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The Washington 
Times Werald 


MONDAY. JANUARY 30. 1956 


Post Finat 


NTS 


The Weather 


Today—-Cloudy and mild with rain end- 
ing at night, and turning much colder; 
highest near 48. Tuesday, partly cloudy, 
windy and much colder. Sunday's high, 
44 at 6 p. m. low, 33 at 12:50 a. m. 
(Details on Page 12.) 


_— 


79th Year — No. 56 


—... 


12 
iN 


Mencken 
Dies in His 
Sleep at 75 


In Baltimore 


Death Claims 
Noted Author as 
Plans Were Made 
For New Book 
(Pictures on Page 3.) 


Henry Louis Mencken, au-; 
thor, editor and caustic critic; 
of two generations, died in} 
his sleep about 4 a. m. yes-; 
terday at the Baltimore home| 
he shared with his brother,’ 
August, an engineer. Mr.| 
Mencken had celebrated his| 
75th birthday last Sept. 12. 

The “Sage of Baltimore” had 
suffered an initial stroke in| 
1948. It was followed by a se- 
vere heart attack two years| 
later which had seriously im-| 
paired his faculties. 

The end came as newspapers 
across the country were report-| 
ing his intent to publish a new) 
beok called “Minority Report,” 
a collection of essays of vary- 
ing lengths.on a variety of sub-| 
jects. Its contents, he had told 
reporters, caused him to look 
forward with pleasure to “being | 
denounced again.” 

Mr. Mencken, who probably 
will be best-remembered for his 
scholarly, oft-revised treatise. 
“The American Language,” had 
become a legend in his own life- 
time. By quirk of circumstance, 
or sly design, he forged of him- 
self a figure which became all 
things to all people, and re- 
mained so to the end. 

Mr. Mencken was born in! 
Baltimore and always called it 
home | 

Unlike many American lite- 
rary giants, he never left the 
city for any length of time ex- 
cept for trips 

When as editor of the maga- 
zine Smart Set and later of the 
American Mercury his presence 
was required in New York, he 
commuted to Manhattan. 

In the old family row house, 
furnished with good solid furni- 
ture and Early American an- 
tiques, at 1524 Hollins st., over- 
looking tree-sshaded Union 


Copyright. 1956. 
The Washington Post Company 


* 7-1234 FIVE CE 


KILLED, HUNDREDS HURT 
MD. OYSTER ROAST FIRE 


> 


1000 Panic Fleeing 
Holo ‘aust at Hall 
South of Baltimore 


Phone RFE. WTOP Radio (1500) TV (Ch. 9) 


| m ; " | (‘Oti er P, 
Ay At 12 persons were killed and hundreds were 
: injured last night when fire and resulting panic swept 
a church supper in Brooklyn Park, on the south edge of 
Baltimore in Anne Arundel County, 


Police estimated that 1000 persons. were present at an 


15.) 


‘ures on Page 


least 


i 
oyster roast and dance sponsored by the St. Rose of Lima 
Catholic Church at Arundel Park Hall, a quonset-type 
structure. 

Firemen said the holocaust began when a small blaze 
broke out 
kitchen. 
it out. 

“Suddenly 
out all along the ceiling—almost like an explosion.” The 
crowd, which had been orderly and had been offering 
| wisecracking advice to the firefighters, suddenly panicked. 

Leo A. Rust, an oil refinery worker who attended the 
oyster roast with his wife and two daughters, said the fire 
spread “as if somebody had spread gasoline over the place.” 

Another survivor, Veronica’ 92%. eaten 
Sparrow of Brooklyn Park, 

| Ps said: “My God, it was terrible 
Cee Women and children were 
_ FIREMEN BATTLE THE BLAZE THAT BROKE OUT IN A PACKED HALL AT BROOKLYN PARK, MD. (OTHER.PHOTOS, PAGE 15) | ““V°XCd Gown snd. trample’: 


Sistant pastor of the. church 


Red Bid Seen’ Sseket 10 Beer mooie, People ed tae 
As Ike, Eden ‘Looked Like Pictures 
Topic Today JT Have Seen of Hell’ 


ithey saw the flames. There was 
‘some panic, and I saw people 

3-Day Conference 

To Get Under Way 


trampled.” 
This Afternoon 


in a duct near the wooden ceiling over the 


several men climbed ladders to attempt to put 


one eyewitness reported, “the fire shot 


Anne Arundel County, said 
there were prdbably 12-14 dead 
but the exact total would not 
be known until” daylight. He 
sald it was difficult to get-the 
exact figure because only paris 
of some bodies had been found, 
Police and firemen were still 
searching the debris last night 

for other victims 
At least 227 were injured. 
Police reported that more 
than 100 persons were treated 
at the scene, and that scores of 
others had been taken to South 
on Baltimore General, St. Agnes, 
huge rec- Mercy, University and Johns 
but the tlopkins Hospitals. South Bal- 
front door. more General which received 
and evewitnesses said there ‘he greatest number of casual- 
lies, reported that it had taken 


was some difficuity in getting . 
some of the other doors open.'*™ 8 casualties, 10 of them 
critically injured, 


Aim te Split Allies Seen 


West Supports [ke 
In Reply to Bulganin 


LONDON, Jan. 29 #®—Most 
western European leaders 
day backed President Eisen- 
hower's rejection of a Soviet 
proposal for a 20-year Russo- 
American friendship pact 

The consensus was that Rus 
Sia Was trying to split the West 
while getting a propaganda ad- 
vantage in its peace offensive, 
regardiess of whether’ the 
United States accepted the 
offer. 

West German officials were 
particularly gratified that the 
President stressed German 
unification as the key to a cold- 


The hall is located in the 6000 
block of Bellegrove rd., about 
one mile south of Baltimore's 
city limits. 

There are double 
each side of the 
tangular building, 
flames blocked the 


' doors 

A striking incident of the Some were cut and bieeding 

Brooklyn Park, Md. fire was clothes of others were 
described by Dick Kahn, a bar- . 

Neier neve any- 
tender in the Park ‘Lounge .. : i 
which is in Arundel Park Hall, ‘ng like it in my Iife 
scene of the blaze The bodies were stacked 10 

He said he smelled smoke and deep at the windows in the 4] Barthelme, former coach 
of the Baltimore Bullets pro- Nine of the victims found in- 
fessional basketball team. said side the hall “ cre pronounced 
that most of those who escaped |@e¢ad by Dr. Leonard H. Flax, 
scene. When first survivors be- 


which line the walls. “There 
gan making their way to the 


sponse to Bulganin reflected 
French official feeling exact- 
ly. | 

West 


The 
smoldering. I 


to- 
saw 
German Chancellor 
Konrad Adenauer may make 
an official comment Monday, 
; ; President Eisenhower and 
sources said. Many West Ger- : 
. : _ | British Prime Minister Si 
mans expressed relief that the | 
. ie Anthony Eden are expected to * somo" Sa 1h 
President continues to place ; = sisi. +4) 
Ptteneee ficat Me tay Ga challenge Russia at White — ie ; 
t the tek at ae ' ee ag {House conferences this week to LL Soi “AP was real panic in the hall,” he 
f p iis Ww “oblems. ‘ . ; a oe : - D ie. F . 
0! the seas gS orld ye “ non goer hg me — . Fee on a , said. doctor's office, he and his nurse 
rhey aiso Sal they abi an settie specific co Wal - ‘a “/ fh : 2 . The Brooklyn Park fire chief rushed to the hail 
the Soviet move was designed | + | | © called it a “disaster” and called “Most of the 
for all available fire-fighting focated before the flames 
reached them,” he said. Dr. Flax 


issues 
to split the United States from) Grounds for 

Mere Leddon equipment in Baltimore County { 

} ) also treated 70 of the injured at the 


By Donid J. Gonzales 


United Presa 


40 


| 
; 


i4 

_ftonsville * 
; dead suf- 
the challenge 


were laid by Mr. Eisenhower's 


Square, he did most of his writ- 
ing and was happier there than 
anywhere else 

Worshiped by a generation 
of Baltimoreans, though inevi- 
tably pooh-poohed by a few, he 
was a prophet with honor in 
his own land, a dominant figure 
in the intellectual life of his 
city as well as the Nation. No 
one contested the title bestowed | 
on him: The Sage of Baltimore. 

He was a son of Anna Abhau 
and August Mencken. The lat 
ter, who died when H. L. was, 
19 years old, was a hard-headed 
prosperous cigar manufacturer 
who loved a practical joke and 
was a self-styled atheist. H. L. 
inherited both the love of jokes 
and the iconoclasm. 

Grandfather Burkhardt Lud- 
wig Mencken emigrated from 
Germany where the Menckenii 
were an ancient family distin- 
guished by many lawyers and 


war settlement in his reply to 
Soviet Premier Nikolai Bulgan- 
in’s offer. 

A spokesman 
Prime Minister Sir Anthony 
Eden’s official party en route 
to the United States said “I as- 
sure you the British view com- 
pletely coincides. with Mr 
Eisenhower's on the _reasons 
for rejecting the Bulganin 
peace pact.” Eden will arrive 
at New York Monday aboard 
the liner Queen Elizabeth, and 
then go’to Washirgton for talks 
with the President. 

A spokesman for the Italian 
Foreign Office summed up 
much of the Western feeling by 
saying that the reply “showed 
awareness of the cohesion 
among the Atlantic (pact) na- 
tions.” 

The British Foreign Office 
had no official comment, but 
general British reaction is that 
a friendship pact would not 
solve the disputes outstanding 
between East and West. 

A French government spokes- 


for British 


‘that 


The London Weekly Ob- 
server said President Eisenhow- 
er was “right to contrast Bul- 
ganin’s ‘friendly letter’ with 
recent unfriendly action of the 
Soviet government.” 

Diplomatic observers report- 
ed from Moscow that Russia 
probably realized in advance 
President Eisenhower 
would reject Bulganin’s pro- 
posal. The Soviet press and 
radio carried the text-of Bul-| 
ganin’s letter to Mr. Eisenhow- 
er, but failed-to mention the 
President's rejection of the 
idea 

Diplomats said the Bulganin 
proposal was a shrewd stroke 
designed to make friends for 
Russia at the expense of the 
United States. One Moscow 
source said Russia probably 
knew United States policy 
frowns on bilateral friendship 
agreements outside the frame- 
work of the United Nations 
Thus, he said, the rejection 
would make the United States 
appear to be turning down a 


rejection of the 20-year treaty) 


of 
Soviet 


friendship proposed by 
Premier Nikolai Bul- 
ganin. The President told Bul- 
ganin Saturday it will take 
Russian deeds, not 
a pen,” to settle 
problems 

Eden arrives here today for 
three days of conferences with 
Mr. Eisenhower on such {far- 
reaching issues as the Israel- 


world 


Arab dispute, Red Chivia trade. | 
H-bomb tests, the Baghdad De-' 


fense Pact and Britain's dan- 
gerous feud with Saudi Arabia. 

Chairman Walter F. George 
(D-Ga.) of the Senate Foreign 
Relations Committee said he 
belives Eden may propose that 
this country become a partici- 
pant in the anti-Communist 
Baghdad Pact: The State De. 
partment previously has indi- 
cated opposition to any such 
move 

Interviewed on the CBS. 
WTOP “Face the Nation” tele. 
vision program, George also 
said Eden may propose that 


“a stroke of | 


Arrow locates Brooklyn 


thought it was from an ashtray 
“I looked up and saw smoke 
coming through the ventilator,” 


he related. “I shut 


off 


the 


blower and tried to call the fire 
department, but the wire was 


SCALE I* 


O : 
& ae 


Park, scene of the fire. 


looked like 
hell.” 
survivors 


It 
seen 


All the 


Hall pictures 


l've of 
who filed 
into South Baltimore General 
Hospital last night for treat 
ment told stories horribly simi- 
lar, 


Equip ment responded 
from Baltimore City and neigh- 
boring towns 

Nine of the bodies 
found huddled together, some 
on top of the others, in a side 
section of the hall's dance floor 
They were 8 feet from a door 
which had not been opened 
Firemen theorized that they 
had been shoved aside in the 
rush to escape the flames 

Ten bodies, burned beyond 
recognition, were taken to the 
Baltimore city morgue. 

Dr. Gustav Flaubert, deputy 
medical examiner of Anne 
Arundel County, said _ three 
were young girls and seven 
were women 

lie said there 
body near the 
the burned-out hall 
not removed, because 
feared the wall would 
Dr. Flaubert said a 
body was en route 
morgue 

William Padfield 
disaster chairman for 


were 


was anoiner 
north wall of 
but it was 
firemen 
topple. 
tweifth 
to the 


Red Cross 
northern 


scene 

The fire started shortly after 
> p. m. with the first alarm 
being turned in at 5:14. First 
unit 4o respond was the Brook- 
lyn Community Volunteer Fire 
Department which arrived 
within three minutes and im- 
mediately sent out a “general 
aiarm” plea for all available 
help from nearby communities. 

The ceiling over the kitchen 
where the fire started collapsed 
about 15 minutes later. Later 
the entire roof gave way. By 
6:20 the fire was “under con- 
trol.” 

Only the walls were left 
standing as firemen began 
searching through the smoking 
debris. Personal belongings 
were strewn all over the area, 
and those who had been inside 
milled about for some clue as 
to the safety of friends and 
relatives 

Julie Bowen, who had just 
emerged from the hall after 


See FIRE, Page 15, Col. 1 


Has Good Chance to Live 


— — 


——--— - — 


said the President's re-'*pipe of peace.” 


—— 


See EDEN, Page 9, Col. 4 


oo 


Frozen F oundling Baby Is Revived 
After Doctors Pronounce Him Dead 


ble gasps were noted, at yh They dont even know who 
point the baby was rus#€d to he is. 


the operating room, where ox- Cathleen Weber, 57, of 5616 
ygen was forced into the in- Eads st. ne., told police she 
fant’s lungs and adrenalin in- stepped out on her front porch 
: be jected into the heart. ‘about 11:15 a. m. yesterday to 
utes after several members of" 4+ 1:45 p. m. there was an bring in the mail, and “there 
the staff had pronounced 5/M sydible heartbeat of 80 a min- he was!’ 
dead. ute and several hours later the. He was 
_ The child, about five weeks child’s temperature had risen wrapped in 
old, was taken to the hospital's under normal room tempera-| blankets, Mrs. Weber said. She 
pediatric ward about noon ves- ture and continued oxygen ad-|was unable to estimate how 
terday with a temperature of ministration to 96 degrees—only | much time the baby had spent 
73 degrees and no detectibie 26 short of normal on her porch, she said, because 
heartbeat. Artificial respiration) Respiration and heartbeat, ap-| she had not left the house until 
was applied continuously with proached normal at the same she went for the mail.. 
no apparent success, and ihe) time, and although the baby| Police last night were exam. 
baby ~was officially called dead, stayed on the “critical” list,/ ining the blankets and the few 
9 with several internes concuf-|the pronouncement of death|poor pieces of clothing the 
_.. 21-23 ring in the pronouncement 'was rescinded and physicians baby wore in an effort to dis- 
Winchell ....35 Artificial respiration was| accorded the infant “a good eover some link to the identity 
Women’s .31-33 ‘continued, however, until, fee- chance to survive.” ‘of the foundling’s parents, 


D. C. General Hospital doc- 
tors battled yesterday to pre- 
serve the life of a frozen found. 
ling baby boy whose feeble 
| gasping was noted a few min- 


By Paul Sampson 
Staff Reporter 
| «What happens when 10,000 
| automobile dealers descend on 
Washington? 


Today’s Index 


Page | Page 
Alsops 9| Keeping Well 37 
Amusements 34} Kilgalien 34 
Classified .24-29 | Movie Guide 34 
Comics . 36-39} Night Clubs 30 
Crossword 36 | Obituaries 12 
District Line 38 | Parsons ....34 

9 


unconscious and 
two dirty white 


Sharing the speakers’ ros- 
trum with Sen. Kennedy will be 
- three other famous personali- 
ties: Herblock, Jean Shor and 
Mary McCarthy. 


Tickets at $3.50 are now on 
sale at your favorite bookstore 
and in the lobby of The Wash- 

ton Post and Times Herald, 
1515 L st. nw. Get yours now 
... all tables are reserved. 


scholars, to Baltimore in 1848. 
egg with him, he began by sit- 
ting at a bench rolling cigars 
dead 
pered and in time became a' - “I heard people banging. on 
tobacco wholesaler and mer- 
ty Reais ’ be Due to Spend 32 Million Hall,” Kahn said. “We keep that 
» so WER COUCH OE Th NRE, door locked ail the time and 
sions eS? When 10,000 Car Dealers Gath 
ing on. 
en 9 ar ca crs a er , | “I got a key from the cash 
Lunch With H * A S hi ~ Th t H the d I heard people scream 
| i 1e door scream- 
el c re ome IlSs a appen ing, ‘Let us through! Let us 
bln Alng a ag Bboy “I opened the door and a hun 
well-known Senator from Mas- . , FE eg gee 0 ean 
ores ee ae as “d0-| scribe the planning that went dred people fell into the room. 
discuss his new book, “Profiles ‘ 
In Courage,” at The Washing- naling oe 
Ong es Merah company hires all the first BP agen bedi oe laps A 
Book and Author Luncheon, ‘floor public rooms of the May-| 8°@5; 4%¢ + m working on ; 
Feb. 8th, in the Statler Presi- | ) 
‘bile Dealers Association, which’ party. It expects about 8000| Coming back to the present, 
thinks big when it comes to guests. he said that by the time the. 
and this is what happens: ‘buffet supper and cocktail/ Will have been attended by 
® A traffic jam develops out- party for 2000 persons. \from 15,000 to 20,000 persons. 
‘the Sheraton-Park. (The deal-|mate the dealers will spend $2,;2%d Many representatives ofp.” Pearson 39 
ers like to drive their prod-' million while here. allied industries. Editorials ....8| Picture Page 15 
16 
_ ©For a little Sunday enter-| started a year ago, according ir Jr., Washington auto! faderai Diary 11 | Radio-TV 
tainment in “good taste for the to Walter M. Kiplinger, con-|4e@ler who is director of the kip Sokolsky 
Goren 
| orchestra, : \who is promotion director for|™eeting last March. A detailed Si ae 
| © They buy about 3000 small’ the NADA, took time out from! See AUTO, Page 9, Col. 6 | Horoscope . 36! 


Though he brought a small nest 
and learning English. He pros-, man 
the door that leads into the 
chant 
rivate schools and the Balti- 
Pp Schools € [ didn’t know what was go 
register and went over to open 
Sen. Kennedy 
. : through!’ 
'cameras to give to women at-| answering the phone to de- 
sachusetts, John F. Kennedy, | 
clasts PR. in ion. 
®An automobile finance be the cpavention 
ton Post and Times Herald 
Well, the National Automo-\flower Hotel for a cocktail) S!plinger said. 
dential Room 
‘conventions, is meeting here) ® One auto firm throws a Convention ends Wednesday, it 
‘side their headquarters hotel, ¢ Convention officials esti-- That includes NADA members 
ucts wherever they go.) | Planning for the convention; Miplinger and A. Letwich | Events Today 12) Postlude ; 
) 5 | 
day” they hire a symphony vention manager. iplinger, Convention, ‘held their first) 


zy 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
2 Monday, January 30,1956 - 


Gee 


Legion Hits Hoover 


Unit 


Plan to Cut Veteran Aid 


i'The Legion expressed strong 
United Press opposition to 46 recommenda- 
, , tions of the Hoover Commis- 

The American Legion yester- sion, approved the “purpose” 
day sharply opposed 46 Hoover of 31 other recommendations, 
Commission recommendations and took no stand on 237 other 
which would change or restrict recommendations not “ger- 
the privileges and benefits of 'mane” to veterans’ programs. 


By John W. Finney 


veterans. 


The Legion reserved some of 


The Legion also called on the its strongest language for Com- 
Eisenhower Administration not mission recommendations 
to make any “far-reaching” stricting the Veterans Admin. 
changes in veterans’ programs istration hospital program and 
—as recommended by the com- the medical privileges of vet- 
mission—until veterans groups erans. 
have had a chance to express’ ft sharply criticized recom- 
their views. mendations for closing down 

It expressed opposition to VA hospitals declared surplus 
Hoover Commission recommen- by the Commission's medical 
dations affecting veteran medi- task force and for curtailing 
cal services, compensation, pens construction of new VA hos- 
sions, insurance, educational pitals. 
programs, home loan guaran-| “Too great stress has been 
tees and veterans preference given the dollar cost,” the 
in Federal employment. Legion said. “Too little atten- 

The Legion's opposition was tion has been given to the hu- 
expressed in a  15,000-word manitarian side of the question 
“analysis” of recommendations of treating those war veterans 
of the Commission on organi-\cither physically or mentally 
zation of the executive branch, | disabled.” . 
headed by former President’, “Guided by Dollar Cost” 


Hoover. | nel fp me 
e Legion opposed as being 

31 Points Approved “guided only by the standard 
The report, which represents of dollar cost” a proposal that 
the national position of the Le- a veteran's statement of inabil- 
gion, dealt only with recom- ity to pay for hospitalization 
mendations affecting veterans. be subject to verification. It 


re 


ost Tcupls 


These footnotes to the 
week's national news have 
been gathered by the report- 
ers of The Washington Post 
and Times Herald. 

British Prime Minister An- 
thony Eden's televised 45-minute 
press conference, set for 10:30 
a.m. Friday in the National 
Press Club, will be the first of 
its kind ever attempted by a) 
British chief—either at home| 
or abroad 
chief—either at home or abroad. 

Patterned after the traditional 
presidential press meetings in 
the White House, Eden’s ground 
rules call for each newsman to) 
identify himself and his news 
affiliation before voicing his 
question. The affair promises to 


' to-heart 


TV-radio talk to the 


American people. 
Record-setting as the 
total of Eden's efforts 


sum 


to get 


‘himself across to this country 


may be, their results still will 
have to be measured in terms of 
the popularity achieved by his 
redoubtable predecessor, Win- 


‘ston Churchill, observers agree 
o 7 7 


The dgree of “reluctance” 


judgeship to return to his 
old job as counsel to the Sen- 
ate Internal Security Subcom- 
mittee can be better caicu- 
lated in the light of these 
reports: 

*His resignation from the 
$17,000-a-year New York post 


|aisie and add, 
the minimum highest regard.” 
with which Robert Morris | 
quit his New York municipal | 


said VA hospital applications 
presently in use are adequate 
to determine an applicant's eli- 
gibility. for medical care. 

It scored as “unrealistic” a 
recommendation that veterans 
assume a liability to pay for 
hospital care of nonservice- 


connected disabilities. 


The Legion also lashed out 
at. a proposal that a Federal 


‘advisory council of health be 


Father’s Project 


Fight for Tax 
Cut Kept Up 
By Dingell 


International News Service 


The late Rep. John D. Dingell 
(D-Mich.), sponsored many tax- 
eut bills during his 22 years in 
,Congress—most of them aimed 

. at helping “the 

; little man.” 

Now his son, 
who has suc- 
ceeded him in 
the House, 


George Asks 
House Test 
Of Aid Plan 


Associated Press 


Sen. Walter F. George (D-| 
Ga.) said yesterday he has ad-| 
vised Administration leaders to 
test the temper of the House, 
before they bring their pro-| 
posed long-range foreign aid) 
program before the Senate. 

George, who heads the Sen- 
ate Foreign Relations Commit- 
tee, has announced his opposi- 
tion to any over-all commit- 


is 


i\means 


MANCHESTER, N. H., Jan. 
29 (‘*)—Sen. 
land (R-Calif.) said tonight he 
will not allow his name to be 


William F. Know- 


Knowland Holds Name 
Out of N. H? Primary 


“I will not permit my name 


‘to be entered in the preferen- 


tial primary in New Hampshire. 
As I have stated previously, 


in New Hampshire’s|I am for President Eisenhower 


ntered 
disiin the tet ion primary. But 


he made it clear he will not dis- 
courage his supporters from 


running a delegate slate favor- 


able to his candidacy. 

The Senate Minority .Lead- 
er’s announcement apparently 
President Eisenhower 


,til that time has passed, 


if he runs again.” 

“I believe the President will 
make his decision known by 
the middle of February and un 
I will 
take no affirmative action.” 

Asked whether he would 
anything to encourage a slate 


“dao 


appointed by the President to 
act as a coordinator of Federal 
health programs. 
of such a “super agency,” it 
said, “would add nothing to the 


types of care and treatment now | 


provided by the Veterans Ad- 
ministration for disabled vet-| 
erans. 


“Not Opposing” Hoover Group 


In opposing the recommenda: | 
tions, the Legion said it “is not 
opposing the Hoover Commis- 
sion. Rather we are in the posi- 
tion of giving constructive sup- 
port to the system of benefits 
and services which have been 
created by the Congress.” 

Among the proposals ap- 
proved by the Legion was one 
calling on the VA to emphasize 
medical care and rehabilitation 
services for ‘the aging veteran 
in order to reduce the number 
of chronic bed cases. 


The creation 


‘equipment, it said. 


ments for future year foreign 
economic spending. He has 
said he might consider some 
specific projects but wants 
‘Congress to retain a yearly 
‘check on policies and spend- 
ing. 

With Sen. William F. Know- 
land (R-Calif.) taking the same 
‘attitude, there were indica- 
tions the Administration will 
take the hint and try its luck 
in the House first. 

Chairman James P. Rich- 
}ards (D-S. C.) of the House For- 
‘eign Affairs Committee has in- 
dicated more. sympathy with 
Secretary of State John Foster 

PARIS, Jan. 29 — French Dulles’ proposal than George) 
scientists have just completed and Knowland, the Senstg 


a mobile radar “brain” that can | Minority Leader. 
direct missiles accurately to a|. S0Wland has 
distance of 50 miles against at-\284!"St economic aid for 
tack planes, the newspaper Le neutral” countries and the 
Journal du Dimanche reported Senate Committee will take a 
today. The brain consists of me phew: aspect of the pro- 
' ram Tuesday. 
two big trucks full of electronic The Senate group has called 
‘John Sherman Cooper, Ambas- 
\sador to India, before it then 


United Press 


Honored at VA 


Naomi F. Mann, Veterans Ad- 
ministration placement offi- 
cer, will be honored today 
with two awards for her many 
years of outstanding service 
in ‘the recruitment and place- 
‘ment of handicapped workers. 


a 


New Radar ‘Brain’ 


Reuters 


come out 


Precedent for Eden... With Ike’s Rules... 


Morris vs. Boredom... Profits and Income 


was listening in respectful pain 
the other day to a Republican 
colleague's speech full of 
praise for the Democrats. The 
ordeal over, Brooks confided 
that it reminded him of a Con- 
gressman who habitually in- 
sisted that “I have the highest 
regard for all my colleagues.” 
But then he'd look across the 
“For you, I have 


> 
Non-stop air travel between 
Washington and any European 
Capital is being eyed by Penta- 
gon officials as the answer to 
its ever-present “Case of the 
Impatient VIP.” 
They have in mind a new 
airliner, now abuilding, as a 


for testimony behind closed 
doors. 
The Committee also plans to 


carrying on 
where his fa 
ther left off 
Young Dingell, 
29. who bears 
his father’s 

name, a n- 
| Dingell nounced last 
night he would introduce a tax 
|bill today. 


Dingell termed his bill “a 
tribute to the vision” of his 
father “and to his humaneness 
and concern for the common 
man.” The measure would in- 
clude a $100 increase in the $600 
‘exemption each taxpayer now 
receives. 

Dingell said ‘ ‘this is the little 
mans tax cut,” and estimated 
‘that more than half the $2,474.- 
000,000 tax reduction would go 
to families with incomes under 
$5000 per year. 

The late Congressman re- 
vealed to a newsman last Sept. 
12, in what was probably his 
final interview, that he was try- 
ing to work out a tax cut “to 
help the little man.” who, he 
stated, “certainly deserves hav- 
ing his tax load reduced.” 

That was a week before he 


Brucker is being billed by the 
National Press Club in his role 
as guest speaker for its upcom- 
ing Wednesday luncheon as 
“The Man Who Laughed At 
Sen. Joe McCarthy.” 

. > * 

The President's heart attack 
is being mentioned prominently 
among grounds for expectations 
that the American Heart Asso- 
ciation this year will top the $15 
million it collected in 1955 for 
research on the country’s hed 
est killer.” 

Gen. Mar. Clark, USA (Ret.),' 
manager of this year’s heart 
fund campiagn, said last week 
the President's attack had fo- 
cussed public attention on the 


look further into proposals for| died. He said he planned to in- 
American participation in fi-\troduce the bil! just as soon 
nancing the proposed Aswan'as Congress met again the fol- 
Dam in Egypt. lowing January. Dingell Sr 
Under Secretary of State|was the No. 2 man on the tax 
Herbert Hoover Jr., is reported! writing House W ays and Means 
to have told the Senate Ap- Committee. 
propriations Committee last Dingell's 
week that a proposed initial would also 
$55 million United States con- itreatment 
tribution may be taken from/ dividends.” He estimated this 
area development funds al-|'would save the Government 
ready appropriated for the In- $420 million a year. 
ternational Cooperation Ad-| He said.a $100 increase in ex- 
ministration. ‘emptions would eliminate en- 
This has raised questions in tirely the payment of income 
some Senatory minds whether taxes by 5,600,000 small taxpay- 
the ICA is going ahead with ers. 
commitments which would in-) 
volve other American expend- 
itures over the 10-year period 
expected to be required for 
construction of the dam. 


son said his bill 
repeal “special 


If you are 
hard of hearing, 
others know it... 


if vou wear s SONOTONE, 
chances are they won't. 


will have no opposition in the of delegates to file in your be- 
March 13 ballot’s preference half,’ the Californian smiled 
poll but that a slate of pro- and replied 
Eisenhower delegates will have’ “Well, as IT understand it, | 
to fight for the 14 votes the have no control over sit 
State will have at the Repub- yation.” 
lican National Convention. 
Knowland reiterated his per- 
sonal support for President|©°"Sists of two separate sec- 
Eisenhower in the event the! tions—a “preference poll’ in 
President decides to seek an-| which voters are given an op- 
other term. But his action ap-| portunity to express a prefer- 
parently assured an intra-party|ence for the presidential can- 
battle for convention delegates.| didate of their choice and a 
Ending several weeks of|separate contest for delegates 
speculation as to what role he) to the national political conven- 
will play in the primary, Know- | tions. The preference poll is not 
land told a news conference: | binding on delegates, 


that 


The New Hampshire primary 


ee 


ees 


accorded corporate | |i 


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Enjoy your cruise or Southern holiday 
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Italian cottons and new Wash and Wear 


Orlon and cotton blends. 


110.95 & 11.95 


LaCoste French Lisle Shirts, $7.‘ 
And Matching Long Hose, 83.95 


be the novelty relief of what ts 
shaping up as the biggest pub- 
licity burst ever launched in be- 
half of a visiting Prime Minister. | 
It includes personal addresses 
to both houses of Congress sep-| 
arately on Thursday | and a heart- | 


‘SPECIAL NOTICE 
OF SPECTAL 


had been drafted even before 
he received the official offer 
te come back to the $13,617- 
a-year Senate post. 

* He has long been bored 
stiffer than the salary differ- 
ence on the bench and missed 
acutely the bright lights and 
excitement generated in the 
anti- subversive hearings. 

> 7 


replacement for the older craft 
in their Lockheed Super-Con- 
stellation transport fleet. It 
contemplates a 6400-mile range. 

No existing airliner, includ- 
ing jet airliners that can be 
put in service by 1960, can 
count on non-stop trans-Atlan- 
tic service if the winds are 
unfavorable Although the new 


disease. This year's drive will 
be conducted through next 
month. 


Sole Agents for Hickey-Freeman Clothes and Cavanagh Hots 


GOLDHEIMS 


FUEL OIL? 


Automatic weather controlled de-| 
liveries. Meter-printed delivery 
Four long-playing phonograph tickets your guarantee of getting all 
records alread) are making the the oil you pay for. We serve D. C., 
rounds (that’s a joke. son) in Md. Ve. Use Our Budget Plan. 
the interest of the ne The Old Reliable 1409 H STREET 
901 Washington Bidg. 


election. They lampoon 
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126.000 “new shares of stock ef revenues by forecasting a rise 
os -ee4|im personal income and no 
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Fala oft pre-emptive rights, bests. +a | ss ago —— a. that | TA , 
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ncrease 6s here pro sonal in- | } 
axed. by the  Boarg. of Birectors st com godine gy gemma A noted publisher in aha 
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Pebruary 10. 1956. wii| “The Secretary's (Humphrey, | Ceareens a : 
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ye AKERS . conservative,” this  highly- others simply by what they say 
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publishers have printed full de- 
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14, IIL A postcard will do. 


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9 AM.—9 P.M. Daily 
9 A.M, to 6 P.M. Sat. 


To the Gentlemen of the Press! 


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thet pein® @ picture. 


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uae 


Little América V 
IsGrowing Town 


LITTLE AMERICA V, Ant-|Task Force 43, who said he is 


arctica, Jan. 29 ™ — Three 
weeks ago this main base of 
Operation Deepfreeze was two 
olive drab tents lost in a gently 
undulating sea of snow 

It looked then as if it could 
he blown away in the first 


blizzard 

Today it's a bustling com- 
munity of .12 buildings with a 
working population of 140, lost 
in the same sea of snow. With 


its whiformly low, flat, orange’ 


buildings, the base looks like a 
lowcost housing development 
developed by an architect with 
a passion for oversize shoe 
boxes 

But what the camp lacks in 
chic it makes up in durability. 
It is well-heated, lighted and 
provisioned with acres of food 


and equipment surrounding the | 


buildings. All in all, the base 
looks well dug-in for the worst 
the Antarctic winter night can 
offer 

With seven more buildings 
scheduled to go up, Little 


only street is snow pavement 


completely satisfied with the 
progress at the fifth camp to 
be erected over the years by 
American explorers on the 
mammoth Ross Ice Shelf. 
Little America’s main and 


about 30 feet wide. A tunnel 
of chicken wire and burlap is 
being built down the middle. 
Feeder tunnels will he tall, to 
permit & man to walk upright, 
and the 76 Seabees who will 
spend the winter here will need 
them when the heavy snows 
come. 

Buildings already up include 
two communal bathrooms, a 
communications .center, dis- 
bursing and aerological office, 


‘ 


four barracks, storeroom, sick 
bay and a powerhouse | 
Still to be constructed are| 
two aircraft maintenance shops} 
near the air strip and three! 
buildings for International Geo- 
physical Year (IGY) scientists 
working on weather, geomag- 
netics and magnetic observa- 

tions. 
buildings 


Surrounding the 


MENCKEN—Fr. Pg. I 


H. L. Mencken, the Baltimore newspaperman, wit, author 
and critic who died yesterday, is shown above at various 


| 


begun, and F. Scott Fitzgerald. | 
After 10 years with Smart 


America is expected to be self- are several hundred acres af more Polytechnic Institute, a/ Set, Mr. Mencken became edi- 
high school. He did not attend | tor—again with Nathan—of the ihe former Miss Sara Haardt, 


sustaining within a week. Thus 


the expedition’s second base. 
400 miles to the west. aft 
McMurdo Sound, where chang 
ing ice conditions delayed cargy 
unloading 

This correspondent visited 
the site here with Rear Adm 
George Dufek. commander of 


N.A.D.A.:— 
@ Is 1% Safety Enough? 


o- 


SAFETY SALLY 
SAYS: took of 
Your Cer! You 
have WEAK.LINK 
bumpers, WEAK. 
LINK Meons B1G 
bumpers oftach- 
ed to avte treme 
by thin straps, 
thot break off 

in collisions, 
absorbing 

ONLY about 

T% of the 


crosh! 


uSMse 
. 


» 1954 Avute Div 


N. Y. for Cairo 


WHITE PLAINS, N. Y., Jan.itnto Verse.” 


food cases, fuel drums, housinj 
it is much further along than) panels, mechanics’ spare part college. 


and radio and weathe 

ment 
Little 

“weether 


r equ 
will 
for 


America 


central’ the en- 


arctic 


teges from attending on 
ground that it was a waste of 


b e time 


After leaving school, he 


book publisher. Mr. Mencken 
remained as editor unti! 1933. 
As editor of the American 


stages of his career. From left: at the 


age of 10 (in 1890); 


with George Jean Nathan (left) in 1920, when they were co- 


succumbed to marriage, how- 
ever. 


His bride was an Alabaman, 


discouraged his pro- American Mercury, a magazine whom he had met some years 
the Started by Alfred Knopf, the before when giving his 


an- 
nual leclure at Goucher Col- 
lege. Baltimore 

Mrs. Mencken was a writer. 


lire IGY program in the Ant-\ worked for three years in the Mercury he became famous for too, and she and her husband 
family cigar factory, from which | s slashing attacks on “the lived 


a contented life at 


he wsa emancipated when it Bible Belt,” Rotarians, Chris- 704 Cathedral st., Baltimore, 


Pilot in Sports 
Plane Leaves 


week 


iP 


29 


He then got a job as 
reporter with 
Morning Herald, and at 23 was 


icity editor. 
First Book at 23 


His twenty-third year was'| 


his first book, “Ventures | 


The locally 


Through his editorials, col-' 
lected in a series of books titled 
“Prejudice.” he became the 
country’s leading satirist. 

When those who felt assailed 


“a pigs snout that loves, 
“a literary stinkypot” 


as 
muck,” 


was sold upon his father’s death.| tian Science, Prohibition and|though her health was seldom 
an $8-a-| everything else he considered good. She died May 31, 1935, 
the old Within “American Boobology.”| whiten 37 years old. 


Man of Vitality 


Exuberant, vitality character- 
ized Mr. Mencken as a man as 
well as a writer. He loved 


also marked by the appearance struck back with such phrases jokes, good food and beer. It 
lof 


is said that he once presented 
the steward of a Baltimore club 


\ veteran 40-year-old| printed, 46-page book revealed | and “disordered intellect,” Mr. With a bronze medal in recog- 


airline pilot climbed aboard his|the current popularity of Rud-| Menken collected a representa- "ition of reviving Maryland hoe 


, 
single-engine sports lane to- , 
P you 


and was also marked by the! flexikon”—and collected royal- of brief letters—the envelopes 


day and took off for Egypt in 


thful imitations of his work 


as “Menckeniana, a Schimp 


ard Kipling with its many tive selection and published it ¢4*e. 


He was a prodigious writer 


a bid for a new 6000-mile, non-|same wordy extravagance that'ties on it. In a prefatory note, of which frequently also en- 


stop solo record. 

‘Capt. Williaim Judd, wearing 
a brown business suit and a big 
smile. left for Cairo at 


characterized much of his later | signed “The Publisher,” it was closed religious tracts 
writing 


said Mr. Mencken “has proba- 


Many 
of the letters gave encourage- 


In 1906 he became secretary bly been denounced more vigor- ment to young writers 


g-31 and editor of the Evening Her-|ously and 


at greater length 


He probably helped more tal 


the author to his interminable 
list of deflatable personalities 
“A capital tabloid reporter.” he 
once said of him, “was lost to 
the world when Lewis learned to 
read and write.” 

No one was immune. On a 
succession of United States 
Presidents he commented: 

Woodrow Wilson—The self 
bamboozled Presbyterian, the 
right thinker, the great moral 
statesman, the perfect model 
of a Christian cad.” 

Warren G. Harding — “No 
other such complete and dread- 
ful nitwit is to be found in the 
pages of American history.” 

He dismissed Calvin Coolidge 
retroactively by referring to 
Herbert Hoover as “Lord Hoov- 
er” and “a fat Collidge.” Frank- 
lin D. Roosevelt was “a snake 
doctor” and a “medicine man” 
whose speeches were “full of 
hooey.” 

At one time or another he ob- 
served: 

(On Government): “I believe 
that all government is evil, in 
that all government must make 
war on liberty, and that the 
democratic form of goyernment 


| 


| 


. 


\ 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD ~ 


. Monday, January 30, 1956 


© ie 


be 


z 


editors of “Smart Set”: 


ee 


Pe 


« 


ae 


a 


at the keyboard of his typewriter, 


and (far right) he’s shown at the age of 75 last September. 


instituted by his second stroke 
In the afternoon he listened 
to a radio broadcast of the 
opera, “Die Meistersinger,” 
about 3 p. m. while lying on 
a couch in the second-floor 
office of his old three-story 
southwest Baltimore home 
“He napped about an hour, 
and about 6 p. m. took a light 
supper of shrimp on toast 
While he ate, | read him the 
headlines of Evening Sun. 
reading article only 
when something interested 
him,” August reported 
“Nothing interested him yes- 
terday (Saturday). There were 
no robberies. or murders or 
women shooting their husbands. 
or anything like that.” 
There followed another «es 
sion of classical musie and a 
reguiar Saturday-night visit by 
Louis Cheslock, head of theory 
and composition at the Pea- 
body Conservatory of Music 
Everybody had “two mild Gib- 
son cocktails, our current win- 
ter drink. Last winter, it was 
scotch.” 
After 


of CO} 


ine 


full 


ine 


amusing” ses 


SiOn iON 


\ugust 
said ("he 


and the 


loft 


H. L. Mencken, Noted ‘Sage of Baltimore, Dies in His Sleep at 75 


household retired for the night. 
That was about 9:15. shortly 
after H. L. complained of not 
feeling very well—“but he ak 
ways said that lately. 
Breakfast was readied for 
him as usual about 7:45 a. m., 
but he could not be aroused. 
He was pronounced dead of an 
acute coronary occlusion by Dr. 
loseph FE. Muse. A subsequent 
autopsy fixed the time of death 
at about 4 a. m 
August said that last week 
his brother had completed the 
task of arranging some 50,000 
pieces gf personal correspond- 
ence, most of it transeribed 
form original secretarial notes, 
The bulk is scheduled for pres 
entation to the New York Pub- 
lic Library, but that portion 
of it pertaining to Baitimore 
and his native state will go to 
the Enoch Pratt Free Library 
in Baltimore. 
Funeral arrangements were 
incomplete last night, but his 
brother said they would be prt- 
vate 
Besides 


survived bi 


Mencken is 
Gertrude 


August, 
a sister 


Mencken. of Baltimore. and an 
other brother 


burgh 


Charles, of Pitts- 


a. m.. from an ice-coated West. 2!4, and when the paper col-| than any other American Of ented young writers to get a 
chester Airport runway and lapsed that same year Mr. this time hearing than any other critic 
in a freezing drizzle Mencken joined the staff of Two years later he assaulted and editor of his time. And 

His plane, the “Star of the| the Sunpapers as Sunday edi-| the sensibilities of the religious| despite his busy life—in 1949 
Red Sea,” was sa heavily loaded | ‘°T, drama critic and later edi-| with a book, “Treatise on the he estimated his life's output 
with fuel that the tires» were| torial writer. Thereafter he Gods,” in which he described at more than five million words 
pressed flat and the under-| Was actively connected with) hig religious attitude “roughly —he always found time to visit 
carriage spread the Sunpapers, off and on, &5\ as one of amiable skepticism.” | the dick. 

But Judd lifted his 1650-/4 staff member and in time as| His views on democracy) 4 fabulous personality, Mr 
pound Cessna from the run-| director of the A. S. Abell Co.,/ were also unconventional. In &| Mencken may go down in his. 
way in only 1100 feet and soon| Publisher of the pavers. |preface written in 1948 for anitory as the American Samuel 
was winging north toward Bos-| Despite the distinction he! anthology of his writings, he Johnson doing for himself 
ton on the Great Circle route| Sained as a magazine editor,|said: “I do not believe in de what Boswell did for the Eng- 
to Rome and then Caito. He critic and lexicographer, Mr./mocracy, but I am _ perfectly! \ichman. _ 
expected to reach Rome in 35 Mencken always thought of willing to admit that it pro ff was through the pages of 
hours and,’if he has enough) himself as primarily a newspa- vides the only really amusing pis Smart Set that Mr nen 
fuel, he will continue on to) PeTman. form of government ever eN- gave initial voice te the views 
Cairo. Otherwise he will stop During the presidential cam-| qured by mankind.” He also of such native literary stalwarts 
in Rome anc refuel paign of 1948, though 68 vears ssid: “In no other country ss Sinclair Lewis and Deaiees 

[The Civil Aeronautics Ad- Old, he covered the political) known to me is life as safe and jp the early days of their strug 
ministration said Judd report- Com¥entions of the three par- agreeable, taking one day with gies for recognition 
' d his position to the weather-| ties; as was his habit, with cus-| another, as it is in these states.” On the friendliest of terms' His brother, August, told re 
, hip Charley as 800 miles east; tomary outspokenness. Among Mr. Mencken's with Lewis. Mr. Mencken. how. porters that H. L's last full 
f Newfoundland at 7:42 p. m.| Wrote Trilogy achievements was his continu- ever, could not resist adding day of life followed a routine 
EST), the Associated Press re- t i he ing study of the American . 
ported.| | Early tn his sixties he wrote | language. The first result of 

Judd took along a bag of the trilogy of books, “Happy his study of the difference be- 
oranges, a box of raisins, a few| Days,” “Newspaper Days" and|tween the English of England| 
‘sandwiches and a container of!“ Heathen Days” in which he) ,n4 the English of America! 
coffee. jrecalled his youth with a nos|~.. published in 1919. He 

He hopes to break the light — hilarity that is in-| wrote: 

io on-s c S. “¢ 
by the late William P. Odom in|, In 1908 Mr. Mencken began |, “Such grammar, so-called, as 
1949 when he flew 4957 miles| doing monthly articles for the | ** ‘#080% In our schools an 
now defunct magazine Smart, Colleges, is a grammar standing 
from Honolulu to Teterboro , mas «| fourlegged upon the theoriz 
(N. J.) Airport. ove SOS ee Seen See oe ings and false inferences of 


than, who began doing its the-|**s*. 
ater articles. In 1914 the editor-| English Latinists, eager only to 
break the wild tongue of 


ship was offered to Nathan, ” 
'who accepted on condition Mr. |5akespeare to a rule; and its 
frank aim is to create in us 


Mencken would be co-editor. 
Mr. Mencken and Nathan @ Digh respect for a book lan- 
guage which few of us ever 


ROK General 
were the first in the United 


SEOUL (Monday), Jan. 30 "F States to print the work of actually speak and not many of 
Assassins dressed in Army uni- James Joyce, Max Beerbohm, mis oud aoe gyn his 
| for Ford Madox Ford and D. H oe. § - 
ee 2 ee Lawrence. ‘Theodore Dreiser signage Sees grr g 
e y 4 ; formes army’s| 2nd Frank Harris became regu- anc two supplements, an 3 
jRepuatc: oC ‘et at; |lar contributors to the Smart |@#y it is recognized as a stand- 
counter-intelligence chief, Maj.) hard work in the field. 
'Gen. Kim Chang Yong, 36, as Set. New American writers to Mr Menck . ar 
ne sede te ble feee to work 2ppear in its pages over the Per a pon +h at aS pe oes 
cen thin hamee tin Monel. vears were Sara Teasdale, Joyce |: nob o - le a Se had 
‘| ‘Twe unidentified men in ROK |Kilmer, Eugene O'Neill, Ben) '™ ~~ S sae re oo 
‘army uniforms rode up beside | echt and Thyra Samter Wins-|™ ache! oe " 1936 d 
him and shot four times at the | ow. Among other writers to|° ay # . 
general. Two shots struck his|#?Pe4* '" the pages of the peri- r 
chest, another ripped through | odieal_ subtitled +" magazine| 
his chin. The fourth hit the left | © spr sett gh were Lord Dun- | 
foot of his driver. The assailants **": whose vogue had not yet) 


escaped. 


is at least as bad as any of the 
other forms.” 

(On religion): “I believe that 
religion, generally speaking, 
has been a curse to mankind... 
all of the Protestant churches 
are in an advanced state of de 
composition and, save for the 
moron South, no one takes 
them seriously .. . the Catholic 
outfit is in much better case, 
if only because it is run by 
much smarter fellows ... the 
Jews are. disintegrating on the 
theological side as they reach 
out for power on the political 
8408 . a. 

(On marriage): “Marriage its 
a great institution, but who 
wants to live with an institu- 
tion?” 


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THE WASHINGTON POST World | ene a —— ° + 
oud TIMES MERALD beens | weep ae Nationalists fers “aad Se ciietsy datoreh 


c"=_60 Are Killed as French’ ae Raidisles 


‘Battle Moroccan Rebels py” Sg Off China 


' 


PARIS, Jan. 29 ‘®—Moroccan | lious tribesmen began their at- cations the rebeJs were spread-| TAIPEH, Formosa, Jan. 29 (? 


g tribesmen and French Legion-|tacks in the Riff in early Oc-\ing south in an apparent effort!) - § | >» % pug \Chinese Nationalists guerillas SALTZ F STREET 
‘ , naires clashed yesterday in A nnd tober. to cut off the city of aa about | 3 oa raided several sma! islands off, 
‘ Riff Mountains of northern 0-| The Press Agency said the ‘25 miles southeast of the scene|. © ¥ se: Ree Sy ~ ithe Red China coast last night, 
FRANKENSTEIN’? ; roceo and more than 60 men clash came near Taineste, 16 of yesterday's engagement. nm : & awe capturing an unannounced SEMI-ANNUAL 
| were killed, the semiofficial miles south of the Spanish Mo-! Should the rebelling tribes- Noe ee vu of prisoners and t 
Read the story on poge French Press Agency reported roccan border. Eighteen Le-\men succeed in encircling the ee me number of p e booty 


r 

' 

| 

i 

| 

i 

' 

' 

. 1 tonight kill ia before withdrawing, the Na 
j on ' gionnaires were listed as ed. | ¢j TS Na- 

of Know the FACTS. W's . The reves vote Nims : Sultan Sidi Stchemeed Ben | thee po! sane betwen aoa ame s @ |tionalist Defense Ministry an- 

g the new “ne bics - no , ee : gy seg “er Youssef and his provisional |ern and western Morocco. Taza, ae. em nounced today. 

" slant’’ pocket - sized § single engagement since rebel- French Moronccan government a ay Ss gees) geek we a . i The querillas landed on Tal. 

mage: fne trem a | are preparing to enter negotia-| only or ro —— ien, Shihyu, Tunglu, Hislu and ' 

i 

i 

! 

‘ 

i 

' 

' 

- 


—— | tions with the French-for what/|the Atlantic coast and the Al-| ee. 
tevets i : | other tiny islands near Com- 


Washington SUEDE Moroccans hope will be a aie gH border. | . ist-held Ping Kelas 9 | 
measure of independence. | French officials today said munist- tan Island, 70 4 
8. TODA y! | The Sultan, only recently re-|rebel attacks have stepped up| International Mews =| ies across the Formosa Strait 100% Pure Cashmere 
ifs fiaves CLEARED with vel omen to his throne, has been |on a perimeter five to seven| W eighty Problem from northern Fornsa, the | 
vety fort and bright color. . . 


appealing for calm in the pro- miles from the outskirts. | ministry said. REG. $929.50 SWEATERS 


i'tectorate so the crucial talks, A rebel strike, referred to as Seveh-month-old Donaldo of Civilians living on the islands 
tentatively set to begin about “grave,” occurred today at the Managua, Nicaragua, has his gave the guerillas a joyous wel 


Feb. 15, will not be upset. small village of Gueldaman, ,. come and asked when the Na- ‘ eo 
weight checked in Managua’s ‘tionalists planned to counter- Bo i Mee 93°” 


French officials in Rabat,'about 12 miles from Taza.| 
, The Dye Work Speciclist French Morocco’s capital, said Three dead and four wounded, Love and Faith Center. The attack the mainland, the an- 
ee ee 7 ie Ave. N.W. earlier today there were indi- were reported. The French dis-| Center is supported in part | nouncement said. | | | 

. by the U. N. Children’s Fund | The communique said the eh Biese time seduced! Lees 

Sy (UNICEF). ‘guerillas encountered their - Py sleeved full-feshioned cash 
only resistance at Shihyu and ‘€. ’ meres ia charcoal end. light 
that that was quickly overcome . som” i grey, light blue, yellow, 
patched armored cars to the With the Communist detach- Swed. id chee boawwa ond ches green. 
area. ment chief and many of his sol- * @.: Stes off ciune tn oll aaleme. 


diers captured. Other sweaters of lambs 


Na Ouster Reported After distributing anti-Com-, rool d liv reduced. 
SY wre ‘munist leaflets, the raiders re- Ay ea nertenn Py 
VIENNA, Austria, Jan. 29) RIES a pe oe 
. Imre Nagy, former Premier of | 
Hungary, has been ~~ ; 


expelled, 


from the Communist Hungarian ; Tae ‘ 
Workers’ Party, according to iy iA VW, 
travelers reaching here today.) 


This was seen to have sosition| 


* |away the last serious opposition 
to Matyas Rakosi, the party's 
hard-bitten First Secretary.’ 
Nagy’s expulsion was believed: 
to have taken place in Decem-| 


ber. 


Moslem League Elects | — | 
KARACHI, Pakistan, Jan. 29 : 
‘—Sardar Abdur Rab, ho Pt | Regularly $45 $32.50 & $35 Regularly $25 
— was elected president of | OUTER JACKETS | OUTER JACKETS | OUTER JACKETS 
the Moslem League, Pakistan's) b 
ruling party. $33 23-95 ] 4 95 
Nishtar, a close associate of| Denego! tweed in imported tweeds 


4 , Cashmere and wee! 
the late Mohamed Ali Jinhah,'| the P oer Natt ian ante od shorty jeckets. Knit 
; mecdcetl, or vy set 
founder of Pakistan, is a League Saed ty oak tn 8 iden, Pitaerte bottom. xipper 


veteran. He succeeds former | sks @ith: 600 length. Limited frent. Neturel, ten 


©0600 0680080888 80006008888 OFO8848F8 8848888888888 884888 SOS OS 6S @ Prime Minister Mohammed Ali, | sts Sg deal i poe. ane ge ny 
© ad ro Ambassador to the United 
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. 
® Police Battle Maltese | Natural and slate grey, suede front 21-95 


| VALLETA, Malta, Jan. 29 an Flot Mionon Se en 
_Club-swinging police rushed to) ee ae 
the defense of Nationalist Party | Now York Sirloin 
speakers who were attacked to-| | 


|day by supporters of the Labor| Chonped lenderigit SALTZ FE STREET 
Party. They beat back a jeer-| 


‘ing crowd that included two! Premum Lamb bheps 
Labor members of Parliament. | 


The speakers were pelted for y Washington: 1341 F STREET NW. 
two hours by bits of iron, Clarendon: 1178 WN. HIGHLAND ST. 
stones, eggs and fruit. They) 
were pounced upon by some | ME. 8-4481 
members of the audience while | . 


leaving the speakers’ platform | 
‘and took refuge in a nearby | RESTAURANT 
house. # 61900 K STREET, NW 


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* LAGOS, Nigeria, Jan. 29 © 
‘least one woman was injured 
crowd of Indians demonstrat-/ here along with a capacity 
night to forestall further mob/by the excited shouts of the 
rioting in which an estimated) beth did not go into the water. 
Gandhi was murdered Jan.\help push back the crowd 


Queen Bilizabeth I is outmatched in royal regalia on her 
arrival at Lagos, capital of Nigeria. 
is Oba Adeniji-Adele, president of the Lagos town council. 


§ 
4 Pe 


PreInaugural Arrivals | 
Jam Up Protocol at Rio 


RIO DE JANERIO, Jan. 29 Mjant chefs, five — headwaiters, 
Foreign delegations for the|and 180 waiters. They will use 
Tuesday inauguration of Jus-| 10,000 plates, 23,000 pieces of 
eelino Kubitschek as President | silverware, 850 pounds of but- 
were arriving at such a fast\ter. 420 pounds of cream, 200 
clip today the capital wasicans of mushrooms, 100 cans 
running out.of motorcycle po-\of asparagus, 400 lobsters, 50 
lice escorts. cases of French champagne, 30 

First arrivals among repre-| cases of whisky and 6000 bot- 
sentatives of 60 countries were/|ties of soft drinks. 
escorted from the airport by| The menu will include caviar, 
six policemen with screaming pate de foie gras, filet of sole, 
sirens on the protocol ride|lobster, pheasant and several 


through the center of Rio'kinds of salads as well as 
de Janeiro. But so many im-|cakes and various ices. pee 4 

, ra . gier doesn't expect to profit 
portant visitors arrived on each from this trip. He said he is 


commercial airliner that the\ doing it for his love of this 
escorts were cut to two motor-| country and the honor of being 
cyclists. | chosen. 

The 16-member United States | 
delegation will be headed by 


¢ 


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Associated Press 


When stomach acid 


In crown and robes 


, ‘A wildly excited crowd of 
New Riots Feared) 4 fricans staged a neaf-riot here 
today in an effort to see visit- 
. oF 
Police Fire 
|wher a wooden barrier gave 
/way before the pushing thou- 
ing in a Bombay slum area on|congregation of approximately 
the eve of the eigthth anniver-| 900 persons. 
violence Monday. Ten persons| thousands of Nigerians milling 
were arrested and a 9 p. m. to| around outside the church. 
200 persons were killed here! The cool and quiet of the 
earlier this month. beach was a far cry from the 
30, 1948, by Nathuhram Godse,' around the cathedral. 
a Maharastrian Communalist.; The ruler of Lagos, 


ing Queen Elizabeth II attend 
church services. 
On Bombay 
ye ‘ 
Mob; Hit 2 
f 7 t sands. 
——— | The Queen, who arrived here 
sary of the death of Mohandas; Several women fainted in the 
K. Gandhi. At least two per-| Cathedral. 
5 a. m. curfew was put into| Later, the royal party went 
effect. to Lighthouse Beach, a cool 
The shooting incident took)| hectic scene in Lagos during 
place in the industrial Thakurd-| divine services. 
The Maharastrians are one of. 
two opposing factions in the 


A special police contingent 

BOMBAY. India, Jan. 20 m yesterday with the Duke of 

song. were wounded. The Duke of Edinburgh read 

The security forces were|sea resort in the sweltering 

war region, one of the worst-| A British police official 
political struggle over Bombay's 


Nigeri ‘Mob’ 

scuffied with the throng in an 

‘effort to maintain order. At 

Edinburgh, attended a 70- 

Polige opened fire today on a minute service in the cathedral 

Heavy police reinforcements|the Sunday lesson. His read- 

moved into this tense city to- ing was almost drowned out 

marshaled to prevent a repeti-|country. The Duke went swim- 

tion. of the recent week-long ming and surfboarding. Eliza- 

hit areas in the recent wave of jumped to the head of a con- 

rioting | tingent of 20 Nigerian police to 

future status. 

Rumors spread through the 


elty tonight that the Maharas-| None of the Oba's five wives! royal couple arrived with colon-| 
trians planned to celebrate| were with him. 


Monday as “Godse Day.” 


Oba| es? 
Adeniji-Adele,. roared up >a wigerial regiment marched to 
Buick. His official] bugler blast-| colors on the altar. 


all along the route. ‘impressive fanfares as the 


The Queen looked cool in a To set things right] 


the cathedral in a flashy red|the cathedral and placed their| green, red and white silk dress 
| and a “pixie-style” straw, Ow 
ed fanfares from the front seat! Nigerian buglers sounded! hat festooned with flowers. | 10 


ez TUNE 


Write today for free informa- 
tion. Simply mail posteard or 


letter (giving age) to Old 
TUMS .... American Ins. Co., 3 W. 9th, 
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‘ 


ial Gov. Gen. Sir James Rob- 
The second battalion of the|ertson and Lady Robertson. 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
— Monday, January 30, 1956 5 


Open till 9:30 pm, 
, ook 


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there are foam-soft berths (at extra cost), 


Buenos Aires 


Leave Rio at 10:30 A.M. Be in “B.A.” at 


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Leave Buenos Aires at 4:15 P.M. Be in 
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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
6 Monday, January 30, 1956 


“My 
| 


RedsPushing’ Hybrid 
German Unity Plan 


By Gaston Coblentz 

Ww. ¥. Heraid Tribune News Service 

BERLIN, Jan. 29—The East 
German Communists are cur- 
rently spreading a German re- 
unification plan that would 
leave the western part of the 
eountry more or less capital- 
istic, but would preserve many 
features of Communist rule in 
the eastern part of the nation. 


Improbable as théis notion) 


may appear, the East German 


Reds are gradually succeeding 


in making extraordinary strides 


This type of scheme for er- 
‘unifying Germany was vaguely 
outlined by Soviet Foreign Min- 
ister Vyacheslav M. Molotov at 
the Geneva Foreign Ministers’ 
Conference last fall. At the 
same time Molotov denied west- 
ern charges that Communist 
terms for the reunification of 
Germany meant the Bolsheviza- 
tion of the entire German na- 
‘tion. 

Called ‘Real Position’ 

At present, the concept of a 
partly capitalistic, partly Com- 
munist Germany.is being sys- 


|\Communist: offiicals in East 
Berlin, the capital of East Ger- 
many. It is being presented by 
East German officials as a se- 


rious proposition—the “real”). 


Soviet and East German posi- 
tion on the reunification issue. 

The point of departure, in the 
East German and Russian re- 
unification program, is that the 
capitalist government of the 
| Bonn Republic and the Com- 
'munist government of East 
|\Germany must directly nego- 
tiate a final internal German 
settlement between themselves. 


. Associated Press 
Sad Quiz Kid 


George L. Wright III, 14-year- 
old New York high school 


, ” Satiome : 
PARIS, Jan. 29—French Pre-| 


mierdesignate Guy Mollet to- 
night announced he would 
present himself to the National 
Assembly for investiture Tues- 
day or Wednesday morning. 
With 11 of his 12 proposed 


“7 
a > 


:|Mollet Talk Expected to Uphold NATO Tie Firmly, 


ist Christian Pineau, Foreign 
Minister; Socialist Albert Ga 
rier, Labor Minister; Radical 
Maurice unoury, 
Overseas Minister, and. Fran- 
om Mitterand, Justice Min- 


Boigny, 50, a Negro, who fs ex- 
Organization pected to be attached to the 


said to- 


Cabinet ministers already|pro 


agreed to join his government, 
the 50-year-old Socialist Party 
leader today began to draft his 
investiture speech. 

Ex-Premier Pierre Mendes 
France, his “junior partner” in 
a coalition headed by the So- 
cialists 
Party, will serve as Vice Pre- 


mier. He wished to be Foreign 


Minister, but has too many ene-| Socialist. 
mies among other parties to) 
iministers also includes: Social- 


get this post. 


liberal but. firm 
ward Algeria, 
and Mendes’ Radicalih 
State for Algeria Max Lejeune, 


YOU are cordially invited 


to attend a 


FREE LECTURE 
ON 


ve : 
Mollet’s speech will reveal a) 
attitude to-| 

advisers said. He | 
as named as of F 


nationalistic-minded 


tough 


His unofficial list of proposed 


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Tuesday, January 31st 


at 8:00 P.M. 


First Church of Christ, Scientist 
1770 Euclid Street N.W. 
(at Columbia Road) 


with their strange formula in 
many quarters in the non-Com-|tematically communicated to 
munist areas of Germany, in-| West Germans and foreigners 
cluding West Berlin. 'who maintain contacts with 


opposed to the position of the 
Western Allies. They propose 
that the Russians should liqui- 
date the East German govern- 
ment by submitting it to the 
‘test of free elections. 


Principal Points 


The Communist scheme ap- 
peared to shape up somewhat! 
‘as follows: | 
| l, Reunified Germany would) 
\be a neutral ay age cane and | 
‘West. It would a loose con-| -. 8 
federation of German states in-| 10 Die in Bus Plunge 

stead of a tightly centralized) MATSUYAMA, Japan, Jan.| 

nation. Thus, the gentral gov-|29 ‘#—A bus plunged from a 
B ernment in Berlin would only) stick Shikoku Island highway 

have limited power over the | into Japan’s inland sea near 
individual German states. ‘here last night, 4 ing all! 

2. Within the confederation, 19 persons poe A atts 
‘the western states of the | 
present Bonn Republic would | 


student, is unhappy because 
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000 prize on a television pro 
gram for missing a question 
on the song, “Betty Co-Ed.” 
But program officials found 
the question had been partly 
in error and George will get 
another chance. 


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Sub ject: 
“CHRISTIAN SCIENCE” 
“God’s Law Made Practical” 


by Lela May Aultman, C.S.B. 


of Denver, Colorado 
Member of the Board of Lectureship of The Mother 
Church, The First Church of Christ, Scientist, 
in Boston, Massachusetts 


a eS SS SS eS 


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‘basically retain their capitalist 
organization. The states that 
make up East Germany would 
| 


Ww YOU HAD A NECK 
AS t 


ey 
basically retain their Com- 4 , 
munist economic and social SORE THROAT 
structure. Exactly what would DUE TO COLDS 
be done along political lines in r 
the eastern states is simply not 


made clear- 

|Hope For Manipulation 

| The Communists conceive of 
‘this setsip being form 
and guaranteed under a bi- 
lateral treaty between the Bonn 
‘Republic and the East German 
'government. 

3. Reunification along these 
‘lines would only be effective a 
ifew years from now, or more, 
after Russia and the West have 
negotiated a European security 
pact along the lines proposed 
by Moscow in 1954. 

Under the type of arr: / ge- 
iments they have in mind, the 
East German Reds evidently 
\believe they could permanent- 
ly manipulate elections in the 
country’s eastern: states and 
\thus assure themselves an en- 
'trenched place in the national 
‘parliament, if not in the na- 

tional government. 


| 
(y Sen) 200,000 Hear 
Pd Billy Graham) 
sam) lalks in India 


| KOTTAYAM, India, Jan. 29 
“—More than 100,000 persons 
turned out tonight to hear 
American Evangelist Billy Gra- 
ham at the last service of his 
three-day stay here. Local or-| 
ganizers said the crowd was 
the largest in 
church's history.” io 
Tonight’s outpouring brought) #0) 9 
the total attendance at the| #5 . 
three meetings here to nearly| ) | 
300,000 


Co | 
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| Graham's next stop on his 
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State. 


| Taj Mahal Denied 


In Unsound Condition 


NEW DELHI, India, - Jan. 
The Indian government today 
said widespread reports that 
the Taj Mahal was in unsound 
condition were “alarmist 
rumors.” 

) Various cracks in the 17th 
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Former chairman of the uni-| | . ” 

versity’s board trustees, nea 


is a life trustee of St. Lawrence. 
By Joe Heiverser, Stat! Photographer | tie is chairman of the finance 


This Groucho Marx. on exhibit at the NADA convention, (committee of the American 


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charged with assault with a 


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Police said Ignatius Cooper 
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two policemen with their own 
nightsticks. Cooper is in fair . * 


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The Washington ee 


EUGENE MEYER. Chairmen of the Board 
WIGGINS, Vice President and Executive Editor 
Editorial Page Editor 
... Managing fdttor 
Contributing Editor 
° Secretary 
” President WTOP Radio and Tqevision 


PHILIP L. GRAHAM, President and Publisher 


_ Vices President and General Manager 
.. Viee Patan > and Advertising Director 


AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER ” 


MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 1956 


rt cent ett cent nt eee ee ee ee 


ha 


Wanted—A Common Policy 


The agenda of the British-American talks which 
_ will open with Prime Minister Eden's arrival in 
Washington today has been lengthening with every 
“think” dispatch from London. Evidently the Brit- 
ish have a good deal on their minds to explore 
with President Eisenhower and Secretary Dulles. 
It is to be hoped they will not transfer all these 
matters to the agenda. The danger is that every- 
thing will be talked about and no differences 
composed. Peace-minded people on both sides of 
the Atlantic will pray, rather, that the common: 
peril in the Middle East will be recognized with 
enough conviction so that the conferees will not 
adjourn until they have hammered out a common 
policy. Then, if there is any time left, they can go 
on to the other problems which they face in this 
troubled world. 

Certainly the Middle East will dominate the 
consultations, anyway. The Western position in 
that crucial area, as a result of the Soviet-Egyptian 
riposte to the Baghdad pact, is crumbling visibly. 
Neither the extension of Soviet influence in the 
Middle East nor the spread of a power vacuum 
there is tolerable. A. joint approach must be 
focused at the softest spot. This is Israel. It is 
essential, as Canada’f Lester B. Pearson has said, 
to induce the Arab states to “recognize the legiti- 
mate and permanent existence of the State. of 
Israel.’ Such is the exacerbated condition of Arab- 
Israel feeling, however, that recognition of Israel 
cannot be promoted in any direct manner if, at 
this late day, it can be promoted at all. 

The Trieste model is cited from London as a 
basis on which to proceed. It has merit. Yugoslavia 
and Italy seemed irreconcilable over Trieste, and 
their rivalry yielded to compromise only through 
a process of incessant comings and goings from 
one party to the other by a British-American team. 
The Western diplomats, in other words, acted as 
agents as well as conciliators 

With respect to Israel the stumbling block is 
that last November Prime Minister Eden by some 
inept words encouraged the Arabs to hope that 
the clock could be turned back to the 1947 United 
Nations recommendations on Palestine. The Arabs 
rejected these at the time, and an entirely new 
situation was created by the subsequent Arab- 
Israeli war. Frontier rectification, but no dismem- 
. pberment—this is the only tational program toward 
“israel. The conferees in Washington will get in- 
valuable aid from the preliminary explorations on 
the spot by U. N. Secretary General Dag Ham- 
marskjold.. 

Israel is not the only particular problem in the 


Middle East which has acquired an urgency. How- 
ever, it is difficult to see how these other problems 
can be tackled as separate issues outside the frame 
of a general settlement. Take, for instance, Saudi 
Arabia. The British allege that the Saudis are 
fomenting the agitation against the Baghdad pact, 
especially in Jordan, with money which they re- 
ceive as oil royalties from Aramco. It looks as if 
the British are right, and this is indeed an ironical 
development. Nevertheless there appears nothing 
that the British and the Americans can do about 
it—as a separate matter. Britjsh- -American policy, 
except in relation to Israel, must be general in dp- 
plication, in the hope that\ these isolated issues 
can be settled as by-products of a detente. 

In this direction surely diplomacy has not yet 
exhausted the possibilities. There is the idea for 
instance of coupling a solution of the running 
Arab-Israel sore with a sort of Middle Eastern 
Marshall Plan with headquarters in Cairo. To be 
sure the Russians in this respect have already 
made the pace, and it would be the height of 
folly to make any Western contribution in Middle 
Eastern development competitive. But there is no 
need to. There are many Middle Eastern projects 
in the blueprint stage, and besides, the lot of the 
Arab refugees is central in any scheme of economic 
development on a regional basis 

Only when the two countries have outlined what 
they are prepared to do together in these matters 
can there be any consideration of American mem- 
bership in the Baghdad pact: Here this country 
has an. obligation. It was Secretary Dulles who 
initiated the Middle Eastern defense arrangement, 
an arrangement which has tightened the crisis in 
the Middle East. Although this newspaper ques- 
tioned the agreement when it was signed, the 
United States is confronted nowadays with a con- 
dition and not a theory. Any retreat at this stage, 
any move on our part to undermine the pact, 
would give.a handle to the Soviet-Egyptian she- 
nanigans. Dillydaliying has taken.a dreadful toll in 
the erosion of the entire Western position in the 
Middle East. We must not miss the bus again— 
provided that this time there is a bus left. 

The outlook indeed looks pretty dismal, but of 
one thing there can be no doubt: a community of 
view in the bare terms of self-defense needs to be 
achieved before the Washington conferees part. If 
the world sees that the English-speaking powers 
see alike and will act together, then the chances 
of avoiding a spreading outbreak of war in the 
Middle East will be that much diminished. 


Locating the Repco Plant 


The controversy over location of the Potomac 
Electric Co.'s $100 million plant.continues because 
it is a matter of vital concern to the entire metro- 
politan area. Montgomery County in Maryland and 
Loudoun County in Virginia are engaged in an 
intense struggle for the plant because of the tax 
revenue it will give to the jurisdiction where it.is 
built. Since Pepco indicated that the plant will be 
located in Montgomery, Loudoun’s delegate in the 
Virginia Assembly has put in a bil] to permit that 
state to forbid the flooding of any Virginia land to 
accommodate plants in Maryland. That is a retalia- 
tion for the pressure Montgomery officials brought 
on Pepco to induce it to switch from the site orig- 
inally chosen in Loudoun County. 

This newspaper deplores the squabble between 
local jurisdictions. The plant should obviously be 
located at the site that will be most advantageous 
to the metropolitan aréa as a whole. We protested 
against use of the Loudoun County site because of 
fears that it would pollute the city’s water supply 
(fears that have since been largely dissipated), 
and fears that it might interfere with possible 
future storage dams and industrialize an area 
marked for low-density residential and recreational 
use. At no time have we supported the Montgom- 
ery County drive to have the plant located on the 
Maryland side of the Potomac. 

It is important to note, however, the fallacy of 
some of the arguments against the latest Pepco 
decision to locate the plant in Montgomery County. 
One of our correspondents whose letter appears on 
this page contends that Montgomery taxes on a 
$100 million plant will amount to $1,228,000 more 
than the taxes that would be collected in Loudoun 
County. District residents, he says, will have to 
pay this excessive tax bill in the form of higher 
power rates. 

Temporary tax differentials are not a sound 
reason for location of plant# that will be used for 
many years. As it develops, Loudoun County will 
need revenue as much as Montgomery does. More 
important is the fact that the new plant will be 
one of four operated by Pepco in,this area. Taxes 
on two of the existing plants go to the District, 
and taxes on a third go to Alexandria. If the new 
plant is built in Montgomery County, of which 63 
per cent is served by Pepco, it will tend to even 
the score. Residents of that county are naturally 
loath to see the taxes on a plant built primarily to 
serve them go to another county that will not be 
using any of the power. Although this should not 
be the primary consideration in location of the 
plant, it undercuts the low-tax argument about 
which so much is heard in Loudoun County. 


Mr. Benson’s Blooper 


By the most charitable interpretation Secretary 
Benson goofed badly in the -indorsement of the 
Harper's article—a fact that he has been man 
enough to acknowledge. It was “inconceivable in 
the first place that the Secretary of Agriculture 
would have deliberately commended, in a letter 
appearing over his name, an article that referred 
to the farmer as a “pampered tyrant” and as an 
opportunist eager to sell his vote. Mr. Benson's 
explanation is perfectly logical: as a busy executive, 
he did not see either the article or the letter, and 
he was trapped by bad staff work on the part of 

assistants who acknowledged the article 
with his signature apparently without knowing 
what was in it. As many other persons have ‘had 


tion in this instance will not be sufficient to deprive 
the Democrats -of some perfectly lovely ammuni- 
tion. Perhaps Mr. Benson feels a kinship to the 
fellow who read so much about cigarettes and 
lung cancer that he gave up réading. It all goes to 
show, we suppose, the hazards a Cabinet officer 
faces these days. It is dangerous to write or au- 
thorize articles, it is discomfiting to read them, 
and, seemingly, it is just as perilous not to read 
them. 


United Giving at Last 


Twenty-five civic leaders have at last broken 
through the barrier of procrastination and contro- 
versy that has denjed Washington the advantages 
of united giving. Their organization of the United 
Givers Fund seems to\carry assurance that a sin- 
gle-package drive for voluntary health, welfare and 
recreation agencies will soon be the established 
pattern in Washington. It cannot be said that they 


, have acted hastily. The various agencies interested 


in raising funds here have been talking about a 
united drive for several years without coming to 
full agreement. Now a leading group of givers 
have taken the problem into their own hands. They 
intend to have united giving in their own establish» 
ments regardless of what the soliciting agencies 
think about it. 

The substantial nature of the UGF is indicated 
by the fact that its chief sponsor is E. K. Morris, 
general chairman of the successful Community 
Chest drive last fall. It already has powerful back- 
ing among business, labor and civic leaders. We 
surmise there will be a rush of commercial estab- 
lishments, Government agencies, and other groups 
of.givers to join the movement. For membership 
in UGF will protect employes and institutions 
against multiple fund solicitations. 

It is important to note that membership in the 
UGF also requires a good record of giving—in the 
single-package drive. Agencies that join up may 
look forward to larger budgets as the united drive 
technique becomes well established. If some agen- 
cies prefer to remain outside of UGF, they will 
have to carry on their solicitations under the dis- 
advantage of not reaching the large number of 
UGF givers in an organized way. 


Unfinished Business 


The American Civil Liberties Union has issued 
another of its significant and challenging annual 
reports on the status of constitutional rights and 
individual freedom. It is, on the whole, a hopeful 
report. There can be little doubt that the past 
year has brought a lifting of the smog in which 
demagogues and thoughtless patrioteers used na- 
tional security as a pretext for ignoring the 
processes and protections of American justice— 
for overriding the rights of citizenship which have 
been the fountainhead of American unity and 
strength. “A general awakening of the public 
conscience to the harm done the constitutional 
rights of people, the guidance of the Federal 
courts, and the courage of a number of responsible 
legislators and governmental officials,” says the 
ACLU report, “have thrown a clear light on the 
danger in which we stood.” 

But, while citing a number .of Federal court de- 


cisions upholding the rights of individuals and of “ 


minority groups against arbitrary governmental 
action and against the assaults of prejudice, the 
ACLU warned that “a terrifying lot of unfinished 
business will face us for a long time to come.” The 
preservation of civil liberties is always unfinished 


—_— 


7 >. a 


\ 


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i. fi se ; aa . 
- - vs 
Vw ot te Sings ty tS “> is 


@rere wet WIA cu ETH! 


Hee eiocm 


Retr Ge 


Letters to the Editor 


PEPCO'’s Plant 


I've always thought you boys 
on the dailies were hep, but it 
looks like you'ye had a real 
snow job done on you, | also 
thought you were the stanch 
defenders of the interests of 
the citizens of the District of 
Columbia, but apparently 
you've let commuters from the 
Maryland suburbs put a big 
one over on you, and without a 
line of protest. 

We here in the country of 
Loudoun County in Virginia 
realize that the B&O Railroad, 
the Montgomery County Coun- 
cil, Sen. Wayne Morse and his 
Senate District Subcommittee, 
Col. Ray Adams and his Army 
Engineers, plus the Senators, 
senior and junior, of the sov- 
ereign State of Maryland, are 
a tough combination for the 
poor voteless residents of the 
District to oppose. But is there 
not one line of type available 
anywhere to speak up for 
them? 

Under constant pressure 
from the “power lobby” listed 
above, PEPCO has decided to 
build a steam generating plant 
on the Monocacy just 
the Montgomery line, and not 
where PEPCO wanted to build 
~—in Loudoun County. 

Naturally, we in wunformi- 
dable Virginia are selfish in our 
desire to see PEPCO build 
here. Loudoun County's tax 
bill to PEPCO for a $100 mil- 
lion property the first year 
would be $802,000. But, get out 
your sharp pencil just once, 
Montgomery County’s bill to 
PEPCO would be $2,030,000 

Who is going to pay the $1. 
228.000 difference each vear?’ 
Montgomery County residents? 
No. The electric power users 
of the District, including the 
Federal Government, will have 
to pay the difference in in- 
creased rates. In 1954 only. 15 
per cent of PEPCO’s revenues 
came from Montgomery, 65.9 
per cent came from the Dis- 
trict, and the balance from Ar- 
lington County in Virginia and 
Prince Georges in Maryland. 

Thatiis not the only probable 
exorbitant cost differential. It 
costs $36,500 a mile to build 
electric transmission lines, and 
land costs bring the total to 
from $45,000 to $50,000 a mile. 
Although transmission costs 
will depend on plans finally 
drawn by PEPCO engineers, 
the fact is that the Monecacy 
site is seven miles from the 
nearest PEPCO service area 
line, and the Loudoun site is 
just the width of the Potomac 
from PEPCO’s Montgomery 
service area. 

Doesn't the District Public 
Utilities Commission care 
about a building proposal that 
must force electric’ rates sky- 
ward? As for you keen news- 
men on the dailies, don’t you 
care? Were you planning to 
abandon ‘the District complete- 
ly and move to Montgomery 
County, anyhow? 

JOHN EISENHARD., 


Managing Editor 
The Bive Ridce i 
Purceliville, Va 
See editorial, 


PEPCO Plant.” 


“Locating the 


Land Exchange Bill 


In a letter which was printed 
in your paper of Jan. 20, Mr 
Fred M. Packard referred to a 
bill of mine which had to do 
with the exchange of lands. 
This bill, H. R. 4646 of the 83d 
Congress, has also beefi men- 
tioned in your news columns 
and in an editorial. In every 
instance, including Mr. Pack- 
ard’s letter, the bill is grossly 
misrepresented. 

The legislation simply sought 
a solution of the problems 
faced by wage earners and 
small property owners located 
around a forest products plant 
which was about to have its life 
ended or curtailed as the re- 
sult of having its forest acre- 
age acouired by the Govern- 
ment. 

In such situations the princi- 


pals in the transaction are sat- 


isfied. \The Government . gets 


inside 


such a situation are those who 
work and have their homes 
there and the other elements 
of the little community which 
depend'upon the industry. 

My bill proposed simply that 
the Government, if it had 
other equivatient forest lands 
in the area which the industry 
could take in replacement for 
the lands needed by the Gov- 
ernment, a simple exchange of 
lands should be made. Thus 
several worthwhile things 
could be accomplished: the 
Government would not need to 
pay cash out of the Treasury 
for the lands needed. 

Loeal government would not 
lose tax revenue since the ex- 
changed lands would go on the 
property tax rolis. The life of 
a going industry would be pre- 
served, jobs would be saved 
and local property values main 
tained. The privately owned 
wood processing business 
would not benefit to the extent 
of a single penny. 

What about “cutting into the 
national parks’? My bill car- 
ried the following language: 
“Provided, that such exchange 
shall not include lands within 
the boundaries of national 
parks, national monuments, 
wilderness areas or wildlife 
refuges.” 

HARRIS ELLSWORTH, 

Member of Congress from Oregon 


Washington. 


Loans to Teen-Agers 


I am the father of two teen- 
agers and I should like to take 
issue with 
article in your issue of Jan. 
14. Mr. Sokolsky writes despair- 
ingly of the Chicago bank for 
making loans to teen-agers. 

I deeply resent the manner 
in which the article was written. 
Its tone was very degrading to 
our teen-agers and certainly was 
not the correct approach in 
helping resolve teen-age and 
adult relationships. The bank's 
action is a forward step in our 
society's progressive thinking 
to improve adult relations with 
our children. 

I. C. WEITZMAN, 

Washington. 


George Sokolskys. 


Pigeonholed Immigrant 


“Recent Democratic victories 
in cities with heavy national- 
ities vote prove that this im- 
portant segment of our popu- 
lation will play a decisive role 
in next years congressional 
election.” This is the closing 
paragraph of a letter I received 
from the Democratic National 
(Committee inviting me to at- 
tend their $25 plate dinner 
sponsored by the so-called Na- 
tionalities Division. * 

As an American (of Italian 
descent), I want to voice my 
resentment to this factious ex- 
ploitation As a regular and 
substantial contributor to the 
National Committee, | want to 
express my utmost disgust for 
the partys sponsorship of this 
dinner 

The very idea that the party's 
composition inciudes a Nation 
alities Division is abhorrent. I 
have always voted as an Amer- 
ican, not as an isolated “seg 
ment of our population.” To be 
labeled minority and pigeon- 
holed into a division called 
Nationalities is the quickest 
way to promote division of an- 
other kind 

Political and economic as- 
similation with the retention of 
one’s cultural heritage has been 
the goal of all sincere immi- 
grants. This is not as anoma- 
lous as it seems. Italians are 
not required to give up spa- 
ghetti in order to become citi- 
zens. The nationality concept 
promoted by the Democratic 
Party is a deliberate way of 
preventing assimilation and an 
excellent method for perpetuat- 
ing the falsehood that recent 
Americans require special legis- 
lation for their protection 

The Democratic Party can 
take a hint from my wife who 
recently became an American 
citizen. Her first reaction to 
that blessed event was: “Now 
| can vote_as all Americans do.” 
If the party wants another dol- 
lar from me—or my wife— 
they are going to have to seat 
us with the rest of the Amert- 
cans—not with any special di- 
vision, nationality or otherwise. 

M. D. 

Washington 


The Kutcher Case 


Your newspaper has already 
commented editorially and car- 
toon-wise on the scandalous 
revocation of the _ disability 
pension of legless veteran 
James Kutcher because of his 
political unorthodoxy. Along 
with you, millions of other 
Americans are gratified that 
the Veterans Administration 
reversed itself in that case. 

May I call your attention to 
some similar cases in which 
the VA has revoked war-earned 
disability pensions for political 
reasons? 

[ refer particularly to Rob- 
ert Thompson, a winner of the 
Distinguished Service Cross 
for “extraordinary heroism” in 
the South Pacific, and Saul 
Wellman,, a_ paratrooper 
wounded at Bastogne. Both 
men~were discharged with 100 
per cent disabilities, Thompson 
with tuberculosis and jungie 
malaria, Wellman after receiv- 


ing a Nazi builet in the heart 


zone. Thompson was recom- 
mended for a hattlefield com- 
mission by Lt. Gen. Eichel- 
berger but could not accept it 
because of his disability. 

Their pensions were revoked 
in July, 1954, by the VA under 
color of authority of Pubhe 
Law 144, the same glatute un- 
der which Kutcher’s pension 
was canceled. The VA asserts 
the conviction of Thompson 
and Wellman under the Smith 
Act as its reason. 

! submit there is not’ the 
slightest authority under the 
law — not to speak of elemen- 
tary morality — for the VA's 
action. ‘Public Law 144, passed 
in 1943, gives the Veterans Ad- 
ministrator power to cancel 
pensions only when there is 
evidence that the disabled vet- 
eran has. been shown “to be 
guilty of mutiny, treason, sab- 


otage or rendering assistance . 


ee 


to an enemy .of the United 
States or its allies 

That, law was passed three 
years alter passage of the 
Smith Act. If the Congress had 
intended to. make ‘violation of 
the Smith Act a reason for 
withdrawing a veteran's pen- 
sion it clearly could have done 
so by the simple addition of! 
a sentence. But it did not 
choose to do so. 

The legislative history and 
the wartime context of Public 
Law 144 clearly demonstrates 
that it was directed against 
anyone in our ranks who 
would serve the German or 
Japanese foe. By no stretch of 
the imagination was it directed 
against persons teaching and 
advocating unorthodox politi- 
cal doctrines in peacetime 

The reinstatement of Kutch- 
ers pension met the minimal 
requirements of public decen 
ey. Similarly, the prompt’ res 
toration of the disability pen- 
sions of Thompson and Well- 
man—and others similarly sit- 
uated—is in order. 

Nor should such action ne- 
cessitate long-drawn legal pro- 
ceedings. Public feeling should 
be as emphatic in the case of 
these Communist veterans as 
it was in the Kutcher case— 
and clear enough to be felt 
in the very bowels of the VA 
bureaucracy. 

For there is more et stake 
here than the pensions of these 
disabled veterans. There is 
here involved a serious ques- 
tion of public policy—the vi- 
cious abuse of pension rights 
to punish political noncon- 
formists. Fair-minded Ameri- 
cans will certainly reject such 
abuses as_demonstrated by the 
heartless “hacks of the VA in 


SIMON. ‘W. GERSON, 
New York. 


* - 
ay 
] 


U. S.-B 


, from ours of negotiation,” 


ritish Parley 


Technique in Test 
By Malvina Lindsay 


NO ONE in Britain or this country is 
holding his breath for fear the talks this 
week between President Eisenhower and 
Prime Minister Eden will end in explo- 
sion, double dealing or 
utter stalemate. Those 
are pot the ways of An- 
gio-American  negotia- 
tion. 

But even a halfway 
success will not be 
enough to come out of 
this conference. For Brit- 
ain and the United States 
have it in their power 
to take the most feasible 
present step toward 
world stability—that of coordinating their 
policies toward global tinder boxes, espe- 
cially those in the Middle East. 

This conference also is a tryout (in a gold- 
fish bow!) of international collaboration. 
Here are twuo'nations with a common lan- 
guage, similar cultures and political ideals, 
and a shared tradition of give and take at 
the council table trying to find means of 
getting together to prevent “little wars,” to 
contro] nuclear weapons, and meet other 
perils. If they cannot do this, what two free 
nations can’? How many more centuries 
must anarchy among nations prevail’ 

The conferees will have one big advan- 
tage when they start talking—that of un- 
derstanding not only each other's words, 
but generally the shades of meaning of 
these. They can also understand something 
no transiator can translate, each other's un- 
spoken language of facial expression and 
bodily gesture. 


Lindsay 


cos 

THE VALUE of a common language in 
seeking understanding is driven home to 
the English-speaking world by the present 
disorder in India, which has its basis in 
part in the varied languages of the feuding 
groups. 

But what gives the British and Americans 
even less excuse for any failure in negotia- 
tion is that they operate largely the same 
way ata council table. An American offi- 
cial who has worked the last 10 years in 
international agencies and projects says 
there is wide variation in the approach to 
conference or negotiation among peoples 
of different ethnic and even national 
origins. 

“Not only do Orientals, Russians, people 
of the Middle East have different concepts 
he said, “but 
even some Europeans approach it differ- 
ently. Some are more emotional. Some 
carry rationalism to an extreme. Some 
make a game of it. Some are more flexible 
than others—they see only two sides of any 
controversy—their own and the wrong side. 

“But in working with the British I always 
knew where I stood. While we both knew 
we would stand firm on basic principles, 
‘yet we were prepared to yield and bend, 
to give and take to get results.” 

The attitude of the Chinese 
tiation is described by former Presid 
Truman in hi® second volume of Memo 
now running in the New York Time In 
writing of General Marshall's efforts to get 
an agreement betWeen the Chinese Nation- 
alists and Communists, he says: “The Chi- 
nese began these endless Oriental negotia- 
tions between themselves, and only an ex- 
pert chess player can follow them It 
was the old Chinese way to be sure nothing 
would happen.” 


toward nego 


a) 

WHILE Americans and British have not 
always been able to negotiate—1775 was 
one example—yet for the last 100 years 
they have generally drawn together in 
world crisis 

H. G. Wells, in his Outline of History, 
refers to two sentences deleted from one of 
Jefferson's drafts of the Declaration of In- 
dependence. In one of these, according to 
Wells, Jefferson in speaking of the British 
wrote, “We must endeavor to forget our 
former love for them ... we might have 
been a free and great people together.” To 
this Wells adds, “but for the British crown 
and great proprietors and the mutual ig- 
norance of the common men in these two 
countries.” ‘ 

Today the crown and the “great proprie- 
tors” do not stand between British and 
American understanding, and there is much 
“mutual ignorance” on the part of 
“common men” in both countries. 

Moreover, the conference this week is 
held in an atmosphere of good feeling, and 
follows long association of the conferees in 
world affairs. And it is not aimed at tying 
the two nations together in other than a 
voluntary pooling of their fire fighting ap- 
paratus to prevent brush fires from getting 
out of control. 

In addition to such a concrete result, 
many Americans are hoping that the con- 
ference will promote closer long-range re- 
lations between this Government and that 
of Britain, serve as another step toward 
world unity, and justify to peoples every- 
where the long cherished Anglo-American 
faith in the efforts of men who “sit down 
at a table to talk.” 


The Washington Host 


Pup) uate every day in the rear by 
The Wash ton Post Compan 


less 


The Associated Presse 18 entitied aaiaiiaae te 
repudiication ef all news dis 

not otherwise credited in this paper an 
spontaneous ori¢in oublished herein s 
lication of all other matter herein are aise 


ons. D. Cc. 
7-1234 


1515 L. ot. WW. Wash 
Telephone REpub! 


Offices of National Advertising Representatives 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
=e? : Monday, January 30, 1956 : 9 


When 10,000 Car Dealers Hit Capitol 
Here Are Some Things That Happen 


AUTO—From Page 1 maintained, broken down by/of rooms at 30 other hotels, 
| Y we : state, town, and make of Cariranging all the way across 
‘blueprint of the convention they sell. mE. town to the Congressional on 
was developed. Roy Smith, exhibition man- Capitol Hill. 


Kiplinger believes in getting 8°": allocated 137 exhibits)” phe impact has, of course, hit 


in about 25,000 square feet of : 
| wives of dealers to the conven |.,ace in the Sheraton-Park ex- oo gy mere ig Bagg 8 ween 


ition (“It tones up the conven- hibition halls, and spilling over | yw ecticut 
‘tion considerably”) and to this into lobbies. The exhibits range hoger tt nthe gdlinomy bridge 
systems 0 vesterday morning just before 
lifter repair -hurch services were held in 

Sheraton Hall. More than 2200 
hours attended the nondenomina- 
setting up tional services. 


(GRIN AND BEAR IT 


Matter of Fact ¢ © ©. By Joseph and Stewart Alsop 
Decline of the West? 


BEHIND the -meeting be- 
tween President Eisenhower 
and British Prime Minister 
Eden there is a single, domi- 
nant, all-important fact which 
is the real theme and motive 
of the talks in the White 


House. 

In brief, Britain is now in 
very real danger of final, de- 
cisive defeat in her courage- 
ous struggle to maintain her 
standing as a major world 


investments in the Middle 
East would bring British in- 
dustry to a grinding halt, and 
the rest of Western Europe 
would be almost equally hard 
hit. 

These facts mean in turn 
that the Communists in Ma- 
laya and the Soviet diplomats 
and agents in the Middle East 
are boldly probing for Bri- 
tain’s jugular vein, when they 
seek to expel British influence 
from these areas that were 
once so safely controlled by 


liance will hardly be likely to 
survive the economic and 
therefore the strategic collapse 
of its second partner. The same 


may be said for. American 
policy in Europe, which is 
founded upon the more elab- 
orately defined NATO alliance. 
And the same may indeed be 
said for the national defense 
of- America itself, which is 
founded upon a Strategic Air 
Command Ay gene = for 80) 
r cent of its striking power 
power, second partner in the British imperial power. ts overseas bases controlled | 
he — eee chief ally ond by the Western allies. ' 

The danger arises from THE MARGIN in Britain is The first and most impor- 
Britain's heavy dependence on already so narrow that London ‘amt of SAC’s overseas bases— | 
what may be called semi- is currently in the grip of an ‘he ones which set the exam, | 
colonial income sources. This extremely serious monetary Ple when they were built and 
dependence has lately been crisis, in the midst of a busi- Wil surely set the example | 
obscured by British slogans ness bomb, The loss of almost #84in if they are taken away— | 
like “Export to live’ and any of the assets for which fe the bases at: Burtonwood | 
“Trade, not aid.” The slogans world communism is now so "nd elsewhere in East Anglia. | 
have suggested that the Brit- eagerly reaching out, would If the Eisenhower Administra- | 
ish economy no longer de- quickly plunge Britain into “on decides to buy true long: | 
pends upon assets acquired in virtually irrevocable bank- Tense striking power for SAC, 
the old imperialist days. ruptcy. of course, the East Anglian 

But in fact Britain’s jugu- No doubt all this sourids ®@ other overseas bases will 
lar vein is not in the busy in- grimly commercial, and with cease to be vital. But until 
dustrial midlands or in Lon- ugly colonial overtones, too. ‘hat day, a collapse in Britain, 
don’s smoky suburbs. It is But the danger of British bank- Wich can quite possibly bring 
still in the Middle and Far ruptey has to be carefully Aneurin Bevan to power, can 
East, and to a lesser degree weighed, none-the-less, for the ite possibly also mean the 


‘end developed an entertain. TOM accounting 
) hydraulic valve 
‘ment program for them. tnols. 
The program included acon-| 4 crew worked 36 
cert in Constitution Hall last ground the clock 
night by the National Sym-'the exhibits The Sheraton-Park's lobbies 
phony Orchestra. Mary W. Wehrle is handling and public rooms are jammed 
The men are welt. looked housing arrangements for the! with badge-wearing conven- 
after by automobile and acces-'convention—a major headache. tioners. Kurt Smith, manager 
“... And don't approach any lawyers Sr doctors... ‘sory companies. There are She got her first reservation of the Motel. said the Sheraton 
don’t want to be billed for any opinions! ...” | more , than 140 “hospitality request in February, 1955, and/Park served 1350 breakfasts, 
13 Re tt rooms” providing refreshments yesterday was still booking ac-| 1960 luncheons and 2300 dinners 
for the dealers. Kiplinger keeps commodations. on Saturday. 
rigid control over the rooms,) The convention has taken| The hotel put on 140 extra 
and doesn’t let them open over 98 per cent of the transient 'clerks, house officers, maids, 
when business and technicalirooms at the Sheraton-Park housemen, cooks and kitchen 
meetings are in progress. Hotel, 700 rooms at the Stat-\help, as well as 230 more 
Kiplinger has a staff of 150 jer, 600 at the Mayflower, 200 bartenders, waiters and bus- 
to run the convention. Thirty|at the Willard and scatterings! boys. 
‘persons handle registrations. 
John Collum, of St. Louis, who) 


EDEN—From Page I 


Ike, Eden Confer Today; 


a 


in Africa. On the average, the 
Middle and Far East together 
produce no less than 40 per 
cent of Britain's annual hard 
currency income. 

ow 

4 SINGLE, highly vuiner- 
able complex of raw material 
sources, the tin mines and rub- 
ber plantations of Communist- 
bedeviled Malaya, earn a good 
16 per cent of Britain’s an- 
nual dollar revenue. 

A single obscure individual, 
the Sheikh of Kuweit, pro- 
vides a substantial proportion 
of all the new capital an- 
nually available to the sterling 
area, by the simple act of in- 
vesting his $250 million a year 
of oil revenues in London. 

The loss of the British oll 


simple reason that British 
bankruptcy will not and can- 
not be a nice, remote, self-con- 
tained proposition. In Britain, 
it will force all sorts of very 
great changes, and above all, 
it will bring on very great po- 
litical changes. 

The main political change 
will quite inevitably be the one 
already suggested—the forced 
abandonment of Britain's long 
and costly struggle to main- 
tain her world power role. 
For the United States, more- 
over, this change will have the 
most practical, far-reaching 
meaning. 

eer 

AMERICAN WORLD policy 
is founded upon the Western 
alliance. But the Western al- 


collapse of America’s own na- 
tional defense. 

As he goes to the White 
House, then, Sir Anthony Eden 
is menaced by final defeat, by 
the insidious attacks on Brit- 
ain's vulnerable economic 
flanks. And Dwight D. Eisen- 
hower is also menaced by 
something very like final de- 
feat, because of the effect on 
the whole American and West- 
ern power position of a British 
collapse. 

This is the context in which 
decisions must be taken about 
the trouble in the Formosa 
Strait, the threat in Southeast 
Asia and, above all, the dan- 
gerous ferment of the Middle 
East. 

‘Copyright 


1634 New York 


Red Note May Be Topic 


the United States join with 
‘Britain in a long-range program 
of economic aid to Israel. But 
he emphasized he was not ad- 
vised in detail about the par- 
ley’s agenda. 
| Diplomatic officials predicted 
‘that the “Big Two” leaders, 
meeting for the first time since 
the July “Summit” Conference 
at Geneva, will declare their 
willingness to negotiate with 
Russia on specific East-West 
problems 

But Mr. Eisenhower and 
Fden are expected to turn 


thumbs down, politely but firm- 


ly, on any Bulganin-type peace 
itreaty. Mr. Eisenhower set the 


ersid Tribune, Ine | tone of the rejection in his let- 


—_ = 


ter to Bulganin 


| The President, replying to a 


Washington Scene * «  « By George Dixon 


A Sip From the Pierian Spring 


ALTHOUGH the philo- 
sophes want to refer to them- 
selves as lumieres, Kant 
was, I think, the first to 


use the term = 
Aufklarung or ~ 
Enlighten 
ment. This, it 
goes without 
saying, does 
not delimit 
itself but 
rather extra- 
polates a priori 
by asserting 
that its immu- 
nitv is a for- 
tiori. It is for 
this reason that empiricism is 
praestabilita harmonia itself. 

| can’t stop myself from 
talking this way. Ive been 
attending the annual meeting 
of the American Council of 
Learned Societies. There are 
phiogiston votaries of Hume, 
Rousseau, Locke and Con- 
dillac, no doubt, who will posit 
the ex hypothesi:x. What in the 
name of Hellenicus (a 5th 
century B.C. Greek historian) 
is Dixon doing at a meeting 
of learned societies? 

The answer is that I’m an 
antiquarian. If you don’t think 
so, ask some antiquated 
broads I've studied. 

This was the 37th annual 
meeting and I don’t know how 
they've stood up that long. 
You would think carrying so 
much learning would make 
them bowlegged. But there 
was a refreshing lack of 
pedanticism about them. The 
members of the American 
Numismatic Society did not 
talk a bit more esoteric than 
the members of the Mediaeval 
Academy of America. 


THE ONLY thing that dis 


Dixon 


tinguished them from any 
other group was that there 
seemed to more than 
average pipe smokers among 
them. The air was so blue 
I could hardly see Prof. Danie! 
J. Boorstin, of the University 
of Chicago, as he delivered his 
paper, “History Through 
Bifocal Glasses.” 

On the other hand, they did 
not lean heavily to _ thick- 
lensed spectacles, popularly 
associated with higher learn- 
ing. | have seen more people 
hiding behind bifocals in the 
National Press Club taproom, 
particularily after a _ trying 
night. 

| ingested so much learning 
so rapidly I cannot decide 
which paper captivated me 
most—“Light on the Enlight- 
enment” by Prof. Peter I. Gay, 
of Princeton University; “The 
Unfashionable Concept of 
Ideal Nature” by Prof. George 
Boas, of Johns Hopkins; or 
“The Twilight of Classical 
Aesthetics” by Prof. Herbert 
Dieckmann, of Harvard. I told 
one of the professors I had 
taken a twilight anaesthetic 
once, but he said it wasn't 
quite the same thing. 


LEST THERE be any suspi- 
cion that I am being facetious, 
let me assure you I was 
deeply impressed. For  in- 
stance, I was right on the edge 
of my seat when Prof. Leo 
Gershey of New York Uni- 
versity came right: out flat- 
footedly: “It lies beyond the 
scope of this inquiry to ex- 
amine Bergson’s judgment 
that the influence exercised 
by Rousseau was the most 
powerful which the human 
mind has experienced since 
Descartes.” , 

I guess that puts Bergson 


in his place! I always con- 
tended he was one of those 
loose thinkers who put Des- 
cartes before des horses. 


Throughout the entire ses- 
sion, the Voice af America had 
tape recorders taking every 
word for broadcast overseas. 
The Iron Curtain not only 
will be pierced but blown 
wide open when it hears Prof. 
Walter L. Dorn of Ohio State 
University ask “Does the 
United States Need the 18th 
Century’” and then answer 
it himself: “Surely there lies 
a certain humor in the cir- 
cumstance that two centuries 
after the beginning of the 
Enlightenment such a ques- 
tion can be serious posed.” 

That's the stuff those Com- 
mies can't take—humor! 


I REGRET to have to report 
that rancor raised its head 
briefly among the learned. 
Prof. Maynard Mack of Yale 
was discoursing on contem- 
porary American attitudes 
toward art, when a Mrs. 
Seward H. Rathbun, of 1622 
Massachusetts ave., who ex- 
plained she paints with satin, 
interrupted: “What has moral- 
ity to do with arf?” 


18th century critics did 
aesthetics a service in posing 
the problem of the relation 
of art and emotion, but their 
over-simple way of solving it 
by dissolving the objective 
work of art into a psychie or 
even a physiological event has 
unhappily stayed with us.” 

Mrs Rathbun seemed 
stunned for a few minutes. 
But she rallied, just as the 
session was breaking up, and 
declared uncompromisingly: 
“I do not feel that my ques- 
tion was answered.” 


These Days 


e By George Sokolsky 


Rest and Repose 


WHAT Theodore Roosevelt 
called 


the oe life” 
was a comparatively quiet 
way of living within the fam- 
ily. Since then 
we have been 
speeded up by 
enforced ei- 
sure. The 40- 
hour week 
leaves too “% 
many hours to ° 
fil and too 
little imagina- 
tion goes into 
filling them. 
An old Ger- | 
man 1 know Sekelsky 
has partly solved the problem 
by holding two jobs—two 40- 
hour week jobs—which does 
him no harm as a week has 
168 hours. 

I now loaf all but one hour 
a day. As I have never loafed 
before, I had no concept of 
how frightful such an ordeal 
can be, although I have been 
told that some of the Govern- 
ment  office-holders have 
evolved a method of loafing 
while appearing to work to 
keep the department payroll 
up to par to avoid cuts in the 
next budget. But prolonged 
doing nothing is degenerative 
of both the person and the 
spirit. 

To listen to radio or televi- 
sion by the hour is to fill time 
with chatter and noise. Noise is 
not a time-filler. It is only 
noise. | have never realized 
how ugly the human singing- 
voice can be if it is an uncul- 
tivated, untrained voice. I can 
only think of Lily Pons who 
is everlastingly beautiful and 
then some female comes on 
the radio which no musicolo- 
gist can describe as soprano, 
mezzo-soprano, alto, or even 
a female bass. It is a loud 
sound, too loud for a hospitel 
room. Whatever it is, it is not 
a filler of leisure and serves 


no good purpose. It would be 
hetter to work on the job dur- 
ing such hours. x 


THE EXPLANATION for 
our bad hearts is that we 
strain them and tire them by 
working too hard. How hard is 
too hard? In the 39 years that 
I have been earning a living 


at this and related professions, 
I have never been tired of my 


work. But life has been tiring *——am 


at times because it has seemed 
so futile. Wars and depres- 
sions and the scalawaggery of 
politicians, not only in this 
country but throughout the 
world in such an era, do tire 
and pain. One often must won- 
der how long the people of 
any country can accept the 
God-man worship for which 
Hitler set the pattern and 
which everybody has since 
copied. 

It is humiliating to think 
that any one man is indispen- 
sable. What about all the rest 
of us? Are we not indispen- 
sable? It was fortunate for 
Soviet Russia that Lenin died 
so early; that ended the myth | 
of the indispensable man in 
that country. 


' 
AS ONE lies here, one. 
knows that nobody is indis- | 
pensable nor that anyone, | 
great or small, can measure 
the tenure of his existence. 
Our lives literally hang on a 
thread and we might as well | 
make the most of it while we 
may. One becomes so con- | 
scious of how little time there | 
is to live while in a hospital, 

And so one thinks about 
how we fill the void of leisure 
and how little we really do in 


stretched out listening 


atonalities or permit ourselves 
to be brain-washed by s0o- 
called commentators who ‘in 
private conversation cannot 
speak an everlasting phrase 
or an ennobling idea. There 
must be a better way to fill 
the leisure hours that.a high 
standard of life and 
hours of labor have brought 
to our people. 


(Copyright. 1956 mas Pealures 
Syndicate, inc.) 


'Premier, said a treaty between 


sother 


|President 


short | 


letter from the Soviet 


the two countries could add 
nothing to the peace obligations 


‘already pledged by both as 
‘signers of the United Nations’ 


charter 


‘Eden Believed in Accord 


It was clear that Mr. Eisen- 
hower, solidly backed by con- 
gressional leaders of both par- 
ties, regarded the Bulganin pro- 
posal as out-and-out cold war 
propaganda. 


: 


Diplomats said Eden shared 


the view expressed by Mr. 
Eisenhower in his letter. The 
President, asserting “it is deeds 
and not words alone which 
count,” told Bulganin that Rus 
sia’s “actual performance” 
since the Geneva meeting has 
increased rather than reduced 
world tensions 
While Mr 
Eden generally agree on the 
approach toward Russia, they 
do not see eye-to-eye on many 
subjects that will be 
threshed out during the White 
House conferences. 


| Eden, arriving in New York 


about 7:15 a. m. today on the 
Liner Queen Elizabeth, was 
scheduled for lunch with the 
and an afternoon 
talk after flying here on the 


'Presidential plane, Columbine 


III. 


Talks End Wednesday. 
Prof. Mack replied that “the | 


The talks are due to end 
Wednesday, although Eden will 
not leave for Ottawa until Fri- 
day. On Thursday he will ad- 
dress the House and Senate 
and at 11:15 that night will 
make a Nation-wide television 
appearance. 

The Prime Minister has been 
under considerable fire at home 
on both domestic and foreign 
issues, even from members of 
his own Conservative Party. 
But the attacks were somewhat 
quieter in the days immediately 
preceding his departure for this 


country. 


Eden and the President are 


‘expected to give a quick ap 


praisal of the Bulganin appeal 
and then take up these prob 
lems: 


| Arab-Israel—Both Mr. Eisen- 


‘hower and Eden are said to fee! 
the time may be ripe to try to 
settle the long dispute. Britain 
is said, however, to favor ter 
ritorial compromises, chiefly 
by Israel. The United States 
looks coolly toward any sub- 
‘stantial border changes. The 
‘talks probably will end with a 
joint declaration for peace and 
against an arms race. 


Red China Trade — Eden 
wants the United States to 
‘agree to more non-military 
‘trade with Communist China. 


/ 
elleff’s 


4 


- + » here 
comes spring! 


Very straight-faced — / 
chic . . . until a 
jacket. Surprise... 


a lining of polka 


acetate and rayon » 


or beige, $49.95 


The costume j 


back the boxy 7 


costume in green | 


e\ ' 
\ ae 
> o- ; 


spring breeze blows =~)! 


-—- 


as 


; 
. 


Fisenhower and! 


th frowsy dames yell in| 


lied trade bans are the best 
weapon against Red China. 
There seems little chance Mr 
Eisenhower will bow to Eden 
on this point. 


Baghdad Pact—London re- 
ports say Eden wants the United 
States to become a member of 
the anti-Communist pact. This 


Nation is opposed, and believes’ 


the British are pushing the pact 
too rapidly in the face of Arab 
Opposition. 

Saudi Arabia—Eden is seek- 
ing U. S. support in his fight 


against anti-British propaganda ™ 


Saudi Arabia, 
the British say are fi- 


activities by 
which 


nanced by funds paid to Saudi ¢ 


Arabia by the American-owned 
Arabian-American Oil Co. The 
United States is wary of any 
action that would disturb U. 5. 
oil concessions in Saudi Arabia. 
Mr. Eisenhower will press Eden 
to resume arbitration of the so- 
called Buraimi dispute. 


H-Bomb Tests — The Presi- 
dent and Eden will talk over 


Russia's appeal to call off H-' ?* 


bomb tests. They will not 


anyone waiting. Men don’t like | 


to wait. Women will.” 

Collum, who prints NADA 
guide books, also is in charge 
of the information booth. A 
file of attending dealers is 


In Congress 
TODAY 


Renate 
Meets at Noon 
Committees 
Judictary. 10:30 & 
tae | 


1 3 ea 
al affairs. Committee Roem, Capito! 
Distriect-Full Committee-Jeint Dp ™@ 
xe To receis rt trom C. Audi. 
rium Committee is\r mittee 
Room. Capito! 
Joint Econemice Committers, 10 
To consider the Presiden 
Arthur F. murns. & . 
{f Economic Advisers 
t Chamber 


“fF ‘ 
economic report 
man of Counc 
Old Supreme Cour 
House 
Meets at Noon 
Committees 
Appropriations. pb- | 
ittee o ricul De se: in-! 
Offices: Interior: HEW: Btate 
Room 


Capito! 


dependent Of 
justice & Judiciary. Committee 
Captto 
Banking & Currency, 2 Db. m 
Disaster insurance bills. Frank \ 
Administrator, 
: 


- 
| 


.» © 
feistre)) 
two be; 


agree to any such step, but may vide 


try again to see if some way 
can be found to limit the scale 
of nuclear tests. 


Formosa—The British would 


- B 
like to see the United States 
limit the commitments to the F. 


Chinese Nationalists on For 
mosa. This Nation's policy to- 


ward the offshore Quemoy and 5 
Matsu Islands depends on the, 


nature of any Communist at- 
tack around Formosa. 


Com mittee m. third floor. Capito) 
Interior & Inselar Affairs. 10 a. m.| 
n. Haley Rascommities on Indian | 


A abert 
Metropolitan Polic 

t : siumbia. are sohe 
heard. Committee Room, New 

CZ 

lediciary. 10°90 & ™@ 

ibcommittes. on HR 

ne B Code entitied 

rith respect to provisions 


: > governing no 
ce of coprricht. Room 344. Old de 


™ exer 606 C6COm-~ 
business foom 434. SOB 
©. Joint Plecal Affairs Sabemte. 
. exec. HR #8168. District fi 


has been in charge of registra.) oro rot ror rh rh rh rh rh 
‘tion for 11 years, operates on) 


The United States believes al-\the theory: “We don’t keep) 


Lewis & Thos. Saltz... 1409 G 


ev lls 


% 


3 


TO een 5 
Ging we : 


Our Store-Wide Sale 
Is Still In Progress 


large reductions ore now in effect on selected 
groups of: Men’s White & Fancy Shirts, Imported 
English Poplin Raincoats, Neckties & Bow Ties, 
Pajamas, Undershorts & Undershirts, Irish & French 
Linen Handkerchiefs, English & Domestic Hosiery, 
long & Short Sleeve Sports Shirts, Sportswear, 
Mufflers, Robes, Television Jackets, Men's Spring 
& Foll Suits, English Outercoats, Fine Slacks & 
Sports Jackets, Topcoats & Overcoats, Shoes, Hats 


& Caps. 


Also large reductions on Women’s Coats, 


Suits & Imported English Raincoats. 


CRD 
* LEWIS & TH°S. SALTZ 


1409 G Street, N. W. 


OY LOL LOY OOD LT LI LO RO RFA 


EX ecutive 4.4449 


The easy way 
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Opening savings accounts for your children is as simple as 
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Just mail in the coupon with your opening deposit. Then 
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When you open your account, Union Trust provides handy 
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UNION TRUST COMPANY 
Attention: New Accounts 

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Please Open a Savings Account for Each of 


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| enclose a check for $10 (or more) for each 


{Age)_____.. 


(Street) 


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OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 
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Member 5 ys Deposit Insurance Corporation 


Rs WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


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Still Sealed in the Original Factory Crates! 


NUM: 
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Reg. $179.95 New 1955 


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ee ee a a a a a ae 


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SMALL: APPLIANCES - 


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both for 


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plus $10 dolly on wheels $41 88 
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recotds . . both for 


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elbum, volved of $3.98 $43 9q 
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ew somes ~ $164) EOUIPMENT 

$138.00 New 1955 EMERSON 17-inch TV 

ade thonel $112 

$299.95 New 1955 GENERAL ELECTRIC 21-Inch 

V Console. Mode $156 IRONERS 

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Table Model $179.95 New 1956 CONLON CONSOLE 

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Discontinved Table Model $69.95 New 1955 FOSTORIA 

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see ty. Wee eonsnas macinke Siieed WASHERS 

TV Console Model , $187 


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$299.95 New 1955 PHILCO 21-inch TV $197 $199.95 New 1955 MAYTAG WRINGER 
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] N 4 ' 

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plue $14.95 set of $69.95 


ettachments .. . both for 


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of 10 RCA Victor 45 rome 


$44 95 Imperio! Twin-Brush Electric records valued at $9.95 $14 95 
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corder . pive 3 extra reels of scotth Emerson Clock Redie $149.95 
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b. , $469.95 New 1955 WESTINGHOUSE 12 Cu. F | Ey ! 
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$199.95 New 1955 JAMES 
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For 29 Years 
Open Mon. 9 te 9 Open Daily & Saturday 


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Portable AUTOMATIC $] 17 
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Saturday 9 to 6; Sunday 10 to 6 9 A.M. te 9 P.M. 


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mer sunshine rays of DISHWASHER....... 


Be — og see Health Lame + DEHUMIDIFIER 


George’? + + : $129.95 New 1955 CORY 
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Mobile Maid AUTOMATIC $] 79 
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Daily & Saturday 9 to 6 
onday & Thursday 9 to 9 


The 
* Federal 
Diary 
By 
Jerry 
Kluttz 


House Committee 
Files Report on 
Postal Inquiry 


A House Subcommittee 
vestigating Post Office opera- 
tions, headed by Rep. Dowdy 
(D-Tex.), has released a report 
which carries these findings: 

The 91 new district offices 
are “neither essentia’ nor de 
sirable” to the efficient func- 
tioning of the regional offices. 
The offices, it said, “will create 
a serious impediment to post- 
masters in the management of 
their offices...” They were set 
up, along with 15 regional of- 
fices, during the decentraliza- 
tion of postal operations here. 

Sick leave used by postal 
workers declined 800,000 hours, 
or about 15 per cent, during the 
period of July through last 
September compared with the 
same period in 1954. The de- 
partment was commended for 
improving its leave practices 
after an inquiry by the General 
Accounting Office had charged 
sick leave abuses. 

The department was credited 
with reducing the postal deficit 
by only $62,327,000 in items re- 
lating to mail volume and man- 
agement activities. It claims a 
much larger. figure; however, 
the cost of mail subsidies has 
been transferred to other agen- 
cies. 

The department here had 329 
employes in Grade 10 and 
above on July 1, 1953, com- 
pared to 1022 as of last Oc- 
tober 31, an increase of more 
than 200 per cent. The report 
pointed out that the number of 
employes here had declined 
from 1761 to 1530 in that period 
but that the present salary cost 
was about $1.5 million a year 
more that it was in 1953. 

The cost of reorganization 
and decentralization was estl- 
mated at $15 millions in sal- 
aries alone. The number of 
management employes here 
and in regiona! district offices, 
the report said, had increased 
1446. or from 4246 to 5692, since 
1953 

A reduction of employes in 
regional personnel offices was 
suggested after the postal job 
classification plan becomes 
fully effective 

The report cautioned the 
department against describing 
the district manager as a 
“supervisor of postmasters” 
and it expressed the fear that 
such authority for the manager 
would lead to confusion and 
make the postmaster an “im- 
potent figurehead.” 

The authority to establish 
and discontinue post offices and 
to select - fourth-class  post- 
masters and frural carriers 
should be transferred back to 
headquarters here from the 
local offices 

What the report boils down 
to is a renewal of that age-old 
conflict over the most effective 


7 


method of administration—the | 


management or functional ap- 
proach. 

The department was oper- 
ated on functional lines prior 
to 1953 and the Dowdy group 
appears to favor it. The reor- 
ganization and decentraliza- 
tion of the department, started 
in 1953, emphasized better man- 
agement and new layers of re- 
sponsibility. The department 
says that improved manage- 
ment has saved the taxpayers 
far more than the cost of the 
managers 

JUSTICE: Assistant Atty 
Gen. Warren FE. Burger re- 
ports that career attorneys 
with from 5 to 18 years of Jus- 
tice service have been promot- 
ed to the dozen supervisory 
jobs that have opened up in 
his civil division during the 
past three years. He says this 
policy has helped to contrib- 
ute to the high employe mo- 
rale and the production record 
in his agency. 

AIR FORCE Headquarters 
has given meritorious awards 
to Lenore Anderson and Kath- 
erine Isabell, superior work 
awards to Margaret Cavin, M. 
B. Cox, G. O. Fiedler, Margaret ' 
Gulish, Ruby Hammond, Grace 
Kelleher and Gladys King, and 


cash for suggestions to Mary) 
Cates, Delamater Davis, R. P.| 


Leonard and Marianne Smith 
... NAVY ORDNANCE has giv- 
en superior work awards to 
Mary Hancock, C. H. Stein- 
kamp, Edythe Rossi and Walter 
Tann. 
NFFE has elected: Elizabeth 
Fabiny, president; Grace Pick- 
ing, vice president; Paris Keen- 
er, treasurer; Henry Nolda, G. 
H. Streeter, and D, E. Thomas, 
executive board. 


Let it snow?! 


—in bad weather _ 


ee 


e we're as near as 
your mail box— 
it's extra profit- 
able, we pay the 


.N- 


Neely Balks 
At Transit 
Strike Ban 


Senator to Suggest 
Other Changes 

In Commissioners’ 
Authority Measure 


Sen. Matthew M. Neely 
(D-W.Va.) gave his support 
last night to a union-spon- 
sored move to eliminate anti- 
strike provisions in the Dis- 
trict Commissioners’ bill for 
a metropolitan transit au- 
thority. 

Neely, chairman of the Sen- 
ate District Committee, said: 
“Notice is now given that I will 
endeavor to have the anti-strike 
language of the bill eliminated.” 

Furthermore, Neely said he 
would propose amendments to 
assure collective bargaining 
and “certain other improve- 
ments.” He declined to specify 
what improvements he had in 
mind or whether they might in- 
clude an arbitration provision. 


| 


lenge - 


Times Berea 


Ae. 


AREA NEWS 


OBITUARIES 
PICTURE PAGE 


ity Life 


MON 


DAY, JANUARY. 30, 1956 11 


Domestic 


elations 
Court for District 


Is Nearing Actuality 


Measures Approved 
By House, Senate 
Shifting Cases to 
Municipal Bench 


By Morrey Dunie 
Staff Reporter | 
After years of bitter, in- 
tensive, non-judicial litiga-| | 
tion, Washington has moved | Arlington voters who will go 
close to a major change in | to the polls next month to vote 
: : ~ 
the relationships of its prin-|°" 4 Proposed $9,430,000 school 
cipal court units—the courts | Pond pony a asking what 
" e wi e 
that day in and day out serve |¢ o Aq 
District residents. /money. 
Focal point of the change is Pb - 
the great mass of domestic re-|,, 0. sce 


: . .. \that a “test” 
lations cases in the Nation’s'yote in the 
Capital. 


For Arlington 


School Bond Issue 
Covers 10-Year Needs 


By Connie Feeley 
Sta Reporter 


recommended that land be pur- 
chased to bring several of the 
older school sites nearer the 
size recommended by the State. 
Enlargement of school sites 
is recommended at Clay, 
Cherrydale, Marshall and Cus- 
tis elementary schools. 


Total funds needed for the 
whole school construction pro 
gram are $9,965,000. With a de 


AFL-CIO President George | 
Meany recently wrote the 
Senator that the antistrike| 
provisions should be junked, 
and that a Transit Authority | 
should be obligated to bargain | 
collectively with the union that 
represents the transit workers. 
The AFL transit union now) 
represents some 3000 employes | 
of the Capital Transit Co.,| 
which is to be replaced by a 
Transit Authority under the 
Commissioners’ measure. 

Meany also urged unresolved 
ssues should be submitted to. 
arbitration for binding settle- | 
ment. 
Neely said he would intro-| 
duce the transit bill today be-; 
cause of “the obvious neces- 
sity. for prompt action.” The | 
Senator said he hoped to hold | 
a full committee hearing Tues- | 
day or Wednesday. | 

Neely also hoped his commit- 
tee’s version of the bill, “fair 
to both capital and labor,” 
would be reported to the full 
Senate within three weeks. 
Time is important because 
CTC’s franchise, by act of the 
Congress, expires Aug. 14. 


/ 


| 
| 


Party Pledges 
On Home Rule 


Held Broken 


Washington has not been 
given the right to govern itself, 
as cities do elsewhere, because 
a “few Representatives occupy- 
ing key committee positions 
disregard their parties’ pledges 
to the people,” the president of | 
the Central Suffrage Committee | 
for the District said yesterday.| 

Herbert P. Leeman said both | 
major political parties and 
President Eisenhower and his 
predecessors have urged “home 
rule” for Washingtonians. 

Leeman quoted former Presi-| 
dent Truman as saying that 
“unless a man can run on his 
party’s platform—and try to 
carry it out if elected—he is 
not an honest man.” 

Leeman gave his views as a 
guest on “Americans All” over 
WOOK 

A home rule bill, passed in 
the Senate and currently pig- 
eon-holed in the House, author- 
izes an elected mayor, city 
council and board of education 
and nonvoting delegate in the 


| 


/munism, 


Chief Justice Earl Warren and The Most | 
| 


Rev. Patrick A. O’Boyle, Archbishop of 


Officials Hear Sermon at Red Mass 


Renaissance of Ethical Ideals Seen 
Halting Trend Toward Communism 


By Kenneth Dole ratiénalists, historic .evolution- 

Stal Reporter lists and pragmatists. All have 

A sharpened sense of right’ advocated, “whether conscious- 
and wrong in Government and ly or not,” he said, ideas which 
law may have reversed aniend up in putting the state 


American trend toward com-' ahead of the individual. 


a leading Catholic’ Conference Noted 
legal authority declared here, 5. 1.4eq among “unmistak- 


yesterday, asd ‘able signs pointing to a renais- 
Because of a “renaissance of sance of ethical ideals and 


ethical ideals,” the drift toward strengthening of moral stand- 
state absolutism—reduction of ards-in law and givernment,” 
the individual to a puppet of was a recent conference at 
the state—may have been halt-| Harvard Law School, Dr. White 
ed, the Rev. Dr. Robert J. White said. 


+ ot | In celebration of the 200th 
told . distinguished attest scl anniversary of the birth of 
tion of jurists and lawyers. Chief Justice John Marshall, 


In his sermon at the annual'the judges, lawyers and law- 


.. The Hospital Guild of | 


‘plant cases for another week, Washington. 


| age 


|) board which held a public hear-| ited ( 
Red Mass in the District of Co-| right 
) 
‘maintained the “closed door 


jing construction of treatmen 
|i plants in that Fairfax County) 


House. If passed, a referendum 
would still have to be held to 
determine if Washingtonians 
want home rule, Leeman point- 
ed out. 

Home rule supporters, said 
Leeman, sense victory this year. 

Rep. Harley O. Staggers (D- 
W. Va.), has filed a resolution 
asking the powerful Rules Com-' 
mittee to pry the home rule 
hill from the District Commit- 
tee. Failing this, an effort will 
be made to collect 218 signa- 
tures to a discharge petition 
and force the bill to the House 
floor for action. Such a move 
failed by only a few signatures 
six years ago, Leeman said. 


thedral, Dr. White, a former 


been moving in the same direc- 
tion as a Communist state— 
toward submergence of the in- 
dividual. 

But now “there is widespread 
evidence,” he said, “ofs«a deep- 
ening ground swell of reasoned 
conviction which repudiates 


mands a greater emphasis upon 


Warren Attends 


Among those who heard Dr. 
White were Chief Justice Ear] 


Fairfax Sewage 
BoardAwaits 
Approval of 
Creek Ruling 


William O. Douglas, Harold 


‘Sherman Minton: Postmaster 
\General Arthur E. Summer- 
\field and Secretary of Labor 
\James P. Mitchell; 22 Federal 
Judges; 20 Senators and about 
125 Representatives; 13 Ambas- 
sadors and 15 representatives of 
other nations, and an estimated 
500 lawyers. 

| Formally known as the 
Control|Salemn Votive Mass of the 


The State Water 


Board will not announce its de-| Holy Spirit, the mass was cele- 
~\ cision on the Accotink and Po-| brated by the Most Rev. Patrick 


O’Boyle, Archbishop 
Since the 13th 
or ten days, a spokesman has century, the Red Mass has been 
‘said. held in European countries and 

Applications for several sew-|later in other nations to 


treatment plants, 


hick Creek sewage treatment A. 


creeks, have been before the! law courts. 


Dr. White instituted the first 


ing last week. | ' 
The board previously has lumbia about 1938. 


"| “Hopefully,” he said in his 


policy on Accotink—prohibit-'§ 


area because of strong objec- 


nied moral values, and dis- 
missed traditional ideals of law 
nd ethics as no longer useful.” 

These persons he classified as 


obtains its water supply from 
the stream. ) 

At the public hearing last * 
week, Fort Belvoir again ob- 
jected to the location of pro-! 
posed private plants on Acco- 
tink. But it said it would go'and support the applications 
along with the plans of the town for private treatment plants. 
of Fairfax to expand its treat-| But citizens associations, Fort 
ment plant, which also dis-| Belvoir and the Board of Coun- 


Red Mass in St. Matthew's Ca-| makers 


this false philosophy and de- - 


ethical training.” | 
\of Washington, of the famous 


Hitz Burton, Tom C. Clark and | 


who gathered there 
“enthusiastically reaffirmed,” 
he said, “the Christian founda- 


dean of the Catholic University) +ion. of American law and gov- 
‘Law School, said America had) ernment.” 


Their action was in contrast 
to certain court cases which, 
he said, “have minimized the 
historic positive moral purposes 
of law and struck down statutes 
aimed at evils threatening to 
corrupt morals and to encour- 
age licentiousness and degen- 
eracy.” 

The mass ended with the 
reading, by the Most Rev. John 
M. McNamara, Auxiliary Bishop 


Washington, lead the procession after the 
Red Mass at St. Matthew's Cathedral. 


jreferendum 
The House has approved and 
sent to Senate-House confer- 
ence a bill to transfer jurisdic- 
tion over the deeply personal 
and highly important domes- 
tic relations cases from District 
‘Court to Municipal Court. 
The Senate last spring passed 
a similar measure. Although 
ithere are definite differences 
'between the two bills, both call 
‘for the formation of a new 
‘branch in Municipal Court. 


‘On Same Level 


| With passage of the House 


bill, even the staunchest oppo- 


‘nents of the so-called “family 


‘court” principle see the trans- 


ifer to Municipal Court as in- 
evitable. 

The transfer means that the 
‘Domestic Relations Branch of 
| Municipal Court, and the pres- 
‘ent Juvenile Court will be on 
‘the same level. Some of the 
work will be similar, judges 
will receive the same $17,500 
salary and appeals from both 
courts will be to the Municipal 
Court of Appeals. 
| Under thé present setup, ap- 
peals from such cases as di- 
‘yvorce, alimony, custody, adop- 
tion and maintenance go to 
the United States Court of Ap- 
peals. 


Heavy Case Load 


According to District Court 
authorities, approximately 
per cent of its numerical case 
load and 15 per cent of the 
judges’ time is now spent deal- 
‘ing with domestic relations 
b> .. «| Matters. The full time of more 
prayer “for those in authority’ |tnan two judges is devoted to 
by America’s first archbishop, such work. 

John Carroll. The transfer to Municipal 


Archbishop O’Boyle and Dr. Court means that this time 
White said goodby to the guests ©4n be spent in District Court 
at the Cathedral door. G. How-'°" civil jury cases. Right now 
land Shaw, former diplomat,|'t takes more than two years 
was one. Members of the Class from the time a personal in- 
of 1915 at Harvard College, he /“'Y case is filed until it comes 

t 


” Whi not seen| © trial. 
and Dr hite had s Municipal Court is up-to-date 


in its jury, non-jury and small 
claims cases. Chief Judge Leon- 
ard P. Walsh thinks the court 
‘Preacher of 1956’ will be able to handle the mari- 
, ‘ tal disputes, with the addition 
President and Mrs. Eisen-\of more: judges, and still re- 
hower went to church in a light si. ceyrrent in its other divis- 
rain yesterday to hear the ion. 
“National Church Preacher of he transfer -will raise the 
1956. prestige and jurisdiction of Mu- 
The Rev. Dr. Arnold H, Lowe, nicinal Court. The forum will 


By Joe Heiberger. Staff Photographer 


each other since graduation. 


Eisenhowers Hear 


|probably to be 
set for Feb. 21 
will 
Arlington : 
schools will be Be: 
able to wind Rutter 

a $29 million school con- 
struction program. 
gun in 1947 when the county's 
first elective school board took 
office. 

School building needs will 
be met for approximately the 
next 10 years. By that time the 
county will be abreast of the 
enrollment needs of the large 
post-World War II crop of chil- 
dren. 

Superintendent of Schools T. 
Edward Rutter has summed up 
fhe basic issue this way: “The 
most pressing need ahead is for 
classrooms to house the hun- 

reds of additional students 
who will be crowding into Ar'- 
ington’s junior and senior high 
schools.” 

He explains that there are 
8834 junior and senior high 
school students in Arlington 
today. The elementary school 
enrollment is about 12,580 
Most of these 12,580 pupils will 
be in secondary school within 
six years. — 

40 Percent Jump 


Thus, without any growth in 
population, Arlington schools 
will be faced with a jump of 
more than 40 percent in its 
junior and senior high school 
enrollment within six years. 

This is the reason why school 
‘officials propose to use the ma- 
jor portion of the bond issue— 
$6,805,000—on construction of 
a new senior high school, a new 
junior high school, completion 
of a new junior high now under 
construction, and additions to 
the present Washington-Lee 
High School. 

The proposed new Yorktown 
Senior High School at 5201 N. 
28th st. would be the last high 
school built in Arlington, school 
officials say. It would be com- 
pleted in Sept., 1958, and would 
take approximately 1400 pupils 
who would otherwise crowd into 
Wakefield Senior High School 
or Washington-Lee. 


Gunston Junior High School,’ 


planned to house 1050 students, 
and scheduled for Sept., 1957, 
completion, would relieve over- 
crowding at Wakefield Junior 
High School, 

Additions recommended at 
Washington-Lee include two 
auxiliary gymnasiums and two 
locker rooms. 

Finally, the bond issue would 


It was be-| 


minister of the Westminster move closer toward being a C°Ver completion of the second 
Presbyterian Church, Minneap- catetype court rather than a/@nit of Kenmore Junior High 


olis, described the three great city.tyne court 


spiritual traditions that have 
shaped America: “A Nation 
under God; a holy concern for 
the wellbeing of men and 
women; a people morall 
strong.” , 

“If we keep to these great 


traditions America will always ).;:\.n¢ cases 


be God's country,” he declared. 
Dr. Lowe was appointed “na- 
tional preacher” by the Gen- 
eral Assembly of the Presby- 
terian Church (Northern). The 
National Church is under the 
Assembly's jurisdiction. 


Warren and Associate Justices Peg and Con 


Case, Smith Give Views 


|\Commissioners 
Protestant, Catholic and Jewish | jy 


y ably 


| 


On District Home Ru 


! 
) 


: 
: 


: 


| 


Stresses Right 
Of Suffrage 


Sen. Clifford P. Case (R-N. 
of|J.), a District committee sup- 


court 


With divorce School by Sept., 1957. The first 
unit, due to be done next Sep- 
tember, is now under construc- 
tion with Federal funds and 
will house 500 pupils. When 
have jurisdiction over completed, both units will 


9 
these matters insofar as they | "°US¢ 1200. 
are connected with domestic re- Double Shifts Seen 


' Right now it has Former School Board Chair- 
~~ such authority. : man Warren Cox is backing the 
The general principle of the|),.4 request because, “unless 
transfer to Municipal Court has our construction p ro gra m 
been approved by an imposing | poves rapidly ahead, within 
array of authorities. The Dis- four years two thirds of all 
trict Court and Municipal Court) o¢ ou, junior and senior high 
benches, Attorney General Her-| noo) classes may be on a dou- 
bert Brownell Jr., the District/ pj). <nit basis.” 
and leading) Cox explains that, with the 
aren nior and senior high school 
organizations have all spoken gnrojhnent going from the pre- 
in favor of the plan. The Dis- cont 9830 to 12.580 in the next 
trict Bar Association, however, | i, years, Arlington will have 
is on record against the “family |4999 more junior-senior high 
" idea. pupils than it has space for in 
resent buildings. 
— i a . Thus, these 4000 would share 
The main objections from the | ¢}assroom space with 4000 other 


cases come a number of legal 
problems dealing with persona! 
property and real estate rights. 
Municipal Court would prob- 


; 


\lawyers opposed to the transfer! nynils with an end result of 


Wants Congress 
To Keep Control 
Rep. Howard W. Smith (D- 


Va.), a home-rule opponent of 
long standing, said “I don't be- 


porter of home rule, said he |jieve Congress ought to resign 


was pleased to note the Presi-|control of the 
in- dent again had cit | 
which: voke God's blessings on the|\urged Con- 
Ii would discharge into the two| administration of justice in the gress to dem- 


onstrate “our 
belief in the 
of suf- | 
frage.” : 
“It is utterly 


ermon, Americans are waking! wrong that any 
t;\up “as from a drugged slum-|body of our 
ber” to a realization of the dam- citizens should 
‘age done “by those who haveibe not only 
tions from Fort Belvoir which|Tidiculed religious truths, de--without the 


right to vote, s°™ Case 
but without the responsibili- 
ties of citizenship. Only with 
participation of District citizens 
in their city government can we 
have an effective and working 
democracy in our Nation’s Cap- 
ital,” Case said. 

“And, in a more personal 
vein, it is sometimes difficult 


' 


‘Smith ts" 


chairman of 
the power ful 
house Rules 
Committee 
which has been 
asked to re 
lease the home- 
rule bill from a 
pose -hole in | 
t ouse Dis- 
trict C o m m it- Smith 
tee. Smith sits on that Commit- 
tee, too. 

“The District of Columbia is 
the seat of Government,” said 
Smith. “The Constitution put its 


for a very good reason. I refuse 
to delegate this power else- 
where.” 


Smith said he had “thought 
the-matter over many times and 


‘is that Municipal Court does) gop9 pupils on double shifts. 


not have authority to issue sub-| At present, Arlington has 
penas which would be valid out-| seven junior high schools serv- 
side Washington, while District jng 5350 pupils. One of these 
Court has this power; and that) s-hools, Brandon, is being sold. 
Municipal Court is limited to) jt is an old building with inade- 
cases in which the property quate facilities, located in a 
value is less than $3000. 


| They also are opposed to sug- highway. The county now has 


, \gestions that investigating com- three senior high schools serv- 


missioners be part of the court/ing a total of 3499 pupils. 
and that there be a 60-day “cool- What would the proposed 


‘ing off” period in divorce cases| bond issue do at the elementary 


' 


| 


| 


‘measure. The Senate bill calls town, 6; Oakridge, 6; Drew, 6;' 


; 
' 
: 


‘mit rotation of judges in the) classrooms would absorb 12 6th) 
‘Domestic Relations Branch as| grade classes now taught at 
‘would the Senate measure. 


: 


affairs in the handg of Congress 


| 


charges into Accotink, if it is 
necessary. Officials of Fort Bel- 
voir pointed out the Fairfax 
town plan called for a greater 
degree of treatment by the pro- 
posed enlarged plant than by 
the present plant. 

Builders and developers have 
been attempting to open up the 
Accotink and Pohick areas for 
construction of subdivisions 


ty Supervisors have cautioned 
against the plan. 
The Water Board has made 


its decision on the applications) 
but has postponed annoufce-' 


ment until it has been approved 
by the V A 


said. The decision will be forth- 


irginia Attorney Gen-! the 
eral's office, a staff member. 


coming in a week or ten days, 
he nae | 


4 


this is my firm feeling. I'm) 
against any such proposal on 
home rule, including the one 
‘eurrently before Congress.” 


Today’s Chuckle 


A really lar book would 
be one on “How to Get Out Of 
Doing It Yourself.” 


. 


D jurisdict 
Wha 


lal 


to try to work out reconcilia-' jevel: 
tions. | It would provide a total of 55 
Investigating commissioners additional classrooms at the 
were called for in the Senate following elementary schools: 
bill but left out of the House Lee, 2; Woodmont, 2; James- 
for two new judges for Munici-|Wilson, 5; Taylor, 6; Reed, 
pal Court while the House|Tuckahoe or Nottingham, 6; 
would establish three more| Madison, 10; Glencarlyn, Bar- 
judgeships. ‘'rett or Randolph, 6. 
The House bill would not per-| Some of these additional 


three junior high schools. 
Another difference between) Some would absorb children 
the two measures is that the/from the present Yorktown 
‘Senate would transfer all pend-| Elementary School which was 
ing domestic relatfons cases and' designed to become a wing of 
files from District Court to Mu-' the proposed Yorktown Senior 
nicipal Court, Se the House High School. 
bill excludes this transfer. ) 
Neither bill would affect the | Bisse® Schoo! Sites 

ion of Juvenile Court.) The bond issue also covers 
tever the differences be- remodeling or additional non- 
tween the two measures, one ¢lassroom facilities at the fol- 
fact remains clear: No matter lowing elementary schools: Wil- 
what the bill which is finally'son, Lee, Woodmont, Oakridge, 
reported out of conference con- Madison, Clay, erry $ 
tains, it is bound te create a Marshall, Randolph, Woodlawn, 

or change in the local judl-jand Custis. 

establishment. —, officials have 


‘ 
’ 


7 


heavy traffic area on Shirley’, 


‘duction of aproximately $535, 
000 for the anticipated sale of 
Brandon school, the total bond 
referendum stands at $9,430,000, 
Is kindergarten space in- 
‘cluded in this program? 


Indirectly, yes. School board 
members say the program is so 
planned that grades one 
through six will not be hou 
in any of the 38 temporary 
classrooms now in use. 

“When kindergartens are 
started, it will be probably nec 
essary to house some of the 
classes in temporary rooms and 
rented space for a period of 
\Ume. It is anticipated, however 
that the slight reduction in 
elementary enrollment occurs 
ring in 1959 and 1960 will make 
it possible to house most kine 
dergarten classes in permanent 
rooms by 1960-61,” a school 
board member explains. 
Opponents’ Views 

What do opponents of the 
bond issue have to say? 

So far, only two groups have 
offered opposition. 

The Arlington chapter of the 
Defenders of State Sovereignty 
and Individual Liberties. a pro- 
segregation group, issued a 
double-barreled attack recently 
on the school board’s plan 
for integration of elementary 
schools next fall and on the 
bond issue. However, it has not 
spelled out its objections to the 
bond issue. 

The Parents Educational Re- 
search Organization, an Arling- 
ton group which has cam- 
paigned against so-called pro- 
gressive education, has called 
the bond issue “hasty and ill- 
considered at this time.” The 
group has suggested that the 
bond program be limited to the 
needs of the next two or thre@” 
years. 

This group has criticized the 
bond issue on the basis that 
Arlington cannot really tell how 
many students will be in its 
schools if the Gray Commission 
proposals and the Arlington in- 
tegration plan are put into 
effect. 

Barnard Joy, School Board 
member, believes this criticism 
is unwarranted for two reasofis: 

If the Gray plan does not be- 
come law and segregation is 
maintained in Virginia, the 
number of students attending 
public school in the future can 
be easily forecast, Joy says. 

Should the Gray plan and 
the .Arlington plan go into 
effect, Arlington would not 
need to fear eventual emptying 
of its public schools because 
no child will be required to 
attend an integrated school and 
use of tuition grants is not con- 
templated, states Joy. 


Jewish Group 
Asks Israel 
Security Pact 


The Jewish Community 
Council of Greater Washing- 
ington yesterday appealed to 
the American Government to 
do all in its power to “pro- 
mote an honorable peace set- 
tlemént in the Near East.” 

The Council, in its annual 
meeting at the Hebrew Home 
for the Aged, urged the Goy- 
ernment “immediately to ne 
tiate a security treaty with 
Israel and with such of the 
Arab states as are ready to 
join in the promotion and pres 
ervation of peace.” 

The 150 delegates from mem- 
ber groups also expressed hope 
that American aid to Israel 
would continue. 


45 Drawer Wood 
3x5 Card File 


If new $175 


ated 


| Excellent for 
office, machine || 


’ 


Steel 


4-Drawer 
, FILE 


ANK & S$ 


ON | 


7 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES na 
*? 


y Monday, January 30, 1956 


Driver Ability 


a 


ests Featured 


n Traffic Safety Campaign 


> 


By Harry Gabbett 


Siaff Reporter 

The Shell Oil Company is pop- 
Ping out all over the country 
with a advertising 
campaign 
hame the important fac- 
tors § in safety—the 
physical attributes and mental |” 
attitudes of behind 
the whee! 

With the wholeh 
ing of community tralltic otfi- 
cials, the company is launching 
the first of a two-a-week series 
of six display advertisements 
in which the reader invited 
to find out for himself if he 
should be driving an automo- 
bile. 

The first of the series (pub-| 
lished simultaneously in 235 
newspapers across the country) 
will appear shortly m the Wash- 
ingion Post and Times Herald 

It's a test of the reflergs 
consisting of a dozen squares, 
mumbered from 1 to 12 and 
arranged haphazardly in an ob- 
long. The idea is to touch them 
all in numerical order as fast | 
@s you can. 

Here's how such 
guys as our District 
umnist Bill Gold and Traffic 
Director George E. Keneipp. 
made out on the first test. 


Under 7 Seconds 


With Gold holding the traffic 
director's own stopwatch on 
him, Keneipp fairly dawdled 


promotion 


designed to drive 


most 
traffic 
man 


the 


arted bless- 


1s 


ref lexible| 
Line Col- 


L 


Our Bill Gold, whose flashing Tinger later 
smashed all existing records, 


By Bob Burchette. Staff Photocrapher 


Shell Oil Company's test of reflexes. 


Director George Keneipp as he takes the 
times Traffic | 


through the assignment —in 
just under seven seconds. Sheil! 
people call that time just under 
“very good.” 

Shorn of its technical ver 
biage, it means that the average 
pedestrian has plenty of time 
to get out of Keneipp’s way, 
providing they see each other 
coming simultaneously with a 
reasonable distance between 
them. 

In all fairness to those who'll 
find they require the full nine 
rectiy.” gp eee gu Sggerwee pils, but beyond that the cup- 

board is bare, an official said 
that Keneipp had taken the test yecterday. 
several times before, always 
with an eye to cutting down his 
touching time between numbers 
4 and 5—the longest haul im the 
whole arrangement. 

The only reason we tested 
Gald at al! was to get Keneipp’s 
watch back. It’s a wristwatch, 
complete with stopwatch, per- 
petual calendar and a grocery 
reminder — shockproof, water- 


proof and virtually guaranteed “ . _ 
it had slipped up to Gold’s el Thus, we feel we have given 


bow before Kenecipp had inoculations to all kindergarten 
stopped explaining why it had and first-grade — who rely 
taken him so long to get from ne us for the shots,” said Dr. 
number 3 to 4 te aieial e 

With Keneipp holding his e departmental program 
own watch again. G | gave about 41,000 children their 
nounced he was ready first shots. A third and final 
the downward sweep inocu lation is recommended 


Sufficient Salk polio vaccine 
is available to complete the 
Health Department's program 
of second inoculations for kin- 
dergarten and* first-grade pu- 


An estimated 27,900 such pu- 
pils will have received their 
second “shots” under the de- 
partmental program when the 
“makeup” program for absent 
children is completed this 
week, said Dr. Grace L. Stone, 
chief of school health services 
At week's end, about 14,900 will 
have been inoculated this 
month, she said. 


City Has Enough Vaccine 
For Second Salk Shots 


> 


Rites Tuesday 


Beneman, 
Newsman, 
Dies at 35 


about seven months after the 
second. 
_- However, unless there is a od eae 
Guick shipment, there will pet 
haps be 4 c.c.’s of vaccine Funeral services for Charles 
(enough for one child) left in Henry Beneman, 35, newspaper- 
the department at week's end man who died in Doctors Hos- 
gS mag not that much,” pital Saturday night, will be 
said Dr. Stone. held at 10:30 
“This means we'll have to a m. Tuesday 
wait for a new shipment before a+ Danzansky’'s 
going on to our next program funeral home,. 
—that for children 1 to 5 and 3501 14th st. 
» = and 11 year olds,” she nw. Burial will 
said. be in Washing- 
Dr. Stone said the Depart- inn Hebrew 
ment of Health, Education and Congregation 
Welfare has been notified “how ,¢ emeterv. 
strapped we are We'v' Mr. Beneman 
heard promises of a new ship wha’ was on 
csotygh but we just haven't associate editor | 
About 163,000 children in the of the Army 
Times, began his newspape! 
polio-prone age group of 1 to 10 
; career as a copy boy at the 
are eligible for the program, Washinaton Times-Herald | 
according to Dr. Daniel L 7 ing as ' 
Seckinger, Health Department 
director. 


Mr. Beneman 


He attended local schools 
and earned his A.B. and M.A. 


neipp’s “Go” hand, Gold's in- 
dex finger was a veritable blur 


He Was Speedy 


It was Speed raised to the 
Nth power of Grace, Agility 
and Purpose. Spectators, many 
of them reflex experts in their 
own right, were unable to re- 

ress gasps of admiration. Not 
nt the whole reflexible history 
of the Statler Hotel's East 
Room had such a demonstra- 
tion of reflexes been afforded, 
someone gasped 

Gold's time was four seconds, 
Keneipp announced—so dazed oe se 
by the display he almost gave apartment paling at 2745 
hig watch up again Ordway st. nw. How pussy got 

, Ae time rated Gold several up there no one seems to know. 
notches above “excellent,” The Animal Rescue League 
— ayy ay hnical verbi- “2% unable to reach it with a 

0 c j : 

age it means only that the aver- 45-foot cat pole. The rain- 
age pedestrian ought to be able soaked feline was nestied in a 
to get out of Gold's way, evén hollow 55 feet up. 
a a onah emt first.) “As of now,” said a harried 
wi ve full seconds to spare pe 
—precious seconds the average league oficial last night, “we 
driver wouldn't have allowed 4re whipped. 

m. He said two of his men failed 

Shell Division Manager Rus- to reach the cat from the 

sell Chase explained that the ground and from a fourth floor 
series of driver reaction tests window in the apartment build- 
te follow in the ad series will /né. 
in this order test the individ Residents who watched the 
ual's: unsuccessful rescue effort del- 
1. Eyesight uged the fire department with 

2. Recognition of road signs. | phoned requests for a ladder 

3. Braking speed “We do not send equipment 

4. Driving attitudes. for cats in trees,” fire depart- 

5. Judgment of distances ment headquarters said. That's 

He said preliminary tests of been policy for at least 10 
the series’ reader-interest and years 
potential value as an accident The police department was 
deterrent had resulted in sug- equally unenthusiastic. 
gestions that reprints of the ads. The Rescue League official © 
be distributed in high schools said if he had the right equip- 
and at civic and sports gather-|ment, such as climbing irons, 

s on a bulk basis 

eneipp himself hailed the the cat. 

lic-service nature-of the ads, “The cat will have to stay up 
which feature a minimum of there until we can round up 
company promotion, as a equipment Monday morning,’ 
“worthwhile project which de- he said. “Maybe,” he added 
serves the consideration of hopefully; “it will come down 
ry other big corporation in by itself.” 
osition to undertake some- 


Resctiers 


Baffled by 
Treed Cat 


A small cat stuck in a tall 
tree had a lot of people excit- 
ed here yesterday. 

The tree is in the rear of an 


Judson Cull, 
‘TitleAttorney, 


his men could have retrieved 


‘linvested with the 


degrees at George Washington 
University, where he was 
elected to Phi Beta Kappa 

Before the Times-Herald was 
purchased by The Washington 
Post in 1954, Mr. Beneman had 
worked his way from capy boy 
to copy editor in the 16 years 
of his associate... with the 
paper. He left after the sale 
to work for the Army Times. 

Mr. Beneman is survived by 
an aunt, Ida Korman: four 
cousins in Washington, Assist- 
ant Corporation Counsel Mil- 
ton Korman, Helene Klawens, 
Mrs. Paul Wilner and George 
Beneman; and cousins in Bal- 
timore. 


Mrs. 


Dead at 73 


Judson T. Cull Jr., 73, Wash- 
ington title attorney, died early 
yesterday at his home, 5331 
Chamberlin ave.. Ken w ood, 
Md., after an extended illness. 

Mr. Cull, who received his 
law degree from Columbia Col 
lege, had been a member of the 
District Bar for over 50 years 
He had served as general coun 
sel for the Metropolitan Build- 
ing Association since 1932, su 
ceeding his father, the late Jud- 
son T. Cull Sr., who had been 
general council for the associa 
tion since itg organization in 
1866. 

Mr. Cull also was director of 
the Liberty National Bank and! 
president of the Home Title 
Insurance Co., which he and his 
father organized in the District 
in 1901 

Surviving are four sisters, 
Mary, Virginia and Florence 
Cull and Ethe] Cull French of 
Kenwood. 

Private services will be held 
at 11 a.m. today at his home, 
with burial in Congressional 


Cemetery. Russell MeCain to Speak 


Russell H. McCain, 
Msgr. Roach Honored ‘of the Maryland State Roads 


About 1200 parishioners and Commission, will address the 


Robert Davie 


Mrs. Robert L. Davie Sr.. 78 
of 3405 Eastern ave. Mount 
Rainier, Md., died Saturday in 
Leland Hospital, Riverdale 
She had been ill about a year 

Mrs Davie, a native of 
North Carolina, came here 
about 1914. Her husband was 
for many years associated with 
NEA. Mr. Davie died in 1951. 

An active member of Mount 
Rainier Methodist Church, Mrs 
Davie was Hope Counsellor for 
the Sons and of 
Liberty 

She is 
Robert L 
astern 
Son, 


Daughters 


survived by 

Davie Jr. of the 
ave. address, a grand- 
and a great-grandaughter. 


a son. 


‘other friends attended cer- | Monthly dinner meeting of the 


emonies yesterday at which Silver Spring Board of Trade, 
the Right Rev. Msgr. Edward 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at the In- 
L. Roach, pastor of the Shrine dian Spring Country Club. 


of the Blessed Sacrament, was) 
Today’s 


ng similar in the ipterest of 
fic safety education.” 


Todas —<“leuds 


Paul P. enon 
86. died 


Paul P. DiMar 
yesterday at the home of his Pas ae 4, ‘2. 
daughter, Mrs. Clifton E. Birch, 
Newton st.. Colmar Manor. 
h whom he lived 
ir. DiMarzo had been a bar- 
here for over 50 years. His cbapsing tos 
t shop was in the Atlantic and much colder 
tel. His son, Paul DiMarzo, "Q,2eh'*"4 
Green Meadows, tad 48 to 6 on 
t his father and grandfather cloudy with By at night. 
had been barbers on Pennsyl-| 
vania ave. for close to 100 years. | 
Ir. DiMarzo was a charter 
mber of the W. A. Srease! Alban 
Camp, Woodmen of the World. “Alouauerque 
Also surviving are three other Amgritio | 
daughters, Severia Harrison, of Asheville 
Atlanta, Ethel Edelin, 


Weehtnoten | pad Aves: 


he mm aa , 40. 
o snee Po ; Tt 
Parti: 
saree avdiy coldet Sunday 
simu ye, i ~ 12:36 Bb. m min 
oe ~ 
Ma at. Today—-Cloudy with ot- 
casiona!l rain: turning colder with chance 
e sieet or ftreering 
highest 34 te 42 
fast portion 


0 
uesday—Partiy c 
with 


Cloudy with 


ApGene 


i 


we hl how 
Dee eo QD 


Brent-| Atlantic cuy 39 
- and Mrs. William Helge- Biilines 
son, Glendover Estates, Md.; imate 
afother son, Frank DiMarzo, of |B 
Edgewater, Md.; two sisters; a R080" un. 
brother; 13 grandchildren and) |Burlingion 
ape tras 
aretise 


' 65° 


4arrisburg 
* | Housten 


: 
: 


> 
> -1-1S 


8 great-grandchildren. 
Services will be held at 2: 30 
m. Wednesday at the Cham- 
funeral home in River- 
le. Burial will be in Fort 
Lincoln Cemetery. ) 


7 


Sh ist Seusesy. sue 
S8EMIRASSHSSS 


National Weather Summary 


ae 


imum 


rain extreme mulated gefciency of precipitation 
t 956 ; 


snow furries in. &. Mm 


ta 
Tod oc. . 8 
ma 
Md. said | sasigne! tein and som ee oe a. ae it & 3 clea: gg ae 
= bane | neers 


Temperatures and rain for 24 hours ending 7 p. m. Sunday: 


#2) 5 | Galveston Rapids 


| Huron 
ndianapolia 
Jackson 


robes and 
Events 


insignia of a Domestic Prelate 
and a member of the Pope's 
The following events 
scheduled for today (asterisk 


private household. . 
colder denotes event is open to the 
public): 


west and 


changing to snow north 
der 


a! 
nort h- 
eriv 4 oi] 
‘ inibility— — oy LUNCHEONS 
Departures irews > wormal vesterdar Am er ican Farm Bureau 
of temperature 


degrees. Accu- 


Accumu! — ed dene iency 13 

ince 1, 1996. © inter- Industry Highway Safety Com. 
since mittee, Sheraton-Park Hotel. i2 
ches Dp. mM. 


t year agse—High, 25 
low, 19 de 


eon and T = Sun rises. 7 16 | 
i Dp Moon rises i 


MEETINGS 
Washi ae Council. Knights of Co- 
2 lumbus 
e- Cit Association 
t. Jonas Church, Po- 


o nm. 
Waketicla Parent. Teachers Associa- 
| tea. 4901 &. Chesterfield rd. Ariine- 


8 Pp 
Wemen'e "National Democratic ae, 
ho New Hampshire ave. nw. 12:30 


“a5 Washington Hebrew Academy 
16th st. nw. 8:30 a” Sex8 

. v 
and Secs 


A ton, 86 m 
wd jewish Weifare Board, 1637 
|Massachusetts ave nw 


L. Pree. 


$m 


ontgomery 
trea! 


PODW OHIO 


Statler Hotel, 


Btates. 
tee on 
Ameri- 


| dustriss Association, 


Wepre ti wtomu 


patentee of , American 

up of the Comm 

Poi ical beatte rs. Pan 
10:30 a. m 


SPECIAL EVENTS 

“The rs tapped 

ress. 8 ea 

Nursing Course ja 
son 5 4.30 ; 

*Piano ecite! wince Seeobees 
Phillips Gallery, 630 p 
pace et a 

rm 464Buresu. The Wil- 


a 


myer a 


wt ww www 
te SD & DIL OH 


3 


a 


* 


Tw 
~a- 


larg {torougn Fu 

(th 
Autom 

Sheraton- obi Motel 


. oe. 
} yey ea oe nete terest > 4 Set eet ray ere teak 


SGVISPNESRESVALS TALL AIH STE 


' 
are) 


30 | 
| the general public funerals 
of the highest quality at the 


8 PD. 
| Helicopter Council of the Alrcraft Ie. 


Li- 
Al- 


Col. 
USA 


Oliver W. DeGruchy, 
(ret.), former 


at his home, 3614 N, Abingdon 
st., ‘Arlington. 
He was 67. 

Col. DeGru- 
chy was com- 
missioned as a 
reguiar Army 
officer in 1918 
and spent most 
of his 30-year 
military career 
as a financial 
6 ye 

e was 
Europe w 1. te Col. DeGruchy 
the Hoover Commission for Re. 
lief in Belgium when the 
United States @ntered World 
War lL. He asked for a com- 
mission and was assigned as 
military attache to The Hague 

Col. DeGruchy was born in 
New York, the son of George 
S. DeGruchy, an accountant for 
firms in England and _ the 
United States. He received 
some of his scholastic training 
in his father’s prep school on 
the Isle of Jersey. 

He attended Erasmus High 
School in Brooklyn and was an 
‘alumnus of Columbia Univer- 
sity. 

Col. 


DeGruchy was an out- 


Funeral services for Robert 
H. McCallam Sr., of 4014 34th 


| st., Mount Rainier, will be held 


‘at 10 a. m. today at St. John's 
Episcopal 
Church in 
Mount Rainier 
The 67-year-old 
retired typog- 
rapher died! 
Thursday at 
Sibley Hospi- 
tal. Burial will 
be in Fort Lin- 
.coln Cemetery. 
Mr. McCal- 
lam: had been 
a typographer 
for Washington 
about 35 years 
time was spent 
Washington 


b %4 


Mr. McCallam 


newspapers for 
Most of that 
with the old 
Times-Herald 


ie Peabody, 
Expert on 
Transport 


E. Peabody, 67, 
the Alexandria 
Planning Commission 
1939 to 1953, died yesterday in 
\lexandria Hospital after a 
long illness. H lived at 510 West 
Windsor rd., Alexandria. 

Mr. Peabody, who was born 
in Middletown, Conn., was an 
alumnus of Norwich Univer 
sity in Vermont, and received 
a master’s degree from Clark 
University in Massachusetts 

After several years of teach- 
ing mathematics at Lehigh 
University, Worcester Poly- 
technic, and Yale University, 
Mr. Peabody came here in 1923 
to work in the Bureau of Rail- 
way Economics 

From 1923 to 1924 he was as- 
sociated with the Nationa! 
Transportation Institute 

In 1924 he’ joined the Bureau 
of Public Roads. By 1934 he was 
senior highway economist. In 
1944 he joined the ICC as 
principal transport economist 

Besides work with the 
Alexandria Planning Commis- 
sion he acted as right-of-way 
engineer for the city and stat- 
istician for the Northern Vir- 
ginia Regional Defense Coun 
cil. 

Surviving are his widow, 
Holden Peabody: his 
Mrs. Will E. Peahody, of Mid 
dietown, Conn.: two sons, Leroy 
E. Peabody Jr., of Alexandria, 
and Robert H. Peabody of An- 
napolis, and two daughters, 
Mrs. Roland S. Szadokierski., 
of Alexandria, and Mrs. Carl 
Blew, of College Park 

Services will be held at 

m. Tuesday at St. Paul’ 
Church in Alexandria. Inter 
ment will be in Ivy Hill Ceme-| 


chair 
City 
from 


Leroy 
man of 


his 


Ida 


mother. 


” 
~_ 
- 
> 


military} 
finance expert, died Saturday 


Col. De Gruchy Dead; 
Retired Finance Expert 


istanding athlete. He won nuw- 
merous awards running the 
mile and half mile races for Co- 
lumbia and, later, for the New 
York Athletic Club. Until a long 
iliness set in, he was an active 
tennis player at the Army and 
Navy Country Club. 

| After World War I ended. 
i'Col. DeGruchy was assigned to 
‘the Aberdeen, Proving Grounds 
in Maryland, wheré he served 
\five years. S 

Later he was auditor for the 
'‘Southeastern United States 
military area, finance officet 
for the Panama. Canal Zone, and 
finance officer at Fort Lewis. 
Wash. 

In 1940 he came 
trict for brief duty 
went to Iran with the United 
States mission. On his return 
he served in various Pentagon 
posts until his retirement seven 
years ago. 

Surviving are his wife. the 
former Helen Fisher of White 
Plains, N. Y.; a son, Lt. Col. 
O. W. DeGruchy Jr of the Air 
Force; a daughter, Mrs, A. E. 
Thatcher of San Marino, Calif.: 
a sister and four grandchildren 

Services will be held at the 
Fort Myer Chapel at 3 p. m 
Tuesday. Burial will be in 
Arlington Cemetery. 


the Dis. 
Then he 


to 


Robert MeCallam Dies 
Retired Typographer 


When that paper was sold. he 
worked part time for the Wash 
ington Star. 

He was an active member of 
the District of Columbia Typo 
graphical Union, serving on the 
wage scale committee. He also 


/held the Union's 40-vear-service 


pin. Service 
work in New Jersey. 
He was a past 


included earlier 


master of 

Castle Lodge 186 
A. F. & A. M., a former member 
of the Mount Rainier Volunteer 


| Fire Department and a member 


of St. John’s Church 
Survivors include his wife 
Ethel M. McCallam, and a son. 
Robert H. McCallam Jr.. of the 
home address, and a daughter. 
Mary Milan of Brockton, Mass 
He also survived by three 
sisters and four grandchildren 


1s 


( Cone. 


Banker and Son 
Shot to » De: ath 


cr) rm. ‘ 
5 4) Se ren Se 4 . 


ROCKFORD, Il, Jan 
George H Arnold, 59, local 
banker, and his son, Robert, 26 
were found shot to death today 
in the garage of the Arnold 
home in an exclusive residen- 
tial district 
Country Club 

Police said 
been shot on: 
temple and that the son 
been shot three times in 
head. A 32 caliber pistol 
on the floor between the bodies 

Authorities said a note found 
in a pocket of the father’s trous- 
ers read: “Dear Mom: I'm sorry 
for what happened Bob.” 
There was no immediate indi- 
cation of the meaning of this 


29 


had 
right 
had 
the 
was 


the father 
e in the 


note : 


Bied 


BARBAGALLO. SARINA R. Sudd 
Saturday anuer’ r 1956 


BAXTER. , aeesT A 


1 4 fio vt 
' made to the First 
Church 

CUARLES RENE Y Or oa 
56 nn 


BENEMAN. 
de Es 


- 
14th 
at i0 


30 8. mm 
ton Hebrew Gonerenst ion Cemetery. | 


chairman | 


complete 


funerals 


' 
} 


The Willerd. | 


Chambers has always 


lowest possible cost. 


4 


@ Complete funerals $95 to $2000 
© Complete grave opened and closed $69 


ONE OF THE LARGEST UNDERTAKE®S IN THE WORLD 


In Case of Death, 


near the Rockford. 


given 


35 


co. 


Calt CO. 50432 


Prayer for Today 


Eternal Father, who art 
older than all creation yet 
forever young in spirit, we 
thank thee for the continu- 
ing generations of youth who 
keep this old world alive 
and alert to thy far-flung 
goals. Inspire the young peo- 
ple of our time to seek thy 
will for the world and to 
spend themselves unstinting- 
ly to fulfill it. For thy king- 
dom’s sake we pray. Amen. 
—Alred N. Sayres, 
caster, Pa., professor of prac- 
tical theolegy, Theological 
Seminary, Evangelical and 
Reformed Church. 


4 ‘ent 1908 by ine Ls ta! oe af 


the th arenes of Christ - the 


Bird 
BODKIN HENRY ROW AnD tur- 
jo ; why HOw 
ARI ) BODKIN. belie od oy her of ers 
Ru Kuhr 


. 


2525 will be hela 
services will A, 


a wet’ KATE ¥. On Bund 
1956. KATE I 


tom 
Friends may call at t 
h a 

- where services will be held 
"Tue day, January 3}, 2:30 Bb 

Congressional Cemetery 
onmeor ew Ane. On Saturday. Jan- 
uary 268 5956. at a O Rs 
F IWARD Br of 2 a 
—: ‘yelow ead of Setharies 

Rrice " 


tag 


nd 


Ke 


fone Ja 
ment. 


Reid's a! Ar Inston National 


Mancow. “SELL . A. oS Bundsy Je . 
home of ner 


W. McCeney. Fielder Taliaferro Ma 
low and the late Alexenia_M . 
and sister of Charies © an 
Mario als at 


Sempares Funeral Home e434 soot 
Sliver. pring, Mad. Notice 
lave 


SK. DUDLEY L.. 


ave 
service 


MAS of 2208 Calvert ot 


on Tuesday. January 31, at ft 
faterment Georse Wakincton Ceme- 


e 
DANIE a rR 
‘MeDANIEL ANK Pm a weage 
New Grieape. 


services 4... 
brua ort Mer oon. i 
m , 8 RW.5 ye A atios 


emetery 
Sinai 
a 


(MILSTEAD. ATs & 


¢ Vadis “is 
ls 


of a9 +) . a 
of 


’ 

| 

| the Arena rt 
Plata, Mé 


Se 
Nararene Church Indian ‘ 
2 m snterment Nazarene Ceme- 


tery. "Picea 


eet MUCKELBAUER, PRANK G, | Buddenty. 
c is 


2 Vs) 
Interment Pros- 


CANTE - 

jan her residence 

in LAN MAE CAN 

wife of t ate Leonard 

r ‘and mother “af Res Mur- 
D.C 


Ruehesy ile. 
bt thre 


an wedi rescay 
. vices Old 
=u Hug! ws ile. Md 
a @ ferment church cemetery 
CONNOLLY, WILLiAm FREDERICK On 
1956 WILLIAM | 


5 
PR DERICK CONNOLLY b pleved h! use | 
Kathi ud Co 


Patish Church in Roce 
reek Cemetery on Tuesday. January 
i}. at 12 noon. Interment Rock Creek 
Cemetery 
CONNOR TEREMIAS J. On Sunday. 
January : 
7604 Ala ~. JEREMIA 
CONNOR. bel os vee "husband of 
yt pee Achstetter). father 
Robert J Yonnor. Mrs. Josephine 
Keena : pateinetic Hudson 
fr Catheriné Scanion. Mrs. Anne 
mhue, Mrs “Eliabeth HolLoran 
Re John B. Connor. FPunerei 
the above veseeeuse on —— 
930 a. m. & 
t Bt ksichael’s 
Md at ji 
Mary's Cemetery 
ives “and friends invite 
, a P| On Saturday 
L95t MARY J. COOKE 
4 ' . 


oO Dens 
4 ne 


a m 
Relat 


Kenwood 
beloved brot mer at 


. at Lele 
MARGARET 


intg¢yment 


OLIVER W. (COL.). 
january 2 1956 Ma 
sold N Adpin ton 
COL rn Ww 
beloved poshend of 


far - c 
DeGRUCHY, 
Saturca’ 


ice! < 


;| ROSE. RAU 


and 
survive 
Home, 

Md 
>: 30 


R rapdchiidren 
- : rts ’ 

ers Puneral 

ave. Riverdale 

iary 1 } 

ment Fort Lincoln Oemetery 

DYER, ty nes 7 On Sunday. 

29 T YER 
1 sat 


"Mrs 


, LILLIAN MAF. On Saturday.) 
28 956 


his residence. 
BH J.i 


} 

J a @i 
srandchildren and 
children. Funeral 


3 gh requ! em masse at 
| Pr Church =" th and Monree 
| at . 10 Interment Fort 
"Comet -. Relatives and 
friends tnvite 
HANLON PATRICK J On Thurs aay. 
954 Atherton. ¢ 
ORANLON. be! lowed — 
{ the late Rose Heany O Manion 
father of Irene Mahaney and Thomes 
L. O'Hanlon Funeral from the James 
T. Ryan Funera! 517 Penne 
vania ave lanuary "ho 
mass at the 
j ’ . the Rietsed Sacramer at 
™m Relatives and friends in 
Interment Mount Olivet Ceme.- 


af 903 Mis. 
19§8- 


| 


evrua 
Interment Rock 


Mary) 


Jat ar 

t Pp Parking f 
Services and interment Ashevi! 
Please omit flowers 


rEaseey. en FI pen 
19 


' st » on Monday 
On Sot if 
ne 


Alexandria 
nnapelis. Md 
kienski of Alexandria and Mrs 
Blew of College Park. Mad 
Christine Parmelee Peabode and 
ate Will Elden Popbegs. 
ice on vesdey. Janu 

from 
Alfzandcria. Va nite 
| Cemetery Priends. may ca 
Wheat ley yunerat Home. 809 |} 
. , u . ol 


re Pes 
H Peabody ; 
Rolar Sra 


y requests 


ontridution be i 
nd. 


“ 
ana brother nf Irene ’ 
lor and Charlies Prevos 


t @:3 
Ervisccopa! 
ere ma 


Fmmaenue!l 


at iOa m for 
Interment Fort Lincoln Cen 


aa ane, Ba + phe Suddenir 
1956 


Nichola ’ 
M. Ri naldi and brother of Sal: 
tore Rinaldi 


10 
Interment st 
; Relatives and friends 
Ba! timore papers Please copy. 


A J. On Beturéey. 
at Casualty Hospit 
of 4°39 5t h a’ nf .ove 
wife of Louis . Rose AN of ' 
Dorothy Jackson. Mr« 
son *. Carrie ce 
and Melvin I! 


ar 
Interment Prospect 


January 


areare’ ag | 


bruar ; ot 
Reauiem mass at the Church of 
Ghost. Iss at i190 
m Interment Hol > Ghost Cemetery 
Relatives and friends invited 
FILTERS Kerry VAN. On ndey. Jan- | 
9 n's Hospitel. | 
of 650 


| 


ikemia Fund at Children’s Hospital 
sagt bear Tees H.. SR. On Thursday.) 
huer os- 


. of 515 
Me on 


“here services will be held on Monday. 
January an. | Interment 
Cedar Hill Cemetery 

HICKINGBOTTOM, are On Fri- 

, e 

WILLIAM 
211 South Irvin at. 
Ariington. Va. beloved husband of 
Annie Jane Hickingbottom. father, of 
' ye 


~ * RDAS. ATHENS 
ATHEN 8 SGouRD 


chusetts ave 


ca 
rugera' 
fter 12 
iti Ber 
Orth lodox Ch 
peassachus ett ave 
Januar 7 
Interment ‘Glenwood’ Cemet ere 
SMITH. ~ eat ed o. On 
vary 29. 1956 
pital MARJORIE. o “eMiTy o! 
Columbia pike. Arlington. beloved = 
f Col nillp E fenit hb. ar 4 mo'ber 


of Caartes 1. Kathe of &y 
atherine & “Hotel ~ 2 


_- 
of 

we granéchil a, 
ae cop Troy 


rived. by 


» F 
LS ay v la 


Ho:- 
of 4702 


“Pune rab 
N.Y 


Saturd 


; v 
bs Germany Funeral serv: 
ines 
ne 


$01 14th at 
day. ruary i. at 10 
Glenwood Cemetery 
* of PB ate 
' Wiltlaen " 
ce 6 


na 
oved 
nee 
an 


m 
Ty weesrenn KATE 


me ‘ Lit} 
wesday January 31 at 19 
* wptermant Geder iil Cemeter 


Interment Columbia Ger- | 


cena Cemetery 


| 7a ORS ey °. Ne Wedn 
January ; : 
nts 


eadar 


6347 North 
Va siDNEY > 


rk C€ Fyne 
Ty ves Pu nera!l Ho me 


ment Ar 


National Bemete ery. 
KINS. EUGENE 


=e Ort tae rien a 
copter 

ro * tase i? @ a 
Bc. te 

sister-in-law, 


JE 


Mrs. 


ment ye 


KEPLINGER. pone Mw 
qpauery nt 


aril and 

chery ata to ca 
bert _ 
x 


rit 


uar? , 30. 
kville 


onder. 
D Interme 
Cemetery 


KRAUSS, CHARLES. 


wary 28 19 pny a 

CHARLES Knauss of of ih 4 Nort 
rye _ Ariington 

¥iv . w, 

is 


oye fuera Wilson 
Bia Saeed oat 


residence | 


fe netere 


—DEATH S— 


Announcement of 
went br Chambers 


Chambers fe 
Chambers fea 
Chambers Ce 
Chambers (a. 
Chambers («. 


Cc 
C1 


hambers (<«, 


SS59545424 44553 


S4445445%4 49524 


Cemetery Lots Wanted _ 
POR RESALE—CALL ME 8-0076 


“Chapel Lot ope jocation near 
, coin emet 
1 rite Box M-309. Post-TH ens 


Funeral Designs eis 4 
C. Shaffer, Inc. 
f ~~ --- 


Gore! tributes. Moderate 
5 oinan caus. Sundays and foli- 
aye. ord 
teoSe.m. 9001 


ane ac ted. 4 30 
nw A. 4-0106 


Sioa it 


CREMATORIUM 


J. WILLIAM LEE’S SONS CO. 
jath ond Mass Ave NE é 3.5208 


THE WASHINGTON POST ond TIMES HERALD 


U. N. Chief in Karachi 
Monday, January 30, 1956 pi! Sie 


KARACHI, Pakistan, Jan. she 


#—U. N. Secretary Gen. 
Hammarskjold arrived ae to- Mabbeey Indorsed In Caroline County 


see Ages Songer BALTIMORE, Jan. 29 \\mittee—in his campaign for 
er ecorge mocratic nomination to the 

Mohammed Ali before leaving ne be pectin: — United States Senate. 

for a meeting of the Economic|°Ut #mother indorsement to!" 1 marked the 12th county 

Commission for Asia and the|night—this time by the Caro-|in which the Baltimore paving 

Far East in Bangalore, India. jline county state central com-\contractor claimed support 


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Georgetown U. Adds Seven New Courses 


Georgetown University’sjers of Eastern Europe, Euro- 
graduate school has added/pean nationalism, the Iberian 
seven new courses to its spring|Peninsula and two physics 
term calendar, it was announced | courses, classical, quantum and 
yesterday by the Rev. John statistical mechanics, and ther- 
M. Daley, S.J., dean modynamies and applied mathe- 

Aare : matics for physics. Late regis- 

They are enzymology, col 


tration will o accepted 
lective bargaining, great pow- through Feb. 


D. C. Céneral 


 Htevalnips Data 


The 
Jat D. C. General Hospital has 


[been revamped te prevent du-|U" 
pop ww and make is 


NEW CONTINUOUS ACTING | Dr Phillip A. E. Stebbing 


SLEEPING CAPSULES |hospital superintendent, said 
iithe change involves cnidisetion 
REAL-SLEEP Capwwles contoin Hey 


tandy-conted granules. of a patient’s medical history 
solve instantly, begin in the out-patient clinic with his 


get sieeo in minutes 
quire two to three hours to dissolve record of treatment as an in- 
patient. 


erd releose their 
Heretofore, according to 


here fit: 
sleeprng can. 
Stebbing, the records were kept , 
separate. Each patient treated Preparing their recommenda.’ 


Continwous Action. REAL.~SLEEP 

@iimirates MYhoat secend sleeping co0- ‘ ; 
in the clinie and later admitted r= lly’ as Bg poe og 

to the hospital was assigned a| y hospital: 


yht. One copsule—Once 
Try ? today! 
Now in the works, Fuhrman 
eer ty Stabbing anid rey taxes said, are studies which he hopes 


This led to duplication of rec- will lead to improved adminis- 


| trative functions at D. C. Gen- 
ords, treatment, laborat 
work and sometimes, X-rays, ed eral in supply, handling of nar- 


cording to Stebbing. It also "ied |Coties and pharmaceuticals, ra-| 
to difficulty in a fone diag- diology, and cost accounting. 


nosis of ailments, he added. 


| By combining a patient's rec- Teachers H i t 


M’Keldin Veto 
T Y P E wW R ITER 5 Of School Bill 


$39->° BALTIMORE, Jan. 29 (P—A 


spokesman for the Maryland 
DIAL ME. 8-100] 


Teachers’ Association said to- 

day Gov. Theordore rt McKel- 
@ Free Delivery 
@® Guaranteed 


din made “misleading” state- 
ments about a $49 million 

' ® Trades Accepted 
You always get « better used typewriter for less money at District. 


,school construction bill he had 
vetoed. 

District Office Equipment Co. 

723 11th St. N.W. 


Milson C. Raver, executive! 
(Between G and H) REPAIRS 


medical-record geen} his complete medical his- 
tory always will be on file | 
under one perpetual file num-| 
ber, Stebbing said. | 
The improved system is the 
work of Herbert S. Fuhrman | 
and Alfred S. Sharlip of the’ 
District Management office, | 
which was asKed by hospital 
officials to make the study. 
Fuhrman said administrative 
| techniques at five general hos-| 
pitals, including Johns Hopkins 
of Baltimore, were studied in 


A ee ee 


o Drue Stare NOW 
@® NO NARCOTICS 
@ NON.HABIT FORMING 


SO SAFE—WNo Prescription Needed 


secretary of the association, de- 
clared schools are in “desper-) 
ate straits” and will. be even| 
worse off unless the Legisla-' 
ture overrides the veto at the 
30-day session beginning Wed-| 
nesday. 

The bill, approved by the 1955 
|General Assembly, would in- 
crease state aid for new school 
construction by $10 per pupil 
in Baltimore City and each 
county. 

Raver said his group and the 
Maryland Congress of Parents 


RENTALS 


Hospital Personnel 


Opportunities Are Waiting 


and Teachers will ask the Leg 
islature to override McKeldin's 
veto. 


or your Travel Agent 
Ticket Offices: 14th & F Sts. 
(Willard Hotel), Statler Hotel 


in America’s Most 
Talked-About Hospitals 


| xcitement be been running high since it became known that 

“ | ho vitals, to be operated as an integrated system, were 
«t ne built in Kentucky, Weet Virginia, and Virginie. Every- 
hody tot been expecting big things from these hospitals— and 
they wont be disappointed —because these hospitals ARE dif- 
ferent—in structure, in design, and—most important. in organi- 
ration. Everyone employed will be a part of a new dynamic 
medical care team. Opportunities of major significance are 
waiting for anestheticts, dietitians, head nurses and nursing 
«, medical technologists, central sterile supply 
suprvisers. and technicians (R.N.), physical theranists and 
fessional and technical classifications. For the above 
the minimum monthly starting salaries 
vary from $3 5. Some of the benefits are « forty-hour « 
four weeks’ vacation, assured annual increase, shift 
and a non-contributory retirement plan. 


The school<construction aid Lobby and Sheraton-Park Hotel Lobby 
bill is one of 61 rejected by 
McKeldin after pasage last year 
and scheduled as the first or- 
der of business when the 1956 
session convenes. 

It shapes up as one of a half. 
dozen or so “hot potatoes” to 
be handled before the lawmak-' 
ers can consider new liegisla- 
tion, which in even-numbered 
years is limited by the Consti- 
tution to bills dealing with the 
budget, statewide matters or 
emergencies. 

Another veto which has been 
the subject of calls to override 
is one to postpone scheduled, Ham 
increases in registration fees! 7) > > 
for automobiles. 


5 Alaska Guard 


Fliers Feared Lost 


| NOME, Alaska, Jan. 29 (INS), 
|The adjutant general of 
' Alaska’s National Guard and 
‘four other men in a storm- 
tossed plane were missing and 
| presumed down in frozen wild- 
ern near the Arctic Circle. 

Aboard the single-engine 
plane which vanished in a sub- 
zero storm were Brig. Gen. 
John R. Noyes, territorial com- 
mander of the National Guard, 
and four others identified only 
as Majors Kolb, Siegwart and 
Colman and a Sgt. August. 

The six-place plane took off 
from Nome Friday on a 140- 
mile flight to Shishmaref on the 
northern shore of the S- ward 
Peninsula. It last was r-ported 
caught in a violent storm and 
unable to land Friday night. 


House Quiz Set 
On Civil Defense 


Associated Press 

Plans for an extensive in 
quiry into civil defense were 
announced yesterday by a 
House Military Operations Sub- 
committee. 

Hearings will begin Tuesday. 
Top civil defense experts will 
be witnesses. Proposals for a 
major revamping of the civil 
defense system may result 
Rep. Chet Holifield (D-Calif.), 
who heads the subcommittee, is 
an advocate of a Federally run 
civil defense system as opposed 
to the present reliance on states 
and local communities. The first | 
listed witness is Dr. Willard 
Libby, a member of the Atomic 
Energy Commission. 


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Miss Chapman, R.N. and Mr. Sadler, Personnel, 
will be available for interview 9 A.M. to 8 P.M. 


HOTEL RALEIGH 
Tues., Jan. 31, and Wed., Feb. 1 
| Apply in Person 


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SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 29 
The biggest Chinatown outside 
the Orient will pick a queen 
Tuesday, but they'll do it with. 
out benefit of bathing suits or 
tape measure. 

The young lady who will 
reign over the festival marking 
the advent next month of the 
Chinese year 4654, said H. K. 
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tee, must be marriageable and) 
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\ — 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
14 Monday, January 30, 1956 


_—— 


Chances Missed to Send Reds 


Farm Surplus, 


Aseociated Press 
Suspect Held 


Louis D. Young, 25, of Dallas, 
has admitted, police say, that 
he was with Billy Jean Ross 
when the latter was fatally 
shot after breaking into the 
Richland, Kans., homie of 
Georgia Neege Clark Gray 
and Andrew Gray. Mrs. Gr® 
is the former Treasurer of 
the U nited States. 


+ A 


Butler. Aiken 
In Tiff Over 
Grain Stores 


Associated Press 
Chairman Paul M. Butler of 
the Democratic National Com- 
mittee yesterday called for an 
investigation of what he termed 
“the gigantic mess in grain 
storage which has been cre 
ated bv the Eisenhower Admin- 
istration 
Butler said e 
harges are “adding 
' to the cost 
s; farm price 


cessive storage 
millions of 
of the Gov- 
support 


' 
oOllars 


ei ai 

rge D. Aiken (R-Vt.), 

anking GOP member of the 

2 > Agriculture Committee, 

i that Butler trying 
some more poiitics 
current nonpartisan 
aid farmers through 


(70% 


know any farmer 

who takes Butler seriously,” he 
said. “He has been mastermind- 
ing some vicious attacks upon 
Secretary of Acriculture_Ben- 
son and President Eisenhower.” 
Butier said “shocking new 
evidence’ is bein diec'osed hv 
articles in the Nashville Ten- 
nessean. He sad the Neshy'" 
newspaper reported the Ad- 
ministration has reentered into 
ora 7 4a hich 


er fees, “with 


pve ep trac’s at 


as Butler put it, 


oe ———- —— . —_— 


Ike Should Run If Able, 
N. Y. Newspaper Says 


29 (Pp—The 
ibune said 


NEW YORK, Jan 
New York Herald T: 
today it is that newspaper's 
and prayer that nothing 


commanding 


“hope 
short of the most 
reasons” will keep 
Eisenhower from seeking 
election 

In a front page editorial, the 
newspaper—which describes it- 
self as Independent Republican 
—commented on Eisenhower's 
indecision about running be- 
cause of his heart attack last 
Fall. It said: 

“No President, no private in- 
dividual, can know for a cer- 
tainty that he will survive the 
rigors of his labors for any giv- 
en period 

“We are convinced that Mr. 
Eisenhower will and should ac- 
cept renomination only if he is 
satisfied, within his own good 
conscience, that he is equal to 
the task after measuring his re- 
covery at full pace.” 

Terming Eisenhower “the 
symbol and chosen instrument 


President 
re- 


_—— 


‘sales of the corn. 
| @tc., 
| be to friendly nations. only, Sec- 


'Renson said. 


lown 


» crooks, 


By Marguerite Higgins 
NYHT News Service 
The United States recently 
had to pass up possibilities of) 
disposing of some of its huge 
farm surpluses to Russia's Last- 


ern European satellites. 


It could not take advantage) - 
of these chances because of con- 
gressional restrictions that any 
cotton, lard, 
piled in warehouses must 


‘retary of Agriculture Ezra T. 


 Bengan has revealed in an in- 
i terview. 


The Administration hopes, 
Benson said, that Congress will 
act on President Eisenhower's 
suggestion that these restric- 


‘tions be repealed so that “we 


can take advantage of any new 
offers fr@m behind the Iron 
Curiam should they seem in 
the Aational interest and should 
they come or Way again.” 
Although the Secretary did 
not wish to specify exactly 
which Iron Curtain countries 
had shown such an interest, he 
said there had been recent re- 
ports that farm products sold 
to friendly European nations 
had subsequently turned up in 
the satellities, thus giving con- 
crete evidence of satellite in- 
terest in these American goods. 
According to other officials” 
in the Department it would be. 
improbable that an Iren Cur- 


itain country would come up 


with a concrete Dusiness offer 
so long as stich a deal was 
deemed illegal. 

There has been no evidence™ 
that Russia itself 
Might be interested in such 
deals. 

The Secretary said it was his) 

and President Eisenhow-| 
er’s philosophy that this coun! 
try’s interest could be served’ 
by barter deals through which | 
our soft—and perishable com-| 
modities—could be traded for| 
durables from behind the [ron | 
Curtain. 

As to a question of possible 
conflict between barter or other 
trade deals and overall United 
States foreign policy, Benson 
pointed out that attached to his 
Department is a mixed operat- 
ing committee including a rep- 
resentative of the Department 
of State. No deals would be con- 
summated, he said, without « 
State Department clearance. 

Benson said his Department 


' 


most of the warehousemen who 
were prosecuted by the pre- 
vious Administration for ‘con- 
verting’ Government-owned 
grain which they were storing.” 

Sen. Karl E. Mundt (8-S. D.), 
also a member of the Agricul- 
ture Committee, suggested that 
“if Chairman Butler has any 
real facts, can identify any 
or is serious, he should | 
turn the data over to chairmen | 
of congressional investigating | 
committees, who are fellow 
Democrats.” 


of national unity,” the news- 
paper praised the President's 
“philosophy and a program of| 
action designed to buttress the 
best of a free society, to main-| 
tain fiscal integrity and to pre-| 
serve an economic strength es-| 
sential to ee the world.” 


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REGISTRATION 


Mondey - Tuesdoy, February 6-7 
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2000 G Street, N.W. 
DOWNTOWN CENTER 
1901 F Street, N.W. 
UPTOWN CAMPUS 
Massachusetts and Nebrasko Aves., 


For complete schedule and course descriptions, 
phone WOedley 64803 or write or visit The 
Office of the Assistant to the President, Mass. 


Session 


thru 7 incl. 


10 a.m. .te 12 neon 


12:30 te 6:30 p.m. 


N.W.” 


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is taking care to see that goods 


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marked with the label “This is 
a gift from the American peo- 


ple.” 
Despite press :predictions to) 
a Pes uine We ha Benson is baited 


ee _——— —_ 


Benson Says 


mistic that the Administration's 
new farm program including 
the soil bank will get through 
Congress without—in his opin- 
ion—the disaster of being com- 


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, supports. 


He said a number of key farm 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
' @eee8 Monday, January 30, 1956 15 
ee ee 


Fire Sweeps Church Supper Near Baltimore 


Associated Press and United Pr: 


* e bd 
12 Die in Maryland Fire | wig moti o 
vy of the scores injures 
| when fire roared through 
FIRE—From Page I | clothes. Two white-haired men| a community hall at 
————_$—$—$—$—<$—$—$—$—$———————————-— c stood off from her, unnoticing|) Brooklyn Park, Md.. last 
aking up a collection for the . her, but crying like little chil; might, is treated at South 
March of Dimes, turned back . dren Baltimore General Hospi- 
when she heard sounds of par : | At an adjoining switchboard tal. Twelve of an esti- 
ic from inside. | | four-handed telephone opera-- mated 1000 persons at- 
“The lights went out, and! ! tors flew about their task of tending a church oyster 
verybody got panicky,” she . silencing a board that would; roast were killed. 
aid. “There were plenty of! i inet be silenced. Nurses glided 
doors, and plenty of ways of: | in their soft-- shoed silence 
etting out. And they could) among the injured, each intent/ i 
ave gotten out if it hadn't} lon her own five cases at a time. | Firemen use a giant hook 


been for the panic.” 
Several eyewitnesses ahaa Bnew Reng Atm a to dislodge a still-burning 
: é section of the building. 


ed secing men who were! | a | 
rapped inside the hall throw-| enoeseyp. sheets. To an announce-| 


ng people through the win-| 7 | iment that 25 more victims! 
fows in a desperate attempt to oa | | were on the way, he said’ ; 
, wees who’ had been in-| @a@ | |simply, “Admit them. We ean ( Below ) 
re 4 oo : 
' ; i\take care of them. Hell, these : 
Kenneth Fickes of Baltimore, | are PEOPLE we're admitting.” The firefighters are 


who suffered severe cuts while) 3 
seaping through . window, bs Here and’ there survivors} joined by curious on- 
said: “I was dancing. Sudden-| Mew were recounting for reporters) ‘ookers after the fire had 


» flames and smoke seemed te |their horrifying experience in| been brought under con- 
ome out of everywhere. Every- | the flame-filled hall. | trol. One eyewitness re- 
bne began pushing, and | was' Andrew Casper, 37, of Brook-| ported that the blaze 
practically carried right out! » (lyn, said he was standing in the re “ somebod 
through the window.” 4 | center of the hall when the fire| hed ~ a 7 me z 
ue | aoe: moe ! spread gasoline over 
Washington Post and Times eee fo the place.” 
Herald reporters counted 20 . “I looked at the ceiling and P ; 
ambulances and 40 fire engines} Ferndale Volunteer Fireman (tongues of flame were licking 
at the scene as the fire was| Lehnert Bierman, his face |their way across the room. Sud- 
brought under control. Thirty-| showing strain, carries an |denly a tremendous © blast 
_ ee mony n Sages knocked me down and seemed 
so responded, as did the th| , ito lift the roof off the building. 
infantry of the National Guard. | found at the fire. ‘I got up and tried to find my 


St. Rose of Lima officials said| | sister.” 

he oyster roast was an annual! te 

he Holy Name Society. Al-| patched one truck hands ear ley ‘fee ond Gave 

ost 1200 tickets had been sold,} The firemen arrived to find! head-Arst through a window 

nd it wag believed that there = -. : 

ere well aver 1000 persons in people pouring out of the front Five people followed me out 

e hall when the fire broke|@or, with flames licking aft-|50mehow, | got back inside. | 
saw a woman lying on the 


owe ‘wy them.’ floor. Before I could get her 
The hall was of cement and; “The fire started in or near!to the window, a rush of people 
inder block construction, with) the kitchen, we think,” Ander-| knocked her out of my hands. 
way MNRTCE thd Tt son sald “and the Kitcen i ai! est, she leaning’ ageing 
t 5 ‘ s 
Toy Helm of Baltimore. It|the opposite end of the build-| ne! WEE f ; | 
as 75 by 100 feet in size. ing. The flames must havé) «1, another window. a girl | 
Doctors asked for blood 4o.| spread like wildfire.” had become stuck, half-in-half-| 
ors from among the crowd that} Lt. W. W. Corbin of the Wa-jout, on a wedge of broken 
gathered, and those who volun-|terloo Barracks of the Mary-|8°ass. ae was ee ~ 
Spitals, From Washington, |12nd State Police said a de-\ing’ her and pushed. her 
he American Red Cross im-|tachment of soldiers from Ft./through, glass and all 
mediately dispatched 200 pints; Meade was called out to help! (00. sister, Gertrude, 42 
bf whole blood and 100 units|/¥™tangle traffic on Bellegrove),.4 neq the building ‘safely at 
of serum albumin, which is on ae ge Per ype age a the first cry of “Fire!” 
. - WI 
nsed in shock treatment. The *y Car ge # seme dg A nurse interrupted his story 
blood and serum were taken Y of >, to adjust the bandages on his 
Baltimore by automobile Anne Arundel County Police head already wet and redden- 
ith a police escort. |Patrolman Joseph B. Jager said ing as he taiked 
University Hospital in Balti-| he was cruisihg near the hall| | 
more reported that it had taken|When he suddenly noticed it 
mn about 20 casualties, none of a. aoe dark inside, nae Names of Those 
hem seriously hurt. Mercy Hos-| °'@¢% Smoke was pouring irom gt 
pital said it had received “12 or) “s aor ba Reported Missing | 
4.” all with minor injuries.| Jager found a crowd milling) .., ». ; 
Ane survivor was treated for|about the entrance, with those| — once Bay arnt “ 
hysteria. jinside trying to get out and| said early today that eight - 
. many of those who had escaped * ; . y Ree cas 
i alerted and standing by to| ‘ving to get back in again to] woren ern eae te cence, vine 
na additional hel y help friends and relatives still hall All po oll on Raitin pace teil, Jean J. 
P. ‘trapped in the burning build. om nicl Siem enn mote, 
-oni P gees ot ret = ether Dougherty 55.45. of Mrs Mar ‘ 
: ; : ' Jager managed to push his| - ; ' amocttenr Leona P 
ald be would have no comment|way inside. the. all. Turaing|S*ver0® Park 
rt P on his flashlight he yelled; “I}_ Anna Brandt, 59, of 3216 
seal ' ) am a policeman. Follow this} Foster ave 
Late last night firemen! )in¢ and you'll get out of here.”| Stella Koslowski,. 45, 5627 
“ns ye with th ee oe Then he backed out, followed Sagra rd. 
Melontlichts, The llth and|OY & stream of people who! Gladys McKay, 41, 804 Drill 
per floodlights. found Seemed to be mesmerized by ct. Brooklyn 
4 eee og He Raney or his flashlight. As soon as they| 
a : a. ae Firefighters had reached safety, Jager went 
ite te continue their back inside and repeated the 
: same routine, stopping only 
— oe — when the flames made it im-|'4., Rockdale. | 
grimly silent crov hs 4| possible to go back in. | Josephine Franczkowski, 34,| 
them work. Many pono gga “1 don’t know how many 1|\414 5S. Washington st., also! 
a ee nS led out that way,” he said. “I’m | known as Josephine Franklin. 


irls in ri d party . 
vrentes whe had been dancing| sure it must have been more| . Therese Kelly, 28, 957 Jack| Moranck: Sry "Jos 
| than 90." st., Brooklyn. aw. James W389, 


inside just a short time before. Op : ‘ 
Familie f those who had At & o'clock last night, & ; : Bienkllewski. Mary A. 
wanes © drizzle began to fall on the|List of Those Hurt Simon, Betty Lee 
planned to attend the church) .oldering ruin, and a heavy . a. 
supper made the rounds of area! 41) of smoke hung over the|{nm Anne Arundel Fire Belty M. Riviera, Md 
hospitals and flooded switch- sodden rubble and _ twisted ¥ eri 
boards with calls. girders. | The following were among) 
The front of the burned hall ithose treated for injuries in 
contained a milk bar and cloak Hospital Was Scene ithe fire at an oyster roast of 
room, and there was a sma St. Rose of Lima Church near: 
cocktail lounge nearby. The Of Calm Mercy Baltimore. All yl nas cag 
windows were of steel frame, af ans, except as otherwise in- Yo r Fr 
about 18 by 30 inches — just! The receiving staff of South) dicated: Youngbar. Mrs 


small enough to cause ee ene na OY 20g Soggy ee ot 
for adults attempting to use|" -’ ; g | pttle, 27, Mad. 


}occasion they had faced only in|  "eteata dS ‘e W 
them as an escape route. lanes Pend oS oy Rereline. “George - | Editor’s Note 
The rear door, a garage-type; Around the ward, in various . 7, 38. The picture story on 


exit 12 feet wide near which) tages of hysteri ; q| Risky. James. . 
nine of the bodies were found, Nlenh fheod ny AB gege o antret the Army-Navy Club 


drew. _ 
was never opened. the Brooklyn church party fire dagan. renee 1 originally scheduled for 
Capt. John J. Anderson of the|stood, sat or stretched. A girl ’ this space will appear 
yn Fire Department, said}in a torn party dress leaned Shc in Tuesday’s editions of 
that the first call on the fire|silently against a wall, blood . , 3k. The Washington Post 
came from somebody in thejstill oozing from an abdominal , ‘26. 
building who said: “We have ajtear through a rent in her of. Mabel’ J.. 27. _ and Times Herald. 


armful of women’s shoes 


a 


. } owski, Joseph, 4 
Frances Obzut, 81-62, 19 Sew- 7 i joaeuhn., Pegedens. | Mi, 
: , Mary : 


ard ave. | Myers Walter @ 
Goldie Otto, 38, 8114 Liberty) fesen. Wieam #- a, 
Novak, phie D 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
16 Monday, Jonuary 30, 1956 


' Pestlude 


American U. Orchestra) 7 


Gives Mozart Concert 


Pastore), a slightly later sere-:high level of competence in 
nade for octet, the second of the the matter of just tempos and 
horn concerti, the Masonic Fu- energetic attacks. 

neral Music of 1785, and No. 26; Abe Kniaz, first horn of the | 
of the 41 symphonies, Steiner | National Symphony, drew a de-| 
presented a reasonably compre. | ‘served ovation for the way he! 
hensive review of Mozart's in-|delivered the solo part in the 
strumental music. 'E Flat Horn Concerto, K. 417. 

Programming it was an ex-|Slightly below the peak of his 
cellent job, and 
ance the concert maintained a'there, the wind players who 
gave the C Minor Serenade a| 
relaxed and jaunty reading’. 
were received with more than’ 
cordial applause. The orchestra’ 
was at its best in the Masonic 
Funeral Music, a study in sus-| 
tained elegiac expression. 

The American University or- 
chestra in this concert provided | 
an index of the quality of the 
music available in several of 
our local universities. These 
groups should come off the 
campuses and into the recog- 


By John Haskins 


The American University Or- 
chestra under George Steiner 
made one of its rare off-campus 
appearances at the Phillips Gal- 
lery on Sunday afternoon, and 
distinguished itself in a nicely 
balanced program devoted en- 
tirely to works by Mozart 

In an early overture (Il Re 


STEAKS 
Che best in town 


Serving only prime steaks 
and ribs. Select your 


in perform: | performance, but still well up’ > 


| pext year a man-made moon 


United Press 
The American Merchant Ma 


day that 98 per cent of the! 
United States privately owned 
tanker fleet was in active serv- 
ice Jan. 1, | 
But an institute report said) 
™. (the fleet has dropped from first 
‘to third place, behind Great) | 
‘Britain and Norway, in recent _. 
years. x 
The report said a 10 per cent’ 
7. | a. aN eA ireduction in the size. of the’ 
ae te | ie fleet last year, coupled with in- 
of RS creased freight rates and the 

‘use of privately-owned tankers 

by the Military Sea Transporta- 
{ |tion Service, helped cut inac- 

tive tonnage to a post-Korean 
hlow. 

| On Jan. 1, the report said, 

the fleet totaled 362 vessels of 

6,016,584 deadweight tons — a 

net reduction of 43 and some 

/ 618,000 tons in the last 12 
months. 

It said the reduction resulted 
from a removal of 46 vessels as 
follows: 25 by transfer or sale 
abroad, three by scrapping, 
one by conversion to a bulk 
dry-cargo vessel, one by trans- 
fer to inland operation, six by 


International News 


‘Crystal Ball’ 


No, Joseph Kaplan, head of 
the U. 8. Satellite Project, 
isn’t a seer peering into his 
erystal ball. The ball, a globe 
of the universe with the earth 
suspended inside, is used by 
scientists who will launch 


to flash around the earth. 


nized concert halls oftener, for 
concert-goers need to .be re- 


steak, brand it with your 
initials, and see it broiled 
to your persona! taste in 
our open charcoal grill. 
Served with giant baked 
Idaho or French fried po- 
tatoes, and mixed green 
salad bowl. 


: 
SHERATON 


the local product is. 


bution to Sunday’s music. Janet 
Southwick was the soprano, 
Gilbert Norwood the clarinet- 


HOUSE 


open from 6 p. m. 


forfeiture to the Government 
and 10 by trade-in to the Mari- 


minded often of just how good were true duets for soprano and| 
x pr hn time Administration to be re 
An offbeat program of music|they won the audience with ,, 
for soprano and clarinet was their cleverness even when the Three 


the National Gallery's contri-| words were lost. In the ~ 
group were two cities 


Arthur Bliss which deserved — 
encores. 


without piano, and 


placed by more modern ton- 


new tankers were 


ist who played obbligato and 
solo parts, and they were ac- 


| 
‘STOPS TeRscAe 


Advertisement 


companied singly and together 
by Alice Wrightman at the 
piano. 

Miss Southwick is the pos- 
sessor of an opulent voice, true 
throughout a wide range, and 
controlled over its entire com- 
pass. She was at her best ac- 
companied only by the piano, in 
Mozart arias and songs by Ber- 
lioz, Debussy, Faure. 

Setting 
voice in a recital is bound to 


Entronce on K Street 


Queraton-(Caruton 


SIXTEENTH STREET AT K, N.W. 


REUPHOLSTERIN 


Now Many Wear 


FALSE TEETH 


up a clarinet with a 


_ EXCESSIVE HAIR LOSS 


98 Pct. of Private Tankers Busy 


added during the same period./current ships will have to be 


The current fleet is 165 per 


rine Institute reported yester)cent below the January 1949, m9, nine youre 


level but 42.7 per cent greater | 
than the 1938 fleet, the report 


said. 


If the United States is to 


maintain a privately - owned 


and operated tanker fleet any- 
where near its current size, the 


report stated, 85 per cent of the 


——————— 


® No More nishment 
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You can stop your rotary A 

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clinical research 

psychiatrists, 

cRhanicea! 

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The institute said the De 
fense Department estimates 
the United States should have 
at least 9,636,000 deadweight 
tons of active tankers to meet 
initial defense needs. The re- 
port said the current fleet is 
37.5 per cent below this mini- 
mum. 


RE. 
412 Albee Bldg., Washington, ©. ¢. 


LOOK FOR A LETTER 


FROM 


It'll bring you your only chance this year to get 
LIFE regularly at a special moneysaving rate! 


COMING WEDNESDAY 


produce a few hackneyed 
things, like that tired old ro 
nut, Schubert's “Der Hirt auf 
dem Felsen.” In this case it 
produced some very interesting 
things, also, notably two songs 
by the contemporary British 
composer, Gordon Jacob. These 


Russia Cites 
55 Plan Gain 
And Failure 


MOSCOW, Jan. 28 (‘*)—The 
Soviet government announced 
today that Russian industry as 
a whole over-fulfilled the 1955 
state plan, but failed to reach 
targets set in many critical 
categories. 

The announcement from the 
Central Statistics ent 
said the over-all production was 
103 per cent the plan—12 
per cent above the 1954 output. 
But the Department listed 14 
separate ministries which failed 
to fulfill production plans for 
specific items and said a large 
number of enterprises of other 
‘ministries also fell short. 
Singled out as outstanding 
‘examples of failure were the 
Ministry of Tractor and Agri- 
cultural Machinery Construc- 
|tion, the Ministry of Paper and 
| Wood pulp and the Ministry of 
Construction Materials. 

“A large number of coal 
| mines, timber mills and fishing 
enterprises also failed to ful- 
‘fll the plan,” the announce- 
iment said. 
| The department complained 
that “many industrial enter- 
‘prises have been working out 
'of rhythm, which has resulted 
in irregular production.” This 
| was a reference to starting off 
| slowly and speeding up as the 
deadline for the planned target 
approached. 
Departments which failed to 
fulfill the state plan for indi-| 
vidual items included the antec! 
of ferrous metals, nonferrous 
metals, coal industries, chemi- | 
cal industries, electrotechnica] 
/industries, heavy industey enti 
struction, transport machinery) 
oe stocks of fresh, potent drugs from famous | construction, trector and agrt 
boratories. cultural machinery construc- 
tion, paper and woodpulp indus- 
‘tries, fish industries and the 
Ministry of Supply. 


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READER’S DIGEST ........ 
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Bluebook . . « Living for Young Homemakers 
Fortune. ...... Astounding Science Fiction 
Young Men ......... Successful Farming 


The Union News Company is owned by American News Com- 
pany. Union News Company refuses to take magazinés from any 
other wholesale distributor but American News, and American 


News takes advantage of this to make unreasonable demands 
upon us. To meet these demands would put American News on a 
better basis than that of our long-established wholesalers through- 


out the country. 


Here’s where to get these magazines 
You can get all these magazines at any inuspendent newsdealer. 


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suburbs. 


r 


Sok M NEWS COMPANY, National Magazine Distributor 


b. T 


EXTRA copies 


A. L. COLE. Chairman of the Board L 
General Business Manager 
The Reode:'s Digest Associaton, inc 


W. A. ROG 
General Manager 


The $-4 News Compony 


GODFREY HAMMOND). Vice Pres 
Chairman of the Roard 
Popvler Science Publisiwng Company. inc 


MEREDITH. 4H... Vice Prew 
View President and General Ma 
Meredith Publishing Compeny 

ARTHUR LD LAWLEK 
View 
Street & Seth Public otons, inc. 


MARVIN PIERCE. Director 
President, McColl Corporation 


TheS#M NewsaCompany is national distributor 
of 17 of America’s finest magazines—and is co- 
operatively owned hy the magazine publishers. 


DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS 


H. MUGGE. Director 
Vice President, Director 
lation 
Meredith Publishing Compery 


WALTER WEINTZ. Director 
Circulatron Manager 
The Reader's Digest Association, ine. 


RALPH R. WHITTAKER. JR 
Director 
Executne View President 
Street & Sauth Publ cations, lnc 


1AMES A. LINEN. Director 
Vice President. Time, tre., 
Publisher. Time 


ERS, President 


ANDREW HEISKELL. Director 
Vice President. Time, lacy 
Publisher, Life 


View ree 
President and Sccrvtary 


KUGENE WATSON. Director 
Vice Premdent and Circulation 
Director 
Popular Science Publishing Company. Ine. 

WL. SMITH. Director 

“General Manager, $m, 1919. 1948 


tt 1. STMWART. Treasurer 


LOWELL. SHUMWAY, Secretary 
Ver Preaident and Cirentatian 
Dhirectar 
Me Coll Conpe: oree 


’ 


THE Manage ~~ POST iol TIMES HERALD 


golden drop 


Permits of 4 drivers were 
revoked and 117 others were 
suspended last week, the Dis- 1 
trict Department of Vehicles! 
and Traffic announced y 

vriyty 
day. ave. se: 

In yeoman ener tg Pa Sas ended for period no noted for at 
were char with driving wi te 
a. - permit had rag 2 nw. 30 cays; Samuel W 
privilege of being licensed or'| |, 
registered in the District sus-| 2°? 
pended until proof of financial] ne. 
responsibility for the future tou.” ao 4 
is filed as required under the $47), P¢*ard ©. 
new Safety Responsibility Law. agton. 422 

Of the 40 permits revoked, | se 
three were for operating after/d 
revocation, two were for oper-|'5,,%; 7 Rover "Brown, 
ating after suspension, one for) Pennsylvania ave 15 de 
unauthorized use of an auto- : Peple “390: : 
mobile, 15 for driving while | 3iy0." nowt a: 
drunk and 19 for accumulated | 10 dys: Marcell. 
record of traffic violtaions)Nre « ne. 
amounting to at least 12 points} fasta “ie dr 
under the point system. | Herbert 

Of the 117 suspended, 93) 5rd 
came under the point system 
for accumulated record 
amounting to at least eight 
points, 17 for failure to satisfy ‘4 
judement in court and seven’: 
for failure to file insurance. 

The complete list of sus- 
pensions and revocations as 
submitted by the Traffic De- 


partment follows 
Rereked fer driving sfter Sovecsttes f 
(peered ef reveecation exten 
eric Hw. Tyree 1350 Consti cath r ve 
ne -eieun D Kine. 1542 Alabama « c 
ae Jenn B Zarno sgh. 417 Seabods 
nr Aa 


8! 
Revoked fer driving after 
Edward HNaynesworthn Jr 

e E. Rebdinson 


ton pendence a 


‘eu ‘Seid de h 
ho| . 4 at 


in every 


Harold 
0 days: Cornelius . 
Lonefellow ast " 
Lewis, 412° M st. nw } 
s G Corbett. 1165 Neal st. 
Donald P. Pienherty 
a. Ae... ~ By Norman Driscoll. Staff Photographer 


The Walking Man 


. A familiar sight to Virginia commuters is the vigorous fig- 
ure of Brig. Gen. Conrad E. Snow USA, (ret.), who has 
made the 3'2-mile trek from his Arlington home to the 
State Department by foot almost every weekday since 1946. 
The General, who figures he’s hoofed over 10,000 miles in 
the last nine years, lives at 3111 N. Ist rd., and is assist- 
ant legal. adviser for the State Department. He's shown 
above crossing Memorial Bridge during a recent walk to 
work. Gen. Snow takes the bus home. He's 66 years old. 


igre 
ont 
3 6 t ith 


evok for wnhaetherised use of an 
sutemodiie——Thomas McIntosh. 513 Sth 


while drunk 
3 9th at ‘ 


fer Griving 
| Johnson. 364 
igtp st ae William E. Brown. 2032) 

5212 C a. se.. 30 days; James Rogers 7th st 
Jr.. 740 Quebec pi. nw. 15 days: Law- tee Bt for , eee te Fae, Barreaee 
rence Lt Wwetss, 2941 Brandywine st. nw.. K « 

rn ckso } ! 5 day 

] davs } ~ Suspended = sattetnetien, o ad sede: 


Otis pl. nw.. 15 days: Soott W. Coophas 


an L Phil Raymond J 
privilece Yesurance 
antit Financial Re«ponsibility ey 
fi —Ismee! Peliciano 
Porce Base 
at <4 r 


— 
james A 
ds Robert 


| Alabda ma ave. so 
won gs J record 
violations tetaling 
Joseph 


r 


ROO OR OO 


se Jonn 

Annandaie Va 

Call siace se : 
' Clark. $10 2¢ 


a b 
Robert Lee 


Prankiin s 
1418 Mareach 
. a i= = oa 
wolnhkh 
Jonnni . 


You can pay more 

for whiskey, but you 
can't buy better quality 
than Echo Spring. 


‘ Mo . 
Roberson i702 Wash- 


o—._.- 


Fugitive Charged 
In Strangle Murder 


Herman Clark, 31, arrested 
earlier this month in Florida 
was charged yesterday with the ton. 3413 13th st nw, 2 days ana Trat-|@ Packing & Crating 
murder of Edna Viola Bell, 41,| C5..Scette ta Hyattsville” wa. 15/@ Local and Interstate 
whose nude, frozen body wai r] 
found in a garage behind 1516 : 
7th st. nw on Dec. 20. She 
had been strangled, a coroner 
found 
Clark 
at the 
peared 
Bell 
from 
ave., 


Echo Spring gives you 
more fine natural quality 
at a price lower than most. 


who formerly roomed 

7th st. address, disap- 
Dec. 6, the day Mrs. 
was reported missing, 
her home at 32 Florida! : 
police said. 


Kentucky Straight BOURBON 
STRAIGHT BOURBON WHISKEY> 86 PROOF + ECHO SPRING DISTILLING CO.,, LOUISVILLE, KY, 


VAN and STORAGE JO. 1-2121 
821 HOWARD ROAD $s. 6. 


162 25 Monte 
Ran sey. 631 


Traffic Schoo! 


5 ave 
Par 


James H. McCall, 1344) 


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on NWA Stratocruisers 


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TOKYO. 1,860 miles closer by NWA. Tourist PetOiccs csc cccaceccecse 


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Ticket Office: 1519 K Si.; N. W. ond Lobby Willard Hotel 


THE WASHINGTON POST wi TIMES HERALD 
18 Monday, = 30, 1956 


Russia: Issues 


. ¥. Herald Tribume News Service 
MOSCOW, Jan. 29—The head 
of the Soviet filnr industry has 
given Russian movie fans a pre- 
pete of what they will see this 
ar. 

Alexander Fyodorov, chief of 
the Central Film Production 
Authority, said 75 “interesting 
and varied” movies will be 
made during 1956. 

“The program includes films 
about men and women of the 
working class, about the 
struggle for technical progress, 
about the further development 
of the heavy industry,” he said. 

Seventeen pictures will. be 
about collective farms, he said, 
among them being: “The Steppe 
Calls,” about plowing up virgin 
lands; “The Story of an Agrono- 
~  |mist,” about machine and trac- 

"2% |tor stations; “He Stays on the 
United Press | Job,” about cotton-growing, and 


‘ “The Girls Plant Flax.” 
One of Carloud’ “They will portray the effort 
Sixteen-yearold San Juan 
the party and the government 
high school senior Anita Me- (+. 4 steep rise of agriculture 
Laughlin, representing the ‘and the development of virgin 
Casino de Puerte Rico, will |land,” Fyodorov said. 
be one of the talented carni- yy films = - devoted 
val auee hand by the tot ommunist education of 
cana: ion the pe Shae Soviet youth, he said, and eight 
p die Carnival, Feb. more to the Bolshevik Revolu- 
once de Leon Carnival, tion. The Soviet view of World 
5-10, War II will be presented in six 
3 movies. 
Moviegoers who are inter- 
ested in comedy and musicals 
Ban Is Urged will be able to choose from 


seven films. Fyodorov said some 


On New Roads ier tiewise screen.” 
Near Canal Sexy American 
A ban on new highway con- TV Act Called 


struction within 300 feet of the vA P i 
Chesapeake & Ohio Canal has! lop in Britain 
been urged on Congress bys) 

representative of 16 conserva-| LONDON, Jan. 29 (®—Volup- 


ae hil Shee : bap who usedsto perform on 
tionist-minded organizations. la sexy bedtime show on Iv 


Rear Adm. Neill Phillips,|;,, +, 
| e United States, is a ‘ 
wake ore eBoy 
oing home broke, a newspaper 
House Appropriations Subcom-| pore bee “said today ~ te 
mittee, which is considering | ; 
oe eben Department's | tne Sunday newspaper The| 
g \People, said Gloria (Voluptua) | 
Phillips, who ‘old the sub-| pay “will be stranded here 
committee he represented the| without a penny,” 
conservationists, applauded Na-| 'in Britain a few more days 
tional Park Service plans ‘0! “British viewers won't buy 
build lateral access roads t0/ your sex-for-sale act,” he told 
the canal above Great Falls,/her in his column, which was 
but said it didn't go far enough.| s..ompanied by a photograph 
Phillips urged abandonment) >» Gioria in a bubble bath 
of Park Service plans to €X-| porhes said Voluptua rated 


tend the George Washington 
Parkway from Washington to|°™Y, three TV appearances in 


Great Falls on a route border- 
ing the canal. A shift in the | Pe™S¢s only.” He said the ac- 


route, he said, might permit ac- tress can ‘t afford the fare home 


and is “getting back only by 
quisition of rights-of~way, such} 
as the Cabin John streetcar|°OUrtsy of the American Air 


route, should an all-bus system 
replace Capital Transit Co. 


Phillips said the groups he) 
represented did not oppose ex-} 
tension of the parkway as such,’ 
“but impinging on the canal| 
and cutting through its mag-| 
nificent woods would be a use- 
less destruction and a stark’ 
tragedy.” | 

* 5 


Egypt Asks Probe 
Of Iraqi Charges 


CAIRO, Jan. 29 #—Egypt 
formally requested today an! 
extraordinary session of the) 
Arab League to inveestigate| 
Iraqi charges that some Egyp-| 
tians in Baghdad were involved | 
in subversive activities. | 

League Secretary General 
Abdel Khalik Hassouna said 
“all necessary steps are being) 
taken” to fix a date for the) 
meeting. 

In Baghdad, a foreign office | 
spokesman said the league is’ 
not the place for Egypt to dis-| 
cuss the charges, that the) 
league council “is not a court! 
of appeal.” | 

Mohamed Ali Isa, a messen-| 
er for the Egyptian embassy| 
n Baghdad, is being tried on 
charges of planning disorders’ 
and bomb attacks on embassies 
of the Baghdad pact countries | 


bottle of Sal Hepatica today! Have 


in the Iraqui capital. Take sparkling 
Witnesses have testified that! 
an organization headed by Isa) 


was in at wee Maj. Mus-| SAL : 
tafa Mukhtar, Egypt's assistant | 

chief of military intelligence in| HEPATICA 

Cairo. They said Isa had 

smuggled hand grenades from| ane smite ! 

Jordan after failing to obtain 
bombs in seni 


_— .— 


* PRSOveT OF Eat Se wv Ene 


00 oe 


NEAR EAST 


ISTANBUL. - CAIRO + BEIRUT 
DAMASCUS + TEHERAN 


ca 


yy | 


“s 
y 


f 
“% 
Rd 
ad 
oer ad 


SCANDINAVIAN 
AIRLINES SST EM 


'to implement the decisions of | 


Peter Forbes, columnist for | 


if she stays | 


|London for which she got “ex-!| 


1509 K $t..NW., Weshington, D.C. © $7. 328i8) 


Y 


| Vi believe it to be our duty to call the 


attention of our Government and our fellow 
citizens to the continuing grave crisis in the 
Middle East, which threatens the existence of 
the State of Israel and the peace and security of 
the entire Free World. 


The State of Israel came into being on May 14, 
1948. Its establishment by action of the United 
Nations General Assembly honored a historic 
right and redressed an ancient wrong. A tortu- 
ous history of agony for Jewish communities 
in lands of persecution ended in a monumental 
opportunity for self-determination and inde- 
pendence. Multitudes of peopfe in all countries 
were deeply stirred by the revival of this nation, 
which in its edrlier age of independence in its 
own land, had given priceless spiritual and 
ethical gifts to civilization. The world commuan- 
ity considered that the Arab peoples, who in 
the past generation have secured a wide sphere 
of independence in eight sovereign states, 
would welcome a kindred people in their new- 
found freedom. Israel’s area of 8,000 square 
miles and 1,800,000 population is not a threat 
to eight Arab states which extend over 2,000,000 
square miles of territory and support over 
40,000,000 people. 


With the moral and material aid of the people 
and government of the United States and of 
friends of freedom everywhere, Israel in fewer 
than eight years has built a free and democratic 
commonwealth in the Middle East. It has pro- 
vided a haven for hundreds of thousands of 
hapless victims of persecution. It has con- 
structed a humane society in a corner of the 
earth which has known for centuries past waste- 
ful neglect and exploitation. Israel has fulfilled 
in substantial and earnest measure the trust 
and high hopes of its well-wishers throughout 
the world. Where it has failed, that failure has 
been due in large measure to inordinate pro- 
vocation which, we feel, no nation in similar 
circumstances would have tolerated with so 
much patience. 


The signatories to the s it in 


sarily reflect the views of these inutioetions with which they 


. 


fo 


J 


Israel’s widely acclaimed achievement is today 
im danger. Its enemies, encouraged by lavish 
supplies of weapons of destruction from the 
Communist world, are making rapid prepara- 
tions to unleash a new round of war which their 
leaders assert will destroy Israel. A renewed war 
against Israel would set the whole Middle East 
aflame, endangering the peace of the world. 


We cannot accept the view held by some of 
our British friends that war can be fore- 
stalled or prevented by applying pressures 
to Israel to yield territory to the Arab states. 
We recall the historic*failure of the Munich 
Conference to avert World War II by forcing 
democratic Czechoslovakia to surrender its 
territories to Nazi Germany. The appetite of 
aggressors feeds upon appeasement. 


We ask our Government to stand firm and 
support with vigor our sister democracy of 
Israel. 


As a first step in restoring equilibrium and 
creating a more favorable climate of stability 
and peace in the Middle East, which has been 
deeply disturbed by the supply of Communist 
arms to Egypt, we appeal to our Government 
to make available to Israel without delay the 
legitimate means for its self-defense. We 
also urge our Government to conclude as 
soon as possible security treaties with Israel, 
ahd those of her neighbors who desire peace, 
guaranteeing their present frontiers against 
alteration by force. Such measures would 
clear the way for the Arab states and Israel to 
negotiate a peace settlement fair to all. Such 
measures, further, can lead to that renascence 
of the spirit so vital to the development of the 
area’s resources, both Israeli and Arab. 


We believe that these positive actions by the 
United States Government will be welcomed 
by the overwhelming majority of the American 
people. In the name of justice, humanity, and 
America’s good name among the nations, we urge 
our Government to act firmly and decisively 
before it is too late. 


\ 
their , Pe — their endorsement does not neces) 


4 
a 


is 
EA 
E 


opr et 
Ht ' 


2 
4. 
: 


le 


~ SAL Lol 
on SIMON #. BAUER, Unrv. of Cal tor mea, 
Los Alamos Scientific Lab. 
JOSEPH BEIRNE, President, 
Commun ications Workers of America 
OR. SAMUEL BELKIN, Pres., Yeshiva Univ 
mee yey JOSEPH BeNSLEY. Commissioner, 
Board of peucetest New York City 
BERKSON, Mayo Clinic 
oy BERNARD, ” iagana Fed. of 


— t, Conductor 
TeIM, Be Rocnester, Nn. ¥. 
M, Eden Theolog. Sem., 


Webster Groves —< 
DEAN ADELE LE BILDERSEE, (Ret.) Brooklyn Col. 


ALGERNON D. yore bore Ethical Culture society 
- WOM, WILLIAM ALDEN BLACK, Denver 
PROF. FELIX 


BLOCH, a ne 
Nobel Prize Winner for Physics 
MANCHESTER ety former publisher, 
LOS ANGELES DAILY WE 


PROF. JOSEPH S. Md BOLTON, Skidmore College 
MRS. GARDA 

ialist intercultural Relations, W. Y. C. 

‘. BOWMAN, a ‘College 
OR. JOHN W. BRADBURY, Ecito 
He warcoene EXAMINER 

. OR. DWIGHT J. BRADLEY, Edgehiit 
ah Church, yd ‘macter Xv 
REV. OR. PRESTON BRADL 
People's Church of were 


_,. before it is too 


SEY. OR. RAYMOND 8. BRAGG, 

All oh Unitarian Church, Kanses City, Me. 
JOHN E. BREIDENBACH, President, 
Central Un nion of AFL 
RABBI BARNET ®B. ORICKNER, Pres. 
Central Conf. American Rabbis 
OR. GEORGE BRODSCHI, Dir. intern. 
Center, U. of Louisville 
REV. ok. vay A R. BROWN, President, 


Pood neh ge Salisbury, N.C 
oR. wit ‘LUSTIB BROWN, Dean Emeritus, 
Colle . of Medicine, Univ. of Vermont 
REY. OR, EMORY 8. bucxe, 
“a ingdon Press ille 

$. BUCKM aasten, prabident, Rubber, Cork, 
aioe & Piastic Workers of America 
JOnN =P. GURKE, President, 
inter. Pulp, Suiphite & Paper Workers 
OR. MELVIN L. BURKMOLDER, President, 
— ngton College, indiana 

ENRY MILLER BUSCH, 

eohere eo University 
FRANK W. BUXTON, Member Anglo-American 
Comm ittee ot inquiry on Paléstine (1946) 
OR. HARRY C. BYRD, tormer Pres. of U. Maryland 
OR. JOWN TYLER CALDWELL, President, 
portent ity of Arka 
JAMES ©. CAREY, President IVE, AFL-CIO 


tion of Labo 
OR. NATHAN K. CURISTOPHER, NAACP, Cleve. 
W. DALE CLARK, Chairman of the Board, 
Omaha National Bank 
REY. DAVID HARMS COLE, 
First Universalist Church, Chicago 
REV. CHARLES W. CONN, Editor, 
CHURCH OF GOD EVANGEL Cleveland, Tenn 
PROF. E. MERTON COULTER, Univ. of Georgia 
FLOYD CREWS, Attorney, New York City 
BARTLEY C. CRUM, Member Angio-American 
Committee of inquiry on Palestige (1946) 
BISHOP RALPH S. CUSHMAN, Raleigh 
LEIGH DANENBERG, Ed., BRIOGEPORT HERALO 
PROF. TARAKNATH DAS, Columbia Univ 
PROF. LEVETTE JAY DAVIDSON, Denver Univ 
BR. PHILIP GRANT DAVIDSON, President, 
Univ. of Lowrsvilie 
CHARLES KOTSELIMBA DAVIS, Businessman, 
Worcester, Mass 
ELMER DAVIS, Author end News Analyst 
AGNES de MILLE, Choreographer 
DEAN RAIMUNDO DE OVIES, 
Protestant Episcopal Church, Atianta 
EARL 8. DICKERSON, Attorney, Chicage 
HELEN GAHAGAN — Actress 
MELVYN DOUGLAS, 
—eN c. ma ArLCi0 ep. of Arizone) 


, Winooski, VL 
WORS, Bucknell Univ. 
wooo EDoY, Author, Relig. Leader 
oR. wile W. EDEL, President, 
Dickinson College, Carlisie, Pa 
OR. HENRY M. LOMONODS, Clergyman, 
Columnist, BIRMINGHAM POST-HERALD 
INDIA EDWARDS, Consultant on Development, 
New School for Social Research, N. Y. C 
PROF. F. SCOTT ELLIOTT, Newberry College 
REY. 1. ao — Cong. Church, 
Stockbr a 
DR. RICK tb a TLVEE, President, 
Northwestern Schools, Minneapolls 
DR. WILLIAM EMERSON, Hon. President, 
American Assoc. for the VU. NK. 
DR. |, LYND ESCH, President, 
gl Central College. indianapolis 
PROF. H. 3. ETTU Univ. of Texas 
REY. DR. lene EVANS, Religion & Education 
Editor, THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE 
LULU EVANSON, Dir. of Education, 
North Oakota Farmers Union 
REV. OR. DON FRANK FENN, St. Micheal 
and All Angei’s Church, Baltimore 
DR. HOWARD W. FERRIN, President, 
Providence-Barrington Bible College, ®. ¢. 
OR. JACOBS FINE. Prof... Harvard Med. Schoal 
OR. JACK E, FINK, San Jose State Co! lege 
oR. Lous FINKELSTEIN, Chancellor, 
Jewish Theological Seminary 
HARRY W. FLANNERY, Public Reta., Wash. 0.€. 
F. FLEMING. Vanderbilt Univ. 
DR. GEORGE ° semaines, President, 
Ft. Worth NAACP 
REV. OR. GEORGE B. FORD, 
Corpus Christi Church, New York City 
OR. HENRY W. FOWLER, Academy of 
~ ig Sciences of Philadelphia 
. RAYMOND M. FUOSS, Yale Unie. 
PROF JAMES FRANCK, 
Atomic Scientist, Ch 
OR. PAUL LESLIE z, 
my aes College c— +. 


PAUL Unw. 
sisnor CHARLES K. Gi BERT New York 
OR. NELSON GLUECK, President, M Hebrew 
Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion 
REV. WILLIAM GOLD, Executive Secretary, 

outh, Boston 


>» Liberal Religious Y 


DR. ISRAEL GOLDSTEIN, President, 
American jewish Congress 
PATRICK E. GORMAN, Secretary-Treasurer, 
Amaig. Meat Cutters & Butcher Workmen 
DR. MORTON GOTTSCHALL, Dean, Arts and 
se ciences, College of the City of New York 
, BERNARD S. GOULD, Mass. inst. of Tech 


VICTOR W. HAFLICH, Pres., Kansas Council 
on Worid Affairs 
REV. OR. FRANK HALL, Pusreat Presb. 
, Wrightsville Beach, 
iH, ~ded Rabdinical 
Amore 


8 HAMLIN, Harvard Univ. 
R. i. MANNELLY. Phoenix College 
Em., Smith Col. 


oe cus Piaywri nt 
A. custact zi. Chicago Ethical Soe. 


REV. 
Communit rem. Church no 
oa SAMULL GUY INMAN, Special 


satornetinns! Glations 
LV. OR. T. CHRISTIE ie lone, Collingunees 
erian Church, Toledo 


ia ; 
z 


SFSlERa3¢ 
: reaeilh 


- 
af 
_ 


a8 


BI 
ROBERT &. MATAR, Economie le Consultant, 
Washin 


— A c. 
DR. A. Pr ~~ 
PROF. VICT Wen ee cation, Feder 


Theo! 2 an 
fake ost, bp ang fa one, 


Christ’s Church, Rye, 
REV. LEE C. PIERCE, First Christian Church, 


Tyler, Texas 

DR. THOMAS ©. POLLOCK, Dean, Wash. Sq. 
College of Arts and Sciences, WN. Y. U 
JACOB $, POTOFSKY, President, 


Pr 

Amaigamated Clothis Workers of America 

. TTIS, Executive Editor, 
PITTSBURGH COURIER 
HON. JOSEPH M. PROSKAUER, WN. Y. C. 

on. WILLIAN QUILLIAN, R., President, 
Rando! 
PROF. 

Garrett Biblical institute, Evanston, !1i. 
DR. HAROLD W. REED, President, 


ay Nazarene Colleg 


ALTE 
EOOIE RICKENBACKER, Pres. Eastern Air Lines 
VICTOR RIESEL, S 
Lm ae Pres., Textile Workers of Americe 
FRINO. City 


Pao. WERDERT ROBBINS, 
FRANK ROCHE 


past. }. oe Teh 
Thestogiegs acy 
State Techees te 
or. Pres., Brandeis Univ. 
. £. SADLER, —— Texas Christian Univ, 


oR. 
MAURICE SAMUEL, Author 
OR. DAVID J. SAPOSS, industrial Economist. 


Washi , 0. c. 

PROF. £. SARTON, arene 9 Univ. 

— SAVELSON, New York Daily Mirror 
fr Exec. Vice Pres., Studios 

paar, @ R SCHROEDER, 

meh y Reserve 

REV. DR. PAUL M. SCHROEDER, 

Seton Evang. & Retor. Church, Rochester, 1 ¥. 

PROF. FREDERICK L. SCHUMAN, 


The Unitarian Church Mol 
we bs Sen a —~15t Se 
Lord’s Day Le 
pho. W. SIRES, Un 
uel $ sien, Cleveland, Onie 
President 


pror.€.t.$ 
ED SULLIVAN, Syndicated Columnist, 


Ty P lit 
REV. ALPRE ¥. SWAK, First Cong. Church, 


Rockefeiler 
Chicago 
ONS, Southern Pines, 


BISHOP DONALD H. TIPPETT, San Francisce 
on EARL WOLLIER TOMLIN, aac. Sec’y., 
Rnode isiand Council of Churche 

. WHLARD &. TOWNSEND 


SEsess! 
sists! 
seh 


Atlanta 
IWSK!, New School for 
ork City 


aL 
ee 
ee 


Pat of Technology 
ident, 
ce, Qhie 
tate Teachers College 


ane con e 
Preside 


Hoe 
4 


- 


ie ele Eyl 


ee ee tee 


Times’ nglon 


usiness_ 


MON 


‘DAY, Y, JANUARY 30, 


1956 


Economic View e « « e« By Harold B. Dorsey 


William H. Timbers resigned |~t~—~————-—|_ Hull said the greatest expan- 000, and Ohio third with 38'two new chemical plants fo 
esterday as general counsel of | f or 
‘ ‘ fom Ge & he aad 0 Afg | A : , sion is emg, place in the Mid- projects worth $152,600,000. In-| the Atomic Energy Commis- 
‘ ‘ . ae ? curities an xc range | j co Ce west, Far West, South and vest nt xc j : , 
Role of Private Enter rise in lke 8 Re orl Comtniasion. las cce p pone lado vestments exceeding $100 mil sion and various other chemi- 
| SEC's chief lion each also were reported cal installations. 
IN ITS very broadest as- action. It was decided that sofar as the millions of con- lawyer since Russian Loan, 5 — 
pect, the President's annual business loans were rising too sumers of farm products are |the Eisenhower . | 
Economic Report presents the fast in the first half of 1955, being deprived by the Gov- | Administration KABUL, Afghanistan, Jan 28 
picture of a modernized ver- so the Government's “capacity ernment of the full benefits 'fook office in | —Afghanistan today signed 
sion of the to moderate economic fluctua- of more efficient farm pro- 1953, he is re- cette tg sedge tietge odo ogg 
traditional tions s exercised t duction and are being taxed a “<page 
concept of a acces baie ” Sean to help the a Porgy, Shawty nue alee la Nine members of a Russian LOOK FOR A LETTER 
private enter- from borrowing money to en- ers. But this is justified by tice’ in New ap comer bn nag bean ep per 
is " ’ . 2 , yA 3 th . t ; 1} f t} 2 : 00h. i A s O va- 
ic nee dl apne Rectan ie nomen aenethin anautiates ghee bg i nt ar- ‘rious government departments FROM 
great many of “Mousines loans insured or tial imbalancing factor in the gued more and to survey their cost Addi. 
the vigorous guaranteed by. the Federal Whole economy. than 30 cases |Uonal agreements were expect- 
arguments to- Government now represent The foregoing example f before United Timbers ed to be signed later. 
day between wer twolfths of the entire Gover t intr nto the (States Courts of Appeal for|, 18¢ current loan was believed - 
“o) a over two-fifths o 1¢ entire Government intrusion into the |States Courts o ppea 'to be payable in about 30 years 
P $0- home mortgage debt. For this normal operations of the free |SEC and four cases before the ,, 2-per-cent interest. 
phies of the feason, if for no other, the enterprise principlas are pre- |Supreme Court. He also testi-| Pte ale tance MERE 
the a a Dorsey Government has a direct re- serfted here with the thought |fied on the Commission's role| 
10se of the sponsibility in helping to main- that each reader will be will- |In the Dixon-Yates power con-|-ongdential SEC file 
’ , s. His posi- 
left are deeply embedded in tain a sound housing and ing to accept some of them |tract before the Kefauver vom ition was upheld as Bearell 4 re. 
this modernization process, mortgage market.” There you 48 a proper solution of cur- | mittee. rsing a contempt-of-court 
its details and its ultimate ob cae the Government, first, “in- Tent problems and will reject | Timbers figured in a separa- Nae and 60-day jail sentence . 
Jectives / truding' into private enter- others as an Unnecessary in- tion-of-powers case last year imposed on him. ; 
“Today, we believe as strong- prise by entering the mortgage ‘rusion of the Government |when he refused to give a} Timbers lives in Darien 
ly in economic progress field in this magnitude and, imto private affairs. United States District Court!conn > 
through free and competitive <acond, the initial step is The chances are that there To RA SEI RE ' 
age as our cage“ did, cited as justification for the will be a wide variation in the SS i 
and we resent as they did any ¢ ' taki ree lee ) , ; 
any Government taking onadirect selections because the judg- @ 
unnecessary ype en poo responsibility for the hessing ment of each person is strong- $ EXTRAORDINARY ‘ 
ernment into private affairs. 4.4 mortgage market ly influenced by the degree @ 
But we nave — ph ram tacking direct control over ' Which he is personally af- $ VALUE : 
. that the Federal Govern- e 4 ei ai” deiaek fected by each item. In th ' 
ment has the capacity to mod- (ot ai dong ign ‘dit vd Share sonfusion that 2 34 Lincoln 
aoe . CGPUennns fluctuations seagrass weg ld be results from opinions so de- 4 Capri Hardtop 
were limited to at coul , . ° sate 
without becoming a dominant . ylishe by moral sua- rived we lost sight of the im- > completely nese ae “ry 
factor in our economy, the accom} d J , »ortant vuestion of whether 4 tive in the Nation's Capital 
report says. The Rightists “re. Sion and bank supervision “e “—_ < AIR CONDITIONED Needless to say it's equipped with 
p — Moral suasion by the Govern- °° not the Nation is yielding @ full power. Crisp interier finish, 
sent as they did any unneces- “Oa 5 On OP ; freedom of privatae enterprise @ Suites Arranged to Suit Tenants toned matched te deep tu-tone 
sarv intrusion of Government ment has become accepted as , 7 . tr , é . pe finish. and has been ecare- 
into private affairs.” fearing Part of the Government's ca- ai cade ps ee tan tania ¢ AT THE NEW finish ‘voune. Specitic® nn 
I at alts, + receh 4 aj. extensively and/or too rapidly. |; L . FP mm oe 
that the increasing use of such Pacity to influence the deci te unfortunate that thie |\& SILVER SPRING ing power at rome chentes touch 
intrusions leads toward social- %!0ns of private enterprise ri Ege iar 413 tom fine. It'll bring you yo ly chance this 
iam or cathmmaiatn: See Lath The pending legislation to vital question gets submerged 5 BUILDING y wrv oP we tee of the veet ring you your oniy c ce t year to get 
ists are inclined to make the’ permit Government control when discussing the problems @ 860! Cameron St., Silver Spring sverything feat robe,” Whe eet LIFE regularly at a special moneysaving rate! 
maximum use of the Federal over natural gas producers is GC VICES! SUEMONES OS tne > invest three thousand, one hen- 
Government's “capacit y te const! ued by some to be an COON) Yet, the Economic > (ale ood, — ss goven dollars in 
sf ' . , ~*~ «) . or an ¢ 
moderate economic fluctua- initial step toward control over nay raditi “ vod : reg ‘ spe by calle Mr. W anen? 
tions " regardless of in- the producers of other raw . ghey ceammabisies "a Pio > WEAVER BROS., YFLOWER MOTORS 'NC. COMING WEDNESDAY 
trusions into private affairs materials—coal, oil, copper, omy are being Seicdoreieal ¢ REALTORS MAY ona Bladensbure na. 
and sometimes presuming that wheat, etc. If natural gas pro- ' tig: he S ON PREMISES Silver Spring. Ma 
- in the direction of centraliz- §& : “Washington's Oldest 
the Government alone can, duction should be under Fed- ing controls and power with || JU. $-0038-——Di. 7-8300 Lincoln-Mercury Dealer” i 
and should, provide cradle-to- eral control, why shouldn't the G . i’ a - 
. the other products? But the Brppesupeppron tor « nad wil . . > - ie 
the grave security. Reenninn ‘ok chamerncnent dom. eee 6.8 reasonable solu- | 
ow ee yan “w - tion for practical problems as- 
THROUGHOUT the. eco- trol contend that the natural sociated with a more compli- 
functions of supply and de- : , i 
nomic report, it is not difficult oe is cated economic machine. But |} 
to spot some of the “intru- mand under free enterpris€ freedoms in a democrary 
sions ‘he authorities decid- should be supplanted to pro- should be yielded very grudg- 
ed last vear “to restrain the ect the millions of consumers.. ing'y especially if their sacri- ~ 
use of credit in security specu- ow fice represents a threat to the 
lation, thereby intruding upon HOWEVER, the latter stand economie principles that have 
the speculator’s freedom of seems a little inconsistent in- made this country great. 
aut Credit Curb 
“~ ~ . | 
Congress Is Cautious on Credit Curbs, 
ke’s Plans Based Upon Stud 
j ré« . ‘o ‘ ‘ ‘ | | y 
Awaits Ike’s Plans Based Upon Study 
> 
By Bernard D. Nossiter have accused the Board of President's study plan. were 
Staff Reporter secking {00 much powel generally rags 
ota) | Privately, Reserve aides Chairman Brent Spence (D 
F urn of Standby power hink thev should have standby Ky.) of the House Banking 
over consumer credit terms is ™ de 
getting the “handle-with-care” control over consumer credit Committee noted controls are 
tw nes HE et 7 Their existing weapons, reserve distasteful to the American 
treatment by both the Adminis- : g pene ter 
tral and Congress requirements, discount rate and people” and said he was wait- 
President | enhower set the open market operations, they ing for “some definite request 
: , sav an’'t reach consumer from the Administration. 
tone when his economic mes 5#Y: c a , < 
a , iit with heroi¢ moves Chairman J. William. Ful- 
sage Tuesday called for a credi without wTroic ; 
; Rigas gs dit ger lly is tightened, >right (D- Ark.) of the Senate 
. udy no enactment. of such if credal 4 Tra 1 g 
powers. The heads of both) they argue higher interest rates Banking Committee said he 24 
House and Senate Banking! Will discourage few persons, 100, would schedule hearings 
Committees responded by say- S4Y, from buying autos on the when a “proposal” is put forth 
se ’ " | euft by the White House. 
ing they would wait for speci- ‘ 
fic requests from the White These are some of the ques- a - , 
House tions the Administration hopes 
Administration sources said a study will answer 
there will be no request until, © What is the impact of con-| kj 
a real study has been made. sumer credit on ups and downs OO Mg 
And there are no formal plans in the economy? A lack of — | 
for a study now, although the statistics here needs to 
Federal Reserve Board likely| cured 11a U e | 
will be asked to make one soon. © Who should administer 
Congress will get its first.controls? Should it be the 
crack at Administration think- Federal Reserve on its own int- 
ing today when the Joint tiative or should the President a 
Committee on the Economic have standby power to call the 
Report opens two weeks of Board into action? 
hearings. The lead witness. ® What kinds of consumer . a 
Arthur F. Burns, is chairman credit should be controlled?” 
of the President's Council of All of it? Installment buying ee S ar S Wil Sa e lI iS 
Economic Advisors and did the only’? Charge accounts?’ 
spadework on Mr. Eisenhower's Consumer credit has grown 
message. Burns, however, will steadily since the end of World 
testify in executive session War Il, from $5.7 billion to ; aa ‘ ; ; te . 
A clue to the study the Ad- $36.2 billion. By far the biggest As this baby and the millions like him grow live better—166 million people today, a predicted 
ministration will get will come hike, $6.1 billion, came last : DAN wil 
Feb. 7 when Reserve Chairman year. Economists haven't been up — big, healthy, robust — the steel industry 200 million by 1975. 
William McChesney Martin Jr. worrying so much about the > . : = : : é 
testifies. In past hearings, he volume of credit as the easy must grow right along with them. The steel companies, gph s. and in tn 
has urged that if consumer terms. And now, there is a gen- Qos et oily setition with each other, have kept pace. n 
credit controls are to be used, cra! belief that the terms, down Bab) s needs for steel will be growing daily I , wile 
discretionary power to apply payments and length of loans, even before he knows what stee! is. they will. 
them should be permanently are not getting any more lib- : od 
lodged with the Board, not eral. So the President reflected | 3 re ne a They have increased their steel producing ca- 
given af one time and ‘taken abt poe thinking B a ha. Even before kindergarten —safety pins, diapers pacity 36 million tons, or 40 per cent in the past 
away later said there is no need now for a7 ‘ "9 ’ . 
| : : ’ was s S, ed for- 
FE Raley 8 Mscard yyy vens Sonning Seger ~~ vot — anbrae pottie rs led ten years. During the next three years they plan 
ng tor such y decause ongress 5 BSE mula an aby foods, baby carriage, stroller, sied. ‘a *10e : 
some Congressmen, notably|consumer credit controls and : : 8 ; to build another 15 million tons of new capacity. 
Rep. Wright Patman (D-Tex.), Capitol Hill comments on the : : ents 
a Ss Early school years —bicycles, skates, toys... It will cost billions of dollars. ° 
new school buildings, new desks, new roads, The babies are not concerned about where 
. . . . * 
Busines Bod ‘ (Q) eS more buses... these billions of dollars will come from. But it 
S Ss \ ppos Ss | : 
o/ does concern their parents, 
er . . Late Teens — bigger house, room of his own, . ' 3 
U % A d t P A ~ They realize that this money can come from two 
le 6 Jae 0 oor reas tools, his first car... ly: dtrantly’? h f th 
baby’ € coll ed sources only: directly from the earnings of the 
soon: your Dady &8 OU college, Marriet . , ee 
Dnited Press All too ae . ra steel companies, and from the savings of investors 
The s Cc ‘om-| w ; " % 0 > wker 0 isown... : sae 
mites said Se et oe Pepeurr Ps wetmpen azar ¢ and the eg ent oe i suger oe aa th who have confidence in the ability of the com- 
1 aid to. 7 ore is real Canger, M said Rie ycle starts all over again — back at the , 
eral aid to depressed ATCAS ctr at subsidy measures would i ~ | The «. cde, g panies to earn profits attractive to such investors. 
might convert them into “per. & safety pin ° ‘ce d rita ; 
manent wards of the state.” convert depressed areas into ; . America’s population will continue to grow, 
In a report on economic con- permanent wards of the state. "@:! Ww hi s since the war : : : 
ditions favorable to attracting at the expense of communities For rocers ' The great number of new babie: The demand for steel will continue to increase. 
business, the Chamber stated which have succeeded in build. g is an amazing phenomenon of ourera... It means : 
that proposals for financial aid ing sound economics.” os 4 a, ; | : 
from the Federal Government It concluded that the Govern. garages more people W anting more things with which to America and Steel Must Grow Together 
to ‘depressed areas fails to meet ment “would be put in the po 
the probiem. It said that if an) sition of assisting—and thus re- : 
area is a sound business loca-| warding — any area that had! linoleum AMERICAN IRON AND STEEL INSTITUTE : 
tion “it is reasonable to expect proved to be economically un- | 
that employers will move there sound for business .. . or any other product FREE: Latest iseue of the magazine, Steelways, with an interesting story. 
per eae _ or service for the home or on Steel's expansion plana, illuatrated in om — Just —_ ni ee | 
business, always look first ‘te American Iron and Steel Inatitute, 350 Fifth Avenue, New York 1,N.Y, 
We are pleased te announce the election of in the YELLOW PAGES | | if | 
of your Telephone Directory, | This advertisement is the second of @ series. Watch for No. 3—“Billions in Steel Expansion Mean Thousonds More Jobs” —Iin two weeks. 
A. JACKSON GOODWIN, JR. , 
(Resident m Chicago) ce , MEMBERS 1TuTe TES ARE: ACME STEEL COMPANY + ALAN WOOD STEEL COMPANY LUDLUM STEEL CORPORATION + ANCHOR DRAW® 
TEEL Cour PANY * wAMcO STE eSeronar/on's ATLANTIC STEE eer: the CLEVELAND-CLIFFS IRON COMPA OOUCTS OIVIS1ON + BARIUM STEEL y ° teiieud tie STEEL Swi . ope 
. * THE CARPENTER STE ° ° COMPANY + THE COL 
nate ari: sata han Find It Fast at Ps “HL BTERS CoM? A STEEL in S SHAFT ING COMPANY * COLU TOOL STEEL COMPANY * CONNORS STEEL DIVISION, H K. PORTER CO., INC. * CONTINENTAL STEEL CORPORATION + COPPERWELD STEEL 
oy * CRUCIOLE STEEL COMPANY OF AMERICA * THE CUYAHOGA STEEL & WIRE RE COMPANY * DAMASCUS TUBE C . IT STEEL CORPORATION © HENRY DISSTON DIVISION, H. K. PORTER _ INC. « EAS 
* In The STAI os STEEL CORPORATION * ERIE FORGE & STEEL CORPORATION + A. FINKL & SONS COMPANY + FIRTH STERLING INC. « TUBE COMP » GLOBE IRON COMPANY + GRANITE CiTY STEEL COMPANY 
SOT In MANUFACTURING COMPANY ° THE MA HANNA COMPANY * HARRISBURG STEEL CORPORATION * INLAND STEEL COMPANY  JNTERLAKE IRON CORPORATION + JESSOP STEEL COMPANY © JONES & LAUGHLIN STEEL 
LEE HIGGINSON CORPORATION ‘Yellow Pages’ Ss Neen oer STEEL CORPORATION * KEYSTONE DRAWN STEEL COMPANY + KEYSTONE STEEL & WIRE COMPANY + KILBY STEEL COMPANY, INC. * LACLEDE S1EEL COMPANY 
wan in lt aie are "he! gts esas SA yt gS TS Seri hoes mac ante Gama» Sao a cS oy MRE it 
oe, ecenrY on acanewestenn aren h wine STSUIPANY © OGLEBAY, NORTON AND COMPANY * PICKANOS MATHER & COMPANY + PITTSBURGH COKE & CHEMICAL COMPANY + P/TTSBURGH STEEL COMPANY + PITTS 
= TUBE COMPANY + REPUBLIC STEEL CORPORATION * RESEARCH PARTS & ENGINEERING CORPORATION + JOHN A ROEBLING'S S CORPORATION * ROTARY ELECTRIC STEEL C SHARON STEEL CORPORATION 
New York, Boston and Midwest Stock Exchanges T . . 10M OF THE Y COMPANY + THE STANDARD E ANY + SUPERIOR TUBE COMPANY + SWEETS STEEL COMPANY « Mersey 4 
daveriann Steck Buchande (Associate) PR B CHEMICAL CORPORATION TIMKEN STEEL DIVISION OF THE TIMKEN ROLLER BEARING * UNION STEEL CORPORATION + UNIT CORPORATION + UNIVERSAL -CYCL 
: STEEL CORPORATION * VALLEY MOULD AND IRON CORPORATION + VARAD IU ALLOYS STEEL COMPANY * VULCAN CRUCIBLE STEEL COMPANY + WALLACE BARNES COMPANY DIV'S/ON OF ASSOCIATED SPRING CORPORATION 
THE CHESAPEAKE & POTOMAC WASHINGTON STEEL CORPORATION + WHEATLAND TUBE COMPANY * WHEELING STEEL CORPORATION + WOODWARD IRON COMPANY * WYCKOFF STEEL COMPANY © THE YOUNGSTOWN SHEET AND TUBE COMPANY 


January 30, 1956 


Investment Banking Service Since 1848 


? 
, . | | enn | 3 
terns oN. Y. |Chemical Trade to Spend $1.6 Billion on New Plants 
Timbers |e cree my walter gan St tng Lenk Se 


spend $1.6 billion on ne lant 
motos A this sear ona Another 246, worth $1.1 bil-| states in new construction, with) The survey did not include 


next, the Manufacturing Chem-) 40m, are under. construction, 66 projects valued at $414,800,-/a reported $3.3 billion of Gov- 
ists Association reported yes-|Said Gen. J. E. Hull, Associa- 000 completed, under construc-|ernment- financed construction - 
terday. : pes kg Prune oo tion or definitely scheduled. (Under way or completed in 

The Association's survey re- p are efinitely com- California was second with 1955, most of it under contract 


ported that 269 projects were mitted” to the building of 84 with chemical co 
more before the end of 1957. 49 projects costing $185,800,- includes seven capaialsnd a 


Resigns as 


SEC Counsel 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
() Monday, January 30, 1956 : 


——— 


o--— 


Bid to Raise |. 
Postal Rates| 
Faces Fight 


International News Service 

House Post Office Committee 
Chairman Tom Murray (D- 
Tenn.) predicted yesterday Con- 
gress would turn down Presi- 
dent Eisen- 
hower’s request 
to boost postal 
rates 

Failure to act 
on the proposal 
would almost 
wipe out the 
small surplus 
estimated for 
the coming 
year by the 
President . 

Mr. Eisen- 
hower's budget assumed Con- 
gress would approve rate boosts 
bringing in an estimated $350 


Murray 


EW BARGAIN IN THE SKY! 


| 


million in new revenue. The 


surplus was estimated at $435 


million. 

Although Murray predicted 
Gefeat of the postal rate bill, 
he said he personally favors 
the. measure. The Tennessean 
said in an interview that he 
will call his committee together 
s00n to decide if and when to 
hold hearings on the bill 

Postmaster General Arthur 
Summerfield made a personal 
visit to Capitol Hill to see 
Democratic Majority Leader 
John McCormack of Massachu 
setts last week, seeking support 
for the bill McCormack is 
known to be cool to the rate 
boosts 

The Administration wants to 
raise first class and air-mail 
raies one cent and inerease 
second and third class rates 30 
per cent over the next three 
years. 


Masonic Club 
Formed on Hill 


More than 100 Masons have 
met in the Capitol to form the 
Capitol Hill Masonic Club. The 
first meeting of Masons in the 
Capitol was held in 1820 with 
Henry Clay presiding 

Gregor Macpherso: Dast 
Grand Master of Masons in 
the District was elected presi 
dent of the new club. Howard 
S. Walker was elected vice 
president; Glenn L. Johnson 
program; Crawford C. Heerlin 
vice-pre charge of offers the 5} ed and 


project Reed, se 


PLUS TAX 


Announcing nonstop aircoach service to 


' Convenient departure at 12:30 noon 


: In addition to famous Flagship service American now announces 

epieeeitens io charm of nonstop aircoach te Chicago, With the only all DC*6 aircoach fleet, American AMERICAN AIRLINE. 
mt it comfort of 300 mph pressurized aircraft. For reservations, see your 
s; William | , Sec travel agent or call American at EXecutive 3-2345. 


retary; Merli Nipe, treas 
wurer, and William P. Gulledge 
ser@cant-at-arms 

The club has been formed 
Officials said, to serve men 
working on Capitol Hill. 


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ENN CARPET CIT 


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This 
orning... 
oa Shirley Povich 


JUST ABOUT a year ago,a notable difference of opin- 
ion was being voiced by spokesmen of two American 
League teams. Officials of the Nats and Detroit Tigers 
expressed viewpoints about Bucky Harris designed to 
leave one of them with foot-in-mouth disease. 

In Washington, the release of Harris and the hiring of 
Chuck Dressen as manager was ex- 
plained: “Dressen will do a better job 
with our young ball players.” In De- 
troit, the chief motive for picking 
Harris as the Tigers’ new manager 
was stated: 
team that needs Bucky's talent for 
working with youngsters.” 

The Tigers’ vote of confidence in 
him was pleasing to Harris but it 
didn't altogether heal the wound of 
his dismissal by Washington. “I 
couldn't understand that kind of a rap 
against me in Washington,” said Har- 
ris, “because I thought I could be 


4 
* 


POVICH 


players everywhere I managed.” 

At the end of the season, there was some weighty evidence 
in favor of Harris and the Tigers. The young Detroit ball 
club won 11 more games than in the preceding season. Al 
Kaline, a 276 hitter the year before, zoomed to .341 and the 
league batting title under Harris. The Nats, under Dressen, 
plummeted into last place. . 

BUT COMPLETE vindication for Harris didn't develop un- 
til one day last week. Then when it came it was with thunder- 
clap suddenness and force. Hank Greenberg and Joe Cronin 
were elected to baseball's Hall of Fame at Cooperstown. Bucky 
Harris had given them both their big league opportunity as 
green kids. A few hours later, Yogi Berra signed a $50,000 
contraet that made him the third highest paid player in Yan- 
kees’ history; just another one of Bucky’s boys. 

Yesterday, Bucky was remembering things about all of his 
prize pupils. “You'd have to say Greenberg and Cronin 
batted their way into the Hall of Fame, and that is interesting 


because in their early days you couldn't be sure that they | 


would hit big league pitching. I always knew Berra would hit, 
but I didn’t dream he would ever get a $50,000 salary as a 
catche™; as an outfielder, maybe, but catcher, no.” 


Harris all but comes out and says that Greenberg has sort | 


of been his favorite. “Maybe it's because Hank had to per- 
severe more,” said Harris. “He was so big that coordination 
was a problem. Then, he had those bad feet to contend with. 
He had those tender dogs to start with and he put in so many 
hours of practice he punished them even more. He overcame 
all the handicaps to be a great hitter and was always under- 
rated as a first baseman. He was one of the good ones.” 


IT WAS AT DETROIT that Harris had Greenberg for the 
full season of 1933 and persisted in using the big rookie against 
the doubts of others in the Detroit organization. Harris was 
rewarded when big Hank finally organized himself, rapped 
out 12 home runs and a 309 average. Greenberg has always 
appreciated Bucky’s initial patience with him. A job with the 
Cleveland club Hank now heads-is always open for Harris. 

When Harris first laid eyes on Joe Cronin in mid-season of 
1928 at Washington, the gangling rookie shortstop from Kansas 
City “appeared to be an even more hopeless case than Green- 
berg,” said Bucky. “But we could tell right away that he was 
a fighter. I liked his arm, and you had to like the battle he 
gave it at the plate even with that funny stance. Sam Rice, 
who also belongs in the Hall of Fame, helped make Cronin a 
hitter with his coaching. 

“The best thing I did for Cronin was to give him a chance 
to show what he could do. I began to see some things about 
Wim I liked and played him every day. Mr. Griffith liked 
Bobby Reeves as his shortstop, but he was too scatter-arm for 
me. On the road one day, Mr. Griffith wired me, ‘Reeves will 
never make a shortstop if you don’t play him.’ I wired back 
something to the effect of ‘Neither will Cronin,’ and kept Joe 
in there and all of us ended up happy with him.” 


IF HE WAS UNIMPRESSED at the beginning with the 
hitting of Greenberg and Cronin as rookies, Harris was vastly 
smitten with Yog! Berra’s hitting potential from the outset. 
“T didn’t know when he came to the Yankees, whether he 
could catch or not, or even play the outfield, but I did know 
I wanted to get that bat of his into my lineup.” 

The other day, when George Weiss, general.manager of the 
Yankees, signed Berra for 1956 for that reported $50,000 
figure, he mildly chided the baseball writers. “You fellows 
keep voting Yogi these awards and it costs us more money,” 
complained Weiss. 

The Weiss-Berra salary negotiations have always been a 
feature of the winter season. Berra, in one of his previous 
holdouts, before the Most Valuable Player balloting was 
finished, demanded a boost because he-said he was sure to 
win it. “I don't know about that,” said Weiss. “Some of the 
newspapers say it’s going to be Larry Doby or Al Rosen of 
Cleveland, not you.” Berra made quick reply, saying, “I only 
read the papers that say I’m it. The others I don't buy.” 


‘Extra-Point Tries From 10-Yard Line 


Canadian Teams Boost 
Touchdown to 6 Points 


TORONTO, Jan. 29 (‘®*}—A touchdown will count six points 
instead of five in Canadian football starting this season. | 
The Canadian Rugby Union rules committee took this his- 
toric action at a meeting here Saturday, ending the era stretch- 
ing | back to the 1870s | in which the value of the touchdown has 
———-—-*always been five points. 
| It is the most revolutionary 
R ] ichange in the Canadian game 
esu ts isince the forward a = ve 
‘troduced from the Unite 
aaa -- sp ee States in 1931 and reflects the 
St, Bernadette’s 18 crowing influence of United 
‘: io States rules on Canadian foot- 
wiball. The value of the touch- 
®' down now will be the same in 
the United States and Canada. 
The rise in prominence of 
s field goal specialists during the 
last few years led to the sug- 
gestion from many football men 
* for a change. 
. They argued that two field 
t. Calvary Ne. 2 13 goals shouldn't count the same 
ae wm = cee 33/as a touchdown since it was 
+ easier to score that way. 
;42| The switch from the tradi- 
ser 3) tional five-point touchdown wag 
26 accompanied by a new ruling) 
14 pushing the scrimmage line on 
| the try for the extra point back | 
‘to the 10-yard line from the 


hry 38 


res ‘Peace ae 


y 33 Sorrows on : 
St. Ann’s Ne. 7? 
Pe ass ea Little Flewer 
JUNIOR BOYS 
St. John's 39 st. Poresdotics 4 


ag 
8 A wey 46 St. Catherine } 
Anthe . 
s & 


St. Francis 
M 


INTERMEDIATE BOYS 
peemenare OD cis ted Fee 
Rots 


Saprpment 58 Hel 


L ventory 55 
gper 4 


Ambre 
aotie 57. St. ‘Francis 


Bern se 4 
Martin's 4! Holy 28 Results 
SENIO 


BOYS 
Usgy" er Sacrament 65. . St. Sasestine 58 Gu _fCuooL BASKETBALL 
@y of Victory a6... t. Aun’ - 


HIG 
a 31 St. John's 88 
bale Ce Lntorise 42 
Hely 


* 17 | ball is placed on the 2-yard line. | 
39) 

ot 

St. 


Ne oly _Redeeme eer a | John Carroll 50 | Mt. &¢. Joseph's ‘8 
eee S See gs COMLEGE va 4a 
St. Francis Xavier 41— Niaare ao. 


Celumbia Wins Polo 


Sen} 112 
COLUMBIA, S&S. C., oa 29 f st. Pale pa 
Columbia beat the Washington, 
D. C., Polo Club, 11-7, Today. |") EXimitioy ma: 
Washington led, 6-5, until the 
sixth chukker. Captain Don 
Bradley of Washington was the 
match’s high scorer with three 
goalt 


“We have a young ball | 


pretty proud of my record with young | 


‘to triumph in the 5000 meter 


llth in 8:06.5. 


. s five. In the United States the| 


can In another area game, D. C.| 


cn| 8 ene Junior High at 8 


Russian Sets Skating Mark 


Reds Fatten 
Lead, U.S. 


‘The Washington 


Times Berald 


pst 


orts 


~~ 

- 
; 
: 


SPORTS 


‘Friendly’ 
Slovaks, 


CLASSIFIED 


Still Seeks 


MONDAY, JAN 


UARY 30, 1956 


Poles Brawl 


ok 


First Medal 


(Complete summaries, Page 22.) 


By Ted Smits 


| CORTINA D’ AMPEZZO, It- 
aly, Jan. 29 #—The precision 
figure skating of World Cham- 
pion Hayes Alan Jenkins bols- 
tered America’s sagging morale 
in the Winter Olympic Games. 
today but Russia fattened its 
‘team lead with a third gold 
medal and a 2lyearold Aus- 
trian plumber streaked to vic- 
tory in the men’s giant slalom 
ski race. 

At the end of the third day, 
'with seven of the 24 champion- 
‘ships decided, the rugged So- 
iviet athletes held a total of @ 
points in the wnofficial team 
standings with Austria closest 
‘at 29. The United States, still 
‘medal-less, was tied with Swit- 
zerland for seventh place with 
‘6% points. 

The Yanks came within sight 
of their first championship 
when the 22-yearold Jenkins of 
Colorado Springs, Colo., 
grabbed a commanding lead in 
the compulsory figure phase of 
the men’s figure skating com- 
petition, with only two team- 
mates threatening him. 


Hayes’ Brother Third 


In second place was Ronald 
Robertson, 18-year-old red- 
haired whiz from Long Beach, 
Calif., followed by Hayes’ kid 
brother, David. 

Boris Schilkov, a wiry 28- 
year-old construction engineer, 
gave Russia its third champion-| 
ship of the games when he sped 


(3 miles, 188 yards) speed skat- 
ing test on the glazed, light-| 
ning fast track at Misurina, set-| 
ting a new Olympic record of 
7 minutes, 48.7 seconds. 

Tony Siler, a handsome 
young Austrian who resembles 
movie star Tyrone Power, gave’ 
a dazzling exhibition of speed 
and skill in capturing the giant 
slalom race in 3 mniutes, and 
one-tenth of a second, 

Americans failed to place in 


RUSSIANS FIRST AND SECOND—Eugenij Grishin, cen- 
ter, of Russia who broke the world record in the 500-meter 
Olympic speed skating event at Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy, is 
flanked by countryman Rafael Gratch, } left, whe ' was second 


both of these championships. 
Their best was 17th in. the 


speed race, 13th in the giant Cary, 72, Loses by Stroke 


slalom. 


The American picture was 
further darkened when Betsy 
Snite, a 17-year-old skier from 
Norwich, Vt., twisted her 
left knee in practice and had 
to pull out of tomorrow's wom- 
en's special slalom. Team of- 
ficials said the injury did not 
appear serious and she may be 
able to compete in the women’s 
downhill Wednesday. 

Also a four-man bobsled pi- 
loted by the veteran Jim Bick- 
ford of Saranac Lake, N. Y., 
overturned on the icy Mt. To- 
fana slide but the crew luckily 
emerged unhurt. The sied re- 
quired some repairs. 

The Russians, who also got 
a third place in the 5000 meter 
speed skating race, created an- 
other surprise when Yry Mosch- 
kin grabbed the lead in the 
tough Olympic Nordic com- 
bined ski event by winning the 
jumping part of the two- ply 
competition. 

Moschkin made two stylish | 
leaps of 755 and 77 meters 
(247 feet, 8.51 inches and 252 
feet, 7.56 inches) off Italia Hill 
to outclass the current world 


fashion plate from 
Invitational golf tournament 


round, and still one shot behind 
Middlecoff passing the 63d 
hole, Demaret wound up with 
a two-under-par 69 and g 72- 
hole score of 269. 

A disappointed Middlecoff 
made a gallant bid to recoup 
the setback, almost bagging an 
eagle two on the 17th and get- 
ting a birdie, but he couldn't 
catch the 43-year-old Demaret. 

Middlecoff finished with a 
par 71 and total of 270, with 
Jimmy collecting the $2000 top 
money and Middlecoff $1000. 

Jimmy's score was 15 strokes 


Norway. Stenersen held second. | record by one stroke. 
Holds World Mark | Gene Littler, with a remark- 


Schilkov outsped Europe's soared to a 76 in the second 
fastest skaters to smash the) round, shot a nifty 66 for a total 
Olympic record of 8:10.6 made of 977 and third place money of 
by Norway's Hjalmar Andersen ' $750. 
during his triple sweep at Oslo Julius Boros, third to Middle- 
in 1952. Andersen was so OUt-|off and Demaret starting out 
classed today that he finished /tnis noon over the 6843- yard, 

par 36, 35—71 Thunderbird 

The lean Russian holds the Country Club course, drifted 
world mark of 7:45.6. 

Pat McNamara, a 29-year-old With slender: Gardner Dickin- 
Minneapolis landscaper, made'|son Jr. of Panama Beach, Fla. 
the United States’ best showing! The latter had a 70. 
in the 5000-meter race, finish-; Today, under brooding but 
ing 17th in 8:10.6. dry skies. 

Austrians dominated the/move to collar Middlecoff on 
mens giant Slalom, winning/the 14th hole. Playing in a 
the first three places and also threesome just ahead of Cary, 


the sixth. Sailer showed re-\Jimmy banged an approach 
markable finesse in sweeping 


able comeback for a man who/|* 


Trailing going into the final** 


under par for the distance and #% 
champion, Sverre Stenersen of established a new tournament ; 


fairway. 
ack with a 73 and a tie at 278’ 


Demaret made his: 


Demaret Shoots 69, 
Beats Middlecott 


PALM SPRINGS, Calif., Jan. 28 (4)—Veteran Jimmy Demaret 
knocked out a pair of dramatic 
that spelled defeat for Cary Middlecoff and gave the jaunty 
Texas victory 


birdies on the back nine today 


in the $15,000 Thunderbird 


re 
Money Winners: 
9 67 69-169 § 20008 
7i—?70 1000 
b6— 277 750 
70—278 Hoe 
73—278 oe 
68—279 
9 68-—279 
t 67179 
69—279 
70—279 
65— 80 


Jimmy Demaret 
Cary Middilecef? 
Gene Littler 
G. Diekinsen Jr 
Jalius Beres 
Mike Seuchak 
Bed Helscher 
Arneid Palmer 
Temmy Belt 
Pred Hawkins 
Walter Burkeme 
Deouc Ferd 

Al Balding 
Billy Maxwell 
Ted Krell 
Jerry Barber 


iso SBS WO oo ot 26 5 
oe - 


wPatadehat Door Fe? 25 oe 28 « 


+i —2a3 ' 


>-_- 


timmy 


shot two feet from the pin and" 
holed out for a birdie. 

Then he followed up on the 
15th green with a 15-foot putt 
that spelled another birdie. 

Middlecoff came to the 16th 
and drove to the left in another 
It gave him a bogey 
and two strokes to make up, or 
a birdie on the last twe holes.' 

He got one with the amazing 
shot that almost brought an 
eagle two on the 17th. He 
drove true to the 18th green, 
but left himself 30 feet from 
the pin. He faced a putt from 
a slanting angle that couldn't 
be whipped. 


oss and Bill Black, 


"lead until 


ize came even with 
> broke even on the 17th and on 
+ the par four 18th came Burke's 


and Norway's Alv Gjestvang who finished third. Grishin's 
time was 40.2 seconds as he and 20 other skaters bettered 
the old Olympic mark of 43.1 seconds on what skaters call 
the “world’s fastest piece of ice.” 


$$ ee —— 


) 

| 
Pete Burke 
Wins Seniors 


Golf, 215 


DUNEDIN, Fla., Jan. 29 # 
Pete Burke, a little known pro 
from Huntington, N. Y., won 
the annual 
tournament by one stroke today 
after shooting spectacular golf 
on the final hole. 

Burke, younger brother of 
Billie Burke who is a former 
National Open champion, shot 
a 75 on the final round for a 
54-hole total of 215 

This was one stroke ahead 


of Ock Willoweit of Dayton, 


sc, Ohio, who also shot a 75 today. 


Joe Zarhardt of Greensboro. 
N. C., was a stroke behind at 


*|217 for third, followed by Frank 


Greenwich, Conn.., 
Huntsville, Ala.. 


Strazza of 


at 219 

Burke, clung to a one-stroke 
the 16th when he 
double bogeyed and Willoweit 
him. They 


fine shooting 

His drive was a bad hook into 
the rough, the ball landing be- 
neath trees. In What appeared 
to be an impossible shot, he 
used an iron to come out 
within 10 feet of the pin. He 
sank the putt for a one under 
par three. 

Burke won $1000 and a trip to 
England where he wW@l play the 


British senior ond champion 
ete Burke : 7 7 

Ock Willeweit 

ee ag : 


oPesae ot 
,=mee 


Geerse Whitehead 
Denny © 

Teny 6 4 
James Barficla 
Gene ae 
fd 


oF oP and eRe PaBe toda’ afele 
ee 

LL. Lee 

Bt ~— Fw wis 


or re) 


Tem Mahan 


through the 69 gates which dot 
the 2660-meter (7700 feet) 
course 

Ralph Miller, America’s GI 
downhill ace from Hanover, 
N. H., finished 13th with 3:15.8. 


GW Plays 
VPI Tonight 


George Washington Univer- 
sity seeks revenge against Vir- 
ginia Tech in the featured area’ 
basketball game tonight at 
Washington-Lee High gymna- 
sium at 8:30 p. m. 

Georgetown University mean- 
while climaxes its Northern 
trip by playing eleventh-ranked 
Holy Cross tonight at Holy) 
Cross. 

Virginia Tech is the team 
that knocked the Colonials 
‘completely out of sight in the! 
national ranking two weeks' 
oe The Gobblers upset GW, 

63-61, on a tap-in by Bill Mat- 
thews with four seconds re 
maining. ) 


(Editor’s Note: One of a 
series on “What I learned 
about golf,” by scratch play- 
ers and duffers alike, to heip 
tune up your game for the 
season just ahead.) 


By George Voigt 


District Senior Champion 


PUTTING is one of the 
most important functions in 
golf and, appropriately 
enough, a Scotsman taught 
me how to be 
stingy with 
my strokes 
on the green. 

In the early 
days of my 
career as a 
tourna- 
ment player, 
I was what 
was known 
as a “jabber,” 
a guy who 

Voigt stabs every 
putt in a jittery effort to 
get the ball into the hole. 

In 1928, I decided to play 
the winter tour and one day 
in Florida I was practicing 
putting when Bobby Cruick- 


Teachers play Panzer College) 


MINNEAPOLIS, Jan. 29 »— 


| my lesson well. 


| amateul 


With Bob Pettit scoring 39 
points, the St. Louis Hawks 
rolled to their fourth straight 
National Basketball Assn. vic- 
Minneapolis Lakers, 114107." 
ers, ; 
ca + 


shank came up to watch. 
Suddenly he exploded, “Why, 
George, you'll never be able 
to putt with that awful 
stroke.” | 

” es told me to 


‘'\ 


What | Learned About Colf 


As Told to Maury Fitzgerald 


lengthen my backstroke and | 
then keep the putter blade 
going toward the hole after 
the ball had been struck. At 
first, it was a little awkward 
trying out the new stroke 
but soon the knack of keeping 


| the putter moving became a 


habit and I became a good 


| putter. 


Johnny Dawson wil! be the 
first to admit that I learned 
Johnny was 
known then as the uncrowned 
champion because 
he wasn't allowed to play in 
USGA-governed tournaments 


because of his job as a pro- | 
| motion-man for a nationally — 


known golf equipment com- 
| pany. He watched me use 
| a putter to knock a 50-footer 
into the hole to beat him on 
the last green of the 1928 
North and South amateur 
final at Pinehurst. 

In that event, the second 
of three I won in successive 
years, I had just won the 
16th and 17th holes to square 


tor in California and still a 


those days were sand). 
a second “= fell short | 


of therreen. my 


the match. At the 18th, Daw- | 
san, now a real estate opera- | 


great player, put his second | 
shot on the edge of the sand — 
green. (Pinehurst greens in 


putter, 
the hole and it toppled in for 
a birdie and won the match 
when Johnny's 6-foot putt 
for a half curled the cup 
and stayed out. 

If you remember 
the histronics of Bobby 
Jones’ grand slam of 1930 
you'll recollect that he beat 
me in the semifinals at St. 
Andrews after I had him two 
down and three to play. 

Jones, who went on to win 
the British Open and the 
American Amateur and Open 
titles that same year, won the 
15th and 16th holes to square 
the match. Going to St. An- 
drews’ famed 17th road hole, 
I hit two of the greatest shots 
of my career to get on the 
edge of the green while 
Bobby was 100 yards short. 


anv of 


Jones knocked his approach | 
20 feet from the pin but he | 
was far from done. My ap- | 
proach putt that measured | 


50 feet hit the hole but hung 
and Jones walked calmly to 
his ball and without hesita- 
tion knocked it in to keep the 
match even. 


it turned out that was the | 
' GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES INSURANCE BUILDING 4th & L STREETS, WLW. 


toughest match Jones was to 


face in his*campaign to he- | 
come golfdom’s only grand | 


slam — 


PGA seniors golf | 


I hit the ball toward 


He won the last | 
hole and the match. and as | 


In Hockey 


CORTINA D'AMPEZZO, 
Italy, Jan. 29 \“—The United 
States team advanced to the 
final round of the Olympic 
ihockey tournament today with- 
|Out swinging a stick. as a sharp 
\Canadian protest and a near 
\riot marked play in the Winter 
| Games. 
| The Americans, who split 
‘their first two preliminary 
games, advanced when Czecho- 
islovakia won a wild, slugging 
/melee over Poland, 8 to 3, elim- 
| inating the latter. 
| The Czechoslovakia - Poland 
game, although supposedly 
‘Matching two friendly coun- 
itries from behind the Iron Cur- 
tain, ended in a braw! with the 
|players piling out on the ice 
‘and swinging fists and sticks. 


‘Handshakes Omitted 


| The incident was inflamed 
when, with five minutes to 
play, Poland's Adolph Wrobel 
'was clipped by Czech star Bo- 
| humil Prosek. The Pole swung 
ihis stick in retaliation and sent 
|Prosek sprawling on the ice. 
| Within seconds, players were 
streaming over the boards and 
‘milling around the ons ice, 
the the alert officials limited 
the exchange to a few harmless 
| punches. Both Wrobel and 
Prosek drew penalties, as did 
| Poland's Janusz Zawadski 
At the final whistle, the grim- 
ifaced players skated from the 
ice without the customary hand- 
| Shake. 


Russia Wins, 10-3 


Germany qualified for 
championship by beating Aus- 
tria 74 The Germans, who 
won one game, lost one and tied 
one, qualified from group “A” 
with unbeaten Canada. Russia 
advanced, too, defeating Swit- 
zerland, 10-3. 

Meanwhile, the Canadians is- 
sued a formal protest with the 
International Federation over 
ithe refereeing of the penalty- 
ridden game yesterday with 
Italy. The Canadians won 3-1 
for their third straight victory 
but drew 11 penalties. 

“It was one of the worst ex- 
hibitions of refereeing I have 
ever had the misfortune to wit- 
ness,’ said James Dunn of Win- 
nipeg, president of the Can- 
adian Hockey Federation 

The Italians. who were elim- 
inated by the loss, have six 
Canadians in their lineup. 

Dunn specifically asked for 
removal of Hans Unger, Ger- 
man referee, from the tourna- 
ment. 


} 


the 


Associated Press Wirephote 


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< 


THE WASHINGTON POST 


and TIMES HERALD 
Monday, January 30, 1954 
29 eee 


Redskin Draftee 
Minister 
Thinks Over 


Pro Career 


——— 


St. John’s © 


Over Loyola 


By Jerry Davis 

This is the time of year when| Staff Reporter 
upwards of 300 top collegiate; Willie Wells’ overhead set 
players are debating the pros shot with three seconds to play 
and cons of a pro football ca- gave John Carroll a 5048 vic 
reer. tory over Mount St. Joseph 

For many of the boys, it's rai eae, of « Washinglon-Bel 

oe 5 -Bal- 
relatively simple. They merely |ti more Catholic League double- 
want to know how many dollars | header. 
a National Football League club; In the opener, St. John's wal- 
cares to offer. Then they'll | - $$$ 
weigh the amount against their 
latest Canadian bid. 

However, the Washington St, Bebe’ 
Redskins find themselves con-| john Carrell 
fronted with a No. 26 draft|**7** 
choice who may not sign and|- =~ a fe 
yet freely admits he isn’t vitally loped Loyola, 88-58, to give 
concerned over salary terms. (Washington teams their third 

Halfback Dave Burnham of clean sweep in three weeks. 
Wheaton (Ill.) College is this) John Carroll was trailing, 4% 
highly unusual fellow. 46, with 1:25 to play but Dick 

Petrillo evened the score with 
Tale of Indecision 55 seconds left. Bob Dunnigan 

To begin with, though only|tried to freeze the ball for 
21, he’s an ordained Baptist}Mount St. Joseph so his team 
minister. And therein lies the|could get the last shot. Dun- 
tale of his indecision. nigan held the ball too long 

Burham explained by phone and the officials called for a 
from his Akron, Ohio home that) jymp. 
he has no religious objection to 
playing pro football on Sunday. | Howell Grabs Rebound 

He added: “I feel the Lord; Bernie Dove of Carroll was 
definitely has called me to the fouled with 25 seconds to go 
ministry. I don’t know whether put he missed his shot. Car- 
or not you understand, but it’s|roll’s Jim Howell. the back- 
a call stronger than anxthing| board star all afternoon, grab- 
on earth. bed the rebound. 

“I love football and I feel; we, flipped the ball out to 
that I would like to give the’ wets who took a quick peek 
pro game a try. Still, I'm won-ist the clock and then fired 
dering if the Lord wants me to|,ys. His shot hit the back- 
ponent Hg about His work board and fell through. 

’ | Carroll led by five points, 10- 
Assists Father 5. in the first quarter, and 
Mount St. Joseph led, 44-39, 

Burnham, a student averag- : : 

ing 94 with a history major, with 4:25 left in the game for 


By Jack Walsh 
Staff Reporter 


ee ee 


GTON-BALTIMORE CATHOLIC 
LEAGUE STANDINGS 

Ww. L. Ww. L. 
2 OMLt. Bt. Joseph's 5 
g wasvers wall | 4 


WASHIN 


Romps, 88-58 


John Carroll Rallies, Wins on Willie Wells’ Basket, 50-48 


— 


+d 


already is in the pulpit assist-‘%¢ Diggest leads by either 

ing his father, Rev. Carl Burn. *©4™. ; 

ham. The father is pastor of| Howell and Wells were Car- 

Akron’s Chapel on Fir Hilj,|Toll’s high scorers with 19 and 

largest undenominationa] | 16 points, respectively. Bob Do- 

church in the State of Ohio, |1a” had 17 points, and Don Ben- 
When he leaves Wheaton, he! 7/ng 13 for the losers. 

hopes to take a more active part Tie For Lead 

in his father’s church as well as , 

doing graduate study. i The victory was the 6th and 
Burnham does more than talk | 12 starts for Carroll, which is) 


the good fight. Summers, he’s tied with St. John's for the) 
toured extensively with evan- ‘¢ague lead with a 30 record. | 


DRIVING FOR BASKET—Don Benzing of 
Baltimore's Mt. St. Joseph's drives past Bob 
Deffinbaugh (23) of John Carroll on his 
way to scoring a basket at Carroll yester- 


By Jim McNamars. Staff Photoerapher 


day. John Carroll won the game, 50-48, in 
| the last three seconds. In the other game 
| of a Catholic league doubleheader, St. 

John’s spanked Baltimore's Loyola, 88-58. 


gelistic groups. Sundays, he|. /® the first game, St. John's 


and other Wheaton students '¢4 by only 18-15 after the first 
frequently visit Chicago's Skid quarter but by halftime the 
Row to preach the gospel. Johnnies had a 44-26 advantage 

Redskin line coach Dick °" S°me dazzling shooting by 
E 


2 > ill Sheehan 
vans recently stopped on the -@try Cox and Bill 
Wheaton campus to talk to and the fine play-making of Jim 
Burnham. 


- Mandes. 

Everybody told wus . : 

he wouldn't play pro football,” | St. John’s controlled the 

Evans said. “but we wented to boards all the way. A full court 

find out for ourselves.” press by Loyola on the John- 
| Mies’ substitutes in the last pe-| 

Cards Wanted Him ‘riod slowed down the Cadets’ 


“The Chicago Cards told us| Pace @ little. 


they would have picked him). Jim Collins led St. John’s to 
first in “os Angeles if they ‘tS 11th victory in 12 games with 


thought he would play. After 22 points. Cox scored 14 and 

talking with Dave, I} got the/>meehan 13. Ed Hargaden of) 

feeling he would play if it fits Loyola was the best point pro-| 

into his plans ducer in both games with 25. 
“I'll tell you, he’s 4 real high- > — eee — ~ 

class guy. And obviously, he's Deve.f Dennigan. 

very sincere in his belief. That's a ma 

No. 1 with him.” if basch.¢ pu. J 
Even a brief glance at Burn-| 

ham's interesting athletic back- | 

ground is proof of that. | 
After a brilliant sports ca- 


eh | 


f 
f 
° 
. 
. 
. 


S| 
a «2 


Tetale 


St. Jehu's 


Ed Waitkus 
Quits Baseball 
After 13 Years 


' 


PHILADELPHIA, Jan. 29 
Eddie Waitkus, skinny Phillies 
first baseman voted baseball's 
“comeback king’ just five sea- 
sons ago, is quitting the sport 
at 35 

Once considered the National 
League's best fielding first 
baseman, Waitkus begins a new 
career tomorrow in traffic man- 
agement and public relations 
with Eastern Freight Ways, Inc. 

As Waitkus puts it: “I was a 
big leaguer and I'm going out 
as a big leaguer.” 

He's been in 


the major 


Without Warecki, LaPointe 


Lions Blow 4-1 Lead, 


Lose to Johnstown, 7-5 


JOHNSTOWN, Pa., Jan. 29—The injury-riddied Washington 
Lions blew a 41 second period lead and lost the first game 
in their last seven starts to Johnstown, 7-5, today. 

Before 2200 fans, the red-hot Lions took a 2-0 first period 
lead and held on to a 5-4 lead as late as 5:10 of the third period 
before the Jets finally caught them 
IRR «ns Seah g = ae aOR ~? Washington played without 


’ o js the services of its two top stars, 
Goodwin Wins 


Player-Coach Stan Warecki and 
Doherty Golf 


who 


reer at Akron’s Buchtel High | 
where he made All-State in 
footbal! and basketball and ran 
the “100” in 9.9. Burnham was 
besieged with -45 scholarship 
offers. 


Paid Own Way 


e—-3awe—aa-—O | ed @erterO 


ee ~enocou't 


a 
| a ee ee | a | ewroen~-ry 


Rran.« 
Fletcher.¢ 
Perter.s 


—wS>R—-~8s~-e200 <2 | ee Osomwn® 


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Srberuc 


2 o 
3! o--vex~e-es~-q o| ~e18=e— 


Tetels 


Center Fern LaPointe. La- 
Pointe is sidelined with a 
broker toe and Warecki is out 

| FORT LAUDERDALE, Fia., 

Jan. 29 #®—Miss Joanne Good- 

win, the 19-year-old daughter 


with an injured foot. 
Center Buddy McDonald and 
of a Dartmouth, Mass., profes- 
sional golfer, defeated Cookie 
Swift Berger, Buffalo, N. Y., 7 
and 6, today to win the 24th an- 
nual Helen Lee Doherty golf 


leagues 13 years. 

The story of his baseball 
comeback proved he had cour- 
age. It began in June, 1949 when 
a crazed girl in Chicago fired 
a bullet that critically wounded 
Waitkus and brought him to 


Wingman Pau] Olafson, 
play on the same forward line, 
engineered Johnstown’'s second 
victory over Washington in nine 
games between the two teams 

McDonald. who scored three 
goals against the Lions in the 
last meeting of the two teams, 


With the biggest schools in Malcolm Fox Wins 
the country after him, Dave — | 
turned them al] down and paid Tourney in France | 
his own way through Wheaton. | . 
The school, a member of the} CANNES, France, Jan. 29 * 
College Conference of Illinois, Malcom Fox of Arlington, Va., 
is located 25 miles west of Chi-|today defeated Joseph Pottin- 
cago. The town may be a bit! ger of Germany, 6—1, 6—0 for 
more famous as the home of the men’s singles championship 
the “Wheaton Iceman,” Red of an international! tourney at 
Grange the Cannes Lawn Tennis Club. 

Burnham explained his Whea-| Louise Snow of Oakland, 
ton choice by saying he wanted Calif. defeated Roberta Mel- 
to study for the ministry as/trane, Italy, 6—2, 1—6, 6—3, for 
well as play sports. the women’s title. Fox teamed 

Concerning Wheaton, he said: | with Rene Bertrand of France, 
“Here men who really love the to beat Thomas Peter Gercueil, 
Lord also play rough, tough South Africa, and Ivor War- 
football] which illustrates) wick, Britain, 6—4, 2—6, 6—4 
there's nothing unmanly about in men’s doubles. 
being a Christian.” ) 


ithe brink of death. 


He won the fight for life and 
went on to four months of ardu- 
ous conditioning that brought 
him back to the diamond. He 
called them the “four most hor- 
rible months of my life.” But he 
hit 284 in 1950 and knocked 
out 143 singles as the Phils 
won the pennant. That season 
earned him the “comeback 
king” title the Associated 
Press poll, 

Waitkus met Buddy Hassett, 
one-time Brooklyn, Boston 
Braves and New York Yankee 
first basem@M, at a banquet and 
Hassett made the job offer. 

“I'm vice president of a big 
trucking outfit,” Hassett said 
“I've been with ‘em almost 10 
years. We can use a guy like 
ou.” 


in 


tournament. 

She grabbed the lead on the 
second hole and was never 
headed thereafter. The 36-hole 
final match ended when Miss 
Goodwin won the 29th hole. 

Her play was. steady, 
though not spectacular. 
won six straight holes, from 
the 13th to the 18th, with a 
bogey 6 followed by five pars. 

Miss Goodwin shot the first 
18 holes in 78 strokes, two over 
women’s. par at the ‘Coral 
Ridge course, and had a 42 on 
the next nine. Mrs. Berger 
shot an 86 on the first round 
and 40 on the third nine. They 
halved the 28th hole and Miss 
Berger won the 29th but the 
match ended when she could do ‘ 
no better than halve the 30th. |: 


sists. 

Otafson made three goals and 
one assist, all in the third period 
as Johnstown rallied for five 
goals. McDonald assisted on 
all three Olafson goals. 

Goalie Jack Spencer made 33 
saves and dJohnstown's Bill 
Anderson made 22. 

The Lions, who began a three- 
week road tour while the Ice 
Capades invade Washington, 
D. C., retain second place in 
the Eastern Hockey League 
while the Jets remain in fourth 
place. 


Weshiastea 
Johnstown 


al 
She 


2 
» 


” 


a 
0 57 


stewn-——O 1 Crash 


scored two goals and four as-' | 


Burnham, 6-foot-2, 185-pound- 
er, played his share and was 
icked on the AP Little All- 
America last season In 30 
games, he scored 30 touch-| 
downs. He gained 3439 yards 
in his Wheaton career and had 
only one pass intercepted in| 
80 attempts. 


Had 25-5-1 Record | 
Playing against schools like 


Babe Zaharias Flies to ” 


Tampa Home. Today 


GALVESTON, Tex., Jan. 29 
#—The noted woman golfer, 
Babe Zaharias, said today she 
will fly back to her home in 


‘Tampa, Fia., tomorrow to rest 


and play golf again. 
Mrs. Zaharias, who postponed 
her departure for a day, is to 


“Sure I'm going to miss base- 
ball,” he admits. “But for once 
I'll be able to live a sensible 
home life. I'll have a lot of fun 
sitting in the grandstand sec- 
ond-guessing every manager in 
the majors. And nobody will 
call me a ‘clubhouse lawyer.’ 


Kluszewski Signs 


CINCINNATI, Jan. 29 
Veteran First Baseman Ted 
Kluszewski 


nati Redlegs for a reported $40, 


| Winter Games in Italy 


Den 


today signed his a] 
1955 contract with the Cincin- in 


rv 
58. Kelly (tripeing). 


ingten-——Nene. John 
hor (tripping). 13 
8.47 

SECOND FF 


RIOD 8c 
ingten—Gaevy Periard 
ald) 1:4) 


Hiirenen). 10 
: Washingcten—Joe Med 
4:03. 


vaski 
Jehnstewn—Lee (holding), 


THIRD PERIOD SCORING Washine- 
ten—Fermica (McMillan. Medvuaski) 
5:10. Jehnstewn—MeDenald (Olafson. 
pil Gellarher) *:37. Olaisen (Ed Rami. 
MeDonaid). 2:33. Olafeon mi. Me- 

Gatlacher 


&:17 
a-i7 


Lake Forest, Elmhurst, Augus- , 
tana and Valparaiso, Wheaton /¢ave the Houston airport about 


compiled a record of 27-5-1 with 7:30 a. m. She was released 
Burnham in its backfield. from John Sealy Hospital for 
Broken-field running was his|\©@ncer officially yesterday 
forte, but the mature Burnham 4fter undergoing treatment for 
shrugged off his headlines by Pains in one leg since last No- 
saying: “Football is just a vember. 
means to an end—the end be- 
ing to reach young people for 
Jesus Christ. 
“Telling people of their need 


‘Ken Bartholomew 


for Him is better than sny| Wins 11th Skate Title 


sports page writeup. Any suc-| ST. PAUL, Minn., Jan. 20 (# 
cess I've had is due to my Aging Ken Bartholomew rolled’ 
friends and teammates, with-|back the challenge of Chicago’s| 
gout them I'd never get beyond|Dick Wellbank in the 5-mile) 
the line of scrimmage, and to\climax today to capture his) 
God, without Whom I'd not/llth national outdoor speed-) 
have the strength to reach it.”|skating championship. 
Burnham said yesterday he 
just about has reached his de-|pairman, father of five girls, 
cision and will give it to the|shaded Wellbank by 2 yards in| 
Redskins Tuesday. 
be pried out of him. jnail down his seventh straight 
“I'm sorry,” Burnham said, senior men’s title. 


“I gave Mr. Evans my word |! 
Bill Merelman 


wouldn't discuss it with any- 
one.” The young Rev. Dave 
Coaches McGuire 


Burnham keeps his word, as 
you would imagine. 


Boxer Dies | which plays at Bolling Field to- 

PHILADELPHIA, Jan. 20 # day, 8 p. m., is Bill Merelman, 
Middleweight Boxer Robert' former University of Maryland 
Perry died today of a brain in-| basketball and baseball player. 
jury little more than 48 hours| McGuire AFB, New York re- 
after he was knocked down inicently upset Sampson AFB. 
8 locally televised fight by Rudy| Sampson was the g serv- 
w imore. ice team in the northefst. : 


The 36-year-old utility line re-' 


It couldn’t| the final event of the meet to! 


(15 Kilometer, 


Yrr Mesechkin. Ressia 
Sverre Stendersen. Nerwary 
weden 


isawe. Japan 


aw eve him 


2s 


5000 Meter Speedskating 


; ria Schilker E . 7:48 7° 
e iecson, & 56.7. 
7:57.48. 
De Helland. 


. (the) Kees Breekman. Holland, §:00.1. 
. Nerwary. 5:01.64. 
Sweden. 8.01.4. 
, Nerwar, 


(the) Termed Kautsen, Nerway 


4 Russia. 
Graaf, 


&: 
35.8. 
rd. Petters ola mark 

ar Andersen, Ner- 


Men's Cient Slalom Ski 


| 


’ 
: 
: 


i 


Olympic Summaries 


CORTINA D'AMPEZZO, Italy, Jan. 29 \*—Summaries of 
events today in the seventh Winter Olympic games, with the 
top 10 in each plus all American placings: 


Nordic Combined Ski Jump 


Peland.. 


; 17 lafse 
PENALTIES: 
(helding), 6:79 ehastown 


Tournament Tickets 


Tickets for the Southern 
Conference basketball tourna. 
ment scheduled for Richmond 
/on March 1, 2 and 3. are on 
poor . Lisner Auditorium. 21st 
. an sts. nw. Ticke 
Cross-Country ) | four sessions are igh gag 


Twe Jumps (Feet. Inches) 


— 


789 
> i 


A ers 
_ 


_— 
~~ o-SP¥vuss- 


tnt 2 
/RSSRISRAS== 
Sassercasuk 


/ Colhere Teave. Japan (a Dartmouth 
Raich Miller. ihe x iss 
Tr. never. %. ot sLS.4. 
Thomas Cerceran, West ’ 7 io 
Breeks Dedse Gorham. N. W.. 3:164. 
glace Werner, Steambest Soriags. 
: Ceo . 3:21.4. 


i. 
13. 
14. 
15. men in field. 

ti. 

nified, necessary and 


Men’s Skati 
ens Skating each year. Experience 


(Cempuisery Figeres 


wares p Jenk 
reel 


) 

Alan Celerade 

Cole., 852.2. 

“7 ¥R tion should pay over 
Davis 


Rebertsen, Leng Beach, Calif. 
sonia. Celerade Springs. 
hints Silesis, rance. 8.22 
‘ 4 en : 
. Buglend. 797.7. 
. 


eee 


6. 


‘ 


5 
ia 
Norbert F settle, 183.69 | 
Calmat. France. 71.8, If you feel you can qu 
Chain, Song Cone ue 


at OL. 9-8303 hetween 


A 


SALES MANAGER 


President of nation-wide consultant corpora- 
tion has well-known and reputable client who 
wants to hire a Sales Manager to direct sales- 


Must have best of references. Business is dig- 


as you will be thoroughly trained by me. Posi- 


year. Liberal drawing account, Lifetime secu- 


| | appointment for personal interview, 


Cousy Leads 
Celtics Over 
Rochester 


BOSTON, Jan. 29 ‘»—Bound- 
ing Bob Cousy, Bill Sharman 
and Jack Nichols pooled their 
talents to lead the Boston Cel- 
tics to a 112-103 National Bas- 
ketball Association victory over 
Rochester today which was 
fashioned at the foul line 

Boston converted 34 
throws to Rochester's 19 

Cousy scored 29 points, Shar- 
man 23 though he was used 
sparingly and Nichols 21. 

The Celtics held a 102-100 
edge with 1:42 left in the game 
but then Sharman dropped two 
of his patented one-hand set 
shots, Ed MacAuley scored two 
quick buckets on slick passes 
underneath and Cousy broke 
away alone to lay in a two- 
pointer. 

Maurice Stokes, the rookie 
from St. Francis, Pa., took scor- 
‘ing honors for Rochester with 
'18 points. Cousy connected on 
9 of 23 field goal attempts, 11 
of 11 from the free-throw line 
and got 14 assists. 


New York Defeats 


Syracuse in Overtime 

SYRACUSE, N. Y., Jan. 29 
M—The New York Knicker 
bockers tightened their grip on 
third place in the Eastern Di- 
vision of the National Basket- 
ball Association with a 99-95 
overtime victory over the 
Syracuse Nationals today. 

Ken Sears hit on a jump 
shot with three seconds left in 
‘regulation time to tie the score 
(91-91 and send the game into 
overtime. Then Ray Felix, who 
‘finished with 22 points, scored 
itwo field goals and a free 
ithrow to more than match the 
‘total Syracuse production in 
the five-minute extra session 

Braun, who netted 12 points 
in the first period when the 
\Knicks took an early lead, led 
iall scorers with 23 points. Ear! 
\Lloyd was high for Syracuse 
‘with 17. 

The victory inc#@ased the 
Knicks’ third-place margin to 
2% games over the Nats, who 
now have lost 11 of their last 
14 games. 


free 


Fort Wayne Beats 


Philadelphia, 90-85 


FORT WAYNE, Ind., Jan. 29 
\(#—Fort Wayne's Western Di- 
ivision leaders dowrfed Phila- 
delphia’s Eastern Division 
jpace setters today in a Nation- 
jal Basketball Association game 
99-85. It was the Pistons sev 
enth straight victory. 

The Warriors, operating with- 
‘out Neil Johnston due to. the 
death of his father, were stone 
cold for three periods, and their 
29-point last quarter came too 
late. They connected with only 
30 of 93 shots from the field to 
Fort Wayne's 42 of 79. 

Arizin was high scorer of the 
game with 20 points. Six men 
scored in double figures for 
Fort Wayne, topped by Bob 
Houbregs’ 18 anl 15 apiece by 
George Yardley and Walter 
Deviin, former George Wash- 
ington star. 


Olympic 


CORINTA, D'AMPEZZO, | 


_ Jan, 29 (»—Here is Monday's 
| schedule for the 1956 Winter 
Olympic games: 


Monday's Schedule 


(Fastern Standard Time) 


2 a. m—Compulsery fieures. women's 


entries: Teniey Al 
Mass.:- Carol 
¥.:; Catherine 


figure skating | 
bricht, 

Heiss. Ovone Park 
Machade. Les Angeles) 

15 kilemeter (nine 
yards) cress country ski race 
Andrew Miller. Metall. 
Burlington, 


. 8 
miles. 568 
‘t S. entries 
Idabe;: Lawrence 
vt.) 

5S «a 
Mrs 
Cele. ; 
Betsy 
| Werner, 

s 


Damen. 


m.—Sialtem ladies «t. &. entries 
Andrea Mead Lawrence. Parshall 
Penny” FPitew. Lacenta. 
Snite, Nerwich. Gladys 
Steambeat Springs. Cole.) 
m.—1800-meter (170 varda less 
. & ene 
Minneape 

inneapelis: Den McDermott, Englewood 
cliffs. N. 1.) 

m —lIce 


m. 8:30 w®, 


gs = “S 
hecker final round. 


ORING: Wash- 
. -} 


Team Standings 

CORTINA, D’AMPEZZO, 

| Italy, Jap. 29 (»—Here’s the 

unofficial team standing after 

seven of the 24 events in the 

| seventh Winter Olympic 

Games (with points awarded 

on the basis of 10 for first, 

5 for second, 4 for third, 3 

for fourth, 2 for fifth and 1 
for sixth): 


} Ressla, 6° 


many. ! 
ted States. 6's. 


er 
ni 
witeeriand, 6s. 


s 
: 


wie =— SVs HeONe 


in demand 12 months 
in our line not essentia! 


twelve thousand first 


alify, phone Mr. Sparks 
9 A.M. and 5 P.M. for 


‘Win No. 40 by 33-24 


California Pulls Stall 


' 


; 


But Dons Break Record 


SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 29 #—The fabulous San Francisco 
Dons, with a record-breaking 40 straight basketball victories 
safely behind them, had practically clear sailing today for a 
fantastic 51 straight 

But, even if the string runs to 100, the Dons will be a long 
time forgetting that wondrously weird No. 40. 

First, of course, the 33-24 victory over the University of 
California Saturday night wiped out the old mark of 39 straight 
set by Long Island University in 1935-37 and equalled by Seton 
Hall in 193841. The Dons are now in a class by themselves; 
the others are also-rans. 

And. with the last 11 games of the regular season al! to be 
played against their weaker sis-| 
ters of the California Basket- 
ball Association, only a mon- 
strous upset could snap the 
string at less than 51 

But the game probably will 
be best remembered as one of 
the doggondest basketball) ne soviet Union has its big 
games played since Dr. JameS| hance to take over first place 
A. Naismith set up those peach , ime D C Reeretin 
baskets in the Springfield, "= “"* »- creavon Le 
Mass. YMCA back in 1891. partment volleyball league 

California Coach Pete Newell Tuesday night when its plays 
figured there was just one Way) ¢j-c¢ place Paraguay at West- 
to upset the Dons—stay as close 

: ern High at 9 p 


as possible, and stall as much 
as possible. And the Bears The Russians are second to 
Paraguay with a 20-1 record 


played it just that way. 

At one point reserve Calli- Paraguay a perfect 240 
fornia Center Joe Hagler stood as 
motionless in the forecourt for mark. Tonigat . be- 
nine minutes without challenge, @/ns at ¢ p. m. with tour match 
trying to lure big Bill Russell es to be played 
out from under the basket. Big There are ten teams in the 
Bill wouldn't lure, however, and league representing nine em- 
the game came to a virtual halt.'),<cieg and foreign service 

i personne! of the United States 

State Department. The Ame 


All Out Near End 
With five minutes to go, and insane are running eighth with 
a 7-17 record 


trailing by only five points at 
26-21, California made its bid 
to narrow the gap and possibly 
win. A field goal attempt was 
short. the Dons took the ball, 
and the pressure was on the 
Bears. They fouled, the Dons 
converted, and No. 40 was safely 
Stashed away. 


Soviels Play 
Paraguay Here 


For First Place 


m 


has 
w( hedule 


Lido Defeats 
Marlboro, 13-1 


Lido Club walloped Mar'\- 


In the dressing room before 
the game, USF Coach Phil Wool- 
pert predicted the California 
strategy exactly: 

“They'll try to get ahead and 
slow up the game,” Woolpert 
told his players. “They'll try 
to make you play it their way. 
Don’t let ‘em do it.” 

But the Dons, obviously press- 
ing for big No. 40, started slow 
and cold. After 13 minutes they 
trailed, 13-3, and the capacity 
crowd of 7500 in the California 
gymnasium showed signs 


boro, 13-1, yesterday in a Na- 
tional Soccer League game at 
24th and Constitution ave., nw. 
It was the largest score run up 
im a league game in several 
years. 

Hans Schanne led undefeated 
Lido to the one-sided victory 
by scoring six goals. Herbie 
Mueck and Fausto Gomez each 
scored three and Oscar Salazer 
made one for Lido. Pershing 
Mondorff scored Mariboro's 
lone goal. 


| Schedule | 


of 


going completely berserk. 
Dons Lead at Half 


Then the Dons put on a full- 
court press and the Bears 
couldn't withstand the pressure 
Their passes went wild, their 
hasty shots went amiss. From 
8-16 behind. the Dons took a 
20-16 halftime lead. Three times 
in that surge USF Capt. K. C 
Jones stole the ball and drove 
for the basket. Three times he 
was fouled, and three times he 
sank a pair of free throws. 
Jones. with 1! of 13 free throws, 
was high point man for the 
night with 15 

In the second half the cool 
and confident Dons liet the! 
Bears dictate the strategy. They 
waited for the inevitable breaks, 
then cashed in on them. 


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| Today’s Events ‘THE WASHINGTON Post 
Gr BASKETBALL and TIMES HERALD 


at Waek.. 
h. 8:30. Monday, January 30, 1956 


at Het 
Toochess vs ide 
ps 


Around. The 


Lee 


Horses and People Race Selections at Charles Town 


By Walter Haigh nt 


lie K. 
Fda 
JOCKEY FREDDIE KRATZ didn't get a swelled head after Gtaoarette 
riding the first two winners for a $47.20 daily double on the gag 
initial Charles Town program. However, there's still a Agape man 
chance that he will. The three Kratz children came down 
e ' with the mumps and I understand 
Freddie hasn't had em A race 
track romance that blossomed into 
marriage some months ago involved 
jockey Aubrey Snelling and owner- 
trainer Rebecca Collins. Henceforth, 
her horses will be listed in her mar- 
ried name and her husband will ride 
them Former jockey Dixie 
Mitchell, currently training horses at 
Charlies Town, says his brothers, Bob- 
by and Donny, will return to the 
saddie the coming Spring. Bobby, 
down tH 116, believes he has whipped 
the weight jinx If Chic’s Town, 
Haight the 77-year-old whdé was first to go 
doWn in Saturday's spill, were a human he would be in de- 
mand as a football back. After regaining his feet, the old 
fellow circled the track four times, eluding efforts of out- 
riders to capture him with a change of pace that was astound- 
_—__-— —e * ing Whenever I see a 
loose horse a plater named 
Flutterinng comes to mind 
and I find mystelf shuddering 
‘He fell soon after the start of 
a 2\4-mile race on a deep, 
muddy strip and arose rider- 
less to run the wrong way 
of the track. Three times he 
met the field head on in front 
of the grandstand, going be- 
tween the charging horses as 
if he were a needle being 
threaded It was the last 
_ *| race on closing day and when 
ihaca 4° 
Coisate so «I left there was Fluttering, 
gh tt oe at, still fluttering around the 
Springtield 5 track 
Queens (h. ¥.) 30 
CONE 3 . eee ° meena -_ 
Boston years. he IF YOU PURCHASED a 
Newark Rutgers © hot dog in the main betting 
ring Saturday, chances are 
the 6-foot-3, 205-pounder who | 
served you was John Shearer, |,{ Prethy’* ind’ bos: 
, r : ' i3 Silver Sour ‘mo Sor 
star quarterback of the un- FOURTH | 
defeated (12 in row) Shep- “Gane. 
herd College eleven of near- | 4 250s" 
by Shepherdstown, W. Va. 
He's a Takoma Park, Md., boy 
who was drafted. by the Bal- 
timore Colts but is headed 
for the United States Ma- 
rines Charles Town's 
first program brought the 
first claim of the Eastern 
season Alfred W. Williams 
gave $1500 for Moon Mate 
out of the eighth race : 
Speaking of claims, in Flori- 
da recently I found Dave 
Weissberger in a sad mood. 
He put a $7500 claim in the 
box for Tee J. H. The horse 
failed to finish, breaking 
down badly. Weissberger 


y Cress, 
nr. Cc. Pancer College, at) 
Banneker Ir. 


SERVIC RASKETRALL 
Andrew APR at Fort Pusti« 
MeGeire AFR at Rol +4 APR. $. : 

HIGH SCHOOL BASKETRALE 
Meuent Vernen at Wach.-Lee, 7:50. 


OLD BONES BENNINGS CONSENSUS 


——_——— 
esabe be Ay 
Betherdy Ken i 4 er 

ut Vendor Font Vendor __ 
ponounce vg 5g ¥ 
Acsnaman, Wiee Tunnel 


Metisse = Moll 
soreny Specs ge ony Queen 
ane Mol! etiase 


SS 


tam 
rty Andy 
inogretts 


weep Clean 
araphrase 
Aganaman 


Metisse 
‘Ar nae Moll 
anet Lyon 


“Railbird Longshot 


IN THE SWIM 
Fifth Race, Charlies Town 


Horses to Watch | 


AT CHARLES TOWN 

COVERED SHED This 
plater is ready. Worth tabbing. 

Pylades—Probably the best 
3-year-old on the grounds. 

FUENTE—Ran well here last 
December, can go any route. 

BUSY PHIL — Working well 
worth following up. 


' 
' 


eraphrase 
GANG MOLL 
v“ietiase 
Colony 


a ; 

Severn Clean 
GANG MOLL, 
Me ti ‘se 

Coiony Queen 
Golden Vale 
Lady Viretnia 
Abbe F 


Po 


' 


Queen 


aw 


ry Godfrey 
pate 
Makin Belleve 


iss Diesel 
livs o 
facenia 
Connatation 
Muaty Inn 
ab>ditt 
Whitsuntide 
‘limus 


> 
lumission ’ 


Mary Godtrey 
may GODFREY Abhe Poo 
aay MVi-cinia 

is Bane 


Poliys 
Air Menarch 


ine Cameron 
ost Guy 
bbditt 


Whiteuntide 
ayer 
lumission 


fame , Pun 
aay Virginie 7 Virginia 
Abbe Pun Mary Godfrey 
Butterbur 

st ne Pride 
Ollys Bo 
onnatation 


abbitt 
Kine Cameron 


Pon SSION 
rt neer 
imus 


be 
Lacy Vireinia 
Poliys Bo 

Pining Pride 

Whiz Pang 


Inthes wim 
liy's Bo 

ay Dreaming 

Air Monarch 


ui 


MORE 
FOR YOUR 


CHEVY 


IN TRADE AT 
OURISMAN 


- 


liys Bo 
ing Pride 
is Bane 
een Pass 

ine Cemeron 
Neat Guy 
Timnus 
Blumisasion 
Port Dencer 


Paddock 


RACE—Purse. 81700: fer 
tharies Town Course (14) 
Rosaile * ; Should win 
ur One to 


Monarch 


ing Caeneron 
uy 


Cameron 
tation 
auy 


lumission 
hitsuntide 
mus 


' 


oo ™. oO 


AP Selections 


AP AT WIiALFAn 
1—Seandia. Perman, Amulet. 
eld Man, Dark Patrel 


> 


Liberty 


ab 
Lady Geshen, White Orchid, Relle 


HIALEAH ENTRIES 


Picks ’Em at Charles Town By hg png 


| Sailors Return 
Mv , 


ay, 
i—TANUASM. Bil Veit. Penny Fer. 
Rige 


13 Amulet 

13 meorpeicee Prandial, Ashenden, 
; em 

10-1 
10-1 


Hangever. Fined 
M. Fell Piicht. 


&—Dee De Fer, 

{—Commedore 
man a 
Gav Stery 

*—Hail Fetlee, 
Shewers Fad 


MERCHANT'S 
BRAKE SPECIAL 


well i113 
here 


4 Koleneka (‘no bor) 
& Charming Dar ino bor) 
FIFTH RACE—Purse, $1200: for 4-vear-olds and 
- inet Chartes Tewn Course (14). 
9 Golde mere 
Lady Virainia * co 
iDosher! h 
frey 


4-vear-olde and ep: claim. | Tra ming 


this 


FIRST 
ine Seote- 


Billtewn, Pertace Ber 
Reurch Ceneurst, 


Ph 

Princetonian 

Extrapoise 

2 2—%,: $3500 
Pixation 

Russet Orenee 

Maid Cotton 


eo: claim- 18 “So Suave 
18 Turcueneff 

4-yr. olds up: cime 
18 Dark Bmbasey 1] 


oo 
~_ 


bea 


to ' 
ntendcer 


dad 


0 
0 


--— he 


> + ewOoere 


o bor 
Dangerous 
ner? 


_ 


— & trv eO-h 
«| r - 


{f 
Wor 


IV OPS OSS 
tee 


g 


eg ne her ee 


Oe nt OO te ee et OR 


X ‘Smithson ) 
Oh Susan (no hoy) 
Epeedic, Kies ino 4 
Makin seve (no boy) 
GOaliant Dolly ‘Blankenship) Har 
4 Zany ‘Amos! Chance if abie 
XTH RACE—Peree. 81500; fer %-rear-elds; 
feur and ene-half fertenee (19) 
Polivs Bo ‘Krats) 
Piping Pride ‘Fitec’d) 
Whis Ban ‘ne boy 


et et nt et et ht he 


Adventuress 
3 %.: £3500 


Fancy Foot 
5 
Gentie Song 


Silver Glow . Likes this track 

COND RACE—Parese. 81700 fer 4-vear-elds 

claiming: about 7 furlenes (14) 

OGinoeretta Cla xi Given 
e 


VeWNuOnwonmerc ewe 
: : : ; ; : : : > : : ; : 


— ees ee Oe 
nent 

aX > 

—_ -_— oe or Dw ewe 
~~ — & 
Yams 


ine bov' 


— 
POV VNOoOBsReeun 
: ; ; : ; : > * ; ; ; 


; 
poe pee 


11 
12 
‘ 
6 
3 
10 
i3 


- 

-_ 
~~ 
ay 


5 


— 
ae 
- 


College 


Basketball 


LATE SATURDAY SCORES 


EAST 
at 


M 
claiming: ; Stop 3 
resh and Pair i721 


nt 


"oe 


es the ciass 
contender here 
pienty speed 
ieures in nere 
0 e\l bere 
Some good races 
Clockers fr 


i alittle Misa Somali 
Belle @ 1 aMahabharatea 

aHanes-Chrysier entry 
olds only 


Ready Dillerd 
Ha ay 


&VrPnvor 
De wap ee were 
4+2S2w-8-Wwu 


a.i0ws 


oy 

o voy) 
bov 

Headier) 

on 


et ee et he ee ee 
~ 


tout ine we 115 
n Harp (n $15 
@@and Anne-o-R “ ; +2 t 
S Day Dreaming ‘no bor! al ' : 15-1 [OF aca Les hy 
SEVENTH RACE—Paurse. 81000: for 4-year-olds 119 Past and Par 119 
| elaimine: about seven feriemaes (14). Peesy's Brandy 112 

Pass (Thacker? Needs onivy rice elds up: cime 
poed iast see 


~~ 


SSSeSISUSosar 
ovo inde POWG0 Fo» v 


ay thi 
Chance off best races 
Not here 


Men —) 


apeed ¢ 
recommend 


+ O-RiIto-- 


Bhowed 
Renarmiare 60 Can't 
Army 46 


+ 
2 
eS 


Duawesne 7 
LONGSHOT DAILY DOUBLE 
PRESTA DONNA and LIBERTY ANDY 


THIRD RACE—Purse. 81000; for 4-vear-elde and ob: 
ins about seven fertengse (14). 
‘Rivera’ 


Delaware 62 


Manhattan 74 Recall 


b a Ltt 
Cheatnut Cross ‘no boy) 
onnmatation ‘Kra: 
rompt Boy ‘Head 
1 Sleipner ‘ne dor! 
I Oak ‘Culshaw? 
" iA ' 


claim - 
Like thia one ley) 


Aganaman 
Ready? «0 weil 


4 Doc Walker 

Lady Eliott 114 *Bronese We 
akKelley-Elmendort entry 

£10.000 4-vear-olds 


one 


: Ociliroce th 
: . a. ont tt 
winnipac (Conn.) 94 eueee 2! 
po Point 70 
Ceepver Lnien i! 
Merrimack +4 
Michacisa (¥t.) 


—- 


: up: a) 

Not here 
Brrearad Lea (ino bor) Bome «ood races 

‘EIGHTH RACE—Puree. 81700; fer 4-vear-olds 
claiming: ene mile and one-sizteen %) 
Timus (Cutshaw Best effort needed 


ine bor 


a 
ga re 
ed ee ee 


DD et we nt et pe 
SOnvOOCwU! BT -raewn 
gparéans oe a oe 


15 

iM 

Can't be overlooked lll Appeal . 
t times 1] 


Alliamece (Pa.) 53 x 
Chance if starts 
Not 


Ww. Y Westesan 67 
Kent State 108 


~ 


Merrie Marvey 7 
Marshal) 11¢ 
Bairmont (W. Va.) 108 
Cencerd 
Alderson -Broaddus &2 
West Liberty 95 
Biueficid State 92 
Beckley (W. Va.) 101 
Davie & Dikins 
Lafayette 18 
Blisabethiown (Pa.) 96 


> seer ae 


1's: $5000 “yt -olds wp: al 
Flight 12] aOcean Lane 
‘'r'dom Parley 115 Mabekky a ie 
bBryn 109 Africance 
ceScote'an Bond 109 Our Dance 
Mas Imp'rtante 115 bMonk Shoe 
War & Peace. 113 ecCommoedere M 
aRoss-North Downs Farm entry 
bHasty House Farm entry. 
—— cCalumet Farm entry 
ro a Le ee is 3500: 4-yr -olds 


RBilltes 


RACE—Purse. 

Charities Tew 
oll (Palumbo; 
Bmail 


iw. Va.) 89 
Gienville 8° 
Petemac State 73 
W.Va. State 90 
National Busi. 56 
Ww ‘ ech “5 
Albright i4 


i200 fer 4-rvear-eld« 
Course 7) 
Da 


| ee SRL PD « . 
wVOv@ese? Ww 
: : ; : : : : ” 
ee et ot et ee et BD 


~~ wee + 


ppas 
bov 


tPA 


sir at ties 


DON’T RISK A LIFE...1# 


“, Costs So Little to be Sure 
Anna pe lis Touchdown | eee Ns ee Boe : ‘ “a : Gel q ii. restone 
Club Is Big League = ===": jie BRAKE SPECIAL 
| , : | Sports on TV, Radio eee and You'll be Safe! 

ke ee Here's what we dec 


} 3—Liber 
| Paint Vender 16 
] Remove froat wheels 


N. J.) Tehrs. 
MIDWEST 


wievillie 66 
ichigan State 04 
inneseta 54 


4. Lewis 104 . 
‘elena 46 
Bessie ao 


2 “Resigned 
4 Gear Story 

Dayton 6s In Just One Year 
Ohie State #i 
Nerthwestern 63 
Oklahema 5% 
De Paul 66 
‘ Cincinnati 
Oklahoma A&M 41 
Drake 77 
Marewette 57 
Leveig itn.) +2 
Telede #2 
Misseurt 53) 


"Les Rondi 


ip 


. Pa 


iradiey 65 

leasterm Kentuckr 76 
Nestern Michigan #0 
. RK. Misseurt 65 
entral Michigen %° 
Baidwin-Watllace 


3 Netherby 14, ' 
L4taowr 
Rove! 


Reneance 7. Farmer 


Meunt Unien bo Metieose 1°. Janet 


litineis Tech. 
18%. Geyneth 10 


By Martie Zad 


Stall Reporter 


ANNAPOLIS, Md., Jan. 29—A little over a year ago Annapolis 
had no big sports organization. Today this city has a Touchdown 
yn ag ge ag ag Be ‘Club with a membership of almost 200 which holds four sports 

|award banquets a year. 

oe ag me never | The big football dinner comes up Feb. 13. It all started in 

8 rf te © new Na& | january 1955 when five busi-*— ‘A tain es wim 
tional insurance arranged ness men were parked in a car 
_ year by the Horseman's at a street corner where they 
Prem n om and haggen 0 on \were waiting to welcome Navy's 
Association comes in mighty ‘Sugar Bowl championship foot- 
handy for members who lost hall team : 
horses in the recent Tropi- | 
eal Park fire, including Those five men decided the 
friend Norman Haymaker People of Annapolis should 
... By the way, Haymaker ave a Touchdown Club. Then 
saddied Florida's first 2-year- the area sports fans could pay 

tribute to outstanding achieve- 


old winner of the year in 
Aladyne, a daughter of Aj- ment such as the Middie team 
they were awaiting 


sab and owned by Courtney 
The first banquet was last 


Burton, mayor of Gates 
March when Sports Announcer 


Mills, Ohio. J. R. Layton, one 
of the Nation's oldest riders, |Mei Allen was the guest speak- 
er. The Navy team was hon- 


— -4, Drought the baby home. 

St. John’s (Bikn.) 39 ored and almost 400 people 
turned out for the affair. 

| Last fall 18 major league 


5 
) Air 
Sicipner 16, 


£ Cameron ROXING 


Biamicsieon 1° mi. - 

welterweichts, 
AT HILFAn 

l—OCleedy Day 18. Eectid 4, 


Matéd ef Cottea 4, 


3—Aganaman 24, 
ond inspect lining. 


Dan i. 
—Gans Mell 77. 
Cleon, imepect ond rev 


iLran 
Gedtrer 
Merningside 5& 
vo « ) modore 4. Oer Dance & 


st. Olef 6] 

Mankate 66 

Superior (Wis.) 65) 

Dickinson (ND) 78! 

Frankiin 62 

Bali State 59 

Rie Grandte (Uhie) 89 

Cencerdia (ind,.) 66 

Indiana Central 90 

alparaite 74) 

Yeungstewn 74 

Hiram <5 

Vimeent's (Pa.) 7! 
H 


RANnIO 
HORSE RACING—Fifth and 
races from Charities Teen. WUST 
kc.) .amde WUST-FPM (106.5 
between 7:30 and 8:30 Bb. 


Kternal 


mm. 
. Freeh and Fair 7, 


» Tanekh &. Penny 
4 Nete IT. 7. 
6—Find 19. 1 Anpen! 9. Dus De Fer 7 


Seixas Wins 


Tennis Title 


HOLLYWOOD, Fia., Jan 
”—Vie Seixas, playing after a 
brief collapse yesterday, won 
the Hollywood Beach tennis 
tournament men’s singles today 
with a 6—3, 6—3 victory over 
Ed Moylan. 

Seixas, of Philadelphia, and: 
Armando Vieira of Brazil, de- 
feated Les Longshore, Annis- 
ton, Ala., and Lonnie Jordan, 
Montgomery, Ala., 6—1, 6—0 in 
a men’s doubles semifinals and 
then beat Bob Howe, Australia, 
and Moylan 16—14, 6—2 to take 


Fost Pragdial 


vansville 
meeers rh.) 
eoster &7 
Rieubenville 84 
Akr 17 
ee ea ‘Ont. 71 
wrenee Tech 8&4 
Mich. Tech. i2 
Bilineia Vestevan &5 
Carrell Wie.) 73 
Quincy AL 
farteace 
Western Tilineis 100 
Reckhurst 6! 
VWeslievan 83 
eu 


aS TUESDAY NIGHTS! va 


| Intheswim 
i r 
14, 
°9 i—Resiened ©. Pertace Ber 8. Seme- i 


Pv per peli 
‘ NATIONAL 5 
WRESTLING 


Adjust the broke shoes 
WITH 


to secure fell contec? 
BAILEY GOSS 


St 


Hanever « 


ti 
aegertene 

hk 
with drums. 


Marquette Adds TCU, 


Tulane, Penn State 


MILWAUKEE, Jan. 28 (INS) 
Marquette University an 
nounced tonight it had added 
Tulane, Penn State and Texas 
Christian to its 1957 footbal! 
schedule. 

The Penn State and Texas 


Hastines 7 
Perw e ; 
Neh.) &° Kearney 
7 overtime) Deane 
peostpened. 
sOULTH 


Vanderbilt «1 


NOW ON 
WMAL-TV 


ALBERT SNIDER was the 
Calumet Farms’ jockey who 


Mississippi 
yur 
Jacksonville 


90 


went fishing in Florida and 
never returned. Mt. Rainier’s 
O. Hammon wanted to know 


iplayers were honored at the 
third dinner. The area kids 
were invited earlier in the day 


the doubles title. 


Japanese Swim Coach 


Christian games will be played 
‘in Milwaukee and officials are 
hopeful that the Tulane contest 


CHANNEL 7 
10:30 P.M. 


1418 “PR” 
St. NW, 


TIRE COMPANY 


ATE Oe Zinta PHONE 
TIRE MERCHANT DE 2-3318 


Georgetown ‘Ky.) 
Bien 97 
N. C. Collece 66 Winston-Salem «NC) ! 
Kaexville &7 

Carsen-Newsmen 8&7 


...» Rockville’s O. C. Graham 
wants to include in my aptly- 
named horses Jailbreak, ch.g. 
(3) Bold Venture by Pass Key 
by Shut Out... Charles W. 
writes he went through the 
recent Florida freeze-out 
with me and vows he saw 
bums tearing down sign 
boards for fires .. . Thanks 
to F. J. F. for kind words but, 
please, no more references to | 
Hartack riding two horses in 
one race. We admit the error 
and agree it looks like a 
chariot race ... Jockey Rob- 
ert Rigby, lone casualty of 
Saturday's spill, is in good 
condition at the Charles 
Town General Hospital, 
where his physician is Dr. 
Marshall (Sleepy) Glenn, one 
of West Virginia’s all-time 
football greats. Leg lacera- 
tions required several stitch- 
es and he has multiple 
bruises However, X-rays 
have revealed no broken 
bones thus far, Dr. Glenn 


San Francisco aid. Sees Pre ae 
? ve you one F" | Pitt to Meet Duke 


Keeps Firm Hold Landv Finds |" Oyster Bowl 
On First Place | . 7 | PITTSBURGH, Jan. 29 (Mi) 
- , 'The University of Pittsburgh-| 

NEW YORK, Jan. 29 (INS) Final Kick p Eisner ai hohe mee ins A 


| Duke University football game, 
Ban Francisco, which Saturday originally scheduled for Pitts- 
established an all-time college’ LONDON, Jan. 29 #—A new burgh Oct. 20, will be played 
record for witfing consecutive John Landy has emerged fro 


m | instead at Norfolk, Va., the two 
ames by beating California|his 3:58.6 Melbourne mile—a | ScHo0ls jointly announced 
or No. 40, retained No. 1 rank- world record»breaker who now typ ill be staged the 
ing today in the International has a devastating finishing kick, |.) dive Temp! - th a A aon 
News Service basketball poll. | The 1954 Landy who set the t aa te on of th Shri ; 
Vanderbilt, which beat Ken- world mark of 3:58 in Finland ~ wr ; i Cri we’ Children 
tucky, moved into No. 2 spot'was the king of even-pace go age or Ts dren 
while North Carolina State held runners. This" il he Pitt’ dey ey 
on to No. 3 ranking. Undefeat-| The new Landy yestetrday ao 4 Pe trip to 
ed Temple moved up to No. 4! said “I have definitely lost my the Oyster Bow! ang the fourth 
and Louisville to No. 5 while pacing ability but I have im- #?Pe4™@nce for Duke. 
vin Mage eta La preg igwecee Meg lone. in tactical knowledge 
Sl aiter losing to LOUISVL/e, and that is what will be im- A 
ean Prapetocs, x eee |portant in the Olympics.” Colgate Names Barnes 
North Careline Siate (14-2). | With his 3:58.6 reeffort—| HAMILTON, N. Y., Jan. 29 
" Loulevilie (16-1). second fastest mile ever—|(»—Everett D. Barnes has been 
m 109-2). Landy established himself| appointed director of the Di- 
§. Nerth Carolina (13-2). clearly as the favorite to win) yision of Physical Education 
10. St. Francis (Brooklyn) the Olympic metric mile of|and Athletics at Colgate Uni- 
SECOND TEN: » Duke | :. 1500 meters in Melbourne in| versity. Barnes, assistant ath- 
$a): it Indiana (9-3); 1%, Lian | November. leti¢ director since 1939, suc- 
+ de Mall, “sowimera |, Lt wasn’t that he had come | ceeds the late William A. Reid. 
back so magnificently in his | 
first mile in more than a year 
that should disturb the Tharos, 
Tabori, Rozsavolgi, Santee and 
.,. Newson hopefuls. 
What matters is the way 


Rosewall, Hoad 
‘Landy ran that Saturday mile. 


Win Aussie Title 
He did his -first 440 in 58.5 


BRISBANE, Jan. 29 \‘#—LeW seconds, his. second in 61.5, and 
Hoad and Ken Rosewall won his third in 60 seconds. Then 
the Australian tenyis doubles he sped the last lap‘in 57.6 
title today defeating fellow) seconds. | 
Australians Don Candy and; The Australian school teacher 
Mervyn Rose, 10-8, 13—11,\ finished with the speed of a 
6—4. ‘sprinter. He went by the 1500 
appeared lethargic meter mark in 3:43.2. That 


| Adenvasion ve the te 
Rosewallimeans he came down Sah 
-, 
an, the 


Leovisiaga Tech 

W. Kentucky 7 

(Memphis) 77 

Athens ‘Ala) 457 
Alabama A&M 
Newberry 
Allen 
Carelina 
Geailferd 

Leneitr Rhyne + 
; Chattanecga 
uthwestern (Tenn) 6A W avash 
ameoden.Svydney 10 Rich. Pref. Inet. 

ent. Wesleyan *5 Geersia Tebrs. 7 

SOUTHEWEST 

Ariczens St (Tempe) 7 

105 Texas Christian 


Christian Bros, 


Zane ‘(Tens.) 19 


irekine 96 


nedict 73 
tlantic Christian 9° 
é» 


It's Merchant's for the tops in new Firestone tires... 
the best in recaps and service. 


DRIVE-IN SERVICE 


Ww 


OPEN 7:30 TO 5:30 


a —————~ 


FREE INSTALLATION—SAFETY BELTS—-FREE INSTALLATION 


ANUARY Seat Cover 


Inwventowy SALE 


-MINUTE Sure Zit 
INSTALLATION 


CLA 9° 
thern Meth. 
ten 104 
rkapsas 
te 


-Simmens 90 

rkanmeee Collese 85 

astin 97 Sheevard AFR & 

FAR WEST 

a Vranciece %5 : 

thern California 73 
a3 Oresoa 


Califernia 7 
Idaho ' 


State 
regen 
Bricham VYeuns | 
Se 


WIHLVI) 


na tniv. 9! ‘ 
Celumbia 3° Central 
N. Me 


dO1 


= = eperenen Fesepaee. Former Olympic breaststroker played in Milwaukee include 
During one year of operation | Reizo Koike today was named Detroit, Holy Cross and Col- BOHEMIAN 
‘President Norm Wulf says the|nete in the Melbourne Olym- Cincinnati, Boston College and BEER 
Washington Touchdown Club) pics in November. | Arizona 
: | 

| “The National Growing Co. Saltimere 24, itd. 
organization. “They're even homeaiaih 
selling tickets to our football | 
the club’s biggest. The guest! 
‘list includes the entire Navy’! 
jman Hickman, Redskin Coach 
Joe Kuharich, Baltimore Colts 
Devore, Ron Waller of the Los 
Angeles Rams, Governor Theo- 
|Whitmire, and Athletic Direc- 
‘tors Capt. Elliott Loughlin of 


also will be a Marquette home presented b 
to meet their heroes. personally TOKYO, Jan. 29—(INS)'game. Other ‘opponents to be NATIONAL 
the club has done wonders in|head coach of the Japanese lege of Pacific. Games away 
fostering athletics in the area. swimming team that will com-|from home include Wisconsin. 
has helped tremendously in set-, | 
ting up the framework of the) 
se ous Norm says gratefully. 

This year’s affair looms as'| 
and Maryland football squads 
‘and both coaching staffs, Her- 
Coach Weeb Ewbank, Philadel- 
phia Eagle’s new Coach Hughie 
‘dore McKeldin, Navy’s Hall of 
|\Famers Babe Brown and Don 
Navy and Bill Cobey of Mary- 
land 


CUSHIONS, 98c 


acifie 69 
7 4 


field i? > All 
reene Siate 8&4 Sen Diese State 


is The Place To Go 


HERSOW’S 
dh 8) | et eee oe 
OUR ONLY LOCATION 


OR NON BURN 
NYCAR 


SEALERS 


PLASTIC FIBRE 


Reg. 
19.95 Reg. 


32.95 
i 


1956 GARDLON 


FUTURAMIC DESIGN 
SUNORAMA 
COLORS 


YINVIID AWILSIONN 


“See 
Pevy for 
Your 


RUG TWINS 


OWN YOUR _4 
OWN '55 Aitvrous 


TAXICAB! | 


LNIWdI) 


BID P OW d— 


CONVERTIBLE TOPS 


CORDUROY 
“oak @&.95 
Installed 


uF 
TERRY TEX 


“Tyur, y head 


SHEE PARKING OF OUP LOT 


Exceeds Minimum 
Strength ae 


CAA- 
installed 


OPEN DAILY end 


TERRY TEX, $7.95 
Sivw MOUHI 


SAT... 3-6 PMA 


Mss 


Washington's Chevrolet , 
Taxicab Headquarters 
610 H ST. N.E—LI. 17-1400 
N. 3B. “Pevy” Povensteis 

_ Manager Test Divisios 


--- 


ss 


CHEVROLET ) Shane Yj 
| 94th & QUE STS. N.W. DU. 7-8500 


_ 
, 
; . > 


Races 
tia 
roaring 
: g If\the last 119 yards, 1 foot 8 — 
im reserve for the vital singles|inches to the mile in 15.4 — 


8 


yy 
; uy *. ' 


"%e 


Your Sunday 
WANT. AD 
in this newspaper 


reaches 
412,000 
families 


130,000 
more than read 
any other 
Sunday paper 


Phone 
RE, 7-1234 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
AND 
TIMES HERALD 
Local Rates 


ne Ww { Points 
a of one District 
bt Sumble 


The one-time rate. per line, 
applies on skip ads or Cteguias 
peewee. Minimum ad is twe 
ines 


The following rates are for con- 
secutive imsertions: 


RATES i 3 7 
PER time times times 
LINES 60¢ S4¢ = 
| 5 
weer anges time times times 
120 3. 
i8 
RATE BEYOND RETAIL 
TRADING ZONE 
(50 mile radius of Washington) 
de Per Line 
um 3 linea) 


PHONE RE. 7-1234 


DEADLINES: 
SUNDAY EDITION: 8 P.M. Pri- 
aay 


DAILY EDITIONS: 4:30 P.M. 


preceding day. 


Aviation 

Bonkruptcy Notices 

Bids and Preposels.. 

Boots _ 
Business Opportunities oes 
Business Property 

Business Service ©... . «6 enn 
Constryction Eqyipment oses 
Child Care 

Cenvelescent Homes ....... ' 
Dogs ond Pets 

Forms 

Farm Machinery 

Farm and Gorden ....... 
Frnanciol 

Found 

Help Wonted 

Herses, Livestock 

Mevses for Reat 

Houses fer Sale . 

Hevses te Build ........ rats 
Instructions 


iain as pak 
Miscellaneous | 
Meter Travel 

Meving and Storage 
Offiwal Notices 
Office Spoce 
Personels 


Persone! leens ...... Destin 90A 
Poultry, Rabbits 

Real Esate Leons 

Real Estate for Sale 


delity ins Corp, 4 


+ "ave 
Room 1 ufidine: 
rd a Site. ¥7 Street. 


Jan. 16.17,23,24,30,31 


any pe 
ing. uniess within 


act mary 
ffice of the 

Chief “yy of the Commission. 

t of $5.00. whith 

be returned to bidders 

or tet ose returning plans and 
fo in ti within 19 
Gays after t of bids... T 
Chairmen: 


-- HEWITT JR. ¥- i 
AN AGER. 
as BLAND. Ww «A MORRIE. 
L toners Astees: 


2:00 P Pin rn 
ime t 
B liely ead and 
roposal a .. 
Provisions for this ¢ 
be ob ed from the 


commententsa, tract No. 
sit Lf  — in M ~ 
Proposal for structing in Morn- 
as Subdivision sctin . 


nty roximately 
say 6-inch. ee 
and 1360 


Zz oen Ceatrocter 
restore. remodel, d-@- 


. exclusive low cost 


porc.tes ‘ree. rms.; 
furn.: PHA @nancing. 9 a.m.-9 p.m 
Cc 8-82 
NS. alterations: now is t 
time to repair that fb add 
room. or build that elubrecm. < 
usual ideas. Free estimates. Zz 


chibi = A 2 mer a 


. 


sm. 


tas 
DRY _ : _ 5 
+ 
mo 


» ‘ WENT 
closed, recreation room, concrete 
porch and ire railing, sudition 
r a* 


a 


pair 
prices now. Pree 
vy hanic 
rons > — Hones and fr st 


ee le werk. 
eekends, 


paint carpentry 
free estimates. Re “neney down: 
er. 


. aintin 
ery and 
bu 7-4 Eves. and 


up 
wk. only. with eT guntoct was 


is PERE r. JU Repa 
cares obs, FO a Me ee 


an ing. remode'- 
ing or new work; no } tee small. 
uD end | delivery serv- 

ice tae sins ap° 


oo Prices, sacou, "irse on 


le. brown. black and 
white. 3 years old: bise collar 
th t 2: -vie ensin 


mal. 
male ‘brindle blk | wht. 
collar. ans te = Dupe ie es- 
da of Riv . Wilson jane. 


ear eT ayer Ne "wor aritagton 
Fa Behe eward. 


; ck Teather a 
Manes herr 


le. vie. 


ave. 
Vest Virginia Turn- 
nd, ae ies A. No. 
re m 
Sncloss. 
15th st. a 


~~ MIST ELLANEWVY 


fe amocin, sevaay> ¢ 
- eebeil e2 


: 
ep Sorin 


fia os =e Fi coats hookease 


: aed 4S! ao 
+a" new 
sie ete 


s0 
Co. iSth and P , 
EK S—Doudie axes: 
bie. — size 
Oak: 5 a cise OS 
Lf ey re 3d bg av. 


ts jesmen. 3- 
or | 


only 
type in good. werk, aioe it 0. 


con ition. 
Fore 907 


ae 6 
fe <4 7. stoves See Fe 
r . . 

oat: Ord and 4th. 2136 P st. 
ontemts of r ng house; 


; . We 
son chair, $32.50. love seat. $30; 
socian & chair, $45: innerspr ne 
mattress. —~ usc couch 
dining bed. : 
~ Se set. 05: ‘coil springs 
ollyw bed. 22.50: 
rug. $10: bunk bed. 
resser and mirror, 


, repairing. slip covers, 
cornic 


Easy ‘ 
offman U Deloherers. Rar’ loth 
. 5-511 
tee Waale side Ns. oak ¢offee 
a Excellent cond. OY. 32-316 
; at 

t Al 


; 
5426 “ath st. ow 


_gacrifice. hss. WE. 5-3i83 


FURNITURE 


3 ROOMS 
BRAND NEW 


FOR ONLY 


$245 


NO MONEY DOWN 
Terms Arranged, Free Delivery 


SWANK FURN. 


1115 H ST. NE. 
Li. 3-8700 


a jess than i 
"$50. JA. 7-9400, Ext. 109, 


pit semen’ spt. 
A s—It wit s exciting— 
the _— Bae e 
—on av Wy 


PRB ts reat bey i pee 


95 Taree fe 5 "wish 

L musIC Cs co. 1108 o ST. 
DI 6417 
pit 


=: 

rr rand- 
new: ~ cents a day rental mey 
app! urchase. Call ST. 3-7 


5.5 and up: makes 
and sizes. guarantee. AD. 4-3780 
ag a small; must 


sizes: some 
- freezers: 2- 
war. UNIVERSAL go: * 800 


, 


peta; pot. one 
o} 


—Com ; 
must ~~ 73. 
tion wet eves. 
— ens §9.7 
combination ows soreane 


each Attiatg ton size 30-in. 
cee SURVEY . 
INSTRUMENTS 


Ley O58 
polished. cemented. a~ — 
sonable pric 
1220 
MD ° Z UMENT 
2 = Lanvale Me 0 to. 2. Ma. 
TELEVISION—New 1556 models. Tr 


UGeal shoo = ast. Pak io 
aie 


Phi ‘6 thxis iS, Seras: | we 
treads ‘i y SERVICE Thr “Go. 


r 


$30-$40-§50-$60 


(ae eS la 


m day: "rental mar appis 


“Inexp, Bre casey fine in 
MED. LAB. TECH. 
DR. $ ASST. 


Pree’ placen nt, reall Wash - 


PHYS. Al 
ABC Shorthand 
Complete Course $15 
dictation be 7 pores 
$18 down with ee 367-90 
Ra ROR RR 
PLE SCHOOL 


Pe ae ees 
' - ad? cutee pat, 


a eens st. ow 


Get » Better Job 
SHORTHAND & TYPING 


In 6 Weeks 


Other 6-Week Courses: 


In teresti — > 3 
ro 7 oppor’ ae: 

count! ‘bes ent aes it sab. 
mi ten resume — g experi- 


age and ted. 
Beets attention: Mr Donald A. 
any ge aren nted with- 


SHANNON ips LUCHS CO. 


A 


¢. rea 
Station Agents, 
ts. Flight Atta i. $265 


_ ACCIDENT AND 
SICKNESS AGER 


an supplies .... up 
COLORED BRANCH 

ace "6 bm.-31. pak pm.. aie oe. 
ker-porter 


S days .. 
sarden apt.) ars. . 


_— cai 4 
ty ; + @, . 


trainee. career od le 
wee Yea 18-19. "st 


blers-wirers trainees. 
str. for tech. institution 
pti mutton Ba 

ache © 
Biee” ec BE ¢ 


~- we, RR 
Janites =. e 


al bi ra 
abd 


ATTORNEY 


Under 32 for le 
loan divi 4 


essa Sevabal 90 


oe tn i oa nes 


Aircratt Maint. Mor., Asia 


free) 


LLOYDS DS EMPL. SERV. 


a Se er sass 3 eves yt 
inatruct n . techincal 


of fone-oeta>- 


wk es 
instit pay Write x 


ae r der sy out 
PicPLorMENT. 130 


a_emnt. 


N. 
AatTo y ws ntco—-{3) 5 ae 
ches ms 

op 


tien, 

ny dise * oe 
A uth Dealers. 
lenty ve ayerage 
5. t a 


+7 te .* wilson Blvd. ‘ 

soe ion vin SO TOT 

BC EMPL. EXCHANGE 
w AND COLORED 


us Devs. MO. cn Gdsie 
expr ‘ee 
Service station attendant ees 
exp ee 
oe, c =e. 960.0000" . ;: 
Parkine lot attend’t (permit) Bit 
ster shucker ‘exp.) .. 845 
Baleamen. ne fem vassing 
HO. 3- ssi “$514 
AUTO SALESMEN 


USED CARS 
$100 guaranteed salary 
000 pects f 


im. a Sa ae "Hersee's 


Engineers 


An engineer with above average ability, a 

desire to progress within his profession in 
accordance with his ability and a need for 
a stimulating envirormer® to perform at 
his best should consider the positions 
listed below that are presently available at 


MELPAR 


~ SENIOR 
ELECTRONIC 
ENGINEER 


Background in digital 
computer circuitry, data 
processing or associated 
equipment. Position in- 
volves supervising the ac- 
tivities of engineers, jun- 
lor engineers and tech- 
nicians. 


SENIOR E. E. 


Experienced in design of 
video circuitry for radar 
or similar equipment. 


Capable of assuming re- 


sponsible position. 


SENIOR E. E. 


Several years’ experience 
in design of RF Ampli- 
fiers, |. F. Strips or mic- 
rowave components. In 
addition to supervisory 
responsibility this posi- 
tion involves liaison with 
customer. 


SENIOR 
MECHANICAL 
'. ENGINEER 


Several years’ 

in packaging of elec- 
tronic equip: ent in ac- 
cordance with Govern- 
ment specifications (Cha:- 
sis, Racks, etc.). 


MECHANICAL 
DESIGN ENGINEER 


Design of small mechanisms and electro- 
mechanical devices or aircraft structures. 


POSITIONS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE 
FOR INEXPERIENCED 


ENGINEERS 


Interested in the above-mentioned fields. 
For Additional Information call eur 
Technical Personnel tative 

at JE. 4-6000, Ext. 220 


or Visit our Laboratory 
» at 3000 Arlington Bivd., Falis Church, Va. 


Melpar, Inc 


| ¥ 
‘a 


“~ =; 


X 


HELP MEN 15 
ste dacite. MAN 


siieae land 


Claims Adjuster Trainee 
Sie ent you uy. 
Bos No. 651, Post-TH 


and have the 
ty te tact e 
oppor 


vers. porters ° 
hwasktrs, porters 
bors 
Young mee, scl. trainees 
aniters, live in 


rilj ona ‘countermen 

r. stat. and aint. men 

Pounta Grivers, rs. “lic. 
mer. 


Couple. ive in . 8250 
SH ws. caan 


RNB IT 


IMMEDIATE OPENINGS 
FOR WORK IN D. C. 


a "Barber . AREA 


TOP SALARY SCALE 
ee 
ary cleaning caper. 
$50 plu ; 
- up 4 +94 


orida ove. 


AUTO SALESMAN 


We have an pening {or ‘ si ear 
yRoLer, ane. 


INSTRUMENT 
ENGINEERS 


MECHANICAL " 
DETAILERS 
ELECTRO-MECHANICAL 
DETAILERS 


MINIMUM 3-3 XPAne 
DO "petenviiw “DA pes 
SEND rout, INTERVIEW TO 
VECTOR DESIGN: 
CORP. 


311 MARKET STREET 
NEWARK, N. J. 


Here is an opportunity te 
work on CONTROLS and IN- 
STRUMENTATION with the 
y which is building 
the EARTH SATELLITE, rev- 
olutionary new ROCKET 
MISSILES, the SEAMASTER 
jet seaplane and the VIKING 
high-altitude rocket. 


Unusually attractive open- 
ings now available in: 


Geiss Tee ogra a ee” 2 
BROKERAGE 
MANAGER 


Sprcecatel Be te. wrcererier see 


DESIGNERS 
DRAFTSMEN 


ELECTRONICS 
MECHANICAL 
Experienced in Layout 


FOR THOSE WHO QUALIFY 


TELEMETERING 

ELECTRONIC INSTRUMENTS 

COMPONENTS 

AUTO-PILOTS 

INERTIAL NAVIGATION 
SYSTEMS 


NUCLEAR CONTROLS 


Personal : 
strictly confidential. Box No. 
M-305. Post 


Join the fastest growing 
major aircraft company 


Chaliensigg Work Assignment ; : 
in the industry. 


Opportunity for Gelf-Advancement 
Liberal Vacation end Gick Leave 
Suburban Lecation Convenient 
Transp. and Parking Facilities 


aM fo PM 


THE JOHNS HOPKINS 
UNIVERSITY 


WASHINGTON 
INTERVIEWS 
JAN. 30-31 


For personal interview, phone 
Mr. Robert Brown, at EX. 
3-5888, on Mon., Jan. 30th, 
and Tues., Jan. 3ist, from 
9A. M. to 9 P. M., or write 


CAB DRIVERS 


Tf vou do not have an identi 
core we pesrest ron, lor 


. cab triving ‘wil help Gees any 


BOB'S STUDIO 


131 15th NE. LI. 3-$102 
E APPLIED PHYSICS 
CAFETERIA ASSISTANT LABORATORY 
MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY 
40-HOUR WEEK * 


Active man with some experience 
In restaurant work and some 


PROFESSIONAL 
EMPLOYMENT 


MARTIN 


Baltimore 3, Maryland 


EMPLOY MENT a ATION 


— ---_ -— 


ELECTRONIC 
TECHNICIANS 


Technical schooling plus es 
minimum of 3 yrs. experience 
in wiring, construction and 
testing of prototype electronic 
equipment necesary 


ime hours 
an af and sick ak and other 
. Age 21 to @. 


Government Services, Ine. 
1135 218T ST. NW 


CLAIMS 
EXAMINER 


AGE 25-35 


—_——— ———— —————? 


ENGRAVING 
Machine Operator 


Pay in accordance with quali- 
fication and ability. 


GUIDED MISSILE RESEARCH 
AND DEVELOPMENT 
PROGRAM 
Offers challenging assign- 
ments with opportunity for 

self-advancement. 


With at least 2 years expe- 
rence in automobile claims 
work for local office of in- 
surance company. Salary based 
upon experience and back- 
ground. Please give complete 
particulars and telephone num- 
ber to Box 642, Post TH. 


Experienced on Gorton 
machine desirable. Many 
company benefits 


APPLY IN PERSON 
MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY 
sa M TO4P. M 


MELPAR. INC. 
ae ABLINGIOE 


‘Ta Pala. SV bus from om 11th 
and “ sts. ow. to plent eptrance.) 


PLEASE APPLY 
_— 8 A.M. TO3 P.M 


r teno.. ~ pub. rel 
30 mo 
Shit clerk. , Bieht stu 4 THE JOHNS HOPKINS 
Airline ike trainees ’ UNIVERSITY 


neater 

sic cee: APPLIED PHYSICS 
Be persoapel Bat LABORATORY 

. “graduate expr 


NE 
in const truction of ‘large govern: R471 GEORGIA AVE 
gala. “nth: Box ax. | SILVER SPRING, MO 


bs 
Blect: lab ee ts to B18 080 O80 
ALLEN c+ BRI Personne! Ss ry. 


Enter the 


-_— — — _—- — ——— 


ENGINEERS . . . rt 
-COMMERCIAL— New Field OFS 
—ATOMIC-— 

—POWER-— 


, join General! Electric's Atomic Power Equipment Department, 
devoted solely to the development of commercial applications of 
nuelear energy. A .large, diversified research, design -and 
development program is in progress here. Activities are 
expanding—new positions for engineers and scientists are now 
open 


CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN PEACETIME ATOMICS 
it is impossbile to overestimate the growth potential of atomic power 
. or set limits to the professional! careers 
of this new industry. 


eduipment for peacetime uses . 
of engineers “in at the beginning” 


MANY ENGINEERING SPECIALTIES READILY 

ADAPTED TO NUCLEAR PROJECTS BY GE 
Only a small percentage of the engineers needed at this GE Department 
require nuclear experience. Whatever your training has been, find out if 
it fits into this program. Where specialized knowledge is needed, GE will 
provide it, through company-sponsored Courses end liberal assistance for 
graduate study (leading to advanced degrees). 


OPENINGS FOR GRADUATE ENGINEERS— 
Mechanical... 
Civil... Electrical.., 
Metallurgical ...Chemical.., 
WITH 1 TO 10 YEARS EXPERIENCE 
IN ONE OR MORE OF THE FOLLOWING AREAS: 


Heat Transfer and 


Power Plant Design 
Fluid Flow 


Pressure Vessels, Structures 
Electronic Gontrol Systems 
& Instrumentation 
Mefallurgy 

Reactor Engineers 


-WASHINGTON INTERVIEWS- 


January 30-31—February |—Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday 
Mon. & Tues.—9 a.m. to 9 p.m.<—Wed.—9 a.m. to 12 noon 
Call Mr. Fred Snell for appointment at MEtropolitan 8-593) 


OR SEND RESUME TO: MR. PRED GNELL 
ATOMIC POWER EQUIPMENT DEPARTMENT 


PEN. ELECTRIC COMPANY 


French Road, Utica, New York 


~ | Le 


4 


A “agen « n 
DRAFTSMEN 
MECHANICAL 

men Bositiona "ope ot 4 
t * Many 


ts. 
vancement. 
interview. 


CALL ST. 3-0986 


SCI 4) | acting independentis. 
| influences 

' 

Creative engineerine of the high: 

est order is 4A red develop 


components making fnert tia) Navi- 


gation possible 
ACOELEROM E T & 
Designer and Developer 
of the 


[RS 
measure acceleration ~ 
TECGRATORS conyert 

VANGUARD 
EARTH: SATELLITE 


ARMA pioneers in 


Inertial 


pie required for 


Navigation 


: 

| ARMA. re anieed for Pe secem- 
P w+ ie in the fi e! - he? 
ion and fre contre 

/ 4 ‘the de elopment 
Navigation 


"Teahe 


at * pertie! 


system deals solely with 
acceleration 


. 
of external 


Thix nee 
space. time and 


this information 1 inte velerc 

ity and distance GYROS 

to srovide directional ref- 

oT and held th prem 
9H COMP 

*- 


ate cau « 1- 
and “Eotance 40-00 


steer 


ee must 

well t on é size re 

| function with wun 
cy 


meet rigid 
uirements, and 


ireamed-of sc- 


Im: ste Oper for 


SENIOR ENGINEERS 


ned! 


ings 


Hat openings for creative 
writers with a concise style 
adapted to preparing 
scripts in- collaboration 
with engineers 


’ 


ENGINEERS 


ASSOCIATE ENGINEERS | 


Individual! selected must have 
ability to coordinate pro- 
duction of films with pro- 
fessional directors and stu- 
die technicians. 


Experienced in 
Systems Evaluation 


An opportunity for growth, 
with initial salary about 
$7000, depending on 
training and experience. 


Gyroscopics 
Digital Computers 


Resume and script samples Accelerometers 


required. 


WASHINGTON 
INTERVIEWS 
JAN. 30-31 


For personal interview, phone 
Mr. Robert Brown, at EX. 
3-5888, on Mon., Jan. 30th, 
and Tues., Jan. 3ist, from 
9 A.M. to 9 P. M., or write 


Telemetry 
Guidance Systems 
Stabilizing Devices 
Servomechanisms 
Automatic Controls 


Thermodynamics 
PROFESSIONAL 


EMPLOYMENT Optics 


| Soe eauipment 3 
con equ e n 
Mechani or rical | = lg 
zg. Physics girical Bag or 


pres Roe 


| hes 


| TT 
working 


Please contact Mr 
E 8-3600 


: surance department has opening’ 
f bee 


APPLY = fs 
WASHINGTON GAS LIGHT CO.| $f AY, 


Field 
Engineers 


ro-mechan 


MAINTENANCE 
MAN 


Good knowledge of heating, 
air-conditioning and plumbing. 
Previous experience in build- 
ing maintenance desired. 


cwatent. 


technical experience: | 
Theoretical and applied in-plant 
training leading te eas 


the fie 4 be willing hee 
locate for field assignments 


ae ~ me okies 


# in| 
offer & challenge 
POSITION OFFERS 
Excellent Working Conditions 
EMPLOYEE BENEFITS 


in all phases of cngines ng 
ring. 


manufactu 


Contact Our Mr. 
John McPhail 
Mon. Jan. 30 or Tues. 
Jan. 31, 1-5 P. M. or 
7-9P_M. , NA. 8-4420 


OR WR 
Mp. JOHN A FRING 


E iER 
SUPERVISOR OF SALARIED 
PERSONNEL AC BPARK PLUG 


The Electronics 
Di¥ision | 
General Motors | 
Corp. | 
Milwaukee 2, Wis. 


| GASOLINE SALESMAN | 


For major producer; start $260' 
excellent future: yy 


Se = MANAGER 
TRAINEE 


send on ability. is rapid 
EMPLOY! MENT. 1307 H at. 

Nati aoe concern. one of the oldest 
and at. ke fie , now inter- 
fants 


and) 


| 
| ; 
| APPLY IN PERSON 
BAM. TO4P.M. 
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 


MELPAR, INC. 


3000 Arlington Bivd. 
Falls Church, Va. 


Arnold 3-V bus from 1ith 


Hs Sts. NW. to plant entrance) 


Reliadbie research organization 

position availatile tor IBM 
0 t familiar ye 
yy ine 6f 


is ~ Osi on offers excellent 
AR ATE Good 
empjove 


IBM MACHINE OPERATOR | 
ereamen? J field sa 


first street floor 
~ en viewing ae “lee ae | 


the ryt’ 


and unusua 


ckel.| a “a 
| resume us 
| with prone number. to 


’ 
Large. well-established teal estate 
office with large anc active in- 


INSURANCE MAN 
VALUE. not & sales hot- 
Un Himited | f future oe high 
t marr 
type, mat od, aually "an Beta: | 
lly estadlished t 
ave car, For 


| view. eall ; 
-0700. iD a. m te Dp. m.. Mon., 


MAN WI 


ttractiy ince e: good references 


ang 


expanding com 
past experience and tra 
as well as salary expected li in 
formas ion treated confidentially | 


ox 654. Post- 


LABORATORY 
ENGINEER 


AGE 20 TO 3 


tning 
tare. Tf seat " exeelie 
ture 
Isla Mi. Painter. at Rh 


M 
Permanent, full- 
future for first-¢ 
butcher Ask for 


Georgia Ave. NW. 
To test gas-fired appliances ana|™M 


Bxcilient openings tos 
controls. ehec operations and in- me ul 
staliations in eld Must Married BL, preferred. 
e 

training — col om engineering Pully. ‘est tablished — 

i bs per hour to start canvassing ° 

$2.09 1 months necessities 

Other perlodic. tn increases 

-—Gay. 40-hour wee 
Virginia driver's permit 


8 ependad 
nM aicel. 


assure 
earnings sa 
ersary. but must be adie vy furnigh 
character reference. For details 
H co... $ii 
ress Bids. i4th and F 
pho 


A l 
; me DI. 71-4477 or 


PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 
1309 Fs 4. ST. NW 
NO ONE CALLS 


LANDSCAPE 
PLAN DRAWING 


No experience required 
cual) lifted for training. 


MEN 


anxious te talk 
(white © are wnemploryed 
through no peut of their own 


Environmental Research 


A. one of America’s largest! 
of Wtre-Oreciee equi p- 
rtunity 


MARTIN 


Baltimore 3, Md. 


supplementary 
ts ARMA career 
doubly ettractive 


Por re information. 
piease Submit resume to 


Technical Personne! Dept 


ARMA 


American 


vet 


FOOD PLAN 
SALESMEN 


Permane nt sales ition now «6 
tn our ranc es ar ane 
g 00d re eleveness nece -| 
hed leads a. “Bains vai. 
ne. vacation wi [> pee 
liberal commission ig vn ion 
and life insurance 


AMANA METROPOLITAN 
PLAN 


Call JO. &-8700 for interview 


$00 


if 
| 
| 
| 


son. A 
mt Gerden 


Corp... Roose 


City. » eo" 


qualified 
ee sey 


] 4- 
t. 


Needs 
oox Pees 


ter | interview ap- 


New Openings at 


MELPAR, INC. 


CREATED BY THE CONTINUED 
EXPANSION OF OUR ENGINEERING 
AND PRODUCTION DIVISIONS 


DESIGNER-DRAFTSMEN 
ENGINEERING AIDES 
MACHINISTS 
MACHINE SHOP INSPECTORS 


ELECTRO MECHANICAL 
INSPECTORS 


SHEET METAL INSPECTORS 
PRODUCTION PLANNERS 
STOCK CLERKS 
TECHNICIANS, ELECTRONIC 


WELDER (HELIARC) 


OPPORTUNITY FOR ADVANCEMENT 
ADDITIONAL COMPENSATION FOR 
_ EXTENDED WORK WEEK 
EXCELLENT EMPLOYEE BENFITS 


APPLY IN PERSON 
8 AM. TO 4 P.M. 
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 


1211 SOUTH FERN STREET 
(OFF JEFF. DAVIS HWY.) 
ARLINGTON, VIRGINIA 


3000 ARLINGTON BLVD. 
FALLS CHURCH, VA. 


Teke Arnold 2-V Bus From 11th and E Streets N.W. 


to Plant Entrance 


RMA 


5 pocmapen and 


future call RA 


M " 
__ tween 10 & m and 5p m 


| Five immediate openings in new 
| aiv wy NM Bg A ay fet 
MAIL SERVICE CLERK | S85° PE. 3-1824. Mr. Mix 


MEN... 
18 TO 25 


Only those interested in full ome 
nw tt ge Be need apply 

pared to start st ace ‘i hierary 
division of nationel concern ill- 
ingness to earn 
important then 
ground, Will be 
ing salary of 

vancer seen a 


te any 
Mr. M 
3 Pp. m 


ite. 


AGE 17-19 


distribution within 


Fer mail 


company 


8 to 4:30 
$40 PER WEEK 


a ie 
ucationa 
paid ve 
or 
Government Employees van 
Insurance Company Avpiy 


14th and L Sts. NW. 
PLEASE PrLY.. AF L eT. 


BETWEEN & “AND 3 


MEN—MARYLAND 


WANAG 
gl ot ~ 


Write te yr #918] '” -& 


ence. reference an 
M.349, Post-TH 


Ktust be able. te han-| 
t part 


arr Mage 5 


2-2332 9 6 mn to 4 


WIREMEN 


Exceptional Opportunity 
GROUP LEADER JOBS OPEN 
Experienced wiremen—for Assembly Department 


Interested in those capable of. assuming responsibility 
as group leaders 


IMMEDIATE OPENINGS 
Excellent rates for those qualifying 


ASSURED FUTURE 
Apply Daily—9 ‘til 3 
MARYLAND ELECTRONIC 
MANUFACTURING CORP 


5009 Calvert Road, College Park, Md. 
WA. 7-9200. 


) 


We are yee a man of LONG- | 
Tee 


companies us 
et acquainted inte AB 
r. Basey at 


ia CHURCH LABORATORY | 


| 


position with | 


ie | 


ez MELPAR, INC. 


_|MEN, 18 to 22 


ENGINEERS 
TECHNICIANS 


You Have An Excellent Future Working For 
‘CATERPILLAR TRACTOR CO. 


THE 
WORLD'S 


In the field of Crawler Tractors, Motor 
Graders, Diese! Engines and Earthmoving 
Equipment. 

Due to a vast expansion program, openings 
also exist for: 


Tool Designers 
Industrial Writers 
Service Technicians 


information and, @ personal interview, cal! 
iller at Hote! 


Metallurgists 
Mathematicians 
Draftsmen 


For more 


f resume to 


EMPLOYMENT DIVISION 
CATERPILLAR TRACTOR CO 
octal Illinois 


A 


LEADER 


OP. | 
“thal —s ded. “Bud's ; 
De 


PACKAGING 
ENGINEER 
ASSISTANT 


This pecition offers an ex- 
ception opportunity ro 
join y nati eed known 
tooa manufacture 


with car. | 
53-9669 for species | 


ling «as, 
arse oaat | 
Trip- Charee, | 


SALES. now actively 
stas. Ea 

terr 

N.Y. mci 


FLOOR COVERING. 
sales position one, covering Wash- 
ington. D. © ra) and North- 
pre Virginia Reatiire ex oo igred 
Scollent 
opportunity wit leading company 
in resilient — Rah lary, 
0 veling expenses. | 
edneation. business | 


nti 
3 {p,poutn itt th S&.. Phi fladeiphia 


Giass 
andle investigations and 
prepare report 


The pestijen 
ground Cc 
nd Cherie t. preferably a 
erree: well 


vesped in the field of foes 
echnology. Age about 30 


The pesition is aaen ia 
Northern: New Jerse 


Please forward a complete 
: uding 


SALESMAN—Quick deal. bie pay. | 
gee John Peters. Rm. 410, 724 Sth) 


SALESMAN | 


Earnings iB, 828.000 © $20.000 a 
a Position — for 

are 

ates less 

o 53138 than this. yea J 


recuires «a 
he 


mistry 


salary 


| SALESMAN—With direct sales ex 
hiy styled nylon 


| Seeaee aifeent hig 
beauticians, wait. 


| Feases, professionals. ete Top com- 
mission. car essentia). + bee in- 
| terviews arranged. Gilson Uni« 

forms poe Sin &t. Flushing 


a 


Box M-341, Post TH 
PERSONNEL TRAINEE 


be veteran in Wa With col-) SALES TRAIN 
positive advance-| Youne a ressive sdnovien * 
Apply employ-' ente raining, procram a2" 
nef quality him 
rT. Co. mupiete ‘wrearem anit | 
be. ‘outlined in personal interview | 
Immediate carnines will be based 
upon man’s ability. Your first year 
should bring u | 
Upon you will be of training pro- | 


PORTERS fhe ne 


' 


ualiy. | 
car is necessary. Previous “direct 
salts man ement heyptel Por in- 


Vickery at. 
ma 4-0700. 
m.. 


| tien ich men are presently | 
earning $25. -$50. 


erview. ca 
i Shoreham Hotel, 
; & Mm Dd 


10 
n. Tues.j 


SALESMEN ' 
CAREER: POSITION | 


With gaceltont f wasp 
with backs and 6 


alls Church residents wreferred 
ermanent posite ions in Palis 

urch rences required. 
anv eapteve benefits 


for men 


|; ment 


n n 
| progressive income must 
ri) 


APPLY IN PEESOS | i 
MONDAY THRO PRIDAY ae areata | 
= 


mete }. fait fone 
, Pos 


quslifcations. M-3 


-_ 


3000 | SALESMEN, SAL. TO $10, a 
Fa | sau Baia electronic equipment). 


$350» Samen. | 
Sree’ 2-V pee from ilith - 


sts. . % plant entrance.) ttovos "EMBL! SERV. 
| 3420 N.Y. ave. nw ST. 3-2207 


SALESMEN 


EARN MORE 

THAN $100 A 

WEEK WHILE 
LEARNING 


Now here is the amazing part. 
No experience necessary. We 
train you completely. We fur- 
nish leads. Work by appoint- 
ment. Training given by ex- 
perts 


rlingten Bivd 
Church. Va 


(Tak 
and 


Por liquor store. driver's 
~ ogee gupet Apply 1430 | 
— To ert | 
\ 


i 
college. Ny B i ~# 


fn pubucity or or Sablic By “Be | 
join, an ending | pubite r lat ions 
poet 
eresting S aeehs syte an ability 
toc create a ter newspapers, 


work in new 

J hn selling a a ame 
perimenters ha 

teal Knowle edge of Fadio and ee. 

eats. & Jordan. JA 


fo a8 


ESTATE SALESMEN See 
MR. COSMO 
10 to 4 Daily 


3508 18th St. NE. 


nt ft ure: 
es, Cal {iburt utur 
: Groreetown 
attr dhe es. | SALESMEN 
tr instrumen gradu 
ae engineer. wil ‘rain at at factory. 
excellent salary. car furn., 
paid. incl. insurance. medi.| 
ferred, but will consider neat 
appearing men with desire for 
sales work. Qualified appoint- 
ment selling in the home. Pos- 
itively no canvassing. Should 
average in excess of $200 
weekly. Guaranteed income 
while training. Apply in per- 
son, Mr. Rice, 501 Rhode 
Island Ave. NE., 2d floor, or 
call AD. 2-6838, 9-5 p. m 
Late model car essential. 


individ-| 


to meet with a, dfstriy re 
~— i 


TW 

ship” firm establish 
an 

ented: ot bn, ren into. ita “ive| 


Weodoet an ually. sen. 


Mon re iO-ig s. 5.400 and 3-5 
* ST ESMAN 


World's largest 
jo ooo oD forms a 
territo 


monatposures of | 
n ; 


xperten im selling | 
| home furnishings. car nec ry 
inside and outside work. liberal 
a+ peg on = sales; Tinest com-! 


pa, SB By r > 
urs rd - 


Cc 
= asl 5. ea af 


ualifies | 
911 hisdens- 


ENGINEERS 


ADDITIONAL PERSONNEL REQUIRED 


An increasing work load necessitates our selecting a 
number of technical persons for key engineering positions. 
We will be pleased to consider experienced personnel who 
feel they can qualify for our job requirements and who 
are looking for an opportunity to advance with our long- 
range development of civilian and military programs. 


AERODYNAMICISTS 


Degree with strong math background plus experience in 
stability, control and performance. 


COMPUTER ENGINEERS 


Electrical org Degree oe several years’ experience 
on design and development of analog computers. 


ELECTRONIC ENGINEERS 


Degree or equivalent experience plus a minimum of three 
years’ design level experience. 


TECHNICAL WRITERS 


Experience in preparation of instruction books, handbooks, 
operating and maintenance manuals for electronic equip- 
ment. A strong electronic background is required. 


TEST AND FIELD ENGINEERS 


Electrical Engineering Degree or accredited vocational 
school certificate and three years’ general electronics expe- 
rience. Some overseas positions available. 


Our company is a growing, progressive, research and devel- 
opment firm located in suburban Washington, D. C. Wé are 
interested in hiring only qualified persons for long-term 


programs. The openi listed above will challenge—and 
reward—the abilities of forward thinking, 1 persons 


who are willing to accept responsibility and tackle problems 
of more than ordinary complexity. 


All inquiries answered promptly 
and in confidence 


ERCO DIVISION 


ACF INDUSTRIES, INC. 


' SALESMEN—COLORED 


MONDAY THRU FRIDAY | 


Direct selling experience pre- | 


in 
with reputable publisher of nat 


MELPAR, INC. 


$\THE WASHINGTON POST ond TIMES HERALD 


Monday, January 30, 1956 


meat Maa 


VETERANS 
oy 6-9 


ara So gg A ut noi =e oa 


Under_3U. Excel. future 


HELEN BAY" 


Varitype Operators 
(D. $. J.) 


se‘ ~ lecation 
Excelient sai- 


Age 25-50 for 
Maryland and 
Washington, D. C. 


Outstanding rtunity for @ 
z one personality’ to associate 
AA nationally known 

les orga 


onvenient 


ior: b-dey week 


Corvey E 
2610 JErr 


ineering Co. 


re eet , Alex 


ced. "raining. 
nancial su +. 
territory 


t 
men who are Ww 


sare. with enth ~r4 to work 
apo nd comp resume. 
SA ton ae bef 


$7436 (Up) 
Amerian’s oldest and leading firm 


ang ver 7 om itie 
Bre) the ong lank ae 


businesses. 
wiles to derzo 4 well-rounded | 
ae pret ment. od 


with 
fications ey a “ 
‘. to. 130 16th at. - = 


2 YOUNG MEN 


Young men (3). white. t open 
nts in M 


per 
ably ngeroasive man. Interv 


eferences; lube ex 
person Monday 


xperience ct 
ong aalary $013 13 


Mt. Rainier. 


re 
In 


time, experienced 
—_. Apply Es 


oint 
aoe or persone! local interview. 


OR OPENING | 


World-wide Pers. Bureau | 
BLDG. | 


rd. 
pee 
1246 ea et st. nw ay, th. ‘9-4ite” 


SHEET METAL 
TRAINEES | 
| P <* ai basemen M4 “tnd out- 


An excellent opportunity for riest-c 
on-the-job training in sheet 
metal trade 

Night Shift Openings 


°o CE 
Ositions zeal able 


and Wom 


G 
Various 


rents | 
ation man 

7 ambitious vet sta reer : 

xpert e not abd- 


Protected 


sales oe 


ter- 


tail 
4420 


For Full Information, 
Visit Our Plant 


ARE 
YOU 
ie | 
MAN? 


S.8.m, to. 4 p. m. 


MELPAR, INC. 


A Buy of 
WESTINGHOUSE. “ATR-BRAKE co 


| 


MAN 
who is not satistied with 
his present earnings. 
'A MAN 

who is willing to work. 


MATOR— $406 
i hem | A MAN 
SHOE SALESMAN ) who sincerely wants to se- 


cure his future. 
for 


1311 South Pern St 
(Off Jeff Davis Hwy.) 
ARLINGTON. VA 


SHEET by ST ™ 


ust have loc 


A MAN 


who wants to make between | 
$200 and $300 per week. | 


smmediote pacitiens by 
nced sale perms 
position a x earuinan. many =| 
pio yee ben } 
; 

| 


APPL 
HAHN SHOE STORES 


3101 Wilson Bivd.. Ari.. Ve 


DETECTIVES (3). ages 35- 

{ust naye clean record igh 
ucation and i-vear aeel 
a pores “ 


WE OF 


STORE 
school 
sidence 

sa ry 
is of 


TAI LOR 


HAVE THE 
MOST SELLABLE PRODUCT 
IN THE WORLD 


Stop in 
Let Us Show You 


CAR REQUIRED 


Apply 


Saturday Afternoon, 
Between | and 3 o.m 
Monday Evenings 
Between 5 & 7 P.M. 
and 
Tuesday Morning, 
10 a.m. to 12 Noon 


; 


Box M, Post T-H 
TAILORING MAN 


| 
| 
| 
To supervise D. C. territory and | 
manage estan! hed office on per-/ 
sone] bus u aed 


tion oar concern. Fypoeay vol- 
- nse 
“YOUNG OLDSTERS 


ume pays . lus. Write 
in confiden for jlocal interview 
| Opening available for time oheck- 
of Langi Par on 


with fectery “exeuntive this week 
ngley 
Applicants 


934 Bonifant Street 
Silver Spring Md. 


Box No. 652, Post-TH 


TAX ATTORNEY 


podrws: inoome tax reporting serv- 


: MUNT-1V—— 


permer Munts salesmen for full | 


al scope r phone for appt. | 
in confidence: Mics Bo e, qe Te 
gorgme eter. 444 Ma aisen Ave. Na 


‘ ’ 


15.50 Per Eve. | 


ime—Eves. & Sat. 
white: car; servicemen | 


Avera 


Technicians 
Electronic 


men ence 
rnace 
onday 
ze — for a man 
for special ‘warn My learn our pase 
Ness and t over ded 
sponsibiiities in 7 short time Must 
be interested in promotion and « 
sition ee a ‘srw Apply 905 


PART TIME 
6 P.M. TO 9:30 | 


° BR. - 8 aring ane me 
work in public relations 
division of large nationa! concern. 
tf evening to those who aua! 
ee College students and serv) ce- 
r age te call) 
HU = 


WANTED 
8 MEN 


| (white) no canvassing. 8405 per 
D gnnually cor; month salary, Call RA. 6-1202 


plus 
y 8-400 in Ba Me} - 


Assembly to experimental! elec- ‘oie Biadensbure ~~ 


tronic equipment. Previous in- 
dustrial or military service ex- 
perience necessary. 


Co.. 


APPLY IN PERSON 
8A.M.TO4P.M 
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 


1331 


JOft Sunt Davis Ber) 
Pils CnoReH, vA. 


Arnold 2-V from 1i 


(Take 
and E sts. nw. to plant entrance. 


Sears Roebuck And Company 


Desires 3 High-Caliber Men 


to Call on Customers in This Area 


THIS IS NOT CANVASSING 


Customers are expecting a representative of Sears to visit 
them and acquaint them with a new service. These are 
permanent positions with many company benefits includ- 
ing paid vacations, insurance, hospitalization and profit 
sharina, to mention a few. 


Qualified men who have a car can expect earnings of 
$150 and up weekly with salary while trainina. 


Personal interviews are being held by Mr. Mather at the 
Manger-Hamilton Hotel, 14th & K Sts. N.W. Monday, 


January 30th, or Tuesday, January 31st, bohwnen 1) a.m, 
and. p.m. 


Riverdale, Md. 


WA. 7-4444) | 


No phone calls, please 


| INTERY 
FO 


a8 Del Farms #? 


| Sommission. 
| 


r 
Bhoppers 


Your daily 
WANT AD 


in this: newspaper 


reaches 
381,000 
- families 


130,000 
more than read 
any other 
daily paper 
phone 
RE. 7-1234 


| HELP, MEN 


| nternstional 


B usiness 


M achines 


HAS IMMEDIATE 
OPPORTUNITY 
FOR 


Customer Engineers 
rok SERVICING 


ELECTRICAL 
ACCOUNTING 
MACHINES 


REQUIREMENTS: 
Electro-mechariical Training 


or 


Armed Forces Technical 
Experience 


LEWS DAILY PHONS 
mR AN A 


PPOT 
REPUBLIC 7.3705 


Customer Engineering Dept. 
Room 205 


International Business 
Machines Corporation 
1220 19th St. 
PART-TIME WORK 

Bvenings 20 Beare iv wk. earn- 


ings; whit nly between 9 
s. m. and 5 p.m for appotniment. 


Life Insurance Company 
has on interesting clerical pori- 


— oF 44 


es bar” advancement 
permanent resident Apply 


$11,112.41 


; bes an in this business in 
udent in coo 


3 


earned 
yous while 


" worked 7 | 
dent “ane aver- 


; wee 
are OT reash manage 
fraid of @o 


over 
still 
& student in coi 
Another friend. 
business for 
still «a “ull-time at 
a] 


If are not 


you 


fashioned work. heave . car and in- 
: - ’ 


res n bduliding j 
ales, | would be ES oor to discuss 
| ous business with 


sentiy a will cone 


" later 
nentiy essociated wi 
Call Ki... 9-006 m. to §& 
name. address. 
vou bac 


LA arrange for an interv 


OPPORTUNITY 


| Pull or part time im our sales de- 


partment. Servicem men 
and government workers (white). 
No euperionce geayires, pa canves- 
verage J ry 

part time. Cail oF 4 does lee 
ppoiniment. 10 s. m@. te i ». m@. 
and 7-9 evenings. 


> oth Bt 
8 COL. MEN with CARS 


Full or part time: $50 per week 
training [or s en: 
references over 


hEly, WOMEN 


Tellier, ¥ *. trates. 
Binns mach. oprs. 


Ppt hone secy + 
yist Gome "Tne. bkkps. . 
o7pun aiphea 
ee it Scie, 5 ‘ans 
cept osp 
Cashier. hotel] NCR. 2000 
Wattress. able mix drinks. top 
SS tm epee order clk ; 
orks. g00d with figures” 


File cler«s 
some 


" COLOREL 


‘ook. boarding ‘tha os 40 

ACCOUNTING CLERKS. To 65600 
COLUM 

| oa NW by) gt) a ee 


cy. legal 


Editorial asst 
roung coll. girl 
f opr 
ne 


eresonnel asset 
ach 


rking elt te 


nk b 
mp 
ap ; 
letype ong 7s . 
cept -typist. attire dl 
Pir Lt iis wb 


yp 
; bkkpr 
A mach 


ro ture 
File. cen ofc clk. MS creds. 
wht.. f id $2 
Too 
z 
retail. ladies 4 6wear 


free to travel to 

Att’ Bf'7-9217 
~ ADMIN. I” SECY. “$370 
Seme Hil| 


a 
MIN SEC NO: SHHD. 
Fo orp. 
Pe Na, Suarteee 
EMBASSY CLERK 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD | 


\e 


Your Sunday 
WANT AD 


in this newspaper 


reaches 
412,000 
families 


130,000 
more than read 
any other 
Sunday paper 


Phone 
RE. 7-1234 


" WOMEN ! s 


, 0 
OR AP HO. ONE AL i 
H_NW._be 
Pea ee 
- jal 
7_B_N, LW bsmnt. 


Administrative Assistant 
fa! accounts Secre 
ence initiative and 
1 with people re- 

Abell. NA. 8-1412,. 


Admin. Secys., to $6000 


Bins Leh pins rune ae 
1, 


Clerk- Typista, rTICEs to ylang 


100 
$4800, 


ss8|CAFETERIA ASSISTANT 


Ge ous 7 
«+. Start $350 
a 75 
.. £01 + maint 
_* “te $ 00 


60\ ence in restaurant Work an 
© $300) su li 


te $300 
to $250 


"MANY OTHERS 
Annette D. Tatelman 


295 Woodward Bids., 15th & H NW 
RE. 7-4414 


AIRLINES 


ATR TRAVEL AG 
Bee our nn ne gu 
Aviation Training. 
1 st. ny., 


» Washington. D. 


AIRLINE CLERKS, $280 
_— $50- 


under 


stating qua ifica- 
a ions number. 
appointment. 


WAVERLY TAYLOR, Inc. 


CARILLON HOUSE 
2500 Wisconsin Ave. NW. 


r 
ve ex- 
me oe of teod buying and 
orrect meals fo der- 
See full particulars tn 
wood. Wilson Lane, 


Asst. Service Specialist 


ASSORTERS 
sort + ots for 
per 3 ‘apply ‘tn 

PERSONNEL OFFICE 


ARCADE-SIUNSHINE 
TiS Lamont 6t. NW. 


“iC€ 
| G-day week. Solerepess 
Cc. la 70 : © 


65 
o.| Yer. on “Glebe Rd. an. 
hr. | 24._1:2933 


7. | Hot 
isl G Street 


mer. Be Dept : 
| ,=-45- me 
in ef. | | at for t ork! #00. 
act. CLERK 


White to tnepect installment > 


a hy we. 3 of 


young girl who desires 
Appiy personnel office. 


HOTEL STATLER 


16th & K 6t. 


BOOKKEEPING 
MACHINE 
OPERATOR 


Experienced, ufder 35, typing 
essential. Excellent working 
conditions. 


NATIONAL 
SAVINGS AND 
TRUST CO. 


Monday Through Friday 
40-HOUR WEEK 


Active woman with some 


manage bus 


ability to 
ay 


| employes In dinin 
| room helpers and & 
Early daytime hours. Ann 
eave and other benefits. Age 


1135 2ist oT. Y . 
CA 


Apel nlRoriier. i. 


; a. Apply 


GOVER! 


er for 
te get + "mast be sy = 
te r Sood per 6 ay 
paid vacations "a an esp om zation. 


y ai 


CASHIERS 
SHIRLINGTON-DAY 
D. C. AREA 
DAY AND NIGHT 


~ furnished. 
and working a 
Soleante 26-45 with 


eemirees Me 


CASHIER-CHECKER 
ane st 

— 6:45 

m. m. oF part 

af ise tek 


y 
ent 


| Quick at ir 


| — x sical ane cant. Ne week 


M. A yetiene 


accu 
stall. " ofpanise- 
° organ 

lon. Air-com tioned ed butiding. 

dey. 40 


leave, etart = ‘a0 
sonne! Office 
HO. 2-2476 
CLERK-TYPIST 


Por mortgage department. Over 31, 
| Ro _ experience eceerery i haat ”"| Bivoa 


40-hour week. 
opens YPIst—For Jewish 

are ats ee good aolary mad 
working conditions Write 

to Box M-3 . Post-TH. 


teh typin ae een. ya exp. 
te sete eo Satlenal sales .— 
esire to work and depen 

ary importance. 

9343 for ap. 


CERES TT iS, a0lt 


RW... bemt. 
CLERK-TYPIST 


cellent opportunity for 
ied 18-95, = bank: good ror 


sala 
N 9 te l, aeily. 
y for appointment, 


Citizens Bank of Maryland 


“iadensbure. Ma 


Clerical 


Both Typing and Non-Typing 
HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES 


AGE 17 


Interesting work in pleasant surroundings, for 
both beginners and experienced girls; oppor- 
tunity and permanency in a progressive grow- 


Ing company. 


REGULAR HOURS 


Friendly Associates 
Convenient Location 


5 DAY 
8 to 


We employ the kind of people you'll like to work with . 


Government Employees 


Insurance 


(NOT A GOVERNMENT AGENCY) 


14TH AND L STREETS, N.W. 
PLEASE APPLY 8 
AT L STREET 


INSURANCE is essential to the American way 
of life, Start in work that is important, offers” 


regular hours and a real opportunity. | 


ty 


Positions 


TO 23 


Paid Vacations 
Paid Sick Leave 


WEEK 
4:30 


Company 


AM, TO 3 P.M, 
ENTRANCE 


wim, 


L 


CLERK-TYPISTS 
5-DAY, 35-HR. WK. 


p 
RM. 


les Life Ins. Co. 
06, 1343 H St. NW. 


nice 


hk. Tat, — for pieas- 

Gone week, e company bene 
ear 

eatn Apply Kane 


cae : ar conditions and 
pe a are a. 


CLERK-TYPIST 


Por mo rtgage » Grpartment. Over 21 
no expe : -day 
40- nour ta ng Call 7 


Clerk-Typist 
bang, Arn aah 


“BOB VM woobs" me 


11112 Bladensburg rd. ne. 


DICTAPHONE 
enters Ie | 


Government Employees 
Insurance Company 


Please ADIT" af Ke Eiirance 


: RAL 
NW. bemt. 


~ CLERK-TYPIST 


Call tr. Bm Smith. DI. St abe” for 


CLERK-TYPIST 
h 


Set ate 
oe ee care 


CLERK-TYPIST 


To work with budget state- 
ments and other financial doc- 
uments, Ability to type 40 
‘wom and work easily with 
figures essential. 


Similar experience desirable. 
Ages 20 to 35. 


ot ITF 


THE JOHNS HOPKINS 
UNIVERSITY 


APPLIED PHYSICS 
LABORATORY 


8621 GEORGIA AVE 
SILVER SPRING, MD. 


CLERK-TYPIST 
seeks seers ecourace (ypist w wo ie bendy | stajor 
with figures. Exce 


to become s ofilintes” ws an — 4 
standing organization offering 
loyment end many 

compan 


. era! of 


experience 
tensive background q 


DI. 7-2900, Ext. 261 
Between 9 A.M. & 5 P.M. 


CLERK-TYPIST 


Ace Hh te 


ws eet et 
Ea ta, baat ae, 
APPLY PERSONNEL OFFICl 


‘MAYPLOWER HOTEL 


‘| CONN. AVE. & DS GALSS @T. FW. 


CLERK-TYPIST 


Must be accurate, experienced, 
under 35. Excellent working 
conditions. 


NATIONAL 
SAVINGS & 
TRUST CO. 


CLERK-TYPIST 
O14 week 


w COLORED 


TRE SS: eR 
r."lsot 
DRAFTSWOMEN | ; 


Mechanical 
Juniors. deta 


flera, drafte- 
terested in working with” ene” 
in Sta." 


Fa ee FM 
call Se deena ms, es ES 


fed Net EA Set 
i a A as 


“hook 


18 TO 30 

OPPORTUNITY 

EXCELLENT SALARY 
EXPERIENCE UNNECESSARY 


COPPER SKILLET 
__ 1204 Connections Ave, 3.W. _ 
HOME ECONOMICS 
GRADUATE 


ment eet Sin 


Sa eues 
te. Age, 


suas - 
ig Se pe 
Ba ne ae 


HOUSEWIVES 


Why Not Become Inter- 
pi in Survey Work? 


Key Punch Onaiesiin 
HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES 


Sore 
Sa ae RS a 


Call NA. 4-9900, Ext. 286. 


For Appointment 


Telephone Company 


Positions 
Are Available 


for 
Qualified Girls 


Visit 
Employment Office 
725 13th Street N.W. 


The 
Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. 


a 


|LINE INSPECTOR 


TRAINEES 


To train for inspection 
electronic assemblies. 
Factory experience de- 
sirable, but. not neces- 


rough Friday 
BA. ”M. to 4 P.M, 


to 


MELPAR, INC. 


Ast South Fern St. 


PY JEFFERSON D. Ve uWYT. 


Arlington, 


MAIL ROOM 
CLERK 


30: active. 


i apoutant 
or wore oe ar . *' 
HO. 2-2476 
MO deal Bell SY 
at oe OPERATOR 


ore. 


» wanted “he active office sell- 


ise tp ects 


dise Or 
ereens | siaricalt 


rs a 


sand) excelieng enti. App 
o Neer 


Excellent Job 


o 
of 


sales department. 
1) Government 


SECRETARY 
CLERK-TYPISTS 


MELPAR, INC. 
WESTINGHOUSE Air-Brake Os. 


SECRETARY 


work 
Immediate position available In 


contract administration and 
Person with 

contracts experi- 
ence and previous security 
clearance desired. Permanent 
position, 5-day week, vacation, 
hospitalization, life insurance 
and profit sharing bonus plan; 


APPLY IN PERSON, 9 TO 3 


MARYLAND 
ELECTRONIC 
MANUFACTURING CORP. 


5009 Calvert Rd. 
College Park, Md. 


WA. 7-9200 


SECRETARIES 
vindis 


r= 


SECRETARY 


ago ENOGRAPHER 
croup Sospitaltzation, 
: 7 


STENOGRAPHER 


position: °S 1 ae ork; vormaaey 


fy at, 


STENOGRAPHERS-TYPISTS 


Front Office Positions 


Opportunities 


‘Must be efficient in both typing and eee shorthand. 
Those having current or recent employment desired. Age 
under 35. Salary commensurate with experience and ability. 


PERMANENT POSITIONS 
5-DAY WEEK—VACATION 
HOSPITALIZATION—LIFE INSURANCE 
and PROFIT SHARING PLAN 
Pleasant surroundings and ‘endieis conditions 
Apply in person— ‘til 3 


MARYLAND ELECTRONIC 
MANUFACTURING CORP. 


5009 Calvert Road, 
WA. 7-9200 


College Park, Md. 


A 
- ra 
; 


CALL MR. WILLIAMS 
10 A.M. TO 1 P.M. 


AD. 4-0800 


ine for 
zo Seyestt erean)- 


t wor 


Sad Elke 3 


fi ae 
FAIRFAX—FALLS CH. 


‘JINGLE 


JANGLE 


EVERY DAY 
's 
PAY DAY 


FOR 


HOT SHOPPES 
WAITRESSES 


WHAT DO YOU NEED? 


$50, $60, $70 
Set a Goal 


HOT SHOPPES 
- WILL TEACH YOU 
TO MAKE MONEY 


APPLY 
HOT SHOPPES 


‘| EMPLOYMENT OFFICE 


1341 G ST. N.W. 


RECENT 
COLLEGE 
GRADUATES 
International Business Ma- 
chines Corporation offers ca- 


reer opportunities for young 
women in its Educational De- 


partment as 


SYSTEMS 
REPRESENTATIVES 


in solving record keeping prob- 
lerns. 


aa 
Department ef Education 


JINGLE! 24 


YOUNG WOMEN 
ir seh 


i| Good starting salary with in- 


creases, meals and uniforms! gj 


furnished, plus other benefits. 
Day and night shifts available. 


5-DAY WEEK 
APPLY 
8 A.M. to 4 P.M. 


WHITE TOWER 
OFFICE 


Tit 18 OT. ew. 
UNUSUAL CAREER 


| FIELD FOR YOUNG MEN| “ns 


AND WOMEN OPEN 


3] SYSTEMS WORK WITH ° 


EDPM 


PROCESSING 
MACHINES 


REQUIREMENTS: 


Business Systems Knowedge 
le or 


Experience in Writing 
Instructions for Operation 
of Electronic Computing 

Machines 
INTERVIEWS DAILY 
8:30 to 5:15 


1220 19th ST. NW. 
Room 331 RE. 7-3705 


International Business| <& 


cook. hele Y with 3 
+R and 
Sunday” off... 830 per 


a4 
MAT -eaTirese, le 
rt 


eee 


| 2131 O ST. NW. 


NEAR DUPONT CIRCLE 


Modern, Comfortable 
Living That You Enjoy 


$60 SINGLE PER MONTH 


ecorated i-bedroom apt.: 
. © stores and excel. trans.: 
ti i vel adu only. EM 


50. tnene a rde 
| ahes pik ae Gergen 
vail now. "enue tiful ana o0 

. FETT OR EY Hae Mig 2 yg room comb 
meioae = fies yeerm.. atest in kit 


an fico 

‘. blir ~ 4 Cc expoaures 
a 43 Por into. cal 
. ARL— ist fir. 
a. ah 
inel 


enetia 
titties f furn.:| 
JA. Be as 
bedrm 

fans iy 
tiie 


er 

~*< ey excel, 
Pan ane "u 
__ EM. z 


: 


em, wing rm... 
incju 


. paver period 
nee ne 7% — 1 th 
chen Sand mo he N. 18t 


eat! bedrennt 
-| carpeted 


’ omnes som ott: wl wtiie.: 


a. 
1 
dou.. $7. BG ‘tm bai ee i nt 
-rms, 8 S.uset. a: ee 81324 
: 32. conr, t 


aritch 


r 
n "Tat | pe 


or cpl. | st. JA 
~1506. | 


“Aurora Hills | 


APARTMENTS 
DE LUXE GARDEN TYPE 


oice a bid ion fer 


o t.. bedrm. 
and kit.. utik furn, $13.80 week. min 


ovt. bid 
' Etat kit. storage locker saree | 
mepect any time, in nearby Va. 
rms.. ; 
a. Ap-| DANIEL E. RAGALIE | 
BAS roe 4-9410 REALTOR OT 4-¢ “4 
‘ 9. 
| ona ‘rene rE 
| $90. SAMUEL E a 


| Cple. = “enild: ing! 

‘| man; tN, Fes 7°5382 
(iéta "i Wee ie Apt. Lit. 
mm. weerm kit. bath: PY inel.| 


cor cor, $00. os » Hi 


BOLLING FIELD AREA 
| oe UP 
NING R 
| | Hinde ni Pies 


WAYNE TERRACE APTS. 
128 WAYNE batty s.£. 
OPEN 


36 
ING FIELD 7 — New! 
ant Risk ‘how. Feb. 
{ eo on cit : 
nee air- 466 ondon Terrace SF 
od comfort: Fs Bh: reas 
cid #. nv. 


- 3-BEDRM. APTS. 
HOUSE TYPE 


loc. an‘ 


ie ‘ae 
BRIGHTWOOD 
CONCORD GARDENS 


liv. rm... dinette. kit 


| c 
a Lb a mae. 
’ Meridia 


fiutnished, stale. Sant 
JRED—Rime ahd « 
Seourity 
<7 cm Completely Furnished 
,. acc" id io a9 
a ae ne sir JEFFERSON VILLAGE 
Seo ah Bw es ae WW: ASST 
man 


JE. 2-5500 


NEW LUXURY APTS.! 


abtfs RMS... . . $63.25 Up 
4% RMS.. .. .$75.00 Up 
"| FURN. APTS., $81.50 Up 


ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED 


bgt oeuloren  ecenentonk ts 
shopping 


CALL RE. 5-8000 


FOR BROCHURE AND 
FURTHER INFORMATION | 


DISTRICT | HEIGHTS APTS. | 
rricEz 
7812 District Heights Phwy. | 


+ AND 3-BEDRM. 
downtown Wa moten. 
oy icture win: 
} ec . - 
p. B ae. 


bes 
center. “Offies 


Dasth s 


‘ he bedrm. = te ante 
omy. transp. TU Tel 


[ ome, mext bath. free 
100g . t nso et 7 


remises. 


_—s , ms, 
usaf 
apt 
= a aD 
tate: } | groun round semidet. 
ite Hous e: “eres. com fort- rick house, with large 
rooms: 2 delicious meals | eae 
: free . pear ‘eR By 
ar 


parking: $16 weekly.’ 
LAIRE A 


HALL | 
}426 21st St. NW. | , 3715 2nd ST. SE. 


EXCELLENT 


FOODS! ROOMS! SERVICE! 
AT AMAZINGLY LOW PRICES 


HU. 3-5432 | 


Con. Will give rm. and board fe 
ae we or eideriy person n 
ange for care o T.-old 
— No house werk Cail on 
ter 5. LU ~4110. 


1-922. | 


oa 


bath. 
modern 


3-7845 
rms.. bath; heat to Call 


. L 
U CL 


EA 


Vic. NAYLOR RD. & 30TH &T sz 


ER A wi 


1-bedroom 


fu 


ea 
‘ayer By: * 3 iS60 


rental 


ib 


st. . 
rm. 3 itv. 
mit. bath al. aley: 
- Jan, of No Ria. 


Gali: 


ee 
din r 
$100 | 


=e. Crane v 
son: cov. cans. 
tion, shopping facilities 


apt.  enliabie for | 
ren over 


Chillum Terrace 
u [*dipine ‘room. fief, bree 


fu 
saee itehete 


am spore. 
mo wg Fk utilities: air con- 
onin onal 


pr a 
» Hs 


c. line aa se tpertaes 
, 5 . 2-3800 
other, | CLIFT ON MANOR APTS. 


Attractively furn. pits. $65: 1 
. uet 


Modern 3- 
adults and 


2900 30TH ST. SE, APT. } 
LU. 1-3300 


x oT. NE. 36—Eedee. Iv. | 
tehem. bath: wtill ee" included: 


mm... 2) 
bath: 


and son. * 
board with 
ee 


—Pedera Fooms and 
t ive 


-'_* wre exce! 


ot. 2. Lee. liv. 
kit. dinette. 


— Exper. teacher. 
te suit perents 


in nice country 
© rd.: @ge 4-7. 


t—~ er)— 
Sesrectire. | cocrn din 
are » oe end bath ‘aul utilities 
clu exc - c 
| ARLES AL ES TATEe conr. 
2533 Wilson bivd ww inate Va 


bedrm. bath. kit.-dt , 
4 closets: util ae 


good 6 tranep 

space @| reason 

hr. switchboard. ous. 
vw. 


251 


elevator. 


-. or day care, 
lesvill 


‘AVE. Clevels ar beds: all 
Efficiencies 1 oF * a0 rates’ j r for i — 
and patee eee ies i fe ne bore liv. rm. dinette, ki 


— 
ne Call CHEVY CHABE HEAT. eo oe | 
ai : 4 ; 
. _— eaut newly fare, apt i 
pF re or eet ee Ph, — 
I show. 7 


rear sacree por 
and ,prenpine cen 
A uM ¢ Eas 
ners pay my ee. 
Will 3 accent 2 nai i “h 4. "Nr. 


1 oe AD. 4 
MS 876 ee cs iv, eo 


en, bath « vend 
ne out 


8 3- rm. Gupier 
$100-$105. plus utils.. wilhin 
of main eee  epring sh —e. 
thone en 
e ; 


5 
exce apt.. 
3 biks 


3 Aa 
ome, ping 
heces 


cRiid | ma. HIE, 
oth: | ‘an. 106, or call 


. oY. om. re 

bath t. FO. 8-3424 
rms and bath. 
te; $65 8215 
JU. 99-4438 Call 


vt 
Gare 


mi 
e cal. ak 
$0. “S20: AS F 
: 2? be iv. rm. kit. and bain. 
t. sa, Newip redes.; 890 mo. incl. utils. RS nw 
? 6p 


aa, | Dail Sai. 6:20 to 5 sud. 
AR 


te’) ~“SHIPLE 


ON 


LOCATION—VALUE __ 
2 BR. 


Teles: 


2733 S. wig iby REED DR. 
“ARLINGTON 


\Dominion Gardens: 
3800 MILAN DR. 
OFF SHIRLEY HIGHWAY 


2 Bedrm., $8875-$91.75) 


; ROM RENT SCHOOLS 
TRANSPORTATION 


“ab. 1-446) 2 BEDROOMS . 


Spacio. ious apts 


a@acent to projec 


8201 New Hampshire Ay, 


Sil 15th St. 


HUNTING 
TOWERS 


ON MT. VERNON BLVD. 
AT HUNTING CREEK 
ALEXANDRIA 
| Efficiencies . . . .$80-$95 
1-Bedroom ..$110-$130 


IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY 


ary cs 
ee a a 


N. PLAN AVAILABLE 
MODEL APTS. 


9T0 8 DAILY, 


Ki 86-8484 


| WAYNE APTS—SILVEA FRING 
We have + gy lovely q?2 


Ligh 
‘ad prone st 


IN WINTER 
G 


OOL 
IN SUMMER 


2-bedrm. and 1} ‘ore apts. avail 

March ; maintenance 

service: 

a: your 

laundry rooms, 

ooms 

12 minutes to downtown 

minutes to Pentagon and Navy An- 

pez: beautiful grounds. Painting 
our hobby 


Washington & Lee on. 
ne. Arlington. Va. _ 


Y PARK 
Boles ern SBS 


8.50 
2. Bedrms., from $80.00 

(OTILITIFS INCLUDED) 
rooms. pastel decor. picture) 
ample ciosets. storage 


iaun facilis + pee we in pro 
Conv, c 3185 38 4 AW seu 


whi = esa mee 


OXON TERRAC E 


for 87 
inc! ‘uding us oe 
r 


. tn tne Pitre Binale Pare 


12 MIN TO DOWNTOWN 
| Sika Flom Bolling Pele 


| 3% Large Rms., $72.50 
4Ve Large Rms., sage 
| 


| ALL AND Ty ANT 


Me 


Ke . B... 
play eres. 
on premi 


ee er 


| N MOMT. | 
‘en BHR MOMS: ORL 2.0000. 
STATE DEPA 
: ogy eee 
eco 


yi oe, ae iy. rf 


sero Bare ites es 


d inetee; t 


ent api. 
m-O316. 
Ss. kitenen. 


8 
ae o> =m 
wt 


3-390, 


ith gt. aw. 2 


Se Chi Ser 
oS path: 


echelor apt. 


bath: bent 
Office, 2747 


rTm., bdbedrm. 


living . 
3 exposures. 


cooing: 
row 


orris rd. =) 
bide.: 


Mr. Nowlin at 7 i 


ARLINGTON 
TOWERS 


$65: mod 
. Bee 


PARKLANDS | & 
LEE Cea, PORE 


“Best Rent Buy in Town” 


| ia are 


neiudes 
New w 


M $66.25-$72.00 

: 877 .50- $86 50 

utilities and ki 
eine. . cony 

os. 


st. oW.. 


Rap, MEE. ST Galveston, 


GERALDINE E APTS., “Beet 
1-Bedrm. Apt. me PDs 
UTILITIES SE 


B dinette 
or to Ay 


transp 


| Large room é 


ample, 
Closet space te n 


Apart rtments 


uti. 


$89. 50 


(Incl. al] Util. Bacept Elec.) 


Ine! 
eee, Se 


* ae Oe Poa 1 


Newly Googee ted 
NOTHING FINER 


GREENWAY 


A CAFRITZ DEVELOPMENT 


DE LUXE 


tagon. 
ington; s th 
eve ent quire sabdout rough 
urni apartment plan. 


WIA. 2-5003 
ay 11-8 | 


3'4-RM. APTS., FROM $67 


ore PEN wa oP van 
"Oh a APPOINT i s-s2 » 


i a athe Clifton 8. 


w | 
me? 4 Fe pantry” and oad 


in 
Gracious Living! 
IN AN ATMOSPHERE 
FOUND ONLY AT 


The Woodner | 


EFFICIENCIES 
& 2-BEDRM. APTS, 


AIR-CONDITIONED 
NOW AVAILABLE 


ponetee, 


, ALEX. | 


Bedrm. $73-$76)| ™ 


ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED 
TO 


B HRS 3-5 MON. THRO 
9:30 TO 4 SATURDAY 


OV. 3-4505 of OF. 39-3337 


D. C.’s MOST. COMPLETE 
SUBURBAN COMMUNITY 


LANGLEY 
PARK 


APARTMENTS 
NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE. 
aT UNIVERSITY. LAN® 


1 BEDROOM 
$73.50 


meats émart 


ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED 
Most Reasonable 
Rents in Area 


all double exposure 
Two large 
@ schools 


tennas. 
exit onto the park- 
war hat one may drive 
the heart of city by 
the park within & min 


ross ventilation 


eppineg centers ond ered 


OPEN 


To Live at “The Woodner” | 
"Ky / 


Dm Is to Enjoy Life 


t.. © am.-7 P= 1-7 
Wernenes,, &8.m p.m 
OFFI RENTAL Oprce 

5 A.M sO? F a 4 
Bat 9 A Mw 


~The Woodner 


3636 16TH ST. 
‘HU 3-5600 AD. 4-5557, 


Patty 


to 6 P 

1402 University Lane 

CALL RESIDENT MANAGER 
HE. 4-3200 


H. G. SMITHY CO. 


N.W. ST. 3-3300 


NW. | 
HU. 3-4400 | 


—<—-  -—— 


West Hyattsville, Md. 


KIRK WOOD 


A PPLICATIONS BC Se FOR 


1 BEDRM. . 
2 BEDRM FROM $81.50 


sn4'(includes All Utilities) | 


— 
ees Barney, ct. ‘we 
. Be ‘bath. 


pies Pa Sa 


st & V nw. 
nr. "hy. Capito! & 
. fromt apts.: 
refrig. furn 


7S. ST. 3-606 
= a 
45 4 


or 
mon 


SAMPLE APT. ON DISPLAY 


| 
opie. of IR. bus downtown Setwes a7=| 
oais. 
ont st.—Clean, at- " 


- 1302 Fair 
tractive; a. transp.: 2 epts.: Free pe OL on Request 
wath? a 2731 NICHOLSON ST. 


ATTSVILLE, MD. | 


- = 2 
in medern bide : 
. * ea 


3-tm aot. with 


bath ond 
also 
"¥70 mo. 


R, 
rm... ae pet. 
iF fnel,, 


r 
share house with 
ae “7 
7 re 

rm. aot. in in ew 0 Blan ay i= %, ah 


small’ red 


one | gores—Attraabive | ant. » i 
= 


Bie. incl, 
11 and 


- ys 


lge. 
earcened ; “utils 
Call TA, ise 3960 be . oe 


rooms, kit. and bath: conv. trane.: 


: Rae ANE aad 


dinette. bath 
Beia"nsce co 
Rock Tae Core Road NW 


OR a 
re _ : 
4 2fFf 


of 8 
ooms., Tiechen. qGnes 
th. after.3 D.m 


= B Apt. 1 
3 pom 


led’ et bath, hae 


fficieney. air- 
over’, Getet 


~ 
e-- 


n tw 
Key 


as sind ‘bath. Geils. 


$73.50) f22 


‘Re 
Individually controlled 
air conditio _— 


| AN ADDRESS OF DISTINCTION | 


Air conditioned. Completely redec- 
¥ 


Beautiful Hilterest Hots., 


is M TO DOW 
FORCE CENS 
G Pu 
Cc 
r: 
ave. 


op 
brook a5 foal “Evek to rental) aqpies. 


2506 Iverson St 


Modern 2-bedroom 


sie 
KaktsBic 


NEAR NAYLOR Rosemary Apts: 
eer ae r ,- 2,- and 3-Bedrm. Apts. 


location, newly decorated (Furn, Apts. Also Avail.) 


Immed. Occupanc 
eile ae Ae 
OR _P 


wr 
vs 


ASHINGTON CIRCLE APTS. 

2430 PENN. AVE. NW | 
EFFIC.—$76.50-$86.50 | 
ntale Imclude All Usetsties) nd 


heat 
switchboard ses 


Chillum Terrace 


legate utilities: liv. rm. - 


. Ge luxe kiten 
iv antenna 
genet air conditioning o- 
s 


ast 
ie = oes "7a Bperidan a at. 


wo Shera 3900 
WILTSHIRE CRESCENT 
3801 CONN. AVE. 


Le arse modern i 


va laundry room convenient to! 
Adel and transportation 
IDENT MANAG 


. EX. 3-7640 | 


THE WASHINGTON HOUSE 
2120 16th ST, NW. 


1-BEDROOM APT.—$112 


Laree. 
ment. 
room. 


eae nt efficiency apar't- 


room dressing 
xd 


Y Lanes aoe a a 
OE yb etiecee 


Walk! ne distance 
ities inelud 


art thle BEI, no Mer | 


2-BEDROOM 


‘HOMES 
$68-$73.50 


Not Incl. Utils 
NO SCHOOL PROBLEMS 


CAN BE 
A includ 


All 
ary cx. Cal 


é—euto. laun- 
resident mer 


THE JOCELYN 
5315 Conn. Ave. NW. 


NEW DE LUXE 
MODERN AIR-CONDITIONED 
APT. BUILDING 


OCCUPANCY FEB. 1 
af’ , 
N 


A ORE 


Efficiencies from $85.50 
1 bedrm, from... .$115 
2 bedrms., from. ..$165 


OPEN SAT. & SUN. 1-5 


Management Corp 
NA. 8-5740 


Md. 
WN. AIR 
H 


BUS URC 
¥Y AREAS: LAUNDRY PACIL- 


te Branch 
to Cole- 


Out ave. «¢ EUG 
rigsht 


D sun. 1 6 


APTS 
JO. 8-5140 


“UT 


ap Iv. 
'-bedroom aS 


ae suns Mt, ie rie 


GARDENS 


T. 


a 


= a. 
jes: — * 


ON MT. VERNON BLVD. 
SCHOOL ON PREMISES 
Complete Shopping Center 


beat PAS Wier haber 


tmosphere tn counter clud 
eae alt ty conveniences: swim- 


25-ft. como. kit. 
entr.: in floor. 


*« prt. 

) cer ) 50. 
ort NN YB. 3747—1] rm. liv- 
rm., dinette, kit. bath, pore 


a Meanie. bie beh Seren 


+ suet bedrm. 
» bath, porc 


o hy . 


Ee 


YA y “| 1-BEDR M APT. . $85 = 
2-BEDRM. APT. $95-$99 


|3-BEDRM. APT. $112.50 
“PURN 


PRIVATE HOUSES 


OR 
DUPLEX. APARTMENTS 


First Floor: Large Living Room, Dining Room & Kitchen 
Second Floor: 2 or 3 Bedrooms and Bath 


Each House Has Front and Back Yards, Lawn Care, Gar- 
bage and Tiash Removal, Gas, Water, Heat, Laundry 
Facilities and Repairs Provided Free. 


SCHOOLS AND SHOPPING CENTER ON SITE 
2 Bedrms., $93—3 Bedrms., from $109.50 
also few furnished apts. 

JEFFERSON VILLAGE 
1734 ARL. BLVD., FALLS CHURCH, VA. 


$35- 
| Seis ie 
_ 85 


JE. 2-$500 Daily, 9 to 5; Sat., 9 to T; Sun, 12t0o4 , 
A 


A : 


ditties ion a Serine 


LUXURY APTS. 
3% RMS.—$68 AND $70 


rial serv 
. laundry fa. 
efilities bea uti asen 
bouses and 6f! available 


EFFICIENCIES —$80-$92.50 
IMMED. OCCUP. AT $85 ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED 
1-BEDRM.—$102.50-$145 


uy, Vio Pangino Uc 
IMMED. OCCUP. AT $110 | * me 
i 
L 


PARKING LOTS) 
CENTRE AN 
DAY AND EVENING | ecm Pes 
INSPECTION RENTAL OFFICE 60. 2-2990 


JAckson 5-5500 Open Mon! to Gat, 9 AM. to 6 PM 
*" CONGRESSIONA 


SERVICE 
PERSONNEL | paetods" tinal ia 
ty ial OWNER. 


for eouity 
Ont bg 5 Ot We ee & ON -” ri 
| 


Lovely Lawn, Trees and Flowers | LIVI NG 
} ( yn ou 

cpest suburban Corttopment Mi a pine Es Scalé 
| theps. schools tf inimum o pense 

orf 
comp 7 equip ov BP 
room - P 
Guiet dis is! 
in the Wil -+ 
875 per mon 


PRESIDENTIAL 
GARDENS 


Vernon ave. & Russell Rd. 


s 
4.4400 for directions 
by —~ Wow 


ice 
Prom 8:30 a. m. to * idnight 
i 


2 BEDROOMS 


$78.50 


ALL, UTILITIES INCL 
CHILLUM HEIGHTS 


1$20 ROAD 
Wrst HYA = MD. 


SCHOOL ADJORNS APTS. 
‘Office A gh 


7 


44 


POOR. 
“2 chen 
RA 


| er APTS. Sate 


COLORED, NW#i 


or 2 rooms. an 
rtiv fu 3-92 


odern and grace 


hed 
ire manner From 


AY. 
| APARTMENTS 


nt or JA 


WANTED 38 


08 


mt 


children need é ] bedroo 

apt. for 4 te mos... loca 

a an ime is desirable call 

DE. 2- ext. 204 pion oF 8 After 
wi 


in 
Fr 


or 


| me reat al, "tt 
MAN a "Ab: 4- iY oo. 

| COLORE Land ord 

| apts. -And_house Call ME 


CcOoL.— 
my 


govt 
NO 

‘Mowine AND os 39, 

$20. 


to . ant aa 


7. 3 as ae 
than 655 


zit 
No more 


bedrm.. 


4 12. 


5s a4 5S - — tes” =. $s 
| exp 24-hr rvice. closed 
vans “itis * ansfer. AP Fas : 


| BOXLEY - MOVERS—¢ “rooms, 


A oe 


a.m.-8 p.m. | 


7-3948 
ie * NO aye" 
WA 7.6745 -® — or , wees 
H. G. SMITHY CO. atta -- Mion THORAOE CO | 
_Bil 15th Bc NW. 8. 63900 | By careful m ms. $2 mo 


=6 Seo. r $ 
186 oe EeTER Stake O- 7-0i8s 


low as $30 or 66 per Br. A a SFr 
COLUMBIA RD. NW. [HOUSES FURNISHED 
MOST CONVENIENT LOCATION | 


| BETHESDA 
NEW 


Dries 3 tg pom. 
Completely Air-Conditioned 


$17 
oe 
LARGE EFFICIENCIES FROM 690 
(SPACIOUS DRESSING ROOMS) 


1-Bedroom Apts., from $115 
BSOUNDPROOP. FIREPROOP 


Beautifully ped nome- 
a! kitchen ining areas, 
and P losets, 
laundry ta- 
self-service elevators: 


30; 
nS 983 22, 


per 


me Kn 
me furnished. 
IGHT. 


sil ROBERT 


Attractive 2-bedrm 
firepl. & patio, only $160; 
A GILL & 6OR. DE. 2-5000 


2-233 


Att white mé- 
sonry bungsiow: 2 yal 


equ! 


Sr RING— 5-rm 
répi.. 
eilities: econ dition My 


RESIDENT. MANAGER 
RE 2-855 


COL.—NE.- ige irt man 
Ned soomseg cou * 6- 01 08 


- 


: ie 
Gail 1 Avds 


Dm 
DAVIS CO.. LD 
HOUSES UNFURNISHED 41 
yen ABLE i-2 
. vit drici home, newly 
|“apartments, yesotes. im NW redec ie ‘in Patt} 
E> 931 H st 1818 afte ‘ 
p31 Wt ow. A + Et — reson Manor. 2 bedr - 
Beautiful one-bdrm a* ige. rms. O8™ wi th rec. mM... °ser 


refrig. 227 ting st (near Ben-/ Tonmed Be to $610 = ‘s 
nine U. 2-4251 or RE.| Pent 20 mo. SO. 


BW, ALEX- 


conv. 
o 


‘ pep me BO. 8-0) 
"sem idet brick. 
ard. 


rm * 

bemt.. f ead ¥ 
session. mo 
ae ke ay 


} 


DOCTOR®S OFFICE 


PAIRLINGTON cooing 
Spacious 4-bdrm. house 3 
completely redecorated. i d 

location for doctor's combination 


7 t. be 
apt 
with lentier” at 5110 A &t. 


PEDERAL RENT A LP as 
’ ath. 2n ” 


$55 mo. uti | 


Center 


LEXANDRIA 
WARWICK VILLAGE 
3- rm. homes. $115 mo piay- 
ae individua] bemt West. 
inghouse washer. dryet. refrig.. gar- 

bage disposa! I 


in apt 
°15 New York Ave. NW 


“COL—SPECTAL, $60 


Like A ess liv bedrm.. kit. 


sredee-s ; rettia. J-H REAL-| Service 
ve 


shopping. 
cloding bendass 
Mi Vernen B63 Kennedy &t 


ac Ss 
Open 9 to y daily to 


eton)—3 bed- 
ath Bi | rooms. modern "Kitchen. bat hot. | 
path. reas 
houses. ai 


DE. 3-8108 | 
+ 


* 
tenes 
n 
A a my an 
15 mo. 


> 


2- and 3-bedrm. neues. 


desirable 
$95- some immed! late o¢e 


cue an 


bees, i toc. 


desirable 2- and 3-be 


= r=. with firep!.. ‘mod. kit.: 
lan jot. Sis 6. WAKEFI 
r liv 


SBF Are, Be 
ied 2s Cpe 


"hatavoed 
es to $74.50 
N——-Redécorated. 
mo. inet “au a a cies. Bes ) Pao teed: vaca: 1 
New 1 oy Bais " 


deta ched” 


945 
4 


£..W. 
te 2 Best: foneea 
immed 


All on 
. a a 
» range. refr 
ormica, e@tc.; peas 
rm , 


FOR IMMED, OCCUPANCY 
1-2-3 BEORM. APTS. & FLATS 
NE.-NW.-SE.-SOUTH 


opatae center ‘and |® 
~T98H 


Colonial, b=? bedrma = 
colonial, w asemen D 
w lot. © schools. 
ne atares. Walk to 8t ‘Somes 
nediately. $400 per 


ail 


—3 room > 
nette and beth. 337 54th «at. ne. 
‘f v2 —| 


rms Dbemt.: im 
ail A. 


at st. Re. 2 rms, Kl. 
: 1 or 2 children: 


RMS.—$81.75 & $84.50 | coLone 
ms 


kitchen. | 


: 
7) 


EX. 3 
| COL, —5ié Tth 


FURN APT” WANTED | COLC RED— SE MO. 


Professional man and wife without ¢.pa¢ 


rvs J "Wolke et re sire | > 
tu. 4 $72 
| _St 


40 ‘4: 
F 


o 
Ts ATTENTION, 1, BROKERS oR SAUES 
ERT 8 : 


= met : 


, eral 


— era 
bedrm. houses, | 


— without, ‘atte Call RESTATRA 


tereee | 


; 


* 


THE. _ WASHINGTON POST and TIMES a 
Monday, January 30, 1956 
4 


A 


Your daily 
WANT AD 
allt in this newspaper 
8 G, MD., Ti it 

dom SFr mole | 
Gon bok ix “se: ‘inna 
~-W~—Vaecant. 6 rms.. 
eat: nr. all schools. 
Pi SSeeatten 
ney. ais: =. 
c - 2644. 


reaches 
381,000 


families 


130,000 
more than read 
any other 


Ps —_ ewly dec 
ving rm., din- 
en- 


| and bath. Hot water 
painted 2 


co 


ag 
yard Geav, to bus an 20D. cen- 
cotoney. “Att a Be into and Supe’ 

n , 


daily. paper 


phone 
RE. 7-1234 


os rches. $90 TU. 2-3575 
a Ay Ra 
Attractive 2-bedrm. det. home: full 

— ion. $° me 
— 


Fis I a - 
rooms, 1% baths, hot water heat. | 


$91. 
623 Maine Avenue aw. 6 rooms, ‘STORES, RENT 49 
. erlooks | 
Lee Highway 


bath. Po- 
* wake $07 0 Living 
“auariaca. ech avaulabie 


acm ey iz PING 6 | 
WALKER UNL STORE 108 . 
EAST PINES, uD. i ai waan, 8 ousig gr gokt Bi 


livi kit 
; bedrms 7 bath, COMMERCE “SITES 33 
‘RIVERDALE 
—_ hs “ie ph ch 
WA. 


mercial witb 
ee OPPORTUNITIES 55 


fi a Prince para eth 
; 
ets COR rents colored: 


67th Ave 
we frame. 


® me 


8- 2197] 
=" pedrooes 
_. Sesmen 
mo CA Balto. -Wash 
er E. Riverdale, Md oc> 
r 


NEAR 


Pern 
heat 


Ww - 
wa 


¢ eae 


aita 
ay 
cash will handle with reliable par- 
HOLLANDER iExe 

8-9743 


- a 1zeD h. ny. 
kit . £90.00 
re Fy _ 3<2943._ 
ARIETTA’S KITCHEN—J017 @ M. 
ne. ,, 4006 =", ee ae By | 
Ow : nis wick 
mA by "Kahin mE shat or TU 2-4252, 
RESTAL RANT, 


iuncheone ‘te style, 


; 


ED 
NW. 6 rooms 


heat. Newly 


6 rooms, 1°, tiled 
good condition 


OUOR 
1617 Corcoran S8t 


and 
Bs aY rh, fi &- . 
gas RESTAURANT —Por 
sasconabie pric 
—_ NA 8- 2226 » Hy 
Capita! sf. : 
os heat wilt. 


$75 
rooms, 


"sopert 

agency 

E invest I a 

hw.’ public end parochial schools 

34 at 22 

| Seavice STATION POR LEASE™ 


$4500 re. 
New fa«- 


A 
10-vear- ~~ houses: oi] h 
heat: reas. 3304, Inquire 801 


kit. 
eat.| Located 
41 


co af 
an ired 


bath: enti h Ja Ayattsville 
° tb investment 


i T. 
N-—Pully eq 


A ul ‘ 
| rd lease. NW. sect. TA Bits 
Ae st. y. oad estabe 
ished business Compiete stock 
3% 4 A. . equipment on mais highway. 
kit ba Must sel. Substantial cash fee 
Ou heat zi 7044 
V STATION POR 


CEASE 
stat ion “foe ated NE. Wash. Capital 
uire- A. 59-8517 


2500. sl 7 


oa 
: es full “pemt cea 
TINE. REA LTY,. 412 


3 rms... & 
egg 9 or wat sep. aD i 


DAY. 5629 oth Fy 
bath. oi] ht 


' ene rij shop Verv “ee 
adie. Write Box 648. Post-7H 
RAD 


q $1 


nd; 
TINE REALTY 
B *)' 


85: 
412 ‘Sth at nw. LA. -6 on 
— | CORNER “GROCERY —-With livin 
wecset and equippe 
opportunity | husband 
Location has excellent 
pies pe 0 ome investment. 


1029 
VEROING mace ‘Nta—45 out , ™S- 
ent epee (Se;. Call after & 


WANTED—Poadhional 

nanci 

Even. cons! a nn oe r — 
Post 


GS - 
den 


na . age 


BRK i. na 
IST NAT’ L REALTY 
2_Thomas_¢u StS sRED RE. 7-3534 


$90 ror MO. 


‘ 


ret 
Write Box 


hn 
Ca 


534 [ 
a bs ond kit.i 
. 

meet 


oastitution ave. me. 


% $24 i st nw. DI 5-370) ters 
i LA. BUS. OPP. OUT-OF-TOWN 36 
A ~~" » ‘anal eae 


. BEAUTY —~ 
‘Bou “ue “ae a Bost _— 


ms... a Va 
Write _ 


hea 

4 “30 mo UstINE R REALTY wit 

th st. nw sy on 

OL Fria 22d &t 

. full Demt.. 

mo LUST IR A. 
. AW, Dt 


Det tram. | 
i Ae 412 


“hath. 


/ fms 
$104 


WANTED 
. WESTERN AUTO DF 
p) YORK, PENN 
L, nant 


rn ER FOR 


—~ “lee 


your own Bgea! eters a 


Yor 


a 
w Fe “eeaiii on an am + Bag 


at 


4 
Ineuvire 


WANTED TO RE 


tile bath’ | 
ave a 


ye rd- jooking dealer 


He will ret tail nationally advertined 
.” su es, 


44) iite 


= 711 TaTHST. NW. 


Ip 
lessen 
N. Jer 


| oye 
jen | ey Teau! we sy rain 
5 with small — y| BUM COSA Capits: o . 
and 1 servant desires nicely furn La Tite or pnene now for com 
home suitable for gracious enter. | = 


Will take long lease seat, | WESTERN AUTO SUPPLY CO. 
ark 


—Need unfurn haoh the + 


o 


_ nt 
mo eferred 


are Mass. ave. and Cleveland 
ARNO 


WAR G. Col. UBA , 
ETOWN Fe hie Ba | {iti ects Ave. Aarbptus 00g 
home ith PROPERTY MANAGEM’T 444A) 
EAL ESTATE LOANS 69 


lease. 


Increase Your Income 
ist voor pentas } provers ry. Call) we will bur 2d trust 
5 a 6 nad .Va 


Tt 2-2521: ey 


“range OFFICE, DESK SPACL Rent 46, 


SPRING iaw office 
Share , 


rec off room 
r-conditioned ice bid 


party and ; 
ox No *Mi-348 Post 
ntowr gt 
—— Masi ow er ‘aI } 
Pri, vate entrance: air 
ned secre! ari al service 


LOAN 
Hitng 0 


r- wrth 
Bids 
— 


MORTG AGE —Finance 
z | fo “ieee ve 


SORCH AGED, 
ea aci wn 
and offic with no o1 porns 
BEATTIE BLDG, 112 WORTGAGE loans. financine 
retinancine homes; convention 
oF yr pla SMITH. OL 


al 
MR 2- 


Pn te tee “pnd 3a 
"cover 


Lia 


proverties. 
z es improvements 


$11 xEW FORK AVE. NW. 
ST 612 


ow yers, ~~ 
‘R. ae WANTED 60A 


s. 
assn. For information. hens RE 
7 


‘102 onn. Ave. a Mie at 


a Lae smal)! eR, hs at “on Wash- 


Rec . Phone MR ‘ect agen Saas Ye 
.—_. TRUST NOTES WANTED 61A 
TT ae 


ver py short 
WA . 
OOD 3 A LON 
E NSTRUCTION OR WANTED’ — WELL-SECURED 24 


L F 
P OPESBIONAL 1 775 | trust, will bay cash: no commis. 
ET: AIR- T SE = 
ALL 50, b-Oini | tea 
R APPT 


OND! 
R Ag RE c WILL BL L Sa t oa “Zee 
BUSINESS PROP. RED. > 


SHERATON 
BUILDING 


choice 3-room with | 


ar | 


suites 
ava llable 


i A 
ay —— em service 


- = MR JAMES—DI. 


HAVE clients with . vali ted 
purc)ase st 
and eounteous 
CHACH REALTY. 
Ww ANTED. We pay 
Phone Te . 
“4 


A) Bake 
S x. Washington ‘st. 


2 __—_—_—_————— 
SALE, INVEST. PROPERTY 62 
1446-—)- ——- 


casa 
note 
service 


AND STs. N.W.—23 6 
Dbl. windows. full ba: ement : 
Co INC 


Alex- 


aa bea nae Nw 
HANDSOME BUILDING 


In center of fastest growing office 
building area near Metropolitan 
Club. Atomic Energy Commission 
Kiplincer and many other import- 
firms. Completeiy modernized 
air-conditioned one story and = 
appro 
for offices. 


Inc. 


fanine space containing 
2300 « ft. Suitable 
Gisplay or retail 


| Weinbe berg & Bush, 


L707 


Heat 
workrms 


ia v 
or 


. 
(urn. Excel | 
Call ME ) 


48 


fant 
BUSINESS PROP. SALE 
WILL TRADE 


3500 North Fairfex -—~ corner 
Pie ody NA. §-7772: ves JU. 


ron’ ce or rent and, 
Columbia Rd. N.W.. 
with 4 apertments 
paking 
CHEVY 


Let 
locate your 
Dbusiness on the right spot in the 
best business peater in Northern 
Virginia. We & number of 
liable at the mo- 
that will seem 
in a few years.’ 


MASON HIRST 


Apmandale, Va.. Phone JE 2-5615 | 


for ae st. sen 
i near Bolin z Field 


se. In — cond nnuai income 
£33 EM. 


investment Prop. Wanted 62A 


ah 


A ne N 
' ro 
Rear 18th é be: r 


~ 2-Bbe9. 
SALE, D. C., 


; in BATHS. 


A Attractive 


ergs ea liv- 
i wemier 


R 


c 
eeee home 
halt: ‘te ei fe ne 


ng st _ 
equip. with 


S (Pairiax).| frame hou 


SO on i 


ouse oe land in trade. Total Gries 
se ,500. Jona M. Anderson. JA to expendivie attic, 


Gas bot -wate 


HEW: 
mee | 


ar 
Nw 


home A 


priced bayemen 20° : 
pepHANNON NON ke te oi eb? 


call 


00 og. ft 
a 


tal ala 


aw. Busy 


Tos ERY 4 

"OF ae month. See janit a Te ae schoo 

iGubiNa “CORP. ane LEO'M. BERNSTEIN Oo. 
$:-% i ighiy ste . 

SEs gener. endl toy ees 

spring Cae tae 

era, *eplneene 


EAL 


end 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Monday, January 0,1 
SALE, D. C., HOUSES 


Your Sunday 
WANT AD 
in this newspaper 


PALATJAL MANSION 
SWIMM ING POOL 


OVERLOOKING ROC 
Lovely aati overlookin 
Oreek Park 

many outstending 


reaches 
412,000 


families 


crystal chandelier & many many 
other extras remain with _ house. | 
Cali till 9 PM 

~eY a AD. 4- sts 


130,000 
more than read 


BETTER N 
NR. MacFARLAND IR. HIGH 


ONLY $995 DOWN 


ma , eee 
& 


any other 


Sunday paper tel fect | 
2-car det ‘br . 


"RALPH D. COHN 
TU 2-9200. 


“‘COLORED—W’DRIDGE 


Det. Brk. 


$998 vr er oe vas PRICE 
nvely ° ud 


we 


Phone 
RE. 7-1234 


SALE, DC. HOUSES ~—~«S6 4 


receding Fs “Fe 


podriser or Soot 

) nd best 
ultra mod ‘ 
reautiful bedren. 

room with ' | 


| TST NATL REALTY 
RE. 7-3531 UN. 4-3422 
|couoneD. -BRIGHTWOOD—N. W.| 


FOR VETERANS 
$11,500 


GEORGETOWN 


hudy or suest 
, 


1728 P ST. NW. 
; er So vecant, 


YOUR HOME WITH Us 
C N. MILLER DEV. co. 
4250 ‘cass Ave. NW EB) -4464 
UR. OF STANDARDS—1 ess 
old Men) ae type} 
se 


NA 


$500 DOWN AND $69.60 MO 


NTHLY 
SEMIDETACHED BRICK BARGAIN 


phys cozy 6 room peme has 
basemen heat 

and | is conven} ent .y every- 

hi 


ee ) et. 
ra & OF or OL. 2-5821 | 


bed 
gan $23,950 0 call LEGUM & 
FRED A. SMITH CO. 


COLORED “TRINIDAD AREA NE 
$495 DN.—2 AP1S.- 


Lovely Colonial brick. consisting of 
2 complete apis full bamit ges 
h-¥ excellent ircation Live 
In one. rent the other 

[_ 


ST. 3,3626 Eves 


COLORED — 4395 | a 
OR NON-G 
Lye? INDEPENDENC! 


TU. 2-5091 


COLORED— V ACANT—NE 


GI-$56 


' CEp TO Sri. HIS : 

$10.600—8530 DOWN Call Mr James. DI ¥ -1655: eves 
. - 403 

ave. 


$80 


ne 

Der mo Open. 
ACHED BRICK 

Froe Properties, Builders’ 


__701 424 St. NE LU. 2-4980._ 


Colored—aAttention 
13TH & FLORIDA AVE. NE 


ONLY $150 DN. 
FRONT PORCH 
6 LARGE ROOMS 
FULL BASEMENT 
Hot-Water Heater, Oil 
Excellent Condition 
Act Fast, Call Owner, 
EX. 3- 8440 or TU. 2- 1820) 


CAPITOL VIEW 
$195 DN.—$95 PER MO 


R. BRI 1CK. ; RMS A dit 
LOUIS _RUDDEN. TU. 2 Soe 
COLORED 
| 1409 DECATUR ST. NW. 


LOV EI ¥ PST ACHED Dee 


ATH | 


is 

porch, 1*> baths 
and rear yard to 
Priced low for 


rage 
LI. 3-0640 ves... 


et 
fall 

20 
HOUSES WANTED, to BUY 65 


NOTICE 
HOME OWNERS 
BETHESDA 
CHEVY CHASE 
D. C. AND MD 
| CLEVELAND PARK 
MASSACHUSETTS AVE. 
$15,000 TO $50,000 


Our representatives have eclients 
: in your neisgn-' 


UPPER NW. 


Meadern French row brick 
fir ¥ rm cor 


earace Owner "must 


CIRTIE M. TURNER 


_ 
“ 


m — saies im toese. 
for an 
experiences = 
ourse 


SHANNON & LUCHS CO. 
OPEN ‘TIL 7 P. M, | 
UPTOWN OFFICE 

< 500 Conn Ave. KE. 77-1800 

ALL CA oH direct [trom owners: 


Quick ser Baucom. Realtors, 
NA 8-126 RA 2003 


ice 
eves 3- 003 

en ar . for your property. | 

Cc Pr rince Georges Co. “ 


: L, night. 
op ‘Cash—D. C. Houses | 
I buy 6.E.. NE nouses Firat from 
owner Mr. Isaac 0 
RAED TATE CASH "AND : RVICE | 
AL RED LIc 
es -_;) 35-0450 | 
nice ‘home 


3909 GEORGIA AVE. TU A312 


- DY ~ 
COLORED—POSSESSI 
100 Bik Ingraham ‘ 
BEnglish-style Colon ria! 
Some w/3 bedrms 
ter bedrm fireplace 
long rear vere w/garace 
heat. Sparkiine con as 
DORFMAN A 
CO. 5-4056 TIL 9 P.M. 


DLORED— NORTHEAST 
REA 1 
6 B 


ON 
NW 


rec rm 
pee h.-¥ 


’ MICHIGAN PARK AR 
A SMART BUY 


Vv ery vard 


“EXCELLENT FINANCIN 
all Mr. Green. TA 3046 
JAMES 


large 


VETERAN APPROVED 
3811 New Hamp. Ave. NW, 


ped $300 DN. 


have to 
6- 


pri “home 


sereines 
bsmt. COM Pt BTEL: y 


nat eRe BTRRE “ACTION 


rs aet  % TU > 1850 4 All cash et once uM Greentielé 
$15,950 GHTWOOD ATG Y a, 
- oasi or ST. "3-3520 
Tmmriaculate modern &-rm. tapestry 
brick ee. ‘Concrete front porch SPOT Aas... 


Garage. convenient transp., shop- es AN 
ln. BR BAIT) BO. 3-128" w RE 
HMeookibee SHBUYEROR | 
will sell om terms. LI. 6-2000. 
> ere 


bedrooms. 
ardwood fioors saroushout 
and ath Garage, 


COLORED ANT 
TRANSFERRED | 


3 DAYS nd SELL 


Spot Cash for Your Home 
Cox & CO 7-163 
66A 
‘ALEXANDRIA, 814 Uke st —New 
conieporsic® bidg., hg equip. for 
- eres 2 $9250, lease £100 
oe iv . - 


my v SES 67 MD. 
ANY CO! 

quickly | for nie MARYLAND 

od. 2 bath Coun 

i 2-ba co- 
. close Naval 

ENDO 
COL.—MICHIGAN PARK—N &. 


VETERANS 


$69.60 


MONTHLY 
RECREATION ROOM 
Por 8500 down and $69 60 


you can bw) 
semidetached 


This detached nESOA 

bath center hall home on «a iol 
752x150 is one of oy fl best buys snd 
should be seen 


PR iCE—S$18, 950 


estat H. JONES & eo. INC. 
'O. 6-2300 * 


| E. Bos 
BETHESDA Eye os for Sarena 


f ely bcondition, 
ov 
Gali die, Might wk 


or 


FRED A. SMITH CO. 


r b 
A*lantasiie $14 300. 


of r 
ish; ustom- built Cape Cod 
vine inte comb. 
modern kitc 
2 pegrectee, tiled 
ansible bee 


a in rarage “CR 


Tis oy 


rbagemen * wtih 
le ( th or pane & PERRY 


T7172. JU, 9-7622 


Rae eer ae nee ) 
COLORED—NORTHRAST 
1413 Trinidad Ave. 
Own AYES 


ONLY 697.50 PER MONTH 
A small down payment will 


ey tree 


* FRED A. SMITH CO. 


OP REEERSOM yowr 
J RSON ST. NW. 


‘with maid's room 
bath. Don’t miss it twice. 
a Z MENSH & CO. 


Tul 4 
“country | 
Com-| 


enormous 


t- 2-s 
rance: satveale tat Bn a 
thro . 3-ton gir-cend 

ws - 

cal OL. 6-6600. 


built brk.-and-stone ronsieer to. 
cated on over or rm. tub 
Sep. 


uel ©. Bosley Inc.. OL. 6 


Leve 
mbier only 2 years old Cente 
e.. liv room a 


PK 
Rock | 


in perfect 


| eeeee 
JAM 


9525 Ga Ave 
offer on Sropatiiee SUMNER. 
Delle. JO. 2-| © 


ot TE 
Li ss SPECIAL. Nea & 


sama 


CHEVY CHASE, MO. 


This attractive 
penned lot 95x 170 


| Walls is 
| s oO cent 34° fey | 


inten 7 J ae co. Inc, 


A lmost 


| Priced “he 
satel cc (Gol, 
CHEVY CHASE. _Gomerset 
ive brk —o 
din 


3 bedrm 
vith breakfast nook 
ev rec 


with lige 


OL. 6-7800 un 


CHEVY CHASE 


G APPROVED—$1 8,100 


Near Rosemary Schodil. shon- 
Ping end Conn. ave. bus 

very charming older home that 
h been completel: modern- 
ized and decorated in ex 
o_o vin 
he kitchen 


B. WRIGHT. EM * pes 00 
CHEVY CHASE—Rosemary 
ar armine older 


i 


ESTATES —$9800 burs 
Colonial. 
kit.. dDEmt., 


a hedres semidet 

Pp rm.. 
entr.. Anchor 
Wheaton High and 8 
School. GI or non-Ul 


i MAL 


fenoe ne 


COR’ 


2-5441 | 


REMINGTON $650 Dn. | 


NON-VET GEM Levels 3-bedrm 
brick and shinele +7 wt = e}- 
lent cone lar re shaded ay- 
ments like ren ‘Trade. your a ie 
bedrm home } MPARKSIDE -— 

LO. 5-87 


excellent 

ust a few years old and 
in new- nouse condition. Has 3 
twin-sire bedrme« } baths. ga- 
rage. réc. rim.: ecreened porch; 
easy terme w B VRIGHT. 


eeMASS, AVES EXT. 
Brand-new and beautiful 4-bedrm 
2*e-bath brick rambier with fin- 
ished recreation oom. on 
jot All-electric kitchen 

pillt by an experienced builder 
Price. ok ay? one oniy 

be LA NCRARD Realtor 


0 , 

PK ~Sacritice” ‘pi 000 

5-rm. brick rambler 

Daylight bdemt all-electric on 
Gl '$% down. Vacant. $14.5 

best offer BEERS BROS. JU 5 761 

ROCK VILLE—613.600. 3-6 ¢ d room 

for additional 

& modified 

in auiet west 

end community: on wooded corner 

jot: house in like-new condition; 

l)} sell veteran or non- te 

to permit 


x 


below market 


L BOG. 
NC i: eves. Mr 
OL. 7- 

ROCKVILLE 


featuring 


LEY | 
Mullen. ¢ 


+ 
- 


up bs 15 
to school and R... 
Price CARBL 
MBLER 


iring living room. 
e kit ith table space. dish- 

washer end lisposa bemt. with 

re [= beautiful well-landscaped 
rice 


WOOD COMPANY 


Ave 


Brick bense, Aan 


0 


* masonry cottage 
redecorated will ap 
and old. It offers 

Kit. and full 
convertible 


completely 
to youns 
drms 
English Dasement | 
rec reation | 


al 


Sheridan 
_ 71-5384. AD. 3-3 


WOOD ACRES’ 


New co pase homes: € and 7 rms 


porch OF a. available 


'Wood Acres Constr. Corp. | 


OL. 2-7338 | 


OL 4-3240 Eves. 
MOOR—New 
rambler 


“FOR “$600.00 CASH — 


pA can move in and assume pres- 

nt VA loan on this cute two- 
Selreem pam in a neighborhood 
of older ho large eve 


including dogwood 

also available for GI 
for appointment to see this loveiy 
home. Priced at $10.950 


OUTSTANDING VALUE 


Rambler with three 
rooms. porch 
ter bedroom. built 


loa 
will fenatees GI contract. 


ESC. "CONLEY & CO. 


JU. 99-4134 ‘til 9 a 
of Mass... Ave—4 bed- 
rms.. 2 baths. Drick colonial, study 

on ist | semi- 
B® L e for 


FER. 


HAMLET — 
ee rambler sodas 
aree bedrm 2\% 
“ain rm and large. 
x and 
All this bome needs is yo 
a 


BY 2 MENGE & co. INC. 


WERE ELef's0 wece: Immacu- | 
4 


late. ail-brick rambier: 3 bedroom 
\% bath and recreation 
full bemt screened porch. Onis 
$14,100 A. J. KESSINGER & CO.. 
RES Se Re STIRS aE. 
WINTER GETS YOU 
BETTER BUY WHEN YOU 
VISIT LOHR HOMES 
Robert E. Lohr, Realtor 
HE. 4-4000 "Til 9 P. M. RA. 6-3600 


RF- RETIRED -COUPLE—c lose- in Silver 
ring 


2-bedrm 
Bxce ~ ape condition 
14.500 


ment 
lige. kit 


5-1260: 


ublic “end | 
arochial schools and ~ Park. 
oe ae ores. - 
ae _- 
om ou 


4548 
sed DN. ONL NET" 
Viers Mill Village: lovely rm. 
bun ee ta equipped kitéhen: storm 
win bemt. with rec. 


arate | jainins 
tiled 


and 
“eat Great hy mis extreme- 
e at 7 

AM & . cb. J 


uding oF aa 


room ramblers. | Li “Ti i <i 
me a ee kit.. bath. ful 
on \ mares street. 513.000. 


LO. 7-851%, 


e roved. a. 


2 twin bed- 
le attic. com- 
. insulated. 


D 
2 BATHS 
$14,950 

$750 DN.—GI. OR CONV. 
This charming home. close 
everything. is very livabie. offer- 
ing rms... wder room 
Is Lene noe separate , cinins room 

basement ny 


“peti. bre 
UGA, Ret.i, #3 
attrac 
rms 
s. 2'FOR BET 
rm. i 


School 
home wit h 


Catherine's 
é& 


level | 
custom | 


l loti 
with a num bee of wonderful trees ' 
0 is 


Please shone 


2) 
a Situated in the ever popular wood- 


2 + earaae 


room. 


2% baths, din 


schools nea 


y. ad 

Charming a ag fC frame 

Colonial. 6 ' b 

tached sarage "Leeda 

Fr appraised. $18 

med possession ofr 
Realtor 


of 


UN 


PROPERTIES. 


*) 


and comm. pr Call 1O a: 5800 
RE 


sep. din 


heat. storm wind 
easy terme 


’ 
space in ki! 
pte ah ater 


re. stove. 


f- owe 
10 MT 
Beacon Hohts.,  hoverdaiia Md. 


NEW. 3 PEPEMS, BRI 
PULL B 


VETS—30-YR, LOANS 
| NO MONEY DOWN 
$12,750, $79 Mo. Approx. 


INCL yy, & INSURANCE 
r 


way to Riverdale ra 
t. to th ave ‘See 
to, end of 66th ave 
PRA BEDFORD AP. 7-7345 
Homes nce Georses Co 
Tae PERRY BOSW El co 


This new 
rowing family 


eae fi 
AUREL. REALTY 
150 Wash La 


$14.450, HYATTSVILLE! | 


ST JEROME 8 PARISH— 
nci bri 


ire] PA 


3 . ; " : ain 

| Harry rs Boswell Co., 
AP. 7 

rev SUBURB. HOUSES 67 VA. 
VIRGINIA 


Inc. 


LEXANDRIA 
YATES GARDENS 
ENGLISH BASEMENT 
$17,800 
Brick Colonie! ‘owe house repro- 
“tile bath. ‘Paslion 
. With lavatory. kit. and din 


_ walled 
INC. | 


WHARTON A POTTER, 
KI. 9%- 7199 KI 
ALEXANDSIA- 
drm oTick 
iad on 
ane to ere, tn 


is reac 
MoTo™ REALTY. 
ALEXANDRIA AREA 


Only $299 Down—GI 
4 Bedrms., 2 Baths! 


15 minutes out 

mabier. 2 baths 

Total price only 
T 


200 


] . 


INC. Ov me 


$14,850, VA APPROVED. 


| $87 PER MO. 


Includes taxes and insurance 
ene sparkiing 


Silver Spring. M4 
o ‘i 9 


kitehen With washer Call now 


| KI. 8.0777 


Convenient to Fort Belvoir 

Call us on severe! un- 
ranging fro 
down varments from | 
' monthivy payments. 
including taxes and in- 
These wont last 


KI 8.0777 
‘ 24-Hour Phone 
OFFICE OPEN SUNDAY 
| BROOKS REALTY CO. 
ALEXANDRIA 
ALEXANDRIA. sh 4 vd "VERNON 
BLVD. $13.950 pedrm. brk. Ca 
ith freplace ise 


Veteranr' 
youn. burs 


surance. 


in walkin v7 it. 
chools, trans ail 
TY ine, OV 


MOTON REALT 
SUBURBAN 


2 xa 
$1500 DOWN 


3-bedr rick 


ar) 8-6220 
ALEXANDRIA AREA— S300 DOWN 


* to some. lucky GI 


BAe TCOLONTAL 


sect | of Arlington Forest: 6 
~ - and screened porch, modern | 
kitchen »cluding dishwasher ; | 
partialiy anished besement: pay 

arewes: good value for $16.950 


| ARLINGTON REALTY 
2300-19 


; ric 
bier Living rm.. "iaree "Titehen. 
ony. ilocatio $14.750 

REAL ESTATE CORP. 
Arlington. Va 


midetached. eres 

ano extra good value in an attrac- | 

tive brick home only 10 minutes | 

by bus to Pentason. Living frm.. 

dining rm... 3 attractive —— 
rms. and bath up Pull. dry 

Close shops vm, ‘and | 


’ 


24 10 Columbia Pike. 


" ~ 
“garage: many extras: trans, 
; full 


Da * 


call 
4-5757 


' t sepa- 
; Jarge jot! 
PHA Norms | "Call JA. 4-1300 


AP 
houses iot | 


Price 
Conley sa ce oe 7-6293 
FADE 


HOMES 
Ts 


right, 


mty | 


GI or 
> 


8-3511.) 


89500 | 


| FIRST 


rambilers. | 


\ 


SALE SuOURE. MUSES 67 VA. Aue uoueR. wousEs 67 vA, 


CRESCENT HILLS 
N. ARLINGTON’S MOST 
DESIRABLE TO 
ALL-BRICK HOMES 
3 and 4 Bedrooms 
2 and 3 BATHS 
wpuilé “All vs es yh 


: 


4-bed 
tom. puilt 


cus- 
All 
n- any 
individual “leat 

conventional Reancine 824. 950. 


bath 
le ull basement 
inaacing $21,500 


3-be a brick Tram- 
Gl or FHA 


Boe homes fust completed and 


for immediate occupan- 
Sepynis- Built. For appt. to 


ey 
insp 


M. T, Broyhill & Sons 


THE WORLD'S LA gar. 
ee rele 


FR OF BRI 
0 Lee Hwy. net at 
FAIRFAX COUNTY 
New 7-room brick at leve! 

bler 4 bdbedrm 2 
thon rm.: wo ded ie Tooxd00 ft 
$22. 950. Terms 


MAC LINDSEY 


7-221), KE. 8.2306 


PALLS CHURC H 
CALIFORNIA CUTIE 
A @eliantful touch of the conte 
porary! Carport-—full 
P23 bright bec rooms 
only “ 


JA 


et: 
y oy aD 
ARLINGTON "REALTY 
2 TY JA. 10200 Til» 
1 SHUR 
 storh BUNGALOW 


or APPROVED! Convenient 
erything. offe 2 snod 
and mammo h kitchen 
room is spacious large Ancli 
+4 peed, only $12.950. Come on out. 


ARLINGTON REALTY | 

2212 Wilson Bird. JA nw 29 
LiS CHURC 

DREAM COME TRUE 


Gonsi rusted, by . master ider 


nancing avail- | 


tn pection ‘DY ap- 
nim 


Sie, oi REALTY 
2212 Wilson Bivd. JA. 7-9300 “T 
—— pao say A, 


rice r " ZT 

eont ky 0. J- Ww REALTY co 
| JA. 8-187 am “ 

L a BARC OFT vIEW- -Spotlens 

drm. ram re rm 

foi bsmt a Psn | 

rg down te 


trust Priced 
CROWELL & CO INC. A +: 07 07 


N, ARLINGTON 
Career Service 
Specials 


SERVICE PERSONNEL 
Rieht here NN. Arlington 
15 minutes from es Pentagon at 
in : ich ca 
| topped canons lent. wise 
| 3 spacious bedrms 
Be. with fireplace. nice 
ine “L. & hoaut iful tiled bath 
and a modern x) ion lar@e enouch 

Just around the cor 
su Vv) reir Lia's 
rat hooping center 


$20,5 


POMPONIO 


ae, will 


ac- 
ere o 


fust 
id 
he 


Peat ures 
large lvinge 
-eized din- 


64560 


22 son Btl\ 


$250 CASH—GI 


er mo pius 
brick home 
very close 


taxes 
with 
in and 


, 


|Mannas.  Rity., JE. 2-3110 
WHAT'S IT WORTH 


OWNER SAYS $13.950 
WE SAY $12,950 
YOU S6EE—MAKE OFFER 


3-bedrm. buaselow. dining rm. die 
_- kit 
-acre iat 


LYNN REALTY, 


sit. 750— Brick 
en acreened 
geners _— garage. 


blocks o 10 
Dus or conventional 
thon REALTY. 
wow [ L.—-WHAT A one — GI 
ppraised. $17,300, 3 bedrms 
baths, fmished reer 
t screened owt 


Je 


rancher 


2-9400 | 
with 
porch 


dishwasher lar In 

bs me eS RORSCHACH REAL- 
WIL, BUILD 
= will build 3- bedroom, fembier 


EAL ‘ 53-1946. ‘s a. 
FOR V RGINTA PROPERTIES 
mas MARCUM CO. KI. &.- ‘6600 
$700 WN 
large lot mont week 
to pee, A Ry ey ae, seatty in 
50 ; 


Pal) 
LTY Ie 40274 
‘OFreki 


| eae TON 
NG 
hew 


7 


charm perched 
ting of con’ 


TOM MORR ISON 

een LISTINGS REALTOR 
AGINE «a 
r 


F-Bedrm. | 


* Close ilver 
Spring—3 bedrms. 2 bathe. sep 
n. rm., pl astered walls and eayip 


at 950 On. LAM = 
_»-6550. 9 - 


| Family. Slee | 
This home ite ideal for the 
larcer family features 
3 bedrms 


tion 
and’ the one 
will get their moneys worth 


Yeonas Realty, Inc. 


2313 Wilson Bivd 8-2100 
MULTIPLE LISTINO REAL TOR 


4BEDRMS.—$800 CASH 


$118 per mo.: spotless con- | 
: femeed yard: convenient lo-/| 
Move in with down pay-' 


Mannas Rity., JE. 2-3110 


ARLINGTON 
Ra ambler—Pover into 21-ft. liv. rm 


Clos 
ey erything 
Ca oe 


To 
Lesnienell with low down 


Deym ae 
ARI LEDOE REAL ESTATE CORP. 
2533 bs oR, Bivé Arlington. . Va 


Pr 


Crntemed’ Rambler 


Here is one of those famous 44-ft 


attic; prised a $21,500 To in- 


spect. call 
ARLINGTON REALTY 


a',-bath split level: “fintshed ree. 
reation room; trees: 3.950. JW 
2 


separate dining my “bull 
detached earece $4 - 


rms 
basement, 


t call 
N REALTY, INC., OV. 


VERLY HICCS 
SPLENDOR 


Situated on corner level lot with 
Lowering trees, best brick con- 


c 
oor leads in- 


vn Hy separate 

family kitehen with bg 7 
ast nook. 3 bedrms 

a rT  . 


COUNTRY COUSIN 
PUtusted ently, 8 Kye Wigetes trem 


BRAND NEW 


largest rambler we have had 
for sale for & lon time for $15.90 
exceptionally (replace 
<a room, P full bam 
outeice eniran 


Mannas Rity.. JE. 2-3) 10 


ADDED to this Immaculate 


ae ROB nh Oe AVIS co 
WN HOU 
GI OR CONVENTIONAL 


IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY 


ge o- joontes 3-bedrm. brick 
hom rom pou naten 


it 

. and storage 

piaverounds 

ING ARRANGED TO MEET 
OUR BUDGET 


$13,200 
Agent on Pipanie Daily ' 
r. $-2216 


Directio Out 
Bhirlington shopp! neg 
lo Pair! 


model house at 1616 ‘Ken wpod ave | 


Larchmont Realty, Inc. | 
ty t : | 
‘wore 


— o rm 
plus 20x10-ft. family rm 
bargain at A, 


$12,950. Eves. J 
$5033 LYN THOMPSON. JA” 
o Buy or 


ELL REALTY. 


lontal 


years oid. 
basement 


5 rooms, full U daylight 
2 places. 

bale kitchen 
Only - 


ire 
Anchor tone 
1 1,400. THE LAGRIE 


it! Not often de we 

where the owner wants 
le cash and 

the first trust. m 
so easy to pan 


, 
Wide center hall, inate | ‘ving im 
with st 
ei’ ho od tage Fig Fm. 


REALTY 65 


we did 


In 
$15.000. 


eRieee 


7 


SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67 VA. 
Megnifieen’ new white brick h 

rawlings on a ‘ys acre of gent ‘ 

sleping countryside. superbly con- | @ 

atructed with fine | 

ans attention to detai throw 

yrac center-hall ee 3 

Sith fireplace in livine room. truly 

large dining room, de 

juipped Kitchen, 3 twinpsize 

* and 2 full baths: com- 

finished daylieht basement 


recreation room attached | 
garace. screened porch 632.500 


ans ation 
s 
OTAL Paice ONL 


Cali u 
end 


BLUEBERRIES — 
Varieties 

afid enjoy 
b: wae ty jes 
18-in si 


Giant Cultivated 

Plant this delicious fruit 
res fro ote en or cannes 
" plan VOR : 


Ur he 
2 


& CO. 


J. Wesley Buchanan, Inc. | 


SEAR RCH NO “FURTHER 


—Kl_ $-40 


Bhopping Center 


Yeonas Realty, Inc. 


® SAILING 


_45 FT. BRICK RAMBLER 
Quaker lane ps 9 wil) hand 


TOMORROW'S _| 


MRAONWEAL TH 
PROPERTIES, INC 
Glebe Rd nth, §-8968 


Sylvan 
Retreat 


packed. 


Arthur L. Walters, Inc, 
NN. Randolph at Glebe JA 5200 


VIRGINIA “PROPERTIES — 
CHAUNCEY REALTY CORP. __ 
TE. 6-432 24. — 5: =4i 37 


| Deep 4 the Heart 


Ar os 7. 


Ask for free 
copy 56. Dace Plantine Gat te rete. 
log a 
+ 


Lan dace og Plant 


ria, ER ies 
Ww YNESBORO. ie 
‘ VIRGINIA’ 

FINEST QUALITY PRUIT TRERA 
Re : peach. apple wprar. 
cot and necta- 
gi uick- 
, Let ts send you 


\ his sweet 
ick co lonial hem :. 
’ hed rms baths 
: he a 
custom-built brict ~ , wen ireplace and mi! 
' se hasem en’ 
atornr 


of sine 


Charrr - 


Brick firep! ace wall 
hadow box and 


730 
aining ares. ‘huge : Yeonas Realty, Ine. 
rt birch ee - 2313 

and over Mi 
ha mee ie 
mu 2-APARTMENT HOME 
A REAL 
TRADE 

AS YOUR 


eccupancy 
iving room, 
cabinets in 
ie 
TRAILERS. ao 


FOR NATIONALLY 
Fomes _ vinit < ohie ‘, 
INVESTMENT of j “a to north 


he 
Mad Pe one +h 5.1922 
YOUR HOUSE 


DOWN PAYMENT 
FOR NEW 2-FAMILY DUPLEX 
IVE IN. ONE SENT ONE 

INCOME PAYS | EXPENSES 
‘ n on each f 


100 
t TiteR r STING REAL TOR 


with 

‘Arthur L Walters, 

Rarcoioh at G 

sowPrer TERS AC ' 
500 GI joan 


iret time 
immediate 
excellent Laure! 
Inc 
7-5200 
Assume huce 
approved. &» 
bsmt 


\ ee 


New 
. fron ae tee ikon 

Gl apprained om 
ter 


Ex. 


conventional 
ph. oa as ae ; 
PREY. JE 13 224 at s Ar 
DANIEL E. RAGALIE 
OT. 4-9410 REALTOR rT. 4-9410 
758 236 8 5... Arrington. Va 


FIT FOR A QUEEN 
IT DOESN’T REQUIRE 
A ROYAL .RANSOM 


‘For AS LITTLE as $2500 cash piu 
low settiement cost you can own 
this house in Country Club Hill 
Pairtax Co., _ Located on a beau- 
tiful is lot 
offers you 
ree oe 


Visit us and 
Free Travel 
the lucky one 


American Trailer Co. 
52700 Wis Ave 
Open 9 9 
osed Sind 
neve ral 
c “omplet —y 63195 
BI ATR MOBILE HOMES CO 


blank for 
You may 


et vour 
raiier 


‘ 
be 


Clo 

2] ~eeren 
git creene + 

DAYLIGHT 
A rea 
Ww’ _ s v 

rye P ee n 
4 -" 
of “$22 94 


naan? ex! ' n 
an with a ' a! 
ROUTH. ROBBIN 
REAL ESTATE CORP 
KT 8-4000 rte 


ANNANI DALE, ASBOC 


total saies prix noo 


7 +n. — 
Syeaese zapiier Village 
Va Rea v ~1248 


PERSONAL LOANS 90A 


Licensed mney _—_ Loan Lawes 


exce! 
KELLEY t PROSTSE® CORP. 


3-0015 OR CR. 3-234) 


DELUXE SPLIT-LEVEL 


Tn wary poeress section on large. 


aie 
4.¢ 


af 


Es 
JE 


» 
JE. 7424 JE 6080 
cU sTOM BUILDER ior 
few who oan build @ aualit 
reasonarl just finishin 
10d. can si tart a new home f 
im eariy peuruers ON YOU R LOT 
bee vou WE 
p Te . your 


| EROWELL & eo” “INC. 


5-0707 


: Youre Seri Signature 


On Jus 
Amer! x) ceR ON v 2-0510 


a 0 


ige. 
den and another 
= Dermt.. 


pennant ae JE. 2-3110 “LUXURY L 


rT. SERA. RAML ot a3 wedrmes 
and oni Entr 
a step- 


“OOK 
4-Bedrm. split Level 


; 
i 
= 


jostta Lose | 2 
(POIANA 
CONFIDENTIAL 

LOANS BY PHONE 


On Your Signature Only 
Suburban Finance Ce. 


S339 BR). Ave. TN. 4-7200 
S608 East-West Hwy. O11. 27-9500 
ew Georgia Ave. Ju. %a0a2 


JA 


Large Family? 
Then See This 
POUR BELIRMS.. PLUS NURSERY 
OR DRESSING RM. PLUS ADDI : 
TIONAI L, MAID bes} BEDRM 3 , ' 
cheerful living rm.. with firep tJ. “Wes ley Buchanan, Inc 
fir a rch, Radio 5 4-1155 


Ouick-Confidential 


LOANS 
MARYLAND CASH LOAN 4 


7898 Geercia Ave. JT. &-T85% 4 
5337 BR. L. Ave. UN. 4-5178 > 


ee 


JUST OPENED - 


A NEW LOAN OFFICE 
RESIDENTS’ FINANCE CORP. 
OF MT. RAINIER 


LOANS IN 2 HAS. 
We specialize in 
loans te women 

S725 Rhede mmod, Ave. 
Rainier M4. Pr. tere 


epiace 


Value Plus 
72-FT. RAMBLER 


Ari 


Radio Bide JA. 4-1155 


Bl- BI-LEVEL 


masonry bi- 
liv — Tm 


pope 


4 


‘. «6 ¥ c 
Le f living space — 
priced at $27,150 


contracts accepted 


Yeonas Realty, Inc. 


=7 


Reas 
and FH 


J. FULLER GROOM CO. 
MULTIPLE LISTING BROKER 


231 


aru i TIL ; t isTING ReAt TOR 


SALE, OUT-OF-TOWN 


al MARYLAND 
orice FOR COML., fh Ree 
acres 


; convenient 
par and Pentagon: 3 bdedrme.. 
basement and enced vard 

lectric kitchen including 
S a 


Mt 


1an 
Write 
Phone 


ne cr 
vy 


Dev 
mi oY : 

Salisbury 
"97 


: iT? 
Rew Md 
’ 


‘ 
7 
4 ra 


Great New idea 


CASH-NOW 
PAY-LATER 


— “Seco Lee | 
Va. Pr roperties LOU tsA—10 bathe. 


or ms 
REAL ESTATE SERVICE INC oi) heat 815,500, for. $2 5.000 home 
4763 Lee Hwy. (off Giebe) JA 7-9000 _$500 mo TE. 6-413) 


REAL ESTATE WANTED 69 
“Fi Rongged Stone WILL BUY PROPERTY 


Brtek or Tome. white or KG 5, Cae 
: t MT Co | 
| Pine | _— 
INTERIOR 


MR 
: —a 
70 
combinat 
on 


VIRGINT 


S353, Eves “TA 
eo LAND, Salt 


VIRGINIA 
, $50 MO. bus 
> lige rms pore n 

cord white 1m 
les south TE. 


> Get cash now 
for @ Fresh Start 
and pey later m 
monthly amounts .yous 
can aflord. Phone for 
i-visit loan, or come in 


for 83750 


elec 
ibe 


S150 DN. 
} acres 


; 


Se nile 


4 perfe ' 


' 6-413! 
FARMS FC FOR RENT 


Le 
TWO-STORY ‘-ROO™M HOUSE 
Newly dex running water. off Old 


ome ae cee 
don LOTS FOR SALE 
WARY LAND 
oe aR A Ls 
$»00 is 


wove it an Sigi 
750 Canventional 


jb econ} L. Walters, Inc. 
NM Randeiph al Gicos. 1A. 7-5200 


Properties 
GOLONIAL. "REAL 3 A ?, 
Realtors. Build 


oe KING STREET 
2nd Fleer + Alexandria 
Phone: King 8-5858 
Open everings — phone tor hoor 
teen: made t© rendente of off Lerrending twwng 


7 


R $33 900 


Ir YOUR TASTE Is fF 
ur or $27 B00 


poc ket book 
_ For co lor ec 
Defense H ehway 
terms. AP 113) 
. Dasement 


ay oh H A Oe bie ,eacre wooded 
} 7 aun 
ROUTH ROBBINS 
REAI,. 


1h _ exclusive | subdiy ston 
rom D« off Indian Head 

hwy Beaut pie tor your rambier 
7's ry th eck | Best offer 


ON YOUR SIG- 
NATURE ALONE 
WOMEN’S LOANS 
Our Specialty! 
WE CAN MAKE 
YOU A LOAN IN 
Phone 


2 H rs. Now 


ONLY ONE TRIP NECESSARY 


MARYLAND Cash Loan 


737 Rhede Isl. Ave. UM. 4-5177 
[808 Geergia Ave JU. 9-t862 


Wheaton Finance Co, 
ones T lon, ES S 


Suburban Finance Ce. 
3339 Rhede Isl. 

7900 Geergia Ave 

1608 East-West H 


) at ibe RS 


“approved. 
AP 


ae NTION Reautiful 
Street 


; ’ . 
Arline - Fo w +] on A 
+ 


M 


ful 


A FEATHER IN. 


YOUR CAP 
$13,950—GI 


An ideal home. for en avers 


AP 
| BEAUTIFUL stFE—2 30 feet front 
American 7f 


on saree Mar lboro 
. 


a. Mar 
- © a 


% 
Ww 
Mow TIP! = : isTINO REAL fon 


: .8 Be rt 1% 

LANGLEY- eS VA. 

CALL EL. 6-416! 

FISHING from Chain Bridge, 4:1 i 5 wen: 
l%-acre wooded lot $3 50 


| Mrs. Wm. #. _Laugh! in, Realtor 


BUILDERS” ATTENTION 


OFT 00% 
Singles or roups etart | 
uliding immediately cellent fi- 
nancing and subordination cee re- 
, 4-3900; RA 


27-6486 


Within walking distance of rour 


in besutiful 
contemporary aw X 2 lev 


sis 
baths. | , 
reation rm. with fireplace. Un- 
weualy large ' 


Resident's Finance Core. 
75 BR. L. Ave, AP. 17-0208 


| 


i LOTR Sewer. wate 


n-beam “ 
Sificent picture wind ana 
preliminary Dist 
ated 


age provides excellent 
storage spece. Big lot has 
ering shade trees and flowering 


dog wood 
LURIA BROS. - 


2048 Wilson Biva JA. 77-8500 


LOTS WANTED 74 
MARYLAND 
more lots. acr 
. OF Heard 
CO..* RA 
ACREAGE, SALE 


MARYLAND 
AC cee ea tracts. 
; mo 


LOAN 
Convenient 
poparete 


LARGE GI 
settine We we LED 
in 


eace and 
farm y 


Md 
tad Pa to clean up all of those | 
7 extra expenses, why not 


phone or visit HFC! Bor- | 


breakfast 
outside en- 
500. 


email 
Richardson & Hall, Inc. 


Bid Ari a 7- My | 


EDWARDS REALTY 


basement 
$19 


ce Gar 


wooded | row up to $1000 with little 
or no fuss. 
Life insurance on oll HFC leans 


witheut extre cost te yeu. 


SEHOLD 
SOFINANCE 


Opes Soturdeys until 1:00 P.M 
SILVER SPRING 


S441 Coles E 
1 ville Oe inl par a2 


7914 Geor to Ge 
ONE: Pepe 5 anes 


SUITLAND 
4612 Surtiand Road 
PHONE: JOrdan 8-9364 


MT. RAINIER 


yee “lurfaced De roa $150 
‘4 left) PARK | 
Sipe REALTY 


5-g775 
STYLING | , PETS, KENNELS | 
TODAY t BASS AKC Ri 4 


shots. Excellent | 
3 igediine 
for tmmediate occupancy 0. 


after 
692. 


pee | cages | 


4 
Bes eee 15th 
li. ext An- 
Ready 
Heres 
porary 
of eye appes! inside and out. 
reom with 


epiace wall with 
and raised flagstone ehearth. 
ces “house e) i 


| SJ, “brown pup- 

AKC: smali standard gine, 

q conservatively pric 7+1007 
rea- KEES 

ray. AKC reels. 


ahw 
freezer. top refrigareter': 
rooms. 2 LL TILED 


aster 
Males. true wolf 
Hatt masemont im Aten Champ. line 


ange p h-Batto | 


4406. 
Bonn eR eter. oh. ee hae 
FARM AND GARDEN 


‘4 
wheels m5. 5 
Sabo. disies "2 
on 
r ork. 1980 
pe 43 bon gh 
alte aon 


<“ ~9197. 


It's sense te 
rade & 


tohiman ‘Chevrolet 
3270 M ST. NW, 
2-4614. AD 81 


~ MANDELL 
TRUCKS 


$95 DOWN 


peme Treck. Unusually 
CHEV. $695 


Canesy Fapress. Seal 
clean. Priced te sell. 


Nichelle Ave. %.%. 
3-105) Lt. 4-4600 


AUTO, CABS, TRUCKS Hire 
ees -8 and 


> wa 
tractor tral 
A 80 fiat trucks for hire a 
92 


AUTOMOBILES WANTED 96 
CASH FOR 


Rich Brtees for clean cars, stat 
Pickups: any abe mod 


_», WOLFE WotFe” MOTORS 
ars “Needed for 
EXPORT 


TU. 2-5415 


BILL ADAMS 
3720 Ga. Ave. N.W, 


c 


OR WILL Pape seit OR DOWN 


BLASS ‘ ct 


CASH MA 


PENN 
" 


SS 


oer ake “a 
or all menee “ cars 


2201 


Cars Needed for 


| EXPORT 


-PIDE OFFER | oN. Por MAR 


Vox coke To YOUR Nome 
CALL 


TU. 2-4200 


BILL ROSS 
7400 Ga. Ave. NW. 
CARS 
WANTED 


Our steck is low one pur ogut 
geslers, pace “ ners 
to 


ASE ne ibe Gatee 


Cadillacs Wanted 


PENNY MOTORS 
vr gay Bie ae te wut be 


wa 


HN GIFPORD MOTORS. INC. 
2501 Columbie Pike Arlington. 
A. 5-9223 
AUSTIN HEALEYS—i9% and 1906 

some . 2 


One-owner cars. 
ne | 5.000 miles 
m 


HORNER’S “CORNER 


Pia. Ave ri at 6th. 
4th (Downtown) 


to 
doo and converts 
ot colors AYATTS 
hode aig! ave. 


raed B. 


viers, 


. ul ww) 
= H. AP practically 
* You'll agar A, ss 
bareain at $1395, Ask for . Bale 
StohIman Chevrolet 


3270 M ST. NW, 
AD. 22-4614 AD. 2-16 
BI Ce _ so¢ S-Geer Roadmaster 


~ 
ae 


eat + Sig 
like new. 12.200 miles only. 82 
oO b- 


& M ats. nw. DI. 71-8196 op in 
doors from 9 ¢ me hs anders. 
""4-4r. 


h. 
teerine 4 and | “brakes, 


Ue« 


hydra. power st 
electric veneers: 


oe aoe 


lack Cus inter 
mmed by Cadiiac s foremost 
etyiist. Pully equipped including 
er steering. power brakes. G 
ir-eonditioning » oh te $1900 o 


cce « 
‘apitol Cadillac- Olds Co. 


-2600 _ 


222 22nd St 
L 


iie's anc * and | 
need 


; 
Power steering $2395 | 
C guarantee 


Capitol Cadillac-Olds Co. 
ay vit mit * 


Distine! v- 


22! 


ch 
sre 
=u J Ba 
Bes 
ter! or desi« NM. 
E powes steering. | 
a cco et. guarante | 
apitol Cadillac- Olds Co. 
1222 pd St ha » 
oup le. 
tne) ludes soeet steering 
akes. electric windows & 
Very low mileage 


urban Cadillac-Olds 
RRADLEY meer ine gdh 


Bethesda 
CLOSED rie NDAY. 


rsa to 
rout ‘ hoice at 


ped 


Eau! pment 


full; 
Swr - Country 
ne wo 


ave 
Fado Be | © 
autitu 


rtible ‘coupe. Be 
ri sh white orien top Al 
juxe equipment including power 
wer srazes Raber 
Ba ° man y hundreds off 


, guarantee 
Capitol | Cadillac: 


NW. ST. 3 -2600- 


too 
ine fodime 
ri rate 


On miles 
MOTOR “SAL FS 
..6-2290. 


Reliable Parties 


‘50 Cadillac 


#62" 4-DOOR SEDAN 
$45 DOWN | 


Chauffeur-driven one-owner driv an! 
embassy automobile: fully equipped 
w! a 


llitary personnel 
t employes. officers 


MILLER nih ae Lat 


_ LL 4-2396 


Stina Ec 
270 M ST Nw 

jon n wanon 

“_ -Dass., 

’ tne $5), 

denviceumn Pi. 


D - 
50 fleet fine 
surf greet r 


Dpavymen' a; 

om Mae Chevrolet 
3270 M ST. NW 

AD AD. 2-1646 


2-461 
CHEVROLET— 34 4-door, low mile- 
| h. like Bee, Ore. | | 


’ 


uel pum 
Hampden 

a S 
< eg) 


3% Dank. 6 6 
BERVICEMEN - 


FINANCED 
FHEVROLET. 
- On t 


iow & 


‘7 fiserftn e 4- dr 
95 . 


.— “ 
$5 an Ase yi 


g's ons 
Mr. Sa 


. 
Stoh!iman Chevroet 


as 


BERVICEMEN 


ib coupe. eaulp. cus 
ime: new paint 
725 or beat of- 


Aiki 


gree 
7 


“1 Vous 


"ARCADE PONTIAC 
1437 ing St. NW AD. 4-8500 
CHEVROLET = 34 my tuton de luxe 


ny a ea! 
14).)0n 
Lu ~~. screen 


ag ee Cheveetil 
37 0 MA ST NW. 
AD .2-4614 
cHEVROLET ‘4 
Peau ify ern | 


: 
c7.1Gef 


ate nna "N 134 $1.205 
Kenvon-Peck Chevrolet 
2606 | BR A 


; Oper 


c By RO! Fr 


- 


excellent 


"MONROE FORO” 


3°73 Weat Hw 
qT’ 
CHEVROLET 
¥ 


CHRYSLER 


P 7an4 


47 Cor 
‘> 


WHEELER. INC 
HRYSLER-PLYMOUTH-IMPERIAI 
ARG EST W ASHIN« bTON DF ALES 


’ 81296 
TEE Ee INC 
OHR YSLER-PLYMOUTH-IMPERIAL 
ST WASH! SOTON “DEA! ER 
\ in NW EM 3-47 


52 Tins er! al 
oose drrtner 
ae 


995 
INC 
HRYSLER-PLYMOUTH- IMPERIAL 
“ARG EST v ASHINGTO = 
4800 Wisc 
CHR SLE a 


CHARYSL ERs . 
Seve ai Oo ci 
eo! sppeG 


AALN 
Ne 
7 
A 


ty or bes a! omer. Du. 7.8249 
c ugY SLE 52 New Yorkers 

ay Coicr Combinations —. 
ss Sinmiont All l-owner cars prop- | 
erly condit ened and puarenhes’. 
Pr av from 


WHEELER, 
HRYSLER-PLY MOUTH- }MPERIA P 
,ARGEST W ASHINGTO LEALE 

00 Wisconsin eM 3-4708 
Fordomatic 
‘HE 4-9189 
{058 Falrlane club sedan 


Victor! 
95 


Xe MON ROE FORD 


12097 t.West Hwy &) 
IU 3- Thos _Open ‘til 9 P 


NEW 
‘26 FORDS 


130 TO CHOOSE FROM 
nS at 


Ait’ F ANDERS 


1300 14TH St NW 


1114 VT. AVE. NW. 


TERRIFIC! 
‘54 i mee $1145 


‘ 
‘ 
‘ 
4 
. 
‘ 
‘ 
. 
‘ 
‘ 
, 
5 
’ 
‘ 
5 
' 


ARLINGTON, VA. 
9140 LER MWY. : JA. 2.9008 


| Foap's4 Costomiine y-6. Rr end 
har: over pay 
Cash. | 1237 past yest wy.. Silver 


3. dr 
$1395: : five (85) ectinie wa: at * 
| Dank. 


‘ad ‘54 Victorias 


Olds Co. | % 
| & 


_| AR 2:4614 AD. 2-1686 | 


1846 For 
boi, VIC} 


| Motnrs. 


er 
MER . RY. 


CER YSLER- PLYMOU TH.- J MPERIAL 


nO 7-2700 Breach cr 1810 King 


Chit 
try " pistion Wages: 


INC | 


D—'54 Custom “9” 

light green 

t covers ed d 

©. 409A. 30-day warranty, 


trade an rms 
MONROE ie 
ring 


ae shester 


—s 
13 ¥Y MOTO 


oria 
EMBASS" 
sedan. 


6% 


bal A. §-9197 SERV- 
irae 


$95 DOWN 


4 To Choose From 

equipped wit 

all leather 
for 


h 7. -7 
interior fully | 
month i 

y be arranged ff you | 
y job and good credit. | 
oF 6 credit approval call | 


HILL & SANDERS 


baler i 7 ten's Oldest Pord Dealer 

300 14th ST. NW q 

roED— $5 Polplane fully equipped. X 
pg 2.088 


sedan. 
ished in beautiful admiral bine 
or sebso ely otless 
with oh ~ ay duecmne 


fin- 
inN- 


Count Nic -1845) 


| of Russia 


an. pay 


™ Stohiman sR 
3270 M ST. NW 


‘S2 FORD 
REPOSSESSED 
$329.50 TOTAL 


4-dr ; Sedan. Beowiit) n a 4 es 

ish; equippe wn take 

up balance at $21. fi per mo. For AUTOMOBILE, SALE . 
—_—_—— 


wwe tt credit v 
approval cai) , 33 Mer ropoliten 


‘BUCK MOTORS 


2521 nti $. UN. iD es 


a ae dor: 


97 
2-ton 

soa8. 
5) dollars down 
ba JA. 58-9197 


NASH— 51 Statesman sray ‘- door 
sedan exce) mechan n 
everedar heater 


He custontin te 

ré@« 
67905 
after 


n Neds 
mow tire 
day Sunday 


ve 
c ining ea’ ne 
KE &-4846 al 

werkacaryt 
CL.DemOn sth “RR” Holiday 

pe ANDARD TRANSMIB- 
BION r wt "4 on very 
clean throug 


POHANKA SERVICE 
126 20th St. NW. __DI. 7-103 


eo | models 9! 
“CON ON ones MOTORS. 
-4900 


6 Co mone. 
Md PO 
= af- 


equipped 


| FRR ry he WR, alg 


3200 Penns. A ° aaet Lu 
ine sentertibts 
beautiful atone lack and vrelle 
with matenhing interior. © -w. tires 
Fordomati« 
miles 
ten pare e and 
-West Hey. Sil. Spe 
on To PM 


ustom. econ 


hed 
; 


Sis5 oe ner. 


terms 


merce 
Rock. 
on Ds ay" 


Cae n 


53 Supe 


r 
and Me ite 


305 cc guarant 


| Capitol Cadillac- Olds Co. 


ST. 3-26 
Ns Rocket Mode 


cor 

N PENANCED 
19 2 Custom 8” Tudor. R. iz im 
ordomatic poss. “Packer “BR len 
ett A ne LA. | sacrifice $225. Terms $10 Gown. | 


—- "Sh roadster Call me Mon. Pick up car Tues 
save 8500 Jack ae ROPER. LA 6-2 


—ss 
“wholigay coupe 
pain R nd 
— sheerinn 
saaiomens 

w-car warranty 
OTOR SALES 62 
NE. LA. 6-2200 


; executive 
car 14th | 


Pry 


cin 
excellent transportation & at reavon. | 
able rig oO 


D4 ve. NA. 8-5 

al Monterey | 3 
rauipoos.! ew blue and white 
| Capitol ¢ Cadillac: Olds Co. | 
22-2600 | 


can: gas- 


uy 


‘54 OLDSMOBILE 
“88” HOLIDAY 
REPOSSESSED 
$1195 TOTAL 


No Cash Needed 
On-Approved Credit 


Arlington. Va 
m ti-9 350. 


‘93 MERCURY 


Mor’ erer sper roupe re 
Mercomatir. electric windows 
buy anywhere 


$585 


Ne cash needed on creqit aprrova! 
For credit approval. cal 


7-4904 
CARR MOTORS 


1518 Pa. Ave. BE 


<5 


towners financed. For 


credit approval cali 


RE. 7-3890 
BOB WILSON 
| 3rd & K Sts. NW. 


Morovinorr 


WHOSE WIFE HATED HIS FAVORITE AUTHOR 
BOUGHT Tue COLLECTED WORKS 
OF VOLTAIRE ANNUALLY FOR 43 YEARS 


OLDSMOBIL F—1955 


*. 


: 
eee Ghee » = i 


~~ fF 


a a 


ne ema Pe -* 


The GEYSER ROCKS OF IONA 


Scotiand 
IN ROUGH SEAS WATER SPOUTS HIGH IN THE AIR 


THROUGH VENT HOLES IN THE ROCKS 


~—— 


Crty Hall, Freiberg Germany 
A LADDER USED IN AN 
ATTEMPT TO KIDNAP 
2 GERMAN PRINCES 
WAS ORDERED EXECUTED 
IN 1455 - BUT THE 
SENTENCE WAS 
LATER COMMUTED To 
“ETERNAL 


TER 
/MPRISONMENT * 


y/ 


@ me Bing Prem been be Verwoerd 


AUTOMOBILE, SALE “97 


eas acess — 53 Clipper de luxe se 
cream 


$1045 Equipped 81095 
OL. 9- & 


51 OLDS “BB” | “amtol Cesillac Olds Co 
REPOSSESSED PACKARD—'49 Lt’ 
$299.50 TOTAL | i 


ea? 
Beau’ ifu i b ack 
lipped 44 50 down 
+. - take =, bal ance at only $20.16 
th Por credit approval 
nail Di 51 


SECURITY MOTORS | 
4th & N.Y. Ave NW. 


Open Today. 9 "til 


engine. 


Hy 
exceptionally nice 
S72. 


an ae 
pois Term 
ma? 


"50 FORD 


t-deor;: fully eautpved. 
FULL 
PRice 
No money down, take over 
bank payments 
For Credit Approval Call 


DI, 7-2404-5 
CERTIFIED MOTORS, INC. 


Srd A K Sts. N.W. 


4. door pecan 6-2 700 
ish ulls eS 


“> 
aded ith tras 


wo 
servi ced reguiariy by wus 
th confidence f 
dest Oldsmobile dea 


POHANKA SERVICE 


1126 20th St. NW DI. 7-1003 | 


__ 48 OLDS 


Others to Choose From 


TERMS OR TRADE 


ARCADE PONTIAC 


Washington's Largest 
Penusee Dealer 


Many 


MERCURY 
SUN VALLEY 


A 
’ Ste USED ( AR + ‘ae 
37 Irvine St, 
460 14th St nw. 


Ste, pute, ngemalls 
"Leaving count 
oe 8-0386. 5:30 te @: 


| Feather | up 
: bh: 
g the in to see t $690. Ca 
maculate mie and gold 
fully ; a" ou 
— ‘such 
lease ask 4, stock No. 


Convers: -~Peck Chevrolet 


2636 Wiison Bivd.. Arlington. Va 


rion, | Capitol Cadillac- Olds Co. 
“and def tires “ PONTIAC 56 SEDAN 
$1899 


armains we have hed. im «a 
time No. 9 


955 | Blarchiet ae de lune 
le coupe Biue 


power 


steering, power rakes. 
guaran 


lone 


| ¢ ondivienes and 


$145 DN. 


RAH: wow. tires: 
matic; power 
EXTRA CLEAN! 


OPEN 6 AM.-10 PM 


No Cash 
Needed 


Merco- 
steering. 


Fer Credit Approval Call 


The Auto Center 


12th and K Sts. N.W. 
ST. 3-6624 


FORD Feairlene 4-door, 


-door 

seat cov 
immecul 

- ner 


~™ B& 


radio neat 


late 
Wort 


INC. 


inal ray fini sh 
mi ease. R, 
rar 


WHEELER, 


LOOK! 
‘S1 DODGE .. $485 


4-dr.: ©. and heater. €466-A. 


on 
hwhile 


pe WASHINGTON Js 
o . = 
ext atars a l a at a Kenyon coor Peck 
. “iae ch : 
TD's.’ : 


ARLINGTON. VA. 


JA. 2.9001 
CAR IS 


ca 475 


We can deliver to you a 


‘56 Plymouth 
FOR ONLY $54 


(PER MO.) 


onal, Senarens gee Ins. 

empany Care 

BETHESDA MOTORS 
t Dreter 


le > wf 
Miller’ ‘and. ‘Wise Aves. 
noe 


‘54 
CADILLAC 
De Ville 
$395 DN. 


newer 
brakes; 
tires; 


3140 Lee Hwy 


Oth 
MANDA ATTAN “AUTO. 
1914). 7th at R ets. nw 


orted cars 
NC. (Eat 


IF YOUR 


K 
AWeLER~ ‘55 Cross-Coun- 


white green 


interior One owne miles 
-§ 


READY TO WORK! 
‘50 Chevrolet. $435 


‘s-tomn pick-up heater and 
defroster. Ne. 110%. 


Kenyon «a Peck 


ARLINGTON, VA 
3140 Lee Hey JA. @-9003 


NOTICE 


FINANCE CO. MUST SELL 
ALL 


46’s-41's-48's-49's 
AUTOMOBILES 
$50) uP rota price 


MOTOR CREDIT Co, 
523 H St. N.E. 


Continental wheel: 
steering and power 
Autronic ere: w.-. 
fully equipped 


Fer Credit Approval Call 


The Auto Center 


12th and K Sts. N.W. 
ST. 3-6624 


BARGAIN! 
‘52 Ford $585 


Tader; heater. defroster 
Ne. 1079 


Kenyon 2am Peck 


ARLINGTON. VA. 


5140 LEE MWY. JA. 2-9008 


End-Of-Month 


CLEARANCE! 


Belew Wholesale 
Servicemen Included 


No Money Down 


Menthiy 
Payments 


Dodge Club Coupe 

Chrysler Club Coupe . 

Buick Convertible Clb. Cpe. 
Buick Super 4-dr. ... 
Chevrolet Fleetline 2-dr. 
Pontiac Streamliner 2-dr. 
Pontiac 2-dr. R. & H. Hyd . 
Hudson Club Coupe R. & H. 
Buick Spec. 2-dr., Dyn. ... 
Buick Spec. 4-dr., Dyn. 
Buick Super Riviera 

Buick Super Riviera 2-dr. 
Buick Special Clb. Cpe. 


OTHO WILLIAMS BUICK 


20th and Rhode Island Ave, NLE. AD. 4-8344 
Open 9 A.M. to 9 P.M. 


Fordomatc w $ | 95 


5 
tires,¢. & h 
’ FORD 4-door, Custom 


fi Looded w ith 
ional pre ti $95 
$195 


55 OLDS Sup. “SS 

a oll 

55 eo Monterey coupe, 
all power, Mer $295 
comatic, r. & h 


’ BUICK ree’ Rivi- 


, of : 
era, o Tone $195 


beovt. 
green 
‘54 _— sup. Kee $195 
53 a By ‘3 


conv J 
erg ice 


& ih. 
¥ ode $95 


Fer Servicemen We Will 
Furnish Transportation te 
and frem Yeur Base in 
D. C. Vieintty, 


~w 


54 Buick .$1395 


Special t-deer; equipped. 


54 Olds. $1795 


Super “88” t-deor: r. and kh. 
Hydra... power brakes. 


54 Pontiac $1495 


Catalina hardtep 
vdra-Matic, w.-# 
mileage. pewer steering 


53 Buick $1295 


paoer eveare panesen: r. and 


52. Ford. $795 


— By Tuder: Ferde- 
r and h. 


wow 


NG 
For service men of ail grades 
insurance of Any Type 


Donald Moters 


145 Florida Ave WE 


ME.8-3336 


Credftt Applications by Phene 
eee a ee ae 
Sundar 16 


Custom 
matic, 


e 
Caithness 
Buick 
OL. 6-5012 
7700 to 7740 Wisc. Ave. 
Bethesda, Md. 


OPEN 9 A.M. to 10 P.M. 
FOR THIS SPECIAL SALE “uit Price 


‘55 CHEV. 


t-doer: eauvinped. 


“47 BUICK 


t-deer: beautiful; A-1 shape. 


‘24 STUDE. 


4-doer; equipped; aute. trans. 


‘29 PONT. 


eg ge en. vewer eteering, brates, 
‘ ydra~-Matie 


‘95 PLYM. 


2-deer: equipped. 


FORD 


2-deor; equipped. 


"25 


995 
869 


DISCOUNT TO CASH BUYERS 
LOW, LOW DOWN PAYMENTS 
—____— ATTENTION 


Military Persennel. Gevernment 
Immediate delivery arranged with 895 
and first three credes military persen 


pont oa? 3-DAY TRIAL AND 


Employees 
dewn for » attheune 
nel. 


Bank financing oveie. a’ 


AUTO DISCOUNT HOUSE 


1510 RHODE ISLAND AVE. N.E. 


_ CO. 5-8214 


CS RR RN ca | 


New. Never Used. Never Sold 


Choose any color. 3 BON TI to pay 
FLOOD IAC 


oe Bn _ Ave 
PONTIAC ‘S-——'56's club sedans. br 


Kenyon-Peck Chevrolet 
ee? hal uoee Bivd Pie no Va 


2-9001. Ope 
ecY Mourn M 4- ar, Savoy. high 


and 


aie GET A =. y USED CAR Bu 1 | 


ve 
condit ion ‘ 
30-day warranty 


No 
aie and 


“MON ROE FORD 


_ — station Wagon 
immeacuiate inal Ge k. 
new & serviced 
& UHydra- Matic 


“ARCADE PONTIAC 


: 


All clean. 3 ‘Briced 
rom 
WHEELER, INC. _| “gisuen 
at PLYMOUTH. IMPERIAL | No 4324 
and term 
MONROE FORD 
5100 W e, aye NW WO 6-2000 
ypen ii 
STUDEBAKER — 25 Champlor lon ® er 
and iTa- Nant Coupe 


. 
ee) er > “0 in} 


} A-|\ nd 
30- day warrant v trade 


popular 


eather inter ior 
heater 
\ in aaatokent 


PARKWAY: FORD 
PE. 34-2204 
art 4 Champion 2- 
equ oped with gas-saving 
' ot yerdrive; Z-tone maroon & ivory 
’ s one is ciean., 


power 
tr wind 
relatively 
in new-car 
rew-car guar- 


ARCADE PONTIAC 


1937 Trvi t_ NW. AD. 4-8500 


0 Little Con' vegtipie 


excellent 
1omised it 


Ar va 


56 BUICK 


Super Riviera 4-dr.; r. & h., 

na., power steering and 
brakes, w.-w. tires; lists for 
over $4,200; a huge sav- 
ings at only, 


$3,295 


Buick 
OL. 6-5012 
7700 to 7740 Wis. Ave. 
Bethesda, Md. 


4 neton 

company 9% 

: new car j 

30 se ~ m) le guarar 
9 


an Ot 
° PONTIAC. 
4-8000. “I 


; 5 
7320 
n the Geert of 


le inside & 


ADE TO 


NW. AD. 4-8500 


’ 
“ARC 
1457 Irving St 


REAL BUY! 
‘49 Chevrolet. $295 


76436 Witeon Bied. JA. 27-9005 
Cenv. Coupe. #605 


Kenyon aiiier Peck 


ARLINGTON. VA 
5140 Lee Hey. JA. 2-9001 


a 
ee eee 
ee i i 
ey 


uxe 
and 


$2095 COC 


Your daily 
WANT AD 
in this newspaper 


WILLYS——'S3 station wagon, 6- ey! 
with overdrive: excellent condi-! 
} tien: omly $695. Cash, trade or) 


| UNITED AUTO SALES | 


HILLUM AND ar ae 
' CHILLOM. MD 3777 

RAMBLER BUYERS aoe 'S6. Save) 
$88 's. Deal at ia wit a her nyt) 

ROWS MOP POs! 

4-B300_ (1 PROSITE 3 Wea yiRD | 
NEVER NOWINO LY. NDERSOLD 


NC) MEAN 
‘TIA ANS Pe ns} 


reaches 
381,000 


families 


1834 


130,000 
more than read 
any other 
Gaily paper 


at “ewer Buick n 25 j- 
. on vd Ar) | A 


Va. JA 


2 $5 DOWN 


ne 


phone 
RE. 7-1234 


HENR , @ Dom Ss wonwTa 


+ a 


$2 

51 

5) 

S| MER 

50 J 
50 


Fre Few? eee 


48 BUICK 4-DR 


ii, CLEAN 
CHANITCAI 


NTFED TH PASS 1 
VIRGINIA INSPECTION 


L ST. MOTORS 


| 22D AND L NW NA. &-3 


AUTOMOBILE, SALE 


SENSATIONAL! 
'S3 Plymouth . $825 


Cou defroster. 


Kenyon ale Peck 


ARLINGTON, VA 
8140 Lee Hey. JA. 


ANT 
J? 


= t7 & t 


IN ‘Tt 
At 


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74 


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‘53 Chevrolet $945 : 


t-deer: r. and kh. #580 


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12th and K Sts. N.W. 


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ee GUARANTEED CARS emmeGUARANTEED CARS commen, 


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J 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
30 Monday, January 30, 1956 


EPU Reports Boom in Europe 


by American troops ‘ting from the Bureau of Cus- Scouts-of America: 


PARIS, Jan. 29 #—Business 
in Europe boomed in* an ex- 
panding market from mid-1954 
to mid-1955, the European Pay- 
ments Union reported in its 
fifth annual review today 


The EPU acts as a clearing’ 


house for trade settlements 
among the 16 member countries 
of the Organization for Euro- 
pean Economic Cooperation. 

Here are some of the main 
conclusions of EPU on Europe's 
economic health: 

The general index of indus- 
trial production (set at 100 for 
the 12 months of 1950) rose 
from 127 in the second quarter 
of 1954 to 138 for the second 
quarter of 1955. Western Ger- 
many, France, the Belgian-Lux- 
embourg economic union, the 
Netherlands and Austria re- 
corded the greatest increases. 

Metal manufacturing, espe- 
cially automobiles, and chemi- 
cal products showed the biggest 
jumps. Agricultural produc- 
tion showed little change, al- 
though there was some increase 
in France, the Netherlands and 
Ireland. Italy, Portugal and 


2 6 


in the gross national product{the dollar area waé from $16 penditure 


per head of virtually all mem- billion in 1953-54 to $2.7 billion in Europe amounted to $2.8) 


ber countries. 


iin 1954-55. This increased defi-' 


billion—about the same as a 


There was increased employ- ‘cit was in turn the result of a 1953. 


ment and higher wages in al- 
most all member countries. 


rise in dollar imports 


($4.9 
+biilion to $6.1 billion) as against of member countries increased | 


The gold and dollar: reserves 


Private consumption per cap-'a much smaller increase in at a slower rate than in the 


ita went up more steeply be-\dollar exports ($3.2 billion to| previous year. 


tween 1953 and 1954 than in 
any other postwar year. Ex- 
pansion was greatest in France, 
Western Germany and 
Netherlands Growth of 
ternal demand led to some in- 
crease of consumer prices in 
Italy, Austria, the Netherlands, 
Norway And Great Britain. 
The value of member coun- 
tries’ exports to other members 
and their overseas territories 
rose by $2 billion as against 
a $1 billion rise in 1953-54. 
The major development 
the balance of payments was a 
substantial increase of visible| 
trade deficits. Member coun-| 
tries as a whole ran a trade | 
deficit with the rest of the) 
world equal to $2.8 billion in’ 
1953-54. This rose to $3.9 billion 
in 1954-55. Exports rose from 
$10.9 billion to $11 billion, but 


1n- 


$3.4 billion). 
Dollar imports increased in 
all member countries except 


especially in Great Britain, 


Germany, the Netherlands and 
Denmark, which was the only 

member country with a dollar 
trade surplus. 

Ameriean and Canadian tour- 
ist increased their dollar ex- 
penditure in Europe from $333 
million in 1953 to $390 million 
in 1954 


U nited States defense aid, off- 


They totaled | 
'$13.7 billion, the highest post- | 
war level, at the end of the, 
‘second quarter of 1955. Biggest, 


incréases were in France and| 
the Iceland. The incréase was noted waogtern Germany. There was 


a reduction of reserves in Great 
Britain, Denmark and Norway. 

Various member countries. 
adopted prompt safeguards to 
head off the beginning of in- 
flationary tendencies. Discount 
rates were raised, credits cur- 
tailed, purchase tax increased. 
and installment purchasing 
restricted, but no country 
resorted to direct controls over 


in shore purchases and local ex- internal of foreign trade. 


Treasury Dept. 
Retiree Wins 
Gallatin Award - 


John F. Williams, 8911 Flower 


Scouts to Honor Warren Today 


@upreme Court Chief Jus- 


\tice Earl Warren will be pre- 


*\sented an honorary Boy Scout 
badge at 3°30 p. m. today to 
highlight celebration of the 


ave., Silver Spring, who is re-\46th anniversary of the Boy 


toms after 35 years with the 
Treasury De- 
partment; was 
presented with 
the Albert 
Gallatin award 
snared “for | 


The presentation § will 
‘made in the: Supreme Court 
Building by Cub Scout William 


EVERYTHING | ATE 


se” TURNED TO GAS 


The 
fetlon was 
made in a cer- 
emony at the’ 

Witiame Treasury Build- 
ing, marking the 195th anni- 
versary of Gallatin’s birth. 

Among the guests attending. 
the observance were Reps.) 
Herman Eberharter (D-Pa.) and 
John D. Dingell (D-Mich.) and 
on Dostert, director of 
Georgetown University’s Insti- 
tute of Languages and Lin- 
guistics. 


CSS | © «For yea 


| forts of edigeation. rey 4 og a to ge 
| any et. a Raymon Payne. Buckhan- 
j non, W, got no = out of eating, 
because pe somach always bothered me. 
Then I took Dr. Pierce's Golden Medical | 


be : 


R. Bland, 4310 Rosedale avé., 
Bethesda. 


Boy Scout Week begins Feb.| 
5. The theme of this year’s! | 
anniversary is “Onward for God | 
and My Country.” 


Chinese Off for Moscow 


TOKYO, Jan, 30 (Monday) 
(INS)}—Radio Peiping today 
said a four-memper Red Chi- 
nese delegation left Peiping by 
air for Moscow to attend a 
“radioactive isotopes” confer- 


lence. 


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\ 
DRIVE A DESOTO BEFORE you DECIDE 


"= 


Turkey fell off because of un- 
favorable harvests. 
There was a substantial rise 


the rise in imports was steeper) 
—$13.7 billion to $15.4 billion. ' 
The rise in the dificit with 


‘i 


a a ee —_— es ”|—l— —— ~~ ee —_—- ——- © i aa — = — 
. * _* y ’ 


% 


By Pau) Herron 


GEORGIE SHAW, the Decca 
balladeer, is back at the Lotus 
this week with his soothing 
songs and facile style. 

I always get 
a kick out of 
watching 
Georgie work, 
he handles the 
mike like a 
professional 
juggler and , 
sort of glides 
around in 
front ofthe 
audience. 

George has 


: dat —* oe a “we - 
0 r¥ y 5 
“A 
Benet 7 
bes | Ee 


he’s plugging some potential 
hits during this trip. ea date te ‘ 

Despite the fact that George Se ae 
is a pop singer he draws an oe 
‘older group of fans and of 3 me 
course the club’s like that. 
Maybe it’s because he doesn't 
wear out himself and customer 
alike with the gyrations a la 
‘Johnnie Ray and Billy Daniels | 
jthat some many singers copy.’ 

George is the high spot on 
the Lotus show—the balance 
is strictly average. 

on | 

| MISS VIRGINIA PARKER, 
iwho has a following here of! 
had some big George Shaw | piano music fans, aitmailed| 
hits with Decca Records—songs me a ticket to a Mozart Concert 
like “Unsuspecting Heart” and in honor of the 200th anniver-| 
sary of the composer and! 
musician. I'd like to attend 
the concert but the ticket! 
came on the day of the concert | 
—last Friday—and it was held | 
in Miami, Fla. 


SPfRe~ 


LUXURY LINER 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE 


ow 

CULTURE DEPARTMENT 
Unofficial Ambassadors, Inc., 
will sponsor an “opening 
Night” of the Japanese Azuma 
Kabuki Dancers at the National 
/Theater on Jan. 31. 

According to John Merkel, 
_fermer publicist for the 
_ Shoreham Hotel and now 
| executive director of UAI, 

the “Ambassadors” are pro- 
moting interest in this dance 
exhibition because “through 
knowledge of other peoples’ 
customs and culture we can 
further international under- 
standing which is the goal 
of our organization.” 

The Japanese dancers and 
musicians have just completed | 
a world tour. Publicist Merk! 
tells me that two new acts,| 
“sword fighting” and acrobatics 
recently have been added to 
the dancers’ routines. 

ow 

Mae Sagan, a French Canadian| 
chnateuse said to be ‘ ‘an excit-| 
ing singing discovery,” opened 
|Saturday night at the Old New 
| Orleans. 


nieee 


Presents 


BARBIE 
RUSSELL 


At 
the Piano 


+ 
NO COVER 


NO MINIMUM « 
NO ENTER- 
TAINMENT 

TAX 


HOTEL 


12th end H Street, N.W. 


Hotel Manger Hay-Adams 


The 
Cocktail Lounge 
and 


The Old English Taproom 


Present 


| Drive the most powerful car in the medium price fiald 


, 255 h.p. DBE SOTO 
Good. Earth 


SB  pserAURANT When it comes down to stark power, the 106 De — really 

1117 17th St. NW. lays it on the line. Under that hood, you’ve got 255 horse- 

(Directly Behind Mayflower Hotel) power... highest in the medium price field oes and brother 

that’s a lot of get-out-and-go in any man’s language. The 

new De Soto out-powers, out-performs, out-handles every 
other car in the medium price field. 


But why don’t you find out for yourself. Test drive the new 
255 hp De Soto at your De Soto dealer’s tomorrow. It’s by 
far the most powerful car in the medium price field. 


A 1956 DESOTO 
COSTS MUCH LESS THAN YOU THINK! 


COME IN NOW 
and get our Special January Deal 


For terrific “green light” get-away, nothing in the medium 
price range even comes close to matching De Soto’s blazing 
high torque take-off. The almost unbelievable power surge of 
De Soto’s sizzling 255 hp engine makes passing at any speed 
so much easier and safer. A slight nudge of the accelerator 
and you're out and by in less time than it takes to tell. 


At the plane 
from 5-6 P.M. 
wer a 


i met Hoy Adoma 


Téth and H Streets N.W. 


end Dinner 


Finest 


CHINESE-AMERICAN CUISINE 
At Reasonable Prices 
Open Daily 11 A.M.-Midnite 
NAtional 8-044! 


‘ 
: 
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“WELCOME N.A.D.A. 


TO A BIG WEEK OF 


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<9 7, SALLY RAND 


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Fan Dancer 
and her revue 


featuring 16 of the loveliest girls 
in the world 


PUSH-BUTTON DRIVING 

Have you tried De Soto push-button driving yet? .. 
it’s the only really. modern way to drive. No cumber- 
some, old fashioned gear selector lever to get in your 
way. In De Soto you just touch a button and .. . go. 
The new De Soto push-button drive selector is a : fool: 
proof, positive acting mechanical control. You simply 
touch a button and .. . go! 


DESOTO PICKED TO PACE INDIANAPOLIS “500” 


Chosen to pace the 40th annual running of the famed 
Indianapolis “500” mile race . . . official proof of 
De Soto’s outstanding performance. Commenting on 
De Soto’s selection, Mr. Tony Hulman, President and 
General Manager of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway 
said, ‘‘DeSoto was selected for its outstanding perform- 
ance and superb handling qualities.” 


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— — ee ee — 


A SERVICE SWAP brought West Pointer John Paul Dod- 
son and 84 other cadets down to Annapolis this past week- 
end to get a first-hand look at life at the Naval Academy 
while some 120 midshipmen went up to New York State 


Bright and Young Looking 


to learn about Army officer training. 
Getting acquainted here are, 
Anna Mae Seim, Midshipman Forrest R. Hanvey 
Both girls are from Annapolis. 


seven exchange weekends. 
from left, 
and ‘Shirley Gossman. 


- : 
EKO» LO pe s 
or. Fy 
st 
> “phi « 
. aah >> » 
* 0 


By Bob Burchette. Staff Photographer 
It was the first of 


New Shop Has Casual Decor 


By Elinor Lee 


CASUAL IS THE THEME 
of today’s living. Not only in 
modern houses, but also in 
new stores, the trend is 
away from the traditional 
and toward the cusual, re- 
laxed look. 

For instance, Rich's new 
suburban store on Wiscon- 
sin avenue at Western, open- 
ing today, looks like a charm- 
ing suburban living room 
rather than a shoe,_store. 
It’s warm and inviting, bright 
and young-looking. Design 
and display set the stage for 
the merchandise with color 


Friends’ 
Speakers 
Are Feted 


HISTORY STUDENTS of 
Sidwell Friends School met 
some of their speakers. of the 
next two days at a tea yes 
terday in the home of Harold 
M. Curtiss, head of the 


Upper School. 

The girls and boys, all sen- 
iors, will hear lectures on 
“Problems of Western 
Europe,” today and Tuesday 
by embassy representatives 
under the auspices of the 
Seminar for International 
Understanding. 

MacEnnis Moore, director 
of the seminar, arrived at the 
tea after a visit to St. James 
School in Maryland where 
he is making plans for an- 
other seminar in May. Moore 
founded the seminar in 1951 
in New England and Friends 
is the first school in Washing- 
ton where it will be held. 
The director is former direc- 
tor of the Speakers Bureau 
of the National War Fund. 

Talking to Herbert Weil, 
Assistant Information Officer 
of the German Embassy, was 
Anne Eastland, daughter of 
Sen and Mrs. James O. East- 
land, chairman of the West 
German lecture. Weil, who is 
speaking on Tuesday from 
11 a. m. to 12:30 p. m., will 
discuss the situation in 
Western Germany today. 


REPRESENTING the 
speaker from Great Britain 


was Helena Lawrarice of the | 


British Education Office. 


Greeting her was senior | 
Charles Holland, who will | 


chairman the lecture téday 
where Maj. T. D. Hennessy, 
British broadcaster, will 
speak from 2:30 to 4 p. m. 
Others. there wholl give 
the word on Western Europe 


were John A. Tzounic, Greek | 
who | 
speaks today from 4:30 to 6 | 
and Dr. Ziga Vodusek, © 
Yugoslav Counselor, also lec- | 


Information Officer, 


Pp. m.; 


turning today from 7:30 to 9 
p. m, 


from 9 to 10:30 a, m. 


’ 
Making his way to the tea 


table was Héadmaster Rob- 
ert S. Lyle. Pouring at the 
table were Mrs. Kevin Kee- 
gan and her daughter Pat— | 
the latter is the Washington | 
representative for the Ex- 
periment in International 


Another lecturer will | 
be Gabriele Paresche, Italian | 
Press Counselor, on Tuesday | 


and light the principal in- 
gredients used. 

There are wide open spaces 
—all on one floor. Color and 
display cleverly set apart the 
areas for men’s, women’s and 
children’s shoes. The brown, 
beige and gold tweedy carpet 
underfoot makes you want to 
“put your best foot forward.” 
Like all other furnishings in 
the store, the carpet was 
made to order. 

White, open-mesh metal 
chairs, designed by Harry 
Bertoia, have cushions for the 
seats covered in bright colors. 
The mesh chair backs form 
shadow patterns on the natu- 
ral finish of the oak paneled 
walls on two sides of the 


room. 

NATURAL COLORED ma- 
terials were used to comple- 
ment leather in shoes. Color 
provides the accent. In the 
children’s shoe department, 
strong primary colors catch 
your eye. Bright orange, yel- 
low and black please the 
youngsters. 

More feminine colors de- 
signate the area for women’s 
shoes—persimmon, turquoise 
and lemon-yellow. In the 
men’s shoe area, a deeper 
persimmon and_e charcoal 
brown provide a masculine 
look. The same colors in the 
three areas carry through on 


-sliding panels on cabinets, 


doors and lighting fixtures. 
Bubble lights float over- 
head at central spots through- 
out the store. Recessed light- 
ing in the ceiling is used 
for general illumination with 
adjustable eye-ball spot 
lights. There are 62 separate 


—— 


Wedding 


NANCY L. MUTCH 

—~DAVID K. DONALD 

Mr. and Mrs. William War- 
ren Mutch announce the 
marriage of their daughter, 
Nancy Lois, to David Knee- 
land Donald, son of the Rev. 
and Mrs. James F. Donald of 
Toronto, Ontario, Canada, on 
Jan. 28 in Ingram Memorial 
Congregational Church. The 


bride is a graduate of the Col- 
lege of Wooster, Wooster, 
Ohio. Donald attended the 
College of Wooster and now 
attends the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. 


ee oe ee ee 


lighting circuits. A ‘grid of 
lighting fixtures brings light 
down onto a center room 
divider that does double duty 
as a combination handbag 
and hosiery bar and a 
cashier's bar. These two are 
joined with a suspended 
trellis overhead. 

The made-toorder cash 
register, “second cousin to 
Univac,” takes an Einstein to 
operate it, but saves time and 
trouble. An employe has 
been dn training two months 
for this job. 

Shadow lights behind a full 
length wall mirror add a 
decorative note as do the 
lighted shadow-box display 
cases on the outside wall of 
Rich's new suburban store, 
designed by architect Jers 
Weinstein of Berla and Abel, 
in cooperation with Frank 
Rich. 

Merchandise sparkles in 
fhe colorful, light surround- 
ings. Incidentially, the store 
is fully stocked with the 
same range of merchandise 
as the downtown store. There 
is everything in shoes from 
an infant's ‘narrow numbg¢r- 
one size to a man’s 13-D shoe. 
Stock is concealed on easy 
to reach shelves in adjoin- 
ing rooms. Shortly a com- 
plete shoe répair shop will 
be installed, according to 
Frank Rich, in the new 
Chevy Chase suburban store 
opening today. 


Shoe Store 
In Preview 


“This can't miss,” said one 
of the hundred or so guests 
yesterday at the preview of 
Richs new suburban shoe 


store at the District line in , 


Bethesda. 
Out-of-town manufacturers, 
commercial neighbors, and 


competitors flocked into the | 


luxurious new store which 


opens today for a cocktail and | 
a chance to look the place | 


over. The hosts were Herbert 
Rich, president of the store, 
and his son, Frank Rich, vice 
president. 

Some of the ladies were ad- 
miring men’s two-toned pastel 
golf shoes. Nearby, on one 
side of the tables was a bot- 
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‘Party Time 


More fetes 


For Terry 


Castro 


Mrs. Robertson Marshall 
gave a cocktail party Satur- 
day evening in honor of 
bride-to-be Maria Teresa Cas- 
tro, daughter of the Ambas- 
sador of .Bl-Salvador and Se- 
nora de Castro, who will wed 
Navy Lt. Charles Dale Ever- 
hart on Feb. 4. 

Many of the affianced cou- 
ple’s friends from Embassy 
Row came. There were the 
Ambassadors from Iceland, 
Mexico, Nicaragua, Union of 
South Africa, Guatemala, 
Honduras and Uruguay with 
their wives 

Others included the Eric 
Johnstons, Dr. and Mrs. Fred- 
erick J. Cullen, Dr. and Mrs. 
A. F. Castro, Mr. and Mrs. 
Glenn Emmons, Mr. and Mrs. 
Victor de Mers, Rear Adm. 
and Mrs. Benjamin Dorsey, 
Mr. and Mrs. James Gilman, 
the Treasurer of the United 
States Ivy Baker Priest and 
Roy Priest, the Priests’ 
daughter Pat with Husband 
Lt. Cmdr. Pierce Jensen, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Littell. 

Close friends of Maria's 
there included McCall Hen- 
derson, Betty Fort, Jane 
Lingo, Mary Ellen Fox, Carol 
Cunningham and Nell Me- 
Cracken. 

Some of the same people 
turned up the next day at 
John -McNulty and Jack 
Duarte’s brunch for “Terry” 
and her ‘fiance. 


Sale! 


basin Des 
= Jor and about WOMEN 


SOCIETY 
AMUSEMENTS 
RADIO 
COMICS 


MONDAY, JANUARY 30, 


1956 


Military Parties Pep Up Weekend 


By Winzola McLendon 


SOCIALLY SPEAKING, 
weekends are usually fairly 
calm for the military. Not so 
this past one. The Comman- 
dant of the 
Haitian 
Corps D’Avi- 
ation E d ou- 
ard Roy and 
his Parisian 
wife, Mme. 
Roy, finished 
a tour of 
United States 
air bases on 
Friday and 
winged in for 
a four-day 
party whirl in Washington. 
And, Netherlands Military At 
tache and Mme. Wm. Th 
Carp topped off a busy week 
of entertaining (they gave 
five parties!) with a gala re- 
ception Saturday evening at 
their Hoban Road residence 

The Pan American Union 
was the setting for the Com- 
mandant and Mme. Roy’s first 
Washington party Saturday 
evening when Haitian Mili- 
tary, Naval and Air Attache 
and Mme. Timoleon Paret en- 
tertained in the lovely Hall 
of the Americas. 

In his 14 years as Com- 
mandant of the Haitian Air 
Force, Col. Roy has met so 
many United States Air Force 
officers, very few needed in- 
troductions Saturday evening. 
Col. Roy came to the United 
States in 1938—several years 
before Haiti had an air 
wing—and at his own ex- 


*pense learned to fly at Floyd 


Bennet Field in New York. 
Four years later, he organ- 
ized the Air Force and has 
been its Chief ever since. 


THE NEW HAITIAN Am- 
bassador and Mme. Zephrin 
brought their pretty daugh- 
ter, Marlene, to the party. 


@ 


Mrs. McLendon 


Also there with his daughter 
was United States Ambassa- 
dor to Haiti Roy Tasco Davis. 
Mrs. Robert Lowe, the for- 
mer Tica Davis, was pinch- 
hitting for her mother, Mrs. 
Davis, who is recovering from 
a fall on an icy sidewalk. 
Spotted at a buffet which 
featured a delicious hot 
Haitian dish of chicken, saf- 
fron rice and shrimp; halibut 
stuffed with oyster and lob- 
ster dfessing; fillet of beef, 
salads, ices and French pas- 
tries were the Haitian Am- 
bassador to OAS Love Leger. 
the Chief of the U. A. A. F 
Mission to Haiti Samuel Rid- 
die, Maj. and Mrs. Carl Bra- 
sier (he’s the Escort Officer 
for Col. Roy's visit), the 
Henry Hoyts and Charles 
Whittakers from the State 
Department, the Military and 
Air Attache from the Domin- 


ican Republic and Senora 
Fernando M. Castillo and 
Nicaragua's Military and Air 
Attache and Senora Julio C. 
Morales 

Last night, the Comman- 
dant and Mrs. Roy were the 
honor guests at a black-tie 
dinner given by Air Force 
InSpector General and Mrs. 
Truman Landon at the Boll- 
ing Air Force Base Officers’ 
Club. 


AT GEN. AND 
CARP’S PARTY, a 


asked the General if he 
planned a long rest after 
hosting five parties in one 
week. “No, indeed,” he re- 
plied. “Now, I plan to keep 
busy going to parties given 
by my friends.” 

Indian Military Attache 
and Mrs. P. C. Gupta—she in 
chiffon sari and wearing an 


MRS. 
guest 


emerald green “tikka” in tie 
middie of her forehead— 
stopped by on their way to 
dinner in Georgetown. Also 
sariclad and dashing on toa 
dinner party was Mrs. M. 
Hayaud-Din. She was with 
her husband, Maj. Gen. H 
aud-Din, the Military and 
Attache from Pakistan. 

I met the new First Secre- 
tary of the Netherlands Em- 
bassy, David Ketel, who with 
his wife, Mme. Ketel, arrived 
recently from the Far East, 
Brig. Gen. and Mme. Loyola 
Daher—he's the Military At 
tache from Brazil — were 
there as were Australia’s 
Military Attache and Mrs, 
Charles Long, the Military 
Attache from Coldmbia and 
Senora E. Palaciog, and Brig. 
Hassan Mustafa, (he Armed 
Forces Attache fr Iraq. 


ee 


DAR Head Sees Era of Opportunity 


“THIS IS a new era, dif. 
ferent from all previous pe- 
riods of history,” Gertrude S. 
Carraway, President General 
of the Daughters of the Amer- 
ican Revolution, said Satur- 
day 

“It is a day of nuclear 
weapons which could destroy 
civilization and culture; guid- 
ed missiles that may be un- 
leashed against pinpoint tar- 
gets and planes that can cir- 
cle the globe more than twice 
as fast as sound,” she went 
on. 

“As always it is an age of 
decision for the atom can 
either turn the world into a 
graveyard or convert it into 
a garden,” Miss Carraway 
said. She was the principal 
md at the first meeting 
this year of the New Era Club 


U. 6. Navy Phote 


NAVY GOODBYES were said to Vice Adm. M. L. Royar, 
retiring chief of Naval Materiel, at a cocktail party Friday 
at the Army Navy Country Club. He leaves the service 


Wednesday, Feb. 
staff gave the party. 


l, after 39 years. 


Members of his office 


Greeting the admiral and Mrs. Royar 


here, at left, are Assistant Navy Secretary and Mrs. William 


B. Franke. 


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at the Broadmoor. Mrs. Hol- 
lis Imes, club president, pre- 
sided. 

“More people than ever be- 
fore have more comforts, 
converiences, time-saying de- 
vices and varied recreational 
facilities,” Miss Carraway 
continued. “Thus, it is our 
greatest era of opportunity. 
To be able to take advantage 
of the opportunities which 
beckon on all hands, more 
persons are attending our 
bulging schools and colleges 
and training for specialized 
work. 


“WOMEN wield = great 
power today,” she said, “and 
they can use their influence 
for either good or bad. Their 
power comes chiefly from 
knowledge, activity and inter- 
est, as developed especially in 


study, 
groups. 


“Good women today do 
much for their churches, gar- 
den clubs, study groups and 
social gatherings. All should 
also do patriotic work, for, no 
club could continue success. 
fully if we should lose our 
constitutional Government 
and its freedoms,” she said. 

“Our representative repub- 
lic is seriously threatened to- 
day from within and from 
without our borders,” the 
speaker added. “As American 
citizens women can play 
major roles in helping pre 
serve the principles on which 
our Government was 50 
firmly founded and which 
have made it so strong and so 
great with the highest stand- 
ards of living in all history.” 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERAL 


32 


—_——— — 


Monday, January 30, 1956 7 


an 


ALL DRESSED UP AND READY TO GO to the Republi 


cans Lincoln Day rally on Feb. 8 is this little GOP elephant 


He's being groomed by (left to 


Chrest and Rettv Jean Lewis 


FASHIONS and .Foibles 


By Evelyn Haves 


DOROTHY PARKER'S old 
and alwayspopular quip 
about girls who wear glasses 
not getting their fair share of 
passes will go ; , 
into limbo if 
the eyeglass 
people keep 
up their 
good work of 
designing 
frames that 
are flattering 
eye-catchers 
In New York 
recentiy 
Tura, Inc., 
staged a 
fashion 


Mrs. Hayes 


showing featuring 
the newest frames with the 
newest fashions by way of 
proving that eyeglasses can 
be a smart accessory rather 
than a fashion and beauty 
detractor 

What's more, 
that properly shaped frames 
can compensate for and 
flatter a poor feature \ 
model with a too-broad nose, 
for example, showed OW 
frames with subtle decoration 
placed outwards toward the 
ear pieces drew attention 
away from the nose and 
created the illusion of a 
prettier slenderer nose. 

With all the eclat of a 
couture showing, ¢vening- 
gowned modeis wore giasses 
that were really glamorous 
accessories to their costumes. 


they showed 


slenderella 


A dressy black cocktail! dress, 
for example, was shown with 
smart black frames decorat- 
ed and dazzled with baguette- 
cut rhinestones, and a big 
blue baligown splashed with 
American beauty roses was 
accessorized with pale blue 
glasses trimmed with glitter- 
ing red stones which also 
formed a spray that went up 
from the earpieces to crown 
the hair like a jeweled head- 
band. Very effective Per- 
haps the most dramatic of all 
was a pair of glasses framed 
in gold, completely paved 
with rhinestone, shown with 
a sinuous gold lame gown. 
However. stunning as they 
were, we'd suffer myopia and 
stumble rather than wear 
anything to distract from the 
golden. figure-following lure 
of lame. In the right-cut lame 
gown, it doesn’t make much 
difference whether YOU can 
see at all—it's the other fel- 
low’s vision that’s important. 


DESPITE the fact that 
glasses are now designed in 
frames so pretty or handsome 
youre not 
to take them off, the majority 
of people wear them in an 
on-again-off-again routine 
with resulting smudges and 
dirt on the lenses that are 
definitely not what the doctor 
ordered. How do people keep 
them clean? Opticians supply 
a special cloth with each pair 


supposed to want 


of glasses for this purpose 


nee 


Or; 


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Fd 


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tan “= 


and 
treated 


there are spe 


tissues for cleaning, 
too, but in a capsule research 
that 
12 people 


only one 


involved talking to 


on this subject. 


used eithe! This 
woman said that she and her 
husband both used the “Sight 
Savers” to keep their glasses 
clean, but found they had to 
keep them in various 
have them ever-handy—a 
few next to each telephone. a 
few on the night-table. more 
in the drawer of a desk. But 
most people are far more cas 
ual, it seems 


-* > 
Spots 


to 


One gir! invariably flips up 
ihe hem of her dress and 
uses the edge of her nvlon 
tricot slip, this gesture re 
quiring a modicum of pri- 
vacy. Another uses a scarf or 
the hem of her dress if she 
has no scarf—this, whether 
the scarf is silk or wool—and 
the results are not always 
good, she admits. A button- 


front blouse provides a suit 


abie cleaning edge for an 
other. while another says 
“Oh—I do all those things.” 


MEN are no more efficient 
about the glass problem than 
women—and just as varied in 
their coping with it. Ties are 


favorite giass-cieaners ol 
bow-ties. of course) and so are 
pocket handkerchiefs No 
woman mentioned a handke! 
chief') One man says he just 
pulls out the tail of his shirt 


eee 


Rr D k Dar 


ey. Staff Photosrapne 


right) Dorothy ( Ox. Dor thy 


(orrection 
Tickets for the Lincoln 
Republi ari Raliv buffet sup 
the May 
Fe 


4 
~ 
< >" 
- 
~ 


ob 
tainable at the D. C. League 
ff Republican Women, 208 

' Republican Na 
tional Committee Headqual 
ae eae 


ibd. |. Si mw R an 
Offi Bidg.. 


T1040 Ne 


lst si se 


ters 
449-4. Senate 
and trr-Reer! 
House Office Bidg 

\ report on | 
editions of The 
and Tin 


Herald erroneously list 


ainnel 
yesterday s 


Washing on Po [ 


* among sources 


q 


f the tickets This news 
paper regrets the erro! 
and wor > work while one 
repo! says that he picks 


up a piece of copy paper and 
wipes the lenses—after blow- 
ing on them. He wasn't quite 
sure whether this 
them, too: 
Practicalls evervbody 
wastes breath on glasses. Yes, 
wastes—because the net re 
sult of on them 1s 
usually clouding them 
worse than they were. We 
particularly liked the remark 
of the girl who said her moth- 
er rarely did anything about 
glasses except an occa 
ional blowing on them and 
wiping them anything 
handy. “This she 
said. “it took four 
days to figure out it was her 
” glasses—and London 


fog ‘ 


hlowing 


just 


ner 


(oT) 
summer.” 
mother 


not the 


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scratched 
a. 


Today's 


Events 


icans born in 


ISRAELI AMBASSADOR 
Abba S. Eban will speak on 
“Israel and the Middle East” 
at the .luncheon meeting of 
the Woman’s National Demo- 
cratic Club at the clubhouse, 
1526 New Hampshire ave. 


Other speeches scheduled 
include Lesley Frost Ballen- 
tine’s topic, “Poetry Took Me 
to Spain,” which will be the 
program at 
Club at 11 a. em 
Chartes Carroll 
orary president of the Na- 
tional Society of the CAR, 
will speak at a meeting of 
the CAR committee of the 
District DAR at 2 p. m. at 


Mrs. 
Haig. hon- 


the chapter house, 1732 
Massachusetts ave. nw 
Dr. Valerie A. Earle, pro- 


fessor of political science at 
Georgetown’ University, will 
speak to members of the 
Alexandria Women’s Republi- 
can Club at 8 p. m. at 1300 
Martha Custis drive 


the Washington - 


. o 
Chairmen and captains of 


the National Symphony Or. 
chestra’s 25th Sustaining 
Fund Campaign will be 
honored at a tea at 4 p. m. 
it the Norwegian Embassy. 


THE EXECUTIVE commit. 
tee of the Woman's Club of 


Lyon Village meets at the 
Community House in Arling- 
ton at 1:30 p.m The Na. 
tional Defense Eastern Star 
Club meets at 7:30 p.m. at the 
YWCA, 17th and K sts, nw 


Alpha Province of Chi 
Sigma Sorority meets at the 
Hotel 2400 at 8:15 p.m 

Edith H. Adams’ art class 
for members of the Woman's 
Club of Chevy Chase meets 
at 9:30 a.m- and the organi- 
zations music section is 
scheduled to rehearse at 10 
a.m the Radio-TV Com- 
mittee of Arlington Branch 
of the AAUW meets at 8:15 
p.m. at 3606 North Woodstock 
a. the Women's City Club 
French meets at 6:45 
p.m. at the clubhouse, 1733 | 
si.. nw 

4 tribute to 


class 


famous Ame! 
February is the 
scheduled program at a meet- 


ing of the Elizabeth Jackson 
Chapter of the DAR at 1647 
Primrose road. nw and 


the University Women’s Club 
schedule includes a meeting 
of the French conversation 
group at 3 p.n a tea at 4 


p.m and a color movie at 
>» pm. showing Christmas in 
Colonial Williamsburg 


_ 


\t Home Here 


Vii and Vi (; 0 rdon 
Brown are making thei 
home in Washington The 
bride is the former Mrs. Cu- 
ca A. Clark, widow of the 
late Hugh Phelps Clark. 
She is commander of King- 
Clark Auxiliary Disabled 
American Veterans Brown 
is TV and radio hillbilly 
star “Luke Gordon.” of the 
Jimmy Dean Town & Coun- 
try Jamboree 


7 


we Sita * 


i; Engagement Announcements 


MARIAN VAN DUZEE 
—RICHARD C. PALMER 


Mr. and Mrs. Edward Heath 
Van Duzee of Montclair, N. J., 
announce the engagement of 
their daughter, Marian 
Amparo, to Richard Claxton 
Palmer, son of Mrs. Roy M. 
Palmer of Chevy Chase, Md., 
and the late Mr. Palmer: 
Miss Van Duzee attended the 


Montclair School and the 
University of Colorado 
Palmer, a graduate of the 


University of Virginia, is a 
member of the research staff 
of the Allen B. Du Mont 
Laboratories Inc., in Passiac, 
N. J..& March wedding is 
planned. 


BARBARA S. ELMS 
~WESLEY 8S. COTCHAN 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Stealey Elms 
of Naples, Fla., announce the 
engagement of their daugh- 
ter, Babara S., to Wesley 5S. 
Cotchan, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. T Cotchan of Wilkes- 
Barre, Pa. Miss Elms is a 
graduate of the University 


“A nurse showed 
me the way to 
marriage happiness!’ 


/ 


~e 


. 

‘ 

: 

; 

ae 3 
spe ‘f 


says Mrs. Eve Akers who now 
uses ZONITE to douchel 


SAPE! Many women wonder about 
douching for feminine hygiene 
Mrs. Akers learned from a nurse 
ine tmportance ot folla ng the 
proper tlhod of douching w tha 
' intain «svt nge 7 an ete, 
tive wet safes 7 like 
j rT? 
EFFECTIVE! No o ’ 
a ae | ye ‘ 
d ‘ . ed 
power , r safe 
bod: esa NITE 
HEALTHFUL! zoNiTE . 
deodorizes pron pt! washes 
away germs and odor a ng 
waste hetances. A nurse once 
advised Mrs. Akers that if an 
abnor id ‘ he 
« | oon dj She « 
he wo | prob reco nend 
that she nue "  FONTI 
BAINTY! You. too. can have the 
“peace of mind that 7ONTTS 
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and « eT mee lice 7FONITE ac 
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use 
ZONITE 


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so etfectivel 


a ee ee 


SOUAAEOREDEUAENDOREL LTLEDURAGAOA TEA OEL LUTE EEO L REE LEOEAOGRE EER OREEDED POOR LD TRO AA tL tte 


TULLE CELE LE LEE LL Ui 


«il 


of Maryland. She is now 
women’s editor of the Collier 


County News in Naples. 
Cotchan is a graduate of 
King’s College in Wilkes- 


Barre. He is a member of the 
advertising staff of the 
Collier County News. 


MARIAN F. GROSS 
—WALTER E. GOOZH 


Mr. and. Mrs. William Gross 
announce the engagement of 
their daughter, Marian 
Frances, to Walter Erwin 
Goozh, son of Mr. and Mrs 
Arthur Goozh of Chevy 
Chase, Md. Miss Gross at 
tends the University of Mary- 
land. Her fiance attends the 
George Washington School of 
Medicine. 


~ - —— 


JANE ALICE CHINN 
—LAWRENCE C. SWEEN 


Mrs. Raleigh S. Chinn of 
Rockville, Md., armounces the 
engagement of her daughter, 
Jane Alice, to Lt. Lawrence 
C. Sween, USAF, son of Mrs. 
William C. Sween of Be- 
thesda, Md. Miss Chinn ‘at- 
tended Mary Washington Col- 
lege and graduated from the 
University of Maryland 


IRENE M. IWATA 
~—TOSHIO ENOKIDA 


Mr. and Mrs. Harvey S. Iwata 
announce the engagement of 
their daughter, Irene Masayo 
to Toshio Enokida. son of 
Mrs. Koharu Enokida of Mon- 
terey, Calif. A fall wedding is 
planned. 


FE 


ON 


“Only 


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Letters from our files 


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Duff's Low Calorie Golden Cake mix with 
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it has less than one-third the calories 


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directions on 


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What's Like Burlap 
But Easy to Wash? 


HAVE BEEN planning 

» curtains of burlap 

boy's room, but 

n this fabric 

idiy, shrinks and 

J. G. “Could 

rienced reader tell 

f this is so. and in that 

‘what similar rough, 

loosely woven fabrie might 
be substituted?” 


DYEING CLOTHES 


I have ap automatic washer 
with a rubber squeeze tub 
and have /alwavs wondered if 
I could dye clothes without 
discoloring the rubber tub. 
Has anyone tried it and with 
what resuit? 

S. M. A., Quantico, Va. 
LIFE IN KAISERSLANTERN 


FOR A. N.: I will try to give 
you a womans Viewpoint on 
Kaiserslantern, Germany, as 
it was in late June, 1954, 
Quarters were good. The ma- 
jority are apartments of two 
or three bedrooms, depending 
on the number of children 
and the rank of your husband. 

All furniture, rugs and 
draperies were furnished, 
The china, crystal and silver, 
come in services for eight. 
Blankets were also furnished. 
Therefore, you will need 
sheets, pillowcases, table 
linen, pots and pans, kitchen 
utensils, etc. 

All of your electrical equip- 
ment will be used on a trans 
former. Don't take an auto- 
matic washer. The electricity 
isn’t stable. and the motors 
burn out. A regular wringer 


everyday china. Also, 


gest taking extra ones. 


at night. 
cost $25 a month 
Carolyn Levardsen, 
Rockville, Md. 


Thanks to H. and E. M. 


al- 
though two blankets per per- 
son are issued, I would sug- 
The 
warmest it ever gets is 80 de- 
grees, and it is always cool 
Maids generally 


Blossom Fete Planned 


Mrs. William H. Rippard 
has been named general 
chairman of the 1956 Nation- 
al Cherry Blossom Festiva 
fashion show to be held on 
April 5, at 12:30 p. m., in the 
Mayflower Hotel. 


Child Behavior 


« No Beau Briinwal Is 


Her Stubborn Son 


By the Gesell Institute 


“DEAR DOCTORS: - 

“My problem is my 25- 
month-old son who refuses to 
wear new clothes. He screams 
and kicks and cries sometimes 
for an hour and a half. 

“In the shoe store he is out- 
rageous. My husband and I 
have to hold him while the 
salesman tries to fit the shoes. 
I can't take him into a cloth- 
ing store without a big scene. 
In a barber shop it is impos 
sible. My husband has to clip 
his hair at home, for whom 
he'll sit very quietly. 

“Recently I bought him a 
new bib just like the ones he 
always wears. He refused to 
wear it and Daddy told him 
he couldn’t have any dinner 
unless he wore it. So he took 
the alternative and just 
wouldn't eat. It became a mat- 
ter of who could hold out the 
longast, with him going to 
bed without dinner, and this 
didn’t seem to bother him 
at all. 

“Aside from all this, be- 
lieve it or not, he is a very 
obedient child. Half the time 
you wouldn't know there was 
a boy in the house. He amuses 
himself for hours with his pic- 
ture books and his cars and 
trucks.: He can name just 
about every object in his 


books and can read numbers ; 


from one to ten. He also 
knows colors. He has an eight- 
month-old sister whom he 
gets along with nicely. He 
loves children and men, but 
will have little to do with 
women. 

“T hope I have covered his 
personality enough so that 
maybe you can see some rea- 
son for his actions. We are 
at our wits’ end when these 
situations arise. We would 
appreciate any advice you 
could give us.” 


proved b 

sands of 

Orange f lavored, 
accurate dosage. 


Worlds Largest Selling Aspirm For Chidren 


@uann 


Edelson for their answers on 
the same subject. 


CORN PUDDING 


DOES anyone have a recipe 
for corn pudding? 
Mrs. J. C. R., Arlington, Va. 


WORN OUT ARMS 

TO MRS. G. P., whose sofa 
wore out at the arms: The 
same thing happened to two 
chairs of mine. If the back 
of your sofa is the same as 
the front and arms, cut out 
a piece sufficienttly large *o 
cover the worn places on the 
arms. (The back can always 
be kept against a wall.) Place 
the right side down far 
enough back on the arms and 
sew tightly, turn and bring 
forward and tack under the 
sides of the arms to fit. Cover 


the hole in back of the sofa 
with any plain piece of mate- 
rial that nearly matches the 
original. The same results 
may also be had by using 
plastic material by 

the yard, which usually wears 
longer than cloth. I have used 
this on furniture in a recrea- 


Want ads 


Ebb (ASTER 


FIRST OF ALL, we would 
suggest, don’t take your little 
boy shopping. Just outline his 
foot on a piece of paper and 
then take some shoes home 
for trial. And similarly with 


the haircut. They have very 
good clippers nowadays with 


which you can give a fairly | 


decent haircut. This kind of 
thing may be necessary only 
for the next six months or so 
while he is at the worst of 
this stage. 

Later, new things and tran- 
sitions will come more easily, 


but for the time being you | 


have to help with all transi- 


tions and keep him out of | 


new situations as much as you 
can. 

As to new clothes, lots of 
children are like this. When 
you get new things, have 
them around for a long time 
so that he can get used to 
them, and get them big and 
turn them up so that they 
will last a long time. 

He is apparently just as se- 
lective about people as he is 
about clothes, but gradually 
he will spread and become 
more flexible, and life will be- 
come easier. 


(Coprri ghs lees by the Gese 
Child Develooment 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
— January 30, 1956 33 


i 


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ONLY STAUFFER SYSTEM TOOK THE INCHES OFF, 
SAYS MOTHER OF 16-YEAR-OLD DAUGHTER 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD : - i tlie 
Monday, January 30, 1956 Fee ite 7 |Leue rsons: \ LONDON, Jan. 29 

 : w MRIS et ; pt lla Pa . « . Foreign Minister Vyacheslav M. 

' . | ta as a Vy or on Molotov and Defense Minister 

The Musie Box ae M 18s Parker Georgi Zhukov returned to Mos- 

e. “—_ cow today from the Prague con- 

Ld: @: eee at ag 4a . NEW YORK CITY, Jan. 29 might have been more sympa-)picked themselves up off the ference of Communist Warsaw 

Tebaldi Singing i a a To Star Lit Raymond Hakim, curre in| thetic if they’d known the real/fioor.and administered shots of| pact nations, a Radio Moscow 


the limelight as Rita Hay-| story, which features one of the : “ " dcast said. 
bs ae i worth’s No. 1 adorer, has/most nerve - wracking sessions py bs ! rag | eile 
i> . we . 4 a Me G M Dra TIL | found plenty sus in tele *-ion history. : meg .  Brgaap bene 4 a he “SQNCERTS 
Her e Satur da : i Ws : ; of time for || | Originally, stars Dan Dailey,|—.) stiented y, and 
y oe. | 011 y wood MMe WE Gale Sherwood, Jack W iting|Substituted for The Program| Tonight-8:30 P.M. 


oyna Originally Scheduled To Be 
vf " . £ starlet Virginia beget and Helen Gallagher had been 
By Paul Hume —_—_ | HOLL*WOOD, uh ol Leith since [PE hired to do a 90-minute versiqn Heard At oe Time. Malt Bok OMice Opens 1:90 om. 
7 | iad = \from Eleanor Parker's shapely | She Age peg: = to Me ~ py taa segs En gorge go we F PG FRED 
HE WASHINGTON debut mental Clinic. The sessions, ie oi igi _ ‘shoulders yesterday when she - e e: = , rac ca Cc, a - : ae 
PA tak Tebaldi next Sat- to be held at the Navy Band  —— was told she is ¢ And Virginia af Fiddle,” but as the Sie Bool. Yeer's BEST Fotetge Pine A; Soe WARING 
| ee  & turns ‘o him : date approached, the Big Boo- padi : A 


urday looks like the big headquarters in Anacostia, — i 3 to be the star | Aad 
news of the week from here re se to the publir ove is > if fn Somerset i yng rm i ede ae ‘wos discovered. No, one|| 
in riday night concer ) eS 00S augham’s wn a 
Showeneet seal : | res “Painted “Veil” a does... Ann , property. They rushed .to con- 
it SHADOW - CASTING comy Hollywood Visitor at MGM. Gar- Woodward a Miss Kitgalles tact Otto Harbach, found him 


records ing events: The St. Olaf ‘ 
% ~ ¥ “ wi of gone a ste disinterested. They offered 
ncn ta Fae T 4 Choir of international fame, | Barbara Ruick, whe plays + this come ae further in her — desperate '$100,000 for the musical. He pase topes Se ea seas ee 
° 7 


ears as if no 7. : adel % ~~ 
singer since | +l Mos Bae paar oe me Carrie in the upcoming tic drama, one ae — nud ee eo said no. They sent a delegation PEAT. 10-90, 1:90, B30, 9:20, 7:98, 9:48 
Claudia Hall Feb. 9: Claudi CinemaScope 55 christener, of Maugham’s "> Sie as ie: +i P her hachene to his house to plead w m 0 $ OPEN TIS AME NE ATES CONCERT BUREAU 
Muzio h a $s ~< lion fa on Fe ; Claudio | “Carousel.” is this week’s best, some « eee tragic shooting o ; He remained unmoved by ed UY, 1332 AVE -Ou ?- -), ae ven) sicinway Prane. 
had such con-, SANNA Ti. with the’National Sym- | visitor from Hollywood. She's |Ye#Ts ago ff + Srovember ‘Bho cetentiy visited] sare, Preuiees st tetptent! = = 
trol of so = WS Se ee eee . a It’s a fasci- ov ; “Ad we ulcers, but permitted thém to 
heantiful a phony Wednesday, and Na-.§ the daughter of Lurene Tut- nating story Miss Parsons (a beauty parlor res ry negotiate with his representa- 
.% | ack to 
natural voice. Pees tees ng bg ~ tle and Melville Ruick, two | shout a woman's search for love | gg teen goog brownish uve; Howard Reinhejmer, whe | 

Tonight Waring Jr. tiot ton F "8 6 d9 oe iand understanding, with suc shade—a move that makes her said the lowest png cape 
the Wari g Jr. ~~ fs wy A> J be | \picturesque backgrounds as virtually unrecognizable to all|  Atier the Lickeoats wee baal 

om ; “ ’ : ” 2 : 

Penmayivenians bring “Hear! the’ National Association for Hong Kong and London. but her close friends. 


Hear!” to the big hall, while 7. ‘ reg | ; The choice of Eleandr proves| ae . , : 
Music Therapy has set its re- | Show Times another point—that Ava Gard-- MANY OF the TV critics LITTLE ar Five Nights Only. Mats., Wed. and Sat., 2:30 
) 


— 


Tuesday's National Theater : 

; ) ' l conference at St. Eliza- OrEN LPM. 

Kabuki opening begins a [5%'008 ner is not coming back as soon| ‘ J eiaae pa 

five-night run of that fas- pao? ay say yithege Bye wee me For Monday as MGM expected. She was sup- ee shea, Aaanee i STARTS vemonnore Wonderful to see! Wonderful to hear!” 
; : “on ear >) } z 2 : V ] , d ° . ‘ 99 ’ — . ’ 

pues Gencing. ric Building Auditorium STAGE ee caeamal te pean te Tol.| “Springtime in Paris.” was a SAMUEL GOLDWYN’S | : JOHN MARTIN, N.Y Times 
aloe hance nag amt USE SHUBERT—"Kismet.” at 8:30 0 ™ ivnwood for it. Instead she lin-| terrible bagel, unworthy of the | HE | 


may see and hear the same OPERA HOUSES: Dallas is SCREEN : , Liebman stamp — but they sents 
Teens who will sing in Con- preparing to break ground AMBASSADOR—<Helen of Troy.” at gers on in Spain. However, Pro-) , Se PIES os 


titution Hall next Saturday, for its new Frank Lioyd ¢. a :ee- U1, T50 Gnd 9:30 BD. Mm ducer David Lewis is very -_———______ —— BEST YEARS | © THE AZUMA 


ART. CINEMA the She Wo at ; 
aes Rise Stevens, Blanche Wright-designed — now get 1:30. 4.50 and 8.  |happy to get Eleanor, whose PATRICK HAYES CONCERTS 


Thebom, Marian Anderson this: symphony hall and opera . "9 P48" and 16°08 interrupted Melody” is one of im a ys OF OUR | 4 
’ : : a + ’ . : =< ? m 

Roberta Peters, Jan Peerce, house, and recital hall AND CAPITOL —"n Bot! om mot the Bottle. © at tpn A good performances Sun., Feb. 1 3 P. M, | a . ) Ge i 

Isaac Stern, Artur Rubin- chamber music hall. Four of and 9482.2 00 | LIVES | 

stein, Jussi Bjoerling, Zinka them | cgtgey itr a 630 410 ane | TEN Commandments’ aia it] ROBERTA PETERS |} Lal DANCERS. MUSICIANS 

Milanov, Gregor Piatigorsky s Milan has just opened its COLUMBIA. “Texas Lady” at 11:48 for Debra Paget. Y. Frank eR A | i. : 

and Leonard Warren. They Piccola Scala,” asmallopera | $m. 145. 3:45, 545. 7:45 and | Preeman Jr. took a look at her GOOD SEATS AVAILABLE | —_ . PRICES: EVES: Orch. 84.40; 16: Bale. $3.90, $2.75, 62.20. 

ppe 


are all scheduled for “Festi- theater for chamber opera | pyuronwt—“piedotiaus.” at 11:30 », |scenes as Lilia, the water girl ae DD MME-JONNNY STOOL. PIGEON” 4 gt — a BS Re eee 
14 ' 


na bolia ; 
val of Music,” on NBC-TV, and music. And now word | ™. 3°45 3:30, 5 30. 7:35 and 9:46 ‘in the C. B. De Mille epic, and SEE AND HEAR — ———_— | $1.65. Upper Bale. 
from 8 to . 9:30. comes from London, ith the | KEITH'S. ~"Guys and Dolls.” at 18 29 |decided she was just the right ROBERTA PETERS wee m a ' 
recently built Festiva® Hall, | Boeke O40, Tne eng 9:55 p-™ \charmer to play Sharain, the! TONIGHT ON 


I AM WILLING to make = nq the old Albert Hall, is | urTis — F si 800! “ 
) a a : | 5 6:15 and § SS p Queen of Persia, in his “Omar| “ ‘ ” 
the week of Feb. 5 Sir jsnning a smaller hall, to ibe, Blood Of My Hand. met 2.18 Khayaam.” PRODUCER’S SHOWCASE 


Thomas Beecham Week in  hojig about 1100. Adjacent to MacARTHUR— “The sieht a Number (Genecae. we WRC-TV AT 8:00 P.M. 
od 9 


— - on. til | t Copyriaht. 1656. by 
Washington: The vivid Brite tne new Festival Hall, whieh 8 Ome 12 sd ee a HAYES CONCERT BUREAU 
isher has been conducting holds 3500, and supplement- ut rForourrax Ficlen. of, Trop.” >| Gin Campbell's o8 G St. N.W. 


' . 7 + Otto 
for over 50 years now, and ing Albert Hall with its 6000 35. 7:10 and | PO+eeeeseooe eae = ge NAtional 8-715 ‘Steinway Plane | Ber, Mon., Feb. 6th thru Sat., Mar. 3rd 


we are lucky that he will seats, yet larger than the 500- | ONTARIO The Man With be —- so 


. ' : ) Golden Arm t 1. 3:10, 5:25. 7 > 
make two appearances’ in seat Wigmore Hall, this would nd 50. Basi data in aac na DALE a. oo NATIONAL | Evenings, 8:30 * Matinees Wednesday and Saturdays, 2:30 
Washington on two night give the British capital a | “15. ne 25. 38 and 9:48 5. mi ' gor pee sg GUARD | 
Rh hay al | ks> on 
STUDIOS Tango, etc ! SUN., FEB. 5 | IMac dl | (, ) , i, ? : wo bs, The 


f » : " » a« 
On Monday, Feb. 6, he will theater for music in a size 05, 7-35 and 10:10 p.m “Mace: DANCE s « ing 
Ma 
1336 New York Ave. N.W. " 
NA. 8-4996 One Big Show! 8:30 P.M. P MacARTHUR BLYD, of 48% SI. 


+) 


—— 


ooo eoeeoooe -¢ 


™m 
lecture on Mozart at the very city could use. Just | ree ee om Oe ae 
Library of Congress. Recall- thought you'd like to know. | PLAYHOUSE—“Aartists and Mode! 
ing Sir Thomas’ remarks omy | nad 95 5. m.. 1:15. 3: is. 5:20 5 | 
there about seven years ago, 5 tye, Outlaw.” st 12. | 
" : . . . . 0 i6 
to say nothing of his running YM Chairman Named an ; wats | 
r r both verbal and ages. ° ear 
ean ae Baa seem scene NEW YORK, Jan. 29 (®—Viv- wikieda” he ss ps bene: - i 
” - ; . - —— ‘ 1 
at all times, his Monday night ian C. McCollom, Ridgewood, aes eee © Mur el Rahn Ce; coe 
comments will approach in N. J., industrialist, was elected | ——— —— —_ —— ial ahoen Friday | we 
vigor and effect his puceday chairman of the national board (. Highlights of CARMEN JONES 
night conducting of the of the Young Men’s Christian ’ Feb. 10, 8:30 P. M. CAME UP” 
Philadelphia Orchestra Association today at the annual) | seteesre: Ruse | tor the benetit of the 
On this occasion he W ill midwinter meeting He suc | ' 4 P| > § ‘ 12th 6t. YMCA Bers’ Dept. | & ) dcthee foot Orgerreten Prevenrehee ALLEN CASE - ROSEMARY KUHLMANN $10 STONE : 
lead a program so typical of ceeds Eugene R. McCarthy of! || Capitol Arena ; JO WURT + HARRY P. S{ANTON + LUCY GREENO 


the finest of Beecham that St. Leuwis. . \ 

we can think of no other con- srw we pinay reves oom Ae | Colony ee .. SHERRY O’NEIL 

ductor either likely to ar- 14th & W Sts. N.W. t pili fein tai ala ie 
z se. $2.20. — 


“an if r . . we HAYES CONCERTS 1/4 PRYSOCK . Gs 
range, it, or capable of de IN CONSTITUTION HALL | Tickets on Sale ot | $1.65, 2.20 uted FRVECS 


livering it with anything ap- ’ .. Willerd Hote ALL SEATS RESERVED: ; ar ’ ' Orch. and Sones, $5.90) Bale. $5.50, 4.40 
proaching the spirffed aplomb | Uhis Sat.—8:30 P.M. || |) 4 ote tan te, | “% tex incl. $2.00—2.50—3.00-—3.50 Tax Ine. |] pe ‘tote si Mate: Orch. ond Sexes $3.85; Bok 

) J, . ' | all seats re Bele 
Fairwoy Sports Tickets New On Sale at... 


we know will fill Constitution RENATA TEBALDI : tenet ! 
Hall on Feb. 7. The list: = 
Haydn Symphony 102; Han- Metrepcifias Peers Comeeny | : = THE 4 SUPER MUSIC STORES |j/ = 
del-Bee ham and perhaps Prese ted tn ee ae PLUS: FIRST WASH. SHOWING PATRICK HAYES CONCERTS i= 
1 Radcliffe Ciub of Washincton IN CONSTITUTION MAT 1850 F St. N.W.—1110 Tth ot. N.W. 


more Beecham than Handel) GOOD SEATS AVAILABLE . ——, NOME TOWN GIRL” ‘ti 1927 & St. N.E.—8569 Georgia Ave. |) = 
Faithful Shepherd; Delius a oe a a a — This Sat.—8:30 P.M. (Im Silver Spring) |]| = Box Ojfice Open 10 A.M. to 9:30 P.M. 


Paris. and Berlioz music from 


et As RENATA TEBALDI =| | tie | Renata Tebaidi 


JASCHA HEIFETZ is tak- TONIGHT ON | opt ead 


tien 


go i eeide Of the opinion || | “PRODUCER'S SHOWCASE” Moon skits beavis, 


son. Already of the opinion 
that his career requires “the WRC-TV AT 8:00 P.M. 


nerves of a bull-fighter, the This Sun.—3:00 M. 


digestion of a peasant, the HATES CONCERT BI REAU 


1 NW. (Campbell's) . 
vitality of a night club host- NA. 6.3184 Steinway Fiane H ¢ | FETZ 
ess, the tact of a career |\— 7 & M LOEW'S 
diplomat, and the concentra- coor . Only ns Appearance ba nm ALLEN ; || "Fer Information Call NO i000 MT. VERNON OPEN-AIR 
tion of an Indian yogi,” the > This Season Final Concert Here ‘AMBASSADOR wif dat § Col. Ra. George Necer. “THE | | - Bo Og. of AX. 80. R-ait2. Winter 
noted violinist also obviously ||. - betes 2 Sees ABLE “HELEN OF TROY.” Roswens Podesta. | Spope— . at 6:30, 9:38, || HOWARD RR 8A 00 Noon | | — ies Cova Svery Pri. Sot. sad Sua.! 
thinks that a bit of time for | | us fm 2 an he nth ne 4.0 t » 1, 3:08; 8:10, 7:20, 9:30. | fer. TigRNGast”  Oxnccbeome S| | Pr Rite mater See OTON— AIRPORT DRIVE-IN 4%t'noTorw 
rest and reflection would be | | wo. 600, GOOD AND aL APPY - OF Stic 

: . 4 ATEST SEX” S ne . 
of some assistance as well. | | Sun., Feb. 12—3 P.M. al x 30 BETHES A OL, 32-2868. Grace wHITe- “xis Fi's- “WARREN Remnainld BL a> eT a) we kt Ae ora 
r ” . 5G i Diy , - eTO 
The Navy Band's Friday 4 |= mapa (BO CATCH A THTee ““Peennicolor LIN 1213 U St. LW Sores n Derek ai 6:50, Cartoot 
night concert, which will | Roberta Peters BEVERLY | Free Pork! Filmed in Monte Carle. where Grace | | COLN Doors Open 12:30 PM Locsted im Artiogies oo U. & Ro ite 
; - . ury OF we a0 ~ pg ° bd : | Cl AT GUN ts , Ire TUFSDAY : - 2 
boast two guest conductors wna? out roo want - od ; * with "Pred ~ ees cM uray, borothy nd. ONK \ TONK —— oo a 


Leadin 
in Frederick Fennell and Don v Temes Kk Meir ciitan Opera. Company ery). Tony Curtis. 8:00 Malone 
D az, AVAILABLE . : — 
Li NSOR VERSION rs — UN. 4-010, = oe 
yillis, is only a part of the Yr. SORED Mh 2 SLI® SLG5. $2.20. 52.35. $3.30 Pree Pork BEVERLY . + GANasiisy Ens, REPUBLIC inet tow st NW. QUEENS CHAPEL WA. 32-2900. 


band’s Friday-Saturday All | HAYES CON CONCERT BUREAU &-2345 “BEC t 6:15, plus Edw in Hamilton 8 Md IN-CAR 
Eastern Band and £ Instru- Bl A f (In Camp belt's) jiea G st. NW. FT REATEST 2» joann ( we Foch. “ILLEGAL. at 6:30, “RANSOM” witi Glean Ford. Donne HEATERS Av ATLAS 5 APRI AN 


5Masy wr musical COMEDY 


*<7-eoeo 


MY NUMBER 


Orch. end Boxes $4.95; Ba $4.95, 3.85. 3.30, 


; mx.” . “6h Dis ; Hope SE 
me Seprane ES TO CROSS” ‘Story of Brink's oY Re Technicolor at 6:15 iam ms 


6:12 
| NAtiona! 8- Steinway Plums ” Clifton “webo “8 only raise 3 3 Reed. Juano Herna 30,and 9: HPRIER f xD 
bs , . ——— - 94 ; 7-O552. 1433 You St. N.W ; 7 StAND AT APACI 
: : oar racetay we||MYATESVILLE Ys, c3|||BOOKER T {0% to 9. nv | civen 


TRANS-LUX + ee , > Bra od eT let tot hte Ca oe “THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN 
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OPEN 10.45 A : . on case hes | HE y WA NTED ALL ¢ KF REACH O ive i R ‘Mitchum. i2 x Sir ; ou ‘GUN oart ; Wour usa epee ANI ) _,. gan Pi ani mM, natra. Kin | c HWY.-ARL. BLVD. 
; M e - 
, _ -_ , : panes readin GUIN.”’ " RIVE. 
“You'll Hang By Your Teeth 2. ‘mamecer: SHE WOLF THAT HEAVEN WOULD ALLOW'! RA. 6-6600. “KISMET,” xy LANGSTON 22% © Bere'g te IN THEATRE 
—Tremendous Excitement.” KEMNEDY, ¥2. 53 oe, ufton Weoo, 750.) KAYWOOD | Disney's 208. Ko CinemaScop? A ! By see Went SS 
Coe, Post 7-H pMOWPLECE of the RICAN LION.” Technicolor, at ) Nyy HEAD Rich ) In 1 


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CAPITOL « THE 9 E ; GReaT ERT SEX | WOLF.” aa and “EMPEROR PENGUIN” | r Lee} Wi Larse 
; F “MAGNIFICENT OBSESSION CROSS.” Tony Curtis, K: 15. 4:35, eS. VIERS MILL WH. 6-7000, Wis Mit | WINELAND THEATERS “COURT. Mi. AR’ TIAL 
0 , / - CO. 5.4968. “THE Tanpen|| S2R!CAN, Lion.” vtech alesion. at ABC DRIVE-IN 7! in: Heo BILLY MITCHELL” 
vor TRAP,” Prank Sinatra. Deb-| | featuretie. Ee aap te | 1O. 92585 s CinemaBcope ana Color. at 


lds 4 7+ W ere : , 
STRIPES IN Tite SUN.” Aldo Ray. 7 CLF 8nd “EMPEROUS PENGUIN OPEN PRI. SAT. & SUN “RETURN OF THE 


1415 Good Hope Rd TEXAN” 
ANACOSTIA '“"? Ss "22 Bi 


be Crain ¥ 9:23. * ; | ASC ial -d *K At a 
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INTO LARAMIE.” John Payne, 8. THEATRES pi th on LisMer ab nicolor. at . 
5-55 "9 20. Als © Rober ay- om & 3A. Shae ; 
| | ree Parking. ‘Arlingten—Falls Church lor in ME ‘ or : K 
| | , ) . ; : ll v ; DY,” Technical or, wt 1:10, 4:35, Thursday: “INDIAN FIGHTER” an 
OPEN Tis Am, | Mowucoon | | ‘SECOND GREATEST SEX” || STATE oat 21388 . 8:00 GOLDEN MASK _" 
4 raed 


es Free 


—— 


ng Jeanne Chain, 2:55. 6:20. 9:45. ‘ET AMET) 2533 Po. Ave. SE 
‘MAN FROM BITTER RIDGE “THE age oP HIGHLAND * i. 730 


____— Lax Barker. 1. 4:20. 7:50. he Age S eo Cok se _Pelance = s eone. _& ALEX.-ARLINGTON, VA. 


TAKOMA © 2 50D. MORK XING all Fs Open ~ a Mt _— 3 Also Da! 1G RIPE. D 
Jennifer Jones. 0 vi 1730 Wilken Bivd Bale y nn ‘ei at 6:20 REED 1723 King Sf 
THE SUN, * Aldo Ray. 6:15. Ki 9.3445 
ATLANTIC — as 4 Atlantic Cine se and Ts mem 
3 3000 . DIAN PIGHTER 


5.1800, “SECOND or cae ne Ki) » Martineile 


"= | Ce aed 


hae ee eee ae | =< re | 


ara ai 

Jean rain in 

OREAT pS rx" VIRGINIA + Vernon Blvd 
45 ls ' - 


» \ 4 fi ret St Ki 9.46139 
tor McLagien in BENGAL! r 8.00 at Color 


| we WO. 6-540. sper ee Wal ¥ CONGRESS 2931 = ave $.£. ‘ on neti 
THe Ann ow 2:38, 4:55, 7:10, 9:30 Arpican | | 2 8777 gt Shop. 
Y L eames. | f ee nnningn ny eaery omaanaane, & | Walt Disney's “APRICAN LION.” CENTRE oe 
py ee Pike | nicolor, at 6:1 10° iso a | 1000 
oe 8 HM. W. + ST. 30808 : K-B THEATRES ) > 2999 } cheney s “EM ND THE WOLF m Scope and Colort 


eg nites pt || ead “PESTER AND — Anh Biyth. Howard Keel 


| 


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gst SSe eeeesescansaser, : | ony Curt 2:00, 


| DOVE’ . 
8 of MacArthur and 4703 Marlbore Pike, Md. 
Selouy Theat Prcalers see display ad || St rd | | CORAL 10. 8-515) Free Forking | || SHIRLINGTON "A®*FAinrax 
| 7130 Nerth Glebe Od. | | ¥ Disney's “AFRICAN Li 3-2000 
4266 a7 chute 9) at 8:05 00 - aScc 
iA. 7 Disney's “EMPER OR “THE SBCOND "GREAT eT SEX.’ 
APEX 4013 Mow. aon wo 6-400 | MORNING iene. nove GUIng” and “PETER AND THE jeanne Crain. George Nader 


Js seone oki eet eee +o 


vet - 


f the Year's inemaScope-Color 


“One o ; — 
Evening & P | i, 
Nations) Bourd of finer teria JEFFERSO Ar. Blvd. & Anson: oh 3211 LOUIS BERNHEIMER 
DAD DAY AT Howard Keel TIME COURT-MARTIAL OF BILLY THEA 
BLACK ROCK” Chicentonns Doles MITCHELL ‘Technicolor, at 6.00 3 a TRES 


th Spencer Tracy ‘CinemaSicope), Geaanes ae tae 45, 9:35 . . . - , =. 00 , 
ay 1:35. 3:35. 5:35, 7:35 & §: 40 >. m. | BYRD 104 Sevth Wayne S&F. CAPITOL Capito! ‘Heights, Md. VILLAGE Seocee ™ dea "Tank 


THIS COMING LANGLEY ©" Ave. & Univ. tone | || trvvor nomare. “Blusabein 4 px: gentiior Yoo “THE BLACKBOARD 


| —— | = | | B. | CINEM ASCO! . anata tee 
PHONE prey . YE THURSDAY “One of the Year's Ten Soar” ~——ve- ft | Sa * Soe” Technicolor. at” ays ° Jl NGLE' 
ACCEPTED ME. 8-44 : ) ONLY 14 NIGHTS— ns Pgs, bot 4 Times Herald, Ne- | | BEST THEATRES eae Ale yt i at » Teas. Sree ere 
4 MATINEES | “BAD DAY AT | | = _ “THE “Wie” ONE” 
— GET CHOICE | BLACK ROCK” ||| SYLVAN Gu.32"hiv< i — 
DORKS SEATS NOW! won pens Tagr SSapenetyons) ||| Abe diate et ie||| BOTH penn alll | MEW TON ee: Sly deta, 
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The Story that has belon to — . FLOWER ,.” lower Ave. ) 0 8242 Georgia Ave. JU, 9-121 ; -2424. Robert 
the world for Thirty we ol BB) | Jeanne crip yo pate we ee saat ® eee Paswing 6 seer 4 wietern,, - VERNON Mi enim Moo. Fab. 048 
ORE 


+40 i. shied | ra Bish LEUShaARD | Tog o6 $86. JESSE OPEN FRI, SAT & SUN 


in | 
RIDGE” at 815 p.m | “Pres Coffee Ber ved in our Lungs 


| 13th and Sevenneh Sts. 5.6. ins) w » & 
NAYLOR 28th ond Ale. Ave. $E.| | aati Shas “tt | P 10. 2-2233 Free Parking GEORGETOWN eo 
. W 22-4000 it"Gares CinemaScope and Color ane ! Revert Cinems 
iy Aa Bee" emaScope, at | | VIEW 7g nea Dan satan” || 
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” ; o Ray hi re 
noe Rac Ay ott. ‘ wesee m a 5 freee Fes 99 
a | Tana erticag, RE wore |) THE DETICTIVE 


Aten, AVENUE GRAND 4s re Ave Ave, St r Ph. am Daas z. HISE ER BETHESDA 7414 Wis, Ave “ Pea: ores 8 al 004 iy ¢ - 
RESERVED SEATS: ; eer "Cinemascope Georee, Mout Mout. re ithe de or “i ah WA LT DISNEY’S c= Tomorrow: Charies Leusuten 
$2, $2. 50, $3. 00, , $3. 7S. $4.25, tax incl. Color “PETER & THE WOLF” “RUNOHBACK OF NOTRE sa 


a The Fairway, | 
Bort Bt. Nw ae i ee -ALEXANDRIA > 1:00. 2:45. 4:35. 6:15, 8:00 and Pree Parkin Wilker 1229 
Arena Box Office enon f from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m, CARVER 6-9602 “THE AFRICAN LION” ae oe Wisconsin ~~ ¥ 


| | : ULINE ARENA | | * 12 “Yechnlocior-Cinemadcone - SECOND 5h 3:16, 6:98 6:48 0:09 ond 10:00, 2103 Penosytvani® Ave-NAK~ 
Ten bcs ta «COS SS - Ose b= FAIRFAX eee GREATEST SEX” oe , CIRCLE ie. Foie 
AMBASSADOR Joanne Crain. Geo. Nader end s A panifer Jones Revert # Pieck. Kipp 
, «pan ibatOEe those 5 8:08 8:00, 7:48, 9:40 = TEN ate. Teebuieobor) at 6:00. 7:50 


, > 


eeeeaen*e Seeeeeeessce, 


i. a 
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RESERVED SEATS NOW ON SALE. 
MATL ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY 
SOx OFFICE OPEN 10 AM TO 0.15 PM 


aud; “4 
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° eeeeteeceenecees Seeeeeaeeces® 


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8 


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Gets prebeoncescetse! 


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seats 


\ 


THIS IS my first brush 
with a hospital, short of 
bringing somebody else flow- 
ers in one, and I may be 


forgiven for rs , “4 


being a little 


nurses bring 
you  break- 
fast in bed 
ir he every- 

ng. Broth- 
er, it’s the Crosby 
greatest. I may never leave. 

And when did they invent 
this stuff, morphine, any- 
how? I must have been away. 
Brother, it’s the greatest. 
And have you tried sodium 
pentothal lately? Well, sir, 
whisky is for children. Sodi- 
um pentothal it's the great- 
est, 


FOR YEARS I have heard 
what radio and television 
does for the shut-ins. And 
now, at long last, I am a shut- 
in—at least some of the time. 
I've had a distressing habit 
lately of floating out the win- 
dow and the nurses have to 
shout at me to float back 
in time for lunch. 

In the few moments when 
they do manage to shut me 
in, radio and television are 
an enormous comfort. I don't 
know how many .of you have 
ever looked at Red Skelton 
while hopped to the ears on 
morphine. Brother, it’s the 
greatest. In more rational 
moments, Red Skelton has al- 
ways struck me as more than 
slightly bunatic. It’s only now 
I see how wrong I was. 

He was on this ship, see 
hiding in a lifeboat. Then 
the purser was chasing him 
around the deck while a 
couple of titled Englishmen 
bet on the winner. Later, at 
the country home of one of 


and T 


Shot With Morphine, 
He Viewed Red Skelton. 


By John Crosby 


the Englishmen, he shot a 
skunk and then he fell to 
pouring punch all over the 
girls’ dresses. As I say, you 
haven't really lived until 
you've seen this sort of thing 
under the influence of mor- 
phine. it takes on what the 
ad men would call an ex- 
tra added dimension. What I 
mean is that some of the 
punch splattered over the 
foot of my bed and I could 
smell the skunk.-If David 
Sarnoff ever gets around to 
introducing the feelies that 
Aldous Huxley predicted for 
us in “Brave New World,” I 
may just leave town. 


I'M TOLD THAT MOR- 
PHINE can still the pain even 
of a brain tumor, which ranks 
high among the more pain- 
ful experiences of mankind. 
But there’s one thing mor- 
phine can’t still, Arthur God- 


frey. I've got Arthur Godfrey | 
I should | 


hooked much worse than | 
us dope junkies) on the right | 


addicts 
say. 


(who are, 


of me and Arthur Godfrey ad- 
dicts on the left of me. 

And that “heh heh heh” 
of Godfrey's cuts through 
everything—morphine, closed 
doors, anything. I even tried 
drifting out the window on 
my little pink cloud and, by 
George, the man on the next 
pink cloud had Arthur God- 
frey tuned in. 

Just the same, with ‘that 
slight reservation, morphine 
is a miracle drug all right. 
I gave it the supreme test 
the other night. I floated 
over to the set and tuned 
in Igor Cassini's “Million Dol- 
lar Show Case.” And you 
know what? Gigi looked like 
a million dollars. Never in 
medical history has a nar- 
cotic passed a test like that 
one. No pain. No discomfort. 
Watched the whole show. too! 
I tell you this morphine is 
the greatest. 


(Co zrient ates New 
Tribune, Inc.) 


York 


s 
ers Digest: 


q 
for a South African diamond 
treasure. 

3 p. m—WRC-TV. Matinee 
Theater: Peter Votrian plays 
a conscience - stricken boy, 
“Romney.” He broods over 
the accidental death of his 
brother until he thinks the 
death was his fault. 

5 p. m—WTTG. Lamb Ses- 
sion: Art’s guest is Lt. Jack 
Davis, a member of 
United States track squad. 

7:30 ~. m. — WTOP--TV. 
Robin Hood: “The Sheriff's 
Boots” begin to pinch his 
tender toes. Robin and the 
Merry Men are the reason. 

7:30 p. m—WTTG. Sans 
Script: A comedy-variety pro- 
gram starring Les Sand with 
vocalist Susan Hight and the 
Sammy Ferro Trio. 
m—WMAL-TV. Read- 
Richard Gaines 
portrays “Cochise, Greatest 
of the Apaches.” 

8 p. m—WRC-TV. Produc- 
ers Showcase (COLOR): Sol 
Hurok presents 12 great art- 
ists in a 90-minute telecast of 
a “Festival of Music.” Per- 
formers are Renata Tebaldi, 
Jussi Bjoerling, Marian An- 
derson, Zinka Milanov, Jan 
Peerce, Roberta Peters, Gre 
gor Piatigorsky, Artur Rubin- 
stein, Isaac Stern, Rise Stev- 
ens, Blanche Thebom and 
Leonard Warren. 

8 p. m—WTOP-TYV. Burns 
and Allen: Gracie hires a 
‘gigolo to teach George the 
courtesies of the “well-trained 
male.” 

8 p. m—WTTG. The Eve 
ning Movie: George Raft and 
Joan Bennett star with Wal- 


ter 


the — 


M onday TV Preview 


in “The House: 3 


Across Bay.” George is in 
Alcatraz. His wife takes a 
house across the bay. 

8:30 p. m.—WTOP.-TV. Ar- 
thur Godfrey’ s Talent Scouts: 
An Ohio baritone, a Los An- 
geles singing duo and a New 
York instrumental trio com- 
pete for honors. 

8:30 p. m. — WMAL - TV. 
Voice of Firestone: Elaine 
Malbin and Robert Merrill 
are featured in selection from 
Verdi’s “La Traviata.” 

9 p. m—WTOP.-TYV. I Love 
Lucy: Lucy drops in on Buck- 
ingham Palace and hopes to 
see the Queen of England. 

9:30 p. m—WRC-TV. Rob- 
ert Montgomery Presents: 
“Mr. Tutt Baits a Hook.” Par- 
ker Fennelly plays a wily old 
lawyer who sets out to defend 
a young man whom everyone 
thinks is guilty of murder. 

:30 p. m— Boxing: 
Gene Poirer vs. Carmine 
Fiore in a 10-round welter- 
weight bout. 

9:30 p. m — WMAL-TV 
Medical Horizons: Strides be- 
ing made to help sufferers of 
arthritis and go are ex- 
plained in “The Sly Ss gg si 

9:30 p. m—WTOP-TV. De- 
cember Bride: Spring ihe 
ton meets a Texan who per- 
suades her to invest in oil 
wells. 

10 p. m—WTOP.-TV. Studio 
One: A magazine writer has 
been married for 15 years. 
“My Son Johnny” tells what 
happens to him when. he 
learns that a baby is on the 


way. 

10:45 p. h.—WTTG. Madi- 
son Square Garden: Film of 
New York Knickerbockers vs. 
Boston Celtics (basketball); 
the Hollywood Ice Revue and 
a main event boxing bout. 


FM STATIONS 


Wae-vm 


mm 
WRUZ-FM (95.5 me)—?7 
WASH-FM (97.1 me.)— 


mm. 
woL PM (98.7 me.)—7 «. m. to mid-' 


nicht. 
\WREAN (100.3 me.)—5 s. m. te 9 Bp. m.! 
STANDARD STATIONS 


$0, potdnight. | WOOK—1340 ke—S a. 
45 p. m.|WEAM—I390 ke 


OTHER 
| won ke.-6 «. ™. 
wr —?7 


eoei—ee ke—% 6. ™. 
FAX—1i1220 ke.—7 «. m. te 6:45 B® 


= = So 9B. m. WARL- 
tes ' 


WMAL- 
Dp. ™m. 


io 
iW 
m.|WPGC—1580 ke. as ‘Suis. 


(98.9 me.)-5:°30 «. mm. ft a Wweows (101.1 me.)>—T «. mm. te 2 
WHOP-FM (06.3 me.)—6:30 a. m. te 2 WOMS-FM (108.5 me.)—6:30 0, m. te) 
(105.1 me.)—5:90 «. m. te 2) 


midnight. 


a. 
WUST_FM (106.8 me.)—7:90 «. m. te 9) 


Pp. ™. 
PM (107.5 me.)—6 a. m. te 12-50) 


m. te 1 a. 
m la 
ms. fe midnis 


° 6:45 pp. 


an s. 
~1450 ke. mw 
1540 ke.— 


Programs printed here conform to information 
eer oy stations at time of prec pas 


—— 


Monday Television Programs 


(Dw 
Wits 


(ABC) 
5 WMAL-TV 


(CBS) 
7 WTOP-TV 


LAttie Rascals 
tile Re 


mper Room | \ecner 


Ding Dons 


Ernie Kovacs | 
5 Ernie 


orees_ | gel 


| Qcogene 


my 


pppeneure “Rekre T¥o_ in 


enry 


Si Hymna 
9" qpeates 


ees 


Academy Theater 
Schoo! kace”™ 


: RE 


This ts th irthur G 
Studio 7 © Story lArtnur 


“Mansion for Jim” 


Cartoon Concert 
Certoon Concert 
Clown rner 

. 


es ome 


! 


in | 
ee 
3 


3 
: 
a 
: 


6°35 Meditations 
7-8 Mornine Show 
ap 


pam PE 
ee 


Monday Radio Programs 


WRC (NBC) 
AM 980 FM 93.9) 


Chanticleer 
-9!i Look Day 
Weather 

. News 
News. & 


00'Breakf'st Club 
115! n meret iA 
130) cNei 
"45 Breakfast clut Club 
‘0O'True Story 


- Ross 
Al Ross; pews 
Date in Wa 
Date in W 


Weekday 

Weekday 
Weekday 
News: 
43 Jerry & J} Jimma Weekd y 


00) Back ews 
"30 Masie *gdom [Pat 
‘45 Magic gdom 


00 Paul Harvey 
133 15 Inner Circle 
’ 


45 Whispering Sts 
"00 News 
mr 


r ro at “one 
frown & Co'try 1 May eae 
frown & Co’try 
frown 


Weekday 


3 
+ 
001! 
1 


jeekday 


eee Reporter 7 
“Ross 6:15-9 
Weekday: ong Piske 


Weekday 


Lunch _ with Ed 


Evy 
Washington |Fred 


Tord xe exe Oy eckday 
: PS 


WWODC (MBS) WTOP (CBS) 
AM 1260 (AM 1500 FM 96.3 


6:30. 7:30. 8:30 


, Hurieigh |News of America 


moore; Gallaher 


een . Be 


Hebi we, iad y | News: 
Lunch Ed |Home i hod 
‘Evans ws: m stud’ 7) —y 


New ; Ci 1260 


vans News; 1260 

P Piske vere 

Club 1260 yt Pe 
News; Mark Bvans 


‘terviews 


‘Brooks Atkinson grumbled: 


arren 
ition 
nt 


> 


Walter Winchell 


... OF NEW yYoRE 
The Stardusters 


THE bop Se POST and TIMES HERALD 


Memo for Prince Rainier’s scrapbook. A current mag quotes 
“If I must name my two favorite pictures, they are 
the pair I’ve done with Bill Holden. I can reaily understand) 
his popularity. If I had to, I'd stand in line myself to see one 


Grace: 


of his pictures”... H. Bogart* 
js starring in a saga titled 
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panning newspaper- 
men. Drop that snarl, Looey! 

. Crities are soooo critical. 


“Amusement may yet turn out 
to be the curse of the enter- 
tainment business.” Thank you, 
Brooks Goldwin. 


“Someone Waiting,” a melo, 
received a swelo reception from 
Variety's New Haven exile... 
Gisele Mackenzie's platter of 
“Little Child” is as cute as a 
baby’s smile .;. . “The Night 
My Number Came Up” movie, a 
British tingler-zingler, is based 
on a true incident... Add 
thorny orchids: The New 
Yorker mag's critic wrote: 
“Anna Magnani proves that, | 
weight for age, she’s the 
greatest actress in the world.” 


| 
Although millions are ex- | 
pended for color tv shows,| 
fewer than 50,000 color telesets | 
are in use ... The latest scan-| 
dal mag, you may be stunned) 
to learn, is Reader's Digest. 
Exposes Hitler’s private life . 
Betty Madigan’s disc, “To You, 


' 
) 


| ‘Justily . 


My Love,” is lovely. Sounds 
like music. 


Sammy Davis Jr. has a pas- 
sion for snazzy jalopies. He 
owns a Thunderbird, a Conti- 
nental Mark II and a Caddy .. 
Playwright Sean O’Casey’s tv 
interview captured his charm 
and intelligence. He demon- 
strated that brains can be en- 
tertaining ... Why the “Ran- 
som” movie may seem familiar: 
It’s based on a tv play titled 
“Fearful Decison.” 


What is fame? ame? Jackie Glea- | 
son puts it this way: “I re- | 
member when I used to waik) 
down the street and nobody 
said hello to me— and I wollen 
real slow. Now everybody) 
knows me” Gordon Mac- | 
Rae’s record, “Fate,” vibrates | 
Ww. Winchell’ s choice | 
for playing Marjorie Morning- 
star in the movie version: Eliza- 
beth Taylor. 


Jimmy Cagney’s talents are 
not confined to cagneying in 
films. He composes poetry and 
jis a skillful draftsman and 


painter 


Highlights on Radio 


ll a. m—WRC. Weekday: 
Guest is Gladys Swarthout. 

11:30 a. m.—WTOP. Make 
Up Your Mind: Designer Ceil 
Chapman talks about why 
women’s fashions always 
change. 

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with Ed: Premiere of a new 
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host. 

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1260: Frankie Carle, currently 
appearing at the Statler Ho- 
tel, is Fred Fiske’s guest. 

1:30 p. m—WGMS. Music 
in School: Our Country 
Sings: “Stephen Foster 
Songs.” 

6:45 p. m. — WGMS. Of 
Many Things: Bergen Evans 
speaks of “Art of Being 
Nasty.” 

7:30 p. m—WGMS. Music 
from Germany: David Bergen 
interviews C. W. Ceram, at- 
thor of “Gods, Graves 


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8 p. m—WTOP. My Son, 
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tedious counting preliminary 
to a bean-guessing contest. 

8:15 p. m—WTOP. Yours 
Truly, Johnny Dollar: Flight | 
Six of the Aztec Caribbean 
Line ‘crashes in mountains 
10 minutes after take off. | 
Seven passengers are killed. 

8:30 p. m—WMAL. Voice | 
of Firestone: Elaine Malbin 
and Robert Merrill sing se- 
lections from music by Verdi 
and Schumann. 

9 p. m—WRC.. The Tele- 
phone Hour: Robert Casda- 
desus is guest. He plays Mo- | 


zart’s “Concerto No. 27 in B 


Flat;” Chopin’s “Ballade No. 
1 in G Minor.” 


9:30 p. m—WMAL. Off- 
beat: Martin Agronsky inter- 
views Dick Davis. 


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and Televisies ——__ 


By John 


THIS IS my first brush 
with a hospital, short of 
bringing somebody else flow- 
ers in one, and I may be 


forgiven for 
being a little 
naive about 


thing. Broth- 
er, it’s the Crosby 
greatest. I may never leave. 

And when did they invent 
this stuff, morphine, any- 
how? I must have been away. 
Brother, it's the greatest. 
And have you tried sodium 
pentothal lately? Well, sir, 
whisky is for children. Sodi- 
um pentothal it's the great- 
est. 


FOR YEARS I have heard 
what radio and television 
does for the shut-ins. And 
now, at long last, I am a shut- 
in—at least some of the time. 
I've had a distressing habit 
lately of floating out the win- 
dow and the nurses have to 
shout at me to float back 
in time for lunch. 

In the few moments when 
they do manage to shut me 
in, radio and television are 
an enormous comfort. I don't 
know how many .of you have 
ever looked at Red Skelton 
while hopped to the ears on 

morphine. Brother, it’s the 

In more rational 
moments, Red Skelton has al- 
ways struck me as more than 
slig lunatic. It’s only now 
I see how wrong I was. 

He was on this ship, see, 
hiding in a lifeboat. Then 
the purser was chasing him 
around the deck while a 
couple of titled Englishmen 
bet on the winmer. Later, at 
the country home of one of 


nnn iO 
Shot With Morphine, © 
He Viewed Red Skelton 


urers,” story 
trustful quartet who set out 
for a South African diamond 
treasure. 


Crosby 


the Englishmen, he shot a 
skunk and then he fell to 
pouring punch all over the 
girls’ dresses. As I say, you 
haven't really lived until 
you've seen this sort of thing 
under the influence of mor- 
phine. It takes on what the 
ad men would call an ex- 
tra added dimension. What I 
mean is that some of the 
punch splattered over the 
foot of my bed and I could 
smell the skunk. If David 
Sarnoff ever gets around to 
introducing the feelies that 
Aldous Huxley predicted for 
us in “Brave New World,” I 
may just leave town. 


I'M TOLD THAT MOR- 
PHINE can still the pain even 
of a brain tumor, which ranks 
high among the more pain- 
ful experiences of mankind. 
But there’s one thing mor- 


phine can’t still, Arthur God- | 


frey. I've got Arthur Godfrey 
addicts (who are, I should 
say, hooked much worse than 


us dope junkies) on the right | 


of me and Arthur Godfrey ad- 
dicts on the left of me. 

And that “heh heh heh” 
of Godfrey's cuts through 
everything—morphine, closed 
doors, anything. I even tried 
drifting out the window on 
my little pink cloud and, by 
George, the man on the next 
pink cloud had Arthur God- 
frey tuned in. 

Just the same, with that 
slight reservation, morphine 
is a miracle drug all right. 
I gave it the supreme test 
the other night. I floated 
over to the set and timed 
in Igor Cassini's “Million Dol- 
lar Show Case.” And you 
know what? Gigi looked like | 
a million dollars. Never in 
medical history has a nar- 
cotic passed a test like that 
one. No pain. No discomfort. 
Watched the whole show, too! 
I tell you this morphine is 
the greatest. 


(Coprricht. mS New York 
ld Tribune. Inc.) 


3 p. m—WRC-TV. Matinee 
Theater: Peter Votrian plays 
a conscience - stricken boy, 
“Romney.” He broods over 
the accidental death of his 
brother until he thinks the 
death was his fault. 

5 p. m—WTTG. Lamb Ses- 
sion: Art’s guest is Lt. Jack 
Davis, a member of 
United States track squad. 

7:30 @. m. — WTOP--TYV. 
Robin Hood: “The Sheriff's 
- Boots” begin to. pinch his 
tender toes. Robin and the 
Merry Men are the reason. 

7:30 p. m—WTTG. Sans 
Script: A comedy-variety pro- 
gram starring Les Sand with 
vocalist Susan High* and the 
Sammy Ferro Trio. 

8 p. m—WMAL.-TV. Read- 
ers Digest: Richard Gaines 
portrays “Cochise, Greatest 
of the Apaches.” 

8 p. m—WRC-TV. Produc. 
ers Showcase (COLOR): Sol 
Hurok presents 12 great art- 
ists in a 90-minute telecast of 
| a “Festival of Music.” Per- 
| formers are Renata Tebaldi, 
| Jussi Bjoerling, Marian An- 
derson, Zinka Milanov, Jan 
Peerce, Roberta Peters, Gre- 
| gor Piatigorsky, Artur Rubin- 
stein, Isaac Stern, Rise Stev- 
ens, Blanche Thebom and 
Leonard Warren. 

8 p. m—WTOP-TV. Burns 
and Allen: Gracie hires a 
“gigolo to teach George the 
courtesies of the “well-trained 
male.” 

8 p. m—WTTG. The Eve- 
ning Movie: George Raft and 
Joan Bennett star with Wal- 


the — 


Monday TV Preview ? 


5:50 p. . 
thur Godfrey's Talent Scouts: 
An Ohio baritone, a Los An- 
geles singing duo and a New 
York instrumental trio com- 
pete for honors. 

8:30 p. m. — WMAL - TV. 
Voice of Firestone: Elaine 
Malbin and Robert Merrill 
are featured in selection from 
Verdi's “La Traviata.” 

9 p. m—WTOP-TV. I Love 
Lucy: Lucy drops in on Buck- 
ingham Palace and hopes to 
see the Queen of England. 

9:30 p. m—WRC-TYV. Rob- 
ert Montgomery Presents: 
“Mr. Tutt Baits a Hook.” Par- 
ker Fennelly plays a wily old 
lawyer who sets out to defend 
a young man whom everyone 
thinks is guilty of murder. 

:30 p. m— Boxing: 
Gene Poirer vs. Carmine 
Fiore in a 10-round welter- 


Medical Horizons: Strides be- 
ing made to help sufferers of 
arthritis and gout are ex- 
plained in “The Sly Crippler.” 

9:30 p. m—WTOP-TY. De- 
cember Bride: Spring Bying- 
ton meets a Texan who per- 
suades her to invest in oil 
wells. 

10 p. m.—WTOP.TV. Studio 
One: A miagazine writer has 
been marded for 15 years. 
“My Son Johnny” tells what 
happens to him when. he 
learns that a baby is on the 


way. 

10:45 p. fh.—WTTG. Madi- 
son Square Garden: Film of 
New York Knickerbockers vs. 
Boston Celtics (basketball); 
the Hollywood Ice Revue and 
a main event boxing bout. 


WRC-FM (93.9 


WASH-FM 

wot -PM (98.7 me.)—7T «. m. to mid- 
t 

WEAN (100.3 me.)—5 &. m. 


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waUT- TM (95.5 me)—T a. “=. te 5 é. m. wae 
(97.1 me.)—9 a. * 10) 


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(105.1 me.)—5:30 «. mm. te 2) * 


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wist- FM (106.8 me.)—7:30 «. mm. te 9) 
Dp. ™ 
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>. ™. . 


OTHER STANDARD STATIONS 


wore. ke.~6 & 


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—1 580 a I ‘Suly, 


Programs printed here conform to information 


_— 


Monday Television Programs 


furnished by stations at trme of publication 


Monday Radio Programs 


(CBS) 


(ABC) 
WMAL-TV 7|WTOP-TV 


6:35 


“Meditations 
: Mornine Show 
Captain 


Chanticleer 


News. 


ff: Hymna 
— 


“Berle 
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WWDC (MBS) WTOP (CBS) 
AM 1260 (AM 1500 FM 96.3 


6-10: Mark Evens, 5:36 
Ken Evans. poe 
5/6 so 7:30. 8:30. 7a 
6, 6°15. 6:30, 

9 ‘ ors) 7:15 
Robt. Hurileigh 
Art Brown 

vans, N's; Brown 
Art Brown 


News of American Ampetien 
neore; 


iPr ske 
Evans News: Piske 
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Hieb 5. Stud'y\ > 
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Lunch 
Pv ans N's: St red’ 7 
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Club —. 


laround Town 
Law 


weight 


Walter Wirichell 


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-" 
THE WASHINGTON POST ond TIMES HERALD 
_Menday, Jachary 38, 1956 


... OF NEW YORK 
The Stardusters 


F 3 


Memo for Prince Rainier’s scrapbook. A current mag quotes 


Grace: 


“If I must name my two favorite pictures, they are 


the pair I've done with Bill Holden. I can reaily understand 
his popularity. If I had to, I'd stand in line myself to see one 


of his pictures” ... H, Bogart* 
js starring in a saga titled 
“The Foolish Actor.” Gives in- 
terviews panning mnewspaper- 
mén. Drop that snarl, Looey! 

Critics are soooo critical. 
Brooks Atkinson grumble d: 
“Amusement may yet turn out 
to be the curse of the enter- 
tainment business.” Thank you, 
Brooks Goldwin. 


“Someone Waiting,” a melo, 
received a swelo reception from 


Variety's New Haven exile... Tt’ 


Gisele Mackenzie's platter of 


“Little Child” is as cute as a 
baby’s smile ... “The Night 
My Number Came Up” movie, a 
British tingler-zingler, is based 
on a true incident... Add 
thorny orchids: The New 
Yorker mag's critic wrote: 
“Anna Magnani proves that, 
for age, she’s the 
greatest actress in the world.” 

Although millions are a! 
pended for color tv shows, 
fewer than 50,000 color telesets | 
are in use... The latest scan- 
dal mag, you may be stunned 
to learn, is Reader’s Digest. 
Exposes Hitler’s private life . . 7 
Betty Madigan’s disc, “To You, 


My Love,” is lovely. Sounds 
like music. 


Sammy Davis Jr. has a pas 
sion for snazzy jalopies. He 
owns a Thunderbird, a Conti- 
nental Mark II and a Caddy . 
Playwright Sean O’Casey’s tv 
interview captured his charm 
and intelligence. He demon- 
strated that brains can be en- 
tertaining ... Why the “Ran- 
som” movie may seem familiar: 
s based on a tv play titied 
“Fearful Decison.” 


What is fame? Jackie Glea- 
son puts it this way: “I re- 
member when I used to walk 
down the street and nobody 
said hello to me— and I walked 
real slow. Now everybody 
knows me” . Gordon Mac- 
Rae’s record, “Fate,” vibrates 


lustily ... W. Winchell’s choice 
for playing Marjorie Morning- | 
star in the movie version: Eliza-' 
' beth Taylor. | 


Jimmy Cagney’s talents are| 
not confined to cagneying in) 
films. He composes poetry and| 
is a skillful draftsman and) 


painter . 


Highlights on Radio 


ll a. m—WRC. Weekday: 
Guest is Gladys Swarthout. 

11:30 a. m—WTOP. Make 
Up Your Mind: Designer Ceil 
Chapman talks about why 
women’s fashions always 
change. 

12:05 p. m—WWDC. Lunch 
with Ed: Premiere of a new 
program witih Ed Studney as 
host. 

1:15 p. m—WWDC. Club 
1260: Frankie Carle, currently 
appearing at the Statler Ho- 
tel, is Fred Fiske’s guest. 

1:30 p. m—WGMS. Music 
in School: Our Country 
Sings: “Stephen Foster 
Songs.” 

645 p. m. — WGMS. Of 
Many Things: Bergen Evans 
speaks of “Art of Being 
Nasty.” 

7:30 p. m—WGMS. Music 
from Germany: David Bergen 
interviews C. W. Ceram, au- 
thor of “Gods, Graves and ¢ 


| 

1-Year Guarantee on All Parts |) 
We Repair "Em in the Home 
Service Calls Any Time—Anywhere 


JU. 5-3210 


If you feel tired and 
weak after illness, it 
may be due to iron- 
poor, Tired Blood. 


To feel stronger 

’ >. fast, try GERITOL, 

et 5 the high potency 

tonic that begins to 

stienestioald Tired Blood in just 
| 24 hours! 

In only one day GERITOL iron 


Scholars” and “The Secret’ ‘of 
the Hittites.” 
8 p. m—WTOP. My Son, 


Jeep baits his family into a | 


tedious counting preliminary | 


to a bean-guessing contést. 
8:15 p. m—WTOP. Yours | 


Truly, Johnny Dollar: Flight | 


Six of the Aztec Caribbean 
Line crashes in mountains | 
10 minutes after take off. | 
Seven passengers are killed. 
8:30 p. m—WMAL. Voice | 
of Firestone: Elaine Malbin | 
and Robert Merrill sing se- 
lections from music by Verdi 
and Schumann. | 


9 p. m—WRC.. The Tele- | 
Robert Casda- | 
desus is guest. He plays Mo- | 
zart’s “Concerto No. 27 in B 
“Ballade No. | 


phone Hour: 


Flat;” Chopin's 
1 in G Minor.” 

9:30 p. m—WMAL. Off- 
beat: Martin Agronsky inter- 


views Dick Davis. 


WEEKLY RATES 
MONTHLY-$12 
LARGE SCREENS 
Db. C. ONLY 


Di. 7-5941 


Jatter Colds, Fiv or Sore Throat | 


FEEL STRONGER FAST 


Build-Up TIRED BLOOD* . . . Speed-Up Recovery! 


feeling. After a recent short sick- 


ness I bought a bottle of Geritol | 


to get back the energy I had lost. 


I thank Geritol for the wonderful | 
job it did in restoring my energy | 


and putting me back on my feet.” 

Mrs. N. B. obviously had tired 
blood. If you've been feeling tired 
and worn-out lately because of 
tired blood due to a recent illness, 
get GERITOL, liquid or tablets. 


2 BIG STORES 


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Daily, 9:30 to 6 P.M. Dally, 9.30'to 6 PM. 


3 Day SALE—Mon:, Tues., Wed. 


New Models—Original Factory Cartons 
‘NORGE ADMIRAL LPOC 
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WASHER TABLE MODEL WASHER 
REG. 239.95 


REG. 239.95 
142°| 144*| "137° 


Nat tenn hee 
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UPRIGHT 


9.8 CU. FT. p59 
FREEZER REFRIGERATOR 


$4 179° 95 1 69 REG. 419.95 


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$222 
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275 


IRONS 

ie UND ccéamecneodnines Vane 
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Sunbeam Dry 

GE D 


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COFFEE MAKERS 
Mirromatic 8-cup 

_ Mirromatic 8-cup 
West Bend 8-cup 
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».00\New Sounds u |News: Car fs in your bloodstream’ carrying 
Jack 

10New I Aer re Be News: "Ar oF | Agee Ste en a 
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‘Bob Dalton store | GERITOL contain twice the iron 
sic| ina pound of calves’ liver, 7 times 

: |News Tonight show | the iron in a pound of spinach. 
Ts Mrs. N. B. of St. Louis, writes: 


Dotty 


Medical 


Gene verer Starlite 


‘SSE Boel Ears Hie 
f Love Lucy 
ember Bride 
Horizons ‘Goring Byington al ' 
00 Vandercook Fibber 
Studio One 
Carmine ‘s| Top Plays omens “My Gon Malone 
ore a’one 
of 1955 i) alone 
News; Rash: Wthr.}j | 
ports: se Star : ss Relaxin: 
“Becond Sight" 
Mer! e Oberon ip, 


00 Reb Montsom-} 
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Lives 


580: 
Mac McGerr (aa 


News: 8 rt 
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: < ome Capri with Baker 


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WE FIX "EM_IN YOUR HOME 
Service Calls Anytime—Anywhere 


: TOASTERS 


Sunbeam 

AN UNPRECEDENTED Toastmaster” «+. 
EVENT FOR YOU AND YOUR 

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tonight _ 4 9 8..9:30 


SDESSE EA EL SL ET eee ery Tr 


VA. STOVE, $21.95; VA. 
INUT, $21.70; VA. PEA, 


DURON 
' PAINTS 


Toastmaster Super De Luxe .. 
Toastmaster, 3 slice 
Westinghouse 
' Universal 
G.E 


| NUT, $17.50; PEA, $16.30; 
MARYLAND EGG, $18.00 
ALL SIZES OF QUALITY 
PENNA. HARD COAL 


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PHOTO EQUIPMENT 
Kodak Holiday Kit 

Kodak Hawkeye Kit 

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ork 
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PRODUCERS’ SHOWCASE fang 

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“FESTIVAL OF MUSIC” 
The world’s greatest musical ‘ 644 ¥ > 
artists performing the world’s ae Y 
greatest music, featuring scenes x 
from “Pagliacci,”“La Bohéme”and 4 2 { é 
“Tales of Hoffmann” and starring 4 ¢ 

, 
i 


sNORGE. 
ELECTRIC. 


TABLE MODEL DRYER 
REG. 179.95 REG. 129.95 


*158°°| *99 
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Defrost 


IRONER Auto. 
REG. 299.95 REFRIGERATOR 


bi. 99°” 5 REG. 499.95 


a Orietnal Casters wa 


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Sofa and 2 
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slightly more 


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REG. 259.95 


1 61 70 


7e 
Marian Anderson, Jussi Bjoerling, 
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CALL NA. 8-5100, Ext. 5397, for appointment Blanche Thebom, Leonard Warren _ 


THE HECHT CO: ese 


as Master of Ceremonies. 


Furniture Re-Webbed 


DAILY 
INCLUDING SATURDAY 
- 7 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 7 a 
% nin own mt | Horoscope 
Daily Crossword Puzzle ot,” as, a Tee Yow 


birthd comes 
outlook is, ee dine’ 4” 
12 3 9 x wy hy Monday. Jan : 
ARSH TO APRIL 20 (Artes):/ 
ting infil 


ECC |e ce 
|| = TO MAY 20, 


APRIL 21 TO MAY 20 (Taurus)—You! 
be top-ranking ip whatever [ield in} 


25 | MAY 21 TO JUNE 21 (Gemint)—Heed 


te allocate work. play and rest properly 


JUNE 22 TO JULY 23 (Cancer) 
i\@ay can be a leader for whole 


) Reg tT) S&S Pat. Of: 
Lig 1936 by 
were 
| $@ select wisely whet to start firet and | Chicage Tribune. 
| Row best to carry on. Today's encourss my 

ing. stimulating, but let your actions be aneaeut 
| jim moderation ) By Dal Curtis 

| JULY 26 TO AUG. 29 (Leol—As with | . r onan na mona pe 

| Cancer. moderation sensible precautions WE ACTS HIGH AND DON’T TELL ME YOUR THAT'S RIGHT, LILA/ TELL 


. oe ammates. Enthusiasm 
icine GY te ae is fina. bal ee REAL SWEET OF | | MIGHTY---BUT HE'S / TROUBLES / TELL THEM ME ALL YOUR TROUBLES / fr 
MUCH you can MR. BARKER 1S COMING OUT JUST A PHONY TO ” Z p : 


ut must de 
harnessed to real knowledge and HOW TAKE IT EASY LADY / YOUNG HIM, (SN“T IT 2 
23 TO SEPT. 23 ‘Virgo)—Could a LITTLE LILA / t 


| with those who achieve 


‘ 24 TO OCT. 23 (lLibra)—Audit 
5 i and proposed physical accounts | 

(and be eure youn are on well-timed! 
| Projects. tasks need to fall back! 
7 this generous. constructive day 


NOV. 22 (Scorpic)—Dar's 


/ ‘ 
’ . ~~ o- 
OCT. 24 TO , | ; : 
| imetinations are toward the ambitic H 4 : ’ r . 7 
. 4 ; : 
>” Me . 


and stimulating. therefore sou shoul 


ACROSS Solution to Saturday's: Parsle |i Match of alt cad wocluer ses] 
1 Cloaks worn 34 Cut didos a [ore ae See aes See 
‘im the 37 Dyeing in- : 
Levant strument 
7Feathered 38 Adjuster 
fighter 39 One of the 
15 Bathe again Americas. 
16 Bach or abbr. 
Handel 40 Begat 
specialty 42 Wooden 
17 Consecrator goblet: var 
18 Time beater 43 Likely ; 
19 Presiden- 44 Is hep, with : 
tial initials “to:” 2 words 
20 Express 45 William uo 
Henry 


NOY. 23 TO DEC. 22 ‘Sagittarius’: | 
Day neither exacting nor rigid. More 
jamenabie. elastic in scope of activities 
if they are purposeful and toward a 
wholesome profiliabie coal. But don’! 
stretch too much 


23 TO JAN. 21 (Capricorm:| WARY WORTH y ~~ By Ken-Allen 


DEC 

Could be acy ag to mix “some 
umor and s ttle fun to relieve the TT WITH THAT SIZZLING , WE WILL HAVE!---AS SOON AS I 
in yh. A. Fe Telntion "ye - Te RA EMO “ek MOVE MY THINGS OUT*.--T UL 


ships. happy doings 

IAN. 2° TO FEB. 20 ( Acuarius)—Even WHY, DR. BARTON! ... 16 A PROFESSIONA ‘ BETTER OFF we SPARE ROOM! SLEEP DOWN HERE ON THE 
weiious Jayks, ana, cradt-tberubi“SOl"| | T HOPE YOUONLY 4 pAN?.-YOUNG BRENT SEEMS 10 | [PUT HIM TOBED IN DAVENPORT! 
can handle ‘duties “well and with s| [Gwe OVER TOMAKE  ) HAVE ARECURRENCE OF THE ag 


can handie duties ww 
smi so now 


=i Olin i-eieit* iwi 


|  |AFOURTHATBRIDGE!{ MALARIA HE PICKED UP 
gurer headway possible In your ‘occups- : SS .a IN SERVICE! 


0 
i 
L 
. 
us 


i) =o] "12> 


GOoQOORwe& 


Ss Willing to heip «a 


et al. term for a own friend © : ber also be too 

49 Declare void comrade 36 Open for | oe age nl a tmes Mawit- 

26 Scampered 50 Symbol for 10 Harrow’'s engage- — . iy Benemien = disposition m.. ' 
27 Free thallium rival ments rec Your torical mind quickly ‘ “ 


¢ 
\@educes effects from causes an | 
51 Become 11 Basket or 38 Lessened bee ‘avi Raw -. Z 
28 Symbols | versa. Don't take advice against your : \ ‘ 
A \ 


Harrison DOWN | : or" 
47 Fr. fabulist 9 Familiar 35 Made one's ' BORN TODAY bave a warm a PO) \\ 


29 Nutmeg Mmm ag coshet grecually § |p ie par ee new) 7 
te: abb 52 Melodic 12 Correlative 40 Separator (Copyright. 1956 "Tm at 
state: abbr 53 Toothless 13 Fruit tree 41 Tristan's ) King Features Syndicate, Inc.) eS 
30 English 55 Game festi- 14 Recent : beloved — 
forest vals. anc. ecen 42 Trifling 


31 Early Greece ¢ combatants 49 Goddess | Fi d 0 t H : i “LONESOME IF PEOPLE WOULD Y A BIG PUBLICITY STUNT g 
alphabet © 56 Revoked = 21 Time. with the if FOR UT now AND DisGusTED” | | ONLY BE DECENT / LIKE, FOR INSTANCE, IF THE 2 
character 57 Simple or. . cornucopia | '/ AINTA HIT—iT < | ENOUGH TO sToP MOST BEAUTIFUL GIRL IN THE 

32 Hungered ganisms; bot. 22 Austrian 45 Siamese YOu may enjoy “ 

; botanist coin ta WELL-PAID, Fascinating . AIN'T A FLOP. (TS EATING OR DANCING | WORLD SAID SHE WAS GONNA 
DOWN 24 Subordinate 46 Negative | HOTEL POSITION , JUST ONE OF OR TALKING WHILE 


1 Thanks 5 Upset 28 Ship’s officer ion { 'T THOSE SONGS. ITS ON—AND 
2 Refresh 6 Hindu 30 Silvery 48 Pilaster in just a few months "ate 14 SUET SOIC IN 


3 Any football eight 31 Hindu queen 52 Dutch liquid Free Nation-wide ; ‘ iW 
com 1 Tapestty 33 Mr. hore measure Placement Service z » TPZ IM CONVINCED ITD ITS HAUNTING 


4Noted phy- 8Can be cule 34 Tooth 54 Epistle: Thousands of successful graduates ff) 
_sician " “tivated “" crowns _ abbr. _l] eam, Cow 1 Const rae Lew 
Training. 

Salvation Army Combination Mail | ee 
Promotes Ranges Plan to Be Permanent }-open Mon. through Fri., 8:30 


Brigadier William Ranve, di-- The Post Office’s “combina-| Sas tay conve, Vestn eleven se ) 


, Visional commander of the Na- tion mail” plan, allowing the in-|f .. 11. for FREE BOOK! 39th 
ttonal Capital Division of the clusion of letters or messageSii yar Ask for Mrs, Poe. 


Salvation Army, and his wife,in third or fourth class pack-| aa | 
also a brigadier, both have been ages, becomes permanent Lewis Hotel Training School 2 SHIRT = eeeptes 


romoted to the staff rank of | Feb. 1. | 2301 Pa. Ave. NW. ME. 8-4692 . 
eutenant colonel! The new service on trial|= —| | HOUR LAUNDERING YEG, A--SaniLin 


The Ranges have 31 years of since Nov. 28, requires the user | TH’ MOST FAsous 

service with the Salvation|to indicate on the outside of FREE HEA Tat 3 DRY CIVILIAN BULLER 

Army. As a volunteer worker, the package that there is letter! N HE 

Mrs. Range directs women’s material inside, and pay ap-| HOUR CLEANING 

services in the area. propriate postage. ) DAILY 
———— SS os = ST | BINCLUDING SATURDAY 


'SLATTERY'S aco 
BEGINNING-OF-THE-WEEK 


TODAY thru WED. 9:30 A.M. to 9 P.M. 
BUY ON SLATTERY’S EASY CREDIT 


SAVE ON TELEVISION / WrTAMIN-D 
, HEAT NOW GOING TO - 
Admiral @ RCA Victor @ Zenith — UP YOUR CHIMNEY FOR GRADE-A 


Emerson @ Philco © Motorola |) stiches anc aw HOMOGENIZED 


At Slattery’s Lewest Discount Prices GARAGES @ PROBLEM ROOMS Milk 
_ Thrifty Heater saves you money 


because if puts heat you are now 
Brand New 1956 losing up the chimney to work for 


you. It’s clean, purified heat AND 73 
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MORE CENT IN FUEL TO OPER. 
ATE. Truly Pays for Itself . . . Is GALLON 


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furnaces only. (Not for gas). a | G A 1§ 
Call fer free heme demonstration, 
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Serving Md.. D. C. and Virginia OPEN BAILY 
Since 1946 fan tian 


Wood srained mete! 
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Swed god BFC company lation, and order The Wash-'f 
ington Post and Times Herald 


, SAVE ON WASHERS . guaranteed home delivery. eS 


WHIRLPOOL @ NORGE @ ABC @ HOTPOINT 
WESTINGHOUSE © THOR @ UNIVERSAL 
At Slattery’s Lewest Discount Prices E 
_ if 75" YEAR 
HOTPOINT AUTOMATIC |} #8 ABCDEF | 
Reg. $279.95 [ia At; (ASCOEE | 
WASHERS $ 3 9 it SSON faa 
Brand New in Original i i | n 
Crates St . BARNEY GOOGLE 
i 1 zn Grammar | : | 
i 4 MY MALE VOTERS 
NORGE Electric Dryers, i BID BETTER Not \ SS ppOINTED 
buy on easy terms a The possessive pronoun denotes ownership. é ae ae aes MISS TIGER-- 
ee ee + Note the following example: “We were abie = | DANCE 
as i} to purchase OUR home with a Washington 
$89.95 LEWYT in Permanent Home Loan Plan.” 
ae ive is i , h 
Vacuum Cleaner chin « Home Loan at Washington Perm. 
1955 MODEL WITH ALL ATTACHMENTS f F® nent. Your present rent-dollars go toward 
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payment you make monthly rent-sized pay- 
ments that cover both principal and interest. 


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wiser: oy a eat se a ee . | & 
et s ° 8 | : See and Hear “Bryson Rash and the News'""—Mon., s ae . 
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17°’ Fam. Make 


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21” Bendix *169 


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17°’ Emerson $138 


Mah. Wood Table Model 


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21” ADMIRAL 


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an’ " Philce $259 
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21°° Fam. Make 


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—_ 


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| Table Model 


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nv’ mth = #219 


2-Speaker Swivel Console 
Reg. $139.95 3-Speed 


RCA Radio-Phono $99 


Every item Fully Guaranteed @ All Brand New 


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eg. $399.95 
Hotpoint Freezer’ 290 


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Hotpoint Refrig. 


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Kelvinator 2-Dr. rome COMB, 


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2-door Refrig.-Freez. Comb. 


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Norge Wringer 
Washer with Pump 


Reg. $259.95 $] 78 


Hotpoint 


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Admiral Freezer 
10-cu.-f#. Upright 


*169 


Monitor Washer $78 


Apt. Size Electric Wringer 


Res. $239.95 
Norge *148 


Fully Auto. Washer 


$168 
$139 


Bendix 
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Reg. $219.95 
Hamilton 


Electric Dryer 


Norge Washer 
Westinghouse $249 
Norge 


Aute. Washer, Porcelain 
2-Cycle Auto. 
LAUNDRAMAT Washer 

Electric Dryer 


Res. $299.95 $9] 4 
Reg. $339.95 
SPECIAL! ¢ 08 


Reg. $239.95 


Whirlpool ~=s- $1.37 


Fully Auto. Washer 


COFFEE MAKERS - 
9 


$10.95 West Bend 5-cup 

$12.50 West Bend 8-cup. 

$26.95 Sunbeam 8-cup 
Sunbeam 10-cup 


$ 7. 


Sunbeam Coffeemaster . 


Universal 8-cup 
Universal 10-cup 
General 


Electric 9-cup y 


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$47.50 Sunbeam Mixmaster w/juicer 


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$49.95 
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Waring 2-Speed Chrome Biendor . 


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$27.50 Sunbeam, fully automatic 


$344 |. 


How to 


‘ 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
. * emdap, Remaanp Gh, 1006 37 


QRPHAN ANNie 


Keep Well 


~ To the limit of space, ques-| 


& |tions pertaining to. the preven- 


tion of disease will be answered. | 
Personal replies will be made' 
‘when return stamped envelope 
ts inelosed. Telephone inquiries 
\not accepted. Dr. Van Dellen 
will not make diagnoses or 
prescribe for individual diseases. 


IMMUNIZATION 


The seed.for a new vaccine 
against tuberculosis was sown 
‘recently in the bacteriology 
laboratories of Northwestern 
|University Medical School. No’ 
/one can predict what the fin-| 
‘ished product will do but the! 
initial tests on mice are en- 
couraging. 

It has been known for dec- 
ades that the tubercle bacil- 
lus contains a substance that 
stimulates the body to produce 
germ fighting antibodies. But 
jthe agent never has been iso- 
| the organisms 
\are microscopic in size and! 
‘splitting them, like splitting 
‘atoms, is difficult. | 
| Dr. Guy P. Youmans, head! 
of Northwestern's bacteriology 
department, accepted the chal-| 
lenge and worked out a tech- 
'nique that makes it sound sim-| 
ple. He ground a trillion or 
more micro-organisms for 18 
‘hours in a ball mill with pow- 
‘dered glass. In this way he 
| broke the membranes that sur- 
round the organisms, which al- 
lowed the contents to escape. 
| The next problem was to sep- 
\arate the “yolk from the egg.” 
| This was accomplished by using 
ithe new and expensive ultra-| 
‘centrifuge machine. The solid 
parts consist of micro-organ- 
isms, powdered glass, and other 
debris, which were separated 
from the fluid when the mix- 


ture was centrifuged the first | 


time. 

The precipitate was skimmed 
off and placed in the ultracen- 
trifuge machine to be separated 
again. The same was done with 
the supernatant fluid. By this 
time, the original mixture was 


By Dr. Theodore R. Van Dellen| 


| BLONDIE 


Ki 


TTT 


| WONDER HOW 
1D LOOK WITH 
A MUSTACHE 


P1996 Kong Pesrares Symdecere, inc, World nights reserved 


~ LI'L ABNER 


OH, AH BO HOPE 
AH DIDN'T HARM 
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divided into four parts which, — 


were divided still further until 
particles smaller than the tu- 
bercle bacillus were obtained. 
| The next phase of the experi- 
ment was to determine whether 
these particles had immunizing) 
properties that might be use-| 
ful as a vaccine. The particles 
were injected into 20 mice; an 
‘equal number were used as 
controls. Twenty¢ight days 
later all 40 mice received an 
injection of live virulent tu- 
bercle bacilli. 

All the animals that did not! 
receive the vaccine were dead) 
within 30 days whereas the 
others lived longer, sdme up to’ 


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MONIQUE 1S BRING- \ 
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|120 days. The experiment opens’ 
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TOMORROW: Degrees of 
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iCoprrizht. 1956. Chieage Tribune) 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD | 
38 Monday, January 30, 1956 » eee 


The DISTRICT LIN E By Bill Gold 


YOU'RE “TO HAVE 
TOWAIT, JUDGE ...JUST 
LIKE I HAD TO WAIT FOR’ 


The Trick Is to Get 


You Into the Act’ 


. BOON to appear in this 
newspaper is the first of a 
series of ads designed to pro- 
mote traffic safety, and a 
| -— news story 
| about same. 
The series 
was paid for 
by the Shell 
Oil folks, and 
the story will 
be perpe- 
trated by the 
inimitable 
Harry Gab- 
bett of this 
newspaper. 
Gold Harry 
makes a living by writing 
bright prose, but Shell makes 


a living by selling gasoline, 
and it might be well to ex- 
plain why the firm is spon- 
sorfing a safety campaign in 
235 newspapers throughout 
the country. . 
Division Manager Russell 
Chase puts it this way: 

“Like many other indl- 
viduals and companies, we 
are deeply concerned about 
the death and accident toll. 
We got inte this campaign 
because we think we found 
a new—and effective—ap- 
proach.” 

The chief difficulty here- 
tofore has been that most 
safety campaigns have taken 
the form of sermons directed 
at transgressors. 

Motorists who have read 
or listened to such lectures 
have, for the most part, con- 


into testing his own knowl- 
edge and reactions against 
accepted standards. The re- 
sults are often eye-openers. 

Suddenly the individual 
realizes that the sermon is 
addressed to him as much as 
to “those other fellows.” 
And once the safety cam- 
paigners have gotten us into 
the act by giving us a sense 
of participation, the rest is 
easy. 


The trick is to get the 
motorist to identify himself 


with the faceless millions 
who have accidents each year 
and thereby become recorded 
in the endless statistical tabu- 
lations through which we 
tally the nation’s traffic toll. 
I don’t know whether the 
campaign will sell any gas- 
oline for Shell, but I have 


Games 


; 


Rita 


fa) 


sidered themselves in solid 4 hunch that it will prove 
agreement with the views to be a mighty intelligent 
expressed about careless yse of advertising funds 
drivers. It might even save 4 vy, 


1 


) 


Careless drivers, let it be life or mine. And at the 
noted, were always “those moment I can’t think of 


iS 


ge fellows.” Each motor- anything I favor more 
ist assumed that the sermons enthusiastically. 

were directed at somebody oan 
' else, and as a result paid 2 
' | little attention to them —— Ss np eng : 

The Shell approach sreetings to Rep. Harold O. |-——> 
seems to have been worked §Lovre, Rep. Frank N. Ikard, JOE PALOOKA By Ham Fisher — 
I sycholo- Maj. Gen. John Lentz and ” 
Sok. Wanek. oa Somaionte TLL TAKE TWO TICKETS... \/NO SPECTATORS 


sro | | 


gist. Based on “audience Brig. Gen. M. W. Marston. 
participation,” it subtly ca- eos 
joles the individual driver THOSE WERE THE DAYS 
In Taxi Topix, bible of the 
local taxicab industry, Editor 
Floyd Montgomery muses: 
“Remember when the 
only difficulty about park- 
ing was getting the girl to 
agree?” 


FROM NOW ON. 


| 
| DAKET: 


THE CHAMPS AN OLD 
FRIEND OF MINE AND MY 
FAMILY BACK HOME., 


oes 


NATCH 

Washington's radio-TV fra- 
ternity is grinning over re 
ports that British television 
stations are planning to carry 
the “I Love Lacy” shows. 
They'll be retitled, of course, 
and known as: “Lucy, You're 
a Brick.” 


We believe this is the 
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a. Custom has ever shown... 

i 

~ BRIDGE QUIZ would not recommend a bid of 

we Q. 1—As South, vulnerable,/three no trump. A possibility, 

SS | you hold: however, might be three hearts 
k accept a &742 YAl0 68763 4Q1094) which could enable partner to 


The bidding has proceeded: bid no trump with some sec 
- ee ondary heart stopper. 

- Re) — ae fess 2. Double. This is a trifle 

now light for a double, but East has 

Was Ge you She ' confessed to a weak hand which 

ORQ3¥ 35 OKI 1086 4K 3| Ud Drove gy ge Beng, ee 

Yarborough. If partner has 


Case of 


STRATFORD FARMS wee bidding has proceeded: most of the missing points, you 
1 no tramp i Foes f will severely damage the one 
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Q. 3—As South you hold: to take the double out, the con- 

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The bidding has proceeded: 3. Three diamonds. This is 

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ere SS ang 4 


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| i. Q. 4—As South you hold: diamonds may get you one too 

| 4K 98693105 €652 @AS54 high if partner has a shaded 

The bidding has proceeded: (third seat opening. If he re- 


N sooth, tt) bids three no trump, you will 
3 ipa dee j Mamonds “aes Fess be faced with a further prob- 
hat do you bid now? em, but considerations of safe- 
ANSWERS ty would dictate a return to) 


1. Four diamonds. Partner) four diamonds. 
has made a vulnerable overcall; 4. Pass. Partner's three spade | 
and then bid voluntarily at the! bid is an inquiry as to whether 
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Just for the Courtesy of a nitely more than he could have| Had your two spade bid come SUSIE Q. SMITH 

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& LOW 


By Alex “Raymond _ | 


The Washington 


Merry-Go-Round 


By Drew Pearson 


It isn’t supposed to be ad 
vertised,. but Prime Minister 
Eden is ‘bringing with him to 
Washington some startling evi- 
dence about | 
the manner in 
which Amerfi- 
can oil com-7 
pany royalties 
are being used 
in Saudi Arabia 
to stir up trou- 

against 


Pearson 


4 Eisenhower 


THE WET 
QUICK! 
FAINT MYSELF. 


GOODS! 
I FEEL 


J THE ACCIDENT STORY SAP 
” ROS AMAYS KEPT OE WOES 


CAR 1% TOP CONDITION / 
WwW 


Pm s « Saez | 
— 


THEN HOW COULD HE OVERLOOK 
A SET OF BRAKES THAT WOULD LOCK 


L 


WAIT, PROFESSOR! I-I GUESS 
I'VE GOT 10 TELL YOU ABOUT 
HER THROAT TROUBLE, AFTER ALL! 


LL j 


~ RUSTY RILEY — 


~— 


THAT GAS 
TANK MAY 
BLOW ! 


y vad 
» 
-« g* > 


D 76 Heng Pees Getic te We 


By Frank Godwin 
[| GOT TOGET THAT 


I MAY HAVE A NEED FOR 
THIS OLD NAME PLATE 
SOMETIME / 


By George Wurlder 


HA! co00 THING YOU'RE “Si. 
LOADED LAD. YOu? wee 
NEVER MAKE THE 


7 , : 
} A 


; ~ 
« ‘ 
¥ S| . = 
4" ‘ : 
: sv *, ; 


\rabian- 
and the 
has been 


‘clamp down on the 
‘American Oi! Co 
‘manner in which it 
subsidizing King Saud 
Here are some of the facts 
iwhich British intelligence has 
‘dug up in the Near East and 
which Eden expects to lay in 
Ike's lap: 
| 1. 1t was American royalty 
i\money which actually paid for 
ipart of the Red -arms which 
‘Egypt got from Czechoslovakia 
iPart of this deal was a barter 
for Egyptian cotton, but part 
lalso was paid for by money 
which the Egyptians borrowed 
from Saudi Arabia 
| 2. King Saud has offered $280 
imillion to the government of 
Jordan during the next 10 years 
iif it will stay out of the Bagh 
lad alliance which England or 
‘ganized to combat the march 
lof Russian communism. Saud 
lis getting this money from 
| Aramco 
| Eden also has some amazing 
intercepted messages showing 
‘how the Saudi Arabians have 
been trying to stir up unrest 
and using American oil royal 
ties to do it: also an intercepted 
message regarding the delivery 
of a 25-year-old slave to King 
Ibn Saud 


Oil Company ‘Fraud’ 


Aramco is a combination of 
some of the biggest oil compa 
nies in the LUnited States 
Standard Oj! of New Jersey 
Standard of California, Socony, 
and the Texas Co 

Aramco was charged by the 
Senate Investigation Commit- 
tee in 1948 with overcharging 
the U. S. Navy many millions 
of dollars during the war by 
making it pay $1.05 a barrel for 
oil after originally agreeing to 
sell for 40 cents a barrel. The 
late President Roosevelt had 
given Saudi Arabia $99 million 
of lend lease on condition that 
the oil companies sell oil to 
the Navy at 40 cents a barrel 
| Said the Senate committee 
| “When the United States 
needed oil because of its war 
demands, notwithstanding 
these prior proposals, the com- 
panies offered the Navy fuel 
oil at $1.05 a barrel on a take-it- 
or-leave-it basis. The Navy was 
forced to buy oil on’ these 
terms 

“The oil companies exploited 
the Government by exacting 
high prices for their products 
despite the assistance granted 
to Saudi Arabia at the com 
panies behest to protect and 
preserv. the companies’ con 
CESSIONS. «. « « 

es ae Government 
clearly was defrauded because 
the royaity payments were not 
doubied.” 

The Senate sent the report 
to the Justice Department with 
a recommendation for action, 
out no action was ever taken. 

Prime Minister Eden may not 
be aware of this Senate report, 
but it’s now a matter of public 
record and might be worth 
looking up in view of what's 
happening in the Near East 
today. | 


More Conflicts 


Two more “conflicts of inter-| 
est” have come to light in the 
Fisenhower Admini stration, 
this time in the Securities and 
Exchange Commission charged 
with protecting investors in 
Wall Street 

In these two cases the Ad 
‘ministration hushed things up 
until the affected parties could 
be removed 

One man with a double in 
terest was William S. Marshall. 
chief of the SEC's regional) 
office in Washington, D.C... and 
simultaneously a director of a 
private firm called the Coastal 
Finance Co 

When Coastal Finance 
planned a stock issue last sum-, 
mer, it came under the juris-| 
|diction of Marshall's SEC office, | 
and SEC Chairr.an J. Sinclair’ 
Armstrong “advised” Marshall 


that “it would be proper” for'| 
him to resign from the private’ 


iSEC’s 


business 


gave the SEC a copy of Nis Tet 
ter of resignation from Coastal 
Finance. ; 
Five months later Armstrong 
was amazed to learn that Mar- 


ishall had secretly continued his 


association with the 
This came about after the 
executive director, Al 
Scheidenhelm, read in a news 
paper on Dec. 23 that Coastal 
Finance had gotten into finan 
cial difficulties. showed the ar 
ticle to Marshal! and discovered 
that Marshall was still a diree 
tor of the firm. He said that 
after submitting his letter of 
resignation, he had “changed 
his mind.” | 

Chairman Armstrong i.amedi-| 
ately suggested that Marshall! 
resign from the SEC. But Mar-| 
shall stubbornly failed to see 
that he had done anything 
wrong and had to be “called to 
the table” at a full-iress meet- 
ing of the SEC on Jan. 6 where 
his resignation was formally 
requested 

Prior to this. John V. Bowser 
executive director of the SEC 
under former chairman Ralph 
Demmiler, had also developed 
a “conflict of interest” but was 
never disciplined for it 

While serving with the SEC. 
Bowser was simultaneously the 
owner of a firm called the 
Gateway Finance Go., which in 
March, 1955. merged with 
Coastal Finance. Though the 
latter company was planning a 
new stock issue that would re 
quire SEC approval, Bowser did 


company 


|not resign from the SEC at the 


lime of the merger, nor did he 
sell his interest in Gateway 

Bowser quietl, resigned when 
his chief, Ralph Demmiler, re 
signed as SEC chairman | 

“| am very disturbed about 
the matter and am trying to 
forget about it as quickly as 
possible,” Marshall told this 
column when asked for com! 
ment. “I've nothing to say,” he 
concluded 


Washington Pipeline 


Secretary of the Air Force 
Donald Quarles would like to 
Diast private industry for as- 
Signing their top scientists to 
commercial projects rather 
than the defense of their own 
Nation. This could mean losing 
the life-ordeath guided-missile 
race with Russia. Quarles would 
like to call upon American 
firms publicly to put patriotism 
ahead of profit, but the Eisen- 
hower Administration won't let 
him make the speech... The 


Trade Board Plans 


‘Outlook’ Conference 


An estimated 300 persons are 
expected to attend the Wash-| 
ington Boat@ of Trade’s annual | 
outlook conference, 
which opens Tuesday at the | 
Statler Hotel. 

A series of panel discussions 
will -be held on the topics:) 
“Downtown Washington, Today 
and Tomorrow.” “Area Busi 
ness Outlook.” and “Do You 
Know Your Market?” 

The main speaker at the noon 
luncheon will be Edwin George, 
New York, Director of Eco 
nomic Research, Dun & Brad- 
street, who will speak on “Con- 
sumer Credit and the National 
Outlook.” i 


| 


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a 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


° . Monday, January 30, 1956 ) 39 


RATT | 


‘firm. Marshall agreed and even!/Air Force will soon launch a 


gigantic recruiting campaign to 
increase the ground observer 
corps by more than a million 


volunteers. Civilian ground ob- 


servers are urgently needed to 
protect this country from a sur- 


prise enemy attack... Navy 


Eden to Complain of U.S. Oil F irms 


engineers are considering build- 
ing a giant submarine abie to 
carry several dozen airplanes 
under water. The revolutionary 
design is similar in many ways 
to an aircraft carrier, complete 
with hangar deck and elaborate 
launching devices 

(Copyright, 1956, Bell Byndicate. Ine 


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$16” 


Pay only 81 Down, 81 Week 


Recular Price $21.95. Measures 24” 
wide, 4]” high and 144,” deep. 


OPEN TONITE ‘TIL 9:30 
FREE DELIVERY—PHONE Lincoln 7-9400 


NORTHEA®T 
iMb & MW Sts 
At Riadensbare Rd 
' FALLS CHURCH. VA. 


wary 
At Hillwoed Are. 


: 


NORTHWEST 


ANACOSTIA 
190% Nichets Are 
At Geed Reve Rd. 
ALEXANDOIA. VA. 

3131 Duke St 
Near Semisery B4 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
* 


AO Monday, January 30, 1956 


SS 


t 


mo GIVE TO THE MOTHERS’ MARCH ON 


PARALYSIS 


“a vital role in 
a human drama 
awaits eat 
citizen in this 


community .. .” 


Miss HELEN 


first lady of the american theater 


“Tomorrow night in Washington and environs, 35,000 mothers will 
march on polio. I urge you to turn on your porch light or hang an 
article of clothing on your apartment door, This is your cue to your 
neighbor on her errand of mercy that you are ready to contribute 
to the nation’s fight on polio. I hope you will give whatever you can 
to support this powerful force, and help ring down the curtain for- 


ever on this scourge against humanity.” 


In her 50 years on the American stage, Miss Helen Hayes has starred 
in countless world-famous parts. But no role has surpassed the role 
she has played in working for The National Foundation for Infantile 
Paralysis. In the midst of a busy career, this beloved actress has 
contributed selflessly and generously of her energy and time. Miss 
Hayes’ tireless efforts are an inspiration to all of us in this great 


cause. Let us all join in its support. 


HAYES 


turn on your porch light tomorrow night 
from 7 to 6...welcome your neighbor 


on her errand of mercy 


Published as a Public Service by 


THE HECHT Co. 


Washington, Silver Soring and PARKington