You will receive 

W%— *s 

: Mt Mi % 

MW% MW 144+ % 


our Market Letter every other week—it is yours 
without charge or obligation! 


APR 


AUCHINCLOSS, PARKER & REDPATH 
129 With Street, N.W. © NAtional $4322 


—“Stevees, 
is % Stew War 1888: 
Ste SAF 128 


7155) «183% Tete el F 


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South Carolina Charleston 
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— — Domestic Round. 


VEGETABLES 


basket and) 


1%-! 


| Members New York 


Stock snbenpentherantnaintanes 


16% 


8 a> WS Oxford Pap 1.202 


Oxf Pap pf 5 
, 


150@ 
sacks 


New Jereey. des! 
1.7 orer 1.00@1.25 50-1 
and bushel besket, Pennsvivanis 1 50 

CARROTS —California. crates, 48 1-'> 
flm bags. mosti few. $5.25: car- 
toms, 24 I-lb. film bags 2.50 t > 

CELERY — Pascal 16-inch crates 
California. 29 25 New York. West 
Section 2-66. 3.75004.25 Ohio. 


7S | 
” CORN—Crates, Yellow 6s: lows. fair | 
| quality, nearby Roor-ordinar 


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POUSTEER Tats STREET « S89 YORE, ». % 


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Sted vy Parem Pict 7 4 wisest oF 


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2 wst A® eutepttan te fhe eo 8 tare 
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: THIS HELPFUL 
GUIDE ON INVESTING 


Byres jack 1. 


Pack 1.98 


57% §7%+ we 
52% S2'e+ 1 4% 


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m0 111% 1 Tttet | tr Cont 
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33% 

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3?te— % Gen py if 
CUS «Se Gen PF OCem 1 


' 


D. C. Security Prices 


Yesterday's prices oa the Washington Steck; TRUST COMPANT 
the Pottedetghie-Bolt- | Aner tes awa 


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" 
teuws ov ere 
via ve» Each month “Market Review” boils down 
—=«jy & wide range of interesting new research 
and statistical material for investors. The 
current issue, just out, is available to you 

now, without cost or obligation. 


Come in, telephone, or send. the handy 
coupon to secure your Copy. 


157% ve Gen Shee 7.58 
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PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 


’ 


--~ HARRIS, UPHAM & C?---" 


Members New York Stock Exchange 
end ether leading Security end Commedity Exchenges 
1505 H Street N.W., Washington, D. C. 
Executive 3-2300 
Gentlemen: Please forward , and without obligation, 
of the new issue of : ¢ 


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: 


Capital Commerce 


Increase Over 1954 


By Alexander Henderson 


Staff Reporter 
profit and sales of the Hecht Co. in the six months - , 


Net 


the University of Minnesota, 
he obtained his CPA certificate 
here in 1938 He is a member 


aS 


‘Winn-Lovett Merger 
‘With Dixie P 


GREENVIL' ©, 8. C., 4° ~. 30) 
‘#—A plan has been tentatively 
10. consd.idation| 


Dixie Home 


Stores. 

A. D. Davis, president of 
Winn & Lovett, and R. E. Ebert, 
president of Dixie Home, an- 
nounced in a joint statement 
egress that one and one- 
b shares of Winn & Lovett 
6%: | stock would be exchanged for 

‘}each share of Dixie Home stock.) 
‘oo: | The plan will be submitted to 
directors of the companies this 
»alew.jweek. If approved, special! 
rimeetings of stockholders will 


- 


ThE 
ue 


EE 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
: wa” Wednesday, August 31, 1955 29 
tion . 


=*='B & O Issues in Demand — 


NEW YORK, Aug. 30(®—The banking group headed by 
$280 million Baltimore & Ohio|Glore, Forgan & Co. 
first consolidated ‘mortgage| “A *Pokesman for the nation- 


, wide underwriting syndicate 
bond offering—largest single) ..i4 late today that $102.5 mil- 


piece of debt financing in Am-|tion of the series “C” 4% per 
erican railroad history—met!cent bonds had been sold or ex- 
with excellent first-day investor changed. Of this total, $98 mil. - 
fetwres| reaction, it was reported today|!ion worth had been sold for 
by an wunderwriter's spokes-|cash and 4% million dollars 
man. . worth had been exchanged. 


E 
s 


= 
& 


“lof the D.C. Institute of Cer-jer 
» tified Public Accountants, chair- 
$43,939,541 respectively. man of:several of its commit-| 

The net earnings in the 12)ice5 and one of its governors, | 


months ended July 31 this year 
Dividend Voted gage obligations, are being dis-|holders of B&O outstanding 


against $2,400,172 and $2.52 a n ee of Southern Nay = it in ll tributed through an investment! refundable bonds expire. 
mmon share similar|Co. have voted a regular divi-i/— wr — —EEEE —_——————E——————————— a RTE SR CE LEP ine. 
a oie dend of 25 cents a share on the |} oe —— 
common stock payable Sept. 30 
.|to stockholders of record Sept. 
20. 


= 
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: 


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3 
> = 
Eak833 
cure 


The new securities, designed; That left only $2 million 
to refund and consolidate near-| Worth of series “C” bonds avail- 


: able for public sale until after 


A 

3 

; 
S=az: 


2353 


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3 


~ 6139 cases OY truck 


eit 
‘SEs 


Who's News 
John D. Hayes, chairman of 
the board of Fanny Farmer's 


Thee anneuncement ma matter of record only and ie neither offer to sell, nor a solicitation of an offer te buy, of these Seour tos. 
The offering is made only by the Offering Circular. — 


$280,000,000 


The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company 
First Consolidated Mortgage Bonds 


$80,000,000 Series A, 37%, Due August 1, 1970 $80,000,000 Series B, 4%, Due September 1, 1980 
$120,000,000 Series C, 414%, Due October 1, 1995 


New Ieewes - 


..» Thomas J. Delaney has been 
appointed director of adver- 
tising of the White Moter Co.|§ 
"|... Walter S. Milton has been 
ted sales manager of 
udson Motors Division, Amer- 
CUS-| ican Motors Corp. . . . Charles 
Antell, iInc., Baltimore manw- 
facturers of cosmetics, has 
named Harold Tuers direct 


presidencies of Brush Rectron | 
Arthur C. Dechene will be|'* C2. & division of the Oeil 
vite Corp: . . . Crucible & | 
sworn in as a member of the ted F 
Co. of America has appointed | 
District of Columbia Board of | of 
ccoun " A. A. Marquer Jr. supervisor, | 
. kancy this morning in employment... B. Paul Blaine) 
has joined the Washington 
staff of Trans World Airlines 
as assistant director of route 
development. ; 


PUBLIC OFFERING AND EXCHANGE OFFER 


The above-described $280,000,000 First Consolidated Mortgage Bonds (hereinafter called the Bonds) are publicty offered for sale, subject, 
Fee re ee ree rane er irene a eS emnenlly euentaniing bends Gtentiiind as Retentene 
Bonds in the under the eaption Purpose of Financing) to exchange such Refundable Bonds for equa! principal amounts of the 
Bonds, as more fully set forth in the Company's Offer of Exchange. Holders of Refundable Bonds have certain priorities with respect 
to $120,000,000 principal amount of the new Bonds through the close of business September 9, 1955. Allotments on exchanges are to 
be in order of receipt of acceptances of Offers of Exchange. The Offer of Exchange will expire September 19, 1955. 


’ 
Pennsy Orders Cars | 
The Pennsylvania Railroad, 
has ordered 100 additional ex-| 
tralong flat cars from its Al 
toona, Pa. shops for trensport-| 
ing trailers in its truck-train) 
service. The order brings to’ 
5800 the total of new freight! 
cars ordered by the railroad for 
delivery this year and early in 
of business administration of | 1956 


American Stock List 


Total sales, 560,000 shares; 
year ago, 599,570. 


The Bonds will heve the benefit of a Sinking Fund (contingent upon earnings, but fully cumulative) sufficient im amount to retire by maturity 65 & of the Series A 
Bonds, 65% of the Series B Bonds and 72.9% of the Series C Bonds. 


In the opinion of Counsel the Bonds will be legal investments for savings banks organised under the laws of the States of Colorade, Florida, idaho, 
Minnesota, Missouri, New York, Ohie and Rhode Island, for savings banks organised under the general laws 
of Pennayleenia, and for banks organised under the lawe of Illinois. 


THE ISSUANCE AND S442 AND/OR BHOCHANOE OF THESE FIRST CONSOLIDATED MORTGAGE BONDE ARE SUBJECT TO 
AUTHORIZATION BY THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION. 


< 
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+ 


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s. 

ae 


Prices and Accrued Interest 
Series A Bonds 99% Series B Bonds 984% Series C Bonds 100% 


(Ref umdabie Bonde will be sccepted im payment en terms stated in the Offering Cireulary 


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Ghore, Forgan & Co. Helsey, Stuart & Co. Inc. Alex. Brown & Sons 
Blyth &Ce.Ine. Dresel & Ce. Eastman, Dillon & Co Goldman,Sachs&Co. Harriman Ripley & Ce. Lehman Brothers Salomon Bros. & Mutsler 
Stone & Webster Securities Corporation Umion Securities Corporation White, Weld & Co. Bear, Stearns & Ca, Dick & Merke-Smith 
Ladenburg, Thalmann & Co. R. W. Pressprich & Ce. A.C. Allyn and Company American Securities Corporation Blair & Co. Central Republic Company 
lncorpersted Incorporated ( bmcorporsted? 
Dominick & Dominick Equitable Securities Corporation = Hallgarten & Co. § Hayden, Stone & Co. Hemphill, Noyes & Ca -Hernblewer & Weeks 
Lee Higginson Corporation Carl M. Loeb, Rheades & Co. F, S. Moseley & Ca. Paine, Webber, Jackson & Curtis L. F. Rothechild & Ca. 
Schoellkepf, Hutton & Pomeroy, inc. Shields & Company Tucker, Anthony & Co G.H. Walker & Ce Wertheim & Ca Wood, Struthers & Co. 
Bache & Co. Baker, Watts & Co. Baker, Weeks & Co Banter, Wiliams & Ce  Cofim& Bur R. 5. Dickson & Company Fulton, Reid & Co. 
becorporsted (Ree per esteg 

Gregory & Sons John C. Legg & Compeny Lemremce M. Marks & Ca Reynolds & Co. Riter & Co. Shearcon, Hermmifl & Co 
F. 8. Senithere & Ca. Sten Bros. & Bopes Stroud & Company Swine American Corporatron Weeden 4 Co 

becorpereted lnowrpareted 

Awohenchoes, P artrer & Redpath Johnston, Lemon & Co. ~ Ferris & Company Mechel & Coe 


August 6. 10%. 


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Offer of Exchange — The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company 


To Holders of the Following Bonds of The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company: 


First Mortgage 4% Bonds, Series A, due 1975 Toledo-Cincinnati Division First Lien and Refunding Mortgage 4% 
First Mortgage 5% Bonde, Series B, due 1978 Bonds, Series D, due 1985 
Southwestern Division First Mortgage 5% Bonds, Series A, due 1980 Refunding and General Mortgage 5% Bonds, Series G, due 1995 
Pittsburgh, Lake Erie and West Virginia System Refunding Mortgage Refunding and General Mortgage 5% Bonds, Series K, due 2000 

4% Bonds, Series A, due 1980 Refunding and General Mortgage 5% Bonds, Series M, due 1996 


The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company (hereinafter called the Company) proposes to issue and to offer for sale and/or exchange its 
First Consolidated Mortgage Bonds, as follows: 


$80,000,006, principal amount, Series A, 374%, due August 1, 1970 $80,000,000, principal amount, Series B, 4%, due September 1, 1980 
$120,000,000, principal amount, Series C, 4'.%, due October 1, 1995 ’ 


Said Bonds are hereinafter called collectively the New Bonds and severally the 
Bonds of Series A, Series B or Series C, as the case may be. 

The Company, through a group of investment bankers and securities dealers, 
is offering to holders of any of the outstanding Bonds hereinabove listed 
(hereinafter called the Refundable Bonds) the right, up to the close of busi- 
ness on September 19, 1955, subject to the terms and conditions stated in 
the Company's Offer of Exchange hereinafter referred to, to exchange such 
Refundable Bonds, with all appurtenant coupons maturing after October 1, 

Me Ih B .-4 , if 1955, for a like principal amount of Bonds of Series A, Bonds of Series B or 

. oe Li a | Bonds of Series C, plus a cash payment equal to the sum of (a) the redemption 

a be a. | lew 106.25 168.58 170.95 175.69 9) premium on such Refundable Bonds on the next available redemption date, 
7” (1828 average equate 168.) | (b) the excess, if any, of interest accruing on Refundable Bonds accepted for 

|i exchange from the Closing Date to such redemption date over interest accruing 
| for the same period on the New Bonds issued in exchange therefor, and (c) 
$10.00 per $1000 principal amount to the extent that the exchange is for Bonds 
of Series A and $12.50 per $1000 principal amount to the extent that the ex- 
change is for Bonds of Series B. Any difference between interest accrued on 
such Refundable Bonds and interest accrued on such New Bonds up to the Clos- 
ing Date will be adjusted in cash. 

The United States Internal Revenue Service has ruled that the ex- 
change of Refundable Bonds for a like principal amount of New Bonds 
pursuant to this Offer will be in connection with a nontaxable re- 

capitalization and will not result in gain or loss under the Internal 
Revenue Code, except that gain, if any, will be recognized to the extent 
of the cash received by way of premium and additional premium. Ne 
opinion was expressed by the Service relative to whether there will be a 
further recognition of gain in the amount of any interest differentia! 


TE 
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Veit Aire? .! 

Usit Stee 72 


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Te—1-16 Wilrich Pet 
28 2% Me-~ Wright Her .12 
™ 29-1629-16 
5’ 1 Sie+ © Appel P 3.25078 
i «6 6 We éRestGhF «1.505 8 
“ss %& 6% itelPw 8 6.500 of 
11-16 6 6-16 66-16-—3-18 GhicPew 3.255 
41% 41% 41%2+ “ Pore 3097 
i 3% T%— W ese 6.508 1919 
1s-'6 ™ 15-16+1-46 fuss $505 1977 
% % % Se Cal €4 3085 
72 6% ©6«6168&%) 6 S164+1-16 


[es ae Commodity Index 


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10024 106%4 100%4— \« 


tie 81% 8% payment received or whether such payment will be separately report- 


able as interest. 

The Offer of Exchange is subject (a) to the approval of the issue and sale 
and/or exchange of the New Bonds by the Interstate Commerce Commission, 
(b) to the sale by the Company of all New Bonds not exchanged, and (c) to 
allotment to the extent stated in the Offer of Exchange. 

Bondholders who desire to accept the Offer of Exchange must fill out an 
Exchange Agreement and forward.it to Messrs. Glore, Forgan & Co., 40 Wall 
Street, New York 5, N. Y., who are acting as Exchange Agent for the Com- 
pany, so as to arrive not later than the close of business on September 19, 1955. 
Copies of the form of Exchange Agreement and of a Circular describing the 
New Bonds, to which is appended the Offer of Exchange, should be obtained 
from Messrs. Glore, Forgan & Co. or from the Company. 

Holders of Refundable Bonds who mail or deliver Exchange Agreements to 
Mesers. Glore, Forgan & Co. prior to the close of business on September 9, 
1955, will have priority in respect of New Bonds over any sales up to an aggre- 
gate of $60,000,000, principal amount, Bonds of Series A, $40,000,000, principal 
amount, Bonds of Series B and $20,000,000, principal amount, Bonds of Series 
C. Rights to exchange after that date, or to exchange for New Bonds in excess 
of those respective principal amounts, are subject to allotment. 

Exchange Agreements should be forwarded promptly but Refundable 
Bonds should not be deposited until notice is given that the Offer of 
Exchange has become finally effective. 


THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO RAILROAD COMPANY, 


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AIM Post to Pearson 


Wade Pearson, a local theater) 
chain ‘manager who withdrew 
on Monday as an independent 
candidate for the Arlington 
County Board, has been named 
co-cam manager of the Ar- 
lington Independent Movement, 
it was announced yesterday by 
Dr. Robert Detwiler, AIM chair- 
man. 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD iF 
30 Wednesday, Angust 31, 1955 Rep. Be it | 
A Repeat Shooting 


Rep. Alvin M. Bentley (R- 
Mich.), one of five Con- 
gressmen shot by Puerto 


Rican fanatics on the 
House floor last year, yes- 
terday crititized Congress 
—particularly the Senate— 
for “doing almost nothing” 
to prevent a repeat per- 
formance. 

The shooting “could easily 


Justice Goes Home 
In His Shirtsleeves 


NEW YORK, Aug. 30 (*# 
When Special Sessions 
Justice William FE. Ringel 
doffed his robe Noday in 
the Criminal Courts s Bagta- 
ing he discovered that | 
some thief had stolen hit Juvenile Committee 
om | ‘The Fairfax County Commit- 


The Justice made his \tee on Juvenile Delinquency 
way home in his shirt- | headed by Joseph Freehill, an' 


ee aaa 


Lions Club $4500 Fire Damages 
To Appraise Mt. Rainier Market 


Fire did an estimated $4500 smoke damaged the Chase 
damage to Haraway's Master tN “nog so Bay 
., 84th st. and the Peoples Hard- 
Market, 4006 34th st.. Mt. Rain ware Store, 4000 34th st. 
jer, and smoke damaged two 
adjacent stores, Prince Georges 


Washington's most complete financial 
pages in. The Washington Post and 
Times Herald offer you Washington's 
only complete N. Y. Stock Exchange 


Table, most comprehensive local, 


tional and world business news by top 


‘Risque’ Art 


Associated Preae 


business reporters and authorities—J. A. 


Livingston, Oliver Goodman and Har- 


The Lions Club of Bismarck, 
N. D., never a group to shirk 
civic responsibility, is going to 
look at a lot of naughty pic- 
tures in the next few weeks. 

It will do so strictly in the 
line of duty, a duty imposed 
upon it by the Senate Subcom. 


County firemen reported yes- 
terday. 

Firemern-—said the ulene was 
discovered about 10:30 p. m. 
‘Monday 
market. 
Started by a short circuit in 
electrical wiring over a walk. 


in the rear of the 
Itapparently was 


Church were told 


Adventists Told 
Of Disaster Duty 


GRAND LEDGE, Mich., Aug. ‘@ty of the church's home mis 
30 W—Maryland members of “onary department, 
the Seventh-Day Adventist more than 6000 laymen attend. 


toflay 


sleeves. attorney in Washington, yester- 
day scheduled a meeting on) 
Sept. 12 to resume hearings | 
started last spring on juvenile | 
delinquency in the county. A’ 
meeting scheduled 
was canceled. 


spoke to 


the ing a five-day convention here. 


She said he church is work. Jhm Marshall Month 


happen again,” 
le 


said Bent- 
y. 


yesterday Helps You Overcome 


Advertisement 


FALSE TEETH 


old B. Dorsey, complete record of the 


day's transactions and 


markets in 


closings on 


all editions published by 


The Washington Post and Times Herald. 


church’s job is “to be of im- Looseness & Worry 


mediate service when disaster ("a to streamline its welfare 
strikes.” centers so they can be con- Gov. Theodore R. McKeldin Nas! case 

verted to civil defense use and proclaimed September “John) ye tone _ an improved sike- 
Mayhelle Vandermark, Wash- as relief agencies at a a Bicentennial Month”’ your pistes holds them ‘ntmer se. ther| 
Firemen saidington, D. C., associate secre- ‘ment’s notice. Maryland. feel _more comfortable Avoid embar- 


ressmernt caceed br leees plates. Get 
FASTEETH ay et ane drag counter 


mittee on Juvenile delinquency. 
The Committee collected the 
pictures and assorted literature 
as evidence in its hearings in’ 
five cities this year. 

Sen. William Langer (R-N. D.) 
‘said yesterday that Sen. Estes! 
Kefauver (D-Tenn.), chairman 
of the Committee, had selected 
the Bismarck Lions to act as a 
jury of citizens to say whether 
or not the pictures and publica- 
tions are lewd and unfit to be 
sold to the country’s youth. 

Langer is a member of the 
Committee and a resident of 


Bismarck. Kefauver is a Ro- 
tarian at Chattanooga 

“Senator Kefauver's Com- 
mittee wants the verdict of an 
organization made up of rep 
resentative citizens, who would 
go over more than 1000 ex. 
hibits, depicting everything 
from nudes to flagellation, and 
suggest legisiation to be rec- 
emmended to the Congress,’ 
Langer said 

Langer said the Bismarck 
Club wass elected because it 
Was a group of representative 
citizens and because it has 
“made a record ds one of the 
outstanding Lions Clubs in the 
country.” 

The exhibits are being sent 
to the club president.«J. S 
Fevold. Each member is asked 
to cast an individual secret vote 
and a decision is asked within 
One month 

Langer indicated that one 
reason the Committee sent a 
call for help to the Bismarck 
Lions is that testimony of ex- 
perts — such as psychologists. 
psychiatrists and sociologists— 
had left the Senators somewhat 
confused. He also hinted that 
the experts may be a little 
mixed up themselves. 


187 Passed 
Maryland Bar 


Examinations 


BALTIMORE, Aug. 30 
Charies C. Rettberg Jr. of sub- 
urban Catonsville received the 
highest score among 187 per- 
s0ns who passed the State Bar) 
examination for July, the Mary- ( 
land Board of Law Examiners 
ennounced today. 

Of those passing, 111 were) 
from Baltimore city. Among 
the counties, Montgomery had 
the largest number. 


Montsomery 
John WM. Ault. 10011 


in icebox. 

The blaze was extinguished 
by firemen from the Mt. Rainier 
‘and Brentwood volunteer fire 
departments. 


= 


ANNAPOLIS, Md., Aug. 30 # 


No longer be ennoved or feel iil- at- | 
bece@tise of joose. woebbiy false 


— ne 


Call RE. 7- 1234, = ne Circulation, and witie The Wash- 
ington Post and Times Herald itahassibie home delivery. 


ee 


_ a . _— ee — _ 


ooo —— 


REPEATING BY POPULAR DEMAND! 


12 NOON io 9 P.M.—9 HOURS 


eo, | 
‘all \OF SAVINGS AT 2-LOCATIONS! 


. @ 


Un Wy 


ar Reductions on Nationally Famous 


AIR 2 CONDITIONERS | 


These. models are all floor samples . . - sll guarantecd anteed! Some slightly 
$389.50 “55 RCA % 


scratched or marred .. «+ many just tke new! 
H. P. with therme $88 


$249.95 1954 SERVEL 
$] 87 1/3 H. P. “Wender- 
stet . — casement 
1955 VICTOR z a. 
vas “gs —— $299.95 1954 FRIGID- $ 
$349.95 vg ae AIRE 4 H. P. Be 
VERSAL % 16 $289. ed 1955 VOR ~ 
flush mount Su. Pw $ 
$239. 95 ‘55 eg $ 
V3 P P. ush ] 
$349. o. 1955 PHILCO $] 89 , 
stat; push-button 188 
controls ¢ 


| hate and 
% H. P. Rush mount 
| $199.95 1955 ADMI- 
$] 66 | RAL V4 H. P. flush 
98 | 
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SAVE! SAVE! SAVE! 
Every Item Marked Down For This Gigantic Sale 


TELEVISION & APPLIANCES! 


Ce coals Nahe eres te annnene Ge suede ave out-of the erates and 


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and every ene a valve! 


$329.95 1955 RCA $198 


Zi«a TY CONSOLE 
5271995 1954 MOTOROLA 71. 


~t. SISO 


mode! 
1955 ADMIRAL 71. 


$148 


im. TV, teble 
model 

REG. $469.95 1953 
SERVEL 11-cu-ft. ICE- 


a2 99 
~ we S159 | 


$229.95 1955 RCA Zin. TV, 


ner $166 


medel 
$229.96 1955 ADMIRAL 2!-in. 


“i $148 


model 
REG. $279.95 1955 
BENDIX IRONER, De 


189 


$3146.05 1954 WESTINGHOUSE 
S ov. . REFRIGERATOR with 


avtemetic de- $1 7 “ 


frost 
$2799.95 1954 BENDIX 


AUTOMATIC $1 ee 


SMALL APPLIANCES 
=. RADIOS” 


Famous Name Floor Seisiahs 


Speen portasie PHONG. *1O4 
“TI 


ta a 


$349.95 1954 NORGE 

18 ew. #. 

memes .. S18 
: 

$199.95 1955 DEEPFREETE 

7 co. %. REFRIGERATOR 


with ecross top $1 1 9 


lreery 
REG. $289.50 1954 
JAMES AUTOMATIC 


Ge NERAL ELECTRIC 


2-Cycle 
Automatic *145 
Washer. 
$519.95 1955 Femeus 

lida. TV 

COMBINATION $244 
$259.95 1954 ZENITH 


ated $169 


tonsele medel 


5499.95 1954 LEONARD 18 cw. 


ht. FREEZER, $249 


upright medel 
$239.95 1955 WHIRLPOOL 


CONSOLE $1 33 


IRONER 
| REG. $169.95 1954 


Fameus a 
Brand Elec- 
tric Dryer. 
$199.95 1955 BENDIX DF 
UKE BLECTRIC 
eevee $129 
$259.95 1954 WESTINGHOUSE 


AUTOMATIC $144 


WASHER 
$179.95 1954 FRIGIDAIRE 


ELECTRIC $11 7 


DRYER 
$129.95 1954 ADMIRAL 


17-4. TV, $97 


teble medel 
Reg. $219.95 1955 
FAMOUS MAKE 2}-in. 


TV, Table 99 


Model 
$199.95 1954 WESTINGHOUSE 


ELECTRIC $116 


mveR 


$539.95 1955 Femeus Make 72!- 
m, Jeway COMBINATION 


AM/FM RADIO, $269 


$17.95 WASHINGTON SENA- 

TORS BASEBALL RADIO 

$39.95 INFRA-RED ROTISSERIE 

BROILER . 

$28.95 12-CuP AUTOMATIC $] 3 

COFFEEMAKER . 

$16.95 WAFFLE BAKER & SAND- ‘ee 

WICH GRILL ... 

$39.95 AUTOMATIC FRYER- $38 
14 


1 Crestwood roeé 


heater and thermo- 
mount with therme- 


stat 

$399.95 1955 Welbilt 
1-Ton flush mount 
Heater and Therme- ¢ 
stat, push button 


control 


| BE Cott N an 
ane Pronk r Cr 3513 Parthing drive 
aber c 907 Aug 


washer, * 159 
washer, 

COOKER | Port. Model 

$29.95 KNAPP MONARCH 

CHEFSTER $279.95 1954 THOR 

$59.95 DISC Autometic WASHER 


RECORDER 


ALL FANS 


(FLOOR SAMPLES) 


30% to 50%. 


DISCOUNTS 


$249.95 WEBCOR CONSOLE ¢ 
| Hi-Fi PHONO, 3 speckers .. 179 


$385.00 ZENITH AM-FM ¢ 
( Hi-Fi COMBINATION 249 

$19.95 ELECTRIC HAND MIXER, $1} 
4 G.E., K.M. OR WARING 

$5.95 4-PIECE ALUMINUN CAN- $9 

$19.95 AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC $7 4 


ISTER SET . 
TOASTER 
An 


$349.95 1955 VOR- 
NADO %4 H. P. with 
$319.95 1955 MITCH. 
FLL 4 iH. P. flush 
$299.95 1954 Famous 
aod Vy H. P. CASE- 


1955 
tebie 


$299 95 
$2099 95 1955 FAMOUS 
“% H. P. 

— Mount. Uses 
only 7“ Amps. ‘* 


$489.95 1955 DEEPFREEZE 


13% eu. #. $279 


Chest FREEZER 
REG. $279.95 1955 
MAYTAG AUTOMAT- | 


$159 | 


nn r 
Seeener il Sherman ave. bot 


oe 3 i 
vi 3220 Leéend 
Meu: nihe* 4520 igh oft 


r.. 233 


at 
bob 


: 
pee man. 1310 Thern- 
erty. 3 Stanler ot..| 


€ 


IC WASHER, Take the 


179 


$159.95 1954 CONLON 

-ONSOLE 

lower $99 
1955 FAMOUS MAKE 


$219 


work out § 
A Leseaat 


tt! mo 

Holmes. RFD 3. Gal therrburgs | 
eore. 4716 Strathmere are 

rreta Park 
Prince Geereces 
William Evereti ~~ eo A domes 
sown, rd.: Harol Ma lape| 
Pi oO Tresansxy “rit Fulsne rd. | 
al ot 


aves taville 
Town L. Dawson and Hele Cc Dit- 


an Collese Park: Samuel F los mi and 
onn BB. Perna : Rainier. Lione v 
anhart i tevensen. 
sf ; McDo 


vid A. Me- 


Sensational Ser 


poe 


aT 0% 
MODERN 4 ge G 
nesn & CHA uTrit 


luxe 
Censole. 


i 


Ge ier ast 125 
Res. 81799 


gems, Sian aera. 9D 
$144 
sore 


we $99 
$25 


_ J Sane with 


$469 50 
15 cv. &. PREEZER, 


m bis 
1 Sangemore rd 
eller 468 (CO Wa 


rner "“ASTONAL 


CHANNEL-BACK Oct 
styled ie fine fa? 
on 94 


‘ o—_ - $25 NTs he del 
Re tifeity ver me 
ries, O@F DECORATOR BREARFRONT prig 


yy 
a= 
osae. os. 
MODERN 
All-rabber 


choice of coters. 
2190.95. 


MODERN HIGH *eTyLe Ly a? —_ 
iInG BROOM aviTEes ation 

Censists of ao Sag 
chair match 0 
6189.95 


‘919 


*219 


$299.95 
10 cu. ft. 
REFRIG. 


WASHER 
$349.95 1954 CROSLEY 


10 ev. ff $219 || 


REFRIGERATOR 
REG $159.95 1954 
ZENITH, 17-in. TV, 


Table +7 T 9 | 


Model. 
$249.95 1954 DEEPFREEZE 


10 ew. ff. $1 59 


REFRIGERATOR 
$229.95 1954 HOTPOINT - 


7 ow. ft. 

REFRIGERATOR $1 69 
REG. $579.95 1955 
DEEPFREEZE, 16 cw. 
ft. Upright FREEZER, 
Food Protection War- 
ranty, % 

rom. DOP 
Ceontrel, 


sofa ana 
wr 


“ 
Z 
€ Re 
© . 


| 
iel-on-the- mecrrOxst, 


4128 | 


MODERN HIGH-STYLE pi 
fy CMAILRS 


aS 
MODERN LOUSG a 


High- stv she room 
Over Res. 54 s. 


Farm i 
Lured to 2 
Virginia Fairs $5.95 ELECTRIC 

“ HAIR DRYER OCCASIONAL TABLE 


Many styies end eo 


By Aubrey Graves =| @ 1. $5.95 NYLON-GEARED HAND ¢ choose 
Country Life Editer ' MIXER 9 
WOODSTOCK, Va., Aug. 30 

There'll be little farm work ¥Bi $39.95 ELECTRIC HEATER with $19 

thermostatic control | 
$12.95 WROUGHT IRON TV $3 

SWIVEL STAND 

*4 


done in Middle Shenandoah 
$9.95 AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC 
$ 
39 


Valley this week. 
Most boys and girls who nor- 
TIMER .... 
$89.95 UNIVERSAL jet 99 
Many, Many, Many Other Unadver- 
tised Bargains at Equally Startling 


mally do chores will be away 
VACUUM CLEANER 
Savings! 


from home, at the fairs. Not 
EASY TERMS! 


just one but two—Page County) 
DOWNTOWN STORE 


and Shenandoah County Fairs.| 
8th & c Sts. N W. 


Here in Woodsteck and 
across the Massanuttens in 

OPEN TODAY, WEDNESDAY 12 NOON TO 9 P.M. 
FREE CUSTOMER PARKING Adjacent te the Store 


ecolers. OF 


ne 
Select frem = oe... 


finish. OFF 


$37.50 SUNBEAM 
COFFEEMASTER 

$12.95 WESTINGHOUSE 
IRON 


2ida. TV 
console medel 


LIvVIne 


FIsCure 


and matepies 
Oar 


Ome $129 
$329.95 1955 ADMIRAL 40-n. 
De Luxe ELECTRIC 
RANGE 


moses” 2-PC. SOFA BED 
7 Senses fabrics. 
wie ‘tried, oe $99 


MAFLE Bt vx 


INNERSPRING MATTRESSES 

Cheice ef fall or twin give 

MODERN SOFA LOUNGES 
Ad jest 7 full- wage 
Oar Ree. 9.95 


$199 


REG. $129.95 1954 
NATIONAL BRAND 
WRINGER WASHER 


*69 


$499.95 1955 BENDIX | 
COMBINATION. P2PO 
tain TV, table $169 


model 


Our 
PHONO 
$299.95 1955 DEEPFREEZE 


8 cu. ft. Chest $1 77 


FREEZER 
$299.95 1954 WESTINGHOUSE 


30-in. ELECTRIC $149 


RANGE 


REG. $134.50 1954 
Famous Make 36-in. 


Gas Range, ‘38 


OARD BED ol reiTs 
wEADRO with mattress. eee. $33 
frame and he adbeore Our 
659.95 

ROCKERS $32 
poked al base am. ,poouses 
eslers, Over Rec. §* 
noom SUITE 

your incisdins soe $79 


« Three 
Our Res. 3139 Me 


$209.95 1954 EMERSON | 


couonrat 


with. guere reall. ~ ¥ janer- 
reeses end 
*9 


+99 


cots 
rouDNe with mattress 26-inch $20 
s Oar Res. $47.55. pn 


springs. 


Big Work 
Sever. 


| With Pump, 


dresser, chest. 
wainat finish. 


Exceptional 
Savings! 


Luray 4-H clubbers and Future 
Farmers today are parading 
goats. sheep, pigs, ponies. 
and dairy cows before meticu- 
lous judges from Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute. 

Both fairs will continue 
through Saturday night. More 
than 20 yofngsters were on 
hand with their ‘mounts” to 
take part in pony races, today's 
feature event at Woodstock. 

In the beef cattle competi- 
tion, Strathmore Farms of Mt. 
Jackson, owned by ~Warren'| 
Richardson and FE. M. Jenks 
families, ran away with most 
blue ribbons in the Horned 
Hereford classes. G.: B. Holtz- 
man, lone exhibitor of black 
Angus cattle, brought 12 fine 
animals and took as many 

_ ribbons. Merville F. Fravel of 
Woodstock showed the top 
» Shorthorn bull. | 


: Sie Gai( { 


Sorry, no mail, phone, or C.0.D. orders. Take your purchase with you and 
save delivery cost. Installation and service extra, where desired. Merchandise 
subject te prior sale. NOT ALL MODELS JAT BOTH LOCATIONS. 


NORTHEAST STORE 


1021 H St. N.E. 


OPEN TODAY, WEDNESDAY 12 NOON UNTIL 9 P.M, 
Completely Air Conditioned for Your Shopping Comfort 


ie | 


* ia ‘ 


is 
Mornin 


CHICAGO, Aug. 30—The polite talk has been going 
on for days around the barns. In the establishments of 
Swaps and Nashua nobody is mad at anybody in the 
stable. Their comments, in fact, have bordered on sweet- 
talk. But nobody has beén deluding anybody, either. 

When the bell rings tomorrow and the Washingtcdh Park 
stall gates open for Swaps and Nashua, 

they. know it will be an equine silug- 
ging match. But on the whole, it has 
been so wholesome that horse racing 


in this instance is even a cut above | 


other sports, : 


This one is tantamount to the heavy- 


weight championship of the turf, with 
the two best ones in there head to 
head. »But there is none of the I'll- 
moider-de-bum boasts or the suspicion 
that a horseshoe is being stashed in 
somebody's glove. 

The contrast with such low goings- 
on is great. Mr. Sunny Jim Fitzsim- 
mons, who trains Nashua, says he 
doesn't know if his colt can beat a 

great horse like Swaps. Misch Tenney, Swaps’ co-owner and 
trainer, says his colt will have to be at his very best to win. 


THE DELIGHTFUL informality of the pre-race doings 
would almost throw you. Hollywood press agents surround 
their numbskull starlets with more circumstance than is or- 
dered up for the two great ones of racing. What has been go- 
ing on around the barns has been almost country fair. 

In the eves of Mr. Fitz, Nashua is a great colt, but not ex- 
actly sacred. “Get closer, pat him,” he suggested to a group 
af sightseers today who bashfully stood their distance, content 
merely to gaze on the famous son of Nasrullah. 

Misch Tenney, who calls the routine for Swaps, doesn’t 
panmtper his colt any more than he did his cow ponies when he. 
and Rex Ellsworth were poor cowpokes trying to get a stake. 
After a public workout the other day for thousands lining the 


rail, he deliberately led Swaps close to the rail on the return | 


to the paddock 

“You can pet him,” he told the fans. “He likes it.” The sur- 
prised rail-birds did, and Swaps did like it and he nuzzied close 
to them. Men like Mr. Fitz and Tenney and colts like Swaps 
and Nashua may yet humanize this racing business 

EVERYBODY WAS UP at six this morning to go on Dave 
Garroway's national television program. The two animals sub- 
mitted te the cameras and behaved as if it were an everyday 
routine. Tenney himself hopped on Swaps’ back, then difted 
his eon into the saddle. Mr. Fitz, $1, bantered with Garroway. 

“When I'm on television, I know I have a good horse,” said 
Mr. Fitz.” They don’t put me on because of myself.” 

tt has all been so disarming. Tom Smith, the man who 
trained Seabiscut for the War Admiral race in 1998, was re- 
calling today that he used to work his colt on foggy mornings 
to keep the clockers away and everything else was hush-hush. 

“Now they stage their workouts publicly and tell each other 
what kind of strategy they expect to use.” said Smith. “We 
know The Biscuit could gun out in front of War Admiral, but 
we weren't telling anybody.” Same thing in War Admiral's 
barn. They. shooed the strangers away with pitchforks. 

OF COURSE. it is not all philanthropic because Swaps and 
Nashua will be running for a $100,000 purse.as somebody 
pointed out. But somebody else could point out that $100,000 
purses these days are quite common and that there is still a 
great deal of sporting to this race because it is winner-take- 
all. and in other hundred-thousand-dollar races there is $30,- 
000 second moncy, not in this one. If you ran second in this 
one, you run last. 

But the nice thing about a horse race like this is that every- 
body comes out to see the horse win, unlike some sports where 
they want to see a swell-headed champion get knocked off, or 
a biz-shot ball club get a fall taken out of it. Nobody really 
roots for horses to lose. A horse really has no enemies. The 
private life of a horse can’t be very much resented, you know 

I suppose I should pick somebody to win the race. You'd 
have to be a maverick and go against all principles of handi- 
capping to pick against Swaps. I cant, quite, although at the 
same time 1am a Nashua fan. Whichever wins this race. 
I hope it is by a lip because the other doesn't deserve to get 
beaten any worse. 


A _—_—_— ee 
ee ~_ 


-_ 


5-Hitter for Kellner 


A’s Beat Yanks, 4-3, 


On Homer by Lopez 


30 (n—Hector Lopez's fifth inning home 
out of first place in the American 

pert pal Sig pn City athletics shaded the 
Yankees, 43, behind Alex Keliners five-hit pitching 
The costly defeat and the° ; 
Chicago White Sox 7-5 victory 
the pennant 


KANSAS CITY, Aug 


Trabert, Hoad 
In Same Half of 


National Tennis 


over Boston, left 
race like this 

Chicago 

New York 78 52 

Cleveland 78 «32 

Lopez’ homer came off Bob 
Grimm, hurler 
to lead off the The 
Yankees, who the 
in in- 
cr Kellner 


7& «(G1 


the national 
opening 


3 w—lIe 
championships, 


third Yankee 
fifth inning 
had ifed 
half of the 
touch 


Trabert and Vic 
will get a chance 
their firstdlay defeats in 


Davis Cup challenge round 


Tony 
score tneir 
ning. couldnt 
thereafter 

Vic Power also homered with 
none on for the Athietics in 
the third inning when the A's 
scored twice. Gus Zernial’s dou- 
ble and Suitcase Simpson's 
single brought in the other run. 

The Athletics may have lost 
the services of Demaestri who 
was-struck on the right arm by 
a pitched bal! in the fourth in- 
ning. Demaestri was taken to 
the University of Kansas megi- 
cal center for examination and 
it was feared that he may have 
suffered a broken arm. ) 

The game produced a near) 
brawl in the seventh inning 
when Johnny Kucks, the final 
Yankee hurler. sent Power 
plunging into the dirt with a 
high fast ball 
NEW YORK. 


half of the 
Lewis 


in the same 


with Australia’s Hoa 


Seixas, opposite his 
bugaboo, Ken Rosewall 


ture in the seedings, 


finals on Saturday, Sept. 10. 


Nats Box 


WASHINGTON 


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Fri- 
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to avenge 
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The draw today placed Tra- 
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draw . 
q cause of Colts holding. 
and the defending titleholder, 
longtime 


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WEDNESDY, AUGUST 31, 1955 


BASEBALL 
RADIO-TY 


CLASSIFIED: 


Two Tigers 


Homer as 


ports 


1 
Close Game 


At 28-28 


By Jack Walsh 
Staff Reporter 

BALTIMORE, Aug. 30—The 
Washington Redskins, looking’ 
like a powerhouse for three 
periods and enjoying a 28-7 
lead, were almost chased out 
of mammoth Memorial Stadium 
tonight when the Baltimore 
| Colts rallied to earn a 28-28 tic. 
| A partisan crowd of 23,280 
went wild as their beloved 
iColts made Washington look 
‘very much like a band of dis- 
‘organized Indians. 
| It started innocently enough 


©. (Spike) Briggs Jr.. president 
and one-fifth owner of the De 
troit Tigers, said tonight that 
any reports he would leave his 
‘present post and make a bid 
for the Washington Nationals 
were purely “conjecture, rumor 
and watered facts.” 


chance, he found himself forced 
to give up his financial interest 
in the Tigers, he would “look 
around for another baseball 
club and the Nats would be the 
_| most appealing.” 
: He elaborated: 
tend to leave 
tiwhole thing 
volved. 


STATISTICS 


First downs rushing “I don't 

- Detroit. The 
is extremely in- 
But let's suppose that 
it does become necessary to 
give up the Tigers. First I 
would attempt to get back run- 
ning a manufacturing company. 
[ ran the Briggs Manufactur- 
ing Company for several years, 
you know. 


in- 


_— 


hen Jack Scarbath, who had 
a miserable time of it early in 
the evening, finally got the 
Colts to Skins’ seven as the 
third period neared its Close. 

Scarbath was roughed up and 
Georc: Shaw came back in at 
that point. L. G. (Long Gone) 
Dupre, contained fairly well 
all night, gained 3 yards and 
the teams changed goals. 


years to clear up my affairs 
Then 4 wouldn't mind at all— 
again providing I decided to 
go back into baseball—having 
the Washington franchise. I'm 
not making any bid to Mr 
(Clark) Griffith and he certain. 
ly hasn't offered me his ball 
club 

“All of this 1 
of conjecture. You go out of 
business in your tailor shop 
because the lease is up and you 
want to find another 
When the rumor says I'd want 
the Washington franchise, 
must say. who wouldn't? 
say all this 


Dupre, Then Pelington in the realm 


Dupre promptly scored on a 
4-yard smash on the first play 
of the fourth quarter 

Starter Ralph Guglielmi who 
failed to compléte a pass in 
8 attempts, got off a wild throy 
that Baltimore guard Bill Pell- 
ington intercepted on Washing- 
ton'’s 35 and carried into the 


end zone, dragging Guglielmi 
with him 


LeBaron'’s Pass Wild 


That made it 28-21 with 11:42 

left and little Eddie LeBaron 
came back in to restore order 
LeBaron, who had a lot to do 
with the Redskins gaining their 
vearly lead, clicked off two first 
|downs bul threw a third down 
‘pass a ta Guglielmi. 
. This one was picked off by 
Carl Taseff on the Colts 40 and 
he scampered 34 yards to the 
Redskins 26 

Shaw. who didnt get a 
chance in the All-Star game in 
i\Chicago but ‘outperformed 
Guglielmi tonight, threw a .20- 
yarde? to Buddy Young He 
followed with a six-yard touch 
down shot to End Jim Mutsche! 
ler with 3:33 left and it was 
all tied up at 28-28. 

At the end, it was the Colts 
threatening. Shaw passed to 
|Mutscheller for a 39-yard -gain 
ito the Redskins 49 and with 27 
iseconds ieft Bert Rechichar 
missed a 47-yard field goal at 
tempt. 


Lucky at That 


If this had been one of those 
sudden-death playoffs, the 
i\Skins might not have come out 
of it alive 

That tremendous fourth-pe- 
riod surge by the Colts indicat- 
ed that they finally got over 
the surprise handed them by 
little LeBaron when the game 
was only two minutes old. 
| With fourth down and eight 
jto go, eLBaron came in to punt 
from the Colts 40. Instead he 
‘ran, and he didn't stop run- 
ining until he reached the 
Colts end zone. When the first 
‘Colt, who had a good shot at 
him, missed, LeBaron went 
the vesg-of the way without a 
hand being laid upon him 

Scarbath, completing only 
two of his first eight passes, 
was given plenty of trouble by 
his old teammates. Scarbath, 
‘generally working deep in his 
own territory, had the furthér 
tough luck of having 46 and 38. 
yard completions nullified be- 


I 
assuming every- 


Gift Runs 


By Shirley Povich 
Btalt Revortver 

CHICAGO, Aug. 30 — The 
White Sox, aided continuously 
by their opponents of the eve- 
ning, the fumbling, dSungling 
Red Sox, tonight vaulted back 
into the lead in the hectic 
American League pennant 
race. 

They were blessed by 
atrocious Boston errors 
won the ball game, 7 to 5 

The Yankees’ defeat in 
Kansas City dropped that team 
imto a second-place tie with 
Cleveland 

It was well for the Red Sox 
that they played this one be- 
fore 41,166 Chicago citizens and 
not their. home-town Boston 
fans, because they would not 
have been much admired in 
Boston for their play this 
evening. 

Twice they tossed away two- 
run leads they held over the 
White Sox. At the tinish, they 
handed Chicago six gift runs. 
One of these was forced across 
the plate. The five others were 
unearned 

Even Ted Williams was one 
of the miscreants, 
Boston's worst. It was his 
schoolboy muff of a soft line 
drive to left field by Nellie 
Fox in the sixth inning that 
put the tying and wining runs 
in Scoring position for George 
Kell’s thunderous triple that 
followed 


four 
and 


hopes, flickering more brightly 
than ever when they got two 
gift runs fro:. Virgil Trucks 
in the second inning, went dim 
Hecker Grabs It 


Right after that, throwing be- 
hind his goal, Scarbath heaved 
that Norb Hecker inter- 
‘cepted on the Colts 35. Le- 
‘Baron came in and steered the) 
Skins toward their  secand| 


are now 4% games behind the 
lead. 


straight win, was a speedy 
See BOSOX, Page 37, Col. 4 


In Realm of Conjecture 


Briggs Interested in Nats 
If He Has to Give Up Tigers 


DETROIT, Aug. 30—Walter** 


Spike did say that if, by any’ 


“Secondly, if I decided that | 
[ wanted to stay in baseball, it | — 
still would take me a couple of” 


shop.| benefit of all the heirs. the ball 
iclub would be 


Iifranchise, including Briggs 


Chisox Take First Plae 


Boston Hands 
Chicago Six | 


perhaps } 


The Red Sox's own pennant < 


again at the night's end. They 7 


Trucks, trying for his sixth | 


Hoeft Beats 
Nats, 4-0 


By Bob Addie 
) Staff Reporter 


The Nats beat the best 
But lose to the rest. 


| DETROIT, Aug, 30—The Nats 
is “Let's face it,” he said. “You \definitely proved the Detroit’ 
don\, make any money out ofy Tigers are no longer contenders 
baseljall and that large amount | but they did it in a reverse way! 
of ney the Tigers represent here tonight by losifig to Billy 
could be invested in something Hoeft, 40, before a crowd of| 
which yields bigger returns. | 20,097. 
‘Part of the assets of the estate| Hoeft allowed only four 
are almost 10,000 shares Of)singles and the Nats looked 
Stock in the ball club. When reminiscently ine pt. That's 
that stock becomes part of the how you could tell the Tigers 
trust, it must be sold. are out of the pennant race 
“And then we're back where because against the contenders 
I'd be a trustee and couldn't the Griffs seem to be inspired. | 
‘buy. But I'm trying to get a' Thus far on this trip the) 
syndicate together and I think Nats have lost two in a row to! 
I have the men I want in the the going-nhowhere Kansas City 
club. We can make an offer! Athletics. But they whipped! 
‘and my sisters must accept. ‘Chicago two out of three and| 
) “We have a tremendous ex- stunned Cleveland by sweeping! 
“ pense here in Detroit since we a double-header. The Nats, 
| '— own our own stadium. That apparently, are good only when 
| may sound funny to you but/the chips are down and Detroit: 
think of the deals that clubs/is a bit too far down the ladder 
| | \like Kansas City,Cleveland and for any pennant ambitions at 
'Milwaukee have. Their stadi-|this stage. 
/ums are municipally owned. I moore Posts No. 14 
costs a lot of money to keep up aa, 
Briggs Stadium and we don't 


Walter 0. “Spike” Briggs Southpaw Hoeft must not 
» «+ He likes tt here ; 
municipally owned stadiums.” (pings. He toyed with the “giant- 
“That's the coming deal if killers” as he won his 14th of 
awners of baseball clubs hope the year and his fourth straight 
to survive. We must draw 1.100...0ver the Nats without a loss 
000 people to break even. We this season 
should do that this year. How-| The young lefty didn't give 
ever that figure also includes\up a hit until there was one 
the revenue we get from con-'out in the fifth. Not a Wash- 
cessions, broadcasts, etc. Unlike ington man reached = third 
Washington, if we didn’t in-'Chuck Dressen, third-base’ 
clude the various by-products,'coach, Was a lonesome man 
we'd have to draw over 1,500,-|this cool evening. 
000 a year Pedro Ramos, fresh off his 
“At amy rate, I should know two-hit shutout of the White 
something within a couple of Sox last week, mede only two 
weeks.” mistakes. He gave up twin 
Spike is well known to homers to Bill Tuttle (No. 14) 
Washingtonians. He married a'and to Frank House (No. 13) 
ernest girl and attended! with one man on base in each 
seorgetown University in the! instance. That was enough to 
early 1930s.—Bob Addie. ‘beat him. Dean Stone and 
~- [Camilo Pascual mopped up 
| The Tigers got eight hits in all. 
Hoeft and Ramos were in a 
hot duel until the third inning! 
when Harvey Kuenn singled 
_and Tuttle parked one into the) 
lupper left-field seats to give 
the Tigers a 20 lead. | 


thing else worked out in De- 
troit that I lost the Tigers.” 

The of the probable 
sale of the Tigers was brought 
out last week when it was 
learned that the Briggs estate 
soon will get the bill from the 
Treasury Department for in 
heritance taxes 

Spike further explained that 
in streamlining the estate and 
investing the money for the 


story 


suspect. (The 


Stadium and other assets, is 
valued at over $4 million.) 


Sentleennenlinenemenemeetttien tidied 


Tribe Defeats Orioles, 
7-4; Lemon Wins No. 15 


CLEVELAND, Aug. 30 ®—Bob Lemon won his 15th game | 


Practically the sme 
‘happened in the fourth when 
Jim Delsing walked and House 
junloaded one in the opposite 
\direction to give Detroit a 40 
edge. 

As it turned out, that's all 


tonight as his Clevelahd Indians capitalized on Jim Wilson's the Tigers needed. They did! 
ifollow up their spree in the | 


fourth inning with two moretsShoemaker, one of the win- 
singles but Ramos worked him- ningest riders the sport has 


wildness and beat the Baltimore Orioles, 7-4. 

Lemon, who has lost eight, gave up 12 hits but whlked only 
two. Don Mossi came in to fan*- . em 
the final batter in the ninth ) 
inning, after Lemon had yielded more in the sixth on three sin-| py 
two singles with two out 

it was Cleveland's 16th vic- 
tory over the Orioles this sea- 
son, against only three losses 

Wilson, who was beaten for 
the fifth time by the Indians, 
walked eight before he was re- 
lieved in the seventh inning. 


' |self out of trouble. 


walks, a single and a double by — genius, Kaline, in the) 


Hal Naragon. A double play’ The Nats, meanwhile, were 
before Naragon’s double had creating their own cold wave | 
erased two runners. i 


For $100,000 


get the break that clubs do with /have read the Nats’ press clip-| 


‘strip, but 


Al Kaline singled in the fifth | 
t was rubbed out on a double | 
gles and two walks, and another! play. After that, the only other | ing—William 
in the seventh on two more Tiger hit was another single by| owner 


See NATS, Page 37, Col. 1 |} 


In Today’s Match 
It’s Swaps 
Vs. Nashua 


By Walter Haight 
Staff Reporter 
CHICAGO, IIL, Aug. 
Swaps vs Nashua — it's 


36 
the 


‘showdown show and away thoy 


go tomorrow. 

Swaps is West and Nashwa 
is East and the twain is meet- 
ing in the race America asked 
for and Washington Park ar- 
ranged. 

Barring a dead heat, some- 
thing’s got to give before 
wards of 50,000 watching in the 
fiesh and millions seeing on 
TV. . 
Doubtful, it is, if the sport oF 
kings, queens, butchers 
bakers and Indian chiefs 
worked up the nation-wide 


ee — 


Swaps Nashua Race 


On WTOP.-TYV, 


Today's match race 
tween Swaps and Nash 
from Washington Park., 
will be televised in W 
ton by WTOP-TYV (Chan 
5), at 6 p. m. The race w 
be broadcast by WTOP (156% 
ke.), at 6:15 p. m. > 


— 
terest centered in this winne?- 
take-all struggle. 

Two of the, most brilliant 3- 
year-olds in thareughbred bie. 
tory ever to come aiong in 
same year will answer 
year's most provocative 
tion in the 1531-foot stra 
away, longest homestretch Jn 
thoroughbred racing — 
“Street of Broken Dreams” fer 
one side or the other 

The match race of the - 
tury, they're calling it, this 
long-awaited battle with the 
conditions of the Derby and 
Preakness, 126 pounds at a 
mile and one-quarter. Jie 
winner gets $100,000 and the 
loser may be too tired te @&t 
his supper. 

The race, in the making evér 
since that May day when 
Nashua moved to Swaps in 
the Kentucky Derby streteh 
and Swaps moved away, is 
likely to be contested on dh 
“off” track. 

Both camps had hoped f 
do their “best on a fast, dry 
two and one-half 
inches of rain fell last night. 


‘The course was muddy today 
House Hits Homer — 


thing | 


with a bright sun and a strong 
wind at work, giving the indi- 
cation that ‘good’ would be the 


|match-race posttime condition. 


The test not only involves 


ithe tops in sophomore ¢olts 
| but 


brings together two of 
America’s outstanding jockeys 
— Eddie Arcaro, regarded as 
the country’s ace money rider 
aboard Nashua and Willie 


known, on Swaps. 

Also it matches two & the 
most colorful owners in rac- 
Woodward dJr., 
of Belair Stud and 
Nashua, and Rex Elisworth of 
Chino, Calif, owner of Swa 

Trainers Sunny Jim 
simmons of the Belair Stud 


See RACE, Page 36, Col. 1 


and Clevelnad turned four of 
the walks into runs. 


—————p 


Al Smith's 20th home run in’ 
the third inning, scoring Lemon 
who had walked, opened Cleve- 
land's scoring. The Orioles 
took a 3-2 lead in the fifth on a 
walk by. Don Leppert and 
singles by Willie Miranda, Wil-| 
son and Fred Marsh. 

Cleveland tied it in the same | 
inning on another walk, a'| 
single, and an error by Catcher | 
Hal Smith, who dropped a fair 
pop fly. | 
The Indians added three 

> . > > — > > 


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WHEEL ALIGNMENT 


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Reg. 
$7.50 ‘ae’ at ovr 


Adjust Front Ené 


R—Mareh, Leppert 
Smith 2. Evers 
land. Lemon E 


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eft.Baltimore 16. Cleveland 8 
Lemon 2. 80+W 


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23. Messi © in 1-3. R-BER™ Wilson 7 


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‘touchdown, Vic Janowicz going! | 

‘ever from the three. eed 

' The Colts cut into Washing-) 

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‘when Shaw took over for Scar-' 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 

W L PCT. GB. 
605 
4600 
400 
574 4 
504 13 
AlS = 

; 365 30's 

‘Baltimore 325 35% 


YESTERDAY'S RESULTS 
Chicago, 7; Boston, 5. 
Kansas City, 4; New York, 3. 
Detroit, 4; WASHINGTON, 0. 
| Cleveland, 7; Baltimore, 4. 
TODAY'S PITCHERS 
Baron threw a pass that Charlie) Boston at Chicago—Brewer 
Jones on gg phted ame only |(9.9) ys. Keegan (0-4) | 
42 seconds léft, LeBaron threw} ¢ | 
a strike that. Jones latched| New York at Kansas City (N), 
onto in the end zone for. his'~-Byrne (12-4) vs, Portocarrero 
first professional reception to | (5-6). 
make it 21-7, Redskins. Washington at 


Early in the third period, schmi 
Royce Womble was hit hard! gm lhe ee ge: Bowe 


See SKINS, Page 37, Col. 3 | Wight (3-5) vs. Score (13-10). 


y ) ) 


with Alan Ameche 


~ oh Chicago 

; New York 
Cleveland 
Boston . 
Detroit 


Is 
r 
But those first-half Redskins, 


».| WASH. 
With 52 
the kicking team came in for 
an apparent field goal try from 
the Colts’ 14. | 


Le-| 


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| Brooklyn 


Detroit— 


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Chicago, 3; Philadelphia, 1. 

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Road N.E. 


|Jeffcoat 
Saves Cubs’ 
3-1 Victory 


Haris, Shoulder Hurt, 


Begins Saturday To Miss Bike Race 


The Northern Virginia clay) MANCHESTER, England, 
court doubles tennis tourna-| Aug. 30 #—Reg Harris, Bri- 
ment will be held Saturday, | tain’s four-time world cham- 
Sunday and Monday at the|pion, announced today that an 
Buckingham Tennis Club in | RUry would keep him out of 
Arlington. There will be men’s' the world professional bicy- 
doubles and mixed doubles\cling championships which 
us | competition. starts in Milan tomorrow. 
Information may he obtained | “] dislocated my left shouler 

1 |in an accident at a or ga 
ja week ago;” he said. “My 
shoulder ligaments were badly 
torn in the same crash and it is 
impossible for me to ride.” 


CEE AF | 


y", 
~ ~~ & 
a= OO) SHAVE 


Kluszewski Belts Nos. 42, 43 : 
Giants Take Twin Bill; 


Mays Homers Twice 


NEW YORK, Aug. 30 #—The ing gw to ‘e a ag Rae a 
New York Giants snapped a uppe s total to 4, placing 
Begg maneghen. « 8% ne | five-game losing streak by/him in a runnerup tie with Brooklyn held on for an 86) 

. pyretagaing OS \sweeping a twi-night double-'Brooklyn’s Duke Snider, who'decision over the Milwaukee |from the club, Jackson 5-112 
bullpen to halt an eighth-inning | header from Cincinnaty tonight, belted one tonight. In the night-! Braves tonight, giving Don oT the Tennis Shop, Nationa 
uprising by the Philadelphia! scoring four unearned runs for cap Chuck Harmon also hom- Newcombe his 19th triumph of 8-5165. 

Phillies and enabled the Chi-/4 50 first poop wey -— ered for Cincinnati. the sensant~-bie, firet victory 
. | overpow e Redlegs in the ; this month~although the big : : 

cago Cubs to take a 3-1 deci Ihighte ye : (First Game righthander left the game af Army Hires Trainer | 

sion tonight. | Ted Szewski and Willie jter six innings when he com-| MEMPHIS, Tenn., Aug. 30 (# | 

Jeffcoat came in to relieve Mays each hit.a pair of home| \plained of a tightened muscle Charley Saad, Memphis base-' 
Sam Jones with one out and the runs in the afterpiece. Big) in his back . iball club trainer since 1952,! 
bases loaded. He got Willie Kiu ran hié major league lead-| The victory puslied the Na-|said today he had accepted a 
Jones to hit into a force play,) ‘ 
scoring a run, and Eddie Wait- * 


tional League-leading Dodgers position on the training staff, 
kus to fly out, easing the Cubs 
Dodgers Recall 


Virginia Tennis 


Newcombe . 
Wins 19th; 


Braves Bow 


BROOKLYN, Aug. 30 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERA 
32 "Wednesday, August 31, 1955 Cy 


Bob Addie’s | 


Column... 


—o 


DETROIT, Aug. 30—Perhaps nowhere else is human 
nature so starkly naked as at a race track, Strictly for 
laughs (since I gave up affording the races long ago), I 
took in a double-header here which shows me a glutton 


for punishment. 

The twin bill of racing consisted of going to Hazel Park in 
the afternoon, where they have TUM- pens — 
ners, and then dashing over to the | 'S 
Wolverine track, where the harness 
horses are holding forth in the eve. 
ning. 

My host was C. W. (Larry) Smith, 
an amiable giant who used to play 
football for Georgia Tech and now 
heads an engineering firm here. Mr 
Smith undoubtedly is shining proof 
that football players do graduate 
once in a while because, as everybody 
knows, the Ramblin’ Wrecks from. 
Georgia Tech specialize in engineer- 
ing—also with turning out a consis- 
tent visitor to bow! games every New 
Year's Day. Addie 

It all started out when Larry Smith wanted to go to Hazel 
Parks to see some fillies and colts he has stabled there. The 
races already were in progress when we go there, and the 
stables were quiet in the warm, sleepy afternoon, with here (£ 
and there a groom cooling out a horse which had just per- 
formed. 


a 


Temp) 
he 
s'exi.ib 
LF 


59° 


13 games ahead of the second of the United States Military’ 
place Braves. Academy at West Point, N. Y. 
out of the jam. * , 
The Cubs’ Jones had himself; 


Newcombe, who had lost 
t three-hit shutoot until ewes Peralane, oy = Mil- 

a nea ree-hit shetott until) wau on uta Nee Gave 

he lost sight of the plate in tne 16 Players,From z 

ighth and walk ree men. . 

tsever, with, Jeffcoat's abie\ Minor Leagues 

assistance, Jones earned his! 

twelfth victory against 17 de-) BROOKLYN, Aug. 30 @ 

feats. iThe Brooklyn Baseball Club 

, announced today the recall of 
Bate’ i 16 players from their minor 
| Merrean it 


+28 
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“en 
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— os ne 


TU, v 
et ‘emeeere eee 
New FerB uci: 
R—Ga 
on fet 
ae 


a OO er 
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olen on 4 G+ 

lick, Jackowski. | 
SECOND GAME 


smacked | 
ot four Milwaukee pitchers for 12) 
hits, including a pair of home| 
runs by Roy Campanella, led’ 
84 when Newk depart d. 
Milwaukee got its other two) 
runs in the ninth, with George | 
Crow hitting a one-on homer 
off Rookie Don Bessent. Clem | 
Labine came on then to fan | 


PHILADEL 


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oy 
+ 


Ashburn cf 
Morgan.«e 


> 


Cv uw su 2 8e4og 


men to join 
the next ten days. if 
From Montreal: Pitchers) auc 


Glenn Cox and Ken Lehman: | Andy Pafko for the final out. 


e@o--+22—-9023--—-33 
@® @ Pes Drs vorars 1 Z 


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® infielders Charlie Neal and emeniat 
* Humberto Chico Fernandez; | Sbuzes 
¢ outfielder Gino Cimoli. From | Kler's.. 
‘St. Paul: Pitchers Bob Darnell, $207 
sR Jim Hughes and Charlie Tem-| Be*, 
one os 1-3 pleton; Catcher Charles Thomp- aMe at 
me _*—* \son, first baseman Norm Larkin| 72>" 
: Apes Eland outfielders Walt Moryn! Piles 
ALL STABLES, like all horses, look alike to me. I thought |g a nes, and Bert Hamric. ) ~ 4 
of that particularly when Mr. Smith enthused over the con- | ty ade! : From Fort Worth: Pitchers | cLendrin 
formation of his two fillies, who looked identical to me. | DMeedvin Sin 7 ; ne ogy tony Susie Pree - ont 
Racing horses must be a hobby because for every one named it i 23. R-er_ Roger! 23. verar 84 Mobile: catcher Herb Olson. |>~ Soest & 
£ spose dt dofee! 88S -gone* YE Templeton and Moryn of St.|i-paees Temes in 
i'Paul will join the Dodgers as Cincom OT Ae beOR 


! Rogovin 3 U-Disen, Gore. Done- 
|teli, Conian 2a A-O7 om 
’ 

soon as the American Associa-| New Terk 


After th . tion ends. Harmon, Temple, Kh . ms connen oo | 
er the tour of the stables, we sat in a box and watched e Virnors | 4n -) an ————| , 
the various manifestations of human nature. INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE ) Herris. Terwilliser ie, . : 
In the box next to us was a i.rge party with several clderly | partete » Syracuse 4 R ts 
women (if they'll pardon the expression). I got a new insight | ss maean | esu > ae wee 
into how women bet and of the female gambling instinct. | — oa AMERICAN LEGION BASEBALL =| PS | = Penn Ster-Drag Reel,-plus 
Still ected ‘ z+ - ros 1. B ~ Gress yn - Burdette 3. 4 + ae : ; 
One doll, who looked like a dowager, was discussing with ent eo Re a OF ulmestn, Neb. . press 2 SS hs | , Plyflex Glass Boat Rod! 
her cham 62 tnecel TEXAS LEAGUE FOOTBALL EXHIBITION 
“The h . age — Shreveport @ Weehingee call TOURNAMENT 
or —— | , APRS 
me ot se I like is No 2, she said. Lenstey APB 6 Anér 
No,” said her companion, “No. 2 won the first race and he 2 Deuer AFR 9 
shouldn't be repeating yet 
and he's a good jockey. 


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Totals MEET UM 
Swaps or Nashua, there are thousands of others you never pee Be 
hear about—and that isn’t just an idle expression, the one 
about “eating like a horse.” 


=— ee ores. 


—Ee een re 


|} Heestesn 1 


AMERICAN ASSOCIATION 
| Indlanapetis 5 Chariestoa 


Tommy Barrow hasn't won a race | 
He's due.” 


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= | 


P 1) 
use, Seckouskt Landes. pe 


H 

5 

ar ar . 
7.433. cofite (194 


So there they are, yelling: “Come on, Bull 
Go get ‘em, Eternal 


for the number 
Hierocies' Come on, you Nocallulla’ 
Shock!” etc 


“BUT,” THE OTHER one protested, “Barrow is wearing 
maroon and gold and you know that's an unlucky color for | 
me.” 

So they finally decided on a horse named Blue Colonel | 
because one woman had a son in the Army and he wrote that | 
he was often homesick and lonesome. That was the “blue” | 
part. Then they decided that all Armies had something | 
named “Colonel” so it was. a good hunch. It didn’t matter | 
that the horse was a long shot because it was a race for 2-year- | 
old maidens. Blue Colonel, of course, won easily. | 

I think the most fascinating part of any race track is around | 
the sellers’ windows. People can't buy their ticketsfast enough | 
and when they finally have made their purchase, they stand | 
around in doubt while the tips are whispered from tout to 


THE BETTING handle at Hazel Park averages about $600,000 
a day, which isn’t bad for a track off “the big apple.” That 
means it’s no Pimlico or Laurel or Bowie but it does all right. 

Wolverine is a beautiful, half-mile track stuck far in the 
country. Yet people faithfully make the long pilgrimage to 
the shrine of money. 

Personally, trotters and pacers baffle me. There's no assur- 
ance, when a trotter or pacer is in front, that he’s going to 
stay there. One trotter had a big lead coming down the home 
stretch and then seemed, to stand still as everybody passed 
him. One sad ticket-holder remarked: “He must have stepped 


tout. 

The average $2 bettor analyzes every horse in the race, so 
he has justification for saying, after it's all over, “I really gave 
that winner a thought. I should have played it.” 

It’s a rather weird experience to hear people rooting for 
tu... odd names that horses carry. You're a hick if you root 


| 
| 
; 
| 


in a hole or maybe there's a treadmill on that part of the 
track.” 


The people push and haul and shove with a complete dis 
regard for courtesy and in 4 common bond of detachment. | 
It’s the greatest show on earth—provided you don't bet, or, | 


you win if you do bet. 


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In Some Cases—More 


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1955 Tubeless Tires Some 
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Cars. 
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39.45 25.89 13.56 
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- ' 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Wednesday, August 31, 1955 


But It’s Diminishing ————— 


Largest Herd of Elk 
In East Near Roanoke 


By Douglas Chevalier 
Staff Reporter 
A MOTORIST tooling along the Blue Ridge Parkway 25 
miles north of Roanoke, Va., may notice on the strip map 
given him by a National Park ranger at the entrance this 
sentence: 


“An elk herd is often seen grazing near 
the road.” 
If the time is dawn or dusk the traveler 
may indeed see a herd of elk in the clearings 
of the adjacent Jefferson National Forest. 
Twenty elk were introduced to this part 
of the country 33 years ago as an e¢x- 
periment by the United States Forest Serv- 
ice, according to James Luck, a National 
park warden on the Blue Ridge Parkway, 
who is an old-timer in this area. 
Luck recalls that the animals a — 

from their native haunts in Yellowstone Na- 
Chevalier tional Park in the wigter of 1917. That win- 
ter was so severe, however, they were penned in and fed by 
the Forest Service until spring when they were turned loose, 
A few years later, six more were brought in to replenish th® 
herd. 


- 
> 


After a good many ups and 
downs in their numbers, 
there are now between 40 and 
50 elk, including seven full 
grown bulls, about 30 cows 
and the rest calves, making 


| gether at mating season to 


cows. One. such fight, Luck 
witnessed and describes it as 
this the largest elk herd east | a ferocious battle between 
of the Mississippi. At one | two thousand-pound bulls 
time, says Warden® Luck, that rent the air with the 
there were more than 200 in | sound of their clashing ant- 
the herd. but the count has | lers. After an hour, the loser 
since been depleted by poach- | limped away, torn and bieed- 
ers, dog packs and natural ing while the winner let out 
hazards. a great bellow to call the 
They suffered their great- | cow he had won 

est losses in the early thirties 
when “a lot of people got 
through the depression on élk 
meat.” as explained by the | 
warden. 


FOR MANY reasons, Luck 
beliewes the days are num- 
-bered when motorists will 
get even a glimpse of the 
| elk herd. For one, the Blue 
Ridge Parkway is becoming 
more and more popular with 
when hunters out after deer | tourists and these hordes of 
mistake the elk for their legal | Ve@calioners scare 
prey. These transplanted ani- | animals farther into the re- 
mals are now fully protected | Mote areas. 
by the Federal Government, | [1 the home region of the 
although at the peak of their’| ¢!K, camping and picnicking 
number a short open season grounds have been expanded, 
was deciared annually for 
three years Mountain a large radar sta- 

It's hard to control poach- | tion has been built. The herd 
mein tnese hack regions, is gradually 
Luck says. and about 
how a ranger. searching a 
mountain dwelling a couple | year at best, and their rate 
years ago, found seven elk | of reproduction cannot keep 
hides concealed in the cellar. | up with the toll taken by 

Other hazards take their | the hazards of 
toll. Occasionally a warden | ence. And it is unlikely, the 
or ranger finds a skeleton | warden says, that the Federal 
of an elk hopelessly entan- | Government will try to re 
gied in an abandoned fence. | plenish the herd by bringing 
Dogs are one of the elk’s | in new stock. 
enemies. Not long ago, a year- | 
old calf was badly hurt after |_. 
being chased over a cliff by | Wisconsin Sells Out 


Poaching has been a con- 
tinuing problem, some of it, 
deliberate, some by error 


telle 


fight for a claim over the | 


the timid | 


and on nearby Apple Orchard | 


diminishing, | 
Lack says, because the cows | 
bear calves only every other | 


their exist- | 


dogs. That one was rescued | . 
All Five Home Games 


and was cared for by park 
personnel for three weeks | aiid 
near a park concession before | MADISON, Wis., Aug. 30 & 
it again was fit to return to |All University of Wisconsin) 
the wilds. home football games this fall) 
‘are seliouts, Bill Aspinwall,; 
jathietic department business’ 
)manager and ticket sales di 
rector, reported today. | 
Aspinwall said the sellout re 
sulted because all remaining 
tickets for the opener, against 
Marquette Sept. 24, have been 
sold. Wisconsin has a five 
game home tard, . including 
lowa Oct. 1; Ohio State Oct. 22;) 
‘Michigan State Oct. 29 and Il! 
linois Nov. 12. | 


—_— -—- — 


HERD has adiusted 
increasing traf- 
Biue Ridge 
passing cars 


THE 
fiself to the 
fice along the 
Parkway, and 
_do not startie them even 
when they are only a hun- 
dred feet away. But when a 
car stops the elk grow wn- 
easy, and if the driver gets 
out for a closer look they 
will gallop off.into the forest 
cover. 

Shy and elusive, they stay 
deep in the woods of the 3000 | 
to 4000 foot mountains dur- 
ing the day and only when 
daylight begins to faik do 
they come out to the aban- 
doned pastures near the road. 
Because they appear in the 
open only under poor light- | 
ing conditions, and because | 
it is hard to get within flash 2. 
bulb range, they rarely are | P: me 1.3 sity uble 
photographed. | tank trie 0298 es 

According to Warden Luck, Leave from 10101 St. N.W. DI. 7-0600 
bulls are seldom seen among | 
the herd except during the | | 
mating season. They travel by | - 
themselves, and come to- | 


| 
| 
| 


‘TIMONIUM 


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Traffie Headaches 
Comfertabie seate in deluxe luxury 


no parking 


signs of life! 


RIVE MORE! 


(It gets cheaper by the mile!) 
When you drive through the beautiful American 


countryside, you can be sure you'll have more fun! 
But please remember to drive carefully. 
Let's make this Labor Day the safest 
ever. Obey al! traffic signs — they're our 


Stop at the Sign of 
“Happy Motoring. 
See how fine the - 
service really is! 


Your Esso Dealer is all set to give your car the full holiday 
treatment — with all the services and quality products for 
which he’s so famous. For example: 


ESSO ROAD MAPS casicst-to-read, best routed. 
TOTAL POWER ESSO EXTRA GASOLINE top-octane power. 
(e=5) TIRE ROTATION for longer mileage. 
™ CHANGE OIL TO UNIFLO keeps engines cleaner. 
CHECK ‘N FILL battery, radiator and brake cylinder. 


ATLAS TIRES regular and tubeless, written guarantee. 


INSPECT fires, lights, fan belt and windshield wipers. 
© » 
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BRIGHT REST ROOMS cleancst away from home. 
ATLAS PERMA-FUL BATTERIES guaranteed in writing. 
REAL WINDSHIELD CLEANING nof a “lick and a promise.” 
EXTRA-CARE LUBRICATION as recommended by car makers. 
Kg THE BEST OF EVERYTHING fan belts and_oil filters, spark plugs 
and wiper blades, flashlights and other useful acceBsories. 


ESSO STANDARD OIL COMPANY 


Get set for this holiday week-end...see your Esso Dealer today! 


7 


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a as) 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
34 Wednesday, August 31, 1955 eee 


Terps Pose 


rT 


Labor Day... 
or any day 


Today, Drill 


Tomorrow 


All summer long the Mary- 
land football players have 
been taking a correspondence | 
course from the coaching staff. | 
Today there will be a photo. 
finish to all that called “Foot- 
ball Press Day,” in Byrd Sta- 
dium: at 2:30 p. m. 

After the photographs and | 
interviews are finished the 
players will stow away their, 
spanking new uniforms and’ 
check in early because at 7:30 
a. m. tomorrow they begin the 
commencement exercises of 
their nee cotirse, in 
"ns. 

ite are 
isn't al. i 


Sree eae "ss 


body loves a loser ices ; 
te Stay ia shape!” 

Advice to quarterbacks— 
“You can have the greatest 
physical ability ... but if you 
are unable to pick a defense 
apart and lead your team over 
a four-lane super highway you 
will not have the confidence 
and respect of the team very 


By George Brantner 


In City Series —_/ Shirley Fry Upsets Hart 


MANCHESTER, Mass., Aug.;nual Essex County Club worp- 


Arcade Beats 30 #—Shirley Fry of St. Peters-\en's invitational tournament. 


burg, Fla, who quit tennis a| Miss Fry, seeded only third, 

Snug H ar bor; year ago, scored a sharp upset| 4s runnerup here in 1951 and 
: K ‘ h over Doris Hart of Coral a oa — eg oie 
a n ina ss 

ru B Gables, Fla, 7-5, 3-4, 6-2 Hart, seeded second, previous! 
4 ts Ow today and won the singles|was Essex champion twice tnd 
championship of the 28th an-\is a triple United States titlist. 


Arcade Pontiac, Washington 
Post and Times Herald In-'/ 
dustrial League champion, 

scored four runs in the fifth 
inning to wipe out a 3-2 alt 
ficit and went on to pound out : 
an 11-3 victory over Snug Har. | 
bor in. the first round of the | 
double elimination Sandlot’ 
City Series, on the Ellipse yes. 
terday 


~ : 


ah first round game, | | ae 
series cham- | i RA 
~ Atchison-Keller, used a) 
man on the bench, and _ ie 
Eales tok the Washington 


onal round will begin 
today. On the North Ellipse 
FBI will play Atchison-Ke ioe, 
and Lincolnia will meet Co-| 
lumbia Heights on the South 
diamond, both at 5:15 p. m. 


SNUG aaneer . 


President of 
Arcade Pontiac 


a 


long. ucco ss 
An explanation of Maryland's Rea: 


it’s always a pleasure 2832") 


“Football is a Rahting game. | Collins ef 

Your team will win very few i bert ap 

games unless you defeat your 

individual opponent the . 

od of 7. The gag acer. > 
ts must won you ¢x- : a 

pent to win the team battle.” | ~ _— See 

It's all designed to help the ae tise 161 045 oo—) 

|boys make the most of the 13 eine Colbert. Vernon 2 Cas 

\days they have to get ready be- pFiriman cities. » wR. Neigringheus 

fore their opener against Mis- ore “> rt Ambros! 

souri at Columbia Sept. 17.~—) a Seen 

pee Brady. 


GW, Virginia, Howard 
Schedule Practices 


George Washington Wniver-' {rs 
sity, Virginia and Howard Uni- 
versity open fall football prac- 
tice tomorrow. 
GW will drill at Frog Island 
at 8 a. m. and 4p. m. A squad ‘ 
of 55 is expected to report at Zietehe:™ 
iV irginia, and Howard will hav® Foctcsor. 2b 
about 30 players reporting, in- Suir a 
| eluding 17 lettermen. — 
D. C. Teachers opens practice 
Sept. 6, 9:30 a. m., and other 
small area colleges. including _ ‘Potats sian 
Montgomery Junior College qa; sights 
and Gallaudet, will also open a sees Rann 
next week. .  Dewaney, 


Morris.o 


+) 3--9O00-v 80900 
- 


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Or-rd + Ora) 0 ® 19 
2 -8>- ©190 8200 OF B 


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13) 7: ae A RCAD E 
|Eernel. 3 
ee ee : 
Courthouse Golf Fett. Gales 2. B. fort W 
Eileen Myers won Class * ce, 6 ; $0 “s Fi. t. 
honors in the meénthly ace i > caine @ is te Geel 
fe Fince As cr oat ; 


tournament at Courthouse with wall, Jeck 
688-79. Class B went to Mrs. a io "6 Poste |. WASHINGTON'S LARGEST PONTIAC DEALER 
in 4 i co Th. ner ~ | ™ 
rt group winner was pba By My pitener sser|\~ 4437 IRVING ST. N.W. AD. 4-8600 


W. H, Rodenberger, 97—19—78. | 
o~ Willis erie _ 


What a difference 


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ALSO AVAILABLE IN POPULAR 86 PROOF 
KENTUCKY STRAIGHT BOURBON WHISKEY 
DISTILLERY BOTTLED 


5 


THE CHESAPEAKE & POTOMAC TELEPHONE COMPANY 


THE WASHINGTON POST 


- Bogart Leads Nine Area Qualifiers for National Amateur, 22" 


oe) 


A. 


- 
nd 


| ithe slugging of ite star football. 
St. Louis Wins Suspended Game Biciok Wrestles  itS Beats Own 100Q-Moter Record Drake University: frme'viin Ovavome A&M 


Br ownell | . Yukon Eric at Dives 1 owes Worl d Mark Rej joins Missouri 
Beaten in P rates D e feat Car ds 3 Turner's Tonight y Valley Group FORTHE 


Wi ] Th R Si h Antonino Rocca, the wrestler, Mae tite gic wide - _ 30 = meters 128 seconds, e 4 KANSAS CITY, Aug. 30 (INS) 
: it the ; ‘ ble fl in ‘ i? stance runN- : m » ys ns in tront. D k U ; it ; ain 
Playoff ul l ree- un Uxt — ape eae J ner Audyn Boysen bettered his|' He passed the 800 in’ 1:51 and pire apg, ir cre DEAL 


Sent, ‘snoots Kunom Erie, 8 fer own world record for the 1000-| increased his margin with every, a member of the Missouri Val 
| PITTSBURGH, Aug, 30 Un—After the St. Louis Cardinals had ™eF lumberjack, in the féature OWT Ot ounlel vane tantathe. \oteide: ley Conference today with the i TOWN 
By Maury Fitzgerald nailed down a 1-0 victory in completing a suspended game, the. bout on tonights wrestling pro- sdockiia’ E30, Wie fermnte roel Thats wee oie tele ab he ‘unanimous appr: val of the sev-| 
Statt Reporter Pittsburgh Pirates came back tonight to beat the Redbirds 3-1 in gram at Turner's Arena. oni aii 2-195 eaten i b aan: the (ee other schools in the loop. | N\\ Ui/ 4 , 
PIFESVILLE, Md., Aug. 30 a regularly scheduled contest. The match is another in an “ty ) 4 N valdiane terre bugs te Moines, Ia., School (A 
Nine Washington area players’ The Pirates scored their three runs in the sixth, the payof elimination tournament to de- The slender Norseman poured tape and set out on his 1aP was yoted in as a member yes: 
ualified for the Sept. 12 Na- blow being a two-run triple by Ramon Mejias. termine an opponent for cham- it on over the last 500 meters of honor. The 20,000 spectators terday at a meeting in Kansas 
be Harvey Haddix was both wifner and loser. He finished the pion Lou Thesz here in the to finish far ahead of his ri-| at the Slottskogsvalien Stadium City. The first competition it 
tional Amateur golf champion- suspended game, receiving credit for the victory as he allowed near future. Rocca defeated vals Germany's Herbert Paul gave him a tremendous ovation. ©? participate in will be base- 
ship at Richmond in the 36- only four hits, He started the regular game and was s lifted for a Hans Schmidt in the first elim- sehmidt took second in 2:22.6, Waniinen edidtitinens ball, track, tennis and golf next 
hole trials here today. A couple pinchhitter in the eighth. ination bout last week. followed by Rolf Gottfredson. 7 were Per spring: Because* of advance: 
of Raltimore Public Links Card first baseman Stan Musial ran his consecutive game In a special midget contest, icadinns te 9: Wied tel fect and the track was in ex- scheduling, it will not be in 
players—Bill Cole and ‘Paul/ Streak to 504 games currently the longest in the majors. Musial, Cowboy Cassidy and Little Fox ~“ | ry SUSstavs- cellent shape. ‘conference competition in bas- 
Haviland—tied for the meda! WoO was hit on the rigpt hand with a pitched ball against Brook- face Vince Venetti and Farmer son, Sweden, 2:25; Jack Bisley, Belgium's Roger Moens. who| ketball until the 1956-57 season, 
with 142s. lyn yesterday started the regular game but was lifted for a pinch: Pete. The Great Kato opposes| England, 2:26.3, and Herbert|recently beat the world record |and football in 1958. 
Ralph, Bogart, Chevy Chase, hitter in the second inning. ‘Gino Garibaldi and Hombre Miesala, Germany, 2:27.4. for 800 meters, had been en-| Drake broke with the con- 
led the District contingent with (Responded Game of duly 17) ost. Lous PITTSRUSGH Montana wresties Angelo Mar-, Schmidt jumped into the lead tered in the race but he with- ference in 1951 protesting that. 
144. The other Washington comin 7 tinelli in other matches at the start, reeling off the first' drew, saying he was tired the loop. would not investigate 


qualifiers are: Col. Rennie Kel- Rover ib 
ly, Congressional, 145: Keith Moon «: ‘ie 
Kallio, East Potomac, 

Perky Cullinane, Bethesda, Wc 's 5 
147; Claude Wild, Washington Berge); 
rolf and Country Club, 147; aWaike: 
Tony Popolaski, Argyle, 148; Sarat ne 
Jack Rountree, Bethesda, 148: 


a’ slecy 


Raver. Th 4 
Sen'da'et.2> 4 
. Virdon. ef 4 
Meon. 1h 4 
Rep skirt 4 
Musial. rf 6 


For a certain reward 
on a hot day, make your 


- whiskey collins this way: 
That CERTAIN —— > in highball gas, 
Tetske @ 


“1 8 6Tetele ) 9 | 
be Pour for Musial , . i . squeeze juice of 
lé-yearold Jerry McFerren, Haddix.o nie S-gereck cut fer Weddin i Oe . : ! 


Western Junior champion from) Tetsts pes 2. 12, Totals | ped st « -Gaeriteced for LAtiefield ty Gp. , ~ A +s —. f : Y%4 lemon over a teaspoon 
Manor, 148, and Tom Pritqnard, | BRan for Walker in sth isberah oor 003 A a . of granulated sugar 
Congressional, 149 Struck oul for Sern! im Sih R -Had EK. O'Ririen, Mejias a 3 . § gal, 


aPied for Pace in 8th 4 : ; . 
a . Moot . Pe stir and disso ve. 
Brownell Has 69 %. touts >. 72> oe Me) : ~“ 3 el lve 


Pittsberch Madd d ' 
Frank Michalek, Mt. Pleas _® ~Gremmas. eWalker 2 RBI Had- Pace > BO- i Get a e. 4 k | ‘ tach Add 1% Nggers of 
ant, and Cliff Healy, Naval <8 . O'Brten, B--Lons. Lett é lefie! | ey 0 ins ee — Gallagher & Burton and ice cubes. 
Academy. are the th Peit sbureh . SS WP.Littiefield W- Littlefield (iI) ‘. ; Fill F h a 
otner piayers a0. Ma r ; HO -Pa mages tei (nM . M Sener? Me s Des : J my ili with car nated water. 
vilef oid " 7 . arn - 1 : 
08 1 = : , 9 w- . ¥ ' Str. Garnish with cherry 


* aWhintsrt 3 
; Sarni. « 

Oram s.ce 35 
bHemus | 
Gette) “ 


= o-waudwows® 
e®2°-—32~—-e~20-8 
22°24u—siiewesd 
22 2a e~e8'59” 


EE  — 


cewrenwoewsww~ So 
> - 


1 Pace. o 
f 
a 


PO0~rSuU30-900-P 
oo~—---.- 093-819 DPD 
* seeunceoe~n~o~R 


Surber’ nk e 


“39S 


who won berths 
Cole, a 43-year-old oil trucker iit ~ Pac 
n. Pinelli. Goer . a . . : 
who plays at Mt. Pleasant, fired S2ich. ‘Ww T-2:22 Snipe Regatta Champion and slice of lemon. 
& morning round of 68 to tie re. aie 
for the lead with Bobby Brown . ' SANTANDER, Spain, Aug. 30 
ell, District amateur champion Flood Aid Group Connecticut's Harry Allen and 
Cole made his 69 at the easier ‘ Terry Whittemore sailed their 
Elkridge course, while Brown- Asks Colfers to '“Canuto Vi" to victory today in 
ell was getting his at Suburban the third race of the world 
In the afternoon, the hunky alee , championship snipe yacht 
Baltimorean played Suburban Help Raise loney regatta 
in 73 while Brownell was soar - ; 
ing to an 80 at Elkridge. Brown NEW YORK Aug. 30 ® 
ell, the most important casualty The chairman Of the Presi- 


of the trials. got into a five- dent's appeal fiood benefit 

way playof at 149, but the for- .om mittee urged today that 
° gent st out o e 

mer FBI ag lost out on th the Nation's golfers be enlisted 


second hole where he failed to 
get down ir two from just off in the “national sportsman'’s 


J . 
the green. crusade” to help raise money 
Piayoff Partners for the American Red Cross 
;, flood relief program 
The , 


plavofl was between ‘ 
Brownell. R. W. Knowles Jr Lee Coffey of Great Neck, 


the former Walker Cup star; N. Y., sent a telegram to Presi- 
John Eisinger of Congressional: dent Ficsenhower. a devoted 
Gil Willett, Prince Georges, and ,nrrer » , . 
. ; , imerlf and 0 Joseph t 
Pritchard make if Menow 


Willer: alia sn. ©. Dey, executive director of 
ille fook seven on the “» at ls _ get pies 


a . . — Golf Association . 
first hole with a ball out of e ' ; . , verything. im 
hounds, while the others had ‘suggestiwg series of tourna ae Deemed ma e it 


: lals, Chrysters, Plymeuti« 
bogey five ments throughout the country . € . 


Pritchard hit his tee shot on and eneowner Wheel- 


. for that purpose : 
22i-vard secon < we over Coffe ’ aid . club the mobiles, nlus beautiful, up- make it eee 


green and eninrnrs | Hack to Glen Oaks« Country Club. town. air cooled building, 


withio th “a fi ci hol 1¢@ \ ws nlanned su ” a three-day greater selection. more con- 
putt afierthe others had taken iournament Sept. 2-5. Each Aiietien 2. orden 
bogev fours None of the four slayer pays e5 ty enter The » mer 
wewe bit the eree toh fe +4 and better waives. All of 
survivor ' ’ green WIth alu expects to raise $1500 : 
his tee shots on the par three America’s 5147 golf courses this plus famous Wheeler 
hole with a minimum of 3,500,000 [| reputation will please yeu 
Bogart Rallies golfers, at $5 each, can show forever at Wheeler, inc., 
Bogart staged 2. greatest ihe world what true sports: entire bleck 4800 Wiscen- 
e 


ral) of th d M ) c c . . : 
lana Began ae shoseston aes Sei te r wy onendlny . sin Avenue. GALLAGHER & BURTON CO., BALTIMORE, MARYLAND. BLENDED WHISKEY. 86 PROOF. 72%% GRAIN NEUTRAL SPIRITS. SINCE 1877, ONE OF AMERICA’S GREAT WHISKIES. 


Was seven over par for the 
first 10 hotles of his round at) ~~ 
Suburban and plaved the next . 
eight in three-under par to get 
in with a 74 In the afternoon 
Rogart had a one-under par 70 
‘ Age 
ane and Rountree were 
y District area qualifier 
t from last vear Boh 


, 


Congressiona! 


George Thornton. Manor. and _* < -. y 4 
Larry Murphy. Kenwood, who ick u Ps | = AK © i 
made the grade last year were . 


among today's casualties 


———— - ation 


John teraser Geese Oreck , 
Ret. Planscan Goeere (reek 1 


[aoe <P ALF QUART CANS 


Ceonsgresstena!l 
Maner 
Martin MeCarthy. Colusebis 
Walter Tathes, er 
Rrece Keesler Rethecda 
MePerren Jr 


— 

ha EP tT het ee 
- 

> -* -* . 


e The handy handle makes ual ORIGINATED 
it so easy to carry oe 53 ss 


» =-t-' 


‘Rw 


Washinsten 
Lewis MeGlevran, } 
Reh 


@ The open end makes it 
so quick to cool 


eet ee Ce ol hed 2 
— ~—* =F -*? .s «8 


33328; 
Ff 


re, 1? ss 
a) 


Washinge’sa 
fencress 
5 


i+? »& 


Theve Chase 

Kenwood 

CGeerces 
Prince (Cerees 
Mike Oliveri. Kenwood 

_f M 


e The pérforated top makes 
it so easy to open 


ses 


= So 


ome... Th Tots Pa 
euwesd #2 1816 , ! the HE Bade ibe “tas — , 
oats | edhe Vitastl E Others have imitated the Schlitz Half-Quart 


can—but no one can match the wonderful 
Wiltiam Cale. M x 38142) flavor of the beer itself. Your thirst can 


em “Manning. Retheeda 


Arnie Prods. Avaric. 83 7160! feel the difference. 
Majors Meet 
Tuesday to Plan 


World Series 

NEW YORK, Aug. 230 
Ford Frick, commissionér of K : 
baseball, today called a meet-| = mA \ ~ Bee 
ing for 9:30 a. m. Tuesday, Sept bo Nae 
&. to make plans for the 1955 gh ANN : , — | , _, 
World Series. ) | Pe | ) | The BEER 

All teams in contention in " 4 - ‘ ° | a. 
both leagues have been asked) 7, % _ ‘(= | \ ( Mil k . 
to have representatives present. | 7 | i h on a ¢ } ' wall ce 

The serjes is scheduled to - | we = . PES ON ae 
start Sept. 28 in the park of the) = ‘ " , : oy Ps . -3 
American League cits $ , VW a : i 4 

As usual, the first {wo games 
will be played in the AL city,| 
the next three in the National 
League city and the final two, 
if necessary, in the American) 
League park. 

Ir New Yark, Cleveland or 
Boston should win the tight AL 
race, there would be no break 
in the schedule for traveling 


wes 


Stoppa Wins Junior 

Title at Courthouse | 
Frank .Stoppa Jr. 16, Ana- | 

costia High student, defeated | The Beer that Made Milwaukee Famous 
ilip Truex, ‘ ' , 

rte A boys club championship © 1955—Jes. Schlits Brewing Company, Milwaukee, Wis., Brooklyn, N. Y.,.Loe Angeles, Calif. 

visa hd at Courthouse Coun-|; — oy , 

try Club. 


> 
- _ ; 
/ ’ 
° ’ . 
; - ~ 7 
; 


- > : 
 & : 
‘ 
> 
: 


3 Petey, oe ss | PEMONIUM 
Siang Racing Charts at | Atlantic City|| 
Opens Today ane uette) 109 1010 8610 6180 22.90 fe B..- 


a Around The Tracks 
Horses and People fons mene om 
i F or 10 Days 2285S 


to dr 
By Walter Haight es 0 Es oe es a ty 
oe 7 , . 
Third of the Maryland minor 7% 


Horses to Watch ‘Sports on TV, Radio 
AT ATLANTIC CITY 


ee aoe ae 
last time out. 

oe by dcagggpe last 

. Good righ 

a; BEN 5 say for this: 


“SanTivieD List LIST—Came 


j PB far back recent outing. 


Coprright. 1965.\Triangle Publications. Ine, 

WRATHER CLEAR—-TRACK FAST 
RACE—Seven furlongs. Purse, 63500. For rear 
claiming. Went to post at 2:01. Off at 2.01%. Start cood, | 
‘Won driving: piace same. Winner. Vine-Lin Farm's eh. f. (3)| 


‘P 2 air a 
CHICAGO, Ill, Aug. 30—After all I've written about Nashua on iy by Brook ol a i 
~T4 be ashamed to look: another horse player in the face if | Giveumn. ident | rained ime 
tn : Hors Joc 
psi ee it | 1 | a 


‘'t pick him to win tomorrow's match race. tn 
» For instance, my story on Nashuas Preakness victory was ‘rack meetings gets under way ars : tp 
here tomorrow, with the Balt sky Game 
‘9 3. 
a Se Poe 
Pop, Pop J 


, or would you say weeded, with the line “Nashua’s 
‘every stretch stride seemed to say, ox more County purse headlining wale nm 
* "Take that, Swaps, wherever you are.’ ” the first of 10 programs, Eight SEFTON: PieK 7 0, $1.80. 84 90: te $5.40. 
But I would gladly switch to Swaps well m ‘ched distance runners © ss 
and. run the risk of being stamped have been named for the mile jager ies <% alate Gad Meinad' nh pariee’ Vitors ever 
and a sixteenth event, which Dri = missed J an ve. ac bed pace from Ag + doce 
ster | — amon ie a ae ut 


3 baa | 
imme tum) 11 
BE, $17.80 "oa ($4.00; ESPHA. 96.20. 63.20; BEAU 
glertiy handled by breaking well end seen , I WONDER 
4 e winner. iF WE'LL STILL HAVE THOSE 
POUCYHOLDER ADVISORY 


COMMITTEE MEETINGS. 


“chicken” by my closest relatives and 
bosomest friends if I honestly believed 
the West Coast colt was going to be 
the winner. 

However, I've dug into this race 
pretty deeply, weighed all the prob- 
ability and slept on it. Somehow |! 
just can’t get away from Nashua and 
I don’t think Swaps can either. 

Why? Well I'll try to tell you. In 
‘the first place, with all due respect 
‘to Rex Ellsworth and Mish Tennev, 
1 believe Nashua is the better pre- 
pared for the task at hand. 

__. There’s one thing I can‘t fault about, BASSET 
Nashua’s pre-race activties. He has not had a competitive 
test over the track. I believe a race, even if at six furlongs, 
would have done him a world of good. However, Sunny Jim 
Fitzsimmons has brought him along gradually. The old 
trainer put the fast works * 
under him two weeks ago and 


will be the sever*h race on the 
card. 

Hasteville Jr. shapes up as a. 
likely favorite in the Baltimore Hat! 
‘County with his chief opposi- 
‘thon rated as Valley Lark, a " 
good. Waterford Park perform: (% 
er, Exec and Golden Object. 
Completing the field will be 
Criskin, John Nick, Quaker 
Meeting and Neat Guy. 

Racing Secretary J. Fred, 
Colwill tound material plenti- 
‘ful for his opening program 
and the other seven races on 
‘the program all drew fields 
with also eligible lists. There 
were some 140  throw-outs, 
horses which were entered but 
failed to make either the races 


Por }-vear-olds 

Won driving: 
(4) Oy Sir Pen- 
1. Kelly. Time. 


- $3500 

cn “et 2:31% 
Gaveenaro's 

Trained by T. J 


ent "Went 0 a io 
A... bene t 8008 | an ape 
iukley be Bull Lea, Barry. | Diace sam 
ke nw Fained ts 


y-Chan E. 


wee euw 


> 


YES, WE WiLL! IN FACT, 
WE HOPE TO SET UP MORE 
COMMITTEES SO THAT 
MORE POLICYHOLDERS 
WILL HAVE A CHANCE TO 

SPEAK UP ON COM- 

PANY AFFAIRS. 


ef 
0S OWO eS Pir ~—-1 « 
- 


EATONTOWN. 87.26 96.20: 


defeat on the 

of <md steadily 
Fatontown's late bid along the 
Weal Tr oe weakened only 
to a the wader 


y 40. $2.80; 
turn. disposed 


oetesy Night ‘Gane, | 10) 
pecreness is 


HIGH nent Be tbs $2.40; ~MIonTY OAK ae 


83.80: PO 
a : ~ eontention to be 
° 


High Kin ropped ou 
midway of “he et circled 
wn Mighty Oa 


beldiy and wo 
(11) Sefton’s Pick 
Double ®) High King 


u 

Proved “Incutlt ictent. 
_ + trailer slihtiy Watier ~~ unable 
while moving SEVENTH RAC mile ‘torf). Purse. 65000. Por 3- 
ear-olds aiaswelnen On ot 5:01 y send for al) but & 
offee W regcen out pa Be . tving. Winner aprine i 
arm's br (3) by Crowfoot asy Reeling by sy Mon 
treined by J.P. martridesc me. 1°37 


Tim 
~ $38.60 vise isd (Batchelier! 
Mis 


es ‘Boulmetis) 
aon 
Purse 


since has asked for nothing 
that resembied blinding 
speed. He has been nursed 
along to a point where I be- 


‘Coprrt 1954. 
Triangle Publications. Ine 
AY ATLANTIC crry 
l—fele, Werrter 19 Brenete 
Marchese 8 
'—Beur ~ we 
Weee and Wail 


3——Kevsione 
After 7 


+—Silver 
Leckhy Here 

oe 33. Leese Tide 
Areran 

— ~ Saw 
Betts 

j—Mabe Coe 
and Ff 

&— One 5 Be. 
Perouse & 


" 
7. Medest Pete 1, 
Aleay 


1s. BDiate Prince 1 


M 1%. Mernine 


Omar 4. 
‘ 


Wendy G 1. Redical 16 


1%. Reconsider 14. Wi 


4, CGebber 1m le 


AT WASHINGTON PARK 
l—Whirtehber 18. Gerre Frente 


Mottentet ' 
ome, Shirt 18 Heete Preedeme & 
Deedend 


14 


Closing 
eo Tevce 
Cerenation Rev 


t{—Umbdreiis oa 15 Preirte State 5 
Witch Wer 


\—Island Queen 

Heigeweed Mies 6 
é&—Jeniay 24. T ocho 1° 
J—Seene *S. Sache 10 
&.Tahitian 13. Blepemar 
rr? 


28, ‘ 


1. Baréwicke if 


Nirgs! Led 5 


Ss ahrel! 13 


Mente: idee 


iver 19 Ge Betweee 
11 


AT AQTEDINTT 
whee * Rese 6 Pepe~ Late 6 Poe 
sneer & 
Henney Bird 16. Simeple Tl. Pet Be- 


sera * 
(hence Deb 15 In Wenderlend 16 

‘ 
13 Lee 18. 


5 
. §—Indiae 
net” 1* Sradier 16 
&—DARE CHARGER 35. Almeine Bich 
7 Coeema 
Piy-le 1% Ble 


tinal = Fite 
Wes estarts 4. Cometic 14. Men- 
trachet 4. 


Land ire 


Command 


7 
-* 


AT TIMONIUM 
Perera Lea f7. Plentifel 7. Peet 


Vegans 
—OO08R VALLEY 7. Pinch 4. 
Gante 
>. ole. Cravat 27 Gev Commander) 
oh 15 F BB. Coe 12. Mt. 
Handle 15 Belles Baby 15 
usr Phil 14. Bie Snort 12 Ga- 


Peer 1h. Vallew Lark 7 
Mar th. Feteh-ti 18 


fiay 7 


Ne 
Ry et rilt } 


Race Selections 


AT WASHINGTON PARK 


1— W hirlaber Frank 
tet 

*—Hasty 
Bert. 

5— erenation 
Armed Treeer 

we m Way 
bre'la Mea 

t thedeaneed 
Lewil! 


b— Peleuse 


Heitten 
Mr 
Rar 


Gerry 
Freedoms Closing 
Re» Ricker 
Coded Messasce. Um- 
Mins Hardwicke. 
Nirgs! Led 


cette 
oy 


Res'edrums« 
Swap 


i—Nashua 
i Seerry ; 

%—Amphibdien 
Diver 


Ge Sheil 


AP AT AQUEDUCT 


Seger Ham. Mies Rice. Kiserne 


?—( hbepequcit. Sime Heney Bird 


In Wendertand. Marvide 
Wien 


War Commard 


’ . 7 ce 
&—Berataria Papa Cat Jamaica 
ore 


TIMONIUM SELECTIONS 
l~Errard Lea. Pret Vender. Tirawer- 


Judece. Geed Valley. Beall Your 
Ceammander 
Mirar 


'—~Joe 
Gear 


Cee. ~ gy Walk 
i—Trank Hand Belles Babe 


Tiatiesut Trephine, Pagan Kin 
ame 2 Celden Ob rect Valley 
MAR. Fetch-t. Frances Doll 


Hale Cravat 
Qesestean Cem 

i-_.F B 
Ore- 
Tp 


Lark 


lieve he will be ready to put 
everything into one package. 


OLD FITZ has done many 
a fine job in getting thorough- 
breds ready for big races 
against big fields. This time 
he has been able to concen- 
trate on beating one horse. 


I like his decision to send 
Nashua out to take it all at 
every pole if it can be done. 
No dropping back to save for 
the stretch rush, no early 
neck-breaking restraint, but 
just free running this time 

Somehow, I'm of the opin- 
ion that Nashua has more of 
the “will to win” than his 
rival, which is saying a 
mouthful when the record of 
Swaps is taken into consider- 
ation. Nashua has won wun- 
der circumstances that would 
have defeated other good 
colts. Some of his early win- 
ter tactics were questionable 
—but he got there just the 
same. True, he failed in the 
Kentucky Derby. But that 
day Arcaro believed Summer 
Tan was the horse to beat 
regardiess of what the chart 
reveals. Between calls he was 
a good seven lengths off 
Swaps going into the back- 
stretch. ° 


ARCARO APPARENTLY 
believed Swaps would come 
back to him at some stage. 
Nashua had Summer Tan 
whipped and sit out for 
Swaps. But the free-running 
colt was not to be taken 
What Nashua used up getting 
to him was the punch. that 
had been saved. When it 
came to the final drive, 
Nashua had. nothing _ left. 
Swaps hasn't had a race over 
the local dirt track, either. 
However, he did run and win 
the American Derby on the 
grass here—a race that at 
least familiarized him with 
the setting. What I don’t like 
about Swaps that mile in 
1:35 he turned in here. al- 
though. normal)ly such a drill 
should draw to him 

When Swaps ran the turf 
course to set a new record 
in the American Derby, he 
showed he was in top form 
Horses in top form don’t need 
a 1:35 mile under them a few 
days later. A work like that 
could have cooked him. 

Then, again. could be that 
all is not well with Swaps’ 
wheels. One of the closest-to- 
Swaps men 1 know has been 
biting his nails the last 
couple of days. and there 
could be more than nervous- 
ness involved 

After all this. if Swaps 
wins, I'm going to start walk- 
ing West—maybe the Chinese 
Reds“would take me in. At 
least, my face is going to be 
the right color, if you know 
what I mean. 


me 


eRe een: 


‘Big Snort, 


or the also eligible lists 

Suporting the 
County purse is a mile and a 
sixteenth number for 3-y.ar- 
,olds for which Pagan Kin, Irish 
Music, Step. Busy, Paraphrase, 
Onrush, Trephine 
and Busy Phil comprise the 
field. 

Last season Timonit op- 
ened with a crowd of 8121 and 
wagering of $361,151 and Gen- 
eral Manager John M. Heil an- 
ticipates that with slightly 
c ler \. ather predicted, these 
figures may be surpassed by 
2 or 3 per cent 


The jockey colc_y for the 10 


day meeting here is a capable . 


one, “including most of those 


who performed well at Hazers- : 


town. Mike Sorren''no, Buddy 
Root, Willie C’ k, Tony Russo 
Fred Kratz, Bernie Hewitt, Gus 
Pappas .and Ray Shirey are 
among the Timonium “regu 
lars” on hand 

Post time has been 
1:30 p. m. daylight daily 
the daily double. on the 
and second races will close at 
1:20. p. m. each gsfternoon. 


for 
and 


first 


set 


Jackson Choice 
Over Charles in 


TV Bout Tonight 


CLEVELAND. Aug * 
Tommy (Hurricane) a i 
was made a 65 choice today to 
defeat former world heavy- 


weight Boxing champion Ezzard § 


Charlies in their 10-round tele- 
vised bout here tomorrow. | In 
Washington, the bout will 
broadcast over WMAL (630) 
radio and seen on WMAL-TV 
(Channel 7) starting at 10 p. m. 

A few weeks ago. 
won an upset 10-round decision 
from the former champion at 
Syracuse, N. Y. Jackson, 23, 
is the third-ranking contender 
Charles, 34. 
sixth-ranking contender's spot 

Charles, who said he 
estimated” Jackson in the first 
Dout. has a 90-14-1 record. Jack 
son has a 243-1 mark and has 
won his last seven bouts 


> 


60 Drivers Race 


At Old Dominion 


MANASSAS, Va., 
Approximately 60 
drivers, representing 
Dominion 
ginia Stock Car 
clalions., 
doubleheader attraction co 
featuring separate four event 
competitions at the Old Domin- 
ion Speedway 
night 

Two l0-lap qualifying heats. 
a 10-lap consolation race and a 
2-lap feature are scheduled 
for each group 


Aug 


top 
the 


area 


Racing Asso- 


AQUEDUCT RESU LTS 


i4 
Me ontaaes 16 ae 
Lester) 
‘ gocceute) 
tock Ma 


a.50 
11 


Baltimore & 


Jackson | 


30 } 
Old | 


and Northern Vir- 


are expected for the M 


here Saturday , 


RACE—Dix Surlongs : 


cla 


aC Porbes 


Jocker W 
(Boulmetis) 
; 


3 


O& PF -2F HO 


Side Saddle 


Time 


“Fert 


_ 
6* 


- 


edad £ 
SHON eS 


BIG 


ure 2 — 
rSGi Re oa #4 20 yf? 40: DEEP RIVER. 06.90 $4.00 i with. 2 


Corfel set 4 
mildly urged w= 
ae ma After 

ahtly 

FOURT 
re. 5 year-olas, a 
> 


: : 
A. Roberts a br ra by Mires! 


‘pee 
_-* revalaing 
toget 


his advant 


uP claiming Went 
on owt 
Rona 


~ ors 
Bon aparte 


rer 3 
m3 4 


-O---- 8 
ee fee 


- 


+3 


Nelson Most Valuable 


In International 


MONTREAL, Aug 
Glenn (Rocky) Nelson, Montreal 
Royals’ firstbaseman. was an- 
nounced today as the Interna- 
tional League's most valuable 
player for 1955 

Neilson was first choice of 21 
of 28 voting writers Archie 
Wilson, Toronto Maple Leafs’ 
outfielder, placed second 

pook Jacobs Columbus sec - 
nd-baseman, was third 


sm hU 


AQUEDU CT ENTRIES 

%, 53500, 2 “year-olds. claim) 
r . Malgen Vovage 

Corny Miss 


has been given the ; 


“under- | 


ScOco «me ” «1-16 


co 


on 
Fe year- olds 
03 Indian 
. Kine Jol ie 
Piy-lLa 


Rouge Falcon 


— 
se 


{par oigs uw: © me« 
ly Bel) 10; 

Ann 

Ga! ; 
aisonts achet ' 
5 Como! ; 
108 *aAr den : 


539 —a— 
PIWPO- Oe o 


105 
os 
03 
20 
Lark 00 
cre S 


aporer' owance 


unger stout restraint and was | 


> River 


ace 
er throughout. with’ the form 


and one-sixteenth miles tepT 


© post « 


ee anvins 
m Or Twin 


Str. Pin * 
: 


RI We we re we 


ress 


of 


SB? ——wRraD— 


i 


| ker gost (Baichelter| 


femmes 
eeDd 
2 


85 om COLD 
M 


orn on the 
continued vine 


te menace ¢t 


er. sster be 


u 
; (Dimauro) 


(Boulmetis) 
‘Barnett) 
meAGE ek 


ST ptiites 


idpassage held 
. 


¢ winner 
been respensible for 


Ov wP--w 
-~ 


3%, $8.00. $4.60. WHITE brageicr Seay 


qhier acing 


st Eee Mes A, Fat oes 


Li's $y to “ea 2 ree 
h wns wy} “eo Ps 
ro 


Ring 
Blue Larkspur 


Jockey Wet. PP 
7 + 
(Be } 

’ 


| 
i 
i 
08 
1 
Le 


crwsed ~~ 
back 
the a, 


TIMONIUM ENTRIES 


on — 


Rad ASSENT ON 


RY 


DAILY DO 


Fist 
sriengs 


County 
. Ora 
More Robust 


5.4 furl 
Sid's Pride. 


Roman 


“tech ) 


3- te” Olds uD. cial ming 


be 
3 
3 
- 


fingine Alone 
Fanne J 
arehoys sem an 


~o be * omtesbeetes 
7" ahane 


RESU LTS 


Ro 
Gene Dars 


UBLE PAID sses4e 


Kildare 
Nizam! 


si.ure 


7? 
Bol id Rock 
née 


$3000: 1:144, 


Sh wee oe eee -eb<-rere 
we etree oe he 
ooo7090 oo 


e 
we 


and Jump. 


& 
Gammaw | 


11.48 5.60 4.98 Rove! 


WASHINGTON ENTRIES | 


ww. & 
x 
: ; 


Sark Treaster 1d6 


83000 on A 


} 
ie a 
; 


oe eee 


Return 
: je: $2000: 4-year-olds up: ol 
Ahoosier Havoc 
ty Preedome 
losing 
Queens 
leepy 


$3750 3. Fy olds: 
Carrier 109 Rick Ray 
ii } Por pores More.. 
ies 0 Sow Bor Bov 


4+—%* 63 
qegnes Moment 111 Greater 


oded Message 


i 
1 
i 
; 
Ha 
aible ond Asbu 


~~. up 
Montenegrin . 


alee 


o ‘ 
ub “Pecies 
F's Wheel ... 


| Nashu ‘a 
81%: £3000: 4-year-o 
"Tu lil *tius 
Maro ) Chee 
; Bienomar 


4 
106 
ili 
vear-oidcs 


- 
owaence claimed 


$3.20: BASIN STREET. 67.60. 
tained 
4 


alled | 
fn Prince cave War after navine 


re year-olds up: claiming | 


Frank's Maude (Opige) 
Kine Bate ‘Scurtec 


— a Roen 
Areu y Best Wishe 
&—6 furlongs: 63250. 
so ie Allee (Sellers) 
Sohes “ear Lf Mastect).. 
- ots Belle 
eribrook Galligas kin 
ac 7. furlongs. 84000 

(Ceek) 


iiss 


—— 


1 26% 


1 % miles: | 
¥ 


Piver 


Paddock Picks ’Em at Atlantic City 


OsT TIME tf FP 


Pr 
=e F— Six furlen«s 


,OT 28.¢ 


M 
puree 


site0; 


8-vear-elds 


liver Omar 
> sic Prince 
Go West ine 


wees 


(‘Shuk)> 


(‘Bervis) The contender 
Pigures very close 
eriooked 


an’t be ov 
orm now 


Owr 
2re~ 


Top 


7.0 er 
Heart Fiesh. Be Free 
ry 


. eo 5-20 7.68 
4.20 3.00 


008 
albopate Week Moment. 


14.48 wrt 3% te 


on September Ist the name 


Farm Bureau Insurance of Ohio 
Se ~—s will change to. 


ATIONWIDE 


BATIONWIOE MUTVUAL |NOURANCE COMP ase 
MATIONWI(DE MUTVAL FIRE I NOURANGE COerPane 
MATIONWION LIFE INSURANCE CORP aceT 


HOME OFFICE: COLUMEYS. Omo 


As 


interested in 
travel? 


Bere w 0 @ivwion-wide 
opportunity for travd in the U & 
or overseas with liberal bora 
and expenee ailowances. ond 
specialised training im a stable 
ond expanding field You'd 


WASHINGTON 


Coll Mr. NM. BD. Kennedy 
ME. 6-593! 


Wednesdey-Thursdey 
August 3)-September | 


PNTERVIEWS AVAILABLE 
trom 12 Neon te ¢ PA. 


Or sead weneme to Me 8 : MeCann 
Supermiser Reoruttrng ond Trarming 


GENERAL ELECTRIC 


the benefits for whieh 
GF te ce well known. 


bo 
Preferred Green's Polly ‘Gonza en) 
ee Neddies Jones (Dimauro} 
Lucky Harp ({Batcheller) 
Talfourd um) 


Boulmetis } 


(Sorenson | these 


Chance with 


RACE—From Page 3] 


mere 
r? 


13 } 
x) 450 3.7. 
| i ie 


‘Ge erin) 
Higt 
‘bel; 


S.am 
uM '. a ’ 


a ive : 
Smart Admiral 
Black mprreor 
Ceme » Red 
| Steamitte -oin Gallic 
The Great : Tanane 

, DAILY POUBLE FAIp 881.80 

1% miles $3500 
Deveau) 3. 
bes + | ta 


sirite? 


et et ot et oe 
- 


. € 
Chief 


banked 


nt St pe Pt pe ht ne tt ee ee 


hs O@&aW--WNYVOe--A 
SSendneoe 


- 
- 


henter (Cutehew) 


NON OCO VS Deu -) 


—— oo. 


It’s Swaps t vs. Nashua Today 
In $100,000 Match Race 


and Mish Tenney 
of Swaps, are on 
die the colts for 
awaited due! 


3°23 
” 


| 


furlenss: purse, 83600; yea 
(Boulmetis } ' aay y's beat hes 
Aesean Sea (Vincent) 7 no conten 
Winner Ts New York 


Leap Ti 
; dangerous 
now 
r at times 
Can't be oeverioo 


and ene-clchth miles! purse, 
cla imin me 
"nett? ote only sepeat Sas’ last 
» > over 
Pigu 
a Smith) Chance 
se 
etts (Boulmetis) Has speed: wate 
‘Boulm Sh 


ae... TH pga ferlengs: 
vear-old«: filles. 
Reconsider (Boulmetis) Best effort needed 
And Pair (Lesisac) Second recent outing 
9 Queen Yvonne (Vince Always close up 
8 Infatuation ‘Choquette: 
? ave Cee (Blum 0od 
Land O Liberty iSeanes Won last: 
10 Tor : boy) 
4 And Rare (ne bor) 
5 Topnia 
ir 
7 * Power St'ring ‘no boy) 
. A Dairo entry 
nonre RACE—One 
ein" olds and up: 


2>9 
. 2. ae 
se 
: 
~~" 


—_) 
oO 
ae 

00 = 00 ee he ee ee 


— i 


WHISKEY! 


‘ 
> 
, 
9 
_ /* 4 
ryman 


f rippert 

Mer M Kon Wise Za Vin - Better re 10e «620-1 

skcoxb RACE —eeen "favicnaes purse, B2100; 4-vear-old« op 

‘ 84000 1:°47%s and @p: claiming 

Grand draphe _ (V'ewela) 3.80 2.60 3.20 7° Poy, . 
‘Weedhbeuse) ‘ 


(Hardinbdreetk ) 
Qa r 


Pu ~<a 
On PA Rawy wa 


et tg et 
ee et ee 


(Stevenson) 

SIXTH RACE—One 
vear-elds and uD; 
Sweet Wendy 


part-owner Both 
hand to sad- indicated their fitness 
their long-! brilliant workout« the past 
week. Nashu, riding a 2:05.4 
Nashua drew the rail posi-'mile and one-quarter drill at 
tion, but neither side attached Saratoga before his departure. 
any significance to it. Starting | skipped a briliant six furlongs ; 00: 1 
out of the gate, there will be here Sunday morning in 1:11:3. Kaa (Geertn| 
an empty stall between them jeasing up an additional eighth} 
and the long run to the club-|in 1:24.2. 


house turn gives either, pro- Swaps amazed the clockers 
he ean oe ag pve een a a week, drilling a mile A 
, 1:35, for one of the most sensa 


The 3-year-o! c 
to the ae oe — tional workouts ever recorded 
r at the local course. 


and conceivably “horse-of-the- 
year” honors, will be saddieqd| Both Swaps and Nashua have 
on the grass in front of the PCem undefeated since the Ken- 
tote board—all the better for |‘Ucky Derby, having been cam- 
you TV guys and gals to see. paigned in previously deter- 

Swaps is held a 3-5 favorite | Mined different areas. One of 
overnight with Nashua figured| >W®>* Outstandin gvictories'| 
to march postward at 6§,|¥4% his length and a half score! 
although it is admitted by alj/0Ver Determine, the 1954 Ken-| 
that were the race run on the|‘U¢ky Derby winner, and other 
West Coast Swaps would be older. horses in world record 
1-2 or less time 

Both colts are ready for the Nashua since has added the 
race of their lives. Swaps, un-/ Preakness, Belmont Stakes, the 
defeated year-old chestnut;Dwyer and the Arlington 
son of Khaled-Iron Reward,/Classic to his pre-Derby 
carries a string of eight TWiumphs in the Flamingo, 
straight victories into the race,| Florida Derby and Wood Memo- 
including the recent American Tial. 
Derby at 13/16 miles over) Swaps’ overall two-vear socerd! 
Washington's grass course. It/is 11 victories—eight in major 
was Swaps first competitive, vents—in 14 starts with total 
start on the grass, and, hejearnings of $439,500. All but 
equalled .the American turf) $20,950 of that amount has 
mark of 1:54.3 for the event.' been garnered this year. 

Nashua hasn’t started since; Nashua with 14 wins in 17) 
his winning performance in the starts has eranings of $783,565 
Arlington’ Classic, July 16,'/which ranks him fifth among 
winning the mile feature by all-time money winners. A vic- 
a diminishing halflength,|tory tomorrow will catapult 
Nashua was given a well-|him into the third spot behind 
deserved respite before Mr.| Citation and Stymie. 
Fitz returned the ‘54 2-year-| Swaps and Nasha are ready 
‘old champ to rigorous training | to give all—and something's 
for the match race, got to give. 


, 


huk) Needs on! 7 ride 3-1 
8 T.8f 1 janvn p 7 . Adar 1’ 
7.40 1% eat Pe 


Nashua and 


, Mi) 


Swaps 
wita 


z ei ek 
- 


ne boy 
how 
5 : | nt 
Jsreultane Higte 
esmenaut (Andersen) 
um Lever (Nichetls) 
sours pater of 
A Mw 


ne 


« 
‘Reade n ow Can! 4 


ten 


_ '* - 
’ S56 2.20 2.50 2 Par (Ree) buto) 

6m 4.ie © v. (Ge be of 

ave 
fr at times 
waho w more 
Chance off best racer 
Can't recommend 
che! \er Hardly the one 


LONGSHOT DAILY DOUBLE 
FUDGE KING AND PINK SANDS 
sa RACE—Six purse £5700; 
. May be good thing 


Diimmy (Korte) 
Keystone (Lynch) | now: comtendcer 
be right there 
To 


rin Phalange 


be Don 


Sl 


4 

SR 

j 
Wi ee 


Read how FLEISCHMANN’S 
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‘ 
on hs ' ee ’ 
14 3 


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$2500 
G reat Artist ic angemiec) 
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(Merene) 
Rico Mame! 
Winning Fieet Labia 


] ‘ miies 5 3500 
(Merene ) 
‘Vv «ff 
ween | all) ae 
jue g Repeater ~ B.,, m Point. Lady saftor 


furlongs. 2-year-elds 


a 


Drv Wern 
and lamarelix 
147% 
1.40 er * 0 
bd +4 


Alsay (Korte) 
Imperative (Bouwlmetis) 
— 5 


oooooo:s 


Seo f#OJ az 
¢ 
Se 


Some good rac 
Ran weil Mi England 


= 
" 


improve and - -cishth miles; purse, 


A 
Like tals one 


so ee pw ee 


e¢ good effort 
Watch out in here 
peut need more racing 
Show more 

Pair at times 


we ee ee pe ew pe 


ber ‘Boulmetis) 


Os w—- We — ar 


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cal 


~ IHD he & 
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ma recent outin 
Clockers recommen 
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TY : coneee helps 


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' 


NATS—From Page 31 


Tuttle, House Homer 


As Hoeft Beats Nats 


by swinging futilely at Hoeft's, 
blazing fast ball. Billy got rid’ 
of the first 10 men to face him. 


until Jerry Snyder walked in 


the fourth and was rubbed out 


on the first of three double 
plays by Detroit. 

Things perked up for the 
Nats in the fifth when Carlos 
Paula got the first hit off 
Hoeft, a single to center with 
one out. Ed FitzGerald sent a 
hot grounder to Kuenn who 
made a great play for the force 
on Paula. Tom Umphiett fol- 
lowed with a single but Joe 
Valdivielso watched a third 
strike go by. 

Harmon Killebrew batted 
for Ramos in the sixth and sin- 
gied but Eddie Yost grounded 
into a double play. Snyder was 
safe on Kuenn’s error but 
Mickey Vernon struck out. 
The last Washington man to 
get on base was Snyder who 
singled in the ninth with one 
out. Vernon then grounded 
into the final double play of 
the night. 

Hoeft allowed only six men 
to get on base four on singles, 
one on a walk and another on 
an error. 


| the West this year. 


SIDEBARS — The Tigers 
have now beaten the Nats 15 
out of 19 times this year and 
yet have been defeated by 
Cleveland 10 out of 16 times 
.. How do you figure it’? ... 
The Nats have won only one 
game in 10 here this year... 
The Tigers play only 14 night 
games at home and have a 
9 to 4 record at the moment 

. The Tigers are 8 games 
better than they were last 
year at this time . . To 
night's attendance 
the Tigers 9269 over last 
year’s total turnstile count 
. . The shutout was Hoeft's 
fifth of the year and the 21st 
time the Nats have been col- 
lared . . . Bob Porterfield’s 
injured knee is still a bit ten- 


-der so he will be saved for 


ihe Yankees ... He probably 
will open the series in New 
York Friday Johnny 
Schmitz goes against the 
Tigers tomorrow afternoon 
while Frank Lary will pitch 
for Detroit .. . This will mark 
the Nats’ final apearance in 


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SKINS—From Page 31 | 


Colts Finish 
Fast to Tie 
Redskins 


und fumbled and End Gene 
Brito picked up the loose ball, 
was knocked down but got up 
and rambled 28 yards for what 
appeared to be more than the 
clifching touchdown. 

Then the Redskins quarter- 
backs started hitting Colts Pel- 
lington and Tase.T. It more than 


White Sox | 
Take First 
Place, 7-5 


failure. He walked four men, 
in the second inning, forcing 
home two runs. Relief pitcher 

Dixie Howell finally bailed out 
the Sox staff, holding the Red 
Sox to a’ single run in the last 
five innings. | 

Willard Nixon, who started, 
was one of four Boston pitch- 
wiped out the Redskins rush. ers. Like Trucks he was wild 
ing advantage of 194 yards to and forced over a run. After 
7 the Sox regained the lead at 4-2 
against Harry Byrd in 
fourth, thanks to Billy Klaus’ 
big single, they promptly gave 
the two tying runs back to 
Chicago. 

The veteran Eddie 
bobbled pinch hitter Ron 
Northey’s ground ball to help 
fill the bases against Nixon and 
on the next play, Billy Good- 
man made a wild throw to 


eel 


Rookie Bert Zagers ied 
Washington's ball carriers with 
69 yards in 13 carries and Rob 
Goode bulled his way 55 in 11 
tries. 

The Redskins take off by 
plane tomorrow morning for 
Memphis where they meet the 
Bears Saturday night in Crump 
Stadium. It should be a quiet 
ride while they ponder the one 
that got away. 


ing for a first-to-second-to-first 


' 
Joost; 


second on Fox's grounder, try-|! 


TiiK WASUL.GTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
asee W ednesday, August 31, 1955 ot 


; : as! 
Mrs. J. F. Leonard Wins at Norbeck 
Mrs. J. F. Leonard of Court Georges, has low gross, 89. -— — 
now oni aon. see Cale Ob Coxe nett Maibew Sebvneh 12-77, and Mra Raph 
tournament at (Norbeck. Mrs. fecker, Bethesda, each with Prince Georges, 89—12—-77, Ewell, Kenwood, 91~—14—77, 


Roland DeLauney, Prince |90—14—76, tied for second low Mrs. M. W, Fillius, Columbia, tied for third. 


eee 


7 
_ 


the; 


/@ 


WASHINGTON 714 7 6—28 
BALTIMORE. 6 7 6 21—28 


Washington, touchdowns—Le.- 
Baron (45-yard run), Janowicz 
\(3-yard run), Jones (15, pass 
from LeBaron), Brite (28, run, 
recovered fumble). PAT—Jano- 
wiecs 4. 

Baltimore, touchdowns—Ame-. 
che (1, plunge), Dupre (4, run), 
Pellington (38, run, intercepted 
pass), Mutscheller (6, pass from 
Shaw). PAT—Kerkorian 4. 


Terps Sell Tickets 


In New Field House 


| Tickets for Maryland's foot-| 
ball games will be “available 
i\Friday inthe new Activities 
Building on University lane.| 

Bill Cobey, graduate man- 
ager of athietics, and Bennie 
Robinson, ticket manager, and 
their staffs will be- the first 
to occupy the new quarters. 
The athietic staff will not 
transfer to the field house 
until a later date 


Chevy Chase's Dalton 


double play, permitting two 
runs to score. 


the contest, the Red Sox moved 
out in front in the sixth in- 
ning. They challenged Wil-' 
liams to hit to left with their) 
special shift with one out, and/ 
he did, cracking « smart double 
down the line. 

With two out, Sammy White 
scored him with a single. 

As if discontented about 
leading the White Sox, the Red 
Sox almost immediately gave 
three runs back to the Chicago 
lads with a resumption of their 
shoddy defensive play. The 
first offender was Billy Klaus, 
who threw wild on Carrasque!'s 
easy grounder. 

Tom Hurd, the second Boston 
pitcher, was the victim of his 
own pals. With one out Fox 
poked a soft liner to left and 
Williams let the waist-high bal! 
pour through his glove for an 
incredible muff. 

That put men on second and 
third with one out and Kell got 
‘em both home by banging a 
os. pitch over everybody's 
. . ~ ead in right center. Minoso's 
Third in Skeet Shoot single to right followed and the 

PONTIAC, Mich. Aug. 30 White Sox had the big un 
John Dalton, Chevy Chase, shat- ©afned runs for the inning, the 
tered 93 out of 100 windswept all game, and the league lead 
targets to tie for third place in S°STON CHICAGO 
the National subsmall skeet Gooden 3 
championship race here today. | & i 
Other Maryland-D. C. leaders genes. : 
were Harry Wright, Baltimore, Hatten» 3 
80; Ed Calhaun, Salisbury, 89: Stic 2 
Joe George, Sudlersville, 75: <Thronevy 6 

: 
0 
} 


> 
“Le Puwe—-*seuv® 


+2990 00--3~oKron~E 
> 


—-5 4-003 
-93o 9300 v) 


- 


J. D. Williams, Washington, 82. | 2?’, 
Delock p 
Perfect Skeet Score 
PONTIAC, Mich., Aug. 30 ene , 
Army Maj. V. J. L. Roth of Ft. sate “error ter Byrd t ~~ 
Lee, Va., shattering every clay .- | : 
pigeon put before him, came alent tec Teast in 7th 
up with a perfect 100-out-of-' fPited owt for Kinder in 9th 
100 score to take the high gun Bestes 020 201 e90—5 
title yesterday in the National |“"***** — o.. ——— | 
Sheet S ne oting Association.wson Port Busby. Carresauel 2. Lor 
champienships. : 


e2c000~-o~0~-oOnwe 
©0200 0-oVve0-)—-gon9 
Se Oo7D Be CO8e8 OF Owe 2 Cee 
wWQ@e- = Ore 

920 0O90+e¢er-+- 
o00--099~--3-- 


Hovell p 


You'll make a new friend for life 
When you taste lighter, milder 


TAYLOR | 
86 


If vou like rare bourbon—but want 
it im lighter and milder 86 proof, 
just say “OLD TAYLOR 86” to 


your dealer. You'll walk out with 


what many bourbon fanciers say is 


the finest 86 proof straight bourbon 


ever bottled. Try it! 


OLD TAYLOR 36 PROOF 
KENTUCKY STRAIGHT BOURBON WHISKEY 


THE OLD TAYLOR DISTILLERY COMPANY, FRANKFORT & LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY 


b 


xe 2-2. Bre 2-2 
+0 Delock 0-0 Kinder 6-0. W— 
7.4 Hurd if U—Napp 


owe), =) 
T—3:26 A-—41,1% 


e) i~3! 
Grieve. Blevens. Rice 


For the third time during ' 


Try the Good Old-Time Taste that 
is making Heurich’s Beer the Big 


WASHINGTON FAVORITE 


Today's real beer drinkers are really going 

for the old-time taste and body of my father's 

Lager Beer. From the way it is selling in stores, 
taverns and restaurants, it looks like it’s well 

On its way to becoming Washington's number » 
one beer. Try it — and you'll see why. 


Expect it to taste 
ditferent cnd better... 


LAGER BEER 


seewese SY CHE HECEICH SOtwrHRe COMFawe, Wateiecror, & € 


— 
= 
— 
= 


' 


>: 


THE OLD TAYLOR DISTILLERY CommaaT 
PRAWKFORT. KY 


“= @eteeweees tee @ feeuee 8 bene HE 


Y Cutt — 

tf you prefer bonded bourbon, drink 
OLD TAYLOR KENTUCKY STRAIGHT 
BOURBON WHISKEY 100 PROOF 


“The Noblest Bourbon of Them All” 


A 


SOTTLED BY 


LOU SVM ET 


is now greater than ever 


ing power that makes 


o 


Y 


Always outstanding, TYDOL FLYING -A- ETHYL 


test. for modern cars. Faster on the start, 
quicker on the pick-up, it’s the kind of surg- 


Team it up with NEW VEEDOL 10-30 Motor Oil 
for HIGHEST OCTANE PERFORMANCE and longer 
mileage. Drive in at the sign of your friendly 
Flying -A- Dealer. And remember, in 7 
this holiday traffic...drive carefully. 


...&a truly Aigh high- 


driving a pleasure, 


e7 - %- 14) 8), i= 


\ 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
i ae Wednesday, August 31, 1955 , 


seeereeeeeeeree 7 
seeeeeeeeerrrr . 
seeeerer as 

: _eraesenees . 


ult 


i 


Hib 
siz 


eeeeeeee 


i 
in 


4 


1 tess eeeeeeeeerr 


i 


i 


int 


eeeeeeeeeeeeeeee 


** 
eeeeeeeeeeeerere 


ti? 
ty 
i 


re-) 1108 16th St. } 


eeeeeere 6675" 
eeeereeeeee 24-2, 
wz 


f 


i 


if 


| 


orous 
white mae n 


Sette A | 


aT | 1966— Merry Mw 


J Fore 9 sTRIe 7 
re Wil 


) Dipirigt eS 
cd ana Pea 


of this 
ecree of diverce from 


2eD money 


4th 
tation - Riges bank ward 
At afl. «4 m 
AF vce teas 
pri chips 


~ $25 REWARD — 
DOG—Near Shadrtrove rd 
vole Male. med.-sire hound red- 
roewn. white ter hese oOOlar 
Gal bere 4 eo OL 
10 


OL. 


‘+ white go. 


ence « 
eeks in the + nip Pe | 
rics - Her: 
¥ m ohinat on t on mes 
 hefore sai : JOSEPH Reward 


HULL 


at Ta 


re oh A un 
UN Deou:y 
aA. a = Atterners§ | 
1075 Connecticat are 
= hr DISTRICT COU aT 
[ Columbia.! 


ts to wives FOUND 
the \- river o 

‘ "he o> ain od | CANOE—Upper Potoma 
the 


FR—Ak mae. 
NR. Barly 


3- 


o> ste Court of . 
the Proba leather collar 


ner oF 


me * 
exuhidit the ‘ame, sith the rouch- 
hereo! a! ~ on ment a 
tore | 

‘Or “PEBRUARY. 


nn e077; aa 
‘< Owner 
3959 
. mart- 
+ oar 
nee. fond of child — 
black Pound week «go 
area Sw 


PERSONALS 


sitting 


hand this 26th 
RICE os RIAN ~ 
7935 Mav Alles Sr MEL-| 
ate a: 


W heeton 


1m @e ovt heme: Be- | 
Cate $52 ms 
Ss «2 demand 
Jods open “te mature women ‘(up 
te 65: Simple training 
spare me sent par 
» >. 


TES ICT 
trict of Colum- 


~ 
es) 


) OF mace ‘te - 


Cipcinn 


rom the cra Court 
Let 1 
LP Counse e 


Dist riet of Colambis . 
ary on the estate of 
late of t 


A) . 
vour brother He 
bo YOU NEED 

~ vay ; : home 
trict of Colunt@is thers 
having claims s¢ains tenten Home. FE 

. wee x_days 
’ 


done «| home 


| Scheel 


be res oo e tor any 
rec 5 ne other 
f er ARLES R STEW - 
: ne 


‘Deput , is hampoo an 
the District of Columbia ear. i WAR? ithe . ee 
Clerk of the oo ate oust “ie  PeREO REL ATIONS = 

31.5e 14 te anyone for zou 
BIDS AND Ls A $03 


6 | Rev. Beixnap 
eg 4 bids for cert sin mechan! | 
. 


Ené neering 


WANT $3.00? 

YoU A. MAKE IT In 
SECONDS BY 

CALL. ING UN. 4-509! 


* | SEWING and ait terations by expert 
ean 


NVITAT 

NVITATIONS. 24-hour Pad 
Be “— 

or onone ord v. 


° WHITE-cO a 

3 a3 wks. 84 wily. Free. reas 
wit typing 

Ma. ching earthed 

$01h yr is 

aval br —Shamp 

¥e.! Lox. Lustrasi 


pep | ins abe — 


+ € onstr 


when pu abhicl y | 

Rm 7 ma- 
terial may be qpraines tro m Room | | 
: Bianley Adams. rigti: 


ith 
11th «at 


ah 


t Ww : 
3-4900 P 
robel. Commissioner of Public 
ulidings. General Services Admin 
7 oe 
+ Ov Dist. or COL. DEPT 
; Ens s Avi 25 

2 D aq pr 

u 


rie Scerentek “2 

‘9 Se “Re k ni call HU 3-4930" stenehers 
“. Masonry sewer: pists ‘Col ored, 

je” dia rein{ cone. ol ° eben 

yr ete Secretarie 4 Write 

2 

BUSINESS shy 

OG Piaee NW 

—Phone Oe Start 

jmmodiate Guaranteed conching, 

NW Lele. G TY SCHOOL 

: A, - 


‘beauty cul. 


pipe yewer 
" dis 
roposa! form. 
obiainabie 


- Rin 
nw. (Tel! 


United P+ ates Capi- 
Washington 0D C s@ust 
5S. Sealed bids in triplicate! _ 
| ii 


RN 


Parking 
Cc fa rol 
ne Stress sed 
or 


7 
PETWORTH ‘DaIviNg | "se HOOL 


= NURSES NEEDED | 


the vicinity of t 
the Unied States 
“Dra 


in ormat tlor } 
about SEPTEMBER } 5. a cter 
wi be a without cep ' it vat ty Excel ay 
the discretion f rchitect ¢ = Sat. Class ° mie! hool | 
‘xe, aise) 

"DOCTOR'S > sO RCSISTANTS 

INFANT NURSING 

| ENROLL NOW For SEPT. 
th 4 Por free >OR ICL Viett write. phone 
Notrane institute of Nursing 
v he () Di yw ST +-~ 387 HF) 


tfiees ulions 


8 


Bm were 
4 GEOR ORG “STEWART. Architect 


SUSINESS SERVICE 
abees eon’ 


OO 
DE. 2-597 


: PT 8CHOOi 
“BROT 


cs a! kit. mod Day rs eeeee Gl ‘ar " 
classes. Sept 

graduate 
Radi ® end 

h 8 NW. ME 
ADIO- TV REPAIR Prac 
courses. $5 TEMPLE 
1338 G st = NA. 86-4690. 


WANTED 


women. 18-46 to train as 


tint miler 


°$5 
eve. shop 
: SCHOOL 
ecopomica 
-hour service. ST. 3-00 | 
A DEPENDABLE | 
GENERA ; 
Additional, 
rooms. attic ! ; Old 
houses seatered Ue te 7 years to! 
PIU. 9-882 RA ee “n 
-% y 4 6-4 h 
5 alterations” concrete Northwest medio & TV Ss on 
d. Na Gener j S27 
0983" 80. ‘b-7458 warn 
.. o e i zor ened “or "phee use rare 
or mechine shorthend: 5 condi. 
tlened TEMP PLE SCHOOL 580th vr 
1338 3 sh. pw. BA, 8-3259. 


“WOM EN—ALL AGES 
eARE, MORE MONT 
“IN 6 WEEKS 
coat Term Courses: 


—_ 


ins 
efficient 

a3 

Men. 


rectors, 
Training 


tec. rms 
-- Type ‘ivpine 
wiv 


° 
Att 


hi) halls Dull, 
Tee walls. ete. 
H 


te 


TRY & 
sree 


“pia. ON, JO. 3-7 
RK concrete wor 
No job too small 


—Houses, apis. By 
Ly 3-723) 
Kx 
6- 1733_ Fe 
=i pert me 
stimate. up to 34 


and brick 


chanics 


Speedwriting Secretaria School 
1406 G. 


Ps 
ae ¢yision 
A 


' 


rd Whsle te urn 
Ubi AED BRANCH” 


| Pull 
pubic °° 
| fore about 
i Wedn 
19 
mo a! To service sutomatic washer 


} 4418 
‘ 


to - 
*| worthwhile "Sone ts 


w 4s 
bite core Sieintk Nice 


$100 
RSE. 638 | | asa L4:h_st 


COLORED- WHITE for | AUTO Panva— MEN —) 
: "Ti 
n9-F e- | Y 


' 


| Dald vacation seed working condi. 
| tems t 


: 


LASSES AIT 


: 


DC SHE 


ob 


| Rock ville 


statistician 
ics) =— ROC 


‘des 
(young) 


Insur. adm. clerk trainee 
Auto. Sains “Inspector ‘ ra 
eo.) 


tee. supy. ‘(real 
trainees ;pat'l mach 4 


NATIONAL EMPLY SERV. 
w.W. at L. BX. 3-7270 


ADMINISTRATIVE 
TRAINEE 


sred.. to ‘tmvesti- 
and adjust autom obviie 
im preparation 
c mining work 
u- 


ot of 
al pref 


training 
3- Detwren §-3. 


~haenic. 
tronic technictans 
room technic 


fee machines 
records 
Aute accessories 


retal! 
re‘at 
Medica! — car furn 


5 
$4700 4 
wii 


J-0650 

$35 
hic $-4 $43 
Ch 40 


apt. 


ry self 


ri 5) 4 
drug store 


Sth ci 175» aten | 
ni $i7 


ASSISTANT 


Mr 
| PAR bd £ ORP 


Times Herald 
Want Ads 
Work 
‘Wonders 


ALEXANDRIA AREA ME 
or art -<y ee i 
© sult you. Mus 

ar -y AB a 


yet an pour Sey oe 
m=. room 
‘ enérs. _ 


epairman 


. aaeee | 


App! lance 


rienced i: : 
ELECTRIC CoO 


era be. | 
Te #8700 TO- | 
Sil Kine «@t.. Alen 


carvers; must be ex 


furnished 

od 
| ree eip 
Ure, EPL. 
K 


Layout. with retell experience seat | O90 
cen. 

isc <4 r 

yr otner 

pmotes te Bm picrmem er "pn! 


Woodward & Lothrop 


to | seen lith * 2 Staasre aw 


{ie naa — 
| } ae’ 


Age 36 to to 48. A 


eH 


bacterio. a , 


——— trpist 


Ruy 


: ve 4; tr 
33 "+ ‘ > m ASST A NACER TRAINER: 


jecated§ in 
AC EMPL, 


Bae i ee 


in middie Os: inside salaried 
position with unusual oppor 
advancement. 


concern 


col- 
with 
in 
® yeh- 
office otal 


and sales carte respond 
GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES 
LIFE Tih soe bam = 


255. 
‘bees, see eae se, 3 


0 
Opportunity tor ist ea mechanic 
familiar with care made by Bi« . 
You will make top money and he 
pondy ll year- roune work Call 


ALERS 
igh piece work | 


More work than 
, 


nly 


Auto . Co 
at To MEC WANIC—Must 


per sor Herson «| 
" agplhance 74 O at 


be sever. 


job with ail | 
plus 


R—* “4. Pairtax cite pe 
a heute 


. Selery pe encstion: , tape Coto 
ul Gn are furn rem 
full-time Othe r fin 


an. 
5 wk. guar. 
vacation with 
is. ave. ow. 


“\P, MEn 


Dept 
Rigbmene "parver Bchool 


R: chen | ~» Se Vireinie 


Exc. guar ut 
Pg ae PP 


#8 


"ber shop. i Tr quacenine ini 


eons navel ra. 


A 
day week. 
try Club 
ween 
Pairfax 


‘ee 
aeicK aven FOREMAN v ireini a 
: 


aperienced < 
—— re 


empioyment a 
. rm 
BRICK He Fee 
Mechanics only Merrimack tob 
bloc ve 


‘he 


ee a. Je 
eat Brosa "ond Spring sts 
or peta 


Church is si Jt 


OMEN 
an ident tft 
for 


MEN 
f vou Go net Tare an 
n a 


If 
ee ar we 
ackers teat 


BOB'S STUDIO 


131 ish & NE Li 


We BOYS, $35 

$100 
$100 
%S 
$38) 


3-5102 


2 
or 


Boe 


“04 NN. OUYCOA® ST 3-363) 


Aceteyiene burner 
Laborer: . 
Kitchen mer 

rt time kitchen help . $17 
NATIONAL EMPLY SERV 
719 11TH ST. NW... @D FLOOR 


CASHIER 


machine ~~ — | 
2 rt 


les - 
son's sto "x APPLIANCE co 
714 O *® ae 


CAR HOPS 
mou Se 


T-) 
e- 
nent - e 
fits incjude meals. ho 
| Th meurance, pe vecations 


HOT SHOPPES, INC 


iMi GO ST NW. ROOM 290 


italtsetion. 


CARPENTER — Experie ienced. Too 
Bry or contrac tos of Moly 
rive East Palls Chureh 


5 ELECTRONICS ENGINERR 


Are You a 
Practical 


ear ELECTRONICS 


ENGINEER 


3 m. to 5 Dp. ™ 
Mic— ord experience 
m 


a 
Ure MEC HA’ ics— 
ae y 
Biss es 
‘ ond! tons . _ dais ae ida and 
Mr ink 
ph ed 14? & Pia 


with experience in 
to warn the “ute 
reetilar work hou hospitalisation 
See Pignone 


2101 i4th «st. nae 


DE 


Very aie lot. 
ambit sous 


needs “bagreasive 


‘oo > 
worker m. 
; Tre poon 
ate 4 COUNTRY SAL ‘ES $336 


Wa SALESMAN 


Expanding rolet dea) ershi p 
Rox 


t 
ceiling for t 
want. Compe 
prefer Sobtoum 
dents 
required 
BOLA! 


teomery County 
No ate sales experience 
Write or ly to J Pe. 


M 
110 North Washington a 


——» 


Auto Body Men (2) 
Auto Body Helper 


Washington's Little 
Detroit has  de- 
veloped such «a fine 
reputation for its 
body craftsmen 

We have a liberal 
pay plan, many com- 
pany benefits and a 
big, clean, well 
equipped shop. Only 


Call for Appointment 
Di. 7-2775 
or Apply to Mr. Norcross 


Call Carl, Inc. 
1250 24th St. NW, 


Interested in Travel? 


GENERAL ELECTRIC'S 
Heavy Military 
Electronic Equipment’ 
Department 


Has Openings in 


FOREIGN OR 
DOMESTIC 
FIELD 
ENGINEERING 


Here le a division-wide op- 


oe ubity for travel in the 
) #8. or overseas with lib- 
era. Donus and expen al- 
lowan and specialized 
training [ 


‘Spectaliete engineer 


staf? headquarters. 


Aided by General Electric's 


Para may progres 
ras ceur abili 


eee Oe RIN 
ane 
WASHINGTON 
INTERVIEWS 
Call Mr.-N. D. Kennedy 


ME. 8-593) 
For Appointment 


on wy ie saa 


12 to 9 P.M. 
i A ean 
GENERAL 


ELECTRIC CO. 
Electronics Park 
Syracuse, N. 


A 


ER 


se ~ 


"METROPOLITAN 

Meat Roxy Ars 

ak golf cl Lo & a5; might 
bent Bs. sue, reggae 


—_— salary an 
By Fe Le 
te 160 B® 

APPLY MR. CLARK 

CALL CARL, INC, 
683! Wisconsin Ave. 
Chevy Chase, Md 


re Reiners da 
“Mechanics only | 
mes voi. 


* soORMAN 


exceptional, good — 

’ ood re | 
days a receiving room 
ieaitentng ata ape 

MAN, -ruct’l ‘steel 


ferns Be PEt. | Be 


"COLORED exp. $100 wk.’ 
wi 
ery 


COLLECTION 
AND CREDIT 
ASSISTANTS 


Wonderful opportunity for 
experienced men to-— be- 
come credit and collec- 
tion managers. Also in- 
experienced men as frain- 
ers Permanent positions. 
Excellent salary. Paid ve- 
cation anc many company 
benefits. Apoly Mr. Swee- 
ney or Mr. Withame 


ord, Hub Furniture Co. 


7TH 2 DTS NW 


wea vO | 


Studie one of 
st \s = 


Marion's "Dance tudio 
1701 16TH ST. NW 
CHASTLETON HOTEL 


Dependable colored 
man belween = and 45. for ae - 
ne bi lh alse as 


ta , 


LLOYDS CE aoe SER 


Ji Y. Ave, NW 


v. nt 
"DRAFTSMEN 


832 py nt Cu rele bids.. or call! 
Du 9-1n)t ; | 


—_ tectur 
35 Degree in architectural engi- 
neering. well-rouw experience 
with emphasis on interior desian 
St. sal to for top Sieh! 
MANAGE vt corsvU LT- 


m 
Ants. I Suite 609. 1406 G ne 


-DRAFTSMEN | 
TRAINEES 


OPENINGS FOR YOUNG MEN 
INTERESTED IN LEARNING 
THE HIGHLY LUCRATIVE 


FIELD OF DRAFTING 


REQUIREMENT 

AT LEAST ONE YEAR OF | 
HIGH SCHOOL 
MECHANICAL 


DRAWING COURSE 


apt eae . 
Sink te. 


EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY 
FOR ADVANCEMENT IN 
AN EXPANDING RESEARCH 


ORGANIZATION 


APPLY IN PERSON 
8 A.M. TO 4 P. M. 


MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 


MELPAR, 
INC. 


ee. | 
CALL CARL, INC. 
6831 Wisconsin Ave. 


gy0 bi 


‘. tenis 500 OTTO! 
sil ine st. Alex maintenan 
Face secrie 

ie Arnold o.. 


su 
ment benefits. Must be good 


nearest seen 
HARDWARE SALESMAN 


Ts. 
ist pa hae P otth sath s OPERATOR 
— ule 6 siuiehos r ig?” a Bhat Bk 4 3 


vei Wve? ie cor O & i2t 


et My 


SUPERVISOR 


Fxprrienced in ting 


ter ic oe = 
” ENGINEERS vxf 
Interested in Relocating 


bie 


ting 
"tee Individual! 
and amoition 
ce. 


‘a ~ _ hospit 
plus © ee. 


a comm 
er interv 
nN. ym witty Leoween 


Aerodynamic 


Heat Transfer 
and Fluid 
Mechanics 


esire 
Captto Priatine 


ENGT- 
ICENE 


ello WNP Bette a P TECHANI 


Supersonic & hypersonic fluld 
mechanics 


we beve a permanent position for 
7 me 


with 
sone a LAUNDRY 
211 


1¢ ST ww 5 
LYOUON COR Reva 

onig. refs.. ry or east me. 
Livingston se. JO $$00 


Machinist 
and 


Machine Operators 


For Electronic 
Manufacturing Plant 


APPLY 9 TO 4 
NEMS CLARKE, INC 


919 Jesup Blair Drive 
Silver Spring, Md. 


"MAN WITH CAR 


1) 


°) Supersonic @Wirine theory 


3) pany Gracie & control 
ly 


—~. ei trajectory & dispersion 
nalys 


. 
Aerodynamic bea'ine 
) Heat eonduc(ios 


Ballictic-range or 
research tech niaues 


free-fllght 


> Basic research in fuld 
mechanics 
be 


Encouragement wil) 
t eers 


who 


for 
ssvanese é@egrees and or 


WRITE PERSONNEL MANAGER 


Aerophysics Development 


(Supsisiary of Studepaker- 
Packard Corporation) 
Box 949 


Santa Monica, Calif. 


ee 


| for 


LOCKHEED | #324 ity 


AIRCRAFT CORP. - 


ro nt ex j00 
= Sholl's Cafeteria ey en 


~ MANAGER _ 


Men to trein 64 manager of N 
establishment Under % 
Must be energetic. alert and 
Bales experience heb- 
be able w furnish qese 
Only live-wire 


GEORGIA DIVISION 


HAS OPENING FOR 


ave. 
nesda 


a_i 


METALLURGIST a caseaak 


¥ | 
ay 


re for pavseceness need . 


required. prefer- 
abiy im Meteallursy. Minimum 
of 10 years experience Im the 
fabrication. desien' and metei- 
lurey in ferrous and materials 
required 


BS. degree | TRAINEE 

| Young man between ages 2!- 
30 
lent tuture 


Good pay, 


for proper man 
advancement, car 


Old established firm. 


JU, 9-49.29 


you 
f=. daily Pid 


$a 
re atkine® cae 


For tmmedtate consideration br « 
Lockheed Engineering Represente- 
tive. eal) 


HUDSON 3-6000 


m W. Schulte!) S**"OS 
12 Noon and HEN) fh full = 
time 


vious a= 2 “oan Ss od 
Repeat Ddusintss plus 


ax — 
to 5 hours aeee 
ean use = 
‘er 
and ask for Mr 
Wednesday, 9 A M 
3 PF. M. Interviews confidential 


LOCKHEED 
AIRCRAFT CORP. 


GEORGIA DIVISION 


Offers exceptional career seppor- 
tunities in structural engineering 
to Encineers experienced in 


ings ound $875 
yay mes “seh 8. Appiy 1116 


THIS IS IT! 


A needed product, service 
selling for men and women 
on the highest, most dig- 
nified level. 


Your paid training period and 
follow-up  field-help, plus 
daily sales clinics under the 
direction of JOHN GAW, 
famous Direct Sales Techni- 
cian, assures you of top suc- 
cess. 


Many Companies Use 
“Blind” or “Gimmick” 
Advertisements 
WE DO NOT 


Unlimited advancement end 
potential in our work. 
INTERVIEWS 
ARRANGED 
BY TELEPHONE ONLY 
Call Mr. Sprouse, Administrator 
HUDSON 3-6000 or Miss Kenyon, Gen!. Secretary 
for appointment. 
and ask for Mr. H.W. Schultz 
Wednesdey, 9 A. M.-12 Noon and! NEW CLASSES EACH WEEK 
ial. 


1-3 P. M. Interviews confident 
Divisions for both Colored and 
White sales personnel 


APPLIED LOADS 


Design Criteria 

Basic Loads 

Airload Burver 

Loading Spectra 

Structural Flight Capabilities 


FLUTTER & DYNAMICS 


1. Putter & Vibration 
2. Control Stability 

5 
4 
5 


Ansioge & IBM Computing 


STRESS ANALYSIS 


. Design Stress 
. Research 
. Method Studies 


Por immediate consideration by 
e Lockheed Engineering Repre- 
sentative. call 


3000 ARLINGTON BLVD 
FALLS, CHURCH; VA. 


(Take Arnold 2-V Bus from 
11th & E Sts, NW. to plant 
entrance) 


National 
Fire Safety 
Counsellors 


“America’s First and Finest 
Fire Detection Company” 


902 New York Ave. NW. 
-|ST. 3-1405 ST, 3-1406 


ST. 3-6960 
TARRON BESSEN 


Must have auto, excel-| 


| allowance, company benefits. 


APPEARING 


3 men 
teresti 
Ky 


ee tn- 
work in ne- 
pogulas J a 30 “> 


bérmanent 
cs eae Saas fae 


MEN (4) 


Arlington-Alexandria 
Metropolitan 
Washington || 


ELITE LAUNDRY 


IBM ASSISTANT |HAVE YOU MADE: took * ial 
an, JP YOUR MIND? 


(1) ce ie 


(2) 


<3) 3 
(4) 


ity 
To be in business for 
yourself at no invest- 
ment to you. 
Te earn what you are 
worth 


IF YOU HAVE MADE 
UP YOUR MIND THAT 


you want a steady in- 
come and a secure future 


See Mr. 
Ralph Goldberg 


ANNAPOLIS HOTEL 
WEDNESDAY, AUG. 31ST, OR 
THURSDAY, SEPT. 1ST 
12 NOON TO 7 P.M. 


—— 


MECHANIC 
‘sree aun 


Rot or oe 


(S) 


(6) 


assistant 

Gearee in pocnceiee, e versed 

Re experience 8t. en 500 
or mn. MANAG 

INC. Suite 606, 


pone 


“3s 


Experienced in 
maintenance 4, 


one F 


APPLY PERSONNEL 


| Arcade Sunshine | 


713 Lament 6t. NW 


A. ypes 
must , -&, ar hy 
408 


reef repairs. 
| permit. ApDiy im rear 


are @ . 
some 


selling experienc or Whe; 
wil te "are te vel Good warting§ We have & permanent 
T 


osition tm 


Supplement vour retirement ot 
eens with light office work. & 
‘4 


| sae tomes 
MILLING MACHINE 
& LATHE OPERATORS 
TOOLMAKERS 
INSPECTORS 


Piret class. shep 
we oe 5 oreferred. of 2 day 


sacar siceiccae co 


rv 
-cut oungs 

references or good BD 
jan drv ine and ia 
route. Geed epportunity for right 
men. 


ee a OSERS 


Washington'’« ateent home i rove- 
ent co. fh 2 


oore a J men 
aadertah job 


who 
om te _* os 


i 

ble 
anc do it Fel Wulie ome improve- 
fren- 
Amce 


A paces ; 


nd major appliances. and tors 
op salary to the right man 


23-2 org... 
neat se J ‘soon nus. 
2334 son 


Bivd Ae iA rT 2088 


New Openings at 


MELPAR, INC. 


CREATED BY THE CONTINUED 
EXPANSION OF OUR ENGINEERING 
AND PRODUCTION DIVISIONS 


DESIGNER-DRAFTSMEN 
~~ MACHINISTS 
MACHINE SHOP INSPECTORS 


ELECTRO MECHANICAL 
INSPECTORS 


SHEET METAL MEN 
SHEET METAL INSPECTORS 


PRODUCTION PLANNER 
TRAINEE 


PRODUCTION PLANNERS 
STOCK CLERKS 
TECHNICIANS, ELECTRONIC 
OPPORTUNITY FOR ADVANCEMENT 


MOOT STENDED WORK \ 


EXCELLENT EMPLOYEE BENEFITS 


APPLY IN PERSON 
8 AM. TO 4 P.M. 
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 


1211 SOUTH FERN STREET 
(OFF JEFF. DAVIS HWY.) 
ARLINGTON, VIRGINIA 


3000 ARLINGTON BLVD. 
FALLS CHURCH, VA. 


Take Arnold 2-V Bus From 11th and E Streets N.W. 
to Plant Entrance 


REGIONAL  camcitnn 


. 


' 


Me 


Pease j4§§ Continued on Following Pase 


; A 


t 
“4 = Pisbdliy” te myee or . & ~~~ 
ree 


e . 32-6171 fer appointment 


a , comm 


Stinger 
wit Cc $37" Galiat 
ville 
ws. 


- Sheet Metal 
< Mechanics 
(AIRCRAFT) 


INSTRUMENT 
MAKERS 


and 


SALARY $300 
has opening for 


Wwe expectenced 45 yeay 


dy YY stpoinimens 


~ SALESMEN 


Here ts the biggest oppor 
you heve ever had 


fl) HIOH EARNINGS 
(2) RAPID PROMOTIONS 
(3) CUSTOMER ACCEPTANCE 
‘4) THOROUGH TRAINING 
pectes by an intensive edvertis- 


tunity 


Electronic 


RENAIRE Corp. Mechanics 


101 EYE STREET SE. | aroiy in Person 
Real ts. | Monday Through Friday 


s Realty os Wighwas. | Engineering 4 Research 
| A Division of 
SALESMEN | ACF Industries, Inc. 
gan quaragiee’ salary | Riverdale, Md. 


+ A 
BALE SEMEN — Immediate 
position open for iwo 


morning P_. ap- 


SHOE SALESPEOPLE 


Immediate open ngs fer expert- 
‘| epoed shoe séleemen and sale 
wom Cxcellient apportunity for 
hieh earnings. Permehent 
with many emplore benefit » Pert 
time shoe salespeople also needed 
Apoly manager of any of our § 
eo or Mr. Sale aad 


permanet 
good raw 


* benu paid 
=. ‘Leona dai , 


“SALEGMEN_ $8000 


must have eduction record. Or 
a 2¢n of kinds epenines. See 


Pord 
BOYD'S COR 2TH A G' WM. HAHN & CO. 
‘can Speci is 


a : on 
mouth Pull time 3 
ith ibis week sf So) 


to ard at .s 
SALES TRAINEE 


Two openings for neat. intelligent 


t och _. p> woo 


<3 9 rr 
— ‘titerview. Ei 8-232 


SALESMAN 


) Oven! ne for men. tnerquaply exD 
4. es shoes 


ee wooo 


1098 CONN. AVE 


wid * EOE SALESMAN 
oes a fitting children’s 
spose, fe ANS Sinn sxos 
o4 F Street kw 
TION alee Near Metropoliten Theater 
SILK SPOTTER— Pilly exderience7. 
° SL eeens| est eer te 
dwich Man or Clerk S¥ERGCEAPHERS typists Bast 
> iw Rocher foods. Apply in 


Fx 
person Hofberg's Delicatessen 
aided Basten ave. Tens 


ar o 


jerks Reccen sents, Ea- 


undr 
pioymen' 
. 


7 The 
700 i2th. cor. G sts. & 


keepers. 


ineers 
ee r 

SECY., $310. Fat at RK—W in. yn 
LLOYD’S EMPL. SERV. re nee us. PotoMke 


2334 Wis ~ Bivd Ari 
_) 420 y.Y _ Ave _NWw ST 3 2307 $-2000 


ELECTRONIC 
ENGINEERS 


SOUTHEAST U. S. 
Radar System Design 
Technical Writer and Iilustrator 
C.1.C. Systems and Planning 
C.1L.C. Installation Checkout 
Field Engr. (former E.T. ratings) 
Field Engr. (B.S.E.E.) 
Draftsmen 


EASTERN U. S 
Engineering Coordinator (R&D) 
Field Engineer (former E.T. rating) 
Field Engineer (B.S.E.E.) 


SOUTHWEST U.S. (Min. Ed. B.S.E.€.) 
Field Test and Evaluation 
Installation and Planning 
Project Engineer 


FOREIGN—FAR EAST 
Field Engineer (H.GR) 


INTERNATIONAL ELECTRONICS 
ENGINEERING, INC. 


MUNGEY BLDG. 1329 E ST. 8 WwW 


ENGINEERS 


AND 


ag ae, \ 


Supporting Personnel 


We rpanufacture our own designs—eirborne arma- 
ments, flight simplators, machine tools, electronic de- 
vices. We erect them. We maintain them. Because 
we do a complete job, opportunities at ERCO embrace 
almost every technical category. There is a particular 
need for young engineers who like to get out and do 
things. The well-seasoned old timer will find excel- 


lent opportunities as well. 


At present a few choice openings exist for engineering 
physicists and standards engineers. Many openings exist 
for electronics engineers, test specialists, mechanical 


designers, design draftsmen and aerodynamicists. 


For further information send us a postcard. Include 
your name and address and the Code E9. We will reply 
_ promptly. Send resume for immediate evaluation. 


Engineering & Research 


_A DIVISION OF 
ACF INDUSTRIES, INC. 
Riverdale, Md. 


f 


- veee a LOT MAN. experienced | 
ouffin light 


THIS IS IT! 


A needed product, service 
selling for men and women 
on the highest, most dig- 
nified level. 


Your paid training period and 
followup field-help, plus 
daily sales clinics under the 
direction of JOHN GAW, 
famous Direct Sales Techni- 
cian, assure you of top suc- 
cess. 


y Companies Use 
ping or “Gimmick” 
Advertisements, 
WE DO NOT 


Unlimited advancement 
potential in our work. 


INTERVIEWS 
ARRANGED 
BY TELEPHONE ONLY 
Call Mr. Sprouse, Administrator ij?°2; 
or Miss Kenyon, Genl. Secretary. 
for appointment. ' 


NEW CLASSES EACH WEEK 
Divisions for both Colored and 
White sales personnel 
National 
Fire Safety 
Counsellors 


“America’s First and Finest 
Fire Detection Company” 


902 New York Ave. 
ST. 3- 1408, ST. 3- 1406 
3-6960 
TARRON BESSEN, 
REGIONAL DIRECTOR 


and 


= average wuee wh “Bes 

YOUNG MEN 
terested we Les wi 
“be OR 


oe ~F 
national ver riety chain 


ee 


ment 


wg tg OY tarting Rate 


With Following Benefits 


\ 


ao 


S33 MR. LIPGON APTER 104. M 


F & W GRAND 


* 400 TTH 6ST. NW. 


‘. a TA a 
WASTE 
>. er to a Veokbeent ; ane “hina 
subjec Sent. & Geod per- 
—— position. chance for sd- 
—in Cle Tr. 
title and settlement 

rege dealership. Ca he age. ry ts . 


ev D “Boice 


CALL TA. $-3600. MR. R 


BLASS sales §=6peonie 
eeee 16 to 456. permanent —_ 
Captiol en¢ | ment tall time or part time y; 
salary carn cae 


WOOL = aly =| bef <r 
de la vasation eel & Room 103 ~<a it iilth ot ow. see 
_ OV _ 2 Beccu 


and me-' 
seceren ety 
pers 

r x 


re- 


we OP DESIGNERS 
DESIGN AND LAYOUT 
DRAFTSMEN 


We will accept applications from al! lev- 
els of Mechanical Design Engineers and 
Layout Draftsmen. 


Board experience in design and layout of 
small mechanisms containing linkages, 
bearings, etc., and knowledge of applica- 
tions of gearing is desirable. 


PROOF OF CITIZENSHIP REQUIRED 


ENGINEERING AND RESEARCH 
A BIVISION OF 
ACF INDUSTRIES, INC 
Riverdale, Md. WA. 7.4444 


ENGINEERS 


ELECTRONIC MECHANICAL 


HOW DO YOU 
MEASURE SUCCESS? 


Some measure success only by money; others 
by the enjoyment they get out of their work. 
But the true measure of success is a combina- 
tion of both plus the knowledge that your ef- 
forts are recognized and appreciated. — 


MELPAR Engineers find diversity and oppor- 
tunity for protessional growth; they enjoy being 
part of a highly creative staff without losing 
their individuality; and they benefit from 
Melpar’s completely integrated facilities for 
system responsibility from design concept 
through production. 


To learn how Melpar measures up to your own 
standards, drop by our employment office at 
3000 Arlington Bivd., Falis Church, Virginia. 


Openings presently exist for men experienced 
in one or more of the following fields: 


*Systems Evaluation 


* Automation 


*Packaging Electronic 
Equipment 


*Microweve Technique 


* UHF, VHF, or SHF 
Receivers 


*Pulse Circuitry 
* Microwave Filters 


*Quality Control and 


*Analog Computers 
Test Engineering 


*Digital Computers 


"Radar and Counter- 
measures 


*Servomechanisms 
*Subminiaturization 


*Electro-Mechanical Design 


Apply in Person 
Monday Through Friday 
8 A.M. ta 4 P.M. 


MELPAR, INC. 


SUBSIDIARY OF WESTINGHOUSE AIR BRAKE 
3000 ARLINGTON BLVD. —_ FALLS CHURCH, VA. 
(Take Arnold V-2 Bus From 11th and E Sts. N.W. 


to Plant Entrance) 
A 


s. 2.1 Pa. 
: oA ovesssy 


235 Weodwa 


ng clerk ba ae, ne. 


Asa Rina bivd. 
r 
t 


ie ra) 
eporaters 5 dvs 


Seat ait - ~e 
BS 


Dr. oF =A 


r Ga ave 
Mratts. vic. 
7. — 
a Spring. part 


$24) 
Personnel Serv 


mer 


fenesa! ofties * work, co jacombany 


nee ee BOER ae 


811 H ST. Nal 


STENOGRAPHER 


fee 
80 
Ry tet er a. 


HOT SHOPPES, INC. 


iMl G ST NW. 


CLERK 


BETHESDA. MD. § TO 4:30 


— MELPAR, INC. 


HELP, WOMEN in 


EMPLOYEE BENEFITS 


APPLY IN PBRSON 


monner PAC"PS. Em" 


PBT 
Spee te 


sts. ow. te plant 


ana 


‘«, Ol. 


be desea 
Koad Weslaco!" cnn and 


. 


dt iy 


T 


Ne shorthand. Deeree 


Re TYpist—s240 


- & Atr- cud ofc. Varied 
Tipolaliee txcy. At ach ew 
Admin. Secys. $6000 


ect Dos! 
a > 


Annette D. Tatelman 


B. ish ek ww 


moles to Employment 


Voodward & Lowes 


ASSORTER 
I work Sper ment. 


Ge DhodBRE Torts SEE - 


BOOKKEEPING 
MACHINE 
OPERATOR 

Experienced, 

excellent working con- 

ditions. 

NATIONAL SAVINGS 
& TRUST CO. 


Ee eh, 


CASHIERS 
FRONT OFFICE 


NCR Desting me- 


perience on 


fence Lanaire CPATLER 


6TH & K STS. NW 


: , . : 
: * S ROToMAG EMPL 


a | CLERK-TYPIST 


5. 


Permanent positio Geod salsa 


> y 
No. Sunday — Apply Searts 


LERK-TYPIS | 
See ABBEY First 


ST 3-0190 
Tibia er Priday River 
coept.-typist. River rd 
t.-typist. downtown 
‘hosp.)}. mature 


ece 
= -Lypist 


us. sor ,. ert ty pets 


5.37. some apti- 
e for (gures. and accurate typ- 


‘CONSULTANTS. 
} WwW 


Burroughs bookkee 
rs. Experienced: 5-d 
fe insurance and retirement. 
at copes office 
UNSEY 


rr 
a- Steno S wk 
a ry 875- 


wk. Ca pital Hull 
Miss rant at 


rk 
‘wh 
ower 


-2220 | 


Mt yi 
a Beenie a ANERS e136 


CLERK 


ait 


oa name nent 
urate with | 
ount Apply at 


ORN 


urea ‘gore. 


ae PHIL 


PERT BVP al 


Likes on at ETP, 


a cigar counter — i aun 


groupes. 3-11. 
er natilo eal ate being | 


— ry | 
Miss 


7 bood work: work- | 


3008 ye 962 Wayne Ave.. Silver Spring, Md 
Rot ‘ 


CLERK 


under sal — 
CLERK-TYPIST 


STENOGRAPHER "a 
a | 


for a 
: a 73 
et > m 


HOT SHOPPES, INC. 


| CLERK TYPISTS 


5-DAY, 40-HOUR WEEK | 


APPLY 


SAFEWAY 
STORES 


1845 4TH ST. NE. 


: 


+ ~~: ppcntaen | Na. young wom - 


Similar wart. ~ eo, desire & 
to restirm 


Permanent pecsel 
Ree 
NCR 
pieasan' 
pieve benefits. company discounts: 
jease apply 


urch = 16th 


Nationselly 
compan 
paid vaca 
com ptometer 
Office Box 


full 


Por 


organization on 


building: pleasent 
trons: mu 
to 35 


Renaire-Freezer-Foods 


ent 
. 


tat ay offering permanen 
ent and 
| Extensive background oer 


ties 


Di. 7.2900, “Ext. 263) = 


Exce 


rancement 


fits 


| PEOPLES LIFE INSUR. CO. 


L 


and 


with details and type 


manent positionn will "eanaider be. 
inner : 


ag 


White 


tien Le of- 
work in F «st. jewelry store: 
2000 48 66—experience ul; 
working conditions, em- 
m person 
uP ST = 
Protestant 
Congenia 


CLERK-TYPIST 
known 
y ay. 
tion 

eg i Wri 

060. Ale Va.. giving 
particulars ineleding caren, 


salary desired 


CLERK-TYPIST ee 


oldest and largest freerer food 
at Coast 

new air- sonaiitened 

work cond: 

. see 25 


eo in 
st be experi 


EYE STREET SE. 
Li. 6-3300 


10] 


ACCOUNTING 


weekly news Magatine 


t ® 
figures: ¢ 
come fi. i- 


organi- 
ompier- 


wees Pala 
as ‘6 
an ym. &- in 


many eompe 


quali- 


BETWEEN $ AND 5 


DAY, 35-HOUR WEEK 
porte tr st) Se 
offices 


8:30 « 


permanent position. NW 

Various clerical duties 
some typing. Must be accurate 
wpm. Air- 


40% 
cond! thor ed building Gees parking 


sick 
cash 
er substantial 


uses 
benefits sot of a, ee appointment. | 


ho 
ERN 
Wo 


ping poctine “he Ma :. for tire 


a. other + employes benefits. wl ae 
cata | —Noaee iy ‘ap 


Tihotkh! et 


week. + salary 1, Ee. 


a 5 
several CLER IL 
© S. cor 
matics Rausch 
i st. ay. 


CLERK-TYPIST 


|. Dutte 
tributing 


and 


and 
uired 


LIBERAL Rie ove benerirs 


VITRO CORP. OF 


& bh Optical tio, 
© aa ne 


POR 
LABORATORY 
et consist oe . Siiee nd dis- 
engin 


Ww 
remorse, maintenanee 0 ‘of files 


Por Please ipigrmation 


Personne! riment 


AMERICA 


1341 @ BT. NW., ROOM 200 


nh 


Rnacprtinii 


-,|5. C_ EMPL. EXCHANGE 


wages, cOMmissions, va attens. 
u B60 Rs REXALL DRUG Co.. cor. 


q : K: sae 
| Appl iho BEX ve. * 
HANDICAPPED G 


8 ades_ at 
wa | TAizs Apply 1318 
hire *ve. aw an 
® 12 6&6 m 


CLERK-TYPIST 


for sedvertisin 
Fesearch epartment 
Nationa ees agacine. 


enjoy voruspe with 


—s —  fenditiens. many 


7.2900, “Ext. 261 


BETWEEN 9A M&S P.M 


1406 WN Y Ave NW. OT. 3-3634 


CURBETTES 


(PEMALE CAR HOPS) 


ow iitir ‘Satere 


HOT SHOPPES, INC 


iMl G 8ST. NW. ROOM 200. 


DANCE INSTRUCTORS 
Marion's Dance Studie. A ~ of 
Wa — ag ’ 


A Aye an + = 


or teen Tos then a asely in 3s 
an 

on ay only. > a somone | RECEPHY 

Pp ~~ gt ~~ at least high 

the ages of 71 and 36. — 

Marion’s Dance Studio 


1701 16TH ST. NW. 
CHASTLETON HOTEL 


Burton 
eT 


Waitt 
ounter Girls 
i er foot. A 
nia Bes 1% ai, kinds) 5 to ap a 
ty Oth os. NW 
BO. 2-1572 
DICTAPHONE 
ovine btn 


With at 


ent me ty 
y xpandis “i ditions. ateng- 
day week. 8 to 4.00 
Government Employees 


Insurance Company 


14th 4 Sts. NW 
Please Apply et L St. Entrance 


DRU th cosmetic, 
sundry one Caseund drug store 
experien ment posit — 
No nights. Sundays or holida 


Dry ry Cerin Help 
apes ters. baggers ar 9 ae em - 
ent sped | De excell jent 
conditions ly 


a ospnter 
gir. 


EMPLOY _ NT rit i INC 


ase Circle ns farm ished | 


eas 


ty IRLS AND WOM- 
2 Modine RBS 
ae Hamp-| 
oe = gh | 


" 
stud) 


KEY PUNCH 
OPERATORS 


Ca.) Cal’ aire hose ste. er ta for 


nonprofess 


lI: will trein. ar 
‘ : only! 


Bia 4 at 
11th ”— 
from 110m | or typip * 


ae 
n 


ave. ensingien. 


of large busiding ’ apply 


"benefits. +e & Mr 
i» oh 


Aggy ao & 
irm 
compa - 


PANTRY SALES 
CLERKS 


PRESSER 
on Ton, and Goesees: 


MACHINE 
OPERATOR 


| Experienced, under 35, 


excellent working con- 


| ditions. 
| NATIONAL SAVINGS 


& tae: ahih ES Co. 


oe 


a5 cy whe “at 


beckarou 4 7 preter: 
Sees pars —_ : 


Gare, & a. 
Sadinment Relies 
Insurance Company 
14TH AND Lt. STS. NW 


‘Not « Government Agency) 
A BS _Btrapce 


ge a See rat ae 


THE WASHINGTON POST ond TIMES HERALD 
- Wednesday, August 31, 1955 


16! seu, WOMEN 


39 


er a ere ame! 
dasa, dd 14d : * 


: Pleasant envi t. 
im person oniy Kase Hor 
Manger tne el 


neat one A. ee - 3 
haired. Bend cot 
ujred 
Das! = fenc . 
photograph Pox 


“O.. alse part-time 
ist fer, head uarters 
a 
wer c 


fred For aa 
sot cal) Dysinews maneena. 

Ueda ARY to ‘Direciar. Pub liek 
r. oun 


Littervie vs. 


ausch & L Opt 
as TENOS~ 


See ABBEY First 


ae EYE aT aw. Re) 3-0190 


mec. secy. 5 days 

ageres eimner stenos. 
puns jestres to “| ee ai Saar | 
pie S-day| > wotiontst-secy 
Ber ice. 5. 5 * union 


1 or 
reau of iecel univ.; §- 


1 experienced falesiady tamil. 
wortiene plenty 

. income to 
party. Call W. ‘s. WRIGHT. 


sulte ond 


dresses, 


ced Coats 
not over #. 


EVALYN’ 5 


— Pai 


aE Invi 


To take care 


re. ~~ §.. - 
1 9-12. 900 - st. aw. 


Must have definite children's wear 
cupestenee: excellent salary and 
mission: permanent position: 
hospitalization. a etc. 
ly Mr Bacharach 
pir 


Bio. cugEy Georgia 
SALESWOMEN 
a ay y exper... or part 
Ch ony co r Ops. 
-2640 
SYREN 


Full Time or Part Time 


GILB 


BE ECONOMITE— IMMEDIATE OPENINGS 


GRADUATE 


Major itn institutional manage- 
ment preferred, but will 
comparable experience 

et 


pene thru Friday. 40- hr 
and sick eave. on 


sereie 
a urs, 


Expettonerd attractive vous 2 
*, in person reer 

=| bes P33 p.m. Silver Pox 
Restaura’. is@onsin ave. 
H SS 


White. ee: ot $50 FAL 


HOSTESS 


Sapeteness,. neat a 
ont Py noah ty; besapes Snare 
a T 

Of fee Api yet 


N 


for office: 

lady. age 2i- cre 
somal and te inaqu 
come | typing seautsed: agi 
wor 


14th : 
Please apoiy S «a. 
. m at L st. entrance. 


survey 
desirable 


KEY PUNCH 
OPERATORS 


AGE 20 TO 35 


fl a Saat 


GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES 
INSURANCE COMPANIES 
4TH AND L 


inp raniehy_ ave 


\ 


HOUSEWIVES 


Arrenee now tor your position toe 
start aftes - lanes Day. Discount 
on pure 


| APPLY EMPLOYMENT OFFICES 


The Hecht Co. 
ror ae TG 


N-ARL.. VA 
GLEBE & WILSON BLVD. 


~White, excellent Working wAg- 
a pe - 
‘AIR Resta ide 13th 


5 ¥ ve of Na 
tional si Oreaniaat xeellent op- 
we AM 


. eesounainee. 
rode ours. on 
ior “appointment. Mc Bee Co. 


SERVICE DESK CLERK 


Per ition: lide 


enent. full-time 
and er employe 


discounts 
efits. APeLY 
Bmployment Office. Room 335 


Raleigh Haberdasher 


~> ra. Nw 


service Representative 


potions @ er paguese.. 
be tra ease 
silty wit 
typing 


: eee Sore se 


be uader chert haad. & 
"Pm... export 5 days, 


B45 
aan AGEMENT CONSU wet s. 


enced seamstress 

prefersniy with {actors experience. 

supervise 

me Pony and omen a 
all t Nod Os: repair. Ap 

INDU IES isis 

ney Hampahire ave. nw. (2ils 

3. Monday 


Metioe ‘SALESLADY — 


~. ehi) ait sy 


thoes Jere r nee ‘siore os P 
pig, 924 
| Peet etropo litan 


r k 
Ww slus tips 
"NATIONAL EMPtY. EERV 
7ie 11TH ST. NW... 2D PLOOR 
— combinatio 
woo): experienced. Good y. ex 
porting cond. Apply Hud 
Tth st. and Bastern ave. ne.. 
. > a Se 
White. Experience not wecessa 
a 


tion with . other be nefits 
Spe A in person. us Store. Unien 


physic ally rong, 


alert pereen toe werk as at” sor 


and 


Rompe hire ave. ow. | 
Pritt s m. Monda 
Prigay 


STENOGRAPHER™ oon 
Superienced. for general office 


; b-day. 40-hour week. 
pital ization, , yesation. . 


ert 2487 App Roe viiie 


soman. , 4. 
ary ope oon 
company benefits: interesting wor 
> ; 


és at Ee i 


NA. ot EXT. 240 


n 
*hrou “ 


Clerical Positions 
Both Typing and Non-Typing 


HIGH SCHOOL GRADS PREFERRED 


Interesting work in pleasant surroundings, for both begin- 
ners and experienced girls; opportunity and permanency in 
@ progressive growing company. 
‘5-DAY WEEK—8 TO 4:30 
AIR-CONDITIONED OFFICES 


Government Employees 
Insurance Company 


(Not a Government Agency) 
14th AND L STS. N.W. 


Please pPply ‘8 A.M. to 3P.M. 
L St. Entrance 


[nae ea 
{ 


= WOMEN 16 
S-DAY, 35-HOUR WEEK 
Esa tars 
PEOPLES LIFE INSUR. CO. 
Room 108, 1343. st. NW, 
STENOGRAPHER 
NEWSPAPER 
eteteae teed 


a ° 


DEPAR 


The Washington Post 
and Times Herald 
1515 L STREET NW. 


SHIRT PRESSERS 

fold Spe Bapertences Apply Dis. 
eiers et Eank 7168 | 
Seeriet Heights. Md . 


~~ STORE RE CLERK 


Por lsundre-drv cleaning branch 
atere in ee. ag experience 

ec@ssary telephone 
and seamee essential) | 
JA oot topointmen: 


R : 
2-8 

Manhatta 
7330 Columbia Pike. 


gee 
OPERATOR 
SERVICE. Under 


RBOARD 
white. day Wo 
a 


vo! 
: 
cal J 


[| , 
rk. good salary. EM 


new extra sections. | 


i To 


fe Ses rageemaig bay pay in- 
BEST & CO. 
Will Consider Applications for 


SALESLADIES 


Pleasant Working Conditions 
5-DAY WEEK 


4433 Conn. Ave. NW. 


A- ! SECRETARY $90 “ke “able 


stenos.. 


n 
Recep stenos.. under > 
Ne new anplic. cat 
al welcome — BOEDS. | 


ST. 
Sor. 12th end G sis. ni 
sio0 IN 


A MONTH Dias | 
al use 


Batis ite rades. Town * Country | 


r Spring. Md. Starting | 
(open tO men Also? 


credee bese 
top salary positions & | 
San Aas’c?. i341 


Catherines School 
va 


“i Murphy, prineteal . 
> he bh byt Bet Ree 
Tee ee MA. S208, 
TELEPHONE 
SOLICITORS 
lenced or Inexperienced 
LIVING IN 
D. C. AND MD. 
Work From Home—Good 
Salary—Unlimited Private 
Phone Necessary 


APPLY MR.TALBERT 


Reserve Life Ins. Co 
2629 Conn. Ave. NW. 
MON... WED., FRI, 
10 TO 12 NOON 


0 to 


’ 


| 


Trlic35u— 


ane ; 
i ey INS 


TELLER 


(UNDER 35) 
Pleasant Working Conditions 


ATION AL BAYINGS & ) 


. | 
TELEPHONE OPERATOR | 


sald vacation. | 
ins urance 


x quoceience rn 

pitalization 

joyment of nate 

K HOTEL 
qenronk. 


{fice 
.* and 
— Exper enced. = 


on 


. : age. | 
sure 3th 
salary and aay 
Beli at BOYD'S 
NA 


cor 13tB and G sts. ne 


wet 


* 


ob Geommia are, wi 
TYPIST 


Feperienced, permanent 
49 hour weer 
conditions. | 
4 oy france and 
retirement 
SEOPL FS DRUG 
Office 6290 
Over our 


hospitalization 
lan Apply 
BTORES m ployment 
lith st. nw 3d floor 
lith and G@ 


"TYPIST, EXP 


Btar' ing Selery Boned a4 
Pre n 


af store 


ee 2 2029 
Ae’ ine “ Pirm Gh ~ “ 


art: ne sa.ary 


TYPIST 


Recent high aC neo eras ate with 
sho 

interesting 

invesmtent 

con 


me 


—_ Accountine office of na- 

jentifie research or@ani- 

tion has an mediate opening 

f & young lady meeting the fol- 
wing qualifications 

l1—High-schoe| craduate. with 

me adcditiona! business or 


+ TANKS 1. ORE ‘mail oites — oe 


ting offic 
This position "oliere the follow- 
in efi 
oo 9 full-t 
oA 


-hour week 
fh sa leave 


* sick 
B) 


em- 


Der 


wave & year. 
; Briel 


sa) lary $2 2880 
: exe oellen opportu 
nities tor advan: ement 
_ 


a Entacy? ys Ca } 


8100 y Bs 
"WAITRESS 
vy work, 86-5 p.m 
person Mayflower 


3308 | r sc. nw 


WAITRESSES 


18 TO 35 


“YEAR - ROUND 
positions. Excellent 
ings, plus weekly salary, 
Meals and uniforms §fur- 
nished, air conditioned 
shops. Hospitalization and 
insurance benefits. 


Day and Night Shi ft« 


MANY LOCATIONS 


Apply 
Bh Pp 


Ww 
Ix ronut 


permanent 
earrie- 


APPLY TO THE 
HOT SHOPPES, INC, 
MANAGER 


THE 
EMPLOYMENT OFFICE 
1341 G 8t_N 
HOT SHOPPE 


WiATTHEREYS for new “Yestauran 
in Silver Metts exp = ae. 


6 a . A 
LUNCH. 


2 


B—Raperienced 
3s Pp Om 


t nw 
4 ia RMU 
Sa a 
_ e 
ithe ply Randy's. 


white, exper. Ap- 
ndolier 
ide 


ve 

8—?2. 

Go Restau- 
abo" Cot mbis pike, Ari., 
to ‘. rid “ 

Ls 


good 
Also 
white, 


Ess a Shift. mS 30 7 > = 
apt. pvan.. 


Must aust, be éxper 
1b ented Bit 


1113 


HAVE YOU 
CONSIDERED 


A goth 


ADVERTISING? 


growth of our 
classified advertising 
deoartment has creat- 
ed a continuous de- 
mand for intelligent, 
ambitious and capable 
women interested in 
making a place for 
themselves in the 
newspaper field. 

if you have @ pleasant 
telephone voice and 
are able to type, you 
can enter wwto ~@ 
career job offering 
opportunity and secu- 
ritv. You will receive 
on the job sales train- 
ing and work a five- 
day, forty-hour week. 
You also will receive 
many other benefits. 


ere SS M. , 


The 


APPLY 
RETA ERS 


‘The Washington Post! es 


and Times Herald 
ISIS L STREET NW, 


PRUDENTIAL 
BUILDING 
ASSOCIATION 


CLERK-TYPIST 
Refined young lady, capable 
and intelligent. Hours 9 a.m. 


to 4p. m. Closed on Saturday. | 
In excellent offices. 


APPLY IX PERSON 
1338 G St. 
“MANY DIFFERENT | ¢ 
POSITIONS OPEN AT | 
THE CREDIT BUREAU | 


TELEPHONE 
INTERVIEWERS 


TYPISTS 
FILE CLERKS 


schoo! education 
ts 


a to 46. High 
Usual employe bene 


ired 
APPLY IN PERSON AT ONCE | 
THE CREDIT BUREAU 
1221 G 


” CLERK —Wwill 
5 dave 
2334 


train 
. _.. 


| 
re | 
PL ison 


a ei y ‘wom Tw 
es ~- 
te 
hth ave 5 * 
safe i@ 
to 45. permanent empley- 
full : 


too ry ry WOMEN 7 


" 
4 
Y. 


prac nurse 
2 


N 


Dae Aas” oes 
ma 
to am 5 silk 

salesmen 

Sa 


0 $50 
PRI DENTIAL 
, 1353 Wallach Pi 
ot. T & U om 14th at.? 
aoC au SALESMAN with car. Lowls 
P. Sheemaker. 1919 K St. NW.) 


3 women sn | 
Write to & 
13 M. Episeo 


mal 
vaker lane & Bradd jock rd.. Alex 


} in Pa 
= 2131 


FORATCO nies “Yor drue a | 
Hou rs 10:30 a. m. to 6 BD 
thru Pridev Seturaays 4 - ) 
{ ry g store references | 
N 8-4360 
to _——. 
ec 


in restaenitia! - ¢) 


m Dm 


' 

"parents of 
: il end 
soli ~~ set | 

up your appoint ment * New 
ing Wash. area. BOX cad ‘Post.| 
URGENTLY SEEDED eal 
cD 

pus | 
10 9th at 

WOOL  PRESSER Guality Work 
: “o . Ao oy Washin ~s 


aundry. & & 
| cleaning department.” 
| 


YOUNG MEN 
& WOMEN 


For Light, Easy-to-Learn 
RESTAURANT WORK 


Day & Night Shifts 
Available 


Good Starting Salary 
with Increases 


nw 


Meals & Uniforms Furnished 
Plus Other Benefits 


APPLY 
9 A.M. to 2 P.M. 
WHITE TOWER OFFICE 
714 18TH ST. NW. 


west | Ci. Wohl" 


. 3 r 
lock fi Y vi 
o 
bibs 


ST. 
ig. CA oa 
ee 


+31_ 
ilk ROE wa gpsls 


B89 ROOMS, BOARD WANTED 29A ao Wie 


rooms 
osue.”’ ths: board optional. 
ot water. conv, trans 
‘kopM 


ied. | din 


- wy t ’ 


2 rms 


Rockers. paby alse 87 5 


. 
» 


res, any. 


—Care for children | oe 


cotres day ays work 


or id oe 
__ depends 


desires maid job. 


ay wor 
ries ee: 

col woman | 
22-1692 


LA. 
o 


r appt. call 
fas 0K 
rte A "1 


Beautiful ae ‘Gojonia home — 


; 
3 


eee fare, mas. ROOMS, —* 


com b! furn., 
J Maid sare “i 


quiet; conv, trans 


a 


er lt 
eo 


une crowd at 


—F rms... orth 


We 
nicely furn.. os bath. shwr 4 | 
- | 


so i 


GUNS Ket BALL 


2 ie ree 
vam Dy 1 nos 


iale—Atiras 


oe cae rivie 


-romn tiie Mars #_-, enerenes 
beth corner lecetion Call 
6- 

Near 


al mk 


—Ciean. nicely furn 
cack. M 


4 
home: front 
club chair tH ean y * pro- | 


ieta 3 NW. 


. iis Live downtown 
istanmce a!) offices yore 

me near shower hat 
ome for nice seber people 


.s raking 
twin 
Nice 


o 1410—Eie bids. api 
m. CO 


Con 
after 6 o 


Walk te 


ee eS ee 


—— 
+ 


PI 
in rm: pvt. kit. gti bas 
fete Feast medars 


all, 
rs. qan4 ) ets 


| COUS 


’ V 


moe hae 
eh Mla Kear bu Pak 
“ ye 


r. pen a 


wit 


large reom 
io” “edulte oale 


Los * yan os ) 
3 Te0 "fees L.™, home ortvi | 


a or nas F 


wily dec ateely a | 
all 


mattress 
. " nicely 
e connie 


2- 
urn. A in > 
“A 
a one, | 


rm. ets Pog 


—" 9 
At i 
5 


di . 


prope 


airfo 


twin, 
50: also onle 


i 


sale 

. trent) 
ly ealp m4 
rm. oh | 
rm. 


; 
or tesether” mpl. cple. or Nadies 


ee ar RW" si eri" 


be 
bed-livy rms. retria 
bed ts, “‘e $15 


; 
‘ 


’ 
soare priv 
children escapied o 2- ie Nee | 
™ —s 
SP — Rms and at 

Security Realy sae" 
ne NA -67 J 


tions 
ave 


Pig Sate | Sida 
Ne 


, kit. path. reas. rent. 


sep 


—_ 
ment as ake offer. 


BANIER 


AD 


' k poreh 
i 


SEETION 


Ideal for 2: living rm. bedrm., 
bath. kitchen-d te. closets. 
ntiry. pvt fatrence; utils, imel.. 


?. 9 
A 
‘between Wash Circle ‘and 
Circie) — > apts from 
$97 50 te 3 rooms. Avallad 
diateir Sendes 


N 
priv 


, —Apt ti de. 
Whit Rashi Be 


bath. te inel. 
cy. 


room, bdedr 
ao com>... private 
r 


| & rome ee “pauite as. ‘7s 


oee-in 
+ thes 
a4 A... 
ople te share ovr ‘home 
NX fe Steger. DS Be 7-)620 

At 
SLUMS — Nice clean rm ‘wtah air 
cond m 4 
Youn 


Younes 
COLUME 


next bath. : 
ood. Trans. 3 =i 
: 108—Home away) 

dis n TY 


DU 


wal 


s 
from home 
: ‘ars : 


rone mach reas 
ms 
5526 Youns peo-' 
p > UP 

2i-acre estate in 

fu! crounss. 
« ma. - 
; mm summer : delic oun 
Mary arki on 

e-k ru “* "894 
ive Driveve 
d 
reasonable 


lor mother en 
. 
1~5108 


* N. Hamp. ave 
: clus 08 


; Ve, 
vt ‘om ; > A ture 


‘ter frt 
privi 


lee 
ph one inci 
-91 


ROOM 
poses hool children. Also 


le room TUT BOARDED 


” 
* 


& board for ay * eae 


QGeood 
430 


ares Hope re .~ 


30 


chi 


JE 


WwW. 543-—Laee 
te i : 
rm... priv. 
adult home 

7 6- tis2 
rum. water tS? up. NO. 7-9868 | 
Use &T 


{ 
single doub'e 


AN NW. 
kit... 


ae a 


s0i6 Hs tie 


rm... 


on wo 
run Wee ‘ia 
ST. ” cle 
front " a a < 
ar e —_ 
eT Rigs 4003—5« 
7. ae 
' 


pas 


EHILD CARE 


—EEoe——— 
_ ee. 1746" The Cquree tt “ ARL.—Nr 


egntinucns ie pone. fe fence 


’ 


WANTED—Rm and board " 
"bess, 2% Jae ac 4 6 wks... 7 
Phon after 6 


Pentagon. 2% 
supervised kindergarten 
in Moensed own home 


peztos and vers. ZA 
nh D as 


4 ~ RE 5-549} 
ve board or give 
day care —P? ’ your pre 
oo) A. chi Gren? Lar 
Licensed UN 4-9448 
NT.24-br. or day care in 
ret. WH. 6 ’ 

yrs fenced 
UN. 4-5647 
Refined 


3.7214 


5 
va JRiversele Ma 
coL.— 

Penced” pi 


home 


care 
SP 


i~—Kind. individual 
for ; ery perser 
rates. UU. 77-7840 


after ¢ 


APTS., FURN. or UNFURN. 33 


s 
“com forteple., 


Seda 


Ty’ to 


3a private 


fORGTAR OTe, 


NNER 
1136 Que St NW. Single rooms 
H TEL 1440 


1440 Rhode Is! and ae Air-con- 


. Se 
. 


$14 
fan $10 50- $12 


SPECIAL WEEKLY 
k AND MONTHLY RATES 


Air-Conditioned 


HOTEL 


ISTH & M STS. NW. 
DI. 7-3436 
“WESLEY HOTEL 
2131 O ST. NW. 


NEAR DUPONT CIRCLE 


Modern, Comfortable 
Living That You Enjoy 


$60 SINGLE PER MONTH 


HO. 29100 
172 NW 
OWIVIAN. HOTEL 


Quiet. F home-like; nice Nobby: 
24-hr 


HELP, DOMESTIC 


with 

th hilar 

Zea, 
prences. 


baths 


yodes.i PBX, elev 
waier all rms.; 
les. dbles., $11.50 wu 
| transient 


NEW COLONIAL | 5. 


BRIGHTWOOD 
CONCORD GARDENS 


NG “made easy’ 
ay my 


xcel. . 
Call MANDEL 


Apply 77 K at me Ve 
APTS. arn P 34 
AD AMS MILI ‘an’ 7 Sete as 


Suit ay or 3 - 


sarge 


nished apts. 
tween 10 sm. end 6 »p 


; emploved couple 


ficely furn i-pedren. 


ary ‘aan , conv 


A eee ra JA. 37-3974. 
; —Nice ioe 


apt 


ii “SALLE A PTH TEL 


private entrance: wtilities. 
41s 9 w 

“Pentagon & Ft. Myer-—i- 
becom. - apt.: pvt, entrance 


urn 
. incl. utils. JA. 32-7252, 
eT corner 

r 


. attractively furn: 
bik , 
; ample par ing apace: 
50. JA. 68-2634 TA. 


Vea 
BF MONT BD, NW... ete Couny 

or 3- 2. girls, $87.50 mo.. incl. utils 
Br epbure Realty Co.. JA. 2-039 a 


or 
—Le Fm m.. jet en an 


O16 


: 00D, i 
bath, pvt. 2 
wicks 


: Garten at 
ans 
i $400 
r luxur- 
apt. tires ace, gar- 


ciency 


lace: air. cont. ¥ 
clignel ty me ettT : B- 


ison8i26, Care Psi ing. 


DE ¢'2 
one- AILERON > 


| beaut 
lv 


and quiet) Tm 
KE. | 
form 


JA. | 


yed-| first floor 


| ok 


ih al 


youns ned 


7 oF ~ Foun 


rm dinette 
OF ROOMS! | 
closet 
. bes) 
Office on de-| 


ample 


velopment 


WARBEAN rk ‘Ana bedrms: 
t h. red << & 


eo Re “uo 
2-0135 


‘er : 
let (fie =o 


ark r nw 

fir newly eaulp.. 
bly 

MONT AVE. onk” 

efficiency. $10 co. 5-$006 
WOODLEY PL. NW. 26296-—<-bed- 
room ing room. kitchen, din 
eile 

provincial furnits 
ADAM sf. VW. 

a basement apt.. 


vely 


room: bath 
sD 


utils 
Sin me 


ees ee 


4-482) 


, & block 


a stile. my 


~ gah RA ; +e 


at we 
ov tren 


5° F349, 


v. 
, ae a 
31! es sa n is Boure theor, 2) 


cS we L} = no pets or 
axe ak ee 


ku prt pt Reor: ran Lory $12.50 wk 
14th 1 ST. NW, 
EFFICIENCY. "APT... 


‘Lares tie bath 
WOlk-in closets } 


Mail! 


rm 


‘kitehen 


Bwitchboard A Desk Service 


ely fturnished 


pon enience¢ “ 
at desk or "CAI LA, ne ROG 
co 7400 


it 4 ST. NE... -- rms 
ae ae ile 


= 


js for 1 ao mo. Cony. transp. | 


ii 


. NW.— 3500 Bik. Le 


inci 


pts $84.50 per mo 
tes includes See resident ma: 
t. 


NE. 434— 
2-rms "A. bath. #875 nel 


. 1B, A9R4 ge ‘and transe. 


~ Wicely furan. lv.) 
ri. Gat 


“T1355 Wice | 


ft .. jolla fruliweod Pren ch 
- 1306 


©. screened 


$75] 


(pai | 2 | 


Werman Bernstein Syndicates fl 


. = : . ..* 
util. Conv.!| incl: ep! aby $69 
L 4-2926 


A 
fir. 
util. ARL 


Most at ve Gocerotes 
speci Sa 


manager at 1823 


mediate Occupancy 
beara s furntched. ¢ 


+, be Ns 
NB nearby Arling- 


OA 
| Gh Large rooms, spacious lawns. 
| — "end playground facili- 


LL, UTILITIES INCLUDED 
"hes Unfurnished Apts 


RES. MGR., JA. 7-0300 


Larchmont Gardens 
So Prederick St. at Columbia Pike 


ONLY $95 
1-BEDRM. APT. 


R BR; 
CLUDES A 
rrace Apts 


rh 
ie oach, Apt 


“s , Sees turn 
5 incl 


tchenette. terrace. 


n 
maid service Parking facilities 


att ° | 791 


ool 


ieee o i , ei, 
rd. mw... ist “ 
ok | 


te tren 
st 


er 


rk 
nt. & sun 


—irm. pri- 


HOUSE To SHAR 35 


tel. A 
—Cirl 35. 3 to! 
share laree well-fera, }-bdedrm. apt 


icely furn eed 
tein | im apt Side: 
ts pref pert, iri. $50 
wetter | 
bat 


~ ar nel utils 


330 
Artist. 


to share 2-rm. studio apt.. 


ouple ue a | 
arte 


| pe § ee "Chevy ’ 
feats Sha tes 


share nice 2- dedrm 
Spt. with mother. child. AP. 7 "iz 
CoOL. | lady to, share apartment with 


tS athiE’ te a “oh are) ) 


each. wtil. 


APTS.. SHPGRHTSTTED 
rm.. Ginette 


Seamare. ates | 
6578. 


laree p By 
ed 


an 
ALEXANDRIA 


AIR-CONDITIONED 


BROOKVILLE 
DUPLEX APTS 


2 AND 3 BEDROOMS 
1% BATHS 
WITH OR WITHOUT BASEMENTS 
FURNISHED 
OR UNFURNISHED 


| FROM $102.50 UP 


nd 
utils 012.50 Opes Detiy Mon Thru Pr 


a b—Epeciays 3 >| 


nae shopping 1 edults 4 
es 


iP 
ental, Office Wo coed “@unée 


FOR FREE BROCHURE CALL 
Ki. 8-818) 
4th Rr 


DIR Bridge 


Acros 
ne 


ALEXANDRIA 


SHIRLEY DUKE 
APARTMENTS 


4613 DUKE ST. 
ALEXANDRIA, VA. 


FREE INFORMATION 
MAILED YOU TODAY 


CALL KI. 8-5100 


Inewvire about the Attrac 
Purnished Apartment Pian 


: 
: 


Bingle applicants accepted 


$75.50 to $77.50 


IN Fy ros Als. UTILITIES 
CEPT SEE RIVES S 
Rental a ice open days each wk 
Mon. thru Fri ' 


2 Bedrooms. 


lge uti 
5 86. ty >. 9682 
—i bedrm. 


iy. 


. DE LU XE | 
-bed $75 


5 


‘ la 
turn. f closets: )} wtils 


Se ol. 
| Eifie. and jit, of apt. $07 sO uD 
} r 


2 s 
| Ontario 


i se af 


comb.. 
. 


L 
L nw. 
incl. 7 
WwW. 271i? 
kit.. pvt 
le 


°. 


t 
Lin 


fo 


Kins es" 


. * j — to 
and bath: waeh. aah ; 


NOW—Atirac. 2- bed- 

apt 

with sie beds. For 
a - 


rther in- 


~ large, 
anaes. Bee to 


1028 CONN. AVE. NW, 
WALK TO WORK 


One room, xivenes. 0F one S pms td full 
ed ; 3 


fur 
hour switchboard ane 
$28 weekly: $100 monthly 
ME. &-2161 


ah 
ois 


service; 


OVEL spacious * apartment. (, entire 
Living 

| knotty pine di 
tile bath 


oll heat. yard convenie 
oun Wee Di. 7-63 
—— 


l BERN. pt 
Wis ave Adulte ania. 


rms.. 


* jan 
isis 
wn 
util 


new furniture. 


ew 8 


5 
ent to down- 


apt Nias ott 
. 232-2292. 


-$100 rm 
e tic. $47 JE 3- 7476 
o in Westover. off 
Washington dived ry- 
thing ] edrm livrm di ine 
space, att and bath: $60.50 per mo 

WEAVER BR 

REALTOR 

_WASH. BLDG. 


g 
| 


ARLINGTON, NO 
1 Bedroom—$82.50 
LARGE EFFICIENCY 
Outstanding Kitchen 
$77.50 


Utilities Included 
FACH HAS PRIVATE ENTRANCE 
ND PATIO 


LURIA BROS. 
JA. 7-8500 


ARLINGTON 
PIERCE QUEEN APTS. 


1 Bedroom—$74.50 
7 INCLUDES ALL UTILITIES 
- an 

nese smart! y decorated gar- 

den apts. are the ultimate in mod- 

ern convenience. 

Apply Res. Mor 

1520 N. Pierce St. 
CALL JA. 5-8 

+. 1019 11h ry 
ARLINGTON—Lie corn 

mh mod. , Semaross bide. 


AIR CONDITIONED 
CARILLON HOUSE 


2500 WISCONSIN AVE. NW. 


EFFICIENCY APARTMENTS 


| al 


tary 
tire ci . am 


vtlttine: 


Your Inspection Invited 
CALL EM, 2-8800 


aufifully a *deenraied ‘ine 


x “ 


mainutes ne. 


. shentagom 2 Soke. 
ae Navy Annex 
ne: washer dryer $75 Sius utils. 


ta Bt Attra 
ocr porc ty men sleaeh. 


4r 
rm. orch. Nr & L. 


arse front 
it 5. All ut 


ARLINGTON 
One Month's Re Rent Free 
WITH 


modern , Sogrtonent , baliding 


bath, _ parking 
space washing facilities 


Pics ‘kl, 9-6644 


Al BAKER & SON, ne. 
506 N. Wash. 8t., Alex, V n 


Samm 3Y% RMS., $63. 25 


—————p - 
| Brive 


a share i berm apt. | Piudes my 


MASS AY 


rms. 
3% beamed ceiling. new modern_bid 
| near 


i. wh in 4 al Choice location. secretarial service 
ew 


-2 bedrm liv 
& bath. close to Pentagon Cali | s&s | gar 
5.28. OV. 3507) € 


: 
. cigetts 


$-5:°30 an 


odel| switchboard 
so effici 


1 Bedroom, $66.00 to $48.00! places. 
: 


| 
| 
) 
Is 


| héat: 


; 


"___Dt. 7-8300 | 


aT poked POST and TIMES HERALD 


Wednesday, August 31, 1955 


A 
clusive;: bdrm... 
bath. SO 
new 
Open 
132 


1 ‘-"™r 
sam. cations 


— 
iv kit. and 
"305 Seward square 
garden apts... 


Sia8- 

$64.50 3! 
Bt Care Pore” wf. and 
CAPT OL a 


~~. uxury y 2--f » >. TS 


4Y2 RMS.. $75.00); 


ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED 


Continucus W a 2s a - ome service 
te and from ad 


FOR INFORMATION, CALL 
RE. 5-8 


P'S ict kionrs Pwr 


5-8. Sat 9-4. Sun . 
Evenings by s opeiieiadh. 


rive out Maribore Pike te District 
i | on we Na bivd. te 
78th ave | © ants 


cng Ag ge Area 


* == 
beth: 
Ue a * 
IN 


Attractive and 
rooms lue Sitcheo 


2 spaciou 
7a toante 
and m ern bath il TEL. 


ri 
are e-siii ls $73 fo 
soe—34 a -—. 
peren: carace. ae utils. a inet 
JOas.| SOs. ‘lass — 
OXON " PARK 
ae. TERRACE 


i ae tudes OMS te 


New. weill- rept 
S: 
do 


wu) ie 


. 
An arewe 
vere. ave 


panne “Olt ce 


search. Census on 
in new 


i " 
dinette. Kitchen. bath 
screened porch: Bear schools ‘onal 
| seoping enter 5 w 880 er | 


i 


aicony 


« 
Shopping Center 


: 
: 


Piower 


’ 
speciou uA 
laund 
SPRING—A val 
You " pace . lst or 34 i. 2 bed - 
rms se n.. dint! 
and pitehee with preakfast apace 


sen R NAYLOR 
GARDENS 


section newly decorated 

im gardgen-type developmen 

fy  % 6 p. units ~ ey : _~v 
pees 


Fite ta ott 


un 
poe ey kit an 
rear porch. $69 50 a. 
éna “iste terrace | oo 
st ‘SEL—Very larce i-| 


Ca 
erie: 
2-bed 


ares | 
he 


Remodeied and redecorated: 

: bedrm liv dining 

itchen and bath tile showe 

tub, new kitchen; elevator an 

elect jetty. furnished 

a .. apitol vic... iv. rm... 
1 tte. kit. end bath 

te tet ak te 

hiv 


nes 
r~ rm , vedrm.. 


-1925 15th St. NW., NA. 8-2100 


BEAUTIFUL 
n. PINE SPRING GARDENS 
1 BEDRM. WITH BALCONY 


EFFICIENCIES 
3 BEDRMS., PRIVATE ENTR. 
& PATIOS 


NEWLY DECORATED 


Near Catholic University 
7th and Hamlin Sts. NE. 


‘LOW RENTS 
$60 TO $67.50 


Two rooms, modern kitchen 
and bath, dinette, screened 
porches. Gas heat, refrig- 
erator. 


DE LUXE KITCHEN 
PICNIC GROUNDS 


Mre. Miller. 7B. 4-0081. 


— 


2639 15TH ST. NW, 
NEW BUILDING 


mains tn 


Janitor in Basement Apt. venien 
= $43 Ham S. NE. 


B. F. SAUL CO. 


THE 


Ext 


| 1019 15 


| service: al) comventences 
or 


| 


uti sare 


R ST. SE —21 15 
LIVING RM. KITCHEN 
‘NG. AREA. POYER TILE 
M. CONVENIENT 


i—i | bedrm.. liv. rm 
bath n 


sist 7TH 


sT. NW ine 
peh. $69.50 incl. wtil ath ‘esate 


t and ee | Incl. wutils.. 


a | to peepeene and Dusiine 
. to D. 


; 


1169—6' ~~ type: | 


2 


__laree rooms 
a bedrm 
edec 


in. rm... 
j bath 
-kitchen - am bath | 
See janiter SAN. 
2 Dupont Circie 


“SOUTHEAST 
MINN. AVE. AND 21st PL. 


odern 
125 


Avaliable now and for future 
cupancy 


o¢- 


Living room. bedroom. kitchen, ¢1- 
nette and bath, refrigerator; gas 
rents $65 and $67.50 

To tnsepect see 1917) 


fanttor at 
Mipnesota ave 11-7881. 


LU 
B. F. SAUL CO. 
925 15th sft Nw., , NA. 8 2100) 


$55 PER MO. 


3517 AMES ST. NE.. 


APT. 202 
ing room 
om 
hed Pp 
tramapertatien near 


APPLY pesipert i 
IN Ath 


J 
633 


Newly decorated. Liv- 
bedrm 


DI. 7-200 


FORT BENNETT 
APARTMENTS 


Beautiful View 
With High Elevation 
Overlooking Potomac 

and Washington 

in Virginia 


RILL 
nv estment Bldg 


ARLINGTON’S 
MOST CONVENIENT APTS. 
One Block from Key Bridge 


ew fireproof ~ ww large 
7 


ai a 
an: a ry 
4. A, ‘7 lavgerounds for the bide 

; - 
a a ae 
s pin. m ve n- 


tago m 
streetcar SR. 


Key Bria 


Over 
black 


Lee hwy... 
right toe 
ok Dieses be here 


us Sint Hee ik. 


PRES B AVAILABLE 
M, T, BROYHILL & SONS 


4624 Lee Hwy. Ari. Va. JA. 4-1300 


P; 


"| 
' 


Efficiency af 


2122 MASS. AVE. NW, 


LA AL 


CORONET | 


2ND & “C” SE 


t OSE PROM Sarit 
Save Transportation 


rear 419 “hs My ats ts és 


GET SET FOR SCHOOL 


and Time | DONNA LEE 
Ue WALK TO PUBLIC AND 
9.50) PAROCHIAL SCHOOLS 
1 Bedroom from $135.00| WALK TO COMPLETE 

potas eR! SHOPPING CENTER 
outiful new BUS AT YOUR DOOR 
vera) LARGE 1 & 2 BEDRMS. 

te SPM | 


FURNISHED OR 

UNFURNISHED 
FIREPROOF 

SOUNDPROOF 

NW | EARLY OCCUPANCY 

large separate Lichen. MALL Pate eck Peskie 
eo wy a. 2, bath, all 

sed tin in cjeen . ee MRS. WILLIAMS, RES. MGR, 

pucayenan | JE. 3-8573 


CONN. AVE. APT. 


rm. tiv.-rm. dinine = 
. Ritehen and 2 baths, } 
ewig decorates. FO. 


Lee-Albemarle _ 
Apartments 


bs OLEBE RD. AND LEE HWY 
room Apt. $95 
nel utils = Jaundre | ee bik. 


, min 
“Broyhill & Sons 


U PLAND 
. ne; —Sinsile ure 


12 MIN. TO DOWNTOWN 


|2 Blocks Prom Navel Research Lab. 
5 Min. Prem Bolling Field 


32 Large Rms., $72.50 
42 Large Rms., $84.50 


UTES AND TV ANT. INCL 
| Gal io" wv ov. 


ge apit tA 
$80, INCL. ‘UTILS. 


Sedens 2-Dedroom apt.: liv. rm 
Gin.-kit.. bath 1-bedroom 
Laundry and 
; ¥. dbus. sch h 

1514 55th ate. mae 


| MARLBORO GARDENS 


~SHIPLE 
\\-Bedrm., 
.$85 | '2-Bedrms.. 


large Tms. plus 


A 
“Sey 7.4500 


in 
tera $59 pe 
tei 4i2 Sth 


| Met. Pleasant St. 
EPPICIENCIES 665-867 


’ 
Ke 


: 
oo 


acilit 
siine 


1-BEDROOM ‘APT. 
ft gd Renee: “t/ 
UTILITIES 

t ya 


nh, BOBO, 


THE STATE HOUSE 


LUXURY TYPE 
AIR-CONDITIONED 


2-Bedroom—$170 

1 -Bedroom—$ 124. 50 als 
| Efficiency—$81-$86.25 | Res 
Avail. for immediate | 2% 
OCCUPANCY 


C. AVAIL. FOR IMMED. AND) 
TURE OCCUPANCY 


plus od 
PREMISES 


~CHASTLETON APTS. 
1701 16th ST. N.W 


1-BEDRM. APT., 


(New!y Gocerates. 
lovely sum porch 


ace. valet service. 
venience 
mgr. sw 


Y PARK” 


8E LOCATION 


trom $68.50 
from 80.00 
LITIBS INCL ~ jg + ne 


In one of Washington's mee at E 


n as at in sro}. 
tractive midtown elevator ops 
; switehboerd and ‘mail desk | Ke: 


CALL MRS PIChS DO. 2408" a ‘ol SE. 


NORMAN BERNSTEIN SYNDICATE Ga 
1868 COLUMBIA RD. NW. | 


EXCEL. SHOPPING AND TRANGSP 


Air-Conditioned 


; NDPROOF WALLS 
BEI o. oke Bae A TORS 


New 1-Bedrm. 
Apts. from $115 


(UTILITIES INCLUDED) 


Peavtifutls equipped home-size 
dining area. spacious 

oo . and closets. tile baths in 
Pastel colors. laundry facilities 
| a JENT ON PREMISES. WO. 7-34 


Lee-Albemarle 
Apartments 


Vic. GLEBE RD. AND LEE HWY 
1-Bedroom Apt. 75\ 
2-Bedroom Apt.. $95 
laundry ~ a lL bik. | 
15 min 


2? dedrms 

dinette, | 

ventilation playground and 
ate parking area: ai) wtils. 


ote NON Memoria! ‘Hey. - 


Lercom vane Garden 
cGecorated. | bedroom ] 
arate din m.; 
sures Farou 
Comfortable “a 


" nS 
Tm Se. . 


r 
incl. 


72 14th 
“NA 8-23 
“SET PS al 
ge, ARLINGTON 
2 BEDROOMS 
“Bi # PURLIC AND 
SOR, . 
MPONIC 


7T-+HAO 


CONV CATH ‘UNIV. 
400 Evarts NE. 


2279 


, $72.50 
‘i ‘ea 
— cot ven! ent 
fast 
and Pentagon 


M. T. Broyhill & Sons | 


4624 Lee JA. 4-1300 


WILTSHIRE CRESCENT | 
AIR-CONDITIONED 


Larece pleasant efficiency sapart-| 
ment Living room 
dressing room by 9 


and bath 
$89. 20 


al bit a ru rw 
iw tee ine 
dr Call 


p 


DREY 
1019 i5th St xW 
DOWNTOWN ELEV. BLDG” 
ttractive effic. cony. to 


thing. Only $42.50, incl. al! 
Appiy janitor, 1126 lith at 


rt. NA. 8-0580 
20. | DREYFUSS BROS. 1019 15th NW 


Laces those | 
RESERVE NOW! 
ROSEMARY APTS. 


dicated to Serve You 
MET. WASHINGTON’S 
FINEST 1- AND 2- 
BEDROOM UNITS 
—Swimming Pools 
~—Free Bus Service 
~——-Mont. Co. Schools 
~— Designed for Children 
~—Play Areas, Picnic Tables, 
Bar B-O Pits 
1929 East-West Hwy. 
SILVER SPRING. MD 
CALL JV. 8- 1170" 


RITE OR PHO 
FoR PREE BROCHURE 


——- ee 


“ARLINGTON 
TOWERS 


THE WASHINGTON AREA & 
LARGEST ELEVATOR-TYPE AIR- 
ONED D 


CONDITI PMENT 
JUST ACROSS FROM IWO JIMA 
MEMORIAL. 

Efficiencies, from $80.00 
Bdrm. Apts. from 102.50 
“| Penthouses, from 245.00 


ry 
t es: off-street perk- 
x: fast transportation te tewn 


NISHED 
—auto.. laun- 
resident mer. 


HH 


T AVE. NW, 


OWN) 
WORK 


1028 CONNECTI 
iDOW 
WALK T 

1 rm... full kit. and bath $77.50- 
| rm. bedrm. full ce A 

ALL eon NE ME Dell 


GOOD SCHOOLS. 
WEST HYATTSVILLE | 


Yitwee ‘> MILE OVER Cc. LINE} 
WEEN RIGOS Roap AND 
QUEENS CHAPEL ROAD 


IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY 


an 


A safe home for your child; | 
schools, recreation and picnic 
areas On project. 


| BEDROOM, FROM 


$68.50 


2 BEDROOMS, FROM 


$78.50 


(UTILITIES INCLUDED) 
Large cross ventilation. 
plenty of closets. 


center, rages. 
decks, play area. ample 

every convenience “nd only min- 
utes from downtown over Mefhorial 
or Key Bridges on Arlington bivd. 


Furnished sample apt. Shopping 


convenfeace 


CHILLUM HEIGHTS 
APARTMENTS 
Office, 1520 Chillum Road 
Open Daily and Week Ends 
‘TIL 8 


WA, 7-3948 or WA, 7- 6745 | 


H. G. SMITHY CO. 
iSth St. N.W. 8ST. 3-3300 


for your 


| Day ~ Evening Inspection 

SA. 5.5500 

| Clifton Manor Apts. 
2514 all TH ST NW. 

| Attrac. furnished. parquet floors: 


t tub-s oo ths. 
| Effie. $62.50: 1 bedi 
a 


5 
Good, pa teing: switchboard. au 
tic dhe vator. 
AD 4-2363 


Sil 


Colore 


NW. NE S.W. 
3, 4 and 5 rooms and wa 


$52.50 to $90 per mo. 


Immediate Occupancy. 
RECENTLY RENOVATED 


RENT > 1207 CAPITOL “ Ll. 6-1618 
“COLONIAL CO. RE. 17-6650 


Continued 7 Following Pace 


NK 


Continued on Following Page 


Mos - 


~! 
_ 


UNFURNISHED _26) APTS, UNFURNISHED 36 : JRNISHED 41) STOR LE, D.C. HOUSES _—-44) THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Pat Cl —Froctaas 3mm Eh im a be = hee lke Gat apeee Wednesday, August $1, 1956 41 
| Bi ca TYLER GARDENS ie ets Pty ct ot scithathy anasto | Sika bob Ce oe ae 
ious ng | re pers I i! | condition: very lange fr OL ten tho ~~) 
: < Falk | SETREED ; 5416 7TH ST. NW. 


IN AN ATMOSPHERE 
FOUND ONLY AT 3 
.$70-72) & 


. rake my, 
The Woodner 2 Bedrms, . +g: $89-$93 rerve 
-SHIRLINGTON | Air-Conditioned 


fo EFFICIENCIES oat, bi 30 to 6. Sun. noon to 5 
BPE SE Be | ome nw 


APT. : 
-erti'Sime | Now AVAILABLE vars eins op 
sat haat and tastefully | a aC a ae. Mice 1 = "only. it i ONLY $65 MO. 
POR FREE BROCHUR® Qreengal | fib beth opt. 949 6 Mee | (2) 2738 8, Troy. of Qube ne. ; , FT. Up meg BUY 


- 


entrance and 
to “Bue Fist Bt 


Es a 
AIR-CONDITIONED Garaes § domntows (BU byngasen, Rake | oe 


rm HOEY" Lotter minutes ENJOY OUR BIG, NEW : ‘ 
GELMARC sar 7 


TOWERS ‘The Woodner 


1930 COLUMBIA RD. N.W. | 3636 16th St NW. 2, S-dedroom pte: $85-898- 
we. 30008 4B. 6.400) Se. 3 boo-112'50" ail litities ‘paid. 
Efficiencies.... from $82.50, | $01 Reliexiow Bivd. 


1 Bedrm......from $127.50 = q HE BARLEE Be Riis [oxi sery . abt, ot 


“Ai Unive LUXURY Broyhilton 
aone APARTMENTS |esc. osep ements ws 


rooms. tr and o 
SS ee cares echies! 61 OW PRICED | BERR O ToT _sas 
Furnished Apts. Available [1 genpoom FROM $87.50 2-BEDRM. APT.—$105 
APPLY RESIDENT MGR. |2 BEDROOMS FROM $109.50 pa) Soupece 
ROOnR4 PF. M. co. 5-977 Incteding AN Ultilitics 


GELMAN Moat copraniant Jocatign ym ctz.| M. T. Broyhill & Son PARKLANDS 


Investment Bidg., ST. 3-6572 | comfort. ea Absa “Best Rent Buy in Town” 
See Ree Mer Ap’ is . . A oy CAPRITE DEVELOPMENT “ : , ; , 
Aldon Mgmt. NA. 8-5740 | WHY NOT TRY THE BEST | sistema ave snd Gtanton R4. Om to : & . e ONLY $12,500 


CALVERT UAPTS. | sss POMAR APTS. | omr unarse moan avant. t a eed Pegce size tel ee-sees Paremee 


Efficiencies with whe oh cami Ve Rems., $68 to $70 
20x12 Ft. Liv. Rm A BEGRME | 414 Ree $81.75 and $84.50 | 2 
Separate Kitchen ADULTS ONLY ALL UTWLITIES INCLUDED 


in a a —— POMPON IO anoPPING ARB SOMOOL AT 
Water Views Say MAS AVE NW RENTAL OFFICE JO 2-2090 
Yacht Harbor, Swim-Pool | FERGOM APT Oven Mon to Sat. 9 i oo PM. 
1-8 M APT. $65 
22 Acres Ground : eeu = = 


ay. 


HUNTING shot Sova art, ceea | Aap Foie Sie Pere 


COLORED $445 DN. 


et s-xer-| BUS. ~ 7 TRINIDAD 
kitchen. Epes 4 —~ |YACT—ERT POM. ¢ Re. RaMT. 
and services wea bon cash coltien, . What $12,958 re Key"tosr tal hate mae IDEAL a teen tee fe 


6.s0em. oes 2-s ee priced equally low. Hurry, 
ness oF starting some. JA. - Mi) pet 


its nant, : st NATL. REALTY 

= airport, 18 man. te A, . -WW.| Germ, } Bet an ~ + ealty 

wey | ERE aes A SP ae ole eae Ae ceasaees| 17 Oe Ne 

xi moter : te imepect get & . ove, beth a . | how ivi . * . =— - Pe! Me Ash S . | bee fr ; Lt 

‘ ; , ; allowed . ya aT s - : ~ iF > ive o . ; ‘ ‘ - 

TABOR Pe LORE sre AIR-CONDITIONED many ce ee xD it Se oe a Sa 
pail a a S| ROBES REAL 


‘| 2-BEDRM.—$81.50-$85 with sep- TY CO. 


a Sr A Ginime ares: 


FREE BROCHURE ON CAPITOL | cing vig | Seba sider Sestory pete. Beal tech road 1700. Bik. Kilbourne Pl. Nw. 
Bevigemt was anesst. Ape Shc Et gen fitife a coopera- s.. poker “ihe 7: ONLY $500 DOWN 


Af Pe Ry G. SMITHY .o. . a "nest bus .? r san PORCH ASEE 9 ath 
aP - 112% 6. oy. aT, 2 yar . ' ' sot tea b| Frome ; ’ bases 
LLOYDS APTS. |ebbticter Hs 4 bail |OROE Tene tay fee 3 Bx F3s00 TA. ae 


800 TENN. AVE. ALEX. re orth weet residential oe section 
R hilt t OFF SHIRLEY HIGHWAY ® bath °° Bompletely 
A 5 Minutes to Pentagon irs 3 
roy ton Dp S. FURNISHED OR UNFURN. fi0 008 oe 
NEWLY DECORATED 
Vicinity Glebe Rd. & Lee Highway ! Bedrm. from $73.50 |) on x, mayen Krenus 
2 Bedrms., from $87.50) APARTME WA 
N. Arlington rom pda at 
: : esires effic . 
Walking distance to all schools and shopping pastel ae Fos rat 0 me. 
shir: limeton Shopping furn. oF upiu 
Plenty of closet and Large living room ae ration pines 
storage space. SUN. 2-4 
Off-street parking Equipped kitohen with OV. 3-0950 management . rec. rm. car. Pa entals ovaries 


m You 
Fenced-in equipped garbage disposal, exhaust fan pon AND —— 39 z| Cun = Pn ok ie have 8) sood-—needs 
a ibis & K at —. i 


ve AIR CONDITIONED ‘fone any oc Fr : 
aie Laundry fecilities * sa a ae rote : 
Master TY antenna 1 block to bus CARILLON HOUSE ~ REAL DUPONT CIRCLE |: 
2500 WISCONSIN AVE NW. Bent New 2 . — rhe Ay Shb08| Se mide Staise qorper 


1 Bedroom. $85 2 Bedrooms. $105 SrTICIENCY sith CSM IN 60. ae Sage 
including AM Utilities 1-BEDROOM ri. unfurn. house inc. 20 
ile | Blec tricity APART MTS a wha oye : " x oan". 4 ” ae += 
M. T. Broyhill & Sons i nia alte a porine ong bag bo T0b| 8 "Ca | DUBE ee dhe 5: ee ve PRICED TO SELL” | $750 DN.—$12,950! 
4624 Lee Hwy., Arlington, Va. JA. 4-1300 oe beeatitgi Aa are me dens near Biadensbure on Bent my apt has 4 rims. Ril. baih- Brick) Buse bemt.: yard. Baap 


low rates: 24-hour: ex 4 compet detal 
yans. JA. 2-18 ores. tyneh tro 


. :, 
eck. master antenna. =i! or wri i Serees yerd. 
‘ fe a G. Wriehh. eh vice aLPy,. inc... SALE, D. C., HOUSES 1M Beech & SON iS o> 
) Your Inspection Invited | Seaded vane. tree est. AD’ 2-she: SMERICAN UNIV. PR—q bearms. “ RSTABLISHED 189 Recreation Rm 
SVING_UNION STC = Co. ” Exe most live brick | 1363 Wis. —e Realtors. AD 2-0513 : 
CONGRESS PARK CALL EM. 2-8800 ts Plorida are, ne. MO. Tie D ee ety tg ee: = cme bt. thal 
; ve a ’ 


et 
at Genter hall, hall, open freviece | #2 
EC ow . : ~ n t lt room, arate din- thom . 
SPICK-AND-SPAN ‘Baste ea LBORM. APT. Seager eae Sar | phadp. of Ranging | ih ve Sm. te ee = St hp t-6600. “& "you haves besuliful reqres-| gis g5. ereciient brick’ Celomisl 
1 AND 2 BEDROOMS Setiedn cei aie tats | Bila: Baie: mens Fors) SNe digs Bel | far atte, fhe LS Soest: |THE OLD HOMESTEAD en nieee aeteseye| icine inten Selemae “a te 
GARDEN APARTMENTS eta lola dee te : BEER Tbs “egal | Slits [cia Be. i8 | ye eepommce or, FY co, _ | Beers. aadyoath op $2) leaign 
a the pradior v ider house. ‘\4 OR S&S bedroom =e home Pak tee . Baw velge 98 44° 
FURNISHED UNFURNISHED eg al Bid ties _ 7a arge grounds, ¢@ bedrms. 2 baths.| nw. Wash Cane ad- * a tte AY awe 4 HY 
manne ee oe en wrt Ties Har\ % £250 ‘ nen wee |e rent. mae i,t 6-3919 ANACOSTIA 4 . aw . 
PLAY AREAS AND OFF-STREET PARKING ir ils, . . Be ioe Cs ‘ee ‘PROPERTY MAANAGEMT aaa, Pt brick. ¢ rms. end bath. a) o 5 


Complete 17-Store Shoppi Center NE. Like and 3% rms..| rm. 2-bath Dome Tastefui™ furn. | hot-w woler ‘hea: ai. 950 Vacan 
in apt “Wigs. "close-in; att Pr Man ment Imme jon. Nr. school : 
gpperencticns Pings hyte neaalomen pane Ties 2. " ‘ed ~ 4-20 ‘Boes. Ba school . ie vitiniry of y aor 4 T. ATEINS “h A D. BURGESS 


WNTO Hos j 
Se ea ies SAVANNAH wr, WASHINOTON [223 VERMONT AVE NW, Lieven Go, BY. 372 hb | i DE. 2-4087 


SOUTHEAST ios teens | ET Bee Psi 


BARENABY WOODS, Chevy Chase— 


ExcL : 
brick center- Legum & rber on > 5 h. ws 
charging wooded in 5 - Br 
be 


. 

NEWLY DECORATED a ta = Realty Co. a ats 

JO. 2-015) Within walking distance of cen. pois et 7 ane war. a = incladins ~ Pe infos ave room =M «(9-9000 3315 awe. 4 6652 wi attractive | ce ram- 
ra winess sect! + - 

Open Daily, 9 to 9; Seturday, 9 to 5, and Sunday, 11 to 6 | off 14th ab. carling “Rents 86g 80 meting i the at bench beach—} hills. “Co. ‘ a bethre Test “screened porch. fn. COLORED . | S2eeen ey a eee 

ri J ¥ apecial om convenient lecation offices is ni "ts _J285 Physician or dentist—Fia. eve. & $295 TO $950 DN. er, 3 D arc CA ite 


Tn this 

available. { from $30 to $120 per I = t ave. nw. § rma. auto. heat. 

‘ ee ¥OG oY BOrTOs tase = " Foomerg 6 ms plus 3 stor-) rave Porm % , Physician’ ss and 913 «tases Bete. NW. tre Re oe bat 
See PSR Dab Bede ore COL. 1235 Sumner wr te —2 Fs yao" rahe tre ie gen" euren, vane. Cal 62. 1514 N . On ST. Né 

ANNOUNCING THE OPENING — |gcu87 artes | tiite tie os "Windntied| CEN ILOING Biniels” dvs: od" bs NW—Built as family iat. S.rme.| 3464 247M ST. SE. 


er [oedtoom Miss. OWN Delite Jivtle | Choice offices. tron om om 90. tn tmel. full NELLE LOWE CASSEL oat are # 28) AP PAST CAPITOL CY 


SHIRLEY PARK gece gel | aaat ne | SAMPY_p1. 7.9000 | eee tt CORO caper uae vam 
AP ARTMENTS arr te TE ws ro i feces =, wi nil file ack ait ant vend Sate rattiusg*" Riu Sisson “bak of |CANIEL DIENER, AD. 4-6652 
SPACIOUS, DE LUXE GARDEN TYPE | & te ry Le pha.c Se Pee ne | gala att srk tie Series ta 


‘7 
ar oe 


INQUIRE ABOUT OUR FREE PICKUP GERVICE 


APARTMENTS PRICED AT: bier Set bia | a wnaramee| G-rm. ¢ 
' rm. re , oF as 
ONE BEDROOM , ep <i se c Nw ot Call = Fe ze te ces, | spect. cn =| B19 Webster St-—-8 re 
. fn : ane Anoenen PL. Bw : ry 3 SOL ORED— SOU : 103 7th St. NW.—7 rms, 
THREE BEDROOMS | vis | ie iad iE Et cai] Bre 


c E - orn. 8 home, eae ana yocrmn ce porch. en ‘27 200 DP 3s f il 
Includes Utilities Except Electricity 160 mo. : . >drms : 
GOON FEATURES As’ “cor” apt “ideal fot fot i ore || JMR REY bene v © SON “ae ey ; af +* ned| ful oft, recrention tm. ond | See 52. 08 m St 4606 HARRISON ST. 
ree, Airy Rooms Hot-Water Heat ay 3S wis A YY aT 9513 5OF F eet : .. : ; ‘ Quiney OPEN 2 TO 5:30 P. M. 
Room seloeets Hrescest_ Gousruction "Newly decorated. EDRMS.. CL : | Dist “1409 of ase ‘eid: lke pew 4812 9th St. NW.—8 rma. 
Pront-Deor Off-the-Street ; “} , P +. sy ~ 
a's! to ac 1 . n te 


Master aa “Antenne Parking ‘ Poe ty Fong -% . $17 1 ST mily Sol fee tee esos ses 
ian nd ————. pd ama and Dryers . Dr't. . —_—— ne 
Wired for Air Condit bath, basm’'t , ‘ < ee ats sat es ne ad. Exciusive . - 

; . 


No More than 1% Fl ghis Eiticient. Oa anton ance Service 
-| 427 Shepherd St. NW. 


in 
of Stairs im Any Building Some With Private Entrances per * ne Co, 915 N. ¥. Ave. : ck, semi-d : HON Ss 


EXCLUSIVE cad aba. + se aE eh i tad ine nti ares, 2 Baths—2 Kits. BRICK-$8950 


Bright, Efficient, Completely Equi poed 


Kitch W ‘ = = : + ‘OND . 90 1. Ee : , ae reer. 
Exon he ee im oot a es Wile aa Weer gaged | aris MAEM Mo: | Ss ane rot aia SSE ee 
: Bend Box: Boxes FOR THE oy Convenient aS ete eet Bal io eS' Ts A Pe . cr , ‘Te . ‘ Nw. i 
* Ciao $71 mo. ; omy , I business an: h eg whew 1S 500: : ! A. HUMPHRIES 
. | SE TO ' ton b 6 ) ie le. 
Only Two Miles From Pentagon 
re fereree Seen Dolly © Aas, te7 Ri 
Resident Manager, Mrs. Dodson, on Premises a _ ss =e ° ' Com! 
1400 S. 28th St. OTis 4-767) ep dime. fully “pit-copds. matage. | AZuSE per Those th owne| Ee me “ee. 3. 
PRCTIONS: (0% Shcer Mehwaz, 4, Wee seat mee | Ee eh ee 5 HotetOi 
M. T. BROYHILL & SONS CORP. : Hepes bette eed opeaaee | STORES, RENT eae 


Bé24 LEE HIGHWAY F JA, 41300 2.1137 i. i 


) 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
49 Wednesday, August 31, 1955 


SALESUBURB. HOUSES 67 MD. 


$395 DOWN 


7414 CARROLL AVE. 

Reautiful. detached. ee- home. 
ern ki _—- 

f bamt 


ter “heater large 


open 
ture 


es: \ (walt 
NON & 


lots re ties 
a & very fine ¥ 
lot’) SHA 


CHEVY CHASE, “MD, 
ell other 


$19.500 
schools School and 
hoa bedrm 
dbeths on ist- 


Tm... 
}- screene 


day W % "Walcot eit" 
bre ha 


—/& Teal va 
area, close to schools and transp.. 
red brick Colonial with slate roof 
| yonene den and mek = Pe 

3-hedrme,, 2 


824.950 aint Ph ots, HL, “wd 
hala 


near Westbrook and we ~, " 
ine family es . Mish schools. attractive colonial 


ae grow 
py Buchanan the , Perpesual Bids. pome 3. dbedrm 
Bethesda, Md f) 


a CLOB A iz=A~ 
stone rambier 

den. studio liv 

m elec. kit 
ideal for 

Hewitt Co. h 


den on ‘ 
Easy” financing 
F 2-8 


to paroch ub 
_ less than a! ocles “of sia 150 


tapion homes with 6 


Crienta! “ 
bat! trached areece. screene 
serch GF «it financing avail 

Wood Acres Constr. Qs 
OL. 4-3240 Eves. OL. 


Woodside Bark. 


Charm comfort popventences and 


—_ 
late. 2-dedrm brick. "rasabber 
near 8 xe vay 


A approved ATHAN 0 
a 00 ON. 
> rick . ee jie.) 
area. di 


room it* king- 
giointne cane roo 
is mamm 

aliy eee Titchen with fur- 
nished breakfact 

recrea lion room 

wth part 


oa ene thes 
te 


outloek 


Th 
with full bath ts in| 
ta al 


backs up 


m 
The jot 
iced the 


lower 


‘James C. Conley & Co 
Ave JU. 9-414. 
s250 gown: cosy p-bedrm 
2 Liv 
‘with. “dinette bath. al 
wot mmaculate 
Ronan. 


N Westmerciane 
pric colonia 
list fi 


Sem cat et 


abs 
oe. rm. 


Payment y 
art 


SEE THE HOME 
OF TOMORROW |} 
TODAY | 


SPLIT-LEVELS 
SILVER SPRING AREA 
IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY 


$17, 730 


3 bedrooms, |! 
VA AND FHA INANCING 


No cash down veer ibe Ow 


-KORZENDORFER | s 


. he rent 


AR. ?- 
or OL. 4-789) 


a [\N 
a = ft. rambler on ¢= 
: laree picture win 
dew with “t aes view beautiful 
nd setting yice well-planned | 


landscaping otte 
withou 


rom ewner, 820.425 


Pius settlement 
cost. Owner anxious to sei n ry 
uel 


‘OVERLOOKING SLIGO PARK 
i tind every convenience 

this attractive 3-ded-/ 

; separate dinine 

porch. garage. beautiful 

j 14 low gown 


parment 
"eee | W. BAUSERMAN 


90-5444 Eres. JU reat 


oP iS DAR Y¥—The new 
te Porest Sten nome 


split-level mod 
ew ‘he i 


"Sean 


trade “Toward hater 


as every} ) 

“athe. Pt 

ll basement 

dishwasher | he. ave 
7% 


on ‘~~ owe 2 Sos 
om SEIDOMA A AND c. cl 
.§ Ger ar it , we A 


p- 


: acres 4 bedrms 


and 
din 


GRARAM 
OPEN DAILY 
1400 Gleason St., Silver Spring | 
_—_—~ liv. rm 1$x20 
becrm*s gas heat 


e.. to 
mA REA! DMOND REAL eetase 
) 


: : move i'n 1 
medcistely. Boman & Foearty. LO 


Cod 
7m. 


be mec. On 
‘ and A $1500 cas 
a Bos Ir PO. 2-615 
4 


% may SERVICE —+ rm. co- | 
nis ciu at & Dargain price 
WAtwooo NA 3-837 

O4 
BEDROOMS AND SATH 
e.] 


53 


a 


oy "SULTON BR GORDON Jk 

NEW 3-BEDRM. RAMBLERS 

Nr Dale rok A. ge, By =. 

2D 4: 

$19,500 | 

LEO M. BERNSTEIN Co. | 
CO. 545-3537 9 ‘til 9 
~ DOWN 


kit 
xis! A eal Pikestbe 
: TY om & aN 


STEP O 


sths. ample closets. | 

attic Beautiful 

reer screened perch. Will consider 
con 


CHEVY « CHASE REALTY CO. 
nS 


tita*i 

A library, a den and unusual out- 

door living srea make this pretty. 

spreading -bedrm 2-dbath odric 

Colonial a d@elightiul home “elect. : 
in location and best schools | 
n Gorman P "Younes | 


« 


greene. Ls i. -*. 
expand. Cape Cod Livine | 


. large dining room moderr 
tchen. bs torm ; 
ie and Owner ‘ . 
Ghats a co. “SESS 

onVEN SPRING 


couple or 


EM 15 
NE AR at SL IVE See ‘this beautiful! 
- c wesroem Colonial with | 


Frise level | 
riced. , 


i hee 


o bem nice 
. with beautiful Sewer gardens 
need $18 
HOLMEAD Realtors 


JU. 9-6200 TILL 9 


~ SILVER SPRING 
Cal! 


see this unusual Home on 
close to schools in 
with fireplace 


oof 


tree-shaded 
garage 
at near Ps 
enter and e) sale achool 
- --2 for —— ones xroeilent 


| Reda 
this 


sf ie Be ane | 
ul 9 | 


ROCKVILLE 


2-story home on ige 

ed int completely 
eutiiti living room with 
rate dining room 


i226 


Sil. Sps. handy te ‘all Four 
. activities 3 bvedar 
peneled den. huge bkfat. room cae. 
arate dining room, i 

porch, recr 


"homer, FU s 
NON-VET OR VET ~ 


450 down end %s79 
ovelyv 2 bedrm 

Wheaton ares. just euecorated 
Eauipped kit.. corner iot. vacant. 
no [oe ie Parseiae Resity. LO, 


_At- 


roo 
off-street parking 


WOOD COMPANY 


. Ave., Silver Spring, Md 
"thi 


Try Match 

This. An immaculate. all. Brick 
bed home in Montgomery Wiis 
near everything Living room with 
mneled fireplace is separated 


living 
rm... pic- 


Bright 
fireplace. separate dinin 
ture window, large kitc 
windows nd f foort oH 


Sarees 
NC neatiars. a) 9-5555, 


Soot 


uw 


y terme center entrance hall. 

ental Ruchanan Rreniees, Base 

ua! Rethesda 

berry “ en beautivul 
, recre- 

ation rm with pictdre window and 

ground-level exit, ; 

port Will consi 

tisale terms 

MOOR AGEN 


G—AI-brick, 3-bed- 

rm. Colonial near everythings. Li 
ing Tm. with paneled fireplace x 
y 


separated 

wrought tron railing Scre ened 

pores: full basement with outside 
rance t. tree studded and 

Seautifully landscaped Veterans 
raisal, $17.4 ticed + for 

¥ kK sale le as sie. SO Bary terms 
Sak ine. * 


Bids. 


WwooD- 
INC.. Realtors. 
of 8: iver Spe. from eg 
brick Colonial, 


acree net nore 
mov 


for dick sale Ani Y« SM 
Ears ess § 


2 baths “and Srepioce set off this 
wonderful new bler ed 
with extras. GI or f- r easy terms 
GRAHAM & CO, JU, 5-6550 9 


$13,950 


Almost’ new end really sparkles, 
many extras, «6 w . ear~ 
1 n fh. yo 


tiful lerge t; 
and 8c 

Diocks from bus, In a Vers n 

ty on s large i — 


. Perpetua 


er oversea 
Colonial Some 


WE SELL HOUSES 
SILVER athe 


SLIGO CREEK PARK 
This uenustel home hes larse Iiv- 
Ing rm... den with fire 

room . bed . 

Ultra modern kitchen with double 
oven and dining area; 2 rooma., 
beth and large recreation room on 
Sd floor. Priced under 680.000 well 
re A - neenen cost. Less than 


3333 Conn. Ave EM 
OnE Counser? 

oes seable wih ‘4 "sian 
— 


beara ‘nee enc’ ‘i es 
cated A 


“we | 5 


pe ltr Het an 


i! ma 4 ™ 
Gc bioss ME! 61250 4 


Ems" 


2 Mass. Ave. Realtors WA. 


Gynce transferred and 
charming artes 

—ae > dDedrms.. dining rm., 
rm ma large corner jot 
brand new’ Walk to 

ees ost 000 Gua RAHAM & CO 


EXPANDING? 


gece mechanic can Increase the 
eeeee: 7 te $71..000 
ree bedr ooms anc 
than new C ape — 
‘wo bedroom iv 
ette kitchen bath and 
a on level tet Co 
venfent te Bt. John's and Perest 
Grove schools 7.950 


Prince G s Count 
BRANCH AV EAT.—G! approved 
614.750; Coc 

fn 


Lv 
AL REALTY co 
$007 


2 
ot 


r ero eae 
2-bedrm +3 
60x100 eorner 


eves. 


bric ram 
Anchor “fence 5 


* _— 
Dk war. WE 6-6760 


conAL—wmcre = Tony is 


convenient 
ne  reom.i- 


ue aCHOOLs 
PAUTIPUL brick ney 
fr 


=m With pewde an 
laondéry with wate, washer : dryer 
Owner transferred 

CRAWFORD & BANDTY. INC 


New 6-rm. brick rambler; seperate 


Complete aoe 
Phone until @ 
JIM BRI rT 
4920 INDIAN HFAD HWY. SF 
FORESTVILLE —Hew 3-bedrm 
rambler $i4 move in 
nice lot 


with 
city 


ee | «6 BETHESDA RAMBLER 


oat” ‘ld 


COA & CO 


ew rm 

25 no fl be on in paren | 2 

riec u ae ecr ¥v re 

ond Fee, $2) 950 hobetr i 


ibeei Low i down par 


din — &, yard 


rma.. rm 
location. John A Cen 


| Ou cen jen sbury Rd | 


Close to Queen's Cha 
4-bedrm prewar prick, 


er conventional 6200 down 
17-4303 unti . »p 
; N 


et 


HILLCREST HEIGHTS 
$750 DOWN TO GI 


reed - Y decorated 6- 

ths aree basement. 
. and di a! Vocen 
possession. Call JO. &.33 


D. BURGESS 


an 


ru — 
ed beaied HILLCREST HEIGHTS 


e| Bemidetached brick 


excellent con. 


_ A a “Ol financine 


CAROZ2 A CO. 


LU. 4-0040 


s| i Mayda $13,560. GT. ap-'| 
proves rms n 


mbler 
evel lot 


| trances 


John A 
‘Dbler on besutiful lot: 
 & oom, separate 
la kitchen. 3 bedrooms 
bat -* beautifal patio in rear: full 
bam ppraisal reauested 
Ask 
cha 


A— 
garage: liv- 
dining room. 


in pur. 


make offer . 


41ST. BERNARD’S PARISH 


6206 S8th Ave., Riverdale, Md 
CALIPORITA rambler on de 

ot with stream; 3 bedroom 

basement. faliy. equipped 

compare this value J 

terms to suit: immediate 


ROBERT S. DAVIS CO. 


WA. 7-3900 "TTL 9 P. M. 


| ~AND ALL HE 


; 


COULD TAKE FROM The 


MARYLANE 
| Prince 


CHEVY CHASE REALTY CO. SaLesUsURB. HOUSES "67 MD. SALESUBURB. HOUSES 67 MD. |SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67 VA. 


AP. 
bite DN it § Firs: 
| &% bed: 


¥.| 
40. | 


bus | 


No agents. | 


aoormvest . 


home 


ora. 


S.bedrm. brick 


—_ | 


Gules | 


R. VER WILL — =, Oxersi 
rambler. close 
convenient to andrews Pie 


’ 
a shopping cen 
S750 down Railence like rem 
: commen s if desired 
wiLoue 
PER 
: vet 


x REAL 
ONTH; only 8250 down 

terrific ——— home 

1s-ft am- 


M 
A 
~4 | anol jot ; 

tw in- sl nee Bore 


today 
AD 2:77? 


Geornes Properties | 
BRICK RAMBLER 


CULATE 3-bedrm. home with 


rs t\ hen ith brea 
tifwl iet Anehor 
purchase or 
- 813.500 
Prince Georges Realty Ge 

UN. 4-1166 WA. 77-6655 | 
nacre, pee shingle 3- bedroom ram. 
rec. atyie full 


con ventione! 


Pacr terma | 
to non. vets. Pri ince Georges Proap- 
erti «7714 


“Wrest at ; 


City Wide Reality. 


BARGAIN PRICES 
RIVERDALE PARK 
OWNER has just reduced price 

én 50 

Bernard's, shopping 
Seperate din. ar 
zit. amd gaa hot 
Payments like 
HYATTSVILLE HILLS 

4 BEDROOMS 
Cyst Oss. A at con 4 Cod. brick. 


rea. &i- 
water heater. 
rent 


= 
= > 


roe 
ATE CO. | You < can oot it “hee 614.500 GI. It's 
rare 


me | new cond! 
day 


. extra 


lowered te 616..- 
suck sae 


THE PERRY BOSWELL 
WA. 7-4500 ‘TIL 8 


3 on ied - , oe 
low t hod 

oo 

WwW «& 


2-454) 


homes. af 
to a. 


Terps ) 
REALTY 


A 


tA h6AluminUm awn 
pat i on rear. An 
Rw A few bioecks 
Michigan 
‘Pe rish Ask- 
te GI 


lo : 


Rt 
ae “si6 250 bubs: ac: 


Praia, 
CALL UN Lk 
FiNCHMAN _ co 


~ Move in Immediately | 


Dera. 
IMMEDIATE. OCCUPANCY 
A? vs BLANCHARD 


. 5600 


“BISTRICT HEIGHTS 


GATEWAY BOULEVARD 


GI Approved, $16,000 | 


?- BEDRM brick Colonial with bu 
To ieapect 


‘MOORE | & MOORE | 
$395 DOWN ~—sCLsC=!! 


or 


2 yrs old 
finished recreation 


queiifying. Assume trust. | 


*PICTURESOLUE 


Immaculate condition many 
rm : 


sepers' ® «ain 


v4 Town beet a2 Builders) 


A 
Feensemes 


PRICE—$9500 ] 


Cc E.IN Riverda! e location. near 
schools, practically new 2- bed room 
aR we - level lot. GI approved 


orges 


WA. 71-3900 "Tu 9 P. M. 


Vets, No Mone 


NEW BRICK >, Money Dr 


CO. | con 
) 


ROBERT S. DAVIS CO.| :; 


at ib Prince a es 
$14, "000 AND $15, 250 


Pa ne. 
left on Southern ey 
right to Open 


0, 65777 
mC, 


RECTIONS. 
wa ave 
4 biecks to Fillis st., 
me 
J. M. MEDLEY 


p.oyees ss 
a 


side entrance, bar 
613.950" GI navee 


vick. Prince Soames Properties 
4 7-777 


can have them with your 
chickens in th 


accept 


‘.. Were cing. Cal now ey, 


ned yeh 


jot: p= 


ag ga DP ae 
ooms. iae sc 
|e patio: shad 


| at ‘ot 
ull nee Hove Wniee 
cation. Like new 

17. 5 ai Sa new 3. 


rambler: 
Cony. le- 


uleht " baseme 


orr 


Cc 


VIRGINIA 


— Ne down | payment 


Only 1. ? amt brick a 


‘ Tid 
i oe Pisheas 7. Snir $1 
with convenient term 

Prince Georges Realty Co 
UN. 4-116 WA. 7-6688 


rfax Charming. 
cuatint ttle sole 150. yea 


ADELPHI, MOD. 


Want « nearly new, peadere. som 
+. poms — 2 an 
or rd ‘bodream 


brick at iook 
5 


old and i spark tas 


bon. Ask te Imepect it w- 


LEW! SDALE, MD. 


This maculate eee will 

delight you. it b bedrooms, liv-| brick and red wood contemporary 
ing and i . 3 bedr : bathe. branc new 
bath on st ee ready for immdiate ocoupenc? 
ou ' t ol 


Bmme » $2000 

mo . peaventiens! 

+ et ALYY 

"ROBERT E. LOHR Homes | 5730 
el... $- 2600 . 


a w 
le attic 


t ~. 


eS ae agen. 


gaiore—wal)- ; 
fenced level lo 

to offer this home—opir | 
ay Aus P| an requested. Call for 


| Visit 
BE. 4-400 


Gi—4 BEDROOMS 
DISTRICT HEIGHTS 


ENIENT Andrews and 
ie. level jet, Get brica. 
and bath 4 >? bed- 

and bath up: fan mi. 
" Rue frepiace. 


1} 
din kit Sxestiont finances Al faenit Ya 
anorored Oy 419 ino" BRE 3300 ty. Ki. 88-6662. Brenines, . 
ALEXANDR! 
SEMINARY AREA 
fortest he for @ large family 
ly Gesten ed fer entertain- 
ing. udly 


exclusive ‘oca by 
ay ey 
+) a 


a __beeutitui 
"hitxe REALTY 


7704 Mt. Vernon Ave 


a>. @ 


DEFENSE BWY. — Close to 
nee Sanitarium 


ALEXANDRIA 


Con 
Holy soot 
HOUSES BY HUGHES | 


on 


Rasy terms James 
4-5600 


LISTING 316-0 
JEFFERSON MANOR 
$650 Dn. to Anyone 
“ts! ’ 


lovely yries Be .. 
s 
bath 


$10.4) ~—Mt Rainier area: 
from express street car 
Lr ramble-jow excellent 


perch basement | a 
freee. con side street. S218 dewn 
to vets 


Tet 
vals, immaculate 
PHONE TE €-7244 - TH. 6-7344 


features 
ite 


10.958~—Check these 
ure Castanea Covisaed 


LISTING 605-B 
DELRAY 


$725 DOWN—GI 


sem i-det at- 
with in. ores 
fine vwtili- 

nice " 


payment?) Only S23 to vets 


811.950 — All close to bries 
« construc: | . 


ee Colonial; 
pub’ ised 


landscaping 
Only 


R. HUGHES & CO. 


AP. 718 Tm 8 FP. M 


in immaculate cond 


PHONE TE 6-7244- TE 6-7344 
; 


LISTING ia 7-9 


BRADDOCK ROAD 


$845 DOWN—GI 


S-bedrm. boric 


OLORED — New 2- 
rambiers; reise 
Wohyeeod * bath 

~y HY 10 
nr. Oxon 


spacio 

line A 

ve ane . Ouiy 
’ 


nen }- bedroom 
s of gare | 
dream lovey 


mi home. riaht nr 
1 


ube a 
epeeliant aélgh- 


PHONE TE. 6-7244- TE 6-7344 
Ai he ee VA.—NO CASH GT 


rms 
adiacent to 
ping sg ed Just f 


use, 
‘Tote price _ Si 


ALEX.-OAKCREST | 
4 Bedrms., 22 Baths 
Direct From Builder 


Thies new brick 


LISTING 613-2 
NEW ALEXANDRIA 


A bvesutiful brick pome with 
; bedrms.. 2 full baths. ise 
ull bemt.. side sereened por 
ab! car garace. 
Deautiful sun room. 
screens. venetian 
driveway to en- 
enced yard. erend nei 
bors here earty to see t 
smart outstanding home 


PHONE TE 6-7244 ~ TS. 6-7344 


AL BAKER & SON, INC. 


508 North Waeshington -«t.. 
_ 


LIENTS 


is 


Cod will 
lease ‘ * most discriminating 
: ; 
cabinets and —_* 
rma nd 


with fireplace. 
Fer 
3d fleer hes 2 huge 


and loads of closet space and 
d 


Alexandria yarstais 


and she FREE PARKING FOR 


bus pring 
Pirections: Prom Alex out 
lock 6rd toward Pairlington 
Page ter on Pace 
Open hot 


o 
right © ARLINGTON WN.—RAWSLER— #02 
500. Brand new am: brick home 


pietion. WIDE 

OV. 3-0319 Pe 
ALEXANDRIA 

“=|$650 Dn., Conventional 


full beamt 
outside entrance 
insert call Metzier. JA 5.757 8 
ARCINGTON—3-bedrm 
bier, nice eauipped kit... 
heat. tile bath “oe 
KI. 83-6600, V. L. MA 


Arlington North 


i 
FoR aakbiy lt? SY’ | 


Alexandria $12 14,500 
bier w 


e,| Low Cost Comfort 
$10,650 


PARKLING 2-bedrm,. OEM sep. 
arate Ginipe r R 


<= 
tried alon 
cans.” 
own GI ig 
other financing ar 


roveton. ‘s| just like rent. Cail 
Beautiful nee ~ . 
62x76 with Srait rees, shrabs and Brick Rambler 
on 


nik ner" thawe ot |$ 15,600, 3 Bedrms. 


Basement—Level Lot 
Retier tha a 
oaded i 8 ap Ei am 


ome 
Qui P SM. if de- 
Sired Call JA. 5-8402. 


Edward R. Briggs 
REALTOR 
LEE HWY. at GLEBE RD. 
JA. 5-8042 
ARLINGTO fear feta, nant, 


BRICK Ge 
$14,750 


One of the cutest homes on today's 
ca n © 

1 highway 

lan 


7 


payments 
§-8402. 


Fr ny 
Gonvenioni ‘Jocation 


DEL-RAY 
$10, 450 
od aeciion 


Lo 
on “Alexas wy VP “albee to the 
} age oy Schoo). 
r . 
Sg shine nssio¥v; 2 
Ss plus pine-pan den. 
living . gonerate 


BQul PrED 
Just 
land- 


ine room. pa 


| seabae water fence 


Approved ‘OL. a] 5% 


BARGAIN SEEKERS" 


poreh. 
thide entran 1 


Priced 
‘aie 
vs 


, on 
nice i | 


attractive because of | 


| JA 7-4487 
sMUmarox- 


approved at 


RL cINGTON "REALTY 


A. 7-9900 "til 9 a 


ARLINGTON 


G.I. 
$1,000 Dn. 


AND $105 PER MO. 


BUYS THIS EXCELLENT 
4-BEDROOM BRICK HOME 
JUST 1% BLOCKS FROM 

SCHOOLS AND 
TRANSPORTATION 


Walker & Dunlop, 


955 ©. MONROB 6T 
JA. §-2400 


i 
CUSTOM BRICK 


‘NEW BRICK RAMBLERS 


4 Bedrms., 2 Baths 


DET. 2-CAR GARAGE | Deneor 


$17,750—ALL TERMS | 


flere. u % pert. y Cade Gee ee ety ~ 4 
. muc 
rties | 


: 
InG- 


NIAL Ai hes CO. 


Tu? 
sr rer, 


SEA, i a en & 


pete Oe ove ~and 
tien renin ar ae 
Ex 


| aoe N REALTY 


“ARLE ALLO CHURCH J "Wesley ; Buchanan Inc. 


REAL ATTRACTIVE 
Contemporary Home 
Reduced to $15,950 


This charming ages with 3 twin. 
bedrms ely liv. re. with 
indirect ehting separate din. rm. 
real de luxe kit: full bemt. with 
beautiful 4 rm carport. La 
lot beautifully leandecaped. Close 
school. bus and opping This 
ie « kind S bereain Je have been 
loot in Own neferred and 


ath hewn 
COLONIAL "Ren ay rate) 
Bheees at Wien... 2 “Te ® 


ARLINGTON NORTH 
4 BEDRMS. 
2% BATHS 
ONLY $22,950 


New Brick, Full Basement 
DE LUXE KITCHEN 


Terme—Gl $2295 down, S135 ser) 


mo. PHA . 30 me 
IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY 
J. FULLER GROOM CO. 


Open 3 te 9 
NORTH 


TARA 


Here ts living ot the beet Wel 
bullt 106-menth level? brick 
ae with. ogy occupancy 

asib Located Ar ’ 


outa ndings 


ts 
living room A 
xitenen. 


perce 
—— offers 2 full be 


ve bath. 


floor od f 


2 bed roo roome- 
teei4 rit y wit 
Don't s this one 


Amazing 
Gi—$23,200 


Re far the aret value on todarv’s 


, Oi : 
ine and dining rooms, large riteh- 
en with ample eating spece on ist 


made before redecoration 


mise this’! 


Split-Levels 


a - amie 
"tp bedrm 
tnished vees 
ne a Call for eppt 


GEO. H. RUCKER CO. 


iA 5§-8585 


N. ARLINGTON 


5 Bedens and Den 


|W 


$'19.950 
7T.-6l4 Orick Cape oa 
% bath Id. Entire 

screened 


‘flagstone patio and 
Wiliamsburs 


RIZE CORP 


Bchoo! | 


ioe tae4 


s we *- 


hiro 514.558. 
will buy this pretty as 
r Cod | 


a 
N-PA 
ILL BUILD 
te puis on your lot. Purnish plane 
eancing. Excellent 


SONe TE  G-aat co. 


— BRAND-NEW §-4470_ 


48°, 3-bedrm., ee 
rambler with 2 baths and 
full basement——$21,950 


White Brick Rambler 
On Corner Lot 


the Shirley hwy. 
miles ‘of do downtown and 


this ih reems “ ® 
o ts situated o 


within 15 


Geo. Mason Green Co. 
REALTORS-INSURORS 
Exclusive Agents, JA. 4-1400 


me center: bus 
cious tv. rm. with firepi.. 


[eadine to ta ag Pe | 


oy uel 


8-878. | 


‘RA 


og 


’ 


SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67 VA. SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67 VA. 


BEDROOM ‘= GT 


weened. level 
City of Patent >i 


corel. 2 bed- 
rms.. bath on ist fleor: 2 bedrms« 
on 2d; in ac. 


aire = 


bears delightful ‘privet screened 
acre. Jbet rahi. 
acre "yhet right fae ¢ 


white exterior; 


it 
5 0080 
, : Ve INC. 4763 
NEW RANCH TYPE RAMBLER OV IN 
5 ie bedrooms. 2 o bethe ’ 
reseed porch. eat ; ronm 
or rec. bet 
7 orak. ‘comp te Oo 
cooled Coeice resi ential 
mes. corner | 


for lnapestion ation 
yprant and beth ot s 


D 
4-9410. REALTOR. OT. 4-9410 
add BM. 8 ington. Va 


- 


3-bedrm. rembier on delight 
a: ures 


Zi- 

ning * 

spark! 
se t@ schools 
bransp Qn #14, 399, on 

term J 

“ESTAR SERV! ick 

me, 4763 lebe 


GI Not to be excelled for veur 
dol) ar is this new senior brick ram. 

> rm 
pa uti ift ul} 


CRESCENT HILLS 


ed veteran. Call JA 

ted tn the ntry = area’ REAL FSTATE 
of R. . ese . nde + 475) Lee Dey. 
gale aes $2! B60: Re ve 
a ES 
war ide , =e — 
3! iain 10, 15% Down! 

FHA and Conventional 

Financing Also Available 


EXHIBIT HOME OPEN DAILY 
10 TO 10 


M.T, BROYHILL & SONS 
4624 Lee hwy., Ari. JA. 4-1300 
LURIA BROS., INC 


YArnYrax 
MIIDE-A-WAY | soe wien mira, asda, 28009 


ARTISTS, TIRED RDSINESS 36 MAN LYON ee ay Cot “with 
or a on poesenes | or peace. quiet : {Oene 

amy hantment that oes | nique pine paneled Livi 
please : 


0; 


BARCROFT 
3, 4, OR 5 
BEDROOMS 
CONTEMPORARY STYLE 
2 FULL BATHS 
2 FIREPLACES 
CARPORT OR GARAGE 
LARGE WOODED LOTS 
LAKE PRIVILEGES 
9 Miles Fram Washington 
Priced from $24,950-$26,950 


Tom nature, 
= ractive. oid 
beaut 


patio 


ve to por: sed AY 
i) 


51 
a ONTS. 
: 


st ¢r) 
this 


ae REALTY 


Wikon Bivd. JA. ?4m0 ‘Tu 9) 


eine CHURCH 
$15,800—GI 


a e se 
All rick. %3-bedreem: excelien' 
condition ‘ARLINGTON "REALTY 
The 272)2 Wil 7.9900 "Tu @ 
yw ARL—OWWNER a aan 
Here a hom aes be oroud 


son Bive 

7 

now for app 9 ahoe ‘so show vour frien 
DOMINION HIS 

Genti - 2 

—_—_ 


paite 
$)2 


NEAT & COMPLETE 


Saat CERTAIN SOMETHING 
i charm or etmosphere 
lovely secluded 0 
ead shoppine stone rambier 
nice bedrm-: huge kitchen 
Ortadie living rm Easy termes 


KRLINGTON REALTY 


rR Wilson Bivd JA. 7-9300 "*f) 9 
AREA—4615.45¢ 

She 

full 


lo! c lose se 
with 
cam 


By 


sunaee'! $1000 D 
eo seperate dinin $1000 Down - 
Bhewn vy : 


> 


f- e 
value 


own GI 
Yun REAI TY 


3 Bedrms., Den 
ONLY $11, 800 


A cule white bungslos righ 
Pals Church. only 6 Yrs 
better than new Modern 

’ 


Malai rs * MARTIN 
VIENW 


i 
wit Smal! Country Homé 
Ow CHAIN SRIDOR RD near 
- | Sys0e Tre - “ 
Same houses have sold recently for > 


@ much greater Price! & We sink it} DParains 
, Sf bargain. B JA. | 


COLONIAL REALTY co | 
ARCINGTON REALTY 


odes at Wilson 
city saa country 
DL BD- 2212 Wilson Bi 7-8900 “TY 
T }-473 


} wr STL ‘Wa 


war : 
RK: 
Nea 
in SS 


wee 


este ik 


tBiON. 


',- act 
2- ined | 
5’ 


# — 

Pover entrance, bookcas 
living rm. with frepiace 
dining rm, with fireplace ige 


rm. with huce wa ry 


_/ 


&, 
p | INEC REST 


inlop, 


PM 


it 
with Arep! ace 
: bath; ty es bu 
Asking $31.500 

m 


sOUTH “WOODLEY —Con tem porary 
lige. liv. rm.. fireplace. 10x12 din-| 
ing area, 2 ge bedrms.. | 
—/ weet disp 

re Ptr y bik 
akon $15.4 Assume 
414.000 MAR B MAQGU RE REAL. 

JA. 17-7941, 


Ae Post 


Kl 


= -De luxe 1.2, ORGEMS., 3\. 
baths Cony financi me 
onl COM ONWEALTH 30 
-8958 


GI, $20,000 


isa a brick capener. 


»-aecre 2 
aot 


WELL & REALTY 
2160 N 90C JA. 5-Q707 KE #-9950 


DOWN - 


atsume laree 4° j 
te of $107 mo. for this % 
3-bedroom home with 


54090 Lee Her 


NON-VETERANS 


FPALLS CHURCH AREA 


$350 DOWN 


WiLL 
IMMEDIATE 
THREE-BEI ROO 
TILED 
LARGE 
EQU 


Suburban 

ebout one d 

cellent condition: ciose to sohool, 
, transporte ion and new 

| sick posseesion 

Call now for appoint. 


| 


ment > show 
J. Wesley Buchanan, !nc 
JA. 4-1155 


~4 BEDRMS. | 
2 BATHS 


Sparkling. aimost new. solid brick | 
Cape Cod, on «a breezy fenced 

just minutes to Cc 

Bhirley hwy 21-f% | 
room with fireplace separate fam 
ily-sised ining roo bright 
ecuipped kitchen. high! DRY base 
ment: comfortable hot-water base 
board heat. GO! appraised at 620 

. but owner has to | 

WILL ACCES $18.250 
chance to ake a real 
well-built bran Al. * 
first and see 


Bo gh L. Walters. Inc 


19 Wilson Bivd Till 9. JA. 77-5200 


‘$950 DOWN 


To enyone This really 
steal) 3-bedrm 

large living 

Westinghouse 


GET 
POSSESSION 
M GAL 


LIVING Roo 
[PPED KITCHEN 
WIDE LOT 


CALL 

M.R REYNOLDS & CO. 

WHLSTON BHOPPING 2 abe 

4% iz. -Arhat 

fv OrinUL wire putt ts tOTY 
soceis oF 


te jot 
VA 


RAMBLER 


TODA 
|W 


oad Bt 


is 6 Falls Chur 
ea. 


ore 


Move ji in s Rakeane 
School Starts 


$1500 CASH 


FOR NON.V RANS 
are like 


price $16.4 $00 


) DOWN 


GT buy of the week 

contemporary rambiet i 
sement; carport mma culate | 

condition +f “approved. for $15.- 


$650 ‘DOWN, 


To anyone. 3-bed in | you move in im 
immaculate senaiticn on mediately qnd have your bide “2 
12,600 Call for details, tend ele mentary 


"$16,950 os 


loan Pull’ 
Imagine, this i the full 


pe ontA 
~ ined ded 


a 
office 


sa, YEONAS REALTY, 


or this beautiful 3~bedroom fam- | 2313 Wilson Bivd 8-2100_ 


WOODED 


PARKLIKE SETTING 


Solid brick rambler with oll the 
a 0 


can Duy it 
ag Ky PHA in Service. Call 


UN ge ton 


Delightful 3- pesrosm  * ram- 
r with full basement, luxe 

kitchen Ba eyeriave! nneed ; 
struction ; vente, 
ye Only 112 980. Foal JA. 


“5% DOWN. 


laree 


RL pETeRoR ates $a gC 
RAGE! Beautifu 3 lot 


deep with 
.Y PLANN patio aaa 
Hut arse a hts Toe onis 
ft is I contracts invited. 
rthur L. alters, Inc. 
“ee 2419 Wilson Blyd. ‘ttl 7-5 


tin on Following wy 2 


-_ oo 


No Down Pa 
10 qgtual -- A | 


yment 
for bedrm. bdrick hom 
fa fe area t 
ton mihiv 
uding taxes 


Realty, JE. 2-3110 


ay i 


aay BROPERTY 


Brick or frame wht or 
ort tlement Call wiulee | > 


= arms. bet = FS Tots mile net Be 


$690 CASH 


. ee Ey 


ARMS, LAND, SA 


5-ACRE FARMETTE 
FAIRFAX COUNTY 


ere are ove 
armeties 


an * 
ie 


ARE YOU 


ALERT 


“Arlington's Best 
mere ee AND GO ot Det 
Rere's wt what you've Took hearing [FY ACRES ee ‘0 yds 
—— new brick rambiers now) hard reed) phone me lights: 
fone it im Medison Manor acre a 
wi touts a doubt these are the most) 


tween | iret a os 


on 
$100 
white 
commun sth 


Te. 6 
NEAR WARRENTON 


Val vable property, 65 res , 
te trontace on ‘ee wT 


ai ten Miss 


Good et ine on Tene 
69000 oF . 
cal : tan F ken ‘4 


outstanding pone values in Arling- . 
tem tedary. All heave separate din- 
laree de luxe equinped'! 


‘erme 


Ww ATT 


lors FOR Sait 


men' 
veterans 


Arthur L. Walters. !nc 
2419 Wilson Bird. “Ti JA. 7-5200 


rh A. , to qualif ied 


youssy naTs 
hillside Jot idea! lv 
tectural designed spiit- level 

| Sewer water, ga6 and 
all paid for otal pr oe ) cay $2 
Phone now LO. 7-88 


A re ripe Tor subdivision, edi. 
ado 


o Gien Hil 
20 interchange at S cchville = 
gee ally loo Wie. ave 


OL. 23-1166 


. Lev 


syited ter prehi- | 


MASON HIRST 
Annandale i Prene 43 


HOME & INCOME 


ttractive mew brick duplex 
- bedroom 


2-54615 


VIRGINIA 
ALFx —anpeeers or builders. 4 lote. 
bioc ah 


r sell. Lote under) 
mercet vYelue. total price’ 
OV. 3-15 


LANGLEY AREA | 


Soveral weodes bullding | 
rom 2% eeres in 
_—. L6ewn- Leesbers Pike 
over > miles from Lene 
le w home owners pes S 
ae ead | 
ture, restrictions 
N 


24 
ORTH ARLINGTON” 
NEAR COUNTRY CLUB 


Tertine for the Oret time 


$8750-—_FULL. PRICE! 
ine’ ‘ . A Pe ed 


|} ‘ae is & niece older 
you fy 


jets are surround 
and are reasonadi 
se bie week. Por 

and sppeintm 


| ‘WM. W. JOHNSTON. | 
| CR. 3-2151 
| COL 


ULATE 


(AL REALTY CO. | 
Rhodes ot Wiison 2 Tus | 


NEW ALL-BRICK 
3-BEDRM. RAMBLERS 
NOW AVAILABLE AT 


BROYHILL PARK) gt 


nave Tull be mm plete 
Gb kntce ens. L epututu) wooded Lots ACREAGE, SALE 
ONLY $15,925 SAEYLANS 
Gi LOANS—NO DOWN °,A°RER WoopEP 


$25 
— Pi dP 
ai ca > — WATERFRONT, SALE 75A 


10% OOWN 30 YEARS | HIILLSMERE | 
SHORES 


Financing Also Available 
EXHIBIT HOME OPEN DAILY A MILLION-DOLLAR 
ESTATE ON SALT 


10 A. M. TO DARK 
WATER 


Directions 

yond 7 Now Being Subdivided inte 

ey Large Lots 

M. T. BROYHILL & SONS) 29 Miles from. Wash. 

4624 Lee hwy., Ari. JA. 4-1300| Where the Chesapeake 
Bay Meets the South 


UNIQUE 
COTSWOLD COTTAGE River 
Miles of sandy ~~ 


LA Should | 
urther informa. | 
ment te inepec | 


RED 


Select your home site among bean. | 
tify, shace trees n 
| ~ 
meee On 
to se eet 
unt > 
Moen BY - 


75 


——_ $500 


M Supper Ac 


+ Out Ari ipeten ee 
> approx. 2 oe 
craecss tw GCG sham rd 
ra... pleccs and eliew signs 


beautiful 
bos 


2-car carace 
on 1% acres of tr oes Ly: shrubs in 


Mannas Rity., JE. 2-3110 
~ 12 ROOMS 


$15 A MONTH | 
BY OWNER 


frame home in Ne 


waterfront 
<..! at P eee 


“MITE BROS. 
ORGANIZATION 
DEVELOPERS 
Hillsmere Estates, 
SALES OFFICE ON 
ere Always Open 


Ar 


Inc. 


> Jy 

basemen bh. | signs All roads 
ee kiichen, detached gerace and ocK— PINES 

wy is fenced ; Three = 

a dining rm 

Ht you rear screened 
us : seen anytime 
an 16. Write 3A 
owes ot Je 5. ST 10! vr prone wie 3 


Yeoco 

Westmore- 
ota 
Ween ore- 


River and 
crest 5 ~y Bendy Poir 
ers ior i2 acres) 
a! 

Jan 


iter "Bisley Boa 2 


195 DOWN 


Compile vely furnished. Nice liv 
fireplace. rms... dDath. lege 
ecreenec porch overlooking 


tus one! 


y-round hom 
4 get together on ete . 
briek Colonial 

New. masonry -built home wi ~~ view 
and use Of water 2 becr ze 
picture window “modern 
it screened porch 
Priced ht | 


heat rie 


73 D 
—"MARYLAND 2 


up 
e; sac 


facilities availapie 


2 
$ uppolevares chairs. 


TRA. ALI 
N 


.2 ee ALL, DAY MEATURDAY 


95 DOWN iy 


twits 


MABY's feeding ble, To 
BED.— Wal. spes. & innersps. matt. 
rxc_sond. HSN. BA_ te) 


mahe ¢€ 2m. 


Sate 5 ae Ro eT Sieter bed: ke 


Rg ey ® cond... rea- 


BED—Hollywood, $25; maple bunk 
beds wa Hiboy $85: love seat 
iT. 2-8546. 12 12 9, 


|*Samaition: “ih 3g ine. gyestiont 


\pawst. t padi, sous: lawn 


| a) for us * in shoe stere 
afe4 


ack cloth, persia lamb | 
~) “4 “Good cond a. 


iphone ee 


"My 
t eoriaine) Re 
ice, GaGa ; 
OND ri — ' 


eo 
rim. 
” 


cu 


paved streets | 5 


Peee| | pie. 


ave. 
DISH 


in FP 

vf 
right. E: year sverantee 
old ge: fice 


' YOUR OWN Tiss | 


chairs. book - 
other misc 


en Teebox. beds 


case Gresser: 


fn — BD 
chairs sofa, 


liv 


Ph vie table 
rm. cnaw 


‘ 
TT 
new 


aut 
ecutive Goer, none chairs 


as. DS 


leaving oot, | 
Wire Bice 


*. smal) 
baie Must yell 
ce also avellabdic 


rCEN y not furnish your apt | 
from our store Smith Storas 


“met-| 6 a 
2): | ae a Rew cont Ba86 | 


mattress, saprings expensive . 
sien ke construction. $76. REd.| 

: 
, chairs, 2-piece 


a \ con din if t 
welnut. ‘$60 ah vein, ‘s25 


FURNITURE 


BRAND-NEW 


sleepin 


ia 3-ROOM OUTFIT | 


LIVING ROOM [5 


BEDROOM 
DINETTE 
we give 


For the LIVIEG as 
Ger ~ 
you os first chotee 


: » 
built TABLE and MATCH.- 
ING CHA IRS 


3 ROOMS OF BRAND 
EW FURNITURE 


ONLY 3239 | 


ALPERSTEIN’S 
1020 7TH ST. NW. 


(AM- 
mee 
, top LS «Mh beat eats. OL. 
T Wagemaker runedout 
we and eh hp ele" sp0 
control, windshie 
Comp 


TRPRUE= ersten ear 


are 


A-1 CONDITION 
Caterpillar Auto Patrol No. 12 
Caterpillar D8 Bulidozer 
Caterpillar Scraper, Model 80 
3 Caterpillar OW 10's 
WILLIAMS 
CONSTRUCTION | co. 


clearance of oi wed mm 
consoles , 


er 6111 ave 

Bet Discicy inserts oil | JUST IN 

age ie a New WOBILEHOMES on our D.C 
| Hla "eet 


damack. te 


completely 
shower 
insid 

S5il pe 


water Heater handsome 
eatin finish. Only 62450 


ts one bee yt 
TV. Moterela <conmscle 
screen. inside tenna 


2 sae as. coomny "fine 
© ounss(ow 
bo. Me § hot- See 


$7 
"AMERIEATS 
co 


COME TO 
Qeen 2 t 
8p aie 


kit 
eater 


; TRAILER 
ts * § Seth. wr x newt «6 
is 6x1! 


We 
S: 8 Soxisé. 7 ) 
r 75 prion apply te! 


A 
3234 Ga. ave. oe. RA | 


White Been 3-8 
pi mi rea ot t 


etsy ior? 


9OA 


eneed under ' Loon Lewr 
ASK FOR Y IN | DAY 
On Just Your Signature 
Or Other Plans 


76 Or 
rginis 


aact $55 . 8634 Col 


\stest model. say S <own. ti 


ree hool. The G 
y aC v cM 
: - 


Use More 
ia 


Up te $1450 or 
im Maryland 


More 


for “fect, ' Pyptoet your Credit Rat. ‘ 
overdue = er lower your 
month! ts 


mperia! 


: utomatic. “55 model: 
2 a Lo. 


mos best offer. ;. 
men. marr or 
on sulte oF Tursiture. 
PHONE, WRITE OME IN 
gs Py fier & mn. Af. 
. dAackson 
° . Alemendria. 


7-3237: i066 WW 
in hte 5 ne.s O07 Per 


OVerilook 

Mt 

Reinier, UNien 4-2660 , Geor- 
" + pron 


JU. Be 
+ ® re «ave. 
-6800 


ain, ood 
Oo 2 ond re 
7-0513 al Te 6-2977 
. boy's, weed, good cond: 


BOOKS —ARy ; 


5 a | 
sa eae it Lee 


or ete osed 
URNITU RE hago 
15 LI 0588 


in Next Column 


PERSONAL LOANS 


Licensed ander Email Loan Lewes | 


CONFIDENTIAL 
LOANS BY PHONE 


On Your Signature Only 
Suburban Finance Ceo 


4608 East-West Bev. © 


iss RL hve 


\y Block Above ©. Y 
ILDIN AIR: “6 SONDITIONED 
D M TOSP M 


HORA? bse i 


a 


| 
| 


S—724 Persian lamb skins 
Y sloie. never used. PL, 4-87 
AS RAN } 
eed: lowest prices 
' a py. MA. 8 

Caloric 

pelt -Gefrosting r 
~5314. 


Jd 
HEATERS, BANGES — ew 
(Cras. Ol) 


Norge 
JE 


_* office or ealli« 


vc ‘SCHWARTZ 


oe rs. FRONT 


Guite frankly we feel 


“POMPONIO 


INTA'S REALTY LEADERS 
24 Wilson Bivd. JA. 71-6660 ‘th 


GARDENER’ <BELIGAT 4 


eres pe Ay ‘ beaut ifu! 
Pe " 


COLONIA A ater-| 
front cottage, sleeps 6. Also boat. 
JA. 2-6867_ : 

. room bungalow. All 


and fishing: aval 


ie% ori : 
16.500: siready 


Mannas R 


re"! neeets Catonie) 


equipped kitchen 
ges, Bee 


aso bey: 
ath, BOT 


bee CPs. bik 


ibe a 


VALUE PLUS! 
LANGLEY, VA. 


A ime cheice area of 
3-bedrm . 


i 
“ a out of -y pose 
Ss. A amp- “ane 
wormed & shot. 5 


Boxee PUPPIES—_Pomale. beautl- 
aw 10 wks.: AKC: champ 
pedigree, KI 9-6954 or KI 9-1609. 
Cor KER SPANIEL puppies. AKC 
ree show stock. 12 weeks. 
on 


Jann 


tit. split-level ai 
Dining rm 
in kitehen.| tes 
in fin- i. 
14x22 


ver _ Ms per bred. 838 oF best offer. Wine ~s 
BE iy pa ccttan kasi amen Ren mi 
YEONAS REALTY | sitiintts ere 


4 real | 

2313 Wilson Bivd. 3A 8-210 | MATIANS—AKG tee. @ 

INVESTMENT sntltods Sit Rae rman 
puppies. Boxer & er breeds 

Gi MAN. ~ SHEP RE 


- 


New Home and Income 
2-Family Duplex Home — 
LIVE IN ONE—RENT ONE 
Incorne Pays Expenses 
ew brick house: 5 6F Sac dnt : 


yedera kitchens 
ti Poca Demi. onc all necesesary papers 
ah 2 te e es child w 
ine: 1 Wash os tear 
FAA nae rope nove 


In House 


$13 22 Ari 
DANIEL 


8 
E. 


4 ate 


MALCOLM 


pt 


PTA! ij 
é ygheaboaabe 


3144 Mest aw NO. 7 
~g and box springs. 
excellem 


fra 
' 5ee 188 he 
isd G68 yet 


he SF pinet ss Fen 
4 ae ‘six to sei) at 

SALES CORP. 

antight gaeel lent 


clai purohase. Fine’ 
$445 1, eid 
G st. 


ee epimers 


—Brand-new standard make 


vertised price 
nish, 10-year peeren- 


. Hauling ents, Good es 
o akes. Also many ¥ 


¥en Pith" eae 


(just above 


WOMEN’S LOANS 
Our Specialty! 

WE CAN MAKE 

YOU A LOAN IN 


2 Hrs. ‘xn 


SUITLAND 
4617? Suntiand Road 
PHONE sOrdan &.8c° 4 


BETHESDA 
. $44 Wieconen Ave 
PH HONE OLiver 6-7698 


SILVER SPRING 
B4A1 Coleeville Rd. Ind F! 
PHONE. Rinioes 8-4208 
Ave.. Ground Floor 
ONE. JUniper §-4400 
MT. RAINIER 
“235 Rhede leland Ave. 2nd 
PHONE. UNien 4 sree 


CLA PENDON-ARLINGTON 
3159 Wiison Bivd.. 2nd FI 
PHONE: Os Ad 56-4474 


ALEXANDRIA 
627 King St. Qnd Pleo 
PHONE: King 92016 
In (he Clarendon end Alesendrva of- 
fices loans are limiuled te $300. I nier- 
est charges are 2\4% monthly on un- 
pard balances 


- Get your hear herve od ' ar 
Phere fret—erwe 2 few somple 
facts about yourselfl—vpen ep- 
prove’, come m te peck up cosh. 

Extrat Bill Corselidstivon Ser- 
ece now avaiable wiihowt entre 
covt or obligatron Empleyed mea 
ord women —marned or tngie— 
presse, wrete, af come om today’ 


7014 Geor 


eeeeeeeeeeteeeeereeeee © 
eeeereeeveeee ee eeeeeeeeeeree 


706 KING STREET 
and Fleer + Alerandrie 
Pheme: King 6-6558 
Pees erer-nas — prese te te 9 
Cees mete We centers of OF cereuetne eee 


* 


oo 7% 


MORE BILLS THAN YOU 
CAN PAY? USE OUR MONEY 
TO SETTLE THEM IN FULL 


Repay on terms 
to suit you and 
your pocketbook 


SIMPLY PHONE FOR A LOAN 


LOANS UP 
TO $1500 
College Pork, Lexing- 
ton Pork end Falls 
Church (Ve.) up te 
$300 ently. Ali leons 
over $300 made under 
the Meryland Indus- 

triet Finance Lew. 


General Q. Acceptance 


MT. RAINIER — 3510 Rhode Island Avenie .. 
MYATTSVULLE — 5303 Baltimore Avenue... Te! UN 46200 
’ iMext te The Het Sheege) 
COLLEGE PARK — 4503 Knox Rood ....... Tel UN 40058 
(Across from The Het 
SILVER SPRING - 7912 Georgia Avenve ... Te! WU 7-6900 
LEX. PARK ~ 150 N. 3 Notched Rood .. . Te! Great Mills 367) 
oe en ens S. A. C. Finance Corporation . 


Tel. AP 7-2800 


ed 
— 


fur- 
hot - 


_ a 
Come 4 
MOBILE. 


per 


eS, a 
ae eat 7 


-m vannette 
of a 


Fg nai te only 
NK SMALL JR. sped 


ene pickup ‘ote -ton 


MANDELL 
TRUCKS 


‘'S2 CHEVROLET $595 
} aad sedan detiverios. Real 


a CHEVROLET $445 
‘S) CHEVROLET, $1295 
od. 16-f 


$795 
. See 


setnwennens 


a 


ok: toi sib ot BS 
a oa piedens. 


ne oie BM. 


ere & & EL+ 2008 Sine fre 
2411 Bedenctere Ae #4 


trucks wan 
ocks and at 


Cadillacs Wanted | heen 


PENNY MOTORS 
1620 B. 1 Ave NE LA 6-900 


CASH FOR CARS | 
PENNY MOTORS 


to oe 


- 


Fosr Wie a . 


b~ 4 
ver 


a Comer, a 


ia 
own 
car a 
at at) 
261 2 ‘Dose a\ 


on 
B74 : 


Will Pay Up Tor: 


CLARK 


loom © CAPITOL & PLA AVE NE 


CARS 
WANTED 


Bir was 


2 RL Ave NE DU 17-8900 
P| Cars Needed for 


EXPORT 


BO » p Vib} 3 Rite 
| Barbee on ae 


BLAte & CPaRK 


TU. >. 4200 


BILL ROSS 
7400 GA. AVE. NW. 


— «= ree 


CASH FOR CARS 


High prices for clean cars, static n | 


local 


Ba 


“7 


top: 
“AL OF N MOTORS 
caper 


com Ww 


ds Co. 


Fe pear 
he : 


7020 Ari, Bivd.. Beth oO 
ae st, 100 9 per week 
D 
ell i bay 

Susarnate otors, Inc. 
14th & Pa. Ave SE. Li ‘166, 
a i Super con vertidie: t. 
eae 2 wer cinaowe. wane and 
’ 1045. 

237 


U 
BU 1CK_—1989 Special 2-door: r 
reduced ont 


¢ ' 
ty: Faoee. 
s. 39- 
“—— 


ne 
m evenines ‘ti * wae 
BT Ck 1942 sedan: runs end looks 


Special price. 


ee ANOLE (PORD) 


cellent transportation. 
No O94-A 
Wis. ave 
_evenings 


‘49 BUICK 
$387 Total 


7 week: | owner 
like 


$245. 
FORD. $100 
a's.” vo. 6-2000. Open 


| Corner W. Capttel and Fis. Ave. FE 


nT 


ES Cadillac-Olds Co. 


‘Ao BUICK 
$8 Dn.—Total $288 


R and h.. A-1 condi 
easy monthiy saguneaka 
for credit’ appre 


MAJOR MOTORS 
—2LA_NICHOLS AVE. 88. 


| STOP! . LOOK! 
‘52 BUICK 


SUPER RIVIERA 


$95 DOWN 


Take up emeli monthiy caym 
2-dr ivory orth whi’ Re 


reem and 
Ey winged With rv 
tires ynafiow uted aioe 


Ne@w-car condition have 
4-doors to choose from Attention 


guarantee 


MILLER MOTOR 


316 Pieri¢a Ave. NE. Lit. 42996 


| SEICK—1052 Super Rive 2-tone 
finish. Dynafio r ch @.-@ 
tires 


AKERS 


really 


ésiy 
OLDS. sie So, S88 


‘93 BUICK 


Super Convertible 


* over smal 


sae éubw whrre 
ot 
oe ” her Care te Choe 


m 
IMMEDIATE APPROV AL 
| * AND COUNSEL CALL 


LI. 4-4552 


OPEN § TO 9 


BURRELL 
MOTORS 
rT ‘i 


ty. > Y= 
VICEMEN’ ts 
TOWNERS 


BUICK—'S? Riviera Hardtop. Fin- 
power ns —y whit 

One of the nicest 536 in the 

Guaranteed 

nd ask for BILL 


Stohiman reteset 
3270 ¢. Ww uO.7 L722 
50 Special 3-dr + 2 
ae “TOW 5 & COUNTRY “SAL 


Wie ea ae 


Dyna iar black fin.; far above 
sversce conc. in every 
eperec! ate $495 
th & R 


care 
Mb ey pickups. A A make mode) | 


" WOLFE MOTORS 


Wis, Ave, NW. EM 3-0 


$50 MORE 


for ‘49s thru ‘S5s. a} 


199) 


| elf 
 SUFOMOSILE SALE 
| Ree —Prefect Tees ene peat | 


cars end trucks TRIUMPHS 
GIFPORD’S 
2501 Columbia Pike. Arlington 
5-922) 


new -car “guarantee 


Aver 
e8s wuen 4.000 
ros signai ij 

95 " Lareest se 
American cars 


Lt 
ey Exe Cadillac-Olds Co. 


wre 
_ Must sacri- 
4-dr.. R 


"SRY Gite | , 


hoe Eh 
6th. LL 6-6464 
7-3993 


A 
eA 
wi pe 


HORNER’ 


Pia reas NE at 6 
Lili) 14th + niown! Di 


‘53 BUICK 
RIVIERA 


$885. TOTAL 
NOTHING DOWN 


with a great nd oi job. he 


gs wi S890 
“ane bis Lot ‘on the Comer” 


models 
7 Motors for New York ave | 
7i 


i4i. | 
~| 


| ‘55 CADILLACS 
$695 DOWN 


gonvertibie or Coupe Deville 

mile Best —e 

Ah n 

) qut- Be ait 
cThec 


BLASS & ‘CLARK 


Cor. N. Capitol & Pia... Ave 


a 
ree financed or cre 


ada. Bt dan. Strik- 


He ra- 
ccc 


| ing 2- tone 2 ‘feud 
ciyeing radip heater, 
tires. $6§1995. 


St. 


= nieve 
dra- Matic RY indir sow Bow: 


i 


pas 
eluding 


Eapitol -adillac: eld Co, 


7 on 


- 
matic transmission. 
ing, elpetric os ows 


Suburban Cadillac Co. 
at o;sepe sreen oi : aii 
a Mat c ‘ tues =e and 


Suburban dillac-Olds 
thw Oke £- 


a 


2- 
ont Trawaune truly fine 
| GPhone CO. 


Ent TH 


ris 


ig, ee 
~~" §2 a= : pe 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
eooon Wednesday, August 31, 1955 _ 43 


“150 CADILLAC. 
COUPE De Ville 


ar 
sole D 


io. bee , ene owne 


__ ts Sige 
‘52 CADILLAC 
$95 DOWN 
Be Rare fe) 
BLASS & “BARK 53. CHEVROLET 
Corner NW. Capitol and Fis... Ave REPOSSESSED 


| GARE $586 FULL PRICE 
CONVERTIBLE | S28 


eovers. Terrific go 4 
“ot. Soe a gy wit no dome 
$595 DOWN 3s: 
Piawless white finish 
Cadi: Iae. equipment 
‘ep eat tak.” 
on? AUTO CENTER 


sts. nw. Complete sales 
dept. for vour cen- 


and termes 


Savy Chase wee 


725 Wisconsin A 


CADTIAAC—190S4 “62” 
tone blue, very 


. faliy 
eau tneteding | Pk es 


r &£& kk pow and 
brakes. as outa’ tanding velue. 


AKERS OLOS-CADILLAC CO. 


ov} ter 


: v 
ty ii em Pye 2. 
sedan. fist Bel } a 
at- 


ttively sige. areen 
millon 


or ractive ”d-tone fine 
a RBLLAe to, 


pots very we 
AKERS OLDS-CA 
Bhopping Center 
BES DA 
WAS $995--NOWw $895 
$150 DOWN 
EASY GMAC TERMS 


cellent hive a ish: ter end 
eT extras oro , recone 


LBBISON"CHEVROLET 


4th ond Ave 2-7500 


~ CHEVROLET—1952 
WAS $1095—NOW $995 


axe convertible 
A” teal she red 
sharo 


a 


ine) r. & A. ‘aones 


! on nk 
Te AND RIA. — ne 3 bas0 


car at « ‘real 


Addison Soap se 


4th & Fis. Ave 


r “CHEMO ES he 
WAS $!745—NOW $1495 
$175 DOWN 


“50 C D. EASY GMAC rene 
62" 4-DR. SED. | rate segeminaga” rk 
REPOSSESSED | fe Seam, 
$799.10 TOTAL | ASDISON"CHEVA 


an rs Ave NW RO 2.7500 
yr | oun and take over payments 
ar" Beate Feet CHEVROLET—1954 
LH cai WAS $1695—NOW $1495 


x aelivery tor 
credit - 
$175 DOWN 
NA. 8- 3571 EASY GMAC TERMS 


CHARLIZE MACK'S 


RELIABLE 


isi ©. ¥ dF NE 
Ls t and ¥. Ave 
ock east of MN. Capite 


auto- 
ow heater. 
beet — ne 


run 
at this rs ie 


nroughout low ‘mi 
evaranteed 
Addison Chevrolet 


14th & Fis. Ave. NW HO. 2- 
OPEN FVENIN 


—CHEVROL 
WAS $1195-—NOW $995 


real sharp 2-dr. sedan equipped 
r Varn signa 


Cc 
, 


or NE 
| 
7500 


sc. & 
excellent 
Addison Chevrolet 


ita & Te Ave. NW. HO. 32-7500 
PEN EVENINGS 


“CHEVROLET —1953~ 


WAS $1445—NOW $1345 
Be ants u 


d 4-<¢ 
bes ful blue 
interior A iow mi. i-o 

Use veut present older model for 
éown payme 


Addi ison Chevrolet 
Mth & Ave ke HO. 93-7500 

"Ser a. check oii Peet OLET 1953 ~ 

BLASS & CLARK! was 51 ee bake $1045 


Cor. MN Capitel & Fis. Ave. KE al Alr as ‘ae iene om 


— 


‘50 CADILLAC 
$1] 9S—$95 DN. 


| Take up paym 
ures 


other ext a 
oneal lent "tires. acy 


Addison Chevrolet 


i4th & Fa. Ave. ©W. HO. 32-7500 


CHEVROLET 1951 
WAS $845—NOW $795 
s vielupe ‘ 
Hid ‘ 


CHEVROLET—'49 Pieet 
2-door. Excellent 

| interior. equipped wi 

transbortatio 


e De Lex 


er ae " 
cost ony Ss ‘$5 a 

NO. 7-721 an ask for BILL DRY. 
MAN 


Stohiman Chevrolet 


Bieck finish. 


” Addican Chevrolet 
't lth & re, Are Be. nO 32-7500 
ut can s 2h ni 
Low CHEVEOL! heat e, 
sired al) NO hea : : 2 pape No 
a and ask for SILL Yuan Esahe 70% ORD 30-¢ =f 
tohiman Chevrolet bey... Si, BD Md aU 
auie 


MECHEVROLET ota CHE VROLET—1952 Siyleline de 
WAS $1650—NOW $1395 et aah te 
$175 DOWN 

sASY GMAC TERMS 
push - butt son 

bn, : 

1- owns 

app throuchout 

felt “warrenty r you will be 
Fees CHEVROLET 


14th and Fila. Ave NW. HO. 2-7500 
QPEN EVENING 


‘92 CHEV. 


toned 


came off the aosemeyy thee — 
5 seen: 
4.-A 


* 


12 
. Md. oes evenings 
* ; 


CHEV ROLET— 54 De Lax ar. 
2.300 miles: like new. $1 05 rite 

te sugrap tee 
IA wOLE (PORD) 
18 ae a’ DE 
HEVROLET _ 1983 
“heater. 


radio 
be ge 
car 
2-6 302 


"210" 4-deor, 
new seat covers. 


evenin 


| | Wt RoLet 


12 down “oh up balance at 
Sst. pe: a 


- Ps credit ap- 
Seen call 


MBA ASSY MOTORS 


4Tu pt AND MASS AVE. Nw 
pen a.m. ti go 


ave. 


R 


ithe"? 336 Wis nw. 
CHEVROLET— 7 ta 


now 
Motors 


5304 Ge. ave. aw 


orker 
4-dr "Automatic transmission 
. new we. tires. new — — 
covers. Onty 
' a this one. $95 iowa ‘4 
HA ATES FE al co. 
Nadensd 

‘ ‘or - 


ew 

xe 4-dr Pow erfiyte. pawer brakes 
235- persspower engine. heater, 2- 
tone blue and ivory matching blue 


this one. Never another 
bargain HAINES MOTOR 


‘54 CHEV. Spotless original Bi 


sutiful ¢ pen finis with 
a J rai inet" 
eering.. -W. 


REPOSSESSED 


by finance company: pa. down 
| @ take wp payments ‘onvertibdle. 


“TRV” MARTIN 


i2th & . NW 
NA 6-4455 


extte cles and mec 
perfect: : 


aulppe, iboed wits 


apitol ¢ 


7 Epanens, be 
sv 
a te sold. we 


or ° 
et Ready te 
‘OR CO. 900 M st. LL. 
ALCORN MOTO 


—— "$6 Coro 
very nice losking. ¢ 
& Be ny oy . 8336 Wis. 


good ru inping — 


=e '52 CHEV. Sane 


Total Price, $369 -: 
NO.MONEY DOWN 


PA me $34 LOW As 


ma SS 


ustom 
seat a = "ae initely top quality 
TAN ( ‘yn 


ee covers: | FX 


othe 


eae 


arrest ES orc 


MOTORS 


\ 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
44 Wednesday, August 31, 1955 


good ; 
: 5) CATALINA 
$334. 19 Total 


mY 
' slack and down. ‘ana 


ke up be anes }. st mo 
EMBASCY MO cal ofr’ et 2 


oh # one epare a*s, 
Seen 8 tit 


1+ N 
AL £1209: bank TN ey u. ave. 
OTOR CO. 4000 Qs. ave, oi 


‘53 MERCURY 
Monterey Bec. 
$985 Total 
NOTHING COW 
| fe eaten 

E3890 
Taste an ans gut “Frcalient we = "BOB WI LSON 


na K ele fe 
. _i* The a tt on the Corner.” 


NOTHING DOWN! 


| "49 Raiser Traveler 8° 
Ade Miss sth *& Penna 
Ll, 4-4441 for « 
rites. +. and 
cog ercomatic drive Boecial. 


“ALCOR N v MOTORS 


Mus! a | 
od, 
roap.- 1951 Vv. 8 club coupe 


ee “athe se 
a2 © ‘ew ce | omatic. Fr, and ‘dish: PORD—i8s4 Gustomline V-8 
mires. ", Weak os new ats. | | glacier bine: ty lly . eeu 


ALCORN MOTORS | teak be exiremely ea 
e020 LEER HWY ' 


P ABL. VS. __-4B_2: 030 | FRANK SMALL JR., 
and fh.. seat covers; tires like new. 


ALCORN MOTORS 
4920 LES oni Oe 
Ake 1985, 5-foor 


wy at Aika rand 
. ALCORN: MOTORS 


‘54 aga 


RI Je, 2-s050 
FORD 1954 
WAS $2045-——-NOW $1895 
° evt Ley  peee Pordomatic. 
Hardtop * ivory & dart} 
Custom Line V-8. 
SIGN " 
ry Tonk ee iL :: roan 1953 Cystom 2-400 
es a bat matching eat covers 6 mt a OP oD 


&& 
Bish be — “trade & Racy 
a 
never af trunk FRANK SMALL JR, 


Addison Chevrolet 
200 Penns. Ave. BF 
im Mr le & O 
| ; * ing ieee 


(th & Pls. Ave NW. MO. 2.7500 i 
REPOSSESSED 
TAR bead Be 'S- an eoniy 


hm 
5) VICTORIA Stata eel 
$379.16 Total. 


st ever payments 
os ae ered 
ate * * -tene finish 
u; 


approval. cl 
Jett OM Motors sa 
oe Take 4 at aft 4) F beautiful sea mist nine 


! and 
eh, Bt ‘ iorcegee: ‘ss oath i extremely 


Baeky MOTORS 


MASS ave nw. | 
‘th 3 ® F 


| BS WO | 
° art v eo 
ast- Beat er 


‘S3 MERCURY 
$785 TOTAL 


2. } Mere & : 
5 ond ry my pa 

Golivers Foieoune n & out x towners 
pances. or credit check call A 


BLASS & CLARK 


Cor. 6. Capitel & Pia. Ave, NE. 


ave. ni 


| door, aut 


fe pea tose Fane fatgt ae 
s3@ | oe i. erdbe- 


Big. BO now Mw a 
Benbow 
- fp green wit ) rr 
! other acce his 


resin 


| 3900 Penna Ave. ne 
ae 


ha 
aculate cond. 


sy tic. 


AND a JOR" 


Supermatic Motors, Inc. | 
Adin & Pa. Ave. OF. Li. 4-4090. 


STOP! LOOK! 


‘S53 PONTIAC 
$195 DOWN 


ake A. 2 ™, alt monthly povene nt 
lex 4-dr 


| Kamsen— ise - luxe 4-d00r: © 
& 6.4.: ceptionaliv clans 


money down 


ak +4 eter Fast- West ay ; 


jadens>ure rd. -6506. - | . 
~ _ private own- Roe SRD, at 5-7804. eves 
bat 2 ads 13 
> bed pore"? y coupe, Rich cream. Anis finn ton’ B08. vies Rk 
mate WO. #:8400.— cial Ca Cadillac-Olds Co. na tre tn a 
et obi otniLe ~ ese Sn” deluxe 


th hapa a ee mi, . Bt) Fr i Batt ee 
RAMBLER _| Capitol Cadila 


PLYMOUTH—1953 |" 
2 = WAS $1495—NOW $1345 | 
$5 DOWN luxe f _ » h 
Rardtop atone Gn enn. ae 2. roen. 


Beivedere. v.Ah 
@-% ck LF oval | 
is Per aul 2 it approve ie 
Stacy Motors | v= 
220 i¢ Ww distinguished green finish » Pa) 
PM equipped Uitramatic, r. 


55 MERCURY Govern m Ba | NOTHING DOWN! | AKERS Se capuLac co. 


m ee Fs ll Pact TaN M BR os 2 Ma Marra Saat ”. 
, RN MOTORS 


ae. “ 316 Florida Ave. WE. LI 4-2306 ‘ 
we. 2-9080 


Kee 2 wt oreiiiicl Supe wt 
NOTHING DOWN 


ey PEAS 
‘52 MERCURY — 
MONTEREY 
SPORT COUPE 
$45 DOWN 


Tve- tone blue. Mercemetic: r & 
tint ciase. Very low milease 
ew-car condtticn ey =. 


ne, nas 
Ask about = By p trial and es eur 


| preva Zell Li 's-oape fT acai 
"BOB WOODS 


1112 Biedenshere Ra. WE 
Oven 1) 5 


wk oval 
ve blue 7 visor Uinved glass ‘> t- 
net mi tir &h 


ave. Nienenaria.” eX 


down Ask about 
ueranteer 


MOTOR CO 


Pieridae ave ne Ld. 4-2996 


STOP! LOOK! 


in . 
| siamals. ete: 


‘54 MERCURY 
Monterey Hardtop! » 
$295 DOWN 


Ana take up small moenthiy par 
ents. Me equip... 


af 
E 
: 


rest. West Vos 


i it averarive. | 
| & F.. tern signals Nice and clean 
8395. 


TRIANGLE (FORD) 25909 
joie BR. Late. ne. Dm. 32-8902 


his me Blink re Pre =. 
4- i 


SURREY, 
MOTORS 


fe cercleanen and out-af Lowners 


OUR 
Reputation 
DEMANDS 


THAT WE SELL YOU A 


“SAFE BUY” 


AT THE 


Right Price! 


COME IN AND SEE 
For Yourself 


es ow. 2095 


Tinton Ceral Bo 


ltthaé “Wat tele nw “on 2-7800 
_ NOTHING DOWN 


“47 Piymeath 4-dr 
Ll. 


sed. 
4001 for « 
a. Ave SE 


TRS OY MOUTH 
REPOSSESSED 
$328 FULL PRICE 


on. Beautiful black 
r or 


ner 
fast 
Nash 4- 


adr 
Cail Li. 4-4441 _ , Fe Y eoait 


any eet creat 


atthe ks ane runs 7 ES Se. 
is Soe Alt IR. ine | BL N. Capitel & Pie. Ave, NE. 


“4TH ST AND 
Open 3 4. @ 


’ 
‘5 pe 
4441 tar test} 


SS Pisce club sedac 
wo-tone. navy & dive 


1796 Good Hope Ra. SE a, 1-960 


40 Packard, 


-400 
Spotiess and ik ‘ke new’ $1995: th 


a Lfetime Paul's 


. : Rear 
—— beater. i-driver, serfect 
numerous other hu amily car. ’ with Aretic white 
dreds ot ligt or Saas toe. Wester. defresters. ete 

Af 
oo = Me 3 A Meany others te Groce From = 4500 wetges miles. Spertr, top 
*.48 


(nton MS OR TRA ) nse 
Supermatic Motors, Inc PLYMOUTH *49—$395 ] 795 


ARCADE PONTIAC + ‘SS PLYM. §$ 
tin & Pa. Ave. SE. Li 4-4000 Luxe Sedan: eoutpoed AD. 4-ah00 : va” 
aa — Svers fimish 
ters. tires 


Weeh's, Largest Pentiae Dedier * 
. a side and _for 14th St. Let Mag I 
7 oer mont 
Lo Price CARS Ae — —_— 
MOTORS. 1991 ine. Ave 
“e “ t-tene creen 
’ Lastgeer 2-tane S —*, : 


is 
cone wo @. tires f «@ 
pewer « ane 

} one owner. 81 


be Rete eteneeenee ear rors «ee 


Stuert. 
» sean tt. oer 


& 
veer: FC. ingen war. 106% ave. ae 
18 DOWN AND A 308 


_ IWS GREAT 
TO ‘HAVE 
‘YOUR OW 


CONVERTIBGE 


7 

51 CHEVROLET 
The baxe convertitie. vrellew “oe 
bietk toe. power clide. ©. & 
seat covers. ture slenals ont 
many other extras. Leeks ond 
rens Whe new 


$745 
FRANK SMALL JR., Inc. 


1796 Geed Meee Bd. LT. 1-9647 


short . 


as tax! car. | 
A 


fi eta Bt er re, EE ER 


g008 r’ canih 
"4 >- "$3 Buick 


ES osewe ater 
rdtes 


sedan fieht om ni nr 
very clean throyebout : 
Suburban Cadillac Olds 


+m 
ms +P 

sit nee . 

after 5:30 


jOUTs— so a luxe 3-2: 
new plastic covers looks 

rums like new. 895 down. $277 

mo HAIN BS MOTOR CO. 

la@gensbeura réd. ne 


‘53 MERC 5.27 oes Mh Besar 


Monterey Hardtop ee Senet af 
Sport Coupe paacvt are A 
HARDTOP 


Washington Post RADIO. NEA TEA 


and PAINT WITH MaTC 
Times Herald * pais, Dow's 
For the Best 

Used Car Offerings 


= s* ote. 14.008 act. mi.: 


x ¥ 095: 


"53 

t alloyer - A 7 : ‘ 
§ kreen Aaih, :s * 8... premio at 
«* tires, Grromatic ar... ote. 4 
x One-owner Share o¢ «& tack 


ime 519953 


. Bocstat hardtes 
bed>. tet black - 


Rivtera convert 
Matader 
@ tee. rn -4 and Catvecter. Ce « 
ete act 
, wi» be hard ‘ dontionsa 


FORD $99 5; 


Castemmne 
fin. 
. a Wadrice. ete 
eo as S75 , Pall price ‘ 


1 MERC. . $79 5; 


cas) 6a ving >= 
“dri rustom- ‘es > , core: : 
ete. Share as 68 


‘S3 MERC. 4 695: 


Menterery Bard- 
-tene fateh. Z - 
matic. 


ROYAL MOTORS 


4160 Geerete Ace. NW. 
TA. 9-988 
CHRYSLER-FPLYMOUTSE. 
IMPP RIAL 


"33 Mercery 


Cestom Rare Tee 
-tene mareen 
: “seat corer. 
& * tere sienale 
Mear ether sceeneeries ' 
driver, vers teow mileage 


FRANK SMALL JR. 


B°08 Penna. Ave. SF. Lt. t- 


‘SO CHEVROLET $5 
pOFrN 


- ge estes x & & 
‘ tives. > -tene. 
7 1 “ty ewner 

CARR MOTORS 


518 Fe. Ave. &. BE. LA. 7-0006 


TRANS. 
ete 
Reel 


PACKARDS } 


Prem “640 te Sée. A bede 
strlen. One-ewner care! 4 


COVINGTON MOTORS ¢ 
7301 Wis. Ave. (Beth.) : 


rea ¢ Lar ad ~~ Deaser_ > 


BURRELL 


Sins 
"Po M aM LA Te “AP a | 
| cS 


OPEN ‘To 6 BENNIN ap WN =. 


BURRELL TREE Fon’ SER VICEMEN A 
MOTORS | 


"54 BUICK $2397 


Super 


OF-TOWN 


"53 BUICK $1747 


Serer cenvertible 


'S2 CHRYSLER $1195 


Windsor Cenvertidte. RAR. 
Pinidmating @rive. &-@. trem, 
bleck Buick; low mileese. 


McKEE PONTIAC 


“PONTIAC MEANS McKEr” 
$335 Wisc. Ave., ST. 3-7107 


*S1 PONTIAC 


Cenvertibie: +. sed bh... Hrére- 
Matte. AN Weather interior 

ish. 8.0080 ro miles. 
Like new. Really 


McKEE PONTI Ac 


“PONTIAC MEANS MeKrE” 


5335 Wisc. Ave. ST. 3-7107 


. $595 


"$2 CHRYSLER 


Imperte! Club coupe. Nicely 
eeuipped. 81794. 


ROYAL MOTORS 


4100 Georgie Ave. NW. 
TA *%-teee 
Chrveter -Pivmeeth- 
Imoeertal 


fresters. Pewer brakes. 


EMERSON A ORME 
(BLICK) 


eh 2 Mw MM. NW, Dt. 7.8196 


Our One and 

; bewtiia RD NF 
ATTENTION’ Immediate Anancing | 
for servicemen and out-of-towners | 


1tth ond M St. N. W. DT. T-8196 


convertible 


STOP! LOOK! 


Tan 


"53 MERCURY "se CADILLAC 


"51 FORD ...$745 ‘48 STUDE. 


Convertitie. : “ey ~ = oute. CONVERTIBLE 
~~ This & «@ Sent RFAL sPoRTY CARE 


$195 
HERSON’S 8th & 0 


t-4300 


4] 


with red int. 
share 


Palmer Ferd 


Hrattavttte. Ma 


Wa 7.8977 
Wa. >-0008 


‘53 OLDS 
"88" CONV. 
$295 DOWN 


“ke UP 66mal) CUM Al 7 my 


cer. 


*S2 PLYM. 


Cambridce tpert 
sedem. He 


PL eeeereroersctos * 


tee 
‘Ask ter 
, ae cCsetp ‘te brigtars 
wa wh 


TEMPLE MOTOR CO. 


Aletandria. Ve. Al #-4802 
1916 Disgenal R4 


‘55 Plymouth 


*1595 


Pleze coupe. Lew Mile- 
age. New car werrenty 
and title. 


MARYLAND 
MOTOR CO. 


Tle KE. Mentgemery Ave. 


Rockville, Md. 
OL. 4-6500 


DeSoto-Pigmonuth Dealer 


Open ‘Til 9 


eur ve 
LP hard te io Dootente fer entry 


‘$2 DESOTO $895: 


2 _ 
Silver’ sone — finish. ¢ 
h. “stem «. covers. 
antie trans ete | 
Remartkab'’e valee 


"52 FORD 


Mv ae 


‘74 BR. 1. Ave 
S116 Hamifien 8 And = 


‘ 
. ) 
mitite: 

$3595 .e. and Ceovetrnment ary 
grades— | 
bout | 
‘ 
‘ 
: 


wth redle 
tires, off 


‘SO PONTIAC 


Cenvertibie. Eavie. 
snd beater. ©.-* 
Excetient condition. 


McKEE PONTIAC 
“PONTIAC MEANS MeKEE” [| 
$335 Wisc. Ave., ST. 37107 


$1295 
Ly rcee. Sew 
& kh. evtematic 


‘53 Ford 


pnrersese 


"52 BUICK $1197 


Seser Convertible. Matader red 
New Meck ees | + 
ooks 


"S51 Buick $950 


freee flinickh. ¢. & & DPree- 
flew tinted clase. Only 14.008 


Stewart Buick 


1405 Witeee Bived. Ari. 
sa. 5-3508 JA. §-7381 


Ask ’ 


MATER "MOTOR CO 


13.6 Pieridae Ave NE Li. 4-2396 


and > 
Grre- « 
euwner = 


895: 


Ay a *vinish 
. 


“$1395: 


be the 
_ 


*1495: 


orice. pn ad wt 


ALMER FOR 


oe oe 


‘53 MERC. 
Monterey | 
$785 Total 


NO CASH NEEDED 
wees GOOD CREDIT 


buy gavutese Por .credit 
, ca 


TU. 2-4200 
i A vo ROSS | 
4 | 

2 Ave NW: ( 452° DE SOTO 


| 
| $895 


EMERSON 4&4 ORME 


(BUICK) 


WA. 7-8777 
1th 2M St. NW. DT TRIS -eset 


He IF... s Wa. 7 


55 BUICK $2700 


Special ee? ecatipoed. BR. & bb. 
een tee bite bedy. Beagti- 
wt 


Stewart Buick 


1506 Witeen Bivd.. Art 
JA. 5-7458 JA. 5-T7E81 


ee ee 


53 English Ford. $795 


& ert. lew mileage. tdeelt Ind 
or besiness car, 


CALL CARL MOTORS 
7701 Wiscensian Ave. 
(Bethesda) OL. 4-2121 
—INDOOR SHOW ROOM— 


ae 
value 


, .. $1599 


Convertible Seeer white with 
pinch tee. Dreafiew. radie ane 7) 


heater 
Stanley H. Horner, Inc. 


BUICK DEALER 


Fla. Ave. at 6th NE. 
Li. 66464 


"Si RILEY. 
‘St 4-e008. comvertibie: beaet!- 
fel condition. Baby biee finish. 
imperial Meters of Fairfax 
1@ Mi. frem Ker Bridge on 
lee Ber. (RT. 28). JE. 4-350%. 
Seen 5 ‘tH 8: Set. “OH SC 


» ROR. Dyreaflew. 


_ $437 
_ $418 
. $233 
. $284 
.. $296 
_,, $233 
. $188 


we DETSR2 > TIVEC1 ch BE GaRS co EI ok eee OF UE 99 we 


‘S4 PONTIAC 


Caithness Buick, Inc. 


7700-7348 Wie. Ave... 
Bethesda. Ma. 
OL. 6-6619 er OL. 6-5008 


ete. Teer " car 
down parment. 


‘S3 BUICK 


* pete wey A 


mary 


vwerwwwr ew wd 


END OF THE 
MONTH 
CLEARANCE 


Every car must be sold. 
Name vour ewn down 


53 Ford . "$1295 


Ranch Waren: r *». 
Licht creen. abse- 
lutely perfect. 


7 
ss 
* 
* 


‘S2 FORD ... $1195 
new 80 Piack 


Convertitin. brand- 
tee. E.4H.. Ferdemeatic. Uebt 
—. with red int. Baceptions 


PALMER FOR 


Byattorte, _ 


4724 &. Ave 
a110 Mn am. 


‘S4 Studebaker $1895 


ComneeSe. Hard tee convert- 
ible, B-tene. sete. trans. Wire 

heater, tires 
Lew milease. 


Martin Studebaker Palmer Ford 


4904 Hampden lane Hvrattevilie,. Vd 
Be 


OL. 3-1700 th.. Ma. 4774. RB. 1. Ave WA. 3-8777 
Open Eves. ‘il * 2110 Hamiltien 4. WA. 71-0902 


°"50 PONTIAC $695 


Convertible. B. & b.. bvrdra. ak. 
green. Very clean 


52 Buick $1150 


(t) Grees. &. & B.. @.-#. tren, 
Dros. Tinted sctans. 


Stewart Buick 


15t5 Witeen Bivd. Ari 
JA. 8-738 JA, 48-7551 


eter. Lew mileage. ene owner 
* real beavty. 


$51 tom 2 $3.95 3 


Seper-4, ene Com 

medere “6”: telly casirned $ 
k cars, excellent tnd cars 

5 one drive. 


Castem . Sede elly 
eauipoed and « stesl at pe 
lew oerice 


ROYAL MOTORS 


4108 Geersta Ave. NW 
*.7900 
Chrvysier -Pirv mouth - 
Imperial 


we 


73-8777 
Wa. jose? 


'S4 PONTIAC .$1945 
Sterchief convertibie: ra die. 
and Hyrdra-Matic drive. 
exeelicnt conditiesn in every 
way. A real ber et thie orice 


MeKEE PONTIAC | 


“PONTIAC MEANS McKEE” 
5335 Wisc. Ave., ST. 3-7107 


‘48 OLDS. 
Cen stood top and 
Bauipped 
$295 


American Service Center 


S45 Ne. Glebe Rad, 
Artingten, Ve JA. 7-722 


saint. 


"55 Jaguar XK 140 


imperial Meters of Fairfax 


1@ pa. from aA Bridge en 
Lee Bw (nT Je. 4-3808 


Gece 8 ae Oe fea we 


"52 BUICK .. .S1197 


master Convertible Light 
een Le with aew tes. —s 
n 


redie. heater 
dvastiow” @rive, Thereushiy re- 
conditioned 
EMERSON 4&4 .ORME 
(BUICK) 
1538 Pa Ave. SE. 


Li. 3-24600 3) 


53 Olds $1650 


“eae” 2. & H. 
— power 


Stewart Buick 


1508 Wilsen Bivd art. 
JA tase aA rh 


7. tires, blew 
brahen. immace- 


51 


"33 FORD 


Convertible V-8. Radia & heat- 
er. Perdematic. new tos. Chere- 
kee red finish 


$1395 
Page-Hughes Buick 


“7! Artingten Bied. (Ri 48) 
Palle Cherch. Va. J. 323-0700 


‘49 CHRYSLER 


Net sew bet leet Nhe new. 
Light ecrey black top. Mest be 
sten te apereciated. 

894 dn.—599 me. 
45 OTHERS TO ELECT FROW 


EAST-WEST MOTORS 
(Chryster-Pigmouth Dealer) 
1137 Fast-Weet Her... SH. See 
Oven 6-16 daily 


‘50 CHEVROLET 


Felly eeuleped. radie and heat- Tf 


or. eenmary veltlew. new black 


tes. Very wice conditien. 8595 | 


st0@ dewn—iew whkiy parments. 


LISH KEEFE MOTORS, INC. 
310 Fie. Ave. N. EK. LL 4-0601 


M.G.’s—81195 


‘3 te cheese from.) Beth verry 
clean 53's. very lew mileage. 


imperial Motors of Fairfax 
16 Mi. frem Kev Bridge on 

Lee Hwy (BT 19). JE. 4-508. 
Open 3 ‘til 3; Sat. “tH 6 


*S2 HILLMAN - 
Cenvertibie. radia and heater. 
mareen with light tes. extreme- 
ly lew mileage 


BETHESDA MOTORS 


De Soto-Plymouthé Dealer 
Mitier and Wiec. Aves. 
OL. 4-1000 


‘S1 FORD—$795 


Fire encine red conhvertibie with 
radie, heater and everdrive. 


Ashwell Aute Sales 
Jt. 29489 


1953 DODGE 


WAS $1395-NOW $1095 
CENTRAL MOTORS 


“Your Friendly saesere a 
2Ae4 Jett, 
Art. Va. OF. ‘- 1328 


*51 OLDS “98” 
$897 


Licht cre convertible. Riack 
ten... #*, fy Fully equipoed 
inclading Hydramatic drive. 


EMERSON A ORME 


(BUICK) 


1859 Pa. Ave. SF. Li, 8-2400 


Read the 
Washington Post 
and 
Times Herald 
For the Best 
Used Car Offerings 


AUSTIN 


Demenstrator 


Biack with red - Statueet. 
Extremely tow mi 
SI 


imperial Meters of Fairfax 
160 mi. from Kev Bridge on 
Lee Hwy. (Ret. 19) JE. 4-8209 
Ooen & til Si Sat. “OH 6 


‘SO OLDS “88” 
Convertible 
Reastifel yellow finish. W.. 
tires. radie, heater, bpdraensiie, 


$645 
TEMPLE MOTOR CO. 


ALEXANDRIA. VA. Ki. &- 
iste PLAGONAL ROAD on 


‘54 MERCURY 


Mentercy. Black vith new 
white top. RB. & h.. tarn sienals 
w.-w. tires. Trimmed in red 
and black uphelstrrr. 


ALCORN MOTORS 


oe “ee Rey. 
rr. 27-5050 


| teow mil, 
= 


"52 CARY SLER 


r. 
t-tone finish. A we 
l-ownmer car. 


WHEELER, INC. 
Chrvyster-Plymeuth -Imperial 
Largest Washington Dealer 

4800 Wiscensin NW... EM. 38-4708 


‘53 PONTIAC 


dow 
Meters. inc. 


ish-Reefe 
S. E. Li. 4-0601 


310 ierias Ave. 


mobile Free Warranty. 


WHEELER, INC. 


Chry sler-Phrmenth-2 
Largest Warhin 
4800 Wisconsin 


KA, LER YSLER 
se. KR. & bh. athe. 


all ather 
ww. tires, wll entens. 
clean. ear. 
eae s Gone. 


$879 
WHEELER, INC. 
Garzelee Fh sea myn 


ler 
4n00 Wier, NH, EM. 54-4708 


Converiiban Honhn e 
blue top. Po Powersiide. 
Mang Gtoere & Cheeses F From 
ARCADE NTIAC 
""Pentinn Dealer 


: nic Monee en CAR let ars 
Seee 14th Pr N.W. 


with 
tr end b.! 


"52 CHRYSLER 


65 MERCURY . 


series You 
cheice of body styles. New- im 
tithe and warranty. 


1130 Cenn, Ave, RE. 7-7878 


Open Eveninge—Clesed Sundays 


"S11 HUDSON 
Derk creen,. 4-dr. sedan: radia 
and heater, sutemetic traens- 
mission. A perfect With car. 


24 months to pay 
Many ‘Others to Choose From 
TERMS OR TRADE 


ARCADE PONTIAC 
weingies s Lergest 
venee ° Soon 


Ask ter ‘seek a. 


5 BiG bg od CAR “Ss hail 
7 trea Oe 


th &. 


COMPANY OFFICIAL CARS 


Air “Tie” 


$275 DOWN 
Lew Menthivy Payment 


BARRY-PATE 
CHEVROLET 


Washington's Oldest 
Chevrolet Deeler 


YOUR 
CAR 1s 


Za" 5350 


We can delwer to you «a 


‘55 Plymouth 
Loa fon $54 


teel. tnterest and Ime. 
Company Cars 


BETHESDA MOTORS 


De Soto-Piymouth Deaier 
Miller and Wiee. Aves 


OL. 4-1000 
——----—-- —— = 


| WANTED 


Reliable Parties 
To Take Over This 
Repossessed 


‘55 CHEVROLET 


TUDOR 


Full 
Price 


$135 DOWN 


Call ter Oar Courtesy car te 
Pick You Us 


CO. 5-8214 
Attention! 
Military peaigel 


Immediate delivery Ng 


Payments. 
And wery «smell down pay- 
mente fer ether military 
persenonel 


Bank Financing Arr 
One ee oe soon © rial 
Me Boochyh ue 


“hit siseaui NT 


| 


‘53 Stude. .. $995 


Champion starlicht 


. fully equteped, 


perfect cendi 


Hard poy cogge 
tene yellow and binch, 


fully eceulpped. 
Mercury $795 


‘? te cheese from) 
t.Dr. and Dp 
Mercematics 
everdrives. 


Pentiac $795 


‘*T te cheese from?) 


'5) Ponti tiac . $595 


nga new patut: F.. 


t-Dr. telly eauteped. 
Absolutely perfect. 


Stude. .. $495 


?-Dr. Commander; 
avie. trans... r. 


Packard $395 


% wi Uiter matic: fF. 
tutely perfect 


48 Plym. .. $195 


- -By. Rens and looks 


'46 Wash $175 


4 a! tires: 


‘46 Ford . . $150 
coe Pa gam Tr. 
. $1 25 


New 


Silver S Soring 
Auto City, Inc. 


Authorized Foreign 


Open Daily 10 PLM. 


f 


(ABRAHAM F 


a (CHEVROLET / 


11339 EAST-WEST a 
FCOR. COLESVILLE RD. 
pILVER SPRING, IAD. 


= AEE 
= 


22 2.2.5 4 2 2 *» » ® | 


a. A. A eS A DAA 


MONTGOMERY. 


fash 795 


Merc 1395: 


o$3 Mercury $ 
. Real cream poff. 


y Monterey sport 
60 ethers te choose from. 


Be mailibe 


me Kany > 


STUBBS 


Liacoln-Mercury Dealer 


3715 Bladensburg Red. 
AP. 7-2929 


wkhhtekanheee 


: 


FORD Ranch W 
WILLYS Station Wagon 
DODGE Station Wagon 
OLDS. Station W 


PACKARD Station Wages 
OLDS. 4-door 


PLYMOUTH 4-door 


CHEVROLET 2-door 
PLYMOUTH 4-door 
DODGE 2 


OLDS. 4-deer 
LINCOLN Club Coupe . 


OPEN 8 A.M. 


Hillweed Ave. & Lee Hwy. 


De Soro- PLYMOUTH 
 ‘TRADE-INS 


Station Wagon Headquarters 


agon 
PLYMOUTH Station Wagon 


CHRYSLER Windsor 4-deoor .... 


SOTO site 
STUDEBAKER Convertible 
PACKARD Convertible ... 


100 Others to Choose From 
‘TIL 9 P.M. 


FALLS CHURCH 
De Soto—Plymouth 


PAF R ARF BREA AF AFA RFAAAY 
VneouwwWwoewvweahwer Seaeaeuw eo 


JE, 2-2300 


Continaed on Fellewing lace 


s 


Contineed on Following Pare 


? ) 
7 
UJ ~ 
: 
' : 


*Biv ier 


*eettet 


7-8 Oe POH) FORO OTHE. 


ef 


7, 


AUTOMOBILE, SALE 97 | AUTOMOBILE, | ) AUTOMOBILE, SALE 97 ‘THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
45 


Prretge seen ei erg ae ae, & nw od.| dooce, beater, belenee ; SFOCERARER — isp chpmpion si > oo en Wednesday, August 31, 1955 
Pectect | mega ¥.¥. a it = te . iston. r covers. : tf, " C ees tu nel fight . , —_— 
| Sab eh KIRK es a ave. . $95. . "UDERAKER. | MOTORS od & Law. x z74, AER Hibs ave. Bw. be: ' | —— 


Ave. nw. TA 


napereaat 1 convertibi, flaming i Tewtn etife| aaa city ve sas. : aps Gr HERERE 


Pie hve 
rows Meter Co. 990 | nee Ma. 


a - _o 4 btn hal 
rtibles. ie 7 sTUD \ ‘$10 Dow When iN 


HY doors aD ea 4 t | pitta 
Scand ES es| save e900 Ihe ae 


"Al CHEVROLET $95 


sso aio oi amo) “SS Clippers by Packard ié'Foro 5195 || ‘95 PONTIAC 


| 4 Dr., Fully Equipped 
‘S2 PACKARD fred Mechanic age mes then AS 
“soe” 4-dr. sedan: Wltire- | oe at j | 48 DE SoTO "$195 _ eites. We i ' or On _NO ¢ Alf oH NEEDED Par 


matic. BR.2N. w.-*. tires, opposes «, rt, and ae 2 . » (prep : im town 9 —_ 
lovely finish; clean threugh- ot aires. xeel- orry! Gee or call os new. Zeur Bills Fromptiy. We Will Bandie All Details. 


out, $1295, , | < <P Sa ai | Many More to From | McNEIL PONTIAC 


ROYAL MOTORS | | | | LOGAN (FORD) “In the heart of Bethesda” ; ue 
feorsia Ave. ’ a / 2\ _ | | 3540 14th WW. TU. 2.41007 7320 Wis. Ave. Ol. 4-8000]) ~ see *AAS5 


Chrysier-Pivmeuth- 
Impertal 
2-Dr. Sedan. equipped. Whr par more? 


wit ete et | gtr Bg Pe Rarn "GOTTA GO” ‘S3 FORD....SAAE 
mise F ully Equipped With LOOK! eeee 
mang Others to Cheers Prom an 2-Dr, Sedan. canipped. Whe vay more? lin 
ARCADE PONTIAC | NO DOWN PAYMENT 8 ‘53 Chevrolet. AA5 
2 en amma | Lee D. Butler Packard : | 949 FORD >= 19503 
nies | OS SUROULASEELT Conn, & Florida Ave. N.W. AD. 4-8000 | ‘50 BUICK 2. .......... $175 ‘5 5 FORD * 4 Pe 5 
/A4 


End-of-Month AL Satet 2 | | AST BUICK 2 --.-... 9395 8S weeesen nm EOD 
‘50 CHEVROLET *=©. .... $345 ‘5] Sta. Wo. seta *7TA5 


Clearance! ee. os ‘AS DODGE ot ...-.0-. PIED issued ahdaies onnen 


M6 to "SA Boicks and Other Late Model Cars. [| = = | | OO NASH 2% «--.---.---. ‘145 F 
1955 STUDEBAKER {te cot Neeent [Lops [Bras STUDE, om... 95g 24 Monterey’, 545 


red and erer. 


Deluxe Coupe $700 OFF! 48 CHEVROLET Sedan. 09 $5.00 | Rim ape rue | | 90 OLDS *. --.-. es OG ‘> Servicemen All Grades Financed 


Company Official Car ‘47 CHEVROLET Aero 2-Dr...... 


LEE D. BUTLER, Inc. 1121 21st St. NW. DL 7-0111_ J} ‘47 BUICK 4-Dr. Sedan... Ret osk . et | ’S5 FORD es) | ‘245 IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 


qmmmmms GUARANTEED CARS™"""GUARANTEED CARSqummmmy || “48 HUDSON 4-Dr. Sedan . ) Fordomatic Low) Milease | ° 
GOT GOOD CREDIT? 47 NASH Ambassador Sedan =. $0 | HY ‘55 CHEVROLET 2" ..... ‘145 Irv. Martin 
Full Down Monthir 47 DODGE 4-Dr. Sedan : , * * R. & H—t-Tene—2000 Miles | 12th & K Sts. N.W. 


‘4b PACKARD 2-Door ... mo «. 0. $10. $ 6.25 8 | 49% HUDSON Sedan 


%9 FORD 2.000 eon oom. : ks 1a Str. Soten | 7) 1B auto & suppLy co., INC. ‘54 PLYMOUTH =. $195 rAREING NA, $-4455 


’ , 4820 Rhode island Ave. One Owner 
50 BUICK ' A arg sro ye sown 


6. peaks testes 1a L | 49 FORD V-8 Club Coupe 00 | | £ 
49 BUICK 4-Door .. ~ me. sen sume | oup HYATTSVILLE, MD 53 DODGE 2-DR $195 
' ‘47 BUICK Convertible | ° seeeeseens 
51 seen en Cuno . | 
KAISER 2-Door 33 PRD 280 4 uN. 427580 | 


50 OLDS “98" 4-Door .........-. | =) Gun “oe = om Down 
‘5 MERCURY 2Dccr ...... . ane « . $ “98” Sedan , | “OVER 30 YRS. EXPERIENCE IS YOUR | THE TRADE-INS HAVE 
= ome oun siamp dens © tay aaa ! | GUARANTY OF A SQUARE DEAL” | 

r 


TE | | i] OTHO MLUAMs BUICK /$e°5$853 I Herson's87 0 N.W.9| FLOODED 


fy & yy ye — As Low As DE. 2-4700 | Our 100-Car Lot! 


‘S) PLYMOUTH CLUB COUPE ........ HR — PML cS a 
2 ne Age 2-Door 


: 
sor ape tains a) og WER Sy te ‘45 flor | THEY MUST Go! 


pow Selling 
Out 
Today 


Present Stock 


No Cash Needed 
With Good Credit 


Every Car Serviced by Our Staff of 
Mechanics in Our Ultramodern Garage! 


'S4 Pontiac... .$1699 = Chevrolet . '$895 
f pee "beater ea 


Rein 1€5 Motor Lo. | [rn Ave Bee a) eed nie 73 die 


1840 Wilson Boulevard Arlington, Va. e F DOWN 
UARANTEED CARSMMMNEGUARANTEED CARS =m LINCOLN .$299 | “49 BUICK .. $499 | 54 Olds $195 


Green. 2-ér. B. O E. potenctte: ~ ont 4. % Beaevtifal ereen sed white 


: matching nte _ Fe 
REDUCED | Sessa 4 $899 'S2 DODGE .. sea | , a 
Corenet: 4-dr. BR. & Ft. 


, ; Ps 
‘52 CHEVROLET..... $795 BUICK . $1,099 | ’53 Bee aa’ “| : ‘34 Ford $95 


—_ 


sera codan | pateme- 
A etee. Teton 
yo . ane ditel a = . “was 


te ) usere a . bape 


ST Hudson $395 i. 

Blue Pacemaker 4- ar “¢ * Feat $4 Mercury . a 

muste. Very elean teeide and 

mechanically A-1. One owner. A 

~ RR os ie spre st 

Th ‘S3 Mercury . 

50. Hudson ... $229} S3e" "te" aon bipe. 18.080 
*.Dr. Grey finteh. Whe we ers since acw. It's almost new, 

ag A pretty job. 529 Ne. 244. 

DOWN. Ne. 144. 

‘S1 Willys ... ..$149 

Biee 2-Dr Rene goed. looks 

seed. 84 DOWN. 


"49 Hudson ... .$149 


4-Dr. Biles. & 4 BR. Ready fer 
werk. 84 DOWN. 


"53 Chevrolet ..$899 
Cxretuily driven.” leon, instee 


ea ee 
‘49 Mercury .. . $269 | ’53 tite a 


reeen. BR. 2 HB. Ready to co . 
$ DOWN. Streamliner inf 


‘50 Mercury ...$199 


4-Dr. Bleck x & &. Rene with eeulipment. 
seed. 86 DOWN 


- ‘S53 Mercury . $1395 
meaty kt $1595 Rordtes Ce Convertibvie._ Bloch. Re- 


hite 90008 miles 
oh. py LR scratch on ~ 4 Leche | like ~§ 


new. ie . like stealing. , 
‘AB Chrysler ... .$99 spre Bye Saree 


and b Almest a 
Windsor Ceprertiste. " Ready te +5. » --- = ew. 


steering Fordematic ‘<< 


4-dr. BR. & H. t-teme creen. Neo. 694. BUICK . $l, 099 
, * -deer f-tene creen "52 BUICK . $1,199 . ae . Lm 7. 
49 PONTIAC....... $445 af a ite Gent, Suse: Bren. 6 Pais ts’ a 


ee BL . %ats Powerstite. v1 453 BUICK . $1,299 ‘54 Buick *95 


Riviers Hardtep. full power 


‘50 . BUICK . $1,599 Riviers hardtes. R. & 
‘ iz Convertible: Drna.. r.. bh. *S3 PONT .$) 499 
4-dr. BR. & HH, Blue finish. Neo. 687. ; MERC. . .$1,899 Catalina: By... 7 395 


4 
‘53 CH EVROLET > Mere-0.. fr. ‘S5 MERC x ee $2.2 . 
pm Bet Ale bardtep; F. Glide, 2-tone. Ne A _ BUICK. hd leh 'S4 vick ry 199 32 Buick $45 


ewnér car, 


rubber. 7 
country parler. 839 BO 


‘50 sacar 


BUICK .. 199 Century Riviera; Drna.. 
Goatery here whan "54 BUICK . .$2,299 


‘S4 : % Dyas. F. 8 Riviera; Dras.. #. 
arent ttt, We ee § 55 5. WAG., $2.299 | 155 BBY $2 299 
49 OLDS. . $ | BUICK . $2,299 | . $e on, Tt oom 

Cled cpe., ‘Ryaramatic. beater, seat Super > tom. ‘asuen 55 VICK . $2, 899 


covers. Ne steering. etc. 


‘53 9 53 CHEV. ..$1,149 | S199 


» Cestemiine. r. 


vertible, Pewer steering 
= power wren Ba eng — 
qpnete va volley faish, Drna- 


: Mercematice 
irene... © “ ge Rn. & i. 
2 te cheese fre 


DOWN 


Green 2-40. r & &. ‘ $ 
iF Over 150 Cars, Buicks and Other Makes, $249 te $2,499 | os a an a 
| STANLEY H. HORNER, Inc. || $ Sio"seae 
: mileage, }-senee car 
__ BUICK DEALER—CLOSED SUNDAYS j bows 


NEED DEPENDABLE TRANSPORTATION? [/@ Sco Sa,®. 


inside and covt. 


Sells new 
se. 86 BO almes v gate. i's e way down 


‘52 Ford ... $795 | ries. Ne 


Tutene bier. V-# eéer xn. @ 
vers. A beauty ot a war 
down price. 


‘50 Studebaker. $249 


Champion 4-Dr. BR. & H.. ever- 


@rive, covers. FPienty gas miles , ; 
‘52, Mercury .. .$895 tod ry R28. “Excellent 


Con fble 
Hardtes coupe. Geeod-ieoking car condit on. Wonderful 


‘46 Buick . .$249 


Rise Supe ‘Dr, at . : hweok 4-Dr. Geden. BR. & 
| dae =" oias ass ‘in. a One owner, clean inside and 


‘53 Hudson ... .$699 | ‘51 Ford 


Reper Jet 4.Tir. BRiack finish. Victoria. Tutene sreen. Eeulpped 
ines Whe new. Weather con- 


trel. A dandy. *S! Pontiac ....$695 
"52 Chevrolet . $695 | 4:25, .Sicuntest. yh i 
Dr. Grev KR. & H., it. Come see. 


De boxe 4- 
Pewerstide. Very sood ene own- 


er car. ‘49 Mercury 4 .$269 
‘51 Ford PL a Eo 8 Se 
fir Ces VA Todor 


FULL PRICE 


gon gy ; $ ‘51 0lds *795 
Public ve “on” 4.De. Leaded with 
Of the 19 55 ‘ a quomens. Hrd... & 


down and good 
Pontiacs ; credit will provide tmmedi- 


ode ate delivety. & te cheese 
™“ | Trade-ins from! Lew menthiy par- 
ments 


FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY ALSO 100 OTHER 
Guaranteed Used Cars Are Being Sold € fast Fimaneiee 


NO MONEY DOWN ‘> FOR SERVICEMEN 
No Small Loan Needed / ee 


TYPE HANDLED ON 
$1000 Off | eee | So 
: $62.49 
71% 1% DONALD 
‘$3 CHEVROLET $5681 
gq | ‘53 PLYMOUTH $56.81 
4 ‘53 PONTIAC : $73.86 


$39.99 1S 145 Florida Ave. WE. 


. oe $56.81 CREDIT APPLICATIONS 
DODGE Hl 52 PONTIAC...» - + +r sens v > > : on ee 
TN a a a y CALL ME. 8-717! 
Oven 6 A.M.—10 P.M. 


Special Discount to 
Serricemen—All Grades 


FULL PRICE 


4/55 FORD...910 85 + 


Tedor coupe. 


FULL PRICE 


£'54 CHEV..... 5685 ¢ 


Sedan. A real steal. Ne. 1970. 


4--,. or, Caretuliy sed ‘S1 Kaiser 
; 0 Old 4-Dr. Sedan, BK. & H. 
retort waa, Riae Club Se- "50 Packard .... 


a. H ‘ Clipper. BR. & BH. One owner. 
like « rR pereqets, Bene In excellent cenditien. 


‘49 Nash $ *53 Buick ee 


Tutene diese. Radic. beater. V 4-Dr. Sed 
clean little car, 88 DOWN. biack and. “white. 
on 


con 
*55 Ford 'S3 Ford 
a nl oe “r —_ P fk Victert va k & white. &. 
e ¢ ora. a - 
5000 — 9 Cos "33400 new. save n.. Fordomatic. w.-w. tires. af. 
ever $1000. i's a steal. most new 


°o>1 MERCURYS 


12 to Choose From. All Shades of Colors. All Models. 


$85 -astowas $540 


FULL PRICE 


‘54 FORD.... 5685 


Custem Convertible, 


ror aoe coer ceecsetesettectsteeeetaetaetieseaseentaetcaettaatts 


FULL PRICE 


‘53 Monterey >7 85 


Mereury hard tes 


SUND fo “nH 6 


Co. Official Cars 


LL PRICE 


‘51 VICTORIA $28 


Ford. A terrifie bargain. Needs repairs. 


a . 4 
Don’t Wait For AE a 
| ‘49 OLDSMOBILE 
These Tremendous aS itp paneer 


Savings 


Call Now for Credit Approval 


TU. 2-4200 


BILL ROSS 


7400 GA. AVE, N.W. 


Special Service 
Where??? Satan ie ataetidta roan lis task Ton tat 


eevennnnbeesverenanneevervennnneseereensntesseesesnnseeesvesennnted 


Why ag Meath as ) cranteed to Pass Any State or D.C. Inspection 


li Loan Nec All Note 
essa . y Courtesy Car 


HALEY’S... OF COURSE for You in 


| DODGE-PLYMOUTH DEALER COAST- IN PONTIAC 


“Ast and M Sts. S.E. LI. 4-3000 
; Open Evenings Until.9 p.m. | 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
ve Wednesday, August 31, 1958 ° 


_ 
—_—— 


More people © 
watch WTOP-TV 
than any other 


television station 


a 


in Washington. 


| 
4 
M 


7’ 


WTOP-TV 


at Broadcast House 


* Telepulse, August,1955 - | 
* American Research Bureau, August, 1955 


> 


WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Wednesday, August 31, 1955 47 


PENN TV co. RENT YTV 
$2.50 Weekly 


Ps 


———— Radio and Television 


Broadway Hits on TV 


THE 


Radio Post Reporter 
Highlights Ryan Named 


\Television Highlights 


World at Home: Evangelist 
Billy Graham is guest. 


drama, “Reunion at Steep- 
lers Hill.” 


9 p. m—WTOP-TV. The ® 1.Hour Service 


® Sets fixed in your home 


et ella le ll lll. ee. ii ee 


IN TRANSFERRING the 
Dallas State Fair production 
of “One Touch of Venus” to 


television, NBC Producer 
Jack Rayel 
pointed out 
that the 
show had 
the great 
advantage 
of having 
been tried 
out and 
shaken 
down be- 
fore a live 
audience 
before *it 
was televised. He added that 
he hoped the telecast “would 
be the opening wedge for the 
Nationwide televising of 
productions done by profes- 
sional theater groups all over 
the country.” 
This is a splendid idea and 
a splendid hope, and it's just 
too bad that things didn't 
work out any better than 
they did. “One Touch of 
Venus” was a big “Broadway 
hit in 1043, conceivably be- 
cause Mary Martin played 
the role of Venus. It is the 
story of a statue of Venus 
which came to life to bewitch 
ant barber and to be- 
and confuse the rest 
of 20th century charac- 
ters. 


"However, once you had ab- 


| of these activities they were | 


sorbed the original idea of a | 


statue coming to life. much 


| hand, 


of the gaiety and all the sus- | 


pense seemed to evaporate. 
After that the authors, Ogden 
Nash and S&S. J. Perelman, 
seemed to have a terrible 
time keeping Venus in water 
hot I 2 to provide a plot. 

£ seen quite a few of 
these old Broadway hits 
transferred to television by 
now, and each one has had an 
overpowering smell of grease- 
paint about it. In this one, a 
couple : low comedy char- 
acters who might have been 
reasonably acceptable on the 
broad confines of a stage, 


| weren't very good jokes. 


| See the youngsters starting to | 


. 


Were almost embarrassingly | 


bad under the intimate scru- 
tiny of a camera. 


Reek of Greasepaint 


By John Crosby 


old .Mary Martin role and 


layed it as if she were Mary | 


artin, which she isn't. She 
even sang with almost exact- 
ly the same ‘phrasing. In Miss 

lair’s defense, I ought to 
add that every girl who fol- 
lows Miss Martin in a role 
seems to do the same thing. 
Miss Martin puts her imprint 
on a role with such authority 
that no one seems to be able 
to get away from it ever 
after. 

Two other performances, 
those of Russell Nype as the 
reluctant barber and George 
Gaynes as an art gallery di- 
rector, were a little too man- 
nered and stagey, too. 


I DON,T know what was at 
the bottom of the Colgate 
people's mind when they de- 


“cided to turn over ali of last 


Sunday's Comedy Hour to 
child performers. Were they 
trying to lure the kiddie audi- 
ence away from Ed Sullivan? 
Or were all the adult per- 
formers out of town? Or did 


they harbor the wild hope | 


that they might uncover an- 
other Shirley Temple? Or 
what? 

At any rate. there were an 
awful lot of kiddies on view— 
singing, tap-dancing and even 
telling jokes. It was rather 
dificult to single out which 


least equipped to do well. Off- 
I should say the jokes 
suffered the worst. The jokes 
but 
they deserved better treat- 
ment than that. But I don’t 
suppose the jokes were man- 
handied much worse than the 
songs. The kids 
butchered some good music 

I have nothing against child 
performers, you understand. 
except that a solid hour of 
them is about 50 minutes too 
much. Of course, it’s nice to 


learn the rudiments of show 
business at such a tender age. 


Eventually, they'll all grow up | 


and I'm all for having them 


back on the show again some 


time. In about 15 years. 


| and 


) ther 


certainly | 


horns" he 


6 p. m—WTOP.-TV. Swaps 
vs. Nashua Horse Race: Don 
Ameche handles pre-race 
“color” and the winner's cir- 
cle ceremonies for the 
$100,000 “dream match” race. 
Jack Drees calls the race. 

7:30 p. m—WRC-TV. Coke 
Time (Return): Eddie Fisher 
is back from vacation and 
sings “You,” “Hard to Get,” 
“Yellow Rose of Texas” and 
“Song of the Dreamer.” 

8 p. m—WRC-TV. Kodak 
Request Performance (Re- 
peat): A marriage-minded 
secretary sets her sights on 
a popular movie idol in 
“Cardboard Casanova.” Stars 
are Lucy Marlow, Dick Foran 
and Richard Montalban. 

8p. m—WTTG. Million 
Dollar Movie: “Conflict of 
Wings” stars John Gregson 
in the story of a revolt by 
British villagers against in- 
stallation of a Royal Ajir 
Force rocket range near their 
homes. 

8 p. m—WTOP-TV. Frankie 
Laine Time: Gloria De 
Haven, Henny Youngman and 
Mort Gunty are guests. 
Frankie pays tribute to the 
American Legion and sings 
“Sitting on Top of the World” 
“If Spring Ever Comes.” 

. m— WRC-TV. Fa- 
nows Best (Return): 
Robert Young sets out to 
“demonstrate “The Art of 


| Salesmanship” to his son. The 


cast also includes Jane 
Wyatt, Billy Gray, 
Donahue and Laura Chapin. 


8:30 p. m.—WMAL.-TV. Pall 


| Mall Playhouse: John Ireland | 
stars as a reformed outlaw | 
to capture a | 


who goes out 
onetime friend in a Western 


Elinor | 


Millionaire (Repeat): An im- 
poverished ex-millionaire re- 
ceives another chance when 


he is chosen for the gift of a* 


tax-free one million dollars. 

9 p. m—WRC-TV. Kraft 
TV Theater: Melvyn Douglas 
play ; \ gg ae repro- 

second produc- 
tion of coer Howard Lind- 
say's “The Chess Game.” 
Featured are Richard Morse, 
Lin McCarthy and Constance 
Wilson. Story tells how 
Douglas saves a young boy 
from delinquency and an 
ultimate life of crime. 

9:30 p. m-—WTTG. Master- 
piece Theater: “American 
Empire” 
and Lee Carillo in a story 
of Texas during the post-Civil 
ry period 

9 m—WMAL-TY. Box- 
x. ormer heavyweight box- 


ing champion Ezzard Charlies | 


vs. Tommy (Hurricane) Jack- 


son in a return 10-round bout. | 


109 p. m—WTOP-TY. VU. S. 
Steel Hour: Boris Karloff 
and Jessie Royce Landis star 
in “Counterfeit.” 


life which is horrid for their 
daughter. Excitement  de- 
velops when the daughter 
elopes. 

10:45 p. m. — WMAL - TV. 
Sports Spotlight: Highlights 
of the past week in sports, 
plus features. 

11:15 p. m.—WTOP.-TV. The 
Late Show. Lili thought men 
were much fun until she dis- 
covers that “Men Are Such 
Fools.” Lee Carillo and 
Vivienne Osborne are 
stars. 


night ie Kovacs is host 
rd George Shearing and his 
trio. 


stars Richard Dix | 


An Eng. | 
lish couple lead a very simple | 


the | 
| end to 


11:30 p m—WRC-TV. To- | 
rm 


| on his way 


PM STATIONS 


wae vee (93.9 me.)——8:90 «o. me. te ad het oy 9 FM (161.1 melh—T «. =. te 
a 
| wror. PM (96.5 me)—5.96 «. m& te t womse.- nf | (100.5 me.)—6:95 «. o@& 


qRUS-98 (96.5 we.—¥ 0. m. to 0 0 | ™ 
oll me « oo te 16 wUsT FM (106.8 me.)—7:30 « 


midn 


wanl-im “(205.1 me.)—5:98 o 


mm 
wor rM (94.7 me.)—t om te i a. oe whale PM (1075 me.)—< o. = 
€ 


| WEAN (160.3 mec.)—5 «o. m 


tee mm 


OTHER STANDARD StATIONS 


| WOMS—570 ke —T «. m. te 645 © 


WPIX—tip ke—T a. m " y 
Ww = 


mm. | 
~ 
te 6:45 ©. m@&. 
© operate sunup te sundown. 


—— oT «. mm. 
thorized 


wera taes mS « @ 
AM—~1590 te—<@ o @& 
‘ 1 ice ‘ost; — 30 . <* 


te — Davie 


wroc— iste ke ke.—Darlight Only * 


Programs printed here conform to information 


| Shipyard to 


m. te @ 


tin a 
| bout 


11:30 a. m—WTOP. Make 
Up Your Mind: Eddie Davis, 
who wrote “Ankles Aweigh,” 
tells how he would handle 
the “wet blanket” type that 
doesn’t join in the fun at a 
party. 

11:45 a. m—WTOP. Howard 
Miller Show: Archie Bleyer 
reviews his talent-scouting 
trip té Europe. Records in- 
clude “Sweethearts on ‘ Pa- 
rade” by the Dominos. 


2:05 p. m—WGMS. Sym- 
phonic Matinee: Handel, 
Organ Concerto in G minor, 
opus 4, No. 3; Mozart, Rondo 
in C; Respighi, Rossiniana. 

2:55 p. m—WWDC. Base- 
ball: Washington vs. Detroit. 

3p. m—WTOP. House 
Party: Guest is Lala Guer- 
rero, composer and vocalist 
for “Pancho Lopes,” a parody 
on the “Davy Crockett” tune. 

6:05 p. m—WGMS. Show- 
case: Offenbach, Helen of 
Troy Ballet. 

6:15 p. m—WTOP. Swaps 
vs. Nashua Horse Race: Bryan 
Field describes the running 
of the $100,000 “dream match” 
race 

6:55 p. m—WWDC. Harry 
Wismer: Members of the Aus- 
tralian Davis Cup team re- 
ceive Harry's “Hats 
award 

8 pn m—WRC. 
tion (Repeat): “Love in Amer- 
ica” is discussed by Alistair 
Cooke, Faye Emerson and Dr. 
Gregory Silboorg. 

8p. m—WTOP. The FBI 
in Peace and War: Federal 
enforcement officers bring an 
the “Prize Money” 
racket, operated by a fake 
fund raising expert. 

189 p. m—WRC. Fibber 
McGee and Molly: Fibber is 
to a Philadelphia 

test his metal 


Conversa- 


glue 

16:65 pp. m.— WGOMS-FM. 
Showcase: Vivaldi: Concerto 
Grosso in A minor: Rachmdan- 
mov. Piano Concerto No. 


in D minor 


10:15 p. m.—WMAL. 
ing Ezzard 
Tommy 


Box- 
Charlies vs 
(Hurricane) Jackson 
10-round heavyweight 


10:38 p. m—WWDC. True 
Detective: A youthful delin- 


ofr” 


News Head 
Of WTOP 


Edward F. Ryan, twice win- 
ner of Washington Newspaper 
Guild Front Page Awards for 
Distinguished Writing, will be- 

teem come director) 
of news and | 
public affairs 
for WTOP ra- 
dio and televi-| 
sion on Oct. 10. | 
In making’ TURE 
the announce- Pict 
ment, John 5.) 
Hayes, presi-| 
dent of WTOP, 
Inc., noted that) 
Ryan has had | 
extensive expe- | 
rience covering District and na-| 
tional news. He has been a re-| 
‘porter for The Washington Post 
‘since 1937.. On the local scene)’ 
‘he covered police, courts, the 
‘District building and District 
legislation at the Capitol. He 
has also covered national polit- 
ical and economic news as well 
as political campaigns in Mary- 
‘land and Virginia 

Ryan will head the new News |F 
and Publie Affairs Division of 
'WTOP, Inc., which begins op-'' 
eration Oct. 30. Previously CBS |! 
|News and WTOP have main- 
tained a single news operation 
‘in Washington. The new ar-| 
rangement calls for separate) 
news staffs, with considerable | 
jemphasis on coverage of local 
and public events by WTOP); 
Radio and Television. 

“The WTOP News and Public’ 

Affairs Division will continue 
the remarkably high standards | 
\which have won so many awards . 
for CBS News. With a local'? 
staff, local outlook, and special- | 
ists trained on the local area 
scene, WTOP Radio and Tele- 
vision will be very close to the 
community in this vital news j 
operation.” Hayes said ; 

Ryan. 39, a native of Denver. | 
Colo.. was graduated from Dart- 


* All Werk Guaranteed 


Fuse 


Were 


nating epicure. 


He was winner in 1952 of the 
Washington Newspaper Guild | 


Front 


Jefferson alive 
Wednesday repast at the Sirloin Room 
would probably be Hungarian Goulash. 
This Old World delicacy is sure to 
titillate the palate of the most discrimi- 


Costin’s 
mouth College in 1937 |Sodoinerom. 


2-Week Minimum 


SERVICE 


Any 10 inch 
Any |7 inch . 
S Any 21 inch . 


1 YEAR GUARANTEE 


$8.95 
13.95 
17 ‘5 


would 
have 
dined 


here 


today, his 


Prime Ribs, a daily entree par excel- 
lence, is served to your 


+ 


a 
NATIONAL PRESS BLDG. Fourteenth Street entrance 


Janet Blair took over the | (Copsrtahti I 


gee. Hew York furnished by stations at time of oe quent who becomes an adult 
killer during a series of rob- 
beries falis into a trap set by 


a sheriff's posse. 


Page Award for —_ 
guished work in interpretive | For reservations call EX. 3-3080 + Clo: ed sere = 


writing In connection with the 


Senatorial campaign of John 
gorda sta 


Marshall Butler (R-Md.) and in 

1953 of the Front Page Award 

in the feature and human inter-| 

Ils on vacation. His column est class for his series on Hen 

36. 4\Giantelees: = SS “TT will resume on his return. W. (the Dutchman) Grunewald. | 

8:30. JimiLook to Day. 6:08 '\Art Brown. 6-10) Mahone . 
News. 6060. 7:00 en : 

: ’ 


17-30 
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| 


7 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
48 Wednesday, August 31, 1955 


—- 


Roy Fined $20 
By Trial 


Police Pvt. Wyatt J. Roy Jr., 
whose seven-year police career 
has been punctuated by several 
appearances before police trial 
boards, was found guilty of fail- 
ure to appear in Municipal 
Court on Aug. 6 to prosecuie 
a case and fined $20 yesterday 
by a three-man Trial Board. 

Roy, who was suspended on 
Aug. 17 on charges of making 
a false statement to a*superior 
officer and failure to carry his 
service revolver at all times, 
pleaded guilty before a board 
composed of Insp. Charies J. 
Sullivan, Capt. Reid L. Ham- 
mann, of the Sixth Precinct, 
and Capt. Danie) O. Fletcher, 
of the Eighth Precinct. 

Roy said he did not appear 
in court because he understeod 
the case was scheduled to be 
disposed of by forfeiture of 
collateral and his appearance 
Wasn't necessary. 

At the same time, Deputy 
Police Chief Howard V. Covell 
announced that Roy would face 
another Trial Board Sept. 7 on 
charges of making an untrue 
statement and failing to carr) 
his service revolver 

Covell also said Policewoman 
Opal D. Farris, 25, of 3520 18th 
st. se., would face Trial Board 
action on the same date on 
charges of willfully making an 
untrue statement to a superior 

Covell said the charges stem 
from an incident that took 
place Aug. 16 and that the 
charge against Roy includes 
six specifications of untrue 
statements 

Roy is charged wit! 

Lt. Thomas C. Sullivan 
Fourth Precinct to whic 

is assigned, that he had left 
southwest restaurant for 
home at 9 p. m. in requesting 
sick leave at 11 p on Au 
16, Covell said 

Covell said the charges state 
Roy actually spent the evening 
at Wahl's Restaurant. 235 4' 
st. sw. Roy had been scheduled 
to report for duty at 11:30 p. n 

Roy complained that was 
suffering with an injured knee 
hurt when he was on a ¥ 
raid, Covell stated. adding tha! 
the charges attribute Roy's in 
jured knee to a baseball game 


TN 


ne 


“@ 


—_—~ 


Student Exchange 
Plan Proposed: 


Chicago Tribune Press Service 
MINNEAPOLIS Aug 
Delegates to the eighth 


3* 
Na- 


‘tional Student Congress today 


approved a resolution calling 
for a specific exchange of stu 
dents with East European coun- 
tries. 

However, delegates ‘nserted 
& provision which many doubt 
the Soviet Union and her sate! 
lites would accept 

A clause specifies that any 
exchange should be on a ong 
term academic basis. This was 
aimed at avoiding the “whir! 
wind” type of tour such es that 
taken last.year by a group of 
American studen* editors 

The idea of the academic 
plan is to place Anierican and 
Soviet students on campuses in 
the two countries, sway from 
their fellows. so they can ab 
sorb a true picture of the host 


nation. 


1 Czech Film Banned 


Board 


The policewoman is charged 
with making two false state- 
ments—that she had not seen 
Roy in the restaurant after 9:15 


pm. and that she was not 
aware that Roy was there later. 
The charges state that Roy 
and the policewoman went to 
the restaurant together and re | 
mained there until 1 a. m. 
Roy, 36, who lives at 1032 12th | 
st. se. was nicknamed “The 
Street Cleaner” because of his 
fight against the underworld, 
which he began as a rookie un- 
dercover worker with the gam- 
bling squad 
Roy often has 
troubles as a policeman on un 
derworld characters who were 
“out to get” him. He first! 
flashed into prominence when 
he spurned a bribe @roffered 
by a notorious gambler and 
helped set up an elaborate po- 
lice trap which caught the man. 
The District Commissioners 
ignored a Trial Board reéecom- 
mendation that Roy be fired in 
October, 1954, and restored him 
to duty as a beat man in the 
Fourth Precinct 


blamed oe} 
: 
’ 


610 H Street, NE 


"34 CHEVROLET 


“T10" Haendrmen. 
Sale Priced 


241! GQlhedenebure Od. NE 


'S3 CHEVROLET 


Peur-deer sedan with Mt tleck 
Pull» cqntopes fale Priced 


im excellent con 
inside and vt - $995 

2411 Gladenshure Od. WE. ; 

, 


¢-ewner trade 


esy9 sics A + 
Cieb Coune 


Gyrematte 
t(ransmictieon radie 
and heater One Sale Priced 


owner Gres Ne $875 


aot = 6POWN 
241! Sledershure Od. NE 


"49 CHRYSLER 


Windser 
finteh 
aute 


? 
Pair to Face ; 


Trial Board Action 


Pvt. Charles Alexander, of 
the Seventh Precinct, will face 
Police Trial Board action Sept. 
8 on two counts of showing up 
late for duty, Deputy Chief 
Howard V. Covell said yester- 
day 

Alexander is charged with 
reporting 43 minutes late on 
Aug. 21 and 59 minutes late on 


Carenet 


ee Oe a ae 


i 


Raymond C. Redifer 

the Seventh Precinct. 

face Trial Board action 

13 on charges of making 

a faise statement as to his 

home address. Covell said Red.- 

isted his address as Rock. 

lle when he should have listed 
1s Myersville, Md 


Sedan Riuwe 
dale Priced 


deer 
Radie-heater 
trane caste 


Peer 


=". 
a 


ifer | 


‘32 NASH 


Was $1050 
SALE PRICED 


*845 


610 H Street W.E. 


Reuters 

VENICE, Aug. 30— Venice 
) Festival authorities today 
ed showing of a Czechoslo- 
‘ John Huss It 
lieved the commiitee ob 
the treatment of re- 
the picture about the 
runner of the Reformation 

as burned at the stake. 


[NEW YORK] 


On « business or pleasure trip 
you'll enjoy the peaceful, resi- 
dential atmosphere at the Hotel 
Tudor. in the heart of New York. 
Adjacent to United Nations 
Headquarters, two blocks from 
Grand Central Terminal and 
three from the East Gide Air- 
lines Terminal. 

Private park, restaurant, cock- 
tail lounge. 600 outside rooms 
with bath. Singles from § 
doubles from $7, 


Write for felder W3 


er. No. 9169. 


| Bladensburg te 


‘S! HUDSON 


Pacemaker feer aeee Sale Priced 


i i i i 
De i te 
ee 


Ne. S415. 655 DOWN 


7 


3909 Minn. Ave. NE 


"S2 PLYMOUTH 


franbreek Feer- décor Sale Priced 


i 
7", Teerheeeeeeee ee 


i i 


3909 Mime. Ave. NF 


"51 CHEVROLET 


Twe-deer Fieetiine De luce sedan. 
(,and black finish Sale Priced 


Sena ‘roe 


‘53 CHEVROLET 


Ss POWwNK., 
Medel! 


et 


i i 


Deluxe 
I estrous 


“e106 Clieb Coupe 


finish. Foeily 


304 Eest 420d Strect, New York Sale Priced 
ale rte 


; 


busine seman 


oy ANE to establish 


PERSONAL TOUCH 


with those with whom 


I do business.” 


— Sherlock Holmes 
The Three Garridebs 


Sherlock Holmes’ personal philosophy can stand for 


wt, t00. Columbia Federal 
by. creating every account 
count at Columbia Fede 


attention that has made so 


Federal can be yours, too—for the asking. 


Stop in and find out for yourself how pleasant, 


convenient and easy it is to save at Columbia Federal. 


You'll like the free parti 
N.W.... of/823 lith S 


+1045 


3909 Minn. Awe. NF 


"02 CHEVROLET 


Bet Air Seert Coupe Reastifal 
ere rvy Ay ee finish Fully 


*1045 


heater » hy 
3907 Minn. Awe. NE 


53 CHEVROLET 


9708. §175 Down 
“s10" 


——— ae bige finish. 
Paiu —~9 Sale 145 


7863. 8176 pews 


Soe) 


fr... 2 pa ATIONS ower oe — 


(=); 


— 
ee 


OO) 


—_— "=". =" 


Twe-deer Delete medel 


¢' 
Ee 


- —_ 
‘-: 


peo 


. 
~4 


(eo 


610 H Street, N.E. 
‘49 FORD 
V-@ Tedder; eres N 
Ryn PLYMOUTH 
eur-deer: sreen Ne 
‘ae KAISER 
r-deer: 


‘ 
‘4a PLYMOUTH 


Twe-deer; «rey Ne 

2411 Bladensburg Rd., N.E. 

tnd KAISER $145 

deer. Na. 875 

“a PLYMOUTH e $225 
Ne. A! . 

AERO. .... $195 

‘eC CHEVROLET $75 

, $175 


Z, 
2 
> 


$303 
- 
$143 
o142 
$97 
215 
$147 


9167.4 


* 


s @ 


= 


has made its many friends 
as if it were the only ac- 
ral. The warm personal 
many friends for Columbia 


Twe-deer. Ne. 8144. 


3909 Minn. Ave., N.E. 
ng... at 1003 H Street, 


treet, N.W. 


See "The Adventures of Sherlock 


Holmes,” on WR 


. Mondays at 7 


. ; 91 
‘a7 PLYMOUTH 


Feeur-Dr. Ne. 8999 


$129 
C-TV Chaunel 4 
p.ne. 


aN Columbia Federal 


AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 
730 Eleventh St., 


‘4 7 


: 
- - 


> 


Columbie the ithe 


Assets over $31,000,000 


OPEN DAILY ‘TIL 


9 P.M. 


SATURDAYS ‘TH 6 


CLOSED SUNDAYS 


ON-THE-SPO} 


Savings 


VOVOTG.e BVO oul RO2e0 0800500 0000:0oC0T0"7T00998 


N.W. 
REpublic 7-7111 


C. £. Kefauver, Pres. - 
amber Federal Sevngs and 
Loon insurance Cor pors!on 


OURISMAN 


WORLD'S LARGEST CHEVROLET CAR DEALER 


LABOR: 


LAST 4 DAYS. a WED., THURS., 


“Gt i 


610 4 Street, WE. 


'S4 FORD 


Cenvertibie with seerkiing red 


Sale Priced 


= $1695 


Vouwr Sas Terms 


610 4 Street, WE. 
64 CHEVROLET 
Convertible Coupe. Greee 
lmterter. Radie 


TO GIVE 


PORTAT! 
WORLD’S LARGEST 5 


IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 


tops, Station Wagers, 2-deors 


4-doors, in all models... 


car tithe and guarentee, 


AT ALL 3 


Rambler Station Warcon. Green. 


i i i i 


3909 Minn. Ave. N.E. 


Block oft Benning Rd. 


LOCATIONS 


BIG SAVINGS! ‘55 CHEVROLETS 


The Biggest Dealer Gives the Biggest Trade-jn Allowances! 


itwee Selection! Convertibles, Hard- 
and 
Bel Airs, 
2710's, 150's. All fully equipped. New 
Immediate 


LOW MILEAGE 


COMPANY OFFICIAL 
CARS 


CHOICE OF 
BODY STYLES 


$985 vom 


36 MONTHS 
TO PAY 


52 MASH RAIME STR WAG 


ACTUAL Pre’ 


Fully equipped, radic and heat- 


; 


; 


Sale Priced 


*775; 


NE 


Tee te” ae 
De tear wipped 
New biee paint ne 
Sharp leekin cer 
Ne. SRG6A. O95 bows 


3907 Mien. Ave... 


62 CHEVROLET 


Feer- ~~ Sale Priced 


*865 


ne 


55 DOWN 


3907 Minn. Ave. 


‘00 STUDEBAKER 


Chameleon Twe-deer 


Sale Priced : 


‘33 CHEVROLET 


Was $1195 
SALE PRICED 


$995 


$125 DOWN 


2411 Bladensburg Rd. NE. 


2411 Bledensburg Bd, WE. 


"49 CADILLAC 


Four -deer “s1" Sedan 
Hydramatic. white 
eter 


Black 
Sale Priced 


YOU DEPENDA 


610 4 Street, NE 


53 CHEVROLET 


Eevleped with 
Bele Priced 


Sedan. 


‘53 MERCURY 


Twe- . . *Oae sate Priced 


"= $1345 
‘53 CHEVROLET 


Was $1495 
SALE PRICED 


$1295 


$145 DOWN 
610 H Street W.E. 


Handyman Station Wagon. 
and heater. No. 9548. 


on58. 8145 DOWN 


2411 Gledensburg Od, WE. 


‘62 PLYMOUTH 


Cranbreet Pour-deer Sedan. Twe- 
tone —— ena Bale Priced 


Very tube ’ 
95 DOWN. 


__. ."..-" 


i 


Siime-) 


BLE ae 


ON OVER LABOR DAY WE 
ELECTION! 


EKEND! 


610 4 Street, WE. 


‘53 PLYMOUTH 


Peur-deer Sedan Wihth Hy-trive 
transmiesten. Sale Priced 


*995 


416 4 Siveet, WE 


62 CHEVROLET 


Sevens de luxe twe- 
dear. wp blue Anich 

and rauinrped 
Ne. 7874. £95 DOWN. 


and defrester 
finish. Neo. 0497. 8105 
DOWN. 


Sele Priced 


*895 


Beige finish. Equipped with, radie 


24'1 Bladensburg td. 


? spadmocter Peur-doer Sedan 
; : 


~E. 


Black 
re ~t he Sale Priced 
whit@watis 

sonia $295 


; 


IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 
ON THE SPOT FINANCING! 


2411 Bledenshers B¢.. WF. 


49 OLDSMOBILE 


fonvertibie ¥-4. Yot- 


‘S1 HENRY J 


Bale Priced 


4 

rester. Economica! $345 
autemobdite 
Ne. £629. 855 DOWN 


sedan 
Bvdramatic. 
mentee 


Fear -deer Bale Priced 


$295 


rey 


9965. 854 DOWN. 


ee 


> 


Si i i 
Re 


Fourdoor sedan with jet black finish. Fully equipped and tn 
excellent condition inside and out. One-owner trade. No. 9559. 


390? Minn, Ave. NE 
‘48 FRAZER 


Peer-deer seden. Valle canionped. 
Riwe finish. 4 “ois “s Priced 


attemedile § fer 
lew orice. Ne. 0416 
ee $165 


“AS-IS” SPECIALS 


‘47 CHEV. AERO. 
Twe-deoer Ne. 9281. 
‘48 STUDEBAKER 
Feur-deer;: blur Ne 


‘48 DODGE 


Pour-deer: erer Ne. #719 


‘49 CHEVROLET 


De Lease 4-deor, bier 


A. 
$97 
RAR® 


$187 
$195 


Ne. D414 


‘47 BUICK $75 


Pour-deer. Ne. 8° 

‘SO OLDS “88” .. 
FPour-deer. Ne. 554%. 
‘AT PLYMOUTH 

Feur-deer. Ne. 9307, 
‘46 PLYMOUTH ., 
Pour-deor. Ne. 8116, 


‘48 FORD PANEL 


One-half ten. Ne. 9078. 


F of -deor. 


§ cms 


nish 
Ne. 6629.5135 DOWN. 


3909 Minn. Ave. WE. 
‘49 PONTIAC 


Fine y ag Do 


$495 


3907 Mian. Awe. WN.E. 


‘49 FORD 


yee -deer 


Ceape. 


Custom Sedan 


cede” heater, Sale Priced 


ia aes $QQ 


7 
ear “ion ge 
stic-A. 855 


“se” 
— 


3907 Minn. Ave. NE 
‘49 CHEVROLET 


Stvleline De 
a 


sane Cledb € 
oppecs. v Nw 


e & 

ish. time n- $7 Priced 
one ese * car 

P4i-A. 8O5 


 - 
DOWN. 


Four-deer sedan. Beastiful iwe- 
tome green Gish. Faily cvatp- 
Sale Priced 


Completely 
conditioned. Ne. 
9548. 8145 dn 


610 Street, NE. 


53 FORD 


Sedan. PFuliv 
=. 


caulpped. 
Sale = Priced 


| 


241! Sledenshure Od. NF 


"51 DODGE 


Ceorenet feer-@eer «1... wucs 


i i 


ee 


Was $2025 
SALE PRICED 


1795 & 


3909 Minn. Ave. WN.E. 


2411 Bledensburg Od, WE. 


‘50 PLYMOUTH 


Feer deer 
Sale Priced 


*395 


ae” eT 


S5S¢#¢# CHEV PDR STA 
PHOTO, 


> 
‘1. VAL 


Station Wagon Model “216,” four-door, for six passengers. Dark 
green finish. Radio and heater. 


6410 # Street, WF 


52 PLYMOUTH 


Fear-deeor Sedan Black finmieh. < 
Petueeped) with Sale Priced ‘ 


eT. 


Ne 9569 395 
DOWN 
410 Street, NE. 


Sd binge 


Teder sedan 


i i i i 


Sale) Priced 


Ne. 


‘D4 CHEVROLET 


Was $1395 
SALE PRICED 


+1195 


2411 Bladensburg Rd. N.E. 


Two-door sedan. Licht blue and ivory. 


good tires. No. 9321. 


™ ~ 
ee ee > 


610 H Street, NE 
; ‘ST FORD | 


Teder: tet-bBleck fin-~ Sale Priced 
ish; heater, defrest- 
ers. As te. Nae. 927%. 


Was S775. 875 Down. 


No, 8993. 


Prewwnn on 0000444400000 
2411 Bledensburg Bd. NE. 


‘49 BUICK 


a 
dl 
; 

Seectal Pour-deer 


Sale Priced 


*495 


410 4 Street, NF 


51 PLYMOUTH 


Sale Priced 


*695 


In un- 
ne condition 
$75 DOWN 


feur-deer 
biee nich 

ene” pas 
Na. 


Cranbrook 


Radio, heater and very 


eee 
410 HM Steeet, NE 
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OOo oGCE000000000088 oimanene 


At Reception 
Lots of 
Friends 
Turn Up 


By Frances Rowan 


JAPAN'S Foreign Minis- 
ter, Mamoru Shigemitsu, had 
a hard time getting to the 
Japanese Embassy yesterday 
afternoon. 

An official meeting at th® 
State Department which last- 
ed ‘til late in the day made 

im almost an hour late to 
the Japanese Ambassador 
and Mrs. Iguchi’s reception in 
his honor. 

The Iguchis received alone 
in the drawing room until the 
Minister, wearing summer 
whites, and his pretty 23-year- 
oid daughter, Hanako, joined 
them to greet the hundreds 
of guests who turned out in 
their honor. 

Escorted by Mrs. Iguchi, 
Hanako, a vivid siender brv- 
nette, took her place in the 
receiving line where she took 
time out for a chat with an 
@x-school mate, Joan Smart. 
Joan, the daughter of Gen. 
J. E. Smart, graduated in 
March with Hanako from the 
Sacred Heart Convent in 
Tokyo. General Smart was 
stationed in the Japanese cap- 
ital at the time 

Going down the line twice 
the second time was after 
Shigemitsu had arrived— 
were Mrs. John Foster Dul- 
les. wife of the Secretary of 
State, followed by John Sim- 
mons, Chief of Protocol. 
Deputy Under Secretary of 
State Robert Murphy came 
Fright behind them. Both he 
and Secretary Dulles had en- 
tertained for Minister Shige- 
Mitsu on Monday. Murphy 
bad given a stag luncheon at 
the Sheraton - Cariton, and 
Dulles had given a stag 
dinner. 


STANDING IN the draw- 
fing room were the Italian 
Ambassador, Manlio Brosio, 
and the Belgian Ambassea- 
dor, Baron Silvercruys. Baron 
Silvercruys left early, saying 
that he was going back to 
work. Greeting friends after 
cate Dine receiving line 
were the new chief of Naval 
Operations and Mrs. Arieigh 
Burke, who say they haven't 
yet gotten completely settled 
in the Naval Observatory. 

Practically everyone even- 
tually gathered on the wind- 
swept terrace overlooking 
Rock Creek Park. The Bur- 

se Ambassador and Mrs. 

rrington were there talk- 
ing with Mrs. John Stokes 
dt., wife of the Commanding 
General of the Military Dis- 
trict of Washington, Edgar 
Morri« and Daniel Bell. The 
Whited States Representa- 
tive to NATO, Gen. J. Law- 
ton Collins, and Mrs. Col- 
lins were chatting with Mr. 
and Mrs. Roy St. Lewis and 
Mrs. Douglas MecArthur, 
wife of the Counselor of the 
State Denartment, was talk 
ing with Mrs. Daniel Bell. 


PRESENT. TOO. were 
French Ambassador Couve de 
Murville: Norwegian Ambas- 
sador Munthe de Morgen- 
stierne;: the Indian Ambas 
sador, G. L. Mehta: the Viet- 
namese Ambassador and 
Mme. Tran Van Chuong; the 
Bolivian Ambassador and 
Senora de Andrade: German 
Ambassador Krekeler who 
joined Mrs. Dulles: and the 
Thailand Ambassador. Pote 
Sarasin, who brought his pret- 
ty young niece, Supapan 
Panyarjun. Mme. Sarasin, he 
explained, is in Bangkok. 

Greeting friends after his 
summer vacation was popular 


Elovius Mangor, First Secre- | 
tary at the Norwegian Em | 


bassv. 
Others passing 


bassador, Wellington 
Mrs. Parker West. Toshikaru 
Kase, Japan's Permanent Ob- 


server to the United Nations: | 
the Assistant to the Director | 
of the Bureau of the Budg- | 
Capt. and | 


et, Ralph Reid: 
Mrs. Floyd F. Ferris and 
George H. Willis, Director of 
the Office of International 
Finance at the Department 
of the Treasury. 


IN ADDITION to Honoree | 


Shigemitsu, members of the 
Foreign Minister's party also 
attended the stag dinner 
given by Dulles at the Shera- 
ton-Cariton on Monday 
This group included Tach- 
iro Kono, Minister of Agri- 


eulture and Forestry: Nobu- | 
ski Kishi, Secretary General | 


of the Democratic Party: 


Toshikazu Kase, Permanent | 


Observer to the United Na- 
tions; Takizo Matsumoto, 
Deputy Director of the Cabi- 
net Secretariat; Wataro Kan- 
no, Naokich Kitazawa, Yasu- 
hiro Nakasone, Masao Maeda. 
Shigeharu Shimura, and 
Shigeyoshi Matsumae, a!! 
members of 
Diet: and from the Ministry 
of Foreign Affairs, Morio 
Yukawa and Koh Chiba. 

From the Japanese Embas- 
sy came Ambassador Sadao 
Iguchi and Minister Shige- 
nobu. 

Among others at Secretary 


Dulles’ dinner were Under- | 


secretary of Commerce, Wal- 


ter Williams; Acting Assist- | 


ant Secretary of Commerce, 


Marsiall M. Smith: Chair- | 
man of the Joint Chiefs of | 
Staff, Arthur Radford: Army | 
Chief of Staff Maxwell Tay- | 


lor; Special Assistants to the 
President, Harold Stassen 
and Joseph Dodge; Assistant 
Secretary of the Tredsury, 
Andrew Overby; Deputy Sec- 
retary of Defense, Reuben 
Robertson; Assistant Secre- 
tary of Defense.Gordon Gray; 
Assistant Secretary of Agri- 
culture, Earl Butz; and Dep- 


uty Undersecretaries of State | 
Robert Murphy, Loy Hender- 
augh. 


som and Samuel W 


- 
: 7 
- 4 
; 
é 


GET-TOGETHER—Hanako Shigemitsu 
(left), daughter of Japanese Foreign Minis. 
ter Mamoru Shigemitsu. had an wunex- 
pected reunion with a former school chum, 


of 
as —_ : P. A 

es ; 

Phofts by Jack Larts. Internationa! News 

Joan Smart, daughter of Maj. Gen. J. EF. 


Smart at the reception at the Japanese Em- 
bassy yesterday. 


Thayer's Tell-a-scope 


Peter Pays a Paltry Sum 


By Mary Van Rensselaer Thayer 


NOW THAT Princess Margaret seems to 
have made up her mind, the following tid- 
bits about Wing Commander Peter Town- 
send might prove amusing. Press reports 
detail how Townsend 
lives in a simple, $84 a 
month apartment in 
Brussels. Such is far 
from the case. The 
Group Commander is 
holed in at 541 Avenue 
Louise, right near the 
lovely Bois de la 
Combe, in the most 
fashionable section of 
Brussels The apart- 
ment house, where 
some of our urbane 
State Department offi- Mrs, Thayer 
cials have lived, is owned bY a de luxe rea! 
estate developer, a passionate admirer of 
American ingenuity and gadgets. 

Heat throughout the apartment house 
is controlled by outside thermostat; gar- 
age doors open by electric eye; radar makes 
the 30-foot aluminum entrance gates swing 
up a8 cars approach. There is helicopter 
space out back, and M. Hamoir's helicop- 
ter pilot lives in a tiny flat beside the 
gates.. There are garbage disposals, dish- 
washers, cabinets with built-in ladders. 
And when one State Department wife ex- 
claimed in delight, the owner said modestly, 
“I tried te make them like the average 
American kitchen!” 


As if this wasn't enough, lush. wall-to 
wall gray carpeting penetrates every nook 
and cranny of the apartments. Town- 
send’s hideaway, a combination living-din- 
ing room, two bedrooms with fancy dress- 
ing-room bath, was furnished as exhibition 
for possible tenants. It's awash th 
antiques and other exquisite accouterments. 
Naturally, it's worth far more than $84 
monthly, * 


CHEERFUL, competent Refugee Admin- 
istrator Pierce Gerety and his wife are 
hunting a four-bedroom house for them- 
selvese and four sons, ranging from 13 to 4 
Though Gerety took over Edward Corsi's 
job June 14, he's not precisely a “new face.” 
since he spent a year as legal advisor to 
Philip Young, chairman of the Civil Serv- 
ice Commission and Presidential Advisor 
on Personnel. Gerety had quit and returned 
to his Bridgeport law firm when White 
House highest-ups asked him back to get 
the lagging refugee program operating and 
out of controversy. 

Pierce Gerety who's scarcely 40, looks 
a blonde 30, was born in Shelton, Conn. 
right in today’s flood devastated area. A 
graduate of Fordham College, he went to 
law school nights while toiling as a reporter 
on the Bridgeport Post. He commuted from 
Connecticut to New York on his first legal 
job in Wendell Willkie’s firm. In 1947 he 
set up his own law firm in Bridgeport and 
now calis Southport home. 


Ohe 


Ze 
Post 
0 


r and about WOMEN 


SOCIETY 
FASHIONS 
cOMICS 


 — 


i 


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 31, 1955 


4 


. 4 


— 
me. 
3 \ “~ . - sa 


REUNION IN WASHINGTON—As the guests filed by the 
receiving line at the Japanese Embassy yesterday, Hanako 
Shigemitsu kept on greeting long-time friends. On the right 
is Mrs. John E. Hull, wife of the former commanding gen- 


r . 


eral of the Far East Command. In the center, Hanako’s 
father. Japanese Foreign Minister Shigemitsu had a busy 


time, too, saying “hello.” 


Town Topics 


Gen. Dorn Has a Brush With Art 


By Marie McNair 
WHEN BRIG. GEN. Frank 
Dorn retired from active serv- 


ice a couple of years ago, he 
gave up one career to begin 
another. 7 

A bachelor, 
In his early 
fifties, good- 
looking, too, 
the General 
had produced 
the “Dorn 
Cook Book” 
and illu® 
trated it with 
his fine pen 
and ink draw- 
ings while he 
was still living in George 
town in a house filled with his 
Chinese treasures 

Rut when he got back ‘to 
his native California and 
inined the artists colony in 
Carmel, he turned to paint 
ing. Success was instant’ He 
couldn't paint fast enough to 
meet the demand. 

And now, after no more 
than two years of serious 
work, further recognition of 
Dorn talent has come from 
abroad. He has been invited 


Mrs. MeNair 


‘Shop Downtown Thursday 12 to 9 at 1207 F 


down the | 
line to join the crowd on the | 
terrace were the Chinese Am- | 
Koo; | 


the Japanese | 


REPEAT 
SUCCESS! 


New Shipment 
Just Arrived! 


——— 
a, 
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or Mail Coupen 


PHILIPSRORN. F Street et 12th : 
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| Please send me Bleck Watch Plaid et 14.95 


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Add. 25< extra on €.0.D.'s ently | 
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( 


to give a one-man show in 
Paris. 

Will he take it? Who knows’ 
Because in addition to turn- 
ing out works of art, Frank 


has recently gone into busi- 
ness. He's leased a large tim- 
ber tract and has turned gen- 
tleman lumberjack. 


Round-About: 


MET MRS. Alben Barkley, 


on the street the other day, 
looking pretty and trim in a 
black and white checked 
gingham jacket frock. One of 
the few remaining Senatorial 
wives in town, she said she 
and the Senator will take off 
today for Paducah to stay un- 
ti! January. Jane Barkley 
loves Kentucky now as much 
as her famous husband who 
was born there. 


THE WOLCOTT Waggsa- 
mans—“Doggie” and Lillian 
—are being welcomed back 
from Trinidad by Mr. and 
Mrs. James Clark and Jimmy 
Parks who have entertained 
at parties in their honor. On 
Friday “Doggie’s” mother, 
Mrs. Alexander Legare, will 


——— 


STRAT-FLATS 


go back to school... 


7th & K 


have a cocktail party for 
them. The Waggamans wil) 
be going back to Trinidad in 
a couple of weeks. 


ONE OF the most attractive 
couples to hit this town in a 
long time are Mr. and Mrs. 
Freeman Tovell—he's the 
new First Secretary at the 
Canadian Embassy. Mrs. 
Tovell is pretty to look at— 
she’s half Peruvian—and is 
the mother of four young 
children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Whee- 
lock will introduce them to a 
small group of their friends 
at cocktail time on Thursday. 


MRS. ROBERT W. Imbrie 
took Mme. Gork. wife of the 
new Turkish Ambassador to 
her first American theater 
the other day. It was a mat- 
inee performance of “The 
King and I.” Also guests of 
Mrs. Imbrie were wives of 
members of the embassy staff 
who were so entranced with 
the musicale that they imme- 
diately arranged for a night 
off for their husbands so they 
could see it, too. 


Farewells 

RETIRING Assistant Sec- 
retary of the Interior Depart- 
ment and Mrs. Orme Lewis 
were guests of honor at @ 
dinner party last night given 
by Rocco Siciliano, Assistant 
Secretary of Labor, and Mrs. 
Siciliano at their new home 
on Macomb st. Others in the 
group were Secretary of the 
Air Force and Mrs. Donald 
Quarles, Assistant Secretary 
of Labor and Mrs. J. Ernest 
Wilkins, Mr. and Mrs. Whit- 
ney Gillilland and Mr. and 
Mrs. Roy St. Lewis. 

Thursday evening Air 
Force. Secretary and Mrs. 
Quarles will be hosts at din- 
ner in honor of Mr. and Mrs. 
Lewis 


Travelogue 


PERLE MESTA, on a 
round-the-world trip, post- 
cards that she has had “10 
wonderful days in Istanbul” 
and that she’s leaving Tues 
day (yesterday) for Athens. 
Perle is expected to join Elsa 
Maxwell's yachting house 


See TOPICS, Page 4 


—_—_—_— 


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| 
THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


_ 60 Wednesday, August 31, 1955 You've tried the rest 

*-* . Now try the BEST! 
We offer for the first time the best obtainable 
PERMANENT WAVES ANYWHERE | | | at any price 


Formerly sold at our old Beauty Seion for $15.00 
and $20.00. Now featured in our new Beauty Salon 


Elinor Lee’s Recipe Box 


Tuna Loaf With Vegetables 


2 Tor. cans flaked tuna Dash of pepper. 
1 cup crushed potato chips 1 egg, beaten 
1 40z. can drained sliced 1 cup thick white sauce 


Wedding 


ORMA KEMPER SIMPSON 
EASON REIN 


Anne’s Trading Post 


How Rejuvenate a Playpen? 


WHEN THERE'S a baby in 
the house, the living room 
furnishings usually include 
couch, chairs, tables and play- 


pen. 

A second-hand playpen, 
with ‘blond wood finish, has 
just been given to a young 
Silver Spring couple. “We 
were s0 py because with 
the breadwinner of the family 
going to college and working 
only part4ime, you can un- 
derstand how necessary it is 
to economize everywhere pos- 
sible,” saye Mrs. M. A. B. 

“I will have to keep the 
pen set up in my living room, 


hands advise whether it's 


worth ——s in a bathi- 
tha 


nette, rather mn &@ small 
portable washtub? 
A Grateful HRader, 
Chevy Chase. 


TO CLEAN a thermos, I 
put about a tablespoon of 
baking soda in the bottle, 
fill with warm water and let 
soak for a while. Then use a 


bottle brush and the thermos 
will come out clean, spar- 
kling and sweet. I soak the 
cork, too, in soda and water 
to clean it, for I think a lot 


ticles lodged in the tiny 
pores of the cork. If the cork 
is very bad, bringing it to a 
boil in the soda solution 


—_. 

or the lady with coffee 
cup stains: Also use baking 
soda. Dip a dampened corner 
of your dishcloth into the 
soda and rub the stain well. 
It will take a stain from the 
most delicate china without 
scratching in the least. On 
heavy pottery cups, one can 
safely use a bit of the new 
scouring powders to remove 


the stain. 
Mra. W. 5S. C.. 


mushrooms 
2 teaspoons grated onion 
2 tablespoons. minced pi- 
miento 
1 tablespoon lemon juice 


Combine tuna, potato chips, mushrooms, onion. 
pimiento, lemon juice, pepper, egg and white sauce. 
Blend and pack in an oiled mold. Cover mold and 
place in the bottom of deep-well kettle and arrange 
vegetables around mold. Add water and cover kettle. 
Turn switch to high heat and when steaming freely, 
turn to low heat and simmer for 45 minutes, or until 
vegetables are done. Yield: 6 servings. Tuna mix- 
ture may be placed in oiled baking dish. Crush addi- 
tional potato chips over top and bake at 350 degrees F. 


for 30 minutes. 


iy ‘medium onions 
1 cup water 


Rein, * son 
of Mr. and Mrs. William C. 
Rein of Arlington, Va., on 


Aug. 27 at Grace Episcopal — 


Church. The former 
Simpson was graduated from 


. LA. Rein is a gradu- 
Washington and Lee 
High School and the Virginia 


Polytechnic Institute. 


1: 


3. vere 
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exciusively, this fabulous deal package! 
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Pat—Your Hairdresser 


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—_ 


now 
might tackle this job? I also 
want to brighten up the color 
of the beads that decorate 
the playpen.” 


CHILDREN’S BOOKS 

M. G. SMITH of Olney, 
Md... was referring to “Swa)- 
lows and Amazons,” written 
by Arthur Ransome, British 
newspaperman at one time 
connected with the Mancheés- 
ter Guardian. This book was 
published by Lippincott, 1931. 
Other titles in this series of 
excellent stories of English 
children and their active life 
in the Lake Country include 
“Swallowdale.” “We Didn't 
Mean to Go to Sea,” “Great 
Northern.” “Peter Duck.” 
“Pigeon Post,” and “Winter 
Holiday.” 

A wide, colorful vocabulary 
and interesting style make 
these books of Arthur Ran- 
some not the easiest reading 
for children, but the fascinat- 
ing content makes them a re- 
warding experience for the 
able reader, and particularly 
well adapted for read-aloud 
family circles. - 

These books are available 
for borrowers from the Pub- 
lic Library of the District of 
Columbia, .and presumably 
from any good county library. 

Lois Watt, Hyattsville, Md 


THERMOS ODORS 

TO MRS. R. R. Sisier. Ar- 
lington, who has trouble re- 
moving smells and stains 
from her thermos bottle: a 
weak solution of baking soda 
in water always does the 
trick for me, and recently 
I've seen thermos manufac 
turers recommend it on their 
product. 

And for an excited new 
mother-to-be, could some old 


| Engaged 


CHARLOTTE KNIGHT 
—JOHN MARTIN 

Dr. and Mrs. Benjamin Mitch- 
ell Knight of Winchester, Va.. 
announce the engagement of 
their daughter, Charlotte Gil- 
let, to Mr. John Bell Martin. 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Alan 
Rhys Martin of New York 
Miss Knight is a graduate of 
Stuart Hall. She. attended 
Mary Washington College and 
was graduated from the Kath- 
erine Gibbs School. Mr. Mar- 
tin is a graduate of Scarbor- 
ough School and attended 
Nichols College. He has 
served with the Marine Corps. 


SHIRLEY A. HAMMER 
~ JOSEPH M. CONNELL 
Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Charles 
Hammer of Bladensburg, Md., 
announce the engagement of 
their daughter, Shirley Ann, 
to Joseph Maclane Connell, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. John 
Thomas Connell Sr. of Edge- 
water,Md. Miss Hammer is a 
te of Annapolis High 
1, Annapolis,Md. Ham- 
mer attends Washington Col- 
lege in Chestertown, Md. A 
December wedding is planned. 


JANE T. HARRISON 
—JOSEPH COLLINS 

Mr. T. K. Harrison of West- 
minster, Md., announces the 
engagement of his daughter, 
Jane Turner, to Joseph Col- 
lins, son of Mrs. Patrick J. 
Collins and the late Mr. Col- 
lins of Washington. Miss 
Harrison attended Western 
Maryland College and Tow- 
‘gon State Teachers College. 
Collins attended George 
Washington University and 
the University of Maryland. 
Both are employed ‘by the 
Department of Defense 


back to school 


in GRO-NUPS 


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of HAHN’S extra value e careful fit 


All the latest shoes from A to Z for boys and girls with school in mind. Mothers can be 
sure of superior quality styles, designed on scientific lasts . . . sure of perfect fit. _ . fit. 
tings are double-checked by the Hahn store manager. As always, children may choose com- 
fort with fashion-rightness . . . when they have the HAHN SHOE HABIT! 


Teachers to Be Honored 


A welcome’s in store for 
new teachers of Fairfax High 
School. Members of the Fair- 
fax Future Homemakers of 
America are sponsoring a 
luncheon in their honor to 
day at the high school, 

Advertisement 


“Rade 7 sizes to 10 P ogs & 8” 


7.95 


For Teens and Sub-debs For the Younger Set 


smart in style, comfort, value fine looks, fit, long wear 


5” 


. fringed-vamp one strap, brown or red, 5.95 
. brown & white, black & white saddle, 5.95 
. brown grain 2-eyelet, youth's 12% to 3, 6.95 


children’s sizes 812 to 3 


mulberry leather with blue 


. brown leather, cush-n-crepe sole 7.95 


smooth leather, honey with brown; white .. brown or red unlined moe vamp strap, 5.95 


with red; black suede with ivory 8.95 . brown moe oxford, cush-n-crepe sole, 5.95 


NYLON STRETCH SOX that grow with the feet. 
Smart solid colors for fall. $.M.L., pr. 79% 


COED-KNEE HI SOX in popular cotton cable pat- 
tern. Favorite campus colors, sizes 9 to 11; pr. 89 


SOUVENIRS FOR THE CHILDREN 


078 mek 
*3113 14th *4483 CONN. “SILVER SPRING, MD. *Open 9:30 to 9 daily 
ALEXANDRIA, VA. Open 9:30 10 9 Thursday, Friday 
CLARENDON, VA. Open 9:30 to 9 Monday, Thursday, Friday 


5 


MARTHA H. ROBINSON 

BRADSHAW RB. BYRD 
. and Mrs. Harry Delmer 
obinson of Winchester, Va., 


Weddings 


announce the m 


nell and their four 


ington. Mai. 


ton, Mass. 


— 


of 
their daughter, Martha Hall, 
to Bradshaw Beverley Byrd, 
son of Senator and Mrs. 
Harry Flood Byrd of Berry- 
ville, Va. on Aug. 28. 
bride graduated from Holton 
Arms School and Bennett 
Junior College in Millbrook, 
N. Y. Mr. Byrd attended Vir- 
ginia Polytechnic Institute 
and Cornell University. 


VIRGINIA LEE WARREN 
—CHARLES R. JENKINS 
Dr. and Mrs. John Francis 
Warren of Chevy Chase, Md.. 
announce the marriage of 
their daughter, Virginia Lee, 
to Mr. Charles Robert — 
kins of Ocean City, Md. 
Aug. 28 at the Shrine of the 
Most Blessed Sacrament. 


Visitors From Boston 
MAJ. AND MRS. T. O’Con- 


dren have been visiting Mrs. 
O'Connell's parents, the Ar- 
thur Sears Hennings. in Wash- 
O'Connell 

with the ROTC Instructor 
| Group at Boston College, Bos- 


Marys PERIODIC PAIN 


Menstruation is natural and necessary but 

menstrual suffering is not. Just take a Midol 

tablet, Mary, and go your way in comfort every month. 
Mido! brings faster relief from menstrual pain—it relieves 
cramps, eases headache and chases the “ bives.”’ 


Washington’s Finest, 
Most Comprehensive 
Collection of 
“NEW-SEASON” FURS 
is Featured in 
the Jandel 


AUGUST 
FUR SALE 


... representing most 
advantageous savings to 


you on all fashion furs! 
DEFERRED PAYMENT PLAN 


If you buy. now on our convenient Deferred 
Payment Plan, your purchase will be placed 
in our Lay-Away Department until vou are 
ready to wear your Jandel Furs in the Fall. 


a 


wwrtdws 


PARK SHOP 


FREE PARKING 
NEAT DOOR! 


Open Saturday 


pANDEL 


. 4 
ATE, 


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BALTIMONS NEW YORE 
7 | 4 


4 
Child Behavior 


Is the Child 
Ready to Start 
School Life? 


By the Gesell Institute 

“HE'S JUST a month un- 
der the required age, but 
were sure he’s ready for 
first grade. Everybody says 
he's unusually smart for his 
age.” 

Or, “The school says he 
isn’t ready and also he isn't 
old enough for first grade. 
Don't you agree, though, 
that it’s ridiculous to keep 
him back just because he was 
born in April instead of in 
March (or January instead of 
December)?” 

This complaint, in one form 
or another, we hear every fall 
as time to start school comes 
around. We certainly don’t 
blame these parents. Their 
children often show great 
eagerness to start first grade. 
This eagerness may be ex- 
pressed in real interest, in 
letters and numbers, in en- 
thusiastic attempts to read 
and write. Or it may be just a 
generalized enthusiasm for 
starting school. And unless a 


_ child is conspicuously slow, 


he more often than not seems 


| unusually smart to his en- 


thusiastic parents and grand- 
parents—especially if he is a 
first child. 

Now, if your child has 
reached the required age for 


| school entrance in your com- 


munity, you will probably 


_ Start him in as a matter of 


course, unless he is con- 
spicuously immature socially. 
Or wuniless right along you 
have felt he is intellectually 
a little slow for his age. 

But if your child is one of 


| those who is not quite up to 
the required age, or if you 


have any suspicions that he 
is less mature. socially or in- 
tellectually, than his same 
age playmates, do think twice 
before starting him in frst 
grade. 


IF THERE is any question 


| in your mind as to his readi- 


ness, though he is old enough 
and you do start him. we 
would strongly advise a 
“trial” period to see whether 
he is ready or not—a trial 


| which ‘can be explained ta 


him in simple terms so that 
he will not be too upset if it 
does turn out that kinder. 
garten would be better than 
first grade 
Overplacement in first 
grade. once the mistake has 
been made. is quite easily rec- 
ognized. It is not just that the 
child can't keep up with the 
necessary “work.” He shows 
his unreadiness most often in 
unruly or inattentive behav- 
jor which causes the teacher 
to say, “He could do the work 
if only he would pay atten- 
tion.” Or, worse, “It's just im- 
possible to do anything with 
him. He just can't stay in his 
seat and he won't mind or 
pay attention or do anything 
that the others are doing.” 
At home the strain of over- 
placement is seen in extreme 
fatigue, irritability, physica! 
iliness, particularly stomach 
upsets, in morning dawdling 
and refusal to eat breakfast 
and to get ready for school, 
and often in tears and com- 
plaints that the child just 
doesn't want to go to achool. 
‘Copyright. 1955 Gesell Institute. Inc! 


STOP DABBLING 


IN DEODORANTS: 


Why put up with hit-or-miss 
methods — dribbly sprays, messy 
lotions, dab-on creams? New 
Sutton Stick Deodorant makes 
positive contact. It clings closer, 
thus protects longer. A certain | 
Sutton ingredient never lets odor | 
sneak up on you! | 


MAKE CERTAIN WITH SUTTON, Posi. 
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checks perspiration ... right on the 
spot. Your fingers never touch | 
Sutton. Not a grease. Safe for fab- 
rics. Soothing, luxuriously scented! 
Get Sutton—today’s biggest 
selling stick deodorant. ¢ 
At toiletry counters, only 59 
or $1 plus tan 


STICK DEODORANT 

SUTTON FIRSMENICS INC. 386 FIFTH AVE, I. ¥, 

. ‘ : 
, 


She'll Be Hostess Now 


Mrs. Houghton Is Honored 


DOROTHY HOUGHTON, 
who has been attending par- 
ties in her honor almost daily 
during her final days as Dep- 
uty Director for Refugees in 
the International Coopera- 
tion Administration, will 
have the last word tonight. 

She'll be the hostess of a 
party for her persona! staff 
at the Army and Navy Club 
at 5 p. m. 

On Thursday, she leaves 


for her Heme in bares Oak, 
lowa. 


YESTERDAY, Mrs. Hough- 
ton was guest of honor at a 
Mayflower Hotel luncheon 
given by fellow women ap- 
pointees of the Eisenhower 
Administration. Guests in- 
cluded Bertha Adkins, assist- 
and to the chairman of the 
a gre ter National Commit- 

tee, Wearing one of the pan- 
cake-type scarlet hats that 
she has made her signature. 
Treasurer of the United 


_ States Ivy Baker Priest, Dor- 


othy Lee of the U. S&S. Parole 
Board and Daphane Leeds, 
Assistant U. S, Commissioner 
for Patents. 

Mrs. Houghton was pre. 
sented with a silver tray in- 
scribed “With Admiration 
and Deep Affection from the 
Women Appointees of the Fi- 
senhower Administration.” 

She told her hostessec: 
“It's been great working on 


the Eisenhower team. I'm go- 
ing. to work for him in '}4— 
I know he'll run again.” 


MRS. HOUGHTON will 
continue as a consultant on 
the U. S. Refugee Relief Pro- 
gram. She has been appointed 
to serve without salary as a 
member of the State De- 
partment’s Public Advisory 
Group for the program. 

In the course of inspecting 
camps overseas for refugees 
awaiting admission to the 
United States, Mrs. Hough- 
ton has traveled millions of 
miles during the = tw ee 
years. Yesterday, 
luncheon, she was HP a 


ing a gift presented to her 
by one of the refugees — a 
necklace made by him in his 
camp. 

Her fellow clubwomen have 
also had their turn at party- 
ing Dorothy Houghton, a past 
president of the General Fed- 
eration of Women’s Clubs. 

Guests at a party given Sat- 
urday by Mrs. Newton Wing 
at Olney Inn included Mrs. 
Arthur Davis, president of 
the District Federation of 
Women’s Clubs; Mrs. Charles 
Hill, president of the Political 
Study Club, and Mrs. Gordon 
Lock, president of Bethesda 
Women's Club. 


| 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Wednesday, August 31, 1955 51 


*. La 


French Singer on Program 


FRENCH SINGER Helene 
Francois Darcel will be on 
hand today as WEAM starts 
the ball rolling on their Com- 
munity Club Awards program 
with a 2 p. m. meeting in the 
Perpetual Building Associa- 
tion auditorium. 

The program, conducted 
successfully as a public serv- 
ice in other cities, is new to 
the Washington area. . 

More than 250 persons rep. 
resenting area church and 
club groups ure expected at 
the meeting today. The 
awards program will be ex: 


plained and entertainment 


furnished by radio stars led | 


by Miss Darcel. 

THE COMMUNITY groups 
are invited to enter the 13- 
week contest which will be 
climaxed by the award of a 
$1500 grand prize. 

A total of $6000 in cash 
prizes will be awarded by the 
station in connection with the 
program. The winning 
groups,.in turn, are to use 
the money for endowing 
scholarships, financing schoo! 
equipment or assisting in 
charity work. 


Party for Randolph-Macon Group 


FALL freshmen headed 
for Randolph-Macon Woman's 
College will be entertained 

a dessert party to be given 
by the local alumnae on Sep- 
aay , at the home of Mrs. 

ang of Bethesda, Md. 

Prospective students and 
their parents will meet the 
local area Randolph-Macon 
girls at the 8 to 10 p. m. 
party. 


NEW STUDENTS from this 
area include Sophie Stuart 
Marshall, Jane Monroe 
Haile, Ann Hornthal, Lyn 
McClure, Martha Ann Me- 
Namara, Lee Sawyer, Helen 
Anne Spentler, Gloria Blou- 
in, Nanette Cushman, Ann 


Lanyon, Nancy Eileen Miller 
and Barbara Ann Sidle. 


@ Be geod to yourself! Enjoy 
CALORIE-CONTROLLED testy 
Mollyweed Breed with your 
WEIGHT-CONTROL diet. Ne 
other breed ie se Sled with 
the selected, extra fre ingre 
dents thet make fer luxurious 
eoting pleasure. Teste the 

tedey... you're due 
for @ very pleceent surprise 


svaet NOW wirw 


* BREAD 


FREE! ~notywoed Diet ont Caterte tote” 4 Chas. Schneider Baking Ce. 


write Teener Dey, Bex 1017, Beliywoed, CoM = nase be Mattnnel Bekors Servings, tne, 


* Reductions Now 


447) Consectewt Ava 
Va -bngtee 


The most startling Month-End 


(Today) 
up fo 


of this year or many years! 


Now you can get downtown to Jelleff’s for a choice of fine 
summer apparel, shoes, accessories which MUST be cleared! 
More than 50,000 dollars’ worth at much reduced prices! 


Or 
more 


Of course—all sales final; no mail, telephone orders or C.O.D.’s. 


Many items also at our branch stores. 


Reduced up to “2 or more! 


Size 7? Lucky You! $35 te $59.95 Wool 
Suits—tweeds, checks, gabardines, camel 
color woo!; also 2 tweeds size 5, a few sites 
11 and 13 suits $20 
(Third Floor, F Street) 
31—$39.95 Imported Linen Suits—beige, 
lipstick, grey, lilac; misses and women’s 
broken sizes. .. & PP Kae $15 
(Third Floor, F Street) 
83 Coats now $10! Woo! toppers in navy, 
red, gold, pink, blue, beige. Summer long 
coats of rayon faille, spun rayon, rayon-and- 
silk; mavy, black, red, beige, charcoa!. in 
the group are broken sizes 7 to 16. Were 
$17.95 to $29. nnd at $10 
(Third Floer, F Stree 
38—3$29.95 to $59. 95 Spring Coats—dressy 
and casual long coats and toppers a!! pure 
wool—navy, beige, red, pink, me, gold 
siete 7 to 13 and 8 to 16. $15 
(Third Fleer, 
50 Blouses ple nol te $3—broken lot of 
3.95 to $10.95 summer sleeveless tops of 
dacron bastiste, cotton, mostly white. Plus 
a few suit blouses of silk-and-rayon, white 
and beige 
(Third Fleer, F Street) 
75—$7.95 Baby Cord Cotten Coveralis— 
striped pink or blue, sizes 10 to 18.... .$4 
s Shop, Third Floor, F Sereet/ 
Pairs——$14.95 te $21.95 Summer Shoes 
ha lustre leathers, white suedes and 
fabrics; spectators, pumps, sandals, halters, 
slips—broken sizes from our famous lines 
of Customcraft, Mademoiselle, Hill and 
Dale, and Margaret Jerrold footwear. Re- 
duced to $8 
(Poaurth Floor, F Street) 
125 Pairs—$7.95 te $12.95 Shoes in Joyce 
fabrics, also white calf, and black suede 
pumps. Broken sizes reduced to $5 
(Pourth Floor, F Street) 
29—$25 Suits of Dacron-and-Rayon (un 
lined), in pink, white, maize, charcoal. Sizes 
10 to 18. $7 
(Sports Shop, Third Floor. r Street) 
Juniors’ $8.95 to $10.95 Bathing Swits of 
cotton, elastex; sheath, bloomer and boy 
shorts styles, assorted prints and colors 
9 to 15. Opie ep; 
(Jr. Sports Shop, Fourth Flaor) 
$1 Plastic Case fitted with shower cap, 
soap dish, wash, cloth. 5 
60—$1.95 Neckline Fill-ins, plain colors 
and polka dots. ...... | 69 
(Street Floor, F Street) 
45—$3.95 Cobbler Jackets—pink, blue, 
lilac, of spun rayon a ge 
(Street Floor, F Street) 
75—$3.95 Orion i pak, blue, 
maize. ... ..§2 
(Street Floor, F Street) 
61—Juniors’ $8.95 te $14.95 Dresses— 
sheer cottons, sheer rayons, nylons, cotton 
broadcloth. Prints, stripes and dark shades. 
(Fourth Floor, F Street) $4 
For Women—$29,95 to $35 Dresses— 
silk prints, polka dots, @ few rayon crepes 
and rayon chiffons. Regular and half sizes 
in the group—just 50 dresses at .... .$15 
(Second Floor, F Street) 
Juniors $17.95 to $25 Dresses—print jacket 
costumes, black bolero sunback dresses, silk 
shantung sheaths, sleeveless Crystalette 
Pe ge ORPET PPE TTL OenereT 
(Fourth Floor, F Street) 
63—$5 Linen Handbags, large and smal! 
shapes, assorted colors . .. plus Fed. tax $2 
(Fifth Floor, F Street) 
220 Pairs——-$2 and $3 Fabric Gloves—triple 
woven cottons and nylons, a few sheer ny- 
lons. White, beige, navy, black and some 
colors. $1 
(Street Floor, F Street). 


At Our Children’s Shops— 
Shirlington and Silver Spring 
Subteens $7.95 and $8.95 Bathing = 


og Plaid Seersucker ote. sizes 3 
’ ..$1 


Suits, Coats, Sportswear reduced up to V2 or more! Third Floor 
46—Misses’ and Women’s $49.95 te $59.95 Suits—wool tweeds, flannels, gabardines; 
famous classics, button-up and open necklines; beige, navy, red, gray, lilac .... $30 

and Women’s $69.95 te $98.95 Suits—tissue tweeds, soft woolens, ‘silk- 
and-worsted blends, handsome dressmaker suits; navy, Ben ag gray, pink M5 
32—Misses’ $59.95 te $75 Coats—fine wool mqnotones and tweeds—clutch and but- 
ton styles; navy, red, blue, pink, beige and mixtures, Sizes 8 to 16 . $35 
42—Misses’ and Juniors’ $49.95 te $69.95 Coats—long and short styles; Forstmann, 
Stroock, and exclusive woolens; gray, blue, red, beige, pink $25 
12—Weomen's $22.95 and $35 Tweed Coats, rayon faille, cotton, navy or black. Sizes 
8 and 14 to 18 $15 


Spo rtswear reduced up to V or more 

41—S8.95 and sides 95 Sport Dresses—striped golfers and one suit in rayon-and- 
acetate; print cotton halter and shirtwaist dresses, pastel eotton knits, two-piece 
Dacron shantung dresses, and broken krinkle cotton sailor dresses; broken sizes, 
19 to 20. $5.95 
78—$5.95 and $6.95 Blouses—embroidered broadcloth, nylon-cotton in lilac only, 
and white eyelet embroidered organdy. Broken sizes , 

$29.95 Suits including acetate and rayon lined suits and linen unlined suits in clas- 
sic styles: light blue in sizes 12 and 14, blue and navy in sizes 12 to 18 .. S10 
$17.95 and $19.95 Cdtten Bathing Suits including one and two-piece dressmaker 
suits in pink stripes, sizes 10 to 16. $10 
$5.95 te $16.95 Skirts, one of a size and style in linens, cotton broadcloths, acetate 
and wool; pink, blue, aqua, lilac and maize, sizes 10 to 16... $3 
$3.95 te $9.95 Shorts, Bermuda and short styles in cotton baby cord, Dacron, blue, 
lilac, pink and green in sizes 10 to 16 . and $4 
$4.95 te $7.95 Cotton Pants in all lengths from pedal ‘pushers to slacks, assorted 


colors in sizes 10 to 16 . te 4 


Junior Dresses reduced up to A or more. 
$14.95 to $19.95 Dresses including dimities, Velveray nylons, cottons, piques in 
tunies and sunbacks, some with separate pinafores, others with redingotes; — 
7 to 15 
56—$10.95 to $14.95 Dresses, including rayon jerseys, dimities, nylon re dotted 
swiss, Dacrons, ripple sheers in prints, pastels and stripes; sizes 9 to 15 .... $5 


Teen Apparel & Junior Separates—Fourth Floor 

Teens’ $12.95 and $14.95 Bathing Suits in one-piece elastex failles with form con- 
trols and cup lifts, yellow, black, turquoise, brown and rose in sizes 32 to 38 $7.95 
Teens’ $17.95 Cotten Dresses, including halter and sunback dresses with jackets 
and two-piece styles in prints and solids, both light and dark colors, size —— 
ment | | ~ er sey Seti pa MP FAD ee 

Teens’ $5.95 and $7.95 No-Iron Cotton Skirts in all around ene styles, broken 
sizes and colors $2 
Juniors’ $15.95 and $16.95 Famous Make ‘Bathing Suits in one piece “dressy and 
tailored styles: lilac, nile green, navy and red in sizes 9 to 15 . $16 
Juniors’ $12.95 Linen Skirts including slim styles in lilac, pink and turquoise, 
broken sizes $5 


Lingerie, Corsets, Negligees reduced 
205—$3.95 No-Iron Frosted Cotten Slips with nylon lace and embroidery trims; 
cover bra styles and adjustable straps. White in sizes 32 to ' 
247—$2.95 to $3.95 Cotten Sleepwear including waltz length gowns in sheer batiste, 
frosted cotton, soft cotton plisse. Prints and solid pastel colors in small and 
medium sizes $2 
99——$5.95 to $7.95 Bouffant Nylon Taffeta Petticoats, long torso style with flounces 
of taffeta and net; white in small, medium, large sizes $3.85 
269—$2.95 Summer Wear Panty Girdles in knitted nylon with garter tabs; white, 
nink, blue in small, medium, large sizes. (Street Floor Aisle Tables) .. 
$1.65 to $1.95 Nylon acon Flare-leg Panties in white, pink, blue with embroidery 
and lace trims: sizes 5 to & 2 for $3 
46—$5.95 to $18.50 Foundations, models from regular ‘stock, many one of a, 
. Be te $10.95 
116—$7.50 te $10 Panty Girdles, Dorothy Bickum, Hollywood Youth and Treo, all 
discontinued numbers from stock, all in power net .... $3.95 te $5.95 
60—§7.95 to $10.95 Loungewear including fulldength zip-robes ‘in printed rayon, 
sizes 12, 16, 20, 40; glamour lounge costumes in cotton, sizes 10 to 16; pastel cor- 
duroy bed jackets in small, medium, large; zip-up princess brunch coats in pink 
or blue sculptured nylon, sizes 10 to 16 $5 


30—Women’s $39.95 to $59.95 Coats—dressy and casual, long coats, a few top- | 


pers, all wool; black, navy, Lecce blue, pink, aqua, cornflower. Proportioned 
sizes 10 to 20 $25 


WOMEN’S & MISSES’ DRESSES Reduced up to 2 or more! 
30—$14.95 to $17.95 Dresses including print voiles in blue rose, striped sheers: 
some with bracelet sleeves $16 
100—$17.95 te $25 Dresses, including nylon jerseys and cotton voiles in prints and 
polka dots, sheer prints and light and dark backgrounds, checked ginghams and 
dressy silk organzas; in sizes 14% to 24% and a few broken sizes ............ 2 
166—Misses’ $17.95 te $25 Dresses in one or two piece — cottons, ams, rayons, 
acetates in black, navy, purple, brown, prints, a few whites $12 


COTTON SHOP—Dresses Reduced up to 2 or ‘more! 
300—Misses’ and Women’s $10.95 to $14.95 Summer Dresses including cotton voiles, 
spun rayons, checked ginghams, nylon and cotton blends, checked seersuckers; coat 
dresses, sun dresses, two piecers in group. Sizes 10 to 20, 40 to 44, 14% to24% $7.95 
150—Misses’ and Womens $8.95 to $10.95 Sumnter Dresses including pane ace- 
tates, sheer voile prints, spun rayons; sizes 12 to 20; 14% to 24% .... . $5.95 


BUDGET SPORTSWEAR Reduced up to 1/2 Price! 
190—$2.95 and $3.95 Blouses including cottons, broadcloths, Dacrons in short 
sleeved and sleeveless styles with scoop necklines, vee necklines, bow necklines, 
pleated necklines; appl ager dots and wide assortment of colors including pink, 
turquoise, navy, black, orange, purple, mint, lilac. Sizes 10-14 and 32-38 . 
$3.95 and $5.95 Skirts including cottons and Orions in prints and checks, flared 
styles; pink, blue, or green in sizes 10, 12 and 14 $2 and 

STREET FLOOR Reductions up-to 1/2 or more! 

“ Famous Brand Nylon Hose including stretch and 75 gauge, 10 denier glamour 

tockings $1.50—3 prs. $4.35 
$1.35 to $1. 65 Famous Brand Nylon Hose, broken sizes $1—3 prs. $2.85 
70—$5 to $7.95 Straw Bags in many styles and shapes including some with shell 
trim; white and natural with colored trim $2° 
$3 Jewelry ‘s to ‘2 off, incluges ye Bie bracelets, some ropes, in colored 
stones, tailored gold and silver finished metal $2 to $10° 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 


5 er ar Ba mm At Georgetown Playground 
_ BELOW It’s ‘Cool and Crazy’ 
Discount Prices | iim”. OE EY Ce a 


recent outdoor dances at the Georgetown Playground, 4th 
and Volte place nw. The girls, who had no bids for the 
lively number, took to the dance floor in a crowd and en- 
joyed themselves after hitching on to a lead couple. 


Storkline or Thayer 


CRIB & ‘MATTRESS 


Reg. 
590c 


Plastic Quilted 
125 Raitt Gowns and Wrappers ........ 
, rag Fitted Crib Sheet 


Training Pants 

Towels, 36°x36" .. TT 

Beacon Crib Blanket . 
Panty. 5. M. L. ‘XL. 


or 
33 


Mrs. V. Richardson has lost 
35 pounds and 51 inches 


I want te thank the Stauffer System for my new figure. That's 
Carol taking my measurements in the picture above. 

If you could have seen me before Stauffer em treatments, 
there would have been « great deal more of 


= — 


~——— 


part about my success story. I took 
the treatments and they worked! Carol Banning tells me that 


400 Panne Lap Pa pan fav wa work for every woman that is sincere about losing pounds 


39c Socks ds Anklets 2 4 to 10% see 
14.95 Beskenette,. Pad and laner .. . 
395 3-ne Booty Set, Nylon 


PREE 8x10 PHOTOGRAPH WITH EACH try lh OF aE oR Hee 
A Deposit Will Hold Your Purchase @ Mail & Phone I leoked “ferweed te the treatment for two reasons. because 


| I was really losing pounds and inches and because they were 
so relaxing. 
I feel — a new woman and every time I look in the mirror 
Happy Slenderizing, 


« the same remilts as Mrs. Richardson. Just 
arol Banning or one of her trained figure con- 
sultants will give you « figure analysis—tell you what vour dress 
should be—and give you a free trial treatment. Treatments 

twe dollars in « series and you'll lose those unwanted 
end inches and love every minute of it. 


Ett iti iti ticititt ts | 


coe treatment was « relaxing experience. I didn’t have te 
disrobe, there was no starvation dict, neo electricity, nothing 


ee ee ee ee 


Cali RE. 7-1234, ask for Circulation, and order The Wash- 
ington Post and Times Herald guaranteed home delivery. 


a ml A TTT -_—_— 


By Harry Goodwm. Staf Photographer 
SEND FOR YOURS TODAY. WALTZ TIME HESITATION STEP, but 
the couple took to the floor to try out their ® ; 


technique during a slow number at the 1732 Eye St. N.W. _ 7.7339 

2 ( . & dance sessions held recently at George- 
B ES ® a, town Playground. Twa of the neighbor- 3520 Conn. Ave. N.W.. - 22746 
« heod gang to turn up for the fun were 4307 Wilsea Bivd. . 7-2256 


Margaret Finnegan, aged 7, and her partner, : 
Thomas Howe, aged 14. 246 W. Broad St., Falls Church, Va. . 43078 
ASK ABOUT OUR HOME UNIT 


size 
ere 
pou 


FAMOUS “BEST-FLEX Tobe Says: - Saks presents new excitement in fur 


EXCLUSIVES Little Black Sheath + Ade 
SINCE PARIS has over s 
cideancl atts . dyed mouton 


screntifically-constructed shoes | | r a 
| lpg processed lamb 
that take them back to us have always had one in our 
school on casy feet. closets regardless, but now i 
these little black dresses are —— ‘ °.¢ m , 
Pee a reer ee PN ae dines gency eliol E: i at Exciting August Sale Savings: 


with scuff-resistanc tip. again. 
Brown. Spring heels The smartest ones are in- 


7 _7 spired by the free-form Chi- 
Sizes 814 wo 12, 7.95 | nese. Highnecked, long 


- 71 ; se 
Sizes 12% to 3, 8.95 sleeved, they hardly touch the 
Moccasin-type oxford in smooth body but reveal all its lines. 4 
tanned, calf-finished elk. Brown Those of us = are more 
ke on 17 conventional wi wear & 
Seses 8% to IC. sg 95 sheath with a real waistline, 


Sizes 12° to 3, with heels, often cut and darted on prin- 
cess lines. 
| Tf you are a belt addict you 
Mad and phone o ders flied may add one but it’s —_ 
smarter without a belt. Your : 
| fabrie choice is wide: soft | . Styled with a look of luxury that belies 
l : ] ‘ 
} one Bag lar | | the small price, mouton lamb never looked 


WASHINGTON ARLINGTON of them are lined to give them oy better for oa A 
4493 Comnectiont Ave. NW. 8 * Emersce 3.7700 Adtingios tied. & So. Glebe Bd. * Sockson 5.5000 bod | campus career. And 


y. 
(Copyright, 1908. New York 4 | | never a better value in versatility, smart 
ER Pa ee tan of " good looks and durability! In exciting new 
ee shades for Fall. Priced at this very won- 


derfully low August Sale Price. 


Sunnybank appeals to — 
sense of taste ... giving you the 
\ Price Plus 10% Federal Tae 

An fer * labeled to show 


| Taste ° ™ ingredients | , | , . country of ovate t of wmported furs 
alone proves — moe 7 SS ae 


Sunnybank NOON TO 8:30 P.M. 


margarine 


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better! 


~ oA L » 


AT 610 TWELFTH STREET 


| P ee — he el ~ THE -WASHINCTON POST end TIMES 

% ee ghee eh meen reyes cme 8 tee ee mer ednesday, August 31, 1955 

AMERICAS Who Says It’s pie eal eae 
b] . po 
Drink deliciou A dD | 8 if ? 
Yeiala, the Os’ 5 Lye. 


not-carbonated 


- 
~ ma ‘ ‘ a ” s 
P) aoe rs 
fe < : . 
4 “ ~ m 
a x” a4 a > ; 
om opaey * : >. ae » : ) ; ‘ 
Seay hate ) eae 7 os Oh bug ‘ 
* a > Ss ee fey is : 
et a} he ee ek a | 
Pen A ‘ s a One : “4 : * 
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Om ¢ - \ 4 Ded an : - , 
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Pu aS 
4 ‘ 3 g 7 , . 
ys ; Pas 2 
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‘ 


AS LITTLE AS $5 www PAYMENT-EASY TERMS 


luscious Valencia rT Your 


SM De ' : 
g.4 y q é oy 
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a 7 ¥ o ? bed - 
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. » » > ad ; a ; a ry. ¢ 
Ps an 4. : 3 
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oranges! ; % ' 
ia Pa ~ . + ‘ 
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Jer ec w? fe be - ‘ oe <i aw. % , . 
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- 


- 


By Douglas Chevalier, Staff! Photographer Youll LOVE 


ANIMAL CRACKERS—But not the kind to eat. CoCo, 
Mrs. Lawrence Wood Robert's poodle, looks over Blanchette, b od slender 
or “Honey Pot” as she is called by her owner, Mrs. Robert's eC1ng 
teen-age daughter, Birney. 
ae —— YOU'LL LOVE EVERY~ 
THING WE DO—with our 
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versity to firm and tone yeu, 
improve your posture, repro- 
portion your measurements 
to the exoct dress size ideal 
for you. 
ALL THIS IS GUARANTEED 
. with Slenderellc inter- 
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just for you and your very 
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FREE TRIAL— Phone now or 
come in to your Slenderella 
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decor —it's so relaxing— it's 
~ A ppm io —_ % like @ coress .. . $2.00 per 
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cuffed sleeves, patch —- wes ) Mo | Open 9 A.M. to 9 P.M, 


pockets. Sizes 10-16; ~, — ; Phone todey... Well keep 
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PR Bandy ote hy Ro PROMENADE—Birney Robert and her stroll down Connecticut ave. Honey Pot, {| 4!!! Ann coats, suits, aicientipicians soso: y ligen -sosngeteige faebl ME. 8-6033 
ington Post and Times Herald @>y skunk “Honey Pot” create a mild sen- who’s-only 6 weeks old is very affectionate |] ®° Gresses. i . a Pt ; 

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Attuned to today’s way of living-on-the-move, wool jersey is a fluid 
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patterns that designers acclaim in interpretations from accessories to full-skirted 


casuals and slender cocktail sheaths. Find this fabric throughout 


our fashion collections. 


Striped blouse, 
16.95 
Greenbrier Sports 


Shop. Fourth 
Floor. 


By Betse Cann. 
25.00 


Debutante Shop. 
Sixth Floor, 


By Talmack, 69.95 


Couturier Salon, 
Third Floor. 


By Nantucket 
Naturals, 39.95 


Greenbrier Sports 
Shop. 
Fourth Fleer 


For late-day, 
Luis Esteves o 
Grenelle, 49 


Misses’ Shop. 
Fourth Floor 


Store Hours: 9:30 AM. to 5:45 PM. 
a , 


q 


F STREET AT FOURTEENTH. NaAtional 87733 © MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE AT 4%h. EMerson 22255 
: | | Bat ce ' ; ae | 


- 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


54 


Wednesday, Ausust 31, 1955 


bell 


‘ 
‘ 


CORSET 


CONVERSATIONS 


Betwcare “Office Spread” 
«++ This Business Girl's 
Girdle Fits Where You Sit 


Paradoxical, isn't it, that the busier you are, the 
more sedentary you become. And, that's respon- 
sible for the only unpleasant out-growth (literally) 
of thot completely satisfying career of yours. Lack 
of « se (week-end golf and tennis just aren't 
enough) means thet figure-disciplining muscles 
lose their tautness, flesh tends to become softer, 
less firm. 


Secretery-spread, of course, isn't @ necessary occu- 
pational hazard. The right office girdle (and, it's as 
ditterent from the ones you wear for sports or 
efter-tive as your on-the-job clothes are different 
from your date dresses) nips away at your slackened 
weistiine, firms your hips, pares your derriere 
And, it's designed to be comfotable IN A SITTING 
POSITION. 


Beauty © your business, and it's shrewd oractice 
to ask expert advice whenever a problem comes up. 
Why not consult the efficiency experts at the 
Hecht Co.'s three corset shoos sbout the require- 
ments of your particular figure and job. Perhans 
they'll suggest the Jantren high-rise waisted girdie, 
sbove, at 7.50. Whatever they do recommend, 
you can be sure it'll get the job done in « business- 
like wey you'll approve Remember, forward- 
looking career gals look aft, first. 


the hecht Co. 


Washington, Silver Spring & PARKington 


/ back 


| which 


Mary Haworth’s Mail: 


College Girl Gave Heart to Wolf i in Sheep’s Garb 


DEAR MARY HAWORTH: 
In the spring of 1954, in my 
last term at college, I fell in 
love with and dated steadily 
a 30-year-old 
veteran who 
had come — 
to 
school for a 
degree in an- 
other field. I 
was accepted 
into his 


| e¢irele of 


friends, 
gave 
me a very 
welcome 
(and unaccustomed) 


Mary Haworth 
feeling 


| of belonging. 


Although I was only 21, 


r had felt older than my 
be- 


cause of my heavy work load 
and didn’ 


weren't unfriendly. 

At graduation, an occasion 
I had so looked forward to, 
I got the shock of my life to 
discover that Jim’s wife and 
child were in the audience! 
And a second shock-on learn- 
ing that all his campus 
friends (and mine supposed- 
ly) knew he was married and 
never had deigned to en- 
lighten me. I asked two of 
them why: and their evasive 
excuses were (1) they thought 
I knew and didn’t care: and 
(2) they don't believe in get- 


ee 


| ting a good rest 
| we shall go south for tuna 
| Gshing.” 


|M. Shoaib 


| Deputy 


Town Topics 


Society, as Usual, 


Is in a Big Whirl 


TOPICS From Page 4 


| party when the ship puts in 
| at the Greek capital on its 
| tour of the Greek Islands. 


FROM picturesque Pictou 


in Nova Scotia, Mrs. Myron 


Cowen writes: “After a three- 
day drive from New York we 
arrived at ‘this lovely spot 
right on the beach. It's cold 
and rainy and we are huddled 
before log fires. Myron is get- 
From here 


ON A Caribbean cruise are 


| Dr. and Mrs. Charles McEner- 
| Rey who will go to the Domin- 
| fean Republic after a Virgin 


Island stay. 
HOWARD PYLE, Adminis 


| trative Assistant to the Presi- 


dent, and Mrs. Pyle, . will 
leave today to motor to their 
home in Arizona for a holi- 
day. 


Dinner at Eight: 

THE EXECUTIVE Director 
of the World Benk and Mrs 
entertained at 
dinner yesterday in honor of 
the departing Pakistan Am- 
bassador, Syed Ali. Among 
their guests were Assistant 


| Secretary of State and Mrs 
| George Allen. 


the Assistant 
President of the World Bank 
and Mrs. Walter Iliff, Assist. 
ant Secretary of the Treasury 
and Mrs. Andrew Overby, 
Undersecretary of 
State and Mrs Samuel 
Waugh, and Deputy Under- 
secretary of State Loy Hen- 
derson. 

Guests from the  Inter- 
national Monetary Fund in- 


cluded Chairman of the 
Board, Ivar Rooth; Albert 
Mansour, H. Merle Cockrane, 
and Frank Southard and Mrs. 
Southard. 

Others were Mrs. Robert V. 
Garner, Jefferson Jones of 
the State Department, Robert 
T. Fluker of the State Depart- 
ment, and Mrs, Fluker, and 
members of the Pakistan Em- 
bassy staff 


Lunching Ladies: 

SENORA DE Guzman Car- 
denas, wife of the Mexican 
Military and Air Attache, 
entertained at luncheon Mon- 
day in honor of Mrs. Ar- 
thur Trudeau, wife of the 
former Assistant Chief of 
Staff of the Army. Maj. Gen 
and Mrs. Trudeau are leav- 
ing in a few weeks for 
Tokyo where Gen. Trudeau 
will take the post of Deputy 
Chief of Staff for Plans in 
the Far East 

Among Senora de Gut 
man's luncheon guests were 
Mrs. Robert W. Douglass Jr.. 
wife of the chairman of the 
inter - American 
Board: Senora de Spence, 
wife of the Argentine Mili- 
tary Attache: Senora de 
Morales, wife of the Nicarag- 
uan Military Attache: Mrs. 
P. C. Gupta, wife of the 
Indian Military Attache; Se- 
nora de Bentancur, wife of 
the Uruguayan Military At- 
tache, Senora de Donis 
Kestiér, wife of the Gaute- 
malian Military Attache; Mrs. 
Paul Harkins and 
Charles Wilkins. 


Defense | 


tag mixed up 

little intrigues.” 
While we were dating, Jim 

treated me as any legitimate 


boy friend would — staying 
well within the bounds of 
decency. Later, he apollo 
gized for having hurt me, but 
I don't think he really knows 
what he did. When he found 
that no amount of persua- 
sion could induce me to date 
him again, he wanted us to 
be friends, invited me to his 
home, offered to introduce 
me to people, etc—but I 
couldn't accept his help, and 
was ashamed to face his wife. 

So, I was dateless and 
friendiess during commence- 
ment week, with a lot of 
painful explanations to 
make,—as in my foolish 
happiness I had written to 
my family of my romance, 
and they kept asking about 
Jim. 

Since last spring I've been 
dating again, and although I 
have a good time, I am al- 
ways handicapped by my dis 
trust of people and usually 
plunge into tearful gloom 
next day. My family (and I, 
for that matter) think I 
should have rallied by now 
..» but I believe I am suf- 
fering as much from general 
loneliness as from grief. 

I have decided to enroll in 
graduate school next year, to 
be among people I can mix 


in “these 


Maliks Honored 


Cornelius Van H. Engert en- 
tertained yesterday in honor 
of the departing Lebanese 
Ambassador and Mrs. Malik. 
At the party the Maliks were 
presented with a silver tray 
on behalf of the American 
Friends of the Middle East. 
of which Mr. Engert is one 
of the founders. 


a 


DOORS 


Mrs. 


Store Hours 9:30 am. to 5:45 p.m. 


Julius 
Garfinckel 
& Co. 


OPEN 12 


with, and to keep occupied. 
This leaves me with six 
months on my hands, which 
I would like to be full ones. 
I am serious minded for 
my age, and don’t fit in with 
the younger set generally, so 
Y.W.C.A. activities and the 
like aren't for me—which I 
say without snobbery. I in- 
tend to join a political club 
that meets monthly; and ex- 
pect to enjoy it and make 
friends there. I know there 
must be other activities in 
which I could participate 


without feeling out of place | 


—but where, and what are 
they? Can you help? P. N. 


DEAR P. N.: You were cut 
to the heart by Jim's arrant 
hypocrisy and the indifferent 
cynicism of his friends— 
which seemed to imply that, 
from their angle, you didn’t 
really rate firstclass treat- 
ment in their circle. As if 
you were nobody im their 
scheme of things—en out- 
sider, of coarser grain or 
lesser origins. The fact is 
that you are not more aristo- 
cratic in feeling than they— 
fine silk compared to their 
asphalt texture. 


Your long letter, here con- | 


densed to a fragment, re- 
flects fine characteristics— 
courage, optimism, gentle. 
ness, honesty and willingness 
to grapple with elusive prob- 
lems and keep on ng to 
solve them. Your dawning 
awareness of an “overcast” 
of general loneliness does 
credit to your intelligence. 


It strikes me that you've | 


been an exile from emotional 
security all your life. Some- 
how your parents failed you, 
—i. e. failed to invest you 
with confident expectancy of 


being loved and accepted by — 
worthwhile people. Your soli- | 
tary routine in college was | 


due to emotional malnutri- 


tion in childhood; and your | 


: 
: 


cumulative problem of lone- 
liness stems from the same 
adverse conditioning. 
Involuntarily you shrink 
from appropriate construc- 
tive social contacts, because 
you assume unconsciously 
that you aren't “fitten” for 
admission to Grade-A close 
relationships. Thus, if you 
have time and money to 
spend on higher learning, 


ly re-educated for human fel- 
lowship. On the heels of that 


deeply. instructive expert- 
ence, rewarding. interests 
should unfold naturally. To 
go back to col in your 
present demo emo- 
tional state would end ups 
matter of going in circles, 
repeating mistakes. M. H. 


Mary Haworth § counsels 
through her column, not by 
mail or personal interview. 
Write her im care of The 
Washington Post and Times 
Herald. 


SALE STARTS WEDNESDAY AT 9:30 A.M.ug 
| END OF SUMMER 


44 PRICE 


Sale 


All Summer Apparel 
Drastically Reduced 


DRESSES - SUITS . SKIRTS - 
BATHING SUITS 


T SHIRTS - 


BLOUSES 


LINGERIE - JEWELRY 
HANDBAGS 
A WIDE SELECTION OF SIZES AND STYLES 


JEAN MATOU 


OF BETHESDA 
“Bethesda’s Most Complete Women's Apparel Store” 


7115 Wiseensia Ave. 


OL. 2-1500 


FREE PARKING 


_-_—-_-—__--— — - 


eee ee 
— — 


GOING ‘or 


FINE QUALITY 
SAMPLE 


FUR 


COATS 


EARLY BIRD SPECIAL 
Just 27 One of a Kind 


$25 


1 Hour Only—WNoon to 1 P. M. 


LAST DAY...TOMORROW 


NOON ...CLOSE 10 P.M. 


BUSINESS 
FUR SALE 


OUT THEY GO ... REGARDLESS OF COST 
$100,000 STOCK OF “FURRIERS” QUALITY 
FUR COATS, CAPES, STOLES & JACKETS 


INCLUDED ARE: 
MINK STOLES, MUSKRATS, 
BEAVERS, PERSIAN LAMBS, LET- 
OUT DYED MUSKRATS, MINK 
CAPES, SHEARED RACCOONS, 
GREY PERSIAN LAMBS, MINK 
COATS, MOUTONS, SQUIRRELS, 
BROWN DYED MUSKRATS, AND 
MANY OTHERS. 


$10 RESERVES 


YOUR SELECTION 


NONE SOLD TO 
DEALERS 


PRICE 


And That's Exactly What We mean... You Actually Pay Only MAIL PRICE 


of Our Original Price Tag... Regardless of Our Cost. Act Quickly! This Is Your Chance of a 
Lifetime to Buy a Luxurious Fur Garment at a Ridiculously Low Price. 


HERE ARE JUST A FEW EXAMPLES: 
Mouton woz, FF 39-9 3, Muskrat $56 “°” 179-° 
Muskrat “s'::' wow 4.50 sam Raccoon 959 *” 129-° 
Mink Stoles 389 "19459 5, Marmot... 429 “” 645° 
Persian Lamb~429- *°” 214° Squirrel 459 “79° 
Muskrats “sc 479 “” 89° Mink Capes 595297 


\___.. JBRESLAU 


B lack Watch 


ina new medium 


This plaid now appears 
in a washable blend 

of 55% Orlon® and 
45% wool. Sizes 7-13. 
pleated skirt with long 
torso look, 14.95. 
Bermuda shorts 

with pocket, 7.95; 
straight skirt, 10.953 
Black wool jersey 


blouse, 7.95. 
DEBUTANTE SPORTS SHOP. 
SIXTH FLOOR " 

AND 6PRING VALLEY 


oon 


614 12th St. N.W. 
Between F & G Sts. N.W. 


F STREET sat FOURTEENTH, NAtional 8776 © 


Fi 


d 


MASSACHUSETTS AVENUB «at (th, EMerson 22255 


Washington Store Hours eden, 9:30 to 6—Arlington, 10 to 6. 24-Hour Phone Order Service—Call Di, 7-7200 


KANN’S Semi-Annual SALE of 
ME FURNISHINGS 


LAST 
2 DAYS 


FURNIT 


69.95 Chrome 5-Pc. Dinettes 
Table measures 30x48” with 8” exten- 
49.95 


sion leaf. Patterned plastic top in red, 
green, blue, yellow or grey to match 
y 
éth Floor—W ashington; Lower Level— Art. 


dded chair seats. “Berkshire 
ouse.” 


10.95 Swivel TV Tables 


Arms extend to hold any size set. Black 

tron frame has ballbearing swivel top for 99 
directional viewing and lower shelf for ° 
storage space. 


: beeiak °°, 


69.50 Sert 


Hollywood style, twin sise 39° wide. 
‘Mattress has prebuilt borders, fem 
inner coils, woven ticking. Box spring 
bese is on 6 mahogany-finished legs. 


49.99 


12.98 Brass Table Lamps 
Nontarnish brass bases @ styles not Q 98 
ea. 


shown). Two styles each with gold foil or 
linen over parchment shades.- Three-way 
lighting. In 24” to 26” heights. 


15.95 Wilton Broadloom 
Embossed, thick pile all wool 
broadlooni in of Or 
beige, roge or slg, In 6 ik wed 
ing or rug sizes. 
Srd Floor -Wudkington, bower Bensb— Ard 
| , 


10.9 


RE and H 


19.95 “Formica’’-Top Tables 
Choice of step-end, lamp, end or eoek- 


Limed oak with Formica tops that are 
tail styles. 2 for 25.00. ea. 


stain and heat resistant, can't scuff. 
éth Floor—W¥ ashington; Lower Level—Arl. 


18th Century mahogany veneered china 
cabinet, Credenza buffet, Duncan 
Phyfe extension table and Regency 
chair set of 5 covered with striped 
fabrie. Allow 10 days for delivery. 


75.95 Poster Bed Outfits 
Maple or mahogany-finished Poster 
57.88 


bed, twin or double size, innerspring 
mattress with sturdy ticking and 
matching box spring to the set. 


+. 
A f iy 
w : 


Pa 
6-98 Ruffled Dacron’ Curtains 
Length 54”, 100” wide to the pair. Pre 
cision-tailored with French headings, tie- 
backs. Tested for washability, accurately 


sized. White only. Other prices now 5.99 
to 24.99. 


3rd Floor—W ashington; Lower Level—Arl. 


10-95 Twist-Weave Broadlocom 


All wool, woven on a heavy jute 
back with latex coating to hold tufts 
securely. G or 


beige, or $8.77 


5.79 


a 


Covered with Boltafiex plastic in 
brown, red or Dowelled hard- 
wood frames. Big, mansize. Resists 
seuffs and wear. Wipes clean with 


39.95 


4th Ploor —¥ athington; Lower Level—Ari. 


*  - ~t> 
2 


ticking has stitched prebuilt borders. 
Twin or double sizes. Matching Box 


“510 Coil” Serta Mattresses 
Extra firm with 510 coils (double 

$39.00 
Springs, $38 ea. Allow one week for es. 
delivery. 


size). Heavy weven nylon reinforced 
3rd Fleor—W ashington; Lower Level—Arl. 


219-5°Englander Bed N’‘ Sofa 
Pearl upholstery, airfoam innerspring 

tress. All-metal spring base. Opens to $ 1 79 
sleep two. 


eushions, king-size innerspring mat 
3rd Floor—W ashington; Lewer Level—Arl. 


brown or violet on white. Twin or 


17.98 Quilted Coverlets 

Of acetate taffeta with camellia pat- 

double sizes. 16.98 Solid Color Cover- 1 2.99 
lets, 11.99. 


tern in basic colors of rose, turquoise, 
ird Floor—W ashington; Lower Level—Arl. 


Fine imports woven of 50% wool, 50% 
68-88 
shapes in approx. Oxi2-ft. size, 


$99 Hand-Hooked Rugs 
carpet rayon. ‘ Borders of grey, green, 
rose, black or wine. Oval or oblong 
Srd Floor—Weshington, Lower Lbevel—Art. — 
4 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
> 


Wednesday, August 31, 1955 55 


TT 


44.50 Channel-Back Chairs 
Covered with woven matelasse in char- 

coll spring base, mahogany-finished 29.99 
legs and trim. 


coal, toast, wine or gold. Padded back, 
4th Ploor—W ashington; Lewer Level— Ari. 


Special height box spring to match. Double 


Twin Size Foam Rubber Sets 
Mattress has millions of air cells for buoy- 

Size Set rv $55 
Allow one week for delivery. 


ancy and tuftiess nylon reinforced ticking. 
Srd Floor—W ashington; Lower Level—Arl. 


129.50 Sofa-Bed and Chair 
Modern arm-style sofa-bed and matching 

with foam rubber. Eggshell, sage green $99 
or persimmon upholstery. 


ehair. Innerspring construction is topped 
Srd Floor—W ashington; Lower Level—Arl. 


wie 8 Ss 
Made-to-Order Slipcover 
sorted washable weaves as well as 


For 2-pe. living room suite including 

4 cushions. Reg. 73.90 to 91.90. Modern, 99 
e 

solid enlors. Allow 2 weeks for delivery. 

3rd Floor—W ashington; Lower Level—Arl.~ 


traditional or provincial prints in as- 


ORR oe TE, YER gee a ban 


Carpeting With Padding 


Installed in your rooms with Roberts 
7.99 
sq. yd. 


tackless method. Thick rayon broad- 
loom in grey, green, rose, sandalwood, 
5rd Moor—Washington; Lower Level—Arl. 


turquoise or champagne over heavy 
padding. 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD al By Chester Gould 
56 - |How To : , . 


Keep Well 


By Dr. Theodore R. Van Dellen 


To the limit of space, questions 
pertaining to the prevention of 
disease will be answered. Per-) 
sonal replies will be made when 
return stamped envelope is in-| # 

: closed. Telephone inquiries not 
/ . accepted. Dr. Van Dellen will | 
Jokes About <* not make diagnoses or prescribe | 


for individual diseases. 
SCHOOL HEALTH 


YOUR HAIR? A LOGICAL place to learn| (J 
v about health is in schools. Hab-| ' -_— 
What is a problem to you may often be viewed its acquired at an impression- By Dell Curtis 


: we : : able age seldom are forgotten, ~ ~ , 
psgiedeiodt od poopie, This ts cartaumly trap Ince mist sehouls give infer , YES, DR. MORGAN/ WE'LL] 7 I SEE THAT DR MORGAN y’ NO, DR. LAYTON---] | T WISH SOME OF THESE EXCUSE ME! me 


Yet you may have less of a problem than you appearance, weight control, pos- WAMEDIATELY / FT. HE GIVE ANY REASON? (T SEEMED DISTURBED THAT THE RESIDENT \\ MORGAN'S PATIENTS 


: . THAT HYSICIANS H ALLING/ I’ 
think, something that can be treated. The experts ture, skin conditions, and acci- | | | 7 ™ CALL a mo ore oe ee en di cdiie 


of the Hair & Scalp Clinic will tell you the exact dent prevention. | ‘ | , 4S — ABOUT EACH OF THEIR \ SHE WANTS / 
condition of your hair and scalp, which is the first Children also learn about ig 
step in treatment. And they will give you a com- sanitation, infections, physical 


‘ , : “yan defects, and general bodily 
plete examination free and without obligation. cere Uacbading thet of eves, 


The Hair and Scalp Clinic has 20 years experience ears, and teeth. A little knowl- 

in treating all types of hair problems, the majority edge of body mechanics and 

of those years treating local people, and thoroughly how to iift or push heavy ob 
understanding local con- ject may prevent a disabling 
ditions. back injury in the future. 

, . Later, the principles of «a 

More Washingtonians have sound emotional life become! 

consulted Ray Plasterer part of the curriculum. Girls| MARY WORTH 

personally than al! the other need information on family liv- a 

Hair experts combined in ing. Lectures on sex are help- 

the city. ful but they should be given by 


; PROBABLY WON'T 
IF YOU DON'T BELONG AMRS6.FRIZZ7BY LF !+eIN FACT, 


: an authority, preferably one oe 
| _. Dial EX. 3-3832 and make who stresses facts and dispels cant canines KNEW YOU LIVED ALONE * A WHAT THEY USUALLY 
yr P wi an appointment if possible. misbeliefs. Emvtion prob INVITED PEN TO BE IN OUR GUEST HOUSE, Hs 7 
s : > " — . lems confronting various age TO THE PARTY? eee 
Better still visit the office 
RAY W. P ? groups ought to be aired 80 
meal of The Hair and Scalp -~ shone a lanes girls = 
_ . get along with others and make 
FREE CONSULTATION Clinic. Come in today. hain white beth semen 
Air Asie In high school, the over-all 
Conditioned Phone EXecutive 3-3832 oe ‘medical field should be dis 
cussed and counsel given on 


handli ies, the 
HAIR AND SCALP CLINIC, INC. mooning ef maolind igupeath | = - Se SS les; oS 
d how to find lified phy- | A. * . s i . SS 

Suite 606-609 Bond Bidg., 1404 N Y. Ave. N. W cdsinh ciel Gubasens. The Rom : 2 . “ . , = = oe SS 
Hours: 9:30 A. M. te 7:30 P. M.—Sature 30 A. M. te wm iager learns about lecal health . _——_ > ~ = 


services, hospitals, and public| “> 
health departments. By Al Capp and Bob Lubbers 


Rie sc RSP RECLUSE Zeltme |. low ‘prevent and contre!) We, GIRLS IN THE WORLD- \ BUT SHE IS 


h h are vijal aspects of hea bedi - HAVE BEEN OURS ST COUL DIFFERENT. 

oh. maa . are vijal aspects of health edu-| ot , JU } A 

a eee NOW... CaO re eld he a iterun | COUNTRY= SIR RODERICK Fo. SWEETIE. HE <j | HIS PERFECT) TO HER-AS, 

Accept dalt de olacl adidas] Ml slelais)>){- sion of alcohol. tobecco. and. MUDLARK=--THE SWEETEST, | ~ eae ASKEP US BOTH FAULTS WE COULDN'T LIVE WITH. } TO ANY GIRL 
; P | | 

narcotics. Meanwhile, the GENTLEST, HANDSOMEST--- cee. | TO BE LADY <| | HE LOVED- L6W2- SHEEP-- IN THE WORLP 


youngsters must be madeto un- a ae MUPLARK. ME IN AND LOATHED MOVIES 27 EXCEPT US, MY 


~ ' iderstand how important good : ~ . ; 
° ihealth is in the way he feels, ae a a = wy? 53, YOU IN 54— 1 ~~ x, 
ectric Mixer —=uaumee i ae ee eas 
Periodic schoo! health exami- = : ae , : le = Be ee. oe at 
) | AS —— wee Bremeaes 
> os | te a tA 


‘nations uncover defects of va- / 
‘rious kinds. Many schools use 4 
‘a rough screening procedure! 7 


'which, while not 100 per cent ow 
jaccurate, spots a high percent- S 


‘age of defects. The child with 


poor vision, for example, may 
not know the difference or real-| 
ize what he has been missing! 
until the disorder is discovered — | 
and glasses fitted. A new world and ye yong od ate Bot 
opens up and it is surprising exposed to the SSuen. 

how much his class work im-- THURSDAY: Vitamins im 
proves. food and capsules. 

Even in the best organized NO SHRIVELING 
schools, accidents and acute ill-} WRS. D. writes: I have had 
nesses are bound to occur and several attacks of appendictis 
school authorities make provi- put have heard that the ap 
sions to cope with these emer-|nendix shrivels after age 50. 
So simple and safe...even | sencies. — Since I am near that age I won- 
a tot can operate it. En- The majority of schools have der if it ought to be removed 
courages kiddies to make a nurse or physicians on or near or left alone. 
their own milkshakes, drink |) the peaemione and —- learn REPLY | 
more milk. 1001 uses in the j|/to rely upon this health team a 2 
kitchen. And this unbreak- |/for advice and first aid. Stu. ade ote mye pve gu 
able, battery-powered Mix- j/dents are made to understand) 4.5) of the organ is in order 
er is so handy for barbe- the reason why they must re-|.. it will not shrivel with age. 
cues, outings, beach-parties. |) main at home when sick With it ever there are other 
Yours without obligation... j|)cold or contagious disease. In) uses of recurrent attacks of 
when you call for a Fabrice this way recovery is speeded up abdominal pain and thorough 

| 


Showing Now | — ‘examination including X-ray|” SMILIN’ JACK By Zack Mosley 


BRENDA STARR 


. : IB 4g should be made before under- n 
Nothing to Buy! No Strings! All FF ‘lk FS ee. | Ld SENET 90 Can Mo Line 
4 $ ’ . . ££ ’ 

Call for No-Obligation Fabric Servali<inandll * sanding eM a What is an se ty win : a cas om fra? 
Showing ...9 A.M. to 9 P.M. Phone HUdson 3-7300 thyroid ered - acts 16 

a’? . a 


Enlarged thyroid containing: 


; os | 


‘po 4 3 Oe 


See a ee ee eae One or more tumors [adenomas 


ADams 2 < cua tmne 
ad SS eee pe Ae ee ae ae 
Daily Crossword Puzzle ae fae . 
ACROSS YESTERDAY'S ANSWER ! / es Ee je LEA « ne \ 
1 Rabbits 39 Broken-arm —_— | ca 
6 Joyful support ne 
i 
' 


CARRY YOUR BAGS / 


10 Read super- {9-Ure 
ficially petting oF 
force 

14 Worship 42 Misty 

15 Food staple 44 Highways 

16 Detest 45 Part of circle 

17 Urge 46 Cooking fuel 

18 Containing 49 Form knot 

in 

| 50 Strugle for 

| mastery 

54 Agreement 

23 Ear-minded 56 Identical 

24 Position of 57 Coal scuttle 
difficulty 58 Engages 

26 Yes attention of 

27 Organ of 60 Delicate 10 Wearing 37 Foxy 
sight lilae color shoes 39 Dyers 

28 Employ 62 One who ll Miss Hep- 42 Revolving Ui wit. : \o sa 

29 Malice takes legal burn machine part a By ' : THEY MERELY 

31 Space cov- action 12 Eur. country 43 Citizen TH in4 sib f MISUNDERSTOOP 

| ered by 63 Harvest 13 Affray 45 Uppet wv ; Our NOBLE 

| acythe's 64 Ethan—-: 19 Songs for human limb a; . PURPOSE. 
sweep Am. soldier two 46 Aspect | 

34 Unmarried 65 Other 22 Devoured 47 Cancel 
women 66 Speaks 25 Writer 48 Locations 

38 Every 67 Wants 26 Whirls, as 50 Stinging 

| top insects 

| DOWN 30 Moral prin- 51 Ultima — AN’ WHAR DID VE 

| 1Calls loudly 6 Hay before ciples 52 Cared for : GIT ENNY SPOT CASH, 

je ~ JUGHAID "# (iF VE 


| | ¢ cutting 31 Look deeply I'D UKE TO KNOW ? 
To ne ae ont Se ee | 2Give en- 7Flufffrom 32 Bee product 53 Paradises PUT THAT BARBERPOLE 
eo e wor me Phe nebo oom reduc- || .. trance to 33 Play a part 55 Withered 


fabrics : 
| 3 Lassoer 34 Glide 56 Remain 
Medes yer ton a m5 pmeay $70 | 4 Before a ee. oe Cosan WHINS NORE 


on damask per 3-pc. suite . . . save up | 5 Egoistic 9 Rotting 36 Male sheep 61 Malt drink 


to $100 on nylons, mohairs, friezes, mod- ; _— CoE 

ern weaves. Save up to $60 on slip- 
covers. We guarantee regular Custom 
craftsmanship every inch of the way 
~no ifs or buts about it! Superb 10- 
Year Guaranteed Cradled-in Steel 
Construction Reupholstery ... or Made 
to Order Slipcovers with the one and 
only Appleskin Fit. Call now. The 
powerful little electric mixer is yours 
free just for getting the facts—it is 
not necessary to place an order! 


ee ee 


oO 
. 
; 
¢ 
. 


ie iri oe 


-—~+ 


—_ 


| RUSTY RILEY By Frank Godwin 


| 


FR ENDS ; HOW ABOUT THOSE “NOBLE PURPOSE af LANKY, HOW YOU 
CITY BULLS WHO THREW US IN SAVE THAT FOR THE SUCK ean TAK, LET US 

THE CLINK OVERNIGHT E / YOU JUST WANT TO MAKE BREAK OUT Cue 

1 MONEY WITHOUT WORKING, J VIANDS AND HAVE 

SAME AS I DO. A FRUGAL REPAST 


me) me) ment oe] oe | ef mel ee | ee | 


ee ed OO) ee ee 


[=[--= 


Kong femere apste ca be _“ gee 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
= Wednesday, August 31, 1955 57 


Our 17 fully equipped trucks are 
available for all types of plumb- 
ing and heating service. 


sr sys sr i 
George F. Warner & Co. } 


Open Daily 9:30 to 6 P.M.—Thursday 9:30 te 9 P.M. 
Regen WEDNESDAY THRU SATURDAY {| 
Models in Original Cartons —_ Fully "re we Fa 20 ‘hamnrtes)—-t- 

| a aabenA ag 

est Ne ofr eotte 


20 
93.95| rae tne cheerful selt 


Gications fer your 


TODAY are highly intelll- 
and very ben mn A 
mech . art. eclence: 


lia 


ill 


YY 


| | ; 

to aid others. 4 

WAFFLE BAKER aig 
Westinghouse : een | 
Sunbeam errr | 19.95 


oe — Onty) pangs a3 Limited Wage LI'L ABNER 


Ga 


nd 


\ 


Universal a Pcuhecdiidel 13.43 , ; | TH CROWD 5S THEN WARMED uP” 
us “Data in Union ren eoeiina mak coonacna ae 


Remington-Rand PORTABLE 


Case Upheld 
$79.45 P 


fon | Aesocialed Press 


| The National Labor Relations 

PORTABLE TYPEWRITERS 30% OFF Board ruled 3 to 2 yesterday 

IRON \that unions may bargain away 

their rights to payroll informa- 

Sunbeam Steam ...... 10.58 \tion used in collective bargain- 

ing. 

no The majority ruled that 

prargige $0 yo the American Newspaper Guild 

- —=|(CIO) lost its right to detailed 

TO ASTERS salary data of employes of 

International News Service by 

GE . _.e 21.95 11.93 agreeing in collective bargain- 

Toastmester, One slice .... 10.99 ing to the employer furnishing! 

Secitmeeshee 14.49, Payroll data lacking full salary 
23.95 | information. 

Toastmaster, 3 slice . The majority was composed 


Westinghouse 12-50' of Eisenhower appointees, Guy 
F , Phil 
ELECTRIC SHAVERS irs tga inc oaaers| LASERS eS 
i Com oo BUS TS ab polmnen Abe Murdock and) (ec cr 
~éabeme 15.25) Ivar Pengees A oad 21h 

ington Leedom sa wou n 
Sonianen tadien — ware 12.10|have required the detailed List. 


2 Ronson 78.) 14.53\ing of salaries of individual 
employes in any event, be- 
DALMO SPECIALS cause no bargaining negotia- | 
West Bend 8 cup Coffeemaker 1250 7.73) Uons were imminent. 
Mirromatic 8 cup Coffeemaker EC ag Fo ghee gg 
12.95 “35 entit to the fuller pay- 


Universal 8 cup Coffeemaker roll data } W 
Westinghouse Deepfryer 18.50| In another ruling yesterday | 
Universal Deepfryer . 11.25 the NLRB decided 3 to 2 that 


1.93.20 employer was not bargain- the / | 
-G.E. Frypan . ey ing in good faith when he in- all time! . 


Sunbeam Frypan . sisted on a contract clause re- 


Johnson Floor Polisher 9 quiring a union to get prior 
Regina Floor Polisher pproval from all affected em- 
Sunbeam Va” Drill 24.95 16.22) ployes, union and nonunion, be- 

a ore calling a strike or request-| 
Sunbeam Ys” Drill Kit 39.95 25.97)' ) 


ing contract changes. 
Revereware . eeeaserseereeens 40% Off) “Tt made the ruling in find- WATER HEATERS 
eae, ing that two companies—the| 1-year GUARANTEE 
TELEVISION \Borg-Warner Corp. division at| 39 GALLON MODEL 
| Wooster, Ohio, and the Darling- 
17” Admiral Table Model 129.95 113.93 ton Veneer Co. Inc. Darling- 
21” Admiral Mah. Table ton, S. C.—made improper de- 
Model 239.95 155.95 | mands in labor contract negoti- 
21” Crosley Table Mod. f/s 179.95 126.95) ations. | 
21” Motorola Table Model 169.95 142.00; The Board said “requirement 
21” Philco Console ..... 2 191.00 | of a poll among the employes 
+P pow Conasie td ; 195.00( ones a subversion of the 
- ra soe ‘VY collective bargainin Ng 
24” Admiral with base . 168.00 ight Aare 

Also R.C.A. and Zenith TV _ 


| ; 
elesbabeaped| Mae L1O'T V cpa Rereseetsrscenn 
BD) practical evehin 2012 14th Street N.W. 
Norge Washer 175.00) lab course-*5 witty. Phone DE. 2-2700 
Whirlpool Washer 175.00) TEMPLE SCHOOL 7 50 Years “JUST™ Service 
Bendix Washer 175.00 _*338 G $7. WABS630 | 
Norge Electric Dryer 110.00 | ; 
Norge Electric Dryer 135.00 
Bendix lromer ..... «esses: ;' 142.00 
lronrite lroner 164.50 


REFRIGERATORS 


Crosley 9.5 cu. f- 299.95 172.00 
Norge 9.8 cu. ft......+++- 269.95 189.95 
Norge 12 cu. ff. ......+00+ 419.95 245.00 
Norge 13 cu. ft.-2 Door .... 529.95 298.06 
Philco 10 cu. ft. 399.95 249.00 
Philco 10 cu. ft. 2-door 429.95 265.00) : 
Philco 12.6 cu. ft. 291.00 bet 


ROTISSERIE-BROILER-GRILL With Wheels and Swivel Top HALF 
ball Auto. Timer. 2 ’ MODEL C3 Cc POUND : By | y Mtcalfe 


heat controls. ->. 
Pully aute- tee ; tily, hes 


| 4 - , : . 
matie all ae now 2 in 1 Moor , As You Are Mine 


r , vot. . ; 
: cl ; $ 95 Dianters we € I do not own the rail- 
Guarantee ; 43. | THE BAG roads or... The ocean 
PEANUTS sxeu | oan aon... Lede he 


Lewyt Canister with Pa- ha fortune, dear... 
$] 8:95 poose and walirack 99.95 49.95 That can offer you... 


also Hoover f tucks Cones |} Planters PEANUTCANDY. 39%, I am no kind of genius 
1955 WINDOW FANS . and ...I am no million- 


aire ... And all my prom- 


E Year ‘Round Ventilator ..... . 34. m ises are just . . . Another 
GE Year entila 34.95 19.95 MR. PEANUT ee a 


in 20” Elec. ible nn. 59. Be 
ach 20” ieee ns pope aa: : SCHOOL RULER have faith in God, 
a oe 
) 


; ” , ) ... Have confidence today 
Are 4 Serene 28.95 16.82) . That you will be 


Vornado 16W .. kc ecm ewe ee 0995 PAT beth beside me as ...tI go 
| 40.27 | 1) or FT oh eae along my way... And 
as PEANUT: STORE Mle He 
4: _ PA f - m eee yo 
| prety ot TE i in me... It matters not 


923 11th St. N.W FOR ‘Als svokts OPEN EVEUNGS & i ae 
| th 
We SALES COC Gs) ae , 7010 F ST. N.W. | prettere net ew Bee 
chance. 


Rae 


Opposite Woodward & Lothrop) 


( 
721 14th St. N.W. 705 15th St. NW. 


Call RE. 71-1234, ask-for Cireulation, and order The Wash- G & N.Y. Ave.) G & N. ¥. Ave.) 
hogton Post and Times Herald guaranteed home delivery. 


q 


\ 


% 


By Paul Nichols 


AND WHETHER I 
WAS ACTUALLY GUILTY 
OF THE CRIME MAKES 
NO DIFFERENCE TO 

SOCIETY EITHER / 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD JUDGE PARKER 


Wednesday, August 31, 1955 


SIT DOWN, ~ {F YOU DON'T MIND, 


58 £ _e | 
The DISTRICT LINE By Bill Gold) iscrt"/srncerSectise 


oo-PARTICULARLY ONE 


iF YOU HAVE ME HERE | j 
a At Least We Learned 


A Few Things 


OUR TRANSIT strike 
wasn't a very pleasant ex- 
perience, but it’s an ill wind 
that blows no good. At least 
we've learned a few things 
from it. 

City officials are now pon- 
dering the lessons of the 
strike. and the resulting 
recommendations for more 
policemen, revised speed 
limits. the elimination of 
streetcars and loading plat- 
forms and similar changes 

Most of these are long-term 
adjustments; in some in- 
stances they would require 
congressional action But 
there's one constructive step 
that can be taken rather 
quickly if the City Fathers 
choose 

One reason traffic moved 
as well as Ht did dering 
the strike was that police 
cranes worked overtime 
te haul away vehicles i) 
legally parked during rush 
hours. 

Putting a ticket on a car 
which is blocking a liane 
needed for running traffic 
doesn't do much good. But 
towing away the offending 
auto doubles the carrying 
capacity of a two-lane street. 

Under normal circu m- 
stances. Washington police do 


Adds Fun 
to 


| GIVE-AWAYS 


cHEew! 


WRIGLEY S 
nG GUM 


not remove many such vehi- 
cles because Congress has 
never appropriated the 
money to provide a sufficient 
number of cranes. 

In other cities where a 
similar problem existed, 
notably in San Francisco, 
it was solved through the 
use of garage tow trucks, 
and other privately owned 
eranes. It would be sim- 
ple enough to set up such 
a system here. “ 
It might work like this, 

for example: Crane owners 
wishing to participate would 
post bond and be licensed by 
the city. -One of their prow!l- 
ing vehicles spotting a car 
blocking traffic in rush hour 
would get the policeman on 
the corner to write a ticket 
authorizing removal The 
auto would be stored at the 
private garage pending pay- 
ment of a fine plus a stand- 
ard towing charge. 

Former District Commis- 
sioner F. Joseph Donohue, 
who saw the system in oper- 
ation in San Francisco, is im- 
pressed with it. He tells me: 

“Many drivers will park 
iegally when all they risk 

is a ticket. Bat very few are 
willing te gamble on the 

that their cars 
will be towed away. The 
system does keep streets 
free for moving traffic.” 


cos 


. TOPAY'’S BIRTHDAYS 


Greetings to President 
Ramon Magsaysay, Gen. Clif 


| ton BR. Cates. Jack R. Howard. 
| Wiliam Saroyan Rep 


James I. Dolliver, Rep. Mor 


| gan M. Moulder, Rep. James 
| P. Richards and Arthur God 
| frey. 


cos 


Fat, mischievous, gray kit- 
tens; $1 inclosed for Chil- 
dren's Hospital (Juniper 

730). White mother ham- 


Pure Wholesome 


“nay 
— ° 


=e 


inexpensive 


ster and three pink babies 
(Randolph 67275). Black fe- 
male personality kitten (Ran- 
dolph 6-0280 after 6:30 p. m.). 

ow . 
GENTLER SEX 


This week we received a 


letter from Alan L. Dean of 
3037 N. Stafford st., Arling- 
ton, thanking this newspaper 
for having selected him as 
the “Ideal Father of 1955,” 
and telling us how much he 
and his family enjoyed the 
episode. 

Inasmuch as the contest 
was held many weeks ago, 
and District Liner Dean's let- 
ter was dated July 5, we were 
a bit puzzled to be receiving 
it at this late date. Then we 
noticed a second letter, at- 
tached to the first, and that 
explained everything. 

The second letter was 
from Vera Dean, who con- 
fessed that she had for- 
gotten to mail her hus- 
band’s letter, and fully ex- 
pected as a result_ of her 
oversight that tomorrow's 
classified section would 
carry an ad stating: “Want- 
ed by Ideal Father, an Ideal 
Secretary.” 

Thus far the ad hasn't 
come in, and I doubt that it 
will. But let's have no more 
joshing about absent-minded 
husbands who forget to mail 
Mama's letters. 

ow 
WHAT A MAN 

Mrs. Dorothy A. Weaver 
of 409 37th place se. is chuck- 
ling about my account of 
mate versus female shopping 
habits. She thinks I ought to 
know her husband. David 

“He does all our shop 
ping, and never coes ever 
his $20 weekly food budget. 
He picks out better cuts of 
meat than I ever did, and 
even his motherin-law i« 
impressed with his skillful 
buying. Sometimes he sur- 
prises me by bringing home 
a dress for me. The sire, 
style and coler are always 
perfect. Nobody will be- 
lieve he picked it out him- 
self.” 

I'm impressed with Dor. 

othy’s report that since Dave 
| has been doing the buying 
| the Weavers have been éat- 
| Ing better than ever. and on 
less money. But in a sense, 
I've got to rate him a traitor 


FOR A LECTURE, TM 


ae 


are 


kt (0ae, Prane 


i ad 


WHO SERVED TIME FOR 
EMBEZLLING FUNDS / 


By Milt Canift _ 


AAEGANWHILE « BACK IN THE UNITED STATES... . 


FZ Gee. 


pen ES 


——— —- 
— ee 


petizers and tinned deli- 
cacies. 
os = 

ADD SIMILES 
Eve Garden puts it this 
way: “As hard to get hold of 
as a watermelon seed on a 
linoleum floor.” 


~ FERD’NAND® 


to his sex. After Dorothy oo 


makes out the menus, Dave TIME MARCHES ON 
goes out and buys exactly An astronomer predicts 


those items on the list. and | 
no more. that the world will end in 


I didn't know there ex- 10 billion years. We'd better 
isted a man who could get a wiggle on if we hope 
walk out of a supermarket _ to finish the Peace Cross 


FARM BUREAU without a cart full of pie- flood control project before 3 
INSURANCE |S CHANGING kles, olives, cold cuts, ap- then. DONALD DUCK 


TS NAME TO "NATIONWIDE’ TERE RE, Pa SS 
{otermth iy Bion. ny | rn a Rg ee 4 tad a ke 


¥ 


“@ ON BRIDGE 


NO TRICK AT ALL. PEOPLE North-South vulnerable.;mentary quandary but decided) @ 
'N STATES WHERE FARM South deals 2M he had sufficient strength to 
BUREAU DOESN'T OPERATE N “a ™~ contract for siam provided 
WANT TO JOIN US, TO | partner had an ace. Since there 
AVOID CONFUSION wiTH was a slight chance that partner 
COMPANIES IN OTHER STATES, 
WE NEEDED A NEW NAME, 


UNCA OONALD 1 CAN OO rT... J M-1-6-6-1-3-S$4-P?-!, 
WAKE UP AND LISTEN’ : MiSSissirri’ 


\had made a perfectly sound 
R , itwo club takeout on an aceless 
’ 


FAST hand he decided to try four no 
a4 trump and propelled himself|~~s5 
: Hy hs ‘into six clubs when South PENNY 


o 1076542 showed an ace it 


on Se ptember lst the mame West being in a confused 
state of mind, believed North 


Farm Bureau Insurance of Ohio ‘to be declarer at the slam in 


ose clubs and that it was his part- ANNO LOVE THE BANO NEW CHARTREUSE O@Ess! 
? 'e, will change te... ‘ner who was to make the open AT THE PITZMORE... 


ling lead. Under the circum-* Ay 
. stances he was in a position to ~ 
Ti ‘request a spade lead by making . 
4 a3 =, Pass ; . a lead directing double. He \ 
: NSURANC E 5 ain monde Pass : , hoped that the spade ruff to- , 
see 


oeble AN Pass gether with the ace of hearts 
i MANONENSS GUTUM, CRANES Company A comedy of errors involving would set the contract 
BATON ET OR TA FE TER A OE SOeer A ary a strange array of facts is set When the auction was con-| 
SATO EE ORE RR ON A ow forth today. An inferior re-|\Cluded West pointed to his) 
HOME OFIYCE, COLUMBUS. ONTO lsponse by South and a bit of | Partner with a triumphant ges-| 
absentmindedness on the part|‘ure and asked him to lead. 
of West combined to produce East was against committing 
a highly unnatural ending to such an indiscretion and West 


a a 
| the story realized that the lead was his. SUSIE Q SMITH 
ia r S . In third position North This placed a gloomier view on a 
opened with one spade and/the situation for, without the se 


bx ve REL ca h 
IF YOU HATE THE BAND PEWNY? BROTHES, yOu DECORATIONS AT THE 
AT THE GR4NOE HOTEL! | WOMEN ARB ILLOGICAL f RITZMORE CLAGH wiITli MY 


vy 
pot, South chose two clubs as a ‘U, it did not seem that the ef tt ‘HE GAS ED, 
THE SHOE FOR CHILDREN as | "SU ie nf BO MJ 


temporizing response. This is contract could be beaten. Since ; 
- “ ' distinctly questionable strategy |*® M®"yY points alrea ly hung > Bir , " ad IN HIS THROAT / 
ore FITTING “~ al as a bid of two clubs in this|!” the balance, West decided to 
A instance is not a temporizing risk the loss of an over-trick 
EOF pefeens bid. In view of South's previous by gamblx g on finding a part 
EVERY STEP OF THE WAY pass, North is at liberty to pass) "** with the king of hearts. He 
—— the two club call. The suggested therefore underied his ace. East 
was stunned when he won the 


‘- # 
>/ 4 BACK TO SCHOOL! response is three spades which iwlek with his kind. fut be fo 
Mey F 


North need not carry on if he 
rom the benches of the world’s has opened a shaded hid | gained nis composure in time 


master shoe craftsmen come Edwards, When West overcalled with | return & spade. 
< . : 
The Shoe For Children. Here, the) two hearts, North was in a mo- 
skilled hands of our specially 
trained fitters select the right 
: 
Edwards shoe for your childs! 
foot-—there is ne substitute for the | 


Py PK ~g-——/{ SILVER SPRING 
every step way! Come HAS 
EVERYTHING! 


Coorrient 1955. be Chicage Tripune? 


———— 


and have your child fitted in new 
Edwards shoes today 


(6.«K...KI0S/ TLL WE ALL JUST SIT AROUND } | IIT SORTA HELPS MAKE TH’) 
MEET YOU IN ON BOXES WHILE | READ MYSTERY TALES MORE | 
A FEW MINUTES ‘EM STORIES / SPOOKY / 


You BETCHA! presses, SHOES, Bo J 

SUITS, BOOKS, PENCLLS- 4. ey 

GOLLY, EVERYTHING For\7(- | “ 
BACK TO SCHOOL 


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$5.50 according 
te size 


SHuOWE 
ru. g€ .Ate 
FO? 


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YOU'VE CERTAINLY STARTED VERY WELL, 
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By George Wunder 


JUST THAT TAKING OUR 


SPRAY, YOU'VE BEEN MCE TO mE. I'm 
VERY GRATEFUL ~ BUT IF YOU DON'T STOP 
SWRKING UKE A RECRUITER, TLL HATE You/ 


Ete: PAN 
—S (omens yi, y 


an 
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— 


BASE 
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Zi; 


Playful Phantom 


By Jack Anderson $672 a month; James Trimble 


(While Drew Pearson is on (D) whose wife, Ruth, collects 
vacation his usual column will | $403. | 
“A P haat by members of his California—Gordon McDon-| 
5 

n Phillips (R), wife, Doro 


pered, haunts the Pentagon 
after dark. By all accounts it 
is a playful 
spook havi 
itselfaH 
loween in the 
world’s big- 
gest, emptiest 
building. 
As soon as 
the gloom seét- 


ed ‘seanhen |» Plorida—A. S. Herlong (D), 
starts flashing wife, Maty Alice, $211. 
the telephone | [linois—Thomas Gordon (D), 
s witeh boar 
+. 80n (R), daughter, Janet, $264; 
from: empty rooms, tampering |H,told Velde (R), wife, Delores, 
ps $373; Melvin Price (D), brother, 
els and scaring scrubwomen Raymond, $317. 
out of their wits. lowa—Henry Talle (R), wife, 
| The — that wornles |Gladyce 
‘agents is w er the ghost : 
security elearance. For it ap- Bg ge Oy George (R), 
parently has been prowling the 1 euleiene.. George Long (D) 
darkened corridors f a restrict- wife. Jewel. $680: T. A. Thomp- 
begs, yp son (D), wife, Willa, $524; F. 
Payroll Padding ‘Edward Hebert (D), wife, 
. Gladys, $480; Hale Boggs (D), 
When Congressmen boosted wife, Corine, $307. 
their own pays50 per cent, it) ~Maine—Charles Nelson (R), 
was supposed to stop payroll wife, Ariene, $264. 


gan (D), wife, Martha, $228; 
Donald Jackson (R), wife, Shir- 
ley, $194; Leroy Johnson (R), 
wife, Elizabeth, $156. 
| Colorado—Wayne Aspinal! 
|(D), son, Owen, $281. 
Connecticut—Albert Cretella 
(R), son, Richard, $626; Antoni 
Sadiak (R), brother Maximilian, 
$580. 


The Washington Merry-Go-Round | 


Rep. Taber wife, Cecelia, $438; Sid Simp-, 


padding. Yet despite their new Waryland—Edward Garmatz 
| $22,500-a-year salary, more Con- (fp), sister, Elizabeth, $435. 

gressmen than ever are keep, Massachusetts —John Hesle- 
ing relatives on the Govern. (R), wife, Libbie, $305; 
‘ment payroll. ald Nicholson (®), wife,' 

This column has examined Ethel, $274. | 
Federal vouchers and found a Michigan—Jesse Wolcott (),| 
record 58 relatives on the|wife, Grace, $576; John Din- 
House payroll. The list doesn’t' gell (D), wife, Grace $534; John 
include a host of in-laws whose Lésinski (D), wife, Margaret, 
different names make them 8467; Clare Hoffman (R). wife. 
| tougher to trace. Florence, $415; George Meader 
| Some relatives, of course, (R). son, Robert, $221. 
earn their Government pay. Mississippi — Arthur 
Others don’t do a lick of work stead (D) wife, Etna, $283. 
for the taxpayers. : 

Worst offender, ironically, is daughter, La Verne, $474; A 
New York's Congressman John 5. J. Carnahan (D), 
Taber, most miserly man ever Mary, $403 
to head the House Appropria- ‘ew Jersey—James Auchin- 
tions Committee, who has prob- closs (RR), wife, Lee, $612; 
ably chopped more people off Frank Osmers (R), wife, Mar- 
‘the public payroll than anyone sverite, $579; T. Millet Hand 
in Washington. He has’a differ. (R), wife, Elizabeth, $467; T 
ent policy, however, for his own James Tumulty (D), wife, Anne, 
family. He duns the taxpayers $907 / 
to pay his son, Charles, $632 a| New Mexico—Antonio Fer- 
month, and a brother, Silas, nandez (D), wife, Cleo, $343 | 
$379 a month New York—W. Sterling Cole 

Highest paid congressional (R), wife, Elizabeth, $220; J 
relative is James Kee, son of Ernest Wharton (®), wife 
West Virginia's Congresswom- Marion, $264; William Williams 
an Elizabeth Kee. He collects (R), daughter, Jane, $264; John 
$722 a month from the taxpay-  Pillion (R), wife, Carlotte, $294. 
ers, but works hard for his sal- Ohio—J. Harry McGregor 
ary (R), wife, Twila Ivt, $505. 

Here’s the list, state by state, Pennsylvania—Richard Simp- 
of other Congressmen who son (R), wife, Helen, $544. 
keep relatives on the payroll: Tennessee—Ross Bass (D) 

Arkansas—Oren Harris (D),' wife, Avanell, $544. 


MENACE 


Win 


DE! : > E 
"h — 


wife. 
Ww 


& 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


—————— 


Texas—John - Dowdy 
wife, Johnnie Deane, 
Frank 
$492 


| Washington—Thomas Pel 
ough (R), wife, Catherina, $581; (R), daughter, Marion, $143. 
Jo 


Wisconsin— Alvin 


ee 
— 


W ednesday, August 31, 1955 59 


Prowls Pentagon 


(D),; wife, Eleanor, $360; Clement 
$549; Zablocki 
Ikard (D), wife, Jean. $333. 


(D), wife, Blanche, 


Note: Putting relatives on 


ly the payroll seems to be strictly 


bipartisan—29 Republicans and 


O’Konski 26 Democrats have one or more 
mittee nai thet yee thy, $486; George Miller (D),|(®), wife, Veronica, $464; Gard relatives on Government 

| wife, Esther, $273; Harlan Ha-|ner Withrow (D), wife, Anne, salary. 
$402; Lawrence Smith (),! 


ee 


— 


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hast .: 


a 


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TTA 
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“Guess we'll have to go to a@ restaurant tonight, 
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' 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES 
60 Wednesday, August 31, 1955 


OME 


Italian tuned 
pants and tops 


Set to music by Phil Rose of California: 
Ours exclusively—yours for that mad Italian 
air and flair in color-drenched cotton cordu- 
roy pants and color-crazy cotton knit tops. 
The lilting melodies romanced by Michel 
Legrand in Columbia Records’ new long- 
play album, “Holiday in Rome,” translated 
into merry-mooded fun-clothes. Typical of 
the huge collection of Italiano pants and 
tops in our exciting Separates Bar. 


WIN AN ACTUAL “HOLIDAY IV 
ROME 2 NATIONAL GRAND 
PRIZE TRIPS .. =. 


Fiy via LAI Italian Airlines. Two complete 
one-week allexpense paid “Holiday in 
Rome” trips 


LOCAL GRAND PRIZES 


1 complete ensemble from the Phil Rose 
“Holiday in Rome” collection at The 
Hecht Co. 

5 “Holiday in Rome” LP Albums by 
Columbia Records at The Hecht Co 


Fouter vour name in the contest croe ticket in oz 
Sporte Shoo, ail 3 stores. Lucky winner cete an all- 
expenere-peic trip via LAI Italian Airlines via 
luxurious “Diolomat 


A. COTTOM KNIT TOP in riotous color stripes, small, 
medium, large 4.50 


COTTOM CORDUROY PANTS in shades to biend, = 


8. HARLEQUIN PANTS in vivid cotton corduroy, ne 


C. MASKED TOP in solid cotton knit with colored mask 
motif, small, medium, large 6.99 
MASKED TRIM PANTS in solid color cotton cordu 
* ata | ima “HOLIDAY IN ROME” Columbia Record Album. 3.95 


Guster, Soe AL a.00 oe — ¥ ashington; 4th Fl. Siloer Spring; Street FL, PARKington 


Call NA. 8-5100 Anytime to Order 


Sporte Shop, ard FL. Washington: Servet Fl. 
Stloer Spring; Ind FL. PARK ington 


life of sheer nylons 


WEAR LIKE IRON! 


They actually wear twice as 
long! 


Van | caalte ‘a NOT ONLY DO THEY 
. \ -- 


perfects “controlled stretch” 


for longer wear, greater beauty 


- 


Holiday from wear-worry! Truly, one of the 
wonder-stockings of 1955! The life of these 
marvel-hose is doubled. The secret? Controlled 


ity’ h , stretch, climb, 
stretchability! You can bend c BUT THEY HAVE 


CONTROLLED STRETCH 


To ft your lee like the skin 


ee 
4 on 4 . . ’ . Tas" P “ " — - — + 43 ~~ = = ied | , . 
“give” it, too, with flattering fit such as you've ek i | itmelf, giving with every 
lett : — movement! 


without fear that your nylons will “pop”! Van 


Raalte “doubles” not only “take” it—they 


never enjoyed, With the unique Flex-Fit seams 


that won't twist. Fashion-right new Autumn 


colors; proportioned sizes 8% to 11. ,. 


Hoslery, Street Floor, Washington, Silver Spring 
end. P ARKingtan 


AND THEY'RE SOFT 


HELP WANTED : nS | 
' ' Sheer ag a Whisper. with thet 
7 Immediate openings for saleswomen, flattering dullness «mart 
clerks, secretaries! Full og part-time po women prefer. . 
° ‘sitions! Apply Employment Office, THE | 


HECHT CO,, Washington, Silver Spring 
or PARKington stores. 
Washinatom. Silver Sosgian & PARKinaton 
F OS 


?, ee | >. | > 


4 


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Pied Pe ante a! “f ae b> the ee ™ 4 


he Washington Post 
Gimes BB erala 


AUGUST 


“MICROFILMED BY THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS | 


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