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The Weather 


Today and Tuesday—Partly cloudy and 
eontinued warm with highest around 90 
degrees. Chance of scattered thunder- 
showers. Sunday's high, 92 degrees at 
&23 p.m.; low, 65 degrees at 7 a. m. 


@Metails on Page 12.) 


* 


Cimes 


The Washington 


Herald 


a” 


Post FinaL 


79th Year— No.161 * #£«°Phone RE, 7-1234 


The Washinston Post Company 


MONDAY, M 


AY 14, 1956 


WTOP Radio (1500) TV (Ch. 9) 


FIVE CENTS 


ANOTHER 90° DAY FORECAST 


Democrats’ 


3 Leaders 
Given ADA 


Indorsement 


Stevenson, Kefauver 
And Harriman Rated 
‘Forceful’ Liberals; 
Rauh Is Reelected 


By Wes Barthelmes 


Stall Reporter 


Americans for Democratic 
Action bestowed its political 
blessing yesterday upon 
three widely considered can- 
didates for the Democratic 
presidential nomination — 
Gov. Averell Harriman of 
New York, Sen. Estes Ke- 
fauver and Adlai E. Steven- 
B07Nn. 

Each, said the ADA. is “emi 
nently qualified” for the nom- 
ination because they are “men 
of forceful liberal conviction.” 

Before making the indorse- 
ments, delegates to the closing 
ADA convention session at the 
Shoreham Hotel listened to 
tape-recorded interviews with 
the three men. In general, Har- 
riman, Kefauver and Steven- 
son, the 1952 standard bearer. 
criticized the Eisenhower Ad- 
ministration’s foreign policy 
and purported “big business” 
complex 

There was he discernible dif 
ference in the \wolume of ap- 
plause by the scores of dele- 
gates after each man had fin- 
ished his interview with com- 
mentator Elmer Davis. A ma- 
jority of the delegates was Ste- 
venson-minded, ADA officers 
reported. However, attorney 
Joseph L. Rauh Jr., who later in 
the day was elected without 
opposition for a second term 
as national chairman, worked 
the local political vineyard for 
Harriman in 1952 

The ADA resolution of ap 
proval warned “against any ef 
fort to reach a compromise 
within the Party by naming a 
—— candidate whose 
iberal convictions and per 
formance are less noteworthy” 
than those of Harriman. Ke. 
fauver and Stevenson 

Rauh in the past has threat- 
ened to “sit out” the campaign 
if a conservative such as Sen 
Lyndon B. Johnson of Texas 
were nominated 

The delegates by voice yote 
approved a resolution that said 
an Eisenhower-Nixon ticket is 
unpalatable to ADA and “must 
be opposed by all its resources.” 
ADA claims to represent aboyt 
45,000 members 

The resolution questioned 
what it called the President's 
“inordinate delegation of re- 
sponsibility” and his health 
Nixon, called “unqualified,” was 
singled out for what without 
elaboration the resolution 
called “his conduct in political 
campaigns.” Former President 
Truman has accused Nixon of 
playing fast and loose with 
charges of communism 

Following the tape record. 
ings, delegates heard sales talks 
from former District Commis- 
sioner F. Joseph (Jiggs) Dono. 
hue, Kefauver's campaign man. 
ager, and former Air Force 

See ADA, Page 9, Col. 4 


416-Mile Glider 


Record Claimed 


Reuters 


DAX, France, May 13—A 
French glider pilot, Maj. Fon- 
teilles, today broke the world 
distance record for a point-to- 
point glider flight by traveling 
670 kilometers (416 miles). The 
previous record was 636 kilo. 
meters (395 miles) 


Want Ad Rents 
Rambler for 
$160 A Month 


“My want ad brought in 14 calls 
and rented a 3-bedroom rambier 
for $160 a month,” declared the 
sales manager of the Frank L. 
Hewitt Co, 8487 Fenton 
Silver Spring, Md. 


You find steady- 
paying faster through 
The Washington Post and Times 
Herald—reaching over 382,000 
families daily, thousands more 
than can be reached through any 
ether paper in town. Simply 


phone— 


RE. 7-1234 


st, 


100, can 


tenants 


IT 


— ee ——— eee 


The Gallup Poll 


Soil Bank Idea Opposed 


By Midwest 


(Following is the second in a 


on the Midwest farm situation today 


the reaction of Midwest farmers 


Oa 

PRINCETON, N. J, May 13— 
The new farm bill which pro- 
vides for President Eisenhow- 
er $1 2-billion bank 
likely to meet with a lukewarm 
reception from the average 
Midwestern farmer 

First of all, the farmer 
doesn't understand the soil 
bank plan. It has never been 
explained him adequately 
and he tends to think of it as 
another instance of the Govern 
ment “trying to tell me what 
to do.” For many farmers, the 
bank just one more 
political football.” 

In the second place, it would 
appear the Government has 
taken an unrealistic point of 
view about the amount of 
money the Midwestern farmer 
thinks is fair if he is to take his 
land out of production. The 
average corn grower in the 
Midwest, for example, wants 
nearly $60 an acre to take good 
land out of production. This is 
considerably more than the 
Government plans to pay him. 

In addition, the farmer is 
inherently opposed to taking 
land eut of production. He re- 
sents the present acreage allot- 
ments and doesn't relish the 
thought of any more 

These are the general conclu- 
sions that this reporter has 
reached after a recent tour of 
the Farm Belt states of the 
Midwest. These observations 
are supported by the work of 


soil is 


> 


to 


soil is 


Farmers 


series of three special articles 
Today's report deals with 
to the “soil bank.”) ) 


By John M. Fenton | 


p Poll @taf@ Representative 


50 resident reporters from the 
Institute's field staff 

There is a great deal of un- 
certainty about whether or not 
the farmers would go into the 
soil bank plan. The weight of 
sentiment at this time, however,, 
is on the side of not wanting 
to go mM. 

The question we asked on 
that score was this 

“Would you, as a farmer, go 
into this soil bank plan?” 

MIDWEST FARMERS 

Yes, would co in 
No, would not 
Don't know .. 27 


It should be emphasized again 
that this the vote of Mid- 
western farmers. Previous In- 
stitute surveys have revealed 
that farmers throughout the 
Nation approve of the soil bank 
Midwestern farmers have op- 
posed the idea. 

The results indicate the typi- 
cal corn grower in the Midwest 
would want, on "the average, 
$57 an acre from the Govern- 
ment to take his corn out of 
production. It is estimated that 
the amount the Government is 
planning to pay a typical corn 
grower in the Midwest is only 
about half as much as this 
figure. 

“I'd want $75 an acre.” said 
a 37-year-old farmer near Crop- 
sey, lll. “In any event, it would 
be more than they would want 
to pay.” He rents a 320-acre 
farm with corn as his chief 
See GALLUP, Page 13, Col. 1 


is 


Red Prison 
Camp Reform 


Is Reported 


High Secret Police 
Officer Tells of 
Changes in Russia 


MOSCOW, May 13 # — A 
high Soviet secret police of. 
ficial said today all internment 
camps in the Soviet Union will 
be abolished within the next 
year to 18 months 

The official told French So- 
cialists visiting a pgison camp 
at Tula, 80 miles south of Mos- 
cow, that deportation of Sov. 
iet citizens to distant sections 
is now generally forbidden. It 
can still be applied, however, 
to persons convicted of various 
serious political crimes. 

Even in these cases, he said, 
deportation could be ordered 
only after normal court pro. 
cedure. In most cases, con- 
victed. persons would be im- 
prisoned. where they lived or 
as near as possible, he added. 

The official told the French- 
men that in the future there 
would be only two types of de- 
tention—in ordinary. prisons 
and in corrective labor colonies. 

He said inmates of the labor 
colonies could not be sent to 
work outside. The colonies 
would contain factories where 
the convicts would work. 

He said that a. special com- 
mission has been set up to 


review the sentences of persons 
convicted of political counter- 
revolutionary and crimes 
against the state. 


He said this commission has 
been ordered to finish its work 
and rehabilitate innocent per-. 
sons by next October. 


Kefauver the Candidate 


Estes’ Ambition in High School Days 


Was ‘To Be President.’ He Wrote at 17 


This is the second of siz 


of our natural resources, pro-| 


Few people have studied the 


articles on Estes Kefauver, |tection of individual liberties|Presidency more closely than 
his political career and his jand rights and betterment of Kefauver. 


phiosophy of government. | 


PREPARATION FOR THE 
PRESIDENCY. 


By Coleman A. Harwell 
Editor. The Nashville Tennessean 


Estes Kefauver was asked 


last week what he thought were 
the qualifications required in a 


‘man to be President of the 


United States. 

He replied: 

“He must have confidence in 
the people and in himself. 

“He must have a clear con- 


ception of the goals he seeks.) 


As I see them, these goals 


should be: Peace, development 


. >. 


the social and economic wel- 
fare of the country. 
“Next. he must have an un- 


problems. 

“He must have a thorough 
understanding of the United 
States. 

“He must be willing to make 
hard decisions and stick by 
them. | 

“He a be pe os 

of nee an 
eoity to cate out the Nation's 
ams. 
, he must have a good 
nervous system, )ots of patience 


It is told that when he grad- 
uated from high school, he 
wrote in a classmate’s program 


\derstanding of the political and ynder the heading Ambition— 
‘economic background of our'“T, be President.” 


Regardless of whether the 
17-year-old meant it seriously, 
in the intervening years he has 
done much to prepare himself 
to measure’ up to the standards 
he now sets. 

Estes Kefauver has always 
seeméd to know where he was 
going. Even in high school and 
college, he set himself a defi- 
nite course. Rom Wright, his col- 
lege roommate, who is now a 


and strength.” 
j 


See CANDIDATE, P. 7, Col. 2 


‘ Dorothy, 


- 
id 


Hitler Aides to Advise 
On German Army 


Reuters 


STUTTGART, May 13 
Some of Hitler's top war- 
time generals are going to 
be asked to give advice on 
how to raise and organize 
West Germany's armed 
forces, Erich Mende, mem- 
ber of the Lower House 
Defense Committee, dis 
closed today. 

Mende said his commit- 
tee would ask for expert 
opinions from former Field 
Marshal Erich von Man- 
stein, ex-Col. Franz Halder, 
and former Panzer Gen 
Walter Wenck 


West German 
Union Parties 
‘Lead in Saar 


3 Get 71 Per Cent 
In Early Returns 
From Council Vote 


SAARBRUECKEN, Saga fr, 
'May 13 “»—Parties demanding 
union of the rich industrial 
Saar with West Germany 
isurged into a 240-1 lead tonight 
in local elections 

| Early returns bore out Pre- 
imier Hubert Ney'’s boast the 
jvote would kill French illusions 
that the Saar wants to be sepa- 
rated from Germany. 

| Three protierman parties 
collared 71 per cent of the vote 


92 Degrees 
Sets Heat 
Record for 
This Year 
Thundershowers 
Seen Possible: 
Thousands Lured 


To Outdoor Fun 


‘Storme kill 6. hurt 240 Page 3) 

Washington recorded its 
hottest day of the year yes- 
terday as the temperature 
soared past 90 degrees for 
the first time 

The high for the day was 92 
degrees at 5:23 p. m 

Previous high for the 
was 68 degrees on May 6 

More of the same summerish 
weather is predicted for today. 
The forecast calls for con- 
tinued warm, with a high 
around 90. There is a chance of 
Scattered thundershowers 

It began to heat up early yes- 
terday, and stayed warm. By 
ll @ m.. the mercury already 
showed 84 degrees. It hit 90 
at 3 Dp. m. and stayed in the 
90s for the next four hours 

The first taste of the Wash- 
ington summer, however. was 
lacking the main wuncomfort- 
able ingredient of a typically 
hot day here—humidity It 


year 


By M/eet. Revert 3. Grer in both municipal and district was low most of the time. hov- 


FLAMES LIGHT THE SKY OVER A BRICKYARD BUILDING IN NORTHEAST WASHINGTON. (A COOLER PHOTO IS ON PAGE 11) eer 


\ptrse Was 4-Alarmer 


| 


Arson Theory Studied 


The possibility of arson as the 
cause of a spectacular four- 
alarm fire that wrecked a brick- 
yard building early yesterday 
was investigated by Fire In 
spector Anthony B. Mileo last 
night 

While the investigation was 
going on another brickyard fire 
did considerable damage to the 
roof of a warehouse belonging 
to the* Mount Vernon Clay 
Products Co. at 800 Hamlin 
st. ne 

Mileo did not rule out arson 
as the cause of the second 
blaze. He said the second brick- 
yard fire “seemed more than a 
coincidence.” 

The second fire took place 
a block from a branch of the 
United Clay Products Co., 
New York ave. and Bladens 
burg rd. ne.. where the earlier 
fire occurred 

The early-morning fire in the 


Officials said 


din Family Die 
With 2 Others in 
Head-On Crash 


NEW CASTLE, Pa.. May 13 
-»—Seven persons, including 
five members of one family, 
were killed tonight in a headon 
auto crash on Route 422 about 
10 miles west of New Castle. 

The tragedy, one of the worst 
ever reported on Pennsylvania 
highways, occurred a short 
distance from the Ohio line. 
All of the five survivors were 
reported in critical condition 

One of the autos carried a 
Niles (Ohio) man, his wife and 
their eight children. The two 
occupants of the other car were 
killed. 

Identified as dead were Rob 
ert Markwell, 38, and his wife, 
33. three of their 
children: Roscoe Williams, 30. 
land Allen M. Fitzpatrick, 30, 
both of New €astle 

Names of the three dead 
children of the Markwells were 
not immediately available. 


Korean Election 


Violence Alleged 


SEOUL, May 13 (#—Three 
incidents of Korean election 
violence were reported today 
as the time approached for 
Tuesday's presidential elec- 
tions. All the reports came 
from opponents of President 
‘Syngman Rhee, running for a 
third term. 

Lee Bum Suk, former Prime 
‘Minister who is a vice ‘presi- 
‘dential candidate of the right- 


with stones and clubs today. 
He said 10 of his aides were 


lence were reported 


Party 


In 2 Brickyard Fires 


il elections. The district 
municipal councils have 
been largely controlled by pro- 
French parties. 


The pro-German parties, out- 


| lawed until last year, were ex- 


pected to get at least two-thirds 
of the vote. About 80 per cent 
of the Saars 680,000 eligible 
voters cast ballots. 

Ney'’s Christian Democratic 
Union was getting the most 
votes among the pro-German 
parties. It was followed by the 


ering around 36 and 37 per cent 
during the hottest portion of 
the day 

District hospitals reported no 
cases of heat prostration. 

Washingtonians, who have 
suffered through a capricious, 
chilly spring, welcomed their 
first taste of summer weather. 

Rock Creek Park was filled 
with girls in bathing suits out 
to get a start on the seasons 
tan. The park also had its quota 
of Sunday picnickers, children 


brick yard near the Washing- rightist Saar Democratic party playing and feeding the ducks 


ton-Baltimore Parkway was ac- 
companied by a traffic jam of 
massive proportions as vehicles 
were routed off the parkway 
north of South Dakota ave. ne 


The first alarm was sounded 
at 12:14 a. m. by a passerby 
The flames were brought under 
control about an hour later. 


Mileo said officials of United 
were unable to give him an 
estimate of the damage, but 
are expected to have one today. 


His suspicion of the possibil- 
ity of arson was aroused, Mileo 
reported, by the fact that the 
blaze started im an unused 
wooden shack adjoining the 
larger drying-room structure, 
which was burned out, Flames 
from the shack spread upward 
to the wooden roof of the larger 
brick building, he said. 

Fire and smoke billowed high 
into the air. Fire Department 
their efforts to 
fight the blaze were hampered 


by low water pressure. 


Off-duty firemen were called. 
Deputy Fire Chief William H 
oman said 17 engine compa- 
nies, three ladder trucks, two 


| battalion chiefs and Fire Chief 


Millard H. Sutton went to the 
scene. 

He said the department suc 
cessfully held the fire to the 
one building, preventing its 
spread to other structures and 
to large oil tanks which hold 
brick-kiln fuel 

All available precinct police. 
men were reinforced by men 
from other parts of the city 
and by Park Police in handling 
traffic around the brickyard at 
New York ave. and Bladens- 
burg rd. ne 

One fireman was treated for 
a cut thumb. He is Marion G 
Rohrbaugh, 4806 Nicholson st.. 
Riverdale, Md.. a member of 
Engine Company 18. 


and the German Socialists 
The only sizable opposition 
came from the Christian Peo- 


._.'of the sunny 


Raab’s People’s Party 
Ils Victor in Austria 


Chancellor Julius Raab's 
People’s Party won in ‘yester- 
day's Austrian election and 
immediately . proclaimed a 
halt in industry nationaliza- 
tion. Page 4 

Panama's election was one 
of the quietest in its histery, 
with Erneste de ila Guardia 
Jr. favored for the presi- 
dency. Results may not be 
known fer several days. 
Page 4. 


Hoff 


postwar 
Premier 


ple’s party of Johannes 
man, who headed the 
Saar government As 
until last December 

The Christian People’s Party 
had 21.7 per cent of the vote 

The Saar was detached from 
Germany after the war and 
made a nominally autonomous 
state linked to France in a cur- 
rency and customs union 

Last October, Saarlanders 
voted down a proposal to “Eu- 
ropeanize” their territory. In 
December, the pro-German par- 
ties were swept ints control of 
the Sear government, polling 
63.9 per cent of the popular 
vote. Ney, chairman of the 
Christian Democrats. became 
Premier 

In their campaign for the 
current election, the pro-Ger 
man parties called on voters 
to “oust the separatists from 
the town halis.” Campaigning 
was chiefly based on their de 
mand for a return to Germany 
Government officials and party 
leaders from Germany also 
spoke in the election rallies. 


Aute Virtually Demolished 


Actor Montgomery Clift 


Badly Hurt in Car Wreek 


WEST LOS ANGELES, May'actor’s face would not be per- two weeks will give drill in- 


13 #.—Actor Montgomery Clift 
was injured seriously early to- 
day when the car he was driv- 
ing struck a 

wer pole as 
he was en route 
home from a 
dinner party at 
Elizabeth Tay- 
lor’s home. 

Clift, 35, suf- 


wing Republican Party, said 300 fered severe 
young Government Party sup- facial cuts and 
porters attacked him and other bruises, a 
members of his campaign tour 


jbroken nose, 
and a possible 


brain concus- Ciift 


injured. Two instances of vio-|sion, his physician said. The 
by Aalactor was taken to Cedars of 
‘spokesman for the Progressive|Lebanon Hospital. 

added that the 


The physician 
' 


4 


manently disfigured. 

The rented car Clift was driv- 
ing was virtually demolished, 
police reported. Clift’s head 
was thrown against the dash- 
board and a 4800-volt trans. 
former, knocked off the pole, 
narrowly missed the car 

Clift was following a car 
driven by another actor, Kevin 
McCarthy, who said he and 
Clift had been guests at the 
home of Miss Taylor and her 
husband, Michael Wilding. Clift 
and Miss Taylor are currently 


“Raintree County.” 


so I was leading him down,” 
McCarthy said. 
heard a crash.” 


working together in the picture fisnt< Today. 12 

| Federal Diary 1) 

“Monty didn’t know the road) Financial 

| Goren .. 

“Suddenly I) Herblock 
| Horoscope 


The Zoo reported a crowd of 
around 35,000. A large croup of 
sun worshipers took advantage 
skies and lolled 
on the grassy siopes of the “P 
Street Beach 

Nation-wide, what the Weath- 
er Bureau called “an orderly 
distribution of pressure 
tems’ resulted in a simplified 
temperature picture, with 
rather cool air over the north- 
west part of the country con- 
trasting with very warm read- 
ings to the southeast 


cys- 


Virginia Lists 
SecondQuadruple 


Death Accident 


RICHMOND, Va... May 13 # 
Virginia's second quadruple 
fatality traffic crash within 24 
hours claimed the lives of two 
women and two children today 
and left six other persons seri- 
ously injured 

The accident occurred when 
their car left the road near 
Stony Creek in Sussex County, 
and smashed into a tree 

Killed were Florence 
gins, 38: Rosa Taylor, 37: 
L. Goodman. 8 and another 
Goodman child. a 5Svearold 
boy, first name unavailable. all 
of Windsor, Isle of Wright 
County 

Four persons died vesterday 
im a truck<car collision about 
four miles north of Port Royal. 


Wig- 
Aaron 


Marines Extend 


‘Boot’ Period 


PARRIS ISLAND, S. C., May 
13 @®—A shakeup in the train- 
ing routine at this Marine 
Corps recruit center has jed 
to a twoweek extension of 
boot camp,” it was disclosed 
today 

The extension of the “boot” 
training program from 10 to 
12 weeks is part of a series of 
changes that followed the 
drowning of six recruits dur- 
ing an unauthorized “discipli- 
nary’ march last month 

Under the extension, noth- 


‘ing new has been added to the 


program, but the additional 


structors more time 
with the recruits. 


! Today’s Index | 


Page 
9 


to work 


Page 
Keeping Well .26 
Kilgetien 
Movie Guide 
Music 
Night Clubs 
Obituaries 
Parsons 
Pearson 
Picture Page 14 

9 


Alsoos 

Amusements 
City Life 1] 
Comics 26-29 
Classified. 33-39 
Crossword 28 
District Line " 


16 


ix 
Editorials 
17 | 
28 


26 | Women’s 


31-33 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
” Monday, May 14, 1956 Goes 


a 


Allies Pressing 
For Red Trade 


By Donald J. Gonzales 
United Press 


Japan, Britain and at least 
half a dozen other allied na- 
tions are pressing the United 
States for a decision on in 
creasing Western trade with 
Red China, Administration ol- 
cials said yesterday. 

Uniess some action is forth. 
coming soon, these countries 
may decide to step up ship 
ment to and from China on 
their own, experts bere said. 
This would amount to destruc- 
tion of the seven-year-old 
agreement barring shipment of 
strategic goods behind the Iron 
Curtain, they said. 

These officials left no doubt 
that the Administration is split 
over What to do ahout the prob 
lem. By agreeing to relax in- 
ternational controls, it would 
be certain to arouse a storm of 
protest in Congress. 

The United States itself has 
no trade with Red China and 
doesn't plan any. But the volun- 
tary trade controls system 
established in Europe and Asia 
operates on a unanimous agrec- 
ment basis. 

The issue assumed interna. 
tional prominence when Brit- 
ish Prime Minister Anthony 
Eden conferred at the White 
House with President Ejsen- 
hower more than three months 
ago. The President and his ad- 
visers agreed to review Far 
Eastern trade “now and period 
ically.” Eden was interested 
in clearing rubber and a long 
list of manufactured goods and 
materials for export to Red 
China 

Delay in acting on Allied 
bids for more trade with the 
Reds results from failure with- 
in the Administration to find 
some compromise of conflicting 
views between various Govern- 
ment agencies. Defense officials 
have been particularly reluc- 
tant to approve any major in- 


creases in trade with Red 
China. . 

Action by the top-level Na 
tional. Security Council, pre-| 
sided over by the President, has 
been complicated by strong con-| 
gressional pressures against any 
relaxation, A Senate committee 
recently undertook an investi- 
gation of the Administration's) 
decision two years ago to agree 
to more trade with Russia and) 
her Eastern European satel-| 
lites. ) 

Approval of more trade with 
Red China probably would 
spark an even bigger investi- 
gation. But indications are that 
the Allies won't wait and that) 
some sort of compromise will) 
have to be worked out. 

Officials cited a recent move 
by Britain to sell tractors to 
Red China. The British in 
formed the United States of the 
sale after it was completed 
This action is regarded here as 
a British warning that the trade 
issue cannot be put off until 
after the November elections 


iIke Awaiting 


United Press 


Off for Gettysburg, President Eisenhower and his brother, 
Milton, smile from the President's plane shortly before 
takeoff for a short holiday yesterday. The Chief Executive 
is expected to return to Washington today. 


Adlai and Estes Ride in Parade 


LOS BANOS, Calif.. May 13 
P?—A spectacular exhibition of 
what the well-dressed politician 
wears on campaign brought 
generous applause here today 
for Democrats Adlai Steven 
son and Estes Kefauver 

The occasion was the annual 
Los Banos May Day celebra 
tion and the two aspirants for 
their party's presidential nomi- 
nation made the most of it 
with Stevenson rigged out as 
a cowboy in boots and jeans 
and riding a roan horse, while 
Kefauver. in a silk suit, rode 
in splendor in a fancy Lincoln 


These footnotes to the 
week's national new have 
heen gathered by the reporters 
of The Washington Post and 
Times Herald. 


Washington next week gets 
its first look at Hugh Gait- 
skell since he became head of 
Britain's Labor Party. He will 
come here Sunday after an 
Atlantic City speech to the 
International Ladies Garment 
Workers Union, chief reason 
for his American trip. In 
Washington, Gaitskell will 
appear on a “Meet the Press” 
radio-TV show. speak to the 
Overseas Writers and © be 
given a lunch by the State De- 
partment. Washington will 
want to hear his first-hand 
account of the now-famous 
Labor Party dinner for Bul- 
ganin and Khrushchev as 
well as size up the man who 
would be Prime Minister if 
Labor again comes to power 

> > > 


The limelight shines ‘se 
rarely these days on Sen. 
Joseph R. McCarthy (R-Wis.) 
that he was discomfited on 
Friday when it was suddenly 
turned off in the middie of a 
statement he was reading. 

Testifying on sedition legis 
lation before the Internal 
Security Subcommittee, Me- 
Carthy looked up in surprise 
when the newsreel camera- 
men’s bright lights went out. 
He said with a chuckle: 
“Would you please leave the 
lights on? I can't read with- 
out them.” The cameramen 
obliged. 

When Murray M. Chotiner, 
Vice President Nixons €x- 
campaign manager, said he 
had been helped by Max 
Rabb. the Secretary to the 
Cabinet was doubly dis 
turbed. After searching his 
memory, his files and the 
recollections of his staff. 
Rabb concluded that he had 
never made a phone call for 
Chotiner, as Chotiner had 
testified. Rabb received him 
at the White House because 


he was known as Nixon's 
close friend and a GOP cam- 
paign figure and because 
Chotiner had written him 
several times on what Rabb 
considered legitimate mat- 
ters 

Rabb gave this information 
to Presidential Press Secre- 
tary James C. Hagerty who. 
after consulting Mr. Eisen- 
hower, put out a White House 
statement. The President did 
not ask to see Rabb but ac- 
cepted his word completely. 

Rabb, however, also wor- 
ried about the story's effect 
on his four children. The 
three youngest were com- 
pletely unconcerned. Rabb 
then went up to Phillips Exe- 
ter Academy in New Hamp- 
shire to take his 14-year-old 
son to Boston for a weekend 
of fun and talk, including the 
(hotiner incident. He found 
the boy bothered not a whit. 


Sen. Harry F. Byrd (D-Va.) 
loves cconomy im words as 
well as Government cash. He 
recently inserted one of dhe 
shortest items ever to appe 
in the Congressiona! Record’ 
appendix. It was an eight. ¥ 
line, 50-werd extract from a 
letter 
Post and Times Herald, sug- 
gesting renaming the 14th 
Street Bridge the Recham- 
beau Bridge. 

> — > 

While organized labor last 
week urged extending wage 
and hour law protection to 
9.6 million workers. the real 
fight will take place over a 
group iess than half that 
Size 

Virtually no hope is held 
out for bringing in farm 
workers and some others. 
But a real try will be made 
to include some 4 million re- 
tail and service workers. 

A key factor is the Ad. 
ministration’s position. Labor 
Secretary James P. Mitchell 
is sehedyled to offer it to the 
Senate Labor Committee 
Tuesday President Eisen- 
hower has twice recommend- 


“There's no place like 


_- HAROLD ROCHE says, 


(Furnishings and Sportswear Menager) 


the BRUCE HUNT store for men 


jor friendly, courteous service.” 


We, on the firing line at Bruce Hunt, take « deep 
sense of pride in the way we greet our customers and 
acsiet them in their needs. This courteous, friendly 
attitude stems from our management te your style 
counseling salesman to the emiling girls in the 
office. Come in and see how true it is. Enjoy saying 
“charge it” at the Bruce Hunt store for men. 


Bruce 
Larry Nathan, President 


613 14th St. N.W. 


ONE HOUR FREE PARKING 


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bearing this insignia . . » 


Bk: ' | 


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(Between 
F and G) 


lam | 
J | 


Post Scupls , 
Gaitskell May Shed Light... M’Carthy Sees It... 


Worries for Rabb .. . Byrd’s Economy in Words 


te The Washington * 


convertible. 


site tion . 
jreplied: “This is the only ex-| fay. - 


Red ‘Deeds,’ 


“Oh, no. He's gotten used to 
them.” | 


pers each morning and “in the 


evening about the same num- 


AideSays 


Press 
White House News Secretary 


President said 
that he saw no 
that ~ id 
at wou 

come from a Hagerty 
visit at this time” by Soviet 
Premier Nikolai Bulganin and 
Communist Party Boss Nikita) 
Khrushchev. The Russians sug- 
gested a United States visit 
while touring Britain. - 

“Right from the start we have 
been interested ... in deeds not 
words from the leaders of the) 
Soviet Union,” Hagerty said, | 
“we haven't got those deeds 
yet.” 

He noted the lengthy disarm- 
ament talks in London recently 
“ended more or less in a stale 
mate.” He said that so far the 
Russians have “completely re- 
jected” all this country’s dis 
armament proposals “after a 
lot of talk.” 

“We'd be interested before a 
visit to this country in some ac- 


some evidence of 
. that we do not have 


The contrast in their getups ercise I get. How are you do-| 4+ ine present time,” he said. 


brought cheers 


plause from the 


and long ap- ing?” 
estimated | 


“I'm doing fine . 


Hagerty made the remarks in 


. just a lit), filmed television interview 


50,000 Central Californians who tle sleepy,” the Tennessean i+), Rep. Kenneth B. Keating 
had trooped into this farming said. 


center for the big May Day 


celebration. 


They both had put 
strenuous 


Roth candidates were in high speech-making through the San 
spirits and greeted each other Joaquin Valley, but were Ziv-iny soo early yet” to describe 
in friendly fashion when they/|ing their all today at this Opis. HDemocraticcontrolied 
met at an intersection just be-| portunity to appear before S0/Fighty-fourth Congress as a 
fore the parade got under way. many Californians. aus 


“Adlai, you're doing fine .. 


They are campaigning for the | 


I'm glad to see you,” Kefauver state's 68 Democratic Conven- 


told his rival. 


tion votes in the June 5 presi- 


Stevenson, from his saddle,’ dential primary. 


ed broadening the law gen- 
erally. But last year, Mitchell 
interpreted this to mean that 
Congress should “consider” 
bringing in 2.1 million retail 
and service employes Ad- 
ministration division could 
bring an equally indecisive 
stand this year 

* . 


Sen. Stuart Symington JD- 
Me.), heading the probe inte 
American airpower, likes to 
pose this one: 

“In 1948, United States of. 
ficials sald we couldn't afford 
te match the Seviets man for 
man. In 1952, they said we 
couldn't match them subma- 
rine for submarine. Now we 
are told we can’t match them 
plane for plane, engineer for 
engineer and scientist fer 
scientist. What can we af. 
ford to match them in?” 

> a > 


Rep. Francis E. Walter (D- 
Pa.), chairman of a subcom 
mittee considering passport 
changes, showed such con- 
cern for his own bill last 
week he blocked a fellow 
Congressman’'s questions. 

When Rep. Michael A 


Feighan (DrOhio) 
question Scott McLeod of the 


State Department on the in- | 


ternational implications of 
changing passport regula 
tions, Walter cut in: “Don't 
answer that.” He told Feig- 
han the committee would be 
sitting all day if such “ex- 
traneous” matters as his ques 
tions were brought into the 
hearings. 
> > 

Despite the talk about eas- 
ing the President's burden, 
*Congress hasn't yet 
the bill te consolidate for one 
signature 10 or more of the 
many private bills it passes 
each session. Actually, the 
measure would spare the Ei 
senhower penmanship but 
wouldn't save much time. 

The President usually 
spends about 1@ minutes te 
listen te an aide’s account of 
each case, asking about the 
police record, if any, of the 
person covered by the bill, 


whether he is a family man | 


and the like. Last season, Mr. 
Eisenhower signed 490 of the 
891 private bills sent him. 


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Hagerty said it is “a little 


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Stamp Issue Scheduled 
VATICAN CITY, May 13 # 
Stamps commemorating 


) St. Rita will be issued May I9 
by the Vatican post office. 
; | 
A Famous European 
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of all Americans, ! 
sometimes think that the ones 
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Injur 


ed in Tornadoes 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


—_ | 


- 


oni. 


. 
b saa, necked 


VA ; a 
& 


* 


day 


tornadoes struck Satur- 


Hardest hit areas were Cleve- 
land; Flint, Mich., and two sub- 
urban Detroit areas; Windsor, 
Ont., and Ducuesne, Pa. 

A night thunder- 
storm left six dead in the 
Cleveland area, injured at least 
56 and caused property damage 

“several million § dollars.” 


urb of Rocky River alone. An-| 
other Cleveland suburb, Lake- 
wood, also suffered heavy dam-| 
age | 
Six others were killed by 
twisters in Michigan and more | 
than 200 otiers were injured. 
Nineteen separate tornadoes 
spun down on that state late 
Saturday. Damage in Flint 
alone was estimated by police 
at between $1.5 and $2 million. 
Five persons were injured in 
Pennsylvania storms. 


Omaha Area Damaged 


Damage was estimated at a 
half million dollars in Du- 
quesne, Pa. 

Winds of tornadie force 
eaused heavy damage in the 


a. 


we. on a 
United Press 


A little victim of a ternade in the Flint, Mich., area, has her injdries treated. 


floods and new tornadoes end- 
ed last night in lower Michi- 
gan when a warning that “sev- 


eral tornadoes” could be Missing Chicago Boy, 8, 


pected between 1 p. m. and IF Found Dead in River 


and a half ahead of schedule. 
At 9:30 p. m. EST, and the 


lyoung Government girls were 


Police Hunt 
Terrorizer 


Of 2 Girls 


A house-to-house check was 
begun by police yesterday in 
the neighborhood where two 


terrorized for four hours by a 
man who had forced his way 
into their apartment. 

Residents of the area were 
asked by sex squad and lith 
Precinct officers whether they 
knew or had seen anybody of 
the description given police by 
the girls, who live in the 100 
block of Joliet st. sw. 

Detective Chief Edgar E. 
Seott asked anyone with in- 
formation on the case to con- 
tact police. 

cers of nearby military 
installations and officials of 
St. Elizabeths Hospital were 
queried. 
The girls, ages 21 and 23, told 
police the man who entered 
their place early Saturday) 
morning appeared “confused” 
and “mixed” up. 
He mentioned the word “hos- 
pital” several times, they said. 
Investigators said one person 


Omaha area. 

The swollen Flint River 
drove 100 persons from their 
homes in Flint, but then started 
receding. 

The worst flash flood in 50 
years was reported at Mead. 
ville, Pa.. a community of about 
20,000 some 90 miles north of 
Pittsburgh. The Mill Run 
stream went out of its banks, 
flooding a 12-block area of the 
business district. 

A small twister struck in Kan- 
sas yesterday afternoon, caus- 
Ing an estimated $30,000 dam- 
age to farm property near 
Yates center. 

The Weather Bureau issued 
tornado alerts yesterday after- 
noon or evening for areas from 
Southeastern Minnesota to 
Western New York. 

However, threats of serious 


———— 


battered southern counties 
breathed easier. 


Three twisters hit almostiof her missing son turned to/ body. 
simultaneously Saturday atigrief today—Mother’s Day. | Some 50 policemen had been 
Flint where 116 died in Mich-| The body of Syearold Leoldetailed to search for Leo. 
igan’s worst tornado in 1953, Rausch Jr. was recovered from| From frequent reports of the 
Three were killed there, in-\the Chicago River. Police had|boy being sighted, they theo-| 
cluding a couple who died in|believed the boy was living a/rized he was sleeping in halls 
the wreckage of their home. A|will-o-the-wisp existence by his|or parked cars and begging or 
woman at Ithaca was killed in| wits since running away from pilfering food. | 
the collapse of a barn, and/school two weeks ago. Last week a Syearcold boy 
other storm deaths occurred at} Members of the Police De-|who closely resembles Leo was 
Muskegon and Saginaw. |partment’s special investigation! given special police credentials 

More than 200 homes were unit said there were no marks|attesting his own identity, aft- 
reduced to rubble in the Flint/of violence on the body andier he had been picked up a 
area, and some 500 families|that it had been in the water halfdozen times on a 
have been evacuated from)at least five days. he was the missing Rausch boy.' 
floodthreatened homes along! The hody was recovered 4%| The Rausch boy’s* mother,; 
the Grand River east of Grand|miles from the St. Benedict! Eileen, said young Leo had run 
Rapids and along the Flint! grade school on the northwest| away once before and was gone 
River. side, where the boy was lastiovernight, and had skipped 
19 Tornad Hit Michigan | seen April 30 as he told play-'school on other occasions. 


| Besides some 200 injuréd in| 
Man, 36, Slays Mother, 


p. m. EST was lifted an hour 
CHICAGO, May 


13 W—A mates he was running away.’ 


‘Flint and two Detroit suburbs 
—Alien Park and Lincoln Park, 
|—another 25 were hurt in Wind- 
sor, Ont. across the Detroit 
River. 

The Detroit weather station 
said 19 tornadoes in all struck 
in Michigan. — as teat nel 

a 
doceaenh dees Be Ohio, caus-| BOSTON, May 13 #—A 60-\boy. His last employment had 
ing six deaths, injuring more yearold widow was shot to been as an elevator operator in 
than 50, felling 600 trees and death in he? home last nightia Boston hospital. 
power lines 
were crushe | 
of a tavern, one under a falling) 
tree, and two were electrocuted ™ 


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what police said was double ment for a nervous breakdown. 
urder and suicide. = | Neighbors told police that 
: . Police said Robert C. ck-| Hickman, armed with the rifle, 
Baa nk ly ‘more than 200/man, 36, killed his mother, Mrs. |had 
| persons escaped injury when a Margaret Hickman, ; 
section of a theater’s roof was wounded her long-time friend, yesterday. ) ) 
blown off. |Mrs. Lillian Hanley, 50, of Rox-| Mrs. Hickman {s survived by 
| Roofs. chimneys and win-| bury, and then himself. All two other sens and a dau 
dows were the principal toll/three had been shot through One of the sons, James, is a 
‘Sunday of a predawn twister|the head. policeman attached to the West 
which struck the western | Police Lt. Leonard Brener Roxbury Station. He was on 
'Pennsvivania steel town of|%4id Hickman left a note say~ duty when he learned of the! 
\Duquesne, near Pittsburgh.|'"s he “wanted to bail out of| tragedy and rushed to the hos- 
Only two persons were re- this ... world.” A 22 caliber |pital to find his mother dead 
ported injured there. There|Tifle was found by his side. | and brother fatally injured. 
was also minor tornado dam- b yg aa 
| | w y a ' . oe, . 
oh northwest of| => who returned to the house Spy Cases Overrated, 


- early today. 
BS. sages ge Ly my hin Hickman was well known in Rebecca West Says 
NEW HAVEN, May 13 (INS) 


imstallations in the Omaha|¢°owntown Boston, having for- 
area Saturday. There were no merly worked as a hotel page British author Rebecca W 
injuries. took issue today with claims by 
former Soviet spy Viadimir W 


\Petrov that secrets were stolen 
Tobacco Ads Stopped ‘wholesale by recent English 


| To Curb Boy Smokers | 


Reuters 
STOCKHOLM, May 13—All 
The body of a 2\-yearold cigarette, cigar ond tobacco 
drowning victim was found advertisements have been 
yesterday in the Potomac. stopped in Sweden to help a 
Rockville Volunteer Fire De-| Dational campaign to stop 
partment men brought the| Schoolboys’ smoking. 


' | The Swedish tobacco monop- 
body of Richard Edward Light-|ojy has ceased advertising its 
foot ashore below 


Seneca products in Sweden and has 
Creek, Md., between Pennifield — ag oy 4 ~y= y men 
. \facturers to follow suit. An in-| system. 

jand Violet locks. Samuel! vestigation has shown that one! __ 
\Chaney, 4824 Park ave. Westicwedish schoolboy in 1l 
‘Chevy Chase, the youth's step-' smokes. 
\father, made the identification. 

Lightfoot was returning from 
a duck hunting trip with three) 
other men when their boat 
capsized. 


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Body Recoverec Miss West, 


son and espionage cases in the 
past decade have been over- 
rated in the extent of damage 
done. 

She discounted the effects of 
defectors Guy Burgess and 
Donald MacLean, who Petrov 
claimed delivered enough se- 


tion in the Russian espionage 


Sg  ——— —— 


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mether’s longing for the return|The boy's father identified the Dear a service station at Nichols 
| ave. 


Detective 
Ambushed by 
Woman Visitor and Self Gang, Beaten 


| NEW YORK, May 13—A de 
He had not ‘ective who incurred the hatred 


Three persons 4nd her son and @ woman vis-'worked for a year and police|of a Brooklyn youth gang was 
4 in the collapse|itor were wounded fatally in|said he had been under treat-| ambushed by five of the. mob 


threatened a man who) juries, 
fatally went to the door of the house! badly cut right eyeball. 


ghter. the youths suffered a mass loss 


eStithe fight was on. 
| Arrested were Harry Plum, 


In a broadcast 
from Yale University, said trea-\* 


crets to @stablish a special sec- 


reported seeing a man answer- 
ing the assailant’s description 


and S. Capitol st., and 
another saw him get into a Yel- 
low Cab about 4 a. m. Officers) 
are looking for the cab driver. | 

The man entered the girls’! 


‘ - 
By Dick Darcey. Staff Photographer 


Men of the St. Andrew's Society troop inte Washington Cathedral for the “Kirkin.” 


- — 


—w 


> 

‘the Society, a charitable and nary, spoke on the character 
social organization of men of and challenge of Scottish Chris- 
Scottish descent. tianity 


- 


RALEIGH HABERDASHER 


enjoy “open window’ 


apartment at 12:30 a. m. Satur- 
day on a pretext, then pulled a 
gun, tied the girls up and held * e 
them for four hours. Pj S Skirl 
The man was described as a, pe 
dark-complexioned white man In his sermon, Dr. Hope, Pro-| The service began and ended 
with freckles or black spots on At Cathedral fessor of Church History, with a procession of pipers and 
his face and a penciled mus ‘Princeton Theological Semi-|other members of the society. 
dine alt lockers, 2 whe chr a 
i , , | 
and dark tie. He was about ‘ Tartan Rites 
feet 8 inches tall, muscular and/| 
weighed about 180 pounds, po-| Bagpipes skirled and drums 
lice said. reverberated in Washington Ca- 
thedral yesterday at the annual 
“Kirkin’ o' the Tartan” cere- - 
mony. S S t 
ae a ummer Suit comfort 
Rev. Dr. Norman V. Hope, the 
tartans, or shoulder plaids, 
were brought forward and) 
blessed by the Rev. Dr. Daniel! 
C. Buchanan, chaplain of St. 
Andrew's Society. 
The occasion was the 10Ist 
anniversary of the founding of 


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early today. In the ensuing 
brawl he suffered internal in- 
a sprained ankle and 


When six policemen rushed 
to aid the embattled detective, 


of courage, and scattered. Four 
of them were caught, and the 
fifth is being hunted. 

The victim, Detective John 
P. O’Brien, 34, who for some 
time has been watching , and 
questioning members of the 
Third Avenue Boys, was sitting 
in his patrol car when a gang 
member, identified as John 
Murphy, 18, approached. Then 
four other youths leaped out of 
the darkness, grabbed him, and 


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ag WASHINGTON POST and TIMES 


i 


- 
: 


HERALD 
Monday, May 14, 1956 vig 


Groted Parmesan Cheese 


Around the World — 
(Conservatives 
Win in Austria 


That was the big issue in the 
contest between Raab’s People’s 


basic industry is state-owned. 
Rightist and Communists 
.|both lost parliamentary seats 


YOU OUGHT| 


since the Russians went home. 
Complete Returns 

Complete unofficial returns 
ave this lineup: Conservatives | 


“apes 
The old lineup in the 165- 
member Parliament was Con- 


United Press 


CommemorationStam p 


: 


_ and Drug Laws will be placed 
on sale here June 27. The 
central design is from a photo 
of Harvey W. Wiley, the fa- 


ED BARNES 


SEE PAGE 17 


Choice of Appetirer 


SPAGHETTI 
Ntalian Style 


Sevory s'-ot Seuce 


Freshly Boked Rolls 
ond Butter 


Orinner Desserts 


There’s a D 


Specia! Coke 


| ther of the act. 


— — --—— 


, 283,713; Communists, 
142.432. 


the assassination. 
Guizado informed Arias from 


parison of today’s turnout with 
his prison cell earlier this week that of the 1952 presidential 
that he had new evidence a mad ag me sng ag 
“The result of these elections porting his innocence in the of a large increase in the num- 
hooting, but the government’ ber of polling places. 


4 el Ole 


y 1; p\ 


car 


tet 


perpetual moto clock 


While  inereasing _ their 
strength in Parliamefit, the, 
Conservatives failed to) 
win a majority of the seats and 
another coalition with the So 


Cup Custord 
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Whipped Cream 
ice Cream or Sherbet 
Cherce of Beveroge 
Hot Coffee 
Pot of Teo 
Orange Drink 


cialists appears possible. 

| Viee Chancellor Adolf 
Schaerf, a Socialist, conceded 
the Conservative Party victory 
,in both the number of seats and 
the popular vote 

| Schaerf said his party again | 
is ready to join the Conserva- 
tives in a coalition government 
like the one that has ruled 
Austria for the last 11 years. 
\May Deal With League 


Aévertipomrnt 


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: 1 the Freedom League if the So-; | -~ 
cialists are unwilling to meet oad — _— ae ta,’ “i 
his demands for a more free —— 
que Raab said the present coali- 


Rabb's strength now ts suf- 
tion ~—so safe that now it can |... get 


tion government will resign 
iformally Monday. President’ 
Theodor Koerner then will ask) 
Raab to form a new Cabinet. 
| The Conservatives won by 
gaining almost everywhere in| 
the countryside and chipping 
idown the Socialists in their’! 
/Vienna stronghold. 

The Communists made a poor | 
showing in the popular vote and 
lost all the four seats they held 


TODAY AT 


Jounsons Perna sc ill | 


gros ‘ from the industrial Wiener 

on 13 x.* yy = ad \Neustadt District. They held 

ae ny eM, \their losses to a single seat by 
Warragier St ARLINGTON—<TOO Lee | picking up three in Liew y 

Sap; FALLS CHYECH—Seven Corners, The Communists looked par- 

cateran—fawtes Cove Om, 05. Om. in what used to be 

tone, which em- 


| braced Wiener Neustadt. 


a 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD — 
_—— | Monday, May 14, 1956 5 


Hungary Dismantles Border Barrier - 


Pee. Sed Bs Despite Hungary's action to|more than 10 miles deep with- 

VIENNA, May 13—The spec-|remove the barriers, Budapest | Out special passes. 

tacular dismantling of the Com- has given no sign as yet of 
‘munist Iron Curtain of barbed eliminating other measures de- 
‘wire and land mines along the signed to prevent anti-Commu- 

' Huegerien-Austrian frontier nists from crossing to the West. 
‘has been extended in the last) These include special border- 


| zone regulations that forbid 
28 heurs to the _ eonens the) Hungarian citizens to enter the - VITA FOOD STORE 


long Western frontier area § 519-1)th St. MLW. RE 71212 


—— —~ — -_ ee a 
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the two-way stretch, though. Some choice First 
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early July, no Cabin or Tourist space until 
after the so-called summer peak—that's about 
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ween 5-7 ell __"_ \French Rush3 Divisions to Tlemcen,} 
_———< emo 

F errvtune vw Cyprus Chief Defies 4%att Attack by “Army of Allah’ TEAR 
EAT TURKS 10 GAS Threat Against Life |= eee me Compact Make-Up 


In Paris, French security 6" 
John Harding, Exitish béilitery ~~ ” large-scale trae ‘In iiegal 

itary showing up for regular Church | : a stregs 
Governor of Cyprus, today/.¢ postend services in this SS ee ee Algerian 
tense island capital. .|. A police report said the arms 
ROKA. the underground er 
ganization, has called upon all 


through four “intermediaries” 
in Paris. The middlemen were 
identified as Syrian and Leba- 
nese Nationals but their names 


Want To Know 7 % Se | ‘ot The Europeans ; \were not disclosed. 
2 ’ what they believed was a ter- 
Where To Go 


rorist preparing to toss a gre- 


Fun? 


= somaae advance units of the rebel oY vee 
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Potomac Playground Net indorion rye > pom bil- WRF force is WES , 7 a : aL : vo be vel it. ~% : 
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A 24-page guide to good times for the whole me — SF by inforcements landed in Oran to sate tS ~s ae Far bas Bye ee 


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the places nearest you for picnicking, camping, 
swimming, golfing, sailing, fishing, horseback commando last Wednesday. French vigilantes in the daring 
riding—or you name it. Watch for this handy, — ~~ 
helpful fun directory in Washington's big 


Sunday newspaper. . F reed Zionist 


Sunday, May 20th 1s owene Disowns Spy F R / CA NY 
| TO MEET Confessions 


The Washington Post | ED BARNES). =< 10 » os. N F S 


Zionist leader, imprisoned in) 


‘the 1951 Czechoslovak anti-| 


Semitic trials, came from be- 
hind the Iron Curtain today 
ane said the Reds use methods 
that “make people say things 
they don't mean.” 

Mordecai Oren. who flew 
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Czech Communist boss Rudolf 


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meee 


THE WASHINGTON POST ond TIMES HERA 
ica Monday, May 14, 1956 , Oe. 


Kefauver Set His Sights at Early Age 


CANDIDATE—Fr. FP. 11909 and later an ee participated in such state|Nation could without ajis in a measure responsible for 


z 
: 
% 
: 
2 
Fs 
= 
$ 
i 


tobacco buyer in Hartsville, 
Tenn., recalls, “He was a hard 
worker, a square shooter and 
oe tee he went after, he 


| His early home life was a 

/preparation for public service. 

Visitors were such pe 

as his cousin, the learned J 

W. B. Swaney, author of a book 

on the Constitution, “Safe 

guards of Liberty,” and another 
- cousin, Joseph W. Folk, Gover- 

ovest Sau’ nor of Missouri from 1905 to 


—_— 


/in Europe. 
_ His boyhood reading was a 
preparation. Many of his books 
line the walls of his father’s 
hotel in Madisonville, where 
‘the senior Kefauver now lives. 
They includé biographies of 
i\Jackson, Lee and Lincoln, 
Campbell's “Tennessee His- 
tory,” Green's “American Com- 
monweaith” and Gibbon’s 
“Rise and Decline of the Ro- 
man Empire.” 

From earliest § times, 


be 

maries more than any man. leader. In others, a Cabinet his being honored by election 
Another Democrat, Woodrow|member might become Presi-|as a vice president of the Ameri- 
Wilson, once said on the sub- dent, not an official elected by|can Political Science Associ- 

ject, “The nomination should the people. ae in 1947. 
a directly e jhe Polls.| Speaker Third in Line | Pag beet Guttines an exten- 
nothing but the party plat-| His bill provided that the line) owe congressional officienes, 
form. al sth (ot Succession should be the Vice | including those on which he has 
te en Sar anaes With | President, then the Speaker of introduced bills. There runs 
confidence inthe House, then the Speaker pro|throughout it a sense of re- 
tem of the Senate. sponsibility to, and confidence 

“bridge Almost as a farewell gift, aim the people. 
the White House and short time before he went to| “The legislature,” he wrote. 
He favored having Cabinet the Senate, the House passed “is the keystone of democracy. 
members and heads of execu. | Dis bill in 1947. It was then ap-| Failure of the legislative branch 


he 
|planned to be a lawyer. In high| ‘proved by the Senate and be- to keep pace with the needs of 
, ‘school days, he loved to attend od soe cieeamens = cues, | came law. the people . . . has brought! 
— isessions in the Monroe County ! tion sessions. Kefauver’s reputation as an death to many democratic gov- 

courthouse. Magistrate’s courts’ He saw in this a strengthen-|@@thority on government was ernments.” 
enhanced by publication of his Kefauver's career has been 


. %e 


ad 
aa” 


~~ were informal and sometimes|ing of Congress, whose im 


| por- 
; ||they'd let him argue for a de-itance thus “would be brought 
Y Shazec BisHor | if 


fendant when no lawyer W&S\to the attention of the people 
7 : 
A -D 
on xe HY ° 


: |available. of the Nation.” 
fe} LIPSTICK 


In college he was interested) Another proposal, certain of| 29th Century 
in student government. A nat-| an uphill pull, is that seniority | 
ural leader, he not only won top be done away with in Congress 
‘Ss Stays on beautifully 
L > from first thing in morning— / 
‘til lost kiss at night! 


‘book in collaboration with Dr. devoted to keeping our de- 
Jack Levin, government eco- mocracy from this fate. | 
‘nomic consultant. It is called) TUESDAY, Government and’ 
and Business. 


posts of popularity but of re- and that committee chairmen be —<: 
ibility, too. | = 
"Prem ibee on he has lost nelauenp terasas bana Althouss| WHY PAY MORE? | ? ) 
ACT NOW! PAY LESS | 
For Our Spring Special 


chance to broaden his knowl-|\this would probably have wide 
on 


edge and take on greater re- popular support, Congress is the’ 
sponsibility. ‘one that would have to approve 
Amenican-Standard 
— 


Among his standards. the first it, so it has not progressed far. | 
one seems especially interesting; But another of his efforts has 
—that a President should have fared better. This was his bill 

NO MONEY DOWN 
FIRST PAYMENT 
IN AUGUST 


a 
<a 

/* 
» * 


confidence in the people. It to change the presidential line 
typifies Kefauver of succession, Kefauver had! 
His legislative career reveals jong been concerned by the fact 
what he has in mind. Time and that in some circumstances the 
jagain he has shown his conf) _ ) 
= dence in the people. | | 
| 

| 


Electoral College Reform ee SS 


$ One of his major efforts in 
m™|\Congress has been to change 
‘the electoral college system. As 
‘it now stands, a man may be- 
come President without a pop-| 
ular. vote majority. This oc- 
curred in 1888 when Harrison 
defeated Cleveland 233 to 168 in 
a the electoral college, though 
m™ | Cleveland had one million more 
‘votes. 
| Jn the House he joined with 
@ Reps. Gossett (Tex.) and Lea. 
(Calif.) in proposing a consti-' 
tutional amendment under 
which the electoral votes -in| 
each state would be divided be 
tween the candidates rather 
ive is in constant usage when you ro sy of tecoaen entirely for 
One of his first moves in the 
Senate was to join Sen. Lodge 


’ 


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\(Mass.) in sponsoring a resolu- 

tion to the same effect. The 

achievement of this may be far 

off, but there is sentiment for 
it. /. 

Meantime, Kefauver has in 
troduced another resolution 
calling for a constitutional 
amendment to provide a na- 
tional presidential preference 
primary. 

= | This seems like a natural pro- 
= posal from one who has per- 


ashington. p ermanent 
BUILDING ASSOCIATION 


| 

Air Power 
‘Facts’ Asked 
; By Harriman 


DENVER. May 13 ®—Gov 


629 F St., N.W REpublic 7-6293 


SAVINGS accor fi mw~suetre wer ro s8e4e.0e08 


Harriman of New York charged | 


today that President Eisenhow- | 
er has “failed to tell the peo-| 
ple the truth” about the cur- 
rent state of U. S. air strength 


Exclusively at Campbell's in 
Washington & Silver Spring 


in relation to Russia's. 
| Harriman here on the first} Fo a ee 
leg of @ seven-state peur Seer ee Po Seca 5. stig 
tour, also said the Democrats | Sk, hey axe, wet a 
must hold to their 1948 and) >.) 4 fe) 9 %% ™ 
1952 campaign stands on civil : ae eee 
‘rights or face defeat in the | 
November election. | ‘ ) ' 

He told reporters Mr. Eisen-! } 
hower had “been less than | 
candid” about this country’s 
air strength 
| “The people are entitled to 
hear the facts of what Russia) | 
has as far as air power is con- 
‘cerned, and what the Russian 
potential is.” he said. 

He also accused the Adminis 
tration of permitting “this coun- 
try to be fooled about our de-| | 


cter, 


fenses and as a net result we) | 
are falling way behind.” ' 
He said the Russians during | 
the last three years had been 
allowed to consolidate their | 
cold war position | 
Harriman said the Eisenhow-| 
Administration “has neg-| | 


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leadership in this (civil rights) 3 
question and thus dangerous 
tensions have been aroused in 
the South.” ee 
“If we refuse to deviate from) kg 
our previous stand (on civil a 
rights there can be no question 
of our victory.” he said 3 
Harriman flew on to Cody, 
Wyo., where he will be keynote) ° 
speaker Monday at the Wy-| # 
oming State Democratic Con-| ‘3 


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AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER 


Forbidding Forced Labor 


Recent reports that the United States has re- 
versed its position and now favors an international 
convention condemning forced labor are a gross 
oversimplification of a complicated situation. The 
State Department had refused to join in sponsoring 
a proposed International Labor Organization treaty 
designed simply to outlaw forced labor in all the 
signatory countries. It still adheres to that position. 
As a result of extensive conferences between the 
Departments of State and Labor, however, the 
delegates to the forthcoming ILO conference will 
sponsor a convention designed to forbid the ship- 
ment in international commerce of goods made 
by forced labor. 

What has evolved is a reconciliation of the views 
of the two departments. Secretary Mitchell has 
been eager to fight slave labor in all of its aspects. 
The United States had taken the lead in denouncing 
the use of forced labor by the Soviet Union and its 
satellites, and much of the interest of the ILO in 
acting against this despicable practice was Ameri- 
can inspired. Although Secretary Dulles had also 
been emphatic in condemning forced labor, he had 
committed the Administration not to use treaties 
as a means of establishing domestic policies that 
would ordinarily fall within the sphere of domestic 
legislation. This set the State Department against 
any ILO convention that would attempt to regulate 
conditions of labor within the United States. 

The State Department has often asserted its 
willingness, however, to deal with the international 
aspects of the forced labor problems by means of a 
convention or treaty. The decision to concentrate 
on this aspect of the problem is the heart of the 
present agreement. If other countries insist on a 
more sweeping ban on forced labor, the United 
States delegation will give tacit support, with the 
explanation that our Thirteenth Amendment forbids 
Slavery in this country and that the United States 
will not use the treaty method to effectuate doniestic 
policies. If the final convention should presume 
to regulate labor conditions within the signatory 
countries, presumably the United States would 
avoid ratification of that section. 

While this policy is admittedly complicated, it 
constitutes a far more satisfactory approach to the 
problem than the previous dispute between the 
two departments. Certainly an international ban 
on the products of forced labor would be the best 
means of enforcing a free labor policy. Moscow 
and its satellites have been pushing for an anti- 
forced-labor convention for propaganda purposes 
without the slightest indication that they intend to 
end enslavement behind the Iron Curtain. A ban 
on the produets of forced labor in international 
commerce would put Soviet good faith to the test. 
Incidentally, this approach will also snatch from 
the hands of the Brickerites Who wish to curtail 
the President's treaty-making power thé ammuni- 
tion which the original Labor Department position 
would have given them. 


A Job Restored— 


Air Force Secretary Donald A. Quarles moved 
with commendable speed in restoring Sidney Hat- 
kin to duty after details of the security charges 
against him were made public. But, although Mr. 
Hatkin’s job and good name have been restored, 
the American people have been presented with an- 
other case history showing how miserably the se- 
curity program can work. How many other Federal 
employes have been similarly treated? If former 
Sen. Harry P. Cain, a member of the Subversive 
Activities Control Board, had not brought the mat- 
ter to public attention, Mr. Hatkin would still be 
without a job and Mr. Quarles would still be igno- 
rant of a major piece of foolishness in his own 
department. 

Mr. Cain's disclosures a week ago likewise con- 
stituted a strong indictment of the State Depart- 
ment. What has-since been brought forth about the 
activities of Viadimir P. Mikheev of the Soviet Em- 
bassy'’s military mission were known to officials 
weeks ago. It was known that, in his approaches to 
Mr. Hatkin, Mr. Mikheev failed to represent himself 
as a diplomat. For this breach of the diplomatic 
code, he should have been asked to leave without 
delay. But no action has been taken. What is the 
department waiting for? 


Restrained Transit Authority 


Before passing the transit authority bill last week 
the Senate adopted a number of amendments in- 
tended to clarify and restrict the power it would 
give to the District Commissioners. One of these 
would forbid the local authorities to condemn th 
capital stock of the transit company. The Senators 
handling the bill agreed that the proposed transit 
authority should not be in a position to take over 
both the capital stock and the physical properties 
of the company. By seizing a controlling block 
of the stock the authority might have sold the CTC 
assets to itself at less than a fair price. Although no 
such action was contemplated, it is well to close 
doors to potential unfairness. 

Another amendment adopted without opposition 
would require the proposed authority, if it should 
condemn any Capital Transit property, to take it 
permanently. Under the bill as presented by the 
Commissioners, the authority could have taken a 
“leasehold interest” in Capital Transit buses with- 
out buying them outright. The Holland-Morse-Allott 
amendment would require the authority to take fee 
simple title to the required equipment, or in the 
case of property in which Capital Transit had only 
a possessory interest, the authority would have to 
take the whole of that interest. Fairness demands 
that, when private property is taken for public use, 
the owner be compensated for its full value at the 
time, without any privilege of dumping it back on 
the owner after it has served the public purpose. 

The Senate did not, however, vote to compel the 
proposed authority to take all Capital Transit’s as 
sets or none. The District would be free to condemn 
buses, for example, without taking streetcars it 
does not want. This is in accord with well-established 
practice. The Government has no obligation to bail 


out the Wolfson interests which have wrecked 


Capital Transit by their benighted policies. 
Taken as a whole, the te public authority 

bill is a thoughtful and discriminating piece of 

legislation that is well suited to the District's transit 


emergency. In this respect it stands out in sharp 


1 


about the best interests of the District can scarcely 
have any doubt about which way their votes 
should go. 


Passport Tyranny 


The cause of internal security has rarely been 
invoked to gloss over so reckless a disregard for 
the rights of American citizens as in the passport 
control bill introduced by Rep. Francis Walter. 
The bill is confessedly intended to circumvent recent 
Federal court decisions in regard to passports. In 
place of the kind of due process hearing ordered 
for passport applicants by the courts, Mr. Walter 
would provide an administrative hearing in which 
an applicant would be denied any knowledge what- 
ever of the information, or the sources of informa- 
tion, on which denial of a passport might be based. 
Indeed, his bill explicitly forbids disclosure of any 
information “tending to compromise investigative 
sources or investigative methods.” 

If the Walter proposal becomes law, the Secre- 
tary of State will once again be empowered to grant 
or withhold passports as arbitrarily or capriciously 
as he pleases. An American citizen desiring to go 
abroad—which the Court of Appeals for the Dis- 
trict of Columbia has declared to be a consti- 
tutional right—could be denied that right on so 
flimsy a basis as derogatory information con- 
cerning him whispered by Harvey Matusow or 
some other irresponsible ex-Communist—and with- 
out any chance to refute it or to confront his 
accuser. What consideration of internal security 
can be involved in allowing Americans to travel that 
would warrant so gross an infringement on liberty? 

Mr. Walter's bill would make it a crime punish- 
able by two years in prison and a $5000 fine for 
any Federal employe to issue a passport to any 
person “if such officer or employe knows or has 
reason to believe such person te be under Com- 
munist discipline, or to be a substantial supporter 
of the Communist movement, or to be proposing 
to travel abroad for the purpose of engaging in 
activities which will contribute to strengthening 
the Communist movement.” These are terms de- 
void of any objective content. Mr. Walter has 
long since made it plain that he regards as “a 
substantial supporter of the Communist movement” 
anyone who dares to criticize him or his commit- 
tee or his immigration law or anything else which 
he chooses to consider sacrosanct. 


Missing Person 


Neither the New York police department nor the 
redoubtable Federal Bureau of Investigation seems 
to have had much success in clearing up the dis 
quieting mystery that has surrounded the disappear- 
ance of Don Jesus de Galindez, who has been 
missing since March 12; but his friends are now 
fully satisfied that he was kidnaped and murdered 
by emissaries of the government of the Dominican 
Republic. 

Dr. de Galindez was a Basque nationalist refugee, 
a bitter adversary of Spanish fascism, of interna- 
tional communism, and of all other existing forms 
of tyranny. He lived in New York where he gained 
a living as a lecturer on Spanish-American affairs 
at Columbia University and as the editor of a 
Spanish language newspaper. At the time of his 
disappearance he is known to have been at work 
on a history of the Trujillo dictatorship, of which 
he had had some first-hand acquaintance. He is 
said to have received many anonymous warnings 
not to publish the book and to cease his journalistic 
criticisms of Trujillo, and to have taken them 
seriously enough to notify the FBI. Among his 
effects was a note, dated October 4, 1952, saying 
that if he should disappear, the persons responsible 
for it should be sought in the Dominican Republic. 
The date is significant, for it was the day on which 
Andres Requina, an anti-Trujillo pamphieteer, was 
assassinated in New York. 

About two weeks after Dr. de Galindez vanished 
Manuel G. Graymore, an assistant district attorney 
for New York City who has been working on the 
case, admitted that all the evidence, meager as 
it is, points to kidnaping by Dominican agents. 
He pointed out that three Dominican vessels were 
in New York harbor at the time. One of them 
sailed a few days later, another left port for several 
hours and then returned. 

All this amounts to a very serious business. 
It is well enough to say that the internal politics 
of the Dominican Republic and President Trujillo's 
methods with domestic enemies are not matters 
for diplomatic concern. But it is quite another and 
very dangerous thing when foreign dictators get 
the notion that they can with impunity execute 
their vengeances on American soil. 


Something Is Wrong 


No one is likely to disagree with Wilmer D. Pyles’ 
conclusion that “something is wrong” in the han- 
diing of the Billy Ray Prevatte case. The youngster, 
who is 14 years old and appears to be less, has been 
im the Upper Marlboro jail for 10 days. Until Mr. 
Pyles was informally asked to make a preliminary 
study of the case, the boy had had no lawyer. He 
has not yet been taken before a judge. Indeed, 
Prince Georges County has no full-time juvenile 


that have been done. It is time for Prince Georges 
County to bestir itself and to begin to provide the 
facilities to aid children with difficult problems both 
before and after they get into trouble. 


~ 


“Let's See—Four 


One Monkey Wrench, Times Two 


Oranges Plus Three Apples, 


Letters to the Editor 


Subsidised Prosperity 


It appears we have a new 
name, Soil Bank, to add to an 
ever-growing political terminol- 
ogy. Evidently the word subsidy 
has become unpopular. Why 
must we strive so hard to de- 
ceive ourselves and others? 
There is something vitally 
wrong with an economy which 
myst have continuous financial 
tr@hsfusions to keep it alive. It 
was not always so. What has 
happened to free enterprise and 
individual responsibility’? What 
has happened to the law of 
supply and demand’ 

We had better face the truth. 
Industry, agriculture and com- 
merce are becoming more and 
more dependent upon Govern- 

in direct 


ment . 
financia] aid or indirect spend- 
ing for so-called defense. This 
is not a normal state, nor a 
normal economy. Yet we are 
assuming that it is. We call it 
prosperity. But it is prosperity 
founded on debt; a debt which 
must be paid eventually in 
kind, or in human misery. 
Before Government control 
follows Government money, 
and we wake up to the fact that 
we have become the very thing 
we now hate in foreign lands, 
it might be best to face the 
truth and change not only our 
desires to get something for 
nothing—which is itself a lie— 
but the idea that one man may 
profit at the expense of his 
brother. CARL B. SMITH. 
Easton, Pa. 


Langley Traffic Jam 

There could be more confi- 
dence that the road and bridge 
complex for a future CIA at 
Langley would be well worked 
out if the present traffic prob 
lem in that area were being 
competently handled. But it 
clearly is not. 

Arlington County traffic over 
North Glebe rd. bound for 
Northwest Washington and ad- 
jacent Maryland, and Fairfax 
County traffic over Route 123, 
bound for the District, converge 
at Chain Bridge to inch along 
in single file until splitting into 
two streams again at Arizona 
ave. and Canal rd. This regu- 
larly forms long jams extending 


laying 
5 to 15 minutes in reaching 
their offices and shops. More 
sporadically, home-bound traffic 
encounters similar jams at the 
same bottleneck in the evening. 
This is a situation, unlike the 
location of the CIA at Langley, 
that could have been antici- 
pated. The steady and contin- 
uing growth of traffic which has 
created the problem could have 
been foreseen and accurately 
estimated at least two years 
ago when the enlargement of 
the Canal rd. and Arizona ave. 
junction afforded temporary 
relief to similar but less serious 
jams at that time. 
But this is still a situation 
medied. 


peak-hour 

of the direction of 

flow of traffic in thé center lane, 
w do the 
roadway 
as wide 


i 


f 
Hk 
i 


ge 


he 


which your editorials antici- 
pated would be necessary, is 
now on, with the commercial 
and large land holding interests, 
represented by the so-called 
Planning Commission, opposed 
to the interests of the residents, 
represented thus far by a slim 
majority on the County Board 
of Supervisors. 
HOWARD E. WAHRENBROCK 
McLean, Va. 


Litterbugs 


While pausing for refresh- 
ment at one of the, picnic areas 
along Skyline Drive recently I 
was forcefully reminded of the 
tendency of some Americans to 
garnish with garbage any area 

inhabit. I'll 


admit I was ocked to see 
papers, cans, bottles and rags 
competing with dogwood and 
laurel for the visitors’ attention. 
I should not have been shocked, 
for I've seen trash scattered 
over our beautiful country from 
the beaches of California to the 
mountains of Maine. 

I realize that a great deal of 
effort is being put forth both 
by Government and by private 
organizations to correct this 
condition. Yet the litter con- 
tinues to accumulate. 

To aid in combating this prob- 
lem, why not enlist the active 
support of the multitude of 
Americans who are desirous of 
cleaning up our parks and 
monuments by asking this of 
them: that when they leave a 
recreation or picnic area they 
pick up just two items of trash 
which they themselves did not 
leave? This, of course, in addi- 
tion to properly disposing of 
their own refuse. 

It isn’t much to ask, and from 
personal experience I know 
that a group of eight or ten, 
through this slight effort can 
make a visible improvement in 
the appearance of a picnic area. 

After all, they're our parks, 
let's keep them up! 

JOHN K. PARKER. 

Quantico, Va. 


Nazi Victims 

During the last war, when 
the Germans were victorious on 
all frontiers, many believed 
that the cause of the Allies was 
lost. Germany used all prop- 
aganda means to convince the 
population of the occupied 
countries that the Nazis would 
rule in Europe. It was the 
underground movement in the 
occupied countries which up- 
held the morale of the popula- 
tion. 

The main task of the 
Nazis’ Gestapo was to wipe out 
the underground movement. 
Thousands of fighters were ex- 
ecuted and thousands perished 
in concentration camps. 

After the end of the war 
Germany could not deny its 
inescapable moral obligation to 
compensate the victims of Ger- 
man crimes. But Germany did 
not forget that a great number 
of these victims were former 
enemies who helped the Allies 
to win the war and therefore it 

xcluded them in the Indemni- 

cation Law of 1953 from any 
compensation, pretending that 
these victims did not fight the 
Nazis as such but the Germans, 
and were imprisoned not for 
political but for national rea- 
sons, as if Germans and Nazis 
were not identical at that time. 

The great powers could not 
agree with this stratagem and 
insisted that the German In- 
demnification Law be amended. 
Now the new law will be sub- 
mitted to the German pariia- 
ment. One and a half million 
Nazi victims are anxiously wait- 
ing for the enactment of the 
new compensation law for their 
loss of limb, health, liberty and 
properties, as most of them are 
in need of assistance. 

It is morally incumbent upon 
all free people to insist that no 
further “bartering” shall delay 
the enforcement of the amended 
German Indemnification Law 
and that Germany, now rich 
again, shall not try further to 
escape its moral obligations. 

A VANOUS. 

New York. 


“The Stakes in Korea” 


To one who often reads your 
editorials, so ably written, with 
satisfaction and admiration and 
with the sound of a great 
“Amen” in his heart, the edi- 
torial in the issue of May 8, on 
“The Stakes in Korea” comes 
as a distinct shock. That pro- 
nouncement in its ethical and 
factual standard is far below, 
in accuracy and manifest 
antagonism to Korea's great 
president, Syngman Rhee, the 
usual tone of your editorial 
page. 

The personal spleen of the 
writer is evident in almost 
every paragraph which is 
smeared with anti-Rheeism. 
Even compliments grudgingly 
given regarding this great 
leader, one of the outstanding 
statesmen of these troubled 
a are qualified by the word 
- hk 


The highest representatives 
of the United States diplomatic 
and defense departments, who 
recently have spent time not in 

7000 


a in these few short 
years encouraging in eve 
possible way his eountryensn. 
so long denied freedom, to pre- 
themselves for future 
adership. 
i The charge that he tried to 
frustrate” the so<alled truce 
is, of course, historically ridicu- 
lous. What do you mean by re- 
ferring to “the supervisory com- 
mission” as composed of “neu- 
tral” nations? That commission 
has refused to supervise the 
present armed truce in North 
Korea and because of the Com- 
munist agents who are a part 
of it has become nothi less 
than a spy ring in South Korea 


reporting all that goes on there 
ir Soviet masters. 
This so-called “neutral” 


direction 
while North Korea in viola- 
tion of the truce terms has 
built dozens of air fields from 
which hostile planes can rain 


af 


: 


BEskess 


: 
5 


ae | 


Overseus Careers 


Call U. S. Youth 
By Malvina Lindsay 


MORE and more one meéts the young 
man or woman in college or about to 
enter it who says, “I'd like to get ready 
for some form of foreign service.” 

Some of these aspir- 
ants see themselves in 
embassies in Paris or 
London. Others in their 
minds’ eyes are carrying 
technical assistance to 
remote undeveloped 
areas. Some are indulg- 
ing in a romantic dream 
of travel. Some want 
escape from home sur- 
roundings. A surprising 
number are truly altruis- 
tic in motive—they want to help Uncle 
Sam be helpful to the rest of the world. 

This trend of youthful ambition is being 
recognized in the educational world. The 
Methodist Church has just decided te 
establish a $1 million school of foreign 
service at American Unjversity. George 
town University has long had its School 
of Foreign Service. Princeton has the 
Woodrow Wilson School of International 
Relations, Boston the Fletcher School of 
Law and Diplomacy. Many colleges offer 
special courses to prepare students for 
overseas civilian jobs. 

Yet many a youth who decides on over 
seas service is hazy about what to do next. 
For what special field should he train? 
How should he train? In what overseas 
fields is he needed? 


cows 


THERE is a confusing network of Gev- 
ernment agencies having overseas em 
ployes. The agencies change names and 
shift from one authority to another. 
Virtually every branch of the Government 
has overstas projects. 

No wonder the American Assembly, at 
its recent meeting at Arden House, was 
concerned with finding ways to bring order 
out of the administrative hodgepodge 
under which between two and two and 
a half million American civilians abroad 
now serve. Some of the leaders from 
Government, industry, labor and education 
present at the Assembly favored an 
ultimate national service of career per- 
sonnel. 

This was necessary, it was felt, because 
civilian forces abroad were bound to 
increase as cold war emphasis shifted . 
from military to economic aid. The United 
States, it was pointed out, was committed 
to a “permanent program of international 
persuasion”. which would need more 
trained civilian recruits. 

Meanwhile what is the youth who wants 
to be one of these recruits to do? 

First, say those in charge of overseas 
trainees, he should get a broad academic 
education. While doing this he should try 
to discover his special interests and 
aptitudes and plan for later special train 
ing. 

In his junior or senior year he should 
make contact with the Government Civil 
Service to find in what kinds of fields 
employes. are being used overseas. At 
present, in addition to diplomacy, these 
inclade communications, agriculture, 
education, engineering, transportation, 
industry, public health, public administra- 
tion. 


cos 


A FIELD from which technical assistance 
remains aloof is the arts. This country 
recognizes the desire of each nation to 
keep its cultural development indigenous. 

What languages should the would-be 
overseas careerist study? This is hard to 
answer since he does not know where 
he will be sent. However, French and 
Spanish are helpful in large areas of the 
world. So is Arabic. 

The Council of Learned Societies now 
has a project under way for a basic 
language comprehension course that 
would pave the way to the study of all 
languages. This would be especially help- 
ful to persons going to regions such as 
Southeast Asia, where there is a multi- 
plicity of languages. 

Since the overseas employe—the symbo! 
of Uncle Sam—will need above everything 
else the ability to deal with people, he 
should have a knowledge of psychology, 
cultural anthropology and sociology. He 
should also have a knowledge of himse!f— 
know whether he is flexible, adaptable and 
resourceful enough to live in a culture very 
different from his own, and one that is 
likgly to present physical hardships. 

He should also examine his own motiv- 
tion and decide wheather it is strong enough 
to sustain him a .career in which he wil! 
never get rich in money, whose chief pay- 
ment will come in added knowledge and 
experience, in personal development and 
satisfactions. 


1515 L. &t. N.W., Washington 5, D. GC. 
Telephone REpublic 17-1234 


Offices of National Advertising Representatives 


Det ony 
“en | 1 — w 
1 month 1.30 


BY MAIL ‘Payable in Ad 


Fale ee 
aT MANL BETDATD MARTI4ND AyD Vom 


rag 


« Sunden Sunday On 
‘3 Per issue 


jee fa| | Belg 


Rates outside U. S. A. furnished upon request 
Ww 
rs ee ade  S 


Matter of Fact ye ot en ee ee Sonal: Alsop 
Sheik Ahmed’s Camp 


ON THE 
SYRIAN-TURKISH- 

IRAQ BORDER. 

IN THIS place Iraq ends in 
sea of winter wheat 


less little is 
land-Like %eseph Alsop 
mounds. 

The mounds are sites of im- 
memorially ancient villages 
that raised themselves from 
the surrounding plain, on 
their own debris and over a 
period of many centuries un- 
ti! some accident of history 
or climete wired out all their 
people. Now there is little 
sign of human habitation ex- 
cept on a single mound 
where Stands a cluster of 
tents 

Here is the spring’ camp of 
Ahmed Bin Ajil Alyawr 
\lmuhammad, Shiek of the 
60,000 Bedouin of the Sham- 
mar tribe who have their 
black tents and pasture their 
million or more camels, sheep 
and goats in the wide deserts 
of central Iraq. 


cos 


THE PLACE is a dream of 
springtime beauty for Sheik 
Ahmed has forbidden the 
ploughs to touch an area of 
almost @ square mile around 


Te 
|? 


& 


his camping place. And so, in 
this protected space, the rich 
spring grass is still 

with all the flowers of — 
—fed poppies, daisies 
liantly white, devils’ paint 
brush, golden mustard and 
blue bellflower. 

Sheik Ahmed’s camp, with 
its huge living tent with 
gilded pole tops and its din- 
ing tent that can seat 30 peo- 
ple, is the scene of a con- 
tinvous house party. The hosts 
are Sheik Ahmed and his 
brothers, tall men, and fine 
looking in their flowing Arab 
robes and head cloths. 

For guests there are the 
Indian Ambassadress, a brisk 
German lady who descants on 
neutralism while the Ameri- 
can Ambasssador listens 
amiably; the Rabiya emirs, 
great tribal leaders and land- 
owners of the south; and a 
whole floating population of 
notables of the province who 
seem to turn up and go away 
as they please. One of them 
is the aged, white-bearded 
Sheik Khalaf Anlasr of the 
Yezidis, an odd but ancient 
local minority who worship 
the devil under the name of 
the “Peacock Angel,” abhor 
the color blue, and hold let- 
tuce eating a mortal sin. 


cos 


SHEIK KHALAF has come 
to consult Sheik Ahmed about 
the novel problems of mech- 
anized agriculture; but at 
lunchtime it becomes clear 
that the customary luncheon 
dish at Sheik Ahmed’s camp 
is at least a seconda con- 
sideration in Sheik Khalaf's 
long journey. And no wonder, 
for this is an imperial “kousy” 


Washington Scene . . . 


‘Miss Lucy’ Will Be Missed 


THIS CITY will miss Sen. 
Walter F. George of Georgia 
when he quits as dean of the 
Senate to become President 


to the North 
Atlantic 
Treaty Or 
g an ization, 
but it will 
miss Miss 
Lucy just as 
much, and, in 
some quar- 
ters, consider- 
ably more. 

“Miss Lacy,” as the Demo- 
eratic solon has called her 
ever since they started going 
together before the turn of 
the century, is the gayest lady 
for her age. size. weight and 
social position that this, or 
any other world capital, has 
ever had the privilege of har- 
boring. 

Her husband is inclined to 
lean too heavily to formality. 
But the only thing formal 
about Miss Lucy is that, after 
more than half a century of 
marriage, she still calls him 
“Mr. George.” 

If everchanging Washing- 
ton has such a thing as folk- 
lore, it's Miss Lucy folklore. 
Everybody knows some story 
about Miss Lucy—and tells it, 
usually with a little quick 
editing. 


These Days 


Patronage and Politics 


WHEREAS to the professors, 
politics is the science of gov- 
ernment, to the politicians 
politics is the art of getting on 
in public af- 
fairs. The 

olitician 

nows that in 
a free society 
most of the 
people want 
to be left to 
their own de- 
vices and are 
willing to pay 
for it, if the 
tax is not too 
high. 

The professional politician 
often prefers to let amateurs 
take the lead in an election 
year because it looks better. 
The professional figures that 
in the end he will manipulate 
the situation so that he has 
what he needs, patronage. 

For it is patronage which 
keeps @ party together and 
while many denounce it, all 
professionals practice it. And 
somehow, it does not take an 
outsider long to understand 
that even if he got a public 
position by accident, if he 
wants re-election, 

_ keep 
and that means patronage. 


IN SUCH a contest as now 
is taking place jn the Demo- 
cratic Party, it needs to be 
noted that Stevenson and Har- 
riman are not regarded as 
professionals, whereas Kefau- 
ver and Lyndon Johnson are. 
To the active manipulator of 
political votes either in con- 
ventions or in. Congress, it is 
not so very important who gets 
the nomination for President, 
so long as he is a good gny 
who understands political or- 
ganization and sees to it that 
the patronage in each state 
goes to the right man. 

During the first year of the 
Eisenhower 


York State, how- 
ever, all patronage continued 


Anniversaries | 
Jewish Bookstore 


$83 Kennedy NM TA, 9.0073 


me's 


he must _ 


—a dish larger than most ta- 
ble tops, fil wi 


you 
meltingly tender 
fingers, with their rich stuf- 
fi iced rice raisins 


drama of this strange encamp- 
ment. And thereby hangs a 
tale, which Sheik hhuied tells, 
not without humor and self- 
depreciation, in the intervals 
of the long bright lazy day. 
In the years after the first 
war, when Iraq was made a 
nation, one of its great men 
was Sheik Ajil, father of 
Sheik Ahmed. Battle-scarred 
veteran of half a dozen tribal 
wars and of Bedouin raids 
past counting, Sheik Ajil yet 
persuaded -the wild Shammar 


to accept the new order. He -——-———-—- 


was the friend of King Feisal 
1, and the King rewarded him 
with al] the wide lands there- 
abouts, where the House of 
Alyawr Almuhammad still 
holds something like half a 
million acres. Here Sheik Ajil 
pees his vast flocks, and 
is diming tent held, not 30, 
but 300 of his tribespeople. 


eos 


DURING THE Second World 
War, when Sheik Ahmed was 
only 17 the great Sheik Ajil 
died suddenly; and the Sheik- 
dom of the Shammar passed 
to his eldest son. But the new 
Sheik was bored by his author- 
ity and unthrifty in his affairs, 
and so he drifted until the final 
crisis came and he laid down 


e . By George Dixon 


Sen. George is inclined to 
be detached. One time he was 
being so Olympian that Miss 
Lucy-just couldn't take it. To 
snap him out of it, she 
threatened: 

“Mr. George, this is grounds 
for divorce!” 

The Senator looked at her 
vaguely. “Miss Lucy,” he said, 
“If you want a divorce you'll 
have to attend to it yourself. 
I have far too much on my 
mind right now to bother 
with it.” 


THE SNAPPY septuagenar- 
janess was having dinner in 
the Senate Restaurant the 
other day with the wives of a 
couple of Republican Sena- 
tors. A friend from Georgia 
came in and exclaimed: 
“Why, Miss Lucy, you're sup- 
posed to be a Southern lady! 
What kind of company are 
you keeping’” 

Miss Lucy hung her gray 
head in pretended shame. “I 
know,” she confessed, “but I 
never am able to let politics 
interfere with my appetite.” 

She has a bewildering fund 
of jokes, but tells them only to 
women. One time she was re- 
galing a group of stately 
dowagers with one of her 
spiciest, not realizing that Mr. 
George was within earshot, 
until he poked his head in the 
door and cried: “Why, Miss 
Lucy, you don't know what 
you re saying!” 


“Oh, don't I?” she retorted, ADA—From Page I 


terminating the discussion. 


WHEN SEN. GEORGE be- 
came chairman of the Foreign 
Relations Committee he in- 
formed Secretary of State 
John Foster Dulles he intend- 


ed to ignore the social end of |4 ‘OP Stevenson adviser. 


the job. 

“I'm not going to be running 
around every night to state 
functions, formal dinners, re- 
ceptions and cocktail parties,” 
he declared firmly, 


Miss Lucy speedily let it be | ¢orehand. 
known that Mr. George was ‘/hower was 


speaking 


could get to. 
If the Georges can't find a 


place to live when they get to ‘through regular 


Paris, Miss Lucy will be able 
to whip something up with a 


couple of old wagons. When | fulness of the ADA project and 
Atlanta banished streetcars in expressed reservations 
favor of buses, the transit com- |the questions asked. 


pany made Miss Lucy a gift of 
two old trolleys. 


She put them together and | lost its position of world leader- 
made a model summer house ship during the Eisenhower 
| Administration. 


out of them 
When Miss Lucy goes to 


NATO, the Senior Congress |ident for what they said was 
Ladies Club, of which she is |Dis failure to use the “moral 
founder and president, can re- | imfluence” of his office to relax 
lax vigilance. It won't have to |racial tensions and encourage 
post so many sentries during |COmpliance with the Supreme 
to |Court’s decision against school) 


make sure no gentlemen are S¢gregation. 


the story-telling period 


listening. 
Creerteny. King Peatures 


1954 
yndicate. inc 


~/ natural 


By George Sokolsky 


to go to Thomas E. Dewey, 
who is one of the most skill- 
ful professional politicians in 
the country. Whereas the Taft 
people can get along with 
most of the Eisenhower peo- 
ple, and realistically have to, 
none of them want to get 
along with Dewey. 

This creates a bit of a situa- 
tion when it is rumored that 


it has become impractical for - 


the Republicans to nominate 
Jacob K. Javits for the United 
States Senatorship, to run 
against the aged Herbert Leh- 
man. Therefore, it is being 
suggested that Tom Dewey 
run for United States Senator 
with the blessing of the Eisen- 
hower Administration. 


IN THE OLD days, when 
Dewey was Governor of the 
State of New York, it was nec- 
essary for every practical Re- 
publican politician to cater to 


his ego in order to get state 
patronage. Now that Harri- 
man is Governor, the state 
patronage goes to the Demo- 
crats anyhow, so why should 


his organization together ; 


“JEWISH GIFTS |) 
ore more significant 


AS 


SCANDINAVIAN 
aaaes 80a 


4 


a Republican worry about 


Dewey? The only reason is 
that Dewey still controls the 
Federal patronage, which is 
mostly disposed of by now. 
So actually there is no rea- 
son why any Republican lead- 
er should take his votes to 
Tom Dewey and most of them 
will not. Therefore, if the 


: 


’ 


: 


‘.++ And I say it's nonsense letting Junior develop his 
individuality... better he should develop 


something useful...” 


_—- 


his Sheikdom. As his succes- 
sor, the government nominated 
the head of another branch of 
the Alyawr House. But the 
Shammar would have none of 
the government's nominee, 
and in three months the Sheik- 
dom passed on again, this time 
to Sheik Ahmed. 


It was a poor inheritance, 
for Sheiks need to be rich, and 
Sheik Ahmed and his brothers 
were by now close to bank- 
ruptcy. Sheik Ahmed sold his 
car to buy seed. He borrowed 
from the bank to get his first 
tractor and combine. And he 
planted the first wheat in this 
land that had always been 
pasture. 

The year was good. The yield 
was rich. Since then, Sheik 
Ahmed has continuously ex- 
panded his farming operation 


1 a ee “AZ * .- 
4) den +* on ) a, 2 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
pao Monday, May 14, 1956 


9 


> 


By Warren Unna 
Bialf Revorter 


SENATE-HOUSE Appro- 
tions Committee conferees 


cisely one 


month. 
The confer- 
ees had been 


unable to 
‘agree over a 


tors and as many American 
combines in their shops, five 
irrigation pumps to put water 
on their other lands along the 
Tigris to the south of here, 
and a whole agriculture em- 
pire to rule over. 

Sheik Ahmed still spends 
most of his summers in the 
black tents of the Shammar in 
the desert. Then, nothing 
seems very different from the 
old days. Yet underneath, 
everything is as different as 
possible. By revolutionizing 
th® whole relationships, the 
very brilliance of Sheik 
Ahmed's success, the good re- 
sults of his wisdom and 
energy, have created a long 
range of knotty, novel prob- 
lems for the Shammar and for | 
him. So the moral of this tale | 
of Sheik Ahmed is that the pat | 


strictly for himself. |Rauh said, but Presidential As- 
She's been going to all she sistant Sherman Adams replied 


’ 


| 


| 


The Day in Congress 


Saatier and Currency. | 
wm. RF. 10157. Housing Act 
hear representatives of the CIO. Nation- | 


Eisenhower political manipula- | 


as a nominee, but ‘does that 


t 
they might have to accept him | 


mean that they will hate to | 
vote for him on election day? | 


Not at all. Most of the party | Seiae Golets” of : 


professionals will do the best 


they can to defeat Dewey and « m.. open. 
Retr ere 


to get him out of their hair, 
as it were. 

That is the talk that is go- 
ing around here in both Re- 
publican and Democratic cir- 
cles. In the latter, they still 
think that Dewey will take a 


stab at the Vice Presidency . 


if any veritable opposition to 


) 


ary. - 
|Committee business. Reem 424, SOR 
7 Howse 


Nixon arises, which Republi- | 


cans who will be convention 
delegates do not believe will 
happen. 
Coprright. 1954. Kine Features 
Syndicate. inc. 


at no extra fare 


Fjords, fairy-tale villages, 
modern cities. London, Paris 
included. See your travel 


’ agent, or write SAS for 


extra-city folder. 
150? K Street, N.W., Washington, D. C. 


until he and his brothers to- Western formulas do not ap- | 
day have over 90,000 acres in ply in a country like Iraq. 


wheat and barley, with 18 trac- (Congrtant,_ Ess, Hye yore 


3 Democrats Indorsed 


Secretary Thomas K. Finletter, of tax reform that would light- 
|en the’ Federal income levies on’ 
In the interviews, recorded the lowest income groups. 
separately, the Democratic| © He would place tighter con-| 
aspirants gave quite similar re-|trols on Government loyalty-| 
sponses to the 10 identical ques-|security programs. Kefauver 
tions asked. An ADA spokes said they had “gotten out of | 
man said each did not know hand” Each directly or in-| 
the answers of the others be-|directly said there was a 
President Eise D-\for screening some sectors.) 
asked to participate, | Stevenson said scientists should | 
be exempted. 


. : | ©He would support a pro-| 
that Mr. Eisenhower's views gram of longterm commit- 
“are available to everyone”! ments on foreign aid. This is 
presidential |/siso the President's position. 
Harriman said any such pro-/ 
gram should be reviewed an- 
‘nually by Congress. | 
tre The trouble in the Middle 
Harriman, Kefauver and Ste-| ast yn Re Sant aa ined 
venson said this country haS\ and the Arab states not: as 
|Harriman said, “knowing where 
pal s- out there.” ees 
arriman reca t 
All three criticized the Pres country in 1950 had signed a 
te declartion with 
France and Britain under which 
joint efforts would be made 
‘should violence flare there. We 
should have stood by it but 
have not, they said. 
Each agreed that, if elected:| AS for what each regarded 
© He would veto any new|# the most important issue. 
legislation aimed at exempting Stevenson said it was the need 
gas production from ‘to resume ‘our quest for) 
Federal price regulations peace”; Kefauver—the need to 
® He would support amend- revamp our foreign policy and 
ment of the Taft-Hartley Law reverse the Administration's 
so as to prohibit state “right-|“general favoritism .. . toward 
to-work” laws that forbid union the big money interests”; Har- 
membership to be considered riman—In the long run the 
in hiring workers. “world problem of the fight 
® He would support some sort against communism.” 


press conferences. 
Stevenson questioned the use- 


oa. ™.. open 
of 1985 Te | 
\a) Association ef Housing Redevelop- | 
ment officials. end others. Reom i130! 
New Bidg ) 
Sebcmie . m™ ta fr 10 & mm. exec | 
ana Judiciary. Perkins Subcommittee on bills, to amend 
To hear Thee-\ and extend public laws relating to Fed 
i : ald te education schooi 


19 &. ™ .| struction. Reom 429, Old Bids 


; . Ca 
“ch Com_| Interior and Insular Affairs, 10 6 m., 
apitol hen Aspinall Subcommittee. on R 
s =. apes 10615. sutheriaging the Secretary of the 
ense Wilsen Interior te construct the San Luis unit 
. Soireee of of the Central Valley Project, Califer- 
mu secur- nia. Room 1324. New Bids 
or Commerce, 10 
.. resume fh TV 
ons 
ear sfineses, “whe a pogene projects 
in field of Room 1 Wore on8 Meena, 70 0. =. anne. Pus. 
sideration ex- 
Laber 8 io, 10 © m. apen. TSicise tax technical and sdministrative 
consenne Dees 2 Se Oe lems §«ssubcommittes Committee 
coverage and ¢ lons pe, poet | New Bids 
Pred lum. University ef mngoese. ’ 
and representatives ef managemen and Heese Adminivtration. 1990 «© m@ 
labor organizations m aor Old exec. Friedel Subcommittee on Accounts | 
Supreme Court Chamber. Capito Commitiee Reom. Third Ficer. Capito! | 
10°30 exec edictery, (EL). 3 op. mm. exec. Celler| 
Bu mittee on pending bills. Reom 
46. Old Bids 
Joint Commitiee on the Libr 
chitect 


ity, Caucus 
Interstate 


Meets at noon 

Committees. m 

Appropriations. 19 & m. etec Sub- 
committee on Military Construction 
Committee . Capitel. ;emet 


— 


million start on a new gen- 


need | looked upon the $3.5 million as 
' forbidden fruit. 


F Street Shirlington Bethesda 
Silver Spring Conn. Ave, 


Good grooming: 
cotton sharkskin! 


lf there’s a city in 

_ your summer, have 
this in your summer, 
too. Deep charcoal 
grey or toast cooled 
with white pique 
collar and cuffs.’ Very 
suity tailoring for 
petites. 


$35 


The French Room 
Second Floor, F Street, 
at all bratch stores 


3.5 - million- 
dollar item for 
the Tennessee 
Valley Author- 
ity. The ironic twist was that 
approval of the $3.5 million 
was not wanted by TVA. Ac- 
ceptance would have meant 
denying the Valley the right 
to use its revenues from power 
operations to expand existing 
power plants. 

Until Friday the seven Sen- 
ate and nine House conferees 
had been deadlocked 88. Sen. 
Allen J. Ellender (@-La) 
crossed party lines to side with 
the Republicans in behalf of 
the $35 million and against 
the revenue use authority. 

The deadlock was broken 
when Sen. Milton R. Young (R- 
N. D.), at the quiet intercession 
of Sen. Albert Gore (D-Tenn.). 
changed his vote and sided 
with the Democrats. 


cos 


THE SITUATION represents 
a public versus private er 
fight of the first magni 
And it again focuses national 
attention on the world’s big- 
gest power distribution system 
which faces a critical shortage 
next yvear because facilities 
have simply not been able to 
keep up with the power appe- 
tite of the Tennessee Valley 
homes, farms and factories. 

A new Government power 
plant was knocked out of Pres- 
ident Truman's abortive budg- 
et in early 1953..A private 
Dixon-Yates power plant was 
thrown out last year. 

With this shortage in mind, 
the Eisenhower Administra- 
tion, for the first time since 
coming into office, asked Con- 
gress to authorize a $3.5 


erating unit, one which would 
augment TVA'’s existing John 
Sevier steam plant. 

TVA and its supporters 
They feared 
acceptance would mean TVA 


its own revenues to do this 
and declared the Administra- 
tion’s $3.5-million request un- 
necessary. 


to the House 
sentiment. 


cos 


NOW the conference report 
goes back to the floors of both 
Houses where it must be 
either approved in toto or 
referred back to conference. 
With some Government agency 
bills already unpaid because 


————————— ee 


—————— 


Néw TVA Row Reflects Basic Dispute 


of the long delay, approval fs 
ex 
Allied to the situation, al- 


Here again TVA and its sup 
porters look upon the Admin- 
is‘ration proposal as forbidden 
fruit. 

They contend the Adminis 
tration bill, introduced “by re- 
quest” into the House through 
Public Works Comnittee 
©hairman Charlies A. Buckley 
(D-N, Y.), would force TVA to 
lean more and more on money 
borrowed through bonds and 
less and less on congressional 
appropriations. 

eos 


ANOTHER bill, more to the 
TVA supporter’s liking, has 
been introduced by Sen. Rob- 
ert S. Kerr (DOkla.). This 
would allow TVA to use reve- 
nue from its bonds for what- 
ever new expansion is needed. 


ho” A aw a eae ae * : 


Lewis & Thos. Saltz... 1409 G 


Lightness and Luxury 
at its Worldly Best 


could no longer invest its in- | 
creasingly abundant power | 
revenues (estimated to net $56 | 
million next year) in new gen- 
erating facilities. 


cow 


26 of the original 
TVA Act provided that TVA 
could use its power reventes 
to conduct its power opere 
tions. In 1948, a corporations 
appropriations act rider 
limited this revenue use to 
“new projects.” 

TVA contends the prece 
dentesetting rider means 
power revenues may not be 
used to expand into new 


Section 


plants. 
However, the 
Administration, particularly 
its Budget Bureau, contends 
the rider means power reve- 
nues may not be used for any 
new generating facility. This 


would include such a unit ex- | 


pansion as now requested for 


the John Sevier steam plant. | 


To clear up the situation, a 
House Appropriations subcom. | 
mittee this spring spelled out | 
that TVA had the authority to | 
construct additional units. It | 
recommended that TVA use 


CAPITAL TYPES #14 


THE HOSTESS 


Has caterer brother-in- 
law who's known asthe | 
hors d'oeuvres king of | 
D.C. Owne pair of fat | 
French poodles naned | 
R. 8. and V.P. Highly unco- | 
ordinated dancer, but 
" Mute about the gambo. Once 
took secret course in 
tattooing; younger sis- 
ter carries lopsided blue 
heart and the words “I 
love you” on her lower 
left shoulder blade. 


And “I love you" is the 
gist of the sentizent 
Vashington advertisers 
have been expressing 
about WIOP Radio. IOP 
gives them (1) the larg- 
est average share of 
audience (2) the most 
quarter-hour wins (3) 
Washington's most popu- 
lar personalities and 
(4) ten times the power of 
any other radio station 
in the Washington area 


Eisenhower | 


WTOP RADIO 
AT BROADCAST HOUSE 


SUITS BY LEBOW 


This celebrated suit takes summer lightly in 
its stride. Its weight is so slight that it seems 
to float on your body, instead of enclosing it. 
It is made of an imported silk with a fabulous 
background. Spun by a specially pampered 
breed of silkworms raised in the region of the 
Italian Lakes, it comes through the loom with 
tiny irregularities of texture that lend a rugged 
masculine touch. Just about the coolest of all 
suits, and certainly the most cosmopolitan in 
its makeup. Hand-tailored by Lebow with all 
the refinements and extras that you might 
expect. Elegant three-button models in blue, 
black, Cambridge gray. Patch and flap pockets. 


+120 
Lebow Silk Sport Jackets $82 


Exclusive with us in Washington 
LEWIS & TH9S. SALTZ 
1409 G Street 1009, Conn. Ave. 


EXecutive 34345 


Want To Know 
Where To Go 
For Outdoor 
Fun? 


Potomac Playground 


4 24-page guide to good times for the whole 
family. It's a special section that will pinpoint 
the places nearest you for picnicking, camping, 
swimming, golfing, sailing, fishing, horseback 
riding—or you name it. Watch for this handy, 
helpful fun directory in Washington's big 
Sunday newspaper. 


Sunday, May 20th 


The Washington Post 


and Times Herald 
Washington's favorite home newspaper 
‘ ‘ 


_ THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
10 _ Monday, May 14, 1956 ° 


—-» 


U.S.News & World Report 
NOW has more than 


s0o0,000 


NET PAID CIRCULATION 


se 


This is just double its circulation of only six 


years.ago. Such acceptance by readers in the 
important walks of life is due to the original 


way that the essential news of our times is 


presented week after week by the world-wide 
staff of “U.S.News & World Report.” 


ORE and more people are aware of the need for the essential news of 
developments here and abroad. They find that this news, now more 
than ever before, directly affects all their important business and personal 
plans and decisions. 
More and more people are discovering that ““U.S.News & World Report” Try it yourself for the next 52 issues— 
1s the one magazine which gives the essential news—and it does so in an 1 aa 
easy-to-understand manner. 
More and more people are passing this helpful word along to their friends 
and associates. 


Americas (lass News Magazine 


U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT 


2312 24th St., N.W. 
Washington 7, D.C. 


uname een ae a ee em coma 


Please send me your next 52 weekly issues and bill 


An essential magazine me for $5.00. 


, > Pe BS ) Pa , Ot: Meds ig 
7 Mh P 4 ae 
Essential to more 5 Na ay A iia) NAME 
'’ a IN ed es" a oe 4 
) oie al : wD 4 ier ee 
"4° ok — e: ‘el (' 
z * ; 4 4 
* oe 5 ; So < may 
Mee ys , ‘ ba od 


Please print plainly) 
and more readers ae 


ADDRESS 


Essential to more and 
more advertisers 


CITY ZONE___STATE 


By 
Jerry 
Kluttz 


CAA Technicians 
Win CSC Backing 
For Higher Pay 


CAA has the approval of 
Civil ‘Service to give grade! 
raises to nearly 1000 of its elec-| 
tronic technicians. Congress 
has been asked for the money 
to finance the higher salaries. 


HEARING EXAMINERS: 
CSC is all set to issue new and 


higher standards for the posi- 
tions. 


MARITIME: A bill, H.R. 
10963, to take the Federal Mari-| 
time Board out of Commerce) 
and set it up as an independent 
agency is being sponsored by 
Rep. T. Ashton Thompson (D- 
La 


LEAVE CREDIT: The House 
cs Committee is planning to 
act on H.R. 8830, a bill by Rep 
Albert W. Cretella (R-Conn.) to 
allow you to eredit accumu- 
lated annual and sick leave 
toward CS retirement. 


RB: Russell A. Stuart, a re- 
viewer in the agency, has been 
nominated by the President to 
be a member of the Renegotia- 
tion Board. 


STORY: A new Army publli- 
cation was recently released 
and then quickly withdrawn. 
Apparently it was of grave con- 
cern to some and funny to 
others. In big letters it stated 
that the booklet had been aw 
thorized by “THE CHIEF OF 
STUFF ” 

GSA employes should be re- 
heved to learn of the statement 
made to Congress the other day) 
by Budget Director P. F. Brun. 
dage who said: 
GSA should be a strong agen- 
cy.” He added it should have 
wider authority and it should 
be staffed and organized to give 
agencies dependable and eco- 
nomical service. Some GSA 
employes have feared that the 
Budget Bureau would like to 
dismantie GSA. 


AFL-CIO unions are bringing 
upwards of 1000 of its members 
here today through Wednesday 
to build up sentiment for en 
actment into law this year of 
the Johnston-Rhodes union rec- 
Ognition bill and the Johnston 
retirement bill. About 400 
Postal Clerks will meet at 3 
Pp. m. today in the Willard. 


Hundreds of the delegates 
are expected to attend the Sen. 
ate hearing Tuesday on the 
Johnston Rhodes bill. Sen. 
Olin Johnston (D-S. C.) says the 
measure would set up machin- 
ery te appeal and settle em- 
ploye grievances and he pre- 
dicts its approval would bolster 
morale and improve efficiency. 


The Administration can be 
expected to encourage employe. 
management consultations. Re- 
portedly, it will oppose enact- 
ment of the bill, S. 3593 into 
law, and base its opposition on 
the thinking first expressed 20 
years ago by the then Presi. 
dent Franklin D. Roosevelt. 
who oppésed collective bargain- 
ing in Goverfiment and cited in 
detail the reasons for his stand 

STORY: Uncle Sam is tough- 
ening up his military officers 
on duty here—and at their own 
hardship and ingenuity 

The officers are being sub 
jected to what is called a “sur- 
vival training program.” 
They're taken to isolated spots 
and are ordered to live off the 
land. They must eat roots and 
improvise their own shelter. 

A Naval officer, weakened 
by the experience, sought to 
salve his wounds by filing a 
claim for per diem (travel al. 
lowance) during the training 
period. Navy referred it to the 
Comptroller General who 
denied it in a ruling which stat 
ed in part 

That the officer is considered 
to have been furnished rations 
and quarters by the Govern- 
ment and therefore can't be 
paid per diem during survival 
training. Also, that officers are 
trained to maintain themselves 
by means other than the pur- 
chase of meals and quarters 
..» PS: The officers wish that 
were true. 


EMPLOYE GROUPS will 
urge the Senate to restore the 
rider to the Defense budget bill 
which requires prior approval 
by both the House and Senate 
Appropriations committees be 
fore Defense activities manned 
by civilians can be transferred 
to private industry. The House 
struck out the rider on recom- 
mendation of the President and 
the Defense Department. 


Sigg 


frst 


omteit ity Life 


~ 


RADIO 


LOCAL NEWS 


AMUSEMENTS 


~ 


MONDAY, MAY 14, 1956 


“We believe! 


BATHING BEAUTIES, BROUGHT OUT BY WARM WEATHER, VIEW PEACEFUL ROCK CREEK WATERFALL. (WEATHER STORY, P. 1.) 


Public Meeting Tonight 


. Da pee 
Pe fF 7. 
a tee i 
a ie :,S*., - 


in ere es ae a a Pe 


Ask Law Change 


Sundlun, 


Rockville Supports 
Mayor in Pike Fight 


Rockville is digging in andiasking the Governor to hear | | 
supporting its mayor in his de- the city officials “complaints” District primary campaign,| 
termined stand against a Mary- before the pike is opened. 


land State Roads Commission 
proposal to open 
link in the Washington Nation- 
al Pike. 


the newest his home 


Gov. McKeldin, reached at 
in Annapolis, said: 
“I doubt if there is anything 


I can do.” He said it would be 


Lamb Urge 
Slate Voting 
Liab olin! 


Two veterans 


of the recent 


lealled last night for amending! 
the election law to permit slate 
voting. 

The prohibition on slate vot- 


Many citizens phoned Mayor a waste of Rockville. citizens’\ing made the ballot counting 


Dickran Y 


Hovsepian yester- time to speak to him until he 


day after his radio protest of studies the problem and talks 
the highway opening scheduled with road officials. 


for this week. Hovsepian said 


it would dump 7000 more cars do,” he said, “I'll be glad to do delegates. 


daily onto Rockville's 
jammed streets. 


ajready 


“If there’s something I can 


it for them. If I can’t do any- 
thing, I'll write and let them 


Supporters said, if necessary, know.” 


they will join Hovsepian in a 


Hovsepian ts rallying Rock- 


long and tedious, said Bruce C. 
Sundiun, who managed Sen.| 
\Estes Kefauver’s campaign for 
There were more 
than 90 candidates on the Demo- 
cratic ballot alone. A voter had 
to mark his preference beside 


human blockade of the pike at Ville residents because he says each of those he wanted. Under 
Montgomery ave., the planned the State Roads Commission jsjate voting, one “X" beside a 


temporary terminus 


Hovsepian and Clyde F. Dem- ago that the leg of the 
West Montgomery ave. would not 


ing. president of the 


promised city officials two years 
pike to 
be 


Rockville Citizens Association,, opened until the next leg—to 
appeared together off WINX’s Montrose rd. south of Rockville 


weekly. radio report of 


Mayor and Council. They joint-> 
ly urged everyone to attend aiof the Commission, now says 


public meeting tonight at 8 in the Montrose rd. project will’ 
the Citizens Building and Loan take another year and plans are) 


Association Building. 


Deming said he was wiring lane 


Gov. Theodore R. 


the —was nearly finished. 


Russell H. McCain, chairman 


going ahead to open the four- 
limited access highway 


McKeldin “Sometime this week.” 


Circus Coming May 24 


With Local Boy at Helm 


As though the dogwood and 
azaleas weren't proof enough 


that it’s been getting later than 
you think, Ringling Bros., Bar- 


num and Bai- 
ley Circus 
scheduled 
pitch tent here | 
a week from 
Thursday by 
way of making 
spring official. 

At the circus 
helm, inciden- 
tally, will be a 
home-town boy, , 
name of Mi- 
chael Bailey "=rke 
Burke. He's the show's new ex- 
ecutive director and a home- 
town boy of about a year. 

The Burkes make their home 
at 1539 29th st. nw., in George- 
town, where a petite girl by the 
name of Timothy presides as 
executive director over three 
little Burkes. named Doreen, 8; 
Michael, 4 and Michael Jr., 1. 

Mrs. Burke has reddish brown 
hair, dark brown eyes and a 
name which represents 
her father’s despair of ever sir- 
ing a son. She is out of the 


University of California and in'a success by 


her early? 20s was under con- 
tract to Warner Bros. as a Holly- 
wood starlet. She has been 
Mrs. Burke these past 10 years. 


All-America halfback who 


; 


slate of delegates would have 
been sufficient. 

Sundlun's view was seconded | 
by Republican George P. 
\Lamb in an interview for de- 
\WWDC. | 
The GOP insurgent, who lost | 
is bid for national committee- 
‘man, also said many Federal. 
employes decided not to reg- 
ister or to take part in the 
‘campaigning because of un- 


‘Act prohibited such activities. | 


| 


‘fully bucked 
| party 


organizations, 


beat “city hall.” 
Both men also said the pat-' 


tal, shortly after the Burkes’ re- 
turn from Europe. 

“Prior to that I'd been a cir- 
cus buff for as long as I can re- 
member,” Burke recalled. | 

The show will be here’ four 
days this year, opening on May 
24 at Oklahoma ave. and Ben- 
ning rd. ne. 


tern of voting in the recent! 
District primary should 
brighten prospects for home 
rule in Washington. 
| Lamb said the balloting 


that 

would 

Sundlun, is behind the opposi- 
tion of many Southern Con- 
gressmen to home rule legisla- 
| tion. 


By Paul Sampson 
Staff Reporter 

The Belle View Shopping 
Center resounded to the gay- 
ety of an old-fashioned block 
party Saturday night. 

More than 150 teen-agers 
gathered in the Center parking 
lot and danced to recorded mu- 
sic and consumed free soda pop, 
hot dogs, cookies and cake. 

When it was finished, the 
2%-hour party was pronounced 
all concerned. 
Those mainly concerned were 
members of Teens, Inc., a re- 
cently formed oragnization 
that hopes to coordinate and 


Her husband's claim to fame) assist teen-age activities in that 
at the University of Pennsyl-| area of Fairfax County served 
vania-was his selection as an by Mo 


t Vernon High School. 
The block party was the first 


managed to’ pass his assigned affair sponsored by Teens, Inc., 

Zs courses of study. He got outin which was organized around 

Zs. | 1939 and hasn't been still since. the first of the year and for- 

» | His daughter, Doreen, was mally incorporated two months 
+ |born in New York, as was her ago. 


father 58 years ago, but she 


The organization is a cooper- 


grew up in Rome and her first ative eommunity endeavor 


language was Italian. 
followed her into the family 
four years later in Germany 
and has been known ever since 
as Mousie. The baby Michael 
first saw the light in George 
Washington University Hospi- 


‘ 


Michelé| made up of representatives. 


from civic, religious and busi- 
ness organizations in the com- 
munities it covers. 

Among the communities rep- 
resented are Belle View, New 
Alexandria, Jefferson Manor, 


By Henry Rohlend, 


Staff Photoerapher 


Brother Maimed. Sister Blind 


Drowning Takes Son 


Of Stricken Family 


By Tony Gieske 
Bitalf Reporter 
Tragedy has struck again at 
the Phillip C. Gerrard family 


| of Silver Spring. 


Robert Gerrard, who at 21 
had almost overcome tbe speech 
and hearing handicaps of his 
infancy, was drowned Saturday 
when swimming across a pond 
at Fisherville, Va. 

Robert's older brother, 
ald Clyde, 24, is still in 
critical condition in Mt. Alto 
Hospital with brain injuries 
suffered last Christmas Eve in 
an automobile actident. 

His sister, Gyearold Jean- 
nette, has been blind almost 


Ron- 


times strikes premature in- 
fants placed in oxygen tents. 
Robert's mother, Gertrude O 


Gerrard, was placed under a 


a. - 
’ 


since her premature birth—the) | 
livery over Radio Station| Victim of a disease which some-| 


> 


ROBERT GERRARD 


.. + death ends comeback 


doctor's care yesterday at the . , 
y y ington Hearing Society provid- fellowmen and have no hate in 

ed a hearing aid 
Then he underwent intensive people. 


family home, 412 Penwood rd., 


‘certainty whether the Hatch Silver Spring. 


Before he drowned, Rob. 


Center at Fisherville. 
He had made “great strides” 
in recent years, according 


oo! 
was 


ee 


Both men, who unsuccess- ert had gained the threshhold SPeech training arranged by the 
their respective of a normal life. He had been District Health Department, 
agreed studying upholstering, carpen- and entered the eighth grade For Mission W ork 
ruefully that it is difficult to\try and woodfinishing at the .+ wacfarian For " ’ 


‘Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation Sch d Junior High 


graduated 
Montgomery Blair High School 
© | last year, and in January en- 


the Rev. Stuart F. Gast, pastor ¢.,ed the Fisherville center. 


of the Church of St. Stephen 
and the Incarnation, where 
Robert had been a member of 
the Acolyte Guild. 

Robert, who suffered from 
injured eardrums and partially 
paralyzed vocal cords, attended 
Gallaudet College as a young- 


Robert's father is employed 
at the Maryland State Liquor 


Dispensary in Silver Spring. 


Today’s Chuckle 


There are bigger things in’ stands 


ster. When he was 16 the Wash- life than money—bills. 


Adults Imaugurate Teen-Age Activities 


Pentagon Speakers 
Cite Home Values 
In Church Talks 
On Mother’s Day 


By Kenneth Dole 
Staff Reporter 


The Secretaries of the 
Army and the Navy and oth- 


establishment yesterday 
spoke at church services 
marking the start of Armed 
Forces Week. 

There was nothing “incongru- 
ous” in honoring the Armed 
Forces on Mother's Day, Army 
Secretary Wilber M. Brucker 
said at the National Presby- 
terian Church, 18th and N sts 
nw. 

On the contrary, he thought, 
it was highly appropriate that 
recognition of a mother's role 
should be combined with ac- 
kowledgment of the basic areas 
of our national strength. Every 
mother and every home are con- 


these days, he said. 

As components of American 
strength, Secretary Brucker 
listed (1) the integrity ana char- 
acter of the people as expressed 
in their industry and idealism; 
(2) homes in which spiritual 
values are inculcated; (3) educa- 
‘tional and governmental insti- 
| tutions, and (4) religious faith 
based on reliance on God as the 
ultimate source of power 
| Both Brucker and Navy Sec- 
‘retary Charles S. Thomas 
| quoted from St. Paul: “Put on 
‘the whole armor of God, that 
|\ye may be able to stand against 
|the wiles of the devil. For we 
| wrestle not against flesh and 
| blood, but ... against the rulers 
\of the darkness of this world 


Heart of Concept 


Speaking on “The American 
Meaning of ‘Power for Peace, 
Thomas said the “very heart’ 
of the American concept of 
power is “that spiritual power 
found in strict obedience to the 
laws of Almighty God.” 

He also said, at St 
Episcopal Church, Lafayette 
square, “any failure on our part 
to maintain power for peace 
would be little short of criminal 
—a betrayal of the American 
trust.” 
| He emphasized that Ameri- 
can power must include “tech- 
‘nological preparedness unsur- 
passed in the world today.” 

Parents, he said, would be 
proud of the Navy's “ambassa- 
dors” abroad—the men of the 
Sixth and Seventh Fleets. “I 
have had our own diplomatic 
officials and officials of other 
countries go out of their way 
to tell me how well our men 
conduct themselves; how they 
are courteous, kind, friendly 
|How they come ashore and rep- 
resent us with dignity and 
| honor.” 


Chaplain Speaks 


At St. Patrick's Catholic 
Church, 10th and G sts. nw., a 
Navy chaplain said the United 
States must export spiritual 
values as well as material aid 
to assure peace 

The “spiritual cargo,” said 
Chaplain (Capt.) George A 
Rosso, Assistant Director of the 
Navy's Chaplain Division, 
would consist of three parts: 
| 1. That Americans are hope- 
ful of maintaining world peace. 
| 2. That Americans have lib 
erty they are willing to share 
with the rest of the world 

3. That Americans love their 


their hearts for any nation or 
U. S. Called Field 


Bishop Sante Uberto Bar. 
0 


\six copresidents of the World 
‘Council of Churches, yesterday 
called the United States a good 


mission field for foreign work- | 


erse 
Noting that nearly one half 


States is not related to any 
ehurch, he said this country 
in need of Christian 
| evangelism. 


Mt. Vernon Youths Frolic at Block Party 


By Norman Driscoll. Staff Photographer 


Teen-agers rock at the big block party staged at the Belle View Shopping Center. 


Belle Have 


n, Bucknell Manor, 
Bueknell Heights, 


Marlan 
, 


\ 


fn Hollin Hall and ere Morris Sp 
Hills. of 


Teen, Inc.'s 


r, a member 
of direc- 


jcommunity. 


| 
| 


| tors and owner of the men's 


istore in the Belle View shops 


ping center, explained the goal 
‘of the organization: 


| “We try to act as a guiding 
‘organization, and don’t run a 


‘teen club as such. We help 
where we feel help is needed 
in a particular problem, or 
‘those who call on us for assist- 
‘ance, we will help if we possibly 
can.” 

The group hopes to coordi. 
nate teen-age parties and the 
like so there will not be two big 
affairs going at the same time. 

Springer said Saturday 
night’s party was the first in 
a series of such events to be 
held once a month in neighbor- 
hood shopping centers. The 
Belle View merchants cooper- 
ated in the party with the whole 


The hardware store furnished 
a record player and loudspeak- 
er system, the bakery supplied) 
cookies and cakes and Pepsi’ 
Cola contributed the soft| 
drinks. | . 

Charles W. Council, vice pres- 
ident of the Teens, Inc., board, 
was chairman of the party. 
Bradford H, Smith, president 
of the board, summed up the af- 
fair by saying, “I think it went 
over very well.” 


er officials in the military,’ 


cerned with national security 


John's \ 


of the population of the United 


U.S. Power Goes 
Beyond Military, 
Army Chief Says 


From O’Boyle 


em —_—_—_—= 


Firemen, 
Police Win 
Plaudits 
| nenteatiogs 


The District's policemen and 
firemen were commended yes- 
terday for their. outstanding 
performance of duty by the 
Most Rev. Patrick A. O'Boyle, 
Archbishop of Washington. 

He told the more than $00 
policemen and firemen at a 
mass in celebration of their 
welfare at St. Patrick's Catho- 
lic Church that the city was 
proud of its police and fire de- 
partments. 

“You men are doing an out- 
standing job. often at the risk 
of your lives.” he said. “Some- 
times you are criticized. but 
remember, yours is no easy 
task.” 

Rev. Thomas RB. Dade. Cath- 
olic chaplain of the police and 
fire departments, cited the vir- 
tues of St. Florian, patron saint 
of firemen, and of St. Michael, 
patron saint of policemen. Med- 
als of the saints were distrib- 
uted to the men at the mass 

The mass featured the 22d 
annual commemoration of 
Mother's Day by the Catholic 
Police and Firemen’s Society 
The Metropolitan Police Band 
accompanied the men as they 
paraded down F street to com. 
mumion breakfast at the Na. 
tional Press Club 

Rep. Eugene McCarthy (). 
Minn.) spoke on the demands 
of democracy in an address at 
the breakfast. 


Arlingtonian 


‘Found Dead, 


(,un at Side 


Herman L. Volker, 61. of 1210 

Edgewood st. Arlington. 
was found dead in his yard 
yesterday with a bullet wound 
mm his heart and a revolver on 
the ground by his side, police 
reported 

He had been in ill health for 
several months and was under 
2 doctor's care for a nervous 
condition, according to Arling- 
ton Police Captain Dudley 
Rector 

Volker retired April from 
the Justice Department, where 
ne was a lawyer, and recentiyv 
had opened an office in the 
Munsey Building in Washing- 
ton, police said 

Captain Rector reported Vol.- 
ker breakfasted with his wife. 
Anne, yesterday morning, then 
went out to mow the lawn 
The body was found behind 
bushes near a cinder biock 
wall that separates his land 
from a parking lot 

Volker is survived by his 
wife, three daughters, a sister 
and six grandchildren 


” 


Choral Concert 


St. Cecilia's Choral. Group, 
made up of singers from Catho- 
lic choirs, will give a free rub 
lic concert at 8:30 tonight at 
the Shrine of the Most Blessed 
Sacrament, Chevy Chase circle 
nw. 


High Point College 


Alumni of the High Point 
N. C.) College met Saturday 
at their annual spring dinner 
to hear an address by Dr. Den- 
nis H. Cooke, college president. 


i'Dr. Grover L. Angel, president 


of the Washington area alumni 
chapter, presided at the dinner 
at the Broadmoor. 


— 


Terrell Junior High 
Poster Wins Contest 


“Red's for the money, 
yellows for. the show, 
green is the signal to go, 
cat. go.” 

slogan, printed in 
color on a large poster, won 
first prize in the 20th an- 
nual School Safety Patrol 
Parade 

Harold Taylor, originator 
of the slogan, along with 
Chester Brown and James 
Selmon, pupils at Terrell 
Junior High School, were 
awarded a trophy. 


-_—— 


36” DOUBLE BUNK 
BED WITH 2 STERILIZED 
LAYER FELT MATTRESSES 


excellent condition 


HOLLYWOOD BED 


With Innerspring = -97”"_— width 
Mattress 


N. FRANK & SON 


414-3rd St. N.W. + EX. 3-8974 


- 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
12 Monday, May 14, 1956 shape 


i 


itt 


Negro Equality 
In School Urged 


* NEW YORK, May 13 eA 


Mental Stadyv human resources study group 
= established by President Eisen- 


NIH S /hower said today the number 
LUTUECYS | of Negro high school students’ 
N rite J graduating annually could be 
400 tripled in the South and nearly 
orma | doubled in the North if equal 

educational facilities were open 


Fa milies to all. 


———— siesiial In a report of studies begun és “ . 
Because it is concerned over Pefore the Supreme Court Washington Hebrew Congregation Class Confirmed 


problems of abnormal be handed down its desegregation 


havior, the National Institute/W!"8. the Columbia Univer Rabbi Norman Gerstenfeld stands with the largest class in tion, which was confirmed at the congregation's sanctuary 

of Mental Health is collecting ™*Y Conservation of Human the 163-year history of the Washingfon Hebrew Congrega- yesterday. Sixty-one were blessed before the Holy Ark. 

information about norma] ®esources project said that on) —-——— Et veo: ae. oe LM Ee 
the same basis Negro college 


on a. 
Dein Kota mcg erty could oe weet R, B. Frazier Rev. H. V. Schaeffer, Rites Today 


for the Bethesda Institute, said The p : 4b 

a survey of 400 Washington © project was started by k | Se F A > 

tren families is dein con Mr Ruennover in 1060, when/K' UNeTal Set Of Bethel Tabernacle "° tome) 

ducted as part of a study of he was president of Columbia N ' < 
Nathan Levin | 


schizophrenia—an illness char- University. Its report will be lor Tuesdav ) 
setertend with on individuals published under the title “The ° The Rev. Harry V. Schaeffer, She rode through the moun- 
65. pastor of the Bethel Penta- tains on horseback to collect Funeral services will be held “WET Pateics 


i 


eyige 
gf 
22% 


bi 
dvi: 


a 


Negro Potential.” . , 
loss of contact with his sur Funeral services for Robert 
roundings and disintegration Dr. Eli Ginzberg, director of B. Frazier. 50, an administrative mn hee ae be _ NS ie nae of a ip. m. today for Nathan. Mer 4. 1969 
of the personality a ak Geile a pe assistant at the Department‘of Church, died Schaeffer was converted. Sec- A_.. 

Kohn said the questions rom Hig. Health, Education and Welfare, ¥¢ ste rday at ond services will be : P ne 
themselves do -. deal with) Schools every year. Through will be held at Sibley Hospital ‘ | ednesday os 7 teed yng ESterment privare 
ow educational equality the figure ! of bral | Be one how merk I mice bie PRFTCHARD, FLEANOR 
schizophrenia, but rather with could be increased to 158.000 | | | , Ses Knows, toe 5 _ | =" 1956. 
chilévearing practices and sit-\a year, he said, and go along | bes . 
uations\in families regarded as Way toward easing critical man : . . 412 | ._ = | Ghevel 1756 Penney 
normal. An interpretation of|/P°Wer Shortages. | | 1 re » ane ae 
Twesda 


\. | The study found that the Ne. P - ' ) . s 
the data — ne ghey gro has made ~important gains ee in A rl ington pastor of the ‘fer is survived by two children: 
used _— os e - : of on the educational front in the Cemetery church for 24 Mildred S. Kimel, 605 Wayne 
dia Gd evejlopmen os 50 — But it also found He died Salt. years. as it : ~ st. and James H. Schaeffer. attack Satur 
7 _ tere sll exist serious defi rday at Wash grew from a 2926 Sycamore st.. Both of Alex- a > 
The collecting of — ciencies in both the quantity am By Sani- small mission Mr. Schaefier andria. Two sisters and two day when tes 
mation is important, Kong and quality of Negro education. tarium after an 4t 6th and G sts. nw. to the brothers live in West Virginia. tifying = = Mr. Levin 
1 ht thimen hers ws especially when compared te Mr. Frazier operation for a Drick building on 12th street, Funeral services at 2 p. m. - tS a lived at 4705. 
dentestiin the oaxvey asking tes, education of whites. tumor. Mr. Frazier lived at Where 300 worship. Tuesday at his church here will Materade ave. ae . ) 
parents a series of questions Bang Ay tcntisn an we & ee Os ee cin mobee tn te became =the ne reed pave Sacer Mr. Levin came te Washing gorzr< 
. - , ton in 1918 to work forthe War = 
Depa “ 


pte ~ Ng ee eae yhoo Southern Negro males were “4"dens apartments. Church in Mt. Storm, W. Va., intendent of the Assembly of 
" wt a = 7 brought only to the level of A native of Bluffton, Ind... the village where he was born. God. 


been interviewed, and the sur-| 5.14), 
vey probably will be completed meg! "amnute,cuaies, (he ania. Frazier came to the Die) 


by early September. high school aetahen | = trict in 1936. He worked for 


Kohn said the value of the < ' the Commerce Department and eo . 
questionnaire is rooted in the joan = increase from 11,- “ Louis Calhern Jehnce Todd 


crosschecking of answers and , 


not in individual answers taken , : 
alone achieved in the North, statistics! tne HEW. where he did budget American stage and screen ac- 


Most people interviewed, he wn a Dagpene yo high scheol and personnel work tor who died here Saturday of Calhoun Vaughn Todd, 79, a) ot and housing | | 
said, have expressed jnterest' ..4-1. 14.000 a Be ay ey from, He is survived by his wife,@ Deart attack. Will be cre- retired Government employe, ments in and around Washing-| ~ 
in the survey and some have | 95 00 year to nearly the former Dolores Bates, of ™4ted in Japan and his ashes at St. Luke's Episcopal Church.'ton His company, which he! 
said they enjoyed taking part Ginzberg ae ts | Vindennes, Ind. She works for Teturned to the United States. 1514 15th st. nw. Burial will founded 30. years ago. is the 
in it. “A mumber even have 214 “nectar ' S sssociates the. Chesapeake and Potomac’ 4 MetroGoldwyn-M a y e r be in Arlington Cemetery. Colonial Investment Co. 923 
asked us to send them word of + al geen ar gains in the Telephone Co. He also is sur- Spokesman said Mr. Calhern’s| Mr. Todd died Friday of a 15th st. nw. , 
how it comes out,” he con- ing. the loot 90 on position dur- vived by bwo sisters. Blanche family requested cremation. cerebral hemorrhage at his . He was president of the B'nai 
eluded primarily to contin were due ~ earin and Bople Bennett and The ashes will be buried in Hol-|home, 947 S st. nw. He never Israel Congregation, 16th and 

'perity rather chem be ok prose » brother. A. Keith Frazier, all lywood Cemetery, where Mr.|recovered from a streetcar ac Crittenden sts. nw. and chair- 

in thinking and attitud anges of Indiana ; Calhern’s father, Eugene A.|cident in 1945 after which he man of the building fund for 

. ONUSSS. | Mr. Frazier served in the Vogt, is interred retired as a Treasury Depart- the synagogue. He was an’ 

Toda Vs ) Army in World War fi. The actor was in this ancient | ment guard. He was a Spanish active Zionist. 
. 


Social Securi inista | trict Bar in 1921. ) 

th me Som 7. oa NARA, Japan, May 13 @| Funeral services will be held| With his associates, Nathanial 
, in ne were.to be tion before he transferred t©/The body of Louis Calhern,| 4+ 19-30 a. m. today for Johnce|J. Taube and James B. Evans, 
Mr. Levin built several apart-' 


Correction icity te act in the movie version|American war veteran. He had| The president of the D. C.' 
. . of “Teahouse of the Augustilived here since 19064. He is _ Association, Charlies 5S.' 
Pa A typographical error in the " Moon.” with Marlon Brando survived by his wife, Ruth Rhyne has appointed a delega-| 
k U ents a PP mer Pope Be in M edical Devices ‘and Glenn Ford. | Putes, of —— and Ae: nb el a - 4 ge 
mts ons =f Sunday's ] aughters, Ru ips, Mary! Char . 

Events scheduled for today| Washington Post and Times On Show Valued Anna Spoeriein Boyd and Annie Singleton of ray, Leopeld V. Freudberg | 


(asterisk denotes event is open “erald indicated a total of 32 | NEWWINDSOR, Md. May 13 this city: and Alexina-Clay, of Josiah 


candidates was elected as mem- > : Kansas City, Mo. Bennett, 
to the pantie) aan bers to the Deme atic mem At $500,000 a meee oe Anna David E. Betts, 
American Business Association, Bur~ Central Committee. — ny eae ‘o er gd William Cc. Wynham 
lingion Hotel 12:30 p.m. a were.’ Only 26 candidates were! ,4, half-million dollar display ment in farm women's work in Sidney Sachs. | 
12:30 Bm pet: Was ‘elected They are: Helen G of the latest medical research Maryland for many years, will| William Clayton Wynham, 48,| Also Sol M. Alpher. Joseph. 
PRPC T Pn) consresa- Boyle, Culver B. Chamberlain | @struments will be exhibited|be held Tuesday at the Pipe partner and manager of the W. J. Lyman, Louis E. Spiegier.! 
ton svnagneus. De ee Esther Lipsen Coopersmith. ay through Thursday at | Creek Church of the Brethren. J. Carpenter Chicken Coop im Milten W. King. Frank Lillard | 
Nationa! Capital Optimist Cup Boaré.'Tilford E. Dudley, Mrs Todd| ‘re Sy NS Institutes of oes bmw oa G. Spoer- arisawesd, Va. Gad of ——~ Sr. senate) Halper, Joseph D.| 217 , 
7012 Beeches rive. 7 . ’ _- Cm ea . . . yesterday er se mon ulman a Leroy Bendhe : , SIMMONS. EMS On Satorder. Me 
nom sociation of Nursing Sunsen, Walter Garvin, Wool- Concurrent with the fourday' Mrs. Spoerlein, a native of | iliness. ed ~~ es sm MONS of 2008 
merican As sey W. Hall. Elisabeth A : cies st oe of 
mer. ler Hote! Hawes David ; Kreeger Her.| Show by more than 100 com- New Windsor, was first state). A native of Donora, Pa.. he Vid . . Talk & 2 Sethet 
Association Sudi-\p4-4 p . eemon Robert Mars ipanies will be a running pro- president of the Maryland 'spent most of his life in Bright- co oervice 1a | on x ss, 24 | 
leith Citizens Association. Gorden Robert R. Nathan. George B|S™2™ on “Recent Develop-'Council ef Homemakers and wood. Surviving are his wife.) Samuel IL. Marshall, editor 
nior Wish, 8 p.m .\Peske Jesenh 1 Rauh ry ments in Research Methods state secretary for many years Virginia: two sons. William of “Radio-Television Service 
i FH HRA rt Also eranhe D. Reeves. Pauline 294 Instrumentation.” of the Associated Women of)Clayton Jr. and Marshall P., all | Dealers.” will address the Tele- | 
; ' Many of the costly and com-the Maryland Farm Bureau. (of Brightwood. The funeral Mee week Service Association of 
x instruments exhibited will be at 11 a. m. Tuesday at the| Washington at 8 tonight at the! 
433 


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Bociety of Ame itary Ensi-\ pert Lee Wearring. George | '"8 live demonstrations of the Graveside services will be Brightwood. ard st. ow 
Young Republican Club of Montgomery Edward Williams, Smallwood public is invited during) arlington Cemetery for Paul, 
’ Potomac Counci’ Knights of Colum- Wilson. de oe ares = Mo gee rector of the SL... States. i 
" | Lh “a ae > m@ ; . . . = Confe of 
Stonewall Jackson PATA. 693 8 di Tuesday and Thursday. Str Betiers, 50, died of . | Due to the Sudden Passing of 
Wathonal Academy of Belences, @ 15 >. Correction i toy mare 
; - . - . . Ing 2 is home. y . 
ciation, Church of ®t Mark's and in-| As the result of a printing Barber Schools Set Burnt Mill Hills, Silver Spring. 
> m 
*Seuse Junior High P-TA. school suadi- : 
>. m correctly in a news account . ' | 
Vireinia Chapter Mental... : Examination for admission 29d four children, Richard,| , 7 
““40t N. Henderson r¢(Which appeared im this Rews| "11 barber schools of the Judith, Barry and Paula, all President of Colonial Investment. Com- 
. EVENTS : ror . - . 
*Open Por “Peter Ciaver Cen- e.. ver renee dingy og - — held at 8:30 a. m. Wednesday brothers survive, Harry R. Bet- pany and Vice President of Colonial 
“Lectura parenis of exceptional ¢hit- cone R at Chamberlain and Phelps Vo-| ‘ets of Falls Chureh and Burt Mortgage Corporation 
Sem ; . > . 
-“Catholic American he Mullen cial Action to ban publication ‘mother, Olivia, lives in Falls’ 
Livrary. McMahon Hall, Catholic Umi-|of a Senate pamphlet should Qh eng age S edvis | Church and a sister, Mrs. W. W. 
oti scar” hessdation bere ho gee pa P note The schools are run by the 
_ Board of Education and are 


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$2 ™ \P Van Arkel. Glenn E. Watts. °° ™ actual operation, provid- Paul Betters Rites Primitive Baptiet Clrurch in’American Legion Club, 
Bociets for Metals. \ eanae L. P. Weaver. A L Wheeler. new apparatus. held at 1:30 Tuesday P. m. at) 
Perpetual Building, Bechesds. & winisne and Charles Ft e=hibit hours of 11 a ™. Vernon Betters, executive di-| 
e st Arlington. & pb. F 
heart attack Saturday morn- 
*Arkeansas Avenue Communite Aste 
arnalie . 
*Port Davis Citizens Association, Ry- CrTor, District Court Judge . . Mr. Betters is survived his NATHAN LEVIN 
land Methodist Church. 8 Robert N. Wilkin was quoted in. Admission Tests wife, the former Myra Week. 
paper yesterday. District of Columbia will be ™iddile-named Keck. Two) 
éren. Jefierson Junior Hish, Arlingten.| Methodist Federation for So- cational Schools, according to| Betters of Silver Spring. His 
versity, 8B ous have read: “Congress has power |. atiiem eiatemat Watzke, in Elk River, Minn. | Our offices will be closed 
fioewer 


. 


Nationa) Smal! Businessmen s Associa- against those who have not had irae tm the ef the Dis. First Mother's Day on Monday, May 14, 


tien Statier Hotel 


Textile Workers Union of America. their day in court.” lt week- - 
oTanearian Reformed Federation of| Because of the error, the| Save from 620 «. yt Pp. ™. Rites Commemorated 
o 


anetonai’ hesoeetan of Printing Ink meaning vee reversed. The i 
Macers, "Shoreham Motel *"*\Washington Post and Times _ GRAFTON, W. Va, May 13 COLONIAL INVESTMENT 
President's Conference om Occupation- Herald regrets the error. Variety Club to Honor @—More than 400 worshipers 


2 


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@) Salety. Mastiower Hote. 


5 pe wes Aig | | Mrs. Warren Today Glageh tolay ta sonepnamante te 923 15th Street N.W.- 


Mrs. Earl Warren, wife of the the first Mother's Day service 
Chief Justice,. will be honored held here 48 years ago. 
as 1956 “Mother of the Year”| The Nation's frst Mother's 
: : / (at a Variety Club luncheon to-| Day was held in the 82-year-old | @ 
Want To Know ee day at the Statler. brick.church in this small rail-' (55 
Mark Evans, WTOP-TV and Toad town on May 5, 1908. It| “s 
| |Radio personality, will preside. was arranged by Sunday School jj 
Where To Go 4 | He will present gifts to the old- superintendent L. L. Loar at| os 
mY - 


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est and newest mothers present , 
at the affair. which is to be at- the suggestion of Anna Jarvis, 


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d tended by the wives of many |# former Grafton resident then 
For Out oor ~ : prominent Washington figures. (living in Philadelphia. 


Fun? 


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et et o£ 


National Weather Summary 


Potomac Playground 


A 24-page guide to good times for the whole 
family. It's a special section that will pinpoimt 
the places nearest you for picnicking, camping, 
swimming, golfing, sailing, fishing, horseback ee . 

riding—or you name it. Watch for this handy, Temperatures and rain for 24 


ae 


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' 


helpful fun directory in Washington's big neal 
Sunday newspaper. ¥ 


Sunday, May 20th 


The Washington Post 


and Times Herald 


’ 
_ Washington's favorite home newspaper 


- 
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rae 
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F Worth 
veston 


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@ Other complete funerals $95 to $2000 
®@ Complete greve opened end closed—$69 


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SSSIRISSS BILE SI=S SSIES IS eAss 


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GALLUP—From Page I 


Farmers Cool 


To Soil 


crop—to feed his hogs, cattle, 
and chickens. 

Adding it all up, the Mid- 
west farmer, by a vote of 3 
to 2, are against the soil bank 
lan. 

' The question that we asked 
and the results: 

“Addimg up all the advan. 
tages and disadvantages, would 
you say that you are for or 
agamst the sol bank plan?” 


MIDWEST FARMERS 
Fer hs Se tei an bod « =a 
Against beusdéaee . 
Ne opinion _.. 29 

Basie to the farmer's opposi- 
tion to the plan is an under- 
lying feeling that it is wrong 
not to grow things when the 
land is there. 

The one great disadvantage 
that the farmer sees in the soil 
bank, however, is that the plan 
would not benefit the smaller 
farmer, and would only work 
for the big farmer with 500 
acres OF more. * 

One recurrent theme that 
we ran into as we traveled 
throughout the Midwest rural 
areas was that the soil bank 


might defeat its own purposes, ~ 


ie. to cut down on surpluses 


_ 


Harvard Plans 
O'Brian Chair 


Harvard University an 


Bank 


Many farmers think that the 
land taken out of production) 
will be poor land which is cur-) 
rently not being farmed. | 

An interesting variation of 
this theme was offered by Bud 
Slickenmyer, a 35-year-old 
farmer with 595 acres in pork 
and beef near Olney, Til (the 
United States center of popu-' 
lation, incidentally). He reacted 
to the soil bank as follows: 

“Well, say I've got a bundred 
acres and they ask me to take 
out 20 of that 100. Well, sure 
lll do it. 
money they give me for that 
20 acres, buy fertilizer with it, 
and put it right back into the 80 
acres I got left. Ill grow just 
as much on what I got left as: 
what I had in the beginning.” 

We heard similar plans from 
many farmers we talked with 
throughout the Midwest. As 
long as there are acres left to 
plant, the typical farmer will 
do everything he can to raise 
a bumper crop on them. 


Coorvrieht. 1964 
Amer can Institute of Publier Opinics 
TUESDAY: Farmers still 
prefer Ike. 


Then I'll take the — 


Mite With a Mission 
“Mr. Civil Defense.” a spry 


little fellew with 


mission, will be used te help 
publicize the first annual Na- 


Civil Defense Week, 
| Sept. 9-15. He was drawn by 
Al Capp, creater of the Li'l 


tienal 


Abner comic strip. 


NEW YORK, May 13 (INS)! 
A New York University pros Met ee stence in dealing 
fessor of psychology today said i+) other people as well as low 
that employes constantly in-' sensitivity 

accidents may have ward pain. 
personalities 


Jd 


be overly 
my Dr, Jenkins 


i 


~ 


Dr. Jenkins noted in his re. 


dent-prone 
port that the person who ally confident in his 


suf- handle his everyday 


services “turned away” from the task 
Cor-\before him by “his 
poration, told 23 manufacturing thought, daydreams, musings 


characteristics include people and are aggressively 
outspoken. They work hard at) 
being different and are apt to! 


person feels 


work prob 
ns, di-\fers repeated injuries is easily|jems and has an emotional 


‘need to feel and act superior 
OWN to those around him. 


Accidents Are Laka to Personality _| oS Gene i 


Where has Puerto Rican — 
been all your life? 


the. sect 


unusu- 
ability to 


companies in a report that he and sensations” as well as 
has discovered a link between things going on nearby. ) 
“accident pronmeness” and cer- This type of person, he said, : 
tain personality characteristics has a tendency to converse = 
in the employes he has studied.'with others and constantly) = 

Distractibility, lack of per-\thinks about what he might do =: WHERE TO 
sonal restraint, feelings of su-|if he were famous or in the) 3: FOR DINN 
periority and social aggressive- shoes of his boss. se 
ness may all be reasons for too) Some accident-prone people| = & uD A FT 
many accidents befalling any|are more than usually frank) 3 


one person, said the doctor. in their dealings with other) a THE TH 
ros | 


a serious 


_- 


SSUPERSA 
SU Tie 


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_ Hazel Bishop | 
Liquid Make-Up 


Takes Years Off Your Age- 
Covers Blemishes Like Magic! 


Brine vour frien 


Continental 
Cocktatia served * 
Gemuvetilichkeit! 


NATURAL” SKIN-TONES 


EATRE 


“evening in Vienna.” 
Tuesday the 823 features 
euthentie Viennese music 
atmosphere 


You'll wonder how you could have 
missed this gloriously dry drinking rum. 
Never before has there been a drink so 
clean-tasting. Excitingly different from 
old-fashioned drinks. Each taste of 
Puerto Rican rum is as fresh as the first! 

Supremely dry Bacardi Puerto Rican 
ram is delightfully smooth on-the-rocks 
with a twist of lemon peel. Makes a re- 
freshing tall drink with a splash of mixer. 
Why not enjoy Bacardi tonight? 


.. 
- 
ae 
G0 Se 
E R se. 
ohne 

- 


ER = 
*,4,°,° 


ds for an 
Bvery 


“Rums of Rierto Rico 


*0:1944 Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Econom ¢ Development Administratios 
Rum Promotion Division 579 Pitth Avenue, New York 17 


til closing 


Call RE. 37-1234, ask for Circulation, and order The Wash- 
ington Post and Times Herald guaranteed home delivery. 


nounced yesterday establish- 
ment of a “John Lord O'Brian 
Professorship of Divinity,” 
named after 
the Washing- 
ton lawyer who 
“ed the effort 
to revitalize the 
Harvard Divin- 
ity School.” 
Ten years ago 
O'Brian was ap- 
pointed chair- 
man of a com- 
mission to 
study the Di- 
O'Brian vinity School 
end later headed a $5 million 
endowment fund effort now 
wtihin $750,000 of its goal. 


A Harvard graduate and 
Episcopalian, O'Brian, 81, prac- 
ticed law in Buffalo. N. Y.. many 
years, and during World War I! 
was Genera] Counsel to the Of. 
fice of Production Management 
and War Production Board. 


Soviet Opens 
Door to Group 


Of U.S. Rabbis 


: 


— 
—_— 


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NEW YORK, May 13 #—Rus- | 
Bia has opened its Iron Curtain 
far enough to admit the first 
official delegation of American 
rabbis to visit the country since 
the Communist revolution, it 
was announced today 

The Rabbinican Council of 
America, which represents 700 
Orthodox rabbis, said the So 
viet Government has approved 
& visit to Russia by five of its 
officials. 

Rabbi David B. Hollander. 
president of the Council, said 
the group first applied for visas 
in July. 1955. in the hope of 
establishing relations between 
the Jewish communities in the 
United States and Russia 

The rabbinical delegation 
will include Hollander and 
Rabbis Samuel Adelman, New-| 
port News, Va.; Gilbert Klaper- 
man, Lawrence. N. Y.;: Emanuel 
Rackman, Far Rockaway, N. Y.. 
and Herschel Schacter of the 
Bronx, New York. 


Cotton Harvest 


Due to Be Small 


Associated Preas : 
The Agriculture Department 


predicted yesterday this year's 
domestic cotton harvest “may 
be the smaliest in 75 years.” 
World-wide production is ex-' 
to reach 393 million 
the Department said. 
just slightly above the 195455 
record of 39 million bales. 


BOTHERED BY 
ACID 
INDIGESTION 


® con rvin your appette, 
whole day But famous antacid Sai 
Hepatica gives speedy reisef this way : 

Just take 4 teaspoonof sparkling, 
antacid Sal Hepatica in a glass of 
water, and feel how fast it relieves | 
your stomach upset. | 

The mild laxation which may also | 
accompany its alkaline acuon heips — 
relieve the constipation that often 
goes with aed indigestion. 

So be wise—get the economy -size 
bottle of Sal Hepatica today! Have 
& on hand when indigestion strikes. 


Ford brings you far more car 


than many which sell for 


hundreds more 


Let’s start off with Ford styling. No other car has 
Ford’s distinctive Thunderbird look. It’s long, low, 


and lovely! 


But the Thunderbird touch is more than skin-deep. 
Take Ford’s 225-h.p. Thunderbird Special V-8—the 


‘ 


' 


Why pay more than Hord’s price ? 


if 
i 


5 om 


jeabe) 
Puke 


“ 


on? on, 
ail f 7 
« >. ; 


2 ws ited < 


engine that smashed 30 world records in one day at 
Kingman, Arizona. You can have this mighty 225-h.p. 
V-8 in any Fairlane or Station Wagon.model. And 
Ford’s record-breaking 202-h.p. Thunderbird V-8 is 
yours at no extra cost in these Fords. It’s the most 
powerful standard “8” in the low-price field. 


Ford gives you more in safety features, too- In 
fact, Motor Trend magazine voted Ford’s Lifeguard 
Design the top 56 car advance, And Ford’s rugged 
K-bar frame has 5 cross members—more than even 
many costly cars. To top it all off, Ford brings you 
the kind of gas savings that won over all competitive 


\ 


« 


°56 Ford Customline Fordor 


= You cant get better value at any price! 


“sixes” and “eights” in this year’s Mobilgas Economy 
Run. 


Put all these facts together, and you’ll see why 
you can pay more but you can’t buy better than Ford. 
Come in and Jet us show you! 


Take a Ford Test Drive 


Also see your Ford Dealer 


for L40> Used Cars and Trucks 


. 
» 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
4 Monday, May 14, 1956 "7a 


is b 


The Hoe and Hose Set 


oz) Ge we? ° | 


Surveying bountiful plots of the Glover Park Community Garden Association) are 
its president, Frank Roczey, and Alfred Goldschmidt, one of the founders. 


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RP - 


YW ASHINGTON'S hoe and 

hose set, a tightly knit 
group of amateur gardeners 
tainted with a faint but proud 
glow of -professionalism, is 
approaching the full bloom 
stage. 

The Glover Park Commu. 
nity Garden Association, a 
survivor of the World War Il 
victory garden era, is typical 
Their 72 plots cover three 
acres bounded by 42d st., New 
Mexico ave. and Tunilaw ra 


the result of hard 

numerous backaches, 

sweat and even an occasional 

tear Take it from Frank 

Roczey of 4027 Beecher st 

nw., the president of the as 
sociation 

“All the plots are takem 
and we've even got a waiting 
list. It's all under the super- 
vision of the National Capital 
Parks We work—most - of 
us—all year. Fall crops, cov 
er crops, spring turnover. We 
even have our own water, a 
spigot for each plot.” 

He introduced Alfred Gold 
schmidt, “one of the old 
timers.” 

Goldschmidt, -84,. said he 
waiked to the gardens from 
his home at 4122 Edmonds 
st. every day. He no longer 
works—just comes and looks 

It was Goldschmidt and 11 
others who first started the 
victory gardens in 1941! 4 
retired banker. he fled Nazi 
rule in Germany, coming here 
in 1939 

Happily at work in a neat 
by garden were Lt. Cmds 
and Mrs. Milton Gaschk of 
i941 Langley court nw 

“Weve been working here 
between my tours of duty 
since 1048 Its my hobby 
and exercise | bring back 
seeds that I collect abroad. 
My wife and I have success- 
fully grown Japanese egg 
plant, Italian peppers and 
German tomatoes.” 


A MAN carrying garden 
-“™ ing tools and accompa. 
nied by his son stopped to ad- 
mire the GaschK plot 

He identified himself as 
Ray Bruneau of 2057 37th st 
nw.. an administrative assist- 
ant to the superintendent of 
the Montgomery County Po 
lice 

He said he 
Howard. 5. had 
watched onions. beets. radish 
es, strawberries, beans, pep 
pers, kale and spinach grow 

Bruneau stopped to catch 
his breath. 

“Hey pop,” yelled Howard, 
“how about our tomatoes, cu 
cumbers and squash.” 

At work nearby were two 
young ladies who share the 
same plot, Kirsten Neergaard 


and hic «on 
planted and 


: 


att 


Amateur farmer Howard Bruneau, 5, makes his way through the gardens with a basket of beans and a smile. 


t 

of [RDO Quebec sf nw 
Dicky Kemmeriing of 
Kilbourne pl. nw 

“Were shopping-bag car 
deners,” said Kirsten “We 
travel by streetcar to get 
here.” she explained 

Sore muscles, sunburn and 


and 
1815 


% ¥ 


A Aede te . Fe 


wes - 


~ 


Happy in their work, Kir- 
sten Neergaard (left) and 
Dicky Kemmerling pause 
to smile for our photog- 
rapher. They share a plot 
in the gardens. 


At the tulip bed, Frederick 
W. Butler wields a shovel 
as his wife gives directions 
from the ease of a chair. 


a 
Lt. Cmdr. and Mrs. Milton 
Gaschk, who specialize in 
foreign plants, work hard 
over -their projects. It’s 
their “hobby and exercise.” 


Text and photos by Arthur 
Ellis, Staff Photographer. 


blisters may go hand tn hand 
with gardening but it's all a 
lot of fun and worth it, ac 
cording to two couples in the 
next plot 


They were Mr. and Mrs 
Frederick W. Butler of 4545 


Connecticut ave. nw.. and Mr 
and Mrs. Harold Maynard of 
1510 Cedar st., Falls Church 
Butler represents the United 
Clay Products Co. and May 
nard is the manager of Con 
stitution Hall 

“It's a jot of fun, the exer 


cise is wonderful and theres 
a great satisfaction in watch 
ng these things grow,” em 
thused Mrs. Butler 

Her companions smiled at 
he thought of the healt 
harvest to come, 


~ 


Postlude y. THE: WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
LE Monday, May 14, 1956 15.__ 


) V|\ | ts , : 
Ea Gh te Tran, Greek Tenor Karatzas Is Heard mit tx, tom 10 comm vin 


By Pau) Herron | ‘Winston and Lad Churchil! Wd European unity. 

NOTE TO NIGHT club own- have turned over the bulk of By Paul Hume Richard Strauss is more] His music, brief, modeled on)about William Tell by some 30 ...04 jh London from Bonn Mimates cm ormen att Want 
ers—The top talent\in the en- | their shows for this cause. John Karatzas, a tenor from than that of Haydn, is filled with| years. tonight after a Sday visit to|Gefman government leaders 
tire D. C. will be under a sin-| Because of the number of |Greece, by way of Vienna, who uelle-| vigor and charm. It was fol-|_,!" his own music, O’Meagher pean yesterday and was the guest of 

of | acts |is pow studying in the Philadel- nad shows facility in laying out mu-/West Germany, Churchill was) i. oiq regiment, the Queen's 
gle roof on Tuesday night at| entertainers, most of the There lowed last night by a Ballad) .;. h ) ; 
il] be limited to a single (phia Acade of Vocal Arts, ™@any young are sic that has been in vogue for awarded the \Charlemagne prourth Hussars. last night at a 
a celebrity show sponsored by) oo ctation, but it should be |Sang a recital yesterday after- of this man/for strings by Henry Cowell,|several decades. He knows the|Medal at Aachen ‘last Thurs-dinner-reception in Bonn. 
the United Cerebral Palsy. Be a an the town’s finest va- |n0on in the Phillips Gallery. in technical achievement|who is very much alive, and|Tesources of his own instru. a ns mmm 
sure to bring along your con-| riety shows. George Manos gave the young| #4 in the acquisition of arep | iting some of the finest|™ment, and uses the percussion 


singer some of the finest ac-/¢ftoire of greater stature. ‘section to augment the natural | 
"The show is being given for ig _compagiments we have heard in _ But if he will continue to cme |g rey — the | plucked effect of the harpsi-\| 
the mofe than 3000 volunteers. TIME FLIES—It seems only a long time. They were musical,|S¥ch wonderful songs as the chord. It is not, however, a' 


sho are. at th ‘ _'days ago that the Shoreham beautifully graduated in sound, wey " | Wore wo 8 to the Pou- 
jecting funds to meet the UCP’s Hotel spened its early spring and always produced with an 5°" Ve Se Seeen Rave 0008 tate as wy yt hen Be eg alr pggre« gey Pans 
$115,000 drive. - pewue in the Blue Room, and ear for their own validity as 4 akellaridi, he will increase | pestry. the present century, lacking’ NEW 19 5 6 


w anagement is ready-|well as for the singer’s role. |““¢ interest in his programs. Retaining the string sound for |forceful ideas or inventiveness. | 

When they turn in the cash ~ hy ne ~ a performance.| Karatzas has a Orie tenor measurably. One question only | the first half of = program, | The evening's playing was 
and pledges on Tuesday, May | jad forgotten just how sharp voice which he is in the open|{0r the accompanist: Why the| Bales) ey Theme ang competent, but lacked any par- 
15, at the Hotel Washington, 54 dazzling the present show process of learning to control. |!0ns pause and great ritard at we next, %0 play oh eme anc \ticular luster or excitement,’ RUUD 
they will be treated to a (.ouid be and it's a treat to He has a half voice that could “¢ ©md of “Ungeduld”? bebe one The theme is iat | partly due to the nature of the 
steady parade of talent that know that it will be around become reminiscent of Richard At National Gallery — oe oe Sve vee program, partly, perhaps to . 
includes the name acts from (through May 26. |Tauber’s if he will not over-| 4, variations are constructed that|-hortness of rehearsal time. ALCOA: ALLOY 
just about every local nitery. the | Work it. His full voice is solid,|,, Music written in Salem,/remind us somehow of Aren-\Noxt week's festival program . 

Patty Cavin, Hank Fort and), "* note! a wae ‘but at times leans on nasai|%- ©-. in 1789 opened the 13th/sky’s Variations on a Theme i. by the American University|| automatic GAP water heater 

' ice skating rink i the ow ‘resonance more than it should|#""Ua!l American Musie Festi-|of Tschaikowsky. Quartet with pianist Evelyn — 


Art Lamb will serve as mistress) poom _givi : ‘val ) . 

' , givin ) ‘val last night in the National) After the intermission, at art 
and bay wd of ceremonies for Charies and Lucille Cava- Gap hg — gem, aye ee ,/Gallery of Art. ‘tention was centered on the — in three piano © Sperkling clean het woter 
the 3%-hour-long show. naugh more room for their row times when one feels that; Richard Bales, musical di-| Baltimore harpsichordist, Hugh _ we We eee News 


The most gratifying coopera-| gawiess routines. If the man- . ’ , 
' ‘there is rector of the Gallery, led the O’Meagher, who played three ® Solid aluminum alloy tank 
ion Sas agg from night club agement magic could just | uoi.. "ies = — Sletutnees orchestra in a concert that cov-/agreeable solos by Benjamin lasts for years! 
owners who, in many C&S€S,) move it up front in the Blue | Jit) which it comes out. These|¢Ted over 150 years of the com-|Carr and a concerto of his own 
: ———~—— — ~—- Reom it would be a perfect sre ail matters that should| Posing of music in this country. for harpsichord, percussion and No Money Down—5,10 per month 
showcase. show early improvement, or a Bales began with one of the chamber orchestra. These Bales 


| At the Marquee Room (ultra change of instruction would be| 8!x string quintets by John prefaced with a suite by the EXCESSIVE HAIR Loss | Pay on your gas bill a 
The | ultra cocktail luxury) at the in order Frederick Peter, a composer|late Eric Delamarter, a noted | 
Z sem. Shoreham. business hasn't) Musically, Karatzas is alight-|born in Holland of German|organist, conductor, and com- | PHONE 40. 7-3466 =; 


) day.| Weight. He sang songs almost) parents, who came to the poser whose principal efforts 
LUXURY LINER joe le gr on all of which concerned them-' Moravian colony in Bethlehem, centered in Chicago. This was, 


falling hair. 
iar ane eek She ae cn em ern epee cae Re, a STANDARD 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE ped coe salem “dnd his over-romantic form. He is later, having become estab- prize music. 


presents salesmanship was good enough More successful stylistically in|lished as the leading figure in| Benjamin Carr was a Phila- 2? & A “G 
2807 a St. NLW. 


‘for 50 orders the first day they Gtieg’s “I Love Thee” than in|the Moravian group of musi-delphia ballad opera singer, 
Friendly Service from Registered D. C., M4. & Va. Plambere 


© 10 Year Worrenty 


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i 


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ow —— — --—---— - 


COMING TO TOWN-—Singer 
Denise Lor opens at the Cos 
mopolitan Room of the Hotel 


|Windsor Park on Tuesday .. | . e 

Joe Reichman’s band has been * 

held over for this engagement. | 

i dee Oe mium wi rtorm 
|Tecord “Ivory Tower” is climb- 


; 


efi 
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Reasons for Abandoning 
Lanza Movie Kept Secret 


HOLLYWOOD, May 13 (INS) | However, she isn’t discouraged. 
It’s a surprise to hear that Mario She remains here Monday just 
\Lanza’s picture, “Golden Voice,” | long enough to pick up her 
has been called off at Warners, little girl and then goes back 
or it was as of to New York to do some 
‘today. Just ‘mother-daughter commercials 
what happened on TV. 

‘is being kept __ Her husband, Dr. Eugene 

a secret, but Czukor, plans to close out his 

whatever it is, practice in Beverly Hills, and 

Mario is out as soon as possible he and their 

of the picture. son will follow Barbara to New 

‘York to make their home per- 
/manently. 

If anybody can make com- 

So —— attractive and fresh— 

t's Barbara. She is very good 

jcan’t ies Miss Parsons |i, those I've seen of her. 


any other star stepping in. SNAPSHOTS: There'll be 
TWENTY-SEVEN years ago wedding bells one of these days 


A 
Dorothy Kilgallen: 


Doris Duke Takes Up Rock’n Roll 


NEW YORK, May .13—Doris, resort and Norwalk, Conn. Only!fluence will make Our Git 
Duke, who has started her own the most elegant patronage will switch from those shoestring- 
‘record company to turn out be solicited. strap sheaths. 


far on, 5 ee Wax) JIMMY CAGNEY gets that) WHO SAID the show must 
rock ‘n’ roll prize plum for a screen actor,'go on? A few nights ago, when 
tunes, although | the role of the Irish-American only six persons showed up in 
ae Bryce tycoon in “The Last Hurrah,” the audience for the Los Am 
to the cool kind with Jerry Wald producing. gejes presentation of “Best 
of music. Her And despite the sale of the Fost Forward.” the manage 

picture rights, the book is be- ment announced that “techni 
ing eagerly sought as a Broad- 9) difficulties” would make it 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES.WHERALD 
16 Monday, May 14, 1956 “— 


The Masic Box —_—_ 


A. U. Pianists 
Next at Gallery 


By Paul Hume ——————" 


THE NATIONAL Gallery's 
13th annual American Festi- 
val continues neXt Sunday 
evening with Evelyn Swarth- 
out and the American Univer- 
sity Quartet in piano quintets 
by Wayne Barlow, Boris 
Koutzen, and Vittorio Gian- 
nini. 

Seats are already selling 
for the opening fun of the 
Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo 
at the Cartef Barron Amphi- 
theater this summer, and you 


dance, and orchestra depart- 
ments of that school. Tickets 
at the door, with an 8 p. m. 
cyrtain both nights. | 
The Montgomery County | 
Jewish Community Choir 
under Philip Lesser sings to- 
night at 8:30 in the center's 
auditorium on East-West 
Highway, to benefit the cen- 
ter . 
Baltimore's Phoenix Choir | 
of ladies will sing in Falls | 


pianist beau, ~~ 
Joe wh ok @ | 
who will hea way play ... Wh poss rmente 
the firm, has \ Gveten actalle are pote 4 ee eee 
| pointed out te Stil. at oeliagy ~s fe ~ to be played, and their money 
. x Doris that roc oclets, was refunded at the bo 
ra's et ca } ‘n’ rollers sell Miss Kilgalien chums expect the former Lynn .. For the Denerenaalt 
) ~ ored to fi better than progressive stuff, Merrick to waltz down the , aah " 
s singing, whether you like them or not.| sist ~~ Fantastic Drawing-Power: A 
Campus Comic y » aisle with Paul Manno, an in- fan magazine is running @ let 
and he’s negotiating with Buck terior decorator. tohaeibiad eahteds 
Phil Bosco, better known for | Ram, who wrote “The Great; One of Marilyn Monroe's 'd Like .. Date oan Elvis 


have ohly eight days left in 
which to pick up the value 
books that save you so much 
money when it comes to get- 
ting tickets for Danny Kaye 

the rest of the lively sum- 
mer set up there. 

Speaking of the Carter Bar- 
ron, the song recital next 
Monday night in the Phillips 
Gallery will be sung by Leon 
Lishner, the New York bass 
who was so impressive last 
summer as Don Marco in 
Menotti’s “Saint of Bleecker 
Street” in the Amphitheater. 


COMING SHORTLY: to- 
night, at 8:30 p. m., the Wash- 
ington Chapter of the Amer- 
ican Guild of Organists will 
hear a program by the 
Blessed Sacrament Choir and 
St. Cecilia Choral. Society, 
singing in Blessed Sacrament 
Church at Chevy Chase 
Circle. The public is invited. 

“Carousel.” the Rodgers 
and Hammerstein source of 
“Youll Never Walk. Alone,” 


Church High School Audito- 
rium Sunday, May 20, at 4 
p. m. Tickets at the door. 

St 
town, is giving an evening of 
choral music by Brahms 
Wednesday, May 16, with 
choir, organ, and orchestra 
under Westervelt Romaine. 
Soloists include Katharine 
Hansel, Florence Verta, Frank 
Callender, and Charies Maul 
8:15 p. m. is the time. 


ATTENTION NATIONAL 
Symphony Orchestra: among 
the Philadelphia Orchestra's 
plans for the coming season 
are performances of Verdi's 
Requiem, and Orff's “Trionfo 
di Aphrodite.” Washington 
has done fairly well in recent 
Philadeiphia seasons in get- 
ting to hear at least one of 
its “big machines.” May we 
count on one of these in the 
new, “Greatest Concert Series 
Ever Presented”? 

We need hardly point out 
that the Orff is the third part 


John's Church, George- | 


\Charies S. Rhyne, 
has announced. 


his classical dramatic roles, 
proves a fine comedian in 
Catholic University’s musical 
revue, “Cross Your Fingers,” 
starting its final week tonight thing. 
in the campus auditorium. I asked Adolphe to name the 
- 10 best of 1955 and he comes 
: up — — ee a 
7 I. resident o artiers, New 
Spec ialized Law | York: Douglas Fairbanks Jr., 
‘the Duke of Edinburgh, the 
|Duke of Windsor, Fred Astaire, 


Service Offered 
‘Frank Sinatra, statesman Henry 


A service to help persons Cabot Lodge, Noel 
with legal problems to locate a ae British photog: 
and engage lawyers in special-| mington. 
ized fields has been established 


the year. This was the very 
first of the “10 best” lists which 
have now become a regular 


president, Ambassador's Daughter,” 


Adolphe has a chance to dress 
The service is aimed at mak- in the impeccable taste which 

ing legal counsel available to has always been part of his 

persons who do not have Sttor- Stock in trade. 

neys and who can afford rea- BARBARA Britton’s show 


sonable fees. An initial fee of “Wake Up, Darling” closed 
after a few one on Broadway. 


and Sen. Stuart Sy-' 


Not one of these was on his | 
by the District Bar Association, original list, but Douglas Fair- 
banks Sr. was included. In “The | 


‘IT printed Adolphe Menjou’s soon for actress Barbara Dar- 
list of the best<iressed men of | row and Tom Tannenbaum, son 
of David Tannenbaum. former 


Mayor pf Beverly Hills. 

Dontia Reed says Africa is a 
fascinating place with beauti- 
ful seenery, but after five 
months away from California, 
home looks very good to her. 

Margaret O’Brien’s mother. 
Gladys O’Brien, who underwent 
surgery at Cedars of Lebanon 
Hospital, goes home tomorrow. 

That's all today. See you to- 


Coward, morrow. 


(Copyright, 1956, 
International News Bor vice? 


WINNER OF 
3 ACADEMY AWARDS 


Pretender,” 
acts for the new label. 


Fawzia... 


to get some of his neighbors, when she moves her 
residence to England, will be 


The Aga Khan's friends ex- Queen Elizabeth's favorite de- 


pect him to announce the en- 
gagement of his son, Sadruddin, it’s doubtful if his bouffant in- Julius Monk's Downstairs Room. 
to Shanhaz of Iran, daughter of 
the Shah and Farouk’s sister, | 
A chic Southhamp-| 
ton syndicate will back a float- 
ing nightclub which will com- 
mute between the Long Island 


HITS! FIRST SHOWING | 


signer, 


Norman Hartnell. But 


ee. 


Presley.” Within three days 
after it hit the stands, the edi 
tors received more than 9008 
letters .. . Robbers invaded 


st} 
‘4 


~~ 


DOORS OPEN!” 
“ \, 


Pi. NEW OELIKE 


ME ON ANY SCREEN, 


el \p. 


oS ae | 


i 


L cas Auditorium 


The George Washington University 


21st and H Sts. WLW. 


Tuesday Night, May 15, at 8:30 


The Drama of Dance 


As a Universal Language 
featuring 


Doris Humphrey, ve 
and cancers 

Wasisto Soerjodiningrat and Ksentjoro Koentjaraningrat, 
of Indonesia; Bhanumathi and Bhaskar, of India: Pauline 
Koner and Company, of the United States. 

Presented by The George Washington University and The 
American Council of Learned Societies in connection with 
the Conference on Asia-American Cultural Relations spen- 
sored by The United States National Commission for 
UNESCO. Admission by invitation. 


_-—-—_-- > eee —— ec | 
Pm wo. ‘ . 


BOR 00) 7 bra, 


bITa, 
/ 


f° 
K-B THEATERS 
APEX 4013 Meu. Ave. WO. 64000 
“WAGES OF FEAR” 


Another A suspense-thrilier a 
eeu ra ee! x. G. Clouset ‘maker of 

ique."") ws Gialogue Gee 

the start at 3:05 

& 9:45 


4:35. 7 bs 
LANGLEY ™ * hoe. Un ‘te 
“WAGES OF FEAR” 


ma Another aw gee to ae Cerne! 
. . 


ciish ish, dialogue Tee t trom 


——— 


and the Soliloquy and a good of the trilogy that begins with $5 will be charged by a lawyer - 

deal more top music, plus its ‘the “Carmina Burana” with for the first half-hour consul. 

prize waltz, is being given which the Nationai Symphony tation 

twice this week— May and has had a two-secson smash eenien lebeeete® bp ie 

19 in Falls Church High hit 

School, as a joint production As in so many service may apply at the Dis 

from the music, drama, ive in hope trict Bar Association offices in 
‘the Washington Building, 15th 


and New York ave. nw. 


Teehnicoler ClaemaScope 


OPEN 10:45 AM." 


fields. 


2 WEEKS beg. Next Sun. 
Mats. Sat. & Decoration Day 


THIEVES’ 
PARADISE 


A Spine-tingling Drama 
of Intrigue and Espionage 
by Myron C. Fagan 


SEATS Box Office open 
NOW 10 a.m. to 9? om 


Wallace 
THE Mee Ccomso” 


ABC DRIVE-IN 
7100 Indien Heed fd. 3.4 
Pe DRIVE-IN 


Theta Phi Elects 


H. Hugo Perez’ has been ‘NATIONAL | 


elected dean of the Delta Theta 
Phi legal fraternity. Other of- 
ficers chosen were: Gordon M 4 prone 
Z = Van Sanford, tribune: Leonard 


NATIONAL—Theater dart. A. Jaskiewicz, vice dean: Mike SEATS NOW 


SHUBERT—Theater dark Radigan,. clerk of rolls: Thomas sox orrice OPEN 16 A.M. te 9:90 PM 


SCREEN S Walsh. clerk of h 
AMBAssavon— | Hugh Sebater, master of ritual, MAUS GMa lament; 
EU GENE 


ORSON WELLES 


Show Times 
For Monday 


STAGE 


| ares weyeners y —_ 
Pincers mus 


200 Maribere Pike $ £ 
ANACOSTIA THEATRE 


“America’s First Theatre” 1415 


WweEexs ° al MAY 2] 


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Now thru May 19 


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Bur eeene Varie John Warne, Susan Hayward. 6:15. 9:45 
5.05, 7.40 and Academy Award Winner 
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DOWN Ro Calhoun, 12:30 wn 30, 
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In THE OZARKS” at 


NAYLOR .*".""" 
“WAGES OF FEAR” 
Another «reat suspense-thrilier tr 
HW. GCG. Clouwset imaker of Diabo! 
lawe.. ) Bee it from the start at . 0 
& 3:40 3. @. Enel = Sialogue Short 

subjects at T00 &2 3920 o mm 


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_“IVORY TOWER” |= BLO. oD 


CATHY CARR 


Coming in Person May 21 


CASINO ROYAL 
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FIRST WASHINGTON 
SHOWING! 


Cornel Wilde. Richard Conte : — 
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Academy Award Winner 
JACK LEMMON 
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Tickets Now on Sale for | 


3 Holiday Shows—Memorial Day 
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A@verttivement 


Money Tightening by Federal Reserve\—='S33zi07— 


Seen as Blow to New Housing Goal 9 | “==orme™ 


(DATED 
SEPTEMBER 1 
17 re the Federal National Mortgage areas hardest hit by the scarcity 15, 1936) 
A House subcommittee pro-| Associatjon. of wath tends NOTICE OF CALL FOR 


For Ju or tested yesterday that Govern-| The iation acts a @ sec-| Under this plan 10 per cent E 
: ment financial policies will|oNdary purchase market for.» national mecvice lite insur To holders of T%, percent Treasury 


. . 
ike it impossible to build 1.3) | fund 
The Commerce Department Ek, n In Vy W make areas where mortgage money #™ce fund reserves would be) “"; puntic notice ts by at 

reported yesterday that pu>-| cO 0 IC Ie PD FL Pie By Harold B. Dorsey million, new homes this year. is tight or is available only at invested in GI home loans. The ee all outstanding percent 
licly reported cash dividends in| . 2 The housing subcommittee, large discounts. The subcom- subcommittee said this would | : ted 
the first quarter of this year4*UDerance Is Much Less Noticeable headed by Rep. Albert Rains mittee recommended: lean teat: thes ih eniinen’ 
hit an all-time record for that (D-Ala.), said recent Federal) .* That FNMA be given au- available for the purchase of! on which date interest on such 

EXUBERANCE about the | IT IS ALSO interesting to | ize, too, that current restric: Reserve Board action in tight-‘M0rity to make standby com- GI mortgages. bonds will cease 


period of $2,739,000,000, nearly mitments to builders in tight The Rain . «pp, | _.2. Holders of these bonds may. in 
aint Wiihes than the seme business outlook is-not nearly | observe that the first quar- | tive credit would be reversed ening the money market will! money areas. Ss group said: “The) aavance of the redemption date, 


safety of the ins | “ 
time in 1988 so great as it was several | ter annual rate of expansion | if deterieration in the econ-| have “unfavorable repercus- eA reduction in the amount wena be jcendiadl nani Ba saan, chan ae a oe une tert af ae 

Despite ca atenbtal) i al months ago. The “where-do-we- | in residential mortgage anc in-| omy seemed to be gaining sions” on the housing industry.of stock required when a mort- over, lower premiums or higher Soortag sbligations of tha Galea 
automobile piadection and| #°-ffom-here” — ili stallment debt outstanding was | momentum. Several Federal Reserve banks gage lender sells a loan to dividends to policyholders | States,.in which event pubdtic no- 


; : " 
sales in this period, the report) 4/5 ¢ 5 - | about $3. billion less than such | Nevertheless, there seems to |"CCe"tly increased their loan| FNMA. would be possible as a result) Sh°crticial circular povecnine whe 


‘| sions are be- es Ay: ‘ discount rates to 3 per cent. *Additional funds for Of increased earnings which) exchar , 
Eeitie ieiaeky chewed she | coming in ies 4 nang . ae penne ye be a growing conviction that! This action, Rains said, FNMA’s special assistance pro- would inure to the fund.” "3. Pull y- - * AS 
blesest path over & yeer age | creasing : — Ps — os ——— ~ | economic activity as a whole |“worsened money market con-|gram, designed to support low-| Rains said in a. statement) {P< "ferentation and surrender of 
During the frat ™ oh ly tense. Busi- | . thi et tne t debt ng ioe will demonstrate slackening |ditions” to such an extent that cost housing programs which that the Federal Reserve raised uncer this call will be found in 
S he Bret quarter ese! ness analysts 4 or this type of deb’ expansion | | ndencies in the next few |it,Will be impossible to achieve cannot secure private financing. its discount rates at a time! mans renter Bo. 900. Re- 
auto dividends amounted to! are studying was more than offset by the | n dc “slack. |, ve, Administration goal of 13) © Creation of a special asso-\when the mortgage market| “°* “sted Spell 30. loss 
$181.9 million, compared with)>ae¢h day's acceleration in the pace of | months. But t © words siack- | million housing starts in 1956.”|ciation revolving fund to en- situation was “already plagued| G. M. HUMPHREY 
$119.7 million in the first three) qe yelop- business debt expansion. This | ening tendencies” seem to| Because “it is imperative to courage construction of low. by abusive and excessive dis-| Secretary of the Treasury 
months of last reer when a rec-) ments with un- reflects the tendency of ac- | 1ean one thing to one person |assure an adequate supply of cost housing in rural areas for counts and by shortages of TREASURY DEPARTMENT 
tele were pro-| usual care. a San guane y wo aren and something else to another. mortgage funds to home owners lower income families, elderly funds in many areas.” | Washington, May 14, 1956 
"Officials. attributed the rise] woinnst oe and for inventory accumula. | It is unfortunate that so many |2"¢ to, the homebuilding in-|persons and minority groups. 
s e | National Prod- ry ac | dustry,” the subcommittee sug-| In addition, the subcommit- 


Dividends 
Set Record 


Oe Destinn ee 
~="Dusiness 


MONDAY, MAY 14, 1956 


to the fact that some of the divi- 
dend payments represented last 
years earning and also to 
the two-forone stock split by 
General Motors and the increase 
in its dividend payment. 

Dividends were higher for 
nearly every segment of indus- 
try with automobiles, metals, 
electrical machinery, oil refin- 
ing and chemical manufac- 
turers, finance and mining show 
ing the best first quarter year- 
to-year gains. 

Manufacturing corporations, 
the report said, showed the bet- 
ter gains over 1955. 

March also .surpassed pay- 
ments for any other March with 
a total of $1,607,000,000, also up 
a»out one-fifth from last year 
when payments in that month 
set a record of $1,340,000,000. As 
was the casein the quarter to- 
tals, the automobile industry 
led the field. 

In the first quarter of last 
year, vublicly reported corpo- 
‘rate dividend payments hit a 
record of $2,321,000,000. 

Only in transportation equip- 
ment did a vear-to-vear decline 
occur. In that industry, divi- 
dends declined from $35,400,- 
000 last year to $34,300,000. 


Pipeline Net Gains 
Natural gas pipeline compa- 
nies reporting to the Federal 
Power Commission had net in- 
come of $228.201,826 during 
the year ended Feb. 29, an 
Inerease of 32.8 per cent over 
the $171,834,464 net in the pre- 
ceding year. The commission 
said the companies. reported 
met income of $24,341,182 dur- 
ing February. That was an in- 
crease of 15.6 per cent above 


| uct figures for the first quar- 
_ter became available a few 
| days ago, and they probably 
| provide as good a background 
as any for considering the 
prospects for the period just 
ahead. In total, GNP’s first 
quarter showed ar-.increase of 
$23 billion (6.1%) over the first 
quarter of last year. The 
figures also show how the ris- 
ing trend of GNP through 
1955 flattened out; the first 
quarter showed only a very 
small increase over the fourth 
1955 quarter. 


An inspection of the major 
classifications that make up 


the GNP total show year-to- 
year increases of $13.6 billion 
for consumér expenditures for 
non<iurable goods and serv- 
ices, $65 billion increase 
for expenditures by businesses 
for new plant and equipment, 
$2.5 billion increase in the 
rate of inventory accumula- 
tion, and a $2.3 billion increase 
in the expenditures of state 
and local governments. 


The laggards in the GNP 
series were consumer expendi- 
tures for durable goods, resi- 
dential construetion and U. S. 
Government expenditures, but 
none of these items showed a 
year-to-year decline of as much 
as $1 billion. Or, to put it an- 
other way, the year-to-year de- 
cline recorded for these lag- 
gard segments combined was 
much more thar offset by the 
year-to-year pickup in busi- 
ness expenditures for new 
plant and equipment alone. 
Note that the total gain was 
recorded in spite of the fact 
that automobile production 


: 


was down about 25 per cent | 


and the number of new hous- 


tion to offset the declining 
contribution to total economic 
activity of automobile produc- 
tion and residential construc- 
tion. 

But at the moment increas- 
ing doubts are being raised 
about the negative behavior of 


several items which in the past | 


have frequently signaled that 
trouble was in the offing. 
Scrap prices in the steel and 
nonferrous metals categories 
have turned weak in the past 
couple of weeks. Copper prices 
in foreign markets have been 
declining. The number of busi- 
ness failures has been increas- 
ing. Hours worked per week 
in the manufacturing indus- 
tries have been declining since 
last December, and this figure 
is now running lower than a 


year ago. The rising trend of | 


business activity abroad seems 
to have flattened out. 

The decline in new orders 
received by manufacturers of 
durable goods in March was 
particularly disappointing, be- 
cause March was the month 
when the confidence of busi- 
ness executives was supposed 
to have been bolstered by 
President Eisenhower's deci- 
sion to run again. Meanwhile, 
the inventgries held by these 


manufacturers continued their | 
14month persistent rising | 
trend through March; the in- | 


ventory/sales ratio also con- 
tinued a six-month rising 
trend. 


eos 


THEN, TOO, students of | 
business conditions observe | 


the presence of certain psycho- 


logical phenomena that have | 
often been prevalent at pre- | 


people in this country believe 


that our economy can do only 


one of two things, namely, 


_ either zoom or dive. The more 
| they think that way, the more 
they act accordingly in their 


business decisions and thus 


| aggravate the trends—and also 


aggravate business analysts 
whose figures are thrown awry 
by the unmeasurable and un- 
predictable psychological 
force. 

In fact, however, there fre- 
quently have been _ periods 
without an important trend in 
either direction, when the 
business structure was mere- 
ly digesting previous gains. At 
any rate, “slackening tenden- 
cies” for the next several 
months, with chprent clues 
suggesting the probability of a 


recovery phase in the fourth | 
quarter, seems to describe the | 
growing opinion of the busi- | 
/ness outlook, expressed as 


lucidly as the English lan- 
guage will permit it without 
voluminous discussion of de- 
tails, limitations and hedges. 


gested a number 


of major|tee proposed a new program to 
ichanges in the operations of'supply mortgage money to 
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NORTHWESTERN 


trderal 
SAVINGS & LOAN ASSW, 


1415 Eye St. NW. —RE..-7-5262 
Takoma Park: Carroll and Maple Sts. 


MERT 
ED BARNES, 


oe $21,047.986 net listed in| ing starts was 15 per cent | vious peaks of the business | 
» 1506. | lower. cycle—the “new era” compla- | 
cency and its encouragement | 
e of luxury type spending, for | 
Commercial Bank Profits 272%7.2 2.22% 
ro | ~ that a fair portion of current 

business activity can be ac- 

Dr b t Di id Ri | counted for by a type of 
ds spending that could be re- 

Op, u Ivl en Ise duced sharply if purchasing 
power were to decline only 

United Press moderately. Consumer expen- 

The Government reported to higher rates and greater vol- “tures Beat ang hag — 
yesterday that last year the ume of deposits. ete | ang ems 4 aieeinaten | 
country’s 13,237 insured com-' FDIC also found commercial have made jobs and provided | 
mercial banks made $1,156,000,- banks’ current operating earn-| income for the people who per- 
000 in net profits, 11.6 per cent ‘85 went up about 10.5 per cent! form these services. | 
Sees than in 1954. However, the)? moet 94-4 billion. | Business analysts are getting 
hanks distrib ted mT A long-term trend continued’ a little worried about the re- | 
n stributed $566 million jast year as the number of com-| cent behavior of these sensi- 
in dividends and interest on\mercial banks declined 86 in| tive indicators, which mean | 
capital—9.5 per cent more than number, chiefly through merg-| more to them than they do to 
in 1954. ers. However, enlargement of the general public. But the | 
The net profit represented a ‘heir activities, especially the analysts also recognize the sus- 
return of 7.9 per cent on total opening of branch offices, taining forces of high capital 
capital accounts, the Federal caused 22,166 employes to be| expenditures by business, the 
Deposit Insurance Corp. report- added, along with 2764 officers,| rising rate of state and local 
ed, compared with an average making combined employment government expenditures, and 
of 8.2 per cent in the preceding 493,791 in these eommercial| the satisfactory expenditures 
eight years. banks whose deposits are in- by consumers for nondurable | 
Almost half of net profits SUted up to $10,000. | goods and services. They real- | 


were distributed to stockhold- esi 
ers, the report said. the highest =u t a SLkaAI ERARRRRARAEASSAEEARRRAREEREERREELARAEERRRSERERRE EERE FOOSE EHP EEE EL EEE be . | A 


STEELWORKER 


When the United States Information 
Agency sought a man to typify an average 
American industrial worker in a project to 
debunk Communist propaganda abroad in 
the cold war, the agency chose a Pennsy!- 
vania steelworker. He is James Edward 
Barnes, of Morrisville, Pa., millwright in 
a steel plant. 

A massive exhibit, consisting or 27 enlarged color photo- 
graphs of the normal living routine of the Barnes family, has 
been sent to Japan and the Far East to acquaint the millions 
in other countries with the American worker's way of life. 
First displayed by The Advertising Council in Washington, 
the exhibit eventually will be sent around the world. Just a 
few of the pictures are shown here. 


Like any typical young father of three, Ed finds work to 
be done even after he gets home — and he loves it. Tricky 
project, too, helping assemble the boy's model airplane. 


Mrs. Barnes takes charge of the big job of keeping plenty 
of wholesome food on hand for the household of five. And, 
often as not, the whole five go to market and help shop. 


proportion since 1942 and well 
above the 40 per cent in 1954. ; 


Current operating expenses Letters from our files . . ‘ 
‘ went up $322 million, or 8.9 per 


cent, to $3.96 billion. About Zr 

half of the increase over 1954 P=“«03r 
was attributable to an 8 per 7 See ZZ 
cent rise in payrolls traceable er] 
to a 5 per cent increase in em- = 4 ' 


ployment. Interest paid on sav-| & , 
ings deposits also added to op-' = 
erating costs. This increase in ~ 


interest averaged about 10 per ms 
me : 

sé 

\ : a ee ; 


: a @) nly 
The Highest Praise” 


The lady was leaving Washington, but she Food 29% Savings 10% 
took time to write to Columbia Federal Savings | 

and Loan Association: “We have only the 
highest praise,” she said, “for your institution 
and your courteous employes.” 


This letter is now in our files, along with those 
from many other happy members of the Co 
lumbia Federal family who have similarly com- 
plimented our employes. 


cent higher than the year be- 


fore, FDIC reported, due both ff ( 
ou : \ 
| \ 


——— ee 
The Barnes home, car and family — all modern, all typical. Inside the house All present and normal at the evening meal — normal even to that remark 
Mrs. Barnes’ kitchen and anderen equipped aaa iiooamnine electrica! 9-year-old Jimmie has just tossed at big sister Linda Gay, 13... Just possible 
appliances. The modern school is not far away. And Ed is planning more that Mrs. Barnes is waiting to tell Ed what tonight's do-it-yourself project is 
education for the children than he himself got in trade and hich schools . soon as they cet the children to bed. Lana Lee, who's only 5, just eats. 


The Barnes Family Budget 
Based on earnings of $500 a month as a millwright. 


House payments 77% — Income tax 7% 


Car payments 14% Clothing 6% 


Recreational Miscellaneous 
As a millwright Ed ranged all over the big mill. e/ 
Here he’s signaling a crane operator. He liked on the car and the family bills get squared away and personal §=610% expenses 
his job, figured to “go places” in the mill. He on payday. Then Ed stops around at the bank 


did, too. He was recently promoted to foreman. to add a few dollars to the growing nest egg. 


Courtesy and prompt assistance in financial 
matters are but two of the many reasons why 
people like to save at Columbia Federal. Our 
liberal twice-yearly dividends, postage-free 
save-by-mail envelopes and convenient hours 
are other reasons. 


Our Vacation Club 
Opens May 14th. Join it! 


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TURNING 
POINT 


: Alf Kjellen 


Jeannie Bates 
pe star in 
, The Nightingale” 


7:00 P.M. 


WTOP-TV 
Channel 


AMERICAN IRON AND STEEL INSTITUTE 
FREE—Write the Institute for a new ilustrated booklet on “Expansion in Steel,” 850 Fifth Avenue, New York 1, N.Y. 


PRAM AA 


Add 


Columbia Federal 
\ SAVINGS AND LOAN 


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~ PAA A Ay te lll Ayah Nt ed A the iy oe 


: 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
18 Monday, May 14, 1956 


By John 


“REPORT from America” 
is a filmed TV series designed 
to show this country to Brit- 
ons — and any other country 
that wants 
to look — as 
we really 
are. It is pro- 
duced by an 
NBC film 
team headed 
by Don Cash 
under the 
auspices of 
the British 
Broad cast- 
ing Corpora- 
tion and the Crosby 
United States Information 
Agency and already, after 
only three shows, it is a huge 
hit with the British public 


As an example of the sort 
of comment the new series 
has evoked, the Bristol Eve 
ning Post has remarked: “It 
is astonishing what a great 
disservice the majority of 
American films do to their 
native country: how inaccu- 
rately they portray the Amer- 
ican way of life. Alistair 
Cooke's ‘Letter from Amer- 
ica’ did much to remedy this 
The new ‘Report from Amer- 
ica’ series is meant to be the 
visual equivalent of these. 
And I think they will suc 
ceed.” 


THE SERIES is designed 
not to boast about America 
—there has been entirely too 
much of that abroad already 
and it does not win us any 
friends — but to show our 
problems and how we mect 
them. The first one, for in- 
stance, was about our park- 
ing and other traffic prob- 
lems and it started out by 
showing that it is practically 
impossible to park, not only 
in New York, but anywhere 
in this country. Well, traffic 
and parking are not just 
American problems, they are 
almost world wide problems 
and are especially acute in 
England. The English reac- 
tion to the fact that we hed 
the problem as badly or worse 
than they did was universal- 
ly sympathetic. 

This, I think, is propagan- 
da at its wisest. For one thing, 
it makes human beings of us. 
For another, it’s honest. The 
traffic show started with a 
shot of Joseph C. Harsch, the 
NBC Washington commenta- 
tor who. narrates all these 
films, trying to find a park- 
ing space and not finding 
one. Then you see the con- 


ee eee —_ — 


Radio and Television 
‘Report From America’ 
Makes British Friends 


Crosby 
gested city streets, 


and you meet a lot of Amer- 
icans, grappling with the 
problem as best they can 

There are some nice 
touches of quiet humor in 
this one which ought to win 
us some friends, too. Of 
course, the picture isn't all 
black. American's great su- 
perhighways, its cloverleaf 
intersections, its freeways 
all get very good notices. 
Harsch pointed.out that much 
of the Nation's cargo moved 
freely on our 3-million-mile 
network of highways. Of this 
bit the London Evening News 
said 
versation between the long- 
distance truck driver and his 
acquaintance in a roadside 
cafe were so convincing that 
one could hardly believe they 
had been staged for the pur- 
pose 

Second of the series was 
about the small town news 
paper, the Suffolk County 
News of Sayville, L. 1. and 
how it managed to compete 
with New York's big news 
papers with local crusades 
and local reportage. This af- 
forded an opportunity to 
show a picture of one of our 
older small towns. Sayville 
was shown to ve a town where 
people chipped in to build 
a new Lutheran Church and 
started an ambulance service 
manned by volunteers. After 
this was shown on the BBC, 
thousands of letters from 
Britons poured in on the Suf.- 
folk County News 


SO FAR there have been 
five “Reports” and a sixth is 
in the cutting stage. Three 
have been shown on BBC 
and the idea is to supply one 
every fourth Wednesday 
from now on. The others are 
concerned with how Pitts 
burgh licked its smog prob- 
lem (which instantly started 
Londoners to asking why 
London couldn't do the same 
thing about its own 
problem), education, Ameri- 
can shopping habits, and au- 
tomation. 

Already the program has 
received the highest rating of 
any filmed documentary on 
the BBC. So far Britain is 
the only country it has been 
shown in but the program 
will be translated into prac- 
tically all languages includ- 
ing Arabic and Chinese and 
it is hoped that it will get 
world-wide circulation. 


Se ee ee 


Monday Televi ision Programs 


the in | 
numerable “no parking” signs | 


“Such things as the con- | 


smog | 


7 « m—WTOP-TV. Good 
| Morning!: Secretary of Labor 
James C. Mitchell is inter- 
| viewed by Will Rogers Jr. 

t 3 p. m—WMAL-TV. After- 
/ noon Film Festival: Patricia 

Roc and Nino Martini costar 

in a comedy dbout an Italian 
| tenor and a girl he meets in a 


| railroad station. This is “One 
Night With You.” 


3 p. m—WRC-TV. Matinee 
| Theater: A young man writes 
a play which nearly destroys 
the marriage of his parents. 

5 p. m.—WTTG. Lamb Ses- 
sion: Songwritervocalist 
Hank Fort tells Art Lamb 
about Tuesday night's Cere- 
bral Palsy Celebrity Show in 
the Hall of Nations at the 
Washington Hotel. 

7pm. — WTITG. Great 
Gildersleeve: Gildy (Willard 

Waterman) tries to do a good 

deed and he becomes a “Pris- 
| oner of Love.” 

7:38 p. m—WTTG. I Spy: 
Story of Sir Francis Walsing- 
ham, a spy employed by 
Queen Elizabeth I. He is sup- 
posed to previde the evidence 

| which “will convict Mary 

Queen of Scots of treachery. 
| 8 p m—WTOP-TYV. Burns 

and Allen: Gracie leaves 
Paris behind her. She also 
leaves most of Georges 
money. , 

& p m—WMAL-TV. Read- 
ers Digest: “Britain's Most 
Bafliing Murder Case” un- 
folds and an accused ‘nur- 
dered appears to have 
escaped punishment on a 
legal technicality. 

8 p.m. — WTTG. Evening 
Movie: “Easy Riches” stars 
George Carney and Gus Mc- 
Naughton A cement manu- 
facturer and a brick manufac- 
turer end their long time 
feud after a series of catastro- 
phies 

8:30 m. 
Talent Scouts 
host 

38 p.m — WMAL-TV. 
Voice of Firestone: Mezzo 
soprano Rise Stevens sings 
selections by Herbert, Sammy 
Fain, an adaptation from 
Tehaikowsky and Oscar 
Straus 


] 


WTOP.TY. 
Bob Crosby is 


Programs printed here 
furnished by stations 


m™ 


Wee -7TM 95.5 me.d-5 38 « me Ot CF 


. = 

BTOr-FM 65 meed—S. 08 « oe. te ® 

= 

WAShH-FM (87.1 eel «2. oe tf 16 
m= 

wht m™ 3.) orb «. =o. te oeld- 


night 
WEAN (1005 me.)—Dartiche Onlr.* 


Monday TV Preview 


o 


9 p. m—WRCTV. Medic: 
“To the Great—a Most Sel- 
dom Gift,” is a dramatization 
of treatment for stomach 
ulcers. 

9 p. m—WTOP-TV. I Love 
Lucy: The junketing Ricardos 


and the Mertzes return home | 


from their tour. There's still 
trouble. 

8S p. m—WMAL-TV. Film 
Fair: Ann Todd, Claude Rains 
and Trevor Howard play lead- 
ing roles in a drama, “One 
Woman's Story.” 

9:38 p. m—WTTG. Boxing: 
Rory Calhoun vs. Randy 
Sandy in a 10round middie- 
weight bout. 

38 Pp. Om. WRC.TY. 
Robert Montgomery Pre- 
sents: Forest Tucker stars in 
“The Right Thing.” A man 
refuses to compromise his 
moral principles to escape 
responsibility for a fatal auto 
accident. Supporting cast 
includes Fran Carion, Sandy 
Horn, Alan Hewitt, Glenn 
Walken and Val Avery. 

18 p. m.—WTOP.TYV. Studio 
One: Henry Jones leads the 
cast of assorted men, women 
and dogs through a light fan- 
tasy, “The Genie of Sutton 
Place.” This is a story of a 
boy's love for his dog, his 
faith and the' lovable genie 
that helps him. Featured 
roles are played 
Rowles, and William Mar- 
shall. 

10:45 p. m—WTTG. Base- 
ball Hall of Fame: Story of 
Jackie Robinson. 

11:15 p. m—WTOP.-TYV. The 
Late Show: Washington TV 
premiere of “The Man From 
Thunder River.” a western 
movie which stars Wild Bill 
Elliott and Anne Jeffreys 
with Gabby Hayes 

1:3 pm — WMALTV. 
The Night Show: “Sarumba™ 
stars Doris Dowling and 
Michael Whalen. An Ameri? 
can sailor jumps ship to join 
a Cuban dancer and to be- 
come her partner. 

1:38 p. m—WRC-TV. To 
night: Jack Benny is sched- 
uled as a guest. 


———_—— 


conform to tformattion 
at tyme of publication 


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. OF NEW YORK 
Pied-Pipers of Broadway 


Happy Fella” 


The torrent of rhythm that gushed from “The Most! 
all music does—as an 


began—as an experiment 
in sound. Inevitably, enchanting melodies leap the borders 
of time, overcome the barriers of geography and the ob- 


stacles of language. Music has* 
no language, mo creed, no na 
tionality. It is as universal as 


world ... 
was in Zanzibar he was stunned 
to discover a group of East 
Africans squatting around 
a scratchy phohograph enjoy- 
ing the throbbifig magic of his 
“Night and Day.” The recent 
international triumph of “Porgy 
. another 


hits. I certainly dont know 
how.” > 


“I cam tell a bad line by watcb- 
ing audiences,” 
“The minute 
to be thrown 
you" 


though, 
bed line so 
look good. 
know 


modern opera since Gershwin's 
classic. Gershwin surrendered 
$250,000 in movie contracts to 
create his masterpiece. He 
spent a year in Dixie dwelling 
among the people he later im- 


|mortalized. Gershwin caught 


the rhythm of their love in the 
haunting “Summertime” and 
lexpressed their easygoing phi- 
lasophy in “I Got Plenty of 
Nothin’.” 


> 

Gershwin's best efforts were 
inspired by profound emotions. 
He once explained “Rhapsody 
in Blue”: “This piece seems to 
sweep through my mind. it 
was the heart of America, the 
feverishness of life, the musi- 
cal welter of races, of people, 
their joys and their emotions, 
their dissipations and their ex- 
altations.” Gershwin composed 
the rhapsody im three weeks 
when he was only 25. By way 
of contrast, he poured years of 
his genius and energy into cre- 
ating the score for “Porgy and 
Bess.” Incredible as i seems 


pression on critics. One scorned! 
it as “trite. feeble and con- 
ventional.” 

His life ended suddenly be 
fore he launched his most am- 
bitious effort He planned 
composing music for “The 
Gettysburg Address.” 


Songs are speculative prod- 
ucts, of course. Porter's = 
Heart Belongs to Daddy” 
Berlin's “There's No - A. 
Like Show Business” became 
popular classics although they 
were originally composed as 
throwaways. They were cre 
ated to fill stage waits .. 
Frank Loesser, a most happy 
fella, has turned out 1500 
songs. Out of that mass of 
melodies only about 30 have 
been outstanding hits. Which 
indicates the odds against cre. 
ating a winner. 


“I haven't the faintest notion 
how one writes Cole 
world. “I 


. Integrated Area 
wa Set to Celebrate 
DETROIT. May 13 W—An 


association of property owners 
in a downtown Detroit section. 


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J 
pe See 


* president, 


| Jack Carson Ghow 
Tens Remase 


tration by minority groups, will 


.. celebrate eight years of racial’ 


‘harmony Monday 
| Im 1948, the United States 
Supreme Court outlawed re- 
of the exclusive 
neighborhood to “members of 
the Caucasian race.” Promt- 
nent property owners 
ews the ruling reluctantly st frst. 
But now, according te John 
Heavenrich, association 
“We have a peace 
ful community of mixed races 
into which anyone can move 
with pride.” He said the policy 
has paid off in a practical way 
with rising property values 


Brownell Slated 
To Address P-TA| 


Samuel M. Brownell, U. S 


P. 


: 
: 
| 
' 


at Its Education” at an 8 p.m 
meeting Tuesday of the Mont- 
gomery Blair High School P-TA 
in the Girls’ Gym. 

Forbes Norris, Montgomery 
County superintendent of 
schools, Board of Education 
members and representatives 
from civic associations and oth- 
er P-TAs are expected to at- 
tend. The meeting will be open 
jto the public. 


co 


HAVE A BRIGHT 


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Call RE. 17-1234, ask for Circulation, and order The Wash- 
ington Post and Times Herald guaranteed home delivery. 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD - 
. Monday, May 14, 1956 19 


Doctor Discovers 100% Relief 


‘Free-Lance’ 

Frogman Called a ‘Free-Lance 
LONDON, May 13 «&—A)today that Britain’s explanation | deep water on that bright April) Ordzhonikidze’s commander, in 

former top intelligence agent of Crabb’s activities “does not morning he believed he would an interview with Pravda. said 


said today that missing frog-|sound convincing.” = hree Soviet sailors spotted 
man, Lionel Crabb, was al Kotov said Crabb was last | Oring back a haul of informa-|viver in a black lightweight 
“freelance spy” on a “hard-|seen by Soviet sailors “movi tion which would be worth a suit on the surface of the wa- 
cash” mission when he dived'towards” _ the Ordzhonikidze, |!ot to him in hard cash. ter ‘between the two Russian 
near Soviet warships in Ports- moored against. the Portsmouth | “Let this fact reflect no dis- dest anchored near the 
mouth harbor and vanished. (quay. /honor on Lionel Crabb. He|/ Cove a. 


Lt. Col. A. P. Scotland gave| The Admiralty explanations | “45 @ man of splendid courage | Soviet ctuiser on April 19. He 
his views in the Sunday Express |also were questioned 


by Scot- Who was bent on using his tal. sis a a 
today on the eve of a full-scale|land, a retired colonel who tents as a frogman’ to carry) y 
House of Commons debate on|served as a British spy in the out some valuable work for 


his He said the frogman re 


) a mained on the surface, face! 

the great frogman mystery. German army in World War I country. | , | 
Crabb disappeared April 19 and directed Britain’s prisoner| Scotland conceded, igo b Pate i ane Pie ro 
in Portsmouth harbor reported-|interrogation service in World that Crabb “undoubtedly was ongsi ) 


for Acid Indigestion! 
' ry stroyer Smotryashchy, lying 
ly while he was diving near the War IT. jin contact with one or two in- _s oh, 
hull of the Soviet cruiser|. “We can dismiss at once al) dividuals in (British) Naval In- alongside the destroyer Sover- 


Bevore After 
Amitore Amore 
Ordzhonikidze. and two Red\those curious Admiralty state-|telligence who informed him shenny. 


navy destroyers which had/|ments about underwater tests,” how much they would be will- —__—— _—_—- . o ” 
brought Soviet chiefs Nikolai/Scotland said. “Nor need wej|ing to pay.” ——— i Contains Safety Guards “Gy-C” To Prolong Its Effect! 
If you suffer from heartburn. gas or acid indi- 


Bulganin and Nikita Khrush-|necessarily assume that Crabb! British Sunday newspapers , 
chev to Britain was recalled (from the naval|joined Scotland in a demand gestion, try minty Amitone tabiets. They act so 
fast. you feel relief aes they go down! Faster. 


The British Admiralty belat-|reserve) for an occasional jobjfor an investigation. The So 
edly announced the frogman's | by some shadowy group in the cialist opposition, and many longer-lasting Amitone is a patented formula! 

“presumed death” while on a/British Secret Service. This is}Conservatives, were uncon That's why Amitone-and only Amitone-can { \ 

“test dive.” Britain apologized |not how these things are usual-|vinced by Prime Minister An- promise you 100% relief! Get Amitone today 

to Russia and explained that if|ly done. thony Eden's explanation that . 

it took place it did so without) “For Lionel Crabb was not|Crabb’s mission was “complete- 434 for @ tin of 24—$1.39 for © bottle of 100 
government authorization on recall from the Navy. Hejly unauthorized.” The Social-) 

But the skipper of the Soviet; was—lI say this with certainty|ists forced a parliamentary de : . 
cruiser, Rear Adm. V. F. Kotov,|—a straightforward free-lance/bate on the issue, beginning! doesnot Call RE. 17-1234, ask for Cirenlation, and order The Wash- 
told the Communist Party |spy tomorrow tenture . 
newspaper Pravda in Moscow “When Crabb waded out into! In Moscow, meanwhile, the ington Fost and Times Herald guaranteed home delivery. 


ooo —_—-— —— — —-- — 


Tote THaT Bae...to Switzerland! 


In fact, this turns out te he a massive “tote.” For But, here we face a point of plain, pockethook 


the Swiss buy thousands upon thousands of bales economics. Anything which seriously handicaps 


Swiss trade means dollars for Dixie 


Switzerland's ability to sell and earn must also af- 


of good American cotton each year... 
4 In addition to cotton, Switzerland is a large 


fect her ability to buy. 
Theat has happened. 


America has already increased her tariff on 


paying American cotton growers millions... buyer of tobacco, rice and peanuts. Switzer- 
land's cash purchases of things grown, mined 
and made in the Southern and Southwestern 


states, come to some $40,000,000° annually 


every penny in cash! 


% 


Made in the U.S$.A....sold Swiss 


Ay: jeweled-lever Swiss watches by 50°. Since then, 
Cotton is just a beginning. The Swiss like American 


Here, for example, is how some of these 

stated benechit : 
Georgic . 
Texas . 
Alaboma 
Mississipp: 
Arkansas 


additional restrictions of even more serious nature 


have been proposed. 
The net effect.pf these proposed restrictions 


products. They buy almost everything America 


makes, mines or grows. American farm and food- - *» $3,112,000 


7,522,000 
1,758,000 
1,620,000 
1,240,000 
Levisiana 2,021,000 
Virginie . 3,310,000 


© Raced on com pits Agura for [O54 lawet eradahe 


stuffs. Chemicals, metals and li . Aut . 
, RS RA PRBS ae A OO AS could he to price the fine, jeweled-lever Swiss 
biles and aircraft. Petroleum, woolens and tobacco. : 
watch right off the wrist of the average American 
+. and with it, the ability of the Swiss te keep 
on being America’s best cash customer in Evrope. 


Obviously, the people of Switzerland have a 


deep interest in seeing what steps are now going 


Switzerland's payments for these purchases of 
American goods come to some $150,000,000 each 
year. An amount she pays promptly in cash . . . 


making Switzerland America’s best cash customer 


in Europe. published in recognition of 


Getting down to business 
Naturally, the prime requisite for being a good 
cash customer is to have ready cash. Switzerland 
has. Because Switzerland earns those dollars 
through the sale of her own products to America 
(mostly watches and watch movements), 


to be taken. But, then, millions of Americans must 
be equally interested. These are the American 
farmers, workers, manufacturers and business- 
men who have long since learned to look upon the 
Swiss and Switzerland as a multimillion-dollar 
market for American products every year. 


the 105th anniversary of 
ThecTreaty of Friendship and Commerce 
pledged between the people of 
America and the people of Switzerland 


THE WATCHMAKERS OF SWITZERLAND 


r * 


Two Youths Are Seized In Holdup Shooting 


BROOKLINE, Mass:, May 13; Boston's Jamaica Plain section 
‘®—Two 19-year-old youths who and Edward Wells of the Rox- 
shot a service station attendant bury. section. They were cap 
tary services.” in a $34 holdup today were cap- tured by two policemen who 

Two years ago, the Subcom- tured minutes later by police. heard the shot that felled sta- 
mittee conducted a series of, Charged with armed robbery tion attendant John Harkins, 
hearings on Communist atroci- and assault with intent to mur- 54. The bullet struck Harkins 
ties against American military der were Frederick Stober of below the heart. 
personnel captured in the Ko- iar; 
rean War, 

Those hearings, conducted by 
Sen. Charles E. Potter (R-Mich.) 
dealt with physical mistreat- 
ment, including murder and 
torture. The new sessions, ac-| 
cording to McClellan, would 
involve only psychological 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
20) Monday, May 14, 1956 eeeR2 


McClellan Seeks Hearings on ‘Brainwashings’ 


| 
By Alvin Spivak under way and witnesses have/doctrination or schooling—re- 
International News Gervice been questioned at closed hear- sulted in numerous cases of| 
Chairman John L. McClel-|ings. An earlier proposal to be- | Prisoners signing peace peti 


, ti and false confessions.” 
lan (D-Ark.) said yesterday he|gin pyblic hearings was spiked ‘The eaatew contends that 
would ask the Senate Investi- 


e . 
ollitt hesigns; 
because of Pentagon feeling|«the thoroughness with which 
®,° gations subcommittee to launch that it might endanger Ameri-\the Communists carried out 
, . eee” caps still imprisoned in China. 
Op rl io ow hearings orf Communist “brain-| weCellan asserted: “The tech- 


Defense Department and mili- 


(Advertisement) 


Science Develops New Tablet: 


Relieves “Hot Flashes, Irritation 
From Change-of-Life For 8 of 10 
Tested -Without Costly Injections 


this operation and the inhu- 
‘9 , ne methods which they used 
washing” of American prison- nique employed by the Com- should be exposed.” y 
ers in North Korea and China.|munists indicates that a well-/ He said public hearings 
He issued a statement saying po pee pe eh ire would give the Subcommittee 
the inquiry would “inform the|.an prisoners Ay come” hina of and other Americans “an un- 
: can Pp . Much of | derstanding” of the seriousness 
public of how the so-called|/what occurred was Ih violation: : ; 
' | . of the problem. He said he ex 
‘brainwashing’ program op-\of the Geneva Convention. —_|nected “the cooperation of the’ 
erates, and most importantly,| ., {te oa eng ay Bag he ES 
how it may be counteracted a s re = 


Reuters | 

LONDON. May 14 (Monday)he became general secretary 
Harry Pollitt, Britain’s top Com-|in 1929 

munist, today resigned his job) je retained that post con- 

as general secretary of the Brit tinuously except for a brief pe- 


ish Communist ) 
Party because riod during the early part of 
| World War II. He lost his post 


: mistreatment to intensive in- 
in the future. 


McClellan said the investiga- 
tion wauld embrace “Commu- 
nist indoctrination, interroga- 
tion of American prisoners of 
war in North Korea and civilian 
prisoners in China.” 

He said a staff study has been 


of. ill health. 
Party officials in 1939. when Russia signed the 
said the 6 Russo-German pact and British 
wear-old leader Communists were convulsed by 
would contin- a sudden turnabout from their 
we as chair- previous anti-Nazi line 
man But with the German 
Pollitt will sion of mere in 1941 
. ~~ was reinstate 
pe pe mtg es During the late 1920s and 
has held for 27 early 1930s he was several 
weare te John Pollitt times charged with sedition and 
Gollan, his assistant, who has “#5 once Jailed 
been a prominent figure in the Gollan, who was born in 1911 
party's executive committee in Edinburgh, has been the 
party's national organizer since 


The stocky, eloquent Pollitt) \, 
mae teld hie executive commit November, 1954 Before that he 
was for five years assistant 


inva- 
Pollitt 


and an experienced decorating 
at your home 


25 Japanese Homes Burn 


OTARU, Japan, May 13 
Fire broke out in a public bath 
house in this Hokkaido village 
at midnight, spread and de-@ 
stroyed 25 homes before it was @y 


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Let him show you samples of patterns and 
colors and help you with your selections. 


No additional charge 


Sanshurgh’ 


tee that he must take “a com- 
plete rest” on the advice of his 
doctor 


Appreciation Recorded 


editor of the Communist news 
paper, the Daily Worker. 


brought under control. Three 
|persons perished. 


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2531 Ennalls Avenue 
FREE PARKING AT ALL 3 STORES 


: 


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In accepting his resignation 
the executive committee record- 
ed “its deepest appreciation” 
for his leadership and asked 
him to take over the office of 
chairman, which he accepted 

Pollitt's resignation caused 
an immediate reshuffle among 
the party leaders, with William 
Gallacher, 74-year-old party 
chairman and former Commu- 
nist member of Parliament, be 
ing made president 

The changes followed the 
party's biennial congress last 
month when Pollitt, a life-long 
supporter of Stalin, was criti- 
cized over the Moscow moves 
to destroy the Stalin myth 

His position was reported 
endangered by the Russian de- 
nunciation of Stalin. But at 
the congress. the Communist 
Party, representing 34,000 mem- 
bers, recorded fs full confi-' 
dence “in the Soviet Union, its 
people and the Communist 
Party of the Soviet Union.” 

Shortly afterward, Pollitt de- 
clared in a speech that Stalin 
had abused’ his power, but 
added | believe he will re 
main for all time one of the 
great Marxist thinkers and one 
of the strongest leaders in the 
Soviet Union.” 


Becan as Boilermaker 


Pollitt. who began his work 
ing life as an apprentice boiler- 
maker, worked his way up in 
the Communist hierarchy until 


Muscovites Acclaim 


Russian Jewish Poet 
Reuters 

MOSCOW, May 13 — Mos 
cow's intellectual elite met 
Saturday to acclaim a famous) 
Russian Jewish poet who died 
in the United States 40 years 
ago 

The works of Sholom Aleich- 
em. who died on May 13, 1916, 
were published widely in Rus- 
sia until 1948. Since then not 
a single poem by him has been 
printed until recently. 


~ 


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‘ 


This 


Morning... 


i With Shirley Pevich 


ON SATURDAY AT PIMLICO they will run the | 


Preakness once more and the 80th horse to win ‘it 
very probably will be Needles, the Kentucky Derby win- 
ner, because he has licked every three-year-old of note 
thus far this season. 

Needles is galloping toward that special Valhalla reserved 


for Triple Crown winners, meaning | 


that they have swept the Derby, the 
Preakness and the Belmont Stakes. 
Needles very likely will join the select 


clufh, but in his case it is the middle | 
jewel, the Preakness, that could be his — 


chief frustration. 
With the Derby already safely in his 
saddle bag, thanks to his stretch-run- 
ning skill, the Belmont in June at a 
mile and a half shapes up as a push- 
over for the son of Ponder-Noodle 
Soup who will relish that last half mile 
when his fatigued rivals begin to 
shorten stride and pant their distress. 
The Preakness, though, may not be 
exactly to Needles’ taste. It is a six- 
teenth shorter than the Derby's mile and a quarter, and it 
will call for Needles to develop earlier get-up than he‘has 
chosen to demenstrate in any of his other 3-year-old triumphs. 
Jockey Dave Erb will have to start calling on Needles for 
a finishing kick before that colt is accustomed to being 
called on. 


IN THE FLAMINGO, the Florida Derby and the Kentucky 
Derby, Needles came from last or next to last. At Pimlico on 
Saturday, he may need racing luck. He is certain to be trailing 
the field during the first mile, and the Pimlico stretch may 
not open up for him as did the stretch run in the Derby. At 
Louisville, he was able to thread a path between tiring horses. 
At Pimlico, he may have to go around them. 

There isn’t as much of the stretch at Pimlico as there was 
at Louisville, where from the last turn to the judges’ stand 
the distance read 1234 feet. At Pimlico it is only 950 feet, of- 
fering Needles less running room in which to make his ha- 
bitual charge. Also, the Pimlico track is 10 feet narrower, 


the turn sharper, and a come-from-behind entry may have to ° 


go far wide to get running room. 

All of which is not to say that Needles isn't equal to it, 
merely that the circumstances at Pimlico will be less in his 
favor than at Louisville or Belmont. There will be nothing 


especially new in the field to challenge him, and he demon- | 


strated at Louisville that he could beat the likes of Fabius, 
Come On Red and Count Chic if given a modest share of the 
racing luck, which meant no interference. 


THE BIG QUESTION at Pimlico on Saturday will be Nee- 
dies’ mood of the day. Thus far, he has chosen to run when 
the chips have been down, but rare is the temperamental colt 


which doesn't have at least one bad day..Nashua had his in | 


the Widener when he finished a laboring fifth, and in his own 
way Needles is as temperamental as Nashua. 

Nashua is a rogue-type colt, sometimes very mean. Eddie 
Arcaro, who rides him most of the time, refuses to go along 
with the stable’s explanation that Nashua is merely playful. 
“Hell he is,” said Arcaro. “He tries to bounce me off his back, 
and not for fun. Sometimes he acts like a big dumb polo pony.” 

Needles is a sulker in the morning, and sometimes even 
during a race. In the Derby, Jockey Dave Erb reported that 
the colt, in the midst of his biggest race, threatened to spit 
out the bit and give up thé whole idea of running, only to 
ehange his mind and win. 


It is in the morning, though, that Needles gives his trainer | 


and exercise boys a trying time of it. The other day, Trainer 
Hugh Fontaine, astride a companion pony, couldn't get Needles 
to break in a fast work until after they had spent 30 minutes 
on the track, and then the colt broke without warning. 


NEEDLES IS AN OBSTINATE one, a “notionate thing,” as 
Humphrey Finney would say, refusing to have any part of 
the morning workout routines until some compulsion to act 
up is satisfied. He wheels, props like a stubborn mule and 
finally chooses to run only when the mood strikes him. 

Yet his stable can't carp at Needles, inasmuch as every job 
they've assigned to him he's done so superbly on the after- 
noon of the race. His stable has realized, too, that in Needles 
they have a colt with a personality, thanks to his come-from- 
behind habits that have been so exciting to so many millions 
on television in the big races. 

In the case of Native Dancer, darling of the television view- 
ers three years ago, it was his easily distinguishable gray coat 
thac set him apart in his stretch battles that helped him to 
win his big fan club. In the case of Needles, it is the suspense 
created by his well-known waiting habits. 

“Here Comes Needles!” is now the watchword in the Nation's 
living rooms on a Saturday afternoon. 


," 
> 


. The Nats 
Pierce Stops Box Scoré 


Tigers, 8-1 jzz., 


, 
DETROIT, May 13 @ Xt 
Southpaw Billy Pierce pitched Pie 
himself in and out of trouble 
all afternoon, but scattered 10 akises 
hits for his fourth victory of 
the season as the Chicago 
White Sox battered the Detroit 
Tigers, 8&1, at Briggs Stadium’ 
today. 

The victory gave the White Lemos. rt 
Sox a sweep of the three-game 2°"R., “, 
series, and their 14 hits off four a ‘ 

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The 29-year-old Pierce had 
runners on base in all but two 

innings, but was tough in the 

clutch. He faltered in the 

sixth, permitting three straight 

singles by Bill .Tuttle, Ray wW GTON 

Boone and Charley Maxwell for — 

Detroit's only run. SSttsaa 
Pierce now owns a 41 record BLE 

and today's triumph was his « 

fourth complete game. 


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Richasdson Optioned 
NEW YORK, May 13 W—The | 


¢| didn't quite get hold of the’ 


— night and 


‘I For Wiesbaden Title 


‘favorite for Wimbledon. 


‘Dosox Strike Back at Nats, 5-3 


Berberet, The 


Jensen and 


ay 


BASEBALL 
RACING 
COMICS 


ports 


Piersall Hit 


ONDAY, MAY 14, 1956 


Home Runs 


By Bob Addie 
Stafl! Reporter 

You can't win them all. The 
law of averages finally caught! 
up with the Nats yesterday as 
ithe Boston Red Sox scored their 
first victory of the season over 
the Nats. 

Boston prevailed, 5-3, after 
having dropped three straight 
\to Washington. A crowd of 10, 
415 watched. 

Camilo Pascual started for 
the Nats and tried valiantly to 
win as a gesture to Cuban In- 
‘dependence Day, which was ob- 
served with brief ceremonies 
‘before the game. 

Alas, Camilo was liberated 
from the mound by the sev- 
‘enth inning after he had stayed 
around long enough to absorb 
the loss. 


Susce Gets Victory 


Frank Sullivan, ace of the 
Boston staff, also was knocked 
out. George Susce, who came 
in after the Red Sox had come 
jup with two runs in the sixth 
| to tie the score, got the victory. 

More home runs, a common 
occurrence at Griffith Stadium 
tliese days, marked the game. | 
Jackie Jensen and Jim Piersall 
each hit one, while Lou Ber-| 
jberet got his first as a major 
leaguer 

For the seventh straight 
game, a Washington pitcher) 
‘failed to finish. Bob Chakales 
wasn't available for relief duty, | 
which was just as well because | 
he'd probably have a stump for 
)an arm with all the work he's 
been getting. 


Bosox Get 10 Hits 


Pascual lost his third straight’ 
game. Hal Griggs and Connie) 
\Grob also saw pitching action. 
Boston got 10 hits to nine for 
the Nats 

Like all these games, the 
Nats had a chance to pull it out! 
in the ninth. There were “two 
on base and two out when Jim 
Lemon came up. Lemon tried 
to make it one for the road be-| 


. Z “ 


just misses beating out a 
_ Pete | Runsels | in yesterday’ 


GRITTING HIS TEETH—Boston outfielder 
Jim Piersall, showing the strain in his face, 


By Dick Darcer. Stall Photoeraoher 


| the Nats at Griffith Stadium. That's fiirst 
| baseman Rey Sievers taking the throw for 

grounder to | the putout. Piersall later homered to put 
5 came with Boston ahead, 43. The Red Sox won, 53. | 


ee 


cause a homer would have won 
\the game. But he flied out to 
end the game. 

Things went along well for 
the Nats at the start. They built 
up a 31 lead by the fourth in- 
ning but the Red Sox, aided by 
Mickey Vernon, tied it in the 
Sixth and went on from there! 
to win. 


Jensen's Homer Ties It 


| Eddie Yost started the Nats 
off with a double and came in 
on Pete Runnels’ single. Jen- 
'sen’s homer in the second tied 
the score at 1-1. In the third. 
Yost singled and was forced by | 
Ernie Oravetz who was pushed 


‘Baltimore 
Routed, 11-2, 
Then Wins, 5-1 


home on singles by Runnels NEW YORK, May 13 #—Bill 
and Roy Sievers. Wight, veteran southpaw once 
__ Berberet’s homer made it 3-l.owned by New York, defeated 
in the fourth and the Nats ap-/his former Yankee teammates, 
peared on their.way to their/5-1, today as the Baltimore Ori- 
third straight victory. ‘oles rebounded from an 11-2 de- 
| But Billy Goodman singled|feat to gain a split in their 
with one down in the sixth. | doubleheader. 
Harry Malzone flied out but) A crowd of 21,935 watched 
Vernon smacked the top of the Wight handcuff the American 
‘right field wall for a double to League leaders with seven hits, 
bring in Goodman. Dick Ger-\drive in the first Baltimore 
nert then singled in Vernon to'run with a single, then ignite 
tie the score at 3-3. a big four-run outburst in the 
eighth with another single that 
Jensen Delivers Again put the game beyond reach. 
Piersall’s homer in the sev- 


enth put the Red Sox in front, 0™les Take Fifth 
43, for the first time in the! 
game. In the eighth, Malzone “es to retain their first place 
walked nd Vornon got bunt 1 0, oy Qaainas bat 
“hit. Jensen bi a si | “ 
center scoring $i gk boosted Baltimore ‘into fifth 
widening Boston's margin to ?'4¢e, 4 percentage points 
53 over Washington. ? 
is 


Kari Olson doubled with one|. 7°™ Sturdivant, makin 
Yankees, 


out in the eighth. Berberet was first start for 
hit by a piteh after Jerry Sny-| fein ‘The young right: 
Soustaae ate ~ a, ie el hander had given up only two 
Griggs but folled a weak hits and was trailing, 1-0, when 
grounder to Vernon the Orioles ganged up on him 
The | Ww , in the eighth. Wight cracked 
SK Ween CEpet. sad os single and was 
tunity came in the ninth. Yost 


Bobby Adams. 
was hit by a pitched ball and |foreed by 


and Manager Casey Stengel re- 
, po Ged out | placed him with Jim Konstanty. 


It was up to Lemon but Jim| Phitley Hits Homer 


—_ 


ball and flied to Jensen. 


SIDEBARS — Gov. Happy 
Chandler of Kentucky, for- 
| mer baseball commissioner, 
was at the game along with 
Gov. Goodwin Knight of Cali- 
fornia... Happy attended the 
Gridiron dinner Saturday 
stayed over to 
watch the Nats play... He 
still loves baseball . ‘The 
Nats leave on an 18-day trip 
tonight .. . They'll play 17 
games and touch all other 
seven cities before they re- 
turn to the stadium on June I 


stanty was Dave Philley, who 
had grounded into three dou- 
ble plays, twice in the first 
game. 


home run into the right field 
stand, his first of the year. 
Don Larsen and Bob Grim 
divided the pitching for the 
Yankees in the opener with 
Larsen getting the victory, his 
third against one defeat. The 
big righthander hurled the first 
five innings and yielded both 


See YANKEES, Page 22, Col. 5 


The split enabled the Yan- 


Bob Orioles, said no cash was in- 


The first batter to face Kon-| game for the Indians as a pinch- 


This time the switch-) 
hitting outfielder slammed a outfielder Wally Westlake as 


Orioles, Yankees Split 


Nats Help Celebrate 


Cuban Independence 


The Nats helped cele- 
brate the 54th anniversary 
of Cuba's Independence 
Day yesterday in brief 
ceremonies before the Bos- 


ton game. 

Cuban members of the 
Nats, including Camilo Pas- 
cual, Pedro Ramos and 
Jose Valdivielso, were in- 
troduced to the crowd 
while Dr. Miguel Angel 
Campa, Cuban Ambassa- 
dor, presented a scroll to 
Manager Chuck Dressen. 
After the Cuban national 
anthem was played, Dr. 
Campa threw out the first 
ball. 


Braves Take 
Doubleheader 


From Cincy 


CINCINNATI, May 13 # The 
Milwaukee Braves consolidated 
their National League lead to- 
day taking both games of a 
doubleheader from the Cincin- 
nati Redlegs. | 


The Braves won the second/| 
game, 6-1, after Warren Spahn' 
pitched his second straight 
shutout in the opener—a 15-0 
victory. | 

The Braves belted out an as- 
sortment of 16 hits today in the 
first game. Chuck Tanner, Del 
Crandall and Pitcher Spahn' 
homered for Milwaukee in the 
eighth inning. | 
| It was the first shutout of 
the season for the Redlegs 

The Braves started scoring 
with one run in the third in- 
ning, added six more in the 
fifth and three in the sixth. 

Tanner and Crandall's hom- 
ers in the eighth both came 
with one man.on and Spahn's 
round-trip belt came with the 
bases empty. 

The Reds collected nine hits 
off Spahn, who went the dis- 


See BRAVES, Page 22, Col. 3. 


Fer Heot Evers 


Orioles Trade 
Pope to Tribe 


NEW YORK, May 13 (*)—The 
Baltimore Orioles today traded 
outfielder Dave Pope to Cleve- 
land for outfielder Walter 
(Hoot) Evers. Jack Dunn, assist- 
ant general manager of the 


volved. 
Pope, a left-handed batter, 
was hitting .158 with the Ori- 
oles and Evers, a right-handed 
‘hitter, had appeared in one 


Pauline Betz 


Wins Pro Tennis 


MILWAUKEE, May 13—Mrs 
Pauline Betz Addie of Wash- 
ington, D. C., captured the Na-| 
tional Women's Professional 
Indoor Tennis championship 
last night by beating Doris 
part of the deal that saw out- Hart of Coral Gables, Fia., 6—4, 
‘fielder Gene Woodling and 6—4. 
third baseman Billy Cox go to Mrs. Addie, wife of Washing- 
Cleveland. Prior to the trade ton Post and Times Herald 
Pope had spent his baseball sports columnist Bob Addie 
career in the Indians’ organiza- and professional at the Edge- 
tion. moor Tennis Club in Bethesda, 

Evers, 35, went to Cleveland Md., recently won the World 
last year in exchange for pitch- Championship by also defeat- 
er Bill Wight. ing Miss Hart. 


hitter. He walked. 

Both players rejoined clubs 
they left less than a year ago. 
Pope came to the Orioles with 


to open against Cleveland .. . 
The Nats finished their home 
stand with a 7-8 record . 

Jensen has hit only two 
homers this year and both 
have been off Washington 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 


; Major League Standings 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 


itchers ... The box score on 
ses runs at Griffith Sta- 
dium is 43 for all clubs... 
Only 45 were hit all last year 
. 22 have been hit into the 
new seats, with the Nats | 
hitting 11 and the opposition 
the same ... The Nats have 
drawn 123,296 in 16 hi me 
dates, an average of 7706 


CLUBS 


New York 
Cleveland 
Chicago 
Boston 


™y 1 2\ A 3) | 3 oe 
| 2—| oj Oj 2) 3) 5| 
0} 2\—| 1) 0 1) 3 3 
ij 1) 2— 8} 1) 1): 


' ; 
: 
CLUBS 5 J 
Zig 
1/16) 9) 640)... ~~ |Milwaukee ee || 2 
;4\14| 9; 609; 
3\10| 8| .556| 2% 
2\1i/i0) . “ 524| 3 


> 
- 
gv 
3) 
2 


i= 
1 Jn 4 «733, 
St.Louis | - 2) 2 1) 2) 3) 215) 7) o82| 


Brooklyn | | i 0| 4) 4| 1) 2/12) 9| 571) 2% 


ee ee ——— ————— -— a 


Cincinnati | ri 1) 2)—| 2| 1 4 2/13) 10) . 565) ‘2h 


ee eee 


Hoad Defeats Larsen 


WASH.. | 1) O 2) 3} S| 0) 

WIESBADEN, Germany, May 
13 ‘#®—Lewis Hoad of Australia 
efeated Art Larsen of San' 
Leandro, Calif.. 10—8, 6—3, 
6—2, to win the Wiesbaden In- 
iternational Tennis tournament 
today. 4 

The young Australian, who 
won the Rome wo Sg 
maintained last 


Detroit 
Lost 


— ee 


| 9) 9} 8/10/14/13/13)1 


Besten. 5: WASHINGTON, 4. 
y. b- 


Kaneee vies be pafecalah a? ” 


TODAY'S GAME 
maintained his position as ve 


| 3} ij 1) O—) 3) 1) S\nziaa) 462) 4% . 


wee eS ee 
TT eee eee — 


Kan. City | 1 1) 1| 1| 1| 2\—| 2| 9\13| 409) 5% |Chl 


eee — - 


; 6 (CTC 8 ej el 2 1\—| 815) 348| 7 


YESTERDAY'S RESULTS 


)—Kuchs (3-1) ve. Lemon 
Wid’ Only tame chose ON) Nomen 
f 


ut R 3) 1—| 1) 1) 4/11/10) 524) 3% 
| OT) 0} 1) 2) 2| 3) 9\13| 409, 6 
CECEL “O—| 1] 5\13| 278, 8 
©} 0} 1) 0} O| 4) O—| 5\15| .250\ 9 
;—S«|:sAs 7): 9/00/20/13/13/05) . 


YESTERDAY'S RESULTS 
Broskive, 6 New By . 


ae 


TODAY'S GAMES 
No games scheduled. 


———_ = 


0/11\13) 4 58). 4% 


5) 


me). ¢ 
Ph 
a . later te.) 


. ., a 


4 


‘know it because he didn’t tell 


Lattrell Comes Back 


Nats Recall Paula; 
Option Tettelbach, 
V aldivielso, Brodowski 


The Nats made some wholesale and startling changes last 
night when they cut their squad down to 26 men, one over 
the player limit which must be observed by midnight Wednes- 
day. 

Three players, Outfielder Dick Tettelbach, Pitcher Dick Bro- 
dowski and Shortstop Joe Valdivielso, were optioned. Two 
players, Outfielder Carlos Paula and shortstop Lyle Luttrell, 
were recalled. 

Two more, Catcher Bob Oldis and Outfielder Tom Wright, 
were sold outright to Chattanooga and Louisville, respectively. 

Tettelbach replaces Paula as the odd man in the Yankee 
deal who must play with Denver this season. Brodowski and 
Valdivielso are on 24-hour recall with Louisville of the American 
Association. 

Manager Chuck Dressen said flatly last night that Paula 
would open with the Nats in Chicago tomorrow night and 
would be batting in the cleanup’ ~~ 
spot in place of Roy Sievers. and I need a replacement for 

“IT told Paula when he went Sievers.” 
to Denver that he would be Tettelbach. who broke in 
back with us soon,” Dress€n sensationally by hitting a 
explained. homer against the Yanks on 

“I intend to keep him in opening day, was batting only 
the lineup against all kinds of .156 
pitching with Karl Olson play- 
ing center and Jim Lemon 
in right. Of course, that’s sub- 
ject to change, too. 


Paula Batting 375 

“I'm going to have a tough 
decision with Luttrell. Jerry 
Snyder has been hitting well 
but I've got to give Luttrell a 
chance. He's been leading the 
Southern Association in hit- 
ting and ri see what he can 
do for us.” 

Paula has been sensational 
with Denver. After 22 games. 
he was batting 375. third best 
in the American Association. 
Sixteen of his first 33 hits 
were for extra bases including 
eight doubles, two triples and 
six homers. He has 19 runs 
batted in and two stolen bases. | 

Luttrell was hitting .379 for 
25 games, the best batting mark. 
in the Southern Association. ares 
He had 39 hits including eight 8a=* 
doubles and three triples. He | FiteGeraie 
had Satted in 13 runs and had Sutten 
stolen three bases. 


erzog Was Sick 


Coertner 

Tettelbach was one of five § rc 
players the Nats obtained in Tet 
the deal which sent Mickey Mc- }°'4 
Dermott and Bob Kline to the 
Yankees. Bob Wiesler, Lou 
Berberet, Herb Plews and <** 
Whitey Herzog still remain. 

Asked why Tettelbach, re- 
garded as a potentially fine 4% 
outfielder, was optioned, Dres- 
sen explained: “I decided to 
| pick Herzog over Tettelbach | 
for a couple of reasons. Herzog 
hasn't shown his best because | kimes 
/he_ hasn't been physically fit.| > 

“He was sick and I didn’t 


Valdivielso, who was the 
Nats’ regular shortstop for the 
last half of the 1955 season, 
also slumped at the plate and 
i\was batting only .150. Brodow- 
iski had an 0-2 record with an 
earned run mark of 9.00. 

Dressen also explained that 
one of the reasotis Paula was 
sent out was to help Wright 
get his time in for the pension 
fund. Wright needed 25 days 
as a major leaguer to give him 
the minimum five years neces- 
sary for eligibilit’. Wright ap- 
peared only once this season 
as a pinch-hitter and didn't 
connect. Oldis never saw action 
in a game.—Bob Addie. 


Nats Averages 


(Includes Sender's Game) 
BATTING 
tb 


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now. Besides, Whitey can play Bee tt 


both first base and the outfield’ rex, 31: 


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Something to cheer about! 
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oren OocnvY @ A. we. - 8 @ ~ SBaTURDAY © A mw. TP Mm, 
® 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
and TIM HERALD 
w i. May 14, 1956 


99 *eeen 


i. 


ee 


Rosen, Colavito 
As Indians, A’s 


ee 


CLEVELAND, May 13 #—Three-run homers by Al Rosen 
and Rocky Colavito powered the Cleveland Indians to a Bo er tars 
94 victory over the Kansas City Athletics in the nightcap | 
today after the A’s had broken a four-game Tribe 


string in the opener, 5-2. 

Art Ditmar limited the Tribe to four 
hits in winning his third against two 
losses in the first game. A two-run 
single by Bob Avila in the third spoiled ’ 
the big right-hander’s bid for a shut- 
out. 

The Athletics’ Hector Lopez also 
produced a three-run homer in the 
second game, driving a Herb Score 
pitch over the left<enter field fence 
in the seventh after singles by Joe 
DeMaestri and Ran Piless. 

Score yielded six hits in evening his 
season record at 33 

Ditmar won over Cleveland's pitch- 
ing dean, Bob Feller, who got his first 
loss of the season in the opener. 


Homer 


Split 


Art Ditmar 


The Athletics scored four runs off Feller and chased him 


, irom the 


— 


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Colavito'’s homer, 
ond. came in the seventh off 
Arnold Portocarrero 

and again the two men were 
| on base with walks. 


waTT 
Filed owt for McLiah 


hill in the third in- 
Harry 
paced the Athletics’ 


first-game attack with three 


Southpaw Tom Lasorda and 
Score had exchanged goose- 
eggs until Rosen belted his 
fourth homer of the season 


ird after two walks 
his sec- 


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MILWAUKEE 


Cubs Twice; 


winning | 


‘Boyer’s seventh 


homers helped St. Louis over-) 


‘come a 5-0 deficit for a 147 sec- 
ond game conquest of Chicago 
after the Cardinals captured, 
the opener, 3-2, to sweep a dou-| 
bleheader from the Cubs be- 
‘fore 22,622 today. 

| The second game was called 
‘after seven innings due to 
_ darkness. 

| Boyer and Rip Repulski each) 
hit tworun homers 
fourth, sending starter 
Jones to the showers. 
fifth, Boyer hit 


Sam. 


Dodgers Win, 6-4; Snider Hits 


Cards Defeat Rescues Newcombe 


First Clout Is Duke’s 


Fifth Grand-Slam 


BROOKLYN, May 13 ‘#—Duke Snider clouted a pair of 
CHICAGO, May 13 #—Ken' home runs, one of them with the bases full as the Brooklyn 


and eighth) Dodgers swept the three-game series against the New York 


Giants with a 64 victory today. The grand slam was the fifth 
of Snider's National League career. 
Don Newcombe started for Brook- 
lyn and was credited with his fifth 
success against a single loss but for 
the seventh straight time failed to 
go the route against the Giants. 
Snider's 4run homer came in the 


third ining. 
fifth. 


He hit his other in the 


Newcombe was breezing along with 


in the | a 60 lead in the seventh inning when 


the Ebbets Field roof caved in on 


In the} him. Hank Thompson opened with a 
his second! single and Daryl Spencer was hit with 


homer with two on and Wally) pitch. Don Mueller, who already has 
Moon followed with a home run’ smacked a pair of singles, doubled 


with the bases =. 


First 
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BRAVES—From P. 21 


Braves Beat 
Cincy Twice 


tance for Milwaukee 
nati loaded the bases 
second, but was 

punch a run across. 
rivet . 


Cincin- 


unable 


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CINCINNATI 


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MILWAL xEr CINCINNATI 


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Jablonski and Sounte Tt e Lefi—Milwaukee 0. 
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onlian, Engein. T 22 


Kid Gavilan Draws 


MARSEILLE, France. May 
13 ww Kid Gavilan, 151, 
Cuba's former world. welter- 
weight champion who has been 
having his troubles with French 
middleweights, was held to a 
draw in 10 rounds today by 
Louis Trochon, 158, Marseille 
middleweight. | 


—— ee 


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scoring Thompson and Spencer. This 


Duke Snider 


marked the first Giant runs since Friday night. 
Carl Erskine held them hitless and scoreless on Saturday. 
It was Mueller who had ended the Giants’ hit famine with a 
single after two out in the second. Until then New York had 


Today's 
Events 


ee 
Caretina 


Villane 
Paes, st Marr’ pst c 
ee in 


cofieeia top, Tikes. a Inter- 
nie at Am Washinaten 


mr ae sates 8-30 


OF TENNI 
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mt ~*~ 
srr 


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_ at Kaas. 


at 
ary's 
ary ot 


Te aRhocdes 
Wemens m torches feurnament Cen- 
ressional ai"chee. eWilson 


re 
RIGHa 
Feirfas ve 
ma 2 
vs. Georgetown ry at Colem- 


=~. SS anene | a Kea weed. & 
Sidwell | Friends Vernen 
Chevy 


Pall thacch ve 


‘Washington v. 
Courtnnase. 3. 


Weashingctes-Lee at 
Wakefield? at 


Decker Gains | Vank 
‘ Semifinals 


Second seeded Donna Floyd 


‘and unseeded Charlotte Decker paitimore runs. He was clipped "*°"" ” 
ch-\gained the semifinal round of for four hits and gave up three 


’ 


ofa sg 


gone 11 consecutive innings 
without a hit. Rookie first 
baseman Bill White followed 
Mueller’s seventh inning two- 
bagger with his second homer 
of the season. That finished 
Newcombe but relief ace 
Clem Labine took over and 
retired the last nine Giants 
in order. 


NEW YORE 


~ wo if 
—_ 


BROOKLIN 
Ollliam 7% 
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_YANKEES—From P.2tT 
s, Orioles 


Break Even 


tennis championships 
straight-set victories 
at Congressional. 


Donna defeated Dot Buttrey, Orioles and failed to last the remedetphte 
and Miss Decker third when the Yankees chased)" 


é6—i, 6—1, 
beat Carol Bentley, 6—3, 6—3. 


with of 
yesterday plays 


the Yankees’ five double 


Ray Moore started for the 


him and reliefer Fred Besana 


‘te the quarter-finals by defeat- cees added 3 more off Babe 


ing Pat Hubbard, 6—0, 6—0. 


SINGLES 
. ARTER - FINALS: Deane Fierd de- 
Det Baettirer. +—i, 6! ar- 
| lette Decker defeated Carel Bentler 
e—3, 6—! 
FIRST ROUND: 
|Petricla Hubbard. A ey 


eaU gy Prenees PBarry- 
defen iefented Barbara Erdiey - 


1—S, 
ND: Ne 


Char- 


scoded 
lette Deckter-Ana a Goer ‘acteatod gy ot Gerdner Tb 
o— 


Graham-Mre. White. 


in the «—2 Jean Deigert de- 
to coated Pan gy J we - | -Carel Bentler 


Nenmer ( eree- 


MIXED DOUBLE 
Qt _ > 2 AIA lee I 
cated Jack 


s 


Colonial Defeats 
Forestville. 


A 


6-5, 


In Ten Innings Rs 


Colonial Restaurant and Jack ry 


Dominion League with 
tories yesterday. 

Colonial outlasted Forest- 
ville, 65, in a ten-inning game, 
and Jack Pry trounced the Vir- 
ginia White Sox, 144. 
games, AtchisonKeller de- 
feated Vienna, 185 and Mece- 
Lean beat Fairfax Legion Post, | 


6-5. 
Colental Reet'seat ose eit = 14 
Perest 1 eee & 


eed Heumen: 
Retlier (7) on@ Anger a ——— 
Shaw (MeLean), 6th. gene on 


paieee- Keller 


7 nA 


erearty (3). Pellend <5) and 


Ley (6). 


ite 152 teeta 12 i. 


Aum Grey é@efented Causer 
4 Boyd 


gala 


8 o— * Pry remained tied for the lead » 2% 
3 in the Northern Virginia Old | Weere 


In other Phillie 


a and master, Neteskt iy, “euna| fore 


eed Mer- ¥ 
Rer — 


ack Pry). 24. 


Birrer in the fifth to take a 90 
iead. 


First 
BALTIMORE 


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in © (Uaced 3 batters & Ire), 


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$2 _ = 


¥~-imore goals to gain the victory. 
' 


BALTIMORE 
dams - 


ane 


S6veceunees> 
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Sovr-eewse*s 

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Two Home Run 


Tenth in 


Lynch Honored Today 


Row, 11-9 


PITTSBURGH, May 13 # 
The Philadelphia Phillies lost 
their 10th in a row today in the 
first game of a twin bill with 
the Pittsburgh Pirates, bowing 
11-9 as the Pirates broke an 88 
tie with a three-run splurge in 
the eighth. 

The. Phillies bounced back to 
take a 62 lead in the second 
game which was suspended in 
the eighth inning because of 
Pennsylvania's Sunday 6 p. m. 
(EST) curfew law. The game 
will be completed here July 3. 

The Pirates’ Bobby Del Greco 
socked two homers in the open- 
er, driving across three runs 
The Phils’ Del Ennis and Andy 
Seminick hit his third home 
run of the season and Stan 
‘Lopata stroked his second of 
the season 


Game 
PITTSssURGr 


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C Y= |Top seeded Ann Gray advanced with a 3-run attack. The ek 


Germans Defeat 
Soccer All-Stars 


BALTIMORE, May 13 aNs) 
‘The Schwaben Soccer Club of 
,| Augsburg, Germany, scored a 
i143 victory over an All-Star | 
|team of the Maryland-Washing- 


Nelson. MeDougald jton Soccer Association here to- 


ay. 

The visiting Europeans scored | 
‘itwice in the opening period.) 
but the All-Stars rallied early 


Moore|in the final period with three 


quick goals. However, the Ger- 
mans’ offense again began to 
click as they banged home two 


Rn 
Called out on strikes fee Orest te Gh ) 
eh 


Joe Lynch, past president of | 
the Touchdown Club, will be) 
guest of honor at an informal | 
party to be given by the elub | 
today, 6 p. m. 


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FALLS CHURCH, VA. 


> 


JA, 2-0024 JA, 71-0012 
JE. 2-2117 


‘Fort Meade Takes Maryland State Golf Title, 12-6 
Dick Lehms | is Beier ores 


Eley, Wernli Beaten, 3 and 2 THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD _ 
Shoots 69 —.m=irtzuvtent (LaSalle, Nelms Capture 
. | 
For Winners 


Monday, May 14, 1956 ” 
green yesterday at Court | 
Fort Meade won the Mary- 


ine ball took one boumee PELE Haven Invitation 


the ball took one bounce 
and nestled in the cup for 
a hole-in-one. | 
Medley was playing with Club champion Joe LaSalle and He 
ywood Nelms of Farming- 
yee yk oF a 4 ton Country Club, Charlottesville, Va., with an assist from Lady 
team championship yesterday, ‘Tne “hole mon egg Lueck, won Belle Haven Country Club’s member-guest tourna- 
defeating Manor Club in the’ — 
final. 124. | e burly LaSalle, who was. club champion at Bethesda 
The service club team built! /'Country Club before transferring to the Virginia club, and his' 
up a big 6%-2% margin at veteran partner defeated Cliff’ * * * * * * *& 
home. At Manor, Fort Meade’s 
_ teams were beaten, 


Area Golf Roundup 


Anderson, Smith Lead 
‘At Congressional, 66 


——By Maury Fitzgerald 


MAJOR JOHN ANDERSON of Prince Georges and Frank 
K. Smith spun a five-under par best-ball of 66 yesterday to 
take the early lead in qualifying trials for Congressional Coun- 
try Club’s member-guest tournament. 

Tee ae Major Anderson fashioned a two- 
under par 69 with his own ball. Smith, 
who sports a 12 handicap and who, | 
with Col. Rennie Kelly as a partner, 
was the winner in this event in 1953, 
helped his partner on three holes with 
birdies. 

Anderson and Smith, despite a 
bogey six at the fifth, were out in a 
threesinder 33. They came to the 
18th needing a par for 65 but both 
took bogey fives to report a second 33. 
George Vass Jr.. Farmington Coun- 
try Club, Chaflottesville, Va. and 
Clarence Nemir combined their tal- 
ents to get a one-under par 70, the 
only other sub-par round of the open- 
ing day in the four-day trial. 
Other low scores reported were: 
Dr. Frank Crilley, Manor, and N. W. Oldt, 72; Kenny Poerstal, 
Bethesda, and Gene Lorenz, 72: Joe Gambatese, Kenwood. 
and R. T, Borth, 72; L. J. Bradford, Columbia. and George 
pay, Alex Halperin, Cape Cod, Mass. and Fleming 
omar 73. ° . ———— 

In a blind bogey, winners | 
were: J. F. Fort, 82—5—77. 
I W. Hall, 98—16—77: F. W. 


1 ‘ 
’ 
) 


yYOue Key TO wWOSPITALITY 


the final choice 


of mature tastes 


yards. 

Eley and Col. Jim Wernli of the 
|Naval Academy Club, 3 and 2, 
‘in the final. | es 

The- new champions were) freat 
jone<iown coming to the 18th an, 
\hole in their forenoon semi-| ¥e** P=» 
final match with Bobby Martino gna, . 
dd 


. 
69, 274 Wins 
Steven Tobash, Fort Meade pro- S > and Frank Clark of Argyle but'** 
fessional, and WO. William At t. Louis ‘won on the 19th green. i 


Houghton, 2%-%, at Manor. | | Nelms hit a bad second shot past th Erle Tehet and 

The big guns for Fort Meade! ST. LOUIS, May 13 #—Dow /on the home hole but the ball/ Ges #04 Bank Andersen, Cour: “Howse. 
were at home. Ssc. Dick Finsterwald, youthful Ohio pro,|sliced onto the fringe of the|_\Feert rnebt rinst—meady Chart and 
Lehms, a stocky Texan, started refused to wilt under pressure|green, took a right angle kick|trd. Belle Meche acl bit Ree” 2°. 
Manor's dowpfall with an indi-\today and roared home with aland rolled up to within two|** ¥* ! =». 


vidual, three-under par 69. : an , 
A SPECIAL OFFER 


The Summaries: 


ip Fitsht Censelations— 
Mer. Cony Heuer. and Ashier 
. » def ane 
* ond Jack Sutherland 
Beach. Fin.. | op in Ti holes 
Final— 


Finsterwald’s 


Club pro Clagett 
Stevens and Billy McFerren, a 
member of the University of 
Maryland golf team, defeated 


Connelty. ‘Washin | 
Beach. Fairfax. se in 


Fight Finel—F4@ Talbot 


\\es\ 


(wa 


Lehms paired with Capt. P , | three-under-par 69, for a 274\feet of the cup. 
—_ pt. *auland first place money in the! wartino had an 8foot putt 
Weber for a five-under par best-'¢95 909 St. Louis open. for a birdie but his attempt to 


matching wih Mr. and Mrs. S 


Henry Ravenel, 143. 


kn Masche, 87—10—77: M. R 
Tinsley, 97—20—77: G. 

Winter, 89-—-12—77: D. A. Mc- 
Cormack, 84—7—77. J. ' 
F. 


ARMY NAVY — Blind 
bogey: Col. F. H. Hartline, 
78—5—73; K. M. Ferris, 83— 
10—73; Col. A. Heebeke, 73— 


ball to collect all three points 


from Jerry McFerren, Western 
junior champion, and the vet- 
erah Louis Fuchs. 


Fort Meade just about 


old 


Finsterwald, a lanky 26-year- 
from Bedford Heights, 


end the match on the 18th 
green was inches short of the 
|hole. 

Nelms got a great birdie at 


o 


se 


The Money Winners R. nineteenth to end the match 
‘after Clark's putt for a birdie 
SS tis See, from four feet bounced out of 
o 7 ste the hole and came to rest on 
rt oe 4 tees the brim of the cup. 
tase; Im the final the LaSalle- 
see Nelms team played three-under- 
233 par golf. They birdied the first, 
788' second and fourth holes to be 
age Out in a two-under 34 and be 
| l-up at the turn 
ace| LaSalle and Nelms birdied 
tes the 12th to go two-up and an. 
es\other birdie at the long 15th 
san| Closed out the match. 
#83; Eley and his Air Force part- 
| Z ————i ner, who is a member of the 
| ond _|started the final day of play| athietic department at the U.S 
™ . sweepstakes event. 2 Me point to 2\e for Classett with a slim one-stroke lead and Naval Academy, reached the 
G. Jebecten 72. won mean “a FF C. or, o"*t, .. | withstood the pressure by an-| final by eliminating 17-year-old 
and john And a 4 ar . 7" Core Moods, ceased © a pe other round of steady sub-par| Johnny Grubb of Manor, and 
ee eo oe | golf on Sunset Country Club’s|18-yearold Carl Lohren of 


entt. Maner 
mond Burgdorf had identical waht, . ore |'Brooke Manor, in the semifin-’: 
Whiteber ened Dave Leaky. Manner 
| Lake. N. Y.. fired a hot 66 on 
MARKET TIRE CO. 
Montreal 3-9 Mies! oat of Odessa, Tex., and Bill Cas-' 
L 

; 3° 14-under-par score. 

medal play tournament. Dr. | (e"aee" 5 Sm ‘ene Ghee Gikelt Gatiemmannedl 


Pirtle and Sis. Geeree Silar- 
73 scores to tie for net. 'F*F Masters als, 4 and 3. i 
> > 

ithe final round to jump into) 

Minor League Standings  |?*,fai.2°"4.'°,20"2 nt 
hester 4. Cotumbes 3-5 ner Jr. of Chula Vista, Calif. ie", A rT 4 Si 
13 ‘4, Maxwell shot a 70 and Cas-| @ mee g a 

on = ae / 


Webster, 04—17—77; L 
Briggs, 86—0—77. 


INDIAN SPRING—Dr. Wil- 
liam Wolf and former club 
champion Eddie Ault ad- 
vanced to the final of the two- 
man team club championship, 
defeating Bert Ansell and 
Vernon Thrower, 3 and 2. 

In the other semifinal, Dick 
Schattman and Dr. Alan Weis- 
berg defeated Lou Harrison 
and Denny Hevener, 2 and 1. 


BETHESDA —Herb Rudd 
fred a one-under par 69 to 
win low gross in a medal play 
handicap event which in- 
cluded a blind bogey prize. 
Del Beman posted 73 for sec- 
end gross. 

- Bob Henrich, T7—12—65, | 
won net. Nelson Hillock, #44— 
, Was second and Hugh 
or, 83—16—67, third. 
. Fred Miller, 93—19—74, 
and Sanford Cooper, 92—18— | 
74. were the blind bogey win- | 


fers. 


* KENWOOD—Dr. Michael 

Oliveri peeled off a one-under 
ar 68 to be low man in the 
lass A division of a scratch | 


0—73; Cmdr. J. A. Brough. 88 
—~15—73; Cmdr. P. A. Tichle, 
92—19—73; George Merrileff. 
88-—15—73; J. Downs, 99-—26 
—~73; Capt. Patrick Henry, 91 
-~18—73: Admiral J. S. Phil- 
lips, 81—8—73; Mrs. F. Brown- 
ing, 86—13—73. 


ARGLE—Roy Renoud and 
Tom Gentle had a net best- 
ball of 29, 31—60 to win a 
blind partner two-man team 
event. P. W. Omen and Tom 
Menefee, 28. 33—61. and 
Warren Webb and Jack Wil- 

| lard, 30, 31—61, tied for sec- 


clinched the match when Spl. 
Jack Lasxon and Cmdr. Jean|_ (Par t& 94—s8—11.) 
Wilchester won 2% points to a Bin’ Serre" Sa 
% for the stroig Manor com- 2 

bination of George Thornton oy 

and George Cornwell. Both pi. Verne 
Lasxon and Cmdr. Wilchester Geeree_ Barer 

had individual rounds of 75 and Peter Themece 


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YESTERDAY'S RESULTS 

5 


“bert Meade inte te 
= ME. 8.2412 NA. 86-0536 =) 
UU a 

place at 277 with Billy Maxwell 

Havana 4-9 Terente 

. on a Pet Finsterwald won $5000 for' 7 

615 Teles ng, 

A77 Heese 

per a 71 on the last round. | Wee 


DAILY 
fim 


doe Kenrick had 72 for sec- UTHERN ASSOCIATION . Toke 2) = 
ond and A. B. Laing, 75, for |,...... ' Pet an Vy te Meth | Som Antont Otishems City 3) victory of the year for Finster-| @ 
third. . “ 14 16 467 ; wald, who earlier had won the) | 
~ Other prize winners were: . ft Fort Wayne and British Colum- 

H. T. Morse, 79; R. W. se? bia Opens. 
illiams, 79; George K. Le- 3se| Maxwell, a cigar-smoking Tex- 
‘an, who played in the same 


run, 680. C—F. J. Hanrahan, | Birmia 
: G. J. Carr, 86; Dick Dut- | threesome with Finsterwald, 
Omabe 8 Said: 


! 1 Hart . 87: 
n, 87. D—Paul Hartman “I never saw a man chip bet- 


—— ‘, Me rae ; ter than he did these last two 
= COURT HOUSE—Glenn 
usey planted his last shot | 
ur feet from the pin on 
the 19th green to be a flag | 
tournament winner. Steve | 
ruex and Dr. C. N. Snow, | 
th finishing on the 18th | 
green, were the other Class 
A winners. 

In B class, E. R. Clayton 
finished 30 feet from the 19th 
@ip. Vaughn McDonald was 
second, in the cup on the | 
(th, and Dr. M. Puzak third, 
fnishing on the 18th green. | 
- William Turpin was the | 
only player matching the 
fucky 73 in a blind bogey 
tournament. 


« GOOSE CREEK—Mrs. Ver- 
nie Clarke borrowed 12-year- 
old Jackie English and cap 
tured the annual Mother's 
Day mother-and-child tourna- 
ment with 55—14—41. Mrs. | 
Harry Wanner and Francis 
McGonegal Jr. had 55—14— 
41 for second. 


PRINCE GEORGES—Jack | 
Murray, 80—12—68, and Bob 
Oliveri, 76—8—68, tied for 
top honors in class A-of a 
sweepstakes. John Jankow- | 
ski, , and Mike Jan- | 
kowski, 71—2—69, tied for | 
third. ) 
“In class B, Tom Miller, | 
60.1369: John Marini, 
89—20—69, and Charlies Hut- 
son, 83—14—69, divided the 
spoils. | 
- BROOKE MANOR—Blind 
bogey: Nye Fraser, 81—4— 
77. Monte Emmerick, 84—7~— 
77; Guy Chamberlain, 82— | 
S—77: Jack Tate, 83—6—77. | 


»« NORBECK — Blind bogey: 
Frank Scheer, 91—20—71; 
Walter Newrath, 86—15—71: 
Murray Kaye, 86—15—71; 
Irving Rubin, 130—59—71; | 
Jack Schwarz, 86—15—71: 
Sam Gordon, 94—14—80: Sid | 


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event. Other 18-hole winners 
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WASHINGTON —Russ 
Graves, Jimmy Murphy, Cliff 
Hunt and Joe Baldwin col- 
lected 21 points apiece to tie 
for the lead in a points tour- | 
nament. In class B, J. F. Wil- | 
liamson with 21 points was 
the winner. J. D. Jameson — 
with 18 points won class C. 


CHEVY CHASE—Mr. and | 
Mrs. E. C. Ferriday carried 
off low gross honors in a 
mixed four-ball tournament 
with a 159 score. Mr. Ferri- 
day had an 80 and Mrs. Fer- 
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champion, had Pn an way? . 

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’ 


THE WASHINGTON POST) 
and TIMES HERALD 
. Menday, May 14, 1956 
4 *#eenr 


imlico 


SWEET ZAYNETTE 
3d Race, Pimlice 


for 


Preakness Prep Today Kicks off 


Ricci Tavi, | 
Invicto 
Head Field 


By Walter Haight 
Staff Reporter 

Not since the heyday of the 
Vanderbilt dynasty has the 
Maryland Jockey Club's 
| Preakness Week, now upon us, 
‘promised so much—a parade of 
‘special events to be climaxed,| 
of course, by Saturday's 80th) 
running of the Preakness 
Stakes at Pimlico. 

The -question of the hour'| 
is whether D & H Stable’s 
| Needles can score in the Preak- 
ness and thus take the second 
big step toward becoming the 
ninth winner of the Triple 
‘Crown of ‘American racing— 
‘Derby, Preakness and Belmont.| 

Indications are that 9 or 10 
‘rivals will face Needles over 


Big Wee 


Racing Selections at Pimlico Track 


PADDOCK 


rose > Ae 
“7 ies 


Bs Whee _ 


ry Naples Siam 
=e Randal! 


Rilewete 
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r tH 
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Around The Tracks 


|Horses and People} 


By Walter Haigh 


FOR THE SECOND YEAR, the Preakness Prep will be an 
exhibition and fot a betting affair. While the limited num- 
ber of entries and the probability of light mutuel action 
doubtless is an accessory before the fact, there's a chance 

the race Always will be betless in the 
future. | 

This is as it should be, because the 
very nature of the race is such to 
arouse suspicion. Nobody expects 
a stable to knock out a Preakness | 
candidate a few days before the main 
event. However, those who wager, do 
so with the best effort of the horse 
in mind. 

if the entry simply is getting a feel 
of the track or a taste of Opposition 
to come, then the customer who pits 
dough on the line isn't getting a fair 
shake, unless he is a mind reader 

For some years, I've advocated a 
betless Derby Trial, too. Through a 
slip of the tongue, a jockey, who won 
the big race revealed as how “I could 

have won the Trial. if I'd hit my horse with the stick.” 

That was a fine kettle of fish—spilled fish, at that, for 

those who had backed the horse in the Trial. Not only were 


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Boss 3s 


| they short-changed by the de- 
This Week's 


feat of their choice but, in 
Fights on TY 


TONIGHT—At New York 
(St. Nicholas Arena), Rory 
Calhoun, White Piains, N. Y., 
vs. Randy Sandy, New York, | 
middieweights, 10 rounds. | 
WTITG-TV (Channel 5), 9:30 
Pp. m. 


WEDNESDAY At Chi 
cago, welterweight champion 
Johnny Saxton, New York, 
vs. Gil Turner, middleweight, 
16 rounds. WMAL-TV (Chan- 
nel 7), 10 p. m. 


FRIDAY—At Los Angeles 
(Wrigley Field). fer the mid- 
dieweight championship of 
the world. Bobo Olson, San 
Francisco, vs. Sugar Ray 
Robinson. New York, 15 
rounds. WRC-TV (Channel! 4), 


CONSENSUS 


AY BELMONT FARK 
m Gase it. Comets Glew 


. +." Celie 4 
reakers Ahead i! 


1% Retreat 


, 4 

Sheet 7 
The 
Rene & 
Piper & 
it, Ad- 
Honest 


Oma 
Fair 
18, 

Pre 
War 


4 


+— Mie sty Mera 18 
Meahearaiah & 
t—Nance’s Lad 4. Seiteh On 


irel 
ww = COLL. B10N Si. Possier 5 


Breed 5 
AT SUFFOLK DOWNS 
i—Kissin Kate 14. Yeoman I!. Beeeurt 
Billy 5 
5. tars Choice 17. Thane of Fife > 
2 
Ace Vbintep 17. Sailersvifie 5. Karen 
Breemmeter is & Olecee 
Innebreck it Bere W. 6 Fede- 
Raintree 16. Pareten & Or. Jekell 7. 
neste Lee 11, Leeks Welliem 1°. 
Marcin * 
A mment 1! 
16, 


Serr 


Tar- 
Fine 


Tar Geeen 7 


ten «(67 
o—Ledie A Indien Led 9 
Bef * 
AT FIMLICO 
t—-BereGesomes 1% Helen's 
Sy moben nis 
—Mis Xu» 15 


mi... ‘4 
3—Detite 
flear Salling 5 
idew ater 
@ent Ardan * 
h—Foeur Jacks 16. Hemteville 11. Mise 
arm 7 
Teri . Helt- 
eepter 6 * waerering.) 
‘—iMr ERATIVE ‘t Suave 5. Anthens 
Wey» 5 
“Thinking Cae Ti. O14 Glendale 14 
Petner 15. Dinle Style 4 


Hosh 4 
Pe sreiteis 19 
AT BALMORAI 
> ee Jee 1%. Demon Be &. Eaalt- 
s 
t—ben Jeew 14. Hi Billee 


ie 7 
en a Pag tng 4. De 


Ace 13 
Foarefus 15. Hudson 
Jeante Randall 11 


Ar- 


‘i. Reman Ge 14 


event— Riess 
Tnviete 


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fe. Jalbeo- 
164 


7 7. Mae 
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ter Red i4. 


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ack Remar it. Bese 


BALMORAL ENTRIES 


ciaimi <> 


Oivmepia's Ace 7 
he T Sea © Prin 15. Dette 9 
Hue 16. Ste 


many cases, the showing was 
enough to steer them off the 
colt when he won the Derby 
proper. 

| wonder what ever became 
of the sportsman who used 
to send a two-horse eniry 
postward with the announce- 
ment, “owner so-and-so de- 
clares with Humpty Dumpty.” 
In other words, the public was 
informed that Humpty Dump- 
ty was out to win whereas the 
other half of the entry was 
qualifying for some future 
event or just conditioning 

Under this system, if you 
didn't like Humpty Dumpty 
it was possible to toss out the 
entry, despite his big name 
running mate, and look for 
something else 


THE PREAKNESS flower 
is the Black-Eyed Susan just 
as the Derby symbolized 
by the Rose. Both are phonies 
at the time they are woven 
into a blanket for the winner, 
the two species being out of 
season. For instance, Church- 
ill Downs has to rely on hot- 
house blooms while Maryland 
Jockey Club goes to consider 
able expense to run painted 
daises as ringers... But to 
tell the truth, Pimlico’s real 
springtime flower is the 
dandelion. At present, thé 
familiar bright yellow rivals 
the green in the infield . 
While sidetracked in favor of 
the synthetic susans, a bed of 
dandelions would not be en- 
tirely out of place as the base 
for a winner's circle blanket, 
in the event the Preakness is 
run over a sloppy track... 
Then, there's always an op- 
portunity for a loser to drink 
himself even, providing he 


has a receipt for dandelion 
wine. 


is 


-—- -—--— - 


BETWEEN RACES—Willie 
Hartack, who was proved 
right when he chose Fabius. 
instead of Pintor Lea for his 
Derby mount, has made an- 
other decision. Calumet gave 
him the pick of Fabius in the 
Preakness for Princess Turia 
in Belmont’s Acorn Stakes 
the same day The filly is 
the one on which Willie sen- 
sationally downed Doublego- 
dare in the Kentucky Oaks, 
but Hartack still has faith. 


Needles not withstanding . 
History could repeat For 
instance, Parlo, Open Sesame, | 
Clear Dawn and High Volt- 
age, who led the field of 13 
home as named in last year’s 
Delaware Handicap—world's 
richest race for fillies and 


Not in Preakness 
BALTIMORE, May 13 


Trainer Sylvester Veitch an- 


nounced today that three C. 
Vv. Whitney herses, Head 
Man, Career Boy and Born 


Mighty, will not run in Satur- 
day's Preakness at Pimlico. 


Born Mighty. who ran 


fourth in the Withers Satur- 


day, 


came out of the race 


with a splint on his right 


fore knee. 
decided 
make 


against trying 


Veitch said he has 
to 
Head Man run a dis- 


tance of ground and declared 


Career Boy has 


been eased 


up in training to prep for the 


Belmont Stakes June 16. 
Daniel G. Arnstein’s Eiffel 
Biue. who ran second te Oh 


Johnny in the Withers Satur- 
day at Jamaica; today was 
added to the roster of starters 


for the Preakness. 


the mile and 
distance and 


om oe 


| etl OPM SIS VS BDOW-09 
=> = 


a 
Sag Nipper (Snelliings) Lt soser 


SECOND RACE——rerse S2500: S-rear-olde; one 
h milees (16 


| Sixteenth 


Eee 


PeWwtwe~-O en Spovrerv 


— tt et 


three-sixteenths 
the Florida-bred 


colt, who already has won three 
classics worth $100,000 or more 


this season. 


ses 


Preakness Week will get off 
today's 
a mile and 
a sixteenth, a test designed to 


with the running of 


Preakness Prep at 


is the solid favorite 
to continue his string of succes- 


Hudson Bay (Rogers) 
Mis Carol (8n 


ood 
(Priseeraia wie 
ra) Clec 


Very 


race 


Nothing last time 
Been recing poorly 


Red Chief ‘Taman aro) 
THIRD RACE—Purse 83000, 
Mite on) Very fast 
Mat chell) 
e 


ha 
Due for unprotement 
Noth 


Jewe 
ai ‘challen iSnellin es) 


( Stark 
ri a Bustis (Mo Bor 
(Drury) 


Pr 
Bridal Wreath Hardly 


FOURTH —~—~w fe e000; 4- year-olds. and 
oftert needed 


Be st 
Wo 


Arédent Ardan ‘(Rran) Ren well 


Needs only ride 


be rieht there 


t-vear-olds; 


Beat this 
Second recent outing 
route suits 
Training te 


last year 


try 
Mt “Hydeman-J M Cudone entre 
” THE SPECIAL EVENT—« No wecertns ): 
Si 5H0. e and enme-sixteenth miles (4) 
bRicei Tayi (Nel " 
arter 7) 


. S-year ~ohds) 


ceeds “aly repeat iset 
' Toe form thew 
Poretener 
Very tast 


ee et et et ee et et et pe ee 


Hesoky 


if starts eison! 
: 


: 


} 
needed \ast 
* good races 


Rom 
pocess Can't be overlooked 


oOo vO OoVvyuUYvoooor 


emit 
ween afth and at sth races 
~~ SIxTs naCE—Paree. g3560, 
seventy vrards 
Anthony W 


— 


3-vear-olds. one 


Seereses 


ne ‘Ruste dee tm bere 
’ teer 


bat 20300 


sere 


15- 
is it- 
claiming. 


field 


et ee Bet ne pet Ot et et Ot ee 


te et os Oe ree 
et et et ee ot er pw 
C27 6e oe Pe 


& Hotpoint (C pee’ Ra 
_ eWiltard Cc eman iveneweed entry 
SEVENTH a £4000. é-rear-elds and 
fertenes (terf) (16) 
4 Old Glendale (Rogers) 
: Thinking Cap ({ Nelson! 
pondinenes 


4 
_ 


2 F 
> 


Rest In here 

contender 
in New York 
ance im here 


«re 
BSS ae qneeeennee 
OD es oO 0) ewe - ne 
PT TT's 
— 


SCooNMonoovvre 


lately 
Amber Pox (ngtkRenen ) 
Lefty Peak ‘Sma 5 


FIGHTH RACE—Perce. S8t800: 
nd ene- cizteent) | mites (8) 


~~ earner 
_ 


vs heal 


: D™ 
_A_. Always rien 
Pi 


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4 
3 


up 
>, 


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823253 
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Boy) 
BEST BET—FPUTNET. EIOHTH RACE 


— 


elle on 


--—- 


2P3]|0O fe 27 OU 


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MERCURY °52-'54 (8-tube push-button 
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give possible Preakness starters 


one last fling 


Only three of today's six en- 
tries for the non-betting race 
are regarded as Preaknes¢ ma- 


Ricci Tavi. 
other 


terial. 
Stables 


Christiana 
hope, Quarter 


Dock, and Invicto, South Amer- 


ican colt. However. 


the others 


could get in the big race with 


impressive showings 


S 
The week also will be marked : 


by 


of the annual 


the presentation Thursday 
Dinner Party 


‘ 


Purse, dash for two-year-olds in| | 
which the subscription fees go 
toward a dinner held that night 
in the clubhouse at which the 
successful owner receives his 


trophies 


Something new has been add- 


ed for Friday. 


Preakness eve 


Indian Dele Da 


Pimlico will offer the first run- 


ning of the Mr 


The race honors Sunny 


Fitz Handicap 
lat a mile and three-siiteenths. 
Jim 
Fitzsimmons, dean of American 


4 


trainers and the man responsi- : 
ble for the successes of Nashua. 


last year’s Preakness winner 


Following the racing program 


of Friday, a Preakness Ball 


is 


scheduled at the Southern ITo-| 
tel in Baltimore, at which the! 
Maryland Jockey Club and the) 


going to the Heart fund. 


The Preakness Day program Peers. 3.queen The 
‘also promises much to enter- 
tain the crowd, over and be. worth 
yond 
race itself 


the running of the 


proceeds 


mares and finale of Delaware 
Park's distaff big three—are 
expected to clash again in the 
same classic come June 30. 
Dave Erb, Needles’ engineer, 
will fly into Pimlico Wednes- 
day night to be up on the 
Derby winner in his final 
preps Entries for the Pow- 
der Puff Preakness (12:45 p. 
m., Preakness Day) are being 
accepted by publicity shed 
tor Charlie Johnson. It's at 
five furlongs with women 
riders—and no official betting 
Molly Mutuel says, “Pim- 
lico’s got me reeling: Rose- 
croft’s got me wheeling.” 


Princess 
Relamber 
o Ellersite 
Dot 
ge Doll 
Aurora Belle } 
gcogineres Par 
$3500. 
yore Cpowust ; 


enatr 
-year- “olds 


| Langley Sets Speed 
* Record at Marlboro 


| UPPER MARLBORO, Md. 
‘i>, May 13—Elmo Langley of Up- 
*. per Marlboro, driving the Hill- 
crest Studebaker Specia! won 
the 25-lap feature race and also 
won a trophy for setting a 
track record for one lap. 


Langley turned the 1/3-mile 


c'me 


~ : 
Refusal 


Mel O'Bim 
| Our Holiday 118 


-yr -olds; hand’p 
e } 


~ —O- 
& Prose 


= 


. 
Styrunner 
9... } t, 6297 
Rede ‘Im age 
bee andy Ba 
hue 


‘er 
*5 Ibs 


a= 
w 


ing Langley in the feature were 
Nace Mattingly, Bill Morgan 


3 


— oe 
ee ee el 


the feature was 7.56.4. 


allowan ce ciaimed 


BELMONT PARK ENTRIES 


$9500. 4- hy ~Olds Up 
‘ ‘Cire 


claiming Orame 
» Of 


iy rwenr 
layto 


*cOnce A Year 
The Kite 

Lyric 
*Lejoe 


13 By 
cOne 


—s 


’ Note , 
1 113 . 
Dave Johnston i} 
Waten a. Gree wy : 
Comes 3 
ireune 


° 
6 Dees River 6 *Tokre Giri 
ar 108 Woodlands 
" afiaee’3 Oppenheim entry 
watt yt py. maidens 
. Bes Ls Boy 
ce ying Venture 
Se ¥ Pat i 8 Ooo 
iid’ Point ..»-b14 Gello 
st4 Scotts Pal 


VRBOnwwwws 


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113 

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lessbdul) 
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Mar 
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13 is 
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i 


track.in 18 seconds flat. Follow- i 


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Gates will be opened at 9:30 Knish. 
seats 


a. m. when unreserved 


Varsity Club join forces in re- 
viving an old custom, 


’ 


big mighty as rise 


4TH 
fer t-vear- 
& Gray Sky ‘Haughton 


P Watch Walsh's 


vEN or +4 NIGHT MEET 
SEvVe La. § Pa | LA oe ae 
187 RACE—Parse, $800; 


one a 


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Le 
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iss Martha D ovd) 
Chester Breeze 


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5-9 Oe 
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itl 
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12 
ALSO 


* 26-0-0 Mover 


ene mi 
2.6.0 
- 


rbdie (Bvens) 


Fanta Fe ‘Crenk? 
K Brieht Sun ‘Crank: 
‘ND RACE—Peree 

Vernon Brewer (Story) 


">. 
1 
*4. 

a. 
0- 

Princess Edith 7 
Go.den Harvest (Cher “7% “2. 
Lao 

ere Renever | (Arth'’r’ 
in Ann t (Lone) 


-3 
et IGIBLE 
"2-5-0 Tar 
+046 Little 


b 
CHESTER ene ts = wson 


bbe Gene 

e Witch ‘Mallion) *6-3-7 
Marviand Mac (no dri'r) *5-}-1 
y) *6-1-0 
Laurina Rosecroft (HW'ln) 2- , 
Keeper's Starlite | 
Can Deo (Richardsen | . 


Miss ae eile (‘Smith).. -0- 
Bay (Quinn) anf- 


a ns ree, o. mile 
-old 


65054 5u0 


1- 
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Daydream Hanover "i s) 3 


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Definite threat 


own > ‘break 
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he _* 
Mas Saeeve — 


Heel 
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sa0e: one “mile (Pace): 
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Not off last 


Has bright furore 
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t enowgh class 


W tenors ¢ at Rosecrott 


Act — ree gi iss mile (Pace) 
i, : 


> 
7s (10) rong 


Clase 


omment Odds 


uD 


Hardly here 
No ine 


one os 
r 


2 ot ee 
7 
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(Pace): Clase CO 
About ripe 


-- 
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raced 


"ow 


Hy-ie GB 
< 


— 


oomentsonas Piare iJ ns 
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RACE—Poeree 


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oublesom- 
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Not much 

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Might 
Pair 


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Fighwer Fxupress ‘Fr 
Par Flight ‘Stoker -§ 


*..._ Indicates two or more starts this rear 
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Pane Trot Selections 


Chester Soeees 


a a 
4—Gr 


1—DUANE 


CLOCE Date Kaieht 
§—— 


Hanever. Hanever 


Sanity 
Geldes arvest.| 
Marviend Mae. 
Penee, Dase- 
Lads 
Dale. 


1—-{are 


Brewer. 
tad. 


Jane 1—Verner 


, 
hten entry, 
land Mae 


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Verner 


Sky. 


HANOVER. 


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Brewer. 


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UANE HANOVER, Hendred Preet 


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Activity on the race 


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There will be the usual music “dream. Hane 
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Fa- Reve 


most important, Needles. 
'bius and the others. 


John Raffa Wins 
Drag Racing 


| MANASSA, Va. 


track Car 
will begin at 12:45 p. m. when 
the Powder Puff Preakness wil. 


: 


May 13— 


—John Raffa of Bethesda, Md... 
won two classes at the weekly 
drag racing program here to- 


day. 


Raffa negotiated the strip Ves 


in his 1939 Ford in 13 seconds 


flat in each class 
Stu Stinchfield, 
Bethsda won 


also 


of 
the motorcycle "> 


event, with a 12.9 seconds clock- 


ing. 


SU FFOLK DOWNS ENTRIES | 


4. yr — « 


o+ bbe ° 

43 Risein Kate ; 

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Abbe Gone, 
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AP AT SBELMO 

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5 Witeh Ene Pusey, 
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Oliver Wins White 


ap 


} 


Demas Wins 
D. C. Tennis 


Lt. Bill Demas of the Quan- 
tico Marines captured the third 
annual District of Columbia 
Commissioners Invitational 


men’s singles tennis champion-| 


ship yesterday and emerged as 
a contender for top area tennis 
honors in 1956. 

Demas, former University of 
Southern California star, de- 
feated No. 2 seeded Donald 
Floyd, 6—2, 6—1, 6—4, for the 
title. 

Floyd, veteran area star, was 
unable to cope with Demas’ 
powerful service. Demas won 
every one of his services and 
broke through Floyd several 
times for the victory. 

Demas ousted No. 1 seeded 
Fred McNair, 6—3, 6—8, 6—3, 
in a morning semifinal match 
that was an even more startling 


executive liaison officer 
Charlies Masterson, 7—5, 6—4. 
A}though unseeded, Masterson 
figured to defeat Floyd as he 
began a comeback in area ten- 
nis. 


Navy Captures 
Sailing Title 


ANNAPOLIS, Md., May 13 * 
Navy's dinghy skippers, w'n- 
ning 12 of 18 races, captured 
their eighth American trophy 
since 1946 today in winning the 
Middle Atlantic Colleigate Sail- 
ing championship. 

The Middies compiled 
points. The Merchant Marine 
Academy at Kings Point was 
setond with 126 points, while 
Princeton carpe in third, just 
one point behind the merchant 
seamen. 

Navy and Kings Point won 
the right to compete in the Na- 
tional championships beginning 
June 19 in Detroit. 

Navy's Dave Minton, with 87 
points, was the top skipper of 
the championships. Team stand- 
ings: Navy, 150; Kings Point, 
126; Princeton, 125; Stevens, 
122; Haverford, 113; George 
Washington, 107; Rutgers, 80; 
Webb Institute, 76; Army, 65 


* ‘ 
The Minors 
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Pucbic 9% : Sieex City 
SOUTH ATLANTIC LEAGUE 
a Auges 
ville 4 


Salem ) 


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“ 


s the team title yesterday. 


Snead Three Strokes Back 


Porky Has 66 tor 266 


‘ mate Perky Cullinane, 3 and 2. 


, Mente 
CAROLINA ee Oe 2.1; State, who defeated Carleton 
ed rons 


With Whirlwind Finish 


WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, W. Va. May 13 #—A whirl 
wind finish with an eagle and birdie on the 15th and 16th 
holes gave Ed (Porky) Oliver the strokes he needed today to 
shoot a 66 and win the White Sulphur Open, his first golf 
| = «tournament victory since 1953. 
| + Oliver was only one under par with 
| four holes to go and he needed to 
pick up at least one more in order 

to avoid being tied with Sam Enead, 
the host pro. He got a surplus to win 
by three shots. 


Oliver’s four-under-par finish gave | 


him a total of 266, 14 strokes under 
par for the 72 holes and good for the 
. $2300 first prize. 

Snead, who started the last round 
two strokes behind Oliver, had fin- 
ished earlier with a 67 and a total 
of 269. 

A 30foot putt for an eagle three 
on the par five 15th was the big shot 
of the day for Oliver, who is noted 
for his runner-up and consistently high 


In contrast to Oliver's strong! A 
finish, Snead kicked away his) 4 (yy) N 
own chance by nogeying three, y avy 
of the last four holes. He was’ 
four under to that point. On ne Defeated, 4.3 
15th he missed a three-foot putt 
for one of the bogeys and shot 
a four on the par three 140-| Edgemoor defeated Army 
yard last hole: His tee shot was|Navy, 4—3, yesterday in a 
short and off a side of the|/Men’s Interclub “B” League 
green on the fi and although 
‘he approached close to the cap | mate at Edgemoor and gained 


he couldn't make the first putt. pony Km be ith the Arling- 


The Money Winners: | Fred Reed of Edgemoor de- 


£4 Oliver, Mass. 69 67 64 ee—cec genes feated Maj. A. Stanley of 
5. Saeed. W. Va. ; = 


Skee Rice. 
Vie Gheesi. N.Y 
. Cetter. Ea 
“. Hema 

M. Pet 


in the No. 1 singles match. Col 

Chris Chaney and Maj. Paul 
toe Buskey of Army Navy won the 

No 1 doubles match over Dr 
sae 2im Shafer and Bill O'Brien, 
see 26. 6—4, 7—5. 
’ * Edgemoor’s Jim Heiskell won 
roe 3 S = > in singles, but Army Navy's 
Pome oe Be Se Chaney and Roy Reynolds 
+ fe. Fes 3 swept the No, 3 and 4 singles 
Sevte “i cm 7 aceee The Edgemoor doubles team of 
Col. M. A. Erana and Ward 
Stewart won both the No. 2 and 


Howerdd Cains No. 3 doubles matches to clinch 
the battle. 


fi Hollin Hills defeated Bell 
Golf Semifinal pers tha toon over tem 


| I in the “C” League. 
| ITHACA, N. Y. May 13 w)o————_—_ gue 


, 
M. Seuchak. S.C 71 71 6 
Bh. Tre bier. Tex 


GON Caveneech 
Gee Paste, Po 


Sulphur Open 


Loretta Lowe 
Wins Tourney 


Loretta Lowe of George 


\No. 1 seeded Joyce Leek of 


tat Coolidge, lived up to her ad- 


isso Army Navy, 9—7, 7—7, default) . 


Washington University routed 


Maryland, 6—0, 6—1, yesterday 
at American University and 
‘won the D. C. area Women’s 
Intercollegiate Tennis cham- 
pionship. 
| Although Loretta was seeded 
‘only No. 2, her victory was no 
‘surprise. Miss Leek, a sopho- 
‘more, was seeded No. 1 for be- 
ing runner up last year. 
Loretta, former scholasic star 


‘vance billing by romping 
through the tourney with the 
loss of only two games in four 
matches. She gained the final 
by winning a morning match 
yesterday over Maryland's Ellie 
Salmon, 6—0, 6—1. 

Joyce won her way into the 
final with a 6—1, 6—1, victory 
over G. W.’s Barbara Baldauf. 
Loretta’s victory gave G. W. 
possession of the intercollegiate 
trophy for the first time since 
948 


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Georgetown University senior J 
Gene Howerdd defeated team- f 


today and advanced to the 
semifinals of the Eastern Inter- 


collegiate golf championships. 
Howefdd meets Yale's Peter 


3 Nisselson in a semifinal match 
« tomorrow. Jim Mayes of Penn 


shore 8-1 King of Navy, 4 and 3, in to- 


quarter-finals, faces 
‘Stuart Bloch of Princeton in 
‘the other semifinal. Yale won | 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


~~ Manday, May 14, 1956 


25 


PULITZER 
PRIZE 


fora distinguished example of 


reporting of international affairs in a 


United States newspaper 


AWARDED TO: 


WILLIAM RANDOLPH HEARST, JR. 
Editor-in-Chief, the Hearst Newspapers 


FRANK CONNIFF 
Editorial Assistant to W. R. Hearst, Jr. 


KINGSBURY SMITH 


Vice President and General Manager, | 
International News Service 


Statement 


from the Trustees 


of Columbia University 


“This team of three men went to Moscow as reporters at a 
time when uncertainty existed over the policy of Soviet leadership and 
when a critical situation between the United States and Communist China 


existed with respect to Formosa. 


“They went without any indications that a change in the 
Soviet leadership would take place during their brief visit. At an impot- 
tant moment in Soviet history, they interviewed the four top leaders, 
including the new premier, Nicolai Bulganin. 


“No other American or foreign journalist or journalists, it 
was said, have ever achieved such a succession of interviews with leading 
members of the Soviet regime. No other journalistic achievement in for- 
eign affairs in 1955 carried such a worldwide impact as did these inter- 


views and the subsequent articles. 


“They provided the first definite indication of what the 
policy of the new rulers of Russia would be on the great crises of war and 
peace as well as an extraordinary insight into the thinking and person- 
alities of these leaders of the Soviet regime.” 


THE HEARST NEWSPAPERS 


are proud of this achievement 


Avsany Times-Union 
Batrmeons News-Post Batrmmone Sonpay AMERICAN 
Boston Damy Recozp § Boston Evenmc Amemcan 
Boston Sompay ApvERTiser Cumcaco AmEnican 
Deracrr Trczs ‘Les Ancetes Examinen 


Los Anceres Herarp-Express 

Miucwauxer Sentinen New Yorx Jounwat-Amenican 
New Yorx Minzonz Pitrssurcn Sun-Tevecearn 
San Awromo Licat San Francisco Catt-Bowiero 
San Francisco Examiner Seatres Post-Lwrec.icencen 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
26 . Monday, May 14, 1956 


\How: to 


CAN YOU MAKE 
A DECISION? 


 Owhks a awe 
llwks nite, ae wk 


A 
Dale Carnegie Class | TEMPLE SCHOOL 


pias | 


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.| Personal replies will be made 


Keep Well 


By Dr. Theodore R. Van Dellen 

To the limit of space, ques- 
tions pertaining to the preven 
tion of disease will be answered. 


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when return stamped envelope 
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‘will not make diagnoses or pre- 
scribe for individual diseases. 


THE IRRITABLE COLON | 
The bowel is a bear for pun-| 


IT HAS A BUILT-IN ¥ /SO WHAT? 
TELEVISION-AND 


lishment. It is irritated from 


YOU SEE 


within by harsh foods, strong 
digestive ferments, bacteria, 
and parasites. It is jolted from) 
/without by the nervous system, | 
‘particularly when the individ- 
ual is upset emotionally. 

| It has been said that many) 
of our troubles “settle in the) 
stomach” because anything that | 
irritates the nervous system is 
likely to affect digestion and 
the intestine. This explains why 
persons with mother-in-law, fi- 
nancial, or boss trouble develop | 
painful spasms in various parts | 
of the abdomen. | 
. The same may occur in those 
who are overworked, get too 
little sleep, or are besieged | 
with nervous stress. The bowel | 
clamps down on itself in a fit | 
of spasm and occasionally pain | — 


~ REX MORGAN 


4 ui, rif 


is so severe the sufferer dou- MARY WORTH 
bles up to obtain relief. These | 
aattacks come and go or persist 
to a lesser degree for days or'| 
weeks. | 
Spasm is not aggravated by | 
eating bland foods or by exer- 
cise and usually subsides with | 


SHES YOUNG AND 
WHOLESOME AND INNO- 
«> AND YOURE 


rest and relaxétion. X-rays and | 


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jother studies may be negative 
‘and the physician often calls 
‘the disorder “nerves” or by | 
its more technical name, spas- | 
tic, or irritable colon. This does 
not imply that the victim is 
imagining his symptoms 

When the physician says that. 
everything is organically sound 
and he is unable to find any-| 
thing wrong, he means that the | 
patient's symptoms are not due 
to cancer, tumor, gallstones, | 
obstruction, or inflammation. | 
The organs are healthy but are | 
not working properly because 
they are irritated. The intes-| 
tine is as sensitive to bombard- 
ments from the brain as the 
skin of some people is overly 
sensitive to the sun's rays. 

How can this condition be 
‘remedied’ Everyone has a 
\eress to bear, consequently it 
is difficult to eliminate all 
istress and strain. On the other > . 
| hand, it may be possible to min- ‘ = Tis S iw. re , ae. 
jimize tension or to increase bye aia. ae 

. \ Yi 


' 


LONG SAM 
AT THE WOON HOUR, ON FAR? Des, 

OF THE YOUNGER 
EMPLOYEES OF S DEPARTMENT SORE 
suo a whan ha AE 


jtolerance by getting more rest, a 
going on vacation. or seeking 
a change in environment, occu- 
pation, or friendships 

Some help is obtainable 
through the use of antispas 


\) 


EAT YOUR LUNCH AND LEAVE! 
MY HUSBAND HAS WARNED M 
ABOUT GIVING HANDOUTS TO 

HOBOES! 


5 


OKAY, HONEY!... BUT. IF MR. WONDERFUL SHOULD 
EVER GET SORE AND GIVE YOU THE A/R, JUSLZa ae 
REMEMBER THERE'S A CAREER 
WAITING FOR YOU: 


modic drugs (belladonna or at- 


ropine) or of compounds that 
paralyze the nerves going, to to Horosco e| 
_ intestine (Banthine. 
anthine, Antrenyl, Pran + , 
Pamine, p= or Elorine | gm ont, ae na “what your 
sulfate). The new tranquilizing |°“°™% ™ secortine to the sar. 
agents are beneficial also. | a th — gy 

But these drugs cannot per- fonored now but common sense should | 
form miracles and the individ-|“<g%.°° 2°" .5° way “21 y 

s 


— must try to correct the un- Qeatls 7 


ities are taboo: 

orange or prune juice if con-' a. 

|stipation is a problem. Belchers ‘x, 

| must bring the habit under con- 

| : not aacress' 
trol, which in turn will elimi- a “eo JULY 2 


no 
— heartburn, bloating, and Auspic ye Fe 


: — _& rer ral 
TOMORROW: Juvenile reac & 
|tions to polio “shots.” 
ANXIETY REMAINS 7 
H. E. writes: I've been taking ™ Bow x 
\rauwolfia under a doctor's di- AUGUST. 34.8 
rections and find it lessens ag- very favorable aspect ai 
gressiveness but not anxiety. 3%4."%. %. "ou." favors | 
What do I do now? the metters Pian NOW for action te- 
REPLY me 
Talk to your physician. Sey-|2"*'— ers. bul} be a well- 
eral mood changers are avail- gy Rae - a at 
able and through a process of « 


too 


and sovencoment too 


ret or oo! 

JULY 

)peak per od 

onst —_ ¥* + 
4 whol 


¢ 
wise. 


o SsErTEM 
cury wit . 


| 


without 


agents, he ine goed 

will find the ideal remedy for pierets 
ww 
‘you. yo 
Copyright. 1956. Chicase Tribune) : 


ch teres fou 
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NOVEMBER 73.lU Me 


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TAIPEH, Formosa, May 13 «{F@ute to Washington to assume 

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THE WASHINGTON POST ond TIMES HERALD 
. Monday, May 14, 1956 , oF 
~ By Harold Gray 


AND YET .~ SOMETHING ABOUT 
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YOU'RE A MAGNIFICENT 


FULL- 
NEITHER” 


OH, YAS YO'KIN, 
TORTURE AN OLD SUH — SOON'S 


STOP TEASING ME. XU) 
SADISTIC YOUNG FIEND! 


THE BEACH COTTAGE 


American University 
You Have Always Wanted : 


Adds New Degree 


4 doctor of philosophy de 
gree in Business Administra 
tion has been added to the 
curriculum of American Uni 
versity, according to Dr. Nathan 
\. Baily, dean of the School of 
Business Administration. 

The doctor's degree will re- 
quire 72 graduate credits with 


I 


is 


dition, the student will be re- 
quired to pass research and 
comprehensive examinations in 
Business Management, Busi 
ness Economics and three other 
‘fields selected by the student.| 


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Plant Lecated im Arlington 


OT. 4-9486 


NIGHT er DAY 


Police Cruise Set 

' ‘The Shomrim Society of the 
Metropolitan Police and Fire 
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and dance at 8 p. m. on May 27 


CHAIN LINK 


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Easy Terms Arranged 
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Weather 
Forecaster 


hances in the weather make you 2 


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bins —— ‘4 ; 
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Look UP in your mirrer— “WHAT'S WRONG WITH MY 
MAIR?” 

See too much scalp? Too 
much part? Too much fore- elt give your scalp a com 
Too much temple. plete examination without 

But don’t strain your eyes. charge. Then he'll tell you 
You've seen enough to guess what's wrong, how long it will 
that your hair won't last 45 take how much it will cost. 


long as you'll need it. 
Now let an expert look at) Ail in less than 30 minutes! 
your hair—one of the best qual-| Come in today and ask the 


ified experts in the country, Hair & Scalp expert Ray W. 


backed by over 150,000 hair Plasterer to check your hair. 
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WHO KNOWS? COME ON 
IN THERE “AFTER HiM- 


He's a friend of Doc's, 
Walt. and Ooc savs 
$Oo— SO Snite. 


Portraits 
By James J. Metcalfe 
Help Us, O God 


O God, Who made the 
moon and’stars ... And 
every flower fair... Help 
us to beautify our souls 

. , With sacrifice and 
prayer... To live for 
others every day ... With 
deeds of charity . And 
in all things~pursue the 
path... Of true humility 
.. » Give us the courage 
to confess The wrongs 
that we have done. 
And make amends for 
harm or hurt We bring 
to anyone . For only as 
we heed Your word... 
And faithfully obey . 
Can we have hope of 
entering ... Your! para- 
dise some day .. - Help 
us, O God, as we are frail 

And falter in our 
stride . That we may 
persevere on earth 
And safely reach Your 
side. 


Coprrigpt ie | Pielit Pater. 
prises. ine. A rights reserved 


ee 


_ —_—o— 


By Jimmie Hatle 


Tf 


| THE WAITING LIST, ! 


FINALLY MADE « 
THE EXCLUSIVE JW 


@.. 


So WHERE DOES HE Est sg 
EVERY DAY? WHY,IN © 
MAX'S GREASY SPOON : 
BECAUSE ITS SO vito 
NEAR HIS OFFICE et : 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


URP! GLOTTA GLET 

BACK ON THE FLOOR: 

(GULP!) BEEN OUT 
MINUTES~WERE / 


~~ 


as 


7 ~~ & © © ae 


© os © ee ee a 


“Ah don't recall seein’ a model like that before... must 
have been before my time!” 


“Sfp, THE WASHIN 


GTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
Monday, May 14, 1956 a iad 


The DISTRICT LINEby in Col 


Hide Your Héads in 
Shame, Gents 


“YOU are a disrupter of 


households.” writes Naomi 
Wood of 6312 Owen place, 
Bethesda. 


“Last night 
my husband 
and our &8th- 
grade son 
started work- 


right after 

dinner — and 

I had to wash 

the dishes:all 

by myself. It 
Bill Gold was the night 

for our cho- 
rus rehearsal (Montgomery 
A Cappella Chorus), but I 
couldn't get ready on time 
because my men wouldn't put 
aside your puzzie. 

“So we were late for re- 
hearsal. Even worse, as 
soon as we got there, my 
husband started the entire 
men's section on the brain 
teaser. 

“That was awful. because 
there aren't enough men in 
the chorus as it is (we need 
more—our membership chair- 
man is Charlotte Moore. 
whose phone number is 
Oliver 41127). So the direc- 
tor of the chorus. Max See- 
both, was ready to tear out 
What few hairs he has re- 
maining 

“Max had reason to be im- 
patient, because we are zgiv- 
ing a performance of three 
of his compositions at the 
New York Avenue Presby- 


June 4, and there is only one 


rehearsal left before we start 


rehearsing with the orches- 
tra 


“So as you can plainly see, 
you area disrupter of house- 
holds, Mr. Gold.” 


Yes, Mrs. Wood. And I 


who keep my wastebask 
filled with dull and badly 


only knows hew to get her 
publicity into the paper, but 

gets it inte a column that 
rarely uses such items. 

Incidentally, speaking of 
the brain teaser, it drew an 
astonishingly large response. 
I got dozens of explanations 
of why the numbers in the 
answer are factors of three, 
the most impressive of them 
from William P. Harris of 
3801 Windom place nw., who 
is quite a whiz kid with math. 
Eleven readers suggested a 
subtle alternative solution to 
the problem, indicating that 
readers not only enjoy puz- 
ties but after solving them 
like to take them apart and 
put the pieces back together 
in a new pattern. 

In compliance with your 
requests we'll go back to us- 
ing occasional brain teasers. 
And the answer will be pub- 
lished on a subsequent day. 
The vote was unanimous on 
that point. As one reader 

ut it 


9459). , white, male cat 
eth Orie Kittens, ac 
customed to outdoors (Jef. 
ferson 24582). Attractive kit- 


tens (Hobart 2-0617). 
oe 


MAIL BAG 
Dear Bill: 

As an experienced reducer, 
can you tell me whether one 
saves enough on food bills 
while reducing to pay for the 
new wardrobe he needs by 
the time he’s finished? 

Paul T. Bruyere, 


3046 Newark st. nw. 


Dear Paul: 


. on 
THINK I DOKNOW, “SU =) | TELLOURFRIENDS? WEVE WHAT THAT 


/ BUT TAKE MY 


I am not.an. experienced | 
reducer. I am merely an ex- | 


perienced talker about reduc- 


ing. So far my food bills have | 
remained constant but» my | 


weight jas edged up to 185. 
Maybe I should worry more: 
I'm having no luck with diet- 


ing. Bill. | 


ow 
TODAY'S BIRTHDAYS 


Greetings to Edward T. Fol- | 


liard, James H. Lemon, Gov. 
Archie A. Alexander, Leonard 
Lyons, Frank M. Folsom and 
Rep. Thomas B. Curtis. 

ow 
ADD SIGNS 


Marv a of 2407 Ee 
cleston st... ilver Spring, 
spotted this sign in the office 
of William Tredwell, a Navy 
statistical chief: 

“Statistics are like a Bi- 
kini bathing suit. What they 
reveal is interesting, but 
what they conceal is vital.” 

eo 


AGAINST YOu THAT 
YouRE A Boss 
GENERAL— WITH 
THE POWER TD HIRE 
AND FIRE ANY oF 


REQUIREMENTS: 
~A FIFTY MISSION 


terian Church on Sunday, “Don't tempt us by run- 


« ing the answer on the same 
day, teacher. We're not 
ready for the honor system 
yet.” 


SMALL WORLD DEPT. 


Gene Hoover of Henry J, 
Kaufman & Associates bought 
some handkerchiefs at a 
downtown men’s store and 

ow was —— = note that 
| 'r.AWAYS three small labels were 
nfs a $1 in. Pasted.to each handkerchief. 


| closed for Children’s Hospi- The first was the imprint 
tal (Woodley 6-7917). Healthy, of a French linen firm, the 
frisky kittens; $1 inclosed for second said. “Woven In Ire- 
Children’s Hospital (Crescent land” and the third read, 
3-0093). Frisky kittens and/or “Made In The Philippines.” 
young cats; $1 inclosed for 
Children’s Hospital (Taylor 
9-1590). Beagle needs country 
‘home: $1 inclosed for Chil- 
dren's Hospital (Kenmore 6 


** « *. **e*s x 

2% 9 +8 « * 6 e's" 

* °°, areata * es 
, 


- 


»* *.¢ 
7 
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e , 
oe 
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LANL 


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7_* 


FERD’NAND 


% Wares 
. +] ee 
Be ea) 55 


REEea ee rae oa a ON BRI DG E . a 


BRIDGE QUIZ 'to manage. Partner's spade suit! f 
Q. 1—As South you hold: imay be weak since he failed to JA 
4AK 9 VAR 8532 €A74 & 10 rebid it. 
The bidding has proceeded: | 2—Two no trump, the same 
—~ ro pasticall you would have chosen 
: 3 se treme Pees without the intervening bid 
" What do you bid now? /Technically it doesn’t show as 
segetetet Serenata Kone | Q. 2—As South you hold: /much strength in this situation, 
en ~~** | 40103 WKQ42 ¢K93 &K 62 but since you are ‘ rcing part- 


h iddi h roceeded: (ner to make his nex: bid at the’ 
FRR a Le atthe —-— three level, he should play you 
; : 


‘for a pretty good hand. 


> 
o*."@ 
.y 
, 


* #* 
Pu *¢ 
a **,* *,.* 
206%. oe”, 


e*e"s 7? 
* 
. 


, 


S . 
~~ 


PGqreeq eg agg eae @ 


amends 


nis , ‘we be serié 


-— 
= 
_ 
~ 
. 
— 
~ 
» 
~, 
— 


spade 4 
What do you bid? 
i beare could have where a game con- 

REUPHOLSTER aes = tract, at worst, would depend 
| 45 WARS #K109875 4A 1064 trump or one of the minors 

|_ The bidding has proceeded: (indicates that he probably has 

|} asede fase , —_-s sixcard heart suit. | 

“| 2 {se tremp Pes 4.Five clubs. Partner .obvi- 


Je 


: Os © wy ) | 
an : . | &—Three hearts. Taking a 

7 leakal v8sse ae arse second bid on this holding is 

sl | The bidding has proceeded: |*shtly aggressive but there 

TB. West . he a are many hands that partner 

' What do you bid now? ‘upon a finesse. His failure to 

| Q.' 4—As South you hold: make a rebid in either no 

‘hat 40 you bid now? ‘ously holds a highly distribu-| 

ANSWERS itional hand, probably 64-2-1,) 


/\@) \OAN 


++ wet for 

your courtesy 
im allowing Mr. ; 
Bond 


> , ‘ , ¥ e 
' re ‘ rel, a, yi ibe a safer contract but it might ~~ rather — —; 4 — 
= SS . : -/in his own suit. Our aces 
v vi : = | not be prudent to override part 
A his “a ner’s decision especially since tremendous cards and make 
: ile tm chou he has already been warned to|slam prospects very — - 
you Ne lovely Nii i jexpect an unbalanced hand/is not possible to show both o 
ere 
Aree. > 
na 


1.—Pass. Either four hearts|and a good one since he pre- 
lor four spades could.prove to ferred to raise our diamonds 


y\ 


selection et ifrom us. If we did decide to them at this point, but a cue| 
ee ene Bae bid again our choice would be| bid in clubs may prove suffi- 
will receive four hearts since a spade con-|cient to induce partner to con- 


lovely wrought . 
iron end milk tract might prove too difficult tract for a slam. 


giess Murricane 


_ Today's Crossword Puzzle 


ACROSS Solution to Saturday's Puzzle 


PHONE LA 6-2666 day or night ; * pinochi in —— over- 


for a free no-obligation estimate in your home 39 Epoch 


40 Wooden pin 
‘é oO Wi UPHOLSTERY COMPANY 


41 Tempo . 
1952 MONTANA AVE. regulation 
. If vou can't phone, write! 
a Ov/ Ow OY (OV (OW) A Y. Yak Yak Y Lad Yee Wun Yous Wry ‘a van Yun Vee \Waweyee 


rable § 


US ZU UJEUIBUSUE 


PAG) NS 


ROBE TZ 


—— -— 
\ 


42 Den 
43 Foe 
45 Dessert 
46 Souvenir 
47 Military 
greeting 
49 Scotch 
name prefix 
50 Ball game 
52 Instrumen- 
tal compo- 
sitions 
56 Mountain 
range 
57 Narrow 
passageway 
| 29 Cooking 60 River valley 
| vessel 61 Audibly 
'30 Gold or iron 62 Woman of 
33 Clothed rank 
63 Toboggan 22 Ant 
64In want 24 Trellis 
65 To sheltered 25 Chant 
37 Atmosphere side 


DOWN 
7 Finale 
8 Poultry 
product 
9 Perch 
10 Redound 


14 Wood-wind 
instrument 
| 15 Jargon 
16 Earthy 
material 
17 Precarious 
situation: 
3 words 
19 Rudely 
concise 
20 Contestant 
21 Calm 
23 Annoy 
24 Dyestuff 
26 Oregon's 
capital 


By Chas. Kuhn 
SHUCKS, THOSE INSPIRIN’ 


THOUGHTS SURE ARE 
EXPENSIVE “7 


IT SAYS. “CHEERFUL 
KEEP TH 


Cash for abr 1. re pi ie 
avelemelsini ee) eeeelaies 
ie 


Y 


11 Anything 35 Pull with 
' resembling force 
wghtning: 38 Fashion 
2\ words 42 ne 
ouse 
12 Work for 44 Spotted 
13 Eng. hymn 46 Polynesian 
writer 


18 Injury 


Here's the kind of 
event that always 
seems to take a little 
more money than you 
have on hand... when 
borrowing seems both 
necessary and sensible. 
And that’s just the 
time to take your prob- 
lems to HFC. 
If you need money for any worthy purpose—to pay 
old bills or for any emergency, HFC is the logical 
_¢ place te borrow. Household provides life insurance 
protection on all loans without extra cost to you. 
There's an HFC office near you. Why not phone 
or drop by today. 


& 
48 Of a city 
49 Musty 
50 Lather 
51 Verbal 
26 Scenic view 52 Removable 
27 Foreign button WON 
28 Extensive 53 River duck Peay x 
29 Allow 54 Highest pt. 
31 Eagle's nest 55 Snow 
32 Find out runner 
about 58 Spanish 
34 Kandh “Bravo” 
language 59 Foot digit 


By Haenigsen 


you won't 


‘ ? 
BE AGLE 70 VISIT US Hie 5 ABAD 


FULLY RECONCILED 


1 Speck 

2 Black 

3 Bumpkin 

4 Discredited 
5 Side 

6 Yarn fluff 


Su" | MONTHLY PAYMENT PLANS 
24 


+ Paymts 
$100 


200 

300 

500 524.62 
1000 | 48.44 


Payments above 
’ on schedule. Char on loans above 
are made under the Industriel F imance 


OUSEHOLD FINANCE 


SUITLAND 
4412 Suitiand Roed 
PHONE: JOrdan 88-9364 
BETHESDA 
7444 Wisconsin Ave. 
PHONE: OL iver 6-7400 


MT. RAINIER 
3235 Rhode Island Ave.. 2nd Fi. 
PHONE: UNien 4-574 


CLARENDON-ARLINGTON 
3153 Wilson Bivd., 2nd FI. 


$3 154 155 


Be the Clarendon and Alezandria offices loans are limited to $600. Interest charges 
are 2% monthly on balances to $300 and 144% monthly on any remainder. 


- 


? 


MARK TRAIL __ | The Washington Merry-Go-Round THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


Oilman Helped [open Mon. THURS. AND 


[ke Dinner Fund | gpipay niGuts ‘TIL 9:00 


By Drew Pearson 


Stores Open 9 A.M.—Phone Orders—Lincoin 71-9400 


ign’ debt 
ae Others Days Open ‘til 6:00 A 
, dog 
tention to retire from the Sen- Snooks, a seven - year - old 


‘ o 
'mongrel picked as the dog 4 h ! 
bero of the yea. ecningers 
The medal was called the 


“Ken-L-Ration Medal,” and ; ; 
-appliances at 


‘te NATO, an |was, of course, the public re 
if mportant, lations brainchild of the Quaker 
‘hitherto undis- | |}Oats Co. Ken-L-Ration is a 
| Quaker Oats product. 


s * 
Campaign contributions will 
carry weight in the backstage 
operations of the U. S. Govern- 
ment, even though the furor : 


Sen George |Sen. Case has simmered d 
d X own. ; ~ oy ee er “Tee ine — ae 
recently — -, the chair- - McClellan didn’t bother _ 
jmanship of a special committee |i, dig into it, but North Ameri- 


. \to investigate the $2500 offered 
can Airlines not only retained == 
jto Sen. Francis Case (RS. D.)) x5 y rray Chotiner, campaign 


jduring the natural gas battle On| manager and closest politicall : < ~, 


— of Nixon, but also con- 
ae tributed to the GOP campaign. 
-. During the investigation, the) When Chotiner was before 


——- nnn —- . committee unearthed another| McClellan's subcommit 
MOON MULLINS By Willard [check for twice that money|got such kidglove treatment ; \ 


; : from the same H. B. Keck, this! that he was not ask 1 ) \ 
MYSEL WOT 2 THEY WAS , | ' asked a single \\ 
WILL TAKE AN Nied ae ' one given to the Eisenhower) question about the large cam- WN 


I'M BLOWIN’ MY HALF OF) Ev reNneD TH’ BANK’'D BE dinner right in the middle of! paign funds he had 

TH’ ONA BETTER OFF IF -% , ae | pag s he had raised; and 
wad op oe DOZEN SNAPPY } a, A TOUR AROUND THEY JUST LET = ™ s ithe Senate's gas debate. Unlike|when he said he had gone to 
VERY 


ze | ‘Sem Case. who returned the\the White House on two oc. 


/ 


| $2500, the $5000 from Keck was\casions, no Senator even took y 


ual 
| anon } Y 
not returned by the Republican|the trouble to ask him who ‘ /} 
National Committee nor by the were the clients on behalf of >. Yyf 


White House. |whom he wanted to exert a 
| Considerable pressure was little White House influence 
‘brought on George's committee; If the Senators had dug into > 
by the White House not to make this case, however, they would 
this contribution public. Some|have found that both Stanley 
committee members felt that! Weiss, head of North American 
| |sinee the gift to Case came from) Airlines, and R. R. Hart con 
= \exactly the same H. B. Keck/tributed to Republican Na 
and Superior Oil, the larger Uonal or State Committees 
gift to the Eisenhower dinner, Campaign managers also 
~\should be disclosed in order to have a way of influencing what 
—— indicate the general pattern of a Senator does or says. 
SHES ME STEVE S¥E wAS SO EXC Teo, TWAS LXE SOCTIMG AGES BA * = the gas lobby. 


“TEN YEARS AGO! YOUNG. [ SHE DASHED HOME To CAMARY-CAGE “WEEDY"/ I Staar woex | n ge Ae case of Sen. Joseph; il . 
- | There was also some Senate ceCarthy (R-Wis.), one of! 
resentment that President Ej-/‘¢ Most vocal members of the) > 


EAGER, AWD DATILED BY TOMORGCwW’ AND BAG THE Luce. 
senhower in his veto message Wrld’s greatest debating body 


& DREAM! I COULDNT “ER LITTLE GLD MOTHER’ 
3A " 
should impugn the morality of Joe is inclined to hold forth on) ° 
the Senate at the same time 4!! sorts of subjects, and at one 
that his own money-raisers had ‘!me started to declaim on the (j r | C e (While They Last) 
4 received twice as much as Sen ws Lt the cheese scandal. 
Case rejected, right in the mid oe, ing from Wisconsin, . 
idle of the gas debate. + ee not 90 per) @ Six Blades 6 3-Speeds In ° 3-Speeds Out 
Tt was fear that the Senate/©®™ Dut oa S> oee e Electrically Reversible 


; help Wisconsin dairy farmers 
committee might make public!) ss only natural, therefore 
the Keck check that materially for him to raise cain about the 

y Here's « fabulous fan value! Just imagine, List Price $99.95 

$2-million windfall profit that|... 3 «, 4, but 6 dynamically balanced 


influenced the President's de 
. . the cheese processors made out blades that te 5.000 ‘ 
oy | Im the end, however, Sem. of Agriculture Secretary Ezra os sis pag nem aes ouk cian — hoy $ G Qh 
o 
5 


‘cision to veto the gas Dill. 
“mis 'George did not make the $5000 7 pancon at the expense of| a) ) — ane 

\contribution to the Eisenhower tne farmer and the taxpayer ames Me Ty 1 =. phar 

dinner public. He and the com-| suddenly. however. Joe shut aot ‘gue iments (Gan ehoiiey Ghat te 

mittee decided they should y, hsolutely nothing has frem 26 te 40 inches wide—it is 29’ Sieh. 

\stick close to the question Ofineen heard from him for Seco) Geoutiine Glecbete do Get. tecastere 

ithe $2500 offered by Keck © months about the cheese scan- with opening or closing windows . . . Hurry, Pay DOWN 
STUFF ABOUT THE AUDITOR GET you P . 4} & Case, and not go into the Keck q,) | by lenited. eouy onumae 
ra On we: gift to more important people; This could be the reason 


us — : , ' | 5 lode cok Keck’s check for $5000, dated wh, 


Jan. 10. 1956. was on the City 
|\National Bank of Houston. It 
was check No. 951 and was 
signed “H. B. Keck” from his 
office on the “7th floor, F.dison 
Building. Los Angeles, Calif.”) 
This address was printed on one 


McCarthy's campaign mana 
ger for reelection in 1952 was 
Steve Miller, president of the 
Central Cheese Co. of Marsh- 
field, Wis? 

That company received $24.- 
885 from Secretary Befison on) 


TH 


i 
i 


| end of the check. — the cheese deal that McCarthy 
» Y . ; : It will be interesting to ste originally was so excited about 


CTIIIN UA 
AMIN 


| 


HTTATIT HH 


| 
if 


' 
' 


i 


\(Coprright. 1964. Bell SGradicate. Ine.) 


| 
HI 


mittee, headed 


se na Sm McClellan @-Ark), . ich is 
supposed to 
WINNIE WINKLE of lobbying. ‘will now make Re-upholstery | 


gigaah it public the Keck check. 
: , It looks as if the Ike Ad. 
ministration had about paid up 
its debt te Quaker Oats. Al 
any rate the debt should be 
paid up after this week. 
Quaker Oats executives were 
big campaign contributors to 
Mr. Eisenhower in 1952. After- 


i] 


if 


» 


at 
i] 


; 
: 


| 


1956 Model, Exclusively at Hechinger’s 


13,000 <- Electric Dehumidifier 


© Effectively dehumidifies « closed area up te . . 
|” 13,000 cubic feet List Price 
4 hw Removes up te 3 gallons of water every 24 $129.95 


Was $29.95 $19 95 © Extra Powerful 1/5S-hersepower compressor 
o 


© Handy casters for easy moving 
NOW ONLY ® Protects clothes and furs from mildew and $ 
. dampness dam 
restores your favorite club Keeps hme and recreation room air dry 


chair te like-new comfort. Helps prevent rust on tools and equipment 
and beauty. Cuts down high humidity discomfort 
Helps keep doors and drawers from sticking 
; et: FIVE YEAR FACTORY WARRANTY a 
You Get: Complete with water collector, or may be Pay Only 
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connected to drain 
23%" high, 11%" wide, 1946” deep ~ 
© Bonderized Fiesta Tan Finish $7 Monthly 


: 50 Years “JUST” Service | 
2012 14th Street, N.W. . 
2-2700 ) 


a. Sears | == 1956 Model, Exclusive At Hechinger’s 
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THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
30 ‘ Monday, Mey 14, 1956 ° 


Wisconsin Democrats 


Tap Grass Roots Aid 


givers of small donations also 


tend to work harder for the 
party than those who have no 
financial stake in its campaigns. 

Actually, the idea of going to 
the people for money is ‘not 
new, according to Ellen Sawall, 
a native of Washington, D. C.. 
who serves as finance secretary 
of-the state party organization 
at Madison. It began. about 
five years ago on a small scale. 
she said. Last year the pro 
gram brought in $7000, and this 


~~ - o_o — 


cent responded. 


i upon the donor’s agreed- 
success the cash yield from oa payment plan. The av- 
similar program in Minnesota.|erage donor gives $2.50 each 
But the party finance official month. 
expects an installment-payment 
system will help it along. 

Another approach to 
problem of collecting campaign son Day dinner, which costs $25 
funds was tried last week in a plate, plus a subscription to 
Alexandria, Minn. where 4 the Democratic Digest. 
public appeal was made for National leaders of both 
cash to be divided among po major political parties have 
litical parties on the basis of endorsed the idea of a broad 
registration and past voting scale bipartisan appeal for 
strength. Of those approached, campaign funds. 


d 
: ee 
8 


Those who give $2.50 a month | 
or more receive a ticket to the 
the party’s annual Jefferson-Jack-| 


' 


Clee Maletis, 31-year-old Port- 


‘Talmadge Says He Would Now! Get rid of dark facial hair! 
Back Adlai for President Stop fast bristly regrowth! 


New Imra Rinse Away Method easy, safe, odoricss! 


Former Gov. «Herman Tal-;what he thinks the state would 
madge of Georgia said yester- do “at some future date.” But 
day he expects Georgia to “go he said Georgia is “the only 
overwhelmingly Democratic” state in the Union that has con- 
this year. He added he would sistently supported the Demo- 

» |support Adlai E. Stevenson for cratic nominee” for President, 
_|President if Stevenson is the and said his state gave Steven- 
me | De atic nominee. son his greatest percentage 
sf adge, who last week an-'yote in the 1952 election. 
a | his candidacy for the| “] confidently expect Georgia 


Sen. Walter F. George (D-Ga.), cratic this year,” the youthful 
said he “feels” he can win the|former Governor said. Asked if 
Democratic primary Sept. 12 al-- he would support Stevenson, 
though “some disgruntled poli- he replied: | 
ticlans are trying to secure a “If Stevenson is the Demo- 
candidate to run against me.” (cratic nominee, I «will be for 
| Talmadge, appearing on the. Stevenson.” 

NBC-WRC television program,| Stevenson has supported the 


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land (Ore.) mother of three, 
was crowned “Mrs. America” 
fer 1956 at Daytena Beach, 
Fia. She won over 49 other 
contestants during a week of 
homemaking. 


“Meet the Press,” was asked Supreme Court's decision on >; 
whether Georgia would back a'school desegregation, but has 
third party if it does not get called for “moderation” in car- 
the candidate or platform it/rying it out. Talmadge is one 
/wants at the Democratic Na- of the South's most outspoken 
— Convention. opponents of the Court deci- Call RE. 
sion. 


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ot ell drug counters 


Chevrolet hangs up 
a new round-the-clock 


nerformance record... 


The hot one averages 101.58 miles 
per hour for 24 hours... tops Indian- 
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280 miles at famed Darlington Race- 
way, Darlington, S. C. 


Here was a test worthy of Chevrolet— 
the car that’s been writing a whole new 
chapter in the record book of auto- 
mobile performance. Twenty-four hours 
at a sizzling, tire-searing pace that few 
other cars would even attempt. Twenty- 
four whirling-dervish hours at near-peak 
performance on a mile-and-three-eighths 
oval track. 

This was no mere test of speed— 
that’s measured best on a straightaway 
run. This was a test of all the Chevrolet 
qualities that go to make your driving 
more pleasant and safer on the road. 

8 


Staffiina. Sureness of control. Wedded- 
to-the-road stability. It was a test of 
every inch and every ounce of the new 
Chevrolet. A test of body, chassis, 
suspension. A test of its great-hearted 
V8 engine. 

And when the checkered flag dropped, 
and the whirring tires rolled to a stop, 
Chevrolet had travelled an almost in- 
credible 2438 miles in 24 hours! That 
was timed and certified by NASCAR. 

It was no specially modified Chev- 
rolet that hung up this new round-the- 
clock closed-course record. No costly 
“limited edition” model. You can stop 
in arfy time and drive a Chevy with the 
same power (horsepower ranges up to 
225!), the same built-in balance, the 
same sweet-feeling sureness of control. 
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=] MILES IN 24 HOURS 


Chevrolet flashes away from the starting flag in late afternoon sunlight. It faces 
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Town Topics 


By Marie McNair 

WASHINGTON’'S top 
flight journalist members 
of the Gridiron Club—let 
their hair down in song yes- 
terday, giv- 
ing a re #o 
peat per | 
formance of 
their Satur- 
day night 
dinner pr o- 
gram. Star of # 
the show, in © 
which every- : , 
one is a star, 
was Arthur = 
Pierce sing- 
ing. “You Mrs. McNair 
Made Me Love You,” Wedli- 
cated to President Fisenhow- 
er by Sen. William Know- 
land. 


Before dignitaries took 
their seats in the Sheraton- 
Park's big ballroom, guests 
gathered for. cocktails and 
snacks. 


And when the performance 
was over, they gathered 
again for “one for the road.” 
Roscoe Drummond, president 
of the club, and Mrs. Drum- 
mond, and Marquis Childs, 
vice president, and Mrs. 
Childs gave everyone a wel- 
coming hand from their 
places on the mezzanine, and 
it was Drummond who 
opened the show 
This performance is really 

the ladies.” he began, 


for 


~ 


“but the men can listen in.” 
Then he introduced Fletcher 
Knabel, chairman of the mu- 
sic committee; Julius Frand- 
sen\ chairman of the enter- 
tainment committee; a new 
member of the Gridiron 
Club, Capt. Albert Schoep- 
per, conductor of the Marine 
Band and director of music 
for the club: a very old mem- 
ber Arthur Sears Henning, 
who. was observing his 40th 
anniversary yesterday as a 
member of the Gridiron, and 
Mrs. Henning, and last, 
Walker Buel who's been Em- 
ceeing the Gridiron’s annual 
songfest for many years. 
Chief Justice and Mrs. Ear! 
Warren led the list of big- 
names. With them were 
their daughter, Virginia; 
their daughter-in-law, Mrs. 
Earl Warren Jr., and Wallace 
Lynn, a visitor from San 
Francisco. “Earl Warren 3d is 
upstairs iii.my apartment” 
said Mrs. Warren, “and I can't 
wait to get back and get my 
hands on him.” She was 
speaking of her two-month- 
old grandson from California. 
Sen. William F. Knowland 
was alone, because there's a 
new baby in his family, too. 
He's the fourth grandchild 
and first grandson, was born 
last Thursday to the Joseph 
Knowlands in Piedmont, 
Calif.. and has been named 
for his distinguished grand- 
father. Mrs. Knowland flew 


JEAN MARIE TRAVIS 

WILLIAM 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Alwood 
Travis of Washington, D. C.. 
and Takoma Park, Md., an- 
nounce the wedding of their 
daughter, Jean Marie, to Wil- 
liam Peter Roche, son of Mrs. 
William P. Roche of Boston, 
Mass., and Washington, D. C.. 
and the late Mr. Roche on Sat- 
urday, May 12 at Church of 
Nativity. The bride is a 
graduate of Immaculate Semi- 


nary and Trinity College. She - 


is employed by the Federal 
Government. Her husband is 
associated with the Catholic 
University of America. The 
couple will reside in Silver 
Spring, Md. 


MARY ALICE GRANT 
ELWOOD BROWNING 

Mr. and Mrs. O. P. Reedy Sr., 

of Asheville, N. C.. announce 


PETER ROCHE 


Weddings 


» 


out to be on hand for the 
happy event. 


FRONT ROW seats were 


Brownell, Speaker Sam Ray- 
burn, former of the 
Interior and Mrs. Oscar 
Chapman, Mrs. Walker Buel, 
Sen. Lyndon Johnson, the 
Norwegian Ambassador and 
Mme. Munthe Morgenstierne, 
the Swedish Ambassador and 
Mme, Boheman and their 
pretty daughter, Mona; and 
Mrs. Arthur Krock. 

The Secretary of Labor and 
Mrs. James Mitchell were 
right “down front” and other 
distinguished guests were 
Rep. Joe Martin, Mrs. Nicho- 
las Longworth. 

Secretary of the Army Wil- 
ber Brucker, there with Mrs. 
Brucker, chuckled over the 
song aimed at former Secre- 
tary of the Air Force, Harold 
Talbott; the Attorney Gen- 
eral shook in his seat at “You 
Made Me Love You.” arid 
everyone roared with “Sweet 
Stu.” “Ave and Harry.” 
“Estes Tied Me to the Mast” 
and the song about Presi- 
dential Aide Sherman Adams. 

Bernard Shanley was there 


dies Laugh at Gridiron Show 


. Foster and Mr. 
and Mrs. Ralph Pittman. 

From the Supreme Court 
were Justice Harold Burton 
and Mrs. Burton, Justice Tom 
Clark and Mrs. Clark, Jus- 
tice and Mrs. Stanley Reed. 
Maj. Gen. and Mrs. Congef 
Pratt, and Mrs. Gilbert Hitch- 
cock, were the Ray Henles’ 
guests. 

Others in the star-studded 
audience were Gen. and Mrs. 
John Hull, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ralph Becker, Mrs. Paul Mce- 
Nutt, Fred Roy, former Am- 
bassador and Mrs. Myron 

. Mrs. John Kennedy, 
wife of the Senator: Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert LeBaron, Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert Watson, Mrs. 
Bourke Hickenlooper, looking 
well again after a long rest; 
former Senator and Mrs. 
James Kem, Marian King, Dr. 
Theodore Koppanyi, Carolyn 
Nash, Irene Caldwell, Charles 
Tompkins, Madeline Austin, 
Hank Fort, and Mrs. Ray- 
mond Clapper. 


Rn 
Ure Weshtagion Dos 


WOMEN'S NEWS 


fOr and about WOMEN CLASSIFIED 


MONDAY, MAY 14, 


1956 


the wedding of their daudch- 
ter, Mary Alice Grant, for- 
merly of Washington, D. C., 
and now of Raleigh, N. C. to 
Elwood Browning of Orlando, 
Fla.. on May 13 at the home 
of her parents. The bride was 
formerly employed by the 
General Motors Acceptance 
Corp., in Washington, D. C. 


MARY HNARAKIS 
—PETER BECHAS 

Emanuel Hnarakis of Hope- 
well, Va.. announces the mar- 
riage of his daughter, Mary 
Athena, to Peter Constantine 
Bechas, son of Mrs. Mary 
Bechas on May 13 at the St. 
Elpis Greek Orthodox 
Church, Hopewell, Va. The 
bride is the daughter of the 
late Mrs. Bessie Hnarakis 
The bridegroom is the son of 
the late Constantine Bechas. 
The couple will reside in 
Washington. 


. 


lke FKles to Farm 
With Gifts Underarm 


By Patricia Wiggins 


United Prees Staff Correspondent 


GETTYSBURG, Pa... May 
13 m—President Eisenhower, 
chipper and cheerful after a 
highly encouraging medical 
checkup, flew to his farm 
here today for a combination 
birthday-Mother’s Day cele- 
bration. 

Accompanied by a Secret 
Service agent with two bright- 
ly wrapped packages under 
his arm, the Chief Executive 
and his brother, Dr. Milton 
Eisenhower, made the 33- 
minute flight from Washing- 
ton in’ Mr. Eisenhower's lit- 
tle twoengine Aero Com- 
mander 

The packages presumably 
contained gifts for Mrs. Eisen- 
hower'’s mother, Mrs. John S. 
Doud. who observed her 77th 
birthday today. 

His wife and mother-in-law 
drove here yesterday, but the 


= 


President stayed in the Cap 
ital to complete his physical 
examination at the Army's 
Walter Reed Hospital and to 
attend the annual Gridiron 
Club dinner last night. 

Despite a golf game yester- 
day afternoon followed by a 
“night out with the boys,” 
Mr. Eisenhower arose early 
and was at the airport in time 
to take off at 8:30 a. m. EDT. 

He seemed in a holiday 
mood as he landed at the lit- 
tle airfield here, where he 
greeted reporters and pho- 
tographers with a hearty 
“good morning.” 

Shortly after he left the 
hospital yesterday after two 
days of tests, the White 
House released a report that 
he was found to be in “good” 
over-all health with “no symp- 
toms” of heart weakness. 

The first family apparently 
spent a quiet Sunday at the 
farm. The weather was hot 
and muggy and none of the 
group made the trip into 
town for church services. 

The President was expect- 
ed to fly back to Washington 


tomorrow morning. 


PUNCH AND JUDY—Little Robin Rocks, 4, watches as Ella 
Hernandez of Georgetown Visitation Junior College oper- 
ates the strings of a puppet at the Punch and Judy booth 


By Frank Hor. Staff Photocrapher 


Saturday during the Opus Dei benefit party at the home of 
Capt. and Mrs. Parke H. Brady. 


ls Ma 


PRINCESS BROUGHT THEM TOGETHER 
-—The Puerto Rican Embassy party to 
honor their visiting Cherry Blossom Prin- 
cess was the occasion of a reception at the 
Sheraton-Park Saturday and two of the 


eee - 


Phote by Robert Striar 
guests, Sen. Dennis Chavez (D-N. Mex.), 
left, and Ambassador V. A. Vallarino of 
Panama took advantage of the occasion 
for a quiet chat. 


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Events 


THE ARCHDIOCESAN 
COUNCIL of Catholic Nurses 
is holding its annual meet- 
ing at 8 p. m. at Carroll Hall, 
10th & G st. nw. Officers will 
be elected and delegates ap- 
pointed to the Convention of 
the National Council of Cath- 
olic Nurses in December .. 
The Washington Club meets 
for a book review at 11 a. m 
The Washington Alumnae 
Chapter, Sigma Alpha Iota, 
meets at the home of Neva 
Greenwood, 430 W. Great 
Falls st.. Falls Church, Va. 
“ay The wUniversity Wom- 
en's Club meets for French 
conversation at 3 p. m.; tea 
at 4 p. m. and Spanish con- 
versation at 7 p. m 

“AMERICAN HOLIDAY.” 
a travel film, will be shown 
during the May dinner of 
the National Secretaries As- 
sociation, Capital Chapter 
A social hour is at 6 p. m.; 
dinner at 6:45 p. m. at the 
International Room, Occiden- 
tal Restaurant ... The La- 
dies Sodality, St. Themas 
Apostie Church, holds a card 
party at 8 p. m. at the Shore. 
ham Hotel 


- WASHINGTON 


Capitalites Turn Out for Shad Bake 


The 
cratic Congressman from 
Georgia, Rep. John L. Pilcher, 
also favored an outside straw 


Indian style, nailed to boards 
which were propped up at 
right angles to a blazing char- 


By Muriel Bowen 


ONE of Virginias gayest 
and most unusual feasts took 
place at the King and Queen 
Rod and Gun Club in King 
and Queen County yesterday 

Welcome bunting spanned 
the lawn from tree to tree 
and musicians strummed gui- 


all dressed up in quail-hunt- 
ing clothes—and Cmdr. Wil- 
liam FitzGerald served the 
food onto picnic plates 
Watching with admiration 


coal trench. Dr. Paul Hatch— , 


tars as guests arrived for the 
annual Shad Bake. Col. and 
Mrs. Robert Guggenheim 
(who have planned a = two- 
month holiday in Portugal 
and the South of France start- 
ing in July) led a stream of 
guests from Washington on 
the 120-mile journey. 

Among them were Virginia 
Warren who was escorted by 
Marvin Coles: Adm. and Mrs 
Thomas J. Kelly, Mr. and 
Mrs. James Moran and Jud- 
son Bowles whose wife had on 
a very pretty dress in two 
tones of mauve linen. 


ABOUT 150 guests sat 
down at tables grouped under 
shady trees to enjoy a meal 
of Rappahannock oysters, 
shad roe, and sh! hush pup 
pies. The shad was cooked 


were Raymond Guest, Mr. 
and Mrs. Phillips Clarke who 
brought a party from their 
plantation, Woodlawn, in 
King William County; Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert Woods, Mr. 
and Mrs. Marshal] Exnicious 
who were over from Warren- 
ton; Rep. Katharine St. 
George's daughter Priscilla 
Ryan who was busy with a 
camera 
pictures on the spot; dress 
designer Philip Robertson; 
and Mrs. Cornelius Bretsch. 

Some of the clothes worn 
were as much admired as the 
Indian cooking facilities. 
“You look a real mad hatter 
in that thing,” said General 
Richard Cutts to Mrs. Eades 
Talman when she arrived in 
a straw version of the ten 
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THE ‘WASHINGTON POST 


and TIMES HERALD ~ 
Monday, May 14, 1956 ° 
s° eee 


a 


Fashions & Foibles 


Anita 


Returns 
-On Visit 


ee = an 
By Evelyn Hayes 
“THE FACE” was in town 
Thursday looking every whit 
as lovely as Washingtonians 
remember her when she went 
to school 
here as Anita 
Counihan 
As Anita 
Colby, this 
home -town 
‘girl has par- 
layed a beau- 
tiful face into 
a fortune. 
She came 
to town to do 
the commen- 
Mrs. Hayes itary on a 
fashion show of cotton dresses 
at Lansburgh’s. And every- 
where she went she left a 
chorus of whispers behind 
her. Isn't that Anita Colby?” 
“Isn't that the girl they call 
‘The Face?’” At the Colony 
she attracted more attention 
than Mary Jane McCaffree 
(Mrs. Ejisenhowers  secre- 
tary), who was lunching with 
one of the First Lady's fa 
vorite designers, Nettie Ro 
senstein 
Anita left here to become 
one of New York's top 
models. Her lovely features 
had been in so many pictures 
that she said “Even I got tired 
of looking at it'” Recognized 
as The Cover Girl ther face 
having appeared on THAT 
many magazine covers!), she 
was called to Hollywood in 
1941 to appear in—and exploit 
the film, “The Cover Girl.” 
Between then and now, she 
has written a book on beauty, 
been an editor for Harper's 
Bazaar and served as Fem- 
inine Director for David Selz- 
nick’s motion picture com- 
pany, a job which entailed 
telling the stars how to look 
on and off the screen. Now 
she’s heading a woman's news 
feature service and has man- 
aged to acquire enough 
monev to sav with feeling 
“dividends are a girl's best 
friend'” 


“NEVER compete with a 
man.” advises this beauty. “if 
you want to get ahead in busi- 
ness. “Compliment him" 
Also. when you're working. 
alwavs make a point of meet- 
ing “the head man.” However 
she’s very unspecific about 
how the average girl goes 
about this 


“WHAT would tell a 
woman who has never before 
faced a camera’™” we asked 
this girl who has faced as 
many as any other woman 
“Keep your clothes simple!” 
she said, pointing out that 
simplicity in dress is most im- 
portant so that your face can 
show up best. Second, she 
suggests that you avoid too 
much powdering. which 
achieves a “flat look’—the 
kind of masque-like quality 
you get with a pancake make- 
up. Instead, she suggests a 
creamy makeup that leaves a 
slight sheen all over the face 
with high spots a camera can 
pick up 

Opening her showing at 
Lansburgh's Thursday, she 
got a laugh—as well as many 
longing looks—by saying that 
Jack Benny had asked Bob 
Hope®@to. ask her to ask Mr 
Goldsmith (president of Lans- 
burgh’s) if he would kindly 
exchange a pair of nvions he 
had bought for Mary. two 
years ago—because “they al 
ready have a snag in them'” 


HATS OFF to Mrs. Wesley 
K. Harris, general chairman 
of Friday's record-breaking 
Sibley Hospital Memorial 
Cuild Benefit. She broke the 
record Yor attendanre in the 
new Sheraton-Park ballroom 
At every place she reminded 
luncheon guests of the pur- 
pose of the luncheon by hav- 
Ing & Miniature nurse's cap as 
a tiny favor—one you could 
pin on your lapel—or give to 
a child to pin on her doll’s 
head 


you 


FOR DISTINGUISHED SERVICE: Secre- at 
tary of Defense Charlies E. Wilson receives 
a Distinguished Service Medal from, the 
American War Mothers at their 32d annua! 
Mother's Day Memorial Service yesterda) 


i 
é 

oe 
9 ee 


-7 


At Mother's Day Ceremony 


me Pes 
g DY ye kee 
> > ‘ > ie 4g a 
bx Se Py i, SRE 
ae oo hee ae 


nae 
- 


By Henry Rohiand. Staff Photecrapher 


Arlington National Cemetery. Mrs, 
Thelma Prather, national president of the 
Mothers, presented the medal to Mr. Wilson 
for “being the type of American in which 
this country glories.” 


Secretary Wilson Gets Medal 


By Winzola McLendon 


THE man who heads the 
“biggest American business 
them all”—the Defense 
Department — received the 
Distinguished Service Medal 
of the American War 
Mothers at a colorful cere- 
mony yesterday in the grove 
which faces the Tomb of the 
Unknown Soldier at Arling- 
ton National Cemetery. 

Sécretary of Defense 
Charlies E. Wilson received 
the Medal from Mrs. Thelma 
Prather, national president, 
at the 32d annual Mother's 
Day ceremonies held by the 
War Mothers at the Ceme- 
tery. 

Gathered under the trees 
for the services were some 
1200 War Mothers and their 
guests. The Army Band, with 
Capt. Samuel Loboda con- 
ducting, presented a concert; 
there was massing of colors 
by many patriotic organiza 
tions—Maj. Roy E. Miffieton 
of the American Legion was 
director: Maj. Gen. Patrick J 
Ryan, chief of Army Chap- 
lains, gave the invocation; 
and Pvt. James McMahon, 
tenor soloist with the Army 
Band, sang three numbers. 


IN PRESENTING the 
award to Mr. Wilson, Mrs 
Prather said he is doing a 
man-sized job in running 
the Defense Department with 
its working personnel of 4,- 
014.500; that he is “an Amer- 
ican of the old school—a 
true American—a product of 
the earlier settlers of Ohio’; 
and that he was selected as 
“the type of American in 
which this country glories 
because his kind helped make 
America.” 

Many of the words Mr. Wil 


of 


“| now have 
peace of mind in 


my married life!’ 


son spoke in his reply were 
lost to the crowd. Just as he 
started to thank the War 
Mothers for his honor, a large 
airliner flew over the grove 
AND the public address sys 
tem temporarily “cut out.’ 
He closed his remarks by 
saying the “hope arid clear 
purpose of our country is to 
establish peace in the world” 


. that the “road to peace 
is difficult” and it takes 
strength, understanding and 
patience. He added that he 
“has great confidence that 
the sacrifices of the past and 


lessons learned from‘ the 
past, will go a great way to- 
ward solving the peace prob 
lems_of the world.” 

Mistress of Ceremonies for 
the services was Mrs. Ethel E. 
Finn of Hyattsville, Md.. who 
is liaison chairman of the 
National Headquarters of the 
War Mothers. Among those 
seated in the grove were 
members of the Gold Star 
Mothers, state presidents of 
the American War Mothers. 
and Secretary Wilson's broth- 
er. J. Vernon Wilson. of Pitts 
burgh, Pa. who was there 
with his wife and two chil 
dren, Frantis and Ed 


kingagements 


MILDRED DEAN 
GEORGE HARVEY JR. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elwood J. Dean 
of Falls Church, Va. an- 
nounce the engagement of 
their daughter, Mildred Joan, 
to Lt. George A. Harvey Jr., 
USA, son of Mr. and Mrs 
G. A. Harvey of Severna 
Park. Md. Miss Dean at 
tended the Woman's College 
of the University of North 
Carolina and is presently 
employed by the United 
States Department of De 
fense. Lt. Harvey is a grad- 
uate of the Infantry Officers’ 
Candidate School at Ft. Ben- 
ning, Ga., and is stationed in 
Washington. The wedding 
will take place in July. 


JANE HALEY 

RICHARD BEERS " 
Mr. and Mrs. John W. Haley 
of Providence, R. I. an- 
nounce the engagement of 
their daughter, Jane, to Ens 
Richard M. Beers, USN, 


son of Mr. and Mrs. Rabert 
(>. Beers of Washington, D. C., 
and Munich; Germany. Miss 
Haley is a graduate of the 
Mary CC. Wheeler School in 
Providence and Southern 
Seminary Junior College in 
Virginia. She is a member 
of the Junior League of Prov- 
idence and made her debut 
in 1950. The bridegroom- 
elect is a graduate of the 
Landon School, Bethesda, 
Md., and Brown University. 


ALICE LANE LE MERLE 
ANTHONY ROBERT JONES 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis G. Le 
Merle of Hyattsville, Md.. 
announce the engagement of 
their daughter, Alice Lane, 
to Anthony Robert Jones, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. 
Jones of Hyattsville, Md. Miss 
Le Merle attends Northwest- 
ern High School. Her fiance 
attends the University of 
Maryland. A December wed- 


ding is planned. 


Child Behavior 


Sleeping Problem : 


Is on the Increase 


By the Gesell Institute 


DIFFERENT times bring 
different problems. In the 
1920s and ‘30s, when parents 
were, and were advised to 
be, very strict about feeding, 
we had many feeding prob- 
lems. Now that most par- 
ents are more relaxed about 
what and how much their 
children eat, feeding prob- 
lems definitely seem to be 
getting fewer. 

Nowadays, however, sleep- 
ing problems do seem to be 
on the increase. At least, we 
hear more about them than 
we did. It is probable that 
some children are taking ad- 
vantage of the greater leni- 
ency of parents to make more 
of a fuss at bedtime, or dur- 
ing the night, than they 
would once have dared to. Or 
it may be that parents are 
just franker about admitting 
the difficulties which they do 
have. 

it is important to differ- 
entiate between those sleep- 


Indian Style 
Shad Stars 
At Feast 


From SHAD, Pige 31 


amongst us—caught 60 bream 
before breakfast yesterday.” 

There were parties in fish- 
ing boxes and country houses 
for miles around, Mr. and 
Mrs Gladstone Williams 
asked about 30 guests to join 
them for an “eye-opener 
before the Shad Bake at their 
place which is perched in a 
plantation clearing above 
Bass Lake. Guests here in 
cluded Rep. and Mrs. Albert 
Thomas from Texas, Gen. 
and Mrs. Leigh Wade, Homer 
Gruenther in a very flashy 
shirt and Mrs. Gruenther. 

The Williams house, which 
has the most lovely stained 
oak paneling, is called 
“Datcha”—a Russian name 
which guests had difficulty in 
pronouncing. 


Weddings 


MARGARET KUHLMAN 
CONRAD HIRZEL 

Mr. and Mrs. William Kuhl- 
man of Zurich, Switzerland, 
announce 
their daughter, Margaret 
Ann, to Conrad Robert Hir- 
vel, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. 
Conrad Hirzel of Fair Lawn, 
N. J.. on May 12 at the home 
of Deputy Assistant Secre- 
tary of State and Mrs. Thor 
sten Kalijarvi in Georgetown. 
The bride is a graduate of 
Bradford Junicr College and 
attended Villa d’Assomption 
in Paris. The. bridegroom is 
a graduate of Amberst Col- 
lege. The couple.will reside 
at Ridgewood, N. J. 


VIRGINIA SIEMER 
—NICHOLAS VICTOR 


> 


the marriage of | 


Announcement is made of | 


the marriage of Virginia 
Seimer, daughter of Mrs. 
Mitchell Luther of Roslyn, 
N. Y¥.. and Henry Fredrick 
Siemer of Shillington, Pa., to 
Lt. Nicholas T. Victor, USMC, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter 
Victor of Saco, Me.,. on May 
12 in the chapel of the New 
York Avenue Presbyterian 
Church. The bride attended 
the University of Vermont 
and presently attends George 
Washington University. The 
bridegroom, a graduate of the 
University of Vermont, is 
stationed at. Cherry Point, 
N.C, 


ing problems which seem to 
arise because a child is smart 
enough to realize that he can 
successfully get away with 
something, and those which 
represent real weaknesses or 
need on the part of a child. 

Some children just plain 
cannot get towleep for a long, 
long time aftér going to bed. 
Others really do seem to 
need the comforting pres- 
ence of an adult when they 
wake, fearful, in the night. 
Others, especially 
really do seem to need the 
comfort of a bottle or a par- 


ent’s presence at bedtime to | 


get them off to sleep. 


OBVIOUSLY how you 


should best treat the sleeping | 


problems which arise in your 
own home will depend on 
what kind of problem 
have. If it is merely a dis 
ciplinary problem, then the 
chances are that you could 
profitably be a bit tougher: 
“You get back into bed and 


stop that noise!” from a firm | 


father has ended many a 
sleeping problem 

But if you have a tense or 
anxious or wakeful child, 
who at one time or another 
in his career (or, perhaps 
even worse luck, at nearly all 


ages) experiences real diffi- | 
sleep | 
and/or in remaining asleep, | 


culty in getting to 
it is a different matter 
Then you may very right- 
fully respect his needs and 
give in to his demands 
Bui—you don't just give in 
blindly and hopelessly, even 
when you give in. First you 
do what you can, by rear- 
ranging rooms schedules 
routines, props, to cut dowfh 
the disturbance and demand 
We'll suggest, this week, some 
of the things which you can 


if you need to, you 
in to the child's de 
mands for a while. Thus you 
may stay with him at hed- 
time. Or you may let him 
sleep in your bed. But, even 
as you do this, you plan—in 
your own mind if he is very 
young, with him, perhaps, if 
he is older—for the eventual 
termination of this 
support 
It is very important, how 
ever, to remember that some 
children, like some adults, 
really do have a hard time 
in getting to sieep and in 
staying asicep. And they may 


infants, | 


you | 


extra 


Newest discovery from the laboratories 


Pen Women Install Off Saint 


NEWLY ELECTED officers 
of the Chevy Chase Branch, 
National League of American 
Pen Women, were installed 
Saturday at afternoon cere- 
monies held in the-Pen Arts 
Building. 

Dr. Margaret H. Sebree, 
past national president of the 
league and a°-member of the 
Chevy Chase Branch, pre- 
sided at the installation. 

New branch officers, elect- 
ed to serve two-year terms, 
are: Mrs. V. K. Stephens, 
president; Mrs. R. C. Dorsey, 
first vice president; Elma S. 
Moulton, second vice presi- 


—— re ee 


BEFORE 


dent; Dr. Myrtle Cheney Mur- 
dock, third vice president; 
Mrs. James M. Mitchell, re 
cording secretary: Mrs. Mel- 
vin Struthers, corresponding 
secretary; Mrs. Rebert .K. 
Winters, treasurer: Mrs. Har- 
vey W. Wiley, historian: Dr. 
Elizabeth Smart, auditor: 
Alice Keith, registrar, and 
Gertrude S. Hill, chaplain. 
RETIRING branch 

dent, Dreese, was 
elected national second vice 
president at the recent bi- 
ennial of the National League 
of American Pen Women held 
~in Washington. 


HERE’S DRAMATIC PROOF 


AFTE 


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MRS. GWEN O'LEARY i a recent 
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When interviewed, Mrs: O'Leary 
stated: “I never realized anything 
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of JOHNSON’S WAX! 


(Copyright. 19646. Gesell Institute. Ine 246 W. Broad St.. Falls Church, Va. 


FOUND! 


ONE BUG KILLER FOR 
~ BOTH HOUSE AND GARDEN! 


row 


Kills House Insects 


to 4 
_ ee anes asa 


Kills Garden Pests 
Raid protects roses and other 


Raid clears rooms of flies, 
mosquitoes, gnats, flying in- 
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bugs, silverfish, ¥rickets, 


flowering plants, evergreens, 
vegetables by killing such 
chewing and sucking insects 
ants, spiders, centipedes, ee ae oe 
says Mrs. E. Rosen who now eg sty. | <T cher anne — :. Vs | tles, caterpillars, cutworms. 
uses ZONITE to douche! . - —s = + dC : 


Events 


HERBLOCK, Pulitzer Prize 
winning cartoonist for the 
Washington Post and Times 
Herald, will speak at the 
12:30 p. m. luncheon of the 
Woman's National Democrat- 
le Club at 1526 New Hamp- 
shire ave. His topic is “Here 
and Now’ The Langlev 
Group, Hadassah, holds a 
membership-Mother's Day af- 
fair at 6:45 p. m. at the Adel- 
phi Room of Lansburgh's, 
Langley, Va . The National 
Parks College Alumnae meets 
at 12:30 p. m. at the home of 
Mildred Getty, 1001 Georgia 
ave., Silver Spring, Md... . | 
The College Park Branch, 
AAUW, holds a 6:30 p. m 
banquet in the dining hall, 
University of Maryland 


massachusetts 


avenue, n.w. 


| 

a 
SAPEt Most women wonder about Dur ‘ 
douching for teminme hygiene 
Mires. Rosen did. until she heard 
how mmportant the proper methad 
om douching with a fountain svr- 
inge i*, using an effective vet safe 
solution—like ZONITE 


SFFECTIVE! No other type liquid 
antiseptic-cermicide tor the 
douche of all those tested is se 
powerfully eff ectwe yet so sale to 
body tissues as ZONITE. 


HEALTHFUL! ZONITE completely 
deodorizes, promptly washes 
away germs and odor-causing 
waste substances. A nurse once 
advised Mrs. Rosen that if any 
abnormal condition exists, she 
should see her doctor, who would 
probably recommend that she 
continue to use ZONITE. 


DAINTY! You, too, can have the 
“peace of mind” that ZoniTs 
gives you after monthly periods 
and other times. Use ZONITE as 
directed, as often as needed, with- 
out risk of injury. (Costs pennies 
per douche. 


spacious kitchens, In aeddition te a- 
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to simplify your hostessing duties 
. electric dishwasher, waste 
disposer, 
refrigerator, double banks of cabinets 


electric range, 


fully air-conditioned 
one and two bedroom 
leases, $150 to $275 


eeps bugs from the air... 
attacks bugs as they crawl...and kills them dead! 


unlike ordinary household sprays, Raid 
will not harm plants. Raid’s new combi- 
nation formula kills only the pests! 

Use Raid sparingly! Its remarkable for- 
mula is so effettive that a little goes a 
long way. Once you’ ve used Raid in your 
house and garden, you'll never buy any- 
thing else. For you’ve never had such. 
complete protection from a single insecti- 
cide before. So, to kill both house insects 
and garden pests, get Raid today! 


You know it’s, safer—it’s from JOHNSON'S WAX! 


pin ‘ ° 


pilus @ private entrance .. . al! 


aids to easy, luxurious dining 


Many apartments from which 
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Saves you buying several 


single-purpose insecticides 


Why buy one kind of insecticide to use 
inside your house—others to use outside 
in your garden? Use Raid’s revolutionary 
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Raid hunts bugs down like radar! A few 
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ZONITE 


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ance 


¢ 


Anne's Trading Post , — : 


Cleanliness is Key to Moth-Proofing 


THE MIGHTY MOTH is by a reliable insulating con cleansers and detergents but tity and has a large outlet. 
always with us. His meals a — had a luck. Have Anne While making aprons for a 
are costly. The price of de- aders advice’ gift shop, I was constantly 
stroying ‘him is slight com- {he vides nnd chee on VS.C., Falls Church. xed to make a special style 
pared with that of a fine wool sible. w.t.0 “Asma Arucrw ‘ in a special color. It seems a 
blanket, a cashmere sweatetr GRprasE IN ANSWER to ML.’s in- simple request but it may 
or a riddled winter wardrobe. WE HAVE painted walls in quiry about making aprons mean a trip downtown for 
The advice offered to Mrs. dini for sale, I can assure her that ithe material. All that takes 
J.R.M. is a word to the wise UF dining room. They wash nore is very little profit. time. It would take a large 
as storage time approaches. eautifully except for grease Unies she has capital to in- ~ number of aprons to pay for 

“To Mrs. J.RM. who is spots. I have tried different vest buying materialsinquan- a sewing machine. R. E. A. 
moving and doesn’t want to — . ite 
move “moths with her. She - : cod gene 
should be sure there are no be or — ' rene a y- ~~! ch OL, CYC & rn 

3 | ile : 


xc 
moths in her new apartment. a 
GOING OUT OF BUSINESS 


If there are, the management 
will provide for extermina- 
, aa as . All Books at Cost or Less 
rs “ Sr ae 4 : : S REMODELING. . G ; BOOK SHOP 
Take acwantage of moving aS Le ae ’ > kitchens mor ' 22 oth ae ME 2402 


tion. 

to have rugs and upholstery e ee — Loa ; mee w | ——“iiicoin Marentar 
cleaned. If that is impracti- | rote es ia - , “aot — a. ean | pigs BP sae 
cal, a hand or vacuum-at- 5 4 eee em, ~~ You, can find just Ge ny cond 81 
tached moth spray is avail- —Wetteae! “Free : 
able commercially. It will kill about anything = a Re 
all moth life. Be careful to 
get at hidden corners of 
furniture. 

“Cleanliness is important 
in saving clothing. All 
woolens should be cleaned be- 
fore summer storage. Moths 
will also attack cotton and 
blended fabrics if they are 
soiled. Furs and feathers 
are moth favorites. tana 2 

aoe nae ae on have fam be geen Wniversity Ter- 
gotten of All moths it's a sae . ; pe PPPREEFE. coe) = : 
good — sae spray- Pe ary te me " or Ma a ee FS 
ing. Remember, it’s not the | , ‘pa. } mand wedd: cous 
moths that fly around that do os ie: Firs we . Bike & Singer ring, “Gens tyes 
the damage; it’s their almost 
invisible larvae.” T. L. C. 


SPLIT LEVEL 

TO MRS. G.L.K. who won- 
dered about heating costs in 
a split level house: Costs 
should not be too high if the 
house is’ properly insulated 


Monday, May 14, 1956 
AUCTION SALES 5 


a 


: THE -WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 


mattress and 
nls. FF 


k 


cbetnatth 


a 
| 
7 


er 

.-3304 

client cond, $100. NO 2735. 
prrr ‘reve 36 ca Tie pew: 


ites 


: FURNITU 


mecawhile “ee 


SPRINGTIME DELIGHT —It's the season 
of the Florida Valencia orange, and you can 
enjoy this warm weather treat until June. 
the | For a pretty pinwheel effect, slice the 


~ 
oranges rather than sectioning. Valencias 
POW-WOW ROOM 


off peel of each Valencia in circular motion, ot : 
cutting deep enough to remove white mem- enera. oe | car owest “rie of Colusa ¥ | BS. 7-408) LA 6-316 rt 
. [oa tf oer : 
brane. If necessary, go over fruit again to . ad PAINT —Nothing tos small or too 
toes woes | Tex)- 7s 
remove any remaining white membrane. > amd all ww ; : Dlerior exterior ~ 
; y - «hie 3 eLrourced rates . - 
Roll each orange in a mixture of 1 table — _= 34 - *x- chenies, "Geet relerence. Pree get 
; : : rest ri ms “me PURN —Sol 
spoon pays go re and \ teaspoon jetioe and exterior afer > 
cinnamon. Eat wit ife and fork. : : a with matching chair. 
fork tect: imme. BA. 3-693 Ta. 9-189. green friese. 835: sale. bed with 
springs, innerepring mettress. might 
stand venity with > an 
mapie. $35 2-3431 


“FURNITURE 
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FAINTING BY HUNTINGTON 


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etc 3-6116. Rm. 208 


& 


sa’ oar 
BR COAT._.Peretan lamb. «¢ 15-14 
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are seediess, and full of Vitamin C. To make 
Cinnamon Oranges, with a sharp knife, cut 


ashamed of blackheads? pimples? 


west wisest r is iw : : 
SEKI yee . ane prepesré ort aves | : a “a iy 
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FURN.—Hide-e-bed davenport Fx 
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Recenter GOING OUT 
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After going out of bastineses. 999.008 
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+ at «6 

ORIG 

859% Holirw'd Beds 


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URDAY 
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service. Also peietine aad paper. 
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ser 52578 | : pom 

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clear them away easily, quickly 
with new scientific treatment! ET 


UNITED STATES DISTRICT 


st ~- : 

of Wits fer the Dictrict ef Colem- = 

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Mary Kir \« 
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.v. 2-298 =—Reward 
T—Woman's of white 
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and other skin infections. Secret Key is _ a oa 


Blackheads and pimples are seriovs skin you've admired in others: 


business. You con't just smear on o 
stick, lotion or cleanser and hope te 
be rid of them. You've got to follow a 
faithful daily routine that does the 
whole job, not just a surface job. 


You know the old rules of skin care, 
of course. And you must follow them. 
Eat a planned diet. Keep hands off. No 
creams or ointments of any kind. But 
do you know that scientists have dis- 
covered some new theories about your 
diaturbed skin? Based on these theories, 
Max Factor has established new rules to 
help you rid your skin of blackheads and 

imples and regain a healthy, clear, 

utiful skin. 


These new rules are (1) cleanse the 
skin with a product especially made for 
blemished skin, (2) belance the skin 
and kill off the bacteria on the skin sur- 
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healing, concealing lotion. The Max 
Factor Laboratories have developed a kit 
based-on these rules. This “Secret Key” 
Disturbed Skin Treatment uses all the 
newest scientific knowledge about skin. 
But even more important to you —ii 
works. 


Here are the steps to follow if you want 
the kind of clear, healthy, fresh-looking 


_ 
»* 
~~ a 


&. 


% " 
PP an ae 


eo 


1. Cleanse the skin with Max Factor’s 
“Gentle Foam Cleanser.” This fine, pearly 
lotion stops the trouble where it starts, 
by flushing out waste materials and 
blackheads that clog the pores and lead 
to blemishes. Since this is mo ordinary 
cleansing job, no ordinary cleansing 
methods will do. Gentle Foam Cleanser 
foams into rich suds that work like a 
magnet, drawing clogged dirt, oil, black- 
heads and make-up from the pores. A 
special ingredient leaves the skin micro- 
scopically clean and soft — but never 
taut or burning, as harsh soaps and 
cleansers do. 


2. Balance the skin with Secret Key. 
Most skins tend to be more alkaline than 
acid, partly due to the use of soap and 
harsh cleansers. This is an unhealthy 
skin and more subject te infection. To 
overcome this condition, Max Factor de- 
veloped Secret Key, a pleasant liquid 
you just pat on your face. Secret Key 
neutralizes and balances the alkaline 
condition and restores the skin to a more 
normal, healthy state. With the help of 
Secret Key, your skin can fight off the 
bacteria which cause and aggravate a 


@ disturbed condition. In addition, Secret 


Key creates an antiseptic “climate” on 
your skin, which safeguards against a 
recurrence of pimples and blackheads 


MAX FACTOR’S 
DISTURBED SKIN 


an exclusive formula you won't find in 
any other product or prescription. 


3. Clear up the skin with Max Factor’s 
“Clear-up,” a tinted, medicated lotion 
that works two ways. It dries up pimples, 
concealing them at the same time. 
Clear-up also has a healing and shrinking 
action on enlarged pores from which 
blackheads have been removed — prevent- 
ing dust, dirt and bacteria from getting 
in. And since it’s flattering and soothing 
to your skin, you can use it not. only on 
individual spots but over the entire face 
as a light, attractive foundation. 


Just three steps to follow faithfully. 
Three steps you won't find in any other 
treatment or product or kit. Three steps 
that can bring you a thousand steps 
closer to skin health and happiness. 


Max Factor makes this promise to you: 
Follow this scientific skin routine. At 
the end of two short weeks, look in 
your mirror. You will be happy to see a 
marked improvement in your skin, the 
clear, healthy, fresh look you have longed 
fof, free of blackheads and unsightly 
blemishes. 

The complete group, Gentle Foam Cleans- 
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enough for many, many treatments, 


only $450 plus tax 


On Sale At All 


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: sind @-Dece«ts 
50 sew stee 4-crewer . 
ss £3493 8 FRANK S8ON. 414 

= = \ =e, . 
Pius THE & For YOU ae. 
oTand new famous mare | 2*9~ 
; ane Tifi- 
Once-in- 


sR itF9 
: DISPLAY AD 
CTOs “wT 


ean 


sl? $24) 
PIANO MART 
“Ff 


einer erences for 
nce we Sa’ er. 


‘ 
- 


{ moc¢erate rates 


r_ ington Va 

- $060 Subs a 

Ty evening ark 
full keyboard console- 
im very seed con- 

ad ana G Sts. 


22 
1840 


| 


PEOPLES 
DRUG 
STORES 


cif 
i 


son. - 
S.. iié-velt: never ased: $200 
cash of terms may be 


Ti 


poster 
mahogany. mw 4 
excellent cend. o see. call Sun- 
rat after 1 @cleck. weekdars 
‘ - 
fistle ‘yeea wee er ‘best 
. St or | { 


$5 DOWN DELIVERS 


Meadccuarters for 
SP 


TREATMENT 
with 
SECRET KEY 


i 1 RRR BS Gaderer tte| ELECTRONIC NS 


7 mnicoc | Sethe pEReTsmen| MACHINISTS 
415,000 : ‘al ee) §~ TECHNICIANS FIELD errucTuRAL | | 
Sunday “9 ; Si 2 es Mer | STRUCTURAL » HIGHWAY sate 
Circulation Se VIL ENGINEER HIGHWAY Electronic 


ea Sets Se Manufacturing Plant | 
r— ecg: 


APPLY . 
e 

Pay in accordance with quali-| Fities sof con-| Green Associates, Inc. 9 am. to 4 pm. 
fication and ability. 220 Bast Pleasant 6. 


: Baltimore 2. M4 : NEMS-CLARKE, Ine 
Guided Missile Research and, GREEN ASSOCIATES, INC. 919 Jesuo Blair Drive 
Development Program offers” 220) st ENGINEER Silver Spring, Md. 

challenging assignment with i6 , 
opportunity for self-advance- Patent Engineer 


ment ENGINEERS , MACHINIST ret . tm 
| lop We New , y-~4 
PLEASE APPLY FIELD SERVICE 5 Feat” collec reins emachinist, with Tecept| Mongay ee PES abekba.! ) 


machinist re 
9AM. TOD P.M. On Digital Computers ont elperience in ¢ tolerance wor 
. ee 


| | ids : 
crmiGena ‘t | tear | WASHINGTON AREA erogeete, spemienl so PERSONNEL OFFICE 
"Ponce eee te soem = *| The Johns Hopkins | Or Germany—France— palent experience. AMERICAN ~ PERSONNEL 


ine both im excellent cond. PO Coe OORBBEY Eat eS ert order oa wel University Japan Sent complete repume INSTRUMENT CO 
Seth fig OPER MONDAY TILL 7 PM Mon. through Fri. | irenaness bo Dove Bi appep PHYSICS Gita "Se “Waastrone fe pat ee 9080 Gs, doe. SA. Sora, Md MANAGER 
7A — up 


LABORATORY er tor tis jiorris Le * : ; MAINTENANCE WELPER — 8: Ste atone ee 


an tors 
end maint men. uD lon ‘eostenment work fer sober man hands wit 


| eal {Se ae 
attendan’s $40 up Wethingten “oe ow - PBS DA RE AT tools. _ Apt av. © wstion. anslectio 

| “Witt 453 CoLonep a gee yee a, Single gen cals | ee, fe ESHANIC Must Nee 0 A. salary 

os PRET TeE ES | merormare mrcnuarne. | EXCELENT SALARY | ESTIMATORS aetna sit 

etn ss ; Y apert- 

#3438) Evening Interviews | cost ACCOUNTANT JU. 9-7700- \ NUS | EXPERIENCED | iii commun OCF ERECTRONICS 
eae Ge men . — — MON ” ROE Engineering  Desres, with som- WTS Bitthine Bre veer of FO. KI. 8.4940, EXT. 36 
vat eee | ELECTRONIC ENGINEERS | meting “experience | a 


resuired. Calculating Machine Co.) % colleet.| im general repairs end mainte 


=! ome manory, A seers CARS 2 | ES eng Bx aa trea! snd serpent, Sit te PORTERS 
| Ean he 


7: > nese forms 6 oEMO co Sime Apply 514 eas. | 
eee Pie ; a : | | wilmington Bh. Delaware me Ra i Fiate- | tor 
cera? we met. ott it tft SS 6:00 to 9:00 P. M | Ca om Vint 2 ee Engineer Assistant | fed i MAN WI H CAR | 


uneey f pew 8 bide most have 
NCH = | ACF ELECTRONICS ' . | hh oS good salary wee ~~ nufectarine FALLS CHURCH LABORATORY 
a ee BRA H | . hoe Leslie Ave, Alex, Va.' ENGINEER © , per ee EXPEDITER aM “v consider inex ~ | 
' 


ferences. Call _ ' 
' sation man wheats 3 Ki. §-4400, EXT, 36 Ac Bide. must neve eet receren ings while) - 
lacs or Sth train are . alls Church residents pre 
F: af Must have evious experi- pe ares a. . 
MELPAR, INC. , COOKS — eee te ; "E, Seonse ek oo _ “ Cee -» > terred. Permanent positions in 


na ne af “* ENGRS., EE—No ¢ ” g20.000.| ence in Purchasing office. RRR W - 
TELE VION Tad, AD 4-419 | Comber her : eS — "ipaatis col ete Cea acer Oe: re aa | N TH CAR Falls Church. References re 
_late model A-i cond. AD. 4-4319 —— 7 a“ . aa TH "Yor | interview. Dupont Cir > ave ork.| Quired. Many employe bene 


a! a ee — Permanent w 
TELEVISION SALE | 2eniien, Boacter "3 — ERCO DIVISION it A 
; $149 Best tes , . E 9528 Georgia : 


1311 South Fern St ; . Room Ne i. 
‘ Electronic & Mechanical Re Fogg ge hes. 7.4444 | Or easy te oper- APPLY ' PRReow 


ler foute 
No cold canvassing rA M TO4AP M. 


to ay’ 
a pales experience unnec. wwetning 
~ FOOD ( ERK S wre Must furnish charac re MONDAY THET rRmIDpay 


, > & eal es ‘ oe for , aver 
Puke ‘ . — ‘i 6 . a! 
7416 ~ aed ave Arlington, Va. ey , Ste ae He over 
| | ' ’ 
a ee Bea | COLUMBIA | |S oee e EN | N E E R | <Atenton Men ing | aioe al & et) MELPAR, INC, 
ace | “ae . — / aE oe 498 —-~ 
ve. sete. -Usea at PARTIAL LIFTING oFLT | . ee tas Di District Heights Annapolis divion— Cigar deparimen 
ott ft eu 2-700. ~. ‘fi -e enw a foo . 
SE cae ie on 
*t iw 7 ™ 


INVESTIGATORS (4) Capitol Heights | better hotel ‘45-hour wee 


State 


on : 
Prince Frederick -2etienee Box 439 si Bane ARLINGTON 


a eS PHYSICISTS: yee, ator" amt pace GOOR CORP. | cs an 
Sa repaired Sanna 


72 ‘s 
er Les 


(‘Take Arnold 2-V¥ bus from Li® 
Naylor | - 1630 L ST. \.NW Sod Este nw to vlant entran 


| Jypewriter mechanics er t rpinees roaTt i. — 
We need nen for sore, io: ington office. AR. must have D.C oe ore beret 
~ . ooeaing is Opeer Martbore Mrective salary with evvertunity | Ball ath “peopl ot ~~. 
n invirarion eee eer Lie eS 
* rement pilen 
Seve gene Sos Ss | vat eS 
“ ¥y sf miter » 4 . wip eae" se nnd Geatry w “ avis Ae ah ccounts 

upright . | 113 Se Columbus 8. Pood institute Experience prefert 
er GENYAL—teciuictan onperlegeet ores fal Salary so Seder 

“Pecirolan. | onary _ > AN ACK ae won 2 aepartment. : winks st ian “are . See tints t pice leave. 
Welter exeel| — EMPLOYERS PAY fice say he AP teocray_ am BELPTES O etter week | Permsnen pack omen gh tt ads = hecati fiiont Cal 0 ee 

—Keumore, {uly suto-| Tre "WRITER. ercran _ aco’ es r le : B =. 7 mane sdditional cee “vor App Fol - eS eee 1 
matic. sud saver. Exceuent conc) s* — Des a) L = rnace Co. a or . 
: RETIN AD. TRANS? . eee. oo r r Inc Sater “Set ER APPLY : te & 
wtintt sulle. goed cone sree. oot’g of bus WE MS- CLA KE. ~N an ‘ 

aor . sy"= ' SALES MANAGER . MEN COLORED . 
= n = 5aSK TELSR TRarees 8 73793 re, r Exp evtenees on Jobe tscn Tenner 
_ BAN KMFESSCYCERS “4°90 . ~ 4 , fast growine comeenr bas —_———> SAFEWAY RAINEES Bo “- » ord 8° Ariimeten. Va 
LIPEIOE CONTRA PLOT moors mak rami) im ence 
5 


ne ex 
6 was “Sans a 7 ane ese’ a an = ————| Oe : rect te ¢9 . _ * ' r «PRESEN fcetent _openin lee 
0 ORT TE epee wa oe ee ae STORES, INC.| Ses aechs: ae 
B- 992) STERS. cm oc com SS - =e ea wi id salary. com ; : peat ip ep-| Tacai ; ’ 1s. 
or py _ _~ . - fo-tien rarer r= rty ities in ; a : ven AST evs i 
€ , 3 : : EMPLOYMENT OFFICE | ro | a te 16:30 © ets. [ions . Be 


- as r °° . : : - _ "% « . - . 
. ’ . <- . Tein 
ae . 9s. sts . — tre cs a . creat : ; . onie , . 
-- - — - ey . . - rt - re © _ 4" > , 3f ; Nw ' — ms — . 
- cas : aa @rive @ | ca rol e a r euite fa ng, Bias need experienced salesmen to han- 
a -@-?rer s ©) ieee W'CcwASICS "dent . ; ; _ 


; p= @, Brampocte for 4 ective subdiri- 
erTege sales. 


‘ental os ebyects tant | AIRLINES _ LIGGETT S EMP SERV. ve at om DOT. ... a Feceot Sa! on & Holidare 
a stow : LIG m= o- a om wai 
a. Sa ‘CAB “DRIVERS pi 


w yeu 2 Om) 3 pears T ® m. tee. Many factors combine to make for a better Furniture Salesmen 


$e2 ee" —— <er vr 


50 x r ~~ . , [LS , Pare : rect pea fer becker test. : ase. J . a of lite for . ineers who join Melpar. Ezrellent oppertunity for nur Pe ie. ihened a 
ween 6-297 22 3s * cai after iB Pe i oe a 


ons. pius general bro& 
id few Experienced oaly 


fee ct he world 


7 ‘ at = | Bees furnisure salesman cpportunity for those 
anc as se mus , BOB'S STUDIO | Sn cal Ss NAGER Located in suburban Falls Church, Melpar | 8 ee Rage “or | 
Charis = Ge ‘aan Assoc. 616, 131 Th NE : >s168 | ioe yy —* is set in peaceful surroundings away from 4 "Boh inside ¢gnd on PORTA CO. ARSm 
. ea y @mount: alse ——— . yy trac - ~~ S ; ithi tt . 

yh SG er <a Ameren Ret Cree metre: Sie tb mand supervise congested traffic areas and within easy for “many of, the leading of ECEIVING CLERK: >. eae 
biane:; Mr Grex, FA 8-2979_ Prat unter MANAGER = 1 S233_ _| om a = | commuting distance of Washington. co te , "|No Experience Necessary! ee socal renerenety, reo red, 

- eT re 2 om : co ur . aye y bet weer : 

ts 2- 6677 — : aa tn com*laed ten! eotana Dear-*0-deer fer salews ere-' ment only _ : yuare aalese faryice. Men whe have just come to W nts 


+ chp Fall me 
Should you join Melpar you would tie your Positio _ dai 105 y— Me he und 9) "Exner Cailes & Karayienis. RA. 


Ps ee valida: ond attics bal E f en ) own professional growth to that of a com- ath Fe Ae ; | p  Weshingla 7 2 | ~ RETAIL a 

OO Sitoy. eracstians work history a CAREER Bectrente eneineering __ sosserch pany which has doubled in size every 18 HAS. ere STOTT & CO. | ons. dane | MANAGEMENT 
rine your, dents SSlo-y $0508 Ber S82 Pct YF ACCOUNTANTS =| Stsaced’ Sraftemne "te" tote “tn months for the past decade. Melpar main- abe cB eee agate | OPPORTUNITIES 
-epars’: charta. eremne. ss tains a policy of INDIVIDUAL RECOGNI- All-eround _ mee. man. soma euperiene ime om ymca " | a. YOUNG MEN 


m meets 


TION which enables our engineers to prog- mo SOT mt Ar eer — 
ress according to their own timetables, not | 628 6th St. SW. ig ea eke Te nent tail variety 


= te 7 =a oer + . Beeerit _fisazanee ~- ory . oo, 590 « ' ( art for eanebia 
Pits eocer. Sigh - Ext | prearranged ones. Ability and performance t Wille oot $ exmense. | Por inter: tween the ag 
ug oes cas” tn : : : 
BS KE BS Set ce . . rimarily determine advancement. Age, -32 | 4 se 8 Evenines. 
YWIN-ETROLLER Good com Ste Staak teen =| HOT SHOPPES p y wh, iby. “Gestaie ave. & JE a-s0ol after Pp m.” 


tenure, length of experience are only sec- : — "| ooo a ering 
—.—, ATRLN me ERWIN’FORD' CO. | EMPLOYMENT OFFICE ondary considerations Ter es St oe 
Lae 


wy © Cham BRIDGE FD «61341 GSt. NW_ Rm. 200 7 p Ww vue generous ben us 
AIR AVE. AGENCY Matnar’e usheess “onelact team” optein el- 10 Hours Per Week)! piorese ¢pcous 


pen an eore- 18-39 BS red , or «22 a ° xe = wmel Gr , lows each engineer to experience the | ; ow fae eae os * Ol apPrL Nene Me 
dar bend came 3 address. age and = [3 es ADs oe ream ney * me — em | — OVER-ALL APPROACH to an engineering | “tet Inter o—_ | NEISNE Behss 
en aE te of 3. S| ee ,| Ee" Recsaeat etme esrt| problem, thus enabling him to broaden his iiuiehidwtivel tii: % 1 "a 
® ory ee on re 3 Wie -| araments 2 brs. ~ experience and background, essential to 
oo NEED D. c EMPL RGR Ne —_—a oan Det, sore Laat Sent - 1 eventual directorship responsibility. Each 
Res "es “ cs WEINSCHEL ENGINEERING project group is responsible for an ENTIRE | 4 
uf : reall > Kenetrg'ot Merriend 7 , “= ans A 
ee ‘. ae CARPENTERS ~ problem, from initial conception to com DEVELOPMENT 


Parke attendants 1... | 858) 9 = eae DRAFTSMAN pletion of prototype. 


ne) | . 
™ a oy Gr eee srerect age Ny 4 Complete facilities are at the engineers’ pee | RESEARCH ENGINEERING 
AN LAUME 


; 
: 


excellent retirement pian 


: 8 . 

dress and» non © to Box i= ' 53 2 ne a3. be disposa!. Our new laboratories encompass 

eS ee ES ee | Ger wtisy szarenvast oe:| over 285,000 air-conditioned square feet | -TIBRARY ‘| ENGINEERS—PHYSICISTS 
bag this soos pay| Rexer eo ce oo . " ie may and offer, in addition to a Central Model ‘ 

area pnicgig” joc ined ee Ms ot oe hs + cagmn + i Shop, supplementary facilities, test equip- Yeral ma . se DESIGNERS 


im Diese 38: : , . ; 
le lesson Opilities Diese , a ment and personne! available for immedi- 
‘i ae ™ 5 AUTO SALESMAN — - 5 ate use within each project group. 


eacing te FOC 


- man 
ieeary  tratnine. Moa “This Is Vitro” 
. must be with ; 
* Ca «ao degrees may take-advantage of the fully vier men Si ey 


Engineers wishing to work toward higher 


. , . ; ° 
‘ t rev. PES. ie AVIATION ¥ MEY seMITS— —— 2 [ae _ = : accredited graduate courses available at M : Permanent Position 
Naé.2me, porn scHooL cor Tec. iais Mem Ne Di oe Melpar. 
- OTs Sia pabos! AWNING time 
rite for t + . : I . 
pleut . 
e144, 1 ie SS ree ie " if you would like to leern more ion Professional Advancement 
terference Write jor Caiaing >| Gem w ) 
pool, Box M-28), Pos TB) ari 247-5773 . about the unique growth oppor- | 


sovers! Roast ‘nthe Educational Assistance 


and 


oe | MACHINISTS . Salary Recognition 
ne Cini, ervice” BOD | = a eS . Technical Personnel Representative 


’ -AT Ss! togrsvee -| . ; Experienced N Moder Labor tor N Bei 
Fp at Pi Cot 2. | eee runes - Jefferson 4-6000 With Small Mechanterns “td o ory Now ing — 


‘DED | 5 Capable of Working to Close 
oy gene ? Neamt Laboratory Or drive out to Melpar and in a me PROJECTS -IN: 


laboratories at r 
SoS RRR sat 2: wr Well Equi sili 
MECHANICAL Pn gat: moe NE AN Nell Bquinped Shop Focitities SHIP MISSILE SYSTEMS 
for quelfred men. Wages. Commensurate With ACOUSTICAL DEVICES 
itt i j 
Design Checkers | Gon OPENINGS EXIST IN THESE FIELDS ——— UNDERWATER ORDNANCE SYSTEMS 
ee Network Theory — Systems Evaluation — Microwave Many Company Benefits . 
am, IO" Technique — UHF, VHF or SHF Receivers — A@blog For Information and Interview Please Call 
: Computers —— Magnetic Tape Handling — Digital Aoply in Person 
ep ~ —— procedure NEMS-CLARKE, INC. Computers —- Radar and Countermeasures — Packag- - ie. i Sitio ee Personnel Department 
919 Jesup Blair Drive, ing Electronic Equipment — Pulse Circuitry — Micro- CM rar JU. 5-7200 
. wave Filters — Flight Simulators — Servomechanisms 8 AM. te 4 PM. 


— Subminiaturization — Electro-Mechanical Design— 
Small Mechanisms —— Quality Control and Test SATURDAY INTERVIEW IF DESIRED 


Ergneenng — Antes Design MELPAR, INC. su. ecemviewe 


~ 


INTERVIEWS DAILY | > o SS°TQ"E : Se TL, . : 

Fame 320 e~ ecpermmill Yen MELPAR. Inc. mapa | Vitro Laboratories 

Serardey boy Appointment | Earley Stay | ene SPE APY Ay ELS 

ERCO DIVISION : “ne vee” | ‘A subsidiary of Westinghouse Air Brake Company. | AO ie 962 Weyne Avenue, Silver Spring, Md, 
ACF industries, Inc mg Oc pet 3000 Arlington Bivd., abe , 


WA. 7-4444 LLOYD'S EMP ‘SERV “ Falls Church, Va. 


tunities at Melpar, cal! 


is 
t 


me ‘ : HELP, MEN 3 LP, MEN 15) THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD , 
Scalinaed Trem Preseding Trae ee ae Monday, May 14, 1956 35 


- \RELIE WATCHMEN ) -- hat td “ LE - TRAINEES : ne | is 382 000 
65 te 70 Years — — , , , . By ee 


GESEE pk, Tey S| Sheed WtpGa Nasines| —— SALESMEN' 2) DRAFTSMEN ; a... Pet ere] Daily 
- APPLY ye . a ns ‘Sos uk Circulation 
HOT SHOPPES i bool ay ; ¥ ‘ OPENINGS FOR YOUNG MEN : or keht a 214 ois epee Applied Physics means quicker sales results 


EMPLOYMENT OFFICE | ff? xi - . | New Mamoshi INTERESTED IN LEARNING | Jus tage Are WD ot Laboratory as pa wz 
1341 GSt. NW., Rm. 200 PARKLAWN THE HIGHLY LUCRATIVE ihe. car necessary. WO. 6-202 | ors. whet pre on vertieame, To plese your od 
Races SALESMEN wariyot | : : 

ROUTEMAN ‘ acheg North, af Betheeda | ELD OF DRAFTING —t- ae 


: | : harec Phone 
Sv Memes trees! Bee ae Rip titesfaae, be FAAS | JOHNS. HOPKINS 
ieee wetteindrees tad) Be miuarss:|  SALESMEN  |OConnors Haberdashery, sewer, coe eee ooh Heads Sena sf UNIVERSITY. | Smee 7°1496 


(Colored) s00Y Cobantie Pike. Art. ve 
Stohr pea Sn tei SALES—HABERDASHERY, $70 “Tork. earnings above, average. |AT LEAST ONE YEAR OF 


, _ and ser 
: ee Le The - now for n “1 A... Has 2 ' in its ad- 
“Sree, mae te a LLOYDS EMPL. SERV. | om x anor, matinee, Saat ey tbe | tees omnicef Posty Winer, “Sal DU i607, “PISS 87") ministrative division at the 
’ 1420 N x Are NW ST 3-2207 wanies ° on n ; n 
yore lesth ltors 


t and . reliable junior professional level. 


SALESMAN caleatien. © oe vithout og, SALESMEN MECHANICAL The positions afford excel- 
on . ‘ vt receive ) {horoush trainine Pull ime @ and Bet to lent epperamity fer ed 
| sae Pease | 4 9) Feces aaa ee seagate] ORAWING COURSE | juniors AND | WANTED | semen anttn laos 


| Seen ioe pay ER fi the eh one rviee ore tory offers many liberal 
up P 7 

ie “Baiimere sand Wasniageon | ES“, CPA, MeaMtots"| nz, ex, spel. guns ethane SENIORS, carn 

Areas, Cor pecessery for trevs,. | visors and branch managers. th ssion: (2) compan vassers. EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY “ENGINEER maw be niedtilibiatiiel 


mission Write or one f you_are wily in makin sox ana espns ct phe 5 wean 
SCATTON BROS, | ix" e-#oa? for ta’ --rralh) rovals ‘| FOR ADVANCEMENT IN 


ive you train- ’ a Bachelor's Deoree in 
CALESMEN al erie shoal AN EXPANDING RESEARCH SCIENTISTS” th care: white. 20 te 38 Fb eamgs * rene 


, ‘_s m My per iat a ivacren 
pg AeA, 44 — $100 SALARY pep bal Pe bet!'9- pbs nbagg © ORGANIZATION CHALLENGING —-- * equivalent. . 
TEnnessee 9-460 1 Plus editions commiaston m while) * fant fy Se mat Ma Spring. Ma y : a a sacy . : ; ” 
SALESMAN | wecenaary. verses ES PROGRAMS STRICTLY hea ng [POTOMAC EMP. AGCY. 


qualifications including 

A ou A ; * 

ase. fp tor mae Car er er.. Ase®? = a row. APPLY IN PERSON PROFESSION AL ‘ college transcript to: 2334 Wilson Bivd.. Ari JA. $- 
ition orzo : . 


| comisorien” bermanen My for the one ion m the BASIC RESEARCH 
3 SALESMEN ~.3"E, — $ | Thi 
‘SEVEN. . aivrn sPhing. MD ; y, i we sil teach pou. ins is “s|, 8AM. TO4P.M. aoe a epeaprate a panes spely You mx i: it| Staff Appointments AIRLINE 
WASFIINGTON: | us-srar sar am SALARY, CONMMSEION Fagernss: Si Ss'| MONDAY THAU FRIDAY | EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH | HEBga Si J LINE HOSTESSES 
1325 Kenilworth Ave. NE. Mins “Siareon at) Bersocinel. ti | ie eae . : EQUIPMENT DEVELOPMENT | magerine | The Johns Hopkins | TRANS WORLD AIRLINES 
G st. NW. 8-211 ctr “nos Sie 


ROUTE SALESMEN AW NEARBY VA PROTOTYPING START NOW AT AGE 20 
OWN YOUR ROUTE SALESMAN ) Miaw FOR xp University 


t . 
to or you! See 4 james. ; 
peaipe-ou Taps enlen for man ° ME PAR m > You can fiy with the finest air 
- years ace wit cat pm | Bias ae oe limes tm. the world with routes both 
Prenchived routes are being A a oe per ailowance ane . ce li "EO =e. plete , 7 ite only zt United State rrseas 
ac 10 & 3 : as eet ¢t : 
r~ : en . 


Professional 


yploped, im, Prince cou tin Prersliyrel sctinnty. rane: APPLIED PHYSICS 


enance 

ment to . 

it iiPete| Sears R VIRGINIA OFFICE | "Rene : INC Kon end prodye | ARE YOU THE WIFE | LABORATORY 

y , ° a & : ° eolor me 

the ow enti you take ‘you | Hata mB 3123 N. WASHINGTON BLVD. >. Rol ° ope Bey, 7x | Esse Slik so opmortunity to sa- 8621 Georgia Ave. 
: s working SALESMAN. HRIVER | ~ pres revi wey financial | Silver Spring, Md. 

ae wet | Wanted for es tad) lished business WASHINGTON OFFICE D professional fovetopasent | him - A Fee Ee - 8 | tenuate — = 

Hed use weorner of pe es: ee lee | 101 EYE ST allow. TONS. 3000 Arlington Bivd. RADAR-COMMUNICATIONS Out sn_sppiication Borate . | UNUSUAL : 

— Pigg RN OF TS ES ALES MAPAGER EES . - | 
ee I RENAIRE | Reperamatneg) OS | Beemer | CAPITAL | CAREER FIELD | AST Tome 
ROUTE, SALESMAN | Sat. ining, | m ct nigues. Circuit desien and L OPEN BEVERAGE 
ac Comp! : 


| SALESMEN | aveading one DL iistteenns 1 Me CONTROLLER 
cram ¢ fae Ste =| 11th & E Sts, NW. to plant) SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT AIRLINES FOR YOUNG MEN tat p teed and. beverues aout 


INDUSTRIAL COMMERCIAL | ent “Men 
excellent Treentfre 


>| enn ag — on ome Ricus’ youns and analogue com , enefits. ple ' at surround mes. 
Paine poms, tsi Me | fang, esowTeaydd eSbsay | Sivee"ang nh eat ront| ap Br owen vom a. Natissienat.ies- | Has Immediate Non Ba SHERATON CARLTON 
ray ot Wotitats ' > - ie, poseenary helpful. ae eertumity to ‘Tepresent e @ nationally cn -werat wage wa, Part time eftern moons (1 (12-4) A> t of business da . DA | HOTEL 
OLD "C ONY _Mr_Basaz. Box M-)85. Post T.H.| recognized cc in. Pe, Toae:| Ste ieense 0 6-430e: cher 6) i A) — Openings for MACHINES 


| —~Keastent Cateteris Ma 
LAUNDRY | SALESMEN Pn eS AERONAUTICAL ssistant Cafeteria Mgr. 


: T YHOUSE Home economics graduate or equiv 
4020 Biair R4.. Takoma Park. DC) LATS! Comper empanding Pro-| fitors “Must be bondabie and SCIENTISTS umask Ave. and & REVELOPMENT ao 3s “s 


Y cor , fh. ee . RE IREMENTS: ‘ Annual leave an 
SALESMAN ) sossts | . bave a car fs v¥ ” ee Basi Goctem _ Caveleomens Reservation - nights ott Cah Mon throuety Pr. 
NG Outside = Bst tact Mr. Sharkey at the U. 6. Em- af avaliable tmmediat oy Le = Mathematicians 


Business Systems Knowledge . ane 7 7. 

ployment Service 1724 PF «st aS | Reynolds bet Good paying piece-work: 5% tems, : - > % posi- 

Sori +~ vacation with pay. Apply aie'h tems. frocket-powered air and or | thon, onpationt income busy shop. 

giving ausitfications | between 10 to 12 &. m. and from r 8-9500 


feta’ Vv round -lea ; Experience in Writin Belvoir. Va 
Sees et -! Lie BS wor TeuzPnone HONE EX. 3-2879 » ENGINEERS|~ You : setae. Ss | Ticket Agents perience o | Boo Fears 


Instructions for Operation — Exp. manicurist, 
i pebesl graduate | bet @scape systems of Electronic Computing wick and efficient Salary. om- 


Interviewing in Washington May 14, 15, For _ |Exceptional Opportunities 3 ies, experi-| INSTRUMENTATION Machines 


: and 
At Several Levels in the) Stistui’ "possible “advancement. vo seiatinateaia:: sett ltesonn Capital Airlines, one of 


Newest Branch of $o°bour week 2 eS Se be al aystemes. America's oldest and most INTERVIEWS DAILY , ‘ ise Be iy Be 
ENGI NEERS , Applied Science SYONE STRAW CORP. sds Sound metre: es Seto 8-30 to 5:15 BEAUTY entree tect 


fers the opportunity for «a Dorothy Prencipe's 


AND SCIENTISTS OPERATIONS RESEARCH| —*\VBURE MRR — | cre ouccuanisms ano | ae 8 tpidly ex | 1909 19th ST. NW. Petite 
$100 


-— Son tor me AUTOMATIC CONTROL positions offer an ettrac- |Room 331 RE. 7-3705/8® "065 Bean 
ti with | | Personnel, ST. 3-664, 1311 O 
SYSTEMS ANALY Ser pfheg Bours, Baceens Design and const eutomatic increases, op. | International Business| 2 BOOKKEEPER 
JOIN THE LEADER IN L SIS week. emplaye in “ portunity for advancement Machines Corp. | General office work. Must be ec 
| All Positions Are i ) | - gad bee csetral ang, wary aine priv | Carlton “sth dat tien SSSR 
AERO CONTROL SYSTEMS . SOUTH adie + —s leges. Applicants must be WHITE & COLORED ——s | -RETOUNG ma Fr oBE oii 
CA ERN rol systems for ¢ single, 19 to 30 years of | ate See © Cee Ste Al. 26 up BOOK EPER 
LIFORNIA . em requireme age, and possess a gr Kec et Cooks ; pres 


RF. port. school education NNING 8 "EMPLY. AOCY Burroughs bookkeeping machine 
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS Lind Vermont ave. Bw. nat? —— A Bo 40 sre 0 ane Permanen, pe- 
Experience in systems enaiveie or over 18. et Mr. J. H. STACK. APPLY a =| ent working eentiices “inete 
—Join Honeywell and participate in research and development | ; ery) HOUSE in Washington, May ALLEN © BRIEN. BANK OF COMMERCE 
programs in the following challenging areas: Operational Dig- MAXIMUM BENEFITS u 1 ny 3 On Mey 15} Personnel Department we Se | Conn. Are. and 200. 
ital Computers, Automatic Flight Control Systems, Jet Engine ane a oa Hangar No. 3 Sis" urkrace. Cons 73 u BOOK KEEPING: 

of the motten* a progree- Call Be me col. good fringe ben 

Fuel Controls, Air Inlet Controls, Bombing Computers, Air sive compan nismt mle many AT LINCOLN 6-6611 Washi ite rapid svance....- st $328) MACHINE OPERATOR 
Data, Computers and Instrumentation and Display Equipment. benefite Relocation assistance. joe with manae oR WRITE as ington ‘ : 4 ‘do . ; Pe. up laree? at sat varied wag with 


—As a Research or Development Engineer at Honeywell you FOR APPOINTMENT Te, ‘epiart, ce ar MR. BM. HALLIDAY National Airport | | 

will have freedom to plan your own work, and to direct your am mays pee ai) U M B ‘ 

activities along the paths of your greatest interests. You wil! one oterling J- re . " 

raise your professional status by working with some of the MONDAY THRU FRIDAY (WHITE—18-28) COOK D. C. EMPL EXCHANGE SHANNON & LUCHS CO. 
best-trained and most progressive engineers and scientists in ' 9A M.TOSP. M RESEARCH TOP FLIGHT $400 mo) ———2#4 Lah _B 


uple 
the aviation industry. SERVICE ATTENDANT — Lubrication | $125 PER WEEK OR MORE SALESMAN 8: Bienographers 


° im 4a, 
7. p.m $50 up 
al | | ag 8} BOOKKEEPIN 
-——To qualify for one of these opportunity-filled positions, you to aa Apoiy, Rises Proven te You in the Field | LABORATORIES | ‘aitresses. ht co Top sal : G 


should have a bachelor's degree or higher in Electrical Engi- te, age 28-40. ex- 8100 NORTH MONTICELLO | [ites Sxperjenced company parked | eae ae: sen, waitin ACHINE 
neering, Aeronautical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, a egtesman: ieee sese-; né th ,, — -m-. “ne travel uniess eee wsee OPERATOR 
Mechanical Engineering, Mathematics, Physics or a related ons Bunoce Service. Wis ave. ; SKOKIE, ILLINOIS desire: no territoria restric: | Fountain sire peaneeeeeepens He 

field. Experience is desired in precision electrical, electronic, . AR EE rn Tohaset Sentient satis Oh ti 
mechanical or hydraulic devices such as gyros, altitude and | NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY A DIVISION OF and Bo = 38. For personal Maids omestie at lent watts nit, 
machsensors, accelerometers, operational computers, servos, “time ; x WE TRAIN YOU and ask rt press operators. . 


: Ty and ; fer Weldon. Seiad rin <8 
compensators and amplifier-cajibrators. ers D. 4 AT OUR EXPENSE COOK $ aby OrmERS Ai Trees. il NATIONAL 
’ 2 ahem HO 2-851? | 
~——PRODUCTION ENGINEERS are also needed to direct the CAR FURNISHED CLLEGE STUDEN us 
production of the above components and systems. These en- ushly experienced CALL MR. KENNEDY FLECTRIC Bye hy . See. "ABBEY First | “TRUST AND 
gineers will analyze designs for productibility and reliability, heat “position ‘with cicellont sealer? EX. 3-4467 . GOV'T EMPLOYEES, ETC. OSTE Mor 7 Liem | UST CO. 
ose design toward economical and speedy production, estab- — | Before Noon ¢.'s ety 


. knowl. bKLDS a) 
ish process methods and control and direct designs through HAHN SHOE STORES | cs | oo ow Se Shecks’ of  bo0- Pile cleus $2500 up| ~ —— 
production. To quality, Production Engineers should have a hot Pal we” $100 Per Week to Start OMPANY $40-850. Car nesded "for le. vping ite CASHIER. CHECKER 
s 


ith floor. im person only. Monde maj 


Honeywell, the leading manufacturer of airborne control sys- 
tems, needs capable Research and Development Engineers and 
Scientists at all levels of responsibility. 


days 


criving. Ne experience necessary 


‘ _~ , , Lame A 
background in precision electrical, mechanical or hydraulic —__4483._Gonn. Ave. 2700 North Southport Avenue | oe ey ete re ame ed.| Asst. bkkpr traince 


. ; a : ~ 5 oper ator ; » in Governenen » id 2 
devices; and must be familiar with process evaluation, cost TOLLEGE GRADUATES cries, ORS Paes? Reaper ve nee hier. NCR No Pit trate it Cae nent building 
estimating, tool ordering, metals fabrication and manufactur- ve employment Lib-_ AGES 21-28 | CHRAGS, BLGENS formation” . | | oes; tom, Baris te ty 
ing—assembly operations. F st. py, INSURANCE INVESTIGATORS | Electrical and Mechanical Engi- PART-TIME a os 


hour week. As 
) i 7 Sect etartal 1a : 140 Government Services, Ine. 
Sout erm Maryland Area INSURANCE *.DIUSTORS | vom, Hy Manufacturing 6-9:30 p.m. aertal bso BRANCH ¢ 138 aise ot. NW 


yr? poer. 34 Starting Salary —$3900 6 nest sppesring young men tres , a pay eth 
CONSIDER THESE i= My Ree Steet Sti, Sasa, Gaee| Pe sects, Bane Scere fe me 
NUMEROUS ADVANTAGES || Eee Sp Ne | fees ota ans cams" *-$8p| fcaieh oflge eae. Saar 


’ use® . bh : 
. . | ° mc benefits a Per’ {m. 
we 4° Ss Boe tee oa ce soeenee girk, Rockrs a oan Mise UN 


—Salaries, insurance-retirement and vacation programs are all Ik Mnisher. Kensington ts 

fi t ate. . . or Appoi ; et Are J aa 3 

araky | Technicians CRAWFORD & EA Melpar’s expansion ACCOUNTING-TYPISTS CASHIER. TYPIST. 
——Honeywell, leader 1 controls for pate) 65 Yous, produces NA. 8- 3361 has created new CLERKS Knowle¢ge of simple bookkeeping 


over 12,000 different controls and control systems for the : W_ A SHANKLIN. Mor al : end general office routine Perme- 
home, commercial buildings, industry and defense. This steady Electronic —— 2 as time ton S'-day week. Apply Mrs Lupe. 


record of achievement and broad diversification means pro- Applied 
gressive expansion and permanent opportunities for you to ad- 
vance. 


Pe tae a ag 3 BLACKISTONE FLORIST 
For positions as electronic M wr. condi ened pulldiz ne ; i407 H Ot. XW 
ather T vatician Sheet Metal! Layout . og Lecatea in “he we PY hime. 


tochniclane | ~CASHIER-HOSTESS 
—Outstandi educationel opportunities . . . 10 minutes from APPLY | Galery commensurate with 


‘ = VITRO LABORATORIES ‘ . rience and sbility: meals paid vas 
the Univ. of Minn. Continue your formal learning while Ability to read wiring dia- Machine Parts Inspection | gation, “life howpital and, medical 
Honeywell contributes toward your tuition. grams or blueprints. eg 2 BS" or a us HOT SHOPPES | air worth shi lle company veneRis 


* 1303 Cs 
. aR... ites . ‘ Crean LA eat 5 dally te envanss 
——Honeywell pays travel and moving expenses to the Land of —- AND . arity snot sae sihere™ bat Electro Mechanical Inspection EMPLOYMENT OFFICE 
10,000 Lakes. Eleni ‘and, formulation © 1341 G St, NW., Rm. 2004 a JOHNSON’S 


ee 


—WMinneapolis offers you metropolitan living with suburban Trainees 7 — Precision Assembly 
way of life. . . Beautiful lakes and parks provide golf, sailing, ' N ona Scie lect. posit! BLIC RELA-| NIGHT 
swimming, skiing and skating. Excellent fishing and hunting. Assembly to experimental’ INE O SR A ne DT A Baan x . 
Residential areas close to the plant. Excellent city and sub- electronic equipment.’ Previ-| Nerris. | pre sities wil bo a les ag + tonerg HYATTSVILLE, MD. 


urban schools. An unusually friendly city for_you to enjoy. ous industrial or military serv- 
Me . . ic@ experience necessary. n = 8 . range © a ee prob. 


5 . ull ; t ’ . * 
tive sebennen! ~ - : ‘ ww oman cng 28 .~ x. veers 
You should have extens pub iat ae ih atiraect reenelit? 


«x pcoustics | x. ; sr Spl ety 2 Sy 9190 needed for permanent posit tor 
. APPLY IN PERSON statistics, ‘magnetics and finid'tiow EVEN NG S. io cri es “sas a +> i NO ag: TU 
WASHINGTON INTERVIEW vein a Pay : INTERVIEWS BE Eee wel APPLY 
Honeywell representative R. S. Nordos will be in Washington Peakiieo' Mongs sou cris 


ya ey ation) os Bi 
for interviews at the Woodner Hote! Monday, May 14, from | Tues May 15th cy ‘retire cas: nia’ "ot! HOT SHOPPES 


to 9 p. -" is and Tusade May 15, from noon to 8 p.m. Please Personne! Department sos 18 EMPLOYMENT OFFICE 
phone H 4400 to arrange an appointment. If dates MELPAR, INC. JU. 5-7200 Various and bad Interesting fields te 134] ace NW., Rm. 200 


are vib naner wh please “— ee resume to: BRUCE WOOD, yD. 6:00 to 9:00 P.M. 
Technical Director, Dept. N. A., Minneapolis-Honeywell Reg. “PRLS Caen. WE Annette D. Tatelman 


Co., 1433 Stinson Blvd. N. E ‘Minneapolis 13, Minn. (Teng Amneta se ae. te plant eotranee VITRO at 3 “KOMI AS fa 100 we mc oa ity 
; ———TIMEREEPER : Sout, "bultse. "beisful” Gnder| Snes’ orators te Fel 
x eee Big eke 
MINNEAPOLIS | RECEIVING CLERK Laboratories MELPAR INC. "BEGIN. SECY. —$325 fe ec 

tired m e . 8 any he | 5 day +h stil fal office 
Honeywell Cease mem iat pee 
: era ol ote | enfin” a 13] ] South Fern St. cer small law arm. Downtown | joo ery endertul x. _ 


te Twe + "RECEPT. —$220 be aaeressive an and reliable lady with 
“at Di “ar RG, ANC.. 1324 Mes e- 4 : Beas execu office. Some typing Gi es 
Aeronautical Division “Ty Eties| Be Ree ee Arlington, Va. tink BE scoe Leyes: 
2 ane cage A DMIN. SECY = $4300 pe 
Other manufacturing divisions located in: BOSTON, CHIC, © . Va, starting - ay. Bat : f a ioe : eins, co day," 
DENVER, | FRE FREEPORT, LOS ANGELES, PHILADELPHIA, Henet® sotnsons Gianaler Co. tng. | TON RAST team ise Seo” bi: ea rol Va Siam 


036 Conn. ave. av.. RE. 17-3153 


' THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
__ 36 , Monday, May 14, 1956 

HELP, WOMEN “i 

4] 5,000 ——— 


CLERK-TYPIST nO MORTON Sk 
% is 2 ch RAS Noe eseed| LIGGETT'S EMP. SERV. Cs 
Circulation | Aikekat tee Wane: | Medical Receptionist a 
means quicker sales results - eee sites saat oper ’ ,. we wv SECRETARY 
: | pocutons. psiine aE! 
Tins Hd cid ws | CLERE-TYPISTS pee ark) Bate ee ee | A EN eee 
, bs "8s “a 


Times Herald classified ad- waite now of ™ ape ri | . 
me guired Menafits D r ous - Greenwood Knolls, Inc. CREDIT BUREAU 
ee PS Oe 


vertisers. To place your ad FILE CLERKS 


at ) art-time. 13224 , 
for Sunday . 5-day. w-heur weet x Excellent a ‘a r. on with pay. | gp. @RiRLEY 322 gg Ave 


Phone Many Company Benefits SIRES aan sted | » for thesda. Indy -| —SECVE-TYPISTS TELEPHONE 
REpublic 7-1234 Air-Conditioned Offices [18 TO 30 : tins . sad! See ABBEY First; SOLICITORS 


OPPORTUNITY “ : A : 
en Sb news | EXCELLENT SALARY ASSISTANT S |stteswoutit-far time Biser:| 912" eda: Experienced or inexperienced | yns. MAUSETH. CALL NA. 8-510 | 
| EXPERIENCE Bren. wfoRR- ave. nd Va. 7 Ble eens ~ Working from your own home CAPITAL 


UNNECESSARY SAL CORNER, EM. 1-640 publiaher sc pt ep arm apes path tare 


wos orn aaah | TECHNICAL SEAMSTRESS = co | #48) LIVING: IN MD.| YS AIRLINES 


AGE 
4 wy Me rope a. + FOR MEN’S ALTERATIONS 
k-typist lass res- 


nder.35 for permanent pos! a i a ant Re ‘will teoch you this AIDES 34 lization Call Mr. Williamson Age 21 to 45 


Rome  popte Pay—Good Hours 
wiedge 
» kee . ‘ ; Company Benefits profession, With permanen - oko 
Raoges oad, Sea het a | Advancement—5-Day Week ecciticn the year arouse. 7 nai 
con 


Has Irimediate 
Openings for 


College level training in math 

uijgine sre” JU. 9-4529 necessary. Recent training or! W dk - LADIE N To train for light assem- 

Se GKAGee co | | i Are work experience desirable. | cane Oeaa ances mene J SR yg : teoee ee . org bly egg ie ne er R : 

ne CLERK-TYPISTS ow oe Experience No megane peveguoune d rs — and yaaa Aves. : = . : BY ona ee MENT organ ia gi e t) ee 
Wh exper, peeded in| Srement ang ee ee tho wad IN LAUREL,. MD. 

CLERKS seg.» thus, gare p- tle-| Age up t0 50, US. ct : CALL MR. TALBERT | EVENING | Ticket Agents 


srad 


e per : ni . Col te. 21-28 - 10-1 
pesiione ovelable in on ox-| Sake gehen ts Seas] mn? SECRETARY | Sitio Sue Gh % Ad, 40800" | INTERVIEW | . 
research organization. . : ; . , t irl 
ore tt de cag taggin aman epee The Johns Hopkins; 5-Day, 35-Hr. Wk. inves. A. America's oldest and mont 
Tring, bday, week. paid, vacations University is ite ain ti Whenen Telephone Solici Tues., May [5th | sxperienced airlines, of- 
BREW GEES) coment nme | tas Sreing n seiy ot ee ha wv w=. summers | 6:00 10.9:00.P-M. | coves arsetenas 


location. _— opportunity for | 
CLERK-TYPIST cen resident and sod 4. work Bi Be Mon Many ove Ahan a ee] yg ye A iS pare AT 


of. this area pre- t lent working conditions, Air-| $2, 2° hour mip. pay: 
ferred. . a, eas “Applicants 8421 Georgia Ave. conditioned office. Previous | A Wiiats Us Yih = » Bar tte ie x 131 ] SOUTH cage "acon _ 
{ “Tle 


- ‘ e lif _ experi desired but Rhode portun ancement 


CLERK-TYPIST RA Me TSG. 00? Py ag NF IU. 9-700 PEOPLES LIFE INS CO! TELI =. (Off Jeff Davis leges. Applicants must be 
a tee ide | Box 3 Li. fot mt Employment Information Room 706, 1343 H St. NW. talization & b4 ) single, 19 to 30 years of 
1 


acorn 4 age, and possess « high 


benefits ~ : mf a 4 with ome, = apti- Wy: 
Simon. 340 MELPAR, INC. | HOME ECONOMIST ~~ Le, . tude and pe a) Arlington, Va. school education. 
pood Oar Me , oat 


' all 5 ee * 
ubdsidier r.. +f . | Capable of meeting the public time. pe - wk. . Bers ’ APPLY 
WESTINGHOUSE Alr-Brake C | t week. | Vacs. SECRE | ARIES ise bemas nine ; , eaenem. PRUDENTIAL BUILDING 
$8000 TO $12,000 | gem» sem ¥ Gad earn as much as $90 per ASSOC. Personnel Department 


t wor 


SPQ | var, nen om, saat | Eg mete ree | CLERK-TYPISTS [Seif ic foed ire | pyy!338 8 5 1 Hanger No. 3 
- . Ay “ —e . shirt unit—_( it Any ac ” j . 
cacateed Sela sieodes Pm veeday nools Renior in upper ‘: MELPAR, INC. Washington 


Steady Sion Park Valet. Vaca .— ition PF t 
RENAIRE _ |—PAYRotL CLEAR — CLERK benoit al hae coreemapeet pReS National Airport 


, ' 0 
STENOGRAPHER FREEZER FOODS E eastistas pte ATISTICAL CLERK-TYPI Bee per, Ec er say | CORTES CMTE. es, Wea 
(1) CLERK-TYPISTS (2) | 101 EYE ST. S.E. Ea  — rjuctlone "gomg i7 iny,| Must be able td operate calcu- po L_ trade associ Corp. hen? "Gomme and learn | MELP, & WOMEN 
Comm. A She we. A in petkon. 416 lator, adding machine, type- wit ’ nteresting ‘itp can be 9:30 L 
Excellent location off Cone. Are.| guawwax—weserienced, a0 Sus: Pek aat {eR a Sete af ’ rk with market anaivst. Experi- oof My Wm 100. Peonaily 
Convenient Alexandria lote-| conditioned. Comprtative salary, | Clivia's Patie Lounge, 711 writer, Ot. softies eae” witk..2 2 5: 25. Tw ot. NW. Thure 
- aeantmetetnes : econ 
Te + sem ig mee We are looking for te. tyoist| full che w+ at PERSONNEL ASST. Eves Bizoat Cire be S eai00. | een t 18, high school education not nec: ACCOUNTING 
working conditions. Experi- | whe wants to learn to handle cor- ' lace. Miss oune ot Personnel. INTERVI DAILY clerk-typis 2 meres ce on a : mee bs oat CLERK 
ence with eelctric typewriter! respondence ane collection pro- | PtnZe = | for qualified oem. 8-3:30 ing. permanent position ov eommenen » 1129 Vermon 
desirable. interview daily, | ry ~~B A, fngiish | mother home Sther servant. ts n ; : xt 3 eek ue 
Monday through Friday. MR a Ss POST TI NS INC tide Masser oes “af “inaurenee deseo SATURDAY | ~~ wee pend Tamed: ate opening for pleasant) 3- Day, 35- Hr, Week 
tails Typing : x ass ave hand ed Por fur | BY APPOINTMENT weeds oh mational trade aseociation| between 8 &. mead is. =. and oe with a, 
valifed person. Salsry open WIVES, A Hi . rote clerk to work with tien wit msurance accounting experi- 
. n sic ve | ! “ orgen ork 
CORVEY fous hospitalisation. Conv. lece-| GOVN’T EMPLOYEES, ETC. aS ECT RONICS den. calculator preferred. B-day NATIONAL oune rabies | ence desired, some knowledge 
Enai Cc at ss t motkine ‘conditions | lex, Va. Et. 6-400 ERCO DIVISION a Sent Cinue’ ees.| GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY | necessary other requirement; 1|.B.M. Procedure desirable but 
ngineering O. $30 | Your spare time can be turned tn- | ACE Industries 4200 | SRD AND R OTS. WE. is ability at arn for appointment not necessary: ote 


eS Sy eo $3 oe en 1a = ve Inc. r_Grittin JU_B-B1O | NO 
Alex = oe. Soe PFS -2190 Type 45 wpm. | Et mpeny | Riverdale, Md. WA. 7-4444) representative ) ~4 ‘bart-time TR sition, with many company 


PROOF Eee sin a TYPIST Src apetereqees. ey te;| benefit. This position offers 


r appt. call | rmenent tion . 


excellent opportunity for ed- 


-~ - 4 | al. office cat tants ve 
salers. Call CO. §-7702 for apot.| "Cheer Spri a? ee For full-time ing: | Experience required. Dwight! vancement. 
CLERK-TYPIST Gener odes work =. rental Ist-class hotel. Attractive. age 20- MACHINE ) yaogperr ee publishing = Permanent| white; Setainade’ batt of America, 428 semen ho APPLY 
gs ween cee ee a | 35. - willing to, train high school OPERATOR . ™ pnrthbranas ities. ‘Sd . alr condi- — Must oa ae <a a: to engine PEOPLES LIFE INS. CO 
ue ry open. Apply fr .* ne : ; child - a : 
VARIED DUTIES | ier sass (ait ot $07 ma3-30i | gg BUH» | Experienced, under 35, :|  STENO-TYPIG Sick’ ond vecationreave:| Se na sph eti| em Te ew A 
SHEPHERD PARK “AREA workers with past experience in| fe Pucelient Temuneretions, na| excellent working Con- | EXPERIENCED Cash bonuses; air-condi-| s#%,,*#ucstign, and phone. 
outee, ans, come i hl ea ditions. CLERK TYPIST—$3900 Mish school education: branch of-| tioned buildi Cal AeRiriot Wocarwren ara ASSIS A N T 
So Eg a Epo cet ie| ‘ofa ‘Abliuy ia Set wait seas] NATIONAL SAVINGS 2H Bes aay! since wEimetentenerene:| ONES Dullding. Call |Abhitme Products has gp Office M 
on " an + t 6500 a. ¢ ea i = ° P » Sn. i. Dup | ur '. ones. » - x oie me. es 2 mommines. $80 ic 
sri esute ££ Personnel Gefienn'? 1229 20th st. ow. au im de- & TRUST Co. & ro | Sy i . eed HO. 2 2476 $160" wr. i un aa HOS ‘wht i i. Yo n ce eek 3 


tet For intervie x er -— --- — —— pel Win Sicel termingles és — WES | “UNUSUAL OPPORTUNITY — 
Sh 8 Pate See) © COMPTOMETER | Sais Eos pes sig bear] RADIO“TV SECY —375 ogi. tarp | Beterening, and vara ! Teeth tte “eat 
OPERATORS Ase os te $5. Apply 0 BertOn, | Good trptst. attrac. 7084 50 Ue fawn a of Ts : 8 a t 3 ryasat TYPIST om yor i setitien® ‘excelent Thai 


| PART TIME Fivwepe- ser eceeaee| See eee Ge . bee | Samy aha giseneaetmaaese| EXPERIENCED Sed seen PS 


ne ~ . se .* ase nd a 
CLERK. TYPIST ) ines Pat Ss ay bre tend 2 'mo. sav ee one 12th & G *| Ne Interviews be A ittaret ‘ Must Be Accurate UNITY tynist. 


a ‘or is 4 rior NN 
Permanent, white, for general qualif! evoter. TEs i © per. dee tere ofte. wea ed RATING CLERKS to be endererit- 865 eA NON ar ond and machine trans 
clerical work and typing. High | work included. Salary open. ) Sis Eswor' Le diver Boring | Gre es pest, Sueare > Sore LUCHS Lote Te series 008 Som! 6 .« ra t ours 1 to 5 


| $60 . t~ 14 St. NW a. ay. Ca 
school graduate and some re- APPLY REY PUNCH OPERATOR! S une. Dl Bou ‘ide. LLOYDS EMPL. "SERN" — and insurance "Pian climin | eth : 


cent office experience pre- his went 
in 


ered Arconsuored tet| HOT SHOPPES | fem, s. atest | Elie bit hts Bat ops: | SECRETARY $90 WK. | STENO-SECY. |. Excellent Working | Sanasetnacai cc | ip 
S-day, 40-hour week. Bonuses EMPLOYMENT OFFICE id f Sg ent | Secessary. Mr tine. caution oe re 385. £ women—Interestt e of geen ‘jn. 2 snimgnt interview ! 
and other benefits. Call 5. Pers : pd me - os oe mae 28h). work wear. distribgtion. depart NATIONAL SAVINGS 

HO. 2-2476 1341 G St. NW., Rm. 200 | sige put some fun in pear an - pet, Ag Catrits building ‘i623 Eve ae & TRUST CO. 


bic ’ ~~ seakiee an "tivins ters. laundry y 7. | : 
e' SELL AVON in territory . - tt e . TYPET : a ls AS . | ier tigee corm. tra ; 
. ; guatepiens 


mee 
| Solars siasee ‘CO 


ced in copy eng 


near you er te so-werhare You! co lal ote 


saant pani OTCTIPHONE OPERATOR — Good ancemen om 
- - 
srewing Li Ensurance Co. °F Ge. "Pleas, ments. "J 5 ae po oe ep ‘ : SECRE ARI ES | Se Dodee. “er. "5-0 — Policy writer: for ceneral r=] Boomer motresses : BROre. | eefied ° ae eed phone xp. P 


™ irlim | PB 
Sd sonaiiony snd eeral, emgiens| LADIES—PART TIME | Bre ee pine, ee. | Spies cme wea’ d eins 
nefits ay work wee heecee 
| BERVICES LIFE INSURANCE CO | Miss at BOYD'S (est. 4 International publication hee va- person ter «© Greene eneeraes 
cd tate “ Barn extra menor’ during your! im. Go ith ena @ae | CLERK-TYPISTS cancy for efficient experienced rapes ibetaeee 4 WOOL PRESSERS 


LY 
Spteventing work snd opporty typist for goesition in wily ‘So our oe condi paid §= vacation a. pense 
or advancement in office of Er ; growine Life Insurance Co "Pleas. | | hospitalization ins Experienc eee Ladi recation 
ae ba arm. Com ne. surroundings. Good workins| Bhou! heave 12 of more spe | RECEPTIONIST For New Laboratory ee ele penetits. « = “Mrs | Starting ‘Beiar . a : valet - Wk. i a See ye ay to 
u nereases 
r 


and liberal ae 
z work week week and dependad . interview in | , Oa eTEN 
I 


wee “éur- 


c Leadin eirt cemen m 

Eve st. ne — easy | oy 8 * an "| On Johns Hopkins Road in a40e ' - Frid estmor- 
. | t abpearane ee a : : 
; OIRECT SLING oe Foret © bau es net se ad contact wath fths| Howerd County, Maerylénd, * $60 | ‘ perl bile. cat neces | Part-Time Glerica! 

WEAVE ROS, INC SALES MANAGER fe Sore vs -: vot jake duties. -~4 just off alternate Route 29, an ° enogs. eepers EVENINGS 

BANKERS enc "pm =| approximately 30 # minutes lor&s » Fret . u- 
7 company | 
me real money'makioe | = m and ofber| benefits. Air-conditioned baliding | from Silver Spring by car. er ae | with national merehandicine fire, Clerks with tlence at proof- 
°o r o- : , : 
seat verses ste ea : ce “Woman : _*| DE 7-290, Rat 261, between 8) This, is s splendid 9p ‘ tr| — _ ee | i. ts sseftieise® fost 

wD AREA — mauona| Mleint carter cpmorianies in's| Su cint it rae. | a cep cen Bere 3 | osne we peteapal jane ies) SPR «pepepeng! Desarment, 

eonaitos per manent pen At ve =a eo 2. 70 : ne he . ral | 4..y m “4 : = yrs No even and weekend Aecu oni AT at we) She Selene r : 

Sti : ; ft , 4 | me ‘ C b| ing, vacation, sic ve i 

Say.’ are sek. Mencteve bene-| soreun =m . irk Cite re Be. retirement benefits. Se, eed Pri Sipe win anges ing tesglons, a pend The Washington Post 
fer 3 privileges. = and Times Herald 


PAPER T ne | es = a 
fits TUBE CO Tae aay =] LIBRARY fan fave Ww | we Be a: ) | tna hereednems setee | ISIS L St. NW, 
4 | re . 9AM 3 PM. Le t a . . 1? - rs will t ant vou, | =< 
CLERKS POSITION ) MONDAY THROUGH FRI. 2AR Al ‘ over fecchere ox-teachers. wives . - COLORED 


hours. wkiy. Call UN 
Drug—C j ar—Candy—Fountain National news magazine has open- ; . 
FULL TIME son with knowledse of current’ sf. | emploves — THE JOHNS HOPKINS “‘e_ : uf A. 2- amily owned en 
fairs , = 


on eror 
ing for ambitious wom- 


mary Cuties will consist | 10 5s ap-| Regin 90 k with + Seve . ccal open 

"as of cateloguing and filing at) UNIVERSITY . an of . unaues ote ch 

Permanent Positions — required, Pontical & ee & = Om Ue APPLIED PHYSICS lesg above mentioned = fineme 25°90. high | gtganization. 
easant and nteresting es eomoet 7 benstiie. | ~ SALESGIRLS LABORATORY GUSTIN GARDENS, INC. METROPOrITAN fter Cus) — Laan octet if Tat Gperentecd 
eee, oe f " DI. 71-3000 —_" 368. between 8 eerie lows aye *® : will Ra oar Teile Mae of tee 1700 H ST _ | | etinice Ble a Boa tment cali HEL, DOMESTIC: Te 
Paid Tr at Pr + ony BP 8 Kes | ing Ter night work aT 8621 A AVE FEXCHERS— Waite , WAITRESS e50R oe Want self-reliant - x 

aoe rere pene aan a a ee at Ven seit. Up tons Adams Teachers ASCH.| Past modern dining room. eneal-| fous v she nei onal 

EMPLOYMENT OFPI ; ‘sa “ski 


~y Ine = ° 
Qnd Fleor, 1ith and G Sts. NW. Entrance om 1ith St Over Bic OR CAIL . * over 2). & and pieasant rolanhone 
“3 Euce full or pert ups, SPECTOR & quired. Shtha desirable but nots 
a 


PEOPLES DRUG STORE Ey JU. 9-7700 coat” Gal 


taurant. ¢ {ter . 
oie a ». =m 


ba ig F expe in selline 
8:30 AM. te 4 8M. Monday through Friday ce mention 
; HO. 2-1234 JELLEFF’S thence ah oo mikes raat ball Winn 


t 
Matas ment fae 


Must Complete Welirertes “El Flew 


The Immediate Opening ADVERTISING Reraton Bark Fre 
, SS | 


CHESAPEAKE & POTOMAC FOR 
Dre dA j 
TELEPHONE COMPANY | ress and /\ccessory Saleswork 


NEEDS ! SALESWOMEN a | : GOLD MINE af Kd vale 


GIRLS Permanent positions available in news- $50 TO $80 POSITIONS 


in our nie ae OPENINGS IN F ING. 
and F St., Conn. Ave. and Silver Spring Stores paper classified advertising department OLLOW NG LOCATIONS 


Typists good telephone voices who like to deal BETHESDA, MD. CONN. AVE. NW. 

; SHIRLINGTON, VA. NEW YORK AVE. NE. 
NOW | Office Clericals with the public, on the job training; typing sles sae antes 
required; five day, forty-hour week; paid raining Classes starting immediately for 


waitresses and hostesses. Classes held in 
EMPLOYMENT OFFICE . Seamstress vacations and other employe benefits. Ap- 


the evening or during the day for your 
725 13th Street N.W. 
uss and Fitters ply PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT, 9 a.m. convenience. 


OPEN APPLY to 2 p.m. Meal ae uniforms furnished. 
YOUR NEAREST NEIGHBORHOOD JELLEFF’S STORE 


‘Monday through Friday OR | APPLY LOCAL 
8:30 A.M. to 5 P.M. tinichaue ple THE WASHINGTON POST #% HOT SHOPPE 
THIS SATURDAY hy SIXTH FLOOR 7 & Times Herald 


_ OR 
9 AM. to 4:30 P.M. | | : 1S1S L STREET N. W. EMPLOYMENT OFFICE 
! | : | 1341 GST. NW. 7 ROOM 200 


vA 211 


-—+! 
= AF 


te =. Gin ae ie 
ath. $15. Lady UN. 4-08" 


ne, ras 


me = HARTNETT PT HALL 


a4) FOODS! 


: > it Very attr 
oa. at. a yr. detached 
ony. trans. 


tt on 
& ‘ 1 peg sh Kit. 


brivis 
-_= — 
; Beth. 


> th: 
ve Py wrivi.; 
VIVIAN HOTEL | 


| fesse 


ari ae. trt. | ™. 


ree | : _ rr com = 


ach... 
shower Young crowd 
. 1315 20th st D 


2131 O ST. NW. 


NEAR DUPONT CIRCLE 


Modern, Comfortable 
Living That You Enijoy | 


$60 SINGLE PER MONTH 
HO. 2-9100 


: Con ‘|g 
n. walking dist foun. 
on. Lae dbl. rms. Suit. ladies 
ntlemen Next bath, maid serv. 


NE 


2134 G ST. NW. 
foc ele ‘ i 
. Attrac. , Phone. 
7 - 


S 
attr. rms.:_ with, without, 
— tes. A 6 


‘lifto 
it rm. —_ priv . Algo neuse- 


-_ 7 
: privy 


Reimont 
; A. Cooking 


bh °. tm. for quiet em- 


SKE ins rd nw 


privs 


- 8e ane ott ar 


oe 
kit. privis. 


| 2 baths, 3 


ach 


233 — iat f 
‘arya! 


EXCELLENT 


ROOMS! SERVICE! 
AT AMAZINGLY LOW PRICES 


HU. ici 


working moth. 


CONCORD GARDENS 


. farn.. evall. June 1: un- 
avell May 15th: at 


led 

corner t: pear ao 
Sind: oaul 

301 uri ave. nw. AD 


made eas 


ae 


— wily . 

modern. 2- room d 

venient tagon. ston 

aan, welt te Ra Annex. Tent 
iris men. $110 


LING VIEW A 
Vv 
ory desirable 1 bedrm. New, mod 


sto 
“1h st. ow. * 30. 


| Bolling 


avy 
bedrm.. a pids.. beans. fur- 
Rm and 


_ DONNA LEE 
Newly 
Furnished & Untied 


n E- 


—WE LOVE CHILDREN 
—rets WELCOME 


ogee CONn- 
Ma THOMTIO" 


1717 17th i NW. 


Navy Yard. 1 and 2-bed- 
. testefu ay “Rahal: 


prt bath: Sas ha st 
SHA 5 


: Shr wartios at 


pacious. 
“pel furn Ww bedrm apt. 4 girls or 


——jJ-Way ex- 
tr sit. rm.. din 


toe Oct. 


“= 
ay, 20 or. efter 


kit. range ref ink Tk week 
russert 8 new 


fireplaces. river view. 


. ay. ew 
effic. new kit. equip.: suit. 
rson y 


=e atir anette, Ei pate. 
sine” lle 


studio apt.. oY bat 
rm. $110. CO. 5-351 


5, OE: habas 
A 


pSeens. p 


J. AED 2-ae 2 We . 
‘eit hod picture *wa:| ga 
poe omete 

ond ‘chee 


By eae ® Scat ekR¥ 


dinette. 


urn. liv. rm. 2 bedrms. 
kit.. bath. me. plus utils. Open 


Toom. “pitchen gad Dalbi| yy 


ly Fu 
JEFFERSON VILLAGE 


1704, AB PUUPS BAERS | 


JE. 2-5500 


» 


ea 


pees is 


ALEXANDRIA 
AIR-CONDITIONED 


BROOKVILLE 
DUPLEX APTS. 
2 AND 3 BEDROOMS 
1% BATHS 
WITH On WITHOUT BASEMENTS 
FURNISHED 
OR UNFURNISHED 


FROM $102.50 UP 
Rental “ities” Closed y dubaers 


Soe 


‘lOpen Daily Mon. Thru pri. 9-8:30 


POR FREE BROCHURE CALL 
FL. 4-9400 


EN AMR Sea 
1Moefenities hey, 
r¢, exit, ts farm fet Bond 


ALEXANDRIA 


BELLE VIEW. 
Pei we 


ts SP 


Brite or, 
aos 


aca 


rt tmosphere 

= m4 conveniences salaness 
mg: lowest 

a eatures in @2 


from @ 


Belvoir 
1ub area with 
includine 


ciency. hs | “ Y 


vee tor. 


mole a= 


r 
rae os ai 
u 
oe Its s 
in, 


ARLING 
ite Re AND —$95 


laundry facilities: 
.. an 4ous line; 1 


aa royhill PE tors 


WS, BLYD. & 
[becrm.s apt.. $70. 
range 


Dominion Gardens 
3800 MILAN DR., ALEX. 
OFF SHIRLEY HIGHWAY 


1 Bed $73-$76 
2 Bedrms., $88.75-$91.75 
ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED 


CHURCHES TRANGPORTA TON 
Flee to's eAtuROAY 


ov 3-4306 ef OV. 35-3397 


: $68-$73.50 
.| Beautiful Hillcrest Heights, Md. 
JO. 8-5140 


FOR BROCHURE AND 
FURTHER INFORMATION 
DISTRICT HEIGHTS APTS. 
7812 


Vic. NAYLOR RD. & STH ST. SB. 


_ ee 


| Beha a 


2900 30TH ST. SE., APT. 1 


SHIPLEY PARK 
\-Bedrm. fro om $68.50 


rm. . 
. wits 
dinette 


eS ee 
FAIRVIEW APTS. 
750 BARNABY ST. SE. 


NR. BOLLING-NAVAL RES. 


and redecorated: 
Wea ‘= lenshow fever, 
over 


ore 


GARDENS 


&. Frederick St. at Columbia Pike 
i. 2 end >-dedrees wale of tt 
9 closets, cross 


tila 
ar Ee nl y “other 
and sieres 


EFFICIENCY 


ALSO SOME FURN. APTS. 
Resident Mor., JA. 7-0300 


NSH TLL REALTY, Inc. 
A 


eg 
oh. 


_ 
ROSEMARY 


Apartments 
OFFERS 
Suburban Living 
At Its Finest 
2-, 3-BEDRM. APTS. | 
a MAITED NO. AVAIL. 


FURNISHED APTS on tedey. 
Make Your Selection 
Vacation At Home 


In r 
SWIMMING AND 
%) WADING POOLS 


CONGRESSIONAL! Opens May 19th 


SERVICE | Tranat & Silver Soring Shopping 
PERSONNEL 


Y MINUTES PENTAGON OR 
gor. | Cae TOL HILL BUS OR CAR 


Lovely Lawn, Trees and Flowers 


vy 
4 Vermont Ave 


© tedrme. liv, fm. bit. cold: 
v 


Meurilee Apts. 
53rd and DEFENSE HIWAY 
NEWLY-DECORATED 
1 Bedroom—from $72.00 
2 Bedrooms—from $89.50 


Numerous play ereas, basket- 
picnic tables, barbecue pits. 
1 -W . 


CALL JU. 81 


| PRESIDENTIAL 
GARDENS 


Mt. Vernen Ave. & Russell Rd. 
a. 

Call TE. 6-4400 for directions 
tment 


fice 
Prom 8:30 a. m. to Midnight 


DON'T BUY 


“*!|~Save your money— 
re Uk 


— Gardens 


Laat & $77.50 


for 
te soe 


2725 30th ST. SE. 
LU. 2-6100 


DONNA LEE 


—LARGOE 1 BEDROOM. 
—CLOGETS GALORE. 

—BUS, SCHOOLS, SHOPPING. 
—SOUNDPROOP. FIREPROOF. 
-a IN EVERY CONVENI- 


shooping ce center AB min. eee 
hatin on y bus ines. 


ton & Lee Apts. 
200 North Wayne St., Ari., V 


701 BRANDYWINE SE. 
2 bed + wtils.: 7 children 


—IMMEDIATE OCOUPANCY 


CALL a Now 


es we 2° 
: : “i231 
‘vi $125 inet. utlte, Res. 


PRIVATE HOUSES 


OR 
DUPLEX APARTMENTS 


First Floor: Large Living Room, Dining Room & Kitchen. 
Second Floor: 2 or 3 Bedrooms and Bath. 

Each House Has Front and Back Yards; Lawn Care, Gar- 
bage and Trash Removal, Gas, Water, Heat, Laundry 
Facilities and Repairs Provided Free. 


SCHOOLS AND SHOPPING CENTER ON SITE 

2 Bedrooms, $93—3 Bedrooms, from $109.50 
ALSO YEW FURNISHED APTS. 
JEFFERSON VILLAGE 


1734 ARL. BLVD., FALLS CHURCH, VA: 
JE. 2-5500 Daily, 9 to 5; Sat, 9 to 1; Sun, 12 to 4 


firing 
mer. 


‘* 


eet athe pe - 
bree hl dt 


All Avail. to Our Residents Only | 
IDEAL FOR CHILDREN 


ball courts, indoor playrooms, | T 


eater. . 


s irc 
2430 PA. AVE. NW. 
AIR-CONDITIONED 


Saat « 


OFF SHIRLEY HIGHWAY 
1-Bedroom ....from $73.50 
2-Bedroom ....from $87.50 


rooms, pastel 


aun. 
Aas 
GREEN WAY 


ea Beare 


1- BEDRM, 


APT. FROM 


2-BEDRM. APT, FROM 


we Aad 


3839" A at 2-5280 


gras 


Rtg a 

& 

NATURE 

HAVE COMB 
“Towers: 
u th tifu 
peur Satta Pa ie a 
ta A ROP ao 
oa a pie u — a gee 
ge ee un - 
jee. aabee ‘clevs oeae 
Noth ouse Mil Sit Tapdacane 
PABA nto lOO 8 


MAN 
Ari ington 
conveniences 
Air err children’s play 
aon, 
fee 


Jaree| FOR RULL FXPORMATION CALL | & 


“!) CLEVELAND 
HOUSE 


Uust Off Calvert St. 
Cleveland Ave.) 


NEW LUXURY APTS. 
COMPLETELY AIR-COND. 
WITH INDIVIDUAL 
ROOM CONTROL 
RENTALS 


1 BEDROOM, from $140 


SEE RES. MGR. 
OPEN MON. THRU SAT,, 
10 A. M.-9 P. M.; Sun., 1-6 


and 


~~WIBRICH COURT 

Lge. Rooms, Huge Closets 
Parquet Floors—Play Area 
Convenient SE. Location 


te 
y 


t 
io. schools ang 
iL 


jorge 

sto 
- Wi. -, stl te 
81) ver Hill rd. near 


transp 


bedroom. Jiving soem. eg 


1 

netle Ri. 

bath. stove an 
ine! otis 422 


APARTMENT Oe 
ISLAN 


i — i dues 


, nischen 01 and. bain. 
_ NE—3 rms. kit. and! 
1531 iy Ht NW. 1 rm. kiteh- 
50" . NE. 3 rms. kit. 
S1l GEORGIA AVE. NW., 1 
‘ living 


9 esr 


rm. 


anit. 


40- . 
Ginette, * 


kit. tile be 


New York ave 


mt . 
entr.. wtils. 


. — 
newly a i 
b) bus 


inel ell wtils door By 


yy 

except 1 
anitor to inspect ni 
a Fe 915 New York 7 


$18 WEEKLY 
tom and Penn. eve 


r 3 bedrm. apt. over- 
Penn ove. "Children wel- 


PARKLANDS 
“eame Ave and Manton Ba 8 
“BEST BUY IN TOWN” 

3% ROOMS: 
$68 and $70 
4a ROOMS 


red. 
~y 


| $81 75 and $84. 20)" 


UTILITIES INCLUDED 


Nursery school. « 
aan beneel a2 pee 


. esr ue. 
P.M 


BURBANK TERRACE 


Lovely. modern 
with modern Res Techies. 


2 eteeme. din.. kit. and beth | 


apts. 685. 
liv. rm... dinette. kitchen 


eee es, 
fing Bn cs bus and iseine 


ra. 
ave... nk st. to vide. 


fee resident maneger. apt. B-1. 
4406 Texas ave. or call LU. 4-5276. 


R. A. HUMPHRIES 


left on 


or &. Ss. ae modern 
1-bedrm 2.50 te 


aalayo8 29th ST. NW.|4 


TERE OETA bw | Se 


t Benning réd. to Mine | 


SRR Es ie 
c ee x: 


i Potty 


nitor 


HENRY SALUS 


roo 3 
vans; mAMILe eery. AD. 3-882, 


2 testo ee 


$ OF-TOWN RENTALS 43A. 


"| WAN 


apt. PROPERTY mAnAGUA 42h 
SS elev a bids.. barking av avail. 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Monday, ee 14, 1956 ors 


=| 382,000 
Daily 
Circulation 


means quicker sales results 
for Washington Post and 
Times Herald classified ad- 
vertisers. To place your ed 


Phone 
Fae REpublic 7-1234 
& SONS | TRUST NOTES WANTED 61A 


Me AME DT Faas 


‘SALE, —— PROPERTY 62 
Se a 


Investment for Retirement 
Couple can live In detached home 
end earn excellent annual ine 

ay keeping the other 9 


NE~—® rms 
. ey 
oA TUMPHRIES “& 
REALTORS 


4- 
= electricity 


. Good 
avail. White 
s 
Ps mt 


~ 0 Louisa. V 


NT a4 
re 


a a3. 
a 


sires 3-bedrm 


convenient yard = © units now rented 
® $50.000, 


Price 
terms. appointments 


MASON HIRST 


Annandale. Va. Phone CL. 6-2200 
Closed Sundays 
SALE, DB. C. 64 
Capitol Hill 


_—the. 


suite, 


SALE 


«4 
ear re. sultab 


ing. ay: 
tal Co.. 916 New York ave. 
8-7416. 


RENT 


A. 


erage porch: near - RR... 


Chas. R. Hooft, med 

Ceetestve menpneeent C t 813 Kine ssed Rin me 

aie and = . —-4t 1 ¥ y avail ercovent n Taseeies BILL OBLEY 
h-chute office a pulding. r yet | 32-3326, eves, 


a By. rou aves. oF 
aaah she 
iow ay "Soho 

v A 
MOVING 
By careful me 
705 Plorida 
HOU 


sep. 
4 nw. iO. 


URNISHED 


A ’ mmer ren 
Village Completely furn.. 
rm. June i through 


xcelent 

tire house. Guaranteed 15 degrees 

cooler than outside. just installed 

with automatic Bryant Heater’ and | 
Air cookas Conditioner. 5 bed 

2% beth firpl.. sun 

deck. eround-s fgom pee 
i 


rm.. 
level dinin: 
em DU ' 
an 


house, 


' N — 3-bedrm. 
nicely furn. evail. June te Sept 


ape = me 2 bedroo 
fen ard 


— 
paneled 
ard, near  paheal. $i 
rehitecture 
century Driex 
Avaliable about 
at en” 'S EALL 


yc OHA 
6 “ 


rs 
w desires 


rent 


ud 
baths oil, ‘heat $} 


= o 
bedrms a 
‘all PRaNcis HEIGLE. AG 
Sat om UNFURNISHED 7 
B HA 


VEN—2-story, 3-| 3-$530 
tone colonia) % 


rm. den. 
Pull bemt 
rd 
N 


Ki. 99-7799, 


help; 
1 x, Va 6- 
FREE aR ar oe Sas) fe | 
- ice rxing space.| ~ 
mo PREECE PA blame — or | | 


| WEINBERG & BUSH, Inc. | 


| ALEXANDRIA 
Immediate Occupancy | 


| 


Lots of Room 
| 3 LARGE BEDROOMS 


(emaliost i2n11 ft.) 


2 FULL BATHS 


‘with lsundry chute) 


FULL BASEMENT 


(with outside entrance) 


Wonderful for’ 


Children, Pets | 


| thon 
tire. 


te 

ate 
EXCELLENT 
supabpaaeale 


RENT $120 & 125 MONTHLY 


| CALL we 5-9100 


* 7922 
ie NIEN 


MONROE DEVELOPMENT Copp. 
134 6UN. Rings Hwy. Alex. 


WARWICK VILLAGE 


-bedrm. homes. $115 mo. Individ- | 
ual basement with Westinghouse | 
washer, dryer. refri¢.. garbage dis- 

sl. Goundproof walls. Full maint 
» BPlaysrounds. Bus. shops. 
schools sdijoin | 


town ash 
daly. iachedne” Buna 


~ Mt. Vernon Ave agen at. 


yn) Va: 
lovely ‘comnmaniay: exeellent pchool: 
Cape Co 3-bed - 
brick: 6127.50 
r . 6-638). alte 
en City. $121 W. 25th! 
Pi —J3 aK ull bdemt.. icy 


room. g-eter 


Dims 


| fuetal ne 


in 

EE 3. Pox eae. eo ” 
— Paity. = 

| ARL.. §.—#85 Coomidel:, gree. 3 | te 
bed sem 

; 
: iie— — 
ay:i5. 
m 
re " 


sie 
excel. 


' - 14 FIELD | 

AVE. —$105. 3-bedrm. rambier. wi —1 
| liv rm “ din. area, Kit.. be and ls 
utility rm WALKER & MUNLOP 


© wee mengee _t— 


aoe. “frie 


RANDOLPH liv. rm. din 
| bedrms.. bath. full basement, Tos! 
ard. kas St $11 0 mo. Call 


enced i's 


re 
aid 7 rh. 
o Sar. 
t+ b 
park and b 


| bee 
C5 —J-bedi 


Vermont Ave. 


of Dupont 2s 


fit in, Bemt: he 


=| WEINBERG & BUSH, Inc.| f 


WEINBERG & t BUSH, Inc. 


| 100.000 8 


‘Apartment House Ground ; 


. An new coup. Good uptown soaa- 
’ li hand 


dD. 
another 


Wee 
rier aay ee 


., ine a Colonial 


| hardly ort 
is for 


eal 
HAS. R. HOOFF, INC. 


flee space, 


on excellent downtow 
ocation 
aciiities. 


—, wie. aero ol oRee aE! § 


immediately avai bie. ‘i is 


Brae | © conhectin 
rooms, air conditioned 13215 an 
15x17: avatladie { mediately PTo- | 
essional tenant — $150 

st- 


M4 co_18 

—First tim 

fered: 4 bedrmes on 24 

1 ® s. 
reception rm. 

sround fr 
BT. 3-8075 bet. 


N 


ir-conditioned space 
et and eat 
we oft three floors. Under 42 


= mages 
on 


| ’ r 
A Lafereite 
reas rent. 6. 


se n 
heels. In the 20%. EM 


poets ern - 
omes, from 


eppraised price ich > © 
.| RA. 3-6552 
DUPONT CIRCLE AREA 


rooms. 


BELLE Nitw “SHOP. CENTER 


Gocras Wpanington Me- | 
nd unt rd..| 


35th.and NW sts 
covers 2 lots. Has « 
a weaving shew Buiteble 

ent or personal occ: 
rT. Kiaban. NA. 68-3 


wees quuiidies 


"Pos 
ancv 
is oF 
—New exciusive 

pe¢drms. 2 baths 

om. Opens on deen 
bachelor nw in bdase~ 


mod. bid | ment. always rent 


rent 
8- 


DiS 


era! offices 

cond 

newly 
5 


ALSO 
— One of last legal-stve lots. 902115. 
vail. up: eir| in Georgetown with room for 
if desired Perking ores. | ming pool. Exclusive, 
dec Immed uD. NEDY. DU -8056. 
TEL 
| 1675 Wis. Ave DE : vids 
GEORG ETOW! = TL 
3, HBO, KOLB 00. 
| NOMTHWEST. 2921 28h sty bad 
rooms. 2 baths, sale. 


for 77 8 


SILVER SPRING _ 
8707 GEORGIA AVE. 


New air ~ conditioned. hich 
speed elevator building. suites 
erranged to 

s'rategic -4 

Weave 


711 “rath ST NW. 


SHERATON 
BUILDING 


Qir- ONDITIONED. pedern bide 

cellent downtown ioc 

ited poace available for , peat in in- 
$235 


PhooM su 
“tan SUT . $167 50 
BOM SU $102 
pen | 


Rental office on premises ts o 
yeekdars and SAT "ROAYS. $8 to 
ne 


—Detached white brick Coio- 
i Huge sun room, 
. ist Or: 3 bed 
ec 


& Gerber ll 6 D. m 


WOODRIDGE AREA 


TU. 2-1105. 413 Butternut &. WW, 
1ST ~ COMM eres ST. NW, 
r ta bri Mr. Grue®, 


i 'M. ‘BERNSTEIN co. 


: mes 5S A i 
mite WN 
. Paymts Sem idet brick 
Dam storm wWin- 
dows, fenced yard Ris chaser must 
have s00d credit M 4653. 
Evenings. OL. 2-0135 


COLORED SPECIAL 


Delightful poruidet Golontal art 
in excel. Brightwood locat ‘4 
‘3 ba’ = T be —- ° 
knotty-pine 

kit.; lovely "yds 

tras feet carsee at 


ye 
DETACHED—_ VACANT 
TRADES ACCEPTED 


Lovely brick Colonial: sun pores 


: 
ate A g ;* suite 
RE. 7-7762 


BUSINESS PROP. SALE 


Pastistt y fore 
48 


M—Small 2-man opera- 
H at. ne “ Owner must | 
Will listen te eul ek sale 


1417 


49 


rms., 


Good lea 
Iiebert at LA 

rm., 
trian traffic of bus step | mod 


ase available Call Nick 
6-8043 
STORES, RENT 

14th and Irving NW. | 
Heavily y 

t. for any type —_ momen. 
Now some remodeled rs a ork 

7-2294 -* irs = Sher 

READY UNE Ts 


(1412 IRVING wi 
77-2294 
New stores in hichiv Le 


wa 
appliances. Lares vol tame | 


a cre : 


$295 DOWN—BRICK 


, Sol lid brick. 3 bedroome, 
side-haill pian. gas h.- 
crete front porch. full. 
ment. \% b 
shops +3 950 
NDLER REALTY CO. HO. 32-1257 
COLORED IDLNEW N 


L NW NA. 8-5500' — 


ik | WAREROUSE SPACE, Rent 50 
HO! AREHOUS 


(1 sa. ft ground floor space) 

with tailboard loading and park-| 

A 2 cars. Available about! 
including 


sa ft 
and showroom. Parking for 


10 cars penet load 
loca 19 
‘3) 12.000 oe ft. light... dry 9 , a ee he’ . ee oe 


story bide. eauip with electric | 
pezet. RR. sidin in fro 
bide. Nice offices 3. Capitol area 


affice 
about | 
ing. Convenient | 


od a “f = h cod 
i kit ern tile Dat } 
‘4 oe ep ins tion call bred 


. HO. 23-1257. 


Colored Gl $250 Down 


NA &- ae | 
BEDRM 


2 AN BRICK 
33. Beouti'e’ ‘ties somseet, ‘S-year me. 
rec ‘s 


from | _ 
way pang. oe ‘Sunset | 


1707 BW St Nw 
eat SITES 


new be 

Sacrifice, 

APARTMENT SITES Tish. ATLAS REALTY 
COLORED—2 KITCHENS 


20-ft 


34 


colonia! aes ~ home vith 
close in: 32.000 o ch 

more: water. sewer 
and paved street already in; 
ideal incation Call JA OR T7 


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 55 


RESTAURANT—NITE | 
CLUB—TAVERN 


a donsit y 


“~“TOLORED—WOODRIDoL NE. 
DETACHED CAPE COD 
$395 DOWN 
Vacant Gemorstere redecorated, 
spacious ome. 


7-7 4-bedrm 
ide-hall sien. bath on is end 2d 
; basement; h 
con 


cash 

Priced _ auick « 

Can a2 seen anytime. 
71-0677 


will 
Air-cond 
For informa- 


Typewriter Hore. 
on 


crete front 

ode Isiand 
jong established. 

experienc 


en 
eat and Re. forniah Por 
yO write Box M-J50. Post- 


kit 
man. es-) throughout. 
complete 2. 


timator ~— can take & 
arse of uire small | D ood 
ital, with good proposition. Box brick bungalow b 
ony. located 
Mrs Seaheen. Li. 6-3892. D 


COLORED—N. W. 


LOOK VETS! 


$12,900 


Only $500 down and 978.46 per 
. is 6-room Colonial 


— oare. 


vu 
r\ profitable business +d vourselt 
} mares oll co ny ‘ 
service 
a od 


stat 
e 


on ¥ Mv i 
uarters BS nn, right to _ = 
=! . Phone Rehoboth 


2- 
eet 
DETACHED CAPE CO 
$395 DOWN 


fous 7-rm 4-bedrm 
echall “bath on ist apd 
eenens. ca os h.-w. 


fata 7 it Tae 
995 DOWN 


Vacant 20-ft. brick home off Cole- 
rado end 16 “" st. nw. 4 s. 
concrete fron 

rage. full ee 


~ 


en * HINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Monday, May 14, 1956 


a5. F15,000 : ». 
Sunday 


Circulation | erated? 
Be aad ae ALT 


means quicker sales results 

for Washington Post and ae 

Times Herald classified ad- Approved | #3390) sampat: | : 3 iwin | 
q : vertisers. To place your ad "aa $2 Down “Ry | Toot ‘ din. rm. < eae i . ‘LOVELY COUNTRY =. 

“for Sunday 920 524 st. ne. Bemidet. brick. lee.| 2 je 2 ine. AES os oe . 2. ‘custom-built home wardrobe spere “s np . ESTATES 


. oo 2-6 e > : 
sep it with dishw : : gar. on f ' i%-S 

P ne 1438 Monroe ot L APS Colentat front dd bathe “ - ‘ ' 

home. Only $& ACRES 


r BROOK 
REpublic 7-1234 Suc pang, Sota More | | 4-Bedrm. Rambler 1s: soa So a 


* bed . 
. & peacefyu 
1358 apitel «t. Wonderful loce~-' dr. ~ 4 fm, to Der rm... ARLING AY urreur 
tion ‘Onis $82 50 mo , ; * Y nA rom ree if ef, rane 


d. ©. HOU 64 


tion. 
ble ate ; _ 4 ASSUME iST TRUST : tehen. 5 ree bed- assuring t 
| For these and many more call EX : S , ent.| Es 5. ip. : ° ~< , , a ies rain »-acre jot. investmen! 


| EALTOR. ‘| Wash mach w/o _ eau wit 4 * |W Realty, JA. 8-1878 . trees, citeular Haney 

REPOSSESSED | $275 Bown "iRicx Samet ah ea aT i hey: een | i 

Masih *s Pa er, full” ars “base ge ya | oa fe ve ; A |. $7500 fer i YF rartgarteot™ room 
ere PA aR oe By -1257 meat: storm windows, ceed jot _f PRICE 


, king at . 
Gur me : ; Ho ood value W ™“ ‘ FOR A >. ary vie a a aren, | 
remit Call at ee nt | 1937 TON Pb, NE. | fit own Sin bs ; PR 3 OF YOUR OWN. WITH § STAIRWAY NAS" REALTY = 3 mi. all utile. sow 


gon 
TO UNFINISHED IND FLOOR “ ] Gien Cariyn Park. 50xi 
MURRAY LEVINE, AD. 4- md $395 gown! 6 tove wi. * Wg tt oa 2-3110 


Moskey, 5415 So. 34 st. JA. 


lo rooms ' ' ; cloveriea!. swimming ee am LAA 
. 2-sto ” | Toom CUST M LONIAI m tones ¥ 
COERMILY. MBE metal. argo: ahaen torm| 8 Anchor” RONAN A ei Seren all epocious x~ light rms. ae ee | siete i $44 Oaly x ‘- ny Poosares 20-5 aie Py at oe — 


$500 TO $1000 Sow Fie af Me isietkty aRBEE™ ip —Sortat,| Eee poreee eg tom ope ai] 2 sber of Mutual Client’ Bxchanse we ‘Ba wes Swith eve-level T OT — 


: teres “INCL. PRInc. it. TAXES & oven. § 

YOUR. CHOICE "ERibattnds tev GO| Setcrrama tam ctaced bret | Bib EAS eee Spey Bae AL BAKER & SON, INC. mae) Regrets, "aa role P| se” Caan pre trom gas 
A WONDERFUL, Sag live pract: Fo - WANTED. to BUY 65 i pore | CAL : 6TVA.| .nedrm. *t vq) ‘908 BN. Wash. at. Alex, Ve VETS—NO MONEY DOWN Penced yard. Nice Ariinston maith con: ft up ; tor 
cally reat free We have a wid Onl 17 ll Legum vi NIA bot: . t ult at afta ¥ 
election of quelity rick *nomet| A CASH BUYER OR tea — =r TRA venetian’ bi ane. Oa Siaere ane rasan Rancho OPEN DAILY. pean Betate CORP. 3 2333) lson ee SONNET. SALE 73 

ome of town. 6 to 9 rooms, 2) wil] sell on terms. LI. 6-2000 : EXANDR ve OVER LARGE ake . MARYLAND 
arde| Woodridge or Brookland man | heme has Bg: we CURTIS MARTIN mw ON. A f 
noes | ae as s | fi 5 lace, wy. VIENNA TATE FURL Mil Ty ¢ CALEDONIA. PA. RESORT AF 
below pi - A ee a teh . 26) som modern kitchen der LINCOLNIA HILLS Vi A 5. Price: 5 | me. 30. 12 mi. West Gert 

; r 


ave of = Semi | 39 Ball. ’ | De _ BROYEILA T re are ne words te describe 
on floor 


Gieflstin ne a MG wis r cash otter on Ag tos wi bnty of wh , peomes 2S ee day's tow. 
Wy er oling an *, JO ces for Or eit 4 By and 3 ins. ; : — My * ARLING ON keatty Arlington Realty Co. 


hom - 
f nad rear -car 

tro] unities slight Sees, ete 2: 1 . || 3-dedroom rambler or split-level_on 
share 1 Williams ts . 
oe rs. Lesile lihams, $18. ' con t 


W. < & A. ey . ee 


LAND = depo ak ect trom ~Senera: | | DEVFI Ot ee A IRE NBS: Out Shirley wy blers. 3. of 
| zo. ate — hh 3- ayers. | | fee aoe ‘Bake ura with fail t afd separate will Dandie. Ma r se the , eae 
dollar—all cash—any WHEATON. ‘icck ots uresa ores room N N this riingten. 
Wr FA on Ye the city - i >: action, ; iS SH . incolnia rd. L ap et Sis. ' x ae SS MOTOR 7 MARYLAND CASH LOAN 
P eamnianice char DORFMAN ms. plus Ge nd leat, cand | aq spk =2} RAMBLER AND uy 4 a. 3 FA 
> 4 »s « are. OV. 3-5900. 
Ice ONLY 99980 a SO, $- $096. res HA Tas | i) is. Assume large | YHILL & SON 


ome | Silos arene: | 172 
for Your H oan Phos Ut level. 2 bathe: qarace: HW 3337 RL. Ave UN, 45 
rt eS . Sah + ard wn 1169| WOOD A Sees Arigptep ry | El os Bat ie. toe : SAY HELLO [income a cond. Over 97898 Georgia Ave. JU. 9-2852 


. 100 acres Ol4 stone house; bex- 
P. G. fo.) | “bats yo. powder nat sot ALEX. VICINITY —Beveriy xt Sin. NEtEEtOn "y was. "Inc.| 1° a Real Good Buy” Srden: streams. Olney 


ee ; fear... Sere ‘Radio Bide. Arl. JA. 7-8108 til 9| poses 8 , - 
icf NATL. ered Fe PHA rv wey {xia nancing “oho + ran temporary rambler ringfield's GOOD a Ni ht | b |: Arlington “sect om 7 |g: S158 DN., “Sa a . for, 
RE 7 3531 UN 4 3422 lahest cash for your property Wood Acres Constr. Corp. ye. a yee win- Ig U led ‘a Bo - 
» oe , “a 4 Bie Cc. or P Day, oF CO.| o ¥ OL. 2- oor jeading to terrace. THIS iS ITH room in fu! ment. | bed oN ES ™m 
ae ORIDOE Eltchens, Bf 3-7308 S| Woo 5—Panelie, en 3} dining “L", erm kite oan eccn.| aan a ob _— spacious a living A. Se 163 seres. springs. state rd 
$9 WN QUICK ACTION” rm. Saf. oa “shee at's tom ime and fish .. lee ew eee, wan) & al r : : noin dining a egtres @ equipped Kitchen lets Ad Tor 83 
. 


ungea Tor 
ely low. Just off R. Tt. ave. | ‘ . ys 
ide front porch. full bemt. ol Cagh a) Once 1 8 -7800 ‘til 9 conventonal terms A. WM 3 al 


cde St TGR any se OSE aes aw| FREMENDOUS VALUE | $1224, 284,900 as | foom, (ae tute “kichen, “fuls| ame ts “ConmmirORaRY | Arthur L. Walters, Inc. | 


i in D.C. or Ma.’ “Sal, BUDNEY. TU ly RDIN-ME ' ° i Wumeat 4 » living room with cathe. ee! 7 a» at Giebe 
nes Ge i. Yo i-7278.| , SILVER SPRING RAMBLER | a] aay | AB, ep 


A 
rookiand contein 
it en bath. f 


CONFIDENTIAL 
LOANS BY PHONE 

On Your Signature Only | 
Suburban Finance Ce. 


7900 Geersta Ave, JU. 5-406 
4608 Fact-Wet He. OF. 2-0008 
555° A. 1. Ave. UN. 464-7900 


rer rrr TS. 


laree _ bre 
COLORED—CORNER—WN w a MW PO hiy rm with fireplace full 7 = .. 
| Sxue SUBURB. HOUSES 67MD. «x fully equipped kit. Close- ungalo n asonic + mise | N'REALTY . oabar | bode) huse | ‘This Will Fit Your Needs’ " 
mi-det corner brick ‘ ee location with all mple Peatures Ist t, wy ) ARLING weeping corner iawn es Brick bier. lot 
rooms 2 mode nearby. Exc ellent hborhood . nin “iP. 2212 Wilson Bird. JA. 7 9300 “Til 9 I roved, and tte A. best vom Loy J 


« 
24.000. Call builder. L. 4-2075 2 = h. 24 JB conventional te ever caw driveway. Fireplace in beutiful 


ed bed Only 81: 
oto e. . Arthur L. ters, Inc. 
= 2-story, 7 rms fecant. 2 1. S os Realty an = : $ ] 9 500 ! aoe it Readol h > ane rreat apereical 

: lenty outbides| Fenced level lot House reedy 16 | RLEX—GI BUY | 2 Baris, MAIN FLOOR V; eae) Ty 

$700. PA. 2- wh. Charming 2-dedrm ; : HOLLEY REAL 

roker. _*F, BLANCHARD, Realtor gh equiee cul-aensee. SE.AeRIS! «=Brick Ramblers ON HIGH HILL 5800 Lee Hwy. KR s-5950 

. “i WHIT + av : ont . retty view. 6-1 bier 
COVELY WH E BRICK ent. use pew bem ous | Finest $ THIS - & . * . ns a other STOR 
Woods! de Park 2 ise 
: os. : ; fl. modern ali-elec. ki 2nd | 31-3034 a‘ full basement. o | . - H e 
fem? } an ao ” Cie: as 2 bar it root, "Sty Baths, paren at for ARLIt NGTON rooms.  Conven x] ' 009 do =. Brolga cis Sora ag ssi Colma — | * ~— vy "Yo" . 
| mac Ris or Weeut. 6 uate: rasaice' acre A lots e - ose a , 90A | repay. We like t say to 

cB abs" eT 9 | conv Ri "practise of, medic eins C ROBERT sags & CO. FOREST wo and” SEE EXCLUSIVE AGENT | foe. Total parments 887 per Ey onth. | nS | ' 


~-Exce 
close im Ariineten 


| W before inert are a0 le V 
oe Beely a. inh, bee d) ? eta ew o BLER Drive — 20. 5-6309 tn St. Thomas More p parish. Beaut.| gone. Annandale Va endure cL. & 2200 | 1 ' 
“ONLY $ LY $495 | 2 wees call & catcrigats a ein Ge ~- — , eaulp : OPEN | P.M. | ONUY $10.000 —Por by owner.) bedrm. 2-bath rambler: rec. 


well bi 4-687, 481 abit We 9 it wis ov rect. rm. _ouisid bamt| Prom Annandale, right on Annan-| {9 wa bedrms ao yore JUST OPENED 


| . ! : : 
Cc call -| rm. c., Mmemedi-| to eversthing. Price f R t Seven Co h doors, “-acre lot. nr | A NEW LOAN OFFICE 
Sis. Balt school. ana. churches. 15 min. from 
DOWN = — . CO : Lo.| F. E. Malcolm, JA7 7-3024 dpgrox , > stop Then | ash. OL* 5-657, No agents | RESIDENTS’ FINANCE CORP. |) 
| . iw treo kame OF Mv. RANGER | 
cA pe son iu. t eo07 BETHESDA Contemporary brick vew'tv shade (trees Nr Mer! Taras THE “TRUTH! Arlington Realty Co. “Comfort Is King CONTEMPORARY anes ix . FINANCE co 
ae Sa or a om 2 bedrms. and path | and Maner Club. Full center-haill| (2212 Wilson Bivd JA. 7 | AND THE GARDEN : a yy wooded setting of velvet) LOANS in 2 HRS. ot pMeanden ? 
wit r »!) pl n. rm ountry- | lawns and tall shade trees . ' 
LOW DOWN PAYMENT | aici ne el. kit. wi nd ete | 2 t. 3 bedrma.. ths. 4 BEDRMS.—$18, 500! | FOR THE vet} soy HOME eure Is Fit for a Queen Brick fireplace well in class -walled We specialize in 706 KING STREET 
¥ PAYMENTS LIKE RENT Cispoca). Gl « OO 4-811 ry 9 race. full Dbemt Only s™ J Excefient location in. THE M 4H ; RRY ORG jiving de leans te women | 
row RAs saute heat - ‘y CHASE rr : -&o 29-4944. venient to everything! Brick on: 2206 Mi. Vernon Ave, Alex. Ve ares grams , ene , i By | oe un S Rhode Island A _ 2nd Fleer + 
REDECORATED. | 750: lonial; ist &.. ige. liv CLO full basement has lovely Pee ole 9-3639- a 93-0078 ts 7a. desutiluliy  tailored| carport, AND you can ASSUME BIG\E| Mt *Relaler mé. AP. %- yaeee ' Phone: King 8-5858 
inspect : . ne + . e. . ns Olg_Relepie Office al AN | 


ul ‘atment . Ga. ELIEV Gl : -top No. LOAN with just 82000 cash. | $e tor hours 
as ‘ ar screened porch . ou a y liv. rm. seo. din. rm. 21 Me i Oper evenings — phone 
cnrogll cmiact. brick. sute bedrms.. ; “Ber A sure to see this one— os 500 Teng ~ : ny handy extras, incloding my —— , ——— 
eat autifully redecorated all | i! ie . 2 " ; rpet > <a 


| a a. ; ; f it last, the wooena. 7 ais 
Pag fee S| Socehee eee Smuncrow ney, Say fre bie Ate LOANS 
Wwe auto. peat Lae ee: sittin A—Close in. off Brediey:| © ? kk we ui tine Neale: neol to move rm. fin meliow ors, nc. | 


A you 
cal for appt. | ge rm home setting smaller as your fam- w m ~ panels 506 me at Glebe 


w $1 

we euges: = ee a - 950 _ : ; answer to "Fa ee fn. POUR nH ° * master begrm , ey 7 et ae . Pins Vireinia —— ON YOUR SIGNATURE 

REALTY MORTGAGE &| “SAmuieE™ pogiEY Inc" | sep'"ain rm. Sern cit:| BEDRMS ° LL BA Gkevur fit cee | fe Bs ott fete a " 4-490 ony 
INVESTMENT CO serarepa - This 6 room and 2| 2nd {| Wooded | “Most destrebie ek basement. ° - ale bhame has Le ie | 


, - r 
ONT AVE § Ww baih brick home With recreation ' ion. Designed for comiortabie ; old brick home was ree recent 7 


oom. #1) 00 ce is! living a " ' ’ ! 
Tenet | Solp's Blocks rom ‘pubs and pa) C ROBERT GRAY & CO. | Wisciy Siuchasin tne Aasio| str tera carpor SPECIAL | P Omponio | COMPARE! SAVE 
aw 22.250 a WO. 6-2300' S916 Fils o- re —F tak -§100 ag. A in a beautiful new bedrmes. liv. rm eautvoed p , WOMEN s LOANS 

m La CAPE LS drm. 2-bath home subdivision for non-Gis. Loca- | kit. | resents . ‘ Our S ialty! " 


tien. 4 miles south of Alex- 


—-——_— = --—- — 


yc ' Pe ents 
Tn s-choo wor tare Secs ~| va tT led & t. corace bent s ice = OOD COMPA (oo ogg Aly yy a fi 4. hf Moton Realty, Inc. ep “iat le “JE. 2 5 | C’mon WE CAN MAKE S80 85.59 
; | edt | | | 
: leet KORZENDORFER. ‘til 9:30 din r 4 rit re —: ) 
COLORED—VETERAN | ott the - REDRM—I-5aih OAR Cape Co, | tractive fix oF = 7". | “i of, nae ort New Hons. Seeacte Engg. =3 barms “| to pty rouse y H Phone 13.97 
' ym : enced io roll a . ° Se i | 
$I ] 50 | fatched bedroom Cape Cod, u se ool Da Ack . Wheaton. meee | | CHATEL—JA,. 8- 7330 aiate carport, euto. lsun-| epee Ra RD ibe | LYON PARK rs. Now 17.47 
home nes been apprg ed SDA. A Y ‘O0ODSs 1. ook =" nutes “TO. powitro WN D Above rates tnclede tuterest and 
ap nand. eho Sper Fat Same Saat il) Bitafcaa Ss Reeanests $14, 500—FHA $13,250 TO $23,250 | : . “fied conueway Das Fo powsTown Dc i Suburban Finance Co, § srr: sim mente mir 
room. & reened — oan . di 6-2860._ 


wood. 6 ful ARLINGTON be ta - . 
bemt. Nice yard. vacant. comp) ; : los ran I | ine 1g : . ’ convenient Wa ancria. Por appt. te see. call orne a S feonths 
Ananein to suit) 1115¢ Georgia ave. LO -7200) 2 ne ~-—y rooms ad ey t Ave, OV. 3-5900 _M Hail ey, J You A LOAN IN 9.08 
ne =— an offer on tie Pull bs rt 

| . : = abe : | 20.96 

: . . Os ' Pi, ’ 

attract a detached | Star Mt PRANK. LO. 4-7080 Fw t hf school. -BeDRMG > BA’ BATHS INIA BURBIA- yar ——ral, Bag ~ ey lye bedrms. and two baths Just | ONLY ONE TRIP NECESSARY @ 
rate char 
“JE ‘ per month of the unpeld belance. 
rit ith 3 rms. and 4:| Each house tm this selection t 4985) ome ls Soe oe tie Bio Pak AA pose Jel. As N. 4.7200 


reat) 


bedrm bath on 2? 
bed 4 batlr on ist: this fust noteworthy for ar + - and | a 3-car ood OL 9500 5 
Cape Cod js tops:| genuine val list of *60 p Der Mc and 2-car saraee ip © i sito .% PHONE JAckson 5-888 
VISIT igi basement: “wosded™ foun) Feed Some pe Wisin at er O. | See POkedat || MARYLAND Cash Loan 


: : sense, fer _ your money today! 

Enjoy spring now in this 3 CROWELL & CO., ie. — Pye ets tse. Is all You have to par if A 1 200 Gooesta Ave. fy Sits 

arate 4. fF. full “or ine 
INC. OL 0098 5 arate dining room . - 

ETHESDA—Coioclal, 20550~ | iy. MR. _suntened Marcy *PALLS agg tractive grounds walkine distance ere 1 sehooly. and Wheaton Finance Co. 

;: bier will ahve y Gown payment 2907 Wilson Bivd. 
= large a 1 Ob 4-388. 8 5504 aher rill ave JOY. "Handsome living room with| Westover, Me MANNAS REALTY eokin 
sehae L - 4000 kitchen with ‘Dreakiast bar an 
— = 4 magnificent bedrm:.| ***ish, display of natures wonders 


‘ ck oa on ) finished r also ultramod. | With tall shade trees wind 
Bea } re yar 4 . ~~ nae | scttoo bus line d_shop- peartas- -$14,.900, assume | | ‘ : | ot and ifice 
¥ Re ye. a, iy 24 .. full Best ‘ PARAWAY HOMES GL kp | Neet-pew brick Cape Cod. 3 od 2 bed-| > equip = 1 
? ior moderp oo. Ho 2-12 SOC ° ‘arc | environment | tamil YOUR SEARCH excellent expansion. bath roughed reach: {out ‘Dominic ar| be ne. 
cat | omfort. beauty! 1 = ume ; vegreome 2b , fd cael Rr 6 ;, Realto ae new shopping area and) 4/19 ete be a with overeat hue ieture Y 
98 995 WN rambler son 5 7; es war rigg ee! r left a. 47th ch is ead-ond at 5. 100 ve $1200) A 
. parkiing 
a a sora seine pekiar idtewitiszin haze] $28, $60, $ MONEY IN 1 D 


l% BATH tt Red sent ~~ ae Pn Biss: ; Sree amie No. Arlinaten. 
ase . 4000 —_ 30a Attractive a—seeren res ND 

‘aang ahicn OA ar. | to $28. abvalle a bs00. * ‘ we'll el u et rm ick aut. p62 coking nice sasdet eened | nly % oie a i ote ite 18 | On bay A mame > oaly : =e Bad ba Ad 
: BE 5 x Cc ens te rie ; : ’ : xious sell ' 

WT | expansible 2nd fi. 2 bedr wf $20 980-827 * wer — 4 4 ona ootent neighborhood sit INnG— 9461 Senifent yw 8.1500 

HO/ AES | rv so. B Ashten Heights. No. Arittnaton— . ded atenerty 1G VER SPR 7906 G lo Ave. iaheines tir 

Banengry AREA idce, S-tedrm home in amecia beyond Cus Course; etreat |) MOUNT RAINIER— 3233 Rhode islend Ave. ADems 2.3500 

ROBERT E. LOHR 12,900 acten, omering can ws a; | bedrms. $ baths: shea: 0 ARLINGTON— 1407 N. Garfield St. JAckson 5 5400 


1 
rate ou ce a acr : easy Upkeep. 664.000. From me bate of city to) 
HE 4-4000 "Til 9 PM. RA 6-3 DOWN aot, e.city 
Out seth Year of Dependable Berviee| Te the euslifted veteran the above! S*0unds. | i va... | Be aulet and of wh In Virginia, Borrow up to $600 


ing 1. spacious den with you need to buy this! | 

2 BATHS—DEN | tur n eg Spe Contemporary — Cape ( Od | a " Lecation one) A gee ee PhP treamlined vi Expansive 

S08 OGLETHORPE ST. NW. | Sheerful kitchen. ig| Spacious living ‘reom. deli | Surrounding t — Sigg — | nei, = Pee by yy Spent a | PUBLI L A 
vide I's detacheg pric oo Bn tixost EY p RBALTY Gining srea. ems | well constructed co use utitwl grows ® pose i elifornisa macazin 4 ot show piace 


Cc 
3 0 ; A a bait- acre corner jot! 2. ree | baths. 
as. o" , jroom cone atte euta washer. hot- lee Bivd. Bets. Addn 620.150 ettractive yomates offers 3 bri formal dining rm 


and a! 
secon Pull »} . ct I—Unusualiy attractive 3-bedrm bedrooms « 2 on one level. | kitchen as «bie a6 most living 
cee § $15.950.00 NER z CO. rick rambier, 27-ft. 1. r.. uti-| Desement rec on rooms' Gorgeous pane notes recr ea- 
CER | Bal bitches ee, Say easing | Bincact alle Sect ent ise itn cute ear, fhelgena 

“4 N 3 Courthouse Square cyiet nee r oa c . 
Woodside—$24, 500 | = 2 7 ws of 7 corners. cowbo ‘ 0 ent terms! 
‘ en NIO. JA. 71-6660 


N M ONE : aad em. sm : aoe 
Lot 139 922175 29136 625 Cen ett —wawon—3— res ED 
T yN- Gruver built. fo ears old. one rms. ington PPRO appoin 
O O EY pod aronel ty. sibit | and half bath Colonia! Three well. | semi-d + = full bemt.; Saeen t.. we. Ar! bed | "ARL ING ON R ‘ . 
your oredit is good. owne el : ives proportioned bedroom &, e| Griveway tho “s 44 i n ler rn ‘ee ° lee | a | ac $20 to +1000 
thie solid prick ” priv n | screened porch. table chen ree. room 27212 Wilson Bivd. JA = ‘Tu 9S 
e ‘ pa tile to th tn itech . . ’ 


h rm ti) is aimost | *auipped & r very mote 
u te full bemt ough poevcosee — large wooded lo Pr . = astes Your prob 4 READ 
ong tev *\enenn ese ul trent - BRICK RAMBLER Fix scersisal — Gi—$300 DOWN . Tits po x Ly For , 
ele ; ’ ivi : : | | orn a «x t you get . 
*RAtbIN b' COHN | ata antes: © JAMES C-CONLEY &.Co. ron pyrecrios ES “Ete a barat ce sisi) «..FOR THINGS YOU NEED AND WANT 


reos : 
sereened porch tle 3-cal a- bedrm -bath home 
rage. By apo choss & PERRY,| has reened. side porch: sep —2100_ 5 plete Rd. JA a GI tor this nic nice 2-bedroom FAMILY 
Finance Cores. ef Arlington 
-f] fireplace race. of city school. shops and 
t Well-bullt mod t., glass x : ~ “44 : F P This spotiess 3-bedrm te "12- portation. e Very small 11081 , yore ee Rd 
in e..-oul! m yp at ; ' In bea MOR o : . te’ . © 
sep : - tcture window view and fireplace in t| for & aR He nice 1 wi Arli mn, Va. 
~ tchen sd A. din ‘in, fer Pant private showing L mopletely eau d borhoed; | x JE. 2-31 10 rambler 7 with ~~ ay ols af ate as & & One 7 ngto P 
hial Ot si Blvd, 2 bedrms. heeted, glassed | peewesaye STONE AND BRICK | rms. and 3 tn in Cortaine._| | — 
peed, | J Rec: proved Ve an =o RLENDORFER HR Short wa St lovely “fenced —s ~level; brand-new: top country ment ve uve never seen such «& 
1@al um : . 
wagers and ‘screens. casement ponitiy 


Ke LEVINE, “AD. c 3737 Chestnut Ridge Manor 


rms 
ing rm, with 


: "AL Ie 2 
TU. 2-9200 | ment with outside OS : better thea | JOSEPH W. SEAY Co. orks . Kitehen 3 z wipreined bed Act ty ah eis = feet a You may be able to take advantage of 
oommns750 DOWN Ww Eves cai “Sikes. Swain. | CHEV “>. antu a tL mS E 2.9400 ier Se NG with cash. Apply for any amount up 

$750 DOWN OL, 2-03 brick home on extra- eye tehen has ‘counter ry Cyan Realty, JE. 2- Baylies i, “oane to $1000 for any ¢ —take up to 


ps brick. 2 encl porches | Walker & Dunlop, Inc. cated on Cheverly ave 
aths 


front “porch, “1s natural bedrooms, 2 baths. ist | storaeg att “attic. c. gorm windows and pe a Sah ee a ey: 24 months to repay. See table below. 
ja. 3 


auto. h Uptown Office EM. 23-6716 room m beeen | conve onal — Surroun . rancher 6-416) 
RaLss trY"to | ttone . rec, rm. | $13,600 with dining elt. all located in popu. | ABH 


lar Pi : 

— - of haper fom with Is verbal orick Tamblet. petached req | Cosh | MONTHLY PAYMENT PLANS 

~All Ebley hoe neastna comple- REALTY MORTGAGE N-| Stanley R. Rowland Co and close ovely x S a loan at HFC is 
| VESTMENT CO. NA y &. . thopplne i ok te bus. $12. S08. 


1 Club’ North Arlington’ Gi 1 

+ . a ; ‘oun ry Clu or riing 

ED ‘s kitohen. 3 bed-| & Sun. AP. 7.8267, 6489.| 120 B Broaq St, Patis Church, Ve with excellen a your ability to 
2-FAMILY ‘3 and 2 baths o | JE. 34-3333 


na for 621, ; 
rooms and 2 by h "O-tt, front | OWEVERLY—6270 cach to vets: 6- r—. Ere | THOMPSON, JA. 2-21.21 B repay in regular 
GiI—$750 DOWN f school, store mus. Rea: ‘ Veteched home Pull bem oil FALLS CHURCH (OWNER PI “Ht g REALTY + me Ri » gt —_R, rags monthly instal- 
| | din. rm.” VA appr. “de” Romi csi ae wooded Coes, Se | mend | gn shout this heme © DO we"! ments. 
g| & saviaed. ne 3% ir aeons | >| MOTHER | freee The: folks at 
ial. AD ‘wT ‘BILLUN—-Spotiess ett . ay sis00, INCOME off IN-LAWS? | t ras are TEXAS BED- ousehold are 
kitchen. | nr ell conveniences.” Pric B'nset | Bae os wh i ro Mio REALTY. Ki itans _ 3 YOUR K DS m2 an ‘ato. bas : experts in fam- 
wth R. 1936 | awegy “AREA —36 Ene lot hank " ily finance . . it’s 
apt) vacan’ tor purer. 55.-| pengertieid | rd. od Cheltenham FALLS CHURCH AREA > — more fun im this ler on pews os po omy place 
815.250 GI APPRO ' borrow. 


com and ar is —Ca “ a es Texans state’ Pha 
4025 E ST. SE. | fie"nom, "alain ped | Ema, Meninished sti, : rus MER xe ‘0 : ss ee dinjne ‘room 53 @ LIFE INSURANCE ON ALL HFC. 
GI—$750 DN., $75 MO. | Sdiata Cus Pit JW Reale, 81878) Persie Ms ‘setae et ei Seat foe tor ares ae =a LOANS WITHOUT EXTRA COST TO YOU 


te 

og ag | ig ay Me yess. pear schools, ens t, im recrea- 

om t ~ ty ree Capitol or rt ‘ bv Park. y owner, and bus. room. , 
ere ae : att | Tar Grail ty MG aset | fable, Src beaming | | OY CAE m1  |MceCAY & McCAY, Inc.| SABE OUSEHOLD FINANCE - 
5 6292. eo a aut ip ak wooded tot. . JA. 8-8675 Eves.. JA. 2-4713 : Uoysetaliona———~—~*S 
RA. 3-4884, HU. 3-3316. fm TOUES FOR X Ji ae: CHESHIERE INC 
CHAPMAN REALTY CO. ler EALTORS | | an ment. ie foun at / . 
’ _, ~~ . ne vine ‘ow 


OT. 4-6400 7303 &. Ari. Ridee Rd. " 
Pinished recreation room in above |“ ems aft. 2223 Wilson Blvd: JA. 17-6660 
farses basement; paneled den, aa bem ua rm. h-w. hb 


*, mi: * appro tedhapen ign 7: 


elena, Lake Barcroft qtaran’s . sesals, new! pedroom , Templer. eR ey scat ateesent 
and uge 


I. 
$200 Down oii 7 oan Page Me 4560 : 
$67.50 Per MO. lipase | fii ey oe ee 


— ~ Buy With 5 Landigonte fulfy , “Peli tote Cempenans 


Alexananrs oftcrs coms are lematod beer eed 
hily on Selenees to £300 end i%% monthly on any 


x ie Se ra = 4 bo tos : .1kC antag rel ie Fe eons | 
aS ome = | bosemape'see ts, : ae eh Ja. 58-0707 | =. BEY BE are RS mt. 9.4008 —e Ses out | : Genlineed on Following Pave 


wD 
“FY 


~e 


SALE 97 


HORS 
Sin tise tide Festi Be 


’ 
from 
. Por Gone & or 
“mal JA. 4-1257, 
r. we 
B cetth eee Far san pe; ivory. & top 
Ie rane fe wer brakes: 


| ES Fe tol Cadillac-Olds Co. 
fw a i 


d_9t._ 3 NW. 
UICK ’49 CON 

AD. 4-4102 
"SS. Riviera - Si 


ee 


pee 
iG) yu any 


ty 4 BUICK 


nee ~|RIVIERA TYPE COUPE 
meses.| $783.96 TOTAL | 


ree $95 DOWN 


on dio condition 
edi, apprer 


"MILLER MOTOR CO. 


316 FUORIDA AVE. NE 


LI. 4-2396 


Bricks — 

lorres po co 
| of colors. MYATTSVIAS B 
Rhode Is) and Ave. SBrent- 
Md. AP 77-9000 


dons & pets. - 
ir of ively male & 
away trom tram 


"a 


ten. cham. | 


bien! 
itnes temp chote. docked. BR. &- 


Tp. ima 0 Wei mt: AKC 
AK 


. mal oe 
“Speirs 


aver tibies 


yoe. loves 
will pay board for food hom wt n 
fogere- im yard or country. AP piick 1955 Roadmaster “Riviera 
secan. ereen & ige; pores steer- 
ing. power brakes: $6229 ccc 
arantee 


apitol Cadillac-Olds Co. 
ict tor FE, 


id black Lop fully 
_— pewer s«eteerin 


power 
brakes. special price. $3595. CCC 
eeoitol 


1150-$200 AD. 4-28). a 


5S. Minia' Pat 


*. ARC. Pals —% 


9981 
, 3 
shots housebroken. arith 


Pm Met ne hws 
FARM AND GARDEN 


RDEN 2 
GARDEN TRACTOR with pb with pilew 
never noes $159 or best offer Rais 


roe soul, nat Ga bisa ptone, an and| 
aryYSTVIEGe ETc. 6 


1962 .) 

foot shift. Gual apot- 
a) 6Utern 6 Os aenale 

Call after 4.30.) 


apitol Cadillac- Olds Co 
222 224 St. NW 3-2800 


CADILLACS 


FF “6?” SEDAN 2-tene 
ed with eesaem low 
age. $495 é0¢ 


"SS 


dos 
Special 


re mm, "eed tom and ite nish. wire 
heels a. ures. & jewel 


' "62 RARDTOP. One-owner. 
ia.000 actual miles. $395 down 


OE io 


blue 
™m..2- 


$4895. 
irecti 


ELDORADO 
Nee on wheels 
¥D 


FE Sic om; 
Faces SALE 


" ; “Ss 
| meek finish. one tne oener 
don 


. ectual miles. t705 


co 
Plats 4671! 


oe vo nes 


American. ‘Tra Power 


338i 
| 


"SS BTICK «special FR ' 
: an se ine 
ieee: ‘Bran: trater and Cree 

AiL sieee a) Veal new and used 


$$ MERCURY Ht- 
American railer Co., inc By - yy S— ey  - 
wn 


Pully eau 

S600 Wie ave oe. WO 6 a shew piece. soos ao 

Ogen 9 te & weekdars. closed ‘bus 
— Cap ROS at 9 Air 7. 

op wert 

TRA WANTED ss very Gnish, 
as house for 3 5 down 
wks. bes. Jube 23, CL. 6-261 i, 


AUTOMOBILE LOANS Mad Soon 


ee e 
Ave 
rN LOANS | 
SACRE 


‘een under Smee oan Laws 


NEED MONEY? 
Cal. Brats Loans. US. 4-2 
LOANS 
On test four own signet ure 
Finaoee 9 -*% 


SALE 


' 
‘ ectual 


a! soper “St” con- 
wer. obe owner 
= 6 Dew 


it 


) 
, BUICK ouper Riviere coupe | 
Puily equipped like epecial 


ae 4 Ad By M.. PRY 


Perret comen. 


of-towners ae on spot 


BLASS & CLARK 


Corner '. Capiwi ra. Ave. NE 


AD. 4- 9882 


, 
> 


™~1951. ten Gump 
| excel os m thrveut. ready 


150 


1S bietas Cir h of 


cll ner the 
Vv. &. Capitel : 
—i arr 
- “a 


—_ panei. 8595 = Co ——_— 
; uf gia UN $- yess Biacs« equipped. power steerine 
—j a. _ dae Gelive ‘ery | power brakes. Special, “30195 ccc 
afvr 3:26. 4822 Pairtax .¢ Ar. 
an 3 > Capitol Cac Cadillac Olds Co 


ace-ot - pained guar 


oe we Sefise 


$ 
wal 


Pe 
anteed trucks ad 
town 

[SON CHEVROL ri 
ore ave Hyattsville 


lon panel see 
mileace Good tires. | 


ee 
iriONaL 47 


Convertible 


+3995 


ruce ence. : 


val 
Mr 


"> 
steer ine fo! brak ee 
Bar 


ate 
( ; anc, an 


ling re 
etre, 
~~. : 


“MILLER  OTOR'C 


116 FLORIDA AVE < 


= LI. 4- 2396 


CADIILAC— i955 Eidor rege custom | 
rt t wnt «(Uerer. i 
= 


"eee! = esses. 


. BL. Sos. JU. 5- ate 
” 
AUTOMOSILES bof a ld % 
Las x. bi 


ck-up 
“tis : 
mi 
4. ” 


or al) makes of car 
Melt Stac 7 _ peeter . j 
t ae CO ¥ 
aT aOR “Wag 
w E MOTORS 
NW. EM 3-014) 


ciret § poy! onl ¥ 


ruces vase 
ona price 

sy SO this Bee 
2 KIRA MO- 


ra ther Interior 
ccc sua 


to 


model ca 
*. t to eel 


nd 
‘ ST_ 3-2800 
your car FDREW) ay cabuLac as La rd 08. besutitul 


arure blue and Ei 
+ “sigering and 


dillacs Wanted brake on PR 30- Say) 
PENNY MOTORS | ito Culy ts C5; 
re. NE LA. §-2200 ee 
PRCHEST CASEY PRICES Paid cCADIELA > 
FOR LATE MODEL USED CARS as 
HERSON’S 


‘pone’ steering 
Capitol Cadillac ‘Olds Co, 
8th & O NW. DE. 2-4700 


~ WILL PAY HIGH | 52 “CAD. 


for any ms 4-DOOR SEDAN 
“FLOOD PONTIAC | $95 DOWN 


eet Connecticut Ave BEAT TIPUL BLUE FINI 


DEALERS nee ADITLLAC Es 
Re 7 Ee Re 


_F Make 
BILL DENIS, INC 


WILL PAY. 
c 


With 
c TPMENT 


~ onl 


PPR. , ACE BBROR 
tie AUTO CENTER 


OR NORTHEAST LOCATION) 
> fae NE 4,00 


ro 
vibes 


rering. 
price took ccc 


Capitol Cadillac- “Olds Co. 


CONVERTIBLE 
$145 DOWN 


Y-BLUE FINISH 

Be i pak 
CADD LA Prenita 
Bstrale Wieden US OM 

Olek CREDIT 


LPPRR 
PENNY MOR re CENTER 


ve. NE. LA. 6-29 
é CARS—Any ae 
ae WH & COU ety 
5336 Wis Ave NW.| 
= brakes. specia) 
M 


A w 
~~ HA uarantee 
TR sc tol Cadillac-Olds C 
WANTED | ize <W. 2. 


1222 224 Bt. NW. ST. %-3800 
“s6 te "SM. any pease o AD 


ER 
w’ 


elcorne and coid cash price, 


' TLLAC lpr caqvertibie. a 
odel. Top cash pa power eau 

— — > MOTOR. 145 So | @eaee: on 

{ 


ave ' ee ec Olds | 
RADLEY SHOPPING c 
BUYING!!! 


Miehest prices pei 4 tor used 
care Brine : 
= of our a 0 s 


loca 


"EMERSON & ORME 
(BUICK) 


ith M Sta. NW. 
e146 Bbees Island Ave. NE 


‘55 CHEV. 


OTORS 
Arlington 


“ar. 15000 wiles | 
commuters ca car. 6250 NO CASH NEEDED 


¥s— sir ana “SSe | Subject to Credit Approval 
Sedan, fully eau Light 
| Snish. gy Se . Servicemen « 


| franks ‘ financed. 
redit approval] cal 


pe Any | Adams | 


} 
eeeters ee 


ervice and su mio 
an 
AL 
ea! 


in Hea! 


ei ‘te Mo 


Sar 


a & Rapp B I 


. — peortis, Min. 


Hi) en | 
ao Willys. | 
ular makes 


AN AUTO. 


artes. and 
914 


37 20 GEORGIA AVE. NW. 


4 eut-| P 


' 
| SHARP yaiow CONVERTIBLE 


Capitol Cadillac: Olds Co. | 


vadan.| 8i2 


= 14-2396 


$785 Total 


Powertide. pert cond siis0 Ja 
8-689 


SE 54 CHEV. 
$375 Total 


NO CASH NEEDED 
| Subject to credit approval 


Take over low monthir saymen' 
2-dr. sedan An settractive eat | 
sold as te. Steck Ne. 1979. Libera 
terms arranged for servicemen ail | 
He yy no down payment) 
For credit sppreval 1 


‘TU. 2-4200 


BILL ROSS | 
7400 Georgia Ave. NW.) 


‘54 CHEVROLET 
$475 TOTAL 


REPOSSESSED 
NO CASH NEEDED 
WITH GOOD CREDIT 


m convertible | . 
only 


ment a lg lt 
ANDY KELLY 
‘FOR CREDIT APPROVAL 


ME. 8- 2674 


1954 CHEV. 
$295 TOTAL 


4-dooer. 2-tene Tints Needs mo'o 
werk, Only +. with apor oved 


MIAMI MOTOR MART | 


aioe | Benning Rd. NW LI ie | 
ok Rot Sea mag tte a 

tien. One low 
with "| 


30-day 


~ AED on 
set ea 


uae 

\s 

639-A 

4 term. MO 

“ ave. oe. WO. 6-2000 oat $ 


Sy CHEVROLET |r 
REPOSSESSED 


$189.20 Full Price) * 


| eat a, Te cade a A > 


A T7O8 
a4 


‘OUR NORTHW 
i ; 5. Su. 


‘56 CHEV. 
4-DOOR H. T. 
$245 DOWN 


a 8975 Down |~ 


| nh 


|THE “xUto center NA, 8-4455 


BLES - 


»7 
’ 


PED OUR PRICE IN FULL $2595 
it! ht eh AF FOR 


THE | AUTO CENTER 


(OUR NORTHWEST LOCATION: 
’ png 4 


CONVERTIBLE 
$45 Dn 


INTER} 
INSIDE & 0 a * 
og | ae 9 
EDIT 


Bek CUEAN 


Devive 


Re Lurk CENTER 


HB EAEVROLET | | 


REPOSSESSED 


a $312 50 TOTAL 


2-dr. sedan 
bia 


2 50 down 


ot eal ly $20 16 


ecit approval call 


SECURITY MOTORS 
- 4th& N.Y. Ave. NW. 


> Tt 5 
Cm vEOLs orcs : 


orve tte ike new 


“Rosenthal Chevrolet 


Gieme Fa. and Columbia ptse 
Ariinaten. V¥ JA 


Der 


CREDIT Top 


ave. ne. LA. 6-6690 


Ss. 


DE SOTO 
$333.86 


FULL PRICE 


$45 DOWN 


t-deor. r and b&b. 


monthiy payments 
with pereus drive 
_, For credit a 


“MILLER MOTOR CO. 


316 FLORIDA AVE. NE 


| * 


SS TU. 2-4200, 


| 


' 


Or dale wlth es T Yancer | 
7102. ad 


| 
PACKARD 2-DOOR 
48 BUICK CONVERTIBLE 


THE WIDOW OF BURMA 


Suin Saweau 
MARRIED AND OUTLIVED 
KINGS OF BURMA 
SHE SUBSEQUENTLY WAS ELECTED 
EMPRESS OF PEGU - Ti1é FURST 
WOMAN IN HISTORY SO HONORED 


Way Dy 


— > a TAY, 


JACK PRY. 1 LTD. 
1508 nh - ae 
Banirsbote A, for 

Beas. Porsc 


end ‘5? FORD | Mercedes. Pers rar 
a Ree, original cad ni 2-DOOR SEDAN Eee are Sa > 


ras tine hw — 

$175 TOTAL | iat se 'teos nity, abet" 
NO CASH NEEDED EeaRie SMALL JR INC 
ON APPROVED CREDIT or 


1736 Geed Heve Ra. aE co 
sno ‘exe up 


24 gtk? 22 ‘51 FORD 
VICTORIA H-TOP 
REPOSSESSED 
| $399.50 TOTAL 


end ivory 2-tene faish 
peed 


shoe white. hee yay 
he 


binky BR R4 ve 


holsters mt £ 


- 


pea iowa ‘Baish 
RE. 7-3890 | 


BOB. WILSON 


sné K Sts. WW 
is Let on the Corner 


‘SS ROYAL 
LANCER 
HARDTOP 
“V-8"" DODGE 


“The 


ana 
balance $25.50 ser mon 
For. Z t Sroais appreval call 


“|ISECURITY MOTORS: 
4th & N YY. Ave. NW. 


ot on 


54 FORD 


CONVERTIBLE 
$95 DOWN 


B K FINISH WITH 
t tor & Lal 
© whit TOR 


O CERITER 
a. aig ® 


ON APPROVED CREDIT | 
‘55 FORD 
2-DOOR SEDAN 
$775 TOTAL 


NO CASH NEEDED | BA 
ON APPROVED CREDIT) BP ofifin 


» ~ take over be)- THE AUT 


jow menthiry oat 
WOR 


—— and 
Roy as 


NEW LOOK Power . steering } 
tt brakes automa tran emission ' 
o.-w. tires. r. & Se Tri- cone fla 

sursie. slack & whit This 


ear te bevond deocribt ne A pa.ace 


IRV MARTIN 


17TH & K STS. NW 


whee . wot eka 


foonese io ; 


CALL 
RE. 7-3890 


BOB WILSON 


4 end K Ote NW 
“The Bis Let on the Corner” 


‘53 FORD 
$265 TOTAL 
$45 DOWN 


On er Credit 


3-dr. sede A car 
aed at! 7 amet Send of Tete 


eines 


155 VICT. 


$1 175 Total ‘S] FORD “8” | ze: IRV MARTIN 
NO CASH NEEDED | YICTORIA TH & KaTS XY 
APPROVAL | $175 TOTAL NA" 8-4455 


No Cash Needed 
On Approved Credit 


Take ever balance of @ 
moenathiy ments 
Servicemen of (-of -towners 


ALL 


ANDY KELLY 
OR CREDIT APPROVAL yr " Hyéramatic 


SUStON — "Ti Commods 
Ak 
7400 Georgia Ave. NW. ME. 8. 2674 Be Fas ih ete Mc 


Ress with 


JACK “a. oe i TD. 
Ww 


Take over wer mon — , baymen 7 
‘ sold ~ 


payment required. Pee 


redii Bilt 


LL “ROSS 


re — 


m.” 
| Thunderbird 
$3495 


FULL PRICE 
Teal Blue finish power 
power + ge radie 
—— am 


REPOSSESSED 
a 50 TOTAL | 


2-tone b) L 4 Gated ule. 
, at 


eK eT 
7521 Siti Vi i ks NE. 


* rap ‘Trucks be ‘Tec. 
Pike. Arlingtes 
rf 


= 


hea 
candition —— 
ing + allabie Por credit 
ee . 


MILLER MOTOR CO. 


316 FPLORIDA AVE. NE 


LI 42396 


“~ 
Stee th >» 


ies 
6 | IHN OF 


We Have Them! 


PACKARDS 


From “@8e te | — | bedy 
styles, One-owner 


COVINGTON moToRS 


7301 Wis. Ave. (Beth. 
ol. 3-9tee 
Area's Largest Packard Deaier 


"S1 CHRYSLER POWER STEERING 
79 Others——Open Daily 9 ‘tl 9 


3 : s 
seis 


‘55 FORD » 
$675 Total 


NO CASH NEEDED 


ran 
ete i ‘Teaulred. Por ies eo | 


TU. 2-4200 


BILL ROSS 


7400 Georgia Ave. NW 


| 


‘4B LINCOLN 
CONTINENTAL 


Rade end beater. beautiful white 
bieck® top. A reel a o! dis- 
Gen. Custom wupheisier 


$i 
UNITED AUTO SALES 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Manda, ‘Wer 14, 1956 


rooms ut___# 382,000 


. 
-___—__— D> 


= 


ong to credit hag tae m| is 


=F oO 
Ina 
a 


" beim oe 3 O.a+ peqiersaip 
DL - 


“coupe Radio and heater” overs maretee 
a Daily 


ona nr 
2 Circulation 
cood. twin beds ear for cane 
NA he 
$395 TOTAL 
$45 DOWN 


nauioned = - 


R ties | 
s 


means quicker sales results 


for Washington Post end 
Times Herald classified ad- 


an 


wertisers. To olaece your ed 
sports | 


Phone 
new paint. tires 


le nabs 
tei T best offer REpublic 7-1234 
easter iter § > mm <UTOMOsILES SALES 
aoe MOTORS. we ~ tLES. —— 


& erey Cinish l-cener. lew 
7 ie0O UC threughout, 


"ARCADE PONTIAC 


ado 
WATA went 


me edilac: Olds Co 
POHANKA SERVICE — 


ST 


PONTIAC 52 & Laet on « luxe 4- 
rm. RF 2 


oe 
| white-wall 
oer @& cr 
fer yGur protection With a 30-day 


writteh guarantee 
an PAUL BROe , 
. = 
uber "a5 4- a“ 
dr. ordan fully cauipped low mile Oy DER AKER — x Cham pen 
a! sedan.  eoverdrive Ny 
beautifal twe- 


Ellicott 
ener. beaut if a! et Diack 


guaran: Lee 


277 
BOHANKA SERVICE 


‘94 MERC. | 


MONT. H.T. 


= $875 Total 


NO CASH NEEDED 


SUBJECT TO CREDIT | 


APPROVAL 


Aat take over mmall mon'h'y pay- 


Officers ne do8n perment reevired 
Por «ereadit appreval cai 


BILL ROSS 


TU. 2-4 


7400 Georgia Ave. NW 


Fagon 
querértve. Tages ree. 
dition, ss. WO 


‘54 MERC. 


MONTEREYS 
HARDTOP AND 4-DR 


| $120 DOWN 


Pu. 7 eguipped. including 
teering ser oranee 
eo condition 
ft og A esemmes 


“MILLER MOTOR CO 


316 FLORIDA AVE. BE. 


LI. 4-2396 


MERC TEY— Ni Monteres sedan 
5 AS r. apd h. See =, oo 
standing car value teday 
Ne. 728- 30-day verreaty: “trade 


MON 
wo «2000. 


wer 
ea..y 


and terme 
Wi. ave. ae 


~ con vertible Green 


K PRY, To. 


168 ith o Sw 
Ga iesroom 12718 Cenn. Ave 
siriputers far 
r 


Mercedes. Bepes 


Excellent selection 
Wo “fere the beat ‘ 


MANHATTAN AUTO 
7TH “AT R ST. NW 


SER VICEMEN 
NO DOWN PAYMENT! 


jw ad applies te ist three grades 
For ener‘ laformetion 


oar Morton SALES 
; > 


COAST-IN PONTIAC + 


407 Fle. Ave. NE. U. 67200 * 


Seer TT TT ETE ELLELELT 


REESE 


rerere SOSA aee on 


t Olds Dealereh'p 


LDSMOBILE 


Washineton's Old 
F Li 
“B8" HOLIDAY 
$1195—$45 DOWN 
This hardter car has 2-ton 
an FY a, + cal beauty. Po 


| | BOVE’: MOTOR SALES 


STATION WAGON 
$995 “$45 DOWN 


ra > 7. 
*.s 
"ered : ac- 


7 seen — 
Bove MOTOR SALES 


lt ave NE BO. 2-GO08 
quikat AG *) Secans comvertiq 


ft . 
condi 


“98” HARDTOP 
$895 TOTAL 


a? n" sts, $2 = ‘Trio MOTORS 

104 G ave. ne 

NEVER KNOWING! 
NIN 


3-4 
7 CNDERSO! D 
aToO™X 
PONTIAC Som MM KER 
a 


ane Por cred! approval ca 
MILLER MOTOR CO. 


1é FLORIDA AV 


Sees 7396 2 


oLbDs— 52 Supe 
ou pe nad 


Re idar 


vrdre-Matx 


w 
ort . serres = car Be ’ 
ves 


Fo 
section With & 30-day efittes 
ounces ee 

PAUL BROS. OLDS 
Wis & Ellicott * hw ae 6.3 


To Take Over This 


‘56 FORD 


driven 
2 Ce: 


sees SUEELER 


| CHRYSI zn PLY™M 
re Ars. : 
or 


INC 
WHEATOYW 
1A). 5-000 

“a = b D 
cond. $5 down. eas / 
MOTORS, 2234 and L 
FET ROUT E— 1855 


" ¢.deer: eeuleeed: 
$2 7) wmilet. le geod 
As tee of 895 


“1395 ice 


|.) ne 
tation waren 
5 Z radio & > . 

celler ~ be s ‘ 
white Rnish low mileage. i-oe 
$1695 


ARCADE PONTIAC. 
: : 


ost models. son 
A a mi ones: 
rranty 
git mot > see nes 
ter trades 


WHEELER. 


orth h 
jowest tefms 


INC 


YSLER -P" YMOUTH IMPERIAT 
LARGEST WASHINGTON DEALER 
|4800 WISCONSIN AVE. EM. 53-4800 


‘53 PLYMOUTH 
$695 TOTAL 
$45 DOWN 
at esate “e ove 
DOYLE MOTOR SALES 
I7i7 ® It. Ave. NE HO. 27-9008 


CTS — ti Cranbrook sedan 
a 3k B. A-i condities. $595. N 


| 2-deor 


Car. 
75 ethers te cheese from. 
“THE ORIGINAL” 


AUTO DISCOUNT 
HOUSE 


1510 Rhode island Ave.. SE. 
ion” Set | CO. 5-8214 
| od a TS 


Z wA 
“In the Hee 


re 
the cere Ge edvertice 


Customer 
Satisfaction 


t-dar mener bore eeer- 
. re 


BIGGEST AUTO SALE STILL 
BOOMING WITH BIG BARGAINS 


‘33 FORD »- 


2dr. sedan “6”. A nice car 
= 4s Interior Dept. Seld 


+159 Belvedere. 


Piymeuth Hardtep. red and 
gees equipped. As is. 


+55 VICT. »- 


ie 8” heater, de- 
good bargain. 


+153 WILLYS »=-$ 


sedan. 6 cyl. equipped, 2-tone 
—. A real nice buy. 


: x 2 CONV. = 


x Ford Fordematic, “V 4", new top. 
As is. 


£54 FORD 


2dr. sedan “6” cyl. mga 


KEKKKKKKKKEKKEKEKEK 


rt pom 


‘265: 


L rene 


565 


ruist. rene 


1165: 


FULL Preece 


465: 


ru. race 


465: 


ret reset 


465: 


Servicemen all grades we give you the same 
quick credit service we give Washingtonians. 


———<— 


KKK KKKKEKEKEKE 


4 


OU: 


Immediate Delivery 
On Approved Credit 


Irv Martin 


12th & K Sts. NW. 
rAnKine NA, B-4455 ,33!, 


NEES 


.- a 
ed 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
» 40 Monday, Mey 14, 1956 . 


“On Aouot Forces Day 1956, soldiers, sail- 
ors, airmen and marines are teamed to- 
gether, at home and overseas, building 
security with Freedom. Our lives are richer 
with the knowledge that hard work and 
dedication to duty are in the best security 
interests of our nation. Together we guard 
our country and our way of life. Together, 


let all Americans renew this day our 


pledges to our country and to the principles 


Cte leaps 


Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff 
U. S. Armed Forces 


Admiral Arthur ©. Redjord, Chairman of the Joint Chiel/s of Stalf 


The greatest force in life today is 


TOGETHERNESS 


On Armed Forces Day, 
Saturday, May 19th, 
The Hecht Co. joins 
Admiral Radford in 


urging all America to 


team up with our 


servicemen in supporting 


peace for our nation. 


*Published as a Public Service in the interests of “Togetherness,” 


McCall's wonderful word for work and responsibilities shared,