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The Weather 


Today—Strong winds, turning much 
colder. Rain likely in morning, possible 


snow flurries during day. 


lowest near 20 at night. Tuesday—Fair, 
cold, Sunday's high, 52 at 3:15 p. m.; 
low, 28 at 6:50 a. m. (Details, Page 24.) 


Much colder, 


The 1 


ashington 


Wimes Herald 


\ 


ost FINAL 


“ 78th Year — No. 358 


. 


Phone RE. 7-1234 


Copyright. 1945 


WTOP Radio (1500) TV (Ch. 9) 


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1955 FIVE CENTS 


- BROWNS TIE 


The Washington Post Company 


REDSKINS WIN 


Re American Stake in Asia——— Red H-Bomh 


| . 
Education 


Washington 


Clinches 2d 
As Steelers 
Bow, 23-14 


Cleveland Ties 
Giants, Remains 
Half Game Ahead ; 


Elter Scores Twice 


By Jack Walsh 
Staff Reporter 

PITTSBURGH, Nov. 27— 
For the first time in the 
history of the Washington 
Redskins, they failed to com-| 
plete a forward pass today. | 

So what happened? They beat 
the Pittsburgh Steelers, 23-14, | 
before 21,760 Forbes Field fans’ 
and clinched second place in| 
the National Football League's 
Eastern Division. 


In winning their fourth in a Nearly $12,000 Due Her 


row for the first time since) 
1948, the Skins ran their sea- 
son's. record to 7-3. Literally, 
they ground out a victory on 
two touchdown runs by full- 
back Leo Elter, 33 and 20 yards 


and a 49-yard punt return by 
Joe Scudero. 
Vie Janowicz booted a 13- 


yard field goal for good meas-| will report to work at the Curtis was finally ousted as unsuitable|analysis of reports on the So- 
_today|on grounds that she-made false|viet explosion suggests 
after a 3\s-year suspension on|statements in the loyalty hear-|Russia has developed a super- 


ure. 
Finks Throws Twe Strikes 


Keeping the Redskins from 
achieving their third shutout 
in a row were stirring 
Strikes by Quarterback Jimmy 
Finks. He hit Ray Mathews for 
a 6l-yard touchdown and fol- 
lowed with a 62-yard strike to 
Sid Watson, 

Washington stayed in con- 
tention for the Eastern Divi- 
sion title with Cleveland nearly 
cooperating to give the Skins 
a tie. However, the Browns 
managed to gain a 35-35 tie with 
the New York Giants and still: 
must lose one of its remaining! 
two games for Washington to 
get in the picture. The Browns 
lead the Redskins by one-half 
game. 

The Skins attempted only) 
eight passes. Starting Quarter- 
back Ralph Guglielmi went 0 
for 2 and Eddie LeBaron 0 for 6. 
But Ralph and Eddie smartly 
directed a ground game that! 
made 329 yards to Pittsburgh's | 


And the final score was 
enough balm for the embarras- 
sing passing statistics: Pitts- 
burgh, 243 yards; Washington, 
minus 29. 


Weed Misses Field Goal 


Washington's shutout streak 
was in jeopardy early when Tad 
Weed, place-kicking specialist, 
missed a 30-yard field goal at 
the outset. 

Guglielmi then came in and| 
directed the Skins on an 80-/ 
yard touchdown march, An odd 
situation came up in that initial | 
scoring march. Pittsburgh de-| 
clined a 15-yard penalty be-| 
cause it left the Skins with a 
third down and nine-yard situ- 
ation. 

Guglielmi made the judg-) 
ment of the Steelers look bad) 
when he took off on a 17-yard 
run for a first down at the! 
Steelers 47. 

Then, from the Pittsburgh 20 
Elter neatly followed his block- 
ers on his first scoring sprint. 


Elter i Pittsburgh boy and) ; 
yp. . ey —this time with charges. 


he was with the Steelers for 
two years but they never gave 


(This is the first of a series 


Fall of Afghanistan 
To Red Rule Feared 


By Ferdinand SEE ae ee 


of weekly reports on the prob- 


lems and prospects of non-Communist Asia.) 


KABUL, Afghanistan, Nov. 27 
The new rulers of Russia have 
something to smile about these 
days as they look southward 
toward the Persian Gulf and 
the Indian Ocean. They can 
see this land-locked country on 
their southern border stum- 
bling into economic, political 
and military dependence on 
the Soviet Union. 

The Afghans are good Mos- 
lems with no love for Russia or 
communism, but their leaders 
may yet deliver them into So- 
viet hands. The result would 
be the end of another country’s 
independence, and a dangerous 
expansion of Soviet power. 

At first sight no part of Asia 
could matter less to the West 
than this Texas-sized country of 
bare mountains, deserts and 


river valleys. Its 12 million 
people, three fourths of them 
farmers and one fifth wander- 
ing herdsmen, are no threat to 
anyone. Of its natural re- 
sources, only karakul lamb- 
sking and fruit have been ex- 
ploited up to now; its foreign 
,trade with the free world is an 
junimportant $64 million worth 
a year. 

But geography has 
Afghanistan important for 
more than 2000 years. Con- 
querors starting with Alexan- 
der the Great have swept 
through its barren plains and 
mountain passes into India. To- 
day the Russians have a sud- 
den opportunity to get to the 
edge of the Indian subconti- 
nent, without sending an army 


made 


See KUHN, Page 2, Col. 3 


Army Calls Mrs. Burrell 
Back After 34% Years 


Mrs. Evelyn P. Burrell, 40, 


Bay Ordnance Depot 
loyalty-security charges. 


But the Baltimore woman's 


battle with the Army does not! statement” order from the csc," 


appear to be over. | 

Mrs. Burrell received a spe-| 
cial delivery letter from the De- | 
partment of the Army yester-| 
day telling her 4o report to her 
$3685-a-year job as a payroll 
clerk for the first time since 
1952, when she was suspended. | 

On Nov. 10 the United States 
Court of Appeals remanded her 
case to the United States Dis-| 
trict Court with directions in- 
térpreted to mean that the 
Army was required to rein- 
State her. ) 

The letter yesterday read in 
part... “Since you are an em- 
ploye of the Army establish-| 
ment, the Department of the) 
Army has a continuing respon-| 
sibility under executive order 
10450, new security regulations, 
to determine whether your re- 
tention in employment is 
clearly consistent with the in- 
terest of national security. The 
department will proceed with a 


——— 


| | were reported from Japan three 
jand almost without lifting 4/days ago. Rain in the Fukuoka 
larea of ‘Southern Japan early 


; 
overturned and Mrs. Burrell) 


ings. 
Mrs. Burrell won a “rein- 


this year only to find that the| 
Army was reinstating her to 
the suspended status she had 
in 1952, 


Now, with her job back, but 
its permanency still in ques-) 
tion, Mrs. Burrell can collect 
almost .$12,000 in back pay. 
Should the Army again bring 
charges against her, which can' 
be done under the executive 
order 10450, she can resign first 
with a “clean slate,” her attor- 
neys said. 


Medical Schools 
Get $7,150,000 
Emergency Gift 


NEW YORK, Nov. 27 #—The 
Commonwealth Fund. an- 
nounced today that the Nation's | 
medical schools need money so 
urgently it has drawn $7,150,000 


. 


| 


cal Institute in Heidelberg re- 


Dro 


; 


ps Dust 
Over World 


Rain Too ‘Hot’ 
In South Japan; 
India Circles Call 
Test Injudicious 


Reuters 

Radioactive dust and air 
currents from Russia’s big- 
gest hydrogen bomb blast 
were reported around the 
world yesterday. 

A Soviet Foreign Ministry 
statement in Moscow said the 
recent blast was carried out “at 
great height” to avoid radio- 
active fallout. 

But falls of radioactive rain 


yesterday registered 28,000 
counts per liter per minute in 


geiger counter tests. The Japa- 
nese Welfare Ministry has said 
there can be danger to humaas 
in an atmosphere with radio- 
activity beyond 100 counts a 
minute. 

In West Germany, the Physi- 


ported they had detected ra- 
dioactivity. 

Western observers said an 
that 


bomb similar to that detonated 
by the United States at Bikini 
the Pacific on March 1, 1054. 
(The Bikini blast .s variously 
estimated to have produced an 
explosion force of betwéen 12 
and 20 megatons (one megaton 
equals 1 million tons of TNT). 

In India, official circles felt 
that Russia’s action in explod. 
ing the bomb and announcing | 
it in the middle of a good-will 
visit to India—which has con- 
sistently condemned the manu- 
fecture and testing of nuclear 
weapons—was an injudicious 
and untimely move. 

Western diplomats in London 
were also puzzled by the tim- 
ing of the Soviet announce- 
ment. 

They believed that the Rus- 
sians consider the test to be 


fresh warning to the West\of the 1956 political campaign. | 


a 
that its lead in atomic “know- 
how” was diminishing, and that 
it was therefore time for the 
Vest to agree to Russian’s de- 
mand for the outlawing of nu- 
clear weapons, 

The Western Powers again 


—— 


Nixon Praises 


George’s Plea Spencer Indicates D. C. 
On U.S. Policy Could Condemn CTC 


| Majority fer 1 
son of Texas “are more repre-|million last summer to a pri 
sentative of the opinion of th 
great majority of rank and file) 


Delegates to the White House Conference 
on Education register in the lobby of the 
Sheraton-Park Hotel. At right, from front, 


are Frank Miles, Des Moines, 


Munck, Oakland, Calif.; Wallace W. Cox, 


Hilda Tomar, 
lowa; Carl B. 


Vallejo, Calif., 
cago. At left, from front, are Ida Mason, 


and Welfare. 


and Edward M. Tuttle, Chi- 


Doris Fessler and Sally Lou 


Hayden, all of the Department of Health, 
Education 


a 


Associated Press 
Vice President Richard Nix- 


jon last night hailed as “states- 
manlike” 
will “do a lot of good” the call 
by Democratic 
George of Georgia for the Na-|Co. by CTC boss Louis 
(ion to keep foreign policy out | $02. 


and something that 


Sen. 


Nixon said George's stand 


e 


| price : | | 
Waltel\the expiring Capital Transit)mendsthe District paying any |quate representation given to 
E. Wolf-|suclf price as Mr. Wolfson of-|labor.” 


determination of your case UD-\from its capital funds for im-|Tefused to do this at the For- 


Democrats.” 


After Price Hike Repert 


By Wes Barthelmes 


Staff Reporter 


District officials 
coolly yesterday to a higher 
tag reportedly put on 


Unconfirmed reports placed 
‘the new price at more than $20 
'million, Book value now stands 


and a similar one by Senate) + about $19.7 million, Wolfson 
Leader Lyndon John-| offered to sell CTC for $144) 


vate operator. 


reacted) 4 
| market valde be set. 


| 


District Commissioner Sam- 


nation’ proceedings let a fair 


“T certainly would not recom- 


|fers,” commented Robert M. 
Weston, member of the Dis 
‘trict Public Utilities Commis- 
sion. 

Weston is drafting stand-by 
legislation to set up a metro 
‘politan operating authority in 
case the PUC is unable to sign 
‘up a private operator as suc- 
cessor to CTC. The latter's 
life expires next Aug. 14. 
Informed District officials 


- 
’ 


Conference 
Under Way 
Here Today 


Union Delegates 
Decide Against 
‘Prejudging’ of 
School Talks 


By Richard J. Maloy 
Sta Reporter 


The White House Confer- 
ence on Education gets un- 
der way today with a wary 
pledge of cooperation from 
organized labor. 


In a surprising flip-flop yes- 
terday, labor delegates decided 
not to “pre-judge” the Con- 
ference and withheld action on 
a resolution which would have 
roundly condemned the meet- 
ing before it started. 

The development occurred 
during a Statler Hotel caucus 
of 100 unionists who are among 
the 2000 delegates to the politi- 
cally explosive fourday Con- 
ference. 

Last week Andrew J. Bie- 
miller, AFL legislative repre- 
sentative, said unionists feared 
“ridiculous” Conference proce- 
dure would prevent honest ex- 
pression of opinion during the 
meeting and called it an Ad- 
ministration “stalling tactic” to 
prevent action on school needs. 


But yesterday Labor dele- 
gates to the Conference decided 
to refrain from further criti- 
cism until they see how things 
actually go during working ses- 
sions Tuesday and Wednesday. 


They scheduled another cau- 
cus for 5:30 p. m. Wednesday 
when delegates will report on 
how the sessions are conducted. 
If Labor feels events prove 
their gag-rule charges it will 
then issue a critical blast and 
press for a change in Confer- 
ence rules. 

The caucus issued a mildly- 
worded statement expressing 
“concern regarding the inade- 


| The statement noted 
‘that “less than 5 per cent of 
ithe delegates are from the 
trade union movement, whereas 
ithe members of organized labor 
and their families constitute at 
least 35 per cent of the popu- 
lation.” 


| Meantime each union dele- 
‘gate yesterday was instructed 
'in carefully devised strategy de- 


vel Speneér indicated that if ‘signed to get the Conference 


der that order and you will be 
further advised.” 

Mrs. Burrell’s attorneys, 
Frank Reeves of Washington 
and Milton B. Allen of Balti- 
more, fear, however, that the 
Army may bring up the same 
charges against her once she) 
is reinstated. | 

Since February 29, 1952, the) 
Army, and then the Civil Serv- 
ice Commission, have attempt- 
ed a combination of a security, 
loyalty and unsuitability actions 
to keep her out of her job. 

The Army “fired” her on a 
“question of your loyalty.” On 
April 14, 1952, she was restored 
to duty because she was im-| 
properly separated and the! 
next day she was suspended on) 
security grounds. On May 16,) 
1952, she was restored to duty 
because no security charges 
had been issued, then six days 
later she was suspended again 


| 


: 


; 


While she was under Army 


See REDSKINS, Page 13, Col. 5 


Iran to Reply 
To Red Warning 


TEHRAN, Nov. 27 (‘#—Iran 
will reply Tuesday to the Soviet 
note yesterday attacking Iran- 
ian participation in the Bagh- 
dad Pact, Deputy Premier 
Abdul Hussein Hamzavi said to- 


day. 

He said the reply will reas- 
eure Russia that Iran has no 
aggressive intentions and seeks 
only to defend her frontiers. 


Ad Does The Trick 
In Just One Day 


“That classified ad really did the 
trick,” exclaimed Mrs. D. W. 
who sold her drop-leaf table 
- on the very first day it was ad- 
vertised in the classified col- 
wmns of Washington's tavorite 
home newspaper, 


A. classified ad in The Wash- 
ington Post and Times.terald 
wan do the trick for you, foo. 
if there's anything you would 
like to sell, rent or trade, take 
a tip from Mrs. 0. W. Phone 
in your. classified ad to our Miss 
Bell. Just call REpublic 7-1234. 


% 


suspension, the Civil Service) 
Commission began loyalty. 
action against her on similar 
charges and the 3%-year fight 
was on. 

The security charge was 


imed 


mediate grants to 10 leading | 
colleges and universities, 


The grants bring to a total of| 
nearly $10 million the amount’ 
given by the Fund to medical 
education during the current 
fiscal year. 

Malcolm P. Aldrich, fund 
president, said the new grants, 
unprecedented in that no 
strings are attached, range 
from $300,009 for the Univer- 
sity of Southern California's 


ical school to $1 million’ 
; 


| 


' 


each for the medical schools at 
Western Reserve and Harvard. 

The other grants are: Uni- 
versity of Chicago, $500,000; 
Emory, $600,000, and Columbia 
University’s College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons, conet 
New York University, Tula 
and Yale, $750,000 each. 

Nathan ‘M. Pusey, president 
of Harvard University, hailed 
the unrestricted-use privilege 
as Opening “a new trend in 
foundation giving in the field 
of. medical education.” 

Aldrich said he hoped the 
Fund's action would stimulate 
similar “unrestricted giving” 


from other sources. 


eign Ministers’ Conference in 
Geneva because of the impos- 
sibility—which has also been 
recognized by Russia—of con- 
trolling nuclear disarmament 
at present. While the Commu- 
nists maintain their huge con- 
ventional armies, the West 
argues, it would be suicidal for 
the Western Powers to give up 
the biggest deterrent to a 
world war which they possess. 
All Moscow newspapers yes- 
terday published without com- 
ment Saturday's communique 
from the official Tass news 
agency on the recent tests, al- 
though Khrushchev’s speech in 
Bangalore has not yet been re- 
ported in the Soviet press. 


Algeria Clashes 
Kill 30 Rebels 


Reuters 
ALGIERS, Nov. 27—French 
officials tonight announced that 
30 rebels had been killed in 
clashes in the Constantine De- 


' 
; ‘public ownership becomes un- ; , 

He said that once Congress| avoidable, the District could|said legislation establishing| °° #° on Tecord in favor of Fed- 

gets back to work in January, condemn CTC and let a con-isuch an authority would COM-ltion the most controversial 

and George and Johnson ex-|semnstion jury decide a fairjtain condemnation powers t0| question which will come be- 

' on the Sen-| Price to pay Wolfson. which Spencer referred. fore the session 
press their views on , ' “You know.” said Spencer, | “I see nop reason why we “Te j h that the C 
ate floor, other Democrats “will | ’ : ’ $s our hope that the Con- 


' Wise municipal governing body (Should make overtures to Mr. | 
have to sit up and take fotice,|, 4. right a deer wn ome Wolfson at this stage,” ference will come out clearly 


PUC|; 7 
ublicans do when | ; . \in favor of Federal aid for 
Oe Ceara see leaders |Property and through condem- a ae o cabinet school construction,” said H. H. 
speak.” | | last effort to find a private in- es PE mma 
Nixon thus joined President | vestor. representative. persons 
Eisenhower in what amounted) Rep. Dewitt S 


—_— ———— 


partment of Algeria during the 
past 24 hours. 


West Virginia Safar 


| 


Romping ‘Little Girl’ Elephants Get 


CHARLESTON, W. Va., Nov. 
27 W—Those six “young girl” 
elephants on the loose at the 
Chesapeake and Ohio Railway 
station here today were the 
real McCoy—not the pink kind 
you see after a bad night. 

In fact, three of the young 
ladies had themselves quite a 
time for almost an hour. Two, 
named and Jean, even 
went into station waiting 
room, where: 

A woman and her small son 


booth. 

A porter fled upstairs. 

Two ticket sellers scrambled 
on Fe | of their counter. 


took refuge in a telephone} 


trapped between two elephants, 
one of which was wearing 
Smith’s new $15 hat on her left 
hind foot. 

The trouble began after the 
six 5-year-old elephants of the 
Polack Brothers Circus had 
been transferred from a rail- 
road car to a trailer-truck for 
transportation to Municipal 
Auditorium and a stint with 
the annual Shrine Circus. 


Their Trunks Checked at Rail Station 


her to freedom. Three were 
caught quickly and secured to 


three had a ball. 
Smith was caught beneath a 
counter between the baggage 


the 


assistant trainmaster| p 
E. T. Smith, probably became 
first man in history to be' and the other 


a utility pole, but the other) 


room and waiting room, with 


_ Hyde, Repub-| £7m all over the country favor 
to a plea to keep foreign policy EDUCATE, Page 3, Col. 4. 
out of politics. Murray Snyder, See 


Assistant Witte House Secre- 
tary, told reporters Saturday 
that the Chief Executive had 
read and approved the state- 
ment made by George to the 
New fork Herald Tribune. 

George, chairman of the Sen- 
ate-Foreign Relations Commit- 
tee, said: 

“We must assure the world 
that we are capable of having 
a non-partisan American 
foreign policy and that regard- 
less of who wins or loses in 1956 
our foreign program will go on 
substantially ‘as is.” 

Nixon’s reference to Johnson 
apparently referred to a speech 
on ‘Nov. 19 in which Johnson 
said: 

“The American people have 
passed the stage where foreign 
policy is a politicking issue. 
There are still individuals 
who seek partisan advantage 
from that kind of politics. 
They have harassed every 
President for 20 years.” 

Nixon made his comments to 
a reporter as he and his fam- 
ily returned by plane from a 
Thanksgiving holiday in Flor- 
ida. 

(Related story on Page 2.) 


‘Vision Near,” Voice 


Told Pope. Page 10 


P 
Kilgalien ... "% 
Movie Guide .37 


‘Jules B. Jeanmard excommuni- 


7 also threatened 
iexcommunication if there are 
; fany_ more signs of violence.” 


36 lused in the decree, the official 
1 jorder called for “excommuni-| 
ication of the 
24\violent hands 
iteacher and removed the as 


FBI Opens Probe 
In Negro Shooting 


MOUiiD BAYOU, Miss., Nov. 
27 ‘#—The FBI today opened a 


preliminary investigation 
‘of the shooting of Gus Courts, 
a Negro leader in the fight 
against segre~ation. 

Two FBI agents questioned 
Courts, 65, of Belzoni, who was 
admitted to a hospital here Fri- 
day night with buckshot 
wounds, 

In Jackson, Gov. Hugh White 
urged a quick and extensive 
probe of the attack on Courts, 
a former president of the Bel- 
zoni chapter of the National As- 
sociation for the Advancement 
of Colored People. 


| 


lican from suburban Maryland, 
said he did not think the Dis- 
trict should be “obliged to buy 
ICTC at a price it did not think 
fair.” 

| Wolfson could not be reached 
for comment. 

But reports from his Florida 
stomping grounds quoted Wolf- 
son as saying that he believed: 
| © Municipal ownership of 
the transit system here is in- 
evitable. 
| ® The District Government 
would have to pay the “ap- 
praised value,” a steeper price 
‘than the book value of CTC 
‘properties. 

Spencer observed last night 
that he was not aware of the 
existence of such an appraised 
value. 


' 


6 Die, 3 Injured 
In Auto Crash 


| LYNCHBURG, Tenn. Nov. 
\27 @—Two automobiles met 
head-on near here today, kill- 
ing six persons and critically 
injuring three others. 

| State highway patrolmen 
identified the dead as Mr. and 
Mrs. John A. Moore, Frank 
Moore, Jess Branch, Mrs. Mur- 
rell Baker, Mrs. Ozella Baker, 
all adults. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clifton Baker, 
and their son, James, were crit- 
ically injured. All are residents 
of this area. 


Bishop’s Order Nailed to Church Door 


3 Catholic Women Excommunicated 


For Beating Bi-Racial Class Teacher 


From News Dispatches 
ERATH, La., Nov. 27—Bishop 


‘cated *hree Roman Catholics 
‘today for beating a woman 
teacher who instructed Negro 
and white children in the same 
catechism classes in this small 
French community. 

A decree aailed to the door 
of Our Lady of Lourdes Church 
“automatic 


Although no names were 


le who laid 


t the lay 


church and denies them 4 
Christian burial.” 

The Bishop, who heads the 
diocese of Lafayette, in south- 
west Louisiana, said the decree 
was directed at three women 
who attacked Mrs. Lulu B- Or- 
temond on her way to recite 


a rosary. 
In Abbeville Court last week, 
Mrs. Ortemond filed assault 
and battery charges against 
Mrs. Etta B. Romero and Mrs. 
Lotar B. Menard, identifying 
them as two of her attackers. 
Bishop Jeanmard did not iden- 
the third woman. 
ather A. J. Labbe, pastor 
of the parish, said “over 700 


dren in this predominantly 
Catholic community are re- 
leased from the public schools 
for the religious instructions. 
“The second grade children 
are released from the colored 
school at the same time as the 
white school,” Father Labbe 
said. “This is nothing unusual 
and has been going on for 
years. The colored children 
generally sit in the rear. We 
sea ton oe ey com- 
Pp —s you see. 
The decree also 
threatened to close the church's 


children” are handled in shifts 
catechism 


“from all graces of the 


f 


sailants 


in the classes. The 
classes run every day and chil- 


a 


\ | 
Report Lists Major Foreign Policy 
Defeats Handed U.S. by Russians 


Germany within the Sovietjin the efforts of our European 
orbit. és allies” to furnish NATO with 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 


2 Monday, November 28, 1955 ease i. 


Shift of U. S. Stand Abroad Urged 


oe U.S. Termed 
Still First 


h C, O’Mahonéy|Democratic candidate, New 
In Air Punch 


ed on the Eisen-| York Gov. Averell Harriman 
and Sen. Estes Kefauver (D- 
By Robert E. Thompson 
International News Service 


Tenn.), regarded as likely can- 

didates, all criticized Admin- 
istration foreign policies last 
week. | 
O'Mahoney issued his denun- 
ciation in a statement to Wy- 
oming Demoératic’ leaders. In 
calling for the “agonizing re- 

Air Force Secretary Donald 

A. Quarles said yesterday the 

United States still has the 

“most powerful striking force 

in the world” despite Russia's 

latest hydrogen bomb explosion 

and gigantic plane production. 

The Secretary explained that 


By Donald J. Gonzales 
United Presse 

The National Planning Asso- 
ciation decldred yesterday that), 
Russia had handed the United) 
States major foreign policy de- 
feats in recent months ranging 
from the Middle East to NATO 
and Germany. 

The Association, a nonprofit 
organization of business and 
professional leaders, said it is 
“high time to recognize and ap- 
preciate the extent to which 
the position of the non-Soviet 
world has deteriorated.” 

Declaring that the “most 
ilous phase” of the cold war 
ahead, it called on the United 
States to take the initiative 
on diplomatic, economic and 
ideolo fronts rather than 
“merely react to Communist 
moves.” 

“It is the contention of this 


troops. 

Calling for immediate action 
on the diplomatic front, the 
Association said the “first order 
of business” should be te 
“breathe new life” into NATO 
by “reviving the dedication to 
a common cause and nee 
confidence in our purposes 
leadership.” 

On the economic front, it 
said, “it would be quite absurd” 
for the United States to be out- 
distanced by the Communists, 
It called for a “more generous 
attitude” toward economic aid 
programs, technical assistance 
and help to undeveloped areas, 

The Association urged Con- 
gress and others to let the U. S. 
information service forge ahead 
with a program to assist friends 
and potential friends of this 
country to realize the link 
between their ambitions and 
those of the United States. 


Sen. J Unless the problem is 
faced in a “realistic” and en- 
lightened spirit, it said, all 
Western defenses based on 
France and her possessions 
will remain insecure. 

But it is in the Middle East, 
the statement contended, that 
the Free World's position has 
been most seriously hurt. Rus- 
sia is making overtures to the 
Arab world and selling it arms 
while the United States fails 
to face the full implications. 

“Can we expect the Arab 

rid to react with deeper un- 
derstanding than we display to 
a threat which seems so re- 
mote?” it asked. 

Even within the North At- 
antic Treaty Organizations, 
he Association said, there has 

een a “disturbing trend.” It 
noted a “noticeable slackening 


policy in light of 
a Geneva deadlock with Rus- 
a. 
O'Mahoney, whose Senate 
Monopoly Subcommittee is 
making a “case study” of Gen- 
eral Motors, also said the 
United States must remain free 
of domination by Big Business 
or Big Government to-retain its 
free world leadership. 
Meantime, Sens. John J. 
Sparkman (D-Ala.) and Arthur 
V. Watkins (R-Utah) split over 
whether President Eisenhower 
and S¢ of State John 
Foster Dulles were “too opti- 
mistic” about the chiefs of state 
and later foreign ministers 


a 
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=e2 ty ‘3 Orvs 2 fat Khanabad 
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appraisal,” he declared that! . 
“world peace is further away! 
now” than when the Korean 
war ended. 

Secretary of State John 
Foster Dulles first used the 
phrase “agoni reappraisal” 
early in the Eisenhower Admin- 
istration in warning that United 
States foreign policy might 
have to be overhauled if France 
blocked Germany’s admission to 


4 
= . é 


Summit meeting and then had 
to tone down their statements 
after the foreign ministers dead- 
lock. Watkins said they re- 
peatedly warned against expect- 
ing too much from meetings 
with the Russians. 

Sparkman and Watkins ap- 
peared on the recorded CBS 
radio program, “The Leading 
Question.” The broadcast, like 
O’Mahoney’s. statement, was 

repared before President 

isenhower and Sen. Watler F. 
George (D-Ga.) issued a week- 
end appeal for a nonpartisan 
policy. 

George said the United States 
must assure the world that “our 
foreign program” will continue 
regardless of which party wins 
next year’s presidential elec- 
tion. The te House prompt- 
ly said Mr. Eisenhower con- 


curred. 

Despite the double-barreled 
appeal, foreign policy gave 
every indication of growing as 
an issue in the 1956 elections. 
Adiai E. Stevenson, an avowed 


the North Atlantic Treaty 


e Organization. 


Dulles said after the recent 
|Geneva Big Four meeting that 
ithe Administration will “hold 
fast” to present policies despite 
the failure to make any prog- 
ress on German unification. 
O'Mahony insisted that a 
“reappraisal is now essential.” 
He said it must be “based upon 
‘the understanding that we have 
an economic war to win.” 
The Senator also charged 
that colonies and former colo- 
nies of Western European na- 
tions are suspicious of United 
States diplomatic and economic 
intentions. 
In the face of Soviet pro 
ganda, he said, these 
have not been “actua con- 
vinced that the United States 
is not secretly seeking to step 
into the imperial shoes of the 
vanished empires of Western 
Europe.” 
“Soviet Russia is appealing 
to these people with deceitful 
promises that... Asia and 
Africa can have plenty if only 
they follow the Communist 
Party line,” he said. 


President and Hall 
To Talk Politics Today 


By Earl Mazo 
N. ¥. Herald Tribune News Service 


GETTYSBURG, Pa., Nov. 27 
President Eisenhower will get 
@ fill-in Monday, for the first 
time since his heart attack, on 
the activities of the national 


““Republican organization and 
the latest plans for its national 
convention in San Francisco 
next A 

Republican National Chair- 


President will see Secretary of 
Labor James P. Mitchell, and 
Sherman Adams, his White 
House chief of staff. 

There have been reports that 
Mr. Eisenhower might be 
asked to take a hand in curtail- 
ing the increasing number of 
vigorous attacks some Repub- 
lican leaders are making on 


man nard W. Hall is sched- 
meee to Sx te Gottzsbucs to see 
the President at 1 


a. m., mark-/ 


ing Mr. Eisenhower's first 
wholly political discussion since 
Sept. 10—two weeks before he 
became ill—when Hall and the 
48 Republican state chairmen 


flew to Denver for breakfast! 


with him. 

The White House said the 
question of Mr. Eisenhower's 
seeking a second term is not 
likely to be discussed at the 
eonference. 

At that Denver breakfast 
more than two months ago, the 
President told the Republican 
leaders they should not pin all 
their hopes for 1956 on one 


man. 
Prior to the conference with 


leaders of labor unions. Mitch- 
ell is understood to be among 
blicans who 


the ranking 
disapproveof the attacks. 

The White House said today, 
however, that there is no con- 
nection between the Mitchell 
and Hall visits. The officials 
will see Mr. Eisenhower sepa- 
rately, and while Hall will be 
here to talk politics, including 
plans for the Republican Na- 
tional Committee sessions in 
Chicago Wednesday, Thursday 
and Friday, it was said Mitch- 
ell’s mission is in connection 
with “routine Government busi- 
ness.” 

On Saturday, Mr. Eisenhower 
is scheduled to meet the Repub- 
lican congressional leaders here 
for the first time since he left 


Hall in his Post Office head- 
quarters here Monday, the 


Washington, Aug. 14, for his an- 
nual Colorado vacation. 


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7 es 


ay. pe. PAKISTAN 


KUHN—From Page I 


finger. The reason is a miser- 
able dispute summed up in the 
word “Pushtunistan.” 

The dispute concerns the 
nine million warlike tribesmen 
who live on both sides of the 
Pakistan-Afghanistan frontier. 
About four million of them are 
on the Afghan side, five million 
in Pakistan. In 1947, when the 
British quit India and set up 
an independent Pakistan, the 
Afghans revived an old de- 
mand that these tribesmen 
should form an independent 
nation. Since the tribesmen 
are Pathans, or “Pushtuns” in 
their own language, their new 
nation was to be known as 
“Pushtunistan.” 

For eight years the Afghans 
have been beating the drums 
of a crude propaganda against 
Pakistan on this issue. They 
have demanded that Pakistan 
give up a huge slice of its ter- 
ritory to make the new state 
possible. To an outsider it looks 
like 
without the slightest basis in 
international law; but the 
Afghans take it seriously. In 
particular, their strong-willed 
young Prime Minister, Prince 
Mohammed Duad, a first cous- 
in of the king, takes it with 
the seriousness of a zealot. 


Pakistan Closes Border 


The dispute reached the 
breaking point last March, 
when Pakistan merged its! 
Northwest frontier province, 
the home of the tribesmen, into 
a single state of West Pakistan. 
An Afghan mob stormed the 
Pakistan embassy here and 
tore down its flag. When apolo- 
gies did not come, Pakistan 
committed an act of breath-tak- 
ing folly for a bigger, stronger 
and presumably wiser neigh- 
bor, It closed the Afgan fron- 
tier and imposed an economic 
blockade. The Afghans foynd 
themselves landlocked as never 
before. They had been bringing 
most of their machinery, trucks 
and consumer goods, and send- 


sidized rates, 


using the 
most of their traffic, 
though Pakistan has now re- 
opened its frontier. In their 
anger at Pakistan, the Afghans 
are even talking about getting 
arms from Russia. 


Showy Ajd Used by Reds 


Map shows the location of proposed state of Pushtunistan 
(lined area) on the border of Afghanistag and Pakistan. 


Fall of Afghanistan 
To Red Rule Is Feared 


Within the past few weeks the 
Russians have signed a transit 
agreement under which goods 
can be landed on the Black 
Sea and carried by rail, at sub- 
to the Soviet-) 
Afghan frontier. From there, in 
this country that has no rail- 
road, the goods are trucked 
over unpaved Afghan roads. 


The proud Afghans are still 
Russian route for 
even 


The Russians, in addition, 


have been making hay with $5 
million worth of showy projects 
here in Kabul, where the Af- 
ghan leaders can 


see them. 
paved the main 


They hav 

streets, bedilt a grain silo and 

cem plant, and delivered 30 
Russian buses and 20 taxi- 


an irrational demand2a4. ‘The taxis are the first 
this city 
United 
contrast, has been 10 times as 
big in terms of money and far 
more useful to the Afghans. 
It has concentfated on tech- 
nical assistance and on a huge 
flood control 
project in the south. But not 
one member of the present 
Afghan government has ever 
taken the trouble to go south 
to see it. 


has evet seen. The 
States in 


and irrigation 


More American milliqans, to 


outbid the Russians, will not 
change the course of Afghan 
policy. The immediate prob- 
lem is political; the crux is 
“Pushtunistan.” 
of Western diplomacy is some- 
how to persuade the Pakis 
and the Afghans to put their 
dispute, and their emotions, on 
ice, and to behave as neighbors 
should. But this would require 
statesmanship on both sides— 
and statesmanship is a com- 
modity sadly lacking in this 
troubled part of Asia. 


The first job 
tanis 


ing most of their exports, 
through of Pakistan Port of 
Karachi. Now they were threat- 
ened with economic strangula- 


n. 
At this point Khrushchev, 
Bulganin & Co. moved in. 
They promptly offered the 
Afghans a new transit route 
through the Soviet territory. 


Veterans Get 
Preference in 


Adler Awards 


NEW YORK, . Nov. 27 @# 
Veterans of the United States 
armed forces will be given. 
preference in awarding the 
Maj. Gen, Julius Ochs Adler 
memorial scholarships in jour- 
nalism, administrators of the 
scholarship said today. 

They also invited publishers 
of small weekly or daily news- 
papers to apply for the five 
$1000-a-year scholarships which 
will be spread over five years, 
starting with the 1956-57 terms. 
‘They are for study at the 
Columbia University Graduate 
School of Journalism. 

The scholarships are given by 
the New York Community 
Trust in memory of the late 
Maj. Gen. Adler, general man- 
ager of the New York Times 
and president and publisher of 
the Chattanooga (Tenn.) Times. 
He died last Oct. 3. 

Applicants for the award 
must be college graduates and 
demonstrate “a capacity for 
leadership in journalism.” They 
must also be unable to afford a 
year of study without scholar- 


Now a HEARING AID 


an 
a plan 
ificials. 


while he is “not satisfied” with 
the fact that the United States 
has fewer planes than the Rus- 
sians, it would not be wise for 


the Reds. 

Quarles appeared on the 
ABC-TV show, “College Press 
Conference.” 

He said tie United States is 
“ahead of schedule” in its cam- 
paign to achieve 137 air wings 
by the summer of 1957 and 
assured his audience this goal 
would be achieved on time or 
earlier. 

Despite a sharp increase in 
the number of Russian planes, 
Quarles said, the Air Force 
budget pope. for next year 
probably will be about the same 
=~ the “et billion voted by 

ongress year. 

Quarles stated: “I do believe 
as a matter of balanced judg- 
ment it is not a serious state 
of affairs that have more 
planes numeric than we 
have.” . 

The United States economy 
would suffer, he said, if this 
country were to try to equal 
Communist plane production. 

The current policy on this 
matter, Quarles maintained, is 
a wise one, although he added: 
“It is characteristic of all milli- 
tary people to want and need 
more.” 

The Secretary said he has no 
objections to establishment of 
wing within the Army, 
p by Army of- 


But, Quarles added, such a 
plan must come from the Joint 
Chiefs of Staff before it can 
be put into operation. 

Asked how Russia's new 
medium bomber stacks up 
against America’s B-47, Quarles 


replied that it is “roughly com- 


parable. 


Paasikivi Observes 
His 85th Birthday 


Reuters 

HELSINKI, Nov. 27—Presi- 
dent Juho Paasikivi of Finland 
today observed his 85th birth- 
day as a stream of Finnish and 
foreign visitors called at the 
presidential palace. 

Paasikivi is reported to be 
considering an invitation to run 
for another six-year term of 
office when elections take place 
next January. 


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America to try to outproduce | posed, 


statement that neither in 
thought nor in action has the 
United States yet faced the 


full implications of the mortal}) 


threat to which we still lie ex- 
” the Association said. 

Its statement was entitled 
“The Outlook After the Two 
Geneva Conferences, a Note of 
Warning.” 


It charged that “the United 


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“as we approach another year |i) 
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rosiest interpretation on the/| 
scene. 


Policy Committee, |i} 
headed by Frank Altschul, |i) 
board 


c n of 
American Investors Co. The As- 
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It declared that Russia, 


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essly pursuing” its drive to|| 
split up the Free World and/|j 
leave the United States “the | 
isolated protagonist of a lost |i) 


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Ticking off United States// 
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three “highly critical” areas—|/) 
Germany, France and the Mid- | iii) 


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In Germany, it said, Moscow | ji) 
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Educational Talks Open Today 


Mrs. Helen Leake, principal of Lanham Ele- 
mentary School, holds an impromptu class 
in a replica of a 19th Century schoolroom, 
part of the Schoolroom Progress U. S. A. 


¥ 


exhibit now at Union Station continuing 
through Friday. Girls are Barbara Tins- 
man (at Henry Ford's desk) and Pat Reed 
(with hand raised). 


By Joe Heiberser. Staff Photographer 


[EDUCATE—From Pg. 1 | organize 


Federal aid, the chances of con- 
gressional approval are good.” 
Even if the Conference fails 


to act on Federal aid, chances | and 


for Congressional sanction are 
good because Sen. Lyndon B. 


‘Johnson (D-Tex.), Senate ma- 


jority leader, has included 
school aid in his major legisla- 
tive proposals for the second 
session of the 84th Congress, 
Bookbinder said. 

The Conference, dramatic 
climax of similar “grass roots”) ‘to 
meetings held during the past 
year in 4000 communities in 53 
states and territories, opens 
officially at 7:30 p. m. today in 
the Sheraton-Park Hotel. 

Delegates will hear a filmed 
message from President Eisen- 
hower, a ke address b 
Vice President Richard 
Nixon, and a talk by Chairman 
Neil H. McElroy, president of 
the Procter & Gamble Co. 

On Tuesday the unique and 
controversial “distillation” ses- 
sions begin with delegates dis- 
cussing six major ucatonal 
topics on the agenda. 

Delegates wl be seated at 
180 tables, 10 to a table. The 
majority view on each topic 
from each of the 180 tables will 
be taken by a table chairman 
to 18 tables of 10 persons each. 
The majority view from these 
18 tables will be taken by a 
chairman to two tables of nine 
persons each. 

The majority view from those 
two tables will be merged into 
a report which will be read to 
the 1800 conferees and then 
transmitted to President Eisen- 
hower. 

Unionists fear no provision 
has been made for floor debate 
and a final vote by the 1800 con- 
ferees when the final reports 
are read during the general 
sessions. They will press for 
such debate and voting. 

Conference discussion topics 


are: 
What should our schools ac- 
complish? In what ways can we 


Volunteer Fireman Held as Arsonist 
After Admitting He Started 30 Blazes 


MEDIA, Pa., Nov. 27 #®—Ed-|house where he was hurrying 
ward Bogardus, 24, a volunteer | to answer an alarm. The alarm 
fireman and son of a former|was sounded when fire broke 
Pennsylvania State and Federal/out in a new $75,000 house 


Government official, was held| owned by Edward Walsh, a 
on arson charges today after he| Springfield Township real es- 
allegedly admitted starting|tate broker. The house was 
| destroyed. 


more 


than 30 


caused $550,000 damage. 


Bogardus, 


Pa., 


fires which 


of Swarthmore, 
is the son of Dr. James/and 30 others in the Philadel- 


According to Allen, the sus- 
pect admitted starting that fire 


F. Bogardus, one-time State Sec-|phia suburbs since early this 
retary of Forests and Waters'year. Allen said Bogardus, who 
and an official in the office of| was discharged from the Army 
Price Administration during) Signal Corps a year ago, admit- 


signed a confession stating he 
started at least 15 grass fires, 
14 property fires, including one 
at a private business school and 
two automobile fires. 

According to the detective 
chief, police began tailing 
young Bogardus about six 
weeks ago at the time several 
suspicious fires broke out. Al- 
len said State Troopers learned 
that a green car was always 
noticed in the area shortly be- 
fore the fires were discovered. 
They said the car belongs to 
Bogardus. 

Allen said Bogardus con-| 


to accept chairmanship of dis-}/ 


cussion tables on the other 
topics so they would be on 
hand to press for Federal aid 
to school construction when the 
financing question comes up. 
The classic arguments for 
and against Federal aid to edu- 
cation were covered during the 
American Forum _ television 
show over WRC yesterday. 
Arguments for Federal aid 
came from William G. Carr, 


.jexecutive secretary of the Na- 


tional Education Association, 
and Edward Fuller, executive 
secretary of the Council of 
Chief State School Officers. 
“Congress ought to provide 
some funds for school construc- 
tion to go along with its other 
programs of help to our state 
and local governments,” said 
Carr. Federal control would not 
accompany the construction aid 
now being considered and local 
governments would continue to 
control education, said Fuller. 
The opposite view was taken 
by Robert A. Freeman, an 
education consultant, and N. 
Bradford Trenham, executive 
vice president of the California 
Taxpayers Association. 
“Education has been a state 
and local responsibility, a long- 


jestablished and firmly founded 


tradition,” said Freeman. “It 


Cubans to Tour U. S. 


HAVANA, Nov. 27 ®—A 15- 
member delegation of the 
American Chamber of Com- 
merce of Cuba left today for 
Miami to begin a two-week tour 


of 11 United States cities. 


” Murdered 


The body of 8-year-old Janice 
May was found near her Can- 
ton, Til., home. The little girl 
had been murdered. 


should remain so.” Trenham 
said “Federal aid to schools, 
either for construction or opera 
tion, would be the opening 
wedge in the federalization of 
the American school system.” 

Delegates attending the con- 
ference have made state-by- 
state studies showing that 
America is now short 260.000 
classrooms and 141,300 qualified 
teachers. This week they will 
try to come up with a formula 
to lick those shortages. 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


Monday, November 28, 1955 


Mrs. Clark 
Acquitted 
In Murder 


FORT WORTH, Nov. 26 # 


The jury deliberated about 
five hours. 


District Attorney Howard 


Fender had asked a 
tence for Mrs. @lark. 

The states case was A 
around the statements 
convict Harry Huggins, earl 
indicted in the case for murder. 

Huggins said that he and two 
other police characters, Tincy 
Eggleston and Cecil Green, 
went to Clark's 23-room man- 


sion here May 19, 1953, for what 
he said he thought was to have | 


been a robbery. 

Huggins testified that the fol- 
lowing day he went with Eggle- 
ston to a north Fort Worth tav- 
ern to collect the payoff for the 
murder. He said Eggleston was' 


life sen-) 


at Questioned in Fires 


Charles Johnson, 18, of Chi- 
cago, is being questioned in 
connection with four Gres 
which caused an estimated 
$200,000 damage within « 
twe-bleck area on the Windy 
City’s Northside. 


met by a man and a woman and 
was given $6000. He tentatively 
identified the woman as Mrs. 
Clark. 


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ted using gasoline to start some 
of the fires. plete color choice. 


Allen said the young fireman 


World War IL The elder Bo-| 
gardus also was an associate 
professor of geography at the 
University of Pennsylvania's 
Wharton School. 

Earl Allen, chief of Delaware 
County detectives, said young 
Bogardus was arrested last 
night at the Swarthmore fire- 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
AND TIMES HERALD 


fessed § minutes question- 
ing began. 


Bishop Due to Get Post 


“HOT SHOPPES 


Max W. Bishop, special as- 
sistant te Undersecretary of 
State Herbert Hoover Jr., is 
scheduled to be appointed Am- 
bassador te 


conside fable 

experience 

with the for 

eign service in the Far East. 
In 1937, he was made vice- 

consul at Osaka, Japan, and in 

1938 was made third secretary 

at the Tokyo Embassy. In 1944 

he was made consul at Colom- 

bo, Ceylon, and in 1945 he 

served as a political adviser to 

the Army in Burma and Japan. 
He was appointed consul at 

Dharan, Saudi-Arabia, in 1951. 


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As Envoy to Thailand 


He was made special assistant 
to Hoover in 1954. At various 
times during his career, he has 
worked here in the State De- 
partment. 


Medical Journal 
Attacks Tobacco 


EL PASO, Tex., Nov. 27 # 
The December issue of South- 
western Medicine has called on 
doctors to quit smoking and to 
seek abolition of the use of to- 
bacco because of its reported 
relation to cancer. 


In one of the strongest at- 


tacks against smoking to come 
from a medical journal, the 
article said: 

“Statistically, it has been 
shown that any man past 50 
years of age who smokes a pack 
of cigarettes a day has 50 times 
as much chance of developing 
cancer of the lung as a non- 
smoker.” 


India °54 Riois Up 

NEW DELHI, Nov. 27 @ 
Riots in India (pop. 380 million) 
resulted In arrests of 128,925 
persons in 22,727 incidents in 
1954, a crime report shows. 
The figures represent a 10 per 
cent increase over 1953.. Large 
scale disturbances grew from 
minor causes such as land dis 
putes and village factional in- 
trigue. 


Records 


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Fs WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


Monday, November 28, - 1955 


a 
ph IPLES 


***Aunt Susie is properly 
sympathetic. 


» «She listens to Mary's symptoms, 
nods wisely and says, “Uh-huh. You've got 
it, all right. Had it myself last week, but 
the doctor prescribed some wonderful medi- 
cine and now I'm fine. I've got some of the 
medicine left over, so—” 


gap” Stop, Aunt Susie! 


3+ We know you're trying to help, but believe 
us, this is not the way to go about it. 


>> “But the symptoms are the same—” 


$e. 

+ They may or may not be. Even if they are 
~—for example, chills, fever, ache all over, 
nausea — it doesn't necessarily follow that 
Mary has what Aunt Susie had. These 
symptoms could apply to a half dozen or 
more illnesses. 


++ +So the only person who is qualified to say 
what the patient has and what he should 
take is the doctor. 


gap Here's something else to keep in mind, too. 


++ The human body is a wonderful, but very 
complex, chemical factory. 


3'¢ It works all the time, manufacturing within 
itself those drugs needed to keep the factory 
going. 


.Y The human body is finely balanced, too. 
Many of its “mechanisms” are so closely 
related that a disturbance of one may affect 
the others. 


# This balance may vary from one person to 
another. 


+ +680 a drug that was right for Aunt Susie 
may not be right at all for Mary. At best, 
it will have no effect whatever. At the worst, 
it could upset the delicate balance in Mary's 
chemical factory—with dire results. 


***Bo the only medical advic® anyone other 
than the doctor is competent to give is this: 


s@ Don’t take anyone else's prescription. 


@ Don't prescribe your medicine — no matter 
how much good it did you — for others. 


«Don't scribe for yourself. When you are 
ill, see your doctor and follow his advice to 
the letter. 


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4 


By William L. Ryan 
Associated Press 


politician, just turned 50. The 


from him in days to come— 
possibly after the 20th Congress 


next February. 
The man is Dmitri Trofjmo- 
vich Shepilov, a Communist 


Diplomats are keeping an eye; © ius 
on an upendcoming Soviet an 


world may hear a great deal 


of the Soviet Communist Party) | 


Party theoretician of ability. 
He is being groomed for some- 
thing big. He may succeed 
V. M. Molotov as Soviet Foreign 
Minister. 


has been nothing short of mete- 
oric. This year he was approach- 
ing the peak of his career. He 
appeared on the stage with the 
other Soviet big shots at the 
Bolshoi Theater for the revolu- 
tion anniversary eve celebra- 
tion, and on the tribunal with 
the leaders in Red Square for 


Shepilov’s rise in 10 years) |e 


Associated Press 


DIMITRI T. SHEPILOV 
. «+ his star is rising 


the parade the next day. He 
was prominent enough to be) 
mentioned among the leaders; 
of the party and government—| 
though not prominent enough| 
to be. listed in alphabetical 
order. 


Given Order of Lenin 


A couple of days previous to 
that the Soviet hierarchy hon- 
ored Shepilov's 50th birthday 
by presenting him the Order of 


“services to the 
Communist Party and Soviet! 
State.” 

Part of those significant serv- 
ices were rendered rather re- 
cently, when Shepilov jour- 
neyed to Egypt as a special en- 
voy to meet the Egptian Prime 
Minister, Gamal Abdel Nasser. 
Not long after that Egypt en- 
tered into a deal for Commu- 
nist bloc arms, to the conster- 
nation of the Western powers, 
and there was talk of Soviet 
economic aid to Egypt and the 
other Arab countries. — 


Besides being chief of the 
committee which puts out! 
Pravda, Shepilov serves as 
chairman of the Foreign Affairs} 
Commission of the Supreme So-| 
viet (Parliament) Council of Na- 
tionalities, the upper house. 
He first came to Western notice 
back in 1949 when he was head 
of the Party central commit-! 
tee’s department of propaganda 
and agitation, a highly impor- 
tant post. He became chief edi- 
tor of Pravda in 1952, succeed-' 
ing Leonid Ilyichev, who was) 
pushed up to the foreign office 
as a department chief. 


Malenkov Dumping Predicted 


| Shepilov was a member of a) 
Soviet delegation to the Fourth | 
ic ongress of the Socialist Unity 
(Communist) — of Germany 
in Berlin in 1954, in his 
role as inlerouuted of Moscow's | 
'doctrines. He is a member of) 
jthe secretariat of the central | 
committee 
| One of Shepilov’s articles tn 
‘January of this year foreshad- 
lowed the dumping of Georgi 
|Malenkov as Premier. The ar- 
|ticle dealt with “vulgarizers” of 
the Party line who sought to) 
give light industry’s consumer 
goods a better share of atten- 
tlon in an economy geared to 
all-out heavy industrial produc: | 
tion. 

His appearance on the revo-| 


Soccer Fans 


lution aniversary programs 
marks a step upward. He had 
not done so before, but now 
jepparentty he ranks with the 
| man he succeeded in the propa- 
| ganda- agitation department, M. 
‘A. Suslov, who ranked high in 
the councils of the Stalin days 
and still apparently holds a 
high position. 

Shepilov was a leading Tito- 
‘baiter during the Moscow-Bel- 
igrade feud, but he was impor- 
tant enough to be on the dele- 
|gation to Belgrade last June to 
‘ask Tito’s forgiveness. Molotov 
was left out of that one. 

Shepilov's ascendancy is not 
good news for the West. Al- 
though from the younger, post- 
Bolshevik crop of Soviet poli- 
ticians, he seems cast in the 
same mold, and his pronounce- 
ments have been predicated 
upon the proposition that capi- 
talism is headed for ruin all 
over the world. 


Rise of Shepilov 
Interests Envoys 


” \dor V. K. Wellington Koo said |munists really lack sincerity.” 


> | stations. 


Koo Says China Rejects 
U.N. ‘Package Deal’ 


Associated Press 
Nationalist China is opposed that the recent Geneva Confer- 


'Twentyfour occupants of & 


One Killed, 24 Hurt In Bus-Car Collision 


BELVIDERE, Ill, Nov, 27 # 


Greyhound bus were injured 
early today when it careened off 


the highway into a tree after a 
head-on collision with an auto- 


torist. ‘ 


The collision occurred about 
3:30 a. m. in Garden Prairie, an 
unincorporated community of 
about 200 persons on Route 28, 
MEN REE a 


to a package plan for the ad-|ence failed, but that this con- 


\firmed “our beliefs and j 
mission of 18 new members to ment.” He said, “We have 


the United Nations, Ambassa-| ways believed that the Com- 


= agent gas? | Red d ’ cna be oa th Satake 
e na sa e 

: Koo said package megan | of: Justice there tecentiy 

amount to a denial of the | repo rted that from January, 

(United Nations) Charter it-| 1984. to May, 1955, 364,000 per- 

self. Each nation should be|sons had been arrested as 


considered individually, he said |Counterrevolutionaries and re- 


yr | actionaries. 
in a television interview re- He said the Minister of Jul- 


| tice called for more drastic 
Koo attackell particularly F measures to “control and check 


plans for the admission of|' his counterrevolutionary 

Outer Mongolia and four other | ovement.” 

Communist satellite states from 

Eastern Europe. “We don’t be- : 

lieve that those so-called coun- 18 Rescued Off Ship 

tries are really independent or; ISTANBUL, Turkey, Nov. 27 

qualified for membership,” he | (Reuters)—The crew of 18 of an 

said. ‘Italian cargo ship, the Emilia 
Russia has insisted these | levoli, 1440 tons, aground off 

countries must be admitted if|Terkos, on the Black Sea coast, 

any of 13 non-Communist na-| were rescued today. The Emilia 

tions are accepted. : \Ievoli sent out a radio distress 
The Ambassador said also' signal Saturday night that she 

that Nationalist China feelsiwas sinking. 


corded for upstate New York 


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In Burma 


Reuters 

RANGOON, Burma, Nov. 27 
Five thousand disgruntled 
soccer fans besieged 150 police- 
men in a stadium for nearly 6 
hours and set fire to its out 
buildings after a game here 
Saturday. 
| Police tear-gas shells failed to 
stem the rioters. 
The crowd dispersed only 


mander, Gen. Ne Win, arrived 
on the scene just before mid- 
night and made a personal 


appeal for order. 
The trouble started when! 
7 mounted policemen tried to! 
break up part of a crowd of 
20,000 spectators who rushed’ 
across the field to watch the | 
Burmese President, Ba U, pre- 
sent a trophy to the winning 
team. Angry spectators threw 
chairs and stones at the police. 
The mob later set off down 
the main road into the enter- 
tainment center of the city, 
smashing movie poster board- 
ings, tearing up bus stop signs 
and wrecking traffic signals. 


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Sultan Mohammed Ben Youssef confers 
with Mohammed Zeghari (left), Moroccan 
deputy, at the Sultan's palace at Rabat. 
“ 7 


» t.0% & ea ; ‘“ 


» Oa ae a a 
i. bt 


The sultanate, which ruled despotically for 
a thousand years, is about to be limited by 
Morocco’s first Constitution. 


Be Mlb, Poth ng f By Barrett McGurn 

MN. ¥. Herald Tribune News Service 
RABAT, Nov. 27—French Mo- 
rocco entered a new political! 
phase here today. Premier- 
designate Si M’Barek Ben Mus- 


ing to form th first moderate 
democratic government for this 
|protectorate which never be-' 
.'|fore in its history has known 


with the support of most of 
Morocco’s native political forces 
and the more-or-less willing ad- 


with the Moroccans on the 
doorstep of some sort of self- 


an awesome tangle of 
problems created by several 
simultaneous revolutions. 

First, the 40-year-old French 

tectorate is about to be 
smantled. 

Second, the sultanate, which 
engages ruled tically 
or a thosand years, about 
be limited by Morocco’s first 
Constitution. 

Third, native political par- 
ties, forced underground until 
recent months, are now trying 
to orient Morocco toward the 
Islamie world 


Faure Offers Reforms 


To End Toppling Regimes 


| 


| 


CHAMBLAY, France, Nov. 27) fires a premier within two years has been discovered in Tottori| tions with France on the shape 
Prefecture, 300 miles west of|and substance of the new Mo- 


m—Premier Edgar Faure, fac-\after its first session. 
ing possible loss of his job in 


urged reforms today to end|of the chamber only if two 
France's “everlasting merry-go-\premiers are fired within 18 
round of governments.” imonths. 

The hard-pressed Faure pro-| Under the present system, 


Uranium Deposit — at one and the same 
Found in Japan 


|\#—A rich uranium ore deposit))i44 4, ¢ 


At present the constitution Tokyo 
@ confidence vote Tuesday,jcalls for automatic dissolving) |, seatorbitg 


It registered 45,000 counts per 
‘premiers also must be toppled minute. 


working to determine the size.| 114 subjects of foreign relations 
and security—w France 


geographically 
and toward the political ideas 


-exploited 
peatatiian to or- 
ganize 


TOKYO, Nov. 28 (Monday)| To the ‘Moroccans, their 
chief problems are primarily 
negotia- 


Kyodo News agency roccan government—which has 


Eight geologists -are_ still 


here is 
most concerned—will be the 


posed a constitutional change). shsolute majorities of all 
to make it harder for the deputies, whether they are 
French National Assembly to present or absent when. the 
topple premiers in the future.| vote is taken, 

The Premier, addressing war; Faure said he planned to re-| 
veterans in this Jura Mountain| quire that all deputies belong-| 
village in eastern France, said|ing to his own group in pariia-| 
government “permanence” was'ment pledge themselves to fre-' 
necessary so that France could|sign and run for re-election if! 
face “the demands of the inter-'a government falls within two 
national situation.” years. 

“France is making a hardly , 
enviable international perform- U. N. to Get Faure’s 
ance, which she must re-| 
nounce,” Faure said. “Among | feneva Parley Plan 
important civilized countries,;| PARIS, Nov. 27 (#—Premier 
none knows to such a degree|gdgar Faure said today his 
> Dever | merry-go-round plan for world disarmament 

“The Republic has almost a}-| coupled with aid to backward 
ways lived under a system of|areas would be carried to the 
six-month governments. It is a| United Nations Tuesday — if 
luxury which we must renounce.|his government is still in 
Continuity is essential for exec- power. 
utive power. [Faure first outlined his plan 

“I do not ask it for myself.|at the time of the July Summit 
I ask it for every French goy-|Conference in Geneva, It calls 
ernment in the future.” for a percentage cut in arms) 

The 47-year-old Faure pro-|outlay by the big powers, with) 
posed that the constitution pro-|the money saved to go to un- 
vide automatic dissolution of\derdeveloped areas of the 
the National Assembly if it'world.) | 


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2a 
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tapaa el Bekkal cet about try-/ons 


Woe pane leaders, as 
over weekend about 
Si Bekkai, 48, begins his task/ . simpler problem: how a 
Cabinet posts sheuld be crea 


janything but native or foreign |™Morocco to vote 
| m 


miration of the French. But ee one of the main 
it felt 8 million Moroccans 


government, Si Bekkai is faced|—— 
with 


any ProblemsF ace Morocco Premier-to-Be 


, announced that 


Dien Bien Phu Veteran 
Leads Morocco Rebels 
Reuters 


RABAT, Nov. 27—~A former 


was disclosed as the 
leader of Moroccan rebels ty- 
ing down about 15,000 heavily 
The Party for Democratic) armed French troops in the Riff 
mountains. 
The former sergeant, Ma- 


hammed el Khanouchi, was 


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come, follow him on his lively, exciting way... 


he’s in Woodward & Lothrop’s F Street windows 


. See how he scurries along, in his 
candy-striped nightgown, crying his 
cheerful curfew. The Pieman is simply « 
amazed at his speed. Rapunzel has never 
before had her long braids used as 
a bell pull. 

But the Three Blind Mice skate nonchalantly 
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Now he must try to waken Rip Van Winkle. 
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THE W TON POST 
and HERALD 
Monday, November 28, 1955 


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bombs 
terror. 


and threats of more 


Seven bombs and hand-gre-; 


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Harding, after five British sol- 

diers were killed in the past 
week. 

Two hensemede grenades 
were lobbed at an ambulance 
and escorting jeep tonight as 
it rushed a British soldier to 
hospital for an appendix oper- 
ation. 

Threats of new - violence 
came from Greek Orthodox 
Archbishop Makarios—leader 
of Enosis, the movement for 
union of. the island with 


Greece. 

Makarios declared: “It is re- 
grettable that the British’ Gov-| 
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On the contrary, it becomes | 

“There is only one correct) 
solution—self-determination for | 
the Crprus people,” he said. 

The terrorist organization 
EOKA tonight distributed leaf- 
lets in Famagusta saying the 
“final battle is coming soon.” 

It added: “The 12,000 troops 


Saigon Cleanup Begins 


you brought to Cyprus by air 
and sea will confront our own 
invisible army.” 

The EOKA warning said 
Cypriots “would not be bribed” 
by large monetary offers for 
information about its members 


big British development scheme 
announced recently for the is- 
land. 


‘lice had already gone into ac- 


and had only contempt for al 


a Cyprus Rebel Defies 


oo gow campaign for Enosis 
has reached a pitch 
since rioters burned down Gov- 
ernment House in 1931. 
(In Salonika, Greece, 15 po 


strationg staged by 
shouting anti-British slogans.) 


Reuters 


SAIGON, Nov. 27—Crowds 
swarmed into the market 
‘square here tonight to see a 
blazing bonfire of opium 
pipes, playing cards, obscene 
books and raw liquor. 

It was the official start of 
Vietnam’s campaign to “clean 
up” Saigon and wipe out its 
reputation as a city of vice 
dens. 

Under the orders of Prime 
Minister Ngo. Dinh Diem po- 


tion, closing down brothels, 
gaming houses and opium 
dens. Hundreds of prostitutes 
were rounded up. 


Malaya Leader Hopeful 


K U ALA LUMPUR, Malaya, 
Nov. 27 ()»—Tengku Abdul Rah- 


vA Nehru Policy Attacked 


artial Law 


tional status, “We shall decide 
one way or another about in- 
dependence.” 

He warned that Chin Peng, 
leader of Malaya’s Communist 
cen-| guerillas’ “should not expect) 
any more liberal terms than 

has already been offered” 


mobilize the whole country if 
they turn down the amnesty. 


Reuters 

NEW DELHI, India, Nov. 27 
The independent Times of 
India skid today that India 
will go Communist in the next 
five years “if things go on as 
they are.” 

The newspaper, which has 
the largest circulation of any 
English language paper 
India, asked in an article by 
A. D. Gorwala: 

“Where shall we be in five 
years hence? If present trends 


Racy Fume 
Trade Ins 66 Finish 
con, Dy oS Men. & Theres, 9-9 
Downtown 
: Charre Nog 


man, Malaya’s Premier, de- 


1. |Boyle to Probe Japan’s 
Trial of Servicemen | 


"lover American servicemen who 


are any indication and if 
continue unalerted—very 
ered on the Communist | 


Reuters 

TOKYO, Nov. 27 — Rep. 
Charlies Boyle (D-Ill.) arrived 
here tonight to probe the jur- 
isdiction of Japanese courts 


commit offenses while off duty 
in Japan. 

He will look into the case of 
Pvt. Alan C. May of Chicago, 
who went on trial in Maebashi 
district court Saturday with 
three other servicemen for 
allegedly beating up seven 
Japanese policemen. If con- 
victed, May and his bdddies 


could be put in Japanese prison 
for five to seven years. 


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‘Bonn Asks Help in F inding 
1,200,000 Missing Germans 


BONN, Nov. 27 #®—West Ger Federal Refugee Minister 
> |man appealed to all na-|Theodor Oderlaender made the) 
F. jtions to help locate 1,200,000\appeal at B agg here in it 
~~: |German soldiers and memory the missing war i a 
f*) |missing from World War II prisoners. West and East Ger- 
’ oe He called fer an effort “in the| many. 
name of humanity and in the} Turning to the sudden halt in! | 
name of all religions and/the return of prisoners from the! * 
faiths” to determine what hap- Oberlaender Re 
pened to 1,200,000 Germans ‘a toe «6 
“whose fate up to now is un- 9626 prisoners “was made| © “aa | 
it of am weg ed ee ck 2 RELIEVES PILE PAINS 
today 


* hatacndet paso ant eee 
5 h labor unio 
ogy eee Germanys ey foam eee], (atten tea ee AS IT SHRINKS THEM 


nestor {ne montage nations sd "te contdenc of the 
nies for nation e “the con 0 42 hh 
observed a nute period|German people in democracy,| Ordinary eavesdroppers are te Pe ng /Ponoanee 9 oman The wrong prescription of Dr. 


ef silence yesterday. peace and freedom will be 
Today, millions of Germans|sharply tested if they see that; "4 enough but look what 
displayed lighted candles in 0! pe nk —— ! policy Janet Crawley, assistant at $8.4 Million Forest Fire 
an of omacy prom re-| New York’s Bronx Zee Edu- WELLINGTON. New Zea 
turn of the prisoners is post- o we 
poned.” cation Office, has te contend 
with. BB, a bea constrictor, 
Dehler Recants Call is being kept at the office, 


For Russom Tathe _| slong with other Sn temsten, (Chenu O6up eres of Snes! §=6s HUMPHREYS OINTMENT 


. os ape Reuters te help him used to 
The Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village VILLINGEN, Germany, Nov. dling - as ‘ans oe New Zee Humphreys — a foremost name in home medication fer ever 100 years 


27—Thomas Dehler, leader of 
; " the Free Democratic Party in 
and the Encyclopedia Americana the West German coalition gov- 


tid 
ig 
e275 
g 

u 


i 
: 


cordially invites each Delegate of the precipitated a government 
cirisis. 


5 Daler iat te teletnton oe 
. . m 
White House Conference on Education rift which for months hes been 
widening in the coalition, in 
which ay pany Eon largest 
. .s partner o ancellor Konrad 
to special showings of Adenauer’s Christian Demo- 
crats. 
The Free Democratic parii- 


SCHOOLROOM PROGRESS U, S.A. |gczerseeets 


Wednesday, November 30, 7:00 to 9:00 P. M. 


Dehiler’ 
that there was no possibility of 
separate West German negotia- 
tions with Russia on reunifica- 


Thursday, December 1, 1:00 te 7:00 P. M. 


Union Station, Track No. 1 dnote codon tet tae ce 
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A eS 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
- Monday, November 28, 1955 


—_ 


urcur co. stores OPEN EARLY itonicy OPEN LATE "Sign 


THE HECHT CO. DOWNSTAIRS 


2 of these, .. ... 


Few-of-a-kind ... that’s what makes exciting sales. We made this 
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It’s a great day for tien gift shoppers! You save as much as you pay 
for many of these leather jackets, And what jackets! Every one 
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The Hecht Co. Downstairs, Washington, Silver Spring, PARKington 


7 
| 
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“For Red 


former royal capital of Man- 
dalay. 

In their flight to these 
interior areas, the Soviet lead- 
ers will pass over territory 
where Communist guerrillas 
have for a long time been 
holding out against U Nu’s gov- 
ernment which has declared the 
Communist Party illegal. 

In Rangoon Bulganin and 
Khrushchev will stay at the 
presidential mansion as , = 
of the President, Ba U, and 
will face a full schedule of 
business and social engage- 
ments. 

They will have talks wit 
U Nu and other Burmese of- 
ficials on political, economic 
and cultural aspects of Soviet- 
Burmese relations. 

Rangoon authorities are giv- 
ing the capital an intensive 
‘brushup for the occasion. 


Soviet Leaders Joke 
In Tea.Plantation Tour 


OOTACAMUND, India, Nov. 
27 # — Russia's two tourin 
leaders cracked jokes, c 
lenged each other to climb a 50- 
foot betelnut tree and were 
garlanded with flowers by 
squad of elephants today in a 
tour of this plantation area. 

They were also startled when 
an engine roof near them col- 
lapsed under the weight of 
curious Indians. No one was 
hurt. 

Soviet Premier Nikolai Bul- 
ganin and Communist Party 
Secretary Nikita Krhushchev 
made a 5S0-mile drive here 


_|from Combatoire where they 


had arrived earlier by plane. 

At Combatoire, elephants 
dropped garlands of flowers 
around the necks of the Soviet 
leaders. 

Later on during the motor- 
cade, another flower garland 
thrown from the crowd struck 
Khrushchev in the head. The 
government had banned flower 
throwing, But Khrushchev 

tossed the garland 
to the crowd. 


On the way to this mountain 


year.| With Splendor at Delhi 


Burma Prepares 
Visitors} 


the Russian leaders 
admiringly as Indians 

slim, 50-foot betelnut 
trees. 


Bulganin put his hand on 


Goulart Asked to Quit in Brazil 


RIO D& JANEIRO, Nov. 27 spokesman for Socialist Presi- cabinet by the generals whe 


dentelect Juscelin Kubitschek. 


one of the trees and asked 


Khrushchev: 
“Can you climb it? 
can,” Khrushchev re- 


Neither did. 
King Saud Is Creeted 


NEW DELHI, Nov. 27 # 
Saudi Arabia’s King Saud flew 
into New Delhi in regal splen- 
dor for a Ray 6 goodwill visit. 

Saud, the first king to visit 
free India, was greeted at New 
Delhi’s military airfield by 
Premier Jawaharlal Nehru and 
President Rajendra Prasad. 

The —_ was given a 2l-gun 
salute Saudi Arabia's 

Saale national colors 

uttered from hundreds of flag 
poles along the 12-mile route to 
the President's House, where 
the King is staying. 

While the Indians tried to 
make the welcome decora- 


-|20th Birthday Today 


il of Ministers 
lof the Soviet Vnion (Bulganin) 
y|should climb first.” 


TOKYO, Nov. 2 (Monday) 


Pome President-on-leave Joao’ 
e Jr. stems primarily from 
tion to Goulart. 
Vice President-elect 
leads the dominant faction in 
President 


father, Emperor Hirohito, 
making biology his life work. 


later Gapeced Vangie end drove 


Ee 


FLY THE WORLD'S 


tions equal to those for the Rus- 
sians, crowds along the streets 
scarcely totaled 7500—mostly | 

pared with 5 to 
10 times that number for the 
Russians. 

Saud’s tour is regarded by 
most Western diplomats as a 
new Indian effort to extend 
its neutral foreign policy into 
the Middle East. lier this 
year Nehru played host to 
Egypt's Premier. 


Nehru and Saud would 

Saudi Arabia’s Buraimi Oasis 
dispute with Britain, the possi- 
bility of Indian technical aid 
for Saudi Arabia, and extension 
of trade ties. 

It is also considered ble 
that Soviet Deputy Foreign 
Minister Andrei Gromyko, who 
is now here, may meet Saud. 

The need for India and Saudi 
Arabia getting closer together 
Po every direction in the in- 


banquet in speec by 
President Prasad and 
Saud. 


Tunis to Snub Britain 
Reuters 


TUNIS, Nov. 27—The Tuni- 
sian government today decided 
to boycott all ceremonies con- 
nected with the present visit - 
British warships to Bizerte in 
protest against Britain's un- 
successful opposition to the 


Food and 


Agriculture 
tion meeting in Rome last week. 


Informants said it was likely 
discuss 


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Tito Acts to Lift 
Living Standard 


BELGRADE, Nov. 27 UF 
President Tito announced to- 
day a new economic policy to 
raise Yugoslav living stand- 
ards, increase consumer pro- 
duction and slow down heavy 
industry. 

Priority will be given to 
balancing foreign trade, he 


said. 
| Tito outlined the basic prin- 
‘ciples of Yugoslavia’s drastic 
new economic course before 
the Federal Committee of the 
Socialist Alliance of the Work-| 
jing People of Yugoslavia, a| 
‘Communist - led organization | 
| which claims a membership of 
_more than eight million. 
| Tito frankly admitted “mis- 
takes in expenditures” and 
cases of “squandering” funds 
rovided for construction of 
arge projects. 

housands of millions of 
dinars did not actually go to 
heavy industry, but were spent 
on various luxurious buildings 
and other local needs, while the 
construction of large projects | 
was slowed down,” he said. 

He said the new economic 
policy will emphasize light in- 
dustry and agriculture because 
ithe development of heavy indus- 


Staff Photo 


Happy Anniversary 


Mr. and Mrs. John R. Holcer, 
both native Washingtonians, 
celebrated their 50th wedding 
anniversary yesterday at the 
Kennedy-Warren, 3133 Con- 
necticut ave. nw. Holcer is a 
retired insurance executive. 
The couple lives at 5618 First 
pl. nw. 


priority to those enterprises 
which will yield the quickest! 
result in improving the living 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
Monday, November 28, 1955 9 


standard and in balancing the 


try has reached such a level Yugoslav payments account.” 


“that we have something upon} 


| which we can continue building | agricultural 


at a slower pace and more) 
easily.” | 

Acknowledging that Yugo-| 
| slavs have had to carry a heavy | | 

| burden up to now, he promised 

| “as soon as possible as many 
‘consumer goods as possible will 
‘be made available” and 
“prices will be adapted to pur- 
chasing power.” 

Yugoslav prices have in- 
creased alarmingly recently. 
Tito’s speech was considered 
designed to give full backing to 
efforts to avert inflation. 

Tito said expansion of heavy 
industry will continue “at a rate 
dictated by material possibili- 
ties,” and added: 

“It is now important to give 


Urging more attention to) 
production, Tito 
said, “We did not renounce the 
Socialist way of production in 
the villages.” This appeared to) 
indicate Tito has not abandoned| 
‘his aim to collectivize the farm- 

land. Yugoslavia suspénded its 
collectivization drive three! 
years ago. 

Tito said farmers were be- 
coming 
vinced of the advantages of 
collectives” and “in the future 
collective farms will have to 
become the factor which stim-| 
ulates the farmers to increase 
production.” 

A brief communique said Tito| 
will visit Ethiopia in December 
on the invitation of Emperor'| 
Haile Selassie. 


“only gradually con-| § 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
10 Mantay, Rovenher #008 2 


an 


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lit over the Church’s role in 


regime of ousted 
Juan Peron, the sources said.| | 
Bishops and priests who boldly 
va. nomen yong ag ex- 
$21.95; to move to fore. 
$21.7; VA. PEA.| 


17.55; BLAC | : 
ys 9g yr ‘Japanese Boats Seized 


TOKYO, Nov. 27—Two Jap- 
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fishermen were seized Satur- 
ALL SIZES OF QUALITY day night by a South Korean 

PENNA. HARD COAL naval patrol outside the 60-mile 


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A | - 

International News 
This recent study of Pope Pius XII shows him in his gar- 
den at Castel Gandolfo. The photo was used in an Italian 
weekly magazine with the story of the Pope’s vision of Jesus. 


Vatican Says Pope Heard 


Voice Forecasting Vision 


Reuters 
VATICAN CITY, Nov. 27 
The Vatican disclosed today 
that the night before the Pope 
had a vision of Christ during 
his illness last December, he 


QUICK-COLD SHELF keeps 
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“The Holy Father couldnot 
attend the exercises but he ob- 
served them nevertheless, med- 
itating in pain and solitude on 
the pages of Saint Ignatius,” 


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reguiarly for Christmas. A convenient coin slot 
in back accepts those small daily savings that 
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our supply is ample. 


Se Cate ct cn i ee 


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730 Eleventh St., N.W. 
REpublic 7-7111 


heard a voice saying distinct-|the newspaper said. 


ly, “There will be a vision.” 
At dawn next day Pope Piusithe spiritual 
XII “saw the Lord close to| great but the spirit was alive. 
him, silent, in all his eloquent|The Pope continued to follow 
majesty.” Church authorities|the affairs of the church,” the 
said through the Catholie Ac-\account went on. 


tion newspaper, Quotidiano. It 
is generally assumed that the December, while his spirit was 
account was compiled in col-| more intent than ever, the Pope 
laboration with the Vatican,/heard most distinctly a voice 
and published with the Pope’s saying ‘There will be a vision.’” 
approval “On the second of December, 
Quotidiano said its account|while the first light of dawn 
of the vision would be pub- | broke the darkness, the Pope 
lished in next Sunday’s issue of|saw the Lord close to him, 
the Osservatore Della Domeni-|silent, in all his eloquent 
ca, the Vatican City weekly. |majesty.” 

Today’s account recalled that, Last Monday the Vatican 
the Pontiff was already illioffiially confirmed the first 
when he returned to the Vati-jaccount of the vision, given in 
can from his summer villa at/an Italian illustrated m ne. 


Castelgandolfo. The illness; The Pope returned Sa y 
ra worse and pre-inight to the Vatican from a 


grew 
vented him from taking part/five-month stay at his summer 
in the week of spiritual exer-/home. Today, with the Papal 


bo St Ne Se Sr Sh 


cises the papal court under-'Court, he began this year’s 
takes every year at the begin-|week of spiritual exercises in 
ning of December. preparation for Christmas. 


“On the first of December 
suffering was 


“On that day, the first of 


; 
4 
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, 


Se 


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- >a 
Washingto 


n Gas Light Company 


RETAIL SALES DIVISION 


11TH AND H STREETS, N. W 


REPUBLIC 7-3275 


BROADGASTING is most effective on stations which have earned 


the respect and confidence of the communities they serve... 


that’s why WBC ts covering—completely—the 
WHITE HOUSE CONFERENCE ON EDUCATION 


FOUR DOCUMENTARY FILMS:“THE 
BIG R°—The Responsibility of 
the Citizen for Education— 
narrated by Raymond Massey, 
and presenting pictorially the 
six main points to be discussed 
at the White House Confer- 
ence on Education. These films 
were jointly produced by, and 
are being shown on WBC’s 
four television stations. ' 


A ONE-HOUR DRAMATIZED RADIO DOCUMENTARY being broad- 
east on the eve of the Conference on the five WBC radio 
stations . . . to focus community interest on this event. 


~ ; 


DAILY ON-THE-SPOT RADIO AND TELEVISION NEWS COVERAGE 
of the Conference by WBC’s own correspondents in 


Washington. 


PRE-CONFERENCE NEWS COVERAGE, ROUND-TABLE DISCUS 
SIONS and documentaries examining White House topic 
—produced locally on all WBC radio stations. 


Now WBC, ever-mindful of public service in broad- 
casting, brings the American people face-to-face with 
the foremost facts and problems of education today, 
through complete coverage of the White House Confer- 
ence on Education . . . November 28 to December 2, 

An outgrowth of President Eisenhower's plea for 
better schools, the Conference is being held in Wash- 


4 


yy 


* 
 *% 
* 


ington, with delegations from all the states and térri- 
tories attending. Whatever evolves from this event will 
affect not only the future of millions of our children, 
but the very future of the nation. 

That’s why WBC has gone all out to emphasize the 


‘importance of The White House Conference on Educa- 


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film for “The Big R”—with camera crews visiting 
more than 50 schools of all types, covering classes of all 


vd 


types, including adult education and physical rehabili- 
tation. And every WBC radio and television station 
plans to preserve the importance and excitement of this 
Conference with continued coverage of country-wide 
educational events throughout the coming year. 

- This ‘constant interest in education is fundamental 
to the WBC concept of broadcasting in the public's 
interest, Every WBC station echoes this programming 
credo, as it stands ready to serve you. 


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s | a oe 


Six string players from the 
Marine Band played yester-| 


+|ay afternoon in the Phillips 


It added there is Teothitens| 


of § discriminatiog 

Jews to prevent undue 
concerning prompt 
nation of that evil. 

The report, prepared by the 
AJC for the World Jewish Con- 
gress, said full employment and 
“relative prosperity” in the 
United States helps to obscure 
the effects of discrimination, 
and that “a tifhtening in the 
labor mosist might well pro-| 
duce a more discouraging pic-| 
ture.” 

The report stated: 

“Jews are largely excluded 
from many of the basic ‘indus- 
tries, such as commercial bank- 
ing, automobile manufact uring, | 
ishipping and _  transportation,) 
agriculture and mining. They) 
|tend, as a result, to be concen- 
gies in speculative ‘ndustries, 
‘retail trade and the pro- 


he survey data showed less 
 sieetioniention in states with 
fair-employment laws, but the 
report added that these laws 
“do not by themselves halt dis- 


crimination.” 
“discrimination | 


Because 
against Jews is more subtle) 
than discrimination against. 
other groups,” it continued, “we 
must alert to find fresh, 
imaginative approaches to the 
task of breaking down long- 
established patterns of employ- 
'ment that limit the economic 
| opportunities of many Ameri- 
cans.’ 


Bishop Hails 


limpartially” the Federal fugitive 


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: Reporter 


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Refusal to 
Return Pastor 


NEW YORK, Nov. 
Bishop D. Ward Nichols of the 
African Methodist Episcopal 
Church today praised the 
Justice Department for refusing 
to return the Rev. J. A. Delaine 
to South Carolina, where he has 
been indicted on an assault 
and battery charge. 

Delaine, Negro minister and 
anti-segregationist, surrendered 
here on Friday, and said he 
would appeal to New York Gov. 
Averell Harriman not to sign 
extradition papers. 

Delaine is accused of firing, 
with intent to kill, at an auto 
near his Lake City, S. C., home 
last Oct. 10. Delaine contends 
he shot at the car after he 
was fired at first. 

Yesterday Gov. George Bell 
Timmerman of South Carolina 
called on President Eisenhower 
to “explain why the Justice 
Department refuses to enforce 


law against Delaine. 

The Governor said he was 
told Nov. 3 by the Department 
that it would not enforce the 
statute against Delaine. | 

Bishop Nichols said in a 
statement that Timmerman 
“aptly demonstrates the split 
personality type of government 
he espouses.” If the pastor is 
forced to go back to South 
Carolina, Bishop Nichols said, 
it means a “return to certain 
death.” 


Army Orders More 
Anti-Mortar R Radar 


Herald Tri 
GREAT NECK Lol Nov. 


27.—The Sperry Gyroscope Co. 
announced today that the Army 
has ordered another $8 million 
worth of the counter-mortar 
radar units devéloped by the 
company and the Army Signal 
Corps and used with “great 
effect” in the Korean war. 
The self - sufficient mobile 
units make it possible to track 
enemy mortar emplacements 
by the trajectory of their fire. 


Your 


Gallery. Only five were heard 
‘in Mozart’s Minor Quintet 


‘which opened the concert, but 
all six were used in. the origi- 


nal version of Arnold Schoen- 


be Transfigured Night. 

Thess are two celebrated 
scores, sharing a single musi- 
cal factor: each has a trans 
parency of texture that makes 
flawless intonation a require- 
ment. In addition to this com- 
mon factor, the Mozart asks’ 
both stylistic and technical per- 
fection, while the Schoenberg 
demands a sense of rise and 
fall in the rubati of phrases 
that are absent from a well- 
played Mozart. 

In mood the players yester- 
day understood all that was 
needed to make the entire 
| point of each work clear. Their 
Mozart was sensitive, well- 
‘paced, and soundly balanced. 


Marine Band Strings 
Heard at Phillips ' 


By Paul Hume 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Monday, November 24, 1955 42 


Their Schoenberg had that 
emotional _— t it needs, 
especially in the first, more 
truubled portion, and a ae 
of serenity achieved in the 
second portion. 


along with stretches of wholly 
acceptable playing, there were 
such regularly occurring 
patches of poor intonation 
that neither score could be 
fully enjoyed. 


‘Spy, Ring Smashed, 
East Germany Reports 


BERLIN, Nov. 27 m—The 
East German Communists re- 
ported today they have smashed 
an il-man ring | of “Western 
spies and agents.” 

The announcement came only 
a day after secret police Chief | 
Ernest Wollweber, a top Krem-| 
lin agent, was promoted 
Cabinet rank. 


PARKING is AST.) 
PROBLEM aT 


uta 


But throughout both works, _ 


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Marriage is both a happy and solemn 
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your life insurance helps 


you face the future with confidence. 


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Last year, American families re- 
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This is one of the reasons why you 
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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD , y | 
_12 ____ Monday, November 28, 1958 As Crowd Cheers 


Forty-Six District Motorists. |Pelice Hold AY XDVERTISED TV snd APPLIANCES. {I bovo’s UNCONDITIONAL POLICY «+ 
eae ae  . . _ .||Bull Session ON LONG | TWICE THE DIFFERENCE 
Lose Their Privilege of Driving |on 0 st. IN CASH IF YOU CAN 
. ype MSI E! 
Lee, ar etn tno ltt, atten, we cas emer l TAY TER AASE) | puy ror uss exsewner 


trict last week as a result of re-| The 33 suspensions consisted. financial responsibility insur- citizens gathered for a real bull 

vocations and suspensions of of 23 cases of 8 or more viola- ance. session about noon yesterday 

drivers’ permits, the Depart. tion points, 8 cases of failure | The complete list of suspen in the 200 block of O st. nw. PG OF THE DISCO 

ment of Vehicles and Traffic an- ito satisfy judgment, and 2 sions and revocations for the | There police ended a several- we MOUNT Houses * 816 cr 

nounced. | cases of failure to file insur-| week, as released by the Traf-\nj5ck chase of a young bull | 4 St treet, N. WwW. 

Of 13 permit revocations, 2/ ance. fie Department, np cscgge AME sea | Which had interrupted his trip : OPEN MONDAY 2 Tu 

were for drunk driving, 9 for | Twenty-three eeeaeas ene arenae pee Bn Rye ‘from Middleburg, Va. to a \ | ESDAY, ? AM. TO 9 P.M, 

accumulating at least 12 points| with driving without a C.| omas Morris Garuer, 618 bub at. F zi acking house by  burstin ' , ° 3195 

for traffic violations, 1 was for | permit or a D. C. registration | Revoked fer en| s . J ilson Bivd. 
DAY, 10 A.M. TO 9 P.M. 


after suspen 
two convictions of drivi fter ‘h i Rale ; . Be. through the tail gate of his! B,cee : a 
riving a r'had their privilege of f Being | mene’ fer ¥ ie 9 cattle truck at N. Capitol and a “7 ; DISCOUNT HOUSE IM q JA\ OPEN MONDAY & TUES 


oon _ veph H. Newman, N st. ov. H ats. 
weattie an totaling 12 points or| In the course of it, the ram- ie cccmmmant 


a gg a Be gh. paging animal dama 2 : 
Reupholstering! ‘Slipcovers! oye eee ust DAYS TO SAVE_ON THIS OFFER. 


| oe s sh. ne Robert Pr a 
r qver §@ or i bd raperies! ne; William M. i026 Whit-icinct Pvt. Melvin Bright las- 
= Pg G18 Mh st ny. aS, er eee ae pen to the 
ave them custom-made by experis! ae 4 port ${| ground as church-going throngs 
Call. NAtional 8-9800, Extension 444 — }/$,33/.s"-,Ariingion. 15 Says, ie septa A 
’ : witie 4, while, nmon 
and an experienced decorating representative will call on you at rt Sig mens, : aiess ¢ . Md. firehouse, firemen. fee- { 


your home. Let him show you samples of patterns and colors and ? land 
60 5 ve: -|\dered first aid to 18-yearo 
help you with your selection. No additional charge for this con- mond ©. Ros , 1338 8 A st ne Donald Lindsey of ryt + oo 


rent ; ' 
venient service ti at m | sington-Wheaton road for knee 


“Ss\injuries he sufered when his \ 


ive , | 17 8 st nw. 5 dave: ¢ \ 
ansburchs — . |e teceeaa eB aie eae art 
near the Norvale road intersec- 
en iam ap es tion. Firemen said the crash 
Washington—7th, Sth and E Sts. N.W. =e? By. | Smee WP fier fatally injured the Black Angus 
Langley Park, Md—New Hampshire Ave. and University Lane |} fitsroy G, Joseph. 2 14¢9 att, B= Be and did about $400 worth of 
ames RQ 39 dap 


damage to Lindsey’ s auto. 


Ee 


EES piroyet 1 y 
aa i kee Fun d ed (1) g Oy 


A By Fraternit EXTRA EXTR EXTRA 
re A 
A DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT EXTRA 


A went out on a $5000 limb to On any purchase or On any purchase or On any pounene ” DISCOUNT 
piusibitiiy Interanecs|promote a benefit for victims roup of purchases group of purchases group of purchase On any purchase or 
Opes man, 18 x gM! of muscular distrophy crawled totaling ade “a $200 totaling $300 group of purchases 
right back yesterday with al $199 to $2997 ae $399! of $400 or more! 
ae report it had cleared $3900 for| “te | — 
; | sufferers. 
2: Jonn| Harold Gershowitz, 17, pres- 
r, 82 i ident of 7 Upsilon Lambda Everything lw. ORD i original py me 2 _— 
i fratenity, said more tha : Models . .. and now yours 
i, ers0n e| A SMALL APPLIANCES })%*2.<.. 1956 RADIOS & PHONOS 


; ~ 2 Rs 
510 5. Ke :12000 persons attended the Nevember at “Extra Discounts.” 
‘7th ave. Rivers ale Ma: Doris 304 ULPS-sponsored dance Satur- HOUSEWARES wud may = $12.99 
Clarion. Massachusetts at aw and T vee 
ardel! pt 647 Florence st |4ay night at the Sheraton- 6.95 Z 

| $39.99 
ne. sya Irving Cassell, 4724 17th| Park Hotel. | ELECTRIC SHAVERS . ve AM: adie . 
penSeP anti Hiemtation. erivilese sus-| Gershowitz, a Roosevelt! 29.95 Shick 25 Electric $15 99 New ADMIRAL 21” TY $44 oo foe a $34.99 
surance s filed Kenneth Cooke. 208|High School student, said the! Shave Table Model .. $4.95 Philce Clock $22.99 
Rhode Island ave nw Jonn & Carver ‘funds raised would be turned 29.50 Reminsion 60 Del. $14.99 RCA 21” TV ee er 

Electrie aver : a - 


ans2 Ordway st. nw.; Mark Howard. 4534 
re Ay ny: tpomes B. Sate. aaa | over to the Washington Chap- 24.95 Nereice $14.29 Table Model Phene. lIvery er $54.99 


st Albert G, moemte er dr. ,.May 

os ] G os ; 
Air Station, Anac oy yO Pia ayo ar Distro- | $11.77 $168 EMERSON 21” TV 20.50 Webeer ‘siiais , ! 
As a highlight of the bene- Duchess Shaver . : Table Model | 76.95 Zenith FM-AM $56.00 


Crosby ‘Unretires’ ‘ . 
by ‘Unretires fit, at which the Sauter-Fine- yet oe Te $399.95 PHILCO 24” TV New 199.98 Admiral i $499 


9 | HOLLYWOOD, Nov. 27 @®/\gan Orchestra was featured, dite tobe NSOLE ene Console 
How does an GG make a great Sherry? (yi00 Crosny will emerge trom /Mickey Slavitt, 18, of 2011] MB '** SnS"De"Ynae.. $11.13 we New 179.95 Famous Make $14 
' what M-G-M called a “short-|Spruce dr. nw., was given a Femeus Make $ 2.99 $349.95 arlene 21" TV = eer: 
To bring out all its native clarity, Duff Let the heart-warming flavor of Duff [lived retirement” to costar with | trophy for his work in making Lady's Elec, Razor CONSOLE 
Gordon Cream Sherry is fined with the Gordon Cream Sherry contribute to Grave Kelly and Frank Sinatra’ the ae . success. oo STEAM and DRY IRONS $179.95 PHILCO 21” TV 
, in “High Society,” a musical|bers of the fraternity three 95 Sunbes : 
whites of eggs. It is this traditional the success of your next dinner party! - y y 17.95 ng, $10.39 Table Model Bey your Chri Gites 


final step which i i Mee Also N , Ning |COmedy film about Newport, R./ years ago promoted a benefit : 
ep nsures its gem-like try No. 28 (semi-sweet), N I., society, it was reported to-|in which they cleared $2000 oe $10.29 $329.95 ADMIRAL 21” TV while Boyd's Extra Discounts 
are in effect! 


brilliance in the glass. (dry), Pinta og dry) and Amon- ee 
: | day. Production will start in for the MD fund after they . ONSOL 
The memory of a fine dinner lingers tillado. Sole U. S. representatives early January. ihad gone $4800 in debt. _— saa — $11.55 . 


long; that of a noble wine, even longer. Munson G. Shaw Co., Inc., N.Y., N. Y. wn " 29.95 RCA 21” TV Deluxe 
: epee 198 See tn... $899 BN CoNsoue Special Savings On 


18.50 Westinghouse Lite- $ 7.69 New $550.00 ADMIRAL 21” TV AMERICAN FLYER 


17.95 GE. $ 9.39 3-WAY COMBINATION 


14.98 Fostoria Lishi- $ 5.99 & New $399.9 5 ZENITH 21” TV ELECTRIC TRAINS 


weight fren 


Reg. $79.95 
AuTowaTi¢ roasvens vat Die 
Teaster Ke 
21.95 Westinghouse $12.39 If New $389.95 WESTINGHOUSE $27 # FREIGHT TRAIN 


Beye —— ee Auto. REFRIGERATOR $ 99 
° Sunbeam . Aare 
98 Monee aiiosic g. ggg ff NO $262.25 ADMIRAL Dusl-Tome = SDE 45 
: _— $ 9.28 REFRIGERATOR . cae 993 
Reg. $59.95 


Res. $29.9 $399.95 NORGE 12 CU. FT. $248 
ELECTRIC — 399 UPRIGHT FREEZER ie vain * oe? 


A teen-age fraternity which 


Teaster 


TRAIN 
$529.95 NORGE 2-dr. Auto. + 00 ‘ 
REFRIGERATOR Reg. $34.95 


MIXERS & BLENDERS ei | FREIGHT 99 
17.80 Sunbeam $29.19 snes rum 2é §6=6— |_| 8ST TRAIN oN 


Mixmaster 


49.95 net mapa sor $29.99 $529.95 PHILCO 2-dr. $287 Reg. $7.95 


Aute. REFRIGERATOR 


29.95 o.b. $17.97 HAND $4.99 
Mixer ’ > 
os germ” gayargl Mer geznaz norrome oom SBSH un | 8S 


o vse me = (8 881 $219.95 FRIGIDAIRE 7 Cu. Ft. $4 3 4 


44.50 Waring 2-speed $25.49 REFRIGERATOR 


Chreme Blender 
49.50 Oster 2-speed $29.99 $189.95 WESTINGHOUSE 2.96 Dragnet Police 

Blender . 6 Cu. Ft. REFRIGERATOR Holster Set 
ELEC. COFFEEMAKERS $399.95 PHILCO AUTO ste All. Nations 
26.95 Sunbe . . ° De 

Coffee ae $16.39 Deluxe REFRIGERATOR hes 3.98 Renwall Viking 


* aa cre oe a £9.95 Universal 10-¢ 
COMPARE ec ® cen $18.58 Ec UIPMENT hip 


Single Aute. Contre! 


$2.95 Coffees Plates ni $ AYTAG Gun 
15.99 $299.95 M 


OUR Bo” eae, & FRYERS sassabbiiges-ton Reg. $2.98 Parker 
ee Sine ARO i es Sa 19.95 Sunbeam 1014" $339.95 WESTINGHOUSE 4 99 
Re ex Bet oe eo e Be | : Cook N-Fryer $18.79 AUTO. WASHER see eeeeeee asses a A Krory 159 
E 5 Se HOUSEWARES $229.95 BENDIX $2.50 Burrows Pool 99 
F INANCING oe ee AE 5.95 Foam Rubber Iren- AUTO. WASHER > Table 25: 
as Se ee wee 8 ae $299.95 BENDIX 490 Amsco Compbell 4.99 


Cever Set 

Plastic Shower & AUTO. WASHER Kids ys ag 

Windew  Curtal $12.95 ir. “I be 
ogepdnteetona I $229.95 NORGE Semi-Auto. Se ae " 699 


— — $13.99 ASHER 1.98 Dick — Police 1-59 


: ee re 
WITH ANY OTHER PLAN AND SAAWEEE | OE 
bad we ee a. Sf a $239.95 WHIRLPOOL 


| ririece Kitchen § 3.99 AUTO. WASHER 
No hidden charges or fees . . . no need to be a depositor, ve eae £9.98 Shetfielt Carving SuTe. WAGER 
‘ Biss eh es sei eae Kaife and Steak $ 7 49 AUTO. WASHER . 
Insure through any agent of your choice. ae ce ee Sa . $ 099 ien.ee parent 
: . , : ; aS: | Se a es = ; | . | J ELE 
Any of our 14 banking offices will be glad to serve you. ul - ges - . 698 Montel Jewel” g 9.49 nonce eine 


Rebinsen 24-Piece 62.95 Reye!l Master 
Stain Steel 
Raite et a/Pace- s 8.99 $249.95 WHIRLPOOL 26” Girl's Bike 


ELEC. DRYER 2.98 PARKER 


‘ ae Ps pe 7.95 ar olla an : 
SUBURBAN I R U a T po oe fealee......., 9 9:98 $222.95 NORGE ELECTRIC es anes, 

“3 oe 29.95 Fresh-N-Aire $16.88 DRYER ._.. er" 6% . ® 

(ses "2 oats He w/Auto . Pony 


$199.95 BENDIX SPEED Ree. $17.75 Child's 


COMPANY 7 \ . se Soom orem 8 £09 ELECTRIC DRYER ... with ® Records ....... 
| = ~ $299.95 IRONRITE Deluxe | 
oe CONSOLE IRONER Reg. $9.95 
aS |. es POLISHERS TV Tables 2 
SILVER SPRING, MD. HYATTSVILLE, MD. 4 Cae. oe Se . Ce $214.50 TAPPAN 30” 
00.95 Burks Tonk GAS GARGEE bic cewivic 


8252 Georgia Ave. niper 5-1000 $214 Baltimore Ave. UNion 4-7500 © 3 $44.00 
8 JUniper > » he fia Jshawen ee $38.99 New $269.95 HOTPOINT Deluxe 


$9.95 aeent "vosuun * $48.99 ELECTRI 


feof EASY TERMS 


» phone or C.0.D. orders. None sold te 


BETHESDA, Md. 
4600 East-West Highway 


PARK, Md. bg . | 
‘ARK, ea ee eee RS ie : ree cae yo lh Installation, service and delivery extra, 
SRLS Ria eee aes ooo and where desired right ‘ 


COLLEGE 
pts ager beam 6950 Carroll Avenue 


: TAKOMA PARK, Md. 
(and F Piney Bran Branch Rosd) 6842 New Hampshire Avenue 


INGELT, W. HYATTSVILLE, Md. Se ses Sage oo 
“ proton Road 5416 Queens Chapel Road . & SiR ha ke | Clarendon, Va., Store 


st aA HH 816 F St, N. W. 9813195 Wilson Blvd. B 
Md. ee Seana * | 


ERS MILL, Md. . WOODMOOR, 
12210 View Mill Road 10151 Colesville Road 
| I ees ae Open Mon. and Tues. Open Mon. and Tues. 
MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION BEE ON COE RS 9 AM. te 9 P.M. CC 10 A.M, to 9 P.M. 


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A@bead 


S$u¥uZAOD 


VS 


rv 


Fees 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
14 Monday, November 28, 195$ pico 


— ss 


ad 


rvice Player-of-the-Week 
Quantico’s Franco 


Rookie Shaw Leads Colts Over 49ers, 26-14 


BROWNS—From PF. I3 


Behind, 30, at halftime in their Thanksgiving Day game Krouse Saves 


with Fort Monmouth, the Quantico Marines followed a now 


familiar pattern by calling upon Fred Franco to make an im- Giants Tie 


portant yard near the Monmouth goal and the 192-pound 
fullback responded with an 1iil-yard a 
burst off tackle and the winning touch- 
down. 

Gaining 44 yards on 13 carries and 
playing his usual outstanding defen- 
sive game, the former Naval Academy 
star has been chosen The Washington 
Post and Times Herald Service Player- 
of-the-Week. 

A workhorse for the Marines all sea- 
son, Franco is the leading ground- 
gainer on the Quantico team with 399 
yards in 81 carries for a fine 48 
average. 

Franco first gained football recogni- 
tion as an All-State fullback for De 
LaSalle Academy in Newport, R. L, 
his home town. A monogram at Brown Fred Franco 
University was next, then on to the 
Naval Academy where he was first string fullback for three 
seasons. 

His football eligibility ran out after the 1952 season, but 
the following year saw him er oe Navy goat, a privilege 
granted football heroes still at the academy. 


Eleven Oklahoma Players 
Named to Big Seven Stars 


VS With Browns 


and sent Modzelewski over for 
the final yard. 

Grief appeared to be piling 
up for the Giants when Conerly, 
attempting to get out of the 
hole on the ensuing kickoff, 


passed poorly into the flat. 
Guard Charles Nolls inter- 
cepted and raced 14 yards to a 
touchdown that put the Browns 
ahead 35-28. 

Now the Giants were racing 
the clock, and they won. In 
nine plays they covered 85 
yards with Gifford getting a 
pass from Conerly on the 14, 
shaking Pettibon loose, and get- 
ting the tying touchdown. 

Agajanian kicked the vital 
point. 

It was the Browns’ turn now 
to try to beat the clock and 
they missed, by the breadth of 
the broad hand Krouse inter- 
posed on Groza’s shot at the 


KANSAS CITY, Nov. 27 (®/\and Bob Burris, guards Bo Bo- a aves 


Resemblance between the Uni-|linger and Cecil Morris, center 
versity of Oklahoma’s starting | Jerry Tubbs and tackle Edmond 
lineup and the Associated Press|Gray on the first unit. 
Big Seven conference football| The Sooners made the sec- 
all stars for 1955 is more than’ond honor team with John 
just a coincidence. Bell, end; Calvin Woodworth, 
The Sooners, who haven't! tackle, and Jim Harris, Clendon 
been beaten by a Big Seven| Thomas and Billy Pricer, backs. 


for the Colts. 


Former Oregon Star 
Wins Duel With Tittle — 


BALTIMORE, Nov. 27 ‘#—Baltimore rookie quarterback 
George Shaw caught the San Francisco defense napping and 
ran 21 yards up the middle today for a touchdown that broke’ 
the back of a late 49er threat and brought a 26to-14 victory 


Pf 


' 


: 
' 


ss over the goal to former 
aryland end Lioyd Colter- 
yahn which was nullified be- 
cause he took too much time to 
get the play off and San Fran- 
cisco evidentally was_expecting 
another forward. 

Instead, the Oregon star of 
last year kept the ball and tore 
straight ahead for his first 
professional touchdown. 

At the time, the @#9ers ap- 
peared to be on their way to 


a ——— 


overcoming a 190 lead which 


—#s\the Colts piled up early in the 
third 


period. 
Quarterback Y. A. Tittle of 


vs the 49ers had thrown two passes 


of 44 and 32 yards to Wil- 


ison and Gordy Soltan for 


inj touchdowns to cut the margin 
Tito 19-14. 
2- 


member since 1946 and by any-| Sharing first-team spots with Salaun Wine Acain 


body in the last 28 games, the mighty Oklahomans were 
placed six men on the first) Harold Burnine of Missouri, the 
team and five on the second) Nation’s leading pass catcher, 
mythical eleven selected by the and Lamar Meyer of Colorado, 
Associated Press with the help | erds; Laverne Torczon, Nebras- 
of writers, sportscasters,| ka, tackle, and backs Rex Fisch- 


ENGLEWOOD, N. J., Nov. 27 
Henri Salaun, Boston, the na 
tional amateur champion, won 
the fourth annual twoday 
Ticknor-Glidden squash rac- 


coaches, scouts and officials |er, Nebraska, and Doug Roeth-|quets round-robin tournament 


who saw the teams in action. er, Kansas State. 

The Big Seven Conference’s; Only unanimous choices were 
entry in the Orange Bowl where Bolinger and McDonald. Bur- 
it'll face unbeaten Maryland,' nine and Tubbs had the next 
landed backs Tommy McDonald' strongest backing. 


by defeating Dick Mateer, 
Philadelphia, the defending 
champion, 14—15, 15—9, 18—15, 
15—9 and 15—4 at the Engle- 
wood Field Club today. 


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DOUDED. 100 PROOF © STITZEL- WELLER DBISTECEER VEGAS. LOSS TILE, CV..1649 


Bert Rechichar, who played 
the second half with a broken 
nose, kicked field goals of 15 
and 52 yards in the first two 
periods to get the Colts off to 
a 60 lead. ran it up to 
130 at the when 
passes by Shaw were completed 
for 80 yards, the last ng 19 
yards over the goal to End ohn 
Mutscheller. 

Three more Shaw completions 


second half by the Colts 
for another hdown and the 
19-0 lead before Tittle got go- 
ing. Alan Ameche rammed over 


Shaw had just completed a? 


+! 233,448 for eight games in 1948 


| 
’ 


from the one for the Colts’ 
score. 
The triumph was the fifth in 
10 games with one tie for the 
Colts and gave them undis-' 
puted possession of third place 
in the Western Division of the 
National Football League. 

The seventh loss for the 49ers 
dropped them into a cellar tie 
with Detroit. 


The crowd of 33,485 gave|® 
“| Baltimore a total attendance 


of 236,826 for six games, a new 
high for professional football 
in the city. The old record was 


when the Colts were in the All 
America Conference. 

Shaw completed 12 of his 22 
—— for 200 yards while 

ttle hit on 14 of 24 for 207. 
Ameche, the league’s leading’ 

gainer, added 87 yards 
to his total on 21 carries. 

Tittle went through two frus- 
trating situations after the 
49ers got the Colts 24 in the 
second period and 29 in the) 
third. Gino’ Marchetti, big Colt 
lineman, dumped him twice in 
a row for losses totaling 37 
yards on the first occasion and 
the 49ers wound up with fourth 
down and 44 to go, ; 

The. next time, a holding 
penalty nullified a pass to the 
13 and Marchetti, joined by 
Bill Pellington, threw Tittle for 


Redskins Like | 
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Washington President George 
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This may or may not be sound | ¢ 
reasoning. One astute pro foot-|¢ 
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the good boys who aren’t picked 
in the first three rounds? They 
rightly may feel insulted and go 
to Canada anyway.” 

—Jack Walsh. 


NOrth 7-7557 


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- Bowl Teams Matched After Irish, Middies Upset|=*: 


. Pass Stress 


Dallas Wanted Navy Wider Lanes| eT ISARS—from Pe. 12 Robs Punch 
Before Loss to Army Will Affect Yy ee Cards Knock Sometimes od 


; | , tj Bears F PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 27 
NEW YORK, Nov. 27 (#—College football fans turned their tj tip} POM = |w—army's galloping iegions 
attention to a star-spangled list of bowl games today after «Rebounds Mss tj truck if favored Navy 


separ tarry season which as a acting climax saw Navy and Notre typ Yj d without completing a pass and 

Dame go down to staggering defeats. | tj; tél 53 14. D b d 
Eleventh-ranked Navy, primed for a bid to the Cotton Bowl, ay Deve Shale Yj Lea . ° a tay ae ee ae op 'y ar OD v0 
was flattened by Army’s fierce ground power and untimely Poti tj; : questions for foo meester 

Middie fumbles in the service classic at Philadelphia, witnessed Yj : Bears and one Cardinal w minds to ponder during the 
by 102,000. Knocked on their haunches by a quick Navy score,| Ae Cone Siar ial L banished “*|iong winter evenings. 

‘Marylan . 
tiie tadtitennia “ ectarae With the snow falling so hard|, 2. 18 the forward’ pass los- b 


Southern California, smarting under a season of 4 defeats, wider free throw lane in basket- ing some of its appeal as a 
rose to tremendous heights toy “=| ball will have its chief effect on from leaden skies the field| striking weapon? 
smother the Nation's fifth- miesed free threw rebounds. lights had to be switched on| 2 Ig one-platoon college 


eee oe i= Pelligrini Meets | ‘he iane this season will be Wij. .“ '| [im the first period, the Cards| football reverting to the “grind. 
12 feet wide instead of 6. Where : rolled 73 yards in 13 plays for decades ago = @. couple o drop by drop 
see 


Meanwhile, telephone bells My 
j from Philadelphia to B olinger on the tall players used to stand “ accidental opening touch- 
own. 


Atlanta, Starkville to Dallas to ul ; just about under the basket and ng passe 
sens the - ey bow! lineup S livan S how merely reach out for missed This came when McHan’s 28-|Earl (Red) Bilaik —_ ann 
or next Jan. Bob Pellegrini, Maryland yard shot to Gern Nagler i team’s 146 upset of the Mid- 

gri ary free throws, now they will have gler in the shipmen in Philadelphia Satur. ; 


Mississippi, winner of the|center, got a close-up look at defie 
Southeastern Conference title| Bo Bolinger, Oklahoma guard,|*° Sramble more for them re mn ‘Rey ere ay wpe day. “I do think we are gain- 
after a 26-0 rout of Mississippi |iast night on Ed Sullivan's New/fom 3 feet farther back on eo pe oF oe 5 oy thay Eo 

inte, wee cheove, to play, : — $erk_ wlovisien show carried! each side. ane , = srs 7 ; . me 
Christian in the Cotton Bow! at | by “TY. Also a player used to t “pome of us may have 
Dallas. The Sugar Bowl picked; They were lined up alongside) himself By the - old oe FOUL L*] NE Mri nd yy “my osu come inclined to be pass-. 
Georgia Tech, 213 victor over) each other as members of the|throw lane used to meet the Cardinal touchdown a few min- happy. We have thought it a 

Georgia, as foe of Pittsburgh) Collier’s All-America football|peginning of the free throw utes later when Matson grabbed cure-all, Yet we have learned 

in New Orleans. team. Coach Ray Eliot of Illi-\circie All he had to do on Williams’ punt on the ro adinat that it produces cheap yard- 

So here’s the way the “big/ mols presented Pellegrini with! direct rebounds back toward 23 in full stride and streaked |*%* and sometimes leaves . 
four” bowls square off on the|the alter Camp Memorial/the free throw line was step 77 yards through the entire ee ae ey eee DANIEL oe 
Monday following the Sabbath| Trophy as the yey play- into position in front of the Bear team to score punch.” 

New Year's Day: de be hep A ne 5 Bi oy res|shooter and retrieve it. . At the close of the first quar- oe Si P naga ee dl = : < 

ROSE BOWL—UCLA (#1) vs./of Coaches which picked the| Won't Affect Offense ter, the Cards made it 21 to o/‘erpach Don om Webster| SZDD22 lav or 
Michigan State (8-1). team. Now that rebounder is fur- ee Upon quick exploitation of ain y. called only two passes 

cm iiatelh: Beret, ..dees ent Pellegrial will be ocins ther back, too, and the foul Bear 24 Two pl ot iain tee against Navy. One. fell incom- 
(10-0) vs. Oklahoma (10-0) Bowl on Jan. # in Miami. Flank.|220oter is in better position to} NEW LANE—Diagram shows how new 12footwide free |, -o0104 19 yards through the|Plete,, the other was inter- 

me , | o Pellegrini on the other side| Ste? forward and try to retrieve) (nrow lane makes scramble for missed foul shots more (Bear middle for a touchiown |°*Pte” b 


ing a new evaluation of the 


.. ing Pellegrini on the other side 
SUGAR BOWL — Georgia|j.® h iman| “8 missed free throw. ~ Midway in th | Yet slashing runs by Full- 
Tech (8-1) vs. Pittsburgh (7-3). |Cuttton UCLA guard, who} Millikan says he does not| ‘Melt. “H” indicates member of home team, “V" visite |) 7)’ Cardinale Lemmas inatlback Pat Uebel, Pete Lash, 
COTTON BOWL —Texas{Played against Pellegrini ear-|¢xpect the widened lane to have| img team. Dotted line indicates former boundaries of € {fourth touchdown through the 
lier in the season. much effect on his offense be-| foot lane, “X” indicates advantageous position rebounder (befuddled Bears, This time, it 


Christian (9-1) vs. Mississippi | rds 
@1). the trode nasi in on er taeat reached the saturation| "sed to have over foul shooter, who now will become im eet che eee ""Holleder might have chosen 

Felix McKnight, president of|.+ the Touchdown Club, 1414|point last season in the use| portant retriever when he misses free throw. tackle. to throw more passes, partic- Zers S moother 
the Cotton Bow! in Dallas, wasi7 st. nw. of the zone defense. In 18 Trailing 27 to 0, the Bears|¥atly when Army was driving 


in Philadelphia Saturday to ex- of 22 games last season, the we finally tallied late in th at the goal at the end of the 
toy tise ners teellFans Honor — |i"zssetseos ‘Sis|QKklahoma First, Maryland |Site tees eres eee Satna] 904 Smoother... 
of a zone , n : a 
om Dosen ase owt Bag ago dip we F vi 2h. * pointed out. . oma rs . ar y it ~~ A Pg a 66-yard march again Navy and i woul a nad 
, t nia Maryland fans will see the . . | The Bears play worsened |*®come guess him. ie , 
time of the game when  the|* CATON, MAPCHINA™ | rerrapins using some zone de 9eCONG in Final INS Poll with the weather in the second|Perb directing job. 
When Army’s Pat Uebel and PITTSBURGH, Nov. 27) Sense = Baw a oo ~_ ie rs er — - ll. il e straight palit foot: 
Washi ‘s Redskins had a/s0n, M admitted, But not -y eld goal by Summer- , 
Pete Lash ripped through hee apy Ae - ation at neces sarily because the new NEW YORK, Nov. 27 (INS), made the select circle. Texas.) with the third period 2:3g| ball because of the ditching of 
Navy’s faltering defenses for a ide 1 ‘ d Millika Undefeated Oklahoma was)|Christian is ranked sixth and oid. the two-platoon system. 
hack tri h. the Cotton Forbes Field today even before; wice iane force n to ow ul don't 
Bowl — eee "had to get |they beat the Steelers, 23-14. | take advantage of it. named National champion in/ Mississippi, 10th. _, After the ensuing kickoff, J persona thang . on smoot i} 
en the telephone. and make Ralph Felton of nearby Mid-\no Help for Little Men the final International News; Sugar Bowl bound Georgia |Brow's she = _ ‘ ay ‘intricate ey patterns 00ber 
, and Ron Marciniak of ) was intercepte | . 
other’ arrangements. Pittsburgh. ~ al wee ae 4o'| Millikan said that as long as|S**Vite football poll announced) Tech is seventh, while its op-itom Keane on the Bear 17 ang|With one - platoon football , 
ponent, Pitt, is wunranked./five plays later, Matson spun|Which has cut in half our pe-| 779) smoother. 


Finally he landed Mississippi, he has to practice his offense | today. 
; the game and presented s Maryland, the only other un-|Notre Dame dropped to ninth/across from the one to make it|tTiod for working oh both of. 


. ore 
the Southeastern titleholders, ainst a zone defense, he is 
as a foe for Jim Swink and his| with handsome mk ehh 00 babe tle vabolir: wee place after losing to Southern|37 to 7. The rout was wel|fense and defense. 
mates at TCU, who clinched the) the zone this season instead of » California yesterday. “So when we find players 
The top 10: 1, Oklahoma ——-—~-—wwennes| Who can run, we stress run- 


Southwest Conference title! : : his rinky dinks as in the past 
with 20-13 last quarter triumph Spanish, Irish Tie Would the wider lanes give|in_ Miami, (10-0); 2, Maryland (10-0); 3, “tet htb tema i | 13 13—53| ning and to some extent I sup- 
over Southern Methodist. Both Reuters the smaller players a break by Michigan State (61); 4, UCLA BEAR SCORING , s|pose, neglect our passing. But 


have imposing 9-1 records. DUBLIN, Ireland, Nov. 27)\keeping the boys three feet (011); 5, Ohio State (7-2): 6.liises). Ces 3. °» iwe feel with a strong running 
. free|f Texas Christian (9-11); 7, Geor-|, CARDINALS : Ton ‘+l attack we can control the ball 


and Dick Murtland carried the 
Cadets to a total of 283 rushing 


Tech, which played|Spain drew with Eire in aif r back from the 

in the Cotton Bow! a year ago,|soccer international here today,|throw rebounds? gia Tech (61-1); 8, Auburn ); Mateom better and show more scoring 

ceepted the New Orleans bid,/2-2. Spain led at half-time, 2-1.| “I wouldn't think so,” Milll- 

giving Coach Bobby Dodd his|The Spanish squad meets Eng-jkan smiled, “those big boys 

seventh bowl team in 11 years|land at Wembley next Wednes-|will be just as big when they 
ef coaching at Tech. day. close the gap.” 


> epentey cet pees Tees 
», ‘ : MARKET hide C0. BETHESDA “ inlaid r¢ 7 ina ala 
aust 


(8-1-1); 9, Notre Dame (8-2); 10,| Mines as rem). ipower when we gét in posi- 
Mississippi (9-1). Te aaree 5 | tion.” 


PS 
Th 


& ‘ ay ¥ . S - ae 


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LYNCHBURG, TENNESSEE 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
16 . Monday, November 28, 1955 — 


—_—_-- 


Areund The 


Horses and People 


JOCKEY HEDLEY WOODHOUSE and the 3-year-old Sailor 
got the Pimlico Special job done in fine style, despite the fact 
that the rider's saddle slipped at the clubhouse turn... At | 
the time, Woodhouse probably believed he'd be lucky to stay 
aboard, much less win the famous race. 
Perhaps you noticed the jockey 
perched well up on colt’s shoulders 
where he could use his knees as 
anchors. Of course, he could still guide 


$15,00 


0 Gallorette Features Final Week at Pimlico 


> 


Searching~ . 


Racing Selections tor Pimlico 


Probable 


* |Favorite 


By Walter Haight © 
Staff Reporter 


Sailor, but otherwise the colt was run- 
ning his own race... Horses some- — 
times know what is expected of them 
and Sailor perhaps kept enough in re- (eam ao * 
serve to stave off his rivals and romp  f8 # . | 
home .. . Jockeys as a rule are willing ~ 3) aa > | 
to trust their mounts when danger 

arises. If caught in a jam, the veteran 

riders often will dangle the reins, grab 

a hold on the mane and almost invari- 

ably the horses come through ship- 

shape ... However, green apprentices 

and timid veterans sometimes yank 

the horse’s head up, thus depriving 

him of seeing the situation, and accidents result . With 
Sailor winning despite loosened equipment, it is a coincidence 
that a horse named Navy figured in one of the most unique | 
finishes ever unfolded before these eyes .. . At Charles Town 

> some six or eight years ago, | 
Willie Balzaretti, currently 
performing at Pimlico, was 
rounding the far turn with 
Navy a length in front... His 
saddle not only slipped, but 
finally swung under the 
horse's stomach. Two horses 
surged to the front of Navy 
but Balzaretti, riding bare-. 
back with the saddle dangling 
between his mount’s legs, 
somehow kept Navy going 
, and he won the race ...A 
| great exhibition of courage— 
human and equine. Had it 
happened in a Derby or 
Preakness, it probably would 
be rated second only to Paul 
Revere’s ride .. . Woodhouse, 
who took only a few mounts 
in Maryland this Fall, gath- 
ered in two of th- big pots, 
having won the Pimlico Fu- 
turity with Nail. 


Bennings’ 
Bets at 
Charles Town 


sieee; 4- aor setae 


WM SRe— IF OMe 


room Party (bervis} 
4 Appleton (McCracken) 


PSPs Seep 


. 
et ee ee te ht et ee et et et et et 


w Oe pe + ee tee 
4 WOADeoO? veo-See§ 


| 
. 


ee wel ) eee ee ee 
6 Oe ee he et ee eee ee OD 


: 
=, 


Red Red “nina. lt 
Wild Wing oh 
ood 


Loks¢ (Ka 
In Production 
Pacet ¢ — 


EIGHT THIRTY, the sire 
of Sailor, made it two vic- 
tories in a row for his blood 
on the weekend show. He also | 
sired Roseborough, the $44 | 
winner of the eighth race. . 
And how right was the 
trainer who has been briefing 
me on the South American 
| horses? If you recall, he said 
'| El Chama and Prendase, the 
| last to arrive for the Wash- 
ington (D.C.) International, 
had the beat chance because 
they retained their Venezuela 
form, whereas the other for- 
eigners, here earlier, prob- 
ably would tail off .. . Then 
the other day I reported, he 
said he didn’t think much of 
Prendase’s chances in the | 
Special because he had been | 
around long enough to have 
become acclimated ... Well, 
-1| Prendase was a dull- running 
*%-i| fifth and I’m more inclined to 
12-1} blame his performance on 
i2-1| the “acclimated” angle than 

on the fact that the Interna- 

tional was on the ass and 
the Special on the main 
| track ... It was disclosed 
before the Special that | 

Prendase, in his native land, | 
“jj had run better on dirt than 

on turf. 


od 


(Parker) 
ada 


ce (McCracken) 
Scepter (Braccia 
Quarterwave ‘Boni on) 
Bunny Pressure (Snyder) 
Byranip ‘McKee 
Pancy Foot (‘Pap 
Spinning Jenny 


LONGSHOT DAILY DOUBLE 
RED COMET and SCEPTER 


THIRD RACE—Parse $1000; 
4 ap: claiming: _ fies 
Course. about 6 furien 
Third Ace (Servis) 
. “on on) 
UTrechet ’ 
Becky (Pappas) “~ 


POUVUSCONNMEOSe-3-3 
’ , , ’ ; * ’ ' , , , 


ef O-§'S WHY -Ne-Ow 


ee 


-year- 
T 


—) 
O-3 Shor’ *# Fw - Os 
' > 


Raipn Holt 

Waiter A Yokel ‘Headley ) 
feemadan (Ardu ee 
10 Miss Jubiiee i ateteai 
12 Gamboge (Snyder) _— 
13 Nostalgic (Pappas) 


voy) ay 


PP LSSe eer ew 
*>et+teeeepeeeeee 


at et ee gt Rt at pt ee Bt Pt et et 
bo em ee ee 


Ot he ne et ee et ee BL he ne 
PN Nhs It O-1& 


od 
vo 
'* 


RACE—Purse $12 -year- 
claiming: ae Town — 


FSF Su 


urrent (Thacker) 
ing ‘*Gray) 
| (Minente) 
Zest (Herman) .... 
y (Servis) 
Locks Betty (Bracciaic) 
| Beaus Arrow (Van Leer) 
Ace Drum .( Arduini) 
Nipeat (McKee) 
Stunning Date (Green) 


oo 
Da 


. . 
ee pe Pe et tet Le he ee et et 


. b S3EE533 


~ 


Ali Gone (Pa 
Columei!le (cl 
Woody Glen * 

7 Palatine Pet (Servis 
r (Teacue) 


y) 
freeage) 
‘Snyd 


nt ne et et et 9 et PP et et 
et pe et et ee PD me 
4uUew See oe 
oe 


TO MISS LIZZIE: As I 
wrote a couple of columns | 
ago, no Ladies’ Days are 
scheduled at Pimlico. You 
have to read ‘em all to keep 
posted .. . To VGB: Tony 
DeSpirito is recuperating 
nicely and probably will ride 
in Florida To EMK: 
Others caught m> napping, 
too. Snark’s world record of 
.2| 1.15 4/5 is for six and a half 
furlongs. The six-furlong | 
mark is 1:06 1/5 set by Eng- | 


; North Ciark 


SIXTH RACE—Purse $1500; 
and ep: erent about 


Pellater | 

Mrs. G Me -Kee) 
Gaict r (Palumbo) 
Lecate {Pasher 
aParr (Par 

sQuick tay Parker) 
Lovely Miss ( Vore! 


year-olds 
ferionss. | 


3- 
7 


—_ 
~~ Ore 
o8-I~ 


soo eeGawts 
>eetete 'eeee 


Ot tn tt et hy pe 


oe 


— 
310 utuatetind 


© oo 


aod o° 


" _* 
Oe pe ht et Le et ne et ~ 
se 
ot 


2 
-- 


SEVENTH = atmPesce si7te0: -year- 
elds and ep: claiming; mile B- one- 
eighth. 
War Fantasy (Perker) 120 
ten ight Mist (Teague) ae 
Date (Servis 


Hot 
Prodigal son (MeGor fern) 
Jackadandy 


--* 
> 
o~ 


eae 


29 +52 WOuwnv ois 
a 


course. Bolero’s 1:08 1/5 at 
Golden Gate generally is ac- 
cepted as tops ... To I-For- | 
get-Who: Route No. 1 goes by 
Laurel at a north-northeast 
angle, therefore the track is 
east-southeast of the high- 
way. The track is in Anne 
Arundel County:. Howard is 


ye 
td 28 259: VI NW —'! 
SSS sssSsssa 
Guat rooorvreeaesS 
>.eee i = ’ > | ; 


Oe et tet 2 eee 


a 


Montecessino (Servis! 
IGHTH RACE—Perse 81700; 
elds and up: claiming: mile 
sixteent 

Wohneda (Parker) 


Lad 
. 
.. 

« 
fe 
7; 


Millie Jess 
Cabo Bianco (Braceiale) 
Beseess (Ser oe 


os 
AADRROH BVO a3 
*>e+eeeeéees: *teaeee 


Prince Georges south of little 
bridge over the Patuxent | 
River. 


This Week’s Football 


COLLEGE FOOTBALL 
FRIDAY 
Arizona &. at Hawaii 
COLLEGE FOOTBALL 


SATURDAY 


erth Coveting at Deke, 
at euston 


Sed 


Se hoe ok 


eo « * 
eT ed ded ee 
A tt et me tps ere 
2224 QA SIAN 


a +4 


' ee 
Trail ‘of Gold (Snyder) 


BEST BET—BELLATOR (6th Race) 


TROPICAL ENTRIES 


$2000; 3-year- — up: cimée 
ve 


wie 


w 

r mM. af Tampa. 

N. Tex. State at Trinity 
SERVICE FOOTBALL 


veilr at Belling APE 
ackson st Quantice. 


By 3 


SOFTBALL 
ERlcare betes “at 


rt. 
Ft. 


eee 
— |) ded At hee 
2 Om AMMVsiogi 


LeSos 


Pilicdciohts. 


Sa 


Francisco. 


—e 
ow 


“=f 


Turee Jane 
ear-olds. pHowan 
ry aw Cc. . 


‘day. 


tain on the Maryland season 


chased from Ogden Phipps and 
whose record 


Dayton Snaps By 2 Papers 


land’s Blink on a down-hill |P®™ 


last season's record. 
west of the railroad and |}.4 


' 

Area thoroughbred horse; 
racing enters it final phase to-| 
Pimlico has six days to’ 
go before ringing down the cur- 


while Charles Town continues 
through Dec. 17 to end the 


AP. 


"s A@miral 
te 
ne 


gh eee tia)’ “Beoutle (18), Bache 


vaachane (15), Westevrer (10). First 
, St (14), Salle (9), Freeh ond 


rt Wlasbore (19), Bal Oot (12), Fe 
or " 
Hackle (21), Chit Chat (19), 


One Threw (1%, 


Ob Se Gegeh May, an ence 0 


year’s sport in the East. 
One more stake remains to 
be decided at Pimlico. | 
This is the $15,000 Gallorette 
Stakes at a mile and a furlong | 
and for fillies and mares. It 
will be run on Saturday and all 


indications point to a field of}, 
'8 or 10 of the better grade 
runners in the feminine group. 


Searching Likely Favorite 


Probable favorite for the Gal- 
lorette is Mrs. E. D. Jacobs’ 
Searching, a 3-year-old filly pur- 


FIRST RACE—Purse, 
. 


cease 


since then has 
been little short of sensational, 
with 16 appearances in the 
thoney in 18 starts. 

Also rated as probable start- 
ers are W. J. Appel’s Another) } 
World, Mrs. L. M. Carver's 
Betty Barr, M. S. Goldnamer’s 
Royal Fan, Happy Hill Farm's |} 
June Fete, Maine Chance 
Farm's Incidentally, E. Barry 
Ryan’s White Cross, J. V. 
Thompson's Grand Graphen, 
T. F. White’s Miss Weesie and 
C. V. Whitney's Silent One. 


|Stake’s Fourth Running 


This will be the fourth run- 
ining of the Gallorette and in 
‘previous seasons it has been 
won .by La Corredora, Sabette 
and Mile. Lorette, The last | 11 seri Boek 
named who ‘covered the nine| is Brent Memor 
furlongs in 1.501/5 holds the|__*?eo™son_ Stab! 
time record for the stakes.) 
Mile. Lorette incidentally is a' 
daughter of Gallorette 
whom the stakes is named. | 

Gallorette performed in the! ,3 38%,?* 


Ce 

; potter New 

ta : “ene 

= Bale in o Bor) o8 nee wer 
AS move 3 


itte ingut } 


HAZ 


back 


Roya 
Af von Cree 
15 Sand Piy 


« Grlam) ” 
(Conlon ) 


‘THIRD & 


ne iss 

Best ot (Ori Neecs 
Had Pee 

earl Neck) Lm vern! Well 


{*e Boy 


‘% Veeese, 
4 Winsboro renson 
Maid ry Cash ‘(Rus 
for | a oval § Some ali (No 


‘Bini nerd i Could 


: Seehon and Sp: 
magne there +4 


we ‘time 


sid yt tnere more) “racine 
LONGSHOT DAILY DOUBLE 
RUCHE and HEORTER 


AGE —Parte, $3000, 9-year-cld maiden fillies; six 


bven the edee 
in debut 


sacked Pere 


and R Tuckerman ot 
FOURTH aha ie. s2500; 2- year-olds; claiming: 1 


up 
te suits aood now 


: 14), 
0% fe. (18), Beliater (¢ Mre. 


er Fentesry (96). Twilight Milet 


odaremet TEN? Webneds (10), Ted- 
sun e ian Gh (7). 


AT TROPIC 
~~ er ». Heep sed Wall 
Ssecs Bab ‘10 
‘S), Gu Stanley On 


» Alan KR. (6). 
Dise (18), Metier (13), De 


ecenoware (14), Mise Stifle (18), 
AiciNg FREE (21), Comeera (19), 
Fret Ue. Marked Game (16). 
mah, a lare (11), Be Report 

onset (18), Dee De Fer (18), 
(17) fet Ber (6), 


aS Seo 
’ 7% 'f 


co me 


eowys. 


~~ 
TTT 


‘ 


et eee 


o- 
. 


he hl 


ibboind® ‘at ty 
5 Tee 
( : 


Caeance Ge 


Dever Dell (4). 


PITTI TSS 


im this 
to. beat 


et et pe ee et et PL 


APMWARMOOP DW OT wes 


a Oe eh pene et eee 


SSSaso wtee 
: 'F 


vetter 


ai tt 


if recently 


| Horses to Watch 


AT PIMLICO 

GOOD TIMES—This plater is) 
|; worth following up. 

ANOTHER PAGE—Well sup-| 
ported in debut. | 

FAITHFUL SONG—Will be 
dropped inte right spot. 

GRAND GRAPHEN—Need-. 
“}\ed last: needs route for best. | 


Railbird Longshot | 


RANGE MAID 
7th Race, Pimlico 


7 IB mORODAPSOAHA 


gree oe 
CNNDOCOC BMS ee 
*>eseepePeepeetet_epeee 


tlh pl om a ls lt ls ml lh ls 


| 
| 
i 
"7 


os 
YROePrryres 

; 
LS Pi tn 


7 


o 


BPs 


chen pe fe 3 : 
en ) + kion 
1 {te fon } y 


a 


1 


SRO SRS Se 


+ Hungarians Win 

ROME, Nov. 27 ®#—A power- 
ful Hungarian team broke 
through a stout Italian defense 
in the second half today to beat 
-j| Italy, 20, in an international’ 
soccer game at Budapest. 


 chaness 


s best bet 118 


DEL pdate ee tedet 
. 7 ; : ; , , 


— te et et ot oe 
: ’ 
los 


Chan 
Very fast: h out 
Bounty (Culmon well in Jersey ] 


w REST BET—BAIL our (4th Race) 


surprise iil 


‘colors of W. L. Brann for a 
‘large part of her career and 
‘then finished up campaigning 
in the silks of Mrs. M. A. Moore 
of Virginia. 


Beats Villanova Horse of Year 


NEW YORK, Nov. 27 @ 


Losing Streak \xisnn. tne 
DAYTON, Ohio, Nov. 27 


The Dayton Flyers broke a sev- |named 
streak 


today,|and 3-year-old champion today | 


en-game 
coming from behind to detest! named the annual poll of the, 
Villanova, 19-7, in the final foot-| Morning Telegraph and Daily! 
ball game of the season for’ Racing Form. 
|both schools. | ‘The bay son of Nasrullah who 
The first meeting between ji. owned by the Belair Stud of 
the two colleges was highlight-| > ¢ late William Woodward Jr. 
ed by two long runs by Day-|was far in front of the King 
ton’s Billy Smith, 160-pound| Ranch’s High Gun and Rex 
left half from Hamilton, Ohio.| riisworth’s Swaps in the ballot- 
Smith raced 51 yards to open ing by 33 turf experts 
the scoring in the first quarter. Neshua, who won $752,550 in| 
In the third period, with the 1955 to become the leading one 
Flyers trailing, 76, Smith ran’ year purse grabber, received 22 
around right end, cut back to frst place votes. He ran his 
the middle of the field, and total earnings to $945,415. 
sped 37 yards untouched for High Gun, a 4-year-old and 
the second Dayton score. last year’s 3-year-old champion 
Quarterback Ken Bocken- who beat Nashua in the famous 
'Stette bucked in from one foot cv.onby Stakes at Belmont 
‘to Low, up the game in the final received eight firsts, Swaps, 
i 
A Villanova kick, blocked by. Soe a ie we yr 
End Jim Katcavage and recov-| Rejair star in the big Washing- 
‘ered by the Flyers on the Wild-' ton Park match race, got three 
‘cat 37, set up the second Day- votes. P 
ton score. Needles, the Florida-bred colt 
The win brought Dayton’s| from the D. & H. Stable, was 
season record to 36-1. Villa- chosen the 2-year-old champion 
nova wound up 1-9, duplicating | ,ve, Career Boy, Prince John, 
er Nail, Swoon’s Son and others in 
© reepaeeel? | ‘this mixed up division. 
; pass from. gre rae Bias og . Ponder, _ 
, ep eeneerns: Kentucky Derby winner, po 
Smith dl, ren). Pat: ward. ”*""""/15 Grsts and on the basis of 
5 for first, a second, and 1 
: \for third, had 87 points. 
Bucholz Victor ' ©. V. Whitney’s Career Boy 
ST. LOUIS, Nov. 27 ‘®—Earl had 55 points, Prince John, who 
Buchholz, 15-year-old St. Louis--won the rich Garden State 
an, today became.the first ‘Stakes for Elmendorf Farm, 
player to win the boys’ division| had 47. Mrs. Anson Bigelow’s 
two straight years in the na- ‘Nail, winner of the Belmont 
tional ‘ndoor junior and boys|and Pimlico Futurities and the 
tennis tournament. Buchholz|Remsen Stakes, had 39 points. 
swept past Gerald Dubie,'Nail was the biggest —s 
Hamtramek, Mich., in the finals; money winner with $239,930 
6—3, 6—l1. The ” junior title; Needles won the Sapling and 
went to Ron Holmberg, Brook-|Hopeful plus four other races, 
lyn, who turned back Les Dod-| and $129,805. 
son of Kalamazoo, Mich., in| High Gun was voted handicap 
straight sets, 6—2, 6—3, 6—3. |champion 


ee ed 
— a 
Bor 


5 
~ 


3" Stoo! 


NEW ORLEANS, Nov. 27 # 
Georgia Tech, the Southeastern 
Conference’s favorite delegate 
to post-season football games, 
bang make its fourth appearance 
mt! Sugar Bowl when it 

Ee Pittsburgh here Jan. 2. 


34331" 


2| 
. 


: ; - 
, . os 


lenged “bowl master” with 7 
teams in post-season events in 
ll years at Tech. 


legend in the South, 
perfect record in his previous 


Dodd Becoming ‘Bowl Master’ 


—— 


themselves as undisputed con-;fornia Center Roy Riegels 
ference kings. made his famed “wrong way” 
Dodd sold Sugar Bowl offi- run that led to the safety which 
cials a real bill of goods as they gave Tech the margin. 
invited Tech back in 1954 to| It was 11 years before Tech 
meet West Virginia. Tech's Pep-| again appeared in a bowl, this 
per Rodgers completed 16 of 26) time in the Orange Bowl and a 
passes as Tech buried West Vir-|21-7 advantage over Missouri 
ginia, 42-19, for the most decis-;and its famed passer, Paul 
ive victory in Sugar Bowl his-| Christman. 

, Tech's two bowl losses came 
in-the 1943 Cotton Bowl when 
Texas shaded the Engineers, 
14-7, and the 1954 Orange Bow! 
.|when Tulsa won, 26-12. 
Tech walloped Tulsa, 20-18, | 
jin the 1944 renewal ‘of the 
Sugar Bowl as the late Eddie | 
Prokop gained 199 yards rush- 
ing with Tech roaring from an) 
18-7 halftime deficit to win 
20-18. 

Pitt hasn’t visited the bowls 


$ 


7 BE 
if 


ce 


lost 
and tied one during the regu- 
lar season. Pitt won seven and 


lost three. 
The Sugar Bowl won't be 


23 


short on experience Jan. 2. 


Nashua Voted Orioles Play Dodgers Lehigh Alan 


In Homecoming Game R 


The Baltimroe Orioles tonight | 
announced 31 exhibition base-|ton 
ball games for their spring|Wednesday, 7 p. m., 
training tour. 


second leading fair against the Brooklyn Dodg- 
money winner of all time, waS\|ers on April 12. The Orioles, | 
“Horse of The Year”|Who finished seventh in the! 
American League in 1955, will) 
also play the Chicago Cubs a 
| times, 


DECEMBER 3 


8 RACES DAILY 


DAILY DOUBLE 
CLOSES 12:50 


Lehigh football coach Wil- 
am B. Leckonby will analyze 
ne Lehigh Lafayette game ata 
dinner meeting of the Washing- | 
Lehigh Alumni Club 
at the, 
home of Chez Albert, 6470 | 
The schedule will include one Addison rd., Pine Grove, Md. 


night game, a homecoming af-| 
nate Football 
E. - §eteone State Pensacels. Navy 


Pres soe | 


BALTIMORE, Nov, 27 lune 


For Factory Approved 
HEVY cuase 


none 0 Country Club veer cans 


OL. 4-6100 
7725 Wiseonsia Ave, Bethesde 


a 


Only a new idea 


justified this new 
whiskey...and here it is! 


— 


~ 84. ¢ 


gotot PEPE ME PVE FB TGS Ey 
sewer SHEE ony 


Every blended whiskey sold in the United States is a blend of whiskey 
and neutral spirits—every one but one. That one is BW. And the big differ- 
ence between BW and all other blended walekeye | is that BW is made of fine 
whiskey blended with Vodka. 

That means that all of the superb smoothness of Vodka— distilled the 
Smirnoff “Breathless” way—is combined with the favorite flavor of fine 
straight whiskeys in this brilliant new BW whiskey blend. Be among the 
first to enjoy Vodka-smoothness in your favorite whiskey drink! 


HOW VODKA IMPROVES WHISKEY 


Vodka is clear, odorless, without taste; it has no bite, no harshness. 


The refining of Vodka calls for slow-filtering through large beds of 
special charcoals. This is slower, more costly—and the result is the 
smoothest grain spirits obtainable. 

Using Vodka as the grain spirits base of blended whiskey gives you . 


a finer blend, LL ae eee 
$242" 
On 


*122. pint +238" 


“plus sales tax 


same bipdee whiskey y with the Vodka base 


> - 


. 


‘ 


ar. 


‘Al Besselink Wins Florida Sudden Death Playoff 


18-Foot Putt ™= pei Yankees, Teo RAMS—From P 13 At Tred Avon Club 


For Birdi Nats Seeking Relief — Les Richter Myers Wins All Four Races 
“geen Pitcher in Draft Today Kicks Rams |/n Annual Frostbite Regatta 


De : It : OXFORD, Md., Nov. 27 Wt—Bill Myers of the host Tred Avon 
Cl es Yacht club ‘skippered his Hound II to an easy victory in 
fith, Manager Chuck Dressen and key members of the Wash- ae scored 62.8 points to win the third annual regatta and 
WEST PALM BEACH, Fia.,. ington scouting staff were heading tonight toward Columbus Phy soot 
Nov. 27 # — Al Besselink of, and the minor league baseball meetings which will be high- roy (Crazy Legs) Hirsch gath- 


r. 
Cincinnati won the $5000 West hted tomorrow by the annual draft of the Monmouth Boat 
Palm Beach Open golf tourna-| of eligible minor league players. ered in on the Philadelphia 36\-y.4, Red Bank, N.J. He sailed) . © 
ment today with a sizzling} Because it finished in the American and raced into the end zone t0/ni, Brown's Lil’ Jug to two : 4, - J-| Open Today 9:30 to 9 
three-under-par 69 on the last) League cellar in 1955, Washington will complete a 72-yard scoring play.irourths a third and a second 
round and a sudden death play-| get the first draft pick, and all signs Richter converted and before for 51.4 points. Mantolokin, N. J. (5-8-5-5), 41; 5. 
off victory: over Don Fairfield) point to the Nats selecting a pitcher, ~ the 31,648 fans were all seated, Defending champion Char ¢|Dormouse, Bille Lane, Tred 
of Casey, Ill. preferably a reliever. 4 Los Angeles led, 7-4. Strausburg of the. Glen Mae\Avon Y. C, 22—did not 
far down in the) Griffith, Dressen, Farm Director Os- i. Late in the first period, Van|arq) Sailing Association fin-|fimish), 38.6. 
sta after 36 holes of play.) sie Bluege and Assistant Farm Direc- : Brocklin again took to the air|ion4 sixth with 34.1 points. 
fini the 54-hole tournament|“for Sherry Robertson have been ve and flipped a 23-yarder to Tom ~~ . sail ’ ‘ 
with 218. screening the draft list of more than * Fears in the end zone for a|, Fifteen skippers <a tee This Week's 
While Besselink was clipping; 100 players for two weeks in search of . touchdown that wound up a six- |i = Sages, of ne Py TV 
off his three-under-par round,| the club’s direst needs, relief pitching, play 48-yard drive. But Rich- @"s¥4r he ‘Trea ‘aa River. F ights on 
Fairfield, with a three-stroke| outfield strength and infield reserves. ter’s conversion made it 140. |™ie in the espe, Bag tp 2 Central 
lead going into the last round,) Bluege, after conferring again with ms In the second period, Adrian| A southerly wind of 15:25 “rtf to New 
skyrocketed to 77. Griffith on the train en route here, Mey a Burk fired a strike to End Pete miles an hour was recorded dur- ves regeigh™ le rey eae a 
In the playoff, Besselink got; declared: “There are meager pickings ee | Pihos, who caught the ball on|img the four races, 
a birdie on the par 5, 475-yard/ on the list, no one who would appear Calvin Griffith the Los Angeles 24 and out-| The first five finishers: ghen- 
first hole, sinking an 18foot) capable of helping us in the outfield sprinted the Rams’ secondary; 1. Hound Dog II, Bill Myers, Es te. Cpnastots, Le 
att. or infield. It would look right now as though we'll take a lito complete, a 40-yard touch-|Tred Avon Y. C. (1-1-1-1), 
Fairfield missed an 16foot; flyer on a pitcher. down maneuver for the Eagles.|points; 2. Brown’s Lil’ Jug, “TV 
putt which he attempted from “Who the pitcher might be would be conjectural right now. |Bielski converted to make it|/Roger Brown, Monmouth Boat! Lecart. ‘Gti. 9. 
the apron of the green. We plan to sit down and confer tomorrow morning in Colum- [14.7 Club, Red Bank, N. J. (4-43-2),' | ypeail aging 8c Leute, wolterrsey ATTENTION GOLFERS! 
The Cincinnati player, who} bus with President Joe Engel * After a scoreless third quar-|51.4; 3. Little ‘Audrey, Bruce (Chenee 4). 19 >. ™. 
has toured the tournament; and Manager Cal Ermer of ter, the Rams increased their 


circuit for several years, won| our Chattanooga club. Martin, Vaught lead to 20-7 on a pair of field a — eS “ | n If” 
$1000. - Fairfield took second; «They've seen all the South- : e goals by Richter, the first| it ° 6 has ee esc - a ae en ay a Opine O 


money of $700. ern Association talent. Joe from the 17 ag — second | 


Five pros. and an amateur —, > from the Eagles 10. ; | 
fnished one stroke behind the| Cambria fying in trom cubs, Owl Pars Tal & i A Sensational New Game You'll Love 


leaders, shooting 219s. They) has carefully sereened all the PI Beet pe 3 - : oe 
were Clyde Usina Jr., of West| other Open classification, TC [) Grads FLES * le 
Palm .Beach; George Bigham,/ trinie A and Double A clubs. ; Re "=a 1 Come in! Phone Your Order 1 99 


Kansas City, Mo.; Ed Furgol, < hat . 
Lowis; Frank Stranahan,| We!) want to speak with | ponr worTH, Tex., Nov. 27 IG: Touch or Mail this Coupon 
; Walter Burkemo, De-| them and we might not make | (pu just be a couple of old : aa 
and. Martin Stanovich,; up our minds until we go into Horned Frogs on opposite sides , from : : W's fast, vs tp. shallensing 
omen “ro _ profes- the room to make our pick at of the table.” said Coach Abe ee eee Please send mé.. setis) at 1.99. sing 5 ecen te a week- 
onais won eacn. ” 4 ee Ris . y se 
Dow _ Finsterwald, Bedford| * ?- ™- ‘ Martin of Texas Christian to-|MeDonald Speaks 2 be | __ | Seaton, she "Get ‘inchndes 6 
Heights, Ohio, one of the lead- Griffith added: Another day in talking about the Cotton Virginia University football i _— -. 3 ing case ond af ag rules. 
ers after 36 holes, slipped to| factor which will have an im- |...) game his team will play|co#""_ Ne@ McDonald will be Bene - RD BE PORE SESE oe : dees oe he rn re 
“6 ° : a play the guest aker at the ban-|® +. e te tet, same for rifts. 
a 77 and finished three strokes portant bearing on our draft ose ie 
back devel ts against Mississippi Jan. 2. quet honoring the Wakefield Bea a ‘ 
Mike Souchak, Grossinger, choice will be developmen It was in 1930 that Abe came! High football and cross country Belmont, } wv . 
N. Y¥. finished two strokes; @ our trade talks with the ito know Johnny Vaught, coach| teams, Friday, Dec. 2, at 6:30 % eo C<y least 4 0. 
back, along with Doug Ford,| Y@mkees, Indians and White lof Mississippi. Martin was|p. m. no - GD | cs soles tae where eppiicatic + 1312GSt. DI. 7-2189 
Kiamesha Lake, N. Y., and| 5°X, among others. playing an end position for the pp as 
Leo Biagetti, Sandusky, Ohio.| _ “Jt Would be folly for us to |Texas Christian Horned Frogs. 
The low scorers and prizes:| W@Ste our first draft pick on | Vaught was a guard. 
’ 11 12 69—418 $1000) SOMmeone we might be able to | Martin said he was pleased 
m Psirtied --» 78 GB 77-318 790) get in a trade from one of |indeed to send a team against 
i Bisham. ... 18 Tt 33—S58 is8| those clubs.” one coached by his old football 


: 438 ExNat Marino Pieretti, | pal. Vaught. 
2 72 aze . 
ie Bertone, 420) now with Sacramento, Conrad : “But T don’t know a blessed | 
fowenat ... 02 e—82 Grob of Montreal, Jack Mc-|thing about that Mississippi 
ora, Mahon of Denver and Clar- |team,” Abe reflected. “I'm go- 
ence Churn of Hollywood are jing to call old Johnny up and 
minor league pitchers under |tell him to send me some pic- 
consideration. tures. I'll send him some. Then 
Griffith hinted strongly | we'll have an idea what to do 
+4 74 that at least one major deal | when our teams get together in 
ia 036 will be swung within the next (the Cotton Bowl.” 
two weeks with the minor Martin, in his third season as 
league meetings here to be | coach of TCU, won his first con- 
followed a week from tomor- |ference championship yester- 
row by the major league con- | day when the Christians staged 
° clave in Chicago. a glittering comeback to beat 
Babe Zaharias The Yankees, in hot pursuit | Southern Methodist, 20-13, with 
of an added starter to their | two touchdowns in the last four 
. pitching staff have been bid- |minutes. Vaught was winning 
I i H ospital ding for lefthander Maury ithe Southeastern Conference 
McDermott ssibility tha = title for the third time in nine 
a strong possi at the {years as his Rebels whipped 
P eee ee iS herion. two cl - 5 will pong a mul- | Mississippi State, 26-0. 
hr ap me bette with > tiple player deal involving Both TCU and Mississippi 
cer, entered John Sealy Hospi- McDermott within the next |have 91 records, the Horned 
tal 't oday for a complete physi- two days. Frogs losing to Texas A&M, 
cal checkup that will last at The Indians, anxious to /|19-16, while Mississippi took a 
Seabee Gane keep up with the Yankees, |2144 drubbing from Kentucky. 
After that she said she ho ped may also get into the running | They have met one mutual op- 
to ine om. Ment” patient and for McDermott, and are re- | ponent—Arkansas. Texas Chris- 
beco P ported to be dangling their |tiam beat Arkansas, 260: Mis- 


return only occasionally be- 
cause she doesn’t want her mus- before the Nats neon Avila — licked the Razorbacks, 


cles to become weak. 
“I'm tired of lying in bed,” 
Mrs. Zaharias, who looked tired 


and drawn but was smiling, a 
said. 


Her friend, Betty Dodd, the) 
Galveston golfer, will occupy a 


2 wera) BRAKE SPECIAL 
room. 
Her husband said he was 


stopped four times fy Texas 
highway enone while driv- 
ing to mpa from Denver, 
who told him his wife was fly- 
ing to Houston to enter the 
hospital. He turned south from 
Fort Worth and met her 
Mrs. Zaharias said she re- 
turned to the hospital because 
after some X-rays were taken 
about two weeks ago “the doc- 
tor said they weren't as good't 
as he would like them to Oe.” — 


Area Golf 


PRINCE GEORGES—Blind 


teeta Kismet | DON’T RISK A LIFE...1t 


three Dyssn etre. | COStS Se Little te be Sure 


Stan Crosthwait, 87—10—77; 
Bill Layton, 95—18—77. 


ms es | beta Firestone 
Harry Hais, 100-2773 De BRAKE SPECIAL 9 
Hollede?, Cheantuskas,| eo @d You'll be Safe! Tams 


Uebel on North Team Here's what we de: 


MIAMI, Fila, Nov> 27 #& 
Army's Guarterbeck Don Hol- pew Remove front wheels 


leder and two of his teammates 
have signed to play for the inspect ond re- 


North team in, ie Shrine 2 pect irnt wheal bar ...tor the Names 


ame Dec. 26 in the Orange 
Bowl. 3 ni brake drums. 
Game Director Andy Gustaf-| 


gn aid Red Bai, Arty conch 4 Chest ond, odd broke at the top of 


leder, Fullbeck Pat Uebel and Adjust the brake shoes : 
your List 


ph Chesnauskas to play to secure full contectd 
in the charity classic. with drums. 


| ‘our Firestone Ss ’ S 
}OSSLY 2 MERCWHAWNT Dive cagram $s antl be unre 
: It's Marchant for the in Firestone tires... 
OAN CO hokes bs tomacaed toes : 
RI DRIVE-IN SERVICE OPEN 7:30 TO 5:30 §, SEAGRAM DISTILLERS COMPANY, NEW YORK CITY, 86.8 PROOF, CANADIAN WHISKY ~A BLEND...O8 RARE SELECTED WHISKIES © SIX YEARS OLD 


Cousin 


of the | 
Thunderbird. 


sue WAoaiusvorv.s EUS end TIMES HEA 
Monday, November 28, 1955 
a Wednesday 
Swa rt H din oodmoor center | THE BEST 
’ _— ee ‘ | . 
nos Oe ; rae a ane rying 
~ | nd ; arm | pany In Silver Spring, 10 a. m. 
Postal Career hart pm, Seder : 
= Me LE Chickens 
By Aubrey Graves pare eatin Po WRN" 
ti cndeplore ~ Eo f ‘a IN TOWN! 
A postal service career;Contrary to regulations, the . -% a 
stretching far back te — rane gy that night had " 
and-buggy days w end wrap t up in a newspaper 
Wednesday when Stacy Sterl-| and taken it home for safe This Pair of Glasses iS 
ing Swart takes a ase von g riers 
stamps and cash for the last’ tacy even y acquired a 
time. /model T Ford. It was faster, —< " A HEARING 
For almost 40 years the Fair- but had one disadvantage. No; 7 ) a : | 
fax Post Office has been his|longer could he snooze along! ~ | — am eae AID 
place of business—39 years, 2) the route. Neither of his horses| _.-h" miss bo 
months and * days as Stacy, 4) ever crepe Be pr cater nica = om... ’ 
life-long stickler for eccuracy,| stopping ts own volition. tres—ne cord-—ne 
ecunts it. He has hood Post-| Postal Inspector Fred Mervis os Seduind on venteieee valle Tae 
master for more than a goer paid ag ms to on s o your or in your hair. 
Before that he was a rural/terday: “He has run : horn-rimmed 
carrier for more than 27 years. | faithfully and well under try- oe r ie aoe one by 
Failing health and the cumu-ing conditions. For several ng ai N- 
lative strain of handling an years Fairfax has been the fast-. € CEALED in the frame and fitted with ft 
ever-more-exacting job dictated est-growing county in the Na-| fe your proper lenses. STYLES FOR the /ittie eas 
Swart’s es he ask = re- tion. I eth know ran Pocono} 5: MEN AND WOMEN. 
tirement “while | can & en- post office t has experienc | 
joy it.” He will be 65 next Feb- weed terrific growth. Swart has) Phone or write for appointment or Nterature 
iby 2 ‘ seen that the Sain oat ar 
Train the mah wae no ee ‘te pepe oid va ~- | ROSEMOND HEARING AID CO 
breeze back in 1916. Stacy’s and thet the mail got through.” eae tacegtens . 
first route was 21 miles long.) Stacy is quite content with art, retiring after nearly 40 1410 New York Ave. Ww ST. 32-1310 
most of them ynpaved. Often|that recognition at career’s end.! at a mail distribution case. = ST. 3-5553 
the mud was axle deep. At such 
times he would unhitch and 
continue on horseback. Some 
areas he served were so iso- 
lated, he would be the only 
traveler for weeks at a time. 
Stacy recalls vividly the big 
storm of January, 1922, that 
left snow three feet deep and 
drifts’ roof-top high. He rode 
horseback nine days before he 
could get his buggy through. 
The pay in those days was 
$1080 a year. The carrier fur- 
nished his own transportation 
—two horses and a carriage. 
The horses worked on alternate 
days, so tough was the going. 
The mailman then was more 
than a deliverer of letters. Often 
he would pause en route to | 
help a farmer with some odd 
job—like hanging up hogs at 
butchering time. | 
When illness struck an iso- 
lated family, it frequently de- 
pended on Swart to notify the) 
doctor. Everything a carrier! 
delivered was required to 
bear a United States postage 
stamp. Stacy would fetch the 
doctor, take a prescription into 
town, have it filled, buy post- 
age out of his own pocket, then 
deliver the medicine next day. 
No such service was provided | 
for in the postal manual. It! 
was just the accepted, neigh-' 
borly thing to do. 
During the war, casualty! 
telegrams were routed to 
Swart in cases where next of! 
kin lived beyond reach of 
telegraph or telephone. On 
many occasions he would get 
up late at night to drive 10 
or 15 miles with such a mes-| 
sage. This, too, was a good-will 
service above and beyond the 
call of duty. Western Union 
relied on Swart because he) 
“knew everybody in the coun- 
ty. and where he lived.” 
“Now, with so many new 
ones coming in, that’s not true 
any more,” said Swart, some- 
what ruefully. 
His most exciting experience? 
It was the time the post office 
safe was cracked open the night 
after he, then a carrier, had| 
brought in $500 in cash. The 
thieves didn’t get any money. 


2 a oe 
Z : 4 ~ 
% 2 <= Se a » 


L k 
age ee ee ay 
SS had . PA vA . « 
S tall uk an ta M A Sa eae , oy . . 
* : Nah cas ST ee SR Me SO BOS F : - 
5 we gee % ig aa “ o>, ae 7 Fone MS | Daig : . 
i o tex < 
By 2 oo 
7, $ a - 
“a A > 
° 
3 


Thunderbird looks, this Ford has aplenty. And it has the mighty 
Thunderbird Y-8, too. All this, plus new Lifeguard Design! 


gu 


al 


For brake Service 
sporting goods 
trailers 


or any other product or 
service you need for the 
home or business, 

look first in the 

YELLOW PAGES of 

your Telephone Directory. 
You save time and trouble 
when you use this 


A look at this Thunderbird-inspired 
56 Ford plays hob with your heart. Here 
is a beauty just begging you to get behind 
the wheel. 

Take your place! And place your foot on 
that hair trigger called a gas pedal. A 
nudge and you’re off—the mighty power 
of Ford’s new Thunderbird Y-8 engine* 
melting the miles, making molehills out 
of mountains, making your driving more 
fun than it ever has been before, 


And go where you will, how glad you'll 
be to have as your guardian Ford’s new 
Lifeguard Design. Ford’s new deep-center 
Lifeguard steering wheel, new Lifeguard 
double-grip door latches, new Lifeguard 
safety rear-view mirror, new optional Life- 
guard expanded plastic padding and Ford 
seat belts—all combine to keep you safer 
in this 56 Ford. Why not come in and 
Test Drive it today! . 

*in Fairlane and Station Wagon models 


‘96 Ford | 


* 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
ph Monday, November 28, 1955 19 


Little Herndon May Burst Its Seams If It Adopts New Plan 


By Muriel Guinn 
maf Reporter 


HE little town of Herndon 

is a typical Northern Vir- 
ginial farm community, pas- 
toral and slow-paced 

But by 1980, Herndon may be 
bursting at the seams if the 
Town Council adopts a pro- 
posed master plan for future 
development. 

Thus far, the wave of mi- 
gration to suburbia has largely 
bypassed Herndon — although 
many of its residents are com- 
muters, 

But 25 years from now, the 
master plan envisions a town 


of nearly double Herndon’s 


present population—1666 


Map locates Herndon 


This possibility was stated 
in a 5@-page report prepared 
by New York consultant Fran- 
cis Dodd McHugh to corre- 
spond with Fairfax County's 
$150,000 master plan. Hern- 
don’s Town Council is study- 
ing the report before calling a 
public hearing on the plan 

Mayor William F. Enderle 
describes Herndon as “homey,” 
with new and old residents 
mixing in a friendly fashion 

The town at present is main- 
ly agricultural and is the larg- 
est incorporated area in Fair- 
fax County—four square miles. 

It has three times as much 
area zoned for business as it 
is now using.,and 15 times as 
much land zoned for industrial 
use as it now uses, the McHugh 
report says. 


ALMOsT half the farm and 

residential areas are now 
vacant, the report says, and 
about four persons live in each 
residential acre. So there's 
room for healthy growth with- 
in the town’s present limits. 

The best way to strengthen 
the town’s economy is to lure 
additional industry, the plan- 
ner says. But the trend won't 
be to heavy industry, if the 
master plan is followed. 

McHugh says suitable indus- 
try for Herndon would be sci- 
entific or economic research, 
industrial training, cabinet 
making, smal] leather goods, 
lithographing, printing and en- 
graving, ‘food manufacture, 
and small machine shops. 

Some 422 persons lived in 
Herndon 75 years ago. in 1950 
the census figure was 1800. By 
1980, the master plan antici- 
pates that some 3000 persons 
will be living there. 

Herndon’s anticipated growth 
would result from the current 
“dispersion” trend away from 
big cities to suburban commu- 
nities,” the report says. 

About 60 per cent of Hern- 
don’s population commutes to 
work in Washington, Arlington 
and Fairfax County. The town 
is 28 miles from Washington— 
approximately 45 minutes’ 
driving time 
‘TT’O PROVIDE for twice as 

many people by 1980, Me. 
Hugh says additional sewer 
lines and a public water sys 
tem will be needed, afong with 
a nine-acre area for apartment 
houses. Also needed, according 
to the planner, are an improved 
highway system, expansion of 
the business area and revision 
of the zoning laws. 

The present retail business 
center would be expanded to 
28 acres, including off-street 
parking areas. The nine-acre 
apartment area would be 
bounded by a proposed “south” 
street which would run parallel 
to the railroad. The area’s other 
boundaries would be Route 
666, Nash st. and Pear! st. 


~~ 


. e a, Sie P 
he ee 


Herndon youngsters spend a quiet afternoon at play near the railroad station. 


Staf Photos by Marry Goodwin 


This is Herndon’s business district, which will probably be bursting with activity if the proposed master plan is adopted. 


—Cr , 


Tis 


ELL TT Ee Ee 
*, - % 
- 4 


_ 
é& 


In 500 block of Monroe st., tall trees shade charming old frame houses: 


Associated Press Associated Press 


Tommy Woodw 5-year-old Baltimore polio poster au _ a picture Israeli settlers dash through a swarm of locusts during a recent plague of the insects in southern Israel. The stricken area called 
for fellow Herbert Merrill, 28, in a e., hospital. on volunteer help and airplanes with insecticide-spreading apparatus to battle the locusts, which blew in from the Sinai Desert. 


Secretary 
"President ) weer Radio and Television 


ee ee ee 


INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER ” 


Educational Crossroads 


The future of American education may be 
decisively shaped by the conference at the summit 
the White House Conference on Education— 
which begins here today. There has already been 
a great deal of controversy about the conference. 
There are critics who charge that the delegates 
have been handpicked to bring in. a report re 
fiective of Administration preferences. We think 
it would be well to avoid any prejudgment of 
the conference and to assess it, rather, on the 
basis of what it produces. 

It would be impossible to overstate the im- 
portance of the problem.which the conference is 
to consider. No meeting in Washington is needed 
to confirm what has been observed by educators 
with growing alarm during the whole of the past 
decade—that the public schools of the United 
States are in a condition of crisis. Inmadequately 
supported by state and local governments which 
have in many instances reached the limits of their 
revenue-raising powers, the public schools in many 
sectors of the country are suffering from impov- 
erishment and neglect. Their physical facilities 
are grossly inadequate to the swelling tide of stu- 
dents; their teachers are underpaid and hopelessly 
inadequate in number. 

Somehow the decline of the public schools must 
be carrected if American democracy is to retain 
its vitality. For the democratic process is ines- 
capably dependent upon an educated electorate. 
This newspaper has been on record consistently 
for more than a decade as believing that the only 
practicable remedy lies in a program of Federal 
, financial aid to state and local school authorities— 
financial aid that would avoid any semblance of 
national control. The Eisenhower Administration 
has resisted this solution and has used the White 
House conference as an excuse until now for de- 
laying effective Federal action of this sort. The 
Administration has, therefore, a special obligation 
to make the White House conference a success. 
We hope the sessions of the next four days will 
be fruitful. 


Israel's Rejection 


Israel’s rejection of the British proffer of media- 
tion through frontier adjustment in the dispute 
with the Arab states was perfectly understand- 
able in the circumstances. First things first to 
the Israelis. The arms deal between Soviet Europe 
and Egypt is uppermost. Second, there is the 
question of a security treaty guaranteeing the in- 
tegrity of Israel. 

Of course there must be some territorial changes 
if the borders are to make sense. The armistice 
lines were so haphazardly drawn, as to put a pre 
mium on clashes and incidents. The frontier with 
Jordan is perhaps the most idiotic. Villagers were 
cut off from their mosques, even wells were divided 
from the houses they supplied. But that kind of 
readjustment is a different matter from redrawing 
a map of Israel according to the United Nations 
partition plan of 1947. 

The Arabs rejected this plan when it came up, 
and the Egyptians “brazenly” (quoting Trygve Lie) 
marched into Palestine when the United Nations 
accepted it. The ensuing armistice, which was 
arranged by the U. N., added to the Arab countries 
no less than 2000 square miles of territory formerly 
in Mandatory Palestine. Those armistice lines have 
been validated repeatedly by the U. N. Security 
Council. It is wholly tnrealistic to suggest, as 
Premier Eden seems to be suggesting and Egypt 
seems to be echoing, that the clock be turned back, 
and the 1947 plan be put into effect. The original 
partition plan contained some injustices, and Arab 
displeasure at it was not hard to comprehend. But, 
having rejected the plan and started a war (which 
they lost) to prevent its execution, the Arab coun- 
tries can scarcely expect to have their cake and eat 
it, too. 

Foreign Minister Sharett in his National Press 
Club speech made out Israel’s case against this 
kind of frontier revision with clarity and convic- 
tion. His remarks on this point of course must be 
considered separately from the other necessary 
ingredients of an Arab-Israeli solution. But as Mr. 
Sharett said, it is one of the paradoxes of -history 
that “the Arab states should now be clamoring for 
the revival of the 1947 plan—a plan which they 
themselves did their utmost to kill—and Great 
Britain, with its record of noncooperation, should 
now advocate that plan as one of the starting points 
in the quest for a new solution.” 


Holding the Course 


The best answer available to economists who 
think there will be a business downturn next year 
is to be found in the McGraw-Hill estimate of 
expenditures for plant and equipment. The pessi- 
mists contend that spending for automobiles and 
houses will drop next year and cause trouble 
throughout the economy. It is impossible to argue 
dogmatically that they are wrong because no one 
can tell what the future holds for these two mar- 
kets. They have been at an amazingly high level 
for months, and some tapering off would not be 
surprising. But the optimists believe that, even 
if there should be a sizable drop in the buying of 
cars and houses, business expenditures for new 
plant and equipment should take up the slack. 

The McGraw-Hill survey, which has a good record 
for accuracy, provides ample evidence for this 
belief. It is based on the actual plans of business- 
men for next year. As of now, the survey finds, 
American businessmen are planning to spend 13 
per cent more on plant and equipment in 1956 than 
in 1955. That is an impressive increase, especially 
so in view of the high rate of spending in recent 
years. It amounts to an increase over this year of 
$4 billion to an all-time high next year of $33.4 
billion. Manufacturing industries are projecting 
a 30 per cent increase in expenditures next year. 

The Federal Reserve System must have had these 
plans in mind when it approved recently an in- 
crease from 2% to 2% per cent in the discount 
rate at six of the Federal Reserve banks. That was 
the fourth increase this year in the interest rate 


Federal Reserve banks: charge for money they | 
lend to member banks. It will mean a further 


slight increase in commercial interest rates and a 
further slight restraint on business. The action 
glso indicates that the Federal Reserve continues 


to be, as it has been most of the year, more worried 
by the threat of inflation than of deflation. Obvi- 
ously a-13 per cent increase in expenditures for 
plant and equipment would be a aig real business 
stimulant. 

In view of these plans and of the steady pressure 
of industrial prices upward a slight pressure on the 
brakes is justified. The stock market has almost 
completely recovered from the loss it suffered after 
President Eisenhower's heart attack and wage rates 
are continuing to rise. The Federal Reserve has 
been able to apply the brakes so far this year with- 
out damage to the economy. Its success justifies 
confidence that its latest move will not prove to be 
too much—and it reveals the confidence of the 
Federal Reserve in the continuing strength of the 
economy. 


ss 
Southwest vs. Museum 


The Wirth Committee of the National Capital 
Planning Commission must choose today between 
the Smithsonian Institution’s proposed air museum 
and the redevelopment of Southwest Washington. 
This is not to say that if it recommends a green 
light for the Redevelopment Land Agency to go 
ahead with its comprehensive program for re- 
building the Southwest the air museum will have 
to be abandoned. There are several possibilities 
of fitting the museum into the Zeckendorf plan 
for the Southwest. But the 10th st. site preferred 
by the Smithsonian will have to be yielded if the 
Southwest project is to go forward, and the new 
site to be chosen will have to be harmonized with 
the larger project. 

What the Wirth Committee and the parent 


Planning Commission should make plain first of | 


all is that the location of a single building must 
not interfere with the vital Southwest undertaking. 
Once that decision has been taken, the air museum 
can be adjusted to the new general pattern. 
Whether the huge air museum should be allowed 
to block Maryland ave. is a separate question. With 
traffic congestion becoming a larger problem every 
day, any plan to cut off a major street must be 
scrutinized skeptically. But this after all is a detail 
of planning on which expert testimony will carry 
much weight. The major point on which the public 
will be expecting a clear-cut stand by the Wirth 
Committee and the Planning Commission is the 
clearance of the Southwest project so that it can 
go forward with no more pulling and hauling and 
no more delays. 


Anniversaries 


The Scandinavians have two anniversaries at 
this time which call for more than regional self- 
congratulations: the golden anniversary of the 
reign of Norway's 83-year-old King Haakon VII and 
the 85th birthday of Finland's President Juho K. 
Paasikivi. Both of these outstanding men are true 
guardians of their respective states. King Haakon 
was a Danish prince when the union with Sweden 
was dissolved, and an ideal choice the Norwegians 
made. Steeped in a liberal spirit, the young King 
fitted immediately into the democratic tradition of 
Norway. He is the peoples’ monarch as no other 
King ever was. One has only to be acquainted 
briefly with Norway to sense the secure bond 
existing between the Norwegians and the dynasty. 
Equal felicitations are due to the Finns and Presi- 
dent Paasikivi. It is a flexible but sure hand that 
President Paasikivi keeps on Finland’s helm. The 
affection which he has evoked from his fellow- 
countrymen is testimony to his amazing feat in 
keeping Finland independent through the tribula- 
tions of the last dozen years. 


“Not Marble Nor—” 


The only thing—apart of course from the ballet 
performances at the Bolshoi Theater—that really 
has impressed the more esthetically inclined 
Western visitors to Moscow has been the local sub- 
way. Whereas the older of our own subway 
stations, with their elaborate tile work, resemble 
a sort of dilapidated and not too well fumigated 
washroom, and the newer sort are strictly and 
starkly utilitarian in design, those underneath the 
Soviet capital are said to be not only immaculate 
but to possess a kind of Renaissance grandeur 
comparable to, say, the Pitti Palace or to the grand 
foyer of our National Gallery of Art. The usual 
explanation of the contrast is that the Moscow 
subway was constructed under the special patron- 
age of the late Comrade Stalin himself and that its 
architects and engineers were under orders not to 
spare a single kopek of expense, and to omit 
nothing in the way of marble, gilt, bronze, mosaic, 
mural and fresco decoration that might help to 
make it the most elegant thing of its kind in the 
world. 

This is what makes it so startling to read that 
the designers of the Moscow subway are now being 
denounced by the Communist Party hierophants 
on the score of extravagance and conspicuous 
waste and that their work is being unfavorably 
compared to the much newer Leningrad subway, 


which apparently has all the austere simplicity of | 


the BMT. In particular, one Comrade Polyakov, 
planner of the especially elaborate Arbat Station 
in Moscow, has become the target of official abuse 
because of what is described as his depraved and 
archaic Byzantine taste. The Stalin prize, with 
which his architectural and decorative accomplish- 
ments were formerly rewarded, has been revoked 
in something like the ignominious fashion in 
which poor Jim Thorpe was stripped of his Olympic 
medals. Thus Comrade Polyakov now joins 
Comrade Vlasov, architect of so many impressive 
Moscow skyscrapers—also deprived of his Stalin 
prize and suddenly recalled home from his visit 
to the United States with the Soviet housing dele- 
gation—in the ideo-esthetic doghouse. 

As for what it all may porten@ in terms of party 
dialectic, your guess is as good as ours or that of 
the editors of the New Leader. We cannot, how- 
ever, escape a suspicion that their increasing 
familiarity with the United States, and with con- 
temporary 


determinism 
like so a ee ee 
behind the times. 


A 


Letters to the Editor 


For a Transit Authority 


I should like to present a few 
points on the transit situation 
for consideration before the 
PUC, the Commissioners and 
the Congress get themselves 
out on a limb which will have 
to be cut off behind them. I am 
afraid they may already be in 
such a situation, but the time 
is now ripe to make a fresh 
start in a new direction. 

First, the retention of the 
streetcar lines until they wear 
out is an essential. The right- 
of-way is in excellent shape and 
so ig the rolling stock. To al- 
low all of this system to be 
thrown away merely because 
other cities (whose equipment 
and trackage was worn to the 
One Hoss Shay state) did so; 
because that is the only way 
to get the streets repaved at 
Wolfson expense; because 
buses are cheaper to operate 
per mile than streetcars, would 
be criminal. 

The majority of the trackage 
is probably good for 10 to 20 or 
more years, with minor replace- 
ment at points of greatest 
wear. The streetcars are good 
for 20 to 30 more years. As to 
the operating costs, I have yet 
to see anyone compare them 
with buses on a passenger-mile 
basis, including the amortiza- 
tion costs of new buses vs. re- 
pairs to the trolleys. 

Second, there is the problem 
of the new company. They must 
be assured of a franchise for a 
definite period of years, which 
can only come by act of Con- 
gress. Unfortunately, such an 
act must also include a seizure 
provision, only to preclude 
the stoppage of services by 
strikes or mismanagement. 
However, the act can be worded 
so that any company can 
know that they can operate at 


“A 


Your cleverly written edjto- 
rial of Nov. 9—“A Guarantee 
for Israel” Py to to a 
many aspects a prooiem 
which has long threatened 
American interests in the Mid- 
end — and which now prom- 

to disrupt American-Arab 
vlanduhie. May I suggest, how- 
ever, that your analysis has 
misinterpreted the basic fac- 
tors at stake. 

The partition of Palestine by 
the United Nations in 1947, 
with the major support com- 


consisténtly and blatantly re- 
fused to adhere to that plan. As 
the situation stands today the 
United Nations’ partition plan 
exists only as a scrap of paper 


derstand how the United States, 
oe applied moral stand- 


govern- 
monte Sepae the tees of Week 
row Wilson. to the present in 
the Red China problem — the 


this 
pene yn me mgmt 
the status = m7 
See nee srae 
I could cite hundreds of ex- 
amples of Israeli statements 
against the partitien plan, but 


some profit without danger of 
ae provided they operate 
tale re and without inequi- 
Ae gem by the PUC, 

ird, now is the time to 
cctabiiah a transit authority. 
I am not particularly in favor 
of public operation, but we 
must face the facts. Let the 


which must eventually be taken 
to provide a long-+ange solu- 
tion to the transit problems. 
(Admittedly, this may require 
a provision in the franchise for 
an earlier liquidation of the 
new company, at no loss to 
the investors, when and if a 
truly metropolitan transit sys- 
tem is estab ) 

About the transit authority— 
we must have subways, con- 
nected to ground-level, private- 
right-of-way operation as the 
suburbs are reached. Gasoline 
taxes throughout the states are 
used for road construction 
which uently benefits the 
minority. Here. we can use such 
taxes to benefit the majority, 
and I, as a driver, would have 
no objection to the use of a 
gasoline tax to better the traf- 
fie and transit situation. Sub- 
ways are a must. 

Since the late 30's, Washing- 
ton has been in the middle—too 
large for surface transit, and 
too small for economical sub- 
way construction. Washi 


ngton 
is still in the middle, but let us, 


for heaven's sake, start con- 
struction for the future as 


‘soon as possible, before we are 


completely mired ages Since 


by 
prise, public ownership is, un- 
fortunately, the only answer. 
It must be done wigh the estab- 
lishment of a transit authority 
which will encompass the 
metropolitan area. 

JOHN J. METZ. 

Washington. 


Report on CIA Site 


To locate such a facility as 
e C. L. A. proposes at the 
Leonie site would, in my mind, 
be contrary to what almost 
everybody interested in the 
proper development . Metro- 


now produced for the C. IL. A. 
a report ae 


zoning scheme as at present 
planned.” 

This conclusion is contra- 
dicted by experience in numer- 
ous situations. One need only 
look at what has happened in 
the areas ——s the Gov- 
ernment ee ne? apne at 
Suitland, d. and on Wis 
consin ave. beyond Bethesda to 
Gountinehebte the formidable 


000 for widening Rt. 123, there 
are no foreseeable funds 


Guarantee for Israel” 


I can find no better example 
than the statement by David 
Ben-Gurion on Nov. 15 when 
he appeared in battle dress 
before the Knesset and called 
the United Nations’ resolutions 
on Israel null and void and said 
that they could not be brought 
back to life. 

Two days before your edi- 


the latest aggression by Is- 
rael against an Egyptian post 
beyond the demilitarized Al 
Auja zone—an attack obvi- 
— planned to coincide with 
“offer of 
world. 


the partisan feeling which has 
clouded the realities of the 
problem but you must realize 
that the desperate condition of 
these refugees makes the s0- 
lution of their problem the sine- 
qua non of any wider settle. 
ment. 

Istael hag consistently re- 
fused to act on this basic prob- 
lem. Her demands are simple 
and clear: recognition of the 
fruits of her aggression and a 
guarantee that she will not be 
forced to abide by the United 
Nations’ resolutions. Her real 


Es 
a: 


H 


é 


B 


3 

z 
ie ify 
gE S3SESE- 


Lindsay 


the Work Skills of the Nation; it embodies 
the proceedings of a conference held last 
spring at Arden House. 

The report emphasizes that the Nation 
needs manpower that has “the capacity 
for reflection” as well as for memorizing 
facts and handling machines. Business 
leaders who contributed to the conference 
said they were more interested in “broadly 
educated” high school graduates, who were 
“thoughtful, reflective, well disciplined, 
and interested in improving their abilities” 
than in those trained in specifie skills. 

Recently there has been much concern 
in this country over reports that the So 
viet Union is outstripping the United States 
in production of scientists, engineers and 
technicians. The report of the 
Council indirectly takes cognizance of this. 


coos 


IT POINTS OUT that it is easier for a 
totalitarian state than a free society to 
produce, on demand, workers with special 
ized skills. A free society is more complex 
and difficult than that of a dictatorship 
and requires much more of its citizens. 
The all-powerful state, says the Council; 
can handle preparation for citizenship by 
the simple process of indoctrination, and 
it can limit individual development te 
“minor and unimportant areas.” 

The Council cites a study by the Masse 
chusetts Institute of Technology showing 
that the basie differences between training 
programs for scientists in this country and 
in the Soviet Union go back to the infler- 
ibility af curriculums and methods in see 
ondary schools. Judged only in terms of 
technical competence the Russian curricw- 
lum was considered very good. 


for about 50 per cent 

duction, available in the 

to two and a half billion people, 
rests on the shoulders of only about 1 
million trained people. 

No matter how many erash programe 
may be started to get the needed special 
iste, the big dependence will be upon the 
ingenuity, imagination and ereativeness 
that is encouraged, not only among scien- 
tists, but skilled workers of all kinds. 


ew 


THE AMERICAN ideal of education also 
must be considered in ang program to | 
increase skilled manpower, One 
contributors to the report, Dr. Clarence 
Faust, president of the Fund for the Ad 
vancement of Education, defines 
follows: 

“The essence of education 


about what he is doing, about future 
bilities and about his ¢ 

tives with respect to 

a better word let me 

and powerful capacity of man 

for reflection ... thie is the basis 
human achievement and progress.” 
“Fhe Council members agree that the 
to the skilled manpower problem is 


ie et: 


£3 


he says, but also call for “imaginative, 
creative and flexible states of mind in the 
way these specialists think about their 
jobs.” 

But he sees no largescale disruptive 
revolution in sight because of automation. 
It will come gradually, he thinks, picking 
up speed through the next two decades. 

Another indication Americans will con- 


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mens 208s ree 8 & 


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' Matter of Fact ¢ ¢ By Joseph and Stewart 


1 They ‘Really Think’ 


THERE IS a real surge of 
hope that President Eisenhow- 
er may after all run again. 

It is obviously wishful. It 
does not appear to be based 
on any rational. evidence. 


There is nothing to indicate 
that the President has so 
much as hinted at his inten- 
tion to anyone in public life; 
and there are a good many 
tive reasons to think he 
as carefully avoided any dis- 
cussion of the future except 
with members of his immedi- 
ate family. 

Nonetheless, this surge of 
hope that the President will 
run has now got to be taken 
very seriously, partly because 
it is so strong, and more par- 
ticularly because it centers 
among the closest members of 
the President's official team 
and his closest friends out- 
side 7 Government. 

Up to a fortnight ago, al- 
though the official line has 
always been that “we're go- 
ing on the assumption the 
President will want to finish 
the job,” almost no one truly 
expected that he would do 
anything of the sort. But now 
the gloomy resignation of the 
first month after the Presi- 
dent’s heart attack has been 

replaced by a new outlook. 
The forecasts are always 
couched in some such lan- 
quage as “I really think he 
may run after all,” or “I almost 
believe he'll do it in spite of 
the heart attack.” But although 
tentative, the forecasts are 
sanguine. 

ow 


OF COURSE the men who 
make these forecasts desper- 
ately want to think what they 
now think. Yet these men are 
reasonably hardheaded. The 
change in their attitude has 
got to be attributed to some 
cause more solid than mass 
hypnosis. It has to be attrib- 
uted, in fact, to the atmos- 
phere these men find when 
they make their pilgrimages 
of business or friendship to 


the convalescent President's 
bedside 


They place gre 
shadit, se, on the way he has 
actively reached out for his 
en peem tei refusing from 

start to accept his in- 


BUT MOST of the men 


et of ye that ™e 


for 


him, an rer tead on 


being given all the facts, pleas-. 


ant and unpleasant, about any 
Government problem up for 
discussion. 

But above all, these very 
high authorities always em- 
phasize two other points of a 
more special character. 


cos 


FIRST, the President has 
been deeply affected by the 
tremendous outpouring of af- 
fection and concern which his 
illness produced, not only in 
this county, but also through- 
out the world. In a rather 
macabre way, it has been like 
reading his own obituaries. 
The argument runs that he has 
found these semiobitvaries 
so extremely encouraging that 
he now thinks life more than 
ever worth living. 


Second, the long, enforced 
inactivity of his convalescence 
is also said to have bored 
the President to tears. When 
a man is harassed and over- 
driven by the cares of a great 
office, retirement may seem 
most attractive to him. But if 
he is primarily a man of ac- 
tion, like Dwight D. Eisenhow- 
er, a long spell of vegetable, 
convalescent dullness is likely 
to change his viewpoint. It 
can make him anxious only to 
get back to work as soot as 
possible and stay at work as 
long as possible. 

Such are the arguments of 
the optimists who now believe 
the chances are better than 
even that the President will 
be a candidate to succeed him- 
self. The more sensible of 
these men close to the Presi- 
dent have now abandoned the 


Roa 


he did not want to do so when 
he had not had this physical 
warning. 

Perhaps, therefore, a better 
clue to the President's future 


response to a toast to his 
1956 candidacy, the President 
told the 22 that for health and 
other reasons he was strongly 
inclined to retire. He added 
that he could not tell what he 
would do in the end, but he 
was sure of two things: He 
knew quite well that there 
were certain Republicans 
whom he did not wish to suc- 
ceed him; and if he decided to 
retire, he would work hard 
for the nomination of a man 
who would carry on where he 
left off, and he would then 
work even harder for this 
man's election. 


Yor 


> - a New 
eraid Tribune. inc.) 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 


Monday, November 28, 1955 


21 


“Let's not forget the influence of i heredity in this case, 
gentlemen ... The patient oe, inherited «a 
relative’s fortune. . 


Washington Scene .... 


An Important Physical Check 


PRESIDENT Eisenhower is 
going to take temporary leave 
of the presidential farmhouse 
at Gettysburg, Pa. in less 
than 2 weeks 
and enter Wal- 
ter Reed Hos- 7 
a here for | 

new series | 
of tests and | 
checkups. | 
How long he 
remains in the 
hospital will 
depend on the 
pe of time 

it takes an ar- 
ray of special- 
ists in every function of the 
human body to check and re- 
check their findings. 

The whole ourse of political 
history may be changed by 
the Walter Reed tests. The 
outcome will probably deter- 
mine the President's future 
course of action, although it 
may be a couple of months 
before he publicly announces 
his decision. 

Mr. Eisenhower should 
know by Christmas whether 


e By George Dixon 


he “can” run again. Whether 
he will is a different matter. 
os 


THE HELICOPTER service 
between Washington and Get- 
veers is being ste up 

s week. More helicopters 
are being put on the run be- 
cause the President is trying 
to see as many top Adminis- 
tration officials as possible be- 
fore he goes into the hospital. 

In to the 10 Cabinet 
officers—the heads of State, 
wong Th ee, Justice. 
Post r, Agricul- 
ture otaoee mg eh and 
Health, Education and’ Wel- 
fare—in that protocolian or- 
der—Mr. Eisenhower will hold 
sessions with as ma sub- 
Cabinet officers and s of 
Executive agencies as the re- 
maining time will permit. 

It is 65 miles fron. the Na- 
tion’s Capital to the Eisenhow- 
er farm as the crow flies. This 
would be handy, except that 
there are no crows in the 
Cabinet. The helicopter serv 
ice, however, is creating 
changelings. It is rendering 
the rustics very blase. 

They won't even look up any 


longer to watch the Secretary 
of State plummeting down. 

The success of the helicopter 
service in enabling the Presi- 
dent to operate from a rural 
retreat almost as efficiently as 
he does from the Executive 
Mansion may result in turning 
the White House lawn into a 
heliport. 

People who come to see the 
President may be referred to 
as helivisitors. Members of 
Congress who oppose Admin- 
istration programs will, of 
course, continue to be called 
hellions. 


os 
This would seem to be carry- 


At Shirley highway and 
Glebe rd. in Arlington, Va., is 
Brandon Grammar School. 
The name is proclaimed in let- 
ters two feet high across the 
facade of the edifice. 

Votaries of a certain male 
cinema idol went to work un- 
der cover of darkness the 
other night and painted out 
the final “N.” 


Postures Brndicatee tne.) 


These Days 


Hutchins On the Record 


WHEN ROBERT M. Hutch- 
fins of the Ford Foundation’s 
Fund for the Republic ap- 
peared on “Meet the Press,” 
hé had a very 
tough time 
with the cor- 

r e spondents | 
who ques; 
tioned him.) 
For instance, 
this 


‘oltman is to 


the point with 
regard to the Sokolsky 


employment of one who took 
the plea of the Fifth Amend- 
ment to a question involving 
communism: 

“Woltman: Would you also 
hire a Nazi or a Fascist, or a 
Ku Klux Klanner? 

“Hutchins: This question is 
a real flying saucer ... 

“Woltman: Well, you didn’t 
answer it. 

“Hutchins: I beg your par- 
don, I did. 


“Woltman: You would also | 


hire a Nazi— 

“Hutchins: No, I didn't say 
I would. 

“Woltman: I'm sorry; I 
thought you said you would 
hire a Communist. 

“Hutchins: No, I said the 
great question always is what 
is the individual in himself? 
This is the American prin- 
ciple, therefore the question 
cannot be answered. The 

uestion is what is this in- 
dividual, what is this job that 
you wish him to undertake? 


“WOLTMAN: Do you be- 


democratic form of Govern- 
mént? 
“Hutchins: I certainly do. 


By George Sokolsky 


infinite great many gradations 
in membership and knowl- 
edge of the purposes of these 
organizations; I merely say 
that the theoretical, the fly- 
ing saucer that you have 
hurled does not decide any 
questions because the ultimate 
issue is what is this individ- 
ual in himself? This is the 
American principle. 
“Woltman: Well, would you 
still say whether you would 
knowingly hire a member of 
the Communist Party? 
“Hutchins: This question 
cannot be answered in those 


te 

What Hutchins wanted to 
say was that he would and 
did hire such a person if he 

could use his services, but he 
permitted himself to get so 
involved that he failed to 
make this point. This is char- 
acteristic of the entire broad- 
cast. 


FROM THE words as taken 
down stenographically, it is 


possible to reach two con- 
clusions: 

1. That Hutchins is vitally 
interested in civil liberties 
but has not thought out the 
subject philosophically. 

2. On the subject of com- 
munism, Hutchins, who was 
dean of a law school and presi- 
dent of a university, displays 
a lack of knowledge which 
would indicate that he has 
not taken the time to do his 
homework. 

This ignorance is not un- 
usual among otherwise well- 
informed persons, because 
the Communist movement 
from 1848 to this day makes 
bleak, monotonous reading 
and men duck it. Also, much 
that is read sounds fantastic, 
unbelievable and even child- 
ish. Therefore, it is avoided. 
But this movement is a fact 
and now controls about 900 
million persons and keeps us 
in a state of war. 


Peatures Bvadicatee ine.) 


SCANDINAVIAN 
MIREIMES SUSTEM 


SM 1 £4F 1 


With Many 


The AFL-CIO merger this 
week will bring approximately 
16 million union members tn- 
der one tent in the biggest 
labor organization in the 
world. But most of their prob- 
lems of living together have 
yet to be solved. 

No one knows this more than 
George Meany, the 61-year-old 
plumber’ who heads the AFL 
and is slated to head the 
merged organization, to be 
known as the AFL-CIO. 

When the merger talks start- 
ed in the fall of 1954, Meany 
said the American Federation 
of Labor and Congress of In- 
dustrial Organization could 
take the short way or the long 
way. They could merge with a 
guarantee to protect the in- 
tegrity of each affiliated union 
or they could try to solve all 
the problems before m 
They took the former, or rt 
way. 

AFL and CIO leaders expect 
delegates from the AFL's 108 
unions and the CIO’s 30 to ap- 
prove the merger of their par- 
ent erganizations when they 
meet at New York Dec. 1. 


Inter-Union Rivalry Target 
The main objectives of the 
merger are to end inter-union 


rivalry, promote the merger of 
individual unions in the same 


fields of work, push organizing 
ing movie star worship too far: of the 49 million unorganized 


workers in this country and 
give labor a stronger political 
influence. 

Optimists among the AFL 
and CIO leaders are cautioning 
against expecting “overnight 
miracles.” Most of them say 
any big progress toward these 
major objectives will take a 
couple of years at least. 

Leaders hope the new organi- 
zation will give labor a bigger 
influence in the 1956 elections. 
Most labor leaders, at the na 
tional level at least, are Demo- 
crats. This is also the leaning 
of the AFL Labor’s League for 
Political Education and the 
CIO Political Action Commit- 


worked in fairly close coopera- 
tion in 1952. 

But the AFL and CIO unity 
leaders were unable to agree 
on any one man to head the 
staffs of the political arm or 
legislative department of the 
new organization. They com- 
promised on co-directors for 
both, one each from the AFL 
and CIO. 


To Back 1956 Nominee 


Meany has indicated that the 
AFL-CIO will indorse a presi- 
dential candidate after the 
nominating conventions next 
year. But there has been specu- 
lation that if Chief Justice Earl 
Warren were to be the Repub- 
lican nominee, he might 
enough support from AFL lead- 
ers at least to prevent the joint 
AFL-CIO from indorsing the 
Democratic nominee. Both the 
AFL and CIO endorsed Demo- 
crat Adiai E. Stevenson in 


1952. | 
In the field of lower-level 


.| get 


tee. Both these political arms|°™" 


Merger to Leave Labor 


Problems 


By Maureen Gothlin 
United Press 


mergers, several individual 
unions are already negotiating 
to join forces or are broaching 
the subject. These include the 
CIO and AFL, textile workers, 
the CIO meat packers and the 
AFL, butchers, the CIO utility 
workers and the AFL electrical 
workers, and the CIO oil, chem- 
ical and atomic workers and 
the AFL chemical workers. 

But AFL and CIO leaders 
don't expect any great rush of 
union mergers following the 
parent merger. 

On the other side the AFL 
teamsters wunion—biggest in 
the AFL—still refuses to sign 
the AFL-CIO noraid pact 
which was the basis for the 
merger. Dave Beck, teamsters 
president, claims other unions 
have members that belong 
rightfully to him. His main tar- 
seems to be the truck- 
drivers and warehouse workers 
in the CIO brewery workers 
union. 


Other Bitter Rivalries 


The AFL. building trades 
unions, which make up some 
of the oldest craft unions in 
the AFL, also have some argu- 
ments with the CIO steelwork- 
ers and other CIO industry- 
wide unions over plant con- 
struction and maintenance 
workers. 

Other bitter rivalries be- 
tween parallel AFL and CIO 
unions will take time to heal 
before mergers can be ex- 
pected, officials said. 

Hopes of launching big or- 
ganizing drives similar to those 
of the 1930s are tied to the 
problem of ending jurisdiction- 
al rivalry. AFL, and CIO lead- 
ers plan to fight such rivalries 
by refusing organizing funds 
to unions involved in jurisdic- 
tional battles. 

This might be 
against smaller unions that 
need money but would exert 
less pressure on big ones that 
have enough funds of their 


effective 


Financing big new organiz- 
ing drives also will depend 
largely on donations from the 
“rich” individual unions, lead- 
ers agree. Neither the national 
AFL nor CIO itself is rich, nor 
will the AFL-CIO be. 


In Congress 


TODAY 


Neither house tm session. 
Senate Commitices: 


en Welfare ond Pee- 

Ss. m@.. open. To deter- 

ne legisla is eestes for 

tion of we re 98 pension 

un > tion o mpereste of 

be ries. To hear John is and 

mers. Old reme Count Chamber, 
Capitel. 

te.—10 e 


obtett ’ 


Jrench loom 


This bare! 
This narrow! 


A very potent 
dimension of 
dressing for five 
o'clock. Pure silk 


black with a shirred 
crescent of neckline. 


THE CONTROVERSIAL 
and now~-canceled Dixon 
Yates contract is back on the 
front pages, and the wey 
things have «» rr. 
now devel |; 
oped, it may | 
well prove to ~ 
be an alba- © 
tross around * 
the Adminis- 
tration’s neck © 
from here to & 
Election Day. 

I have al- 
ways thought 
that the sub- 
stance of 
contract was thoroughly de- 
fensible. You might be for it 
or against it, but it could well 
have proven to be a prudent 
saving of the taxpayers’ money 
and could be honestly argued 
on that basis. 

Its pufpose was to replace 
power, through a contract 
with a private company, pro- 
vided by the Tennessee Val- 
ley Authority to the Atomic 
Energy Commission and it was 
canceled by the President 11 
months after the city of Mem- 
phis decided to build its own 
plant. This décision made the 
Dixon-Yates contract unneces- 
sary. 

If the issue stood right 
there, the Democrats could 
have fun with the Dixon-Yates 
contract in the campaign and 
might even make some polit- 
ical hay. 

But it doesn’t stand there. 
Something new — and some- 
thing more—has been added. 
It has become polit'cally com- 
bustible. It is almost certainly 
going to flash out all over 
the place as soon as the 1956 
electioneering begins to heat 
ip. 

Here is what has turned a 
moderately controversial issue 
into a political explosive issue: 
The Atomic Energy Commis- 
sion has just informed Edgar 
H. Dixon, head of the company 
with which the contract was 
made, that the Government 
will not compensate his com- 
pany for the expenses it in- 
curred in carrying out the con- 
tract to the point of cancella- 
tion. Reason: That the con- 
tract was invalid because of a 
“conflict of interest” resulting 
from the fact that an official of 
the First Boston Corporation 
—which was the financial 
agent for the Dixon-Yates un- 
dertaking—was simultaneous 
ly a consultant on other as- 
pects of the Dixon-Yates con- 
tract for the Bureau of the 
Budget. 


cos 


THIS MEANS that the 
Dixon- Yates contract, which 
high officials of the Admin- 
istration praised as prudent 
and proper, is now deemed by 
the Administration itself to be 
a legally imprudent and 
legally improper contract. 

It means- that the Admin- 
istration is citing as the rea- 
son why it should get out of 
its obligation to pay Dixon- 
Yates. compensation for ex- 
penses one reason why Dem- 
Ocratic critics contended it 
should never have gotten into 
the contract. 

It means that the Admin- 
istration is now itself brand- 
ing as illegal and improper the 
dual-role participation of 
Adolphe H. Wenzell in work- 
ing out the contract, which role 
it earlier defended before the 
Kefauver Committee as legal 
and innocent. 

For a contract which was 
defensible and constructive in 
purpose and whose essential 
terms met that purpose, the 
Administration has certainly 
gotten itself into a monument- 
al snafu. 

The contract which was so 
uniformly. hailed by the Ad- 
ministration as an “improve- 
ment” over similar past con- 


| Lewis & Thos. Saltz... 1409G 


tracts, is now found by the 
general counsel of the agency 
which negotiated it to have an 
illegal foundation. 


cos 


The issue, which will be 
with us politically anyway, is 
not yet settled factually. Dixon 
will certainly take it to the 
courts. No court decision can 
get the Administration off the 


hers @ | 
Dixon-Yates Albatross . . . By Roscoe Drummond 
AEC Ruling Puts Issue Back in Politics 


gricdie. The court will elther 
agree that the Government 
has negotiated an invalid eon- 
tract—the circumstances of 
which came out only under 
pressure—or that the contract 
is valjd and that the Admin- 
istration must pay several 
million dollars of the taxpay- 
ers’ petseced’ hes get out of it. 


area Tr Heke » * ™ 


ee 


LEBOW’S 
Cashmiracle Jacket 


Men who wear a Cashmiracle sport jacket prize 
it among their most cherished possessions. It 
has a weightless feel, a caressing softness that 
encourages relaxation and contentment. Ranked 
among the luxury cloths of the world, Cash- 
miracle is woven by Ballantyne’s of Peebles of 
60% cashmere for elegance and 40% pure wool 
for wearing strength. Lebow’s inspired hand 
tailoring gives this fabulous fabric the brilliant 
treatment its richness deserves. In charcoal tans 
and browns with faint tracings of stripings. 
Sizes are 38 to 46, regulars and longs. Exclusive 


with us in Washington. 


*95 


Second Floor . . ..Clothing Dept. 


¢ 


LEWIS &:TH°S. SALTZ 


AT BOTH OUR STORES 


1409 G Street 


10094 Conn. Ave. 


EX ecutive 3-4343 
am) ae Same) ae! ae ee ae! ae! ae! eS a 


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RPORATION, wr 


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Checking 


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lead a double life! 


You save a lot of time 


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your canceled checks. constitute legal receipts. 
Open a McLachlen checking account today, 


FREE PARKING AT MAIN OFFICE 


MeLachlen 
Banking Corporation 


10TH AND G STREETS, N.W. 
Southwest Branch, 12th and Maryland Ave., SW, 
Banking Facilities “B” Bldg., 2nd & Que Sts., $.W. 

| Member Pederal Reserve System & Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 


“Since 1891 a name you con bonk on” essen 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
22 Monday, November 28, 1955 


y 
ORGE’S MONT 


biti i: 


APDLANC NE 


bs VALUABLE PRIZES!! 


Just thee more daye and our Giant U MEET THE WINNERS . . 


Jackpot of Prizes will be over! All 

you adh enter is come fo any one W. H. Oliver, 304 54th St. N.E. 

of George's 3 locations .. . fill out an (Hotpoint Washer); W. C. Li pphard, 

entry blank . . . and that’s all there 228 Decatur Pl. N.E. (Travier 21 

is to it! Absolutely nothing to buy TV); Mrs. Robt. Freeman, Warren- 
ton, Va. (Westinghouse Dryer); Mrs. 


and you need not be present at 
the “aving on Nov. 30 at our huge L. Brillion, 4132 Military Rd. (Lewyt 
Vacuum Cleaner); ag B 


th ritting- 
warehouse to win. Here are the re- vecwen aT SE. 2-Pe. 


maining prizes: 
ite); Liflie Si er 
¢ $399.95 Thunderbird tr Na yy ergy em 
Jr. Car Hilda Dorfman, 4719 30th St. Ww 
¢ $469.95 Phileo 14 Cu. Ft. (Ironrite Console Ironer). Miss D. 
Upright Freezer Nearan, 1301 Ridge Pl. S.E. (Dinette 
¢ $279.95 CBS 21-inch TV Set), Edith Dickerson, 5713 Quintana 
Table Model . St., Riverdale, Md. (Roper Range) and 
® $239.95 3-Piece ° F. i Rhodes, 3124 Tulane Dr., Ww. 


Bedroom Suite Hyattsville, Md. (Olympic Hi-Fi). 
1955 AND 1956 FLOOR SAMPLES AND OPEN STOCK 
... ALL NATIONALLY FAMOUS BRANDS ... ALL AT 


YOU MAY BE A LUCKY WINNER 
TREMENDOUS SAVINGS! 


TELEVISION and APPLIANCES!! 


a TELEVISION REFRIGERATORS: LAUNDRY RANGES 
: $179.29: me not oe EQUIPMENT | eae $279.29 


le-Bey Console w/elum. 
$104.29 : $229-29 , 
- ‘55 oeepractze T 7 WASHERS se anos '$44.29 
, ; 


tube 
$139.95 "SS ADMIRAL 17. 
Apt.-Size GAS RANGE 
$99.-29= etd Ses gh emt 1 - $4799.- 29 $290.95 ‘ss NORGE Del si tee ‘SS NORGE din, § 29 
 $159-29: $199.29: Sere $159.29: 136- 
- 
$119.29 


in. TV Ebony Teble Model, 
$159.95 ‘SS CROSLEY 21-in. 
TY Welnwt Teble w/clem. 
— GAS RANGE .. 
$499.95 53 Denon - Due. = $169.95 "55 FRIGIDAIRE 30. 
$96-29: pees cifh spgg.z0: Miichsta 
$239.95 _ "55 TAPPAN 30. 
$424.29 5 9s actin, 2 ag 3 me me Saar” ~ $169-29: “* $136-29 
tic rost 
= $389.95 ‘5s WESTINGHOUSE s 29 = = 66 = 
$1 27. 29 = = 10 Cu. ft. w/eute, m E . $1419.29 
$212-29= 
$54-29 


$349.95 "SS EMERSON 21-in, 
TY Console Model . 
= luxe AUTO. WASHER ... ELECTRIC RANGE . 
= $199.95 "55 Apex WRINGER = $199.95 ‘SS ADMIRAL 4. 
= = $497.95 '55 DEEPFREEZE 11.1 $1 49-29: = 
P inch 328 Cu. Fe. = 
$88. 29: 4 = 29 93 ‘SS HOTPOINT 10 $7 59-29: $116-29 = 
w/cross-top freezer 4 
- 


Save on New Modern and Traditional 


FURNITURE 


SMALL APPLIANCES 
and HOUSEWARES 


Reg. st? .5e 
5-TUBE 


Superheteredyne 


RADIO 


in assorted colors 


$ 3 9-*” 
‘4 67° 


$5.95 KITCHEN WALL CLOCKS + § 29 
in a choice of colors . 
Res. $47.58 


Famous Make 
Elec. Food Mixer 


= $419.95 "35 NORGE 
= f. w/avte. 


sag 9 "35 — 102 Cw. 


= = 
= Freezer 
= $399.95 "55 CROSLEY 11 Cu. 
= Ft. w/prestomotic defrost 

= $299. . "55 HOTPOINT 16 
= aad . w/evte. defrost & 


*140 
ida! 


3-Pc. BEDROOM 


Deeble Dresser, Chest, and Beok- 
case Bed. Blend Finish. Our reg. 


$64.95 PHILCO PORTABLE 
RADIO with ladies’ vanity. 


$34.95 CLOCK RADIOS 
with slumber switch 


in. TV Table w/alum. tube, 
$229.95 ‘55 PHILCO 71.in. 
TV Mahogany Console 
$159.95 “SS RCA I7-in. TY 
Table Mode} 

1955 CROSLEY i740. TV 
Walnut Teble Model with 
alum. tube 

1955 MOTOROLA 2!1-in. TV 
Teble Model w/alum. tube, 
$219.95 ‘55 ADMIRAL 271. 
TV Console w/oalum. 


$169.95 ‘SS ADMIRAL 71- 
AUTO. WA 


FRIGIDAIRE 


| 3:PC. BEDROOM ‘SUITE. Double 
| dresser, chest and bookcase bed . 

) dy mink and oak finish. Our Reg. 
ia 199 


} 3-PC. BEDROOM SUITE. Déesser, 
and bed. Our Reg. $159.95 


119.95 ‘SS s+ a 
in. GAS RANGE 


179.95 ‘SS TAPPAN 
ELECTRIC RANGE . 


229.95 "55 FRIGIDAIRE Frill. 
Size ELECTRIC RANGE ... 


219.95 ‘SS FRIGIDAIRE 30- 


$729.95 "S53 BENDIX AUTO. ol 
WASHER w/agitator ection, ae 


= $199.95 “SS GLE. 
AUTO. WASHER 


$299.95 "55 MAYTAG AUTO. 
WASHER w/agiteter action, 


2-Cycle 1% on 


$149.95 "55 MOTOROLA 17- 
in. TV Blonde Table Model. 
WASHER with pump > Geen 
; $239.50 "SS TAPPAN 36-in 
$2209.95 ‘55 . ; 
SHER GAS RANGE ‘a 
$ 2h a ie : w /puah- bution $ 4.29: 
rost 
$149-29:, $166-29 


mn 


tube 


The appliance of 
* a dosen and one 
uses, 


$23.29 


$19.95 NELSON or KEMCO 2- 
Slice AUTOMATIC TOASTER 


op 95 BATHROOM 
SCALES 


$49.95 COPPER ELECT 


FRY PAN & SKILLET com- 


plete w/cover 


$729 
cor 
$4 4:*9 


TRIC 


$34.95 


“Double Bed Size 
ELECTRIC 
BLANKET 


w/13 heat control 


mostat control, tip 
safety switch . . 
forced and radiant ‘has 


$29.95 ote STEAK 


and CARVING SET, 9 
gift boxed .. 


ae 95 ELECTRIC HEATER ae. ther- 
yo 


167 


KNIFE ¢ 7: 29 


ane 
Res. $79.96 
REGINA 
Chrome Elec. 
FLOOR POLISHER 
and WAXER 


As versatile aa it 
la low im price— 
5 


(plus tax) 


$5.95 ELECTRIC HAIR 
on st 


$2.49 INDOOR TV 
ANTENNAS . : 


$9.95 WROUGHT IRON 
TV STANDS 


DRYER ¢ 4:9 


PORTABLE 45 

RPM RECORD 

PLAYER 

fn senses carry- 
€ RCA 

unit . 7% aes -8e~ 

lected 45 rp 


== at no “ee, 


~~ se 


Reg. $49.95 
ROTO BROIL 


ROTISSERIE 
Pius. FREE of 


set 
oy one low price! 


$329.95 ‘55 WESTING- 
HOUSE ?7)-in. TY Mehoe- 
any Console 

1955 PHILCO 2!1-in. 
Ebeny Teble Mode! 
1955 RCA iin. TV Teble 
Model w/alum. tube 
$229.95 ‘55 ADMIRAL 24-in. 
TV Teble Medel w/cium. 
tube 


1955 WESTINGHOUSE 21- 
in. TV Table Model 


1955 EMERSON 17-in. TV 
Table sé 
$239.95 ‘S55 MOTOROLA 
Zi.in. TV Console w/elum. 
tube ‘ 
$199.95 "35 WESTINGHOUSE 
21-in TY Deluxe tTeble 
Model 


pe "SS ADMIRAL 24-in. 
V Mehogeny Console 

$159.95 "55 Philee 17-in. TV 

Table Model 

$249.95 ‘55 RCA 2I-in. TY 

Console w/alum. tube 


TV 


1955 EMERSON 17-in. TY 
Table Model w/alum. tube, 
$199.95 "55 WESTING- 
HOUSE 21.in. TY Consolette 
$549.50 "55 ADMIRAL 2. 
in. TY 3-WAY COMB. with 
io end J3-speed phone. 
with deors . 
$269.95 ‘55 MOTOROLA 24- 
in. TV Table Model 
$219.95 "SS PHILCO 2!-in, 
TV Swivel Console w/elum. 


$269.95 ‘5S ZENITH 2!-in. 

TV Console Model 

$199.95 "SS PHILCO 72!-in. 

TV Mahogany Table Model. 

$575.00 ‘55 ADMIRAL 21-in. 

TY 3-Wey Comb., blende 

w/redic, phono. & “doors... 

1955 WESTINGHOUSE 17.in. 

TV Teble Model 

1955 PHILCO 17-in, TV Mee 

hogany Consolette 

$399.95 "55 ZENITH 21-in. 

TV Flashmatic Console 

a ng ‘ss URES 24-in, 
onsolette 


$179.95 ‘55 EMERSON 17.in. 
TV Mahogeny Table Model. 


$399.95 ‘55 ADMIRAL 2!1-in. 
TV 3-Wey Comb., me ny 
w/radio & 3-speed phone. 


$349.50 "55 RCA 7Zi-in. TY 
Mahogany Console 
eee ‘SS PHILCO 24-in. 


yderge "SS RCA 2I-in. TV 

Blonde Console 

$329.95 ‘SS PHILCO 21-in. 

TV Console Mode! 

es ‘55 MOTOROLA 21. 
. TV Blende w/olum. tube 

$299.99 ‘55 Wereres 

2i.in. TY SBSlende Tab 

Model 


$349.95 ‘55 gy waved at 
in. TV Blonde Console 


$339.95 "55 RCA a in. TV 
Console Mode! . 


$389.95 "55 CROSLEY 721.-in. 
TV Console w/phenograph . 


$269.95 ‘55 PHILCO 21-in. 
TY Mahegeny Table Model 


$239.95 ‘55 CBS 21-in. Me- 
ary Me seg Mode! ws: 


$124-297: 
| $139-29:; 
$159.29 
$119-29 
$99.29 


$159-29 


- $1 39-29 
$194-29 
$11 7-29 
$f 76-29 
$11 7.29 
$144.29 


33: 
On 
1 OO 


: $147- 29 = 


$189-29 = °) 


$299.29 
$99.29 
- $429.29 
- $249-29 
- $167-29: 
pba : 


= S $354.33 ‘ss 
HOUSE 


-_ 
= $479.95 “S35 PHILCO 14 Cu, 
= ft. Deluxe UPRIGHT 


= 
Cu fh. UPR 


S Cc. 


- $f 29-29: = UP 


/ $46 7-292 
$199.29: 
$119.29: 


$97.29: 


$129.29: 3 $297.25 "35 NORGE 10 Cv. SOS. 29: 


99s 3s - $259.29 
= ser ys_ ‘36 ADs ADMIRAL 103 $229.29 
$229 9 

29.98 "88 CROSLEY 8 Ce, - $144.29 
$229 
$2 798 "33 HOTPOINT ? Cu, pe 68 
$369.95 °s5 
ex Take "s $188-29 
$269.95 33 NORGE 1 
a aa butten Ae sayy 4 $7 54-29 
$349 
$349.95 "33 crc CROSLEY Cun $1 79-29 
$269.95 “SS FR 

uv. Ft. w/eress- = $144.29 
$99 93 'S5 HOTPOINT 
_ w/avte defrost 4 $239.29 
$529 95 
Cu. Ft. Duel ADMIRAL 123 $319-29 
$219 98 ss b FRIGIDAIRE 7 $133-29 
$399.95 '55 PH 
Bre 7e 2 munco,03 <. SPO.29 
$199.95 "33 

Soh weenie te $494.29 
$497.93 °33 FRIGIDAIRE 11.2 - $2 79-29 
$289.93 33 FRIGIDAIRE 10 $229.29 
S sos. os ‘$5 WEstinonouse 
Fr 
S fest vt $139-29 
= $199.95 
S hanvestes ¥ NATIONAL 


reerer 
= $529.95 "55 PHILCO 122 
Cu Yt. 2-dr. 


$249.95 ‘55 INTERNATION. 
Al MARVESTER €.5 Cu. Pr. 

w/deoor es 
see 35 WESTING. 
HOUSE 12 Cu. FB. w/eute. 
defrost 


$424.95 °55 INTERNATION. 
Al HARVESTER 10 Cu. FP. 


$259.29 
w/push-butten st $166-29 
$519.95 ‘Ss WEST 

HOUSE 11.5 Cw. ad > $279.-29 


FREEZERS 


$167-29 
 $237-29 
$288.29 
$199.29 
$198-29: 
- $159.29: | 
" $259.29: 
- $299.29: 


WESTING. 


5 4 ht. UPRIGHT, 


$579.95 "SS DEEPFREEZE 14 
PRIGHT 

$469.50 ‘SS BEN HUR 15 

Ph. UPRIGHT . 


$399 50 
= 


1955 aes 1 cy. A, 
RIGHT 


‘SS DEEPFREEZE 12 
Mt. UPRIGHT . J 


$499.95 ‘55 sOtAaD 18 
Cu. &. UPRIGHT 


$399.95 “55 NORGE 18 Cu. 
Ft. UPRIGHT 


$499.95 ‘53 WESTING.- 
= HOUSE 14 Cu. ft. UPRIGHT, 


$397.50 ‘SS DEEPFREEZE 
13.5 Cu. Pt. CHEST ... 


$99.29 
w/e. $276.29: 


$79.95 ‘53 MONITOR Port. 
able WRINGER WASHER... 


$249.95 ‘SS SENDIX 
matic AUTO. WASHER... 


$299.95 “5S PRIGIDAIRE De- 
luxe AUTO. WASHER ‘ 
sivp7s 6's MAYTAG 
WRINGER WASHER with 
$199.95 "55 SENDIX AUTO. 
WASHER w/agiteter action, 


$239.95 ‘55 NORGE AUTO. 
WASHER w/agitetor ection, 
$2779.95 ‘55 THOR AUTO- 
MATIC WASHER 
$319.95 ‘S55 
HOUSE AUTO 
w/weigh seve 
$159.95 ‘SS BENDIX 
omatic WASHER 
$279.95 "55 MAYTAG AUTO. 
WASHER w/agiteter ection, 
$239.95 ‘S53 WHIRLPOOL 
AUTO. WASHER w, vhs, vee 
action 

$139.95 "55 NORGE WRING.- 
ER WASHER with pump 
$162.45 ‘SS MAYTAG 
WRINGER with pump 


$339.95 “55 BENDIX AUTO. 
WASHER , 


WESTING- 
WASHER 


Diol- 


$199.95 "35 THOR WRING.- 
ER WASHER with pump 

si99.9s ‘55 WHIRLPOOL 
WRINGER WASHER .... 


$299.95 ‘55 THOR Semi- 
Auto. WASHER 


DRYERS 


hay 
110-228 » 


$191.55 ‘SS 
ELEC. ORYER, 


$149.95 WESTING- 
HOUSE ELECTRIC DRYER 


$274.95 “558 MAYTAG ELEC. 
TRIC DRYER 


$158.66 ‘SS BENDIX ELEC. 
DRYER, 110-220 v. 


$179.95 ‘SS PRIGIDAIRE 
ELECTRIC DRYER 


$149.95 “35 NORGE ELEC. 
TRIC DRYER, 110-220 wv. 


$269.95 ‘SS WHIRLPOOL 
imperial ELEC. DRYER .. 


$169.95 “56 CONLON ELEC. 
TRIC ORVER 


IRONERS 


$279.95 ‘S55 BENDIX rennet 
CONSOLE IRONER ... 


Sop.9s °S5 pam Con- 
= selette . RONER 


$299.95 ‘SS imOnRITE 
Deluxe CONSOLE IRONER 


DISHW ASHERS 


= AUTO. DISHWASH 


Model, Brand New 
CORY Y DEHUMIDIFIER ‘ 


pron go 


EE eT AF EG 


$] 89-29 = $199.95 "55 JAMES Portable 


$249.95 "55 APEX cam 
AUTO. DISHWASHER ... 


$44.29 
- ST 59.29 
$977-29 
$1 22-29 
$1 06-29 
$122.29 
$124.29 


$159-29 
$99.29 
$149-29 


$118-29 
$66-29 
$99.29 
$177-29 
$7 4-29 
$109.29 
$99.29 


$98.29 = 
$95-29 = 
$159-29 = 
$89-29 : 
$99.29 = 
$96-29 : 
$133.29: : 
$86-29: 


26-29 
$17'7-29 


LL 3 LOCATIONS OPEN EVERY NITE ‘til 9 P. MI 


Sth & E 
Streets, N.W. 


OPEN SATURDAYS 9 A.M. 


Warehouse Store 


 2146-24th 
Place, N. E. 


OPEN MONDAY & TUESDAY, 9 A.M. 


r 


to 6 P.M. 


Northeast Store 


Street, N.E. 


im, ELECTRIC RANGE 


$469.95 "55 WESTING. 

HOUSE 4-in. ELECTRIC 

RANGE . 

$149.95 “S55 NORGE 2. in. 

GAS gee 

$339.95 we st 

aoe Poll Size ELECTRIC 
NG 


eM "SS MORGE 34-in. 
G NGE 

$2 
MOUSE 
RANGE 


o 
30-in. 


w . SsTin a. 

ELECTRIC 
$397.95 "553 NORGE .-in. 
Deluxe GAS RANGE 


$249.50 “55 TAPPAN sation 
ELECTRIC RANGE .... 


S199.9S “S53 NORGE ee 
GAS RANGE . 

$344.50 ‘55 TAPPAN Pyil- 
Size GAS RANGE 

$329.95 ‘53 ADMIRAL 4. 
in. ELECTRIC RANGE .... 
$249.95 ‘SS (4H 4@-in, 
ELECTRIC RANGE 


$139-29 


- 
$89.29 
E $199.29 
$95.29 
$159-29 


eee ee - oee 


-_—— eS 


; $129-22 
~ $109.29; 
- $197.29) 
$187-29) 
$112-29 


es 


~- 


Drastic Reductions On 


oa 


$199.95 Famous wae MAHOGANY 


*- 
— 
as - ee ne ee ent 
— = — ——E—— 
- _ - — - 


i 2PC, LIVING ROOM SUITE. 


5 2-PC. SECTIONAL SOFA. 
) tubber cushions. Our Reg, $199.95 


| STUDIO COUCHES. 
beds. Our Reg. $79.9 


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City Life 


WOMEN’S NEWS 
COMICS 
RADIO-TV 
CLASSIFIED~ 


— 


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1955 


Outside Jobs 
Of Engineers 


FEDERAL AGENCIES are 
making a check of the after- 
hours and weekend engineering | 
jobs hahdied by their engi-' 
neers. The study of the side 
jobs and agency policies con-| 
cerning them was requested by 
the National Society of Profe 
sional Engineers. 

MILITARY PERSONNEL | 
will be giad to learn that they 
will no longer be required to| 
buy their own surety bonds’ 


’ 


Start of Advent 
Observed. in 


Aven Churches 


after Jan. 1. The Defense De-| 

rtment will buy and pay for'| 
lanket bonds to cover both! 
fts military and civilian em- 
ployes at that time. | 

AIR FORCE has made sev- 
eral changes in its excellent) 
civilian personne! office. James. 
Walden has been promoted to 
deputy director; Joseph Hoch-| 
feiter to chief of overseas and 


In D. C. Area 


Apprentice 
Unit Studies 


Don’t Let Tinsel 
Of Christmas 
Overshadow Jesus, 
Ministers Warn 


By Kenneth Dole 
Stall Reporter 


The opening of Advent, 


Automation 
L dieses telieesmmnael 


field affairs, and Fleyd Dando- 
melen to chief of standards. 
Dan Pruitt, the former deputy, 
is going to Tokyo to be’ the 
agency's civilian personne! 
ehief in the Far East. He has 


‘cil Committee 


ian service award. ‘automation as 
STORY: Mary E. Switzer, di-| workers in the 
rector, DHEW’s Office of Voca-|,..5 
tional Rehabilitation, has been 
given the annual award of the 
National Rehabilitation Associa- 
tion for “outstanding achieve- 
ment in advancing the rehabil- 
fitation of the handicapped.” 
She accepted the award on) 
behalf of all of her employes. | 
She then called a meeting of | 
her employes, displayed the/| 
award, and told them: 
“It's yours; so come 
enjoy it whenever you wish. 
ARMY & NAVY have cav-| 
tioned its officials to keep lay- 


Ghrisimes season. Botn ace in] WA Develops 
the process of eliminating about ‘ 5 
: Quiz to Aid 
SMITHSONIAN STORY: One. : 
TB Patients 


20,000 civilian jobs before Dec. 
3 
of ite better secretaries banged 
United Press 


soon as the survey is 


annual report. 


demands in the District area. 


the period on the last sentence 
of a letter she was typing when 
the phone fang. She picked up 
the receiver and answered: 
“Very ours.” 
A RECOR JMBER of em- 


from the Naval Gun Factory, a|‘*® guard against premature re- 

total of 70 with more than 2000/lease of tuberculosis patients. 

years of service. The six who/}t said the test may save the 

ree te 9G eee . _ |Government thousands of dol- 

seph Riani, William Gately,|/4"S- 

Ha Weisbrod, Olan Diggs; The test, developed by Dr. 
George Calden of the VA's 


and aa aga inaien! 

hes saluted 11 of its employes} serermine “what's rags ra 
wheeach have accumulated |). 44” as well as “what's in a 
'patient’s chest,” the agency 


the maximum possible amount 
said 


of 2776 hours of sick leave. 
These employes have taken no} 

sick leave since July 1, 1972,| ee eee 
when the benefit was first al-| patients whe leave hospitals 
the depart-\ szainst medical advice before 


lowed. Further, 
ment says it has hundreds Of/their treatment is complete. 
other employes who have OUt-iThe VA estimated each such 
standing sick leave records. “irregular discharge” costs 
Because of the different laws, $19 000 in wasted treatments. 
the maximum amount a classi-| The test is a series of incom- 
fied employe can have accuMu-|plete sentences which the 
lated is around 1100 hours. patient fills out in any way he 
By the way, this column, at| wishes. The VA said the an- 
the suggestion of an Army!|swers permit doctors to deter- 
employe, started the systeMimine the patient’s attitude 
a year ago of commending toward bed rest, hospitalization, 
employes who have large ac-|ward life, family problems and 
cumulations of sick leave. Most ‘other matters. 
every Federal agency is now; A doctor, when he knows a 
following that lead and we're! patient’s attitude, can guard 
giad to welcome Post Office against any tendency to leave 
to the ranks. |the hospital too soon, the VA 
ROUNDUP: John A. Mann said. 
has been given an outstanding) In the three years during 
job rating by the National|which the test has been used 
Capital Housing Authority ...\at the Madison hospital the 
Eleaner Dale of the Women’s|percentage of premature dis- 
Bureau has won a $250 cash /|charges has dropped from 50 to 
award in a Trans World Air-|33 per cent. 
lines contest .. . Civil Service| Explaining how the test 
has exams open for economists,| operates, the VA said a patient 
$5440 to $11,610; medical and|™may have strong doubts at — 
X-ray technicians, $2960 to/his ability to work and support 
$4525, and bindery women, $1.51 this family after hospitalization. 
an hour. Contact CSC for) Such fear, it added, may seri- 
details The Nationa! ously interfere with his medi- 
Customs Service Association °#! treatment or lead him to 
has asked Treasury to with-|@it the hospital in despair. 
draw its order which prevents hen the tests bring out 
local Customs officials from/|SUCh, fears, psychologists on 
excusing employes on local holi- the hospital staff can reassure 
days such as Columbus Day . , .|*®¢ TB patient of his ability to 
CSC Chairman Philip Young |¥°™* — a is dischar — = 
pte le « »even help him prepare se 
ys he's “deeply gratified’ |'.. useful employment. 


A District Appgentice Coun- 
headed by 
‘Robert E. Phelps is gathering 
been given an exceptional civil-|fAgures and information on 
it relates to 
Wishington 


District Apprenticeship Di- 
rector Gino J. Simi said that as 
com- 
pleted, the council will release 
it in the form of a special 


Phelps, whe recently toured 
mass-production plants in the 
Middle West, told the Council’s 
\quarterly meeting recently he 
in and |Delieved automation will have 
» | little effect on the skilled labor 


The Veterans Administration 
announced yesterday it has de- 
ployes are retiring this week | Yeloped a simple test designed 


the period of prayer and fast- 
ing preceding Christmas, was 
observed yesterday in most 
Washington churches. 

At the Washington Cathedral, 
the Right Rev. Angus Dun, 
Episcopal Bishop of Washing- 
ton, declared Jesus wasn't a 


“puritan,” scornful of the joys 
of the world, but “one of the 
most world-accepting of the 
great religious figures.” 

He would not have His fol- 
lowers shun the gaiety of the 
season named for Him, the 
Bishop said. “He would have us 
say: 

“Do not despise the tinsel 
and the colored lights; do not 
despise the ribbons and the 
wrappings, though try not to 
get wrapped up in them: do not 
despise the expectancy and joy 
of children. But do not let the 
tinsel hide the Kingly Person.” 

Through the festivities, we 
should take care, the Bishop 
said, not to ignore “His speak- 
ing of the ultimate issues of 
fe.” 

These, he said, include an- 
swers to the questions: “Why 
am I here? Is the world going 
somewhere ultimately, or is it 
just going? Are there others 
| really my brothers? Can I face 
death or invalidism or the loss 
of someone who means much to 
me? Can I be forgiven—ulti- 
| mately?” 

As a response, the Bishop 
offered the phrase, “Salvation 
through Christ.” Christian sal- 
vation, he said, “means the gain- 
ing of the goods that moths 
and rust do not corrupt; the 
tasting of the ultimate joy 
which is blessedness; knowing 
a peace that the world cannot 
give or take away; answering 
to a love that triumphs over 
death.” 

At the Lutheran Church of 
the Reformation, 212 East Cap- 
itol st.. the Rev. Dr. Lawrence 
D. Folkemer said, “Advent re- 
minds us that our life must con- 
'Stantly be lived in preparation, 
not only for death, but prepara- 
tion to enter the real joys of 
this life.” 


Hampton R. Lackey and William R. (Coun- 
try) Carpenter (right), charged yesterday 
with the $4000 holdup of a Safeway Store 


‘Pvts. Charles Carpenter and Tony Rais examine masks police say were used by suspects. 


At a Wednesday circle meet- 
ing, he related, the question 
was put: “Suppose you knew 


Before Commissioners Advisory Board 


for an absolute certainty that 
the world was coming to an 
,end one week from today, what 
‘would you do?” 

| A woman who had never been 
able to afford a maid, said: “! 
iwould employ a maid for a 
\week—and pay her on Thurs- 
day.” 

A merchant said: “I would 
close shop and completely re- 
lax for a week.” 

Another man replied: “I 


Traffic authorities from 
throughout the greater Wash- 
ington area have been invited 


would spend that time in prayer e attend the meeting of the 
and preparation.” Commissioners Traffic Advis- 
In the advent season, espe-|ory Board at 8 p. m. today in 
cially, Christians, the minister|the board room of the District 
said, should put on “the livery | Building. 
of Christ—His manner, His way|. The meeting will be ad- 
of life.” dressed by Franklin Kreml, 
The Rev. John Bayley Jones|nationally recognized expert 
of Calvary Methodist Church, | on traffic problems, who is as- 
1463 Columbia rd. nw., warned|sociated with Northwestern 
against “switching off Jesus.”| University. 
Although approving “the eth-| Meanwhile, finishing touches 
ical well-being” between Chris-| were being applied to plans for 
tians and non-Christians at|the mammoth noon parade in 
Christmas, he said “we need to|celebration of Safe Driving 
keep the central core of Christ-| Day on Thursday. (Yesterday's 
mas in mind, lest we switch off| edition of the Washington Post 


that Warren B. Irons has been 
selected to receive one of the 

Man Arrested 
On Illegal 


10 career service awards from | 
Liquor Count 


the National Civil Service! 
League. Irons, he said, “is a 
fine example of a devoted 
career public servant.” He’s one! 
of Young's top aides .. . Senator 
Humphrey (D-Minn.) is drafting 
legislation which he hopes will 
reduce accidents and fires in 
Government. He said they cost | 
the Government upwards of 
$26 million last year. : 


611 Q st. nw., was charged with 


John Robert Robinson, 51, of|. 


Jesus.” and Times Herald erroneously 
The “bacchanalian debauch”|reported the parade date as 
that many turn Christmas into| “Friday,” Dec. 1.) 
also puts Jesus in the shade,| The parade, which will be- 
he said. “We become so car-'gin and end at 2d st. and Penn- 
ried away with the joy of|sylvania ave. nw., consists of a 
Christmas that we forget it has|motorcade which will follow 
holiness, too.” ‘ Pennsylvania ave. to 17th st., 


possession of numbers slips and 
keeping and selling whisky 
without a license yesterday 
after he was arrested at his 
home, Sgt. Samuel W. Stickley, 
of the morals division, Ne Aa 

Stickley said that Inson, 
released in custody of his attor- 
ney because of poor health, had 
a record of illegal whisky ar- 
rests dating back 10 years. 

Robinson was arrested after 
a ldyear-old girl sold a half 
pint of whi to an under-) 
coverman, S 


| 


—— 


New Hear This— 


seve 
persons in a house at 1408 V st. 
nw., Stickley said. Stickley re- 
ported that Jaseph Moore, 39, 
was charged with keeping and 
selling whisky without a license 
and that Raymond Ford, 39, of 


The holiday season is the time 
for giving to the needy, but po- 
lice cautioned generous Wash- 
ingtonians to make sure their 
ts don’t go toward financing 
a charity gyp’s January vaca- 
tion in the Florida sun, 


Det. Sgt. Joseph Chennault of 


_ One rule recommended by po- 
lice is to never give money to 
an organization that © solicits 
over the phone. The pitch at 
this time of year is frequently 
a contribution to buy Christmas 
baskets for the needy in the 


—Police Warn Gyps Are on the Make 


Beware of Fake Charities! 


Washington Area Traffic Authorities 
Invited to Hear Expert's Address 


‘then double back and forth| 
‘along 17th, 18th, 14th, 11th, 7th, | 
| H, and K sts. ih the’ 


‘northwest area. 


’ 


’ 
; 


| 
Touchdowners 


Honor Pellegrini 


The performance highlights 
Safe Driving Days (Nov. 21-| 
Dec. 10), a period in which the 
Nation’s traffic experts will try 
to impress upon motorists the 
heavy toll taken each year in) 
highway accidents. A. Julian 
Brylawski is S-D Days Director 
for Washington. 

In connection with Mary-| 
land’s observance of Safe Driv- 


ling Day, State Police Chief 


Maryland center Bob Pelle-| 
‘'grini will receive the Walter) 
Camp Memorial Trophy as out-| 
standing player on the 66th an- 
‘nual Collier’s All-America foot- 
‘ball team at the Touchdown 
'Club’s weekly luncheon today, | 
12:30 p. m. He was presented 
the trophy on television in New 
York last night. | 

Halfback Ed Vereb of the’ 
Terrapins and Bob Ward, two- 
time AllAmerica guard at 
Maryland, will also attend. Max 
McKinney, local representative 
of Collier’s will make the pres- 
entation, 


: 


Elmer F. Munshower called on 
the public to “make extraor- 
dinary effort to walk a nd| 
drive safely” in order that the| 


‘State “may go entirely free Of | ndike told police. 


accidents” on that day. 


’ 


MIT Club to Meet 


The MIT Club of Washing- 
ton will hear Wendell B. 
Barnes, administrator, Small 


Business Administration, speak 
on “Opportunities in Free En- 
terprise” at 6 p. m. Tuesday at 
the Cosmos Club, 


neighborhood. In most cases 
those making the phone call 
feel they are the “needy.” 
Difficulty in enforcement 
arises because frequently neigh-' 
borhood churches and civic 
groups actually perform the 


,|815 N. Capitol st. 


type of charity the gyp artist 
claims they will. But a legiti- 
mate charity worker will never 
‘be offended by a request for 
credentials, or a phone call to 
the Better Business Bureau if 
there is any doubt. 


the Special Inv tions, 
Squad said Washington is con- 
sidered an “excellent charity 


Coordinating Agency 


town” by those in the racket. 

“In this town all you have to 
do is put on a Santa Claus suit 
and stand on the sidewalk and 
people will start sh money 


1432 V st. nw., was charged with 

on of numbers slips. 

ve other persons were 

duet and forfeited $8 collateral 
a . 

Stickley said. sr 


Kyle to Get Award 
The 


at you,” Chennault sai 
He has 


United Community Services 
again will operate a Christmas 
Bureau as a coordinating unit 


oing 
for charitable giving to the 


organization with 
Better Business B 


UCS to Ope : 
!To Direct Yule Giving 


n Bureau 


Mrs. Gehring’ said the Bu- 
reau—a Red Feather service— 


will be staffed beginning to|7%¢ 


day by volunteers. 
The Bureau channels gifts 


Some gimmicks can lead to 
prosecution for false pretenses, 
for example the C. O. D. racket. 
It starts with a phone call to 


\detenmine that you are not at 


home and then a messenger ar- 
rives at your door with 
C.0.D. package addressed to 


0 
for the 


: 
: 
: 


you. Your wife or neighbor’ 


most appealing mage 2 “ rted to police. 


2 Ex-Convicts 


Held in Holdup 
And Burglaries 


$4000 Robbery, 

Whisky Theft, 

$1300 Safe Job 

Laid to Pair 

Two former convicts were 

charged yesterday with the 
Nov. 5 $4000 holdup of Safe- 
way Store Manager Thomas 


M. Updike. 


The suspects, identified by. 
Deputy Police Chief Edgar E. 
Scott as William Russell (Coun- 
try) Carpenter, 51, and Hamp- 
ton Ray Lackey, 38, also were 
charged with two housebreak- | 149° 2th st. nw., died at 


|Emergency Hospital last night 
a eee shortly be-| wo hours after she was struck 


yesterdayiiy a car at New York av 
morsing im the 1200 block of|-7, °c" @* New TE ave 
Pennsylvania ave. se. | Police said she was walking 
Scott said the pair first broke |jn the 11th st. crosswalk when 
into the Jim A. McNamara Liq-)she was struck by a car driven 
vor Store, 4126 3d st. nw., steal-iby George G. Cunningham, 25, 
ing two cases of liquor and rip-| of 5012 3d st. nw. 
ping from the wall a safe con-| Pyts. Leo Tippen and Walter 
taining about $1300. Pilkerton of the Accident In- 
Next, Scott said, they broke vestigation Unit said Cunning- 
into the Patsy Green Dress| ham was making a left turn into 
Shop, 1661 Wisconsin ave. nw.,|New York ave., when the front 
but apparently took nothing. A of his car struck Miss Hirt. 
citizen saw them leave the shop; Doctors said Miss Hirt suf- 
about 4 a. m. with a pinch-bar, fered head injuries. Cunning- 
and gave police the Maryland |ham was charged with failure 
tag numbers of their car. ito yield the right of way to a 
The car with Lackey and pedestrian and with homicide. 
Carpenter in it was spotted|He was ordered held for a 
within an hour or so by Fifth|coroner’s inquest. 
Precinct Pvts. Charles Carpen-'_. 
ter and Antonio Ruiz. Neither| Youth Held After Crash 
man resisted arrest, police | Montgomery County police 
said, although two revolvers | vesterday charged a 17-year-old 
were found in the car. boy with reckless driving 
Also in the car, said,ithe result of an accident in 
were six masks, of the M&%\which he and three women 
querade ball type, and the | were injured Saturday night. 
whisky reported missing from) Police said a car driven by 
the McNamara liquor store. (the juvenile struck the rear of 
A case-hardened veteran of|a parked auto in which Mrs. 
outlawry, Carpenter hasn't al-i\George W. Jacobs, 25, of 4839 
ways surrendered so meekly,/Ariington bivd., Arlington, was 
lice said: It took a policejsitting. Witnesses estimated 
lade to bring him to book/the youth's car was going 60 
as a housebreaking suspect/ miles an hour. 
here about five years ago, po-| Mrs. Jacob's car was knocked 
lice recalled, and his record is into the rear of another parked 
studded with prison service,'auto in which Mrs. Jessie M. 
mostly for safe cracking. \Jennings, 34, ef 7033 Strath- 
His earlier conflicts with the|more st. Chevy Chase, Md., 
law date back to the rum-run-jand Mrs. William T. Lowe, 33, 
ning era, police said. In 1938\of 7035 Strathmore st, were 
he was convicted of perjury sitting, police reported. 
when his memory failed him) The accident occurred in the 
on a District Court witness) 11000 block of New Hampshire 
stand from which he was sup-|ave., Hillandale, Md., near the 
posed to detail the gang warjentrance of the Naval Ord- 
shooting of Joseph E. O’Brien nance Laboratory. Police said 
two years earlier. ithe juvenile’s ear, running with- 
Alse the possessor of a long| out lights, left the roadway 
lice record as a safe thief,\and hit the autos parked on 
ckey hails from the vicinity|the shoulder. 
of Ralelgh, N. C., police said.| 
He was arrested here at least| Pedestrian Injured 


once previously with Carpen- . 
ter in the fall of 1950 in con- Phan ee mong Sm bade ead 
mere with a series of hous®-| ture of the left leg and possible 
reakings. skull fr 
Scott described Carpenter as he A pom ayy gen espe 
a cracksman “in the old tradi-\ne ran across the street in the 
tion of the profession” when 8/909 block of FE ¢ ae 
dynamite blast was the favorite; arty pyts Harold E. Serin 
method of opening strongboxes. | sn4 Matthew F i 2 said 
“He's probably one of the Rogers, admitted to Casualty 
very few safe men in cireula- Hospital, was struck by a cab 
tion who stilluses that method,”| driven by Kenneth H. Maurier 
Se att said. 42, of 5741 Colorado ave. nw. 
Neither the safe at the Mce-| Serine and Lee charged 
Namara liquor store nor the/Rogers with failure to yield 
money it contained was found right-of-way the taxicab 
in the car, ba A -_, ; . 
Scott said Updike had identi- . 
fied both Lackey and Carpenter 16 Charges Hold Driver 
as the masked pair who accosted|. ‘azzie Singleton, 29, of 454 
him as he walked to his parked|“ st. mw., was held yesterday 
car near the store earlier this|O" 16 charges, ranging from 
passing a red light to grand 
larceny. 


month. 
One of them held a gun on ' 
him and announced he would! Simgleton was arrested by 
“eount to 10 and then kill you Second Precinct Pvts. John Lea- 
if you don't give me the money,”|COCk and Henry Perkoski after 
the car he was driving ran up 
on a sidewalk at 4th and I sts. 
nw. Police said they had been 
chasing him at speeds up to 
70 miles an hour. The car he 
was driving had been stolen 
from Miss Pearl Wantman of 
+ Longfellow et. nw., they 


] 
Driver Held 


Auto Kills 


|Pedestrian 
In District 


DISTRICT TRAFFIC TOLL: 

| 1955 deaths to date 

1954 deaths to date ...... @ 
Total 1954 death toll 


Miss Rosa Hirt, about 80, of 


to 


2 Beat Off Thieves; 


2 Others Robbed 


Two intended robbery vic- 
tims successfully fought off 
their attackers, but two others 
lost $38 to weekend marauders 
who beat one man so severely is 
he needed hospital treatment. 

Agostino Santucci, 60, of 4604 
4th st. nw., told police he had 
just closed his barber shop a 
Saturday 
night when two teen-aged boys 
jumped him as he walked to his 
car parked in the rear of his 
shop. One grabbed him around 
the neck and the other put his 
hand in Santucci’s pocket. 

The barber said he grabbed 
the hand in his pocket and 
threw its owner to the ground 
and knocked down the other 
assailant with his fist. He threw 
a ladder over one of the pos 
trate youths but the other was 
about to resume the attack 
when a woman resident of the 
area yelled for police and both 
jyouths filed. 

Louis Lipsic, 37, of 1320 
Sheridan st. nw., told police a 
gunman accosted him ag he 
was about to. get out of his 
aytomobile near his home, but 
fled in a car driven by another 
‘man when Lipsie yelled for 


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26"x42"x30" walnut finished 
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|pharmacist, on the street near 
his home at 777 Harvard st. nw., 


Liston R. Shaw, 36, listed at 
1802 Wyoming ave. nw., re- 
| police that a lone 
thug who attacked him at New 
Hampshire ave. and Swann st. 
nw., stole $13 and inflicted a 

ee olan Washing- 
‘treatment at 
ton University Hospital. 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
24 Monday, November 28, 1955 


Virginia Council Seeks 
Integration Acceptance 


By Paul Duke 


RICHMOND, Va., Nov. 27 
@—Quietly and without a 
Great deal of fanfare, the 

irginia Council on Human 
Relations is going about a 
task its members believe must 
be done to preserve the 
South's honor. 

The job is that of trying to 
win acceptance in Virginia of 
the Supreme Court’s decision 
outlawing segregation in the 
public schools. 

It’s an assignment the Coun- 
cil, and its some 280 members, 
clearly realize will not endear 
the young organization to 
thousands of Virginians who 
are reluctant to give up a way 
of life that’s as traditional as 
Southern grits. Ags John H. 
Marion, the Council's full- 
time director, says: 

“It’s a painful time to have 
to go through, but when the 
wounds heal—as they will— 
the South will be a better and 
ro gee place than it was be- 
ore. 


“Our Virginia Council, 
through the medicine of edu- 
cation and persuasion, is try- 
ing to help in that healing 
process.” 

What is the Council? How 
did it come about? Who are 
its members? And how is it 
going about its business? 


The council was orgat- 
ized last February, four 
month after its opposite 
number, the Opefenders of 
State Sovereignty and Indi- 
dividual Liberties, had its in- 
ception. The Defenders is op- 
posed to even the slightest 
lowering of the segregation 
barrier and advocates with- 
holding public funds from 
counties and cities which are 
willing to attempt integration. 

The was set up 
under the auspices of the 
Southern Regional Council, 
long a leader in promoting 
racial harmony in the South. 
About a year and a half ago, 
the Regional Council received 
a $240,000 grant f-om the Fund 
For the Republic, a branch of 
the Ford Foundation. 

The money was allocated to 
expand the Regional Coun- 
cil’s work through the estab- 
lishment of affiliated coun- 
cils in 12 Southern States. The 
Virginia Council became one 
of these. 

The Virginia Council’s or- 
ganizational meeting in Rich- 
mond last February brought 
together about 20 white and 
Negro leaders of various 
faiths and pursuits. Charter 
members included, am 
others, Dr. J. Earl Morelan 


dent of Randolph-Macon 

ie ao Thomas Hender- 

son, of Virginia Union 

University: and Mrs. Theodore 

:. Adeins of op gw — 
tist World Alliance. 

W. Carroll Brooke, an Epis 


In Maryland 
Segregation 
Suit to Be 

Fu iled Today 


BALTIMORE, Nov. 27 @ 
The National Association for 
the Advancement of Colored 
People (NAACP) has announced 
its intention to file suits in 
United States District Court 
here in an attempt to force an 
end to public school segrega- 
tion in Harford and St. Marys 
Counties. 

Robert B. Watts, NAACP at- 
torney, said the request for an 


il injunction against the Harford 


County School Board and su- 
perintendent would be 


airs | Monday im behalf of 21 Negro 


in 
work, to run its headquarters 
oie ¥ ae the 
nce 
has been working w 
half a dozen local interracial 
groups across the state. These 
groups include on their mem- 
bership rolls educators, attor- 
neys, churchmen and business 
leaders. One cate — poli- 
ticians and mem of the 
legislature—is notably absent. 
The Council has defined its 
a - ye and fact- 
and definitely non- 
poltieai It stands ready to 
d assistance to any groups 
or localities interested in work- 
rad out integration plans. 
Most of all, the Council 
serves as a rallying force for 
Virginians who support the 
Supreme Court decision and 
believe the state should move 
toward implementation. 


Marion, a scholarly, soft- 


National Weather Summary 


ashingten and Ares: Today—Gtrong 
ral in ie 3x rsing and possiety 
ain 1 e morn 
f curing the day. 


* near 20 at 
te cold. 


eqrees 
ANA cuey ane @ qui 


Much eather at a 
te 20 degrees in 


Temperatures and rain for 24 


i 


AbUene 

Albany 

Aipecuerene 
Lipen 


3 & 


hmaritle 
inchorese 
ras 


Sault ater heft 
“Winds North 


west, at 25 te 35 miles 


ee 


eS se 


ie 


“the (Corps 


TONIGHT 


T he antics of “‘My Son Jeep’ create turmoil 
and amusement for good listening—8:00 pm. 


spoken mah with prematurely 
gray hair, says the Council is 
not “out to fight” the Defend- 
ers or any other pro-segrega- 
tion group. 

“This doesn’t mean we 
aren't fighting a battle,” he 
declares. “We are. We are up 
to our necks in what many 
pergeare| Of us believe is the biggest 
and most important battle go- 
ing on in America—the fig 
for simple dignity and equal 
opportunity for all Americans. 


cat yy 


---| out special 
— tunities to anybody based on 


“To put it briefly, we are 
#4) trying to help people to prac- 
tice what the United States 
Constitution proclaims in 
principle, and to extend the 
guarantees of the Bill of 
Rights to all citizens on a 
strictly impartia] basis, with- 
favors or oppor- 


The Council made its big- 


--:| gest appearance in the public 


work out 
adjustment plans. Marion 
the Council had “no il- 


find the change to nonsegre- 
gated schools much easier to 
make than others. He ac- 
knowledged that in some in- 
stances it might be many years 
before integration could be 
achieved. 

In recent 


months, there 


‘| have been some attacks on 


“Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar,’’ free lances 


his investigative talents 


at*8:15 pm. 


the Southern Regional Coun- 
cil and its affiliated units, 
partly because of the ties with 
the Fund for the Republic. 
The latter has been accudéed 
by some critics of harboring 
leftish leanings. 

Recently the New York 
Journal-American ran a story 

certain members of 
the Regional Council—and two 
members of the Virginia Coun- 
cil—with having “past pro- 
Communist sflifietione” The 
story prompted this comment 
from Marion: 

“These are typical smear 
charges ... Many members of 
both are eminent 
and respected church leaders, 
and to suggest that these peo- 
ple or their churches are pro- 
Communist is ridiculous.” 

In the months to come, the 
51 a native 


will see a surge 
in membership with more 
and more persons coming into 
the open to take a stand for 
what he calls “one brand of 
citizenship for all Americans.” 


Md. Girl Wins 
4H Scholarship 


cei an entomology award for 
her knowledge of pest control. 
She was one of six national win- 
ners in the 4H entomology pro-| »- 


ht | Te 


of South toa beli 
eves y 
the Council " 


CHICAGO, Nov. 27 W—A/ 
Maryland woman who 


J 


Sear 


children now attending segre- 
gated schools in.the county. 

A similar suit in behalf of 30 
children will be filed against 
St. Marys County school au- 
thorities within 10 days, he said. 

Watts said the suits, the first 
of their kind to be filed in 
Maryland, will charge that the 
children are being denied their 
constitutional rights under the 
Fourteenth Amendment. 

The United States Supreme 
Court has ruled that segrega- 
tion in the schools is unconsti- 
tutional. The 23 counties of 
Maryland are in various stages 
: carrying out the Court's man- 

ate. 

Tucker R. Dearing, an NAACP 
member acting with Watts in 
the filing of the suits, said a 
group of Negroes petitioned 
the Harford County School 
Board for immediate integra- 
tion last July, but were turned 
down. 

The Board ngmed a commit- 
tee to study the issue, but set 
no date for it to report and gave 
no indication when integration 
might be started, Dearing said. 

In Aberdeen last night the 
chairman of the committee, 
Ernest Volkart, said four sub- 
committees are studying the 
matter and will “be ready to 
rt before very long.” 
olkart said the intention Is 
to put any changes into effect 
in time for the beginning of the 
school year next September. He 
estimated about 12 per cent of 
the county’s school students are 
Negroes. 
Harford’s school superintend- 
ent, Charlies W.- Willis of Bel 
Air, declined comment. 


Edward Hancock 


LYNCHBURG, Va., Nov. 27 # 
Edward Harrison Hancock, 69, 
president of C. W. Hancock and 
Sons, general contractors, died 
today at a Lynchburg hospital. 

Mr. Hancock was director 
and president of the contract- 
ing firm responsible for build- 
ing many structures in Virginia, 
West Virginia and North Caro- 
lina. 

He was a director and former 
vice president of Morton Man- 
ufacturing Co.; president and 
director of Allied Arts Building 


—who has |Corp., and a director of Lynch- 


burg’s First National Trust Co., 
Lynchburg Foundry Co., Vir- 
ginia Greenstone Co. and 
WLVA Broadcasting Corp. 


Daisy DeVilbiss 

Daisy D. DeVilbiss, 78, a 
Washington resident for 56 
years, died Saturday at her 
home, 2937 Macomb st. nw., 
after a long illness. 

Mrs. DeVilbiss was the 
widow of J. C. DeVilbiss, a 
manufacturer’s representative 
here who died in 1939. She was 
born in Preston County, W. 
Va., and was the daughter of a 
circuit rider in the early days 
of the Methodist Church in 
that area. 

She is survived by a daugh- 
ter, Mary V. Rumsey of the 
Macomb st. address; a brother, 
Herman R. Cool of Grafton, 
W. Va., and two grandchildren. 

Private funeral services will 
be held at 2:30 p. m. Tuesday 
at Woodlawn Cemetery, Balti- 
more. 


Mildren Waldron 


A funeral service for Mildred 

Lowe Waldron, 34, wife of for- 
mer Washington resident 
Charlies F. Waldron, will be held 
at 4 p. m. today in Greenville, 
s & 
Mrs. Waldron was fatally in- 
jured in an automobile acci- 
dent Saturday night. She was 
a claims clerk with the Green- 
ville offices of the Social Se. 
curity Administration. Her 
husband is with the Internal 
Revenue Service. 


Deaths Elsewhere 

Ray Vir Den, 59, publisher of 
the Rome Daily American and 
a former advertising executive 
and light opera singer, after a 
heart attack; in Great Neck, 


Hallett Abend, 66, former 

aper city editor, author 

and foreign correspondent, fol- 

lowing a heart attack; in 
Sonora, Calif. 

Fauston Torrefranca, 72, mu- 
sic historian, author and critic; 
in Rome. 

Luis Freitas Branco, 65, 
famed Portuguese composer 
and author of more than 100 
popular folk songs; in Lisbon. 


Today’s. 
Events 


Area events today (asterisk 
indicates event is open to the 
public): 


Re 
park 8 De mm. Board Room, District 
pre Bs 

Obureb. 


0 Grouch Boe. X 


Sees 


Vekeman 
Rites Slated 
On Tuesday 


Eldege G. Vekeman, 53, a 
supervisor in the patents sec 
tion of the Government Print- 
ing Office for 25 years, died of 


filed| man 


for some years. He left the 
paper to come to Washington 
in 1930. 

Mr. Vekeman was a member 
of the Typographical Union, 
and of the Temperance Union. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Madeleine, of 3702 37th st., 
Mount Rainier; two daughters, 
Betty M. Vekeman and Lucille 
T. Vekeman, and a son, Mau- 
rice L. Vekeman, all of the 
home address, and seven broth- 
ers and sisters in Rhode Island. 

Requiem mass will be offered 
at 9 a. m. Tuesday in St. James’ 
Catholie Church, Mount Rai- 
nier. Burial will be in Mount 
Olivet Cemetery. 


Nannie Daniel 

Nannie Partlow Daniel, 69, 
mother of Sen. Price Daniel 
(D-Tex.), died yesterday of a 
circulatory ailment in a Liberty, 
Tex., hospital. She had been 
hospitalized since Thursday. 

Funeral services will be held 
at 2 p. m. today at the First 
Methodist Church of Liberty, 
where she was a lifelong mem- 
ber. 

Besides Sen. Daniel, she is 
survived by another son, Bill 
Daniel, a former State repre- 
sentative; a daughter, Ellen 
Daniel, of Boston, and eight 
grandchildren. 

All three children were at 
her bedside when she died. Sen. 
Daniel flew to Texas from the 
Midwest where he had been 
holding committee hearings. 


Frederick Trott 


Funeral services for Fred. 
erick Pearson Trott, 73, retired 
Budget Bureau attorney = 
died Thursday, were held Sat- 
urday at Gawler’s funeral 
home. 

A native of Baring, Me., Mr. 
Trott came to Washington in 
1906 to work in the Office of 
the Supervising Architect at 
the Treasury Department, 
where he remained until 1939. 

He was graduated from 
Georgetown University Law 
School in 1910 after attending 
night classes. In 1939 he joined 
the Bureau of the Budget and 
retired in 10945. 

He is survived by his wife, 
Ethel Thornton Trott, 3802 
Gramercy st. nw.; two daugh- 
ter$, Sarah Louise Trott and 
Mrs. Vernon H. Doane, both of 
the Gramercy st. address, and 
two grandsons, 


Ralph Parker Welton 
CUMBERLAND, Md., Nov. 27 


®—Ralph Parker Welton, 46,|™4= 


former member of the West 
Virginia House of Delegates 
and publisher of the Grant 
County Press at Petersburg, 
W. Va., died today in Memorial 
Hospital. He had suffered a 
heart attack at his home in 
Petersburg Nov. 18. 

The Grant County Press was 
founded by Welton’s father, 
Arch J. Welton, who died sev- 
eral years ago. Ralph Welton 
was appointed to the House as 
a Republican in July, 1954. He 
was elected to the House in 
1946 and 1952. | 


Joseph Rexroad 


Petersburg, W. Va., Nov. 27 
(Spl.) — Joseph Leonard Rex-/. 
road, 93, retired schoolteacher 
and former delegate to the 
West Virginia Legislature, died 
here Saturday. He had broken 
his hip last month. 

A graduate of West Virginia 
University, Mr. Rexroad taught 
school for 40 years and was 
superintendent of Grant 
County sciiools for 16 years. 


Rites Teday 


B. T. Nielsen, 


Gun Factory 
Worker, Dies 


Funeral services for Bert T. 
Nielsen, 62, retired Naval Gun 
Factory worker who died Fri- 
day, will be held at 2:30 p. m. 
today at the 


Lincoln Ceme- 


tery. 

Mr. Nielsen 
had been hos ) 
pitalized for en 
more than four ' 

a oe after = Mr. Nielsen 
ering a cerebral hemo 
and partial paralysis. pies 

Mr. Nielsen lived at 2456 
Tunlaw rd. nw. for 12 years 
before his stroke. When he 
was stricken, about 30 neigh- 
bors joined in and f a 
ob he had started—painting 

house. 

A month later the same 
group, along with some of his 
and is wife’s co-workers, pre 
sented him with a television 
set. During his illness, his wife 
_— he constantly received vis- 

ors. 

He was a member of the 
Naval Masonic Ledge and of 
the Reformation Church, 


| 


i eaegshyiiee 
i al 


In Memoriam 


SYREBOLSSR, sar. 
Ce AUDE 


“1y c= haiftiodl tise 
Fille : a My m.. afo y sentakes 
* year has passed, dear Burt. 


nee you were called « 
ow well do I somenber r thet sad and 


at it means to lose ¥ 


The Ry bay Ci 

YRNES 

ery Re 
oye 


te. 
at "Fon deoarted . tom" Yte Ufe. 


DAVIS. JAMES 5 y 

sreems. i AVIA. 
ty po pom aso lodev, 
7 things you did for ma. 


‘tingle da 
ry faite te to hold ite mirror 
eine aa my 7 eratetul ey 


CLARA N 


No 


(Btonghead) 


Ae rie Te pomery ot Vin- 
ovem ber wee. foes . — 


pase, their 


te ett! ite pala 
dear beloved ene. 


copes. smother ga In Pe | ml 


Gearest mo wife, fief 


iteol neal 21 years age: 
Somewhere ohore, & le troubled 
Gafe ree S Tief an 
our «< St oad ones: 
grant wy day We mest 


ip Yom Praeger 


Hoxpi aie ited 


ie sera 


Ea ae Se pea A. Ae ae 


tery, Bealisvilie 


ee 


For the latest weather:; 
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For the correct time... 

E ial Th 4-2525' 


It's fast and easy! 


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_In Washington, it’s Chambers Flower Center 


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ASIA TALKS: And listens, too, at the party given in honor 
of Pakistan Ambassador and Begum Mohammed Ali by 


” Pakistan Minister and Begum Abdur Rahman Khan last 


evening. 


By Joe Hetherger. Staff Photoerapher 


Minister Khan (second from left) and the honor 


guests are lending an ear to the conversation of J. K. Atal, 


Minister of India. 


Ce tDashington 


f* 


or and about WOMEN 


. 


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1955 


a 


‘Wedding Date Is January 21 


; Couple Honored at Shower 


CAPTAIN and Mrs. Francis 
Wien were the Sunday eve- 
ming hosts at a miscelia- 
jRReous shower for bride and 
groom -to-be, Maria Teresa 
Castro, daughter of the Am- 
Dassador of El Salvador and 
Senora de Castro, and Lt. 
(mdr. Dale Everhart, who 
are to be married Jan. 21. 

The Ulens’ Westchester 
apartment was done all in 
white from wedding bells and 
Goves that decorated the 
Walls to a garland of minia- 
ture mums around a silver 
bowl filled with champagne 
punch. 

Early to arrive bearing gifts 
were the Ambassador of Hon- 
duras and Senora de Iza- 
quirre, the Cuban Ambassa- 
dor and Senora Angel Campa, 
Panamanian Ambassador and 
Senora de Vallarino and the 
©olombian Ambassador to 
the Organization of American 
States and Senora de Del- 
gado. He is the newly elected 
president of the Council. 

.» Tall, slender Terry wore a 
black suit with a gold scarf 
about the neck and a spray 
of white orchids given to her 


by Mrs. Ulen, who was also 
in black. 


ASSISTING the hostess 
were the bridesmaids — Mia 
Choumenkovitch, McCall 
Henderson, Betty and Mary 
Ellén Fox, Jane Lingo, and 
her matron-of-honor, Mrs. 
Alex Castro, Maria’s sister-in- 
law. 

Others in the crowd were 
the James D. Pauls, Mrs. 
Parker West, Mrs. B. Harri- 
son Lingo, Mr. and Mrs. 
George Quirk, Jeff Davis, 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Shaw, 
Mr. and Mrs. G. Anderton 
Burke, Dr. and Mrs. Meichor 
F. R. Savarese Jr.,. and Mrs. 
William Manger, wife of the 
Assistant Secretary General 
of the Pan American Union. 

Sisters Ximena and Ines 
Sepulveda came with Italian 
bachelors Francesco Chia- 
nura and Elio Bondi. Also 
there were officer friends of 
the fiance that included L4t. 
Robert Holstrom, Lt. Richard 
Carken and Lt. Comdr, Nello 
Andrews. 

Amusing gifts given to the 
groom4o-be included cook- 


ag--—- —-- -- - --- -— — — 


On Holiday From 


College 


Joyce Keogh Bows to 


MR. AND MRS. Michael 
Francis Keogh introduced the 
eldest of their three daugh- 
ters, Joyce Mary, to friends 
of the family at a Saturday 
evening reception in their 
Wesley Heights home. 

Joyce, who was home for 
the Thanksgiving holiday, is 
an English major-at Manhat- 
tanville College in Purchase, 
NWN. Y. She was graduated 
from Stone Ridge Convent of 
the Sacred Heart last year. 

The debutante received in 


Wedding 


JANE ABEL 
-~—ARNOLD GINGRICH 


Announcement is made of the 
marriage of Jane Kendall 


the living room wearing 4a 
chantilly lace gown of apricot 
hue with matching satin slip- 
pers and carried an old-fash- 
ioned bouquet of red and yel- 
low roses mixed with white 
carnations. Standing beside 
Joyce was her mother, 
gowned in a pale blue bro- 
cade sheath. 

Members of the family 
present included Joyce's 
sub-deb sisters, Kathie and 
Adele. Mrs George W. 


Dolan, the deb’s godmother, 


a’~ attended. 


MANHATTANVILLE class- 
mate Margay Ferguson, who 
bowed Thanksgiving Day, 
also came. Others represent- 
ing the younger set included 


Mason Hamilton Abel, daugh- | 


ter of Mrs. Ormond Lawson- 


Johnson of New York and | 


London, to Arnold Gingrich, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. John 
Hembling Gingrich, on Nov. 
138 at the home of Mrs. 
Reynold Bays in Pook’s Hill, 
Md. The bridegroom is the 
publisher of Esquire mage- 
zine. The couple plan to live 
in New York and Ormond 
Beach, Fila. 


12 te 2 every Wed! 
in the beoutiiul new Coleniel 
Dining Room, Featuring the 
west, in fashions, celebrities, 
erizes ond must. 


SHINGTON vt 
4020 Whecensin Ave, M. W. 16, Exrersce 35-7706 


books, aprons, an eggbeater, 
bottle openers and cocktail 
shaker. Some of the presents 
for the prospective bride 
duplicated those given her 
fiance. It took two cars to 
carry all the gifts ‘home at 
party's end. 


Nurses Meet 

Two leading authorities on 
the international aspects of 
medicine, nursing and publie 
health will speak at the meet- 
ing of the Washington Arch- 
diocesan Council of Catholie 
Nursés tonight at 8 p. m. 

The meeting will be held 
at Carroll Hall, St. Patrick's 
Church, 10th and G sts. nw. 
Speaker Dr. Estella Ford 
Warner is Chief, Program 
Development Branch, Divi- 
sion of International Health, 
United States Public Health 
Service. Virginia Arnold, 
other slated speaker, is chief 


nurse, Division of Interna- 
tional Health, USPHS. 


Society 


Marie Dennett Murphy, Leo 
nora S. Rocca, Jeannette 
Townsend and Dorothy Alte- 


mus. ' 

Other friends were Mrs. 
Frank L. Dennis, Mrs. John 
J. Hearne, wife of the Irish 
Ambasador; Mrs. Louis J. 
Faust, Mrs. Walter J. Reed, 
Mrs. William H. Rippard, Mrs. 
John J. Sweeterman, and Mrs. 
Leo J. Rocca. 

Out-of-town guests included 
former Washingtonians Mr. 
and Mrs. Hugh K. Duffield 
from Gladwyne, Pa., and Mrs. 
Edmund I. Howard of Boston. 

Joyce will next be honored 
at an eight o'clock dinner for 
young people at Columbia 
Country Club on Dec. 23. 


Governor to Speak 

Michigan Governor G. 
Mennen Williams will speak 
at a Woman's WN ational 
Democratic Club dinner to 
be held Tuesday night in 
the clubhouse, 1526 New 
Hampshire ave. nw., at 7:30 
p. m. Governor Williams is 
in Washington attending the 
White House Conference on 
Education. 


Town Topics 


Trio of Parties Kept Day Busy 


By Marie McNair 

MR. AND MRS. Spericer 
Waters introduced some vis- 
itors in town at cocktails yes- 
terday; Mrs. Bissett Norment 
su r prised ee ee 
friends by @ 
showing 
some of her 
p ai ntings 
y es ter : 
and the Pak- 
istan Minis- ~ 
ter and ™ 
Mme. Abdur & 
Rahman 
net enter- “Spar 
tain for ~ 
the Pakistan ™ts- McNair 
Ambassador, Mohammed Ali 
and his bride, Begum Aili. 
And in that order I was out 
on the town yesterday after- 
noon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence 
Barreto from Carmel, Calif., 
where Spencer and Mary 
Waters spent a couple of win- 
ters, were guests of honor at 
the Waters’ party. 

Half the guests, or so it 
seemed, were neighbors in 
the same building—2101 Con- 
necticut ave. 

Justice and Mrs. Tom 
Clark, former . Ambassador 
and Mrs. William S. Culbert- 
son, Mrs, Parker West, Capt. 
and Mrs. William Murpby, all 
had the shortest route possi- 
ble to get to the party, just 
by taking the elevator. Brig. 
Gen. and Mrs. Franklin Bab- 
cock — rare partygoers be- 
cause Eleanor Babcock pre- 
fers golf—were there. Edgar 
Morris and Madeleine Adams 
were together and among 
others were Campbell and 
Julie Watson, Mr. and Mrs. 


vg 


Beverley Robinson, George 
Williams, Mr. and Mrs. Doug- 
las Hatch, Mr. and Mrs. 
Meade Patrick, Mr. and Mrs. 
William Lee and Virginia 
Parks with her nephew, 
Jimmy. 


Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Berg- 3 


man, Mrs. Fred Britten and 
Mme. Viadimir Rybar all met 
downstairs, as they came in 
together. Dr. Milton Clayton 
talked for a time with 
Eleanor Whitworth of Nash- 
ville, Tenn., who's here to 
visit Hank Fort. 


AND SO on to Mrs. Nor- 
ment’s charming apartment 
at 2601 Woodley pl. where, 
when you enter from the 
street you're already on the 
sixth floor and it’s only one 
story up to Esther Nor- 
ment’s pale green and gold 
decorated suite. Mrs. Nor- 
ment spends half the year 
or more in California where 
she often sees the John 
Kennedys who live in San 
Diego and are back visiting 
Washington where they 
used to live. 

The Kennedys were guests 
of honor yesterday and an 
excellent portrait of Bruce 
Kennedy hangs on the wall 
of Mrs. Norment’s studio 
room, along with a seascape 
of La Jolla, Calif.. a Calli- 
fornia mission and a cathe- 
dral interior. 

Mrs. Norment has taken 
up painting only since the 
end of World War Il. She 
has a great gift, as friends of 
Senora de Oreamuno, wife 
of the former Costa Rican 
Ambassador, George Wil- 
liams and Clarence Nor- 
ment, whose portraits were 


on view yesterday, must ad- 


mit. It's a grave Maria Orea- . 


muno, one of Washington's 
great beauties, who looks out 
from her portrait, which 
shows a facet of character 
that her friends don’t read- 
ily recognize. 

Mme. Munthe Morgen- 
stierne, wife of the Norwe- 
gian Ambassador, was there, 
accompanied by Elovius Man- 
gor, First Secretary of the 
Norwegian Embassy. Mr. and 
Mrs. Sidney Graves and 
George Williams, came from 
the Water’s party. 

Mr. and Mrs, J. Lawrence 
Houghteling were there and 
also in the small group were 
Mrs. Septimus Austin and 
her daughter, Madeleine: 
Lyle Brookover, who brought 
Dr. di Martini, head of the 
American Hospital in Rome: 
Hugh Hutchison, Fred Roy 
and Mrs. Persifor Spilsbury. 


AND THEN—to the Paki- 
stan Minister and Begum 
Khan's house on Lowell st.— 


the home of Maj. Gen. and 
Mrs. Bernard Robinson, now 
on duty in Paris—for a party 
in honor of Pakistan Ambas- 
sador and Begum Ali. 

In the receiving line with 
the hosts and sharing honors 
with them was Maj. Gen. M. 
A. Latif of the Pakistan army 
who arrived just a few days 
ago and will start a tour of 
military installations this 
week. Begum Ali wore her 
favorite pale blue, a sari bor- 
dered in gold. 

This was a party that lasted 
long “after hours.” Early ar- 
rivals were Deputy Under 
Secretary of State and Mrs. 
Loy Henderson, 


HAVE A WAFFLE—Helen Bullock, an authority on early 
American cooking, and author of the “Williamsburg Cook- 
book.” serves a waffle made from a recipe originated by 
Thomas Jefferson's daughter to Gen. Lemuel C. Shepherd 
Jr.. Commandant of the United States Marine Corps. Mrs. 


Mr. and Mrs. Lemuel T. 
Threatt were recent visitors 
in Mt. Pocono, Pa. 


Bes! e°€O): 


Double Duty 
Trench Coat 


Our handsomely tailored boy 
trench coat responds to aay 
and all kinds of weather. 
Styled of sturdy wind—and— 
water repellent rayon and nylon 


gabardine, rayon lined, with 


tip-in-or-out lining of warm 


woo! alpaca fleece. In taupe 
only. Sizes 8 to 16 24,95 
» The matching ski cap, 3.95 


Mail and phone orders fled 


__, ,. ARUNGTON 
Adtngton Bred. & Sa Glebe Bd. eckson 5.0500 


Defense Department Photo (Marine Corps) 


“i -_ ; “73 


Bullock will help whip up more of the waffles to be served 
at the bazaar of Christ Episcopal Church, Washington 
Parish, at the parish hall, 620 G st. se., from 12 to 9 p. m. 
on Dec. 3. A meat loaf dinner will be served from 4 to 7 
p. m. Gen. Shepherd is senior warden of the church. 


This 
Doll 
Has Been 


LARRI THOMAS 


Blonde—blue-eyed Goldwyn 
Girl, featured dancer in the 
current Hollywood hit, “Guys 
and Dolls,” appearing at 
Keith's, was at our downtown 
salon recently when on a 
personal tour, Many featured 
artists rely on Jules for pro- 
fessional beauty services. 


Hair cuts, 1.50 and 2.00. 


JULES PERMANENTS | 
from $7.50 


Hair Color Analysis, Without Charge 
JULES DOWNTOWN SALON 
13th and H Sts. N.W. 


ST. 3-1037 


JULES SUBURBAN SALONS 
109 Washington St., Alex., Va. 


Shirlington Shopping Center 


KI. 8.7400 
Shopping 
HE. 4.5500 


Pree Parking at all Jules Locations 


Assistant 


Secretary of State and Mrs. 
George Allen, the Australian 
Ambassador and Lady 
Spender and the South 
African Ambasasdor and 
Mrs. John E. Holloway. 
Deputy Chief of Protocol 
and Mrs. Victor Purse 
were there and others 
the Counsel of the Jordan 
Embassy El-Sherif M. Sharaf. 

The Minister of India and 
Mme Atal, the Military and 
Naval Attache of the Indian 
Embassy and Mme. Gupta, 
and United States Maj. Gen. 
Robert A. Schow and Mrs. 
Schow were amoag those who 
showed proper appreciation 
of the buffet which offered 
half a dozen native Pakistan 
dishes such as kofta—spiced 
meat balls, dry or in sauce; 
pokoras, made of graham 
flour, spices, spinach, pota- 
toes, and tomatoes, then fried 
in bite sized pieces. 

Talat, daughter of the for- 
mer Pakistan Ambassador, 
Amjad Ali was there, in pale 
blue sari with her dark hair, 
not flowing now, but pulled 
back from her face. Sitting 
with her as the evening 
ended was Nighat Shaoib, 
daughter of Mohammad 
Shoaib, an executive director 
of the International Bank. 

Other Pakistan ladies con- 
tributing pictorially to the 
scene were Mme. Akhtar, 
wife of the Minister of the 
Embassy; Mme. Karim, wife 
of the Assistant Military, 
Naval and Air Attache: Mme. 
Soonra and Miss Aquila 
Scheik. 


BON VOYAGE: 


JAMES BARRINGTON, 
popular ambassador from 
Burma, left Washington yes- 
terday afternoon with his 
wife and teen-age daughter 
Marika. 

A big crowd was at Union 
Station to see them off for 
New York, from which city 
they'll leave for Burma. In- 
cluded in the well-wishing 
group were the Ambasadors 
of India, Ceylon and Korea, 
practically the entire Bur- 
mese Embassy staff, and a 
host of friends. 

The final party of a round 
of farewells that has lasted 
for the past two months was 
given Saturday evening by 
the Indian Military Attache 
and Mrs. P. C. Gupta. 


VISITORS: 


GENERAL and Mrs. Ken- 
neth Royall arrived in Wash- 
ington yesterday from New 
York for a short stay. Gen- 
eral Royall, Chairman of Ed- 
ucation for New York State, 
is attending the White House 
Conference on Education 
which commences today. 

Mrs. Royall will entertain 
at a luncheon today at the 
Chevy Chase Club. 


oe -— 


| SLENDERIZING | 


NEWS 


| 
| 
| 


“I’ve Lost 22 Inches” 
Now | Gan Wear the | 


New ‘Sheath’ Fashions! 
|) “This is the greatest mo 


ment of my life,” 
claims smiling Miss ec 
Croix. “Just think, I've | 
lost 

3 inches in my waist 

4 inches in my abdomen 
7 inches In my hips, and 
4 inches in each thigh 
What fun to follow the 
latest fashions again—now 
I can wear sheath dresses 
and slim skirts!. That 
Stauffer System sure 
works. No steam or elee- 


Call today for your FREE 
trial treatment and com- 
plete figure analysis. 


| Pe penne commen 


ee em a 


oD 
4 
a oe 


ALL THOSE DOLLS! 


Ackad Photo 


Little Kathy Miller, daughter of 


Mr. and Mrs. Allison N. Miller Jr., marvels at the array 
of differently-dressed dolls that will be among the wares 
to be sold at the Holiday Fair of the Church of the Annun- 
ciation, 39th st. and Massachusetts ave. nw., on Dec. 2 and 
3. The fair will also feature a “kitchen cupboard,” includ- 
ing foods home-made by the men of the parish, and an in- 
ternational booth with gift items from all parts of the 


world. 


Child Behavior 


Book Is Helpful 


To Twins’ Parents 


“THE CARE and Feeding 
of Twins” by Phyllis Graham, 
paraphrasing the title of that 
earlier and widely read 
parents’ manual by Holt, is 
exactly what a great many of 
you have been asking for 
for years. 

It is a practical book of ad- 
vice for the parents of twins, 
particularly of young twins. 
It tells them, for instance, 
what to do with one baby 
while you are feeding the 
other—“After all, a woman 
does have two breasts.” (Of 
course it is a little harder if 
you are going to bottle feed. 
Here, if you don’t have help, 
you will probably need to 
prop one baby in a corner of 
the couch beside you, or pull 
two big chairs together and 
prop one baby in one, near 
enough that you can closely 
supervise what is going on, 
while you hold the other.) 

It gives helpful sugges- 
tions on what to do about 
sleeping problems. “Sleep- 
ing problems? No,” replied 
one mother of twins when 
questioned by Mrs. Graham, 
“we didn’t have any sleep- 
ing problems. We didn’t have 
any sleep.” 

It makes many practical 
suggestions about bathing, 
particularly that, whereas 
from an aesthetic standpoint 
a daily bath is fine, medically, 
if the twins have no skin 


problems, it is not absolutely 
essential. 

It helps you with the prob- 
lem of toileting, recommend- 
ing definitely that you pro- 
vide two potty chairs. Other- 
wise, “If there is only one 
facility, and mother is giving 
personal attention to the per- 
forming twin, the other baby 
may occupy himself by un- 
winding the toilet paper and 
turning on the taps. If 
banished from the room, he 
may howl outside the door 
or get into mischief in some 
other part of the house. 


PERHAPS most helpful of 
all, there are in this book 
good practical lists of things, 
such as: “Suggested bedding 
for bassinets, or cribs, or 
twin buggies, or big beds,” 
lists of good stories about 
twins which twins themselves 
will enjoy, suggested sched- 
ules and routines, lists of 
clothes you will need for 
new-born twins. 

This mother, and the 
friends whose experience 
with their own twins she so 
amusingly includes in this 
book, have met and somehow 
or other solved these dan- 
gers. The worst of these, in 
our opinion, is the apparent- 
ly inevitable lack of sleep in 
the early months. 


(Copyright . by the Gesell Institute | 
of Chia Development ¢.) 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
26 Monday, Nowember 24, 1988 oe 


q 


Weddings 
BETTY JANE KEENE 


Mf. and Mrs. Gerald Everett 
riage of their daughter, Betty 
Jane, to Dr. Jaroslav Stephen 
Taska of Jamestown, N. Y., 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen 
Taska of Czechoslovakia, on 
Nov. 25, at the Washington 
Cathedral. ‘The bride is a 

aduate the American 

niversity attended Co 
lumbia University. Dr. Taska 
is a graduate of Druhe St. 
Realne Gymnasium, Bratis- 
lava, Czechoslovakia. He re- 
ceived his Master of Arts 
and his Doctor of Philosophy 
from Komesky University at 
Bratislava. Dr. Taska is pres- 
ently employed as a member 
of the faculty of Jamestown 
Community College. The 
couple will reside in James- 
town. 


JOCELYN LORENZ 
—KENNETH POERSTEL 


Mr. and Mrs. Eugene H. 
Lorenz of Arlington, Va., an- 
nounce the marriage of their 
daughter, Jocelyn, to Ken- 
neth Poerstel, son of Mrs. 
Maxwell Poerstel, of Be- 
thesda, Md., on Nov. 25, at All 
Saints Episcopal Church in 
Chevy Chase, Md. The bride 
attended George Washington 
University. Mt. Poerstel at- 
ended the University of 
Maryland. The couple plan 
to reside in Bethesda. 


for a thoughtful Christmas gift 


~ 
is 


k Wedding 


JEAN INNIS GIBB 
—FRED B. PHILLIPS 


Col. Frederick William Gibb, 
USA, and Mrs. Gibb of Ar- 
lington, Va., announce the 
marriage of their daughter, 
Jean Innis, to Lt. Fred Brad- 
ford Phillips, USAF, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Noel 
Phillips of Falmouth, Me., on 
Nov. 24, at the Moore Base 
Catholic Chapel, Mission, 
Tex. The bride attended 
George Washington Univer- 
sity. Lt. Phillips is a gradu- 
ate of the United States Mili- 
tary Academy at West Point, 
N. Y. The couple will make 


their home in Mission, Tex. 


ALL 


and ribbon. Snowy. 
white, Tall-sized 34 to 
40. | 


To match: half-slip, 
SM.L. 98 


see eeee : 
t 


927 F ST. NW. 
Second Floer 
Di. 7-1987 


4-piece imple- 
ment kit, leather 
case, 5.00 


Elgin American 
compact, color on 


gold-color, 8.95.4 


Woman's razor 
set, leather case. 
l 


~ 


‘S 


Miss Giselle Briton 
suggests a perfect gift 


MAGIE PERFUME 


by Lancome 


Miss Briton, Lancome’s consult- 
ant, will be here this week to tell 
you about Magie Perfume... 
magic for the women men re- 
member. 


Perfume, 

8.00, 9.00, 14.00, 27.50, 45.00 
Eau de Perfume 
Please add 10% Federal tax. 


W&L—Cosmetics, !st Floor 
+++ also Chevy Chase and Alexandria 


little gifts with flair 


can 


GIFT NOVELTIES 


If you are looking for the novel, the 
different little gift, take a stroll 
through 
Your eye will be caught by these 
sparkling gift ideas, they're sure to 
please so many people on your list. 


Please add 10% Federal tax where applicable 


W&L—Cosmetics, 
.» also Chevy Chase and Alexandris 


4 Cp ~ Gold color pill box 
> ie with mock jewels. 
cat 1.00 


é 


Compact with lip- 

stick case and 
bottle. 

2.95 


. ¥i 4 : > 
rand or s, 4 
~ { x be 
a ey a 
’ 4 “~* 
¥ >> ee) 


PRIS 3 
* ry hs co” ho ‘ “> 
PS Oe eee 
i ¥ , a 4 
"Aare, . - eee 


Mondays, Thursdays, Fridays, 9:30' to 9:30; other week doys, 9:30 to 6 


5.00 and 9.00 


WATCH BANDS 


Left to right: 


Lizard Link—By Speidel, 1/20-10 ke. 
gold-filled top with stainless steel bottorn 
shells. In red, green, tan, black. Also 
comes with “T” ends. 11,77 
Leatha-Elegance—By Speidel, same as 
above, with leather inserts. In blue, tan, 
cordovan. 11.77 


Escapade—By Germex, 1 /20-10 kt. gold- 
filled shells. Outstanding in quality 
durability. 8.14 
(Please add 10% Federal tax} 


W&L—Watch Repair, Ist Floor 
+. also Chase and Alexandria 


make a big impression 


our Cosmetic Department. 


Ist Floor 


.** atin 
a = : : 
NT ee il 
4 I io rf 


— 


don’t wait for the snow to fly, 
now’s the time to order your 


PERSONALIZED 
CHRISTMAS | 
‘CARDS 


Bae 8:00 ., 78-0 


Avoid the last-minute rush, come in 
now for leisurely selection of your 
Christmas Cards . . . and for the dis- 
tinctive touch to your holiday greet- 
ings, have your name imprinted on 
them. You'll find a wide assort- 
ment of designs in religious, humor- 
ous, novelty, pictorial, sophisticated 
and unusually shaped cards. Make 
your selection now in order to have 
your name imprinted and to receive 
early delivery. 


W&L—Engraving, Ist Floor 
+ « « also Chevy Chase and Alexandris 


Cigarette silent . 
butler, gold color 
with trim. 1.00 


Mock jeweled party 
pieces, left to right: 
Dinner bell. 3.9 


Can opener. 1.50 
Bottle cap. 1.00 
Can opener. 2.50 
lee tongs. 2.00 


s 


—_—_—— : —~ EXTRA SHOPPING HOURS AT WOODWARD & LOTHROP ——— : 
CHEVY . CHASE: Wisconsin ond Western Aves., OLiver 4.7600 


WASHINGTON: 10th, 11th, F ond G Sts. NW, District 7-58 ALEXANDRIA) 615 North Weshington Street, King 8-100 
Mondeys, Thursdays, Fridays, 9:30 to 9:30; other week doys, 9:30 to 6 


Mondays and Thursdays, 9:30 to 9; other week days, 9:30 fo 6 


—— 


7 


eae 


- 


* . ’ _ 
\ 


THE WASHINGTON POST ond TIMES HERALD 
one Monday, November 28, 1955 27 


i Events on Today’s Calendar 


FOUNDERS DAY will be 
celebrated by the active 
chapters of Phi Sigma Sigma 
of George Washington and 
Maryland Universities  to- 
gether with area alumnae at 
the Maryland chapter house, 
4812 College ave., at 7:30 p. m. 
. . » Dr. Otis L. Mohundro 
will speak to the legislative 
reference and transportation 


grou of the Special Li- 
ortie Association in a hear- 
ing room of the Interstate 
Commerce Comission at 7:30 
Dp. m.... The Women’s City 


Club will hold a French class 
at the clubhouse at 6:45 
Saree Shermai Emu- 
nah Sisterheed will hold its 
regular meeting at 8:30 p. m. 
in the home of Eleanor 
Rosenbloom, 1004 Gallaway 
st. ne. 


The garden department of 
the Woman's 


Community 
Club of Kensington will meet 
at 1 p. m., in the auditorium 
of Perpetual Building, 
Bethesda. ire Helweg of 
the Potomac Electric Com- 
pany will demonstrate 
Christmas decorations ... 


The University Women’s 
Club will have French con- 
versation at 3 p. m.; tea at 4 
and a speaker, Janie Ellis 
Mason, who will tell about 
her freighter trip around the 
world at 5 p. m., all at the 
clubhouse, 1708 New Hamp. 
shire ave. nw. .. . The Inter- 
national Relations study 


in the home of Mrs. Allen 
Franta, 5312 Bradley bivd., 
Bethesda. 


REDUCE 


the size of your 


TUMMY 


ot HOME thie amazing new way 


all you have toe lose are those ugly inches. 


WOMEN SAY: “4 inches removed from abdo- 
men, 3 inches from hips.” — M.F. “3 inches 
from hips.” — M. A. “First time since I've had 
my three children, my tummy is flat.” — E. 5. 


lose less 


16, now 12.” — C. P. 


or MORE. Many women 
first few treatments — at 


A DESIGNER who actually started out in pictures herself 
is blonde Kay Cantonwine who designs beach accessories 
that are so witty and attention-arresting that they almost 
distract from the bathing suit. Miss Cantonwine first 
achieved fame as the designer of fabulous robes like this 
one for wrestler Gorgeous George, which caused so much 


comment on television. 


Even in the Fashion Field 


. 
. . , 


. R 
12 months to ae 


‘gto for lar 
which you can buy wi 
to pay (on established credit). 


billed every 30 days. 


= 4 CONVENIENT 
“WAYS TO DO YOUR 
. CHRISTMAS SHOPPING 
) AT LANSBURGH’S 


INSURED REVOLVING CHARGE 
ACCOUNT—Enjoy ali the conveniences of a 
ular Charge Account—with no down payment, 
Yet, no matter how much you charge (up to 
the limit of the Credit YOU select) your payment each month 
will always be the same! 


= | 
cy) INSURED REVOLVING BUDGET PLAN— 

Works just like the plan above, but it’s planned 
r purchases, furniture, appliances, etc.— 
no down payment—take up to 24 months 
(plus small service charge). 


30-DAY SHOPPING ACCOUNT—such a 
quick and easy way to shop—just use your “Group 
Shopping Plate and say—"charge it’’—you'll be 
*Member of Washington Shopping Plate Associates. 


MERCHANDISE CERTIFICATES—Just 
spend them like cash throughout the store—no 
down payment, six months 
keep on getting new ones as you use them! 


’ 


For more details, see our Credit Sales Offices, 
Washington, Sixth Floor; Langley Park, Maryland, Second Floor 


(plus small service charge). 


Sun and 


Sensation 


Vie in California 


By Evelyn Hayes 


BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. 
California is a wonderful 
state of sunshine and show- 
manship—and it’s a dull day 
when you're . 
not treated 
to both. The 
sunshine 
didn't do too 
well by the 
Nation's 
fashion edi- 
tors or the 
C alifornia 
Chamber of 
Mrs. Hayes 
rained two days while we 
were there, although Call- 
fornians were quick to point 
out that it was really very 
strange—it hadn't . rained 
since last April. Anyway, the 
showmanship never lets you 
down. The place is bathed in 
it. Even Press Week for the 
California fashion creators 
wound up in a blaze of good 


| box-office attractions that in- 


cluded a trip to Disneyland, 


| a trip to Santa Barbara with 
| a showing of men’s fashions 


on the train and dinner in 
the Beverly Hilton Hotel. 
The night I was there, Inn- 


| keeper Conrad Hilton was en- 


tertaining a large party and 
that was indeed the last word 
in showmanship. There was 
a banquet-size table strewn 
with flowers and with Lib- 
erace-type candelabra which 
cast their light on the gor- 


geous beauties all around. 


As the dinner progressed, 


it took on more and more 


the aspect of a Hollywood 
movie. There were buckets 
of champagne and a proces- 
sion of waiters bearing im- 


pressive-looking silver serv- 
ing pieces. They bowed from 


_ the waist as they served the 


boss. The last word was the 
sculptured ice—large bears 
stuck with fourth of July 
sparklers which were lit to 
shower sparks over the 
frozen deserts. 

For the last day of press 


| week, it was only fitting that 


they save the greatest show- 
man among the California 
designers, Don Loper. For his 
early morning show, he loped 
in with a 10-gallon white hat, 
strode up the steps to the 
runway and announced he 
had just arrived from Texas. 
Then he called for a bucket 
of champagne with which he 
quenched his thirst out of a 
highball glass. He started in 
Hollywood as a dancer and 


graduated to the point where | 


he was taking screen credits 
in five categories: Dancing, 
acting, directing, singing and 
designing clothes. He's still 


at it—credits or not—he said 
the other day that in Febru- 
ary he will take a holiday 
from designing and hie him- 
self to Europe and five coun- 
tries to dance. Whee. 


LOPER’S designing talents 
go off on seyeral tangents, 
too. In addition to his ready- 


to-wear and custom collec- 
tions (many of the latter for 
the stars), he has designed 
special petticoats, a line of 
men’s ties, sports shirts and 
even uniforms “for all ladies 
in white,” he explains. 

The one we saw was cut on 
princess lines with high pock- 
ets on the tucked bodice, a 
set-in belt and three-quarter 
sleeves with French cuffs. 
This was so pretty and ap- 
pealingly feminine it would 
make any patient—or doctor 

—<call “nurse, nurse”-—just for 
the pleasure of seeing her 
in it. 

Referring to Marlene Die- 
trich, one of his custom 
clients, he explained, “How 
can she be so beautiful at 
4.” He cited her measure- 
ments as 36—-21—32. The 
editors raised a querying eye- 
brow at the first, but agreed 
the second two dimensions 
were right. That's the fe 
male of the species for you. 

Occasionally a fashion 
show is enlivened by the pres- 
ence of a picture star or 
celebrity looking over the 
clothes with a personal shop- 
ping eye. Hedda Hopper of 
the famous hats sat with the 
editors at the Howard Greer 
showing. Her hat was a sable 
toque with which she wore a 
natural cashmere loose coat, 
a black peau de sole suit, gold 
jewelry, brown leather shoes 
and a saddle brown handbag. 
From ten paces it was imposs- 
ible to determine which of 
the sexy numbers in that 
collection she preferred. 

“Star on the Roof” is the 
name of one of the cocktail 
and dining rooms atop the 
acres and acres of hotel 
called the Beverly Hilton. 
The starlit panoramic view 
from this spot is one that 
would vie with the - best 
efforts of any Hollywood set 
designer, the lights twinkle 
like diamonds over an in- 
comparable vista that 
stretches for miles and miles. 


7, 


to pay. And you can 


SHOE REPAIR SPECIAL for TODAY 


WOMEN'S TOP. LIFTS 


Leather or composition 
lifes for spike or 
small Cuban heels 


a 


WhHiititinne 


unt, will precede 
the ball. Those entitled to do 
, so will wear scariet, 


Christmas Store Hours 9:30 A.M. te 6:00 P.M. 


Rican Un Air Embaume 


“Fragrant Breeze” for the last, 
perfect touch. A delicate and 
exquisite fragrance 
created to delight 
the most discriminating 
one on four Christmas list 
Perfunie, 3.00 to 27.50. 
New Mist, 2.5@ All plus tax. ‘ 


Mail and phone orders invited 
NAtional 8-7733. 
Perfume, First Floor 


HH and Spring Valley 


Julius 
Garfinckel 
& Co. 


> aeetind ; 


a —— 
\ 
. 
, 


Done While You 
Wait or Shop 
Use Your Shopping Plate 


THE HECHT CO. 


Downstairs, Washington Store Only 


Lt nsburgh s 


i” ty, Oth AND & STREETS NW 


4k 


NA. 8.9808 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


28 


Monday, November 28, 1955 


eeee 


Anne’s Trading Post: 


TIMID ADULTS who quake 
at the idea of air travel must 
feel mildly abashed when 
they see infants - in - arms 
boarding transcontinental 
and even trans-oceanic flights. 
But sometimes those infants’ 
mothers are quaking, too— 
not at the idea of a plane ride 
but at the thought of how 
baby may react. 

A trip by air from England 
to America lies ahead of one 
reader, who'll have a 6 
year-old in tow. Here’s en- 
couragement for her from a 
seasoned traveling mother. 


Air Travel With Baby 


TO BE SURE there is a 
schedule problem with air 
travel with a small infant, 
but within a week, each of 
ours was nicely settled down. 


Babies Adjust to Air Trip 


(WHY WIVES 
GRIPE HUSBANDS? 


De you peeve your husband at 


Coronet has polled the women as 
well... and the man of the 
will be very : 


tinnes. Read “Pet Peeves” in 


Dec, CORONET now on sale 


—_ 


TUES., NOY. 29 
4 P.M. to 7 P.M. 


"We went abroad with a 15- 


month-old daughter and re- 
turned when she was three 
and one-half with a 2-year-old 
and an S8month-old baby. 
Both trips were on first-class 
flights, and we had berths at: 
night. We also had a 66-pound 
baggage allowance for each 
adult and half-fare ticket and 
none for the little mite who 
had a large proportion of the 
baggage. When our baby 
awakened in the middle of 
the night, in the air, the 
stewardess fixed a special 
breakfast for her. 

We fed her another break- 
fast on clock time, though, 
and tried to help her nap at 
the “proper” time, and her 
tummy’s schedule soon fitted 
the new one. 

We carried our own canned 
milk (using the small, one 


~~» bottle size cans) and jars of 


food, for we learned that the 
“kit” on each airplane con- 
sists of six or eight diapers 
and six or eight jars of food 
for all the babies on board, 


_merely emergency fare. Di- 


apers were rinsed out and 
placed in a plastic bag await- 
ing the laundry. Our flight 
bags contained our night 
wear, and whatever toys 
could be crammed in for the 
older children. The plane 
crew doesn’t like a lot of toys, 
but they can provide only 
crayons and color books, and 
a few small toys help pass the 
time. If baby doesn’t have 
either a bassinet or basket, 
he may rest better on a crib 
sheet than on the upholstery 
of the seat. 

Our children slept well in 
the air. We felt the berths 
were well justified. A small 
baby must either sleep in an 
airline bassinet or with one 


| parent. 


If it is possible to consult 


| ahead of time with the air- 


line, you may be able to 
choose a time of year and a 
day of the week when you 
can hope you'll not be on a 
crowded plane. Our most un- 
comfortable flights have been 
on planes which were fully 
loaded. Also, it is best to ask 
the stewardesses before- 
hand when meals are served 
and when it is most con- 
venient to have food warmed. 
Have a good flight. 

Mother, Silver Spring, Md. 


Doorbell; Crocheting 
I HAVE two special prob- 
lems which I hope some of 


your readers will be able to 
answer. The first concerns 
the installation of a doorbell, 


Ladies, You Are Invited! 
Open House 


with gong, in our home. Upon 
inquiry, I find I need 
the doorbell, push button, a 
transformer and wire. But no 
directions are available for. 
the step-by-step procedure 
for installing this doorbell 
system. I hope some reader 
will come to my rescue! 
Incidentally, can the trans- 
former be placed on an open 
porch? We have no base- 
ment. 

My next problem concerns 
the source of the crocheting 
directions for a T-inch pie 
plate. This crocheted border 
fits over the front and back 
edges of the plate leaving 
an open circle in the center 
of the plate where a decal 
is placed. A hanger is fas- 
tened to the back for using 
as a wall picture in kitchen 
or dining area. I would like 
to know in what crocheting 
booklet I might find direc- 
tions for this border. 

Mrs. R. B. H., Alexandria, Va. 
Indoer Golf 


I AM interested in improv- 
ing my golf this winter, but 
it will soon be impossible to 
play outdoors. Does anyone 
know where in Washington I 
can go to keep my hand in 
the game? 

ED. NOTE: The YWCA 
features golf instruction dur- 
ing the winter and may 
have a class convenient for 
you. 


i Today’s Events | 


Elizabeth Jackson chapter, 
D. C. DAR, will hold a pre- 
Christmas meeting at the 
chapter house at 8 p. m. Mem- 
bers will bring children’s 
Christmas gifts ... The Dia- 
mond Wings will meet for din- 
ner at 7:30 p. m., at the NeW 
Smorgasbord ... The St. 
Mary's bazaar will open today 
5 Mo be 


at 6 and close at 10 
The Ladies 
town University Hospital will 
hold a business meeting at 
12:30 p. m., in the hospital, 
3800 Reservoir rd. nw. 
Alan Barth of The Wash- 
mn Post and Times Her- 


ald’s Editorial Staff will 


tional 

“Common Sense and Secu- 
rity” at 12:30 p. m.... The 
nature section of the Twen- 
tieth Century Club will meet 
in the fourth floor Assembly 
Room of the YWCA, 17th and 
K sts. nw., at 2 p. m. 


MILLERS — 


By Paul 
THE ENTERTAINMENT 


feeling effects of a forced 
march from Buffalo. 
Albert has a new vocalist 


with him on this trip—a Miss 


Evans. I didn't have 
a chance to become personally 
acquainted with Evans 
but I hope to. Marilyn was at- 


from the knees down. Pretty 
form-fitting the rest of the way. 
Sings well, too. 


take time out and play just 
his own compositions. He has 


JACKIE LEE, who's getting 
to be somewhat of a commuter 
from his home in Philadel- 
phia to the Lotus, is back at 
the 14th street club this week. 

Jackie says all he needs to 
be at home is a piano, and the 
Lotus has that. 


The Coral Records artist 
is still trading somewhat on 


°Oh the 


y 
cent of it seemed to be located jsays the management. Her name 


COMPLETE 
DINNERS 


2.25 


Open Daily & Sunday 
11:30 A.M, to Midnight 


a 


NOTES around the town— 
Jack Murray provides just the 
proper touch for the taproom 


HONGKONG, Nov. 27 W—A|P, m. 
Chinese Nationalist warship to-/"@., *° 


and cocktail lounge at the Hay 
Adams. Jack's a fine piano 
player but his tunes are unob- 
trusive and apparently just 
what the customers had in 
mind when they asked for en- 
tertainment in the previously) 
silent imbibing bars ... Jean 
Muncy is the “blond bombshell 
of song” now targeted at the 


Club Kavakos ... There's an| 
“exocutie” at the Blue Mirror, 


is Jacqueline Turner. Incident- 
ally, the new host at the Mirror 
is Matt Windsor .. . Special note 
to Virginians—Dale Turner and 
his 1l-piece band are now ap- 
pearing at the Club Nightingale: 
just south of Alexandria. M 
memory of this place goes bac 
to high school days. I wonder 
how long it has been in exist- 


and 
The Old English Taproom 


Present 


Handsome 
and 
Talented 


_ 
> 
we. £. MALER — 


i om 
— FURNITURE = 


is See Ms KS Sa 
¥ 


r “NIGHT in PARIS” 


featuring 28 of the Loveliest Girls in the World 


Produced by Komarova & Komaroff of New York's Latin Quarter 


spotlighting DON CHERRY ‘oon mow 


GODFREY SHOW 
M | Edwards—Jack Parker and Doll—The Bob De V Trio— 
Chris Viereck—Jeanne Michelle—The. ay ee Lovelles—Riob simpson’s 


_—Ninl 
Hear Don Cherry Sing His New 
Columbia Hit i of Geld” 


14th & H Sts. N.W. 


Christmas party at the Casine 


NA. 8-7700 


for that comfortable lounge chair for Dad 
. « + for the wall-to-wall carpeting Mom 


wants to welcome guests the minute they 


2 


{ 
ae 
+ 


MILLER 
iz : 
a. 


y FP 


Favors and refreshments for all 
who stop during our open house. 
The shop is now under the man- 
agement of Marthe Barnett—eise 
Agnes Shiver is still with ue— 
both hoping to be of service to you. 


of 
as 
a 


step inside your door. Just 3 more days ) | 
to shop together for furniture you'll treas- | 


ure the rest of your life and appreciate all 
the more now because these sale prices 


are the lowest ever! 
For Appointments 


BARCROFT BEAUTY SALON 


4613 South Four Mile Run Drive 
{Cor. COLUMBIA PIKE & SO. FOUR MILE RUN DRIVE) 
(Entrance in Driveway, Food Fair) == 


Come by cab; take a taxi—or pile into : 


Ms 


your own car and park at the door. When 
you shop at Miller's it’s as easy to park 


— — —_—_ ——s 


as it is to pay. 


PENNSYLVANIA AVE. AT EIGHTH 5.E. 


Open Weekdays, 9:30 a.m. until 9 p.m. 
Open Saturdays, 9:30 am. until 5 p.m. s 
“ / a \ 


Maclevry jhe. farts Sale Ends Wednesday, November 30th « tasy PARKING og Ae AVAILABLE 


3513 Ne. Fairfax Dr. | JU, 9.0080, 
) : $53 Bentiont 
pommmenThe Only MacLevy Salons in the Washington P a iat 3 : oa Ey BREA eed RS as 
é . ‘ . : : i J ° 


Stores Predict 
Record Trade 


NEW YORK, Nov. 27 @® remaining stores expect higher 


_ ere 


usiness — 


MOND 


—,. 


AY, NOVEMBER 28, 1955 29 


Christmas business up 5 to 20 volume in varying percentages 
cent over last year to an up to 20 per cenit. Nineteen. 
alltime high—that's the pre- per cent of the reporting stores | 
diction today of the National say that their Christmas sales 
Retail Dry Goods Association. will be identical to those a 
Dapper one of a survey of mem- year ago.” | 
‘' stores were presented by, The associati resident 
Association President Philip M said 53 per roan OF g the stores 
Talbott, seionr vice president of will spend the same amount on 
Woodward & Lothrop, Wa*h- Christmas promotions as they 
ington, D. C. He gave this run- did a year ago. Forty per cent 
down on Yule prospects: said they planned to spend 
Eighty-one per cent of the more than last year, and only 
Nation’s department, chain and 7 per cent reported smalier 
specialty stores look for a defi- promotional budgets. 
nite gain in Christmas sales) The survey found that pro 
over last year’s booming Christ- motional efforts will be con- 
mas season. centrated, as in 1954,, on gifts 
And not a single merchant for the home and “practical” 
polled by the association ex- items. Generally, the pattem 
cts @ decline. shows little change from a yar 
“Of the 211 stores with esti- ago. The great majority will 
mated annual sales of $2 billion place about the same promo- 
reporting to the NRDGA study, tional emphasis as last year on 
2B per cent expect 1955 Christ-'such categories as practical 
mas sales to be 5 per cent! items. 
higher than in 1954,” said Tal- 
bott. he 
“Eighteen per cent look for achieved 
increases of 10 per cent. The stores,” 


~ — — 


among the best 
by the Nation's 
said Talbott. 


——— 


Economic View © © © «© « « By Harold B. Dorsey 


Attention Focuses on Discount Rate 


Associated Press 
| The Agriculture Department! 


yesterday offered farmers little 
hope that their production costs 
will go down next year. 

The agency already had pre- 
dicted that farm product prices, 
which already have dropped 
more than 25 per cent from 
postwar peaks, may average 
slightly lower next year. 

Yesterday's forecast that pro- 
duction costs will continue near 
record levels was made as the 
department prepared for a 
week-long conference of its own 
specialists and about 120 agri- 


“This holiday period should cultural extension economists | ‘ 
ever from 48 states and Puerto Rico. The 


The conference, opening to- 


‘day, will feature a-diseussion of individual cost rates in recent Set a mew record by mid-De- 


POLITICAL and economic 
attention is again focused on 
eredit policies asa result of 
the recent decision to raise 
from 2% per- 
cent t6 2% 
per cent the 
interest rate 
(so-called @is- 
eount rate) 
which com 
mercial banks 
have to pay 
for borrow 
ing from the 
Federal Re 
serve Banks. 


cisions on the basis of all of 
the foregoing conditions. The 
fact that they have again 
raised 1t Federal discount 
rate symbolizes their belief 
that inflation pressures ere 
present and should be curbed. 
However, there is an element 
over which the monetary 
authorities do not have di- 
rect control, namely, the psy- 
chological conditions that in- 
fluence the velocity in the use 
of money and credit. 

Loans are being made at a 
high rate, but they are also 


cials are making their de ferrous metals, and on eo | 


ployment and purchasing 
power in general. The econo- 
my contains important vulner- 
abilities which might be laid 
bare in a chain-raction proc- 
ess. 

However, the blend of the 
various economic forces in- 
volved at this juncture, and 
particularly the dearth of neg- 
ative clues in the sensitive in- 
dicators,.do not suggest that 
important deterioration in 
business activity is likely for 
the immediate future. The 
monetary authorities undoubt- 


Cut in Farm Production Costs 
Next Year Declared Unlikely | 


Some politi- 

cians and businessmen are 
asking why it has been 
deemed necessary to tighten 
this key instrument of credit 
control to the highest point in 
22 years. 

The condition of husiness 
today is also different from 
anything in the experience of 
the past two decades. The 
demand for goods and services 
on an over-all basis is taxing 
the Nation's capacity for pro- 
viding those goods and serv- 
ices, a situation that hes not 
been present in this magni- 
tude since the late 1920s, ex- 
cepting the war periods when 
rationing and other controls 
restrained price inflation. De- 
mand for hard goods and for 
workers is in excess of avail- 
abie supply and is causing 
an upward pressure on wages, 
costs and prices, thereby con- 
stituting a serious inflation 
pressure 

It is the demand factor that 
needs the closest inspection 
It is quite apparent that the 
high rate of demand for dur- 
ables and houses, and the con- 
sequent demand for workers 
to produce these items, has 
been stimulated by the high 
rate of borrowing. Thus, the 
eause of the inflationary 
pressures—of the pressure to- 
ward further deterioration of 
the purchasing power of the 
dollar—is to be found in the 
ability and willingness of buy- 
ers to borrow and spend be- 
yond their current earnings. 
A continuation of this condi- 
tion would set the stage for 
the boom-and-byst sequence. 

ow 


THE FORECASTS of busi- 
ness leaders are calling for a 
eontinuation of at least the 
eurrent levels of demand, 
while business itself plans to 
increase its own expenditures 
for plant and equipment. State 
and local governments plan to 
increase their expénditures in 
1956. The renewal of foreign 
tensions may call for some 
increases in Federal Govern- 
ment spending; nevertheless 
there are high hopes for a tax 
reduction which will permit 
the private economy to in- 
crease its demand for goods 
and services. 

The Federal Reserve offi- 


being paid off at a high rate. It 


is a fact that new debt granted edly would reverse restrictive 


has been exceeding the rate of ‘TCdit policies quickly and 
repayments so that there is a *"#rply if important signs of 
net increase in debt outstand- dow n-side momentum de- 
ing, from which business ac- Veloped. Meanwhile, the mod- 
tivity is obtaining a net ben- *T#tely upward trend of in- 
efit. Nevertheless. it ic also a ‘**™eSt rates has been resumed | 
fact that the economy is being at least on a short-term basis. | 
influenced by the rate of turn- Credit for business and capi- | 
over of debt. Consumers are ‘2! for investment promise te | 


more willing te borrow, spend, be less readily available. 


share. 


a 


by inereasing hourly labor out- 
put, have been able to reduce 
their unit costs of production 
enough to offset the unjevor- 
able changes in prices. Use of 


economie trends and develop- 
ments in agriculture for the 
ipresent as well as the future. 
Secretary of Agriculture Ezra 
'T. Benson is scheduled to ad-|more laborsaving machinery 
coun the first session. and fertilizers, as well as en- 
“The general level of farm|/@tgement of farms, made this 


| 
‘eosts has changed very little ~ eee 


the last year,” the department 
Steel Output 
interest, taxes and wage rates, 
report said there have CLEVELAND, Nov. 27 @ 


reported. | 
“The index of prices paid by’ 
> 
For ’55 to Set 
was the same in mid-October as 
ivergent movements in Steel production in 1955 will 


farmers for goods and services 
it was a year earlier and iittle| N ew Record 


used in production, including) 
over-all change ig expected in) 


been d 


years, In general, farm cost cember if production continues 
items that are mainly farm-pro-|4t the present rate, Steel mag-| 
duced—such as feed, seed and azine said today. 
livestock—have gone down in| The metal working weekly 
price. But wage rates, taxes'said the year’s production. now 
and prices for many industrial ‘totals 105,530,000 net tons for 
items have gone up. ingots and castings. The all- 

The report gave this outlook/tims record, set in 1953, was) 
for 1956: 111,609,719 tons. 

Prices of feed and seed are; Heavy demand is raising 


Effect of Brazil’s Output 


f 


Of Coffee, Cotton Studied} 


SAO PAULO, Brazil, Nov. crease in coffee production tn 
27 (‘#—The intertelation of cof-| South America as millions 
fee and cotton in Brazil, and| new toffee plants set out 
how it affects the United States recent months begin to produce §. 
cotton grower, drew the atten-|in three to four years. 
tion of a United States agricul- Many older Brazilian coffee 
ure subcommittee during its! producing areas, where lands | 
eight-day visit to this country. | a *$ 

Headed by Rep. William R, *7@ worn out, will turn te cot- || 
Poage (D-Tex.), the committee | ton production as a source of | 
was here of a tour studying cash income. P } 
South American agriculture)| In talks with Brazil’s Min- 
and how it conterns the United ister of Agriculture, Mario 
States farmer. Camara, the question of com-| 

Two longrange possibilities | petition in the world cotton’ 
stood out in the committee’s| export trade arose. Camara’ 
discussions with Brazilian and | said his country was “worried” | 
Unie States Embassy offi- | by reports that the United | 
cials: 


AIR CONDITIONED 


Suites Arranged te Suit Tenants 
AT THE NEW 


ILVER SPRING 
BUILDING 


| Cameron St., Sliver Spring 


Cal? 


WEAVER BROS. 


ON PREMISES 


JU. 5-0038 


: 
: 


|States might offer millions of | 
There should be a big in' bales of Government-owned | 
: ‘ 


‘ 


at ad 


Srliacy bills disappear 
with the help of a 
Runsey rust- 


expected to average lower than steel prices, the magazine said. 
in 1955. It cited a $6 to $20 a ton raise! 
Prices of fertilizer, farm sup-\on junior beams and junior 
plies and livestock for feeding|-hannels by Jones and Laugh- 
and replacement are expected jin. a $2 a ton increase on rail 
to remain fairly stable. steel merchant bars by three 
Farm wage rates, interest +] companies, and $2 to $11. 
rates and prices of building and poocts on import prices of most. 
fencing materials, farm M™M& major steel products from 
chinery, motor vehicles and wocorn Europe. 
motor supplies are expected to) siee! said United States pro- 
average slightly higher. duction continued at 99 per cent 
Farm wage rates, interest) ,» capacity for the third con- 
are expected = be — 5 Per secutive week, while the maga- 
cent higher t ia this te ‘zine’s composite price on fin- 
The report said some farmers, 'i.ned steel remained at $128 a 
net ton. The magazine's compos- 
ite re ens rose for the fourth 
> . straight week to $46.33 a gross 
Rail to Isene Rights ton, highest since January, 
NEW YORK, Nov. 27 (® 1951. The scrap composite was 
Western Maryland Railway Co. up 66 cents this week. 
has announced it planned to| The magazine predicted the 
raise 5% million dollars by | aute industry will spend a rec- 
offering stockholders rights to ord of $1.8 billion for modern 
subscribe to 128,597 additional|ization and expansion next 
shares of common stock at $41 year, an increase of 50 per cent 
‘over this year. 


Christiias Club Account 


Plan now for next Christmas with 1 of these 5 
convenient Christmas Club Savings Programs. 


$ 2.00 every other week... 8 «$0.00 
$ 4.00 every other week... *"_.*.” ~ $100.00 
$ 6.00 every other week =o 

$10.00 every other week..." 

$20.00 every other week 


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PEMNSYLVAMIA AVENUE BETWEEN 130h AND 14th STREFTS. NW 


All accounts becwred wp te 810.0080 


and repay than has been the +— 


™_ 
* ’ 


historical experience. This | r 
matter of debt velocity, which 
depends so much on the state 
of mind of the consumer, has 
become an important force in 
our economy, The monetary 
authorities cannot dictate the 
psychology of the consumer, 
although they can influence it 
by reducing the availability of 
credit and raising the interest 
rates. 


ow 

CREDIT inflation psychology 
is sometimes difficult to start. 
but it is usually more difficult | 
to restrain after it has gained | 


momentum. The letter condi- 
tion defines the situation at 
the moment. There seems to 
be no way of predicting just 
when a noticeable proportion 
of borrowers will become dis 
couraged about higher interest 
rates and about the increasing 
difficulty in obtaining credit. 
The several steps taken by 
the authorities throughout the 
current year have, as yet, had 
little effect, except to reduce 
moderately residential con- 
struction prospects. 

There should be little doubt 
that the eredit restraints, 
which are aimed at a reduc- 
tion in the demand for con- 
sumers, durable goods and 
housing on a credit basis, will 
become effective sooner or 
later. It is difficult to predict 
when, but at least business 
people should be alert for 
clues that may help with the 
timing. From a practical view- 
point, the business executive 
should not be predicting an 
ad infinitum upward trend in 
the demand for these items. 
Just as it is difficult toe pre- 
dict when the actual effects of 
credit restraints might be 
seen, it is equally difficult to 
predict all of the results—the 
degree of effect on steel, non- 


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THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
30 Monday, November 28, 1955 


Book Tells How Russians 


Slowed 


Reuters ° 


LONDON, Nov. 2 (Monday) 
Sharp differences between Brit- 
ain and the United States over 
the use of shipping during 
World War 41 are described in 


an official British war history — 


published here today. 

The book, “Merchant Ship 
ping and the Demands of War,” 
y Miss Catherine Behrens, a 
Newnham College, 
is a contribution to 


fellow of 
Cambridge, | 


an officially-sponsored series en-| 


titled, “History of the Second 
World War.” 

It also outlines the frustra- 
tions and administrative set- 
backs which met Allied ships 
when they reached Soviet ports 
after taking part in the north- 
ern convoys to Russia. 

Only three months after the 
Churchill-Roosevelt strategy- 

lanning conference at Casa- 

lanca in January, 1943, it was 
clear, the book claims, that ship- 
ping problems would have to be 
tackled again from the begin- 
ning. 

The optimistic mood in which 
the Casablanca meeting had dis- 
banded gave way to disillusion- 
ment and bewilderment, it says. 
Each side became increasingly 
exasperated and began to ac- 
cuse the other of incompetence 
or deliberate intent to deceive. 

The book says the British, had 
to work out the intricate sail- 
ing schedules required by the 
sustained movement and on 
countless occasions intervened 
to prevent American officials 
from sending ships to ports 
that could not accommodate 
them, loading food in ships that 
had carried heavy oil on a pre- 
vious voyage, loading shells in 
one ship and their fuses in an- 
other, and other things. 

Writing on the convoys to! 
Russia, Miss Behrens says: “No| 
nation in need of help can ever | 
have been so unwilling to recog- | 
nize the limitations imposed, | 
not only by the other urgent | 
claims on resources, but 
geography and the nature 7 
sea transport; no government 
can ever have more obstinately 
insisted on the impossible than 
did the Russians.” 

Although the Russians wanted 
their supplies through the ports | 
of Murmansk and the Gulf of ' 
Archangel, these ports were 
not equipped to receive milli- 
tary cargo. There were no 
heavy cranes and other shore 
cranes and mechanical means 
of cargo handlings were rare. 

Rail links with the ports were 
insufficient and the quays were 
sometimes not even connected 
with the railroads. 

Miss Behrens adds that “at 
@ time when it was taking six | 
weeks to discharge from an | 
American ship a piece of ma- 
chinery weighing 68 tons, for 
the only way of getting it out 
was to raise it alternately at 
either end by means of a 35-ton | 
crane while 60 truckloads of 
timber were jammed under- 
neath it, Stalin was asserting 
that the British could, without 
risk, land at Archangel 25 to 
30 divisions.” 


Teamsters Sign Aid Pact 


War Shipments 


; 
Associated Presa 


Fire in the Firehouse 


Farmingdale, Maine, volunteer firefighters battle flames 
that broke out in their own firehouse, a 100-year-old struc- 
ture that also houses a community meeting hall. The fire- 
men rescued two engines and other equipment before dous- 
ing the biaze. 


—_— = - - —— 


‘Ousted Longshoremen, 


NEW YORK, Nov. 27 %.—The! The mutual assistance pact 
powerful AFL Teamsters Union was announced by ILA Presi- 
and a longshoremen's union|dent William V. Bradley and 
which was ousted from the AFL' James Hoffa, chairman of the 
for waterfront crime and Central Conference of Team- 
racketeering joined forces to-sters. Bradley and Teamsters 
day under a four-year “mutual/International vice president 
assistance pact.” 'Eina Mohn signed the agree- 


Dave RBeck’s teamsters and) ment, which will run until 
the International Longshore-| July, 1959. ' 
men’s Association reached an| “Under the pact, the ILA 
agreement after nearly nine and the Teamsters conferences 
months of negotiations. jare pledged to render mutual 

The unions do not plan to assistance and aid in joint or- 
merge, but they will conduct! ganizational efforts,” a joint 
joint organizational campaigns statement said. 
and the ILA will receive finan-| joint committee of these bodies 
cial help from the teamsters. is being formed to implement 

The ILA was ousted fromiand coordinate the agreement’ 
the AFL at its St. Louis con-\of alliance. 
vention in 1955 because it| “The two organizations have 
allegedly was dominated by agreed as a first step to make 
racketeers and had scores of'a joint check of three major 
criminals and former convicts ports in the eastern, southern 
among its members. ‘and central areas to determine 
lhow much freight is. being 


Little Sisters of Poor = = s=.* 
Honored at Party 


The Little Sisters of the 
Poor were honored yesterday 
for their work among the aged 
poor of all races and creeds at 
an annual party for the nuns 
and their elderly guests at the 
Home they have operated since 
1871 at 2d and H sts. ne. 

More than 1000 persons at- 
tended the affair which was 
held under the auspices of the 
Washington General Assembly, 
4th Degree Knights 


lumbus. 

“The selfless work of the 
Little Sisters of the Poor helps 
us understand better our own 
obligations as Christians,” the 
Most Rev. Patrick A. O'Boyle, 
Archbishop of Washington, told 


those who attended a benedic-| Restaurant Association 


tion service held in the Home's 
chapel. 

“It is very easy to forget,” he 
eaid, “that some day we'll be 
called before God and asked: 


of Co. 


moved by nonunion longshore- 
‘men and truckmen.” Bradley 
and Hoffa said the three ports 

New York, New Orleans 


“An over-allP- 


} 
‘Barber’ Course 


Halted b y School 


| 
poor? | 
eta As Union Protests 
Knights of Columbus for ar-| DETROIT. Nov. 27 wm—A 
ranging the party, the Circus) <-hoo! course teaching parents 
Saints and Sinners for making) how to cut their children’s hair 
a substantial donation to the|n,. heen temporarily sus- 
nuns, and all other benefactors pended because of union bar- 
of the -ome. bers’ protests. 

A check from the Circus) Rattle lines formed between 
Saints and Sinners was pre-|narents in suburban ~ Redford 
sented to Mother Marguerite, township, and the local .AFL 
the home's superior, by Milton|barbers’ union over who has 
Kronheim, local civic and busi-' the right to cut junior’s hair. 
ness leader. State officials halted the 

Richard A. Mahar, a Wash-'school barbering instruction 
ington attorney, was chairman after the local barbers’ union 
of the’ perty, assisted by | and the State Board of Examin- 
Francis C. Heigle, Lester F. ers of Barbens protested that 
Moss, Addison B. Clohassey the haircutting course is illegal 
and Joseph G. McGowan. because the Redford school 
does not have the right to 
license barbers. 

The School Board said the 
The Washington Restaurant | course is legal and plans to re- 


.an|Sume it because “we are not 
Association will meet at 8:30 | interested in licensing anyone, 
tonight at the Washington Gas! justin teaching parents to cut 


Light Co., lith and H sts, nw. ‘their children’s hair.” 


‘What did you do for My 


Hats 
Depdty Police Chief Howard Covell sets 


his gap on Dr. Paul Kernan and Fire Chief 
Millard Sutton crowns Dr. Joseph 


with his helmet, signifying 


Off to Visiting Doctors 


saya memberships in the Police and 

Fire Departments. The medical men, both 
connected with the Mayo Clinic, were hatted 
at the Shriners weekly luncheon. 


Bailey. 
the doctofs’ 


Investment Property 
Leeal Notices . 
Lest 

lots 

Machinery and Teols 


Real Estate leens 

Real Estate for Sele 

Rooms fer Rent 

Sitvetions Wanted 

Steres for Rent .....sccseens 
Trailers 

Trust Notes 

Vacation Places .......ssees 
Weorehouses 


Waterfront Properties Pet 


UNITED STATES DISTRICT COUR’ 
UNITED Spe COURT 
oe Bistriet 0 oe “Gola — 


the unknown heirs at law and next 

of kin of Jessie Rose Daniels. de- 

ceased. and all « concerned 
appear in said Court on Monda 
ber. A 

» € 


* why such application 
should not be sranted. 
hereof be published in 
n 


successive 
weeks before the return day here- 
in mentioned. the first publication 
to be not less than thirty days be- 


fore said return day. Witness. the 
L J WwW 


! 
Nov if. 21.4™ 


Hes ano ryrosais 


work involves ae 
waterproofing. aor 
crete. ex 
paving. stone, eaten 
related misce! eou . 
&. specifications, and bid- 
pasrepete wie, be ready on 
ber 1955. and 
will = issued without dapest. in 
the discretion of the Architect of 
the Capitel te «ualified con- 
tractors proposing to submit bids 


catio 
. and bidding» ne. 
mation should be filed at once 
ARIK ¥ COO: Acting Archi- 
ect 


BUSINESS SERVICE 


A Go 
R. additions. all remodel. 


TRA 
ing & repairs. helpful c 
AR KEEPER CO to 


Ibm 


n 
7 


rs! - +e le. Li im 
— Ue : 
i ay work. coal? joes 


caring “ealior | with Sells. 
rk. Regard JA. ts 
old.: vic, ML. White. Park > 
ENGAG pie 
. Sol..and Par vee, Nov. 18, 
between 6-9 % ~ . TA. 0-2114 


Cards & Photos A 
WATTING Pinion station 
| 5 min). ily. 8 AM te li 
allet 


sice 50 conte ‘incl. tax) 
Por other prices phone ME. 9-085 


Teh eae Beh ia HM eet 


touch with me 
|  feaponelble for any 
6a _outsee by any other, than 


3 { F. Jt 

NOT be responsible for 
depts imecurred by anyone er 
mag myse /Set. Ernest P } ut- 


are biviaae — R Caphal ‘Privin Sa 


New ode not fereet- 


ATIONS. aS, st F 


= DL Mane 


TIA 


aay riders te lows: 
return Jan. 1 


TIA 
A o a Nov_ 29. will 
RIDA Ain? 


FLORIDA 
TRANSPORTATION 


a e reons to drive 
orpne and new 


AIRLINES 
AIR TRAVEL AGENCIES 
NEED 


Men and women. Mang interest- 
well-paid. 
ment wgroued and oppo 
tunities everywhere, coast to 
coast and overseas. After short 
low cost paste traiming that 
need not interfere a present 
roe 4 me rou Wil 
Calif.. 


th st. nw.. Wash. 


FOP bracket position 
"eb whee $10,000 yr. att ki 
an rease 
oan “Classen saves 
MORE Typing. 
hand. ante pr mnauire A. 
8-2340. BO ‘=. test. 40 


Cor h 

gi +3 FORMING 
MEDICAL LAB. TECH. 
DOCTOR’S ASSISTANTS 


Day and eve. classes. Prepare for 
+ Spelaasionnt career, big demand 
place 
ormation cal) Vasiag J 
for | - 
ti) A iy peaaty cul- 

ture: all subjects va t: approved 
at oI pr vite eat : eve. classes. 

SAAS. 


NURSES NEEDED 


ae 17- 65. COLORED-WHITE. for 
Ottiass. Institutions, ri- 


nee’ ASSISTANTS 
ar A NURSING 


ENROLL NOW FOR DEC. CLASSES 
Por free booklet. visit. write. phone 


National Institute of Nursing 
Victor Big.. 909 G pl. nw. ST. 3-3671 


RADIO ann 4 : job 


Get a Better Job 
EARN MORE MONEY-—LZEARN 
SHORTHAND & TYPING 
IN 6 WEEKS 


Other Short-Term Courses 
PBX NIST 


TYP - 

AR a ely td RS 
lalaaas : A NIST 
outs meine. +_h eX 

nauire 9 AM. 
Phone: ST. >. 3086 


Speedwriting Secretarial School 
at: ST. NW. 


est. 40 yrs.) ter 


oI ORED—Tea em in ourse, with a. 
LE Sbiioo "ise G 
at aie NA. 8-3259 


TS 
HELP, MEN 15 
Nis specialize re Bod positions 


Acct., Far East, $9690 
Air Stations mgr., $9000 
LLOYD’S EMPL. SERV. 


ockroom supervisor 
iooteee 
sards. y under 60 
ata 


ear ye vata a 


obacce prod. 
(GI b 


Col RED BRANCH 


17 ST. 3-0 
all eur- BR. § live in — 
Flee oupvesee operator s 


7 anito $140. atrs. 
~ va store. oy Spe 
k, 2 Dp 2am. ne 4 


coo 
rter. downtewe 
ar washer, B-12 B. M....«. 
rter, . nee 
rter . = 
eee. Gate ie 
anitor, Ba “or ath. “a it se 


Pinats e -. ee y 13 
ACCOUNTING 
STUDENTS 


Bace elient opportunity for 
ten 


tudents 

fine night WV, M. + 

r 

r week, Many worth 

its. an 

upon com tu : 
* vrevious 
ve industry 


ADVERTISING 
LAYOUT ARTIST 


and Times Herald 


iS15 L Street NW. 


oF eek gee 
a precra ea eas 


Apply 


ASST. MANAGER. 


White, restaurant exp.. vw 
900-488 


-PORTER. itive in 
pre wee me. “1 


1904 N.Y, Ave. NW. ST. 93-3638. 


ASST. MANAGER 


TRAINEES 
ane 


Panes te 1 slack. trae: 
peounts and meals furn 


“TOT SOPRES, a 


iMl G ST. NW ROOM 209. 


AUTO 
openin 


Assistant Bookkeeper 
$70 PER wee TO START 


alent Sermaneat > 

a. Many c er 

any ae 
includ acation 

ms Reed Tor — 


“fae, ay 


_NIGH 


under - wit 
pleasant w 
with 


ial ee 


Assistant to Treasurer 


———$$—— 


ITOR 


Ry ri- 


aes 


Beust ,be experience ip making 
Pins ; ts 


cea 
routine saudite of sur 


r service sta 
be Derienced 
2 


Ms en Vireinis 
AUTO ASSISTA 
PARTS MANAGER 


Excellent salary: mA week paid 
vacation A. AL insu lan 
manent 


Wilson Pontiac, 
7 


7 ty) v 


a s 
p-<er ey 


Inc. 


= 
ressrenees : taberts 
—_ 


station 


x. UP. Gas 
wk, UP. Miss MORGAN rm yo 
Bell. 13 st. N S ae 


COLORED 


BA . Gecorator, exper.... 960 
RIVERS. fu er. $30 
Ege: 6th ‘4. ei $200 mo 
TERS, refs. 840-846 
he refs., $150, plus artrs. 
NATIONAL EMPL. SERVICE 
e ii : 2D 
A A 
BSE AUG Sa HE'DIS' a 
AUTO. SALESMAN 


Fave openings for two sesressive 
ar 


and floor time furnis 
Mr Koval 
ig Tem Ave 


AUTOMOBILE 
a 
sa | as 


Por used car department of « long 


oor 
te 
iar Sade 


5 Re A PONTIAC 


407 FLORIDA AVE. NE. 


SALESMAN — We 
for an experienced 
em salesman. 


onpre ~ en 
used- 
Cup 


rthern 

est Chevrolet "aoaler. 
preferr but not ab- 
ody nsportation 

’ benef! 


on. Tarn | 
951 worth: "=. 


tem st tnd eb 


v r 
Center, 7015 3 Brookville ia 

$ Sr 
# —s teady, i pave Be. 
union shop: <, ve 
cense. Na P Bacher 


™ 4 We chance 1 for ‘ater «bem 


t your license. was cover al) ey 


por old reliable firm, ust 
tenced ‘Sus rape 


= 


in ¥ 
BRS 


’ '* . Irc 


DISTRICT MANAGER 
$12,000 UP 


2-SALES 
/ 
$7436 


“ion TRAINEES—4 
$5200 
transfers and 


ay Pas 


hy Pent: _ 
34 for personal interview. 


DRAFTSMAN 


Mechanical-Electronic 


Experience Preferred 
Permanent Position 


APPLY 


Nems-Clarke, Inc. 
919 Jesup-Blair Drive 
Silver Spring, Md. 


MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY 
9 TO 4:30 


ENGINEERS 


RESEARCH 
for DESIGN 
PRODUCTION 


Airplanes and 
‘ Guided Missiles 


BOEING AIRPLANE 
COMPANY 
Seattle, Wichita, 
_ Washington Kenses 


Engineers 


An engineer with above 
average ability, «a desire te 
progress within his profession 
in accordance with his abill- 
ty and a need for « stimulat- 
ing environment te perform 
at his best should consider 
the positions listed belew that 
are presently § available at 
MELPAR. 


SENIOR 
ELECTRONIC 
ENGINEER 


Background in digital com- 
puter circuitry, data proc- 
essing of associated equip- 
ment. Position involves su- 
pervising the activities of en- 
gineers, junior engineers and 
technicians. 


SENIOR E. E. 


Experienced in design of video 
circuitry for radar or similar 
equipment. Capable of as- 
suming responsible position. 


SENIOR E. E. 


Several years’ experience in 
design of RF Amplifiers, |. F. 
Strips or microwave compo- 
nents. In addition to supervi- 
sory responsibility this position 
involves liaison with custe- 
mer. 


SENIOR 
MECHANICAL 
ENGINEER 


Several years’ experience in 
packaging of electronic equip- 
ment in accordance with Gov- 
ernment specifications (Chas- 
sis, Racks, etc.). 


MECHANICAL 
DESIGN 
ENGINEER 


Design of small mechanisms 
end electro-mecharncal = de- 
vices. 


POSITIONS 
ARE ALSO AVAILABLE 


FOR 
INEXPERIENCED 


ENGINEERS 


Interested in the above-men- 
tioned fields. 
Foe 
Additional Information 
call our Technical 
Personnel Representative 
at 
J€. 4.6000, 
or 
Visit our Laboratory 
et 


Ext. 220 


3000 Arlington Bivd. 
Falls Church, Va. 


MELPAR, 
INC. 


DRAFT SMEN. 
TRAINEES 


SEE AD UNDER 
TRAINEES 
DRAFTSMEN 


MELPAR, 
INC. 


DRIVER — Whi 25-38 ane. neat 


have 


ELECTRICIANS and helpers 


"aaperience, call Whe B-S1BS. 
2 Yamane Call atter 6. A. 


STONE PAPER TUBE 


ENGINEERING 
AIDES 


Knowledge of elec- 
tronic components, 
ability to read blue- 
prints and schematic 
diagrarns .desirable, 
or previous experi- 
ence in stock, oe 
pediting or planning. 


Position offers 4p- 
portunities te aed 
vance, in expanding 
organization. 

APPLY Iv PrRsow 


ate AM. TO £00 PM. 
MONDAY THRD FRIDAY 


MELPAR, INC. 


3000 ARLINGTON BLYD. 
FPALIA CHURCH. VA. 


COMMUNICATIONS 
ENGINEERS 


5 
EUROPE 
FAR EAST 


with communica- 
reetie 
ere _reculverp 


fingers, 
age tals” 


ABOVE AVERAGE 
FINANCIAL RETURNS 


PT TE a TRO 
1329 & ste i, Ww 
ENGINEER, 6th CLASS” 


Rete: re for ant. deve 
. rea. Nee 


Bivatel 26°" aan ae 
FIREMAN 


Permanent position open 
for an experienced Fire- 
man, white, under 50, 
Boilers Stoker Fired, 
Class 5 or 6 License re- 
quired, oy week, 
many employee benefits. 
Salary $256 per mo. Ap- 
ply in person to BI 
Superintendent U. 5, 
Chamber of Commerce, 
1615 H St. NW. 


7, 


ROOM 741 


death vance ie te 


’ 
perioneed end Sinker. 
. " ; 
mee a be 
edge of meat ry. 


PST : 
HOUS FMAN 
Colored. Must have hotel exper. 


over 30 yre. of age: 
he Pertonnel Dept. A 


INTERVIEWER 


a atili ie Thee 


GOVERNMENT 
EMPLOYEES 
INSURANCE CO. 


Plea - 
Oh a x 


-o~_-— 


tS mes 8m, 


——e 


Insurance 
Casualty Underwriters 


a 
Account Executive 
Trainees 


a See 


MACHINISTS 
GENERAL ALL AROUND 
Experienced on Small 


MACHINE PARTS 
INSPECTOR 


MELPAR, INC. 
col be" Bere aes 


"Fils ae 
Sat AMS Cust Sire 


gave eae Scr ree 
| =| OFFICIAL CLEANERS | iMstthiteck Soles 
; og en ae me | 


SECY. (to 35) $70 Set Ey 
PL'SERV'|. TRAINEES | 


. oe: | 1420_B._¥. Ave, NW. ST. 2299) 
, i | ae, aay ee YOUNG MEN 
MANAGER a ale | DRAFTSMEN 


TRAINEE NEED A ang ‘A Bieady embioy 7 . White, 18 to 25, col- 

: hi schoo! ‘ 
v eS Recent al WILLARD HOTEL STOCK CLERK | | a come 1a mo 
21.30 "hia so aa feces oi wiecturer "6 Aft _& Penn. Ave. NW. : esterase A with one of Wash.’s sti Paso : 
aetie 7 Ble men sith in md, eiean-cus ; ree , PENINGS FOR YOUNG MEN ! t stationery and met. 
excellent future for proper ith PRINTER’S HELPER 1948, and gisine og! s * oo — 


man. Good pay, advance- WORK IN D, C. MD. & VA. Se INTERESTED IN LEARNI 
ment, car allowance, com- CO. APPOINTMENTS | fps: ant "now how te optrate ob] savancemer with, sepu ) 7 cong eral opportunities for 
pany benefits, Old estab» | press. Apply Personnel ae eet C . . THE HIGHLY LUCRATIVE ais Gapeiee’ ere 
Teich ont atten ers | HOTEL STATLER a a Se ae FIELD OF DRAFTING position with a fu 
wil to start 


lished firm. 
Maintenance JU. 9-4529 hak oe oe lar mari revews. Mary posit 
Man En weal eSTATE | © SALESMEN. [| ee |: OC NIN 


y. tor personnel, some jeneral an SALESMEN ‘ APPLY IN PERSON FOR A 
CALL L. J. 


Sraisens bac M EN’S egceent eee MONDAY GH FRIDAY with - 
Experienced in main- i FURNISHINGS for oy ie e7 : cnt andseaog ut fos pe ee REQUIREMENT: Chas. G. Stott. & Co. Ke of Beg 


tenagce of heating anager Trainee ) . 
and a g ees SALESMAN office | ; sflce adv ma pets ta ee MELPAR, INC, AT LEAST ONE YEAR OF ee a “ni cniveinain 
ested in men who must ‘ > 
ROTATING SHIFT age We Have Openings for | Bags Bio at co ulsitewst| Erastus Ph puedes pes ihe HIGH SCHOOL | ebsrmatlonat 
— Permanent Positions try and B de ae. ts oon en | 
MOMs, |REees| TE [eee e| Bees [ATA eounen Basins 
‘40 not t any sort . ROUTE MAN isth st. Rey's Dry Clean ably a. and ha . oe DRAWING COURSE | MA hi 
: a achines 
SALTZ F ST. tga itt Meta: | | echnicians stv 
im & sales career. profe ; 
1o4t F ot, NW.” jo nafiaain a? Electronic | exce.tent opportunity pital OPPORTUNITY 
fos ; FOR ADVANCEMENT IN | With High School Education set 
ae 4 oe ore ost Be froqie. equipment. Previous indus-| AN EXPANDING RESEARCH Customer Engineers 


STARTING SALARY $81 WK. 


‘ 


MESSENGER ae Phe cdee nau Peemey| beter Se | | onaAATION ARE NEEDED yen sonvecene 
Ne sis baa SALES Balsabereeies yn: | AE oe renoae IIEATESY | ELECTRICAL 
sh Gait, shige egg R ose ACCOUNTING 


magazine. Inside and 


AN ! 
pers Ds ave 3 to 5 a Sere ree aged a _ bey and ’ No th i “ron a ree . 
in Fe serving or r myst veroun other duties RENAI RE MELPAR, INC. APPLY IN PERSON rll ame vrF cB electrical MACHINES 
| operation of the mai! THE MOST RESPECTED SALESMEN Pe a 8AM. TO4P. M. Investigate this opportunity REQUIREMENTS: 


Ing it Representative ! cog gg eae af me TT | SPECIALTY 2000 mY. SP ig ae A ped — pore future in ee Training 
cense and be !8 selling books? Ceme- y CHURCR HR Armed Forces Technical 
oor Fire and Casualty Insur- years of age. Five- HAS OPENINGS FOR = ete. ox ee) ieee ; a ae es ina se os sts. nw. > > clans calvaset BOX 976, POST-TH Experience 


a. : proven INTERVIEWS PHONE 
is looking for young men Sy, Sonar. wee | Sales Trainees Ret: today. mont Tuerative —— FOR AN APPOUrEMInT 


een Company for sales training program. Nem WOeking = | 
conditions, many Weekly commissions and Pode taupht the home remodelinn REPUBLIC 7-3705 


t have coll educati company benefits. CALL MR. PEARLMAN qy4 ’ , sy s coming year, 
= " prtecineh ay MONDAY OR TUESDAY] 22 jontr’ down. plenty of leads MELPAR. | seth te [| Customer Enaineering Dept 


This is an excellent opportunity for TRAINEES ' ene af Pra 
F! Bilie 


@ ma interested in a career that can lead CALL DI. 7-2900, |'9:9° A.M. TO 1:00 P.M. 4 sean Of 
"til 11:30 & nternational Business 


to sdes management with one of the na- TUNITY WITH A FUTURE 

tion’| outstanding insurance companies. Ext. 263 LI. 6-0445 SHEET-METAL FOR INC. OPPOR A Machines Corporation 
Guatnteed annual Salary plus incentive Bet. 9 A. M. and 5 Pp. M, | | SALESMAN Wea pearance, amare WORKER ape Eepestiqnal a Ss Pield 1220 19th St. NW, 
plary getic and sananis.d 3000 Arlington Blvd. $5 to underso 1 year of Stee 


If ygu are interested in your future call NIGHT WORK = at ae, ea err For Electronics ELECTRONIC Falls Church, Va. with u ty ‘es ts M4 pt. 

Mr. Lynn—DU. 7-5100 NEWSPAPER | iA RHOR SUPRA Eo to tacareree = cs ee Sere) 
ah ; e ass asurin - : . st abili to equiva — 4 , - work in publle F rela s div ‘stom 
| rertising ‘ - Pe 3 " %: teed dies areata ASSEMBLY on) vy hg © St. | work Wa ution, or roneern. a 

SALESMAN APPLY 9 TO 4 eff Davis Hwy.)| 2s Box 286. post-rit. 


Sear $ Roebuck And Company bok Mw to ee ee shi. ae. MONDAY Through FRIDAY Arlington, Va. 
he “Washington Post Attractive position in estab- Nems-Clarke, Inc. 


" i. | ‘ ; 

Desires 3 High-Caliber Men and Times Herald hor ninbude ioe 919 Jesup Blair Drive (Take Arnold 2-V Bus from : : 3-1 2m 
to Call on Customers in This Ares 1515 L Street, NW. Dick Duplicating Equipment; SILVER SPRING, MD. llth & £ Sts. NW. to plant AAA vk. 838 te 3 must ese § 
and Supplies. Excellent op- ply 47 


OFFSET PRESSMAN portunity for young 24- Conn. Ave. 
Wat fe sett SANOASEINS ge Ge fp Fae 


Nee eed man, why = bition, initiative and direct- Opportunity 
or ibe wens teed on ‘ cage tego the! pe to &s Ber sa Pe, a ee ee bes ae SHEET METAL Position Offers 
permanent postions with, many company benefits includ- 7 | Call Me. Gist, ME. 8-1721 for MECHANICS & | FOR A MAN OF 
ing paid vacatons, insurance, hospitalization and profit |———OFFSET STRIPPER | Persona! interview. ASSEMBLERS OPPORTUNITY FOR $10,000-$20,000 | UNUSUAL CAREER 
CALIBER FIELD OPEN 


sharing, to meition » few. ee Eo (AIRCRAFT) ADVANCEMENT | EST ENGINEERS 
44 Wonderfyl opportunity, for . : 
sos cuslihed ences salesman. age o areal. This Is interesting work related F ELD SERVICE SYSTEMS WORK WITH 


Pd SALESMAN 
ified men who have a car can expect of 
$150 and up veekly with salary while aa this. Oe gears PoeTH. | ing and serv icine. to estabisshed to aircraft structures, Will be 

—Box_ 258. ae 3 rantee| working from blueprints. MANY EMPLOYEE ENGINEERS Ability to extract EDPM 
Personal intervéws are being held at Sears, Roebuck and OIL BURNER Known. References required. Week a ; 
Company, 450€ Wisconsin Ave. NW. in the Division 12 MECHANIC f= a eae Biome, , WIREMEN BENEFITS a positive ~ 
Office, Mondaj and Tuesday, November 28 and 29, | "zperienqed: permanent: pale ua iid. be RcON sion from quali- ELECTRONIC DATA 
between 11 2.4. and 1 p.m. Apel Mr. Wuspiees. ‘THE BROOK SALESMAN 1 Bn gone > Pg pon APPLY IN PERSO Wiser SEAS, Se aS fied salle of PROCESSING 

sat ectron , ‘ lectroni ngineerin ; ¢ N 

Ne phone calls, please very capanie in peach work! Se@ Our Ad Under ee ee CAM TOP M oe thin. ct Vemntionad prime considera- A 

ee daine’ tee . 42% school certificate pl REQUIREM 
ee Barrio. Cleears ERCO Division MONDAY THRU FRIDAY experience n trouble tion, Salary, COM- | Business systems knowledge 

PEN DEL FARMS |ACF INDUSTRIES, INC. oe testing and mission and bo- 


or 
Riverdale, Maryla in such ; Experience in writing 
of Maryland, 6. nye me — fields as radar, com- nus. Expansion Instructions for operation 


puters, television, etc., of electronic computing 
M ELPAR aap totetieed, th program forces osnuidinan 


934 Bonifant St. SUBURBAN WASHINGTON, D. c 
ENG | NEERS SILVER SPRING, MD. NC. : trovadoe of eacton this ad. In our INTERVIEWS DAILY 
h a! f-century- | 1290 19TH ST. NW. 


Planning Your Career for 5 Years? 10? 20?) . AERODYNAMICS 1211 South Fem St. | even neyye | O10 Company you  |Room 331 RE. 7-3705 


CFP SPVERSON DAVE control your Own "|i ternational Business 
Look into General. Electric's AERODYNAMIC ENGINEERS are sine TBE | MAY BE ARRANGED | income and ad- Machines Corp. 


| Long-t Guided Missile Progr Arlington, Va. | t. 
: FS OE TS en ee urgently needed at ERCO. SN ean 


This progrin at GE is big—and getting bigger steadily. In fact, plans for | Late model car 
in researchbnd development of added Ghetlanast cg eens S eagybocgt meng se We offer an opportunity to work ERCO DIVISION nucebeety 5 
YOUNG MAN ACF Industries, Inc. | PORTER 


mow for yers ahead. ith many types of the latest air- 
| ¥ Y 7 HIGH SCHOOL GRAD. Riverdale, Maryland Meet with dis- nails 
Your indivBual achievements will stand out clearly, because the work is orgenized craft in phrases of aerodynamics Warfield 7-4444 ; FALLS CHURCH LABORATORY 
RR Maes trict mor., MR. 


in small, units. And salaries are based on performance, it's up to you d caae ti mar d 
how much earn. Your ability can really pay off here. and power piant operation inciuc- : é (Located In Suburben DUNCAN Tues. ie Church residents 
| Martin Manning Washinaton, B.C) Frmasaat -ppeitons ty. iui 


i : éning, 8 p.m. arch. Raferenege. 
ee asi Nits itiiaties ssp entadinbiiah eitamsshs ts eases Wares Gaal ing aerodynamics and power plant yan to Ge NW Ie Ota p Many employe be 
with reco@ized leaders in science and engineering . . . by promotion from within equation, aircraft stability and per- only. re hot 

MONDA Bhar 


. » by lib@al plan of aid for advanced study. Why not discuss this opportunity for a 
stimulating rewarding, long-term career at General Electric? formance, Congressional Hotel 


‘ 3 J. Ave. S.E. INC. 
You will find salaries, policies and ENGI N FERS es celui MELPAR, 


OPENINGS NOW FOR EXPERIENCED MEN IN personal advantages excellent. APPEAR ONLY ONCE "Kul te. 1 


Opport f bi rsonnel to 
re poet rae see: INSTRUMENTATION | OPENINGS EXIST AT ALL LEVELS Join a growing company that combines. . ) STE hae, (oY olach Saleaaaes 


. RECORDING 
Design, development and eval- 
ELECTRO-MECHANICAL ores ones FRIENDLY Sere , SEs: | HELP, WOMEN 13 
WI : 


DEVELOPM rg Components such nach INSTRUMENTATION APPLY TO SOR. , 
AARLIN ETON AREA 
— C00D. pene en, 


entrance) 


| po SYSTEMS | * ERCO DIVISION Large Company Advantages 


STRESS ANALYSIS BAROMETER DATA PROCESSING ACF INDUSTRIES, INC. 


STRUG ‘betes rene cance TRANSDUCER DESIGN ’ RIVERDALE, MD. Desirable Openings: 
TIMERS AERODYNAMICISTS 


CONTROL EMS 
fr IMPACT MECHANISMS TELEMETRY ELECTRONIC ENGINEERS 


AERO-THERNMDOYNAMICS RADIATION FUZING | FLECT RO- pail: og cthage oh 


PLIGHT TEST PLANNING INERTIAL GUIDANCE 
| Call Mr. TK, Koerner] Call Mr. R, E, Robertson MECHANICAL LAYOUT: DRAFTSMEN 


Call Mr. A. Smith | MAXAGER—Qomponest | Rauipt. inetrumente FIELD SERVICE ENGINEERS 


. . TEST ENGINEERS 
Design Engineer DESIGN CHECKERS 


TRAY YEARS OF PRACTICAL "DESIGN TECHNICAL WRITERS 
ERA 

| mal vp & Tuesday, November 28-29 EXPERIENCE. THOROUGH KNOWL-. 

| » Smith, Mr. Koerner or Mr, Robertson EDGE OF AND EXPERIENCE WITH GOOD SALARY 


| 1 P.M. to 6 P.M. | TELETYPE MECHANISMS. PLEASANT LOCATION D. 3-6 
| to arrange appointment at your convenience THIS POSITION IS LOCAL AND IM. GENEROUS BENEFITS tase, (hit, bei prac jeeto a CLERKS 


. WA 4! TON INTERVIEWS MUST HAVE EXTENSIVE ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING PHYSICISTS 
| S NG O . AND ELECTRO-MECHANICAL EDUCA- SPECIFICATIONS ENGINEERS 


NAtional 8-4420 MEDIATE; OFFERING EXCELLENT SAL- 
| | ARY AND OPPORTUNITY. . HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES 
| Or send resume to: APPLY TO #10." plus ts 

ee eer International Electronics -_ ERCO. DIVISION - He ak : Pe 
Engineering, Inc. | » dee Tee 
GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. NON MUNSEY BUILDING in - ROOM 741 ACF INDUSTRIES, INC. oak banat kage 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES’ HERALD) aur 
Monday Ms 


~ — pA. 
mpacenie? sae 


iberal 


it ee ote 


$70 PER WEEK me TO START Bison appre rs, Wad ees eiak tele” p 6 BOX 3408 
Fra aie tera CASHIER-WRAPPER Newspaper {Comm Heights Station 
WASHINOTON., D. C. 


fe | PCS. | ER A a bie 

ee: : si Nl 7. Pe! EQUNTAIN-COUNTER STONE PAPER Tuse co, | 'NTERVIEWS DAILY 
MANY OTHER OPENINGS ; HAHN SHOE STORES COLORED, WHITE, 896 + TIPS | we coe —_—_-9 fnetin 6.8. 1990 19TH ST. N.W. /sf 

4403 Connections Ave. and Times Herald | LLOYD'S EMPL. : oat | STENOGRAPHER |Room 331 RE. 7-3705 


ACCOUNTING 1515 L Street, NW. 1404.8, ¥. Ave, NW. ST, 3-3694 SECYS.-TYPISTS Saat a Pend ot * nie 
5 oe +f CASHIER CLERK TYPIT—Awy [8-95 oe fnsurance agency needs ma- See ABBEY First NEWSPAPER international Business . A EER 


CLERKS oY fa . ot SEKTEP 
eres ane et a sree rats | deen eh ee oes P| OA A a | Sars ett erg] _ Maines COP.) GW 


SF ea varied ‘allicg ghort order ¢ Oo “open Seite Ee en, eae private be 


beset c aK. 


ms . 
won ¥ eN salary anc 1 | ———1ah_snd_K St. NW. __ . . ' ' Hare. : si inourance 
Ay aX ah ge CHECKROOM GIRL aa oS wre Georaitonn-'*™ s5ts| Paste pmeamtageers 


neni D. || Shlet press ‘ope. ys ‘ + }- in cond ‘ . ' * re ms ae ington ost 

HOPPES. IN Dishwashers .....+-+::+--$90 WB) Between dang 3 Bm, =e pees ae ow atte | and Times Herald 

tal @ 8. NW ROOM 200 ass er Stone General Employment, Rag GIRL < sere eee = 1515 L Street, NW. 

Poe Hat $225 re Baar PF PS, rs ag A plage % 

work. Ber Some’ ic Sehr wk | hofthers’s “Bakers fore pees: Under 30 years. white to, work 36 ate 2 mf mae | 

SEY" no shhd $97 weiyere—rireacnt ues | Seat“yn ay, Sy, ieiad| | erence permanent oot fe Bowes remanent 
Apply between oh and tion with excellent salary and 


. x Lekseenih uy wikte| Bhopzing Sopa: aie | Stiie 
CLERK TYPIST, $250 |"fs0 sue commission, ae week HO. 2-2476 Washington Post ol ag 435°. Tye. to 19 i 
fu revtgees “hot Be, 48 ok iy Boon. Paake a myentory. and any Herald HAHN SHOE STORES me EACHERS—Waite Use —ADAM| Columbia Heights Station ence. 
it ee des ay salary open. eh 1515 L STREET N. W. 3113 14th ot. Ww.” amas. Suey. OM, = LETYPE OPER Gi00-— taco WASHINGTON. 
eBEARCH ANALYST BOOKKEEPING Pik atracties fan ik San ARY ors | Boley tL MEY | Golden Opportuni 
cote igs! «= MACHINE | sieht se ehcee acies| HOUSEWIVES | OBS, INC | aerate Plan ee | on ee nore uae sees ol 
of 


back " , 
| with be pe { . 

» 28-97. OPERATOR be p Commere mercial Why Not Become In- Te eRe 7-3153 STs—an tt cetionl — OP 
BRKPR,, "Berh, Lad r FI ec tric ql terested in Survey Work? ASTID” ger. bate. fai y ~ weal Phone aD. | “0! 
a ex. a.2808 | Experienced, under 35, ee, for i Qoeping evaiable ta. Marviang ‘erat tpeuetey oft ces immediate “Pewee argeh a 

ae 


commissions, 


rLbs 
Ait Sheraton Bide. Til iéch NW excellent working con- 8:20 8. mm. iS p.m. a ; , | con- od Suk Ot e| Mr. Des 
Admin. Secys., to $6000 | ditions. seinen or . : Wo rke rs an r spect ins ° SECRETARY- courve, small cleages. MPTC 

A aes NATIONAL SAVINGS | va 3 ey ieee “ STENO , aaa Soe 3 " 
Clerk-Typists, Many to $70 & TRUST CO CLERK-TYPIST MUST BE EXPE- . Hime 3508 Sth ot. nee (UNDER 35) fg ri . tol Hill Steno... $325 
GOCY. RGUREIY oe oe RIENCED IN WIR- . m. > m. : ist, immed. Miss| ae" 
Secs np qhorthand) it Wag re. Govnteve when you ING, SOLDERING w i maghet me: ch pei NATIONAL : “6 & 12th aa 


ie| oe  Talheanemirce ben ge Jor a cerk-wolt in Sliver! AK) ASSEMBLY oleae ee ein GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY _&_1 2th cette se 
OF SMALL ELEC- venience. For appointment, 1 x me to ord and B Streets WOE . EMPL. EXCHANGE t is . Pract ..° 


Beri. overseas . =. i 
Scchacceersivict ae, isc | company pexarrta.. | TRONIC UNITS — cabrio rary 
eras pubenerre 1260's m os rom Advancement—5 2-Day Week SHOULD BE ABLE Pleasant dignified wo f- 
Bictaghons ‘oors-+.:<:-=-. te JU. 9-4529 TO READ WIRING | _Bitdlos. 2217 wichols ay 
DIAGRAMS. “mas? Show AV 


to to 
MANY OTHERS ull charge of books coke snd general atal to customers ! 
nnette . ateiman week: Gir-aen openings now. many company 
A tte D. Tatel pee ja S-dar wee ai CLERK “TYPIST — Permanen ent post. te 
#35 Woodward Bide, 16th & H NW.| ory Mutual ins eco, 498 Warner| fies: S-day week: many employe = 
ithe Siac’ RO D. C. SCC tts ERCO rie A CALL 
DI. 7-2900—Ext. 261 
Ss ok some. White: hotel maid 
Agures. some, . lew nf DI | | N Sunday an ; Between 9A. M.&5P. M. 
ae eS. = 6 Tike ot 2808 Wis. | a 


- ia 
GIRLS! LERK-TYPIST =| ACF INDUSTRIES |... Aaa || "30 zs. General Rmployment, 1504 
Gero Pak ol ok RIVERDALE Mp.  |sSEBIAREBMS Any atti bethera 
’ : : office in Alexandria.| 25 and 37-hour week $3000 to 


YOUNG WOMEN! | [Saisie i ae poe eh Ye 
Your Clerical Positions BoB at prs eek Sete ait ae COPPER SKILLET 
val (EN) to iti , _—. 


TELEPHONE COMPANY | Both Typing and Non-Typing | aie ‘asin = =| Uiee se Fics Wie] 1 comm. avn 
one HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES ” ape i Soa det-| sist ae oe eee ae 


oo. — Be 
or . ly person. Tés- Z 


Attractive Positions AGE 17 TO 23 bas, sili Re ah Re ‘ 
1" Interesting work in pleasant sur- aed "| our xmnes 19-2: real estate| Mp Wint boMtH sltob 750 
TY : ndings, for both begi d + Saline FOBRG SY Petar ARTIS ore 
VARIOUS PES OF WORK roundings, for both beginners an PAYROLL n 3664). ES Petree $2.50 Se ae | 


experienced girls; opportunity and 
New Higher Pay Schedules | permanency in a progressive, grow- 


° estab 
ing company. yententiy in Ve.| 1eurani Sia 9op : , 
Now in Effect 7q payrch or siniter ener | Hemet rhe oy reek. Ses oil, pastel, etc. Apply in 3 


5-DAY WEEK neste coat, | Sama, Brita wz | Garaees bing, setples | eat 
APPLY EMPLOYMENT OFFICE ke aon é pontionftring opper- ii, one lia Entire 8th Fi. 930 F St.| cle anit 
. tunity ancement. ; ence’ . she) 
725 13th Street, N.W., ene ie employe receptions ect rial e : a te der oer. 4 — » — 
Monday through Friday fits; convenient suburban ite gthls $7000. HAR! ; : a 


8:30 AM.—5.00 P.M. Government Employees} == Pt on 
CHESAPEAKE & POTOMAC TELEPHONE CO. ee ere volts toa owes association. f WOMEN 
14th and L STS. N.W. MELPAR, al: ae : 8, sot Age 21 to 45 
PLEASE APPLY 2400, Aringtgp Bird gy * am a : gS 
8 AM TO 3 PM. urch, Va. athens" vale and -| To train for light assem- atin! 
LAST CHANCE AT L STREET ENTRANCE _ |i ‘sttest Sst tacts] Mitta ha oo Sa ahs | PY mee ety Se] CAR HOPS 
FOR _ —<| SECRETARY | "ot recemary WEEKEND WORK 
| APPLY IN PERSON for wesiund werk. 


CHRISTMAS EMPLOYMENT ACT NOW taaw-=| CLERK-TYPISTS See 


Need 
full-time salesman 8 AM. TO 4 PM 


AT THERE IS STILL TIME wonderful ae ava - 
TO GET YOUR el Fe aa MONDAY THRU FRIDAY | Lot SHOPPES, INC. 
THE HECHT CO. CHRISTMAS JOB SRP POR a6 | comet abut eee ee 


uo hie ae - _._\gbenaiee| Fe ne: | MELPAR, 


Apply Today—All 3 Stores |\Woodward & Lothrop} , Retr “dR INC. Waliooeane 
COME IN TODAY co eotie seis Coen ae] TE 


SALESWOMEN SALESWOMEN poe MELPAR Inc.| Sizosee | oe 
CASHIERS CLERKS NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY pee EAy cals Resets eee ; Pn: Immediate Openings |die"s 

: WE WILL TRAIN YOU. | 22, AR OTN BY? rlington, Va. —_ IBETHESDA 
NOTE THESE IDEAL WORKING HOURS 5-DAY, 40-HOUR WEEK eee | Sw ETAT CONN, AVENUE 


Daily Part Time 
FULL-TIME—5-DAY WEEK Y 
OR 5 DAYS-~@ HOURS : SECY. —T0O $80 Age 18 to 30. White, high esto w™y D. om 


Monday Through Friday, 9:30 to 1:20 or Later WE WILL ATTEMPT TO ARRANGE 
HOURS TO FIT YOUR HOME SCHEDULE PL. SERV. TRS SS 


AT OUR SILVER SPRING STORE EXCELLENT WORKING CONDITIONS ) an 
FULL-TIME—S-DAY WEEK ) AEE) | Apoly 

OR IMMEDIATE DISCOUNT aad ee POS SERVICE See ry ae 

Monday, Thursday, Friday Nights, All Day Saturday GOOD STARTING SALARY wane ower ay REPRESENTATIVE 

seat en es | YOUNG WOMEN 


AT OUR PARKINGTON STORE |Woodward & Lothrop eisai cr te Biivermhee) 


sivepatieagst” es WEEK az PS i 09 
PERSONNEL OFFICE, 9TH FLOOR ESAT tte ~atat | person : ag jurent. oe oon 
4 Days, Monday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday MAIN BUILDING Ine ‘ ' ie tb st. 8. Bot CS eraisaat pau p ages 
Goed Starting Salary Training With Pay With Incresses 
2131 O ST. NW. 


Immediate Discount ; | 
Meals and Uniforms Furnished 
cant y telecon entero Use Washington Post and Times Her ald Pius Other Benefits APPLY YOUR LOCAL | ear puponr finest 
Day and Night Shifts Available Hot Shoppe, Inc.| Modern Comfirtale 
Living That Yoe Enjoy 


THE HECHT CO. Classified Ads {2 “amr Oy tingoymant Offic 


WASHINGTON PARKINGTON, ARL., VA. WHITE TOWER — 1341 G St. NW., Rm. 200] * a rc 


F St. at 7th N.W. — Glebe Rd. and Wilson Blvd. | ins 
You Reach More People, Get Quicker Response at Lower Cost . tapes nag wife, Tor cup gard 2134 G ST. NW. 


SILVER a , | ; 
Fenton S$ and Ell : ; . 
ee ) Phone RE. 7-1234 


a for exelae os | to $4 per hr. for quali-/"- 
CLERK "firm eo: 4 yee! fied artist commercial, |S 


4613 DUKE ST. 
SHIRLEY DUKE || Nil : > a,\| 2: o Fit? =: 
- APARTMENTS : , : 7 ¥, any ma 


FREE INFORMATION , wee LL8 CHURCH—4100,”3-bedroo veh 
MAILED YOU TODAY | |é ) a , N Beane. Abr. Sha | 14TH St. BTWN, is K 


CALL Ki. 8-5100 F- wee a mary lane. Comfortable }-bea-| & et eS 
“iy re . 
eet ined WES Se aia, pe CENTRAL BUILDING 


Single applicants seceptea. } , ett, Athnsven, fiona, wired “ot ‘als 
4| 1 Bedroom, $66.00 to $68.00 R waaiet tet ARTZ DL. 7 7-9080 
med} 3B i oii 


2 Bedrooms, $75.50 to $77.50 


APTS., UNFURNISHED 36| APTS., UNFURNISHED 36 


FORT BENNETT |"Agrincros Cae 7" ATE 
. AVE.NW. LO Uptc ’ ae | 9-4383, 
APARTMENTS | ertic. —$91.50-$86.50 | Asses ah | Sots ey 46253. | Yar 'sa's 
(Ren Muntwosd eesiedbbie i . Located oy DOCTORS SUITE 
Beautiful Vi ing. switchboard ee x ta. Petounae f Dick ground fi 
th With High Elevation ice: laundry | room: rtatoin. 1 Bedroom, $71 "i, Bearme.-- breakfast rp, "ree. a, cenler 
fas lea EA | Be A a pooey ste Overlooking Potomac | 2Bedrooms $8) | gr setce Pinel ae| tere pe 
Bi neat per | yale irs nines, eaiaees| a Mae 3 nin wg ye os | ye Hs Me Yams Reema | rye seeey Sy hace | Sepa aes ES 
; ef Senate ‘Wo: i, SECTION—1, bed rp0% $0, vis, Wash and , WILTSHIRE CRESCENT . 1 bedroom, 686. al : ero — STORES, RENT 49 
at; ' « et : vias 3801 CONN. AVE. ARLINGTON’S - MT. PL WNTOWN CORN 
5 + 


4 eee Fo im quiet. ie MOST CONVENIENT APTS, and bath house; 2" 


on Gs. ave. 


6-rm. 
apt, in . ND 2 inciosea rear| 2Ist & L Sts. NW. 
ey a ting. . One Block from Key Bridge art of Pai A WHOLE NEW ang shops = se taeane ese i ae : Newly remodeled store, 22436. with 


; “me 
fron and mos R.., LIFE Sith Bae itg Neh. 8.3860: e ows. Geib ne Sees 
nd decorating ool AWAITS YOU Ee ms eaienamntens CAFRIT: fo 
ae N, “ AVE N.W. 


= and tionally attractiv S Sedroo at 
NEAR NAYLOR fan, P— .a.. | Bedrm. $7 + y “sider, eo ie Rome tis op gna, full Reid, 
GARDENS gy . - pone in 2 | tte Souab or Brera _—_} CARTY by, P5080 


] IL. 
a tesa tion. _ nowt decorated , ‘agon—4 , tic par . semi-det.; yard, bsemt ay} 
apts is nati 4 Piyetbe Beck git, bus—8 min. to cag ae! sopping. | heat. HE 4-o0th whys, JU 5-2008 | tees Mock SOW area 
unit pom : wm FUR ON om. PL... dur idea! } a aay ‘wee business 


stores. churches: 


rd. South tear bo tact 
“ . eos rive = > Ca — rset 2-300. Be 
turn uena Viste race se 


prise ave. 


Green . 6 es ; > 
pet To oe Fined Sk) U1 TRA-DESIRABLE s Fur. $150. Haale Isipdry" Sad storage| APARTMENTS WANTED 38 


Pr. 
= -cond.. . rm ow a sits — rik 5.0610 JU. 5-880 et Ger ‘ 
‘Atl, 2,5 mia, DC. Font. rand 1-BEDRM. sud ave. Mil: Pree for the right tenant? ’ *—Br 
= Es te wer teed . 2 F pecans eve! ae west on L wy bes, | Ry Ant BOR 0 GARDENS wen Ree hate Pe: | Abe RSA a th ae Sie ate Tevet 2 EE 
Oak ot. right te’ Pleres st, : nonth. JA. 2-0¢ 

Boa ar eek eats ngcheapuladcenes "TRENTON TERRACE | ori ane 26 | beta perc | Ce OE a 
a: RES. MOR. MRS. CUMBERLAND [. 77 a x Close-in 

Bivd left on on One se ts 1800 Leth ti aT 1621 NM. 2ist ST., APT. 1, JA. 6-404; 2 BEDROOMS—$81.80 — ee 


3 BEDROOMS—$108 “1 MO SIT or Tee, Jobe: 
ARLINGTON, —UAREERE PTE. — mer renee Alt utilities nel . Laren at{ractive Caer Hier: bors ee ard + Roles 


39-6633. or Pe ed 
; “ Peat) . 7, Walter Reed ae FLOWER AVE. coms. aun. odern. Fs ee my done any time pr w Sm tal 
redec.: easy chai: , See iden’ 3 t —_ 2919. 13th RD., SOUTH TAKOMA. PARK M. T. BROYHILL & SONS ats an ao tie insissiD MEORN. inp Poa Be tor— 
ate cof YW ise e. seem. dec. ulte: Unusually large i-bedrm. «6 “ . , 
Bae peti weer Hi) TE mee ac 1 BEDRM., $79.50 | 32," eS abenter eta Piremne | ee, R De te - we daoedact * 5c PERSO. a 

jie eae ae 3940, nec kiteben. | ad : 2? BEDRMS., $95 ope an irae, Heaiden! ae on | be Luxe EFFICIENCY A osemary ee Ta eq. ft. Open ep space. , algae 

~ ’ , . INCLUDING ALL UTILITIES - of Park. Ayes. ompletely sir- t t an} i a ae elo benfitnc 

. > Se. aie . . TON eA conditioned. Luxurious appoint Dar men S . ViNG — Clean. JCOLORED 75 DREYFUSS BROS., EX. 
Safa ee] Ge PRE E| eS nepsee vs |, Ded Seve Yo | ther worm ahaa oe : ae EE 
Sans" ana serene rooms” ""| DR Rey BRmDSae OR mmCNOS] Bacrare Bs MY cues, Bie: |p’ & S-BEORM. APTS. | fence 3 NAPE REALTY 


NEW 9-Cu.-Ft. Refrigerators —Swimming Pools R A * bar a’) ATTENTION URGENT 


Just Installed —Free Bus Servic TO LEASE 3000 to 5000 sa. ft 
ARLINGTON HERE IT IS! weds 3: a . 116 YOU ST. NE. of epece for light i oe 


than 10 min. te Nevy Annex 20-ft. brick home; 6 rms.. Bemt., 


. : i) heat. : 
Byotagon bus" 4 ent. serine hag: FRYERS. Beauty Spot Location 1929 East-West Highway ™ whats: HASTINGS | sharte Ro 


; ’ a CORP.. 4420 
9 to 5 Weekdays; Sat., 9 to 12 Geran ea Silver Spring, Md. —_—— , 725 HARVARD ST. NW. Baltimore 19, Md. ATWA 


, . Ra CAL Sentient, ~ raed heat. gas, 
ee a only hie to, trans. DELIGHTFOLLY RUIN TOR eee A O07 ROSH PRTAGoM ea Ste HUNTING Saige, 70 & PR eg ~~ = ' —— SITES - 33 


N - uving © dining 
FURNISHED giais on. ki a Gracious suburban divin air con. MOST CONVENIENT room. ull basement. 


| ed. meals wousy Nye $12-813 co of ; mew fireproof, - h 198. perenet fee ie Dailt-tn Pease | OWERS 1868 . 
1 ‘ r-cond. 2 iMramodern itehen root top 5s pa 4 COLUMBIA RD N W a j : _ 
F : = : ; Ia ° . 27; c $80 ; . ’ pat TO RE 
; Je =. w )-934 al ser express elevators. : iciencies, From , NW. CHEVY _— NT 
me. 17 st oe fare high ot piazrece * ofan eilities beautiful landscape. t- 1-Bed c $110 Completely Air-Conditioned" AL, GPE . a_bed 
nw —A austin ive home {¢ youn ay et ee » for car. Only $110 per mo'| 2ouses and offices . room, From (Controls in Apartments) ington : *nouse with, din and bemt. 
Newly de ae Bela aw Ring JAMES L- . DIXON & CO. EFFICIENCIES —$80-$92.50 Occupancy Now : MALORA R. CHRISTMAS | tasters samity'ot £0 u"e-sice for a amity of & ise: se 
Furn. Plan Available LARGE EFPICIENCIEa FROM $90 is, Ave. “ WO 8- 2283- PROPERTY MANAGEM’T 44A = a Bote, net 
IMMED. OCCUP. AT $85 Maid Se 4 Oot! | TOOmS: || $1 10.609) rear. Cost & $30 
ons ¥ a rv. an nens ; ~or J dec ' eat. iN price 000, 4 ee 
Pov gy A emiaiities included. free parking lots. SPACIOUS DRESSING ROOMS) afise 1, nee se or 151 S : : pet oF original investment back 
' . shopping center, rest. sect. S| 1-Bedroom Apts., from $115 . $12 . RAGES, SALE RENT 45 
DAY AND EVENING Sohue a appear yt sana ion ses house. eral praemee. for rent, 


comb st. rm . Beautifully equipped home | © 2 | GARAGE 
‘am eee INSPECTION ON MT. VERNON BLVD. hens, Bia; itad areas, k 


and 3 
basement. nfinished 
IN ALEXANDRIA : th : laundry fa- forced-air heat egal fired. 


eee vy ‘ S. 7 - , JAckson 5-5500 INSPECTION INVITED y rot fait rvice elevators! possestate to schoo is 
1426 21st St. NW. AUTORLEVATOR AND -| GOOD HOPE HILLS ~ Ki. 8-8484 


Vic. BAYLOR ED. & 30TH 6. & 


requir P ; 
telephone. only. mn 4-1174 Large sy Be onto 


i‘ WESTOVER APT. Bullding i-bed 2 
‘ Lm . ay. a. DISTRICT room spt. $99.50: close! = b. spate id . 
EXCELLENT = 50. Modern i-tedrm. apartments o Ave ble i e- L.—A SEecestight te rms 'T toot eal for 
cellen 


1 _e . Dd bull Des rerith home * naunched i 2 . BRAND-NEW APTS. nr. everything; gas heat. porches. menul. repr. Air 
1434 RMS. $75.00 UP ran fwin-sise bedrpom \4xi0| {ir AND eb Domioe. inc. 989% 750 OTH ST, SE. | ceekarfOwie Stine wat . 


Delightful for bachelor or A= 
2 bed- 


FOODS! ROOMS! SERVICE! poeees a . 4% RMS 
; 7 A. “Sax Mor riz Ride, oo Ls 

AT AMAZINGLY LOW PRICES if rM vae. : TEURN. APTS.. $81.50 UP ' A ~ 3 > porch. pie | PRESID! NTTAL Soak Adia- \2 BEDRMS.—ONLY ole i we. large comb, liv.-din. rm. p bee a _ ‘- 
HU. 3-5432 . anal “a ; ghoragp space, Rent $72, olt-strest | lovely iawn, tre rs Da ek ee g0g Mass. Ave. ae Emria Moore Beet, CO. 5-017, | MONEY TO LOAN $8A MONEY TO LOAN 

a uti me... § st ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED <r perkins. a a. -§ -~ Pentag ‘ ond 4) water: child accep U.| GEORGETOWN — Altrec” furn. for 
La ix * _ odern garden a $ ' - : rie 

ES wens ouse ree "ps. | AETRACTIVE—yppe, WW Ty. downown. meconvenieak to APPL N service dine. new relrigerator® “COL, LIKE NEW, $80 
wS _ : . ; 2 an expo- , 
n 


: parking: trom. 16 eck oT wr ‘Benning end Central 
wocanctas Je CALL RE, 5-8000 t 


' ) lin a ; 
ILD CARE . 0 : | “ r:. d Air Force personnel: . ‘. ‘ eves. EM. 3- woe ~ A ‘of sor 
SUR OROVE Der Nore), bert | £01 34 ot nw. Bk, 3-830. FOR BROCHURE AND Last Wor ee Re 2 | € iol ig Se te| Sa OP Bas oe 


ur ; 4 * - 


2 ad Bt 2- 
AL, ire- apt.; plenty ‘closet + $100 per mont 
7812 Brier Heigl Heights Pkwy. = tact areas. | am ample ty Ft of bus line. conv. we 4 8 4 


i q val. - 

we , 4% . 5 care af) 
fF reat Be Thome: fio week. i781 cit. ang peih: reas.; “wn. “tes: Daily 9-8. Sat. 9-4. Sun. 1-6 soraey, space gages AM. fo 8 PM. Key at Greenstone -BEDRM. ROW—IN ALEX, conv. 
= Alo a = . ee . ciate: a reas. as. | Hilton. ee N a A Cleaners, 333 Cid Gt. N.S. LV. pean a wor SG immed. 
APTS. FURN oc CURR. 33 nicely turn, By liv. ew Luxury Apts. |dorpees-recamer scwwrn|.. CHAUNCEY REALTY | 
7 x ry ¥C bed $65 and bedrms.. 
| : ed rooms— Co oe bed 8 shea, is 
= 4704 att twe netic - VEL OVEN AND BUILT-IN 


, ANDRIA — 2 
lst to “Gist af _ Aruné el rd.), — ude Pee -boor 
bere Maric DISHWASHER AND Soy igoent “ereened 


porc . 
EFPRIGO. WITH bedrm ., 4M st bath. pvt. entr., Available immediate! 
P t call 


DISTRICT Ang iS APTS. ae ‘ts Soar of of ity: ge 282 
Si, a 3) 


x 
ny 


WL 
VL 
‘ a \ 
uy", 


." 


~\ 
DY), 
it 


A\\ 
(AnD 


/ 


> 


ab 


,) 


5 me. nel heat. 


7 
= 
Wy 


ANTE SE. Apt. 
aat SWitCHBOARD share Path. “u util. fur. 852.50. 
AND DESK & RVICE -3400 


‘| 1 AND 2 BEDROOMS Rington blvd. left to” GARAGE PARKING. COLORED TSTH—R NW. ANDRIA — Yates Gardens. | : 
| FURN. AND UNFURN. | jSlosts vp slde"it"c “esttety| 1 Bdrm. From. .$145.00 $6 5 MO. brick walled sarden, Srevisen, best segs ies poo 
POMPONIO ae 2 Bdrms. From .$199.50 cignborhood, Pho me | Office im Suitland 
went? | 2222 Wilson Blvd. JA. 7-6660| Dominion Gardens ietating eB wilttiies i. BATH. oa = 4% 
wk. OXON PARK 3800 MILAN DR., ALEX. ie tho heart gt overrthing and ore NAT’ i R arage, trees. § | 
express buses. 


SF SHIR : sana Mae | 
OXON TERRACE 0 5 LEY HIGHWAY a L ; or ten = ic. m © 


1 Bedrm. ‘tates $73-$76 Gee Resident Manager ~ sr. ww. 3 i | 
| :| 2 Bedrm., $88.75-$91.75 piggomenrs chen. and bath: s40 $0. and 486 $4 WARWICR VILLAGE | 
iut. ture. bedrm. ¥ = ear as ant, neste nelle tes 9 4th and K WB DI. 7-9080 Hit and pat E. No. 34. 2 rma. ae Pri $115 eee lay- | 

dining” ' . : fic 7 Be covecdia tain . : 50 per mo. See janite 
ement: uti "Band kit whe ' i 18 , LO. ~ 197) . SPORTATION SHIPLEY PARK x mises. 


¥: 4 $29.50. LU. 2-9682, | GEO! 9 D | MS. | BOCKVE ~~ . ¢ cE . 9-5, , vu ES L& SE. LOCATION rms. — and path, oor onal heat, “yb gsees 4 
Silber es | Witedoe Sch | seg He bat AE Bnd < EefoRBAY’ | 1 Bedrm.. from $68.50 | = ™ 7.90. thesia PAULINE LEE QUY HARPER, Il! RUSS MAYES 
To Ss vu. “oes - wth : D i : 

RLINGTO 


nw 
F 


— 


TORRE BAL 
1628 No. Capitol ai J Mt. Ve Ave, & Kennedy St. 
2 Bedrms., from $80.00 Bethesda Maneger Mt. Reinier Menager Rosslyn Manager 
—immediate oc- 


Soe ee PARKLANDS ROE ool rth Rin May We Help You With 


2213 UNIV. LANE — jtehen 


; per mo. " : ; ‘ aR ae on eae || Aint fre and Btanton ed aE. +. Fa, teers a a location; 
1 BEDRM., $71.00 $e tet Rant Ce ts Tone” _ AN ALE 
UTILITIES INCLUDED BROYHILTON ¢ Fe ee rae Batata Memes 
2p : Orns sur : APARTMENTS KIRK WOOD _. LUXURY APTS. SOEROYHILL & SONS 
#X tay i rem cmncton "| BEDRMS PTB | “5 iMSactti 73s 3040 | Ee “aise iit sill for Christmas Shoppi 
TT = - - ° CL : efie 
ati! + 4 AIR-CONDITIONED ’ 2 bs , : ar 2. BEDRM. —$81. 50-$85 district mo. JA. Tbo7L. pping 


i “tin ie is ; “ RR SOUR ad DES ALL UTILITIES ae a ttle Festal | Less Than 50¢ a Day Repays $200. Cov- 
Ci : rae BROOKVILLE 5 a PENTAGO :AMPLE APT. ON DISPLAY ectOPPnG CENTER Aw _ | $100 up: 38 ot reae jee | ers Both Principal and Interest, No pay- 


U ; ‘ ir | 2 
PTS. a ees mew, f “ioeit**Lartt| FREE BROCHURE | xerray orice. 0. 2200 |ARLNGTON N— ‘<page ment at all for 6 weeks. 


AVAILAB 


wit IPR R TS bo, | Open Mop. to Bat, 9 AM to 6 PM. = Ps ore 
OR UNFURNISHED 7. hes ; noon 5 perches geulberd |, Sith 
FROM $102.50 UP 4 ; 2 7 °{ ” = ture. 8150 plus slss- 2?-BEDROOM - is. Tas . : _ JA. 4- “oe 
a 5 | | HT, Bo £ So ae hcl | Ee neeecnas: 
ee ee x” be ino HO" 9-£8 “Whee Terrace, Inc. , yall beet $49.50. ME mi 1% Sodom. spagper: oreo gti YOU jespay vere. 
1217 VALLEY AVE. SE. : MONTHL 


PRIVATE HOUSES 


LEX APAR wo et MLA | Heh cemeruan, aye 


Second Floor: 2 or 3 Bedrooms and Bath 


fodh-Howss Hap Feant ond Gack Vert, Lown Core, Gor , : | ol 
Removal, ater, Heat Laundry parochia:: © aoe! }-6 383. 
Facilities and Repairs Provided Free. . pow Naga OF ag om New Suitiand Office: 4710 Silver Hill Rd. JO. 84440 


SCHOOLS AND SHOPPING CENTER OWN SITE EVY CHASE, MD.—3-bedroot Bethesda: 7438 Wisconsin Ave.w.5:'h: OL. 68400 


2 Bedrms., $93—3 Bedrms., from $109.50). ,NEWLY DECORATED 5) !- ir Rtere eat Le 3. "ete, | Mt. Rainier: 3400 Rhode ode Inland 277m, AP T7800 
alto few furnished ‘ents. ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED W.-SE.- “hot Joe Rosslyn: 1302 Lee Highway racing xey Briase JA, SOVOO 


All Offices Open Till 6 P.M. Mondey Through 
JEFFERSON VILLAGE Pridey-—Setuedey Til 


1734 ARL. BLVD,, FALLS CHURCH, VA. 
* JE 2-5500 Daily, 9 to 5; Set., 9 to 1; Sun., 12 to 4 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD | | } ' ALE SUBURB. HOUSE ISCELLANEOV SALE 
“C = gee cine se 


am. Ered cues. S25 Je 3. 


iif 


1 


aa* 


friend ter. 
antsy, sone 


$00 t} Colont 6- full 
Sethe neal Co. Same by Bol hw 


h.. oie ARENA very reas 


santeesay CO. 5-4056 ‘TIL 9 P.M. joe WANTED te BUY 

_| VACANT D ACHED o Set reer oa 
will . 

, TRADES ert Wl ottatiet RkatY oo. . 

ovely -—m © — im new ALL, CASH for D.C. houses. Cal 

1) Bouse ee smit.. t Mr. —— LE. 3-0640; eves Bcc 


| pear school. & ee ing. ransp. 
ove in at —s 
3-3626 v 


BY OWNER 


1600 block of Rises pl. av. 
rooma. a. 


oon, 
basement. . a 
late possession. 1 
;. 0558 and JE. 4-049 hor: Su it in » =i y pears. si =_ — -- —————$_—______. 
e vee to rea. Subs i] 
COLORED BOT ig TRADE | cash. No age a “a box 1797 Bal- SALESUBURB. HOUSES 67D. § 


N 
Oe ges ‘STERN AUTO Fee it’s true, you can become the MARYLAND 
POR YORK, PA. } sorely. oe. c 


be m m cae 
ht.: Anished attic, ioe. ’ front and 
" and quick SILVER & G Area. not 
_— pao Aa gig ne BO 4 "Galt tr “S-0640: "evenings, welcome St. Nick in s brand new 
or more the 3 split vel ram amine 
aa forward tock ine “ecole er. 


BA, 3-229. aepeet ~~. for your a riced trom 17, 
will Mm nationally adver- RHODE ISLAND WN Me ea 


No 

a abotalanl Day or or night. ue others. scllent financing T S S 

auto supplies, radios, ISLAND PLA APAR Va) ‘ vr : oor room : Hi | IT 

Re, gl lay Belg ee"| “a Ran me epalanes - ate ironed LORCOM LA LANE REA 
required- rain ~ you.| OO 

nin cash capital of $25.000 ' REDECORATED : * e = : Ww D ACRES ARLINGTON REALTY 


WN AP . : 

; 
-. Bits, ot phone now for com-| VACANT, MOVE RIGHT IN Ney. 1 aS on sent Say Call BUD-| ¥ Fa Se: sttached gar. ry screened ee Air " be 7p 3 SD. YEARS AT 935 FP St. wy... 
va ac $760 DOW! . NEWSPAPERS 


stately row e prop- financing. avaliable. EXCELLENT BUY : . 
_ weaele ahaa” ea See eshte ae] Shh se te" | Wood Acres Constr. Corp. $760 DOWN ae Sree EONIGE| asc PER 100 LBS. 


rou Can house has and 
w t To ; 
| salt on EXCHAN 66 To Anyone : on 7 
“sTe-path| baepmept ¢ fares, | *R Modern “semibune. nr. U. Ws. OF HUGE OAK TREES ; ispose RE Come 
‘is Fe, ae tl pede! oe | Ge aah 90c PER 100 LBS. 


rent 959 mo. ~ A COZY LOOK rounds this “Salem-style” rate on 
, 46 
FRED A. SMITH CO. room well car e and. - ive. 
SALESUBURB. ee-bedr = a eh 2 -y pboards. ormal dis in. (the STONEY Pee — oft at BY Beate 
R 


a ~ On . ——__——_—_—__=[[ i r bedrm \. side 
es MARYLAND rh. hot-water J heat: Y It 
ATE LOANS wn. ern h abieon YW. ue pit in We pe water 1818. Wash, Bt. Palle Church 
7 | SHORT ON CASH? ce wi Fa bss en eel 8 $93 MO. PAYS ALL ne A 
eecnce._5hi Sth StF EPOSIT 


ANS cover. 
¢. and Vs A. 5-0819. VERNON REALTY co 
model-| ONLY $495 DOWN County RAMBLER WITH CARPORT rch area. asbestos shin 
as : Will give you the opportunity te C One-year old rambier po three| -2007 Mt. Vernon Ave, EI, 8-3106, ome. Cy 2 788. “ 
move right in to this Col. Tap. Bre. brick loniel | bedrooms, dining “L”. Large cor- 


q e, cor Meake 
home. 6 rms. & bath, full bemt.. 3-| Ber jot. Will consider GI contrac THE COLONEL 


gas bt. Gar Beautifully decorated. . eee 3 s located in one of 
L hoods 


Bethesda a tinest “neighbor James C. Conley & Co. 
TU. 2-9200 


Call_BX. 54 KORZENDORFER REALTY 8 nite 
or ist and Mf'ttaits Stearn? soa | COLORED, POSSESSION | BETHESDA | ‘ot aa Sat sine iis 


Gl ioe —. Fampet, oes. oy. hen; rm oa a 
= me consolidati " exce len eond. sing on - oor an toilet: 
residential property Maree} DO7 Kennedy St. NW. "On on ES ho LANE Jer's. LO._$-3494, OL. 71-9097. _ | ust deen vacated: A dito BUY 
ve ist trust especially pa isT Cc * Sunday PRICED TO SELL 850; GI APPROVED. Call 
Mortgage Loan Corp. LI.| pinsr Tie COMMERCIAL, 6 ® lee armin locate we | arroiniment 
walle x j Eifchens. 12 bathe. 20 ft. home - arming brick wooded. ) LINGT N REALTY 
‘ 
ialist, quick, courteous serv-| mall down. pays din, tmi., kh. back vine poreh,| COLONIAL features spacious liv- enon eek 1 

ice for tin Lae J or TE. 6- ead. this week. Call til ; ’ “ . bemt. stairway to attic ng > Se oe né ny ARLINGTON NORTH 

AL BARKER & BONS, INC Murray Levine, AD. 4-3737_ | Brediey bird. left to Wilson ‘Lane.| basement with resteation rm, end) = LGE, BRICK HOME 
} va t on ison to oven shower bath. Well-landscaped lot. 

; BOW I NC 2. GARDINER Close to public and parochial) YVACANT-——IMMED. POSS. 
tes Qh 4- 4-5229 


uy 
Md Reas 
NAL ORTORGE : ET fPeepA Or VALU NEW SPLIT LEVEL 
“het = 3s FOR A V ERAN LUCKY YOU have immediate occcu- ; = 
itt, Fie Ton S PURCHAS! : G.I. APPROVED, $13,950 oy of =e covey now peme. mm ‘dead end ¢ 
TOW REAL CO. Realtors. | Low down payment and $63.87 per ; meee sopee. in price) | able anette. i% paths. ‘beau- MILLER REAL. ESTATE 


th 
: baths. 
NK CA sta us| LOMIAL ROW Brice od. | $18: tual price $18,960, but| Styl steamer tert ta on and 
Money in 4 bre BUDNEY. 770§| room © jivine room. dining| % Gi this beautiful Bdsemoor parking: down 
v n residence will sell to- year financin to quali. 
I purchaser; excellent 


very tent 
1% A teal value af $14,500. 
. hot. b a ransportat 
UST NOTES WANTED 61A| freat. perce A i buy. Call| $2 16.000—Actual price 21.500, ut] ‘conventional terms. price,| $P4 markets. Priced for quick sale. 


ae we ae te 
cal 


APERS, NES, 
RAGS, METALS, IRON, PICK 
UP SERVICE. 


this lovely 3-bed 2-bath brick Spit tie L. 


WILL BUY OR SELL 00 trust noire, may go today « rice $0 THE PICKETT . 4 
MR. JAMES—DI. 71658 “ERED A. SMITH CO. 2 id te ny A ANOOD COMPANY, 24 80, Glebe id. Atl. Th. S980 DON T DALLY 
LO. 4 i 9 


LE, INVEST. PROPERTY 62 st = Tp RT Broadmont—Falls Church 
mer. rince oun clust 
New 12 Unit Apt Bldg : Colored—Sherman Circle 8 ed come ands . Ss ‘Prine acerest c unty fel homes 3. becrms. 2p. \ $12 550.-GI_ APPROVED 
. , 'Og. " HEVERL l Dosa arse ea space. f - 
Owner Dying |RERESPS se cat spit ter! | ons slags operate] 12% 7% Sin, Pat, : at Pecut* cash] Ony $650 Down-—$79 Mo 
Se erolens te" oward | niv. and To sell—HURRY CALL This custom home has lovely liv. 0 , MR es ¥ Besutiful, lan landscaped jot. Por : 
- rm. ay town ow ner reduced price} Dointment 


a OR RE. 7-353] UN. 4-3422| sehen. 3 bedrails beth, ihase with| SIDNEY 2. MENSH 


9 
hi b th KORZENDORPER REALTY 121 6. WASH ST. F CHURCH 
0. F. SMITH & BROS. CO fnal tiful circle at 7th ond. ritten- 4-611) till 9. bAG Roster: 8. DAVis JE, 32-1212. 44-2738. 
OL; 23-1627 Bves.. Ol. ¥-6458| auto heat,’ ‘porch : BETHESDA THE ST BET 


| Dayments Ii NAME Ap unusual attrac. brick ram ; i 

SALE, D. C., HOUSES Ow aN DOWN PAYMENT on s large landscaped lot: riseetied Hyattsville Hills r YOUR LIFE will go by if 
Mtl | lant trees, Unique floor $11,000 on’t hurry ous to 

pring ORED—VAC 3 delightful bedrms, and 4 maculate 5- rm mbler home with 


—s Val-| “ 
brick Cofo- | (1) $998 Dn., $99 SO Mo. ; immac. condition. 3-car. Custom-built English cottage, jars acres screened fop wit ii op Behe ey 
‘ ’ 


garage. Priced for im- 
“4 6th ST sz ’ + . . tance | love 
RM Colonial brick a . mediate gale. Call WO. 6-2300 till on tn 24xif 


a. : Vace : ie | : ~y fully 
open be We oo ae a oe & Edward H. Jones & Co., thin 2 a t ie dertee . ae 
dstachea | -(2-—-$495 Down Inc. W. R. Hughes ARRINGTON REALTY 


SeSreemne. i on ist y A, 2 moths. aTrRact pt , Se _ brick . det CHEVY CHASE. D.C. 

*, rms. Seth; tull bem “= BETHESDA TEMPLE HILLS—By owner. Ideal] UNDER V . 

>t. house; finest (3)—$495 Down EDGEMOOR a oe. Bricy.”3 rage. ioacre re pate, Soret “hos 
00x 


: 2 jaree—2 small . 
ene ae ST reas Red brick Colonia] with slate! util. ym. no bsemt vel lot. I 


r 
CHEVY VYCHACE gna. Ae, tl be baths, . om an Gor Club. ail school Lx is $17.00 GI. approv. LO. phn os 


; " e 1 
ASSUME Gl TRUST MR ROR MING, ST ME 1] fr. 3 bedrms, —r ; 3-Bedroom Brick Rambler | “No Down Payment Gi” 


12n20-1t. liv. rm. with firepl. 3! bat heat: recreation rm. also nice scree HOME FOR CHRISTMAS 
rches, built-t ; ol b.-w.b : on agains. and siorace attic ay. —_ is rut aly lage a 
Raareee: ol b-w..| wall-to-wall carpeting: mirror rT approved. whic se0 erifice over €2500/ 5.w mgaury 3 Bedrooms, Basement, 


er wi 
ETHESDAT | ent | : Re wthw es: BAST, QUICK 
(5)—$495 Dn.—$99.50 Mo, ~B Anacostia; eo CHARMS Rehiel er BB mskee rep > 


a 
fit, PEL a ine NW, QREENWICH FOREST—A charm. entrance: en with detached eatage. Lovely 3- walle 5 we PRIVATE 
pain Hs > 
LOANS AT 


rick h 
ec poe porches } many extras 
see best, $13 a, ”* gl ae Be ke get for quiz i Soo. "VA ‘ asiaset 


3-3400 RA. 3-5711 com, an elaborate fitchen with 


TA 9 77 0 all conveniences. Lovely rec. rm HO years Convenien . : 
Paes. CU ro al ae with fireplace and numerous puilt- BRA mwcnew ) ut tid te VACANT. Price 7 711-7 ce A : 
- — — COLORED—OWNER 34 Attio® 4 —_ 4 so i a. 

HEVY CHASE, D.C. IS CRYING! Owner has purchased another p fice | FO FOR BETTER BUYS on houses lot ARLINGTON REALTY houses Shee. room optional with | i cits 


li at once. All for 
edyoom and bath on PLL THIS ROME $36.950. Call WO. 4-2900 tills PM _IN 


ree algal ssi ONLY $350 DN. | Edward H. Jones & Co. MOVE IN etl fa LAKE BARCROFT 


Webste W,—This Inc. rms. ; very 17 ae. st oqreened | 


bedroo 24 f pe ee 
bath on 24 floor, beautiful brick Lome a 7 laree pvand 
paneled attic ri: ood |... Ge VY CHASE. DC. . as se 
ee ae on, "e- as Sach te ole Tear BROOKDALE RAT eee Cos 2-LEVEL 
= 


lat 


ea) perch h priced $27.9 .. . ‘ir ar oa gerace.| La brick Colonial in select 
EM y meignbork ore— Apts. =e ae 


v ou'll never cet a buy e this rhood. ving froom, s¢ : BRICK RAMBLER 
ny Bb Ee E Las PR za > t $e s07 arate dinine room. “kiteben, den.| Hr, Quee Pies CHP tiso eran’ ome Contemporaries he 80-<ime t, dasement 


sovelp ori detached ‘prick home COLORED, VACANT: NE | fcreened porch’ full bemt, built-in | Stolar, ate 
Pe Se fA $19 4 DN. ae Sri moving out ef|L EO M. BERNSTEIN C co. 3, 4, OR 5 Mannas Rity, matte 
un — . “.. care . ’ ROBERTSON - 

! OYE clkel Nad tsb oh pag Nec gg SH] «BEDROOMS «| UREA 


tructed and in exorlient « 
toca on s Guiet shad - ~ on at : : . ~ ss 
redecorated well ulpped | Ff bedrm.. ; : 
APPROVED Murry, hurry on this one: latee| Colonial om aulet et 2 tika oft| with auto washer, alumna, storm TABLE-SIZED KITCHEN EAGE, SALE - 35 : rental ma 
Weageman- Brawner auto. h.-w. bt.: spotiess con-| Conn. ave. nr. s center and a low ma nie LN pir te purchas ! 009 ; 


Realty Corp. rea BOREMAR & CO. small dem. is bach on 2st fl 3 /SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67 VA. : 
bedrms.. bath upstairs. Charming . loca : 
ee LA RECREATI ROOM : in Tri 
CO. 5- 4056 OWN & URBA FM 8400 " pom me sly ma 3- bric : . \ i boat 


‘gondition. Owner lear! - c K 
country and must se. tec! COTReb BO a SPER 43 . oF liv rm 32x16. Normandy firer - iF : ' wi 20 
shopp! rr. 22,000 o app proud to own Colonial ¥ a i . 4 , i ape oles ie apace in : ; < 
im dean somidetached| Sone ienant house spark, ston 3] Beth. in od h dlog™ 2 FULL BATHS ireh, cabinets.| Ti end | ar best offer: yt y= 


in we FS py BO Lving rm. “tah hoor.” and pretiy| >") i811 or Box 081. Post TH. zoom, | 1 "- hs NS oasis clean | eee as potas || out extra cost. Phone or come in. 
eady financing and eas “99 2 bedrm ; ie ; and - 
Behe “eres’| bath on D4. "Rec rin. an bemt. | COUNTRY CLUS AEES—B ; 2 FIREPLACES /#': 
‘ Ten KOLB CO” Wonderful fenced lot. Get “| fate. brick ull day- -4487 
cO.. “tbs today, Cc h A aie ight bemt.. level yard, | near > Ar 
aN C 
it ?) 


x oon tise kabaey’ ei 30, 9-3885. CARPORT OR GARAGE 


9 TO 9. Realtors. Va. AiRST” 22-8515 
~ pASB PERE AREA EDGEMOOR oo ig LARGE WOODED LOT SPLIT PEVEL Sarre fos 


Z ne 
a Fey Fey sf ON Ry Ae brick] 8 am 5 the ¥ les fs = mh $24,950 TO $27,850 Posi. A nen ld 
ome. €6 es » 
‘ AUVERBA ¢ & © Di. 7-6601_| Seed. close w . e space, rate di 
vm dig Fa pomees COLORED, VACANT a ochal a , bet Facts LURIA BROS. 
on ar Bef GOOD J08?| farts ne : ou : with reason ;|2048 Wilson Bivd. JA. 71-8600 
T° een Come, moders. 6 lee. SLEEPY HOLLOW 
Wiican ry OUNLOP, > nc. _ 8 $21,950 
tan Men tae Uncompromised Value 


Bal neninmegianay. ain ** "1D RTO Lo Oakview! itt 


Murray Levine, AD. 4-3737 $13,250 . x i : . MORE BILLS 
BRIG Nw az canara tre| ES i erates TAKE ——- OF Fees. E i: ‘ vig ca wid —— ei PAY? NS ’ 0 uR M Or 
, atic. rate din ’ ' = FAM By Chins — 610.9 
7az|FOR A VETERAN) finite pats fe von at FAY bane M° ee aL aoe Hi} «TO SETTLE THEM IN 
4 BEDROOMS, 2 BATHS Rrousnout. 
RECREATION ROOM & BAR 


fine comidesaches | brick 
lore Adm rea mnirt ih 
8 bat auti. 
ul recreation room oa . 7 . 
call’ Mr ot 


| eergge. 3 eo re Ca . 
FRED A. SAITH Co. eran * cae #{2.600 Toni: 
Sey v8 . 


ty oi tor. yely main 


GA .CSFINANCE 


aOR PORATION 


MT, RAINIER 
a ARLINGTON FOREST : 3510 @hode island Avenve* - 5. Vol, APplaten 7-2800 
spare rm. in emt. ene. s. ) LARGE SIZE sere ** 10% down fovels 28 3317 Rhode island Avenue’ * “TTT~. Tel, HObert 2.5028 
pant arn eee | eae tent Jon} Suand. Ip tibctos iioliy hey ee. .- HYATTSVILLE 
lusive end be ion "priok. oaly af reel) & _bamt. - beaut Bu, $303 Baltimore Avenve* ceseeeenesFoh UNion 4-8200 


(est te The Mer Shoppe) 


- : ahr : VER 
to 816.980 for DOCTORS, DENTISTS |,¢ oo kan 7912 Georgia Avenve* poeegesee shen ia anes 


CORNER PROPERTY i) & PROFESSIONAL MEN orm ae BR Pe has 8513 Georgia Avenve**..."......Tel. Uniper 9-3566 


saath 5 ago a aie a wa] Leer, te Beastitul S-bearm. 3's bal : ita. TR e472 || 4503 Knox Rood” Tel, 
; ; . PE > Love. now ty: 5. Pa, aif eee eeeee ee eee UNIiea 4-0058 
field, J 6 / c NC | | Los fAcrons The Met Sheose) » 
yon t wcont | SOMERSET ARLING a ae oe ee ey sae tetas ~~ sscsre pang — 


This 2- Melereae beep bf L ver seeing, ealiy, JI 310 end Ticwt. i seasonal ~ 150 N. 3 Notched Rood”. .......Tel. Greet Mills 3671 
x zt NEW SPLIT-LEVE oa os x nee 1 ered ierndon |B) FALLS CHURCH, VA,—<—<——_—_—— 


a eres be bethe, he So vot : rm... - : 
vely Brent- Berth , Sere te rn ripple wood fin. Fm. TEN AC Ee ee il 438 Was tmad 5. Bip fo SOND. Sek Senn abe 
gerece. : Neh tial ; : —_ Be, v " 


rm., 


6 DOWN 0. F. SMITH & - 4 SS co. 
Red UN. 4-342 me 6. “Sa CO. [es 


own signature 


4 NEED MONEY ? 


WHEATON FINANCE CO. Fhe 


beats My ny 


hevy 
7725 Wisconsin — 


able? paziond 
ase. Chevrolet 
Bethesda 


11681 Viers Mili Rd. LO. 5-3006 


@ MARYLAND CASH LOAN 
S587 BR. 3. Ave. UN, 4-8179 
. 1898 Georeia Ave. JU. 9-2852 


iE 


CONFIDENTIAL 
LOANS BY PHONE 
On Your Signature Only 


Suburban Finance Ge. 1; 


oe ey Sale BE 


aaltiens runs 
Bi oe - 


aod . Sia uel 
Paliigere 


Oe te aa 50 I-ton stake. $395. 


oor 


LET—Peace 
7 at frst, : 


(PORD), 1111 18th st. nw. 


me 


c 


) DL1l 18th 


QUICK XMAS LOANS 


OM YOUR SIGNATURE QNLY | 
2-HOUR SERVICE 


RESIDENTS’ FINANCE CORP. | 
3225 R. |. Ave. 


WOMEN’S LOANS 
Our Specialty 

WE CAN MAKE 
YOU A LOAN IN 
Phone 

2 Hrs. *,” 
ONLY ONE TRIP NECESSARY §) 


Suburban Finance Co. 


i-ten penel: real 
Priced te 


MANDELL 
TRUCKS 


$95 DOWN! 


‘49 CHEV. .. $350 
l-ten panel. Cost 
Transportation 


"S) GMC. . $595 
j-toq | panel. Real bargain. 


‘S) CHEV. _. «$695 


clean. 
sell, Cholee of 


$845 


twe. 


"51 FORD 
pte Seeeh body. 


Li 


see ere Bren private io owner: 5 — 


agora A 


feed, $288 at. ‘oe. : 
A 


o ) I%-ton chassle & cab. .91_ 9 Nw. 3-0141. 
Excelien Sa shad oitt good. 's_Are 
cane = argain. 


7400 GA. AVE. NW. 
. k%.! 
‘51 CHEVROLET 


4606 East-West Heyv.. wag wets 


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SILVER SPG.: 
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eccninnll cenit 


MT. RAINIER: 
3303 Rhode Is. Ave. 
UN, 4-2900 


BETHESDA: 
7001 Wisconsin Ave. 
~~ OL. 6-5500 


wagons. ick for casa baw eotten 


a ia Brors 


Will Pay Up To: 


Cars Needed for 


EXPORT 
Hecrige oh 
CALL 
TU. 2-4200 


BILL ROSS 


feaiere des we 
HOVE’ MOTOR SACs 
adillacs Wante 
PENNY MOTORS 


Rut “si fe “ne 


MURDER. 


Yes, it's murder to give or 
trade away that 1952 to 
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3720 GA. AVE. NW. 
TU. 2-5415 
WE WILL NOT HAGGLE 


AUTOMOBILE, SALE 


st. 


ey he. mbes Mere 
i Bo eve 
A TINS. Volks penne ouber SAGE 
ran OR 4 
| agers gene 
LOANS *” PHONE nye 


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aif 


: — Rosenthal Chevrolet 


| ihe 


S| AB ee CLARK 


“| 401 MASS. AVE. N. W, 


O42 UMEV: 
SEDAN 
Total Price—-$197.00 


ve ee ti Bee 


er ears to choose from ; 
p fuaranteed 100% and throug 


4.458 CALL 
LI. 


SORRELL 
MOTORS 


LRN RING Rb. 3 te Financing 


or servicemen & cut-of-towners. 


ee 


“For the Best Deal of 


s 6 ti. and Catumbia Pike, 


f ish. estes - Hy -- 8 and 
si powntslide. “Pais 

aw iecks tke & beby 
seen to be ud 

8795. Call 


“~ 

"Sais" 

mee EVROLET 
$95 DOWN 


Sedan. Bri peathis yments 


* cash and p ms 
or meredit approval call 

Reliable Motors 

101 N. ¥. AVE. NE, 
NA. 8-5671 


Servicemen pee ost: -towners 


= 
easier Blue «ev 
werslide, 7. and p.: Zn. SS: 
18956 own Por credit ap- 
Dreval call Aa 


STATION WAGON 


© owner encsien 
“S”" pasten 


eondition. 4 
eet. all metal bods 


Cor. N. Capitol & Pia. Ave. N.E. 


—_ soot 
ont. Gee a Anish: lew > a 
owner: No. 8445 
Kenyon- Peck Chevrolet 


3140 e Hey. Arlington. va. 


A. 30- 
Ne 

. +o 

faves let Bel Air 


$45 (pill 


One-owner y~- 7 ne 
a. ai vor “e es cceptionsil 
approval. 


he Mise Center 
—— th ond KE Sts. WN. OW. 
‘52 CHEVROLET 
$332 TOTAL 


: evistnal 
Ja gat take 


- pa ig 


ne WwW sen rs 


Embassy Motors 


. SALE 
WHEEL 


oe 


—. = ogee. 


mperia) 


: $346 TOTAL 


$100 Wis. Ave_NW. 


i de 
with  powe rine 7 
vedio “Wtate 
cals. $2395: ong. 


Capitol Cadillac Olds. Co ; 


b 
wegnené 


- fr covers; er aeint e ae 


UARANTEE 


sad’ Restor, aes ‘vondhuen. 


Many Others to gS ees 


$197.12 TOTAL 


. 3-tene blue, Only 
payments et 81 
credit 


Miami Motors 


ae 


-8196 Shop Th gate from 


1 wn. 
; per | 
r approval. call) 


ther 
ony ma low 


ete ecuivped: 


Akers fe oe © Shae Co, 
Eo 


3-tone blue , fully 
Suburban Cadillac-Olds 
5 


illac ; 
$495 DOWN 
eee es me 


pment. powe steerin 
pawer and white in- 


Sait 
The Auto Center 
oer nish, 


SS amt eck 


& ol Cadillac Olds. Co. 


3 Mang Others to Choose From @' 
TERMS O ) 


49.747 


ee 


52 DODGE 
$198.12 2 TOTAL 

ihe ar ea 
wr Motors 


poDpGE— Club 
cei 
gi voriainel 


, + Tid 
WH ELER. "INC. 
-Plym b} : 


sien 
sate, 


‘53 MERC. 
$585 Total 


Pa CASHNEEDED 
|e ee 
BILL ROSS 
7400 Ga, Ave. N.W. 


i a 


H , ttng x, Sew ¥ . 


’ 
ie 1nd ‘on ig tpt 


Soares + clean buy at 
: 30-day guarantes: 
E FORD 


Rey. si. 


vate owner leaving a Becrt 
ee $420 a4 


i tanch == 
’ ere heater ale Ex- 
£ senaition.  oseis! te- 
deve . 2 


FRANK SMALL. JR., Inc 


ly N : 8 
avery eck Chauvrolet 
J? Lee Hey... Arlington, Ve. 
-9000 *t 


‘S1] FORD 
VICTORIA 


t 


7-9292. Open 
(ates ‘Motors 
401 MASS. AVE. N. W. 


FORD— 10% Fprklane sistion, we. 
rich tone a -- 
er steering cas ‘ 

ts ond heater. $2695. 


Sere sdittec Olds. Co. 
2800 


$995 TOTAL 


peta 
we MONROE FORD 


WO. 6-2000 
P 


Carefully “maintained: exzce 
a : 


ew. seafoam green 


hea 
car Warrant 


“cone 


BR TRADE 


ARCADE PONTIAC 
mater bat 


ae 


=| a wake valk capipped, in in- 
itol Cadillac Olds. Co. 
1222 23nd St. NW. ST. 3-3600 


: Pre a wo hardtop, ae: 
Reaenns| PE 


‘54 MERCURY 
MONTEREY 
REPOSSESSED 


No Cash Needed on 
Approved Credit 


vith vr. h anat 36 
rvicemen 

anced. For credit. = 
proval. call 


7-3890 
BOB WILSON 


Mand K Gt. WW 
The big lot on the corner. 


Eau 
matic 
towners 


Tracie. Uaaer 


. . oD af 
es 
- being yA, Sees. 


; y trone 4 om. | 
cy 2s ft. xf ® 5196 
Bo : 4 


OLD EM ORTL: pen ti ‘a 
pe 

tire; 
Cpt Cadillac Olds. Lo. | 


‘53 Plymouth 
Coupe 
Full Price $695 


Sasa tales "aoe th 


infer- Fi 
‘OL. 4-2891, 


BARGAIN! 


= 1198” 


"52 Chevrolet, $645 


'  @-@r, Me. 496 


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2436 Wilson Bivd. JA. 2-9008 


WANTED 


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eae 


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MILLER MOTOR CO. 


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Ll. 4-2396 


‘ 


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77 Others. Open Daily, 9 


_ Every Car Serviced by Our Staff of 
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CARSeummmenGUARANTEED 


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% Servicemen all grades financed 
% Immediate delivery 


Irv Martin 


12th & K 


nm NA, 8-4455 3.2’. 


Cadillac-Olds 


REPOSSESSED 
$299.50 TOTAL 


fe te es fe Tt 


urity Motors 
4th & N.Y. AVE. N.W. 


iri a Ray 


ee ls Bote aise rates 


ee and Lehitewall = 
ae fs adillac ¢ Olds. Co. 


- ony = t 
. v. ( 7: 
owner. W finance "Tt 


ow are, t tan 1 finish a 3, 
— ; UES | terms; % 


Renan Peck Chevrolet 


Hey... —— ve. 


REPOSSESSED 


$228. 60 

= o acy le 7 payments. Pully 
aisped be eal, ST. 
e Auto 


your "aulek credit 


enter 


4-door ‘sedan. 
. 8350. Private 


‘| new car 


* cond 
s -* iv 


wow! 
"54 Chevrolet $1145 


S-ér, Ne. 458, 


Kenyon @9@ Peck 


Artingten, Va. 
8148 Lee Ber. JA. 23-9008 


PONTIAC 


Chieftain et felly 


COAST- Hd pong 
ave RE 


Was Boke m B. 
ing publie for ever « quarter 
century. 


Reliable Parties 
To Take Over This 


‘55 FORD 
2-DOOR SEDAN 
FULL 
PRICE 


WANTED 


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Te BANK FINANCING 
Je ASK ABOUT OUR 


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UTO DISCOUN 


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1510 Rhode Island Ave. ¥.E. 


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‘S4 Rambler 


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Only $135 Down | 
| ATTENTION— 


7 rus 


1999 


a , ‘ 


CHURCH 


se-/$895—$5 DOWN 


ake Dp 


f tary pe 
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p+ +¥ 


MILLER 


316 FPiorida Ave. WE. 


1 at: 


Wis. ave. 


‘54 PONT. 
CHIEFTAIN “8” 


49 
MERCURY 


| ‘-ér. eofen. ». & be. 
Overdrive. 


menthiz pers 
ployes. 


en te. | 
and) 
otheer 


our 100% oguat- 


MOTOR CO. | 


Li. 4-3396 


ab agons. 
an 2-year, 


ae car title as as 


: S| AS a! 


WANTED 


Reliable Parties 
Te Take Over This 


‘55 FORD 


$885 price 


No Cash Needed 
W ith Good Credit 
and take ever payments 


Ne Payments 


PECIALS 


SAVE UP TO ‘500 


146 OLDS 4 Or. 
49° end b.. AY. 


49° ay a 4 Dr. $156 
50 ' Hudson ‘ Dr. $188 
’ —_ | b. 

oo os 4 $244 
4g ° BUNK ‘ Dr. $288 
“1° cAdiitac f ‘, $299 


TU. 2-4200 


P ete Dell 


BILL ROSS 


7400 GA. AVE. H.W. 


WANTED 


RELIABLE PARTIES TO TAKE OVER THIS 
‘S53 MERC. MONTEREY SPORT COUPE 


PULL 
PRICE DOWN 
Rad e 
mie, Mosat SEntte foyant Mato 
rom ceenrr arrnovat cat LI, 7-4904 
Special Discounts te Service Personnel 


and Government Employees’ 
D. ©, Inepection 


CARR MOTORS 


1518 PA. AVE. S.E. 


tAST WEST HoWY 


¥ 
OPE a DAILY + AY 
SUNDAY 7 


a 


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715 


375 


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*A75 


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575 
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———— 


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Tr 


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NO PAYMENTS TILL ‘56 


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A real bargain. #11896 3-dr. coe 


‘53 MERCURY $ 


Cestem 4-Deer Sedan. #1544. 


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: 


“ 
- 


tw 
co: 
ui: 


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385 
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TU. 2-4200 


BILL ROSS 


7400 GA. AVE. N.W. 


ort savenunvenaumns 


THE 
__#6 


WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
en Re & a 


“PLAYWRIGHTS 56" is 
one of the more ambitious 
new drama programs of the 
year and one worthy of your 
attentio an. 


days) and he 
has been aiming high. He 
doesn't always hit it but the 
score so far has been very 
satisfactory. 

I've seen quite a few of 
the productions, and all of 
them have been interesting. 
The latest was a play called 
“Daisy,. Daisy” by Sumner 
Locke Elliott, directed by 
Arthur Penn, one of the best 
men around, and starring 
Tom Ewell in the sort of role 
he’s begun to specialize in. 


HIS CHARACTER in this 
play is rather aptly summed 
up by his mother-in-law as “a 
middle-aged Peter Pan who 
has been grounded.” In short, 
he's a novelist whose first 
novel has been greeted with 
great success but whose sec- 
ond, a five-pound, five-year 
job on the Civil War. is met 
only with rejection slips. He 
dashes off a novel that be- 
gins “My name is Daisy 
Smith. I'm in love” and con- 
tinues pretty much in that 
vein for 150 pages and is a 
runaway best seller. 

This sort of thing provides 
a field day for an actor like 
Ewell. Ewell at a bus stop 
watching the first two girls 
to queue up with copies of 
his book, then his look of ex- 
asperation when the third 
shows up with “Marjorie 
Morningstar.” Ewell at a 
cocktail party fabricating 
anecdotes about his nonex- 
istent Daisy Smith to the in- 
creasing annoyance of his 


Fred Coe’s Aim Is High 
On ‘Tiaywrignts 56’ 


turns out to be not nonexist- 
ent at all, to be a living girl 
in his past, now safely mar- 
ried with seven children and 
the eighth on the way. It was 
good contemporary pungent 
comedy with a strong cen- 
tral idea and some pretty 
fair satire on the hook world. 
My only objection was that, 
while amusing, it wasn't 
funny in the sense that a 
comedy like this would have 
been if, say, George Kauf- 
man had had a hand in the 
proceedings. That's my ob- 
jection to a lot of TV com- 
edy. Everything is there but 
the high polish, the final ex- 
plosive phrase that sets you 
howling rather than just smil- 
ing, the perfectly timed and 
executed scene. 

Still, even after these carp- 
ing complaints, “Daisy, 
Daisy” is upper class fare. 
Ewell is an experienced co- 
median, perhaps a little too 
reminiscent of Edward Ever- 
ett Horton, and he and Jane 
Wyatt, another light comedy 
veteran, make an excellent 
team. 


ANOTHER of the “Play- 
wrights of 56” productions of 
more than ordinary interest 
was “The Battler” based on 
a story by Ernest Heming- 


a house afire. A young man, 
running away from home, is 
robbed in a spirit of beaming 


good nature by a truck driver | 


and later, also in a spirit of 
spirit of good clean fun, 
tossed off a moving train by a 
sadistic brakeman—both <u- 
perbly written scenes and su- 
perb Hemingway. 

Later the lad encounters a 
punch<irunk former fighter 
who is tenderly nursed and 
cared for by a giant Negro. 
This, too, was splendid tough, 
vivid writing. It was only | 
later when a series of flash- 
backs got us imbedded in the 
story of how the fighter got 
that way that the play seemed 


to go off the rails. Still, it was | 


a mighty interesting hour. 
In fact, I've yet to see any- 

thing on 

that wasn’t. 


| is a comedy about 
| clerk and his 
way. This one started out like | 


WASH-FM 
whi Pu (94.7 meo.)—~—T «. m. te mid-| 
with’ (106.3 me)—5 a. mm. te 8 8. m. 


“Playwrights 56” | 


kindly old man who causes a 
family crisis because of his 
love for children and horses. 

7pm. — WTOP-TYV. Sol- 
diers of Fortune: A smug 
gling ring stirs trouble at a 
seaport near the atagens 
peninsula. John Russell and 
Chick Chandler are the ad- 
venturers, 

7:30 p. m.—WTTG. The 
Game Room: Madcap Les 
Sand is assisted by vocalist 
Susan Hight and the Sammy 
Ferro Trio. 


7:30 pom — WTOP.-TY, 


Robin Hood: A member of 
Robin Hood's band faces 
trial. The sheriff's henchmen 
are not playing fair, either. 

7:30 p. m—WMAL-TV. Top- 

1r: Leo Carroll goes to Wash- 
ngton on a secret mission, 
accompanied, of course, by 
the ghostly Kirbys. 

8 p. m—WRC-TV. Caesar's 
Hour: Bob Victor (Sid Caesar) 
starts a rumor. It grows and 
grows and returns te haunt 
him. Nanette Fabray, Carl 
Reiner, Saridra Deel, Howard 
Morris and Ellen Parker are 
we ae 

p. m. — WTTG. Million 
notte Moavie: “Eight O'Clock 
Walk” stars Derek Farr and 
Cathy O'Donnell in a story 
about a man on trial for his 
life. 

8 p. m—WTOP-TV. Burns 
and Allen: Gracie succeeds in 
wrecking her anniversary din- 
ner party. She attempts to 
patch up a quarrel between 
an artist and his jealous wife. 

8 p. nr.—WMAL-TV. Read- 
ers Digest: “If I Were Rich” 
a shoe 
family. 
WMAL.-TV. 


en mm 


| Guest stars Nadine Connor 


and Eugene Conley sing 
duets: “Give Me One Hour” 
and “O Suave Fanciulla” 


| from La Boheme. 


9 p.m—WRC-TV. Medic: 
The plight of a hypochondriac 
is explored in “A Glass of 
Fear.” Story concerns a suc- 
cessful cartoonist who con- 


PM STATIONS 
WRC-FM (95.9 pa Se . m= & a a ie fal 


. wm. 
| Wror-rm (96.8 me.)—5:36 «. m. wo a tae 


| eneneir (ens medal’ « tm. 008 & =.| 75 
(97.1 me)h—* «. m. te 16) wis 


M ondday TV Preview 


iia | stantly imagines 
stars John Abbott. He plays a 4 


; agent accepts a 
job, calling for Ricky to ap 
pear at a Rodeo and broad- 
cast to Cuba. Complications 
and confusion allow Lucy to 
land the assignment. 

9:30 p. m—WTTG. Studio 
57: A perfect robbery pro- 
vides mystery about “The 
Brown Leather Case.” John 
Sutton is the main player. 

9:30 p. m.—WMAL.-TV. Med- 
ical Horizons: A visit to Bos- 
ton’s “Adolescent Clinic.” Doe- 
tors explain ailments and 
treatment for teen-agers. 

9:30 p. m-—WRC-TV. Rob- 
ert Montgomery Presents: An 
immigrant from an Iron Cur- 
tain country encounters a 
new form of dictatorship in 
his own family in “End of 
the Rainbow.” Cast includes 
George Voskovec, Jane Rose, 
Virginia Kay, Ken Konopka 
and J. Robert Dietz. 

5:30 p. m-—WTOP-TV. De- 
cember Bride: Lily Ruskin 
(Spring Byington) invents an 
invisible lover. She sends 
flowers to herself. This ruse 
prevents her family from an- 
noying her with new beaux. 

10 p. m—WTTG. Boxing: 
Billy McNeece vs. Tony John- 
son in a 10-round light heavy- 
weight bout. 

10 p. m—WTOP.TV. Studio 
One: Alan Young, Gisele Mac- 
Kenzie and Henry Jones 
are featured in a comedy 
by Rod Serling, “The Man 
Who Caught the Ball at Coo- 
gan's Bluff.” A mild-mannered 
bookkeeper goes to the ball 

ark and makes a spectacu- 
ar catch in the bleachers. 

10:45 p. m—WTTG. Madi- 
son Square Garden: Film of 
New York Knicks vs. Boston 
Celtics (pro basketball); New 
York Rangers vs. Detroit Red- 
wings (hockey) and a boxing 
bout. 

11:30 p. m—WRC-TV. To- 
night: Guest list British comie 
Gerald Moore, singer Frances 
Wayne and the Queen of the 
Civil Air Patrol. 


THER STANDARD 88 hemp 


co 


—lee8 he.—Darytichs 


*Authorized to operate sunup to sundown. 


11:38 a. m—WTOP. Make 
Up Your Mind: Questiéns 
about baseball umpires and 
football dangers are tossed 
at sports writer Tom Meany. 

1:15 pm. — WRC. Doll | 


Walter Winchell 
«++ OF NEW YORK 
The Broadway Lights 


House Opening: 
for the 1955 opening of the 
and WRC-TV Doll | 
House at 1ith and G st. nw. | 


WRC 


Ceremonies 


2:05 p. m—WGMS. Sym- 


phonie Matinee; Bach,. Sici- | 
liano; Sibelius, 


Violin Con- 


night , . Margaret Sull 


Curtain bee | Up: The week's Lone 
Plymouth Thea a 


ly 
avan returned in “Janus,” 
comedy hy Carolyn Green . .. It is blessed with the star's 


m landed at the 
Thanksgivi 


a whimsic 


‘whamsical performance .. . 


The others in the very funny 
show (which it is a good deal 
of the time between lulls) are 


.|Main St. 


the H-Bomb, folks. There are 
more dangerous weapons. The 


. Stop fretting sbout 


certo: Britten, Lea Interludes. | 


3:35 p. m—WTOP. Mark 
Evans talks about a “Diction- 
ary for Paratroopers.” 

5:05 p. m—WGMS. Early 
Evening Concert: Sullivan, 
H.M.S. Pinafore Overture: 
Gould, Latin-American Sym- 
phonette; Anderson, Irish 
Suite. 

6 p. m—WWDC. Bob Wolff: 
Interviews with the Washing- 
ton Redskins. 

8:65 p. m—WGMS. 
from London: Ravel, Noble 
and Sentimental W al tzes: 
Bartok, Music for Strings, 
Percussion and Celesta. 

8:15 p. m—WRC. Roston 
Symphony: Charlies Munch 
Conducts, Schumann, Sym- 
phony No. 2 in C 


adroit players . 
Robert Embhardt and Americans annually, 


) 


Music | 


8:15 p. m—WTOP. Yours | 


Truly, Johnny Dollar: An al- 
coholic dies of malnutrition 
in the streets of Tucson, Ariz. 
He leaves $50,000 in insur- 
ance to his widowed sister 
and Johnny hecomes involved 
in “The Lansing Fraud Mat- 
ter.” 

5 p m—WMAL. Sound 
Mirror: “Sounds We Hate 
Most.” 

> pm—WRC. Telephone 
Hour: Baritone Igor Gorin 
sings Handel, “Sommi Dei.” 


| phin, 
‘Mary Finney . 
/Robert Preston, ‘whose full-of- 
| vitamins-performance gives the | ‘Fagan Dept.: The 
new entry a lot of zip, zing and | (on the 
tong . 
and stage presence are some- |" 
thing showfolks should study 


Claude Dau- 


But it is 


His timing, delivery |, 


. Happiest tiding is Variety's | 


‘item that Paul Muni may re- 
turn to “Inherit the Wind.” 


The Cinemagicians: 


. “Desert Sands” 


“Quentin Durward” has 


Robert Taylor swashing one 


helluva buckle. 
dicated 
duel-or-die-saga. 


The notice in- 


it is a conventional 


The Aristocrats: G. B. Shaw's 


‘mockery of moral hypocrisy in 


“Devil's Disciple” 
tively recaptured via NBC's | 
“Hall of Fame” 
the thumb-on-the-nose a down- 
right artistic salute .. . 
Is Your Life” 
throat 


was attrac 
. Shaw made 
“This 


(the lump-in-the 
champ) was weepier 


do-it-yourself fad (reports Read- | 
\er's Dije) injures about 600,000! 


| “Good | 
'Morning Miss Dove” offers a 
generally poignant valentine to| 
schoolmarms. Jennifer Jones, | 
the reviewers reported, 
acting lessons. (Hardly a skewp. 
of course) .. 
enlists in The Foreign Legion 
/and offers an opportunity to in- 
duce sleep by counting camels 


gives | 


Leoncavallo, 
Zingara,” and Edwards, “Into 
the Night.” 


"‘n’ Andy Musie Hall: 
suit hits the Kingfish in the 
pocket. 


anil m.)—? «. m. t fF) 
(100.5 mo)—4:20 a. m. te! 
(108.1 me.)—8:88 «. m. te 8 
Frm (106.8 me.)—1:90 ©. m. te 9 
MaE-wne (101.3 me)—6 0. m, to 12:30) 


“Zaza Piccola 


9:30 p. m—WTOP. Amos 
A libel 


9:30 p. m—WMAL. Of. 


Pp. 
beat: Humor with Ernie Ko 
vacs; readings by Ted Malone. 


16:38 p. m—WWDC. True 


Detective: A hotel maid finds 
& corpse in a “Vacant Room” 
and opens the case of an un- 
usual homicide. 


Dorothy Kilgallen 


than ever if that’s possible... 
CBS offered the 182-yearold 
spoof, “She Stoops to Conquer.” 
Unfortunately, wrinkles out- 
numbered dimples ... “Big 
Story” merits a pattycake for 
not permitting the Hollywood- 
type reporter to invade its 
scripts ... Sid Caesar's satiri- 
cal thrust (at cliche-ridden mus- 
| icals) had a razor edge. A funny 
man. 


| The Story-Tellers: Holiday 
takes you to Miami Bedth. 
‘where sunshine is sold by the 
‘karat; Collier's discovers jazz 
addicts in Russia; Anita Ekberg 
(in Swank) confides she was 
pinched and patted in Rame. 


The 


Intelligentsia: 


version of 


Nutsy- 
hottest record 


The New, Big 


See the 


RCA-Victor label) is a| Post Times Herald 
“O Susannah,” | 


December 2 


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Programs printed here conform to. information 
furnished by station# et time of publication 


Monday Radio Programs 


and the Satdee Review's jour- 
ney extends to the Moon, Mars 
and Venus. (Brooklyn anyone’) 

. Pageant confronts you with 
a " rather baffling query: “Are 
you driving your alcoholie to 
drink?” .. . Cogmopolitan’s dis 
closure: Husbands and wives 
often battle over money .. . 
The one war that has never 
known a truce: Adam vs. Eve 
Newsweek records the 
timetable: First 
« Next stop: 


wife (Jane Wyatt). 
In the end Daisy 


{ prians. 1955. New York 
aM Tribene. Ine.) 


a 


Monday Television Programs 


(CBS) 
WTOP.TV 


Berle Goes 
|| Back to His 
: Early Days — 


Thos “6:18-9:30 NEW YO 
nm Club (Robt. Burleigh [News of iB le d RK, Nov. 27—Milton *- 
Al Ross rt Brown | Encore: erle devoted part of his New Communist 
x Bare Wash. t Brown spor |aooree 9. Drake York visit to conferring with | Asia, then Africa . 
ee rome 
N eekday 


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(Du Ment) (ABC) 
maw alwrre sWMALTV. 7, 


_ - 
‘News, 
S 7: y 8: 


FREE — Rote 


— } = 


‘Bien Off; Eyme 
Seria! eater 


Leoneyv B 
Looney nes 


coi) A°*S0St Tasure of 


ORgE ae 


Were 


ener or his — TV writers — the! 
4 boys whose fun- 
ny lines helped 
make him * "Mr. as 


ae Aiternoon 


the early #3. 
2-2:30 PM 


of video. He 
with 


rehired one 
INGA 


and is nego- 
fashions. 


tiating with 
glamour, 


others of the 

group. .. Gloria 
home-mak ing, 
entertainment. . 


3 Bearm for 


‘00\ News: Jerry Weekday 
and Jimme 
erry & Jimma Woekde 
erry & Jimma 


ve Story 


meroemes Jack Smith 


ays Piay’h 
f 39) | 
as Home 
reus 
Shadows" 


a ae 


Vanderbilt's in- 
~ on + 8109 


timates suspect 
Miss Kilgallen she walked out 
oan ‘on the Frank Sinatra picture 
ene with the approval of Sidney 
4 spare, ‘Lumet, the TV director. He 
appears to be calling the shots 
Galisher (On her career. 
nite Gellaner| Joe Louis found himself in} 
ash. News ater't|the role of private referee the 
Weelper, Sports| other night when he separated 
jazz pianist Dorothy Donegan 
and her ex-suitor, Carl Maxwell. | 
They were trading punches like | 
pros until the Champ stepped 
‘in... Grace Kelly is consid- 
— ering Jean Dalrymple's bid to 
Jack intr star in “The Swan” at co a 
Center next season . e Wil- 
= ine mall ad em Woodward -children are 
foowsees| being guarded by private de- 
Bob Dalton ieey tectives. 


News na "We 
FF a ae NANCY KELLY telephoned 
a Sherman Billingsley all the way 


adie Galisher | 
“M 
i from California to order a 
rae coal Oa | Stork Club wedding cake and’ 


enough champagne for 100 
people to celebrate her wedding 
to Warren Caro... A hot mid-| 
TRENT TV town rumor has it that Milt 
| Blackstone, Eddie Fisher's man-' 
17"-21" Sereens 
RESERVE ago aoe 
oo FOOTBALL GAM A S. 
DI. 7-5941 


‘ager, may take over Monte) 


_Proser’s most recent night club, 
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‘the shuttered La Vie. 
1 MONTH MINIMUM 


Young Larrie Thomas, one 
of the Goldwyn Girls, is being 

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songs styled 
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There should be headlines 

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——— The Musie Box——___. 
Tots’ Concerts 
Start This Week 


By Paul Hume 


THE NATIONAL Sympho- 
ny Orchestra breaks out its 
Tiny Tots concerts for,-the 
year this week, playing them 
at 10 an@ 18:15 on Friday 
morning in the North Area 
Gym of Fort Myer. These 
are remarkable affairs for 
children and grown-ups alike. 
Tickets at the door, or, if 
you like, ahead of time, at 
Audio Consultants, 76 North 
Glebe rd., Arlington. 

The orchestra also gives 
two performances of “Mes 
siah” this week, on Thursday 
and Saturday nights in Con 
stitution Hall. As in past 
years, the chorus will be 

up of members of the 


tist, and First Congregational 
churches. The soloists are 
Ewan Harbrecht, Kathleen 
Joyce, Walter Carringer, and 
William Jones. 

On Wednesday night the 
National Symphony plays the 
first performance of Walter 

*s ptize-winning over- 
ture, for which the composer 
will recéived a $300 check 

t on the platform. Grant 
Jo epen Will be soloist in 
the 3d ,Piane Concerto of 
Beethovén, and Washington 
will have its first hearing 
of the 10th, latest of the sym- 
phonies of Dmitri Shostako- 
vich. 


THE AGRICULTURE Sym- 
phony Orchestra under Fred- 


erick Fall opens its year with 
the Beethoven “Eroica” Sym- 
phony tonight at 8:30, follow- 
ing it with the 

Overture of Weber, and 
Death and Transfiguration by 
Strauss. 

Next Sunday afternoon the 
Saint Cecelia Chorus of Rome 
sings in Constitution Hall, in 
a benefit for Georgetown Visi- 
tation Convent Alumnae 
Building Fund. The chorus is 
best known in this country 
for its excellent cooperation 
in making opera records for 
London firr. The past mem- 


Parsons: 


Studio Star 


Donald Cook costars tonight 
with June Havoc for the 
opening of Washington's new, 


bership of the Academy of 
Santa Cecilia includes not 
less than Palestrina, Corelli, 
Monteverdi, Frescobaldi, P 


anini, Rossini, Cherubi Ninth st. Their play is “La 


Ronde 


new bride- 
room, Bob 
organ, might 

not have been 

found so 

ckly in Las 

@gas and of 

dered back to @ 

Ho llywood to ¢ 

or e ailing 

Sterling Hay- Miss Parsons 

den in “Bed of Fear.” 
Sterling sli 

spine on W: 


strenuous action scenes which 
Morgan was helping him on be- 
fore he up and eloped with 


Verdi, Puccini, te name only 
part of the list 


AT 1:5 NEXT Sunday aft 


_ AT 148 NEXT Sunday atv |A ppeals Court 


will give a 2hour-and-15-min-|J'g Hear Law 


Ereroedoys 
utt y.” In En ,itw . ..* 
be the longest opera produc- Practice P efition 
walilen toes tone o eight judges of the 


warding opera theater. The 


will sit en banc Tuesday to hear 


Symphony Concert Set {a local man’s petition to force 
the District Court to admit him 


The Agricultural Symphony|+, prectice law in that court. 
Association will present the; The petitioner is Charles H. 
first concert of its sixth season|Flashphaler. In his petition for 
at 8:30 p. m. today in Agricul-/mandamus, Flasphaler states 
tare auditorium under the|‘R6r® ,™as, 2, conspiracy, that 

c m to e c 
baton of Frederick Fall. bar examination five times. 

Bethoven’s Symphony No. 3} He asks permission to prac- 
(“Eroica”) and Richard Strauss’|tice here as a transferee. Flas. 


“Death and Transfiguration”! phaler, who was graduated from 
will highlight the program. National University Law School 
| im June, 1941, states he was ad- 


Show Times For 


“Pontagns im, The Gres Pp ~ and arnt 
SHUBERT Antonio's Br Spenish ballet 


ree a. gg owl os 830 Be m 


Ty 10. T sige #38". iy 
ak be iligtt tater 


“T},§, 2 1:20. Nee he 1:40 

covony — are mo 
eee a Sh Bat ats ae 

pin on WES “aad Ts 


FS 


° > * 


ME 86-1326 F 


Monday 


mitted to the bar in the Canal 
Zone while in service and has 
spent five years in association 


Mifinian a” wt O18, PT cad 10 be - 
rit wee 


ONTARIO—‘“‘Footeteps 
at 1, 2:45, 4:30, S19 ota os 


"ete Eh ee Ts 
| Egret se 
s-,c4es, 2 2:40. ohexige 


PATRICK HAYES CONCERTS 
IN CONSTITUTION HALL 


SUN. DEC. 4—3:00 P.M, 


SANTA CECILIA 


ie | ar 
15 on 


“heer 


WARNER—Cineramea UHollday.” at 
8:39 ». = 


“Yn rt Theatre 


SUN., DEC. 11—3:00 P.M. 


RUBINSTEIN 
ALL-CHOPIN PGM. 
ote tee 


United States Court of Appeals wi 


Never let it 
Yvonne's stuntman husband 
isn’t a trouper. He caught the 
first plane to Hollywood 
the SOS went out about 


Yvonne. 
be sald that 


iIt’s Best to Keep Secret 
\Plans for Honeymoon 


HOLLYWOOD, Nov. 27 (INS)| most comfortable thing 
Yvonne De Carlo should have| world, but it could be 


a disc in his|when I saw them together at 
esday morning| the “Guys and Dolls” premiere 
and was unable to do the ca a ao le a ugh 


den, arriving Wednesday afte- 
noon. 


DAN DAILEY was very 
philosophical when I talked 
th him in the Cedars of Leb- 
anon Hospital after his horse 
threw him 


“I figure I'm very lucky,” 
said Dan. “I might have broken 
my back instead of cracking 
my neck. This traction isn’t the 


PATRICK HAYES CONCERTS 
IN CONSTITUTION SHALL 


TUES., DEC, 6—8:30 P.M. 


NATIONAL © LAST 8 TIMES! 


Byres... 6:30; 


aa 


"The Great Sebsabane 


Bex Office Open 18 a.m. te 9:30 p.m. 


a: Wet 


A Mew Comedy by 
by BRETAIONE WINDUST 


mn aa, Pees 
DAVID OISTRAKH 
co it auras? 


ud oo. ee "Ka. Soran 


(Compbdell's) Steinway 


Open 10:45 A. M. 
THE DL 17-7600 
DESPERATE 
HOURS 


CapIToL 


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ULINE ARENA 
FRI, DEC. S—-8:30 P.M. 


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: STARRING 


Oren 
9115 A. M. 


ea@ Ge Seedeceeenes —eucssémesese, 


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Wednesday Sym. Series 


in Color and CINEMASCOPE® 


MARLON BRANDO JEAN SIMMONS 
FRANK SINATRA : VIVIAN BLAINE 


RKO KEITH'S « 


evattae ° 


CONSTITUTION HALL 


 JOHANNESEN 


Shales S190 Lam Su BK BOD 2.00, 490 Geen) 


re of the Year... 


— Gi siuvet COUNT: 


ee Us nee 
(QIUAIMO 


t out o 


10. 4 2.20) et 65 (Vox In 


ee ee TE 


of” ce. (Orch) 


Call RE. vent EF. DD AR By 


. 9- 
B 
Audie, Murphy, 1:10, 3:18, 8:25, 1:30 


PEeLe 


AUS CAL DIREC TOR 
Nov. 30 at 8:30 


aaa lek be tee 


Thurs., Dec. 1, and Sat., 


MESSIAH 


Win = VAN OTTERLOO 


SYLVIA i MEYER 


= iit 


Dec. 3, at 8:30—Handel’s 


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1.50, 2 


Dee. 7 at 6:30-—Dee, & of 2:50 


na Te 


‘SYMPHONY BOX OFFICE 


|HISER-BETHESDA ”*\;' 
NW WANE OF cOB" 
«Io 

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7 4848 


l4, WUAAR TL 
SOT VORHOOD THE 


Ey si. Brides. ds em 


——e eee ee ee 


215 U & NW. Alex... Ri 
Doors Open 12:30 P.M. te Bap: : 
“THE TALL MEN . s! Cipem ener 
Gable Jane F ‘THE LAST COMMAND 
Ster NEL EM ED a TARRY Pluss 
1343 You St. NW. NM 


Doors Open 12:30 P.M. get Lt 


— Se eee 


REPUBLIC .."*“ 
Youy tare hrey.foeare Jane ane Byen S:oe 10:30. caer Cartoon! 
Perea sas tha “dco “THE “VIRGIN. QO: QUEEN? 


BOOKER T \“° *~ NW “TALL IN THE SADDLE” 


12.30 P.M. 
in Vista Viston. Terre 200 2 i. —— 
with Ja ten Heston SUNSET DRIVE-IN ——, Pike 


Open Weekends: Pri, Sat... “Sun 


| QUEENS CHAP 


Hemilten St. W. 


Audie . pay ‘FO. 
RIVER _ Kiddies fren. 


PAIRPAX, VA, 


the Season. 


PALMER Closed for the Season 


LEE HWY.-ARL. BLVD. 
DRIVE-IN | THEATRE 


Aimerica'p ae 
aes pet gies 


“BLOOD ALLEY” 


John Wayne—Lauren Bacall 
CinemeScope and Color at 8:48 


APEX 4013 Mess. Ave. WO. 6.4600 “PRIDE OF THE 
pitt. Mazerdee 2°. {P||| BLUE GRASS” 


and 9:35 p color et 7:07 and 10:48 


LANGLEY * "Ae. txv tm alla Sater TSAivar Fro 
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so Parking. 30. 8 ALEX.-ARLINGTON, VA. 


FLOWER mark Oene ” Tiemer. 
i a 


TUNAIs a, a fs er 
wrist tro 
: -, 7:45 and 9:40 »p. 


The Continental 


SECOND W 


coise ty * in 


In 
spsrage te 
seestheden subject! a 
cause 0 of its delicate theme, showings 
ited to adult audiences only 
6:30, 8:10 and 9:50 p 


a Libr, HARD, Pi, one: Ki, 9-445 


MAYLOR 7, Soning” 0300 _ "Wie" Ch th SE 
Bogart, FRE a Vernon Bivd. 
6:15 and &: Tae Ur 


ROCKVILLE DRIVE-IN 
Opening early in March 1086 


PARKFAIRFAX 
OV. 3-2500 


1003 Nichols Ave. S.. 
= yrrrry 


ll 


General’s Son, 3, a 
Killed in Crash 


WILSON, N.C. Now 27 @ 
Four persons, including the son 
of an Army general, were killed 
and four others injured near 
here early today when a car 
crashed into an automobile car- 
rying students back to The Cita- 
del military school from the 
Army-Navy game at Philadel- 
|| phia. 

Dead were David Clinton 
Robinson, 28, Leland, N. C.; 
Leon O. Jenkins, 22, Sonierville, 
N. J.; Richard P. Cardwell, 20, 
The Citadel, and Ivan G. Pri- 
kals, 18, Seabrook, N. J. 

Cardwell was the son of Brig. 
Gen. E. F. Cardwell, commander 
of the 40th Anti-Aircraft Di- 
vision in the Fat East. 


MAKE YOUR 


OLD CHAIR 


AND WEAR 


a Pt. +f fot Fa a 


MARY WORTH By Ken Allen 


“See? She says it's a chee-wawa. I TOLD you — a ; WELL ‘ 
aia IN,DANNE | magyt...1 GOT A STAY s 


it wasn't no dog!” a A 

ad 7 bas soe! YES, ' HAPPY GOING 

7 * EXCITED LL ONT en HAVE A CAREER! AS vy oc Oe oe 
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= 4 

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f° | i eeomel| | TO SEPTEMBER 23 (Vir- 

ae | | gi gene, . 

n talents and make vai- 

a eee \N APPRECIA ‘B® Any Size for Any Room u —— Take time for rest. 

NN: SEPTEMBER 24 TO OCTOBER 23 

: ve “G0” a + 

SS) berious work shere avor with lighter 
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S A LE 1 "SS SALE 5.95 * 
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y 
HAIR SqveMee 33,70 DeCuMagE 23 
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gp 23 TO JANUARY 21 ¢ » 
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TO 


TO FEBRUARY 20) | 
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Chair and Soja Seat Botoms ReWebbed *~ 


is inclosed. Telephone 

not accepted. Dr, Van 

will not make diagnoses or pre- 
scribe for individual diseases. 


By Dr. Theodore R. Van Dellen 


SINUSITIS 
Is sinus trouble less common 


ably not, because sinusitis was 
a popular selfdiagnosis a gen- 
eration ago; anyone with head- 
ache or a nasal discharge was 
‘convinced his sinuses were at 
fault. X-ays were expensive 
and treatment none too good. 
As a result, statistics were 
‘bulging with cases of sinusitis 
that never existed. 

Nowadays, the disorder is 
easy to diagnose and when 
treated properly, usually is 
cured. Most attacks follow a 
head cold and this complica- 
tion is less likely to develop if 
the passageways are kept open 
and the newer antibiotics are 
used to kill the germs. In this 
respect, there might be fewer 
bona fide cases than in yester- 
year. 

The nasal passageways are 
catacombed with eight sinuses 
that help filter and warm the 
air we inhale. This arrange 
ment aids comfort but is not 
entirely necessary because we 
could still achieve a normal life 
expectancy, breathing day after 


cated on each side of the nose, 
between teeth and eyes. The 
ethmoids and sphenoids are 
way back in the passageways 
and the two frontals are located 
in the forehead above the eyes. 
Each communicates with the 
nose through a small aperture 
and is covered with the same 
type of membrane that lines 
the entire nasal cavity. : 

The frontal sinuses are hol- 
low spaces in the bones of the 
forehead over an area roughly 
covered by the raised eye- 
brows. Through a drain in the 
boitom, the secretions escape 
into a tube leading to the nose. 
But unlike that in a sink, the 
drain is a two-way affair. It is 
easy for bacteria to pass from 
ithe nose to the sinus and vice 


' 


versa. Keeping the mouth open 
while blowing will release the 
pent wp pressure back of the 
nose 


Swimming under water and 
diving may affect the sinuses 
because of the sudden ingress 
of water under high pressure 
through the ducts. The ensuing 
irritation invites trouble, more 
so when the water cannot es- 
cape. Sinusitis from this cause 
has ruined many a vacation. 

In addition, it frequently is 
responsible for a nasal dis- 
charge that follows the first 
swim of the year. The nose con- 
dition usually is blamed on a 
cold until it fails to subside 
within a reasonable length of 
time. Those who are bothered 
along this line should use nose 
clips. 

Surgery is not done as often 
now as formerly. Penicillin or 
antibiotics of the mycin family 


ly during the acute attack 
Drugs also are available to re- 
duce swelling of the nasal mem- 
branes, thus opening the pas- 


day through a hole in the wind- 
pe. , 
The maxillary sinuses are lo-| : 


are the best remedies, especial-| 


today than in the past? Prob) if 


BLONDIE 


ee ht 


> 


GENTLEMEN, PVE COME TO GET 
OF DONDI’S FIRST IMPRESSIONS AS 

AMERICAN—ANO EVERYTHING ABOUT 
HAPPY HOME LIFE~{7 4S HAPPY, ISNT 


By Gus Edson and Irwin Hasen 


S STOWING MS 


~s 


Occasionally the sinuses ate 


washed out. Surgery is recom- 
mended when biockage defies! 


ordinary treatments. 


TOMORROW: Nutrition and 

the life span. 
SINUS DISCOMFORT 

K. W. writes: Could a sinus 
condition cause dizziness and 
a feeling of pressure in the 
eyes or nose? 

REPLY 

Yes. Symptoms due to sinus 

disturbances vary according to 


the sinus involved and whether 


it is draining or obstructed. 


sageways leading to the sinuses. 


(Coprricht. 1956. Chicage Tribune 


THE! HECHT:CO. 


i é 


Portraits 
By James J. Metcalfe 


rll Get It! 


Each time the phone or 
doorbell rings . . . I feel 
we ought to let it... But 
always there is somebody 
..« Who hollers out, “Tl 
get it!” ... It's usually 
the children who... Are 
dashing to the door... 
Or snatching up the phone 
to hear... me voice 


they're waiting for... 
Though sometimes it is 
Mommy who... Will get 
there in a hurry... With 
great excitement in her 

. Or with a look 

.». I never get 


call should be for me... 
I see those disappointing 
looks . . . Throughout the 
family ... 1 hesitate to 
answer rings... I fear I 


Order by Mail or Call NA. 85100 may guavas it. .5 Sua mee 
my wife or youngsters 


—— 
Life insurance on all HFC loans without extra cost to you who ... Will always yell 


OUSEHOLD FINANCE THE HECHT CO. (Dept L-18) “T'll get it!” 


Dries. Bhs. if’. .ki Ry 
BETHESDA 
7444 Wisconsin Ave, OLiver- 46-7400 


: at Le at ae y? 
Mt. RAINIER | A mone 
3235 Rhode Island Ave., 2nd Floor, UNien 4-574 Nee 


eae | FAIR LOANS 


7914 Georgie Ave., Floor, J 5.4400 
"WW. 5-1323 


Household Finance Corporation—you can borrow the money 
you need with little or no 
foes. Your promise to re- | Yi, | MONTHLY PAYManT PLANS 

terms that you se- 
lect—is all that’s usually 


A miniature 554” weather bureau of your 
very own! Accurately cts weather 
8 to 24 hours in advance. on crafted 
by skilled German experts in handsome 
mahogany finish with gleaming brass 
trim, easy-to-read dial. 


The Hecht Co. Optical Dept.—Sereet Floor, 
Washington, Silver Spring 


‘ 


UU UE 


Payments ebove imcinds costs of tha lnm & 
py Oe Ey Ket, 
ore made under ihe ndustrial Fumence 


SUITLAND 
4612 Suitland Rd., Ground Floor, JOrdan 8-9364 


Ground 
8641 Colesville Rd., Eig Bidg., 2nd Floor, JUniper 8-4200 


CLARENDON-ARLINGTON 
3159 Wilson Bivd., 2nd Floor, JAckson 5-6474 


aoe oT a 


ALEXANDRIA 
627 King St, 2nd Floor, King 9-2915 
raterell heey eR sentite on saved Cones. 


’ 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
40 Monday, November 28, 1955 


The DISTRICT LINE ®y BitGold 


The Hazards of Being ****4 m* to be sure to specity 


that it was a biond male 
A Columnist thoroughbred, and had been 
MINE is probably the soft- roo pan AH the Ameri- 
est job in town. So I don't — : = 
want you to think I'm com- “That's a mistake, Joe, 
plaining. I said. “You'll get too many 
But there are certain calls. Just say ‘dog. 
drawbacks te the assign- “No,” Joe insisted. “I want 
ment. For one thing, I nev- to get a dozen calls so that 
er know when some irate I can pick the very best home 
reader is about to descend for him. Give it the full build- 
on — to give me unshirted up.” 
what-for. “Joe,” leaded, “just sa 
The late Joe Short, Presi- uate hea ’ y 
dent Truman's press secre- We finally compromised. 1 
tary, provided a classic @X- san the listing as “male 


ample. Joe once had to giv€ cocker” without mentioning . 


away a cocker spaniel, and the AKC registration. 


Two days later I heard 


from Joe. “You dirty douw- 


Ne | blecrosser,” he began. “Why 
res ens | didn’t you warn me that 
| people would start calling 


wood-burning fireplaces. Sat- 
bedy boom: “You biack- 

re hearted rascal.” 
“That,” I mused, “must be 


before daylight? We got 
- urday morning I was walking 
Enjoy chewing delicious an irate subscriber.” It was. 


h- 200 calls on that dog—you 
ou dog.” 
| down F st. minding my own 
Stephen M. Walter of the 
Wrigley’s Spearmint Gum 


The other day I wrote about 
| business when I heard some- 
National Association of Elec- 
daily... millions do. 


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1952 MONTANA AVE. 
LA. 6-2666 


“What did I do?” I asked. _ 

“You wrote about fre- 
places,” growled Steve. 
“I'm allergic te weed 
smoke, so we haven't 
touched our supply of logs 
in 10 years. 

“But this morning I got up 
about 5 o’clock—just couldn't 
sleep—and it was so chilly 
it reminded me of your item 
and I thought gosh, wouldn't 
it be nice to greet the rest of 
the family with a cheery fire. 

“So I went out to the garage 
to get some logs. It was so 
dark I had te turn on the 
automobile lights to see 
what I was doing. But I got 
my logs and built the fire. 

“Everybody enjoyed it 
except me. I got a splinter 
in my finger, the smoke 
bothered my allergy se 
much I had te go see my 
doctor, and when I got out 
te the garage I discovered 
that I had forgotten to turn 
off the car lights and the 
battery was just about 
dead. You and your 
blankety-biank column 
about fireplaces caused it 
allt” 

There is another type of 
booby trap in which colum- 


* nists became ensnared. It 


works like this: 

Gladstone Williams, Wash- 
ington correspondent of the 
Atlanta Constitution, is an 
old friend of mine. Mrs. 
Gladstone Williams stages 
those Washington Party 
luncheons at the Willard that 


This week Mrs. Williams 
called to ask me to join her 
guests at the “celebrity table” 
on Saturday. 

I protested that I’m not a 
celebrity, that I'm really very 
busy, that maybe I'd be run 
over by a truck before Satur- 
day, and everything else I 
could think of. It was no use. 

“Gladstone,” she _ said, 
“will be so disappointed.” 


are such a delight to fashion- | 
conscious women and such a | 
bore to fashion-blind men. | 


Se I sighed and accepted, 
and resigned myself te not 
being able te watch the 

Army-Navy game, for which 
I had reserved the after- 
noon. 

It was a fine luncheon as 
these things go. The models 
were pretty, the food was 
good, Paul Kain’s music 
eased the pain, Bachelor 
Charlies A. Patrick of the 
Ford Motor Co., one of the 
few males in the room, grew 
hilariously pale when he was 
publicly reminded that it was 
Sadie Hawkins Day, and Zoe 
Calevas won the prize offered 
to the lady with the the great- 
est number of items in her 
handbag (26). Besides, I had 
a wonderful opportunity to 
chat with a long-time friend 
I hadn't seen in ages, Mary 
Haworth. 

But all through the lunch- 
eon I kept stealing glances 
around the room to see if I 
could spot Gladstone, and 
when it was all over I said 
to his wife: “Where's your 
husband? After all, he’s the 
man I really came to see.” 

“Oh,” said Mrs. Williams 
airily, “Gladstone couldn't 
make it. He’s watching the 
Army-Navy game.” 

I'm not complaining, you 


£.3'S GONE OFF W USTEN TO THIS 
WIS ROCKER / HE © QUESTION.’ 9008 
PRACTICALLY THINK Ts SuAPLe 


* - 
— -_ wee 
eT St 


DEY stevie, Ve 
TOLD MY BOYS HOW 


UNe Lie UUN 


"| 


ssh 4 ¥ 


GF 


understand, but the job does 
have its drawbacks. 
c+? 


TODAY'S BIRTHDAYS — 
Greetings to Judge Rich- 
mond B. Keech, Jose Iturbi, 
Miguel J. (Mike) Uline and 
Sen. James O. Eastland. Yes- 
terday’s celebrants: Wiliam 
V. Nessly, Harold K. Melni- 
cove, Johnny Schmitz, Brig. 
Gen. Charles H. Swartz, Rep. 


John J. Allen Jr., and Sol 
Kullen. : 
ow 


GIVE-AWAYS 


Adorable black-and-white | 
kittens; $1 inclosed for Chil | 


dren’s Hospital (Harrison 
2-7286). 


os 
HOW'S THAT AGAIN? 
Mrs. Elsie Cowan of 3313 
W. Coquelin terrace, Chevy 
Chase, raises a questioning 
eyebrow at the ad for “The 
Desperate Hours” which 
quotes a movie critic as say- 
ing: “Hardily recommended.” 


ow 
AIN’T IT THE TRUTH? 
The current Coronet in- 
cludes the observation that: 
“Nothing lasts as long as a 
suit you don’t like.” 


‘@ ON BRIDGE. 


*, ¢ 


BRIDGE QUIZ 
Q@. 1—You have a 40 part 
score, vulnerable and partner 
opens with three spades. 


What do you bid? 
Q. 2—As South you hold: 


The bidding has proceeded: 
West North East Seutb 
Se ita eC 
What do you bid now? 
Q. 3—As South you hold: 
4386 ¥Q3 @H8543 &ADG 
The bidding has proceeded: 
Seuth Went Nerth East 
Pass Pass i heart Deuble 
What do you bid now? 
Q. 4—As South, vulnerable, 
you hold: 
4A1095 YWQISTES 642 &S 
The bidding has proceeded: 
West Nerth East East 
I spade 2 clubs Deuble ? 
What do you bid? 
ANSWERS 
1. Four spades. Despite the 
fact that partner's hand is 
marked as of less than opening 
bid strength, some thought 


O34 VA Q86 OA107T54AQI 


4AQ 9Q43 @K95 487432) 


ivulnerability, North should have 


me SLATTERY'S 
4309 WISCONSIN AVENUE N.W. 


The Uptown-Discount House 
Shop Weekdays 9 a. m. to 9 p, m. 


should be given to slam possi- 
bilities. In view of vulnerabil- 
ity, he must have a hand of 


sound playing strength, particu- 
larly aince with 40 on score his' 
bid may jeopardize a safe game. 

2. Two spades. The meaning 
of North's cue bid is not clear 


at this point, but it is our duty) 


to return to two spades. Since 
we did not offer an immediate 


raise, partner should not expect |“ 
better trump support than this.|° 


3. While normally -it is our 
practice to redouble with 10 
points, it is our view, that in 
this instance, a better result 
can be obtained by an immedi- 
ate bid of one no trump. A re 
double might render it more 
difficult to bid on the next 
round. 

4. Unless partner is a known 
prodigal, the recommended pro- 
cedure is a pass. In view of the 


a very good club suit and East 

may be taking an innocuous 

“pot shot.” An-attempt to es- 

cape may be running “out of 

a frying pan and into the 
re.” 


Buy on Easy Terms 


@ KEllogg 7-1500 


aluminized picture tube. 


Famous $179.95 New 
21 Table TV 


| °99) 


Mahogany grained metal cabinets. Giant 21” 


A whale of a buy. Each 


in original factory carton. 


Whirlpool, Norge 
Westinghouse 


Waite 130 


tn Origine! Factory Cartons 


Brand New 
Famous Norge 


cane L, 


en 
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WHATS THE Bi¢é 

sarerons ¢ (DV | 
ec?. aE | 


The Washington Merry-Go-Round 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
ove Monday, November 28, 1955 4} 


Here’s Background 
Of Education Parley 


Supreme Court segregation de- 
By Byte Fearn |cision, southern Democrats also 
The White House Conference | got cold feet and proceeded to 
stymie schoo] construction. 
Northern Democrats still 
‘pushed it. But, caught be 
itween unenthusiastic Republi- 
cans and unenthusiastie South- 
ern Democrats, the school bill 
was never passed. 
So, with Mrs. Hobby now out 
of Government, the White 
House conference which she so 
wanted convenes today. 


South-North Opposition 


i 
ee 
Tei te 


{ 


Supreme Court decision he has 
ibeen just the opposite. 

| The Catholic College of 
Bish recently meeting in 
Ww m issued a strong 
istatement that parochial 
schools should be included in 
any Federal aid. As a result, 
the separation-of-church-and- 
t,"istate issue is certain to enter 
the education debate when 


Way; ~ 


Congress reconvenes, and, 

since many northern Demo 

crats come from Catholic areas, 

.|it may influence their position 
too. 


Inside the Kremlin 


Sen. Kefauver, while in 
Moscow, sat in on an interest- 
ing conversation inside the 
Kremlin with Premier Bul- 
ganin and party boss Khrush- 
chev. He got the impression 
that Khrushchev was easily the 
more dominating of the two. 
Despite his toughness, 
Khrushchey has a contagious 
sense of humor and at one time 
was telling Kefauver and other 
| United States Senators how he 


MICKEY FINN 


- 


Wig 


. 


EP 


se 
Nj 


_~ YX 
» 


aders|\was trying to move 200,000 

‘people to eastern Russia, but 

they wouldn't go. 

Or aay see, od have trouble 
while . Hobby, th our constituents, too,” 

~~ of Health, Baeeation, said the top leader of the Com- 

munist Party. 

At one point a Senator asked 
Bulganin and Khrushchev why 
the Russians were opposed to 
the United States having bases 

today.| abroad. 
extreme| “How would you like it if we 
forbidding her|5uilt a base down in Cuba?” 
Education,| Was Khrushchev’s quick re- 


oinder. 

“We'd bomb the hell out of 
you,” replied Sen. George W. 
Malone of Nevada. 


| Washington Pipeline 


John Foster Dulles will fly 
to Paris next month to attend 
a NATO meeting and try to 
bolster our western allies ... 
Political denial of the week: 
Harlow Curtice, head of Gen- 
eral Motors, insists he was a 
strong Eisenhower man from 
the start. (Everyone remembers 
how hard he plumped for 


however, and later, after the 


Daily Crossword Puzzle 


—_—— 


USTY RILEY 


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