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Full text of "The Washington Post 1955-11-25: Iss 355"

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i wee 
10 See Stories 


54° On Page 31 
. 0 


10 Detroit: ......24 Howard 
.: 3 Green Bay ...10 Lincoln 


209 Utah ........14 Denver .. 
bee .14 Utah State ...13 Wyoming 


Che Washington Post FINAL ~ 


Times Herald 


Phone RE, 7-1234 me with’ rit'temer FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 1955 


.38 GW High 
12 W-L High 


6 Wichita 
3 Tulsa 


Temas .,.....2) VPI Ce W&M gl 6 Quantico .. 
Texas A&M.. 6 VMI ........13 Richmond 6 Monmouth 


Cornell ......39 Miami (O.) ..14 Colgate .....25 Ft. Belvoir 
Penn te-eeees 2 Cincinnati 0 Brown ......0 Ft. Dix .... 


The Weather 


Today—increasing cloudiness, rather 
cold, high around 45, rain likely by 
night, posibly mixed with snow. Rain’ 
ending Saturday followed by partial 
clearing. Thursday's high, 50 at 2 p. m.: 
low, 43 at 7:20 p. m. (Details on P. 18.) 


78th Year — No. 355 WTOP Radio (1500) TV (Ch. 9) 


MIDEAST MAPS DEFENSE LINE 


Charged Arms Plan | Degen & “ee Men Agreed On 
With Unfair Is Rejected To Halt Red 


Practices Soviet Delegate Aggression 


Says ‘No’; Is Mum 
Giant, Food Lane, On H-Bomb Blast New Strategy Will 
Chestnut Farms. At U. N. Meeting Link Five Nations 
10 Others Named NYHT News Service To Advance Front 
In FTC Complaint Of the Free World 


UNITED NATIONS, N. Y.., 
Nov. 24—The Soviet Union 

The Federal Trade Com- 
mission yesterday accused 


two large grocery chains and 
11 food manufactiring com- 
panies of arranging special 


anniversary sales allowances 
that discriminated against} 


competing grocers. 

Named in the complaint were 
Giant Food Shopping Center, 
Inc.. of Washington, which, ac- 
cording to the FIC, does a 
$60-million annual business in 
28 Washington area stores, and 
Food Fair, Inc., of Philadelphia, 
which has more than 200 
stores in six states and has an- 
nual sales of more than $348 


MAX OFFENBERG 
. + the road is rough 


Road Fraud 


Arraignments 


Begin Today 


Authorities to Press 
Search for Du Pre, 
7th Defendant in Case 


kept tightly shut today the 
door it slammed recently at 
Geneva against Western dis- 
armament proposals. 

Less than a day after the 
disclosure that Russia recently 
exploded its largest nuclear 
weapon to date—a device of 


Soviet Delegate Arkady A. 
Sobolev rejected in the U, N. 
'Disarmament Commission the 
basic Western position. This is 
an insistence that an effective 


lished before any over-all plan 
for arms reduction can begin 


hydrogen-bomb-. proportions— 


system of disarmament inspec-| 
tion aud control must be estab-| 


By Don Cook 

NYT News Service 
BAGHDAD, Iraq, Nov. 24 
A new strategie line of de- 
fense in the Middle East— 
the Zagros Mountain range 
in Eastern Iraq and Western 


Iran—has been agreed upon 
by the chiefs of staff of the 


International News 


lin Ir 
(ited ath tebe tin tre niitebetnne len... 


Pakistan and Britain in the 
new Middle East Treaty Or- 
ganization (METO). 

In effect, it advances the 
strategic front of the Free 
World about 1300 miles closer 
to the Soviet perimeter from 


de ere beer See fone 
Pictured yesterday st his Gettysburg farm, a famous g 
father leads a pony cart carrying his three ¢ 
That's Z-yeareld David holding the reins, while Sasan, 3 


Ike Relaxes | a 


Six men indicted Wednes- 
day for conspiring to defraud 
the Maryland State Roads 
“Food Lane”. The company|Commission have told Mont-| 
has no connection with area! somery County  aiithorities 


stores using the name “Food 
Fair”, which were not involved |*ey will appear for arraign- 
| ment. 


in the FTC complaint. 
The charges were denied by! County detectives next week 


both food chains. 


to operate. 

At the same time, Sobolev, 
who didn’t mention the Soviet 
test explosion, called upon the 
major powers to pledge “not 
to be the-first to use atomic 
or thermo~-nuclear- weapons 
against any country.” 

Official American sources 
could find nothing new in either 


million. 

The Philadelphia firm op 
erates two stores in the Wash- 
ington area under the name 


Services, Feasting 


The 11 manufacturers include | 
one Washington and four B 
timore companies. 

The companies, 
dresses and principal products, 
as listed by the FTC, are: 

Chestnut Farms Chevy Chase 
Dairy, Washington, dairy prod- 
ucts; Crosse & Blackwell Co., 
Baltimore, date and nut rolls, 
marmalade, relish; Pompeian 
Olive Oil Corp., Baltimore, olive 
oil. 
McCormick & Co., Inc., Bal- 
timore, spices, extracts, tea and 
coffee; Minute Maid Corp., New 
York, frozen foods; Jos. Martin- 
son & Co., Inc., New York, 
coffee and tea; J. H. Filbert, 
Inc., Baltimore, salad crecting 
and margarine. 

The Sweets eitinbaes of 
America, Hoboken, N. J., candy; 
Tetley Tea Co., New York, tea; 
Reed Candy Co. Chicago, 
candy, and Atlanta Trading 
Corp., New York, hams and 
bacon. 

The Philadelphia grocery 
chain, according to the com- 


See COMPLAINT, P. 11, Col. 1 


Index 


What can Washing- 
ton do to improve its 
school facilities? The 
third in a series of four 
editorials on Washing- 
ton’s school crisis is pub- 
lished today on Page 14. 


Kilgallen Ses 


Livingston .... 

Movie Guide 36 
Night Clubs 27 
Seeeres 18 
Parsons .....37 
Pearson ....59 
Picture Page 2! 
Radio-TV ... 


Page 
Alsops ......15 
Amusem‘ts 36-37 
Classified .38-44 
Comics . .56-59 
Crossword .. .56 
District Line 58 
Dixon 15 
Editorials ... 
Fyvents Today 18 
Federal Diary 17 


will press their search for | the rejection or the demand for 


al- | seventh 

| Commission right-of-way engi- 
their ad-i\neer Ben Du Pre, who is re- 
' portedly in Mexico. 


Weekend Pass 18 


of Detectives G. W. Linthicum|? 
said attorneys for six of the 
defendants, all of whom reside 
in near Maryland and the 
"7 +4 authorities|ing effectively before 


Distri 
a ment actually begins.” 


they would appear today and 
Monday. 


senfeld of 5113 Manning dr., 
Bethesda, was jailed Wednes- 
day night after being served 
with a bench warrant but was 
soon released on the personal 
guarantee of his attorney. 


of 5419 32d st. nw., and Max 
Offenberg of 4707 Connecticut 
ave., 
have agreed tommeet county 
detectives in the 
day and accompany them to 
Rockville. 


rants Wednesday night by Dis 
trict police and refused imme- 
diate extradition. Had they re- 
turned, they would have faced 
possible imprisonment until a 
county circuit court judge was 
available to fix bond. 


ed 
Maryland Attorney General's 
office and county officials of 
speculative activities along new 
Maryland highway projects. 


men indicted in the roads case, 
John B. Hudson, 5412 14th pl., 
Hyattsville; Constas Gus Basi-| oc 
liko, of McCeney dr., 
Spring, and Jerry Goldberg, of 
1119 Navahoe dr., Silver Spring, 
agreed through attorneys to 
appear in Rockville Monday. 


Pre’s whereabouts in Mexico, 
county police said their next 
step would also be to find out 
whether 
could be invoked to return the 
missing road official. 


defendant, former 


Montgomery County Chief 


notified 


One of them, Robert J. Ro- 


Two others, George Basiliko 


each under $2000 bond, 
District to- 


Both were served with war- 


The jury indictments follow- 
an investigation by the 


Linthicum said three other 


Silver 


In addition to checking Du 


extradition powers 


the pledge. 


British Delegate woomys sf 


Nutting followed Sobolev by | 
telling the Commission, “In all) 
the weeks and months and years 
that 


we have discussed this 
problem, we have never been 


able to get the Soviet Union to 
agree. that the control 
chinery for disarmament must 
be set up and capable of operat- 


ma- 


disarma- 
Sobolev made clear his posi- 


tion today in four ways: 


First, he refused to accept a 


compromise suggestion made in 
the Commission yesterday by 
France, 
thesis” of Western and Soviet 
-|disarmament proposals—to be 
preceded by a 


calling for a “syn- 


“preparatory 
stage” that would be devoted 


to creating an adequate inspec- 


tion system. 
Included in this initial stage 


would be President Eisenhow- 
er’s proposal to create an alarm 
device against surprise attack’ 
through an American-Soviet ex- 
change of military blueprints to 
be 


verified by air inspection. 
Second, he admitted Mr, Ei- 
senhower’s “good will” in sub- 
mitting the early-warning sys 
tem proposal, and said Russia 
is willing to consider it “favora- 
bly—only if it were part of an 
immediate scheme for arms re- 
duction and the prohibition of 
nuclear weapons. 

Third, Sobolev held up the 
United States as the main cul- 
prit in the failure of the West 
and Russia to resolve their 
nine-year disarmament dead- 


k. 
Finally, he attributed the 
whole situation to a “turn- 
about” in Western views 
brought on by what he implied 
to be the West's fears of accept- 
ing “clear and concise” Soviet 
disarmament proposals. 
American Delegate Henry 
Cabot Lodge Jr., replied “that 
such an inference is entirely in- 
accurate and completely con- 
trary to fact.” 


‘Veteran’s Extension’ Good Until 1959 


New Typing System Inventor Advises 
U. S. His Patent Is Legal, Eyes Royalties 


The inventor of the simpli- 
fied typewriter now conten 
Government tests came forth 

rday to claim the patent 

ts to his machine. 

f. August Dvorak of the 
University of Washington said 
he was “absolutely delighted” 
to hear that the Government's 
research on his machine would 
continue even tho oe the pat- 
ent had not exp as previ- 

-_, penn cos by GSA, 

GSA rose to 
ane occasion : ves, Mt, are 
very eased to ar that 
Dvorak is ‘delighted’” 


‘ 


This —— developed 
after H. Kleinstuber, chief 
of the Suniodion branch of the 
personal property utilization di- 


vision “3 GSA told a a pte 


of The Washington Post and 
Times Herald Tuesday that 
Dvorak’s patent had expired. 

A reply came from Seattle 
yesterday, Dvorak said he had 
a war veteran's extension of 
the patent that would run until 


Kleinstuber, who fs in charge 
of the research project, said 
informatio. from the 


“I guess they didn’t go into the 
" he said. 


by 35 per 


his on 
GSA General Cc . Ms office. 
> 
i 


ee 


fin ant RE for GSA 
| onth | 


At Farm With 
Grandchildre 


40-Pound Turkey 
Served for Nine; 


By Richard L. Lyo 


GETTYSBURG, Nov. 24 
President Eisenhower relaxed 
at the farm today in his favorite 
role of grandfather. 

He did it for photographers 

and reporters this morning 
and then had a four-day week- 
end to do it for real, 
The President went outdoors 
with his three grandchildren 
and son, John, at 10 a. m., to 
let photographers get some 
pony-cart pictures in the yard 
of his chief farmer, Ivan Feast- 
er, 200 yards from the main 
house. 

He was dressed in-a sports 
jacket over a loud yellow-and- 


black vest, brown slacks, tan 
Stetson and pigskin gloves—but 


no top coat despite a nippy’ 


wind and the 43-degree tem- 
perature. He looked a ruddy, 
beaming picture of health on 
this Thanksgiving Day which 
fell exactly two’ months after 
he suffered a heart attack in 
Denver. 

The children—David, 7: Bar- 
bara Ann, 6, and Susan, 3— 
were bundled up in stocking 
caps and snow suits. With their 
Scottie dog, “Skunkie” they 
piled into a two-wheel wicker 
cart behind their black-and- 


See IKE, Page 2, Col. 1 


rk Thanksgiving 


By Wes Barthelmes 
Ball Reporter 


Thanksgiving Day In Wash- 
ington yesterday was one of 
church services, family Tre 


unions and satisfied appetites. 


The city echoed with hymns 
and prayers of gratitude, the 
pleasantries of family reunions 
and the scraping of chairs and 
clash of knives and forks as 
area families sac down for the 
traditional turkey feast. 

Thousands of American serv- 
icemen sat down to their tur- 
key dinners in countries where 
peace is not as strong or pros- 
perity as bright as here—bar- 
ren hillsides of war-ravaged Ko- 
rea and the politically unstable 
countries of Africa, Asia and 
Europe. More than 250 tons of 
turkey were shipped to troops 
in Europe alone. 

Bus, train and airline em- 
ployes enjoyed a breather after 
experiencing what airlines de- 
scribed as the “heaviest Thanks- 
giving holiday travel in his. 
tory.” 

Thousands in their finery 
went to church in 40-degree 
temperatures. 

Chief Justice Earl Warren 
led a host of American officials 
and diplomats from 20 Latin 
American nations to the 46th 
annual Pan American Thanks- 

iving Day Mass in flag-draped 
St Patrick's Roman Catholic 


Church. 

From the Bg the Most 
Rev. Jerome F. Hannan, Bishop 
of Scranton, could see on the 
Gospel side of the nave the 
Chief Justice, his wife, and 
daughter, Dae inia; Associate 
Justices niey Reed and 
Sherman seintom, Secretary of 


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Labor James P. Mitchell and 
Deputy Under Secretary of 
State Robert Murphy. 

The 21 American republics, 
said Bishop Hannan, should 
“thank God this day for the 
friendship, good will and other 
blessings He has given to them.” 

The Apostolic Delegate to the 
United States, the Most Rev. 
Amleto G. Cicognani, cele- 
brated a solemn high ponti- 
fical mass amid the pomp and 
panoply of the crurch. 

The Most Rev. Patrick A. 
O’Boyle, Archbishop of Wash- 
ington, presided. 

Op the opposite corner of 
10th and G sts. nw., in the ivy- 
clad, red-brick First Congres- 
sional Church, the eighteenth 
annual Union Thanksgiving 
Service was held. j 

The Rev. Mr. Clarence W. 
Cranford of Calvary Baptis 
Church sounded a note that was 
heard from other pulpits: that 
the great blessing Americans 
enjoy amid the threats of com- 
munism is the freedom to wor- 
ship as they cheose. 

Participating congregations 
were Calvary Baptist, First 
Congregational, Mount Vernon 
Place Methodist and National 
City Christian churches and 
—— Hebrew Congrega- 

n. 


Gonzaga Faces 
Cardozo Tonight 


Catholic League cham pion 
Gonzaga faces Interhigh titlist 
Cardozo at 8 p. m. today, at 
Griffith Stadium in the 12th an- 
nual City Schoolboy Football 
Championship game. 

(Details on Page 29.) 


Charged in 
School Talks 


Rep. Kelley Doubts 
Parley Will Support 
Federal Aid Bill 


Rep. Augustine B. Kelley 
(D-Pa.), sponsor of a House 


the Suez Canal base which used 
to be the fulcrum of Western 
military power in the Middle 
East. Instead of Mediterrane- 
an shores, there will be a rug- 
ged muntain barrier between 
the Black Sea and the Persian 
Gulf where the Allies will fight 
if the area is attacked. 

A staff paper outlining this 
“strategic concept” was dis- 
cussed by the chiefs of staff of 
the five Baghdad pact nations 
at the Council meetings of the 


school-aid bill, charged yester- 
day that the forthcoming White 
House Conference on Educa- 
tion is “stacked” with oppo’ 
nents of Federal aid to educa- 
tion, 

Kelley's blast was delivered 
as Clint Pace, director of the 
Conference, tendered angry 
Democratic House members a 
“peace offering” in the form 
of an invitation to attend the 
Conference Monday as full par- 
ticipants, rather than as mere 
observers. 

Kelley, a member of the 
House Education Committee, 
said the Administration-spon-' 
sored Conference looks as if 
“it has practically written its 
‘conclusions’ before the Con- 
ference even starts.” 

He added: “We hear that the 
Conference is so stacked with 
those who oppose Federal aid 
to education that it may not 
even indorse my bill now pend- 
ing before the House to hel 
states to build school rooms.” 

Kelley’s bill, drafted by the 
subcommittee he heads, and ap- 
proved by the House Education 
Committee, provides for a four- 
year program of $400 million 
in annual grants to states on 
a matching basis for school con- 
struction. 

The latest attack upon the 
Conference followed disclosure 


pact members here this week. 


|Each of the military staffs will 


now be giving detailed study to 
the problems of a unified de- 


fense of the Zagros range. 


The problems include what 
each nation can contribute, 
what special needs in the way 
of equipment must be met and 
the planning to determine ex- 
actly what each force in the 
area will do in the event of 
an attack. 

Two essentials to make the 
Zagros defense line effective 
will be a speedy concentration 
of British land forces in the 
Middle East and establishment 
here in Iraq of forward mili- 
tary supply dumps, which will 
be built up under the provi- 
sions of the Iraq-British mutual 
assistance treaty and the Bagh- 
dad pact itself. 

Although the British forces, 
having been withdrawn from 
the Suez area, are now spread 
out all the way from the Gulf 
of Aqaba to Tripoli, air power 
makes possible a reconcentra- 
tion of them in a relatively 
-ishort time. 

Estimates vary, but the Brit- 
ish could move an armored 
battalion, now stationed in Jor- 
dan near Aqaba, across the 
desert to Iraq in a matter of 
five or six days, and could fly 
in battalions of infantry from 
Cyprus in two or three days. 

It would take perhaps three 
weeks to bring British armor 
from Tripoli, in Libya, where 


See EDUCATE, Page 2, Col. 1 


itwo battalions are stationed, 


‘Cops and Cops and Cops 


Perle Mesta didn’t send out 
invitations, but she had about! 
10 Thanksgiving guests at noon 
w 
The guests, mostly policemen, 


showed up. in response to a 
unique invitation to the famed 


st. nw. 
An inquisitive houseboy 


pressed 
“aon eal ara se 


8 Precinct. Said Campbell: 
“When we got there, and we|be 


party-giver's home at 4040 52d 


H, E, Campbell and W. C. Stein, | 
whe are usually at home at No. 


had some trouble getting there, 
it seemed like the whole. Police 


Department was coming on the tah 


scene. 

The other guests were Capt. 
‘Daniel Fletcher of No. 8, two 
preginct detectives, four more 


two men a the age 


Perle Mesta’s Electric Invitation 
Brings Holiday Guests Awheeling 


trouble locating the house, be- 
cause the street was renamed 
from Tilden st. and renum- 


red, 
Campbell and Stein dashed 
into the house, without being 
announced, and found a sheep- 
houseboy. 

“The houseman pointed to a 
button in the kitchen and asked 
the butler what it was for,” 


a holdup alarm "ASV wo. me in two scout cars, and|Cam 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
y 4 : Friday, November 25, 1955 


Democratic Advisers 


Ask Rigid Price Props 


tion campaigns, because farm request of the Eisenhower ad-' * 


By J. W. Davis 


Associated Press 


The Democrats’ special ad- 
visory committee on agriculture 
came out formally and wunani- 
mously yesterday for “restora- 
tion of farm price supports at 
not less than 90 per cent of 
parity.” 

It said: “Farmers have been 
brought to the verge of bank- 
ruptey: The Eisenhower pro- 
gram has been an absolute fail- 
ure.” 

The farm issue has already 
stacked up as one of the hot- 
test in sight for the 1956 elec- 


— 


IKE—From Page I 


Ike and 3 Grandchildren 
Relax at Farm on Holiday 


white Shetland pony, Tony. The 
President took them in grand- 
fatherly charge. 

“Hey, quit chewing gum,” 
_ he told. David. “They're taking 
your picture.” David had just 
lost an upper front tooth, which 
wasn't going to help him any 
at the table later. 

Movie photographers wanted 
Tony in action. David, the 
driver, said “Giddap” twice and 
nothing happened. The Presi- 
dent led Tony by the bridle and 
told David to stop him. David 
gave a sharp tug on the reins. 

“Easy.” said the President 
“Always remember a horse has 
just as tender a mouth as 
you do.” 

“T have to be tough with him 
so he'll know who's driving 
him,” David explained 


He Doesn't Like Blinders 


The President decided Tony 
wasn't being as responsive as 
usual because he didn’t like the 
blinders. “You wouldn't like 
blinders, would you?” be asked 
David. “With the other bridle 
(no blinders) he never makes 
any fuss at all.” 

Tony was a gift from the 
brother of former Sen. Robert 
C. Hendrickson (R-N. J.), the 
President said. The cart was an- 
other gift. David said he 
thought it came from Texas 

After pictures, the girls and 
“Skunkie” hopped out and 
David drove Tony home, with 
an escort 

The President. his son and 
the girls rode in his golfmobile, 
a small open jeep-like car with 
a fringe on top built to carry 
a golf foursome and clubs 
around a course. 

The two men rode 


- 


15,000-Mile 


inside. 


income has been dropping at; ministration there existed a 
a time when other segments of system of rigid price supports 


the economy were booming. established early in World ee 

One big argument is over !! to increase production, On| 
rigid-vs-flexible price supports.| 9@sic commodities, the level! 
The Eisenhower Administra-\¥43 90 per cent of parity, parity, 
tion has put into effect a fiexi-|being a standard designed to 
ble system under which Govy-|Teflect a fair price for farm 
ernment price guarantees vary Products in relation to what the’ 
in relation to supplies. In times|f@rmer has to pay for things 
of surplus, price supports are| he needs. 
lowered to discouraged over-| Surpluses were accumulated 
production; in times of short-jin storage under the rigid! 
ages, supports would be raised. | system. Secretary of Agricul-| 

Before the flexible system)ture Ezra Taft Benson main- 
was voted by Congress at the tians these are a major factor) 

RE RL in depressing farm prices, The 
tO ae Democratic farm committee 
yesterday said the administra- 
tion has put up “a smoke 
screen of greatly exaggerated 
‘surpluses.’ ” 

Two former Secretaries of 
Agriculture, Claude R. Wickard 
and Charles F. Brannan were 
among those who signed the ad- 
visory cOmmittee recommenda- 
tions, which went to the Demo-' 
The girls stood on the black ee yp anemage never A | 
platform grasping a rail like | “Immediately upon coming 
firemen, with a Secret Service into office, the Eisenhower Ad- 
man standing alongside. =| ministration put into force the’ 

“Don’t forget to get the fringe sliding scale or flexible price 
in,” the President told photog- support program behind a 
raphers, and off they went to- 
ward home. 


Up and Out at & A. M. 


The President had been up 
and out at 8 a. m. with David 
to inspect the kennels and say 
sood morning to Tony in the 
barnagby the big house. 

On the lawn east of the farm 
house a flagpole flew the Amer- 


aggerated ‘surpluses.’ 

“The Eisenhower Administra- 
tion said that this approach’ 
would be painful to farmers— 
who it said had been living in| 

‘dream world’—but that it! 
fit the consumer. 

“It truly has been painful to’! 
both farmers and consumers 
ican flag and, below it, the for consumer costs continued 
President's flag. to an alltime high and farm 

The first family planned its production has remained 
Thanksgiving dinner for 5 p. m.,'ord levels . . 

White House Press Secretary 
James C. Hagerty said. The 


-_ - ————_—_ 


smoke screen of greatly ex-/hower, after conferences with with such new and existing 
his brother Milton and Secre- tools as will assure a sound and bri 
tary Benson, made clear to the effective national 
American people that, despite'and 
the fact it was liquidating the equitable 
traditional 
of family farming, this policy: 
would cut.production and bene-| 4¢ the Administration would be called for 
‘pursued relentlessly and with- from the Government for the tics.” 
out significant modification .. . 


rn ae Party re-affirm its'expansion of the school lunch 
stan 
at rec- with supports at no less than'tic distribution of food, greater 
. : per 
At Denver, President Ejsen-'should be fully implemented rates on all types of farm loans.’ Averell Harriman came back 


Rep. Walter Will Support Harriman, 


Scores Stevenson’s Decision to Run 


from the West today and;the truth of my analysis since 
headed for a turkey dinner at! they avoided any comment on 
his Arden, N. Y., farm. the facts that I brought out— 

Arriving at La Guardia Field|ithat the Communists had 
from Lewiston, Idaho, the Dem- panes, our cause had lost dur- 
| | ng the three months that the 
pao = nee one for the Demo-| enough to tell newsmen the Re-|Spirit of Geneva reigned.” 
/eratic preisdential nomination. |nublican Party has tactily ac-| Harriman journeyed to the 

The Pennsylvania Democrat'cepted his critical view of|Far Wést after attending the 
said Harriman “is the only|eyvents following the Geneva! Democratic meeting in Chicago. 
presidential candidate in the| Conference. At Portland, Ore., he aséailed 
United States who has a true, He said: Reptiblican handling of natural 
appreciation of the number one | “The Republicén high com-| resources, and in Lewiston he 
problem confronting the Nation! mand, in trying to answer what! accused the Eisenhower Admin- 
today—the threat to our secur-|I said in Seattle about foreign istration of a deliberate effort 
ity by the Russians who are in-|policy, obviously recognized'to drive down farm prices. 
tent on world domination.” ) a oh aes Oe 


By Robert E. Thompson 
Internationa! News Gervice 
Rep. Francis E. Walter, a bit- 
ter political foe of Adlai 
Stevenson, announced today he 


EE ——ewe 


Associated Press 


A Gift From the Kremlin 


Ann Latman, 11, of Los Angeles, whose hobby is asking for 
dolis from foreign chiefs of state, wrote a letter to Soviet 
Premier Bulganin with the usual request. Above, she ad- 
mires the ll-inch doll, dressed in the costume of a Russian 
peasant woman, which Bulganin sent to her. — 


—_——_—_—— 


LAPIS LAZULI . .. the magnificent deep-blue stone said by the 
ancients to rival the perfect blue of the sky. JAGUAR caprures 
this true richness of Lapis Lazuli in cuff links for today’s man 
$10 plus tx 


$$ ae 


conservation 


cratic convention in Chicago ‘as| | | 
ter became the first important i 
on Salone wt Here in cuff links by wJAHr»les LIZA 
F Committee, the Immigration ) 
He co-authored the contro-|} 
iby Congress in 1950 over Presi- 
son, 
|Europe” when the New Yorker 
lend-lease expediter, Harriman 
food, fiber conelusion as early as it did.” 
of fashion. 
American pattern and producers.” issued a statement branding the 


Walter told newsmen he ex-'f 
a Harriman delegate. Ml Rare stone of the ages ... 
Walter is chairman of the|/i 
5... Subcommittee, and the -Demo-|iif 
_versial McCarran-Walter Immi-|if 
ident Truman’s veto which has 
| He declared that Harriman did | Hi 
| was Mutual Security Adminis- 
made a great contribution in 
program,| When Stevenson announced 
Other recommen dations former Illinois Governor as “the} 


pects to go to the 1956 Demo. f= == 
With his announcement, Wal-' |i} 
Democratic congressional lead-' i LAPIS LAZULI * ¢ @ 
| 
House Un-American Activities|/} 
cratic Patronage Committee. 
gration Act, which was passed 
drawn heavy fire from Steven-| 
splendid work in rehabilitating | 
trator and that as World War II 
nging the war to a successful 
to both consumers) his candidacy last week, Walter| 
“sympathetic aid” laughing boy of American poli- 


In Sterling Silver or Gold-Filled settings 
Sole Agents for HickeyFreeman Clothes and Cavanagh Hats 


GOLDHEIM S 


1409 H STREET 


EST. 1875 


Rural Electrification Adminis- 


“We recommend that the tration and other cooperatives, CQP Avoids Reply, 


in favor of full parity|and other programs for domes- Sqgys Harriman 


cent. This program exports, and lower interest NEW YORK. Nov. 24 ®—Gov. 


President was to carve a 40- 
pound turkey presented by the| 
National Poultry Growers As- 
sociation. 

There were nine for dinner. 
The President's brother, Dr. 
Milton S. Eisenhower, drove 
down from University Park, 
Pa., 100 miles away, with his 
daughter, Ruth. They joined 
the President and Mrs. Eisen- 
hower, John and his wife, Bar- 
bara, and the three grand- 
children. 

The only official business the 
President transacted today was 
to send a telegram of best 
wishes to King Haakon of Nor- 
way on the 50th anniversary 
of his reign. He will do some 
work at his office Friday morn- 
ing and then rest until Mon- 
day, when Republican National 
Chairman Leonard W. Hall is 


‘due here to talk some party | 


politics. 


$e 


Latin Junket 


Worth Cost, Hardy Says 


By Frank Eleazer 


United Preas 


Here’s the latest word on 
that Congressional junket Rep. 
Charles B. Brownson (R-Ind.) 
diin't take. t went without 
him 15,000 miles through 12 


gressional district. His report 
from this one-man junket was 
that he found the natives happy 
and prosperous 

Hardy, taking no exception to) 
the Brownson-type domestic! 


ee 


ONCE A YEAR DURING MODEL CHANGE-OVER TIME PACKARD IS ABLE TO OFFER 
THE DISCRIMINATING MOTORIST A RARE OPPORTUNITY TO OWN AMERICA'S 
LUXURY CAR AT AN ENORMOUS SAVING. 


ALL’ THIS WEEK YOUR PRESENT CAR HAS GIGANTIC TRADE-IN VALUE TOWARD 
THE BEAUTIFUL NEW 


1955 PACKARD “400” 


OR PACKARD PATRICIAN 


OF COURSE ALL THESE BEAUTIFUL BRAND NEW PACKARDS ARE FULLY EQUIPPED 


Latin American countries. Its junket, nevertheless viewed the | 
chairman, Rep. Porter Hardy|Indianan’s comments as some-| 


WITH ALL THE LATEST POWER FEATURES... INCLUDING THAT GREAT PACKARD 


(D-Va.), said its worth proved 
“many times” what it cost. 

Hardy said yesterday he 
thought most Congressional 
junkets, despite possible abuse 
and .some criticism from 
Brownson and others, serve a 
good purpose. Such official 
travel by House and Senate 
members, most of it at expense 
of the taxpayers, is setting a 
probable all-time record this 
year. 

Brownson, who has done 
some junketing of his own in 
years past, called a news con- 
ference on Oct. 28 to say he 
had passed up the trip planned 
by Hardy’s Government Oper- 
ations Subcommittee because 


what surprising. 


Brownson said his trip cost | 
$38.54 and that he paid every) 


cent of it himself. Hardy said 
the bills aren't in for the Latin- 
American tour, on which he 
was accompanied by three other 
Subcommittee members, but 
that an accounting will be 
made for every cent spent. 

The group at long hearings 
took 50 hours of testimony on 
this country’s technical aid pro- 
gram and is preparing a report 
to the House.. Hardy predicted 
the report will have “consider- 
able significance” and _ will 
point the way to substantial 
savings. 

“It was worth many times 


“FIRST” — TORSION LEVEL RIDE—THE ULTIMATE IN RIDING PLEASURE AND 
SMOOTHNESS. DRIVE IN TODAY! 


| 


’ 


| ; 


Here are a Few Examples of the fantastic allowances now being given 


| AS HIGH AS AS HIGH AS 


A 1953 Lincoln >3210 +2218 


| A 1953 Buick 3%, $2805 |A 1954 Mercury tt $3295 


Capri 
Coupe 


A 1951 Lincoln 


Sedan 


A 1954 Chevrole 


A 1956 Ford 


Victoria 
Coupe 


AS HIGH AS 


‘2810 
*4150 


Belair 
Sedan 


what it cost,” Hardy said. 
Brownson had been asked 
Brownson said he decided in- what was the purpose of the 
stead to take a 700-mile tour Subcommittee’s trip. “That's 
through Indianapolis and en- why I didn’t go,” he replied. 
virons, roughly his own Con- “I was never able to find out.” 


he was “never able to find out” 
its purpose. 


——— | 


EDUCATE—From P. I 


School Meeting ‘Stacked’ 
With Aid Foes, Kelley Says 


that Kelley and Democratic Conference is ‘stacked’ against 
Representatives Cleveland Bai- it; opponents say it is ‘stacked’ 
ley (W.Va.), Frank Thompson in favor, and a third group 
(N.J.), and Edith Green (Ore.) claims we don't want to dis- 
had rejected invitations to at- cuss the problem.” | 
tend the Conference as observ-- He said “I can say that the 
ers. . ‘Conference committee does 
Thompson had said “there is want the problem discussed 
no sense in going there and not and has set up a procedure to 
being able to talk.” assure fullest discussion of all 
Yesterday, however, Pace dis- major problems in the field of 
closed that he already has asked education.’ 
Bailey and Thompson to at-| Pace said the conference of 
tend as full-fledged delegates, 2000 delegates from the states, 
He said he would extend the four territories and the Dis- 
same invitation to members of (trict, will break up into 180 
both the House Education Com-|groups and then separate into 
mittee and the Senate Labor | still smaller round-table discus-| 
and Welfare Committee. ‘sion groups when it opens the 
Pace’s action on the eve of' four-day session Monday. 
the Conference was expected, This procedure, Pace said, “is 
to remove all but political ob-janything but ‘ridiculous’,” as 
jections of those Democratic|one labor leader charged on 
Congressmen who had threat-| Wednesday. 
ened to boycott the Conference.| He referred to Andrew J. 
Kelley's criticism of the Con-|Biemiller, AFL legislative rep- 
ference yesterday prompted resentative who said the “ridic- 
Pace to reply: “The Congress- ulous” procedure was designed 
man’s criticism would be funny to “make sure that nothing hap- 
if it didn’t deal with such a pens” at the Conference. 
serious problem.” The Conference, called a 
onal ap- 


: 
“At this moment,” Pace said,' President Eisenhower and 
“the Conference stands accused nanced by congressi 
propriation, is expected to deal 
with all major problems in the 


of holding three mutually ex-| 
of Federal aid to states say the educational field, 


clusive positions: proponents 


A 1952 Cadillac 


A 1954 Chrysler Yorker 


A 1953 Mercury “eter $29O85 
A 1952 Buick 
A 1955 Ford 


A 1951 Cadillac sem $2995 


Belair 


Coupe 
Sedan 


DeVille 


25/5 
‘3040 
‘2900 
*3610 
*2815 
*3185 


A.1953 Oldsmobile 


“98" HOLIDAY COUPE 


A 1954 Chevrolet 


*3415 $3085] A 1953 Chevrolet 


*3155 2890 
im “4895 

A 1951 Oldsmobile $9405 
*3310 

*3018 


Hardtog 
Coupe 


Bela!r 
Coupe 


A 1955 Dodge 


Coupe 


A 1954 Cadillac A 1954 Ford “ese" 


Windsor 


Super 
Sedan 


Coupe 


*2608 A 1955 Chrysler 


3645 


Ceuntry 
Sedan 


Beach 


Country 
Wagon 


Sedan 


A 1954 Mercury A 1953 Ford 


Super 


Victoria Hardtop 
Coupe 


Coupe 


A 1954 Ford A 1954 Buick 


PACKARD 


LEE D. BUTLER, Inc. 


SERVING WASHINGTON MOTORISTS FOR OVER TWENTY-FIVE YEARS 


Connecticut at Florida Avenues N.W. * AD. 4-8000 


Alexandria You 


th Jailed 


In Police Auto Chase 


, 


Car ‘Lands’ 
In 2d-Story 


Bedroom 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
Friday, Noyember 25, 1955 3 


Msgr. Loughran Goes 


To St. Francis Xavier 


— —. An Alexandria youth was sen- 
tenced to seven months in jail 
‘Jon traffic charges yesterday 


The Rt. Rev. Msgr. Francis J. 
pastor of St. Mary's 


DALLAS, Tex., Nov. 24 @—A 
Loughran, 
Catholic Church, Upper Marl- 


car jumped the rail in a park- 


‘after he led police on a 100- 
inile-an-hour chase along Mount 
Vernon bivd. 

Donald L. Carter, 19, of the 
200 block of N. Washington st.; 
was charged by Alexandria po- 
lice with driving on a revoked 
permit and reckless driving. 
The sentence was levied yes 
terday by Judge James R. Dun- 
can in Alexandria Police Court, 
and Carter was held on $1000 


ing garage without walls last |), 


night and landed in a bed in 
the second story of a hotel 
across the alley. 

It was still there today. 


and told a policeman: 
“Hey, there's a car in my 
hotel room 


ro, Md.. one of the best 
known clergymen in the Wash- 
ington area, has been named 
pastor of St. 
Catholic Church, 2800 
vania ave. se. 
The Most Rev. Patrick A. 
O’Boyle, Archbishop of Wash- 
ington, who announced the ap- 
pointment, said the Rev. Law- 
rence P. Gatti, assistant pastor 
of the Shrine of the Blessed 
Sacrament in Washington, will 


Franeis Xavier). 
Pennsyl- 


Msgr. Loughran Father Gatti 


ead. Jochatth, Wii wes xiv + ete naa carat nts 
~ the car down the ramp in| Msgr. Lougliran will succeed 
gg Tagen yh — a life-long friend, the Rt. Rev. 

The parking penne enn og | MSer William E. Kelly, who|he ministered to the spiritual 
up equipment this morning and ee ea needs of thousands of Washing ‘™ 
pulled the car back into the Msgr Loughran, 2 aative of tonians vacationing in the 
garage after police, firemen and/paitimore, is the oldest pastor | Chesapeake Bay area. 

ef in point of service in the Arch-| Father Gatti, ordained in 

diocese ‘of Washington. He has/ 1941, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
been at St. Mary’s 4] years. Joseph D. Gatti. His father is 

The friend of literally thou-|a well-known Washington mer- 
sands of persons, Msgr. Lough-|chant. He _ — at Blessed 

: ran was ordained in 1911 and/ Sacrament since . 

France Honors Historian has been pastor of churches in| He is chaplain of the Newman 

PARIS, Nov. 24(#—The schol-| Benedict, Md., and Solomons,|Club of George Washington 
arly French academy today|Md. He was appointed to St.| University and has been active 
elected to member Dr. Jerome|Mary’s in 1914. He also wasias assistant director of the 
Carecopino, 74, best known for|pastor of three mission/Thanksgiving and Laetare 
his historic works on ancient|churches, including St. An-|Clothing Collections for the 
thony’s at North Beach, whereirelief of needy persons. 


bond pending an appeal. 

He also faces similar charges 
by Park Police and was to ap- 
pear before United States Com- 
missioner Stanley King today 
in Alexandria. 

Park Police Pvt. Edwin Con- 
lon said the chase began about 
4 a. m., when he stopped a 
speeding car containing four 
youths about three miles south 
of Alexandria on Mount Ver- 
non bivd. He said he planned 
to give the driver, Carter, a 
ticket for 

Conlon said Carter pulled 
away. and streaked north on 
the boulevard, at about 100 
mph. Conlon followed and ra 


Fy -phigensc Wheelchair Holds Boy, 15, 
‘| Uncomplaining Prisoner 


around the roadblock, narrowly 
mapa John — 


missing several policemen, and 

sped through the city until he 

reached a traffic circle near t 

intersection of Route 1 and t 

boulevard, Conlon said. Swervy- 

ing halfway/around the circle,! jimmy Nolan has only "tb fay, but that was when he 
strong desires these days:|could stand. He still has hopes 
He wants to see a real, live pro-\that maybe someday— 
fessional football game and| Next to J. P.. who-has cheer- 
help a group of teen-agers pro-|fully given up a normal teen- 
mote a successful dance. age life to care for his older 


Carter’s car hit a curb and over- 
turned. 
Treated and released at Alex- 
, ; lik n|brother, and his mother, who 
Fae ee eet idanepinight efter night fo awakened 


andria Hospital were Carter: 
By Richard J. Maloy, Robert Hall, 19, 200 block of N. 
to ask coming from a lS-ye ne |t® turm the helpless Jimmy in 
i 
old boy who has been in a whee his bed. Jimmy's favorite peo- 


Stal Reporter Washington st.; Robert Sw 
Why do people climb moun-| reference to the two expedi- | 19, 1900 block of Naylor rd. se, 
chair for seven years, but that’s 
. / i l a ple are the ULPS. 
the Kind of kid Himmy Nolen. "the initials stead fer the 


tains | tions which assaulted 28.250- ‘and Gary Seal, 19, 311 Com- 
high school-age fraternity, Up- 


- new pastorates 


By Frank Hor, Staff Photographer 


Jimmy Nolan (left), 15, victim of muscular dystrophy, 
shares 2 book with hit’ younger brother, John Pat. 


ghate Paste Rome and Greece. 


Pakistan Army Col. M. Ata-Ullah locates 25,250-foot K-2 


Colonel Climbs Peaks 
But Can’t Explain Why 


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Pakistan Army Col. M. Ata- merce st., Alexandria, passen- 
iich wih. beleed. south \ta- | foot K2 in the Himalayan gers in the ear 
second highest peak in the| ™@™8®- Alexandria police charged 
The 51-year-old military doc- 


world, says he honestly doesn’t | Sr arts, owner of the car, with Jimmy who lives with his 


know. allowing an unlicensed person 
to drive it. However, ‘deta 


itor was a member of the 1953 


“I have a way of getting | American expedition which un- 
mixed up in things that are | successfully attacked the peak 


none of my business,” 


Col. Ata-Ullah, who is wind- 
ing up a two-week visit in Wash- 


ington 


“There was every reason why 
I should not have gone—so 
said the «mmuch-deco- 
rated Pakistani physician in’ 


I went,” 


anno —_ _- 


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TRIAL PLAN 


You'll be playing your fa- 
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monthly terms. 


Di. 7-8464 


& eerrtea 
“Name £08 
musec.. 


‘and of the 1954 Italian climb 


ing group which reached the 
top of Mount Godwin Austen, 
also known as K-2. 

He “started going to the 
mountains” of Kashmir as 


youth of 18. He was invited to 
join the K-2 expeditions be- 
cause of his climbing skill, his 
knowledge of local conditions 
and his medical ability. 

A mountain-climbing expedi-| 
tion is frustrating for a physi- 
cion, says Col. Ata-Ullah. 
“Climbers live so near the 


margin of existence that the 
slightest thing can topple them 
over,” he says..“Normally if a 
climber gets a disease he is 
dead before a doctor can do 
anything about it.” 

A member of the Italian ex- 
pedition contracted pneumonia 
high on K-2. “He was dead 
within two hours, even though 
we gave him every medical at- 
tention,” recalled Col. Ata-Ul- 
lah. 

At one and the same time, 
climbers must protect them- 
selves from frostbite because 
of cold glaciers underfoot and 
from sunstroke from the blaz- 
ing sun overhead. 

In such a situation, a doctor 
practices preventive medicine, 
says Colonel Ata-Ullah. He 
closely watches members of the 
climbing party for the slightest 
sign of illness. 

Particular attention is paid 
to the two or three members 
of the party who are selected 
to make the final assault on 
the mountain peak. “We carry 
their packs and treat them like 
spoiled children, to conserve 
their strength,” said Colonel 


James R. Duncan dismissed the 
charge in Alexandria Police 
Court yesterday. Swartz is to 
appear before Commissioner 
King today to face a similar 
charge by iyo? Police. No 
charges were placed 

a| Hall and Seal. 0 — 


Woman Fires 


Ata-Ullah. 

He went te the 21,000-foot 
mark on K-2 during the suc- 
cessful Italian attempt on the 
mountain. 

Col. AtaUliah’s trip to 
America, his first, was to have 
a reunion in New England with 


5 Shots In 


Row, Misses 


Mary Rush, 41, a housemaid 
with no fixed address, shot at 
her boy friend five times yes- 
terday, police reported. She 
missed every time, but the po- 
liceman who fired at her 
didn’t. 

Miss Rush was admitted to 
District General Hospital for 
treatment of a flesh wound in 
the neck, She was charged with 
assault to kill, assault on a po- 
lice officer and carrying a dan- 


was 8 years old. 
“But 


self-pity in Jimmy,” 
mother, Mrs. 


complaining, considering 


for anything.” 

Jimmy’s condition, complete 
dependency on his wheel chair, 
is the result of the relentless 


left leg at the age of 3. Within 
five years he was doomed for 
the rest of his life to confine 
ment in his chair. 

Even with the encourage- 
ment of his mother and the 
almost dog-like devotion of his 
younger brother, affectionately 
known as “J. P.”, Jimmy faces 
a rather dismal future, but he 
is making the most of it. 

Jimmy's mother works and 
J. P. attends school. So he has 
learned to live alone during 
the day. “I read a lot and 
watch television, and twice a 
week a publie school teacher 


gerous weapon. 

Police said Miss Rush be- 
came involved in an argument 
with a boy friend, Haze] Lee 
Springs, 61, of 1228 Florida ave. 
ne., at his home and grabbed 
a revolver from a chest drawer. 
She fired three times. He fled 
outside. She fired twice more, 
emptying the five-shot revolver, 
police said. 

Pvyts. Louis Blancato and 
Ronald Jefferson arrived and 
she pointed the gun at them, 
police said. Blancato then shot 
at her, the bullet grazing her 
neck. 


Fire Damages 
Schoolroom At 


comes in to help me with my 
studies,” Jimmy said. 

With the coming of celd) 
weather, Jimmy, sitting in his! 
wheel chair propelled by the) 
ever-present J. P., is no longer | 
a familiar figure on the side- 
walks near the Soldiers Home 
grounds. 

He goes out now only on Sun- 
day to attend mass with his 
family in the chapel of nearby 
Holy Cross College. 

Chair-bound Jimmy gets 
pleasure from televised sports 
events. That's where he de 
veloped his love for football, 
and his favorite teams are the 
Washington Redskins and, it 
goes without saying, Notre 
Dame. Ralph Guglielmi is 
tops in his book. 

Jimmy has never seen a big 


mother and 13-year-old brother, 
John Pat at 713 Jackson st. ne., 
hasn't walked a step since he 


he has never com- 
plained. There isn’t a streak of 
said his 
Gladys Nolan. |>°Ys- 
She added: “I doubt if any bey 
could be more cheerful or _ 
condition—and he seldom asks 


progress of the qseaping crip-| ¥® 


| 


silon Lambda Phi, whose mem- 
bers work for the victims of 
MD. Jimmy has an even more 
personal reason for liking the 
ULPS. The parakeet bouncing 
around in a cage in his living 
room was given to him by the 


ing what is for him the. diffi- 
cult act of lifting the phone off 


do. His telephone number is 
Hobart 2-7026. 

Jimmy said he could tell peo- 
ple about the dance and what 
the boys have done for him. 
“And maybe others 


want to talk to Jimmy, too,” 
Mrs. Nolan | said. 


—_————— 


A THOUGHT, 
FOR FRIDAY 
if it ewime the see 
Or dwells in a shell 
And if it’s good to eat 
as well 

Youll. find tt here a 
Longchamps! 
Oceanfresh! 
Magnificently prepared! 

Famed for. Seafood 
these 36 years. 


—~.S Sr 


SUITS 


26—$65 Raleigh 55% Dacron- 
45% Wool Flannel Suits. Single 
breasted in greys ard tans. Regu- 
lar 5/40, 1/41, 4/42, 2/43, 3/44, 
1/46, 1/48; short 2/37, 3/40, 
1/44; long 2/42, 1/43 34.75 


7—$75 and 79.50 Hart Schaff- 
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wool in single and double breast- 
ed; tan, blue, charcoal grey. ges 
lar 1/40, 1/44; short 2/42; 

1/40; portly 1/40, 1/42 59.78 


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ey eguter 1/42, 1/48; short 

portly 1/40, 1/4l; 
long portly 2/48 54.75 


4—$100 and $125 Hart Schaff- 
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double breasteds in grey and 
brown. Regular 1/39; long 2/39, 
1/46 $68 


6—S$115 Hand-Tailored Brook- 
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single and double breasted; blue ° 


and brown. Regular 2/37, 1/38; 
long 1/39, 1/40, 1/41 $58 


12—$65 and $75 Raleigh All 
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double breasted; tans, browns, 
reys. Regular 1/36, 2/40: short 
/37, 1/42; long 1/38, 2/40; 
portly 1/40, 1/44; short portly 
1/39 39.75 


18—$65 Raleigh Worsteds. Dark 
and medium blue in single and 
double breasted models tn 
1/36; short 2/35, 1/36, 1/37, 
3/38; long 2/48; extra long 1/40, 
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1/44; short portly 1/39 36.75 


8—$95 Brookstreet Hand-Tai- 
lored Worsted Suits. Single and 


9—$65 to $75 Raleigh Navy 
Blue Worsteds. Short 1/36, 2/37, 
1/39; long 1/40; extra short 
1/42; long portly 1/44; short 
portly 2/40 $48 


22—$75 Hart Schaffner & Marx 
Navy Blue Swits. Worsteds and 
gabardines in single and double 
breasted models. Regular 3/44, 
1/48; short 1/35, 1/36, 2/37. 
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short partly 1/39, 1/40; lon 
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SPORTS COATS 


4239.95 to $60 Tweed Sports 
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long 2/38, 2/39, 3/40, 1/42; 
extra long 1/38, 1/39, 1/41, 
2/46, 1/48 24.95 


OUTERCOATS 


7—$65 te $85 Topcoats and 
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velours. Regular 1/46; short 
2/40, 4/42 $44 


2—$120 Brookstreet Hand-Tai- 
lored Vicuna-Wool Coats. Single 
breasted in dark brown, L 

1/39, 1/40 $6 


4—79.50 Hart Schaffner & Marx 
Cheviot Topcoats. Single breast- 
ed; dark blue. Regular 1/35 
1/36, 1/37, 1/38 46.78 


5—$60 to $75 Raleigh pe ayer 
All wool gabardines, tweeds and 

velours. Regular 1/38, 2/44, 
2/46 36.75 


College Park 


game. “I remember once when 
we were in Pennsylvania a 
Four fire companies extin-|long, long time ago, my mother 
guished a 2-alarm fire last nightiand I stood on a hill and 
at the College Park ci ne ge watched a game down below in 
School that burn out oneithe valley,” he recalled wiat- 

a injuries had crippled classroom and the attic and) 
Presently director of medical caused extensive smoke dam- 
age. 
services, for Kashmir, he was] rng are at the school, located 
studied in Berlin cod Views. ~ & gp Prego atbw fe nog 

He was awarded er 

the British Empire for refugee |»: ™- 
work during the war and was Rede ge wesw sy to 
also decorated by the Italian{*™™ine a o injuries 
and Pakistan governments for wvaleein RE RS 
his climbing achievements. aE Seas ee 
lege Park, Riverdale, Branch- 


ville and Berwyn Heights 
Wife Prays By (citi. "cma senor 
Sleeping Mate, 

Then Slays Him 


double breasteds in blues and 
browns. Short 2/38, 1/39, 1/41: 
long 4/40 49.75 


7——$75 te $85 Hart Schaffner & 
Marx Worsted Suits. Brown and 
blue. Regular 1/38; short 1/37, 


1/39, 1/41; | 1/37, 2/39 
STATION WAGON long W787, 2/38 
1955 PONTIACS 7—68.50 and $75 Hart Schaffner 


& Marx Worsted Suits. Grey and 
‘2,399 


brown In single and double breast- 

ed. Regular 1/36, 1/44, 1/48; 

short 1/36; long 2/39, 1146 eB 
Left Over @ Never Sold @ Never Used 

pped Suits. Single and double breasted 1/48; extra long 1/38 , 1739 
Fully Equi models. 1/37, 1/38; stout 39.7 

1/44 36.75 
FLOOD PONTIAC 6—$60 Raleigh Worsted Tux- 
6—$65 Ra 


leigh Worsted gree édos. Grosgrain |apels; dow 
Regular 1/46; short 1/38; ble breasted models. Short sh 


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A woman told police she knelt " : , : 2 2/39, 1/41; extra short 1748 3/36; extra long 1/37 29.9 
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ae oe ee ee ee ae 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


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4 Friday, November 25, 1958 


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tare. ry 


THE WASHINGTON POST on4 TIMES HERALD 
. Friday, November 25,1006 5 


Red Return 
MOSCOW, Nov. 24 #—Seven 
Soviet journalists who spent a 
month touring the United |/v*ters stood up ta 6 ° 


States arrived home by pene cities today. Three 
yesterday, They are expected have died and four 

to write a series of articles on heavy storms and floods in 
their impressions. idan in the past 24 hours. 


——— 


U.S. Moves to Ease Stand on Outer Mongolia 


ATIONS, N. i, age ap gps A gy it will the nomads of this curious and Urga, now renamed Ulan Ba-,Outer Mongolia is ruled and) This land, wLere tion 
Western diplo-/not_make rade for mem |temote land, whose forebearers |e (Red Rider City). | . in a manner almost and magic, plus the jelop- 
the, United/Dership. He | abstain al89\thrust the boundaries of one Power then on the eee oe ae Sone ee eaeee, beve 
other Com satel- . who, ae rawn a curtain isolation 
steps to get it- Hungary, Romania, Al.\of the world's mightiest em- There are two houses of 2¢ross its frontiers, has been 
bania and Bulgaria, but feels pires to the banks of the Dan- Parliament—the Great Hurul-\T@tely visited by the outside 
aes = get enough votes for'ube who took Moscow and dan, which meets but once a Y°r!d. Prof. Owen Lattimore, 
sacked Kiev, should now be a Pes year, and the Little Huruldan, F@t Eastern expert long under 

was a priest, living 


fire for his alleged support of 
junior partner in the Commu-||, yee monasteries. Communists, is one of few 
nist bide. The Pikunee. re ~ on 
‘intriguing 


ily, 10 to 6:30 0M coe 
Westerners who has trated | 
And it is an an incarnation of ip Outer Mongolia and s the rf 
By Ronaid Batchelor thought that Outer Mongolia) "¢#4ed the government of la-|mier and five Ministers. people and language inti- 

ae lies at the strategie crossroads mas, but the power of the The present Premier, Yumz- matey. | 
| LONDON, Nov. 24—A vast, between Russia and China: me Pl ap nae lag Fe hagin Tsedenbal, is Moscow- R me vag he = a dp 2 
isolated land wedged between |the former a “liberator” and trained. All 295 seats in the by Saat Mongolia which is in-| ACME LIQUOR STORE 

corporated in the Chinese Com-| RETAILERS—IMPORTERS 
927 PENNA AVE. N.W. 
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golian Peoples’ Party launched 
" A b 

Russia and Communist China| the datter a hated neighbor|* Tebellion with the active as- Peoples” mevedidiaeny "scum. | 

which has been an enigma to,» overlordship in past. ong — TS ogy Sy Rane { 

COLONEL 


sistance of Russia. 
the West for the last six cen-|cen s is still a bitter and'2 Houses of Parliament aie coat 
| ven the country’s currency 
turies now is bidding for ajever-present memory. A semi-Soviet government|is pegged to Russia, one tugrik - fa wae het ten. cube! 
in Ca David. Md seat at the United Nations. The Mongols are, by repute,|was set up and 10 years later equalling one ruble. cement the two most powerful 
Bo vid, 4 The status of Outer Mon-|the most ——s arate gen | the Mongolian republic con-| The small, but efficient, Mon-|\Communist nations on earth | 
diplomat would not per- golia is the crucial point in of peoples—a characteristic of cluded a mutual assistance and/into an even more mighty en-' Vix 
86 .. aa 
STUART >: 4 rire 
AND - 
ACE HIGH ‘4-99 
Bottled in Bond PiPTH 
100 PROOF 


golian army is 
mit disclosure of his identity. : the nomad cattle breeder—yet pact with R trained by Russia and, in 1945,|tity—or become a buffer, the. 
He said the Americans finally’ nang 2 ngethggess. Sacro! the objection by the United) Today, with a constitution possession of which could lead 
YEAR 
o> ANNIVERSARY 3.45 
86 PROOF FIFTH 
veark BANKERS 4 49 


marched against the Japanese 
resign Wile ets bo Waened byl idea works coe States to their admittance to'drawn up on the Soviet model, to disharmony between | 
OLD | 
CHOICE Ji. 


their friends if they kill el pa vere the United Nations is precisely in Manchuria, Pere, 
FOAM RUBBER CENTER 
Bottled in Bond 


that their country is not inde- 
membership issue by opposition| Outer Mongolia, 1,500,000 
100 PROOF 


pendent. 
to admitting Red- sponsored! square miles embedded in the| Outer Mongolia has been a 
Outer Mongolia. jheart of Asia, is one third the |S@tellite of the Soviet Union 
size of Canada. It has only 
MOSCOVA — 80 Proof 
Distilled LONDON DRY 


since 1924, when the last reign- 
Prospective members who are) ing Khutuktu (Living Buddha) 
tri Inited § ‘about one million inhabitants,|'®& Adu (Living Bu 
ends of the United States, bet 90 head of Meentect for Soviet 
__ EXTRA DRY-—85 PROOF 


died. influence and 
such Italy, J ) 
ead ydey nay ogee oe Spal | every human being existing in| Control — egy the Red 
ington if the United States|'*# remote hills and valleys. ie wae a blood stoined 
would prefer to have Outer| Sealed off From World 
MAPOLEON BRAND 

MARQUIS DE LA FONT 

80.4 Proof 


regime initiated by the “Mad 
Mongolia out of the United Na- ” -| 
tions than to have Italy, Japan| Never a land for tourists,|Baron,” White Russian ad- 
Q vax CROWN VATA.59 
SCOTCH FIFTH 


+ 
i 


E 
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ii 


g 
Pe 


oa - ——_ --.. 


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Enigma for Centuries, 
Vast Area ls U. N. Isaue 


oho 
wR ene 


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2 
3 

3! 
233 


3 
i 
ty 
5 

‘ 

35 

‘i 
S 
} 


Lodge 


yy 


- 
& 


Uv. 8. Henry 
Cabot Ledge Jr. returned Tues- 
day from the Cabinet meeting 


ome | venturer who claimed descent | 
and Spain in it. for the last 30 years it has been | om Genghis Khan. 


The § ‘tightly sealed off from the rest 
Aion Pe 2g geome bag the world by Russia, which | But Russian ee and 
zarist 


reported to feel it must con-| 
ti Mon-|clasped this homeland of Gen-|suzerainty started in 
nue its stand on Outer Mon-! thea. Tensurians and days, when the Manchu dy- 


olia. However, in vi the | Shis 
senmiting roltele ‘Troe elose| Kublai Khan in the tight grip|nasty of China fell with the 


and frie " " ‘of communism after the First|1911 rebellion by Sun Yat Sen. 
out of = Cr oem and World War. For 600 years be Two years after the Bolshevik 
United States is said to be just|fore that, Outer Mongolia was/revolution, there was still a| 
about ready to let others or-| Virtually unknown. Russian imperial consul in! 
ganize the membership vote so| It is an irony of history that|Outer Mongolia’s capital of 
that all 18 will be certain of| - J entemimeaiiaiens 
acceptance. Many loose diplo-| 
matic ends must be tied up to 
accomplish this result. ) 

The Séviet Union has said it 
will veto all the candidates if 
Outer Mongolia is barred. 

The nub of the question is 
the dispute between the United 
States and the Soviet Union on! 


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. THE WASHINGTON POST ond TIMES HERALD 


dia Friday, November 25, 1985 hy ae “et | | ! 


Around the World 


Red China Aide Talks Tough, | Way (CTA = R ey oof LEY 
Tells U. S. to Quit Formosa | 24s I eyo 


BERLIN, Nov, 24 #\—Deputy| Welt, East Germany's official from Formosa. Previously this ey — 
Chinese Premier Chen Yi was youth newspaper. Wi added. no railroads, Chen/| te , eee 
uoted today as saying Commu. Chen listed the following adde . ag 5 aa 
nist China will ievade Feriness| ‘active” preparations for in- jet GP see ony begged for’ | ROE a 
} vasion: et planes are under construc-| See, > me | i ¢ S 
if negotiations with the United ne. tion on the coastline bordering Pe hdc | | TRA DéE- IN - ‘ ‘acme 


States break down. | ® Railroads are “rapidly” Sy Ge hie ct oe 

His statement was made in aniing built in the province of rormese. At eee Cy) age NOW! TODAY! 

interview printed by Junge|Fukien, on the mainland across “Numerous” ships are be- eer as . . 
ee built “in order to sail across: ee 

oenhebal _ to Formosa.” 


. yee te Me Sees 
| United States Ambassador’ Serra ee 
Se 'U. Alexis Johnson and Chinese fiat iB iey yt cae 
a Ambassador Wang Ping-nan OE ase all ne aa 
™ | Ee ae have been negotiating since BP Rik ee. qe 
Sensationa Me OP Ras Aug. 1 in Geneva on the re- °F ihe Be a as oie 
) e zs a " ; Pgh Fa a eae re 
ee 4 og ae Ma. 


lease of American civilians 


New ». AS i \ = from China, a pledge of non- 
violence in the Formosa area 


. . q i ‘and other differences between| 7" nm Je mets 3 
Electric Shaver ‘pe the two countries. The only con-| c.. Bo we ts 
, | ; erete result of the secret talks| ei. eg 


f ce 'so far evident has been the| 
or se progressive release of Ameri- 


ig can prisoners by the Peiping| zg ca * Ss Be 
Women Pe. 8 regime. a : Automatic 
Oe | “The Americans,” Chen said nee | 


SS ee in the interview, “must vanish) og hee Ps 
a / from Formosa in order that} CLOCK | 
China can assert its legitimate International News 
ady ‘tights in Formosa.” | 


Dailey’s Dandy 


| He insisted that Formosa,’ 
as ‘now occupied by Nationalist 
SHAVEMASTER ‘China is an integral part of| Actor Dan Dailey, shown rest- | 
China. ing comfortably at Cedars of 


Has a shaving head with | Chen Yi 4 
) en Yi declared there are’ Lebanon H tal in Holly- 
one edge especially ground te shave the legs, and (only two ways of solving the wood, has agi a 


the other ‘Formosa question — for the 
~— aney ground for undererm vse United States forces to leave series of X-rays after being P . 
thrown from his horse. Dai- New for 1956! Crosley’s twin speaker 


Seay seat, fresh and dainty all-year long with « Lady Sunbeam will” ort or "7 chi vty “tree” ley does not have a broken , : . 

Shavemaster. Its gentle, sure performance will always safeguard Poluaae “atth "ten tates af iadela san esas tetigit dinate Clock Radio with panoramic clock face, 
your personal, feminine charm. This electric shaver is especially arms.” seen aera — simplified clock operation, automatic ap- 
designed to serve the needs of women. The Lady Sunbeam shaves | Chen stressed a a Kill 2B | pliance outlet, modern printed circuitry, 
both legs and underarms with equally perfect results. It is smal! — prefers the first solu- Cypriots Ki ritons | slide rule dial, shockproof cabinet, bass 
mo larger than a compact. Ends muss and fuss, nicks and cuts| “We have long been negotiat-| NICOSIA, Nov. 24 w—Cyp-| tone compensation . . . in attractive leath- 


of soap and blade. W ine. ing with. the United States,” he|riot rebels killed two British ss : : 
ap onderful at home, or for travelling. $14.95 said. “The length of these\scidiers and wounded two erette finish with scuff-proof vinyl, 


w® son meagan od gh ong Beco others today in the latest out- - 
i le in this world will learn| break of violence against 4 95 — 
people in thi 
& the truth about Formosa.” (British rule. ° CROSLEY AUTOMATIC 


He added, however, that An army sergeant was shot 
if/ “many people” in China are|while walking along a road 
4 becoming impatient about For-|where several British service seaiieae Ghaenath heii 

mosa. Despite this, he said, his|families live in Nicosia. The: 4 wqulaitely gned, w a large eany~- 

government believes the main- ‘othered murdered Briton was Even less with your old trade-in aw Faye nosy —& wandert nl | CY "make each day ay 


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| copper to add new beauty to your 
SALE PRICED! : kitchen. A terrific bargain! 


Wool liner zips in or out in a flash! Coat tailored for style : — GEORGE'S ‘32° 


ROEBUCK AND CO 


PtPoSSessseowsssernvwsyerrs 


Reg. $39.95 Value 


Knapp Monarch 


3-Speed 


LIQUIDIZER 


The lquidizer of dezens of 
wees... . and yours in beauti- 
ful shades of turquoise and 
yellow te enhance the ap- 
pearance of your kitchen, A 
real value on on extremely 
useful appliance. 


$9 4-29 


=. 2... hk ee ee 


eee ete tt hh hh hk 


and ease... in fancy patterns and new colors. . . of pure ® | 
woolens. Sale ends Saturday 6 p.m. LOW PRICE 


Men's Clothing Dept., Sears Bladénebdurg and Wisconsin 


,e TSF SBE EEE EEE EERE EEE SEER EER EE GG GS GO = OO 


. © Aan LOg>. game. 
* eee ‘= Ni ds - eS POPy x _ . - 
F Rigi ae A or, OR, Ae I eR 2h» abs ~ 
bee a Sa ph oe * 
x - 


eg. $34.95 Value Reg. $24.95 


KNAPP MONARCH re KNAPP MONARCH 
3 Heat Electric _ gee ain Automatic 
[et QUAD WAFFLE 


HEATER | Pe ° Oaxer 


ae get quick, Wea oped | P able sandwich grids. A real con- 
trolied heat st a touch, 


ar: 18° vy ing pu 


Reg. $22.95 Reg. $19.50 


KNAPP MONARCH KNAPP MONARCH 


AUTOMATIC POP-UP 
REDI.- 


Imported Fabrics! Fine Suits ae | _ > TOASTER me oe MIXER 


100% All Wool and 92% Wool-8% Silk a | Tonst jest the wey you wont 2 
In Regular Stock Would Be $65.00! | beautitul pl myo ete ge Br 100 ‘Amp a 
ty and extra durability. 


oe 7 SALE PRICED! = SUH he 147 ame, 


a SEE THESE AND OTHER EXCITING KNAPP MONARCH 
Made to Sears order with expensive striped linings, APPLIANCES AT ALL 3 GEORGE'S LOCATIONS 


“needled in’’ tailoring for lasting good looks and carefully x/ | ¢ _. Downtown Store | Warehouse Store | Northeast Store 


ae sizing. Conservative lounge and business | et: 4 ae | | Sth & £ 9146-24th 102] H 


plain and fancy patterns . . . regulars, longs 


and shorts, Don’t lose out on this fabul lue! ) ing W ont 
See etl ted ap esther geass en rrcarmena 6 Sts. N.W. | PI. NE. | St. NE 
| ADDI TA Tees y vm ey Open Daily 9 to 9 Senn. Bally & hat. 


Saltafaclion guaanlbed 01 your money bach craps 911 Bladensburg \Rd, N.E. (2)... . Lincoln 7-7500 sa PUELY RS 12 9to 6 | Saturday 9 to 6 9 pm. 
. 3 em, : EMenon 2-1122| | . - 


Wisconsin Ave. at Albemarle (16). . 


SAVE MORE AT GEORGE'S ON 


WESTINGHOUSE 
_ APPLIANCES 


Reg. $189.95 New 1955 


‘WESTINGHOUSE 


6 Cu. Ft. 


REFRIGERATOR | 
115° 


WESTINGHOUSE 
AUTOMATIC WASHER 


‘47 7 29 


w/cross tep 
freezer 


Laundromat 
“25” model 


“=~ $2897 


Reg. $199.95 New 1955 


WESTINGHOUSE 


30” ELECTRIC RANGE 


Reg. $249.95 New 1955 


WESTINGHOUSE 
ELECTRIC DRYER 


Sate for *7 3 7° 


all fabrics 


Reg. $169.95 New «1955 


WESTINGHOUSE 
ELECTRIC DRYER 


Dial your 5 
own weather 


Reg. $239.95 New 1955 


WESTINGHOUSE 
8 Cu. Ft, REFRIGERATOR 


»/ push-button s7 3 3” 


Reg. $469.95 New 1955 


WESTINGHOUSE 
12 Cu. Ft. REFRIGERATOR 


w/aute. $9 g 4:29 
detrost 


$319.95 New 195 


- WESTINGHOUSE 
AUTOMATIC WASHER 


wivtightesre $a 5 4:29 


Reg. $299.95 New 1955 


WESTINGHOUSE 
ELECTRIC RANGE 


re ‘7 62:7" 


$354.33 New 1955 


WESTINGHOUSE 
8 Cu. Ft. UPRIGHT FREEZER 


You can be sure if s 29 
it's Westinghouse 


Reg. $519.95 New 1955 


WESTINGHOUSE WESTINGHOUSE 


30” ELECTRIC RANGE REFRIGERATOR 
== 357" yr: wae 


$229.95 New 1955 


Reg. $389.95 New 1955 $469.95 New 1955 


WESTINGHOUSE WESTINGHOUSE 
10 Cu. Ft. REFRIGERATOR 40” ELECTRIC RANGE 


is 91999 2 9279” 


ve Sts. NW. 


& Daily 9 to 9%, 
Saturday 9 to 6 
Warehouse Store 


2146 24th Pl. N.E. 


Open Daily 9 te 4, 


Sth & 


Saturday 9 tm 6 
Northeast Store 


1921 H St. N.E. 


aily & Saturday, 9 to 9 


LONG EASY TERMS—ALt, STORES 


GEORGE’S LOW PRICES ON NEW 


—_ aa 
Reg. $149.95 New 1955 


NORGE 
ELEC. oes” 
Sete fer > 5:29 


Reg. $239.95 New 1955 


: NORGE 
|AUTO. WASHER 
| iv "E267 


Reg. $269.95 New 195 Reg. $139.95 New 1955 


NORGE NORGE 
10.6 Cu, FT. REFRIGERATOR | WRINGER WASHER 


w/push-button $4 5 6?° veh pole $+66° 


detrost & freezer 
Reg. $399.95 New 1955 Reg. $239.95 New 1955 


13 Cu. Ft. oo FREEZER 41” GAS RANGE 
Exceptional Clean, efficient, | 367° 


Reg. $359.95 New 1955 


10 Cu. Ft. CHEST FREEZER 


r voy wd $7 89”) 


Reg. $419.95 New 1955 


12 Cu. Ft, REFRIGERATOR 
s_ | "199" 


Jubilee Special 


Reg. 149.95 New 1955 


Reg. $169.95 New 1955 


NORG 
30” GAS RANGE GAS RANGE 
Lone EASY TERMS—ALL STORES 


Downtown Store 
a 
Eh ical 


2146 24th | 24th eis N.E. 


Gigantic Savings On New Famous Make 


| TELEVISION 


ADMIRAL 


Ls 


Ehony table $94- 29 Ce 


ERE i aes 


$169.95 New 1955 ADMIRAL 21-in. TV 
Ebony Table Model 


$239.95 New 1955 ADMIRAL 24-in. Vv 
Table Model 

$219.95 Mew 1955 ADMIRAL 21-in. TV 
Console w/ slum. tube . 

$339.95 New 1955 ADMIRAL 24-in. Tv 
Mahogany Console bom 


$419.95 New 1955 ADMIRAL 21.-in. Vv 
3-WAY. COMB., blonde 


$549.50 aie on ADMIRAL 21.-in, TV 


"Reg. $575.00 New 1955 
ADMIRAL 21-IN. 
TV 3-WAY COMB. , 


CROSLEY 


17-INCH TV 
w/ Alum. $89-7" 
} Tube 
$389.95 New 1955 CROSLEY 21-in. TV $229" 
Comb., 3-epeed phone. . 
$159.95 New 1955 CROSLEY aie. 1 2 $495: 29 
walnut table model w/ alum. 


$249.95 New 1955 CROSLEY 21-in. TY § 29 


$138.00 New 1955 EMERSON 17-in. 105°" 
TV Table Model ...... ae 


$158.00 New 1955 EMERSON 17-in. TV 
Table Model w/alum. tube 

$349.95 New 1955 EMERSON 21-in. 
TV Console Model 


$279.95 New 1955 EMERSON 21-n. TY = §f 29 
Blond Table Model ...... 


MOTOROLA 


$149.95 New 1955 MOTOROLA 17-in. $9 5-29 


TV Blonde Table Model is 
125” 


$169.95 New 1955 MOTOROLA 21-in. 
Tv T 
$289.95 New 1955 MOTOROLA 21-in. TV $4 39° 


able Model w/slum. tube 
Blonde Table Model w/alum. tube 
$239.95 New 1955 MOTOROLA 21-in. TV 1 59-7" 


Censole w/alum. tube 


$269.95 New 1953 MOTOROLA 24-in. TV $7 69- 29 
able Model 


PHILCO 
Bem 
21-in TV 


$159.95 New 1955 PHILCO 17-in. 
Table Model 


$179.95 New 1955 PHILCO 17-in. 
Mahogany Consolette 

$219.95 New 1955 PHILCO 21-in. 
TV Swivel Console . 


$319.95 New 1955 PHILCO 24-in. 
Table Model... ... 

$399.95 New 1955 PHILCO 24-in. 
Console Model 


$249.95 New 1955 PHILCO 
21.-in. sole 


% 


New 1955 RCA 21-in. TY 
Table Model w/alum. tube ... 


$249.95 New 1955 RCA 21-in. TV 
Console Medel w/alum. tube .... 


$159.95 New 1955 RCA 17-in. TV 
Table Model. 


WESTINGHOUSE 


$329.95 New 1955 WESTINGHOUSE 21-in 7 65°*° 
TY MAHOGANY CONSOLE _... | 


$199.95 New 1955 WESTINGHOUSE 21-in. ~ oe 39” 


TY DELUXE TABLE MODEL 


TES, 
PTTANCES: 
Uta 


Warchouse Store 


8th & |2146 24th| 1021 H 
£ Sts. N.W. Pl. N.E. ST. N.E. 


‘i N 


JE WASHINGTON POST nd TIMES HERALD 


Friday, November 25, 1958 


FRIDAY & SATURDAY! ALL 3 BIG LOCATION 


SAVE ON QUALITY APPLIANCES BY 


FRIGIDAIRE 


Reg. $189.95 New 1955 


FRIGIDAIRE 30” 


| ELECTRIC RANGE 
| For Matchless $419-29 


> Service 
Res. $399.95 New 1955 


FRIGIDAIRE FRIGIDAIRE 
7 Cu. Ft. REFRIGERATOR | 12.5 Cu. Ft. UPRIGHT FREEZER 
‘— aa “ve *249* 


Reg. $259.95 New 1955 Reg. $469.95 New 1955 


FRIGIDAIRE FRIGIDAIRE 
AUTOMATIC WASHER | 40” ELECTRIC RANGE 
Povealate $7 4 4:9 POOR $2 797° 


Reg. $179.95 New 1955 Reg. $299.95 New 1955 


FRIGIDAIRE FRIGIDAIRE 
ELECTRIC DRYER AUTOMATIC WASHER 


sete — $29 Deluxe model 99 7 D-29 


all fabrics 
Reg. $459.95 New 1955 


Reg. $229.95 New 1955 
FRIGIDAIRE FRIGIDAIRE 
11.2 Gu.. Ft. REFRIGERATOR 


ELECTRIC RANGE 
rose = 9 QQ29 2door med *RHQ-2? 
Reg. $219.95 New 1955 


FRIGIDAIRE FRIGIDAIRE 
9 Cy. Ft. REFRIGERATOR 30” ELECTRIC RANGE 


_vcom 939-9 vem AZO 


LONG sitrrtel ne — ALL STORES 
Sth at E Sts., ,N W. 


Reg. $219.95 New 1955 


Warehouse Store 
2146 24th Pl., N.E. 
Open Daily 9 to 9, 


Saturday 9 ta 6 
te 4 ’ Nertheast Store 


Cha 1021 H St., N.E. 


Open Daily & Saturday 


Al Ah AE APRUANT 
9 am. to 9 p.m. 


Daily 9 to 91 O ily 9 ’ 
yd ag Aly thos Rog ' aby yp day 


SALE! 
THREE COMPLETE 
Pi sreg beriiitt 4 


20H | 
‘COMPLETE 5-PIECE LIVING ROOM OUTFIT 


King-size sofa with matching chair by nation- 
ally famous “Artistic” . . . plus three match- 
ing, authentically styled tables. Reg. $239.95. 


COMPLETE 4. PIECE BEDROOM OUTFIT 


You get a modern bookcase bed, large double “7 40 


dresser, spacious chest of drawers and match- 
Popular Chrome Styling 


ing nite table. 1% $219.95. 
CHROME 5- PIECE 


DINETTES 


m ST! ded seats in a choice of 
“>. . exciting colors. Reg. 
Bi. $69.95. 
EXTRA! EXTRA! 
32-PIECE SET OF DISHES 


YOURS AT NO EXTRA COST 
with purchase of this bargsin - priced 
THREE-ROOM OUTFIT 


Sth & ES E Sts., NW. 


Saturday 9 te 6 


2146 24th Pi, N.E. 
«Satur dey” 


9 te %, 
9t6 


1021 H St., N.E. - 
Saturday, 


Open Daily & 


OTA ro 


PPL 


OME 


9 am. to 9 pm. 


5g 
tye 


eer ae sew, i 


Business Outlook. 7... + eh} Unigene 


||Funston Sacrifices Principle in Ford Listing 


Page har come a dotting ihe Hanna B, which has voting rights. 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
8 Friday, November 25, 1955 


Bombay Speech 
‘Tron Curtain 
Gone, Says 


' 
¢ 
Zz 
iH 


s 
sF 


Soviet Rioters 


; 


3 


s 
: 


It should refuse 
to list Ford Motor Co. stock. It should let 


Get Stiff Terms 


Georgia and 3000 persons ex- 
pelled from the Communis: 
Party of Georgia. 

A story reporting the riot and 


MOSCOW, Nov. 24 #—The 
Armenian Soviet Republic's 
Supreme Court has sentenced 
12 persons to jail terms rang- 
ing up to 25 years following a 
riot which broke out in a foot- 
ball game at Yerevan, the Re- 
public’s capital, Oct. 12. 


Yerevan newspaper Kommvu- 
nist reaching Moscow today. 
The newspaper said, in part: 
A disputed referee's decision! “Numerous representatives of 
apparently touched off smol-| workers, employers and stu- 
dering discontent which re- i dents were present in the court- 
pottedly has been below thejroom. They said that on the 
surface for sometime in Ar-| day when a football match took 
menia. place for the Class B champion- 
There is nothing unusual in/ship of the Soviet Unicon, groups 
disturbances following a sport- 
ing event in the Soviet Union,/ing dissatisfaction of a part of 
any more than fhere is in West-|the crowd at the result of the 
ern countries. But such severe) game, started riots. 
@entences, such publicity and | cone Hits Militiaman 
appearances before a Supreme 
Court are unusual in the ex-| “The disorders were accom- 
treme. | Panied bv violence and resist- 


lance to h sentatives of 
Political Motive Seen se repre e 
autho rity. 
Experienced observers 


inj “One. person threw a stone 
Moscow doubted that any.suchiagainst a militiaman and 
sentences would have been im-|)wounded him, and when the 
sed if there had not been po-| militia tried to arrest him he 
fitical motivation in the action/resisted stubbornly . . . There 
at the'football field. were other examples of vio- 
This belief was reinforced by !ence and resistance to author- 
the fact that six pérsons were | it) 
e.ecuted for counterrevolution-| “Nine of the 12 persons who 
ary activities just before this' were brought to court were 
in the neighboring Republic of from the criminal element of 


i ithe population who had been 
——TAX FREE—— 


accusations true. condemned 


McCormick have the business. 


~ 


court action appeared in the} 


of hooligans and criminals, us-| 


Khrushchev || 


(Related story on Page 15.) 

BOMBAY, Nov. 24 #—Nikita 
Khrushchev declared tonight 
that Russia has torn aside the 
so-called Iron Curtain. “No one 
who applied for permission to 
‘enter the Soviet Union was re- 
fused a visa this year,” he said. 


Soviet Communist Party chal- 
lenged other countries to open 
their frontiers—“as we have”— 
in a speech before the Indian- 
Soviet Cultural Society, con- 
cluding the Russian leaders’ 


is a so cantahah Messiah, pedo 
ous to make every American 
an owner of common stocks. 
Time chose a headline occa- 
sion for this accolade—the 
announcement by the Ford 
Foundation of the ee 
sale of 6,952,293 shares of 
Ford Motor Co. to 
the public. 


stock 


The First Secretary of the! 


visit to Bombay. 

“Why,” he said, “we had at) 
least 17 American Senators! 
touring Russia this year, I be-| 
lieve, as well as farmers, news- 
men and others. Does that 
sound like an Iron Curtain?” 
‘Bombay State Governor Ha- 
rekrushna Mahtab sounded the 
keynote for the meeting when 
he told Khrushchev and Bul- 
ganin: 

“That your country stands 
firmly for peace is not ques- 
tioned seriously in any quar- 
ter.” 

Khrushchev said India and' 
Russia are firmly committed to! 
work together for peace and 
“the welfare of our future gen- 
erations.” He frequently thun- 
dered at “enemies who would 


To Funston, the Ford pro- 
posal was the triumph of the 
common man over the family-dominated cor- 
poration. Americans soon would be able to 
ride Ford stock to their fortunes while riding 
Ford motor cars to Grandma's. Funston 
promptly declared he would urge the Board 
of Governors of the Exchange to list the 
Ford stock. 

This was a setback for his tough, aggressive 
rival, Edward T. McCormick, president of 
the American Stock Exchange. The Big 
Board would get the commissions, not the 
“Curb.” But it’s a cheap, tawdry victory for 
Funston, gained by lowering standards, sacri- 
ficing principles. 

The American Stock Exchange will trade 
in voting, nonvoting, and 
common stocks. But the Big Board has been 
choosy. Since 1926, the New York Stock 
Exchange has refused to list stocks of com- 
a controlled by insiders with minority 
oldings through voting devices. 


cos 


SEVERAL years back, when M. A. Hanna 
Co. decided to issue a ponvoting stock, 
Funston personally tried to persuade Secre- 
tary of the Treasury George M. Humphfey, 
former Hanna chairman, that this was an 
unworthy practice and a departure from high 
sen He told the Secretary that so 

ong as Hanna A stock had no vote, no Hanna 


restricted-voting 


Under the Ford Foundation plan to sell 
stock, voting control, for all practical 
poses, will reside with the Ford family. 
family starts off by owning 6,480,750 shares 
of new voting B stock. re nts 12 
per cent of the 53,461,000 shares which will be 
outstanding. It can sell 3,780,000 shares and 
with its remaining 2,700,000 shares, or as 
little as 5 per cent of the outstanding stock, 
possess 40 per cent of the voting power. 

Furthermore, the family can reduce its 
holdings another 1,200,000 shares to 1,500,000, 
or 2.8 per cent of the outstanding stock, and 
possess 30 per cent of the voting power. 
That's disproportional representation That's 
control by minority interest! 


cos 


FUNSTON and Philip L. West, vice presi- 
dent of the Exchange in charge of stock 
listing, justify the Ford stock okay in this 
fashion. Betause the Foundation’s 39,396,327 
shares will be nonvoting, 60 percent of the 
—s power wil] reside with (a) the public 
shareholders, who will buy 6,952,293 shares 
from the Foundation, and (b) 108 key Ford 
employes, who own 632,100 shares. What 
could be more equitable than giving 14 per 
cent of the equity 60 per cent of the vote 
when the Ford family’s 12 per cent gets only 
40 per cent of the vote? 

That's specious. 

If the Foundation sells additional stock, 
each of these newly-sold shares gets a vote— 
at the expense of the voting strength of each 
public share already outstanding. But the 
Ford family voting strength is untouched and 
unimpaired. The public voting power never 
increases beyond 60 per cent so long as, the 
Fords hold 2,700,000 shares, or beyond 70 per 
cent so long as the Fords hold 1,500,000 shares. 

If the Fords hold 2,700,000 shares, an oppo- 
sition would have to amass 85 per cent of the 


TODAY & SAT. 
BONNIE DONNE 


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Scotch Whiskies, 


86 proof 


1949 CHILEAN RIESLING 
® Santa Maria, 12% by vol. 


We reserve the right to mit quantities.” Cath and Carry Onl 


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Lievgs 
stort 


votes of the publiclyowned stock to change | 
the management; if the Fords hold 1,500,000 | 


shares, the percentage drops to 73. But | BLY. Geore Te Ave. at ala Rd. 


PRICED RIGHT 


for Christmas Giving... 


shares could be listed on the Big Board. It's 
significant that Hanna A stock, traded over 
the counter, sells three points lower than 


find a way to end peace.” 

Warning Western nations 
“Russia does not stand alone to- 
day.” he said “we have many 
other countries who think as 
we do and India is among them. 

“In competition for peace we 
are sure to win,” he told mem- 
bers of the society. “The capi- 
talist press accused me of mak- 
ing a slip of the tongue when I 

lantic Pact’s Permanent Coun-'said that in Moscow—they said 

‘cil announced today that the|my tongue was loose—but it 
| Western defense alliance will | was no slip. 
hold its annual budget con-| “We will not deviate from the 
ference here Dec. 15 to 17. path set for us by Lenin.” 

The ministers of foreign af-| [United Press quoted Khrush- 
fairs, defense and finance of|chev as saying Russia was dis- 
the 15 pact nations will meet | appointed with the “microscop- 
to decide how much in men/ic results” of the Geneva con- 
and money they will contribute ference, and that “The Western 
in 1956. -Little change is ex-|powers will get nowhere so 
pected in the defensive build- long as they speak from posi- 
up. jtions of strength.” ] 


four people to 25 years in pris- 
son and one to 20 years. Two 
were sentenced to 15 years. 
three to 10 years, one to 2 years 
and one to 1 year.” 


in court before and released. 
BONDS 


The Collegium, finding all the 
Circular on Request 


Jones, Kreeger & Hewitt 
Memsbers New York Steck Sechange 


Cafritz Bldg. DI. 7-5700 


1625 EYE ST. N.W. 


LOW, PRICES 
CREDIT, TOO 


at 


STANDARD 
TIRE AND 
BATTERY CO. 


10th & H Streets N.E. 
Open Evenings "Til 9 P.M. 


Li. 3-9082 


Atlantic Ministers 
To Meet Next Month 
PARIS, Nov. 24 @—The At-| 


SHELL OIL 
ceo™mMPAN YT 
The Board of Directors today de 


clared « reguler querterly divi- 
dend of Gity cents (50¢) a share 
mon Stock 


—— 


Commons Near Rupture 


Over Eden’: Peace Move 


jection of his earlier offer on 
the ground that it would mean 
a contraction of the Jewish 


=> 
= 
= 
wae 


ber 1, 1955. Checks will be mailed. 
}. A. HORNER 
Secretary 


oor ~ 


, a = 


2? 
~—{&.. 


— 


Movember 272, 1955 


QUICK 
DELIVERY 


from 


FULFORD’S 
COLONY 
RADIO CO. 


6119 Georgia Ave. N.W. 
Open Evenings "Til 9 P.M. 


TU. 2-4900 


—_—- = 


> 
‘ 

) 

| LONDON, Nov. 24 #—Prime 
}) Minister Sir Anthony Eden re- 
affirmed today that his Gov- 
} ernment and he personally “are | state. 

very ready” to help Israeli and | Eden told an opposition 
Arab nations negotiate a Pales- | Laborite questioner he had con- | 
tine peace settlement. isulted neither the Arab nor 

The british leader’s state-|the Israeli governments before 
ment in the House of Com- his recent declaration that Brit- 
mons came in the face of the ain is willing to mediate in any 
Israeli Government's public re-| peace talks. 

Meanwhile, the Labor Party) 
disclosed it intends to press | 
the Eden Government to con- 
clude a treaty with Israel which 
would guarantee the existing 
frontiers of the Jewish: state 
against any major changes. 

The British Government has 
declined to enter into any di- 
rect treaty relationship with 
‘Israel before it makes peace 
| with its Arab neighbors. It does 
‘not regard the present Israeli 
frontiers as permanent. Addi- 
tionally, it is anxious to avoid 
any offense to the nations of 
‘the Moslem World. 

Against this background the 
‘opposition Labor Party's move 
signalled at least a temporary 
lapse in the foreign-policy bi- 
partisanship which is tradition- 
al with Britain’s main political 
parties. 

{In Jerusalem, United Press| 
reported that Israeli autori- 
ities today accused Egypt of 
stepping up its guerrilla war- 
are. 

[The officials said 21 Egyp 
tian-provoked incidents and 12 
Egyptian aerial incursions dur- 
ing the past three weeks were 
retaliation for the recent El 
Auja battle in which 40 Egyp- 
tians were killed.) 


Martial Law 
Approved by 
| Brazil Senate 


RIO DE JANEIRO, Nov. 24 
U.P—The Senate tonight passed/ 
a bill to put Brazil under modi- 
fied martial law for the next 
30 days. The Senate vote was 
35 to 15. 

The bill already had been ap- 
proved by the House. It now 
goes to acting President Nereu 
Ramos for his signature before 
becoming law. Ramos was ex- 
pected to sign it kly. 

The measure, w puts Bra- 
zil under a technical state of 
siege, was designed to protect 
the right of President-elect 
Juscelino Kubitschek to assume 
office next Jan. 31. 


Danes Hit Snag 
FOLGER, NOLAN—W. B. HIBBS & CO. ine. In Polio Vaccine 


MEMBERS NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE 
Oldest Investment Banking Firm in Washington, D. C. 


1956 RCA VICTOR 


21” Table Model TV 


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double-daty water ceocler that 
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@ New high and easy 
top tuning 
@ Famous RCA Victor 
quality in sound 
and picture 
. pres! priced for 
second set 


Special Jewelry Gifts 


ee et ie 


RCA Victor is a 
BETTER VALUE at 
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aUSe We give- 
* Biggest Trade in Al 
Service 


HIGHEST 
TRADE-IN 
PRICES at 

DISTRICT 
HOME AND 


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1320 Good Hope Road S.E. 
Open Evenings "Til 9 P.M. 


LU. 4-7500 


Newest 
RCA VICTOR /| 


21-INCH 
‘SWIVEL’ a Fat Cael Ser 
TVCONSOLE | °°? tate 


259"... 


@ Giant Size 21” Aluminized 
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@ Swivels into any viewing posi- 
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@ Choice of fine mahogany or 
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= = - = - - - - - - - = - OU lhCUleCOleO OOOO 


. CON 
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ae Seo ? nh 


lowances 


Om ms a RS. on ke 


Here's the 


the co flee- 
handy and inexpensive. ours plenty 
fer drinking. tee 


NO “EXTRAS” 
TO PAY 
at 


CAPITOL 
APPLIANCE 
COMPANY 


8527 Georgia ae 
Silver Spring, Md. 
Open Mon., Thurs, & 
Fri. ‘Til 9 P.M. 


JU. 5-3400 


OASIS water coolers are sold and serviced 
direct te the purchaser by HYNES BROS., 
Commercial Division. 


HYNES BROS., INC. 
4th & BRYANT ST., N.E. 


RCA VICTOR 
Table Model Radio 


@ RCA Victor ey 
budget LIST PRICE 


66 years of 
continuous service to 
Washington investors. 
Our clients are 
invited to make use 
of our extensive 
financial library. 


THESE ARE YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD BIG 10 DEALERS 
combining 100 
years of integrity 
and experience. 

lf in ‘doubt about the 
name of your | 
nearest Big 10 

Dealer—check by pho 


(Upper Georgia Ave.) 


6119 Georgia 
Avenue H.W, 
TU. 2-4900 


GUARANTEED 
SERVICE 


Avenue W.W. 
EM. 2-7300 


in Northeast * 
10th and H 
Streets N.E. 
Li, 3-9082 


In Silver Spring 
8527 Georgia Ave 
Silver Spring, Md. 

dt oes 


In Southeast 
1320 Geed Hope 
head S.£. 
LU, 4-7500 


LOOK FOR THE “BIG.10” SIGN ON YOUR BIG-10 DEALER'S WIKDOH' 


; GUARDIAN FEDERAL SAV INGS 


at Dupont Circle AND LOAN ASSOCIATION in Silver Spring, Md. 
1369 Connecticut Ave. N.W. HUdson 3-3828 Leo M. Bernstein, President 8400 Georgia Avenue. JUniper 8-3131 : 


s ¥ 


4418 Conn. Ave. N.W. 
Open Thurs. & Fri. ’Til 9 


EM. 2-7300 


“HIGHEST DIVIDENDS 
consistent with safety” 


up te $10,000 
System 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD | 
” Friday, November 25, 1955 Q 


: 
- 
- 
. 


_— 


lansburghs 


——/, 7th, 8th AND © STREETS N.W. NA. 8.9800 
a N 


EW HAMPSHIRE AVE. AND UNIVERSITY LANE 


4 


Sweet as Christmas Candy 


Lexile, “Caprice Ensemble” 


In New Pink Copper Nylon Tricot 


-_ ~~ - = = - 


A. Feminine little pettiskirt with C. Waltz gown with ruffles at the 
front and around hem. Fitted mid- 
rif? with ribbon ties. 32 to 38, 
ML. Also tn white 3.95 also in aqua 10.95 


two-tiered flounce lastex waist. 5, 


B. Double ruffled hem slip with shir- BD. Enchanting full length gown with 
red self fabric at top and appliqued two double layered, lace edged ruf- 
fice bodice. Sizes 32 to 40, also in fles of chiffon sheer tricot. 32 to 
white. 6.95 38 ,also in aqua. 12.95 


Langsburgh's—Knit Lingerie—W ashington, 
Third Floor: Langley Park, Md. First Floor 
Boe Attention, thrifty shoppers! There are real savings 
in this lineup of valpes Safeway has for you now. Good buys 

in every section of the store! See how you can save on item after 


item. For example, 


USDA “Choice” Grade 


CHUCK ROAST 


Safeway chuck roast is generous with meat. All the meat that belongs 
on a chuck roast is retained ‘(with none cut off to be sold at a higher 


price). 


Boneless ¢ ARM BLADE 
Chuck Roast at Bone In 49 Bone In 330 
Ib. Ib. Ib. : 


Sweetwood Thick : 


Sweetwood or SLICED B ACON Jr Briggs’ 
Swift's Premium meen 5 AUS AGE 


BACON | FRANKFURTERS » wae 

ScStn wADS*) GROUND BEEF «39: [S729 

RRR A 

a vee ee Carey 3.9 Snowy-White Heads 

an entheric ipstick Reg. 49c 20-oz. Cake CAULIFLOWER 
4.95 EGG NOG ICE CREAM 


oi a ' . \ Every head f i 
pain Ok camming dee TR aie, baer Party Pride _ HALE 89 c we. i from the growin 


li 


i, dl, dl, in, ln li, Mt, i, li, li, li, i hi i i a 


»” - . 
ce 4 
oS ee 
ted 
Seanes is ~— < 
———e Pr 


: ees ory 
. oe 
4 XO OR 
a e, 7 


i ie ie i A ie i, i li, li, i, li, i, i, i, i a =< ae 
ll i i i i i i i i i i i i i de a i 
7 


Two Gifts In One 


bxue, N ylon Hose 


i i, i, i i i i 


plus Lentheric lipstick, all for the price of GALLON fields, neatly trim. 


the hosiery alone. in Finesse, a new taupe, med and lively with 
DAIRYLAND MILK 


roseblush, a radiant bieige, or Tantrend, « 
vor. 
Grade A Homogenized ey SY 2 gt 
In 2 Half-Gallon ... ow. Gallon TV] ' | ee Cc 
: Head 


brilliant coppery tan. Sizes 8% to 11, in 
Cartons or 4 Quart = Stores 


New taste treat 


proportioned lengths. 


Lansburgh’s—HOSFE RY —W ashineton, 
Street Floor; Langley Park, Maryland, 
First x 


Cartons. 


Florida 


LUCERNE ECG NOG si 
Rich, Creamy Full GRAPEFRUIT see | 5 bulk 29° 
sin Weatale Qt. /5¢ ORA NGES 

5 ib. Cc 
SLENDER-WAY BREAD steeeee gS 


Too much Thankagiv- 


‘4 


Fancy as a Christmas Ornament 


— a a oe ltl tl 


Nylon Tricot 
Gift Slips 


es 


She can never have too many slips, and 
any one of these beauties will be a wel- 
come gift under her tree. Many styles 
to choose from, fitted midriff slips, 4- 
gored styles, two seam slips in white, 
pink or blue, many lavish with lace and 
ruffles, Nylon tricot in sizes 32 to 40. 


Check These Low Prices 


Mammy Lou Corn Meal EDWARDS COFFEE = 5I° 
ier 1De 8 3° CHASE SANBORN x's 55° 


Vol. 1 on sale today at Safeway MAXWELL HOUSE aie 2 on 53° 


The Illustrated Home Library 


ENCYCLOPEDIA WILKINS COFFEE co oor 


ow can help ons your sore ih BM. aie Se Off 
i ; au e And t, 
Rane eS EVEL fem, & 0 


years! 


22 va QQ, PARSON'S AMMONIA ~-<:21 
DRIED BEEF “=: 


Lansburgh’s—LINGERIE—W ashington 
Third Floor; Longley Park, Maryland, 


Fm eri Sage Sg SRE RR Rr eR REE 


Lots of Free Parking at Langley Park, Md 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
10 Friday, November 25, 1955 


“B16 F St, N.W. | 3195 Wilson Blvd.) 


Open Friday 9 to 9; Saturday 9 to 6 - Open Friday 10 to 9; Saturday 9 to 6 


: Se ee Sil. Dae i ey os 
. Rony rae ee a aa a + ’ SF cayecgpmee 


Ro: RA 
S 


eee aoe ’ : > i — 

: “ae rons &S "o2 

Oe Se oy + 

Ate oP Oi oe 

ee ree Be, Re ees ; ee 2E2> = Siete Oe 

Re as 
ae 
<<: yes 
ioe on 
Nn 
*. 7 
~~ 


Buy your Christmas Gifts ’ 
Discounts are in effect! nt Sevd’s Extes 


Bes 


gio 
> ALLELE ETD 


GENERAL 


“$4541 ELECTRIC 
APPLIANCES 


$ 
124 | 
$4 0 5 With Christmas only weeks away, here is a wonderful opportunity to do that early shopping you~ 
: promised yourself last year... and enjoy Boyd's Discounts on Discounts even on world-famous ; 


$4 40 ot cme: 


e 
¢ 


Special Savings On 
AMERICAN FLYER ELECTRIC TRAINS 
TRIPLE os Reg. $34.95 
FREIGHT TRAIN FREIGHT TRAIN 
45" |_ "18% 
Reg. $7.95 


HANDCAR 


$3 -99 


Stotion 


NEW 1955 and 1956 


MAJOR APPLIANCES 


New ADMIRAL 21” TV 
Table Model 
New RCA 21” TV 
Table Model 
New $168 EMERSON 21” TV 
CR I ia Se i 
New $219.95 FRIGIDAIRE 7 Cu. Ft. 


134 


REFRIGERATOR 

New $189.95 WESTINGHOUSE 
6 Cu. Ft. REFRIGERATOR . 

New $229.95 NORGE Semi-Auto. 
WASHER 


349 Unien Roller 
Skates 
New NORGE ELECTRIC 198 Renwell Globe. 


DRYER 
| New $239.95 WHIRLPOOL 


AUTO. WASHER 
New $249.95 KELVINATOR 
i AUTO. WASHER 


if te) | ss 
New $222.95-NORGE ELECTRIC = 
DRYER 

New $399.95 PHILCO 24” TV 


CONSOLE ip 
New $349.95 MOTOROLA 21” 

j consous sae (a wea etes 
New $329.95 ADMIRAL 21” TV 

: CONSOLE 


New $299.95 MAYTAG 
AUTO. WASHER ae 
New $339.95 WESTINGHOUSE 
AUTO. WASHER . age Aa 
New $399.95 PHILCO AUTO. 
Deluxe REFRIGERATOR 

New $369.95 HOTPOINT Deluxe 
ELEC. RANGE . 


SAVE 58:"' 


Regular $19.95 an 
AUTOMATIC SKILLET | 
Skillet with a brain! Cooks every- © ee 


thing from a simple breakfast to a 
complete dinner—automatically. It 


SAVE 8-8 


Regular $19.95 


AUTOMATIC TOASTER 


Gives you toast the way you want it, 
thanks to the famous 6 - Position 
Control that lets you select any 


HOUSEWARES 


ELEC, SKILLETS & 
FRYERS 


‘4 t 
4 : 
- A PS 
| i 
= 
3 7 
e2 - 4 P 
- 9 ae ss 
, > Free 
. 6 v es ee 
_ * ’ 
¥ ra 


Regular $19.95 


PORTABLE MIXER 


Add new, exciting color to your 
kitchen! This famous G.E. Hand 


_miectrle $15.99 
waco hEtti‘(iéS DD 
$11.77 


‘240 
4266 


$12.09 B 
* site 


19.96 GF. 
Remingten Duch- Skillet 


ess Shaver 


New $389.95 WESTINGHOUSE 
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New $369.95 ADMIRAL 
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New $399.95 NORGE 12 CU. FT. 
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New $550.00 ADMIRAL 21” TV 
3-way COMBINATION .. 


REFRIGERATOR .......... 
New $299.95 BENDIX 
Auto, WASHER 
New $199.95 BENDIX SPEED 
ELEC. DRYER a 
New $299.95 WHIRLPOOL 
Auto, WASHER 
: New $249.95 WHIRLPOOL 


ELEC. DRYER ... Ae pe 
New $329.95 RCA 21” TV 
Deluxe CONSOLE 
New 459.95 FRIGIDAIRE 2-dr, 
Auto. REFRIGERATOR 
New $529.95 PHILCO 2-dr. 
Auto. REFRIGERATOR 
New 214.50 TAPPAN 30” 
GAS RANGE ... vias 
New $229.95 BENDIX 

| sew 5290.95 1 iis ake es 


New $299.95 IRONRITE Deluxe 


CONSOLE IRONER 
New $149.95 BENDIX 
ELEC. DRYER . 


m=, New $399.95 ZENITH 21” TV 


New $329.95 ADMIRAL 21” 
CONSOLE 

New $179.95 TAPE 
RECORDER 
New $189.95 ADMIRAL HI-Fi 
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‘278! 


New $529.95 HOTPOINT Deluxe 


2291 
248 | 
$300 
$324! 


‘319! 
$287] 
155) 
154 
174 
115 | 


816 F St., 


Open Daily 9 00 9, Saturday 9 to 6 | 


Mixer is now available in 3 Mix-or- 
Match colors, plus white — Petal 
Pink, Canary Yellow and Turquoise. 
Mixes everything from cake batter 
to whipped cream. 


*T 7 47 


shade from 


-to-clean chrome 
bee, te styling add a look of luxury 


to any table. 


light to dark. Bright, 
finish and 


SAVE $8 


‘yp ae oe , 
Bo ae oe 
. ae 2 2k + oe an 
= 4 Se | Pes "teas > ie 
= Bo eS s <r: 
Ss a) ok eo.) ae ey 
: 4 a pds One ee 2a 
d digas Dt a ae ; ae 
ieee ‘ 3 > 
o 2 we ee 
~s - =“ a 9 : 
7 —. » ~ 
‘ A S , 
be eT sae < . 
oe x) 
iy ” > “ A 
ro > ; »: M 
oo RES SS i 
_ a . S 
% oD " : 


Regular $17.95 


STEAM & DRY IRON 


Here's the steam and dry iron used 
by more women than any other 
make. It switches from steam to dry 
ironing at the flick of a button 
weighs only'3'% pounds, and has a 
30-sq. in. soleplate, 


$@-39 


no mail, or C.0.D. 


only, 
N. W. 


yi ? 


SAVE *8-%¢ 


Regular $22.95 


SANDWICH GRILL & 
WAFFLE BAKER 


it serves 3 ways! Use it as an open 


grill for bacon, 
it as a closed gri 


or use it to 


, or chops, use 
for sandwiches, 
delicious waffles. 


All this right at the table—no more 
running to and from the kitchen. 


ST 3°77 


GET LONG EASY TERMS at BOYD'S! 
oF THE 0! 


fries, bakes, stews, braises—has a 
dozen different uses. 


- * . . a. 
“ a © A » y 4 
1A "a oe a —. - y 
¢ SY ee Os ea a se 
a ee b ws 4 - ?. on 
a ‘. a ae bay - t 
5 ‘ Pe de. wy 74 32a" 
:  * . a aS oe * 
> , , e* 2 ai ° 


Regular $19.95 
Auto. Coffeemaker 


You're assured of coffee just the 
way you like . . . with the same re- 
sults every time. Does it automat- 


ups. 
ST t 29 


ically, too. No need to watch it or | 
time it. Makes 3 to 9 five-ounce | 


shaver. SILAT 


14.95 Lady Senbeam 
Shaver 


STEAM and DRY IRONS 


17.96 Sunbeam 
Steam tIren 


17.98 Westin us 
Steam ya 4 


14.98 Fostoria Light- 


19.95 G.E. Peo-Up 
Teaster 

71.98 Westinghouse 
Toaster 


16.96 Svester, Aute- 


@aster 
Res. $29.95 
ELECTRIC BLANKET 
Single Aute. Contre! 


13” 


r 


49.95 Westinghe 
Mixer ~ 


79.95 GF. 
Mixer : 
19.95 os. Hand 
18.96 Wartns Hana 
wn Betas Sect 
19.50 Oster 2-Sreed = $99.99 
ELEC. COFFEEMAKERS 
26.95 Coffea f-Cus $16.39 
*.98 Usireral 19-Can $19.58 
19.96 OF 8-Cup $12.56 
$2.95 Stiver-Piated $15.99 
Reg. $9.95 
WROUGHT IRON 
TV TABLES 
$2.99 


weight Iron 5.99 

AUTOMATIC TOASTERS 

$11.47 

27.50 Senbeam De L stops 
Teaster .. te 


$ 9.29 


29.96 Westinghouse 
Coek-"N’ Fryer _- 


HOUSEWARES 
5.98 F Rubber 
on 43 Bea 
Pad ® Cover het 


: 
nife 


6-Piece 
6.95 fatal Jewel | - 2 


"905 Rebinsen 24 


, wee talnie 
er Kaur e Set 
— aa 


RA 
15.96 vy 


54.95 3 


89.95 Admiral Radic. 
°.. Ivery 
or Green 
99.50 OF ay 
76.95 Pons ai 
28 Fz 
Clock Radio 
VACUUM CLEANERS 
& POLISHERS 
actum (Cleaner 
88 Foca iteer $44.00 
60.96 {ebasen 
ater $38.99 
29.96 
Beal Pelcher “ $ 8.88 
79.95 Westingd 
ticsner = $96.97 
$36.97 


69.95 GE. Tank $42.47 
Vacuum Cleaner 

at dort, Yoomm $48.99 

nn Hee ea, 200.98 

64.50 Reging Yexer : 


BOYD'S WILL GIVE YOU TWICE THE 


DIFFERENCE IN GASH IF YOU CAN BUY FOR LESS 


within 48 hours. 


$12.99 
$39.99 
$34.99 J 
$22.99 
$59.50 
$56.00 


$18.79 fe 


PORTABLE RADIO 


13195 Wilson Blvd. | 


Open Daily 10 t0 9, Saturday 9 to 6 


v8 
THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


Food Firms Accused of Unfair Practices | "ORES. oe ETS 


COMPLAINT—Fr. P. I jin is anniversary celebration.| The two chains were accused be ne Some are known, its ac- 

FTC said a variety of| by the Commission of using un- tion, which is completely proper! 

approached its suppliers plans, ranging in cost from $200 | fair methods of competition in my the standpoint morals’ 

early year on participation’ to $3750, were offered and+278| violation of the FTC Act by “in-'and economics, will prove also 
participating suppliers con-|ducing” these special allow-/'to be legally valid.” 

tributed a total of about $216,-| ances. Louis Stein, president of the 


In return, accordingf to the| should have known,” eaid the | ‘hat his firm used coercion. 
ER Commission, the suppliers were | Commission, that similar allow- | Stein said he felt his firm 
i ances were not offered to their complied with all laws and reg- 


to receive special attention in 

VOR.-- newspaper advertising, in dis-| competitors. | ulations. “As far as we know,” 

FLA plays and signs and other chain-| Raymond R. Dickey of the’ a aon emg a = pon 

wide promotional activit o us manufacturers)’ was 
P y. law firm of Danzansky and offered to everyone else.” 


sane: plaint, ‘received $31,000 from Giant, yesterday said the FTC|. Herman A. Schulteis, vice! 
134 suppliers in a similar plan | action “is a shock to the Giant President of Chestnut Farms, 


this year which included two| management.” said his firm had received no 
weeks of stepped-up promotions ye effort to give the great- official word of the complaint’ 
in newspapers, on telvision | es ssible notice to the pub-| 
and feature displays in all its|lic of the coviaite available | ment at this time. 
stores; during its birthday sale,’ Charles P. McCormick, presi- 
The FTC said the suppliers | Dickey said, “Giant offered its dent of the Baltimore spice 
named by failing to offer “pro-|suppliers a chance to partici- firm, said, “If we have ever 
portionally equal” allowances | ‘pate by paying their fair share violated a constitutional or 
to other retailers, were in viola-{of the advertising and promo- | /¢84l regulation—and I'm not| 
tion of the Clayton Antitrust |tion costs of this annual chain-|5#¥ing we have—I'm sorry.” 
Act, as amended by the Robin-| wide event. “'m sure our salesmen) 
son-Patman Act. | “No supplier was ‘pressured’ would not want. to violate any’ 
‘to participate by any threats|/@Ws,” he added. “A manufac- 
or ‘induced’ by any promises.|‘’rer always wants to do the 


The suppliers who did partici-| right and legal thing. We can 
wweXtla pate received at least as much | #5Sure you we have never failed Wind saethciiine’. 8 
advertising and promotion as|‘° Cooperate with all social, ee Bee es 
they paid for—and each was legal and economic patterns of CS geese ee " 
iia New Mayo NNAISEC | advises of exactly what adver-| life.” . 
nNAlse ive he received. | Comment from the other Bo on. <OOD F AIR‘S 


“Giant had no knowledge | companies was not immediately 


and therefore could not -‘om- 


and had no way of obtaining’ wos 

any knowledge of what, if any, | he 13 firms were given 30 j | , 

arrangements its suppliers had Pei to file answers to the com- yy me Ls, WON DERFU L 

with Giant's competitors on/Plaints. The FTC set hearing : . : | ee 

similar sales. dates in January and February | ce etn See T ON US 
“Giant did knoW, as does of next year. | — ss os £ x ne A 

everyone in the food industry, | - —s se # ve 

that it has been common prac-) Be: i a : Fs, OFFER! 


: tice for many years for food m- 
Never oily ' tailers to enter into cooperative oe ; g: Redeem S&H 
suppliers during special sales. ONLY Sm - | GREEN STAMPS for 
. : , ¢ | i 
Real lemon juice Such practices have not injured . | ° BF Nagra neh emg Se) ee ee ae 
Ul aS ae sone and Pala’ 


competition but instead have : 
Home and Friends! 


™ Rie Segme 
Se te fostered it. 
= for fresher flavor! “Giant's biithday eales have WASMES, CLEANS, 
resulted in more people being) “Fi ; go BES 
| able to buy more and better JUST BY SOAKING! NR re fe? EI Se PRICES EFFECTIVE 
- food at lower prices. Giant's! eve Nuc eer ew a en Ee THRU SAT. NOV. 26 
it’s Mrs. Filbert’s suppliers have gotten fair value | 
Own Recipe oe (eee | for the money they paid as their’! m il | 
i ee —e 2 ae ‘ - " Pe, ee i a ee ee 
, sales. Dirt , 2 8 


Stee | | : ;;share of participation in the DIAPERWITE 
otal in 20 years’ Eggs, then Xa | | s P 4 ‘| “Giant is confident that when | S ondallboby’s| | FOR AN ECONOMICAL MENU CHANGE 
more eggs make it light, just as Cire white things THIS WEEK END, TRY NUTRITIOUS . . . 


eggs make a cake light: Ne oily : a | x sweetly fresh 

heaviness — Mrs. Filbert’s blend- Gm » lie Fe Ss mith N amed rand hospitel-| | 

ing discovery whisks the oil away! $4 < ees & 2 : clean. Works | 
Fresher with real lemon juice , a ee - 3| Reser ve U nit : wonders in| | 

e+. smoother with Mrs. Filbert's ile La al ie C J A washing ma- 

secret apices. Taste Mrs. Filber’'s (a ae eamagrersd bay Bsaday Wa thn converte 2 

atts rd a aan be en h 'o, se ‘ sith TIL, USNR. eens = Ib. economy size or in the handy 

¥% “t, lpgtat mi NR, a member o 

could make it taste so good! ——- ot the Navy Reserve for 18 years, | 

Try these, too — all Be cg = 70, ae has — ser Fes command: | 

7 ce eS eS, oe ing officer o ) 

Mrs. Filbert’s own recipes ! ee LOE... D W3 on | 

pe ‘ AAT! . po gy Bee 4 ~~ | | TENDER, JUICY, FRESH DRESSED Ae COtTen 


, }\River Naval ’ | oh | 
ea |Command. tr 8 : . ) 
[| Command ¥; PORK 
er Smith, a : = 


F mi | resident of Lor- > | 
Fiton, Va.. was . ‘ 2) 


cop Al DinPERUITE i. 39 LO 9 
= ATG) = 39. = 43.|-59. 


SALAD DRESSING tive duty during the Korean NEW YORK 
conflict and served in Navy 


BINAU SALES, INC., 2708 26th St. N.E., Wash, D.C. TEL: CO. $-4477 headquarters in Washington. 


Our only excuse for this advertisement is an entirely | SLICED BACON usse oi 43. | | 
SEP 


Ae Pi SR 


Biue Ribbon, Top Quality Guaranteed rr. SWEET, FULL O’ JUICE, FLORIDA, 


hew ide Cl| ekoune (©, ORANGES 
BEEF \ ote 

. hj k Ib. 39. , > ps > B: bag 35: 

if) blended wv Is CY KRISPY CRACKERS m= 25¢ pe fon alisy sroparns MAS 


OLIVE OIL rons ‘22 (QRS) SALISBURY STEAK 16 69, 


MARGARINE 1. muserrs j o> \ WITH GRAVY ean 
COOKIE DELIGHTS oN SCALLOPED POTATOES 16 ot. Age 


SANDWICHES c.5c tudor > : WITH CHEESE ean 


BURRY’S COOKIES 22. ‘! 
PEGAN COOKIES <2!" ‘= SWISS STEAK tome 7 


LOW, LOW PRICES J%Af GREEN STAMPS, TOO 


BAKED BEANS (WITH. PORK) y J pide 31 C 
Every blended whiskey sold in the United States is a blend of whiskey REYNOLDS WRAP ALUMINUM 3 “Roll 25- 


and neutral spirits~every one but one. That one is BW. And the big differ- _ 
ence between BW and all other blended whiskeys is that BW is made of fine prying - ot NEW MIXES 
SOUTHERN STYLE, BUTTERMILK 


whiskey blended with Vodka. ae 
That means that all of the superb smoothness of Voika—distitled the | FLOUR | 5 >\—— CORN BREAD MIX = 210. 27 


Smirnoff “Breathless” way—is combined with the favorite flavor of fine Er | Paid | ° SPOON BREAD MIX tor. O Be 
straight whiskeys in this brilliant new BW whiskey blend. Be among the 5 Ib 49. er, St gee 


Ls 
vy 
ion 
Ld . 

ere a” 


i eee Hal SOILS Meas, 
deere tyeds Paes an . Paap 
shies alt i 


PO eT Mana 
gf CRORE HE WY Peden ag 5 


> 
“ ¢ 3 ae 
= . oe ee : ; ; ; ~. x 
oe ’ aa < - 
t 4 . : 4 
a peepee Poe 798 Pet gee ie 


first to enjoy Vodka-smoothness in-your favorite whiskey drink! ae 8 CORN MUFFIN MIX i 10° 


Ct AOR 


"HOW VODKA IMPROVES WHISKEY : Age) HOUSEHOLD PRODUCT VALUES’ 
Vodka is clear, odorless, without taste; it has no bite, no harshness. SAAD S ciant wxo. Jc AJAX CLEANSER 3 * 35¢ PALMOLIVE 3° * 95¢ 
The refining of Vodka calls for slow-filtering through large beds of | AJ AX CLEANSER 2 sien 33c PALMOLIVE > te 95 


special charcoals. This is slower, more costly—and the result is the 7 | 
smoothest grain spirits obtainable. > « ' — 3l¢ CASHMERE BOUQUET Br Yo 25 


Using Vodka as the grain spirits base of blended whiskey gives you im \Q\ TA T/S | “ 
a finer blend, et Peg LARGE PKG. pa — ne shad ” worn yer 7% 


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THE Mg ye POST 
end TIMES HERALD 
Friday, November 25, ms 


ee: 
Butler Asks 


Power Deal 
Prosecution 


By Darrell Garwood 


International News Service 


Democratic National Chair-' 5 ; 

man Paul M. Butler yesterday | 

challenged the Administration | 

to prosecute those responsible | a 
a eee for what he! 7 
ed % called the Dix- 

a on-Yates power 

i : contract “scan- | 

oa sae dal.” 
. . Butler said 


voiding of the 
contract will 
test “Repubii- 
can promises 
that any 


wrongdoing or 
misconduct in 
Butler the Eisenhow- Lf ° 
er Administration would be 
dealt with quickly’ and. vigor- ; 
ously.” , 
The Party Chairman said the e 


Democrats can take credit for 
the Atomic Energy Commis 
sions announcement that the 
contract is void because the sem... 
“conflict of interest” laws were = 
violated in its drafting Bs 
Butler charged that the! @ 
Dixon-Yates “deal” would have | = 
cost the taxpayers more than| = 
$100 million in “excess power! & 
costs” and that another four! 3 
or five million has been saved! i 
in cancellation fees. 
He declared that Democrats 
who tried to stop the Adminis} 3 
tration from “ramming this| 2 
thing through” were “slan-/ $3 
dered and denounced as parti-| & 
sans and demagogues,” Butler 
added 
“But they refused to be in- 
timidated, and for that we may 
all be grateful.” 
Meanwhile, a hot court bat- 
wn: | AUTOMATIC TOASTER 
over the AEC announcement 
that the contract is “not an 
obligation the U. S. can recog-| Compare at $79. 95/ 
nize 
The AEC provided a legal Gleaming aes ee ee ry with hag 2 40 
right for the Dixon-Yates com- 
bine to sue for damages in the 
Federal courts Fdgar H 
Dixon, originator of the con-| _ 
tract, indicated this would be! “22553 
done | 
The AEC announcement cited oo 
the activities of Adolphe H./| <sc55 
Wenzell, senior vice president re 
of the First Boston Corp.., a 
New York investment bank.! 
which was to act as financing} © 
agent for the $107 million con-! ; 
tract ) 
AEC Counsel William Mit- 
chell pointed out that Wenzell| 
was serving at the same time! 
as consultant to the Budget)| => 
Bureau and that “it is the pos | S23 
sibility of damage and the ten-/ : 
dency of such conflicting rela-| = 
tionships to tmproper influence 
which have been condemned) = 
by the statutes and the courts.” 


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Hennings Bars 
Probe on Use 
Of Union Dues 


Associated Press 

Sen. Thomas J. Hennings (D- 
Mo.) yesterday turned down a 
suggestion that the Senate Sub-| 
committee on Constitutional) 
Rights investigate the alleged! : 
misuse of labor union dues in 
political campaigns 

Sen. Carl T. Curtis (R-Neb.) 
had asked Hennings whether it 
was feasible for the subcom-' 
mittee, which Hennings heads,' 
to look into the subject. Curtis) 
said it is charged that dues are 
sometimes put to political use! - 
contrary to the wishes of some 
union members 

Replying, Hennings wrote 
Curtis: Rew 

“! agree with you that the! 
problems raised in your letter | 
are of serious import Under | 
the rules governing the proce-| 
dure of our subcommittee and 


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He said he understood that] § 
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E WASHINGTON POST 

| WFridey, November 25,1955 
13 
a 


Permanent 
Polar Bases 


Associated Press 


Rear Adm. Richard E. Byrd 
sald yesterday the new bases 
being established in the Antaro- 
tie by the Navy expedition prob- 
ably will rep- gue 


made that com- 
ment at a news 
conference dur- 
ing a stop-over here en route to 
join ships of “Operation Deep- 
freeze” at New Zealand. 

Byrd also said, in answer te 
questions, that: 

® Russia is establishing its 
bases in a vast area where there 
has been little or no explora- 
tion. (This is in the quadrant 
of the Antarctic continent fac- 
ing northward in the direction 
lof the top of Africa. 

® For the United States, a 
ipermanent base in the Antarc- 
tic can have high strategic 
value. “If the Panama Canal 
should be destroyed in a war, 
ships on the way to the Pacific 
would have to go by way of the 
itip of South America. The edge 
! P the Antarctic is only 300 


Antarctic ‘Womanless’ 


Is Peaceful, Byrd Says 
Rear Adm. Richard £. 
Byrd disclosed with a twin- 
kle in his eye yesterday one 
of the unsung advantages 
of the snow-covered South 
Pole. 

“No woman has ever set 
foot in the Antarctic,” he 
declared. “We found it to 
be the quietést and most 
peaceful place on earth.” 


miles away. We would have 
to control that area to protect 
ithe passage around Cape Horn.” 
Be So far there is no proof, 
‘but he believes that uranium 
imay be among the rich mineral 
deposits of the Antarctic con- 
tinent. 

When asked if the refur- 
bished “Little America” base 
on the edge of Ross Sea—where 
Byrd set up his bases on previ- 
ous expenditions — might be- 
come permanent  establish- 
ments, the admiral replied: 

“I think this will become a 
permanent thing from now on. 
I think it ig the beginning of 
permanent bases, permanent 
little villages down there.” 

Would there be a thousand 
or more persons? 

“More like 500,” said Byrd, 
“who would be there for a two 
or three year stay, then re- 
lieved by others. They would 
be mostly civilians, with per- 
haps 10 per cent military.” 


Zionists Pray 
For Security 


Of Israel 


The Nationwide membership 
of the Zionist Organization of 
America was urged yesterday 
to offer special prayers for the 
security of Israel at synagogue 
services this evening. 

The proclamation of a special 
Prayer Day—which will also 
usher in the eighth anniversary 
of the birth of Israel on Nov. 
29, 1947—was announced by 
Rabbi Noah Golenkin, presi- 
dent of the Board of Rabbis 
of Greater Washington, and 
Rabbi Simon Burnstein, presi- 
dent of the Rabbinical Council. 

The proclamation was issued 
| by the ZOA rabbinical commit- 
tee in conjunction with the Rab- 
binical Council of America, rep- 
resenting Orthodox congrega- 
tions, and the Rabbinical As. 
sembly, speaking for Conserva- 
tive rabbis. 

The Central Conference of 
American Rabbis, representing 
|'Reform congregations, asked its 
communicants to offer special 
prayers at their regular serv- 
ices. 

The rabbinical messages 
stated that “in this hour of 
Israel's desperate need, when 
the enemies who seek her an 
nihilation are being strength- 
ened with an unlimited supply 
of arms by Communist coun- 
tries, it is urgent that we turn 
to our Heavenly Father and 
ask His protection for this for- 
trees of freedom and democ 
racy in the Middle East.” 


Envoy Assumes Duties 


ters 
HELSINKI. Nov. 24—John D. 
Hickerson, new United States 
Ambassador to Finland, pre- 
sented his credentials to Presi- 
dent Urho Paasikivi yesterday. 


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 1955 


A School Program for Washington 


III. School Facilities 


In discussing the needs of Washington's schools, 
there is a temptation to dwell exclusively on the 
importance of enlarging the number of teachers. 
The three-year program devised by the Board 
of Education, under which 489 teachers would be 
added th Me school system in order to bring the 
pupil-teacher ratio to 30 to 1 by 1959, is absolutely 
basic to the attainment of a satisfactory public 
school system. But there are other reforms and 
improvements which go hand in hand with this 
personnel increase and which are vital elements 
in a sound educational program. 

The District White House Conference Committee, 
which canvassed Washington's school problems in 
preparation for next week’s national meeting, has 
listed a number of improvements which, as the 
general chairman of the committee, Robert V. 
Fleming, put it, represent “not the extreme in for- 
ward thinking but reasonable, practical goals which 
are essential if the District is to provide an ade- 
quate educational program and keep pace with the 
rest of the Nation.” 

Obviously, an increase in the number of teachers 
and an attendant reduction of the size’ of classes 
will necessitate additional classrooms. So will the 
rapid growth and the constant shifting of the 
school population. Estimates made by the White 
House Conference Committee call for the con- 
struction of 463 new classrooms by 1960 to accom- 
modate an anticipated increase of 6000 elementary 
school children by that date and to enable classes 
to be held down to 30 pupils. For the fiscal year 
ahead, this prescribed building program will de- 
mand, in round figures, some $8 million. 

Among the grievous lacks of the District school 
system at present is adequate help for hahdicapped 
pupils and for others needing special care of var- 
ious kinds. Remedial reading assistance and other 

‘forms of remedial treatment, such as speech ther- 
apy, ought to be available to children requiring it. 
Counseling, psychological testing and psychiatric 
aid ought to be provided in every school in order 
to deal with personality problems in their early 
stages and before they erupt into serious problems 
for the school as a whole. Increased vocational 
counseling is needed. Clerical assistance ought to 
be provided to relieve school principals of their 
heavy, distracting and often wasteful burden of 
paperwork. At the bottom of the school ladder, 
there ought to be kindergarten classes adequate 
to accommodate all of the community's five-year- 
olds. At the top there is need for a new plant for 
the teachers’ college. Sometime the community 
also is going to have to consider the establishment 
of a good municipal junior college. 

Taken together, these needs call for a marked 
increase in the quantity of school personnel. But 
it is no less important to raise the quality’of this 
personnel. There is no realistic way to do this save 


by increasing the pay of teachers. The conference 
committee recommends a salary increase for teach- 
ers ranging from $100 to $1200 as a long overdue 


measure to attract and hold teachers of high cali-. 


ber. The District's salary scale for teachers com- 
pares favorably with that of other Northeastern 
cities of more than 100,000 population; starting 
pay here is slightly above the median, while the 
maximum pay which teachers can attain is slightly 
below the median. In Washington, however, the 
schools must compete for thd recruitment of per- 
sonnel with the Federal Government, which offers 
college and normal school graduates far more 
enticing opportunities for advancement. 

Moreover, the salary scales in comparable cities 
are, generally speaking, so low that a comparison 
is hardly worth making. Everywhere in the United 
States, the men and women to whom we entrust 
the education of our children have been subjected 
to an economic disadvantagement and degradation 
which tend to exclude talent and superior ability 
from the teaching profession. In a report recently 
issued by the Ford Foundation’s Fund for the 
Advancement of Education, Beardsley Rumi ob- 
served that “the best talent of the younger genera- 
tion finds that education is not as highly valued by 
its seniors as law, medicine, advertising or many 
technical skills.” The average salary of railroad 
engineers, for example, far exceeds that of college 
professors, let alone that of secondary and ele- 
mentary school teachers. 

The teaching profession is perhaps never likely 
to rival other callings in material compensation. 
But it must, if it is to attract and hold people of 
maturity, character and intellect, afford them dig- 
nity and a reasonable measure of comfort; it ought 
to provide enough pay to enable a man to support 
a family decently. One of the steps which Wash- 
ington can usefully take toward improving the 
caliber of its teachers, in addition to raising their 
salaries, is to give the graduates of teacher colleges 
outside the District of Columbia an equal oppor- 
tunity to qualify for teaching positions here; the 
way to do this is to let all applicants take national, 
rather than strictly local, examinations. Washing- 
ton needs to recruit from a larger field than at 
present. 

Perhaps the most effective way of all to get 
better teachers, however, is to give the teachers 
better teaching opportunities. This means smaller 
classes in better buildings with improved equip- 
ment and the kind of counseling, clerical and 
therapeutic help recommended by the White House 
Conference Committee. Teachers are drawn most 
of all by the chance to help children. Washington 
needs a school system in which teachers can gen- 
uinely fulfill their function—in which teachers, 
children and parents can work together with an 
uplifting feeling of confidence and pride. 


Loused Up 


The pious announcement by the Atomic Energy 
Commission that it will not pay a cent of cancella- 
tion penalty on the Dixon-Yates contract just about 
completes the mess the AEC and the Bureau of 
the Budget have made of this affair. We hold no 
brief for the role of Adolphe H. Wenzell, whose 
private activities, according to the AEC general 
counsel, invalidated the advice he gave as a con- 
sultant to the Budget Bureau while the contract 
was being framed. But why such sanctimonious- 
ness? The Atomic Energy Commission and the 
Budget Bureau did their utmost to ram through 
the contract long after its defects had been brought 
to light, and they deliberately stuck to the contract 
until the period in which it could have been can- 
celed without penalty had expired. 

Perhaps it is time to say a word of commisera- 
tion for Messrs. Dixon and Yates, whose private 
electric companies are out substantial sums of 
money and who may well feel that they have been 
euchred. If these companies entered in good faith 
into the proposal hatched by the Budget Bureau 
for having private firms furnish additional power 
needed in the Tennessee Valley—a tenable concept 
in theory if it had been debated in the open in- 
stead of drawn up in secret and presented as a 
virtual fait accompli—they must have been sadly 


disillusioned. Altogether, the pulling, hauling and, 


trimming are a sorry kind of advertisement for 
other private companies that may be asked to do 
business with the Government. This obviously is 
a case for the courts. But the two agencies which 
led the Dixon-Yates combination down the garden 
path ought to be the last to attempt to disavow 
responsibility with such smug self-righteousness. 


Robert Lincoln O’Brien 


Robert Lincoln O’Brien, who died on Wednesday 
at the age of 90, was a Washington and national 
institution for longer than most of us can remem- 
ber. As executive clerk to President Grover 
Cleveland at the time when the White House staff 
consisted of only eight persons, as Washington 
correspondent for the Boston Transcript and later 
as its editor during its days of renown, as president 
and editor of the Boston Herald for 18 years, as 
Republican chairman of the United States Tariff 
Commission during the Administration of Franklin 
D. Roosevelt—in all these responsibilities Mr. 
O’Brien acquitted himself with distinction. The 
variety of his service made for an unusually full 
career. 

Although Mr. O’Brien had been bedridden for 
gome months before his death, his tall and grace- 
ful figure was a familiar sight -in the Capital long 
after he retired from the Tariff Commission in 
1937. His charm, his sharp Yankee humor and his 
direct expression were famous. Journalism re 
mained his first love, and he was a bridge with the 
newspapering of an earlier day through his mem- 
bership in the Gridiron Club for 56 years. . He 
enjoyed telling reporters of this generation, who 
would be horrified at a similar effort today, how he 
helped conceal the news of President Cleveland's 
operation for cancer in 1893. 

A man of strong Republican convictions who 


tives in his own party, he supported reciprocal 
bargaining for trade concessions while on the 
Tariff Commission and condemned what he called 
the “take it or leave it” tariff-making under Presi- 
dents Hoover and Taft.. Washington, his adopted 
home, is much the richer for his long and useful 
life here. 


The Johnson Program 


Democratic legislators will not be empty-handed 
when they return to Washington in January. 
Majority Leader Lyndon Johnson has indicated that 
he will lay a 13-point program before the Demo- 
cratic Policy Committee of the Senate. If he has 
his way, the Democratic majority in Congress will 
make its bid for support in the November election 
by enacting a constructive program, instead of 
merely blocking recommendations from the White 
House. That is a sensible approach, and we hope 
that it will have strong support on Capitol Hill. 

In some particulars, Mr. Johnson’s “program 
with a heart” is similar to that which President 
Eisenhower is expected to offer in his State-of-the- 
Union message. High on the Texan’s list of re- 
forms are further improvement of the Social Secu- 
rity System, additional aids to health and hospital 
construction, Federal funds. for schools, public 
roads, housing and water resources programs, a 
natural gas bill, relief for economically depressed 
areas, amendment of the immigration and naturali- 
zation laws, a constitutional amendment eliminating 
the poll tax, and disaster insurance. 

If the Democrats decide to make a fight for the 
Johnson program, the sharpest clashes are likely 
to come on tax reduction and farm policy, and 
possibly on the vaguely described natural gas bill. 
Mr. Johnson is leaning toward the George proposal 
of increased exemptions “to benefit the low-income 
groups.” The question is whether any such ex- 
tensive cut as that proposed by Senator George 
in the last session can be made along with in- 
creased spending for schools, roads, social security, 
health and farm benefits without seriously un- 
balancing the almost balanced budget. Certainly 
deficit financing to sustain added benefits of this 
sort could not be justified in these boom times. 
The other disturbing aspect of the program is the 
proposal to return to rigid farm price supports at 
90 per cent of parity. That, of course, has become 
a tempting political slogan because of the decline 
of farm prices, but it is essentially a step backward 
and, in our opinion, has no place in the generally 
constructive program Senator Johnson has outlined. 


Kadser Stoel in India 


The Henry J. Kaiser organization, which has 
branched out with automobile assembly plants in 
the Netherlands, the Philippines, Israel, Mexico 


and Argentina, has won a significant contract to‘ 


build a steel mill in India. It obtained the order 
to construct a $130-million plant near Calcutta 
against competition from Great Britain and Ger- 
many and over another American competitor. The 
new plant will increase India’s steel capacity by 
about 45 per cent. 

The Kaiser company deserves congratulations 
for seeking and winning this contract. It is an 


example of the export of American know-how | 


which should be of substantial benefit to an under- 
developed country and which is in line with Ameri- 


can foreign policy objectives. 


+e Bticcx. 
Oty 08 WA erred Dom ~— 


Letters 


Preserving the Canal ~ 


I have read with much en- 
coOuragement and appreciation 
your editorial, “From Street- 
car to Parkway,” in The Wash- 
ington Post and Times Herald 
on Nov. 15, which com 
ments favorably on the restudy 
which the National Park Service 
is undertaking in order to avoid 
encroachment upon the C & O 
Canal of the proposed new seg- 
ment of the George Washington 
Memorial Highway to be built 
from Chain Bridge to Cabin 
John Creek. 

The alternative possibility 
which you recommend, that of 
using the right-of-way of the 
Cabin John car line, seems to 
commend itself as a practical 
solution of where to place the 
Memorial Highway without dis- 
turbing or encroaching upon 


the canal rty. 
HOWARD ZAHNISER. 
Washington. 


“Dangerous Drivers” 


In reading your issue of Nov. 
12 I noticed particularly the let- 


Drivers,” by 
W. P. Bowman. 

“I am undoubtedly prejudiced, 
as I am a serviceman, but my 
views concerning his letter are 
expressed as follows: 

I drive approximately 50 
miles a day to and from work— 


- | am married, have two chil- 


dren, live ashore, and am 24 
years old. On an average of 
about three times a week, some 
civilian driver, not doing over 
80, almost ends my career. The 
only reason I remain able to 
continue my career is that |! 
have become quite adept to 
pulling myself out of odd situa- 
tions and tight spots. You can 
almost compare much of the 
driving on public highways with 
the hazards encountered in 
combat. 

It’s hardly the serviceman’s 
fault that the highways are not 


wafe. Servicemen’s accidents 
are generally noticed more be- 
cause the term soldier, sailor 
or marine means news and 
catches the public eye more 
than an individual’s name. 

As to the three simple ex- 
planations for this type of ac- 
cident: 


(1) Youth—Most of us service- 
men are relatively young, but 
how many kids are there driv- 
ing on the highways that are 
not yet in the service? A goed 
many kids in their teens and 
many not yet out of high school 
have their own cars now—are 
they not dangerous? Eighty per 
cent of my considered driving 
road hazards are caused by kids 
who think they are “hot rod- 
ders.” 

(2) Daring—Daring is gen- 
erally a part of youth—from 
one extent to the other. Most 
servicemen already know what 
daring is—and many have had 
their fill of it im combat; so 
when they return home they 
have more reason and are more 
willing to take it easy. What 
chance do the kids here at home 
have to prove their daring ex- 
cept on the highways? 

(3) Haste — Statistics show 
that your fast drivers (exclud- 
ing reckless drivers) are more 
careful of driving hazards and 
are safer and have less accidents 
than slow drivers. People who 
drive fast normally are safer 
than the slow drivers who think 
nothing can harm them because 
they are only doing 36 in a 50 
mile zone. Actually a slow driver 
can be extremely dangerous on 
the open highway. 

Let the Department of De- 
fense take care of its own 
problems, of which it has 
more than enough and let all 
drivers be a little more cautious 
and courteous te the other 
drivers on the road. I think 
that will solve everyone's prob- 
lem. J. O. CLARKE, 

USMC. 


See 
Fredericksburg, Va. 


to the Editor 


Zoning the Upper County 


On behalf of many thoughtful 
people here who have become 
members of the Montgomery 
County Planning Association, I 
wish to express our apprecia- 
tion for your enco edi- 
torial on our zoning pro 
in your issue of Oct. 29. The 
further postponement of the ef- 
fective date of our temporary 
zoning ordinance, enacted 
more than a year ago, prolongs 
the time when this essential, if 
rudimentary, form of protection 
will be given our homes and 
communities. 

Meanwhile, the County Coun- 
cil has embarked upon the per- 
ilous course of preparing a “per- 
manent” zoning ordinance un- 
der time limits so absurd that it 
will be unlikely that the result- 
ing legislation and maps can 
really be based upon a plan 
that accurately forecasts the fu- 
ture demand for land for homes, 
business and other purposes. 
We believe with you that our 
able zoning consultant, Irving 
C. Root, should have the neces- 
sary freedom of operation. 

It is a pleasure to note that 
in the days following the pub- 
lication of your comment, the 
County Council has given Mr. 
Root this needed assurance, 

ARTHUR J. KELSEY, 
\. Mon County Piea- 


Gaithersburg, Md. 


World Bank Location 


May I eall your attention to 
an error in The Washington 
Post and Times Herald of Nov. 
17? A story in the paper of that 
day indicated that the World 
Bank is about to build a new 
headquarters. This is not the 
case; the Bank has no plans 
for leaving its present head- 
quarters at 1818 H st. nw. 

HAROLD N. GRAVES Jr. 
Director } orme tion, Eaternafienel 

v ent . 


Washington. 


“Virginia: Backward March” 


In his reply to your vigorous 
editorial of Nov. 14, entitled 
“Virginia: Backward March,” 
Sen. Fenwick states, “In the 
final analysis,” the Report of 
the Gray CommisSion, “is de- 
signed to preserve the public 
school system and to protect the 
school child of the state, recog- 
nizing that, in order to main- 
tain the public school system, 
sentiment and conditions in the 
various areas must be recog- 
nized.” 

It is understandable that Sen. 
Fenwick and others on the 
Commission, when confronted 
by the extreme proposals of 
many to repeal compulsory 
school attendance laws and to 
abolish publie schools entirely, 
should feel that they have sal- 
vaged something valuable in 
the report as finally adopted. 
But for those who realize the 
intimate relationship that exists 
between the survival of a s0ci- 


any vital concern for the preser- 
vatfon ef a public school sys 
tem. 

There is, for example, no sug- 
gestion in the report of the 
state’s responsibility to assist 
localities to solve in good faith 
the complicated problems of de- 
segration..On the contrary, the 


that communities are to receive 
all possible assistance, legal, 
and educational, 


parents who might prefer their 
children to attend private 
schools. That is, any parent 
who wishes financial assistance 
in erder to send his child to a 
private school need do no more 
than register objection to at- 
tendance upon an integrated 
schoo]! 

(2) In order that localities 
may be free to abolish public 
schools or to strip them bare 
of any and all of their present 
functions, the report would re- 
move from the State Board of 
Education the authority’ it now 
exercises to maintain standards 
and to stimulate desirable im- 
provements in education. The 
board is required te provide 
state funds with which to sup- 
port education, public or pri- 


vate, in the localities, but each. 


locality is to exercise “wide dis- 
cretion” in the employment of 
teachers, in the educational ac- 
tivities it provides, or “in the 
entire elimination from the 
scheels of every activity but 
bare ” even in the 
length of the school year it 
maintains school “with no loss 
in state funds.” In shert, each 
locality is free te maintain as 
low a level of education as it 
may desire, or to abolish pub- 
lic schools altogether! 
Sen. Fenwick states that the 
in outlawing 
has 


of the Supreme Court that sep- 
arate but equal educational 
facilities were acceptable for 
Negroes. You used your posi- 
tion as a newspaper to further 
your ideas on racial integra- 
tion. 


Now the Supreme Court has 
handed down a ruling that is 
in line with your thinking and 
you take it upon yourself to 
castigate all of those who op- 
pose, or differ with the ruling, 
by printing scurrilous editori- 
als about their actions to main- 
tain and foster their ideas on 
racial matters.. You prate and 
prattle about Thomas Jeffer- 
son, George Mason and other 
former great leaders of Vir- 
ginia, knowing full well that 
they were rebels against the 
rulings of the legal government 
of that time. You say Virginia 
leaders should accept change 
gracefully and should prepare 
for that change, yet there are 

of thousands in V 


a change with all the power of 
A ta state and a great peo 
ple. 
You say the ruling of the 
Supreme Court is the law of 
the land and must be obeyed to 
the last letter, while there are 
hundreds of thousands in the 
South who say that the people 
are the law of the land and 
such a ruling as has been 
handed down is opprobrious 
and will be opposed by every 
means that is deemed appro 


what the Supreme Court may 


rule. 
I, for one, ~~ in segrega- 


Shall We Develop * 
Dinosaur Park? 


From the Sak Lake Tribune 


Editor's Note: Washingtonians tact 
spring read many columns of news about 
the dispute over whether to build « dam 


of the national monument more accessible. 


REPRESENTATIVES of the four Upper 
Basin states have agreed not to presse for 
retention of Echo Park Dam in the Upper 
Colorado Riven Basin reclamation program. 
This poses the question: What-next? 

The proposal to build a dam and power 
facilities at Echo Park within the expanded 
section of Dinosaur National Monument 
was violently opposed by wildlife, wilder- 
ness preservationist and national park en- 
thusiasts. Hence the decision to jettison the 
Echo Park project in the interests of get 
ting congressional approval of the over-all 
program which is so vital to the future eco- 
nomic health of the Intermountain West. 
The program, including Echo Park, was 
passed by the Senate and advanced through 
all the stages except the final floor show- 
down in the House last spring. Then it was 
decided to postpone action until next year. 

Spokesmen for several wilderness-parks 
groups have said they would not oppose the 
program if the proposed structures inside 
the national monument were eliminated 
from plans. 

Dinosaur National Monument originally 
was 80 acres of dinosaur graveyard seven 
miles north of Jensen, Utah. The monw 
ment was created in 1915 after the discovery 
there of the bones of the prehistoric 
reptiles. In 1938 the monument was e= 
panded about 200,000 acres to include the 
Canyon of the Lodore on the Green River 
and the Yampa River Canyon, neither of 
which contains any dinosaur remains. 

Except for the brief flurry of interest 
caused by the executive proclamation e» 
tending it, the monument has been grossly 
neglected and almost forgotten these last 
40 years. Publicity incident to the contro 
versy over Echo Park and flooding the 
lower canyons aroused widespread interest 
in the area, however. 

ews 

VISITORS at Dinosaur National Mone 
mient—the dinosaur graveyard and the riv- 
er canyons—have been negligible until a 
few years ago. Then a year ago last sum- 
mer 57,000 people visited the headquarters, 
and this last year the total rose to around 
80,000. The visitors concentrated on the 
dinosaur graveyard section, however. Only 

a relatively few of them viewed the canyon 
section which is virtually inaccessible te 
ordinary tourists. 

There is really something to see now at 
the shabby monument headquarters, in ad 
dition to the museum. Some interesting 
dinosaur bones are being brought out in 
relief in a steep hiliside on the grounds 
and are being preserved in their natural 
state. A good part of the $200,000 current 
appropriation for the monument is going 
into this project, which will take several 
years yet to finish and house. 

There is, however, no direct link by 
road from this headquarters area to the 
newer section of the monument that fol 
lows the river canyons. The only com- 
munication is by radio, with signals being 
bounced off the canyon walls. Actually, 
there ig scant need for communication, 
however, since a relatively few people get 
into the canyons. They travel by boat for 
the most part, when the water is not toe 
low, and must be self-sufficient. 


cw 

THE QUESTION now is whether the high 
rock canyons will be kept inaccessible to 
the ordinary tourists or whether roads and 
facilities will be provided. Last year In 
terior Secretary McKay proposed a $21 mil- 
lion program to develop the monument, 
including construction of a lodge at Yam- 
pa Beach for 400 guests and of roads and 
trails to serve part of the 100 miles of can- 
yon. 

Nothing came of the plan, which may be 
overly ambitious in view of other national 
park needs. Currently there are no tourist 
accommodations whatever in the canyons, 
and those who view them sleep on the 
ground and bring food and supplies along, 
usually as paid guests of professional boat 
men. 

A definite policy Will need to be forme. 
lated soon as to whether this is to be kept 
as locked-up desert wilderness or whether 
people generally shall be encouraged to 
enjoy the area. No doubt the Advisory 
Board on National Parks, Historie Sites, 
Buildings and Monuments, which has con- 
siderable influence in securing public sup- 
port and funds from Congress, will have 
some recommendations to make. Dinosaur 
Monument’s future should also be included 
in the “Mission 66” recommendatidéns of 
the National Park Service being formulated 
for a program of development for the next 
10 years. 

We hope a plan of developing and put 


every day im the year 
ashington Post Company 


The ted Press ts entitied « 
Sy ae 
= 


Dally & Sunda Sunday Only 
week . & | Per tasue ‘= 


ine la 


BY MAIL—PAYABLE IN ADVANCE 


- | : : ) / f 


Matter | THE WASHINGTON POST ond TIMES HERALD 
of Fact e « « « « « By Stewart Alsop [eattap Pon Friday, November 25, 1955 15 
The Johnson Program Stevenson 


PROS S RSPR IOI EL ESO SO SEA 
sone gt ecto Takes Lead || Lewis & Thos. Saltz... 1409 G 
In the South — 


housing programs on dis- 
tinetly New Dealish lines. It 
By George Gallup 
Director. American Institute of Public! . 


ealis for disaster insurance, 
PRINCETON, N. J., Nov. 24 


Federal relief to depressed 

areas, and amendments to the 

McCarran Act. It calls, most 

importantly, for tax relief for 

“low income groups,” and for 

a “farm program which will 

restore 90 per cent of parity.” Now that Adlai Stevenson has 
tossed his hat into the presi- 
denntial ring, the question| 
asked in many quarters is: 
How popular is Stevenson as a 
candidate today among rank- 

|and-file Democrats in the Solid 


regulation of natural . gas, 
which involves hundreds of 
millions of consumer dollars 
and some of the most power 
ful economic interests in the 
country, threatens 16 split the 
Democrats all over again. 


Although the issue, more- 
over, was successfully shoved 
under the rug last session, it 
is almost sure to crop up this 
time. It could well become for 
the Democrats what the off- 
shore oil issue was in 1962. 
And, as in the case of off- | 
shore oil, there is a special | 
danger in the issue for front- | 
running Adlai Stevenson, since | 
he will make powerful ene- 
mies no matter which side he 
supports. 

There is another special 
danger for Stevenson as well. 
For it has been too often for- 
gotten that, although Steven- 
son may make the speeches, 
the Democratic Party in Con- 
gress will make the record. 
For example, Stevenson has 
recently made unenthusiastic | 


real tte the 7 
of a little 


Lyndon John- | 
son, Senate 
majority lead- 
er, made a 
few days ago 
in Texas. In Stewart Alsop 
his speech, Johnson outlined 
in surprising detail the 
Democtatic program for the 
next session of Congress. Just 
about every item of the pro- 
gram he outlined is carefully 
designed to catch the Admin- 
istration and the Republican 
Party neatly between the ribs. 

There is no question but 
that the Johnson program, 
which he rather lyrically calls 
“a program with a heart,” is 
the official Democratic pro- 


tack, not. react.” 

Each item of the program 
was carefully selected. On 
almost every point, very clear- 
ly defined party positions have 
been developed since 1952. On 
almost every point, moreover, 
the Administration is left hold- 
ing what certainly looks now 
like the short end of the stick 
politically. 

This is especially true of in- 
creased tax exemptions, which 
would put extra dollars in 
every voters’ pocket, and 


Johnson's unprecedented ac- 
| South? 


tion, in announcing such a 
detailed Democratic program 
long before Congress is to 
In the 1952 election, Steven- 
son lost five states in the South 
jte Gen. Eisenhower—Virginia, 


meet, was most carefully 
planned. Its object is to “at- 

‘Texas, Tennessee, .Okla 
and Florida. 


As of a an Institute sur- 
vey shows Stevenson running 
well ahead of the field in the 
South as the 1956 favorite can- 
didate, although his margin 
there is not as great as it is in 
other sections of the country. 

This gives Stevenson a lead 


“Since daughter insisted we come to her house for 
Thanksgiving dinner, we ele can't go there 
empty-handed! . % 


‘Trade, Net Aid’ 


a a ead 


a Bins. ane 


gram. Before he made his 
speech, Johnson conferred at 
length with virtually every 
Democratic leader, and there 
is equally no question that the 
great majority of Senate 
Democrats will unite behind 
the program. 

Indeed, the fact that he was 
able to announce such a pro- 
gram well in advance of the 
session is a remarkable tribute 
to the party unity Johnson 
has achieved in his two years 
as a majority leader. The 
program has a markedly New 
Deéalish flavor, and two years 
ago it would have thrown the 
Senate Democrats into a can- 
tankerous uproar. Yet the 
best guess is that Johnson 
can now count on nine out of 
ten Democratic votes on al- 
most every item. 


AMONG other things. 


oo 


the 


olen --——=- 
—— 


which the Administration op- 
poses. It is even more true of 
the farm issue, certain to be 
the most bitterly fought issue 
in the next session of Con- 
gress. Shrewd Democrats also 
believe that there is much 
more political hay to be made 
than is generally recognized 
in such issues as schools and 
roads. 

In short, the Johnson pro- 
gram is carefully tailored to 
present the Democratic Party 
in an election year as “the 
party with a heart”—and the 
Republican Party, at least by 
implication, as the heartless 
party. Republicans would be 
ill-advised to underestimate 
the dangers involved. 


YET THERE ARE lurking 
dangers for Democrats, too. 
One of the dafigers is sug- 
gested By the ambiguously 


Washington Scene . 
Somebody Scoffed at Escoffier 


CHIEF JUSTICE Earl War- 
ren and 69 of us other gour- 
mets gorged ourselves the 
other evening in ee of 
Escoffier. But cponemon 
at the dinner 
honoring le; 


was a gentle- 
manwho 
once got so 
a..noyed at 
Escofier for 
snooping in 
the kitchen 
that he hauled 
off and kicked le maitre 
le derriere. 

The annual dinner of Les 
Amis D’Escofier was limited, 
as «lways, tv 70 diners and 
winers, because th» great chef 
laid down the principle that 
anything over that number 
was not a dinner, but a ban- 
quet—anc that banquet food 
could not be controlied. The 
world’s great cc oks are friends 
of Escoffier now that he is de- 
funct, bu. there are still a few 


Dixon 


in 


of them who felt no friendliness 
toward 
master when he was alive. 


the irascible little 


Among those who used to be 


aggravated beyond endurance 
at the perfectionist is Harry Ko- 
pel, owner of Hamel’s Res- 
taurant here. The Vienna-born 
Mr. Kopel used to be a 
kitchen apprentice in the Carl- 
ton Hotel in London in 1994 
when the great Escofficr, who 
lived to be 87 was directeur de 
cuisine. 


ESCOFFIFR always arrived 
in th> kitchen ‘esplendent in 
gleaming high silk hat and 
Prince Albert coat. He was a 
skinny little man, barely 5 
feet 6. but a tyrant if there 
ever was one. He would al- 
ways make a tour of the kitch- 
en before removing topper or 
cutaway. 

An aide de cuisine would 
rcverently lay < napkin over 
the master’s arm. Escoffier 
would dip an elegant finger into 
everything cooking, taste the 
preparation, and then wipe 
his finger o:. the napkin. But 
when any daish dissatisfied 
him he’d wipe both his hands 
in shrill rage, and order the 
offending concoction  recti- 
fied. 

It was the 16yearold Ko- 
pel’s job to collect the lieft- 
over food and put it in re- 


These 


Censorship 


By George 


AFTER THOMAS E. Mur- 
ray’s speech recommending 
that all the nations be invited 
to attend a pice up of a 
hydrogen 
bomb so that, 
to put it sim- * 
ply, the hell 
might be 
scared out of | 
them by the 
very horror of 
it, Air Force 
Secretary 
Donald aA 
Quarles said: 

“The pro. 
posal has a Sokolsky 
lot of merit. I believe that 
such a ‘spectacle’ before world 
leaders would. help, because 

ple get an impression from 
ust reading about them.” 

In a word, he endorsed Mur- 
ray’s proposal. Subsequently 
the other commissioners of 
the Atomic Energy «Commis- 
sion jumped all over Murray 
for talking out of turn. They 
said that this idea had been 
discussed and turned down. 
Discussed and considered by 
whom? Surely this is funda- 
mentally a question for the 
American people and the Con- 
gress. However that may be, 
Murray had his say; Quarles 
endorsed what Murray said. 
Then the other commissioners 
had their say, and then this is 
reported: 

“The Air Force later said 
Quarles was unaware that the 
Murray plan had been re- 
oe an sald the AEC. A spokes- 

Quarles was express- 

his personal views, but 

ematy would have declined 

Te de Wf be had known that 

. the Commission had takep an 
official position.” 


WHAT KIND of brain-wash- 
ing is this? Quarles is a dis- 
hed man, knowledg- 

able in the science of atomic 
fission and fusion. He has ex- 
—_ in the entire fie!d. 
phcrcactone gy hea pnt lewd 

e authority 

Ag him look ridiculous 
The Hennings Committee 
«ought to investigate the role 
\ ghat the Government press 
egent plays, as a political com- 
fMissar, in suppressing the 


Agents Criticized ( 


Days 


by Press 


Sokolsky 


news that should go to the 
American people. 


Of this you can be certain: 
You and I do not know much 


about the atom bomb and the | 


hydrogen bomb. Unless we 
are experts in the field, we can 
hardly understand what it is 
all about. 


trained and successful 
gineer, a commissioner of the 
Atomic Energy Commission, 
who says that radioactive 
strontium, once it is shot jnto 
the atmosphere, moves along 
for years and comes down not 
only on the target but every- 
where, upon the shooter as 
well as those shot upon. This 


is what Murray said on this | 


subject: 


“BEFORE THESE 1954 tests 
took place, a policy of almost 


utter silence had been estab- | 


lished. The decision was made 
to use only two statements— 


first an announcement that | 
tests were to be held, and then | 


a short, guarded statement at 
their conclusion. However, 


the inscrutable providence of | 


God, our Father, decided other- 
wise. Radioactive dust settled 
on the Fortunate Dragon, some 
90 miles downwind. You re- 
member the results. The news 
about the potential hazard of 
radioactive fallout from ther- 
monuclear weapons out 
of secrecy. Twenty-seven Jap- 
anese fishermen announced 
to the world the first fateful 
tape tat may pol 
tro t may y 

wait for all of us. In this in- 
stance, the official of 
secrecy proved inept. When 
the secret came out, through 
the wrong channels, the shock 
to wage: opinion rivaled in its 
own the blast of the H- 
bo “fteelf. . 

“True, information about the 
radioactive fallout problem 
was subsequently released to 
the publie early this year and 
further information has since 
followed. But there is still 
more that must be explained 
to the public.” 


ang ee oY 


liked man 
he 


noises about both rigid parity | 

and a tax cut. But the John- 

son program clearly means 

that he will have to get fully 

in line on both issues, or find 

himself isolated by his own 
arty. 

It has also been too often 
forgotten that Lyndon John- 
son will be a remarkably 
dominant »olitical figure after 


the next session starts. John-| mier Nikolai Bulganin and 
} not a can- Communist 


son says t th 
dicate for any office, and that 
he m.eans to concentrate on re- 
covering from his heart at- 
tack. But he is a very well-| 
in his party, and 
is not the only man who 


has had a heart attack. All in’! 


all, 


the tall T san will be a 


man to watch in the months to 


come, 
gram through the Senate. 


—— ——— 


as he steers’ his pro- 


(Coorvright. 1955 New York 
Heraid Tribune. ine.) 


——awes | 


By George Dixon 


|Red Leaders Visit India 
In “Win-Asia’ Campaign 


By Phillip Deane — 
NEW DELHI — Soviet Pre- 


vestors~do not have?” ask nu- ie 
merous writers. 

The whole Communist ap- 
proach is cleverly judged—if, 
of course, it is deliberate. 
When Prime Minister Nehru 


Party Secretary 
Nikita Khrushchev are visiting 
this politically 


of better than 2-+to-l over his 
‘nearest rival, Georgia’s Sen. 
‘Richard R. Russell, who today 
polls 17 per cent among South- 
ern Democrats. 


Kefauver of Tennesse, with 12 


r 
Spe aker Sam Rayburn of Texas, 
with 10 per cent. 


selves 
handed a list of names promi- 
inently mentioned 
‘Democratic nominees and 
|asked 
Here's how they voted: 


| paign. 


| the concept of 


important sub- ™ 
continent to 
personally 
lead and su- 
pervise the 
new “Win 
Asia” cam- 


It is a cam- 
paign using 


“trade not I, 


aid,” and is di- Deane 

rected at equipping resurgent 
Asia for the industrialization 
which the entire continent 


| craves. 


| 


choud, or hot box. 
was forever prying into the 
rechoud to see what had not | 
been used. 


“One day,” recalled Kopel, 
“something snapped in me. 
Escoffier had his head buried | 
in the rechoud. [° gave him a 
swift kick and dodged aside. 


Judging from the experience 
} of other countries —in South 


Escoffier | | America, for instance — trade 
| agreements with Communist 


| suppliers are not always fol- 

owed by prompt deliveries of 
a But all appearances 
es seem.to indicate that the 
Russians are determined this 
| time to produce the goods, and 
on time. At the Indian Indus- 


| tries Fair, Communist pavil- 


By the time he got his head | ions have far more industrial 


out of the rechoud he 
tell who had done it.” 
Frederic Gisler, the food | 
man at Sibley :Aemorial Hos- 
pital, alse worked with Escof- 
fier. He told how the master 
had once vented his irascibil- 
ity on a titled English lady. 
The peeress wished Escof- 
fier to put on a “very spe- 


couldn’ t | 


cial” dinner for her. “She 
asked him Suggest the | 
main course. | 

“Canard sauvage,” replied 
le maitre uncompromisingly. 

“What on earth is that?” 
inquired the lady. | 

Escoffier flew into a rage 
at this abyssmal ignorance of 
his native tongue. He jumped 
up and down, flapping his 
skinny arms. 


to 


equipment on display than the 
Western, and many of the 
Communist- produced machines 
have big “sold” signs on them 
alre 

The money, their salesmen 
hasten to say, can be paid in 
very easy installments —i 
some cases, “25 years” is men- 
tioned as the credit period. The 
Czechs, the Poles, the Roma- 
nians, the East Germans, the 
Russians themselves are offer- 
ing whole factories at competi- 
tive prices. And India is not 
an isolated case. Japanese 
salesmen in New Delhi speak 
of their concern over increas- 
ing Communist competition all 
over Asia. 

ow 


NO COMMUNIST trade min- 


was in Moscow he was told 
that the Russians thought In- 
dia was doing fine and needed 
no aid, “which the Soviet 
Union was in no position to 
offer in any case”; but trade 
on mutually satisfactory 
terms was another matter. 
Did Nehru have surplus raw 
materials? That was just what 
the Russians wanted. Besides, 
they were willing to offer for 
hire their technicians, some 
of whom they could spare. 

Those were pleasant words 
for Nehru, who considers re- | 
ceiving aid is a sign of de 
pendence, and who still smarts 
at the memory of the Amett- | 
can congressional debate on 
the wheat loan to his coun: | 
try. He does want American 
aid, of course, but hates hav- 
ing to want it. 

And if the Russians have 
understood this and are pre- 
pared to give their aid in the 
form of long-term loans with 
interest so small that they are 
practically gifts, then, the So- 
viet. Union will give aid and 
still be popular. 

ow 


rank - and - file 
| throughout the country, report- 
‘ed earlier this month, showed 
Stevenson polling as many votes 
nationwide as all the other Dem- 
ocrat candidates put together: 


AN IMPORTANT result of 
Nehru’s Russian visit was that 


he came back convinced the |Southern states in 1952, when 
Russians were not going to Stevenson ran against Eisen- 
hower: 


help subversion by Indian 
Communists. His reasons for 


believing this, and any men- 
tal reservations he makes 


when he voices this belief, 
are unclear. But his belief | 
in Russia’s abandonment of 
Communist subversion in In- | 
dia is an imporiant political | 
fact, because it leaves no | 
area of active discord be- 
tween Nehru and his Soviet 
opposite numbers. 


But we have been | 
told that these bombs can de- | 
stroy the world. Now along | 
comes Thomas E. Murray, a | 
en- | 


“Canard sauvage, 
he screamed, “is a wild bird 
which goes ‘quack! quack!’ in 
water!’ 


THIS YEAR'S dinner. in 
honor of Auguste Escoffier’s 
106th birthday, was hosted 
by George Johnson, general 
manager of the Sheraton- 
Cariton Hotel. 


(Covyright 1955. Kin 
Peatures Syndicatee inc.) 


madame,” | 


To Nehru, European crises 
are somewhat remote and, in 
his view, often of the West's 
doing. On the Middle East 
he shares Russia’s opposition 
to the Bagdad Pact and ¢can- 
not blame her efforts to dis- 
rupt it, while in the Far East 
he is in full agreement with 
the Soviet Union's champion- 
ship of Communist China. 

Lendon Observer News Service 


—_— — = 


ister, of course, when hawking 
| his products, mentions such 
ugly words as “guarantee 
against nationalization.” But 
the West does mention them, 
land the ultra-nationalist In- 
| dian journalists view such de- 
}mands as an attempt by the 
| “eolonialist” West to retain its 
privileges. “Why should West- 
ern investors in India have 
guarantees which Indian in- 


j 
elleffs 
rack poowe 


7—$35.00 


: 


| 


9—$39.99 Double 


Cognac 


3—$69.99 
5—$69.99 


After- Thanksgiving Reductions 
in Jelletf's French Room 


Regularly $29.99 to $49.99 


2-$29.99 Full Skirted Yellow Dotted Swiss Dresses 
2—$29.99 Black and White Checked 
2—$39.99 Short Sleeved Black Cotton 
2—$35.00 Full Skirted Silk Prints in aqua or yellow ... 

3—$29.99 Linen-like Rayon Sheaths in blue or black 

2—§29.99 Short Formals in printed pink nylon, stole 

4—$49.99 Long Strapless Formals, white, pink, blue nylon $90 ig 


Regularly $35 and $39.99 


20—$35.00 Grey or Brown Winter Cottons, velvet bolero 
3—$35.00 Aqua Nylon Lace Short Formals, ruffled skirt 

Black Rayon Crepe Basics, velvet detailing ... 

8—$39.99 Slim Wool Flannel Coat Dresses, camel-tan, black.... 


| Regularly $39.99 and $45 


) §8—$§39.99 Full Skirted Black Rayon Velvet Dresses 
4—$45.00 Mother of the Bride Dresses in mauve, light blue or honey rayon 
and nylon lace 
12—$45.00 Beaded Grey Rayon Alpaca Sheaths 
2—$45.00 Natural Wool Dresses, gilt button trim 
5—$39.99 Button-front Wool Tweed Sheaths, green, taupe 
Breasted Wool 


5—$39.99 Slim Forstmann Wools in beige 

4-39.99 Torso-line Wool Two Piecers, green, lavender 

2—$45.00 Wool Tweed Two Piecers, dahlia or green with velvet collar 
18-——$39.99 Pleated Orlon and Wool Two Piecers in green, black, brown 
7—$39.99 Black Rayon Velvet Sheaths, white collar 

Rayon Jerseys with gathered neckline ...... | 


Regularly $49.99 
5—$49.99 Black Dacron Dress and Jacket Costumes 
*2—$49.99 Beaded Black Dacron Jacket Dresses . 
2—$49.99 Blue Silk Organza Full-length Formals | 
3—$49.99 Two-piece Woo! Costumes, black, brown 
3—$49.99 Volvet Collared Wool Costumes, red, royal 
3~—$49.99 Jacketed Wool Sheaths in periwifikle, green 


Regularly $65 and $69.99 


6—$65.00 Aqua Silk Taffeta Cocktail Dresses . 

Trim Silk Peau de Soie, po blue. ‘pink.. 
Wool Jersey Dresses with tweed coat 
4—$69.99 Knitted Wool Lace Suits in beige 
1—$65.00 Double Breasted Navy Wool Costume 
and ae 


5—~$110 Black Wool Sheaths with Chesterfield coat 
0 Sheath 


Senslid! Mess, lets F Stee; Selene a Shige, Conn. Ave.’ 


It's a big day 
shop 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. 


$10 and $15 


Sheer Cottons 
Tunic D 


0 and $25" 


ool Tweeds, dahlia, brandy, green 


in Forstmann wool . SY ee 
sl es nr: ef ie Wisc wkbics vos. Se 
0. 


_------ - 


In third place is Sen. Estes 

cent, followed by House 
In today’s survey, all South- 
rm voters classifying them- 
as Democrats were 
as possible 


to name their choice. 


DEMOCRATIC VOTERS 
—SOUTH ONLY — 


An Institute survey among 
Democrats 


DEMOCRATIC VOTERS 
— NATIONWIDE — 


Here is the vote in the 13 


1952 ELECTION 
Eisen- Steven- 


| 


(Copgright, 1955. American 
Institute of Public Opinion) 


~ 
ne: nme 
| es Se 


Vie 


Macintosh has the gift 
for pleasing people 


Your gift has special import when it’s the im- 
ported Macintosh weathercoat. Woven of fine 
Egyptian cotton, the silken-smooth English pop- 
lin always looks magnificent, rain or shine. The 
tailoring, too, is singularly handsome—with 
clean lines and beautifully cut shoulders in the 
true London tradition. 


For bim there’s the time-honored man’s Mac- 
intosh at $29.50 in regulars, shorts, longs. 
And for ber, the classic Lady Macintosh 
$29.95 in regular and petite sizes, including 
a detachable belt. Matching hats for the ladies 
are $4.95. 


at 


Other Macintosh Coats Available 


All Worsted Gabardine 
Gabardine Trench with removable lining... .. 


$65 
$68 


¢ 


LEWIS & TH°9S. SALTZ 


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EXecutive 3-4343 
eee ere? 


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Call RE. 71-1234, ask for Circulation, and order The Wash- 


"ington Pest and Times Herald guaranteed home delivery. 


- 
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Admiral 9.2 cu. ft. ‘ 161.70 
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| Fiesta (king size)... 
Capri without baker. 79.95 
Roto Table 


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Arvin 5510 7.12 
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Kodak Brownie Hawkeye Kit 14.35 
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' Kodak Duafiex IV Kit 21.75 
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g Argus 75 Kit 22.50 
Argus C-3 Kit . 66.50 
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Waring 2-Speed Blender . .44. 
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Mirromatic 4 Qt.. 1395 8.60 
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|| 


omit Vity Life 


AREA NEWS _ 
PICTURE PAGE 
CLASSIFIED 


Auto Victim 
Succumbs 


FRIDAY, 


NOVEMBER 25, 


1955 


To Injuries 


bothered by the pressures he 


doesn’t show it. On the con- 


the 


and leaSt-rewarding in Govern- 


them. 

However, Mansure has told 
his key people that he—and he 
alone— is the boss. He has a 
system of weicoming their su 
gestions and criticisms w 
a decision is in the making, 
but once a policy is set, he 
expects them to follow it to 
thie last letter. 

He has been irked by re 
ports that some of his policies 
are being undercut by some 
of his subordinates. As a re- 
sult he sent a confidential 
memo to his top people re- 
cently which said in part: 

“No service is running or 
going te run GSA. Inter-serv- 
ice rivalry has gone too far and 
is te be stopped at once.” 

GSA insiders are convinced 
that heads will roll unless the 
pat is heeded without de- 

y 


Mansure also is a believer 
in the career civil service sys- 
tem and he'd like to see it 
strengthened instead of weak- 
ened. Furthermore, he’s of the 


courage Federal employes from 
playing politics. 

GSA has a sizable number 
of vacant jobs, mainly in the 
professional and technical 
fields. Mansure says he’s glad 
to have recommendations from 
all sources on candidates to 
fill them. But first and fore- 
most, he wafns, those appoint- 
ed must be qualified. 

As Uncle Sam's housekeep- 
er, Mansure spends several 
hundred millions a year and 
ewards numerous contracts to 
supply the Government's 
needs. He has emphasized a 
sealed and competitive bidding 
system of procurement to mini- 
mize favoritism. 

Manstre says he has tried 
his very best to demolish the 
widely held belief that GSA 

" and that 


Mansure also has taken steps 
to knock out fees of certain 
Washington lobbyists who say 
they are necessary to make 
sales to GSA, an action which 
has made him some enemies. 


He says no business needs té- 


anyone to do business with 

A, and also that GSA won't 

be influenced by those who are 
hired. 


ee ee 


New is the time— 


——— 


na , 
: se 
+ be Pe 

‘fom 23 Pes 

' SRR me 


A 20-pound turkey with all 


erations gets together. 

This was the case yesterday 
when the Richets, Schwiers 
and McLeans sat down at 4615 
68th pl., Landover Hills, Md. 
| Ethel McLean, the great- 
\grandmother in the family line, 
was up early cooking the 
turkey and making the pre. Her 


a 
vr 4 = 
aad Se ee de ee 


"9 
 - 
“ae 
a Ri 
A ASP ae 
a ~ 7 ¥ 
Pais 8 ; . : 


Se, 


About te do justice to a 20-pound turkey at 4615 68th place, 
Landover Hills, Md., is this family of five generations. They 
are (from oldest to youngest) Hattie Richter, 85, a great- 


Five Generations vs. Holiday Bird 


mother, Hattie Richter, a great- 


gre dmother at 85, set 
TS ties and helped with 
cooking. 


“She's spry as at 16.” said 
Mrs. McLean. live to 


gether 

Then the doorbell began to 
ring — and the stone-faced 
single home began to resemble 
Union Station concourse. 

Mrs. McLean's son, Ear! L. 
\Schwier, 43, who lives a few 


the| William, 15. 


great-grandmother; Ethe! McLean, great-grandmother; Ear! 
L. Schwier, 43, grandfather, and Earl C. Schwier, 19, father 
of 3-month-old Cheryl Ann. 


houses aw 
arrived wi 


at 4607 68th pl.,/the telephone company. 
his wife and son,| “But they're building some 
He would be the 
aeigsaecw nd and a repairman 
or Washington Gas Light Ca. 
Schwier’s other son, Earl 
Clipton Schwier, 19, arrived 
with his wife and the youngest 
of the clan, 3-month-old Cheryl 
Ann. Somehow, the young 
Schwiers got off 68th pl. They; Mrs. McLean, Washington 
live at 2014 Ogelthorpe st.,/native, has played host to the 
West Hyattsville. He works for' group for the last five years. 


ted two guests who 
room at her home — Arthgr 
Rind and his son, Frederick. 


Blank Named Assault Charge Caps Futility 


Chairman. of 


Auto Show 


. Blank, president of 


‘the Areade Pontiac Motor Co., 


e 27th annual A 
which will be : 
iheld at the Na- 
tional Guard 
Armory Jan. 
7-15. 

| The appoint- 
iment was an- 
nounced by Ed- 
win L. Stohl- 
man, president 
of the Auto- 
motive a 
A ss0 ci ation, 

National Capi- Blank 


event. 
Blank has served five times 


the Aged. 
Washington. 


On Bold 


strength, family and weapons 
went against him in a futile 
night of deering-do .was held 


lon assault charges yesterday. 


| Detectives J. A. Jones and 


. W. J. McLaughlin of the Sec- 


ond Precinct gave this account 
‘of the youth's. unhappy e* 
capade: 

The boy tried unsuccessfully 
'to buy some vodka for himself 


tal Area, sponsor of the annual and his date Wednesday night jto) st. to get out, and ordered’ 


a Northeast store 
He asked an older man to 


at 


and snapped the blade. The 17- 


Retired Marine Seeks 


Martin A. McGrory, assistant 
superintendent of the District 
Receiving Home, has asked the 
Justice partment to seek an 


Indictment Against Self 


By John Lindsay 
Staff Reporter 


The Marine Corps stopped 
most of his $216-a-month pen- 
sion in Jan because, they 
said, under the Dual Compensa- 
tion Law, a retired officer can’t 


li work for the Government at a 


salary exceeding $3000 a year 
and still receive his . 

McGrory claims that legally 
he was retired as a master ser- 
geant and later was advanced 
to officer status. But he said he 
had never recei ed official no- 
tice of the advancement. 

“The way I see it, I am an en- 
listed retiree, not an officer, 
and am not subject to the pro- 


was 

letter he wrote on M 
Attorney General 
Brownell 


Fate Sideswipes Juvenile 


Adventure Spree 


A 17-year-old boy whose age,'year-old’s mother showed up) Lott tumbled out of one door | 


and slapped her son’s face. and the gun flipped into the 
The boy ran home, pried front seat and fell out also. 

open a dresser drawer and re-- Lott jumped on the boy just 
moved his father’s 32 caliber as First Precinct Sergt. Cyrus 
automatic. His sister saw him F. Thompson drove by on his 
and called her parents, who way home from work. He 
notified police. helped Lott subdue the young- 
| At Ist and N sts. nw. the boy 5*r. 

commandeered an auto driven| The boy was held at the Re- 


¢ |ceiving Home on two charges 
ay SE AO, HEA ee of* assault with a dangerous 


|\weapon, and one charge of car- 
rying a dangerous weapon. 
Bus Driver Robbed 

A wrist watch and $45 were 


ne. 
He told a passenger, Thomas 
Lee Jackson, 31, of 806 N. Cap- 


Latt 
After a 20-minute cruise in the 


to drive to Brookland. 


as president of the- Columbia ™ake the purchase. Meanwhile | vicinity of 12th and Monroe sts.|stolen from a Capital Transit 
Heights Businessmen’s Associa. @ bigger youth accosted the ne the boy ordered Lott to|bus driver by three men early 
tion, and as campaign chair- girl outside the store. The 17- drive him home. 
‘man for the Hebrew Home for year-old pulled a knife. His) uring the ride Lott heard|1500 block of Congress pl. se. 
He is a native of rival promptly pulled it away the gun hammer click. Police! 


yesterday at a bus stop in the 


Michael D. Callahan, 26, of 
later found the cartridges were 1228 Abingdon dr., Alexandria, 
inserted backward. ‘said one of the trio held him 

At 4th and Michigan ave. ne.,/by the throat during the rob- 
with the boy and the gun in the|bery. Police broadcast a look- 
back seat, Lott speeded up thenjout for three Negroes, one 
jammed the brakes on hard.'about 20 years old. 


Key To Sunday's Good Reading In Your 
Big Washington Post and Times Herald 


What's Happened To Dear Old Dad?— 
A famed writer and social critic claims 
that American dads aren't the fathers 


boys’ club meetings... 

for a free day with the children? 
Wylie feels Dad isn’t doing his jo 
one De We ee es 
American Weekly. 

Memo From Santa—Do you have book-lovers and music- 
lovers on your Christmas list? Wish them a Happy 
Holiday by giving the gifts they'll treasure most— 
books and records. You'll find’a world of ideas for 
good reading and good listening . . . in the 
Christmas -Book and Record Section. It'll save you 
hours of shopping! ie 

Life In Russia—Are Russia's children happy? What 
are Russian women really like? What is the Soviet 
sense of humor? Is religion still alive in the US.S.R.? 
You'll get a close-up of how Russia lives ... in the 
special “All Russia” issue of Parade Picture Magazine. 


4 Colorful Magazine Extras—In addition to the Parade 
Gestion and The Amerikan Weekiy, 


Picture 

ot a Show entertainment magazine 
TV-Radio eek (which includes a complete listing of 
the TV programs for the coming week). 


be Comic Sections—Your Sunday Washington 
Bran comics than 


Ae. 


Phone RE. 7-1234 for Home Delivery 


/Police Badge 


Pedestrian Hit 
On Saturday Is 
62d Traffic Death 
For Year in D. C. 


DISTRICT TRAFFIC TOLL 
1955 trafic deaths to date. 62 
1954 trafic deaths to date. .46 
1954 total traffic deaths... .59 
James W. Ingram, 65, of 

1434 Swann st. nw., the Dis- 

trict’s 62d traffic fatality of 

the year, died yesterday 
afternoon of injuries suf- 
fered when he was struck by 

a car on Saturday. 


west of the intersection of R and 


traveling west on R st. 


right leg. 


performed today. 


Man Fractures Hip 


man was admitted to Casualty 
Hospital in a serious condition 
after he was injured yesterday 
when he alighted from a Capital 


Ingram was crossing R st. nw.,| _ g@ 


14th sts, when he was struck] |” 
by a car driven by Dr. Enver| 
Aydogan, 29, a resident doctor) 7) 
at Emergency Hospital, who was} | | 


He was taken to Emergency| © 
Hospital where he was admitted! | 
for treatment of abrasions of| 
his face and right hand and a| 
fractured left collarbone» and| ~~ 

Police said Ingram was not in| 9 = 


the crosswalk at the time he| jal 
was struck. An autopsy will be)” ~ 


An 8S-yearold Washington |“ 


[Tax Project 
Action by 


ltor Schuyler Lowe. 
The nearly $11 million in new 
mmended by the 


citizens would cover an im- 
deficit caused mainly 
pay raises approved by Con 
gress last session. 
Lowe said city fathers 
— to send to the Budget 
ureau next week their tax 
program and $190 million bud- 
get Ǥ the year beginning next 
uly 1. 


Hope to Relay Program. 


Their hope is to relay to Con- 
gress a Bureau-approved reve- 
nue program and two supple 
mental money requests by the 
opening day of the session in 
January. 

One bill to supplement the 
current budget would be “emer- 
gency,” Lowe said. This meas- 


JOYCE BRYANT 
- “Tl made a bargain” 


Transit Co. bus. 

Samuel J. Green of 901 13th 
st. mw. fractured his right hip 
after falling to the ground in 
front of 911 13th st. nw. Police 
said Green reported the bus 
struck him, but the driver. 
Charles B. Wills, 59, listed at 
4901 Sth st. nw., said the bus 
was not moving. 

There were no police charges 
and a hearing has been set for 
Jan. 10 in the Corporation 
Counsel's office. . 


Boy Struck by Car 


A six-year-old boy was struck 
by a car going west on Otis pl. 
nw. yesterday when he ran out 
into the street after being 
chased by a friend, police said. 

The child, Vernon Collier, 
listed at 46 L st. nw., was taken 
to Children’s Hospital, where 
he was treated for a bruise on 
the forehead and released. The 
driver of the car, Philmore D. 
Wise, 29, of 210 Webster st. nw., 
}was not charged. 


Trips Suspect 
In Robbery 


An honorary Metropolitan 
Police badge, reported stolen 
Nov. 8 in a Southeast Washing- 


ton housebreaking, led yester- 
day to the arrest of the alleged 
thief. 

Det. Sgt. Edwin P. Grafton, 
of the General Assignment 
Squad, said William Samuel 
Jackson of 1417 Florida ave. 
nw., a deliveryman, was picked 
up Sunday under the 
porary stands at Griffith Sta- 
dium and, en route to the 13th 
Precinct for questioning, 
dropped the badge on the floor 
of a police wagon. 

The badge, given to the late 
Albert J. o for civic work 
20 years ago, was reported 
stolen from the home of his 
brother, Joseph E. Sardo of 
4028 Southern ave. se., alon 
with three platinum rings v 
ued at 

Jackson denied the theft 
and was released until a check 
by Grafton revealed Wednes- 
day that he made several de- 
liveries to the Sardo home just 
prior to the theft. 

Jackson was rearrested yes- 
terday and a search of his 
home turned up a wallet re- 
ported stolen at 1028 Connecti- 
cut ave. nw. on Nov. 10, police 
said. Municipal Court Judge 
Edward A. Beard ordered the 
suspect held under $1000 bond 
for the grand jury on the 
housebreaking charge and $500 
bond for a jury triel én the 
wallet charge. 


Gas Station Holdup 


George A. Sproessor, 38, of 
357 Parkland pl. se., night man- 
ager of a service station at 50 
M st. se., was robbed of $300 
at gunpoint at 4 a. m. yester- 
day. A lookout was broadcast 
for a Negro, 28, 5 feet 6 inches, 
iweighing 145 pounds, wearing 
gray clothes and dark glasses, 


| 


ure is expected to include such 
items as $50,000 to finance the 
city’s first elections next May 
and up to $150,000 to pay pri- 
vate hospitals for treating Dis- 
trict-referred indigents. 

The other supplemental, pre 
sumably, would include the pay 
raises, estimated n 
and $7 million each year, de 
pending on working staffs. 

To Trail Other Requests 

The big $190 million budget 
for next year will trail other 
money measures te the Hill, 
it was understood. 

Lowe said the Commissioners 


Jazz Singer 
To Become 
Missionary 


By Shirley Elder 
Stat Reporter 
A shapely 28-year-old night 
club singer has announced her 
decision for a new life—that of | 
missionary for the Seventh Day 
Adventist Church. hoped to get their revenue pro- 
“There was no contest,”|gram passed before congres- 
Joyce Bryant said yesterday.|sional hearings on the fiscal 
“Nearly three years ago 1/1957 budget. A timetable drawn 
made a bargain ... I promised|by Lowe's office earlier set De- 
God I would wind up my af-\cember as a deadline for at- 
fairs in show business and| tempts to arrange a joint fiscal 


tem-/| ag 


come back te Him.” 


The singer, who for the past 
eight years, has hit night clubs 
across the country as well as in 
England, Europe, South Amer- 
ica «and «Canada, said show 
business seemed to have 
“everything a girl could want.” 
But, she added, “Then I 
weighed the other side.” 

She leaned her head against 
the back of the couch and 
glanced at the ceiling. “I real- 
ize | have God's gifted voice, 
a talent. And it’s not going 
to stop right there.” She ac- 
cented the last word with a 
gesture toward the wall. 

Miss Bryant, a native of Oak- 
land, Calif.. who attended high 
school in San Francisco, said 
she intends to continue sing- 
ing, but now it will be religious 
and semiclassical. 

Her last jazz singing engage- 
ment was at the RKO-Franklin 
Theater in the Bronx two weeks 


0. 

Yesterday Miss Bryant was 
supposed to begin a cross-coun- 
try circuit. 

Instead, she sat in a Wash- 
ington home and held her first 
press conference since she de- 
cided ‘to give up the glitter of 
show business. 

She wore a conservative gray 
suit, black gloves that seemed 
to accent the graceful move- 


committee hearing on taxes by 
Congress in January. 

Taxes suggested by the Ad- 
visory Council were a 5 per 
cent tax on gross earnings, to 
yield $3 million; reducing in 
come tax exemptions and rais 
ing rates, $3.8 million; a new 
20-cent levy on table wines and 
hiking the rate to 45 cents on 
‘other wines, $275,000; increas- 
‘ing beer taxes from $1 to $3 a 
| barrel, $925,000; increasing spir- 
its tax from $1 to $1.25, $080, 
000; increasing real estate 
‘rates 10 cents per $100 of as 
sessed value, $1.9 million, 


} 


| 


Hearings Set 
For Fairfax 
Sewer Plants 


RICHMOND, Nov. 25 ()—The 
State Water Control Board re- 
leased a series of orders today 
land set Thorsday, Jan. 26, for 
hearings concerning the con- 
struction of sewage-treatment 
plants on two Fairfax County 
creeks. 

An application will be con 
sidered from Stafford builders 
to construct a disposal plant on 


ments of her fingers, and no 
hat. 


Two representatives of Oak- 
wood College, Dr. Frank W. 
Hale Jr. and Prof. Mylas Mar- 
tin, both of the English de- 
partment, came to Washington 
yesterday to welcome 
Bryant to the school. 

Even though Miss Bryant has 
stopped nightclubbing her 
voice can be heard through 
Epic records release of “Run- 
al Wild,” a long-playing al- 

um. 


Man, 75, Succumbs 
To Train Injuries 


A 75-year-old man, struck by 
a slow-moving train on the 
Pennsylvania Railroad tracks 
near Kenilworth and Minnesota 
aves. ne. on Oct. 31, died yes- 
terday at Casualty Hospital. 

George A. Helier of 122 33d 
st. ne. is survived by yi ns 
Thomas A. Heier, with om 
he lived after his retirement 10 
years ago as a furniture packer 


and carrying a black automatic. 


for Woodward & Lothrop. 


Miss) 


Accotink Creek to serve a 1000- 


ihome subdivision. The board 


deferred action on the applica- 
tions at its November meeting. 
In addition, the town of 
Vienna wants to build a plant 
on a tributary of the Accotink 
and Fairfax wants to enlarge 
its plant, also on the creek. 
Later in the hearing the 
board will consider a uest 
from Fairfax County ders 
for permission to build a sew- 
age-treatment plant on Pohick 
Creek. The board deferred ac- 
tion this month on the request 
and asked its staff to get infor- 
mation on possible additional 
discharges into the creek. 


Today’s Chuckle 


Many a girl who seems to 
throwing herself at a man is 
actually taking very careful 
aim. 


Let The Shade Shop 


Rep. Hyde Wants U. 


S. Funds 


Rep. DeWitt S. Hyde (R-Md.) 


tomac pollution control te allow 


Better Potomac Controls 


Urged to Permit Industry 


yeesterday advocated more Po-| ization, he 


lery County location because it 


bound to come added industrial- 
said. 


a. f 
He said he backs a Montgom- 


is farther upstream from Wash- 


RENOVATE 


Your Blinds 
and Shades 


> 


~ 


: 
Ji 


Ee 2 lien moony RN. Wingard Dies at 36, |[rexere: tea07 


Wt: | Daughter of |Special Agent for FBI Gen. Irwin 
William Patterson, Rep. Walter || p28 wen he layed on the city champion || RULES at 


ICC Ex-Chairman Dead at 1 Sy ry pons hy Sieees "dine Calan te Fort M yer fae 


° wien J. Patterson, 75, who} Barbara McGarry, 27, daugh- m9 ’ — there in 1947 z Funeral Ran okay for nahh oe : On Ss pherd of 

Tose from a safety inspector on of _ Francis E. Walter| een hospi | half/Stafford LeRoy Irwin -| Residence, Manas . : survived by 

Veteran Teacher | the interstate Commerce Com-|*".° ¢P : ret.), former Assistant Chief of {of Bizabeth Smit Base a ee 847 Wi 
¥ 


(D-Pa.) and wife of Maurice 2 ucation ton, i 

: |miselon to chairman'et the SOC.) 00” ay WRCTV end] ee oT ekoddier at' the wate Ade tan Oral, tee Intelligence, will be] flher of"Bitabsiy ber i i 3.5,.isereat cn 
Rites Slated : radio entertainer, died Wednes- A tion in Atlanta, Ga. : is. Servic metery 

day night of a heart attack. Bs, BP gia Rokeg agg Cag on 

me ee ; g in New Or- 

Today for Cemme 


stroke Nov. 12. ee ogticameyren whe pe 4i od. Estates, hE a —e and Atlanta before com-|Cemetery 
». Mr. Patter-ie matic frever 10 years bens assign , ere... 
son, who lived in her sleep at her home, 5304\to liaison wi eg e is survived by his wife, ne Baa ge Be of "are 


. 
Mrs ith at 3916 Lega : duties at the Muriel E. Wingard; two sons, 
: . S mt on ak 5 : se J ie wees be ea! Capitol, Srp Court and| Gregory Bruce: 9, and Neil Bry-|Omar Bradley and Gen. James 


a graduate of Easton High. White House. He came to the) ant, 4; his parents, Mr. Van Fleet, died Wednesday of 
Ww 


Funeral services for Ruth j : School and Moravian College |Washingto Robert H. H heart attack at Asheville, 


; Cc. 
Warren Smith, 82, widow of ; for Women in Bethlehem, Pa. : Gen. Irwin was assi 


gned 
famed plant pathologist Dr.|¥P © director patterson | Much of her life was spent be- and Associate Director Clyde . Frede s,| Washington in 1948 as director 


: of the Bureau 
Erwin F. Smith, will be held at/o¢ Safety. President Franklin| tec father entered Congress in Tolsom were two of the last|Senate Chaplain, will officiate|of intelligence on the General 


11 a. m. today at Gawler’s Fu-|D. Roosevelt appointed him to/ 1933 persons to visit Mr. Wingard in| at funeral services at 11 a. m.|Staff of the Army, later called 


: the hospital Wednesday before|Saturday- in the Lee Funeral/Assistant Chief of Staff. He) ress, , Ga Wetnes. 
neral Home. She died Tuesday |the Commission in 1939. He was; Besides her husband and he lapsed into a pong Home, 4th and Massachusetts|left in 1950 to command the! 4 nate 


: at nig pest 

, d by President Harry) fath M McG ; . t 
night at Emergency Hospital. | T¢@ppointe ather, Mrs. arry is sur| wr Wingard aduate| ave. ne, Burial will be at Cedar/ United States forces in Austria.| {fon "Va. 

: | Truman in 1945 and served) yiyed by her mother and r. garc was a gradu ° le E mn 

Mrs. Smith, a long-time | throneh 1952. President Tru- ae. Sirk Willa Muck. FA. of Eastern High School where! Hill Cemetery. bs ed pe alae co yvage? Eg at - tes 
Washington resident, suffered: man waived the statutory re- Ridgewood av , Chevy ony Gen. Irwin — saw action 
a stroke after breaking her hip tirement age of 70 for him. ‘ye - {the spring after graduation 
in a fali at her home, 1474 Bel-|_ A native of Neenah, Wis., Mr. Funeral services will be held Pees Girardi : James Brockwell from West Point—with the pun- 
‘ Patterson went to work for the | at 10 a. m. Saturday in the itive expedition into Mexico 
mont st. nw. 2 old Wisconsin Central Railroad/Church of the Little Flower,| Antonio Girardi, 88, PETERSBURG, Nov. 24 against Pancho Villa. 

Her husband, who died in'as a call boy at the age of 13./ 5601 Massachusetts ave., with shoemaker and a native of San James Brockwell, a member of In 1933, he came to Washing. 
1927, was for 40 years an expert|He was a conductor when he! burial at Parklawn Cemetery. Fele, Italy, died Wednesday at the State Board of Corrections; ton as an instructor for the or- 
plant pathologist with the De-|Went to work for the ICC. | the D. C. General Hospital. He ied i Peters-| ganized reserves. ler hn esda. where s¢ 
peer He|,, He was a member of the Na- riffney (. Godfre had suffered a stroke a week|for 29 years, died in a Peters- In World War II. General ra ett. iso] be held on Priday. Nowember 
partment of an a ©\tional Press Club, the Colum- y y ago. burg hospital yesterday after, i, commanded the Ninth , ane ‘| Lo. m. Interment Port Lincoia | 
served as chief of the plant bia Country Club, the Masons,’ Tiffney C. Godfrey, 65, of; Mr. Girardi, who had lived in|a long illness. Mr. Brockwell Division Artillery against Ger-| trlen Jett and Mn both LORNE, CHARLES c. 


bacteriology laboratory and as the Order of Railway Conduc- 7907 Gist ct. Silver Spring, Washington since 1890, had re-|wijjieq his estate, valued atiman Field ; D. THORNE. beloved husband of Bernies 
epresentative to many interna- tors, the Newcomen Society of died yesterday at Washington | paired shoes in his home, 124 N oo ‘ vomcg ne Rommel’s ag rider i T. Eetecopel’t 7098 bp norne (and tether of 
rep y $100,000, to Petersburg High|North African Tank Corps in -| Pitkerton, Charles M 
tional conferences on plant England and the Union League attack. Hospital after a heart! F st. nw., for the last few years. School 1942. In July, 1944, he led the a eee Oe + “BIB-| Cecelis A. Prancis © 
: Club of Chicago. attac Before that he had a shop at Cemetery, ae 
tumors and bacteria. | Surviving are his wife, Mar-| Mr. Godfrey had been on the| 91g F st. nw. He served as Petersburg Po- Fifth Infantry into Normandy, maine fee cntler &. mo. Re- Thorne, Funeral services 6) 
Mrs. Smith was born in garet; a daughter, Mrs. James police force at the Supreme His only immediate survivor) lice Chief and was named to the and on the first ult 8 me, 809 a Alexandria, Va, 9™% Hope Td, ss. on Saturdey. 
Springfield, Mass., and was 8. Kirk, Oxon Hill, Md.; a son,'Court since 1941, when he came|is his son, Stephen, of Phila-|State Prison Board—later the ing of the Rhine in Sree ai é ow,' Fember 26 st 2 p.m. inte 
, . : William A., of the Legation st.|here from his birthplace, Ma-| del hia. A requiem mass will| Board of Corrections—by Gov. athe TSWORT JAMES u. On W 
graduated from Smith College les\toaka. W. Va. H pars. After the war he served with | = 
sag to Ghe address; a brother, Charles) toaka, e served with he offered at Holy Rosary}Stewart in 1925. He left the|,, 13th Corve te Bavaria be- Steriaa Wa 3 
and Columbia University. 5h€ patterson, Los Angeles; a sis-|the Army Engineer Corps dur-' Church, 3d and F sts. nw., at| board last year. val bein rls to th 
taught in New England schools, 'ter, Myrtle Brogden, of Puyal-|ing World War 1. 9 a. m. Saturday, after prayers} Funeral services will be con- Penteamn igned ™ 
and came here in 1910 to teach/lup, Wash. and three grand-| In Matoaka, Mr. Godfrey w@S'st Chambers Funeral Home,| ducted at 11 a. m. Friday ‘ He is survived by his wife in GOMEEN. wilt udder , aly he 
at the National Cathedral sons. mayor for two terms, and/1499 Chapin st. nw. Burial will|the graveside in Blandfor Asheville, o> Gen aad al ae ie ‘J a st Norman ‘Titewor ‘ 
School for Girls. | Funeral services are tenta-'recorder for several more years. ' ‘be at St. Mary’s Cemetery. i\Cemetery in Petersburg. daughter. M. . hus ght 5 
Among her students at the tively scheduled for 1 p. m.'He was also commander of the vid eens Funeral Home. Reraden, Vs. 
Cathedral School, where she Monday at the S. H. Hines fu-|Matoaka post of the American! Joan lame. brogher of urday, November 26 Interment in 
specialized in languages, were /neral home, 2901 14th st. nw.|Legion and master of the Ma-| i at A — og —— 


: . CHARD en} 
daughters of Presidents ‘Wil- Burial will be in Fort Lincoln sonic Lodge of*Matoaka. At aN al W h S Fee November 23. Funeral services, fhureday. November 2 Rion 
liam Howard Taft and Theo- Cemetery. the time of his death he was ation eat er piesa] a "s and "interment “will take piace in ARS 0D Bites is Piney 
dore Roosevelt. member of the Matoaka Lodge! ; o L. Tarpon. Merle slew 
Mrs. Smith’s knowledge of Set. Xavier Hill and of Princeton Post 54 of the| Washington and Ares: —In- Re ding Saturday. "followed by par- | 


es WAS DI s h Legion. ing cloudiness ind rptmer ; ti , k ts 
ae ieee: te ne hevteinaee A requiem mass for Army | He is survived by his wife,| Se Steet wth “ere ay tS sorthwest, 20 to 18) ven 
Department, and during World Sst. Xavier W. Hill, who died /Gertrude, who is a teacher at ake ae ili: a} from james 
War II at the Foreign Funds | of pneumonia in a North Korean| Weller Road School in Mont-! mum. n = wrette toler yy , Movember, Be & BOSTWICK. On 
Control division of the|Prison camp on March 4, 1951,\gomery County; a son, Louis, a “3 toe : pli S| a npg y _ — Satin a ans at Bt. Peter's! i240 ee sets the 
Treasury De partment, where will be offered at 9 a. m. today and four brothers and sisters. in the 40s anaes bie ose open e a a. m nelati ves end BosT wick U UPHAM. 
she did translation work in|in Ft. Myer Chapel. mined Beheleses | ). Olivet’ Comete 


LUNCHEO 
French, German, Italian and}. A rig omer William H. Marr IT aR p aaturdes, 1 q Reciprocity Club, 136 p. m., May- 
~ 


dxsies of 
- . 
— gg F 
, Md., | = ~ as : 
Spanish. She was hosphalised heard from a few days after| Funeral services for William nese. — sera cea 2 mi hs ary ms » Rational . Homes ae es 


in 1944 with heart trouble and i = a. o1 DL m, | Rs " ets” dt 
enderson Marr II, killed in an ashington Round Table, 12:30 p. m.. 
retired. ‘Thanksgiving five years ago. d southwest portion and spresaing over} a and 10. ie § im ‘The’ Potomac River at) Washington. 


, cteare (On Nov. 30, 1950, he was re-\air crash in Nevada on Nov. 17,| the east and no as Ur Gale a ae MEETINGS y air and. Robert] at the cemetery’s sdministration 
eaves wy geo gat Stage ported missing in action. will be held at 1 p. m. Saturday| Temperatures nee rain for 24 h ours ending 7 p. m. Thursday: 1 i Welfare Siaf. 25. m. 8 tatier. r ier. Remains at Chambers 
private. Set. Hill joined the Army in| at Gawler’s Chapel, 1756 Penn-| ™ - . Gites 19 Gpeenisetion i 


ee 11947 and served 27 months in’ sylvania ave. nw., with burial at | Abuens 2): | Monte S i: | gear 

Robert L. O’Brien | Japan. He reenlisted in June/Cedar Hill Cemetery. ‘Abuaueraue tot ve -«» | Mew Orleans 64 | The Washin Post and Times "Pernt HEPBURN ANNIE V. On Tuesday, No- 
\ipe 27 os on Community: conn. mber 22. 1955, yaence, a2 

a 


r, 
A 
. 
Z 
Funeral services for Robert of 1950 and a month later, was! Mr. Marr, one of several ci-. or College i a 
y 
d 
. 


122 33 


a 
Pentecostal 
m. Interment Cedar- 


nN 
~ 


38 
Nashville 8 : aareetasien 4 Polish Veterans. 


merat Home, 
chusetis ave. ne. unt 
day, November 
and interment 


> >? _ an > 
h 1 1. Paso . Harding, slumnmi sssociation secretary, 
Lincoln O’Brien, 90, former pub-|assigned to Korea. jvillans aboard an Alt Force sheville 4 +s | Port Worth 16:30 DY wm. Woodhall House. S030 G| git { John F epbura. Jr 
see : s 


st. aw l the Demain 
Gr. Rapids PECIAL Pa | Pu 520 a. ‘wockinenn on 


Harrisburg "Navy Band. & Departmental] Alexandria "Wass will be offe at St. 
oust Apeitectam, Const tleution ave. between Mary's Catholic a a.*% iday 


. 2955. AR 
12th and 13th ste. November 25. at terment MINNIE) t. 
Ind{anapolis St. Mary's Cemetery byte of 06 


‘2 Jac lord Takoma Park. 
‘ Scksonvie 80 
see y 
| Boe wees 3 
: oxville 54 


oston Herald and| Sgt. Hill went to Margaret) ‘transport plane, was on a special tlante 
swatahigh oo dn on of the Tariff Brent High School in Helen, | assignment with the Air Force’s| eceese Cue 
Commission. will be held at 4|Md. Before that he was an) Office of Special Investigations. Birmisaam 
p. m. Saturday in All Soul’s\altar boy at Immaculate Con-|He was a native of Maryland's 
Unitarian Church, 16th and Har-|ception Church in Mechanics- -and a graduate of George Wash- {ay 
ington University. rownsville 
vard sts. nw. Burial will be ville. Bese 
private, | He is survived by his mother, He is survived by his wife, Burlington 
Mr, O’Brien died Tuesday of|Catherine R. Hill of Waldorf,| Sydney; two children, William| Sharteston 
a stroke in his apartment at the; Md., and two brothers, Thomas} Henderson III, 9, and Edward. arlotte 
Brandywine, 4545 Connecticut | Spencer of Washington, and/Blaine, 5; a sister, Jeanette Marr 
ave. nw. He had been bed-rid-| Robert B. Hill IIJ of Waldorf. of Washington, and his parents, |‘ 
den since suffering a stroke 16;Burial will be in Arlington | o and Mrs. William H. Mart/§ 
months ago. | Cemetery. |Sr. of Upper Marlboro, 


t 
Weekend Calendar . -|"irer trae e | Be 2 ce ire 
INGTON of where services 


. : 2 tur 
|For Service Personnel | Mar" Sioibeisbesa dav. November [6 Sp. inter 


oneressional of ie 

The Armed Services Hospi- 
tality Committee has furnished 
the following information on 
weekend activities for service 


-| personnel in the eres: IRWIN, LIEUT. GEN. STAFFORD LE 
ORCHESTRA NCES ROY. On Wednesday. November 23. 
Central YMCA, 1738 Cat. nw., Co-ed Libor at his Soune in Asheville N 
Club Capes, 9-12 p 75 cents. GEN. 
St. Ma tthe Ae “Cathedral Grub. i8 WIN, the beloved husband of Clara 


. a ews 
. Pa. Priends 
neral 


seseneseeesercentiys 
VEUSESIOSSIVS SLU VaSVRSssy 


CRRSSSISRLISSIGaSass 


~ 


an Pu 
incomplete. " Notice 


GARD. ROBERT N. Op Wedneoday. 
3 i: 1a \ Tee 


| Dance instruction 
yuceed ne | oarsmen ea 


pl. ow.. 8:30- re . f . . Interment Ar- 
m. Refreshments. Contributions, 50. | etery 

cents iJ STON, CHARLES W. On Monday 
; of av Gahtasten Street Methodist Church. 21. 1955, at his residences. 
Z ‘awe | 115 S&S. Washington st.. Alexandria. Re- 17 © «et. me. CHAR WwW. JOBN.- 
a " | freshments. — activities, from 7:30- Fre, husband or Virgie Johnston. after 6 ™ “ 
elit, “ik ' a m eather o a - 
o~ ae Fenthou use YWCA, 17th and K sts. nw.| V. Stanton, Perraro, fees will "be held on Seturday. Nevem- 
open 6:30-12 Dan in- A anna. . a Hill Cemetery 

| struction. x to 6 Dp. m. "Dechestre dones. , nh 


'50 cents. Music by Joe Macy. 9 Dp. m. to : 

| 12  midnispt Saturday ipeper. 4 survived by 10 

rmed Forces Goater +f th Episcope! prandch dren Ww. J may call at the oa — 
| onuretnes. 1317 ers! Home, 4th st. and Massa- 

ip. m. Orchestra, »* $0.7 30. Hot Sean, ~ whe - geryjees wil Announcement of 


ile ; in., 25 cents, Saturda Priday. November 25. at 1 
] m | bg * 4 Fy and Information| 6. =. Interment Fort Lincoln Ceme- Services by Chambers 


Center. 218 &. Washington st.. a ry. 

| dria, ae >-7585. Open 2-11 . @.| LINCOLN, LT. JULIA M.. Army Nurse’ 

| Saturda . On Wednesday. November) & 
' 


Ggnare re Dane 
Prien nasnip onpe. Ae, > t. se. cities | 


ensemble, turd 


h Door Canteen {Calvary Bap- tends may call at the 


wa 8th and 
ames, velrectiansnte “tree, | fF dines pet 


ernen Piece Methodist Gaurch. 
ae 5 and i 1 sts. 


Pp 
| bi Arlington National Geupstery. 
30". m. | LIND. CHA gw On Tuesday. No- 


: Matthew's 9 ginegral Club. 1814 us stern ave. ow. cash; car, other items. AD. 
‘ . Bervicemen, ; th ° 


>. mn. ounce ay. Also open 


, and 
. m.-10 p . s ecto 
Lutheran Service pation tee llth at. evy Ch Puneral . 3 Funeral Dir ad 
Dp. m day 


mw., square dance, onsi ve. nw where ‘ 
ven? House—Variety t } J. WILLIAM LEE s SONS co. 
It would take a fleet of 125 arm- UBC, oy wore Pyeare. TS Sine ssadiocn os 3 Dp. m. Stormont ¢ : CREMATORIUM 
resanemie ana record dance. 8:30 MARR, WILLIAM HENDERSON I. ith end Masse. Ave. N.S. LL 8-s90e 


On| 


Thursday, November 17. 1955. WIL- 
» internstio - Crossroads, breakfast, | HENDERSON MAR rt. :| 


ored trucks fo deliver all the pen- oe v citthgram Be Bervice p Lenage. Lith st. tiihact Henderson. Mart. fathers of | Fun Funeral Designs 


Ma iso i ed 
a. ae teas iuatng Weiter $7 fis parmnts. Mir ted ‘tre, Willam| © George C. Shaffer, Inc. — 
Siline Mecilities. 9a 


. - h/ J a sister. Paty canette biar? Beivices| orien “Open Doral Bi undaye 
nies Hig s customers save on Jug syivanip are ne. on Baturaay,| iat Phong orders also rea 


| r Hill Cenletery,” 

ilk - J | in Memoriam MeGARRY. BARBARA W. Suddenly on LEGAL NOTICES 

M ed JONES. WILLIAM B.—In loving memory » Mover + 1985. Se 
C may bel band. WILLI pethesda, Ma. é Fewer tide 
7 ¢ ee i count in pennies are big savings B. Jofens. she, get Year ago tox "J. Mets ob Rm pist Ric rT 
ngs NITED §T 
Prerr “ae ’ oe You sre not Sergetion loved one, Mee 5. ond Preacis 4 alter and | Court tot our 
apt 1 a- Softrell 

Adminis + 


Nor will ¥ vi call at the Bethesda bia. hol ip 
—when you t them every day. And when you As long as iife and memory Jasts, C Chase Punerai H Robert | Estate of Law 
y Be *Y y y Ww - remember thee A Pumehrey of Bethe a. aid. Serv- | “ian “Docket ees 


. » 2 : 
2 INET RE I I : PE rT use High’s Milk you save 365 days a year. In a ) ss you ho ™. our hearts are eee. Church of. the Parenter ee oo ot phe tals 
fill your vacant place. be ‘otered at 108. m. Interment Park. | sa! ot 


T° , | year’s time, an average family can save &s much COUR LOVING WIPE. NELLIE P. JONES| Jaen Cemetery.” On Wednesday | Madge “s pao sl 
. Me v r 955, a ovidence Hos- ~y » = , . ‘D. 
, S B A C K A A | N! as $100 by buying the Jug Milk Way! Thousands Card af Thanks ages Bi sees tbe series at! and ne 
of families are doing it—so why don’t you switch ie alee al Be ae cparieg ©. 
today? 


berg d ¢ ¥ nveved | _ kind- ilidren. Bre cat Weene. +" : 
oA re r, | ement = 4 nBITETTO Coot, Hape at 10% ter and The Wa 
sy is am and Times Herald, y 
HIGH'S eA? Bree Grade-A oe wii lake say Saets z 
: - we ‘ . la si t ys before said re 
_* o> | . | the 
rif * wz > 1A ar Homogenized Dy » Nag oo "is . aie eat 7 LAWS. Ch 
c FA | Vitamin-D ae De ggg ht Rage A 
Famous Sy. BNA fr Beach of ME, f Ma. and Mrs. ‘Bae gia" Soanect 23.1966. at his) ink ‘of the ‘e 
“ — (e.. MILK GALLON IN , D.C. 24 yb. Beach of pend of s Helen Veto toria DO Brien ome 
ee | WASHINGTON Modesto, Calif: he x her of M. Underhil : 
rerio P Arse eth Uses | gen eS © 
Churen of ‘and Harvard sts iP Senn 
Hi H suant to the 
snl ort Ab 


yi x . “es 
wines tes- 


om at, nw. (free on we 


EGG O4c GALLON IN VIRGINIA ‘Slit Sie Min ead, 
We 7, 


NOG ICE CREAM There's a HIGH'S STORE Near You! 


In half-gallon, quarts, pints, and bulk— 


na : a or ait} 5 ‘ ; 
ad For the latest weather. vem t's Hes. a TK: ip 
ji pth, . 2 je, daughter edd, Seelth or fives of seoqnents 
long famous for rich, flavor smooth Dial WE §-1212 he ge # A fe tle 
creamy texture and highest quality. Fs Ee -athn | Sir shy condemned 
For the correct time Wunerel Home, 4ih,‘st.|  bulldige ye part, ereo 
Stock your freezer now! yl at services ‘will be. held day Mo. a puilashe Fite 
‘ + SON. FiebeRioK iad on ne, Dui 
re 
ay Ceme- 


‘Dial Tl 4-2525 


Se ¥ SIRES OS 2 ESS ", 
OP genony ENS ‘ Be se ee %. 


MILK @ BUTTER @ EGGS @ ICE CREAM OPEN 9 am. fol! pm we Seven Days 0 Week tts fast and easy! 


crs | The Chesapeake & Potomac 
COTTAGE CHEESE @ BAKED GOODS | , | Telephone Company 


The Washington Post 
at Bherald 


Ceferecaie.: toedhs .seearatie:'; sane Sst ie ee ne gests ss tagtestance: spegetisc: Slim 
eh SR ee ee anes res ee Fuge ; Opie <3 Pie ; 25s Sees , % Ra: > 
hg of eh 
-,! on weet . V5 4 


; re 43 bi: pices 
apse we oan. ef pe Eee: 


Ge SCHWARER Ger 


Home of Flawless Diamonds for 66 Years 
1305 F St. N.W. Silver Spring 708 7th St. N.W. 
STerlimg 3-1525 Ellsworth at Fenton STerling 3-1525 
JUniper 17-7711 


Famous Wm. Rogers ff 
Silver-Plated Server 


Exquisite 
Mountain 
Rose 
Pattern 


Amazing low price 
on fine silver-plated 
server. A lovely ad 
dition to gracious liv- 
ing either as a gift or 
for yourself. Moun 
tain Rose pattern is 
available in specially 
priced sets. 


SORRY, NO MAIL OR 
PHONE ORDERS 


Park Free While Shopping at F St. Store 


Mac Mannes 


“Year Round Gift Store” 


15-Pc. mee Set 


FOR THE FESTIVE DAYS AHEAD 


creas mm | Q98 


merrymaking season. . . this 15- 
Ret. 295 


piece punch bowl, by one of 
America’s finest manufacturers of 
glassware. Large bowl, plate, 
twelve cups and ladle. 


Sorry, Neo Mail or Phone Orders 
Open TODAY 9:30 A.M. te 9 P.M. 


PENNEY’S 


Always First Quality 
@ Silver Spring ©@ Arlington ® Alexandria 
TALL TAPERED LUGGAGE 
LIGHTWEIGHT! STURDY! : 


SPECIAL 
[= PURCHASE 


Get off to a great start 

- ++ save at Penney’s 

on smart, matched 

luggage! Scuff-resistant 

vinyl covering in fash- 

| ion-pastels . a 

[aaa €«brass plate hardware .. : 
"=. 2 lovely lining with spa- 
ics cious pockets! 


-STEWART'S CORNER- 


Your DISCOUNT Department Store 
6h & D Sts. N.W. ME. 8-429§ 
Phone Orders—Mail Orders—COD.'s 


| TOYS AT DISCOUNT PRICES | 


Portable Electric 
Washer 


@ Latest in Design 
Precision Built 
Lightweight—for 
easy handling 

The Famous Flexible 
Agitator washes 


clothes more 
than human 


Reg. 529.38 


$1 5 88 


TURNER S 


FINE FURNITURE 
923 G St. N.W. NA. 8-8157 


Owantice, Va. 227 Potomae Ave. 


PRE-BUILT BORDER 
Hollywood Bed 


on legs 


Full 39-inch wide pre- 
built border twin Hol- 
lywood bed on legs. 
Fancy woven ticking, 
multi-coiled unit with 
Sisal pad insulation for firmness. Button tufted with 


handles for easy turning. Box spring solidly con- 
structed on six hardwood legs. 


FRIDAY AND SATURDAY ONLY 
Phone and Mail Orders Accepted 


FREE PARKING «at Anderson's Gervice Station, 1th & @ Place 


————MORTON' S—— 


°° SOUTHEAST —25 “16 & 427-33 Seventh 34., N.W. 

EAST —2324 Pennsyloania Ave. $B. 
NORTHEAST—H S¢. af 7th, NE. 

SILVER SPRING—Colesville Rd. é Fenton 


Cashway Scoop! 
$6.98 Famous 
“Helen Harper’’ 


ORLON 
Cardigans | 


Orion in classic 
or mock-turtle 
style! All with 


| ib 
Shop Friday Nite until 9 AM 4 Morton's Stores 


—Discount Sales Co 


ks atahataacdl 
1906 Benning Rd. Lincola 7-1359 
salte my Oy Sot. “a 6 PM. 


Nationally Famous 


$33.88 $38.99} Boys & Girls’ Bites 


Lifetime 
Guarantee 


: Reg. NOW 
13" Tricycle, Ball . 
16° 2-Wheeler with 


ights aw’ 
USE OUR LAYAWAY PLAN 


GUDE'S 


Washington; 1212 F Street, N.W. NAtional 6 
Fate car 2812 $, Randelph Se OVerlaok 30700 


: 910 Ellsworth Dr. JUniper 7-7100 


Weekend Special! 


Lily-of-the ‘Valley Pips 


5 pips planted 
in eontainer 


$9.15 


COMPLETSB 


Healthy green pips that will burst into fragram bloom in 
two to three weeks time. Planted in handsome, decorative 
pottery containers, at special low weekend prices. 


NARCISSUS BULBS | 


cr 


ao Ae ag 


in tive o@ 
package 


a oaks With Decks 


Park Free—One Hour ROMP RN, 


r>—MANHATTAN—— 


etyd & RADIO CO. (Est. 1914) 
rts, accessories and tires for Austin Healey, Austin 
uC. Morris Minor, Hillman, Sunbeam, Porsche, 
Mercedes-Benz, MGC-Magnette, W illys. 


1810 KING ST. 
Alexandria, Va. KI. 85525 
Monday thru Thursday 


Sales, service, 
of Eng 


Both Sides of 7th at R St. N.W. 


S AM. te 6:30 P.M. 
Priday and Saturday 
SAM. te 7 P.M. 


meme UREE PARKING 
THE PERFECT CHRISTMAS GIFT! 


New 1955 and 1956 


MOTOROLA 


AUTO 
RADIOS 


a —S«So ind 808 
Specially Priced! s 
}NO MONEY DOWN!} 6 oe 18 vot 
} As Low as 750 a Week } ! 


@ With new, exclusive Volumatic “Non-Fade” Seneein. 


@ Won't fade out under bridges, viaducts, underpasses 
@ 90-Day Unconditional Guarantee at Manhattan Radio 


Immediate Repair Work on All Auto Radios 


IRVING'S 
ue and E Streets N.W. EXecutive 3-2626 


n Friday and Saturday 9 to 7 
ustomer Parking Opposite Store 


Repeating A Sell-Out Value! 


fee ~=Winter Weight 
‘4 Men’‘s Sheen 


Gabardine 
Suits 


© Regulars, Longs and Shorts 
But Not in Every Size 


® Charge IT! 


—CURTIS BROTHERS— 


Nichols Ave. at V Street S.E. in Anacostia LU. 4-4000 
Washington's Largest Furniture Display 


Corner 


China 


Regularly 99.96 


, 


One 


Beautiful corner china in 
rich hand-rubbed mahog- 
any with antiqued brass 
bail-type drawer pulls. 
Four roomy drawers for 
lots of storage space. Hand- 
gome scroll top, bowed 
front on top drawer and 
grooved shelves make this 
an attractive dining room 
piece. 
You'll be proud te own 
this at such « 


WONDERFUL SAVINGS! 


Buy Now for Christmas On Our Layaway Plan! 
Open Evenings ’Til 9 . Park om Our Lot 


ASTON —— 


CME LIOUOR STORE 
~ IMPORTERS 
927 Penn. Ave. ancy wetatTE FRP8S oo vu 


COMPARE MILSTONE’S LOW PRICES 


We Honestly Believe Our Prices to Be 
the Lowest in D. C. 


DEEP SPRING 
Now. 5 Years Old 


BOTTLED IN BOND 
100 PROOF 


Kentucky Straight 
BOURBON 


% HR. FREE } 
PARKING } 


7 


923 D St 
Rear of Store 


| $9.99 

; ae FIFTH | 
THISTLE 

12 vo OLD SCOTCH $549 49 


PRODUCED AND BOTTLED IN SCOTLAND 


DOWNTOWN—409 llth Street NW. 
FALLS CHURCH—446 8. Washington 4%. 
WILLSTON—6475 Arlington Bled. 


Famous Titan Heaters 


Extra Warmth for Cold Days 
Model 322 


Reg. 29.95 


The style leader of electric heaters! Famous 
Therm-O-Dial control, tipover disconnecting 
switch, and fan-forced convection heat. See our 
entire line of Titan Heaters at new low prices! 


—BARON’& MELTZ— 


New Spinet Piano 
aoeee ; 


Nis445\ 


| Basy Terms : 


, 
] 
1 
] 
] 


A special purchase allows us to offer this fine quality 
full-size, 88-note spinet at this remarkably low price. 
It is made by the Estey Co., one of America’s oldest 
piano producers, has a lovely mahogany finish and 
construction features of excellent pianos. Be sure 
to see this value. ) 


——FOGIL'S 
10th and D Streets N.W. ExXecutive 3-4212 


@ Open Friday and Saturday, 9 to 7 
@ One Hour Customer Parking 


TERRIFIC GIFT SPECIALS! 
Men’s $17.50 Smooth Grain 
; 2-Suiter 


Holds Suite on Hangers! 


: Q.88 


Outstanding Luggage 
Value! Scuffproof! Dis 


tinctive Style! Cloth 


lined and Clothing 
vider! : 


@ FREE - 
INITIALS 


~Metching Companion 


——POTTERY FAIR—— 


Original Washington factory outlet for Fine Imported and Domesthe 
Dinnerware Seconds 


$112 M ST. N.W. 


In Georgetown Spring 
Detlg to 6 p.m. Fridag to # p.m. Opes Mon., There, & Fr. te 8 om. 


AMPLE FREE PARKING 


Swedish Angel Chimes 


Solid lacquered 
brass for year 
‘round use, 


« 
Heat from candle 
makes Angele re- 
volve. 


Reg. 2.75 


$1.79 


eireieeet 
| 

nih 
eects 


C REFRIGERATORS] | 


JUST A FEW OF OUR VALUES 
Internatione! Harvester, 7-cu.-ft. 199.95 128.60 


| Westinghouse 6-cu.-ft. 199.95 119.80 | 


Kelvinetor, 8-cu.-ft., shelves on 

door, freezer .. 229.95 138.85 
Internationa! Hervester 8 \4-cu.- 

de tue .. 239.95 159.97 
Norge, 10-cu.-ft., freezer, shelves 259.95 159.60 
Frigidaire, 9-cu. -t,, de luxe 1954 269.95 169.93 
Hotpoint, 10 2-cu.- ~ft., shelves.. 279.95 179.00 
International Harvester, 8 Va-cu.- 

ft., auto. defrost 299.95 179.83 


Kelvinetor 11 - cu. - f., 
shelves on dr., freexer_ 329.95 188.95 


internatione! Horvester, 9 '/2-cu.- 
ft., freezer .. 299.95 189.60 
Norge, 10 4-cu.-ft., "freezer, outo. 
SED . Ubtnotvietunewwe ~..299.95 189.80 


International Harvester 
10 %-eu.-ft., no freezer 329.95 189.90 


Internctional Horvester, 9 '2-cu.- 
ft.. euto. defrost 329.95 199.40 
Norge 10-cu.-ft., euto. defrost..369.95 216.45 
Philco, 1 | -eu. -tt., 2-z0ne, outo 
def 399.95 219.80 


rost 
International Horvester, 10%A- -Cu.- 
2-tone, de luxe, auto 
424 95 239.80 
defrost 


; ae. 95 259.80 
Internationo! Horvester, 12-< -cu.- 
2-zone, de luxe, auto. Peal 449. 95 259.97 


Frigidaire 10'2-cu.-ft., 

de luxe 2-door 509.95 288.50 

—— 13-cu.-ft., 2-door, outo, 
defrost 

Westinghouse, 12- cu.-ft., 2-door 

Philco, ; 


defrost 
Norge, 12-cu.-ft., 2- ~zone, auto. 


298.00 
298.80 
299.80 
329.95 
379.97 


399.50 
._.--299.95 158.65 
Frigidaire, 10-cu.-ft., 2-zdne, quto, 
green porcelain ._. 419.95 269.65 
Hotpoint, | 1-cu.-ft., 2-zone, auto. 459.95 249.37 
Philco, 12.6-cu.-ft., 2-door, 2- 
tone, outo. 2-woy door ...: 549.95 344.60 
Philco, 10-cu.-ft., 2-door, 2- 
at 429.95 249.97 
199.77 


sh 
. 279.95 
outo., 
de luxe . 369.95 249.70 
Frigidaire, 11 2-cu. tt, 2-door, 
: Zone, duto. _.. pase 459.95 316.67 
Frigidaire, 1|4.3-cu. i. Upside 
Bown | freezer, outo. ......- 549.95 389.77 


12-cu.-ft., 


«= 599.95 


Frigidaire, 15-cu. -tt., 2- door, super 
de luxe 
Hotpoint, 1O-cu.-ft., shelves on 


Frigideire, 10.3-cu.-ft., 


fou've Never 
| FREEZERS 
J JUST A FEW OF OUR VALUES 
[ Admirat 10-eu.-ft. ee) 


International Harvester |2-cu.-ft. 
Chest, de luxe . 


Kelvingtor 12-cu. ft. Upright. 419.95 218.88 


International Harvester 
15-cu.-ft. Upright... _. 499.95. aie 


Norge }3-cu.-ft. Upright wane "| —_- 
Philco }4~-cu.-ft, Upright 
Internationa! Harvester |9- 


Famous" Make 12-cu.-ft, Upright 429.95 169.95 
Hotpoint 12-cu.-ft, Upright 399.95 243.90 


; 


; 
| Admiral, Bie outo. 


TODAY—9 AM to 9 PM 


SAT. 9 AM to 6 PM | 


_. AT BOTH SUN RADIO STORES 
938 F St. N.W.| 11th « E Sts. NW. 


THOUSANDS and THOUSANDS of ITEMS—MOST FAR BELOW WHOLESALE cosT! 


OUR ENTIRE INVENTORY OF 


1955 TELEVISION 


© Over 1,000 Pieces in This Mammoth Sale 
Mahogany, Maple, Traditional, Modern, Provincial) 


CROSLEY 

21” Table Model, mahogony, 
21” _— Fidelity Console . .. 
21” Hi-Fidelity Decorctor Model ....249. 5 
21” High Fidelity Console ..--.....249.95 
21” Hi-Fidelity Console, blond 259.95 


CBS 


21” CBS Hi-Fidelity Console 


CAPEHART 
Mahogany Console 
21 Hi-Fidelity, mahogany, doors ...399. 95 
“ Mahogany Console 279.95 


DUMONT 


21" Console, é 
21” De Luxe Console, mahogany - . 


GENERAL ELECTRIC 


21” Console, mahogony 279.99 169.87 
21” De Luxe ULTRAVISION Console.369.95 189. 50 


eum 


= 


--369.95 218.35 
389.95 236.61 


SUPER SPECIAL 


Famous-Make Portable Television, 
built-in ontennoe, hondle 
eosy corrying ......--~..-- 


MOTOROLA 


21” Table Model, mahogany 


21” Console, ebony 
Super Spec 


21” De Luxe Console 
21” Spinet Consolette.... 


Specic! 98.88 


259.95 159.95 


249.95 19.95] 


329.95 189.60 
319.95 189.65 


—E _ ™ = -—_ 


BELOW WHOLESALE COST! ) 


AIR CONDITIONERS . 
ALL OPEN DEMONSTRATORS 
*F ST. STORE ONLY 
Frigidaire, 1 H.P., 110 volt .... 469.95 198.97 
Gibson, 1% HP. Thermo. --<=« 599.95 249.80 


Mitchell 


1 4P. De leae flesh. 

Ly 

wud o-20 
Philco 1 H.P. Console 
Philco 2 H.P. Console, water cooled 995.00 
Unerco 44 H.P. Roll-About Unit... 369.95 


Coolerctor 3% H.P., euto. therms. 399.95 


International Harvester % H.P., 
thermostat epee ie 


Philco ‘ H.P., flush mount....299.95 


Frigidaire | HP. 

Mitchell 4% H.P., 220 volts 

Coolerator 44 H. P. arsenite 220 
Wn ‘cediecate 


International Horvester, Y% HP... 319. 95 
1 SRG Oe AN 95 


Save 40% to 50% 
DISHW ASHER-SINKS 


27" Undonenaer ees — 198.93 


“44995 269.90 
Hotpoint 27” 


rcounter, 
Ra hee Lee ne 3399S 148.88 
Frigidaire, 24” Undercounter....319.95 188.93 


ENTIRE 
INVENTORY OF 
OPEN STOCK 


Famous-Name Television... 


SAVE Up to 60% | | 


@ All Perfect 

@ All Styles and Sizes 

@ All Carry Complete 
Guarantees 


@ In Original Sealed Cartons 
© All Sizes (14, 17, 21, 24 and 27 Inch) 


Most Below Wholesale Cost 
ELECTRIC RANGES 


JUST A FEW OF OUR VALUES 
RCA Estate 39” a 
Norge 36” Automotic 
Kelvinator 30” Automatic 


-249.95 168.85 


inghouse 59.95 178.87 
West 30” Ausomotic....- 2 178 
poin 279.95 189.90 


uto- 
matic - 319.95 189.80 
RCA Estate 39” Auto. with Griddie 329.95 199.87 


479.95 259.60 
RCA t Estate De Luxe 2-oven with 
399.95 266.35 


Bor-B-Kewer ........+-..-- 
Frigidaire, 39° De luxe, euto., 
‘ _ 439.95 239.65 
Hotpoint Stainless steel, " 4-Burner 
Built-in Oven ..... - 124.95 89.65 
Het point Stoiniess steel, Bui ilt- 
p 169.95 119.95 


"339.95 248.80 
249.95 179.65 


— — a 


. 34-inch Outdoor 
Barbecue Grill 


GARBAGE 


DISPOSAL 


Werld-Famevus 
lroner. 
Were 


ws... 188-93 


VACUUM CLEANERS 
=F i 
Vecuun joswume, ond Johasss Wexers 


ELECTRIC BLANKETS 


& . _ SAVE UP TO 48% 
GAS RANGES 
JUST A FEW OF OUR VALUES 
20” Apt.-Sixe Model 109.95 59,97 
20” Apt.-size De Luxe Model...129.95 -68.77 
Standerd Model 14 pee ye 


a B 159.45 
249.95 1a.00 


Auto. 
1 lia amend Ssaagtige 228.85 
RCA Estote 40” Auto. Ber-B- 


— 


Out Distributor’s Inventory 
Portable Electric Fons 


SAVE 50% 


@ All Styles (Blonde, 


PHILCO 
Console 


UHF (82-chonne!l) 
31” De Lane VIE ond UN channel. 160.95 


ZENITH 


99.95 298.50 
750.00 369.90 


449.95 198.65 


Seve 40% to 50% on Brand-New 
POWER MOWERS 


ROTARY TYPE 
, America's Top-Reted Mower 


16” 2-cycle engine_...... «~ 89.95 ue 
" 109. 


4-cycle engine 95 56.88 
WB” 4-cycle engine, recoll....419.95 59.85 


REEL TYPE 


Moetemower iT” with weed topper, B & 6 


iS 28 


toe & ie BoE 


hire 


PORTABLE TAPE RECORDERS : 
Timez 46-RPM Phone- Recorder i ae 
—e Advertioad 

eble Tape Recorder SF 69.95 
Webcor De Luxe Tape mentee 207.0 139.93 
Wilees-Gey Super De 


At the Lowest Price We've Ever Seen! 
GRUNDIG HI-FIDELITY 
DISCONTINUED 1955 MODELS 


Grup portable. 
wee tin baits’ = antennsa, 3? Sr 


Ted 


Sf ose a i. apnners 2B SE af 113% 


JUST A FEW OF OUR VALUES 
SAVE UP TO 61% ON 


DRYERS 


Speciot 96.88 


239.95 93.88 


SAVE 35% TO 40% 
HIGH FIDELITY PHONOGRAPHS 


40 93 
99.95 59.81 
109, tie 65.73 


1a Be. aE 


Whirlpool Imperial 
269.95 159.80 


TS. 
199.95 128.83. 


95 
279. 
2 


SAVE UP TO 46% ON 
AUTOMATIC WASHERS 
JUST A PEW OF OUR VALUES 
| Ther Automatite 239.95 129,50 | 


os ea 
259.95 39.47 


Whirlpool Automatic 


Whirlpool Automatic 
Thor De Luxe, with woter-sover.299. 5 169.93 


95 349.60 

Super Specicl 118.65 

| Norge Automatic ____249.95 139.66 66 | 
10s 


63 Wringer Washers 
Norge, Apex, end others 
Sect 50% hyn yo S 129.95 to 289.95. 


MISCELLANEOUS 
SMALL eebuegie =: 


Aluminum Conister Set 
Ree. Wastes? 6 a. . 4s ededecke $33 
De luxe Food Slicer 
CASCO ‘ELECTRIC 
HEAT PADS — 


roe P haianeble Spl 


3 fixed heot......~ 
Waterpro! * fixed heat, 


ese fa eee oe 


Right in the Middle - 
Of a Right-of-Way . 


By Aubrey Graves “ 
Country Life Editor 


Che topography of the land is not 

the only obstacle the National 
Park Service must overcome before 
it can build the proposed George 


Washington Memorial Parkway exten- 
sion from Chain Bridge to Great Falls. 

First it must win its long-continued 
contest with Mrs. Ann Winsor. This 
determined lady took up “unauthorized 
residence” in a cottage on the right- 
of-way more than three years ago. 
She isn't about to move. 

The cottage she is occupying is one 
of the last 126 decaying structures 
scheduled to be torn down, prelim- 
inary te grading the four-lane high- 
way. 

Mrs. Winsor'’s relations with NPS 
are now at their least cordial. An 
artist and interior decorator, she first 


proposed a sort of partnership with 
the. NPS some years back. She had 
an ambitious scheme which involved 
using several of the unoccupied build- 
ings adjacent to the C&O Canal as 


a center for rehabilitating disabled 
war veterans. 

Mrs. Winsor had been active in USO 
work during the war. And somewhere 
along the way she had fallen in love 
with the Canal and the River. For 
a serviceman sick in body or mind, 
a sojourn in this scenic area would 
provide wonderful therapy, she 
reasoned. She envisioned a cultural 
center where painting, music and 
other arts might be studied. 


HE PARK people had other plans 

for this stretch of wilderness. The 
buildings, they said, were mostly 
abandoned summer camps, many of 
them “chicken coops and shanties.” 
They were old, unsafe and, for sanitary 
and other reasons, unfit for human 
habitation, she was told. 

Unwilling to accept “no,” Mrs. 
Winsor has taken her proposal to 
all who would listen—and many who 
wouldn’t—all the way up to the office 
of the Secretary of the Interior. One 
Department spokesman estimates this 


cultured lady (a Bostonian) “has cost 
the Government at least $20,000, con- 
sidering the time officials and Park 
Police have spent in dealing with her.” 

I set out to find and interview this 
unusual “squatter.” Piled outside her 
doorway (hard to find in the jungle) 
were furniture, art objects and knick- 
knacks too numerous to mention. She 
almost breathed fire as she related 
how park officials had called it “junk,” 
and ordered it removed. She insisted 
most of the pieces were “antiques” 
which she was “aging further.” 

Delighted with finding a willing 
ear, Mrs. Winsor took me over the 
surrounding area, foot by foot. She 
knew and loved every bramble, every 
twisted vine. ‘Here and there we 
passed a stump. At each she paused 
to recite the circumstances of the 
tree's death. 

Sometimes the blame was put on 
“vandals” seeking firewood. In other 
instances the culprits were surveyors. 
Each departed growing thing was 
mentioned with such feeling that it 


~ 


— aS Bae aa PQVEZIOR Spel 


oe ~~ 
S = Ry 
“a Eom, — a 
oo we . 
? " 


Articles of furniture overflow from the four-room cottage of Ann Winsor into the garden outside. At left, 


Mrs. Winsor tends her flowers. Nearby is a Japanese 


might have been a member of her 
family—as, indeed, it was. 


_ hidden by tangled honey- 

suckle was a miniature Japanese 
garden, possibly six feet square. 
Pagodas and figurines lent a realistic 
illusion, By the pathway grazed a 
bronze peacock which once graced a 
more grandiose garden. 

Halfway up a nearby cliff a con- 
cealed cave-like shelf was still occupied 
by an ancient Chinese wicker chair. 
It was her place of “meditation.” 

“Look at that savannah,” she said, 
pointing to a level, treeless expanse 
below. “What an incomparable place 
to set up an easel!” 

Inside the cottage was a veritable 
storehouse of once fine possessions. 
It was now clear why all those belong- 
ings were piled outside in disarray. 
Thete was no space for them within. 

On the floor of one room were four 
layers of rugs—expensive rugs, once. 
Tasteful tapestries and pictures lined 
the walls, along with racks containing 
fine chinaware. I counted 14 lamps 
and shades in one of the four small 
rooms. They would be needed, she 
explained, to decorate the other 
cottages after her project had been 
approved. 

“Look at these!” she said, holding 
up tablecloths of lace and fine linen, 
most of them bearing ragged holes. 
“Rats chewed them,” she hissed, 
“National Capital Park rats!” 


ted gence etree alin af 


Church, gets his first dru 


’ 


N AN elegant silver tray, which 

once saw service in a New 
England drawing room, my hostess 
graciously brought out four bottles 
of wine. She poured my choice, and 
hers, into proper glasses. For the next 
two hours she told me her story, 

A United States Senator, she con- 
fessed impishly, gave her the idea 
to move in. “What could happen if 
you did?” she quoted him as asking. 
Meeting her in a corridor a week 
later, he remarked: “Well, Mrs. 
Winsor, I suppose you are all settled 
on the Canal.” 

“Of course not,” she replied. 

“Well, what would happen if you 
just moved in?,” he asked again. 
Understand, I'm not suggesting that 
you do. I'm just trying to HELP you, 
Mrs. Winsor.” 

And so she moved in. 

“You know what,” she added with 
what might have been feigned incre- 
dulity, “in all this time they've never 
sent me a single rent bill.” 

Park police say they have tried all 
manner of peaceful persuasion to no 
avail. She has refused to sign or accept 
eviction notices. They keep a watch- 
ful eye over her. 

Around the cottage she long ago 
planted a curtain of vines. They cover 
two sides of the house. Or did, until 
a wrecking estimator tore some away, 


‘in order to gain an idea of what he 


thtub, one of her many prized possessions. 


was going to have to tear down. 

“Look how my home blends, almost 
disappears, into the landscape,” she 
said. “It’s not conspicuous. Why don't 
they just fix it up and leave it here. It 
wouldn't bother all those people 
whizzing by on that million-dollar 
parkway.” 


EARBY the hammers pounded 

and wrecking bars cracked. The 
demolition crews were getting closer 
and closer. A man from the light 
company came down to disconnect 
electric wires from the building next 
door. Carrying a stout, homemade 
cane, which conceivably could have 
been used as a _ shillelagh, she 
persuaded him to go away. 

As if unaware of the odds against 
her, the old lady who gave her heart 
to the river—and her broken soldier 
boys—trefuses to envision defeat. 
When eviction eventually comes, it 
may be reminiscent of Sewell Avery 
being hustled from his mail-order 
throne. They'll probably have te carry 
Mrs. Winsor bodily away. 

At last report, structures on either 


side had been knocked down, their 
sites cleared and the debris carted off 
to a junkyard in Virginia. But Mrs. 
Winsor’s little dwelling was still there, 
electric wires intact. 

It is clear that Park officials are 
leaving their most unrelished job to 
the very last. 


By Wally Matemes, teft Photoerasher 


Ties, 1% oon of Mr. and Mrs. William Tapp of 704 Taylor rd., Falls 


FRIDAY 9 A.M.-9 P.M.—SATURDAY 9 A.M.-6 P.M. 


© WE'RE CLOSING DOWN OUR OLD WAREHOUS 
AND CONSOLIDATING ALL OUR STOCK AT 
THE FABULOUS “KING SIZE WAREHOUSE! 


Staff Phote eens 
= oes ¥ key mt er 


Here’s how the new double-barreled blood-sampling meth- rs ELE Pane EO he Sede Nasielya oF Seman, clei a. ake 
od looks in operation. The technique requires only one jab. | 


) ] ) | 
Double Needle Technique WASHERS (TELEVISION BARGAINS | REFRIGERATORS 


Makes Twin Blood Tests — é ‘ae | “aateanaile Wor aeuseenry| | Yep tome | | tap Tee Med tore. || 10.5-Fe 


24” CONSOLE TV Top Tuning 21") | 44” Table TY 
WASHER WASHER Console he : ; 
2 sah aie Mahogany, 1955 Wood, mahogany, Motel Table Tv—1956 Weed, mahogany, Refrigerator . netrigerater 


$199 $199 $178 $138 $99 $149 $157 


By Nate Haseltine 
Staff Reporter 
A piggy-back technique of;the first needle in the vein, 
taking two blood samples with simply inserts the needle of the 


second unit into the. rubber 
one needling has been tested on “neck” of the first. On the 950.95 temiben Actematic .Wesher, 1958 269.95 Capehort 21" Table $187 299.95 Emerson 21° Comole 1V. |G 1 Blectric 14° Clock Portabl 269.95 Nerge 10-4. Stenderd Refrigerator, $158 


the Washington public and/ breaking of the glass collar of Wood TV, mahogany, 1956 wooed, mahogeny, $208 TV, metel, 2-tone $139 


$117 


, 1956 beige, 1955 
found welcome. this second collegtor, the vacu- 299.95 Capehert 21" Conscle Wood 9 269.95 Admiral 9-t. Avte. Defrost, Deluxe 
The general reaction was: It’'s|um of that vial pulls blood § 279.95 Mayteg Automatic Washer ......... TV, blonde, $169 219.95 Admiral Yop Tuning 21° 830.00 Emerson 15" Color $199 


1955 Console, $166 TV, mohogany, 1955 Refrigerator, 1955 
Seager, 239.95 Nat. Advertised 21° Teble | 369.95 Admiral 16-Ft. Dusl-Temp. Deluxe $939 


only half as bad as being | through both n®edies to draw 
+3 , its blood volume sample. A Admiral Phone.TV¥ 21” 

jabbed with two noedles. 1D boo no 
The double-barreled blood/ small quantity of ee Se 279.95 Hetpoint Aviometic Washer, 1955 Comb., 1955 $249 Metal Table TV, $149 mohogeny, 1955 $109 Refrigerator, Auto. Defrester, 1955 .. 

sampling method was inaugu-|rice in the iatter via ecp 249.95 Admiral Top Tuning 21° Super  SPOnY. 1955 | odsnh tine: nihininiaie’ Git aekiaie ; 

rated here in a house-to-house | dlood for the diabetes test from 299.95 Maytog Deluxe Avtometic Washer Cascade Comole TV, $178 329.95 CBS 21” Console 198 TV, eluminited tbe, side i | 419.95 Merge 12-F. Stenderd Refrigerator with $929 

bloodtesting campaign to uwun- coagulating. wolnut, 1956 TV, weed, blende, 1955 9 ace ag: Sap blonde $17 

covér—at one needie’s jab, so| Some 22 medical students 367.95 Capehart 21" Console, woed, 319.95 CBS 21" Console . ine 529.95 Norge 13-Ft. Deluxe Refrigerater, 

to speak—unknown cases of |canvassed neighborhoods, ask- 289.95 Norge Fully Automatic Washer, 1956 $199 3. specker, TV, weed, mohog., 1955 $199 Pleas Pw pay say . — , : 1988 = $96? 

two separate diseases, diabetes ing residents over 16 to volun- pews 369.95 CBS 21° Console TV, weed, weed. mahegeny end $248 ndeer, 


and syphilis. jteer. Some 25,000 permitted § 19995 whirlpool Surgometic Semi-Automatic 369.95 CBS Hi-Fi AM/FM fRedic. 380 sound, dual speaker, blonde, 1956 | 499.95 Servel 9.5-F. Electric Refrigerator, 2-Deer, 
Because one test is made on|blood samples to be taken for Washer, 1955 Pi Sik) TRAD $148 naar 3 speeds, $228 mahogany, geuik $228 46093 Wet. Adverticed 21° with Automatic Defrest, 1955 $249 
clotted blood and the other on ithe diabetes test. ands : 249.95 Philco 21” Console $149 doors, console TV-redio-phene, AM. 
preserved whole blood, two sep-| Of them, 677 showed suspect 299.95 Whiripes! Supreme Av 269.95 CBS 21” Table TV, Metal TV, moheg., 1955 FM, aluminized tube, : 
them, Let sok, eahepee?, 900. aed an ", Red weed, blonde, 1955 .... 419.95 Gib cdiiae 
arate samples are needed.iof being diabetes victims. Of Washer : 3 weed, mahogeny, 1955 419.99 Philo 17", Redio-Phone-TV, Seaen'ite Sh” td Mab: te son 599.95 Kely 159 
Health Department officials de-|this number, so far, 592 have | 289.95 CBS 21” Toble TY, or ela O $16 oe tag ne ~ “haan 11-FT. Refri _ 
cided that asking residents to|been more extensively tested, 299.95 Maytag Automatic Washer, weed, blonde, 1955 $144 mohogeny, 1955 ........ Refrigerator etrigerator 
g and Freezer 


249.95 Admiral Side Tuning 24” TV, woed 


submit to two hblooddirawingiand of these 292 were diaz 1934 


injections would be asking too|nosed as suffering diabetes $99.95 Norge Autometic Wether | Auto, Defrost, De Lane, 
much. Some 170 of those positively toe Oe. ie 899.95 Nat. Adv. Nat. Advertised 189.95 Nat. | 1955 17-inch $1 69 


The piggy-bank samplingidiagnosed had no previous 
technique proved the happy knewledge they had diabetes 
solution. Its very novelty was\The other 122 knew they had Westinghouse Automatic Washer, 1955 model ssdtel) sialhisasiat 17” Table TV 

; : - " Ss ’ ad ’ ; 
credited with inducing some re diabetes but were not under chancer. mahogany = 1955 Mahogany, 1955 
luctant residents to participate supervised treatment. 500.08 Matteniy fe i ere bienae 
in the twin screening project. Those tested for syphilis ’ ET eS I OE +o 5 40: $229 : $88 $89 $117 $9098. Notelne 10644, Geis oa 

The blood-collecting units numbered 16,843, since many os pe ge age $909 
used consist of a hollow, steri-\agreed only te participate in mplete Aviomatic Defrost, 


lized needle protruding from|the diabetes detection phase. 49.95 dat. Advertised 21° with 269.95 Motercle 21” “Teble TY 34095 tetercle 21” Conia. TV 499.95 Hotpoint 11-5-¥. Stenderd Refrigerator. 
a rubber-sleeved and stoppered Of this number, 1783, or more doors, console TY AM-FM.phone,  eluminixed tube, wood, $179 sivminized tube, UH) VHF, $212 Complete Aute. Defrost, 2dr. 1955 .... $244 
vial, and the vacuum main-'than one out of every 10 were eluminized 5 wood, $366 mahoghny, 1955 .. PA wood, blonde, 1955 .. te i 
tained by a closed-end glass mg wah Prawe ve He wed syphilis | — | 289.95 Metorcla 21° Toble TV, 319.95 Motorola 21” De Luxe Console . = idee 6 on — some $319 
collar tip. The glass collar runs or be in doubtful status. 349.95 Nat. Advertised 24° with lvminized tube, wood, VV > GRaSeeS: SDS . 4%. 
under the flexible rubber| Leaders said only 610 of 219.95 Hamilton Elec. 199.95 Hamilton Elec, Seer aaaniie 0 . onthe ihe ' blonde, 1955 $188 wood, mahogany, 1955 540.98 Kelvi ~ 
sieeve these 1783 screened as “posi- Automatic Automatic cheinized whe, weed, $399 339.95 Motersle 21° Console TY, 329.95 Motorola 21” De Luxe Console : a - Deluxe Refrigerator, 
| a oe r mahogany, 1955 cluminized tube, UHF/VHF TV, eluminized tube, UHF/ a-deor, 1955 . 
In operation, the blood col- Uves” were previously known DRYER DRYER mahogony weed 1955 ‘$199 VHF, weed mah 1955 $199 
lector inserts the hollow needle Peer enon. rT 1956 1958 Hy, cheddesd ee See 90096 Rinerson 91° Bide 7 aj Coo 1090 hen ge Portable TV 
. : Ses i S um merson ’ unm . merson r e ° 
into an arm vein, and with his Phage anti-sy — rsa $ weed; mahogeny, 1955 159 sole, swivel bose, wood, $139 table model, metal, $119 399.95 Philee 11-Ft, 299.95 10-Cu.-Fr. 
finger breaks the glass collar ere given to ose $129 129 mahogony, 1955 ebony, 1956 2 Doo 
The v h ulls the sub- found suspect, and all cases of 389.95 Zenith 21" top Tuning Console a % of KELVINATOR 
»e vacuum then p TV Emerson 17” Side Tuning Teble TV, 239.95 Emerson 71 side § tuni . 
ject’s blood into tite vial end. (either disease were referred to blonde, 1935. 0 $277 — aa $114 Ganttned she, tbls $1 , Refrigerator 1966 Retrigerater 
Atte. Defroster, 1956 4 


After this first sample is ob- Private physicians or health de- green, 1956 model, wood, maheg., 1955 

ri artment clinics for observa- 179.95 Zenith 21” Side Tuning Tobi iy : pe .. 

tained, the operator, leaving on a Mesos a r 239.95 Hotpoint 1955 rv. pa aeon FF . "$1 — bse BS: — can Toble TV, 24 9s treoreen 21" Side Tuning Table $248 $199 
The program is a joint proj- A Electric DRYER ep, ES 34 mahogony, 1953 $149 blonde, 1956 

lect of the Health Department ufo. ecrric 389.95 Emerson 721” | 209.95 Motercla 17" Teble TV, General Electric 14” 


7° . jel ' doors, wood, cluminized tube, wood, 
Firémen’s Group division and the United States ‘ biende, 1955 $1 bionde, 1955 


Public Health Service. $ 58 .* $ 
Chooses Officers |_ Heading up Public Health 939.95 meyieg Avtomotic Drver, 1958 
Service's participation was 


The Firemen's Association, John L. Pendleton. Anyone de- ROA 91” Top 399.95 Nat. Adv. 288.95 Meterela 695.00 Meterola 
e* 2 


CONSOLE | | 14” Portable TV Avert 


AM-FM PHONO 


ZENITH 


Hotpoint 10-f. Stenderd Refrigerator, 
Table Model TY Automatic Defrost, 1955 


Local 36, International Asso- siring further information may 1956 Norge Avtometic Electric Dryer .......;. oa ”“ = 
ciation of Fire Fighters, has call National 86000, Extension Tuning Table TV “ mary Console TV 19” Color TV Set 419.95 Deepfreeze 1 399.95 Deepfreeze Yr 
9, 


elected officers and directors as 2185. 4 A Dr th heat Aluminized Tube 
follows: sa sae Sent, 1908. cathe Gm +169 Metal Ebony 1955 mahogany 1955 Built-in UHF Tuner eet Rate ee CHEST UPRIGHT 


George E. Tacey, Engine Ce | <i $144 $1 wal $1 68 $399 FREEZER FREEZER 


Devine, fireboat, re-elected 1st) “Ser. , $196 
Peel, Engine Co. 22, re-elected| 

Elected directors are M. H. Paris. Gouenmere | 299.95 piste Wnteils Oak 499.95 Deopiresze 16-F. Upright Freezer, 1985 
Clarke, M. W. Timko, H. C.| SUGARINE 399.95 Not. Advertised Hi-Fi Console fm hey” speeds, "$119 Capehort Hi-Fi i 6597 $949 


vice president; Alvin E. Davis, | 3 
Engine Co. 6 elected, 2d vice @ 1955 Nerge Avitemotic Super Electric Dryer, $169 | 
+g} HMIGH-FIDELITY BARGAINS {rice sn vote recne, 10 
A 289.95 Nerge Avte ignition Ges Dryer, 4-wey Dry 
treasurer; and G. W. Rock, En- : ~—_ Ee CONCENTRATED md 
| SWEETENER 269.93 Not. Adv. Hi-Fi Console AM- 169.95 Nat. Advertited Console Radio.  Capshort Hi Console 3Speed | punial 99. Upright Preeser, 1988 . 
Hemingway, cs Atnipp, A. P.| | ie Diedetics. Overwelghts aN nm Jaques 3 speeds, |! tuber mahogany, 1955 - oi we 
DeGeorge, R. C. Basford, J. R ee ee Page $177 199,95 Emerson AM Redie-Phone, “re ‘795 


ai, reelected president; D. 249.95 Norge ‘Deluxe Gas Dryer, 1956 1986 
president; J. E. Zeis Engine Co. | : | 4-way dry 
21, re-elected secretary; A. M.! ; 
gine Co. 12, re-elected sergeant-| = Te Pi Phone, 3 encode, 12 Seana, 3° totale, soneeees 
at-arms. ) For Home Use tubes, 3 tpeckers, ‘ose > 69 mahogony, 1955 . mahogony, |956 
1. # PE. ” - tie Electric, 24°" once, speeds, weed, . 
Arendes, E. K. Sweeney, D. J. PURE-HARMLESS 269.95 Admiral 30" Avtomatis : rie , $199 5 speeds, wend, $108 Sa a ee ae 319.95 Mayteg &-Ft, | | 299.95 Kelvinator 7-F1, 


Plass, C. R. Hawkins, W. P. ECONOMICAL Oven, 1955 ......, 419.95 Ned. Advertived 21" Conmies “PO” Comb, TY-Redio-Phono, slide tun- CHEST CHEST 
| [ x TV-Redio-Phone, side tun- 199.95 Emerson Hi-l .Phone, 3 ine weed, 

Waldenmaier, P. it... Burthe, useiaaied non- fattening | 299.95 Nationally fpmous 36” Ges Ronge with 3- on, weed, bhende, $028 S2SB speeds. weed. $112 cadens, 008 $198 FREEZER FREEZER 
+e .» & » Oe Oe » ths 1948 


. , heur timer, complete with set of pots s mohogeny, 1955 1988 
Kefauver, J. A. Krahling, J. D. ; 148 7 Combi neti ; 

: : . 2 1 aah : . Capechart WI-A OC , 3. Speed 479.95 Capehert Hi-Fi mbination 
wat hk aoe | 4-02. Size Bottle Only 75¢ ond pone, 1998 Soned Phonogrochs GQ Qy Mame Gage ith jor $357 $166 $166 
nea 6 _____|_ AF F000 & cave stones evenvuncas 299.95 Hotpoint 39” Stenderd Avtemetic mahegany, 1955 s mohogany, 1955 recorder ’ 
Range, 1955 


399.95 Hotpoint 39” Deluxe Automatic Electric $238 099.98 Kelvinator 16-M. Upright Presser, 1966 $366 


foto | SMALL APPLIANCES |... 3 


Oven, 1955 
349.95 Hotpoint 39” Super Deluxe Auto. Single $997 6.95 Farber Chrome Relish 39.95 Auto. French Fryer ond E 34 Pe. i" Electric Drill | | 499.95 Norge 17-F. Upright Freezer, iss... 9999 


Son Kes fate eee om S00 Ee Pl O98] | mone on TOO 


339.95 Kelvinetor 40" Super Deluxe Single Oven $] 55 . - . 579.95 LEONARD 
Automatic with reisable deep well, 1955 (Kelvinator) 16-FT. 


419.95 Hotpoint 39” Super Deluxe Auto. Single $198 13.95 7 pc. Stainless 4.95| ne Sanselersanr 19.98 UPRIGHT 


Oven with Lighted Push Buttons, 1955 Steel Kitchen Tool Set saosin Sane, Tadic FREEZER 
Avie. ne sterege drawer, ne 


1958 
$299 
deep well, 1955 69.95 apt. size Port. Bec. 29.95 Philo Persone! size 


11995 Kanner 40” ulus age Orato cropesemn poe 39-99) | wae | -- USE TODD’s — 


299.95 Kelvineter 40" Super Deluxe Single Oven 


: Senecmeaani|.. GASY PAY 


‘ eke ig Ke 95 Farber Ch 8.95 Child's Howdy 
998 AA 1 ins wih, nt $7 | | Tn” on 9-98 | Sian’ acec” 5.95] [sce voe oom 


RCA 36” Electric, ne clock end timer; 1985 $166 Admiral New 1956 S-sp. Aute. 


RCA 40” Gas C. P., with Griddle, Clock, Timer, $966 . ; 2 Aas ryiieb nny 39.95 29.95 epee tn 17.88 


Ber-B-Quer; 1955 : Sow 


is @ scientifically RCA 36” Gas, no clock and timer, 1955 8.50 Burgess Electric 
belanced deg feed. Meade of Point Spray Gun .. 4.99 


349.95 Kelvinator 40” Deluxe single even with Benus 
Broiler and Reisable Deepweil, 


real- : , 
ly ge for Caper... (cats toe). Compare oo oy es 499 


gvaranteed ingredients with other : Rie any aioe. Gt 


BANQUET CANNING 7 
COMPANY DISTRIBUTORS «'ST. LOUIS « MO. 


Ate "at : THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES 
. : / , e . od Friday, November 35, 1958 


BFREE PARKING FOR OVER 1,000 CARS - OPEN UNTIL 9 P.V.m 
At Last! The Mew1ook in Shopping Centers Comes 
to Southeast Washington and Southern Maryland 


JOIN THE FUN...JOIN IN THE SAVINGS DURING THE BARGAIN-PACKED 
“s 


Grand 0 


r 


iV oot 


a: 
a re 


J St dae —— Ie sete 
c. Anes yp St ~~ Ph me oF 


ne SPS? ala 


7 


Country Music Festival 


WITH ‘COUSIN’ BOB BANKSTON’ AND THE 


HAPPY MELODY BOKS 


You've seen them on Arthur 


. you've 


*: 2 7 an 
2 " Fe i. heard them on radio station | (95 
are a* WPGC... now meet John and 7) — | 
ar 4 Bill Garry and all the boys i * 
| SiN i IN PERSON at Eastover’s big 
j oS 4 « 


5a er S Shear Godfrey's shows . . 


wo p as 


SiS ater 
% ey 2 were 


Indian Head Road at the District Line 77" rns. 


IN PERSON 
It’s the biggest news for shoppers ever to hit Southeast Washington and Southern Maryland... 


TODAY AND SATURDAY 
NOW NEAR YOUR FROM 5 TO 8 P.M. 
Now you 


3 6 of Americas 


tinest Sfores! 


WITH HUNDREDS OF GRAND OPENING SPECIALS! 


a really big, really modern shopping center like you’ve read about elsewhere .. . 
HOME! Now you can get downtown selection without downtown inconvenience. 

can enjoy one-stop parking with 36 stores lined up side by side! Parking’s a breeze with 
space for over 1,000 cars on paved, lighted street-level areas. Come out. Bring the family. 
You'll find hundreds of amazing bargains during the big Grand Opening Celebration! 


LAST 2 DAYS TO WIN! NOTHING TO BUY! Pe 
NOTHING TO WRITE BUT YOUR NAME! ae 
ENTRIES 


JUNIOR MODE BOOTERY 
Shoes from Cradle thru College 


KINNEY’S SHOES 
Fine Shoes for all the Family * 


MEENEHAN’S HARDWARE 
The Hardware Man has the Quality Lines 


ADELINE SHOP 
Women’s & Children’s Apparel 


ARISTO CLEANERS 


Laundry, Dry Cleaning, Dyeing, Tailoring 
Shoe Repair Service 


BROOKE’S FLORIST 
Artistry in Flawers 


CITIZENS BANK OF MARYLAND 
Complete Banking Services 


EASTOVER BARBER SHOP 
Special Attention to Children 


EASTOVER LIQUORS 
Complete selection of Liquors, 
Wines and Beer 


EASTOVER VALET 
Laundry, Pressing & Shoe Repair 


FANNIE MAY GANDY SHOP 


THE CHERNER MOTOR CO. is displaying this 
new 2-dr sedan at the Eastover Shopping Center 
all during the Grand Opening. Contest ends this 
Saturday, November 26, 1955, at 8:00 P.M. Win- AT 
ner will be drawn at 8:30 P.M.; you need not 
be present to win. Come in— regis- ALL 
‘ter in as many different stores as ’ 


you wish! There’s still timelto STORES. 


be the lucky winner! 


MILLER’S INTERIORS 


Finest in Slipcovers, Draperies, 
Upholstery, Furniture, etc. 


G. C. MURPHY 
The Complete Variety Store 


PEOPLES DRUG STORE 
Registered Pharmacist on Duty at all Times 


RICHIE’S JEWELRY 
Nationally Famous W atches and, Jewelry 


ROBERT RUSSELL GIFTS 


IF YOU LIVE IN OR NEAR THESE COMMUNITIES 


EASTOVER IS THE FIRST COMPLETE 
SHOPPING CENTER NEAR YOUR HOME! 


CONGRESS HEIGHTS BRYAN’S ROAD MARLOW HEIGHTS 
POTOMAC HEIGHTS ~— MARSHALL HALL - LA PLATA 
FOREST HEIGHTS ACCOKEEK BEL ALTON 
FOREST HILLS PISCATAWAY WALDORF 
FENWICK GLASSMANOR CLINTON R. 


OXON HILL SOUTH LAWN CAMP SPRINGS a 
- WM. &@ A. BUS STOPS RIGi 


OXON RUN PARK TEMPLE HILLS INDIAN HEAD 
: 


: 


Really Fresh Candies 


FISCHER'S BAKERY 
Experts on Wedding and 
Birthday Cakes 


FOOD TOWN 
Your Complete City of Foods 


GRETA STEVENS 
Exclusively Your Feminine Apparel 


HIGH’S 


Highest Quality Dairy Products 
at Reasonable Prices 


Landmark for Hungry Americans 


IN EASTOVER 


; 


Complete Line of Hallmark Cards 


SACKS MEN'S WEAR 
Home of Nationally Known Brands 


SANDY SUE KIDDIE SHOP 
Children’s Apparel & Shoes 


SOUTH CAPITOL TV. 


AND APPLIANCE CORP, 


Radio-TV Sales & Service; Complete 
Line of Records 


TOY FAIR 
The Right Toy for the Right Age 


VINCENT ET VINCENT 
Hatr Stylist W ith Supertor Know-How 


‘PASSA LAGAAAAAALI ib ibaeaae! 


. * 


Associated Press 


The Pope and Grethel 


Pictured yesterday at Castelgandolfo, Pope Pius XII holds 
a chaffinch on his finger. The familiar European bird was 
found 18 months ago in the Papal Gardens and was named 


Grethel by Sister Pasqualina, 


a German nun who is one of 


the Pope’s personal attendants. Grethel lives uncaged at 


Casteigandolfo and also at the 


Vatican. 


Pope’s Viewing of Christ 
‘Singular and Significant’ 


By George W. Cornell 


NEW YORK, Nov. 4 W@W 
Pope Pius XII’s account of hav- 


ing seen Christ is the most un- 
usual supernatural event re- 
corded in modern church an- 
nals. 

“So far as has been reported, 
it-is unique in our age,” said| 
Father Herbert Rogers, Ford-| 
ham University theologian. 

Not since the fourth century 
has an occurrence of this kind 
had the weight of such author- 
ity behind it. 

“Truly singular and signifi- 
eant,” said C_iholie scholar, 
Msgr. John Dvuugherty. 

“It brings out the proximity 
of heaven aud earth, which so 
often escapes us in our busy, 
active lives.” 

Not since the days of the 
Apostles has there been a re- 
eorded vision of Christ more 
vivid or specific than that by! 
the Roman Catholic egg 

Italian accounts in) 
the depths of his il Ben ‘last! 


ther, is not part of the teaching 
given by Christ to the church. 


“A ©atholic sho accepts a 


private fevelation does so not) 


on the infallible teaching au- 
thority of the church, but be- 
cause of the credibility and 
integrity o° the person to Whom 
the revelation has been given.” 

As late as 195i, the Vatican 
cautioned agaisist excessive 
readiness to believe in reported 
visions by highly emotional per- 
sons. 

Monsignor Dougherty gave 
this chronology of such inci- 
dents since the time of the 
apostles. 

1. Pope Sylvester. 

2. In the 12th century, Saint 
Fratucis of Assisi, on an island 
in Italy’s Lake Trasimene, told 
of seeing Christ on the cross— 
and of the stigmata — the 
marks of Christ's crucifixion— 


sn appearing rake the body of Saint 


Francis him 
3. In the 14th century, Saint 


year, but in complete wakeful-'Catherine of Sienna, Italy, de- 
ness, the Pope “saw beside Nis scribed manifestations of Christ 
bed the gentle figure of Jesus,” |to her. 
and that Christ spoke to him.|; 4. In the 17th century, Saint 
Msgr. Dougherty of the Im-| Margaret Mary, a French nun, 
mactlate Conception Seminary, jhad a series of visiqns in which 
Darlington, N. J., said that only|Jesus appeared in ‘full figure, 
once before, so far as cursory|urging greate~ devotion to him. 
research could determine, has|It was this phenomenon that 
the Lord appeared to a Catho- started the movement of Cath- 
lic Pope. lolic devotions to the Sacred 
That was in the 300s when Heart, as a symbol of love. 
the Emperor Constantine had; In.Catholic teachings, there 
halted the savage Christian | are two kinds of visions. 
rsecutions in Rome. The; One is the imaginative vi- 
ision came to Pope Sylvester|sion, in which the object is 
as he was consecrating the) only a mental conception—like 
Mother Church of St. John Jacob’s ladder. Such “intellec- 
Lateran there. \tual visions” of Christ — seen 
A Mosaic in the historic) with the eyes open or closed— 
ehurch today recalls the mys- were reported by Saint Teresa 
tical episoce. of Avila, Spain, in the 16th 
Although the modern Pope's ‘century. 
deep piety and high intellect; The other is the corporeal 
doubtlessly will produce wide vision in. which the figure is 
acceptance of the authenticity | externally present, or a super- 
of his vision, church scholars|natural power so modifies the 
emphasized an individual Cath-| retina of the eye as to peeeees 
dlic may accept or -eject it. | the same effect as if the 
“It isn’t bi.ding on the faith-' actually were present. 
ful,” Father Rogers said. Pope Pius’ description, 
Father John Sheerin, editor| his vision apparently wa of 
of the Catholic World, noted:| the corporeal type—seen with 
“A private revelation, such his eyes open and in a wakeful 
as that given to the Holy Fa-| state. 


~ TONIGHT 


8:00 P.M. 


GRIFFITH STADIUM 
CARDOZO 


Public High School Champs 
MEET 


GONZAGA 


Metropolitan Catholic League High School Champs 


You're really going to see some football! It'll be an 


exciting evening packed with fun and pleasure for 
every one! Bring the family—fill,the park! 


$1 GENERAL ADMISSION—*2°FOR BOX SEATS 


Get them at Fairway Sports Shop, Mitchel’s Sports 
Store, Sports Center, Touchdown Club and the lobby 
of The Washington Post and Times Herald. 


Sponsored by The Washington Post and Times Herald 
and the Touchdown Club, Proceeds go to publie and 
Catholic schools, 


+ 


~~ eee we — ee P 
A 


MID-SEASON 


men’ 
wo 


° Single-breasted 2 and 3-button 
coats 


© Smart natural-look styling 
® Tailored by top makers 
® Blues, greys, browns, tans 


An unusually busy fall season has left 
us with a group of our most popular 
suits in incomplete size ranges. And 
what a terrific break for you! You save 
from $12 to $17 on every one of these 
wanted business suits. Check the size 
charts below and then come on the run! 


‘ 
Washington Store, 2nd Floor 
33|34!35/36'37|38'39|40|41|42/43'44/46/48/50) 
Regular | | V2) 3} 6 9/10/15) 4/20) 2/17/12; S| 3) 
Short 1) 5/10)14/14/10| 2) 6} 3) | | 
Long 12 S17) 5\15|_ 17\10) } | 
Extra long | 4 jayy a 


Stout aaa 
Short Stout 


Silver Spring Store, Street Floor 
33 34/35/36 37 38 39/40'41/42'43/44 46|48 50) 
/ 2) 3! 5! 6 812) 3/11) WT Si 
‘¥e7 ooo} fa ya | hc 
1 2) 1) 4jiyy 12) 12} 6 2h | 
fa Tuy | 


Regular 
Short | 
Long 
Extra Long 


PARKington Store, Street Floor ~ 
34)35)36)37|38|39|40'41/42)43' 44/46/48 50) 
Regular 1 2 5) 6 7/10/12) 2/10) 1/11) 9) 2 | 
Short Hf 7iojio oF spar Tt 
1} ¥) 3) 4j12} 212 
BRAM. SE 


al 


Ag -pe 


eget 
- » 


Shop Early, Shop Late Today at AM 3 Heeht 
Ce. Stores. Washington 9:30 te 3 P.M. 
Suburban Stores 16 A.M. to 9:30 P.M. 


CLEARANCE! 


Pick from hardy worsteds, the 
backbone of the smart business 
wardrobe, or find your choice 
in good-looking flannels, 
gabardines, sharkskins. 


Men's Clothing, 2nd Fl, Washington: 
Street Fl, Silver Spring & PARKington 


1.50 Men’s Wool Hose 


GIe 


Silver Spring p. PARKington seh 


Imported from Germany! 


Supple wool ribs with nylon-rein- 
forced heel and toe—the kind of soft 
luxury you thought you couldn’t af- 
ford—for just 89c. Ankle and garter 
lengths in popular 6x3 ribs. Sizes 
rconpecnceobecae:t pea pata 


$1 Helanca Stretch Hose and 
Combed Cotton Argyles 


Throw away those size lists! Helanca 
nylon—the yarn with the permanent 
wave—makes these comfortable 
socks that fit any size foot, perfectly 
and forever, Solid colors and patterns 
in this season’s smart shades. Also 
lush cotton argyles from a famous 
mill, sizes 104% to 13. 


69ce 


3 for $2 


Men's ee, Street Fl., Washington, 
Silver Spring, PARK ington 


the hecht. co. 


Washington, Silver Spring, PARKington 


$ 
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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
vs Friday, November 25, 1958 95 


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! ALL 3 HECHT CO. STORES OPEN EARLY-OPEN LATE 

Silver Spring & PARKington 10>: Bee ©.30: 


7 AN SS AN By AN 


Men’s Famous 
1.98 to 3.98 Gift 


MUFFLER 


® Wool 

® Nylon 
® Rayon 
® Dacron 


1.39 


If he’s dreaming of something warm and 
soft for Christmas, here’s your chance to 
grant his wish! These mufflers come in an 
assortment of colors and patterns to exceed 
his fondest ‘expectation, in a choice of ma- 
terials to please the most exacting at a price 
to thrill the budget-minded. 


Men's Furnishings, & Fl., Washington 
Silver Serine and Panitineton 


« 

~ 
£ ~ 
‘ og 


« 
; 


The Hecht Co. Puts 
Gift Savings in the 
Palm of Your Hand! 


<3.88 


@ Soft-as-Butter Imported 
Capeskins 

® Wool-Lined or Unlined Pigskins 

® Velvet-Smooth Imported 
Deerskins 

® Distinctive, Costly Suedes 


For 10 months, our buyer worked 
hand-in-glove with the top name in the 
industry to bring you these savings 
when you need them most. Every pair a 
truly distinguished offering in costly 
leathers, whip stitched and hand-sewn 
«+. lined or unlined to suit his fancy. 
Grey, tan, brown or black in sizes 71% 
to 11. Lat us gift box them for you to 
complete this handsome present. 


Men's Furnishings Street Fl. Waskingtoa 
* Siiver Spring and PARKingtos 


hecht co. 


eee 
Ne os mm * 


MEN 


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Our Own High 


Count Broadcloth 


SHIRTS 


®@ Sanforized 
i .99 


@® Mercerized 

®@ Combed 

Month in and month out we sell thousands 
of these shirts ... sure proof that they'll 
make the Christmas gift par excellence. And 
the new London short spread collar is a dis- 
tinctive addition. Also in regular collar with 
ocean pearl buttons, barrel cuffs. White, 
blue, pink; sizes 14-17. Cd 


Our Popular University Button-Down 
Sh 2.99 


Men's Furnishings, Street Fl.. Washington, 
Siiver Spring, PARKington 


; or. 
Pei 


Washington, Silver Spring, PARKington 


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ae * on 264 A) Oe 2 OD 


if ee ear eee S Frills’ on Volga Don Cont Cotialand 
? of the canal and the an hy-' 


Better High Schools Called Need! ES | 2 an a ye 


Sauins aliees of cbeammesd 
i rubles, 


By Bernard D. Nossiter - hay = chairman of Bay J, The panelists concentrated 
taf Reporter tomie Energy Commis- on the roles that three institu- | 
Better high schools are need- on, at Ww ie aod —— “ tions — secondary schools, in- United Press 
ed to upgrade American skills.'shortage of scientists a ee Slay in ‘develoving schools’ | Celebrate Their 80th 
a National Manpower Council | gineers. programs. Dr. Clarence Faust, president| Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Hart- 
report concluded today. | The National Selenee Founda-| © Union help to apprentice-| + us. Fund for the Advance-| ley, both 96, of Sagle, Idaho, 
More: spending on éducation tion has reported that the So-jship and vocational training) 41+ of Education, said the| celebrate their 80th wedding | 


and other training will raise we on Py cette i et TS Gan cooperation between high schools were caught be-| anniversary today. The cou- 


the level of skills, step up eco- as this country in 1955, the Armed Forces and other|'ee®, two objectives, prepar-| ie believes this sets a record — 


nomic progress and strengthen | agree on 12 Points veloping kill or 


em security, the study) a. council's report found ® Stronger wvocational guid. ame — —_ ee Tenn., when they were 16. 
2 general points‘on which its ance im sc ee “apprenticeships” in trades or 


conference conferees agreed. ‘“Improve- © Federal a} 1 surv professions. This, he said, . 
of 69 experts held last spring. ment of the Nation's secondary | o¢ saumees meek. . °Y5 would make the schogl-leaving Trial Is P ostponed 


The council is a private group school system” was stressed as time less abrupt. 24 

se|Roles of Three Institutions | 1 stor Secretary James P.|—Judge Vincent A. Carroll 
leaders and industrialists. It for skill acquisition.” The 208-page re included| Mitchell said “our margin of|yesterday postponed until Jan. 
was set up by President Eisen-' Besides more spending on|ussions hid at thvn-shrdlucm| advantage” over Russia “is fast|9 trial of Milton Schwartz and 
hower in 1951 under the aus-'schools, the study urged: ‘the papers and summaries of|diminishing.” He urged end-|his wife, Rosalie, on charges 


The report summarized a ties. 


council-sponsored 


of 16 educators, editors, labor “the key to broadening the base 


pices of Columbia University.| © Attracting and holding/discussions held at the springling discrimination againstiof performing the abortion 
The council's study follows more good teachers. conference on Columbia’s Har-| workers because of age, sex or| that killed supermarket heiress 
closely a warning from Adm.' © Adult education in school) riman Campus in Tuxedo, N. Y.\other reasons. Mrs., Doris Jean Ostreicher, 1320 Wilson Bivd. JAckson 4-120 


institutions concerned with de-|fS ,Switents for college and) tn the United States. They 


were married at Lenoir, 


PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 


athwawéi nae 


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te a 
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Oh the Tan Af Distribution Firms Unite |[ricrt morose ||" “*"natscei's sa ar 
To Fight Gas Legislation U.S. Orders | sv.aras m Sea tcasl pines wu et bo 


. 
B . minimum wage required in| courts. 
BETTER KEEP a sharp eye wees Ae a eee, NEW YORK, Nov. 24 a Heyke declared that, “By onds un 
on these fellow ames; units as bu-| coordi atts of 7 
Brahms, urbane owner of — ny Long and Sues Manion plato “ie nee 5 to-| local a Oedenahie’ te Coun. 6 oal dD e als | 
gether to wage a unitéd fight'cil intends to inform the public Me ator 


‘against legislation which would/that passage of the bill, which) “7. 1 abor Department says 
exempt natural gas producers/will relieve natural gas peo it is alerting all Federal 
weve from Federal regulation, it was'\ducers from effective oe — . grou Virgiale 
| bee | to| tral Pennsylvania and Virginia 
|reputation asa mixologist him-| 1»: c.rstoue ie the new announced today ment oi is contrary seal companion mast pest sieé- 
self. sparkplug im the Hi Hat Trio|_ They contend thet the Harris-\the publte interest. ble bonds-on all future Govern. 
| The combined efforts of pad at the Ambassador Ho-|Fulbright bill, coming up before} He asserted, “The campaign! oon: contracts. 

this pair produced the (te) Herbie is the new violinist, Congress in January, could jwill be carried on by local gas} Under a Federal District 
| Frokcrw 4 per gg ae — \replacing Harold Veo who re-lincrease gas prices to con-\companies in their own com-|Court order, the firms oe "seo 
LUXUSY LINER niog sopeened at the theater |°¢"tly moved across town t0/sumers by $800 million annually,| munities, There Will be high/ bonds ee cate oe 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE fn the phar of the same name. the Sheherazade, because the producers would| pressure, expensive advertising gh m — selling ae 
"Wi sual Some said the drink was as one be free to charge what the|campaigns such as used hy the ropes verses s 

4 stimulating as the play— HAVE YOU been on the/traffic would bear. proponents of the bill who have phone the firms won a 

w ? The W The group, to be known asialready spent over a million} On Monday s 

maybe more so. agon? The Wagon Lunch at the C a tilot Local Gas Com-land a half dollars for its|preliminary injunction against 
The latest project is to con-|‘h¢ Purple Tree, that is. The)‘e Counch o the minimum wage order on 


Manger management tly |panies, will be headed by John/ passage.” 
coct a libation in honor of} te iiced thie feature in the |Heyke, president of the Brook-| Gas producing companies|grounds they could not afford 


\Tyrone Power, who is‘ sched- irms il have led the fight|to pay the wage. 
juled for an appearance soon oy ee oo gn ote the Sonlochen tor "jegislation ending Fed. Federal District Judge Ed- 
jthe National. The mixers have)”, ., sae ; a ees | will include New York's Con-leral control over rates charged| ward Tamm, who granted the 
‘coolly decided to name the|* °° to eat with their drink- solidated Edison Co. Long|by independent producers for| injunction, also set the bond— 
‘drink the “Power” cocktail but |'™*- Island Light Co., New Jersey’s\natural gas sold in interstate | 40 cents a ton for the Pennsyl- 
the exact ingredients are still) | Serlousiy, the Wagon |puniic Service Electric and Gas, /eommerce. They have contend-| vania and 70 cents a ton for the 
© secret. Lunch (it's brought to your |i nited Gas Improvement Co.,/ed that the regulation dis-| Virginia firms for each ton to) - 
| ow Satie yi a a Ba va of Philadelphia, Philadelphia|courages the risk involved in| be delivered under the Govern- WARNER THEATRE 

. Pitch,» gned busy Ww : hunting for new reserves of; ment contrac 13th & E See. N.W.. Washi 4,0. ¢. 
MIGUEL VEGA, the noted relaxing ¢ Electric Co. and Commonwealth eo . ngton 6 
‘Latin American soloist, has the lounge while they dine Natural Gas Co., Norfolk, Va.jnatural gas. The bond is required to as 
foyer es o. ne ee band! at midday. The “wagon” fea- — 
at the Madrilion for a limited| tures sandwiches and ht 
engagement to help the restaw-| lanches. 84 pen Tonight to 9... Saturday to 6 


jrant in its 21-week salute to the ane 
Pan American countries. 


nnapols "Johnny Robb, Madrilion | A DATE to remember—Jazz Store Hours: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday, 10 to 6; Thursday and Friday, 10 to 9. 

musical maéstro, was fortu. |steat Art Totum is scheduled 

—- nate enongh to get Vega on | ‘to appear at Olivia Davis’ Patio 
the bandstand for at least a (Lounge starting Monday, Nov. OT IN LILLE LE LOTTI LT CIS Sepa teeta. 
Hote! Manger Hay-Adams week. The singer formerly 28. The piano artist will a pear Ri ata name eee Gere: poe: oan en tae bees Pa ete 55 “ae es . Si ae se 
\for one week and the Tatum Seon sence a oon Sa |e oe ce ta eae Sa 


By Paul Herron 


Wk 
*, 


Presents |. 4 


The ae) group also will feature Slam 
Cecktail Lounge $1.20 Admission — No. Cover || Stewart on bass and Everett 
No Minimum te see Barksdale on guitar. 


and : et | 
peo goer a ROEBUCK AND C 


Presents _—_— 


ons 


and his 


Handsome Olivia. Davis’ DIXIELAND 


sited Pe | PATIO LOUNGE At Its Best 


711 13th St. NW. ME. 8-21.2 | Inthe Relaxed 
J ACK - NEW ORLEANS 


. . . | sate se is Ee: i OE sR ROR TORIC. ae ae Wa Pe oe CR Pans 
L OPENING MONDAY - _ 
MURRAY ‘ > Suki Yaki Booker Coleman Trico ee aS -™\\ : The “New Look” Is the Harmony House “Custom” Look! 
* | a a Extraordinary Savings for a Limited Time Only! 
At the pine AT YOUR TABLE 1S CHARLES HOTEL 2 
fg |. Native style chinese Dishes | LOUNGE aah Sears Custom Made 


American Food— Excellente Bar 
Lench from 65¢ Dinner 1.25 up 


TAM ont 2 AM Dally —. Harmony House 


14 F Street N.W. nr. Union Station 
Private Dining Rooms 


<e HINESE ay aa «> | ——- Slip Cover for Chair 


' Maryland (Pan) Fried Chicken i Se a Sk, | MR OS MMR. con Bs, AS LOW AS 
___Air Conditioned | Prime Steaks @ Fresh Seafood ee I ae OL” ile Ba a 
COMPLETE DINNER MENU a i 2 A | . SaaS a : 
Special Children's Dinners 7 ee. | ee 
Spon 12.9 pm. daily f < i. sa gi 


were * cae Engg 3. eee © Choice of Regularly 99¢ Per Yard 
: as a SP Pee % ~ — “ad oo . cae Oe Harmony House Fabrics 


COCKTAIL LOUNGES 


: : a | ee ote tae oma BSS ® Choice of Modern, Traditional 
MARIANA } are - e Ses ~ eee Bie: Rips KOR aot Rae Pics and Floral Patterns 
ATTHE PIANO f P os Be se Es Se ite eS, MF ® Choice of Exclusive Harmony House 
; a : Be Sto Coordinated Colors 


¥ MOTEL , tain - $ F. Bs ee ~ eat 228 ee sah pO BS SS In addition to the fantastically low price, you select 
| CHEF SVANQUIST # e eS Boni ee : Ne ee ee : 5 te from designer type fabrics—right in your own home, if 
fi . ) SSS... BARON i s eh is iia > Bik _—— : : . ; e: you prefer. And that’s not all, the slip owe cut 
Vath AT K, LW. | E By eae i “mn Ge to 3 &A and fitted on Say furniture by Sears-trained — 
9s RE SERLED, Osttee Sho é:, a ae oe ye et SS OK OBS The job includes Sears own 10-Point Slip Cover Plan, 
Bove ow wie —— Bs . ie P Se UB, (es, 4% > S Sey = % another Sears exclusive service. Order your slip cov- 
ew Lune eee Lee Hi . agton ee - 3 : : Be as % 3 e 
The Purple Tree Lunch *Approved ae Hines oe , x 3 — es % Se: — ° te ers now from complete assortment. * For average chair 
Weekdays, from Neon to 2:30 | ae cs : with 1-cushion. 
ee Re ‘ oe 3 : er ; . Stig Cover Dept., Seart Bledeneburg, Wisconsin and Aritngtes 


, ThatRegiving Turkey ane ano vis CO-EDS x 
rn — pa cavauea Custom-Made Harmony 


ADA CAVALLO 
> No Minimum During Dinner Hour BUCKY LAWSON 


OPENING TONIGHT! ‘ DANCING AND rod ee ‘ 88 
) ‘ air wi usnion 
JACKIE LEE ( Tle eo ane iaee 


Sensational Coral Records’ ‘Star ‘ iz : eee _— Ueual Carrying Charge 

8 Shows Nitely: 7:30-—-10—12:15 | | : 

Dancing te, Jack Gorry’s Orchestra > <—Te* ; +f @ Choice of Special Group of $2.29 Per Yard Fabrics 
-< | @ Ask about Sears Free Decorating Service 


Sears exclusive 12-Point Custom Reupholstery Plan means careful 
DAF : | ‘s Pes attention Is given to the smallest detail. Skilled workmen trained 
NO COVER @ NO ADMISSION Wha | NSZafe OLY in “old master” tradition actually rebuild your furniture — not 


LoOTU S i4th & Now York Ave. 24 FEN > a Ei 2044. merely re-cover it. Take advantage of this saving opportunity te 
NA. 8-0600 9 -— Te. ) give furniture new life. Select now while the assortment is com- 

M ne es Pe plete. 

Harmony House Upholstery Dept., Sears Bladensburg, Wisconsin and Arlingtos 


Complete $2 ? ; Children's BEACH JOHNSON Sa. : Specially Sale Priced . . . For a Limited Time Only IJ 
a 


oo, “4 
; 
; ’ ae 
Si 7h ee a 
it ene 
A 
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Companion Feature! With Sears Exclusive 5-Point Plan! 


LADIES NITE TONITE Custom Made Draperies 


FREE ADMISSION——-NO COVER 
NO MINIMUM FOR ALL LADIES ‘|@ Perfect for Odd-Size Windows 


Alive—in Person—"Spectacular” B= |, peirect for Special Color Schemes 


“NIGHT in PARIS! = Pics rein tine 


qual 
featuring 28 of the Loveliest Girls in the World A= dco ig tome 


Produced by Komarova & Komaroff of New York's Latin Quartes = while there's variety galore of solid colors, floral, provincial 
igns. 


Michael’ Edwards—The Bob de Veye Trie— — i stract des 
Chris Viereck——Jeanne Michelle—The Casine =—— Drepery Dept., Seart Bladensburg, Wisconsin and Arlington 


Lovelies—Bob Simpson's Orch.—Nini Baker's Combe | 
$1 COVER | = Custom-Made Push-Button* 
—— Draw Drapery Tracks and Motor 
No Minimum—Ne Cover—Spend Only — . © Specially Seid Priced 
What You Like, Everything Extravagant —— © Included Up to 6-4, Widths 88 
but the Price — $7-50 Down $6 Monthly 9 
3 Shows Nightly: 8—10:30-——12:30 « = Usual Carrying Cherge 
asonable Prices : 


° P — *Push-Button draw drapery tracks are the latest in 
Dinners from $1.75 — modern home seseretonetor windows, deers 


to _ ee > 
‘~ ¥ a is “ “4 
ae ve EES 


ere 


Wes, “@-e ** 
SS. Y 


: ¥ ; 
oti ay = 
ioe! 
eek 


3 
7 
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york 


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Free Estimate! | 
Sears Custom Services 
for Slip Covers, Draperies 
Reupholstery and 
Traverse Drapery Tracks 


. $e 
mo ® 


a a 


Ss ated eat eh 


wy < 


RNa BAR 


For Each Foot Over 6-Pt. Add $1.00 Per Foot 
Sears Bladensburg, Wisconsin and Arlington 


D. C. Gales Tax . 
rchases or $20 or More! 
i 911 Bladensburg Rd. N.E. (2) ... Lincoln 7-7500 

) | ‘Wisconsin Ave, at Albemarle (16) . EMerson 2-1122 

14th & H Sts. N.W. Plan now to hold your : 2800 Wilson Bivd., Arlington .... JAckson 7-4900 


NA. 8-7700 ee Christmas party at the Casino 8455 Colesville Rd., Sliver Spring .. JUniper 9-9010 


THE WASHINGT®:> POST and TIMES HERALD 


28 


Friday, November 25, 1955 


/ 


we 


Sharp Rise in 55 Living Level Reported 


By Robert F. Morison 
Umited Press 


Americans have enjoyed one 
in- 
creases in their standard of liv- 


of their largest postwar 


ing the past year, the Federal 
Reserve Bulletin reported yes- 
terday. 

The monthly publication said 


due mainly to stable prices. 


Advertisement 


“Nearly all of the increase 


things to remember 


when your BASS 
COMES TO DINNER 


in dollar outlays over the past 
year represents a gain in real 
consumption, as average con- 
sumer prices have changed 
relatively little,” it said. “The 
growth in per capita real 
takings of goods and services 
durirng the past year was one 
of the largest in the postwar 
period.” 


come and 


the better living standard was 


ither 
place’ in the current quarter,” 
‘the Bulletin said. 


national preduct” now indi- 
‘cates a final total for the year 
of $387 billion, the Bulletin 
said, about $27 billion higher 
than last year. 

All major types of spending 
have contributed to the rise 
in the GNP, particularly con- 
sumer spending. In the third 
quarter consumer spending ran 
8 per cent ahead of the third 
‘quarter of last year and “a fur- 
se is apparently taking 


Personal consumption out- 


However, with production, In-| lays were running at an annual 
at rate of $256 billion in the third) 


sumer spending have outpaced 
growth in disposable income.” 

Consequently, the Bulletin 
said, “net personal savings fell 
from an annual rate of $21 bil- 
lion in late 1953 and early 1954 
to $16 billion in the third quar- 
ter of 1955. The ratio of such 
saving to disposable income has 
been running at about 6 per 
cent this year, the lowest since 
early 1951.” 

However, despite the use of 
credit to buy goods and ser- 
vices, the Bulletin said, “indi- 
vididuals have contirmued to add 
substantially” to their assets 
and savings. 


By Rowland Evans Jr. 
N. ¥. Herald Tribune News Service 


Sen. Walter F. (D- 
Ga), an influential vo in| 
Congress, appealed yesterday 
to both political parties to keep 
foreign policy out of the 1956 
slestion campaign. 

The chairman of the Senate 
Forei Relations Committee 
submitted to questions at a 
time the Eisenhower Adminis- 
tration was coming under the 
most vocal criticism for its for-) 
eign policies since it took office. 
| The attack was formally 
mounted at last week's Demo- 
cratic Party. meeting in Chi- 
cago. It has already brought a 
sharp rejoinder from Harold 
E. Stassen, President Eisenhow-' 
er’s disarmament assistant. Sec- 


retary of State John Foster) 


“We must assure the world | mittee, Sen. George notwith- 


that we are capable of having 
& non-partisan American for- 
eign policy and that, regard- 
less of who wins or loses in 
1956, our foreign program will 
gO on substantially as is. We 
must show that we are a ma- 
ture Nation.” 

here was no express criti- 
cism of Adlai E. Stevenson, 
Gov. Averell Harriman of New 
York, former President Harry 
S. Truman, Sen. Estes Kefau- 
ver of Tennesseé or any other 
Democratic Party leader. All 
these gave clear notice to the 
Administration last weekend 
that foreign policy is going to 

examined critically and 
from every angle between. now 
and next November. 


No Foreign Policy in Politics, George Pleads| 


sota and Sen. John Sparkman 
of Alabama. 


standing. These include Sen. 


soln Humphrey of Minne 
Wayne Morse of Oregon, Sen. 


THE PERFECT GIFT 
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employment 
Dulles has expressed his con-| Mr. Stevenson, was reported | scurate. 
cern to the President and may meanwhile to be planning a' Also, hundreds of words have changed 
have something to say public-/étadual increase in the critical | im meaning through the a In the 
ly at a news conference next) content of his foreign policy | lec, ct understandab —— 
week. | speeches. | using expressions, yet sti 
Sen. George, a pillar of Ad-| While Mr. Stevenson now ak cae Uumeless beauty. 
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Senate's weighty foreign af-|the 1956 foreign policy debate,| —. pom ae oe problems is 
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record rates, the Bulletin said.|\quarter, of which $18 billion; High rates of consumer 
“since the middie of the year| went for automobiles—50 per spending and record expansion 
A pack of cards... and a'|,.. price advances have been a|cent more than a year earlier,|of production facilities by busi- 
good round of his favorite |more important factor than the Bulletin said. |ness, both supported by heavy 
rd e! Ite relaxation (°¢@t tier.’ If personal income in Sep- | credit expansion, have com- 
oS | The Bulletin noted that out-|tember were continued at an | bined to push interest rates up, 
that always makes for good \put of goods and services in|annual rate it would total $307 | bringing about a change in the 
company and agoodevening. (the third quarter hit a record |billion—about $20 billion above | Federal Reserve Board's policy 
To score best ... be ready |annual rate of $392 billion —/|the September rate a year ago,|of low discount rates to its 
with fresh new packs! 9 per cent higher than the same|Despite this increase, con-| banks. That policy was altered 
P quarter of 1954. The steady|sumer buying has been boosted this summer when the interest 

climb of the so-called “gross; by credit so that “gains in con-’rates were hiked. 


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Inctia pacer Genuine leather binding $°.ce 


Fhe RSVB is published by Thomas Nelson & 
Sons, publishers of fine books rince 1708. 


. 


SHOP TONIGHT TO 9...SATURDAYS TO 6 


SASS 


“1 | 
Teld:ilia @\ Tae! | 


Wi Ve: © ATliNgtgy 
Biatensnart & ,o Silver Spring 


* k io 
OD*GIRLS?*AND:BOYS) — 


“3 


 : 
J NIRX (43 xK g @:: 
WONDERFUL TOYS FOR G 


Value for All Early-Shopping Aides of Santa! 


Rex “80” Wagon 


@ Regularly $3.49 
y he | 


@ Ball-bearing Dise Wheels 
@ Semi-pneumatic Rubber Tires 
@ Sale Priced Today and Saturday 


Streng aell-steel construction, 
25x12x3)e-nch bedy, in gleam 
red Dish that’s 


ahead, with 


“Trigger” 11-Pe. Tool Set 


32-Pe. Set 


Sears @ Stores ¥ 


+ \ , 
~ , ’ 
» oy i mwah ( 
a . pes . a 
oe er Pr). Yh) )\ Oe 
ro een 7 - 


2 ore TIE 
ge isdiises decal —— 
ye Reg. $4.95—Todsy and Saturday : ” 
wy bakes cookies, cakes, and other pastries! red 


Betty Crocker bake set \j 


* Over 9 different bake mixes! r 
© in big gift-type box! 
Little bekers learn te moke cokes, cook 

ot. 35-clece sot hos cookie culters, be 

spoons, spotule, rolling pin, ; 

mony 


te ee od. 


Sale Priced Today and Saturday! Rex Heavy-Duty “100” 


34-Inch All Steel Wagon 


6”’ 


Special design for smooth and speedy ride. plus ball-bearings for easy hendling. 
Durable maroon enamel body. Buy before the holiday rush—and seve now, 


Happt-Time Top Dept., Seare 4 Stores 


Specially Priced Toys on Sale Today and Saturday Only for Sears Storewide Value Demonstration Sale! 


25-Key Piano 

Tey Spinet Style 
Sele Prieed .... 5.88 
With easy instructions! 
Welnawt tecquer finish, 
precision ground steel 
tone rods. 


Sears Biadensburg. 
Wisconsin and Arlington 


® Regularly $7.96 . . . Sears Exclusive Happi-time 


® Streamlined Design . . . Big Tractor-Type Tires Blackboard 


With Chalk—Eraser 


Happi-Time ... 3.98 
Twe slate surfaces, and 
pictures. Easel - type, 
strong pine. 36-inch size. 
Sears @ Stores 


s! 
Happi-Time Toy Dept.. Sears Bladensburg, 
Wisconsin end Arlington 


perfect for little people's gatherings 
lazy Susan party set 
24-piece 


98 
aluminum set T 


She can entertain just like mommy 
does! Service for 4 has coffee perce- 
later, butter knife, sugar spoon, and 
Lazy Susen. 

Happi-Time Tog 


Dest., Seare 4 Stores 


a junior set for « funior miss 

Bo-Peep bake set 
16-piece hay 

aluminum set 


Little girls’ cook and bake set hes 
whistli tea kettle, mixing bowl, 
cup, cake pan, double boiler, cookle 
cutters, efc. 


Happt-Time Top Dept.. Seare 4 Stores 


= 

2-Tot Truck 

Steel Fire Engine 
Reg. $21.98. 19.97 


With ladders. Easy-pedal, 
improved steering de- 
sign, heavy tires. 


Sears @ Stores 


we, | aR” yu 
OR MR iy, oe ile 


Police Cy 
With “Police Siren” 


Easy Terms 24.98 


“Radar” type, with 15-in. 
antenna. All steel, “gas” 
tank, “grill.” Chain drive. 


Seare Bladensburg, 
Wisconsin and Arlington 


Plastic Horse 
31%-In. Over-all 
Happi-Time .. 5.95 
Plastic body, rugged *- 


in. steel White, 
red-ivory 
Sears 


Rocking Horse 
Full 26\4-In. High 


Happi-Time ..19.95 


rockers. 


Spring Hofse 
Gallops, Bucks, Trots 


Hot-Rod Auto 


Chain-Drive Design 


nes. 319.98 17.88 


Big 35-in 4 all steel, 


Big Tractor 
38'4x22-in. Size 


Reg. $23.95 

Spring-type 

turn, ball-bearing wheels, 
1%-in. tires. All steel. 


Sears 4 Stores 


heavy tires, 10-in. wheels. 
Makes “engine” noise. 


* , 
Wisconsin and Aritngton Sears Bladensburg. 


4 Stores 
Wisconsin and Arlington 


Sale 


Fvccs dl 


Sale Priced Today and Saturday! 


10-Inch Trike 


® Ask About Sears Pre-Christmas 
Lay-Away Plan 
® Regularly $6.98 Happi-Time 


14-Inch Doll 
With Rooted Hair 


Happi-Time ... 3.98 


Pony tall or curls. Sits, 
kneels, crosses legs. 
Turns head, closes eyes. 
Dressed. 


Seare @ Stores 
<> 


Tiny Tears Doll 
With Big Layette 
1314-Ineh 


Folding Buggy 
Full Metal Frame 


Reg. $7.95 .... 7.33 


Washable green leather. 
ette with cream. White 
spoke wheels, foot brake. 
22-inch size. 


Sears 4 Stores 


Gient 21-in. Size 
Heppi-Time ... 1.79 


Heavy Gauge Steel 


.... 249 


delight little 
boy. 23-in. long, 6 wheel. 
er decorated with reflect- 


Seare 4 Stores 


bumper, grill, Realistic. 


Sears 4 Stores 


Ficced Tedsy ond Soturday . . . 
Reg. $13.98 Happi-Time 


10-In. Velocipede 


© Ask About Sears Pre-Christmas 
Lay-Away Plan 


Today and Saturday... 
Deluxe Happi-Time 


28-Inch Scooter 
6” 


whe EP ae : 
 E. e # 

oF ae ee > RS 

i ee 4 

) ‘ oP aan . * 
Me s | 4 
* 


1 Trunk 
Big 14-inch Size 
with super cushion tires,- fenders, bell Hes 1 dr 2 
snd Besvl pint jb. har everything for sped he Oa ed ay 8 
Resei-Fene Toy Devt. Sears Bladensburg, Wisconsin “ white frien metel on weed. 


aliefaclion guaranteed o1 your monty bach” SEARS 


22-In, Doll Crib 


All Weed Happi-Time 


@ Regularly Priced at $7.98 neg. st1.95 10.88 
| steel 


for nails, hold crib 
12%4x15ex22"% 
Sears 4 Stor 


911 adsnabiie Rd. NE. (2) Lincoln 7-7500 


Easy Terms on Purchases of $20 or More “ 
Wisconsin Ave. at Albemarle (16). EMerson 2-1122 


Prices Do Not Include D. C. or M4. Sales Tas 


You Can't Lose... 


8455 Colesville Rd., Silver Spring. .JUniper 9-9018 


a eR ET ee 
- bmn On. « tii ak f 
. 
f 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
r Friday, Nowember 25, 1955 


OPEN TONIGHT TO 9 ... SATURDAYS TO 6 


STORE HOURS: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday, 10 to 6; Thursday and Friday, 10 to 9-AMPLE FREE PARKING! 


A « 
X oo 
x 5 raaakh : yp > —— 
he eg " , Res he ae = al ¥ SB RE ~~, WINE ee a2 
5 , a BP “a . TT 5 es — 
st y ; oe nto oe D _ o ) << i < ‘ 
: Pe Ape - * y ey, “ ~ - 
: 7 ONE cn, Se _ ey ; ~ . . POLY >» 
7 ee Se Sara me : Otigitiar: = patt Tey > 7 ’ 
—, F We Z ee as ' rae Si Ps ~ j r ; Se. z 
y Cee: a j ALLELE wo 
: te is | t BROS, Soe ar cou Se, ee OR Tare 
=a vege vi ae t  * : a 
par, " om ¥ Po 5 eter es oe ; 
ik: ORS EE OI ane ee. Ae ES OORT SS ORO NORE RE BIEL "GTI tS SM 
4 “aa ‘ a ig ° ‘ 
- iR 
o4 ns 


se] a:iila @\, lek ae) 


Wie a © ATIINEL OD 
Sconsin AVe .; 
Blay n pg.0 silver Spring Mew 


oe. "She Se ee sy ; z » wd " a a $ 
om Pat LL tam fy : Pa, 4 r$ ae ae we 
Kan ‘ ee EE A OR ae SF PR be ae eek, 


eae ¢ Doe ie 6 aloe 
SD 3 gS ee eee ee RE 


The The Most Famous Names in Home Appliances . ; .At Huge Savings... 
LAST 2-DAYS ee @ Last Two Days of Sears Storewide Sale . . . Today and Saturday 


WHERE BUT AT SEARS... 


KENMORE WASHER //(u[ stun tourna 


é>-: Pe, RE ae eM 
oy Sante as BS 
Sr. Bi) es ate ~ 


That Frees You Forever 


From Washday Drudgery AT ONE LOW SALE PRICE! 


Combination offer includes Sewing Machine, Cabinet, 


Save $21.95 This Week! 


Bi. aS 

SS en MM hc 
Sou ee Sega 
Be sens i i 
Soa ens cee 
Bice: §6|—|_ ponent Cs 
Soames , 
ses Seecins = - 
Soa Sincere 53) 
Sta AS 
ms | Be 

Sena nm . 
beatae 
a ec 
a snc 


$5 vown $8 
© New 1955 Model 


® Washes, Drains, Spin-Dries, 
Stops Automatically 


© One-Dial Control . . . Flexible 
Timer Dial 


Check the top quality of HydroSwiri that 
guarantees washday freedom at Valve 
Demonstration Sale’s lower price. Easy 

. « « flexible timer dial te 


Get your 
Christmas 
Gift yo 
Shopping | : a Pf oe S 6; : , . 
Agitator washing ec- oe Son Sie Za ine Cabinet Buttonholer Sewina Chair 
aouthce tion gets dirtiest : out bolting down. Buy it now and save : " Desorator sty ling, Buttonholes and does Seat oak handy 
clothes clean again. —before the last-day rush. rich walnut veneers, many fancy jobs fer 


Shop Sears Light duralite, 6-vane 4 
and Save. agitator. ’ Kenmore Home Leundry Dept., Sears 4 Stores hand-rubbed finish; with “by hand” look. storing sewing. 


Complete Set of Attachments — for plain and fancy sewing, including monogramming and embroidery! 


Reg. $159.95... New 1955 Automatic Model /.\ Kenmore De luxe : 9 g 
| Kenmore | Rotary Round Bobbin 16 yA ans 
Electric Dryer | > Sewing Machine Offer 


Special sale price for two days only in- 
cludes Sewing Machine, Cabinet, @ Brand-New 1956 Model 


| / on Buttonholer, Zigzagger, Sewing Chair Gift hinting or Christmas gift shop- 
(4 ; Bir Fe hs and complete set of attachments. buy 
Os ho: mS | 3 ® Double Lock Stitch—forward or reverse . . . no backtacking ion, 
, Fe 


$5 Down $5 Monthly 


: : ®@ Simplified Bobbin Winder—entirely automatic head lusive features for easier 
5 Down $7 Monthly a ee © Hinged Pressure Foot—automatically adjusts to fabric thickness and Leer dais AND Sears 20-year 
, as © Numbered Stitch Regulator—instant wide variable range guarantee. 


Kenmore Sewing Maching Dept., 
Sears «4 Stores 


Load-A-Door design with “table” top . . . 24-in. width ' 
matches Kenmore HydroSwirl . . . convenient I-dial con | 2 Laugh at 

trol for any kind of fabric, wrinkle free drying with con- ob - * ght The Weather w=) Sea\N . 
vection type “breeze blown” action. Don’t miss this super. With Sears" | t \ Fabulous Low Price Today and Sat. Only! 


“« Pin Rai ~* 
saving valve. Nee Kenmore ; ' VO AOR | K mi 
aR Ki tg j Kenmore Standard 
Kenmore Home Laudury Dept... Sears 4 Stores i ee, Dryer P ‘ h ' ‘ P en ‘ 4 : 
Vacuum Cleaners 


ry te - ' 4 4 
eo ; a . “ re 4 x ; 
pe ae | : ‘ M 9 
; ae ie \ “1 tite oe Va \S “_ 
KENMO 2 : \ | x a \ / 
' 4 | " : = 7 
see ' - : WY } ” ‘ 
4,0. 6 fet ore x ' . S.9 \ eS k o 
| \ ( Tank or Uprig 
. 4 - " 


as \\\ SSH i A B=) Down Month 
snane, ecsiuce s6mh C0. \\\@ te haa \ ; $3 $5 ly 


EACH 


®Value Demonstration Sale Price 
© New 1956 Standard Models 
Tank with essential attachments or upright—both with power- 


Sale Priced Today and Saturday Only! New 1955 Kenmore | | ey i , ful suction, both with the same fine construction as most ex- 
i oa ce pensive Kenmore, both sale priced for every budget. 


° *@ * i} | 7 iN \ Vacuum Cleaner Dept, Sears ¢ Stores 
Visi-Matic Washer \ Ve The New Kenmore 705 
Hal xm Deluxe Vacuum Cleaner 
$5 Down $7 Monthly — | ANY © With Floer-te-Coiling Attachments 


| Balance in Month- 
\ ly Payments Oh 


Double-Wall Tub Insulation 
6-Vane Duralite Agitator 
Automatic Electric Timer 


Fast-Drain Action to Empty 
Tub in Two Minutes 


— 
Kenmore Home, Leundry Dept., Seare 4 Stores 


‘Ss 


Shop and Save at Sears, the Washington , 7 SiN ae : f 
Area's Most Complete Department Store ) : “ 
Bi iiowkasin ances Oaliofjaction guawanieed ov your money back 
You Can't Lose... — a . talk 


8455 Colesville Rd., Sliver Spring. . . JUniper 9-9010 


’ 
e 
} > 
b , | 
. a 
- 
: : e 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
Friday, November 25, 1955 ad 


ee = 


OPEN TONIGHT TO 9...SATURDAY TO 6 


STORE HOURS: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday, 10 to 6; Thursday and Friday, 10 to 9; ACRES OF FREE PARKING SPACE! 


SEARS ° 


te) 3:jild @ 1 jihee) 


——- ATIINGtoy 
'Sconsin = o Silver Spring 
Bladanspurg Re- 


We Bougit the Entire Stock of Famous 


Sof , REVERE-O-MATIC 
Liced | POWER TOOLS 


SS 


. - 
, > ‘+> 4 os , 
‘ %, ye eke SS eae oS fae Stee 2 fr 
KD > , : a , f ~- ’ As “ 
~s : : 
Ss 


:° le 
7. , a 
a * “> 

7” - 


HILE THEY LAST 


BUILT AND 


includes @ brocket for 
@ounting on bench for use 


,@s grinder ond buffer. 
BY THE REVERE 


CAMERA CO. 


* Complete with over 37 useful accessories and casel 

* Use it for engraving, polishing, grinding, other jobs! 
* Tools for working wood, glass, plastic, iron, aluminum! 
* Precision-built tool with 15,000 R.P.M. electric motor! 


Herdwere Dept.. Seare @€ Stores 


jstable height. 


4 Basic Power Tools In a 6'/2x3-Foot Space 


Plus moulding head, insert and 6 sets of cutters at no extra cost with 
this workshop combination. 


WO oe aes 


‘Saving of $11.12 . . . Ceafteman 100" 
10-Inch Bench Saw 


® Reg. $101.00 


= 
Bi 


om 3% 
. 


$27 vowe $15 monty 


No time-consuming, troublesome 
changeovers with this Craftsman 
workshop. All teols operate from 
single motor unit. Complete with 
stand end % hp. motor, 

Hardware Dept., Sears ¢ Stores 


Bench Saw 8.25 ea. 
# 


LAST 2-DAYS STOREWIDE SALE... .... 


American 
switch. Choice of copper or br 
listed. 


- \ Us a > , y 
oe ek &  . : ; 
“oe A nd p . . 
: - ee i ~ 
‘ afd. ~ ° “ney a 
V4 mae OO WE * a fos a’ 
7 7 
: s. - 4 . oeey * “ ete ee ; 
‘ Byes" : ‘ 
aes 7 7 fae” f 
: 4 , e one meat eee Seep et ste ep a ee . ~ 
4 ee x % 7 


¥ — . i ~- 


j , “4 ~ ~~ ..._ 
“Wii 


SiTTITITT 


beegeeer 
F 


Savings in Every Department at Sears, The Washington Area's Most Complete Department Stove 
Hundreds of Gift Ideas ot Sears, Where Quality le Always High end Prices Lew 


And... Have A Warm Winter Home! 


|| 2-Light Wood 
i, Storm Sashes 


: 
a ~" . . 
oy. a a. <7 vouweeae —* 7. Ay” . — 
> 4 ue » e's"s*s 7 a a 7 x a * a eten * 'e #.°,y - 2 
a sia : Botta she RM. De Novy ea 
. . > a ° “ 7 - 
7 ated 
YO OO = es eat.” 8t Satara a, hae ee 
~~ Loe : a ee ab e's es 
= & ant cote ade hana — ne tain / 
. we af “~ BAe AWAY’ ¢ ee " * 
2 : . Se ee : 
, , 
' . — 
<e 
>> 
. : ee aie oF 88 


¥) ® Regularly $3.29 
i £.\ @ Glazed and Caulked 


Ren Neon ee SOIREE III NY NAS 

tee OO ie LE Oe eer eee ne 

DIEING roa CPS PPR hen ieee v' 
—s 


seiksmses 
a a 


wrens tats e Sy 
ae a 


28 V4 x39 V4 -Inches, 
28 ¥ax55 V4 -Inches, 
31x55 %4-Inches, 
32 44x47 4-Inches, 
3244255 \4-inches, . . 
34x55 V4-Inches, regularly $6.19.......5- 
36Vax55Ve-lnches, regularly $6.49....... 
25 other sizes alee at 10% savings. 
Building Meteriale Dept., Sears 4 Btoree 


Specially Priced! Famous Homart 


Asphalt Floor Tile 


Ayr 


© Regularly 7« 
® Size 9x9-Inch 


Saving of $5.07 . . . Deluxe Harmony House 


Reel Type Fixture 


9* ; ' 

Pe: ge te 
T Budget Fixture 
Adjustable Reel Type 
nes. 17.95 .14.88 
Harmony House, brass, 


copper and chrome 
finish. From 18 te 5)-in. 


@ Regularly $24.95 
@ Smart Colonial Design 


cut glass 


styling, with 15-inch shade, 3-wa 
ass-pla ‘ 

enamel, &§ . 
ress~ pleted 


Electrical Fizture Dept , Sears é Stores 


oe AN sae 
4-Light Fixture 

Square Glass Shade 
Res. $9.95 ... 
Rermnny Deets, 17V44n. 
glass beaded de- 
sign. Brass-pleted holder. 


Sears 4 Stores 


3-Light Fi 

I-Light Ceiling Type 
Harmony House, chrome- 
plated holder. Better light 
at low coq. 


Sears é« Stores 


Fluorescent 
Reg. $16.50 . 14 88 
Recessed type, twe 20- 
frome. UU listed. 
te 
install. _ 
Seare 4 Stores 


7 
1.” , ¥ 


Jointer-Planer 


SAVE $25.10 
Regularly $179.98 


| 60-Inch Deluxe Homart Cabinet Sink 


* | 
try Terms on Pancha of $29 or Mee 

Prices Do Not Include D. C. of Md. Sales Tas 

You Can't Lose... - x 


’ - 


This 
Morning... 


Liu With Shirley Pevich 


THE WORLD'S unhappiest persons this week could 
be that handful of Naval Academy professors who are 
finding Annapolis a sort of torture camp in these days 
before the Army-Nayy game. They are instructors at 
Annapolis, but they don’t share the “Beat Army!” enthusiasm, 
because they happen to be graduates 7 
of West Point. soy ate: SS 

They're at Annapolis under a sort ~ 
of exchange program and are pro- 
tected from violence, thanks to the 
code. They are even permitted to 
bet their students that Army will © 
win; bet anything but money, that is. 
Usually the loser has to sing a solo @ 
in the classroom, and as a conse- 
quence Annapolis classrooms have 
resounded with some of the most dis- - 
cordant braying this side of a mule | 
corral. ‘ 

This is the week, too, when the j . 
braid at the Academy winks at some 
of the sacred regulations like proper POVICH 
dress in the dining halls, singing on the way to cla‘ -:s and 
other outrageous violations of discipline. After all, the 
brigades aren't doing anything the braid itself wasn’t doing 
& generation ago during Army-Navy ‘week. 

Even the two head coaches appear to have been infected 
by the hoorah of this year’s contest. Up at West Point, Earl 
Blaik has been saying such nice things about Navy’s team 
that Navy Coach Eddie Erdelatz hints Blaik is trying to bring 
about a deplorable state of overconfidence in the ranks of 
the Middies. The situation has gone from simmer to boil. 


ONE OF THE CHARMING facts about Army vs. Navy is 
that nobody can predict with any certainty what's going to 
happen after the one o'clock whistle. There has been much 
said and written recently about Navy dominance in these 
things, with Erdelatz’s teams having licked Army fotr times 
in the past five seasons, andthe tmpression may be out that 
West Point hasn't had much of a look-in. 

That's very wrong, of course. One of the cold facts is that, 
coming up to this game a year ago, West Point was a five- 
point favorite to beat Navy. Its Pete Vann was a more- 
famed quarterback than George Welsh. Nobody was wast- 
ing any tears on Army. Navy was the winner, but it had to 
be an upset. Navy is the six-point favorite this year but 
only the lion-hearted citizens would give away that many 
points. 

There is one very good reason why Navy can’t be cocky 
when it takes the field tomorrow against the Cadets. The 
reason is named Pat Uebel, who has license to strut more 
than a little bit, were he the type. Halfback Uebel, now 
Army's captain, personally scored three touchdowns against 
the Middies last year and Navy's 27-20 win wasn't much of a 
victory over Uebel. 


IT’S POSSIBLE to confuse the bejeebers out of the pic- 
ture as the game nears. Navy has been beaten only once, 
an undisgraceful loss to Notre Dame on a day when the 
Middies appeared strangely flat, while Army has been thrice 
beaten. Michigan, Syracuse and Yale were Army's con- 
querors, but on the day of their every defeat Army was in- 
yolved also with a wet field. On a dry one, they've never lost. 

if the Detens® ‘Departinent 
energy that goes into the Army-Navy game, it might be able 
to cut back on the expensive atomic installations. In no 
other game are the athletes so much a-quiver and straining 
to unload their destructive powers. Army-Navy games may 
not be the best football games but they are often the most 
bruising. They are goaded in their banzal charges not by 
any fear of each other, but by the fear of losing. 

Army and Navy coaches don’t have to whip their charges 
up to any pitch with artificial gimmicks. The players are 
surrounded by inspiration at the two academies. It's the 
game sort of stimulation that prevails at Notre Dame, Like 
one envious coach from another section once remarked at 
an Army-Navy game, “These kids get awfully dedicated.” 


THE BIG FIGURE as the big game nears is George Welsh, 
Nayy’s quarterback, who used last year’s game as the spring- 
board to All-America fame. It was a year ago that Welsh 
out-performed Pete Vann, picking Army to pieces with his 
choice of plays and passing, and then going on to the Sugar 
Bowl to beat Mississippi and emerge as the quarterback who 
had been the year’s most underrated. 

The best ‘reasons why Navy is the favorite are Welsh’s 
passing and Army’s weakness at the same department, at 
least hitherto. Acknowledging that Rookie Quarterback Don 
Holleder, who used to be an end, cannot match Welsh at 
throwing the ball, Eat Blaik says, “We're not a passing team: 
We are a running team and we'll take yardage any way we 
can get it.” 

Army learned last year that neither Welsh nor Navy, as a 
unit, is to be trusted. Welsh used his best end, Ron Beagle, 
as a decoy last year and then passed to Earl Smith, the other 
end, for two touchdowns. Army’s team may be just as 
dedicated but they may be in need of a couple of more 
tricks. 


harness some of the’ 


Navy Ends Practice; 
‘We're Ready’'—Erdelatz 


By Martie Zad 
Staff Reporter 


ANNAPOLIS, Md., Nov. 24!/gans reached a peak yesterday. 
Navy’s football team concluded 
preparation for its date with 
Army Saturday and was pro- 
nounced “ready, willing and 
able,” by Coach Eddie Erdelatz. 

The squad went through a 60-| 
minute drill this morning in 
sweat suits. The drill empha- 
sized punts, kickoffs and punt/ Admiral Walter F. Boone were 
and kickoff returns. ithe main speakers at the rally. 

After practice the players) ne Middies than disbanded 
worked their way through a to Bancroft Hall. “Beat Army” 
Thanksgiving Day dinner and/ 11, echoed out of the win- 
‘then took a nap, before taking|Gows of the sprawling dormi- 
their places of honor at a huge | ory on the banks of the Severn 
rally in Thompson Stadium | River on into the night. 

night. | In dormitories the passage- 
The annual pregame shenani- , avs were decorated with gim- 
micks praising the Middies and 
you-know-whats for Army. 

In front of one dorm, the 
statue of Tecumseh, the Mid- 
dies good luck Indian, was cov- 
ered with bright war paint. At 
the base of the gigantic monu- 
ment were countless pennies. 

The Middies toss them to 
Tecumseh in traditional pay- 
ment for the “many wishes he 
has granted to them.” 

One Middie quipped to Coach 
Erdelatz, “Get in voice.” Erde- 
latz has made an annual prac- 
tice of ms his favorite, 
“Shanty in Old Shanty Town” 
ito the Middies whenever his 


its final send- 
Iphia F 


morning at an impromptu rz 
ly. The Middies will work out 


Midshipmen toasted their team 
with songs and thundering 
cheers. 

Coach Eddie Erdelatz, Team 
Captain John Hopkins and 
Academy Superintendent Rear 


After a towering bonfire the 


‘ 


Carpenter 
Leads Lions, 


24-10, Over 
Green Bay 


DETROIT, Nov. 24 #—Half- 
back Lew Carpenter exploded 
over right tackle, catching 
Green Bay's secondary nap- 
ping and raced for a 49-yard 
touchdown which broke open 
an errorfilled game and 
sparked the Detroit Lions. to 
a 24-to-10 victory over the Pack- 
ers today. 

The crowd of 51,685 saw each 
team lose the ball five times 
on fumbles, while Green Bay 


: 


ports 


Texas Crushes A & M, 21 to 6 


Ce teshington Pog 


Cotton Bowl 
Picture Is 


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 1955 


Cleared Up | 


Pro Standings 


<2 eR 


cas TERN CO 
Bears 

les im oo I 
reen see 

re .. 


San anciseo 


suxbaY- SCHED 
Precast 


ne braneieee. at . 
WAS GTON at Pitteburch. 


had two passes intercepted and 
Detroit one. 

With the score locked at 10- 
all early in the fourth quarter, 
Carpenter took a handoff from 
Bobby Lane and set sail for 
the end zone almost before the 
Packers knew what was hap- 
pening. 

In the final 6 minutes, De- 
troit added a clinching touch- 
down when Linebacker Sonny 
Grande picked off Fred Cone’s 
fumble in the air and ran 
46 yards to score. 

The loss evened Green Bay's 
record at 5-5 and just about 
crushed the Packers’ hopes for 
a title in the Western Division 
of the National Football 
League. 

Carpenter also scored in the 
second quarter as Detroit 
wiped out the Green Bay's 10- 
point first-period lead to forge 
a tie at halftime. The former 
Arkansas back scored after tak- 
ing a short swing pass from 
Layne on the Green Bay 3. 
Carpenter was the leading 
ground gainer of the day as he 
picked up 120 yards in 20 car- 
ries; Deon Hart, running from 
fullback, gained another 56 
for Detroit in 14 tries. 


of Leng Passing 
The loose contest also was 


range passing. Tobin Rote of 
the Packers completed 10 of 24 
tosses for 130 yards, while 
Layne hit on 11 of 21 for 92 
ards. 


Lion Richie Woit, signed to 
a Detroit contract only yester- 
day, fumbled Fred Cone’s 
opening kickoff and Cone recov- 
ered on the Detroit 18. After 
three plays failed, Cone kicked 
a 2l-yard field goal and Green 
Bay had a 30 edge with the 
game less than 90 seconds old. 
Later in the first period, End 
Nate Borden recovered Hart's 
fumble-on the Green Bay 10 
to kill a Detroit drive and start 
the Packers on a sustained 
march downfield for their only 
touchdown of the day. They 
went 90 yards in 14 plays, with 
Tobin Rote pitching a 5S-yard 
touchdown pass to End Gary 
K naftec. Core’s conversion 
made it 10-0 at the 13:40 mark. 


Liens Record Now 37 


From then it was all Detroit 
as the Lions won their third 
game against seven defeats. 

A Green Bay fumble opened 
the way to Detroit's first touch- 
down. Jack Christiansen picked 
up Howie Ferguson's bobble 
and raced 37 yards to the Green 
Bay 33. Detroit scored six 
plays later with Layne passing 
to Carpenter from three on 
fourth down. 

Walker booted a 25-yard 
field goal late in the second 
quarter to make it 10-10 at in- 
termission. 


Pellegrini Gets 
Camp Trophy 
On TV and Here 


Bob Pellegrini, University of 
Maryland center, will receive 
the Walter Camp Memorial 
Trophy as the tanee All- 


magazine, will present Pelle- 
grini with the trophy . Sunday 
night on Ed Sullivan’s CBS tele- 
vision program between 8 
9 p. m. OP-TV (Channel 9) 
carries the p locally. 
Pelle will receive the tro- 
phy n Monday at the Touch- 
down Club’s weekly luncheon 
at 12:30 p. m. at the club di 
room. A local representative 
Collier’s will make the presen- 
ta 


tion. 
Res 


noticeable for a lack of long}. 


ree 1 
veers El 
aieeet ae 


PICTURE OF CONFIDENCE—Gonzaga students are so 
proud of their football team that they count on a sure vie- 
tory in tonight’s Schoolboy Championship game with Car- 
doze in Griffith Stadium. Here Gonzaga rooters display « 


Tonight 


Cardozo Play.for Schoolboy Title 


High School 
Championship 
Game Lineups 


Here are the probable 
starting lineups, with weights, | 
and lists of substitutions for 
Gonzaga and Cardoze, oppo- 
nents in tenight’s City School- 
bey Championship football 
game at Griffith Stadium: 

PROBABLE STARTING LINEUPS 
POs. 


%| ranked. But Cardozo, which was 


sede 
” ra Le 
eomcmeacgesei 
Gore, Justin 


etter be ail. Dave Pena, 


—y & ce 


|Nicheisen, Harris Top Runners 


ine) bar and Spingarn. 


| League 


"\dozo advanced 
ichampionship contest when it 
-\was awarded a victory under 


‘ey Joe Heiberger. Staff Photosrapher 


sign that reads, “We're No. 1,” referring te their position at 
the top of area-wide rankings of schoolboy teams by The 
Washington Post and Times Herald. Lower, the sign says, 
“Cardoso, youre next,” in the line of teams defeated. 


’s Big Night—Gonzaga, 


’ 


|Previous Scores 
Of Schoolboy 


Title Games 
Here are us 


Catholic Champions Meet 
Interhigh Team at 8 P.M. 


By Jerry Davis 
xa Prep, 0 

It’s Catholic League champion Gonzaga versus Interhigh| *"2s." sua) ai 
winner Cardozo in the biggest high school game of the year Prep. 6. , 
tonight at Griffith Stadium for the City Schoolboy Football) joc)” au». ¢ - sh 
Championship. 20 ’ 

If the weather stays good, upwards of 25,000 are expected for | , 

‘the 8 o'clock kickoff. 

The game is the 12th in the city championship series, which 
began in 1944. The annual contest is sponsored by The Wasb- 
ington Post and Times Herald and The Touchdown Club. 

Gonzaga, the area’s No, l-ranked high school team, is a slight 
favorite to whip Cardozo,third?*® * * * * * * * 


Team Records 


GA CARDOZO 


scores 

of City Schoolboy Football 
Championship games: 

1944—-All- High, 6; All 

All- 


Prep, 0. 
1IM5—Al- High, 


son, 7. 
1950—E astern, 6; St. 
| John’s, 6. 
| 1951—St. John’s, 20; East- 
ern, 13. 
| 1952—Wilsen, 25; St. 
_ John’s, 6. 
1953——St. John’s, 7; Roose- 
velt, 6. 
1954—Highs All-Stars, 12; 
St. John’s, 7. 


tied twice during the regular 


_—— 
oe 


lf 


, 
| @ewew~ooe 
| eseekes 


By Upset 


By Harold V. Ratliff 
COLLEGE STATION, Tex. 
Nov. 24 ®—Frenzied Texas, 
making one last but gli 


Se Sey, Wan. a 
to the co 


Texas A&M 
football story today with a 
crushing 21 to 6 triumph that 


will be classed as one of the 
Con- 


~——. 


pionship with one of the most 
decisive beatings Texas ever 
has administered in this storied 
60-year-old rivarry. 
As a result, A&M was 
knocked out of first place in 
the conference race and Texas 
Christian took over the top 
rung. TCU can win the title 
outright Saturday by beating 
Southern Methodist. 
Two-touchdown underdogs, 
losers of 5 games out of 9, the 
Longhorns played like cham- 
pions in a mighty show of 
power. They came back after 
bumbling away two chances to 
score, seefng the Aggies take 
a 60 lead. They then ground 
A&M underfoot on the batter- 
ing runs of Fondren, Womack 
and Hawkins. 


74, Texas, at Half 


Sharing in the glory was a 
youngster who is too slow to 
play regularly but can kick the 
extra point. Johnny Elam came 
off the bench to boot the ball 
through and give Texas a 74 
lead 10 seconds before the first 
half ended. 

Fondren rammed to one 
touchdown and kicked two 
extra points. Womack and 
Menan Schriewer, the Great 
Texas wingman, got the other 
scores. 

The Aggies, great surprises 
of the conference race this sea- 


radi without a conference de- 
feat—were outplayed thorough- 
ly by Texas. In the entinre last 
half( they couldn’t make a first 
down nor get out of their own 
territory. 

They got only three first 
downs in the first half, made 
only 30 yards rushing the 


whole game. 
Could .Have Been More 


They were fortynate not to 
have been beaten by a larger 
score. Texas lost the ball a 
foot away from the Aggie goal 
in the first period. Charley 
Brewer, who quarterbacked the 
Longhorns masterfully, fum- 
bled the ball across the goal 
line to wipe out a Texas touch- 
down in the second. 

The Aggies could do nothing 
against the fighting, slashing 
Texas line and got their only 
touchdown on an 80-yard drive 
engineered by Jim Wright and 
his passing. Wright made the 
touchdown himself, smashing 
over from the Longhorn one in 
the second period. 

The weather was as cheer 
less as the Aggie followers. A 


See TEXAS, Page 3, Col. 7 


———- 


The Clerks won seven times 
this fall but were tied by Dun- 


Cardozo shares the Interhigh 
title with Spingarn 
after the teams battled to a 
scoreless tie last Friday. Car- 
to the city 


TIRE and TUBE 


FRIDAY 


the penetration system. 
Gonzaga hadn't won the 

Catholic League crown since 

1949, St. John’s dominating play 


Highs Title Game 


The program fer tonight's 
City Schoolboy Football 
nship game between 


7 p. m.—Teams practice. 
7:40 p. m.—Introduction of 
the 


7:59 p. m-—Redskins’ quar- 
| terback Eddie LeBaron 
throws out ball. 


8 p. m—Opening kickoff. | 
* . > , 


the past five seasons. Gonzaga 
defeated St. John's 13-4, last 


over Wilson. 

Gonzaga found no area com- 
petition too troublesome this 
fall. Its only loss came to 
Easton, Pa., High, 21-7. The 
Eagles won eight games. 

The game pits Gonzaga’s 
single-wing attack against the 
a t-T employed by Cardozo. 

th teams have operated very 
effectively all season, and an 
interesting clash should de- 


most dangerous man on 


At Five Dewntown Locations 


GAME, Page 34, Col. 4 


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"J2222"GW High Defeats W-L for Ninth Straight Time, 14-10 


; 
: 


T : -_— 
= Richmond 


te eee Mike Aoee Pass Clicks . 
§ ar 6 Tied, 6-6, 


4 In Final Fwo Minutes By W. &M. 


George Washington High, under pressure all the way, climbed 


from the depths of defeat twice yesterday and continued its) 
mastery over Washington-Lee, 14-10, béfore 11,000 at George) RICHMOND, Va.. Nov. 
Washington High. W—An underdog William and 
It was the ninth straight Thanksgiving Day victory for GW)|Maty football team held fa 
in the traditional Old Oaken Bucket game. The Presidents now 'vored Richmond to a 66 dead- 
have two legs on the Bucket, which must be won three consecu-|lock before a Thanksgiving 
tive times for permanent possession. Day crowd of 12,000 today and 
Washington-Lee appeared headed for its first triumph since kept the Spiders from moving 
1946 in the traditional series after Halfback Kiric Woolley into second place in the South- 
scored on a 7-yard run with five minutes to play in the second ern Confere-ijée. 
quarter. ; on ’ 
GW caught up in the third period when Bob Gibbs leaped arte go = Ph ta 
across from the l-yard lirfe. ; ~~ lopportunity after opportunity 
Wayne Ballard kicked a field/stepped back to the 15 for a| but muffed all but one. 
goal with six minutes left in the |field g attempt. | The Spiders’ touchdown 
game from the George Wash-| His boot was good and W-L came in the late s‘ages of the 
ington 15 and put W-L back | regained the lead, 10-7, with six | first quarter when End Phil 
into the lead, 10-7. |minutes to go. Curley blocked cn end zone 
But with Quarterback Mike! A 36-yard pass from Agee to punt by Halfback Charfie Sid- 
Agee triggering a 68-yard|Bucky Poole picked up a first- well and sprawled on the ball. 
march, George Washington | down on the Washington-Lee 16 End Jack Wilson converted 
scored on a Syard pass from after the ensuing kickoff. Agee |for the extra point, but Rich- 
Agee to End Bob Garda with!had his work cut out for him|mond was guilty of holding. 
just 2:30 to go and GW was the with a battle to wage against| Wilson faked a kick the next 
winner again. ithe clock. time, and Quarterback Tommy 
GW Halted on Four ae 1 Rag a og | ene 2 wow flipped an incom-~ 
= Ea ities ' , o e W-L. /, Agee hande ete pass into the end zone, 
Peo ME ae ae: ee g's best ar "ten Re pening |! to Alexander who wént to ‘ A tumble by Richmond Half- 
neath - en ae ‘period but it ended in disaster|“"® five. Agee was back to|back George Riggs, who sig- 
a, ee —. oa, : ga i eT, on the Washin pass, but was thrown at theinaled for a fair catch on & 
| fine ee ae a ee oe i tlle, ok. gton-Lee 4. After) nine on first down | 
putting the ball in play on its! where ; punt and then let the ball 
120 following a punt, Pullbeck|,55° snd faded back tea ho squirt from his hands, led to 
, | ’ n. S| W&M’s touchdown in t 8 
By Dick Darcey, Staff Photographer |Bob Sisson ripped off the}. yi. protection was su-\ond period. mn the sec- 


AGEE ON THE RUN—George Washington High day's annual Thanksgiving Day game for the Old Washington players are Charles Torpy (56), Bob ay wi. on tnriling run t preme and he carefully flipped| Eleven plays later, freshman 
| : to Garda, who joyously accepted Quarterback Tom Secules 


quarterback Mike Agee sets up a touchdown as Oaken Bucket in Alexandria. Teammate Bob Fowler (72), and Bob Garda (70). GW wo 
. . n the 
He stopped by Washington-Lee’s Jim Baker | Gibbs scored minute later. Bill Gilbert (40) | game, 1410, and gained a second leg on the tra- nathoaa aeecy Alenteaae rj ead nape Fn the end zone. Dick|snaked into the end zone from 
» on the W-L 13 in the third quarter of yester- closes in te help on the tackle. Other George ditional Old Oaken Bucket. the W-L 6. But Sisson couldn’t/ good for the 14th point _ gy Aw ee Fullback Manuel 


| may a handoff from Agee and| woartha Duke, 17-year-old sen- Sempeles, backing up the line 
| lered on the 4 to snuff out the/Queen at halftime.—Jerry end blocked ay 


. ! W-L’ x h * ’ 
VPI Rallies Rye High’s Streak 1) Wi L, t vis Gene Sherman recov jior, was crowned the game’s!on. defense, streaked across 
a . | ‘touchdown bid. Davis. in’ 
) Snapped at 33 enver ins on as | Washington-Lee’s Fred James winnie 7. 2. foe Sook tabueie elaiaey’ te wae 


’ pn tec 
Stole a pass by Agee on the Grerse 


Pe 
‘ 


\V ins 39-13 coe Mpg Patera ag L ante = saa wat | William and Mary LJ 
One of the longest high P] re PI B | |W-L 33 early in the second quar-| , W- scerins: 7 eine een -| Richmond eee FR 
7 ? school football ‘winning a 5 avers raw ter. With Woolley, Dave Lef-|downs—mebert Gi Shence), heb 7 i Qectes: Seuchisen—de 
. streaks in the eastendedto- | . fler and Sherman sharing run- gene eae | ik ' (1, plunge) 
ver ey ets LY. | ini ; :). PAT: 4 _ on ,, Touek tr 
| J day when Harrison, N.Y. | DENVER, Nov. 24 (®—A 78-|from both benches swarmed|7/né duties, Wl. advanced (0) tilly seemed (2) wae ee 
: High defeated Rye High, (yard run on the last play gave onto the field and began fight- “"° = 4s pws 


; | ROANOKE, Va., Nov. 24 Ap 13-12. . ; |Denver a 63 victory over Wyo-|ing. The crowd of 25,000 waited | Woolley Goes Over | 
‘Virginia Tech today won the) _ "ye ad swept 33 straight |ming today in a game that re- for 10 minutes after the game n | 
| | ~games and was seeking to é Quarterback Dennis Damon, 
\Virginia Big Six football title} ‘Cioee out its fourth con- sulted in a free-for-all between was over to find out who had whose main function was to 

os players of both teams, leaving | won. give the ball away in a hurry, J 


‘ere } [by overpowering an alert Vir-| secutive unbeaten cam- |the crowd confused. as to| Denver didn’t bother to try entrus ‘oo with it and| 
eg Sinia Military Institute team,| paign. Fyre is unde /whether the touchdown had for jhe conversion because the “os eS pond og ory 
39-13, after the Keydets had feated this season. counted. clock showed no time and the'to his right and went into the| AUTO RADIOS 
thrilled a Thanksgiving Day All the points were scored on|field was packed with spec-iend zone. Ballard’s conversion| é, 
|crowd of 24,000 spectators by the last two plays of the game. tators. made it 70 at half time. | © EASIEST CREDIT 
scoring twice in the first 7| Wyoming's Joe Mastrogio-; Denver's victory handed Col- GW tied it in the third pe- 
minutes before the Techmen I] h h in the last 10 seconds. jorado A&M its first undisputed! riog on a buck by Gibbs from| * HIGHEST TRADE-IN 
a Started rolling. Fa - CC ure 9 | Wyoming’s Joe Mastrogio-|Skyline Conference champion-\the one after a 39-yard drive mE ° FACTORY WARRANTY 
“| Don Divers, Tech fullback ’ | vanni booted a l7-yard field ship in 28 years. W-L had the bali on its 23. © IMMEDIATE INSTALLATION 


‘land a Roanoke boy, scored ° ;goal against a strong north 

mit. /three of his team’s six ouch-| Viason Tie | wind in the last 10 seconds. Sports on TV, Radio Woolley poy h ayy CUSTOM SETS, 44.95 

I'm an Old Bolton wn 7 Wyoming then kicked off to act TELEVISION fast first downs to the GW 40. 

mene, Keydets, underdogs IM) George Mason High and) ‘#lfback Max Willsey who lat-|, BOXING —Fauard Lense vs. Gene On fourth down on the 37, ! 

booste f b p jthis 5ist game which has be- Falls Church High, crosstown eraled to Fullback Vick Gupton! wrc-Tv ‘cn. 4). 10 pm. ‘Damon gambled and hit the Fits Most Cars Up to and 
r Trom Way atx icome known as the Military | -ivals in nearby Falls Church,|°" * 76-yard touchdown play.; soxwo sae Laeue vs Gene jackpot with a pass to Sherman Including '56 Models 

or 


‘Classic of the South, rolled UP} met for the first time in foot.| 2UPton broke through the Filimer, middieweights. from New -'to the GW 26. 


e 
Tak . 107 of their 138 yards rushing Wyoming defense at midfield “hich sé#660.' Footsatt—cuy| A pass interference penalt 
e it from me: in the first half, most of it in ball yesterday and fought to a and was hauled down from be-/ Scheclbey Championship. Gonzaga vs. squad GW’s Gibbs gave the CAS hy Oo R f Z 1 ' RMS 
Vv d Ww m m www - 


I 


tie. ; ‘ardese at 
‘ the first quarter. They set the hind at the goal line. | (1268 k. ¢.). 8 p.m. Generals a first down on the 
IT s heavier Tech team back on its|. George Mason took a 60 lead Before the referee could sig-|reces trem Soden tae wosT ise 10. On third down, Woolley got 


heels with a brilliant offensive| im the second quarter when Ray); the touchdown the players) 5:35),°%. "057 -7™ (1063 =. @), 2:30- Our 30 Years of Service Ie Your Guarentee for © Square Deal! 


é led uarterback Bill Ne- Peterson plunged over from)——— 3:38 ». 2 aes 
REAT! cher in’ the first seven min-|the two after a 46-yard drive. ae PST Vege, 


utes and it began to look like|Falls Church evened the game) EPRICE | ft Hite 
| - F | | | ED! § | AUTO RADIOS REPAIRED ey 


another of the upsets whieh | early - — = | . | . DF | | | 

hav ST when tackle » es ‘ ity 

sented clack uenehted Ph'* blocked a George Mason punt| _} | # z is eles A ; iiiull ii |) WHILE YOU WAIT. LABOR 
Nebraska scored the first/and ran 28 yards for a touch- << | i I i PARTS EXTRA 

touchdown on a sneak from down. | 

eight yards out and passed to| Falls Church and George) — R , a 2 La wk Viue 

‘Paul Janshego on a 19yard|Mason henceforth expect to) > ‘< 4 e& ' | ine A 

scoring play for the second six-| meet annually at Thanksgiving | : aN ik \ Bat aig | TT H! \ i LUMA MAM UE T A MUdE  AULF 

pointer. He kicked the extra as a climax to their seasons. ‘NN RTE tures 

‘point and VMI led, 13-0. For this year, Falls Church | Tela TIRE SALE 

| But Tech began to roll before ended with a 5-41 record and . (aia CUS Ay 

‘the first quarter ended, with|George Mason had a 42-2 mark. : 


‘Div scori on a plunge of — a ’ ' * da \ ill 1 At 
Hive yards. ‘Divers and Leo|faie Church | ) | “ty. os Ha 8: ® GOODRICH 
Burke crashed over to, climax| f0oR™Gre*ttedt7S: Tee S| “31 — ie 30% No Money Down 
l drives in the second period | ieska. a . =—— | 
W H and give Tech a 20-13 lead at nee i — 3° GOODYEAR ° Pay Only 
the half. were 4s | ” | 
Y PAY The second half was mostly) Wichita Routs Snteaiameis tn | / : e FIRESTONE 3 OFF $1.25 Wkly. 
Tech. Divers crashed through | - ; Tj \ m\ _ = * 
MORE ) midway of the third period and Tulsa, 04-0; Lies i Qa 
Ray England scored again mic- 7 « | . 1 | 
‘ Detroit for Title e > ‘Al =6COMPLETE AUTO SERVICE 


way of the final period. With: 


three seconds left in the game,, ; : AM A iy 
Burke went around right end’ WICHITA, Kan., Nov. 24 < rf oe ae NY | RAE tha eee 

for a final touchdown and Wichita University exploded Se Py o ) =" eS Sree Re 18. 

boosted the score to 39-13. four touchdown ae in thee Sy FS FOS - «Cee Peasy aoe | 

Start “Je oer ' Dhab ie . ie Ak le | 
Welcome 3 STATISTICS - second quarter today to sta 5 oa coe i ile) | iad YY a Hi 
‘ = = 5. SB. pao pom < ‘ a ! ¥ i = - - : mith Bd | it ' . : . 
‘ 


First dowas ...cosce dh 2 540 rout of Tulsa that gave 

Old lil" Washing yardage ry a Hi the Wheatshockers a tie with 

G---05 Passing tera ‘'.:., -& Detroit for the Missouri Valley| 

is ; d! | ‘++ F ted ! Conference football champion-) 
rien + 225 oe . . 


sae Ship. 
13 3s yeiy Wichita, defending Pera 


. 
VFI scoring: Touchdewns—Divers 3 finished the league season with) 
ALL fs 5 te pimnae: I ees tit, gens, |@ Sl record, identical with De-| 
Conversion ard 3. ‘troit. Detroit, however, defeat- 
> ; " Nebrask . : . 
Whiskey Py Munsel, dachese 119, pase from Ne- ed Wichita early in the season, 
. 


braska). Conversion—Nebraska, 
| Tule 22 2 
tah Defeats - |Reee s 


: Pe ee el fec2. 
L tah State, 14-13 ip ond Ra. yards) Migmes | (vere | 
| SALT LAKE CITY, Nov. 24| Girard pass from Holimer): King (3. SPECI ALISTS ON 
w—A blocked kick for — Hellmer i. Kilsanin 'S. Baher, — y / 
he diff today | | 
ee Utah aleane Utah Slate, 14] Weg Defeats ? BRAKES e FRONT END 
13, in th n finale for | ) 
eee Ki * TRANSMISSION ® REAR END 
The vital block took place in} ides, 20) to 6 | 


the first quarter when the etre | 


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Blended and Bottled by with nine straight victories in- play in the second for the 
r. 
LANSDOWNE, MD. 1937, finished with only one|'"sount Vernon finished with a | HERSOWN'S 
Call LA, 6-1234 jarten . wICQtING—Paistan, TP, Dos Contes. 814 King St. Alexandria, Va. Phone King 9-0405 


‘Cornell Rolls, 39-7, Ending Winless ‘Season for Penn 


+ 


| Bob Addie’s Column... 


FOR THOSE OF US who remember Alexandria as a rural 
outpost distinguished as the place where George Washington 
watered his horses and then laid out the city, it comes as a 
shock to think that George Washington High and Washington 
and Lee High met for the Zist time 
yesterday morning. 

Alexandria was once a part of the 
District of Columbia for more than 
50 years until 1646 when the pride of 
Northern Virginia went on its own. 

At last reports, the city is still doing 
all right. 

But it hardly seems possible that 
the two high schools have been play- 
ing each other for 21 years for “The 
Old Oaken Bucket” This is by 
way of being a traditional game now 
but poor W. & L. still hasn’t a bucket 
to its name. It seems you must win 
the thing three years in a row to re- 
tire it and G. W. High has done kK 
twice. 

In the past few years, other high schools, notably Wakefield, 
have come along to challenge G. W. and W. & L. for football 
prominence in Northern Virginia but, like the Big Three 
series, there never is quite the excitement which attends a 
game between the traditional rivals. 

In 1953, Washington and Lee won the game by 14. You may 
ask how this is possibié in football. It seems G. W. won the 
actual game but, due to an inéligible player on the roster, the 
Presidénts forfeited. The nice part of it was that G. W. called 
attention to itself with the ineligible player and there has 
always been that feeling of friendly rivalry and sportsman- 
ship in this series. 


THE SPORTSMAN’S Club of Alexandria held a pre-game 
breakfast yesterday at the George Mason Hotel and a lot of 
the “old-timers” like Paul Shu, captain of the 1935 team, were 
on hand. Shu was a great halfback later at V. M. L. and was 


MEN’S SUITS 


Save on long wearing worsteds, wool flan- 
nels (medium and charcoal gray), shark- 
skins, cheviots and tweeds. Two- and three- 
button single-breasted models. Wide range 
of patterns and solid colors. Blues, grays, 
browns and tans. Regulars, shorts and longs. 


MEN’S TOPCOATS 


Just two days to save on both imported and 
domestic wool topcoats. In a wide assort- 
ment of colors and patterns, there are 
cheviots, tweeds, gabardines and saxonies. 
Raglan and set-in sleeve models, some with 
‘Bip-in linings, Regulars, shorts and longs. 


EXTRA SHOPPING HOURS TODAY 
Shop Teday, Washington Store, 9:30 a.m. te 9 p.m. 
Chevy Chase and Alexandria, 9:30 a.m. te 9:30 p.m. 


\ epee perme 
6.70x15 


yy 


Friday and Saturday only 


would be 50.00 and 55.00 


would be 55.00 te 60.00 
W&L—The Men's Store, And Floot . . . aise Chevy Chase and Alexandria = * 


an All-Southern choice as well as an All-America mention. 

It was a bit early in the morning to be whooping it up for 
anything except a cup of coffee (at least to this sleepy-cyed 
reporter) but the enthusiasm was unbounded. 

It was something to see the motorcade wending its way to 
George Washington Stadium, with a police escort to clear 
the way. It was reminiscent of everybody's high school in a 
small town when the kid who pumped your gas or delivered 
your grocery was revealed as the local gridiron hot-shot. 

There was one father who was understandably nervous. His 
name is Bo Sherman, better known as the coach of George 
Washington University’s courageous Colonials. 

Certainly, by this time, Bo should fear no one. But this was 
different. His 16-year-old son, Gene, was playing fullback for 
Washington and Lee. It all became slightly confusing with 
the G. W. U. coach rooting against a G. W. High team. 


BO REVEALED his own method of preventing juvenile de- 
linquency. He said he gets young Gene up at 6:30 every morn- 
ing and, what with playing football and all, the young man 
gets droopy about 9:30 p. m. and has to hit the sack. 

“Gene was saying he was so nervous the night before this 
game he couldn't sleep,” Bo said. “I gave him a pep talk and 
a half an aspirin and nature took care of his ‘nervousness’.” 

Like all professional coaches who have their own sons play- 
ing football, Bo has no idea how good or bad young Gene is. 
“T look at him like a “mother,” Bo explained simply, “not a 
coach.” 

This was reminiscent of some other sons who had followed 
famous fathers. When Tuss McLaughry coached Brown, his 
assistants had to put a bomb under him to put his own son, 
John, on the first team. John was not only a fine fullback but 
he also turned out to be a fine coach. 


BOB SPEARS, son of Dr. Clarence Spears, coach of Mingpe- 
sota’s powerhouses in the late 1920s, was a Yale captain. Bob 


Blaik, son of Army Coach Earl Blaik, was a standout back at 


the Point before the unfortunate cribbing scandal. 

Anyway, young Gene Sherman probably will have to do it 
———E ? on hig own because his dad 
hints that the boy will seek a 
school other than G. W. 

Perhaps some of this en- 
thusiasm for high school foot- 
ball will carry over to this 
evening when Cardozo meets 
Gonzaga at Griffith Stadium 
for the city championship. 

There’s one thing sure and 
that is the kids will be well- 
coached. Sal Hall, Cardozo 
coach, has built up a tremen- 
doug record in District. 
His opposite, John Jankowski, 
long has been as 
one of the soundest men in 
the coaching profession. 

Put on your bobby-sox to- 
night and loosen up those 
tonsils. 


Four Tie at Norbeck 
Four men tied for blind 


beck. Walter Ogus had 94—20 
—74; Max Bressler, 94—20—74; 
Sam Tash, 98—24—74, and Si- 
mon Sandler, 93—19—74. 


bogey honors yesterday at Nor-|* 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
end TIMES HERALD 
Friday, November 26, 1986 
2s 33 


# 
Quakers 
Lose 18th 


‘Time in Row 


PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 24 # 
Cornell's herd of swift-running 
\backs swept past Penn, 39-7, 
in the annual Thanksgiving 
‘Day game between these an- 
‘cient Ivy League rivals. The 
hapless Quakers found little to 
be thankful for as they wound 
up a second straight winless 
season with their 18th consecu- 
tive defeat. 

Penn, battered by the likes 
of Army, Navy and Notre 
‘Dame, was thought to have a 


chance in this return to Ivy 
League competition, but Cor- 
nell merely wrote a new chap- 
ter in the same old story. 

The Big Red ripped off two 
first quarter touchdowns, 
added one in the third period 
and wound up its fifth win 
against four losses in 1955 with 
three six-pointers in the final 
15 minutes. 

Cornell led, 140 at halftime 
on a pair of touchdowns by Art 
Boland, the first a one-yard 
plunge at the end of a 66-yard 
drive and the second a 30-yard 
sprint te wind up a 64yard 
maneuver. 

After the scoreless second 
period, Capt. Dick Jackson 
smashed seven yards for a 
third-quarter touchdown. Bo 
Roberson cracked eight, Boland 
passed 20 to Jerry Knapp and 
Jackson raced 14 yards for 
three final period scores. Billy 
De Graaf, who sustained a pos- 
sible fractured jaw in the sec 
ond quarter, converted three 


times. 

Penn’s only chance to crow 
on turkey day came in the 
third period, when trail 21- 
0, Bill Young sprinted three 
yards into the end zone and 
Frank Riepl converted. 


ae ee 


4\0f nine games. 


Four Times in First 


Quarter 


By Ernie 


Striking for four quick 
University rolled to an easy 


fans. 
The win gave the 


*s seventh 
worst record since the 


Call Leads 
Alert Colgate — 
Over Brown 


PROVIDENCE, R. 
24 m—Colgate’s Jack 


oy oe 2s Se 


downs as Colgate won its 19th 

in this traditional Thanksgiving 

Day series. Brown has won lili 
with 7 finshing as ties. 

pe- 

Martin 

plunged the final y on a 46 

ard move begun when center 

k Solana intercepted a 


pass. 
Call, the junior halfback 

from Cortland, N. Y., swung 

around end from 6 yards out 

to cap a 74yard march in nine 

ae. after the second half 
c 


The Red Raider backfield of 
Call, Martin, Frank Nardulli 


Call went 13 yards on the first 


n third down at the Brown 46, 
Martin passed to Capt. Fran 
Angeline for 27 yards to the 19. 
Four plays later Call had the 
touchdown. 

Brown was frustrated in two 
long matches, bei stopped 
by the Red Raider ense at 
Colgate’s 4 in the third od 
and again at the 7 in the fourth. 

The victory was the fifth in 
as many games with Ivy 
teams for Colgate and enabled 
the Raiders from the Valley of 
the Chenango to finish a 63 
season. Brown won only two 


seortng: Touchdewns—C 
ran) 


oppo 
Brown’s errors into a 25-0 vic-| period, 


;er, 


lay and Whitehair 10 to his 49./" 


ou 
writers, scored four touch- 


‘idowns. The speedy senior from 


Darby, Pa. scored on runs of 
42 and 17 yards in the first 
period; 36 yards in the second 
and was on the receiv- 
ing end of a 10-yard touchdown 

from Quarterback Wilmer 
Smith in the final period. Walk- 
who accounted for 110 
yards rushing in 11 carries, has 
been Howard's leading ground- 
gainer and scorer for the past 
two seasons. 

Howard's other touchdowns 
were scored by Fullback 
Eugene Smith on the first 
period runs of 24 and 2 yards. 

Outclassed: the first three 
periods, Lincoln came to life in 
the final quarter to score twice. 
They came on drives of 42 and 
68 yards. Halfback Bob McCoy 
capped the initial drive when 
he skirted right end from nine 
yards out. Quarterback Jordan 
Ewell raced over on a “keep” 
play from the 29 to culminate 


and fullback Ed Whitehair was the 
at its best in the big drive.|- 


TL ot 2 
pase-ren from 


Colgate 
gi. —P 


first-period 
36-12 victory 


Howard Scores Quick 
To Smash Lincoln, 38-12 


Goodman 


touchdowns, Howard 
over 


Lincoln University of Pennsylvania before 5000 Griffith Stadium 


Bisons a season record of three and six as 
they completed their Gist year of varsity football; the 
in eight starts, gave the Pennsylvanians their 


me ! 1920s. 

oward to even ite long series with 
for each team. Nine 

, the 1939 meet-? ° 


games have ended in 
7 7 > . 7 « 


: 


Pascual Wins Seventh 


HAVANA, Nov. 24 #—Cam 
ilo Pascual, a righthander who 
works for the Washington Nats 
during the major league season, 
‘picked up his seventh victory 
in eight decisions last night as 
first place Cienfuegos defeated 
Havana, 5-2, in a Cuban Winter 
League contest. Pascual scat- 
tered seven hits after tossing a 
one-hitter In his last start. 


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, 


genes“ (Our Dance Steps to Victory in Pimlico Feature 
Horses and People|DailyDouble Racing Charts at Pimlico 


ul claims. This method, of 
. 
. Established 
“claim of a century.” He took Stymie = : 


for a mere $1500 and the horse found "# ee ne “i alter Haigh 
himself to run up earnings a shade © par | * nglinte Been : 
under a million bucks. ... Once in a ) i 3 x 

while, Jacobs digresses from his -_ sacee the taanbink tied tee 
formula for a ge ae purchase. He | ; fn 


gained possession as oe 5 “0 
715,000 frome Ogden Phin, roe course in the 
: od last fh a convincing vic- 


. 


TH 


re 
i 


f 


. 


middle wi 


ugh- tory today. 
ter of War Admiral and Before,a 21,903 Thanksgiving 
Black Toney mare, p Day crowd, which set one bet- 
ture b purposes. ... a the won : 
cast-off of Trainer Sunny Jim Fi —_— aye Pat tied Olpety B 
mons, Searching had rated seven Haight Thorneliff | $e" 4 7-29 | Sane 
times this season under the Ogden : +s ony fare $.0 


colors and had failed to win a race but was in the money le . Stanley| mis Man’ (Gsastiess HE a 2.26: 3.00: 
—— he — ee +s Foie og bye, for ae meee. to |C. oR ted BTERKAL QUEST $7.40 ‘60: HERO on ee Shea soa fe oe 
mature into a mare, Jacobs pu r to work in compe- gly-p Rivne oe was no m wear 
is ieee $45.00 "DY fee 

- 


tition and her record has been g. For her new owner Ipiec 
she has been to the ow Pimlico, = 2 ~oornas Geet Fer . 
seven mon closer than New F-aida: aiieoee tae ae Ol ot aoe 4:09. ¢ tar Won, eaaiy; 
r Rigi Ga ke Meccan fer ee, ie ay ee 


10w ghode Me Sige| Be Fawiess) 11 - TR 
Bets tor | ar ce : : I 


fartis ¥ 
om stion II iC nts f i 
the $1,915,800 wagered on sc ad Rare (Green t : 
le Town Laurel's International day. | fa! ingte «1 
ries ue york 
part of the money |*#47,809 Played Fonte tains ON 

The new track mutuel/e irk l'¢ 
in |record came on the daily ~ 
double when $147,808 was 
played, sen into discard 
the mar kof $143,303 established 

on Preakness Day in 1954. 
Our Dance, strongly handled 
by Joe Culmone, had only a/Qp 


scattered backing as the cus-|i peck: (Gy direct (Ghocusttes if 
tomers fairly jammed the tote| foo Sl) Gree ) | Michae}  larees | Herndon Rall 


ey Day supporters o OPTIMU . $2 108 ROW. 68.40. 46: ; 
ing a little time until be- [Dance jigged to the cashier’s|™ : DOVE 60. Beats Madison 
comes a housewife. windows after the chestnut colt M aes SON, Va. Nov. 24 


0 "NG NEW. hes had carved a $19.40 mutuel. 
iy tor Cardozo, Go Play Tonigh 
South American way of pre- 0ZO, Nnzaga y onig { 
paring Venezuela’s Prendase |}.,1¢ Our 
for Saturday’s Pimlico Spe- 
cial. Yesterday afternoon, the vd for thé course is 2:32 1/5 GAME—From Page 31 has an am 70-34 record 
horse was taken to the back- eye bee pig oe bead oe D in nine years of coaching. 
-year- and, with a stable ow aes *Y\ offense. Nicholson ran 45 yards| 5 one game |,.22nkowski coached old Cen-|tne end zone in the final quar- 
“3-3| boy on his back, stood and sehen Kope’s Baby and|.0%.® ‘touchdown against St. : tral High to its 1948 City Cham-|+.- Herndon finished its season 

“}| watched several races, honest. ane’ a om, nope a ge al John’s, and had a 40-yard scam- pionship victory over Gonzaga.| with » 53-1 record 

Prendase kept turning his ence hal? ; Sh orware) per called back on a penalty. Jankowski, besides formerly)” 
head this way and that as if |TU"ners for of the mare| Gonzaga likes to stick to the coaching at Central was head Gerptes 

r) t| he liked an entry and was |‘hon distance. Howeyer, thei ground, and only occasionally olf coach at Catholic University for|—_— gy 

art ibasde “| looking around for a book- | Pace was rather — and the|/is quarterback Bill Barnes! ; several years. wa a = NOW THRU 
Vale (Austin) maker who speaks Castillian |Others were ~bunc ed up 4andicalled upon to pass. Fullback Redskins quarterback nadie the han: ere: 

SF Tit “|| Spanish. ... By the way, the [Close by. = | == ===). | Vince Cleary and halfbacks Jim LeBaron will throw out the ball] | DECEMBER 3 
(Copion) .. *| Prendase spoonte may not Along the bac of Ww r Eppard and Mike Canning com-| and Bill Sheahan are the ends,|to start the game. Catholic 

head for Florida next week, |# half mile to go, Moufion and| bine with Nicholson to keep the/Dick Schoeb the other tackle,| Youth Organization midget Charles Town 

after all. It seems they have | Kope’s Baby began to weaken.|Fagies’ running game in high| pick Eppard and Steve Chase|teams will play an abbreviated 8 RACES DAILY 
been talked into taking a |Our Dance slipped through on) gear. the guards and Mike Loh the|contest at halftime. Race Consensus 
shot at the big money in Cali- [the imside and Rock Cottage; Tom Stephens directs Car-| center. Today has been proclaimed 
fornia, particularly the $100, | came into serious contention on) dozo’s split-T from quarterback.| a] Dutch, a fine pass de-|“High-Parochial School Day” by! _.3—Swinsins Fern, Geiden Dodie, DAILY DOUBLE 
000 Santa Anita Handicap. |thée outside. Brush Burn made/He, too, won't be —— very|fender, and Glascoe Johnson|the District Commissioners in| “3 ¥eker pen. Smiling Mare. Crank! CLOSES. 12:50 
... Alfred Vanderbilt's Social |a brief rally. often. Stephens will be giving/ will man the ends for Cardozo.|honor of the championship|™*P*%.... 5.. swiss Eimens, Esste 
Outcast will be Florida-bound |Long Lead for Our Dance the ball mostly to halfback Dave| Dick Kilgore and Dave DuBose|game. Athletic departments of |®ep4 1. wssty Dish. Astro- 
next week, along with anum- | Approaching the stretch, Our| #@rris a 440-yard dash cham-jare the tackles, James Harris|the public and Catholic schools| tes. 
ber of yearlings who will | nance drew out to a long lead.|Pi0™ im track who runs like a and Frank Gibbs the guards and|will benefit from the roceinss, — + ag peeway aa: me. ye 


make their debut at Hialeah. t to work| 2°e?- Everett Frazier the center. (with returns equally 
Richard Lawless wen Harris injured his ankle Nov.| Cardozo Coach Sal Hall has| between the divisions to use for BREW. Rich Ration. Hop- 


. » » dockey Jorge Contreras, Co 
twice shaken up in recent |With the whip on Rock Cottegs,|4 against Baltimore Carver and|won nine Interhigh titles and|equipment A SRGRE I He 
spills, failed to report for a narrow Our Dance’s m h 
Wednesday mount and was sligh as they went into 
fined $50 by the Pimlico stew- | 7. rash Burn was a drop- 
fsinhcbiet tecksip whe tabbe 
a red joc who as , 
me in Chicago last summer yer gy running stars. None of them is 
if I thought he could “do any City last August, turned in his quite so fast as Harris but all 
good” in Maryland this ¢all, | CHF SE Ae i icles this| #7¢, Teliable ball carriers. 
currently is leading the Pim- sixth rg it 15 times in Gonzaga’s line, which Coach 
lico riders. year an Th $6500 he earned John Jankowski credits for his 
the money. Lhe e team’s success this year, has 
CHARLES TOWN swings |today upped his 1955 total to! sino » 20-pound buige to the 
back into action today, after $30,520. man over Cardozo. The Gon- 
Thanksgiv- The crowd overdid the bet- zaga line averages 191 pounds, 
when the heavy show action di The biggest man on the field 


~.* ‘ 


—- 


ih 
yy 


$3.00: ROCK COTTAGE. $5.20. 


SS es 


or) ts 
CNM OAS WM PROWS 


: } 
‘ 


>| 


 ohe Gee om, gee ek Se ee ee Be ee ae OA ee ee ee ie ee ee ee ee 


Sn SC bent, ee 
with limit fields for what | not provide for the “10 cents Oni¢or hoth teams will be Gon- | 
looks like a fine program.... |the dollar” pay-off demanded|zaga’s tackle Tom LaMoure, a 


Racing Form’s Palmer Hea- | under state rules. A minus pool|g4 229.nounder. John Farrell - “ ~ - bo 
erty and Baltimore Sun’s |of $2442.60 resulted, However, ria! 12 t.as scotcn, fi as I ye satisryin 2g as urpbon 
oe wander 3 have Bean most of this amount was offset ? ? 
reelected president and vice “breakage.” 
Ta 1 ene geen elle 
acin rs’ Association. 
vos To P. ee ew by bap Race Selections At erican U, T y 
Noble Impulse CHARLES im- 
Pimlico track record of 1:42 Me 5 Galent Dear, Wire Pong Fr a at ntl 
for a mile and a sixteenth HANDLE, Fencr Den, Mat-|the first Amateur Athletic Un- 


set on May 9, 1949, while |i ‘ Mons, Move Bis, Weber. J 


re 117 pounds, And 
t's a honey of a mark, con- 

sidering that many of the Na- Pg ee 
tion’s greatest have had fre- Gem. Movelens Jehe. 


uent shots at the distance, ’ 


= @:¢@.@ €@4 2. @-¢@ 


_. Cee ah 


You can stay with 
Canadian Club all evening long... 
in cocktails before dinner, 
tall ones after. 


< 


Philadelphia, Hagerstown, 
York Pa., and Baltimore will 


. * 
compete, according to Bill Arm- 
at P imlico . eee who is handling pub- 
$2600; 3-vear-olds and eisimins: 6 ’ Top form now 116 6.) ty. 
* ey pe } r E aa York | ; 


‘ Base only y ovegir Jae ‘ 
adie a eee pright Memory (Picou) Wig "sade Fee -i|Ross Wins Marathon 


Reapers, | ae Seat ia “|. BERWICK, Pa, Nov. 24 ™ 
d ; ‘Browning Ross, 31, Woodbury, 
'% ; , /\ ; w ninth Ber 


6 YEARS OLD 
90.4 PROOF 


i|N. J., annexed his 
»| wick marathon ee ee 
today as he far‘ ou 

a field of 44 in the 46th an- 
nual Thanksgiving event. It 
was Ross’ sixth consecutive win 
in the grueling up-and-down, 
91/3 mountain course which 
‘saw three of the large field 
drop out. Ross’ time was 46 
minutes and 43 seconds. 


, Fork Union Loses 
pany bulls Mer (Gcan mes iii i8ci gS TAUNTON Nov. 24 in 
nage eee | ee AC : taunton e 
LONGSHOT DAILY DOUBLE ’ rephen (C , d off N.Y. feated Fork nion M tary 

TIME and ANOTHER PAGE Rh a a _ Academy here today 2614 to 
7 win the state Military League 
football championship. 


thy Ae Events 


te ae Yazon Bt f sake | : our st F 
one . . - . tit r= 
: or 3 Beha tunes Te 
Y FO Regeite st Chicas rem Treees 


P 


Oe ee ee a Be oe oe i or eee ee 


pariinh op, Preterrad tn bere HE 


Racing Selections for Pimlico 


IMPORTED WHISKY + MADE BY HIRAM WALKER 


IMPORTED IN BOTTLE FROM CANADA BY HIRAM WALKER IMPORTERS INC. DETROIT, MICHIGAN + BLENDED CANADIAN WHISKY 


ow eer FE Pee FP) Pe bw Seb Dd Pd D.D > > > > @ 'd'1s.d > > > D> D9 aD >.d> 


on Fe Gee, ee ee ee oe er oe oe oe oe oe 


©0 [MA] os | 02 | [69 [ro | 2! 


Se Ss SoS 6S ee eS SS SE Se 8 eS & be Ss oN Se De Oe 


will quarterback the South 
team in the Shrine’s All-Star 


cach Wally 


__ “*t'€ treat Outdoors 


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 1955 


35 Butts announced today. 
a Consoles, 21 years old and 6 


Winter Pike Moving 
In The Tidal Rivers 


By Hugh Brannen 


last in the tidal rivers, imposing a cardiac strain 
of spincasters, bait stickmen and fly hands. 
These patient brethren wait all year for 
go at the pike, which rarely are caught in 
uantity during warm weather. In summer 
toes must frequent the deep holes of spring- 
fed streams. 
If a bait minnow drifts within reach then 
they'll take it, but mostly they content 
themselves with plankton, the anima! minu- 
tiae of the Bay. That's why, in these lati- 
tudes at least, pike fishing is unprofitable in 
June, July and August. 
But after the frosts they rise from the 
depths and spread out, lrungry and belliger- 
ent, in search of forage. Brannen 
They like any conventional type of small artificial lure, 
rising with prejudice to both plugs and spoons. On an overcast 
day, with the water a little thick with silt, artificials will pay 
off best. But on a day of high visibility when the plastic or 
metal offering can be detect- * ~~ ar 
ed as a phony, live bait is | 
indicated. | the hot spot of the moment. 
The famous Baltimore bull | Particularly favored is Broad 
minnow, or barred killfish, is 


By Peggy Reynolds 
FOR THE yachtsman, win- 
ter lay-up does not signify 
merely the end of a season. 
It is ah opportunity to begin 
preparing for ; 
the next boat- 
ing year. A 
This thought 
softens the 
| sadness of | 
“mot h bal l- 
ing” the boat 
as bitter 
winds, ice 
and snow put 
| an end to wa- 
ter sport for age. Reyno 
| most local = 
boatmen. With four months 
ahead for working on spars, 
cabins, and removable parts, 
the owner envisions his craft 
finer than ever come spring. 
But the prudent skipper is 
aware that, dry or afloat, his 
eraft needs special “winter- 
izing” if he is to take her 
out next April sound and sea- 
worthy. Winterizing ig a 
broad and varied subject, but 
a few local experts would like 


A Feour-Menth Joh 


forget that their boats need 
attention, too. 

“Don't wait for a heavy 
freeze.” Fulton warns. “By 


then it may be too late, par- 

ticularly if you need service | 
from a-yard. The profession- | 
als may well be too busy by | 
you | 


mid-winter to 
prompt attention.” 

It's cold water for im- 
meérsing your boat, so all ad- 
visers suggest special care 
for the hull which is win- 
tered afloat. Sometimes it 
is not enough to close tie 
seacocks, particularly if they 
are not flush with the plank- 
ing. Metal pipe connections 
burst with a freeze and rub- 
ber hoses crack when water 
freezés «inside, so that the 
next thaw will flood the boat. 
Openings should be plugged 
from the outside with soft 
wooden dowels, the way you 
plug your marine engine ex- 
haust. 


A SPECIALIST on rubber 
hose connections is Jack 
Clifford, owner of a 30-t. 


give 


still. a preferred bait. You 
want a big bait, a2 minnow 4 
to 6 inches long. Tiny branch 


minnows, like those favored | 


of skiffs anchors every day. 


| Cheek. where a convention 


fer crappie and perch, are | 


not much good. 


THE SOUTH RIVER, from 
its junction with the Bay on 


up and beyond its headwaters | 
the 


where it on 


charts the North River. is 


INS Team 


Maryland Has 


3 on All-South 


The South is no doubt over- 
fished. but seems to be con- 
taining the pressure. 

One reason why it is over- 
fished is the defection of its 
beautiful sister, the Severn, 


| and the consequent transfer 


: 
; 


ATLANTA, Nov. 25 (INS). | 


Maryland players dominate | peared in the upper Severn 


last spring, festooning them- | 


the International News Serv- 
ice 
for 1955. 

Undefeated, untied, Orange 


All-South football team | 


Bowl-bound Maryland placed | 


three on the all- 


sectional eleven. 


Ed Vereb, | 


who set the pace for Atlantic | 


Coast Conference halfbacks 
with consistent star perform- 
ances throughout the season, 


and 


i—mainstays of the: | 
Maryland line which set a | 


new ACC rushing defense 


record, bolster the All-South | 


| @m was 


of patronage. 

Until about 1950 the Sev- 
the unchallenged 
pickerel stream. Something 
happened to it. Whether it 
was pollution, the death of 
the eel grass or some other 
obscure calamity, is still un- 
der debate. Anyway, the Sev- 
ern failed, though lately we 
have happened on evidence 
that the pike may be on the 
way back to Indian Landing, 
Boone's Cove and the Bottle 
neck. 


Spawn strings again ap 


selves on rocks and around | 


fallen trees. It was once be- 
lieved that the eggs were laid 
in long strings, but the best 
thought now is that they are 
only temporarily adhesive. 
We came upon that finding 
in the Maryland Tidewater 


News, the publication of the | toda 


Solomons lab. Biologists A. J. 
and Remeo Mansueti team 
up with a paper on juvenile 
pickerels in which they de- 
scribe the birth of the larvae 
on a lyrical note: 


“The first larvae that burst | 
| through their egg membranes 


created great interest among 
observers. Gaudily colored 


| with a line of brilliant, char- | 
treuse-green pigment spots | 


to get in some tips to supple- | auxiliary sloop. Last winter 
ment the engine manuals,the * * * * * * # ®* 


boating books and magazines, Trophy Banquet 


and the individual experience 
of local sailors. The Potomac River Sailing 
Association will hold its an- 


ee Friday, Dec. 2, at the 
ge Hotel. Cocktails will 
be served at 7:36, dinner and 
awards will follow, and there 
will be dancing afterwards to 
Jack Myerly’s orchestra, 


Dee 


| 

Jim Leftwich, 
Wells Pace 
Belvoir, 25-14 


Wins Over 
Monmouth ay ibe 
Sees : Aieadioer “halfback rae 


) . ‘ ‘wich and former Washington 
cad ak. toe oe ak ee “3 Redskins Halfback Billy Wells 
weeniaw Fa Ber Fe serio today led Ft. Belvoir, Va., to 
| y gue rUnTUNE)s 25-14 football victory over 
i< pe thoes — Jackie te Ft Dix 

i nd ee Sees Senmee | Some 1500 chilled fans saw 
yee > Seg 79 a my hae the Engineers score twice early 

’\in the first quarter. 


y. | | 
Hague, former Cleveland With Leftwich and Wells car- 


ing from their own 32, Wells,| 
schoolboy great and all-Big Ten|*” 
end at Ohio State. kicked a(% !°rmer Michigan State star,| 


a. 
got the first touchdown by go-| 
fourth quarter field goal of 14 | ing over from the Dix three. | 


|yards and a the game’s'' The Burros couldn't get 
jonly extra point. started and kicked to the Bel- 
Franco, former Navy fullback, | yoir 4g where Wells picked up| 
: the ball and ran to the Dix 43. 

prong 11 for Quantico’s touch-' Quarterback Joe Husk. former- 
own. ea ly of Southern Illinois, then 
But Quantico’s biggest hero tet to Leftwich who went 


KING FULTON, manager 
of Columbia Island Marina, 
puts in a word to “do it 
early’” People who hasten 
to add antifreeze to their 
automobile radiators at the 
first sign of frost frequently 


Ging Runs 43 Yds. 


Quantico 


: 


Area Yachtsmen Mothball Their Boats 
For Winter, Prepare Them for Next Season 


Jack went to his dock, and 
instead of a boat found... 
bubbles! He managed to 
snatch her from Davy Jones’ 
locker door, but spent long 
days and weeks cleaning out 
Potomac River mud. 

Rot is another danger to 
the hull. A custom-fitted 
boat cover is a fine thing, 
but be sure it. permits ade- 
quate ventilation. 

Walter Bonfield, who 
teaches the Potomac River 
Squadron’s course in engine 
and boat maintenance, be- 
longs to the school of thought 
which advises filling the en- 
gine block, after draining 
out the water, 


foot 1, is ranked among the 
country’s 15 leading passers. He 
completed 66 of 123 attempts 


Outdoorsman Swaps 


Kocene Age Oysters 


THE POWER of the press is many-splendored. 
cleaned wp dirty politics, 
defended motherhood and clobbered sin. 


Today, it is my 


with non- | 


freezing fuel ofl or kero | 


sene. 


“AIR PERMITS rust to 
start.” he points out. “But 
avoid kerosene if there is a 
rubber hose, for it will rot 
rubber. 

“Ice is terribly strong,” he 
continues. “You'd be sur- 
prised what it will do to a 
metal vessel. After you think 
you have drained your fresh 
water system thoroughly, 
there might still be low spots 
where water has settled. Fill 
the water tank with anti- 
freeze, which you can clean 
out quite easily in the spring.” 

And how about sails? Jim 
Morgan, who operates the 
Washington Sailing Marina, 
has words for his special 
breed of customers. 


“MAKE A thorough inspec- 
tion of your sails now,” he 
suggests. “If repairs are 
needed, send them to a sail- 
maker right away. Most lofts 
aren't busy this time of year, 
can give special attention to 
your work, and many will 
give a discount on jobs re- 
ceived before Jan. 1. Be 


| sides, you'll have your sails 


back when you need them. 
“If you aren't satisfied with 
the set of the sails,” he con- 
tinues, a good idea is to 
mark with pencil where you 
think correction should be 
made. Another scheme is to 
send a photograph of the sail 


in use. But, when writing the | 
| sailmaker, 


make ‘sugges 
tions’ instead of positive ‘or- 
ders.’ The sailmaker prob 
ably knows his business.” 


Boating, it seems, keeps its | 


adherents busy the year 
around. Caring for a boat 
does not cease when the 
river freezes over. 


in nearby Mafyland. In a dufflebag he carried an interesting 
assortment of bones. 

Some, he said, had been identified by Smithsonian experts 
as petrified sections of the bac 
porpoise. Others were pro *~~ 
nounced spinal remains of | 
the ocean's biggest mammal. | the eastern 


“UNCLE NEAL,” 


this season for 787 yards and 6 
touchdowns. 


Solomon's Island, you may 
have seen a crossroad sign 
pointing left to Scientists’ 
Cliff. It rises about 60 feet 
» above the bay. 


CLAGETT dug through a 
layer of shells 2 feet thick 
until he hit a strata of 
grayish-tan clay.. In this he 
found his whale fossils. Be 
low the clay was another 
thick layer of shells. This 
indicated to him the area was 
first under water. Something 
happened to make it recede: 
Later the ocean flooded the 
region again. 

It's things like getting twé 
such men as Bragaw and 
Clagett together that makes 
a newsman feel he is doing 
something constructive. It's 
almost as commendable as 
the public service Mary 
Haworth performs in re 
uniting love-lorn couples oF 
as Chalmers Roberts contrib 
utes in reporting what Dulles 
said to Molotov. 


It has 
brought criminals to justice, 
pleasure to report that journalistic enter- 
prise has brought together an outdoorsman 
with a batch of Eocene Age oysters and | 
another who owns segments of vertebrae 
from a bottle-nosed porpoise and a small, 
prehistoric whale. They have made a swap, 
so “2 now both have some specimens of 
each. 

John F. Clagett and his boy, George, of 
College Park, Md., as related here on Nov. 
ll, discovered the “ostrea.” which are an- 
cestors of our modern bivalves, in a Prince 
Georges County stream. / 

This week to our desk came Neal D. 
Bragaw Sr., who lives at 5400 Riverdale rd. 


kbone of a long-interred 


. coast of the | 
United States. In any event | 


as | the particular fossils Bragaw 


Bragaw’s young friends call 
him, has indulged an inter- 
esting hobby since his re 
tirement as a motion picture 
cameraman. He gives illus 
trated lectures on natural 
history and related subjects 
to school children. 

He is a frequent guest- 
teacher in the schoolrooms 
of Riverdale, the District of 
Columbia and Westmoreland 
County. 

Given Clagett’s address 
Bragaw hurried to the for- 
mers office to suggest the 
exchange of relics. Clagett 
and Bragaw soon consum- 
mated the deal. 


FIFTH GRADE pupils at 
Colonial Beach School found 
the mammal remains. At the 
Smithsonian it was surmised 
that Hurricane Hazel might 
have churned them out of 
the bed of the lower Poto- 
mac. The- children turned 


| them over to Uncle Neal so 


he could exhibit them to 

young students elsewhere. 
Bragaw reasoned that the 

whale bones must have been 


buried since the time when 


| all of this country, excepting 


the Great Plains, was at the 
bottom of the sea. 

As for the pointed-nose 
porpoise (“Tursiops Trun- 
catus), the encyclopedias say 
they sometimes even today 
ascend the Hudson and Poto- 


| mac and other rivers near 


carried had been part of the 
ae strata a iong, long 
ime. 


THE COLONIAL BEACH | 


area abounds in mammal re- 
mains. 


at the river's edge at low 
tide. 

Clagett, it turned 
the vertebrae of a whale. He 
found them at Scientists’ Cliff 
in Calvert County, Md. only 
last weekend. These sperci- 
mens, however, were con- 
siderably smaller than Bra- 
gaw's; he was happy to 
acquire some of his fellow 
explorer’s. 


Two miles beyond Prince | 


Frederick, Md. en route to 


Collectors of such | 
items put on boots and wade | 


out, | 
already had some discs from | 


ABRAHAM 


CHEVROLE 


1339 EAST-WEST HEWY. 


at Cotesville Rd Silver Soring 
OPEN DAILY & AFTER 
CMURCH SUNDAY TH 10 PM 


2 A) et ~ ~“ 


running along their dorsal 
fintoids, the larval pickerel 

| gave the impression of a 

| piscine harlequin. The bright 
green pigmentation over the 
head and along the back was 
surpassed only by the many 
areas of bright orange color 
around the eyes and along 
the sides of the body .. .” 


or. reat 


ack De 
aeghs 


Pesitien 
aT. ve Fre 
s tnd 
° eke Ferrest Teckle 
. Aabers Tackle 
Marviand 


la Terre, 


a. 
: Tennessee : Ss. &. 
Chllisee, noe SPaGt ner r. &. 


Center 
a. 


FRESHWATER season 


|was Jackie Ging, former Okla- 


over for the second score. 


ithoma halfback. On a fourth 
‘down gamble on Quantico’s 46 
with two yards to go for a first 
i\down, Ging took the ball and 
iraced 43 yards and set up 


Franco's touchdown. 


Dick Pryor, who doubles as 


head coach 


and halfback for 


‘Fort Monmouth, kicked a 35-| 
|yard field goal for Fort Mon- 
imouth with only four minutes 


half. 


After a scoreless s@cond 
quarter, the Welis-Leftwich 
battery marched from their 
own 39 to the Dix three where 
Wells made it 18-0. 

The visitors scored 
fourth and final touchdown in 
the last quarter when tackle 
Bob Squibb of Philadelphia in- 
tercepted a pass on his own 38 
and ran to the Dix 34. Fullback 


their 


Shrine Staffs Complete 


MIAMI, Fia.. Nov. 24 —Coach- 
fing staffs for the Shrine’s North- 
South College All-Star football 
game in the Orange Bow! Dec. 
26 were completed today when 
Bernie Crimmins of Indiana 
was signed to work with Art 
(Pappy) Lewis of West Virginia 
on the North team. Wally 
Butts of Georgia and Rex En- 
right of South Carolina will 
coach the South. squad. 


| ends in Maryland Nov. 30. ) 


| When we observed the other 


: 


; 


day that bass fishing was 
over, we did not refer to the 
calendar season, and regret 
that some Marylanders so in- 
terpreted it. But the pike of 
brackish water are subject to 
salt water laws. and so are 
caught all winter. until 
March, together with 


run with them. They hit on 
rong same bait, those busters 
0. 


the | 
pound-sized yellow perch that | 


ut Attendance Is Down 


Horse Bets Will Hit 
New Record This Year 


NEW YORK, Nov. 24 ()—Betting on the horses at the Na- 


tion's ru 


year, al 
Associated 


tracks apparently will smash all 
there will be a slight decline in attendance, an 
survey disclosed today. 


records this 


Incomplete reports from the 24 states with legal parimutuel 
wagering show that the betting turnover will hit $2,086,638.242. 
thus exceeding the two-billion-dollar mark for the third time 
in history and the third straight year. 


This is a 2 per cent 


blamed it generally on the weather. H nes 


the East 


Coast, along with extreme heat 


bothered 
aves, while other 


areas had rain during their meetings. 
It was virtually a standoff in attendance, 11 states being 
up and 12 down (South Dakota 


wagering, 17 showed increases. 


no figures). However, in 
le New York, Massachu- 


setis, Kentucky, New Hampshire; Delaware, Arkansas and 


Arizona reported decli 
The 


thoroughbred figures do not include those for trotting, 
a an additional 10,147,255 witnessed the sport in 1954 


$444.845.200, with $31,767,467 revenue to the 


states. 
figures: 


expects to report another gain for 1955. The 


1965 BETTING AND ATTENDANCE 
a 


ae! got by without him, 31.0. 


‘remaining in the first 
| Fort Sensouts was stopped Larry Fromhart, Indiana Uni- 
‘twice within Quantico’s five-| versity, carried it to the Dix 
\yard line and once on the 16 one where Quarterback Bill 
‘as Quantico’s defense per- Frasier of Rice, sneaked over. 
‘formed magnificently. | Dix scored its two touch- 
| Quantico now has a 7-3 record| downs against Belvoir reserves 
‘and will play Fort Jackson next/as Lou Scarzello of NYU inter- 
iweek in its final game. Fort! cepted on the Dix 47, Quarter- 
'Monmouth completed its sea-| back Jim Tansey of St. Bernard 
‘son with a 55 mark. 'College ran to the 17 where 
STATISTICS | fullback Dan Begin of Cornell 
Ft. Menmesth took a pitchout around right 

61. end to score. 
Dix took over again on downs 
Son the Belvoir 31, worked to 
i 2=-"t\the four, where Scarzello went 
‘over right tackle for the second 
touchd . Tom O'Brien of 
Notre Dame kicked both extra 


- Quantice—Toachdown. 
pg NO gS 


He’s Thankful 
Jim Norman 
\Edlowitz Defeats 


Not Gripmg 


It hasn't been quite a perfect Footer for Title 
Ne Or ee ent asn't doing| . Bilis Edlowitz defeated Jerry 
pa a g,2 oe et Thanksgivin Footer, 2 and 1, yesterday and 
Day. Cas ™ . won in Class A in the handcicap 
The Redskins’ growing 250- > nn aN tournament at 
pound 2)-year-old is at George- . 
town Hospital, recovering from Dave Allentuck defeated Nat 


Lurie, 2 up, in Class B: Sam 
es sateen se pe Eichberg defeated Lee Catz, 1 


was at the base of his spine.|@P, in Class C, and Dave Wise 


3 defeated Dr. A. Lewis, 2 and 
=e will be out for the 1, in Class D. 


Although he could not play 
against Cardinals, Norman 

was scheduled to accompany BRIGGS 6 REDSKINS 
Special to 
STEELERS GAME 
BY 


come to Chicago from York, | 
Neb.,” Jim said, “I didn't know 
| about the change in plans until 
iI read about it in your paper) 
‘when it was too late.” ; 
Norman, a non-collegiate who 


the team to Chicago last Sun- 
B&O 


day. However, due to a slip, he 
Speedliner 


wasn't informed of the switch 
from plane to train because “4 
| 

PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Sunday, Nov. 27 


unfavorable weather condi- 

tions. 
LV. WASHINGTON 6:30 A.M. 
RETURN — LV. PITTSBURGH 


“IT sent my mother money to 
What did he think of the 
6:30 P.M. SUNDAY NIGHT. 


team? “I'm proud of them, real 
of them,” Norman said. 
—Jack W 


Redskins Office — District 7-6148 


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6 Palen tee | A Movie Immértalises Out Lacquered Liberace {w1==-=7= 


PATRON saint of the Gasping! irving Wallace's screen play whom ultimately he bestows on|has been faithfully caught in all | 
One On the Aisle Girdle set, Liberace is on view spins out to nearly two hours,/a poor composer, Alex Nichol. | ‘ts nauseating tasteleisness. HOWARD 
V dd RAF in his first movie, “Sincerely | the first half dominated by a| Carefully celluloaded are the Rnd 
, j ait Be Yours,” at the Metropolitan and parade of Liberace arrange-|Liberace trademarks: The un- ee | AGE ? 
e 5 ke a | | Ambassador. ; | menté straight from his. TVinervingly deathlike smile, the| apesnmpeey ei aemeedeeeen | ” an € 
On the grounds of the Four “concerts.” sequined dinner jackets, the % | “Lucky 7 Blues Show” 


V , J i d & "m=. ~©6©6h@ «éC| Freedoms, I will defend Liber-_ There also is a romance in-| wavy hair lacquered to a froth, . wih 
ce 00 ee ae Mims | *°° to the death, even his, This| volved, wherein the pianist age Rl sergeants ta he | * JACK DUPREE 
P Es dp, Oe is a free country and anybody| ‘© realize his secretary—Joanne | ODizalion of the halt - * EARL KING 
Pr | Dru—is the Real Thing and, un-/ Nician over the true artist. 
By Richard L. Coe aff has a right to be Liberace or see| * LITTLE WILLIE JOHN 


| Liberace. It’s as simple as that. | ‘i! the last moment, yens for a| TV's phenomenal half-hour|§ »,, 4 ser ot es; Sundep ot 8 ’ 

RATHER SUSPECT Parliament has been had concerning a — 2 His movie bow is made via a|Fich girl—Dorothy Malone— | Tetatne Losey *® LITTLE GEO, SMITH 
London report that “The Dam Busters” has been doctored By George Arliss and Bette Davis,| am mem || NATIONAL ® NOW THRU DEC. 3 sb EX * MARIE KNIGHT 

to give an Amefican angle on this side of the water. “The Man Who Played God.” A TICKETS NOW ON SALE | .“amentcas rongr roeatan” tiene * OTIS WILLIAMS 

Eves.. 8:30; Mate. Wed. & Sat, 2:30 and his charms 


The version now on view at the Plaza certainly couldn't be pianist (originally it was an or- 
more British, more heartily RAF. Maybe a Flying Fortress : >. ganist) suddenly finds himself FOR THANKSGIVING 
* HAL SINGER ORCH. 


| o deaf. He learns to read lips, ra . 
meng ‘ag aad kg 2 air shots, a sis people never will i vn | ohendiis Gir ananmae’ et hinds ws ase , | . * $PO0-DEE-0-DEE 
This is RAF, Air Ministry and Britannia throughout and a/ ' ) ea 't Sain $:30 p.m. > A They're. All Record Sere .. . 
good picture at that on a theme usually thought too technical. £ aa $1.20.$1.75 $1.75-$2.60 i And Theyre All Great 
Now Thru Thursday 


As the leading character—an inventor played by Michael Red- INCEREL “. ia 
grave puts it, “There's a very thin line between inspiration ih posses” green bert oq by" py Te eee Ee 

BS gi. a 4 In Warne bier by TODAY 3 SHOWS HOWARD LINDSAY and RUSSEL CROUSE Midnite T 
Directed by DRETAIGNE WINDUST Show Tomorrow 


and obsession.” ie H. Clothier usicgl arrange- 

His inspiration was a particular type of bomb which could ‘SES | mente by sag Pal pene Sones > | 
blow up dams vital to Ruhr Valley industry during World War gn rected by Gordon Dourias At the | 
If. For reasons still too obscure for this nontechnician, ordinary) ne THE CAST 
bombs won't do the trick. They have to be taught to skip. ay | ieclen Magee 


Dr. Wallis—Redgrave—has a theory how to do this. In Movie Bow 


But for theory to become practice a squadron must learn 
how to pinpoint the mesg at a given angle 60 feet—no more, psy sn ane 
t d G — _ » mak | 
no less—above the water. Wing Cmdr. ibson ~Richard Todd bew in “Sincerely Yours” at | 


heads the outfit which masters’ ~~ So gecees 

this trick, thanks to a primitive; «rye pay a0 * warner | he Metropolitan and Ambas- | Hr Roleck ....05.-+++»- tan a Welle | 

bombsight and a lesson learned Rereen play by" at ae Oe in Brtjain. ) sador. rs. Cosgrove ..... Barbera Brown 

in a music hall, where he noted pe book by Paul Brick m on_ Wing 

hat two spotlights could be’ & ae? Geom pom 

owe —— : er Photograph Gees, Die | De a forceful player of sure 

trained to meet at a given rected by Michael Andersen. Al the . : 
Plaza. renown. deeds after spying on troubled 


IN PERSON 
distance. wR CAST le from hi th 
So all this, as you see, is| wine Comér. Gibson. Richard Todd | ; r .| people trom his penthouse, 
technical but I think it can be Dr BUN. Wai lis Michael Redgrave CALENDAR: The Venezue His kindliness gives him cour- 
te. have an operation which 


Pm. 


eo Ee gna 
a, si 


RESERVED SEATS NOW ON SALE 
MAIL ORDERS FILLED PR Y 
SOK OFFICE OPEN 10 AM. TO 9:15 PM, 


PHONE RESERVATIONS 
ACCEPTED ME. 8-4425 5 


SOS SS F868 S88 SF SEES E88 SEE SEES eee 


e* 


ai Jeans | lan Ambassador to the Organ-| , UN DONALD COOK 


rus 
said that the screen play by Set Se, aimee Basets Baril age’ | ization of American States and|* either will kill him or bring him ARTWUR SCHMITILER'S COMEDY 


R. C. Sherriff and direction by, Kir Vice Marshal Cochr 
ye mn Bepest Clark Senora de Gutlerres Alfaro) pack his hearing and his de 


Michael Anderson make the Group Capt. Whitworth .. Derexk Parr | Will show a group of docu- , ” 
purely technical points as im mentary films about Venezuela ferred Carnegie Hall concert. wig A RONDE” 
oe . —, ag he /tonight at 8:30 at the anesagl a % . a 

emt out the phony ‘ove sun British as the RAF and I hope; Department auditorium . — a ee & 

customarily thrown into such the members of Parliament | The Playhouse is opening at 9 wre J > A. Late Show 10:30 -m™m. é& cm uA EMGLIGM VERSION BY ERIC BENTLEY 
yarns and the film benefits ac- who've expressed concern over | | this wey Saturday in WaltD | BRAMATICALLY POWERFUL Sor eer 

cordingly. The players seem the Americanization of an | honor of e African Lion” Liberace 
to fit the assignment. heroic foray will quickly turn! . The Howard's stage bill 


But the story published in their attention to more vital this week is “The Lucky Seven , 
*”| Blues Show,” with Jack Dupree, a JOANNE Dru 


this newspaper from London concerns. : YMOUSE 

on Nov. 17 stating that the Earl King, Little Willie John, om oo DOROTHY hae tune 6 

presence of some Flying For-- ANTONIO TO CONTINUE:| Little George Smith and Hal 
Postponement of the Shubert’s! Singer's band, offering the ———— =e " ; __ MALONE 


tresses gives the film an Amer- -_ 
ican tone is sheer bunko. Much| incoming revue “Pleasure; usual midnight performance 


was made in the press book) Dome,” means that Antonio! Saturday . . . Theatre Lobby’s’ ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S 


abou ttin ropriate Lan- 2nd his Spanish dance revue) final three performances of | 
prenendhny eee Bri Tos the film-| Will be able to stay another| “Blood Wedding” will be given|| THE "TROUBLE 
ing of events that happened 12) week starting Monday ... As|tonight and Saturday at 8:45,| . 
years earlier and the Lancs Paul Hume noted in his review, | Sunday afternoon at 5, at 17 St. | WITH HARRY ; 
surely look factual. of the opening, the Antonio| Matthew's ct. nw., behind * TECHNICO 7 
“The Dam Busters” is ag Company is not just another| Rhode Island and Connecticut | Oba by 5 LOR 7S On dig 
\Spanish dance company .. .| aves. | 
Audiences and reviewers alike| m 
seem convinced that this is Were Ie. Oo 


. THE current that A 
Show Times | toate os rightful her to Escw- ) MORE WEEK BY : AMBASSADOR 
. ero... At any rate, see for POPULAR = | = —— 
For Friday youreett | SET ACCLAIMED TERRIFIC ee S- ike AIPULPLIOGARL 
STAGE | _RE-DISCOVERY: Simon Oak. BY ALL WASH. PAPERS tak ee ee a ee 1 7 lak j y/ f y 
uM EIOMOUAT 


HATIONAL—"The Great Sebast ians.” | land, the compellingly different a ! nf : eft £0UF7 
SHUBERT. fatae’s & Gpaenish bdaliet ee rhe Gas Lh. AB. = od ' 
company. st D e eat: suians, | e+? "4 . 
SCREEN probably is getting a little : S. HUROK present SIDNEY LUST THEATRES DISTRICT THEATRES 
TREE PARKING Air-Conditioned | | [| Por mee Con dfaon ie 71-3000 


AMMASSADOR —“Sincerely Yours: st | Weary of being discovered . : SMASH HIT - UNANIMOUS RAVES! 


: 3:40 
18TH & COL, RD.| 


anr-cin vos = Only after writing my admira-| | R 
— “International Buyt- AMBASSADO : 
lesque.” st 1:30. 3:35. S246. 738 tion of him in the opening per-|] & | “SINCERELY YOURS” ened 6200 Marlboro Pike 
933 “and. 11-30 formance did I realize he wasii & | é tO” HELL 
CAPITOL-— “The Tender Trap. at race, Dorothy Malone, 1:25. 3:40./ | Audie Murp 
11:25 a. m. 1:30, 3:38, 5:48. 7:50 |the fellow who got such ap-| ist® 6.65, and Late Show, 10:30. BACK.” CinemaSeape- deine had : 
6:30, 198, plus Judy Rw ack 


| plause for taking over Paul M 
> mm |Muni’s “Inherit the Wind” role} AVALON a iy ee ial Mot 

10. 235, |when Muni developed the eye | end his electritying Tb 8 20, 20, Me Po i. show aly: 
ad » AR ow i713 0 he. NW. 


. - 
Fe Te a Sy ® ite i . |trouble which forced him to SPANISH BALLET COMPANY “BONG OF AR! _ Big a : 
. f $30 "943 an ee Parking. LL 3-3300. | _ Open 12:30 P.M. 
ee MEN” 


of 2:10. 3:20, $:20. 7:35. 9:45 and leave the cast... Oakland is x , ; with thrilling Bamence singers cad guiteriat te dine 
with nee “Gable, Jane Russell, 


a he 


Cow Youn aaa ae en naan 


7th & T Ste. WLW. 


an of 
odtony— "Tempest in the Fiesh.” | 
m 


xuitit's— 6 Guys "26 Dolls.” tt. 10-07 |no stranger to the cast sheets,| BI y AXNE. iT Tm AL we, ae 
12:47, oon and ‘having been in “Ski Next ; . bet ¥ £: ‘% 8 S: t) . \ M6. 15 ) 
ving n pper Next! Pad ~ ROSITA SEGOVIA * CARMEN ROJAS es At 1:00 P. M a eel "|| Humphrey Borat. Geng ineme: | REPUBLIC , 1343 You St. NW. “THE LAST ¢ leader 


bite at den of Eden.” tod.” “ . 
and 16 ess Tad FAR" ate “Caesar snd’ Claceutre” "all gt athe scams tee yo WO. 62345, Montgomery, “DAS det? piv. Oms jor | | | Late Show 11-30 T O Tenient ie vuste- 
| ae | seataees : eSeubeecte othe.’ wits | AIRPORT DRIVE-IN At™o1=* 


mecART HC! 5 Sis Sse §00 snd | The Shrike” ... So here he ~~ Burt art, Prederi b 
wi tndron  ragene Se nee is again, shining like a big) = — — ———— _— “} . rad r Last show of season. Sun. Nov. 27 | Martha Scott. erie Mare able, “Sus er oe emaseope) 
—'Bincere! rs ' . Ga ussell at 7:00 
— 5-30. 7-40 | leaguer, who, admittedly tar- Show Children Under 12 Pree! BOOKER 1433 You &. WW. || Plus. “Passace 
enor d a _*Big Pree Playeround Now Open | | T i | Pay Wrst” “Cester) 
Doors Open 12:30 P.M. ne at 9:30. Cartoon. Located in 
Ungton ute 


5 . 1:20, 3:25 
and 9 $0 dily, I confidently predict will aa22, ALLANT 
oxtanio— © SPORE i. the Fos.” et : - Near Parking. ME. 8- 2841 ' + ie Mur-| | on U4. just 
245, 43 rs ALWAY a . a with dene Wrman. Charlion Heston. | 14th St. Bridge. Kiddies "Pree “setae 


sipoatts.. Lpybtancs , — a rane : CENTRAL. "= Kelly, Ibe Ey BA Gusmcaeese-Oulee at fon 
. : ne Ww. ope . : 
2. soa chy Rirves.”| | 49" LANGSTON 22% & Bern's ta. we. | SUNSET DRIVE-IN Leesburg Pi 


Doors Open 2:45 PA. 


PALACE’ Good Morn! BS Miss Dove.” | 
RST ema 3:40, 8:80 LATE SHOW TONIGHT % | 12:83, 4:35, 7:55. s “Sean CRORES — ane I| | - po Pw 2, 
| | Wee Today 1 | MEIDI' In CinemaScope, “TO HELL AND | “GENTLEMEN MP MARRY 


mad 10:15 p oa 
. * at 12. 1:28, 3:18, | odilitiee. 20% Contery Fos precenty KENNEDY RA. 6 Special 
7:05, 9 and ii p. m. ats oe inee 7wo J si CARTOON CARNIVAL at’l P.M. BACK” starring Audie Murphy. 
} awe ane ‘2 3 raw % | : Paid’ ' . ¥ JENNIFER JONES eas . ne “Onis, © pba At| cleared. before svening ks, BRU NETTES” 
‘ ° ig 
om rl» Good Morning, Miss Dove! ‘i; Fite Eee h = age | BETHESD 26a. | ‘E-B THEATERS Rcott Brey. Jeanne “Crate. ar} 
(eurtesout} | & : : PEN 1 ai, Te nar | HER Bae Semasesee || MacARTWUR 5 Bock | | parry. 7:00. i020. “Cartoon. hie 
: . CINEMAS cOPE  bterline Hapden, i 2 ." 4:50. | ~ ; P Bivd. EM. 2.4600 | | 
NEW PRENCH 5 . COLO® by 04 Lunt wm prEREOPHOmee SOuN® Directed by MENRY KOSTER dite at i a . = NE 7 ad im 2-8 htt: MATINER TODAY! | LEE HWY ARL BLYD 
Revue CF. inte , —— . go. _ 5-908, Special Matinee. nly, plus || Alastair Sim. eons renfell in th | : 
, ty ——5 Ss SAVOY ao {1 08, ' 40. | pane ore a ene © will be | or  TRINIAN _"* Stik BELLE, oF | 7. DRIVE-IN ' THEATRE 
mt ek minal | 490, widniens shor Seactne 3120 P| | CHEVERLY Cin Seats hes) Bomnhons™ (Pechiccor), at] | | Church ra |m 
CONTIMENTAL STARS | een oa F OCK ON WOOD.” Danny Kaye. | | TODAY, 1PM Bur aoe 3:30. 3:25. 1:30 and 9:30 p.m | and a Paurtan ¢ rs 
st Am . . " ’ SHERIDAN aa. 6-2 100. zi eres ||} Techaicoler at 1:15, 3:22, 9:30, ascope: | [ Soeee aim, our complimenta ) — 5-- doping, St Galle 
al Na caste eae ‘oe . RATTLE YATTSVILLE 4° | COLONY et hog A 5 | “THE | TALL MEN” 
| ae terling . . , 
ie tee Bar ‘1 wee aa | £ at = | “TEMPEST IN Tite ||| SOARS SAMce, Jang pose 
' , 7 Foes rkins. hes Z a i olo r~ 
STRANGER SILVER HELL AND tere | REE (TODAY. 1. PM “MBIOE. FLESH” “ABBOTT & 
, , : : 45. 3:00. 5:15. 7:25. Mw red PM. Only. eatre || with Prancoise Arnoul. Fo ) 
on HORSE BACK | et Serer on! ee Sil, Senared etors evens ||| | Bag §Riecce Me cube | COSTELLO MEET 
| | AKOMA "7; {ae ick ELE KAYWOOD Wa 7-399, duties only. At 6:30, 8:10 and 9:50 p. m.| | 1: ; : & 
eer a Ladd. 2:08. AND BACK." CinemaBcope-Color at | | APEX 4813 Mes. Ave. WO. 6.4600 MR. HYDE : 


cari || SF PEE BOE ||| sate mens ten aap||| “CARTOON 


BACK.” seen ost". e. _— | roe. v8 | CARNIVAL” 


I Sin'at te Losi i 6: 30, *: Color Color plus Cartoon Carnival at 1 || 5:25. 7:30 and 
Sr lost erry, $30. su: 53 PM. enly. Theatre . rie os “: ace | Six in color at 7:00 
° 


—, 


Pe a Show Only, dee. ail te “aleaal before evening LANG ) 
ur Rade ‘Cartoon Show. show we. Ag 5700 SPs? 6:30. Show raat? 
ae id iz” divers a Pree 


-_—— ee || Audie Mur 
“ m phy L A 
mo Site ‘thro. | MILL tie surony, “Po | | | PACK.” Cinema cope. “st tah $58) | | Sam. “PRIDE 


in “THE die Wii, 
UPTO Burt Lancaster, 2:35, 5:00, 7:20, HELL AND — * CinemaScope- 


9:65. Color st 7:12. | 7 Flewer Ave. 
| SPECIAL oo Pa ten MATI {| | FLOWER ,” 9 Parking. JU. 91666 QUEENS CHAPEL 
WINEL AMD THEATRES Wome =” (echale oh Rs! WA Solar y 
hak and oni us | (Tee nnicolor >. at . 3: a ae & Homilton St. W, Hy. 
: : ; udie 
ABC DRIVE-U IN 7100 Indien Head | | will be cleared before evening ny Mo ! * eh. Coane ae 335'° iy “TO AND bce _ 
Hy. SE. LO. 7-2555 | | _ shee (Technicolor), at 2:30, 5:30 and RIVER.” 8:42. =x free 
| D ae , 


Borart, Oe Pheney te >THE | NAYLOR ** <4 “Ale, Ave, OL 
Free Porking. LU. 2- poo 


Audie ptarems in “TO 
" Cenomaeene, at 2:25. 338 


Saag, Wissen Se -dk| | | THEATRES—ARLINGTOM. ||| £355.02 f 
fad. ork ead FALLS CHURCH, VA. ||| “tputicky pikint™™ Sc 


ALMER ; 
[auwave mer rooo ar a0] ||/STATE ‘ls Ons. “= ||| ROCKVILLE DRIVEIN eh ii ae 
- MOU 


1415 Good Rd. Clark Gable. Jane Fussell i 
ANACOSTIA '“"! Goo4 Hove Osh, ee Ee 0,8. Rouie 240, Rockuite, auc. || CERLLOW Mi 


LU, 1. . : 
ABSCOPE! bre Bogart. CinemaScope—Color ~ ‘ ” 
e Tierney in SHE LEPT wrt WILSON 1730 Wilson Bivd. ‘TO ‘© HELL A AND | BACK CARVER. ALEXANDRIA , = 
~ De 4 oe ee: at 1:00. 4:00, ja. 7-1 | | CimemaScope. , 
Also Pele, "aor een dene Buccs Russell. wi eh Cra ) . 50s p xs CKY _ mary “BATT , Paver” Westey 


in “TOP OF THE 


L + oe | ere aan" | 
N ATIO N A one pene she did’ “2, | sas” wr $a 3 tines _femmperature. faile eae ar re ALEX.-ARLINGTON, VA. 


~. 8 HIGHLAND ** ‘> - 
wm M-G-M's hilarious tale of 9 / i: we b%. ii U4731) BUCKINGHAM *' N, Glebe Rd. | | degree for information CALL Ki. 9.9000 
cence ON nn 
ag ia &. 


oR ee sit AL DIRECTO, | a rs eae file story of Audie Murph eit Ss John Wayne. Laure REED 
; “s erence, at ne hin BLOOD A BEST THEATERS .. , Suve 


ee pAlTOe “Gay & Lau hing Film” .g re he 
santo ~~) Nichole vo 8 | Atlantic | : Rory | Calhoun « 
y ening | ATLANTIC 525.55 % SYLVAN Ft ae “SURE | || VIRGINIA Yon ea 


POP CONCERT ages ! ' 
TOMORROW NIGHT at 8:30 P.M. eee Jay Carmody—ST. AR semaphore true Des m4 i | TAB TE ta - eT t ntl First $4. KI. Me 
BACK.” Metiniosler. at a:18-" 6:08, use IEMY fn of " Reagan 


R T . S F 1 1 “Ht’s First Class Stuff- : i aie a gt naan 
Lots of Laughs!” : Perens eee Ee ee as saares aio “8 


aane Funniest Woman in she Werld”’ Bi Sins Also Robertson nk Lovejoy 
, ill Majeski—NEWS ¢ in OF THE WORLD.” at 7:55. ts LL 6-8300, 
Love a Cherry, Gentle ie ina with S Peath pi a ~ gos pao HELL ATLAS er, “THE LONG. ‘ona 
Overture: 3 Dances t ' died LINE” Wanda Hendrix, 
ty - Anemia's Death Scene, ta Danza; erlion. ; . c >: BLACK D. —s ini 
: HAND —_ YORK - 


| pu 4. ' LE D 
Tickets $1.20, 1.80, 2.40, 3.00, 3.60 | oF Tae Ee cdler ate-50. | Bette Davis rt Ryan, 
oy rtson nk Loveloy ae a rank 6in- 

in ‘“ 0 P THE Y WORLD” at 7:55. emaSc Cc ae Onest bi 


Next Wednesday Symphony Concert—Nev. 306—Censtitetion Hall ; _ 
ne: r “ "Leurel, md. vote fe 
STRAND saree, fe in - arte 


my || A ae ROTH THEATRES oe BE 
ae "||| ROTH'S THEATRE $v" 
Meee OP TERAS," at 8:05. i SPRING || GEORGETOWN 12°), Wisconsin Ave 
bass, & Capito! Rolie a. Georgia ti Reng at a AD. 4.8100 
ley Overture: Beethaven; Piano Concerto 8; Shostakovich Symphony #10 = 4 Re. 4 > * - "Finals Wash Benertory Cinema 
ws Bb ge ee: msm || ALEC CUINNERS 
i 


Thursday, Dec. 1 and Saturday, Dec. 3 at 8:30 | 2:30, 


SAS REYNOLDS . FAIRFAX FAIRFAX, VA. Lae inte HA (LAST HOLIDAY Times 


Dad WAYNE: Celeste HOLM. Sterling Hayden. Yvonne DeCarlo ‘Feature Wilkerson’ Li Toa9 Wisconsin 2 Ave. 
: Pe ; “SHOTOUN" MAK pe  AvENeE 443 Pa. Ave, 5 
IN CINEMASCOPE AND COLOR | a SISER-BETHESDA "32725" || on." 79h tea - PR || a aa : 
TICKETS: $1 do. 135 1°50, 2.00 (GOxts) ——— Fa ae es ROCKET.” in Color. mtd Lats oe oper ae 


_8HO Ww 


ATIONAL SYMPHONY BOX OFFICE FT CAPITOL aaa CARVER *) tsa Welder, ad 
HELD HELD OVER! iP WALDEN in 


F 4.z>2e 


N 
RITT’S, 1330 G Se. N.W. NAtional 68-7332 Sone Weed 


7 


7 


Anna Magnani for Premiere 


plete today when the Metro-, 
Opera Soprano, Liciaiv 
the set. 
third | of 


Friends Think Bing May Wed Kathy 
Ser Peer tan ites 
000 copies of the record, waiting 
for the Nov. 24 release date... 
Clifford Odets is sighing over 


screen neweomer Valerie 
French. 


HOLLYWOOD, Nov. 24 (INS) 
Influence that Anna 


could not resist was to 
bear on her to come here for) 


NEW YORK, Nov. 24—Bing,up and went to California to 
Crosby is seeing so much of make it really final .. . The 
funniest rumor of the week has 
young actress Kathy Grant, his 

: Dali working up 
friends wouldn't be surprised to nightclub act for one of New 

hear wedding bells, despite the| York’s chic East Side bistros. 
big difference in their ages.) The former Mrs. Mel Ferrer 
Kathy's only 22 .. es become the bride of noted 
heir ‘Ed Luckenbach and his al-|artist Howard Warshawe .. -| pponucer Julie Styne, who ™ 

most4iancee, Audrey “Kit”|Tin Pan Alley thinks Roy Ham- skyrocketed Sheree N orth ond 
Clifton, have ended their ro-|ilton will have the top-clicking ‘Jayne Mansfield from bit player 
mance after a tiff. She packed version of “Everybody's Got a status to stardom via Broadway 
stage, is looking for a similarly 
sexy type to enliven his forth- 
coming musical, “Mr. Wonder- 
ful”... . Gina Lollobrigida has 
a funny new hobby. She's be- 


ks. 
Her latest is “Incident 
Titanic,” in which she soenie os 
for the Screen Directors Play- 


‘DID YOU READ 
THE CRITICS REVIEWS? 


“IT’'S.BEEN RUMORED THAT ON 
OCCASIONS | SPEAK MY 
MIND FREELY .. . BUTI 


FREELANCING has been 
very profitable for darkeyed, 


son, Luca, who 

is a polio vice Miss Parsons 
tim. Hal explained to her that 
come quite expert at picking|the boy could get polio treat- 
pockets as a parlor stunt. ment here that would benefit’ 
Detroit's current dance craze,)"im, and Anna, who is a de- 


which has parents of teen-agers Voted mother, consented. 
worried, is the opposite of|. There will be great whoop- 


rock-’n’-roll. It's called “Motion-|4¢-40 about both premieres. In| 


ng oes 


well enough to drive his car : 
around Hollywood... Lucille|yoceain use gu me 


Ball and Desi Arnaz are toying)" warion Brando, former mem-| 


with the notion of doing @)se- of the Actors Studio, and| 
Spanish-language musical revue| warilyn Monroe, now studying | PATRICK MAYES CONCERTS 


| jin Mexico City. ‘there, are posing for pictures.| IN CONSTITUTION BALL “A Must, 
on the West Coast, a week, and/ettes, with Helen Hayes as 
cited over the doctor’s happy sea trite ten Dy de 
0 . 
move from the Warner or| ROME 
h ined 
the other night when she joine all who listen, he raves about | Choral Orsanizations in Swe 
Pa 


SAMUEL GOLDWYN’s 


Picture of the Year... 
America’s Own 


in Color and CINEMASCOPE® 5 


STARRING 


MARLON BRANDO-JEAN SIMMONS 
me PRANK SINATRA - VIVIAN BLAINE 


VOTE FOR AUDIENCE AWARDS TODAY __ 


DISTRIBUTED 
SY M-G-M 


vent 
Paramount presents 


HUMPHREY  FREDRIC 


BOGART... MARCH 
-WILLIAM WYLER'S 


Production of 


THE DESPERATE HOURS 


it 
JANET LAKE, a model from/Marilyn, Margaret Truman,| 
Manhattan, will get a fast Holly-| Jayne Mansfield and Viveca SUN., DEC. 4—3;00 P.M. a 
wood buildup. She's only been|Lindfors will serve as usher-| Master- 
already an important MGMitheir captain. SANTA CECILIA " 
executive has flipped over her 4 plece 
... The Jackie Coopers are ex-| YOU CAN BET all the tea in| 

China that Mario Lanza won't! 
warning: “Get ready for twins.” | Star 

Ethel Waters won an ovation|5is next picture, He's com- he Qeuinneiee 

at Art Ford’s Club Valentine|Pletely sold on Jack Warner Georrstown Visitation 

and Jack understands him. To ot “Ga are ee 
Thelma Carpenter in singing 
“Happiness Is A Thing Called | Dis boss. fTonteverdt Mosart one 
Joe” ... One of the liquor| Mario's happiness was com- sears AV 


firms is putting out a Christmas 
decanter that can be converted | 
into a table lamp in eight sec- 
onds. In other words, you can) 
down the contents, get all lit up, | 
and then turn on the lights. | 
Alan Ladd has bought Louis 
L’Amour’s book, “Guns of the) 
Timberland.” He'll produce as) 
well as star in the film. Restau-| 
rateur Gogli is going all out to) 
break Luchow’s hold on the) 
Sunday night celebrity trade. 


- — 


U.L.P. Presents its Annual | ~~ 
Z Gala Thanksgiving Festival . 
‘ 


S 4 Hy 


$1.20, $1.80, $2.40, $3.00, $8.60 


SUN., DEC. 11—3:00 P.M, 


RUBINSTEIN 
ALL-CHOPIN PGM. 


GOOD SEATS AVAILABLE 
$1.20, $1.90, $2.40, $3.60, $3.60 


i Phene of erite for sew Met of 
§ remaining concerts. 


— ——EE ' 
— — a 


PATRICK HAYES CONCERTS 
IN CONSTITUTION HALL 


TUES., DEC, 6—8:30 P.M. 


DAVID OISTRAKH 


GOOD SEATS AVAILABLE 
$1.65, $2.75, $3.30, $3.85 


pares sg CERT BUREAU 
1168 G 8ST. H.W. NA. 8-715! 
(Campbell's) 


ARTHUR KENNEDY - MARTHA SCOTT: DEWEY MARTIN  CiG YOUNG. MARY MURPHY 


TRANS-LUX as At 


CON BUREA 14th at 
(in Campbell's} 1108 G NW. Open 16:45 A.M. 
| NAttonal 68-7151 Steinway Plane DI. 77-7600 


Steinway Piane 


1956 PONTIAC 


ADMISSION 
tax incl. 


Glamorous PATRICIA STEVENS model 
Your Ticket in Person if _ 
Ce from Pa- 


FIGH-POWLRED 
—— with the low-doun 
STEWART GRANGER 
JEAN SIMMONS 
ee 


ONTARIQ }: 


“BRITAIN’S FILM IS 


A FUNNY ANTIC 
as delicate as a hotfoot and 


i} 
i 


Hi 


' 


Hl 


i 


" 


' 


Hil 


Hil 


: 
hil 


ALASTAIR SIM 
JOYCE GRENFELL 
_ with George Cole 


Ertra! 


“Royal Symphony” 


Technicolor 


O 
lac Corlhuaer 
nn MecARTHUE BLVD. ot 40m SL 


— 


levelness, a new sweetness to the car's every 
inch of travel. 

It's Buick big and Buick roomy and Buick sure 
in its handling ease — and when you boss the 
miles in it, you know you have a brawny and 
beautifully balanced automobile under your 
command. 

And for sure — at modest extra cost — you can 


have this high-powered honey with the sizzling 


How about this one? 


How about this robust new 1956 Buick SpgciaL 
that comes to the American scene as the biggest 
prize-package of high-powered performance 
and high-fashion luxury ever offered in Buick’s 


lowest-price Series? 
For this one’s priced so close to the well-known 


smaller cars, you can hardly count the difference. 
(And the price we show here proves it.) 


. 
STARTLING! 


An Honest Approach 
To A Bold Subject 


‘TEMPEST 


AT POPULAR PRICES! 


' COLONY 


AVENUE AND FARRAGUT 5ST. NW. 


But brother! — you can sure tell the difference 
when you see it, sit in it, drive it. 


It’s Buick styled with a new sweep-ahead look 
and sports-car snap — even to the raised-skirt 
rakishness of full rear-wheel cutouts. 


It's Buick powered—with a big new 322-cubic- 
inch V8 engine that delivers its walloping power 
at a record-high compression of 8.9 to 1. 

It's Buick solid — with a brilliantly engineered 
new chassis that puts a new buoyancy, a new 


D. of C. 


PEAKE BUICK, INC, 
4505 Wisconsin Ave. N.W., EM. 2-2000, Washington, D. C. 
OTHO WILLIAMS BUICK 
1710 Geed Hope Read, $.E., LU. 4-7800, Washington, D. C. 


STANLEY H. HORWER, ING. 
1529 14th Street N.W., HO. 2-9200, Washington, D. C, 


|. EMERSON & ORME, INC. 
17th & M Streets N.W., DI. 7-8100, Washington, D. ¢. 


double-action take-off of Buick’s advanced new 
Variable Pitch Dynaflow. t 


So —how about this one? 


And how about coming in to see for yourself 
how much more sheer automobile your money 
buys here than the same money buys elsewhere? 
Come in this week and we'll show you that if 
you can afford any new car, you can afford a 
Buick — and be a lot happier in the bargain. 


tNew Advanced Variable Pitch Dynaflow is the only Dynaflow 
Buick builds today. It is standard on Roadmaster, Super and 


Century—optional at modest extra cost on the Special. 


' 


ws ing comm 
a equipment ond oc 
able at your OF 


Get 4 Secon Comtort in your new Buick with 


FRIGIDAIRE low 
CONDITIONING — wow af @ new - price a 


WHEN BETTER AUTOMOBILES ARE BUILT BUICK WILL BUILD THEM —— 
> 


MARYLAND 


JACK DANIELS BUICK, ING, 
8526 Georgie Avenue, JU. 9-6543, Silver Spring, Md. 


CAITHNESSS BUICK, ING. 
7700 Wisconsin Ave., OL. 6-5000, Bethesda, Md. 


HYATTSVILLE AUTO & SUPPLY CO., ING. 
5323 Baltimore Avenues. AP. 7-5200, Hyattsville, Md. 


VIRGINIA 


PAGE-HUGHES BUICK, ING. 
621 Arlington Bivd, (Rt. 50), Faille Church, Va. 
Jt. 3-9700, Lic. 535 


| STEWART BUICK, ING. 
1119 Wilson Boulevard, JA. 2-5800, Arlington, Ve. License 380 


TEMPLE MOTOR COMPANY 
1912-14 Diagonal Rd. KI. -4800, Alexandria, Ve., License 84 - 


Pee oe 8 Owe «+ 2s © «« «= 


e 


_ 
a. 


. 


en 


DO-IT-YOURSELF CENTER 


| AT ALL FIVE 
HOME INC. STORES | 


THANKSGIVING 
WEEKEND SALE 


SALE PRICES CONTINUE 
THROUGH SUNDAY 


OPEN EVERY DAY 
INCLUDING SUNDAY 


Gveronteed 


in 26 


water 

kitchen of bathroom 
. YELLOW. GR 

4%" by 4%" Tiles 


Variety of Colors and Sizes 


Easily installed, durable, beautiful. 
Easy to keep clean, even the wre 3 
est cleaners won't harm it. Availab 
lamorous colors in spatter or 
marbelized patterns. 
Waxing! And It's Grease Proof! 


GUARANTEED FIRST QUALITY 
ASPHALT 


As Advertised in 
Better Homes an 

ens and 

bearing the 

Good House- 

—_—— Guer- 

e¢ Seal. 


-prvof, beovtifies 
. WHITE, BLUE, CREAM. 
ff ond PEACH. ne 


3 Bisgest Names A, Pressure 
Lamine 


Reg. 75c 


Nationally Advertised CORONET =| 
PLASTIC WALL TILE 


» Q-. 


Sq Ft. 


3%... 


Special sizes. 
oy ide a 
24"x84"  30'xb4 
20x84” 


Vinubllex 


REG. 


“9 


30” x72” 


we He 


but nothing te mar — wear. Can- 
eval- 


perfect 
colers. 
“ 24"x72" 
36” x96" 


PLASTIC 
FLOOR 
TILE 


29%¢ EACH 


; 10° Each 


Never Needs BLACK 


nae tweets 
ROFLIZE , SAEs 


TU. 2-8100 


Open Daily 
and Sundays 


pert at res, 


Sanitary Commission, 
Maryland, Le Monday 
1955 2:10 


0 time. at which 
time they will be 


Suburban nitary Co ission, 
preter Maryland, _ Mon- 
da + 5. 00 


at 2: 
Pi. astern Sta atact Time st 


which R and time they we! ee 
ned one read 
e Special nk 


HEWITT JR... 
MAN AGER. JAM 
WILLARD A 
Commuomenets Attest: 
Becreta 


BUSIN SERVICE 


A 
“TRACTOR. additions. = Ro el. 


ing & repairs. ete C edit. 
EDGAR co. 


clogged sewers. 
ulpment- 


L. 8. RA 
JOHN 


terations, — 


Saget hs dst 


. 


ee eee - Sad . 


OST WANTED 
WINTER TIRES 
White 
Black all 
List Sale | List 

| Price | Price Price 
“6 40x15 | 16.00 | 11.96 | 17.96 
"“6.00n16 | 14.15 | 9.95 | 17.95 
6.7015 | 15.05 | 11.05 | 19.95 
“710x185 | 17.70 | 18.86 | 20.95 
“960n15 | 19.20 | 14.95 | 22.95 | 
“B.00x15 | 20.55 | 16.96 | 28.905 | 17.96 


Wo Taz! Exchange! Add ti each tf you 
ih fe to keep old tire. Tires mounted free! 


tens Se ee 


_ PARKINGTON. “ARLINGTON - 


Open Friday, Early & Late—I10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. 


Winter Tires 
List Price 14.15 


rs 
: 
: 
: 


Size 6.00c<1¢ 


@-95 


No tax 
Fully Retreaded .. 
recapped 

® Mounted Free 


Guaranteed 
Hazards for 1 year 


. not just 


against Road 


Cell NA. 86-5100 te Order! Minimum Order $2 


ia 
Nov. 18, 
. te 9-2114 


“o.¥ HS. 2800, bik. = 
ale a = 
Cai rae before 


e 
q stimulates cire 
a —— sion 


stful 
ay book Ke. “Miracle °o 
stop write or eall 


C COA 
aor oth 


"Ere oe Dali, § AM | Cents incl. tax) stax) 


Por other 4. fA 
covers 


typing « 
ter Service. 9 


ressing 


A , 5 . LON ma 
rT wave 75ce. Se ca 
210 © St. 
° = manuscr 


FLORIDA 
TRANSPORTATION 


bees a. ae aaa mos 


Bhort ‘. 
North west t Radio & TV School 


1627 K St. NW RE. 7-034) 
15 


ADMINISTRATIVE 
TRAINEE 
spies and sdlust, ¥* pasbile 

in- 
Sack 
ca | sone 


1 year 


anys => 


Se eae 


sae Be a 


AUTOMOBILE 
SALESMEN 
nh 


Por car e Gperte ofs ¢ 
st at ollie, ™ Bie 
100% 


= FLORIDA AVE. NB. 


AUTOMOBILE SALESMEN — We 
n good combination wed and 
car selesme for orthern 


iu 

Very acve. well-loca : 

need a ive qnerpetes sa es. 

man: ae have integri one re- 

oo nt pevsenee: for ruc ~ 
wi 

ood hours. 
COUN- 


yr - 
ONE. TO 
. W 

c e 
to 1:30 A. M. ghift: experi- 
truck men only: holidays and 
ation cu ay: Contact & 


ae “Gronoce si st.. oye + 


m= i0 is” Soutecle _ ‘o 


piy Mr. 
750 


Come «a 
work. Apply Idea 


Senmane. 
Rufus 
ae st. nw. 
or , A opping 
8478 Piney rd., 
7v. 9 


_ y. 
uar.: We hy 


rt time. ° ~ 
} ti; 75%. AP. 17-5036. 
— r, 75% commis. 
sion. Hours. COOP 
ARBER & 
Va.. or call Hillsboro 2262 
—aoereren Par otel 
5-2000 


Barber Shop. C 


BUSINESS Manager for Washington 
zone Studebaker-Packard Gerpere- 
tien With sone business 


ment experience 
salary and excellent chan re) 
vencement. All replies confidential. 


private line. ST. 3-5065 
Mr. Armstrong Mr. Mana. 


CAB DRIVERS 


re or part time. We instruct you 
ore neces 2 ae Best season now 


BOB'S STUDIO ~ 


Li 3-$102 
will help you 


Pes WRrvenswe 
et your license. Mt cover a x 
ry LO 
"CARP NTERS 
BRIN 
MR. PRICE. 6505 Soo let ST NW 
experience 
pelptus but mot necessary, Short 
to D. ms good 
ery. bonus. vacation with pay. 
erson Auto & Appliance Oo.. 714 


ust be fast. Hil. 
crest Amoco Station. 2601 Ala- 
dam ve. 


CLERK 


wnder 29 for brapeh office. Near 


. Please apply at main ot 
Sea Employees Ins. Co, 


16 A&A ro Streets N.W. 

8 Govt. Agency) 

peeas op y at L St. Entrance 
ween 6 and 3. 


Variety of 
yD 


. White, 19-25. 
fea. cellent i 
| MANAGEMEN “ 
ULT INC.. Suite 600. 1406 
H ool graduate. 
off 9-26 accounts rece vable and 
billin Ex- 


& experience beneficial. 
benefits 
floor. between the hours 


~T5-35.  Bev- 
Syping — 


excellent 
nity for advancement 
MANAGEMENT ONS 
ult FO aR 
ntract Coordinator 
Sore) ane ae sane 


roves" ‘EMPL. “SERV. 


ooks, colored . 
washe 


dl re politan ot 
onday. & 
st. ne. 


ANTED, fiust have 


pat WALL-HANGERS. tapers gha 
ishers needed immediately. Ca 


DRAFTSMEN 


An outstanding opportu- 
nity to achieve profession- 
al status. The Glenn L. 
Martin Co&, which has re- 
cently been awarded the 
contract for the EARTH 
SATELLITE, has positions 
for draftsmen with either 
schooling or experience. 


You can become an im- 
portant part of this indus- 
try working and learning 
on projects such as the 
SATELLITE, the MATA- 
DOR guided missile, or 
the VIKING rocket. 


Opportunities in ME- 
CHANICAL,. *ELECTRI- 
CAL, and STRUCTURAL 
drafting. Write or phone 


PROFESSIONAL 
EMPLOYMENT 


MARTIN 


Baltimore 3, Md. 


Nems-Clarke, Inc. 
919 Jesup-Blair Drive 
Silver Spring, Md. 
MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY 
9 TO 4:30 


“a. 


ELECTRONIC 
TECHNICIAN 


AEROJET 


IN 


SACRAMENTO, 
CALIFORNIA 


tand ° rtunity for 
ge By : initiative to 
rogress in of Rocket 
; ulsion. itiens now open 
or: 


i ce 


ent. 


rmo 
terials. spark systems 

hig Treasure flow systems. 
enomens. gas 


. 
and pumps 
COMPUTER 
SPECIALISTS 
Digital and Analog 
Coders 


Analysts 
Programmers 


CHEMICAL ENGINEERS 
OR PHYSICISTS 


Experienced in Thorpe amics. 
combustion and anpied seer? 
or research in wae 
Combustion Chambe 


METALLURGISTS 


For paiure In sting 


eval- 
Stainless Bteel Super r Alloys. 
ain 

d Lightweight metals prefe pred. 


ELECTRICAL 
AND ELECTRONIC 
ENGINEERS 


for Control Gystem design. re 
ability testing. magnetic circuit 
element design ond os application. 


TECHNICAL REPORT 
WRITERS 
neerin poue 


degree 
qoastonse im Tee steal 
it 


DESIGN GROUP 
LEADERS 


BsS.. ME... or 
oP in yh 8 
Missile work. 


PROPULSION 
ANALYSTS 


r MSE. degrees in — 


« s 6 yra. 
: B.-A or 


STRESS ENGINEERS 


Of M.S. tin Mechdétiidal or Aero- 
nautical Engineering. Supertene ed 
in Aircraft Propulsion 


DESIGN PLANNERS 


Dupertanse in Coordinating Pro- 
puision. Aircraft. Systems Design 
Program or Engineering Man- 
agement. 


FABRICATION 
PLANNERS 


rience in Coordinating Pro- 
puision or Aircraft 7 aye Fabri- 
cation and Procuremen 


Company paid vacations. oe leave. 
holidays. Com nsored edu- 
cational plan. Life Insurance, hen 

pitalization and Retirement pian. 


Restful, residential ereas S/n 
eellent educational fac 


aging 270 sunny x4 ans 60 part- 
ly clear days per 


WASHINGTON 
INTERVIEWS 


Today Thru Nov. 27 
All Day & Evening 


Call Our Engineering 
Representative Mr. J. S. 
Tillman 


EXecutive 3-5036 


Firm Commitments May 
Be Made at This Time 


If unable te apoly cond resume te 


AEROJET GENERAL 
CORP. 


P.O. BO 947 
Sacramento. a 
Subsidiary of tRe General Tire & 
Ru r Co 


COMMUNICATIONS 
ENGINEERS 
Ls 
EUROPE 
FAR EAST 


ABOVE AVERAGE 
FINANCIAL RETURNS 


1339 © OTRGET Fy, BOO 708 


Pee 


FLIGHT - 
PERSONNEL 


The Flight Test Depart- 
ment is expanding rapid- 
ly as a result of extensive 


der development at The 
Glen L. Martin Co. 


itions in the 
Flight Test™ Department 
extend well beyond the 
$12,000-e-year bracket. 
In addition, employees at 
this level may benefit ex- 
tensively from the incen- 
tive compensation plan. 


Test pilot 


The following opportuni- 
ties now exist: 


ENGINEERING 
TEST PILOT 


Flying time of 2000 hours 
and 500 hours. jet time. 
Completion of a service 
school for experimental 
test pilots. 


PRODUCTION 
TEST PILOT 


Flying time of 2000 hours 
and 500 hours of jet time. 
Multi-engine experience. 


FLIGHT TEST 
ENGINEERS 


Coordinate and direct pro- 
gram of flight testing for 
an airplane or missile proj- 
ect. 


Your reply will be treated 
with strictest confidence. 
Cantact 


PROFESSIONAL 
EMPLOYMENT OFFICE 


MARTIN 


Baltimore 3, Md. 


re ing & repair 
te heave general super- 
in fturni- 
work oe 

unusu 
Industries. 
nN. W 


ts) . . . 
r phone for appoint- 


nent. 
Gas Station Attendant 


2 colored. car washers: lu 
must be experienced . 
Bervice Station. 1305 New Jersey 


Gis-8t, ATION ATTENDANT — f— We 


have immediate o 


ev ‘Chase. Md 
eg “Bars, $2100. 
A i are ee Roy 

full = 5 wa = 


to work 
nity for sober 


ne accounting operator— 
= erience | , Toageee i wiring 


a; eats 
sed: heen -# 6 


pens . i. 
Kell. Tek" Wath st. aw. et ae floor 
y~ a Fran se Salle 


3708, between 
INTERVIEWER 


renin  follepe sudens. ay d=. 


Depart semnoms of eer sewine y 
surance oo. 6-day week. 8 to 4:30. 


GOVERNMENT 
EMPLOYEES 
INSURANCE CO. 


Evenin 


14th _. # L See Fy. 
Please A 3. Mm. 
btreet Brance 


ust know bide. ° 
ork. must have etre 


JANTTOR—M 
t 
eady empioy.: lary 2 
mo. Ask ‘or mer CAVAL ; 
3500 léth st. nw. TU. 2- 
J 


ary “in etchanes.t to et ee 
oe 


ite Whore ist Cc 


or 


rye ee 4-13 a. @. 


MEDICAL DETAIL 
REPRESENTATIVE 


amen 
MANAGER 


iL. Lads Bre a) 


Ol BURNER 
MECHANIC 


an 
ence desirable. State educe 
experience and salary expec 

~ Ss oul " 


a 


Georgia ave. Silver 


wk. plus tips. GU " 
Mitchie A, 
\pply GIBBO 


pas 20, 12 cents 6 


cee a ap 


L ATE 
SALESMEN 
an ¢ cellent opport 
~ ight a v is 
office force, Sealed ester 
SSanmtuslon’ and draw. We ore - 


o— = Ee oe 


Siege, 5 Be is for an interview. 
Gordin-Mensh Realty Corp. 
: 


Here is 


et estadiis P. ry 
anin 


prefer 
eae ay 


cat at Ses ee 
SALES TRAINEE 


NO EXPERIENCE REQUIRGD 
Salary, car 

incentive. 

for 4 to 6 months. Must be 
between 23 and 32. Local ter 
ritory. No night work, 


Victor Adding Machine Ca. 


INTER . avai. eat. MORN. 
art- wo 
Monday. Ly and Friday 
eves. and al roa turday. App! 
HECHINGER isth and 
MAN—Adding machine an ; 
h an. Exce 


ogn a. Contact 


SALESMEN 


EXPERIENCED—AOGE 26-39 


Immediate opening due to pro- 
motion within the ranks. Call- 
ing on local businessmen dur- 
ing day. For further details, 
phone 


Victor Adding Machine Ce. 


aprotNtMEnTs AVALASLEY a7. 
SALESMAN 


Chemica food 
—— rn institutions! in- 
ustries Nations 

ad commission. See OG 


TE BVERSEAT* BRB" 


Sales Representative 


ational man u- 


fos experience 
gcuce ton “ye. 
orty yeare of ex- 
ene ave 

u * ed to 


PAM. FE oe : 


> 


: 


TEST ENGINEERS 


FIELD SERVICE 
ENGINEERS 


Recent graduates in 
electronic engineering 
or men with vocational 
school certificate plus 
experience in trouble 
shooting, testing and 
maint in such 
fields as radar, com- 
puters, television, ete., 


INTERVIEWS 
MAY BE ARRANGED 


IN YOUR CITY 


ERCO DIVISION 
ACF Industries;- Inc. 
Riverdale, Maryland 
Warfield 7-4444 


YOUNG MEN. |e 


FOR SERVICE 
AND SELLING 


STARTING SALARY $81 WK 


«<=> oo oe edb eu eo et 


"reas le irapaing i duty Boe aD. = 


CLERK-TYPIST 


SHEET METAL! S28-3e4"2 Sing fine Be) hay ieee 

' MECHANICS & |¢ avis heron oF | nternational > Se ya 
ASSEMBLERS Te | en 8. raft “apaneone, a “aehahbor- 09.0476 eee aollene ® $:| ror dountown. hotel pe ee 
isworth ; : 5.90 usiness bet i mie: cc “ uate | e . pees } tee mun. 


.S er ; 
This is interesting work related| M*sh. apeiiude. Carver oppor ;, ixperienc 
to aircraft structures. Will be RSONNE Bre pw. Machines Y oe eee | ing un- er 7p ‘ 12: dows + A. 
. mest Pow Ste atm Gupires LE ite; @ rk. 

Including pent Blan. — eorge’s Cale . 5 ae . me i 


= 
working from blueprints. attra ve int $ yous ’, 
age under 30. have initiative ‘ ;; =<. m : 
sespon- in ft ’ ‘. ’ > _ 


Acteve suburban Ford 
HAS IMMEDIATE eves. week an insurance h. 
WIREMEN eosed Bundars. OPPORTUNITY Ey rem tye 1. B80. et Rainier, Md. ihe, Bente eel “7 >: maid servite AD, 2-096” 
I a perien FOR Nt “#028 _ wor condition’. . at) # oT . aad’ 
empl YOUNG LADY [St 3 amt 


a rT 
Men experienced in trouble- x . aan 
shooting and wiring, compli- = FORD 00. Customer Engineers wath nal Haba has : T2900 xt. ; | , ; ge, rec, hall, 2 
cated electronic equipment. SAND resent ae cas ork Lye ty . ' ne 1, Bendix ; “4 
rienced in Kosher foods. Apoly san tama fe casbier-typist: attractive start- —By_ nationally Age 18 to 30. White, high BN st. ow. -7474. 
person. HO CING {iMons. ify. “ies Visee con- ——~ we i-man Washington office: school graduate. Type 45 to! ®. 


Front room; #60. 


ERCO Division ——— — - Ectiate Seascalwtldeca"| 50" w om, for general of 
ni pam, gener e 
ACF INDUSTRIES, val ELECTRICAL CI . tg ~-) By ge cpg ett ipuualing age oan. Permanent — oe : 
Riverdale, Maryland YOUNG ACCOUNTING erical ee ane hee Mee Seen | ere : ar) 
eosvnsslGATEaBion. v. ¢ MEN MACHINES Posit; vin irk , Een Aiitgs| Charles G, Stott & Co. | #8 — parking * at 5+ 
3 OS! IONS Serie Vex casa WEETMORELAND heeds 5 ladies To 
- seas 7 TO 25 REQUIREMENTS Ne Walince’s closed" Sunday 626 popir —~ Ag ty ve p= necessary. “white, = in , soupe on ia “. 
| Electro-mechanical training Fort. hour. 5- Week, ) ronan. white practical sa tor, phon - 
i , , ducati nurse ¢ ence elderiy m 
SHEET METAL With High School Education pues iu ites Both Typing DICTAPHONE resident of slee: tere convalesc “county pearidden pie 
WORKER Experience TRANSCRIBER | Fo giant ive amen] Recetas eben ts | 
ARE NEEDED - and Non-Typing | win st ieast ¢ monttir ex. pocition’” Seday weet. | Sati to! ABS bight E 
perience in Dictaphone or air conditioned office QUALIFI.| ° care for 1 ~year-o vane 
For Electronics | |MMMEDIATELY | eateoee ga ye ae a ALL 
Manufacturing Plant . ‘ working conditions. st i gest Sectronice helpful but not] Sunda . Stay 2 nights. ) stat rower, Men. WA. 1 
Must have ability to] No experiance le nacenary,| Cutomer Engineering Owot. | — "CRADU ATES Lave | Po — | aie aS Ca c| ORM Pe ca 2 alt bt 
read shop drawings. but mechanical or electrical ete Government Employees : ent of bank, | You can, earn 2 Sard before ae tat 1406. ho 16. Yaeal 
iad 6 ea aptitude is desirable. International Business AGE 17 TO 23 Insurance Company setts tYDe “Person 2 ' ork! 
; investiaate thi rtunity) Machines Corporation vical? tht b Se & on, Citizens Bank of | ‘ acs. wee eeume, Te ASG. AVE. KW. 15 
sacs es "ae for career with @ future in| 1220 19th St. NW. estat lon ican — ese’ tous Ea 
ems- arke, nc. | the electrical field. ales’ dresses. a and suite. G 
919 Jesup Blair Drive | ‘ans PLES taresting wos ts plone oh RnR an He Bae epee sr oak pms eee 
ma SO te Fe -y privis. for oe unlimited 


SILVER SPRING, MD. | BOX 976, POST-TH need Mur fray. Reom 402, beginners and experienced Es insurance le. assist a = See ABBEY First as key maker and focksm Peek i. Tio athe Charhil ABO NURSERY Infants to 


r 
08. “S t nw ‘ persoaast 
girls; opportunity and per- 
INTERNA 9 ELECTR ‘ in 
te . manency in @ progressive, ite, sale ry, open ~ By — EYE Sugars 3 5-018 pioymen Y ons en re ean sale, ras, ru B, weiet: #1 up. 
$50 YY; K growing company. Pay nai Ave. BW. goer. os eas. ¢ a ristmas bon hoop ngle $7. vk = S 

no IBM typewriter pom pleasant work. sf. - TT — Binge room: COLORED Loring 

~ PARA TIME +. yes Vy Ai, Prater office. Secretaries iecal ... st. £3900 fons 66 advancement ing wa week. 

oo oan Beep, Be ‘start. Cs os Wy teen, x enyetctnys prove they con adant themocives : ir] 

siete a . to ate oe, aupe ss SB . 


to te: car: > ti = er: re , . 

= : 

MECHANICAL |e °c ce aes et ares eae 
uate - on exeolien r re aa oon Seitee od tet = ais ad. Bo . ‘1 “the Guaate uae ee we use * 


ae ae ie Siacton 2.2079 : parts D. 0. “Gall 


7 . . : ’ typ $50- 
Design Eng l neer 71 to 5 tg oe car: ar: experience Government . 7 : typist, association _—— ; wits r for ole Nicely furnished room in 1 of 
Ret, necessary Colle al retisry Employees 2 SECRETARY —Ero.. ace 30-38, 5. fey, sem aes Bn3. off.| Suess ond zoupe, Coumnier: sor ynfurn, ir. Gs 
MUST HAVE EXTENSIVE ELECTRONIC Pe eee he er © S/INSURANCE COMPANY| on. M¥ am : ~My te ert aoe sly | COL kote 
AND ELECTRO-MECHANICAL EDUCA- EXTRA (Not a Government Agency) for ich class b} B = pers. ne ~| meighborhood; earn $25 eek ; Por employ L4 iy edule | wash 
TIONAL BACKGROUND WITH. SEV- ne sear ca en oh work 09, hourly basins “ADé ai ae af. aoe Sinkibat iit ig : 
ERAL YEARS OF PRACTICAL DESIGN . white: car Apply Ssturday,| '4th AND L STS. NW. 1 ply st 2800 Wie ave. ae jon with advance , 48963, | pittae, “dpe: } APTS., FURNISHED 

ff rt- noon snd 6-8 p. ‘tn. b ot. 7-2900, Ext. 215. | 11TH NW. it “ea hon ALEXANDRIA 


ge THOROUGH KNOWL- , Re. 3-4 fof Court ; PLEASE. APPLY » APHE 2-9240. | op 
FE OF AND EXPERIENCE WITH Peary ton, Va A. M. TO 3 P. M. MPL E a i ST. NW., “Prt. rm.. twin| firehene seth "24, form, inette, 
DG O C PA Rr Tite EVENING EMPLOY- AT L STREET ENTRANCE White MANAGER =. Generel ates, werk: Fae 4 . as ‘ ; bed, ‘ om theater ath, Sik 

$50 Co 1 -$35\ i6Tm ST NW. 1814—Redecor. asic. to Washingion and | Ava Amys 


TELETYPE MECHANISMS. tact with Sublic ADDF Tbi4s Coles- ' U 
ville rd. at Pour Corners. between NW or fe. hort. Bee gee . | , ) 
ja agp a AB a ng Fh aig HY minarets . haa Wie? eek sao tgh oerenesl, niga: | Sr Oa ag 
ARY AND OPPORTUNITY, | Sema CLERK-TYPIST : Galt hi ge | [oe Tain a to = faye Et: | Poa a MT 
- $0. for day duty. prt. jate| super? Bise =e Can See abo ON oi ith at, nw. iT nr. bus; $98.50. TE ; 


immediate 
7 Md. ay positions in Enelish. tal studi teleticies 
‘ ; why travel downtown - you| T al D TH . romocs read ety } 2-4 _ 2-15972._ —— ory. eg e service, - 
International Electronics Sie Yor cacktrpist wore om aprons, ice work must| AGCT.. 1241 apie ak ae Bist iota ie ‘ge RE Sth Gd is SOF Bar Cal PR Pik Z 
SER, ’ ‘ »| jovely jarse next to ANACOSTIA TS ee , 
r mon 


ja Engineering, Inc. rere ruck ovnlby Tom, $96 §80°82] GOOD PAY—GOOD HOURS rs| wo praferred bed a6 not TYPIST , 
UNSEY es cesar’ RP Hotel "hore at sw. pling Pe a als “yaar a Wi ina’ experieges UNUSUAL CAREER % ki.” 
ABT TI ; Immediate opening In office FIELD OPEN fot: maid es rv; plenty hot ia 42 i sesso. "LU. 9-003, 


MR. GILLER PART TIME “ie 
- ' c y le menu ree auto. wa ik. off Conn. av 
onmiee aaa ma Soonnas Wp JU. 9-4529 benel copes: £9 thao BRS ig ~ea ay ~— | SYSTEMS WORK WITH walk. ‘dist, d'towne ‘© Sik White 
NR. UNION STA.—Paci 


— Atiractive - rn day week 


tin for youne women with high 


hrs.: Dk.; sat. 

ey sehogs ceneatite. Setecsstins wor fo real estate co. Must be Datemme Manel. 1h . gon, A 
AERODYNAMICS sheen oe Ys SFr eee on eae ties Oka arnt EDPM oe To | Ai A Aan a ae 

Newspaper Dealership |etfik gust ur-tathalca am-| settee "tha tne Epa | Nems-Clarke, INC.) ELECTRONIC DATA MORE? ree eet. 
; necien- otel - 


AERODYNAMIC ENGINEERS are in Chambersburg, Penna.| tous “Ab ty to icky. | CALESLADIES-—TAKOMA PK.| 919 Jesup-Blair Drive | PROCESSING MER! as hi Li ae 


-| Pull or part-time > ene. Silver Spring, Md. MACHINES l CEORIAN | , 
ial weekly and monthly rates. | JA | un i eon Protestant home. “. 


urgently needed at ERCO. rs = = ae profitable chad PP af “30 for & ‘. be ircelien' . oak. 
} Chambers ™ — 15-40. N . ond in mos ‘eal TS: room. free pe and - 

: an sations ary usiness systems owledge | ers. See MRS. HILL m . 3 
We offer an opportunity to work : re- tnt sub TANTS. INC., Suite pany benefits. Ap 9 JO 4:30 er we | es ave roe} mo 


inte . wT ampshire ave. ed bedrm 
Brostu om One — DU Experience in writing beth sent men 0 
: Ze BO instructions for operation Y-GEORGIAN HOTEL Newly euoas, at, OE turmishedt 


. 9 ton 
with many types of the latest air- bersbarg. Pa. . - oF 
: pl. ing, $65 , , ST. NW. 
' of electronic co ti d j 
: ee er ial weeks and monthly retes.| Weekdays, 5-6. JO. 3-1088, tee 


craft in phrases of aerodynamics UNUSUAL CAREER YPISTS te Phas rea aes Py Toor tree | * 
personals" aad Bagel wets Se is Mia tals ttaade™ | SQUEING piel Yeo ora 
Bt.—1)-bedrm, apt. $90. | 


FIELD OPEN work in Manage office! INTERVIEWS DAILY PARK : 
ps “ eres @O m EN R RRS ak 
vole AR CONES BRIGHTWOOD 


Bee Mana 


and power plant operation includ- sa rat apt. project. art 
K wi ‘ I n on owers ts, in fon 
SYSTEMS WOR HIGH SCHOOL GRADS PREFERRED v_Atl. Ve. HO ONE C 1220 19TH ST. N.W. APT.-HOTEL CONCORD GARDENS 
1 bedrm., liv. rm.. dinette, Ee. ana 


ing aerodynamics and power plant - Ta sage 

‘Room 331 RE. 7-3705 

equation, aircraft stability and per- EDPM Interesting work in pleasant surroundings, for both be- ‘on me ocler 7 sna : EXCELLENT Spee er te araliabte 
ginners and experienced girls; opportunity snd permanency workin ial pea International Business _ Location—Rooms—Service om Fisat - 

formance. ELECTRONIC DATA in a progressive growing company. St, Soot of advancement. Machines Corp. Re aT NE TR ) . 

tion and rience rates. Light housekeeping. vodees ~~. - ba 


PROCESSING Write Sox HELP, MEN & WOMEN 17 De t at ) 
You will find salaries, policies and MACHINES S-DAY WEEK—8 te 4:30 a, aera ee ARTISTS (6) : <TC (6) 1900 F ST NW.” | Soh conti ee ce 
, : ness -bedrm. apt., ai fo 


personal advantages excellent. sushield aaeaey Namudotse od HAWTHORNE HOTEL 
u ys : ea he be * 9) Men or women. $2.50 jh ta age ys 


or 
i in wri : to $4 hr, fo uali- ewly deco modera ‘ 
OPENINGS EXIST AT ALL LEVELS | Experience in writing Government ‘Grapiaypes Earn Christmas Money | fied® artist commercial,| ate see"std ies os _ Sats ate PB 
of electronic computing Insurance Company oil, pastel, etc. Apply in| “powxtown— TCC 

APPLY TO machines . The Hecht Co. _ person, bring samples. | 
ERCO DIVISION INTERVIEWS DAILY sap Breese soba he Christmas Help | mative th FI. 930 F St. 
ACF INDUSTRIES, INC. 1220 19TH ST. N.W. tem An otk ew. Wanted Now | 
RIVERDALE. MD Room 331 = RE. 7-3705 ALL THREE STORES ar and cook 
, % mo. . ve. on mo. 

Please Apply, 8 A.M. to 3 P.M. SALESWOMEN Pierida. nti, il 

64 


International Business : 
: At &. St. Entrance CLERICALS i x 7 D 
Machines Corp. CHECKWRITERS | "a.phe seruet a wept ca She : re | Fare Mt 


mia (ae Se si, ae ell 
ENGINEERS t ACT NOW wat OUR TELEPHONE CLERK 


WASHINGTON STORE PART TIME (Newspaper) ~ 


asonable datly and monthly 


uses. 


Oppottunity for capable personnel to | Billins clerk. trove: 5 aye ....8 3 i ra 
kkpr. full charse store:’,.:. THERE IS STILL TIME FULL TIME, 5-DAY WEEK Part-time clerical position — | qpiftlt dren. HC og pana . 
women = 


join a growing company that combines... . a, | 
oe eae TO GET YOUR on se . | : 
Monday Through Friday, cae. Sunday | work, ilene: : wet wit vs culery. 0 a ced we 
"30 6. oa NE ; ~| cluded: $115. J. ¥. B 


FRIENDLY ATMOSPHERE som ‘bEkps 
WITH tg Ay CHRISTMAS JOB 9:20 to 1:20 or Later 


Large Company Advantages orks, 00d ‘wid es — on aunnel Dene 
bs Lb eevns AT Monday, Thursday and Friday WASHINGTON POST 
Nights and All Day Saturday AND TIMES HERALD 


rggrorn f|\Woodward & Lothrop) © x a’ 1515 L St. NW 


AERODYNAMICISTS pin.) 
ot. SILVER SPRING STORE HELP, DOMESTIC. ©ONS ane 

ELECTRONIC ENGINEERS rout © COME IN TODAY SILVER SPRING STORE ae oh 

: om ~~ gi 7 


COMPUTER ENGINEERS ia Pe yet on 
MECHANICAL DESIGNERS er Sten Gegiiwas SALESWOMEN Monday, Thursday and Friday’ 
Nights and All Day Saturday | $..™ stt = Sala nal oie a sth 0 


LAYOUT DRAFTSMEN “~ACCTG. CLK. —$60 ~ 
sah intedes NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY, AT OUR ay; _zecmnt relerences 


FIELD SERVICE ENGINEERS be), moe — 
TEST ENGINEERS mNCT | : WE WILL TRAIN YOU. PARKINGtOed sront A — 5 days 
DESIGN CHECKERS are Bo to 2 5-DAY, 40-HOUR WEEK FOUL. Tae 5-DAY WERK oie ap : 
ENGINEERING PHYSICISTS BU ck oh ee aka testes 4 Days, Monday, Thursday, |qfge@-S-sullanen Hels-Wo. eit § 
SPECIFICATIONS ENGINEERS ett oa Daily Part Time Friday and Saturday | 3am i 

Pee eee WRITERS ye a gertoand> atts] §=WE WILL ATTEMPT TO ARRANGE | Good Starting Salary |'goman 33 or ; Fay 

GOOD SALARY | ial istiee| HOURS TO FIT YOUR HOME SCHEDULE] T’@ining With Pay 
pee : ) Immediate Discount 
siegseyoade scat chit + gale _ EXCELLENT WORKING CONDITIONS Saiki: Nenanahca take 
GENEROUS BENEFITS | Bletaghons, core:c+°<s- .. 82 Ras) IMMEDIATE DISCOUNT OPEN FULL STORE HOURS 

APPLY TO 3 GP IRS SALARY | The HechtCo. ata : pom: iso Bewir| ps 
| 235 nw WASHINGTON STORE 3 , Lad Ompl, Del wi wim PARI 
ay : F St. at 7th NW, | hotel or country eiub AD. 4-6408 | DRED 1 1 1st . i | ye or , 
ERCO DIVISION meats Woodward & Lothrop! ,J8.°.7"""), | aiinemisstane tecnica 
: t "RS ; ' “OL — c it, dk : 


ACF INDUSTRIES, INC. ; a PERSONNEL OFFICE, 9TH FLOOR nagghoreeapeanns eux: 


RIVERDALE, MD. : 7 ; \ MAIN BUILDING \ [Fenton St. and Elisworth Drive site 


' 


t vec tion: cit : 
SREY PERSONNEL, 1017 K NW 
SU SEREEPE. fom tae ref 


Ce PE SE SeS 2-288 se- 2p eee ee 


_ 


4613 DUKE ST. 


SHIRLEY DUKE 
APARTMENTS 


7m ST We fot 8 et) FREE INFORMATION 
jntioding wilt Jt. 6-2591. Open MAILED YOU TODAY 


ST. N. W.. S228-—Bearm... itv m. S-tam | : 

1 . ’ oii wm a CALL Ki. 8-5100 “a e@- pts of bw. ; oF UTILITIES INCLUDED | GREENWAY 

a tm. ~+ RK. * the A thy YA a Ak ‘ ’ } ’ ie a “atk ew . tion. 2 me DE LUXE lea! 

° ra 35E-|  gunete saladih sacha ment. 9 bedrooms, separsie dinine ms : . 3¥%4-RM. APTS., FR. $65.00 Hie Minit Sm 

"tnel. rt peep. it 4. fies 08) bedroom, 686. Call if” dais 4¥%4-RM. APTS., AT $78.00 0. A a ee 

ies a Ae, gee Hien Geen Ane (eee RPAOE See 
a =” ant. and e : -, os ‘3539 A BT. 

7 a Tad vd ere mye es va = ities ae vo modern : : ws : ; he or —_ > Flo ' aY 0104. —— = 

‘ee. vin 


tl. inel 


’ jency apt.: 965 mo uD nh | ON MT. VERNON BLVD. ing 
pare ‘we SCHOOL ON PREMISES) .. | ! INCLDT rine bike. Capitol sh sy son try EFFICIENCIES HOMES : . : [amber newiy Geeoretai. 


Kit bath ome air eB 1963, de ve a . . mort ee o AND 68- 73. 50 . oS. eee & 

Sedrm ins Tak, Band aemiprc| "nets Shopping Center a PART vORMAN Belief ix BYNDICETE zm. ie 1916 aarz| | BEDRM. APTS. be PN id Acasa ee ae Se Feith tts 
ae Tam 
3 


i, mile south Alex...20 min. from : ' - . . ‘ , ba 4 maid's , : 
“S 2430 PENN. AVE.NW. Beautiful Hillcrest Higts., Md. : slinalee ites ro 


Newly dec. downtown . Dp. Pentag main . 
bedrm.. liv. rm.. L :%. and pe ema prvt.| Navy ena 10 m Po voir. STUDIO-TYPE” Teelvig emt. a . 
oi in to Port BACHELOR APT. $59. EFFIC.—$91.50-$86.50 asta Bendix’ wa 


I Sire ew sort atmosphere in country club " : 
55 month, : e eth moa rare) fine al Stel ea pack : ARLINGTON. A controling nea sT¥-| 9500 WISCONS! ¢ ; cw. 7. 
gToun off-stree r 5. AND ¥ 4 " N NW. ; 1IsTs 
2-3 BEDRM., APTS. i eee a ew TOWERS : EAA Rp sharing sce, aneporiaiotn. EM. 2-8800 ; Out Pa. ave. oc. to Branc 150— Oo 
HOUSE TYPE . tal of 
Completely Furnished | BEDROOM APT.. $85!» susces co pomrown| ourilMTLET Mia | 86925: INCL UTILS. (CLAREMONT | aonb hati. 
. .$ S Sar tort a, nia’ Bia act:| fis bath: ee wspceee shremest oury 8-5140 ; ie re oe ee 
JEFFERSON VILLAGE |3 BEDRM. APT.. $112.50) Bix encie Pa hee isi “| TOP VALUE : =| Larchmont ne. 
1A ABL 4 BLVD. AU Lia CHURCH oy ee TP dittoned au pee pa park. ny L 20 NS >. Bd $89. 50 CoL.—1 Indep. Ave. rms. ‘ ae 200 ne xi0p a 
2-5500 tal offs 1 ew ¢ rauet floors. built Peaulnpes , rms.—— ; ’ room, yo. 5 ‘| ea yee 
. HE Pela | Sem Se tetas co Peoneaafoee,| REBAR eR |Porming Fs, Apts sare HW 2a Attia 
auty . : Ms 


tet: it. lL. 3 giris.: ti ; . » 
quiet: sult. cpl...3 girls.: u 50 ES Alp cilities g benuiifgl Inndsgape, eo Unequaled Water Views : roy A OL eat . 
Bedrms.— se comb. iiv.-din 2 bed- reas. rent. 


aay AIR-CONDITIONED Yacht Harbor—Pool incl : und tecllities. a 

ODE ISLAND A EFFICIENCIES—$80-$92.50 1. modern. t: : i% baths: avaiianle Deo, 1. | 

t rm. Pullman Bit ei sete BROOKVILLE IMMED. OCCUP. AT $85 HI INTING “i fen ' ayy 3 Bedrms.—-$66. 50 iit e re aH te Ta are, 3 kit and path "Aree 
tus INCL. male -bath: : in Btsily 


1-BEDRM.—$102.50-$145 


rkaiipa OTE in $20 Conn ave 

same a A i Tye BATHS My eb ahs bossa ‘SHIPLEY PARK 2733 $. WALTER REED DR. |coroezp eis | Too i couvéntent | 
M APT. 2 | Efficiencies, From Reina ARLINGTON JA. 2-5003 “S941 | ff nog TA OOO bier 

Attrac, furn. mod. bide: express) WITH OR WITHOUT BASEMENTS INSPECTION |-Seloan Mea S745 omg = a ee dente Ga it RD sae TSS. erat dt bed | 


bus 10th and Pa. ave. nw; suit- VA ANT 
a:tit dinette, tile ce | Central HH S. 


g TOF —Le, clean bedrm. | FURNISHED JAckson 5-5500 Occupancy Now 
hg hg eS yarn = * OR UNFURNISHED canis ane aaa Furn. Plan Available let ien mn a, decor. Bletare Z801 15TH ST. NW. te, Peaes ya yout ¢ ‘door. "fig mo mo 2 Teme ee 
2220. : GOOD HOPE HILLS Maid Serv. and Linens Opti. 7 ae a in pre. EFFICIENCY —$71. 50 an a elec eio-| © 6 MONTHS LC AS 2 DATES Ol. 
ran 9562.28 1 VIC NAYLOR BD. & 30TH 8. &. | Sitbtiee Indates. tose pockine tots, | UE - | us oe sere. ee Se 2? ieee, | ys aN ae 
Chesapeake Terrace , *h Ree® Cle ERT, buses ‘ drect ae in ars ; ; ae; cn eqcerwes stor- year ION Bishsll re $93.50. w new. | PCL SAHENTION™ 


furaished” apartment? in modern. ) exposures 19 rafurnctive. det Shed | Selvotr. p leupery Te, pPPy cee mer. CEILING, tI comet. 
-type developt Open Daily Mom Thre Pri. 9-6:30/ $.thhows ures " stmoophers BRAND-NEW APTS. | “ticna-biack ok furn, thru thruout, new : 116 YOU ST. NE. 


ment: extensive 
: sual 
a, out WE ein POR PRER BROCHURE CALL rately yar, Tae ais} | ON MT. oe BLVD. 1868 750 9TH ST. SE. pedrm, ember. BEAL BARGAIN 20-(%. brick home: 6 rms. bemt. 
rki fi utilities includ- Ki. 8-818) arge _iving room with dining ares IN ALEXANDRIA MO is i ee eet 
7 ft; concrete reat F356 pe ample INSPECTION INVITED oD of 7 - COLUMBIA RD. N.W. /2 peng Py toot $75 . HOU UNFURNISHED 41 
. Across 14th St. Brid to ‘ ¥ 
neff Bsr E Apt. 5 irley ey m4 Bhiriey “ ft ie _aeitihes. Nation . amen Ki. 8-8484 prs so t and rear entrances | Completely Air-Conditioned & KE EW $20 ALEX. AREA Needs re airs. BO. 4225. 723 HARVARD ST. NW. 
JO fou — Broos evils signs to mode ny “ cony. transportation, shop- | ——~ Lo fh (Controls in Apartments) ; . 6 sae bemt. Bei -water heat. 
Wr EXCHANGE for ebiid care ea Spt. Ding actitGe- we PERSON | BROYHILTON ‘ rp, kit. din. hi; 5% WARWICK VILLAGE new-house condition. 
x. “pachelor. f ropa with Drivave bath 2900. sore St Bt SE. APT. 1 APARTMENTS LARGE EFFICIENCIES PROM $90 ' 2 
41-3209 (SPACIOUS DRESSING ROOMS) by es | 
1 
cl 
: 


pee. s, indivigual ba basement, West: 


snoee and Hs - Mod 10-year-old houses 

pFoot wal us. shopping. schools 
ose by pm min. be Went “ heat: reas. rent. inouire hot ey 
, . ally. including Sundays. 


1323 Clifton St 
? rt beds. #8110) .. 
TO. Be anitor. or cal uN. RG 7-409 | pe gat cot es 8 2 0083. a | Vicinity Glebe Rd. & Lee Hwy. 
2701 14th ST. “NW. | a pir-cene,, oe nt 26k =| Last Word | N. ARLINGTON 1-Bedroom Apts., from $115 
Pr. FIREPROOP 
EFFICIENCY APT. $75: ; yg ay JA. rf-isto 3 DraWJe FA: ‘ . : ewiy 
——, Ba, Mat Dene at Por w| Apet ~ he < n asl sep ayer yo & | p te: AOn z ; a alling — oe 7°. 3 ia + ‘ BrnnAewen e omarte ons NEEDED for immediate oc y. 
ell-mainteined| closets. oak — — > Stes of city: new vear- Srscatey a atte nde ink oc eate| sani Destel ile pacha: ry, te- Key . ae AMERICAN UNIVERSITY PK. convenient pee suparben ores. 
: . "| Exmecuis on ——— :' 


wine 
ceray nt deg: ‘Sea utiful lobby | | bags. disposals. nr. s. war 4. 
Se aiices on premises ay \ | 
storage space, seeretaria: : Yaya Wheeler Terrace, Inc. Max > wip, it. th.| bedtme. ist-tit, powder ‘rm tec 
os. o pletely equ Heat " gis furn. $75. Tm. with adjoin er room, 


WANTED TO RENT 44 


er, CALL mir OG A 14 desk | vie alsa euto. laundry, TV 


“s _— , . , : 121 : : 
~ Ser ste cue sbopping x eee to, “bt:| isis ne =_— “ 102 ey equip. plarero af ge at Mane og our WILTSHI CR 
MODER im. & , coir CONN. AVE. SAW = 
ARLINGTON, VA. . AS. ie B bee rm. unfurn. 6105 wlus elec- ar - . thelnera ator ‘on each ap! m i} - sree tepant . red: maximum 4 Richardson é 
pores 


- rm: iv tm. ‘dinette, kit andl 9 ' 
eee APTS. | Walter Reed Gardens bath. $99 ; sae AG pee 3 pie E Keys R. erielty peor. | see pee pes coms, ginetis dinette 2 gt bathe ay BURR IN’ Ny SOLINSON iR&CO 
| 2919 13th RD., SOUTH f-bedrm. furn. $150 plus eles-) 1-4657 : room. 13520. dressing st ts per mo. Ke mall at a 239 Wis Ave, XW. EM. 3.8777 
GLASSMANOR | FORT BENNETT | pe Broyhill & Sons , ' yw | BA —_ aspeswe V 1C.—2-bdrm. (2 unfip ) 
—— a a BEDRM., $79.50 / APARTMENTS | 4610 Lee Her JA. 4-1300 Rosemary CAN BE FU 1315 apts: oad NW — 94) ANDREWS ANEAe omottars ue 
ee Date ? BEDRMS. $95 | foetus in. 9 utl bu Bre Supt. a Shion’ esa’% bedroom. Sevels 
a R INCLUDING ALL UTILITIES | el 


northern Va 


All wtilities included —ayto laun- 
mn deck all resident mer 


dry. su eck nad STONE 
DISTRICT UELORTS. MP Apar tments | Bt Fite! COL TOT Gain : NW—l tm. full bat. aiaree CO 
Picture Windows Beautiful View NEW LUXURY APTS! \ ” 872 50: . ah) Fee. Bre e 110- | D AREA—Ga rage 
Two blocks from Oolumbia pike | euTifu Dedicated to Serve You bare bath 85 7-871. ontage excel ot fooation: for rent, $15 ay meee © ye 
—F . 


Draperies ; 
New Modern Purniture shopping center; off-street parking. | With, High Elevation 3% RMS. R $63.25 UP l, 2, & 3-BEDRM. APTS. KIRK WOOD itcber 4, 7 . tris me. be ee ——| ornck, bis SPA 


Parking * iar and Equipped aie “ “igcuied. plenty closet | Ovéridoking Potomac : 
space and storage room. and Washington 4% RMS. ...$75.00 UP| Furn. Apts. Also Avail.!° BE AA "S75. 50 and’ bath, 1-7-4024 ~ Kit) p-bee si rm, rambjer with basement iF — Ake Bp 
NEW 9-Cu.-Ft. Refrigerators in Virginie FURN. APTS., $81.50 UP - ——ps J. iD isa, 9 “we | M. T. BROYHILL & SONS | Lars jaw cutie ad 3 rooms avail 
ice 2- BEDRM. —$81. 50-$85 ns he . nN Meat 4 ioe Bo ectasst ad 


od 
Brovsine Center 

bia ed i ) 
DAY—WEEK—MONTH Just Installed. ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED INCLUDES ALL UTILITIES 
SAMPLE APT. ON DISPLAY 


Rates for Transients and : 
Semi-Permenent Residents | ¥ttaitas bus ling within ts Block| MOST CONVENIENT APTS, | 2a*"3 rE ekene et to] | 1929 East-West Highway FREE BROCHURE PARKLAN DS 


of" any aparim One Block from Key Bridge schools an Silver Spring, Md. 


MW ee eran §= | 9 to S Weekdays; Sat., to 12 CALL RE 5.8000 CALL JU. 8-1170 bed com!-4 
JA. 8-4226 = mites Cn } Aisbama 4 Stan -BE| Rasement.  Exeelien ie conden 805 G@ 8T. 
ee | Sexpert mcm se | son snocune ano | ee TRaPLAMth | PARARGGM | SRGLPEPEO SE) RR RT P| cee OES Og 


and storage space; master TV FURTHER INFORMATION Best Rent Buy in Town” bay htiany agha frepjoce raise ot 7. 9080 


P. M.: . *X comp st. 2- rm. ao Fy ‘ils. to Fn en +g vith - - 2 -bed 
LO = : , age an ex ust . : 

COLNA MANOM-—4603 Aird Ave. : fy ;off- | DISTRICT HEIGHTS APTS. FAIRVIEW F | OWER LUXURY APTS Dietety redee. 118 ‘14TH St. BTWN, T&R 
AIR-CONDITIONED a iv ‘~— — = beaut ng. mm @ RENTAL OFFICE p 3¥2 RMS.—-$68 AND $70 & bedrms., 2-story stone with | 24 Tl. fromt; 2 lee. rms. and bath; 
CARILLON HOUSE | istanttieahepaiiha: Mactaus| Bost io schools and’ anppine, | 7812 Dlarict Heights Phogy APARTMENTS 4¥4 RMS-—$61.75 & $84.50 | fox Sek, tee using | Si-tond aul atoctad. “Who no 

; ve ' 7 oe - sage L IZs INCLUDED -_ , 
} 1 b —— n 
2500 WISCONSIN AVE. NW. | furn ett 44 oft tees act 3 eooumenn. en ae NIV ITY APTS. ; lon ay , : 42 PVT. PAVED iin al ROROR _ H. RUCKER co gs Bagh Soe f 
_ JO. te U : C . 11 PRIVATE PLA n——— | Sliver Sprin Geo 
( i YM ; ) | ARL. WN. =i N. Granada. Corner! room suite at +e 


° ~ . } 
<aphan each nse Tegsonable rents, JO. 4.0182 mee o vet bias 6a 2213 UNIV LANE Includes heat plus utils. Balconies, electric garbage dis- ocr ne, ct AT CAND Be casement ites Tarae attic. “CONT INE 
sampler ‘ ecorated and 1 Bedrm., Furn. . ] BEDRM $71 00 posal, exhaust fans, efficient janitor service, playground. ile ne 7 eel Sbalsianuy\ 
PaO a a GEORGETOWN 2 Bedrms., Furn. * DED Mistomatic washers and dryers. Bus, school and shopping AL OFFICE. JO. 3-2908 “96-4200. Brookhavea K,*. beths Brand- New Ajir- Cond. 
INCLUDING ALL UTILITIES UTILITIES INCLU centers nearby. Cpen Bing. to Gat, 9 AM te 6 PIL! foe: ser rer porch, 5 firepisees, 8140 BUILDING 
arms. liv. tm, kit. Meet ge 


mart aA maya: ty tay gt To Reach: “* Key Bridge, “He. 4-770 _ PHONE JU. 5-9630 Attrac tive 'e, Orem Fas rem 1012 14th St. NW. at K 


NW 
dg; 875 1115 
28 28 fe FRVICE O living rm..| west on Lee hwy. 1 block to —_ 13TH ST., PINEY BRANCH RD., JUST PAST FLOWER AVE. cee bier recent Superb offices with de luxe 


~| Oak at.. ~~ey to Pierce st., ES a aes “4 stairs yp oe atte aood “aes 
er cent to shop. center ig & bs St. mn .| rooms “large fenc ard: pear tures. Will partition te meet ten. 
trees an ers; bath. her 5666 ManGaner ants requirements. Suit fro 
; pools: elas . sq * te en entire floor 


left on Pierce *o corn 


Hing entive city ‘amplified mas-| 108 oF calf bore: pT. 1 JA. 5-404) 7 | ony. ioc, RA. 6-162, ° Ua A— 

Woking entire city. amplified mas-| j. McKENNEY BERRY & SON | Seacapr-0) Sy Cor tasboteenss | fee oor: mele partis a : Glen Manor Gardens c. elect lose PECIAL 8 ‘CAFRITZ—DI. 7-9080 
rato , : : ' oR » 

ISTMAN,. INC 

» OE. 7 WO, 
—2-bedrm. apt 
ransporta- pleased | to INCLUDES HEAT. HOT WATER AND GAs LOOK AROUND | | Ste Sta aaiioot pt apartment 
H ay) 
distance 

ACE . 

Pree laundry facilities, private cre wi ta oe ow ges vance -- id | BUSINESS PROP. SALE 48 


king om 
hroughout, See Janitor on prem-| » mn wre c 
Wile Nous eee ee 1363 wise AVE RW AD 43-0513 | van 5 = ith 1 bs building: Rep re . . S 
, == , ' ally at available 4 heart 
Sour. Snapestion wy KENSINGTON. WD 2 ~~ — ew 7 M. e's BROYHILL & SONS | Air Force a _ *, &.- 3 rasa Rea S . a oe Me acre: 3. 3 bedrins ‘ae ‘ 
CALL EM, 2-000 Fite en" and, ‘bath: convenient. & to my TFORD Va Rik call Jour you : K AR UND -bewschiel; $190 mo, KE 8-638) me $ | 
>. B MA. APT. tion: ete r « tt and ut TRATF RD feahy win-size luxe kit. | Dies. 
Se RAR ea MAE ens tio cee ret 2 | Pa ee MOVE IN AT ONCE COMEARQUNO gBURLETH,| BE yeti 
stores. « 7 se. . Svecious 2-bedrm.. modern s. «a 1915 37TH ST. Nw ne Un . ractiein 
Sit di Cuil nett ., Bit. bale ate Ne dist ea os oe Ciel his 4 si BILANNON Ron & teem Eh ast COMPLETELY AIR-CONDITIONED lgtely, "hors and pointed stoned fo *» acticing nysic 


AND 3-BEDRM. APTS. 24 
a8 hooyé see | i, etal : home-like surroundings, tae  peoaiiieg ‘ 7 ronvenient Iseation. Price NE EL Sale 
ow, am ; laand. : SECOND FLOOR: 3 well ar- FROM $61.50 me. oie: , bes traffic district. Cail 
f es ty ats a Tm: ‘center: ote ae : & £8809 LEE GARDENS ficient’ janitor ss 2 Sy acer alesse and bom. - Pee Oa ae 0513 ‘STores, RENT . 
ce SURREY HOUSE oa : 

Vecant store, 30a18. wi ese 


on premises , 
' See Mrs. Guy, 2512 Holman Ave. 5 RD. N 
t nw, RA. 3-277. wk, > . ‘nal street ned wa contrat Bh COMMUNITY OF APARTMENT HOMES Phone JU. 8-1297 ie MANAGER “abr Af ma | CAMP SPRINGS. MD. AREA— Mod mest in, reer: Slants be i 
pre rm. 5 apts. in : - scree o 
’ t ? Ine -- NA #8570 LU. 2003 Doreh. of] heat, fenced yard: avail-| deau acili- 
Se hh sar oe) rt I-bedroom apt ree . .$81.50 GEORGIA AVE. PAST SILVER SPRING TO FOREST GLEN RD. LEFT| COLORED—it0s Guarles Si. NE. MEVY -CHakE $6000. ties: pet rete “i Pe, Be 
7 | 2 ewly ONN. RUE APT. ON FOREST GLEN TO HALE PL. RIGHT 1 BLOCK TO GLEN MANOR. and * Atte. 2 bdrm Bi.) bedrm, b ‘te B aby mS) Y-AVE N. Ww 
c 
L. Phillips, W . 


: 2 large rooms, kitchen pote ; mo ' 
pene, —< shooo!2 $200. Thomas 
. tte 2 


share bath: all Remodeled and redecorated: large All Utilities Included 
Ls ‘Cony. transD.: em- . livin ‘ dining ; | aoe, 
reas. ie 3- “4937 , 7 : 
Fdth, 8 rms... Niner slectzicity. turn Playgrounds and Tennis Courts ." 8-7416 ee sare i ik, pe: _— ae ft Je ie 
~ et bed tai ‘Sb Tie—tae mod. 3 Adajacent to, Fort Myers. moments from the BRENTWOOD VILLAGE oft cckyEL AND ND FARK—3 hee 7m Di. 7080 
5 mo. 2nd cine teet heart of downtown Washington. 137] RHODE ISLAND AVE NE FOR IMMED. OCCUPANCY | ) 7 ‘live, Nr. many, 204. snd homes S 
a : ross Linco emo "Wis -2- . AP PLATS | ‘ 
0; tee — Bits bath. eee artings ob 4. tm 1 rian at shen to RDEN APARTMENTS 1-2-3 Sn 36 — wi , oe 
for ine ae transe. fled ented on circle et bend GA N. &.-N. W.-$. £-SOUTH | dining 21st & L Sts. 
ie AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY 


med Daily Hours 9 “til 7:30 20 Minutes to Downtown—Direct 
sco Saturday 9 “til 5:00 Single Fare Route 
Sunday 


1 “tit 5:00 ; 
1-Bedrm. Apts. from $65. CORED, BR ' 


* 7 : tr. 2 xms 

, SW 2 laree 2 dinette and . 

, it an nd Sc and See he Apply Office; 70! No. Wayne st. Newly decorated, cross ventilation; ample closets, laundry, em be 
i: : at ice cate ze zB i Rad Sat Wey a. Arlington, Va. storage facilities and parquet floors. Play ereas, near 5. ew York ave . 
Quiet york: WrOw UF. Ww ie. Lovely 2 Rental Mgr. JA. 5-6546 school, churches, shopping center and theater. 
tae y hoube ag Ms Ges OPEN DAILY ‘TIL 8 P.M. SUNDAY 10-5 


Office JA. 5-6986 
DE. 2-3202 


» 


si. somodeled a 


ears br 


“AN ADDRESS OF DISTINCTION” 


2828 CONN. AVE. | LIVE IN COMFORT | SE aff Paaeaie| Ee cig 
sil ~ 4 986 my ince NA, F975... 


POR INFORMATION 6-rm. 
a Bik. Columbia Pike Brand New Luxury Apts. CONTACT US FOR FREE BROCHURE 
rlington, i ys pen 


Boring homies oe). e Rapes. sors | Completely Air-Conditioned MODEL APT. 
} oe valley: 30 10 os ga Oe Antex and 1 etre tetten! : Z ' cep er ie 
: Ayint FEATURING Las 


i ae rn Ea all at mon ca BRADDOCK: LEE 


sits = (COMPLETELY AIR CONDITIONED) 


ome with eeaiatene! 


venient to 
| Bedrm., $80 to $81.50 . 2 & 3-BEDROOM DUPLEX APTS. 


SPiransuable fates Genfed"| | BEDROOM APTS. FROM ... .$145.00 BRADLEE TOWERS 


AIR-CONDITIONED 2 BEDROOM APTS. FROM ... .$199.50 : FAIRFAX VILLAGE 
NCLUDES ALL UTILITIES rime , DE Sree 4144 SOUTHERN AVE. . 


bn tnt tring snd ra it .. . FREEZER- cee ae | et arbitra $78.50 MO. 


corner. 


HERSHEY: 


aia 2 Epa 


Gee Resident Manager at Bullding 


CAFRITZ 


ALE Sve oN VA THE, WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Friday, Nowember 55, 1955 41 
VA. 


1OGE 


CHAIN 
NEW 53-FT. "RAMBELR 


VACANT— 


SPT 
hyn IP B. KEY CO. 
Realtors 942 Wayne Ave. JU. 5-3019 
CHEVY CHASE NORTH 


ram- 
py 


ihe. Rnqaned pe 2 ee J 
ott +f 
PHLeTCHER 


ee a” SO 
a te” 
1366 OTIS PL. NW. 


Fa. trons — ¢ to wi ag 
nm ERED y EHRLICH 


stele i is new- abe 14th . N.W. 
Mae See te 


f Be 
ie. pair, 00, every ere 


NON-VETS 


petio. with 
GEO. W_ ROBERTSON 


| 
| WALTER R. REYNOLDS CO. 
| FAIRFAX RAMBLER 
bedrms. : 
places: full 
radiant b Dent. 


or amen By will like this 
Rromes me am other 

es that fh ofer & rea rre- 
ar oe a. one 91) per : ote eon itien and 4 wonder!) 

r e 

Cs é. & tow ciks. _~ buy. 23 bedfoome and tiled 

b recht | tranep. | 3-27 Ry oy mi room, 
Laree fy. rm. wi rep kitchen. 
. kitehen with on ne area. 2 beautify! , ee ecreation 
very la bed aen or 34 rm | ment. Extremeiy 
Suck sale 


“Only 12.000 oe ws B hn ) 
ONLY 3 


; 2 OG) td nt 
levels 


shopping. Transp. 


wn | wi will SOUTHER wif 
ante like) ALL my for D.C. houses. 
"4 Mr. Dean LI. 3-0640; eves 


Sede sine appr Distinctive, 
rm wre fam ~& *. rm.. die 
aeeh. ige. 


i Rrtes 3 


eit, Tor vite 
with 


as So. HILL 
Pp Sharch. Va 4 4-5000 
FAIRFAX COUNT 


NEW ENGLAND | 
COLONIAL 
ON 2 ACRES 


MASS VE ROOMS —4 BEDROOMS | 
B OOM3S-—- 


’ paris 2CAR GA- 
you will get rour meaner’ s worth at | RAGE with expandid ° for | 
$18.950. Home has bright basement | guest house = eorve: s quarters; 
with er window it ip a real) GI appraisa 


a. all now—Vacant—im- ‘VERNON REALTY, INC. 
ARLINGTON REALTY | 2007 Mt. Verhon Ase._Ki. 6-108. 


wera vd JA. ec 9300 “TT PAIRFA 
new brick olue Ri bbon "Wrenet 


inecludin 
ee room 


Demi f 
tilts my hs 
LY THI NA 


itehens. Atlas "Malte 
PLUS SETTLEMENT cHARcEs | 1,? 
ay bullding 


apt. ce 
in ores. - 


u 
rent. 
det 


RBBB H RUCKER CO. 


JA. 5-8565 Bves.. JA. 23-9617. 


ere Rpt LiZcTor ssi 
* “ST, THOMAS MORE'S” 
sai] Be RETA AT RO, ay 


m og and Want be | 
5M 


“JUST FOR TWO” 


ou're sure to love with 


‘981, 


GE. the most 
aes. Ave. ur 
tie “Willams ure re 
ick ? 


BEDROOM SHY? 


Then here you are! at hare 


room 

. meee 

aiene lovely drapes. 
sto 


incladeg and’'it's brick, 


our new sens 
bed 


too! Pric 


TWO BATHS, THREE BEDRMS. 


lar + piven. seem and. 
din 


f ~My poets 
ted vl i. 


xurious neigh- | 


stay ore’s 


porch. 
ireplace | 


AiNok 


{tint ase me at 
Chevy Chase Lake Area 


OFFERING—Spiit level 


sterece bemt Nice ‘sara, ‘aii r. 
Lewry evenin after at img room 
8-539 , Dart me call Mr Blitz. fi ices parate 
> r ?. se 
fully eauipped kitch 
fled rec. r 


sh for your f greperts. | 
ce ppestace 
: ed night. it 


borhood s ov 
.. jeee toe sell autekiy: Only 823.- 


JAS. C. CONLEY & CO.) 
9525 Ga. Ave. JU, 9-4194 "til 9:30. | 
| Mile From Lansburgiy' $ 


brick Englisch 
ti . ing ; is 
er ei lying ie with : 0, 2-52 -8746 : Pull basement. 
7 : 77 ’ An excellent of- 


re c 


ree appraisal 


sees. AS distance Unis 
‘ RAHAM 


| 


bid 


xi 
) wt brick: 
& Di. %7-6561, 


COLORED—vVACANT |” 
co | 213 FARRAGUT ST. NLW, | 
pene AE brick ay a ay Tt’ 
| mod. tiled “3 and bath: maete 
& — ey , 

col uit Som dally 
| MURRAY LEVINE AD. 4.3737 


$495 DOWN 


Seenia row prick; 6 rms. 
bemt.; aute. heat: e.. in a 
+ ¢ nice yard; vpeant. move 


CO. '5-4056 ‘TIL 9PM. | 


_—— 


Nannes Rity., JE. 2-31 10} $3 


pordes AD. 2-7441. 
PHILLIPS. WO. 6- 


lvd.—Split-le ramble a “ | 

Vv i rr 

| Bate ome: Ay study or fam- 

etely ecu 
Ve (e) 


FALAS CHURCH AREA i 
“| $1, 975 Cash, $113 Mo.! 


taxes and insurance 
GI 4%% 1 


room rm lee Office open 
white Lim Frou ihaed” , ea Pop rent 

"| Saher BG 3U. 56010 

A SEW WAY 


To tell your wife you 
for 


stor ; 
ee Pymis | 2. PCRS “et 
Ons ARL. Valley). Vacant. 
rooms, b Incl udes 
1.300 


@oerk!in 


BRICK APT. BLDG. 


Modern picture-windo livine 
ooms make br 


Located 4 - >. white 8 aren; tlese| 
rents a Te ie 
:. ) 


do Por details. call 
MeeinN eves. TU. 
(LIST 41 


MEN’ 


brick ram 
jus 


“com 
sie arn "Tt Gad- 
ec. 


er = tes 


MARCUM 


“ARLI INGTON FOREST: 


: Most exclusive and convenient ie- 
lington This bri 3 Co- 
ise. living 
separate dini pi mm 
basemen’ storm 
to 816.950 or 


full | i B - Es PROPERTIES. 


$66. 29 MONTH 


INCLUDES TAXES AND INS 
DOWN «a ' 


NA ’ 

J awn DIC 

ie —O home with 
be $.. 


acho ols 
neighborhood full 
4g pagen , son. UN. 4- 


os. WA. 


' uper ait 
eRe Oper! wenity ock- 
ry oF 


1 AL John ‘Chapman n & Son 


6e7s Lee Wey Arlington 


c) 
Frederick W. Berens Sales 


1722 L St. NW. NA. 8-5000 

’ NR. 2nd & JEFFERSON N NW. 
New 18-Unit Apt. Bldg. | Bedroom & Bath—Ist Fir. 
tenants Modern brick 


hom rms 
+ and deaths plus complete basement apt 
Gross an- wee heat, ce 


LAUREL. L. MDS: 
brick with f 


511-800 of ae ariy 


mi 
ols e an a4: ad). “schools, chur 
s. and complete — 


eosenTatien 
hen 
Reduced 


FE Malcolm, JA. 7-3024 


Ant INGTON. NORTH Por sale by 
owner -bedroom brick Colonial 
‘a9 818.750 Call JA 
8-5) 


plann 
American bedrm a athe. full “bein 
Gl of scrgtons| slate rot, sep terms a 
1. ADNSP~| rage. Immediate pinata jon 8B) 8 ary Rm A." of Silver | Spring. 
Call 1% 


hes. terms 
eibwk? Pe unnay &co 
‘GALLERY OF HOMES’ | 


peat | U. 5-6550, 9 ul 5 
HILLANDALE NEW 
Boas tiful bath-cnd-o-bait brick ARLINGTON 2 


A sparkling better-than-new 
ts gu 3 ares dining room. Pail L O O K ' “READ LOW D ax 
pecroeme c BUSINESS AS USUAL 4 you i be f + to see why 
Perieah ConsiDERED NOV, og 24th AND 25th | an it this lovel) 


entnus this lovely large 
BLANCHARD miss res 


are « abéu 
ANTIQUE BRICK RAMI 
Fa. 
Be BOW ee 
bath. : vm : : 
NR, aD BRAER CIRCLE 


many outstanding features. 
lead 
On « beautiful large lot. on a quiet 


trance fover |} te step down 
living room with fireplace separate 
1. 
street, this small ome ls idea 
a couple. young or 
to be 


acreened re kitchen with close to transportation and. 
ampie table space: 3 bedrms.. ae i A Ait Ri 


sl ALLEN SHERWIN, INC. 


w edows. CHURCH - 
“EIT. FOR A KING 

Yes. you can be kin proves + this 

REALLY BEAUTIFUL A Vue 

BRICK }+BEDR 


BLER. Ah except ona! ly “oP l- 
p anned home with pienty of clos-| 


us 
your 4 ‘ AP 9 -8089 
V3: 


Heme). 
buys this 3-bedroom 


rambler with spacious living room. 
cimning room. well equipped kitch- 
en with automatic Washer. * 
lot with jots of trees «a 
terraced garden $12.9 
price rapeciate occupancy. Eves 


JE 4-575 
REAL | ESTATE. 4711 Lee bw. 


GRACIOUS “LIVING 


3 BEDROOMS. 2 BATHS. BSMT. 
L Own- Charming stone-and -brick rambier, 
rambier on wooded) «itwat on 
pores layroom close in lot 
en? 


Sl Lake Barc oft | 


Unbelievably underpriced, ter- 
rific neighborhood, quality 4- 
bedrm., 2-bath  center-hall 
brick rambler; 3 picture win-| 
Gows in walk-out basement,| 
beautifully finished recr. rm. | 
with fireplace; 1725 sq. ft. on) 
main floor with Mr. and Mrs.' 
Bathroom, makes this truly) 
under the market at $29,850. | 

GI contracts considered im| 
med. occupancy. Exclusive. 


E. F. STEFFEY 


2-4970_ JE. 4-3447 


LAKE BARCROFT 
2-LEVEL 


Contemporaries 
3, 4, OR 5 
BEDROOMS 

TABLE-SIZED KITCHEN 

FULL DINING ROOM 
| LARGE RECREATION ROOM 
| OPEN BEAMED CEILINGS | 


2 FULL BATHS 


2 FIREPLACES | 
|CARPORT OR GARAGE | 
LARGE WOODED LOT | 
beth bret Cape See Pale] deh tasement 08 bit $24,950 TO $27,850 


equipped kitchen. PLU tor fireplace in reer area © 


Gryer and ironer. Nice jot 13 situated on Anchor- 

Hy i A-l a : fa ro 
eit in condition. Price neighborhood se! LURIA BROS. 
AR LINGTON REALTY bome Just a Ja. 1-880 
Wilson Bird J 9300 "Ti! BS : 

7 A. 2909 a a 
bungalow 
dinin 


rented 
Saas a isal 
6 


O. F. SMITH & BROS. CO.) 
OL. 32-1627 Bree. OL. 2-6488) 


SALE, D. C., HOUSES “ 


4 -room. | 
-bath brick: finished attic. slate 
eet. oe good AN 24.990. Susie V 
t 8375; evenings, 


Big 


ARLINGTON 1 REALTY 


212 Wilson Bivd. JA. 7-9300 "Tu 9) 
A 


attic 


—. . ~ a Brick 


‘Rack Redeco- 
. hes oOD. on 
ea . Ginette, kit 


semidet mt miss this— 
950. 


ah Yor’ $3 


CENTER HALL 
RAMBLER 


Th new custom-built center- 
hall ra romaree in exel 7°, ~ 7 n- 
larce W ~~ 

spanious living reom as 
lace and picture window, din. 
oom with entrance to large 


"a 
iv. rm ane) 980 


PES RR Purnis 
.B RNSTEIN Co. | 


q or 
saioole tranen wF + ighly rec- 


ommend these fine homes 


sOReyS Ra A - = 
500 


ort acon. | 

or 
room, dinette. 

Extras include washing 


— ; . it ms 
time offer room brick Co- bedrooms —$18.- ° 
sonia, powder room. rear screened | 
porc We ty storm windows 
a See G n y Bhop 8s Ave rom 
ng alley op pin = er 

2- % te MERRY PIEL & 


PITOL Hilt 
$10,000—-RESTORED 


U Rt) and bath brick nome | 
ree bw 1 modern 
h. nice yard. | 


3-2761 
LL 


artes home 
. fren modern 
“*. be Blee yard. 


ayo : N 
G! APPROVED: $11,250 


orm a few yrs. old. 

rms. and bath 
eas a.-c. heat 

seach as gard. disp 


exhaust PH D ‘COM. 
TU. 2- 9200 
COLORED—WALTER REED 


very nice kitchen 
machine. 


Lider ‘BASEM 't has lovely fi 

ed rm ted on auiet, 
shed and street ae for children. 
Pairly priced at $21 950 Immediate 


possession 
Parker, Smith & Donnell 
616). OPEN 9-9, 


aE VIEW 


New custom-bdvuilt split- level ra 
bier on «a li in exelusive neig 
borhood paeremndes b 


‘stand —— ony | 


‘ARLINGTON REALTY 


2212 Wilson Bivd. JA 77-9300 
ahi PAIR FAX—FALLS eau Yer? 


Yes, Ma‘m! 


‘ TO SPARE 
everthing 


Ou 


’ 
’ 
ree : 
comfortab! e hom iz 
: 


CLINTON AREA $12 950. 3. 
bedrm. rambier. firep! hancs 
to shops and Andrews Pieid 


fide? gy tal CO., INC, 


4 Silver Hill Re 
2 Sonus” , oe Silver HUl Firehouse 
8-5800 


bus fonpital, Good Fe available 
val Hospitea ce v 
Ry apot. onis. CROGS & PERRY 


BETHESDA 
Bedrooms—!'%2 Baths 
$23,950 


Colonial brick-an a A frame tn | 
gnesee jecation . oe: big 
rm.. dining t 


BA RGAI N garage: sefeened porch. Bam “has 7 | S-YR-OLD BRK BUNGALOW 


a bus. 
Bogutitul modern semi-detached at , La ' | In ulet, exclusive and tri 
ei? this Tan pestry brick home| 81! wi exposures: ‘er . all istinctive }- Gutetantion’ neighbor ~ 
near Aspen st. in gorgeous Bright- op oa: % petepes, is Leve wit Golonisi hes loede ot of P .-« Ful e a.): 0 
bemt.. ell brick. OF financed 


concrete pel, “igs. rina: 2 tear| 2 uth je Pae ree rte anene ; 
SAM N 3.950. A e will 
TO 6 “_ OL. 6-7800 VACANT ou al ee ad » | lent 


& rear 
80 
i “Atlas Realty 
l-> bd . 
groom. both 3 woune and eld. & Gpet- AS. rick. LA E rambier: 3 bed 


pore Hae ancl. : lov front 
vds.. Swittults lendesnoat Hurry. | 
n's ia ery conven- lo jet this one cet away ‘Temi 9 
jarse Neaatl bedrm. “rambler situated 4 —— pine-pancled (Rreniacs i SAL £SU S URB. HOUSES 67 VA. 
lot VIRGINIA 


igh. St 
nce— Excellent brick Colon ia! 
rea. $995 DOWN | 
established neighborhood screened 
ALEX.—Suburbds. iS mine out 
500 


ves bedr e *. 
Soar. rm.; ‘se — + 
s00 5) RE. 7- wah Leama 4-3422 
BY “OWNER w Ork. rambier on ' 


gied act 
rte ar aioe oie appro 
N. EM. 2- 
1600 wl ock of Rises pl. nw. —5 bed- 
r 


seems, 1 on 
rage. marvelous value 038. 
room ae oom, 
full 


garage 

r. 

NW. é- 
rehes. 


aa 


Visit ROBERT E. LOHR Homes 
HE. 4-4000 “TIL 9 P. M. RA. 2-3600) 


| KENSINGTON Home ewood subdi- 
vision. For the large family, 

this 4-bedrm. home, Lee. 

r firepl 


OOM for 
but complaint 
ecrooms | 
large 2 the ist 
on the 24. “with full 


CE POR OTHER 


CALL O 
s MM, PROP 


liv.-din combine HOU 


ull > 
oo. I 


tA 2 rms... 
tien. com " kitchen. 


r and 4 
| on eacl 


15x32 


with fireplace 


fo of them 
00 
a 


Living Room 


sloping ter raced lawn 2% 
+p # darviight base- D 


Reas sien at 
Oven daily and weeken 


dishwasher 


Prick construction 


WHITE BRICK RAMBLER 


Kitchens 
mem os throughout and "e- 3-7368 


Somethitie Different 
$22,500 


TRUTHFULLY AN UNUSTAL AND 
DIFFERENT CENTER-HAI 
RAMBLER OF UNIQUE 

3 bedrooms 18x18 


king 
100 joan ys 
terms 


‘Better Not 
See This | 


wire ready te move’ Wel 
resist the appeal of this 


laree faite per 
"8 i "ot rom bus: off 

igebeles 821 
ISON, Move in now 


ar peat ae Graham & Co. JU; S- 6010) 


wd 
EDGEMOOR| brick with full bemt vie 

excellent| Meade, 811 4th st, PA. 5-0819. | Prince G s Count 
LP G I7th ave.— 
rambler. 


Mass. Ave. Ext. Area ri) NDS. 
rick 3 bedrms.. mos. as 


va oe 
SPLIT LEVEL with pireh cabinets. rec. a sa ANDRA $550 down to GT! 
$20,950—10% DOWN er mare ‘offer. 


Sennen! ate in 
-0202 loc to! quiet dean-end street ‘t 
baths. =a) and * mooping otal ‘Stiles mee 3 bie bedrooms. fireplace 
ra, chine dish Mo 
pF -+y 


nm rambler ar eine f -3-bed- ’ Ca ton Realty, io eying | seem, separ pte large din- 
ing room, ft in iy. room he equ! 
exandria-Fairlington 
oe 2- 46 ves 
tet E BOGLEY, Ine. 
a 7800 «EST. 1939 


t- 
ce 
Direct From Builder 
a: ‘ » - ‘ Smart 
stone and brick rambler: 5 yrs. old 


living rm.. 
= 3 bedrima. 
ick possession 

HUG NS & HARR 
tors. 


Pretty di getached 


~ re 
irep! 
with | 
own | 
Bee 
Moton Realts 


ige. liv. rm. with 
n edrms 


wii 
large floor-to- eee { 
dow Bright dining. “lL.” 


section: doe . 3 large -2 omen PHA y me 


ts— " 


sa eek 


“aelachea 
late possession 
and JE 4-988" 


oom. 
basement, 
m 
on this autos 3- 
re. rmin D—Uppe 
conv. “| brick. front ana 


A 
na pening! 116 YOU ST. NE. 


This beautiful 20-ft Colonial brick 
heme contains 6 large rm ; 
closed rear porches 


wniess Fe 
one could 


se-in North Arlingtos 

j. Wesley Buchanan, Inc. 

Radio Bids. Ari, JA, 4-188 
“| don't need a new 
house. | just want a 
larger older home 
that will make a 
comfortable home.” 


ce b 
room. Beautiful 
y extras. Conventional 
ave 


ng de 
Slcnee with a+ “space 
I EMENT 
ots. 800. Vet : er 
7 % 
Dp - WA Lop sah call . last but Be least. this 


‘Brick 
clean 


ollywood). complet tion 


=n 


hed room 
ae - art desires. - . 
e¢ 
te oso tteho” ALLIE 
‘REALTY. 


BETHESDA RAMBLER 


lg a dayiieht 
this . 


ne 
ano THERE: « ‘ORL e, 


CUSTOM 
RAMBLER 


Peatu 
hen 


rambler, full 
pay $12. 750 on 
big 


ey ” tot 
PRINCE GkonoEs ROPER 


larse front porch and yard 
’ | 
type home. with | 
jst floor: 3 bed- 


s.. 2 baths, . ~ 2-0aT ea-| 122 Kentucky Ave SE. 
e 
xt —s 839.986 eal rms bath kitchen -dining 


ETOW ONLY $195 DN. combination full beme 


quiet 

6 laree rms... tile bath, hot-water home: a i, be street. lovely lot. Weekends call 

T FRONT brick aut wlll tas. new-house condition the bi t this) 29 ws he Gorman Young. 
room. libra ary, fining | 

Peoom n 

ooms 


Bberat ‘Verma and have priced thy les 
chi dea sont my wa re 2000 Me NALD KNOLLS 


Pf at least 
tal $19 500 
“C. Chatel, DE. 2-1167) 


sh country 


li 
en, powder or carport 


Includes 


wall done in Roman brick. large level 10! 


bt Es to p 
bile schoo! 5. 


te and | earache 


t Brad- 
te 
r 


asphalit-tiied | HAVE YOU EVER SAID THAT? 
bessem of 


newly decorated. 
fireplace: GI 
“ : 


here s ths} 


fully jorulat od. 
peer ¢ Gt 
| he eS? 750. JOMN 
_— ie fons. 

| er ‘ _ einem 
5g ; 


is Bao" JOHN 
: = ew. ase: | 


eluminum Le vindow | 
GI, 8550 ee $75 mo 


ria ou kind of home 
ite 


s ring nell entrance to de luxe 
© 2510 and ign a. fu 
own & Country Builders 
OV. 3-0319 
ALEXANDRIA 


“BIG ROOMS” 


familiy—elmost rew 4-bed- 


twin “sited 


ning rm.. klichen on ist 
> bedrms. and bath on 24 
S.car carage. Located on 
beautiful “% acre. GI approry 
at £15.500 . 


Yeonas Realty 


13 Wilson Bivd. JA. &-2100, 

PRIZE WINNING HOME 

__| FAIRFAX (VA.) AREA 
Beautiful ed 
wood 


Bri ck and red mb 
large living room rece re 


under the mar 


Chevy Chase Realty Co. 
e _ Ay an 


CALL OWNER EX. 3-8440 | 


BRICK RAMBLERS 
wn. 25 yra. to veteran, con- 
financing available. 

oom. 1% baths, G 


orate 


lo at tS 
brick Colonial: poparate dinin ing $10.90: 


nn attracts, ~ Boreh wes base- | 


lara. level “lot; itt Sti = 


Just bevrond Kenwood and 
end street, close arade 

Attractive 7-¥r old, brick Ce 
wit r bath. den. 


198 DOWN 
Several vacant brick houses with | 
all imprevements. } ”_ pos- 
M * omAt NER. 1029” ermont 
ave n.W. NE 8-6036;: home, HO. 
L SSESSION 
507 KENNEDY STw N.W. 

1 iALy 
yinet AD ISED. 8 | 
ms utiful orien, 

9 2 kitchens and 2% aths. 


bargain all dow aym 
ust sell this week. ” call vin 3 


MURRAY An A AD. 4- oh Lg 


» $695 | DOWN 


NW. 
ish- | tless , Colentat brick: 6 rooms, | 
= bemt. with extra kitchen: oil | 
a. | peat: mice yards: very easy 
; 


Suge A fast “irene. RX) COS 4056 ‘TIL 9 P.M. 
7": COLORED—$500 DN. 


uety WwW. b 4 bedrms.. 1? 
bemt.: to right party. 


iis 
z j 
ee: VACANT: 3 


| ere DN. 


6-RM. BRICK—BSMT. 


hurry on this one 


23 


A , NE. eae a. 
$119 monthly; full bsmt. and sttic. 


tehen. pantry. oil heat. 
and race. OL. 2- 


Hyattsville Hills 
$11,000 


Custom-built Euslish cottage, 
brick qonstryetion, 
r heat. detac 


month 
pays everything 
R. Hughes 
7-1400 "till 8 o. m. 
LANGLEY PARK 
BRICK 

3 BEDRMS., “PULL E BSMT. Bon. Inc. 508 

ist offering of this attractive hvnny ensingten| IDEAL LOCA T Io ae: og ee TO) Ask. Va 


Colonial. spacious livin ts. 2% lots. all util — avall-| SHOPPING AND TRA —(Beverly Hillis) 
ginmns room. ohne on ; e lote ready te ith | I yom . | ly present a home in 


a en | ie community _ 
d floor rear | Rs 8-6600. V. 


a porch. sundeck. petganse 
garage Anchor 

pit: sbundenee of clnoste: 

to Glenbrook School, 


shopping and transportation 

Briced ry u 8 seo. 

this beautifu ‘white-brick rambler 

2-{t. livinge-dininge room with o 
earth adjoining huge fvine madab. 

rooms. 2'5 be larse 

age expensively 

wooded dot on @ no-through street 

Pri st under $30,000 for fuics 

sale al ‘SHANNO ys LUCHS CO. 


FH A 


GREENWICH FPOREST..A charm-| 
ing stone-and-brick home wi un | 
scaping. — hall. den 

neled sun | 


tung 
af cus 


fees 2048 Wilson Bivd. 
mesi, 
nia 


mes.. 
ist floor powder room: 
ely 


THIS IS one of the very BEST 2? 
bath. 3-bedrm. homes of this type. ' 
stone firepiace and 
step-down ii 


‘Ti 9 PM. 


~" aPac Non. vets ee 
Hen regener. 


icture 
erry 


19113 Colesville Rd 

-6010 Open * yard, entent 
for ifetin s 

¢ 6-72.44 AL BAK 

Alexandria, Va. 

100 down to anybody Bal- 

og 

hum be 

Al Baker 

N. Washington st.. 


DU. 7-01 ristmas 
WALTER REED AREA” mS 
16TH 
OUSE 


4-year- old 


‘yard with iots 
ner will consider G 
To inspect please call MR b 


TZ. I 
& | n 
P Wathinnten separate dining room. 
kitchen has breakfast apa 
basement with rm an ‘4 
a rep ace > ~ fireplaces are Heat- 
ched ork 
TOo MANY EXIR As to 
To mu to appreciate this| 
fine home Sho own by appointment. | 
ry Sfexidle financing to substan-| 
names y flag Fy ao ry Call 


ase ei) J. Wesley Buchanan, Inc.| 
aa Radio Bide. Arl. JA. 4-1255 ‘til 9. | 


NO. ARL., CLOSE-IN | 
| Unusual 2- Family Home 
‘1OR 7-BEDRM., 3-BATH HOME) 
Bik. to Wilson Bivd. 


Jbe & McCay, 


JA 8-a675 Ey ves... 
4 LEVELS of gracious 
acre n 


ar Inc. 


tract 


“JAMES L. DIXON & CO 
(Exclusive) ED. 3-3603 
HESDA 


acant ia ree 
PARKSID 


£ 


‘Cor ISCIOUS: | 
WELL ALRIGHT ly 
attrac e ntemporary bri x 
went od with “Sleaks of eve appesa!| 
Huse livi ~ room | 

firepla wall | 


fo on "aI ist trust 


5 here's 


room 1 daB- 
4-64. 


le Pork 
| RIDE RRA 


We proud- 
® fine resi- 
for .500 
L. MARCUM 

bedrms.. lee 
tail bemt. Cor 


7B. 3-333). 


—. 
ae 


“or ee ) 


—~—- Clean | 
storm windows 


with din 
birch, cabinets 
gleaming copper eve yel oven —4 
counter top range. dishwasher 
Srepecel end Sreeser | t. refri ee | 


brick ambler; 

7 A—$1 05 
liv. rm. fre ——e 
lot. ROWLAND CO 


_ JU. 8-8600 siesta 
SILVER ROCK 
Well-planne 3-bedrm rambler | 
featuring : comb 
Kitchen with and 

mt.. fenced Terms 
or will take GI terme 
© school and tranep. Price 


FOUR CORNERS 
Call to see this 4-bedrm. Cape 
home in beautiful Woodmoor 


tod : Bm 
y wr $13.500. HUGH 


86 T 
bedrm. rambler. 
fenced rear yard 
porch. GL. appr 

dn r andy 
Craw RD A 


| RE. §-9100" 
PA KLAWN 
COLONIAL 


We are looking for offers on this 
charming 3-bedrm. Coloni ithin 
Me kine distance to pee te shop- 

ms and transportation very | 

oo ane om excelent site: | 
w suit 


tic & McKEEVER| 


REALTORS & INSURERS 


IDETA 
ONLY sare 
$500 


.Paraday 2S 


A. §- $393. Ot- 
open 9 ‘til 9 


eee RANCH 


NEARBY PAIRFPAX 


a. Ls, ey ALEXANDRIA 


/-FT. 


RAMBLER 

3 BEDROOM 
YEARS OLD 
ONLY 
CALL Us 


Walker & Dunlop, Inc. 


959 N. Monroe. Arlington. Va 
JA. 5-2400. 


. new 
fenced var 


ART BROS Ps 


fronting on black~top road. 613.5006 
Richardson & Hall, Inc. 


Radio Bidg. Ari JA 77-8108 *t 


CENTER HALL 
RAMBLER 


» the Bivd. Heights and &t 
thon Partah 


75s \0n, price 


‘$319 Down 


fied 
so CR 


ee 
BL: 1-695, 
Residence “s PS 
2440 KALARAMA RD. NW. 


rambiers 
hasement separate 


some with terrife 
GROOM co on 7-4487 
N., ARLINGTON 
Brand-New 
3-Bedroom Brick Ramblers 
Full Basement 


$20,500 
J-W REALTY CO. 


ene 


otleb 


labie 


iS 23 BAT ; 
PULI Bagi ENT.; at TODAY: 


$17,850 Rugged Stone | 


TO INSPECT Manor House 


Indi v! ou and charging in 
200 ‘ ati shade trees 
tind! ng es eker™ nd barbeoue sur- 
rounded by distinetive and 


: 2 bedrm ns 
Many extras Tree-shaded jot. 2 us 


uD 
Price. 814.500 


WOOD COMPANY 
Aye. 8 


r 
F 
|. CO..> 4056 
| COLORED—HOME & INCOME | 
g's ww £ Verner E See Ry idth| 9 
| rms $13,880 


i, | LEO M. BERNSTEIN CO. 


pf ihe | 
en 
jor entertain) oak: -bed room brick rambler, Liy.- 
ee bat sir-condi- 
allel tric kiteh- 

s heat: express 


tienaliy fine proper Fae 


JOSEPH W. SEAY Cc 


a a 
with regenee 
113 W. Broad &t., Falls Church. Va. 


n een pullt 
in featu rms.. 2 baths = 
24 


Attic and attached gara JA. &-1878 


; You are i = 244 
char = rt se” an 
uded « den 


eu Thanksgiving,« 1 ‘til Dark 
Bo EAC: ou, ower eh 


racy. left on 
JAMES L. “DIX! N & CO. 


TO CLOSE AN ESTATE 
FIRST TIME OFFERED 
ALL IN GEORGETOWN 


1233 ST 
. O, H.-W. 


7 RMS... BA 
as i 'SON 


For se tou 
Realtors 


J. McKENNEY 
. AVE. AW. 
© RXCLUSIVE 


FE ONL? $350 DN. 


REE 


“ORE 
EXCEPTIONAL VALUE 


Beautiful area. Tot 
Attrac, semidet home, 
throughout. |} proms pore 

mm. apt. mF me 


inaneine  .- | 


Park 
mmac. 


RED—OWNE 
IS CRYING! 


PLL THs HOM 


N.W.—This 
h 
~ 
ront wuts. 2 rea 
t. a heat. 


aod We 


beautiful spi 


ate. 
7 laree 


G!I_ APPROVED 
4209 3D ST. NW. 
ONLY $300 DN. 


Owner has pucmhense another eines 
and sell All fo 


must 


vaine 
*“, at “near. ev 


ESDA 


An unusual attrac. bri ‘ remshier 
land estied 


plan wi 
seat the, imme. condi ; 
wee oie fall WO. 6-2300 till 


Mis Bg --Fhaee -  e ™, 
Tae STA a a 


ag & rec. . Bs 


k it = lot. full ; 
in rm. make 
brick mble ° wonderful 


ip 
kage. Penced 7a rms. one 


“| oe ble attic "GRAHAM & 
: tt. 9. 
Chevy Chase; Md. 


& DUNLOP, INC. 
Realtors. Uptown Office, Ba. 39-6715 


, 06 
nw. . 8-O714. After & pm 
9-5 r JU. §- 


iy bungalow e 


v ‘ ft 
bedrms.. 
me Oe 
over 
£. 
My best 
LE 
Office pa - So te 


A ee 


"SOMERSET 
NEW SPLIT-LEVEL 


Pive twin-size bedrooms. 
OF. kitchen with break 
screened porch. patio epi 
light club rm., 2-c&r garac 


0. F. SMITH & BROS. CO. 
OL. 2-1627 Byes.. 


ARK — y 
type brick Colonial. 7 rma... 
baths, plus % Levne ae fi.; 

el h. olate 


21,980" best otfer 
tte 


WOOD ACRES 


Be ake te 


Wend Frags Cana. Corp. 
OL. 43240, ives, OL. 2-7338. 


ully igsulated te Colonia! , Speeeved. 
‘" ine}. are 


oe 
ter ha en 


MUST SELL 
i baths liv 


-house 
7 83000 ¢ 


WEST HYATTSVILLE 
$14,950 


Harry A. Boswell Co., 
AP, 7-1111 


: FORCED SALE 


BRICK RAMBLER 
Owner's have Ms of forced to 
on this 3-bedrm ramb ar in 
en i. vel lot. San 
a tases Patt, 3 7160s eo. 
Ths Ps zaey Boswell Co. 


Til 8PM. 
NB 


i BERNSTEIN eb 
CO. §-3533—9 TH 


$750 DOWN Gl 


3- as ag Rael ee— 


Large ietan’ ay rit ette tile 
bath, large “sitchen: lots of tabi- 


nets. _ Babi te snack bar, stove andg| ‘#ched 


Screen my oil! 
heat. * ruil basement rtiy finished | 
rec. room with shower. atalino e- ; 
trance. Alum. sterm windows 
acre jot, nice view. Only 614 oad. ; 


ae ad Realtor 
8-6220 


TERR ae Anti | 


non-veterans Pook Eltchen | 


cludes everything 
+ 8-1868 9 * 


ree t. 
* $11 - Month! y prmts 


“at L REALTY CO. | 


615 Wythe St... Alex., Va 
"th 


gown =~ this 


at 
joa loan. Fae a 


| 


: m 
separete ‘dining ‘room. MAH 
overs! 

(meester 20 {ft 


Geneva kitchen ¢ 
ft. le door re 


y owner. Assume GI joan 

poss 1% yr old brick 
NY Pall bemt. “A . 3 ize 
outsize range, dishwasher lee. all eine kit. ° feating | 


hot- wargs heat spe . sD 
| toda } ac s. mJ 


sel! 
} ping. churches. 15-min Pentagon - | 
wither FHA or| |B Belvoir. $18.250. Call PL 


A Whedaecr att 


TA RA 


WE HAVE A 3 BROAN 
with full bemt. in e hishe 
tion of this A ares 


sf $20,950 
Walker & Dunlop, inc. 


969 HN. Monroe Arjasten. va. 
JA. 5-234 


long). . 


rope 
price ta $21.950. 
Gt terms availab! 


Spl it- revel, 


ULL TIL 
at y FS. ' and . Bvt a 
recreation room basemen?! “ 
esiient bric«z construction Attrac- 
oh ‘e Palle Chureh residential sec-i 
then on &@ ¢ iy" lot 


$17,300 


EITHER Gf OR FHA 
| Arthur L. Walters, 


Randoiph at Giebe_ 


$760 DOWN 


To Any One 
A WOODED GROVE 
OF HUGE OAK TREES 


urrounds this * a - ~aty) ye prist | 


rambier 
st sec 
Priced | 


bpbe 
WEETOVER—3-bedroom brick ram- 
bier with daylish : basement oni 
ssetudes dead end street. Just | 
é a. ‘ 


aty inc. 


is 
wy HAUNCE yy REALTY ‘ORP | 
ie fos 9-2737_ 


=, “SERVICE < ANIZATION 
4? JOAN wad asst 
$93.00 MO PAYS ALL 
VERNON REALTY CO. 


007 Mi. Vernon Ave 


“BELLEVUE FOREST HA, Word 

Da to Wise” . 

; wert 08 listening?) 
Es ful Kitchen. re 


excellent “tts 


JA. 4-1400. 


peat es 


Broadmont—Falls Church’ 


ve in excliisive ) ares of beautiful | 
2% ba 


ths. at : 
ree 


2313 Wilson Bivd. JA. 38-2100 | 


aibkity Z. MENSH ee | 


Bh TUE SF PAS AG | 


- ereergeenatieaiepeatenimremnectneiag i 
oaany} SPRINGFIELD 


A¥ 


Realtors. 


28 
Choice ee 


in 
COLONIA ae 
ealt rs. _Puksers 


Immediate occu 
hesitate. Call now. 
JE. 4-4900 


ie 


a 


4 BEDRMS.—DEN 


$20.950 ~~ Immaculate home fus 
for ams for « © Bee, fam rides! 


ye u 
completely 
-— 8 big trees. mapect today. 


METZLER—JA, 5-7575 


iving rm., 


LAURIE CORF., 
Ol a oa 
a Yoho. 
I. 9-36 KI. 9-0078 
The Old Reljabie Office” 


7 trees in lovely 
on 


"Better Homes fealty 


Sesh teahian 
Susie 


ree 
payment to anyone. 
Price, $16 


Amazing Value. 
2 BEORMS.—EXPANDIBLE 


$13,900 
By far Re & best vane fe today’s 
market 


that tots het 


transper- 


dicen, H. RUCKER'CO, 


JA. 5-8585. Bves.. JA. 86-6262. 


THE WASHINGTOR POST and TIMES HERALD 


Friday, Nowember 25, 1955 


as 


BRICK RAMBLER, 
i l- “oe 
iy ae 
GI 
NOTHING DOWN 


rambler 


wer 
mm 


Mannas 


3. betrm 

—- ellen location ‘Alresa . 
excellen r . 
proved $17.990 about $2 | 


é- 


ro 

monthiyv ith no doe: 

— Reaity.. 
ALUE, 


ft .. B 
A218 
new brick rambie 


en 
9393 “ Ottice open 9 “tll & 


THE UNUSUAL | 
5-Bedrm. Split Level 


ew brick and redwood on ‘ss 


recreation 

» ec poreh 
irable 

ow at 


J Wesley Buchanan, Inc. | emir 
A S-1155 "th 9 


adic Bids... Ar' 
4 Bedrms., 2 Baths, Den | 
ALL ON ONE FLOOR 


is lone and lew brick rambler ts! 


. secluded, 
ot. A 


CR ROWELL & CO 
~2190_N —y 


"ROMY E 1 bast 


INC 

JA. 5-0707 

IN REAL ESTATE 

RN REALTORS 
_ OT. 4-8035 


~~ Sean PROPERTIES 
ARFAX REALTY 
1E. 4-4900 


FOR EXCELLENT city and country 
rty at poaseagple prices. call 
473 


JED WARDS REALTY, JA 
IT’S A DILLY 
DON’T DALLY 


AR and can be Sought on reas- 
enebie terms al ~brick ram- 
_ fl on @ beautiful jot Home o 

rooms. baths. mod- 
= a hitches with dishwasher. dis- 
posal and 


Pi 10 


on ~ a! oleve- 


ed « 
resigen' jal jecation Priced 


level 
STEAL 


s overfiowing with value for the 


jaree eating space full-' 


ized Ciaine room. living room with | 
c 


of uree: 
basement garage 

we million-dollar view 
= — Por appointm 


“POMPONIO | 


2222 Wilson Bivd J 71-6660 
3 BEDRMS. 2 BATHS 
$14,950 


is immacu ete home situat ad 
“acre lot in convenient leca 

u Cc ; '- 
= room. separate dining room 

ot-water eqcepeers heat: priced 
iS. will go Gl with 


err 


_ 


st 4 miles from D Large 


—~Gi—$750 DOWN” 
Prame colonial in So Arline- 
ton. 23 dBedrms ] 


beautiful 
viek possession 


Lynn Realty, JE. 22-9400 


“GOOD LOCATION—_ 
LOW PRICE 


large rambler 


{ eard’ Im cies 
ssqconse: 515 950 Por full par- 
iculars 


JOHN W. MULROY CO. 


99 Hillwood ave. rolls Church. Va 


ING “VIEW 


$14.500 
Tree-surrounded imm 
bedrm. antique brick 
email knell at tep dead-end 
gtreet offers privacy and command- ) 
ing view from every window. Wall- 


ulate 
mbier on 


$14.000 in trusts. with very rea- 


sonable payments 


Parker, smith & Donnell! 


Balen WINN if 7- a oe 


vy Be = NO NER on 
Center-hall lan, rambler Living | 
ro 


URPRISE the: 
$00.38 
J Wesley Buchanan, Inc. | 


| op of the World 


3 a hill by your own fireside | 
ae -. you act at once 


recreation —~y ‘Tull 
THE 


ram-| rectly acre 
on rd = al 


arport on laree 
dew $28 


McCay & McCay, a 
JA. 9-0075. Eves. BL. 6-3096.} 
HOME AND INCOME 


= $-room-and-bath home has al 

3-room-and-bath apart-/ 

aes jot near Lee pe. and Glebe, 
a Le ke 

& SO Nc 

4160. W Glebe Rd JA. §-0707. 


Incomparable 


nd com this 3 twin-bed- 
aoe aK aan my with others. 


center-hall 


— Ne -- 


L|GRASTY & CO., Brokers | 


: 
; 


SPLIT LEVEL 


eed 


—* s with mullt- 
neok ent Onty 


etter Homes Realty 
| -Resiters e ; 


Need Lots 0’ Space? 
TS 


PRICE . 
Dent mise seeing these. Call 
nn 


Commonwealth 
PROPERTIES 


78 N. Glebe Ra JA. 5-8968 


LEESBURG. VA 
from 

min 
mod 
house. 
fr more acres 


59 
New 
custom-built 


from 


recreat 


(L%& 
sh 


side 
Dickerson & Osler, 


Next to Post ee 
_Leerburs. Vs 


Honeymoon Haven 


ONLY 816.500 
charming and 
pe Cod h 
BATH 
bedrms 
lovely living 
rm 


Perfectiy 
| futely 
| REDRM 
72 large 
bath upstairs 
separate dinin 
kitchen; PULL 
fenced rd 2 
| many extras will deliaht you 
this distinctive poms Wwoday' 
PARKER SMIIH & BONWELL 
REALTORS -§161 


SALE, OUT-OF-TOWN 
GINTA 


NORFOLK, VA.—} bedrms. 2 bath 


JA. §-9400 


*.| GENTLEMAN'S ESTATE 


center of Leesbure 
downtown 
S\-rm. rick 
2-car garage, | 


A 
ble” eee bd oitneh ved | 
xe cary 


columns, 

ee 

“ether tina eesareas tiful wine ee hie 

inant CLOCK — Mantle 

by bs aiarm. about 100 
Edgewood rd 

—— a 


clock 
rs ots. | 
ensing- 


key en 
"on ma tiresses. 
i 


riots, Ban babi Et ae ed 


$10.95: carriages 
D 


78 Au ne IA, 3-6697, | 
BABY FURNITURE 
AND TOY SUPERMART | 
SAVE 30-60% 


all nati. ady. baby furn 
wear. «over 


n a) na 
country living with comforts fone 
ven c — ——— Conven- 


Inc. 
Te). 446 


tricrcles 
J | on h 


~ 
; | market. There must 


: ation 
This is our only loeation—We 
have no branch store 
NO 


LOWER PRICES 
ANYWHERE 
2497-6] 18TH 


ST. NW 
ton thar Theater) 
oe rs. and Fri 
, $25: = * Sao. 
S75: bookca 
. dresser 


— . sed. 
bia: £10 and up: boys’. 
. mapuels Center. Bast Po- 
irs 26° Swinn. light- 
gearshift and hand 
ev 4-4417 
inch, 


: 


amall den. fenced-in yard Pullneies| 


-| d ‘ e 
omas B.' 
Belvedere nee 
Norfolk. Va 


WILL U R 


settiement 
ME 4-549 Sees. 


. "_ 6. A. 
FARMS, LAND, SALE 70 ver plate. 
———— a — 


MARYLAND 
Ts ACRES with 27300-[t. road front- 
i and 


” Aderholt Realty Co. 
A LO 


Eetate area: 


land magnificent view Price. 


MIDDLEBURG, VA. 


PHONES 5251 OR add 


LOTS For SALE 


' DISTRICT oF COLUMBIA 


“A. * CAPITOL 
r. Rell 


» S62d—Por $5700 


oe 


ST. 


A. AVE . 
All or part. $2000 per lot win 
ordinate Seecss e32277 O08 
JO. 8-6288 


ACCO EEK. MD 


mo. 


) miles from District line. 


le price. Li 


Pm 


+. i3 


Hills area "of Bil 


| and communit y swimming 
OF _ 4-7 


‘p44 rambler sites, 
near D. C. line; 
EK. Roebineon, 


loce on 
each wr 
-275 


aoe 
NEAR FAIRFAX 


Small acr 


Lj,“ Writ ion o Lb 
QUICK CASH QUICK SALES 
J VICTOR DICKY, AP 7-8060 
ACREAGE, SALE 7 


M 
OKEEK. MD.—5 to 10 
ye sw, 12 mi. fre 
5500 per acre. Seg sak "425 ne 
10 on 
4 onde: deep ‘weil, na . 


-a1aL— 


gers: 


es 

iyst off Annapol 

rate. Surro ups 
rounds of Glen 


ale rd. 
197 e-ft. 
beaut 


on 
Gene is 

ed 
the Dale 


bv 
Hospital! a 


| BEAUTIFUL mountain A af - 
res 


ac 
iti homesites ane Pivondertul 
ing ‘ possibilities. ey 


very promising capital ge pos- 
nha on 


i sibility Offered 


or non 
w AM L. WAR 
Td Eves. oe a 6166 


SYP Ee 


North see ton 
GI APPRAISED, $18,000). 


ACANT — Im pootio’e possession! 
Bis all-brick Colonial home 

" etity Paisley Forest eget | 
tures 20x15 ft. living reom 
fireplace, permease sized dining reo, 

eon has a pawamer range end 

refrigerator. 
rooms, ebony tile bath: 


k 


a BLOCKS TO SCHOOL *& BUS! 
ACTION PAYS — CALI 


Cas PONIO 


_22223 Wilson Bivd JA. 71-6660. 


~ YOUNG MODERNS 


Witt love this 
rambler soatert s paneled liv 


ining roo pres 
us lots of guilt in c nar iz 
me cereaned 
\% secre of treed ap 
uly $1500 a) Roburk'ts 


ya only 
4% loan 
be Maret | 
ott 
. 4763 Lee hwy. 


Ain dish 
RAMBL 


er rms tle batha,; ive. | 
begrma.: 2 ti separate din- 


A real bargain at 
tae rate 


PRasiesim, JA. ?- 3024 


BRAND-NEW 
BRICK RAMBLER 
3 BEDRMS.—2 BATHS 


Here is more house for your money, 


8: 
arate din 
sires oe 


RTIs E. MARTIN 
operates Ea 


with WATERFRONT, SALE 


fine 


mn ve, fuese 7H. 232-5515 
ose undcays ‘ 
LY 100 ACRES 


resi- 
with 
erms. 


4 

Pairfax Countr. unit rure 
dential. 8650 per acre. leve 
live stream. vlat avalilabie 


7 ACRES Fairfax Gounty 8200 


= iB level groun plat avail-' 


UNCAN JR § ASSOC. 
5, Copsmius t 


Ki $-4093 | 
7SA 


LAKE JACKSON 


Choice of 3 nied. lo cabins with 
all improvements and | 
500 Drive oo or eal 


MNALE ACRE 


ce $6995. Completely fur- 


al ole 


X C. SCHWARTZ 


expensive wares? x 


: 


: obeaer S's 


ee Ké 


r ie ee 


es. - 
ed oy matres. $35. 


xer Pups, AKC, Xmas Saal | 
38 te oes: Sy ally fine: re-' 


sha ‘ : 
REAL ESTATE WANTED 09 Po Rm ee ji 


several 
o miles south 


REALTORS awn 

00 | Middleburg on U. S. 50) 
293-acre farm. mod-' 
tenant house. farm barn. £004 | 


Ral x. ae "32000 


& 
=. 


wa oO mode 
t: excel. cond. 
rH 2- 
NGES. new 
co.. 1011 

38. bik. broad- 
caller. used only few 


~ eld. 7 
= 


ae te 


—_ . ai ma 


and state ri 


ina a. mt me 
Irs -49 


di 

ormica 

chrome: $39.50. Z . 1925 King 
Alexandria. L 8-04 11. 

_— complete set. Slingeriand. 


A. 
ELE 1c ANGE. po. Kenmore. | 


17-8515 


-- 


: ; in 
gee Bg ood; $147 “valen. sell 
u . J 


MILE CABINETS 
WoonD. AL A 
LLER BEARING 
CHES 


tools; maa. Tee. 
1911 Tth naw NA 
FOAM -RUBBIR—Gat— ony shape 
are, P ow. EX 3-600). 

ou- 


TS—Size 14 and T' 
muskrat. . Cocktail | 


=. 

_— a mink. 4 skins. | 
4-0929 

unclaimed at 


| 4-DRA 
| CEA’ 
-DRA WER 
AWER 
CAB 


>| SBRR 


screens, andirons 
ACME STOVE 


pittveet s 
AN OFFICE. 


ton, aes 
res 


an 
wholesale or less. 
ular. sae 

ve 


bedrm 
al sole 


SHOP. 1416 


give-away prices a Euciiad at 


— Reas 4 ° 
Du n Phvte table. 
and a abies. 


upholstered 
* th st 


foam | wo 
| Call rs. Fri 


' 


Quick-Confidential ‘ 


LOANS 
WHEATON FINANCE CO. ; 
11081 Viers Mill Rd. LO. 5-8006 


MARYLAND CASH LOAN 
S537 RK. I. Ave. UN, 4-5172 
TR9R Georgia Ave. JU. 59-2859 


> 
i.» 
°¢ 
; 
, 
7 


‘ 


Just Opened 
a new loan office 


RESIDENTS’ 
FINANCE srir'scisiee 


Loans in 2 ~ien 


We Specialize In 
Leans to FW omen 


3225 Rhode Island Ave. 
Mt. Rainier, Md. 


AP. 7-2228 | 


—— SS ee ee ee a 
Raaekkkkkkhkhkhkkhkhkekkkkkekeke 4 


AC- 
ton i MISCELLANEOUS 


$3 
noe ren 


‘| Brass Colonial jemoe, 


Mins. Git BAN GE. Kenmore. 36-in Si 
—<—<——_me | PORES Cid: © ent condition. 636. 
-| JE 47840. 
A 


i 6 P Bt. teh for PERSONAL 
—— in or shout I Dec L 
eciou FURNTTURE SALE—All Vinds 


“Have you got to the ice cream part yet?” 


COMPARE AND SELECT 


PIANO - _ sires, § 


oe Pe 


pete 
» INQUIRE ABOUT 


Pte hes 
Se a 


Sale: 
_ ™ 


“ielection 4 New 


fully oTeseieel 
starting at for «a new 


oan fk ae ee 


78, SALE, MISCELLANEOUS 
very Wat the 
FURNITURE 
SALE 


Excessive inventory forces use to 
fi following ifice 


— ew, 
‘gas. oll, wood, coal). Acme 
ex 
subject to 


| JALOUSIES 


BY SECO 
a Clearance 
"a. 


36437 un 
Other ‘anes ~" 


and sold 
—— “eondition, and 


| Prier 
. BS: 


ma 

tee fruit- | 

9 cnan- 
‘$24 

, 

i 


hog. cocktail tabies, 
| Wood pull-up chairs. $1 
pet-sen 

m 


piete 
7.95: 
rt Thursday an oe ae Pridag ail ® ae a 


Ste 
lL. Bps.. JU 8-3010 


mach ine— 
x of 
¥.. « 


s' 
ta 


“FURNITURE — 


ist tanta ~ | 17 Sligo Avs. 
33 MUL} TILITS 


4 
information call ‘wn 


b match. £24 
- s. $12.95; Diastie 
Re eh $3 o 


Hundreds of other ttems stocked | 
on 3 large foors ome i and | 
poewet, shop and compare. Budget 


NIT Monday nights 


FURNITURE MART 
a xing fT ST. eee VA. ‘ 


7s 
£3 


New quer- 


rus 7 not furnish your ' 


= ? Smith 8 
ur store ith toracs | 
>. 


FURS DISCOUNT 


Savings up to 50% on any- 
thing in the line of fine furs. 
A visit to our shop is e must 
if you value your $$$$$$$. oe N.W., 5169 Lee 
Hundreds of. slightly used Sliver “Sorina a ee 
tandard ma 


mink garments at a fraction = 
yl Epa 5 only aoe 
5 


of. their original cost. Shop) La i piney ' 
- 7 ve A] 
and compare. Open Monday | Mahoe > finieh 4 et ore he 
te leo many onion used 


and Thursday Till 9. and con 
pe ARt T. st ae, at st 


BASKIN FURS 
8TH AND G 


4 

1 prig 
studio ites . baby ar 
4 


sat ta! 


ree del. bot Go 


ne and 


spine 
PLA xO 


Lews 


a RE telly) 


a se. RW.) 


ms—Like new 
es ‘= sizes. 
rms. UN 


. =: co. Adm 
ana some i-yr. 

. $10 up all makes. Bic 

ons. skates. ete. 


3608 isth St. KW. 


sizes: 
ear: 


rebuilt: some 
625 (wp. 
nv 


— can - y 
any. dropleal, 2 extr 
tended 


ahog 
n.. genuine 
each excellent cond.: 


~Large pal. 4g 


Prices 


when we sell all new tele. 
te 


visions right at wholesale 


| “Ext obey, 
Televisi 
GivE- Aw y Pai one at 


Wh 
price when “ sel] all new appli 
ances at x_ ~ prices. 
e washers 
AWAT ye . “g 


| CONFIDENTIAL 


LOANS BY PHONE 
On Your Signature Only 
Suburban Finanee Ce. 


.. IKC.. 3623 12th st. me.! 


ANS 


A! 


t r type. 


eer a will 
a 


G.A.C. FINANCE 


CORPORATION 


MT. RAINIER 
3510 Rhode Island Avenve*......Tel. APpleten 7-2800 
3317 Rhede island Avenve**......Tel. HObert 2-5028 
HYATTSVILLE 
$303 Baltimore Avenve*..........Tel. UNien 4-8200 
(Next te The Het Sheppe) 
SILVER SPRING 
7912 Georgia Avenve’ ..........Tel. JUniper 7-6900 
8513 Georgia Avenve**..."......Tel. JUniper 9-3566 
COLLEGE PARK 
4503 Knox Rood*.... ost el. UNion 4-0058 
{Acres from The Met Sheope) 
LEXINGTON PARK 
150 N. 3 Notched Road* Tel. Greet Mills 3671 


ee 


; MONEY 


FOR YOU 


EASY, QUICK 
PRIVATE 
LOANS AT 


LINCOLN LOAN 
7910 Georgia Ave., 
JU. 5-5200 


WOMEN’S LOANS 
Our Specialty! 

WE CAN MAKE 

YOU A LOAN IN 


FALLS CHURCH, VA. 
128 West Broad St. (Up te $300.). . Tel. JEfferson 2-4643 
* Formerly Generel Accoptence Corp. °*fermerty Consumers Credit Service, ina. 


American Finance Company’s 


CHRISTMAS LOAN CLUB 


IS DIFFERENT 


YOU GET YOUR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING : 
MONEY NOW... 
- Thew Save for ## Next Year! 


Select the Amount of MONEY You Can Use 


$10.08 $20.16 $36.45 


$24. 62 
Schedule shown includes charges under Md. Small Loan Lew 
$300 and o Industria! Finance Lew. Loan 


to $300 made in Vs. a 247 per imo. on oS Ye ae 
Shop All Over Town With CASH 
Save Time — Save MONEY 


act *25 ro *9FOOO on won 
ON JUST YOUR OWN SIGNATURE 
PHONE or STOP IN. TODAY 


AMERICAN FINANCE CO. 


4803 INDIAN HEAD ROAD LO. 7-1200 
Ol. 4-7731 
JO. 8-8680 
AD. 2-6510 
JU. 7-7200 
OV. 3-0130 
JA. 53-2200 
JA. 7-8510 


‘ 


a 
rae Sesbenede ana 
Brerocaene 


prise 


rai. 
“unr. 


4. 
Sl Gate ba 
ca. ft. Serval 


~A-WAT—. green 
slipeover and pillows. 
also manes, eles table. good 


rand- “a! ] — 
aes 3286 mn most REGULAR 


TV—La screen, 
Why par Sut or s0-called discount 


ntee to 
7 at just « y t 


American Trailer Co., Inc. 


10180 oe imore v4. 
Co 


Th mnlles im metho. of Oper. ‘a ue ma 


i, PERSONAL LOANS 90A 
a roneed gander Smen Lose ie 


—'$1 a. delivery, 


excellent condition 

ru 
het oad 1lil 28th st. hs 
7-5800. 


omny dat cai aetna 


. 
Ax (FORD). 111i eth st. nw. 


%-ton panel 
te ewer: 


motor just ~ overha 


—_— pane 
condition: runs good TLo- 
GAN (FORD). L131 lec st. Dw. 


ton: 

ay es pF ti a. also 
T chev a me pertect 
a A 

Seated clean 33 
d cpenes. etc... 


53) 
stake, val oo : 
*. Ase ae sf and ‘% 


yioad 
oy te 


hevy i Chevrolet 


7728 Wisconsin Ave. Bethesda 


ce-o ~-™m 
a = es 
SLBO 
‘at 
ti ma 7, dingo 

\y -UuD, 4 - 
et condition: 6695 ar 
‘| 33000.” llll Mth & BW. . 
on -5, i-ton: a serv- 
ice body for pi mbers. elect ——. 

oil burner service. ete 
ning order: quick sale. w 6180. 


-ton pe at or | 


Chev 
ity piee 
e 


£004. 


al bargain. 
>» Lil 18th 


Excellent condition. 


tires excel 
395 


runs 


"32 very 

cellent condition N 

(Pord). i111 ith st. aw. DI. 
ydramatic 

excel. cond... low mileage. reason- 


: ° 

8434 ’ 
oWNER-OPERATED 1 rocks wanted 
- rer cinder e.- * and brick 


AUTOMOBILES WANTED 


; 
' 
make not important, ‘Sar| “A 


Ae 
¢ 


wagons. pick for cieam on B cose. Hatten 
WE OL EE MOTORS 


euginewie ted 


PENNY MOTORS 


‘>i 


| Will | Pay Up To: 


5 . ol 


ic 


Cars Needed for 


EXPORT 


Cad 


$300 
| i222 


rune Capitol Cadittec:- nes Co. 


‘ic 


BUICK — '49 “2. 
very clean 1 


Rosenthal 
| 2921 Columbia he. Arlington, Va. 


Phone JA. 7-1. Dally 9 te 9 


"coupe, ia Marcon and white 
Capitol | SaTtitec-Olds Co, 
ano 1dd2 724 ML NW AT. 2-2600 


‘teh ny - * rn 
i ef pe , = 


“5 ik Raitt saa 
AKERS OLDS-CADILLAC CO. 


Patryneton Shopping Hester 


‘34 BUICK 
$1285 Total 


p payments: 
of: 1 ie 


a nadie 


Bay Sees % Sh eens | 


Cor ¥. Capitol a Fis. Ave 
| oP NKSOIVING DA 


tn town. 
evrolet 


Fate sing irrorie 


101 N. Y. AVE. NE, 


4-door: a in 
dition: goed tires : 


Lee D. Butler =) 
$34 Penn: 
~——I965 Bel A 


a _ Ave SE LL 279 
Sei + 


WEY 
and coral! paint 
Vea meculate an toe 
& engine, eee | 
St! A... — 


‘Chevy Chase Chevrolet 
% me ow Country bs » Good > al 


“tie on” hi & po ulppet. Be. 
ROSENTHAL 
CHEVROLET CO. 


2921 Col ngton 
Gees Dae oy ba 
Phone JA. 7- 


nec. 


, | CADEEEAO—1988 “62” Neck top| 
’. 

luding pee steer./ 
ing. $2495 ec, guara 


|| Capitol Cadillac- Olds Co. 
2 224 St. NW. ST. 23-2600 


CADILLAC "55 Fieetwood sedan: | 
Beautiful white finish with spe- 


cial cus intertor, radio. heater, 
Hydra- a-Matie. full power 
warrant 


Suburban Cadillac-Olds 


BRADLEY SHOPPING CENTER 
4 OL, &- 


CADILLAC—1965 
Beau ORR TSLER— "ei, {toon codan. Ra- 

ons A real value. Weekend special 

AKERS OLDS- Satta 0 A. 
ak, hn ee Pe 

_Alex ¥. 3- ‘Shse 


‘55 CADILLACS 
ot apt 


ditioned end guaran 


W NEELER. IN 


NC. 


|e ck a 
distinction 


a 
transmission, nae nile 
' radio, W- t 


ires, 
condition’ winter 
to Ru ter at 


t 
se Imabection 
be good. len g $16 « 


BANNING” & SONS 


5800 Balto. Ave UN. 4-3130 


-- 


mediate delivery 
oyners. Reanced —— ond 


=a a cee & CLARK 


Cor. N apitol & Pia. Ave. 
OPEN HANKBO VYING DA 


CHRYSLER—1953 Windeor cub 

coupe. every extra: power « 

a to . Lite new . 
er i2th and 

ave. N. EF. 


CHRYSLER - 
Coupe; eq with 
power stee 

Ville. dio, heater: @ ligh 


2: : owner, 
mr ivek 


1 "60" sedan. Fieet- 

eautiful 2-tone blue. 

Bauipped with power steering and 
power brakes. £3396. C.C.C. 


Club 


WHILE GOs BA 
WHEELER, INC. 
YELER PLYMOUTH -IMPER 


‘32 CADILLAC 


heater. 
very 


1 
——- on 


CADILLAC— 1956 “62” 
servative black, Sta 
accessories includin ors 
white-wall ros. 


cou Con 
ndard "Bedities 


r- 


$3995 


Capitol Cadillac-Olds Co. 


A232. 226 Bh. NW. 87. 35-2600 
CADILLAC—1955 “60” jal 
wood sedan Jet 


equipped including wares " ateering 
uarant 


and powes brakes. 
apitol Cadillac-Olds Co. | ,ne st 6th 
4222224 Gt. NW. _ BT. 35-2600 

1 “2” 


an 
criminating buyer. 


Conn. at Fila. B 


ADTLLAC— 42" 
~ finish, "ousle 
-* inn fl equip 
Suburban ‘Cadillac. Olds 


BRADLEY SHOPPING 


“deville @y 


} I. oy wandewe. 
ruly a fime car Special for . 


AKERS OLDS-CADILLAC CO. 
Pairlington Bhopping Center 
Alex. 6 V. 35-0350 


S&S Series “62” 
-tone fi 


uw 


tad is 


wig 


ish. st = 
ra-Me- 
w 


erg on 


CALL 


BILL ROSS 
‘| 7400 GA. AVE. NW. 
CASH FOR CARS 
PEN OYBRS 
A 
WANTED 


teed 


petivercd to to veer ferme | , TP, 


E 


siFet 


= 
*t 
,; "2 


ii 


f Ze 


fi 


i 


if 


; 
F 


eekdays 


CADILLAC—1965 


Capitol Cadillac-Olds Co. 
222.226 St. NW. 87. 3-2600 


a 2-4200' 
ca 


lars down 
fall JA. 5-3) 


Ne moner down with 


Gor. N. Capitel & Fis. Ave. ¥LE. 


“62” convertible 
Gray. equipped with power steering 
and power brakes. radio and healt- 
s. uced to $4495. C.C.C. guar- 


RE —'S® sedan. with mus 

and heat: 100% asaren 

nepection;: $5 dn. & 

or credit poprevat 

ra) afte from—-sam 

P ATiIc 
AY 


new, equipped : $795. 
4 er 


: Bhue. 
ve (85) dol- 
1’ appreyv 


; 
, oS 
| Peas, SMALL JF re 
roe is _Vicioria oe 


D re eniy «a tew 
car. 


i) the extras ipod credit ga 
other Por iF ; " - o ¥ 
and Fordomatic on most ot One of 


the nest selections of 

town INEY BRANCH M 

' ; re “rs rv. 

1299.13 aiBAnE MO Of, 
v " 


Ls rer 
ART ry 


‘55 CHEVROLET 
$985 TOTAL 


ereatt 
r oy 


OPEN THANEKSOIVING 


G DAY a eee 


autifu 
> ete. 


Yes, it's murder to give or 
trade away that 1952 to 
1955 car. if it's clean and 
you want to get cash value 
for it, call us immediately at 


Big Bill Adams 


Pia. Ave, NE at 6th. 
tewn) 


| wed re. 


args Ra i 


* Rank * IR.: 


baba 
a 


Segutite = ena aod fata eautgped 


7725 Wisconsin Ave.. 
“Home of Countr 


: a W e RY 


oater 


5] CHEVROLET Rik 


STATION WAGON 


eee condition. 4 
all body 


om J oes Be 
TVine " DA 


NK SMALL JR., ! 


er steer- 
Tr i2th 


tra 


‘93 FORD 
$385 Total 


NO CASH NEEDED 
WITH GOOD CREDIT 


Fe cs ale 


Beat 

cain. far. — No 
temorrow 
credit Seaettel call 


“TU. 2-4200 
BILL ROSS 
: 17.400 Ga. Ave. NW, 


tT. Wirn signals, ¥.-9 
7 ul acces- 


oy ova ie 
hase Chevrolet 


vy 


thesda 
Club Used Cars” 


at uxe A 
ae 


LL JR, 


Capitol “‘Cadillac-Olds Co. 
12422240 St,. NW. _._ST. 2 


REPOSSESSED 


‘ST FORD CONV. 
— ee ro ie 2 with 
oe a Se eran of Bite "oe 

a CANBY BROWN 


Ne NELSON STUDEBAKER 


REPOSSESSED 
‘S1 OLDS HOLIDAY 


‘55 OLDS “98” 
gin oe ee Shopping | Penter HOLIDAY 


ee oS ad $1600 UNDER LIST 
empeny puree am = A ta 
only 
ER K SMALL iR,, re 
Ac bi 


Bras eT 

economical. Sarvs 
enthal Chevrolet REPOSSESSED 

2921 att Gs fsjineten. 43) $299. 50 TOTAL 


NER “Counte ep oar. rully oan on Ddiack fin- 
: y 
ae gRNER oh ne 6th if ane rare See at only 3858 
onthe redit apProv 
aule trans. ball i 77-0510 
coupe. 


Bato ethan "| Security Motors 
osenthal Chevrolet 4th & N.Y. Ave. N.W. 


2921 Columbia Pike. Ariastes. va. | 


0 
2 dea eeu 
BUpsOoON— 49 4-dr. sedan. 


ur 2.109 
apertericn t p ‘theap. price  — TA ng - ewer EI elu: 
i = idl ae Fal pete ine 
A 1078, $390.” 
a sane] ™” ROSENTHAL 
CHEVROLET CO. 


2921 Cotunsite Pike. Arlington, Va. 
< 


Pi ks M 


ve. 
& 


—_ Ki20 
Carefully maintained: 
condition : new seatoam 


nte conver’ - 
ble Pully ¢ equip  pewer stee 
es: low mi ste 4-3601, a to 


spotless orig. 
r. a h. 


-2600 


‘SS MERCURY 
$195 DOWN 


BGenterer 4 top o codon: om: 

room 
condi fon: ie hare. ‘5 

"be "Mereurs thal 


Sass & CLARK 


today's special $3 4 $95 deus. 
Thacker otors. 12th end RK. 1. 


‘owner t 


HASR—1 


-ton 
toowni new seat covers. A 


Lee D. re tare S.E. bd 


& 2 ioe = 2 essadey Lu. ‘- 


CONGRESSIONAL M 
erce 


rat rose 


7218 Balto, Aye. Collece Part. fin 
mI Sp. has radio. beoter. w. 
n. white 


FRI.~SAT.-SUN. 
‘985 
‘975 
2-Deer. FULL PRIOR 
‘54 MERC. ‘1295 
ne nrg Mercomatia, B. & B.. power brakes, steering, seats, 


‘54 PONT. ‘°845 


ATTENTION 


AUTO DISCOUNT HOUSE 


1510 RHODE ISLAND AVE. N.E. 
: OPEN DAILY and SUNDAY 9 A.M. to 10 P.M. 


: 
~ 
i — 
; 
' 
— ee ee eee . . 
> > 


- : 


‘S5 PONTIAC 
CONVERTIBLE 


res eine La ane 


PPAPPPPOD 


area, St 
BANNING & ONS 


5800 Bal Ave. UN. 4-3130 
* 


ST OLDS"HE ee 


° 4 s red 
a mm Ww tic drive. 4 & h. w-8. 
take t t ‘ “i immaculate one-own 
car, properly condi 


BANNING & SONS || Siriiaghat “Se seer 
ey Motors 


a 
r. 
Etat - a take uty, payments. A i 
ter ic 


‘55 FORD 
FAIRLANE 2 DOOR 


$145 DOWN 
2-tene red ond 


w mileage: ATTENTION 
BANKING: SONS Financed. /Ottjcors and. th 
$000 Balto Ave. UN, 4-3130 é taste Pasdelen 
® Ask About Our 3-Day Trial 


® Ask About Our 100% 
Guarantee 


MILLER MOTOR CO. 
316 FLORIDA AVE. NE. 
Li. 4-2396 


— * custom ) S795 
. low mileage: 1 owner and HALEY’S. » Of Course 
Dodge- 


‘54 CHEVROLET 
Your Choice 


WEEKEND 
All Bedy Styles 


—~SPECIALS~ 
* Sentliet binck, white ion. 
very a oe 


white sidewalls; oe 


"4 PLYMOUTH 3%-ér.. beater 
and defroster; 1 owner. .§99 


SS DODGE 4-dr. Gosenes va. 
p Re og heater and 
frester, leoks ike. 
imal gloss black 


MERCURY 4-DR. 

BUICK 2-DR. . 

CHRYSLER 4-DR. 

BUICK 4-DR. 2 
STUDE STARLIGHT CPE. .. 
NASH STATESMAN 4-DR. . 


‘st FORD Teder YS. black 
with cream toe. r. one h.; 
mech. A-i $697 


Grromatte r. Saa’ns oe i 
. } saeranteed .. 5047 
criginsl Seeks | owner “80s? 
beater” and ae 

Francis & Parsons 


Dodge-Plymouth 
2116 Nichols Ave. $.2. 


4-DR. 79 
63 Others—Open Daily, 9 Ctl 9 
Every Car Serviced by Our Stafj of 
Mechanics in Our Ultramodern Garage! 


eines Motor Co. 


1840 Wilson Boulevard Arlington, Va. 
ARANTEED : 


Here’s the Sale You've 
Been Waiting For! 


54 PLYMOUTH 


STANDARD 
= 


PONTIAC 


Francis & Parsons 
(Dodge-Plymouth ) 


2116 NICHOLS AVE. 5.E. 
LU. 46-2880 


rw ~ + wy FY FY YY YY. 


BARGAIN! 


4-ér, Ne. 496. 


Kenyon afar Peck 


Artingten, Ve. 


All Service Personnel! 
ON APPROVED CREDIT 


SAVE $$$$ 
with DONALD 


‘35 wow 9S 73 
‘55 wtéon 9395 
155 Moon $395 ™ 
All Makes and Models 
‘S2's, ‘53's, & ‘54's 


- -----" 


MEtropolitan 8-7171 
; 145 Fila. Ave., N.E. 
Washington, D.C. 


Many Others to Choose From 
ARCABE PORTIAC 
‘Washington's Largest 
COAST-IN PONTIAC 
as Fisrids oe i 


—— 


. 


TWO DAYS ONLY 
FRIDAY & SATURDAY SALE 


Down Sale Price 


154 Buick «~ $95 $1595| 


i owner, w.-w. tires, fully caulpped. 


‘53 CHEV. =~ $45 $1095 


Hardtes. extra clean, r. & hw w.-w. tires. 


‘53 Pont. $25. $895 


Like new, fully equipped. 


‘52 Plym.o-- 515 $595 


Lew mileage, extra clea. 


‘51 Chrys.»--*-910 $395 


Niece ear, SHE Y'S.New Yor 


55 Cad, co. $450 $4295} 


Original 5000 miles. 
* All Cars Guaranteed 

% Lew Monthly Payments 

*% Servicemen & Out of Towners Financed 
°49’s, °50’s, and ’SI’s as low as $195 


THE AUTO CENTER 


12th & K Sts. N.W. 
ST. 3-4255 


CONVENIENT DOWNTOWN LOCATION 


FAIRFAX 


Always Offers Superior Buys 
‘SS Chevrolet $1796 |‘54 Ford .... 61296 


yo wares: | {34 Chevrolet $1496 


Bel Air. Tardive. Bie & white 
$3 inept let $1096 


"310" 4-dr. B-tene creen. Very 


ha 
‘sq po | "$1406 


tie Air, 4-dr. Fully eoaulpped. 4-dr. Nes soi R. 
52 


ee outh “$14 446 


2 aut ‘52 N se (946 
Ford 22 Neon 4- ar cellent. 
Custom voates. x & 8. Fine orteseel finish. mrare Matie. 
¥-8 mote xR & 


OTHER CHOICE BUYS 


Blee Hwy. & Chain Bridge Rd., Fairfax, Va. 


JE. 4-2863 Or Dial CRescent 3-1330 


Bill Adams’ 
ie = 
‘55 FORD 
‘55 CAD,» "see 
Bill Adams 


SALE 
55 CHEV. °895 
55 195 

3720 GA. AVE. N.W. 


‘53 VICTORIA 875 
TU. 2-5415 


GALA WEEKEND _ 


ABRAHAM| 
* [CHEVROLET / fa 


1339 EAST-WEST 


HWY. 


ca a iN 


97 AUTOMOBILE, SALE 97 AUTOMOT 


s te 


No Cash -_ ee 


nye 33 5 No Payments ‘til 
Serie te | Jan. Sth °56 


: 55 
Francis & Parsons | PONTIAC Wer $1595—now $1345 go G- | 
(Dodge-Plymouth ) Chietiain De Lane ~ tires. lymouth * Servicemen and out-of-towners financed 


S116 NICHOLS AVE. 5.2. a iydrs. late " 
_. — $1995 ; heater: te adie. $ ©. Sen ” FULL PRICE 


eed & | Me aac ‘>> CHEV. --- -*795 


‘4 Chevrolet $1145 3. wapgticds im: Addison Chevrolet TREW MOTOR CO. r V-8 4dr, Bring in the cath and drive it away. 


S-ér. No. 456. Mth & Pia. 0.W. BO. 5.7500 6th & Fis. Ave. WE. LA. 7-4789 aL. 4-10 vous. - 


Kenyon acer Peck ¢ | GOAST-IN icy ng | ior ore 1 lf defetot t.t.2.$.8..2.9.5-0.2.0-5.0.%.4 "54 MONT. - - ‘995 


ie te. a s-s008 3 | — Mercury hardtop, R. & H., Mercomatic 
a . FULL, PRICE 


‘51 HENRY J ---*185 
* Z Bring in the cash and drive it home. Equipped with R. and H. 
Bill Ross's?) ‘52 FORD ‘345 
ss 8 @ 


a ee POST and TIMES HERALD 


STATION WAGON 

|°S1 BUICK ....$897 |) 

Super dark sreen station waren geen. 
Very clean inside ond out. Ex- 
mechanical cenditien. 

"EMERSON & ORME 
(BUI cK) 

1539 Pa. Ave. 6B. LA. 3-24080 


WANTED [Seer nn wn ony be 


car in stock. 


e model 
Reliable Parties BY o.¢ cositec fl kc aaee, 
Te Take Over This erie. — l-owner ‘53 Studebaker 


‘ ‘ Commander, auto. 
| 35 FORD is on. trans., heater, direc- 
mou e | . Shs tional sig., new seat 
ms 2S x Ei Siee | Sebhe A Goer: Stone “covers. i Tahoe 
. | green. 
BEST BUY! ?| hein gh by 087 Bil Your Wish Come True 
"Ss! Dodge $49 4" $1095. 
ddr. No. 066-4 | LEE D. BUTLER S.E. 
30. 9-s800 Open kewe. 1534 Pa. Ave. $.£. U. 3-7717 
Kenyon #fie Peck ; 


Arlingten, Va. 
3686 Wilsen Bivd. JA. 92-9008 


ee FULL PRIC! 


Big 'S6 FORD - - - - 1395 


2-dr. 4,300 miles. 
“The Big Lot on the Corner” — 


Friday +] BOB WILSON 


| 3rd & K St. N.W. 
| : CALL NOW FOR CREDIT APPROVAL 
S A I E RE. 7-3890 
Open 9 A.M. Till 9 P.M. 


NO CASH NEEDED NO DEALERS 
WITH GOOD CREDIT ae 


NO PAYMENTS TIL ‘56 Only Premium Trade-ins 


‘53 FORD ‘396 on New ’56 De Sotos and 
Plymouths Earn a 


‘53 MERCURY ‘685 Merit Award 


Custem 4-Deer Sedan. £1544, 


SAGEV. 585 
‘53 HOLIDAY ‘205 5 


“88” Oldameobile bardtes. #1518 


i | : 
53 FORD pan ‘QOr 2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS 


Best buy anywhere. Teder sedan. 
34th and Benning Rd. 3321 Lee Highway 
NORTHEAST LU. 1-8300 ARLINGTON, VA. JA. 53-0604 


Special Financing Open Mon. Thru Sat. 9 0 9 Open Mon. Thru Set. 9 to 9 
for Military Personnel 3 


TU. 2-4200 
. 1954 DE SOTO 1952 BUICK 


% CONVERTIBLE RIVIERA 4-Door 
BILL ROS . jy AF 
. the bee 1 
combi . 
Dynaflow 


SOOO Ik 


a 


| 


1955 STATION WAGONS 


STATION WAGON =} 
1 MERCURY $897 / | (All-Metal, 2-Door) 
a a | | PLYMOUTHS 


EMERSON 4 ORME | 
(BUICK) | 3 to Choose From! 


Itt & M Sta. NW. DL 17-8196 |) Fully Equi “= of Col 
u quippead—S olors 
| Priced from $1,895 
‘S3 PLYMOUTH §) Bank Financing—Fully Guaranteed 
4-DOOR 
Be Safe and Trade With Trew 


mcr $995 oe 
$175 DOWN Washington's Oldest and Largest Dodge-Plymouth Dealer 

————» ay: ee x Py Fenmsediate Delivery ) TREW MOTOR CO. 
Li. 17-1732 


SOOO kk 


A real bergein. £11686 3-dr. ape. 


ons -+- 
Merit Award Care are the best of our one-ownar | 
ears taken im trade from the finest areas on 

new De Gotos and Piymouths just out. 

fine selection at both locations. You'll agree 
Awerd Oars Ofe dependability and 

driving because they are better 


tion tally lreconditioned” and | 


gemeletely wincerteed. Car | 6th and Florida Avenue N.E. 
OPEN EVENINGS ) 


Addison Chevrolet tf r400 GA. AVE. #.W. 
a | TFICE 
FRIDAY |) oinseenensne 


| 'S4 Chevrolet 2-Dr, Standard, Model 210 .. $1000 
4-Dr. Standard, | 
‘ 4-Dr, Standard Bel Aw 

if 4 tiene $1650 
amt ara 


No Cash Needd On 
Credit Approval 
HURRY! HURRY! 


FULL PRICE 


) - Country Sedan | 
s NT 838 5 | ALL ABOVE CARS HAVE LOW MILEAGE AND 
° §  —— ARE - EQUIPPED WITH RADIOS, HEATERS 
o-Gebe | AND SEAT COVERS 
NO TRADE IN’S 


'S3 PLYM. *425 |} tertz Rent-A-Car System 


Oranbreck 4-d0er 1317-21 L Street, N.W. 

FULL PRICE 
‘52 PLYM. ‘395 
Ceonvertidie 


FULL PRICE 


'52 CHEV. ‘325 | TURKEY ons = asad 


FOR CRDEIT APPROVAL CALL 
stone aren, = *PAQS |] | Se racee "*2695 


me i die spose HASH ) 1954 CHEV. “210” 4-DR. 1953 PONTIAG 2-Deer 
CARR ‘54 Rambler *75 30 1 oftovers resale so $1195 


7400 GA. AVE. 


tock ickictckikkickk kkk kth 


ale * he a OD i CO ce 


maces me 9695 


MOTORS ‘54 Chey. $ 5 ] > ON THE SPOT FINANCING 1962 DODGE 4-Door 


1518 PA. AVE. $.E. 
———— fe, ot, ot 
‘55 FORD Tudor, Fordomatic $1688 $168 


| CLEARANCE! ‘53 Plym. ‘475 Na Seka, irdeto pia 138 47 Olden 94 ‘ 


ng alt 5 Me 1995 ne oD am oe 
" —_ *145 ‘51 Henry J 


47 STUDEBAKER Sedan ar Fark ity scene 52 FORD Teder 
"50 HUDSON Club Coupe , ; ; Hardtop 
, 11.40 ‘52 HUDSON Sed., 
41 PONTIAC Sedanette ; 52 Buick 57 5 32 HUDSON ig Sphed Fe 

cornu ene. "145 


‘48 FORD Ranch Wagon $11.40 
46 PONTIAC Sedan $11.40 ee ere ‘48. CAD. Sed. 

___ LOWEST BANK RATE FINANCING——— 
150 OTHER MODELS TO CHOOSE FROM 


1961 DODGE 4-Deer 
J 


male ‘53 chev. 9475 $4 Stee 


Stomme Giey SE. caceruinias-vaaee LP SEuat Ine. 
Irv Martin HERSON’S 8” & O N.W. hutherae Ri) ot soro J merous ester 


OUR ONLY LOCATION 
34th and Benning Rd. 3321 Lee Highway 


th & K> Sts. N.W. DE 2-4700 NORTHEAST LU. 1.8300 ARLINGTON, VA. JA. 5-0604 


rane WA. 83-4455 om? ‘Our 30 Years Experience Your Open. Mon. Through Sat, 900 9 — Open Mon. Through Sat, 9 to 9 
- ee Guarantee of 2 Square Deal | $0 Years im Busines... the Lorgest im the Bast! 


BT . ' er i : t ; 
Open 9 A.M. to 9 P.M | | —— EW CAR LOCATION AT 1440 P STREET N.W pecs 


ACS EEEBEEEEE 


& 


} 


|Cracking the Barrier 


By John Crosby 


‘cpio gelailiemanes & Television ——_——— 


{Looks as Though TY’s 


Television Highlights 


3 p. m—WRC-TV. Matinee 
Theater (COLOR), “The Dis- 
possessed,” story of a middie- 
aged spinster who becomes 
completely dominated by an 
unscrupulous woman. 

8 p. m—WTTG. Million 
Dollar Movie: The 12 most ex- 


EARLIER this season Rob- 
ert Saudek, director of the 
Ford Foundation’s “Omni- 
bus,” stated the cautious 
hope that 
television r 
might this 
year break 
through 
the barriers 
which had 
confined 
broad cast- 
ing some 20 
years. What 
he nreant 
was that the 
set formula 
—a program had to be com- 
edy, drama, quiz, or audience 
participation and that was 
about it—is beginning to 
crumble. 

It looks as if he’s right. The 
boldly experimental type of 
programming is murdering 
the timorously conventional 
type. This does not mean 
that networks and ad agen- 
cies are suddenly staffed 
with courageous intellectual 
adventurers. They are not. 
It's just that the boldly ex- 
perimental has paid off. It's 
hard to say when this start- 
ed. Ed Sullivan should cer- 
tainly be given some credit 
for giving it a boost. Sullivan 
didn’t simply repeat next 
week what was successful last 
week. One week you got 
Straight variety, the next a 
little ballet, the next maybe 
a bit of opera, the next a sort 
of living biography and then 
possibly a salute to a film. 
Sullivan's continuing success 
showed that constant change 
hot only did not scare the 
people away, it kept them 
there. 


THEN Pat Weaver, presi- 
dent of NBC, began sched- 
wuuling the irregular show—a 
b0-minute opus every five 
weeks, let us say. In the old 
days, this would have been 
heresy. Now 


Crosby 


irregularity—ir- 


“Omnibus” made its own 


vatuable contribution toward | 


unfettering television by pre- 
senting bits that ranged in 
length from five minutes to 
the whole 90 minutes. And 
what they presented defied 
easy classification. One day 
they'd have Hume Cronyn 
and Jessica Tandy reading 
children’s classics; the next, 
Leonard Bernstein explain- 
ing how Beethoven's Fifth 
Symphony got written (and 
more recently the evolution 


| citing hours of a newspaper 


a reward for heroism in Ko- | 
rea, He doesn't take to Acad- | 
emy tradition in “The Care- | 


less Cadet.” 


10 p. m.—WRC-TV. Boxing: | 


Eduardo (KO) Lausse vs. 
Gene Fullmer in a 10 round 
middleweight bout at Madi- 
ba eee Garden. 


of jazz), and the next, 90 min- | 


utes of the Renaissance. 
Television, 


| offers Eve 
in short, has a | 


remarkable range and it has | 
been used remarkably. In | 


part, this has been an acci- 
dental discovery. 


BUT LATELY, the qualities 


have been used deliberately. 
“Wide Wide World” is a good 
example. On the latest “Wide 
Wide World” the entertain- 
ment—i that’s quite the word 
for it—varied from a christen- 
ing in Bennington, Vt., to a 
gymkhana out west some- 
place to kids’ hockey in To- 
ronto. 

It Wasn’t all good, but it 
was all] fairly unusual. Un- 
usuainess used to scare a 
sponsor out of his wits. “We 
want something with a track 
record,” used to be the cry. 
Now, even controversy — 
which used to be a dirty word 
and to a large extent still is 
—has been discovered to be 
not nearly so lethal as every- 
one thought. Alcoa, which 
sponsored the Ed Murrow 
show about Senator McCar- 
thy, conceivably the most con- 
troversial telecast of all time, 
reports that sales didn’t drop 
or fluctuate one way or an- 
other a single bit after the 
show, and that public opinion 
about Alcoa continuously im- 
proved while Murrow was 
putting on one controversial 


| Globetrotters vs. 


editor’s life are described in 
“Front Page Story.” Jack 
Hawkins and Elizabeth Allan 
are the stars. 

8:30 p. m—WMAL-TY. 
Crossroads: “The Good 
Thief,” story of an Army 
Chaplain who keeps up the 
morale of his fellow prison- 
ers of war by stealing food 
from their Communist cap- 
tors. 

8:30 p. m—WTOP.-TY. Our 
Miss Brooks: A maharapah 
Arden “untold 
wealth” if she will accompany 
him to his palace. 

9 p. m. WMAL-TV. Basket- 
ball Exhibition: Harlem 
Boston 


| Whirlwinds in a game played 


of TV discovered accidentally | = fe Beimate Sessoms. 


| WRC-FM 


WEAN (100.3 me.)—5 o m. 


9 p. m—WTOP.-TV. Cru- 
sader: Prof. George Lujack, 
whose broadcasts from West 
Berlin have irked the Com- 
munists, is kidnaped. Brian 
Keith goes to East Berdin to 
find him. 

9:30 p. m. WTTG. Guy Lom- 
bardo Show: Guest tonight is 
vocalist Toni Arden. 

9:30 p. m. WRC-TV Star 
Stage: “The Girl Who Wasn't 
Wanted” stars Jeanne Crain. 
John Ericson is featured. 
Jeanne schemes to win the af- 
fections of a young attorney 
from the daughter of his rich 
boss. 

9:30 p. m. WTOP-TV. Play- 
house of Stars: Don Taylor 
portrays an enlisted man who 
is assigned to West Point as 


(93.9 me.)—5:80 oa. 


night. 


&S—570 ces a. =. 
a. 


HER 


‘ $45 . 
=i eft te 6:45 © 


te > . mm. 


Arnold Ft ml or 


m—WTOP-TV. The 
tan oe Circumstantial evi- 
dence almost leads to a nar- 
cotics theft charge against a 
young hospital nurse. 
10:30 p. m. WITG. Edward 
“My Wife, 
Poor Wretch.” 


lyn. 


10:30 p. m—WTOP.-TY. | p. 
,. boy Football Championship: 
| Cardozo High vs. Gonzaga | 


Person to Person: Orson 
Welles and Mr. and Mrs. Eu- 


ene Meyer a isited by | 
Edward gy ere FB the annwfal classic sponsored 


Edward R. Murrow. Onetime 
genius Welles, 
child are “at home” to Mur- 
row in New York. Mr. and 
Mrs. Méyer receive Murrow 
at their home in Washington. 
Meyer is Chairman of the 
Board of The Washington 
Post Company. 

10:45 p. m—WRC-TV. Red 
Barber's Corner: Woody 
Hayes, coach of Ohio State's 
Big Ten football champions, 
is interviewed. 

11:15 p. m. WTOP-TYV. Dou- 
ble A Theater: “Saraband” 
stars Stewart Granger afd 
Joan Greenwood with Fran- 
coise Rosay and Flora Rob- 
son. A Princess is forced into 


a loveless marriage. She later | 


falls in love with a dashing 


ton TV premiere for this film. 

11:25 p. m—-WMAL-TY. 
Billion Dollar Movie: Wash- 
ington TY premiere of “Man 
from Texas,” starring James 
Craig, Lynn Bari and John- 
nie Johnson. The El Paso 
Kid attempts to reform. 


OTHE 
te. ce a. ‘| We 


=| 


_ 1 te L wane FM (101.1 meb—7T «. mm. tf & 


wioF-vn (96.3 me.)—6:50 «. mm. te @ be 
n t. 


who? oe (98. ‘ me e. <=? A. 8 m. Lay . A+ ied 


m 
| wh. Phe (96.7 me.)—7T «. mm. te mld- wOst-rm (106.8 me.}-—7:38 a. m. to 9 
as thee (107.3 me.)—6 so. m. to 12:30 


(106.5 me.)—6:30 a. 


. $e 7s s. = 
— 7 ‘ umidnieht 
- mm, 6:44 © 
oc Dertieke” “Only.” 


is a happy | 
farce which stars Allyn Jos- | 
| Falla, Popular Spanish Suite. 


his wife and | 


soldier of fortune. Washing- | ‘Ve 


mm. te 
(105.1 me.)—5:90 «a. om. te @ 


ll a. m—WRC. Weekday: 
model 


Anita Colby, actress, 
and fashion expert, signs the 
guest book. 

11:30 a. m—WTOP. House 
Party: A 66-year-old former 
actor discusses his present 
work as a Santa Claus help- 
er. 

3p. m—WTOP. Mark 
Evans talks about “Witch 


| Hunting in Africa.” 


3:05 p. m—WGMS. Record 
Album: Albeniz, Mallorca; 


4 m—WWDC. School- 


Prep at Griffith Stadium in 


by the Touchdown Club and 
The Washington Post and 
Times Herald. Bob Wolff 
ndles play-by-play. 
8:05 p. m—WRC. Radio 
Club: Ralph Young and 


Terri Stevens, recording art- 


ists, are scheduled as guests. 
8:30 p. m—WMAL. Your 


| Better Tomorrow: Actor Jo- 


seph Schildkraut speaks on 
“Your Living Thoughts.” 

8:30 p. m-—WTOP. Zist 
Precinct: The disappearance 
of a gun from a liquor store 
confronts Capt. Cronin with 
an unpleasant puzzle which 
turns out to have a happy | 
solution. 

8:30 p. m—WGMS. Libra- 
ry of Congress concert: 
broadcast): 


Mozart, Quartet in E fiat, 
K. 428; Roussel, Quartet in 
D, opus 45: Beethoven, Quar- 
tet in E minor, Opus 59, No. 
2. 


9:05 p. m—WTOP. Jack | 
Carson Show: Jack answers | 


from listeners and 


“hobo” poe 


mail 
reads * 


Beat: Morey 
humor; a description of plas- 
tie homes of the future; and 
Nelson Olmsted's reading 
from Dé Maupassant'’s 
“Moonlight.” 


10 p. m—WWDC. Army-- 


Navy Grid Salute: Interviews 
with Navy's Eddie Erdelatz 
and Aymy’s Col. Earl (Red) 


' THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES ae 


Friday, November 25, 1955 


COLUMBIA, S. C., Nov. 24 


Loewen- 
| guth String Quartet plays 


poetry. 
9:30 p. m—WMAL. Off | 
Amsterdam's 


the School of Education at the 
University of South Carplina, 
is leaving his post, apparently 
jas a result of his views on seg- 
| regation. 


| ‘Travelstead sald last night| J 
‘that he was dismissed by uni-) ~ 


iversity trustees after he made 
a speech last August in which 
he called for an end to public 
‘school segregation. 

But the only university offi- 
‘cial who would comment—Rut- 


trustees—said the educator 
asked the board to relieve him, 
effective next Feb. 1. 

Donald Russell, university 
president, who served for a’ 
time as Assistant Secretary of 
‘State under James F. Byrnes, 
would not confirm or deny that 
'Travelstead had been fired. 

The educator said he will be- 
‘come dean of the School of Ed- 
‘ucation at the University of 
\New Mexico next February. 

The speech that led up to the) 
dispute was made before some | 
400 summer school students and | 
‘faculty members on Aug. 2. In: 
it Travelstead said that edu-| 
cators’ silence on the subject! 
‘of segregation could well be) 
‘due to “fear of embarrassment, | 
‘ridicule or reprisal.” He added: | 
| “I tis my firm conviction that 
lenforced segregation of the 
‘races in our public schools can 
jno longer be justified on any 


WALTER WINCHELL 
appears in The W 
Post and Times Herald on 
Monday, Wednesday, Thurs- 
day, Saturday and Sunday. 


Fast RELIEF for 
Dry Skin and Eczema Itch 
| Chafing — Simple Pile Misery 


Diaper Rash — Minor Burns 
Lubricetes es if Medicates 


Dean Says Integration 
Talk Cost Him His Job 


Chester C. Travelstead, dean Of rr sew 


ledge L. Osborne of Orange-| 7 * 
burg, chairman of the board of| =~ 


DR. C. C. TRAVELSTEAD 
»++ a matter of position | 


ethan for E. Germany 


OTTAWA, Nov. 4 @—Be 
tween seven and eight million 
Pounds of government-held sur- 
plus butter have been sold to t 
Dutch importer for resale in 
pee Germany, a Canadian agri- 
* culture department official said 


‘mond 


— —/ 
<i 


| basis—and should, 
be abolished as soon as prac-| 
ticable.” 


PENN TY co. 


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“EST. 1943 


= Afternoon’ 


x Brows News: Gallaher ne PLAYHOUSE 
iene — son | | , 2:30-3:00 PM 


Weather: ‘Bports 
r\Lewell Thomas 


|News: Teng, 3 


ing osby 


regularity of length, of per- 
sonalities, of type of show— 
is almost the order of the day. lai Tork raid Tribune tee) 


Blaik.” 

10 p. m—WRC. Boxing: A 
10-round middleweight bout 
between Gene Fullmer and 
Eduardo (KO) Lausse. 

10:30 p. m—WWDC, Coun- 
terspy: “The Banking Broth- 
ers” finish a series of’ hold- 


show after another. 


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Programs printed here conform to tnformation 
furnished by stations at time of publication 


Friday Radio Programs 


MAL | WRC Weg) 
poo veres ee Tee FM 93.9 | 
uste. ’ ups and report home to “Ma” | 


: Chanticleer, — 23: Art Brown. | ; r "SG: | 
Gibbon Rist sie” \Nows, 04, 3 ans, 6 ; RR a _Chief Harding greetsthem. | 
New Al Ross, 6:15-5. land 8:50 | — Bere 


— —_— — 


(NBC) | (Ou Mont) | (ABO ' iCBS) 


w 
WRC-TV 4 WTTG 5,WMAL-TV 7, WTOP-TV 9 AM — 
6.45. Farm: 7-3-5355 | ;| 


F riday Television Programs 


orning Show 
geese vit} Garro- 6-5. Captain Kan- 
58 | garoo. 
a 4 — 
Cooking 


8:55. 


OO Little Rascals 
15 Little Rascals 

30'Romper Room 
45 Romper Room 


Ding Dong 
15! 


:30 Search Beauty 
eautyjAcademy Theater | 
Academy Theater 
Academy Theater 
peocemy eater 
\Ac 


“Serial : 
Theat er| 
lLooney Tunes 
| Looney Tunes 
\Academy ge peter 


allence 


Sign On Robert | Hurleigh 


fark Ey O0/Break eakiast ClubiA 
Q Mreieifilal art ® wn 
30 Breakfast cine te In Wash'ton vans "News 
‘k Evans ___ oe F%s) Bro 
r ride: \4 red Fiske 
Beans -_.. 


ie a 
Brn Bi Gal 


tspe 
= = SCF Marries 
14 0h": Jerry 
and Jimmsa Weekda 
3 


rong Show 


Gerry Moore __ 
Garry Moore 
Garry Moore 
Strike It Rich 
(Quiz) 


| BRE 


45H Ac i 
00’Tenn. Ernie tes Looney 
5 e Time 


Por » s Tun 
peath. 'T ee Theater 


238 tos Lee 
JA. 5-4 


pi ee News: anning 
123m be , arty avin 


Valiant 
v 
rch atty avin 


Cartoon 


Fp 
: ys Nol“ 
73) a Holloway 

00 Afternoon 


15 Afternoon art i Soust as how 


= (pa sane - 

Be | sted me 

, Pe Lynn 

WE: 30 Troubie wit _ ie ‘ Uxdventures rty 

er . 7 _—_— 
Ho Matinee Ther . ied Ladies Home aio 
They e 

30 Matinee tr. [Pill Film outs Club e me Per Of 
45 Matinee Thtr \ie Saw Time _ (Quiz Club _@: Bt — tors Wi | 
00 Date wit rh Life|Brighter Day tudio “00| News: Strone ‘Mark Evans 


7 
is P Pirst Secret Storm “Autumn Flames” ‘15\Jerry & Jimma|stella ack 
‘9M word rtf ‘aw aye On Your Account ‘30 Jerry & Yim | pder e News: ere 68 Club News: Billy 


Art “Tinkletter 
\News: ark = 


Kit Pi coe Show 


06 Pink te Mic ouse om. 
5g t Lamb Mickey Mouse 
Doody 
a ae : : 


Lamb Session 


Happity Skippity 
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— 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
Friday, November 25, 1955 ¥ 


Death Inspires 


Blood Donations 


i 


Ma 
= 
ips ite i 


iF 


unit paid one of jts periodic 
visits to Catholic University 
this week, to find that a tragic) ee, | eh, : 
campus death only last week visi BD Be oe ) & ge a a Ry 

had provided a closetohome of eo . get \, 3 Pe mee | Rickmesa, Wines ae 
incentive for approximately 300 ‘ae Ol ow gee Ste | ware, Buffalo and or 
donations by students and mem- Balt : Py: ae Bete ln ae ttsburgh. 


bers and employes of the fac- ese ARE? Ie hg , Key” : 
“Well, you see, we had a girl) (77MM 7g MM ater eee pe 


ulty. ieee 
_|here r, | 
For an overwhelming majot-|pisnces Stanbro. She had’ (ie s . 2% | {7°S SMART TO SPECIFY 
ity of the donors, the leukemiaiieukemia and we knew our) & _ ee ae 2 Oe VE, | 
; ~— ts < *. Le 4 | 
| oS as | R 
| 


death last Friday of 20-year-old |niood couldn't save her. But we 
Frances Stanbro of 433 St.icent her going as long as we. 
Lawrence dr., Silver Spring./could.. ” 
brought home graphically the; at one point in the futile ae. Ogee 
endless need for supplies of the tight for Miss Stanbro’s life, “a sf} THE GREATEST NAME 
een ony daughter of the students set up an on-call i te ’ | 
list of those who could supp! , ae eee ae 8 

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Stan-\the rare type whole blood the | ye aL man Ona 
bro, a senior, majoring in art. | needed on a few minutes notice . 
amass a! last ——— day or night. As great as was 

iagnosed the incurable can- need ever ' | 
cer of the blood which took her ~4 end of = list penenes | CO. |/Call RE. 71-1234, ask for Circulation. and order The Wash 
life. | Sngton Post and Times Herald guaranteed home delivery, 

“It was a death sentence,” 
recalled the Rev. Joseph B. Mc- 
Allister, an instructor in C. U.’s 
school of philosophy. “but she 
didn't seem to mind. One 
would think it would make 
the vacation she took seem un- 
important, but she planned it 
as though it were just another 
of an indefinite series of them 
she would take in the course 
of a normal lifetime. For her, 
it was the last, and she knew it. 

“She returned this fall to 
register for a semester she 
knew she could net finish, and 
she maintained her honor stu- 
dent standing to the end. 

“I had her in my class once. I 
like to think I contributed 
something to the formula she | 
used to adjust*herself in those 
last months.” 

Father McAllister said he had | 
always been impressed by the! 
constant need for whole blood, 
“but you might say Miss Stan- 
bro’s profuse use of it inspired 
the pint I gave today.” 

Red Cross officials said Miss 
Stanbro received more than 20 
transfusions of O-negative hlood 
before she died in National In- 
stitutes of Health, where she 
spent the last two days of her 
life. Most of them were. given 
in Suburban Hbspital. 

Mary Daly, 25, of 613 Hamlin 
st. ne., rolled up her right sleeve 
in the university's gymnasium | 
yesterday for a personal reason 
of her own. A weekend visit 
to her husband's aunt in flood- 
ravaged Connecticut gave her 
first-hand access to first-hand 
stories of what the Red Cross 
accomplished in that area in 
the wake of last summer's hur- 
ricanes. 

Her husband's aunt lost only 
her furnace, the pretty bru- 
nette secretary in the school 
of sacred theology recalled, 
“but she knew so many who 
lost everything, including their 
lives, that the Red Cross can't 
ever ask too much of me.” 

With Peter Morris, 25, 
3201 12th st. ne. the donation 
of a pint of blood is fairly 
routine. A sophomore major- 
ing in speech correction, Peter 


New Greek 
Premier Gets 
Things Done 


By George Weller 
Chicago Dally News Service 
ATHENS, Nov. 24—Greece 
has found an opposite kind of 
man to replace its fallen sol- 
dier-Premier Marshal Alexan- 
der P apa gos. 
At 47, “Costa” 
K aramanilis is 
the youngest 
Prime Minister 
in Greek his 
tory and the 
first Macedo- 
. enian since Phil- 
ip. A farm-bred 
lawyer and 
¢ o n servative, 
he is riding a 
wave of popwu- 
larity. 
Karamanlis began changing 
Greece's face like a hurried 
beautician even before he was 
named Premier by King Paul. 
He built roads, triggered slow ~ cain 
bureaucrats into action, and | 2 ET ren 
rescued waste land for fresh — 
crops. Now, to the horror of the 7 


=, What all the cheering’s about! 


a 


did two things that slightly 
shook the Americans: First, he 
caused the release of 11 air 
officers charged with Commu- 


nist intrigue, and second, he 
the port Ai goth Etat Eve b d ' h ~ " “e ” : o Bs 
Javed by American mission off rybody’s cheering the “GO"— Y-8. In Customline and Mainline models you the steering post if he is thrown forward .. . 
These steps helped his popu the styling—the fineness of the may re the big Ford Y-8. And the new I-Six new Lifeguard double-grip door locks for extra 
ars, on the. United SSR ee 308 is av e in all 18 new Ford models. protection against doors springing open under 
part on Cyprus at the U. X. | shock. As optional items, you can have new Life- 
ar - — Greek pap een in every low-swept line, jn © And for the first time ‘in any car = impact-absorbing padding for sun visors 
Pe Ne —- is no fellow every s i etaili in eve feature, : irited : and instrument panel +. and Ford 
ime forthe West to make performance .. . the new Ford fe Ancries’s  UFEGUARD DESIGN to help reduce belts to help hold car occupants seeurely in thei 
said. “Cyprus is one of those fine car at half the fine-car price! __ serious accident injuries seats during an accident. For the life of you, 
gents out of existence. If ge ih : you can't bu better than F ORD! ; 
te ino red But ait, could | | This is the most important safety news in car ‘ 

ypriot Communists are play- New Thunderbird -Y-8 Engine history! Lifeguard Design is a whole new family - Come in and Test Drive the 


ing with fire in the Midde 
meet Sear Ae much cleverer 7 of safety features, desi to give you extra ? 
ny gt ho dita ts Now, as the standard eight for all-fairlane protection against neat ails eae 5 6 F ORD 


knife Karamanlis fo 

bitter enough against “neitain and Station Wagon models, you can have the of the serious car-accident injuries. Included | | 

him whether Greece would b be same — engine as made the Thunderbird a are: the new Lifeguard deep-center steering : Also see your Ford Dealer for 
: ~ natoi : : : ; . . 

See the British nationa avorite ... the mighty Thunderbird wheel that’s designed to keep driver away from > 47, Used Cars and Trucks 

“If the Cypriots are satisfied, : | 3 | : ! 

we are,” he 


ra : 


or oe about WOMEN 


SOCIETY 
FASHION. 
CLUBS 


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 


1955 


Tn Star-Studded Sheraton Hall 


29 Debutantes Make Bow 
At Thanksgiving Cotillion 


By Frances Rowan 


DEBUTANTES, postdebs 
and subdebs—all got in on 
the fun last night at the gala 
Debutante Cotillion and 
Thanksgiving Ball. 

The spotlight, of course 
was on this year’s debs. it 
was their big night—the 
night to dance in formal 
white gowns, wear long kid 
gloves, and carry uquets 
of deep red roses tied with 
red satin streamers. 

There were 29 debs in all. 
Most were from Washington, 
but a few had come from 
Baltimore, Norfolk, New 
York, and Charleston, W. Va., 
to make their bows in the 
Ddaliroom of the Sheraton 
Park Hotel. 

The ballroom was a sight 
to behold and a very pretty 
sight. The ceiling sparkled 
with iridescent stars, red 
roses twined around false 
columns, and four fountains 
surrounded by vari-colored 
lights dotted the room. 
White doves hung from the 
ceiling, each carrying in its 
mouth a long stemmed red 
rose. 

To make the girls feel at 
home, one mannequin of a 
debutante dressed in white 
was set up on one side of the 
room. Facing it was another 
dressed in black representing 
the subdebs at the party. 

Devron and his orchestra 
played for dancing ‘til well 
past midnight in a country 
garden setting. Banking the 
orchestra were ferns and 
plants and enclosing the foli- 
age was a little white garden 


fence. 

On the dance floor each 
table was centered with a 
white and black rose sym- 
bolizing the white dresses of 
current debs, and the black 
gowns worn last night by 
postdebs. Picking their way 
through the crowded floor, 
a group of pretty subdeb 
misses distributed perfume 
favors to each lady. Heading 
the subdeb committee were 
song _ ~ gin daugh- 


BEFORE DANCING BE- 
GAN, Jane Harrison Alexan- 
der, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Walter Raleigh Alexan- 
der of Norfolk, made her 
bow at a dinner in the Conti- 
nental room of the hotel. 
Wearing a gown of white 
nylon tulle trimmed with 
nylon bo gph ces and 
sprinkled with sequins and 
pearls, the blonde debutante 
carried a paar we of white 


Jane, who is a graduate of 
Fairfax Hall Preparatory 
School in Waynesboro and 
attends Richmond .Profes- 
sional Institute, rushed from 
her dinner to join the 
receiving line at 9:30. Head- 
ing the line, which formed 
fn the foyer was M Stuart 
Montague Price, cheirmen 
of the ball. 

Before the line assembled, 
boys in the floor committee 
were pinning their red rib 
bons on one another. Nelson 
Johnson - helping Bob Ed- 
gon pin his. Others in the 
group were John Bull, 
Philippe Zuger and William 
Askin. 

The receiving line, a long 
one, formed a huge semi- 
circle in the foyer. It took an 
hour for all the guests to get 


. S&S. Treasurer Ivy Baker 
Priest, Mrs. Robert E. Lee 
Ill, Mrs. Ernest E. Norris, 
Dr. and Mrs. Virgil Damon 
and Countess de Castellane. 

Standing at the end of the 
line, ng out programs, 
were subdebs Ginger Poole 
and Helen Mahan, one in 
blue and the other in pink. 
When the line broke up, the 
orchestra struck up “A Pretty 
Girl is Like a Melody” while 


RE 


biz! 
[itd 
beistitenr 


: 


got in the act too. A group 
of girls who made their 
debuts at the dance last year 
also made a spotlighted en- 
trance down the stairs wear- 


ing black dresses and carry- 
ing cascade bouquets of 
white roses. The group was 
headed by Nancy Elizabeth 
Bealer. 

Heading the list of spon- 
sors for the dance, which 
benefits the Damon Runyon 
Memorial Fund for Cancer 
Research, were Mrs. Dwight 
D. Eisenhower and Vice 
President and Mrs. Richard 
Nixon. 


DEBUTANTES from Wash- 
Ington presented last eve- 
ning were Joan Carolyn Bark- 
ley, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank Latimer Barkley; 
Elizabeth Gore Barnes, 
daughter of Capt. Robert Mc- 
Cumber Barnes, USN, and 
Mrs. Barnes; Ethna Mary 
Brennan, daughter of the 
Irish Counselor and Mrs. 
Brennan; Judith Carmichael, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
James H. Carmichael; Mary 
Catherine Dempsey, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. William 
James Dempsey; Anne Reed 
Doherty, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. William Henry Doherty; 
Elsa Lucile Farman, daugh- 
ter of Dr. and Mrs. Carl Hugo 
Farman. 

Also Patricia Stevens Gal- 
vin, daughter of Brig. Gen. 
Michael J. Galvin, formerly 
Undersecretary of Labor, 
and Mrs. Galvin; Jessica 
Shepherd key, | daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Justin Albert 
Griess; Nancy Elizabeth Hol- 
gage daughter of Mr. 

Mrs. Sherman Hall] Hol- 
lingsworth; Ann Hhll Horn- 
thal, daughter of Dr. and 
Mrs. Henry Amiss Hornthal; 
Roberta Lee Lohnes, daugh- 
ter of Mrs. Horace Luther 
Lohnes and the late Mr 
Lohnes; Eleanor Marie Me- 
Guiness, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Roy Conrad McGuiness; 
Elizabeth Ann McliInnis, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Ballard McInnis; Eliz- 
abeth Ladson Mills, fimaeore 


of Mr. and Mrs. Ladson Ar- 
thur Mills, Jr. 

Also Marcia Miram Mitch- 
ell, daughter of Judge and 
Mrs. Richard Furlong Mitch- 
ell; Judith Mansur Pierce, 
daughter of Capt. George EL 
lis Pierce, USN, aoe a Mrs. 
Pierce; Shirley Gail nb nem 
daughter of Mr. and 
Ralph Dale Pittman: Moline 
Ross, daughter of Brig. Gen. 
Stoyte Ogilby Ross and Mrs. 
Ross; Dolores Ann Ve 
a of hee? and Mrs. 

hen Fi Verges; 2 Gaete 

lie Wal ~ daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Austin Coo Wal-~ 
ler; Carole Willett, ter 
of Mr. and Mrs. James F. Wil- 
lett, and Joan Ruth Blue Wil- 
ley, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Francis Willey. 


GIRLS FROM BALTI- 
MORE making their debuts 
were Josephine Taylor 
Albert, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. James Hollis B. Albert; 
Anne D’Arcy Bryan, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. J. Wallace 
Bryan; Susan Tilden Howard, 
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. John 
Tilden Howard; and Joanna 
Leigh Lloyd, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Edward Lioyd. 

From New York and Rock- 
land County, N. Y. was 
debutante Sandra Daniel 
Damon, daughter of Dr. and 
Mrs. Virgil Damon. Also 
making her bow was Anne 
Lewis Johnson, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Spoford 
Johnson of Charleston, W. Va. 


POSTDEBS TAKING the 
spotlight last night include 
Beverly Anne Bland, Dana 
Dewey, Claire Gail Garrison, 
Sydney May Hessick, Melissa 
Ann con lek. — 


Tewsksbury 
Whitfield Lidah Con bniateenes 
MeGoodwin, 
Meeker, Shiroly ma Kathleen 
Merkle, Alice Martin Mott, 
Kelsey Martin Mott, Carmen 
Quinones, Alexandra Scheele 
and Mary Woodson Tyler. 
Some more were Elizabeth 
a ad Blackburn and Jean 
Alexandra Stein of Baltimore 
and Nancy Gail Smith of New 
York. 


Photo by Wendell B. Powell 


JANE HARRISON ALEXANDER 
. «- Bows at dinner before ball 


LAURA MacARTHUR 
. Makes debut at tea 


= |] Engagement Announcements | 


JACQUELINE EVERHART 
— JOHN MceMULLEN 

Mr. and Mrs. George G. Ever- 
hart of Mount Vernon, Ohio, 
announce the engagement of 
their daughter, Jacqueline 
Joy, to John Joseph McMul- 
len, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles S. McMullen, of Sad- 
dle River, N. J. Miss Ever- 
hart is a graduate of Ohio 
State University and is pres- 


received his doctor’s degree 
from the Swiss Federal In- 
stitute of Technology in 
Zurich. 


HENRIETTA H. HOYLMAN 
—FRANK A. PARSONS 

Mr. Birdie Austin Hoylman of 
Clifton Forge, Va., announces 
the engagement of his daugh- 


ter Henrietta Harriett, to | 


sity of Virginia and is now em- 
ployed as a chemist by the 
Industrial Rayon Corporation 
at Covington. Mr. Parsons is 
a graduate of Washington and 
Lee University and is now di- 
rector of publicity for the 
university. A spring wedding 
is planned. 


Town Topics 


Mimi MacArthur, 
Presented at Tea 


By Marie McNair 


THANKSGIVING DAY 
traditionally is D-fordebwu- 
tantesdiay to caveddwelier 


home, is the daughter of 
Douglas MacArthur 2d, 
Counselor of the State De 
partment, and Mrs. MacAr- 
thus, the former “Wahwee” 
Barkley. The debutante’s 
grandmother is Mrs. Arthur 
MacArthur, widow of Adm. 
MacArthur. And Mimi is the 


granddaughter on her mater- 
nal side of Sen. Alben Bark- 


ley, former Vice President of 
the United States, the great- 
niece of Gen. Douglas Mac- 
Arthur, former Chief of 
Staff, and later Supreme 
Commander, Allied Forces in 
the Pacific. 

But with this illustrious 

background, the debutante is 
charming and unspoiled. Yes- 
terday she stood with her 
— to greet the guests, 


held in her hand a tight, 
round bouquet of pink sweet- 
heart roses and white carna- 
tions, sent by Mrs. Morris 
Cafritz. Mrs. MacArthur's 
taffeta frock was cafe au lait 
color and she wore a wristlet 


the receiving line. 


DOUGLAS MacARTHUR, 
moving from one group to 
another, was full of praise 
for his boss, Secretary of 
State Dulles with whom he 
constantly travels. Back just 


a week from Geneva, Doug 
MacArthur was telling about 
the Vienna Ball held follow- 
ing the reopening of the 
Vienna Opera House, when 
150 white-gowned debutantes, 
with their escorts, opened the 
ball. Most of the guests yee 
terday were the MacArthur's 
close friends, with a sprin- 
kling of Mimi's young friends 
included. 

Blonde Claire Phillips, 
‘Mrs. Robert Schenck’s daugh- 
ter, has been asked to assist 
and Mrs. Georges Thenault 
was also to be among the 
assistants, but she’s down 
with the flu. Slim and vv 
Jane Hadley, Mrs. 
Barkley’s. daughter, a 
there as an assistant, helping 
to entertain the debutante’s 
beaux. 

The Belgian Ambassador 
and Baroness Silvercruys 
were there, and Mrs. Cafrits 
brought along her son, Cal- 
vin, home from school for the 
holiday weekend. Said “hello” 
to Mr. and Mrs. Carroll Mor 
gan and the Ed Foleys— 
Emily Foley wearing her 
Paulette red velvet petal hat, 
the same model that she and 
Gwen Cafritz bought in Paris 
last summer. Mrs. Cafritz, 
however, wore a white feath- 
er number yesterday. 

Commodore and Mrs. Dud- 
ley Know—she's a sister of 
Mrs. Arthur MacArthur— 
stayed awhile and other old 
friends of the MacArthurs 
were Justice Stanley Reed, 
and Mrs. Reed, whose shock- 
ing pink hat was a gay accent 
to her black frock. 

Mrs. Lawrence Wood Rob- 
ert had come up from her 
country place at Warrenton 
for the tea, as one of “Wah- 
wee's” oldest friends. Mrs. 
Harold Walker was in the 
group and others were Mr. 
and Mrs. Kurt Hetzel, Mrs. 
Littlefield MacArthur, and 
Dawson Teague, who's at 
Virginia Theological Semi- 


nary. 

Mimi MacArthur’s dancing 
debut will be at the Washing- 
ton Debutante Ball on De- 
cember 19. Meanwhile she's 
busy being a good - student 
at George Washington Uni- 
versity. 


Today's Events 


Toaping Castle Chapter, 
Daughters of the American 
Revolution, will hold its reg- 
ular November m at 8 
p. m., in the home of Gail 


Weddings, oN 


BERYL SCHAUM 

—ARTHUR JOHN 

Mrs. Louis A. Schaum of Mc- 

Keesport, Pa., announces the 
of her daughter, 

Beryl Louise, to Arthur Wil- 


JOAN LITTLEFORD 
—MAURICE DONEGAN JR. 


Hathaway, 4316 Van Buren 
st., Hyattsville. Mrs. Robert 
J. Boyd will discuss her re- 
recent trip to the mountain 
schools of the Carolinas in a 
talk titled “DAR Approved 
Schools” .. . Also having a 
monthly meeting today is 
the Alexandria Branch, Na- 
tional Leagu 


89.95 Values 


RPorstmanns, Anglos, other fa- 
mous makers! Newest fashion 
silhouettes, most-wanted col- 
ors. Misses’, petite sizes. 


3rd Floor 
Unusual Group DRESSES 


14.98 to $ 
19.98 Values 
Sheaths, flares, in wool, silk. 
Sk 
Misses’, woes alee. ” 
2nd Floor 


Famous Maker SUITS 
Fully lined 
14.95 Values ‘IT 


les in flannels, tweeds. 
charcoal. Misses’ 
half sizes. 3rd Floor 


$66 to $69 Mouton Lamb Coats 


we tear 
69.95 Coats, imported wools. .$39 
ird Floor 


22.95 to $35 Holiday Dresses .$15 
and Floor 
5:98 to 8.98 Wool Skirts 


Street 
10.98 to 16.98 Fine Skirts... $7 
Street Floor 


3.98 to 8.98 Famous Blouses. $3 
Street Floor 

3.98 and 5.98 Vicara Sweaters 
2.99 and 3.99 

1.35 Full-Fashioned Hose.3 for $2 
2nd Floor 
5.98 Nylon Tricot Slips...... 3.99 
2nd Floor 

$5 to 8.96 New Holiday Hats $3 
and Floor 


5.95 to $10 Famous Make Girdles 
- 3.99 


Shop Downtown Today 9:30 to 9 ot 1207 F—Tch & K 


SA LE 


FRIDAY and SATURDAY ONLY 


CHILDREN'S SHOES 


o” and G* walues 


GSS 


thrifty savings 


on school and 


dress styles 


Shep Hahn's fer special 
THANKSGIVING WEEK-END 
SAVINGS on girls’ party 
straps, pumps or aniclets ta 
BLACK, RED, BLUE er PAS- 
TELS ... beys’ and girie’ 
sturdy GRO-NUP scheol ex- 
ferds in BROWN er BLACK. 
Sizes 844 te 3 in the group. 


AT ALL STORES 


TEEN PARTY OR 
SCHOOL SHOES 


Large selection of dressy or 
campus styles beloved by 
teen-agers, pumps, 
straps and ties in NATURAL, 
BLACK er RED. Sizes 4 te 
DB in the group. 


SILVER SPRING, MD. 
CLARENDON, VA. 
ALEXANDRIA, VA. 


CSOD 


reg. 7.05 & 8.05 


7h & K 


1207 F 7h & K 


“313 14th “4483 CONN. “SILVER SPRING, MD. ‘Open 9:30 t0 9 daily 
ALEXANDRIA, VA. Open 9:30 to 9 Thurs., Fri. 
CLARENDON, VA. Open 9:30 to 9 Mon, Thurs, Fri. 


”= 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
48 Friday, November 25, 1958 : 


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MAKE BELIEVE: Secing isn’t believing if you think your 
eyes tell you that this is a jumper and blouse. Designed by 
Edith Small of Los Angeles, it’s black and natural Italian 
silk in two-piece style with jacket that simulates a jumper 
and blouse. Typical of the casual and clever clothes that are 
coming from California these days. 


In Miami Beach 


It s Beaver Mrs. Albert Steinem is 


spendingesome time in Miami 
Beach, as the guest of Mr. 


Se 
Fashion 


Is Rosy 


By Evelyn Hayes 
BEVERLY HILLS, CALIF. 
Fashion is off on a rose kick 
for resort wear and the up- 
coming spring season, judg- 
ing at least ....... 


vivacious 

blonde Cali- 

fornia de- 

signer Edith 

Small. Roses 

bloom from 

tin rose- 

buds to great. = 
full-blown 74 

beauties in 

pattérns, cut- 

git and appliques. Prize 
roses in the collection include 
a rose-printed short cotton 
evening dress with side- 
draped full skirt and rose 
cut-outs on the bodice, a rose- 
printed silk cocktail dress 
with roses blooming again at 
the square neckline, another 
ditto-printed cocktail sheath 
with high bateau neckline in 
front, low drawstring bloused 
back. There were also after- 
noon sheaths of linen with 
tiny roses trellised in vertical 
stripes, and a rose-colored 
tiered lace cocktail dress with 
tunic overshirt. Roses are 
busting out all over this love- 
ly collection, shown to the 
fashion press here. 

However, one of the love- 
liest was no rose. It was 
“sheer magic.” That was 
Edith Small’s name for a navy 
navy blue silk cocktail sheath, 


with a bloused-back, hip- 
length embroidered-dot sheer 
packet, through which the 
lines of the sheathed figure 
beneath were provocatively 
silhouette ... sheer magic, 
indeed. 

One reason for the fame 
of California suits is the 
Edith Small suit. This suit 
collection is typically pretty 
with several numbers in sil 
and mohair, the latter a4 f 
rie favored for both men’s 
and women’s suits in Calli- 
fornia. Suit skirts are slim, 
shaped in by a contour waist- 
band that does nice things 
for the figure. Jackets are 
briefer with typical Edith 
Small signature touches of 
contrasting fabric inserts 
that create an interesting de- 
sign. 


WELL WORTH the price of 
admission was the collection 
of Don Loper, who mixed his 
ready-to-wear (which he calls 
“ready-nows”) and custom de- 
signs with such abandon—and 
both so good—that the fash- 
ion reporters frequently had 
to ask which is which. Of 
course there’s an obvious dif- 


Wretched bird upon the platter, 
Never was a carcass flatter. 

All my feast and all my fixin’s 
Set upon by pack of vixens. 


Rack of bones, you sad surprise, 

Nothing left but bridge of thighs, 

From the groans our guests were making 
Was there not too much Thankstaking? 


* 


r Ellen Wise. 


ference in the price-tags, with 
the custom numbers going 
way up there and the ready- 
to-wear running between $50 
and $125. 

Staging his own show, this 
designer-decorator-dancer ap- 


peared in a black mohair suit 
with tucked-front white shirt 
and an improbable white ten 
gallon hat. Loper’s coats 
were incredibly beautiful for 
the price and boasted an ap- 
pealing young look. Cut with 
natural shoulders, their hem- 
line fullness flares softly from 
smooth - fitting shoulderline 
yokes that subtly narrow the 
top of the coat. On these nar- 
row shoulders. big collars are 
draped and fall dramatically 
in portrait-pretty effects. 
Typical was a lovely red silk 
faille dress coat with large 
portrait collar and huge turn- 
back cuffs, this a “ready now” 
another lovely evening coat 
was in rosebud pink satin 
shown with a leaf green chif- 
fon dancing dress. 

“Tango” was the name of 
the rose-painted lace full- 
length mermaid sheath gown 
shown with a pink silk satin 
stole. This, hé said, was the 
same silhouette he used in a 
black velvet gown he had 
made for Ariene Dahl in the 
wardrobe she will take with 
her to England shortly. 

Explaining the many full 
skirts in his dance dresses, 
which are mostly short, Lo- 
per, who designs for as many 
of the stars as anyone in Hol- 
lywood, explained that “the 
stars like full skirts.” He 
cited Loretta Young as favor- 
ing the full-skirted silhouette 
in particular. Secret of his 
new kind of bouffance is a 
petticoat he has designed— 
this with two full tiers spring- 
ing out from a smooth hip- 
yoke. 

By way of showing off an- 


- 


other one of his degign enter- 
prises, this versatile designer 
had a model come out in an 
enveloping black Jersey cape 
which she flung open to re- 
veal a rainbow of men’s ties 
slung over each of the in- 
side arm-straps in the man- 
ner of tieracks. He called 
the coat “el toro,” but “shop- 
lifter” would be an equally 
appropriate name. 
Interspersed among jhe 
glamour gowns were hand- 
some “his and her” sport 
shirts in good-looking designs 
—such as a pale blue cotton 
with tucked polka-dotted 


front yoke. Another, carry- 
ing the idea one step further 
was “his, hers and little his” 
—a navy blue cotton shirt 
with medallion pattern. 

“Nothing over six ounces” 
is Loper’s boast for dresses 
he recommends for travel. A 
great one for coordinated 
wardrobes, he showed en- 
sembles with linen or silk 
coats lined to match prints 
in suits or dresses beneath 
for Arlene Dahl’s upcoming 
trip to Europe. He designed a 
coordinated wardrobe all in 
black and white with touches 
of green. 


THE ebullient Marusia, the 
Polish - countess - turned-de- 
signer, was not here for her 
showing—but typically they 
were clothes in which you 
could visualize Marusia her- 
self. She makes much of re- 
versible coats to match or 
contrast the dresses beneath 
and she features the “short 
gala” dresses for summer 
nights, these often stemline 


sheaths. One appealing nov- | 


elty here was a white silk 
linen crepe trimmed with 
black cellophane fringe with 


a similarly trimmed match- | 


ing cardigan. 


More Natural 
Teenagers 
Said to Be 
Smarter 


ST. PETERSBURG, Fia., 


#—She's a little taller, in | 
better physical shape and — 


shaplier. She and her boy 
friend may be wearing shorts 


and shirts of the same kind of 


material and she is worried 
about when he’s to serve his 
hitch in the military. 

Know who this is? 

She is the average sub-20 
girl of today as she looks 
to one who has studied 
first hand 3500 girls from 
head to foot in the last 11 
years and had a hand in mak- 
ing them charming and ap- 
pealing. 


Mrs. Kathleen Galvin, di- | 
rector of the city-operated | 
charm school which offers | 
free courses to girls who want | 


to look and act prettier, says 
the girls who parade before 
her now strike her this way: 

“They are paying more at- 
tention to their proportions 
as far as figures are concern- 
ed. They are not sophisti- 
cated, but rather strive for 


naturalness and. simplicity. | 
are definitely taller. | 
‘They are in better physical 
condition due, perhaps, to the | 
vitamins lovingly fed to them | 


They 


by Mom. 


Mrs. Galvin, who’s a good | 


looking charmer herself, 


adds: “All in all, I put my | 


money on this generation. 


They are smarter, have a bet- | 
ter time and are aware of | 
world events far more than | 
my teenage companions | 


were.” 

Girls now coming under 
the scrutiny of Mrs. Galvin 
are ready 


the teegagers were accepted 
five years ago. 


The young Beauties ask | 


more questions about clothes 
than anything else. 


Adjoining Cocktail Lounge 
Open 10 am. ‘til closing 


Sueraton-Cartron Jforet 
_ SIXTEENTH and K STS. NORTHWEST 


r charm training | 
at 14, which is younger than | 


It contains Nee- 

* Eases 
misery the same 
way your doctor 
does when he 


Cony fa pockee (A 
pure, ue anytime, MY EES (1) 
Get MISTOL MIST 

baly 98¢ 


at KANN’S 


Luxurious Lingerie Case 
filled with 6 Different Briefs 
Beautifully Trimmed 


Adds Glamour to Practical Gift 


3.99 


A lush padded rayon satin case (especially 
nice for travel use) holds 6 run-proof cel- 
anese-acetate tricot Hollywood style briefs. 
Each trimmed a little differently with nylon ;, 
3 are white, and 1 each in yellow, pink, mint. 
Sizes 5, 6 or 7. Case in pink or blue. 


Kann's Knit Undies, Street Floor, 
Washington and Arlingtos 


Arlington 


For Lady: 22> 


Fur-Bearer 


By Emily Belser 

BEVERLY HILLS, (UNS) 
Movie queens .who once 
. screamed for mink are now 
yelling “beaver!” 

That's the ‘word from 
Fur Designer Al Teitelbaum | 
who's been draping dolls in 
expensive mink for nearly 20 
years. 

Al paraded 32 of his finest 
fur creations before the coun- 
try’s top fashion writers to- 
day in a wind-up of style 
showings sponsored by Cali- 
fornia designers. 

Despite the fact that his 
collection included a $15,000 
desert gold mink, the furrier 
insists beaver has definitely 
gnawed its way to top fay- 
orite among furs. 

“Tl think it’s the Grace 
Kelly influence,” he added. 
“Ever since she came along 
other stars have gone all out 
trving to achieve that look 
of stylish simplicity. 

“Yes—she has a 
coat'” 

Teitelbaum also attributed 
part of the new interest in 
beaver to its lighter weight 
and a new shearing and 
bleaching process that makes 
it possible to dye it in 
dazzling colors. 

It now comes in white, 
apricot, capri blue and va- 
nilla! 

“But vou can’t overlook 
the fact,” he insisted, “that 
our stars today suddenly 
don't want to look like movie 
stars. 

“They're rebelling. They 
want to look like very smart, 
chic women and they are all 
striving for neutrality in 
their manner of dress.” 

As proof that actresses 
aren't exactly tossing their. | 
old minks in the ashcan, Al | 
featured it along with the 
multicolored beaver as spec- | 
jal trim for cashmere sweat- 
ers and as one-armed stoles. 

“Mink used to be the su- 
preme fur, with white erm- 
ine second and Russian sable 
third in line,” Al declared. 
“Now, everybody's gone 
beaver-mad.” 

Mamie Van Doren once 
told Teitelbaum that it was 
her great ambition to own a 
mink coat, but when Mamie's 
piggy-bank finally filled up 
she changed her mind and 
bought a white beaver. 

Lizabeth Taylor also went | 
for beaver and bought a pink | 
one when she went shopping 
recently for something to 
knock the British for a loop 
during a trip to London. 

Ava Gardner commissioned 
Al to whip up an apricot | 
beaver for her just after she | 
finished “The Barefoot Con- | 
tessa” and recently wrote 
him from Madrid to send | 
along a short beaver jacket | 
in blue. 

“Mink’s great,” the furrier 
said, “but over-dramatic!” 


‘ 
is j “ ‘ 


beaver 


+ 


Both Stores Open 


| 


Tonight 


MIST GREEN 


double size only 


YELLOW 


ROSE-PINK 


DRESDEN- 
BLUE 


Blankets Make Beautiful, Useful Gifts! 


“KENWOOD” 
19.95 to 22.50 
BLANKETS 


ALL WOOL—TWIN SIZE 


wre 10,95 - 


WATERMELON 


There’s.no more heart-warming, more desir- 
able gift for a home than & beautiful blanket. 


These beautiful “Kenwoods” are made of 


pure selected fleece with a deep, soft, fluffy 


nap to give warmth without weight. Made 
extra long to tuck-in .. . now at an extra low : 


price because We were able to make a special 


Washington 9:30 to 9 


. 


purchase, Choice of white and five rich, warm 
shades. 


: 


19.95 | 


at KANN’S 


Domestics—Strect Floor, Washington and Arlington 


, Arlington 10 to 9:30 


, 


; 


‘ 


the Republican state central 
committee for the county; 
Ruth Swann, member of the 
Democratic state central 
committee for the county; 


at § 


t Smithsonian 


James Polk 
Treasures 


On Display 


A dessert plate patterned 
with brilliantly colored birds 
and flowers, part of the 
White House china used by 
President James Knox Polk, 


ssa | Mrs. Irvin Lavine, chief judge 


THANKSGIVING DEB—Margay Ferguson was presented 
to Washington society yesterday at a tea given by her par- 
ehts, Mr. and Mrs. Alan Mark Ferguson. For her, debut, 
Margay wore a ballerina dress of pale blue lace and car- 
ried a colonial bouquet of pink carnations. Mrs, Ferguson 
was wearing a cocktail dress of mauve satin. The brownette 
debutante is a graduate of the Stone Ridge Convent of the 
Sacred Heart and attends Manhattanville College. She will 
make a second debut on Dec. 25 with Nancy Gene Gardiner 
and Helen Craig at a tea dance at the Chevy Chase Club. 


si 
i 


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if 
= 


ij 


sg? 
© 
= 


ote 
if 


4 
Ly 


Kay Patterson Presents 
the New 


LINDA’S BEAUTY SALON 


1426 G St. N.W. Keith-Albee Building 
Suite 305-306 
Formerly Located 900 F &. N.W. 


You Are Invited to OPEN HOUSE 
at our SALON, Sunday, Nov. 27th 
3 til 6 p. m. 


linda’s beauty salon 


1426 g street n.w. 
EX. 3-3232 


| SEE 


between 1845 and 1849, is one 
of the latest treasures to be 
acquired by the Smithsonian 
Institution. 


This and several other 
Polk relics have just been re- 
ceived as the gift of the Polk 
Memorial Association and 
will be displayed in the 
Smithsonian's First Ladies’ 
Hall. The. hall was opened 
last spring as a special show- 
case for the gowns of the 
various Presidents’ wives, 
and the collection represents 
all the first ladies from the 
time of Martha Washington 
down to Mamie Eisenhower. 


PRESIDENT POLK’S CHINA 
- «+ used at the White House 
or 


LL. Frank. Co. 


12th & F St., Washington 
' Virginia Sq., Arlington 


White House at different pe- 
riods in our history. 

Other new acquisitions are 
Mrs. Polk's white lace fan 
and a pair of pewter-framed 
eyeglasses once worn by Polk 
himself. They will be dis- 
played in the room that is in 
the style of the middle of 
the 19th Century. 

The Polk Memorial Asso- 
ciation, donor of the new 
items, runs the ancestral 
home of the Polks in Colum- 
bia, Tenn., as a historic house 
museum. 


Mme. Rybar Feted 
By the Delmars 


Friday ang 


MR AND MRS. Charles 
Delmar entertained at dinner 
Tuesday evening in honor of 
Mme. Viadimir Rybar. 

Major Gen and Mrs. Leigh 
Wade, Mr. and Mrs. Leslie 
Biffle who left yesterday for 
Miami and Key West, Fia., to 
spend the week: Mr. and Mrs. 
Burks Summers, Judge and 
Mrs. George Neilson, Edgar 
Morris and Robert Sayre. 

Fashion note of the eve 
ning was made by Mrs. Sum- 
mers. She wore her arm in a 
silk sling which exactly 
matched her gold colored 
faille gown. Three weeks ago 
she fell and fractured her 
shoulder. 


| Wedding : 

e uns \ 
DOROTHY J. DEYERLE 
—EDWIN W. COLEMAN 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Wewbill 
Jeffries of Roanoke, Va., an- 
nounce the marriage of their 
daughter, Dorothy Jeffries 
Deyerle to Edwin Wayne 
Coleman, son of John Edwin 
Coleman and the te Mrs. 
Coleman of Green Bay, V2., 
on Nov. 22 in the Kensington 
Baptist Church, Kensington, 
Md. Mr. Coleman is employed 
by the Bethlehem Steel Corp. 


SLIP-ONS$ and CARDIGANS from « 
famous maker, at big savings. In oushmere- 
soft, é¢asy-care orlon that washes in 
a wink, needs no ironing, retains shape 
without shrinking. All sizes and colors. 
Sweaters—Street Floor 


— 


BEST és CO. 


with your initials. Sizes 30 to 
with any color 


Mad and phone order: filled © Allow 2 weeks for delivery. Ne C.O.D.'s 


WASHINGION _ | ARLINGTON 
4070 Wheemin Ave. MW. 6, Bence S9708 ‘Ritington Wed. & Se. Glebe Bd, locheon $8008 


Today--From 9:30 am. to 9 p.m. Jelleft's 


Rerhosde 
44°) Conmechewt Ave 
WD agtee 


‘Atter Thanksgiving Clearance! 


Only a partial listing . . . make P day of it: 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. 


43 Dresses were $17.95 .......... $5 
33 were $17.95 and $19.95 .... 

37 were $17.99 and $19.99 

38 were $19.99 and $25 

32 were $25 and $29.99 

46 were $29.99 and $35 

Among the fabrics—rayon crepes, wools, 
rayon satin, rayon taffeta and blends. 
The styles — one-piece and two-piece, 
dressy, tailored, cocktail and a few for- 
mals. 

The c¢olors—biack, navy, brown, red, 
aqua, blue, and high shades; sizes 8 to 
20 but broken, of course. Many dresses 
one-of-a-kind. (Second Floor). 


$3.95 to $5.95 Underwear $2.85 


Cotton Slips .. .frosted cotton, Dacron- 
and-cotton trimmed with nylon laces and 
nets; some camisole and panel slips here. 
White, sizes 32 to 44 and 9 to 15; 3.85 


nylon tricot slips with sheer and flut- 
ing trims, some shadow-paneled, mostly 
short and tall lengths, broken sizes and 
colors. 3.85 


cotton gowns, pajamas, ful! length 
and waltz length gowns, baby doll pa- 
amas; cotton plisse and frosted cotton. 
astels, broken sizes. 3.85 


SHOE REDUCTIONS! 


Mademoiselle! Margatet Jerrold! 
$16.95 to $19.95 Fashion Shoes 
: $12.90 
Friday and Saturday! Beautifully de- 
signed shoe exclusives in biue calf, black 
patent, black calf, black suede, red calf, 
calf. Both high and medium heels. 

pairs at these savings. F Street only. 
Mademoiselles also at Shirlington and 


‘Silver Spring. 


$16.95 to $18.95 Walking Shoes 
100 pairs! 
$10.90 


All tailored calfskin with medium heel. 
only a pair or two in any style but you'll 
tind red, navy, beige, tan in both pumps 
and sling pumps. At F Street only. 


AT SILVER SPRING! 


Children’s Sample 
Size 8 Dresses 
Regularly $7.95 to $14.95 


*4.95 to *8.95 


Fine cotton, broadcloths, organdies, pol- 
ished cottons and nylons; both school and 

. Peach, blue, yellow, mint, 
red, coral, lilac, a few in party white. All 
in size 8 only. 


“Little” Furs! One af a kind 
Reductions! 
$533.50 Natural Ranch Mink 
Stole 


$71.50 


$165.50 
$148.50 Two-skin Natural Sable 
Scarf $104.50 


$110 Three-skin Tip-dyed Ameri- 


55 Women’s $17.99 to $22.99 Dresses includirig tailored rayon 
gabardines in red, blue, navy; rayon tweeds with jackets in brown, blue 
and wine. Few of a kind dresses include silk-and-cotton, one-piece 
rayon crepes. Sizes 14% to 22%. (Second Floor) $11. 


75—Women’s $25 to $39.95 Dresses including basic type 
dresses in rayon crepe; black, wine, blue; some with colortrim, Dressy 
rayon crepes with lace, beadwork, velvet and tucking details; black, 
navy, wine, blue. Sizes 14% to 22%. (Second Floor). $18, 


Misses’ and Juniors’ $69.99 to $85 COATS. Dressy and cas- 
ual styles in polished woolens, Biara tweeds,° precious fibers blended 
with wool, imported tweeds, wool chinchillas . . . many of them with 
Jelleff's famed SYCAMORE label. Yarn dyed grey, red, teal, black, 
charcoal grey and blue in the group; sizes 8 to 16, 5 to 13. (Third 
Floor) $59 


Wonderful Worumbo! $110 COATS for Misses. Rosewood, 


beige, green, blue, black! Capelet collars, wrap coats, chin collars 
... beautiful wear-everywhere coats in sizes 8 to 16. (Third Floor) $89 


Women’s $89.99 COATS in Imported Tweeds. Hand woven 
wool tweeds . . . and ours alone, that makes this savings even more ex- 
citing. Classic tailoring with snug three button closing, virgin wool 
interlining. Mixtures of browns, reds, blacks, greens and mauve. Pro- 
portioned sizes 8 to 20 as well as sizes 32 to 40 for taller women. 


(Third Floor) $75 
Women’s $145 and $155 Furred Fashion COATS. Twenty 


prize buys here! Hand-tailored coats in Forstmann, Anglo and Hock- 
anum wools. Shawl collars, ascots, deep muff cuffs of natural beaver, 
natural ranch mink, natural grey Persian Lamb. Women’s propor- 


tioned sizes 10 to 20 and sizes 34 to 40 for women. (Third $125 


Famous! 25.99 to $29.99 Year-Around SUITS. Misses’ sizes 
18 and 20! Young proportioned plus sizes 18 and 20! Junior sizes 7 
and 9! Tailored in crisp, wrinkle shedding acetate woven by Celanese 
just for these famous all-year suits, (Third Floor) $15 


27 Misses’ $79.99 and $85 Tweed Ensembles. Ful! length 
coat over slim skirt and color-blended wool jersey blouse. Black and 
white, topaz, avacado, hyacinth, wine in the group; broken sizes |0 to 
18. (Third Floor) $59 


$25 Classic All-Weather Coats. Rain-ready corduroys, cotton 
tweeds, Pima cottons; some styles have matching rain hats. Red, 
grey, green, blue in sizes 8 to 16. (Sports Shop, Third Floor F Street 
and all branch stores) $17 


Country Clothes by Handmacher! $14.99 to $17.99 Skirts. 
Handmacher tailoring in wool flannels, wool tweeds. Slim, gored and 
button-front styles in the group; some with pockets. Wine, camel- 
tan, green or blue in sizes 10 to 18. (Third Floor) $11 


$10.99 “Sports Swing” Tailored Classics. Action-designed coat 
dress for misses and women. Crisp pinchecked rayon menswear with 
yoke back, three-quarter sleeves, two pockets in the skirt. Checks 
of black and white, brown and black, or green and black.: Sizes 12 
to 20, 38 and 40, 14% to 22”. (Fifth Floor) $6, 


20—Misses’ $25 Wool Tweed Sheath Dresses in grey or mauve 
mixtures with patent leather belt; sizes 10 to 18. (Fifth Floor) $18. 


136—$10 to $16.50 Girdles and Panty Girdles including 
boned and boneless styles by Treo, Dorothy Bickum, Sarazin of Con- 
necticut, Franco and Warner. Many are one or two of a size and style. 
Sizes 27 to 32 but not in every style. (Second Floor) $2.95 to $9.95 


$3.95 At-Home Wear including zip-back cotton seersucker pina- 
fores with wide straps; crisp prints on white, sizes 10 and 12. One piece 
zip-up coveralls in navy, red or aqua no-iron cotton; sizes 10 to 18. 
(Fourth Floor) $2. 


700—-$1 Necklaces, Bracelets, Pins and Earrings; s o me 
rope necklaces included. Choose from tailored metals, colored beads, 
a few stone set pieces. 2 for $1.* 


50—$5 Dressy Handbags including rayon failles, woo! broad- 
cloths, rayon velvets and gay prints in clutch bags, pouch styles, both 
single and double handles. Navy, light blue, pink and green. $3.85," 


$1.65 and $1.95 Nylon Stockings, 1.35, 3 pairs, $3.90. 


Designer Milliners! $12.50 to $38.50 Hats to $5 to $25 
including velvets, panne, furs, velours, fur felts in such a wide style 
and color variety that you'll choose several. Many are from our French 
Room collection and one of a kind. Dressy, tailored and cocktail styles 


included. (First Floor) 
*Plus Fed. Tax 


$ | 
‘ ; t ee 


ss 


er ne ee 


THE WA 
and 
Friday, November 25, 1955 
50 . . : | . : 


4 


Tire¥or| Kann... Both Stores Open Tonight 
Old Soap | Arlington Hours, 1:00-9:30 Meare 2a : | Washington Hours, 9:30-9:00 


IF BARS of soap would 
simply dissolve when they 
reach a certain size, a lot of 
mental conflicts would be re- 
solved. Even when a piece of 
soap’s too small to use, thrifty 
housewives still tell them- 
selves it’s too big to discard. 
Such economy-minded ladies 
will be happy to read these 
suggestions for making new 
soap bars from old bits and 
pieces. 


SAVING SOAP 

FOR M. Myers: Keep a = . a Cui hee 2 a 
glass in your bathroom for wars a es Rr BOBS Sere 
small pieces of toilet soap. : ; a ee GOO ag RE ea hoy 


N , “f a M ee > " 
%. . 2: Oe 2 “? : ae ae 2 oo de & Ae : 
When quite a heap has accu- 3 hee ee mts Rie di ¥ 4 
them in l f yaks , sah ge Roa ree e +] us the ut i 
mulated, cut into smal ‘eax ene % a | a Ww | 


pieces, put into a saucepan 
with a small amount of water 
and let simmer for a few min- 
utes. Then put into a greased 
container the desired shape. 


and round edges. Set away to ee Re seen Be 
harden for a week or two. a3 M, 6 Ce i eH 
Makes an attractive bar of .. ae & A wee 
bath soap. A few drops of pine hoi a ee See 
oil or perfume just before eae: 6 ee ee 
> 


pouring gives it a pleasant 
scent, also a drop of cake | 
coloring can be added then if 
desired. 

MRS. W.T.B., Washington. 


TAKE ALL small pieces of 
soap and get them dry, then 
put them through your grater. 
Put same in your washing 
machine; they dissolve like 
any other detergent and are 
wonderful used this way. 

Mrs. L. P. Plyler, 
Falls Church, Va. — 


I PLACE leftover pieces of 
soap in a large mayonnaise 
jar to which I add enough 
water to cover. Then I cap 
the jar and set it on top of the | 
radiator in my bathroom to | 
insure .its continuous liqui- 
fied state. Every night I use 
some of this solution to rinse | 
out my stockings. Eventually 
the jar will become full. At 
this point, I pour all the solu- 
tion, along with a small quan- | 
tity of soap powder, into the 
automatic washing machine | 
to wash my lingerie..Then I 
begin my accumulation all 
over again, ad infinitum. 

Roberta Lipscombe, | 
Washington. | 


POETIC PUZZLES 


THE POEM requested by | 
J.S., “Which Shall It Be?” by 
Ethel Lynn Beers, was one of | 
the favorites of my mother 
who, I believe, memorized it | 
from one of the McGuffey | 
Reader, one of her school 
books. My parents, inciden- | 
tally, had seven children, | 
some of them with names- 
mentioned in this poem. So, 
you see, it is one that is par- 
ticularly dear to me. My copy 
cah be found in a book called 
“Heart Throbs,” purchased at | 
one of the bookstores in Wash- 
ington. | 

Gertrude G. Fiedler, | 
Washington. | 


ED. NOTE: The sentimen- 
tal poem which aroused so | 
much reader interest can also 
be found—our readers tell us 
—in “The Best Loved Poems | 
of the American People,” | 
“The Fireside Encyclopedia | 
of Poetry,” “One Hundred | 
Choice Selections, Number | 
3,” and “McGuffey’s Fourth 
Eclectic Reader.” It is also 
known as “Which” and “Not | 
. One to Spare.” The latter is | 
a revised version, apparently, 
which mentions all seven 
children. The -first. version 
only named six. Those who | 
wrote to aid J. S. include Mrs. | 
George Mazur Jr., E. H. B., 
Mrs.’ T. M. Marion, Helen 
Young Vetter, Jean McCol- 
lum, Mrs. H. P. Brown, Jessie 
E. Morgan, Mary L. Little, | 
Mrs. G. T. Starnes, Mrs. | 


i . M. bar pe ng eee | 4 4 ” ste’. i ee 

Squrth grade. in lows), Mrs. iy ee ee Calfskin makes the most of Naturalizers 
R. C Wysong, Frances W. ¢ Ge Me 

Dorothy D. Schmitt. 1. H.W. i ee ee 
J. Cherry. Julia Coitier, irs Be ee sega famed heel-hugging, toe-freeing features 
Hoovier, Jennie Mustapha 2 Aa 3 the 

and Sadie M. Lewis. Thanks 


to all, and also to Mrs. G. H. phe ity Bn SPR ae erie x 
Wilson, H. Joyce McCall and ME es RSs ‘ | ee ets 3 
G. H. who identified Thomas | is ena at ; . : 
Moore’s poem, “Farewell, But : -_= 
| * € 


Whenever You Welcome the 
Like getting a Christmas bonus 


PEED SI: 
ae ve ni > 2 s . 2 — 


cp PRR SgeNBRE RCI 
ve agt S aee 


Hour,” for Mrs. Janet F. 
Field. 


REJUVENATING FRAMES 


The suppleness of calfskin lets you see the fit of these Natu- 


TO THE person inquiring 
‘about frames and h t 
Ghost frames: snd how te to find Leather Linings in | ALESIS GRE BTC ASE 
paints ours white, lets it set | it’s a year-in, year-out favorite. Choose these Naturalizer 


a few minutes, then wipes it 
off. The frame looks nice and 
fresh, yet the natural wood 

isn't marred in any way. . 
Mrs. F. Gooch, 
Washington. 


SALT; WASHCLOTHS 


CALFSKIN BAGS ocr 


about salt shakers that don’t . 
Prrrir 10,95 


pour: One of the chain stores 
sells seasoning salts in attrac 
Ls B. Janet . . . halter pump. Black. .11.95 
at only | ° } C. Venus . . . open-toe sweater pump. 
| pine tes = y Black. Also patent leather and black 
7 ‘\.. | jidesao coke 


calfskins for assurance of smart comfort on shopping tours 
or long periods of standing at holiday parties ahead. 


tive shakers with heavy 
plastic sifters and metal 
screw tops. Table salt kept 
in these, with the screw-top 


D. Sheath .. . sweater pump. Black, blue, 


Good buys for their interesting and varied shapes . . . Extra- — red. Also potent leather and blue or 
Me. | | suede 


ordinary buys when you add to it their leather linings. 3 | 
Some even have change purses.of leather; many with zipper E. Punch ... new spectator style pump. 
compartments, Nice enough for very special gifts. Colors are Brown were ereeeter ts te eee 11.95 


oniet Gees Meade come at black, brown, briarwood red, navy and avocado. : 


? : 
Mrs. W.P.P., Ari, Va. | Kann's Handbags, Street Floor, Washington and Arlington 


— ** 
CLL LL LT Ct tl te et tt: tt tata 
a — 


* 


~ 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD , 
vf Pridey, November 24, 1955 


-Kann’s.>. Both Stores Open T onight 


Penna. Ave. at 8th St. N.W., Washington N. Fairfax Drive at N. Kirkwood, Arlington 


Washington, 9:30 A.M.-9:00 P.M. 24-Hour Phone Order Service—DI. 7.7200 Arlington, 10:00 A.M.-9:30 P.M. 


Let Kann’s Expert Fitters Show You What Wonders 


Maidentorm’s “Once Over” 


Does Under New Formals 7 Q 5 


“Once-Over” is the new all-in-one strapless you'll need for new long lines. 
Easy flowing waistline, exclusive inner hug-band for quick fastening and 
extra fit. Removable garters; undercups lightly foam-rubber lined. White 
cotton broadcloth. Sizes 32-36, A cup; 32-88, B and C. 


Maidenform's Light-as-Air Elastic Bra . . . it’s “Ariette” 
with airy-elastic panels where you need them, so the 
bra gives with your every gesture. Embroidered 
broadcloth cups designed for new raised- 

and-rounded silhouette. White; A cup in 2 SO 
32-38; B, 32-40; C, 32-42 ........ ve: og © 


Kann's Foundations, Second Floor, Washington and Arlington 


Cashmere 


Sweater 


Imported, 100% Cloud-Soft Cashmere 
Full-fashioned, Perfect-fitting Sleeves 


Quilted Lounge Wear | | 
Gifts for Those with : 17.95 slipons, 
¥ 3 sale priced...... e 


Perfectionist Taste \ 


Saybury beauty begins with fabric, carries through with such perfectionist 22.95 cardigans, 


touches as these: beautiful fit across shoulders, linings finished as per- 
fectly as exteriors, outtons with rustproof metal backs (extra ones in- 


cluded), daintiness of piping trims. un 
: nitted get For ~ ye te Nena — another rontes when it’s ae 
| mere e full-fashioned feature add these: firm shape- 

Lounging Set... Quilted rayon Duster . . . Quilted rayon crepe | m : | ing necklines, closely knit ribbing at cuffs and waistband, ribbon- 
ae. ) yon Poa aqua rl moetestn a. rayon oe oe tulip collar. , : backed buttonholes, color matched ocean pear! buttons. Sizes 34 

p qua or coral ; 0s : i 
ara ap an fing ng “no 19.99 3 ven ™0 . to 40 in group, some may be matched in sets. 
night) trousers of bine k rayon | \ Colors: Pink, blue, periwinkle, cherry, pecan. 
| | Phone Orders Filled Where Possible 


12-18 
Kann's Sportswear, Second Floor, Washington; Street Floor, Arlington | 


\ 


Kana's Negligees, Second Floor,.W ashington and Arlington 


’ 


\ ‘ 
THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD . 


5? Friday, November 25, 1955 


a 


Girl Friday 


‘A Decorator After Office Hours 


By Maxine Cheshire 


THE NEIGHBORHOOD 
grocery is almost the only 
store that Margaret Pearson 
- needs to patronize. Almost 
* anything but food she can 
make herself 
' With her artist husband, 
Morris, she has a do-it-your- 
self partnership that is very 
nearly self-sufficient. 

Both take credit for the 
handsome modern furniture 
and decorations of their Fif- 
teenth st. apartment. That 
means lamps, pictures, ash- 
trays, bric-a~-brac — every- 
thing 

Paintings on all the walls 
are his work. Ceramic ob- 
jects are hers. He did the 
carpetry and cabinet - work. 
, She's the seamstress and up- 
» holstery expert. 

. Margaret's at-home proj- 


| Weddings 


FRANCES JOHNSON 
~—JOSEPH W. AUSTIN JR. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis A. 
Johnson announce the mar- 
riage of their daughter, Fran- 
cis Lewis, to Joseph W. Aus- 
tin Jr.. son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph W. Austin Sr., on No- 
vember 24 at St. Luke’s Epis- 
copal Church. The bride at- 
tended Howard University. 
Mr. Austin is now attending 
Howard University Dental 
School. The couple will re- 
side in Washington. 


SHIRLEY BECRAFT 
—CHARLES KIMBALL 


Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Becraft 
of Spencerville, Md. an- 
nounce the marriage of their 
daughter, Shirley Ann, to 
Charles Richard Kimball, son 
of Mrs. Mary E. Kimball of 
Ashton, Md., on Nov. 19 at 
Ashton Methodist Church. 
The couple will make their 
home in Ednor, Md. 


ects also include dress-mak- 
ing and Christmas card de- 
sign. 

“I have much fun that I 
had to quit Working at a full- 
time office job in order to 
find time for everything 
else,” she says. 


Margaret was an execu- 
tives’ secretary with coast-to- 
coast experience before she 
decided to “taper off.” She 
works only a few hours a day 
néw, at the Remedial Educa- 
tionel Center on New Hamp- 
shire avenue. 


By Douglas Chevalier, Staff Photographer 


MARGARET PEARSON 
. ceramics are her dish 


THE PEARSONS were mar- 
ried here in 1950 while she 
was at George Washington 
University and he was study- 
ing at Corcoran. The next 
year found them in Mexico 
City, where both were study- 
ing under the GI Bill. 

“Tl was in the Waves and 
Morris was a Marine and it 
worked out wonderfully,” 
Margaret says. “I got my de- 
gree in Spanish and he went 
on with his art training.” | 

Margaret's interest in ce- 
ramics dates to 1951. They 
lived for a while in San 
Francisco before returning to 
settle in Washington. And 
California has almost as 
many ceramics schools as 
drive-in restaurants, she says. 

“I work here at the Work- 
shop Center of The Arts,” 
she says. “It’s a serious in- 
terest with me, but I haven't 
had enough training to think 
about doing anything to sell.” 

Morris, who works at the 
Smithsonian Institution, has 
high regard for his wife's 
progress and has helped her 
with design technique, both 
for her ceramics and the 
Christmas cards. 

“We share almost all each 
other's interests,” she says, 
“except movies. I once 
thought I'd teach Spanish, 
you know, and I like to keep 
up with it, by going to 
Spanish movies—but I go 
alone. Morris stays home and 
paints.” 


ND TW, 7 


POT 2 


juniors, here's new 


matchmaking you'll love 
SOFT SWEATER ’n’ ™ 
SKIRT BLENDS 


Sweaters are Premier's Kitt’n-Gora, blissful 
85% lambswool—15% angora. Skirts are the 
neat and narrow styles you love. Both in pas- 


tels that look extra-beautiful in mid-winter. 


Above: full-fashioned pull-on, apricot, flower 
rose, sky blue, bud green or white. 34-40, 8.99 


Striped wool skirt harmonizes. 7-15. 


12.95 


Right: long-sleeved, full-fashioned cardigan, 
sky blue, flower rose, bud green and apricot. 


34-40, 


Matching woo! skirt. 7-15. 


& 


wa ere Misses’, 4th Floor 
..» also Chevy Chase and Alexandria 


10.95 
12.98 


EXTRA SHOPPING HOURS TODAY 


Shop Today, Washington Store 9:30 a. m. to9 p.m.... 
Chevy Chase and Alexandria, 9:30 a. m. to 9:30 p. m. 


Wz 


the Uhpisnas 


criss-cross, it shows 


off your hair 


WISP OF HAT... 
MUCH ELEGANCE 


Dramatic understatement, this 
party-going hat with its new look of 
width. Slender strips of rayon panne 
velvet glow softly, a veil twinkles 
with rhinestones. In-between, your 
own hair shines. Have black, brown, 
navy, Dior blue, mauve, rubis, pea- 


cock or white. 5.99 


W & L—Hat Corner, Ist Floor 
. « also Chevy Chase and Alexandria 


f 
SS BIA 


look at those collars... 


stroke that fabric... 


then marvel at our Fashion 5th’s 


~~ 


LOW-PRICE-TAG 
FASHION COATS 


39” 


Look and feel extravagant as you wrap 
yourself smartly in our polished wool 
coats. They're slim . . . they emphasize 
top interest .. . feature the new black- 
ened colors. And they’re warmly wool in- 


terlined. 


Left: button collar drapes softly. Black 
or blackened wine, navy, charcoal or 
green. 10-16. 39.95 


Same colors 


39.95 


Below: vast shaw! collar. 
except green. 10-16. 


W&L—lInexpensive Coats, Fashion 5th Shops, 
Sth Floor... also Chevy Chase and Alexandria 


our 
sparkling 
TRIM-A-TREEB 
SHOP 

radiates glowing 
ideas for antes. 


r tree, your 
tml your pack. 


ages. 3rd floor. 


‘Mary Haworth’s Mail 


> 
& 


‘Visit by Children Is Upsetting 


DEAR MARY HAWORTH: 
The other day I received a 
letter from my niece saying 
that she and her three chil- 
dren are 
planning to 
visit me next @ 
month. 

Ordinarily 
this news 
would fill me 
with joy, but 
as there is a 
reason why 
it doesn’t, I 
am writing 

eto you for 
some advice, 
please. 

The reason for my discom- 
fiture is that on a previous 
visit, eight months ago, the 
children tore up my little 
cottage house, scared the 
chickens, broke things, 
spilled food on everything— 
all of which meant quite a 
little expense to me. 

The children are com plete- 


-- 
— ee 


Re an, 10 A.M. 
CLEARANCE 


FRIDAY ONLY 


ly undisciplined and un- 
trained, which isn’t fair to 
them, of course. Their father 
is presently in service in the 
Navy. 

My niece is my sister’s only 
child and I do not want to 
hurt her feelings: but I fear 
she doesn’t sense what her 
‘little brood can do. 

Please ket me have your 
though on the situation is 
that I may answer Edith’s 
letter in whatever way is 
kindest and best: and mean- 
time, my thanks to you. 

eS 


DEAR R. Y.: The conscien- 
tious mother of small chil- 
drey, who feels accountable 
for their behavior, soon 
learns from experience that 
it is too exhausting for all 
concerned—and for her es- 
pecially—to take them vis- 
iting in others’ homes for 
days at a time. 

It is a revealing sidelight 


Mary Hawerth 


me — — 


to 9:30 P.M. 


Elegant 


Cashmere Ceats rec. $1495 


Group of 100 
Coats All imported fabrics, reg. $98 


100% TummiceTuaff 
Coats Beige grey, pink, reg. $59.95-69.50.. ....,. 


Group of 1@ 
Raincoats All-weather coats, reg. $22.95-25 


Group of 50 


100% Wool Suits ces. $49.95.5995 


Group of 100 
Su ts Many imported fabrics, reg. $79.95-$98 .... 


Group of 15 
Wool Kuit Dresses res. #1795 .... 


100% Wool 


Skirts reg. $8.95-10.95 


Cotton 


Blouses rec. $2.95 


Suede and Leather 
Jackets rez. $39.95 


Quilon treated, water repellent, tangerine, beige, mushroom and rust. 
Charge Accounts Invited 


| during 
eight months ago. And that 
she how proposes another 
visit in the near future. 

This indifference to your 
peace of mind (shall we say) 
indicates that she is neither 
a very thoughtful nor a very 
sensitive person; that she is, 
in a sense, about as heedless 
of the proprieties as her chil- 
dren are. (Or as most young 
children are, when sponta- 
neous urges cause them to 
“forget their manners.”) 

It appears that Edith as an 
“only child” is accustomed to 
a good deal of indulgence— 
of feted and preferential 
treatment—by the family eld- 


ers. Perhaps she feels that a , 


visit from her is a treat to 
you; and that she increases 
the magnitude of the treat by 
bringing her children along. 
It seems you have a fixed no- 
tion that this is the senti- 
ment expected of you (are 
you the spifister aunt, per- 
haps)—and that you have a 
sentimental duty to act in 
keeping, regardless of other 
considerations. 


MY ADVICE is to pattern 
your rejoinder along lines 
that an affectionate, common- 
sensical grandmother might 
write, in response to Edith’s 
proposed yisit. I think such 
a grandmother might explain, 
kindly, that the commotion 
of the past sojourn proved 
that your little cottage sim- 
ply isn’t adequate the re- 
quirements of lively small 
children, which means a hard- 
ship on the children, as well 
as the elders of course, when 
you try to fit-them in, for any 
length of time. 

So, to make things easier 
for all, and the visit more 
enjoyable for all, therefore, 
you think it would be a good 
idea to reserve rooms for her 


and the children in the neigh- 
say at a hotel or 


good ‘ 

you could plan times tegeth- 
er, for breakfast, lunch, after- 
noon trips, dinner, etc., in a 
much more relaxed and foot- 
loose way. 

Thus your rejoinder is 
warmhearted and welcoming, 
without — you in the 
unenviable role of doormat. 
And she has a choice (implic- 
itly presented) of coming or 
not, as she decides on second 
thought. 


Miss Haworth counsels 
only through her column, 
not by mail or personal 
interview. Write to her in 
care of The Washington 
Post and Times Herald. : 


| Engaged | 


MAURA LYNN SILVERMAN 
—JEROME FREIBAUM 


Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. 
Silverman announce the 
engagement of their daughter, 
Maura Lynn, to Jerome 
Freibaum, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Freibaum of 
Flushing, N. Y. Miss Silver- 
man attended the Universit? 
of Wisconsin, the University 
of Geneva in Switzerland 
and is a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan. Mr. 
Freibaum is a graduate of 
the City College of New York. 


HARRIET A. STERN 
—ROBERT S. MARX 


Mr. and Mrs. Edwin L. Stern 
of Arlington, Va., announce 
the engagement of their 
daughter, Harriet Ann, to 
Robert S. Marx, son of Dr. 
and Mrs. Martin S. Marx of 
Brockton, Mass. Miss Stern 
and Mn Marx both attend 
George Washington Univer- 
sity. A June wedding is 
planned. 


Elinor Lee’s Recipe Box 


6 tablespoons butter 
or margarine 
1% teaspoons garlic 
or onion salt 
3 dashes Tobasco sauce 


shire sauce 


about 2 quarts. 


=—=(ur only location: 8630 Colesville Rd., Silver Spring=—* 


Nibbler’s Delight 


2 teaspoons Worchester- 


2 teaspoons caraway seed 


Combine butter or margarine, garlic or onion salt, To- 
basco sauce, Worcestershire sauce, and caraway seed in 
saucepan. Heat slowly until butter is melted. Stir. 
Mix cereals, pretzels, and nuts In large, deep baking 
pan. Pour melted, seasoned butter over cereals. Mix 
well. Bake in a slow oven (300° F.) until lightly browned, 
about 25 minutes. Stir every 5 to 8 minutes. Yield: 


4 cups crisp corn puffs 
2 cups oven-toasted 
rice cereal 
2 cups slim ‘pretzels, 
whole or broken in half 
1 cup salted nuts, 
if desired 


UMM WM = 
the Chiithnas Hie * 


the Christmas gift 


to treasure through the years 


FINE JEWELRY 


When you select fine jew- 

elry you have in mind a gift of 

lasting beauty. We show a 

few from our exquisite collec- 

tion: 

Top to bottom: 

Diamond heart necklace’ of 14K 

white gold, 22 diamonds. 
295.00 


14K gold bracelet with 16 sap- 
phires and 16 cultured pearlis. 
150.00 


Cultured pearl and diamond 
ring, 14K yellow gold and 15 
diamonds, 195.00 


Christmas charm of 14K yel- 
low gold, tree sparkling with 
genuine stones. 110.00 


Man’s ring of 14K yellow gold 
and genuine sardonyx a. 


Please add 10% Federal tax. 
W&L—Fine Jewelry, Ist Floor 
. » » Selection at Chevy Chase 
and Alexandria 


It's New 


FLIPPING your lid has be- 
come socially acceptable 
kitchen conduct! More than 
three million women do just 
that every day, according to 
the White Cap Co. of Chicago. 


This figure refers to the 
number of women who now 
own a lid flipper—the 10-cent 
opener for pry-off capped 


glass food containers. Intro- | 


duced to food editors only a 
year ago, the handy gadget 
is now available in grocery, 
supermarkets, chain, variety, 
hardware and department 
stores. It opens jars, tum- 


blers and bottles quickly and | 
easily. 


Another quick ‘n’ easy is 
“Fizzmaster,” a new home 
soda maker that makes fla- 
vored sodas, club soda and 
sparkling wines in their own 
bottles. 

The unit operates on the 
carbon dioxide cartridge prin- 
ciple and uses an ordinary 
large glass soda bottle. Makes 
as much or as little carbon- 
ated beverage as you like. 

Packed in an attractive kit 
with a Fizz-Kap to cork the 


bottles of soda, “Fizzmaster” | 


was introduced in New York 


this week and will soon be in | 


national distribution. 


At Sea Island 


AMONG recent arrivals at 
The Cloister, Sea Island, Ga., 
were Miss Mary Turner, Mr. 
and Mrs. Thomas J. Brimer, 
all of Washington, D. C. 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
. Friday, November 25, 1955 53 
Miss Universe 
Mr. Bulkin 


Beatty 
vie Don road - 
amone’s 
and plays the drums for Biliie 
Ekstein. 


eS eee 


Christmas Shopping Hours: 
Monday, Thursday, Friday 
Silver Spring: 10 A.M. te 9:30 P.M. 
F Street: 9:45 A.M. te 9:00 P.M. 


Lacé-and-Ribbon Lavish 


Luxury Gift Slip! 
White, Pink or Blue 
Nylon Tricot 


3°98 


For Christmas, give thi are 
at our Silver Spring and F Street ‘Stores. 


Sizes 32 to 40. Allow 10 days for 
phone orders. Please include sales t cA 
state second color choice. Sorry, no C.0.D.’s. 

vai / 


—_—————— 


| TOSEPH R. HARRIS: 


Shop 


EXTRA SHOPPING HOURS TODAY 
Today, Washington Store, 9:30 A.M. to 9 P.M. 


_ Chevy Chase and Alexandria Stores, 9:30 A.M. to 9:30 P.M. 


for 


. » » practical and pretty 


GIFT LAMPS 


7 


the Lhistnas The?” iS 


a ae aan, 
em «J 4 4 ey “4 3 
Boca ¥ - 


% 
RR igh 
eS. _A Radel « 
x & Pa Se ee “% 
OE SR ef eae 
, - 


"ét 6 ea .% 


seus 


every room in the house 


3-95 to 10-9 


A.. Inspired by Walt Disney's movie “The 
Lady and the Tramp,” pert lamps with 
shades at a saucy angle. Washable. 


Brown, blue 
dot shade. 3. 


or P ren harlequin or polka 


B. Black metal 16” rooster pin-up lamp 
with calico cutouts on white shade. 5.95 


C. Three-piece milk glass boudoir set 


with 


pompon 
cludes 21°’ night table lamp and 2 vanity 


trimmed white shades. in- 


lamps. 10.95 


D. Space saver wall lamp moves up and 
down, puts light where you want it... 
over table or desk, by a chair or over a 


bed. 


Brass, black, turquoise, nutmeg, 


charcoal or coppertone. 9.95 


E. Verplex 
Sen tate and 
shade 


50” 


black metal “combination 
zine rack. White 
. ‘Use beside or chair, stands 
high. Packed in carton for easy 


giving. 10.95 


W&L—Lamps and Shades, 7th Floor — 
» » - also Chevy Chase and Alexandria 


A FIRST THANKSGIVING was celébrated by a contingent 
of foreign students at Randolph-Macon Woman's College. 
For Margaret Spencer Burnside, at left, born in Nassau and 
a British subject, it was the third American holiday. With 


@ . 


wee 
ime 


her from left are Johanna Propp of Germany, Anne 
Catherine Andree Castelain of France and Anna Cecilia 
Ekman of Sweden. All are first year students at the 


woman's college. 


gal’s 


Christmas 
ma gic 


A most delightful manner 
te show your adoration. For 
every woman loves the 
luxury of exquisite lingerie. 
~ «+ And she'll feel 
especially cherished when 
you choose this flattering 
ensemble from her favorite 


tall shop. 


; “ 7 4 


W rite Dept. 20 to be placed on tall mailing list 


Tall Apparel Shop 


738 12th St., Between G & H 
9:30-6 P.M.—Mon. & Thurs. 9:30-9 


NO CONNECTION WITH ANY OTHER 
“TALL” STORE IN WASHINGTON 


Child Behavior 


BoyFinds Difficulty 


| 
| 
) 


Adjusting to School 


By the Gesell Institute 


“DEAR DOCTORS: 
“Help! Help! This is an 


| SOS from a frantic mother. 


“My 6%-year-old son has 
just started school this past 
September, and yesterday. I 
talked to his teacher for the 
first time. She says my son 
is having a very difficult 
time—that he is far behind 
the other pupils. He does not 
listen to her—cannot concen- 


| trate, cannot do his numbers. 


| rude 


His attention span is ex- 
tremely short and he even 
sings out loud. 

“His behavior at horedg far 
worse. He talks back, he} 
and mean. He whines 
and cries incessantly. He has 
a negative attitude about 
everything and he argues 
constantly. He contradicts 
everything I tell his sister or 
him 


He’s supposed to practice 
his numbers at home, but he 
goes into terrible tantrums, 
screams, yells, throws things, 
say he can't do them and 
won't. He tears the paper up, 
breaks the pencil, and carries 
on so much and so long that 
~ actually makes himself 


“Our doctor says he is 
physically fit—a little under- 
weight, but his teacher says 
he is very nervous and she 
does not think he is ready for 
school. 

“There is no kindergarten 
in our school system, so I 
realize that this is a tremen- 
dous new experience for him, 
but he just won't try. He 
wants to do things his own 
way, yet he really likes sehool 
and wants to go. But our 
home life is just dreadful. 
This behavior problem is not 


ig 


"Beech-N ut is fussier than lam 


about feeding my twins’ 


7 


says Connie Clausen on the DR. SPOCK TV Program 


See DR. SPOCK on TV presented by BEECH-NUT BABY FOODS. 


+. ‘ | 


I’m discovering so many won- 
derful things to tell Dr. Spock’s 
audience about Beech-Nut. Be- 


est baby feeder in the world! 


) 


entirely new—it’s been going 
on about two years. 

“We cannot afford private 
treatment and have no Fam- 
ily Service Bureau in our 
community. But I feel that he 
and we, as parents, need 
guidance. At least I would 
like to talk to someone about 
this situation. Can you sug- 
gest anything?” 


TO START with, we can 
state that your son quite cer- 
tainly is not ready for first 


grade. He probably would do 
well in kindergarten. Since | 


“ou do not have one available, 


set 


program in m home. 


Not for all day, but for #brief_|i 
period each day. We antici- | 
pate that you would find his | 
behavior much improved if | 


he were trying to carry out 
kindergarten routines and ac- 
tivities rather than 
his numbers and letters at 
home. a 

If you could find some 
other child in the neighbor- 
hood who would share this 
activity, it would give it more 
the atmosphere of school 


—which you say he does like. | 
Are there other parents who | 


might be interested? Had you 


thought of organizing a co- | 
operative nursery school or | 


kindergarten? Of course it 
would take you quite a lot 
of time, but probably in the 
long run it would be much 
less tiring than just coping 
with his present behavior, 


and certainly should help him | 


improve. 
His behavior in 


you say he has been like this 
for some time, the bad points 
normal for his age are ap- 
parently reinforced by 

basic personality. The chap- 
ter on the 6-year-old in Gesell 


and Ilg, The Child From Five | 


to Ten, may help some. We 


think that taking your boy | 


out of first grade, and thus 
reducing the strain of the 
too difficult situation, will 
help more. 


(Copyright. 1955. Gesell Institute, Inc.) 


Needle Is a 
Modern Aid 


NEW YORK (INS) — The 
latest aid to a smart modern- 
looking bedroom is the old- 
fashioned embroidery needle. 


Thtehewest bedspread and 
curtain sets go in heavily for 
embroidery, both in an all- 
over pattern and in a random 
scattering. Generally, the fan- 
ey needlework is performed 
On monotone spreads, either 
in a matching color, or as a 
one-toned contrast. 

For example, if you have a 
somewhat uninteresting look- 
ing brown spread, you might 
sew onto it a white-outlined 
floral an allover 

ttern. Then embroider the 

rder of your matching full- 
length or cafe curtains with a 
similar design. 


Or you can confine your 
needlework to the dust ruffle 
of the bedspread and then 
work out an all-over pattern 
for the drapes, . 


DON’T BE too ambitious 


urtains and bed- 

eens ‘since this might gi 
room an over-decorated 

crowded look. 

It's a I's room that 
an touch of good 
cheer, you'll be right in style 
with strawberries. U the 


~ 


_ me eememamnene omnmeel After Thanksgiving 


two at breakfast, not fried. 


: aes . It's Boon Po t to . eae. 5 — 
Back Comes the Diet B=sstvs<~  aatnee 


By Ida Jean Kain 


MANY REDUCERS, on Then teo, the rate of loss is | 

determined by the calorie | 
deficit which is the difference | 
between the calorie intake 
and the calorie outgo. Bear in 
mind that calorie require- 
ments are directly related to 
body weight: the heavier per- 
son burns more calories; the 
lighter person fewer calories. | 
Therefore, the closer you | 
come to normal weight, the | 
more gradual the weight 
loss becomes. 


SO WHAT to do? Apply 
nutrition science to give new 
impetus to losing. Instead of 
cutting calories further, 
change the character of the 


Stieff Rese... 


best beloved of all 
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famous Stief 
Sterling in both 
flatware and 
Another 
that after losing 50 pounds in holloware. 
18 months, going from 230 to 
180, she has stopped losing. 
“Many times when I was dis- 
couraged and slipped off my 
diet you came through with 
just the right encouragement. 
Can you help me now?” 
Sually the greater the 
amount of overweight, the 
faster the weight loss at the 
start. Since the first fat to be 
lost is “soft” fat, with a high 
ercentage of water, the rate 
of reducing tends to slow up 
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en 


3-Piece 
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JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS SINCE 1874 
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lith and F Sts. N.W. | Western ef Wisconsia Ave. 


We would ges that you | 


racticing | 


general | 
sounds like exaggerated 6 | 
year-old behavior. But since | 


his | 


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' 
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Corduroy Slacks 
2.59 


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Well made fancy cordu- 
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CONVOY COATS 


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fants NYLON 
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1.98 INFANTS’ 
SLEEPERS 
2-Pc. cotton knits, 
1 to 3 1.39 
249 FLANNELETTE 
PAJAMAS 
2-Pc. prints, knitted 
Wristlets and ank- 
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2 for $3 
4.98 and 5.98 COTTON 
DRESSES 
Smart to wear now 
and later. Sizes 1 to 


4 to 6x, Reg. 6.98 
5.99 


7 to 12, Reg. 7.98 
6.99 


Girls’ Orlon 

PULLOVER SWEATERS 
3toéX 298 1.99 
7 to 12 3 98 2.99 


14” 
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Girls”, Orlon 
CARDIGAN SWEATERS 
3toGX 398 # 32.99 


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Silver Spring | Shirlington 


» 


¢' THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
. Friday, November 25, 1955 ' 8S 


— 


* - ar ” . ~ . a : ¥ = 
- 7 ; . » 4 . ; w/ “4 . ~ . ~ . ; . ’ " o : ' : ~. 
, . - SF s+ : : [<% a * . . s x —, » “ 
, 2 aac ei | | .3 a> 3 Nos ‘2 
: : : , . : , ' " 7 > - om 
* _~ . : ‘ . ‘> er “<= . ‘ s . ' . : A a yas, : tg Son ie fie 
4 e e % Z ht. ‘ in = - S . ‘ . - \ ’ - ; : 
. ; 
<e 7 ; ; , ood ’ a ie fe 
. 


ie 


ne 
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y' ay " 


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TODAY! AL’ 3 HECHT Co. STORES OPEN EARLY-OPEN LATE 


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| ‘ A 

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-_ 


l4 Price! Famous $1 


ee $3-87.50 DAZZLE 
Simulated Pearls Y * , NO Sy ila : | | me 
—-aste 59° beeteem RHINESTONE SALE! 


ings! Rondelles, earrings, bracelets 
d necklaces . fust in time for 


plus 10% tax 


& \ | 2 
‘ - 
‘pilver Spring @ PARKington y. By Wt ® Big! Bold! Beautiful Pieces! 
mie iin wil — ian @ Massive Bracelets! Necklaces! Pins! 
— = aa — RE, s® Choice, Hand-Picked Styles Only! 
, » “ge é 4 i ae a } . , @ Imported Austrian Stones set in 


Non-Tarnish Rhodium Plate! 
Piles 10% tax 
Jewelery, Street Floor, Washington, 
Silver Spring and PARKington 


aa 


- . : oF ‘ . 
Oe 2.4% Rete ae —"y 


’ - 
aly 


3.98-5.98 Orlon* Sweaters 


5-98-10.98 Top-Name ‘# oa | Pullons, Cardigans, Novelties 
Fashion Wool Skirts? If Perf. 7.95-12.95 ? 
2 for’ 89) , Theodor-of California | 9 9 


4.79 each Classics! Vee Necks! Choose for Gifts! 
Wash, fast! Need no blocking! 
© Sheaths! Flares! Pleats! Gores! 7 ” " 
ey ng ae ee pe Kitten soft Orlons* with all the quality-in-the-making of high- 
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Twos: Fueees! We a Lorettes! (ge ee coun a er priced sweaters. Vee necks, square necks, classics, batwing 
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fees All 8 Stores OPEN EARLY + OPEN LATE Mon. ‘Thur. and Fri....,Until Christmas, 33m 


dip: Banas | ; eu 4 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
56 Friday, November 25, 1955 


COLOR PRINTSE 


* |How to 
Keep Well 


By Dr. Theodore R. Van Dellen 
To the limit of space, ques 
tions 


? 
4 oney* 
Nee 


FAIR LOANS 


ING 


i" JU. 5-1323 


7906 Georgia Avenue 
Silver Spring, Md. 
(2nd Fieor 


is inclosed. Telephone inqui 
not accepted. Dr. Van Dellen 
will not make diagnoses or pre- 
scribe for individual diseases. 


DEEP BREATHING 
Years ago emphysema was 
noted only as a late manifesta- oy Dell ~ 


tion ‘of bronchial asthma or GET SIXCC’S a / WHAT'S WRONG, )/ THEYRE GOING To arte me / 
industrial diseases like coal IMMEDIATELY--- AND \ EARL 3 4. THEIR PANGS ARE GOING TO 


miner’s lung. Nowadays, physi- POISON ME/ HELP mE / 
cians see the condition in many 
@ldsters with aging pulmonary 
tissue and in those who have | 
suffered repeated chest colds or 
chronic bronchitis. 


In other words, emphysema’ 


follows years of periodic bouts 
of hard coughing or respiratory 
infections as well as excessive 
smoking and inhalation of dust. 
Aging and incorrect habits of 
breathing also play a role. 

In this disorder, the walls of| ~ 
the air sacs lose their elasticity) 
and become overdistended. It 
is dificult for air to enter and 
leave when the alveoli (air sacs) 
are overstretched in this way. 
As a result, breathing is im- 
paired and in time, the heart 
begins to suffer. 
| Cough and shortness of 
| breath are early manifestations. 
'Both are precipitated by exer- 
tion such as climbing, or even 
| walking down the street. Cough 
usually is grunting in type and 
may be associated with wheez- 
ing when asthma coexists. 

As emphysema progresses, 
\symptoms increase in severity. 
|The victim becomes breathless 
'while dressing or talking in the 
‘morning. Should heart involve- 
iment occur, it is necessary to’ 
‘sleep on several pillows to’ 
'breathe more comfortably.’ 

Because the thoracic muscles 
‘are used to excess, the circum-|i. 
ference of the chest enlarges. 
Typical lung changes are de 
tected via A-ray. 

Details are important in 


‘ Pa ae SS 
jo. tae 


——— 


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gravated by little things suc 

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1 


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1956 Model 21” Mahogany .9o5 | : z : . 
Reg. 199.95 139 "you for Acid Indigestion! 
RCA Wictor 21" T.M., 199.95 164.89 ; sscrine! : 100% relief 
Admiral, 21” T.M. , 142.79 in Amitone g'vSjigestion and the 
Admiral 17” Television 105.00 ctomach 
Emerson 21” 1956 . 216.00 149.00 


Also Zenith. Motorola. Syvivanie & GE 


ELECTRIC BLANKETS 


Westinghouse Blankets 19.95 | tone 100% Relief = 
Westinghouse Electric Sheets 16.95 @) Ami Acid indigestion 
G.E. Double Bed,’ } control | 23.99 SLEEPING CAPSULES 

G.E. Twin Bed, | control ks SS Larne SPELT Ee 
G.E. Double Bed, 2 controls ..... | 32.69 ESS EE a Hy nse a PARC RE OL.” Ue nap SO she SO pcg 


Cn ) ba 
ELECTROSTEAM & ARVIN Heaters PRESTIGE EDUCATIONAL | 
Electrosteam Auto. Thermostat 5.97 
Model 5514 1320 Watts . 95 «(9.72 TOYS A TOYS 
Model 5516 1320 Watts 10.85 ' . 

Model 5518 1350 Watts 5 12.57 
Model 5529 1650 Watts 18.85 
Model 5534 1320 (two heats) or 1650 Watts ... 22.02 
Electrosteam 8 Section .... ae 23.07 
Electrosteam 10 Section « re ee ; 26.97 


Aévertioomen® 


Discounts on nG. 3 Appliances . NIGHTLY 


= SKILLET Res. 19.95 
Electric, aute.; tempera*ure 
selector dial: cooking cuide PRE-GHRISTMAS 
emperature chart on handle $41.49 
three quart capacity. cast 


aluminum 


Automatic |@ AUTOMATIC | “> SALE FOR ONE WEEK 
@ Coffee Maker TOASTER 


Brew selector makes 
porte ie, ‘magi. | MEG, TMermowiacie contra NOVEMBER 28 - DECEMBER 2 
um or strong coffee for light. medium or 

very me —- S098 at cf 


My for ght. | | ral 
cares ts | acs ° 5:00 P.M. TILL 9:00 P.M. i Fort — 
. . 29 ' . aft a 
~ Bey 8 eg. a | y ames J. etcaije 
97 95 $11. 33 a $1135 : “= || Least Fortunate 
: | The children of the 


: . pi a | 
& io g R ee MS poor are those .. . Most 
fortunate today .. . They 

Be bien ny e\ Y 

3 beaters; built-in light, Rasy, sinter eeheenn tame S eclal: ‘rans (' i \\ know that they have noth- 
Oeters Bo cumeed gertip control, 3 speeds. Bie Ail ing and... They have 
for cleaning. Portable ) . to work their way... 
moter unit; white baked . 19.95 And so they struggle to 
A juicer and 2 bowls. AC, 5 89 | se ge ay Pinned pores 
2 an emselves ... An 
Reg. $26-95 11 ; they are always grateful 
43.95 . for ... The groceries on 
STEAM & & TRAVEL IRC IRON i a|| their shelves... The chil- 
4 dren of the rich are next 
S DRY IRON Uses detachable rub- : 26” Celumbia Deluxe... . (Regs $68. .. » If in their luxuries 


ber alb «ot water 


: .« » They do not laugh 
Button on handle chang- container: entre: Ae 24” Columbia (Reg. $54.45) NOW and Pre Sli s% Their 

es iron from. steam to becomes 4 ire - : 
haces dry instantly. Visualiser Lee Ber with "eartys I 20° Columbia (Reg. $49.95) NOW ones | opportunities .. . While 


fabric dial. last are those whose par- 


A 


: t +. 10 be t 
reli. 110% om spactaL 10% ow | Smet suet” int 
OFF OFF cannot afford... ir 

& AUTOMATIC AUTOMATIC SPECIAL 


aca car - — NOW = sane 
Waffle Bak grey | TREE LIGHTS, CANDLES, DECORATIONS §)| bic... who cannot under- 
8 Grit =|) (77 MOBLEMAID BR i|| stand’ -. « Why now and 
wate hee y S| | then their parents must 
| commistely automaue NEW STORE HOURS i]... Refuse what they de 
tes. $12.97 $179.95 | : Open nightly till 9:00 P.M. Copeciebt, 1°. Kiet mates: 
<n As eS beginning Monday, November 28, Saturday 4:00 P.M. | hay, ‘mys eel MADE IZ DIFFERENT PAINTINGS 

[ Lay Away Now for Christmas |) Use OUR LAY-AWAY PLAN—FREE DELIVERY | 6 Ee a Rina HOF Ts HOLY cay 


KEEGAN S || DOMINION HARDWARE |) cir fc co| [AMES Maal) S59 2 ate 
|} = (DIVISION OF CHERRYDALE CEMENT BLOCK CO, INC.) 7/9 ho . = “S | 


A584 MecArthur Blvd. WW. 72s Th“ Naen ve” | ne nate Cree 
Follow The “i To Savings! " many. Dewan Cres ; 
mat eaten Ny CANAL Arlington's Largest and Oldest Bidg. Supply House. Ext. 1921 | 


Hie t FEderal 3-3900 | 
ahs Fae § | 7 ~~ wight Til 9 PM. Call RE. 17-1234, ask for 


 Pimance Ceo, 
ee eee WA, 1.5470 3809 RIL Ave. | TRIBUTE TO HIS MEMORY _ 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Friday, November 25, 1955 


58 : 
. Yes, 
The DISTRICT LINE By Bill Gold armel |" rence weuncon oe 


? h tem was that properly in a fireplace built ) : 
The Latkies Leeks pee. tar aces ates a | . TWO... MAYBE FIVE THOUSAND. 


ting dressed in the morn- utility. j y . WE NEVER DREAMED HE D 
At Fireplaces ine You hal to heap mov. Finally, when the dra % , GET WHERE HE 15 / 


- 7 : 
v c T 0 replace is an smoked up and the fire has : ‘3 


good deal of sentimental non- even more inadequate heat- mnafen the bed of astes cad 
sense about wood-burning ing device—possibly the least charred fragments which 
fireplaces. efficient ever employed in- must either be cleaned up 


: or left as » bed for the next 
But a logical and unemo doors. fire. This is a Hobson's 


tional appraisal of open It heats only the area im- 
choice at best. 
fireplaces permits no con- nediately adjacent to it, Cleaning is work, but a bed 


the 

pea Bier oa aul leaving the remainder of the of ashes left for next time 
room at pneumonia tempera- quickly becomes a convenient 

gon : STEVE CANYON 


; - wastebasket for cigarette 
Even the old-fashioned coal tures. Worst of all, most mod butts, conde wressers 4nd 


furnace I grew up with was ern houses have only one practically everything else 
better. At least, it was hooked mide yl mag oy it’s usually > one is too tazy to dispose of 
og cated in the living room, no roperly. 
up to a central heating sys rena Bory vor metye ag sree Pp ooey, Se EC ae 
tem, and when it was operat- which controls the automatic other logical reasons why 
ing at peak capacity & Kept heating system. fireplaces should be left fire- 
the entire house at a feason- So, when you build a fire, jess, but before my space 
able temperature. you make a few cubic feet of runs out perhaps I ought to 
Of course, to save on coal your living room too warm, mention what Senstned when 
overnight we'd bank our fire and the rest of the house too | built a fire one chilly night 
so frugally that by morning _ eold. Haagen 
we bad neither heat nor fire, And let me remind you We turned out the lights 
and the house was as cold as that it is not easy for a and just sat there and 
ea Eskimos nose. householder to inconveni- watched it for a long time. 
The only thing good you ence himself in this man- And gosh but it was fun! 
could say for that type of ner. He must be willing to I think we'll do it again 
work at it, and pay for the real soon. 
-~ privilege. ow 


Seasoned logs cost at least TODAY'S BIRTHDAYS 
$20 a cord, often more. When Greetings to Joe DiMag- 
ay e you find any quoted at & io Hobart M. Corning and 


lower price, chances are | surence Stallings 


‘ you'll be getting either less ane 
than a cord, or green wood . “J - I MUST OF BEEN 
While which will not burn well. THE ACID TEST , =: hu 3° . Ae MISTAKING..1..1 WAS 
There is seldom any kin- A cosmetics firm which wer} P ec. ‘ | SURE I GAW A FACE 

e dling available for the mod- caters to men is bringing out y Zn WL : AT THE Wi 
/ ern urbanite who wants to a hair spray designed to keep 1S CHARMING...I'M ° iy /4, NOOW oo 

ou rive H build a fire, and even after male locks in place. We'll SO SORRY HE HAD TO 0 , 

he saws and chops a batch know how = it veto al gy LEAVE...WHAT A WONDER: r \ ¢ bee 3 
(leaving a littered basement we see. it demonstrated by FUL DAY IT’ : me es \ typ ttt MOE 
Keep alert-chew gum for his wife to clean) he has TV's Steve Allen. Ut S BEEN > pes : ee hlattaadial 


trouble getting it to draw ow 


» on THE MALE ANIMAL 
tters and 
Avoid traffic i Yy On the bus headed for 


driving drowsiness. : downtown the other morn- 
Chew gum while you're gum you like but chew ing, a handsome young wolf 
behind the*wheel. while you drive. Nat- tried a novel approach. 
Chewing helps relieve urally, we recommend ae ee te 
strain and tension— refreshing, delicious trp ys “Helle. I'm writ: 
helps keep you feeling Wrigley’s Spearmint ing a book on friendship, 
fresh and alert for Gum —for lively, satis- What's your name.” 


hatienen: , real It's a novel approach, all 
safer driving fying flavor and re right, but I can’t recommend 


Chewanybrandof chewing enjoyment. it. He got no response. 


Mat os 


LOSS SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSOSOOSE GIVEAWAYS : 
| Adorable, housebroken kit- 


dren's Hospital (Randolph | 
6-5955). 
IN ARLINGTON 


KNOTTY PINE 


ows 

KID STUFF 

Incidentally, if you'd like 
to know how chilly it was this 
week ask the Bethesda ma- 
tron who shivered through 
her housework in a heavy 
sweater for several hours be- 
fore she discovered that her 
4year-old had flipped the 
master switch on the fur- 
nace. 


© Presdtex Silid- 
ing Doors on 
both sides of 
Bottom 
Shelves. 

(Top 2 shelves 
are Open) 


> 
re > 
dk 


— -—— oa 
a 7 
we 


cos 


VAGRANT THOUGHT 
Is there a sadder sight than 
a man nicknamed “Slim” 
who no longer is? 
ow Ww North 


HOW'S THAT AGAIN? ' : 
Mrs. R. L. McDonald of —e lead: Four of dia- 
6200 2d ave., Silver Spring, |™O"°*- 
recalls that when her mother, |, This humdrum hand pro- 
Katherine Kernodle. was duced more variations than 
teaching Sunday School in |Might have been expected 
North Carolina, she began |When it was encountered in a 
each class with the query: recent tournament. 
“What was the lesson last All Souths opened with one 
week?” no trump and in most cases, 
On one occasion, one of (North, holding nine points in 
her young Tarheel pupils (high cards, raised to two, In 
volunteered: “I know, |one instance, North employed 
teacher. It was about the (the two club convention which 
fellow who traded his bird (asks the opening no trumper to 
rife for a mess of part- j|show a four card major suit if 
ridges.” he has one. North felt that the! 
hand might possibly play bet-| 4 
tee ter at hearts. However since 
. | ry the short suits contained the| 
FOGEL e principle part of North's 


strength, most of them pre 


ferred to carry on in no trump. = ng 


West d the f f dia-| . 

“CHICAGO” RINK SKATES Women's White Figure monds and the | jack held ithe * a. 
. rick. ena yas 0 
Reg. 88 ICE SKATES declarer’s king, West won with 

19.95 r ad 


11%" deep 
and 38” high. 


FRIDAY AND 
SATURDAY ONLY 


The Largest Selection of Unpainted Furniture In the Area 
IN ARLINGTON 


SAAH BOOKCASE SHOP 


2340 Columbia Pike, Arlington, Va. JA. 5-3977 
Mon. and Fri., 9-9 Twes., Wed., Thurs., Sat., 9-6 
Parking im Rear of Store 


> 
, 
> 
¢ 
, 
4 
, 
, 
4 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
, 
> 
> 
> | je 
> ia ee 
> - 4 © 42” long— 
, 
, 
, 
, 
4 
> 
, 
, 
, 
, 
, 
, 
, 
> 
¢ 


SPSS SSS SSS SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSOSSSOSSSS 


| 
: 


| 


Reg. $12.95 the ace and recognizing the fu-' 
oe tility of continuing the attack/ — 

White or Black! All Stres! te in diamonds, he realized that) wat \ If 

SKATE CASES ...2.88 4 unless East had a prepodner- " 


SKATE SKIRTS ...2.98 ance of spade strength there|- 
SKATE TIGHTS .. .1.29 CHILDREN'S ICE GBB Gane was little hope for the defense.| SUSIE.Q. SMITH 


SKATING HOSE 98 scene A shift to that suit netted five 
more tricks for down two. 
New Shipment! | One players, in an effort to 


P ’ pull the wool over West's eyes, 

LADIES’ OR MEN'S deliberately overtook dummy’s 
BOWLING SHOES jack with his own king and 
led the king of hearts. West 
meee . SPECIAL took the trick, drove out the 


47 ace of dimaonds and declarer 
- ran for cover with 10 tricks. 


West perhaps should have 
smelled a rat. South’s opening 


em Men's Sises bid of one no trump made it 
| xy ét 12 highly improbable that he had 


leon’ Sone to play the king of diamonds 


WINTER at trick one. He, therefore. 


JACKETS y Accept uitab " should be suspected of trying 
° We Eq oO to throw his ex sonnsiee J off 


® Central Charge Service Another declarer gave him- 


self the best chance. He went 

CHRISTMAS ; Fr up with the ace of diamonds 

- at the first trick, and when’ 

GIFT SPECIALS | ‘So » oe = seven, he fol- 

” ’ : a * tae owed with the six from his) 

. eee Tau Footballs oe LY own hand. When West wor the 

onal ags ‘ i x ace of hearts, it was. quite 

@ “Wilson” Set 5 Golf SF 4P natural for him to continue 

Ee eeaiy ‘ nts with a diamond, and declarer 
Uniflex Golf Carts : ran home with his contract. 


Basketball & Goal Sef.... 4. (Coprright, 1955, by Chicage Tribune) 


boy's Feottel Ourfits .. gas | Swiss Made 


Men's Fur-lined Gloves . ‘ 
Sedore tal oa WATCHES 


Award Coat Sweaters... . 


and 
Pigskin, 
apd Gerocce! .99 Men's Orion Sweaters... . 
or'Black! Rod-Reel Fishing Outfit... 
Plus Tax Metal Tackle Box 


SAREE WOCET Tow vaca etm of THE Ts TO 
GUNS @ All Brand New a, ase te tes, Oo One Ee ee 
@ SHOTGUN SHELLS—20% OFF! 


® HUNTING 
CLOTHES! 
® Woolrich Plaid Jacket 9.88 


Originally 7.50 
Pocket Leather 
SECRETARY 


BILLFOLD 


OPEN FRI.& SAT.9TO7 ice 1 / on | 
MONDAY 9 TO 9 : Fx ; “ 


pare if \" ” 
ri S .. oy * a 


tin 9 


a a 


‘ ; Pt 4 
, 7 - i v hg 
+ aS Ai h AB, ; 
‘Gebeow n “a J nt ‘. ‘ * . 
EP LB os heen aie , > & 2 he i % ee Oh ; . ‘ 
h . 
; : \ 
, - ' ; 
‘ 
_ 
} 


LE 


THE TREACHEROUS 

WOLVERINE FOR THE MOMENT, 

WARK AND JOKNNY HAVE MADE 

EMERGENCY SNOWSHOES AND 
ARE HWURRVING HOME 


~ RIP KIRBY 


"By Willard 


7 


The Washington 


| 


Merry-Go-Round | 1s wa 


‘ports, out from 

undet vegetable oils, which 
would permit the big soap and 
margarine manufacturers to 
buy in vegetable oils at an esti- 
mated windfall saving of $120 
million. 

In the case of the cheese 
deal, which was declared illegal 
by Comptroller General Camp- 
'bell, the big cheese companies 
‘benefited from reduction in 
iprice supports on cheese by 
selling high and buying low, 
with the cheese not even leav- 
ing their warehouses. The De- 
partment of Justice has had the 
cheese deal under scrutiny for 
some time but has done noth- 
ing about it. 

It’s interesting that the man 
inside the Agriculture Depart- 
ment who is spark-plugging the 
vegetable oil windfall is Walter 


iwhich would benefit most are 


ASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
Friday, November 25, 1955 59 


in frequent touch with one of 
the big three soap manufactur- 
ers, Procter and Gamble, which | 
would profit from the 

pricelowering. on vegetable 
oils. The other soap companies 


Lever Bros. and Colgate. 
Farmer Would Lose 


For years, the Government 
has had a “package plan” for 
oil seeds, whereby the Agricul- 


D’Ewart, but the sparks flew 
when a group of 37 conserva- 
tionists protested the way 
D’Ewart's office was handling 
the public lands. 

“I am dumfounded and 
amazed,” bellowed C. R. Guter- 
muth of the Wildlife Manage- 
ment Institute, “that one of the 
officials of the Interior Depart- 
ment has gotten off in a closet 


New ‘Cheese Deal’ Under Study 


with the Navy and without any- 
one knowing it, and given away 
land that was set aside by the 
state of North Carolina for 
recreational purposes.” 

“All I've got to say,” pro 
tested Gutermuth, “is that # 
that’s all the protection we 
have for our national parks, we 
need some laws!” 

(Copprieht. 1955. Bell Gradicatea, Ine) 


ture Department purchased oil 


sold the meal back to livestock 
producers at reasonable prices. 

The net effect has been to 
hold up the price of vegetable | 
oils while at the same time) 
keeping down the price of 


dian ‘yee the ofl Sor exxpert ond : Lo 2 d S of TOYS at 


Discount Prices 


cotton meal in order to help) 
the hard-pressed meat and'| 
dairy producers. 


Secretary Benson recently | 
canceled this, but was expected. 
ito replace it with a simplified | 
oll-buying program which) 
‘would cost less but have the! 
‘same general price-support'| 
| effect. Instead, his deputy, 
Berger, at the urgent sugges- 
ition of the big soap and marga- 
rine manufacturers, is trying to 
drop vegetable oil supports 
altogether. 

It’s estimated this would per- 
mit the big manufacturers to 
buy around 4 billion pounds of 
vegetable oils at 3 cents a 
pound less, which would mean 
a windfall of $120 million 


For Lumber Call Our 


Number—LI. 7-9400 


Hechinger s 
BICYCLE 


_— ~. 


_ STEVE ROPER 


ssaais 


TIMES WHEN IT 15 
MUCH LIKE BEING 


$O-+4i CHONG 
YOU UTTLE RASCAL’ YOU VE 


HAD US ALL WORRIED TO DEATHS 
WE THOUGHT YOU WERE SICK / A 


— 
D> « 
a -A 


4. 
LAS 


Oy 


Y 
! WATURALLY CLANCY! HE KNOWS 
\ TOLD YOU, EH? / TM YOUR CLOSEST FRIEND—AND 
THAT I'D WANT 10 DO EVERYTHING 
IN MY POWER TO KEEP YOU FROM 
MAKING SUCH A MISTAKE! 


At — — tf ' 
J ee 


he > at 


WELL-AA~1 WAS GOING 10 THE 
LODGE TONIGHT, DEAR! OA, 1 
SEE! WELL-AH—OKAY, DEAR 
TLL ORDER THE TICKETS AND 


4 IM SORRY,BRAD... 
FATHER 


2 


~ 
eh 


<> 


c 1998, Keng, feoem Senin im, World rather temrond 


~ TERRY AND THE PIRATES 


-—_ wer 


Berger, Deputy Administrator; Actually, our vegetable oil 
of Commodity . Stabilization|surplus can be sold abroad 
Service and the man whom this|more easily than some other 
column recently reported | surpluses which are hard to dis- 
might have a conflict of inter-|pose of, and Secretary Benson 
est. Berger has retained his|has been doing a good job of 
stock in the Shea Chemicalithis. But if the fats are dis- 
Corporation of Baltimore,|posed of as proposed by Ber- 
which has been doing fertilizer|ger, the farmer would take a 
business with the Agriculture|price drop of around $300 mil- 
Department. He was formerly|lion, counting the indirect 
executive vice president of this effect on meat and butter pro- 
firm. ducers. Soap and margarine 
Berger has denied that he companies, in turn, would make 
was in any way involved in the around $120 million. 

purchase of fertilizer as an P Civ at 
Agriculture Department of. * Totest Giveaways 


Berger, who has spent mostito an interesting meeting in 
of his life in the farm products|the office of Assistant Secre- 
processing business, has been|tary of the Interior Wesley 


igen ine 
77) and Server 


Just for calling 


for a no-obligation 

\) Fabric Showing 
and the facts 
cbhout Quality 
Reupholstery 


or Slipcovers 


ADams 2-9000 


CALL 9 A.M. TO 9 P.M. 


* 


BU. APPRECIATION 
SOFA AND CHAIR 
Reupholstered 


WITH CUSTOM’S COMPLETE 9-STEP 
REUPHOLSTERY—NO EXTRAS—AS LOW AS 


4 Thanks to you, our volume this 
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way down low. Custom says 
thanks with a sensational low 
price for superb reupholstery, 
with 10-Year Guaranteed Cra- 
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rebuilt to thrilling new beauty. 
While the cost of new furniture 
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now for your Free Carafe and 
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Made-to-Order SLIPCOVERS 


Sofa and Chair ( 


ra All guaranteed washable fabrics 
that defy wear .. . truly Beauty as low as 
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ustom. Call now for your free 
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a, $59 
ADams 2-9000 


501 RHODE ISLAND AVE, N.E. 


ficial. | The public was not admitted} 


i 


Safety Chain Guard 


Reinforced Pedals 


Complete Tool Kit 
Ruby Tail Reflector 


es ™, a 7 - ~~ ow . . vy c> . 
OO aa a WE: E er 


IMPORTANT FEATURES 


Coaster Brake 

For Safety end Ease 
Fully Pneumatic Tires 
With Buty! Tubes 

Nylon Bearings 

Head Assembly and Crank 
Tangent Spokes 

Fer Extra Strencth 


DACRON FILLED 


Racing Coaster Brake 


Black with Chrome Trin 


GAIN 


\ 


ait, STANDARD 


Both Boys’ and Girls’ Models 


Junior Boy’s Or Girls 


0” Balloon 
ired Bicycle 


Complete With Training Wheels 


$ 5® 


PAY DOWN 
ONLY +] wetex 


6"’x80 
SIZE 


Every Boy Wants This 


Sleeping Bag 


Mildew& Moth Proof 


Dustless—Odorless 
Non-Allergic 


Full, Heavy Duty Zipper 


Regular $19.95 Value! 


10+ 


Open Tonite ‘til 9 


SATURDAY—8:30 ‘til 6:00 


|Hechingers 


Free Delivery ° Phone Lincoln 7-9400 


ete : ha, 


ES: te 


vA. 
"SS “ata 


. 


¢ 


Baie — ach em 80s eS 
; - 


TODAY’! ait 3 HECHT CO STORES OPEN EARLY-OPEN LATE’ 
Silver Spring & PARKington 10: To 9:30; 
“By 


Washington Store Hours 9:30; To oa M 


(2-DAY SALE! TODA Y. SATURDAY 


ssid & BROADLOOM 


Ce 
14.95 Wool Embossed, 
Sculptured or Twist Carpet 


~« [Q-% 


Choose beautifully patterned or rich 3-ply 
wool twist broadloom in 9, 12 and 15 ft. 
widths, many decorator colors. 


Sample Room Size Rug Prices 
(including finished ends) 


If Perfect 10.9 
tweed-twist 
Broadloom 
99 


sq. yd. 


Rize Regelerity§ You'Par You Save 
9x12 Fe. 183.90 135.90 ...... 48.00 
12n12 Pe. 245.20 181.20 ...... 64.00 
12x15 P. 3205.00 225.00 ...... 80.00 
15n1S Pe. 381.25 281.25 ......100.00 


Durable Carpet 


Vat-dyed so it’s color-fast, DuPont Ludex treated 
so it’s soil-resistant! Heavy jute backing, rubber 
locked tufts for longer wear. 9 and 12 ft. widths 

. heather green, turquoise, grey, beige and gold 
in the group. 


Sample Room Size Rug Prices 
(including finished ends) 


16.95 Luxury All Weel 
Cut Pile Breadleom 


we [D-95 


. a Paste > cade ee 
* m, \ y eS ei tits ne pet Ww plus latex backing te 
, re Sak: Re. St tags Libabiates RS abe teak OR ae be ees ee | insure tightly tufted finish. 12 ft. width 
ott af ee f pens exe Pye } en 25 only in 5 decorator colors. 


mi Fey iS abe. St 5s If Perfect 6.95 Broadloom (ie : 


S Fi sa™s 

fj ot pp?) #05 Fe » 
Lush rayon and nylon cut pile 
broadioom with heavy latex 
backing to cushion sound, lock 
each tuft firmly in place. 12 ft. 
width. Spruce green or honey 
beige. 


Semple Rug Prices (include finished ends) 


Regelerty§ Yeo’ Par 
277.20 213.20 


345.00 


Size 
12x12 Pe. 
12x15 Pe. 


Odd Rolls of Broadloom— 
Drastically Reduced 


65 Sq. Yds. 9.95 All-Wool Corduroy-Effect Broad- 
loom, 9 ft. wide. Sq. yd. ' 5.99 


63 Sq. Yds. 8.95 All-Wool Green Tone-on-Tone 


Round-Wire Wilton Broadioom, 9 ft. wide. Sa. yd. 
5.99 


95 Sq. Yds. 8.95 All-Woeol Red Tone-on-Tone 


Reund-Wire Wilton Broadicom, 9 ft. wide. Sq. yd. 
5.99 


ae ~bog Yds. 14.95 Green Heavy-Duty Round-Wire 
, 9 ft. wide. Sq. yd. 8.88 


200 Sq. Yds. 14.95 Beige Heavy-Duty Round- 
Wire Wilten Broadicom, 9 ft. wide. Sq. Yd.. 8.88 


75 Sq. Yds. ines. Ame tearetietaceinds “(~ 
9 and 15 ft. wide. Sq. yd. .. 9.95 


100 Sq. Yds. 18.50 Grey Sculptured All-Wool 
Wilton, 9 ft. wide. Sq. yd. , 12.95 


170 Sq. Yds. 16.95 Sandalwood and Rose Sculp- 


tured All-Wool Wilton, 9 and 15 ft. wide. Sq. yd. 
12.95 


42 Sq. Yds 16.95 Gold iitioeai Weel Wilton, 
9 ft. wide. Sq. yd. 11.95 


300 Sq. Yds. 11.95 Cinnamon and Limestone All- 
Weel Sculptured Broadicom, |5 ft. wide. Sq. yd. 
8.95 


150 Sq. Yds. 16.95 Gianemew-Tentwrad Wilton, 
12 ft. wide. Sq. yd...-... yy 11.95 
BO Sq. Yds. 13.95 Cinnamon-Textured Wilton, 
15 ft. wide. Sq. yd. 9.95 


80 Sq. Yds. 13.95 Cocoa All-Wool Swirl-Pattern 
Sculptured Wilton, 9 ft. wide. Sq. yd...... .9.95 


38 Sq. Yds, 13.95 Paimette Green All-Wool Swirl- 
Pattern Sculptured Wilton, 9 ft. wide. Sq. yd. 9.95 


Exceptional Values in Rugs & Broadloom! 


9.50 All Weel Broadloom 


Tone on tone, two toge and 9 
floral patterns. Soill-resist- r ho 
ant, 8 colors. sa. yd. 


8.935 Weel Breadlcem 
Fiorals, tone on tones, two 
tones. 9 ft. width only, 8 o” 


7.95 Broadleoom 
50% wool, 50% carpet pom 
in 9 and 12 ft. widths. Prost. /@. 99 
crystal on beige, grey or blue 
leaf, colomial black, cocom Om aq. yd. 
beige. 


10.95 Rayon Wilton 


“Tuften” heavy rayon carpet 
with latex backing. Goll re- G-»9 
sistant, 9 % .width. Beige. 


grey, nutria, or green. sq. yd. 


.49.95 Apprex. 9xI2 Ft. 
Rug 


Tone on tone leaf —- 29-%5 
rove 


in burgundy, 
meadow green. Noles = 
cotton. 


If Perf. 79.95 Rug 


Modern effecte Im hand- 
& 
some Ox1l2 rugs. 49° 


89.95 Cotton Hooked Rugs 
Blends of rayon, wool end 59-95 


white cattle hair in 8x10 
or 0x12 % hand hooked 
oval of oblong rugs. 


89.95 Cotton Braid Rug 


Reversible 9x12 M%. famous 4 
cotton braids in tradition- 69” 
al patterns. § colors. 


49.95 Embossed Rug 
Swir l- pattern embossed 29-95 


cotton 9x12 ft. rug with 
skid-resistant back in 10 
decorator colors. 


69.95 Nlooked Rugs 
Hand hooked cotton oval 


or oblong 8x10 or 9x12 ft. 44-*5 
rugs in rose, beige, bleck, 
green. 


, 


39.95 Oxi2 Ft. Rugs 


Choose nubby twist 5 
plush cut cotton pile, both n 29 
with latex back. 10 deco- 

rator colors. 


119.95 Oriental Pattern 
Rugs 


All wool Wilton 83x 104 69-95 


ft. rugs in blue, red and 
ivory. 


49.95 Oriental Pattern 


s 
Save Rg A clear 
through to th 

in lustrous 


and cotton. 
and mm... 8.3x11.3-ft. size. 


Buy on The Hecht Co.'s 
Convenient Ever-Ready 
Home Furnishings 
Credit Plan! 


If Perfect 9.95 Breadleom 


a” 


pane pile ra 
het ain bene any doe 
12 and 15 ft. widths in nutmeg, beige, 
French caramel, green, grey, and océan 
all colors in all widths. 


If Perfect 3.95-9.95 
Rayon & Nylon Carpet 


Bea patterned or durable twist 
latex-backed 


rayon nylon broadloom, 

to lock each tuft in place, 12 and 15 ft. 
widths in spruce green, honey beige, 
antique gold, dawn grey, beigetone, water 
green. Not all colors in both widths. 


aq. yd. 


7.95 Weel Rayon Twist 


Durable wool and rayon carpeting at an 
exceptionally low price! 8 and 13 ft. 
widths. Grey, beige, green and nutria 
but not in both widths. 


If Perfect 7.95 
Rayon & Nylon Carpet 


Choose twist or cut pile textures, each 
with heavy latex backing in 9, 12 and 15 
ft. widths. Honey beige, nutria, rosewood, 
water green, eggshell, spruce green, and 
turquoise in group. 


oq. yé 


6th Floor, Washington; 3rd Floor, Silver Spring; 4th Floor, PARKington 


aw 


oe 


THE HECHT CO. 


Sak, All 3 Stores OPEN RLY * OPEN LATE Mon. Thur. and Fri... Until Christmas. 


3 Coniplete Gift Stores 


th 


Washington—Silver Spring—PARKington