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Full text of "The Washington Post 1956-02-28: Iss 85"

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\ , 


The Weather . 


Today—Clearing, windy and colder. 
Highest about 45 degrees. Wednesday 
~Fair and moderately cold. Monday's 
temperatures: High, 60 degrees at 3 
Pp. m.; low, 43 degrees at 5:05 a. m. 
(For details see Page 28.) 


The Was 


~*~, itil - , 


—_ 


and ; 


Times Herald 


7 
' 


n Post einat 


79th Year — No. 85 Phone RE. 7-1234 «me weetalia ei tenccns 


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28. 1956 


WTOP Radio (1500) TV (Ch. 9) 


FIVE CENTS 


D.C. TAX RAISE BILL ADVANCES 


i. 


> 
> 


_— 


Police Brass 
Due to Molt 


Metropolitan Police dep- 
uty chiefs, inspectors and 
captains are finally going 
to peel the gold leaves off 
their uniform caps, ; 

The officers’ cap change 
was ordered in July, 1954, 
but they were allowed to 
wear caps decorated with 
gold oak leaves until the 
supply was exhausted. It 


is. On March 1 the offi- 
cers will revert to plain 
black leather visors. 


School Board Police Chief Robert V. 
Murray degilded his cap 


Serve Out Terms | tithe time of the tmitiat 
| order. 


Moncure 


Bill Passes 


. Virginia 
House, 80-10. 


Compromise Plan 
Lets Arlington 


By Robert E. Baker 
Staif Reporter 
RICHMOND, Va., Feb. 27 
The House of Delegates 
passed the compromise Mon- 
cure Bill quickly and without 
debate today by an 80 to 10 
vote. 


Bill Proposes 


$100 Tax-Free 
The bill, which now goes to Political Gifts 
the Senate, would: 


® Abolish elections for School | 


Board members in Arlington} N an 
and substitute’ members ap-| After Negotiations 


pointed by the County Board. 

® Permit members of the; 
present School Board, the only| 
one elected in Virginia, to serve | 


out their present terms. | 
eas emptions for the firste$100 in’ 
® Prohibit election of school, otitical contributions yester- 
boards anywhere in Virginia in day was dropped into the House 
the future. jhopper following House and 
Del. Harrison Mann of Ar- Senate leadership negotiations 
lington told the House the com-'on a new six-point elections) 
promise bill had the complete law. 
concurrence of the Arlington| The House move pointing the 
delegation. The sponsor of the way to probable two-chamber 
bill, Del. Frank Moncure of collaboration on a “realistic” 
Stafford, did not oppose the election statute, coincided with 
compromise. ‘these developments in the Sen- 
Moncure’s original bill would ate: 
haye thrown the present School| ©The special 4man Sclect 
Board members out of office'|Committee. investigating the 
and substituted members se~/ $2500 “campaigi contribution’ 
lected by a Board of Trusteesito Sen. Francis Case (R-5S. D.) 
which, in turn, would have been by an oil lawyer-lobbyist, pre-| 


Plan Is Introduced 


On Elections Law 


By Robert C. Albright 


Stal? Reporter 


Legislation providing tax ex-| 


—_ 


“ 


President and Mrs. Eisenhower greet Halian President and 
Signora Gronchi on their arrival at the White House yes- 
| terday. President Gronchi, the first Italian chief executive | 


appointed by Circuit Court. 

Moncure had said he intro- 
duced the original bill at the 
request of the “good people” of. 
Arlington to remove the School 
Board from “politics.” But the 
measure generally was  in- 
terpreted as punishment of the’ 
School Board for a partial in- 
tegration policy announced last 
dan. 13. 

The bill, as passed, is ex- 
pected to put the final burying 
touches on the Boatwright Bill 
which would bar Federal em- 
ployes from school boards and 
other local offices. 

It was understood that if the 
Arlington delegation -would 
support the compromise Mon- 
cure Bill strong efforts would 

made to keep the Boat- 
wright Bill buried in com- 
mittee, 

‘The compromise Moncure 
Bill, in effect, would concen- 
trate the attention of the rival 
liberal and conservative fac- 
tions in Arlington on the 
County Board election, because 
those elections would be the 
key to the membership of 
future school boards. The five- 
member School Board now is 
controlled by the liberals. The 
conservatives have a three-two 
edge on the County Board, but 
control of the County Board 
would be decided by elections 
again before the first School 
Board appointments. 

In another development, At- 
torney General J. Lindsay: 
Almond Jr. said he is con-| 
vinced that the controversial 
Moore Resolution by itself 
“would prove to be a ready 
and dangerous weapon in the 
hands of the opposition.” The 
resolution calls for operation 
of segregated schools in 1956- 
57 and delay of the Gray Com- 
mission program to avoid en- 
forced integration. ) 

Almond’s opinion today may’ 
forecast a real fight on the 
House floor when the Moore 
Resolution is debated, prob 
ably on Tuesday. Many lezgisla- 
tors, who heretofore have been | 
reluctant to oppose the move’ 
of House Speaker E. Blackburn | 


See GRAY, Page 17, Col. 1 


Want Ad 
Brings In 
$90 A Month 


"| rented a 2-bedroom house 
for $90 a month from a want 
ad in The Washington Post and 
Times Herald,” stated Mr. Harry 
L. Goddard of 1346 Connecti- 
cut ave, nw. 


. 
| 


You, too, can find steady-pay- 


to résume public hear- 
ngs today with nearly all the 


Italian President Arrives in Washin gton 
to visit the United States, will pay 2 4-day state visit with 


President Eleenhower and make a 15-day tear of the 
try. (Story, Page 2; other photos, Page 16.) 


] : 
‘Dulles Feeds 


—— ooo ————- 


Defense Fighis Use of Statement 


key witnesses on the stand. 


® Senate Democratic Leader 
Lyndon B. Johnson (Tex.) ex- 
pressed hope that a second 6 
man, bipartisan Senate Commit- 
tee, set up to investigate the’ 
whole lobbying-campaign con 
tribution problem, would seek 
iirst to clear up “innuendoes”| 
of improper influence on the 
Senate, especially in connection 
with the gas bill. 

The House tax exemption bill, 
designed to help keep elections) Edward Vincent Marcionctte, 
clean by encouraging wider 17, accused slayer of a Universi- 
ng eg ac PAL or aa ty of Maryland student, sat with 
and lobby law revision now be- head bowed last night as police 
ing pushed by Johnson officers told how he admitted 

To clear the way for the pro knifing his victim to death 
og ag Pag mt pba Then Marcionetie took the 
a leadership spokesman said. stand at 6:20 p. m. to deny that 


By Eve Edstrom and 
Harrison Hagemeyer 
Bielt Re 


rters 


He stressed that the Senate has he had ever told police officers, 


no authority to initiate 


legislation. 


taX\he stuck 20-year-old Richard 


The proposed $100 allowance 4 's0n with a knife. 6 
for political contributions was! In a quiet voice with hands 
introduced by Rep. Wilbur D. folded he declared, “I never 
Mills (D-Ark.), a key member pave caid it.” 
of the tax-making House Ways ‘ me 
and Means Committee. It fol-| The victim died of a jagged 
lowe the lines of earlier tax cut which punctured his heart 
exemption legislation sponsored'in two places after he chased 
pA A ngy Ry Race ye Marcionette for a car theft the 

“i 0.) p : j "7 
Udall (D-Ariz.). In the case of ®!sht of Nov. 11. | 
married couples, filing joint re-- It was for Gibson's murder 
turns, am exemption of $200'that Marcionette went on trial 
oS. pees i amaiiene for his life im Prince Georges 

° Ss : . . 

age participation of all persons Circuit 3 ourt yesterday. He 

in the cost of political cam-| pleaded not guilty. 

paigns,” said Mills. — | His attorney, A. Gwynn Bowie, 

duded cs osceads bill dasiunng|*ou™ to prevent Marcionette's 
: ' istatements to police to be ad- 

to make proceeds from the sale) sag ton Th ’ 

of rights to an oil property | He ym Tee nee. oe ey * 


‘ 8&8 men and 4 women was ex- 
aeuee “eapiial gain.” which 1s cluded as Judges Charles Mar- 


ry and John R. Fletcher 
See ELECTIONS, P. 2, Col. 5 ccmund the officers testify. 
| Later, huwever, the judges 
‘ruled the statements will be ad- 
mitted when the trial resumes 
at 10 a. m. today. 

Detective Joseph F. Longo of 
the Metropolitan Police’s Youth 
Aid Division, who questioned 
International Marcionette following his arrest, 


Red-Spy Hearing 
On Hill Today 


International News 


The Senate 


Service 


Subcommittee yesterday sched-' said he asked Marcionette what 


uled a public ‘hearing today had happened and the youth 
into “the activities of the So- answered: 

viet secret police in the United| “I killed a man. Why don't 
States.” 


James QO. Eastland (D.-Miss.),|body kills somebody else they 
said the investigating group/should get the chair.” 
would hear “several witnesses.” | Longo said he asked if the 


lyou put me in the chair? I have} 
Subcommittee Chairmanikilled somebody. When some-| 
jury to be selected. 


Marcionette Denies Confession 


In Maryland U. Student Slaying 


killing were accidental and got'Ball and his deputies were dis 
this answer: patched to corral passers-by 
“Don't go making any ex- Many of the potential jurors 
cuses for me, I meant to do it. ruled themselves out by declar. 
I aimed for his heart.” ing they already had opinions 
Longo said that Marcionette on the case 
described how Gibson had Marcionette, an escapee from 
chased him and as 
closed Marcionette report- niles in Maryland, previously 
ediy said: described the crime as the cli 
“You asked for it, punk. Now max to a week-long rampage of 
you're going to get it.” housebreaking and car theft in 
Longo said Marcionette add- the Silver Spring area 
ed: “Then I killed him.” Both his father, Vincent Mar- 
Detective Set. Grayston'cionette of Fairland, Md., and 
Chapman of the Metropolitan'the victim's father, James 5. 
Pelice Homicide Squad told Gibson, Leetonia, Ohio, were 
how he questioned Marcionette on hand as the trial opened 
at the Lee House in response; The first major witness was 
to a lookout for the youth fol-ithe slain boy's 23-year-old 
sowing the murder. Chapman brother, Robert Patrick Gibson,, 
testified that when he was ad 
mitted to Marcionette’s hotel|Of 8106 New Hampshire ave., 


room the accused killer asked: | /@ngley Park, Md. It was from 
“Did that man die””’ a parking lot near that address 


When Chapman asked, “What that Marcionette repoftedly 


man that tried to steal my auto-| 500 boys gave chase. 
mobile and I caught up with! Robert toid how they caught 
him and I stuck him with a|UP with Marcionette at the in- 
knife.” \tersection of New Hampshire 

Several policemen from the #ve- and University lane, how 
District and Maryland gave sim- Marcionette slid out of the 
ilar testimony about Marcion-/Stolen car, and took off into a 
ette’s verbal statements. Detec-\field. Richard Gibson gave 
tive Set. Charles Nally of Seat|chase, but soon, Robert said, “! 
Pleasant had a written sfate-/ heard my brother call to me— 
ment which he prepared after|"Bob, Bob, he!p me, help me’. 
Marciohette answered ques Robert said that his brother 
tions in his presence. Nally| was walking toward him stum- 
said Marcionette, acting on the bling. “I ran to him, but he 
advice of his father, did not sign) passed out before | got to him,” 
the paper. | Robert said 

But Marcionette denied mak-| Most of yesterday afternoon's 
ing the damaging admissions.|testimony was concerned with 
He also said the slaying took|successful state efforts to get 
place after Gibson had beaten|a dagger-like, blood-encrusted 
him with a “thing,” which Mar-|knife, and blood-stained cloth- 


if, 


‘cionette indicated was about a/ing admitted into evidence. The 


three-foot stick. ‘knife and clothing were found 
It took until the noon recess|in Marcionette’s hotel room. 
yesterday for the Marcionette| An FBI agent testified the 
iblood taken from the victim 
After the original panel of 38| matched the blood found on the 
was exhausted, Sheriff J. Lee items. 


Gibson a rehabilitation camp for juve- 


| Bigger Income 


= | Levy Approved 


Btalft 


| By Committees 


By Richard L 


Rep 


Lyons 


r‘ear 


A District revenue bill raising local taxes by $8 million 
a year and boosting the Federal payment by $2 million 


was approved yesterday by 


The bil! contains most 
provisions recommended by th 
District Commissioners to rais 
‘$10.1 million in new  revenu 
next year. The taxpayer will 
ihurt most when he pays his city 
income tax. , 

The measure now goes to the 
full House District Committee 
which may act next week to 
send it to the House floor. The 
full committee usually approves 
\actions of its fiscal subcommit- 
tee without major change. 
| Under the proposed program 
the average married District 
resident with a $5000 income 
land a house assessed at $10,000 
would pay about $75 a year in 
new taxes A married man 
learning $10,000 with a house 
‘assessed at $20,000 probably 
| would pay more than $100 in 
inew taxes. If either is a pro- 
| fessional man, he would pay $25 
|more. 
| These are the provisions of 
the bill: 


Federal Payment. The ceiling 
‘in the annual Federal payment 
to the city would be increased 
from $20 million to $22 mil- 
lion. This would not guarantee 
payment. The amount must be 
voted “each year in an ap- 
propriation bill. Last year Con- 
gress paid only $18 million 
laf the $20 million it had 
authorized. 

Income Tax. Drop the present 
$4000 individual exemption to 
$1000 for single persons and 
$2000 for married workers and 
theads of families. This: would 
icost the average married 
iworker $62.50 more a year. 
Rates remain the same except 
on taxable income above $20.- 
000, which would step up from 
4 per cent to a maximum of 
5 per cent. Taxes would be 
‘withheld by employers starting 
October 1 like Federal tax 
Changes are expected to pro. 
duce $3.4 million next year and 
$5.3 million the following year. 

Real Estate. Not included in 

Sen J. William Fulbright (T)- the bill. But the Commission- 
Ark.) yesterday charged that °'S have promised (the subcom- 
Secretary of Siate John Foster ™ttees concurred) to raise the 
rate a dime from $2.20 to $2.30 


: 


By Arthur Eljis. Staff Photographer 


coun- 


Public ‘Pap,’ 
Fulbright Says 
Secretary's Estimate 


Of World Situation 


Attacked in Senate 
By Chalmers M. Roberts 


Statf Reporter 


Dulles “misleads public opinion, 
feeds it pap” and offers “an es- per $100 assessed value It 
timate of the world situation” ™eans a $10 increase on a 
resembling “a mid-summer house assessed at $10,000. It 
dream.” would produce $1.8 million next 
In a speech on the Senate Y®4!. 
floor, Fulbright said the ques-- Restaurant Meals. The 
tion which “dwarfs all other cent exemption would 
things” before that body is: dropped to 13 cents. It 
“Will Secretary Dulles tell you wotld pay a 2 per cent tax 
America the truth about our On a meal costing 14 cents o: 
present peril or wil) he say more. This would produce $900 
one thing publicly and an op- 000. 
posite thing privately.” 
The Senator's harsh words from $1 
were a followup to his critical probably would increase retail! 
questioning of Dulles at Fri- prices a nickel a fifth. It would 
day's Senate Foreign Relations produce an estimated $980,000 
Committee hearing. They were a year. 
a prelude to a closed Committee, Wine. A new tax ef 15 cents 
session yesterday with Under a gallon imposed on table wines 
Secretary of State Herbertiof less than 14 per cent alco 
Hoover Jr.. and Adm. Arthur holic content. Champagne tax 
W. Radford, chairman of the boosted from 30 to 45 cents a 
Joint Chiefs of Staff 
Chairman Walter F. George to 45 cents. Yield is estimated 
(D-Ga.), said later that Dulles at $255.000. 
was too busy to be called until; Beer. Tax per barrel would 
his return from an Asian trip be raised 25 cents to $1.50. The 
late in March. He leaves Friday, Commissioners wanted it boost 
George said that. with the ex- ed to $3. When a similar in- 
ception of*some questions ON crease was voted two years ago. 
Formosa and Korea, the meet- the industry said it would not 
ing concerned the Middle East. change the price of a glass of 
A statement by the Committee beer. The boost would produce 
said in part: an estimated $132,000 a year 
“It can be stated generally| Rental of Persona) Property. 
that, for the area as a whole,'Al)] rentals of property, such 
the United States has not been) as folding chairs, would be sub- 
an important source of armsS,'ject to the 2 per cent sales 
for one reason because of the?tayxes even if rented for only 
relatively high cost of United|an hour. Exempted from the 
States military equipment. Un: tax were films and records 
til last fall, however, the United| rented by theaters and radio 
States granted export licenses!and‘ television stations This 
for almost all orders, except) would bring in $150,000 a year 
those for certain types of); Professional License Tax. A 
weapons, from the Middle East.'$25 annual tax would be im- 
Most of the shipments have) posed on professional men, like 
See POLICY, Page 10, Col. 2 ‘doctors and lawyers, who are 


5 
b 


By Edward T. Folliard 


Staff Reporter 


at his last news conference, on 
Feb. 8, that he would make an 


said he was not prepared to 


News Conference ‘Probable’- 


\President Held Likely to ‘Give Word’ Wednesday 


he called the/unvarying answer to questions 


news conference Wednesday. 
heart attack on Sept. 24. 


sharply when he suffered his 
They | “pressing” 


over what 
tactics of the NEWS-'on the subject is, “If I did 


day 


means 


Liquor. Tax would be raised — 
to $1.25 a gallon and - 


gallon and other wines from 20 °* 


use and Senate District 


He 


Subcommittees that had worked on it for six wecks. 


maior’ 


biect to the unincorpo- 
usiness tax. It would be 
a flat fee tax imposed on resi 
and nonresidents for the 
priviiege of doing business 
here. It would produce $175,000. 

Military Commijssaries. Post 
exchanges, commissaries and 
clubs on military installations 
in the District would 
brought under the District’s 1 
per cent grocery tax and 2 per 
eent general sales tax. This 
would produce about $220,000. 

Farm and garden matcrials. 
Seeds, fertilizer and like items 
would be brought under the 2 
per cent sales tax to produce 
$40,000 a year. 

Besides trimming down the 
Commissioners’ request on 
beer, the subcommittees cut out 
two District tax proposals en- 
tirely. They were proposed 2 
per cent sales taxes on local 
telephone calls and on admis- 
ions. 

Theater operators had testi- 
fied that they were hurting at 
the box office now and couldn't 
stand the tax. The subcommit- 
tee decided the telephone com- 
pany is taxed enough by the 
Federal.Government. 

The taxes. on . professional 
men, commissaries and garden 
materials were not in the Com- 
missioners program. They were 
added by the subcommittees to 
help make up for the revenue 
they cut out of the bill. 

The Commissioners made up 
the difference by revising their 
income tax revenue estimates 
under prodding from the sub- 
committee, The city originally 
estimated the income tax 
changes would produce $2.2 
million next year. Federal tax 
experts said it should be far 
higher, and the Commission- 
agreed to be “optimistic” 
and estimated $3.4 million. 

Schuyler Lowe, District Gen- 
eral Administrator, said the 
new higher estimate would re- 
quire a very much expanded 
Staff soon to get close to full 
compliance with the new tax 
law 

The subcAmmittee’s bill 
would prefuce an estimated 
£10,087 000 next year and $12,- 


ers 


052,000 the following year. 


Cammissioner Samuel Spen- 
cer called it an “equitable” bill 
and said he was “very well 
fied” with it 

Rep. Howard W. Smith (D- 
Vi chairman of the House 
subcommittee handling the bill, 
plained the proposed military 
nmi tax this way: 

mmmissaries are come 

‘with business people who 

that keep the 

Army and Navy going. They 

ought to pay the same tax. It 

ought to be enough to hire @ 
more teachers.” 

» proposed tax boost is the 
of $10 more next 
from every man woman 
and child in the District. It 
would raise the per capita tax 
payment to the city to about 
$170 


Adlai Urges Ike 
Call Racial Talks 


27. om 


~~. 
‘a is 


ne taxes 


few 


vaient 


NEW YORK, Feb. 
Adlai FE. Stevenson tonight 
urged Whites House to sum- 
mon Southern white and Negro 
Washington to try 
to ease racial tensions 

At a visit t- his New York 
campaign headquarters, the 
Democratic presidential * aspi- 
rant told reporters 

“IT am deeply disturbed by 
mounting racial tensions in the 
South. To avoid any possibil- 
itv of disorder at home or fur- 
ther damage to the Nation's rep- 
utation abroad, I think the situ- 
ation merits the prompt atten- 
tion of the President.” 


ne 


leaders to 


| -Today’s Index | 


Page 
Keeping Well 46 


Amus'm't 
, Kifoaiien y 


Lniid 


ing tenants faster through The 

Washington Post and Times 
Herald—reaching 381,000 fam- 
ilies daily, 130,000 more than 
any other paper in town. 
So easy to place an ad. Simply 
call... 


"RE. 7-1234 


Bis 


It’s. 


‘ 


President Eisenhower will “in 
all probability” hold a news con- 
ference Wednesday, 


White House Press Secretary 


announcement to the reportels 
before March 1. He said he 
“ought to have as much infor- 
mation by the end of this month 
(February) as 1 am going to 


James C, Hagerty, in announc-| get.” 


ing this yesterday, said “I 
wouldn't know” when asked if 
the President would then make 
known his decision about a 
second-term race. - 

The Chief Executive indicated 


aS 


o* 


He added that he didn’t think 
he could go on much longer 
than that and “be honest with 
myself.” 
|. Secretary Hagerty, in talking 
yesterday about a probable 


say what time of day it might 
be held. 

It has been an almost invari- 
able practice with President 
Eisenhower to meet with the 
reporters at 10:30 a.m. .— 

There has been speculation 
that he might make his an- 
nouncement about a second 
term after the New York Stock 
Exchange closes at 3 p. m. 


Stock. prices went down 


have since rebounded almost to men. 
where they were before the at-| Hagerty, who has been under 
tack. ian extraordinary strain, told 

Representatives of morning reporters yesterday: “I have 


newspapers have filed a request| made a resolution to myself—| 


with Secretary Hagerty that the| you are not going to get me 
President's announcement be mad again. I have probably 
made in the afternoon. gotten mad for the last time.” 

Such a request, made to Hag-| Whether Hagerty knows what 
erty while the President was in'the President intends to do 
Thomasville, Ga., added to the! about a second term is a riddle 


iknow, I wouldn't tell vou.” 


Virtually all Republican pro- 
fessionals appear to think it 
is a certainty that the President 
will run again. However, a 
good many people who are 


‘say they “honestly” don’t know 


irritation he was feeling. that! within the bigger enigma. His|what he is going to do. 


4 


L 


close .to the President echo 
Maj. Gen, Howard McC. Snyder, 
the White House physician, and 


Classitied 
Comics 
Crossword 
District Line 
Dixon » 
Editoria!s 
‘tvents Today 


, Federal Diary. 2 
33 
4 


| Financial 
Goren 
Herblock 


Horoscope 


Lippmann 
Movie Guide 
Obituaries .. 
Parsons 
Pearson 
Postiude 
Picture Page 
Radia- TV 
Sokolsky 
Sports 
Weather 
Women's 


. ee oe oe 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


ly 4 Tuesday, February 28, 1956 te "y 


High Court Reinstates 
Conviction of Joe Ryan 


| strikes in the 60-day period 
day reinstated the conviction P urpose” in writing the law.| 


Usited Press lstruction would “substanti- 
loses his status as an employe. 
of Joseph P. Ryan on charges He said Ryan's relationship) terday’s 


Specifically affected by yes 
with the union clearly brought) Plastics 


ruling were Mastro 

Corp. and French- 

of accepting money from afihim within the scope of the; American Reeds Manufactur- 
employer in violation of the) statute. ing Co., Inc. Although separate 
Taft-Hartley law. Ryan was released last week-/ firms, they operate within the 
The 7 ld ¢ boss 024 from the United Hospital| same plant in New York City 

- ee _— SS \in Port Chester, N. Y., follow-|and use the same employes. 

of East Coast Longshoremen ing six weeks treatment for in| The National Lebor Rele- 
faces six months in jail and|ternal hemorrhages. The ail-' tions Board found the firms un- 
a $2500 fine. ment developed while he was a lawfully interfered with em- 
Ryan ‘e-time resident of | Patient in a private Catholic! ployes’ organization rights by 
tan’ International’ Lon shore-|"0me for mental diseases. Ryan trying to have Local 318, In- 
men’s Association. was ee nviet.| suffered depression after the) ternational Brotherhood of 
ed in 1954 of receivin $2500 death of his wife last fall. Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill 
from James C Kennedy. presi- Workers replace Federal Labor 
dent of two firms which em- Union No. 22045 AFL as bar- 


, : gaining agent. 
ployed waterfront workers. In Hich Court Rulin , 
The Government appealed ! 8 & Che Supreme Court majerity 


to the Supreme Court after United Press opinion said the employers had 


the conviction was reversed| The Supreme Court ruled yes ee ee aie 


of workers to select their own 
union. 

The Court also decidell that 
an employer's charge that «a 
union representative has not 
filed a non-Communist oath 
may be raised directly in an 
unfair labor practice case, The 
decision was given on an a 
peal by the National Labor Re- 
lations Board, which contended 


Two Utilities Lose 


York. / 

j T 3 ad customer by filing higher rates 
ws baen a A — eg with the Federal Power Com- 
stated the conviction. Justice ™/ssion. 


] ij |. Justice John M. Harlan spoke 
ag ee ee for the unanimous court in two 


The Taft-Hartley law for- C28¢8 interpreting the Natural 
bids any ren Plo or any Gas Act and the Federal Power 


employes” in interstate com-)4¢t 


loy-|__Im one case, Pacific Gas & 
no ae Pe Papen Bay orm 3 Electric Co. filed rate increases such a charge should be in- 


» ; of 28 per cent on power sup-|Vestigated and disposed of in 
See Mage Bi gern plied to the Sierra Pacific separate NLRB proceedings. 


‘bili .- Power Co., which has customers 2 
ae yo ccergeer 4 ge Bee in Eastern California and North- Review of Tenant Oath 


The Appeals Court had held ¢™_ and_ Northwestern Nevada. | rose Again Refused 


0 _| The effect of yesterday's deci- 
+ ae conied oats — gt sion is to nullify the rate boost Associated Press 


rganization or an individual|#94 require a refund to Sierra’ The Supreme Court yester- 
ya pa cor to actually bargain of the amount collected above day let stand a California Court 
for a union. It held that the ‘e old 1948 rate. The increase\decision that tenants of a 
law did not apply to Ryan un-|Dad been ‘estimated at about Federal housing project in Los 
der this interpretation. $419,400 for 1953 alone. \Angeles may not be evicted 


grew out 
a decision by the Appellate 


urt of California for Los 
Angeles County, holding that 


artment of t 
: - Ton Lael @cts, if they are brought in 


‘separately, that can receive 


Boys’ Clubs Golden Anniversary 


Frank R. Jelleff, president emeritus of the 


celebration of the 50th anniversary of the 


vr. 


Officials Welcome — 
Italian President 


President Giovanni Gronchi 
of Italy arrived in Washington 
yesterday for a precedent-set- 
ting visit and immediately 
pledged to “deepen and extend” 
cooperation between the United 
States and Italy in the cause of 
peace. 

Gronchi made the pledge in 
a brief speech at National Air- 
port, replying to a welcome by 
Vice President Richard M 
Nixon. 

Nixon, who headed the large 
a em p Seer oo greeting 

e Italian sident, said his 
arrival was the end of one era ican national anthems. ' 
and the beginning of another. After inspecting an honor 

The Vice President said the | £¥@rd from,the four services, 
visit marked the completion of (r0 — — pct re age 
1 emocra rogress »?P 
aes sated ceded by a motorcycle escort, 
drove downtown. 


Streets along the route were 
decked with American, District 
and the green, white and red 
Italian colors. The president 
had been scheduled to arrive 
at noon to take advantage of 
Federal workers’ lunch hour to 
assure a good turnout. 3 

Because of the delay, the 
Civil Service Commission has- 
tily advised department heads 
to be liberal in extending lunch 
hours for Federal workers. 


Dulles, Adm. Arthur W. Rad. 
ford, Clare Boothe Luce, United 
States Ambassador to Italy, and 
other officials. 

Mrs. Nixon presented bow 
quets of red roses to Signora 
Gronchi and Signora Martino, 
wife of Gaetano Martino, Italy's 
minister of foreign affairs, who 
was in the official party. 

Gronchi, flanked by Nixon 
‘\and a State Department aide, 
stood bareheaded at attention 
to receive a 21-gun salute and 
listen to the Italian and Amer- 


Plane’s ‘I Like’ Sign 
Delights Dulles 


By Douglas Chevalier. Staff Photographer 


Boys’ Clubs of America. The Boys’ Club 
members are Dick Harding (left) and John- 
ny Beavers. The Commissioners have pro- 
claimed 1956 as Clubs’ Golden Anniversary. 


George Spurns 
New Plea for 
Longer Aid 


United Pres 

Chairman Walter F. George 
(D-Ga.) of the Senate Foreign 
Relations Committee yesterday 
spurned a new appeal by Secre- 
tary of State John Foster Dulles 
for approval of a big long-range 
foreign aid program. 

George said he is “still op- 
posed to long-range aid, es 
pecially economic aid” He 
added, however, that “there 
must be certain specific pro}- 


authorization.” 

Dulles said in a Philadelphia 
speech Sunday that a long- 
range aid program is needed 
te counter Russia's sudden 
switch from “violence” to “eco- 
nomic subversion” of underde- 
veloped nations. He served 
notice he will fight for it de 
spite strong congressional op 
position. 


wewwwe ew eww» 
Tuesday’s a la Carte 


DINNER SPECIAL 
for *D 15 


BROILED 
SPRING LAMB 
STEAK 


With Fresh Mushrooms, 
Fresh String Beans 
Delmonice Potatoes and 
4 Crisp Mixed Creen Sglad 
. 

This delicious Entree served 
penigne from 5 P.M. till 9 P.M. 
in Washington's most beautiful 

Restaorant. 


4 


Tay 
STEAK 


; in town 


Come in 
titi mia ae 
prove it! 


The second case began in| for refusin 
Clark edid this narrow oom | June, 1953, ag 3 - United | oaths. yr the - = oa ae 
———-'|Gas Pipeline Co. filed new rates high court h 
SPECIAL NOTICES with the Mobile Gas Service| peal to reinetate the saa ot 
am JETTERREAD SPECIAL Corp., an Alabama utility, rais-' quirement enacted by Congress 
, geier—se | 30-tn. rs ing the rate on gas to be re-sold'j, 1959 
’ tee avaliable. (DY Mobile to the Ideal Cement/ The case acted on 
9989 P ap rte 3 s.sie5 |©°. for industrial use from 10.7| o¢ 
———— to 14.5 cents per 1000 cubie feet. |. 
The old rates had been fixed by! ¢, 
BENDIX contract between Mobile and: 
United since 1946. eviction would violate tenants’ 
‘ "Automatic === : as constitutional rights of free 
High Court Clarifies speech and due process of law. 
WASHER T-H ‘Cooling Off In other actions, the Court: 
Factory ) aii. ta se nares to review the con- 
Authorized mf || The TaftHartley Act's 00 Detroit one ekores ear ot 
Service and Parts day “cooling off” period applies!ing » Michigan ban on obscene 
only to economic strikes and! poor. 
SUMMERS does not bar a walkout against . Denied the Scott Publish- 
Sales & Service, inc. — yo ear puaee ing Co., publisher of the Tri- 
1503 M. Capitol Se. he a OF wae. rulec yes 47 City Herald at Pasco, Wash., 
ADams 4-6782 The Taft-Hartley provision Re gg Aa greg 
says that after either pafty to 
dealing with the purchase and 
a labor contract gives notice) 4; ition of G 3 
‘of a desire to negotiate —/°°?°*™ CveSREReRS Sur 
change, the contract must re-/P'™* supplies by ‘the Ken 
main in effect 6) days without |2ewick (Wash.) School Board. 
any resort to strike or lockout. | * Refused for a third time 
It also says a worker who! *? review the trial of Verne 
A. Braasch and Melvin L. 
Sullivan, who face execution 
before a Utah firing squad for 
the murder of a filling station 
attendant. 
> 
High Court 
R Al 
copens Alr 
Crash Case 
The Supreme Court yester- 
day reopened its order of Dec. 
5, 1955, involving a test case 
of the legal responsibility of 
ei Eastern Air Lines, Inc., for an 


“a 
Z eT Abadi 
o* 


|(D-Ark.), who sometimes differ 


Ala.) and J. William Fulbright 


with Dulles, indicated they 
looked favorably on his plan. 


Sens. John J. Sparkman (D-|q 


‘duplicates of the statements on’ sion, however. 


5 


ELECTIONS—fr. P. I 


$100 Political Gift Tax 
Exemption Proposed — 


taxed at a lower rate. The ideajcontributions and expenditures) Gronchi, speaking in Italian, 
is to raise enough new tax | they file in the states. replied: “We intend, not only 
receipts therefrom to offset any | ®Exempting from tax the jto | vas oy Aw ne 

| c ad- 
loss of revenue from the pro-| first $100 contributed. iS Salags, bet to eines 1 at ths 
posed $100 tax exemption. *Amending the Federal corvice of peace, of freedom and 

Across the Capitol, Senate Communications Act to enable! .¢ social and human progress.” 
Maj ri Le John on {radio and TV broadcasters to The dynamie, 67-year-old 

ority Leader #°D' sive free time to major candi-' 

president is the first Italian 
praised Mills for intraducing| dates, without extending the|cniet executive to visit the 
the proposed. tax exemption.jsame benefits to fringe or\tnited States. He will make a 
Johnson again predicted the ‘Pinter office seekers, 1Sday goodwill tour of the 
present Congress will enact | Point No. 6 in Jonhson’s pro-|country and pay a fourday 
(1) an effective election bill| gram involves an entirely sepa-' state visit with President Eisen- 
and (2) a tightened lobby law.|rate lobbying law, providing hower. 

Johnson's proposed elections |™ore effective registration pro-| Gronchi’s plane arrived|see Mr. Eisenhower at 10:30 
bill, evolved from a series of |©¢dures. ‘shortly after 1 p. m., and he\a. m. today. At 12:45 p. m. he 
bipartisan conferences, pro-| Johnson's proposed election stepped out into bright sun-|and Signora Gronchi will visit 
vides for: law revision provides for some shine and a stiff breeze to be| with President and Mrs. Eisen- 

@Strict reporting of all| °22™ses im the “clean elections” | greeted by Nixon, Mrs. Nixon,| hower prior to a 1 p. m. lunch- 

. bill now on the Senate calen-|Secretary of State John Foster! eon. 
political contributions in excess | 4,- s nsored b Sen. Thomas | 
of $100, and new procedures'. ; pe 7 ; . 


a | 
Stevenson Is ‘Astonished’ 
By Kefauver’s Statement 


unation” of this information. ‘would extend to every state pri- 
© Raising the limits for politi-| mary, as well as the general 
cal expenditures by candidates ejections, and the Missouri 
BOSTON, Feb. 27 #—Demo-jall. I did not enter the New 
cratie presidential aspirate| Hampshire primary. 
Adlai Stevenson left for New | “If my friends chose to sup- 


for Congress to more “realistic” Democrat has insisted that any 
levels. 
York today after “a pleasant/port me in preference to Sen. 


‘bill passed by the . Senate 
® Omitting State primaries should do the same. In ape 

weekend” in New England,/Kefauver in New Hampshire; I 
reiterating that he is not.a can-|don't think it's subterfuge.” 


Park Police estimated the 
welcoming crowd at 7500. 

Gronchi received the key to 
the eity from District Commis 
sioner Samuel Spencer in a 
ceremony in front of the Dis- 
trict building. 

He then went to the White 
House, where he was warmly 

ted by President and Mrs. 

isenhower. The President, 
bareheaded under the North 
/Portico, shook Gronchi's hand, 
\smiled broadly and said it was 
a “great privilege” to welcome 
him on behalf of the Nation. 

Mr. Eisenhower and Gronchi 
exchanged small talk while pos 
ing for pictures. President El 
senhower told Gronchi the 
crowd of photographers was 
“the b st bunch I ever saw.” 

Gronchi did not go into the 
White House because of his de- 
layed arrival—caused by head- 
winds slowing his plane. He 
went to Blair House and will 


in Italy and was the beginning 
of “another great era.” 


ulring co 
dates to fille 


Fulbright said it deserves “care- 
ful consideration.” Sparkman 
said he definitely favored some) 
long-range aid. | 
Rep. Frank T. Bow (R-Ohio)’ 
said Congress should stop the! 
foreign aid “giveaway pro-| 
gram” and use the money to 
cut taxes and reduce the Na 
tional debt. | 
Bow, a member of the House’ 
Appropriations Committee, told’ 
the House Congress should 
allow $9 billion in unspent for- 
eign aid funds to be used, as) 
planned, but should refuse to) 
grant new funds sought by the 
| Administration. 
| George opposed any “long- 
‘term contractual authority” be- 
cause 


- 


| “each Congress. each’ | 
airplane crash in which 55 Per-| year should consider the whole doing.” He said changes are would make surplus foods avail- 


from scope of the law but re- leadership quarter it was said 
ional candi-'Hennings has agreed to go 
in Washington'along with the Johnson revi- 
‘didate in New Hampshire's; Asked what he thought about 
March 13 presidential primary.| President's Eisenhower's com- 
| Stevenson told newsmen } iftig decision on a second term, 
| before he boarded a New York-| Stevenson said: . 
(bound plane he was “aston-| “The President has to decide 
lished” by’ a statement attrib-|whether he has the strength— 
uted to Sen. Estes Kefauver| mental, emotional and physical 
SIGOURNEY, Iowa, Feb. 27\tary of Agriculture Ezra Taft, (yTenn) that Stevenson, the |—for the hardest job on earth. 
W—Sen. Estes Kefauver (D-' Benson, saying: |1952 standard pene a hat = lee is A. im decision a yt 
roposed ad-| “* etting sick and tired paigning “backhan "in the | conscientious man can 
ay soaps te f agent of Bese ma Secretary of New Hampshire delegate fight. an ordinary burden, let alone a 
nS SO UES ” — | . The Tennessee Senator was -time job. I pray to God for 
to provide, among other things, Agriculture moan about the quoted in news dispatches as good health and I don’t envy 
for a food stamp plan and pro-\overburdening gurpluses and complaining that Stevenson in-| him his decision.” 
duction payments on livestock. | blaming all the farmers’ woes sists he is not a candidate in Stevenson came to greater 
Carrying his bid for the 'on them. An imaginative man— New Hampshire yet a full slate Boston yesterday to visit his 
Democratic presidential nomi-|an imaginative Administration of delegates favorable to him /|two Harvard student sons in 
nation into Iowa, he said the —would consider the surplus is on the ballot. New Hamp-| Cambridge. 
farm bill “as recommended by not as sorgething to eee shire has a gr = eng ag 
the Administration or as re- but as something to use. | want as well as a delegate vote but : : . 
ported by the Senate Commit-'to see it used.” /Stevenson is not entered in the Soviet Signs Yemen Pact 
tee, won't do the job that needs; He said the food stamp plan’ preferential list. LONDON, Feb. 27 #—Mos- 
“I am astonished by the Sena-'cow Radio announced today 
‘the Soviet Union has ratified 


Kefauver Urges Food 
Stamps as Farm Aid 


sons were killed near ‘Cams oo oo also ry a — to oy a — -— po ae Onaga ve J ewanagagn 9 Stevenson told 
Airport : ope t foreign aid cou surpluses and “get money into an ose on relief. He esti-/new: 

The hich os “owmugp erde ended by this time, but did not/this livestock farming region’ mated there were about 18 mil-| “I'm not running by subter- 
reversed a “<c a fA ais voice flat opposition te continu-|and get it here fast.” lion such persons in the United fuge or backhandedly in New) 
i ruling and left standing oo ing a program on a yearly basis.!| The Senator rapped Secre- States. Hampshire—I'm not running at! 


trict Court award of $65,000 in 
a suit brought against Eastern 
by the Union Trust Co., acting 
for the estate of a Chevy Chase 
couple killed in the crash. 
After consideration of East- 
'+erm’s petition for rehearing the 
‘Dec. 5 order, the Supreme) 
‘Court yesterday sent the case 
‘back to the Court of Appeals. | 
The Supreme Court said: it) 


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See food. tee! 


Stores Closed 
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The Court of Appeals on Feb. 


out of respect, at the passtng of 9, 1955, has ordered tha 


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brother-in-law of 
Joseph D. Kaufman 


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2 AF B 
Crashes 


Indian Unit 
Scored on 
ira Hayes _ 


The Federal Bureau of Indian 
Affairs is criticized in the cur- 
rent issue of Harper's Maga- 
zine on the basis the agecy 
should not | 
have publicized 
Marine hero 
Ira Hayes at a 
time when he 
was fighting a 
battle against 
“drink.” 


The Bureau 
retorted late 
yesterday it did 
pi to ary: him 
and that Chi- 
cago newspa- ‘8 Hayes 
pers publicized the Pima Indian 
despite the objections of the 
Bureau's relocation office there. 

Hayes, who gained national 
attention as one of the Leather- 
necks who raised the American 
flag over Iwo Jima in World 
War Il, was found dead a year 
ago on the Pima Reservation 
near Phoenix, Ariz. 

His death was blamed on “ex- 
posure,” but the article said this 
is “common Indian Bureau par- 
lance for drink.” 

Hayes, memorialized in the 
Iwo Jima statue, here is bur- 
jed in nearby Arlington Cem- 
etery. 

“It might have been different 
if the Indian Bureau had been 


? 


omber . 


Kill Lo 


DAYTON, Ohio., Feb. 27 @ 
‘Two Air Force Bombers crashed 
into farm houses hundreds of 
‘miles apart today, apparently 
‘killing a total of 15 men. Both 
accidents occurred shortly after 
the planes took off on what 
were to have been routine 
‘flights. 

| Eleven of the victims died 
when a four-engine B-50, based 
‘ata top-secret Air Force instal- 
ation, crashed into a farm 
‘house 10 minutes after taking 
loff from Wright-Patterson Field 
near here. 

Some three hours later, a 
B-47 Stratojet also crashed into 
a farm house near Sedalia, Mo., 
ll minutes after the six-jet 
bomber. had taken off from 
Whitman AF Base. Four crew- 
men aboard the big plane ap- 
parently were killed, and two 
occupants of the home were in- 
jured 


Nine days ago, a B-52,. most 
potent weapon of the Strategic 
Air Command, crashed near 
Tracy, Calif., in a similar acci- 
‘dent. One witness said the 
plane appeared to explode in 
ithe airy 

| A witness to the accident 
near Sedalia told Air Force of.-| 
ficers that the B47 seemed to 
“explode and burst into flames 
about 300 feet above the 
ground” before it plummeted to 


Drops Cargo 


In Alexandria 


The Israeli merchant ship 
Yehuda was welcomed yester- 
day to the historic port of Alex- 
andria, which has seen only 
one other gen- 
eral cargo ves 
sel in recent 
history. 

City officials 
gave the ship's 
captain a key 
to the city. 

The Yehuda 


earth. 
} Mrs. Clay Curtis and her 
young son, Danny, were burned 
,when the plane sheared off part 
of their home. Mrs. Curtis’ hus- 
band was working in a nearby 
field and escaped injury. 
[Associated Press reported 
the crewmen aboard the B47 
were identified as: Capt. 


’ 


Staff Photos 


An Israeli ship, bearing a cargo of potash, docks at the port of Alexandria yesterday 
7 


Israeli Ship (Radar Sentinels Ready 


To Police AF Missiles 


NEW YORK, Feb. 27—A $10-| missile and rocket flights, and 
million chain of 21 huge radar|report back to the flight-control, 
installations will go into service|test-center near Cocoa Beach. 
in April on,eight islands extend-| Locations will be given to with- 
ing from Florida into the South/in one-hundredths of a degree, 
Atlantic to police the traffic of the company spokesman said. 
Air Force supersonic rockets|) The information will be of 
and missiles fired over the vital use to safety officers, who 
ocean, it was announced today.| have the responsibility of mak- 

The radar sentinels will keep) ing .sitre that no inhabited area 


such a close electronic eye On| along the length of the missile alternatives, 
‘weapons shot from the Air range is in danger from test Leave Me.” 


Force’s Cocoa Beach, Fila.,|weapons. If a missile strays a 
launching site that any missile|tiny fraction from its charted 


‘|Filmland’s 


‘Worsts’ of 
55 Chosen 


CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Feb. 27) 
‘®—The Harvard Lampoon, de-! 
livering its annual backhanded| 
compliments to Hollywood, ‘ to-| 
day named Debbie Reynolds 
and Kirk Douglas as the “worst 
actress” and “worst actor,” of 
1955. 


| “Not As a Stranger” was. se. 
lected to head the list of “ten 
‘worst movies” last year. Other 


| nominees were “Ulysses,” “The 


|Prodigal,” “Hit the Deck,” “The 
‘Tall Men,” “The Rains of 
|Ranchipur,” “Battle Cry,” “The 
Last Time I Saw Paris,” “The 
Long Grey Line” and “Under- 
water.” 

The new edition of the 79-) 
year-old undergraduate humor} 
monthly selected actress 
Sheree North for its “Roscoe” 
on the basis of “couragebdus) 
self-analysis” she has displayed 
in answering a Lampoon ques- 
tionnaire. | 
| Asked what her hobbies 
were, Sheree replied, “Yale 
men; I toy with them.” 
| Clincher for Award 


' 


The clincher for the award, 
however, might have been her) 
answer to Lampoon's request 
for “in 50 words or less, please 
state why you deem yourself 
worthy of this award?” | 

Sheree’s answer, “I am not 
now nor have I ever been a 
Commuhist and I never did a 
bump and grind in my life.” 
| Other awards: 

Title with most 
“Love 


interesting 
Me or 
Most mature nature movie, 
“The Seven Year Itch.” 


Most 


_ 


THE WASHINGTON POST and ‘TIMES axayep, . 


Tuesday, February 28, 19356 


A 


zine handed out a “Boscoe.” It ness, an aura of fresh-baked, 
went to June Allyson “in recog- deep-dish apple pie like mother 
nition of the science of geri- used td make, and an endless 
atrics” (study of old age). supply of tears, bravely but 

Miss Allyson, it said, “who vainly attempts to resist the 
with eternally girlish homeli-onslaught of advancing years.” 


~—<—mmme RALEIGH HABERDASHER, 1310 F ST. 


the coat that outwits- 
the weatherman... 


DACRON *—WOOL 
GABARDINE 


Re. ss COE es 
we'll get plenty of 
both this Spring. But 
you'll be set with this 
gabardine all-weath- 
er topcoat. 50% 
it 


more interested in helping an Robert R. Hayes, 37, Knoxville, parried fruit that strays an inch off its course course or behaves erratically,| unpropitious return, worsted gives 


Indian than in getting publicity |}0w4; Capt. James P. Gianokos, 
for its newly launched reloca-\95, formerly of Roek Creek, 
tion program,” wrote Doroth ‘Minn.; Lt. Jack L. Peters, 27, 
Van de Mark of Chicago. She | Lakeland, Fila., and Capt. Frank 
is described by the magazine|4. Matuszewski, 35, Chicago.) 
as one who has spent “20 years; The B-50 left the Air Force's 
studying and teaching Indians.”|experimental laboratory at 

Mrs, Van de Mark wrote that/Wright-Patterson field near 
Hayes took a job through the Dayton at noon with ' nine 
the Chicago relocation project|servicemen and two civilians 
to get away from admirers who aboard. 
offered him drinks. But “Hayes| The servicemen were identi- 
was greeted at a Chicago rail-fied as: Lt. Col. Channing 
road station with an official Stowell, 37, Baton Rouge, La. 
welcome,” repeated when hethe pilot: Capt. Elias R. 
reported for a job. ‘Augsburger, 35, Columbus, 
- “How does one show friend- Ohio: Capt. George P. Angles, 
liness to an Indian?” Mrs. Van'35. ‘Upper Sandusky, Ohio: 
de Mark asked. “One asks him M/Sgt. Robert O. Watkins, 35, 
to have a drink. Ira Hayes’ per- New Castle. Ind: M/Sst. 
sonal battle was lost... With\ James tL. McCullough, -37, 
a little help, he might have won | Westport, Ind.: T/Set. Walter B. 
his battle. But he had no help.” Piotrowski, 41, and A/IC Lee 

Hayes subsequently wasn Gardner, 22, both of Fair- 
picked up on Chicago's Skid porn, Ohio: A/C James R. 
Row, returned to the reserva Coones, 19, Henderson, Ky., and 
tion and died. A/3C Donald J. Norman, 20, 
Oak Park, Il. 

The civilians were Henry Bou- 
lay, Mt. Holly, N. J., of General 
Electric Co., and Michael Spock, 

Champaign, Ill., of the Illinois 
gee Water Survey, University 
‘of Tilinois. 


Quake Opens Up 
Warm Springs in 
Lower California 

B-SO plunged into. the 


| The 

SAN DIEGO, Calif, Feb. 27\frame home of Mrs. Medella| 
‘*—The sharp earthquake that ‘Henderson. who was. vacation-| 
shook southern California Feb. ing in Florida. The bomber 
8 has opened warm springs iM burst into flames. The house 
the desert of Lower California,',n4q » nearby barn were de 
Mexico, it was reported today. | stroyed. 

An expedition of scientists; Fire seared an area the size 


sponsored by the aSn Diego 
Union said a fissure more than 
18 miles long was discovered 
about 120 miles southeast of 
here. The fissure was about a 
foot wide and four feet deep. 
The quake also opened one 
large warm spring that.is pour- 
ing more than 500 gallons of 
water a minute. 

Robert Gil, geologist at the 
Navy electronics laboratory, 
said the water temperature is 
81 degrees, indic~‘ing it is com- 
ing from a great depth. Indi- 
ans in the area were reported 
constructirg dams to hold the 
water. 


PHOTOSTAT 


PRINTS 


O15 tye S. WW. Bet. Orh & Tor 
NA 8-0219 


of a city block and parts of the 
plane and bodies were strewn 
over the area. 


from Israel to 
northern Eu- ~? 9 
rope. From 

Bremen, Ger- rkowitz 
many, she brought 1200 tons 
of potash. On the return trip 
to Haifa she will carry a gen- 
eral cargo of grain, powdered 
milk and cheese. 

The ship's company, mostly 
Israelis, had a “very rough 
srossing” over the Atlantic and 
in Baltimore last Saturday 
feared the pier would “blow 
over” 

The ship was named for one 
of the 12 original tribes of Is 
racl. She was built under a Ger- 
man reparations program for 
$1.75 million She is part of 
the 24-ship fleet of Zim Israel 
American Lines which began 
yperation eight years ago with 
ye vessel, half English owned 
and half Israeli owned. 


« 


ee” 


The ship's captain, 34-year-old “7 


Bernard Berkowitz, fled his ga- 
tive Germany in 1935. He fas 
seen sailing for 20 years and 
juring World War II served 
with both the British Navy and 
the British Maritime Service. 


Terrorists Surrender 
Reuters 


LUMPUR, 
Eleven Communist ter- 


KALA 
Feb. 27 


will be destroyed by the push of) it will. be destroyed immediate. “To Hell and Back.” 


a button before it can fall on a 
populated area, the announce- | The radar stations also will 
ment said. | | provide the precision informa- 
The Dynamics Corporation of | tion needed by the Air Force of- 
America, the builder, called it|ficers, scientists and engineers 
the world’s largest chain radar|who design missiles. The data 
tracking system. The Depart-' will enable them to make tacti- 
ment of Defense “censored out”) cal evaluations and studies of 
the distance the chain of sta-|the effectiveness and potential 
tions would extend into the use of weapons being tested, a 
ocean, but it was believed it company official said. 
would be more than 3000 miles', In addition to 21 radar sys- 
long. tems installed in air-conditioned 
The islands linked into the structures, there will be five 
range are Grand Bahama, Eleu- other systems in mobile vans 
thera, San Salvador, Maya- for special operations. Only one 
guana, Grand Turk, the Domin-'man will be needed for the op- 
ican Republic, Puerto Rico and eration of each of the electroni- 
St. Lucia. cally-controlied units. ia 
One radar station is going up| The first installatidn was 
at Cape Canaveral, Fla., near) made near Cocoa Beach in Jan- 
the launching center of the Air|uary, 1955, and the Grand Ba. 
Research and Developmentihama station -was completed 
Command's guided missile soon after. The chain is now 
‘complete except for the two St. 
Lucia stations. 


ly by remote control, 


ange. 
The radar stations will record 


Title with most unattractive 
connotations, “You're Never 
Too Young.” ) 

Most pathetic remnant of a 
vanishing race, “Victor Mature’ 
las Chief Crazy Horse” in film: 
of same name. | 


Most Futile Advice 


Title with most futile advice, 
“Bring Your Smile Along.” 

Best reason “for closing the 
open door,” “Love Is a Many 
Splendored Thing.” 

Most embarrassing  inter-’ 
lude, “Jennifer Jones in ‘Love 
Is a Many Splendored Thing’ 
standing disconsolately on the 
proverbial high and windy hill,’ 
waiting for the snow to end, 
to the tune of a stirring chant 
from an archangel chorus: 
‘When Your Fingers Touched’ 
My Silent Heart and Taught It 
How to Sing.” 

) For the first time, the maga- 


Maryland Woman, 53, 


Dies in U.S. I Crash 


Cordelia Wheeler, 53 of Sav-| Davis Highway and U. S. Route 


Malaya, | 


Archbishop to Speak 

The Most Rev. Patrick A. 
|O’Boyle, Archbishop of Wash- 
ington, will address the fifth an- 
iniversary dinner of the John 
| Carroll Society of Washington 
'at 7:30 tonight at the Mayflower 
jHotel, following a reception 


: 


rorists surrendered today, the age, Md., was injured fatally 1. MeBride was treated at|** * 


first to surrender since the Gov- 
ernment’s amnesty offer to 
terrorists expired Feb. 8, police 
sources said here tonight. 
Police nabbed them near 
\Kalumpang in Selangor State. 


: 


“See Uses Old Law 


BALTIMORE, Feb. 27 @ 
‘Legal principles dating back to 
‘the reign of Edward 3d of Eng- 
‘land were thrashed out in court 

here today as a Baltimore artist 


sought to collect $7500 from. 
‘Mayor Thomas D’Alesandro for | 


lordering a painting removed 
‘from the city art gallery. 

The artist, Glenn Walker, 
claims damages and charges the 
Mayor with illegal censorship. 
The Mayor ordered Walker's 


| picture of two reclining nudes, 


| 


Pontiac '56 Station Wagon 
Used 1000 miles. Hyd., R. & H., W.-W. Tires, 


In Nude Painting Suit 


called “In a Room,” removed 
from the exhibition at Peale 
Museum on the grounds that it 


was “obscene.” 

Directors of the city-spon- 
sored museum took down the 
picture, but permitted it to be 
jshown upon request in the mu- 
seum office, an arrangement 
satisfactory to the Mayor. 

The Mayor's lawyers, argued 
that the Mayor was within his 
rights as “conservator of the 
\peace.” Those rights date back 
jin part to an act of the British 
‘Parliament in the reign of Ed- 
pward 3d, they argued. 

Walker's lawyers countered 
ithat judges, magistrates, sher- 
\iffs and coroners were also 
i“conservators of 
jand if all so qualified acted as 
/censors, the result would be 
|“chaos.” 

The city lawyers argued in 
the libel-slander aspects of the 


the peace,” 


yesterday when her car col-|Arlington Hospital. His wife, 
lided with another car on! Daisy, 20, of 663 24th st. ne. 
U. S. Route 1 near Savage, af to admitted to the hospital 
. river of the other car, 
papa . William W. Brubaker, 32, his 
_ Maryland tate _SPOoper wife, Jean, 26, and their two 
George Robinett said Mrs. children, William Jr., 6, and 
Wheeler died of head injuries) ?one ie. —_ of 506 pe serrre 

, 4. pl., Alexandria, were admitted 
at St. Agnes yr eigste Balti to the hospital. Mrs. Brubaker 
more, shortly after the accl and Jana Lee still are hos- 
dent. 


pitalized. 
The car driven by Mrs. 


Wheeler was struck by a 
‘northbound vehicle driven by 
Ralph V. Knisley, 34, of Jes- 
sups, Md. as she emerged 
from a side road onto the high-| 
way. Police said the victim ap-| 
pearently failed to halt for a) 
stop sign. . 

Knisley was treated for) 
head and arm cuts. Police 
said Mrs. Wheeler was thrown) 
from the car by the impact of 
the collision. 


Soldier Con sicted 


In*Traffice Crash 


Benjamin F. McBride, 23, a 
Ft. Belvoir soldier, was found 
guilty of reckless driving yes 
terday in connection with an' 
Arlington traffie crash in which 
six persons were injured. | 

Arlington County Court 
Judge Paul D. Brown fined 
McBride $50 and costs, and 
‘gave him a 30-day suspended 
sentence. McBride was also. 
fined $5 and costs on each of) 


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LUCKY BUCK? 


*If any of the serial numbers on your dollar 


|case that the Mayor's state-two other charges stemming) 
‘ments about the painting were|from the accident—operating 
fair comment on the art itself,|without a permit and driving 


bills contain a “3” and an “O” (in any order) 


New Warra Immaculate. 
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and no mention was made of 
the artist. 

Walker seeks in addition to 
damages an injunction prevent- 
ing the Mayor from further cen- 
sorship of art shows in the city. 
EE aD CS te c 


& 2 gene 


Chief Anacostia 


plenty easy. 
Smart paleface stave wam- 
pum, too.” 


A\NACOSTIA 
FEDERAL SAVINGS 
S LOAN ASSOCIATION 
1340 Good Hope Rd. $.E. 
7118 Marlboro Pike | 
District Hetghts, M4. 


‘on “dead” tags. | 
The twocar smash up 
occurred Feb. 5 at Jefferson 


BEEF 


French Fried Potatoes 
Garden Green Beans 
Hot Roll with Butter 
Dinner Dessert 
Creme de Rum Sundae 
Chilled Ambrosia 
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nearest you, plus a wonderful 80-page dance 
book from which you can learn the Fox Trot, 
Waltz, Rumba, Samba, Mambo and Jitterbug 


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Just mail in your “Lucky Buck” with the coupon 
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be able to learn quickly, easily when you take 
advantage of this double opportunity. Arthur 
Murray is making this amazing offer to show 
you the fun and good times to be had when 
you learn to dance his simple way. So don't 
wait. Look in your wallet now. If you have a 
dollar bill with a “3” and an “0” (in any order), 
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RULES—To receive your lessons, mail in your 
Lucky Dollar Bill with a “3” and an “0” (in any 
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Minors and present Arthur Murray students 
not eligible. 


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~ 


“THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
me Tuesday, February 28, 1956 


South Africa Votes to Kaas 45,000 
Of Mixed Blood From Electoral Roll 


aes ivoters of mixed blood from|the vote was announced. Their 
CAPETOWN, South Africa,!the common electoral roll. leader, Jacobus Strauss, has 
Feb. 27—South Africa’s Na-| The final and third reading! challenged Prime Minister Jo- 
tionalist Payty government to-\of the bill was approved/hannes Strijdom to resign if 


day won a five-year pariia-| jointly, 174 to 68, by the lower ~ 
mentary fight for a major| House and Senate. ‘the courts should not invall 


plank in its “white supremacy”! Opposition United Party leg-| date his action in enlarging 
program: removal of 45,000/islators sat grimly silent when the Senate to get the two- m § ; y 
” ne waitin thirds majority needed — and 
ee at. a ee ‘won—today. : : | j | Q J UJ N f O re S 
| re . coe : é ; ‘ sped ae: : ‘ ‘ ¥ 2 & ) The bill passed today also 


- 
= .. 


‘restricts the powers of the 
‘federal courts to test the va- 


lidity of any acts of Parlia- 

ment except minor legislation 

dealing with equal language . re 
rights for English and Afri- | 


kaans residents. 

It seeks to conclude the 
fight begun by former Nation-/ 
alist. Prime Minister Daniel) 
Malan to make Parliament 
“supreme.” 


The overwhelming vote of g 
the joint session gave the gov- 
ernment more than the two- 
thirds majority it needed to 


change the constitution. 
| The legislation removes 45,- 
; |000 persons of mixed blood in| 


Cape Province from the com-! : 
+ |mon electoral rolls. It entitles 
them to vote only for special 
white candidates who will sit y 
| in the House as representa- a 


: 
; tives for the “coloreds.” 

: Of the 2 great Canadian =. i The next move in the ‘five- 
SE. » 6 ; ——— ae year battle will come from the! 

»whiskies—O. F.C. is the 1 - Fn ‘United Party leaders. They! 
| a ‘have pledged to appeal to the 

‘courts to invalidate the Na- 

‘tionalists’ enlargement of the : 

| Senate. Were you ever locked in the closet on your TOth birthday while the older folks ate your birthday cake themselves? That sounds 


GUPORTED CANADIAN WHISKY, A BLEND, 6 YEARS OLD. 04.6 PROOF. SCHGRLEY DESTILLERS CO, MEW YORE CITY | : birthd it’ iati ; 
MT MUU like « teerible way to celebrate a tenth birthday. Yet it's happening today to our 10-year-old aviation enterprise —NORTR 
AMERICAN AIRLINES. 


PRE-SEASON SALE Aircosch, the economy postwar travel prodigy conceived by North American's management, is 10 years old this month. 


Only a decade ago our fledgling took wing from Long Beach, Calif., when a former GI flier piloted the first transcontinental 
STORM DOORS. WINDOWS and JALOUSIES 


sircoach to New York in 18 hours, with four stops en route. For the 22 passengers it wasn’t luxurious air travel. The flight 
: attracted no fanfare. The California war veterans who founded North American were too busy operating their DC-3's to realize 
AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES 
WASHINGTON BRICK CO. 


they were making history. 
History records that our low-cost North American idea made air travel possible for the first time for average Americans. 
6th & Decatur Sts. N.E. TU. 2-3200 
Subsidiary Thos. Somerville Co. 


We did & with our own moncy. We did it without a penny of government subsidy. We demonstrated to all the airlines that ft 
was possible to cun @ competitive lower-fare public service at a profit. 

This Offer Will Not Be Repeated! 

PROVIDING SERVICE WITHIN 50 MI. WASHINGTON, D. C. 


HOW? Look af the record. For six years after the War vour tax dollars subsidized the major airlines—to the tune of half 

@ billion, Aly travel was a luxury service for the wealthy. In fact the industry tried to get rid of round trip discounts, as well 
TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, FRIDAY and SATURDAY 
ALL NEW =—_NO DARKNESS 


as aircoach— this was the attitude they expressed, “Get all the people off the planes who shouldn't be flying anyway” 
But Junior wes already growing up—aircoach the North American idea was by now in public demand. What aviation 
ROLL-UP IN WINTER 
NO SUN IN SUMMER 


needed was aot more subsidy but more passengers. We got more passengers into the sky by bringing fares down to earth. 
awnincs §-99 


North American has flown a million passengers over 8 billion passenger miles, with a perfect safety record. Competition 
30” Width 48" Proj. 


of North American led the subsidized industry to adopt aircoach. ‘The industry adopted North American's $99 transcontinental 
Made of 


fares, tater imitated our $80 transcontinental rates 
AMERICAN = aiywinum 


WHO BENEFITED? ° You, the public-North American's low fares, copied by the industry, saved the public nearly 
BEAUTY @ Aluminum Company of Amertcs 


$500,000,000. 
*The government —Aircoach profits made it no longer necessary to refuel airlines from the U.S. Treasury. Today, all 

All Aluminum Combination ALL NEW 
| ON as North American. And these rules rothlessly branded North American as a “violator” Al! they say was we flew too 
Storm and Screen TILT ACTI “frequently” No question of safety or service has ever been raised 


major domestic airlines are off subsidy. That saved U.S. taxpayers another $500,000,000, 
Metropolitan : So actually North American was “charged” onty with giving the public too much low-cost aircoach service. Achievement 


ces for lightness, for elegance 
€ 


—- 


—— 


ne — 


a eee 


North American bs the last surviving independent airline seeking permanent CAB certification to compete on major routes 
with the “grandfathers” Our efforts have met rebuffs, ridicule, punishment and downright persecution. The CAB, which 
regulates civil eviation, was pressured into adopting technical economic rules specifically désigned to destroy such independents 


aaa 


* The aviation industry —Aircoach passengers account for 40 per cent of their business. This year almost half the people 
obviously had embarrassed the Grandfathers. 


who fly will go aircoach. 
*Since 1946 all transportation costs have risen 37 per cent, but lowest air fares created by North American are down about 
50%. This could not have happened without independent competition, North American is the only major airline that has 
never asked for a rate increase. North American only asks that it be allowed to operate what it created at a possibly —even 
greater savings to the public. 
We're proud of thess candies on our tenth birthday cake. You, the traveling public, made aircoach pessidble. You put 
Junior in the family circle. 
JUNIOR AND THE “GRANDFATHERS” Aviation’s |2 big “grandfather” airlines resent Junior. They say their 
family is big enough. They want to keep the tight grasp they had on al] major air routes since 1938 For 18 years they have 
enjoyed exclusive squatters’ rights in the skiea. Nobody new has ever been allowed by the Civil Aeronautics Board (CAB) 
t compete with their passenger operations. Protected by government regulation. propped up by subsidy, they control 96 per 
That's why—an afrooach’s 10ch birthday—they stil) say no youngster may enter this select family circle. No birthday cake 
for Junior. The caks he brought to Aly party sow belongs to the “Grandfathers:’ Lock him in a closet sealed by government 
regulations. That'll make sure he won't bother the old folks—no more new ideas about lower fares and better service, 
In plain words—block all new air competition by government edict and keep the skies the private monopoly for the 
_, Grandfathers. , ; 
NORTH AMERICAN WANTS TO COME OUT OF THE CLOSET North American Airlines has earned 
a place in the family circla) American principles of fair play demand that new qualified enterprise should have the right to 
offer responsible. vigorous competition. We believe that is what President Eisenhower meant when he told Congress on 
January 5, 1956: 
“An integral part of our efforts to foster a strong and expanding domestic economy is keeping open the door of Opportunity 
to new and small enterprise—checking monopoly and preserving a competitive environment’ 


cent of the total airlines business. 
ONE INCH THICK bee Limi Fair minded Americans wonder why the CAB refuses to recognize this basic policy. 


Built to Our Own == Regular $89.00 


North American's management flew the first Califormia-New York low-cost aircoach in 1946, (other airlines did not introduce aircoach generally until 1951). 


95 North American gave Ge public the Ora $99 transcontinental aly fore. (other airlines did not follow until 1952) 

. North American aut Re New York-Califoria sound trip fare & $160 in 1952. (other airlines did not cut coach fares on this route until 1955). 
Installed 
Soxts 


10th BIRTHDAY FACTS ON NORTH AMERICAN AIRLINES “FIRSTS” IN AIRCOACH 


Nor® American firs few asew DC-6B alrcosches in coast-to-coast service. 


North American gave the public the first drop-down doors and facilities for carry-on baggage 
e : North American's passengers are served free meals on all coach flights. 


North American is the largest Independent aircoach system and the country’s sixth largest aircoach carrier among al) airlines. 


| Ornamentation Available 
| Immediate Delivery | 


Any size up to 32x66 : WHEREVER NORTH AMERICAN COMPETES, AIRCOACH FARES HAVE COME DOWN 
BUY oo ~ tenn dy AT : ON ROUTES WHERE NORTH AMERICAN IS NOT 4LLOWED TO COMPETE, AIRCOACH FARES REMAIN SUBSTANTIALLY HIGHER. 


WO DOWN PAYMENT | 


Ist PAYMENT NEXT SPRING 


For Free Home Call TU. 2-3200 


DEMONSTRATION Till 10 P.M. Tonite 


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RCA VICTOR COLOR-VISION 


\ 2 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
ad Tuesday, February 28, 1956 5 


o 
2 


mn 


Where courtesy and quality are traditional 


/ 


Never before has there been, such a variety in color TV programs, and it’s 
all yours at a new low price. Have the thrill of séeing the spectaculars in 
all their brilliant color, catch the excitement and color of your favorite va- 
riety shows . . . and remember, color sets also bring you black and white. 
RCA Victor’s big color television sets bring you more for-your money, for 
they include all the new features of RCA Victor’s un-mechanical look. You 
have high quality “’4-plus” picture performance, high-and-easy tuning and 
the famous Golden Throat of balanced fidelity sound. Also, the distinctive 
cabinet styling corhmplements any decor, from traditional to contemporary. 


W&.—Television, Ist Floor, North Building... 


Ask about our convenient Deferred Pay- 
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25.00 or more. You pay just 10% down... 
balance in budgeted monthly installments. 
Minimum down payment 5.00. 


also Chevy Chase 


RCA Victor Factory Service Contract 
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Victor Television eat minimum. cost: 
assures TV service by factory trained 
experts. 

. 


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+ BOO ACen em 6: tees 6 


COLOR PROGRAM 
SCHEDULE 


Weekdays 


Matinee Theater; 
except Monday, 
NBC, 3-4 P.M. 


Howdy Doody, NBC, 
5:30-6 P.M. 


Monday, March 5 


Producer’s Showcase—’’Caesar 
and Cleopatra,”” NBC, 
8.9:30 P.M. 


Saturday, March 10: 


Ford Star Jubilee— 
“High Tor,” CBS, 
9:30-11 P.M. 


Sunday, March 11: 


"Richard I1!," a three-hour 
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2:30-5:30 P.M. 


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The handsome cabinet comes in mahogany 
grained finish. Model 21CT660. 


SAVE ON 1956 GENERAL 


save 140.00 on 1956 
AIR CONDITIONER 


219” 


Save now on this pre-season sale of 
the new G-E air corditioner, featuring 


original list 
price, 359,95 


the space-saver drape-line design. High 
power factor steps up cooling for extra 
hot days, low operating cost with one 
Model R71N. 


W&L—-Major Appliances, 
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horsepower motor. 


save 100.00 on 1956 
G-E “Magnetic-Door” 


REFRIGERATOR: 
FREEZER 


299" 


with trade-in or allowance 
original list price, 399.95 


With G-E’s new magnetic door, you 
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just the touch of your toe, and it 
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are no hard-to-reach corners, with re- 
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G-E STEAM IRON—B8oth a steam and dry 
iron, enables you to iron -without sprinkling 
many pieces. Regularly 14.95 10.94 


G-E HAND MIXER——Conven- 
ient, able, lightweight. Regu- 
larly 17.95 2.76 


G-E FRY PAN—aAutomatic temperature se- 


lector, bake, fry or stew. Regularly 17.95 G-E SPEED KETTLE—Automatic tea ket- 
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tle heats quickly, large capacity, push-button 
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Aluminum Cover—for fry pan. Regularly 2.00 id. Regularly 16.95 12.46 

i 9 

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3 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES. HERALD el the World | Minister of Culture under 
Tuesday, February 28, 1956 oe : nena and a candidate presid- 


lium member. On May 8, 1955, 


be was named a to 
Il Top Reds Retain Soviet Party Power Ss2"82 
By Richard K. O'Malley ° Pee Oe ef © © &© &© & **\was high in party councils, garded as a high priest of party | 
MOSCOW, Feb. 37 w—The| - during Stalin's rule. + —— |theory. He enjoyed a high rank | ADVANCED AGE 


Soviet Communist Party's Cen- - oo conge agg peer Maan in the secretariat under Stalin.|]| Fine nursing care 


tral Committee kept the he ‘through the Ukraine party| The only man to lose his| 

USSR's “collective leadership” | | organization and served ie in the top party body) COLLEGE MANOR 
intact today. It reelected all 11 a“ as first secretary. He is a mem-| was P. K. Panamarenko. former | Brochure Lutherville, gw 
members of the Committee's ber of the Supreme Soviet. 
ruling presidium and retained , .— *. i Candidate Members 

Nikita S. Khrushchev as the ‘a : ' -. Besides Shepilov. Zhukov and 


gy Aw Boag toe all | ——° so Furtseva, the other three 
The Committee, however, ex i. . candidate members of the § 

| panded the number of alter- P, ~~ 2 . ipresidium are: 

‘nate presidium members from : a i | | Leonid I. Brezhnev, Arst| § . 

itwo to six, naming Defense; Be ; ) isecretary of the Kazakhstan| § and You'll Leap! 


Minister Georgi K. Zhukov to bs Pi 4 party and long a member of 


one of the four new places. Ex-) ¥ | the Central Committee and ; 
1 tension of this honpr to the 7 | , secretariat. He has served as| § 
1551 3439 40 World War II hero once again 7 ‘ Jy |a deputy chief of the political 


Aiabama Ave. Benning Rd. N.E. ‘Eastern Ave. underscored the — of io XY 4 administration (the political . 

Shopping Center River Terrace Seat Pleasant armed forces’ influence since Sh < commissar system) in the De-!| E ; ge 

PLENTY OF FREE PARKING AT ALL TIMES Stalin’s death. j ‘a fense Ministry, with the rank February has twenty-nine days this year, and 

Prices effective Today and Wednesday, February 28 & 20. We reserve the (Moscow Radio, pte: . of lieutenant general. 1956 can be divided by four. So, by tradition, it’s 
mit ntities. Ne t ealers. si- ) : ; ten 

right t , qua sa 0 ing the names, listed the pre N. A. Mukitdinov, premier! — a time when a She or a Ship (femininity every- 


ee ‘dium in alphabetical order, de- and leading political figure in 


noting equality of leadership, the Uzbekistan Republic of where!) takes the initiative. If the 14 personality 
but when referring to the al- a Central Asia. He is also a Su- Cumarders could talk, for instance, they'd remind 


\ternates, placed Zhukov's ‘ ; preme Soviet deputy. 
‘name first, This was deemed N. M. Shvernik was reelected | Europe-bound travelers that desirable space is 


jstgnthicene B. ae — dine ie. i a is a former head of the still available between now and the end of Thrift 
| position in the party s councis. BA Riles. | Supreme Soviet presidium and ; ' } 
| The presidium — called the Se an alternate Politburo member| [ Season on April 15. They'd say that the coming 


| |Politburo in the Stalin era— a a * aad ties under Stalin and is now chair-| E summer travel peak will be a very high one and 
rules the party and the nation i. oe 4 0% ae man of the All-Union Council that it’s not a bit too soon to book for next Thrift 
in the name of the Central! 4 1 BG, cag of Trade Unions. 
Committee of 133 members. | lee | Season (after August 5)... when crowds are 


a Beg wae we mage oA - poe ge Fans Fe ae aa wo Doeretariot | smaller and choice is wider. The world’s largest 
e party's ongress ) peo, a : ; 

week. "AS First Secretary, | , wea! Adeoatahadl Teaon str sy ga oe py superliners Queen Elizabeth and Queen Mary 
Khrushchev remains boss of the | ; Brezhnev, Shepilov, Mrs. Furt- would remind you, too, that you can count on. 
party's vast apparatus of more| Russian Communist Party Chief Nikita Khrushchev (left) (seva and the following: . Cunard’s impeccable shipboard facilities. Ask 
than a million party members| and Premier Nikolai Bulganin, shown chatting with an uni- A. B. Aristov, first named es uUnarGs IMpeccavie snip RCURICS. 
and candidate members. dentified woman at a recent Kremlin reception, were among secretary last July. Prev iou d}y your Cunard travel agent for more leaping facts. 
Khrushchev became party boss the 11 members of the-Soviet Communist Party's ruling (' the secretariat, he was 


in 1953 when Georgi Malenkov, dropped ju aft , : 
then Premier, stepped down presidium who were reclected yesterday. death. just er Stalin's NEW YORK TO ALL EUROPE 


from the post. Stalin kept the | | N. I. Belyayev, originally! # QUEEN MARY Mor. 14, Mor. 28, Apr. 11, Apr. 25, May 9 
eee 0 REE CARE 28 ee deputy premier, Supreme So-|impotant Stat Planning Com-| — to the secretariat in| QUEEN ELIZABETH Mor. 21, Apr. 4, Apr. 18, May2, May 16 
First Woman Chosen viet deputy and Malenko’s boss mission. uly. He headed the party | ASTANA Mar. 39 | SCVINGA Mar, G, Age. 5 


\machine My Altai Province MEDIA Mar. 30, Aor. 27 PARTHIA Mar. 16, Apr. 13 


V | For the first time, & woman as a leading Soviet industrialist.| K. Y. Voroshiloy, a Soviet) p 
| yotr N. Pospelov, once ay SAXONIA Mar. 23 IVERNIA Apr. 6 
BEEF LI ER : jechieved the upper reaches of He personifies the new tech-marshal and old eomrade-in | 


ithe party apparatus. Ekaterina | 


| Alexandrovna Furtseva became |nocrat in the Soviet hierarchy— arms of Stalin. He is the figure-/ Get 100% PURE Mineral rm CO C U N A FR D 
FRESHLY 29° 7 an alternate member of the'a devoted Communist, but all head president of the Soviet Be Sure Of The Best. demand | ) O 


SLICED presidium. Chief of the Moscow | business. Union in his role as chairman of 


city party apparatus for some| Maxim- Z. Saburov, another|the presidium of the Supreme) AY | Thark o a Wa Fut 
TENDER Uso || gms 


time, she had been singled outirepresentative of the tech-| Soviet. 

by Khrushchey in recentinocracy. He is a first deputy) M. A. Suslov, first named to| ig Cunard Line, 914 15th*Street, N. W 

months for notable honors. |premier, a Supreme Soviet the ruling presidium last July.| | MEW-it you prefer antacid-texative help, F, : . ; 
Another rising star reelected (deputy and ehairman of the A former editor of Pravda, he | ash by name for new Magne-Nujol 


to alternate membership in the 
SHOR : RIBS. presidium was Dmitri T. Shepi- 
lov, regarded by many &s a log- 


LEAN ical successor to V. M. Molotoy 

as Foreign Minister. Editor-in- 

TOP GRADE |, chief of Pravda, the party's of- 
' \ficial organ, Shepilov has had 

BEEF | isuch outstanding assignments 


recently as membership in the 
top government delegation sent 


| |to Yugoslavia to make peace 

SCRAPPLE with Marshal Tito and a jour 

ney to Egypt as a bearer of So- 

BRIGGS, MEATY & TASTY | |viet friendship offerings in the 
| |Middle East. 

The Central Committee also 
elected a secretariat of eight 
members, headed by Khrush- 
chev. Both Mrs. Furtseva and 
Shepillov are members of this 
secretariat, which controls the 
far-flung party apparatus in the 

Save MORE on PRODUCE ay RSS See 
| The ll Top Leaders 
al JUMBO The 11 members elected to 


| ithe presidium — the collective 


U. S. No. l POTATOES gaoe 58 First Secretary 


lof the party and a Supreme So- 


lviet (Parliament) Deputy. He 

Ib. Cc holds no other government of- 

bag + |fice, but is the party's dominant 
figure 

' Nikolai A. Bulganin, who suc- 


ceeded Malenkov as Premier 


U.S. Ne. 1 : early in 1955. A former finance 
ALL-PURPOSE ONIONS expert, he became a Soviet 
YELLOW } army marshal under Stalin and 


Defense Minister after Stalin's 


c "= death. 
3 lbs. ] Lazar M. Kaganovich, old Bol- 
shevik and Soviet industrialist. 
He is a First Deputy Premier 


U. $. No. 1 and heads an important new 
WASHINGTON APPLES wages and hours commission. 

STATE . Malenkov, former Premier 

DELICIOUS , until he confessed lack of abil- 

Ib. Cc | ity last year. Now @ mere Dep- 

4 cello 35 _ |uty Premier, he is Minister of 

+ (Electric Power Stations and a 


Supreme Soviet Deputy. His 
Ministry was criticized during 


GRAPEFRUIT = | #"y,coures 
A. L. Mikoyan, a first deputy 
SEEDLESS U. &. Ne. | FLORIDA premier, Supreme Soviet 


ASS MARSH for Cc deputy and foreign trede ex 
/- VARIETY 5 25 pert. One of the early revolu- 
: / tionaries, Mikoyan was a leader 
in the recent party congress’ at- 
tack on the cult of Stalinism. 
' Molotev Holds Post 


¥ ee ee 
. Vv. M. Molotov, Foreign Min-| 
ister, first deputy premier and! 


Supreme Soviet deputy. The 


U.S. GRADE “A” personification of stubborn So- 

viet foreign policy under Stalin, 

; NEARBY STRICTLY Cc he confessed publicly to a grave 

FRESH error in party doctrine last fall. 

; Mikhall G. Pervukin, a first 
FRESH AS THE 


DAWN—NONE FINER 
AT ANY PRICE DOZ. CTN. 


Oe LTT wees 


oT plies te dene Manan 


Eden Agrees 
WALDORF : With Reds on 


ATOILET TISSUE /] Less War Risk 


€ | Reuters 
LONDON, . Feb. 27-—5ritish) 
ROLLS Prime Minister Sir Anthony) 
Eden agreed with the Soviet 


Communist Party chief tonight 


that the risk of war had gfiwn 


less and commented: “There is 
in existence an all-powerful 
mutual deterrent—the hydro- 


Cc oe : - , de. 
Eden was speaking in 8 

GALLON bate in the House of Commons 

BOT | LE on foreign policy. He disclosed 

he had spent most of the week- 


end studying the speeches at 
the recent Congress of the 


Soviet Communist Party at e e es 

Moscow, which began with a 

six-hour address by party chief ra 

Nikita Khrushchev. 
Eden said everyone under. 


HORMEL’S LUNCHEON MEAT ‘stood the immense destructive 
ose who own it know they 


pow of the H-bomb. 
12 oz. ¢€ 
can can always receive it back, and 
are not likely therefore to want r 
to use it,” he added. te 


| He said the Communist lead- 

& BOOTH’S FRESH FROZEN peas, eneenes. ee et oe 
BFILLET POLLOCK ot ee a cee 
FILLET WHITING | ‘tusion,” he added. “If ever 


| io weapon were would be} 
rge areas there wou | 
is oT | , - | |wholesale destruction, oblitera- 


/ ; ~ / 
Good to the Last Drop ! 


© \tion, oblivion. Whether a town 
was capitalist or communist 
‘| po not affect its fate one 

jot.” ; 


A 


U. S. A-Bomb Pile Seen Triple Soviets’ 


LONDON, Feb. 27 «--A,based its detailed report on a 
prominent British newspaper|public speech by a British of- 
today calculated the United ficial, a “congressional indis- 
States stockpile of atomicicretion” in Washington and 

* bombs is triple that of Russia.| readily-available public infor- 


The Manchester Guardian, mation. 


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The Guardian’s scientific 
correspondent estimated th 
United States has more than 
32,500 A-bombs and the Soviet 
Union about 10,000 

Britain, thirdtrunner in the 
atomic production race, “now 
has enough mnuciear explosive 
in its own possession to de- 
stroy every large city in the 
world and probably most of 
the large towns as well.” 

The newspaper said the Rus- 
sian stockpile might be “suffi- 
ciently large to make the mili- 
tary think i is large enough’ 
for all foreseeable military 
purposes. 

The Guardian admitted its! 
calculations contained “in- e 
evitably large wuncertainties,”’| 
but said they were backed up Assectetad Pres 
iby other information such as 
the relative cost of manufac- Denies Bombing 
turing nuclear materials. liane Harvey, 22-year-old 


-@ 


said, “that the stockpile of) 
nuclear explosives in all three| *¢amster union official, has 


countries is much larger than pleaded innocent to a charge 
has previously been thought.”| she participated in the bomb- 

The United States, accord-| ing of a rival union official's 
ing to the Guardian, probably; auto. Five others also were 
‘has at least 5000 Peete | indicted in connection with 


type bombs from the Hanford, 

Wash., atomic piles and enough | labor bombings m Rlnneap- 
Uranium 235 from Oak Ridge,| °#s and St. Paul. 
|Tenn., to produce one bomb an 

i hour. 

| It said Britain can make 
‘tween 60 and 100 bombs a year the six main exporting coun- 


‘from its plutonium reactors at) tries—United States, Canada,) 
|Windseale, England, and pro-\Argentina, Australia, France| 


duces enough Uranium 235 at 2a” 
‘Capenhurst, England, for 609|°"¢ Sweden—"in the hope that 


bombs annually. it will be possible to conclude 


lan agreement mutually satis. 
Iran Quells Revolt factory “In all respects.” 
| TEHRAN # — The Iranian) ——————————_ 
Army announced today it had | 
quelled a revolt by Jevandoudi' 
tribesmen in the mountains of 
inorthern Iran after a 21-day 
fight in which 120 tribesmen | 
i killed. ) 
The communique said lead- 
lers of the revolt were rounded 
\up and mountainous areas for- 
merly held by the rebels occu- 
pied by Iranian troops. 
| The Jevandoudis are a small ee 
group of Kurdish tribesmen| pagers 
living along the border of Azer- Ii 
| baijan and Kurdistan provinces 


Cube Appeals to OAS 
| HAVANA @ — Cuba has 
asked the Organization of 
American States to intervene in 
\its dispute with the Dominican 
| Republic, it was announced of- 
ficially today. 

Acting Foreign Minister Gon- 


: 
| 
; 


troversy immediately before 
the OAS Peace Committee. | tells all : 
The action indicated had 


aled to et sntatactory FePlY| Taig werk “Coop” tells how 
ment to protests against Domin-| >¢ fell off horses—and into 
ican “provocations.” The pro- stardom. He tells why, at first, 
tests charged that Dominican’ actresses hated appearing with 
— in aoe eC 7 Do-' him, why hechanged his name, 
minican political refugees, , = . ont te 
bribed = high Cuban official) %%2,%°W his Montana ‘boy 


a b ' 
and engaged in espionage. hood was a big head start. He 


| describes his early struggles as 
Wheat Talks Centinue | gcartoonist... his failures as 
Reuters a salesman and his hair-raising 

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here have announced they @ill| 1% the Post. Be sure to get your 

continue negotiations with ex-| Copy carly! 

porting countries for a hew 

world wheat agreement with- Out today —at all newsstands 

out Britain's participation. 
Britian has announced she 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
: 7 


Tuesday, February 28, 1956 


“Tt is certain,” the Guardian secretary to a Minneapolis | 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD» 
8 Tuesday, February 28, 1956 eee 


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UNITED NATIONS, N. Y.,!was “premature,” saying “there 
97 (INS)—U. N. Secretary is more of a threat of an*arms 
climaxed his 6week global tour region now. He stressed that 
by ruling out ~eeoseeee an armaments race was always 
any threat ~of ‘the “symptom and not the 
war in the Mid- cause” of world unrest. 
idle East:  Hammarskjold described the 
H am m arsk- U. N.’s “preventive” function 
jold, who re in averting a Midwestern con- 
‘turned Friday flict as follows: 
from a 30,000- To prevent day-today con 
mile journey flicts and skirmishes along the 
across Asia, Arab-Israeli frontiers. 
ichallenged as- To serve as a “third party” in 


Israelis Rap 
Statement 
By Dulles 


AMMAN, Jordan, Feb. 27 | 
‘Moves for a summit conference 
‘of Middle East Arab states next 
‘month on the burning Israeli 
‘issue gained momentum today 
\with word that Syria had joined) 


‘Arab Parley Moves Gain; 
Iraq Makes Arms Offer 


Saudi Arabia was expected to 
make a decision on the meet- 
ing soon. Ahmed Kuheimi, the 
Saudi Arabian charge d'affaires, 
left for home after conferring 
with Rifai. 


Premier Guy Mollet prepared 
to submit the plan to Parlia- 


JERUSALEM, Israeli Sector, | 
Feb. 27 (‘®—Israeli newspapers, 
commented bitterly today on’ 
i\United. States Secretary of 
State John Foster Dulles’ state. 
ments before the Senate 
Foreign Relations Committee 
ast week. | 

Dulles told the Committee 
the Arab states are bound to 
win any arms race with Israel 
so long as they have access to. 
Soviet-bloe weapons. He said 
Israel's security could be bet- 
ter secured in the long run 
“through measures other than 
the acquisition of additional 
arms in circumstances” that 
might increase Middle East 
tension. 

The Tel Aviv trade union! 
organ Davar, close to Premier 
David Ben-Gurion’s Mapai 
|Party, warned: “Let not the 
| United States play with Israel's 
isecurity in order to achieve a 
|‘British-American Peace’ in the) 
‘Middle East.” ) 
| The Jerusalem Post, which) 
often mirrors israéli Foreign 
Office views, said Dulles’ state- 
ment aroused “intense bitter-! 
ness” throughout the country,| 
and added there is “little doubt 
it has brought a renewal of the 
Arab war against Israel meas-' 
urably closer... It will need 
more than reassuring words to 
‘counterbalance the incalculable 
harm done...” 

The religious orthodox paper 


Lebanon and traq in supporting 
the Jordan proposal. 

In another development in the 
tense Middle Eastern area, Iraq 
offered Lebanon and Syria “any 
military aid that they may ask” 
to block Israeli diversion of the 
Jordan River. 

King Hussein of Jordan pro- 
posed the conference of Arab 
heads of state to plan a united 
defense against any Israeli ag 
gression. He suggested Amman 
as the site. 

A Jordan spokesman said 
Syrian Ptesident Shukri Ku. 
watly had accepted. Earlier, Jor- 
dan Premier Samir Rifai said he 
had received written accept- 
ances from Lebanon and Iraq. 

Rifai also said Premier Gama) 
Abdel Nasser of Egypt sup 
ported the idea with reserva 
tions provoked by Iraq's mem- 
bership in the Western-backed 
Baghdad pact. 


The Iraq offer of military aid 
was tied to Arab reports that 
Israel might act alone in divert- 


ing the Jordan River for irriga- 
tion and power. Israeli officials! 
have denied the ,reports, but) 
say they will not delay indefi-' 
nitely. The United States has 
been pushing a plan for joint’ 
israeli-Arab use of the river, ~ | 

Iraq in recent months has’ 
been getting arms from the 
United States under a military-| 
aid program. Arrival 
third United States arms ship-| 
ment in Baghdad was reported! 
only last week. ) 

Informed sources in Damas- 
cus, the Syrian capital, today! 
reported that négotiations for 
the sale of United States arms’ 
to Syria collapsed last Decem-' 
ber because the United States' 
insisted on concluding a mutual | 
security pact with Syrians as a! 
\condition of the sale, 


a 


fo, (, DIRECTOR 


ed 
uses new t 
calling for’ 


3 LITTLE KITTENS 
ALL-FISH 


Ad vertisement % 


sertions that; ‘settling differences and as 
ithe Arabs and Hammarskjold | midwife” to new plans for 
the brink of war” and urged peace. 
that the “overdramatized”| Hammarskjold indicated op- 
phrase itself be scrapped. position to use of armed forces 
‘Egyptian Prime Minister Gamal ; 
| Abdel Nasser, Israeli Premier), > .. 
Ay 
David Ben-Gurion, Indian |: rance I lans 
other Asian and Mideastern . . 
leaders in their respective cap- B 4 4 
foe P > big Army In 
| chief, asserting he - he 
ireturnea “a iittie Dit wiser Alo . 7 
‘from his trip, told a news con- * gc! la oon 
\ference all the leaders he visit 
a desire to settle peacefully the The French government early 
problems of the region today adopted a sweeping 
Hammarskjold indicated his “Peace-in-Algeria” plan which 
ion and other leaders would get script to duty against Algeria's 
together in due time at the Mosiem Nationalist rebels. 
conference table to discuss 
ting the situation was tense, he ment and military leaders. It 
said he saw no reason for panic. asks wide political, military 
The Swedish Dipiomat barred and economic powers to cepe 
Middle East situation, but said pioodied Algeria for almost 18 
a gradual solution was possible. months 
, “rey " . 
He added: Phat for me is Robert LaCoste, Minister for 
optimism.” 
asking for military rein- 
He said talk of an arms race forcements of 20.000 to bring 
- French forces in Algegja up to 
| Sources close to the Premier’s| 
office said LaCoste and Max 
LeJeune, State Secretary for 
=\the military class of 1956, esti-; 
poner cg eye pe he if mated at 60,000 young men, 
oe - chest cold, or acute bron- .o-v» half of its induction peri-| 
They are also proposing that 
all conscripts be inducted to- 
gether March 1 or April 1 in- 
sections. 

Under this plan, a conscript 
would spend four months of | 
eight months in Algeria, and) 
finally four months with the 
North Atiantic Treaty units sta- 


‘Israelis are “on maintaining and strengthening 
He held consulations with/to police the Palestine borders 
Premier Jawaharlal Nehru and 
| The U.N. 
‘ed showed strong sincerity and) PARIS, Feb. 28, (Tuesday) (# 
belief that Nasser and Beri-Gur- would send every young con- 
their differences. While admit 
any overnight settlement of the with the rebellion that has 
enough as a source of certain Algerian Affairs, is reported to! 
350,000 meh 
the Army, are proposing that 
_,od with the army in Algeria.| 
stead of being split into three 
basic training in France, then'| 
: tioned in West Germany. 


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Hatzofeh of Tel Aviv and the 
two left-wing Tel Aviv labor 
papers Lamerhay and Mishmar 
all saw the Dulles statement as 
a declaration of abandonment 
of Israel by the United States 


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For 1956_The big buy is THE BIG MIERCURY. 


Dent miss the big television hit, “THE ED SULLIVAN SHOW,” Sunday evening, 6:00 te 9:00, Siation WTOP.TV, Channel 9 


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ON NEC RADIO AND TELEVigION | 


The Navy has stepped up its 
undersea guided missile pro- 
gram after getting some good 
news On progress being made 
in missiles, submarines and 


atomic power. 
A new type of weapon—a 


pable of launching missiles with 
atomic warhcads at targets hun- 
dreds of miles distant—will be 
constructed, Navy Secretary 
Charles S. Thomas announced. 

The other guided missile subs 
also will be built powered by 
conventional diesel engines and 
electric batteries. 

Both actions involve a switch 
in peviously approved ship- 
building plans. Thomas wrote 
Congress yesterday, saying the 
first guided missile submarine 
to be built from scratch will 
have atomic rather than con- 
ventional power, as originally 
planned. And two other attack 
submarines now building, the 
Grayback and Growler, will be 
completed as guided - missile 
craft. 

Navy officials said three 
things contributed to the shift 
in plans: 

1. Fleet experience with two 
submarines converted to fire 
Regulus guided missiles, plus 
the highly promising experience 
to date with nuclear subma- 
rines, convinced Navy chiefs 
that the two could te “mated” 
‘sooner than previously planned 
‘Interior construction of mis- 
sile subs makes this more com- 
iplicated than other submersi- 
bles. 

2. The likelihood that atomic 
power plants for the Navy's 
growing nuclear submarine 
force will become available fast- 
er than once believed. 

3. Recent progress made in 
both the development and pro- 
duction of Navy surface-to-sur- 
face guided missiles. The new 
submarines will fire the Regu- 


eS 


' 


British Ambassador Sir 
Roger Makins denied last night 
that his country is shipping 
strategic materials to Soviet 
blee nations P 
in Europe. 

Makins  ia- 
beled as “in- 
accurate” a re- 
port that the | 
British have 
sent 260 mil- 
lion pounds of 
copper wire to 
Russia in the 
past 18 months. 
i also said Makins 
“w are not 
‘shipping any 60,000 kilowatt 
‘generators to anyw here behind 
ithe fron Curtain.” 

Makins made the remarks on 
the MBS radio program, “Re- 
porters’ Roundup.” 

Charges that the _ British 
were selling big machinery and 
lother potential war materials 
ite the Communists were made 
‘during a recent Senate investi- 
gation of East-West trade 
| Chairman John L. McClellan 
\(D-Ark.) of the Senate Investi- 


ATHENS, Feb. 27 #—Pre 
mier Constantine Karamaniis 
resigned today and King Pau! 
immediately asked him to 
form a new government. The 
National Radical Union led by 
Karamaniis won 163 of Parilia- 
ment’s 300 seats in Greece's 
general elections Feb. 19. 
With his solid majority, 
Karamaniis pledged to con- 
tinue Greece's alliances with 
the West, is expected to have 
no difficulty in forming a Cab- 
inet. 

Karamaniis became Premier |. 
as head of a caretaker gov- 
ernment last year on the death 
of Premier Alexander Papa- 
gos. He led the Radical Union 
to victory over an alliance of 


nist-line parties. 


ae 


Apex 


BOTTLED 
ac Mga abu 


A 7 


nuclear-powered submarine ca- 


Makins Denies Britain 
Sent Reds Copper Wire 


| , United Press 4 


King Asks Karamanlis 
To Form Greek Cabinet 


Prone. rightist and Commu- 


One of the leaders of this | 1920 Wilson mira. 


Navy Steps Up 
Missile Plans 


By John G. 


Staff Reporter 
a 700-mile-an-hour missile 


Norris 


lus, 
with a range of several hundred 
miles, that can carry an atomic 


warhead. But they also will be 
adaptable to the more advanced, 
higher speed missiles under de-' 
velopment. 

After hearing secret briefings 
from Army, Navy and Air Force 
chiefs, members of the Senate 
Afmed Services Committee re- 
sently expressed satisfaction 
with Navy missile progress and 
that of other new developments 
in the Navy, but have ordered 
an investigtaion of the progress 
toward intercontinental and in- 
termediate range ballistics mis-' 
siles ) 

Democrat Senators have) 
charged that the Administration | 
has not sufficiently pushed such | 
programs, and have urged a’ 
“erash” spending program to 
prevent Russia from mpeateied 
ping us in this field. 


The House yesterday passed, 
without opposition, a $15.4 mil- 
lion dollar bill to speed re-| 
search on one of the big prob | 
lems holding up development of | 
the ICBM. Part of the research 
funds for the National Advisory | 
Committee for Aeronautics 
would go for an “atmosphere- 
entry simulator” at the Ames 
Laboratory in California. 

The project will simulate con- 
ditions when the warhead of a 
long-range missile plunges down 
from 100,000 feet. The intense 
heat generated weakens most 
metals, and presents a chief lag 
in the development program. 


Product Fireproof 


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OBERHAUSEN, Germany, 
Feb. 27—Police today estimated 
fire damage at $11,000 to a fac.) 
tory manufacturing fireproof | 
materials that burned for 7% | 
hours here last night. 


—_— — rE 
— ee 


' 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Tuesday, February 28, 1956 9 


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gating Subcommittee accused | 


the United States Government 
of making “astounding” con- 
eessions to Britain and other 
Jnited States allies who want | 
to trade with the Communists. | 

The Subcommittee is trying 
to obtain a secret list of goods 
which were taken off the em- 
bargo list at a 1954 allied 
trade conference in Paris. 

Makins said he was not cer- 
tain whether the embargo ~s 
now permits shipments 
60,000 kilowatt generators : 
Russia. But he said Britain is 
not shipping any. 

He said that copper wire, 
described at the Senate hear- 
ing as having strategic uses, is, 
not embargoed but is on the 
“watch list” of items on which 
trade reports are made to an 
allied committee. 

Makins said he knew nothing 
about another report that a big 
machine tool called a horizon- 
tal-boring mill had been sold 
to the Communists. But he 
sald the trade rules are being 
“stringently” enforced as far 
as the British are concerned. 


' 


group, Savas Papaolitis of the) 
National Progressive Union of) 
the Center, told the King in) 
an audience today the genuine-| | 
ness of the election results’ 
is questionable and the more 
democratic solution would be 
formation of a national govern- 
ment representing all parties. 
Other righti leaders of 
Karamaniis’ eléction opposi- 
tion, however, have pledged 
cooperation with him, espe-| 
cially in foreign affairs, and 
have announced: their 
with leftist parties is ended. | 


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and TIMES HERALD 
Tuesday, February 28, 1954 


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POLICY—From Page I 


‘som aircraft and spare parts, 


' 


largely commercial types.” 

| The statement added that 
‘Traa, as a Baghdad Pact mem- 
ber, was the only Arab state 


lreceiving American grant mili- 
tary assistance, The other ex- 


‘ports were licensed governmen- 
‘tal or private sales. 

Hoover was quoted as stress 
ing that “the problem of pre 


(venting war in the Middle East;any promise of American arms) 
‘is fundamentally one for the|at some future indefinite date) 
| United Nations.” ‘would be considered as hardly) 
Israeli sources, meanwhile, differing from a flat rejection. 
said Ambassador Abba Eban|The request has been under 
shortly will seek « yes-or-no consideration for months. , 
answer from the State Depart-| Jordan's Ambassador Abdul 
ment on Israel's request to buy|Monem Rifai told newsmen 
$64 million worth of jet inter-|after a State Department call 
ceptors, anti-aircraft, antitank/he felt Dulles’ views on Israeli 
‘and antisubmarine equipment|security problems were “fair” 
to offset Communist arms sold/ and “realistic.” The envoy said 
to Egypt. It was indicated that'that “if Israel shows goodwill 


and a readiness to recognize 
Arab rights in Palestine, it 
would change the whole situ- 
ation and wipe out the present 
tension.” 

No details were given on Rad- 
ford’s estimate to the Senators 
of relative Israeli and Arab 
armed strength, a point of con- 
siderable dispute. Radford was 
asked by newsmen about 
Dulles’ Friday reference to the 
presence of American destroy 


Dulles Speculates on Changes in Russia 


By Chalmers M Roberts? 
Bta(tf Reporter 

UNDERSTANDING John 
|Foster Dulles is sometimes 
| like eating an artichoke, You 
‘have to work your way 
through a 
mass of cover- 
ing to get to 
the heart of 
the matter 

The latest 
Dulles flap, 
arising from 
the Secre- 
tary s oplimis- 
tic outbursts 
at Tast Fri- 
days Senate Roberts 
Foreign Rela 
tions Committee hearing, 
case in point. Like the in- 
nards of an artichoke, the 
heart of the Dulles argument 
hat a good deal to be said for 
it. The pity is, in terms of the 
national interest, that few 
seem to be paying any atten- 
tion to the heart. Dulles has 
diverted most people with his 
claims of Republican policy 
successes, by his cracks at 
Democrats. by his lectures in 
morality, his legalisms and 
his often inept use of words 
with dramatic meanings. 


THE ESSENCE of 
views on the Soviet Union, 
both as expressed to the 


Senators and in his more rea- 
soned Sunday speech in Phila- 
deiphia, amounts to this: The 


Dulles’ 


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the | ambitions of International 


| Seviet Union. whatever | ) 
ite | Communism 


Marxist-Leninist base of 
leaders’ ideology, cannot and The Secretary's less 
does not remain forever the | troversial brother, Allen Dul- 
same. Even though the cur- | les, head of the Central In- 
rent Communist leaders are | teiligence Agency, last fall ad- 
still determined to try to mas- | vanced the thesis that if we 
ter the world, the post-Stalin | take a long look ahead, “we 
period has been marked by | can foressee the possibility of 
both “more liberalism” in the | great changes in the Soviet 
‘internal governmental struc-| system” with Soviet educa- 
‘ture and “greater tolerance” | tional advances playing a “ma- 
by the government toward | jor part.” His argument was 
the Russian people. that however much the Soviets 

Thus. Dulles said extempo- | try to condition the mind of 
raneously on Friday, that it | the Soviet man trained in 
may well be that “new forces” | technical skills, “they cannot 
have been set in motion within | in the end prevent him from 
Russia which “may be irresist- exercising tliat critical serisé 
ible” and that the “yeast of that they, themselves, have 
change is beginning to work.” caused to be created in him 
This is the basis on which when they gave him an educa- 
Dulles said the Russian rulers | Von 
are now in the process of 
bringing their “system and 
habits closer to ours.” 

On Sunday, Dulles said in 
his prepared address that “we 
do not assume fatalistically 
that there can be no evolution 
within Russia or that Russia's 
rulers will always be preda- 
tory. Some day Russia will be 
governed by men who put the 
welfare of the Russian people 
above world conquest. [It is 
our basic policy to advance 
the coming of that day.” 


con- 


NOW ALL of this can be 
heady stuff and dangerous 
It is the kind of thinking that 
can play into Moscow's current 
united front” policy, for one 
thing. It is a type of thinking 
on which many Asian leaders 
have rationalized their “neu- 

| tralism” or “non-involvement” 
policies. Yet there is a mass 
of testimony that Russia is in 
evolution, that the history of 
industralization in Western 
nations may be beginning to 
|repeat itself in the Soviet 
Union with respect to the 
building of the middle class. 
of managerial groups, of even | 


.NOW SUCH sentiments as 
these are shared in varying 
degrees by a good many hard- 
headed men who devote their | 
full time to Soviet affairs. One | 
of the most widely respected 
of such men has put KM very 
simply: there are only three 
ways by which the Soviet 
threat to the United States 
| can be eliminated: (1) by war, 
| but that’s out with today's 
weapons, (2) by a revolution 
inside Russia, but there's no 
| sign of that, or (3) by evolu- 
tion of the Soviet regime, a 
process now under way but of 
uncertain outcome. 

Back in 1946, Dulles wrote 
that the United States “must 
act on the assumption” that 
| it can do something to bring 
Soviet leaders to change their 
policies. Just a year ago, 
Dulles said he believed the 
time would come “when Rus- 
sians of stature will patriotic- 
ally put first their national 
security and welfare of their 
people” instead of subordi- 
nating both “to the worldwide 


a —EE — 


tor better, 


numbers of 

increasing stake in 
the privileges and the good 
things of life Revolutions 
historically have burned them 
selves out after a few genera 
tions 

Historian Arnold Toynbee 
likes to point out that the con- 
flict between immovable Chris- 
tianity and irresistible Islam 
was. in fact. never resolved 
And Adlai Stevenson has 
asked whether “the great is- 
sue that splits the world,” the 
“issue of tyranny or freedom 
(which) cannot be reconciled,” 
need “be forced to a decision’” 
-One of Presidemt Fisenhew- 
ers great contributions has 
been his ability to isolate the 
fringes of American political 
life, composed of those who 
insist that since the East-West 
issue cannot be reconciled, it 
must he resolved and that 
those who are not for tis are 
ipso facto, against us. There is 
every reason to believe that 
the President shares the Du! 
les long range views as stated 
here 

The pity of it is that Secre 


larger persons 


with an 


‘tary Dulles so often damages 


or destroys opportunities for 
cooperative, creative states- 
manship by surrounding the 
heart of his artichoke with so 
many leaves of political par- 
tisanship, extravagant claim, 
pious hope and startling lin- 
guistics, 


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Fulbright Says Dulles Feeds Public ‘Pap’ 


ers in the eastern Mediterran- 
ean. The Admiral said des- 
trovers were there all the time, 
that Sixth Fleet operations 
were normal and that there had 
been no additions to or changes 
in the orders of the fleet. 

In his Senate speech, Ful- 
bright declared that “what we 
want and what we will support 
is the truth, however, unpleas- 
ant.” He asked how the Admin- 
istration could ask Senators to 
vote tor “new outlays related 
to our foreign affairs” when the 
public has been told by Dulles 
that “Soviet designs had been 
frustrated airead, 

Fulbright said there was 
truth in Dulles as tions that 
Free World wunitvw and Ameri 
can aid programs had “check 
mated vaviet expansion and 
helped prace countless na 
tions against ¢ snock of sub 
versio! 
suCcCESSCS due in 
measure to mononoliec 
clear weapons and the 
tO export capital 
monopolies have be 
by Russia 

Russia now appears able 
imitate the best features 
American policy’ and is push 
ing ahead “with vigor and de 
termination.” Fulbright said 


nN _ 
But 
were large 
om nu- 
capacity 
and “both 
n broken 


‘Mn 
of 


Hiere he took issue with Dulles’) 


riday that Soviet 
pares peu Aonod 
in Asia and 
“eracks” in 


claims of last 
Pp eB 
Soviet advances 
the Middle Fast, 
Western 
tion into Latin America 
Fulbright described the So 
viet Union as “on the march 


, , 
TST 


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he added. these | 


Europe and penetra-; 


confident, even cocky, wearing) 
a false mask of new respecta-| 
bility, talking 
in soft words that are suited to! 
parliamentary governments.) 
and losing no chance to preempt} 
the causes of peace for its ex-| 
ploitation.” By contrast, he said, | 
there is a widely atcepted “bit-' 
ter caricature” of America due! 
in part to “causes that can be 
laid straight at the door” of 
Dulles. 

Fulbright said the new Soviet 
“strength and boldness” should 
not cause despair but should’ 


bring a “program of action de- 


signed to demonstrate by deeds 
and not words the superiority 
of our system of society.” 

Sen. Leverett Saltonstall (R.- 
Mass.), said Dulles was “perhaps 
too optimistic” but had made 


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no misstatement of fact. Sen. 
Mike Mansfield (D-Mont.), said 
Russia is “ahead of us” in air- 
power and guided missiles. Sen. 
Wayne Morse (D-Ore.), called 
information, 


can people that is going to have 
the dying if Dulles 
stumbles off the orink.” 


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tries constitutes an imminent 
danger and threat to the world 
»| peace.” 


McKeldin Urges~Arms for Israel 


CINCINNATI, Feb. 27 iP aggression and preserve peace. Whar tede Kee to wok Wihwein 
Gov. Theodore McKeldin of' The Maryland Republican ‘the Arabs and Israel alone but! 
Maryland called today forjtold a Jewish Welfare Fund | between the Communists and 
prompt shipment of arms to Is- meeting. “The flow of arms to the free world,” the Governor’ 
raei to “prevent and discourage Egypt and the other Arab coun said. 


| THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


Complex Problems Seen Sena 
For A-Powered Future pep has the VALUES! 


Over 350 Grocery Prices Reduced Since Sept. ist 
of the University of Chicago,, Those who took part in the | ——a ; 


inetuded these: imeeting were Reuben G. Gus- ? 
®* Use of atomic power for |tavson, keynote speaker, and | 
peaceful purposes will develop) panelists Robert A. Charpie of . 
COMPARE! 


rapidly in countries which are|Oak Ridge National Labora-| 


already economically  ad- tory; Andrew J. Biemiller of}: 
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mediate panacea for under de-'strom, international relations | 7 


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energy agency should be estab-|terson of Brookhaven National |? 
lished to supervise distribution | Laboratory. 
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land use of nuclear material for) Humphrey, 
peacetime use. It should have| disarmament was complicate 
| PT rT et crt eee es LENTEN SEAFQOD SUGGESTIONS 
AEC Taken to Task Over Haddock Fillets =<» 99: 
Atomic Mutation Effects | 

y Salmon Steaks FANCY Ib. 69°: 


in its membership all nations/ical problems,” but said they | | 
because | 
jVj~—_] er OS OSe— 


producing or using atomic en- could not be solved “as a 
FROSTED FOOD VALUES! 


ergy, and should be supervised as the armament race goes 
ESSKAY OR GOETZE CHOPPED 


ened 


Liz Hillenbrand 

BSialff Reporter 

Hope for an atom-powered 
in a disarmed ahd 
world was envi- 
at a Confer- 


By 


future 
harmonious 
sioned yesterday 
ence. of Na- 
tional Organ- 
iyvyations on 
Great Issues 
hefore the 
lynited Na 
tions,” 
being 
the Shoreham 
liotel under 
auspices of the 
American Asso 
ciation for the ow 
United Nations Humphrey 
Rut both “Atoms for Peace” 
and luncheon speak- 
Hubert H. Humphrey 
rold E. Stas 
tant to the 
armament, 
‘x problems 
that 


Watch Dog... 


wr balance 
GUARANTEES. 


yout : 


cautioned § that! 


cach re 


el tl ei ed 


by the U. N. General Assembly.; Charging that the  emetien | 

®*On the basis of present|branch of our Government | 
knowledge, 100 per cent control |“clamps the secrecy label on 
of nuclear material is impos-|far too many items,” he said 
sible. We must, therefore, rely| ‘the Special Senate Subcom-| 
on other deterr nts to destruc-|mittee on Disarmament, of 
tive use Two of these are the which I am chairman, hopes to 
terrible potential destructive-| conduct virtually all of its work 
ness” of the material, and the in full public view.” 
provision that a nation break- Stassen pointed out the “tre- 
ing the rules would have its) mendous progress for all peo- 
supply of nuclear material cut ples” inherent in a disarmed, 
off, thus imposing grave conse peaceful world which could 
quences on an atom-powered (share “use of the advances of 
economy. inuclear science.’ 


—_ 


ranclists 
‘re Sen 
Mi ) and Ii: 
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@ 3430 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W | A group of scientists yester-|the present rate of atomic test 
“oer nagar ‘day criticized the Atomic En-|ing represent “only & negli- 
ergy Commission for “mislead- gible” increase in the number | 
ing” language in connection of mutations carried by the 
with the hereditary effects of human race as a result of other 
the fallout from A-bomb and factors. 


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H-bomb tests. 

Five members of the 
bridge, Mass., branch of 
Federation of American 5Sci- 
entists said it is true that, on 
a percentage basis, the number 
of harmful genetie “mutations” 
deemed possible as a result of 


Cam 
the 


In fact, they said, genetic haz- 
ards from medical A-Tays may 
be at least as great and perhaps 
even twice as great as those 
from the present rate of “fall 
out 

But, said the group in a spe- 
cial report, “as individuals we 
iare sensitive to the value of the 


~ jindividual, and from this view- 


ipoint the number (possibly) af- 
\fected ean hardly be called 
inegligible.” 

The report, made public by 
|'Washington headquarters of 
ithe Federation in its periodic 
i“Newsletter,” declared 
| “Although, as the AEC has 
istated, the amount of radiation 
exposure from all nuclear weap- 
(ons tests to date is very small 


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‘received from natural sources 
(not to mention medical X-rays), 
and although the magnitude of | 
the deleterious effects of nu- 
\clear tests must be judged also | 
‘in the light of the presumed 
advantages of continuing weap- 
ons development, we would 
suggest that it is misleading for 
the AEC to call effects of weap- 
‘ons tests ‘negligible on the 
‘grounds that they constitute a 
‘statistically undetectable in- 
/crease in the normally occur- 
‘ring spontaneous rate of muta- 
tions (variations in offspring).” 

The Cambridge group said 
ithe number of offspring affect- 
ed by the present rate of test- 
ing is not known with certainty, 
‘but that a number of geneti- 
‘cists have estimated about 100 
a year for the United States 
and between 500 and 1000 a 
year on a world-wide basis— 
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Paper Reports 
Mao ‘Escape’ 


. . 
In Air Crash 
| Reuters 
| HONGKONG, Feb.. 27—The 
\Chinese - language newspaper 
‘Hongkong Times said here to- 
day that the personal aircraft 
‘of Chinese Communist leader 
Mao Tsetung exploded and 
crashéd near Peiping on Feb. 
13, a few hours before he was 
due to fly in it. 
| The newspaper said sand was 
‘put in the engines in a deliber- 
ate plot to kill Mao. It quoted 
diplomatic missions in Peiping 
for the report. 

The newspaper said the 4en- 
gine plane was on a test flight) 
\when it plunged into a field 
inear Fengtai station, south of 
'Peiping, killing all five crew- 
men. The pilot was Chinese 
and the co-pilot a Russian 

Three possibilities were be- 
ing considered by Chinese Com- 
‘munist security forces, the re- 
‘port said. They were: 
| That Moscow was respon- 
sible and that the Russians 
‘wanted Mao replaced by Liu! 
Shao-chi, “strong man” of the) 
Chinese Communist party and. 
‘its chief theoretician. 
| That the attempt on Mao's) 
life had been made by Chinese 
‘Communists. 

Sabotage by the Chinese Ne | 
tionalists., 


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Se Mee gee em SAMY | “Fire! Cry to dveaien Va W° Pension Plan Meets Opposition 


—_— 


| SANTA MONICA, Calif, _ United Press disability and their dependents. {ing at $66.15 g month at age 
e 7 4 Feb. 27 (» — Hearing the | The Veterans of Foreign Wars; Under present law, an ordi-|65, provided y have income 
* | woman next door shout yrged Congress yesterday to|nary veteran of World War I, of less than $1400 a year of) 
O ] 1¢S core | “The house is on fire!” (grant all low-income veterans|World War II, or the Korean single or $2700 a year with de-| 
: Mrs. Ruby Burkholder (of World War I a $100-a-month war can obtain a pension start-| pendents. | 
| called the fire depart- pension at age 62 ‘clita thins ¥ cittaaatstasias | mama a 
| ment, | |. The Veterans Administration | | 
| Fire trucks arrived, and (ang the Budget Bureau ob-| 
th eC er TO e a captain pounded on the jected that the plan would cost SWEETEN A | 
| neighbor's door. | $1.9 billion in its first year and) - eas 
| . “Pire? There's no fire (4 total of $28.8 billion by the! | yet 8 
United Press ey the = gag house- |year 2000. The Administration = 1314 # STREET 
Rep. Kenneth B. Keating,things as commercial aviation, ” hk car meedbecn?" re ee oe Lama several | 
(R-N.¥.) charged yee eds me television, surtace transports! added sheepisily. “I was VFW Commander Timothy J | STOMA H T hi 
House Democrats = gp tion and power industries. | trying to get my husband Murphy told the House Tonen | op Grain Cowhide 
att oo ion Keating, the Subcommittee’s} out of bed and I finally (4. Committee, however, that LEATHER SCUFFS 
4 : fa the Ad- ranking GOP member, said he yelled at him, The Bouse the VFW plan would add “sub- | | 
ovate tion in i did not oppose the inquiry; *% ©” fire, but I had no stantially less” than $1. billion 
Ri ‘Business he. hecause it might serve a worth-, idea the neighbors could (14 present veterans’ pension . 
foxn.”” , : while purpose in yi eeg > Meng hear me. ‘ and ee a ae ae mye Best little KIT ever | r 

eati ' om, true facts about the big-busi- now Tun cue — oo : : | For her, sizes 4 to 9, red, navy or suntan. 
_ Beating com RECON |ness bogey.” hy sug Deo SEE ENR devised against MILK OF MAGNESIA ‘For her, | : 
Rep. Emanuel ea But he said he objected to? _ | But Murphy appealed to the i" For him, sizes 6 to 12, in suntan, navy or wine. 
Celler (D-N.YE the “veil of secrecy” imposed) White House and the Admin-|Committee not to base its de- RAIN? Ts F 
ordered the P by Celler in planning the in-/ istration.” | cision on economy or budgetary | . , NO PHONE ORDERS OR COD. 5. PLEASE 
inquiry by a a vestigation. He suggested that; Celler replied that he had | grounds. He testified as hear Don’t forget on vacation time 
Judiciary ‘Sub Celler was trying “to throw | outlined the scope of thelings opened on the VFW bill! and outings—there’s a pack of ues | 
committee : enough dust in the air to create|inquiry in general terms to the/ and some 75 other proposals for) fun in a pack of cards. Take Call RE. 7-1234, ask for Circulation, and order The Wash- 
thems € 6 i> Barnes an impression that a big busi-|full Judiciary Committee last/liberalizing pensions to veler-| some new cards with you. ..and ’ ington Post and Times Herald guaranteed home delivery. 
sulting its Republican mem- ness fog has enveloped the! fall. Jans without service-connected | ¢nioy yourself, rain or shine! 
bers. EAS 


_ a a a ee — 


_—_—_ _— ——— _— - ee ~ —_—_ ee ee i — ee vee 


He called it a “purely politi- 
cal” move, and said Celler's 
“eavalier’ methods could endan- 
ger “public confidence in the 
congressional investigating 
process.” 

Celler opened the hearings 
by questioning Stanley N 
Barnes, the Justice Depart- 
ment’s antitrust chief, about 
a transaction between Westing- 
house Corp. and the National 
Broadcasting Co. involving 
radio and television stations in 
Cleveland and Philadelphia. 

He asked whether the Federal 
Communications C 0m mission 
was “thuntbing its nose” at 
the Justice Department by 
approving the deal after Barnes 
warned that a “serious” anti- 
trust question was involved. 

Keating interrupted to say 
that the whole point of the 
hearing was “to show that one 
agency thumbed its nose at 
another.” He said Celler wanted 
to play politics by getting one 
agency to criticize another. 

But Barnes said he has “not 
criticised the decision of the 
Commission.” 

Celler said the purpose of the 
inquiry is to determine wheth- 
er Government regulatory 
agencies, such as the FCC, have 
become “unduly responsive to 
the dictates of the industries 
which they regulate.” 

He said it would cover such 


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;co-Thymoline Sen. Hubert H. 


7 said yesterday the Administra- 
Fi ( HT ‘tion's lobbying activities on the 


Senate farm bill make the nat- 
with 


ural gas interesis look like 
‘“pikers and second-rate lobby- 
« 
Grapefruit 
. 
Juice 


lists.” 

The Minnesota Democrat, be- 
ginning a massive 350-page 
speech, said the Administration 
has resorted to “huckstering 
tactics .. ., the likes of which 
the American people have never 
seen,” in its effort to defeat 90 
per cent price supports. 

Asserting that his speech will 
‘explode what he eéalled misin- 
formation and myths being 
| peddled by advocates of flexible 
price props, Humphrey said 

‘At the very first sign of @ 
cold be sure you drink p/enty 
of grapefruit juice! Florida 
Grapefruit Juice helps build 
resistance with its alkaliz- 
ing action and rich supply 
of vitamin C. Get a big 46- 
os. can of Florida Grapefruit agreement on when the voting 
Juice—costa only 3¢ a giass! ‘will begin, however. 
Se handy—full strength, | Democratic Leader Lyndon 
ready to pour! B. Johnson (Tex.) said he prob- 
ably will seek Senate agree- 
SS ee ment today or Wednesday to 
ieut off general debate—now in 


c 


“the American farm family is 
not being given economic jus- 
itice” under the GOP, 

Humphrey's charge came as 
the Senate agreed to lead off its 
voting on the farm bill with a 
‘showdown on the crucial issue 
of fixed versus tiexible price 
supports. There still was no 


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| introduced an amendment call- 


ty Humphrey Hits 
GOP ‘Lobbying’ 


By Dayton Moore 


United Press 
Humphrey its second week—at the end of! 


this week. 

Voting then would start Fri- 
day with talking limited to two 
hours on each amendment and 
four hours on the bill itself. The 
first test would come on the 
Democratic proposal to restore) 
flat 90 per cent supports on 
basic crops 

Humphrey's allusion to the 
natural gas interests was a ref- 
erence to the recent Senate de- 
bate on the now-vetoed natural’ 
gas bill. Both friends and foes 
of the measure contended they 
were subjected to unprecedent- 
ed “pressure” in connection 
with the measure 

He said his speech is aimed 
at destroying such “myths” as 

the idea that... most fayme ers 
are driving around in C adillacs 
and smoking 50-cent cigars” and 
that the farm “mess” was in 
herited from the Democrats 

Earlier, Sen. Richard L. Neu- 
berger (D-Ore.) called for 90 
per cent of parity supports on 
all farm crops. He also said a 
two-price plan for wheat should 
be given a trial. 

“Why should the Government 
support the prices of wheat, 
corn, cotton, tobacco and pea- 
nuts—and thereby the income 
of those who raise these crops— 
and do nothing to protect the 
incomes of farmers who raise 
cabbages, apples or turkeys?" | 


|Neuberger asked. 


He said support of the s0- 
called basic crops, “important 
ss they are... reach only a’ 
minority of farm families.” He | 
‘charged that the much-vaunted | 
stabilized cost of living under 
the Republicans has been taken 


out of the hide of the Ameri-' * 


can farmer.” 

Sen. Price Daniel (D-Tex.)| 
ing for 90 per cent supports on 
‘feed grains. He said farmers 
lwho raise these crops “are 
\going broke.” 

The amendment was cospon- 
sored by 
Hubert H. Humphrey (D-Minn.), 
Milton H. Young (R-N.D.) and 
— Chavez (D-N.M.). 


Mother, 2 Daughters 


‘| Government 
before the United States Court’ 


Johnson and Sens.) 


Die in Fire: Son Lives 


oil ’ 
| EAST MEADOW, N. Y., Feb. 
\27 w—A mother and two daugh-| 
ters died today in a fire that) 
— their Long Island home. | 
l5-yearold son escaped by 
i from an attic window) 
after trying to save his younger, 
sister. 

Police identified the dead as 
Mrs. Madeline Kaye, 40, and her 
daughters, Gail, 13, and Mere-| 
‘deth, 6 Gail's body was found | 
‘on the living 
i\brick home. Mrs. Kaye and 
Meredeth died after they were! 
taken to a hospital. Joel Kaye 
was the sole survivor. 


’ 


room floor of the), 


Court Use 


10 pinion Near 
jOn Phone 
Recordings _ 


The way was cleared yester 


| day for the Govérnment to ge 


a final decision on whether the 
recording of a telephone con 
ver satior 
would be ad 
missable a 
evidence in th: 
perjury cas 
of Warren |! 
S tephenson 
former Wash 
ington Repub 

' lican leader. 
Federal Dis 
trict Judge Do 
vid <A. Pine 
Stephenson granted m Oo 
tidhs of both defense and prose 
cution attorneys. He ruled for 
a second time that a recording 
could not be used. He also dis- 
missed the case 
The dismissal 
to get 


permits the 


of Appeals, which earlier 
turned down a hearing on the 
basis that Judge Pine’s pretrial 
ruling to suppress the record. 


the case!) 


RIVERDALE ROAD 


at Edmonston Road 
PRINCE GEORGES COUNTY, MARYLAND 


OXON RUM SHOPPING 


CENTER 
Oxon Run Parkway at 23rd Parkway 
PRINCE GEORGES COUNTY, MARYLAND 


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110 S. WAYNE ST. 


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ing was not a final decision.| 
Subsequently, the Government) 


reindicted Stephenson in low-| 


er court. 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
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MARY LAND 


td * «“ 


id tie tanwyn me *_| omens (Colorado Judges Are Given Authority  |"3200.""s,.. | —"™ 
ce a , —~ ean bonne so 


‘' . “ ere 
ee atce” ae | suffering from broken bones to-| AUGUSTANA 
.¢, || A | To Rule on Courtroom Ph dTV Sees) 
| jak Son. RG Pe su n a sheet of ice glaz 
ee ds oe E, ~ DENVER, Feb, 27 s - The tices, attached two provisos to| clusively that the assumption| sidewalks and streets in awit Pastor Clarence L. Neléon 
: tee tere - o Supreme Co ay 'the n permiss dropping temperatures Sunday. 
gave the judges of its subordi-| subordinate state courts. ~ woe caheti sda a : ~~ ~~ os SERVICE OF THE 


se z 4 Na 3 nate State courts the authority) The opinion expressly stip- , . 
Charged to U ™ ae a a: [to enagreng + whether photo-|ulated that no photographs or|"e4lity.” the LIGHTED CROSS 
e S| = SCigtaphs or broadcasts shall be| broadcasts be allowed over the} Moore said that 100 photo- 
La... aa graphs were taken “without the Wednesday at 8 p.m. 


made of judicial proceedings,| objection of a witness or juror, 
The Court thus in effect'or without the ‘permission of|least disturbance or interfer- 


By Paul Southwick a ee ~.. jabandoned the American Bar| the trial judge. ence with the proceedings.” He | 
United Press ie og gum, «6|Association’s canon of judicial) It also held that picture-tak-|S4id radio microphones “were 
House investigators dis-\lenged the chargeoff of con-| : =) jethics, which it previously had\ing and broadcasts should be|20t discovered by me until my | 


losed yesterday that a com-| tributions as far as he knows. | By ws ; |adopted. The ABA’s Canon 35| made only under regulations as|@ttention was specifically di- 
vee shia wees fighter|...¢ contributions included — - = \forbids the taking of photo! prescribed by the juden. rected to their locations.” 
|$118,500 to educational institu- we graphs or the making of radio| Moore's opinion also added| A% to the television demon- show ; 
planes charged the Government tions, $386,615 to hospitals and or television broadcasts of|the admonition that court pro-|Stration, the justice said, “All Featuring: 
FROM LONDON CHOIR 


for $688,403 it paid out in dues' medical research, $155,763 in| - : ‘trials on the ground that such | ceedings should be “conducted |¢quipment used, whether large 
and contributions. dues to various trade organiza-| ’ activities upset the dignity and with fitting dignity and deco-|°T small, is capable of_installa- on film 

; MRS. . NELSON, 
Of the canon of judicial|only the lens appearing on the Peace Poetry 


The contributions were made tions and $27,525 to such groups — ‘decorum of a courtroom. \rum.” tion outside the courtroom with 
able and trade organizations by Scouts. Green Surrenders | Approved Unanimously lethies, the opinion eheervea|exterier wall, Gheough on ether. 9 


te various educational, charit-ias the Red Cross and Boy 
the G Aircraft Engineer| The company made additional | The decision was written by|\that the Colorado Supreme|Wise concealed door or win- The Lighted Cross Quartet 
. Wong Island, N. Y., from contributions, not included in) Gilbert Green, m3 former ‘Associate Justice O. Otto| Court has not intended, i rod dow, or from a booth in the ® Gospel Singer Carroll Hoffman 

1950 to 1955. ‘the total, in the last half of| head of the Communist Party (ytoore, who has presided at aladoption of them earlier, to|Tear of the courtroom.” Pastor Nelson will speak on: 
Testimony before a House) 1955. They included $20,000 for| in Illinois, who had been & week of hearings, called by the! give them “the force and effect| He also pointed out to his to 

Armed Services Subcommittee! Polytechnic Institute of Brook-| fugitive for almost 5 years, (Court, at which groups repre-|of law.” fellow justices that only the e AN HOUR TO CHOOSE” 

showed the outlays were lyn, $16,000 for Cornell, $15,000) i, pictured yesterday just be- \senting the press, radio and tte 3 normal lighting in the court- This ts « dynamically different serv- 

charged as costs against mili-|to New York yt yond mag fore his surrender in New |television industries present | Repe ustices room was necessary for photog- tee. 

tary plane orders. for Princeton, $6500 for Massa-| » 4 City, Green was con- |afguments and demonstrations}; In Moore's report to the|Taphy. © 


Chairman F. Edward Hebert chusetts Institute of Technology | ree . oe 
@-La.) said the Grumman pay-|and $1000 for Dartmouth. | vieted on Smith Act charges (#5 to why the Court should other justices, he said: ‘The dignity or decorum of tonight Call RE. 7-1234,-ask for Circu- 


ments were the first of their) Swirbul and L. R. Grumman,| in 1949. The party faithful a as eupeevenee & Ty “For six days I listened ants tee hans ey hag lation, and order The Wash. 
kind the committee had encoun-| chairman of the board, attended! were on hand to cheer as he M 's decisi imously evidence and witnessed demon-' recommendati fn ington Post and Times Herald 
tered in its investigation of Cornell. But Swirbul said he! gave himself up. & = oath > hi a idles jus-|strations which proved con-|th —y aytt ath ad guaranteed home delivery 
military plane profits. He said didn’t have the money to grad-|—— —_—____- [approves ty Ms Sve ss ” yheareien ; 
they “struck me as rather pe- uate. He said he started in the! . 
culiar.” aa aca peer business as a “greas€ complained that the Govern- 
Grumman president, Leon A.| monkey.” wT , 
Swirbul, said the grants to| The investigators brought|touipment end game Inquest Planned 
educational institutions were out that Grumman, which had profits” to P naka. He told D h 
aimed at getting good engineers) $235.3 million in sales in 1954,/Swirbul “it is time for you to In Party eat 
for the company, He said “we're| uses $24.2 million worth of Gov-| operate on your own steam in-| An inquest will be held at 
shooting for results in air-ermment property on & rental) stead of conserving your work-| 11:30 a. m. today into the death 
planes. basis and $27.2 million rent-free.|ing capital for yourselves.” of Elsie Montgomery, 37, listed 
D. W. Field, Grumman con-|It does 98.8 per cent of its busi-| “We're putting our money at 1108 I st. se.. who died Sun- 
troller, told Hebert that the|ness with the Government. |more and more into it,” Swirbul|day, police said, of a head in- 
Government never has chal- Rep. Leon H. Gavin (R-P2.), | replied. “I don’t like to see the jury after an argument about 
word ‘guaranteed’ used.” whether or not to leave a 
Hebert noted that Grumman, friend's party. 
unlike some other plant manu-| Mrs. Montgomery was pro- 
facturers, did not pay out large'nounced dead at the friend's 
bonuses to company officers/house, 304 G st. se. Otis 
aoe charge them to the Gov-| Mitchell, 38, listed at the I st. 
ew es. ag ong yg aed pee was charged with 
case where the officers “don't homicide. 
Reach Europe split part of the melon.” | Police said witnesses told 
2 Swirbul said bonuses are paid'them Mrs. Montgomery fell 


7am |te all employes except com-| when Mitchell slapped her after 
relaxed and refreshed i |veny officers dhe testoted Gaur Gave. 


by France-Afloat 


_—---- 


Hearing Set in Assault 


a. “age 
in fee On Alexandria Girl, 14. 
fsa: ei Hi | sa. 8 A 22-year-old unemployed|tive in the Strawberry Hill sec- 
amy a 


>  % electrician will get a prelimi- tion of Alexandria. 
Ge & nary hearing in Alexandria Fri-| The girl was attacked in « 
a ht Soa day on charges he raped a 14/locked bedroom of the house 
year-old runaway and cocntrib- later that night, officers said. 


lice. The teen-age youngsters in |the pair 
heey . France, . } A 1 2. Ma 4. | 
May a =~ a ee an countered Pierce at a Lorton|police stated, McConchie had 
store after they had attendediasked to accompany his own 


SAILING SOON from New York uted to the delinquency of her! The youngsters were arrested 
| 14-year-old male companion last/by Fairfax police after Pierce 
Tuesday. had left them in a restaurant 
Bernard Pierce of Lorton,/on U.S. 1, it was charged. The 
Va., was jailed in lieu of $10,000| Tuesday night incident was dis- 

. . 
" |the ease had been re In a preliminary hearing be- 
ILE DE FRANCE LIBERT missing by their parents Feb. 19 fore Juvenile Judge Irene Pan- 
after a Saturday evening party. coast, Elmo F. M , 32, 
According to Det. Sgt. Fran-|was charged with the statutory 
734 Fiftecet> . W.. Weshlegtes, 8. an Alexandria movie last Tues 10-year-old daughter to the 
French bate a 39-4266 ¥ day afternoon. movies. In the hearing yester- 
Police said Pierce provided day McConchie was continued 
CONSULT YOUR AUTHORIZED FRENCH LINE TRAVEL AGENT them with separate bedrooms in| on his original $5000 bond for 
sae Saas aa ea eases eee ee es 8 Vacant house owned bys rela-'the Grand Jury hearing. 


bail Sunday by Alexandria po-|closed when officers 
Sailings Liberte, . 21, April 6, 
se eg be og mgt eg « vagy yy oy 5 cis H. Johnson, the pair had en-|rape of a 14-year-old girl whom, 


LCT) 


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| ) { ) [ | ) ( ) ) | = Wi Las: 7 T ~ ae The time between your boy’s grade school days and 
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AN for any parent. A time for careful planning . .. a time to 


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America’s most widely used form of thrift. 


Probably your present life insurance policies can be 
arranged to provide an educational fund for your 
children. The best person to advise you on this, of 
course, is your own life insurance agent. 

You'll also find many helpful suggestions in the new 
booklet, Your Life Insurance—and How te Use It. Ut tells 

; - “ you different ways to use life insurance for educational 

| " . . for famil for your own retirement. 

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epovese- ; ' 


}\, 


7 
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: ~ 


At Cathotie Estate] Congress Gets White House Fund Bill |" “ah arn as 


innit 


fr 


‘ o ; 
$1500 Ruin The House Appropriations |775 to keep up the White House |}000 it had requested. The 


\ ‘ 
t d A . 
| ‘Committee yesterday approved |and its grounds. ! Bureau still was allow in-| | 
A ‘b ] bee smallest an a M ye Png ona was allowed crease of $201,000 ae one | 
| year—a mere © mition t0'$1.9 million for special projects year’s fi in-| 
r e or ttri lu tec run the “ ‘hite House and close-|such as Harold yee ng ~ a" etieiadls sen Sbiey 
ly related agencies for the year;armament Work and $1,875,000 The House is scheduled to act SIMPLE 
‘ * 


starting July 1. for the regular White House of. 
To Vandals | The Committee voted the cus-'fice staff. wth vache iss mdecconend | 
Sta Reporter = —! |tomary $150,000 paycheck for. The Bureau ete teil eee 


; A aommittee of experts has| diseases.” Senior appointments! Alexandria police are search- the President and allowed $383,-, was cut $9000 below the $3,559.- eT 


‘recommended creation of anew|@t NIH, the committee said, ing for vandals who have done he Ba eg Sa When stomach acid B 


see eee 48 


By Nate Haseltine 


should become “the most More than $1500 damage to the 


“Federal agency to administer | | 
: . ) - ld Woodle “e| | Ms : ‘ | . 
tthe outside programs now guid sought after in the country. oa af Ricnesiieata Gaia Axle Con firmed As Wreck Cause Brings sleepless hig 
ed by the National Institutes of | RE ae P som” = not 'y ag high school BALTIMORE, Feb. 27 .urday. Six died bi tees eon Take 2 Tums 

alt} ipres e. ‘ Pig Re ’ : . f ; . 
a alth ih e report sai rhe Rev. Joseph Schwartz,| The Pennsylvania Railroad con-|@nd about 100 were hurt. To . things ri } 


e proposed agency, an Of-| The committee recommended anist : ; ’ , 
tedical Research and. cevamping of sal | ions | 25S!stant pastor of St. Mary's! eluded its official inaui Railroad officials met today 
Medical Research and ae eatery lenttations Catholic Church in Alexandria, weg. habe sd ‘ \ 


for research scientists at th ~ : with representatives of the In ' 
p ° the | said yesterday that vandals ~r4 od ee appa terstate Commerce Commission 10¢ 
a ys had caused approximately “¢. %elween aitimore and and the Maryland ic Serv. ee : ; 
Education and Welfare A Public Serv. say ° Teena That's Oriental’s. Direct Reduction Loan! It doesn’t take 


3 ia -|$1565 daimage in the past Washington, D. C., and con- ice Commission. oan 
> It would administer the so-|available in the leading uni- - ; cl , , 
Sealled extramural activities of | versities and medical schools.” |(™Omth to the estate at 2839 firmed that a broken axle was ——_———- - 2 wast ow pcan Sone v= cag oe 
“he Bethesda~ institutes, the| “Full usefulness of the Clin-| Puke st. the cause. economical and sound. Since 1861 we have success 
fully helped thousands of families to own debt-free 


‘medical research arm of Public| ical Center (NIH’s research hos-| He said ail the radiators in| The railroad had announced | 
Health Service. These activities,|Pital) cannot be realized until|the vacant main house, a ram-|its findings informally last Sat- homes, and they will support our statement that when 
sacacit  aranteinaid  towards|@ large number of able clinical|bling white frame building of | you borrow from Oriental you get more than a loan. 

Payments are arranged to include interest and part of 


' . . easiemineith mmapmetuinine —— 
‘medical research and training|Scientists can be attracted to|approximately 20 rooms, had Advertisement 
the principal so that you are constantly reducing your 


in non-Governmental institu-|the senior positions,” thé com- pro anager — lm 
tions, now total about $40 mil-;™ittee report noted. | Yandais aiso took three sinks, lf EVERYTHING : , . 
Sion a year about one-third of| “While the mere payment of|smashed all windows in the | Only part time, but owner can expand to full time. Will overall amount. 


NIH's total appropriations. large salaries is not always a house,-tore down a brick outer | inst : : : 

i.e | he pie aren Ri = factor in the accept-|shed and damaged a barn and FAT TURNS 10 GAS | instruct in operation. Should net $500 a month. Will | 

Folsom. who released the spe-|4mce or rejection of an appoint-|a well. The house is about 65 ** | assist in expansion. . i — ENTAL UILD A 

cial committee's full report,|™emt, nonetheless, there is a|years old, Father Schwartz said. le oat have to suffer from sae pains ° $2300.00 will handle. Addres | RI ING SSOCIATION 

aaid only that the committee's | realistic salary level for lack! The ll-acre site was bought) every wall theene lems found tebe! 

‘ammen , OF whi not eve stitwo year: Io through the effectis 4 , - = 

recommendations “will be stud-/Of which not even the mostitwo years ago for $86,000. No! (rpm civars aemede ‘ae ocies Box 755 Post-Times Herald Oe a ee 

ied intensively within the De.|/ Superb facilities and freedom date has been set for construc-' taken regularly. No more gas, heart 

partment and the Public Health fOr research can compensate.” tion of the school. boating! Get De. Pree's Cobden Medical 600 F St. N.W. ESTABLISHED 1861 NA. 8-7300 

Service | ——$_______— qumnicdiant - —— 
Proponents of the proposed | 

new agency said it would re-| 

lieve the Institutes. of burden-| 


some details and allow institute 
scientists to concentrate full- 
time on their own investiga- 
tions at the institutes and their 
500-bed Clinical Research Cen-| 
ter. 
The proposed split-up of jur-| 
isdiction was the chief — and 
perhaps least acceptable—of a'| 
series of recommended changes | S 
proposed by the special com: | 
mittee. The committee was ap-| 
pointed. at the Department's) : 
request, by the board of the Na- 
tional Science Foundation last 
July. ) | 
Many of the committee's 
other recommendations have 
been Incorporated in proposed 
programs now under congres-| 
sional consideration. These in-| , 
cluded expansions of the Food | 
and Drug Administration, and; 
moves to place more emphasis) 
on Federally-financed basic re- ; 
search, particularly by ents) 
° 


a 


to non-;overnment institutions. 

Heading the e igh t-member'! 
special committee, appointed at! 
the request of former Secretary | 
Oveta Culp Hobby, was Dr 
N. H. Long, Yale University 
physiologist 


Concerning NIH's intramural 
programs, which the committee . 
would leave under NIH control, : 
the committee recommended 
there be no major expansion of T Cc 
medical research. or nBo new A Cc 
institutes for specializéd medi 
cal research there D 

“The committee believes,” 
the report noted that the In- 
stitutes are at present sufficient 

mn number and size, and have = 
’ . 

- . 


wn more rapidly than sound 
evelopment warrants.” 

The report stressed the com- 

concern over the In- 

ability “to retain and a Ford 


nhunderbird 
be uction sports ,- 


“ wal fec a edie con le f 
make effective « ‘ 
- yred ™ 

re is conducted " seconds—Reachin 


to categorical dis- M.P.H. 


estoeall 
in the Nauo 
r.gs took 1s and pace. Ford not only 
. : top 
eC d, but i a's? cational 


red, but_ 
for the Grand * 


Describes Need 


United Press 


ee | start m onl 
an on pee 
ee «i t. cancer, arthritis, FIRST | 
Rh arch programs, the re- “ ed—Class 4 | 
. i. sho be organized In Top Spe mile 
pune tted individuais, ’ top honors in the sete cars. 
thar round specific 4 H@ix” took ‘on passen 
4 Ford =i roductio 
American P 
— for class 4 ! 
FIRST | 
Red Cross Head p.mile Convertible Race 
mile 
In 160-m 


Red Cross Chairman E. Ro- recor 
land Harriman said yesterday t me race. 
that the organization's 1956 Championsh!p 
fund-raising drive, which gets FIRST 
under way Thursday, is “the r nce 
most important Red Cross fund all Performa 
appeal since World War It.” in Over 

He said the United States al 
ready is in the midst of “the Ford won 
worst disaster year in Red gaining the & ay 
Cross history.” It spent $27.5 rformance of ae + 
million to help disaster victims k car re 
in the first six months of the 
present fiscal year and knows 
that the greatest threat of dis. 

“lies ahead.” 
rriman said Red Cross 

lapters increased their 1956 

ind goals by $18 million, or 10 
per cent, after relief for west- 
ern state flood victims caused 
tne organizations disaster re- 
serve to dip below the $1 mil- 


; 


lion mark. 


, by 

scturer’s award © 
Manuloints for the best 
oo car in this great 


Dr. Mollegen to Speak | 

The Rev. Dr. Albert T. Mol-' 
legen of the Virginia Theologi- 
cal Seminary, Alexandria, will 
speak on “Our Faith in Christ 
the Revelation” (1) at 8 p. m. 
Thursday in All Saints’: Epis-| 
copal Church, Chevy Chase cir. 


_ ee eee — nn en ee ne a a ee eS 


WHEN YOU ORDER A 


VODKA HIGHBALL 


AO 18 SP iton ¢ ~~ 
AS A SPD My Me aimee ee Ponti at OS 
® . _ * 


The Ford V-8 again showed its taillight to all competitors engines. For example, Ford’s new 225-h.p. Thunderbird 


in the “Olympics” of stock car racing at Daytona Beach, Special V-8 engine develops more torque than any other c 
Florida. Es Eo engine in the low-price field. This means quicker response, ’ 
In blazing across the finish line Ford demonstrated once smoother running in the kind of driving you do. Just a 


more the sizzling performance that keeps it the largest- gentle nudge of Ford’s accelerator and whoosh! You pass in 
selling V-8 in the world. No other car in the field could instants when instants count! 


match Ford for getaway “git” .. . for straightaway Ford now offers this mighty 225-h.p.:engine with any ’ ° 
acceleration . . . for all-around roadability. To see exactly Ford Fairlane or Station Wagon model with Fordomatic. World S larg est-selling 


how the other cars trailed behind Ford, see the chart at What’s more, these engines are coming off the assembly 
| the top of this page. ' lines right now! So why wait? Come in today for a Test. Test Drive the V-8 
One of the secrets of Ford’s performance is the tremen- Drive. Find out for yourself about Ford performance. Find = ae 
Champion: 


pose pam satiate dous torque (wheel turning power) developed by Ford out why Ford is the V-8 with the biggest following! — . 


SMIRNOFE 8 YOUR LOCAL FORD DEALER 
| "AMENNVODKA , ; 


tes beta | . GREAT TV, FORD THEATRE, WRC-TV, 9:30 P.M., THURSDAY—— 


_ 80 Proot. Made from grain. Ste. Pierre Smimnet? 
Fis (Division ofHeubiein) Hartfors,Conn..U.$.A. 


/ 
: . 


THE WASHINGTON POsT and TIMES HERALD 
16 * Tuesday, February 28, 1956 . 


——— 


‘Benvenuto al Presidente’ ~~~ 


aa 


5 ri} ret 
ie Ae 
: % Meyer 
ra 


> *, . . . , : , : f : : : 
ae ey BR ORR FP Rage ' ere 


or eT | » \ 
eo » ~ | 
- : % * 


Associated Pres 
An official District of Co- 
lumbia car leads the way 
up Pennsylvania ave. for 
the motorcade taking 


Internationa! News 


Oy caer a ie) Mics This English elm tree on the Capitol grounds, said to be nearly 100 id, | 
‘ued | is Engli: ' ear » is be- 
chi of Italy to the White | glish elm tree on the Capitol grounds, said to be nearly years old, is be 


House yesterday after- 
noon. The motoreade stop- 
ped at the District Bui d- 
ing for the presentation of 
the keys to the city to 
President Gronchi. 


ing cut down because it was attacked by Dutch elm disease. 


International News 
A member of the military 
guard of honor at National 
Airport yesterday for the 
arrival of President Gron- 
chi kneels to aid another | " NS ee Se e2atid a 


soldier who fainted during International News 
A German shepherd dog has taken over the job of being foster mother to three lion 


the welcome ceremony. 
cubs in the zoo at Duisburg, Germany, and is making good at it. 


. United Prees ; By Bob Burchette, Staff Photographer 
John Salling, Virginia’s only Confederate veteran and one of three left in the South, This photo gives a clue to the reason why the fire department hall at Silver Hill, Md., was needed to stage the 60th wedding anniversary 
Is recuperating from a cold at his home at Slant, Scott County, and looking forward party of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Ransom of Bedford, Va. The couple is surrounded by some of the 51 grandchildren and 44 great-grandchildren 
te celebrating his 110th birthday on May 15. ; Who, with 13 of the Ransoms’ 14 children, attended. A 20-pound cake was consumed at the party. Ransom is 81 and his wife 73. | 


" 
/ 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
a iy | Tuesday, February 28, 1956 17 


Lankford Hits Baptist Leader Rejects Negro Work Stoppage sailemnmnneieenies sensonnneg 


* 
: 
MIAMI, Feb. 27 (#—A minis-, minister, a native of Mississippi,|ties to penalize them with a; Jackson said a local boycott, Se 


the Paper Man 


Nation-wide stoppage.” | such as the one in Montgomery, 


« ° ter who said he is the religious, "Dut me ee — By bey nd Fat Pride Penal ent a R A 3 9 8 8 
. ew now su *| ‘ “ ” : 
a Vr 1e leader of one-third of the Na- wide eronomic Eavcott.” ‘group of New York Negro min. “45 all right” but he said it . bed 0 
\ tion's Negroes today rejected| “any work stoppage would isters called for the Nation's would be an “economic boycott” 5609-11 Georg: A 
Rep. Adam Clayton Powell’s'he exactly that,” he added. “I Negroes to stop work for one if other groups around the ‘ COrgia Ave. N. W, 
proposal that all Negroes stop gon’'t believe religion should be hour the Wednesday before United States went on “strike” # , ee ee 
* HEADQUARTERS 


work for an hour of prayer on\yced as an economic boycott. Easter. in support of the incidents in|¥ 
Powell, a minister and a mem- Alabama. 


Staff Reporter 
, i March 28 for the Negroes ar- Calling a halt.to work is not 
A bitter aoemnererty is luis of euutetiaad reaameiie in a boycott of buses in in the Christian traditions.” _ ber of the National Baptist Con-| Jackson, who now lives in * Frozen Food Packa in Su lies 
mering between Rep. Richard). and the cokt of conatruc| ontzomery, Ala [In Minneapolis, Cecil New- vention headed by Jackson, said/Chicago, said he hopes “our|s an alissense ow PP 
FE. Lankford (D-Md.) and Navy linn "Se ctreneed thn beet We are in favor of prayer,’ man. editor of the Minneapolis the work stoppage would be a Southern friends who are will- 
Academy officials over the pro- bility from the Naval Academy! hs! coqnenr wetgth 20 one _— Spokesman and a Negro leader prayer campaign “for delivery ing to ask for‘God’s guidance” JANITOR SUPPLIES 
posed $16.9 million airfield|and the good operational fea. ane ae come: Ea Pan of that city and St. Paul, said from persecution and for tne de- will join in the desegregation- 
' | _ 1 ‘ CKSON, Ke di “qui re” livery of persons afflicted with anniversar ra d ! , ‘. 
scheduled to be situated near /tures. president of the 5-million-mem- ll | red ney we racial prejudice.” ; 17, ee oe _ A ‘ate > manvery 
sal. ops aps 
* Brooms © Waxes 
© Brushes © Dusters 
- 
° 


SS 


By Irving Lee 


ete ee ee 
2.8 2 2 6 4 


al 


ee - 


ia oe 8 ee ee 
* 


There is no airfield at the ber National Baptist Conven- ‘He said that in 94 of 40! 
Towels ® Detergents 


Davidsonville. ie he 
The selected site is about gO renee gael et e bites ah Sen states “there is no open oppres- r -A a 
, ' JACKS sal e aiso has N | eA 
sion of the Negro. It would no p ay WwW y 
zn t ) 
Sweeping Compounds— , 
GE Bulbs 


miles southwest of Annapolis which use the Severn River called on his con dies 
: : | gregations and ; re 
and would occupy an area of| The specific boundaries «a}; real Americans..white or Ske deat Gee ate — “ae H d C id RA: 
Negro’ —to observe the second actions of the Alabama authori. ; pn Med ‘ ea 0 sery 
§ 4 GALVANIZED MOPPING EQUIPMENT 
) Me DEODORIZING SPRAYS & BLOCKS 


approximately 5500 acres. Resi- Sought by the Navy are Route 
ANYTIME, ANYWHERE 


50-A, known as the Washing-/anniversary of the Supreme 
Mistol Mist contains Nee-Synephrine*. Opens stuffy 
-~PAPER PRODUCTS — 


ts of the proposed area have |, a Ada . | 
dents prop ton-Annapolis Expressway, on Court desegregation decision, Petate and Storage Sale of 
nose, checks sniffies, sneezes fast. Get a handy 
Whatever your requirements for 


voiced protests and have taken the north; Route 424, the David- March 17, as a “day of mourn. NEW & USED 
Rear Admiral Walter F. 214, on the south and the Patux-| Jackson, here on vacation. Qccuns antl Gna Pie spray bottle for each of the family. Carry in 
PACKING, MAINTENANCE, RESALE or other needs 


hi, Mh he i i i 
a ee a ee 


steps to organize opposition.. |sonville rd., on the cast; Route ing fasting and prayer.” 
: FURNITURE 
Boone, superintendent of theient River headwaters on the said he had spoken by tele. For Every Reem In the Home Pik 3 see pocket or purse for on-the-spot relief. 98, $1.98 
engineering reports on three field would not occupy the is not necessary to stop work to oes BGT. .W a 7 “Registered Wademert of Wiethrop Steers, Ine. 
WE HAVE IT IN STOCK FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 


Academy, selected the site after | west. phone with Powell, a New York By AUCTION Ra aaa at all drug countets. (If you prefer dropper-type 
prospective areas. The Navy whole site but would be situ- offer prayers TODAY & FRIDAY % i 
will recommend the site if the ated somewhere in the bound. “I told him I agreed with Commencin AM | & PLOUGH PRODUCT A Get Mistol MIST Boxes and hogs of every description—corrugated wropping paper—gift wrep 
’ . 
, sere 


FEPPEPEEEEREREREREESESEE ERE R ERR RR 


long consideration of detailed’ Boone emphasized the air- Democrat. and had told him it at WESCHLER’S | ae relief dernand Aqueous Mistol, 79¢.) 
Ceontinaine UT i Mid. After 
ain n ‘ . neon 
pking one tablecovers—plotes end cups. Tissues, Twines end co 


> 


necessary funds for its acqul-| apies. the prayer aspect,” said the —_ | 
sition are approved by Con- ” NEPUCTION ENVITES MEW — Mistel Cough Syrup contanning Vitamin C quickly mothes throat, checks coughs due to colde res 
ay re yey A a tO ORR Re rt 32 ——— REE REE EREEEEEEEEREREEREEREARE EES 


gress. 
A committee of Davidsonville | 


area residents accompanied by | 
Sen. J. Glenn Beall (R-Md.) yes-| 
terday lodged protests with Sec- | ¢ 
retary of Navy Charles S. | 
Thomas. Reall suggested the 
Kent Island area as a possible 
alternative site for the field 

Lankford said he was “not 
completely sold on the idea 
that the Academy needed 4 
separate airfield for indoc- 
trinating midshipmen.” He 
pointed out midshipmen could 
use existing naval air installa 
tions for training 

Navy officials reported, how 
ever. the added duty of mid- 
shipmen training would put “a 
big load on any air station 
which usually operates at near 
maximum efficiency.” 

The Congressman said he 
opposed appropriations for the 
site because an airfield in the 
proposed locality would be too 
close to densely populated 
areas. The Navy said the site 
would cause “a minimum effect 
on the residents of Anne 
Arundel County.” 

Lankford cited the air lanes 
in the area are already densely 
utilized by aircraft from Friend- 
ship International, Fort Meade 
and Andrews Air Fields. Navy 
officials cited studies showing 
“minimum interference of com- 
mercial and military air opera. 
tions” and absence of hazards 
to air navigation 


Other reasons cited by Lank * 
ford included the depriving of 
the county of a large area of 
farmland and the addition of 
more tax exempt land in the ' : 


county. 
Boone, in announcing the se 


N eg roes Sue The following message from E. G. Grace, Chairman of Bethlehem Steel, appears in the company’s 
. Annual Report to Employees for 1955. If you would like to see the report, your request to us 
F or Admission | at Bethlehem, Pa., or the nearest Bethlehem office, will bring a copy to you promptly. 


To 5 Schools 


NEW ORLEANS, Feb. 27 


Thirtyels Negroes sated « Pod To the Employees: —integrated from raw materials to the finished 
It is very gratifying to report that our product—to serve properly the demand of the 


force five state trade schools 


to admit th tudents. , . er 
"rhe Negroes claim that thelr mutual efforts last year resulted in the pro- __ public. This is much more costly. 


ivil hts bei rlolated . , . arg . 
Sisters duction and shipment of more steel than ever For this reason we must maintain adequate 


The suit was filed against the before in Bethlehem’s history. earnings to attract investors and to have funds 


wo Rags — ying “ 
president, Robert H. Curry, an . . . . . 
The expansion and improvement of our to put back into the business. This requires 


Shelby Mi. Secksc of Education 
" c n. ° . . 
a1 12 Attorneys for the Nation. facilities to meet a growing demand for steel the maintenance of sound financial practices, 
’ C 4 Pp ‘ * >. a > — * > 
— af Colere J “foe Ther products have brought benefits to our company realistic price and wage policies and continuing 
ea eee fare OP and employees through increased production __ progress on the technological front. But, we 
must have also an enlightened public policy 


fling the suit. and earnings. 


The action asks that a three 
2 hey agen Aeaagaelbee Boro It was a notable year, one which showed to assist us by means of sound government tax 


clare the state's segregation that our large investments for growth have policies which will encourage expansion and 


laws unconstitutional with re 


"7 ar ce been bearing fruit. We cannot stop here. _ development. 


The ethools named are at 


Guan Ga Gee The United States is growing and the steel We have been presented with many problems 


Charies and Opelousas. 
GRAY—From nee ’ industry must keep pace with that growth. Our in our endeavor to meet the great demand for 
: rising population with its steadily increasing steel that occurred during the last half of 1955. 


Moncure Bill | per capita consumption of steel creates a New problems will arise. But the response of 
Passes House demand for goods using steel which must be our employees through record production last 


supplied by private enterprise. year shows what can be done. 


Moore, now have the opinion 
of the Attorney General to Bethlehem’s response has been to launch l am confident that the demand for steel will 


lean on. ; 
Almond gave his opinion in| the greatest expansion program in the com- remain strong throughout the year. Our ship- 


answer to questions submitted . , . . . . 
Soothe end Tea reper find ~ pany’s history. Within the next two years we building prospects are improving significantly. 
sponsoring @ pupil assignment shall spend some $300,000,000 in adding more In short, the immediate future is clear and 


program similar to that of the “— . . . 
Ses ae Comecbeeae ta than 3,000,000 tons of annual ingot capacity. promising: But the long range job, with all it 
» > ae In recognition of the needs of the country, implies, lies ahead. Production performance 
og ge lg ar eS the steel industry as a whole is planning the ~— such as we had in 1955 will immeasurably 


however, addi j ‘se ; . 
tary. tuition grant plan was addition of 15,000,000 tons of annual ingot ca- ease our task. 


United ‘States! pacity in the next three years. The maintenance of steel as a free industry 


— The financing of such a program is not an in a free economy is vital to our personal lib- 
(“yy easy task. In the past, much of the expansion erties. The growth of the industry is essential 


upon as call for early enact- 
of the Gr commission . . . : 4 
Suck Be teeee: was brought about by improving or adding to to our economy because steel is a basic ingre- 


program. He already has given 


he opini hat Virginia's in- so he ‘ . oat . | 
derponition resalution ‘would be existing installations. However, additions to dient. I am sure Bethlehem will do its part. 


no defense in Federal Court . . . ° ° 
desegregation cases. | capacity in this manner cannot continue in- 


| 
| definitely. In the future, the industry, and 
LOOKING FOR | Bethlehem, must create entirely new capacity 


A CHEERY 
APARTMENT? 


_ The first place to look is * 
the want ad section of | 
Washington's favorite 
home newspaper — The 
Washington Post and 
Times. Herald. You'll 
find wonderful ways te 
get a mew lease on life. 


-- 
—— ie, ee ee ae a SS FT nm 2 CORE RE © oo POM re 66S BFF) ORD Ree A ee -: a eoe a i - ~~ ee ow ee - 
=e ap wae or we ea 28 ar - o_o — “oe v* tient 2 EN PED OR RE OO Ee ET ee oD ene 


} 


THE WASHING 10: \ PUST and TIMES HERALD | Girl Dies After 15 ae in Iron Lung 


as —e Three Moi ore + Tenn pos Slated to Go, Says GSA siriey Leyes tin wheat cfined te “inne 
a en in an iron lung since sey the dg to her home 


Heart >} an y a ~s Temporary Buildings F, G, seven-story building. Several | Some 1300 State employes)shall Butler (R-Md.) introduced) 1° was 8, died today—her 23d! anq emergency action kept the 
come —— _ Seis” pron hundred State Department em-/now work in tempos.@About,a revised version of his last * birthday. vital lung operating. — 
ri 4 
struction Pn. for a proposed ployes now work in them. They 1700 more work in converted year's bill to demolish all tem- —_———— ——— 


pos in the District within five 
State Department building, will be temporaryly rehoused|apartment buildings; 550 -in : P ) , 
Nets - | 309,000 General Services Administra- during the demolition and con- office buildings and another: Seamed ps ors eggs ona RE-EASTER SPECIAL! 


tion said yesterday. struction of the new building 1700 in the main St , 
The “tempos,” located on 23d that will take about 2% years, jc saat og on Brena i deetk eave. Furniture and Rugs Cleaned 
Heart Assoctat! k campaign within striking dis-|*t Setween C snd E sts. nw.,/0 GS” spokesmen end. | Yesterday, Sen.. John Mar-'riation. Sly # 
Carl ASSOCIAUION SPOKESMEN | CAMPUS * otcupy part of the site for the Jf Congress acts this session, as) in Your Home 


— 


estimate that close to $135,000 tance of the goal of $200,000. es = the tempos may be razed by the - sincigeimensiilidietiidal te > 
5 


was collected in the Washing- The Northern Virginia Heart end of this year. FULL KEYBOARD | : \e 1 Sofa. 2 Chairs and 


. , Ae “7 ; : : =» Architectural plans are now 
ton area Heart Sunday door-to- Association, which covers Alex- Train Worker Crushed being prepared. one 9x12-ft. Wool Rug. 


door canvass two days ago. /andria, Arlington, Falls Church,) CUMBERLAND, Md., Feb. 27 A AN ae 28.59 
While the totals are not yet Fairfax and Prince William ‘»—Lex_D. Merrill, 45, laborer) Advertisement — iA 2 i Ye Reg. 33.49 .... 


for the Baltimore & Ohio Rail- 


completed, Heart Fund volun- Counties, brought in a t0tal of — , Bae: 
d, w tod h Ken Chairs and Sofas 
teer workers seemed to have $33,109 from the day-long cam-j) 0 a eae STOP SCALP $6 MONTHLY AND UP a p> f 


come close to the goals set in paign. Goa! for the month is cars. He was in fair condition. Plus Hauling Charges , 
the District and surrounding $50,000, including contributions) g g Re-Webbed in ¥ our Home 
Maryland anc Virginia. from business groups. ys WELD FOR Ease! n STORY & CLARK GEORGE STECK Chair Seat Bottome Sofa Seat Bottoms 


In Prince Georges County, CHICKERING MASON N 
The total does not include the $6000 was counted. with about LCOHOLISM & HAMLI , 
residents who were not at home Mongomery County, with a goal removes uti OT ee ae ates yt WURLITZER HUNTINGTON STIEFF 


: ' By the conditioned refi thod Giov real medicine made likes doc- | BRADBURY MUSETTE CA 5 from. Rental or 
when the campaigners called. ot $30,000 seemed well on its peutanene anaie saive in. Washington | traced on ~e Contains sulphur. tars and ’ CABLE-NELSON Rental Purchase Chair Cushions Refilled in Your Home 


Contribution envelopeds were way toward that sum. Write or phone for free booklet. soothing oils that really stimulate the sealp (+... — shen : 
left at each empty house Heart Sunday was the climax and cleanse away scales. Try Glovers 60. | & JORDA N’S atl CALL NA. 8.5100, Ext. 5397, for Appointment 


In 1 oy about = of the oe runs a btn hel | second | Mange, ere i ae lf 
was collected. e tota), added | Drive, which continues throug | sealp CC COMPLETELY _R pm 
to the $100,000 collected earlier Wednesday. Area. groups plan) thove coming ne ul becaone your scalp con 13th & 6 Sts, WLW. 9332 Ga. Ave., $. $ 5169 Lee Hwy, Ar. THE HECHT CO. 


ri he month, b ht the collecting a total 5,000. Medic: STerling 3-9400 Wniper 5-1105 ° K 27 | 
nae ™_* vo "7 : er | 3145 16th Ot. NW co. 5.474 at al dvectias. 3 Money beck guarenter " ~ snare 0758 W ashington— Silver Spring PARKington 


— — - 
_ er 


“Pontiac 


ee 


Rios a: ies 
tad 


cen ME cae Be Sea 


a 


STAR CHIEF FOUR-DOOR CATALINA 


Lhe Beauty and the Lu 


Just look—and you can see for yourself. You style and beauty are paramount); there is 
can see that Pontiac for 1956 is more than the this other practical reason for changing to The car says GO 

beauty of the year—it’s the Beauty of All Pontiac: It offers you outstanding value. You can d th : ; 

Time! There never was such a thriller to look buy this unapproached beauty—and this unap- and the price won't stop you! : 
at—whether you see it at the curb—alongside proached performer—for a price unbelievably You can actually buy a big, beautiful Pontiac 
you in traffic—or coming toward you down low for a car so superior. Come in and see. 860 for less than you would pay for 44 models 
the highway. And, while that alone should The model of your choice is waiting for you— of cars of the low-priced three! 

point you to Pontiac (for, in motor cars, and so is the greatest deal in this community. ! 


‘ 
' 


SEE “PLAYWRIGHTS 'S6” AND “WIDE, WIDE WORLD" ~—NBC-TV 
, 


ARCADE PONTIAC Co. COAST-IN PONTIAC CO., INC. FLOOD PONTIAC CO. McKEE AUTO SERVICE, INC. WILSON PONTIAC, INC. 


1437 Irving Street N.W. | 407-27 Florida Ave. NE. . 4221 Connecticut Ave. N.W. 1834 L Street N.W. 7923 Georgia Ave. 
Washington 10, D..C. AD. 4-8500 Washington 2, D. C, LI, 6-7200 Washington, D. C. WO. 6-8400 Washington, D. C. ST. 3-7100 SILVER SPRING, MD. JU. 9-1818 


MeNEIL PONTIAC, INC, ; _H. J. BROWN PONTIAC, INC. — STANDARD PONTIAC, INC. KING MOTOR CO. BENDALL MOTOR SALES, INC. 
4830 Hampden Lane 1550 Wilson Boulevard. JA. 2-4700 7125 Baltimore Ave. Diamond Ave. rn 1625-31 Prince Street. OV. 3-1600 
Bethesda, Md. OL. 4-8000 Arlington, Vs. Dealer Lic. No, 34 College Park, Md. AP. 7-4282 Geithersburg, Md. Geith. 71 Alexendria, Va. Dealer Lie. No, 38 


7 - 


PAE ES 2 6 8 EON Ae egEn: Eos ERO OF er ene a eganapaaia, apenenh aep aan te pn Re 
, = aaa 


f 


THE WASHINGTON POST ond TIMES HERALD. 
wcbetis Tuesday, February 28, 1956 19 


\ 


ae Aas ES ee Re a 


Super Dome 
OLYMPIAN HIAWATHA 


lv. Chicago Union Station 3:00 pm 
Chicago * Seattle * Tacoma 
o 


Of course... 
it costs 
a little more 
than other 
straight 
bourbons 


AM and PM Super Dome 
TWIN CITIES HIAWATHAS 
lv. Chicege 10.30 om and 100 pa 
PIONEER LIMITED 
lv. Chicege 11.00 pm 
Chicago * Milwaukee 


St. Paul * Minneapolis 
Mibwavlree Rood al! the woy 


Streamliners via Omaha 
City OF SAN FRANCISCO 
ly. Chicoge Union Sation 6.30 pam 
City OF DENVER 
ly. Chicago 4.30 pm 
Demeliners vie Omaha 
City OF LOS ANGELES 
ly. Chicago 645 pm 

THE CHALLENGER 


lv. Chicege 9.00 om 


City OF PORTLAND 


ly. Chicago 4:45 pm 
Biwevkse Load + Union Pociic « Soothers Pace | 


By Joe Heibereer. Staff Photoerapher 


George E. Clark Honored 
Edward J. Kelly, Superintendent of Na- after 40 years of Government service, was 
tional Capital Parks, and George FE. Clark | 
(right) look at one of the siggs Clark 
erected as former chief of the construction 
branch of NCP. Clark, who recently retired 


feted at a party yesterday at the Hains 
Point tea house. Among the honors con- 
ferred upon him was the Department of In- 
terior Meritorious-Honor Award. 


— a — 


| 
: 
’ 
' 


a ee 


Montgomery School Board Committee 


To Make Study of McKinsey Report 


supervision of the School Su- school superintendent. The Mc- 
perintendent Kinsey report wants this under 
The McKinsey a “director of business affairs.” 


... Dut this is 
Old Taylor 86 


You'll enjoy travel at its best on these lux- 

uriously appointed trains—six of them 

Dome equipped, all with distinctive fea-, 
¥ tures. A smooth, quiet ride, fine food and 


The Montgomery County 
School’ Board last night re- 


: report urged 
ceived the McKinsey report on - 


four main. classifications 


You see more by rail. There’s more room 
for you and your luggage. Yet round trip 


42\, friendly service add to your pleasure. 


conduct of county school affairs 
and referred it to a committee 
for a March 14 report on rec- 
ommendations contained in the 
survey that can be incorporated 


that 
headed by a director of educa 
tional services, assistant su 
perintendents for elementary 
and secondary education and a 
director of business affairs be 
set up under supervision of the 


one of six new positions recom- 
mended in the survey. 


Norris called for placement 
of elementary and secondary 
school directors under the as- 
sistant superintendent for in- 
struction, whereas the McKin- 


ow can Old Taylor 86 cost consid- 
H erably less than our 100 proof 
honded bourbon—and only slightly 
more than most other 86 proof 


in the 1956-57 school budget straights? 


At the same time, School 
SuperintendentgForbes H. Nor 
ris brought in his recommenda- 
tions for reorganization of the 
county school. administration. 

Norris’ recommendations dif 
fered on several points with 
the McKinsey report, which 
called for a sweeping reorgan 
ization in the management of 
the school administrative setup 
and fiscal policies 

Norris recommended that of 
fices of assistant ‘superin 
tendent for instruction, admin- 
istration and business manage- 
ment be set up under direct 


coach fares are barely over two cents a mile 
—as much as 50% less than air line fares. 
Even greater savings are possible through 
Milwaukee Road family fares. 


Talk io us if you're going anywhere West. 
We are eager to serve you, 


Schools Superintendent 

Norris also recommended that 
office of comptroller be 

directly under the 


sey report would list these di- 
rectors as assistant superin- 
tendents” responsible to the 
schools superintendent 

Norris’ reorganization plan, 
which contains several other 
differences from proposais in 
the McKinsey report, will be 
included in his operating budg- 
et recommendations which will 
be released to the public on 
Thursday. Public hearings on 
the budget are scheduled for 
March 13 


an The reasons are simple. 


placed . 6% 
Old Tavlor 86 is exactly the same in 


quality as our 100 proof bonded bour- 


hon. It costs vou less. only because 


Youths Score 
Recreation in 


Takoma Park 


A delegation of 25 teen-agers 
protested the administration of 
Takoma Park's recreation pro 
gram iast night at a meeting 
of the mayor and city council 


. 7 --* r David Smith, of 33 Columbia 

lave. the group's spokesman 

7 ‘said the youths were not 

pleased with the recreation di 

rector or the way the program 
was run 

Smith, a sophomore at Mont- 

|gomery Blair High School, pre. 

\sented a petition signed by 115 

|persons, protesting the firing 

,of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Sutton 

who started as 


of lower taxes. 
iy © 51% fevaiee tide Yet even in this milder, gentler proof, 
oom _ Sher . ) 
711 14th St. NW 
Phone REpublic 7-1038 
J. 8. Cunninghom, Dist. Poss'r Ag. 


ee 


Old Taylor quality is unchanged— 


rich, mellow, and deeply satisfying. 
That is why Old Taylor 86 must cost 
slightly more than some straight bour- 
bons, but money can’t measure the 
difference in taste. 


IA 


dl 


Washington; Silver Spring, PARKington 


“WY TWO GREATEST BLESSINGS—MY PHONE AND MY 


| The Suttons. 
‘volunteers. helped with a teen- 
age club on Wednesday and Fri- 
day nights, for which they re 


ceived a small fee. The petition 
said the couple was relieved 
‘without justification” and had 
the support of the majority of 
the parents and teen-agers 

| It was learned after the meet-: 


ing that a difference of opinion 
over the direction of the teen 
age program led to the Suttons 
being ousted 

The Council voted to divide 
revenues of a soft drink dis- 
penser in the city recreation 
center between the junior and 
senior teen-age clubs. One of 
the teen-agers’ complaints re 
portediy was that the recrea 
tion director had a machine 
that dispensed drinks tn bottles 
taken out of the center and re 
placed it that dis 
pensed drinks in cups. Receipts 
from the new machine will be 
handied by the city instead of 
the club as in the past 


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— he 


3 


This 
Morning... 


ee ith Shirley Povich 


IF HORSE RACING has been somewhat more honest 
the last 10 years, it can hardly be ascribed to pure coin- 
cidence. An expensive outfit named The Thoroughbred 
Protective Bureau has been breathing down the necks 
of the swindlers, con men and assorted rascals attracted, 
naturally enough, to the fast flow of dough at the race tracks. 

Spencer Drayton is the head cop of ae - 
the TRPB and was no green-pea when 
he took the job ten years ago. He was 
certified by J. Edgar Hoover who was 
Drayton's boss in the FBI for 14 years. 
Most of Drayton’s men are FBI gradu- 
ates and there is a fine old school-tie 
spirit in the ranks of the TRPB. 

The 40 tracks which hire Drayton 
and his professional sleuths to ferret 
out the miscreants who might steal the 
betting public's money and besmirch 
the name of racing, do not get this pro- 
tection cheaply. The fees run to $500,- 
000 a year, shared by the tracks. 

Naturally enough, Drayton's men use 
FBI methods in putting the grab on the scoundrels who are 
their prey. The late Joe Palmer once said of the agency: “The 

TRPB does not depend on‘any flashes of intuitive genius, nor 
the deductive methods of the late Mr. Sherlock Holmes. Its 
business is the slow, careful, methodical and often boring ac- 
cumulation of information and the patient asking of many 
little questions until the big one is answered. It is not spectacu- 
lar, it just gets there.” 


Povich 


IN THE OLD DAYS, the track operators used to like to 
pretend that racing was not so shot-through with rascality as 
was generally believed, but now they seck more comfort in 
bragging about the deeds of the TRPB. There must have been 


some semblance of dishonesty because in the last ten years | 


Drayton's men have investigated 11,000 suspicious cases. 

To discourage the “ringer” business in which unscrupulous 
horse owners have attempted to disguise and run better horses 
in cheaper races under the equine alias, a lip-tattoo program 
has branded 54,000 horses for easy identification. And just in 
case guys with unsavory records get into the horse business, 
finger prints of 85,000 racing personnel have been taken. It 
must have scared off some of the rascals. Ten years ago, the 
first year of the TRPB program turned up 35 doping cases. 
, In 1955, there were only 16. 

In the early 30s, a character named Patrick Christian Barrie 
won the title of “The Irish Rembandt” with his ability to 
disguise one horse to resemble another and run it as a ringer. 
He actually did a very skillful job with a paint brush to dupli- 
cate the markings of the horse under whose name he was run- 
ning a superior steed. Track stewards were neatly taken in. 
The TRPB’s lip-tattoo operation, taking only three minutes 
and harmless to the horse, would have kept Barrie poor but 
honest. 


TO CIRCUMVENT one bit of skullduggery at Rockingham | 
Park in New Hampshire, the TRPB planted an agent in a tack 
room disguised as a groom. The tip was that Jockey Nick 
Restivo was going to stimulate the horse King Eric with a 
sugar pill. The “groom” rigged a shaving mirror on the tack 
room wall so that it showed the entire area of the stalls. With 
the aid of the mirror, the agent made the grab and Restivo 
later confessed when analysis of the pill showed strychnine 
and brucine, nervous system stimulants. 

They operate not only in the stable area. At the Fair Grounds 
in New Orleans one day, a light flashed on over the $10 cash- 
ier’s window and two detectives moved in to grab the man 
tryong to cash a phony ticket. They had the right man, but it 
hadn't been that easy. 

The case had started many days before when a forged $5 
win ticket showed up. It had been altered by an expert who 
removed the original number and date with a razor and in- 
serted the winning number and date. Only an experienced 
hand could detect a slight raise in the numbers, The cashiers 
were alerted, however, shown how to search out the bit of a 
bump by running their fingers over it carefully. Then red warn- 
ing lights were wired to each cage. It was cold, deliberate 
detective work, not inspirational genius. 


OUT IN CALIFORNIA, a breeder was suspected of false 
registration of foals. His scheme was to race 3-year-olds as 
2-year-olds, a big advantage in racing. Four foals were regis 
tered as having the Citation bloodlines. In each case, the 
breeder picked a chestnut to make it appear more likely that 
his claims were true. On the TRPB’s evidence, the Jockey Club 
barred him from all tracks. 

One of the most fantastic schemes to slow down a horse by 
drugging occurred at Hollywood Park in California. 
novel feature of this one was that the horse would be drugged 
by a pellet shot into his flank from an air rifle fired from a 
trailer truck near the track. It was supposed to leave no trace 
and bother the horse no more than a fly would 

The trainer who got the tip on the plot took the agents to 
the scene. The plotters swooped down, seized three men, one 
of whom admitted the air-gun was his, and had the trio barred 
from all race tracks for life. These are among the racing facts 
that come to light only in the TRPB past performantes. 


One in a oo 


Profiles of New Nats 


WHEN DICK BRODOWSKI was a pitcher for Bayonne 
(N. J.) High School, his favorite team was the Brooklyn 
Dodgers... “It's funny,” he says, “how your loyalty switches 
once you get to the big leagues yourself. I haven't thought 
about the Dodgers for years” . He was 
scouted by Bill McCarran, of the Red Sox, 
and was sent to Marion, Ohio, a Class D 
club, once owned by Warren G. Harding, 
who later became President of the United 
States. 

Dick says it was quite a wrench to be 
traded to Washington by the Red Sox... 
He's honest enough to admit it... “There I 
was talking about never being sentimental 
again, but I was about the Red Sox. But 
then, it was my first big league team so di 
maybe you can't blame me.’ Brodowski 

He says that after he got news of the 
trade, nothing could go right . “Maybe it's like a golfer 
pressing,” he says. “I was trying $0 hard to justify the trade 
that maybe I tried too hard. I played winter ball in Puerto 
Rico. First I played with Ponce and had an 0-6 record. Then 
I was sent to the San Juan club and started with an 0-8 record. 
I told myself: “This is Sreat. 
me in Washington now.’- Then I settled down and won seven 
out of my next nine games so I finished with a 7-10 record 
with San Juan.” 

Brodowski was born on July 26, 1932, in Bayonne ,.. He 
played basketball as well as baseball in high school ... He 
stands 6-2 and weighs 190... He's a dark, good. looking boy 
with a pleasant personality ... He's been married gnly a few 
months and has an added incentive to make good... He 
says baseball is his only hobby at the moment... “I'm a 
hungry man and a hungry man hasn't time for hobbies until 
he makes good.” —Bob Addie. 


Nats’ Notes From Orlando 


ORLANDO, Fila. 
Lou Berberet, husky catcher, a short rest period . 


_ Feb. 27,and the boys eat lunch during 
. the first 
‘casualty of the camp turned 


reperten SeGhy end went into! nt’ to be Dick Hyde... the 


L 


ie Pitchers Look Good’ 


rs - 


j7. “me. o se | 


i 


Dressen Has 


ripe Praise 


The Washing 


Times ashyinglo 


fon aiost 


ports 


For Griggs 


| 


TUESDAY, 


FEBRUARY 


ad 


2 95 


28, 6 


And Valmas | 


| By, Bob Addie 
| Steff Reporter 


ORLANDO, Fia., Feb. 27 
Bursting with enthusiasm, Man- 
‘ager Chuck Dressen said today 
the thought he detected several 
'promising prospects among his 
|juvenile pitching corps. Hal 
Griggs and John Valmas, two 
‘of the rookies, drew the high- 
est praise. 
| Griggs was the boy Dressen 
‘originally tapped last year as 
a possibile relief man but be- 
‘cause of Chattanooga's desper- 
‘ate need of pitchers, Griggs 
\was signed to a Lookout con-| 
tract. 

“He says he never threw al 
change of pace ball in Chat-| 
tanooga,” Dressen said. “I took} 
him aside and showed him and| 
| he caught on fast. He’s a great’ 
competitor with the heart of a 
‘lion and he’s really going to be 
something, if he keeps improv-'| 
| ing.” 


Not Even on Roster 


Valmas, who isn't even on 
the roster, is a slim, bespectac- 
‘led youngster from Bronxville, 
\N. Y. The 22-yearold right- 
hander won 25 and lost 11 for 
ithe Class D Orlando club last 
year and was invited to the 
| Washington camp. Dressen was 
itipped off on his potential by 
| several of the batters who told 
‘Chuck that Valmas’ ball “Teal-| 
ly moved.” 
| Valmas, who is 5-11, weighs | 
\only 150 pounds but Dressen'| 
‘already thinks he has another | 
Pedro Ramos in the New York- 
er. Ramos was discovered the 
same way in spring training’ 
last year and was ticketed for! 
“Charlotte until he won Dres-| 
sen’s admiration. Now, Chuck! 
insists Valmas is a better-look- | 
|ing pitcher, at this stage, than 
|Ramos was last year. 
However, it is Griggs who | 
iseems to have the best chance! 
jof sticking. With Chattanooga| 
| last year, he had a 15-9 record | 
|with 180 strikeouts in 209 in-| 
nings, second best mark in the| 
Southern Association. In al 
‘bookkeeping transaction, the! 
Nats gave Chattanooga three 
players for him last September 


Old for a Rookie | 
| The right-handed Griggs 1s 


the logical choice as opening 


— & meer a a ae © Swe a ae 


TO AN EARLY START—Chuck Stobbs is the dean of the 
Nats pitching staff this season. His seniority may make him 


day pitcher. But Stobbs long 


has been a slow starter. Last year he won one game in the 


“old” as rookies go. He was 27 
‘last August and has been 
‘knocking around the minors 
since 1950 when he came out of 


‘Bad Example for Kids’ 


a tryout school in Deland, Fia.. 


' 
The own pitching coach this year 


iHe 


‘good look at Connie Grob. 


ichange of pace until Dressen’ 


“er was signed by Hickory, 
N. 

poi also took his {rst 
the 
Nats’ No. 1 draft choice from 
Mobile, Grob also lacked a 


\worked with him all morning 


| 


isinker,” 


\youngster had mastered 


the 


the 


After a couple of hours, 


technique. 

“He has a good, overhand 
Dressen enthused 
“Can you imagine how sweet 


\it will be to put a guy like that 


iin relief? 


One thing I'm happy 
about, these kids all seem to 
have live arms. They can real. 
ly throw that ball. That's half 
the battle of pitching. The rest 


‘they can learn.” 


Dressen intends to be his 
thinks he'll do better by 
sticking closer to the pitchers 
so he has taken over the chore 


of coaching them himself. 


Berrios U psets 


Bell in TV Bout 


NEW YORK, Feb. 27 W& 
Scrappy little Mauguel Berrios 
of Puerto Rico blazed from 
behind tonight to pull out an 
upset, split decision over Bo by 
Bell. Youngstown, Ohio, in 
bristling, 10-round telecast bout 
at St. Nicholas Arena. Bell 
weighed 128, Berrios 127‘ 

From the seventh round on 
it was all Berrios. Judge Artie 
Schwartz voted for Berrios, 54- 
1: while referee Mark Conn had 
it even on rounds, 44-2, but Ber- 
rios ahead on points, 54. Judge 


a 


|Artie Aidala made it a draw, 
‘giving each five rounds and six 


as 
ae 


points. The AP card had Ber- 
'rios in front, 6-4. 


Results 


COLLEGE BASKETBALL 
ope 
Tennessee 
oy warthmore 
OF Vanderbilt 65 
len Cedaryiite f 
ten © Colles. 00. necim's &? 

eckpe ‘\ > 


lerida 66 
‘Greenville (Hh. 9f 


1 wonder what they think of | 


Denbar 77 


Spingarn 


Gentage 6! 


Simmens 63 New Mex : 
Michigan Norma 


State ai Western Michie 
Nerth aakaun cs | 
Ms. " 


cia 
cNeese State . 
; wete eT. 
nes He oe en 
Michisen 
VMi 7 


Fert Valley 
a Bt A vi + 


Res atom Tebes. : 
stern 


A 
2 Tom 117 Tes 
= Missinsipe! | Blake 18 


—_* * a se 
aener 34 Hofstra 6 
HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL 


Anacostia ! 
Poolesville 


INTERMIGH TOURNAMENT 
61 Ceolidge 
we HIGH TOURNEY 
Annandale 
SERVICE BASKETBALL 
Ras Alr Foree T paar 


Southern Di Air 


Frederick ‘BR’ 52 


guys 
jalmost killed. 
three kids. 
come of them if anything hap- 
Oe pened to him?’ 
! 


tie 6 
West Chester ‘Pa. ) 
‘\ L. 74 


| sistant 
fessional 


er FL 
See et let Di aa ew ee! 


| o- 


4 
Br Dick Darcey. Staff! Photocrapher 


' first half, season's record was 4-14. This spring at Orlando, 
Fla., Stobbs is stepping up his pace, as this picture illus- 
trates. It shows him warming up with Ed FitzGerald catch- 
ing as other Nats work out in te background. 


Georgia Tech Meets 


” , 
Georgetow n Notre Dame in 1959 


s pingarn, j 
Dunbar Gain » 
Semifinals 


In Playoffs 


By Jerry Davis 
Staff Reporters 

Dunbar crushed Anacostia, . 
77-56, and Spingarn rolled over .;, 
‘Coolidge, 6145, in opening ;: 
| round play in the Interhigh 
‘League playoffs yesterday at 
‘McKinley Tech. , 
| Magician Willie Jones, wha’ se 
\does all sorts of tricks with a is 
basketball, sparked Dunbar in-. 
to the playoff semifinals, which . 
will be played Thursday. at 
‘McKinley. 

Triggered by Gene Johnson .« 
and George Williams, wore ng 
also advanced to the semifinals, . 


— 
> 


38 


Two Games Today 
Two more first round games 
in the Interhigh League 
championship playoffs will be 
played at McKinley Tech. 
| Armstrong meets Wilson at 
3:30 p. m., while McKinley 
| and Cardozo play at 8 p. m. 


; ——— an 


| Yesterday's losers were elim- 
inated from the tournament. 

Jones, the league’s No. 1 scor-- 
er, rarely missed from the floor 
‘and batted 1.000 from the foul’ 
line, connecting on all 14 of his* 
free throws. The 5-foot, 10-inch 
star wound up with 32 points. 
Calvin Knott led Anacostia with 
19 points. 

With Frank Copper hitting 4 
for 10 straight points, Anacostia 
grabbed the lead early in the s é, 
game but Dunbar took com- 
mand, 13 to 12, with three min-; 
utes left in the first quarter. * 
Its lead was never‘in jeopardy 
after that. 

For a while, it looked as if” 
Jones would reach the 40-point ” 
mark, a feat which he accom- 
plished twice during the regu- 
lar season. He scored 10 points 
in each of the first three periods* 
but got only two in the final ~ 
quarter. 

Spingarn completely out- 
Classed Coolidge with a big 
‘rally in the second half. Spin- 
garn led by only 15-10 after 
ithe first quarter, and 27-19 at 
halftime. But entering the final 
‘period it was no contest at” 
45-28. os 
| Johnson scored 13 points and”~ 
Williams 12 for Spingarn, 


f T Denbar Anacostia 
3° Jones f Sastts ¢ 
Creer. f 


. 
. 
2 


“ 
~~ = 
me. * 


— Sieur 


Dodgers’ Carl Furillo Plays GW at 
Criticizes Dirty Play 


*" 


VERO BEACH, Fia., Feb. 2 
of philosophy, 


this year 


leagues in recent years. 

“Kids go to a ball game and 
see a batter get hit in the ribs, 
or in the head, or see a man 
get cut up by spikes, and they 
think it’s okay; that it’s part of 
the game. I don’t think it is, 
and I don't believe the fans, 
young or old, want to see that 
kind of ball. I think they want 
a clean game 

“But if baseball teaches kids 
that it's all right to play dirty, 
as long as you win, then you'll 
never stop juvenile delin- 
quency.” 

“I know a lot of people think 
that if you take the spiking 
and brawling and dusters out 
of baseball, it'll be dull, but I 
don't think that way. If base- 
ball is the national game, it 
can get along without that stuff 
I think it’s up to us to show 
the kids we can play it that 
way, so that they grow up on 
the lots playing clean ball.” 

Furillo, who has been struck 
in the head seven times during 
his career, claims his blood 
boils whenever he hears shouts 
like “stick it in his ear” ema- 
nating from a dugout. 

“I've only got two or three 
more years to go.” said Carl, 
“so I'm not just thinking about 
myself; But what about young 
like Zimmer. He was 
He's got two or 
What would be- 


a irty play” 


Uline Tonight 


George Washington Univer- 


7—Carl Furillo, in an unusual flush sity is host tonight to George- 
said today that baseball will be a cleaner game 
The veteran Brooklyn outfielder further charged 
that much of the relaxation of moral values among American season's 
youth can be traced to the toleration of * 


Big Three Cup basket- 


in the big ball series at Uline Arena at 


8:30 p. m. GW beat the Hoyas, 
70-67, 


ATLANTA, Feb. 27 (®—Bobby 
Dodd, 
d football coach at Georgia 
h. tonight confirmed a re- 


hea 
Tec 


port that Tech w 
ball 
in 1959. 

Dodd said the teams would 
town in the final game of this meet at South Bend, 
vember 7, 1959. | 


7 
3) ~~ ee 
| he | 


athletic director and Coclidce 
ae. 
Ceonnelie) 


Michaelis : 


oe 


=| ose«tesn-en 3] esoeses4 
a a > 


ll play a foot- 
Notre Dame 


‘<. 
Co: s43o—q al “== Sone 


weyvr s¥e-o2 


game with 


Ph et 


Ind., No-|——— 
co 54 Teta 
Walftime score: 27 


So 


ls 
7-19, getnenen, 


— ee eee 


First Negro Turns: poth teams lost twice to area | 


Out for Vi irginia 
Football Practice 


CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va 
Feb. 27 W—Coach Ben Martin 
today began work on the pro- 
gram he hopes will bring the 
University of Virginia back into 
football prominence. 

On the first day of spring 
practice, a squad of 60 re 
ported to the new 
head ¢oach—including the first 
Négro ever to turn wp for prac 
tice here 

The Negro was George 
Harris, an engineering student 
who played quarterback for 
luunbar High in Lynchburg, Va 
A University spokesman said it 
was unlikely Harris would be 
able to continue to practice 
with the team since he is on 
academic probation. He 
freshman. 


35 for McCoy 


EAST LANSING, 
27 (‘#—Michigan State closed 
its home basketball season to- 
night, defeating Wisconsin, 89- 
82, as Forward Julius McCoy 
scored 35 points for the Spar- 
tans. 


Cavalier! _ 


is a ance along 


Jay 


champion Maryland. 

Featured on tonight's pro- 
gram is a trophy presentation 
to Joe Holup for compiling the 
best field goal accuracy record 


Game on Radio 


Tonight's George Washing- 
ton - Georgetown basketball 
game at Uline Arena will be 
broadcast by WRC (980 k. c.) 
at 8:30 p. m. by Jim Simpson. 


in the history of college basket 
ball and scoring more points 
than any GW player in history 
Holup has a field goal percent- 
age of 64.8% this season and 
has scored 2195 points in four 
varsily seasons, 

Holup, 6-foot, 


~~ 
, 


6-inch center ; 


is making his last local appear- | 


with 


(;eorce 
The 


hlein and 


Pp 


| Petcavich, 
Manning. 


Navy entertains Catholic Uni 
versity today at 4:30 p. m., Gal 
laudet is host to Western Mary- 
land at Miller Junior High gym 
at 8 p. m. and Montgomery 
Junior College plays its Alumni| 


‘at 8 p. m. 


By Gil Willett 
Former Prince Georges champion 
JACKIE BURKE once said 
there are four keys to good 
golf and one of them is a big 
drive. 
There is no 


is} doubt that 
| big tee shots 


make the 
game easy— 
that is if you 


keep your 


drives in the 
fairway 

I] was an as- 
pro- 


under Wiffy j 
Cox at Ken- Gil Willett 


wood in 1936 and 1937, and 
he taught me that you can 


' then allow 

| celerate the | 
I have found that two of | 
_ the most important things in 


(Editor's Note: 
series on “What I Learned 
About Golf,” by scratch play- 
ers and duffers alike, to help 
tune up your game for the 
season just ahead.) 


is getting the clubhead Started 


without too much effort and 
the hands to ac- 
clubhead speed. 


driving are a good grip and 
a square stance. You don't 


_have to grip the club too 
tightly and you should ad- 
dress the ball slightly to the | 


left of center. 
The reason I suggest a 
light grip is because I[ have 


One of a! 


What | Learned About Golf 


“As Told to Maury Fitzgerald 


| however, 


professional, tells me, despite 


the fact that several big-name | 
tournaments have been held 


at Prince Georges, that I‘am 


_ the only player to ever drive 


the first, second and third 
greens on the same round. My 


| tee shots were hit from the 
| middle white 
even from there the first hole | 
measures 346, the second 315 © 
| and the third 


markers 


Tree | 
. Oo 


My biggest hitting thrill, 


National Amateur qualifying 


| trials at Baltimore's Elkridge — 


Club. The 18th hole there 


| measures 621 yards and some | 
members told me before tee- | 
ing off that it was impossible | 
in two 


to reach the green 
shots. 


but | 


vame in last year's | 


ershing § 
‘Rifles Drill team of GW will 
‘march during the ceremonies 
Mich., Feb. | 


in overtime last week. | 


seniors JOC hes 


\ 


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action immediately . .. Clint! 
Courtney wired Calvin Grif. 
fith that he’s on his way 
to 0 oe 8 was 2 
great day for a workout with 
a hot sun beating down on 
the players... the Nats have 
set up their own cafeteria here 


combine power with accuracy 
without being wild. He told 
to always hit within my- 
self-and never try for extra 
yardage. 
Distance is caused by power 
and power is generated by . 
clubhead speed. The big thing 


rookie pitcher, who wears 
glasses, was practicing bunts 
and one hit him in right 
eye, breaking his glasses .. . 
two stitches were taken in the 
eye but Hyde will be back at 
practice tomorrow 
—Bob Addie. 


found that when you squeeze 
hard you tighten all the 
muscles in your arms and 
shoulders, This tends to bind 
your swing, making it impossi- 
ble to swing freely with your 
hands. 

Al Houghton, my home club 


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onzaga Gains No. | Sp 


Cardozo, 
} ar Pass 
Spingarn 


Gonzaga High, beaten only by 
the Georgetown 
freshmen, moved into the No. 
1 position for the first time 
this season in The Washington 
Post and Times Herald's final 
high school basketball rank- 


Gonzaga also was ranked No. 
1 among area schoolboy foot- 
ball teams last fall, and in an 
identical situation didn’t reach 
its first place goal until 
final week of the rankings. 


Spingarn High, upset last 


week by Dunbar, dropped from} 


its No. 1 perch to fourth place 


oe he 
« Se LS 4 
oe 


ae ae 


Dy: Ae eee ot 


y oe. aS aw 
: 
. 


J 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
and TIMES HERALD 
Tuesday, February 28, 1956 
see ’ 91 


| 


Bob Addie’s 


Column... 


University | 


the | 


after leading the rankings | 
since January 31. The loss to) 
Dunbar was the only blemish’ 
on the Interhigh League East 
Division champion’s record. | 

Cardozo, the only team to de- 
feat Dunbar all season, ad- 
vanced to second place with) 
Dunbar leaping into _ third.| 
Cardozo’s only setback came at 
the hands of Chamberlain 
early in the year. 

Northern Virginia Group I 
champion Washington-Lee re- 
tained its No. 5 spot in the. 
rankings, with George Wash-| 
ington High remaining sixth. | 

The final rankings: 

1. Gonzaga (16-1) 

2. Cardoze (16-1) 

3. Dunbar (15-1) 

4. Spingarn (15-1) 

5. Washington-Lee (18-2) 

6. George Washington (17-4) 

7. St. John’s (17-6) 

8. Northwestern (15-3) 

9. DeMatha (20-6) 

10. Armstrong (14-5) 


Eddie Stevens 
Signs as Pro at 
Driving Range 


Eddie Stevens, who for.the 
past year has been assistant | 
professional] under his brother, 
Clagett, at Manor Country 
Club, has been signed as pro- 
manager of the Arlandria Driv- 
ing Range at Mount Vernon | 
ave. and Glebe rd., Alexandria. 

Billy Jurges, a new coach 
with the Washington Senators, 
is a part owner of the range. 

Stevens was professiona] for 
three years at Fort Belvoir be. 
fore resigning last spring to 
work for his brother at Manor. 
Before that, Stevens was a sales. | 
ag for Wilson Sporting Goods 

0. 


North Carolina 
Files Appeal 


CHAPEL HILL, N. C., Feh. 
27 #@—The University of North | 
Carolina has filed an official ap-' 
peal with the Atlantic Coast 
Conference on the suspension of 
basketball player Bob Cunning. 
ham for his part in the free-for- 
all following the North Carolina- 
Wake Forest basketball game 
here Feb. 15. | 

Jake Wade, North Carolina’ 
sports publicist, said the execu-| 
tive committee of the ACC will) 
hold a hearing Wednesday at) 
ee m. in Raleigh on the| 
eve of the conference's tourney. | 
The appeal has been filed with 
Dr. Charles E. Jordan of Duke, 
president of the conference, | 


ORLANDO, Feb. 27—There was the crack of the bat, 
a long fly which turned foul and then a spectator, from 
the sidelines, took two running steps and speared the 
ball bare-handed. One of the rookie fielders went about 
10 feet from the spectator and coaxed him to lob the 
ball—as one would with a small child. 

a] The spectator disdained the player 
and whipped a tong throw home—a 
perfect strike. The youngster’s eyes 
popped open and his jaw went slack. 
The spectator nonchalantly turned 
away and resumed his musings. 

His name was Taft Wright and you 
really don’t have to be too old to 
remember him. Like most sports 
writers, I always had one sentimental 
fayorite and mine was Taft Wright. 
The reason was that he featured the 
first baseball game I ever covered by 
hitting a home run with two on in 
the ninth against the White Sox. That 
won the game for Washington, 5-4. 

I remember writing a corny line like: “I'd rather be Wright 
than President. etc.” The wheel has made a complete turn 
now and Taffy Wright is looking for a baseball job. 

“Last year,” he said without bitterness, “I managed Ama- 
rillo in Texas. I took them over when they were in last place 
abouf 12% games out of first. We won the pennant by a half 
game. So this year Amarillo gets a working agreement with 
Sacramento ahd Sacramento gets a new manager for Amarillo. 


WRIGHT TALKED casually of the Nats’ chances this year 
with a young club and then remarked: “I suppose I'm like a 
lot of oldtimers—I came along too soon. I remember when 
I broke in listening to the veterans who wished they had 


been born later on so they could get some of the big money | 
| we got. 


“That's a laugh. I think now of these 240 hitters getting 
better than $20,000 a year. I never even came close to that 
in 12 years as a big leaguer. 
maybe I wasn't the fanciest’ fielder in the world but I'll 
guarantee I could have held my own with some of the guys 
playing ball today. 

“One thing I could always do—I could hit. I was a lucky 
hitter but an unlucky manager. I mean I used to rap a ball 
in the hole more often than not, but in managing, things 
would be reversed. For instance, if I walked a dangerous 
hitter, the next guy would come through with a hit. Some 
managers walk a guy and the next one hits into a double play 
or something. 

“I remember one time when I was with Washington we 
were playing the Yanks. I hit the ball to short center. Joe 


DiMaggio and Phil Rizzuto converged on the ball and then | 
out of nowhere, came Myril Hoag out of right field to spear | 


the ball. All three bumped and all three had to leave the 
game. So, you see, even when they caught me, I used to 
paralyze the opposition. Getting rid of three Yankees at once 
is quite a trick.” 


WRIGHT HAS a philosophy about big league managers. 
“There's no such thing as a genius,” he said. 
the material you go a long Way. Casey Stengel is a genius 
now but he couldn't manage his way out of the second-division 


| before he inherited the Yankees. 


“In fact, I'd say he was a better manager when he had the 


Braves and Dodgers. It stands to reason he “was quicker on | 


| MERCHANT'S 
BRAKE 


SPECIAL 


EXTENDED ONE WEEK 


the trigger then than he is now. Nope, I don’t go for that 
genius business. I've been around baseball too long and 
played under too many managers. Some were more gifted 
than others but they didn't get anywhere because they didn't 
have the material.” 

Taft made a pertinent comment on the lack of imagination 
in most spring training camps. 

“Most of the clubs spend all spring on a lot of nonsense 
they never get to use in the regular season,” he said. “For 
instance, a lot of managers try to teach you sign-stealing. 
From what I've seen of big leaguers, they have all they can 
do to remember their own signa 


“THEN THEY practice pickoffs, trick plays and the old 


“If you have | 


| 


' 
' 
' 
' 


I batted 313 for my career and | 


' 


| @ F & Genre 


| 


one about the pitcher covering first on a drag bunt on the | 


right side of the field. Sure, they (the pitchers) do fine in 
practice because they know 
, , isn't going ta tip them off, 


‘AUTO LOANS 


is The Place To Go 


HERSORN’S 
id op hn | et) ee 
ohtE Sel. 5 Gael ey Bale). 


what's coming. But the batter 


once the season starts, that | 


he's going to drag one to the 
Tight. 

“You'll see the pitchers get 
eaught flat-footed time and 
again during the regular sea- 
son. They can work from 
now until forever practicing 
plays but when you come 
right down to it, the game is 
still pretty fundamental. 


Get 


of competent big 


fense. 


sport. But then, you know, 
if I had it to do all over 
again, I'd do the same thing. 
I never had it so good as 
when I was in the big 
leagues. 


still say I was born about 20 


“It's a great game but I | 


Nothing takes the place of | 
the base hit for the offense | 
and nothing takes the place | 
leaguers | 
who know their trade on de- | 


“Someday,” Taffy said slow-. | 
ly, “I'm getting out of this © 


Gonzaga, 
W-L Win 


In Tourney 


| «eoee-ee owen 


| wenewweonw-ee® 


By George Brantner 
Gonzaga and host Washing- 


ton-Lee won first round games 
last night in the Washington-| 
Lee Invitational tournament at’! 
W-L. 

Top-seeded Gonzaga whipped | 
Annandale, 61-50, in the first! 
game of a doubleheader, while! 
Washington-Lee trounced Inter- | 
state Academic Conference 
champion Landon, 76-51, in the 
nightcap. 

Gonzaga got off & a siow 
start, trailing. 9-1, after four 
minutes of the first quarter.| 
But the Eagles rallied to go! 
ahead, 19-16, after the close of 
the period. | 

By halftime, Gonzaga boosted | 
its advantage to 10 points at 
40-30, and after three quarters 
led, 49-39. Annandale didn't 
call it quits, however, and’ 
pulled to within three points of 
tying it, 53-50, with 1:30 left in 
the game. ) 

With Gonzaga’'s first team on 
the bench, Annandale gave the 
Eagles a late scare on some fine | 
play by Dick Wickline and/| 
Bruce Hewitt. Gonzaga’s regu-' 
lars returned to action and 
scored eight straight points to 
avert an upset. 

Tom McCloskey was high 
scorer for Gonzaga with 24) 
points. Tom Gaines had 19 for 
Annandale. 

Landon scored only one goal 
from the floor in the first period 
of the second game and fell way 
behind W-L, 164, at the end of 
the quarter. 

Although its regulars watched 
most of the game from the side- 
lines, Washington-Lee’s North- 
ern Virginia Group I champions 
continued to pour it on and 
turned the game into a rout. 

Bob Clements and Tom Hyde 
sparked W-L, with 15 and 14 
points, respectively. Don Dell 
paced Landon with 23. 
rage Annandale 
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| Wakefield in the second game 


‘condition’ ‘of the GW team was 


S trictly 


By Jack Mabley 
Chicago Dally News Gervice 
CHICAGO, Feb. 27 — Pity’ 

the poor woman who wants 
to learn golf. 

“It's positively brutal,” says 
Samuel Rauworth, a man who 
makes a living teaching wom- 
en—and some men—how to 
play golf. 

“So many women want to 
play the game, and they have 
an awful time. On the courses 
men kick them around. They 
treat-us like women drivers, 
they tell me. 

“They're embarrassed on 
the first tee, and usually the 
more nervous they are the 
tighter their muscles get and 
the worse their swing is. The 
man yells, ‘Hurry up’ and 
that’s what she’s trying to do 
and she gets all the more 
nervous. 

“Out on the fairway, it’s 
downright dangerous the way 
men will blast their drives 
through women players.” 

Rauworth, who operates a 
golf school, thinks a tremen- 
dous number of women would 
take up golf if men didn't 
make it so nasty for them 
when they are beginning. 

Eight years ago Rauworth 


n W-L Tourney 


DeMatha 
Replaces GW 


George Washington High, 
whose star player was involved 
in a fight following Washington- 
Lee's victory over GW last week 
for the Northern Virginia 
Grop I title, yesterday withdrew 
from the W-L Invitational tour- 
nament. 

DeMatha High replaced 
George Washington, and meets 


of a doubleheader tonight at 


Washington-Lee. Fairfax faces 
St. John's at 7 p. m. in another | 
first-round tournament game. 
GW principal Edgar G. Pruet, | 
in a statement announcing the 
withdrawal said “the physical 


“the primary consideration.” 

G athletic director Rasty 
Doran said that the team was 
tired from a long schedule, and 
will be resting for the Virginia 
State tournament in Richmond, 
March 8, 9, and 10. 

GW’'s Mike Agee fought off 
several boys on the street near 
W-L after a game last Thursday 
night, which Washington-Lee 
won, 60 to 55. 


RU SAT. 


oe 


3% 


We Do. .* 


730 


REGULAR 


ot in F inal Basketball Rankings 


; 


Those Who Play Golf 


for the Women... 


discovered that in one class 
of 96 girls from a government 
office who had taken eight 
golf lessons, only 20 had ven- 
tured onto a golf course six 
months later. 


He then put into his school 
a course on how to overcome 
timidity—how to get through 
the embarrassing first few 
rounds. 

The first tee can be terrify- 
ing to the beginner who often 
as not dribblés the ball 20 
or 30 yards down the grass 
before an interested but not 
particularly sympathetic audi- 
ence. 

Even an experienced golfer 
frequently gets the first tee 
jits on a crowded day. 

Rauworth has a practical if 
not overly sporty solution. 
Use the hand mashie (Mr. Ei- 
senhower glorified it recently 
to the distress of golf purists) 
and carry the hall a couple 
of hundred yards out. In oth- 
er words, don’t keep score the 
first few rounds. Just famil- 
iarize yourself with the game 
and the ourse. 

He also suggests that if the 
round is going slowly that the 
beginner not putt out. 

Beginners fare best playing 
twilight golf, Rawworth says. 
The ideal way to start, he 


thinks, ig to go out with your 
husband, or a companion who 
is an experienced golfer, and 
play alternate shots. Playing 
one ball, the man makes the 


tee shot, the beginner the | 


next, and so forth. 

Rauworth studied psychol- 
ogy at Northwestern Univer- 
sity and uses it in teaching 
golf. He says these factors 
are usually overlooked: 

“.- The rate of forgetting is 
very fast. Tests show you for- 
get 50 per cent of what you 
learn in the first hour. Over 


a month you retain 30 per | 


cent. So if we hit one thing 
three times, you should have 
90 per cent retention. 

“.—You must know why you 
do a thing, and not do it just 
because the instructor tells 
you to. 

“—Repetition is not prac- 
tice—it is a facwor in practice. 
I give you something, you 
have to go out on the golf 
course and try it and see how 
it works.” 

A little psychology, a touch 
of boldness, a halfway decent 
swing, and a set of clubs and 
you're in business. Whether 
it works or not in every case, 


_— Sign Pair | 
PHILADELPHIA, Feb. 27 # 
The Philadeiphia Eagles today 


announced signing of John“ 
(Rocky) Ryan, 61, 200-pound 
end from Illinois, and John 
|Erickson, 6-3, 230-pound tackle 
from West Point, for the 1956 
National Football League sea- 
son, 


TONIGHT! 


NATIONAL 
WRESTLING 


| WITH | 
BAILEY GOSS 


Rauworth certainly is on the 


girls’ side. 


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THE WASHINGTON POST 
and TIMES HERALD 
Tuesday, February 28, 1956 
99 *e*e 


Rejoin Warmath 


Minnesota 
Hires Blaik, 
Me alavasti 


MINNEAPOLIS, Feb. 27 


ob Blaik, son of Army foot- 

ll coach Earl Blaik, was hired 
today as an assistant football 
eoach at Minnesota. 

Also appointed to an assistant 

st was Ray Malavasi, former 

est Point lineman. Both are 
25 and served under Gopher 
Coach Murray Warmath while 
he was assisting Blaik at Army. 

Young Blaik, All - Eastern 
quarterback with Army in 1950, 
was graduated from Colorado 


® College and served as football 


- 


assistant there in 1952. He re- 
cently was discharged from the 


" gervice. 


> 


Malavasi, a native of Clif- 


© ton, N. J., played guard at Army 


7 


in 1949 and 1950. He assisted 


: under Warmath at Mississippi 


= State in 1952 and played part of 
* the 1953 season with the Phil- 
adelphia Eagles. For the last 
two years he has been line 
coach of the Fort Belvoir, Va., 


team. He is due for discharge) 


» from the Army next month. 


Tennis Fathers Act 


NEW YORK, Feb. 27 ‘#—Two 
of the United States’ touring 


tennis players, Hugh Stewart of | 
and Tony! 


San Marino, Calif... 


Vincent of New York, have been | 


temporarily “grounded” in 
Europe on orders from the 
United States Lawn Tennis As 
sociation. 

The action was announced 
today by Harold Lebair of New 
York, chairman of the Inter- 
national Play Committee. “It's 
not a suspension,” said Lebatr. 


THANKS, MY DEAR—Golfer Ted Kroll 
| gives Orlean McCallum a “thank you” kiss 
for saving the rich Houston Open champion- 
ship for him. Kroll’s second shot on N 


a 


°. 17 Kroll won by 


Associated Press 


in the final round Sunday struck Miss Me- 
Callum on head, prevented ball from going 
into serious trouble, saved Ted two strokes. 


three shots, picked up $6000. 


Despite Losing Power 


Tribe’s New 


“It's merely a grounding until) 


these boys meet with regula- 
tions.” 
Stewart and Vincent made 


Makes Lopez Happy 


S peed 


Uhl Faces Russell 

NEW YORK, Feb. 27 \®—Day- 
con’s Bill Uhl and San Fran- 
cisco’s Bill Russell, two of the 


biggest and best-publicized bas-| 


ketball players of the season, 
are due to meet face to face 


Yanks Sign. 


McDermott, 


kees pitching staff stronger 
than the one which helped win| 
the pennant last year. 


‘ers, listing Whitey Ford, Bob 


Ford still is a holdout, but Lar- 
sen and McDermott signed this! 
morning and participated in the 
club’s first workout. 

“A year ago at this time 1 
was only sure of Ford and Tur-| | 
ley,” Stengel said. “Byrne was| 
trying to make a comeback and_| 
Larsen hadn't been a winner in| 
ithe majors. Bob Grim got a| 
sore arm. I even had Ed L opat | 
‘figured in the rotation as a once- 
a-week-man. 

“Now I’ve got five good start- 
ers, all strong and hard throw- 
ers. Byrne’s the only old one 
(he’s 36) but he’s got a young 
arm.” 

McDermott agreed to a $20,- 
000 contract, a raise of $2,000 
over his Washington salary last) 
season and Larsen accepted) 


son, 
) 


Montgomery J. C. Beats 
Hagerstown, 79-62 


$12,000, as well as conditional 
clauses which demand that he 
'maintain top physical condition | 
and a weight maximum of 210) 
‘pounds during the playing sea-| 
He is 226 now. 


Montgomery Junior College 
‘defeated Hagerstown Junior 
College, 79 to 62, in basketball 
last night at Montgomery. 


Steele.f 
Richardsen.e 
Francis.e 

reh zg 


i —_e a 


Wolff Speaks 


O’Donnell’s Sea Grill, 1207 E st. 


nw., at 12:30 p.m. Films of the 


be shown. 


He named five certain start- 


‘Turley, Tommy Byrne, Mickey 
McDermott and Don Larsen. 


Hoads Leave Australia 
Bob Wolff will be guest 
ispeaker at the weekly Varsity 
Club luncheon Wednesday at 


SYDNEY, Australia, Feb. 27 
‘(‘#—Lew Hoad, Australia’s top 
/amateur tennis player, left Syd- 
ney with his wife Jennifer by 
air tonight for an overseas tour. 


For Long Tennis Tour 


2-months-old daughter Jane will 
be cared for by Hoad’s parents. 
The Hoads will visit Egypt and 
Europe. Hoad will play in all 
major tournaments and will 
‘team with Jennifer in the Wini- 


While they are away their'bledon doubles. 


the man 


who cares 


says: 


Nats in spring training will alsd| 
Don Larsen ha li 


ST. PETERSBURG, Feb. 27) 
‘®—Manager Casey Stengel to- 
day called his New York Yan-| 


yes, 


JAY SAILS. 


For pure enjoyment 


When quality counts, 
make the “thumbs up” sign 
for Carstairs! Great 


since 1788, today’s 


Carstairs 


—in the traditional 
early American bottle— 


is the 


best yet. 


Thumbs up 


for Carstairs 
.-@ great American 


name since 1788 


ee ot oe eee Behe | 


G 
2 


the mistake of not notifying| 
the committee on their over-| TUCSON, Ariz., 
seas schedule as demanded by swapping power hitting for speed will make the Cleveland|game here March 31. 


Be 
Andeoresa. zs 


Teta! 
re: 


Feb. 27 —Manager Al Lopez believes! the fresh air fund East-West 
s 
40-25, 


oS) a LOUISVILLE, KY. BLENDED WHISKEY, 86 PROOF, 72% GRAIN NEGTRAL SPitiTS 


speusstenen. CARSTAINS DISTILLING CO., BALTIMORE, D., 


the USLTA. 


Coach Was Right 


DENVER, Feb. 27 (‘#—Coach 
Harvey Moore of Regis col- 
jege's basketball team said to- 
day he had told officials “some 


one’s going to get hurt if you. 


don't start calling them closer.” 

One Regis player, Tom Hoog- 
erwerf, suffered a head injury 
end another, Mickey Shannon, 
had the wind knocked out of 
him during rough play in the 
Regis-Seattle game yesterday 
Seattle won 84-77. Ken Fuhrer, 
Seattle forward,. was ordered 
out of the game by the officials 


after Hoogerwerf was hurt. | 


Aguirre Replaced 


REGINA, Feb. 27 (#—Jack 
Russell, all-star Western Inter- 
provincial Football Union end 
with Saskatchewan Roughriders 
in 1951, has been signed as line 
coach. 

Russell, at Baylor the last 
three years, replaces Joe (The 
Toe) Aguirre, line coach as well 
as a player with the Riders for 
the last three seasons and one. 
time Washington Redskin star. 


Panciera to Coach 
DAYTON, Ohio, Feb. 27 


- The University of Dayton an- 


Uline, 
s 


mounced today the appointment 
of Don Panciera, 28, as back- 
field coach. 

Panciera, a native of Rhode . 
Island, played college football 
et Boston College and the Uni- 
versity of San Francisco, as a 
quarterback. He played profes- 
sional football with the New 
York Yankees, the Detroit 
Lions and the Chicago Cardi- 
nals. 


Colby Names Clifford 


WATERVILLE. Maine, Feb 
27 W—Colby College today 
mamed as its new footba 
coach, Robert EF. Clifford. cur- 
rently assistant coach at Wil- 
liams College. 

President J. Seelye Bixler 
said Clifford, 39-year-old former 
assistant football coach at 
Northwestern University, will 
join Colby next fall. Clifford 
succeeds Frank Maze, who re- 
signed last December after four 
seasons at Colby. 


Lakers’ Coach Cries 


MINNEAPOLIS, Feb. 27 #* 
Coach Johnny Kundla of the 
Minneapolis Lakers today ac- 
cused National Basketball As- 
sociation referees of deliber- 
ately picking on his former 
champions. 

“They're giving it to us.” 
Kundla declared. Kundla him- 
self was clipped wit! a $25 fine 
during the Fort Wayne game 
efter telling Referee Mendy 
Rudolph, “You choked.” 


Haight Quits 

FREMONT, Neb., Feb. 27 
W. Mark Haight, 43, director of 
athletics and football coach at 
Midland College, said today he 
has submitted his resignation. 


Today’s Events 


COLLEGE BASKETBALL 
Gee. a ngshingten vs. Georgetown at 


Cat ay U. at 
Ga er ve. eam..." ad. at Miller 


ar. 
‘aleaa) > at Montgomery 3. C.. &. 
SERVICE og me 
re. ae 


we. Mees ° Artinet sion Hatt 


Portis Toland” be = Tables, a. 
COLLEGE SWIMMING 
am ae = =Pizce Championship 


Senue Meet at 
be HOCKEY 


Wesbiante 

INTERES a LE PAGE PL PLAYOFFS 
aa. NTERHIG Se. at MeKiniey 
OEE vs. Cardese of MeKiniey 
Lagemagpsigger et Bt gear egg 


wits PAs 7 ohms ot WL. 7. 


cabana SIE 


ork rant at fonret 7:15. 


re at Arundel, 


| | pitchers, too.” 


Ft. Meade. Wal. | 
in @4 Army 


Indians a better baseball team. 

“This is a wide-open ball 
|watched his big squad at work 
youngsters in camp. We're go-* 
ing to give them a real chance 
to make it. But even without 
the youngsters we're a new 
ball elub. 

“We've got speed we never 
had. Sure, we sacrificed long- 
ball hitting power. Now we've 
got speed and maybe that will 
even be better. Anyhow, I know 
we are going to have a more 
interesting club. 

“We can run. We definitely 
won't be striking out as much 
as last year.” 

Some of the Tribe's new 
speed came when homerun 


|hitting Larry Doby was traded 


to the Chicago White Sox for 
Jim Busby and Chico Carras- 
quel. 

“Busby is real fast on the 
bases,” Lopez said. “With him 
we can run the bases more. I'm 


‘not saying we're going to change 


our style of play, but we could 
We've got the offense now 
where we can change and use 
speed on the basepaths. It used 
to be that we sat and waited 
for the long ball | 

“Carrasquel will give us about 


‘45 points more batting power 


in the lineup. Doby and Strick- 
land were good on defense last 


‘year. Our defense will be about 


the same this season. 

Lopez said he's impressed 
with the youngsters in camp 
“Joe Altobelli is a real comer 
at first base,” he said. “We are 
going to give another young- 
ster, Rudy Regailado, a chance 
at first base as well. 

“And look at those catchers 
We've got eight in camp .. 
| We've got a fine group of young 


Busby Joins Tribe 
Heavier by 20 Pounds 


TUCSON, Ariz., Feb. 27 
Jim Busby. 29-year-old Texan, | 
has put back 20 of the pounds | 
he lost la&t season when his| 
batting average dropped to .239 
and says he’s ready right now 
to play center field for the 
Cleveland Indians. 

Busby refused to go into de-| 
tails of his batting slump de 
the Chicago White Sox last sea-! 
ison when his weight went dow n| 
ito 157 and his average zoomed | 
down from .330. He's now 177 | 
and hopes to add another five’! 
pounds. 


Two Braves Sign 


BRADENTON, Fla.. Feb. 
”—The Milwaukee Braves to- 
night announced signing out- 
fielders Billy Bruton and pitch-, 
er Humberto Robinson. 5 


27 


club.” 


Lopez remarked as he 
here today. “We've got a lot 


Andrews, 


. re 
Bolling Win 
LANGLEY AIR FORCE! 
BASE,, Va., Feb. 27 — Bolling} 
~y Force Base of Washington, 
C., advanced to the second | 
le of the Northeast 


Air} 
Force Conference Southern Di-! 
vision basketball] tournament’ 
by beating McGuire Air Force 
Base, 90-67. 

Defending champion An-| 
drews Air Force Base of Wash-! 
ington, D. C., beat Mitchell Air) 
Force, 101-69. 


MeGeire 
Alerei af 


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Matthews«e 
Burrews.s« 


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16 15 67 Totals 
Halftime seore: 35-32. Bolling. 

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Crago ies J 
Meward ’ oat 
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Tota | 
me scere: 15 1. Lensler. 


Andrews. Mitchell Afe 
Chanave Sega 
Goeteer 


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Tellingten.¢ 


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Malftime score. 5. 4%, 


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HOPE: 


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ed’s Joy, $39.40 Longshot, Wins Charles Town Feature‘! 


ee 93 


] 
oe 


Aroma T¥ T= Pundonor, | Race Selections at Charles Town| "tie 
Horses and People| sats wake lds Pt — IS 


By Walter Haight Nasromond |; er lem |g ge —| ae lee —|Re.. 


ac Soe ay any 
ARS Spinning Jenny Record Trip Record Tr Coda C co, 
ALTHOUGH SEVERAL topflight riders have warned, “if | Parnell ae k-Well Pete lyquest ciquest = == TIRE 
red i ' Close Fk ast hy SES Setises”* pap piyou Miele Eat goin 
Hu 
i 
i 


you want to know what happened in a race, don't ask a jockey,” Poiyquest =| Polyauest — 
’ . : ) dy Virginie Reddst Redbi unt Teentle dy Virginie ters Di 
“we'll have to string along with George Stidham who now | unters Diane ont Teepie : et Busan, Hunte , lady Virginie. Reddst Retin SPECIAL 
denies he was blown off his mount at Charles Town last , Softiv er. Diane Anna Jarv “enters Diane : Anna ee Lady Virginia 
By Walter Haight Big Tattoo rty olden, Dodie Aganaman EN fess IZA ~—s| Aganaman 


' 
| 
Saturday ... He said, “it sp gg ne ; Staff Reporter Aganaman franaptan rard Lea ster Dan Trard Les 
looked that way, but if my horse . | Errard Lea rrard Lee Aganaman ister Dan Aganaman Golden —. Tires 
es Unknown riy Traffic arinikin antath Ben Neat Guy arinikin 
erits Best antem Ben eat a Marinikin arinikin antam Bea 
n 


—t | 


hadn't stumbled I'd have finished on CHARLES TOWN, W. Va. 
him. But you can say the wind had ‘Feb. 27—C. E. Henry's Ted’s| arinikin Marinikin Bantam Bantam Ber Eggert Eegert Net Gu 
something to do with it If the horse Joy put his scattered backers Eonnatation essai ling Boy Rolling Boy eae, North Clark Bo burprised 
hadn't been blown sideways, perhaps 60 Surprised orth Clark rr Connatation Connatation connetetion. onnatatio 
he wouldn't have stumbled and I : = |'n @ gay mood on a rather) Tyrus oe Apure High Dividend Hish Dividend Matin Relieve 
might have stuck in the saddle except — balmy afternoon with a thrill-| Makin Believe fhe, Bi ene ' Aree Bop are, AP ve Pri kin ‘Petieve Pele Anus 
for the wind which was no help once « ¥ wane, ©6€=Cs ing nose victory in the Kayak pies on unter Plot WILLIAM TELL Quosas Wa : Toraaieng War Dauber i 
se geen par Rattgy Aged cages Fon: | : Il purse, named for the z ar Dauber revhrase. ornabuon! Busy Ambie ism “Tell of Your Own Wiltem ‘elt | 
: 3 mous West Coast Campaigner tS 


being an accessory before and after 


the fact that Stidham and the horse iat: The son of Hasteville was in " H t W f h 

separated approaching the stretch . . . , a hurry all the way and never P ld k Pi ks E Ch | fos orses to aic 

Our conversation ended when Stid- was worse than second. How | a OC uc m at ar es oun 

ham left me to chase a fellow jockey | CHARLES TOWN 

who had yelled, “Why don’t you admit ever, he barely finished ahead Post eneeee P.M. |"? Paner Ben ‘Gonlon)’” oon 

it, you bum? You “just fell off a Haight of a charging Pundoneor, FIRST RACE—Parse. and | § Loulsrilie Low (Amos)... Par HIGH VISION—On the im- 

horse.”...Which reminds me of the owned by the Magnolia Farm.| ,")°s* (ost sé oe hal : ¢ Montang. Pride. (Righ by) str “the one prove. Worth following up. 

time the late Pappy Witmer, not the best rider in the world but |Third money in the field of) 7 Mad Gal (Ciert: 13 Quatre Pass (Pinde t | 

a well- liked boy, had a mount at Bel Alr and told the press- eight- went to Mrs. J. T.j 8 Sun" Brandy (Gordon) ""abeat goven farlcabe tity: CO GES 3 MISTER CLIFF — Will be 

box gang, “The only way I can lose with this horse is to fall |Menziés Jr.'s Nasromond, beat-|,5 Solsning Jenny (ante res) ‘dropped into proper spot. Tab Blackwall 
1 him. 


off.” That's exactly what happe ned as the field broke Little (en after two decivise victories * 
Witmer. who went ‘hich in over this track SPEEDY FOOT—Good a Rubbe 

ood now fa 
will win soon. Cre ¥ J Co. 


the air and did a “president's The first program after Sat- am Pac ai + cer 
seat” on the hard, dry track, hand, 3-year-old winner of the |urtlay’s big blow, which forced ottle Patio "hon, oy) .. _ re Woe Neve 

THE VEEP — Turned in a 1602 14th St. N.W. 
good performance last time out. 
HU. 3-4666 


ews 
sere 


S23 


@6050we ews 


Win another 


- 


73 + ot oe BIO 
PLNe VEO D@ 
0) me eee pe ee 
> PRIS BO 
i a ’ ’ 
of 
’ 


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wore 
eer 


H 
was so angry he threw his Derby, got in the $100,000 the cancelling of the eighth iss Smith (Mcivor) Closer if starts 
whip at the horse. h , and ninth races, brought out SECOND RACE—Purse,, 81700; 3-rear-olds: ciuiming: sbost 
andicap with 100 pounds and a crowd of 4008 The track! .‘** ®*4 ene-bel favlonas (12) 

Nick Wall de h beat Sea- . ¥ ” it Rockwell Pete (Servis) ..Needs only repeat last 
aan aii made him Deal 5e@- was slow and Ted's Joe was (Russo)... Pe 
biscuit, carrying 130 pounds, ‘clocked in 1:18 for the about ond recent test 
6 furlongs. Backers of the 4 ‘Will be Fight = 
year-old collected a $39.40 win 
mutuel. Raymond Arduini of 


ures off 
who says his seat covers were | with me on Aneroid. See you |Falls Church, Va. rode Ted's 
blown off with the car locked | on the rail. Joy. , 
and all windows up ... I'm | Tetrapoise Wins Longshot Daily Double 
giad to report that the pigeon | anaes Seaieinn ideal tin SILVER GLOW and DE BARON 


amily, intinding the two ceptional speed in the feature. 
' sti Ppuuiie THIRD RACE—Purse. 81200; 4-rear-clds and ap: 
squabs who are ne ting in one | Hilltop II, Ted’s Joy and Pun-| Charles Town course (14) 
of the photofinish lights, Lady Virginia (Kratz) Like this one 
weathered the gusts in good donor fought for the early § Hunt rs Diana (Ci “ Ready. so well 
fashion. However, Mrs. Pi- lead with Nasromond being Cynel (Snyder) Figures aains t these 
geon, who speaks perfect pi- AT CHARLES TOWN rated just off the pace. After hed ig | SEC oni 
geon English, said yesterday Brandy s Gel 20, Record Trin & Seng half mile Ted's Joy drew ordon) 
“We're getting need ta the a Reck-Well Pete 11. clear and led by two lengths 
atomic flashes, but what goes |,,*;'aé7 ,Vitsinis 21. Munter's Diane SWINGING into the homestretch 
with this rock and roll stuff?” "4 —Errard Lee &3, Aganeamean 12. Sem- However, in the drive, Pun 
| << Sects O ore rallied alertly and closed A. rere, ene 
A iary. urse. 700; 4-vyeer- up; 
LARRY MacPHAIL, who 2. » North’ wasromond. who was forced: ,—* own course (14) 
had a strong hand in the de- | | ?—MAxim’ Believe 18. Feteh-It 11, Joe- to go to the outside, for the| | Asszam > «gate Sends Bee 
velopment of ball players cent jem Tell 15, Ternsbucnt 15. drive, closed boldly on the 
through the Yankees’ farm |‘*w#r*®™ extreme outside. Nearing the 
system is making his presence | AT WIALEAH PARK finish. Ted's Joy, a, Bihan 
oe in ag ago oe cir- tigue Lady S z neh o 4 and Nasromond fought it out 
cles via the Macrnall tarm , 4" — ee “8 furiously with Ted's Joy just 
system ... His latest venture "nears Cut 17. Wie Miss 5. Kine- managing to last under the! Call Mr Bond now! 
interest in the colt. It hasn't , mer Gal ts. Fiset Father” & E. A. Nicodemus’ Our Ace Yennse ‘b eckle (Brooks) 6 we 
$5000 
Funkhouser sent a dozen 


is a partnership with the Aga wens od Besher 11, Cook's Teer 16, strong urging of Jockey Ar-| HIALEAH PARK RESULTS SANTA ANITA ENTRIES 
and get this handsome expensive 
(Stevensen) 
but ran a dull race and fin-| W's ig, S200: 1:60". £40 2-20 
- 10 
names to the Jockey Club be- 


“a 
Khan, no less, in the owner- Olymaie rela Gal 16. Bold Hunter 18. duini. | eka} miles: $3800; 1.585 , 1%): 6 year-old maiden fillies Firing Bo r 
ship of Hafiz II, three-year- set's ‘. Jay Jax 4. Tetrapolse, owned by Mrs. kg | 4-10 3.99 3 3-60 Impertinent 118 Home Ta Bere 13 
old winner of the Champion | PIFTEEN $1. Besher Fan. Virginia McKenney of Wash-| Pudee king Best Fiee,, Bégar J 
Y ew ister De But Whe 
Stakes in England last year. | wy 9 #, Judgement § Pree & Marsicen a imaton, D. C., won the fifth | Mise Pei ver, Circiine, Bu , 
The son of Nearco and Double — Brock 11. Brecae fi 1k "Ge and secondary feature race.|~s_% none. 83500, 30% 
Rose Ill won eight races and worn & ithe Microphone purse, by a Cupid Girl (W'dhouse) . 7 
08 |t Modern Design 

been decided if Hafiz If will |, e's Birthday 14, Bidere 14. Howdy finished second while Mag- "le Bleck) 11.60| 3—'s: $4500: S-year-old = eas tale Og «year olds up; alwe Swedish $ 
be raced or bred in this coun- Mee be aroer %. Free Siride 9 Be- nolia Farm's Silver Omar took ytdens Apes. C .- yeyo- cesta Ww un of Queen ..138| The Character i} 17 Co omic TUER .. ) 
try, although MacPhail hopes lonpracter he 19, Hour Referds 19. The show honors in the field of re First. Buide Babe. | Whi re» lentonian 1}8| Sreeps Sams 129 Valiant | oe | 2 4 p C 
> ares ree sere AS mead § S© Fortormer 19, O64 Mil 1. Trece SEVEN. } sue om } 4-5 | ytees liver foanes ail Bent r ie. 8 = Recards . 
any rate he will get the bene- ad 6. Tetrapoise, a Syear-old son! w~ 5 furl ei boy es nalft .. : Aci ; 
fit of the blood line which at- of Equistone, raced the about Plime iii” 3-38 3 iz 
tracted him to the colt in the HIALEAH ENTRIES 7 furlongs in 1:31 flat. Off ag) *echerche (Baller) oni , one Oreedy a panes 
first place ... Trainer Frank | 11s: s1s0o: «-s#ar-cids wo: clme.|the third choice im the bet-|ier. Sunnréene, Candias | Sariite Abeer 

Siished fifth. rincess Kiss (Blum ) 

09 r Rae 

The daily double on the 4 erGiacl parse Shia er fl, dicks Bil Pretty soft for you 
fore being assigned the famil- jand 6 tickets paid $25.40 aoe —— —— ame 
jar barroom expression ... | iE. A. Nicodemus’ Swinging! pecathion (Marts tn re i} 98 258 +f an exact reproduction of imported 
Tagg wens am Bey Breet : Hocreers ting Jor 28 ond mers 

ave orses in training. 

Frank Gall has six at Charles 
Town with the others at 
Bowie in charge of his 
brother, Bob. 


‘seeae. Mardly the one 
Last was bad | 
.-On the improve i 
ve RAC a aene: i% 4-vyear-olds and up: slileowances: 
ries SoA Lourte ‘7 


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I MISSED THE big wind 
The majority of the reports of 
the 100 mph. blow doubt- | by racing's thinnest nose... 
lessly are true. However, I | That was the year Washing- 
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we ~~ very eens 


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LIGHTH RACE—Puree. $1700: 4-vear-clds and ap: claiming: 
ene end ene-eichth miles (14) 
bpaas (Snyder)... «Regt over this field 129 3 , THE FINEST OF SEAFOOD 
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Due for maprovemnes rt 
Secend jest time 
Some good races 

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Pair at ti imes 

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« 
EUGENE MEYER, Chairmen of the Bocrd 
_ AMES RUSSELL WIGGINGS, Vice President and frecutive Fditor 
ABROOK Editorial Page Editor 
Managing fditor 
Contributing f£ditor 
: oecretary 
” "President wroPp Radio and Television 


: 


‘The Washington oo 


PHILIP'L. GRAHAM, President and Publisher 


JOHN W. .. Viee President and General Manager 
DONALD M,. BERNARD . «Whee President and Advertising Director 
ADRIAN 6. PISHER Vice President and Counsel 
canny GLADSTEIN Cireulation Director 


«+. Production Manecer 


AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER ss 


PAGE 24 


—— ee 


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1956 


Two Sides of Dulles 


If Secretary Dulles had been as restrained and 
persuasive in his appearance before the Senate 
Foreign Relations Committee last week as he was 
in his exemplary address in Philadelphia on Sunday, 
he would have invited far less criticism. Mr. 
Dulles was at a disadvantage, to be sure, in facing 
a barrage of senatorial questions immediately on 
his return from a needed vacation. What was 
infuriating about his performance was that he 
managed to convey a lack of comprehensible Amer- 
ican policy in the Middle East in almost the same 
breath with his politically tinged claim that Ad- 
ministration policies have forced the change in 
Soviet tactics. He seemed to display a hostility 
toward Israel quite out of keeping with understand- 
ing of the tension there, and his attitude toward 
the broader Soviet economic challenge seemed 
almost smug. It was as if the Secretary of State, 
while watching a twister demolish the garage, were 
quoting Browning that “all's right with the world.” 

There is some truth in the contention that past 
Western strength has been a faetor in the change 
in Soviet policy. Also, it probably would be un- 
realistic to think that the West could have fore- 
stalled altogether the new Soviet approach. But 
Mr. Dulles invited a horse laugh when he indicated 
that the Russians have not been making progress 
and that the Western position is stronger today than 
it was a year ago. Anyone who looks about him 
can see the erosion of our position. If Mr. Dulles 
were to say that this position is imperiled, that the 
problems are very difficult, he would have much 
sympathy. But when he brags about programs that 
are patently inadequate, when he attempts to puff 
up such paper projects as the Baghdad Pact into 
something meaningful despite the American failure 
to infuse it with life, he forfeits respect. Pri- 
vately, Mr. Dulles is known to be a good bit less 
sanguine about the problems of foreign policy. 
Why he injures his own standing by attempts at 
political gloss is something that could be explained 
only by an understanding of his own complex 
personality. 

At any rate, there was little of this gloss in his 
Philadelphia speech, which this newspaper ranks 
among Mr. Dulles’ best efforts. He diagnosed the 
new Soviet economic campaign as designed “to 
subvert and communize the nations that are its 
targets,” and he recognized the difficulties some 
nations face in resisting Soviet blandishments. He 
envisaged the ultimate possibilities of change in 
Russia, while acknowledging the constant danger 
that the old military pressures may be reasserted. 
He gave an eloquent plea for a relatively modest 
program of long-term economic commitments in 
Asia—a program which, as Ambassador Cooper has 
pointed out with respect to India, would make an 
enormous difference in the success of India's five- 
year plan for economic stability. Mr. Dulles ended 
with a compelling description of this country's 
interest in helping other nations in terms of the 
values of the Declaration of Independence. 

If there is criticism of this approach, it is that 
the program is too modest—that it does not carry 
enough of the breadth and daring urged by Paul 
Hoffman, John Cowles and others. The way to 
counter the Soviet Union is not merely to react, 
but to be there first with a better and sustained 
program. But of the two sides of his thinking Mr. 
Dulles has recently laid before the public, this is 
by far the more appealing. Let us hope that this 
is the side he will show in Asia on his trip that 
begins this week. 


Visitors From Italy 


President Giovanni Gronchi and Foreign Minister 
Gaetano Martino of Italy are welcome guests this 
week in Washington. They.are welcome first of all as 
representatives of an important nation of friendly 
people to whom Americans owe a continuing debt. 
This debt is found in the cultural heritage, the 
music and art, the millions of geod citizens Italy has 
furnished to this country. President Gronchi and 
Dr. Martino also are welcome for reasons of state. 
That Italy succeed in her economic struggle to raise 
the standard of living and spread the benefits to 
low income groups is of vital importance to the 
Western World. President Gronchi's feeling that 
the Christian Democratic coalition of Prime 
Minister Segni must move to the left and sponsor 
more comprehensive reforms if it is to win con- 
tinued support is a feeling that has much sympathy 
among observers of the Italian scene. President 
Gronchi will have an opportunity to explain this 
in detail and to place in perspective his thoughts 
about the possibility of wooing the Nenni Socialists 
away from the Communists. He and Dr. Martino 
also will have a chance to discuss their views about 
the weaknesses in NATO and about Italy’s new 
relationship in the United Nations. For their part 
the American representatives will have a chance 
to size up the new role of the Italian President as 
Signor Gronchi exemplifies it. Amicable discus- 
sion should be useful all the way around. 


Atomic Leadership 


“Atomic energy in the form of industrial power 
could so renew the face of the earth,” Atomic 
Energy Commissioner Thomas E. Murray told the 
Joint Committee on Atomic Energy the other day, 
“that man would live on it more abundantly.” This 
is the promise that has been held out to the hopes 
of mankind since science first developed this vast 
and terrifying source of power. But the hopes 
have gone glimmering as new weapons of destruc- 
tion were perfected, while peaceful applications 
were comparatively neglected. Commissioner Mur- 
ray'’s purpose in going before the Joint Committee 
and voicing a disagreement with his AEC colleagues 
was to urge that the Government get behind a pro- 
gram of atomic power development in something 
like the way.it has gotten behind the program of 
weapon development. 

We believe, as we have said on a number of past 
occasions, that Mr. Murray is quite right in assert- 
ing that the imminent development of atomic power 
by private initiative alone is a pipe dream. One 
. compelling reason why private industrial concerns | 
have done little or nothing toward building reactors” 
and generating power for industrial_uses in the 
United States is that water power and coal are so 
plentiful in this country that the generation of 
power by atomic fission is unlikely to be economic- 


ally profitable for many years te:come. Another 
reason may be that private enterprises, entrusted 
by the AEC with no more than a limited knowledge 
of reactor progress, are fearful that future develop- 
ments—or, indeed, knowledge now available to 
the AEC but as yet undisclosed—may leave them 
saddled with an obsolete process if they undertake 
the tremendous investment of constructing a re- 
actor at this time. 

As Mr. Murray observes, therefore; “at the 
moment our sweeping promises to the world con- 
cerning atomic power are in danger of going by 
default.” Worse, they are in danger of being taken 
over by the Soviet Union. Mr. Murray urges Con- 
gress to give the AEC an additional billion dollars 
over the next five years to enable it to build atomic 
power plants capable of generating 2 million kilo- 
watts of electricity—half of it at home and half 
abroad. Public policy rather than economic con- 
siderations should be the controlling factor, in his 
opinion. We share this view. Leadership in the. 
peaceful uses of atomic energy may be no less 
important than supremacy in military applications 
in the decade of struggle that lies ahead. 


Reporting Comes First 


The amount of support Majority Leader Johnson 
and Minority Leader Knowland are mustering in 
their bipartisan efforts to obtain a practical elec- 
toral reform law is very encouraging. One indica- 
tion of the breadth of the support is the bill intro- 
duced yesterday by Rep. Wilbur Mills to grant a 
$100 income tax deduction on political contribu- 
tions. This is essentially the same proposal already 
made by Senator Hennings and Representative 
Udall, and its enactment should help stimulate 
small contributions at a time when expenditures 
are being brought under better control. Sjnce tax 
measures must originate in the House, additional 
sponsorship by one of the ranking members of the 
Ways and Means Committee materially increases 
the chance of action. 

In light of the progress of the reform bill it is 
unfortunate that a statement issued by Senator 
Hennings’ office has attacked the Johnson-Knowland 
draft for its failure to include primaries. We agree 
that it would be desirable to have a new law on 
campaign expenditures include primaries, . which 
are the meaningful elections in perhaps one third 
of the states. There was such a provision in the 
original Hennings bill, and it is useful to have the 
principle restated. Soundings on Capitol Hill have 
indicated, however, that because of controversy 
over Federal powers a bill covering primaries 
would face many difficulties. 

Senator Johnson has indicated that he does not 
rule out the reporting of expenditures in primaries, 
and we hope that he and Mr. Knowland will find an 
acctptable formula. Perhaps the answer lies in 
the proposal of Senator Mundt to require candi- 
dates to file in Washington duplicate copies of their 
reports to the states on campaign contributions and 
expenditures. In any event, our own feeling is 
that it would be better to concentrate on a general 
bill covering the reporting of contributions and 
expenditures, even though it might fall short of 
the ideal, than to permit a fight over primary 
coverage to snag the whole effort. 

The compelling need is to obtain full reporting 
of campaign contributions and expenditures in gen- 
eral elections, with realistic over-all limits and with 
identification of the original source of funds. That 
is the approach which the Johnson-Knowland effort 
appears to take, and it is almed at correcting the 
major evil which concerns Mr. Hennings—namely, 
the dependence on and influence of undisclosed 
funds. The proposed plan also would include the 
$100 income tax deduction and a provision enabling 
television and radio stations to grant free time to 
major presidential contestants. The important 
thing, it seems to us, is to get behind this plan 
which would correct the big defects and has a 
reasonable chance of passage, and to leave the 
more controversial qualifications for later action 
if necessary after the reform becomes law. 


Back to Burke 


It has taken three years for the Department of 
Commerce to recognize the obvious need for the 
proposed Burke airpori—three years of costly 
waste, great uncertainty for residents of the area 
and inexcusable delay in preparing Washington 
for the jet age. Any study of management prac- 
tices surely would point to the pulling and hauling 
over a program that agencies of the Department 
recommended five years ago as a horrible example 
of confusion and inefficiency. Nevertheless, it 
would be wrong to look a gift horse, or a spins | 
gift airport, too closely in the mouth. It is encot- 
raging to have the assurance of Louis S. Rothschild, 
the Under Secretary of Commerce for Transporta- 
tion, that the Department is prepared to ask Con- 
gress for money to start the Burke airport if the 
recommendation for use of Andrews Air Force 
Base is rejected. 

It ought to be ag apparent to Mr. Rothschild as 
to others that Andrews will be rejected as an 
alternative because joint military-civilian operation 
is not only infeasible but dangerous. Precisely 
what Mr. Rothschild means by operation of the 
Burke airport by a tripartite authority at a later 
stage remains to be seen. A case can be made 
generally that local authorities should take over 
at least some of the airport functions now exercised 
by the Federal Government; and probably the 
airlines ought to contribute more toward meeting 
the cost. But it would be foolish to think of a 
tripartite authority here as a practical current 
possibility, especially before an airport was built. 
Apart from the staggering jurisdictional problems 
involving Virginia and Maryland, there is the 
sobering fact that the District, because of its 
peculiar budgetary problems, is i‘at broke. At any 
rate, Mr. Rothschild seems to have recognized the 
principle of Federal responsibility to get the air- 
port under way. | 

Great credit goes to Senator Monroney and his 


“Somebody From Outside: Must Have Influenced Them” R oily: Gear Scio ‘F < 


ermBptoctk. 
Wash eTown Petr & 


Letters to the Editor 


“Bonds and Chains” 


Re your cditorial of Feb. 23, 
“Bonds and Chains,” it is my 
opinion you are correct when 
you say “Arlingtonians have not 
turned against” the school board 
they elected last fal I believe 
it is a protest against the yearly 
real estate tax increases we 
homeowners have to pay. I 
know my own vote, and that of 
my husband was such a pro- 
test. 

For example: the tax on our 
property in 1934 was $50.40, by 
1948 it was $98.80, the next 
seven years a raise each year 
until we paid $146.05 in 1955. 
Same property, but older, as 
are we. 

More bonds voted, more 
taxes; and you just cannot pay 
them on a fixed small retire- 
ment income, no matter if you 
would like to ‘Vote Bonds.’ We 
have paid real estate and all 
other taxes in Arlington for 
over 34 years 

CAROLYN H. BASSFORD. 

Arlington. 


False Alarms 


One Sunday evening recently 
as I left my home on an errand 
I was met by clanging sirens 
and flashing lights of three fire 
engines, a hook and ladder 
truck and about eight cars of 
volunteer firemen. Much to my 
surprise, they were rushing to 
my home, which had been re- 
ported as having smoke coming 
from all windows and the roof. 
Needless to say, my home was 
not on fire. 

When the excitement had 
subsided, though, the horrible 
thought occurred to me—what 
if there had been someone in 
the neighborhood whose home 
was on fire and they were fran- 
tically awaiting the fire depart- 
ment’s arrival while some 
prankster had sent them on a 
“wild goose chase’; and it ob- 
viously was a prank because a 
few minutes later an ambulance 
came to the house across the 
street to pick up a “seriously 
injured child” which was also 
a false alarm. 

If a child had called for these 
emergency vchicies, he cer- 


tainly should be severely pun- 
ished and if he were an adult— 
I can’t find words of contempt 
to fit him. At any rate, my 
point is this: Please, parents and 
teachers alike, impress upon 
your children the seriousness 
of such a deed and the tragic 
consequences it could have. It 
might help to prevent some of 
the terrible tragedies that we 
so often read about where the 
fire department or the police 
weren't able to get there in 
time. MOTHER OF FOUR. 
Silver Spring, Md. 


Correction, Please 


Is it the policy of your news- 
paper to assume for editorial 
purposes facts contrary to 
those printed as “news”? My 
assumption is that the Page 1 
news stories by Robert Baker 
on Feb. 8 and Feb. 9 were fac- 
tual. 

May I quote’? . 

Feb, 8, “The bill is scheduled 
to be reported out following a 
hearing set for 10 a. m. Thurs 
day in the Wall of the House of 
Delegates - 

Feb. 9, Ben ge wy of the bill 
face an uphill fight before the 
House Privileges and Elections 
Committee, which will hold the 
hearings jointly with the Sen- 
ate Committee ... 

“If the bill is reported out 
of the committee, it faces a 
fight...” 

The next quotation is from 
the editorial, “Consent of the 
Governed," Feb. 9. 

The measure so cava- 
lierly ‘reported out of commit- 
tee seems slated to encounter 
a stiff floor fight... 

On what basis does your edi- 
torial writer assume the bill has 
been reported out of committee 
befor the scheduled public 
committee hearing was held? 

MRS. H. C. BUXTON, 

Dunn Loring, Va 

Editor’s Note: Our editorial 
obviously was m error, and we 
apologize to._the committee for 
prejudging tts actions—though 
not for our criticism of the Mon- 
cure bill itself. The dill actually 
was reported to the House on 
Feb. 21. 


Rude Audiences 


I once overheard two gentle- 
men conversing and one of them 
remarked, “Well, this city 
should become the center of 
conventions and culture.” Sir, 
I assure you we have no lack 
of conventions in this fair city 
but, oh, the culture! 

When an audience will arise 
immediately after the last 
selection of a prominent artist 
and/or a group of five musi- 
cians, and the last strains have 
not yet carried the last echo 
through the hallowed halls of 
the DAR stronghold, Le., Con- 
stitution Hall, it behooves some- 
one to protest such action. 

I presume many of these 
“lovers of music” would think 
it horrifying to leave in the 
middie of an address from the 
President; many of them would 
never depart from a commer- 
cial on the home television set. 
Yet, these same members of the 
educated species of animals on 
earth scramble from their seats 
while an accomplished musi- 
cian is walking from the stage. 
Where are they going? To a 
fire? To a restaurant? To a car 
parking lot? 

The beloved Dama Myra Hess 
played three or four encores. 
The accomplished Jascha 
Heifetz strummed three delight- 
ful tunes not listed on the pro- 
gram, These are just twa of the 
finest ‘performers this country 
has to offer to music lovérs. Yet 
they must submit to such un- 
dignified reception! 

How many of us resent, and 
justly so, others treading over 
our feet, brushing past our 
eyes, stumbling up the aisle 
even while the musicians are 
returning for another round of 
applause from those of us who 
go to hear and not to rudely 
disrupt such fine performances? 

New York frowns upon such 
actions. London would be furi- 
ous. San Francisco hisses such 
disturbances. Why should Wash- 
ington permit such unmannerly 
evidences of rudeness? 

MARGOT A. THOMAS. 

Washington. 


Soviet Visit to London 


Nowhere are the Americans 
and British as popular as in the 
countries ruled by the Soviets. 
This may be due to some extent, 
to the propaganda campaign, 
which the Soviets have been 
waging within the last ten 
years, against the United States 
and Great Britain. For the op- 
pressed open their hearts to 
those whom the oppressors 
hate. 

Even before that time my 
country, Hungary, was linked 
by an old tradition of friendship 
to these two great countries. 
The United States and Great 
Britain had supported the Hun- 
garian cause of freedom in the 
ig of independence of 1848. 
4 ‘ 


In September, 1849, a promis- 
ing young Congressman, Abra- 
ham Lincoln, proposed a reso- 
lution to a pro-Hungarian mass 
meeting: “. . . the immediate 
acknowledgment of the inde- 
pendence of Hungary by our 
Government is due from Ameri- 
can free men to their struggling 
brethren...” 

In September, 1850, the Aus- 
trian general, Julius Baron von 
Haynau, who had ordered the 
execution of 13 Hungarian gen- 
erals, was beaten up by a 
London mob. 

The British parliamentary 
system, and traditions of 
political fair play, served as 

the small states, 

the dissolution 

of the Austro-Hungarian mon- 
archy were threatened one 
after.the other, by two totali- 


our peoples would immediately 
be swallowed up by Hitler. 

I clearly remember the day— 
it was in February, 1945—when 
the Germans shot down a 
British airplane which had 
dropped leaflets over our con- 
centration camp in Ohrdruf, 
Thuringia. “Hold out, your 
suffering will soon come to an 
end,” the leaflets, bearing the 
joint signatures of Roosevelt 
and Churchill, announced. 

The 5000 prisoners’of Ohrdruf 
concentration camp wanted to 
place a wreath of pine boughs 
on the coffin of the pilot, who 
we felt had sacrificed his life 
for us. However, the camp 
command barred us from at- 
tending his funeral. At that the 
camp inmates stopped their 
work, and we held a symbolic 
funeral ceremony for the dead 
pilot, in the depth of the forest. 
Five among us who had partici- 
pated in this demonstration 
were beaten to death by the 
SS 


Prepossessed by such mem- 
ories, it came as a great shock 
to. England's friends behind 
the Iron Curtain to learn that 
Khrushchev and Bulganin, who 
represent the opposite of all 
that England stands for, were 
invited by the British govern- 
ment to visit London in April. 

I do not fear that the Lon- 
doners will receive the dicta- 
tors with flowers and ovations, 
as was done in India and 
Burma. Nevertheless, I have 
grave considerations as to the 
disastrous effects this visit will 
have upon the European conti- 
nent, in the free countries as 
much as in the enslaved ones. 

Behind the Iron Curtain the 
masses will feel sold out and 


been unsuccessful in wangling 
an invitation to Paris. 

The French are fully aware 
that with the help of highly 
developed © Communist _tech- 
nique, the Communist masses 
of Paris and its suburbs, num- 
bering millions, could arrange 
such a festive reception for 
Bulganin and Khrushchev, 
which might equal a triumphal 
march. It would be far more 
difficult for the Socialist-Radi- 
cal Guy Mollet-Mendes France 
government to turn a deaf ear 
to Moscow demands after the 
London visit. 

The peoples of West Europe 
are afraid that this visit to 
London will lend prestige and 
respectability to the. dictators. 
They ask themselves what the 
reaction of Great Britain 
would have been had Hitler 
for any reason been invited to 
Washington, even to discuss 
the reunification of France, 
after her defeat. 

Can the Bulganin-Khrushchev 
visit offer such advantages to 
Great Britain, which would 
compensate for the bitterness 
it causes to her friends? I do 
not think so. In Malaya and 
in the African dominions Soviet 
agents will not discontinue 
their sinister work of stirring 
up revolts. During the festive 
celebrations the dictators wil? 
try to please their hosts and 
at the same time compromise 
them in the eyes of their 
friends. 

The Bulganin- Khrushchev 
visit will bring nothing else to 
Great Britain except bitter ex- 
periences. The British are not 
the first ones to try coexist- 
ence with the Soviets. The 
Albanian, Bulgarian, Czecho- 

ovakian, Hungarian, — 

Romanian statesmen have_ 


ttle it, too. 
| BELA FABIAN, 
New York. 


. " } 


vy 


To Win Cold War. 


By Marquis Childs 


Gusesees a. 


A REPORT based on first-hand observe 
tion adds another note of warning that edu- 
cation in the Soviet Union is far outstrip. 
ping education in the United States. 

The massive educa- | 
tional program still ex- 
panding in Russia, under 


' which today nearly twice 


as many students are en- 
rolled above the high 
school level as in this 
country, is one reason 
for the extraordinary 
confidence expressed: by 
Soviet leaders at the re- 
cent 20th Congress of the Childs 
Communist Party. 

For as the latest warning, from former 
Sen. William Benton of Connecticut, makes 
clear, the Soviet educational system ‘is 
geared to win the cold war. 

Benton, who made an intensive study of 
Soviet education and propaganda last year, 
says that system is producing.g surplus of 
engineers and technicians who will be as 
signed to carry out technical assistance in 
every uncommitted coiifitry of the world, 
While getting their scientific training, they 
are thoroughly indoctrinated in the Marx- 
ist-Lenin line. 

There are schools—and this seems to 
have escaped the attention of éven special- 
ists whose business is to know what is go- 
ing on in Russia—in which all the training 
from the first grade on is in English, 
French or German. Graduates of these 
schools have a fluent working knowledge 
of the language they will need when they 
are sent abroad to do a technicial—and 
propaganda—job. 

ow 

WITH A RUSSIAN-speaking interpreter 
and assistant, Benton took a tour of Soviet 
Russia's universities, technical institutions, 
laboratories and libraries. In a 30,000- 
word article for the Britannica Yearbook, . 
of which he is publisher, Benton writes: 

“The Soviets are now challenging us 
frontally at what have historically been 
two of our strongest points, technology and 
mass education. The present rate of Rus- 
sian educational advance is faster than 
our own, just as their growth-rate in indus- 
trial production surpasses ours. The gap 
in total performance. is closing. It is clos 
ing rapidly. 

“In less than 30 years the Soviets have 
created a primary school system rivaling 
our own in universality, with nearly 100 per 
cent enrollment. Their secondary school 
system is mushrooming amazingly; by 1960 
every Russian youngster is to be given an 
education at least comparable to a better 
high school diploma. 

“They have already surpassed us in both 
the number and percentage of students 
enrolled in institutions above the second- 
ary level—with 4,300,000—to our 2,700,000,” 

In two speeches late last year, Adm. 
Lewis L. Strauss, chairman of the At~mie 
Energy Commission, sounded an equally 
grave alarm. He said it was evident the 
United States was rapidly falling behind 
Soviet Russia in the training of scientists 
and technicians with the “certainty that 
we are turning out less than one-half the 
number of scientists and engineers we re-_ 
quire—an alarming statistic by itself.” 

The deficiency begins, according te 
Strauss, in the high schools, where science 
training has long been inadequate and 
standards of science teaching dropping 
rapidly. He cited the fact more than half 
of all American high schools fail to teach 
physics or chemistry. 

In contrast, Benton points out that in the 
last years of secondary school, Soviet stu 
dents must take four years of mathematics, 
including algebra, geometry and trigonom- 
etry. 

oo 

THE OBJECTIVE, it is hardly necessary 
to add, is a Communist education—that is, 
first-rate technical training buttressed by 
complete indoctrination in Communist 
dogma. It is the combination of indoe 
trinated zeal with technical proficiency 
that is so ominous for the West, 

In a recent speech, Benton proposed the 
creation of technical assistance academies 
similar to West Point and Annapolis where 
young men of superior intelligence would 
be trained as engineers and technicians in 
every field. 

The academies would be attached to and 
under the supervision of such outstanding 
institutions as the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology and California Tech. !n re- 
turn for their free education, young men 
would, agree to sign up for a certain num- 
ber of years of service in America’s tech- 
nical assistance program overseas. 

Short of some positive, constructive step 
such as this, thé drift will continue. And 
if estimates of Soviet progress are even 
approximately right, the gap will widen and 
America will fall increasingly behind, 

To permit this to happen is hardly less 
than an admission of defeat. For if we have 
learned nothing else in the atomic-elec- 
tronie age, it is that the engineers and 
scientists of today win the battles of to- 
morrow. 


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a0 | | 


Today and Tomorrow . 


| Getting Rid of the Surpluses 


SECRETARY Benson's stat- 
| have made a calcu- 
that but for the accumu- 

"— now 


eight billion 
dollars—farm 


20 per cent 
higher. As 
these sur- 


temptation 
to get rid of them abroad is 
naturally very strong. Sen. 
Bridges has let it be known 
that the Senate Republican 
Policy Committee is disturbed 
over reports of “resistance” 
by the State Department and 
the Defense Department. The 
Policy Committee is also 
agreed that the Administration 
should be “pushed, pressured, 
and encouraged” to step up 
surplus disposal. 

The trouble with this idea 
is that so many of the allied 
and friendly countries abroad 
also have surpluses which they 
need to dispose of. Our efforts 
to get rid of parts of our sur- 
pluses at cut-rate prices, easy 
terms, and as outright gifts are 

- Being denounced, accurately 
enough, as dumping. Thus New 
Zealand has protested that 
“dairy products are now being 
dumped at prices well below 


those ruling in world markets.” 


Mr. C. D. Howe, the Trade Min- 
ister of Canada, a country also 
bedeviled as we are by a wheat 
surplus, has complained that 
“markets generally are disor- 
ganized by VU. S.. surplus dis 

measures.” Thailand and 

a, themselves recipients 
of certain of our surpluses, are 


Pa ee 


— oS 


e By Walter Lippmann 


protesting that we are dumping 
rice, which interferes unfairly 
with’ their rice. export trade. 
Uruguay has made a protest 
against our agreement to sup- 
ply Brazil with wheat and other 
farm products, contending that 
they compete unfaitiy with 
Uruguay's trade with Brazil. 

No wonder the State De- 
partment is not finding it easy 
t6 dispose of the surpluses in 
a hurry. The Department is, 
in fact, in a jam. It is under 
pressure from Congress to 
dump the surpluses and under 
attack abroad from the coun- 
tries which suffer from the 
dumping. 


IT IS ALMOST certafiity an* 


error to think that our farm 
troubles can be solved, or even 
appreciably alleviated, by the 
effort to get rid of the sur- 
pluses abroad. In 1955 we 
made strenuous efforts under 
a number of different Acts. 
The Administration got rid of 
something over two billion 
dollars’ worth of surplus com- 
modities, of which a little over 
one billion was disposed of 
abroad. But the surpluses ac- 
cumulated at home are bigger 
than they ever were. 

The basic fact of the matter 
is that only 10 per cent of our 
total agricultural production 
is exported, and though the 
world market is important for 
certain crops, the problem 
cannot be solved by pushing it 
off on to the world markets. 
It is not possible to dispose of 
the surpluses quickly even by 
a combination of such devices 
as giving them away, selling 
them for currencies we do not 
need, or bartering them for 
foreign commodities that we 
would buy anyway. 


FOR US to push very hard 
along these lines, essentially 
that of dumping, would almost 
certainly do us more harm 


abroad than it does us good 
here at home. For we must | 
not lose sight of a cardinal | 
element of the new. Soviet | 
campaign in Asia and in Afri- 
ca. This is the willingness of 
the Soviet government to be 
paid, or at least to appear to 
be paid for its industrial goods, 
by accepting payment in cot- | 
ton from Egypt, rice from 
Burma, jute from Pakistan, ac- | 
cepting in other words, the 
surpluses of the wunderde- 
veloped countries. We shall 
not do well in this contest 
with the Soviet government if 
the Soviet accepts commodi- 
ties which are in surplus while 
we dump those same com- | 
modities. ) 


ALL THIS is not to say that 
some part, some comparative- 


ly small part of our surpluses, 
cannot be disposed of abroad 


through commercial channels. | } 


Appreciable amounts can still 
be gotten rid of abroad) 
through programs designed to | 
help remedy undernourish- 
ment and raise economic pro- 
ductivity provided these pro- 
grams are wisely conceived 
and administered as aid pro- 
grams and not as dumping 
measures, But in the main we 
should regard these surpluses 


i 


’ 
; 
aa? 


as a reserve to be drawn upon 
in time of disaster at home or | 
abroad, when there are great | 
crop failures or natural catas- | 
trophies such as floods, ty- | 
phoons, earthquakes, drought. 
These surpluses cannot really 
be disposed of in the world 
market any more than they 
can be disposed of in the do- 
mestic market, and as an eco- 
nomic factor in supply and de- 
mand there is nothing to be 
done with these surpluses ex- | 
cept to isolate and neutralize 
them. 


1966. w . Berald 
enedin bervioni 


Washington Scene . . . 


Those Badlands Aren’t So Bad 


KARL MUNDT is the Sena- 
tor from South Dakota who 
was NOT bothered by a 
campaign contribution. But 
the fact that 
the junior® 
Senator, Fran- & 
cis Case, is © 
cur rently 
grabbing the ~ 
headlines does ¥ 
not mean that 5 
senior Sen- 
ator Mundt 
is allowing 
grass roots to 
grow in his 
street. 

While all the furor over 


“did it have strings?” rages 
around the junior Senator, 
the senior Senator is calmly 
telling married couples who 


expect boy children they 
should go live in South Da 
k 


ota. 

Instead of 25 $100 bills, 
Senator Mundt is brandishing 
the latest report of the De- 
partment of Health, Educa- 
tion and Welfare’s National 
Office of Vital Statistics. It 
states that males born in 
South Dakota can expect to 
live longer than those born in 
any other state. They have a 
life expectancy of 68.4 years, 
as against a national average 
of 663 years. 

There is only one tsetse fly 
fn Senator Mundt’s ointment. 


By George Dixon 


South Dakota isn’t as healthy 
for females. 

Girls born in Nebraska 
can expect to live the longest 
—74 years. Those born in 
South Dakota have an expect- 
ancy of only 73.6 years. 

Senator Mundt thinks there 
is only one thing to do— 
lower the immigration bar- 
riers and let women from Ne- 
braska come in his state and 
marry men of South Dakota. 


I CAN hardly wait for the 
fourth annual Republican Na- 
tlonal Women’s Conference to 
open here March 5. Myrtle 
Tinklepaugh will be in town. 

Mrs. Tinklepaugh is Repub- 
lican chairman of Columbia 
County, N. ¥. Not the cochair- 


county's political boss. 

But the county has many 
other interesting features in 
addition to Myrtle Tinkle- 
paugh. Its county seat, 
Hudson, was once a center of 
the whaling industry, although 
it is 125 miles from the sea. 
In 1805 Hudson lost its chance 
to be capital of New York 
State by one vote. P 

(Just think, but for that 
solitary vote Carmine De 
Sapio would be making regu- 


lar pilgrimages to Hudson to | 
coax Governor Harriman into 
letting herself be a presiden- 
tial candidate). 

Columbia County also has 
a Shaker museum with nearly 
4000 Shaker relics, including 
a washing machine said to be 
the first ever invented. But its 
main attraction is still GOP 
Czarina Tinklepaugh. 

I have never met the lady, | 
but she captivates me, too. I 
can't keep this jingle from 
mushing through my head: 
Tinkle, tinkle, Tinklepaugh 
How I wonder what you augh? 
In the GOP so high; ! 
Columbia County's dernier cri. | 


THE WASHINGTON corre | 
of a national weekly 
is tearing what little hair he 
has left over an assignment 
imposed upon him the other 
day. His editor ordered him 
to ask the Department of 
Health, Education and Wel- 
fare this question: 

“If Abraham Lincoln were | 
shot today instead of in 1865, | 
would the antibiotics we now 
have save his life?” | 

So far the correspondent | 
hasn't been able to nail the 
HEW down to a positive 
answer. He wants to give up 
on it but his office tells him | 
to keep trying. He is begin-| 
ning to wish he had gone into | 
some other line of work. 


edie nas, Features 


These Days 


They’re Letting Me Out 


SIX WEEKS of being holed 

up in a little room, governed 
three nurses, is not my 

idea of a holiday. Neverthe- 
less it is the a 
-— complete 
holiday I f 
had so far as I | 


them going, but 
everyth was simultaneous- 
ly work and hobby with me 
I enjoyed liv- 


to kee 


likes better than good weather. 
Another joy was to work 
in the woods, cutting limbs 
and trimming trees. I did not 
raise that question. Perhaps 
that will be permitted on a 
modified scale. Every day, | am 
to rest in the afternoon, which 
I have done most of my life, 
and yet I find myself in this 
predicament. I shall be sorry 
not to smoke pipes and cigars 
~—that will be a real loss. 
“Heart attacks” of one kind 
or another will be better 
understood because of the 
dramatization of this illness 
dent Eisenhower. 
ie orgy his adventure with 


daily, as the public does,. 


will serve to take the f 


| 


The Day in Congress 


By George Sokolsky 


is in trouble if he does not 
watch himself, because he has 
to go to the doctor to be 
checked and each checking has 
a tendency to frighten. Of 
course, the person learns to 
take all that in his stride just 
as diabetics learn to check 
their blood sugar. If these 
checks are developed into big 
deals, it is no good at all. 

But this much is clear, the 
checking must go on and the 
person who has once had a 
coronary and does not check 


the state of his heart and other 
organs is not, from what I hear 
around here, very smart. 

Se one can only turn to 
prayer which is not only a 
solace but a hope that it might 
be answered. At any rate; in 
that direction lies balance and 
sanity, for the reasonable 
mind finds it easier to have 
faith in God than in any kind 
of an expert man who, the 
wiser he is, knows more sure- 
ly his limitations. 


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“A paramount fact we have 


uncovered in our investiga- 


tion of campaign contributions, gentlemen, is that they re 
not as generous as they could be!” 


Asia Policy 


———By Roscoe 


THE GATHERING judg¢- 
ment of many who are close 
to the facts is that our Asian 
foreign aid program needs to 
be radically om» pa 
and resolutely | 
re-examined. 

This judg- 
ment — that 
things aren't | 
going right 
with the free 
nations in Asia ~ 
and that we 
had better 
face up . -- 
before it 
too late— Drummond 
reaches to three specific con- 
clusions: 

® That the attempt to cause 
those Asian nations which 
want to remain neutral to 
abandon their neutrality as 
the price of American aid 
simply isn’t working, that it is 
a bankrupt concept which is 
helping nobody but the Sovi- 
ets. 


®*That United States public 
opinion has become so disil- 
lusioned and impatient with 
our aid program as it is cur- 
rently expounded that Con- 
gress is at the point of chop- 
ping it down at the very time 
when Moscow is beg to 
offer both trade and 

®*That what is imperatively 
needed is a whole new concept 
of our relationship to these 
new-born nations of Southeast 
Asia and, indeed, the Middle 
East — a concept which will 
make better sense to the 
American people and a frela- 
tionship which will lift itself 
beyond the narrow limits of 
paper military pacts. 

e+e 


I ADMIT that tt ts easier 
to criticize than it is to cor- 


rect, that it is easier to enun- . 


clate these generalities than 
to come up with a constructive 
proposal. I do believe that 
men like Paul G. Hoffman, 
John Cowles and now J. D. 
Zellerbach, chairman of the 
Committee for Economic De- 
velopment—all of whom know 
what they are talking about— 
are doing a pyblic service by 
suggesting to the Administra- 
tion and to the country that 
we are on the wrong track in 
Asia and that now is the time 
to do something about it. 

I suspect that Messrs. Hoff. 
man, Cowles and Zellerbach 
have some pretty specific ideas 
about what should be done. It 
is implicit in everything they 
are saying that we ought not 
to condition our willingness to 
help these young nations upon 


Close Re-examination 


Of Aid PlanCalledF or 


Under Fire—— 


Drummo 


above all others, clarifies and 
separates Soviet purpose and 
Western purpose. It is this: 
Since 1939, the Soviet and 
Chinese Communists, through 
force, threat and organized 
coups d'etat in neighboring 
states, have annexed outright 
or extended their miltary and 
political control over. 740,216, 


|. 000 people and more than 13, 


400,000 square kilometers of 


territory. 

In this same period the 
Western non - Communist 
powers have granted freedom 
and/or self-rule to 692,969,000 
peoples covering 15,294,640 
square kilometers of territory. 

In a word, during the past 

decade and a half, Soviet and 
Chinese Communists have im- 
posed dominance and depend- 
ence on about 700 million peo- 
ple and the West have helped 
give freedom and independ- 
ence to about the same 
number. 
- These newly freed peoples, 
these newly independent na- 
tions, have long looked to the 
ideas and ideals of the Amer- 
ican Revolution as their in- 
spiration. As the Prime Min- 
ister of Burma, U Nu, re- 
marked when he visited: Inde- 
‘sont Hall in Philadelphia 
ast summer: “In our part of 
the world the ideas of the 
American Revolution are to- 
day the most explosive of all 
forces, more explosive in their 
capacity to change the world 
than B-52s or even atomic 
bombs.” 

Our struggle for our free- 
dom, our achievement of it 
and our wupbuilding of an 
undeveloped continent have 
long fired the imaginations 
and incentives of Asians to go 
and do likewise. 


cos 


SHOULDN'T our relation- 
ship with these freedom- 
cherishing, poverty-plagued 
nations be that of the most 
friendly, understanding senior 
democracy intent upon help- 
ing these new democracies to 
help themselves deepen @heir 
roots, guard their freedom, 
improve their economic lot 
ahd fashion their own free 
nation in their own image in 
their own way—as we did? 

Such an objective would 
appeal to Americans as prac- 
tical and realizable — and 
worth doing in a way which 
will serve our own security 
and that of the whole Free 
World. 


“Rereld ‘trivuhe. ine) 


their désire to be “neutral” 
but rather remember how we. | 


as a young nation, felt new- | 


trality was precious to us in 
a similar stage of our national 
development. 
ow | 
IT SEEMS to me that the | 
clue to our true relationship | 
with all these new nations is | 
imbedded in the most meam- | 


ingful fact of recent history— ° 


the one fact which, perhaps | 


° 


their willingness to abandon | 


The President's 
Appointment List 


President Eisenhower's sched- 
uled appointments for today: 


,« congressional leaders 
10-30 Giovanni Gronch! of 


“4 Ts 
3 . ae 

Eis * Will rective 
chi is in the 


ent 


and Mrs 
ent Oren. 
f quarters 
1—The nd Mrs. Bigenhewe 
eitain at ence for esident 


will 
Gronéhi end his wi 


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slim silk... ? 


Our very “‘lady 

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Forest green or — 
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$39.99 


The French Room, 

Second Floor F Street and 

at Shirlington, Conn. Ave., 
, Silver Spring 


New Envoy 


To Turkey 
Is Named 


Associated Press 
President Eisenhower yester- 
day nominated Fletcher War- 
ren, now Ambassador to Vene- 
zuela, be Ambassador to 
Turkey. Fletch- i y 


er Warren, 59, ™ le 


a career diplo- 


mat, would suc- 
ceed Avra M. 


Warren, who is 
‘retiring. 


The ‘new en- 
voy to Turkey 
has been Am- 


bassador to 

Venezuela 

since 1951. A 

native of Wolfe Warren 
City, Tex., he formerly was di- 
rector of the 
ment’s Office of South Amert- 
can Affairs and has been Am- 
bassador to Paraguay and Nic- 
aragua. 

The Senate Judiciary Com- 
mittee yesterday ap proved 
President Eisenhower's nomi- 
nation of Ross Rizley, chairman 
of the Civil Aeronautics Board, 
to be United States District 
Judge for Western Oklahoma. 
The committee also approved, 
clearing for Senate action, the 


T. Kerr of Wyoming, Joseph P. 
Lieb of southern Florida and 
John M. Cashin of southern 
New York. 

The nomination of Charles 


‘1K. Rice of Summit, N. J., as 


an assistant Attorney General 
also was approved. 


4739 Flee to West 


Reuters 
BONN, Feb. 27—The West 
German Refugee Ministry an- 
founced that 4739 persons fled 
from East Germany last week, 
as compared with 5227 in the 
previous week. 


:. 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


State Depart-|. 


President's nomination of four}: 
other District judges: H. Dor-|. 
sey Watkins of Maryland, Ewing |* 


. babel Tuesday, February 28, 1956 25 


> 
a 


——— 


— 


Lewis & Thos. Saltz... 1409 G 


On Connecticut Avenue 


For the past few days, towering piles of hat 
boxes, each with a famous name, have been 
marching into our Connecticut Avenue shop. 
Quickly the word got around. “Dobbs Hats are 
here—can Spring be far behind?” 


With the arrival of these fine hats, we forge an- 
other shining link in our service to men in this 
area. Today we are ready to show you an ex- 
cellent selection of Dobbs renowned Guild Edge 
hats in feathery foam-weights that feel as light 
on your head as a benediction. There is nothing 
that fits better, looks smarter, or wears so faith- 
fully as a Dobbs. Try it yourself. +20 


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LEWIS & TH°S. SALTZ 


now showing Dobbs Hats in both stores 


1409 G Street N.W. 
10094 Connecticut Avenue 


featuring 


extra 


General Offices * Dallas, Texas . 


— Wed SERVICE 


one» DALLAS 

ome FORT WORTH 
om SAN ANTONIO 
woes NASHVILLE 
er NEW YORK 


end the greet Newerk iadustrial area 


You will land at Newark Airport . . . most modern air terminal 
serving New York and elosest to midtown New York. Only 21 
minutes by limousine to new West Side Terminal at 42nd Street and 
10th Avenue (just s féw blocks from the hotel district). 


fiber 


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"Now Braniff brings to this new route 27 
years of experience, an outstanding record 
of safety and on-time performence, million 
mite pilots and an enviable reputetion for 
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WH WASHINGTON POST 
© and TIMES HERALD 

. Tuesday, February 28, 1956 
e » : “ @#eee 


Housing Bill 
Introduced 


In House 


By Sterling F. Green 
Associated Press 

The Administration's housing 
bill was introduced in the House 
yesterday. It calls for liberal- 
ized Federal support of home 
im pr ovement 
loans, housing 
for the aged, 
and dwellings 
for those dis 
placed by slum 
clearance. 

The measure, 
offered by Rep. 
William B. Wid- 
nall (R-N. J.) 
also would pro- 
vide 35,000 pub- 
lic housing 
wnits in each of the next two 
years. 

As the bill went into the hop- 

per, Housing Administrator Al- 
bert M. Cole repeated his de- 
nunciation of a broader gauged 
measure introduced by Sen. 
Herbert Lehman (D-N. Y.) as 
“an undisguised anti-private en- 
terprise bill” which “would not 
get more homes built.” 
. The Lehman bill calls for 
600,000 public housing units in 
the next three years and a “mid- 
tle income” housing program 
Which Cole has said would com- 
mit the Government to a $2 bil- 
lion outlay to “invade the mass 
market of private housing.” 

The Administration bill, 
Which Widnall termed “a lib- 
eral one,” would: 

® Permit the Federal Housing 
Administration to insure repair 
and home improvement loans 
of up to $3500 instead of $2500 
lt would let the FHA Commis- 


a 


gioner increase the length of|- 


guch loans from 3 years to 5 
years if he sees fit. 

® Provide FHA financing for 
multifamily rental projects 
with only 10 per cent down 
payment, provided 25 per cent 
of the apartments are designed 
expressly for aged tenants. 

® Permit a third party to 
make the down payment on an 
FHA-insured loan if the mort- 
gage holder is 60 or older. The 
third person could also co-sign 
the mortgage. 

® Permit 40-year mortgages. 
with down payment of only 
$200, for privately built, FHA- 
insured dwellings for families 
displaced by slum clearance 
projects. Also, increase from 
$7600 to $8000 the maximum 
mortgage on such housing; in 
high-cost building areas, this 
maximum would be raised from 
the present $8000 to $10,000. 

® Increase from $5 million 
to $10 million the total of Fed- 
eral funds which may be grant- 
ed to communities to assist lo- 
cal redevelopment planning. 

® Provide that single persons 
of 65 or older, who are not now 
eligible to live in subsidized 
housing, be accorded a “prior 
preference” for admission. 

The bill would make FHA's 
home improvement ' 
which is scheduled to expire 
Sept. 30, a permanent program. 


Transit Firm 
Seizure Is 


Voted Down 


ANNAPOLIS, Md., Feb 27 # 

The Maryland House of Dele 
gates refused tonight to vote 
Gov. Theodore McKeldin au- 
thority to seize and operate the 
strike-bound Baltimore Transit 
Co. 
' At the same time, the Senate 
passed a bill to authorize the 
Public Service Commission to 
set up permanent, competitive 
bus franchises. 

Like the strike-seizure idea, 
this measure was aimed at end- 
ing the Baltimore transit walk- 
out and still requires approval 
by the other house. 

The bills came shortly after 
@ report by a $30,000 grand in- 
Quest of the strike reported that 
both union and management 
“must be adjudged to have been 
guilty of responsibility.” 

The unprecedented inquiry 
By the Maryland House of Dele- 

tes took the view that “full, 

ank and fair negotiations un- 
ertaken and carried out in 
d faith” should bring a 
quick settlement of the 29-day- 
old strike. 

If it doesn't, “then serious 
eonsideration shall have to be 
given to the enactment of 
remedial legislation.” 

The report was prepared by 
@ special staff headed by Je- 
rome Alper, Washington attor- 
Ney, and was adopted by the 
House of Delegates at a secret 
Session. 

The 83-page report contained 
mo specific recommendations 
for the “remedial legislation.” 

In fact, it cautioned that any 
G@ction taken during a “period 
of crisis” might overlook a so- 
lution of the “underlying con- 
ditions which have given rise 
to the critical outbreak.” 

“The fundamental problem,” 
the report states,” is the prob- 
lem of a declining industry in a 
generally expandingeconomy. 


Absentee Ballot 
Bill Passes Senate 


RICHMOND, Feb. 27 #—Re- 
publican opposition to a meas- 
ure dealing with the mailing of 
absentee ballots touched off de- 
Date that tied up the Virginia 

nate for better than an hour 


_ But the bill—which allows 

absentee ballots to be mailed 
won anproval by a 31-to3 vote. 
Jt now goes to the House of Del. 


egates. 


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35-Hour Week 
Proposal Studied 
By Senate Group 


STORY: Two House mem- 
bers yesterday were having 
what appeared to be a serious 
discussion on guided missiles 
and other defense weapons. 

“It's too bad,” the first one 
said, “that we've spent so much 
money and time on that weapon 
which has turned out to be such 
a dud.” 

“Which one do you have 
mind?” asked the second. 


“You know,” his colleague 


. 
in 


solemnly began, “the one called 
it won't 


‘CIVIL SERVICE; 
work and you can't fire it.” 


35-HOUR WEEK? 
ate Appropriations Committee 
has before it today a proposal 


for a 35-hour work week for the! 


4000 _per diem employes in’ 
Treasury's Bureau of Engraving 
& Printing. No employe would 
be given a pay cut as a result 
of the shorter work week. 

The plan was laid before the 
powerful Committee by the 
Plateprinters and other AFL- 
CIO employe unions. Employe 
spokesmen said the proposal 
would prevent new bureau lay- 
offs of skilled employes. 

Treasury flatly opposed the 

lan. Under Secretary W. 

andolph Burgess told the 
Committee: 

The bureau will not lay off 
additional skilled employes 
during the next two years. It 
will continue its motlernization 
program which will result in 
fewer employes. The reduc- 
tions can be handled through 
employe turnover. 


He added that a reduction in 
the work week was a high’ 
licy matter which shouldn't’ 
considered on a “piece- 
meal” basis. 

Sen. Robertson (D-Va.), chair- 
man of the Treasury Subcom- 
mittee, had asked Treasury to 
comment on the feasibility of 
the shorter work week plan. | 


SALARY PLAN: Treasury) 
aiso implied opposition to a 
proposal to eliminate Govern- 
ment checks and to have the 
payments disbursed through 
the various national banks. 

The Committee was told that 
the plan would present many | 
new problems and that it would. 
resuk in very little, if any, sav- 
ings. Officials pointed out that 
many employes would insist en 
being paid in cash as they do 
not have bank accounts. 

Treasury is going ahead with | 
its proposal to speed up check-' 
writing through the use of elec- 
tronic machines. 


PREFERENCE: The National 
Civil Service League will re-' 
lease @ report soon on a survey 
it made on the operation of vet- 


' 


The Sen- 


' 


Committee Appointed 


Interior 
Asks Senate 


' Bridge Fund 


New Jones Point 
Span Struck Out 
Of House Budget 
On Technicality 


The Interior Department 
asked the Senate yesterday to 
restore Jones Point Bridge 
construction funds which the 
House cut from its budget 
last week. 


The House struck out the 
$13,825,000 item 
for a new Poto-' 
mac crossing 
below Alexan-’ 
dria chiefly on 
the procedural; 
grounds that if) 
a pending bill 
is enacted the’ 
funds should 
be put in the! 

| _, Commerce De-) 
partment 

McKay money bill) 
later. A bill which seems to 
have clear sailing would trans-| 
fer the building job from In- 
terior to Commerce. ) 
But the bridge is Interior's’ 
responsibility at present and) 
until Congress transfers it to) 

Commerce, Interior must con-: 

tinue to defend the appropria-| 

tion to preserve a clear legisla 

tive history of Administration. 

support for the funds. 
Secretary of Interior Douglas | 

McKay stressed need for the: 

bridge yesterday at a hearing | 

before a Senate Appropriations | 
subcommittee which started! 
hearings on his budget. 

There are several ways to 
vote the bridge money this ses-| 
sion even if the question of| 
who is to build it stays up in the | 
air a while longer. One would) 
be for the Senate ta restore the 
money to Interior's budget with | 

a provision that it be switched | 

to Commerce if the transfer bill | 

passes. ) 

Another would be to wait and | 
put it in the Commerce De-| 
partment’s money bill which 
will be coming along in a few! 
weeks. Or it could go in the’ 
catch-all supplemental money 
bill which comes up near the! 
close of the session to take care / 

of projects like this which did) 

not get legislative clearance in| 

time for the regular money) 
bills. | 


On Cabin John Span 


The National Capital 
gional Planning Council named 
three-map“tommittee yester- 
day to seek interstate and 


| 
| 


Federal agreement on a site for! 


WOMEN’S NEWS 
AMUSEMENTS. 
CLASSIFIED 
COMICS 
RADIO-TYV 
FINANCIAL 


TUESDAY, FEB 


ook yity Life 


To Restore. = 


RUARY 28, 1956 


ot 


S. 


By Norman Driscoll, Staff Photographer 


The Ox-Cart Is Here to Stay 


Ada Cavallo, a secretary at the Pan American Union and 
a singer at Hote! 2400 as well, gaily waves a Latin Ameri- 
can hat from the side of a hand-painted ox-cart just pre- 


sented to the Pan American 


Union by the government of 


Costa Rica. The ox-cart, a popular vehicle in Latin American 


nations, will remain on displ 


ay here. 


Police Press 

Search for 

Kidnaper 
Victim Describes 


Him as Polite 
‘Kid Next Door’ 


The police manhunt con-|result in solution of several’ Cases were cleared up so fast} Group Hospitalization, 


tinued last night for a gunman 
with long biond hair who 


mare for a young Washington 


couple that befriended him. 


The clean cut gunman, about 


Three Teen-Age Mohs Hit 


’ 
’ 


Juvenile Gang Arrests 
Solve 100 Car Thetts 


A weekend roundup in which) said he abandoned after driving, 


112 juvenile boys were arrested 


has cleared up at least 100 auto led police to two stolen auto-| 


‘them for “a couple of blocks,’ 


‘thefts in the District and may) mobiles. 


more in nearby Maryland, Lt. 


‘that John Payne, civilian clerk, 


John E. Williams, head of the'said he was swamped under 


police auto squad, reported yes- 


Re. turned a good deed into a night- terday. 


Williams said the cars were 


stolen by three different Juve 


nile gangs. Most of the stolen 
automobiles 


were abandoned cars after 


the “most hectic” deluge of 
progress reports in his 22 years 
with the auto squad. 

A group of six boys from 14 
to 17 led police to three stolén 
telling auto squad de- 


Medical Unit 
‘Has Bonus 


For Members 


| Group Hospitalization 
Plans to Give Extra 
Days of Coverage 


: 
Inc.., 
this area’s largest prepay hos 
pital insurance plan, has ac- 
cumulated a $650,000 bonus for 
its subscribers, it was an- 
nounced yesterday. 

The bonus will be paid out in 
extra. days .of talization 


By Passage of One 


the next budget. 

As the “package deal” came 
from the Ways and Means Com- 
mittee it had been proposed got 
to move one bill without the 
other. It also was planned to 
vote first on the proposed sales 
itax increase to finance the 
raises which would cost $11.2 
million in the first year. 

The House turned down the 
Sales tax proposal by 64 to 55. 
It found only Del. Carlton R 
Sickles against it in the Prince 
Georges delegation and only 
Blair Lee Ill and Charles W. 
Woodward Jr. in favor of it in 
the Montgomery delezation. 

Before its defeat, Lee told 
the House the package deal 
faced the facts of life in two 
|ways. The money, he said, had 
ito come from somewhere and 
\the purpose was to permit rais- 
‘ing the teachers’ salary with- 
‘out tapping the property tax 
rate. 

) After that vote the House 
‘approved the pay raise provi- 
sion without the financing 
measure by a vote of 111 to 8. 

Before its approval, Del. 
Thomas J. Hatem (D-Harford) 
| told the House he had been told 
if he did not vote for this bill 
“I had better take a slow boat 
to Hawaii. I am not going to 
take a slow boat, I'm going to 
stick around.” Hatem said he 
would not vote on the measure 
because he did not want to be 
accused of acting With ven- 
geance in his mind. “But I don't 
like being threatened either.” 

The House previously adopt- 
ied tonight without change a 
|favorable report on the Gover- 
nors whopping $303 million 


‘budget. 
Only $53,000 in general funds 
was pared from the big money 
bill after days of consideration 
by the heavily Democratic Ways 
and Means and Senate Finance 
committees. 
| Meanwhile, subcommittees of 
the two fiscal groups agreed 
late this afternoon on a plan 
to help balance the giant meas- 
ure and also to give an in- 
jcrease of $5 per pupil to the 
| State Incentive Fund for schoo! 
construction. The Governor had 
propesed an increase of eight 


By Frank R. Kent Jr. 


Staff Reporter 
ANNAPOLIS, Md., Feb. 27—The House rejected a plan 
tonight to increase Maryland teachers pay by raising the 
state sales tax and then turned around and voted for a 
salary increase of $400 across th 


Md. House Votes 
Teacher Raise, 


Kills Sales Tax 


‘Package Deal’ Plan Crossed Up 


Bill Without Other 


4 


e board that would go into 


: 


lernor’s proposal, for the state’s 
mile tracks. 
| In other actions today: 

®* The Senate Finance Com- 
mittee voted a favorable report 
on the bill by the Montgomery 
delegation to drop the tax on 
wages and salaries of non- 
residents working in the state, 
The House already has ap- 
proved it. The bill would apply 
only to residents from other 
jurisdictions which reciprocate. 
Fiscal experts say it could go 
into effect immediately as far 
as the District of Columbia is 
concerned because that juris- 
diction does not now tax wages 
and salaries of non-residents. 

®*The Senate today passed 
19 to 8 the controversial bill to 
increase salaries of Maryland 
judges. 

®t also passed two bills 
sponsored by Sen. H. Winship 
Wheatley. Jr. (D - Prince 
Georges). One would exempt 
parochial school buses from the 
automobile titling tax. The 
other would authorize a bond 
issue of $2.5 million by the 
Prince Georges County commis- 
sioners to add a 100-bed wing 
to the County Hospital. 

® The Senate Finance Com- 
mittee voted to approve in get. 
eral a bill to reorganize the 
State Tax Commission into a 
State’s Tax Court and a De 
partment of Assessments. in 
other words, to split the present 
dual’ functions of the Com. 
mission. 

® The House this afternoon 
passed and sent to the Senate a 
bill reorganizing the corrupt 
practices section of the elec- 
tion laws... The League of 
Women Voters has complained 
that the revised version leaves 
out several recommendations 
that were in the bill introduced 
at the previous session. 

® The Senate passed a bill 
by Del. Margaret C. Schwein- 
haut (D-Mont.) that would 
abolish the present advisory 
boards of the four training 
schools for delinquent children 
and create a single advisory 
board under the Department 
of Welfare. 

* The House rejected, by 76 
to 19 a measure that would have 
prohibited construction of pri- 
vate toll bridges. The bill would 
have prevented a private cor- 
poration from corstructing a 


and about 95 per cent of them tectives they had stolen about | coverage, beginnir March 1, lene ng days with the proceeds 
have been recovered, Williams|15 automobiles in the District | tor present and new ‘subscrib-ito be shared between the state 
reported. |and “a lot more” in Maryland. | ers, said Joseph H. Himes, pres-'and the tracks to bring his 

A ‘li-year-cld boy arrested} The six youths were arrested ident of the Blue Cross-affili- pudget into balance without in- 
Saturday. after he fled with a\Saturday by Virginia State po-| ated, non-profit organization. ‘creasing general taxes. 
‘companion who was hit by a) lice at Engleside when the boys! Himes attributed the added| The two subcommittees 
police bullet which barely|were sighted in a stolen car on benefits to GHI’s “favorable ex-|agreed on an increase of 20 
| pierced his coat told police he Route 1. Police said the boys perience” since its last rate ad-|days, or 12 more than the Gov- 
abductor had carried her into had stolen 60 automobiles in| told them they had pas — justment (increase) went into 

‘| woods on Route 642 near Lor-i|the’ District since September,'ing to Florida but turned back effect in 1952. If used to de-| 

since 1921. akan ie ee nigh sores ‘ton Reformatory. Williams said. \after they went broke and sold crease subscriber costs instead 

Stanley N. Barnes, Justice's} The Cabin John bridge even-| Miss Richoux described — The youth, who was paroled a spare tire in Richmond. of increasing plan benefits, he 
hard-hitting trustbuster, is|tually will form an important| last May from National Train-; Three 14-year-old boys ar-|said, the rate recuction would 
slated to be appointed to Unitedilink in the outer eireum- |2°2uctor as pleasant, polite and jing School after serving a term! rested Sunday night after they | amount to only about $1 a year 
States Court of Appeals in Cali-| ferential highway ringing Wash-|5°ft-spoken before he pulled out there for auto theft, ‘was im-/crashed into four parked cars| At the same time, Himes said 
fornia. A scramble is on for|\ington and will connect also\a gun and forced her escort, |Plicated »y the 17-year-old boy at 16th st. and Ridge pl. se., told he saw “no likelihood” of any 
his job. with the west leg of U.S. 240 Fritz H. Wolf 26. of 5912 14th “2° stopped the police bullet police they had been stealing|rate increases “for the next 

VA has given superior work; The Council also discussed ., nit ‘ ‘ 2 “ and by a i6-year-old boy ar-\cars from a southeast auto re-| three years” for subscribers to 
awards to Jean Roederer, Inez|ways yesterday of expediting|*_"*” °%* ° the car, rested as the older youths fled,/pair lot for “joyriding” over ajthe organization's standard 
Sullivan, Ruth Scott, Louise|agreement on approaches to| She said the gunman looked William said. period ef several months. Most plan. 

Williams said the youth who of the cars were returned to| The increased benefits in- 


Ogle, Louis Rosenblum, Royce'the authorized Jones Point| ike he might be “the kid next tald ; > ton” tae on + ty th tude 10 4 * full-cost 
re, or oor oli aken the lo ouths,. police clude more days 0 . 
Nevels, Ray Borden, Robert Mc-| bridge at Alexandria, another ° police ne hac t rte / ‘coverage, by aiiniien to 31' Maryland's primary election Arundel County, 


Pherson, Curtis Reagan and'link in the outer belt route.| After forcing Wolf from the automobiles, some of which he 'reported. | Py 

Etta Thomas. , ! exandria officials told the| Car, Miss Richoux said, the gun-| _ days the present 21-day limit of campaign, which opens today, ?yle, Aberdeen. © . 
GPO: Glenn Rottman is chair-| Council the Bureau of Public|™@n's actions “became so hor |full-cost coverage for each CON-| promises political pyrotechnics ' Fifth Congressional District: 
man of the committee of offset| Roads now is working directly|rible I can't describe them.” Vi it’s Lif finement in participating hos-| 44 as have been seldom wit- yg am ee 
platemakers negotiating a wage with the Virginia State High- — —= -g pe oe appear to ctim Spared Bandit’s Life a. ate ‘one pays what the ied Sin Satharen’ Uuuieaitbwanie canie 
| ” Pubi , way Commission on plans for|*#0w what he was doing.” ospital charges for semi-|® : , : ' fetie 
oe Pas Be Bey — ee rtond qdieatnes aher te eo Wolf had taken the keys. The ae private accommodations, medi. Free State. in we ny. ~ tera Navy 
William Watts. Jack Condon thorities opposed original plans summan tried to start the car fj, - = eation, meals—not doctors’ Last mid- ss — peta et), 
and Paul Melton proposed by the Bureau, | without them, Miss Richoux WEAN) SNCICTEC IN IAMITING  jcharecs night's filing Pearl Harbor hero; William B. 
Ut : | The city’s alternative pro- said. He asked her how to drive Also: Doubling the present deadline pass- rendergast, former Naval 
ROUNDUP: Atomic Energy! posals. however, have won sup-| the car. $5 a day to $10 a day up to the ed with only Academy professor, ang Clifton 
has given cash superior job port from a House committee! It started rolling down a hill present limit of 180 partial) two last-minute L. Clevenger, Laurel merchant, 


toll bridge from Ocean City te 
Assateague Island where a pri- 
vate development was launched 
by Leon Ackerman, a Washing. 
ton real estate man, several 
years ago. Property owners had 
sought to build the bridge if 
the state would not do so. 


ahs. the projected Potomac River/|24, dressed in a white shirt and 
bce a ms Over® bridge near Cabin John, Md. (light colored suit, abducted a 
a a on Pee. See represent. \ 
group will urge that preference ine SMarwtadd: Max Wehriy 23-year-old Marine annex sec- 
for veterans be curtailed during Sotwedatiien Virginia and|retary after stealing her es 
TEES, appetia, vie. Harland Bartholomew were|Cort’s car Sunday night. 
carect vivil wervant, will be on |named to the committee) Lois Richoux, 23, of 3419 Oak 
pointed associate director Of] seckine Tr aotinn aan ee ter. nw., escaped after her 
Interior's Geological Survey.jthe Governors of Virginia and 
He has been with the agency| 


Two Late Candidates File 


Maryland Primary Opens 
With Fireworks in Sight 


and Roy IL, 


ee ~ ee ee _ ee ee 


: 
Of Two 7th St. Merchants 


holdups of Palace Laundry 
stores, one at 1624 7th st. nw. 
Jan. 16, the other at 101 Rhode 
Island ave. nw. Jan. 18. James 
Williams, 31, of no fixed ad- 
dress, also was charged in the 


- ——er Se eet 


-_——> 


—_ coe a eet 


You don’t have to be | 
' 


a girafie | 


START SAVING 


w 30% 


ON YOUR FUEL 
BILL 


and cure cold walls-leors. 
 hard-te-heat rooms with 


Johns-Manville 


INSULATION 


STORM WINDOWS. 
and DOORS 


For FREE Estimate 
Call HU. 3-6400 


——- 


et ee ee ee 


: 
: 


Organization 
wilh 


i 


7. © 
Jonn FP 


e Georges C 
for the 


awards to Helen Hymowits, considering the bridge. and he asked her how to stop benefit hospitalization days.|candidates in- | Seventh Cireult Court Judge- 
Priscilla Reuter and Hannah M. | The Council also directed its it, Miss Richoux said. “He kept This is for those requiring! serting their ship (includes Prince Georges 
retire this week from ‘thelwhat local highw ! said Jesse Spencer, 25, listed at 21 hospitalization provided by the already mud- Judge John R. Fletcher, ap- 
Army's Adjutant General’s Of-| sewer and other facilities muss The- gunman picked up the|U st. nw., was indicted yester- plan died racés in pointed last year by Gov. Theo- 
..+ Maurice Eysenburg of State! dictions to serve the proposed|carried her into the woods two 7th st.:merchants during a hospitals affiliated with Blue ties. atmer H. Meloy, a United States Com- 
is the new president of the So-| Central Intelligence Agency where he tried to assault her, holdup Jan. 22. Cross will be covered for 31: Seats-at stake of interest to ™ssioner; William B. Bowie, 
signers. Vice presidents are The data will be used B h im hold tt A second indictment. About $22 : « in Con- 4. T. Briscoe, Philip H; Dorse 
| in sup- ut she kept talking to him Holdup attempt was aron seco the $10 a day partial benefits one in the Senate, two in Con Ori: ; y 
Charlies Daffer and Robert! worting the Council’s ssanigue and finally he brought her back Bran, operator of a tailoring was taken in the first holdup/for up to $180 days. gress, two in the Montgomery and William Alexander Loker, 
eerie Littwin of State, | era! Government share in the lost his nerve, police said Miss to a liquor store, coowned by said. ; scribers are eligible for the new in the Prince Georges County Sixth Circuit Court Judge- 
and Mary Kennedy of ArMY,' costs of these projects. Richoux told them. “He started his brother, Ben. James Robinson Jr., 19, list- benefits. Excluded are some Circuit Court. ship (inctudes Montgomery 
treasurer ... The United Na- he' did it. He said he was out threatened Ben with a knife by police the “kerchief bandit”\py GHI Preferred Hospi | Lawlor and Thomas M. And 
: : > ’ . : . pital ° . :< led f r 4 : er. 
tional Association of Post Office | Detective Knotts with a girl last night and she after ordering a bottle of wine.|after his arrest Feb. 12, was Service Contracts. Ihe’ Democratic nomntuation to readied te bet acie ie 
oe tol 
tition indorsing S. 2875, the re- . per aia wt ‘ , a ' has Republican R. D 
. . trying to get even. while Ben got a gun, polic¢ robbery. Police said he was ‘ ‘ | h Wheaton | p : uncan 
tirement bill by Senator Jomn. Gets His Man Virginia State and Fairfax said. charged with holding up gro Fights Looming | Sema empl ech 1 eisner Clark. Democrats: Juvenile 
chief of FCC's broadcast re-| Third Precinct Det. Clarence i] ie: ine “ County’ Atterney Charl M 
Wi ol | ‘ _ << report went like this: police “I couldn't find it in my | 535 4th st. se. and 301 D st. se Oo ; - y ries ° 
newal division, has been given| W. Knotts appeared before the| Wolf and Miss Richoux were heart to shoot.” ihe tends mabe atated pb For Delegates jot Se fear onan nem =~ 4 Irelan and Bethesda Attorney 
= _lyesterday with a prisoner he|home at 8:45 p. m. after an out-|\to George Washington Univer-|in his seed 
| ' @ » Mm. ) : pocket as if he was 
hunted for eight straight days.|ing at Sugarloaf Mountain. A'sity Hospital. Both recovered.|armed. He wore a white hand- .. Anderson, pees ‘Ane 
v st held $3500 In Montgomery County, an Georges County /uveniie 
ss. nw., was held on for directions to the i4th st.' Spence wa h 
bond for action of the grand’ bridge. ew <j _— ee , , he Demo. the county's Circuit Court. An- 
) ge developing among the Dem , 
yess. crats as an antiorganization derson resigned from the Juve- 
the studio-home of Artist My-| peared to be an armed services| 
kola Shramchenko, 1742 Riggs |entification card and said he} Win Right to Use 3 Acres to the state convention filed it was found he was practicing 
: | ‘at the last minute yesterday. law before the Circuit Court in 
jier Cyril S. Lawrence also setirine Base. Wolf agreed to drive 
fibond at $3500 on a second'him and Miss Richoux said she ickey. _ Ruth Only one of the candidates 
| in the nearby races will be un 
1827 Wyoming ave. nw., on the; The young man directed them are : 
same day, ito Lorton rd. and near the Re-| |Schweinhaut, | Hostetier. Henry | De Witt S. Hyde (R.-Md.) will be 
| cud Shirier P tarense «= “*"°°"| unopposed for renomination to 
|iwrenched away from him at\forced Wolf out. Wolf went to Republican delegate 
J 16th and R sts. nw. after|a nearby house and called po- George 4. Moare. Neary K. Meitare 111. | Other Democrats, who have 
{t ¥. Aled are J, Grahame Walker, 
i tioning. After Johnson ran, ‘At Coldwell, Hele 
' ‘return on your e O. ‘sioner; Orphans Court Judge 
money when you D o£ C qunty. De: ocratic| John Foley; and Robert C. Cre- 
ots - Lancer 7roup Bayne Brooke, Ralph W. Power | d 
| es M. Rea, Guy E. Curtis, M. Theresa | Chevy Chase Rescue Squa 
nad John J. Piynn 
The mid-winter meeting of bloodhounds yesterday. The | neighborhood for a park Republican candidates for th Senate: John Marshall But- 
the Board of Trustees of the D.|dogs picked up his trail once|recreation area. fard, ¢ epublican incumbent, is 
ler, Rep 


Jones ,. . Miriam Johnson will «sare to prepare a report on threatening to kill me,” she more than the 31-day full-cost' names into the County): Besides Anderson, 
fice after 37 years of service.'}. pyilt by various local juris- struggling Miss Richoux and day on charges that he stabbed Subscribers in out-of-town nearby coun- dore R. McKeldin; Samuel W, 
ciety of Federal Artists & De-\headquarters at Langley, Va.| police said. Most seriously hurt in -the instead of 21 days, and will get: nearby Maryland voters are Upper Marlboro attorney; John 
Hayes, both of Navy; secretaries, recommendation that the Fed-\to the road, police said. “He shop at 1333 7th st., next door|and $59 in the ‘second, police) Himes said some 600,000 sub- County Circuit Court and one all of St. Marys County, 
and Ole Schmidt of aeeeneres, | ‘erying and tried to explain why| Police said the holdup man ed at 912 Ist st. nw., dubbed 50000 others covered chiefly Victor A. Leisner, 32, County): Judges Kathryn J, 
Clerks has 5000 names to a pe- his money and he was Aaron threw him to the floor |indicted on three charges of IConaress in the Sixth District. crossfiled in both primaries as 
ston (D-5.C.). .. . Joe Nelson,| | tel - Court Jud Alfred Nove 
County police said the couple's! The bandit fled. Ben told cery stores at 1259 K st. se., is developing a shopping center ge oyes, 
a $250 cash award. ‘United States Commissioner |<itting in hi | " James C, Christoph 
sitting in his car in front of her; The brothers were admitted|'gun but always held his hand ’ . | ‘as Fran ; oes 
caine | In 2 Counties |, Another late filer was 
___ William Johnson, 25, of 1633! young man appeared and asked| In two other j ice’ 
) Fa. ndictments kerchief over his face, police Pgs Seg. 
inter-party fight appeared to be Judge, who is seeking a seat on 
jury on a charge of entering! He showed them what — oa fter 
| slate of candidates for delegates nile Court two months ago afte 
|) pl nw., Feb. 16. Commission-|had to be back at Quantico Ma- 
| i mocrais are Frank J apparent violation of the law. 
jcharge of housebreaking, at would go along. y | P ‘k R d {s 
, , y er al esi cil S opposed in the primary. Rep. 
Knotts said Johnson formatory produted a gun and | ~ land ley F sh al 
AWaAPGed NEcreatlion ALed Mrveicey etme’ wogeies ye|Congress in tbe Sixth District 
: Knotts stopped him for ques-' lice. t. Wiliam C. Bire 
regularly save it | convention are) ning chief of the Rethesda- 
To Present Medal | Police combed the area with’ a Jehn 3. Flynn. Other filings include: 
e Sid 
C, Division, American Cancer but lost it. Lorton officials} Residents led by John D. by Brig. Gen. John D. 


e conven- 
hari 
H 


League games, PR ery- 

The Tyler Corp. sold a nar-| Drown, William W Ward, George OH. 

DI | 

row 88-foot-long strip’. of then. Rice. Hilda Imes, Ruth B. Hall and|/opposed 
ordon Louk, 


and' 


Frederick; Henry J.) 


$10 13th'St. MAW. Wat. F 
» aale W a 


i 
x 


ao)” 


Society, will be held at noon’ 
Wednesday in the Home for 
Incurables, 3720 Upton st nw. 

Highlight the meeting will 
be presentation of the Society's 
St. George Medal and citation’ 
for distinguished service in can- 
cer control. The name of the 
a has not yet been de-| 
vu’ ted, 


4 


i ee spent 5 AE ma eR ne 


Orr Ae eet” ot ee ore 8 


said they believe the man left 
the area in a car. 


Today’s Chuckle 


If you could kick the person 
responsible for most of your 
troubles you wouldn't be able 


to sit down for six months. 


’ 


-.°* 


Nurge filed the suit last July 
against the Tyler Park Corp. 
of Arlington. They said the 
development was dedicated in 
1947 with a plat showing nearly 
30 acres at Tyler ave. and 
Irvington rd. reserved for a 
park and playground. 

Through Attorney John Alex- 
‘ander, they contended the pro- 


playground site in November 


1954 to Russo Consumption Co. 
The defendants said they had a 
right to sell the land because it 
was never formally dedicated 
fer a playground. 
Circuit Judge Arthur Sin- 
clair ruled the area would be 
perpetually restricted to rec- 


reation and park use. - 


‘4 


a te ie en nn Lk i ee 


Alumni to Meet 


The Fordham University Club 
of Washington will hold its regu- 
lar monthly meeting at 1 p. m. 
today at the alumni lounge in 
McDonotgh gymnasium at 
Georgetown University. 


Markey, 
poten Jr.. Linthicum; Earl FE. 
Knepper, Clear Springs, and | 
Harold J. Redgrave, Ceremest. 
Democrats: Former Sen. Mil-| 
lard E. Tydings; George P. Ma.-| 
honey; Kenneth E. Lee, Andrew | 
J. Easter and George Washing: | 
ton Williams, all of Baltimore, | 


Thomas L. Christian, Anne 


29 ee eee - —- ee ee eae) — Seed Ce ee ee Pai se MEER ee — ie 
% 


In Alexandria Call KI, 9-9130 


1834 Wisconsin Ave. N.W. 
Over 26,000 Satisfied Customers 


ii . Se OI Re 


, 


PE Oe ES ER em Rr ee + mei nde 
. 


j 


THE WASHINGTON POST end Tidiks HeRALD 


__28 


Tuesday, February 28, 1956 


River Victim 


enna 


Elsie Janis, 66, 


Darling of AEF Ue 


BEVERLY HILLS, CALIF.,* 
Feb. 27 #®—Elsie Janis—the 
“Littl Elsie’ who sang and 
danced her way into the hearts 


of World War I doughboys—| | 


died last night at her I 
She was 66. 

The one-time “sweetheart a 
the A. E. F.” succumbed after) 
several years of failing health. | 
Of her many friends in show 
business, only Mary Pickford | 
was reported at her bedside’ 
when she died. ; 

Miss Janis’ death came just) 
as the movies were about to 
make a film of her life story. 
Production on “The Elsie Janis) 
Story” has been scheduled for’ 
this year. 

Miss Janis, a top comedy star 
of Broadway and London for a) 
20-year period beginning in 
1906, would have been 67) 
Tuesday. 


ELSIE JANIS 


. in 1935 photo 


wo 


Curly Fox Is 


Fort Myer 
Rites for 
James Fry 


A requiem mass for James C. 
Fry Jr., 
Point graduate, will be con-| 
cn a. m. Monday in 


lieved drowned 

in a boating |” 
accident in the *gag 
Potomac River 2 


with Richard 
W. Parkinson, ™*- ¥*7 
who was saved. Mr. Fry was a 
salesman for the Aetna Life 
Insurance Co. He was stationed 
with the 350th Infantry in Aus- 
tria when he met and married 
Patricia Klotts of Columbus, 
Ohio. 
Besides his wife, Mr. Fry 
leaves his parents, Maj. Gen. 
and Mrs. James C. Fry of Falls 
Church, and five children, Cath- 
erine, 4; Ellen, 3; Patricia and 
James C. Lil, 2-year-old twins, 
and Virginia, 1. They live at 
bo Kennedy st., Alexandria. 


'|Sleepy Hollow 
who was a 1945 West Ch 


Drum Virtuoso, Comedian 


Ralph Stanley (Curly) Fox,; 
52, a jazz drummer with a. 
quick ready smile, died of can-| 
cer Saturday at his home, 656 


rd, Falls — ) 
urch. 4 

Mr. Fox, who ~ 

‘was born in 
Westfield, 


birthday, he 
was playing 
with the Cen- 
tral 


and drumming 
gg at the old Gayety thea- 


In the 1920's, = Bay pre- 
maturely bald, tagged 
Curly, and so he at hacen to 
theatergoers who saw him as 
featured drummer-comedian at 
the Capitol theater, It was 
jcalled the Fox theater then, 


Dead at o2; 


and Sam Jack Kaufman, or- 
‘chestra leader, used to exchange 
a stream of comments with his 
witty drummer. 

Mr. Fox played almost every 
theater and most hotels in town. 
He took time out to go to ota 
York in 1925 with a 
act in the Ziegfield Ta as 

In the 1930's, he served as 
vice president and business 
manager of the Musicians 
Union Local 161. 

He left the Capitol theater 
in 1942 and enlisted in the 
Navy “to deo some fighting,” 
wound up teaching at the Navy 
School of Music at Anacostia 
and prs 5 with the Naval Air 
Stat in Dallas. 

Three years ya Mr. Fox and 
his wife, the former 
Brightwell of Alvin, Texas, 
moved to Falls ‘Church and 
opened the F School of 
Music and Da They started 
with 15 students and built up 
to 1000. 
py = wife, Mr. Fox 
eaves a sister Helen Smart of 

ashington. 


Elonzo Morgan, 81, Dies; |** 


Prayer for Today | 
se ba lglt) God, . make 
known thy truth. 


Inspire % “with thy in- 
dwelling presence. Give to 
us the peace of thy ay ge 
love. Strengthen us in 
our worthy ideals and hopes. 
Show us always the ways of 
goodness and service. Steady 
us when we are uncertain 
with power from on —_ 
Quiet our fears with a sure 

and comforting faith. In 
times of confusion and 

steadf. 


Ti, ister, 
mette nod ca Methodist 


Cheesman Herrick 


PHILADELPHIA, Feb. 27 \®' .oo 
Dr, Cheesman A. Herrick, 89, 
retired president of Girard Col- 
lege, died today. 

Dr. Herrick served as Girard 
president from 1910 to 1936. He 
was principal of William Penn 

High School for girls from 1909 
pdb 4 and head of the com- 

ercial department of Central 
High School from 1904 until 


A ‘graduate of the University 
of Pennsylvania, he taught in 
the schools of Jefferson County, 
N. Y. and Illinois before coming 


Jac 
be 2 > 
mit now Priends ip Cometery, 
ers 


ees RRs 
ARLES L. Suddenly, on Satur- 


Bs ry: 25. 1956 
2. “24 > s@. the beloved 


29, 
cKendree Cemetery 


s. m. Interment 


air Pee ~ Mg Py Reeiose. at, er foe 


¢ C7) rs, 
on sete rs. , 
Pe of “Philedt : hia. 
Priends may ca wie 
¢, 7 Wi | piv. 


Panera 
i. interment "ost Ba 
ous . 


"ote a eke? 
J 
. idiom asia “tS 


lees and Mrs. Pir 


ot 


won gece SIORGGS RRs 


OORE,. of 4103 18th piace 
ne. beloy usb tg ; M 


ec Me 
ate eens Set 


ryices 
ome. 
= sw on nesda 
nie ary at 10 s. m {parking ie 
ellities). Arlington 
tional Cem 
MORGAN, , BLONZO On Sunday. 
a 19 at De ‘Doctor's Hosp try 
2 av. b ‘ Sed ‘et 2 ie 
v 
Leote he . tether of 
organ, —— 
amden J. and Pies 


rvices gt Compa 
meral Home. ° 350 I on 


wesday. 
(Parking facilities’. re re rort 
Lin Mausoleum. 


aS 1986, a 


M v. 


Veteran of Patent Office 


Elonzo T. Morgan, 81, a)Virginian: a the Presbyterian Church. 
founder and retired president Virginian; Robert Mt mag of Funeral services will be held 
of the Progressive Building and Silver Spring, a Patent Office *t 2 P- m. Thursday at the Arch 
Loan Association, died Sunday examiner, two brothers. a sis. S(Teet Presbyte Church, | 
at Doctors Hospital. ‘ter and a grandson. His first! ie burial in Arlington Ceme- 

‘Mr. Morgan spent 41 years wife died in 1949. ry here. 


with the United States Patent) Services will be held at 3 p.m. 
Baier 


Office. He was examiner in ‘today at the S. H. Hines Funeral 
Cio Set oRew xp 


LL x, 
peer? General to 


ional par ¥ 
u 


She was born Elsie Janis Bier- a 
bower in Columbus, Ohio, in all across the American- French 


1889. At the age of 8 she “go front. and was the only woman| Esther V. Green 
te Boge le: 0% favorite w by vos entertainer permitted to 0) Puneral services for Esther V. 
she hit Broadway as “Little into the front lines. Green, 51, a sales clerk at 
Fisie.” She was a vaudeville’ For this she received many: /Hecht’s, will be held at 11 a. m. 
bigtimer by the time she was 11. honorary decorations. She was. today in the Ft. Lincoln Chapel. 
Miss Janis retired from show 
business after her final movie|"e doushboys favorite. Burial will be in the cemetery 
role in “Women in War” in 1940. Best known as a singer and’ there. 
She was one of the best-loved comedienne, her talents were) Mrs. Green, 
say — gg of her aa - varied. She wrote the original | 5600 For nag 
Vv simp seldom ‘died 
went to parties, and frequently © ae ee vaNance’ Can| aeneral ospital. She was a 
visited old soldiers at the Saw-0ld Buddy Rogers-Nancy Car-| .ember of St. Luke’s Episco- 
telle veterans hospital. 'roll movie hit. With Edmund | pal Church in Bladensburg. of the loan association, after be- B 
Mary Pickford, who was at Goulding she composed a song, Sufvivors include her father, ing executive vice-president for ernard Smith Jr., 34-year-old’ yous, Secay S. 3» be Pgner, 
the bedside when Miss Janis\“Ge Me Time for Tenderness,”|Robert W. Baker of Baltimore:|eight years. “oan night club singer, will! whe departed parted this ENA. PONS. 
died, paid this tribute: for another film, “Darkiher husband, Dana L. Green; @ was born in West Virginia,'be conducted at 2 p. m. tod 
“Elsie Janis was a valiant/Victory.” ‘four children, Dana L. Jr., Mar-|@ direct descendent of Col. Mor-| at fves Funer- ie ster" e BibyT mina ou mers 
person, a great trouper, a great; Her Broadw ay successes in-' garet Evelyn, Robert Henry and hy Morgan, the first settler in| al Home, 2847 o one can fill pour vackn 
soul. She was certainly one of cluded “The Vanderbilt Cup,”| Virginia May; two sisters and |‘he state- His grandfather or- Wilson  bivd., Tour devoted wits, FONO. 
the greatest entertainers of all\“The Fair Coed,” “The Slim a brother. — at ee go J of volun-| Arlington. 
Princess,” “A Star for sing go dl eers and fought with the Union Mrs. Smith, | MESBE®, LaLa os | 
and “Miss Information.” Army in the War Between the known seutes. uckerman sts. 6 re | 
made her London debut in sna Vincent B. Murphy 
Mr. Morgan was a member of | 


in “The Passing Show” and be-' 
came a big English hit in sub-| Vincent B. Murphy, 68, Te ithe West Virginia State society’ 
sequent shows. ‘tired executive of the Central here and president of the group | 
Throughout the 1920s, Miss Railroad Signal Co, and former !" the 20s. In appreciation of | 
Janis and “Her Gang” were big controller of the State of New |"!5 work, the club awarded him | 
| vaudeville and silent movie fa- | York, died at Providence Hos-| a life membership. Mrs. J. B. Smith? brain tumor 
vorites. ‘pital Saturday. He lived at), “e is. survived by his wife, operation Dec. 
“She had a beautiful career,”| 1841 R st. nw. Le ota M. Morgan, also a West 28 She had been unconscious 
Miss Pickford said. “A beautiful} Mr. Murphy retired and since New Year's Eve. She lived 
life.” moved to Washington in 1953. | = 2515 N. Harrison st., Arling- 
After graduation from Yale he'| on. the end of this lone year 
, work for a department store Glowacki R. Parker Mrs. Smith was the former Thetis "mouskt "pees ath. a9 peat 
in his native Rochester, N. Y.,| SCHENECTADY. N. Y.. Feb. Kathleen Howard, of Colum-| #i; eriet of parting withont ‘soedbs 
becoming a director. He served 27 ‘»—Funeral services will be bus. Ohio. Besides her husband, farewell 
overseas as an infantry captain) held here Tuesday for Glo- she leaves her mother, Estella Ye ota FB 
‘with the 77th Division in World | wacki Redfield Park 73. Howard of Cleveland; three 
Washington phil- | War L tired 4 ws re-\brothers and a sister. 
| Mr. Murphy is servived b ire irector of Region 4 of) 
and businessman ¥ithe Social Security Board. He’ 
Clagett 


Xs 
will be | his wife and three children. A/ died Saturday after a short iil- ‘Mrs. G. H. 
Parker was appointed to| Mrs. Guigir H. Clagett, mem- 


vice president of General Dy-/held at 11 a m. Tuesday at — "iuinesiee ae bel eens. 
P. 
Social Security post in 1934.|\ ber of an old Maryland family, 
in| Region 4. embraces Maryland,'died Friday at Johns Hopkins 


namics Corp., the parent COn-/Gawier’s Chapel, 1756 Pennsyl-| 
; ) latthews Cathedral. I 
cern; at New London, Conn. i\vania ave. nw. Burial will be) with military honors will be the 

North Carolina, Virginia, West| Hospital in Baltimore. She ‘was 
Virginia and the District of|in her late 60s. 


G. V. Mavalankar, 68, speaker|in Washington Hebrew Con-) | Arlington Cemetery. 
Columbia. His headquarters| The funeral will be today "| Be 4 


CURTIS. JAMES A. rda 
eae a CURTis. | 


here. He was a member of the 6, 
— of Sat ty 6 curtis 


Board of Foreign Missions of 


at tne "Be 
Interment Chure 


chief until 1930, when President Home, 2901 14th st. nw. 
Hoover appointed him to the 
Board of Appeals, where he 
served for 15 years. 

In 1940 he became president 


who lived at 


* Bain 
4115 
Interment 


ry. 
REED. Tt. 
rca 
Oates st 


a. in 
+ te buspe 
and 


tine and 
Dey S at 


Ce. Gunster. Peb- 


Mrs. J. B. Smith 


| Funeral services for Mrs. J. 


on 
noon 
snginterment Ariin 


Ace ae 
fev, Priends 


. and a brothers Re 
. en “Charies Crifton d 
lb at Gasch Punerai 

tt 


ational! 


wruar? a! ae at Te — ee her 


= torment Arlington eme- 


a riends invited. interment Cedar 


ae Comet 
TELL. MARGARET On Sunday. 


time. This ends the vaudeville 
era.” 

Miss Janis is survived by her 
husband, Gilbert Wilson, to 
whom she was married in 1932. 
They made their home in Tarry- 
town, N. Y., before moving here 
several years ago. Wilson is 16 
years her junior. 

The name “Janis” meant 07 
to the GI Joes of World War I 
as “the sweetheart of the 
A. E. F.,” she entertained troops 


10111 Wlidwood Feb. 


mata, Sad 


unerel i Silver Spring. on February 
since 
sad and 


States. sionally as 


Kay Howard, 
died Saturday 
at Georgetown 
, University Hos- 
; pital, following 


One ie nes 
How “— a0 


re called away. 
—_ member that 


ry 
aiweys” - true. unselfish 
A tew in this world her euus 


n 
A “wor |" tag ate hay came te an end, 
6ne uved over? ones 


Deep in y life is « lonely 7 
Your bri cht face used to 

But maught can take your memory met 
ys wil 
ness. my 


s Cometery. Anna 
: suonrs. rw 
vs) 


Sunday. Februa 
ob euler 3 


tts «ar 
ae on " Wediiesaay. Februa 
m. Interment Saeserstown 


| sore KAT ene R On 


shines there and aiwa 
We wee still eee t,- poy 4 


es shed years 
Only doa knows — ise Fou at 


ment "Oedar Wel Cemetery 
ab ANS. eae G. On Monday. Feb- 
1 es 


Deaths Elsewhere Mare S. Goldnamer 


bor Pomeroy xg ho _ Funeral services for Mare S.' 
€ manager of the Electric ¢,) 

Boat Co. of Groton, which built eee 
three submarines a month dur- 2@*"OP*s 
ing World War Il, and senior who died last Friday, 


ce 


Lovi Mpsené. 
SCHERRER 
SHEA. LULU 


vin 
our dear Site arte a She FA ”-: 
awey four years ago tod 
Somewhere above this tepubled "emits 
— beyond A gree and care. 
mother in Heavenly Peace: 
God 6rant semnedae we meet her there. 


LOVING CHILDREN. 


7 nl 
Td Bad 


ather of Ter” 
nt 


. 
ment National | rk 
A M. On Sunday. February 


.. ma 
be held 

. ater. m latives and 
tmevited. Interment Brookiyn. | 


| wee. On Mon- 
LUCILLE 

loved wife of 
Pletcher. permet x ag, 


Wedges, Ma iae 


Seat reais Gay Peeton Cemetery 
Honorary pallbearers include Dr. Robert M. Lindner were in Washington, D. C. ‘ll a m. in Trinity Episcopal 
He had been regional district|CGhurch, Upper Marlboro, with 


hi and a top leader of the In- 
dian independence movement, the following local men: Alvin | BALTIMORE. Feb. 27 #—Dr. 
at Ahmedabad. |Aubinoe, Morris Cafritz, Oscar ne Lindner, 41, nation-| director for the National Re- er in the church cémetery. 
I. Dodek, Dr. Aubrey Fischer, ay own psychologist and covery Act (NRA) in the East- irs. Clagett was the former 
USN (ret) former asistant chet Dr. Melville Fischer, Phil Fil-/2Uthor of “Rebel Without a ern Atlantic States. In 1945 he| Margaret Paret Wilson and was 
f staff of the Third Naval Dis 4 an, Charles F. Jacobsen. |\Cause” on which a movie was directed introduction of Ameri-|born in Anne Arundel County. 
trict and at one time skipper of i ‘based, died today of a heart can farming methods in Japan She married in 1923 and moved 
the cruiser Brooklyn, in New Joel S. Kaufmann, Leroy King, | condition. for the Foreign Economie Ad- to Prince Georges County. Her 
York City David Legum, Frank J. Luchs,| He served for 10 years | mtistration. ‘husband died two years ago. 
; 'L. Gardner Moore, Roscoe S. \eriminal psychologist for the| Survivors include a son. | Mrs. Clagett was an active 
Max Nigrosh, 79. vice pa Mullins, Alvin Neumyer, Wil- State Board of Correction ‘Stewart R. Parker. of Schenec-|member of the Ladies Associa- 
dent of the New Engiffnd J 7 | Dr. Lindner touched off & tady, anda brother, Ralph C. ton of Trinity Church and the 
ish National Fund and active in|iam David Nye, Horace Pack,|controversy recently when he 'Parker of Bethesda, Md. ‘Forest Garden Club. 
Zionist organizations, in Boston,|£4ward Rosenbloom, Dr. San-'contended “the world has run 
following an automobile acci- ford Rosenthal, Melvin Schlos- amuck.” 
dent. berg, Arthur J. Stephens, + 4 “As a species,” he said, “we 
Le Walters and James are exhibiting exactly what the | 
Dr. Guenther Ramin, 57, lead-| Wilkes. most profoundly disturbed psy- ; 


ri dnatee. 
bia , ~ 0 * £5 


|| STROBEL. CASSIE. \ yioLA, On Monday, 
IZ 


; wher 2 
a. on 
Interment Colum. 


ALLY ¥ Gundez.. 
7 yes * She Salt Wea 


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FOX, RALPH & 
75 1956. at 


; aul @ Washington. 
tends ‘may , at Gawier's Chapel 
1756 Pennsylvania = ‘+ 


Reid st se 
rch. Oe! 
= , wei Wy Pebruary zm. 5 
. mm Interment Arlington sistional 
one Cemetery 
also GEORGE. ARTHUR. 
tel, ARTH 


mp 
ve S. wrere services wil pe! bel 
esday, February 29. at 
Interment Lewinsville. Vi 


ANBaEwes FLIA 


Gociety 


aptly Pri 


wit vite of the 
ot 


American Cancer 


SULLIVAN. mAs 
Cas ~ oT % 


National Weather Summary 
Lec ee ee es 


68 degrees 
Tbe = mo rately coid Feb i. ioe 


er of Leipzig’s famous Thomas; The family has asked that in-'chopathic personality shows. ne 
Church Boys’ Choir, and a well stead of flowers contributions Like him, we are without con- 
known organist, in Leipzig. ibe made to the Heart Fund. ‘science and given to violence.” 


oe temperature since 
45 ‘7 a, , cess since 
eSrpes 
pa a. 7% ive *Ramiait Maximum. ¢efctenc tation since Jan 
at 8:25 « minimum is > «2 ime iy ess since Feb. fate: at ar ineto oa Nall onal 
: oer cont at 2 3 » m™ /Sege. 47 2 ch e Cemetery ichmen 4 Lynch 
Today—Rain Sporn wure yw Fe “igh. €7| papers, 7. © 


Marviand ane Virgints decrees. i 
cory Solowss.e Shares, wes pet bun. Moon and. Tidew Sun rises 6:43/ BISCOR. ANNIE t. On Sundar. Por 
. : 59 DP Moo — A hy" sesidenge 


colder Wedodedav——-Pair an 
ately cold 2 
Wieds: Northwest et 30 miles an hour 
Visibility: Good |Great Pale 
Departeres from normal sesterdar— ‘of Ensines 
Temperatures and rain for 24 hours adios 7 p m. Monday: 


_ ie woes. | nn. WL. Pree. 


of Trenton. 
a H x tt 


28 1a 
Goatnk 


‘THOMAS. JOmN On Su ae Pebrue 
26. sia ape te Fonette 


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rends mar call” “at ; te k- ee st. nm a ~ 
nayiv sf ' 0 | mere servic will 

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on Tues Pebruary 
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NAME ° = cus 6. On Uyiday. 

ly in Miami 
a. cUs & GOLDNAMER ha — 
band of Helen Jonas Goldnamer 
Priends may call at Ga wier's Chapel 


of the jate 
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ze held on Wednesday 
Interment Fort 


— ~—¥ ation Cemetery a 
Ment the family request 
donations be m 


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mean «& Calvin 
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WHITE. wiLt. 1A unde 

at, Pa ryan, ae ke WEL Wale 

beloved wife of the late Asa of Md... 4 aloved husban 

armon, mother of Mrs had “and hers ° hite and ton ef Mr an 
rs. er of ” 


p~ oe DSO Ne SE HID | 
wens OO tr WF SS 


t 15 years and by 
e had worked at the Mayflower Ho- 
rs. Services at 
neral Home. 


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Wedne 
nterment 


WHITENU RST, .anmna On 
Pebruary 27. 1956. at the Menten’ eat 
Alexa ore. Va 


ee a ee ee eee —_—— ae 


—— 


Hope 
day, Pebruary “29 1 2 >. “s 
Cedar Hill Cem 


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. On Feb 


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‘ vig MS caeunes.) Interment Roc 
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ec, WISE, WILLIAM ay. veerpe 
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CREMATORIUM .| 
at . WILLIAM LEE'S SONS Vor 


A RR 


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tia eh te a 


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chil 7 
“Jor and about WOMEN 


Quoting Italy’s First Lady: 


Signora Gronchi 


Wants to See 
‘Everything 


By Ruth Sh umaker 


ITALY’'S first lady, Signora 
Giovanni Gronchi, will have 
lots of stories to take back 
home to her teen-age son and 
daughter of her first visit to 
the United States. 

Beginning with the 21-gun 
salute and military honors at 
the National Airport yester- 
day afternoon and continuing 
with an escorted oe 
to the White House, whe 
the visiting President and his 
wife were welcomed by Presi- 
dent and Mrs. Eisenhower, 
there was lots to tell. 

Signora Gronchi'’s eyes 
sparkled as she watched the 
performance of the U. 5. Air 
Force Band from a reviewing 
stand in front of the District 
Building and listened to the 
bagpipes, whose instruments 
are reported by some to have 
originated in Italy many cen- 
turies ago. . 

A pretty woman with blue 
eyes and bronze-toned hair, 
she seemed smilingly delight- 
ed with the whole reception 
and when asked what she 
wanted to see in Washing- 
ton, replied, “Everything.” 


ARRIVING in Washington 
ever an hour behind schedule 
after being delayed by bad 
weather in Newfoundland, the 
Gronchis were met at the Air- 
port by a big welcoming party 
headed by Vice President and 
Mrs. Richard M. Nixon, Sec- 
retary of State John Foster 
Dulles, Chairman of the Joint 
Chiefs of Staff and Mrs. Ar- 
thur Radford, Italian Ambas- 
sador and Signora Manlio 
Brosio and Clare Boothe 
Lace, United States Ambasa- 
dor to Italy. 

After the day's welcomes 
were over, the Gronchis pro- 
ceeded to Blair House, where 
they are staying, for a brief 
rest before going to the 
Italian Embassy for a small 
reception given by the Bro- 
sios. They returned to Blair 
House to dine privately and 
went to bed early. 


SIGNORA Gronchi wore a 
full-length mink coat over a 
grey jersey dress for her ar- 
rival in Washington, with a 
small black felt hat and 
needie-heeled Italian pumps 
of black leather. 

Signora Gaetano Martino, 
wife of the Foreign Minister 
who is a member of the Presi- 
dent's official party. wore a 
blue tweed suit, black seal 


jacket and a tiny hat of r 
Milan straw. | 

Mrs. Eisenhower appeared 
on the White House steps in 
a navy blue taffeta dress and 
platinum mink stole. 

The most interesting hat to 
be noted in the party at the 
Airport was Ambassador 
Luce’s, a dove grey Milan 
shaped like a small salad 
bowl and banded in redot- 
ted white silk. Her full- 
length pastel mink coat con- 
trasted with Pat Nixon's good 
Republican black cloth num- 
ber, worn with a small white 
felt hat. Signora Brosio looked 
very chic and Italian in a 
milk-collared black broadtail 
coat with a small black hat 
and cocoa-brown accessories. 


SIGNORA Gronchi and 
Mrs. Nixon rode together 
away from the Airport in the 
big black Cadillac that was 
second in the motorcade led 
by the plastic-topped Lin- 
coln that carried their hus- 
bands. 

The Italian first lady car- 
ried the sheaf of red roses 
bowed with her country’s col- 
ors of red, white and green, 
which had been presented to 
her by Mrs. Nixon. 


INTERESTINGLY, it is re- 
ported that Signora Gronchi 
drives a car although the 
President does not. 

With their son Mario and 
daughter Maria Cecilia they 
live in a modern apartment 
house in Rome rather than in 
the Quirinal Palace. Signora 
Gronchi often goes to her 
husband's office to join him 
for lunch 

Today the Gronchis’ visit 
continues with a 9:30 a. m. 
trip to the Tomb of the Un- 
known Soldier, luncheon and 
conferences at the White 
House, a look in at thé Na- 
tional Gallery of Art, which 
houses many Italian art treas- 
ures, and a state dinner at 
the Pan American Union, to 
be given by the Nixons. 


ENTERTAINING this week 
in honor of Signora Gronchi 
includes a luncheon Wednes- 
day in the dining room of 
Woodlawn Plantation. David 
E. Finley, chairman of the 
board of trustees of the Na- 
tional Trust for Historic Pres- 
ervation, and Mrs. Finley, are 
hosts. On Thursday, the Wom- 
en's National Press Club is 
giving a reception for her in 
the Mayflower Ballroom from 
5 to 7 p. m. 


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1956 


oe 


IT’S DOGWOOD TIME at the nursery of A. Gude & Sons, 
in Rockville, where this dogwood tree has been forced to 
early blossom for exhibition at the National Capital Flower 
and Garden Show to open Saturday, March 3, at the Na- 


Photo by Ankers 
tional Guard Armory and continue through March 9. Ad- 
miring the early blossoms is Corinne Griffith, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Griffith, 


Leland Olds Charges: 


GOP Power Plan 
Is Exploitation 


By Eileen Summers 


THE EISENHOWER water 
resources recommendations 
to Congress, if adopted, would 
end Federal construction of 
hydroelectric projects and 
would “restore the rights of 
unlimited private exploita- 
tion” of water power, it was 
charged yesterday by Leland 
Olds, former chairman of the 
Federal Power Commission. 

He addressed a luncheon 
meeting of the Women's Na- 
tional Democratic Club. 

President Eisenhower's wa- 
ter resources policy has 
meant no new starts of Fed- 
eral projects with hydro- 
electric power unless some 
non-Federal partner is ready 
to finance the power plant, 
Olds said. 

Eisenhower's “partnership 
policy” has already disrupted 
the great Columbia River 
basin program in the Pacific 
Northwest, he added. 


“SINCE the Interior De- 
partment-Federal Power Com- 


Benefit 
Is Styled 
To Leap Year 


THERE will be a bigtime 
Wednesday—Leap Year 
Day—in the Sheraton-Park 
Ballroom at the luncheon and 

fashion shéw to be staged by 

Woodward & Lothrop for the 
‘benefit of the Columbia Hos- 
pital Building Fund. 

The fashion show, natural- 
ly, will be built around the 
kind of sartoria! bait that 
girls use to. get a man—and 
there will be tables of stags 
to pass judgment on the bait. 
Star stag will be bachelor 
Sen. Warren G. Magnuson 

_ who will sit at the head table. 


FOOTBALL star Cliff Bat- 
tles and Comdr. John Paul 
Floyd will have tables at the 
luncheon, and guests, may 
hear these men interviewed 
by Hazel Markel on NBC's 
coast-to-coast broadc ast, 
“Week Day.” 

She will ask whether the 
fashions shown could really 
snare them—or, if they have 
al been hooked what 
“kind of clothes they fell for 
at the time. 


There are still tickets for | 


those who want to join in the 
_ fun—and help a good cause 
‘at the same time. 


i ee 


mission combination decided 
to give away the Helis Can- 
yon development to the Idaho 
Power Company, the power 
company wolves have been 
closing in én other important 
projects,” Olds added. Among 
these, he taid, are power 
projects on the Columbia 
River. 

In each instance, where 
the Federal plan calls for 
storage to provide for greater 
flood control and power 
development, the private com- 
pany plans call for less 
flood control and less power 
development, he said. 


HE CHARGED that the 
water resources report and 
the accompanying message 
to Congress from President 
Eisenhower withdraw the 
Federal Government from re- 
sponsibility for power supply 
to all non-profit local power 
systems. 

“These non-profit local 


systems represent the only 


check the people have on 


the gigantic private power 


monopoly,” Olds added. 


The Eisenhower water 
policy report fails to con- 


sider “the 88 million kilo. 
watts of hydroelectric power 
which the Federal Power 
Commission estimates 
remains to be harnessed in 
the United States ifthe Fed- 
eral Government continues its 
river-basin programs along 
the lines of the Tennéssee 
Valley Authority develop- 
ment, said Olds. 


At DCFWC Session: 


Refugees Plan 


Mental Health Bill Opposed Gets Backing 


By Marie Smith 


IN A STORMY session yes- 
terday the executive board 
of the District of Columbia 
Fede?ation of Women's Clubs 
voted overwhelmingly to op- 

se “as now written” a men- 
tal health bill which the Gen- 
eral Federation endorsed at 
a Senate committee hearing 
last week, 

The controversial measure 
—HR 6367 which was passed 
by a voice vote in the House 
last month—is to provide for 
hospitalization and care of 
the mentally ill of Alaska and 
for other purposes. 

Mrs. Ernest W. Howard, 
legislative chairman for the 
District Federation, said “we 
want the best for the mental- 
ly ill in Alaska” but this 
bill “is not as harmless as it 
sounds, It has seven dan- 
gerous provisions,” she de- 
clared. 


AMONG THESE, she said, 
is one that permits the ad- 
mission of a patient to a 
mental institution upon writ- 
ten application of an inter- 
ested person or health officer 
before judicial proceedings 
on the commitment are held. 

She added that it would 
dispense with the requife- 
ment that patients be present 
at judicial hearings on com- 
mitment and would give au- 
thority to the hearing com- 
missioner to exclude from it 
all persons not necessary for 
the conduct of the proceed- 
ings. 

Mrs. Howard said the group 
should be further concerned 


with the fact that the bill 
calls for a tract of one million 
acres—an area larger than 
the state of Rhode Island— 
for the Alaskan hospital pro- 
ject. 

“This area is sufficient in 
size to set up a Siberia for 
political prisoners who may 
be incarcerated there under 
abuses possible in case of en- 
actment of this highly 
dangerous piece of legisia- 
tion,” she declared. 


REP. EDITH Green (D- 
Ore.), author of the bill in 
the House,. expressed sur- 
prise to a reporter on learn- 
ing of the District Federa- 
tion's action. “The General 
Federation gave the bill ex- 
cellent support,” she _ re- 
marked. 

She explained that the bill 
is designed so the mentally 
ill in Alaska will have more 
humane treatment and the 
provision for commitment on 
a doctor's certification is the 
same as is followed in many 
of the states today. 

Alaska, she said, is the only 
territory forbidden by statute 
of taking care of their men- 
tally ill and under present 
procedure for commitment 
there a mentally ill person 
must be arrested “like a 
criminal” and tried before a 
jury and then sent to a his- 
pital in Portland. Ore. 


The Congresswoman added | 
that the bill proposes to set | 


aside one million acres which 
may be sold or leased to ob- 
tain revenue for operation of 
the hospital in Alaska. 


THE General Federation 
of Women’s Clubs has asked 
its 15.500 member clubs to 
sponsor refugees coming to 
this country to boost the lag- 
ging United States program. 

The president of the Fed- 


THE BILL has been on the 
General Federation's list for 
support for some time and 
when it was passed by the 
House by voice vote last 


By BPW Foundation 


Studies Started 
On Career Gals 


WOMEN who have been so 
busy making progress in the 
business and professional 
world over the years that 
they haven't taken time to 
take stock of their legal and 
economic status are about to 
do just that. 

Creation of a Business and 
Professional Women’s Foun- 
dation—a non-profit educa- 
tional corporation to de re- 
search on working women— 
was announced yesterday by 
the National Federation of 
Business and Professional 
Women’s Clubs. 

Marguerite Rawalt, nation- 
al president of the Federa- 
tion, said the Foundation will 
set up headquarters here, in 
the Dupont Circle Building 
until permanent headquar- 
ters are acquired. 

She and other officers of 
the Federation which held an 
executive committee meeting 
here this weekend to iron out 
final details of the new organ- 
ization, are incorporators of 
the Foundation and will serve 
as its oficers for six months. 


THIS IS the first national 


foundation .created to serve 
business and professional 
women the world over and 
it will conduct studies on 
such matters as the effects 
of automation on women, 
problems of retirement and 
laws which affect women, 
Miss Rawalt said. 

At present, she said, “there 
seems to be no single place 
in the United States which 
has a complete syllabus or 
analysis of state laws that af- 
fect women,” citifig one of 
the needs to be filled by the 
Foundation. 


THE FOUNDATION will 
begin operation on a grant 
of sevéral thousand dollars 
from the Federation and will 
“grow from that,” said Miss 
Rawalt, a lawyer in the of- 
fice of the chief counsel, In- 
ternal Revenue Service. 

She added that it hopes 
to get grants from outside 
sources to carry on the work 
planned. It will also have a 
number of working. commit- 
tees on research projects, 
management, library and fi- 
nance. 


—- 


OF 
OUR DA 
1S FREE 


You, Tee, Con SAVE WORK... 
SAVE 


4 


LUNCHEON ... COCKTAILS .. . 


DINNER . . 


Nana Ramon 


ES OR 6 ER ee mem mm te ag 


his group, featuring 


A HILTON HOTEL 


in the Lounge with 
delightful Sidney music. 
Dancing ‘from 7 p.m. to 

exotic Latin - American 


rhythms of CHAMACO 


Pianist of the Stars’’ and 


Jy 


The Mayflower SS 


4 


month Mrs. Theodore 5S. 


Chapman, president of the 
General Federation, told its 
board meeting here then 
their members could take 
credit for its easy passage 
because of their strong sup 
port. 

She was not available yes- 
*rday for comment on the 
District Federation's action 
opposing the measure. 


A WORD picture of Wash- 
ington'’s. “Southwest of To- 
morrow” was given at the 
District Federation Board 
meeting yesterday by John R. 
Searles Jr.. executive direc- 
tor of the District of Colum- 
bia Redevélopment Land 
Agency, who described de- 
velopments planned in that 
area. 

He said 75 “vacant acres” 
are awaiting development in 
the Southwest and that steam 
shovels will go in to begin 
work in two or three mnoths. 

Mr. Searles said only 10 per 
cent of the land will be oc- 
cupied by buildings and they 
will provide residential! facili- 
ties for 5000 persons. 


—_—_—_—_—- 


eration, Mrs. Theodore Chap- 
man, set the example by 
signing papers agreeing to 
sponsor five East Prussians. 

The GFWC, which asked 
the State Department to mail 
necessary sponsor papers to 
the club women, noted that 
under the Refugee Act of 
1956, the United States is 
committed to take in 209,000 
refugees by Dec. 31. 

SO FAR, only 80,000 mi- 
grants have come in under 
the program. After confer- 
ring with state officials, the 
GFWC said that 40,000 addi- 
tional sponsors are “needed 
at once.” 

The quotas are particularly 
lagging for Germans, Aus- 
trians and Dutch refugees. 

Mrs. Chapmant will house 
the five persons she is spon- 
soring at her farm in. Jer- 
seyville, Ill. 


Returns Home 


MRS. Marjory Hendricks 
has returned to her home at 
Normandy Farm after a Mex- 
ican tour including Mexico 
City and Acapulco and many 
side trips. 


Handmade 


Blouses 
7.95 


A, 
“oo 


A find if you love niceties! 


Yolande has that daintiness all 


its own. Top, white dotted 


swiss with rose buds at the 


neck. Left, soft appliqued 
batiste. Shell pink, meize 
or white. Sizes 10 to 18. 


Fourth Floor 


4 tohin 


Se pee ee en eee 


| 


. 
i ee ee ee eo eee 


——— 


Its.a Woman; That's 
Who in ‘Who's Who’ 


THERE CAN be no doubt 
that women are coming into 
their own, after an announce- 
ment by the publishers of 
“Who's Who In America” 
today that four times as 
many female names appear 
this year than ever before. 

The latest edition of the 
biographical] sketches, which 
were first compiled at the 
turn of the century, is being 
published this week. 

Not only are more women 
making a name for them- 
selves these days, say the 
editors, but their fields of 
achievement are more diver- 
sified. In the 1890's, most 
female listings claimed fame 
in the theater or literature. 
But modern woman is find- 
ing a high-placed niche for 


herself in the more serious 
callings of business, .Govern- 
ment, science ard the mili- 
tary services. 


AIR FORCE women’s dl- 
rector Phyllis D. S. Gray is 
included in the new volume. 
So is Louise K. Wilde, direc- 
tor of the WAVES. 

Other well-known Wash- 
ington names appearing for 
the first time include Frances 
A. Knight, director of the 
State Department's Passport 
Division, and Mrs. Theddore 
S. Chapman, president of the 
American Federation of 
Woman's Clubs. 

In the field of fashion, 
dress designers Ceil Chap- 
man, Freda Diamond and 
Anne Fogarty are making 
their debut. 


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’ 


— i ee eee ee ee ee 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
and TIMES HERALD 
Tuesday, February 28, 1956 


_30 


pn sa'se s 


112 Years: 
Dominicans 
Celebrate 
Holiday 


ONE HUNDRED and twelve 
years of independence for 
the Dominican Republic were 
the occasion for a gala black 
tie reception at the embassy 
on Edgevale terrace. 

Ambassador and Senora de 
Salazar greeted several hun- 
dred guests in the wide en- 
trance hall. The Ambassa- 
dor’s lady wore a form- 
fitting sheath of white wool 


jersey embroidered all over 
with crystal beads, and a 
white orchid at her shoulder. 

Mrs. John Foster Dulles 
came and left early, saying 
that she andthe Secretary of 
State also had a dinner date. 
“My husband almost never 
gets to parties at this time of 
day,” she said. 

A number of Congressmen 
were in the party throngs 
among them Rep. and Mrs. 
Clark Thompson of Texas, 
who were also going to a 
dinner; Rep. and Mrs. Robert 

. Sikes of Florida, Rep. 
ictor Anfuso of 
and Mrs. 


Mre. W. R. ‘Poague of Texas. 


SENORA de Gonzales, 
recently named the Wom- 
en's Advertising Club as one 

‘of ‘Washington's 10 best 
dressed women, came with 
her husband, the Venezuelan 
Ambassador She looked the 
part in a halter-neck black 
dress with lace skirt, with a 
diamond lavaliere necklace. 

Air Force Chief of Staff 
and Mrs. Nathan F. Twining 
were — many friends 

harles Patrick Clark 
no by-passing the lavish buf- 
fet supper in favor of his own 
home-cooked spaghetti and 
meatbalis. 


PERUVIAN Am bassador 
and Senora de Berckemeyer 
were there, she in a hand- 
some black and gold brocade 
dinner dress: and so were 
Homer Gruenther, El Salva- 
dor Ambasador and Senora 
de Castro, Associate Justice 
and Mrs. William O. Douglas, 
Chief of Protocol and Mrs. 
John F. Simmons, 


YOUNGEST DOMINICAN—Five-year-old Bernadette Sale 
zar took the honors as the youngest at the party her par 
ents, Dominican Ambassador and Senora de Salazar, 
gave last evening in honor of their eountry’s 112th Inde 


By Norman Driscoll. Staff Photographer 


pendence Day. Mere she is with (left to right) Lady Makina, 
wife of the British Ambassador; Senora de Salazar, Ambae 
sador Salazar and Ambassador Makins. 


Town Topics 


Why Is Washington Wonderful? 


By Marie McNair 


WHAT IS it about Wash- 
ington that makes people 
once they've lived here, un- 
happy when they leave it? 
Why doso 
many people 
elect to make — 
it their per- 
manent home 
after their 
particular 
mission is 
completed? 

Are the 
people here 
more friend- 
ly; is it be <« 
cause that in Mrs. McNair 
the Nation's Capital everyone 
feels he’s in the “know’? Or 
le it because the “livin’ is 


= 


and New York? 
questions Mrs. William 
Mitchell, wife of the General 
Counsel of the Atomic Energy 
Commission would like to 
find the answers to. 

She's writing a magazine 
article on Washington from 
a personal point of view. 

The Mitchells first came to 
Washington from Minnesota 
during World War Il. Mrs. 
Mitchell frankly, wasn’t very 
happy. But then, no one was. 
The city was terribly over- 
crowded; living conditions 
were bad: there were short- 
ages in everything and 
everything was sky-high in 


rice. 
Mrs. Mitchell never wanted 


She'll Attend Swiss Conclave 


By Frances Rowan 


BETTY JEAN Stamps is cur- 
rently making scouting his 
ory. 

The blonde greeneyed 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert M. Stamps, of Alex- 
andria, is going to be one of 
four Girl Scouts in the coun- 
try to take part in the sum- 
mer meeting at “Our Chalet,” 
international headquarters of 
the World Association of Girl 
Guides and Girl Scouts at 
Eggetli, Switzerland. 

ow does she feel to be the 
first Girl Scout so honored’ 
“Very excited but a bit scared 
of the responsibility,” Betty 
told the Washington Post and 
Times Herald in a telephone 
interview yesterday from 
Westhampton College in Rich- 
mond, Va. 


THE VETERAN scouter, 
who admits to having been 
“sort of hoping I'd be chos- 
en,” feels the meeting will 


contribute a lot to “help 
broaden my concept of scout- 
ing.” Actually, her experience 
in the field has been pretty 
complete. A member of the 
Alexandria Council, she’s win- 
ner of the Curved Bar award, 
highest scouting honor and 
in 1954 was chosen to partici- 
pate with 15 other Girl Scouts 
in a 1200 mile archeological 
tour of the West, a trip that 
so sparked her interest in 
archelogy that Betty is going 
to take a course in it at col- 
lege. 


BETTY who says she’s still 
“up in the clouds” over her 
coming trip is one young lady 
who isn't concerned about « 
wardrobe for doing Europe. 

“My scout uniform will be 
the number one item,” she 
says. Paris and Rome are on 
the agenda for Betty who has 
never before been to Europe 
but the meeting at the 
Chalet will be her greatest 
thrill, she says. 

Before sailing on July -@, 


— 


Betty will go through en 
orientation course in New 
York with the other girls at 
International House. 


THE WESTHAMPTON 
freshman is living up to her 
role as a leader at college. 
She's the freshman editor of 


the yearbook and is now get- 
ting ready to help with an 
intermediate scouting group 
in Richmond. She's already 
chosen her major subject at 
college—sociology. 

The international roundup 
begins with the trip to New 
York on June 30. From there, 
the girls go to London on the 
way to Switzerland for the 
July 17 to August 7 meeting. 

Then comes a jaunt to Paris 
before sailing to arrive in 
New York on August 
Betty will be representing 
Scout Region 3 comprising 
the states of Virginia, Mary- 
land, Deleware and Pennsy!- 
vania and the District of 
Columbia. 


— 


Garfinkel 
& Co. 


Store Hours 9:30 A.M. to 5:45 P.M. 


AEN Iie by TUPPER 


a 


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spring. Flax, here in an open-toed, halter 


strap shoe with very high, very slender heels. 


Flax or blue calf and 


black patent, 17.95. 


Debutante Shoes, Sixth Floor 


* end Spring Valley 


; 


to see Georgetown ag 

But she IS wt “ving 
about a half mile from her 
former home. And she's 
happy! ° 
aA she would like to know 
why! 


Dinner at Eight: 


THE YUGOSLAV Ambassa- 
dor and Mme. Mates were 
hosts at a firet of a series 
of dinners iast evening. 

The British Ambassador 
and Lady Makins and their 
house guest, the Countess of 
Munster; the French Am- 
bassador and Mme. Couve de 
Murville and the German 
Ambassador, Dr. Heinz 
Krekeler, were among the 
group. 

Others were Senator Allen 
J. Eliender, Representative 
and Mrs. James P. Richards, 
Representative James 


R. Wiggins, Mme. 


A 


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er A Gere er © gree)« oer cme gene een. queer, mer ence 


Viadimir Rybar, and the 
Minister of Yugoslavia and 
Mme. Primozic. 


THE TURKISH Ambassa- 
dor and Mme. Gork's buffet 
dinner on March 16 will be 
followed by color films of 
Turkey to be narrated by 
Julien Bryan, executive di- 
rector of the International 
Film Foundation. 


Leaving: 

WOLCOTT Wags aman— 
known as “Doggie” to his 
friends—is leaving in a few 
weeks for Korea to spend 
seven months with the ICA's 
low-cost housing project. He 
and Mrs. Waggaman recently 
returned from the Barbadoes 
where Doggie was architect 
for the ICS’s housing proj- 
ect there. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Davis 
had a buffet dinner Sunday 
night for the Waggamans to 
meet the Korean Ambassador 
and Mme. Yang. 


Travel through spring and summer 
with wonderful, packable robes 
of lightweight wool and 
Egyptian cotton by B. Cohen. 
Left, dotted coachman robe with 
double button waistline in 

white with red or blue, 39.95. 
Right, pink and blue pastel 
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Lingerie, Fifth Floon. 


. council president, 


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Garfinckel 
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F STREET AT FOURTEENTH © NaAtional 87738. MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE AT 49th © EMerson 2.2258 


Council Meets: 
Resolution 


A GLIMPSE of Russia will 
be given the Board of Direc- 
tors, Federation of Women’s 

’ Clubs’ of Montgomery Goun- 
ams ata 12:39 PB, m. lunch- 


On Today’ 


s Calendar * 
eon. Rep. Williams will re 


+ on his recent trip 
7 St. John’s 


Supports 
Miss Luey 


A RESOLUTION has been 
passed here by the National 
Council of Negro Women 
supporting the recent anti- 
segregation actions of two 
Alabama women, Autherine 
Lucy and Rosa Parks. 

At the same time, it was 
announced yesterday that a 
mass meeting of both Negro 
and white women from all 
over the country is being plan- 
ned here soon “to call public 
attention to the principles of 
democracy.” A planning com- 
mittee is being formed, but 
no date has yet been set. 

Both the resolution and 
plans for the rally came at a 
meeting Saturday at the na- 
tional headquarters at 1318 


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THE RESOLUTION pledged 
“financial, moral and spiritual 
support” to Miss Lucy, the 
student who has been seeking 
admission to the University 
of Alabama, and Mrs. Parks, 
the 43-ye ar-old seamstress 
whose arrest touched off the 
bus boycott in Montgomery 

The resolution said, in part: 

“This organization has since 
its inception the founder, | 
Mary McLeod Bethune, strug- 
gied for better educational 
opportunities and for the 
elimination of segregation 
wherever it is found. Auther- 
ine Lucy and Rosa Parks per- 
sonify the kind of action and 
idealism for which the Na 
tional Council of Negro Wom- 
en stands... We defend and 
support their actions ... and 
pledge our active corrobora- | 
tion in the ideals they have | 
exemplified with such dignity | 
and calmness of purpose.” | 


OTHER ACTION taken by | 
the council Saturday in- 
cluded: 

*® Formation of a national 
committee to plan a perma- 
nent memorial for Mary Mce- 
Leod Bethune. ) 

® Plans for a Ste + Depart 
ment-sponsored ex: ange pro- 
gram between women leaders 
in this country and Africa. 

® Plans for the first annual 
Mary McLeod Bethume Com- 
memoration, with leaders of | 
‘all national Negro women's 
groups scheduled to meect 
here May 18. 

® Plans for a visit by the 
Mrs. Wil- 
liam J. Mason, to Israel this 
spring at the request of that 
country’s government. 


“Over 40.” Theme 


“So You Are Over Forty” | 
is the theme of a talk to the 
Twentieth Centrury Club on 
Thursday, March 1. 
Speaker is Joy Elmer Mor- 
gan president of the “Senior 
Citizen of America.” The 

will be held at 11 
a. m. at the YWCA. | 


* and Spring Valley 


k resh as spring 


French-printed cotton 
suit by David Crystal. 
A versatile, dark classic for so 
many occasions from now on 


into summer. Black background 


with delicate flowers of purple, 
blue or red, Sizes 10-20. 29.95. 
Misses’ Suite, Fourth Floos. 


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satin lastex and power 
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Side zipper and front 
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Also available:in panty 


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ONL ERs CE ree or em ee Een ig st ane ees ree, 


FIRST PRIZE WINNER at the arts show of. 
Time of Evening,” 
a portrait by Rosalind Farley. Looking over 
the painting at the McLean Bank where 
the show was held on Sunday is Genii Diehl, 


the McLean Arts Club is “ 


; fone s Trading Post 


By Jim McNamara. Staff! Photographer 


9, of McLean. Miss Diehl’s mother, Mrs. E. F. 
Dieh! was a second prize winner at the show. 
Third prize was a draw between Teckla 
Kumdzin and E. B. Nordlie. Popular vote 
determined the winners. 


oe 


_ WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


/ Tuesday, February 28, 1956 


51 


How Show Dormer Windows to Advantage 


“TY LOVE dormer windows, 
but how do you decorate 
them?” inquires Con stant 

eader of Fredericksburg, 

a, eyeing her upstairs 
rooms in consternation. 

“Mine are 38 inches in 
length and 33 inches in depth. 
Both dormer recesses contain 

a radiator. I'll certainly wel- 
can any hints. 

“Also I will appreciate any 
information on d ating a 
room for a boy, aged 2% 
years. This room is long and 
narrow.” : 


READY-CUT LOG CABIN 


We have just bought a lot 
for a summer home and 


would like to know if any of* 


your readers have had ex- 
perience erecting a ready-cut 
log cabin. We would like to 
have any information about 
local cost and other details, 
if one does the work him- 


D. A. B., Washington. 


TRUNDLE BEDS 

FOR Mrs. S. B. who in- 
quired about trundle beds: 
We purchased a set last fall 
for- our small sons after 
“shopping” beth bunk and 
trundle types ex tensively. 
For our purposes we found 
the trundle beds far superior 
and are more than pleased 
with them. Our set is of 
heavy oak in a medium fin- 
ish which does not show the 
marks of normal use. It also 
separates into twin beds if de- 
sired. The bottom bed is 
formed of the footboards; the 
top of the headboards with 
the addition of an extender 
which is included 

The trundle is much easier 
to make, more compact and 
flexible, and we consider it 
far safer as the top bed, in- 
cluding mattress, is only 
about 29 inches from the 


floor. The lower bed is on 

casters so it moves easily and 

does not mar the floors. 
Patricia B. Smith, 


Dumfries, Va. . 


REGARDING trundle beds, 
I made my own before they 
were available ready-made 
and recommend them highly. 
They are safer than bunk 
beds, especially for restless 
children, and the weather 
must be less comfortable up 
near the ceiling in a bunk 
bed, Trundle beds are more 


easily made up than otter 
the top or bottom bunk. The 
lower trundle requires bend- 
ing, and contour sheets are a 
help. The top one is.at the 
ideal height for bed-making 
comfort, being about the 
height of a hospital bed. I’ve 
seen advertised a pair of beds 
which can be used as trundle, 
bunk or twin beds as your 


requirements change. 
Mrs. Ruby Little, 


Arlington, Va. 


CHANGING MEASURE. 
MENTS 

THE LADY WHO asked for 
help in converting recipes 
from weight to volume meas- 
ure may like the “Handbook 
of Food Preparation,” pub- 
lished by the American Home 
Economics Association, 620 
Mills Building, Washington 6, 
D. C. While it is intended 
primarily for professional 
home economists, many parts 
are very useful to me as a 
homemaker. There is a list 


over three pages long of 
weight and volume meastre- 
ment, giving the weight in 
grams and ounces of one cup, 
and the approximate volume 
of one pound of all kinds of 
food—flours and cereal prod- 
ucts, fruits and nuts, fats and 
oils, dairy products, and 
others. Another section gives 
equivalent substitutions and 
still another has a tempera- 
ture conversion table, centi- 
grade to Fahrenheit. 


E. M. K. 


Elinor Lee’s Recipe Box: 


Hearty Chowder 


4 tbisps. butter 

% Ib. lean smoked ham, 
cut in small cubes 

% cup finely diced celery 

% cup finely chopped 
onion 

Dash of pepper 


Melt butter in heavy kettle or Dutch oven. Add ham 
cubes and cook over low heat for about 5 minutes. Add 
celery and onions and continue to cook over low heat 
until vegetables are soft but not brown. Cook potato 
cubes in boiling salted water until nearly tender. Drain. 
Blend flour into ham-vegetable mixture. Add milk 
slowly and continue to cook and stir until mixture is 
smooth and thickened. Add potatoes. 
needed, and a dash of pepper. Cook over very low heat 


for several minutes, until 
potatoes are just tender. 


with a sprinkle of chopped parsley. Makes 6 servings. 


2 cups cubed, partially 
cooked potatoes 
4 tbisps. flour 
4 cups milk 
Sait, if needed 
Chopped parsley 
for garnish 


Add salt if 


chowder is piping hot and 
Serve in hot soup bowls, 


PRIVATE and public 
school teachers will flock to 
a 3:30 p. m. tea at the invita- 
tion of Martha Rogers, 
president of the D. C. Chap- 
ter, Association for Childhood 
Education. The tea, which 

recedes the Association's 
Study Conference at the 
Sheraton Park, April 1-4, will 
be held at the Burdick Voca- 
tional High School, 13th and 
Allison sts. nw. The Wom- 
an’s Club of Chevy Chase, 
Md., Candamo Spanish class 
meets from 9 to 10:30 a. m.; 
Randall's class from 10:30 to 
noon: the craft class at 9:30 
a. m.: Mme. Caskie’s French 
class from 10:45 a. m. to noon: 
Hassel’s German class from 
12:30 to 2 p. m. Club mem- 
bers will attend a 10 a. m. tea 
of the Newcomb Club of 
Bethesda at St. John's 
Church, Wis. ave. and Brad- 
ley. Lane, Bethesda, Md. Dr 


On Today's Calendar 


Charles W. Lowry, Executive 
Director of the Foundation 
of Religious Action, will ad- 
dress the club at 2 p. m., 


NARCOTICS will be the 
subject of a talk by Sgt. Jo- 
seph Gabrys of the Metro- 
politan Police Narcotics 
Squad to the Opti-Mrs. Club 
of Washington The meet- 
ing is at 12:30 p. m. at the 
Sheraton Park Hotel... The 
Our Flag Chapter, D. C. 
DAR meets at 12:30 p. m. at 
the chapter house, 1732 Mass. 
ave. nw.; the Capt. Wendell 
Wolfe Chapter at 8 p. m. at 
the chapter house; the Co- 
lumbia Chapter and Federal 
City Chapter at 8 p. m. at 
the chapter house and the 


Livingston Manor Chapter at | 
at the chapter | 
. The Woman's Club | 
of Annapolis and Anne Arun- | 


12:30 p. mM. 
house . 


del County meets at 1:30 
at the 


DR. MONTENIER’S NEW 
SOLID DEODORANT 


turns at a touch into 


Stopéette 


PROTECTION! 


You. put it on with a stroke 
it evaporates. 
All that remains is sheer Stoy~ 


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Here in this new'stick deo- 
dorant by the famous chemist, 
Dr. Jules Montenier, is the 


anid les 
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FROM A oun. 
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re : 


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perspiration and odor. : 
Try this great new deodo- : 
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On Sale 
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tint tiie tte TL a 


building, Annapolis, Md... . 
Samia Temple, No. 51, Daugh- 
ters of the Nile, meets at 8 
Pp. m. at Joppa Hall, 4209 9th 
st. nw. 


CLARENCE G. Adamy, As- 
Sistant to Leonard Hall, 
Chairman of the Nationa! Re- 
publican Committee, is speak- 
ing to members of the Wom- 
en's Republican Cl»*b of Sil- 
ver Spring at 8 p. m. The 
meeting is at the Woodlin 
Elementary School, Luzerne 
and Lewis aves., Silver Spring 
. » « The Pive Hills Garden 
Club, Vienna, Va.. meets at 
8 p. m. at the Vienna Presby- 
terian Church 

The Washington, D. C., 


es a — 


ee ~——— —— 


Alumnae Chapter, Theta Up- 
silon, meets at 8 p. m. at the 
home of Mrs. D. Eugene Cope- 
land, 1027 N. Manchester st., 
Arlington ... 


The Women’s | 
Auxiliary, Alpha Omega Den- | 
tal Fraternity, meets for tea | 


at 1 p. m. at the home of | q 


Mrs. Fulton Kraft, 4301 Ver- | 


planch pl. nw. ... The Pi 
Beta Phi Alumnae Club of 


Arlington meets at 8 p. m. at | 


the home of Mrs. Edward L. 
Mason, 
dr... 
Georgetown 


neit, Bm: & 


League of Women Voters, | 


meets at 10 a. m, at the home 
of Mrs. William Brown, 1254 | 
Sist st. nw. 


_ Health & Welfare | 


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Bursting with Springtime 


March Ladies Home Journa] 


+ ™ ... four ex-fatties 


sae 


make dieting easier! 


Would you ever recognize these dieters... 


6 


your diet... 


before and after? And now, in the March 
Journal, these two and two other ex-fatties 
tell you their diet secrets. 

Want to know how you can get fun out of 


how you can stick to it... whom 


to confide in for your greatest moral support? 


You'll learn the answers firsthand... 


to compare the experiences of all four girls. 
You'll learn how they whittled up to 20 
inches off their hips, lost up to 115 pounds in 
just one year. Their rewards? New figures, 
new pep and new happiness. 
And you'll find 36 varied diet menus as 
each girl gives you her favorite menu plans. 
Whether you want to lose 50 pounds or just 


“trim down, 


” read “We Lost 450 Pounds.” 


Her famous leading men tell— 


What makes 


GRACE KELLY 


different? 


Cary Grant, James Stewart, Gary Cooper, Sanaa ae 


Alec Guinness, William Holden and Paul Douglas. . 


. the 


men who know her best on the screen—reveal, firsthand, 
the special qualities that fit Grace for her greatest role to 
date with a real prince for a leading man. 


The reckless Captain Mungo Clark was 
gone, leaving this young and beautiful 
girl desolate in the Sandwich Islands, 
unwanted and unloved, Be sure to read 
this exciting story of a headstrong girl 
who left New England to find adventure 
and romance under... 


“Another Sky * 


by Neomi Lane Babson 


OVERWORKED YOUNG MOTHERS. Answers the 
question to “Why can’t women organize their homes and children 
the way men organize their businesses?” Don’t miss “ Bulging at the 
Seams,” second in the new Journal serics on “The Plight of the 


Young Mother.” 


NEW SPRING FASHIONS... 


8 pages in glorious color, 


Your hat has more size, new shapes, new charms, Jackets go to 
new lengths to please. Purses, gloves, shoes and jewelry in color, 


IN ALL, 37 articles, stories and features 


MARCH 


JOURNAL 


Out today—on all sewiubendi 


0 Oo-w e -e ows 


: 


4 
oo > Gee ee eee + eee 


be able 


rar err 


a 


# 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TjMES HERALD 
32 Tuesday, February 28, 1956 . 


é Engagements 


KAREN GAIL O’BEIRNE 
PATTERSON C. TAYLOR 


Rear Admiral Frank 
O’'Beirne, USN, Commander, 
Field Command, ._Armed 
Forces Special Wéapons 
Project, Sandia Base, Albu- 
querque, N. M., and Mrs. 
O’Beirne announce the en- 
gagement of their daughter, 
Karen Gail to Ensign Patter- 
eon Corwin Taylor, USN, son 
of Capt. A. H. Taylor, USN, 
and Mrs. Taylor of Little 
Creek, Va. Miss O’Beirne at- 
tended Women’s College of 
the University of North Caro- 
lina and George Washington 
University. She now attends 
the University of New Mex- 
ico. Ensign Taylor attended 
Puthahou School in Honolulu 
and graduated from the 
United States Naval Acad- 
emy. He is now stationed in 
the U.S.S. Northampton, a 
light cruiser based at Nor- 
folk, Va. 


JUNE ELLEN COCHRAN 
~-ROBERT A. SHINN 

Mr. and Mrs.. Ellison R. 
Cochran of Falls Church, Va., 
announce the engagement of 
their daughter, June Ellen, 
to Midshipman Robert A. 
Shinn, USN, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. B. Claude Shinn of Nor- 
man, Okla. Miss Cochran at- 
tended Pennsylvania State 
University and is employed 
by the Department of the 
Army. Midshipman Shinn at- 
tended the University of 
Oklahoma and attends the 
United States Naval Acad- 
emy. 


BEVERLY JUNE WALKER 
—MELVIN LEON RIDER 
Mr. and Mrs. A. Vance Walk- 
er of Falls Church, Va., an- 
nounce the engagement of 
their daughter, Beverly June, 
to Melvin Leon Rider, son of 
Mrs. Erma Rider of LeSage, 
WwW, Va. 


——$$< eee mee ee ee 


You've tried the 


PEGGi R. UNRUH 

—SCOTT W. LUCAS JR. 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Unrulr 
of Havana, Ill, announce the 
engagement of their daugh- 
ter, Peggi Ruth, to Scott W. 
Lucas Jr., son of the Hon. 
and Mrs. Scott W. Lucas of 
Havana. Miss Unruh is a 
graduate of Havana High 
School and the Electronics, 
Radio and Television Insti- 
tute of Omaha, Neb. She is 
employed by the Department 
of the Navy. Her fiance is a 
graduate of Stuyvesant Boys 
School, Warrenton, Va., and 
attended Maryland Univer- 
sity. 


DORIS ELLEN CARTER 
~—DONALD J. KRESNYE 
Mr. and Mrs. Clark L. Carter 
of Calera, Ala., announce the 
engagement of their daugh- 
ter, Doris Ellen, to Donald J. 
Kresnye, son of Mf. and Mrs. 
Julius Kresnye of Cleveland, 
Ohio. Miss Carter is employed 
with the Departmé@nht of the 
Navy. Her fiance, a graduate 
of Fenn College in Cleveland, 
is now employed with the 
Naval Gun Factory. 


RUTH M. WOOL 

—ALVIN FRIEDMAN 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wool 
announce the engagement of 
their daughter, Ruth Miriam, 
to Alvin Friedman, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Benjamin Friedman. 


Living in Maryland 

Mr. and Mrs. Tucker Morris 
are now residing in Silver 
Spring, Md., following their 
marirage on Feb. ll. Mrs. 
Morris is the former Eliza- 
beth Ann Deffinbaugh, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Charlies Ewell Deffinbaugh 
Sr. of Silver Spring, Md. Mor- 
ris is the son of Mrs. Elvira 


Morris of Takoma Park, Md. 


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SATIRE IN SONG will fll Holton Arms 
School Auditorium March 1, 2 and 3 when 
the Hexagon Club lampoons life in Wash- 
ington with “Meet the Beep,”—its musical 
production for the benefit of the American 
Cancer Society, D. C. Division. The 60 
youthful performers, who'll operate in the 


make-believe framework of a weekend 


variety show, will stage numerous produc- 
tion numbers, among them “Starlings in My 
Eyes,” and “What's Good for GM Is Good for 
the Country.” 
the American Automobile Association, the 
Francis Soott Key 
Georgetown Shop. 


Tickets may be obtained at 


Bookshop and the 


Mary Haworth’s Mail 


Hesitates to Ask Another 


DEAR MARY HAWORTH: 
I have been married, and re 
cently divorced. Shortly after 
my wife and | separated, I 
met a young 
woman at a 
church event. 
She didn't 
impress me 
much at first, 
but as our 
ecquaintance 
ripened, I 
fell im love 
with her. I 
feel I should 
like very 
much to mar- 
ry her. 
At the time I met Edith, I 
was trying to patch things up 


with my wife, who was being 
stubborn and ill 


. Want- 
ing to be fair with Edith, I 
told her the facts and said I 
would keep her posted. If the 
marriage was finished, I 
wanted t6 see her again. I 
had been lonely, despondent 
and on the verge of a break- 
down before we met; but her 
society renewed my faith in 
life and I let things take 
their course. My wife divorced 
me. 

At first Edith kept me at a 
distance, but since my divorce, 
her friendship has grown. She 
has changed so much, and has 
been so warm and decent and 
kind, that I am very much in 
love with her. We ride to 
gether, go to church and par- 
ties together and visit her 
friends and mine; and our 
friends seem to be taking for 
granted that an engagement 
is pending—or forthcoming. 


I HAVE SPOKEN of mar- 
riage to Edith, but haven't 
directly proposed. How long 
should I wait, do you think, 
before I tackle the subject 
seriously? I feel that Edith 
has developed more than just 


friendship for me; and yet I 
am afraid if I ask her now, 
she might refuse, and I will 
become disgusted and break 
off. 


We are both fully mature 
and should know our respec- 


‘tive minds; and Edith is a 


very fine person who can 
make decisions. But you un- 
derstand that once a person's 
confidence has been shaken 
he needs guidance as to the 
next step. I don't want to 
make a social or ethical blun- 
der. I should like to propose; 
but not too soon. I shall ap- 
preciate your advice. L. B. 


DEAR L. B.: You say if you 
were to be turned down by 
Edith now, you might get dis- 
gusted and break off. And this 
despite the fact that you feel 
very much in love with her. 
So you are being anxiously 
careful about your next step. 
hoping to avoid any possible 
blunder. 

All of which suggests that 
you need a good deal of help, 
to give you a chance at being 
happily married—whether to 
Edith or another woman. 

Your essential problem as 
I sense it, has to do with be- 
ing a pretty rigid and de 
fensive fellow, behind your 
well-meaning air, in the field 
of human relations. 


And it may be that yours 


past marriage failed largely 
because you were t0o involved 
in selfconcern—and in face- 
saving and ego-holstering 
operations — to become in- 
vested in a meaningful shar- 
ing-of-life with your spouse. 
Or to recognize (that is: admit 
to yourself and her) that you 
were difficult to live with— 
due to your struggle to seem 
faultless, in every circum- 
stance. 


REAL LOVE is openheart 


Coyyrtgn 


Tit Generel Ponds Corp 


, Je eo ? J 


THIS COUPON WORTH 


THIS COUPON TO YOUR GROCER HOW AND GET S/ OFF ON 
BIRDS EVE-PEAS 


=a = eb eo eeeaeceecenaneceece 
Cibisisi Si bitivibieieie:e 


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8s MARAT TS 


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se 

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MONEY-SAVING COUPON! 


ed, devoted and tender; it is 
humble, without counting the 
cost. It is outgoing and co- 
operative in spirit. It is dis 
posed to understand and sym- 
pathize and aid. It is other- 
centered, and not selfishly 
watchful or wary, as if fend- 
ing with a potential adver- 
sary. It anticipates good, 
works for the best, and “en- 
dureth all things” (as Scrip- 
ture says), for the bdeloved's 


sake. 

Had this been your attitude, 
your pattern of feeling and 
reacting in marriage, it isn't 
likely that your wife would 
have got a divorce. The se- 
quence of events indicates 
that you hadn't enough self- 
acceptance to be comfortably 
sincere and unafraid, in rela- 
tion to her. Having more or 
less defeated yourself, you 
now look back and think it 
was tifat experience that un- 
nerves you now. Not so; you 
are simply running true to 
form—freezing up, fearful of 
scorn, if you show your 
hand, as a forlorn fellow, 
needing love. 

If you hope to marry Edith, 
speak out—as soon as you are 
legally eligible. And don't be 
afraid to discuss all pros-and- 
cons of your feeling with her. 
Development of such reciproe- 
ity is essential to making a 
worthwhile marriage. As an 
aid to inner clarification, 
read “The Mind Alive” (Nor- 
ton), by Harry and Bonare 
Overstreet. M. H. 


The 


Today’s Events | 


The Washington Chapter, 
National Executive House 
keepers Association, Inc., 
meets at 8 p. m. at the Crown 
Supply Company, Arlington, 
Va.... The Washington Area 
Chapter, Bennett College 
Alumnae Association meets 
at the home of Mrs. Harry 
Thompson, 5319 Ist st. nw. 
Alexandria Branch, 
AAUW, music group meets at 
8 p. m. at the home of Mrs. 
Lioyd Herrick, 719 26th pl. 
Arlington ... The Wheaton 
Unit, Moentgomery County 

of Women Voters, 
meets at 8:30 p. m. at the 
home of Mrs. William Bee 
timt, 11500 Regnid dr., Whea- 
ton. 


Alexandria Residents 


Mr. and Mrs. Max W. Willl- 

ford are now residing in 
Alexandria, Va., following 
their December marriage. 
Mrs. Williford is the former 
Joan Marie Kirby, daughter 
of Mrs. Jennie M. Kirby and 
the late Mr. Early F. Kirby 
of Alexandria. Williford is 
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Da- 
vid M. Williford of Arling- 
ton, Va. 


Va. Rivenbark is the 
of the late Mr. and 
James Erle Rivenbark of 
Eastern Star, Md. 


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Capital Commerce | | | ____ [World of Finance On Extension 


Gas Firm to Spend |. us 1 nes S |$60-Million Credit |Treasury 


“ii; oes TUESDAY, FEBRUA 28, 1956 we : Backs Fed 
Record $16 Million | eee ed * Granted Argentina Buying Bill 
thy &. Chee Gotten — Slump in 1955 Am. Express The Export-Import Bank announced yesterday the signing || pid 


Financial Béttor of a $60-million credit to help finance a stee] mill in Argentina Associated Press 
Washington Gas Light Co. plans record construction ex- | The bank had approved the credit last year, but execution Another two-year extension 


. . 7 
‘of the loan agreement was dela ed b overthrow of the Peron 
penditures of $16 million this year, President Everett J. Boothby (Gain LIL Savings Rate Net | Ip 16% soveroment. s y y of authority for Federal me. 
s to purchase secur- . 


reported yesterday. The $60-million credit, to be | ote 
This follows record capital outlays of $13,430,000 in 1955. ‘used for purchase of equip-| Martin Co. Votes ities directly from the Treas 


he noted in the annual report’ ~ di T M hs ment, materials and technical | : ape ury was recommended yester-:. 
to stockhold-| Note LIL WO ont To New : Op | services in the United States,, 40-Cent Dividend day by Undersecretary of the 


ers. | Washington district manager, ls for 18 years and bears 5 per | NEW YORK. Feb. 27 (>. | Treasury Ww. Randolph Bur- 


: . ‘Sa ' | | gess. , 
on » PAs audio division . . . Howard M.| 1, -rRolT, Feb. 27 @—Banker David Rockefeller said today’ | CONS SRCOER ES. | Glenn L. Martin Co. today |* The present authority ex- : 


Jacobs, formerly with Washing-| , fter t It was made to Sociedad) declared a quarterly dividend 
mericans saved only 6 per cent of their income after taxes) NEW YORK, Feb. 27 q y = ires June 30. A bil 
aS hie ate ton National Airport, has been |jast year but he added there is evidence in the first two months/ American Express Co., world- oe sepa ap gpg of 40 cents a common share, pices 4 bankin "gy pemnen Pa 
that gas sales|appointed by Willard Hotel as of 1956 that they are getting thriftier. ___ | wide travel and shipping firm, | cenindinedd af Kaetathen saat cree Poon holders would extend it until June 30 
in this arealbanquet sales representative) The executive vice president? ~ ston today reported record ms toe the mikwe ee it 7 and) of record March 9. 1958. . 
arl nite of the Chase Manhattan Bank, adequate information on this for 1955. Pp yP © capita The company stated last | The short-term . 

have neat'y|. .- Maurice D. Rosenberg Jt.) york, said in a speech to\matter. It shows that if one| Profits amounted to $5,433,-|_1%e loan agreement was) year that the stock would be |... in effect b ings. The 
tripled in the of the Washington agency was omic Club of Detroit 1 iods of 000 or $2.44 a share, up 16 pe ~ | signed by Samuel Waugh, pres-| placed on a quarterly divi- . SECS DOCTOW IES. The - 
ast 10 years. the Economic Club o ignores abnormal peri 0 p ident of the bank and by G dend basis thi ' , |purchases are limited to five 
ep announced as number one pro-'that the $17 billion.saved by war and serious depression,|cent from 1954 earnings of $4. e bank a y Gen.) dend basis this year if condi- 


| | billion dollars a ime. 
) aa, oealed ducer of all Guardian Life In-|Americans last year was the Americans have tended to save | 684,869 or $2.10 a share. Busi- — hee yee gy yee of} Hons warranted. Two pay- | The last + Bo the Subanien 
thby 4 Te cheb cana C soli te al ‘smallest since 1950. about the same proportion of|ness transacted during 1955 to-, im —e $258 fy mill itself arg ae eee last year. \was employed was March 1%, 
wee aa ve oe ‘| Saving at this rate, he said,'their incomes year in and year) ‘taled $3.4 billion, highest in|!!! cost eo ' A nae tage ta ger 1954. 4 
oa 


therms, as compared with 298.) aircraft Armaments, Inc., of probably would be too low to out. That proportion interest-|the company’s 106-year history. | 
151,000 in 1954 and only 116-| Co -Keysville, Md., announced|finance the nation’s expanding) ingly enough Is 8 per cent—just|; “The outlook for the future) Rail Head at 41 A ag a dividend at | —— a 
262,000 in 1946. 4 continued|@ppointment of Harry FP economy. what seems to be required for|is equally favoreble,” President! Gale B. Aydelott, 41, yester- greeter ; : 
The record tren A. of 89,-/Kniesche as chief of manufac-| “Rather,” Rockefeller said,/the future; thus, it appears| Ralph T. Reed said. “Our econ- |day succeedea the late ‘Judge |— Ae Ree Harte Rie N Y S E FIRMS 
in January with sa ait withturing and Col. Harold J.\“savings on the order of 8 per highly probable that savings in| omy continues to prosper while Wilson McCarthy as president' thnk Sashes 
oy yg wae s is oe ame Conway as production and en-|cent of income after taxes ap-|1955 were abnormally low; in-\the travel habit grows among|of the Denver & Rio Grande French newsmen on the eve of After Talent and 
46,628,717 therms in thiy re- gineering consultant. pear necessary if economic deed, even-in the. first two) oe ge in every level of so-| Western rail- the ministerial council session : 
1955 month. The mon of $1. growth is to move ahead as we months of 1956, there is evi-|cie | road. Aydelott- of the Organization for Euro- New Business 
Oo peg tee 574.345 over Joins Hughes Aircraft desire.” dence that consumers have be- Beil Aircraft Corp. reported| started less 7 pean Economic Cooperation Middle management exece- 
624,629, a gain 0 mae 9 ts S00 et.|, Fortunately,” he added, “I )gun to save more than they didjits net income during 1955\than 20 years ; (OEEC) which opens here to. § U\*., 
a year ago. Pau ; § age = she a “|\do not think we need despair'in the past year.” dropped from that of 1954 andia go as a morrow. member firm. 
Boothby in the annual report nome he ee ry me yi of achieving this level, although| Rockefeller said, “personal cited increased pension costs|laborer on a @ Pee 2 a rmy_ contacts provide 
pointed out these highlights for ‘ry - Co Se ; ugnes “'the financial community may savings on the order of $30 bil-'as the major cause of the drop.|Rio Grande Silver Price Eases I excellent potential as’ ie 
1955: os ye sy ern area MaM-| have to exercise some ingenuity lion a year may be needed by| The company reported a net in-ltrack gang * r NEW YORK, Feb. 27 (R—The | tered Representative. Admin- 
Number of meters in service -* re Ww a > wee ito bring it about. 1965 to support the growth of come of $5,914,482 on sales of|shortly after a price of silver was quoted by istrative experience vee 
increased 15,028 to a total of .S _ ers & ™ | “Let us look for a moment at|the economy. If savings return $204,440,543, or $2.25 a share.| graduating | Handy & Harman, New York og Ph ag , 
348 366 at the close of 1955. (At! ta ington. Ti ‘the past history of savings in|to an 8 per cent rate in relation|This compares with 1954 earn- from the Uni- dealers. today at 90% cents an Box M-144 
the end of January, meters le ‘ormerly ..7 the United States. A recent to disposable income, our goal ings of $2.47 per share when) versity of Tili- | ounce, down % of & cent from Washington Post T-H 
} served with study gives us for the first time'can be realized.” 'Bell’s income hit an all-time! nois. In 1954 ou | 
numbered 349,833). Borg - Warner ax Aydelott the previous posting. — a 
am : we Bs aoe high of $6,404,~°3 on sales to-\he was made ; | TAN 
tag faa hae ga econ Corp. in charge 'taling $185,646,114. ‘vice president and general man- Foreign Exchange 
ag A seonce to os Sith oh. onl ma gy _ D. C. S Pri Reynolds Metals Co. reported '|ager. Leonard H. Hale succeeds New oR, mon ” & > eee 
Virginia ave. The price for two re nm ent yo ecurity rices | net income for 1955 was $34,- him as vice president and gen-| rye; teiiew . “ Are YOU 


acres. he revealed, was $828-'fense relation | 306,521—highest in the com-\eral manager, effective March 1. eee totter in New Vert, epee 
5 i . $/ ce 
000, with the purchaser taking| chin. He also | Yesterday's prices ve Weshington Stock E1- Lincole (11.00) \pany’s history. The earnings State cents ‘anchangee, reat” sriam | interested In 
options on the remainder. aha Gh iam change Wraned of the PUilageiphioSaltinore  Riegs (112) ‘ »|amounted to $3.41 a common Trailer-Ship Approved | igsuss $2.40 12/16, off 1/22 of a cont. 
Number of shareholders at sultant to the ‘#rsem sats “company z pee se Taes anes bdjestinnet! The Interstate Commerce —__——— | Investing In 
the end of 1955 was 11,188, an| Defense Department's technical) Pet Elec Power com. 28 at 23, 7 at MF, en ’ Commission approved trailer- ‘ 
increase of 412. About 63 per advisory panel on aeronautics. 2 - $s odin a, ‘We at 2, 2 at 2%, Suberbee trest ce (1.28) H. Uy for a i. sg Bay cones ship service proposed by Pan- CONTINENTAL | Rem sama 
cent of the outstanding stock| At one time he was in charge of |caten Went Co ae... 8 |The net Income 7 h— Atlantic Steamship Corp, of ar 
is held in the Washington area nuclear weapons development baad ad ot ON ‘Bank of Bethesda (11 50) sas | ORO RS. Net sales aa leg | Mobile, Ala. This is the s@ago- BUILDING Series: 
“ ent of as assoviate director of the Los| » ot Bank of Commerce (110) se 6. ...., Were $384,887,790. In 1 sales ing version of the railroads’ 
and “less than 4 per cen ' ash Ges Ut com. 56 at 39%, 3 at 39% 06 778.822. 1012 14th St. N.W., et K 
the company’s stock is owned Alamos Scientific Laboratory. | Mectt Ce. com. § ot 32, 18 at 22 : vat INSURANCE ; 'totaled $3 2 “piggy-back” operation, and in- . iW, National Growth Stocks Series 
by any single stockholder.” Bones (1.08) 3 «6 :|_. Warner-Lambert Pharmaceu-| volves transportation of loaded is @ common stock mutual in- 
Pra camhered 2508 iit Cashiers’ Group Elects | PUBLIC UTILITY “S TITLE ONSURANCE itical Co. reported. net income |i-uck trailers between the’ S eerins vestment fund providing a 
mpioyes num h The Cashiers’ A eae ¢ Georgetown Gas Ist $'s a” res -lfor 12 months ended Dec. 31 ports served by Pan-Atlantic. ‘aa Sach FLOOR supervised investment in 
tle changed from the previous e Cashiers’ Association 0 ya's > io EPPO FREER was $7,282,784, equal to $3.83 a So Fh VAILABLE ties selected for possible long- 
year’s 2242, the Washington Stock Exchange a 2 he as barfieche! Com (1 68) ? ‘common share, compared with Tons $6 Billion Mark | “he term growth of capital with spe- 
Hous! t has elected Paul A. Yates as ;™ barfiackel 4o% ce cv ect 125) =~ * 92 « sh f p Meg; . 
As reported previously, ne 00+ | Ggldenberg = , |$6,378,082, or $2.92 a share, for; . e WED ir 4000 cial consideration given to cor- 
income last year totaled $3,946,-/ President. Yates is associated se! | the preceding 12 months. Sales|| “EW YORK, Feb. 27 #—New ‘ie ret hts Severe Feet porations actively engaged in 
500, highest on record and a With Jones, Kreeger & Hewitt. a os eas Ce (1.86) ifor 1955 totaled $90,037,390 York Life Insurance Co. an-| newer scientifie devel ‘ 


es 


gain of nearly 12 per cent over Other new officers = Sheridan te ese. (48) ” compared with $85,945,861 the gees its a 2 = Pe ‘| | and tec 
$3,530,500 in the previous year. Grass of Rouse, rewer & Amer Tel tau Mergeethaler Li ee previous year. $6 liiion mar or the rst) 
Becker, vice president; Donald Capital Traesit ee 1 @ige & Com “eo. @ wee time in its history last vear,! leeeeeeeeeeeeceeaeaceeacaeest 
Due to more common shares Pot Elec Power yi ‘ | OTHER BARNINGS REPORTS (fo ) } ; 

Fravel of Johnston, Lemon & Poth lecPowerCe. 1% Woy} Mm) 4% Peep St com it. os) am twelve months ended Dec. 31, unless tota'ing $6.050,000,000 as of Dec. | 


outstanding, the 1955 earnings ire “ + oo pri heer pun 4. 
after preferred dividends were Ce., treasurer. Wash com. Pi — on 41% Ter het me “wi a | American Calele Co. a ha end of ee 000 - 


Cerp 193% 1954 
} , , ) om pte | ))0 6s Wewd & Let 08) ° 7 é ret: ‘| 
seu ten ae a unare, n Be & O. Net Declines |e Se ree ed [eee Ot ee tds 
1954. There were 1.190.667 com-| Baltimore & Ohio Railroad ” | 0 tar tels| sect ee Soe ee skis | : ; 
mon shares outstanding at the! reported January net income of (8) 118 | yeor. (@) Paid in 1955. | share Se $34 422) CHICAGO, Feb. 27—Stock- | 9 5 
end of 1955, compared with nary eran) ny of Sage as from | »» Aematrens OTN 85.20 911.913. 27 Holders of Hallicrafters Co. to-| CAFRITZ Wisinciunt 
1.001.050 at the close of 1954, | the same 1955 month. Operating A share 83 245\ day approved the sale of their | $90 Seeaduen, Mew Yo &. tame Ged 


|revenues for January increased Pri eS ae corporation's assets to the CALL DISTRICT 17-9880 ovecccesnsccecnoneosacsdent 
Who's News | $7,056,543, while operating ex- D. C. Div de rices Taare AES 8.18650 | Penn-Texas Corp. Terms of aie 
ipenses jumped $7,835,279. The Edison Bros. Stores Inc sale call for issuance by Penn-' din 


Melvin C. Sprinkle has been railroad cited increased labor'| . Yesterday's gholesale produ Pion: | puss 3 inches up. 200-2 25. Staymans cae eS Texas of 332,600 common 


fig 
ik 
| 


68-4 


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Established 19 


promoted by Ampex Corp. to costs and higher prices on ma-/%. pboried bo for less than earload lots, | quay “00 New York fasade island | Foster Wheeler Corp _\ shares, or a basis of one Penn- 
gutio division. Charts, Ls for railroed unemployment in- APPLES —Delawe are meta aa 3S | ee ; san 3 tt bons | anatier » sate’ oe vo nse san| Of Hallicrafters. 
onmeen | echeescstesmnimendal See Pees Pst asoag gran St Regis Files Offer CHIEF AND ASSISTANT 
2 ft Hl deren meow sas. usagy |New York’ has’ filed an offer 
eet ng sagy| New York bas CHIEF DRAFTSMAN 


‘ padde® 42 09084 eds ~ de idodced hed V4ahebictbsidstlas de hs lJ el Lralt watzats.! 


manager of Government sales, terials and a higher tax rate |g psriculture reeuinas, boxes loove-pack. New York | Wet income .... 61.289.602 93.5873" Texas share for each 2% shares 
tra ack. U. S. fancy Net incs "Ei r45.5) $ 
| Net income , - 863 = $787 800 
1.67 Securities and Ex- 


Lebtsh Coal & Narteation ©*. s0¢cag| Change Commission to trade 
i i .»»»| 940,000 shares of its common 


wrapped. U s ; ao. 80-1 008. 
a ‘' “4 : 
Cash Savings can Ae te her ne ontunnsng eee 
+¢ tiple, Red Staypans. .. $6,596,000 $6,342.143) Mon of Rhinelander Paper Co., To take charge of Ordnance Drafting Depart- 
RS: pores i ped. esi | 4 share sees 207 1% of Wisconsin. The exchange 
* .... 1.808.294 $1,441,106; WOuld be on a one for one ment for well-known midwest defense plant en- 


* y : 56-725, 23:|  Ohte B 
a. t boxes. Net inc aad 
€arn Vou dividends soe hye, Welingion. Pavliars, bomet:| Guests co Oe 
Hall ig = : vas gt a incase ".. 000 031.290 $26.138.101 gaged in research and design programs. 
$0 each: Res oo A share .... i13 im Frane to Stay Stable 
. en De- Cc. 1. T. Pimanetal Corse . 
Extra Fancy. Net income $6 $.680,479 $35 $90,217 PARIS, Feb. 27 (#—French 


: 50a 7 00 
You needn't possess a smoll fortune in order to pul some cartons a. Finance Minister Paul Rama- 


: n DS. cartons Roa -lb 
; ; nf file bags. Extra Pa 7. 40 | Genenerel Aeceptence « erp. - " oer . 
cash to work earning you liberal dividends. J a EPRU 4 ac s-boung bone wet t income $1 663 283 $1.304 £36 onan ean ay Mot neg = W rite Box M-193, Post-Times Herald 
I ia Federals alert investors . - , jorids. Dun-|" Admiral Corp en 0 
Not if you re one of Columbia e _ ebb , 4 . : jet, incempe +. 0% eH s 47.97 74 t present level. 350 to the dollar. | 


less. , 
* » . | . “ee . aA ; 
At Columbia Federal your cash savings ore reinvested Beodiens, 45-040 '34004.00" ‘obex cane et eer Se 180 s4..pas The minister made this state- 


. . : . : : ° 5 - : » . 
principolly in first trust loans in this oreo. Liberal oF Pinks Standard, crate. 46-|* share <a ee, ment in reply to questions from | 


Duidends dso pall todas © you? ony ornia. cartons, 180- A teare ome $4.055 Sone ” $9.218.721 
air quality, 3.00 135.433.680 76.142.491 | 


, ; : . ' | NG tfornia. ~ -box |" 
it's the unique kind of investment that allows you ee arse. 2 $04 3.00 a General eee $33.43 i (81.380,527 © 


. . . neia . +- she 
the conservatism of a savings account — but provides a 4.995 ; ee it Bales ** sarsedtt sa.escuhl 
: . 2 . mertese lee Ce 
the liberol dividends of o shrewd investment. | es. Dost ie <a8ie, $50 otis: oe ver ine $501.537 8460.439 


So even if you've only @ small omount of cash ie a Sy moe “nae Bisse women, Tonight, discover why it’s called 


inves! it wisely today. Then odd regularly as 306 pare 
to your account ond watch your cash reserve grow. Rs ye oberg type. “ohid cation mene Yat | Net income $37 res 83.370 685 
ae ; 2 


alr que share 


se atemed " cote, Tue, 


ai $0 ¥ *Eesion Net A... 3.895.748 2 238.106 o | 
ae GAT Lh son ceate, we) = Lhe Best In The House” 
ally ' }—~ 50-ib. sacks. gener A share 3% 233 ‘ 
In 87 lands see 
\ 


ity. (tumiess 


5. 
acks. 150@1.75. New York 
Ae ty and comdition 


—T. 8. Wo. 1 ize 
res ri ogek = 
~" sete ~ 


730 Eleventh St, N.W. Washington 1,0.¢. REpublic 7-7111 
Assets over $33,000,000 C. £. Kefewver, President 


ape 
atabdins, un wash 
25@13 


SS a a ea ea ee ee ae ee Ta ae ee ee ee i ee a ae ee ee ee ee re eee SS 


PLANNED DIVERSIFICATION 


alert ang aggressive management Aas pul this com- 
pany into numerous diversified fields of endeavor. 
Diversification, combined with sound management 
and interests in fields where future growth is indi 
cated, means security and profit potential. 


) basketa, ors8, Rican 
ersey ris. ores range: 
v. 6. No.1 2 00 2.50. 
iretnia, | 6 Rican tyoe. 


Plorid "ete 
beat rehade: hart ae 


| CHERVIL MYPES 


was a dilly for details . . « 


your dream home SIS | 


Chervil couldn’t order a 
memo pad without chang- 


4 if +e 
red lin the specifications 
isa lity ! | forty-eleven times. So 
| Chervil’s promotion never 


Igot out because nobody 
Ward's Northern White Cedar ||] °cc- knew what he wanted. 


Log Homes are custom de-|)]| Then we sent him 
signed or modified to provide ||| GUIDE TO EFFECTIVE 
individuality, functional beau- | PRINTING — 20 pages of 


sturdy practical dope on layout, 
Y construction. pictures, copy fitting, and 


80% precut and prefab. | promotion planning. He 


Patented tongue and groove ||j learned it pays to plan : _— ' 
gots ty wel Guioe 10. Canatian Cll 
weather as Ward's log wall] | Giji DE TO EFFECTIVE worldwide popularity? . . . Only 


is self-insulating. Very low}! PRINTING i for th | 
aid has fee ae has a distinctive flavor that captures in one great whisky the lightness 


nbvioe cad of scotch, the richness of rye, the smooth satisfaction of bourbon. That's 
why no other whisky in all the world tastes quite like it. You can stay 

with it all evening long. . . . in short ones before dinner, tall ones after. 
“HENNA GE “The Best In The House” in 87 lands. . ,. 6 years old. + 90.4 proof. 
Imported from Canada. | | 


WINTR ond KEARNY steers, we, Imported in bottle from Canade by Hiram Walker rapertens Inc., Detroit, Mich. Blended Canadian Whisky, 


WASHINGTON 17. 0. @. 


For certainly diversification and consolidation give 
the stockholder a greater measure of security than 
participation in a company manufacturing and distrid- 
uting one product only. The different nature of many 
businesses owned in expanding fields gives the stock. 
holder a chance to increase his potential gains. 


Here in Diversified Financial Corporation the manage- 
ment plans to continue its policy of diversification by 
the acquisition of other companies and properties. 
There's more growth ahead 


5.00. LEDERER €O., ENC. 


56 Beaver Street . HAnewer 2-5440 New York 5, N.Y. 


a a a a = << a 


J, HW. Lederer Co., Inc. 
56 Beaver St. N.Y.C.5 
SITHOGRAPHY 
Ple information of Diversified Financial Cor 

For detacied information on Diversified a8 9086 me poration. 
Financial Corporation, just fill in and 
mail the coupon. 


— 


Address: eeeeererere Oeeeees Oo were Serer « eereeeeee eee bees seeeeeta 
™. 
; State. ee eeeeeer eee 


: = 


i ee eee a eer = ee 


/ : 


at a ee eee ee 


Minor Di 


1955 to date. 125 
to date, 68,721,151. 


Dow-Jones Stocks 


4,400; 6S stocks, 356 190 
eee ee contends, 
discounting of a “yes” 


Sutfered his heart attack 
into a maior reaction bh 
the lost ground. Now 


~ a+ — 
“2+ e-eeewe 


~ 
~ 
~» 
a - 


SSeeESEES 
cidizeeed 


3 
-~ 


p In 


all Street wijl he run for 


awaiting the official word 
major 
There were. however. 
in the chemicals. oils, 

The Associated Pres« 
was off 40 cents at 


lew Close Chg " 


terr 


#—The stock market 
a small decline after | thinks could well be tri 


ul swillly retraced ali 
it is poised for another | tomers in a Pate 


as though 


mm” Wednesday. That's backed down 
probably will hold a 


upts 
Traders Wait tke D 


NEW YORK, Feb. 27 
oday with 
straight advances. ° 

All during the day it seemed 
Wall Street had its eye ; 
the day the President 
press conference. 
d there Was onl 
any interest for W 


7 
ae 
es 
° 
=] 
a6 
= 
a 


rial compo 
30 cénts 
ties remained 
as a bit above aver 
compares with 2 


cents and utili 
Volume w 
y One question that held | shares That 
traded Friday 
F. L. Jacobs. up 1! 
five advances in the market, | of 11,000 at 8 early 
have largely been a | disclosed that 
from President Eisen- 
Now the stock market appears to be lapse. That much 
control of the com 
divisions closed lower. | Eastern Air Line 
afew good Plus signs 
and airlines 
average of 60 stocks at 45%, 


a buyer 
estimated 85,000 shares 


reporting a 


$35 million classed a« 


‘oy ‘ti | FINANCIAL NOTE 


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St's Site te Crees? a8 oe Ms M% Bus 4 Seer 1 80 

1's Wed ty Greyheses + 14% -t4% at te Melty Shee pf 4 

1's Wia— %e Greyh pia os 8 M's 8, Oey Menge! 1 

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ei tee. leah a | Serene ws 


$179.50. It still is near disappointing earnings st 
gh of $181.50 established Sept Glenn Martin fell back 1'% 
and matched agaih Dec 5 and 6. Right dividend of 40 cents 
the record peak Was set, the President Line was off 1% at 
The market went | Commission told the company 


os 42 47% 
™ 4+ | Investment company assets Meh ? 
$64 $63,— ‘s . Loe ‘ 1 
i, Bh ts) | Soartonew high at’55 end. OPAL pte 
72% 27%+ % Tes ? 
37% 37a —t9 Assets of Invesiment Cos. hes Man te 
+ a Opes En johmioks 1 Abe 
24 24 — '* : ‘ t Se 
6) ~ lonesBi = 9fS 
78's 28'» = Mig j 
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1814 182t9+1 < at 1 
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“% 4 + ty . + Ie 
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4% Mt, la t 1.2% 
M% 3 4 ‘ Je ee 2 O'S) BP Sh se % Sere € id 2a 
et stb Ve END OF YLAR pata err Mcgee 60 
% S044 1% Keystone $ 2 
3% 4+ te I. Wer) Aseor. of teweet fax = Kerr Meg pf 119 
4% M+ % Morrie Kate Kime Chk 1 800 
2 862% ' ’ King See! 629 
% a5 (108) High Lew Close Chg . ;: 
1% @% Fea ! ‘ ' 2s Wes & Keppers 2? 
} at ‘se Fed Pac {!' O68 ih t e+ Frese, SS toe 
‘7 lat ‘e Fes 'y ae 1 5 3% Fits Tit’ Press, SH 3 
7) «(138% > Fed 8° Str + 3 Ms I 1% “s Kreebler {a0 
8 16 +2 Fe & Tarr 2 W's a e+ vy reper 2 
ma Mm + & Ferre Ce fe ’' is 3}*s 
sa W% —'s Fig PB fwe te ? 108) 198% 188%2-- 
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4 194+ ‘se Fuwestene We ” is ' te Cons pf fie 
7% 28  e First w Ser da & 5% S3% 57 Sry 1 
| 6S TD Forth Cot te 2 1% 1%— 124+ % Les Reb & OT 3 
2% 2 + % Fliethete ) (oe 13 38% 3% — % Lees & Sens > 
4% M&+ ty Fleres Sty | 9% 9% 19%4 ‘% Leth Can bee 
16's fie Pw ie ‘mon ao 43 Len Pert C te 
7 6M + Fle pee in 74 > 39 86s 1 Lee Vel Cont 
th ] w+ 1 food fa ' 6% 30% Se e+! teh VC te 
11% 32+ % Fong Mech 2? af 4) is & > teh VE dor 
1%, Tie—Pe Foeg wu L.23e6 290178 178 «eG ‘ teh Val #8 199 
3 68 Foren 8 52 10% 18% 1984+ % Lebmen B30 
1) 18% fost Wheel 1 60 MM Me BY Sty i 
42% 42% + % Fraecis ¢ 2M | Be Pe Mat  LOF Glass tee 
% > * Freak Str 6 5 17% t— tFie4 ‘ be Mena i) 
1? wT - % Freest Swi 3 Ss GB's Sev 2% 
2% 2Iy— te Freed a 12 % 2% Me Bi & My 4s 
ma uM 4 freee pts re 8) 89% Sh a— % Liege 6 My pf 7 
% 9%)- ds Tele 108 
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LF) 
leet ¢ 3 


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Garéeer Sen 248 7 sy, Ss B+ % berg Bell a ome 
Seles Citteng Garrett > 8 47% 41%— 41%. 1 
Me 1S gest c., Accept ta 7 3% 1% Stes 1 
- See im ie the 5 2?) 27% 37 
. See Am is “3 rie 168. 168s 108%<4 | ; . ° 

8 +e |éoe ‘Aenea Ma m8 : ws ow 1 Vhat Stocks Did 

Ba +I% Ses Bok fe > ht % % 

a+ te | tes Sreere (562° 3 95 1s Wt ' Advances 

Se —% | ges Cattle She T 2% 25% 25% : Sestince 

a 6+ fe ipf 4 8 95% s S%~ - ‘ 

“u%4— % Cigar 1 “M63 a enange 

eee —"s | Gen Cig pty 178137 «138% 136%— ate ms 8 

zs + 3 i Gen Contract tee 2 6% 8% 16% eg hs 

5 + "e | Gen Cont pt 60 4% 1% 1% 155-56 lows 

Ss +2 i 1) G2< 61% tis 

6+ [Ges lect te 6? 3%) 3s 58 

Te — ty See fase of a 4 i, 8% Bes bet 

Mi ~ 3 (Cee Fas tte 8 Os Bile Siig a, Lome tet Lt 2 

M's bre lestre ‘le ss % Ses te one pes 

Gee Mills 3 5 a oF, BB y-— ty Lersilarg a 

“ ae Mills of 5 238 127% 122% 127%4 %, Lorillard pf 

See Meters S60 293 45 sah, 44% ty a ie 
33" te— ‘4 bee Met sf 5 3 123% 173% 123%, 

: i. Gee Out Ad  M% 35%) y+ a Lewenston 1 See 
17% 27% See P Cem 16s $55 Sate Ss 4+ ieee obtt 8 
Mis i See Pree 2.606 2% S7%) 92 53 | a, hens Sti tg 
1s Tike “oe Gee Pee fy r 4 es &% & GMs ‘s 

§ See Poe it 7 Ws Ma My ‘ MGM We 
M's See fy Sg 20 5 me . - hs ~"s Meched & Ff tg 
110% 118+ % Con Reolty Am 5 8% 1% S\e+ We Meck Tre 2 0o 
T2%— 12% —2', Cee Selves 7 4% @ a1 ie 
My “-~ “a Gem Shee 258 3 57% S7% Ste ty Macy pid os 
‘'"— 41% ty Gem Tel ape i 2 a “: Mage € 
198%- 108', See lime & / 3% Ws Mya ‘s Magma Cop 4 Ye 


52%) 52% Gillette ts “a ‘») 1% ‘ Maree Mid tte 
se Set % Gombe! te so Ms 244 Mid pf 2 
7 861 +?% Glddee >? S MW ~ “s Mare Cee le 
174 Be— ty Beebe! or . 8% 5% st ‘s March fielg > 
He Mie— % GCeodricd S%e ® Ms tee | March F of «4 3 
$1 St2u+ % Geedvear She S? Gi») 63% Mas ' SL 1Se6 
Hu 277 + 6 Sat 118 } 39% 38% J5tRu. %. Par 1 
S$)", $?*e+ ')» Grace & Ce ? " ‘> @% 462,— 'y Macenste 12 
31's I2iet t% Gree Pavee oe Ms 2%) MM Master f! tte 
37% «Py ty Cramby “ 1%) W% ty “% Mey 8 Str i» 
Ss sy % Grand Ue os MMs, Wa+ ty 


le 
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terd 2 
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Mercast $i 1408 
a6 


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; n+ ‘ta 7 2? 
sag oer ve Holl Print te Sk 21% 29+ m et Ee 80 
. i. 08 iT Z : 
S'4  B54—1h Haliimurtes 2 $6 6% 4 4 See *.. ‘Se 
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1p tet Ye nerees Met 7 1 18%, 19) ev 
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108"2 108'9—1'4 Wert: 1 as ” ot 
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37%4 37a Ve nay Elect 1 6 me 2 sce 3.58 
vs Se % Nelleng F 4 8 1% 13% 1 Menarch Mf 
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ane seo TS) Memesth thes xe 10 are? 276 S7t4— a9) eeeae Ot 
My 14+ ‘| Kensie on te a 5% Slo+ & Mest ® wt 1 
77"? Meeker £i 1 “4 Meat ae 
M'e+2 Hotel Cp de | i hye "*| Menter ou 
58% _ 5855+ ©) Hotel Cp de ye 8 IM) 2 Wert is 
“* Heed ted 254 2 1% 4% ly Moore Me 1.50 x4 
S's “4 wneud jad ae. | 0% MW% 2u4~ : 
225%— 226%4+ © Housed Fis 1m 82 Bh 26° Pe 
% Exe ‘MewseF pf}. 7s 10 82%) S2\_ 97: 2 
os" ms. | Meust 1 1 1? 4% @% 45'y— Metereia ‘se 
My Mh Heest Gi 2d 12 159%) 159% 160 Mueller Br 2 
“a M+h& Weward Str 1 8 4% We My Munsingw 1.20 
a) “” + Ma Yewe Se ” M 23°.— Murphy 2. 
6 8 +h), MedtMoe " : bey } Murray Cp 2 
* Mediu ““ : a+ 
Bey ek tar trate SAS Os Gray iq) MOE 8 Bre Bate 
1% 482441 " “— te 
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2 68 re, Mt Cent ate 3 04% 63% Ey Avte F tb 
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me tat lit tere ee 8 18%: 15% 15% ie 2 
ame 27%— ty népis PRL ta 2 25 25 285 Rise of? 
» A PRS oy Ae ee te 
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- © ing Rane “Me Mg ty bt 
 MM+ iy | intent St! te | i) &0% s"s— (608 
5 1! lesger te of n “', 6)'s of i. | 
27%+ % laterchem 6% 4 4%, “ 9o+1 Cyt & 12% 
8 58 + an Ieterch pte se 6 103 (183 1 
4434 4424— tq IMleriak ir tse ‘13 dary ‘te : 
‘Ss 6% int Bes Mek a LL +1 Distili 1 
igs 7 a va) jt Mary " Vo 172% 172% 177% 7 | oe Fue! 2! 
sin’. "| tot Sllet 2 6a $2 82% 81% B24 1, 
: ! +> %) 2. 
a Sed ij Int Wich pf? 180 190 128% 18 + tae baad Hee 
2% 27 | tat Patk 48 13% Nat Lead 
BS Be fia grt | BS ngs inte laa dae Fy 
Wty fie ia IatRyeh “pra.sex viag sie 0° 
~ mia shee 24001 ain aay gaint aa Mat Seal 
. a~ ‘al Mat Sug fet oe 
fet Silver 4 4 8) 6%) 8. : 
Ca a oe a a a 
: i ; a a 
13% 4 =: Util pitas ’ tog 3" 40 Nat Thea 59 
amy deny”) (erat 8 Str 2.50 ; ee Nat Vol fib 9 
2% 26% _| Interst mM 4 1M 1% 1H. Natomas 
12% 32%— % 1400 1 4% 41% “Gy ‘Mehl Cp 
tis tiie tsiieee pu’ tet Im rut wienet, 
i'4 + We isi rh 1 1 % ~ta\ Now fee an 


: ete. ae 


y Climb 


* 
(100) High Lew Close hg 


Stocks’ 5-Da 


7: * 
e * 
test that Wall Street 
Sgered by the Presi. 
unning again. 


nent 
while r 


LN) Nigh tow Ciase tig | 


LEANS, Feb. 27 


forced out of 
“unfair compe- 


automobile boot. | fantastic con 


“/dealer is being 
. business by the 


dealers wil] fad 


‘i e out of busi-|, 
4 Ness if the pre 


Sent trend con. 
oney predicted. 
the Louisiana 
alers Associ. 
said 1956 is the 
on in the autemo- 


4 at the close, had a block 
in the day. 
with an option of an 
had decided to let it 
stock would have carried 
pany, it was said. 

5 Was up 1 at 48% after 
JuUMp in profits. 
over a billion for the first 
Admiral] Corp. lost 
atement. 


4 Automobile De 
” ation. Monroney 


the reason dealers 


the oy ersellitig of 
on and a half care 
ainly by automobile 


Ford Off a Bit 

NEW YORK, Feh. 27 7 
Ford Motor over-the-c 
closed at 62". h 


Panhandle Eastern Pinte 
76 as the Federal Power 


He said the boo 
cars at about $100 | 
dealers who are 
delivery of the s 


tleggers get 
ess than the 
screaming for 
ame models. 
oesn't change. 
dealer will be 
supermarket 


an overcharge to cus. 


a 
increase case. 6274 on Friday, 


can of peas. 

the value of a fran- 

ery gravel lot in income, poyable March 
Petition, and : 1956 to stock 

the new car, 

ls your cus.' j 


town is your com 
you must service 
the bootlegger se! 
, tomer?” he asked. 
Manufacturers he said, blame 
. anti-trust laws for their slack 


—] TISHMAN REALTY & 
| CONSTRUCTION CQ. Inc 


DIVIDEND NOTICE 
firm to he The Board of 


Wholesalers, 
ave. ne. has 


: 
@eh a. 2. ee 
* © 2 6 «2 *~ 


~ 
* + = «& 


| New Wholesale Firm 
Equipment 


- . 
ewe w 


2052 West Virginia 
been organized by 
and Washington R 
0 


*= 
a 


formerly with 
Wholesalers, has régular 
joined the new firm as man- dend 
A. Smylie will also 
ed with York Whole. 


: 
oe et 
*-s & ao 


- 


a * «- 
* * @ @ «& 


previewed by 


‘ area dealers this week. 


Area Studebaker 


Dealers‘to Meet — 
Keller, Stude. 
general sale« 
Will meet with more 
area dealers Wednes. 


operation as a 
the Studebaker. 
In charge of 

Eugene J 
remins, Washington zone man. 1937-1955. 


New York Cotton 


* —Coettes future: 
ower te 98 cont: 
Close 


- 
-— * 


off 5. WHomiesl 


THE WASHINGTON POST and 


Tuesday, F ebruary 2R, 


er ntlnnienieenisialnans, 


automobile. 


the sma} ning. 


hey Say, 
their cars 


ers. 


TIMES HERALD 
. ‘oe 


attitude in controllin 

ney (D-Okta.), Said | ging” he said. 
“Using the anti-trus 

nh excuse 

small indepe 


ndent dealer is a 
tortion of the act's 


“Manufacturers, 
are free to distribute 


and promotion of g00 
most effective.’ 
Monroney 
manfacturers 
take it will be 
of the experienced « 


realize their mis. 


_ eee 


re lees 


announces its 


consecutive 
cats being quarterly dividend 


2 10 shore from net 


9, 1956, 


WALTER L. MORGAN 
President 


York Corp and 


efrigeration (171 


Com 


this 


The 1956 line of York equip. payable March 26, 1956 
: to Stockholders of rec- 
ord at the close of busi- 
ness March 15, 1956, 


Norman Tishman, 


declared 
dividend of 


2¢) per share on the 
mon Stock and a 
Qquarteriy divi-. 


cents (25c) 
the Preferr 


report on the A MUST for 
—indicating ma rket 


unlisted stocks. 


36.97 


~~ —s 
—-* @ese aw 
i 
"+e & oes 


- 


oot 

—= ~~ 
ieee) | eee 

> 

*- ~~ =o 


Mackall & Coe 


Members 


New York Stock Exchange 


Available upon Be ret 


er Arce ffocks hugoesied fae carrent Purchase 


626 Woodward Building 


aon ~~ enn 8 


~ 

~~ —- 

= «+ 
“_—— @& “= 


~ 
- ~~ = ~e - 
ie | -«28.2f 


CAPITAL 
180 000.000 S. Fea. 


Vet of reding tee shares or - tales 
m tyii 
Rates of dividends ie t 


. wi 
Wi-~When issued. ad Next 


Dividend Actions Time Deposits. 


Deposits (*"( 
Payabie’. 
cceptences... eee 30,571.92) 


- 
—_ 
- 


SWISS BANK 
CORPORATION 


Head Office: BASLE. SWITZERLAND 


Bienne - La Chaux-de-Fonds 
Neuchatel - St. Gall - Sc 


bye 


Statement of Cendition, December 31. 1953 


ASSETS = Swies France 


tthe. 36) 389,892 
ee 424,046 46° 


Opinion, rating, earnings, 
dividends. Price range 


formation on listed and 


Call or Write for Free Copy 


Jones Kreger & Hewitt 


Members ¥. ¥ Steck Exchanse 
1625 Eye St. N.W. DI. 7.5700 


‘ Geneva - Lausanne 
haffhouse - Zurich 


; RESERVES 
4.000.008 & Fea 


awe  76,000000 


“*2+terees wummmes $26,272 159 


oe 
-_ 
) 
- 
2 
. 


2--=.~.~22z 


18 
(Oth Street Otten 10 mena 
LONDON OFFICES 
Street, E.C. 2. and lle, Regent Street. S. wl 


= 
eee - 


-_—-— 
~ 
_ 
= 
> 
- 
Sones 
- 
SPP e em we weeons 


~ 


cs~se~ 


a 


—_ 


ie 
~we.@w 
so"tsty 


-_- 
Ssss 


? 


/_2?2 ©» oo r= 
Pe Pe meee mee 


o~— 
™~ 


Corporation 
360 St. James Street West, 


“es 


NEW YORK AGENCY 
Nassau ‘Mew York 5, ©. Y. 
New York 20, N.Y. 


AFFILIATE mt CANADA 


for Canadian Investments Lid. 
Montreal 1, Canade 


nee 


ESFzE223*$23= 


SEU Mee wow 
~—- «—_—<- 

“we ew 

—_ <i 


Soa BSeeSels ye 8 
—- 


_#8sseer 


3 


ee 


EH. 


me 


American Stock Market Prices |=#=== __||New York Bond Prices: re Nn Tony Poraey 6 8 


ae a Press 


\ M4 | | ‘Total $4,220,000; pont; aa Sle 

we sagen Apron (00) High Low Close Chg.) : (100) High Lew Close Che. January ago, $4,832,306, | B” muse ) ; 
Total sales, 850,000 shares; - _ on saicthcincnnyntanntaanputtiliabapameaden "ows ms 2 o/ anak 8 3 a% 

year ago, 1,260,280. ~~, & oe | a get pe (00) Wigh Lew Close Che. : ui 6 Se % Guu he 

rag (10m) Wigh Low Clase Chg. COMs MnghS 800 18 _ Shore 108 = Advertising anere | 1 Site S0¥ Seta+ el Meh 457 | 


$75 
Cont  Urani > mM 2 T. Th 1% BFP Ss2038 Se $8 Mier bo 198 
‘9 ters me L Se be ™ . ) 1 “a NYC Gste 1 104 
s+ Cott Bever 37 | . & Ship - a 1 R , | , f a 0 pg = po :: ie | 
ms 6 7 +% sae os : es 


ee a ie ee Which Have Best Records Since 1949? 


Airtleets ? m4 “m 4 

% 11-18 11-1641 
als. Gas “ MYu+ 
Aiaska = Airi a e & - 
Aileg Air 


Her Ce wt 
Allied Art 


Crown CPet 
oa ” As NEW YORK, Feb. 27 Wiac tine ate Nor? IMT : 
Dav Mas 59 175 ‘ : P - 
try i M4 “| Mereit Wet ‘| Newspapers started out the pier rns Sos S| Poem 4.5008 se% 198% 1 3 Investment Companies Favored 
i Ys new year with record-breaking | 0es8Me 480 SS Sits Sas... .. | Poorest os | 
Ti+1 | ROA 3.5980 H 


+ @§ + am eM 


? 
sae eae & & & Oa 


We Ms ow 24 leading Mutual Funds and Investment Trusts have 
mime in advertising, the Amer- performed over the 6-year bull market is shown in a 
26% 


an N Publishers As- tet | Sis 188% inci | 
%— % ican Newspaper Pu ood 7 — a. | 13; new study by UNITED Service. While some have out-gained 


oMunt s 1% He\e+ Va 
i 2 MestPRing We. 8 Wik HH Wied sociation reported today. 7 2 8 | 121 ‘the general market — one up 37% — others have made a 
; = Oe ; " 
2 +s —ane kh «@ ; Spy ‘Last month, the ANPA’s bu- , : > Seuty San | 13%. | relatively poor showing. This revealing study will help you 
+ : ; he ar eee of advertising said, wast — 7. M iipe 1 6B ‘2 7 | to rate the management ability of the following investment 
‘ 4 the biggest January in history. ' oil ae ? i & Ce 3965 : + companies: 
2%— 12% Ce , . + Ml 
7 ? 11. . ? one tient. i Nearly all categories of adver- ~ . ~~ AS a Adams Express Co Gen Amer Invest Masse Inv Growth 
1 f $ : 
;: eee a tising scored thumping gains Srie 4.902015 : Wisten  eaaent . 6 Affiliated Fund Geo Putnam Fund Nat Investors 
“8 6M «(6 i1%+ % over the like year-ago month, FiatC 5574 FOREIGN ) Boston Fund Ine Incorporated Inv Nat Securities St 
i 1% e+ % ? Austratia 3.5066 2 6% 8% Consol Inv Trust Imvestors Mutual Scudder Stevens 
Science {0erd 13 18s 16% 1%+ % With the total increase averag-|\Gen dyn 3.5575 nite 3582 Dividend Shares Keystone 5-2 Selected Am Sh 
Bold Sec ite 1 73 : " t St fee a a . ing out at 8.2 per cent. Auto- Eaton & Howard Lehman Corp State Street Inv 
— a : +t | * 12 Nips 2% 210-18 243 ‘6 motive advertising led the Fidelity Fund Loomis-Sayles Tri-Continental 
* Ss 1%? *1 GMetCy 3.25579 : Fundamental Inv Mass Investors . Wellington Fund 
| | 3 ~ . x 1 ies 11-04 tio Held with a rise of 42% per) tities 3 ses : Creek 7s6t 4 ; 
es Mm Y cent over January 1955. WiGh et Os82 ital PUL 3577 Every holder or prospective buyer of Investment Company 
or % ih Hi a Other gains, an reported Leh¥ 4$¢ € 2002 2 TS $ Nerway 4 75965 1 = Vs ; . . " 
11958 128% 119% Nise | \% LeckhAir 3.75088 1: 116% 116% RF Ye Ureg aj 4.175079 “ "+ 44 shares should have this timely Report. Asa guide to new pur- 
$1 13 1% 1%— % Jointly by Media Records Inc. chases, our Staff selects the shares of three companies that 


i+ land the ANPA’s Bureau of Ad-|~ | appear especially attractive, based on their past records. 


ww — -_ 
= oo ~ «& 


saten ae : oo |vertising, were 
Send only $1 for your copy of this valuable Report, and receive 


: 
178ia-+ 18 Pepperet! 3a +% National advertising (includ- al . Cote ) ) : 
a wed — ae4.% 1g automotive),” up 184 per utua un f ces | without extra charge the next four issues of the weekly UNITED 
» a . PithLohet a... 110 10140 Rs ui cent: “general” (national ad- | Investment Reports. (This offer open to new readers only.) 

Polaris Me . om M MN ‘ertising other than automo- | a 

$3 —0 proctt deme 979.169 1-18 7 7.163 4, veru ‘ ox feb. 27 (Pi~(ietl, feee.\Reretene Cot $4 r———FILL OUT COUPON AND MAIL TODAY WITH ONLY $1 -—-— 
1) PAM ine A Wie s+in tive) up 88 per cent; retail, up , "EN TOR. oe Oe letene 0 eae wP.23 
4, ered Corp 2 2.1 per cent, classified, up 13.1 Asked Lexincton 1 N ’ De hhh 

‘ 


14 ’ ; ' 5 3 ’ ‘s 
Mame stead ‘ : : + ‘ate 14\e-~ ts per cent. Affi: isted 


Marcon: (6° bi Ken : Z ‘9 ' . , ‘ 1 ‘ : * o im 
Petre! of pA ede pes on ~. aie i S+% Financial advertising in 


Cesce Not Gas ; m2 St w 1% , : i ts newspapers showed an Im- Ass ; ; ’ —_ 
Semen ee Hert ee iG ie Bee aoe crease of 18.1 per cent over & fi" wit mea ba ‘ie UNITED BUSINESS SERVICE 


~ Fg! , .» i th én ae. ag * year ago ‘4 
de- ) saat gig kr 210 NEWBURY ST. BOSTON 16, MASS. 


Catalia og 3 1 ”* 
Ces Exp ” 7 7.16 ' | | ia : _ — 2 9 : in the retail category, Sec er Dividend 


’ ' * 2T lp " int ret a ? 
ek i. : : " + : : ‘mt eiaeer. OaeROiae 19: Sal r : Serceng more smvcstors than any other investment advisory service. 
S% 4-—%& Sanuary advertising 19 per 

He e116 cent, the ANPA noted 


> % 

,Scdick ine ta 1 we 24 mu +" 
me 2 18 1 ~)18 Sespaw Airt 1% Me Me 
1% 3%  . 


, * 4 } > At 5 . 
Celenial S¢ + KingsteePa = 28 | . ; ps Pe ts Baltimore Markets 


Miss V. Wood 


OA A ee be. 1600 good an 4 Comwith lavest 
Formerly. Associated with National 


eip 
choice 923. 1420 ib deush' ter sleers. 16.50 Delaware §8= Fund Selected 
: } 20.50; scait ; iy Divers Grth Ste Sharepiers §=6 Tr 
ihe . cho! ce under 1200 » _ 2 | OGG head Giwers tevest Fe Stete Street tev 
® jots, commerc ial an |= ; 
1700. load ih 4 Diwitesd Sar 
if» 
” hs ners and cutters. 1050012.00 
iu+ VW commercial grade youns cows on hei ile: 
orcer up to 15.00: most utility and <com- Fidelity 
Jie— 's mercial cows : i . 
cut 9 Ri2 he 7 ee 
ver. Founder: 
f endameanta! 
y ana commercial. Ges tedest 


eur e@eeuen vw 


| + 


has opened her 
Personnel & Employment Offices 
232 Southern Bidg. @ DI. 7-5752 


805 15th St. N.W. at H 


Placing Office Staff of All Kinds 
Wen & Women Thicke! Ch 1.129 


st 


1% Wu— %) 15 
oe PS . Vv 4 Rees pts 75 te high : fura:thed by Nationa! 
- _ : a Secerities Dealers 
‘e+ YW mixed Jots good ‘and acs 7 they de set secessarily 
low a3 10.00 Weesections or) firm = bits 
ts. 750: mbet mixed lots ut sould sndicate apererimate 
' tho. Ys ‘eo . 2? oe) 6spless§« «otherwise §= dicated 


. ; barrows 

© mainiy 13.50; around , $ queies by the spensers of isiwers 
Theme Star 
Tie Reet te 


head stly : ee} 
1s | 30-240 Ibs. 13.00@13.25° 240- md 
wi a0. Ibe. i2 ‘7O- income 
m™ %-— % tie! ter 00 - ? s. 10.759 come 
Teties 6! ’ § — % 1125 20-140 i fei) 140- tecerp = fevesters 
160 1 50¢8 12 160-180 ib levestmest Ce 
oh] 


Tress tmp Pe 21-18 2 1-18—1-18 12 701125, under 4 tevest fr Gest 


: oo 
Tri Cont wt Ti. 11 Tie? “ 302 “ies ibs 000-600 ib 
2 ~% - % a Pe ibs. and bea: cownvara oe ae : () > 
she Tie 77-16—1-468| from 8.25 aaeioe D > 
Aw Cond 


S0%% S%— % Poultry and Ecos Keystone 


™ i POULTRY —Market quiet. Rec nd | 
fb outst, Recsints and! Repstens We Hove The Answer For You 


M% Wy © carried Keystone 


. | i j por be : lever 
HODGDON & Co. w Bache Slathet ‘neat Amie nupoly ot Merten 
wat : bs ae 1% — ® + r mecium ean Recewu Keystone 
STOCK BROKERS we tone weak oo Pee 
Vince 5% ed: 
va tt Ch Se 
Velcoe SH Le 


MEMBERS 40 | . x ee 
won int § me T* Tes wlemt A eeatis wets, Sat trees aca NlCag@ Livestock 


a ; oe , Ni geab’ 8 Gaane > et te) mixed colors stig -40 ourrent| | CHICAGO, Feb. 27 um (OBDA)—BAL- So A ken 
PHILADELPHIA-BALTIMORE STOCK EXCHANGE a . oe ae ck & —— “opt oer “Receipts. Ress. ABLE HOGS—Raceipia. 10,000, general ity fo wa ou 
] 1-18 el 8 linstances 75 bicher on welthts under 
Oo b 


: d a 3's sows around 25 higher >st 
( ryt NIG > NEW zy i 190-260 Ib butcher 
ee Aa eee oe Se en % Bat ™ 2" Government Bonds |12,00¢012.9);"some 80-250 ib ots ai ; Commander, But... 
ie Tie Tie“ mew YOR, fee. 27 (AP)—Clesing ever x me 
s 8 — the oe wv Ger Ethan Allen of Vermont and his famous “Green Mountain Bors” 


a: 

IN THE : Not most Ne 

4 oe beads, jy ® .*, & ng 7% Toei to: ‘pest larest fom | Vendi dealt the British a strong blow when they staged « surprise attack 
“4 


— 
Pt > 4 oo 
en ed > he ~~ ee he 


“3 
£ 


few head on the British-held stronghold at Fort Ticonderoga in New York. 
When the commander of the fort was aroused from his sleep by 
© Gliminstes Allen's summons of surrender, he naturally asked: “By what 
— | authority?” Back came Allen's reply: “In the name of Jchovah 
ay; betters py var ag and the Continental Congress!" The fort, with its garrison of 50 
veal ty vai ——- love it men and nearly 200 cannon, plus many military stores, was imme- 
tea adv. prime st busine © tactetied tes diately surrendered. It will be « pleasant surprise to you, when 
groups of you learn how casy it is te finance your home with « low cost 

ves pesete Liberty Building loan. 


or mere 


24 ic pastries 108 
— stours 12 Semi ea” y anc ee COMPLETELY INSTALLED 
; MAINTAINED ond SERVICED LI BE RIY 2 
pny ig treat a Bt RO S051 10 dastas 
. 1p BUILDING ASSOCIATION 
ST 3 00 4409 G@ STREET NORTHWEST @ ST. B-8208 


| oo We 
tedersi , = aaa be ma bey MAGEE BIS WF Siveet See and bear Bryson Rash and the News Monday, Wedaesday and 


Ee a 83%» taxes. “oes average equals 168.) Washingtos 1, 0. C. Fridey at 11:00 p.m. WMAL-TV, Channel 7 
£9, vor ie el 


PENNSYLVANIA BUILDING oe a 190% 181 
Wasatch 103%— 104 


THIRTEENTH STREET 
Chicago Grain 
AT PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE, N.W. 


Seats foe 77 W—Creies closed 
on Searé of Trade tedey, teed 
a while mest ether cereais 


+++ + 
~—aw we 


District 7-29G68 


— 


- 
- 


a 
Seuueese 


e .« lina Ee 
Sineuseseez2= 
uth 3 
=< 
“3 
BuBsk-<=s 
a SESEERSLGTE -SEsaTSESRRGG 


_ - - = —~- - — See — ee ee ee + ~ - ————— 
. - " : - = —_ _ — — ee a re 


: 
’ 
Does Your Letterhead 137% 
| 


oe ETT) |For  igpesog & COLDS 


ie oe” ae s Get Amazing New SUPER 


vou entfr your re@aquirements . — ws 78 ? 1% 
“ 4 
2. 


SRR eg "enya earagus: ae Le : 
printing for over sixty~ veers eee 2 2 2M A ME 
‘Brew@no = ag ety 

a 2% 12 » 18 
ENGRAVERS ANDS FINE PRINTERS ie 2 7 *: ai ’ Yi ANAHIST 
District 7-4868 1217'G Street ae, Se ee EFOPL APC Compound APC COMPOUND 
| 1.20e-28; ‘ 1.1%-2% a pate > . 
| Bais tate We 1 hear white 46-6 : 


With VITAMIN C 


Oe 8° Pre MOTE REO Or” 


ae oe an For ADULTS 
Shortens Bottle of 20 COLDS 


1M ALL STAGES 


Tis ww nol an oger oj tmese Sec morass 8 for sale. The offer ss made only by i Prespectas | 4 * aor raglved 9 b Cc SIMPLE HEADACHES 


a | Any Stage HAY FEVER 


New Issue 
@aMBAHITCT CO.1hC. YOwNErSy WY 


422,992 Shares 
SLICK AIRWAYS, INC ERR 


ne | ANAHIST Afcteg) | re 
Common Stock p CHILDR SF 
” SUPER ANAHIST 


Value) 

ss tae ne APC Compound With Vitamin C 
men fr 223 Shem ae hese pany sa a For CHILDREN | . Mi’, Deep Penetrating 
eld o or c February | ‘ | 


to subscribe, subject to certain ‘conditions, for shares not subscribed Accurate Dosage 


shareholders pursuant to their primary subscripnon rights. Such offers a 
b , tye a hi 30 PM. E.S.T.. March 15, 1954. Easy to Swallow rs Fast Relief From 
| ) if Pain of Chest Colds 
i Ht he, . 


Subscription price $5.25 per share 


SUPER 


The undersigned has agreed, subject to certain conditions, to purchase . | i if ANAHIST ory 
any ' wibscribed shares, and during and after the subscription period | aaa 
_ may offer shares of Common Stock as set forth im the Prospectus haa i [eas '] | 
Coprei of the Proipectus may be obtained in any State, oaby from such dealers | j i : : A NA bd iS i 

ma may legally offer these secunsies tm inch State, an ° a hyn COUGH SYRUP | : 

Pat r | | 
i) | ioc ei 6 NASAL SPRAY 

With VITAMIN C | : 


Auchincloss, Parker & Redpath — Allen & Company <i - mie «” Mabibalns ' My RO ¢ Opens Up Your 
\. i Ounces _ Resistance | Size 


_ Pebruary 28, 1956 


. 
lt ee ie a an nn, 
lt eee . bead 
~~ —e- a a a Le + “ vr. + wee ~~ age 
—_ ~~ = eee cow onitin PP 89 Pr eer ee ee er Oe re wv PL ee CO. Re AO aes ghee 
“—werne a O° err owe Pe ee Se OEP 8 ar ee on aw 


Pusilude 


Violin and Piano—Steiner, Swarthout : 


; 
{ground all the while he keeps,was one more evidence of the |The latter is in the direct line 
repeating overt and over a brief wealth of music from this great of Mendelssohnian scherzos of 


By 
George Steiner 
Swarthout played 
of music for 
with one excepntion— 
in the congdénia 
of the Phil! 
The exception 
Honecger sonata 
to whic 
usual mu 
une@rate« 
ment, da 
player 


Paul Hume 

and Fvelyn 
an evening 
niano— 
night 
| surroundings 


s Cratle 


violin and 


last 


ry 
the 


or solo violl 


as 


It 
move- 
the 

of 


that 
deal 


cover a great 


BEST 


little figure in the manner of/era that we have not been per- happy memories. 
In other move- mitted to hear, music which on from keyboard and violin alike 
in this 
We would ‘ve happy .to 


a ground bass. 


ments the sonata is remarkable first acquaintance shows attri-- were of high order 
“made famous music. 


for the way in which it 


con- 


butes that have 


stantly presents a melodic line the better known music of Vi- have numerous chances to en- 


without 
‘hords and similar devices. 
The evening's 


to us: Pietro degli 


Antonii~—an | lights. 
obscure Italian composer most songful 
f whose life was lived around |two 


the breaking up of| valdi, Corelli, and the rest. 
| A sonata in F by Mendels- 


sonatas began |sohn, discovered only in 1953, 
with an entry trom a name new was one of the season's de- 
surrounds a richly 
with 
passages 


It 
slow movement 
“allegro vivace” 


joy this sonata again. 

A little D Major Sonata by 
Haydn, far better known as a 
keyboard work, followed. I kept 


wondering in the first move- 
ment, why the piano seemed too 
loud for the violin. Marking it 


his native Bologna. His sonata'that kept both musicians busy. 4.u, to the fact that Haydn 


om ee 


a or ee 


Nominated for 


|ACADEMY AWARDS! 


BEST PICTURE! 
BEST ACTRESS! 


Eg» Se 


Musial Score 


Actress» Photography 
Decoration 
Costume Design 


wrote the work for harpsichord, 
a fact of which I could not at 
first be sure, I realized in the 
finale, that the whole thing was 
lan arrangement of the familiar 
ilconata for keyboard, which 
| made the intrusion of the 
iviolin and the poor balance 
imore understandable. No won 
'der, then, that the piano had 
‘the better of it most of the time 
in this. 

Paul Hindemith’s C Major 
Sonata closed the evening. It 
lis a gem of a piece, with an 
opening movement built on an 
easy-to-remember theme, and 
with a most expressive middle 
movement. The closing fugue 
is not the broad assertive kind 
we know from other Hindemith, 
but a more reflective affair, re- 
lserving its broad moments for 
ithe final page. 

Miss Swarthout and Steiner 


to play in a way that, based on 
solid technical grounds, em- 
phasizes the ensemble’s impor- 
tance. In a season busy for both 
of them, they maintain a praise- 
worthy level of achievement. 


WHEN YOU ORDER A 


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it’s smart to specify 


SMIRNOFF. 


THE GREATEST NAME IN VODKA 


it leaves you breathless ' 
80 Proof Made from grain. Ste Pierre Smirnoff 
AAAS DION, Hartiord ,Conn..U S.A 


STANLEY WARNER 
ee 


AMBASSADOR 


fo. 


sal A 
BEVEALY Pree Pa: perotale. 
CALVERT ! 

CENTRAL, * 
KENNEDY - 
PENN 
SAVOY 
SHERIDAN fis _ 


HAN 


A : 


+. 496% 


Basenar 


SILVER jt. 9.3800. 
“MAN ¥ rH THE ‘GU apt 
Ro a? 4 - 3 


TAKON A’ 
TIVO 


UPTOWN “DEAN 


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aren! Sila 


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Call 


ut .. 9616 x penres 
READER en 8 
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tan 


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D 


2200. Richard Bean, 
Th VIEW FRO M 
+ piiy. 

; Pex 

PORT OF 

*.9a52 Ange rant 


A The BEACH ° 
ruty RODE 


ROTH THEATRES 
ROTH THEATRE is 


SPRING 
8742 O¢oareia Ave 


D BACK in << ibe ma- 

ty 600 7°85. 9-50. 
ea in Our Lounge 
ck OFF Alobama Ave 

th and Savannah Sts. $.€ 


©O. 2 and 


Pp, 


arn: : Bu 
NS OF i ANC HIPU. R 
; A at 


son my c 124g ~~ 8:00 


. wu 
tn Vista Vis 
135) Wisconsin Av 


GEORGETOWN 3” \” 


Weoshingten s Repertory Cineme 


, HELD OVER 
America’s Comic Genius at his 


DANNY KAYE. 
“THE SECRET LIFE: 
WALTER MITTY” 


aha nicolor) 


heat 


OF 


reinia Mayo pew Roots Fariett 
eatures at 6°00 f’OH 190: 3% 
Pree Parting 


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at we ikeraon . 
. AY 


 — ee re ee 
a 


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ype 


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“THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY” 
Vista Vision -Technicolor 


BUCKINGHAM *', ost." 
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Gienn Ford-—Donnea Reed 
RANSOM’ 

Matinee 2 P.M a 
ARLINGTON “n=, 75° 
JA. 7.2099 
Sheree North-Tom Ewe)! 
THE I = — WORE SKIRTS” 
emaScope —Color 
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dole Ad. JE. 27-4640 
Edmund Gwenn—Jonn Porsythe 
“THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY” 
Vista Viston— Technicolor 


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jA. 7.1733 
Stewart Oranger—Jean Simmons 
FOOTSTEPS IN THE FOO" 
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BENNY GOODMAN STORY.” 

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DRIVE-IN THEATRE 


Two miles west of Palle 
st bdDeautiful 
between Seven 
orners and Fai i Circle Via either 
Bivd turnine ‘ Gal- 
and Lee HH’ war-— World's 
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“THE BE ST YE ARS — 
OF OUR LIVES” 
Fredric March and Myrns Ler 
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spotlight the music they elect’ 


ese -786 “3 Alan i | 


The playing 


International News 
Announces New Film 


Charlie Chaplin is shown at 
a London press conference 
when he announced plans for 
a new picture he'll make, to 
be called “The King in New 
York.” Chaplin designed the 
sets and costumes and wrote 
the music for the film. He'll 
be the star. 


ADA to Hear Ashley 


Rep. Thomas L. Ashley (D- 
Ohjo) will discuss the $2500 
campaign contribution to Sen. 
Francis Case (R-S.D.) at a meet- 


ing of the Washington Chapter 


of the Americans for Democrat- 
ic Action at 8 tonight at Pierce 
Hall, 18th and Harvard sts. nw. 


LA PLATA, Md., Feb. 27 
Part of the wreckage of a mo- 


tHE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
alt dy Tuesday, February 28. 1956 37 


torboat that carried five per- 
sons to their death Sunday was 
fished from the bottom of the | 
Potomac River today off Cobb | 
Island, Md. 

Deputy Edward Cooksey of | 
ithe Charles County sheriff's | 
|staff said it appeared the bot-| 
tom of the 22-foot inboard craft 
had broken open. 

“It apparently was traveling 
at very high speed and in beat- 
ing against the waves, the bot- 
tom came off,” Cooksey said. 

Three young women—an aunt 
and her two nieces—and two 
men were drowned. Two other 
young women survived. 

The dead were Kay Round- 
tree, 20, of Washington: Glenda 
Stafford, 18, and her 16-year-old 
sister, Kay, of River Springs, 
Md.: Peyton C. Wodzell, 41, of 
Warrenton, Va. and Russell 
Walling, 32, of Colonial] Beach, | 
Va 


Wodzell was the owner and 
\operator of the boat. 
| Linda Knight of Washington, 
lone of the survivors, said the | 
boat was going very fast when | 
suddenly it flipped over. She 
was able to reach the piece of 
wreckage. Miss Knight and/| 
19-year-old Ba’ wa Ann Rus-| 
sell of River S,. ings, who was 
wearing a life preserver, were 
picked up about 20 minutes 
after the accident. 


Louella Parsons: 


Spencer Tracy Huddles 
Over Big Picture Deal 


(INS)! 


| HOLLYWOOD, Feb. 27 
My money says that the serious 
conversation Spencer Tracy 
had with Don Hartman in the 
‘Paramount 


comm is sary 
i'was 
| Spencer 


about 
star- 
ring in “Desire 
Under The 
Bims,’* the 
Eugene O'Neill 
classic. 

“Desire” is 
one of the 
plays Don an- 
nounced as an 
independent 
venture after he asked to be 
relieved of his chores as pro- 
duction chief 

And, while I'm telling secrets, 
I happen to-know that Don is 
negotiating With Sophia Loren 
for Tracy’s co-star in the drama 
which was one of the Theater 
Guild’s greatest hits. 

The columnist who printed 
that Tracy had plans to retire 


Miss Parsons 


Gaming Cases 
Are Pik 


Cases involving four of five 
‘men accused of setting up 
gaming table as a result of a 
raid on the Round Table Club, 
923 lith st. nw. were con- 
tinued yesterday unt®l March 
13 by United States Commis- 
sioner Cyril S. Lawrence 

Lawrence also continued 
bond of $1000 for William 
(Snags) Lewis, 41, of 3636 16th 
st. nw., One-time District gam- 
bling czar; Nick Keart, 48, of 
1214 Massachusetts ave. nw.: 
Frank B. Martin. 38. of 2504 
10th st. ne. and Frank M 
Goldberg, 50, of 1302 Sara- 
toga ave. ne 

William Walter Smith 58 
of 1719 Allison st. ne.. free 
on $1000 bond, was reported 
ill yesterday and will 
raigned later. 


Show Times 
For Tuesday 


STAGE 


' wATPOe AS -- Damn 


Sut sekr- “Bus Stop.” 
SCREEN 


a aS — “Never Gar Good- 
25. 3:36. 6:30, 17:30 and 


“Twilisht Wo 
10.1 SP mr 
CAPITOL ar ouse’ et 11 

4°40, is, and @ 45 Dp m 
COLONY — Mar! y.” at 6.350. 6.10. and 


Yankees” at 


at 8:30 o. m 


"74 
ant: c Ean ~ 


“The Renny 
5 6&4. mm 7 


Go ec man 
thsi 3. 
and 9:59 ® 


541 ‘todo 


Litt Lz— Summertime 


9:50 
PALACE Pit Cry Tomorrow,” at 
11.30 «a. 2:05. 4:40. 7:10 end | 


45 
mm fhe Rasste ee t Bin.” os 12. 2°20 
45 ee P ‘Dream 
-: 10 3:35, > 55. 8:2 


OT. 4-6100 
Gie on Pord. Denna Reed 
“BY ENCAL . 
an 


8 Route | : 


“% Rride Kids 
|? “THE BIG KNIFE” 
and © “FINGZAMAN 


| 


| pee 


HISER. BETHESDA ”: 7414 Wie, te 


Victor Mature & Anne oa 


“THE LAST FRONTIER” 


7:00 o, 2 50 
PWrciaame 


-gunct ie MOON MEN” 


5 & 8:40 PLA 
“MR. 


2°45. 8:4 1s 
955 sekaams Awards Cartoon 
EW.’ 


M AQGOO FL 


[ 


FAIRFAX FAIRFAX, VA. 
Glena vert. S Donna Reed in 
RANSOM" 
CARVER. ALEXANDRIA ,' ene 
“RANGOM, oe ject. Benne on 
M e hl 
VILLA ROCKVILLE, MD. 
Maryland's Newest Pinest Theatre 


“THE "TROUBLE 
WITH HARRY” 


Bre 2 iit 040 bm 


Wed. & Thur. only. Vivien Leigh 
“THE DEEP BLUE BEA” 


D 
all ae = Ye 
We * 45, 4:3 
OS and 35 - 
Setlest Guile at 2 3 
6:50, 8 30 arid - 10 
THANA- LUX 
s mm. 


“Picn 0:1 
fo 2:15, 4:15, 6:15, “| 


m 
“Cinerama Holiday.’ 


——— 


| a Crlhuvr 


_MecARTHUR BLYD, of 48rh SI. 
“ONE OF THE YEAR'S 


10 BEST” <3, 
ALEC GUINNESS 


MCP aawe 


| him? 
| grove” 
ihe told me his new book, * 


be ar. 


OM 


from movies must have a very 
red face these days. Spence 
has enough offers on tap to 
keep him busy for years and 
how about his being nominated 
by the Academy for best act-) 
ing? | 


TELEPHONED Mary Pick-! 
ford to talk with her after she 
sold her United Artists stock.| 
She said she still is going to 
produce “There Goes Lona | 
Henry,” which she has owned) 
for some years 

“TI own many properties,” 
Mary told me, “And I'm going 
to produce them for U. A. I'm} 
not really leaving the picture! 
business.” 

She said Buddy Rogers, who 
is making “The Killer and 
Twenty-One Men,” plays the 
role of a preacher. 
bay getting more fun out! 

said Mary. “He has to! 
et i at 5:30 every morning) 
. go on location and doesn't| 
even mind it. | 

TALKED WITH novelist} 
Marion Hargrove (Remember 

“See Here, Private Har-| 
of World War Il) and| 
*The} 
will | 
be | 


j 
' 
' 


ob 


— He Left Behind” 
ome out in May and will 
filmed by Warner Brothers. 
“I came out here,” said 
Hargrove, “to do the script’ 
from an idea Jack Warner had. | 
I became so fascinated with it 
that 1 decided to write a book. 
Jack Warner gave me per 
mission, but it means that I 
cannot do the screenplay be-| 
cause they cant wait for me.” 
Now married to the ex- -wife| 
of the late Franklin D. Roose-' 
velt's grandson, Curtis Roose- 
velt, Hargrove told me that he 
and his wife are having an 
experimental separation.” 


‘Coprvriaht. 19056 
International News 


he 
Ber, 


The word is 
getting around 
thot M-G-M's 


wee 
» 


Mat << 
| MS 


’ gold mine of 
entertainment 
in CinemaScope 
and Color! 


cae” ' 


y, 


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y 
COMING SOON 
to LOEW'S 
ON F ST. 


Presenta 


A VERY SPECIAL 


DANCE Ga 


15 hours, including 4 PRIVATE lessons, 6 class lessons and 
10 hours of supervised dancing practice with your ews 
teacher and fellow students, ALL FOR OMLY $15. 


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a. Don't pet off being @ good dancer ane loners, did 
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THE HECHT CO. 


Washington, Silver Spring, PARKingten 


Learn how to make 


Slipcovers, Draperies 


Miss Deitch, Consolidated Trimmings 
Co. decorator will demonstrate Slip- 
cover and Drapery making at: 
Silver Spring store, today, 2:30; PARK. 
ington store, Wednesday, 2.30. 


5 


ay 


HOWARD HUGHES 


THE WARRIOR 
SHOOK THE WORLD! 


W FIO 


This Tartar Woman 
matches his fury. with flame... 
meets his fire with ice! 


‘3 


URN WAYNE SUSAN BAYWARD 
THE CONQUEROR 


> YEAR‘ N THE MAKIN 


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RMENDARIZ « AGNES MOOREHEAD + THOMAS GOMEZ » JOHN HOYT + WILLIAM CONRAD « TED de CORSIA 
A DICK POWELL Production + wines by OSCAR MILLARD * tredweed ond Ov-eved by DICK POWELL 


CUCroIeE 


15th 


at G 


Starts Saturday 


7 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
88 Tuesday, February 28, 1956 cats Ys 


Need Stressed 
For Park Land 


) Sidney Oliver, vice chairman 
and park commisisoner of the 
‘Maryland - National Capital 
| Park and Planning Commission, 
stressed the importance of im- 
‘mediate acquistion of park 
land last night. 

| Oliver, who spoke at a meet- 
ing of the Allied Civic Group 
of Silver Spring, cited cases in 
the past where land values have 
‘climbed out of reach because 


Renamed to 
Land Agency ‘the Commission has not been 
—————" |able to act fast enough in pur- 


The District Commissioners °>asing land. 
have nominated James E. Colli- Pose discussed the recently 
flower, vice president of Grif- ggg ag song Pgh wg 
P 5 sion to buy 10,000 acres of! 
ath-Consumers Co., for a third park and school sites in subur-| 
S-year term on ban Montgomery and Prince! 
the District Re- Georges County over a 15-year 
aievelopment period. Cost of the program is! 
Land Agency. (estimated at $20 million. | 
The nomina-| He said it was expected about 
tion goes t6 the $3 million would be spent in 
Senate District Montgomery County during the) 
Committee. first three years of the program. | 
C ollifower,,He said taxpayers could be 
vice chairman saved thousands of dollars if 
of the RLA, is the land was purchased as the 
one of the orig- need arose. 
inal members, Oliver emphasized that the! 
Collifiower Of the five-seat parks would be developed on| 
board that is a key agency iM neighborhood and community 
the Federal City's battle against pacie 


For 3d Term 


Colliflower 


’ > 3 : ‘ : bs ‘ 
ann = 
sae 
= 
_ 
. - 


r 


Associated Press 
Falls—to Safety 


Mental patient Nestor Moss 
Jr. drops from the third floor 
of Roper Hospital in Charles 
ton, 8. C., after balancing pre- 
cariously on the narrow ledge 
for nearly an hour yesterday. 


slums and blight. His present 
term will expire March 3. 
Collifiower is a past president b ~ 
of the Board of Trade. In 1953 Jo ervice 
he sold his fuel and coal com- 
pany at 906 F st. nw. to Griffith. 1 f 
Consumers and became a vice rans er to 
president of the company. 
D. C. Sought 
Falls Churel eS 
a 4 . Lure I | A bill transferring adminis- 
V | li tration of the Public Employ-| 
‘ =~ ment Service here from the) 
andaiism Federal to District government'| 
C J was introduced yesterday “ 
. “yo | Rep. DeWitt S. Hyde (R-Md.) 
Jul ) ra | The task of helping people 
‘find work is administered here 
In an effort to cut down v@n- by the Department of Labor| 
dalism in schools, the Falls but by the states everywhere 
Church City Council last night else, said Hyde. The transfer 
asked the School Board to look would cost the city nothing be-' 
into the possibility of keeping cause it will remain a eoeave 
janitors later — possibly all’ program, he said. 
night. | The Department of Labor ~~ He was finally dislodged into 
The action came when Coun- quested the bill so that the em-| the waiting fireman's net be- 
cilman Charles Seymour called| ployment service could be ad-| low. 
attention to the fact that three! ministered in coordination with |—— 
Falis Church schools have been the city’s unemployment com-' 


broken into in the last month.|pensation program, said Hyde. 
One, George Mason High'The District Commissioners 12 1) (" Grou i) 
> ” 


School, was damaged to the have approved the bill. 

amount of $2500. | Hyde said he thought a bet- 
The other two, Madison Jun-'ter job could be done if the 

for High School and Oak Street/programs of helping people 


Map Plans 
Elementary, were entered and find work and of paying unem- . 
apparently searched for meney, Ployment compensation bene- For Primarv 


‘campaign to bring out a heavy 


although little damage was fits were handled by the same 
done. local agency. 
The Council proposed that 
janitorial work be spread out to w> - bree ged | + 
cover the whole night, instead K ao strict primary vole were Gis- 
of being concentrated in the ensington cussed last night at a meeting 
early evening. This would elim- i ~ civic = pent alo 
inate the necessity of hirin T P istrict mocratic Commuit- 
“fulltime watchmen. : O rotest tee spokesman A. L. Wheeler 
Be other action, the Council: . = his group is making ap- 
® Rezoned two small lots be- R pea s to more than 400 organ- 
longing to Walter Phillips at ezoning ‘izations—veterans, lodges, 
Hillwood ave. and Douglas st.! ‘churches, labor unions and citi- 
from residential to commercial, The Kensington Town Coun- one association s. 
One will be used for an office cll voted last night to protest; 3 is asking them to hold 
building, the other for a park-\t0 the Montgomery County tahiti on six registration 
ing lot for commercial devel-| Council a proposed rezoning of| days, adjourn briefly to regis 
opment that the Council ap- Property on Summit ave. owned tration centers, and reconvene. 
* Appropriated $6000 to build) George Sharp. ‘and 17 and April 9 and 10. 
a storm drainage line from Oak' The Council said the request; The idea, said Wheeler is to 
st. to Spring st. along Park to rezone residential to com- jead the members of these or- 
ave. ‘mercial was contrary to the = to the registration 
® Issued a license to the Falls master plan of Kensington. 
Church Volunteer Fire Depart-| B. C. Dooley requested nat (a A Chamber of Commerce 
ment to hold a carnival May 27\ another exit be made from the member Ken Parkinson said 
to June 2 and waived the busi- parking lot of the Safway store the plans fit in well with his 
ness license tax for the event. (at Connecticut ave. and How- group's plans to apply the 
lard ave. The lot's only exit is| “broad brush: to send up a bar- 
‘onto Connecticut ave. Mayor rage balloon with a banner, send 
* ‘Lewis Meriam said a public! gut four sound trucks. take 
Todav’s hearing already had been held | radio and TV time and hit for 
on the matter and said no fur-| gyi} page newspaper ads with 
- ‘hr action was planned , ipublic-spirited department 
Events Nivheeler also told 
. ; Theeler also told the meet- 
‘Store Owner ing, called by the Americans 
' for Democratic Action Wash- 
Events scheduled for today ‘Wings’ Bandit ington Chapter, that a house- 
qasterisks indicate those open| | to-house canvass was a waste of 
to| public): | A grocery store owner who! time without a voting list. 
. MEETINGS dared a bandit to take his wal-' The primary—first official 
ei | Sone arenes 2 a ae ie let and then fired two shot at! one in 82 years—is May 1. 
ep. Rm. 317. Corns meet him told police last night he was 
Pinler Wien fie Ledeen 5 “farts | sure at least one of the bullets | Oldest Inhabitants, Inc. 
Perms Recreation Cen 4, "i230 Sum.- “hit the holdup man. 
anctl, Koiehts of Colum-| Joseph Kaplan, 34, of Oldest Inhabita nts, Ine. 
10 nw meeting at Odd Fellows’s Hall 
Knights of | 4th st. nw., owner of a market 
Bt Ter esa's School.| a+ 1900 T st. nw. said he turned | &* Sth and T sts. nw., passed a 
Group Health "Association. 100 members last 
Commerce r nt 


demanded his . h f 
.|“Come and take it,” Kaplan | Port t e “passive resisiance” o 
gy ™isaid. The bandit turned and. [Negroes in Montgomery, Als. 
aul Junior High Schoo! Wome and started to run. | The donation was in support 
~ horpe sis. bw . grin jah Kaplan grabbed a .38 revolver Fle Rn wag of bus service in 
wank Welton esue. Arlington ir ¢ he] 
ewer At ual = lots mon ran down oo me The group also voted to send| 

Langley Democ Kaplan said he. saw the man/letters to Alabama University’s 

*|Tureh as if he ha unwelcome student, Autherine 

© bees bet Lucy, and Rose Parks, Mont- 

A li S h | gomery Negro arrested for 

ao 00 violating the bus law, com- 

rain ston C 8 mending them for their “cour- 

age in resisting racial segre- 
gation.” 


Buc ig! agen 
313 N. 


noty Council of Par- 
ations. Suitiand Jun- | 


1 allnghh gegen :/Slate 2 Concerts 


sur ot Association. ap : Arti 
: , riington’s annual . 
om. Y fa tor Reed "tostitutes of Re: high rw music festival, will | Northwest Boundary 
wi nae Institute of Electrical Engi. be held in March and will be! Northwest Boundary Civic 
ana 8 nk’ ae suditorium, 10th | divided into two programs. The|Association members were 
LUNCHEONS first concert will be March 9 atiurged last night to join forces 
actmeriten Society of Civil Engineers, Williamsburg Junior High/in a campaign to cut down the 
tome Plu ists © “SS Vimuten School, and will include pupils|cancer death rate, 
imipt_Club of Washington, 12:18] from Jefferson, Stratford and! Dr. Charles Clark of Freed- 
p.m. Martio |Swanson Junior High Schools. | men’s Hospital cancer detection 
mi. cynine. Club of Washington, 12 %0| A second concert will be held|Clinic, stressed the need for 
Oraanized Women Voters of Arlington. March 15 at Wakefield Junior-|¢arly detection of cancer and 
ore an tick 330 oe Washington | Senior High School. Pupils ap-|Urged Association members to 
pearing will be from Brandon,;|make the community aware of 
rmaccan Sepcnion tor ine voine| Wakefield and * Williamsburg|the need for frequent check-ups, 
ons. “Shoreham “**| Junior High Schools, articularly by persons over 40. 
ationa habilitetion Committee, | Boys’ chorus, girls’ chorus. he Association watched 


ae Tnatituie. Shoreham. | mixed chorus, orchestra and 


DINNERS band will perform. 
rlax County chem ‘, of pampetses. 


mo ty of Virgin in Lite bi Wash. | , 
ington. officers clu is ty McNair, ‘Va. Taxpa ers 


SPECIAL EVENTS  . 
esion, 148. Bm Mi eas. ‘Owe $22 Million 
Virginia 


rated le lecture 8 y figs . iy eae Nave Associated Presse 
taxpayers owed 


Lecture th Medietne, 8:30 p. 
A. 1335 H at. n Uncle Sam almost $22 million 
Agency. 


ney, Jewish Community (in delinquent taxes as of Dec. 
Barer oh, 1 IY smey doe 


Enters Speech Finals 


ere ort of 2 aes 


ait 


— — 


yk Bryant, senior m 
Arlington next 


Plans for an all-out publicity’ 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
‘ AND 
TIMES HERALD 
Local Rates: 


Sinn 38m a May of the District 


aye rate, 60¢ pe 


eee or BH 
on or ren r 
nse ns ad is two 


The following Epten are for con- 
secutive insertions 


TEs 
LINES 
7 

Word es t times times 

ore 8 i . time e712 
is , 10 

3 ‘ 2 13.44 
eeahe eaten RETAIL 


ADING ZONE 
($0 mand i or Washington) 
S30 Per Line 


I 3 7 
time times times 
we’ 7. 48c 


(Minimum 3 fines! 


PHONE RE. 7-1234 


DEADLINES: 
oes EDITION: 8 P.M. Pri- 
ay 


DAILY 2 e 
preceding day 


4:30 PM 


412,000 

Sunday 
Circulation 

means quicker sales results 
for Washington Post and 
Times Herald classitied ad- 
vertisers. To place your ad 


for Sunday 


Phone 
REpublic 7-1234 


LEGAL NOTICES 


- weed, 


Ww. Sheet Ateorney 


or 
Wweorge marnel. aT. 
end riwrence iownsend. pee Sar- 
nett. Piaimtisls, ve. wwe Riggs #8- 
pank of _ Waehington, wv. C.. 
, toe am rican Bap- 


devieses. tructecs and 
immedi ate and remote ac 


Rises "Rettonal Bank 
lington Cc. wes de- 
signaied trusice ae Dursyant se 
ich agreement the sum of 

ou) be — gin e. Cr af- 
atterwares 

rd anlinene + © the aid 
Bank by the Secretary of the to - 
to recover judgement direcit- 


ana Y¥ anae 
@ppearance 


be sis 
for 5 successive weeks tn the W 
insten Law Reporter « 
Weshington Post and Times 


administrators. 
ns 
cause their pt 
ered herein on or be- 
rule av occuring 
tion ot 3} months 
of the first pub- 
otherwise the cause wil! 


an‘ tyr 


JOHN 
£4, anc 23 


Atterney 
16753 K ST. Ww, 
Washingtes. D. C. 


for the DISTRICT CO RT 
+ 


onder 
¢’ stipe” 
De les 
TBODORE. coast ‘EL 
of Wiis for bi J District of Colum 
bia. Clerk of the Probate urt 
OFFICIAL Novices 
Dd Cc GOVERN MENT PEPRUAR 
wth wie 


ee ft 
REQULATH _ ¥ or 


¥ rom Eas 
te the Dletties line on both 
- any xuT Amend wert 


9 ‘wal ‘* 
TWENTY. a NUTE 
NES. by addine ¢ = 
eT W. From 


8 
630 > m. 8. SPENCE Ag gs 
LAVGONLIN - A LANE, Commis- 
stoners, 


BIDS AND "SROPOSA 6 


NATIONAL CAPITAL HOUSING 
UTH wyee ae ‘1ON FOR 
ction Centract). 
a vids a “quadruplicate. sub- 
the conditions conte teined 
corer”, an i. the Centract Vecu 
ments. will be received for furn'en- 
ze labor and materials an 
ork necessary an 
. wir o 


side doth pad a me ‘ wt 

ned in Ri a. 1906. ing 

f? Buildings Soteie Rov 
Generel I Fyjets ts 


DvD. C. 43-4900. 


Fred 6. Poorma Ser. 
missioner Publi Pr iaee 
"1 z aoa a 


st ONE Ez 
the following describ 


gre vot "Goh is@s. situate in ¢t 

fetriet 0 umbia. 

nated #6 and ns t 67 
5S wdivision ° 


Converancing 
: s purchacer s 
Adjustments 
date of sale. Terme 
Pied With within 
otherwise pe 


be ad 
“the discretion of 
the trustees 


HOWARD BERNSTEI?r. 
CHARLES E. MITCHELL. Trustee 
Pep. 28. March 1.3.6 


BUSINESS SERVICE = 


“ r IN c aot 
clorged sewers. sass. oma: Be 

pment: eco — “oath betent: 
| Gen'l. Contractor, 
——— remodel. srdd- 
exclusive low 


equi 
a: beers mabe © 


po 
dormers. attics. 
improvement work. No cash ‘seeded. 
EDOAR KEEFER CO.. JU. $-6862 


, 'D: 815.75 
A IONS. me ae 
rec. rms. mod 
Tr - 
A po eo. cit. mod. 
rec. rma.: free est.: guar: no down 
paz S-yr. terms SECO. JU. 8-3010 
ADDITIONS—Any home improve- 
ments from yw te pal 
specia! winter discount eas 
NO. 7-0275 19. 2-8063 eee 
ao arte —' arports 
rches. es : ; plans 
Back PHA. finan oa ke 8.m.-9 p.m. 


‘vai lt Attles 
doors HON , 


and Remodeling +t nner oaebiane 
hk ee Estimates 


“s 7 Le pee me. 


ches 
a than Chin ik 5.3388 
Rinse 7 


outside 


N 


PEDERAL-—STATE—LOCAL 
oesree. , 5 3 == at: y? 


we “Ditties “Bis. ‘lath st. aw 
en iE TAX Gn 


Pry Be > ee ad y hen pea 
Be Oe ies hae hon 202 


INCOME TAX RETURNS 
). &.—S8TA >. Cc 
srepared by expert with 15 years’ 
eves 


te 

Sitert .. zn. call TC. 2 -atei 

INCOME | TAX “RETUENE_By se 
a2 . a 


. cx a 

Returns prepared by - oe 
ete: reas a ar bh A 
. \ pt 
’ morias. paper fing 
free est exe 
PAINTIN paperh aagice 
remede ing, eeemiad 

General repairs 

nier. exter 


en thas com | work phat » See ae. 
wk —" rity rH ast sah 
ares x ro 08, BA: estt- 

- ve. LY 32-0389 


A -— Al makes: 
exc! : - 


Saat as 
esements: repair 
ac = 


Reasonable. Call LX. 3-1411 any- 

flagstone. ai Y cement spe- 
Claliizing in a an alos, 
steps lks. et 


BnLLFOLD. back Trard. contaip. 
ing important keve 


—femae, (een, Connect- 

; Sunday p. m. vie. Cher 

r . ‘ 

é w vv 

male. white ches. and paws. 

and goer, he * - beats j ps > 
aco 5 14- x wh 
jace Theater 1..., 

Peat. _ ceoteelown vic. 

ard, OO. $-8965 


BYAN pet 


i? ro ames © 
gold im green folder in  eab. HO. 2- 


b66 r LINK gad Amethist Brace- 
ne my dete 


Noy  --— 
eo Dp. mm 


3404 Ww 
amt Finder a. call NO. 7-2385. 
€ 
lack vee? Wod- 


ard'’s beral ard Return 
Brighten ‘Hotet California a. NW 
EWELLYN SETTERS—1 male. i 
—— : all pete With Diack face 
an . L.Orindie with 
solid biack face. Reward RE. 


ght Vlie Wale, Bat 
ath. wie me: and Whea 


(4. Metre- 
politan Police: rig. Sbatfouss Guard 
Armo 7- 


Places, it in 


1 
i TTo abil ty Tnsurence ~~ $19 
$ te: 6-mo oa | 


wit foe 
a. a woman w was i 
by diplomatic car. x 
, . 


aS 


are 


-Ball, 4-poster, double, 
A. hn box springs. 


BELL SYSTEM 
SCHOOL BELL OR 
FACTORY SIGNAL CONTROL 


control program instru- 


schedules, with 
me i113-volt. 4-ineh 
A-1 condition. practically 


a va oy Cost 
Post and ines Hernia. RE Dubie 


sacrifice tor $356 A 
t tron table mahogany 


wrou 
siveight angek uphoistered chairs. 


achat ING scholarship Th 
change for office work. Na onal 
Academy of Brosdcastins. 2- 
pone. 


BRICK 


$15 PER M 
CALL LU. 4-0500 


ACE allah Co. 


CHAIRS ne = = mise eee rT) 
= 


-vear~- od ™ 
rae ers column ¢o 


rs 71. 
_ 5-631) betw and 8 ». m. 
nia Rosenthal. gone for 12. 
cL adies + rf. men's 


4-172). e weahdare. after “~~ 
BR bucks. steel in various sizes 
rood masonry rti 


_§s 
tall gt Jo 444 
‘. screens andirons. “ote. “Ag Cur 


A) ut 
a) od. 114 Pox, a9 Thepe. 


ME CLAIMED—-Precc chair 


a buffet ; 
Ficiorins chair, 
$50; sofa an chair. $60: 
chair. $6: studio couch, 825 
ers mattress. $10: bed, 
$25: coll springs. ; 
Holiywood bed. $22.50: desk. $12; 
SOSusaes $3: maple chest of draw- 
2 roo*«case-head-board. 
érop- cong kitchen table, $12: 
c 


. ers. draperies, 
Sofa and chair 

‘ 9 up: siip-covered, 
‘labor and eateries?) 


. 23-3991, 


hissed ed i come 


FURNITURE 


3 ROOMS 
BRAND NEW 
FOR ONLY 


$245 


NO MONEY DOWN 
Terms Arranged, Free Delivery 


SWANK FURN. 


1115 H ST. NE. 
Lt. 3-8700 
GAs BANGES—New. | a " guaren- 
Yon parts, repeats hove. 
HEA weer. Fos 
viene” Wee bast offer or LO. 4, 
wood. coal) Parts. used | (eas. Acme 
« W bret d oo ; 4 cu. 


: = op 
rfting bd.. mol. on ip... air 
8 


eraitere. Reconditioned. e 
at sacrifice prices. Gavings up te 
75 r cen’ 

FREE DELIVERY AND PARKING 
MANHATTAN OFFICE 
EQUIP. CO. 

639 New York Ave. NW. 
OIL oP RTI ga... 3 compart- 
men ( fuel ofl truck. meter, 
pene oak electric hose reel NA. 


today: tomerrow 
in 


io—Lovels. small Ri 
right: jate model; _e. A! L 

PIANOS— New fine que paso. 
zer-Spinet pane 

valu Quan mited : 


nw. (just above 


~ —Wew and used 


.= 
bright, $2} 


ee rite pa 


er 
rier Chic voiced, ~ ea 
y keyooar $ 5 
quick sa KI. 


Cee 


TV—RCA - 
sole Sihn ao va Motorola, 
16-im. table mode 

r . 


make, oric. 
eand .. Will sac. 


automatic. Jt. 

» #000 cond.: reas. 
Eas¥ Soin 

Li. 7-8090 

ve up 


\—Sa 
to 75%. Giga ntic warehouse sale. 
pond washers it) be 
a - 


U “7001. Ope ti Ss 
Bb. m.. . 12 4 
TRI-GTATE APPL. WHLARS.. 84: 
Georgia ave. ilver ring. Me. 
ARTICLES WANTED 13 
im INTERE TED in viewelty. old sii- 
ry. 


5 
verware, any cond.;: pews bric- 
a-brac afd china. N D 
les son Wis _ave. 


rac w5 
ver jewe Oriental objects: pa 


- 
office 


SRDS Ta ee 22977 


GHT—Any quantity. 
ALBION BOOK SHOP 1768 enn- 
syiy nia ave. aw ASS 
ov ie eq Casn for too 

_ Mr. 


mr 


for 


nilau Closed : 
 PORNITORE iSen NG! . 
by 


Nreb- —Cash dor since 
heuseho.¢. JU. 5-0313. 
Wal T Any amou 
also need refrigerator. was range 
ise av. NA 8-24 


Diatinum 


ring your dental Ge” oJ 
cash. 


charged jewelry 
A. KA 


7 
AT 35 F ST. NW 
NTED—All <xinds. Call 
Ber, ice = Company to 
day. JU 


PIANOS bourh “Wishes 
-3039 - 


ED—Cash 
Seltzer, JU. $-4679. 
niture wante a or 
: Bed with reliable company 
t tora So. DE 22-7900 


° 
piano. _ ie 


AIRLINES 
AIR TRAVEL AGENCIES 
POSITIONS 


Many tnteresting. well-paid Rood 
advancement ground " and ft 
eer" tenttiies everyvihtre, coo 
and ; Por auslified 
men aaa women . lowe 
cost basic training that need not 
eatertere wi present employ- 
~ Or to LAL 


Bchools. paid 
job baat phone 3 
r c 


G in beauty cal- 
sere all cubjects taucht: approved 


I fraps . eve. Ciasses. 
Wanhiinn BMAD “Eouivae: 
NURSES NEEDED 
100 women wanted. 17-65. to learn 


Rursing: white or colored: for con- 
valescent home 
vate 


EN -ay 3 iy, 
ty =e et, visit. "te pace 
ational institute o ursin 
Victor Bis age ‘pL De oa 


n¥ 
feo 


Bon _7omen te train as snmounc- 
ters directors. cameramen. 

Sooresen: closed eireul it telecasts; 

short courser: placeme 

pel peste Ac oat School 

1627 _RE. 4: 


in 16 wks. 


course with 
or macnine 


kves. §-5 
40 yrs). 


ACCOUNTANTS 
~ AUDITORS 
COST ACCTS. 
BOOKKEEPERS 


assistance Im securin 


“COLUMBIA 
aaa ICE 


1334 Eve x 
Bookkerpers ss 
Adjustors. car furn. .. 
Secretaries 


Wwelnees ‘career: . 


Hieh School 
Route sales. 


Janitor supplies 
Bailes trainecs 
“CO ve seories 


RED D BRANCH 


trash Leue! 
seman 


acer o OFC MGR. $125 


Retail eepeance store 


OTHER POSITIO! 
divisions! a pasee 


Operatine meint $2 
ers. -Physicisie (tn). to si¢ 000 
motregios techs 75 

ectr. draftemen (10), £350 


ALAS Ang RE 7- 5767 


N ais ore NW... Room 
MISENIOR—TO $4800 

POSII : TONS, INC. 

1334 MASS ae 

Im mediate openings or salesmen, 
secys.. investi- 
erks. echanics 
any other open- 


fleids 
ne CALL Di. 7-927 


ADDRESSOGRAPH 
OPERATOR 


AGE 18 TO 3 


schoo! «graduate. Experience 
wi eraphoty machine pre- 


eteteen baes tet dan 
WASHINGTON 
GAS LIGHT CO. 


PRA 


Samatinte opening maintenance 
and car — 


ASST. WAREHOUSE MGR 


Pe n ti 
oe nd Mind Feapousie, ma man 


fom eS Tigh ifehool, busi 


att tee 
gienwaypers, nd. 


DOUGLAS DISTRIBUTING 
CORP.—LA. 6-5573 


etebek” af one 


Dish wah 
Preseers sik. woo! 
Porters . 


s boys, ex xpr ; 
Hotel. housemen, expr 
Creat “havister 


ome sende 


Parking lot rhe ndan 
Beryice Stat ion attendant 
oo 


AUTO SALESMEN 
(New and- Used) . 


Salary. commission and wemon- 
strator furnished. Bee Don Wicon. 


DIVVER MOTOR CO, 

Dodge and Piymouth Dealer 

7730 Old Georgetown Rd, 
Bethesda, Md. 


AUTO SEAT COVER ie. Ae 
Good pay. steady peositio Appiv 
in person. Ravco Seat Cov ome. 2117 

b 


Ba BG. NE vitaieeal 
BA ATEN Ge R. 5a 5308 
poo warehousemen. $225 
» 20 F ai he 
LL ie 10. Ho. pre. 


so oe 
MAN sox LENT 
INC.. Sulte 609, 
BARBER Steady ‘ob esuar 
n ke $125 to $150 week. Dow 
Shep Box W-rse Posi-T™, 
: ary anc come 
i-9:.0, 


good 
_Alex. | i 
wy a 
o JA. #- 
BAgBiR—<iuar. and comm. 
go8 Turn system 951 Fi 
Sil. og JU 9-975 
SAKRER— 3 guar 
Meet res. otheer ye. 


a! 


BARBERS 


G org: 4 “Ave 
BARBE ER —Wan 


WANTED) nder. 
es Sarber Shop. #8405 
Bu wer Sprint, Md 


Bookkeeper- Auiédvalline 
YOUNG MAN UNDER w 
re! : coun 


ng ‘backero “ 
eock. Rosen 
Columbia 

J 7-673! 


BOOKKEEPER 


21-25 37 *-hw. wk.! 
age concern; 


<. 
between 
Prele 
traih Gen er ral 
-” a 


BOOKKEEPER Ur re 


Cor mpany 

has need 
x sales men. We will pay 
* okie ama ae 
a! ontaly 
the repead of 
*expension pro- 
c need for 
0 ntiervie? 
40° 2 "Mond ay and 


Ly 
pric RLAY EES Wi hite 
nly App) A Gr een’ rier " 
rh x Ari Va or cai L 
BC ur DOZER. ope rat H.D 5 
rs C 
i. on. P ‘ON ta 
“Bus OPERATORS. 
fears - 


te hin 'c | 
a o 


“hy operat or "25- 3 
ect oo or oat on : 
-%%00 Pers 2H 


canLE sPLiC = af ctr 


Be exper ence and pere 


Sona backs) 
CIGAR CLERR —White 
per in ne nec 1g 


n ist be Oh. 7 
: 


ate... —— ~ 
COLLECTOR SALESMAN 


appearing. age 21-45 
rr a. % S . 7 


AGEMENT CONSU: 
* Go NW 


. ee 


Por tnside telephone work 
Position to the right per 
ce! lent sa! ary Man company bene 
: Ask for Mrs Yea ts. Marvin's 
Greait : Co. 734 7th at nw 


sescy 
Ex 


_—— 


CONCRETE CONSTR. s pratihs 


air con 
Dr : 
SURVE Y PARTY 


i CHI IEP 
LLOYDS EMPL fenvitt 


TECHNIC [IAN WECLPERS 


Department Manager 
and Salesman 


\ ome ograph vo —"t y ied 
: ree 
; comanel surat ~ 
} Positions a! 
exce! lent op portunit les for further 
ac ancement. 
_etits. Reply 


ho 
Ww 
Pe rTPA 
rt. ORME, INC., NA. 86-1393 
9M, NW. near N.Y. Ave 
saya touEs ok od oportunity fo 
young man. age 21 to 30: re: éent 
of Va preferred. noe ledge or arca 


a in terview, ae tao, ‘Post: TH. 
DRAFTSMEN 


Mechanical 


layout draftse 
ey ~ ae open for me 
interested in orking With engile 
neers and seianti sis electroe 
mechanical mechanism in y me ne 
development stages. Many eaer ze 
benefits Opportunities or 
vance! ment. mplies required tr 
intervie 


CALL ST. 3-0986 


Juniors 
men 


DRAFTS MEN ‘ 

Credit investigator 

ar ippine clerk 

BLL SPRING Rocky! J 
Ay JU. 99-4446. 

“married ace “Sy 


Call Ob. T 
NTRY CLEANERS 715 
fe Lane. he thesda, ‘Md 


rRONIC ef (DO), $10,000 
“Circle MER WAYNE Nes 


YOUNG MAN 
INTERESTED IN 
DISPLAY WORK 

ae aa as WASHINGTON STORE 


of home 
win- 


15 18|THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD» 


es Tuesday, February 28, 1956 39 . 
=! 381,000 

Daily 

| Circulation 


means quicker sales results 
| for Washington Post and 
Times Herald classified ad- 
vertisers. To place your ad 


HELP, MEN 15 


Pane 


TUBE CO. 


AD 


__15)HELP, MEN 15) HELP, MEN 


ELECTRONICS! ENGRAVING 


Machine Operator 
RCA 


MISSILE TEST 
PROJECT 


Florida’s 


=o 


We have 

be able te furn 
STONE PA 
ee 00 _ Pre 


HELP, MEN 
OPPORTUNITY 


Eee detrenen: colt 
hig Oi he canvas: 
appointment. a 4s s. m. bare 
WANTED 
SALES REPRESENTATIVE, 
ae tise refrigeration 7" 4 
BPRNR Te CORPORATION | 
____ GARWOOD, N. J. Phon 
WORK 4 NIGHTS ee. 
MAKE $49.50 REpublic 7-1234 
erRit:| HELP, MEN 3 


Ww. | Aver $15.50 Per Eve. 
Part-Time—Eves. & Sat. 


and college students cc 
whe ry. 


Mlactronic 
Technicians 
AND 


a 
he dete eee te. 


THE YOUNG MENS SHOP 
ee +) ae |S 


Experienced on Gorton 
machine desirable, Many 
company benefits. 


MANUFACTURING 
ENGINEERS 
ee swell as : Guar a still clas- 


MELPAR, INC. Bpecitic openings for iseaiaial 


men “— xist in 


PRODUCTION 
PLANNING 


TOOL DESIGN 


PROCEDURE 
ANALYSIS 


INDUSTRIAL 


Trainees 


Some experience helpful but 


ALESMAN, for full iine 
ts. not necessary. 


APPLY IN PERSON 
MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY 
SsaM TO4P. M 


PRESSER 


fenced on 
press machine 
prepared to work 

. NW, 


| SPP hus at K st 


POWER CLEANERS 
Corner Broad & Washington Sts. 
Falls Church, Va. 


“PRINTING PRODUCTION — 
ASSISTANT & ESTIMATOR 


peuet be under 38: mm and ae 
Ag A 


et 


dow 
siding. ete. 
struction. 


SALESMAN- MERCHANDISER 
Nostones” advertised f 


as openin 
es ar turn it vlene, 1 
DB 
rea Fe ig 
peed rs expe 
desired. 


mo irean et PRRSON. 


SALESMEN 
(White or Colored) 


ool. New alr 
Pull or part time 
Take 


work on th ance Veusht Exper 
der, ““Workd’s 


5-DAY, 40-HOUR WEEK 
~ \ appLy 
<| EMPLOYMENT OFFICE. 3D FLR. 


LANSBURGH’S 


Th. th & B Gte. NW. 


For positions as electronic tech- 
nicians. 


Ability to read Same 
er blueprints. 


Assembly to experimental elec- Central Fast Coast! 
tronic equipment. Previous in- 

dustrial or military service ex- 
perience necessary. 


3000 ARLINGTON S&L ve 
+ FALLS CHURCH. VA 


Arnold 2-V bus from 11th 
ts. ow. to plant entrance.) 


end fs! 


with 


Interesting Assignments 
— 


in Electronics and Optics 
FOR TRAINED AND 
EXPERIENCED: 


Radar Engineers 
Communications 
Engineers 
Telemetry Engineers 
Optics Engineers 
Instrumentation 
Planning Engineers 
Opto-Mechanical 
Engineers 
Mechanical Engineers 
Physicists 
Field Engineers 
Radar Technicians 
Communications 
Technicians 
Telephone Technicians 
Mathematicians 
Draftsmen 


YOUNG MEN 


White, 18 to 25, col- 
lege or high school 
grad, perm. position 
with one of Wash.’s 
largest stationery and 
office equipment 
concern, Several op- 
portunities for serious 
minded young men 
interested in a posi- 
tion with a future. 


Cae PSO ite 
2- Chas. G. Stott & Co. 


1310 NEW YORE AVE. NW. 
NA. 6-4161 


APPLY IN PERSON 
8 AM. TO 4 PM. 
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 


MELPAR, INC. 


3000 ARLINGTON ve. 
RCH, 


PALLS CHt 
Sea fs 


ESTIMATORS 
EXPERIENCED 


| Engineering degree, with con- 
| struction experience and/or | 
| @stimating experience rée- 


ENGINEERING 
| aieel.. Sa ga | TOOL RESeAGn 


| cote 87 111s extension 9992) AANUFACTURING 
Engineering Dept METHODS 
gE. I DUPONT de nEyvOuN & CO. | 


| 
| iimington 98, STATISTICAL 
| wt | ANALYSIS 


ENGINEERS, 6th_ ‘el. $200 


COLORED 


CAR POLISHERS 
RU 4 Evans 


hs 

E} 
NATIONAL EMPLY. SERVICE 
_.719_lith St. NW... 24 Fleer 


COLLEGE-TRAINED 
MAN 
LIFE INSURANCE CO. 


Beats Ane! in 
Lysis 


bow comnetennta nf 
nd +. = 4 eg tea vin 
os s fe nteres 
lu incentive alae. com- firing + ge ond sates | 
experienc ‘* 


6 in srowin 

ts to — 
Toine ages 
handwriting. 
E.. a? life insurance end hos- 
srauutnss State complete back- 


You will rece! ve Pag +g) training, 
nad will be “ere 
ou will L-F from ‘tuntlfieg ‘e ods 
only. Positively no 
‘| Becellent opportunity. te ere, 


to well-paid position® as super- | 
7 S$ and branch managers. 


mee in first 
at- 


ma 
0 ee valent. § fe wil 


an train 
Denne. onaiviicel tech- 
3 *® ave ished 


-40 
d news ’ ‘expe 
Btate oe sale ary 
ments and references in ist letter. 
Post- . 


_Write Box 756, 


Real Estate Salesmen 
a SS , ew ~ 


apes ee oo 


Arnold 2-¥ bus from tith 
. BW. te plant entrance.) 


f you are Interested in mak! 
r ¢ 


to $15.000 yearly. 
LA. 6- 8023 for an appointment 


SALES MANAGERS 


A new company in the Washing 
rea oO for ri Mew 
the beet 
men of proven 


“a * ty | P ikea 


dD. J BLACKMORE 


ENG INEERS—PHYSICISTS 


WASHINGTON 
INTERVIEWS 


ACCU RAY 


THE NATIONALLY TELE- 
VISED INDUSTRIAL MEAS- 
UREMENT & CONTROL 
SYSTEM USED BY CHES- 
TERFIELD & LEADING 
PAPER, RUBBER, PLASTICS 
& METALS MFRS. HAS 
SEVERAL OPENINGS FOR: 


Ph.D Research Director 
Chief Radiation Physicist 
New Products Project Mor. IN WASHINGTON to phone calis SALES POSITION 4 —_ si KY few Dey ‘tax on a 5- ure | gree 
Blectronie Design Engineers | CALL MR. R. A. FREEMAN ea A ga| Meet aMataes Mataaae.ees,| sieht, cals Troues Eanes! = TOP. RANK Zs ace, me seers fee deans 
| Desi Loca. 
aor ro AT DL. 7.4800 | Exct . SALESMAN 


| j well in th ~ fle Sela bee the 71 
Sales & Field Engineers | ) = yz 5, are carefully trained, carefuliy su REQUIREMENTS: 
Paper Industry Manager | WANTED BY AN EXPANDING Electro-mechanical Training 


end 13 A 


das at 


For horough evaluation of your, 
cualitigations. and to arrange is 
con nse id 


. .§45 
—} 
terview send a... resume to: z 


eaning . 
New development: salary and 
Must have 

seston Re.. 


commission. Ra hite 

gt? 3 Livin 
rae ~ 
4. ome 
project ewiotion 


apply uniess experienc 
train 


Salary Bmployment Office 


CHANCE 
VOUGHT 
AIRCRAFT 


Incorporated 


oe Ei THE MAN WHO 
/ 


Emba!mer-Funeral Director 


KNEW THERE WAS 
ag soot Smee’ 


HAS IMMEDIATE 
OPPORTUNITY 
FOR 


ne, ed. D.C. Confidentia) 
vege H SAWCRH | 


saleam silpoovers 
00 on qualif 


= oa aus tied leads. | car al- 
Be| faint Eee gi a 
~ SALESMEN—$125 COMM, 


FARMER’ 5 HELPER —6 ~ A mene? 


‘shine inery 7 aa ata 


FLORIS We expe 
of, Fi han . Plerist. Sy > ome .. 
¢ 


Customer Engineers 


rOR PERCE 
ELECTRICAL 


Broad, Liberal RCA Benefits 


Relocation Assistance 


SALESMAN 


AGES 234-38 
Senior salesman — cach registers 


FORMIC 
1A. 5-5 
GAS STATION Fp pews gt wai ite 
Experienced ly. Loc f 


r 
t have @river’s permit ADDly bi 
SG AN (PORD? 540 14th WAN te acs ro -esta 


See Mr Fbener or Mr. Chat 


sink top man: exper. 
eet. JU. 8-404. Dallas, Texas 


FP. ©. Box 3907 


P , 
For Personal Interview ished 
Poe 
r 


sky is the limit. $7000. 
ore | 


=| Szpect to carn ¢ 
Brora the ‘sky'is’ths 


ced - 
intng. > a 


ith ¢ 
oa AN man A + ee cusseuatel compensation | 


ichels 


job 
week Ty * ae 


Transportation 
allowance yy r 
not necessary 
mission while 
company benefits opis 


exper 
oars | 


M 
»| WEDNESDAY OR THURSDAY &: inoce, 6360. New » *--~ ave. | 


a 
wer 


¢| fasion. ew Fo ~-* and are 
sales and manas 
WE'RE THE ACKNOWL- 
EDGED LEADERS IN OUR 
FIELD. OUR CAPACITY HAS 


February 29 or March | 
2 P?. M. to 9 P.M. 


GASOLINE SALES TRAINEES—Mes- 
will train 

a and. : 

| Bondable. $285 mo. plus 

| OFA. Empiovment 1507 _H NW. 


GROCERY CLERK — Colored or! 
»? ist heave vegetable or] 


| son on at hw 


MACHINE | 


come 
interview, 


ne * evellable on east const Por 
appointment. ca Eavenson. 
Dupont 7-5100. 


IM. 3-9668 
Evering appointments invited 
5-8 P.M 


~ SALESMEN 


*MANUFACTURING| 32 


*CONCERN 


ward peak performance. Va. and | 
men Work im ijocal areas so) 
must have « car. 


ula YOU at pte we picture? 
be « pleas 


or 


Armed Forces Technical 


Or Send Complete Resume to: 
RCA Service Co., Inc. 
Employment Mgr., Dept. N-78A 
P. O. Box 1934. Melbourne Florida 


ap 
ure to sive ull by & 3 
opportunities at Gears in 
reer. Now see 


MON OR TUES. 
/BET. 11} A.M. &1P.M. 


SEARS ROEBUCK 
& CO. 
4500 Wisconsin Ave. | 


emen 
Cancidate must hare apti- 
e for quality sales w - 
DOUBLED EACH YEAR FOR 
THE PAST 5 YEARS, NOT 
| ONE DESIGN ENGINEER 
HAS LEFT OUR EMPLOY IN 
THE PAST TWO YEARS!!! 


LIBERAL SALARY RANGES 
GUARANTEED BONUS 
PLAN 
RELOCATION EXPENSES 
NO MILITARY WORK 


TEL. MR. NEIL HUFFMAN | 


DI. 7-2852 


TUES.. 8 AM—8 PM. 
WED.. 8 AM—6 PM. 


Ir bly ary Sao“ thee Cae 


Washington. D. C. headquarters. 
$6500 to iret year 


commission Potential #14, tence 


“TREY BAe rem 
REPUBLIC 7-3705 
Customer Engineering Dept. . 
Room 205 


shone Mr on z 
| \! Think | have the Propo- 

| ition You’ ki 4 

MANAGER TRAINEES Representatives (5) sition You're Looking For 


Excellent Opportunity for 
men w can qualify as DING ST ro CALL AD. 4. 3648) .., 
Branch manager, | § BLA 


future branch managers. 
i precuete. | 0 


LUS MON 
| LIBERAL OPENING COMMS. 


"Be BE Rie 4 


PPLY necessar 
_ a C. ‘Tieante = ts ‘ sof Tem _ Bae Mt D Bes Turers Hotel mission 


SALES: 
TRAINEE 


AGES 23-28: 


f you Soak se. 5 wi =| 
‘eat oan Tas. th spe no ae ) | 
HARDWARE SALESMAN 


Toe work re: tie is mATOwaTe | 


5-8163 I a oniy, 
o Pp. mm. 


stores Re 
mecessary 


P.orida Ave 


ing experience 
7 morn! nas, 1434 | 
=o *i 


Ape or call Li 7- 
S 


Engineers 


SHIP 
BORNE 
MISSILE: |i 
LAUNCHING |} 
= |G HANDLING 
EQUIPMENT 

DESIGN 


Mechanical 
ENGINEERS 


Experienced tm hrdreulics er pip- 
ing systems 


ELECTRICAL | 
ENGINEERS | 


Experienced in clostrie ot Bee 
and check os tronics 


International Business 
Machines Corporation 


1220 19th St. NW. 


R.C.A. 


Ledger Clerk—Maintain perpetual inventory records 
on Electronie parts. Coodin Coordinete material 
distribution te company branches in Southeastern 
U. $ Accounting experience helpful—not esseritial. 
Vacancy due to promotion; 5-day week, all company 
benefits. Selery range minimum $3380. Interviews 
by eppointment. Call OV. 53-1223. 


R.C.A. Service Co., Inc. 


A SUBSIDIARY OF RADIO CORP. OF AMERICA © 
District Office—S15 Wythe St. Alexandria, Va. 


SALESMEN 
(FOOD PLAN) 


Perm anqpt salen om positi 


im our 
ville end Annanda 
ficest car 


wht up 
aes © EMPL. a | 
1404 N.Y. Ave. NW, Roem 332 


TM MACHINE OPERA’ ‘TOR — 
citizen, to 35 for 


~ cee! fl 
sion of organi Al modern | 
' empiovee benefits. 


ent poet Straight Salary—Car Furnished 
tien tn emall insta wn with P 
vate research organization Penta. 


eae 


erences 
ee _— 
= i 


' 7 
Ty plus finerat ec co | 
telization and iile 


6:30 
a7. 28) 


venin appcigoments 6:36 
-— Tues Pes 


ao, pall © th AMANA METROPOLITAN 
FOOD PLAN 


Mm | Asst. raed 


 perouae knew) 
ines 


MARKET RESEARCH 
‘ S| Mupt has bere 


i = re 


Ex ae " ae 
ys Fy or yt! a8, »- 
LABORATORIES 
OFFER 
Must, have CAREERS IN 
THE FIELD OF 


COOK RESEARCH 
SATISFYING 
. RESEARCH 


“ ? Mm. 
‘ Geore 
. stores.” » Sales oxo nie 

of the se following A 
bull dine materials. ewim 
trical supplies, pe ning 
ers ond gerece ractors, Good ss 
ary > ween, 
profit _— 
Apply 


of 
lor posi- 


Due te sdvencement 
sales trainee te 
tion March I. we 


|; sary epogt 
person. Appiy Pe 
ment between 9 6. m. 


rsonn 


and salary desired. 
end 2 


ATRORAY? asOcIATION 
aes Ba -West Highway 
INSTALLERS 


Experienced sound and inter- 
com. men. Good working 
conditions with top firm. Ap- 
ply service manager. 


CESCO 


45) CALVERT AVE | 
ALEX., VA. OV. 3-2063 


Washington Post and 
Times Herald 
1515 . Street NW. 


MEAT 
CUTTERS 


N.W. SECTION 


We have openings for men | 
with or without experience in | 
meat cutting. Men with High 
School education and be- 
| tween 2) and 35 years of 
| age are preferred. 


Research Laboratories 


Pies on 
, a field 
physic - bota 
end junior evel. 


+— CUR Research ~~~ § 
So Sa 


men _ are eg 


the ree 


At Cook Research 
ine of, technica 

uate work 
by the oom 


ENGINEERS 


How Do You 
Stop A 
1,000 MPH 
Fighter? 


Sure, challenging is an 
everworked word But 
ean you think of a bet- 
ter one te describe the 
problem ef bomber de- 
fense in an era of 1000 
mph fighters, ground-to 
alr and air-to-air guided 


missiles? 
That's Spe [o- engin 
work lve at eral 
Tem the past three thes 
engineers have made im- 
reasive @ record. Bi Since the Yo abd- 
t @ depar 


for 4 
terri- 


lee trainti 
months: 


SALESMEN 


Established recogn. 


ined ; 
leader in ty ) eld of bust Renaire Freezer Foods 


Pven 
vited. 


pepet niments m- 


ast. Beet New Openings at 


MELPAR, INC. 


CREATED BY THE CONTINUED 
EXPANSION OF OUR ENGINEERING 
AND PRODUCTION DIVISIONS 


DESIGNER-DRAFTSMEN 
ENGINEERING AIDES 
MACHINISTS 
MACHINE SHOP INSPECTORS 


ELECTRO MECHANICAL 
INSPECTORS - 


SHEET METAL INSPECTORS 
SHEET METAL MEN 
PRODUCTION PLANNERS 
STOCK CLERKS 


TECHNICIANS, ELECTRONIC 


OPPORTUNITY FOR ADVANCEMENT 
ADDITIONAL COMPENSATION FOR 
EXTENDED WORK WEEK 
EXCELLENT EMPLOYEE BENEFITS 


is i age 
Gomacey P 
mi 


SALES TRAINEE 


~, 


JUNIOR 
EXECUTIVE 


AN EXCELLENT 
OPPORTUNITY 
The mee we are seeking must be 


capad of supervising peop'e 
o = i iete reining program pro- 
ed 


2 epenings for neat. tntelligent. 
ambitious a si perm. 4 


company 
| fits Cal Mr ‘s-2336 for persone) | 
| interview Must. be evallable im- 
| mediately 


products ve 
on all oreial ent 


tary aircraft. 


rasta 
ENGINEERS | 


Civil Bneimeers and WNaral Archi. 
— in structural 


Pee Ss oor" tlon teste thee. 


"5. © 


THE LABORATORY 
ACTIVITIES ARE 
WORLD-WIDE 
IN SCOPE 


| Rate of pay ranges between 
$68 and $84 per week, ac- 
cording to experience. 


ree Panerionsed. Fi Prefer- 
ony with masica: know ct; 
| Mr. Hil oa NN Kitts Musie “— ; 


Cake eee 


Call Mr. Weaver or 
Mr. Sloan 


LI. 6-0445 


Paid vacations, group insur- 
ance, credit union tacilities 
and other employee benefits. 


are ermaenent positions in 
| Devistos offers 
Mich led work in bom 
ries with ideal 
verking » edaditions. 


IMMEDIATS OPENINGS 


RADAR 
COMMUNICATIONS 


MICROWAVE 
TECHNIQUES 


INFORMATION 
THEORY 


CIRCUIT DESIGN 
PULSE TECHNIQUES 
SERVOS 
FIRE CONTROL 
WEAPON SYSTEMS 
SYSTEMS 


MATHEMATICAL 
ANALYSIS 


FOR NUMERICAL COMPUTATION 


THERMODYNAMICS 
AERODYNAMICS 


AIRCRAFT 
INSTRUMENTATION 


NUCLEAR! PHYSICS 
MECHANICAL DESIGN 
TEST ENGINEERS 


COMPONENT AND 
EVALUATION 


Theee 
Detroit Mo st be reeent college eraduate 
with stromhe leadership qualities. 
Must be willtne to re-locate 

Oive us your age. height. weight, ’ 
educational beckeround and work | 
Supystenes. if any. All replies will’ 
be held in strie’ confidence. 


WASH. P-TH. 


search 
Bletar divers 
eres 


SALESMEN| 


NCOME 


| $125-$300 week! Ys 
high | 


rates and con 


SEND RESUME TO 


Chrysler Corp. 


Missile Operations 


PERSONNEL DEPARTME 
PO. BOX 2628 
DETROIT 31, MICH 


APPLY 


SAFEWAY 
STORES INC. | 


EMPLOYMENT OFFICE 
1404 New York Ave. N.W., 
Suite 712, Bond Building 

8:30 to 3:30 except | commission 

Saturday, Sunday and holidays. 


HOTEL 
‘MAN WITH CAR 
OPERATOR — Baer - | liberal bonus. 
ence with heavy wee ont { 48 
a ~14 Tree ana T 


Phone eae references. 

MACH NIST age Trucks. “ais {8 ro ADVANCEMENT 
. for Waht aivory | 
“ep pay: pe el ‘. ‘Apply rn 


4 class, with minimum of | Shuren, Ve. ie 
years experience in op- MEN Excellent 
eration of lathe, drill presses, 

milling machines, etc., for 
shop of research firm in Alex- 
andria. Must be capable of 
doing job with little assistance 
or supervision. Excellent op- 
portunity for edvancement. 
Salary open, Call KI. 9-7500, 
ext. 106, for appointment. 


MAN—Exper. in 
r teod. Apply 


ies Jelica essen. 7 am pane" East. 


een SERVICE DEPARTMENT 


Married. ege 23-35. permanen 
position in service department o 
, established firm Daytime 


quired ‘gp b- references re: 
ern ag, Co. 4904 Wis- 
“RERVICE STATION | 
ATTENDANTS 


Boa M-167. 


ag 


- KITCHEN STEWARD” 


*. intelligent man 


e's i ccratt Products 
ent. 
xX T 
ent in 


re esevided” arme- a 


ooh ‘cs he a eae tac 


New the crowth of the depart- 
ment and the scope the engi- 
problems with which it 
ave created new open 
ineers ‘re | 


| drawing account, 


Experimental | 
and 


Theoretical 
Physicists 


‘Large Southern Com- 
pany offers an excep-| 
tional opportunity for 
professional advance-| 
ment in an atmos-| 
phere which encour- 
ages individual initia-| 
tive to men qualified 
‘in: 


vou can 
Kk the job descriptions 


SILK SCREEN 
PROCESS PRINTERS 


& of interest. of profes- 
of ron te 

of ex ally 
conditions "Teese 

fone deserve investi- 


Men with executive abil- | 
ity will be trained to be- 


~-y 
# A come branch and district 


- epenings - fer (2) | 
Be part “ee. 
u needed to work tn 


good 
yet “APB = person, 


Exp. print pee 
moders 4 
vacation m 
ne phone c 


eee OPENINGS 
FOR ENGINEERS 


Be 
;| managers. 
IN THESE FIELDS: 


SECURITY 


Raracter reference. For details, 


apply dil) 
tional a lide oP 4F 
ate. mw, hone Dt. 


7-4477 oF) 
_MEN—PART-TIME 


nes 


p,m. sharp on 


Systerns Analysis 
Data Conversion 
Instrumentation 
Field Test 
Flight Test 


Servo Systems 

Radar Systems 
Reliability 

Missile Systems 

Engine Controls 

Design of: 
Modification Equipment 
“Electronic Circuits 
Electronic Packaging 


* WASHINGTON 
INTERVIEWS 


Mon., Tues., Wed. . 
Feb. 27, 28, 29 
10 AM. to 2 PM. 
and 3 PM. to 8 PM. 
Call Mr. Charles E. Irwin 
at ME.“8-5932 
If appointment ts inconvenient 
at this time, write to: 
CHARLES E. IRWIN 
Products Dept. 


GENERAL 
ELECTRIC CO. 


+600 Mein / 
Johnson City, New York 


Large 50-year-old cor- 


ration offers career . a 
pe Technicians 


RCA 


INTERESTING OVERSEAS 
ASSIGNMENTS 
IN BAHAMA ISLANDS 


‘MACHINISTS 


: Infra-Red Research 
& Development 


positions te men who 
qualify. 


Due te rapid expansion 
and promotions within our 
corporation, we have open- 
ings for high calibre ex 
perienced salesmen whe 
have been earning $6590 
or more per year. Our men 
do not canvass or solicit. 
You will call only on cus- 
tomers who have asked 
for you in response to wide 
TV radio and newspaper 
advertising. We want men 
between the ages of 25 to 
45, with. no less than 3 
years selling experience. 

Applicants must have car 


GENERAL ALL AROUND 
Aerodynamic 
Stability 
& Analysis 


Experienced on Small 
Mechanisms 
| APPLY IN PERSON 
MACHINE PARTS 8 AM. TO 4 PM. 


MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 


TECHNICIANS 
Trenf. ving kaupments 
RADAR 
COMMUNICATIONS 
TELEPHONE CARRIER 
AND CENTRAL OFFICE 


Salary, bonus, food and lodg- 


Analysis of 
Weapons 
Effectiveness 


We are tn a position to train. under 
r men 


INSPECTOR ° 


Capable of using machine! 30, Slee, representatives, Gur me 
shop measuring instruments | hiy, bonuses. | Transportation 
for inspection of first piece carries es alt are ree co. bene S at 
experimental and production to inger Sewing Center, 
quantity parts. 


CONTACT 
MR. D. M. HALLIDAY 
IN WASHINGTON 
2-26 TO 2-28 AT 


EX. 3-5034 


MR, DM HALLIDAY 
COOK -RESEARCH 
LABORATORIES 


oe mii, A 


1311 SOUTH FERN STREET 
(OFF JEFF. DAVIS HWY.) 
ARLINGTON, VIRGINIA 


Theoretical 
Physics 
Physical 

Chemistry 


For Professional 
Interview, Send 
Resume to: 


VERNON WELSH 


APPLY IN PERSON 
8 AM. 


TO 4 P.M. 3000 ARLINGTON BLVD. 
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 


Rossi oF JOB? 
Apply to Mr. Rice, FALLS CHURCH, VA. 


501 Rhode Island Ave. ne. ‘Te ie~ Wah Tas COOK ELECTRIC | “te eat 
9 A.M. toS P. M., Daily | geneity. Ost sth COMPANY | | 
Or Call AD. 2-6838 mmenliaey Mino ) : 


i doesn | a ph opps 


Melpar, Inc. 


BRM BT» 
ope RURGTON By. 
i's ADS Ton Sos 


WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
4 Tuesday, February 28, 1956 
Zeon HELP, WOMEN 16 
412,000° 
Sunday 


ACCOUNTING CLERKS 
Circulation 


HIGH pues GRADUATE 


means quicker sales results 
for Washington Post end 
Times Herald classified ad- 
’ vertisers. To place your ad 
for Sunday 


ie 


P . 
a TLE HAR oh bein 
We ave mee ing ° 


secys., stenos. in paid. ‘ 
typist. beginners. Tee < : 
an acsts oprs 
an sen. ofc. ¢€ ws 
trainees for HS eee. 
cure » eadre ra 
infor. ciks. and various « 
tiene too n ; 
Coe Lk whe as, roy fe werk 


ny 4 


Phone 
REpublic 7-1234 


HELP, MEN 15) 
F 
Jr. tor C.P.A. to $3. 300 ACCT. | Cc 


NATIONAL LEEDS NEEDS” 
Employment Service | 


bss cuaKAgrE. &¢ 
epremaees’: o as Agency 


ations! co, to om oof te | bx 


oo pecker, exper 6.000 id 
sic $e f vr. 


Gitice ag te “Reid. PE co) ees 
-$350 


Acct. $300 | 


.. B- 
lation« asst 


EGINN 


Prices AND BANK TRAIN 


“LEEDS EMPL. SER\ 


930 F ST Nw 


AUMINISTRATIVE | CLERK = 
work in Dusiness office of national | 


nec 


ainees. many 


inee ‘Wood a car 


fice supp 


OF Hes. Syutoment comm, (3nd $9 


Advertinine promotion men, alates 
ne. Dd —- . 
hans clk -ime. . #300. 
Auditors Ls aerem “ 
er (any ae 
ntent Jr.. for CPA 
r. Accoun‘ins re = 
(jadoratory exper ’ 


working condi- 
tions. @00d salary interesting and/ 
yaried work. Call RE. 77-3553, Ext 


ADVERTISING | 
RESEARCH 


- 10 Market 


Mei ¢ irainee. vouns 


Adjustors. car. Research Depa 
106 16th St. 


= | ‘NW. ati Ex 3- weekly news magazine 


WORLD WIDE i 
PERSONNEL BUREAU | Preferable. “Biping requires 


iM1 6 Sh. NW Co! orado Bids ) 


~ |Call Di. 7- a Ext. 26] 
EXT. 261 


to 4 —SETWEE N_? AND_2 P M 
art time or full time man ‘e 
Considered Write Box M-! .. 


IGNER | 


anaivee and) 
t 


* ASSISTANT a 


AIRLINES 
AIR “postions 
our classi “4 
sruct ions ave a 
Reg oc oy ah 
| Pleasant workis ait : 
| Me so 4 ae ne | 
USEK 
EMPL. XCHANGE 
te 840) 
Be 
- 5 
$35 | 


B 


—— gn; 
ainin 


© design. 


wip 
mig 


WANTED (WHITE) 
. es r $100 


weealy. 


wh " 
ecei vine clerk. by white 


Bus 

Baia girls 

Counter pre. , white 
ith 


WHITE AND COLO 
Mechanic 
w Dr 


ver 
(+e 


ark IDS Lou gant 


RED 
+ 
open 
awe t@ 840) 
neon 
Nw | 
_ HO. 32-5512 
Gmi—® rperienced. eve-| 
° mm per 
misher Hofbers’s, 7822 
Porter 


‘ 
—_ Belers ave.) 
hare EMPL rt aS 100 BEAUTICIANS—Tp 


260 MEN WITH CARS anit. Spr: ngs 


$10-8: S per evening while ‘reeaee | ” BEAUTY 
OPERATORS 


ED 
S/LANGLEY PARK STORE 
Excellent opportunity 
for top earnings. 
5-Day—-40-Hour Week 


DISCOUNT ON PURCHASES 
CALL- MISS PAULINE rh 


Lansburgh 
BEAUTY SALON | 


3 Langley Park, Maryland’ 
ay NA. 8-9800 


Nursery teacher. wh ® .« 

Practical nurse, white | 
hirt press opr 
resser. {13 oth apparel 


St 
HO. 2-1572 


a Ke endant 
biel, Cok 
us Boy 8 wand Dishwasher 


F gna Crater 


nY 
ber's Helpe nme work 


re for ve. 


ee, over it 


COLORE 
SALESPEOPLE WANTED 


a 
. Apply, in b berson 
Room. 10 
11th we 


rasslpa nie CLERKS 865 


ABBEY First | a 


st. - 
as 
ee wit? figures, 


$260. 
- oD 
ie ches 
with . gures 
or 


at = BOOK INDEXER $150 WK. 
Experienced historica! 
fTOYDS EMPL. SERV. 
1420 N. ¥. Ave. NW. ST. 3-207 
PER— Th trial lance. 


fur nit 


whet 


. 
850 


D Pale 


; por 
| in 


CLERK-TYPIST 


cae | maT a ty e| 
ora. * 
HOTEL STATLER 


*“heply per- 
16TH & K 


38 


CLERK.-TYPIsSTs—Under fo 
_rw 


sitions. Will 
to 4: 


em- 
joe. 3rA 
R- 


porscrisSAaiag 


ESTA 57 


rh _ 
ce _ ae 


B. F. SAUL CO 


Parttime, Aigranting pifier 
Part time Aepancrs office. $1.35 
, Pech CL -3 specie 
ERK. TYPIST 
Aas 18-25: : 
aS?) Ulu e col ; 
“up depending on exper 
tunity ior oh 
per 


CLERK-TYPIST 


ng 18 te. 35. — Vay oe be able 
ork 7:15 


m 
one “week 


“and .T . m. to ste . 
the following week 
nefits after 3 months emples-| 


APPLY PERSONNEL OFFICE 


MAYFLOWER HOTEL 
Gen Cet Ht Prse 


m. Proof read 


a 
cial. | 


Mert bite wae’ ae i = 


ooo 


CASHIER-TYPIST 


Knowledse of simole beck beeping | 
and seneral office routine — 
pret “aay week work in 


istone PSR 


Sa ONS. INC. 2k ions 


1334 Mase Aye WW, at Thomas Cir 
CERK-TYPIST 

meee ésversis fied v7 nae | 

comaitions with | 

of 10 Ase 25-40 

63388. Mr Gibbs sie 

fashington T - 


S| ux: 


| Sots iment | 
SECRETARIES 
STENOGRAPHERS 
wLERKS 
SEct a: ie : 


lative 
legal. -— enD... 


. 35 wom 
Rita Ty $60 
= INNER shos. mature 
$00- oe? 
STENOS. ture 
STS. meny , o- $60, 
. bee feures 
responsidie 


ale 
ict 
By 


MAIL, 


| end 


233 
08 3 ST. 
“ad Be PYPISTS. Tak. Px. 


De mach trainee — 


— fringe Ate days 
must trpe. 

as | fron iters) 70 wk NATIONAL 
_ $25-635| EMPLY VICE. 1108 16 8 
o| NW 

EEPER 85 
clerk-typist. $60 
Y. 131) 


oe typist. 
ACCOUNTING bt 5 ok rh trpat. Bey) GRACE 
Fa. wy ~ AINEE —— $250 


Some i Min. req 
General wg 1307 H ua. 


BOOKK 


with at trective —s 


mod ee =] Branch Store Clerk 


x _ sale 
mod 
gintened of eg.  ONTTED BS eekvi 
ckeepers., We have « 


1625 Eye 
, = yy A . 
rs, Dkpr mach. oprs 25 new | one of our as 
openings daily nokn's > ‘r | | miner sewing vpepaize ie desired. 
ais is 
A L | Fasten, Sect ites iasurease. "hp 
tion a 
MANY TO $3900 o Dy in person 
ei ‘ 
 aeart $3300 | ELITE LAUNDRY 


$3400 2119 14th St. NW. 


. Ape 
aah 


rons at « ~ eer ae nee. Bren! 
erred, © = 
id vacation, profit ace ' wal 
com bene 
Hechin er Co. 


pa 
many other 
ply Mrs Dead 


CASHIERS 


: 
| Experienced 
iping room 


women 


youne 
ork, 004 ster’ ins 


ADMIN. ae $350 | “HOTEL STATLER 


i6th & K Sts. NW, 


CLERK 


25! General office (white); 
: pecurare "Et cures: 
| Jos. LA. 6 


must 
some typ- 


9990 CLERK — Typist, recept 
837 | Pe Fre ie 
ages. Weicome 
CLERK 
(Newspaper) 


tien 


promotion de. 


* tra 
Mplots cai _fntown & 


clerit. 18-30 


rtment. 


The Wechbauiel Post 
and Times Herald 
1515 L STREET, N.W. 


at L. EX. 23-7279. 
| Por saatte tetephene eS 


"for | COOKS. « 


-Rocky 


fallen a 
fie . credit on Me 


Campion Operator 


—_ ee. 


virginia Ave 
aa ‘tor 


short order 
sh yomers 


ED AND wi ) 
| METROPOLITAN | 
EMPLOYMENT AGENCY. . 


EN Yate. eX TYPISTAE 
Ti 


I IRLS 

Por lsaundry and 4 _wietains 

stores: ee positio RS 
ote yo r~ t 


aon = pene ‘Apply Gu yy es 


ite for sesressive 
cmeed = wearing | 
- — f 


"ete sek" 


dao" 
| Pe a ah — Sve. wie ta 


DICTAPHONE 
we PANSCRIBERS 
experience tn a iets phone or or 


r traneeriptte 


= his MENT MGR 3 able 


ye ra | 


ernment 
Insu rance Company 
“4 


L PTR. 


ind reliawle fady. theedy job. good 
y "Central eprhing, be 


saath te letter 


shorthand i oon erent: at 


&.. 
ng + 


eee 


aay 2 
Must aS ax 


eer cu 


mail, of 
‘Bien. 


CLERK 


(LIGHT TYPING) 


Under 35 Por 
rome” of — 


A pvt, reuiation | £ 


ee: 
reception #0 or 


mo cf? 1 $265 
sassist controller. 


2 toe 


ae '|Call DI. 7-2900, Ext. 261 
BETWEEN 9 AND 5 P. M. 


% : © $6000 
: CLERK 
Beton 


Washington Post and 
Times Herald 
1515 L STREET, N.W. 


worker. Vaca > pe ve 


Mit orvens 
Annette D. Tatelman 
> Wee Westone ag yO # 


>. 


el 
et Ba tet, SOUP 


The Washington Post 
and Times Herald 
1515 L STREET, N.W. 


Key Punch Operators 


HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES 
fe 


HELP, WOMEN 


‘pase est 


“Sed att oe 


FULL OR PART TIME 


7th, 8th and Market Soace NW. 


NURSES. ating room eeceoirel su 


ef i Gli DI. 7-2900, Ext oe 


@ MELPAR, INC. 


Se ee 2 


Barc hare | 
Seek eats israel 


HELP, WOMEN’ 


| PRESSER. 
fe ae as” pull hy port-time 
rork 7 preg rgd iy 
POWER CLEANERS 


Corner Broad & Washington Sts. 
Falis Church, Va. 


16 


RECEPTIONIST 


FOR PERSONNEL OFFICE 


wie me ethics _oEnerig 


attractive youn 


ce in 
m. 


SECRETARIES 
5-DAY, 35-HR. WEEK 
ment A 
PEOPLES LIFE INS. CO. 
RM. 706, 1343 H ST. NW, 


ST ENOGRAPHER 


h 
but 


BANK OF COMMERCE 
Conn. at K NW.—Rm. 200. 


ist, * 
ts 3 WI frolne a it 
Civcok poly "Pina " Department is of ee hey 
Washington Post. ‘and 
Times Herald gb noi ee  ageg 
! ) 
ISS SYRRET. HW, un and ot oe 
Please Apviy L & 


must be lst cl.. good 
rs Ave Dupont 
arber op HU 


Dental a ent 
bkkpr 


NICURTST. 
salary. 108 h 
Piasa Hotel 


Res. prac 
’ 


wt J, HON,” £ 


RVic gE. 1108 16th 8 aw 


~ a F 


Pat 


nowil- 


Dar. hos itallzation Apolr 


Sewing Centre "40s6 28th 


ata 


salary & 
Saleswomen 


vx. 


openings for top- Richt sales\adies; 
adresses. coats . = sports-| 
weer u roushiy exp.: 
excellent salary and aa 
Appiy im perso 10 

p.m feager’e i630 Chiesvilie 7. 
Silver Spri “a1 

SALE LADY 


steady pesiiion: 


DISCOUNT PRIVILEGES 


Exover.: 


| mana al Or cchen Ce aed Ae 344' 

"Br £ : fe) | 

SALESWOMEN | 
KANN’‘S | Ladies’ Ready-to-Wear 


In i's cn wR the 7 a 


ne enced . 
oman s)0n errangem 


Apply 
Personnel Office 
Fourth Floor 


Many 


tor 
- ev 


i manent 
in ed iortal I division ust 

ave initiative. an- 
dling confidential. matter and some 
corre ee) 
skills and secceurate typin 
= ot HI enous Rw a 


Age 21 
ition 


OFFICE 
ASSISTANT 


Por weekly news 

dicta mene 

experie nec 

consis s of vara off 

one transcription dino 
spe of 50 


wom 
eond!tions 
benefits 


7 
~ ee for 
some ur week 


magazine, al ions 
ates | [era eye " stem: 


J 
._4 

te Geoasrs phie Bociety_ 16th 
ss nw 


“all DI SECRETARY 
CLERK-TYPISTS 


Positions available in an ex- 
| panding research organization. 
| Opportunity for advancement. 


ETWEEN 9 AND 5 P. M. 


a a ee ee 


PAYROLL | 
CLERK 


Previous Convenient suburban 
location. 
Permanent 
of this 


ferred. 


experience in 
payroll department re- 
quired. Permanent posi- 
tion offering opportunity 
for advancement. Exce!l- 
lent employe benefits: 
convenient suburban loca- 
tion. 


resident 
sree pre- 


APPLY 
trad f Te 
00 M 


MELPAR, INC. 


WESTINGHOUSE Ait_Brake Co. 


JP EL A 


4 iy PRIDAY 


| 
| 


APPLY IN PERSON 
SA M twé4?P 
MONDAY THRU FRIDAT 


3000 Ari, aatee e we 
Felis Chure 


3000 ARLINGTON BLVD. 
PALLS CHURCH. VA. 


Pers 


(Tak 


Arnold 2-V bus from 11th) 
ats. ow. te plant entrance.) 1 


PBX TYPIST 


ormenens 
1 tw 28. 
ocal 


sonable 
Persscabie ) 
Srmcinal | 


poe’ ion. young 

schoo! graduate. for | 
tee ot Nation 
asent working con ‘ttons. 
vencement. Uni- 


Sirtlacd of Baleige poe Bom 


orp 
stitution Bw. PS5%5° ates 


SECRETARY 


Position open for se 


ie hoodanere 
on 


Personnel Clerk 
NEWSPAPER 


avellabie te newspaper 
or Yi pias and 
and | 


Emplov 

—— 3 aie an interesting | 

fob or © who \ikes to dea 
th college 


wi ee | 
referred 1 Dept 
tween 9 « 


salary cOm- 
meneurate with soility n 


experience a) 

pan benefits which 

! ud penis = plan. Excel- 
con i s 


pz hh Perse some 


tt 


“apply Personne 
o2 DD. m. 


The Washington Post 
and Times Herald 
1515 L STREET, N.W. 


‘ 
Gar : $50 "ars. eo. POTOMAC 


PBX.TYPIST 


5 netige “83 waenten. 2 7m "Bg 


a8 ae a 16th 
2334 4 div rac 


son blvd. 5 
MPL 334) | Bh 


nt Assistant to 


) ee with firm in 
Pace a typi 
quired uate pr 
da A 26-hour wee eS 


~ SECRETARY 


lady. 20-35 for tnterestin 
ent section o 


ere 

Alexan- 
rT@- 
x 


Youngs 

position = develop 
me f esearch firm in exan- 

dria. osition involves substantial 

Olume of recruitment correspond- 


sensu 416 Tana 
M sts. a 


r © _ 
lax. PER’ ane 


NNEL 
INTERVIEWER 


In, middie an for company 
office. in 


at least 1 tear. rote college 5 us 
per ee pas 
ing clerical po. AM pews Ahan 
} u experience 
position tn 
~day 

weee. 6 


GOVERNMENT EMPLY, 
INSURANCE CO. 


14th d Sts. 
Please ty a 4 m 


ood starting ry. 
for meen 


aay week, company benefits 


WORLD WIDE 
PERSONNEL BUREAU 


i341 O ST. NW 
' Buite 


NW 
to 3 vm. 


ADVERTISING 
SALES-TRAINEE 


Career-Minded Young Women 
ARE YOU 


interested in learning the fundamentals 
of advertising and merchandising?’ The 
Washington Post and Times Herald has 
a planned training program in its Classi- 
fied telephone room for women interested 
in a diversified sales field. Permanent 
positions with 5 tr gy for 
advancement | many employee bene 
Typing helpful. 


APPLY PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 
9 AM. to 2 P.M. 


The Washington Post and Times Herald 
1515 L Street N.W. 


5 
be ed 


eecast RY—Stenographer. 


acl 
"leamns 


is 
SA Y 5 

cond Pu calls seeneth 
ete chan i We have seterall - 


eelary and & 


eu et M 
tional @ 


_1420 BS. ¥. ave. nw. ST. 3-2207 


SECRETAR 
ctetasog 5 


s 
Assistant te shoe forem 
ence 


_ STENOGRAPHERS 
TYPYIST 
STATISTICAL CLERK 
Call or visit Personnel Office 
NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSN. 
1201 16th St. NW. 


ae 


ee typing. gene 
ween 8:40 and 4. 


fee 4 dutie 
t 


under 
pn. ae posites. 


st we 


aeW—_—— 


We have man spoutnes at all 
Ment | leva “8 var fie 


expert assistance in 
that better job. 


COLUMBIA 


securing 


awe TS. Suite 


\ interest and ec al- 
opports y - 
volves responsibility aed concen- 
Biiots ‘Are re sation ‘Yes pete pe eat. _ 
M4 TE 


@ newspaper 
NY STENOGRAPHER Tor 


i BSUS or Teh 


STENOS i TYris - 
Gay| enced. who can con’ 7 tae 


e cA days rt wee “a or temporary full 


OS  STENOS 


Os STEN 
>. Metations | s* 
ig ai th cathy ih ; 
’ NS deme 
our oo day week Cail 


| 
oes STENOGRAPHER 
INQUIRE ST. 53664" | 5.DAY, 35-HR. WEEK 


Wright ‘at 
na 6 


tarting 
Cie 


| bes evious experience in Ray + 
or te ba 

rmanent poaen xin res 

| Sheree Secsiitat sepertonite position 

savenennent hy 


PEOPLES LIFE INS. CO. 
Rm, 706, 1343 H St. NW. 


editorial yy ° 
sine ood Ce 


5 Fae BPE e 


"hese ane 
oo on peey be ae 


BEATE ar vr 
. wring 
You lady (white) te Lc. 


NEW_IN ye EMPL cERV. monitor Aches = vp board 


LLOYD'S EM ire ” tee 


TELEPHONE 
SOLICITORS ~ 


~ cy F Experienced or inexperienced 
A irst 
see or. 3.34 LIVING IN MD. 
+g thes Work from Home. Good Salary 
3909 up Unlimited Private Phone 
Necessary 


Derson. cap- 
ry, Ree Xe 
whos & ata. 


me regardless 


a * 
’ 


a hols 


6 
yre 


ame 


nw. @l- paler to 4 
5 ders, com 


ae ot . 


10 AM, TO 1 P.M. Only 
4-0800 


f 
pist. Inew 
¥. v.. bearr 


nee he 


VER SPRING- 1G-Rocky 
. 


TELEPHONE 
SOLICITORS 


Experienced or inexperienced 
LIVING IN VA. 


Work from Home. Good 
Salary. Unlimited Private 
Phone Necessary. 


CALL MR. RENE 


10 TO 12 
JA. 2-8355 


it 16 


man. expert- 


noon. von thru Pri. 


Ps RT Bisa ng is 
xperienced 


7 «ave 


or 


GIRLS-YOUNG WOMEN 


February Job Quotas 
Are Unfilled In 
Several Desirable 

Telephone Company 

Positions 


You May Qualify 


Don’t Delay Your Visit 
To Our 
Employment Office 


725 13th St. N.W. 
The 
Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. 


White, t 


tunit 


dag sesiguenente’ aveliaby. te 
ve. gloves * faleteria” Mucole 


—For pocmanent t 
established pany; 5- 
| y ospitali- 
vacation 


e Call Mr Gerdnte. 


TYPIST 


Young ledy (white) 
typist, goyuives by was 
pd ition; 


ears © 


f 


=e firm 
week. 


TYPIST 
Oomertynity . oor young woma 
ested in eer wi 
ineurance company 5- Len 37° ee | 


king - 
colae, Hart- - 


ford") foment 124 i, Raestice 


oman in- 


rcs =. — Rec 


74 


lege | | 
— os agg 
offic 


sition. advan 


a nrestes experience Cay T SERVICE 
oly 1341 ae 224. ME. 8-3629) 
—e PLACED 


18 to 30, white, high school 


CALL MR. WILLIAMS | ing, 5-day week. 
| Shelton. 
‘Chas. G. Stott & Co. 


CLERICAL POSITIONS 
30 OPENINGS 


Each month for the next several months 
In Both Typing and Non-Typing 
BECAUSE 


We are occupying 75,000 additional square feet of office 
space. 


HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES 
AGE 17-23 


Interesting work in pleasant surroundings for both beginners 
and experienced girls. Opportunity and permanency in a pro- 
gressive, growing company. 


REGULAR HOURS 
FRIENDLY ASSOCIATES 
CONVENIENT LOCATION 


5-DAY WEEK 
8 to 4:30 


PAID VACATIONS 
PAID SICK LEAVE 


We employ the kind of people you'll tke to work with. Come 


in to see us. ay 


Government Employees 
_ Insurance Company 


14th AND L STS. N.W. 
(NOT A GOVERNMENT AGENCY) 


PLEASE APPLY 8 A.M. TO 3 P.M. 
Aa L Street Entrance 


essential to the American way of life. Start in 
' eagitee NNT ANE. 8. OSPREY 


:| Call NA. 4-9900, Ext. 286 
For Appointment 


~ 


AD. epnlore cement one eran 7- rate 


AITR (2) white. exper. day 
work, no @.&, apply in person 
Francis y 7 Coffee Ship. 


be | 0 ete white. 


6 days 
I we” 


. m. $25 plus tips. W 


WA ATTRESS...White: closed Bunday:, 
2aperienced. 812 13th St. NW. 


WAITRESSES | 
fal” Howard Jo Rod rene. ee & 


wntow ohasen t 13th end | 
"Sis Ny léca! workin cond) - 
tions. excellent earnings 


vous APPAREL F PRESS 


for Gary, Ind. $35 wk . 


| axine Pi PRESS OPRS 
MAIDS. live in or out 


NATIONAL eMPLY. ‘SERVICE 


WwomMaANn— my “6. w 
a he has baste 


Apoly in 

| Ee A. r Sewing Center. 3421 
eg time for interesting 
eye ap, WOE sa 9 w 12 
tes sy ame me : be per- 
peop fos 

Apovlr Wedne 


10 


WOMEN, syinree--emens solie- 
knoe from your home. Nationalis 
oe product 


between 10 a. m.- 


UMEN A a pena A Ser telephone 
906 


A full o 
ve| Chie ies ‘rent’ Pails 
to 40. interested 


urch 

OMEN—20 
yt mm feld. No expr. required | 

@ Will train you. Good salary -— 
meals eg Apple. to 

r Geo . 
teria. 300% ,1 gate. 


: st. nw. 9 
through. ‘seturdas 


YOUNG LADY 


sw“. 


in 


/nent position, immediate open-. 


Apply Mrs. 


1310 on” PS AVE. Nw. 
8-418) 


POUNDS 
FRANCS 


No Matter How YOU Say it 
our 


WAITRESSES 


AND 


CARHOPS 
MAKE MONEY! 
DON’T BE SATISFIED 


WITH LESS THAN 
$50—$60 A WEEK 


Positions open for 
5 or 6-day week 


at many convenient locations. 


7 
- 


ALOT a 
“anes: 
AND GEN D. C. AREA 
et any cuvarves 


HOT SHOPPE 


or Employment Office 
1341 G St..N.W. 


m aaa 


"wo 
upward 
$%. eure. White + ii 


A. MAN'S WORLD, sé 
AND LET IT GO AT 
THAT 


guperienced ‘ 


Baie 


| for 
in 


: Aoely in | re 


membershi io 
ot not 
cellent werkine 6 


eet 


ie 1 
wats 
F ee tIm ee 
solicitation for a Rational Lar ‘ ’ 


concern ails M 
Papcaarore3e “Tid afer SP — 


COLORED 


S&S REPR ATT 
Seton a ANAG 
s fastest- 
organization. Oreates 
git ee ee ey Aa 


 Oppartun 
t 


&U- 


c 1 tatn se ny. 


me te woman, 
7 mail areca. home nr 
bet and Laurel. Live in 


~— Janitor. u 
ee for sGest house: 
a a 


peror h 
oman cooking - FF 
driving and De 
d saiarr. 


adults 
pit Call JA. 17-0464 


td plus sslary,. 
, are. te = ne ae 


. Local references. 30 


Fw. al San 


ectory . 
Ov ook 
ive out, Pagy ( week 


cS 
,- +4 board an and smalls 


serv cane ho: ineneid 
a hy 


“? 


ah Hs cr “alana El. 3 


all Corl. 


omft'ble : 
77% 
dha 
ed 
pRA “AVE SC. 2h p 
. im he 
¥ 7 he 55. 
: * urn =+Tm. x 
ome Gentieman, § 
AVE & ae NG 
v 


emi 
3 ™ 
shower Drivate home. gen lone 


A 
at 
TR as 


. 
CA 


Lae. frit 


ve Bsing. | kia 


NN. e 
, M. commboniesiins 


women e mak- 


ry or ee bh 


30 sts 


- our A... 
leading 


te roa 
ure - 
ive-fis ma. 


come o 
hold. tyme prospec ane 


Ps aban sive sae-week 


oT, se 


" UNUSUAL WOMAN 
Rela "Sto | 
ee Pane 


7 


in uncrowded 
or can- 
; oul- 


me 


| @d), 


3 “nied front at neie 


=a. i GRORGIA Ave RW. 4010—Nen 
? . win Vv sal 
ty fay 3. bik from st. car, 2 Dri bath: 3 or 4 empl. edults pref. 
Biwo BLAH K 14 QPORGIA and New y Nampshire ave 
eer et th work “i ee pe inéla. rttis. “AUER | 
7 n & CO. ytils, TU. 


Rw. " a eee 
bedrm.. Kit 


ae wit! Gat rt ent. washer. | 
_ epie.; 875. UN. 4-1574. 

“IRVING * NW. 1369—}-rm. offic. 

re ow \ aaa, Peseta 


P SE ~ 1005—Apply apt 
< nicely furn 
a 


1440 Rhede Isiand nw. 
dbie. fms.: running ween 


HORNE 4 Ste 
fg ds G ST. ae. 


Newly decora' od, mod? rately 
a Phe dbie. rms.i 
one. elevator. 


—Nice?! ely furn i 
ME. &-3187 
1833 -1 bdrm. 


. ear 

x. P 098s 

) 181 ay irm.. 
467.50, sil 


mo 


Meads < 


: : al 
util Bust eH 

; | MechRTRUR Rr r Army 

—2-d 2-449... 


: . near 
- OL ~ 
iii omb. | 


) and Columbia re 
me 


+ kiich. an rm. ath 75 io ? 
e kit . $7! 
va AVE. 
nee ¥ a ty? in 


: ™ d “eee” 
ne bath eit § ho 
Cony. trans. -4080 p.m 
ans 


effic 
NW... Sie — Alirac: | 
CoOL. Pairmont St ao 1129. Cony eg @. home, conv 


trang rea home pr vis AD. 4: 706 
ya 7 
m _ men. Tu. S639. bath, 


t Le it 
—Hot "De, S182 cold eony. tra: 
any me. DR. 2-612. Base mR MI 


a: aoe Bg —" fms. 


rms 


: 
express bus, 
LD! 


rans. fe a Nok pw CAROLINE AVE... 
— 7a urn 
: . f bath Home privis. 


win bets. | 


Ls 


porch: sir) 


ROOMS UNFURNISHED 


ge er TH STS. — 
bedrm : all privis a 
ae. Can ‘A, ame or call up 
and ait 


ab cincce. 16th et. EY, On- 
_~ Manager at i's23 
=: living. 
middle-aged 


ati 


y $110 mo 


S| a APTS., UNFURNISHED 


ge 2 eau >. | 
all wi 
Mrs ‘Hodes. 


i 
with care if nec he tee) 


ace 
owls decor. studie rm.. hot) 
3-4709. 


us. See 
24 
| — 
r asit—Lee. ae -bedrm. 
decer : 


t.. elec, refrig. Trans 
; 8.2521 or TA. 9-8269. 
© downtown. | te hey* aw. 5625- —meest ium 
t. on 
13- Lge RA? 
7 ras 


sinall rooms 
No objection nud 


=e j 


Rms. and ie a) 
ae Briel fet 


sep 


See 


ae nicely 
LU 


a0. 220° ON MT. VERNON BLVD. | 
®,|| SCHOOL ON PREMISES | 


Te FLOATING CHURCH 


THE MARINERS CHURCH in Liverpool, England 
WHICH HELD ay. SERVICES FOR 46 YEARS 


1626-1872 


© 1990. King Pew em Wade bx Yeu @& 


woe 
(Pe ir 
1 UM Madle \ 


2 


SHIP 


— | 


of Rome 
CHANGED 
HIS SHOES 

3 TIMES 
EACH DAY 


te 


‘Gave ehicur 
GAVE HER Lire 
NEW YORK 
HER HUSBAND 
MISSOURI 
A HOME AND 
& CHILDREN 


36| APTS.. UNFURNISHED 36 
HOPE HILLS 


BELLE VIEW RTS a 


ALEXA! 


a at ” 


Complete Shopping Center 
1 mile sou Alex. 20 min. from 
gountous is C. Pentagon, main Sui . soneres 
: ‘ ivotr. 
wave as as = am | street Lsterege specs venti- 
lation, amp < +4 con?, trans-| 
| Dertation. shop ing facilities | 


| Modern 3-dedrm sot sul ble for: 
adults and chil ates over 1 


2900 oovee sv. =. APT. 1 


Resort atmosphere tn counsty Bw 


t including above features ip 


1-BEDROOM APT. . $85 


2-BEDRM. APT. $95-$99 


WEST HYATTSVILLE 
apt. Avell- 


KImMK WOOD, 
"Kedecosatna. 


6| APTS. ——n"w—wt.. a 


Be cman atl es 


6 


2-Bedrms., from $80.00 


Large rooms 


pull 

' waging a 
D Pet 
BET , 


OR 
MONTH WITH 
Secretarial service. 


rage 
Eite’ 


r 
, a Riker he 


closet: $79.5 
Mrs. Meister, Res. Mer 


SH IPLEY PARK 
1-Bedrm.. from $68 50 


‘UTILITIES INCLUDED: 
pastel decor picture) 
closets. storage 
s — ae om ” 


BS tiles = Erenieg 
_ IO 2 aoe staat 
AIR-CONDITIONED 


CARITESR HOUSE | 


500 WISCONSIN AVE. NW. 
EFFICIENCY APARTMENTS. | 


letely fire 


ing “beautifully decorated 


= LINEN AND MAI 

sundeck over- 
woking entire city ee. mas 
sev aion antenna svete <a- 


r te m 
faciit tties’ 12 minutes from 
House 


Your Intpection invited 


CALL EM. 2-8800 


Air- Conditioned Apartmer 


1930 COLUMBIA ROAD NW 


apt.. $1239.50 
Res Mar co 5-4377 


Park Ellison 


i700 HARVARD ST NW 


$145 
dressing 


AD. 4-3636 


GELMAN COMPANY | 


i. 


witha 


“BEST RENTAL IN SE. 


'2-BEDRM. APT. —$81.50, 


1-BEDRM. APT.—$66 


aNEWLY OECORATED, 
| Piha MeEpraTeS tht, 

' as 

ARLINGTON | 
TOWERS 


Shine An a indes i 


$69 50 


$242 4th St. 8. B. 


| 639 tI: pny 


1100 INVESTMENT BLDO 
BT 33-6574 
IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY | 
SXPRese BUS SERVICE 
: m. apts 
Nay 
utils 


egos 
aa in oa" 


CHESAPEAKE TERRACE 


- 9776 


and up 


Weekdays 9-8. Sat. 


transportation nea 


PPLY eeerc . MAR AGER 

p Apt 202. 35 S Bi. NE. 
OR PHO we ‘ii 

ERRILL CONNER, 4 


Bia 


CONDITION 


Arent 


ser. 
| ice 


Ne 


OFFIC 
=e 


Weekdars 9-8. Sat.. 


313 N. Glebe Rd. Arlington | 


THE , WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Tuesday, February 28, 1956 41 


LGE. | and 2 BEDRMS. 
se  eta 
Res. Mor., Mr. 
JE. 3- oan 


_ BTCETTOWERS 
pe es RR 


a RIF oy 7-9080_ 


* it Hoge cone 


ide. | Circulation 


means quicker sales results 
for Washington Post and 
Times Herald classified ad- 
vertisers. To place your ad 


+" ‘de lume 
wi 


Phone 
REpublic 7-1234 
Da 

ma. "working ok 


ie he ft ti rent. Cc Piao rath, ee & 


hy Ap ‘and 4-Bedrm. Flats) Si Sithitin Mk hy ve 


ere Pgs EM A008. a 


es ates. Hy rm | 
COLORED—1627 1 rae ats 

| COL Duplex: are ‘ie st. = > 

mee 

silos ave. t& 

cinch Lette |e n or LL 6-2915. | 
COL 3 

A CAFRITZ DEVELOPMENT 


i oe ma 
gO Rig ha a 
. Be ro ee inel. a | 
OL: OL.—2 rms... kit., ehil, 4018 | 
NOTHING FINER 
GREENWAY 
DE LUXE 
1-BEDRM. APTS. FROM 


2 BEDRM. APTS. FROM 
IN NORTHWEST AND 


Rentals trom $52 50 to to $75 
Call Mr. Knight. RE. 17-6650 


. 69827 after r . m. 
COLONIAL INVESTMENT CO. 
2 


fated . Cal — 
Bon: LORED ie 


st. 
rely a wt S mai 14d 


ee to responsible 
00 _ Completely redece- 
ns 


OPEN MON THROUGH 


5 A abl cn 
of 6 rT san 


3539 S 


r | 215781 
Suchen Benen | | pee: heat, 949.90, "MES 


~| CLAREMONT 


Gelma rcTowers 2733 S. Walter Reed Dr., Ari. 


rms. kit and bath. ~ eo 
Key decorated 


Hi Sob 
Re Sec TION —eearaom cot 


ws aw, é he 


a ¢ fa bore 


i . ‘t eal 


(Off King St. JA. 2-5003 


Best Value 


2 B.R. APTS. 
$89.50 . 


9-5. 


y semogs ‘Sr 
ol odern: tor fe 

4 re. | 1004 Vermont 
weekaars: ey to 6 6) 


| rn 37 ne, pees 
r Bate .-¢ 
; 


Sun 11-5) 


Buckingham F 


AVAILABLE 
1 Bedrm. Apts. 
$75 Up 


9-5. Sun 


PARK “CRESCENT 


STH ST. N 

Bedrm a in de luxe ae bide 
with switchboard service; $92 
inc!) wtils.: avail. March 7 


"CAFRITZ, Di. 7-9080 


Rosemary Apts. 
2 and 3 Bedrm, Apts. 


— 
NEW HORIZONS 
AWAIT YOU 


Living tn & cooperative, 
brick. ae cool 4 apt.; 


asy ° maintain. 
left 20 Gal and see for youre 
sell, JA e-o8r or JA. §-6576. 


——- WANT ED 38 


————=— |S SUlre lect 
rents 


Call the ates oS ea is 


¢.|3-BEDRM. APT. $112.50 


sbie #73-99._A 


ic 


ARILLON H 


: furn. wants fifa & 
room, bath Grover Park er) ee Tt 
MacAr* wr Bive. area. Box 57.) tr “4.7797 
t- J 
MS WITH BOARD 
. Meals. 6 dave. peck gen. 5 
. Men. SS. | efficiency apts 


Pron‘, | 
4 $75 ALY, 46050 


se. ap 


: 1916, 
2.2% > > 
Bes 


be 
A 
zi "beat s On! 

: see resident 

; 143 


a 
rms: . 


ie tt 
fais iy: “tis” te $15 wi.; 


De luxe ‘living in o efeb residence 
or Dusis eas meee and men. Sinelies - 
and sere. BLE te - 50 wk. in- be: 
euatae meals end hotel services 
SLPONT TOWERS 1700-3 tists 
ae —A distinctive eae for young 
opie: elev.. TY: Co. 5- r 5. 
wr PL BASANT—Are ges relives? | 
oh : re e . ; ‘ 


SEWLY ‘PAINTED AND DEC. 
ls 
apiex. & 7 


EC REENED PORCH” 


i medern apt. ‘a BF re. 
ify rm mod 
bath with sho wer 


2-, 3-BEDRM. APTS. 
HOUSE TYPE 
Completely Furnished 
JEFFERSON VILLAGE 


ARL. BLVD. FALLS CHURCH 
‘Dany 3 7O &. SUN. 12 TO 4 


JE. 2-5500 


PRESTIGE 


vers 


7.761 


» $s. “WA. 


eee ehos. 
*pieceer Fs BEST 
That's HARTNETT HALL’S 
claim based on good food . . 
good service pleasant 
rooms ... and lots of enter- 
tainment and companiaqnship 
at low week'ly rates 
HARTNETT HALL 
1426 21st ST. NW. 
HU. 3-5432 


te» Bt 7 ~wy~*' 
Speci & 2-be 


Rollins .. 
$90 we 


CHESAPEAKE TERRACE 
4242 @h 68 rf JO 


NEWE ¥ Fe ENisa8t 5—Ci 


core 


7. 
inci 


APT. HUNTING Mace Rasy’ Owners 
per. me se j ane PREE. excel se- 
a time! 


et tn bc Say 
sDpc $120. All wtin 
Call MANDEL. AD 4-4 


COL.--Apts with + 3. 4 rms. 
t.: ehild.: 
leo houses 


a a 

i DoF > or : 

fton ieee Apts. 

ai Swi TOHROARD 
ELEY R 
: o> 


NDRIA—Elficienctes an a 
D.s janitor service. aan 
civis.: downtown oat a 
9 pee 50. Call 


; tre 

lear fares SHOT ping 
+ AD 4 or 
x 7. Cone 


Emp! etek at work 


: 
MM > 


modcern 


a.50 


—_ <= 


E WEABON ARMS RO oem: 
D orr ” 


nw Red 
16.50 ws 


rm 
wit? 


ad 
wiln : privis 
Weadon. HO 


* DOWNTOWN” 
bath 


a. or apply wer 


DONNA PEE 
Nev %, ec NO LEASE REQUIRED 
ry ™ he 16th a. Abe | Ul tra Converient Location 
% : : . _ ‘ Ped 5 


. me pat over vee -bedrm. ee. | 


. 
ou HILL—W 
quiet bidg.:; suitepic 
88 ys -- SHIPLEY | PARK 
l- AND »BEDRM APTS 
curt ben evs in ei i Attract 9 Gowntowa Wastin — ge 
tiractiy fur a 
bee a wants ciency, TLARG z. ROOMS) - 
; ape me. . closet pease: n 


tm 


0. 


\¥ 
80. H 
"yit—d 
| redec. 


Poe Lu. 4-34 
. tractive ‘OL Ets 136 per mo "incl, will 
-bedrm hare bath 

ev 1805 Eta bet 2 § 
~PO)}. 5| pyaar . 
he | iteh b 

h i | 


’ apt 


ani 7 Teo : 
ache voreh Uti 
— $80 


ec ots 
y coms: 
-699 


: Trhnist 
ight ba 
1H. 


—~/-fm. apts a \ 
5 « ment 


1... 
‘ is aver) 
( '% empl. ple fl 


| oe Mid peleone NO, 4-020" 


ron” 3 er 4 girs. AD. Pet 
Ps ste UTION AVE NE—416— 
i-badren . 6 bY accept 
“ eee tt 
erat me vOnBY furo. ie é 
‘ gpa at ae se 
Bar Bath bus at door ‘Rx kit. oft WK 


—_ RA 3 v 
| or i362 Arse, 


Ciean. .“ rac. @ wi 
m 


and bath. 

1a attr. ‘urn! 

. oa arcing space rear of 
HH, al} utils. inci, in Bf 

. 4 » °* 


4 . 
no 


, Ren‘ ~4 
pt 


mana- | 


st b 
| Stock from any apt: te GALVESTON 


ABLINGTON—-Avaiietp new: 1 bed-) 
ve ry te Pen r 


? 
BROOK aM SES 


ave. 
e 


_ 
& Que 6&t. | 


youns 
are attr. 4-Tm. 
mo 


ALL, UTILITIES INCLUDED lit w. of New Me Ger 
APTS. ALSO | ietin ong 


hire an 
bath .” ¢ = ttis. eft 
. | t s . s 
“ani coe Sollerwe Bivda AE tsi0-s “ti 


“dinerve, kite sens bat Sy ies 
screened porch ne ar schools ‘and 


a 


shopping. 
se adic 
ae) 


Vernon Ave. & Kennedy st 
TE. 6-6913 


, MD. 
Eek 


to Andrews, 


fer 3 Eyese , Navy R 


2087, | 


1“ ely 2-bedrm 
t.. $89.50 7 


ARLINGTON, VA. 
Walter Reed Gardens 
2919 13th RD. SOUTH 


«1 BEDRM., Ye 8 


INCLUDING ‘Aut wricrrizs 


Less than 2 miles from Pentagon 
Nay anper Fort Myer and Ar- 
ne? 7 


R 
~ ol apt 


bide "ts Br: utile Sethi 


$06 23 ine 


us not merp than 
PL... 


Foon dinette. kite 
“4 er 


shovetnn churches and os ~ 
New resriger aters. Dlenty of c gen) 3 
ets wand storage spece. laundry fa- 

es. free off-street parking. 
to id fully 


od kit. 
bes oar 3 


9 to 5 Weekdays; Sat., 9 
JA. 8-4226 


Eves. end Sat. Afternoon. JA. $-0077 | a. nw 


aste 
ores refri 
ene 


ited al 


F718 50 JA. 4-1 


rederickx ‘ 
d spacious 


an 
mbination. 2 
im kit 


ul 


; ee 


7  , Sate! bale oS 


A Few Choice 1-Bedrm. Apts. | 


and ‘aa mew 
7 — 


ID = ° 
complet oly, 
7 


HILL 
Woare 


oo 
e. ap’ 


r features —— aa 
cluces the pat 
ene-bedroom ap 
John F. Donohoe & 


714 Penge. Ave_BF 


per 


yilts | 
Y. ed - 

hat a 

STM BT. nw. PEN CougnDy 


s 
ewy 


NeW =yren had " 


a aa 
4y, p 
FURN. APTS.. $81.50 Up| 1616 16th St. N.W. 


ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED | 2-BEDROOM APT, 


Modern garden Petonrenteat te} 


bus downtown 
hnools and shoppi 


CALL RE. 5-8000 


FOR BROCHURE AND , 
FURTHER INFORMATION 1 
DISTRICT HEIGHTS APY 3 


L. OFFICE 
| 7812 District Heights 


couple or 


bath: newly dee. 
2 aculls a igh Sonne at 


See Mra. Murphys. 


Cavite! 


cious aes 


| Larte a bldg: 
bedrm. ¥. rm... 
with shower. 


new. 
t.. 


ee 
mfr WARWICK 


| Two Large Shopp 


Sat SA M-7P 


— Suse |i ( 


dente 
ng. 

Fees —— par 
im bookcases 


2500 WISCONSIN AVE, 
EFFICIENCY APTS. 
th ever 


Hike it's ay 


it 
eonditiongd "ch 
ture windors 
tchen. roof 


ts 

om sun 

ck. r an . laundry 
fac: ies and garage 


| Your \aenection Invited 
CALL EM. 2-8800 


ONE 


AND 


TWO 


BEDROOM Ceca 


| CON ¥ EE 


EFFICIENCIES—-$80-$92.50 
IMMED. OCCUP. AT $85 
1-BEDRM.—$102.50-$145 
| IAMED, OCCUP., AT $112.50 
DAY AND EVENING 
INSPECTION 
JAckson 5-5500 


Lee-Albemarle _ 
Apartments 


AND LEE HWY. 
' 1-Bedroom Apt.—$75 


2-Bedroom A aaggree id d 
ta. shops igs eed _— ite 


et ot & _—o 


[ite 
“38 t 
40. 2-015] 


‘CLEVELAND 
HOUSE 


2725 29TH ST. NW. 
Uust off Calvert St. and 
Cleveland Ave.) 


NEW LUXURY APTS. 
COMPLETELY AIR 
CONDITIONED WITH 
INDIVIDUAL ROOM CONTROL 


Sie mi 


7 


Sons 
= 4-1390. 


2828 


CONN. AVE. 
BRAND-NEW 
AIR-CONDITIONED 
LUXURY APTS. 


PEATURING 


Tha: pateets 


ee APA 


IGN 
ONV 
eae L 


SN Ra 


PARKING AVAILABLE 


Available. 
See 428. MOR. AT 


CAFRITZ 


MANAGEMENT 


r eras 
~ Maryland’s agnien 


Most Progressive Community so ERN BI 


LANGLE’® PARK 


APARTMENTS 
New Hampshire, blocks 
h of University iane on right.) 


1 BEDROOM, $73.50 | 
2 Bedrooms from $83 


(Utilities Included} 
ing Centers | 


is New Lansburgh Dept.’ Store 
Grade School & Bus on Project 


1 Apts. Newly Decorated 
Purnishea Gampie Sot. for Your 
Inepecti 


OPEN 
M.,. Sun . 


RENTALS 
11 BEDROOM, from $140 
'2 BEDRMS., from $220 


SEE RES. MGR. 
OPEN DAILY & SUN., 10-6 
MITH. ACENT 


805 15th st. ow. 
3-2646 | 


BLDO 


~~ PARK CRESCENT 
2901 1 
Soave apt xe. , bla 


ade 
sw) tchboard service 
inci. wtils.: ail. March 


"CAFRITZ, DI. _7-9080_ 


Out 
bor| 


Gracious Living! 


IN AN ATMOSPHERE 
FOUND ONLY AT 


The Woodner 


EFFICIENCIES 
& 2-BEDRM. APTS. 


AIR-CONDITIONED 
NOW AVAILABLE 


' 
PM 


Weekdays 9 A. M. wo 7 P.M. 


OFFICES: 
6291 New Mamopshire Ave. 
1402 University Lane 
HE. 4.3200 


~ 


$95. 


i 


t Immediate Occupancy 


HB. OG. Smithy Co 
_ aw. ST. 3-3300 


TON CIRCLE APTS. 
> NW. 
9.50 to $91.50 


clude All Gsiiieies) 
contro heat an 


S11 16th | Beautiful lobbies, 


WASHI 


| services. master 
a! Ry 
pears exit = one var. 


ie ‘St e heart of os “city tr byw way 


To Live at “The Woodner”’ 
is to Enjoy Life 


oA tO.) Pat DAILY 


set” and Sun. 8 A. 


The Woodner 


3636 16TH ST. NW. 


ot ats 
PRIVATE HOUSES 


OR 
‘DUPLEX APARTMENTS 


First Floor: Large Living Room, Dining Room & Kitchen. 
Second Floor: 2 or 3 Bedrooms and Bath. 


Each House Has Front and Back Yards, Lowe Care, Gar- 
and Trash Removal, Gas, Water, Heat, Laundry 


Facilities and Repairs Provided Free. 


SCHOOLS AND SHOPPING CENTER ON wit 
2 Bedrms., $93-——3 Bedrms., from $109 


also few furnished apts. 
JEFFERSON VILLAGE | 
1734 ARL. BLVD., FALLS CHURCH, VA. 


“padroom "0 decor 


Undry. facilites 


on 


yep mee 
___vOR FREE BROCHU ae 


|; ia 


Furn. Apts. Also Avail.) 


WATER VIEWS 

SWIMMING POOL 

YACHT HARBOR 
BEAUTIFUL GROUNDS 


HUNTING 
TOWERS 


ON MT. VERNON BLVD. 
AT HUNTING CREEK 
ALEXANDRIA 


Efficiencies ... $80-$95 
-| 1-Bedroom ..$110-$130 


IMMEDIATE ge gg 
: : 


FURN. PLAN AVAILABLE 
MODEL APTS. 


9 TO 8 DAILY 
WARM 
IN- WINTER 


COOL 
_IN SUMMER 


ms Lose op 
12 minutes to “downtown 


minutes ° P 
Annex penutifel eveun 
is our y. 


; 6 
nd "aes 
s. Peint- 


200 _N. A ye 
COL.—Eng 
rear entr. 
2 or r 4 adulis 


PARKLAN DS | a 


A MEW CAFPRITZ DEVELOPMENT | 
SINGLE FARE BUS 
“Best Rent Buy in Town” 


LUXURY APTS 
3% RMS.—$68 AND $70 


ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED 


oye ca 


ron BSED. 
se Alt 


Lia B, — 
=. on th te 
=. LAA 3 ¢. 2-rm. 
wh. lee, ons 


COL.—201 E 


te he wtils.; bate age wore. 
Cou. <nl room are kit. ‘elle 8. 
as ; 


. | , - , 
—+ “BW. 5 rooms. 
ae 

OLOF ' -W. 
. £2 rms. and be eas t. 


a APTS. 
4433 EB St. SE. 


2 BEORMS.—$77 


"JE. \2-5500 Daily, 9 to 5; Set., 9 to 1; Sun., 12 to 4 
} 


COLOMED Las 


moving ny STORAGE 39 


AY 
our; 
prea ae 
nies | oldest mo-ets: 


> Se 


4¥e RMS.—$81.75 & $84.59) fe 


‘FA 
| bath, full 


3408. 
"Prelerred Fists 
pone a 


DESK SPACE Rent 


mec) ag gtr om 
Gite ly nisa- 
Bisa, Piasanes Be 

acapecrs mtn ho 
Zour poets. soem cad oor, 


; conditioned. aes aa) 2 


ge 


mig, are aa ig hat wa SI 


D 

cond. out. "ofc. 
ew as and telephone service, 
wv . 


osiveke wat 


ee as 


MPT BERG & BUSH, Inc. 


mm. 
|W 
ane bear. ci bent, enced: os = 

trac. amt 5 ao ai avail 
a irabie 2. 3. 4-cedroom buses 


me immediate ote 


: 


} Ren 
Available tmmediateiy. 
transportation at door. Apply 


NTI 
Brand-New Aijir-Cond. 
; BUILDING 
1012 14th St. NW. at K 
| Soren Will par‘ition 2 to = St 4 


CAFRITZ—DI. 7-9080_ 


a Dostairs. | $100, 


. B00 Lee beT. 


| 


. 
SPEC 
65 _6-2986 
eM, nr. sete 
| 
100 to 8 $125 
° 
$133 te 518s 


iin 3 hs 3-bedrm 


ie 


R 
50. 2-015) 


Choice location for your office ong 

leree suite about sa. ft. 
recept. hall 

; shortly also 

Saonable ren 


PS McCue eatgh 
HAN 


Stork and alr- conditioned 
7 ine con 
Bran 


offic 
Svailabi e 
—_— 


$110: no 5307 Sth s 
- $100. Auerbach to 
>1 +4 
et ition 
po ae ny oe 
ven. to transp. sche. ' 
s. Weightman. HA. 


liplo- 


eeeecatlve or 4 


= ®, WEINBERE'E & BUSH, Ine. 
. OL. 6-5080. 


bed 707 H St 
>| BUSIN ory 


severe Was — 
dinette, kitchen ad 
basement; $135 


atte, 5 ba 
Very OTe ert 


pl 
ond similar vopereti 

ion 
etc x SFOM aM ect 
STOR me bullding. each foe 
a complete ua’ anne can be 
or rented & tely 


heat cellent 
per mo. Paul 


pareee. éon- 
and ‘bus. Arai Avet. 
. a ft. alley : ul 
re.; , a =o : eleva J 
outside. 

= s pu 


ht utMeasage 2 Bah 
cea. 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
42 Tuesday, February 28, 1956 


SALE, D.C. nousts_.o 


Dre, pidg.. consiatine 


Rare | 


$95 DN.—$87.50 MO. 


house ¢on., 
, Close to every- 


Ps AN & CO 
,| CO. 5.4056 ‘TIL 9 
28 | ao iter 9 Cel TA. 9-9533 
| COLORED—NORTHWEST 


9 RMS.—2 BATHS '¢ 


LOW DOWN PAYMENT 


412,000 

Sunday 
Circulation 

means quicker sales results 
for Washington Post and 
Times Herald classified ad- 
To place your ad 


ist home; owner. 
: 


ONLY $895 DOWN 


for large fem 

Rey i oan 
odern 

.4 ms. a 


) Ceti 


= ave. nw. AA 
CHASE Somerset 
— “fbrary Bvine room, ine toy 


WN—New exclufve list- 
ed house 


ae ecm 
Foyer. 

a68 Of~' room, 
style pase. | 


ock from a 


vertisers. 
for Sunday 


Phone 
REpublic 7-1234 


WAREHOUSE SPACE, Rent 50) 


iD. i suit tenant in 
ba hit . 48140 or 
BUSINESS stand 55 


working &H 
Priced e oF Bped. ole 
ves.. JU. B-4394. 


. OP. Fully 
v 


ty. Ob. ong. eves. 
SE—A most 


rooms. 2 — = home 
super Box! 
SHIPLEY TERRACE | Sit) 4088. 
GI APPROVED, $10,750 


$500 Down—$64.85 Per Mo. | 


cusyt Cc 


er ee 


Lovely modern, semidetached bric = 
in this convenient location Living 
room, dining room and kitchen | rooms, 2 kitchens and 2 
floor: 2 r *s an modern Full basement with excellent oil- 
tiled bath full ment with a system. Redecorated and 
heey and outside en-) y move in. ideal for large 
i Mr P family Call Mr Mcintosh Ex 


Laree. foomy. row brick with §| 
baths. | CHEVY ck 
Coionial 
oe. floor pow , complete ely 
auip. auto. kit shee. separate din 


ing room, gern ot 


yard Be safe 
Br’ S40 
CHEVY gy HAMLE auti- 
ful Colgate jal brick with B ~Byaut 

> baths, study with o> Em 
rm 


. rm 
2-car serene: oad in slow 40's 
udin rages. 


MMON ko ¥: 


vy Chase, Md... 
I THE “HAML where the) 
homes are beautiful and uch more | 
expensive than this. enter hall! 
orien colonial with Kea siate 

oof. Modern kit. with dishwasher | 
4 tnrge bedrooms and 
recreation 


GEORGETOWN TYPE 

rner brick in Fosrsy Bytiom. 
a a ane £ * 2 ’ 

dinine area. of ‘turn Excl 

ChAT BE et iay” 

GEORGETOWN 

New Listing 

A solid brick eaet of Wisc. ave in) 

ia 

bric 


“attractive 
pa garten. 2 G 
or immed ate > e. 
ai 
for apet. 


4 A te’ SON 


terrace 
iced 
per eine mt eR 


see. cal 
eves. and 2480 eves.. 


"FRED A. SMITH CO. | FRED A. SMITH CO, 


| 
| 
| 
| 


COLORED 
Imposing English Colonial 
brick side hall 
wroucht roe div 
stone fireplaced 

large dining rm. 


COLORED—$ 13,500 


FOR VETERANS 
Near Soldiers’ Home 


i 
| Corner 


Prench 
friendly 
Tm. from 
and ultramodern 
and 2%, baths, rec 
place. garage, beautiful shrubbery, 
in excellent upper NW. iocation 
Call Mr. Alt, me wwe | te diepeeni: 
- sydnor Reality Co. 2 tiled bathe 2d floor: 
TA. 9-6700 room with fireplace, 


and full 
~ COLOREB—VACANT 
NON-GI 


SEMIDETACHED 
‘ONLY $99.50 PER MO. 
(525 RITTENHOUSE ST. NW. 


You don’t have to be oe to axe | 
on vi 
brick home | 


1th fireplace eae 
is 
m 


and | 
. ar room | 


down 
6 
ced | 

59 with | 


LAUNDROMAT.-21 1405 
worth Capitol st. “3197. 


DRY CLEANERS—Bobdtatlers 
better deal call Mr. Carroll. 
8-0457 after & pm. 
T 


; 
Tc on la profit- | 
wk. Open 6 


For 
JA 


’ 

. padern 3-bedroom row brick 

vgs located on Buchanan &. 

| Just off North Capitol. Concrete 

front porch, living room. dining 

oni bh. oom. fully equipped kitchen; 2nd 
lov ‘ely 


he. 4 rms... hea floo rooms «a ern 
vere pith oldfish “pond Seautifut | bath Pull basement. gad heat, 
shrubs flowers plus day! ight | and large lot. Call Mr. McIntosh 
d sement? MR.) EX. 35-2480; eves. and Gun. AD. | 
UARANTEED | Peart res LU i 3 . ae, 
usiness Reas ant ) ORS . 
tire. Grocery, y vegerans es. -- Ry and, _ ; ia FRED A. SMITH CO. 
er 988 2-sto -bed bath 
pome with hot-water. heat . 


SECURITY modernized kite ispo 


é shy asber. storm windows, jarge| 

omf{or Lab real Enow : 

ja tract ive ey . “na 300 how 

onty by appointment. 
wi 


baths: 
KOLB 


ranch 
® bo 


a oom, | 
6.4843 3. bo 
ave | 


———- 


‘ Chevy Chase Rambler 
I 


the Somerset School area 


COLORED 


607 TAYLOR 


$750 DN., $100) 


rooms and 


organizin 
mount o 
stock? | 
protected 
per week 


Have you seme sales 
ability plus 


Exclusiv ely STREET NW. 


Visit ROBERT E LOHR Homes | $13,750. 6 beautiful 


bath, porch. Big living rm. and sep- 


arate dining rm.; full base- 
ment; 2-car gerage. A real 


value at J B. 
WRIGHT. EM. 3-5000 ‘wl 5&8. 


in excellent 
cas bowh. 
-outstanding Petworth community 
convenient to everything Call 


sP.M 
R. A. HUMPHRIES | 
Realtors NA. &- 5028 | 


— COLORED — Vie. ifth & Columbia | 
—3j- Fea S| & NW. 2 complete apis Bitch- 

deep center ball. eas. 2% bed full 
op 2-car 


dDamt oil 
detached brick ie mo 


vey porches Wh 

a buy’ Cal : 
MURRAY LEVINE, "AD. 4-3737 | 
TT 
HOUSES WANTED, to BUY 65 


A CASH BUYER OR 


terms. Li 6-2000 


warty 
*. details. ca 


RD. A 


FOREST GLEN REA—Unusu 
al ' a}-orek Col 
o 


barga) 
nial 


ut necessit 
i Carl Larson, 


Vaniery sTORE — Centraly loc 
onetie. fully 
Sell e doctors |* 


Date ot ea 2 Mass Ave 


wil 


PRINCE GEORGES CO. HOMES | HILLANDALE — 83-ft. 


ram 
. buy for ce Bytom from comps a - | 
wer AAC. Di. b paee | ee Toes —.. fuk 
614.600 first tru 


tie A Cash Buyer or Terms | Sonim sacra 

full lee —_ ws MO6S ? ; 

emall dn. pymt bel le ee Webs tear 3. or 3-bedrm. home| 3-55 

rent ‘e neho, today. Dixie Realty oo SE P Co 
| Bee B 


or nearbdy 
are savetanties cash Mrs. KENSINGTON — ~$12. 780. Haven f 
8196 or ST. 3- here 
DETACHED BRICK | RAMBLER. new or used. S&S or 6) 
Lar bri- home | bedrooms. 3 os + ha nity Com-| 


73468 — | 
ressionsa! Co ci 
a. side | hall ian, . s CHARLES Eagan. INC 


st. 3 
py “TAM BUYING” 
LA 6- ile — Top Pri oe Pee. M Prssaree | 
” COL.—COLUMBIA HGTS.” pot 
HOME PLUS INCOME 


. compiete tit.. plum bing for 4th 
rit.. 3 compi beths 3 or a ories 
lus . with rec anc 
ront entrance Priced te sell 

REALTY 


_ A. 8-1 LA. 6-6 +. 
COLORED, ATTENTI 


13TH & FLORIDA AVE. ey 
ONLY $150 DN. 
FRONT PORCH 
6 LARGE ROOMS 
| oy ULL BASEMENT fee 
H T-WA ER HEAT, OIL! ay after 6. TV 
EXCELLENT CONDITION "isi ta Sir 
Act Fast—Call Owner | vial No 
EX. 3-8440 or TU. 2-1820) sect 


» 
rms 
wales hea'. 

$) 


ox to 
orders. terms 

Wants Tas WNERS 
EXECUTIVES 


Secktas 


$) 


RED— Newir Gee — vie > -) 
rms Inc. J 
> ‘wi 


more N Sts 


e nad 6 6pe 
nd anneal pete window and 


age. entra 
en 7 Ee 


rec. Tm. Wl 
| Ber poe lev a 


cat 
tractive 
wh 


an Profits. | 
Institute of 
>. 


ome.” Price 


—_—— 


COLORED—WOODRIDGE _ 


chandirers -!| Love 3-dedr 
down-to-earth 2*a! te ye 3. 
Yoult com ‘ bh meet-| 

ou'll come away from eac . ee F 
ine with fresh. new ideas. and rms. P 
summaries of the key points cov-| Lareer ec! _ “rear groupd level | 
ne Tmstitute is 


_kiven by ) Com oteiy sir-cond. A EM 
rican Universi “9000 t ° M 


coo : ta | 
t} | n ot? 1§ Conn Ww.) 
ore ps Soass’ As SI) NEY DOWN 
u ‘ 
parolmen ts ate, 
ch 


until Mar 
; at the doot pH 
6-6800. ext. 39 


REAL ESTATE LOANS 60 
1ST. 2D TR. LOANS PURCHASED. | hh Se PARK 


ALTY CO. Realtors. | 
| 8039 10th st. ne. biks age 
gh. Bs Lat of New Providence ospite s| 
| than 3 years old * dec me 


meetings of Custom-bul!t 


¥ 
bier with de luxe kit. 
bedr 


| KENSINGTON — 4-vear-old - 
mbier in perfect condition: 
<a MF $9 ha 


: 
price for D c | 
o 


ue 

hes washer ane dryer in- 

dend, no-traffic street 
- sacrifice price at 


7-6 850 un i} 5 Bp. m 
MENT. co 


: 


Guick service 
BA. 3-2 


oo. eve 


ALL CASH 
QUICK SETTLEMENT 


old mod- 
house, completely sair-cofdi- | ; 


ened, with payments Just ike 
‘Dr 7 y ¢ ay) 18S ee 


“ONLY $ DOWN 


IN 


KENSIN@TON—2-bedrm. ex 
brick rambler. 

ent. deep * “Ss0-ft 

Gl only. 8750 cash and mo 

Stairs to unfinish- 

rm. 


mpegemie) ° 


trees 
tnterested th 
Ne obiiga- 


& SONS 
Li. 3-0084 


We have tevestors 
an, types a@f property 


_ a OHOE 


' 
’ 
' 
’ 
; ae 
i314 _ Ay 
PAY 
HOUSE D 


vb 


: “Wes 
D. Cc. ' 


‘ +650 on until 9 Pp =. 
‘a 4 (ESTMENT CO. __ 


| Con ONAL ABY 
| KENSINGTON — $10. 2-bedrm. 
8. 10 


750 
rambler. washer, fenced 
ot, $66 moe BOOLZ 

OL, 7-90F7, 


- will buy 2d trust notes 
nearby vy 

NAT 
112 N =a 


oe aac —E oy tes 


u forms of ‘Sgurence ' 
en. EM 


. the es r “ASI 

re. 869.50 

40801 
-3 


44. 


KENSINGTON — 


ou. D ee 71-2451. 


° homeowners. All! 
INSKY,. 


aa i ‘ 
Investment Property 
$750 WN MONEY MAKER 
You can make plenty on this pros- 
erty. “. 4 retrigera- 
tors. 4 feves, plenty of furniture 
font last long cal) aa 


EXCEL RENTAL AREA 
Semidet brick. Anacostia. contain- 
ing 2 apts. plus 2 rentel rms lus 
owner's quarters. Exce! cond 
79 Owner 


to every thins. : 
neome 
y i” 19377 


pk can get construct - Ba A an¢é 


service on finenci 
WAL ‘BAKER & SONS, we. 


h. £ ) 
Sets ya Wwe + we 
: 


wena ‘ eres 
sell before ge’ une my prompt 
: ¢€ 
greoteey th oul ICK. LO. 4 6565. | 
an NOTES 61) 
e2026 tp TRUST on well eocured. 
senteouery property. Price 
— ie ’ ~.. 
tanti as pro . 
Be. aay oe 3-5586. (tres. 
$8000 


+ wnat gpebing 
—— 
TRUST NOTES WANTED 61A 


pied 
RAMBLER —~ 912.500. 3 tedrm 
mM near schools and 


oe aie ee 
IMMEDIATE ACTION 

4 HOU SPOT ray FOR 

ear Pek ‘at 
be L heh VACANT 10 be /. 4. ate ta 8 ema 
- ¢-6579 
is aly FRO M OWNER 
for vour VINER 


DO IT YOURSELF 


REDECORATE 


FARRAGUT ST. NW. 


ppraised or. 930. 


§-room game - pf porch. be poet. ae- 

ment, . 700 

éown aw palenes on en low monthiys 
now LO. 17-8877 


77 
’ 


_ 


cond Trust 
Pa “7 


erpetua! 
¢ -*-% 
978333 until © 


HUGGING ‘e HARRISON, NING. | 
_ Realtors 10635 Coce ave. * 
ASS. AVE. AREA. fost over C.| 
"Une This new fall center- “pal 
er bes 


i 6 years 
teed. Di. 


Winter Park. near 
im exchance for 
-—e of belléime —-_ @- th 
vicinity of Weahir “a rite Box | 
| 


<a 
th and 


Past Top 6 6 f 24 Trust “Notes s 
15 Investment Bide... ME. 8-407" 
UST NOTES pourht and sold 
ave yf wtih unlimited cash 
service at 
YY. inc... JE 3706 
2ND TRUST “NOTES —— 


ev 
Bought and soid_on Vi ~| Beeroe 
erties. Phone i: 6 74 ‘or TR| . 
rg 


w AL BAKER & SON, 


Pag FOR YOUR 2 2ND TRUST | 


time oT ts 5. o 244 
ves. ca » 
BAKER & son Inc 


2101 
COL D—UPPER NW, 


$795 DOWN 


Beautiful 6-rm. tapestry brik. 
d + a wer e. 


ae You will ‘yur this Wass) SALE SUBURB. HOU 
MUS REALTY MARYLAND | 


eee 7942 ACREAGE 25 with 2. small_b 


ouses 
—— step 2 miles from Security | 
. Reas -1807 
st "enclosed 
pores a. 
ree 


| PA 
RED EHRLICH 


Menigomery County 
ADA maculate brick om 
nels rooms. 3 baths. is 
1930) 16th nw 3-04 

> 3 Ba BOT 7. | 


NO MONEY EY DN. | 


| ine -dinine area with fireplace. 
ompietely equipped kitchen patio. | 
me me 
‘Figee Ropes, Berere You Buy 
NE 
1658" BR ST. W 
pe 


yar 
washer dryer 
) ' , $e oe. pt 
SPECIAL. hy ay The 
one ca * of areety 7 Teduced SO SOL. INVEST. Co on a 3-5307 | 


$42 14th SE -—— 
; small Gown payment mas  COLORED—PETWORTH Nw 
~ a $795 DOWN 


NER semidetached | 
-_ hall 


HILLCREST SE. 


Detached brick. less than 8 crs 


Tic00 Fin we 8 
EDGEMORE AREA 


2% 
beautiful Wi ‘i rs "about 6 


years , Bn: than 
ne: tEALTORNS. pew i condit — 2S jovel 
pee DO $995 DOWN ot. 2-car gereee. 6f ‘ 

. fuk. tent, ol tim 
READMOND "REAL ESTATE 
TV. 32-6101 mM. 353-8673. 


Eves 
DETACHED BRICK 
At ye LARGE Bass +S 


Tw 


enc 
bee: 


PROPERTY “il 


comm 
A h 


, INVEST. 
NAVY YARD— ist 


_Eves, TU. 2- Dowder rp a. 
COLORED BARGAIN - a "Sine Goavens 
arace Th ay 


ee 
Andris f 


44) 
INVESTO v= 
rick 4 spertments 

w Southeast section 
$21 950; Gown payment 


j 
» ite. | 
mi.) = lease wi 
with stunnigs breeze *| or sm? vet 
: a« 
M. Pau me 


COLORED 
HOME AND INCOME sini te 


Move js vith NO DOWN aut COLORED—* WOODRIDG 
5125 HANNA PL. SE. Benning rd, $495 DOWN! VACANT! fe enced iot. BAMU + 


| ee Central eve. to Hapme. Fulli Lovely 4-97 a ott tet with 6 ise) Inc OL. 6- 7800 o> m 
sem a nti; : ——— 
| old. prremendous BETHES@A High pence, area, im-| 


in 
Kl "t-5396 


7-2960, wi ith 3) 
i } Gtoamian | 
moce rn kitchen | 

+4~ R eeeeed 


to 
LER Re ity'co. “HO. 2- 1257 
ie Island & N Capito! 


cannot find a detler oppor-| 
ny investm than ‘his 
y 


a extra | 


at low renta:. : 
reasonably priced = an 500. | 


en 
Yocated Cail Mr 
"ROB 


Sear 
elec kit with dishwasher 
preall SF, : air af coo} ser 

Le ement with toile 
eer’ EL | 
o down payment | 
and 874 
home 
fenc ed yard N 


manedia te oecupancy | 
ee . 
en 


or al 
». 


s 
Sther. bes 
> segue 


- SRC CT. vel 


wet ell thie week 


recreetion rm... ascreetie 
sacrifice. 
a! NW 


ge ee anee” 


5521 4TH ST 
Row brick, 7 rms... 
porch vase. garage 

porenes. A pertect an won venient 


Ras ea 


813 250. ‘WO - 
pedrm 

| yard. rim arse. 
me 


Ee oitian 


seen eh 

brick in 
full din My : 
rm. rec Eee 


Nw: 
concrete Rn ad 


—— redie ; a 2 t-- 
Stately custom- built, “s ite “Jere Realtors. 


an ext epitshed nejennes 
‘uf aca . with asa) — 


ples. A distinc- 
7 the approach 
me. J ms 


of 4 mit 
Lovely tS becarm 
ba me. 


Wane 
ISTH AA Ste NE. 
7 row Rd 6 larese rms. 
mead it 


peas new 3-bed 
ler. . din Loe ia “a ‘ 


‘30d e soya 


vel 
full 
In finest NW is this magnifi- 


“coe abs6 Ti 
cent witramedera Co Colental } asaater __ APTER 2 CALL JU. 
nie | gate, ans i Ea bem awn 'COLORED—$66 44 MO. 


a AN OFFER | .35 ATOTAL, RICE, ONLY 810.900, 
4. 

RE!" COLORED—VACANT | fartii6 both bait 

te 


semidetached 
home convenient 
ich Par 
eo tty A or 


iL 9 
89269 


if 
Some of disti 


NOR REALTY $3 
fea 


beth. brick loniei caraee. 

ck colo . 

ed porch. slate roof, ne 
; Very conven ~ Taney built 


wk with "tots of auuality, 
ase e 


tures aod h 


Saltese 


earace. use. lovely ki 
pew bdric 


all 


ara 


nd 
= erick oth 
Better than ne P stty fe ‘ .o-~ 


sized = Lt Wow! | 


Yai 
DA 
18ST OFFERING 
Large femily home im «6 con- 
venient section. Nr. schools ‘pub- 
lic, private, parochial), bus and | 
shopping. € bedrooms. 3 dens, 
beautiful kitchen with deluxe | 


". FE. oe NCHARD. Realtor 


PR Fy 


8.500 
bri OT os Poland. on 


tgomery 
sect) n moor: 
much higher whet 

—_ - ad 


te} hte LANCH 


~ 


liv t has 

rae. (1 sma} 4 i 
«warden, all A. ye 
AD. 2-3029. a 


Fm 3 noni 
Owner lea: ine 


"FRED EHRL ICH 
epi semidetached: f1 "nisi foot re fe | seal PAST: NW. 


Ei, and nantey: 
bath up: bamt.; 
met . aan 


cellent 
REALTY 


FRED A. SMITH CO. 


‘CORNER CORNER PETWORTH 


Real ty! 4 natural 
Sea, full bamt.. qerece, 
ition. down. 


& 
CO. 5-4056 ‘TIL 9 
® CALL O., 6-865 
COLO ED $495 DOWN 


ARD, Realtor 


oo 


semi-det 
the 


pian. re 
Ue, 
ace. 


ish hd al nader %$20.000 
Wo hr een ull ee m BOW 
& Chevy | 


b- ‘e Charmin 


53 


A | Cah at once 
MURRAY LEVINE, AD. 4-3737 


4800 BLK. KANSAS AVE. NW. 
ONLY $1500 DOWN 
Beautif Colente) brick pome: 


. 
plus enc], poles 
" bemt, and jsv.. ye 

‘ar ear 


LOAN 
3 BEDRMS.—REC. RM. 


ee DOWN, 


coy Naval Medical wit ly rm 
iy 


aM 


MENGSH & CO 
| “THE ALL ERY oF Toans 
A| WESTMORELAND “WHLis — 4 bed-' 


8- 
{on ‘New Tore ooms, 2 baths. Cape Cod; in ex-' 5 
of fine ho 


RMS. 
Mi. ™ at se frei. 
i Rereh 8 


2 


Cr. 
Yew. 


2-bathr, pore rick, | 
with da sens oem’. : H 

\ A. a- eves. . 52196: Mil 
FREDERICK W. BERENS 
SALES, INC., NA. = 3000 


Pe 


a. 
4‘ 


| Venetian 


| SUBURBA 
$402 


SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67MD. | SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67VA. | SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67VA. 
ee a ee 


: 
ee a 
oe ee eee ee 


TAKOMA PARK, MD. 
3 BEDROOMS—2'2 BATHS 
r home 


Secotigns ae ee HR. entne e 
up. and 


with 2 bf 
ivine anc fuk pons dining | in 
room, breakfast room. n, | 
ancled nm % on first! 
per. basement with th. | 
Ss or 


we 
Visit "ROBERT ‘LOHR: Homes | 
4.4000, ‘til id pum., RA. 6-3600) 


White Brick 
gg A ge cove 4 


1 pes Step-Down Living Room 
a Nee eed tse oe ay 
3 Dd. a with indiyi 


FORESTVILLE | 


i% qores. 
with fireplace 
hea 
car 


Bede oe" 


Radio Bids, Ari. JA. 7-8108 "ty | 
typ hee PARK—-$16,9 950 


Plant. 
 SReer J opney peh. 
Aes M. * BERNSTEIN CO. 
LO. 5-3533 


JE. 2- 4-6962 

ARLINGTON—Gleamina white brick | 
on treed jot = fine. Tew | 

on. Just irate 
at 

. on We! oa 

retired cou 

PIELD JA 4 


New Colonial homes; 6 
2*@ bath attacned 
fional GE Kitchen. 
Wood ig Constr. Corp. 


_ Eves.. OL. 32-7338. 


t a4.290—Newiy ~~ y and ao vandhal Sasem oe ent. 
chan iat Ft ab 


TAKE OVE 4% pa joan 
all brick "s 
Toeation. All lige. 

int. ; 


gone. 
nak yaa | 


"con mentions 


Eves. Mr. 
9 


LANGLEY, VIRGINIA 


ssootes 


| anes a 


all | rambler, custom 
—. her > aep- 


nd Bathe. 


many outras’ 


upstairs, 2 
nchor-fenc 
> fh! and public schools, 
: AP. ‘- i400 till! i gat nearby: various terms 
t J 


JU. 90-4644 dir wy AT THIS—4-bedroom Cape COLONIAL REALTY CO. 


r Tous pects separ the east inkng ten Cod, living soom with “Ei ach Rea ltors-Developers JA. $-6200 
° ms inin 


ful beats, te og eat ARLINGTON — 
cae. tine Hah 
SetintiinNON-Cr 


nt Exes mira Watch the world— 
orcad, mB caf buy 
NOK FOREST 
Cg a wall oy fireimee: 
PP Redtms. 


Ms A Pear lande 


feeling 


Ear = 


asement wit 

patie with barbecue 

“sot Baitic 

rs) NCE 

ROP TiEs. AP. 7-i7i4 | Older home 
teresting 


2-hedrm. ram-| t 
rene porch 
Py 


asement, only | 

. AR appointment 

Py A. Wents. AP. 7-0900. 9 +11) 9.) 

vhs tpg oy EVER 
standout. 

drm 


oo 
hea! gateee” “si 900! GI con- 

acts rae, J oT easy terms to 
— vetera 


“ARLINGTON REALTY | 


maxes 
Sf p- | 
Ist 


LORCOM LA. LANE ARE AREA—418. 950. ‘You 
may search and search but tht« : 
ard to 

Cienitied 

: ure 


J. att age” 4 
country = pin 


brs "Tins apd roads JOHN R. de SOUR & co. 
2 dbedrm 
a 


subject Gl 
$79.10 mo 


CONLEY = huge daylieht 


down and assume big 


dn 

| 4 JAMES 

footyres | ASSUME GI LOAN for this spar ie | 
lin clean. aill-brick 3-bedr 


DESIGNED FOR 2 FAMILIES 903 
home for 2 poamees: 


Ideal am with 
hot-water heat. My 
rm 


; nice os trees. side- | 
and ter ool | 
All new neanes on street. | 


Ee Dp. RvoSsgsS 
OWNER & BUILDER 
fest on Col. Pike 1 
oad to Monroe. 
to 13th. 
¢ ieft 


Storybook Setting 
35 FT. LIVING RM. 


Bulltt te fit the 
se uae = and thls 


Nehtfu 
vine 


7‘. a on | 
COLOMWIAT TANG 
PARK AREA Oak- 
room»: basement 
ait school Gl ap- SCRLTNGTON —— 


PECK “Mother S Apt. 


ea home| THE FAMILY HOME 
$21,500 


help vour newlyweds te’ 
this custom-designed home | 
esidential area. consist- 
ing of living rm. with a ——~" 
separate cinine oom. 
x! scpen. 2? bedrms. and bath, 

eatio ° eparate entrance to 
a wonderful apt, upgteirs. with her 
+ ivacy Excefiient terms on 


“et-| COLONIAL REALTY CO. 
evelopers JA. 3-6200 
ARLINGTO 


. 
a Dittmar Forest | Ashton Hei Hei 
PAYMENTS LESS THAN RENT (| Bit. modern J3-bdrm and 3- bath | 
Sacnees fenced home. with sep. dim-) | itt sm recrea- 

me rm... lige. expandibdle 
taht bemt.; only 3 bikes 
bik bye ang stores 


just 35 ves N 18 
walk-in DY KRY ap 


BRIC 
Lty 
> he Pr 


COMPANY 


p “one Rea! 
Aig MH sere 


Bilv 

> 4-7260 oY ° 
ON-VET—A oma 

rick sneaiioe: 


tepography 
wniaue split 
ce« 
larse 


WOO 
Me a Le 
justine ere Extra 
with 


repiace af fay pews ly pa 
on Co. "3b. 


Sie Su Cansburghv's 


Attractive living reom, fireplace, 
i ing 


wall-to peting. huge enced 2-BED 
Dius ed-| 
ait 1 a 


Mother, 
afford 
in highly 


GI 
drorc "EB 
16. WA 


wa c 
ayes sil Biunce, 


. FRAME—Barn, oak firs 
new miles south D Cc. ine 
. jan Head hewy 


Sry 2° Wear 


payment requi 


YEONAS REALTY 


2313 Wilson Blyé 8-2100. 
Ma Listing i eau 


pee mei: 


im @arace 


- cert 
g 


= 


R 
ORS 


"7 


ait “Tove ci 


: 


ike” ‘pew 


eee een jacent t 
Weodm Welkine distance to! $250 Realtors—D 
adett OOF tt 


} Rann ~ af ane al 
schools. Gully ahrubdvbed 
grounds. iret tame offe Owner 


anx) we of 
GRAHAM & CO, 
ee el: 
NEAR D. C. LINE 
years brick rambler 
i. £18.80 Lovely it... 


$1500 dn 
eves JU 
‘| a 
This dell« 
ck 


ghts! | 


poante ful house and grounds bw! 
craftsman 


-38 VICTOR | 
71-8080. 
SRICK BUNGALOW Gulp S11 000 
4 ,0897 ~— location. Twin sized bedrooms 
ares nving room 
kitchen. aluminum 
lus. Comfort = Bey — - large {et 
htful hedreo to an =e PRINC “GEORGES 
Thess aoe? “wit lores | PROPERTI AP 
ce: UNDERFRIK ait for quick sale. Red- 
pees d and masonr 3- cdrooms ram- 
id 
} 


"SECLUSION | 


A beautifu Rn ab pome in a 
autet nee rhood Thre bed-| 
rooms. two aad * ~y Sethe. mod. | 
ore kitchen. dining room mre. 
ace. recreation reous one enrege. ' 
stablished, close in Price | 


JAMES | C. CONLEY & CO. 


4 til 9:30) 


ee ee 


jane oon cull Baths 


WOODMOOR 
OWNER leer yo Pia. This 
much -sought-alter home im! 
this sectlan will . last jones 

lose to rnadette. beautiful 
recreat! om reom: GI ised 


$13,950, 


im better 
eatu 


only. 


so Ss 
ARLINGTON REALTY. 
2212 Wilson Blvd. JA. 7-300 + 


‘80. ARLINGTON Care cop Pea. 
p+ — - lt 
Treen rc pasienent 8! 14.980. 
| Ein THOMPSON, JA. 2-2 
i} . ARL.— 3-bed 
men brick. ox 7 te ® 


ARVINGT ORT site 
2213 Wilson Bis JA. 7 -9999 | ve 
ARLINGTON FOREST 
LARGE SIZE 


~ 
7 


ful 


$0 


wr on -base. 
Pireplace in laree J-W 
proves 1 : a 


base ch. A 
$i4 "300, *p! rand acy 


occupancy 
¢ I 
| EROr RULES. AP — ar 


eee P... an 


rm 

3 -? 
at ‘on 1878 
NORTH ARLINGTON 


‘4 Bdrms.—2 Baths 
LARGE RECR. RM. 
$17,500 


cavely Ra Cape Cod wi ih 
se 
piace. full bem 
ed corner 


F_E. "Maleoinn JA. 7-3024 


PARKLAWN, VA. 


3-BEDROOM 
BRICK RAMBLERS 


$16, 200-——$18500 
VA—FHA—FHA in Service 
and Conventiona! Financing 


OPEN EVERY DAY 
10 A.M, TO DARK 


IRECTIONS: Memorial 
ay idge or i¢ St -> a to Colum< 
. 7 


Colm 


—_ entiona!l . 


+3 Dp evail.' 
FE e vedios iby "JA. 7 /-3024 
ARLINGTON and 2| 
bec room: it occupancy 
. Pe for ap-~-! 


monthly in 
Dayvmerts« bed - 
lare 


sa’, ce 
{ yard w ' 


tops 


Pped 
th tower pees Be ad poin’ 


Ons REALTY CO 


4- }%* 
WANT A GARAGE? 


ick end red wood ram- 


tr er’ 
: 


ARI {NGTON NORTH 


Country Club View) = 
| PRICE $26,950 


ful vieta of the surround- 
' an tetas ding feature | 
rambler. 


sep 
: 


‘Situated on ise. 
‘. 


miles from DC ' 
titel (at Phone eeu Lo 
Lo. 7 wt Vi od, 


M BRITT 


j fi 4 t ry > t3 bd 
CUTE BUNGALOW commands @ mer- 
ON CORNER Ph | Pull besem : 
expancibile at fenced yard 
OL with bees than '75 per mo pay- 


fr | SUBURBAN REALTY Co 


windows 
end $402 eta oe 


W. 8B. WRIGHT 
sot c Giede Rd.. Ari JA. 4- 


k ARLINGTON | 


then | 
res— 
retrig. | 


open ¢ 
cornices 

or all 
ws 


A884 : 


sepa 


bedrm. brick 
NEAR = JOHN'S 
cy 


ce 
Donald E. Younkin, Realtor 


Sexrcl tHe 


rambler, 


iy te on 
Br cA 3 —a 
ime rm. wits 


-_ Sparkling } : 
Pir iett epposite Lore Barcro! 
Built By 


MACE PROPERTIES. Inc. 
Model Home, CL. 6-1134 


bath. large ifr- 
ing ares ane fire- 
Ro BR fully equipped 
full basement with: rec 
-y* venient area; fe-| 
duced "10 
Pn ana "Real Estate Corp. | 
2433 Wilson Bi, neon. Va. 
ee 7-4448 4-4015 
INGOTO 


NELLIE CUSTIS. DR. 


Orr LORCOM LANE 
NEAR RIVERWOOD 


EXCEPTIONAL TERMS 
EASY FINANCING 


ave labi . Be om fies purchaser 
cl-designec 
vant 4 wit + 3 double 


h 7 
pornsns. ak 
4 
Fitbce q BORGES ° PROPERTIES. 
‘ SBEDROOMS. near Bait 
nH. ; _ 


’ 
gs nr 


wnor re pay 
hy th r. 


~——— 


ARLINGT ox 


Addison Heights 


inte colonial home in 
—e condition situated 


Ar 
E 


— 3-vear-old aoe 
™ h nwa 
PRINCE G 
UN. 4-1 iG 
| #10 Mins D. ee 
eacon Hots., » Riv rdale 


| VETS—30-YR. LOANS 
NO MONEY DOWN 


i's» basa, liv 
u b ts 


«4 
iznnes es 


, 
NEW a itard HOMES 
$12,750 TO $12,995 
PEW Na rp Berry | | 
richt 700 feet 


~~ 


, 
11.500 with eared land 


SiL.VER SPRIN ——-year-old brick 
ambier wit Jae 7 living roem 


"ARLINGTON REALTY 
2212 Wilson Bivd. JA. 7-9300 t!] 9, 
ck yard. 


cin 
ce en- 


ancaped fenced 
and “tranap rtatlon “price. 12 - 
ed ane | 


), a. BUCHANAN, INC.! i : 
et al Berherte, 5 es to Sanh. ane kc cm : me c * | JA. 73 
CLOSE-IN Nig nee Ska. BEDFORD. rien ' 7.2 L 4 Chatel 8- sd 


‘Poreh, ang pareec. | SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67VA. 


fase, ch 
hao 


Ver 
erick © ‘ape Cod 
stone tirep 
ped kit. Low geen par- 
T. Moten Rea)- 
Vernon eve OV 


4- year- ola. 
lot. ¥ elem, 
. Call owner, 4- 7187 


Smal House 
Large Lot 


cute ramb. er 


comp) _— y 
portunity 
not afford to miss Call quick! ty 


“ARLINGTON 


Brick- &- Stone | 
24-FT.. LIVING | 


Detached Garage 


oa email — too 812 B00, 
"ARLINGTON REALTY 
2212 Wises Bivd JA. 17-9300. 


“Mighty Good” 


Excellent vamily home near 
Agnes ae a" school. Large 1 
¢ ms 


; re cai 
2309 Mi 
si2 560 non-OG! 
; tearm 
cond 
located te beth publi 


St. 


a Fenced shady 
LINGTON REALTY 

2212 Wilson Bivd. JA. 7-990 
Colonel Transterred © 


Must Sell 


A Be Denetssus brick roms er site 
HUGE OR 


ped 
off-street park) : “= oxim erage 
kit... Gish washer thine | 

7 Colonial }~* Co | 


Developers oh & 620 


BEVERLY HILLS 


rs 


ex 
2 ye FA peeves 
LL. THIS Us 
$1500 town 
Y lL. §-6652 


A 7-1 
NTON AREA—30 

Dangerfield rd... 

Radl tion : 

, ALE™.—15 min. out. 4-bedrm 

Cod, $14.500 GI in excel 

featurine many extr 3 
Bcenic location Por appt 
cali J. T. MOTON Real'r 

2308 Mit. Vernon ave OV 


-T™ uD 
gd nd , e ape 2 baths 
te ad fi in price. $13.500; 

‘ +4 5 an. Mrs outdoor ba 
7 Tras: COx & CO. carport , ~~ ~ 


ene Realty Co., Realtors | 
Ki. 9-1600 eves... TE 6-3372 


o 


YS — New S-bed-| 
ALEXANDALA— “Giant oa 
rambiers, priced right at gg r only $450 dn 
ou a lovely 
erson Manor 
ana rear porches. eauip 
laund erm “> 


ood eno 
Sis RAMBLER BoYs Tx tum 
This one will sell fast, 
don't delay 
$21,100 Gi OR FHA 


POMPON 10. 


__ 2222 Wiisen Bivd 
’ BUILD 
We wil) bulld 3-bedr 
or split level on your 
$1500 
HU 


Sieh 
3-Bedrm.—Rambler 
$10,000 


in town 7. Pairfax and 


~— = ont 


} 


3 ay * cony 
to $22.950 
thece | 


comma ote in 
a 
vine ho 


th 
. 9 


this cute 3-be: is m 
in bea tl 
porch. patio and carpor 
13,.950' Al 
18-6652. eves, JE. 2 


ALEX Mt Vern 
approach to this 
rm. trick rambler 


pl , sereened 
fered yard and 


m 

picture 

terin-sine bodren ex. | 

alum storm windows 

t 632140 Mre 

76128 COR & CO 0 

7 it *MOTON REALTY. a OV 

c ie “Te ERBROOK (GARDENS | area— 

brick: liv. rm. ise kit. 
cobain att ~ bsm 

acre Commun) 

814.500. KE. 8.2373 


on Bivd is lovely 
attractive 3-bed- 
a~ gaa | pre: 


FORESTVILLE 


ICE BRICK RAMBLER - 3 Bast, Abeo On! 
. ace, eet hn D 
comievel. ett ; Are — LEXANDRIA ARFa 


N REALTY ( CO. | Jefferson Manor 
mio. 3800 $9150 : 
~paorek —piatac:| $1150 Dn.—$48 Per Mo. 


and shingie.| to non-veterang or veterans: brk 
iinine "room | onticello rd... 
and schools 5 
peaemennt eas 


lL. &- 
RAMBLER. 
3 BEDRMS.—$16,500 
FULL BASEMENT 


Masonic Temple on \aree cor- 


bed. 
Gl 


_— 


FALLS CHURCH 


G! APPROVED 
NO MONEY DOWN 
Ex iting pew plan for better-bullt 


r-designed 3-bedroom | 
rambler: extra-large) 


pm any hy 
——s 


windows. copper Bis 


a cate 


ract with $500 


wi 
couple 
accep 


with fireplace 


ieiehen $a YEONAS REALTY 


kitchen and 
ison Bivd 8-2100 


clure- window | 
daylight bamt.i! 2313 
738. ultiple Listing nidlies 
$i2,.806 G 8 
a iv 


ful 
laree ict: ariaed trom $19, 
m Cave Cod. 
ipa Tar ‘with Arepinc®: 
\q-acre lot with 


toe fe A nt. "ssi" pots 


SPRAWLING: 


+? 
Strung-Out Rancher 
Rorfoctis placed on kt 
wanered | oe en shade touts 
“better- new” 5-mo 
yo that 
omare nae $2 to 


‘eet of bo Took hn 
Wide are yours if you veit 
ide ing Foot entrance to big 
L, a e th firep! aby an 
emus seperate 

rs 


percedt tor 
pine ral ‘iret ee 


: rm 
ture w indow 


ns 
dable h 
porch «@ side screened, 
poroh. Ciean a approved. 
Only $2 down vet pete 
hagan Son, aiiees UN. 4- 
er 
Sevan 
. has bedrms. and th, 
rm.. fireplace. din. -.. kit..| EL. 86-1868 FR 


iv. 
full Demt; t Price 
Gl *th00 én. Call Mr | 


ae: a, ie 
 Hithens eats | BEVE 
ce &E 4 Bedrms.—$18,950 
} WR. nd hy ig) A sep - 
— on! 
Fade 


Agent on Premises Daily 


or non-veterans. Cell for turther 


deta! 
BELL REALTY CO. 
515 Wrthe St. Alex. Va 
PALTORS "TY! 


Thirections ba 6 Les Ber to Bro 
at ' ule 
right on Bre ads 

to Parker st.. Left i 

nsehee Mode! Home at 910 Parker 
st. Falls Church, Ve 


LEXANDRIA archmont Realty, Inc. 


RLY HILLS. a yo ne JE. 4-5513 JE. 3-1830 


ALLS CHUR 


3 Bedrms ~-$10,850—GI 
$75 MONTH 


Immediate occupancy Liv 
spacious 
bat 


wget Highly desirabie, 
fe a trem 
full arate dining rm: pine paneled 


jon Convenient 
ari % bj 
rice 
HUBBARD REALTY CO. | Pisco? 91°" inhibi 
Rs S90 | ERED ERICK W. BERENS — 
rang haa SALES, INC., NA. 8-5000 _ 
rT] sO 


$11,700 


pe incloned. a 
porch. T ans es weet 
for ack 


"tae! @ an 
falien cows ae 


Ae 
7th Eon} REALTY 


r will take back | 


<a he 
quick - ex Maren 1 
lEe ee 2 
Arthur Walters, dnc. 
“Glebe. JA 7-8 
ME BU 


2212 Wilson Bivd. JA. 17-9300 


SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67VA. | 


NOR + as ARLIN N 
3 FEDRM ba BATHS. Ben 
Poerkiing . —— rambier Ae@ar- 
pletion ier 


8 
A 
r Smith’'& "Bonnel 


rarker, 
JA = 


Ov erlook ing: beau- 
id mi, t 


Only $22.98 
CM HULEY. i” “3.79 


Sleepy Hollow 
$33,500 


Rambiler—3 Baths 
THIS HOME WAS BUILT 
BE REST OF ITS K 


ent Sage and 
DAUTIFU’ 


far Aetached race 
For appointment te inspect call 


J. Wesley Buchanan, Inc 
“Radio Ride. art tA. 41158 


Winter Won't 
Last Forever 


Gree’ 


; ATH AND Is 
POR ADDITION at 
ea 


n heme of 
North Artington 
rick colonia! 
with partially 
side screened 


YEONAS REALTY 


23193 W 
M - 


> —— 


TRADE YOUR 
OLD HOUSE 


3-bedrm Drick row 
-“- ige_ itv 
ree ‘Beaustfulls 
with o 
alee 


detached tn 


AL Baicet's font TNC 
808 N. Washington St. Ales. Va 


_—_ 


ARE YOU 
st 
Por a 


PLANNING TO 

LL YOUR HOUSE? 

c te on Virgin ° a 
Te 6-744 


i 
BAKER & SON, 


Washington 6&1 


INC . 


son WN Ales 


“Barn Red” 


RUSTIC RANCHER 
*. acre paddock -fenced., 


at tached Tt age $19 750. excel: | 
terms 


Asthese L. Walters, 
N Randolph at Glebe. JA 
IMAGINE: Sat y 614.950 Sees 
goreeous nite Colonial home 
& superb Nor th Aritngten locatio 
tinghem S8choo!l Pirepiace 
rm. | i ain rm + 
: Mu ge side-screened 
Dat 10 tamed at °. Secmmaney Cali 
eb } A. JO 


CHAPMAN & 4 


inc. 


de 
in 


r 
Sc on 


Within Your. Budget 


SPLIT LEVEL 


Imr acylate | bed 

venien ecated in Pale Church 

few ae ocks from dbus. stores 
»5- 


A: — fo ty, JE ri ‘4900 
WHY PAY RENT 


FO 
n mas onry , a. or 
& very amali 4 
and rave snout niy peay- 
> ee * 


WANNAS REAL 


Ry appt 


mn. Bal in 2b ¥re 
NDSEY 


means the end for Werld War 
Ti Gi ing rights but doen't 
: hen te 

we found a dandy’ 


noY 


@o@wn end 3 bedrooms up 
basement with rec. room: 
ocated Im a besutiful let with 
fenced rear vard. fruit trees 
and a pe arber Canvenient 
Pa Church lecation, Gl ap- 
prov red at $14,500 


THIS i ASSUMEF NO 
PESPONSIB! ITY FOR YOUR 
FRIFNDG FEING ENVIOUS 
WHEN YOU B® ¥ ee with 
ONLY #8735 


YEONAS R REALTY 


2313 Wiis 


&-21 
Multiy ste Eisties pe kee 


VIG ORGAN or 


SM, Pn See 


TRosTe BALES 
py aP! : INSURANCE iz 
SOT H. BOBBIN REA ESTA 


——~ TREE 


ACRE OF THEM. 
bed ramps. i™% Daeths. ful 


meciate 
s. 
Rite [NNAS + 


ALTY. JE ore 
$32,950 


On 


PLUS A 


M BUILT 


r neat N 
tien ALMOST | NEW. 3- 
° rx BRICK 


OPFICE OR DEN. Level At- 


fachec garace 
J Wesley Buchanan, Inc 
Radic Pics JA. 4-1185 


Here’ “a 


CHARMER 


ty come - 
eye 


ot 


low orick re 
mse. 2 


n 
attractive aalntebaer- 
Asking $23 with excel- 
lent terms available 


Arthur L. Walters, 


KH. Randolon at Glebe. JA 


YOU'LL LOVE 


the trees on this nalf-eqry jot 
2 nedree 


ne room th firep 
expansibir attic ne 
heat, 


_ $15,250 
J. FULLER GROOM CO 


7 ‘any > til) 


“TH E “MOSTEST 


Home for the money we know of! 
Charm! te atone J *Sbe’ 
evi ering MASTER 


RIV 
with huge ciorcet and 
a bath. 2 iled 
bookcases. outd 


NG 
On! 
ty 823.950. you must 


Parker, Smith & 


Inc. 
-§200 


a 
’ 


Liv- 
ms. 


g4- 
a ao- 


ERM CTUR 
DOWS. selene caeeainne. bullt- 


‘aaa Tas! 

; 

genventiona for x #. Fe, 
‘ sep 


"|For ALL the Family: 


roll- 


rm. «=Cohome con-' 


POR EXCELLENT VA PROPERTY 
| WA REAI TY 


v4 kitchen —— ¥ 
me 


730 


: ue.) 
E Berl | 


SALE SUBURB. povees 67VA. | SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67VA. | FARMS, LAND, SALE = 70 


Vv | VIRGINIA 
ey tdrosms. | HOME AND INCOME 


rec creation rm. with fire Fortif urself for those “rainy 
: open -Déame days w P te this tneome property! 

alk to new grade echoo! teday. N_ Arlington location near 
$18,200.) schools, bus and an nae center 


opp: 

, "Ts - ; ivine room, inine room, eauipped 

Y > iui patna, 2nd two lark 

OUNG IN HEART: on first floor. Second 

Then here's the home far youl floor containa one e living- ain. | 
ULTRA MODERN yet conservatier 
SPACE SAVING but anality con- 

WALLA 


Prince William County 
ON HISTORIC peg RUN 
jess than 30 miles to et 
crostlence? 
erated *: 5 


i 


70 howak modernized home in 
Manassas, $75,000 
| To inspect, call Phylis Under- 


ine room, equipped chen, fun 
bath and one laree bedroom. Hue 

struction Oiace 

vate: CLO 


hasement with, bath and oerb 
RE.- th ponsenesy Put 
iv % 
This wuniaue for onl 
RAMRBLUR will « 


1 detalia trom 
vol ONLY i See ' BRIGGS REALTY CO. 
Parker, Bang a Donnell Lee Hithway Bt Glebe 14.4. 5-2493' wood, HAymarket 4-3193 


1A. T4161 | Mac Lindsey, JA. 7-221) 
PRETTY HOME N MA eee a LOTS FOR SALE 


$250 DOWN AND $90 PER MONTH MARYLAND 
iys this larger than Ususl brick ACCOKEER—) acre op erat 
4. bed? m. home xi3 living rm wooded $950: $90 an $20 
with Nireolace, 13x11 oon Jay H. Supper, Broker. 
anned kitchen @& ning ms ; 
full basement. level fenced er ee Scere tsetse. 
trees THIS HOME i8 Supper. Broker, FA. 2-5 
BELOW THE Gl AP- 
ACCOKEERRK ARFA—Lots 
fiat. $600, $50 dn 5 mo 
Broker. FA. 2-514} 
7% ACRES — Ol Cheveriy 
cenange eacy ta Go 
$3000 
buliding 
DOUG M 
44-8290. Eves 
VIRGINIA 
[ MI. FROM ms -- try 
ar JA 


sites. "s acr 


In addition tw tliving room 


io =6Wwith 
PRICED 
satisfying i! a utiful' PRAISAL 
level garden handsome . ‘ 
fully fenced Gprensté neichbor- ALSO LOW DOWN PAYMENT FRA 
wrest J. Wesley Buchanan, Inc. 
‘Radio Bide ri JA. 4-1158 ‘t 


hood near Ow 

Chureh. $17,950 ‘ 

cepiadie Dial ae. Be a) ri 

pointment,, to\ in x RELVEDERE RANBL rd 
warms eaulp ‘ 


t 
50 GI =. REALTY. 


JOSEPH “W. SEAY CO. | 4 
REALTORS | 


113 W. Rroad &t alle C 
PR OP 
REAL 


I 
$i 


Inter- 
Under 


Other individual 


yA 2- 8230. 


rambier 
equipped 


NO. na $17°000 


section ?-hbedroom Cape 
ar ras finished rm. on 
walking dist 


arse 
VIRGINTA ER TTES 
CHAUNCEY a CORP ACREAGE, SALE 
“2737 
Cc HILDEN wanted in this nei ignbor- 
hood peetens fam ving 
brick 
featuring 


4 MARYLAND 
te AC agg on Rt. 301 


. 
5-12 


a “Tell me the ua rid 


for further Information 


VIRGINIA 


BEAUTIFUL HOMESITE 


BROYHILL BUILT 


would you marry a girl who 
wore glasses?” 


‘et black, 295 ¢ down 

Motors, me, 1002 Bast-We 

fat te Stiver Borne 
9-4! 


oS BUICK 
CONVERTIBLE 
$149 FULL PRICE 


, real nice ‘49 automobile 
1. w.- ieee, Cynatios low e.. 
Payments with 


AUTO CENTER . 


7th and K Sis. NW 3. 9624 | 
ROICK—'¢7 Super a radio 
heater: excellent trainaportation 


#95 
NELSON STUDEBAKER 
T7215 Balte. Ave.. College Park. Ma 
ui 5 2m UN. 4-8°00 
cde luxe sedanette, 
wn r. & 


"52 Super 
h.: §899 
n 
r 
Century ard? conve! 
—— paves steering and brakes 
ynafiow 
endamaptae Riviere Looe 
eoulpped: £2.699. HOR 
NER. Rulek Dealer 
at 6th. LI 6-64864 


‘55 CADILLAC 


|.Brick. ; Bedrms.., 


DOGS, PETS, KENNELS 76 


PHERD. not a yr. oid 
had shots Female 
Good with ehildcren 


Basement 

9¥%2 ACRES—CLOSE IN 
Raths the site of an oid house 
Fe Lots : nd 6 . 


MRS a 
LANGLEY - M et “SPR 1s \sTs 


SIDE BY SIDE 


OWN R A Pit N 1250 ‘ : 
BT eenAisaL ee” Re) LINCOLNIA HILLS | 

| font the eter ee live ternaces gee oa development 
ALEXANDRIA ettle e estate of one of x ir 
77 FROM Aes AGON ¢ eid resteen' s. Pri ce $27.500 8200 
FHA PINANC 


heat Dai! y, 10 Til Dark 


te hi rley 


* 


+ 


rity? 


? 1, 


a, 
“nh « 


“] 
yet within Walking 
and with city utili 
ner of the property 
estate or for su 


MIN ry 
exclusively by 


MASON HIRST 


senate. ’ Ya. Phone CL 
D SUNDAY 


WATERFRONT, een 


irom own 
Both par- 
AKC afd 
shots, ready 
and hunting 


PR $20 000 
Art, L CONSIDER “SELLiIno SEP.- 
A superd iecation 
Hwy and within the city iimit 
of Alexandria. You'll like ine 
quality construction anc var) 
’ : rs ’ 


j Wesley Buchanan, Ine 
nad Ga hea JA 4 L185 ti] 
GIN tA PROPER TIES 


v4 MARCUM CO KI 
UME 


> 
te someone wih lee 
Terrier 
8.2600 -9404 =e 
8-week-old puppy must 
nave & wood home ih bet. 5-8 
JA -5747 


COAL FUEL OIL, WOOD 80 


ASO oak fir 
livered anywhere 


Li. 71-4406. 
BOATS, PARTS, SERVICE $1 


BOAT fishing sot : 


plane feature complete OF 
itiehen with space for boreak- 
bar ectronie 

| g¥aranteeing even 
ture at all times. Prices 
from $18 700 to 621.500 


DIRECTIONS Out Shirley Hew? 


Chesapeake Bay 

Lots te. 

tALTY RA. 46-2200 
DOGS, PETS, KENNELS 


) * res Y 53-5675. 


mable Lil 4.068 
rd * prike Ane: . ealthy 
ack. Call OL 30 
re. male. il — oid 
| er a6 pedieree papers 
ze 


Ps, bik buff. beoute. 
, BB 
a rooms 
traneporraetion 
er 


We $35 JQ. 8-8353 
P. pups. beau = rk. 
7 sed AKC ME 4-7529 
Ras 
MANNAS. REALTY Je 2.3110 PER 
REAL ESTATE WANTED $9 =< —- An. Loan = 
WILL BUY PROP 


Brick or. frame. white or col, euick | 
se'tieme Cc ur MILLE | 
HU. 3 4443 LA 194 : 

70 


FARMS, LAND, SALE 
MARYLAND 


range 


hay 
= | 

exten tea) 
guard oe 
ror a 


M. T. BROYHILL , SON pe 


$61 10 Lee tiewy Ar ington Va 


$15,300 


GI APPRAISED 
3-hedroem br! rambier 
ro 


RR 

HARRIS N 
FREDERIC W. BERENS 
SALES. _ NA. 8-5000 

A L. sTOM on iL.?t Home 


fication« your 
Bell lerue For eat ‘a 


: ra 
x Rd. Lett te exhibit home. 
NC 
tral 
ne motor 
PILING for sale 
Prince Frederick 


PERSONAL LOANS 


Licensed under Small 


32 
2. deliver Phome 


GOA 


50 piar ele 
from or will ise your Pla 
TA e100 MASON GREEN CO 
tA “A268 area 

VIEW OF c APITOL fiw a: " schools ond 
= level ave “y RIV tr 


THE. oes ie seen today 
AURIE CORP. TA 5-17) 
hick RAMBLER Lat us te you 
this ~e wher 
wale quick wate ag Oe 
OF or 
LYNN REAL ry, Je. 32-9400 
STONE RANC HER—.> 
ory 30-ft. seree ned 
VERNON. 
HEAP OF “a 
thie <4-bBedroo 
home. Gl 


a) 
eves 


NATURE ALONE 

WOMEN’S LOANS 
Our Specialty! 
: tot. Around cor.) Duly, 4 rd. frontages. A neslected WE CAN MAKE 

, a = Got hurry en| oe, © we : eiuxent xe | Base YOU A LOAN IN 


“$500 DOWN 2 Hrs. *.. 


Now 
NON. 
ONLY ONE TRIP NECESSARY 


-bed room Colonial. full 
MARYLAND Cash Lean 


aA r 
s75 PER MONTH. 
MANNAS REALTY 
S337 Bhede tal. Avo. TN. 4-74 79 
7898 Geergia Are. JU. 9-2882 


HANDLE 5 
Wheaten Fihance Ce. 


With Car a oe 


Perfectie ‘*mmecu 

or der ’ her es ‘ 

a; Sa a 
Ati 


300. Gi 
HERE . 
re and 


PERSONAL LOANS 
Licensed under Small Loan Laws 
; liatelatataaatlatede 


’ CONFIDENTIAL + 
LOANS BY PHONE ; 


> 
r« 
°On Your Signature Only} | 


; Suburban Finance Co. > 


* Take long as 20 months to 
repey. We like to say “Yer” to 
employed men and women, mar- 
ried or single. Phone, write, 
come in. 


hasement 


FINANCE CO. 


of Alerendra 


re KING STREET 
2nd Fleer « 
Phone: King 8-S858 


Open everings — phone for hours 


Cit 


Suburban Finance Co. 


S338 Rhede Is! 
T98 Geersis 


ja Ave 
4608 Fast-Weet Hey... 
OL. 2 


nasement hot 
' Snaceg patio im rear 
AS > * ns $) 15.280 Gi contracts ac- 
cepted 
Arthur L. Walters. 
MN. Randolph at © AT 
UNUSUAL 


This different 3-bedreom rambler 
effers lots of living epaece fer the 


Residents’ Finance Corp. 


Quick-Confidential ects BR. lL. Ave, AP. t-2008 


¢* LOANS 
@ MARYLAND CASH LOAN 4 


> 7895 Georgia Ave. JU. 9-8852 o 
7 337 BR. LC ave. ON. 46-5173 m7 
7 


JUST OPENED 
| A NEW LOAN OFFICE 


RESIDENTS’ FINANCE CORP. 
OF MT. RAINIER 


LOANS IN 2 HRS. 


We specialize in 
leans te women 
TTS Rhede Island Ave. 


"Rainier M4. AP. 7-2208 
> 


Inc 


: 
oe 


ere 


bedrooms 

riingten jleca 
venient to everything with bus at 
door Priced under the Gl ap- 


praisa! $16 750 
J. FULLER GROOM CO 


1A 7-448" REALTORS 


PERSONAL LOANS 


Licensed under Small Loan Laws | 


quickest and easiest way to 
straighten out one’s financial affairs. 


ARRANGEMENTS CAN BE COMPLETED QUICKLY 
—, 


G. A.C. FINANCE 


CORPORATION 


MT. RAINIER 
3510 Phede hiend Avenve* 
3317 Phede triand Avenve** - 
MYATISVILLE 
5303 Beltimore Avenve* 

iitect te The Met bieene 
SUVER SPRING 
7912 Georgie Avenve’ 
8513 Georgie Avenve’* 
COLLEGE PARK 


FINANCE CORPORATION 


$600 


. 
7s 7 


Ov" 


LOANS 
UP TO 


At any of our 
Virginia Offices 


Tel. APnleten 7.2200 
Tel. HObert 2.5028 


RUE! Now you con get up to $608 in 
Vege efices . . . TWICE AS 
MUCH CASM AS EVER strorer 


QUICK CASH TO 
CONSOLIDATE YOUR BILLS 
+ «+ oF to use for ANY 
good purpose 


NOW «-<— TODAY m= is the * me oe # 
Phane fret for FASTEST SERVICE... . THERM 
COM th FOR THE CAH, 

"ss @8 eoty @s thet! 


Your 
Payments * 


$37.53 
$28.56 
$22.45 
$16.09 


You Can 
Gert 


$600 
$450 
$350 
$250 


Tel, UNien 4.4200 


’ 


Tel, JUniper 7.4900 
Tel. Ueper 9.3566 
4503 Enos Peed’ .. 
cco trem The Het Deence! 

LEXINGTON PARK 
150 N. 3 Netched Pood’ Tel. Great Mills 2471 
FALLS CHURCH. VA. 
128 West Brood $1. (Up te $4600) Tel. Jefferson 72-4643 


Meryland Offices Up Te $300 


Tel. UNien 4.0058 


FINANCE CORPORATION 


Alexondrio—807 King Street OVerlook 3-0130 
Arlington——3159 Wilson Boulevard JAckson 35-2200 | 
Rosslyn-——2021 N. Moore Street JAckson 7-8510 


* 2) Monthly Payments. tachedes chovese of 2%% per month on the unpeld | 
balance not in excess of SO. and 1: > or man month on the remaining unpaid 
balance as set out in the NEW ‘weinta Small Leen Law. 


ee ae ee ne. ee 


Now You Can Get CASH!! 


Up to $600 at your 


VIRGINIA 


STATE LOAN OFFICE! 


Now — More Money For You! 
How much do you need? $25? $250? $4502 $400? Now for the 
16 $400 "ny Virginial 


fuel, repairs 
and 
new born heirs 


Yes, you can borrow $20 
to $1000 for any good 
purpose at HFC, The 

principal requirement is 
the ability to repay in 
regular monthly instal- 
ments, There's an HFC 
office near you. Why nob yi on Sader ite lodorirel Pusan 
phone or dropintoday. 4 


MONTHLY PAYMENT PLANS 


Davets 
SIA 
wo! 
“i'w 
eee | 


? 
Params 
S105 
OO 
wala 
oe, (* 
‘a. 


~~ 
pater: 
s&s 
biada 
"16 
‘2 &R 
‘Rl 


24 
Pasmle 


S716? 
45.44 lead 


is above snelade conie of the leven of 


First hme, you con ge! up 


Pas: ve 


_ Here's your chonce te consolidate 
these scottered bills Inte . .« 
ONE EASY — 
MONTHLY PAYMENT 


| Maney for Easter . . . for Taxes. . 
ery geod purpose. 
tedey for quick, confidential service! 


” Our Virginia Offices are ready te 
serve you! 


YOU CAN 
Get 


$600 
$450 
$350 
$250 


your 
PAYMENTS* ; 
Life insurance on all HFC loans at no extra cost te you 


OUSEHOLD FINANCE 


Suitland Mt. Rainier a 
4612 Suitlend Road 3235 Rhede island Ave., Ind Fleer 
Phone JOrdan 8.9364 . Phote UNien 4.5740 


. tor 


Phone of come in 


ROSSLYN 
1200 LE HIGHWAY 


ALEXANDRIA 
113 S$. COLUMBUS STREET King 91714 
i * Pav in onda Inetaliments Includes charges of 24% per month on the 
; th on the 


| nna’ uopeld balance no set out in. and 1%° per 
unpaid baiance as set out in.the new Virginia Smal) Leas Law. 


Bethesda 
JAckson 12-3224 7444 Wiseansin Ave. 
Phone OL 6.7400 


014 Gearmin Ave. Ave. oat Finer ag Fe fl A aad 


no &., 
Pa aae te soni ™ Bm 


y 
i 


CONVERTIBLE 
$695 DOWN 


a 
. itr tronie: eve. 
BLASS & CLARK 
N. Capitol = ae Ave. NE 
Dally MP s* 3 San th § 


FARM AND GARDEN 82 
FOR SALE—NHORSE MANURE. 80 
5-8485 
POWER gh be T LER. wh 
b 112 ‘ae 
os iE. - vem 
MOTORCYCLES, ETC. 86 
MARLI-Y >. SON—-1954 medel 
re with rhead vaive motor & 
de box tor ah delivery service 
N Lik RE NEW CONDITION. 4795 
ore and Mr 
‘StohIman Chevrolet | 
3270 M ST. NW, . 


barre. 
nm tools 


_ Len a 
power 
mer hoemae fi- 


1 owner _petual 
nm > 


vote. 


Cor 


trade Ask 


De Ville-st rie: 


Alex E Pin 3- +727 
| “a.” sedan Btrie- 
2.4614 AD 2. ae by “Finetwoed,.,2:tove ofiat' 
TRAILERS, SALE 87 CCC cu 
CONT NENFAL 50. 33 Thier 33 exce!- Capitol i Caditiac-Olds Co. 
ST. 2-26 


lent Saaeiites: 2 


CADILLAC— 56 C 
oS ne. & pee | 


16446 


Admiral 
sparkiing interior, 
made 


erie 


dire 
Call 


Cadillac Coupe 
REPOSSESSED 
$697.92 Total 


950. 2-tene. excellent condi‘ion 


Oven 9-9 
a Plains 


mi orth of La Plate on R 

no se *TRAILER--22 ft.. fer rent 

Be! per me. ; 
gi. 


dds ' rs mh , give oe 

= = 
sieiSrat LOANS 900A 
licensed under Smell Loan Lats 


NEED MONEY? 


Call Kraft Loans JU °- 7900. 
QUICK PE NAL LOANS 
tr PAMILY FINANCE CORP 
Wilken Bivd. Ari. JA 


TRUCKS, SALE 


556 CHEVROLET—-$1145 
\, 7. pict up. very nice 
CHEVROLET 8006 
Seten” 40 


ilvery 
51 ee $595 
1 ‘s -ten ‘le clean 


ery 
53 CHEVROLET. $1145 
a, as latbed ieee than 30.000 


CADILLAC 1954 
Chevy Chase Chevrolet - 
OL. 4-61090 $3395 "ste 
CHEVEOL cet “Peace of ming ae Capitol Cadillac-Olds Co 
anteed trucks at he reer a ioe 1222 22nd St. NW ST. 3-260 
im lew * we iret < 
NICHOLSON a Lt CaDILLaC— 62 0 new throughout 
Balt! more ave. Hyatteville WA Brivaie owner. sims Bo. 5.5197 
_ LAC—'Si convertible. 8. & H 
GE WANTED power seat, power 


OWNER-OPERATED trucks wanted Bive finish 3! 
to. haul cinder bieeks and brick BRANCH MOTORS. 
re) 4-927 


‘ ADE. —- - §*® converti bie. Hydra 
OWNER -OPERATED trucks 


wani- wim tires —— 
te heul bullding material. Bee Fusiahe This i 
Jann rrydele Bi 


s Oo} 
AUTOMOBILES WANTED 96 


OR WA welcom nd eold nee 
HAI MOTOR, cS 


aed 3 ri ap eh }- Poy 
“ aor 


make 


75 

wal 
brakes; iow 
dr! vo Must 
U 6600. ext 


CADILLAC—'53 Series 
fully eaulp 


4dr 
cond 


2 
ouip pert 
85 


MONROE FORD 
East- West Hey. Si ont. 


Dt 
J Open rH 9 


‘62° coupe _— 
eo Suis equipped 


er brakes, ete. Immac throug out. 
$3795 


uburban Cadillac-Olds 


RADLEY SHOPPING CENTER 
OL. 64-7780. 


‘80. CADILLACS 
$45 DOWN 


4-dr sedans 
All care extra clean 
; Pully cvueranteed 
leemediate delivery. Call now or 


"AUTO CENTER 


25 & EK Sts a: a634 
ADILLAC 

tene gray inelud- 
ing power steering tg er brakes 


i ‘Cadillac€ Olds Co. 


Ys iy ri 
Good cond. $1700/ 


200 
OR DOWN 


BLACE & CLARK 


Cor. M. Capito) Se Pris. Ave. NE 


Cars Needed for 


EXPORT 


we A ribe OFeE TO Tor ANY 


ROMs R ON ie, 
"HO 


wrt cong bc) Your 
coupe: fully equip 
$1350 or best effe 


TU. 2-5415 a 


BILL ADAMS fapd tog nan, 7300. 0c S| 


CASH FOR R CARS tz," Ene ett 
NNY MOTORS — | Bawwittoiss | 


Ave NE LA €-2200. rade & terme 


Benes Dollar $$ ma 


StohIman Chevrolet 
3270 M ST. NW. 
BILL BENIe” “INC. 
KE. 7-1522 


clin ROL ‘i ae §2 bivjeline de oe 
finish. Pow lid 
“CASH FOR CARS 


a orig 
od b. Reliable patties E 
am 
my = fetes fer. clean aw > stat 
—_ any make mod 
w: WB “Ee alan 


wt MOTORS 


ay a} 
and H.. original brewn « 
finish owner 


} 
McKEE PONTIAC 
“PONTIAC MEANS Mek 
5335 Wis. Ave ST. 5-7 107 
Air sport 
including 


CHEVROLET—1944 Be! 
power windews, perlect fier. 30 


1195 


BEAU 


Ask for Mr. Hae 


-1646 


' 
' 
| 
huxe 
: 


983. Ki 
>. ave nw 
black. 2-dr 

se 8 RE 


AY a U 
| bar Md. MArket 71-3430; Clinton, 
9642 ADS a Sa a 
; cer — 55° « luxe 2-de 
wergtide. low mileas 
hee Rye? ‘sciasl derk 
finish 


wMcKEE, PONTIAC 


“PONTI 
af rae AL, 


5335 Wis 
a 
ery | 


notes of 
Ave NW. EM. 3-014) | 


cy — 
lg 
dillacs Wanted 
PENNY MOTORS 


hard 
oweral 


. Sve RD MOTORS. INC. 
ee 5 e234 Ariinston 


“AUSTIN | , | 
HEALEYS 52 CHEV. | 


SEVERAL TO CHOOSE From| /Otal Price $148 


Extremely Popular Sports Car Ail You Need Is a Job, $5 
i $ | 995 ‘Down and You Can Ride 


Oe. ave. aw 


’ 


ates 


We finance 2 benk a ano T site del 
LI. 4-4552 
BURRELL 
MOTORS 


213} 1 te OY RD. NE. 
TIO mmediate financing | 
a servicemen and out-of-towners 


‘ilys and other ular makes. 
nhattan Auto, Inc, 


(Established 1914) 
7th at R St. NW. NOrth 7-2700 
| Vheitag 
OM 


Pairfax 
29-21), Merri 


| 
C 


oliaes ith ea Bh $3983 


3923, 

nvertibtes: | 

of gM ¢ IYATTSV ILLE BUICK, 

4920 “thede Island ave... yartts- 
vile. Md. AP. 7-9000 are 


BUICK: '53 


Olds 
: * Buick. 
AB LOW Ae os oy RG 
Hawkin 


ohiman ‘Chevrolet. 
3270 M ST. aie 


$685 Total iil 
Bveqiions © condition: original, Spin CHEVY i, Powers aa 
fs, Ps w.-w. tires; rums and om gad a. AML, 


BLASS & CLARK and ver 


MONROE FORD 
N. ave. 
we ite A eRe en PAE Raat West, Mr, 


“< 


Teas | 38 I 000 
Daily 


‘lver 8 Md. JU. 9 
aed ee os Jase, Ci rcu lat ion 
“ rguce, rf n 


s 
ibe Veretiae, r con e 


means quicker sales results 


for Washington Post and 


Times Herald classified ad.- 
vertisers. To place vour ad 
ne. low mileage 
ee WHEELER, IN 
. 
A HRYSLER-PLYMOUTH-IMPERIAL 
ARGRST WASHINGT cM 4108 


4800 Wisconsin NW 
CHRYSLER 48 


Phone 
REpublic 7-1234 


a 
finish 


G 
JU 


Heate 


AUTOMOBILES, SALE 


CEM TENGEN AE ~~ 1947 
1.100 actual miles 
Seatac Rox 1218 Soak, oke. Vay 


og 54 Mon ters 

coune "5 hy own ntABUM 

MOTO So 1O6l 
57) 


MESC v aY— 49 


97 


converse 
$1950 “s 


010 
7°98 ave. Bilver Spring. Md, 
IMPERIAL 55 seda 


including 
blue exterior 


fully eauip 
beau tiful 2- sone 
harmontizin 
luxurious > 
1-o@ner ‘car properly con- 
Htioned and euaranteed yr heel 
mobile free ELER. INC. 
CHR YS ER- PI YMOUTH. IMPERIAL 
AROEST WASHINGTON DEA RI 
4200 Wisconsin NW. EM 
DE SOTO.—'52 Custom 4-dr 
and th excellent eond.: 


4-door, R. and hea 

$149. Thacker Me- 
34708 R. I. ave. ne. LA, 
sedan. 


priv — uRY—’ — Biation Wason 


$795 . #000 condition: can finance: 
i moe it Diplomat hardtop So PEOPLES MOTORS, JU 
| a 2 b. 


new 1 ' MERCURY — "St Monterey Sedan’: 
n guar anteed 
{ORNER: 5 C ORNER 
ave. ne. at 6th 
53 
uuyv 


station 
beautiful 
m try i 


Coronet 
;} On, equipped 
ahape. VY-8 motor 
yourself, $1295 
DODGE—'5i 4-< 
sianals ae 
maculate 
guarantee was 


heater. turn 
= finish im- 

er Worthwhile 
5 ik £499 


R. INC, 
CHRYSI im PLYMOU rH IMPERIAL, 
LARG ES! WASHINGTON DEALER 
4800 Wisconsin 3 f 3-4708 
bOpcr— oe Coronet + i-dr snatiess 
; w.-w. tires Gyromatic | 
extras per! mech. | 


trade and terme 
co... 4000 Ga. ave 


Buick peek er. Pia. ave. ne 
Ll. 6-646 


whRC # DER “BENE — 1956 
so 190 * 


pObGE 


ie 
cond rromalic $945. 
ay ONRC trad 


E FORD 
510 rate are. NW > M : 
*. en +? 9 
‘pobgt— 5s oe Dipiemat 
1 y * v- tires. 


“Cor onet sedan. r. 
rive, 


werranty 
7701 


‘50. pvt. owner. $250. Can 
seen at Pruce'’s Semaes Station, 
| a bh and Md. ave 


‘S| VICTORIA 
REPOSSESSED 
$367.50 TOTAL 


Beautifu 7-tene 


Ambass ador 4-door e- 
fully equipped 2 


tone finish 
Recently 


approva: 


BUCK MOTORS 


2521 BLADENSBURG RD 
OPEN 9% rth 5S SUN. 10 j 
DODGE—i1948 convertible. BR. and 

juet had engine overhau, 
going abroac 

FE. 3-399 
Ranc n weaen. 


Mr or 
y= Chevrolet 
sere MST. NW. 
OLDSMOBICE. 1536. All mole) a 

SSIONAL MOTORS. in®? 

KY Commerce Lane 
Rockville. Ma PO 2-4 
OLDS MOBILE FF 
coupe: beautify 


, 


pee Ne power steere 


ora ya ectric Wife 
Gows and sea‘ pane ose Olds 
Suburban Cadillac. Ids 
BRAD rel SHOPPING CENTER 
Bethe Mad of 6-7700_ 
riect. $695. 


“MONROE FORD 


do Wisconsin Ave. NW 
0090 Open “Til 9 P 
“on veTrtibie 
excellent condjt! 
RA. 3-293 


y equipped 


ower 


“fl 
rURb 53 me. 

eauipped 
$1000 
= 2 ee - _ 
55 bieck 4-dr. Custemiine 
matic: r. aod h 4000 mi 
655: 2 snow end 5 


Owner goime overseas 
2-81 


Arter 


“Safete padded instrument 
braxes. 200 fh 


qa 
spraaer 
— power 
roll b ~~ 
16534. 30- 


NROE "FORD 
pnw Her. au. 7 


_ Open. ; ; 
Victoria herdteo V-6 
- 7 ir Pu! 


A "’- 31043 “att er 5 wkdars 
weexcendcs 


| 42997 Bast 
a TROs 
FORD—195} 


‘54 OLDS “88” 
REPOSSESSED 
FREE TAGS 

$1285.50 TOTAL 


$108 50 down and ‘ake 


"$5 Crown Victoria; Fordo- 
. © god h 
HORNER'S@ 
Buick Dealer, Fie. ave. a4 


i 
k . i : udor 


Forde asting 
FRANK "SMALL IR., 


3200 Penne. Ave. SE. LU '2-9827. 


‘52 FORD 
REPOSSESSED 
$329.50 TOTAL 


4-dr. Sedan Beautiful Blue fin- 
ish: eauipped. 89.50 dow + 
up balance at 

immediate credit 


LA. €- * 
BUICK MOTORS 
2521 Bi ADENSBURG RD WE 
OPEN 9 “TIL 9. SUN. 10 "TIL 5 


6464. 
Customline - 
contr 
domatic. 


towners 
prova! 


financed. For credit ap 


RE. 7-3890 
BOB WILSON 


3D & K Sis. NW. 


approval! 


OLDSMORBILE — ‘55 “G8” Wolltes 
coupe. completely equipped includ~« 
ing radio and heater . 
steering, 

pbieck finish; 

Batisfaction 


BOHANKA SERVICE 


1126 20th St 


OLDSMOBILE— SO 
radio & heater & 
$395 


Rosenthal Chevrolet 
the Best Deal of Al 
and Ce) umpbi + Pike. 

JA 7A TR] 

ae Roliday 

power 

ary finish ‘l s car ¥+ 
shape high above aver 
5495 down = approved 
Three other ie choose 
joven ait ment 


Bey 


ORD — 1954 V-8 station wagon. 
beaut. orie ereen. Country sedan 
, 8-pass. Completely equipped | 
silc. fr. Ot 
Trade and 
cCU., 


r 


5 
MOTOR nw 


- _ very clean 
¥ 1951 V-8 Tudor sedan. , 
finish in peautitul ecean biue. set 
off wit gleaming rome. clean 
tnterior best of treatment 
bd rmer Go A 


sel, ftteelt 
$545 Asx for Mr 
Balter 


StohIman Chevrolet 
3270 M ST. NW, 
2- 1646 


FPORD.54 Victoria. RK. and A 
Pordomatte. black body with cream 
top and mote leather ntertor, 
w.-w. tires 14 No. 327TAB. 30- 
day serra trade and term 


NROE FORD 


hs Addedondee Ave. NW 
Ooem “Til 9 P.M. 


VICTORIA H.. TOP 
REPOSSESSED 
$299. 50 TOTAL 


lack nad ivory zy tone finish 
Buipped Lae - Por ama tic CHRYSLER-Pl.YMOUTH- IMPERIAL 
FA 


! LASOnST L. ASHINGTON 
— DOWN L 
ance at—$20.16 per 4800 Wi sip Fe EB? 23-4708 


SEGRIFY MOTORS ‘secre amet stone 
: inc,uGipg rae 


dio and heater Rparamatic trans. 
4th & N. Y, Ave. NW. 


mission. power hrakes 
= 
PEN TODAY 9 ‘TIL 9 


shows 
owner 

it will 
terme = trade 


& H 
Like-new Cana 
in excellent 

Only 


Ol 
Yo 
steering 


“WHEELER INC 


res inte 
A Ponhanks servi “ed car 
and recw.al ed 
Satisfaction gua 


POHANKA - "SERVICE 


a 
lipped. cus $195 
Serves watts SALES 
oan Axo RIGS & RDS S F717 


CHILL A 
FORD — 49 2- New blue finish 


Tle ge tae li a 
PINEY BRANCH MOTORS, JU. 5- 
idea - ppenrenry Srakes m titen CC C guerantee 
Be Bs [Capitol Cadillac: -Olds Co. 
232 22nd St UW. ST 
$749.60 FULL PRICE) tut exizars iste nen 


Pull extras Like new insid 
| out rtifie 1-owner 
re wre low monthly payments. } 
fie Buy! Por credit soproval 
3-6625 


ped 
m lea 
Suburban Cadillac. Olds 
ADLEY SHOPPING 
par OL 
OLDSMOBILE 
tae cou pe. 


ay 
- 


$1495. 
nw TA 
r Super 2 
: 99 
at coring an 
ar d 
Ho ollday: 


ad te ° 
4-cr, 


"s nh. 
Read 3 A 


Rerviscense financed. KIRK 
TORS CO., ; ave 


6LDSMORILES ST WE 
: and 
000 Ga 
ENB} lent 3d car: oe 
6 Dd. 
Ney, 5 “~_% e oh of 


ave. | 2 .” 
power steering and brakes 
r ad h $2.399. “35 
an 
COR’ 
ave. ne at 
Ga. ave 
. 


McKEE PONTIAC 

“PONTIAC MPFANS McKE? 
5335 Wis. Ave.- ST. 3-7107 
PLYMOUTH 1951 use 
te “hy ag 
27 


mmodore tires, 
NER'S 
. ne 


con "are Bae Pla. av 


Va sedan. 
Uitramatic. 
reclining bed 
2300 miles 
$2395 — L, 
; Wise. ay 


spec ¥ de 

. bah: @ 

Dp eats 
LA. 6- 


PLYMOUTH 1950 


dollvwood Hornei 
Hydra Convertir. coupe: 
: tan 


~Matiec 
a ene finish and meat enina 
interior. of -w $1 No, | 
544- o-d trade | 
and ‘ale 


MONROE FORD 


1237 Bast-Weat Hwy Soe. 
- up ‘ oe 


dst. ern} heels 
Vil, 


bering — “- rise No. 623-A $425. 
Kenyen-Peck Chevrolet 
3140 lee Hwy.., Arlington 

9 10. 


Open 
rt ovr "2 Belvedere Mand 
Top, ee, Lac Al vig gua 


. tia” 


‘Sn teed oto 
gua. 3A ACK a TOS yoctgts be ay — 


Pl OR “Gar | PLYMOU n—'s3 “Suburban, 


Fully eae why esr! * he 1602 


ave.) Silver’ | Spring, Md, 
oar Met ‘$i 4dr; 


ennt antlee, 


"53 
gah, 


he 


runs 
~~ equipp 
Ae, ee 
ave. ne.-at 6th. LI, 


— 
ivory 


8. pil Codie’ Pal 


. : 
* ' ¥ ; 4 “ 
THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD, AUTOMOBILES, SALE 97 AUTOMOBILES ae , AUTOMOBILES, SALE 97 AUTOMOBILES SALE AUTOMOBILES, SALE 97| AUTOMOBILES SALE 


44 Tuesday, February 28, 1956 -| ly sit a1. ps oS ee ott egg ‘o> Ah, MR PONTIAC — a2 7 5 Sy Rerom pond bat od means: Ts or f you cant beat 
TRUTOMOBILES, | SALE , 7| brake eautp te we. hvdee and| 3 Matic einai get. : seat oe ae tires: tual at miles les original “ab and black a8 $3 aan ; IT NICHOLS AVE. cE 
4 bin Wor Te MEERER IN ?. “Mckee PONTIAC Of eA On. A ai Cli & 

: ?- nee ae FT steering. @ agg en ne Biers ae consti: cHRTRLEN FLTMOR TH. o- 5335 Wit Wi na ve. ST. 9-71 07 | sTCDEnAKEE —_ soo Shoat baths ton | 

end h.. hyd " MecKEE PONTIAC "50 4-dr. Chief “8”; a. d| LARGEST HINGTON DEAI LER | :. avs. b d-n EE 
Meee dares, 9 | Me ho, like new; g499. ‘SS coh" |- 4800. Wisconsin NW. _EM. 3-4708 | tens DEBAKER -- oe | Se ; Io (aT: Fat t. VY RR 
NTI a id statin ar vor ms, , » : 
fe Syne o ake pay yments and! 700.|— 4-deor sedan, Diack, radio, §| O L ‘ 1 


“PONTIAC MEBANE McK EE” 2.199 HOR ait a cr on zs cvmw 
45335 Wis, Ave. ST. 3-7107 | 2335 Wis. Ave. 51: 3. 7107 | § aier, Fie. ave. ne. at 6th. Li. | JONN RD MOTORS, INc, | . : oe | 7 
‘53 PONTIAC wiyt tone, pesdest, 


NTIAC eT —— station 


a “S454 2501 a la Eige, Arlington 


PE : visor ; 
“a” .-cyl, O-dr. radio and heater, | PONTIAC.'55 2 ar hydra, heat or. . . ! | $595 | 


| fr 1 tom J S Sees wl Sark a1 eon. Gir. si Novel Pe we =. ie 4 t 2 ore th seee Pre 
54 JAGUAR oo fant ce | 6000" x . NEW ; ar ry 23th fe eat a TERMS ‘om TRA = 
$945 | "McKEE. PONTIAC | oe 4 1 ARCADE PONTIAC 


XK 120 
| PARKWAY-F | aan Ne MEANS MOS f Washington's ‘Largest 
“Foulle Modified” e¢eure. Riack | -o5) wat Nw ORD 04 5335 Wis. Ave ST 3- 7107 ‘53. Buick, $1195 “Pontiae Beal a 


‘ AD 
Almost new, one owner, PONTIAC-'S4 4.47, r&b. Mydra-| STUDEBAKER—'51 Commanaer 4- The Post-Times Herald oe ee DISPLAYS 
Mati« ' i} - | x fo lar ‘ a 4 h ' “6 enaime y gE . aoe arvies st. N Ww. 
$2495 ry $1295 B na oor: g. 2 ' + 7 i ‘s ” S 1o seal covers Regrets “ ° hat : 3460 N4th St. N. Ww 
feareta ave Sly ; orie pal a) nish: immaculate FORDS ' 
Bites WHEELER INC. , 
Broad Street Motors STUDEBAKER—'53 Commande: rine CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH-IMPERIAI R lj b] P rti 
date ag 3 pass. coupe. An ASRNG TOW DEALER eliapie Parties GEORGE LET US DOWN 
. 4 Tt . 
: | «00 Wiscor selbst § To Take Over This 11 ACT NOW! 


10.000 act sai 
Falis Church——JE. 2-5100 


meee | eS | FeNaL ce || SAAN IIe saver (fant ride 


= On Ss “00 CLEARANCE ” Sue fetiened : oe Victorias 1. @ R.  Fordomatios R. m.. deer, f. and h., dyna., 
uv quipped -tone net. a . an ‘ 
‘OWN A NEW ‘SS Pontiac THEY MUST GO: re ‘$1 FORD $595 | ‘52 BUICK $995 


Station wacom; f. and Bb. Ex~ | Super conv. 7. and h., dyna. 
cellent condition. 


“36 Plymouth | J so: ever s-soor scans, 2-100 5 SPECIAL CARS “4 ‘l Edmonds Motors ax testes gros | SIMERCURY $495 


tureweise and ereami radio, "$) Batck *%-dr it Chev Custem 4-deer; fr. and 


heater, Mvdra-Matic, vewer A] Site's as Metre f-aecge |Tm 3298 Wilson Bivd. Jp" "Pm" | st oups. S595 
“eer. new meter r. an 


steering, pewer brakes. w.-# 
tires, back-ep lights, rear seat $75 to $195, Arlington, Va. Saper t-deers + & b.. Prva. h., Hydra-Matic. 


: “e speaker Many ether extras Execelieont condition threegcheout. 

IF Your $ ae a — New ear ‘S2? Ford . $ 3 95 be SEEN ; ‘S3 PONTIAC $995 at Sreveeney $595 
warr c . cte %.ten e re ’ ’ 

B CAR IS WORTH 385 tee can ae fone ue ] ; Bi at inte Saebr sean. | “53 BUICK... $1395 

2 | onv.i ff. an . yna.; new 


a, fF 
Rank Financing $2195 fires. tailored stat covers, good $95 DOWN ‘Ss? FORD $595 son. 


* es "$3 PI th $695 IF YOUR Tudor 8-cyl, equipped 
oe yg $48 Many Others ta Choose From heeaien” abem coupe AND TAKE uP SMALL CAR is $ ° ounce ees $895 Pade yy aS noomep ag DELUXE 
TERMS OR TRADE ——— * oe Be Oe MON Roadmaster 4-deor: +. and h.. | ™ 478%. F. 8. and FP. B CHEV PLYM FORD 
nee ae, Be THLY PAYMENTS WORTH | Bl power steering. Excellent cond. | “$6 BUICK $2695 ° ° MODELS 


| BETHESDA MOTORS One owner. 
Re Sete Stee ARCADE PONTIAC ‘47 Cadillac $395 ATTENTION . # We can deliver a new ‘S3 CHEVROLET $995 | Bend bh. Drns.. power steer 
Miller and er, proc Washington's Largest and sh Hvdra. ron fimtehs * personnel, aff erades i Bel Air 2-door; ©. and h AE cara at Sees 
4 Pentios Dealer sitet ‘soni finances, Sincere ana fee 3 'S6 Plymouth & Biss toro $995 | '52 FORD $843 
a . oF " BIG. Usep c aR DIS? ays LOGAN ‘(Feord) - P FOR ONLY 3 00 me ad Tuder; ¢. and h., = Re AN S; vr. and hk. 38°99 A 
: — 37 Irving St. N.W 3540 14th St. WLW. Bank Financing o ' MONTH 
Heo Lith St. NW. m (PER MO.) Trades Accepted—Terms Arranged 


TU. 2-4100 ® Ask About Our 100% Incl. Interest and Ina, 


Dodge-Plymouth Dealer - 
7730 me Ra ae ty Rd. 


‘PUBLIC [tit] fou craw] ag = 


Open Monday through Friday, 9 ‘til 9; Saturday ‘til 6 
‘54 BUICK 


Sunday 
RIVIERA HARDTOP 


YOU GET A HM 
Fully Equipped 


BETTER USED CAR Tuesday ; 


SALE 


STEWART 
pow $5 
Name Your Own Terms 


BUICK 
AND TAKE UP SMALL 
FULL PRICE 


MONTHLY PAYMENTS E nm d -0 f “ M on t h 
aTeNTON ZICLEARANCE! 
Militars pefsennel, all crades® ° 

‘55 Ford 3=8=*BR5 

Sedan, Ne. 1775. ates 


+ 


We Need 
The Space 


These Must Go! 
‘5S! Packard $470 


Lee D. Butler eT 


‘49 Packard $174 
Will Give You The 


$47 Hudson $125 
BEST DEAL $« sa... 5 
HERE'S why: | > “9 Buick .. $384 


. fremendéovs me — 
Past Torney Many More Barge 


Cus eomnet Levalty ' 

Hivce Volume Tecstions | COVINGTON 

Low Overhe MOTORS , 
4 BUTLER SPECIAI 7301 Wis. Ave. 


1954 Firand New Packard Cieper Bethesda, Md 
De bene Sedan 
Bistro co.... $2000 OL. 2.9200 


FORD (maxes 


PERERA 


FEEREPERERERER ERE EH 


rere 


SEREEEEREEREES 


financed Officers and first 3% 


"canal beeeek @8 FOE $9] 50 , 33 Olds 
BOB woobs: i Fordomat- . @ ©. onte- 


. coral and white with eus- 
Area's Lerorst ac castem interter, to . wer brakes, 
{ BUTLER SPECIAL Pacteré Desler Te a awe” ee ay ee F — - cenaltiaa 


| MR A nee $1745 : vw » *53 Buick ‘49 Buick 


Sedan. READY TO GO 


PACKARDS & se, fa >] 195 ath." dyatier, $300 


omg rc Bleck 


STUDESAKERS oe Si pee ete tee ae fo 
Company Official Cars eo 5] Bard ‘5? Ford 


Mow Available at | 


. Tremendous Savings |) Thee: " vs Convertible ee 7 
Rutler Specials at a : | : a = - in my vies finih 645 pte $695 
Packard Meadquarters = a tnt Pe Black fints 
Conn. & Fila. ~e NW. . 
; 8000 | ’ ‘ . 
a _— a aan 14th and Florida Ave. N.W. HO. 2-7500 47 Pontiac 49 Chevrolet 


MEW WSS PACKARD. One of So “The SAFE Place to Buy” rah, ‘seat sue =. $150 ies ealetadine. $345 


las? 
he lode Serdonys, Ultrometr< 
vane : very eleam car! 


tremsmissionr, Power brokes, ‘a END-OF-MONTH CLEARANCE Steck Ne. S50A. 


steering, white-woll tires, 


sions, torsion level vide $3990 S ALE ‘SO Olds @ ‘49 Olds 


Mh 2h Wh Mh Mh Mh Mh Mh Mh Mh. 
rKKKKKKKxnKxnnxkrk 


FORD a 


ARS AAA 2 2G 2S Se Re SSeS eo. 2 


26° ates 


PULL PRICE 


‘SA Chev. ‘AR5 


Sedan. 


FULL PRICE 


‘53 Ford *A 


Sedan. Ne. 1768, 


CHEV. PLYM. FORD “waxes 


FULL FrRice 


‘53 Plym. = *3Q5 


Sedan. Ne. 1778. 


Wes $5240. Seve $2050 
1953 DODGE VS Coronet 2-door - 4-dr. 8 2¢ 
automatic transmission, rodio, heot : oe Réroms tis 395 Convertible r« $ 
or. white well fires, seof covers . neh saline ’ Tee ae new top. + -* 375 
™ ww ' re. = 
*, oowcwrer $895 $3 Chevrolet $979 55 Ford $1289 io ae et Estre cae! 


4-4r Sedan = *-4dr. Sedan Mailnliner: %-ert 


A lio e xe fell¥ eauipped nN 7 moedel in new-cor conditien., 
ce Soden im - aan ,~ ne ‘S] Chaveclet $439 Cer Be. 500. *51 Hudson ‘53 Willys 
mach Wanemission, hewter, awe 28 t-dr. Sedan, fully sentppeds 54 Chevrolet $995 4-ér. sedan, heat. $300 


PYLE PRICE 


‘55 Chev. ‘885 


Sedan. Ne. 1735, 


RF I OR OE a Oe 


neis, foam rubber soots ~; $1598 very coed transportation. Car 2-4¢. Sedan ow wmileace, = a08 oy 
cov 


: or, aere sedan. 
one ewer, Butler Bonded Ne. S94. ecuipped. beater & defrosters. as —_— $ 
ne inspected _-_oo as finteh. 


1951 PLYMOUTH Subucbam Stotion B/S] Buick ... $839 | or 3* Sinn! “siset he 
Wager Grey — & rede 


Very cleom; 1 owner, Bu Bob smensenS-tese nene, | 32 Chevrolet $1695 "51 Buick © « ‘ST Nash 


ter-Bonded Thereushly reconditioned. Car 2-ér. Sedan. Bel Air series; 
Ne £95 standard transmission. heater 
Goostal 4-dr 


1953 DOOGE V8 Corenet 2-Dr Ne on. : 
evtometic transmission, f >, 7 ‘Ss! Dod e $595 & defresters. Cor _ b.. Dyaaitew 3 ottoman Sager. 3 
te seat covers, turn 9 : "ss Ch let $1695 hich sretn with 4 h.. overdrive 
— s But 4-dr. Corenet series that looks evro a@ark green a teen finish. Vo, 
signals. One owner. By $895 and rune like © sew car, Car “210" Series: B-erl, 4-dr. Se- Steck Ne, 59% inepected, 
ler Borded Ne. 976. ° dan: fully cauipped. R & HB & 


1950 OLOSMOBILE “98 4-Dr. Sedan , 2-tene finish. Car Ne. 1001. d 
De luxe, Mydrometic, redic, ‘ 33 Chevrolet $995 'S2 Pontiac $699 SO Others Equally As Clean and Priced Correspondingly Lo 


ture wgnets, other extr eauloved heater, <defresters *-dr. Sedan: excellent eondi-~ 
A Butler Barger & «.-@. tires. Car Ne. 586-A. tee: BR & MH. Car Ne. 89! FW 
ss = Convertible. I 14th and Florida Ave, NW. Open Evenings HO. 2-7500 | STEWART BUICK 


steering ond brakes, rodic, heoter, 
ee a extros .~ tier ‘er. $1895 ADDISON UW hare Actiorgd eak / | JA 5 7350 Closed Sundays JA. 5 7351 
Bonded Loudde than ota, te Weekdays ¢ AM.9 PM. Open Saturdays 9 A.M.5 PLM 


1933 DODGE - sega ee rook — . m 


: geet Natal ~—wimioalle RARE MEME HH HH 

tees 8 SS IRI T I IOF | a] 

ie teens, Con, Shans pele TRV MARTIN’S MANORS... END OF MONTH 
PRE SPRING SALE LIQUIDATION 


equipped with overdrive. $1095 z 
Ve) le: CONVERTIBLES & | ines a 
HARDTOPS | ot DE sora. sean] st ooee gm 
CHOOSE YOURS NOW! 51 STUDE. .... $135) "49 MERCURY .. iad 

‘55 CADILLAC $295 1 oat). we ee 


163 CHEV. SPT: P+ | ogy GHEY. Mop 


get Air Hard- na eg re 
radio at ° tone Ae <. 


and | Ivory 


F Cal! Now for Credit Approval 
TU. 2-4200 


BILL ROSS 


7400 GA. AVE. 


Ne Care te Dealers 


overdrive. 


Twe- ae 

eaadi®e® te - oS eer 

heal’ "t elu. 
tt. 


aces 


De SEEKS SISSIES SIC SISHIC ICSI titties 


DOR OR yy og oe 


a 


SESERRESERTT NESS, 
HENNY 


New tithe end new cor $2295 


querentes. Selling price 

1943 NASH Bambler Country Club 
HMerdtes, 2-tone grey 4& red, $995 
rece, heater, low nuleoge 


1955 STUDESAKER President Hoard 
top, Ptone grey & red, aviometix 
tranemission, radice, heoter, fully 
eavioped. Ore owner cor 

Butler Bonded $2195 
1953 BUICK Super V8 Hardtop, 
Dtere ved 4& white, ceutomotic 
trecemission, redic, heoter, white 
wall tires, turn signals 
One ewnrer. Butler Bonded 


SS WIHLYS Aere a luxe Pere, 


re, & h. Butler-Bonded 
Rutler Specials at 
Hurry! Hurry! 
immediate Delivery! 
Convertible, Fell power, Fully cauipped OPEN 9 A.M. te 10 P.M. 50 PORTIAS . $99 


Studebaker Headquarters 
* FULL PRICE 
SOUTHEAST’ T N OF FINE | FOR THIS SPECIAL SALE , 


ma 


‘54 Victoria +67 5+ 
USED CADILLACS —SOME WITH NO MONEY IEA BUICK $] 096 ‘ar : 5419. 


DI. 70111 
Ferd Siyliner, B. & H. W.-W. O.D, 
FULL PRICE 
green, equipped own- 
$695 DOWN . . . -7 TO CHOOSE FROM 
2-deors eavipped. 


S| See LPF 
H)'55 Ford $195 III +55 PLYM. 997 |) “-- “oe 


mande: twee fone green Fully 
1949 CHEVROLET Styleline, 2-Door, 2-dr. Sedan. 
white 


DOWN 


anana 


eavipped, cvtomeotic transmission 
bive, full but- 
v y equipped. $295 ieee 


ocwusircr tag * “54. Belvedere ‘975% 


1949 PONTIAC Chieftein 4.-Dr,, 
coral, rt. & bh. One owner 

car. Butler Bargoin 

1955 STUDEBAKER Commander De FULL PRICE 


— hy . . a so | of 53 Ri $ 
, very as iviera 
. Low 
$1695 » Bates. Dros. B.a8.; red and black 

finis 


Butler Specials at » 
Southeast Branch * FOLL PRICE 


eat 4 Bane | 53 Catalina 978: 


1954 FORD 2-0r., V-8. blue, fully % 
equipped. One owner $1 095 
Butler Bonded 

1952 “pewogyr wang vies Hard 
Tee, 2-tone blu , heoter 


detroster. 6: Ov, "$595 


Bonded 


Eweoum. R. & H.. Hy-Drive; t-tone 


DOWN 2-deers eauipped. 


- ‘POLL PRICE ; ; , 
55 Chev. 95 ‘55 | FORD B89 BUICK anes $345 sone Spe i 


Bel Air Convertidie, Fully Eautpped - $485 48 CHEV. 4-Dr. .. 


Tuder: equipped. ee 
DOWN Ne. 141. . 


N55 Merc. 195 | ‘AS OLDS. $48 | cr _. $199] 48 PLYM, &Dr, $99 | 


Menterey. Full Power, Canary vesow and $199 "47 PONTIAC ees $99 : 


a on 2-door: Hydra-Matie. 
D 
ar PULL PRICE Super @-dr. Neo. S582 3.ér. Ne, 18%, 


‘53 Plym. $5 [NI] ‘55 CHEV. $62 |} weer. eae nm 
50 STUDE. .. $275) 38 DODGE 


SERVICEMEN OF ALL GRADES FINANCED “Convertinne, No. 198 ar. Ne. B451¢ 
—IMMEDIATE DELIVERY ON APPROVED §| Boned Il | mee 


Pentiae, Sun gold and green: Hydra. 
R.4n.. w.-w, tires, 


* FULL PRICE 


‘55 Ford «= SQ 75S 


2-dr.: equipped. 
Servicemen all grades and out-o/-towners, we give quick credit 
service and delivery. 


Cash, Trade & Terms 


No Cars to Dealers 
Be Sure to See 


1953 STUDEBAKER Commender 


5 
poss. Rego! Coupe, corel, $995 


overdrive, r. & bh. 
195! legge a Chempion Steor- 


a 
light Sport Coupe, green. $396 2 
ef 


ee 


Very clean. . 


195) CHEVROLET De Me sy 4-08 


100 Other Cars te te Choose From—Call for Credit Approval 


) Bank financing available. Ask about our 3-DAY TRIAL AND 
. 100% GUARANTEE 


IOTORAMA ||| AUTO DISCOUNT HOUSE |] - 594] NICHOLS AVE. S.E. 


| eas | nm: poner pion _ : New Cor Showroom—1800 Nichols Ave. $.8. WU. 4.4400 


¢o 5.8214 3 Open Mon. thry Fri, ‘tt 9 P.M. Set. ‘Nl 6, Closed Sve. 
- = 3 } 


Sedon, gtoy, heater. 
condition. bBwtler. Sergein 


: + 
mn 
+ 
we 

Lee D. ' 7 Irv Martin 
: 
» 


BANK 5 | | ee | ; LU. 3-1051 


Sineernenent tata teerenneeee ieee 


Butler, «. | 12th & K Sts. N.W. 
2 Aon 4665 SOUTH CAPITOL ST. 
pci i ala cael mene NA, B-4455 J, i 2-7171 OPEN 9 A.M.-9 rm. Mt 


Leis slalalaialolelaiaie’ dstetelolelataialels —_— | 


* . - 
oer ene ve) 9 EY Gee Seer ea eng oasis 


*¥ 


See Ra) ow eee 


ae - ie i oY ee 
a eee 
. atin os, i ee 


ie Mie i le ee ee eer eee eee — = a aa 
er RN eet) ete ee © > 


i | | } cis 


‘ 
7 


t ‘ FM STATIONS | THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
7 ; ; FM me.)-6:30 « m te 1,WWDC-FM (101.1 mei? 6. @ te f 

——Haudko and Television Television H tghlights |i sea. loti ams mae oe “Tansey, Febrary hy 136 45° 
W ; wiksi-rm (or. me)—* «. m te 10 TRY on 1 me.)—5:80 a. m. te 2) o] 
GMS to Be New | 8:45 a. m.—WRC- TV. Today: an epic air-sea battle, “The whit -FM (98.7 me.)—T 6. m. te mid- wist-eM (106.8 me.)—1:20 «. m. to 9) 


Adiat Stevenson, : candidate Helium Umbrella Dh wr FAN (100.8 mc.)—Daylight enty.* w Alem (107.3 me.)—6 a. m. fe 0) 
for the Democratic nomina- 9 p. m.—WRC.-TYV. Fireside .. m. ) 


Mutual Station Here | tion for President, is inter ‘Theater: -Joanne Dru and orneR sraxmann STATIONS | : 
| viewed hy Dave G arroway. Tom Tryon costar in “The | WwomMs—570: +6 a, m. to midnight. WOOK-—1240 he-—-5 s. m. te | ; 
10:2. m—WTTG. Kaleido- Mirror,” story of a great — iho ‘ke. —Davlighs only.* OL idse ke? a. me to mianisht.| ©) AR be VA, 

. 7 " sink . i) “ee wrhtretn : . ¥ 7.° “ 
; . c George Reeves stars love whi ti congue m 2/44) OAV G4 ’ : ; : a Sa6 ke ig On 
By Lawrence Laurent in “Hurry "Hurry "a roman- 4nd mental hardships ictherioed to cpumle sunue totus. dere. Pig e™ NO. 7-311 
f he es Panes 9 p. m—WMAL-TY. Danny . ° s ; 
RADIO STATION WGYVS properly written, produced va econ vn gg ye Bi Bo ogg Thomas Show: Daugiter Programs printed here conform to information 900 
has affiliated with the radio and enacted, satire can be civilian life Terry goes to the aid of furnished by stations at time of publication 3611 LEE 

hilarious Uncle Oscar, played by Hans ; | 

network of the Mutual Broad: But satirical production re Il a. m—WRC-TYV, Home: (Conreid w hen he is ridiculed | HIGHWAY 
casting System. The affilia- qyijres the highest skills. It*| Ethel Waters, star of stage 


" : by her schoolmates 7 7 e 
tion agree- requires, also, that the a.di and movies, is a special guest 9 p. m—WRCE-TV. Meet 109 1 io ts on ac io 
nounied yee ence understan” just what is Ll p. m—WTOP-TY. Jack Millie: Frequently embar- 7, 
nounced yes- ' being satirized. Paar Show: Jose Melis plays rassed by her mother's con- 11:30 a. m—WTOP. Make beat: A Bell Laboratories of- i 17 inch 
WG 3 a = Benge nol ae audi. “Sabre Dance’ and  dJack stant efforts to get her a hus lin Yous “Mind: British stage ficial evaluates solar bat- 12 inch .... $21 inch 
WGMS Presi- ee ence who knew that “Pano- | jearns the big social doings band, Millie turns the tables polo film coy wom tain “Smekee 95 an 
ve Me tal fun at 1 1 on he Pn ro from Elsa Maxwell and teaches a iesson to Mirs. is guest | 5. Sat 10 p m.—WWDC. Here's to ; — ~~ Guarantes | 
det M. Rob- | na ee tee ne a fine : ~ wea, , - Bronson S >t , : — ° “- . § Nn A BES INSTALLED BY BELMONT} 
ert Rogers. | J | cnet Sen ve Panto wr tate” (Col yA Be 9:30 p. m—WTTG. Master- [| _. 2:15 p. m-—~—WRC, Weekday Vets \ discussion of “Buy- e) LL PI TURE TU LED BY BELMONT 
“ytutwa ” abaya ay edema ark Straneer”’ , 7 . pec Theater: Roddy Ic- Guest is composer-arranger ing a GI Home : METAL AND ELECTROSTATIC $2.00 MORS 
rob yn e -onfused and bored Dark Stranget Stars 45a seas Ray Charles 16:50 p. m-—WTOP. Cam- 
They th t th Yea Gabor with Hugh O’Brien Dewall ts ordered to be “Kid- « fy mese r ; es 2414 .) WW. 2414 14th ST. N.W. 
resent affil- They ht the joke ‘e sa Gabor wi ugh rit 7:05 p. m—WGMS. Howard paign ‘56: Walter Cronkite a 
They thought the Jokes were the title role. Story is naped” by an uncle to pre , : _ Walt | sang 
ment, wt a1 arrived at the office yes 0 in “fl ‘an Mitchell: Berlioz. Benvenuto calls on CBS reporters 
ment with Laurent as I arrived at the office yes 


told in “flashback” form and vent claiming of an inherit Cellini Overture; Rabaud, throughout the country for 
WWDC runs terday morning, I was pressed tells why a beautiful woman eae m.—WRC-TY. Pla Nocturmal Procession: R reports on political develop- 
until August 1, he said, for explanations. “What were was murdered by an employe ‘olf ¢* “Flight » hy Hor Strauss, Final Scene from ments. 

WGMS, however, will have they trving to dn”. one of of het wealthy husband govt «f ay ee hy . , Salome 

“second refusal” on all Mu- the maintenance erew wanted 7 p. m.—WTTG. Sieve Don- Rut) Hi se yet Albert Dek. | 7:45 p. m—WWDC. Eddie e 

tual programs “beginning im- ty Know ovan, Western Marshal Se ne | . Fisher: Guest June Hutton 


mediately,” Rogers said ‘| Douglas Kennedy is ordered **! \ Wyearold girl | sings “Clambake” and | TUESDAY 11:15 P.M. 


— . ps r mi iag A secret ‘ 
WWDC began its afiliation IMOGENE did a takeoff on to follow the Trail of the keeps he MASTIAGS S SEC What'« the Use of Wonder- 


-. ' from her parents. The news , 
it) , ! 50 . ' "the jude” when Dude Mandell ing e Channel 
with Mutual in March of 1950. a scene from a “forthcoming _ Dud : creates a crisis in her family 


. s% . ’ — " : . | : ; r? —_ ; s as ti ‘ 
Recently, however, as a movie.” The sketch was built | #8 released from, priso 9:30 p. m.—WMAL-TV. Cav- | , aoe ova = han ye 
, by . ‘ee « . ™— 2 ‘ oan ——~-~ ;corge 
number of networ J YWWDC around the standard cliches ae Pp me WMAL-TYV. aicade Theater: “Smyrna In- | Goorce Washington Univer- 
gpg ee Pg 7 ‘My. of dramatic bathos. I found it pilerine, Pan: Mee gg 4 cident” stars Carl Menton | sity at Uline Arena BETHLEHEM 
nas carried very few © WPM ye assassin’s plot is expose Reid as a U. S. Navy com os "Caan 
i We SVaes 8:05 p. m.—WGMS. Sym 


.* . 
tual’s programs. It has been thorough. y entertaining when ton-level diplémat oe n ; $b cn . Mm. MS. : € T 

. ner ‘ret that Mutual : 3 ‘ -% : ie at mande1 wno provects an phony Hall Bach (ome, pol ts ime 
an open secre me +8 She followed with a “live meet at the Cafe American American citizen by defying | Sweet Death: Mozart. Piano 
° wee ‘ {) 


, % ; ' ’ . _. 
“ WWDC are unhappy with appearance of a2 movie star in “Casablanca” for a peace ithe Austrian navy Concerto No. 22 in F fiat 


each other. : or - eC P ° area 9 . . 
Rogers said WGMS is pat This was a little too close to | “°™8**"S oan : ie mee 4s . 9:36 p. m.—WIOP rv. Red 8:30 p. m—WMAL. Life Is 
, : ~ * in tereatend ie ‘eaews real for comfort. It was a lit- . Pp. m —WTOP-TY. vt Skelton Show (¢ OLOR {on Worth Liv ing Bishop Fulton 
we yas, OP Silvers Show Sgt Bilko nie Haines and Alan Hale Jr. ’ What Hap- 


ay ‘ ; shpeens t | . 
and pubDiic affairs programs tle too much like the actual een oOpic is 


cooks up a contest to choose are guests | pened to Politeness? 
oftered Oy - we pene tom appearance of those empty- the Sweetheart of the Pla ..7 m WMAI Sound + | 
‘ide that (;ViS Will fur _ , ~~ , . ' ey —e — - 
oa ; ve | with music pro headed, inar “ulate “movie toon” at Fort Baxts rhe ‘| W .,* rt \ tight rope walker, u het | or 25 
: .%J Madi st I . mips ’ le ; ' ekhres “- ¥ ' . 
grams ’ stars” who use television for en _ — ay A - ; ltet / ling wearing a blind{old, goes ovet 
mito a arive to cK iis | Nis Fall ~- 
: y “Ss @T NAsSIizZe at the ‘ 0 7 “es ~ . ’ ' tht ais a 
Roget empae ized tha promotion of picture Kansas for the annual Miss Cost Hioh [ ( / 4 %:: Pp. m-—WMAI Off- | “We like to have people in for a buffet supper, 
station will continue its baste Television, itself, came in Ameri agcant west ee coe : bs i« 0 : 
“Good Music” format ‘ 4 sh 7 . | _, | said the lady in the red beret, “and I've always 
; I od share of treatmen = “TV 0 ’ \ 
WGMS began operating al 4,09 ail eal H . » Sh “om hes de 4 . Surve y Shows thought it might be nice to have a punch. Are there 
. ’ () ify i¢ rs 
most 10 years ago as WQQW, TORY ian any ietn wae | Cornel Wilde (Jean Wallace : e NEW LOW PRICES e any good ones?” : 
a day-time only station. The  vision’s techn'ques “to get Pe ee [es deny "s POOEs Vy SeLee 1OS ANGELES. Feb. °7 : 
: ug i irpanks JT : Whit), of : : 
station's call letters became that audience in the first 30 wrench ph Abe ; npg ye “fe Wak Aedes & uhek. &. tole PICTURE TUBES There are dozens, we answered, and the trick is to 
WGoOMS in 1951 It now oper seconds ” Rest of this series ‘ : ; = . _ have one that jan t too aweet or too watery. and Tt 


- aa a naud. British comic Tommy nant i ‘ , a 
- full time power of 50% firm to write a lette — “ag” ; ' 
wa L time power of 5000 . good and cold, If you serve it in a pitcher, it’s called 


was the “Pitfall Personality,” Trinder and four European e 
, ul ai ‘ . ‘ 
the established star who ad movie actresses——PFisa Mat A survey of 200 Los Angeles 17-INCH ....... ; red Veer Cuarentee | a cup, for no good reason other than tradition. & 


™ ‘ : ‘ imece » ‘of — 
vertises beer, cigarettes and | tinelli, Julia Arnall, Relinda Dusinessmen indicates the fig 21-INCH | A . Factory Sealed Cartons good white wine punch calls for dissolving a table- 
, «l " te} . reer Sy . can ‘ & ~ 4 " r ¢1 95 pe “ee . 
Vire Ieland Stat ffi a show he won't even watch | are guests This includes dictation, steno Metal & Electrostatic Tubes—$1.50 Higher 
sin Islands, Station offi- L : i ; ' a long lemon peel has been added. After the result- 
ials indicate that WWDC himself 8 p. m—WTTG. The Eve- graphic time, overhead, mail T Vv SERVICE id I 
" eontinue ite Riehiv sue Imogene closed the show | ning Movie: “Now RBarabas” (ing, stationery, filing, and re . . ing syrup has cooled, you add a bottle of white wine, 
“program format of With a tramp routine, a | is the story of the last hours lated charges 3 ounces of Spanish Sherry, preferably a dry Fino 
jockeys sports and news classic bit that never fatis to | in the life of a condemned rhe survey was made by Dr — —s or Amontillado, then let it chill in the refrigerator 


yr ert peg a Na Se agar Saino Hier Agee Ry ~ Sagy —adl pre ase gen, eg hg Sag agg oo T for half an hour. When. you take it out, add ice to 

IOGENE Coca came back singers Alan Dale, Johnny | 8:30 p. m.—WMAL.-TV. Wy- education faculty at UCLA, who 1 cl : , 

: wo , oad the howl or pitcher from which youre arrvingd. 

to television Sunday night in Desmond, Bill Hayes, Eileen | att Earp: In “The Desperate § says few businessmen are aware —_— es “ ind of wi 1 what kind I re 

@ spectacular called “Pan- Barton, dancers Bambi Linn | Half Hour,” Wyatt prevents of the high cost of correspond What kind of white wine and what kind of glasses! 

orama’ (NBC, WRC-TV It and Rod Alexander and the the lynching of a teenager ence LU 4 600 COR. TEXAS AVENUE said the lady. 

was. a wild satire on televis- marionettes of Bil and Cora 8:30 p. m.—WTOP.TV. Navy Most firms, he says, would -6 & & STREET, S.E. 

ion. itself Baird Log lwo German-born (benefit by organized programs Whatever vou have on hand, we answered. Rhine 
Satire is ar extremely dif I thought all of them were | brothers, separated since to improve the efficiency of let- ——— wine, a white Burgundy or Bordeaux, or Champagne 

feult form af peneey. if enjovable. | ehildhood, meet in combat fm ter writing for the wine, cocktail or Old Fashioned glasses. for 


watts 
Ren Strouse, vice president 
and general manager of 


| serving. The.classie claret cup calls for the juice of 
Tuesday Television Programs Tuesday Radio Programs six lemons, a hig tablespoon or so of sugar, depend: 
£ Hi soon ray 8 tan! = : ing on your taste, and a bottle of red Bordeaux, 

(Du Ment) aso (CBS) WMAL WRC (NBC) WWODC (MBS) WTOP (CBS) poured over ice; vou can decorate with mint aprigs, 
TTG _ SIWMAL.TV 7 wWTror.tyv 9AM630 §M 107.3 AM 980 FM 93.9 AM 1260 AM 1500 FM 96.3 if vou like. To either of these. vou can add half a 
hottle of soda water and two or three jiggers of vour 
favorite cordial or brandy. Incidentally, cucumbers 
taste wonderful in the white wine punches and to 


oe : either red or white wine punches you can add straw- 
Br« ; cr : , : 
ay Brown Oper fouse TOTES berries, cherries, pineapple sticks, apple, peach or 
Rrown 4o0u : 

. F pear slices, or orange and lemon peel. But one such 


FODWARDS garnish is enough. Another perfect punch is made 


: ' r A G Ma ’ ‘ 
+ Yesterday Ar jod Thispering | We . Piske Tony rvi . 
Bit ue Rovaca \vesterdas > | ae | AEE net Veekday ae : ‘3 | by adding 3 ounces of Cognac to a hottle of Cham- 


arth od W ; ‘ ' : T net , y 
wAports Al ' coat 15 . Janett | 
re rs Hom me. Wisde +8 5 ee? ao ine nee ie : p Jimma| Voeeeee Story Time | Fm a WITH THE pagne; this is a wonderful drink if the party is small 
+§ Home cae Keieigescope ones of the Rock” L ’ | Weekday Queen for ard Miller and spirits are high. 


toon Concert ett (2 '* a jews: Pane | : udne * ; * tn 
Ext Siar leit Lettre tas Keon [Rs Sous frase Bice Helen, rent’ : NEXT: THE WONDERFUL RHONE WINES 


Mr Pe 
TT the Mermaid We have a magnificent collection of all the things 


you need to make wu onder ful punches, and a fine 
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oe ae HANNEL 9 ae urka  & liquors 


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WTOP-TY ve 
tonight at ge EEG 
. HE QUIT SCHOOL seal 
THE FOURTH GRADE 


. but Lawrence Welk rose to fame, | 
fortune and stardom nevertheless. | 
. 


This week, TV GUIDE tells how this | 
simple farm-boy became a top TV | 
performer .. . how he picked up his | 
only formal musical education from 

@ correspondence course... and | 
how he became a national celebrity | 
without sacrificing his simplicity. | 


You'l meet Welk's charming wife | 
Fern .. . who has devoted more | 
then 20 years to assuring her hus- 
band a restful home-life in the 
few hours he can spend away 
from this public. 


TV GUIDE's penetrating story re- 
veals a different kind of star...a 
star who is, essentially, a Dakota 
farm-boy still. 


Don't miss TV GUIDE's intimate 
close up... . containing answers to 
many of the questions you've been 
asking about Lawrence Welk. Look 
for TV GUIDE .. . with Hal March 


~ 7 


: . ” Osa 
2 RP ee re Ee oe we ew a a ee ee fo ee pe tet 
* “ 


‘ 


ee te) rrr ee a eae: .-< 2 Se ee eng are Gar e ” 
. 


ee i ee ed ron re) ee mee eee ere 
: 


os 


THE WASHINGTON. POST and TIMES HERAL 
Tuesday, February 28, 1956 


“46 


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—_— 
— _ 
ne oer LT TO CR ay eee, nen *~ 
a 


| How to 


Keep Well 


By Dr. Theodore R. Van Dellen 


_ To the limit of space, ques- 
tions pertaining to the preven- 
tion of disease will be answered, 
Personal replies will be made 
when return stamped envelope 
is inclosed. Telephone inquiries 
not accepted. Dr. Van Dellen 
will not make diagnoses or pre- 
scribe for individual diseases. 


‘TYPES OF INTESTINAL FLU 
| VIRUSES get around, Dur-| 
ling the winter and spring. many 
|comrhunities are plagued with’ 
inumerous cases of an intestinal | 
idisorder called “intestinal flu”| 
‘for lack of a better name. Sev- 
eral types of viruses inhabit 
‘the intestinal tract and these 
organisms are responsible for 
itwo kinds of bouts, even though | 
ithe exact culprits never have 
been isolated 

In the first, are 
ichiefly intestinal, with intense 
‘abdominal cramping and wa- 
tery stools. There is little or 
no fever and the majority of 
ivictims feel fairly well except 
lfor the weakness that accom- 
panies diarrhea. The causative | 
‘virus is transmitted through 
‘contaminated fingers, clothing, | 
sand linen. The infection also 
‘occurs in epidemic proportions 
in communities, army camps 
‘and asylums 

The second variety is accom- 
ipanied by fever, intense head- 
ache, nausea and 
‘Diarrhea is uncommon but ab-| 
dominal pain is persistent and 
occasionally severe. This form 
of the disease has more of the 
characteristics of influenza, 
which explains why the term’ 
“intestinal flu” has persisted’ 
lover the years. | 
| Treatment rarely is necessary | 
because spontaneous recovery | 
itakes place within two or three 
days. But these 
inot always as innocent as they 
‘appear and now and then mask 
a more serious malady. 

Several weeks ago a 50-vear- 
old executive was awakened at 
night with slight diarrhea, 
chilly sensations, and aching 
all over. By morning he felt 
jwell enough to go to work. He 
went to the club for lunch but 
toward the end of the meal, 
became faint and blacked out 
suddenly. 

On coming to he found him- 
self on the floor and a physi- 
cian was trying to get his blood 
pressure. He was taken to the 
hospital because a heart attack 
was suspected but several elec- 
trocardiograms showed a sound 
ticker. The man went home 
several days later. 

The chap was lucky: the pre- 
ceding five patients who had 
been admitted to the same hos- 
pital with the same story 
proved to have coronary throm- 
bosis. The viral infection may 
have paved the way for these 
attacks or the heart attacks 
jmay have masqueraded as “in 
testinal flu.” 

Many different virus strains 
reach the intestinal tract. The 
polio virus may be one of this 
group because the disease has 
followed in the wake of a mild 
bout of nausea, vomiting and 
diarrhea 

TOMORROW: 
the arthritic, 

OVERACTIVE THYROID 

MRS. F. writes: My thyroid 
is too strong. Will it have to. 
be taken out? 

REPLY 

It takes a better diagnosis 
than this to convince a surgeon 
that the thyroid must be re- 


symptoms 


Self-care for 


_—-—-- - — --—— 


ACROSS 


1 Hardened 43 Russian 
into ice flogging 


whip 
© mers 44 Arm of 
10 Exchange Arabian Sea 
14 Coat flap 46 Essayist 
i5sJosip Broz 


Lamb 
16 Roman 


47 Free 
garment 49 Most ex- 
17 Puff up 


cellent 
51 Papal 
/18 Virginia 54 Plant 
willow producer 
19 Level 56 Early Bud- 
20 Actress dhist sacred 
Olivia 
22 Outlet 


language 
57 Sinister 
23 British 
Prime 


film star 
Minister 


63 Sea con- 
nected to 
Black‘Sea 
'94 Occurrences 64 Sora 
26 Constituent 65 Indians 
of turpentine 66 Musical 
30 Nehru's Horne 
| homeland 67 Marine bird 
32 Hot and dry 68 Storms 
33 Wings 69 Observed 
35 Priscilla 70 River to 
| Mullens—— 
39 Comfort 
Aye smithy . 


North Sea 
stands” 


capes 


71 Bushmaster 
or fer-de- 
lance 

DOWN 

4 Greek letter 

5 Number 

6 Fence steps 

7 Oberon's 
queen 

8 Solar disk 


| 
| 
: 


1 Vanished 
2 Breathing 
sound ” 
3 Large 
| brightly- 
| colored fish 


| [Reg U. S. Pat. Of.: 


vomiting. | 


diseases are ~~ 


Dailv Crossword Puzzle 


“DICK TRACY 


ew LIZZ, I KNOW 


N 
NOW-AND I THINK I HAVE 
SOME INFORMA 


—_—— 


—e 


an 


‘ a ‘ 
19 4 by \" » 
|The Chicago Tribane. o } 


“== VEAHP OKAY, 


~ REX MORGAN 


YOUVE HAD EVERY 

DOCTOR WITHIN A 

RADIUS OF THIRTY 

MILES, DAD/ THERE 

ef AREN'T ANY MORE 
TO sEE/ 


"I WANT YOU TO GET 
ME ANOTHER DOCTOR, 
EMILIE / 


TO SOME BIG CLINIC 
SOMEWHERE --- WHERE 
THEY'LL FIND OUT 
WHAT'S WRONG 

WITH Me / 


IS WRONG 
PHYSICALLY 2 


Jeb 


f : 


THEN I'M GOING To 60 \ AND SUPPOSE THEY : 
TELL YOU EXACTLY 

WHAT DOR. MORGAN TOLD 

YOU-=-THAT NOTHING 


Suess 


WON'T SAY WHAT 


AT LEAST rod 6 THAT 
MORGAN SAID/ 


By Dal Curtis _ 
YOUNG UPSTART 


---TELLING ME I’M 
FEELING SORRY FOR 


MYSELF / 


ai 


ales 


~ MARY WORTH 


By Ken-Allen 


| AND I'D ADVISE YOU TOCATCH 

THE EARLIEST TRAIN FOR NEW YORK 
+**BEFORE HILDY'S FRIENDS AT THE 
FACTORY FIND OUT WHAT YOU CAME 


y 


ITS HARD TOFIND 
WORDS HARSH ENOUGH FoR 
A MAN WHO WOULD BREAK 

A GIRL'S HEART TO FURTHER 
A BUSINESS PRQUECT, MR. 
BRENT! 


= 


LOOK, PAN! .-» MRS. WORTH! 
I'M ALL THE NASTY NAMES 
YOU'RE THINKING !--+BUT.+.. 


|, LET'S GET THIS SFRAIGHT! 
M NOT LEAVING THIS TOWN, MRS. 


\ By A NICE FEELIN’ To 
—_— 1 
\ os 


 SMILIN’ JACK 


moved. Send a stamped, self. 


addressed envelope for leaflet 
on hyperthyroidism. ' 
1954, Chicage Tribune) 


YY, MQM! LONG 


HE 
Bias DISTANCE -'TS OAD’ 
(Copyright, CALLING FRow 
CALIFORNIA! ) 
——. ‘ 


oy" 7 


KEY 
TO YOUR 
DREAM CAR 


See the town’s best car 
buys all in one place—at 
one time. Turn to the want 


: 
2 @ 


ae 2 


: /OD Fe“ A, A, 
i AMD a MAVEAS T - 
ONE LETTER 


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By Zack Mosley 


LOWESOME ? 


- 


ee 
" 


“a 
Vy | 
Zl 


ad pages of The Washing- a ST ans 


ton Post and Times Herald 


BOWLEVARD SENSATION /5 LONE ~ 
SOME? HAR-DF-HAR 


[HE MEW SUNSET 
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By Dale Messick — 


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4 


NDA RUMMAGES THROUGH THE 
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YESTERDAY’S ANSWER A 9) 


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MEANWHILE ON THE PLANE, PERRY FRANK 
LEANS BACK WITH A SIGH OF PELIEC..... 


a 


ir leelieoiwicsl oe 


-=—iai~€ 


“ar it ic 


I>je-jol=|x|—l-~ 


YSIS 


9 Incited 

10 “Tonight” 
man 

11 Intermeshed 

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ative 

13.\freusers 

21 Perfect 

25 Small bottle 

26 Group of 


42 Deduce 

45 Foreordain 

48 Fish hawk 

50 Ne'er-do- 
wells 

51 Gems 

52 Ship cut 
wolves down to in: | 

27 “Man in the ferior class | 


LADY LUCK, I KISS Dz 
THY HAND! ... EVEN 

~ FT COULDNT HAVE 

~s, PLANNED A BETTE? 


a 


SETUP! 


’ 53 Isolated 
55 Lamprey 


AN’ WHAT'S 
WRONG WIF 


IT AIN'T 
DIGNIFIED # 


catcher ‘\ 
58 Auricles Ww 
31 Granular 59 Algerian 
snow port ) 
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lands 61 Fume 
36 The late—— heavily 


Carnegie 62 Existence 


my 


TO BE 
'SHAMED OF YORESELF 
SNUFFY !! CAMPAIGNIN’ 


11 


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YE AINT SEEN 


NOTHIN’ YET. 
“MAYOR -TO-BE 
BARLOW 


© PR Beng Femeree speek Sed ogee mere 


This gourmet item is one of the 6 en- 


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Y 


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Reservations: ADams 40700 


larded roast of filet mignon... |) 


trees:on the menu of our delicious and |) 


Your choice of 11 varieties of hors | 


vegetables, salad (Roquefort dressing | 


~ ARPHAN ANNIE 


; THE WASHINGTON POST and 
ican Tuesday, February 28, 1956 


med and im ether salt-free 
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| GASOLINE ALLEY 


By Jimmy Hatle 


Portraits 
By James J, Metcalfe 


WiEN FLOTILLA WAS MEASURED FOR A 
NEW DRESS, SHE WORE HER NEW GIRDLE~: 
AND CUT AN ALMOST PERFECT FIGURE 


oe 
THEN SHE WADOLES WV FOR THE FITTING, 
WEARING HER OLD HARNESS WITH THE . 
‘SPRUNG STAYS = AND EXPECTS A MIRACLE 


Happy Memory Book 


No book of happy memo- 
ries... Is written in a 
day ... No page or chap. 
ter is composed... Of 
moments whiled away... 
No paragraph or sentence 
is... Without a touch 
of fear... As how and 
then some period... 
Reflects a tiny tear... 
There are those anxious 
hours that... Are penned 
between the lines... The 
sickness and the struggle 
and The sun that 
seldom shines ... But 
when the space is growing 
small ... For wrinkled 
hands to write... The 
ink is flowing smoothly 
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we, f THIRTYSIXAND WAIST V 
TWENTY-NI~-NO~TWENTY~ Ff 
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able side but keep your energetic 
nature and emotions Wisely directed. 
22 
the section in which your!’ Pirst. thank . 
wo. Re. and in what your out-| proceed to deo wh you should r- 
ot according te the stars B+ vies co Ps i vas ene 
dey. Feb. 28 study, follew oalede without ans- 


wee APRIL 20 (Aries)— 
ercury among w 


and 


7 + ny ae * 3S ero Ee Soe 
stimulating. helpful, | *'. 
pected 2 ambitious. Beaulsttive vibrstiegs Sui spur 4 meee. 
terest cA. ‘ anes ' ee executives fr 
, om honored. ™ 


thors. 
jemployes 


” but without strain. 


~| (Libra) —Bkilled » ® 
-| coveries; chemicals. medicine, atomic 


MAY #8 TO JUNE 71 (Gemini)—You SErTEMeER 4 TO «(OCTORER = 


oe ; 


PO UF SE eer rare eee bee aren enter nee ainieiees 


ae mee te nvest:| ,ACGUST 24 | TO 23 
Se Sat Seco eae Pee 
vance, ahuire new ene 


EE Ne RE Re RR NE ey caer 


| (Aquarius) Your planets Uranus 
amiad tasks stresses steady application of talents 
opportunity, encoursge- ®04 restraint for restlessness. in order 
to get the fine results possible now im 
OCTOBER 24 TO NOVEMBER 22/ industry, trade, en- 
orpio)—-Your Mars plus Jupiter and | deavor 
reury well positioned er fresh FEBRUARY 20 TO MARCH 20 
rsonal efits. gai for military | (Pisces)—Small but important advance- 
terests; government official business.’ment of iastine quality. fresh offers 
Worthy matters can move ahe ad- for personal achievement, honored now. 
van ¥ ; | Don't agar ee undertakings if they 
D 91 have, value. Your day 
sons — metheds.| YOU BORN TODAY have 
save labor. time. etc.:' worthy qualities but ther need to 
tw an ~ Tovelaned an ut to daily . 
- ultive te es. 
weak, 


ve strong, . mae a 
toh 


anics ow dis- 
energy favor 
have splendid 
ment here. 


profession, any 


NOVEMBER 23 
(Sagittarius)—-New 
u ent to 


’ 
wanes ving pi PR By them are 

TO JANUARY 20/must ot be ourisis. ¥ 
: a a fF But * ar setiatie anit are 
tha eeenasee faye ttt | pmaalitls Genet: badd poe 
jane Mg ef be drive wo . 


JANUARY 21 TO FEBRUARY. 19 


> 


thre me ee ow 


By Harold Gray. 


ea. ee 


48 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


Tuesday, February 28, 1956 4 


It’s Developing Into 
A Cliffhanger 


WELL, gents, IT am back 
in the doghouse, but for 
once I am too preoccupied to 
care. I am busy packing for 
_ a trip to Flor- 
ida. 

A couple of 
days ago I 
wrote about 
sportscaster 
Bob Wolff 
dropping in 
for a chat, and 
told how the 
two of us 
talked our- 
selves into de- 

Gold ciding to take 

a midwinter vacation. When 
‘the lady.at our house read 
that column, she made no 
secret of her displeasure. 
“Imagine my embarrass- 
ment,” she pouted. “Friends 
called up and said, “I see 
you're going to Florida,’ and 
all I could say in reply was, 

*We are?’ ” 

“If you'd read the column 
occasionally.” I needled, 
“vou'd know about these 
things. ’ 

“Oh, I do read it,” she 
snapped. “I just hadn't got- 
ten to it yet that morning. 
But that’s water under the 
river—what's more important 
is: When are you leaving?” 

“Water over the dam,” I 
gaid. “On Tuesday the 28th.” 


eee — —— - — a 


Your 
Taste 


Yet never rich 
or filling 


' Satis fies. 


The DISTRICT LINE ty Bincotd 


“Menuhin plays with the 
National Symphony on the 
29th,” she reminded me. 

“All right then,” I said, 
“Thursday morning the 
first of March.” 

“We're due at Roggie’s 
house for dinner Saturday,” 
she added. “And Frances ex- 
pects us Sunday.” 

“And I have a lodge meet- 
ing the following Monday,” I 
groaned, “Nuts to all of it, 
I’ve got to leave this Tues- 
day to get back in time for 
some previous commit- 
ments.” 

“I simply cannot get ready 
by then,” she announced 
flatly. “It can’t be done.” 

The phone rang. It was my 
dad calling from Cincinnati. 

Anybody who thinks I am 
a character ought to meet 
my old man. I come by my 
idiosyncrasies honestly. 

“You know I can't accept 
your invitation to join you 
in Florida,” he began. “These 
knuckleheads would ruin my 
business while I was away.” 

“You are not the indispen- 
sable man,” I said for the 
thousandth time. “You can 
take vacations just like 
everybody else—if you really 
want to.” ; 

There was a dime’s worth 
of silence from the other 
end. Then: “Okay. I'll be in 
Miami Thursday night. Meet 
me at the airport.” 

“You're going to fly for the 
first time in your life?” I 
gasped. “How come?” 

“Oh,” he sighed, “if I'm 
going to be a sap and waste 
time on a vacation I might 
as well go whole hog. Be 
there Thursday. Goodby— 
this is costing me money.” 

I hung up the phone in a 
daze. It rang again. Bob 


| Wolff was calling. “I've just 


been making out a list of all 


| the things I have to do be- 
| fore I can leave,” he .said. 
| “I've got to make some 
| TV films, record some radio 
| commercials, see about two 
| mew shows that they'll be 

whipping together while I'm 
| away, and...” 


“We leave Wednesday 
morning,” | cut in. 

“IT thought you said Tues- 
day,” the lady of the house 
heckled from the other room. 

“Oh, pipe down,” I growled. 

“What'd you say?” asked 
Bob. 

“Not you,” I sighed. “Wait 
a minute—Bernice is shov- 
ing a letter under my nose.” 

The letter was from Yard-. 
bird 13507256, and she had 


underlined this passage: “I 
don't see how I can possibly 
join you, as we're very short- 


handed right now and since 
there's a payday coming up : y 
this week the Old Man will if 


«AND SO THE 
need all available medics, . 
including me, to take care FILMING OF THE 


of the usual payday casual- SCARLET PRINCESS ° 
ties. Besides, it takes a min- BEGINS !.. SAVAN~ 
imum of seven days to get a NAH GAY, AS THE ~ ee LD pio! 
request for leave processed. DAUGHTER OF THE 
How about delaying your LATE GENGHIS 
trip for a couple of weeks?” KHAN, SEES HER 
I read the passage to Bob. FATHER'S EMPIRE 
“Gee,” he said, “this would OWINDLING ... 
make a terrific daytime serial | 
for radio. What a cliffhang- | 
er! Will the Rover Boys get | 
to Florida? .Of course they | 
will. But when?” | 
“Quit clowning,” I snapped, | 
“and get back to that list of | j 
things you have to do before | 


\~ 


| 


Rewmered | Bb Pecme Fee ea 


Comrright 1956, Pleid Enter 


LETS TRY THAT AGAIN, 

HENRY! REMEMBER, _ 

} YOU'RE ONE WAR LORD WHO \ SLOAN 
ISN‘T GOING TO ALLOW THE \ 
PRINCESS TO PUSH HIM «(07 

B AROUND AS HER DADDY / 


you leave. I'm getting out of 


By Ham Fisher _ 


here by midweek, or my 


Enjoy Daily... Millions De 


> - 


— 
 or~e Se 


name ain't . 


“Buck Benny,” Bob con- 


cluded for me. 

And that’s about the way 
it stands. If the column 
doesn’t appear one day, 
youll know [I made it. 
With or without Bob, the 
Yardbird, or even the lady 
of the house. 

ow 


TODAY'S BIRTHDAYS 
Greetings to Milton Caniff 
and Ike Diamond. Belated 
greetings to Anthony L. 
Ellison, who celebrated his 
birthday on Sunday. 


cw 


GIVE-AWAYS 
Black-and-white puppies; $1 

inclosed for Children’s Hos- 

pital (Lockwood 5-5183). Cute 


* mixed terrier who does not 
| like children (Ludlow 1-2326). 


cos 


| $64,000 QUESTION 


When the Very Rev. Fran- 


' eis B. Sayre Jr. became the 
| father of a new daughter 


(Harriet Brownson Sayre) 
last week, there was rejoic- 


THERE IT 1S... TLL BE 
RIGHT WITH YA ? 


—— eee —— 


¢——_—_____—_———_ 


School for Girls. They were 


I LEFT SOMETHING BEHIND... 


o ALS 
TNS 


YOU TOLD ME, ALEX 
I SHOULD HAVE... 


OHO! THERE'S WALSH? HE'S TH’ 
CAUSE OF ALL MY TROUBLES? 
NOW TLL FIX HIM... 


FERD'NAND 


given a half-holiday. 

But the lads at the Na- 
tional Cathedral School for 
Boys (St. Albans), also under 
the aegis of the Cathedral, 
were deep in gloom. 

They spent the half day 
wondering whether they'll 
get the holiday if the next 


= ing at the National Cathedral one is a boy. 


Special Offer 
Pre-Season Rug Cleaning 


= 
he 
| te the 
: G ~ DONALD DUCK 
Je 


East-West vulnerable. North-|There is a convention currently | ( _. CN Ts ee ' 
> 


South have a 40 part score. gaining momentum among tour-| BLACKBOARD? 

|nament players which provides) 

ithat in competitive situations a) 

leall in no trump which is ob-| 

viously unnatural, and in com-| 

mon sense could not mean what 

it says, asks pariner to name) 

the better of his minor suit) 

holdings. On that basis a two 

no trump bid by West would 

‘have elicited a three club bid 
from East. 

Against the game contract 
of two spades West opened the) 
\king of clubs, South ruffed the) 
‘continuation and led a low 
‘spade to dummy’s nine. Had|-—--— 

East taken this trick declarer} SUSIE Q. SMITH 
‘would have been home. A club! 
icontinuation could be ruffed in 
vest GUMMy and later club forces 


The busy season/for our plant starts In March. This 
is our “slack” time. To keep our plant busy, we 


“th 


will clean 2 of your rugs for the price of one. 


Example: |f you have 4 rugs to clean, we match the 
2 larger ones and charge you only for the larger 
rug. Then we match the 2 smaller ones, and charge The bidding: 

West poe 


you only for the larger of those. vi e! get = I voade Fess ~- Pass\would net the defense just WHAT S 
many rugs cleaned as you wish at these “2-for-1"’ O . wy three spades and two clubs, If ! 

pening lead: King of clubs.' ~ 
prices. So it is really quite a saving. East continues trump, declarer =e ' THERE ? 


South was well on his way 
* |seores three spades, four hearts 
to score an easy game when end o diamond 


my friend Howard Schenken Bu , 
; t Schenken allowed. the 
snatched it from his grasp by nine of spades to hold. *Im- 


AB cone: unusual holdup play pressed with his own strength, 
ps. declarer now tried the diamond 


In view of vulnerability, | tinece losing to West's king. 
TU. 2.8000 West could not safely overcall On the heart return, South won 
the opening spade bid and Eastiand led a spade. The rude 


SANITARY’S could hardly risk a call at the| awakening~ came - when West 


level of three. It may be sug-| showed out. Schenken cashed 


gested that West might bid his two high spades and contin- 
6207 Blair Road N.W. 


Please have your rugs rolled up and ready when 
we call, For special fast service, phone Miss 
Payne at .c«.« 


> 
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*+-” € 
- 
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. 


oe ee eee 


three clubs after the opposition | ued with a club. This took de- | 
had reached game, but if part-\clarer’s last trump and when — 
ner were short in clubs this Fast got in with his surviving 

could lead to a great digsaster.| trump, the defense cashed suf- f 
_A double by West with such | ficient club tricks to defeat the 
little preparation for hearts) contract. 

—jcould hardly be recommended. (Coprright, Chicase Tribune) | 


t ALWAYS MANAGE ‘T’ SNAG 
LOTS MORE OL TIRES, BOOTS | 
AN’ PIECES O° METAL THAN 
1 DO Fish.” | 


BUT YOU COME BACK 
SOON AS*TH' FISHIN’ 
SEASON OPENS../ 


SORRY. UNCLE JOE.’ 
Ll JUST DON'T HAVE 
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rr a ee ee ——— 


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Wash., 0. C 


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CHANTILLY, WA. 
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4550 Rhode Island Ave. WA. 17-2511 


el ey oe we we oe oe Oe we ere oe 7 aaiee tate 
OE CORES wa ree 


CCR Se ee eer ee rw ew a a: 
. 


\ 


_. MARK TRAIL 


> MARK T SvVPPOSE 
= mom YOU'RE WONDERING 
a WHY DAD OISLIKES 
el INDIANS SO 
f THAVE UP HERE 


A I CAN'T UNDERSTAND I... 
=I LOVE TKEM AND ENVOY 
WORKING wit TrEM.,.mIT'S 

THE ONE GREAT PLEASUeE 
IN THE 4 

wooos... 


—— 


-/ 


ma WHY 6 — 


CONTROLS, MARK... 
THERE'S NOTHING 
TO iTP 


BUT iTS 
CONSTANT #£:GuT 
SETWEEN CAD AND 
ME... AND HE WONT TELL 
YGAes, BUT TF 
UL«a TO Tey: 


RIP KIRBY 


RE 00 MANY DIYS, THE MANGLEP WELLES SAZA0) VC 


vat 


| MOVES DEEPER? INTO THE BG-GAME COUNTRY. F 


— 


tl 


AY 
4 x 


nk hh D> 
onl \ Wij DyffW/ ty 


ae “4 
eEN\AG 


on 


7 
YY ae 


TELL Me ABOUT) 
THEM, WELLES, 


a 
“~~ a “iy 


ry, 


By Willard 


% MOON MULLINS 


1 WAS OVER TO 

TO THE HOSPITAL 
TO SEE HOW MOON 
iS, ANO HE SAYS 
HE GAN'T COMPLAN. 


LET'S GET A NICE BAG OF 
CANDY, WILLIE AND GO 


WASTED YER DOUGH 
ON ME... BESIDES, YOU 


AW, YOU SHOULDN’TA SURE, MOON. 
BUT WE “ 
Do. 
KNOW L DON'T-CARE k 
FOR. CANDY. 


: 3.4 
*>" 


L ad 


) erally known, 


The Washington Merry-Go-Round 


Brownell Is 


By Drew 


Attorney General Brownell is 
moving vigorously against an 
underworld figure regarding 
whom the Democrats for a long 
time pulled 
their punches 7 
—Frankie Cos- 
tello. 

On July 21, 

1947, almost 
nine years ago, * 
this column. 
pointed out: 
“It's not gen- 


but the king- 
ipin of Ameri- 
jean gamblers, Pearson 
'Frankie Costello, could be de-' 
ported from the United States | 
if anyone really wanted to get | 
tough about it.” 

The column then proceeded | 
to point out that “Costello did| 
not tell the Government, when 
he took the oath as e citizen, 
that he had previously served 
a term in jail for carrying a 
concealed weapon. eae 

“Even more important, a new 
citizen of the United States | 
takes an oath to uphold the) 
laws and Constitution of the 
United States. Yet at the very) 
time Costello was taking his) 
solemn oath as an American 
citizen (1925) he was engaged 
in the largest-scale violation of | 
the Volstead Act and the 18th 
Amendment in the history of! 
prohibition.” 

Following publication, I per- 
sonally talked to Various mem- 
bers of the Justice Department | 
u action against Costello, | 
but it was not until Sen.| 
Kefauver had focused the spot- 


To Deport Costello 


7 


Striving 


Pearson 


nephrosis. This is a crippling) 
kidney disease that ravages) 
children and costs their par-| 
ents as much as $10,000 in medi- 
cal and doctor's bills. 


Adlai and Harry 


It looks like the breach be- 
tween Adlai Stevenson and 
Harry Truman is widening. 
Stevenson forces appear to be 
frowning on Truman as key- 
note speaker at the Chicago 
convention. 

On Feb. 7, Jiggs Donohue, 
campaign manager for Senator 
Kefauver, wrote a letter to 
Democratic National Chairman 
Paul Butler, urging Truman as 
the keynote speaker. Donohue 
pointed out that Truman was 
for no one candidate, was a 
strong advocate of party har- 
mony, and would be the ideal 
speaker. 

Two weeks passed. No re- 


ply. Came Feb. 20. Donohue 
wrote Butler a second letter) 
asking for a reply. This time 
he enclosed a carbon copy to 
Truman. 

Finally, on Feb. 23, Butler re- 
plied: “We have not gotten to 
the point in our plans and prep- 
arations for the convention 
where we are ready to select 
the keynote speaker. However, 
I can assure you that your sug- 
gestion will be carefully consid- 
ered by the committee called 
upon to make recommendations 
to the full National Commit- 
tee.” 

Naturally, a copy of this 
brush-off was immediately sent 
to Truman. Since Butler was 
hand-picked by Adlai Steven- 


OuT OF THIS PRIVATE PRISON 


TT oe) 27233 SA Y.. 


ws) ee 
MICKEY FINN 


light on him that Attorney Gen- 
eral James McGranery finally 


moved. - 

Brownell is now moving with 
considerable vigor, and Alfred 
O'Hara, one of his bright 
young men, Assistant United 
States Attorney in New York, 
will go to trial against Costello 
some time in April on three 
counts, two of which were out- 
lined in this column. 

They are: Failing to give his 
record of arrests; listing of an 


|son to be Democratic chairman, 
and since Gov. Harriman, the 
other leading Democratic can- 
didate, also had proposed Tru- 
man as keynote speaker, Harry 
‘isn’t likely to be happy about 
Adiai._ | 


Copryrieht. 1954. Bell Grodicate. Inc.) 


Fairfax Plans 
Roads Cleanup 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
4 Tuesday, February 28, 1956 49 


Open Mon., Thurs. and 
Friday Night ‘Til 9:30 


Stores Open 9:30 A.M.—Phone Orders 
from 8:30 A.M.—Lincoin 17-9400 


Hechinger s 


has a big selection of 


Fireplace 
Fixtures 


Why Pay More When We Have Such Beautiful Sets at Such Low Prices! 


b 


erroneous occupation when fil-' Fairfax County will embark 


ing for citizenship, and failure this week on a spring roads 
to be loyal to the laws and Con- cleaning project 
stitution of the United States. | Some 50 containers will be) 


placed on the highway to en-| 
Merry-Go-Round 


10 BE NERVOUS, LULU? 


By Lank Leonard — 


courage litter bugs to mend) 
Estes Kefauver’s female sup- 
porters are deserting him. Fay 
Porter of California, once 
strong Kefauver gal, now tells 


their ways, according to Direéc- 
tor of Public Works Edward 
Kipp. The State Highway De- 
partment will place the con- 
tainers on primary roads. The! 


' 
i 
| 


: —— 
Luxurious Solid Brass 

7-Piece Ensemble 
Price List 77-00 


Pay Down 


Only Weekly 


4 $ 9 . 9 5 
him: “Il love you, Estes, but I; ] 
am for Adlai.” Lis Snyder of/ he County Dum 3 
California says the same . . Kipp said County trash col.| , } | 
Dick Nixon may have been jectors have picked up 50 truck- Heres what you get: Your choice of brass or 
ee eS; — _ at Be loads of trash along Arlington’ black traverse curtain screen in solid brass frame that 
lla he gy ol nel. tetbate blvd. in the last two months./ measures 31”x38”—a pair of turned, highly polished, 

He said signs will be posted by! .ojid brass andirons—and a four-piece, solid brass fire 


to the anti-segregation decision ) 
of “a great Republican Chief ms Ea al a ‘the $300 fine for set, consisting of brush—poker—shovel and stand. All 
at our low price. 


Justice.” The remark certainly ) , 
was not calculated to help War-|°°™>i"s trash on the highways 


ren below the Mason-Dixon 
line. However, it has boom- 
eranged and hurt Dick on both 
sides of the line. ... When Sen- 
ator Eastland of Mississippi is 
asked whether he will withdraw 
his two daughters and son from) 
the Sidwell Friends School as 
a result of its admitting Ne- 
gro children, his only reply is 

“No comment.” 


JUST SING LIKE YOU 
DID AT THE BALL 


Las... it 
~ WINNIE WINKLE 


POOR m: 
ALWAYS THE TARGET / 
OF THESE DOTING él 


Washington Pipeline DALE CARNEGIE 


thru his course in 


GOOD COMMUNICATION, BET- 
TER HUMAN RELATIONS AND 
LEADERSHIP TRAINING has 
helped many to GREATER HAP. 
PINESS and INCREASED IN- 
COME. 


Write for free literature 


Di. 7-4165 EXTENSION 
Dale Carnegie Courses 
509 14th St. N.W., Wash. 4, D. C. 


The White House requested 
photographers covering the re- 
cent Heart Fund luncheon at 
the Mayflower not to take pic- 
tures of Mrs. Eisenhower with 
famed comedian Victor Borge, 
because it might give him pub- 
licity. As long as the comedian 
was within camera range of 
Mamie, the orders were “no 
shots.” Photographers obeyed 
the orders. The incident was 
‘important only because it shows 
how one part of the press 
definitely kow4ows to the 
White House. Borge needs pub- 
licity like a hole in the head 
He played to standing room 
only in Washington... Mrs 
Eisenhower is openimg the an- 
nual drive to aid victims of 
j 


By Frank Godwin _ 


HE MUST 6B MILES YEH.LETS GO 
Away BY NOW.. BACK AND REPORT. 


14 
A 


STAIRWAY 


Sensational ‘“Master-All’”’ Is 
5 Different Ladders in One 


5' size extends to 8 ..... $11.95 
6' size extends to 10'.... . $13.95 
7' size extends to 12'..... $15.95 
8 size extends to 14 ..... 817.95 


Imagine! 5 ladders in 1 to handle all your household 
ladder chores quickly, safely. Lightweight, yet compact 
.,. there’s only one ladder to store. Made of thoroughly 
seasoned lumber with rust-resistant hardware. Converts 
from a stepladder to an extension ladder, to a stairway 
ladder, to 2 individual ladders, to a scaffold base 


ZZ §SnNOOZzeZZz 


ty) 
n Le & 
¥ , 


These are friends in need 
but expensive indeed | 


Their services cost money— 
and, though it’s worth every 
penny these indispensable gen- 
tlemen charge, sometimes even 
well-budgeted families just 
don’t have the money right at 
the time it’s needed. 

When this happens to you— 
remember, HFC offers prompt 
loan service for just this kind 
of emergency. 

A quick look at this sample 
payment table tells you loan 
amounts, and repayment sched - 
ules. You may borrow any 
amount from $20 to $1000. 

For prompt, courteous atten- 


"TERRY AND THE PI 


By George Wunder 
44 od « t | 
Way 


We TRIED TO SEND THEM ELSEWHERE, 
SENOR FOLLY, BUT THEY SPOKE OF 


. / 
; —. 


Sete 


For Backaches Caused 
By Overly Soft Mattresses 
All Prices Include Delivery 


24”"x60" for one side of 54” double bed 
30”x60" for 36” single bed.. 

36°x60" for 42” to 48” three-quarter bed 
48460" for both sides of 54” double bed. 


If placed between your spring and mattress, you'll find 
a bed board the most inexpensive, yet effective, way to 
cure backaches caused by an overly soft bed. Ask your 
doctor about the beneficial effects of using a bed board. 


Free Delivery ® Phone Lincoln 7-9400 


Free Delivery on Orders of $5 or More 


pe Sagi ay 


ALEXANDRIA, VA, 
3131 St. 
r aa 


‘phtest ad et 


OUSEHOLD FINANCE 


under ihe 


AsT 

ih and M Sts. 

At Bladensbyre B4. 

FALLS 

| Lee al 
At Hiliwood 


* 


wo ree OP ene ° a . wns wer 
-_——e- CR Ee QR es ee rrere ow iia ee a i ee a ON a PEN. 4.0 BSS 


". VA. 
ay 
Ave. 


Plenty Free Parking 


t 


~ 


SE eee) See eee) eee eee 


SL Oe EO RS Gr wae ae — 


* te i ti i dee i ee a a ee ——er oe act. ——~ —— - Orr ow 
Pe 
‘ a5 


Mog me é SOR 


/ | 


. 


— 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERAL 


Tuesday, February 28, 1956 - 


eae 


See breath-taking 

designer originals by 

Mr. Arnold, John Frederics, 
Gardner, Wm. Silverman, 
Mr. John and many others 
all flown here specially for 


The Hecht Co.’s 


fabulous trunk showing 
easter designer millinery 


Every hat’s a triumph . . . a true fash- 
ion creation from the imaginative 
hands of America’s brilliant design- 
ing talent. At right, Mr. Arnold’s 
superb feathered tambour in a divine 
shade of pink (79.50 at all 3 stores). 
See it, and a trunkful of equally ex- 
quisite masterpieces in The Hecht 
Co.'s 3rd Fl., Millinery French Room, 
Washington Store. 


P.S. Haven't you noticed?.. . 
a lady always wears a hat! 


construction gives double 
the wear! 


DUBBELIFE stretches 
the wear of 

CAMEO BUR-MIL 
S-T-R-E-T-C-H Nylons 


The life of your stockings no longer 
hangs by a single thread. If one 
thread breaks, the other thread of 
Bur-Mil Cameo nylons holds. You 
get pre-war wear, post-war sheer 
flattery and a whole new concept of 
stretch fit. New spring shades. Size 
A (fits 812-91), B (9-10), C (10-11). 


Sheer Eleganc 

ees TON. a incenueass nies tae 
Service Sheers ..... ose UGS 
Non-Run Sheers ..... 


Hosiery, Street Floor, Washington, Silver 
Spring & PARKington 


EMPIRE ENSEMBLE 
Slub-weare sheath plus 
jackelette, all washable 


2 2.98 


Our trim duet that leads a dozen 
busy lives ... jacketed or pared 
to its essential sheath. In this 
season's many-textured blend of 
silk, cotton and rayon, Grey, gold. 
Sizes 10-18. 


‘ 


Retter Dresses, Third Floor, Washington; 
Second Floor, Silver Spring & PARKington 


“ 
* © 

: 

’ 

7 


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. 


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i eile LOLS A me te ay ee 
i i i a se) 2 eggepes «=. » 
. ) Se rr we 
- >. 


~~? 


d 


\ 


A 


Washington, Silver Spring, PARKington— 


y 


a ae oe OO ee - POO eG “ongre ammmmeneey 
— 


\ | In Person, Meet 
Miss Mary Wyman 


«++ famous New York fashion 
authority, back by popular 
demand with a trunk showing 
of fabulous millinery, today, 
Wednesday and Thursday, 3rd Fl, 
Washington Store. 


LADY. SHELDON 
our suit-exclusive in 
crisply tailored wools 


MA @-%8 


Our own Lady Sheldons achieve 
best seller distinction for fine 
fabrics, tailoring and fit par-excel- 
lence The filared-skirt classic, 
shown from a superb collection of 
Easter suits, in navy or black tis- 
sue worsted or grey.or tan feather- 
weight wool flannel; 10-20. 


Reuer Suits, Third Floor, Washington; 
Second Floor, Silver Spring & PARKington 


~~