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Driver D 


ro 


~ 


wns 


as Car Dives Off Bridge 


* 
7 


The Weather 


Today *% Considerable cloudiness and 
warmer with scattered showers likely, 


highest near 78. 


Tuesday — Partly 
cloidy with chance of showers. 


Sun- 


day’s temperatures: High, 67 at 5:25 


p. th.; low, 61 at 8°10 a. m 


(See Pg. 16.) 


79th Year — No. 175 * Phone RE. 7-1234 


1956 
ost Company 


Coprright. 
The Washington P 


MONDAY, MAY 


28, 


1956 


WTOP Radio (1500) TV (Ch. 9) 


FIVE CENTS. 


TED 


NEW BIKINI H-BLAST REPO 


Explosion, ’ 


Earthquake 
Recorded 


In Japan 


Defense Dept. 

And AEC Say 

They Know Nothing 
Of Tokyo Report 


TOKYO, (Monday), May 28 
(™%—The United States ap- 
parently set off another hy- 
drogen blast at Bikini this 
morning, the Tokyo central 
Meteorological Observatory 
reported at 1 p. m 

The observatory’s 
throughout Japan reported 
atmospheric pressure waves 
similar to those caused by the 
hydregen bomb dropped from 
an American bomber near 
Bikini May 21 

The pressure waves came 
from the direction of Bikini. 
the observatory said 

(In Washington, The Defense 
Department said it has no in- 
formation about any new nu- 
clear explosion in the Bikini 
area. A spokesman for the 
Atomic Energy Commission 
here also said he had. no infor. 
mation about such an explo- 
sion.) 

The Tokyo observatory said 
it at first could not pin doWn 
the direction from which the 
pressure waves came, raising 
the speculation that Russia had 
set off a blast 

Later the Observatory said 
its gauges showed the source 
of the shock waves was in the 
direction of Bikini 

he shock waves lasted about 
49 minutes today. the same 
‘length of time and the same 
strength reported after the May 
21 explosion 

[Time of the explosion was 
believed to be around 6 A.M. 
Bikini time (2 P.M. EDT Sun.- 
day). the United Press reported 

[The Government E art h- 
quake Observatory at Matsus- 
hiro. reputed to be the most 
sensitive in the Far East. Re 
corded an “é@arthquake due to 
an explosion” at 3:02 a.m 

[More than 10 weather sta- 
tions from Kagoshima in the 
south to Kushiro in the north 
recorded “extraordinary” at- 
mospheric pressure waves after 
& a.m. today, the announcement 
said 

[The pattern.of disturbances 
was almost coincidental with 
those caused by the Bikini nu- 
clear test on Mav 21.” the 
announcement said. “All weath 
er stations agreed that they 
were caused by an explosion 
which originated around the 
Rikini area around 3 a.m. to 
day.”’| 

The United States has sche- 
duled a series of hydrogen 
weapons tests during May and 
June at its Pacific proving 
grounds 

4 small number of news- 
papermen were on hand for the 
bic May 21 air 4@rop and a 
smaller test earlier in the 
month. But all have left. They 
were only permitted to stay 
30 days 


15 gauges 


Tornadoes Skip 
Across Two States 


Associated Press 


Israeli Road-Builders 


Find Ancient Tombs 


JERUSALEM, May 27 
(INS)}—A number of tombs, 
dating from the Hyksos 
period more than 35 cen- 
turies ago, have been ¢» 
cavated near Ginossar, on 
the shores of Lake Kin- 
neret 

Agence France Presse 
quoted the Israeli Director 
of Antiquities, Dr. S. Yeiv- 
ing. as making the disclos- 
ure today. It said the ceme- 
tery of Hyksos, or Shep- 
herd Kings who invaded 
Egypt and ruled it for two 
centuries, was discovered 
when tractors plowed the 
area to construct a road 

The agency said the 
tombs revealed Hyksos 
burial customs, which in- 
cluded severing the head 
from the body and sur- 
rounding the head with ves- 
sels, weapons and orna- 
ments. 


Sen. Malone 
Asks Boosting 


Of B-52 Goal 


Republican Advocates 
Cutting Army, Navy, 
Urges 2000 Bombers 


By John W.. Finney 
United Press 

Sen. George W. 
(R-Nev.) said yesterday the 
United States should cut its 
Army and Navy and concen- 
trate on building a powerful 
Air Force. 

His statement to reporters 
seemed certain to add fuel to 
an already bitter interservice 
controversy over the relative 
strength of the Army, Navy and 
Air Force and the role each 
would play in case of war. 

Malone joined in Democratic 
demands that this country boost 
production of intercontinental 
jet bombers to offset growing 
Russian airpower. He said he 
was “very much disturbed” 
over Administration plans to 
limit production of the globe- 
circling B-52 jet bombers to 500. 

Malone suggested that the 
Air Force needs at least 2000 
big B-52; eight-jet bombers in- 
stead of the 500 planned by the 
Administration. He did not say 
how much he thinks the Army 
and Navy should be cut 

‘The Strategic Air Command 
should get what it needs,” he 
said. “If it does, we wouldn't 
have war because the other side 
would not attack us if it was 
not sure it could win.” 

Malone said “it makes no 
sense to be preparing for World 
War II all over again.” 

“The ext war will be fought 
in the air and under the sea 
with bonm:bers, submarines and 
missiles,” he said. “This coun- 
try will be defended from the 
American continent. There 
wont be surface ships and 
troops going to other countries 
to fight.” 

“We can't afford to keen up 
three services,” Malone said. 
“What we need is a strong Air 
Force” a complete line — of 
guided-missile bases around the 
United States, as well as radar 
warning networks.” 

He said he probably. would 
make his annual attemr: to cut 
off foreign aid and have all 
the mecrey put into airpower. 
But he wes not optimistic he 
would be any more successful 
this year than he has been in 


Malone 


French Stage 
Casbah Raid, 
Seize 4480 © 


522 Are Detained | 
As ‘Supersuspects’ ; 
7500 Seal Off Area, 
Ferret Out Arms 


ALGIERS, Algeria, May 27 
(‘™—Thousands of French 
troops and special police 
swooped down today on Al- 
giers’ Casbah (Arab area) in 
an unprecedented raid for 
rebel suspects and arms. | 

They seized a quantity of 
arms, some of them concealed | 
beneath the white dresses of! 
veiled Moslem women, and de- 
tained 4480 Moslems for ques-'| 
itioning, All were released later 
except 522, held as “supersus- 
pects.” 


The French sealed off the! 
16th Century Casbah, hitherto 
considered an inviolable refuge’ 
for Moslems, and held it in an 
iron grip for 18 hours. 
| The raiding party of 6000 
troops and 1500 special police 
swarmed through the dark re-| 
cesses and twisting, narrow) 
‘streets of the area. Searchers 
combed through the possessions | 
of some 50,000 Moslems and 
(6000 Frenchmen who have in-| 
\filtrated the area over the 
‘years. ) 

During the search a Mosl¢ém 
was fatally shot when he) 
jostled a soldier. The only other) 
casualties were a policeman 
who was shot in the leg as he; 
checked a captured rifle and a 
Moslem whose leg was broken| 
in a jump from one terrace to’ 
another. ' 

The raid uncovered hundreds | 
of arms and thousands of shells| 
an | grens des, a makeshift rebel) 
propaganda printing press,)| 
French Communists who have) 
been operating a secret radio 
transmitter, lists of rebel lead-! 
ers and organizations, and 30 
bales of assorted military uni- 
forms. 

The search parties used mine 
detectors in ferreting out arms. 

Helico>ters hovered overhead 
throughout the day to aid the 
ground :earchers. 

Troops and police, including 
an infantry regiment, a bat- 
tzlion of Foreign Legion para- 
troops and many newly re- 
called reservists from France, 
swoopec down on all entrances 
tu the area. They were armed 
with rifles and machine guns 
Detachments near the main 
Casbah gate halted Arabs out- 
side the area to inspect their 
suitcaser. packages and identity 
po pers 

In order to achieve maximum 
surprise, officers did not alert 
their troops until 1 a. m., an 
hour before the action started. 

Morning services in the 
Roman Catholic Cathedral, 
just inside the Casbah walls, 
were canceled without notice. 
Police directed Catholics to a 
smaller church nearby. 

Elsewhere in Algeria, scat- 
tered acts of nationalist vio- 
lence and clashes between the 
French and rebels were re- 
ported. A French “pacifica-| 
ition” patrol engaged a group 
ot rebels near Bougie, killing) 
‘several” and capturing a 
wounded man. At Batna, three 
‘rebel bombs were tossed, caus- 
ing heavy damage, but no in- 
juries. At Philippeville, Henri 
Migcliorri, a junior police of- 


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By Francis Neal 


The auto which plunged off the 11th st. bridge yesterday is raised from the Anacostia River. (Other photos on Page 3.) 


Result of Riley Condemnation Ruling 


Follin Sees New Urban Renewal Hurdle 


Robert C. Albrook 
Staf® Reporter 
The United States Court of 
Appeals decision in the Mayme h 
Rile ySouthwest 


By 
owing $1900. 
The District 


Redevelopment 
and Agency condemned the RLA officials here that if over- 
. ' ouse, at 823 Delaware ave. sw., mortgaged houses must be con- 
Washington jn 1954 as part of the pilotiqemned at values above ap- 


favor. 
Follin said he agreed with 


slum clearance case “raises a Area B slum clearance project.|nraisals in order to protect 


very serious question whether|RLA offered $6250 for 


the country can go on with 
full-fledged urban renewal, 
Commissioner James W. Follin 
of the Urban Renewal Admin- 
istration said yesterday. 


The Federa! slum clearance 
chief said he hoped the May 


17 ruling by the Appeals Court’ Bunche Praises 


here would be the subject of 
“further court review.” 

The Justice Department is 
expected to ask a rehearing 
this week. Judges E. Barrett 


ler, with Judge George 


Washington dissenting, set| Nations, praised Negroes today | 
aside a $7000 award for the for their six-month-old bus boy- 


Bus Boycott 


MONTGOMERY, 


Prettyman and Wilbur K. Mil- 27 ‘®—Dr. Ralph J. Bunche, 
T. undersecretary of the United) 


Merchant, Police Seize 


Ala.. 


Riley house made by a lower cott against segregation. 


May 


: ‘he | owners against losses, the price 
pooner which ae me Se. |tas on wholesale slum clear-| 
» ernment appraised vaiue. rs. | n e may grow impossibly high. | 
Riley turned this down and the|* “ ys pe 
jury boosted the award to $7000. 
This she also rejected and the 


Most slum houses in South-' 
west Washington, nearly all of| 
which is slated for clearance 


$2200 profit 


who bought the Riley house 
from an estate six months be- 
fore Mrs. Riley got it, said yes- 
terday he thought the $7000 
jury award was “a good award.” 
Himmelfarb held the house 
only a few days, realizing a 
in his sale to 
another broker, Charlies  T. 
Martin. Martin sold it to Mrs. 
Riley at a heavy paper profit 
for $300 down and $72.50 
month. The $7000 jury award, 


|and redevelopment under exist-| however, would not pay off the 
|ing plans, are heavily loaded third trust which Martin holds, 
'with second and third trusts. | 


| Morton Himmelfarb, the’ sponsible for the §)900 balance. 


and would leave Mrs. Riley re- 


—— incinerate 


300 Bad Checks Alleged : 


Car Plunges 
Off Bridge, 
Drowning 
lis Driver 


' 


Auto Recovered 

From Anacostia; 
Search for More 
Victims Canceled 


The body of James W. 
Skirty, 26, of 775 Columbia 
rd. nw. was recovered last 
‘night almost 12 hours after 
Skirty’s auto crashed through 
‘an 11th st. bridge guard rail 
and plunged 35 feet into the 
Anacostia River. 

A search for the bodies of 
two women believed to have 
been passengers in the car was 
called off after recovery of the 
man’s body. 
| Cpl. George I. Eppard, of the 
‘Accident Investigation Unit, 
‘said that police at first be- 
ilieved two women were with 
\Skirty on the basis of informa- 
ition given them by an eyewit- 
ness to the crash. 
| The witness, William Worrell, 
64, of 506 13th st. se., a bridge 
jattendant, told police he 
‘thought he saw two women in 
ithe car seconds before it 
| Dlunged off the bridge. 


Eppard said Worrell told 
|police he saw no faces but did 


see “something fly up” in the” 


‘rear seat which he took to be 
\a woman. Police, however, said 
their investigation showed 
Skirty was in the car alone. 
Skirty’s body was found 
\shortly before 8 p. m. by Har- 
‘bor Patrol Boat Pvts. G. R, 
Sydnor and M. G. Bailies. They 
found it 150 yards upstream 
‘from where Skirty’s car sank 
‘upside down in 20 feet of wa- 
|ter at 8:20 a. m. during a rain- 
storm. 
| Skirty’s body was identified 
jat the District Morgue by two 
of his aunts, Prader Lee Rob- 
inson, 1601 E. Capitol st., and 
Hazel V. Williams, 1325 Q st. 
nw., police reported 
| Skirty, an employe of the Na- 
tional Institutes of Health, was 
an Army veteran of Korean 
service, Miss Robinson said. 
The Accident Investigation 
Unit reported that Skirty’s car 
left no skid marks and ap- 
|peared to have been traveling 
‘about 20 to 30 miles per hour. 
Pvts. Leo B. Dove and 
,Charles R. Wright said tire 
marks indicated the car made 


‘enough: since it left Mrs. Riley Appeals Court ruled in her Washington real estate dealer), right turn on the District 


side of the bridge before jump- 
ing the curb and crashing 
through a 10-foot section of cast 
iron railing. 

Worrell, who was in his con- 
‘trot house with the door open, 
told police the driver did not 
‘apply brakes before the auto 
suddenly cut to the right at 
about a 45-degree angle. 

Worrell said he ran to the 
gaping hole in the bridge rail, 
saw a man’s head . bobbing 
above the water and threw in a 
life-ring. 
| Fifth Precinct police 
privates arrived, comman- 
deered a rowboat at the Army 


| Engineer Station, llth and O 


i“ se., and rowed to the scene. 


Pvts. Charles Carpenter, 28, 
‘and Charles A. Naecker, 24, 
‘each of whom already held Po- 
liceman of the Month citations 
‘for bravery, dove into the pol- 


ae 
¥. 


luted river but could not locate 

the car or bodies. 
Skirty’s mother, Mrs. Mallie 
S. Braswell of the Columbia 
rd. address, said she had last 
| lege, a Negro school. <p ote seen her son about 7:30 p. m. 
‘ ‘ | Most of Montgomery's ap- pues seperies : 'Saturday when he left to visit 
| , ) DD , kK] a | S ‘proximately 50,000 Negroes, Storekeeper's caution and a|from the firms being passed by|his sister, Mrs. Luther Harri- 
aly oes QO O S inl on™ a\ e¢ 1ons | Rave been boycotting city buses policeman’s aler*ness have re- a suspect wearing horn-rimmed son, 1322 Fairmont st. nw., and 

° ° ‘since Dec. 5, 1955, to protest suited ‘n the arrest of three glasses. his aunt. 

|segregation ordinances men here cn charges of forging} Hooper attempted to pay for! All three said Skirty was a 


Regarded as Test ot New Red Policy Face allree ing P eee an estimated 300 bad checks in|some merchandise by check at|good swimmer and a B pees 
; 


ficial, was assassinated court jury, declaring it wasn't Bunche, 1950. Nobel peace 
prize winner, spoke to about 
| 1500 persons, including white 


| persons, at Alabama State Col- 


At least 10 tornadoes skipped the past 
through sections of western 
Kansas and northwestern Texas 
Sunday. 

None caused measurable 
damage. They struck the 
ground or dissipated aloft. Fun- 
nel clouds or tornadoes were 
reported seen in western Ne- 
braska 


~~ re _ — - - 


3 on Forgery Charges 


First Returns Favor West By Alfred E. Lewis 


the past two weeks. ithe Reliable TV-Radio Co., 2471\ steady boy.” Mrs. Braswell sai 
‘be abused. If one cannot ride! Charged with forgery yester-|18th st. nw., on Saturday. Al-| her son worked nights as a 
with dignity, why should he day by police wer* Edgar W.|though the check was not from cleaner at NIH and studied 
ride at all?” ‘Horn Rims) Hooper Jr., 26, one of the firms where blank tailoring during the day under 
| “Voluntary segregation is a listed at 3435 Holmead place checks had been taken, proprie- the GI Bill of Rights at a school 
myth, along with the ‘separate "W.; Grayson E. Salmon, 29,\tor Murray Schwartzman be-|on U st. nw. | 


t ; ” id. listed at 1330 Fairmont st. came suspicious and signaled! 4 - 
but equal’ legend,” he sald ‘nw., and Isaac P. Hill, 34, listed|for an employe to call police, 2 D. $e Engineers 
Missing in Bay 


Mr. Windsor 
Sells Car 
First Day 


"After bringing im an amaz- 
Ing number of cal's, my want ad 


weather brought ort the heavy 
vcte.] | 
Warnings -from the Vatican 
newspaper L'Osservatore Ro- 


By Stan Swinton principal party in Premier An- 


ROME, May 27 (#)\—Millions | tonio Segni’s pro-West coalition 
of Italians.voted today in 7694|80vernment, 12,654; anti-Com- 
local elections. The results will;munist Social Democrats (So- 
show whether Western Eu- Cialists), 3580; Liberals, 1372. mano on the importance of 
ropean democracy is losing! Among leftists, the pro-Com- getting out the anti-Commu- 
ground to communism’s new/munist Socialists had 2896; nist vote were reflected at the 
line of coexistence and anti- Communists, 1428. polls. Thousands of nuns and 


at 1436 Meridian place nw. When police arrived to arrest 
Sgt. John Fitzpatrick of the' Hooper, Pvt. W. A. Dickson 


5 , ‘ 
Today’s Index ‘check and fraud squad said/noticed a taxicab cruising in 


sold a ‘4! Ford before noon the 
first day,’’ said. Mr. R. C. Wind- 
sor, Sr., 817 Philedelphia ave., 
Silver Spring, Md 


You can sell anything faster— 
from used cars to samovars— 
through The Washington Post 
and Times Herald — reaching” 
over 382,000 families daily, 
thousands more families than. 
any other paper in town. Simply 
phone-— ’ 


RE. 7-1234 
—- 


Stalinism. 

Both the East and West are 
watching Jor the final outcome, 
expected late Tuesday. Voting 
continues through Monday ex- 
cept in the Italian Tyrol and 
Sicily, where the polls closed 
tonight. 

The election was orderly. By 
nightfall not an incident had 
been reported. 

_ First returns came from 
Trent, largest city of the South 
| Tyrol. The vote In 40 of the 
‘Citys 60 voting districts was: 

CRyistian Democrats, the 


| The neo-Fascist Italian So- 
cial Movément (MSI) polled: 
(1736. | 
| Trent has long been a Chris-| 
‘tian Democrat stronghold. 

| [The Italian Interior Ministry 


per cent of the eligible elector- 
ate voted in Sunday’s elections, 
Reuters reported. . 
[The high turnout was ex- 
ypected to favor .the center 
parties at the expense of Com- 
imunists and right-wing Mon- 
ug and neo-Fascists. Good 
> 


priests 
voters. 


a Christian Democrat, 
early, as did Palmiro Togliatti,| 


announced last night -that 76.9 p 


were among early 


| Also 
President Giovanni Gronchi,| Pyaar 
voted! Churches ... 15 
City Life ... 15 
Classified 29-35 
Comics.. 40-43 
Crossword .. 43 
District: Line 42 
Dixon . 3 

12 


19 


secretary of the two-million- 
member Italian Com munist 


arty. 
aoe deciding factor could be 
© women’s vote. There are wat 
1% million more wome | cotorials m 
men among 30,817 8B crn feed 
; €u-! Federal Diary 15 
le voters. In, the past the) ginancial .. 17 
Ik of the women's vote has! Goren __.. 
gone to center and rightist’ Herb: | 
part(s. ' Horosciihe 


af 


| 


Page 
Keeping Well 40 
Kilgalien ... 19 
Movie Guide 29 
ae | 
Night Clubs 29 
Obituaries .. 16 
Parsons .... 19 
pei ens 2 
icture Page 
con. 
 _ . 
TV-Radio. 20-21 
Weather ... 16 
Winchell . 2) 
gs, 37-39 


ff 


9\a furniture firm at 2622 14th 


most of the checks they are 
accused of passing were forged 
on blank check forms stolen 
from Hamilton & Jordan, Inc., 


st. nw., and Savarese Fabrics, 
Inc., 2513 14th st nw. 


ing business hours, Fitzpatrick 


had reported the theft of a 
checkwriting machine. 
The arrest of the. three men) 


inessmen 


aid. Earlier, the furniture firm| char 


watch for checks’ 


the area and called headqfar- 
ters to broadcast a pickup or- 
der. Later Salmon was arrested 
while driving the cab near 7th 
and T sts. nw. 

After all-night questioning, 


Fitzpatrick said, Hooper impli-; 
The checks were stolen dur-'cated Hill, who is now on $7 


bond while awaiting trial on 
s of conducting a check- 
stealing operation. Hill was ar- 


irested. 
Fitzpatrick said the check- 
culminated a city-wide alert to|writing machine and remain-| 
all meno and small busi-|ing blank checks were found in 


Salmongs room. | 


The Coast Guard was search- 
ing last night for two Washing- 
ton engineers of the National 
Broadcasting Co. who have 
been missing on Chesapeake 
Bay since Saturday. 

The men are Arthur H. Hal- 
lam of 9704 Bristol ave., Silver 
Spring, and George Brewing- 


‘ton, 134 Tedrich bivd., Fairfax. 


They left the Woodland 
Beach area near Annapolis in 
Hallam’s 20-foot open, outboard- 
powered boat about 9 a. m. Sat- 
urday on a fishing trip. They 
were due back Saturday pisht. 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERAL 
2 Monday, May 28, 1956 


i 


_ Dulles Favors 
Policy Debate 


Aaseocia 

Secretary of State John 
Foster Dulles said yesterday he 
will welcome “a _ pretty 
thorough airing of foreign pol- 
icy” in the 1956 political cam- 
paign. 

But he said he hopes the dis- 
cussion will be kept on a high 
level—“not just throwing dead 
cats around.” 

Dulles, now vacationing on 
Lake Ontario, was interviewed 
by Rep. Kenneth B. Keating (R- 
N. Y.) in a television program 
filmed last week for upstate 
New York stations. 

Keating asked if Dulles an 
ticipates that foreign policy “is 
going to be an election issue 
this coming fall.” 

“IT believe,” Dulles replied, 
“that at a time like that there 
should be a discussion of for- 
eign policy.” 

“I think it's a healthy thing 
that every four years foreign 
policy should be discussed,” 
Dulles added. “I hope very 
much that the discussion will 
be on a high level, and be con- 
structive and really educational 


Democrats Call on Ike 


To Fight tor Aid Bill 


By Ernest 
Associa 
Three Democratic Senators 
called on President Eisenhower 
yesterday to put pressure on 
Republican Senate leaders to 
fight hard for his $49 billion 
foreign aid bill 
The three , John J. Sparkman 
(Ala.), Hubert H. Humphrey 
(Minn.) and Mike Mansfield 
(Mont.), are members of the 
Senate Foreign Relations Com- 


mittee. This group is now con- 
ducting hearings on the pro- 
gram, which the House Foreign 
Affairs Committee last week 
slashed by more than a billion 
dollars. 

Republican Sens. H 
der Smith (N.J.) and Thomas H 
Kuchel (Calif.) voicéd hope of 
more favorable treatment by 
the Senate. But Sparkman told 
a reporter: 

“There is danger of the pro- 
gram being cut in the Senate. 
too. This cut can be forestalled 
only by the President's exercise 
of his leadership, through his 
own leaders. 

“If he can get the support he 
ought to have from his own 
leaders, there’s no reason why 
the program cannot be sub- 
stantially sustained. 

“We Democrats ought not to 
be required to carry all the load 
for him. That job belongs to 
him and to his leaders.” 

Senate Republican Leader 
William F. Knowland (Calif.) 
and Chairman Styles Bridges 
(N. H.) of the Senate GOP Pol- 
icy Committee have said the 
Senate will not vote the full 
amount sought by Eisenhower 

Humphrey, in a separate in- 
terview, declared “the passage 
of this program is going to re- 
quire more leadership thar just 


WHY 


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Vital Heating 


Services: 
1, Emergency Service 
24 Hours per Day 


ya Fuel Oil & Burner Serv- 
lee Trucks that can be 

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| Radie. 

3, Thrifty Heating 

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4. Avtomatic Re-Fill Serv. 
. with Metered De- 
ivery. 


CALL ME. 8-4840 
| 


Gnsumers 


Brown 
onliag 


i nena 


ontiac 
Bae : 


Alexan- 


1413 New York Ave. NW. I 


| 862.516.19 
52. 206.7 2-—CGuests 
; a 
\true. Edwin P. Pa " v 
Ff. G, Addisen lll, 4. W 
i  aetmaan A. L. 


ted Preas 


from the standpoint of the 
American people, and not just! 
throwing dead cats around. | 

“But I think it is useful at) 
these four-year periods to have 
a pretty thorough airing of for- 
eign policy, and I would wel- 
come that myself.” 

He proceeded, under Keat- 
ing’s' questioning, to defend 
actions which have come under 
Democratic fire: 

Frequent Travel Abroad— 
Dulles said it is “silly” not to 
use speedy modern air travel 
instead of “the old-fashioned 
way of exchanging notes” which 
might take a month and still 
not provide as good understand- 
ing as a brief face-to-face talk; 
with foreign leaders. Dulles) 
figured his air travel now totals; 
more than 310,000 miles ) 

Consulting Democrats—' 
Dulles said he has met with) _ 
congressional committees more) 
often than any Secretary of 
State, and that “big, critical 
issues” were discussed with 
leaders of both parties before 


Sa ee Approve Pact, ¢ 
rd osed b 
Pee OR aad of J 


A worried Sen. Alexander Wiley bites his 
nails at his State's Republican convention, 


ee 


Internationa! News Service Sen. 
Republican National Chdair-| Wis.) faces his campaign for a 
man Leonard Hall and his Dem. fourth six-year term in a some- 
ocratic counterpart, ~- 
ler, agreed yesterday to keep posed by many of the Wiscon-| 
the 1956 political campaign “out|sin Republician leaders. | 
of the gutter’-—then immediate-| The chief reason for this op- 
iy began assailing each other position is Wiley's backing for) 
on | on a personal basis. more than a decade of Ad-' 
sending a bill down here and| Hall accused Butler of being ministration foreign policies, 
having witnesses testify.” “extravagant with truth and including those of Franklin D 
In another interview, Mans-| ‘he facts.” _. _ |Roosevelt, Harry Truman and, | 
Reld eald Mo inewleed sod The Democratic chieftainjeyven more enthusiastically, 
; jcountered that the Republicans! pwieht D. Eisenhower. 
Bridges get behind the full pro-jare “afraid to face up to the The action by the Wisconsin'| 
gram “it would have a better| American people on issues.” Re ublican Fo ean agg ere 
chance.” | The Democratic leader said eg in repudiating Wiley after 
Tie Demacrais ave teen the only way the Republicans hear} shouted objections to 
. can keep the campaign clean is|) een 
carrying the ball for the Presi- |». keep Vice President Richard his stand on international af- 
ent’s foreign policy.” Mans- M eis end Res "s i, Mi, fairs came as no suprise to the) 
field said. “Some of them are Carthy (RWis , son ak or | veterar. Senator. | 
ans cloner aiendatan of The Republican maintained et ee aan 
Administration foreign policy, |“"#* Butler and former Presi- yw: Tiger Bg R Glenn | 
said he is “hopeful we'll beable |2°"* Harry S. Truman were vee faye | indorse-| 
to restore the funds over hbre,”|C@ally adept at mud-slinging. | Davis for its senatorial indorse- 
Kuchel said: | Hall and Butler dehated on/ment. | 
‘President Eisenhower pro- the NBC-WRC TV Program,| Davis, a conservative and an) 
poses a foreign aid program to! American Forum. . Eisenhower delegate to this) 
lessen hazard of aggression, | Butler renewed his demand|year’s Republician National 
Communist or otherwise. And' 
the Nation will support him.’ 
Chairman Walter. F. George 
(D-Ga.) of the Foreign Rela- 
tions Committee said Saturday 
the billion-dollar cut in military 
aid proposed by the House com- 


B. Vaccaro 


'television 
Democratic 


network with the'date for the Senate, after stat-| 
pencente candi-ting last fall he was giving it 
ate. serious consideration. 

Hall, however, refused the) wijey anticipated he was not 
proposal as he has in the past.| soing to get the Convention in-| 
mittee “is too deep.” t, Butler said recent “feuding|dorsement when he left here 
_ George said he was partic-|'" the Pentagon” has become a/\),.+ week for Milwaukee. At’ 
‘ularly disturbed about a pro-/™4Jor campaign issue, and one|s1.4+ time he told a newsman) 
posed cutback in military aid}that disproves the Repulican|inat “jrrespective of any de-| 
to North Atlantic Treaty Or-|1952 platform pledge to study) ici), ot the Convention,” he 
ganization (NATO) countries, |‘%¢, preparedness effort and). 5u14 seek renomination in the| 

“strip it clean of conflicts in September primary 


the service.” 
Wiley, former chairman of 


Hall maintained that the: 


Moss Favors 
‘Information’ 


Party Planks 


President| Committee and now its senior 


and argued that 
member, took a 


‘Eisenhower is better equipped Republican 


“than Gen. Butler or Gen. early Senate years. But with 
Symington.” His reference was this country’s entry into World 
to Sen. Stuart Symington (D-| War Il he began to swing over 
Mo.), who recently has been|to the Madership of the late 
United Press ‘investigating United States air|Sen. Arthur ree “4 

*,1i¢\ power and who is a possible) Mich), and became a strong aa- 

Rep. John E. Moss (D Calif.) contender for the Democratic vocate of international coopera- 
said yesterday that Republicans | presidential nomination. tion. 
and Democrats should adopt’ Hall deélared that Symington) Wiley's strong backing of va- 
platform planks calling for a| was Secretary of Air when the|rious foreign aid programs and 
freer flow of public information Korean War began, and that)|other foreign policies cost him 
from Government agencies. #mericea was wholly unpre-| the support of many Wisconsin 

nee, cidiuainn of a- Gane pared to fight at that timie. (party. leaders, particularly 

eee Butler countered by refer- among followers of the late Sen 
Government Operations Sub- ring to recent testimony by Robert A. Taft (R-Ohio). 
committee investigating the Gen. Curtis LeMay, head of One of the bitterest blows to 
suppression of public informa- the strategic Air Command, Wiley was the action of the 1953 
tion, said both political parties that the United States is lag- Republican State Convention 
' ~ ging behind Russia in produc- censuring him for his opposi- 
should emphasize “the people's tion of jet bombers. tion to the Bricker amendment, 
right to know and even more 
important, their need to know.” 

Moss, in an interview, said he 

indorsed a proposal by Clark 
Mollenhoff, Washington corre- 
spondent for the Des Moines 
Register and Tribune, for fae- 
dom of information planks in 
the party platforms. 

“Its a very commendable sug- 
| gestion,” Moss said, “in view of 
‘the restrictions that we have 
uncovered and the philosophy 
which seems to govern the ac-' 

tivities of many agencies.” 

Mollenhoff told Sigma Delta 
‘Chi, professional journalistic’ 
| fraternity, last week that the in- 

formation plank should be 
“specific enough in its pro-| 
nouncements that it could be 
jammed dowrethe throats of any | 
public official who sought to — 
hide his errors, his frauds or his 
policies behind some vague’ 
claim that his actions are 
, confidential.” 


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that President Eisenhower de-|Cor.vention, only last month of his Senate duties. 
» bate the issues-on the national|announced he was not 4 candi-| 


| matters. 


feuding is “not too unhealthy,”|the Senate Foreign Relati MS | newspaper had a circulation of 


to handle military planning strong nationalist stand in his/- 


‘Manifesto’ 
Role Seen 
InN. C. Vote 


Two North Carolina Congress- 
men who did not sign the 
“Southern manifesto” on school | 
segregation were defeated in. 
the Democratic primary yester- 
day. 

A third Representative who! 
did not sign the document won| 
a new term over an opponent) 
who had campaigned hard on) 


“the segregation issue. 


The ousted incumbents were: 
Rep. C. B. Deane of Rocking- 
ham. beaten by A. Paul Kitchin | 
of Wadesboro in the 85th Dis-' 


trict; and Rep. Thurmond) 
Chatham of Winston-Salem, de- 
feated by Ralph J. Scott of Dan- | 


. 
. ae 


United Press 


Rep. Glenn R. Davis of Waukesha smiles 
after he was chosen by convention. 


Hall, Butler Wiley Is Used to Being 


State GOP 


Associated Press 
Alexander Wiley (R-which would curtail the treaty: 


making powers. 
The action. Wiley said at the 


Paul But- what familiar role: he is op-|time, was a “stab in the back.” 


He said he was following the 


wishes of President .Eisen- 
hower. 

In latter months, sensing that 
a move was afoot to deny him 
the party indorsement this 
year, he issued various state- 
ments calling his opponents in 


Wisconsin the “smear boys.” 


'He said their aim was to get 


him out of the party at any 
cost. 

Davis went to the House of 
Representatives as the result 
of a special election in 1947 
and has been reelected four 
times since. He is a member of 
the House Appropriations Com- 
mittee. His voting record is pri- 
marily conservative. 

At 41, Davis is a forceful 
campaigner. But he is faced 
with an equally vigorous cam- 
paigner in the veteran Wiley, 
now 72, who has not neglected 
“the folks back home” iff Spite 


Davis claims he has been a 
consistent supporter of Presi- 
dent Eisenhower on domestic 
His close associates 
here say he favors a “conserva- 
tive foreign aid program.” 


Paper Cuts Publication 
ISTANBUL, Turkey, May 27 

imM—The leading morning news- 

paper Hurriyet today an. 


nounced a 50 per cent reduction 
‘in publication because of a 


shortage of newsprint The 


225,000. 


‘bury in the Fifth District. | 

Fourth District Rep. Harold | 
D. Cooley of Nashville turned! 
back challenger W. E. Debnam | 
of Raleigh, who had used Coo- 
lev’s refusal to sign the segre- 
‘gation document as his main 
| campaign issue. 
| Cooley, chairman of the 
|House Agriculture Committee, 
was the only one of the three 
non-signers of the manifesto, 
‘however, who made it clear 
during his campaign that he 
“despised” the Supreme 
Court's opinion and that he was 
strongly opposed to mixing of 
the races. 


| Ina congressional raee where 


segregation was not an issue. 
former U.S. Sen. Alton A. Len- 
non of Wilmington defeated 
Rep. F. Ertel Carlyle in the) 
Seventh District. 

Other results of the voting 
gave whopping victories for 
Gov. Luther H. Hodges and 
U. S. Sen. Sam J Ervin and 
left the possibility of a runoff 
in the Eleventh Congressional 
District race. 

In the Eleventh District 
where Rep. Woodrow W. Jones 
did not run for renomination, | 
Ralph Gardner of Shelby held 
an edge over Basil Whitener of 
Gastonia and Hugh A. Wells of 
Shelby. However, it appeared 
that Whitener would be entitled 
to call for a runoff 

Gov. Hodges piled up a tre- 
mendous lead over three oppo- 
nents. 

Sen. Ervin overwhelmed Win- 
ston-Salem Mayor Marshall C. 
Kurfees. 


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‘THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
woke Monday, May 28, 1956 3 


4 


2 Dead, 4 Hurt in Crash 
Church Hits 


At Funerals 


9»: As? agan’ 


? 


Two Washi mn area men* 
were dead and four were in 
serious condition yesterday as’ 
a result of a three-car collision 
Saturday night on Maryland. 
Route 260 near North Beach. 

State Police identified the 
dead as Tim McCoy Ridgely of 
Lothian, Anne Arundel ounty, % be se ‘fe : ie gee 
and Paul (Junior) Foster of __ eo 
Wayson’s Corner, near Upper ’ a ; 
Marlboro. 

Guy Talbert, 3501 Madison 
“ pag ame J. E. Al- 
inson, Dunlap st., Oxon tT , . 
Run Hills, Hillcrest’ Md; Rob- ah gaan. | NEW YORK, May 27 &—The 
ert E. Boswell, 6808 Fairwood | , . - gue §6| United Lutheran. Church in) 
rd., Landover Estates, and Mi- - oe a , , oF = |America, the Nation’s largest! 
chael Timothy Kearney, Upper ‘Lutheran group, today charged 
Marlboro, were in serious con- 


dition at 7rince Frederick Hos- that modern funeral ee ee 
‘are “downright pagan. 


pital, Calvert County. Tez. oe 
State Police said Boswell’s| 7” == a. ae BE Bs, "be fee | Dr. Edgar S.- Brown Jr.,| 
sid —- to — - ™ \director of worship of the 
ided with a car ven by _ 
Kearney, who was coming from| + ~~ . co" . | United Lutheran Movement, 
the opposite direction. The) /* * Wa —) | jalso criticized long funeral 
dead men were in Kearney’s * ted : “ eulogies and newspaper obitua-| 
car. The third car, driven by ries. He said he sometimes won- 
James Thomas Galloway, 12808 ders “if there isn’t a spirit of 
Evanston st., Wheaton City, ‘competition to see whose) 
‘obituary will read the longer.” | 
| “Whether we like it or not, we’ 


went over the bank when it i. 
swerved to avoid the smashup. ee: : 

hein i'must admit that too frequently| 
modern funeral practices are 


William Worrell, operator of one of the 
control houses on the lith st. bridge, tells 
Deputy Fire Chief J. W. Kay how an auto 


New Lincoln 
Relies Found 
In Illinoi 
SPRINGFIELD, Ill, May 27 
‘%—A collection of historical 
material on Abraham Lincoln 
and other Civil-War-era perso: 
jages has been unearthed in a 
‘basement storeroom, where it 
gathered dust for 20 years, 
State officials reported today. 


| The material was uncovered 
lw a records management firm, 


which has been hired to evalu- 
‘ate old state government rec- 
ords and discard useless files. 
Secretary of State Charles E. 
Carpenter said the collection 
includes about 10,000 pictures, 
books, scrapbooks, diaries and 
letters and other materials. 
The collection concerns Lin- 
coln, Gen. John A. Logan, Eli- 
jah P. Lovejoy, abolitionist ed- 
itor murdered at Alton in 1837, 
and other persons of the era. 
The Lincoln relics include a 


Saw Car Plunge Off Bridge 


crashed through a guard rail and inte the 
Anacostia yesterday. He said the driver 

didn't apply his brakes. (Story on Page 1.) 
oogn eumeenae, . 7 + . . 


Galloway was uninjured. ee | 
downright pagan,” Dr. Brown) 


Girl, 12, Dies in Crash | : 
Five persons remained hos- By Lawrence Krebs said. “To a Christian, death has 
pitalized yesterday for injuries 
suffered in an accident south 
of Alexandria that fatally in- 
jured a 12-year-old schoolgirl. 
Dead in the accident Satur-| 
d.y night on Collingwood rd.,| 
off the Mt. Vernon Memorial! 
arkway, was Loretta Mae’ 
ridges, a fifth-grade pupil at 
the Hollin Hall Elementary 
School. 
Police said she died in Alex- 


fiioun agate ae yetsors| Man Who Pushed Pram 


of a car driven by her father,| 
5000 Miles on Bet Dies 


Mark Howard, 23, of 4534 Klingle rd. nw., lies in the street 
after he was thrown from a car driven by George B. Epstein 
when it collided with another aute at 9th st. and Massa- 
chusetts ave. nw yesterday. Howard was treated for bruises 
at Casualty Hospital and released. Epstein, of 1724 lith 
st. nw., and the other driver, Joe M. Cleaver (right), of 
300] Kenilworth ave., Bladensburg, were charged wtih 
colliding. Pvt. H. E. Serine makes out a report at left. 


jnot a time for sorrow, no 
matter how much the hurt 
which separates us from a loved 
‘one, but a time of joy.” 

| - Brown made his observations | 
in a message to the denomi-| 
‘nation’s 4400 pastors printed 


news magazine of the United 
Lutherans. 


‘Dr. Brown said. “Since our 
faith is right, it must be our 
‘it must change.” 


Ray F. Bridges, 106 Colling-' 
wood rd. Both Bridges, a 43-) 
year-old carpenter and member 
of the Mt. Vernon Volunteer) 
Fire Department, and Mrs. , 
Bridges were hurt. ~~ 

Hospitalized occupants of the} BRIGHTON. England, May 27; He had to support himself/was not in any way “warring 
other car involved in the head-|Harry Bensley, who won fame |by selling postcards on the way|on undertakers.” He called for 
on crash were listed as Isaiah' pushing a baby carriage 3),000\and to find a wife before the' the follwing program toward |# 
Sylvester Higgins, 28: Arthur miles while wearing an iron| walk ended. ‘a “more Christian witness:” 
McDonald, 38, and Jack Knox,|mask, has died here at the age} The prize for passing all 15) When death occurs, notify) 
26. None of the five injured) of 80. ‘conditions of the wager was to your pastor first. 
was in serious condition. The one-time wealthy London|be 21,000 pounds ($105,000). | If possible, have the funeral) 
Funeral services for pleyboy died penniless with) Thousands cheered him as he|in the church where the dea 


the| 


crash victim will be at 11 a.M./only his 80-year-old widow and set off from Trafalgar Square| person was baptized, confirmed | Both said that no Negroes meet- 
ing 
Consid™. sealing the casket! sandards 


Wednesday in Mt. Vernon Pres-|two friends to attend his cre- in London, pushing a spindly|and married. 
byterian Church on Accotink! mation. baby carriage and wearing his! 


rd. Burial will be in Mt. Com-' weird mask. ‘before the funeral, for such an 
fort Cemetery, Fairfax. |, But in 1908 when he took a) ie met King Edward VII at| arrangement i: easier on the 


bev weal oe Rn Re... Newmarket races and sold him mourners. | 
Car Hits Trees, 2 Die ‘on a yearly income of 9 3 — sry Foye ts ee 8 
: More than omen offered ful expression but a more per- 
DAYTON, Va., May 27—-Orey pounds (then worth $25,000) to marry him during six years|\manent memorial should be! 
M. Michael, 27, 0° 4717 Queens- from Russian investments. | 
bury rd. Riverdale, and a com-| In that year American mil- 


of trekking around the world. |considered. 

panion were killed today when |lionaire Pierpont Morgan bet Re At eg ange cont.| a else ie Pls eggs Me 3 

. | g through New York, Mont-' ganizations 
their auto plunged off Route|Lord Londsdale that a man real, Sydney, Australia, andi nated 
257 and struck two trees about | could not walk around the many other cities. | Demonstrate your Christian 
15 miles from Harrisonburg in/world unrecognized. Then, with only 7000 to go, belief to + our pastor by giving 
Rockingham County. Bensley agreed to act as the 

Michael and Darrell C. Grogg, | “guinea pig” although his 


World War I broke out. 

: wager was called off, and Bens- , “i 

24, of Dayton were pronounced |identity was kept secret at the , jof your trust “in. the promise 
dead at the scene of fractured | time. 


ley returned home to a 4000! of eternal life.” 
skulls. Under the wager, he had to 


pounds ($20,000) consolation, 
lrooper J. C. Hash said/wear a mask all the time while 


prize and to join the army. D 
; . Vv s 
Michael, who was driving, ap-|he pushed a baby carriage| ‘ cath 


| 
td bt te benonne. 1 NUL SEN School Called 
Open to Negro Girls 


The District's nursing school|for Nursing. Applicants under- 
‘in the Memorial Day issue of would “definitely be happy to go a series of educational, psy- 
‘the Lutheran, official weekly|accept any qualified Negroes” | chological, 
for training, Dr. P. A. E. Steb-| emotional 
“The important thing is our)ing, administrator of District}meet the school’s standards— 
|Christian faith, and we cannot|General Hospital, said yester-|are interviewed by Beatrice E 
|say one thing and do another,” day. - 
Both Dr. Stebbing and Lucile|the hospi‘al and head of the 
| practice that is in error. Hence Holsinger, an 
of nurses at the hospital, de-| The reports, which said there 
Brown emphasized that he nied reports that the Capital|were no plans to admit Negro. 
City School of Nursing refuses|nursing students, 
dmission to Negroes as a mat-|uted to Miss Ritter. 
ter of policy. out of the city yesterday, but’ 
They added, however, that no'Mrs. Holsinger said she had| 
Negroes now are among the 99 been authorized by Miss Ritter 
q| Students who attend the school. | 


admission. | 
Mrs. 
Flowers always are a thought-'that this didn’t imply that Ne- 
groes, as a race, were not quali-| nointed out by Miss Ritter that 
fied. 
“the better Negro nursing stu- as the only members of their 
should be elimi-' dents have applied to the good 
Negro schools, and many of|...u1q have been accepted if 
the graduates of those schools|they had not decided to apply 


The|him the best example you can/4re on | 
tions as high as head nurses 


land assistant supervisors.” |B. Karrick, who is the Welfare 
At present, she said, four Ne-| 
gro girls 
group | 
\tested by the National League day. 


‘piece of boarc with seven bul- 
~s jilets that Lincoln fired into it, 
' |a piece of cloth lining from his 
‘coach, and a wheel from his 
carriage. 
| Data on the colorful Logan, 
who also served in the State 
| Legislature, the U. 5S. Congress 
‘and was three times president 
‘of the Grand Army of the Re- 
©} * |public, were given to the State 

i ‘by the General's family. 
and eh | It includes notes on the 
they Police Pvts. Charles A. Naeck. | House of Representatives im- 
‘peachmen. proceedings against 
er (left) and Charles R. Car- | president Andrew Johnson. 


penter took turns diving into | The material was part of the 


‘Adjutant General's collection 
the cold river from a boat in 'when it was stored, but has 
a search for victims. Both |been turned over to the State 
hold Policeman-of-the-Month 


‘Historical Library for use by 
awards. 


‘ 
+ 


personality 
tests and—if 
| Ritter, director of nursing at 


assistant director affiliated nursing school. 
historians and scholars, Car- 
ipenter said. 


RALEIGH _HABERDASHER ————" 


NUNN-BUSH ... - sar 


way to take Summer in stride 


ee 
eo 
She was) 


'to speak in her behalf. 

Dr. Stebbing said the school 
has stuck to its high standards 
rather than lowering them to 
for Gil up its classes. 

He declared that on two oc- 
emphasized casions “four or five years ago” 
\Negro girls sought admission 
to the school, but it was 


rigid high 
applied 


the school’s 
have 


Holsinger 


’ : . bop Oe PON ee ae A ie am - eS re > 
“In past years,” she said, they might be uncomfortable _ 
the oz DOWNTOWN STORE ONLY 
race in the class. They ‘were SRE EE ra EEE cy a Sm 
not turned down, he added, and 


our hospital staff in posi-| elsewhere. ae 
District Commissioner David 


Commissioner, said he had not 
included in a'familiarized himself with the 


are 
being'situation but plans to do so to- 


applicants 


WING-TIP CLASSIC 


of 
IN NYLON MESH | 


He gave the prize to charity) 110 Holida 
parently lost control. The auto|through 169 British towns and/that followed lost his lucrativ 
shot off the side of the road/125 cities in 18 other countries. private income. 
The Council says 70 is the cana 


—and in the years of ‘uerative| Forecast by Coscectt | 
oatabed “Both ge a eae. 
Short Circuit Blamed 
As Couple Dies in Fire 
mal average of motor vehicle 
fatalities on a seer gd 


| CHICAGO, May 27 (»—The| 
National Safety Council today 
thrown clear of <he wreckage. predicted 110 Americans will 
be killed in traffic accidents 
Memorial Day. But, at the same 
time, it challenged motorists 

to hold the toll down to 70. 
Memorial Day is Wednesday. 
An electrical short wasdoor. Vernon, 10, and Wayne,| Wednesday at this time of the 
rym ee tecioms ae 9, went out the bedroom win-|year. The period cavered by! 
| n um Springs, Va., idow.” Larry ran +) ithe advance estimation is from) 
which Irving and Mary Car-| mee as ne uP ay hill m. (local time) Tuesday | 
‘michael died Saturday night. wih elgnbor, who called fire-| y nti} midnight Wednesday. 
| Assistant Fairfax County Fire | 

Marshal Alfred Savia said an Ph oe ee wo 

'extension cord had been strung wwdlage and her takes’, sora 


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'Saturday from the house next 
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‘The refrigerator shorted out 
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Fluffy Whipped Potatoes The one-story, two-room 
» Tender New Broccoli frame structure was destroyed. 


Hot Roll with Butter 'Savia set the damage tenta- 
Dinner Dessert tively at $1500. 

Butterscotch Sundae Companies from Mt. Vernon 
Tapioca Pudding ‘and Penn Daw fought the fire 
Fudge Layer Cake for about an hour. 

Red Cherry Pie The house was located on @ structure. Johnny said their in- 
Fresh Apple Pie country lane near the new surance may have lapsed. 
Beverage Drew-Smith school. The Car- 


$ michaels, both in their 40s,\~ om ~ , 
1.85 Me 
NOW-=-THERE’S A ELL) Fook 
j 


lived at Route 1, Box 514. He 
TO ALL OUR BANQUET 


was a laborer. | 
AND MEETING ROOMS 


the eight children watched 
firemen from Annandale and 
Franconia fight the fire. 
Two firemen were treated on 
the scene for smoke inhalation. 
All the children except Bar- 
bara lived in the six-room frame 


9 Made Homeless 
Includes Choice of 


In Annandale Fire | 
| Nine members of an Annan-| 

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Larry, 11, said, “I was sleep- 
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Democrats to Confer 
On Convention Plans 


United Press 
Democratic National Chair- 
man Paul M. Butler yesterday 
called a joint meeting of the 
Democratic National Commit-! 
tee and the arrangements com- 


War Feared 
On Cyprus mittee for the 1956 convention 
for Chicago June 12. 


By Charles P. Arnot . agit ; is ™ j Butler, who will preside,’ 

NICOSIA, May 27 (INS) gn 3 — jsaid the group would go over 
Fears that an all-out civil war details of the convention. 
between Greeks and Turks 
might ertipt swept the already 
trouble-plagued island of Cy- 
prus tonight. 

A Cypriot Turkish leader 
warned that any Greek Cypriot 


CODD FOOD EON EOD TODS 


Greek-Turk 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
ne, Monday, May 28, 1956 


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‘to put them under Greek rule. 


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y because of a dispute over| cow anti-Stalin party line switch. (See story on Page 1) 
39 MANCHESTER Ihis moderate approach to. the| oh asap is of 
‘Cyprus problem, United Press’ | by their pain relieving action, 
reported from Athens.) ‘free-for-all last night between) Nicosia were set afire. Damage ineit mild diuretic action through the doers 
‘that secret orders were trans two lives in the village of The Turkish quarter in Ni miles of 
dragged 
—~ nights, don’t wait, try Doan’s ph ie ~ 
calling for “voldan”—use of|liceman was slain when a bomb rioting me happy relief millions have enjoyed for 
9 ae ‘was thrown outside the court 
BOTTLED-IN-BOND 100 PROOF 99 “cold steel daggers”—against| Sees cr Sata gtonts Open an FS a rat eek 8 
ek Cypriét’ oT as 2. ee 
) =outiawed “re dating: was hurled at a British army| Seience Develops New Tablet: 
FIFTH 
on the heels of a bloody inter-| Nationalists fired shots at a 
ttacks against Greek shops|hicle was damaged. 
KENTUCKY STRAIGHT ist 8 & As an aftermath of the inter- 
{32.35 case } BOURBON --- Proof. |pit Grook sgsinet Suck os se eee ee | freedom from much of the mis- through # woman's sympathetic 
ewe as Greek against British. The} ________ H—_~________| 4riex of change-of-life! You no nervous system to relieve the tense 
| relief from “hot many homes. Clinica] tests prove 
worsening 
12 oz. can 
At an impromptu news con- ‘ 
ference, a spokesman for the 
Pennsylvania of trying to annihilate the| 
tempt is certain to bring action 
by the Turkish armed forces 
PLUS DEPOSIT 
tical” and hinted he would ask’ = 
IMPORTED FROM CHILE ithe British Cyprus Governor. Sta rtin June 3rd a new 
Field Marshal Sir John Hard- 
s. w @ e 
ia" hfe @lrCcoach service off 
| against what he called “an 
armed Greek majority.” 
and night guard over every vil- 
lage where there are mixed 


RAIGHT This reporter learned tonight|Greeks and Turks that claimed | ¥®5 estimated at $11,000. — tendin oo teermse the output of the 15 
—— tted throughout Cyprus to) laced 4 rf So if nagging Pacheco makes you Sock 
OLD /mitte rou cosia was placed under curfew cut, miserable, w stless 
x 28.50 case 7 5 et vel 80 PROOF the Turkish underground forces; \fania. Later an auxiliary po- tonight to prévent further 
one a years, Ask for new, large, economy 
size and save money. Get Doan's Pills today ! 
k attacks led by the EOKA/Duilding at Paphos. 7 y= 
WESTERN TRAIL = a cones nie od 2 Tablet: 
4 oe f jeep, but there wer 66 ” . . 
KENTUCKY STRAIGHT The new threats to safety on e e no cas ° | h | 
BOURBON f this British crown colony came ualties. e eves ot as es, rritation 
35.75 case 
— ‘communal riot between Cypriot ‘security force vehicle on the h f . F 8 f 10 
‘Greeks and Turks that claimed|main road between Famagusta rom ange-0 -Life or 0 
69 CENTRAL SPRING two lives, the slaying of an| and Larnaca this a but : ri 
{ary Peuctmt Greek shops|hicle was damaged. | Legted -Without Costly Injections 
ren jin Nicosia. developments now|communal battle at Afania,| Boston, Mass. (Special)—Medical rectly on the cause of these 
- in| science now offers women new troubles. The new tablet acts 
'Greek Cy priots—led by the) | longer have to face those years feeli and physical distress that 
EOKA—have been fighting for | with dread hae = can have have brought unhappiness to so 
¢ ay eens 
GRET | 
Situation Termed Critical 
| There is increasing fear in 
PENNA, high Turkish circles that the 
situation between 
the two nationalities may mani- 
a | fest itself in bloody civil war. 
$2.39 Ss; 
of 24 
island’s 100,000 Turks, Dr. Fazil 
DEPOSIT BOTTLES!!! Koutchouk, accused the Greeks |~~ 
gq Turks. 
PREMIUM He warned that “any such at-| 
CASE 
\from the mainland.” 
He termed the situation “crit-| 
SANTA PAULA 
, to arm the Turkish resi- 
He said the Turks no 
Koutchouk also is planning * 7. = 
to ask Harding to provide 5000 
Turkish policemen to stand day y merican ir ines 
Greek and Turkish residents. 
Bomb Kills Policeman | 


Since last Monday nine per-/i 
sons have been killed, includ-' 
ing three Turkish policemen. 
two British and four Greeks 
Sixty-nine persons have been 
‘wounded, including 20 British 
FIFTH | There have been five) 

»\ |ambushes by Nationalists and 
- pe sare —————— |} | 16 cases of arson 
2 29.95 case ° There are no signs the vio- | 
= lence is tapering off 

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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


nag Monday, May 28, 1956 5 


a — the World . 


raiseree’ U.S. Pilots Thrill Air Show Crowd geccczceee 2m: 


Don’t be embarrassed by loose false | F | 
. to ge ZURICH, Switzerland, May)sent up only one plane—their} The election to pick a succes-;wo's party has won 41 parlia-;crisis. Political unrest also 
27 ‘#—Jet pilots from the West| sleek new TU104 jetliner. sor to President Jose Maria/mentary seats. gripped West Pakistan. 
put their military craft through| It was the windup of the two-| Velasco Ibarra will be held next President Iksander Mirza sus- 
more ispine-chilling acrobatic per-|\day International Air Show/|Sunday. Crisis in Pakistan pended the Chief Minister and 
formances before a half million/which attracted both East and ‘ | the Legislature in a proclama- 
spectators today. The Russians; West air force experts. Election in Nigeria KARACHI, Pakistan, May 27/|tion last night and took over 
3 ihinthies soglien [United States Air Force of-/ [.AGOS, Western Nigeria ‘e—Famine-stricken East Pakis- absolute control. 
ids stains alert ficials toured Russia’s TU-104 ‘itan was under presidential rule) East Pakistan Chief Minister 
Nesta saan jet airliner but refused to per- May 27. #—The incumbent Ac-|today in the wake of @ political, Abu Husain Sarkar and his 
mit Soviet Air Marshall Sergei|tion Group of Premier Obafemi 
'Rudenko to inspect the interior| Awolowo was returned to pow-) 
‘of a B47 Stratojet, United|/er in Western Nigeria today on’ 
Press reported. ia platform calling for self-gov-| 
[The United States officials|ernment for the British protec-| § : 
said it was “not convenient” to|torate this year, near.complete) # 
show Rudenko and his aides|election returns showed, Escape by Sea 
through the six-jet bomber in| With contests for 66 of. the’ 
return for the close-up look at|80 House of Assembly seats de-| 
the Russian plahe. Rudenko,'cided, returns showed Awolo-| $ 
) who showed Lt. Gen. William; *.~ | ~ 
H. Tunner, United States Air| 


—— — _ 


at any drug coun 


Force Commander in Europe,) ; 
oe = Badong. Some | Plaster Palntiies Peates | 
e refusal without protest.) _ | : ; i‘ 
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Some Kid Stuff drivers hold up traffic in lanes meant for rope, stole the show. Headed | Sate tha ee oh aes ena ree ae 4 
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precision. Tomorrow Feel Frisky as a Kitten! | 5 son (Aug. 5~Apr. 15). Just see your local ay SEM 
’ te Te ett Al P 


OPEN MEMORIAL DAY ! nz |jet pilots put on acrobatic per- ee eee | ; travel agent for plan-ahead reservations! a ee 
WEDNESDAY ge ang gs Feel balf-alive, headachy, suffer | 4 ory 
‘TIL 6 P. M, é , wing Super Hunter into the air.| soured by constipation? Biack- toe ASRS 
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I: | a. , Draught from 
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Peace Talks Stalled 


Ai Pie | TOKYO, May 27 (INS)—Ja- 
pan’s chief delegate to the re- 
DRAPERY ey Se cessed Russo-Japanese peace 
‘| 5 me talks in London said today the 
| Japanese government must 
eo ‘back down on its territorial S id; om 
2. claims or face total collapse of - me 
|the discussions. al a clever young angler; Wetie, 
| Shunichi Matsumoto, who ne- " . ‘s 
UPHOLSTER |gotiated fruitlessly with the So- This beer is the best bait found yet 
Me Oo , 


viets for the past year, warned 


} CC Y NOW! | @eithat the Russians will ' 
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| Matsumoto pointed out 
At Our Calvert St. Showrooms Only! Mithere is no “third course” in 
We're liquidating our entire stock at our Calvert St. showrooms. ‘the negotiations. 
As soon as our new showrooms are ready, this sale will end. = : 
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yd. Reg. $11. | , (GF 


‘cussed with Tito, explaining:| } 
'“That’s a diplomatic secret.” va , , 
| The Yugoslav president its; F —  - 


END ! scheduled to come to Moscow | | 
NO MILL S ‘June 5 for a three-week visit.) | Attention, Isaac Walton and friends: Schaefer i 


ND-HAND FABRICS! Newsmen questioned Bulganin| | - s real beer, real in + 
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Dan River Harmony Schumacher Ecuador Factions Fight | 


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BOLT ENDS & REMNANTS ‘a political rally last night in| 


‘the town of Milagro, about 24 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
fj Monday, May 28, 1956 “f 


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t 5207 


Reg. $169.95 Brand New 1956 Reg. $189.95 New Reg. $299.95 New ee oe Ce s HOTPOIN 

PHILCO $¥ 7 y | CROSLEY ‘o8 NORGE $¥ 39 EMERSON Electric 1% TON Flush Mt. w/thermestet 

17-Seriés TV Table Model 7 cu. ft. REF. w/treexer Rite. Sather ‘w/tmelee contwel tA eran ea, maar Reg. $249.95 Brand New 1956 4 

eg. $269.95 Brand New 1956 s Brand New 1956 5 Reg. $239.95 New Reg. $349.95 s EMERSON Electric 7 67 , 

EMERSON *92QQ4\Avmina. *95Qsenvix  %4Q6 Hotpowr 997 7 |= = ~~~ : 

21-Series TV Console Model 10 cu. ft. UPRIGHT FREEZER AUTOMATIC WASHER : Reg. $299.95 Brand New ; 

gh men deacons aps Seta % Sag, SO00.S0 Brand How 1086 « Reg. $179.95 New Reg. $299.95 Brand New PHILCO $t 47 

EMERSON = *994 |FricipaineS3 29 |Fricipame $8O Mirch *9QZ |e : 

21-Series TY Table Model 12 cw. ft. Refrigerator w/evte. de- ELECTRIC DRYER 1% TON Flush Mount Reg. $319.50 New 1955 

Reg. $179.95 Brand New 1956 Reg. $239.95 New 1956 = $319.95 Brand New RCA 1167 

TOP BRAND 377 Res. $279.95 New $ ' IRE $¥ 24 eg. . Lp gE 

ites 0 tae ones DEEPFREEZE FRIGIDAI PHILCO 197 sae, 5A7 3 
8 cw. 


trost & treezer 


Reg. $229.95 Brand New 1956 4 ft. Chest Freezer Res. 3189.95 Brand New 1956 208 VOLTS TOP BRAND 

. 1 TON Flush Mount 
General Electric * 29 Soeent Batt. KELVINATOR $96 og IT9S8 Ror TT V4 TON Flush Mount 
21-Series TV Table Model neral le r 168 ELECTRIC DRYER 7 67 Reg. $349.95 . 
Reg. aay — New 1956 § poe Refrigerator w/freezer & Reg. $129.95 Brand New 1956 RCA w / thermostat HOTPOINT s¥ y | y | 
PHILCO 149 | = ° MAYTAG $69 |S on ION Ps hn 
21-Series TV Table Model , ; WRINGER WASHER FAM Ss M 4 147 . " apd 
Reg. $249.95 New 1955 5 —s DEEPFREEZE 7 y | y | Reg. $239.95 Brand New 1956 S ae MOUS N CHRYSLER x AIRTEMP 
RCA VICTOR A once 9907 [Ea $457 | % TON $917 
21-Series TV Console Model Reg. $529.95 Brand New Aute. Washer w/time-line contre \ 
Brand New 1956 $ NORGE $248 Reg. $219.95 New ‘a TON CASEMENT 7\2 omp CASEMENT | 
ZENITH 7 06 13 cu. ft. 2-de. REF. w/eute. defrost NORGE $99 Reg. $369.50 New 1955 8 Res. $329.95 Brand New 1956 $ 
17-Series TV Table Model Reg. $499.95 Brand New ELECTRIC DRYER RCA 7 a EMERSON Electric 147 
Reg. $269.95 Brand New 1956 5 NORGE $9 5 y | Reg. $229.95 Brand New 1956 ‘a TON CASEMENT w/thermostet ‘4 TON Flush Mount w/thermestet | 
CAPEHART 7 7 A 16.6 cv. ft. Upright Freerer. WESTINGHOUSE $T 7 4 GAS f jie ; 
eS cont Res. $249.95 New $ AUTOMATIC WASHER ci 
Res. $179.95 New 5 adage 7 2 5 Reg. $319.95 Reg. $399.95 New Reg. $169.95 New 
Rca vicror #9 26 |ADMIRAL — WHIRLPOOL $966 |Aomina. *49GQ\Norce %86 
21-Series TV Table Model ae : Deluxe AUTO. WASHER 40" ELECTRIC RANGE Full-Size GAS RANGE 
Reg. $169.95 Brand New 1956 $ Reg. $399.95 5 Reg. $169.95 Brand New 1956 5 Reg. $109.95 Brand New 1956 Ss Keg. $224.50 New 
FAMOUS MAKE SQ§B|HotPont $22 7 | westincuouse 95 top srann *57 \tappan %422 


17-Series TV Portable Model 11.9 cv. ft. Deluxe Upright Freezer ELECTRIC DRYER Apt-Size GAS RANGE 30” GAS RANGE 


THESE ARE ALL NEW 


= = Reg. $139.95 Brand New 1956 Reg. $139.95 Brand New 1956 


———— 
ee 


———— =: = : 
DS SPECIAL! FEDDERS FRIGIDAIRE 


SHOW-ROOM 
HT - Fa samecss up ae St wet en ting we ome A DEHUMMIDIFIE DEHUMIDIFIE 
| ONE AND TWO OF A KIND cay sans sad wwe Mpg bd be = DD eaciery Sentea $6 3 nota $ 


199.95 Philharmonic Hi-Fi Console wii Pes 
+66 Hi} Cartons 


w/2 speakers "Gs Saas il REFRIGERATORS | 
|) TELEVISION | REFRIGERATORS | WASHERS & ||]  MmosiLE 


149.95 Columbia Tape $ 16 . 
ae phallic at 76 WY een creda nana, | $299.95 New CROSLEY 9 cu. fh, RE. DRYERS MAID SMALL 
149.50 Webcor 3-Speaker $7777 lh es f $214 par swe went $144 sespan Has She Lay $] 66 E 
Hi-Fi Pertable ........---+ sees j}|l| New 1956 pare genta $99 $169.95 New ADMIRAL 7.3 $] 94 | $329.95 New NORGE AUTOMATIC - AUTOMATIC 
; 14-Series TV Portable . os. ©. Belene oan ie 
grt time azar | ns gg | spas ttn ae | oe = "Tse | osuwasuer 1 SAWE ON NEW FANS 
: oe | : erte cv. ff. HOTPOI 
199.95 V.M. Mahogany Consele Hi-Fi $9o9-"” $349.95 New CAPEHART $139 Saad 2h pepe i 199 naaene er <s +103 *¥ 37 pale yes be = te get these 
Aig Meta OBES Spectais when it really gets HOT? 


Shes : 1-Series TV Blonde Console 
w/3 speckers .... , a RAMA 15.9 cu. ft. REFRIGERATOR & | $249.95 New 1956 KELVI- $] 13 
59.95 20-inch Electrically Reversible Windew 39.55 16-inch 3-Speed Windew 


149.95 Columbia 4-Speake $7}-5° f} $389.95 New 1956 CROSLEY 21-1] 166 pesezeR all in one $39Q | MATOR Auto. wasnes 
i Series TV Censole with cabinet only 47-nches wide $249.95 New 1956 BLACK. $] 36 Fen, w/2-speed in shh. enete 


Mahogany Hi-Fi ..........+055- i $189 cchinen: ite Racine ii 
229.95 Admiral 3-Speaker $ 60 enthes thew 1 sod dune 95 New 1956 ev. | STONE ELECTRIC DRYER G.E. moter ae 7 
: , ft. Shelveder REFRIGERA- i 2-inch 
Mahogany Hi-Fi Console ........ 117 | 21-Series TV Teble Medel ‘$y 64 aaa chan be sae $] 89 ” iar goad en Se $88 SPECIAL! - wk Bath, Pachamens Cutten tun 
i Reg. $289.50 89.95 22-<nch Selt-Drives Electrically Reve 


99.95 Grundig Ma ny 5-Speaker Mahogany Il] $169.95 New 1956 MOTOROLA | $219.95 New FRIGIDAIRE 7. cu. ft. a. 
3 rundig hogany P $179.95 New 1956 WHIRL $98 | Brand New 1956 49.95 2-Speed Exhoust tible Fon w/l2 speeds; 4 1.P. $54 95 


Cartons 


Ill 17-Series TV Teble REFRIGERATOR 

. * iy . e , 

Hi-Fi Console HH ” $] 23  daflvaians $] 19 POOL ELECTRIC DRYER 2 Windew Fon with panels G.E. moter and S-yr. gucrentes 
$424.95 New INTERNATIONAL HAR. | $469.95 New ADMIRAL 40-inch Cus- 


w/AM-FM SW-LW | it . ~inch 3- eversi tle , 
| \ $239.95 New ‘54 ADMIRAL $] 38 VESTER 10 cv. #. REFRIGERATOR | tom ELECTRIC RANGE with $] 98 JAMES ; pb - a er some $4 6.95 wg Apes Sitar $5.44 


119.95 Symphonic Mahogany Hi-Fi ¢ 72 | 24-Series TV Table Medel : 
w/2 speakers 72 | $259.95 New 1955 RCA 21- $167 mv eae $148 cng an ct DELUXE ae re 4 guerontes 64.95 26-inch 3Speed Sloctrteally Reversible 
Hi $399.95 1956 ADMIRAL 21 Spend -o-s Waa’ | sean ase ta $39-95 
7 AM-FM-SW-LW 1} 95 New 1956 -A ft. Shelveder REFRIGERA- at 

ee aes on I) Ss 222 SOM 995 | ton </ane satan, tear 299 | iin win serine $7 |] DISHWASHER a 

Hi-Fi Console Hil] $138.00 1956 EMERSON UPRIGHT FREEZER w NORGE | N 
275.00 Webcor 3-Speaker Hi-Fi i 1FeReriee TV Yoble Medel .. $98 w/deor shelves $249 oneal ppp ma $] ] 2 $ GREEN THUMB DEPT. oa EW LAWN MOWERS 

HOTPOINT 8.3 cu. ff. RE- i 
= =e 1201 9420 [lnm 59.| Sane es 
339.95 CBS Blonde AM-FM -2- s119-* il aaa bbe Recto pre SOAS | w/u-shepe treeser $95 | root auromanic wasner | Seeker Hose sate hoe af " $79-%5 
| onan $399.95 New GENERAL ELECTRIC R ANGES | S95 25-N, Smet Mastic Gorden $1.59 | 99.95 Foley 18-inch Retery Lown Mower 

i 

| 


595.00 Grundig 6-Speaker Mahog- $349-%5 I] Series TV Console Medel... SaenOS thew 100s CaGRY th on Leet ae $10? AUTOMATIC ence age ty porgiacrs 
meste? on “y'. gverentes 
249.95 Webcor 3-Speaker Mahogany $99-% Hi with redie and phone. $499.95 New HOTPOINT 16 cv. ff. | 
Console in Mahogany || $479.95 New 1956 FAMOUS MAKE | $249.95 $339.95 New 1956 WHIRI- 
Speaker Hi-Fi Console .......... 
| $279.95 New 1956 MOTOROLA | ,, cu. *. REFRIGERATOR 
$222 


139.95 Traveler 3-Speaker $ 59-% ih 21-Series TV Table $157 w /treexer $364.50 New TAPPAN Full- $] 44 | SPECI AL 1.00 Stetienery Garden lent nutdide -& enesll. suds 


Mahogany Hi-Fi $459.95 Brand New NORGE $9] 9 Size GAS RANGE ... Sprinklers % 1009 
$419.95 New 1956 FRIGIDAIRE |II!) YOUR 5 Foley 20-inch Retery lewn Mower 
1.00 All Bross w/Briggs & Stretton Engine, 


399.95 Grundig Blonde 5-Speaker $990° Hl seen bes 1956 hy on $176 wt ply tang mynd ee aneeees 

Hi-Fi Console w/AM-FM-SW-LW .. lig) 2‘ Series TV Console Model $ $99 $964 ' $7 8-06 
$259.95 New 1955 RCA 21- ¢ 5.5 cu. ft. REFRIGERATOR | RANGE CHOICE! Hose Nozzles leaf mulcher & recoil storter 

129.95 Symphonie Blonde Hi-Fi $99.52 peta hpathineensgg TO7 | sasees ancrond 015 a $94 $299.95 New WESTINGHOUSE Full- 39.95 Electric 32.95 Lightweight 18-inch $91.95 

w/Bmpomkers ... 2... scccccvnces $399.95 New 1956 PHUCO $ ft, REFRIG. w/freexer 8 pnd piy MsCrRIC $149 | SCHICK Hedge Trimmer Cut Hend Mower or 

239.95 Webcor Hi-Fi $109°” Hii 21-Series TV Console Model 189 NEW AIR $239.75 New ROPER 30- $139 | OR oot vee ; 

Cl Metis... ks arom ]} 329799 wow 1995 aca 21- go04 CONDITIONERS inch GAS RANGE... +77 ! NORELCO | fl 29 vie-a-t0in SPECIAL SPECIAL 

oe ne $77 | tg. Sri PRICES SLASHED 


99.95 Motorola Mahogany $59-99 ii $459.95 New 1956 PHILCO 21- | $399.95 New 1956 DEERING | ton | oo De 


2-Speaker Hi-Fi | 40-inch Wil 
= 9.95 Webcor 2-Speaker $59-% i phene Reguler et ee | $] 79 ELECTRIC RANGE with $] 69 i SHAVERS ia so ie emekene 4 
ahogany Hi-Fi (ge eenmenpllbiane dl Medel *209 ) t double even ........ il : 
ace sing 3-Speaker $66:'° Il], $239.95 New 1956 ZENITH $1.59 a $179.95 New 1956 ii 4 99 : | ° 
any a 2t-Series TV Teble Model CONLON HH In our health & beauty aids 
Dept., national brands tooth- 


ia 2- | ll] $299.95 New 1955 RCA 2 i|| 
99.95 Columbia 2-Speaker $ 49-% aera oooh $] 66 CONSOLE $ HH : 7 
79 Hill with your old paste, shaving creams, le- 


Hese w/S-yr. guerantes 3 w/Briggs & Stratton Engine, $70-% 


4h :3 
bi 


Mahogany Hi-Fi Il $399.95 1956 TOP 1. | 
New BRAND 21 IRONER electric shaver 95 oO. tion, deodorants, soaps, ete. 


159.95 Columbia 4-Speaker : Ill Series TV 3-WAY COMB. ¢ 


CONTINUOUS HOURS! STARTS TODAY! 12 


res 
r 


| ’ 


SSE 


' 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Monday, May 28,1956 


| ¥ “ . 4 ; hs othe 
‘ ty ’ 
E | . 
@ oon TE ; = * @ 
; ’ a F - 
— + 


, & 


ay 


3 CONTINUOUS HOURS 
ITH SPECTACULAR SAVINGS!! 


Special Group of 


SPECTACULAR SAVINGS O : 
MODERN AND , wororo.d COE IN IV 


SPECIAL REDUCTIONS =a 
ALL FLOOR SAMPLES Stay CONE w/ANA volte 6 shone 


Some slightly scratched or marred . . . many just like new . . . most have never EMERSON 17-Series tv 
been plugged in . . . all are tremendous values! — Console Model 


TELEVISION AIR CONDITIONERS } 1 - ia srpeeee Suivi MOTOROLA ¥7-series 1 


3-Way COMB. w/AM-FM radice & phone 


$279.95 ‘56 MOTOROLA 21!-Series 148 | $249.95 ‘55 server vs $69 ~ 3 
TV Table Model $ TON CASEMENT a a ee ‘ ak ‘ Double dresser, mirror, chest and EMERSON 21-Series TV 


$369.95 ‘55 CBS 21-Series TV $349.95 “55 TOP BRAND 3%, TON . . Nei 

mahogany Console $126 Demetene Eaaden $99 . . bookcase bed in blonde finish. Our 3-WAY w/radio & phono 

$299.95 "56 FAMOUS MAKE 17-Series $99 $389.95 “SS EMERSON ELECTRIC $129 is , reg. $199.95. ADMIRAL 17s ; 
. . eries TV 

TV 3 WAY coms w redo A phono 3, TON w thermostat ; % ’ 

$239.95 ‘56 ADMIRAL 24-Series TY $129 $549.95 HOTPOINT 2 TON Plush $269 : f +130 3-WAY w/rodio & phono, 

Teble Mode! Mount with thermestet ’ } P 

$399.95 56 FAMOUS MAKE 21 -Series $349.95 ‘56 INTERNATIONAL 

TY 3-WAY COMB. w/redie & shone $117 MARVESTER 24 TON w thermostat $144 


$249.95 "56 CROSLEY 21-Series TY Ga gE | $299.95 (55 senvel $98 MODERN a PIECE BEDROOM SUE Dene TRO TVING ROOM SUTTE tele ee Special Group of 


Tabi i ' TON AS NT 
$359.93 56. PHILCO 21-Series TV $499 93 s CHRYSLER AIRTEMP Gresser, mirrer, chest and bookcase $77 w/fteem rubber in brown knubby ] 
Console Model $195 1 TON Deluxe Model $188 bed in welnut finish. Our Reg. $139.95 tweed. Our Reg. $259.95 - 
; ’ : ROOM SUITE. Sefe end metch. 
$169.95 “56 CROSLEY 17-Series TV $399.95 5S KELVINATOR % TON w ‘oush- 4-PIECE MAPLE BEDROOM SUITE. Dresser, | 2-PC. LIVING o ate 
Teble Mode $88 butten controls, heeter and $1 19 chest ond " g ing choir in red frieze $150 WESTINGHOUSE 16 


hed 
! 
> Our feo. $169.95 Owe Reg. $279.95 . 
a a oe oY $157 cane a CHRYSLER AlRTEMP MODERN 4-PIECE BEDROOM SUITE. Double | 2-PC. LIVING ROOM SUITE. Sefe ond choir AUTOMATIC WASHER 
Console Mede $177 dresser mirror, chest end beokcese bed in | in nylon end foom rubber 
xe 


' 
$329.95 "56 MOTOROLA 21-Series TV % ton Dek : a 
Meohogeny Console $153 | Sass Horo %4 TON $159 —. ae SIGS ac. tivine noOe SUITE.’ Kine $ 60 BENDIX $26 
$319.95 ‘56 PHILCO 24-Seriee TY EEG CASEANT w/pych-bytien controle, 7 4-PC. BEDROOM SUITE. Double dresser, mirror | ond lerge matching choir in 100% nylon frieze SEMI-AUTOMATIC WASHER .... ; 


$279°98 "56 ADMIRAL 24 Series TV ABO | Conemen w Reovior Window Mode raion dow ore cious Wes SU oe $190 MAYTAG $ 
$ $399.95 ‘55 1 BRAND 1 7 ' 
5 orp D ON $159 MODERN 4-PIECE BEDROOM SUITE. Double] 2.PC. SECTIONAL SOFA. With foom $120 WRINGER WASHER with a 


Table Model 
$139.95 ‘56 CROSLEY 17-Series TV $94 Flush Mount w thermestet dresser, mirror, chest, beokcose bed $160 rubber cushions. Our. Reg. $199.95 


Seite’ thedel $339.95 ‘56 FAMOUS MAKE 1 TON in genuine wolnut. Our Reg. $289.95 2-PC. SOFA BED SUITE. Sofe opens to sleep 
$319.95 ‘56 FAMOUS MAKE 21 .Series Flush Mount w thermostot $149 MODERN 4-PIECE BEDROOM SUITE. Double |’? - » with moetching cher $94 KENMORE Ss 
TV Censele Medel $299.95 ‘55 TOP BRAND % TON $98 dresser, mirror, chest and bookcase bed w/dust. | Our Reg. $189.95 SEMI-AUTOMATIC WASHER ape 


$1468.00 ‘56 EMERSON 14-Series with thermostat proet end center drawer gvides. $1 8 SOFA BEDS. Open te sieep two. 
Our Reg. $249.95 


TV Portab! Our Reg $79.95 $4 

$169.95 'S6 PHILCO 17-Series REFRIGERATORS MODERN 4-PIECE BEDROOM SUITE. Deuble| STUDIO COUCHES. Open to make twe ZENITH s 

Tv ’ dresser, mirrer, chest end boeokcese twin beds Our Reo. $79.95 
Kable i e. Our ree. $269.95 $209 SOFA LOUNGES. Convert inte full WRINGER WASHER ; 


ode! 
$229.95 ‘56 CROSLEY 21 -Series $339.95 ‘SS HOTPOINT 10.5 cu. $169 MODERN 2-PC BEDROOM SUITE. Triele dresser, | leneth bed. Our Beg. $59.95 BENDIX $3 ; 


RECENT REVERTS 
LATE MODEL TELEVISION 
YMPIC 21-Series TY 3-WAY CBS 21-Series $TT 


DMBINATION with $77 Table Model 


i@ end phone PHILCO 72)-Series TV $77 


DTOROLA 21-Series $57 Tob'e Model 

Console Mode! MOTOROLA 721-Series TV $37 
ERSON 17 .Series Console Mode! 

Teble Mode! $47 EMERSON 21-Series TY $37 
ViER 2)-Series TY $37 Console Mode! 

sole Mode! ADMIRAL 21-Series TV $57 
YMPIC 21-Series TY 3-WAY Consele Model 

MEINATION with $137 MOTOROLA 17-Series TY 3-WAY 
16 @nd phene COMBINATION with $57 
DTOROLA 721-Series $97 radie and phene 

Console Model EMERSON 14-Seri 


2) Series TV $77 Portable Mode! sith $77 


sole Mode! 
a WESTINGHOUSE 21 -Series $ 
VER 21-Series TY @AT | TY Concle Model 67 


sole Mode! 
MPIC 21-Series TY 3-WAY MOTOROLA 2)1-Series TV $47 
BINATION with $97 Console Mode! 
and phone ADMIRAL 21-Series TV $97 
RSON 17 Series TV $57 Table Medel . 
de! 
= MOTOROLA 21.Seri 


EHART 17-Series $47 Console Model — $67 


Censoie Mode! 
WARNER 21! -Series $47 TRAVLER 21-Series TV 
Censole Mode! Console Mode! 


TOROLA 2)-Series TY $77 CBS 2)-Series TV 
le Mode! . Table Modei 


REVERT REFRIGERATORS 


LVINATOR 7 cu. ft. 

DTPOINT 10 cu. ft. w auto. defrost .... 
RIGIDAIRE 8.6 cu. ft. 

LVINATOR 11 cu. ft. . 

DMIRAL 9.8 cu. ft. 


REVERT WASHERS 


HIRLPOOL AUTOMATIC WASHER 

NDIX AUTOMATIC WASHER 
DRGE AUTOMATIC WASHER ........ 
NDIX AUTOMATIC WASHER 

YTAG WRINGER WASHER w/pump .. 

EX WRINGER WASHER 

NDIX AUTOMATIC WASHER 

DAGE AUTOMATIC WASHER 

STINGHOUSE AUTOMATIC WASHER. .$27 


1 My hy. EE ae Oe i REFRIGERATOR w froeser ; miccer, thet end hechkeass bed ian 0 CONVERTIBLE HIDEAWAY TYPE SOFA. Opens 

$459.95 ‘SS FRIGIQAIRE 11.2 ev. $198 striking pink. Our Reg. $339.95 to sleep two . . . with seperate innersprin AUTOMATIC WASHER 
TV Table Model REFRIGERATOR 2-dr. w door shelves MODERN 4.PC. BEDROOM SUITE. Triple dresser, | Mottress. Ovr 
$399.95 ‘55 CAPEHART 21 Series $169.95 "SS ADMIRAL 7.3 ev. $1 16 mirror, chest and bookcase bed in 0 Reg. $199.95 
TV Blonde Console Deluxe REFRIGERATOR seatoam mohogeny. Our Reg. $319 95 2-PC. WEOUGHT IRON SOFA BED SUITE. in BENDIX 
$309.95 ‘56 MOTOROLA 21 -Series $249 95 ‘S55 KELVINATOR 86 cu. &. REPRIGER 4-PIECE BEDROOM SUITE.. Trinle dresser aend| G#torted decorator colors 1 AUTOMATIC WASHER 
TV Blende Conscle ATOR w door shelves, freezer end $119 lerge mirror, specious chest, bed with 2] Our Reg. $209.95 $ 40 


$239.95 ‘56 CROSLEY 21 -Series crisper commoedes built-in . Heminge $380 SOFA LOUNGES. With foem rubber cushions APEX 
TV Teble Mode! eeees $189.95 ‘S55 QUIK.PREZ 53.5 eu. $87 finish. Our Ree. $549.95 on wrought freme, in essorted colors $90 
WRINGER WASHER 


$139.05 ‘56 CROSLEY 17-Series REFRIGERATOR Our Reg. $139.95 
$349.95 56 PHILCO 21-Seri : 

cop} ho - emia ggg EE gros INNERSPRING LAMPS, END TABLES FAMOUS MAKE 
$349.95 ‘55 CAPEHART 2)-Series REFRIGERATOR w ovte $229 f WRINGER WASHER 
TV Blonde Console defrost MATTRESSES or COCKTAIL TABLES 
$259.95 ‘56 PHILCO 21 -Series $249.95 ‘55 HOTPOINT 83 cu. * $89 

TY Swivelet PEFPRIGERATOR w U-shere freerer BOX SPRINGS 

$299,935 ‘56 TOP BRAND 17-Sories TV @QE | $399.95 35 G.£. 11 cv. ft $217 Your choice of full or twin sizes. STEP TABLES and Special Group of 


3.WAY COMB. w redie end phere REFRIGERATOR w freerer 


$219.95 “36 MOTOROLA 21-Series $129 $419.95 "SS NORGE 12 cv. #. REFRIGERATOR 20% to 50%x%off TRA é N R | 
$166 ALL OCCASIONAL DEIN, REFRIGERATORS 


TV Teble Mode! w avute. defrost end twin 


TV Teble Mode! FAMOUS MAKE 4-PC. BEDROOM SUITE. Triple 
a3 36 PH dresser, mirror, lerge 5 TABLES cu. ft. GAS 


$359.95 “56 PHILCO 21-Series TV FREEZERS freeene, 

Cc le w tull deo uvtiful commode 

$329.95 "55 WESTINGHOUSE 2). 6299.95 "56 CROSLEY Te S$ 9OB Our Reg. $550.00 LEONARD 

$319.95 Se PRICO 5) Secles UPRIGHT FREEZER DDS 6 oo hi | 

; $499.95 ‘55 NORGE 17 ww. # 

TV Swiveler nt ag Adil $244 | GENERAL ELECTRIC 

$399.95 ‘Sé ZENITH 21-Series TV $179 1956 ADMIRAL 10 cu. # 149 choice of full or twin sizes; some % o 

Console w flashmetic tunin UPRIGHT FREEZER Ss slightly domaged some perfect Our WESTINGHOUSE ee 
tt na 


$359 95 55 CAPEMART 2) Series TV 3 $499 95 HOTPOINT 4 ‘ +e 
v 9.50, 50, 
Mahogany Console w doors 114 UPRIGHT FREEZER w door shelves $236 ag = $10 in assorted styles ond 
Pi $349.95 (“35 EMERSON 21-Seriee GEES | 3409.95 '55 CROSLEY 14 cw. #0 $229 $39. a Oe $27 cu. ft. aad 
PRIGHT FREEZER e 4 
FAMOUS MAKE 21.Series TV scan 95 ‘S35 i 2S aw. # ODDS 4&4 ENDS . « INNERSPRING MATTRESSES! 5-PC. WROUGHT IRON DINETTE SET. ler ADMIRAL 
$188 or BOX SPRINGS. Your choice of full er twin! teble end 4 sturdy choirs $39 rm 


3-WAY COMB. w/AM.-FM redie $269 UPRIGHT PREETER on. 


EW OUTDOOR ITEMS || =:~: Base m9 7 | eee es 810 te 
$169.9 OTOROLA 21-Se Ow & 59.50, $49.50, $39.50 7.PC. CHROME DINETTE SET 
ge Mg “ rm ahi S117 | cuest reeezer $18 Senta “INNERSPRINIG MATTRESSES 29 and 6 err ugh erg Our Reg, 3129.95 FRIGIDAIRE 


KKK KK KK LL KL LL LL ks 


TV Teble Model w/alum a om To or 
S All-Aluminum Rustproof $].39 $209.95 ‘SS RCA 21-Series $136 oe ieee $177 SPRINGS. Your cheice of full 


PReaegammnossensocses TV Table Medel $354.33 “55 WESTINGHOUSE 8.5 $159 FOLDING “cors Complete with inner 


8-Qu $279.95 ‘36 EMERSON 2).Series TY 
95 3-4. Ber bd $3.25 Salts Meted w/in ree | $128 cv. . UPRIGHT FREEZER spring mettresses, 30° size. Reg. $32.99 


s : 
9 Bar-B-Que 49< ager Ay ol $136 LAUNDR ogee yo 


Our Reg. $10.95 


de! , 
Starter , adae (ieee ee mmmereoeers $389.95 “56 CROSLEY 21 -Series $177 
, HOLLYWOOD 68EDS. Innerspring mottress ond 

ein Settone Foetal $499 BF] oss" WotetOU ive’ 447 EQUIPMENT ben sorina ole $33 
ee Bees es se : TV Table Model $289.95 “SS NORGE AUTOMATIC oy RL 

22-inch Deluxe Ourtdeor Ber -8-Qve with $}]-95 $519 95 "sé FAMOUS MAKE 2) Series TV WASHER w time-line contre! 2 ianerspring matteeeses ; springs quvord 
beering grill elevotor sh ge COMB, w/AM-FM radie $255 $219.95 55 NORGE oat aadk’ teadiien . $67 
! S one ELECTRIC DRYER ore Our & $139.95 . 
sp oelhee—yatiamgee rs ch ys ripe +$16°°° one, a ED Wpaees $1 1 | $249.95 56 BENDIX Supermoric FOAM RUBBER BOX SPRING AND MATTRESS 
ator and shelf . . . folds up for easy eernge TV Toble Model pee AUTOMATIC WASHER Firestone 6° rubber. Mede te 2-PC. LIVING 

22-inch Deluxe Ovideor Ber-B-OQve w/grill eleveter $149.95 ‘55 RCA 17-Series $1 12 $229.95 55 BENDIX Super.fost sell for $149.50 ... 

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JON ‘til 9 P. M. TUESDAY! =!) (5 VCS 


pas os ‘oes A 4 


on . 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
8 Monday, May 28, 1956 en 2 


Premier Nasser 
Called Dictator 


VICHY, France, May 27 M@)tlons arms embargo on the 


PARIS, May 27 ®—Police murder weapon, which;train in . Bir nee of Nantes 


The 
made a newspa a poe bet pele ee Se eee ares\ii 
day asking 4 tee a hammer or ajon their third-cfass tic sin 


a sha 

hatchet. : order to énter the 

young ofp to help solve the There was evidence the mur-|catriage. 

mysterious “murder on the! der had been carefully planned| Black-edged announcements 

night express.” by someone who had studied| in today’s Paris newspapers 

Théy took the action after|Bonnamy’s frequent journeys|@sked an unidentified woman 

feet baltine Gtive ta Which to Paris as an honorary offi-:who yesterday telephoned 

lice coal i . iaaeeeal” ee cial of the Railway Union. ogg ae , rag to 3 
But union officials denied re-|‘* oe VOSS 

death of 75-year-old Paul Bon- ports that he. was carrying the Paris police. 


Why risk inferior results? Kodachrome and Kodacolor are 
eiameraieninte, bocsgumy Kodak Laboratories. 


French Minister of Defense! Middle East { namy, an ex-railway inspector’ expesere Processing and 
> 5 
Maurice Bourges- Maunoury to- Shaker, former Egyptian Pag eo gy ees to death in bow ad te aly eyed oe M H H ig sxpesure cdachrome a. Ce seessing tnd Mocntine Te tear 
a locked first-class compart-| | 4 treme ts Wis. Geliet and oroceans fiear Hymn exposure » $.90; Prints each, 32 nods i 


day called Egyptian. Premier|Government Director of Infor-' 
Gamal Abdel Nasser a “dic-|mation, said “people's China is| 
tator” whose ambitions are the biggest producer of arma-| ; | 


ment of ane Paris-Quimper! 1 900 francs ($35) tucked away| RABAT, Morocco, May 27 


night. express. | ' 
Bonnamy’s body was found!" bis briefcase. ‘For the first time in 26 years, 
under a blood-stained trench-| Bonnamy was a man, appar- the Moroccan hymn was played 


SOMMER'S CAMERA EX. 


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“without limit.” ;ment at present and can supply 
Bourges-Maunoury charged|Arabs with all they want of coat when the train reached|e™tly without enemies, living at the beginning of the Moroc-| 
that Nasser’s ambitions are di-| war material.” It was the first Montparnasse station, Thurs-| quietly in retirement. can radio's regular program) 
rected not only toward the| open hint here of an Egyptian. International News | 049 Morning. | The only clues were the| yesterday, instead of the French) tp 
Middle East and North Africa,|Chinese arms deal. He de-| His compartment door hadjmark of a bloodstained handjnational anthem. Morocco is'\cay RE. 1.1234. ask for Circulation, and order The Wash- 
but also at a large portion of|clared British Prime Minister | Heads Arab Legion been locked from the outside|on the trenchcoat and reports emerging from its status as a : ! 
‘with a special pass key. ‘of two men who boarded the|French protectorate. ington Post and. Times Herald guaranteed home delivery. 


Africa south of the Sahara Eden had tried to persuade So-| 
desert. ‘Viet Premier Bulganin and) Lt. Col. Abu-Nuwar is the |- 

The Defense Minister re-| Nikita Khrushchev to join a new head of the Arab Legion. 
ferréd to the Egyptian leader in) Middle East arms embargo dur-| He replaces the retiring Gen. 


a message read to the National ; ir visi ; 

Veterans Congress meeting iis 'tee mance ae ne wae REED, Wane Seek SneP 

here, appealing to former serv-|bargo should be handled| ™#m4 o% the Legion after the 

icemen to support French mili-/through the United Nations,| ¥Ster of Sir John Glubb. 

tary efforts in Algeria. Shaker said, Eden planned to| Aba-Nuwar is said to be a 
French newspapers have long use the U.N. to stop arms ship-| confidant of young Jordan 

charged the Cairo government ments to Arabs. | King Hussein. 

with training and supplying na-| “But Eden forgot there are ——-—_— 

tionalist rebel troops in Al-: watchful eyes in Egypt,” Shak- 

oT he Vineilt tty tao tant ~ Fn a ea a world ists raided the central Malayan 

e 
reveivéd a mission to stop the seiecatap eps member.” | village of Kampong Pahang 
development of a totalitarian jlast night and held it for two 


movement by a dictator wishing Malay \ illage Raided hours while they stole food and 
to hide the misery of his people} SINGAPORE, May 27 (®—A arms and kidnaped two villag- 
in an expansionist adventure,”| band of 20 Communist terror-' ers. 
Bourges-Maunoury’s message 
said. 

“We must not deceive our- 
selves, the ambitions of the! 


Egyptian dictator are without! 
limit.” 
He cited the necessity for 
retaining French control s Al- 
how 


geria and then described 


rebel tactics there had brought 

about an “adaptation” 

French army strategy. d 
He said the demands on the’ 

French army had forced it to 


reorganize into units of 
“greater fluidity” armed to per-| distinguished Supreme Court Justice and 


mit task force operations. best-selling author, has written a clear, 
: first-hand report on the people, places 

t Hints Deal srebis 
Esyp things, and ideas he observed during his 


With China for Arms recent visit to the Soviet Union. His 

CAIRO, May 27 (‘*»—Maj: 
Amin Shaker, assistant secre- 
tary general of the Islamic 
Congress, wrote in the semi- 
official newspaper Al Gum- 
hurriya today that Egypt rec- 
ognized Red China to circum- 
yent a threatened United Na- 


~ —_—_—_— —— a 


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Bevan Attacks 
Eden, U.S. on 


World Policy timely comments and realistic conclusions , . : 
‘ . vation ‘this @ tebels Ghat coriedis renfare enn mixer—fruit, tonic, vermouth, cola, whatever. And it’s odorless—so there’s never an after-breath, 
CAMBRIDGE, England, May not miss. It will be published Thursday, 


7m — Left-wing Laborite 


27 

Aneurin Bevan said today the June 7, 

Eden government is leading y 
Britain “to ruin” by following ° ) 
an American foreign policy BY 


facies micme'tss! Russian Journey 


der. 

| Bevan launched a scathing 
attack on the Conservative gov- Mustrated with photographs. $4.50 at all booksellers makes evel y drink te better 
ernment and the foreign poli- tas 
cies of the United States in DOUBLEDAY 


a speech here. 

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bad blood between Britain and am 

America.” Bevan said. “I be- 

lieve the American working) 

man is as good as We are. 

“But the official policy of| 
the United States is founded| 
on a profound blunder and we) 
have been following it. We are 
still following it and we can-| 
not extricate ourselves from it. | 

“What is this blunder? It is) 
the assumption that the Soviet! 

Union is arming itself . for) 
a favorable opportunity ‘for a| 
military attack on the United | 
States. 

“As a result of that we im- 
posed on our economy the big- 
gest single program of rearma- 
ment this nation has ever 
known in peacetime and we im- 


posed conscription on our Fe ; 

young men.” | oh Sal 
Bevan charged Britain had i. 

been “misled into believing a , 

Soviet attack was imminent.” a 


“>? 
“I always took the view that 
the threat from the Soviet 


2 \ 
“2 
Union was first social, secondly a 
litical and thirdly technical,” ee 
e said. “It was not military.” . = 
Bevan also attacked the Eden| > a 
government on the Cyprus is-| 
tory of the British Empire no tgs 
i 


sue. “There has been in the his-| oe 


? LOS ANGEES 


- \ 
2 : | dl 
P Eoch woy plus tex* 


more vivid example of bun-| 
gling than the Tories have been | 
responsible for in Cyprus,” he 


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Raids Laid to 8, Vietnam |charse that South Vietnam ‘ = ey a | THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
' HONGKONG May 27 forces .made 75 armed raids oe ee bork Monday, May 28, 1956 9 
commission : - <i Ve a ee ia | 


the armistice 


a|/Hanoi radio said. 


An D Ibn Saud Of f. 2 . & \|AtBaltimo 
| ad LONDON, May 27 (#—The|his son, the present King Saud.|. se | te 
British Government today pub-/The new King has been at odds|,) fe «er og aeeatetie Caius 


. lished a captured German docu-\with the British recently, main- The sinking of the freighter, 


1 ment that claimed the late King ly over territorial claims BS ee a ne F psi ioeessidiaiieeenessesca werrcgainggerteers: sca tana stttion: 
Take the speedy gentle laxative that Ibn Saud offered to cooperate against British protectorate ter- te G6 «| Panamanian, at a Baltimore . FOR) 


won?t interfere with work or slee with the Nazis just before|ritory on the Arabian peninsu-| = @ dock, blamed 16 years ago on 
bes P World War Il if Germany would|la. The British have accused ames, > S Teethece ts prt eno “. 


: ) ide bargain-price arms for|Saudi Arabi re f 
When ouywake up miserable get relief unully by bedtime! AE ee ne lot the ant British campaign in| Mi oA Maam ote) |structions, apparently was the 
w y And sparkling, antacid Sal 2) whe. document is part of a ithe Middle East, particularly in| ~ so  — | work of a Nazi agent. 


+ 


Sal Hepatica before break fast. Hepatica will soothe your sour series of papers on German|Jordan, where Britain's Sir | ae. " This was revealed Saturday 
Get relief in about an hour! stomach. too’ | foreign policy being published | John Glubb was ousted recent- | 4 when German documents, part 
Or in the evening, take Sal ANOTHER FINE PR OVET ag fav Ph tl tony o og Oe ogc te cegesn ery | of @ collection of S34 captured 

Hepatica }4hour before supper, or snrerec-avene | I lthe outbreak of war. The series|\Cliveden Ideas Reported : at the end of World War Ii, : 
| | were made public in a book 1551 # 3439 401 


is day is entitled “The| ; ° 
Take sparkling Sal |Last ssonti ft "pean Sent Directly to Hitler | International News (published by the State Depart- Dlctidinin Daun: Benning Rd. N.E. rent 
¢ lepatia ft The document on Saudi | Reuters Documents Revealed ee deer te entioned h SED AL iv Terrace Seat Pleasant 
SAL HEPATICB ro) ti 2 Bets vonwo, aay 28: atonday) asin, mentioced ELUTED ALL BAT DAY, MEMORIAL DAY 
: | \Fritz Grobba, German Minis|4, Young German who mixed| Hans Thomsen, man in charge ithe Red Star Line and  de-| prices ettective Fela anh teegoy Mar oh aT thie mecrve the viet te 
and smile! soe eee  \with Britain's leaders at the) of the German Embassy here | cer; stances whic h/|Hmit quantities. Ne sales to Dealers. “ap 
ter in Iraq and Saudi Arabia scribed circumstance: | 
s cesllienecticeantienenttieadimedtiasesttitenedtnaeniadtiadtcetiediaatiteticantieediteetied sill |Grobba’s report as published country home of Virginia-born) in 1940, made special efforts (left little doubt that the Pana-| . | — 
————————— X by the British, indicated he|/iedy Astor shortly before) in america's last full year of |manian was the ship in ques-| . ~ 


had been sounding out possible)’. . ; 
allies ior Hitler “ ade war | ‘#lled report to Adolf: Hitler, | A Nazi agents named Berg- 


—_ 


 peenaaaze eye en ae en erm oem one ey ag ema 


to get the press and Congress | 


official documents revealed to- ‘mann took credit for sabotag-| 


brok t. 
“While in Jidda (Saudi 4%: | on the German side. ling the 15,575-gross ton Pana-/ 


rs if f —_— |Arabia) I completely revised|, The report on the attitude! Labatt /manian. 
Do you e a avor Few amie of King ibn Saud’s|toward Germany of leading) , : | The Panamanian, a converted | 
to Britain.” Grobba| British figures was prepared by|#*m Hitler's opponents else-|iiner flying the flag of Panama, | 


attitude Adam von Trott zu Salz, a for-/ where, Lord Lothian was said|was owned by the Red Star|, 


. . 
wrote. “I have gained the def-| 
try this dry rum! inite taspeustiea that he hates|™mer German Rhodes scholar at to have suggested. Line headed by Arnold Bern-|:; 
: the British and is trying to ex- Oxford University. It is con-| The theme of the whole vol-|stein, a German-Jewish ship-| . 


ping magnate. Bernstein's ships | 


their tained in the latest volume of , ' 
oo wa iis tered tn documents on German foreign |“™° which contains nearly 800 were confiscated by he Nazis) D 
by them ... In three detailed ows! —_ 1918 to 1945, pub- sees ae from ee and he was sent to jail for i ressed Cc 
conversations which I had with, “shed here. achives of the German Foreign | two years. 
Wass your Gimme Sepe to ee —_ * the King, he never spoke of} Von Trott, in June, 1939, se-| Ministry and tne Reich Chan-; On March 21, 1940, the Pan- Drawn 
switch to clear, dry Puerto Rican rum. P the British other than as liars.|cured an invitation to the coun-|cellery, is provided by the ef-jamanian sank in 35 feet of| Pan Ib 
It's startlingly different. You've never ; “Compared with the oppor-|try. home at Cliveden of Lord/fects on the European situa-water shortly after loading ° 
tasted a drink so dry. Refreshing. And e tunities and advantages offered|and Lady Astor, whose son had tion of the German occupation| 11,500 tons of tobacco, glucose, || Ready 
; ry: 8.4 | to us in the event of war and|been a fellow-student at Ox-! of Czechoslovakia in March,|automobile supplies, canned) | 
each drink tastes as fresh and new as , = even in peacetime by coopera ford. 1939. goods, resin in drums and steel’ 
the first! : tion with Ibn Saud, the price he| There he was introduced to) Mention is also made in the) billets for Great Britain. H , 
asks is extremely little. He|Prime Minister Neville Cham-| documents of efforts in 1939 to} Chief Engineer S. Hansen - _ 
Pour a hearty measure of smooth, dry li wants 8000 Mauser rifles with|berlain, the Foreign Secretary;|preserve world peace made by|and Second Engineer Robert 
Bacardi Puerto Rican rum on the rocks. | : ammunition and a small ammu-|Lord Halifax, Lord Lothian,|President Franklin Roosevelt|Alberto testified before the Bu- KINGAN’S RELIABLE SMOKED 


: nitio in favorable con-| Who a few weeks later was ap-|and Pope Pius XII. reau of Marine Inspection and| 
Add a twist of lemon peel. It’s delightful ! om ) Gilaes came sal pointed British Ambassador to| The Roosevelt appeal is re-|Navigation that the fuel door! 
Why not do yourself this favor tonight? The documents published by|the United States, and other|ferred to by Hans von Weiz-jhad been closed and locked | 

the British Government do not| British political figures. isacker, German Ambassadcy to|securely before the ship sank. | 

show what action wag taken on| Von Trott recorded his con-|Italy, as “a comic document of A spanner wrench, which the 

Grobba’s report. But Saudi|versation with the British lead-| mental aberration and not a chief said did not belong to the 

Arabia remained in the Allied|er in a 6000-word report on his|diplomatic document _to be ship’s tools, was found beside) 

camp during World War II and| “fact-finding mission,” which| taken at all seriously.” ithe door. 


+ 
Ru 4 Rierte Rico was given American lend-lease| Was stamped by German au-| 
ms aid that ranged to $17.5 million arene “submitted to the). ___ Advertisement ____ Advertisement 
© 1944 Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Ec ic Development Administration up to 1946. uhrer.” ) . ; 
hems Poumetian Doves ee n's79 Fit Aveous, New York 17 Ibn Saud died in 1953 at the| He reported that Chamber-| st ma Formula Prese bed | F NZET RTE S 


, |age of 71 and was succeeded by | pom nye f gern eno 4 . | 
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eee {Adlai Ends Florida Bid, 
Flies to California Today 


C ; By Edward T. Folliard John B. McDermott, political}church servites with Mr. and RL ee 


; Stell Reporter writer for the Miami Herald, Mrs, McCarty and had lunch ww * 
MIAMI, May 27—Adiai Stev-|predicted in this morning’s is-| with them, and then returned , Ci IC Oo WeS 
enson had ‘his bags packed to-/sue that Stevenson would win to the Miami Springs Hotel to ~ aa 


in Tuesd Florida primary,|take it easy for the remainder 


| . ay’s 
e hight, and was ready to fly to) Ce | ¢ 
_.. |when 28 Convention votes will! of the day. sy rg ‘ 
There he will wage his finai| *tasee® caftithough Meport from polit) iiaa _, 119 the Visre-Lome COAST LMMED 
8 ° “Here,” McDermott * wrote, cal scouts in Florida indicate a . e 
headlong ‘primary battle with) «is our reason for figuring that| Stevenson victory on Tuesday, LV, Visit Portland, the Columbia Gorge, Mt. Rainier, 


Sen. Estes Kefauver of Ten-|stevenson will emerge on top.|there is undisguised hervous- Tacoma, Seattle, Victoria and Vancouver, B.C. Return 
nessee for the 1956 Demerreue ty the case of a light turnout! ness in the Illinois man’s camp. direct or via Yellowstone, Lake Louise-Banff, Jasper, 
nomination for President. '— and without a Governor’s|Some of his aides think he is or Glacier Park, as you choose.. You'll travel on one 
: If Stevenson wins Florida's | race this seems almost certain making a mistake in flying to of the world’s extra fine trains, stay at the best hotels, 
;| presidential. primary Tuesday, sizeable numbers of the peo-|California Monday morning. enjoy a wonderful two-week vacation with all reserva- 
‘and California's a week later,| ple voting will be friends and | They think he ought to emulate tions made in advance. Call or write now for free folder. 

j| his political lieutenants will) supporters of experienced polit- ver an nd all of elec- 

jconclude that he is “in busi- istoae. Sevenen has a atentilon ete “y the Misr! area, ss pte oe oe gee te 

ness”—meaning he will then be|jty of the state’s politicians shaking hands, flitting from £. K. Kremer, Dist. Poss. Agt. FREE! 
;|a@ heavy favorite to get his par-|with him.” tplace to place and making 500 Shoreham Bidg., Washington 5, D. C. 

4 ive ta gh oo The Herald writer went on'| speeches. Phone NA. 86-8670 WA. 86-6671 3 
;| me at the cago Convention ito list the “name” politicians; To sum up, they say they 

; |a mid-August. 'who are backing Adlai, men! are Bie Bry Foon will win but CHICAGO ° TWIN CITIES ° NORTH PACIFIC COAST 

||. If Stevenson should lose in/like former Governor Millard! they don’t seem to have a whole 
|; both states, he would stay in Caldwell, six of the seven Flor-|lot of confidence in their confi- 
}|the race, but with no hope of|ida Democrats in the national) dence. 
j|vietory at Chicago. He himself|House of Representatives, and 
;|Says that. . ‘others well known in Florida. 
i; As matters stood on this| Stevenson today sought to 
+|Sabbath, Stevenson felt good/capitalize on another big po- 
‘| about Florida, and even better! litical name in Florida. He mo- 
|} about California, where a poll) tored to Fort Pierce and visited 
‘\by the Los Angeles Mirror)with John McCarty, brother of 
|| News showed him to be a 2-to-l/the late Gov. Dan McCarty. a @ 
choice to beat Kefauver in Los|much-admired figure in the Sun-| 
|Angeles County. 'shine State. He attended! 


| 


a ee By Robert C. Albright / | 
ite oe a ; Staff Reporter 
ke | me | MIAMI, May 27—Estes Ke-,as hard in California, when he 
1 a fauver today predicted he will takes the stump there Wednes- 
—_" come from behind to win Tues- day for that state’s 68-Conven- 
a tO day over Adlai Stevénson in tion-vote prize in the June 5 
ie, Florida's presidential prefer-| primary. 
a os ae ‘lence primary. | A reporter asked Kefauver if 
weer ae i] “We have come a long way,” |he¢ would “continue these at- 
Sag * a ‘Kefauver told a press confer- tacks” on Stevenson. * 
= 


‘his campaign in California “in 


% ene hoos Coby ‘# feel we are | general” will be the same as his NEW IDEA FOR 
| The big Tennessean based |°2™Paign in Florida. He said 
"> |his forecast of victory on five | Me 


lence at the Miami eee The Tennessean replied that 
BIG THIRSTS 


thinks. Californians are 
greatly interested in old age 
security, growth of monopolies, 


rr: ' 9» ‘and a number of the other is- 
iof “considerable change” in the sues he has been raising in 


Florida political picture. * this state 

ate said the first and fore-| Kefauver said he believed he 
‘most of these was his position been running about even 
on social security, as opposed to with Stevenson in California 


|| Adlai Stevenson's old age pen- 
until Mrs. Roosevelt entered eeece 
ae Secete a Governer of |the state in behalf of Steven- ee° “es 


Illinois. ; 
Kefauver repeated his charge os a ieee . Ps > on 


: | (challenged as a “distortion” by| 

Stevenson) that the former Th atecine a — Bay HF on 
j|nois Governor vetoed a 10 per|...4” this however 

; cent a old age PeM-| Kefauver flew here today 
*}|sions Aug. 3, | , 

Then he listed the other ac-|{rom Jacksonville for a 19-hour 
| cusations he has been hurling at 

Stevenson all week in what has|~ Ste will open ‘bie last day of 
become a brawling contest for| campaigning with a 5:40 a. m.| 


this state’s 28 convention votes. | sypearance at the Miami Farm.| 


He added two new ones: ‘er’s Market. Later he will at- 


1. He berated Stevenson for' 
itend three separate breakfasts 
jests about the Mediterranean designed to turn out the vote, 


fruit fly. He said some of Ste- , 

venson's funny stories about|224 finally wind br Pte a TV 
the fly and about another cttrus} Kefauver attended services at 
scourge known as ‘spreading!s Jacksonville Methodist 
decline” were resented in the| ohurch today 

citrus belt. | 

2. He charged Stevenson's 
support, on both sides of the School Group Elects 


segregation issue, reflected a - 

“dual personality” on the for-| au = P a. 7 10 aa co 
mer Governor's part. In Flor-| o¢ the Senay bo School A _— 
ida, said Kefauver, Stevenson is! ciation of the Takoma yp Fon na 
championed by former Gov. Mil- tary school. Raymond S Weath. 
lard Caldwell, a strong segre-|oerjy 415 Walnut st. nw. was 
ong? In ae re. | named first vice president and 
_ athe tg Me oa P= aA ‘ vs Louise Hoyberger of the facul- 
ae him on the ground he is a| second vice president. 
strong integrationist. 

Other factors Kefauver 


e Gaims are operating in his fa- 
® His insistence that Steven- DANDRUFF 


ee 3 ___.,. |son used a “smear and smile”| EXCESSIVE HAIR LOSS 
Ee | i itechnique when he disclaimed 
# responsibility for an attack Siever’e tt 

oo "y . fellinn hades Calis 


4 made on Kefauver by Caldwell 
a in Stevenson’s presence. 


‘=| (factors which he said have 
Pog /helped his cause during a week 
SF & 


=. 
= 
& 
a 


campaign windup in Dade| 


ee 


% 


nn LS inaising a ee eee - 


Ipanema Beach, Rio cratic Party cannot win in 1956 ond deamen really stimwalote ihe a to. 
edicine tonight — then 


e with Stevenson as its nominee | second Menge, icine te = 
—that the Party needs a “new | po) COMPLETELY REVITALIZED” 
look. Se indicated h e —_ nnn Dende eee Danaea, Hair 
The Senator indicated he will | Sjop* coming out because your scalp can 
hit many of these factors just! 9 at ao, Glover's Mange Medicine 


—_—— — -— —— a —— +. — 
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A 


Cut in B-47 
Show Asked 
By Stassen 


Harold E. Stassen confirmed 
yesterday that his protests were 
partly responsible for the dras- 
tic curtailment of the Armed 
Forées Day display of atomic 
jet bombers here a week ago. 

Stassen, President Eisenhow- 
er’s disarmament chief, said he 
felt “this was not the time to 
rattle bombers by the hundreds, 
but it was good to show types 

strength. 
me aerial show was cut from 
216 B47 atomic bombers to 45. 
Protests against the mass flight! 
had been made by private air- | 
craft owners and pilots, who 
cited the hazards of a low athe, 
flyOver at jet speeds. 
ssen, in a filmed TV inter- 
view (“Reporters’ Roundup”) 
said other factors in his protest 
were the big U. S. H-bomb tests 
in the Pacific and the presence 
of Indonesian President Sukar- 
no in the Capital. 
me S0 it was my judgment there 


' 


Staff Phote 


Chester Leich with his “Manhattan” and “Bergen, Norway.” 


should not be hundreds of 4 ett gt Leich to Retire 


said. 
aDiccuning dearmanent 86! 4 @ C ondetic Em p mye 


tion that the Russians would 
some day accept President Eis- 
enhower's “open skies” inspec- 


tion plan. er in the Nautical 


Chester Leich, a cartograph-| Branch of the U. 
Chart Geodetic Survey, it 


“The Bes Frying Chickens 
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8417 Georgia Ave., Silver Spring + JUniper 5-1690 


| Accord Reached 


Thursday after 14 years serv- 
ice. 

Leich, 67, is national known 
as an artist and his works are 
listed in detail in “Who's Who 
in America.” 

Leich, 67, is nationally known 
painting and sketching in stu- 
dios in Chicago, Greenwich 
Village and Leonia, N. J., aft- 
er completing art studies in 
the United States, Italy and 
Germany. He did graduate work 
at the Universitly of Munich. 
Before joining the government 
service as a cartographer, he 
completed a course in phofo- 
grammetry at Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

His art works include “Land- 
ing at Ulvik” and 
Street, Bedford.” Both were 
reproduced in Fine Prints in 
1930 and 1932. He has etch- 


in the National Collection of 
Fine Arts, the Library of Con- 
gress, Museum of New Mexico 
at Sante Fe, Society of Ameri- 
can Etchers, National -Acad- 
emy of Design Library, and in 
several other libraries and mu- 
seums across the country. 


the print collection in the Met- 


City. 

He lives with his wife, Jean, 
land daughter, Mary, at 1224 
|S. Thomas st., Arlington. 


‘Dr. Rose to Be Cited 
For Long U, S. Service 


Dr. Edwin J. Rose, manager 


istration 


this afternoon . 
for completing 
| years of 
Government © 
service. , 
Dr. William © 
S. Middleton, 
chief medical © 
director for = 
the VA, will oe 
present @ 40- 
year pin and a 
special com- 
mendation to 


Dr. Rese 


on the hospital grounds. 

Dr. Rose, a veteran of both 
World Wars, has been asso- 
ciated with the VA medical pro- 
gram here for 23 years. He has 
been manager at Mt. Alto for 
about three years. He served | 
previously as an executive ad 
the VA Central Office. 

Dr. Rose has managed VA. 
hospitals in Kansas City, Mo., 


ist in orthopedic surgery. 
He lives at 4501 Cortland rd., 
Chevy Chase, Md. 


On Berlin Loans 


Reuters 
LONDON, May 28—Repre- 
British creditors have reached 
agreement in principe with 
representatives of the city of 
Berlin concerning the direct 
dollar and sterling loans of that 
city. 

This was announced today by 
the Foreign Bondholders Pro- 
tective Council, Ine. of New 
York and the Committee of 
British Long-Term ad Medium- 
Term Creditors of Germany. 
No details of the agreement 
were disclosed. 

Berlin’s direct loans comprise 
two dollar issues of 1925 and 
1928 with a nominal outstand- 
ing total of about $17 million 
and one sterling loan of 1927 
with about 2% million pounds 
($63 million) nominally out- 
standing. 

Berlin in the past has bought 
up and retired a large part of 
these debts, hence the true out- 
standing aggregate, on which 
the city will have to pay, may 


ropolitan Museum in New York | 


Dr. Rose during the ceremony ' 


Muskogee, Okla, and Min- 
neapolis, Minn. He is a special-' 


sentatives of the American and) 


be less than half the nominal 


100% Relief for 
Acid Indigestion! 


, 8 


ee 


Coast and| 
retire | 


“Village | 


ings in permanent collections 


One work, “Manhattan.” is in| 


| 


of Mt. Alto Veterans Admin-' 
Hospital, will be’ 
honored at a special ceremony) 


“For the Full Luxury 
of Fine Bourbon...” 


THE WASHINGTON POST ct eae HERALD 


tie 


_ Monday, Mey 28, 1956 


11 


ad ‘ 


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air Bh ee - 


cities across U.S.A: 


Steel writes a 
pay check like this 
twice a month 


That’s a big check. 


Most pay days it’s even bigger. Some 
pay days it may be a little less. But in 
1955, for instance, the total paid out 
for employment costs in the steel in- 
dustry and its affiliated interests was 
almost 4.7 billion dollars. 


About 90 per cent of that was paid 
directly to employees and the rest was 
set aside for their pensions, insurance 
and other benefits. 


The 4.7 billion dollars was an aver- 
age of $5,800 per year per employee. 


And the steel companies, in 1955, 
wrote another series of checks that 
totalled more than 6 billion dollars for 
the materials and services needed to 
keep the steelworkers employed. 


Any way you figure it, elose to 11 
billions of dollars from the steel com- 
panies alone, went directly to the 
workers or was paid out for materials. 


AMERICAN 


IRON AND STEEL 


Thus, wages and materials alone ac- 
counted for close to 11 billions of the 
total 14 billions received by the steel 
companies from sales, services and all 
other sources. As the chart at the right 
shows, this was 77.1 per cent of every 
dollar taken in. 


Then, with what was left over, the 
steel companies had to pay taxes and 
interest and allow for depreciatien 
costs before any money was available 
for expansion, reinvestment in the 
business or dividends, 


Meanwhile the country’s needs for 
steel increase daily. To meet this need 
the steel companies are expanding 
their production capacity to increase 
it 15 million tons in just three years. 
This will cost more than a billion dol- 
lars this year alone. Expansion will 
mean more jobs, bigger payrolls. 


It all leads unerringly to one con- 
clusion — 


America and Steel Must Grow Together 


INSTITUTE 


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MONDAY, MAY 28, 1956 


New Look at Foreign Aid 


The 22% per cent cut made by the House Foreign 
Affairs Committee in the foreign aid authorization 
for 1957 reflects the congressional confusion and 
skepticism about the aid program. The Administra- 
tion simply did not convince legislators that the 
program has been accommodated to the needs of 
the changing international climate in light of Soviet 
economic competition, or that the purposes and 
techniques of the program have been fully thought 
out. 

Did the House committee cut too deeply? We 
are inclined to think it did, at least from a psycho- 
logical standpoint and in the absence of definite 
guideposts. One billion dollars of the $1,109,000,000 
slash from the $4.9 billion requested is in military 
aid. We agree with the implication of the com- 
mittee that the military emphasis in Asia has been 
of dubious value; but some of the military cuts 
also would affect Europe. Here the impact is 
likely to be bad, in view of the already strong 
pressures to pare commitments to NATO, reduce 
or eliminate conscription and the like. There is 
a danger that if so large a cut is sustained this 
country’s European allies will regard it as justifi- 
cation for further military relaxation. 

Chairman Richards says that there is enough 
money carried over from past appropriations to 
provide all needs for two years. This may be the 
case; and the Administration may have delayed 
unnecessarily in obligating funds. But military 
lead-time in procurement is a complicated affair. 
The net effect of such a reduction in advance 
authority could be to force the Administration to 
do what Congress already has criticized it for doing 

‘in the past—rely on materiel in the pipeline. This 
does not give a true picture of accumulating needs. 

Nevertheless, it is apparent that the congres- 
sional misgivings over the aid program are neither 
quixotic nor partisan. The Foreign Affairs Com- 
mittee has declared the intent of Congress to 

‘continue economic aid as long as necessary. But 
the widespread doubts about the kind of program 
meeded argue strongly for an independent study 
ef purposes and performance. 

Such a study will find much help in a stimulating 
and comprehensive proposal for a new foreign eco- 
momic policy by Max F. Millikan and W. W. Rostow 
of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, as 
well as in a new policy paper by George F. Kennan. 
Mr. Kennan’s comments closely parallel those of 
the MIT experts. He decries the tendency to regard 
popularity and gratitude as criteria for aid, and 
he urges a curt answer to the blackmail type of 
appeal that a country will go Communist unless it 
receives American help. Respect and advancement 
of enlightened American self-interest, he says, are 
all that this country can reasonably expect. He 
would channelize aid through an international 
agency on a long-term basis and accompany it with 
liberalized trade. 

Messrs. Rostow and Millikan go on to advocate 
an international-development fund to make grants 
and loans (mostly loans) to underdeveloped coun- 
tries over a five-year period, gearing help to 
absorptive capacity, using existing national and 
international agencies with contributions from 
ether advanced countries, and stimulating the flow 
of private capital where possible. They attack 
vigorously the idea that friends can be bought, 
and that American efforts can dissuade Asian coun- 
tries from “socialism.” They also assert flatly that 
mo amount of American aid can enable countries 
in Asia to make much of a military contribution to 
defense. In other words, it is far more important 

\to help India succeed in her economic development 
jes an offset to the lure of Communist China than 
to encourage broader Asian military pacts. 

This sort of fresh and frank talk is much to be 
encouraged, for it is apparent that what the country 
is groping for is an aid concept far more mature 

and sophisticated than any yet devised. The need 
emphasized again by the House committee’s action 
is for an imaginative and penetrating study in 
which both Congress and the Administration will 
have confidence. Until there is such an effort to 
project American policy, Congress will be in the 
position of having to take aid requests pretty much 
on faith, knowing that any cuts it makes will be 
largely in the dark. 


Conflicting Sedition Laws 


The Department of Justice has given its blessing 
to the Bridges bill designed to upset a recent ruling 
of the Supreme Court invalidating state antisedition 
laws. This seems to us a mistake, for it once 
more contemplates the enforcement of conflicting 
policies in an area where Federal control ought 


to be clearcut and exclusive. In conveying the 
Administration’s approval of the bill to Chairman 
Eastland of the Senate Judiciary Committee, Deputy 
Attorney.General Rogers expressed the view that 
“in the fieltis of sedition and subversion, the Fed- 
eral and state governments can work together 
easily and well, supplementing each other .. .” 
But in the opinion at which this bill is aimed Chief 
Justice Warren pointed out that some state anti- 
sedition laws are very different from the Federal 
Smith Act. In a matter so closely related to the 
national security we think the Federal Government 
has an overriding interest in seeing its own policy 
enforced rather than the divergent and often con- 
flicting policies of 48 states. 

The Court did not in any way restrict the right 
of the states to protect themselves from subversives 
and seditionists. It said only that, inasmuch as 
Congress has legislated to protect the Federal Gov- 
ernment against the activities of disloyal elements, 
the states should not undercut this national policy 
by passing local laws to protect the Nation. The 
states should confine their laws to protection of 
themselves. ~it is true that Congress did not spe- 
cifically say, in passing the Smith Act, that it in- 
tended to occupy the field and preclude the states 


tairly be drawn from the Smith Act. 
We can see no reason for disturbing this con 


eral penalties for a single offense peculiarly national 
in character. Instead of inviting interference with 
the national policy, Congress should tell the states, 
by voting down this bill, to confine their antisedition 
laws to protection of their own institutions. 


McCarthy’s Hand 


In indorsing Rep. Glenn R. Davis for the seat 
now held by Sen. Alexander Wiley, the Wisconsin 
Republican Convention demonstrated that Senator 
McCarthy's influence still is strong in Wisconsin 
GOP affairs. This influence does not appear to be 
decisive,, however, and the voters will have a final 
say when they choose between Senator Wiley and 
Mr. Davis in the September 11 primary. The chief 
McCarthy candidates for the convention indorse- 
ment were former Rep. Charles J. Kersten, who 
was happily defeated in his bid for reelection in 
1954, and Mark Catlin Jr., Speaker of the State 
Assembly. The convention balked at indorsing 
either of these men, and finally, on the third 
ballot, threw its support to Mr. Davis. He was 
acceptable to Senator McCarthy and will have 
McCarthy support in the coming primary campaign. 

The 41-year-old Congressman, who has been in 
the House since 1947, has been generally in the 
McCarthy camp, but perhaps not so openly and so 
unreservedly as some others. His voting record 
would satisfy the most extreme right winger. In 
his campaign against the 72-year-old Senator Wiley 
he will have the support of the old guard in the 
Wisconsin Republican organization despite the 
fact that he is an Eisenhower delegate to the Re- 
publican National Convention this summer. The 
real fight is between the pro- and anti-Eisenhower 
Republicans in the state. 

Senator Wiley courageously went before the con- 
vention and made a strongly pro-Eisenhower 
speech, which some of the old guard greeted with 
shouted objections. They have never approved of 
his vigorous support of the President's foreign 
policies, but despite this home-state criticism Mr. 
Wiley has been a conspicuous and consistent sup- 
porter of a progressive foreign program. It is not 
unusual for him to have the opposition of Repub- 
lican leaders, but the voters have stood by him. 
This year he probably faces a tougher test than 
usual, partly because Mr. Davis is attractive per- 
sonally and is a vigorous campaigner. Despite his 
voting record, Mr. Davis undoubtedly will attempt 
to convince the voters that he is as much for the 
President as Senator Wiley. But Mr. Davis will go 
into the fight with the rage saad albatross around 
his neck. 


Realistic Postal Rates 


The House Post Office Committee has done an 
unusually good job of recognizing the realities of 
the postal deficit. The bill it has reported would 
give the Post Office Department everything it 
wanted by way of rate increases, and a little more. 
First-class rates would be advanced to 4 cents an 
ounce for letter mail and 7 cents for air mail, and 
third-class rates would be increased approximately 
30 per cent. Second-class rates on newspapers and 
Magazines, however, would be increased by an ag- 
gregate average of 84 per cent over five years in- 
stead of 30 per cent over two years as asked by 
Postmaster General Summerfield. 

This increase seems great only by contrast with 
the present unjustifiably low rates. Actually the 
new rates—a 30 per cent increase for publications 
with less than 5 per cent advertising and up to 
120 per cent for those with more advertising— 
would bring in an estimatéd $45 million annually 
in additional postal revenue when they took full 
effect. Yet the cost of carrying second-class mail 
last year exceeded revenues by some $232 million. 
No doubt there will be substantial protests, but they 
ought to be measured against the fact that even 
the proposed new rates would not nearly meet 
the out-of-pocket cost. Fortunately, many publishers 
have stated their views that users of second-class 
mail privileges ought to pay a far greater share 
of the expense. 

In one particular the committee denied the re- 
quest of the Post Office Department, which had 
advocated the creation of an independent commis- 
sion to fix rates in the future. The committee. did, 
however, adopt a timely declaration of congres- 
sional policy which recognizes that although the 
Post Office is not conducted for profit and there 
are some functions “in which the public interest 
outweighs the profit and loss factors,” the postal 
rates should be set through periodic studies in 
such fashion that total revenues are approximately 
equal to expenses. Altogether the bill represents 
a major step forward in its effort to set more 
equitable postal rates and its reflection of the fact 
that artificially low rates merely kid the taxpayers. 
We hope that the Rules Committee and the full 
House will speed it to passage. 


Japan and U. S. Textiles 


A Tariff Commission report to the Senate Finance 
Committee ought to help speed to final -passage 
the bill authorizing American membership in the 
Organization for Trade Cooperation. One of the 
chief objectors to the bill has been the American 
textile industry, which has fought the trade liberal- 
ization move on the grounds that American textiles 
and American cotton producers are threatened by 
foreign competition. The Tariff Commission says 
bluntly it just is not so. “Such imports are not 
offering serious competition to most segments of 
the domestic textile industry,” the report says. 
“It is clear that textile manufacturers in Japan 
do not have an ‘across-the-board’ competitive ad- 
vantage over the textile manufacturers in the 
United States.” | 

It cites two specific facts which should convince 
Congress of the speciousness of the textile argu- 
ment against OTC. First, the raw cottorl content of 
textile imports from Japan last year was equivalent 
to only about one fifth of the raw cotton which the 


stunned. Humane? 


Letters to the Editor 


“Humane Slaughter” 


I was indeed pleased to read 
your editorial of May 7 indors- 
ing Senator Humphrey’s bill to 
require humane methods of 
slaughtering meat animals in 
American packing houses. 

Just recently I paid my first 
visit to a slaughtering line of a 
meat packing plant. I was 
shocked at what I observed. The 
slaughtering line was both 
nauseating and disgusting. I 
remember quite well the in- 
dividual in the slaughter house 
striking a very frightened steer 
in the head four times before 
he was felled. 

The instrument used by the 
slaughterer was a “pick ax” and 
a “straight blade ax.” How can 
any normal, intelligent person 
deny the cruelty of this ancient 
method of killing? The kosher 
method was even more in- 
humane. Picture a calf in ter- 
ror being shackled 
throat cut without 


and its 

being 
Of course 
not. 

From all indications meat 
packing officials are not con- 
cerned over their ancient 
method of slaughtering (at 
least not those at the pliant I 
visited). As you stated in your 
editorial, there are modern 
metbods that can be utilized. 
What valid argument do these 
people have for not adopting 
a more humane method? 

Unfortunately, the DA veter- 
inarian at this particular plant 
could do nothing, even though 
he agreed that the methods be- 
ing employed were inhumane. 
He even stated that he had 

spoken to officials of the meat 
plant over the possibility of 
using a captive bolt pistol, but 
he was completely red. 
This within itself should justify 
the full support of Sen. Hum- 
phrey’s bill. 

CHARLES M. SANDERS. 
Silver Spring, Md. 
ow 

Thank you for bringing to at- 
tention the hearings on Senator 
Humphrey’s bill to provide for 
the humane slaughter of meat 
animals. It is shocking to learn 
of the brutality and terror to 


which animals are now subject- 
e It is more shocking to 
learn that the Department of 
Agriculture, which should have 
fought for humane conditions 
years ago, is opposed to the 
bill and favors voluntary com- 
pliance which has never worked 
to date. What possible objec- 
tion could anyone have to this 
bill, other than the meat pack- 
ers’ objection that it would be 
inconvenient or more expen- 


sive? Those objections should 


‘carry no weight in a civilized 


country. 
MARGERY BURT. 

Fairfax, Va. 

oe 

I was horrified and shocked 
to read of the barbarous treat- 
ment of animals in our slaugh- 
ter houses. Such cruelty should 
not be tolerated in any civilized 
country. I just cannot under- 
stand why the Humane Society 
has not done something to put 
a stop to it long ago. 

I am glad that we have such 
a kind-hearted man as Sen. 
Humphrey and fervently hope 
that his bill will pass. 

Because of such unnecessary 
cruelty I and many others no 
longer eat meat. 

CORNELIA C. PEALE. 

Fairfax, Va. 


Support for the Nats 


A few days ago a letter ap- 
peared on this page making 
fun of the Washington baseball 
club because they have lost so 
many games. As one who has 
enjoyed many Nat games, I 
cannot let that letter pass. All 
ball clubs lose some games, and 
the anguish to the fan is great. 

For myself, the chance of a 
good game, win or lose, keeps 
me coming back, and the 
thought that Los Angeles 
(which by its own admission 
already has everything else) 
might get “my team” strikes 
terror to my heart. The Nats 
are a fine group of men, they 
play good ball, and as long as 
they are in there trying, I'm 
for them. 

JOYCE HARRELL. 

Takoma Park, Md. 


Judge Cockrill 


I have long been grateful for 
the existence of The Washing- 


‘ton Post and Times Herald and 


for one who serves the citizens 
so faithfully, Judge Edith Cock- 
rill. I feel I should tell you so, 
not only “think” it. In her re- 
cent desire to have better 
trained and more professional 
help in handling cases, I feel 
she is doing a favor to all con- 
cerned. She makes her beliefs 
clearly and definitely known, 
then stands behind them. As a 
mother of four, I feel that they 
would have more than due con- 
sideration and fair decision 
from this outstanding lady. 
JANE FLYNN. 
Washington. 


. Miss Washington 


Looks like the Miss Washing- 
ton contest is in its regular 
groove with the entry of two 
young ladies, one from Alexan- 
dria and the other from Arling- 
ton. I was hoping that this year 
would find only local residents 
eligible. Can you imagine any- 
one from the District being se- 
lected as Miss Maryland or Miss 
Virginia? The much-heralded 
statement “The City of Wash- 
ington belongs to all the citi- 
zens” sure proves: itself. Wel- 
come Indians. 

FRANK D. TIPPETT. 

Washington. 


Service Squabble 


Well, the Air Force says all © 


those billions going for Navy 
carriers and other accessories 
are just so much down the 
drain; the Navy says we can 
get along pretty well without 
the Air Force and the Army; 
and the Army calls for a plague 
on both their houses. 

Seems to me that since all 
the experts have figured out 
that the other services are un- 
necessary, why don't we just 
give up on all three of them? 
We could save a few billion and 
let the Boy Scouts and the 
Coast Guard carry the load. 

Cc. D. CUNNINGHAM. 

Lexington, N. C. 


“The Stakes in Korea” 


Just what are the “stakes in 
Korea” discussed in your edi- 
torial (May 8), the letters from 
Dr. Frederick Brown Harris 
(May 14) and Miss Dorothy Al- 
1 « (May 21), and in the speech 
by Sen. Wayne Morse? 

If the debate is over whether 
the Republic of Korea is an 
obedient satellite of the United 
States, then the measuring rod 
of “intractability” cited by Miss 
Allan is proper. If the ques- 
tion is whether the United 


States and the free world (as . 


well as the people of Korea) 
profit from the maintenance of 
an incependent and free gov- 
ernment in Korea, then the in- 
quiry returns to the grounds 
established by Dr. Harris. 


Morse and Miss Allan, are an- 
swered with summary direct- 
ness by the New York Times 
editorial of May 21, which de- 
clares that the election in Ko- 
rea “has given a strong demon- 
stration of patriotic democracy 
in action. It should have si- 
lenced the thoughtless charge 
of ‘dictatorship’ in Korea.” 

Most significantly revelatory 
of the real political situation in 
Korea is the successful evolu- 
tion of a workable party system. 
In 1946 ver ys were 


ance of a stable Korean govern- 
ment after the retirement from 
politics of Dr. Syngman Rhee. 
Of course he will be greatly 
missed, but with two strong 
partie, about equally matched, 
the Republic of Korea demon- 
strates greater stability than is 
evident in many older democ- 
racies. 

Second, the emergence of a 
genuine party system is abso- 
lute proof of the falsity of the 
loose charges of “dictatorship” 
indicated in several of the ques- 
tions. asked by Sen. Morse. 
There are many dictatorships 
around the world, on both sides 
of the Iron Curtain, but they 
do not hold free elections 
marked ‘yy vigorous campaign- 
ing and producing a divided 
result. This Sen. Morse is | meg 
ically mature enough to know. 

Some of Sen. Morse’s ques- 
tions are already answered by 
the election results. Others are 
so Startling as to require at 
least minimal attention. 

“Why has President Rhee so 
Pa altered the constitu- 
tion?” He has never altered it. 
He cannot do so. It has been 
amended by “due process of 
law”—but thus far less fre- 
quently than was our own Con- 
stitution in a similar span of 
years. The major amendments 
provided for direct election of 
the nt by the people, 
: establishment of a bicam- 


because he insisted upon pur- 
chasing aid supplies in the 
United States, rather than in 
Japan. There was a dispute 
over taxes levied upon Amer- 
icans doing business in Korea 
—but this was settled to the 
satisfaction of the American 
Chamber of Commerce in Ko- 
rea, and the American business- 
men are still there—doing a 
profitable business. 

“Is there a heavily financed 
Korean lobby operating in the 
United States?” Registration of 
all lobbyists is required by law; 
none is registered; none exists. 
There is a public information 
office for Korea—the Korean 
Pacific Press—which I have the 
honor to direct, as a part-time 
activity. Its very modest financ- 
ing (far less than that available 
to most foreign governments in 
America) is reported quarterly 
to the Department of Justice. 

It is unfortunate that from 

a few very vocal sources there 
emerges a continuous barrage 
of criticism of President Rhee 
and of the Republic of Korea— 
America’s stanchest ally in 
Asia. Oi course President Rhee 
does not always support our 
policies. As a matter of fact, 
the steady advance of commu- 
nism in Asia indicates that our 
policies have not been notably 
successful. Naturally he op- 
poses the truce—just exactly 
as we,: mericans would do if 
our own Nation were divided 
and half-occupied by a foreign 
Communist army. 

The freedom of the May 15 
election is encouraging. So is 
the economic recovery now be- 
coming manifest. So is the 

stanch defense maintained in 
Korea against Communist in- 
roads. Let us disagree with our 
Korean allies, when we must, 
i a spirit of mutual respect - 


‘New Era’ Surge 


Faces Two Roads 
By Malvina Lindsay 


PEOPLE still talk of the mental excite. 
ment of the early 1930s in Washington— 
ideas shouted above the clatter of cocktail 
gatherings . . . economic arguments taking 
over at dinner parties... 
politics washing out gos- 
sip at the bridge table. 

Today the eyes of the 
returned traveler—who 
may have zoomed over 
much of the world in a 
few weeks—light up 
when he speaks of cer- 
tain places. They are not 
the places of picturesque 
scenery or of famous 
shrines. They are spots 
where the mental atmosphere is most 
highly charged with future plans and ex- 
pectations. 

Such an atmosphere prevails to an extent 
at the beginning of every new administra. 
tion in Washington, or elsewhere. But it is 
most strongly felt when a new economie 
era is being born. 

Two places today, Puerto Rico and India, 
are seen by one globe-trotting Washington 
economist as having a mental atmosphere 
most similar to that of the early 1930s 
here. In both, the human mind is seething 
in an effort to meet the challenge of want. 

However, many countries, newly con- 
scious of national dignity and fired by 


desire to improve living standards, have 


much of the same mental ferment. As the 

speech to Congress of President Sukarno 

of India evidenced, these nations feel them- 

selves reliving politically America's 1780s, 
cos 

IN PUERTO RICO the excitement is 
over a successful start on the conquest of 
poverty. A recent “Bootstrap Week” cele 
brated the passing of the island into the 
industrial age as a result of a 10-vear effort. 
The 400th new industry has just been estab- 
lished and production per worker has in- 
creased 100 per cent. 

India has long seemed to many Western- 
ers a place where adequate food supply 
would never catch up with population. But 
now that India’s first five-year plan has 
been an outstanding success, and as a sec- 
ond five-year plan is launched, Indians feel 
a great surge of confidence that they will 
solve their food problems. 

Indian officials, unafraid of the word 
“nlan,” are trying to demonstrate that the 
welfare of their people can be raised by 
economic planning while at the same time 
their society is kept free. 

Nearby Communist China also is carry- 
ing out plans for raising living standards, 
but by totalitarian means. Asian nations 
are watching both projects. If the Indian 
plan falls short of success, a turning toward 
more radical solutions, toward more dras- 
tic p eseare and regimentation, is expected 
to develop, not only in India, but through- 
out all Asia. 

But the Indians are determined, hopeful 
and dedicated. Many of their officials 
bring a religious fervor to their duties. 
Western visitors feel an eager, excited - 
sense of the future pervading official life. 

The first five-year plan, which empha- 
sized food production, carried India from a 
famine-prone country to a potential ex- 
porter of food. While the weather helped 
some, much credit for this is given to use 
of the techniques of a free soci¢ty, namely 
helping and encouraging the vast numbers 
of villages to help themselves. 

cos 

THE NEW five-year plan calls for a 20 
per cent increase in agricultural produc- 
tion, but its main focus is on basic industry 
and housing, this to be ¢arried out by both 
government and private investment. In 
pursuance of building a free locally based 
economy, India plans to bring its more than 
half a million villages into the program— 
which is now operating in 140,000 villages. 
This would require expansion of small- 
scale and village industries. 

Carrying out of the plan would need a 
net foreign exchange of $300 million a 
year. India, it is believed, would prefer to 
receive this as a loan on reasonable terms 
rather than as a gift. Indian leaders have — 
indicated they would not accept it either | 
from the Soviet Union or the United States 
if any political strings were attached. 

Most Southeast Asien nations want to 
demonstrate to the world they can im. 
prove the welfare of their people by the 
methods of a free society. The methods 
they use cannot be identical with those of 
this country—they do not havé the capital 
for much private investment and their gove 
ernment must shoujler much of the load, 
But they seem determined to maintain as 
much freedom as possible in their econo 
mies and they are confident they can make 
their plans work. 

The Hope and enthusiasm for tomorrow 
that have been sparked in many a new 
nation are important collateral for any 
creditor, including this country, who wants 
to help the experiment in Southeast Asia 
succeed. 


The Washington Dost 


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BY MAR, BEYOND ee 


ES Gi EE ewe 


- Matter of Fact . 


oT he Ghostly Candidates 


strong in California. The fact that most readers don't give 


MIAMI, Fila. 


MOST EXPERT political 
observers in Florida believe 
that Adlai Stevenson has a 
slight edge over Estes Ke- 


faeuver 17) swe 
their primary | 
race here. | 
Since the 
voters have = 
aequired a 
nasty habit of # 
making ex-@ 
pert obsefv- > 
ers look silly, 


for the record. eso... Alsop 
Meanw hile, Stewart 

what will it really signify, 
Stevenson beats Kefauver, or 
Kefauver beats Stevenson? 


The answer is simple and 
indisputable. As a fair index 
of the relative popularity of 
the two candidates, and of 
their chances of beating Pres- 
ident Eisenhower in Novem- 
ber, the outcome will mean 
nothing. Nothing at all. 


THE OUTCOME will mean 
a great deal to the candidates, 
of course. To maintain the leg - 
end that he is the people's 
choice, Kefauver has to win 
here, and in California too, to 
have a chance for the nomi- 
nation. Realizing this, Kefau- 
ver has decided to go for 
broke. He has accused the 
leading Florida politicians of 
“ganging up” on him, a 
charge which will not be lost 
on other professional politi- 
cians in other states. And 
Kefauver’s tricky last min- 
ute attacks have so infurt- 
ated Stevenson that Steven- 
son aides are saying that he 
‘would not take Kefauver in 
second place, even if it cost 
him the nomination. 


OBVIOUSLY a defeat here, 
after the Minnesota disaster, 
would also hurt Stevenson 
badly, even if he came batk 


— ee re 


remains that, aside from the 
personal fates of the two can- 
didates, this is a remarkably 
meaningless contest. 

For one thing, Florida is 
entirely unlike any other 
state, North or South—and 
proud of it. Thus ites a little 
as though the relative national 
popularity of the candidates 
were being tested in France, 
say, or perme Patagonia: 
For another thing, both can- 
didates have delicately skirted 


around the only issue which - 


really raises the voters’ blood 
pressure in Florida — school 
desegregation. 

In the five or six speeches 


it? this reporter heard Kefauver 


make in central Florida, the 
unpleasant word was never 
mentioned. Stevenson has 
been more outspoken. But 
the views of the two men are 
substantially identical any- 
way, so for the Fiorida voters 
it is a Hobson's choice. 

The outcome will be cloudy 
in other ways. If Stevenson 
wins, Kefauver will surely 
maintain, with some color of 
truth, that the “bosses” 
meaning the local politicians 
—gave Stevenson the victory. 
If Kefauver wins, the Steven- 
son men will surely claim, also 
with a measure of truth, that 
Eisenhower supporters voted 
for Kefauver as in Minnesota, 
to kill off the strongest can- 
didate. 


BUT WHAT really under- 
seores the meaninglessness of 
the outcome here is the total 
indifference of the voters. 
The weary reporters covering 
the two candidates often 
make up half the crowds that 
gather round them—Kefauver, 
running out of voters’ hands, 
occasionally grabs a report- 
ter’s hand by mistake. But al- 
most all the reporters come 
from out of state. Most Flori- 
da papers are giving the race 
only the most casual cover- 
age, eindee because they know 


-_— 


Washington Seoan iy 


‘Flying Barmaids’ Protest 


AN ARRAY of airline host- 
esses and pilots have just 
finished testifying that the 
upper air is teeming with bac- 
chanalian high sou 
kickers, in- 
cluding per _— 
sonable young 
females who 
get strato 
loaded. Why ? 
do | always 
get the un- 
eventful 


nesses 
the House In- Dixon 

terstate and Foreign Com- 
merce Subcommittee that 
these piquant performances 
stem from the practice of serv- 
ing strong drink aloft. They 
averred that aerial high-jinks 
are commonplace, due to the 
airlines being too generous 
with the stimulants. This 
forces me to one inescapable 
conclusion: The airlines on 
which | travel must be very 
stingy with their drinks. 

The witnesses were mep- 
bers of the Airline Stewards 
and Stewardesses Association 
and the Airline Pilots Associ- 
ation, both of which are 
strongly opposed to. stratos- 
pherical wassailing. The host- 
esses complain they are forced 
to be “flying barmaids.” The 
pilots declare they resent be- 
ing forced to be “flying bounc- 
ers.’ They are _ petitioning 
Congress to pass a law prohib- 
iting the serving of alcoholic 
beverages on domestic air- 
lines. 


» AFTER DEEP meditation I 
have decided to take no stand 
on the basic issue myself, al- 
though some of my dearest 
friends are toss-pots, at all 
altitudes from one foot above 
sea-level to 19,000. In fact, my 
most 
think a seat belt is a drink 
served to them while sitting. 

There is, however, a boon I 
would crave of the hostesses. | 
1 wish they would tell me. 
which flights they recommend | 


inseparable companions | 


a hoot about the results. 

The best guess here is that 
the total vote will run under 
40 per cent of the eligible 
voters. As in otlrer states, the 


Florida voters are mainly in- | 
terested in local issues, and | 


these have been largely set- 


tled in a previous primary. 


But the real reason for the 


apathy is that Floridians gen- | 
erally assume that Dwight D. | 


Eisenhower will carry “the 
state in November, and thus 
both Democratic candidates 


are as unreal to the voters as - 


though they had been con- 


structed of so much ectoplasm. | 


ALL YOU have to do is look 
around you here—at the pink 
and purple villas, the red and 
green bars, the cars that choke 
the highways, the busy bustle 
everywhere — to understand 
the main reason for the ghost- 
liness of the candidates. 
Florida is enjoying a boom to 
make the splurge of the "Twen- 
ties pale into insignificance, 
and as one bystander 
marked: “You dont vote 
against prosperity.” 

Another bystander, 
hearing 
patented pitch to all the ma- 
jor voting groups, said: “Looks 
like both of them need an 
issue.” They do indeed. Aside 
from unmentionable desegre- 
gation, there simply is no is- 
sue that makes the Florida 


after 


voters’ ears prick up, and their | 


pulses beat faster. It is all very 
well for Stevenson to com- 
plain, as he does regularly, 
that the Republicians are 
“liberal only once every four 
years,” the fact remains that 
the Administration has 


astutely undercut every ma- ope 


jor Democratic issue. 


All in all, the ghostly contest |5¢ 


here is a convincing demon- 
stration of the truth of Harry 

Truman's dictum: “Pri- 
maries are eyewash.” 


(Copyriaht. 1954. New York 
Heraid Tribune. Inc.) 


e By George Dixon 


makes women feel oOver- 
dressed, when the plane hit a 
pocket. The passengers went 
down, and the ice in their 
glasses went up. 


BUT POOR drab little me 
has never had any excitement 
like that described by the hos- 
tesses. These aerial beauties 
were introduced one by one. 
Because they kept the Con- 
gressmen, including the Chair- 
man, Rep. Oren Harris (D- 
Ark.), spellbound, I feel it is 
only chivalrous to identify a 


few of them. They were Juna ° 


Abbott, Jane Kobeck, Pat Fan- 
ning, of United Air Lines; Pat 
Starn, of American Air Lines; 
Mary Woodruff and Dolores 
Lach, of Capital Airlines. 
They all looked the soul of 
girlish candor, but their first 
tale of flying saturnalia I find 
difficult to credit unless it was 
an all-female flight. This con- 


a young woman a 4-ounce cock- 
tail, whereupon the damosel 
went up to the cockpit and 
told the captain: “Move over, 


I'll show you how to fly this 


had 


plane! 
If we must have a moral to 


finish this column, how about «-- 


this? If the airlines don’t want [2° 
strange dolls trying to fly their | 


airplanes, stop serving cock- 
‘tails in dippers, 


19564. Kine Pea! 
yndicate. Ine 


aE. ures 


These Days 


Tribute to (Siw Luce 


munism. Clare Luce grasped derstanding these confusions | 
because she has educated her- | 


IT IS NOT pleasant to learn 
that our Ambassador to Rome. 


cerned a fair passenger who Clare Luce. has worn herself 
became  verspirited and pro- out fighting against the slow, 


ceeded to disrobe. The witness 
added, however, that the per- 
formance drove all the other 
passengers from the lounge. 
Another hostess told of a 
lady who did the same thing, 


i nfil trative 
conquest of 
Italy by the 
Com munists. 
When one 
realizes how 


except that the captain and | / n adequately 


purser proved to be spoil- 
sports. To quote the witness, 
“They were able to subdue and 
redress her.” 


A THIRD thriller was of two | 


couples who boarded in Wash- 
ington. One of the men 
drenched his coat with cham- 
pagne. The hostess took it to 
hang up and dry, and noticed 
he had a gun in his belt, The 
women employed racy lan- 
guage. The witness built up to 
almost unbearable suspense, 


the United 
States is rep- 
resente a 
in many im- 
portant coun- 
tries, it has 
been fascinat- 
ing to watch this frail woman 
doing a man’s job and doing 
it to perfection. 
When Clare Luce first came 
to Italy, the Communists con- 


_ ducted a violent and smearing 


propaganda against her, first 


because she is a woman. How 


then left us hanging. We never | 


learned 
gunman and his molls. 


One hostess said she served 


Chou Reported Urging 


as most likely to produce -the | 


interesting experiences they | 
recounted. 

About the only 
ring thing that ever happened 
to me on an airliner came in | 
my sleep. I was hit on the head 
by a shower of ice while flying 


| 
| 


Learning From West 


HONGKONG, May 
Red Chinese Premier Chou En- 


lai was reported today to have 
ulse-stir- urged 


Chinese students 
learn “humbly’ ‘from the West 
in scientific matters. 

The pro-Communist newspa- 
per, the New Evening Post, said 


27 


to. 


r 


what became of the/a 


| circulated 


dare the United States send 
female Ambassador to Italy! 
That objection did not stand 
the test of time. Then a 
series of funny stories were, 
about her. Fortu-- 


| nately, many of these stories 


not so funny 


associated with Mrs. 
Luce’s Catholicism and were 
to those who 
She survived 


were 


heard them. 
them all. 


CLARE LUCE 
America’s most 
women, who has succeeded in 
many fields through sheer 
ability and a tremendous 
capacity for work. It would 


is one of 


re- | 


Kefauver make his | 


remarkable ° 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Monday, May 28, 1956 13 


” —_— 


Sip 


prs da 


——e =< 


Baptists Hear Racial T dlerante Plea 


KANSAS CITY, May 27 (ithe plea in an address to the an-jzation and the protestation of 
Southern Baptists were urged nual convention of the Women’s rights. They are making the 
tonight to seek a solution of| Missionary Union (WMV). relation of white and colored 
racial problems through “imag- | Geren, who was reared at El peoples the dominant political 
- jination rather than compub'Dorado, Ark, and has served and moral issue of the world 

as a Baptist missionary in the Re. 

Paul Geren, former State De- Far East, told the WMU: hat is required of us in 
partment representative in Am-| “Colored people are increas- dealing with the problems in 
man, Jordan, and recently ap- ingly articulate. They are in-'our backyards is that we be 
pointed executive vice presi- creasing in political power and faithful to our reach across the 
‘dent of Baylor University, made in the consciousness of organi- sea.’ 


- 


ee 


OOOO OOOO OK OK ON 


Lewis & Thos. Saltz...1409 G Street 


. Just « bit of indigestion end a touch of gout... 
Nodhine however, in the way of an ailment ! that might 
endear you to the voters, Senator !” 


— ———- oo. ~ -_ 


The Day in Congress 


TODAY 


Senate 
Meets at 106 «4. mi 
Cemmittees: 


Apprepriatiens ny Int 10 ™.. 
open. Public iS ie nterior Depart. 


Apprepriatiens Bare Pu 
ie Works Corps of Seckone Room 
Si 4i. Capi itol 

ar cone? Subcmte 


Larric missioner 
ood oné ru Administration and | 
raseret office officials District Com- 
ittee ape Capitol 

"Pe er tiens Subemte.. 10 
open . hold hearings on 8 hea” “3 and 
8. Re . Proposals establish an in- 
ternational! Teed ban ond an rna- 

a 7 _eaeertate reserve 

tt 


D-N. C.) | utilisation of ome 


y (D-Mont.) 


ip . 5 
he ra 


,exec. To mark 
| Ro oom F-39 


Meets at Noon 
ees. 


Cemmitt 
Appropriations 
on 


cagte 


| Bubcrite 


9600, | 
en 


ulate the number of vehicles to be us ed | 
as taxicabs in _- of Columbia. | 
Room 445, Old 


er ment "eneettees. 10 a 


tee matters 

r and 
open. Ful 
procedures 


| States 


eee ¢ Vv “Ei uleet Beate Assistant Roo 


eretary of Asricullure 
SOB 

Interstate and Commerce 
aviation Subcmte open 
resume hearings on . 2618 to separate 
CAA from Commerce Department. and 
on resignation of Frederick B. Lee from 
Cc oom G-16. Capito) 

puaistery ers mw Menepely 
bem - To resume 


4 
HR. "4048. "5404 and 
layton Act amendments. To hear 
representatives of Nati 
Natio nal 
Mik ind 
Ballard, Spahr. Andrews and 
npc, Philadelphia “oom te ats 


t Atemic 
Bes 


peentse 
m 


Association of | 


rica 
Manufacturers: ustry Pounda- 


ear 


Asher of Santa Mexican: alt 


a open a 
Caucus Room, | on ‘esistation which would reauire 
stalliation of safety devices on 
held refrigerators shipped 


ie safety devices 


10 «& 
on HR 
passport review procedure under the 


Tostelees. 
Bubcmte 


Laministrative 


a 
onal Association hibiting issuance o 
under Commu 


tne Co 


Communist 
Old Bide 


, Merchant Marine and +> ggetoge ® 


hant Marine 


Vesse! Operations Revolvin 


m | Department of 


resident o 
0 and Jo 
manager of Wolverine 
Ce.. On proposals I ag 


monwealth Edison 
n. 


ec AR 42 
to amend Internal Revenes Co ; 
nogm +1 SOB - of i 38 

exe 5 


2:30 s 
trans “ont District Beermition Roo 


‘Eoeroeriations Subemie.. 19370 a2 mm 


eetric Subcmte on Fileod Control. on 


tee resolutions 


Supreme consideration fer inclusion in 
contre) bill. Room 1304, New 


—- | ) Me ry. 3, 


w ihe Ca 

i 10 «a. mm. 
on Co 
is Room 


bile flood 


y ee 
cmte. on 


ubcemte 
on pending bi! 


By George Sokolsky| 


Ce pito 


‘orelgn Relations Committee Room 


od Services, 10 « 
on H.R 
bh. @d members of the Armed forces to make 
time jiost during enlistments: 


SPORTSWEAR 


with its own special flair 


Men come to us for their sports togs because they know we make no 
mistakes in judgment of what is smart, becoming and correct. Also because 
they know that here they will always find the rare fabric, the unusual 
pattern, the newest and smartest in international fashions. 


up P ©. appropriations 


OUsE 


16 a. m.. exec. Bubemte 


open. Br cooks | 


8407. voneiring enlist- 
H_R 


For the Memorial Day holiday just ahead, come in and choose from our 
exciting collection of summer sportswear. Everything from polo shirts 
to cabana sets, bears that unmistakable flair which to Washingtonians 
means “Lewis & Thos. Saltz.” Shall we expect you today? 


m., @x- 
on Legal ait 
ending Commit 
m New Bide 
Insular Affairs. 10 &. mm 


be 


mn Commeree, 10 
cial Subcmte. 


officials § will 


Hathaway India Madras Cotton Sport Shirts $12.50 
LaCoste French Tennis Shirts $7.95 
Aertex English-W oven Sport Shirts $6.95 & $7.95 
Room 414, “Old : Cotton Mesh Club Shirts; Long Sleeves 
seetaane het | and Button-Down Collar $6.50 
Allen Solly Lisle Polo Shirts from England $12.50 


Washable “Baby Cord” Play Shorts $5.95 
White Twill Gabardiné Cotton Tennis Shorts $8.95 
“Heller” Linen Walk Shorts $17.50 
D&J Anderson Tartan Swim Trunks $11.95 
D&} Anderson Tartan Cabana Sets $22.50 
Cotton & Nylon Stretch “Crew” Socks $1.00 
L’Aiglon Braided Sport Belts $6.00 
D&] Anderson Lightweight Robes $25 & $27.50 
Knee Length Walking Hose from $2.95 
Dacron & Wool Tropical Slacks $18.50 


in 


receive a report 
tandards and t 


m. 
999) 
Procedure Act and oe 
pasteports toe 
mist discipline under 
Control Act. Room 32 

in 
mner Bubcmt er 
on bills 


on 
to authorize the 
Fund of 


Commerce to 


Devs Shen ) 
and projects eligible for 
an omni- 


exec. Subd- 
First Floor. 


Poage 
on afid Credit 
1310. New Bide 


exec 
nservati 


——_- a a -_— 


the essential fact that the 
strength of the Marxist move- 
ment lies in its pseudo- 
religious character and Or- 
ganization. It is sometimes 
suggested by anti-Ror anists 
that it is a rémarkable cir- 
cumstance that 
accustomed to regard as 
Catholic countries, France, 
Italy, Poland, etc. The an- 
swer is that when those who 


rebel against God, they still 


they are accustomed. 


ITALIAN communism, 
therefore, must be acknow!l- 
edged as being anti-God but 
still seeking a morale which 
comes from association in a 
religiously disciplined society- 
Such anomalies and paradoxes 
are within the nature of a 
society which is undergoing 
violent changes, as all s0- 
cieties of man are these days. 
In both Italy and France 


self in the 


the humanities which is more | 


than can 
professors 
have 


Ma-xism hand does not 
thrives so well in what we are pinky on the left hand, if any. 
The narrowness which comes 


become 
that the pinky on 


French Shriner Golf Shoes $18.95 
Imported Kiam Linen & Cotton Sport Jackets $45 
Dacron & Cotton Wash 'n’ Wear Country Suits $39.75 
Dacron & Cotton Cambric Cloth Sport Coat $28.50 
Imported Irish Linen Sport Jackets $39.50 
Lebow Marveleen Gabardine Slacks $37.50 


broafiest sense in 


be said for many 
in universities who 
so specialized | 
the right | 
know of the | 


from specialization results in | 


a loss of 


ship which 
accept dialectical materialism needed here than engineers 
scientists 

desire the disciplines to which we hear so much. 


and 


If, Clare 


tinue her work in Italy, 
is plenty that she can do in| 
America, and the fact that she 
is a woman will 
difference. 
witty tongue which, 


any 


hibited by 


makes fools sorry that 


tested thei 

minds 
feminine 

Copvright 

a 


against 


yndicate 


leader- | 
sorely 


intelligent 
is more 


CAPS IN GREAT VARIETY: COOL, SUMMER SHOES 


CTY 


ewts & Thos. Saltz 


1409 G Street.n.w. 1009, Gonn. Ave 
EXecutive 3-4343 
* a a Sm > a Sa) a Se S ae eS aS aS, 


about which | 


con- ’ 
there | 


Luce cannot 


not make 
She has a | 
if not in- 

| 
advisers, 
they 
r little masculine 
her colossal 


cautious 


mind 
1954. King Peatures 
ne 


ee ae a ae ae 


there are n.en who believe | 
that they car. be Roman Cath- | 
olics and Marxists at the same | 


time, which means that they 
believe in God and are athe- 
ists at the same time. 


Clare Luce is capable of un. | | 


— 


atid. 


JEWISH | GIFTS 


Bar Mitzvah ° S" Weddings 
Anniversaries ® Confirmation 


be a great loss if her illness 
vere to lessen her oppor- | 
tunity for public service. 
In the struggle against com- 


Frank Rhelifpm 


* $Teee? SRLeGgtOw sETHtIDA “save8 Wee COM + 


over the gl Canal. There (Chou encouraged the students 
was, however. scientific ex- ‘to “catch up” with Western 
planation, based on the New- |sciéntific advances. Chou made 
tonian theory. Some of my the statements in addressing 
wakeful companions were a — in Peiping in honor) 
swilling that vile stuff which of Chinese scientists, the pa- 
destroys men’s souls, and per said. 
® 


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825 Kennedy &. N.W. TA. 9.03732 - 
1 Daily 10 Sender } | 


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’ 


* 


H% 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
and TIMES HERALD 
Monday, May 28, 1956 


14 


a Looking 


Rival F actions Unite to Back 
Arlington School Bond Issue 


Hearing Slated Today on Pool Zo 
The Montgomery County,applicdtion of Wheaton 
Board of Zoning Appeals will | Woods Swimming Pool Corp. to 
build a $70,000 pool in the vicin- 


hold a hearing today on the 


By Jeanne Rogers ? 
Gtaf Reporter 


Arlington County's oft-feud- 
ing factions have united to 
stump for passage of a $6.7 
million bond issue for badly- 
needed school construction 
and courthouse improvements. 
The referendum comes before 
the voters June 5. 

The County Board, the 
schools, parents, the Chamber 
of Commerce, business inter- 
ests agree, for a change, that! 
these facilities must be. fi-’ 
nanced by higher real | 
erty taxes. 

They are an absolute must, 
these special interest groups 
contend, in a relatively wealthy 
suburban community which is 
approaching its population 
limit. 

The bond issue includes $4.5] 
million for school building,) 
primarily on the junior high! 
level, which will be inundated/ 
by new students in two years. 


‘Grade Schools Overflow 


Conditions are bad now in| 
jthe grade schools, where many’ 
youngsters attend classes in) 
basements, rented space in| 
churches and in school libraries! 
and multi-purpose rooms. Sev-| 
eral hundred sixth graders are} 
‘housed in classrooms in junior 
high buildings. Beginning next 
year, they will have to get out.| 

“Currently, there are 3800. 
more students in the county’s| 
‘first six grades than in the! 
Junior and senior highs. But, 


with Luke 


—— 


This is Arlington County's courthouse, vintage of 1898. 


Architect's drawing of proposed reconstructed courthouse. 


J ,. |tlons are planning a whirlwind 
ys |campaign to. secure passage of 
the bond issue. | 

Here are the major projects 
that the school bonds would 
provide: 

® New Gunston Junior High, 
28th and S. Lang sts., which 
would house 1050 students, and 
serve as a recreational center 
for the Oakridge area. The 
school would require 42 addi- 
jtional teachers. 

® An addition to Kenmore 
Junior High, now under con 
struction at 200 S. Carlyn 
Springs rd. The complete struc- 
ture would accommodate 1200 
students. : 

® Planning money for the 
proposed Yorktown Senior High 
needed in North Arlington and 
slated to adjoin the present 
Yorktown Elementary school. 

® Classroom additions to six 
grade schools, Jamestown, 
Drew, Wilson, Woodmont, Oak-! 
ridge and Lee. . e.? 
® Planning money for eads-| fully air-conditioned 
tions at Madison, Clay, Custis' 
and Marshall Schools. one and two bedroom 


Samples of Overcrowding | 
As proof of the need for these | leases, $1 50 to $275 


ladditional classrooms, county | 
school officials gave these ex-| 
amples of present overcrowded | 
conditions. | 

® More than 180 sixth graders 
of Jamestown are being housed | 
in Williamsburg Junior High, a’ 
bad combination because of the | 
difference in students’ age and 


massachusetts 
avenue n.w. 


The perfect summer retreat. . . 

completely air-conditioned inside — twe 
sundecks above, available to residents of this 
ultra-modern building. Spend afternoons 
acquiring the “tan” you desire .. . cool 
evenings overlooking beautiful Rock Creek. 
Select one of these beautiful apartments now 
and choose your own color schemes. 


SHANNON & LUCHS CO. 


Renta! and Management: wo. 6-5162 of WO. 6-4881 


these youngsters are growing) 
and moving up in their educa-'| 
tional lives. ‘feat a proposed $9.4 million 
The bond issue—on a second, school building program. The 
separate ballot item—calls for| referendum confusingly coin- 
$2.2 million for reconstruction| cided with a special Mate elec- 
of the central portion of the| tion on the issue of racial inte- 
county courthouse, which was) sration. | 
built to serve a sleepy, rural’ School officials admit they 
village, vintage 1898. \made a mistake in saying. the 
At present, the county's issue would take care of a! 
seven courts squabble over|decade of school needs. The} 
use of five courtrooms, some|VOters, they say, apparently 
of them reminiscent of the days|thought “let's take care 


For automobiles 
air conditioning 
laundries 


or any other product 


needs with the aid of Rutter. 


mum recommendations of this|ing’s library and myilti-purpose 


rou ained support of the ' 
om goo) which was in-\crease of 100 pupils next fall. | 


terested in support for a new 
courthouse addition. 


Taylor, who last week stepped classes in a nearby church. 
down as president of the county 
council of Parent-Teacher As-|open from. 6:30 a. m. to 7:30 


of |seciations, 


the educational programs. 
® Nearly 100 pupils of Drew 
School are housed in the build- 


s4333 


The more conservative, mini- 


ee Le 
TP ERER DIT 
7's ese es ee @ © 

S32 ee4a05 


ivesececan 


}room. The school expects an in- 


S389 eeece88 
i 
saaedaae 


® Sixty Wilson School pupils 


iare located in Stratford. Junior 4 
Model Apartments 
Purnished by 


M aver ECs. 


Oven Dedeily 189 AM. till dark 


According to Theodore W.\|High and 30 others attend 
Regular polling places will be | 


Arlington organiza-'p. m. June 5 for the bond vote. 


of the tobacco-chewing, cracker| present needs now ... and keep 
barrel form of judiciary. Some!the ante down.” | 
county offices are housed in’ Shortly after this defeat at} 
shacks behind the present the polls, School Supt. T. Ed-| 
courthouse. Parking facilities|\ward Rutter said “it’s the 
must be expanded. | Asennen ee — nd 
ipay now.” Rutter sai ouble 
Tax Hike Put at $8.40 ishifts in the grade schools meat 
Arlington businessmen figure September surely would be a 
the bond issue would cost the) by-product. 
‘owner of a medium-priced home| Last Thursday, 


or service for the home or 

» business, always look first 
in the YELLOW PAGES 
of your Telephone Directory. 


Find It Fas? 
in The 


the county) 


’ 


Hi Cecil, the 
Jolly giraffe 


‘Yellow Pages’ 


|—$17,500—approximately $8.40 
|more a year in taxes. They add 
this isn’t an unheard-of in-' 


school board received a report 
that between 28 and 32 classes 
of some 800 to 1000 pupils will 


Says 


be half-day scholars whiten 
school opens in the fall 

After the bond issue defeat a 
committee of about 30 county | 
on the part of some property residents—a cross section of the 
owners and business interests, community—began a several) 
\who in February helped de- month study of school building’ 


crease for a community with the 
per capita income of Arling- 
ton to bear. 

This marks a turn-about face 


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’ 


wee < ity Life 


MONDAY, MAY 28, 1956 


LOCAL NEWS 
PICTURE PAGE 
AMUSEMENTS 
RADIO | 
BUSINESS NEWS 


Nation’s Papers 
Urge Home Rule 
For Washington 


Editorials Demand ’ 


House Committee 
Report Out Bill 
Passed by Senate 


Some of the Nation’s 
largest and most influential 
newspapers have lent their 
editorial support recently to 
the District’s long effurt to’ 
gain home rule and the right) taf Reserter 


to vote. The Rev. Dr. C. Leslie Glenn 
Among the words they used W4Tned yesterday that Ameri- . 


to describe the plight of the |°2ms should avoid “the enemy's 


raat ear trap” of thinking pow 
Nation's Capital and its citizens| idealism do not a a ~Alhg 
are “ridiculous,” “grotesque,” | 


We are engaged in a psycho- 
“senseless,” “ignoble,” “undesir-| /Ogical war in which we can be 
able” and “absurd.” ee yy tI 

The bill has been gathering the Washington Cathedral, 
dust in a House District Com-| «1¢ our enemies make us 
mittee pigeonhole since its pas- think that power and goodness 
sage by a vote of 59-15 last year|don't go together, we'll be 
in the Senate. The measure has at poner plas poe 

, | : ed. 

‘|been indorsed, with some pro-| Dr. Glenn, former rector of 
posed changes, by President St. John’s Episcopal Church, 
Eisenhower. Lafayette sq., spoke at a “Mass- 

The most widely circulated ™S Of the Colors” service, 


Representatives of many patri- 
newspaper in the country, the otic and veterans’ erenninitionn 


New York Daily News with a brought forward their flags in 
circulation of more than 2,100,- the annual ceremony sponsored 
000, is among papers backing by the Military Order of the 


home rule and supporting ai “ori Ware. 


“Fighting is 

House petition by Rep. Harley wrens” said te Dine oa 
O, Staggers (D-W. Va.) to pry tain in the Naval Reserve Chap- 
the measure loose from the Jains Corps. “We know perfect- 
District Committee. ily well that defenseless nations 

Describing the end of home|with a high standard of living 
rule in 1874 as a “temporary” |are swallowed up by the enemy. 
measure, the News continues:} “Power and idealism belong 
“Congress is still running Wash-|together. There can be such 
ington—and very badly—with a thing as a Christian soldier.” 


Senate Hearing 
Set Today on 
Drug Addict Bill 


. 


v 


1 


House Approval 
Seen This Week 
On More Top Jobs 


THE HOUSE is expected to! 
approve and send to the Senate 
this week another bill to in-| 
crease the number of top pay| 
Federal jobs. This is what the 
measure would do: 

The Defense Department 
would be given 285 GS 16, 17) 


Measure Aims 

To Close Loophole 
On Commitment 
In District Law 


By Wes Barthelmes 


At Cathedral 


Dr. Glenn 
Ties Power 


To Idealism — 


By Kenneth Dole 


In Family Court 


3 Expected 
To Be Given fos Barth 


> | 
J ud geships | A congressional spotlight 
| will focus this week on a Dis- 
Pi Sune 16 trict measure designed to 
and 18 jobs that pay $12,900 to} = (Pictures on Page 16.) — treat the salvageable drug 
$14,800. The 269 it now has; A Municipal Court judge and’ addict, confine the hopeless- 
would be turned back to Civil|two leading Washington attor- ly addicted and improve con- 
Service Commission for alloca-ineys are being given Pre itrois over distribution of 
_ tion to other Federal agencies. jnomination investigations for), bit formal ti 
Defense also would be given! judgeships in the new domestic SOU-TOCEMINE .HATCOUCS. 

325 scientific and professional) _istions branch of Municipal} 4 Senate District subcom- 
jobs that could be paid salaries, Court mittee, under Sen. Wayne 
up to $15,000 a year, including | \°"T™ Niceus (D.Cue\ wil entie talk 

50 for the National Security) A high Administration spokes-\""~ ; Ms swing in 
Agency. It only has 45 suchiman said no formal decision #*#0" at 10 a.m. today. An ar- 
f ik Aiea nite ‘teh thew Rien ray of witnesses, including Fed- 
National Advisory Committee | she oni persed being checked eral Narcotics Bureau Commis- 
for Aeronautics would get 50\hy the Federal Bureau of In-|<ched ey S. Sees See 
new up-to-$15,000 jobs; Com-| vestigation. schedu ed to testify on the bill 
merce would get 35, and Inte-| The three are Judge Frank 4 | Which ab cg py- widespread 
rior 10. NACA has 10 similar) yivers Godfrey L. Munter and a. t 10 a.m. Thursday, 
jobs. ‘John H. Burnett. a tee Sh Rereeny 
CSC has the authority to allo-| jJugge Myers, 59, was POE aban will conduct a hear- 
eate 931 GS 16, 17 and 18 jobs! pcinted to Municipal Court i ing on a similar bill before his 
: , pointed to Municipa urt IM District Health Subcommittee 
to Federal agencies. The bill) 1948 by President Harry S. Tru- im cuieamannes Yncee “eel 
would have the effect of boost- man. A native of Washington, th Di re . he INR me ole an 
ing the number to 1200. | Judge Myers practiced law here -o hina neces ne the eyes of 
police, prosecutors and ‘health| 


GSA: The Senate Appropria- for 25 years before his appoint- officials is an inadequate pro. 4-Day Convention Here 


499 Publishers Display 
Book Lines With Univac 


—. 

By Wally McNamee. Staff Photographer 

through at the Booksellers Convention. 
Daniel lives at 1202 Mississippi ave. se. 


Seven-year-old Daniel Weisser is a bit con- 


fused by a book he picked up to browse | 


struck from ‘the GSA budget Studied Medicine 
bill a provision to allow the! He is a graduate of the aro ah vias tae ad- 
- ped 11 more GS 16, 17 and|George Washington University,| 7. i101 4 ae aced the Nations 
18 jobs. The officials may regret where he studied medicine for| i, Oh vy aan Soret cities 
that tactic. ‘four years before turning to Mir se : icts to the 
VA’s insurance staff here law, He is married and lives at a Pt ae ay ation, according 
must be cut from 763 to an av-| 3754 McKinley st. nw. He has| lary sbpteantiens. Todas cane 
erage of 582 employes during/a son, Charles, and a daughter, he mony mere unknown addicts. 


~ 


is getting the addict off the 
street and into a hospital for 
treatment or quarantine, ac- 
cording to a report of the sub- 
headed by Sen. 


By. Harold Willard 


Stal! Reporter 


(« 


'Rand, does its phenomenal job/the convention to read a few 


by pulsing 2,250,000 times a 


‘pages and make suggestions for 


Univac, an electronic brain | second when recording words | promotion of the book. 


members of Congress doubling 
in brass as aldermen. The whole 
(business is grotesque.” | 
| A Texas newspaper, the 


Sixty persons attended the 
fourth annual service at the 
graveside of Gen. H. H. (Hap) 
Arnold in Arlington Cemetery, 


' 


him 30 years. 


Kyle Onstott of Sacramento, 


Graham, publisher of the paper, 


Univac, owned by Remington Calif, and asked retailers at,will be master of ceremonies. 


Ideal Father Contest 


the 1957 fiscal year that starts| Ann. 
on July 1. It hopes to avoid a| Judge Myers has been con-| The crux of narcotics control} 
layoff and to absorb the cuticerned with the problems of) 
through employe turnover. ‘alcoholics. About a year after 
: ; ihe took over his judgeship, he 
oa ge since ge — tried an experiment whereby |Conng °° 
appointed a three-man team tO\he lectured and gave drunks ; Ti , y , | . | 
work out an expanded employe |appearing before him the first|PtTice Daniel (D-Tex.). Seventy that is compiling a complete /on a magnetic tape. It takes 91) Elsworth Young, president of | Houston Post, calls the home| in memory of Air Force person- 
training program. The mem-jtime a suspended sentence, if|PeT cent of the addicts, the re- concordance of the Bible, is'electronic pulsations to make |the ABA, commented on the rule bill “a good cause. Con-|nel. The service was sponsored 
bers are Thomas Flynn, 4 New'they promised to stay out of port explained, also are “push- | on view at the American Book-\one word. The first step of|current trend in book selling | ues ~ dsp et ings pa ng Air Force Association. 
Wright of the University of|fore him again, both sentences \" overt Vv. MUITay Nasih Hotel, where 121 Ameri- Ini , lane | > ee Ny Seg : in (Col) J. F. 
een See Coes 5. Fon, |were in elsect. stated, “A large proportion of|can and 378 foreign book mee mcerhy hingitor meee a laeee Toons aid it ea “first |the reagle supects ot Gat we Brig Gen Robert P'scott Jr. 
Utah's IRS director. Munter, 59, is a former presi- Our serious crimes is committed | ;, mitt vg | - BOUNG S han Mached bere " “janis. en. Robert L. Scott Jr., 
dent of the District Bar ‘Ame by addicts.” jlishers are exhibiting their) he thinking machine is one| thought the advent of TV would litical situation, there are many Director of Infomation Serv. 
POST OFFICE will be able to ciation. A native of Berne,| The subcommittee was told of | W4Tes- of the highlights of this 56th’ ruin the book trade. ye ; pore. USAF, gave a talk. A 
@ase up on its economy pres Switzerland, he eame to this|this existing cumbersome pro-| The convention — pened yes- annual convention of the Amer-| “We are today selling many|th e ooh en” newspaper in color guard took part and jet 
sures. Congress has just voted | country in 1913. and to Wash- cedure for collaring addicts: terday and runs verough : | ! \ e capital of Kansas, the To- aircraft flew over the cemetery, 
it $16 million additional for op-| ington in 1918. He holds degrees Ww sd th th ican Booksellers Association,’ more copies of books than we|peka State Journal, poses a| About 300 persons were pres- 
erations during the month of|from the George Washington|""* Simple Law bso proms Weciectlorn senree,| Wee for the first time in-|did at that time and, strangely question: “Will you imagine|ent in the Arlington Amphi- 
June. University and the National} There is no simple direct law ing the scores of booths for Cludes an international exhibit enough, the biggést increase what phery Rone pe ergs corned “yo annual Military 
G-GIRLS: The District's Rec-| Sivret nee eid mony eiviclforcement dificers to on to ax|bright new books to fill their|—the largest ever seen in the/has come in the sale of chil-| municipal administration of its|ed > the Keak eee 
reation Agency needs 1000 sin-| positions, ineludin “ther” Civic | met agg he. aa to ig Fong shelves in coming months. United States. dren's hooks.” he ceid. own choice, but by the State| The Right Rev Ms = oy 
gle girls, 17 to 25, to be host-| ) So ie pres ne and arrest him.| One operating unit of Uni-| Alexander P. Wales, director) ,, gee ; adatenat Then yeu con® e . Msgr. 4 
esses at nearby military instal.|ocncy of the Chevy Chase/First, the United States attor-|ya- plus a display of part of of the International exhibit,, “American book buyers are} as ine the feclinies of the pee | Dioee lear General of the 
lations. Call ADams 2-2567. Rover by a «¥ ao pen bs pos —_ obtain a court/the work already completed on said there are 378 publishers | spending 70 per cent more for | vie of votelees "Wechinaen.\ea thas sbeerlager ony —— 
bent ou = ; raft order authorizing a physical ex-|the concordance, is on exhibit.|represented from 10 countries.|books than they did 25 years | C. whose municipal affairs\of Chaplain (M e assistance 
JAMES E. GORDON will be| 4 of tren a an i G the amination. But for the Govern-| Thomas Nelson & Sons of New|They have several thousand|ago ... the 1500 major book)’. 24 cutting and all—arelrick J — vate ra oo Pat- 
accorded a rare honor on ; ees of the George| ment to get the facts upon) york is publishing the concord-|books on display, he said. In outlets of the country are sell-| 4 Bag Sn enge - Ryan, ef of Army 
_| Washington University. He has which the court is to act, the ; | " , ing. i ' q|managed by the Congress 0!'Chaplains. The Most Rev, 
Thursday. He ll be > ~e | taught law part-time at National addict must be given a quick eaee, of ~ ee ene ae oe 173 foreign stent gress for sahgyw) pt a an ggg ‘the United States, no less.” | Philip J. Furlong, Military Dele 
orary commissioner of the “| University. is a director of ) Version of the Holy Bible Feb.|publishers are reépresente y;number of c ren’s. Home rule, observes the! cate of th Mili 
eral Mediation & Conciliation |; i. ye of the examination—to discover|; 1957. Univac is taking just 400 periodicals in a special sec- close to 125 million adult books . blocked | B e tary Ordin 
oe | rty National Bank and a need! ks. f : : pe ’ ‘State Journal, is being blocked ariate, preached. 
Service, the day he'll retire needle marks, for example. over two years for the com-|tion. ‘per year,”. Young said. | s barn contr little , 
after 38 years of faithful serv- [Or Riegs oe ey beard | Even if the court order is| plicated job of producing an} The American publishers are} Today’s morning program |DY non the Pectios Cansanite Randy vba bagyene moe from 
| ; . i wi vote n -| ed 
ice. | He be mesried gad ves at granted, the addict frequently | alphabetical index of the prin-|displaying every type of book/will be devoted mainly to busi-|,., sehen ae ee otic and 
; git toenll tae Ue bee el ee it, Then an order for|cipal words in the Bible, with from .“how to” series to phil-/néss. Nobel prize-winning physi-| “ype New York Herald Tri-\jaid on th Tomb yt was 
THE SENATE struck from | cons ae tear aaa s two contempt must be obtained $0/a reference to the passage in'osophical works and cook|cist Arthur H. Compton and/yune says the recent primary | known S +f omb of the Un- 
the Agriculture budget bill a crane: he can be arrested and brought|/which each occurs,.and part of| books. author Ika Chase will speak at| jection’ is “a noteworthy| The Distriet De 
per a plan 7 heer: . ser Active in Law ee . ithe context. A methodical man} Denlinger’s, Richmond, Va.,;a luncheon sponsored by the| vent.” but adds that the privil veterans of Ferelan Wass heat 
nearby Beltsville. ‘Senators are| Burnett, 59, of 4817 36th t.| not left eu ar gee aoibet | cham’ eet ie WE he ceaitoee Bae ee prone gene por ee ee i lege of voting should be eX-|its annual memorial service at 
insisting that the facility be| nor. = been —_— in law) ground, he may have volun-| y | : P 4 \tended. “Now, more than ever, |Cedar Hill Cemetery. Seventy 
built elsewhere. eeuasionn Slatversiy — aay entered’ D. C. General’ 
BARTON GREENWOOD, a school in 1920. He served in hele tae . seven to 10-day 
w ‘United States Att , when a court order 
eareer civil servant, has a | for. r Bae er ong office |i, served, he is not a drug user 
romoted to the new position of °°. S before going into 5: that particul 
, " private practice. Pareewar Semmens, 
puty Indian Commissioner. | PF Ti Dr. John D. Schultz, chief 
fred Massey has been moved|, He is a member of the Amer. hiatrist at D. C. G 
; | ican and District Bar Associa-|PS9C™@trist at D. C. General, 
up to acting assistant in charge | SS0Cia-' notes there were 43 court. 
of administration, Greenwood’s| “0"s, Barristers and Phi Alpha) .,,.mitted admission 
’ | , | s of ad- 
old job. Delta. He is married and the! qicts in 1954-55 as compared to 


| 


' 


‘father of two sons. col 
OVERSEAS: Civil Service| The bill setting up the new|!"* voluntary admissions. 
ures 


Commission has taken steps nad b sane of court was signed by 

extend its competitive merit) President Eisenhower on April 

system to overseas jobs. held|11. The long-sought domestic a yon ig gee ge. 
by American citizens in cone ot be marge branch will handle | nic way: 

itary agencies. Several hundred |cases invdlving divorce, ali-| 1¢ the } 

Commerce, Agriculture and:mony, custody, maintenance, es npobabie yore ay my pas 
jlieve a person is an addict, po- 


other agency jobs.are menos a. -e and such. 
| The post will pay $17,500 a’ 

EUGENE J. LYONS, Assist-|year and is for a 10-year term, | Fo be afsoa ant examineiion ant 
ant Postmaster General for pet-|the same as other Municipal|i¢ there is sufficient evidence 
sonnel, has accused Blue Cross Court judgeships. Domestic re-|of addition, he is immediately 
and Blue Shield officials of sel- lations cases will continue to placed in ~ hospital for a thor- 
fishly opposing” the President's | he filed in District Court until| ough examination. A_ patient 
plan to give you and your de-'39 days after the new judges) shall have right to counsel and 
a free insurance against! taxes office. jury trial te contest any fladiiie 

avy medical costs. | If Judge Myers Is appointed,'of the examination. If addic- 

CHECKOFF: The Govern-| it will create a vacancy on the tion is proved, he is committed 
ment is reconsidering its oppo-| Municipal Court. ‘to an institution for treatment. 
sition to a checkoff to cover the) 


This procedure, proponents 
employe cost of basic health | Today’s Chuckle 


say, has —. merit of keeping 
5 tho ee t 'the suspected addict in custody 
Nee angers ag "Wat ‘oly |_Schmidt announced he_ way from te begining wth smal 
4 going to marry a widow. A/chance for him to elude appre- 
with prior employe approval. |f ind called him aside. “Are hension. In addition, unlike 
THOMAS J. HERBERT has you sure you want to do this?” | now, the juvenile addict is spe- 
gained new respect within the I could never be a widow's sec- cifically covered and there is 
Administration following his|ond husband.” ordained a two-year probation 
resounding political comeback | “Well,” replied Schmidt, “it|period embracing counseling 
in his home state. The chair-| seems like it’s a lot better than and other services after release 
man of the Subversive Activi-| being her first one.” ifrom treatment. 


ties Control Board won the) 


GOP nomination for the Ohio 
Baccalaureate Sermon 


Supreme Court by a 118,000- 
vote margin without actively 


re a 
First Federal Kee 
“Educated” me! 


p Weapons Handy, 
Chaplain Warns Middies 


’ 


ANNAPOLIS, May 27 (#)same kind of world that con- 
The building of a new and bet-|frcnted Nehemiah,” he told the 
‘ter wor'd today presents the'graduates. He said it was a 
same problems that confronted |world of international tensions,) 
Nehemiah in the rebuilding of charges and counter-charges, 
\Jerusalem nearly 2400 years and a world “in which it is dif- 
ago, Naval Academy graduates ficult to separate slander and 
were told today. name-<alling from truth.” 

“We .nust—like it or asi “It is evident that we must 
build with our weapons aticontinue to be girded with 
hand,” Chaplain John D. Zim- | weapons, but we must never 
merman said in a baccalaureate cease to remémber that our 
address. primary purpose is to build, not 

He said when psychological to destroy; and to build the 
warfare, false accusations and kingdom of God.” 
islander failed to deter Nehe-' He spoke at the min chapel 
miah and the builders of a wall|service. Earlier, Catholic mid- 
to protect Jerusalem's security |shipmen had attended military; 
in a reestablished nation, their|mass celebrated by the Rev. 
enemies threatened force. 

¥rom then on half of Nehe- 
miah’s n:en worked on construc- 
tion and half held their spears, 
s bows and coats of mail 


in 

“And each of builders had 
his sword at his side 
while he ” Chaplain Zim- 


merman said. 
“We +re certainly facing the 


chinist, who not only works on 


Tommy, 11, Is Proud of Airman Dad, 


Who’s Always Ready When Needed 


Thomas Burns, 11, whe wrote 


inating his father, Elmer G. Burns, for the 
Ideal Father title of 1956, holds his dad's 
picture and talks about his favorite subject 


By Jean Jones 
Staf Reporter 
“My dad gets angry some- 
times, but who doesn’t?” wrote 
Burns, 11, in his letter 


the planes, but takes his chil- 
dren to see them, too. 
Burns built a “con 


a letter nom- 


Carolyn, 16, 
machinist. 


year-old boy recovering from 
third degree burns over more 
than half his body. 

“Father is never too busy for 
us—which includes four—Caro- 
lyn, 16; Evelyn, 14; David, 13, 
and lf, Thomas,” wrote 


myse 
the fifth grade student at As- 
“We have 


By Jim McNamars, Steff Photographer 


te his equally proud brother and sisters. 
From left are Evelyn, 14; David, 13, and 


Their father is an aviation 


paign managers who think 
they have a candidate-father 
who beats Santa Claus, the 
Prince of Monaco and Presi- 
dent _Eisenhower combined. 
Win or lose, some youngsters 
‘say they will give copies of 
their notes to Dad as a Father's 
Day present. ~ 

A Statler Hotel dinner and 
Presidential Box seats for “A 


..Catered Affair” at the Capitol 


Theater are on the winner's 


letter soon. 
Be sure it includes your full 


Tommy did and may 


be writing shout 8 


5 


> 


jagenda for June 17. The con-| 
test closes June 11 so mail your 


says the Herald Tribune, “it is 
time for Congress to give up 
its powers over the District,| 
which it does not employ too) 
well anyway, and allow Wash-| 
ingtonians the rights enjoyed) 
by all other Americans.” | 

The New York Times notes: | 
“It isn’t pleasant to say it, but| 
one of the main reasons why a) 
modern home rule bill has 
never seen the light of day in 
the House is the unreasoning 
fear that Washington's large 
Negro population might control 
local government in case suf- 
frage were granted. That is an 
unworthy as well as an ill 
founded one.” 

More than 75 favorable edi-| 
torials were collected by the 
Washington Home Rule Com- 
mittee. More excerpts follow: 

Cleveland Piain Dealer—‘It 
seems to us only fair that the) 
whole House have the right to- 
vote on the measure, and that) 
Washington citizens have their) 
right to vote on whether they 
want the charter in force 
should the bill be enacted. This 
is the democratic way of doing 
things.” 

Seattle Times—“The Ameri- 
can colonies fought the War of 
the Revolution to escape the 
burdens of taxation without rep- 
resentation. Almost two cen- 
turies later, residents of the 
District of Columbia are in that 
undesirable situation.” 

Christian .Sclence Monitor 
(Boston)—“If there is anything 
more ridiculous in the struc- 
ture of American Government 
than the provision current laws 
make or fail to make for gov- 
erning the eity of Washington, 
it would be difficult to find it.” 

St. Louis Pgst-Dispatch—Few 


’ 


Francisco 
“The present system whereby 
Congress serves as a city coun- 
cil for the National Capital is 
an affront to the 850,000 resi- 
dents of Washington; it is a 
needless expense to the payers 
of Federal taxes, and it imposes 
time-consuming duties and re- 
nsibilities upon members of 


Chicago Daily News—“We 
ihope every Illinois Congress- 
‘man will sign this petition and 
help to obtain justice for the 
hapless Washingtonians.” me 


people who live in the heart 
city of the world’s Number One 
‘Democracy do not themselves 

the basic of 


persons heard a talk by Chap- 
lain (Capt.) Harry L. Wood, 
ISN. 
Several Legion posts held ex- 
ercises at Arlington Cemetery 
and elsewhere. 


Shirkey Says Schools 
Being Short Changed 


The Rev. Dr. Albert P. Shir 
key said yesterday the public 
school systems of the country 
are being short-changed. 

American boys and girls, the 
minister ofthe Mount Vernon 
Place Methodist Church said in 
a sermon, “are limping along 
under terrible conditions.” 

The teaching profession 
should be made so attractive, 
he said, “that teachers stand in 
line for the privilege to teach, 
Instead, we give them a pit- 
tance when all of the rest of 
life offers them all manner of 
inducements.” 


Howard U. Offers 


Atomic Exhibition 


An exhibit showing the basie 
principles and uses of atomie 
energy will open at Howard 
University at 8 a. m. today. 

The exhibit, prepared by the 
American Museum of Atomie 
Energy at Oak Ridge, Tenn., 
will be on display in the lobby 
of Founders Library. Hours are 
from 8 a. m. to 10 p. m., Monday 
through Saturday. The public 
is invited. The exhibit continues 
through June 9. 


» THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
16 Monday, Mey 28, 1956 re ae 


i, 


WilliamHaskell, 
Milk Specialist 


William Howard Haskell, 67,\to his insistence on sanitary 
sanitation and retired senior precautions. 
milk specialist with the United) After the war, Mr. Haskell, 
States Public Health Service, discharged as a captain, re- 
will be buried turned to Beaumont as the 
with military town’s meat and milk consul- 
honors today at tant. His handling of a rabies 
3 p. m. in Ar- epidmic and an outbreak of 
lington Ceme- the bubonic plague there won 
him U. S. Public Health Serv- 
ice recognition and a job as 
one of the Nation's first three 
milk consultants. 

He is the only man to hold 
ithe title of senior milk spe- 
bony Mr. Haskell “ 
ville, Fla. Until draft the first standard mil 
his death he ™*- Haskell (ordinance and code and the 
was actively teaching, writing) model public health ordinance 
and developing health and sani-|and code regulating eating and 
tation material. drinking establishments. 


while working on his under| ty eee aa 
graduate thesis at the Univer-| 9 serie tto crag a 
sity of Pennsylvania, Mr.\Kienzade » Product +e ae" 
Haskell developed his litélong) Klenza Ras ucts at - 
interest in the Public Health| >\t, Wis. and traveled a 
Service. Instead of returning over this country and Canada 
to his home in Taunton, Mass.,|@cturing and = seminars 
to follow his father as a veteri- ro age renga nie held. a pro- 
narian, he went to Beaumont, | 


Surviving are his wife, the 
Texas, with the Bureau of Ani- 
mal Industry. former Lynet Plumley of Beau- 


mont: two daughters, Mrs. F. S. 
During the 1918 influenza Hutchinson, 2706 79th ave., 
epidemic, Lt. Haskell’s com-| District Heights, Md., and Mrs. 
pany was the only one in his| Joe M. Murphy, Bellaire, Texas; 
Army camp to come through|a son, William A., Lake Charles, 
without a fatality, largely due|La., and six grandchildren. — 


Ask for your Free 
Parking Stamps 


kell died Tues- 
day in Jackson- 


GOOD FOR 


GOOD FOR 


OME HOUR PARKING. 


002474 


Today and Every Day 


When You Shop 


Down town 
IN WASHINGTON 


Here’s how 225 Firms make it easy for 
you to shop and park free downtown: 


1. Drive into any of 112 down- 
town parking lots and ga- 
rages that display the red, 
white and blue Downtown 
Park and Shop insignia. 


. The attendant will hand 
you his regular parking 
ticket and you leave your 
ear under careful protec- 
tion. Now you shop at lei- 
sure. 


. You identify the 225 Down- 
town Park and Shop firms 
by the circular red, white 
and blue insignia on the 
store doors, windows, and 
newspapers. 


. In each place you make a 
purchase (some stores have 
a minimum requirement), 
ask the clerk to place a 
stamp on your’ parking 
ticket. The first and each 
additional stamp are each 
good for one hour of free 
parking. Remain downtown 
all day if you like. 


Now you have enjoyed “one- 
stop shopping.” Pick A 
your car, hand the atte 
ant the stamped ticket and 
ride away without parking 
cost or trouble. 


Park Free! 


Where You See 


> BO WNTOWN 
PARK-SHO 
RKI 


Judge Myers 


Considered for Judgeships 


Municipal Court Judge Frank H. Myers, and attorneys God. 
_frey L. Munter and John H. Burnett are receiving pre- 
nomination investigations for the judgeships on the new 
domestic relations branch of Municipal Court. (Story, P. 15.) 


Ben Segreti Dies at 56; 


D. Hayman, 
Merchant, 
Dies at 66 


David Hayman, 66, merchant, 
died yesterday at his home, 1614 
Montague st. nw., after a long 
illness. 

Mr. Hayman, 
owner of David 
Hayman’s 
Store Fixtures, 
625 and 633 In- 
diana ave. nw., 
was in business 
in Washington 
for more than 
45 years. 

An active 
member of 
Ohev Sholom 


Synagogue, he Mt. Hayman 
was a charter member of Ben- 
jamin Franklin Masonic Lodge 
and of Fudda Nabi Grotto) 
M.O.V.P.E. 


Building Contractor 


Ben Segreti, 56, Washington;several disaster relief fund- 
building contractor, died yes- raising drives. int aes 


He was a member 
‘terday at his home, 3118 Ari- /Washington Board of Trade, | 


zona ave. nw. after suffering *|the Washin n Building Con- 
heart attack at a party in a gress, enwood Club 
friend’s home Saturday night.|the Holy” Name Society. 


Mr. Segreti was President of ama i tenor. yom 


the Segreti Construction Co.,/ang his mother, Annunziata 
5009 Wisconsin ave. nw. Before /Segreti, all of the Arizona ave. | 
founding his firm in 1947, he address; four brothers, Joseph, 


' 


Brothers stone masonry firm three sisters esa Proven 

for 22 years. \zano, Maria Pinnicehia of Italy, 
A native of Belmonte, Cal- and Rosina Furgiuele of Brook- 

abro, Italy, Mr. Segreti came lyn, eo 

to Washington in 1922. He was| Funeral services will be nas 

active in Italian circles here at 9:15 a. m. Thursday at the 


and was elected last month to'S. H. Hines funeral home, fol-| 
the chairmanship of the Board' lowed by a requiem high mass 
of Trustees of the Lido Charity|at 10 a. m. at Our Lady of) 
Foundation, Inc. He was a past Victory Catholic Church. Burial 
president of the Lido Civic Club/ will be at Fort Lincoln Ceme- 
of Washington and conducted tery. 


Methodists 
To Open 4th 
News Office 


A fourth Methodist informa- 
tion office on the general 
church level will be opened 
here in September. by the 
Methodist 
Commission on , 

Public Rela-; 
tions. 

Bishop Rich- Wis 
ard C. Raines | 
of Indianapo- ~ 
lis, president of 
the commission © - 
announced this = 
yesterday. 

O. B. Fan- 


Replica of Chapel 
900 Attend ~ | 
Forest Glen | 
Dedication 


A replica of a chapel used by | 
the first Catholic archbishop of | | 
‘this area was dedicated yester- 
'day by the present archbishop | 
of Washington, the Most Rev. 


Patrick A. O’Boyle. 

Five hundred persons attend- 
ed the dedication at St. John’s) 
Church, Forest Glen, Md. Orig-' 


the service was held inside be-| 
So rain. . 

ning, an associ- n the ication address, the 
roy Swe of Fanning Right Rev. Msgr. Philip M. Han. 
the commission and head of |"4n, chancellor of the archdio- | 
Nashville Methodist Informa-|cese, told how Archbishop John |» 
tion, will be director of the new Carroll, the first American| 


; 


was a member of the Segreti-| Frank, vm | and Mario; 
er 


inally scheduled for outdoors, |* 


He 1s survived by his widow, 
Ethel! B.; his oe: Mildred | 
H. Solomon of ilver Spring; 
two sons, Louis T. 
“Buddy” Hayman; 


six grand-| 
children; a 


sister, Bessie 


and /Olstoi, and a brother, Joseph, 


f Alexandria. 

Funeral services will be held 
Tuesday at 10:30 a. m. 
Danzansky's Funeral Home, 
3501 14th st. nw. Burial will be 
‘in Ohev Sholom Cemetery. 


|/Raudenbush 
Rites Held 
In California 


and Irvin| President Lincoln signed the 


SAN DIEGO, Calif., May 27 


(#—George King Raudenbush, 
57, concert violinist and orches- 


tra leader, died Saturday. Serv-' 1. 


jices and cremation were today. 

Raudenbush was conductor 
of the New York Philharmonic 
'Symphony Orchestra in 1937 
‘and guest conductor of the Na- 
tional Symphony Orchestra in| 
'Washington in 1946. 

He founded and conducted | 


| Symphony orchestras in Har-\Grace Dent an 


lrisburg and York in his native 
Pennsylvania and was conduc- 
‘tor of the Harrisburg organiza-| 
ition from its start in 1929 to) 
1950. 

He was also founder and con- 
‘ductor of the Toledo Sy mphony | 
Orchestra from 1989 to 1943. 

He was assistant concert mas- 


' 


‘ter of the National Broadcast-| 


ing Co. Orchestra with Walt 
‘Damroseh from 1929 to 1934. 

He and his wife, Marguerite, 
‘had come here recently from 
New York to spend the sum-| 
‘mer. He had been ill since! 
|February. 

Other relatives tMmelude his 
‘parents, Mr. and Mrs. omy 
‘Raudenbush, Jamaica, N. Y.: 
brother, Dr. Henry Raudenbush 
Jr., Queens College, New York, 

and two sisters, Mrs. Julius 


43 Descendants 
Mrs.Newman 
Dies at 98; 
Rites Today 


Funeral services for Mary 
Elizabeth Newman, 98, mother 
of 9, grandmother of 14 and 
great-grandmother of 20, will 
be held at. her home, 114 § st. 
nw. today at 2 p.m. Burial will' 
be held at her 
home, 114 § st. | 
nw. today at 2 


p. m, Burial | 
will be in Lin- «@ 


the roving eyes, which. can 


see near and far 


around, for the closeness to 
all parts of the world by 
flight in space or of imagi- 
nation. For a whole wide 
world to live in, we thank 
thee, O God, and rejoice over 


every moment of 
it. 


—James W. Kennedy, N.Y.C., 
Church of the 


rector, The 
Ascension. 
ar. ah ol 


ouncii of th 
nm the UBA 


a 


by the Division 
cation. 
Churches of Christ 


and all 


living in 


Nationa) 


coln Memorial 
Cemetery. 
Mrs. Newman 
died Friday 
morning at her 
home after a 
brief illness. 
She was in ex- 
‘cellent health Mrs. Newman 
until a heart attack four 
months ago. 
She was a 5-year-old girl in 
Loudoun County, Va., when 


‘Emancipation Proclamation. 
‘She was 18 when she married 
John Thomas Newman, a horse 
‘breeder and caretaker who was 
later employed at the Botanical 
Gardens here. 

Mrs. Newman moved her 
growing family to Washington 
some 70 years ago So the chil- 
dren could receive an education. 
They lived in Georgetown, 
where she became a member 
of the First Baptist Church, and 
was known in the neighborhood 
as a source of courage and help. 
When her son, Lloyd, went to 
Howard University many stu- 
dents can.e to make ver home 
theirs. 

All her children fulfilled her | 

wish, graduating from high 
schools in the District. 
Her son, Dr. Lloyd H. New- 
an, is now a professor, head 
of the Biochemistry Depart- 
ment at Howard University 
Medical School, where he has 
/been a teacher for 30 years. 

Of the surviving children, 
the eldest son, Stanley D. New-| 

man, is retired and living in| 
Connecticut; two daughters, | 
d Eleanor Reed, 
‘employes of the Interior De- 
|partment; Irene Hawkins is a 
retired Bureau of Engraving 
and Printing worker, and Mary 
'F. Thomas is a retired Depart- 
ment of Defense employe. 

One grandson is a nuclear 
chemist with the Atomic 
Energy Commission and an- 
other is an insurance attorney. 

A sister, Hattie Caesar, lives 
jat 1340 Fairmont st. nw. 


V.A. Peterson, 
Lawyer, Dies 
In Plunge 


Chicago Tribune Press Service 


' 
; 


COGAN, ast 
May 26, 
COWNE. 


| COWNE, CRABLES 


Gx E 


in Memoriam 


JARBOE., MARY 4. In jovine memory? | 
d mother-in 

. who paseed 

away two eM, ory today. May 28. 

1954 


of our ff mother. 


law. MA 


A wonderful mother. women and side: | 
On 


e who was bette 


A 


ever made 


wondertut worker, ow joyal and 


tru 
One & million, that mother was) 


Just in your judgment. a! ar right 


Honest and iiberai 
Loved }b 
whem you kne 
Our weneertul mother. 
was 


ALFRED AND Pry, DA_ BON 


ever upr 
y your sreends and all of | 


|\Me 
that mother y 26. | 
Pp 


AND 


UGHTER.- we LAW. 


SCALA. Any our deat a a. 
oar ear mo 
CATHERINE BC 


We hove a only a memory 


farough 

But your 
fo 

As 


YOUR 


‘hak 


VING 


dB 
Bird 


Ce A. 


Cogan. 


cherish our 
sweetness will 


we cag our memory 


vu BANDS. eid AND 


On Saturday. 
al Previoenee | Hos 
A OGAN 


e lovi 
AN 


dear mother. 
whole lise | 
be with us | 


of you. | 


Friends may call at the Lee Punerai| 
4th and 


Home 

ave. ne 
- equiem mass 
olic Church at 9:30 
Cedar Hill Gunskers. 


CHARLES 
May 26 or 
of 900 
J. Cowne, Hh 
uckett. Leroy 


r owne 
great-graodchildre 
creat- ‘srendener 
FP ne 


husett 
services, Fill be wf on “rue adey. "May 
terment Cedar Hil 


Gemete yy. 
8. 


218. 
» 
a 


Masonic burial. sarvinee 
brother aaa H 
mneral services 


interment ‘Cedar E 


ar - com 


LES H. 


Pos 
wi . be hela on Tu 
2 m. Interment Ce 
ory. 


ROBE 
RICHARD A BU 


ourtesy parking 


nw 
Sorviess will we he “~~ 

at nter 
sie. Me 


DENNIS. RUBY J., at 1121 24th at. nw. 
on 


fH. On Saturday, 
1956, CHARLES H. COWN 
Ridge se 


and 
“Prends 


Beat Pleasant Lodge 
AFP AAM.. are BR 
aaa requested 
present gt Masonic Temp e 


of 


Lee Pun 
atacacehusette ave. 


Worshifut Master. 
WALTER B. MASON. Secre 


COWNE, CHAR Members 


Association of Retired 


aay. Me Hitt | 
RT & = lg Peg Pres. 
RTO’. Sec 
M. On Su 
AM 


ment 


Massachusett 
until ‘ a. m.. Tuesday May 


be offered 


wi 
rom ous Lady —. of Peace Cath 
m net cent 


Mis Val 


Members of 


fececny. 
for the 
conducting 
for our iate 
COWNE. Fu- 
eral Home, 
ne 

every. 


of the 


aie May 


Mon ; v 
resque 


office. An enlarged appropria-| bishop, founded St. John’s/% 
tion by the recent general con- 
ference of the church made the 
office possible. 

The present regional news 
bureau here, supported by the 
three conferences of the Wash- 
ington area of the church, will 
be continued. 

The new office will 
housed in the Methodist Build- 
in 100 Maryland ave. ne. It) 
wi ‘provide a general Method- 
ist news service. 


Del. Thomson 
V oices O pposition in 
To Integration 


James M. Thomson, Alexan- 
dria delegate to the Virginia 
General Assembly, said last 
night he was opposed to racial 
integration “because it may) 
ultimately lead to pene] 
riage.” 

Thomas, a Democrat, was! 
guest on the WTOP ty S| 


radio panel show, “City Side 
Thomson said he believes the 
Negro and white races are 
equal “but should be separated 
for the best interests of both.” 
Louis Lautier, Washington 
correspondent for the National 
Negro Press Association, asked 
Thomson if he thought there 
was equal rights for both races 
from an economic viewpoint! 
in Virginia. 
Thomson answered yes. “Ne- 
groes in Virginia have better! 
economical positions than Ne-| 
groes in Illinois or New York.” | 
Thomson said he believed’ 
that Negro children in Arling-| 
ton and Alexandria had the 
same educational advantages as 
the whites. 
Benjamin Muse, Virginia Af- 
fairs columnist .for The Wash- 
ington Post and Times Herald, 
said he didn’t believe this was 
true. “Ten years ago,” Muse 
said, “educational facilities for 
the Ne s in Arlington and 
Alexandria were vastly inferior 
and today the facilities, while! Lo 
improved somewhat, are still 


not what they should be.” 'N. C 


Church when he was a priest, 
asd described his patriotism 
and spiritual gifts. 

Greetings from. President 
Eisenhower were read by the 
Right Rev. Msgr. Joseph T. 
Kennedy, tor of the church. 
The President praised the arch- 
bishop’s “spiritual leadership 


be and patriotism.” 


His famous prayer “for the 
President and those in author-' 
ity” was read by the Very Rev. 
Ignatius Smith, Dean of the 
School of Philosophy at Catho-' 
lic University. 

The work of the Rev. Patrick 
J. Bennett, curate at St. John‘s.' 
in restoring the replica of the’ 

hapel, was commended by! 
‘Archbishop O’Boyle. 


Gary Wilder 
Dead at 14; 
Rites Today 


'Fenyo, Freeport, N. Y.. and 
re, Robert Rogers, Bayside, 


Rev. Mancy H. Whitley 


| The Rev. Mancy H. Whitley, 
*|minister at the Baptist Church 
at 10th and R sts. nw., died 
Wednesday in Garfield Hos- 
pital. He was 61. 

Mr. Whitley was born in 
|Nash County, N. C., in 1895 and/| 
came to Washington in 1932. He 
became a minister in 1947. He 
is survived by seven daughters, 
|two sisters and two brothers. 

The body will be taken from| 
‘the Latney funeral home, 1822) 
lith st. nw., to the Baptist 
‘Church for funeral services at! 
1 p. m. today. Burial will be in| 
Woodlawn Cemetery. 


Dr. Edgar A. Jones 


CAMBRIDGE, Md., May 27 # 
Dr. Edgar Allan Jones, deputy 
state health officer in Dor.- 
chester County from 1914 until 
his retirement in 1947, died to- 
day at his home here. He was! 


Wilder Jr., 14, a seventh-! 83. 


Funeral services for Samuel 
oe e student at Sleepy Hollow 

hool in Falls Church, will be 
held today a* 2 p. m. at Glen 
Carlyn Road Baptist Church in 
Falls Church. 

Gary, who lived at 1318 Wray-| 
wood pl., Falls Church, died’ 
Friday at Georgetown Hospital 
after a short iliness. 

A quiet boy who animal 
building model planes, cars, 
‘trucks and boats, Gary also 
liked to read Civil War history 
|books. He was a member of the 
|Cub Scouts. 

He was born in Alexandria. 

Burial will be in National Me- 

Park Ce . Until 
noon today, friends may visit 
the Ives neral Home, 28647 
Wilson bivd., Ar n, 

He is survived by mother 
Mary, and father, Sam, who is 
associated with the Lemmas 
Room, 13th and E sts. nw., a 
sister, Helen Graham, 12, and 
his alae Mr. and Mrs, 


ag te Rochester, N. Y.., 
bow Mrs A. Wilder, Clayton, 


Area: Tod 


umidity: ” 
7 Dp. m.; minimum, 77 et 12:01 


land: Today and with scaviered 


r sttered 


th 
Stays Wish belwten 


ae oe, isnt 


thwesterly, at 160 to 18 


96 at 

* Maryie 

a = aia ‘ 2 in “th 
ane 


miles an 


National Weather Summary 


1 vesterdar: 


‘ic0|To Attend P-TA Parley 


ted 

Ry EP LG ye. ye 
si Mostly 

High, 85 


hide 


River ot Gres 


Bue 7 wane 


Temperatures and rain for 24 hours ending 8:30 p. m. Sunday: 


..., Teacher Associations, at Eliza- 
‘| seth, N. J., Tuesday and Wed- 
-09| nesday. 


Dr. Jones was a member o 
the State Board of Health from. 
1912 to 1914 and served in the’ 
rag bee Legislature in 1904. 
A publican, he was chair- 
man of the party's Dorcheste 
‘County Committee from 1910) 
to 1914. 


Deaths Elsewhere 


Georges Bonnefous, 89, for- 
mer cabinet minister in several 
French governments, and 
father of Edouard Bonnefous, 
president of the Parliamentary 
Group of the Democratic and 
Soci Union of the Resist-|--~ 
ance; in Paris. 

R. L. Burton of Granite City, 
Ill, member of the Federal 


tion Service at St. Louis, Mo.; 


Imstead, 70 
professor Emeritus of Physiol- 
ogy at the University of Calli- 
fornia and a research partic- 
ipant in the discovery of insulin 
at the University .of Toronto 
in the "20s; a Ber =. 

Robert 0. Cannon, 76, a gee 
at the Little White House at 
Warm Springs since it was 
opened to the public in 1948; at 
LaGrange, Gs. 


Rabbi Abraham A. Kellner, 
brew Acad- 

emy of Washington, and Mrs. 
Leonard Price, vice president 
of the Hebrew ‘Academy P-T A, 
will attend as Washington dele- 


of Hebrew Day School Parent- 


Labor Mediation and Concilia- 


CHICAGO, May 27—Vernon 
Albert Peterson, 47, attorney 
specializing in international 
patent work, plunged to his 
death today from a fire escape 
ae his llth floor Loop of- 

ce. 

Peterson, who lived in sub- 
urban Highland Park, had told 
his wife, Ruth, 46, that he had 
been under “pressures” in his 

work. He was a partner in the 
law firm of Langner, Parry, 

and Langner, which has 
offices in Washington and New 
‘York, and handles registration 
ot foreign patents in this coun- 


Mrs. Peterson told police he 
‘had been under a mental strain 
|for two months. He had gone to 
his office yesterday to work on 


scribe to her. He left home 
again at 7:30 a. m. today, tell- 
ing her and two of their three 
children, Marion, 17, and 
Judith, 11, that he was going to 
the office. A son, Thomas, 20, 
is at the University of Mich- 
igan. 

At about 11 a. m. Peterson 
signed a register at an entrance 
of the office building. Police 
, Said he leaped or fell from the 
of | tire escape about 15 minutes 
later. Across the street from 
\where his body was fpund is 

the Union League Club, of 
+l which he was a member. 


| in Memoriam 


i 
BEwELDee. DELORES CECELIA. In | 
oving memory of my~feughter. who) 
posses ix: ray aaneteniy two years ago! 
oday 
Gicer on My AE say your res 
e all loved you, but God 


ae Paes | 


loved | 
Gone but not OTHER M 
a Dixon 


& 
___BBLAT 


SERVICE 


beyond all other 

considerations is 

a Gawler funeral 
tradition 


bali cost less then $700.— 


253 cost less than $400. 

325 cost $400 to $700. 

347 cost $700 to $999. 
735 cost more then $100 


a century 


Gawisr’s ||: 


FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
“The Finest Costs No More” 


1756 Penn. Ave. N.W. 
Courtesy Parting Opposite 


Telephone: NA. 8-5512 


of service 


aS 


some “problem” -he did not de- 


26, 1956, more of Grier Lee 
d gh 


s. py of 


a re 
at : Dp. m. Interment ‘Tuesday, May 


o EI . 


DesiMONE. F} ETTORE. On 


one 
1 Puneral Hom 
mn Tuesday. Ma 
EB Holy Cross Suunster?. Phi io. 
delphia, Pa 


DOWNEY. AMANDA J. On Sunday. May 
27, 1956. at Prince Georges General 
Hospital. Chéverly. Md.. Ad 

of 4401 
Bladensburg. Md., 
he late Charles 


m i 
Interment Evergreen one 
densburs, . Md 


DRISCOLL, HEN RY SR. Satur 


) | SCHMITT. GEORGE N. 


w. On 
56. at United 1 
dters® Home tal HENR 


yattsvi le, 


enry r ii 
c prac brother ‘of Pran 1 
. lly Priends may 


cecuiem hi 
5 net 


metery. 


oar mR "Waujonal Ce 
a agen and i wood rds. ft 


Creek C 


EDWARDS. on 


outs uddenly. 
sur day May 26 seer RALPH E 
EWA RDS of Robe pl.. Annandale 
e the beloved a 

pewerds 


ran 
orkinese 
riends may call at 

4t t end will be, bela oF 


4 
and 
the Le 


a. m. Inter- 


| ne h coryneee will n 


ment Cedar Hull cnmeers 


GILLIONS., By a ROBERT. On Bun- | 
ca Ma 1956. at the Arlin fea | 


Va WAL 
Ronit off LLIONS = 3854 N. 2d st.. 
Va ved sb 
on lions. 


A 

alter Gil ion Tabender-: "Seether of | 

ill & e. Va. a Miss 
it oux Fall 

| ll gran i 


neral 0 


ton 
gs. Arznesea, Va.. © whore ohevines will 


Tuesda 
yt -R- National 


a 
emoria! 
bub ey area Palis Church. Va. 


4 
a ” 
+f 29. a6, 10:3 To: . a. 
may ete 
feet Be 
*~ 
a ce af Rees 


7 thet contributions be sent 
rere ts C. Cancer Bocie 


vases DAVID. A al comm 
-_ cation of Ra eae Fran iH 
odes AM... 


called ” for iF Tueogay. 


torn . & hb st. 
brother Ger ay 


DAVID a BUCHALTER, 


¥ at Atiineron. 
me ae oe 


hy a Davi e oe 


“¥ Wo late 


gta, fe ml hee 17 
Capitol sts.. at pm 
friends it invited. Interment Cedar 


= CHARLES £. On Sunday. May 27, 
1956. at Circle Terrace Hospital. 
CHA ALES LE Lone ¢ ae S 13t 

ed hus 
ne. ies 
co 
Car 


ngton. lov 
. fier. of Lod Char 
on 


one areat- 

may call at 

2847 Wilson 

d. Arlington, Va. Notice of funeral 


services jater 
leDNA 


‘MAWHOOD, EDNA J. On Sund 
27. 1956. at Alexandria ‘ws 

J. MAWHOOD $35 

Mrs Alice 


Ma 
eight ba ee 


A ee en 
k Hill Cemetery. Battle Creek. Mich. 
DONALD, WALLACE. On turday. 
. . the Alenee ria flog: 

c 
omes. Alexan » VBw 

f Mrs Ms 
ace JT. rs, 


ald ams services 
29 4 m. from 
the Cunningham Pune ral Home. C 
eron and Alfred sts.. Alexandria a. 
Interment Mount on moray 


beet os MIRIAM I. os 


er rey. 
. Md., where services will be 
Tuesday. May 29, at 10:30 m 
interment Parkiawn Cemetery. 


Ww 
spends invited. Interment Ft. 


Cem 
fe Prid 
0 
nd 


MYERS piel Ht. 
spit 


| at Cc suaity 
i ifvins' of 2012 
e . e 
ary 


Massachusetts av 
will ld on esda 

12:30 ~ come “iri lington Na- 
tional Cemeter 


PROCTOR. MAE ‘aes. On Saturda 
May 26. 1956. at her foatdenee, ne 


a 
rom the Huntt Punera 


: . e 
osaty Cemetery, 


Resarsy ile. Md 


REYNOLDS. CLAUDE T. ‘Bude nly on 

- Saturday, Mey 26. 19 t ualt 
it} Of CLA rs) 
belov us ° 

ed father 


se. ed 
2m, ;? Reznojds and belov 
ward, eynoids. brothe 
s. Ro iss Bertha 
olds. Vv Chesley Reyno) 
Notice of funeral later. 
ROBINSON, MARK T. A special com- 


of 


| fm 
2 


Dp ationd ty saad ai 
corviees of our late Brother 

ae RS { th Porshipful at 
y oreer © a ors u aster, 
PARKER THROCHMO ox. 


Attes 
J. Sisert COLLINS. ong 
ay. 


On 
eorget — y+ 


ss isband of 


H 
rs. ‘Dorothy me 
on an 2 
spee 


Shears Schait "Tredher of Mrs 
eenie 


Roe w. 


bel 
Mrs 


nw. 
mitt, 
By 


er 
Bunday (parking tact) ties). 
at tae. — wr on 


Bag m.. tae 
aul's Catholic Gnutech. I — 
‘ off 

se 


h 
Interment S Seeeeee Washinsten emo- 
rial Cem 
prt. ‘Witte . OF turds 
OTT OTHE, iChat sear h st 
my te sister ° 


lass Cy way a Roy 
- Gos 7 


Af- 
eee s by 
Sty BEN. Suddenly. on Sundey, 
sh og is 
Anau nsiate ae, “ile errr ite 
Anthony be reti, brother of Mrs. Maris 
. eresa Provenzano, 
rgiuele, Joseph, 
reti. 
n 0. - 
nera r 
facilities), 
ered on Th 
. m.. 
Catholic 


fn Mausoleum. 


ab 


tombment Fort Linco 


| SORDESINES. SAMUEL &. 
May 1956. of ae reside 
a 


BOBRE TER _ beloved 


Pu 
naqeuseis ney 
ay 29. 
at the 
3405 Wi 
" term 


one 


3 
oltere 
cs tinal & awe 


OB Clade. 


; "tiga 27, nas re 


aatat 


AHS i SSiated 


nd igtnes 
ie 


y. 


ris we 
ey rs 
hee he 


. 
held at 2 
Memorial Park 


Ww 
Friday. Mi RIE, IG hie ton 
aftera Lert ree 
rs. 
anny t fees 
236" ‘S P tie 3 erp. 


muy 
Contribu 
would be deeply appreciat 


George C. Shaffer, Inc. 


sre pu ae 


Cemetery Lots 


eer rei Se ae 


Federal Reserve Board 
Defends “Tight Money’ 


By Robert F. Morison 
United Press 

The Federal Reserve Board 1956.. 
fired back yesterday at Admin-; Jt said commercial building 
istration and other critics who was at an all-time high in April | 
contend its “tight money” poli- while the number of contracts | 
cies are hurting the construc- signed for new industrial build- 
tion industry. 

Without naming the critics, 
the Board said new housing 
starts an dthe rise in mortgage 
debt during the first four 
manths of this year “have been 
large” compared with any other 
year except 1950 when housing 
starts set a record. 

The Board has been sharply 
criticized because it has raised 
its discount—or basic interest— 
rate to member banks five times 
in the past year. This forces 
local banks to raise ‘their own 
interest rates and tends to slow 
down economic expansion 

The Board said in its month- 
ly bulletin, however, that a rec- 
or $42 billion will be spent for 
construction of all kinds this 


‘its April pace over the rest of | 


high. The Board said industrial | 


rate 50 per cent higher than a 
year ago. 

While the Reserve Board lim- 
ited its discussion to the con- 
struction field, its “tight: 


portang@ critics has been Treas-| 


phrey. 

Others, including some Ad- 
ministration economists, con- 
tend that higher interest rates 
will make it impossible to build 
the 1.3 million new homes orig-| 
inally forecast for this year. 


The Best in Commercial 
ft AIR 
CONDITIONING! 


a ls Sa Insist on PACKAGED | 
A CEILING OR FLOOR “y 
WATER OR AIR COOLED MODELS 


Capacities 3, 5, 7 
10 and 15 Tons 


CALL, JA. 5-7984 
FOR FULL INFORMATION 


USHWA 


lyear if the industry continues | 


BRICK & BUILDING SUPPLY CO 
HEATING.AI®R CONDITIONING DIVISION 
1355 Lee Highway, Ressiyn, Va. 


Ever open an 
investment account ? 


The Administration is expected 


soon to drop this goal to 1.1 mil- 
lion, 


The Reserve Board made 
clear, however, that it still is 
fearful of inflation in the hous- 
ing market. It said 1956 private 
housing outlays are expected to 


~ Pusiness 


MONDAY, MAY 28, 1956 


a 
4 


W 


) 


ing during the first four months equal last year’s $15 billion de- 
of this year was at.a record spite fewer housing starts. 


NOW that the criticism of 
the Federal Reserve Board's 


The Board said about 476,000, Most recent credit policies 


about 547,00 in the comparable 
period a year ago. 
But it said this was about 10, 


money” policy also has been 999 more units than were start- 
blamed for a slowdown in new eq jin the six months period| 
car sales. One of its most im-' ended March 31, 1950. Builders 


went on from there in 1950 to’ 


Despite its faster start, 1955. 
did not equal this record be- 
cause of a downturn later in 
the year. | 

The Reserve Board conceded 
that housing starts slowed down 
in mid-1955. But it said spend- 
ing for new industrial and com-| 
mercial construction picked up 
about that time and has pretty, 
well offest dollarwise the drop) 
in home building. 

Meantime, it said, builders 
still are working on a heavy) 
backlog on homes started last) 
year which has resulted in a) 
sharp demand for money, labor 
and materials. This demand has| 
been accelerated by the spurt 
in commercial and industrial 
construction, the Board added. 

It said construction costs rose 
7 percent last year when nearly 
13 million new homes were 
started and construction out- 
lays hit a new dollar record. 
The Board said this trend has 
been “unusually long sustained” 
and still is continuing. 


Optometry Examiners 


‘To Be Nominated 


Four optometrists will be 
nominated Monday and their 


names submitted to District 


Commissioners who will ap- 
point two to the’ Board of Ex- 
aminers in Optometry, the D. C. 
Optometric Association an- 
nounced yesterday. 
Nominations will be made at 
the Association's monthly meet- 
ing Monday at 8 p. m. at the 
Willard Hotel. The appoint- 
ments will fill vacancies created 


contracts were being let at a one and two story dwellings | 
were started in the six months) 
ended March 31 compared with 


ury Secretary George M. Hum- | start 1.4 million new homes! 
‘which still stands as a record. 


| 
’ 
’ 
; 
’ 


’ 


’ 


seems to be approaching 
unanimity, it 
is interesting 
to observe 
how sharply 
the thinking 
of some of the 
critics has 
changed since 
the early part 
of the year. 

Several 
months ago it 
was clear to 
the credit au- Dorsey 
thorities that the inflationary 
part of the boom was becoming 
more serious. The confidence 
factor was extremely high and 
debt was mounting at a rapid 
pace. Consequently, efforts 
were being made by the Fed- 
eral Reserve to restrain the 
creation of an inflationary 
maladjustn ent. 

However, as we pointed out 
in one article, “the stock mar- 
ket and business are still defi- 
antly singing “Who's afraid of 
the Big Bad Wolf?’ ... Tight 


| credit thus far is being over- 


whelmed by the desire to pur- 
chase materials and plants be- 
fore prices and costs rise 
further... .” 

But now the slackening tend- 
encies in certain portiosn of 
the business structure are 
clearly visible, even to those 
whose exuberance of several 
months ago was an integral 


| part of the earlier inflation 


| pressure. 


’ 


/ are 
' full 
growth, and a rising trend in 


As the public tries to paSs 
judgment on the merits of the 
current widespread criticisms 
now being leveled at the Fed- 
eral Reserve's credit policies, 
it might be well to recognize 
an incontrovertible fact. The 
Federal Reserve Board and its 
staff includes some of the best 
economists in the world. These 
men are not sadistic. They 
just as interested in 
employment, economic 


the standard of living as any- 
body else. Furthermore, all 
of their working hours are 


MANY of the critics who are 
passing judgment on their de- 
cisions do not have these sxme 
qualifications. A prominent 
name does not necessarily 
carry with it the inference of 


great skill in the highly intri- 
cate field of practical eco- 
nomic8. 

Among the present critics of 
the credit policy there is a 
pretty fair sprinkling of those 
who have invariably favored 
perpetual inflation. For some 
reason or other they have 
never been able to compre- 
hend the fact that no individ- 
ual can forever borrow and 
spend in excess of earning 
power. One would think that 
a person’s day-to-day personal 
experience would prove that 
fact. Our economy is simply 
a composite of about 165 
million persons. 

Last year, business activity 
in this country obviously was 
sharply stimulated by a $51 
billion expansion in the total 
of all kinds of debt. Money 
is borrowed to be spent and 
hence this increase in debt 
must have ‘been poured into 
the economic stream in the 
form of buying activity. 

Perhaps it is not generally 
recognized that last . year’s 
$51 billion total debt expan- 
sion was by far the sharpest 
on record with the exception 


of three of the World War ‘lI | 


years. Very rarely has the 
level of business activity been 
as heavily 


debt expansion was only 48 
per cent of Gross National 
Product, whereas last year it 
was 13.2 per cent. 


It should not be too diffi- 
cult to comprehend the ulti-| 
mate effects of excessive debt | 
because we cur-| 
rently have a very apt illustra- 
tion. Last year when sharply 


expansion, 


rising installment debt was 
stimulating business activity, 


it was very difficult to focus 


Economie View e « « « « e By Harold B. Dorsey 
Events Suggest Credit May Become Easier 


attention on the fact that this 
debt would have to be repaid. 
At the moment, these repay- 


ments are absorbing a larger 
share of purchasing power, 
without an offsetting contri- 
bution to buying activity. 

oo 


ONE DOES not have to be 


an expert economist to under-* 


stand these facts. Al] that is 
required is enough common 
sense to foresee the second 
and third layers of effects that 
must necessarily follow a pri- 
mary development. 

The primary seeds of a busi- 
ness setback are always 
planted in the immediately 
preceding period of prosperity 
when excessive confidence en- 
courages too much borrowing 
to finance spending for future 
needs. The setback is the pe- 
riod when this kind of spend- 
ing subsides while the econo- 
my uses up the earlier pur- | 
chases and when a large por- 
tion of its current purchasing 
power has to be channeled into 
repayments of debt instead of 
buying goods and services. 

The current criticism of 
Federal Reserve credit policies 
is of interest to the economist 
because such criticism by 
prominent people might tend | 
to reduce the respect to which 
the Federal Reserve is en- 


dependent upon 
debt expansion. Even in 1929 | 


First Trust 
Money Wanted 


Secured on choice District resi- 
dential properties. Amortized | 
monthly payments bearing 512 
and 6% interest. Excellent op- 
portunity for private and trust 
funds. Call MR. SINDLER. 

HO. 32-1257 


SINDLER REALTY CO. 


interest to the business analyst 
are the current indications 
that the inflationary pressu-es 
of several months ago have 
now been sharply reduced. 


This condition is likely to have | 


Cthed if fk fe to carry ent ite eBly calmed. down. < 
anomie functions. 


suggest 
Possibly, of more immediate time is not far distant 
pt conditions will become 
easier. 


/ 


these 
the 
when 


2 


| 


much more influence on credit | 


policies than any politica: or 
business pressures that are 
being 
serve at the moment. 
(1) Weakness which has de- 
veloped in the prices of stocks 
and some of the non-ferrous 
metals, (2) rather clear indica- 
tions that productive activity 


t on the Federal Re- 


in the business structure will | 
be reduced by the subsicence | 


of inventcry accumulation, (3) 
the prospect that inventory re- 


duction will reduce.the de- | 


mand for bank credit in the 
third quarter, and (4) other 
signs that inflation psy- 
chology has been very notice- 


MUTUAL 
INVESTORS 
Corporation of New York 
Common Stock 


Price $1.00 Per 
Share 


For FREE circular 
write or phone 


C. J. BLIEDUNG 


915 Eye St. N.W., Washington 1, D. C. 
NA. 8.7358 


Name 
Address ... 


ing to 


such Statement. 


Dated: May 28, 1956 


PoTomAc ExLectric Power ComMPANY 


PuBLic INVITATION FOR BIDS FOR THE PURCHASE OF 
$10,000,000 Principal Amount of 
First Mortgage Bonds, 


Potomac Electric Power Company, a corporation organ- 
ized and existing under the laws of the United States of 
America relating to the District of Columbia and a domestic 
corporation of the Commonwealth of Virginia, hereby in- 
vites bids for the purchase from it of $10,000,000 principal 
amount of its First Mortgage Bonds, 
1991 (hereinafter called the “Bonds”). Such bids will be 
received by the Company at Room 931, 929 E Street, N.W., 
Washington 4, D. C., up to 11 o'clock A.M., Eastern Day- 
light Time, on June 4, 1956 or on such later date as may 
be fixed by the Company as provided in the Statement 
referred to below. Copies of a preliminary prospectus relat- 
the Bonds, of a Statement of Terms and Conditions 
Relating to Bids for the Purchase of the Bonds, and of other 
relevant documents referred to in said Statement may be 
examined, and copies of certain of such documents may be 
obtained, at the office of the Company, 929 E Street, N.W., 
Washington 4, D. C. Bids will be considered only from bid- 
ders who have received copies of the Prospectus as contained 
in the Registration Statement when it becomes effective and 
only if made in accordance with and subject to the terms 
and conditions set forth in such Statement, including the 
filing of questionnaires at or before the time specified in 


Officers and representatives of the Compeny, counsel for 
the Company, counsel who will act for the successful bidders, 
and representatives of the auditors for the Company will be 
available at the office of Sullivan & Cromwell, Room 1306, 
48 Wall Street, New York, N. Y., on May 29, 1956 at 11 
o'clock A. M., E-stern Daylight Time, to meet with pros- 
pective bidders for the purpose of reviewing with them the 
information with respect to the Company contained in the 
Registration Statement and Prospectus and in the Com- 
pany’s invitation for bids. All prospective bidders are in- 
vited to be present at such meeting. 


POTOMAC ELECTRIC POWER COMPANY 
By R. Roy DUNN, President 


.»% Series due 1991 


% Series due 


devoted to a dispassionate 
analysis of the business forces, 
uninfluenced by political con- 
_ siderations or personal profit. 


by the expired terms of W. Earl 
Leese, ©. D., board president, 
and A. W. Francke, O. D., secre- 
tary. 


It’s as simple as opening any 
account. If you buy one or more secu- 
rities outright and keep them your- 
self, the transaction is simpler still— 
no more mysterious than buying a 


7 6 « 
piece of furniture. Our famous little P r osperily Is Surface, 
pamphlet “Opening an Account” tells 


Tet. Tho couren below wi... |OCR DERE Says 


bring it to you. ° DETROIT, May 27 (INS) |bling down unless proper steps 


Sen. Pat McNamara (D-Mich.) are taken. 
Francis I. duPont & Co. 


lashed out against the Eisen-| McNamara said: 

hower Administration today| “According to some sources, 
Members New Yor} Stock Exchange and principal! security 
and commodity exchanges + 63 offices from coast to coast 


Planning qd (3 
picnic ? i 


and warned » lyou get a picture of people | 
that the Na- , |singing and dancing in the’ 
tion's economic streets and lighting their cig- 
picture was arettes with $10 bills. But when 
REpublic 7-4000. beginning to you look a little closer, it re- 

look like a minds you of a movie set. All 
“false fronté the buildings are beautiful, but 
prosperity. when you get around behind 

Speaking be- 'them, you find they are only at- 
. fore a meeting Him \tractive fronts held up by some 
of laid-off Unit- : ‘shaky props.” 
ed Auto ae ) He added: 

‘ers, he said the “That's why I think what we 
whole prosper- MeNamera have now is something like a 
ity structure could come tum- ‘false front prosperity.’ The 
— |surface looks good, the high- 

sounding figures are impressive 

—but some of the props are giv- 

ing way—and these are im- 
portant props such as the auto 
industry, the farmers and inde- 
pendent business.” 

McNamara pointed out that 
the auto industry's high pro- 
duction of 1955 which has 
robbed this year’s market and 
the Eisenhower Administra- 
tion’s “tight money” policy, 
were contributing factors to the 
current plight of the auto work- 
ers. 

He also said that 10,000 small 
firms went out of business last 
year and that farmers lost a 
billion dollars, while corpo- 
ration profits went up nearly 
$10 billion. 

McNamara reminded the auto 
workers of the recent remark 
‘lof one of President Eisenhow- 
er’s assistants, Howard Pyle, 
who said that the right to suf- 
fer is one of the joys of a free 
economy. 

“I don’t think any of us will 
agree that the right to suffer — Me 


is part of our Bill of Rights,” : 3 
NO COIL BOX NEEDED! 


the Senator said. 
Continetti Heads 
hy G Why didn’t someone think of this before, you'll ask 
Dystrophy Group when you see the new Gretz Party Keg—just the thing 
Reno A. Continetti, 208 for picnics, fishing trips, barbecues and parties because it 
“mtg 20m wart goood ae —p gives you the extra goodness of genuine draught beer. 
as n eléc nt o , 
the District chapter of the It’s so small you can keep it cool in your refrigerator or a 
Muscular Dystrophy Associa- small ice tub. Weighs 7 pounds less than a case of quarts, 
tions of America, Inc. yet actually holds almost a gallon more! 
David A. Isler of Hyattsville : . ' 
| And—listen to this!—with this new Gretz Party Keg, you 
aces a ght ml peg don’t need any coil box! You tap it right from the keg and 
William T. Pryse, second vice get the golden goodness of Gretz brewery-fresh draught beer. 
For picnics, barbecues, fishing trips and parties—get the handy 
new Gretz Party Keg—and enjoy the wonderful flavor and 
goodness of delightfully delicious Gretz Draught Beer. 


president; Mrs. David A. Isler, 


recording secretary; Mrs. Wil-| 


liam Newman, corresponding | 
Distributed by: MERSU DISTRIBUTING CO., 2801 8TH ST. N.E., WASHINGTON, D.C. 


secretary; and Mrs. F. R. Hager, 
treasurer. 
Telephone: North 7-3200 WILUAM GRETZ BREWING CO, PHILA, PA 
| «Ween te ‘ 


> a 


Wyatt Building, Washington 5, D. C. 


Please send me your pamphlet entitled 
“Opening an Account.” 


be smart- get the new Grefz 


| PARTY KEG 


AND ENJOY GRETZ | 
BREWERY-FRESH DRAUGHT BEER | 


Me Nee 


ton Raceway, Darlington, S. C., where 
Chevy blazed a new round-the-clock 
competition track record into the books! 
And you can sample the things that 
made it happen —the Chevrolet quali- 
ties that put more pleasure and safety 
in your driving—any time you stop in. 


And what a record! Twenty-four hours 
at a 101.58-m.p.h. average. Twenty- 
four hours in which Chevy covered an 
almost incredible 2,438 miles. Twenty- 
four hours that put Chevrolet’s stamina, 
stability and great-hearted V8 to a 
supreme test. It happened at Darling- 


Get a Gretz Party Keg or two 
See Your Chevrolet Dealer cK 


| THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
18 . Monday, May 28, 1956 eee 


a 


————————_ 


. 
: 
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P88 RN POV I RET wR Ot EO Or 


By Bob Burchette Stal! Photographer 


More than 70 youngsters piloted their bicycles through obstacle courses and tests 
at the third annual bike rodeo at the Carter Barron parking lot over the weekend. 
AT LEFT, Park Policeman Frank Papuga is led deroudt a maze of blocks by 
Sharon Silva, 10, and Heinz Zysk, 12. The rodeo is sponsored by the Metropolitan 
Area Traffic Council. ABOVE, 13-year-old Carol Hollingsworth brings her bike in 
for a perfect score in a stopping test. She won second place in the girls’ 13-14 class. 


- OP 2 OTR oe Pr ae 


Christening a New Hostel 


Robert Nicholson, who 
bills himself as the “oldest 
inhabitant of Nethers, 
Va.,” serenades fair ladies 
on an ancient organ at the 
open house dedicating a 
new Youth Hostel at Neth- 
ers, over the weekend. 
Joining in the seng are = 
(from left) Siv Ohison, from 


. . - 7 : 3 
> ho rr" 
Sweden; Teresa Rico, from _ ae a =. 4 
| e he 
*] oe | 


Exhilarated by a plunge, Nina Schiaf relaxes on a mattress attended by George Reynolds and George Orr. 


Ps. a 


. 


Colombia; Jean Rae, from -” 
Arlington; Donnie MacMa- * hie hase 
hon, from Falls Church, ea: 

and Hertha Lederbogen, 

from Germany. Nicholson, 

by the way, is only $3. 


—- 


Somebody with a big foot 
stepped on Major’s paw. 
Donnie gives sympathy. 


By Aubrey Graves, Outdoors Editor 


a a e sa 
ca 
Ges; a 


Richard, 14, and Maureen 
Duffy, 9, were on hand for 
the “informal” opening of 
the Glenwood Recreation 
Club Swimming pool yes- 
terday and they look as if 
they wished they had 
waited until the “formal” 
opening Memorial Day. 


By Vie Casemento, Staff Photographer 


Mozart Series 


—_————- By Paul Hume 


IN A YEAR embracing 
more Mozart in live and re- 
corded performances than 
ever before since the young 
Wolfgang died, the Phillips 
Gallery is taking its place 
with a series of complete 
works for violin and key- 
board. 

Werner Lywen, concert- 
master of the National Sym- 
phony, and Richard Dirksen, 
playing harpsichord and 
piano, are to give the whole 
series in eight concerts. The 
first was heard yesterday 
afternoon, the second comes 
tonight. Next weekend a sim- 
ilar pair, and the rest in the 
fall. They are being played in 
chronological order. 

The National Gallery's 
American Festival returns to 
its orchestral form for the 
two final concerts, with Rich- 
ard Bales’ “The Union” set to 
close things up on June 10. 


THE D. C. Federation of 
Music Clubs’ auditions result 
ed in awards of $100 to pian- 
ist Sally Streeton, and $50 
prizes to Richard Billastrigo,,. 
Elliot Prescott, Karley Tollef- 
son, Steven Ross, Leon Rix, 
Bessie Levin and the Bethes- 
da-Chevy Chase a cappella 
choir. 

Ignacio Villa, Latin Ameri- 
can popular and folksinger, 
will do his first Washington 
recital Tueday night in the 
Pan American Union. 

Epiphany Church's final 
noon organ recital of the sea- 
son Tuesday will feature Jack 


4 , 


Plans 


Kline, clarinet; Paul de 
Bourg, cello, and Adolf To 
rovsky, organist. Mr. Torov- 
sky has arranged the entire 
series and will play in the. 
program at 12:10 p. m. with 
music by Bach, Mozart, Schu- 
bert, Weber and Hure. 
Carter Barron Amphithea- 
ter's biggest season opens 
June 7, with the Ballet Russe 
de Monte Carlo in for a two 
weeks’ run. Among their un- 
usual offerings this summer 
is the ballet, “La Dame a la 
Licorne,” with a story by 
Jean Cocteau, based on the 
famous Gobelin tapestries. 


TONIGHT’S' Agricultural 
Symphony Orchestra  pro- 
gram directed by Frederick 
Fall, is a Mozart evening with 
the D Major Violin Concerto 
and the “Haffner” Symphony. 

Next Sunday afternoon at 4 
p. m., the Montgomery A Cap- 
pella Chorus, directed by Max 
Seeboth, will sing a program 
of their director's music in 
the New ork Avenue Presby- 
terian Church. 

At t he special National 
Symphony invitation concert 
to be presented before the 
Congress of the International 
Association for the Protec- 
tion of Industrial Property, 
Leontyne Price will sing the 
first performance of a new 
cycle of songs by John La 
Montaine. The songs were 
commissioned by Mrs. Fran- 
cis North. The all-American 
program includes music by 
Sousa Coplan, Barber, Cres 
ton, Burleigh and Gershwin. 


Postlude 


Lywen, Dirksen Revive 


Mozart’s Boyhood Musie 


By Paul 


Hume 


Setting out to play all thejexpanse of unkeyed running 


music written by Mozart for| counterpoint, 
‘and busy piece that in the long posite him in 


run matters little either way. 


violin and keyboard instru- 
ments is a project involving the 


this is 


Toccatas by Roy Harris and 


learning of an enormous num-' George Antheil explored the 
ber of notes, and taking on the|further reaches of the piano| 


undertaking of a vast area of with 


Remarkable 


Eugene Kressin is “The Re- 
markable Mr. Pennypacker,” 
of the comedy to be presented 
tonight, Tuesday and Wednes- 
day by the Temple Players at 
the Washington Hebrew Con- 
gregation’s social hall. Ru- 
doiph Pugliese has directed 


the large cast with Lorraine 
Flocks as Mrs. Pennypacker. 


Columbia May Annex British Studio 


stars. 
-. Sammy 
Davis Jr. and | 
ad gD xing 
ave postpon 
the nuptials un- Miss Kilgallen 
til Frank Sinatra returns to the 
United States. “hey want him 
to be best man at the wedding 
. A garment center manu- 
facturer has bet $10,000 at 3 to 
1 odds that Rocky Marciano 
will make a comeback within a 
year. 
Peter Lawford, a showstopper 
with Jimmy Durante. at the 
Copa, is first choice for the’ 


Englis 


| male lead in Judy Holliday’s up- 


coming Broadway starrer, “The 
Bells Are Ringing " with book 
and lyrics by and 
= music by Leonard Bern- 
stein. 


ANTENOR PATINO, the Bo- 
livian tin king, doesn’t exactly 
hate Linda Christian (who 
doesn’t exactly hate tin kings). 

. » Martha Raye, England 
bound for a holiday, may com- 
bine work with her fun. She 
has a standing invitation to do 
a fortnight at the Palladium. 

. Nadia Woods, former secre- 


whose career she helped guide 


tary of Grace Kelly, intends to 
'write a book about the Princess 


from behind the scenes. 

Mrs. Davis G. Bringler, widow 
of the mining millionaire, is on 
the verge of another marriage. 


suits at $275 per copy. ... 


Her birthday present to her 
fiance—former Ohio State ath- 
ilete Clark Perring—was a eso 
oe 
Louis has a new protege —a 
Philadelphia welterweight 
named Charley Scott. 


‘Leuella Parsons: 


: 


British Monroe Accepts U. S. Job 


HOLLYWOOD, May 27— 
(INS)—After many cables and 
trans-Atlantic telephone calls to 
Diana Dors in England, William 
Dozier can now 
relax. The Brit- 
ish Marilyn 
Monroe has 
agreed to be 
here in July to 
costar with 
George Gobel 
in his next 
comedy, “I 
Married a 
Woman.” 

I might add, 


himself and his two children. | 


George can Miss Parsons 


also relax because for a time it! 
looked as if the voluptuous! 
“gee wouldn't be able to make 

And she is so right for the | 
Mrs. in the Mr. and Mrs. beauty 
‘contest which she and George 
both enter as husband and wife. | 


THE LEADING lady Henry | 


a brief|Fonda has chosen to play op-| 


“Male Animal’ | 
at Cape Dennis Playhouse, is 
his 18-year-old daughter Jane. 

The way Richard Aldrich fen | 


the excitement usually | able to wangle.a deal with Hen- 


style in phrasing, touch, and|built up by expert playing of|ry to play in summer stock is| 


musical history in general. 
Yet that is preeisely what’ ‘ 
Werner 


a well built “touch piece.’ 
by Ernst Bacon | Henry to do a play at Cape Den- 


‘Sombrero” 


Lywen and Richard | was a skilled bit of portraiture. | 


Aja story 


Dirksen began to do yesterday | The solid music of the second | 
at the Phillips Gallery. Tonight | half of the concert was the 
and gain next Sunday afternoon| powerful 3d Sonata by Halsey | 
and Monday evening these re- Stevens. 


markable artists are playing the 
first four out of eight concerts | 
in which all of Mozart's music| 
in this classification will 


low next October. 
We cannot 
reservation in the experience | 


of hearing all of this music,/and Fugue, the Seco 
some of it written by a boy six) phony 


Paris Organist Pleases 


Pierre Cochereau, organist at 


be! Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, 
heard. The other four will fol-'delivered a masterful recital Macomb st. nw., has won the 
‘Sunday night at St. Patrick’s| Minor S. Jameson award from 
rejoice without! Church. 


In the Bach B Minor 
—— 
Vierne, 


of Louis 


to eight years old, and none of| Scherzo by Durufle, and Marcel 


it drawn from the 
house we mean by ‘ 


until we reach 


treasure| Dupre’s Fileuse, he displayed a 
‘Mozartean”| formal program of variety and|Canaan, Conn., was winner of! 
the concert)sound construction. Most im-| 


scheduled for Monday, June 4.| pressive, however, was the con- 
Up to that time we are hearing | cluding improvisation on two! 


a fascinating study in the mu-| 
sical development of a genius. 
The early sonatas heard yes- 
terday —ecight of them —are 
astonishing as products of a 
child prodigy, a boy who may) 
have been the finest pianist of; 
his time in Europe; whose) 
father later told him that if he) 
would only practise he could) 
be the foremost violinist of his 
day. There are touches in the 
25 movements played yester- 
day that give a hint of the 
glory to come. 

In all that they did Dirksen. 
and Lywen gave brilliance and| 
personal conviction that made) 
it constantly alluring. | 


| 


| 


in itself. Dick asked ' 


D. C. Woman Wins 
Painting Prize 


Martha Moffett Bache, 4532 


| the Miniature Painters, Sculp- 


Prelude tors and Gravers Society of 


Washington for her landscape | 
“Cape Cod Blizzard.” 

Glenora Richards, New, 
the Society’s Elizabeth Muhl-; | 
hofer Prize for t' > best water | 


contrasting themes submitted|color on ivory. The two win- 
by Conrad Bernier. 


ners were selected from entries | 


—John Haskins on over the Nation. 


"lt és alfairs that mabe 
men that make 


men 
atlairs.” 


— MAE WEST 
See the fabulous 


MAE WEST 


and her complete revue 
in person — next week 
at the 


Casino Royal 


4th month 


A 


14th & H St. N.W, NA. 8-7700 | 


Tolson Piano Recital a 


Margaret Tolson played last) 
night the customary piano) 
recital which has become one | 
of the valued events of the 
American Festivals in the Na 
tional Gallery of Art. 

These annual surveys of the 
history of piano music written 
in this country drew briefly 
upon the classicisms of Alex- 
ander Reinagle and John 
Palma, and then moved on to 
one of the spectacular show- 
pieces of Louis Gottschalk. 

From there to Walter Piston’s 
massive Passacaglia led to a 
Sonata by Jean Berger from 
whom, heretofore we recall) 
hearing only vocal music. The| 
rich harmonic style that marks’ 
Berger's solo and choral writing | 
is also present in his piano) 
sonata. Miss Tolson played it, 
with particularly high spirit 
and fine control. 

Moving to equally positive 
contemporary work, Miss Tol- 
son included in her mastered 
playing the 5th Sonata of Vin- 
cent Persichetti. Moving with 
essurance through a familiar 


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kept his part of the bargain. 


MRS. Milton Greene, wife of | 
Marilyn Monroe’s mentor, is' 
heading East with their two- 
year-old-son. After a stopover) 
at the Grand Canyon. She'll re- 
open their Connecticut home, | 
which hasn't been occupied |* 
since the Greenes accompanied 
M. M. to Hollywood while the | 
glamor girl made “Bus Stop.” 

After her illness, Marilyn 
‘didn’t live in the big and ex- 
pensive Beverly Hills. house 
which they had rented. She 
moved into a Hollywood apart- 
ment because her doctor want- 
ed her to have complete rest. 
‘By the way, Marilyn’s birthday 
is June 1 if you want to drop 
‘her a card at 20th. 


THE ARRIVAL of popular 
Nanette Fabray, who just 


|walked out of Sid Caesar's life | 


6 ot poem Tee Lowe Sreay os 


TECHMICOLOR 
FEAT. 11.00, 1.30, 4.05, 6.40. 9.20 


nis and Henry said he would do as his TV wife, at the Villa 
it if Alarich coula get him a 
house there for the summer for | 


CONCERTS 


GALA 1956-57 SEASON 
| IN CONSTITUTION HALL 


SERIES A 


yt a oy ~ Orchestra, Vien- 
ne armon chest 
Swedish e Or ra. National 


the oer 
Leon Wal Glesekin 
Rudelt Serkin, Singing Bers of Ner. 


Berlin Philharmenic Orchestra. Vien- 
ma Phitharmenic Orchestra, Robert 
. Isaac Stern, Vienna Acad- 

Peters. Arter 


4 = concerte presram 
featuring Swarthout. on Bae and 
Meyers pe a chamber orchestra con- 
ducted b&b hard Bales, 

a 
SERIES PRICES: 
$9.54, 


For either concerts. 
Mall and 


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jabout Marilyn sleeping in the 


‘Kerr 


moilidn: 3 


ine WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
Monday, May 28, 1956 19 


MARILYN MONROE’S 
thoughtful landlady, Mrs. Cotes- 
Preedy of Berks and Herts 
(where La Belle will live duting 
her stay in England) has — 
all those fan magazine stories 


nude and has bought an electric 
blanket for her bed. Mrs. Cotes- 
Preedy also plans to toss a 
party in honor of her celebrated 
est’s arrival, and every male 
or miles around is holding his 
breath waiting for an invitation. 

The three most chic ladies at 
the Colony the other noontime 
—Mrs. Charles Amory, Mrs. 
Jock McLean and Mrs. William 
Paley—were all hatless as they 
munched their lunch... . Hey, 
Rainier! There are 17 Grimal- 
di. living:in Manhattan. (Kis- 
sin’ cousins, perhaps?) 

Long range prediction: The 
next English actress to hit the 
films with Vivien Leigh-Deborah 
impact will be Anne 
Heywood, a beautiful brunette 
of the “classy” school who 
turned down the role of Liza 
Doolittle in the Broadway pro- 
duction af “My Fair Lady,” be- 
cause she wanted to stick with’ 
the flickers. 


Coprright. 


1956. King Features 
. Byndica 


te. inc. 


‘Capri with Marty Mills, execu- | 
itive of the Mills Music Publish- 


The house forthcoming, Henry|img Company, caused a lot of 


whispering. 

Marty, who is the son of Jack 
| Mills and the nephew of Irving) 
‘Mill s, accompanied Nanette 
‘from New York and it won't | 
jseraeine their close friends if| 

e and Marty marry. She has, 
tow here but hasnt yet an- 
nounced either her business | 
matrimonial plans for the 

future. 


(Copyright. 56. dy 
international bode Service) 


ANGELA LANSBURY RAYMOND BURR 


WEDNESDAY 
ROBERT MITCHUM 


SHOWPLACE of ' 


SREOL FA 


HOW Open 10:48 
M-G-M’s drama 

of flaming 
Love and Revolt 


CINEMASCOPE and el 


STARPING 


Tickets Now on Sale for 
3 Holiday Shows—Memoria! Day 
Wed., May 30th. 2, 5, 8:30 p.m. | 


ACCEPTED ME. 8-4425 


RESERVED SEATS WOW ON SALE 
MAM ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY 


now inits Oth | 
fabulous month 


Ava GARDNER 
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Bill TRAVERS 


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The CASINO ROYAL 


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Evening Show Time 9 and 11:30 
Fri. & Sat., 3 ae 12 


We sellout. 
CU a and Mali the Attached od Order Porm with Your Check or Money Order. 
Casino Royal, 14th and H Sts. N.W., Washington, D. C. 


THE MAE WEST SHOW 


seats af $1.80 each (tax incl.) for 


seats at $2.40 each (tax inci.) for | 
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3rd show 


(Pri. & Sat. only) | 


Tickets saz sise be purchased ot the Casine Revel. iath and H Sts. “aly 
rt 


— ~"By yrivase 3 ete. 


Show Times For Monday 


2:45, 4:45. 6:45, 8:35, 


ae er een 


12:28, 


"The Ladykilier.” at 6:15, | 


ue . ene Pay vist | 


be Pk Pat oth Be 


at 12:44, 
gt 3:36, saa o33 and 


Rpt 
gy 
"‘Dector at Sea.” 


&. *e 
Herts 

t 11:40 « m.. Fi. ta Tis. 
ofifinse—-roe x Man Who ew 
1% uch.” at 1, 3:10, 5:25. 7:40, 
PA 23 P to Baker Street.” 

wie Pos. 3.e" sf 7:35. 
PI at 12. 2, 

p Tease Girl,’ 

Washington Premiere 
Tomorrow 12 Noon 


at 


4. 


(As 
Bit | 


nF 


DANIEL GELIN 
RAYMOND PELLEGRIN - FRANCO FABRIZI - LING! ZAMPA 


Last Day—Orson Welles in ‘Citizen Kane” 


a 


20th Century-Fox Starts Wednesday 


Air Conditioned 
LOEW'S PALACE 


F St. at 13th 


CINEma 


Robert Richard Dana Edmond 


JAYLUR - TUDD - WYNTER - O'BRIEN 


THE 


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FLYING 


YOU WILL SEE 
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Actua) color films of 


SAUCERS! 


THE MOTION PICTURE SCOOP OF THE CENTURY! 


v 


Written by FRANCIS MAR TIN « 


TIN Dane ia hate @BBJECTS 


+ Produced by CLARENCE GREENE « Directed by WINSTON JONES 


Released thru United Artists + With the people who octvally liwed the story of the UFO. 


THE TERROR 


EXTRA ADDED acre MARK STEVENS in 
ITH ALL 


OF A TIME BOMB: 


Released thew United Artists 


: *& 
7 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
20 Atonitan, Hed, 5, 2008" Mico 


: \scholarships, 


“a chio, of Gonzaga, for his work|Jefferson Junior High School; 


Donna Douglas 


show 


CiE-tesleleiae]si-m Blelalat- mi Blelsieli:t- 


with features for women 


NEW TIME! 


Vion. thru Fri. 


Teme 


‘sRENT TV 


Area Students Win 
Recognition for Art 


Thirteen area students won 
cash prizes or 
honorable mentions in the Na- 
tional Scholastic Art competi- 
tion sponsored locally by Jel- 
leff's Department store and na- 
tionally by Scholastic Magazine. 
In the Photographic Division, 
cash prizes of $15 each went to 
Matthew S. Watson, of Bethes- 
da - Chevy Chase High School 
and Charles Best, of Leland/iontee High School (illustra- 
Junior High. Honorable men-| tions). 
tions in this division were| Honorable mentions went 
awarded Charlies G. Del Vec- also to William Drummond, of 


the general art division and an 
honorable mention for her 
transparent water colors. Win- 
ners of $25 in cash in the art 
section were Janette Vass, of 
Roosevelt (transparent water 
colors); Laura Moskowitz, of 
Coolidge (fashion design); Shir- 
ley Brower, of Spingarn (fash- 
ion design); John A. Fitzgerald, 


of Suitland (oils), and Jadith 
Heller, of Arlington's Washing- 


in sports, and Samuel S. Jones,| Mary Chambers, of Shaw Jun- 
of Leland, for his work in|ior High School, and Mike Ox- 
school and community life. |man, of Montgomery Hills Jun- 

Elaine Marcus, of Coolidge |ior High School, for their work 
High School, won a scholarship|in enamels, water colors and 
to the University of Georgia in oils, ee 


Events tn the Area Today 


iat larendon First Baptist Church. | 
scheduled for today | ; A icon Nea and WN. Highiand st. 8 o. m 


* Northwest Boundary Civic Associa-| 
jon. Macfarian Junior High School 
owas ave. and ebster st. nw.. >. m 


SPECIAL EVENTS 
ure “treatment and 


Events 
(asterisk denotes event is open|” 
to the public): , | 


DINNERS | 
aie Goes es County qastnecs, and) Lect 
ofessionsa TINnC® | tion of Juvenile Delinquents,’ 
Georges Golf and Country Ciub, 7 D. M.\Chevy Clrase ecreation Center. 
jal Librarie Bgnoete tee. wey “sb Y 
at 7:30 oY Scout , Court of 


habilita- | 
ethesda- | 
8:30) 
Rock | 
’ 

7-8) 


Ele- | 
Capito] | 


Bpec 
Restaurant. 1837 Honor 


estions Anegered 
ecutive 


ME 
Dp. 2. Call . 
Lay Society of "the y District a -t © Dedication. , Marion 
a 


Association. 
Monteomery 1 Medical € Care “Coun ssion. tts. nes {Sebo 


a Spada 


CONVENTIONS 
Bookse oe May,31). ion. 
1) 


* Columbia 

Gien Cariyn 

*Area 1 Council PTA, Sonthwest| lghorehain 

Branch Library. Tih and H se. | I 

se - m. ere prey BBY Sheraton. ad " ote 

* Alexander RB. Shepherd PTA. st. | rough June 1.) 

warmers Ba h. 13th end! spt peatienal dympetum on the Vene- 
s¢s and Treponematoses 

qe bare “pi w Association at. Btatler Hotel (through June 1). 

ure 


ae h Parish Hail 
} CABBAGE JUICE 


Mia-chty, ci & tisens ‘Association. Thom - 
¥ 
Iso, Carrot and Ce Sehee 


a oe Daily — $1.00 


VITA FOOD STORE 
519-11th St, WW. RE. 7.1212 


sights fre Association. 


Colu 
Pairfax County Private Bchool Asso 


LARGE SCREENS 
CUT-RATE RENTAL CO. 


DI. P by 9941 


a 


bias Martini Teaches You | 


6 DANCES FOR *- 


17” Screen $10 Monthly } 
BLISS TV | 


{ 
AD. 4-74 14 


ee 


Priviong of Monday TV Programs 


usic and com- 
edy, with Glenn Turnbull, 


vocalist Laurie Carroll and 
the New Yorkers, vocal and 
instrumental group. 

3 p. m—WRC-TV. . Mati- 
nee Theater (COLOR): 
“Bachelor Buttons” is a story 
about a seamstress who is so 
bemused by a handsome col- 
lege professor that she is 
unaware of the devotion of 
a coworker. 

3 p. m—WMAL-TV. Aft- 
ernoon Film Festival: John 
Mills stars in “The Long 
Memory.” A man seeks re- 
venge on people who have 
had him imprisoned for a 
crime he didn’t commit. 

7 p. m—WTTG. The Great 
Gildersleeve: Willard Water- 
man stars in “The Political 
Plum.” 

7:30 p.m — WRC-TY., 
Gordon MacRae Show 
(COLOR): A jazz session is 
the feature. 

7:30 p. m—WTTG. I Spy: 
Adm. Canaris, German spy 
chief, joins conspiracy to 
assassinate Hitler in “The 
Canaris Story.” 

8 p. m.— WMAL - TV. TV 
Reader's Digest: “The Man 
Who Dreamt Winners” stars 
Robert Hutton. A Harvard 
student picks winning race 
horses via his dreams. 


8 p. m-~WRC-TV. Produc- 
er’s Showcase (COLOR): 
“Bloomer Girl,” a musical 
comedy based on the life of 
a militant feminist of the 
1840s, Dolly Bloomer. Stars 
are Barbara Cook, Keith 
Andes, Carmen Mathews, 
Paul Ford and Nydia West- 
man. 

8 p. m—WTOP-TYV. Burns 
and Allen Show: Gracie tries 
t- cute son Ronnie's spell of 
lovesickness by introducing 
him to another beautiful 
girl. 

8 p. m—WTTG. The Eve- 
ning Movie: Three adventur- 
ers find prehistoric monsters 
on an island in the Pacific 
in “Unknown Island.” Vir- 
ginia Grey stars. 

8:30 p,. m—WMAL-TY. 
Voice of Firestone: 
Warenskjold and Brian 5Sul- 
livan are guest soloists. 


9 p. m—WTOP.-TV. I Love | 


Lucy: Lucy is consumed by 
curiosity over what Ricky is 
going to give her for their 
wedding anniversary. 

9 p. m—WMAL-TV. Film 
Fair: “Operation’ Disaster” 
stars John Mills. A Royal 
Navy submarine hits a mine 
and sinks during maneuvers. 

9:30 p. m—WRC-TV. Rob- 
ert Montgomery Presents: 
“Who” is the story of a man 
as he sees himself—and as 


Dorothy ,..._ 


(as he sees himself). Six 


ing: J o ey Giardello vs. 
Charlie (King) Cotten, 10 
rounds, middleweights. 

10 p. m—WTOP-TV. Stu- 
dio One: “Family Protec- 
tion” stars Everett Sloane 
and Joanne Woodward. A 
bank robber offers a young 
hoodlum and his teen-age 
wife a chance for happiness. 

10:45 p. m—WTTG. Base 


Budweiser Champion Bow? 
ing team. 

15 p. m. 

Late Show: Allan Lane, 
the Weaver Family and rd 
Acuff star in “Grand 
Opry.” 

11:20 p. -— WMAL-TYV. 
The Night Show: Donald 
Woods stars in “Enemy of 
Women.” This is the film 
story of the life and loves of 
Nazi Joseph Goebbels. 

11:30 p. m.—WRC-TV. To- 
night: “Moondog,” the na- 
ture singer and the Johnny 
Bernette Rock ‘n’ Roll Trio 


are guests. ; 
- — 


ball Hall of Fame: The Bob 
Feller Story. 

11:10 p. m-—WTTG. Fea- | 
turama: Host Milt Grant in- 
troduces film features in- | 
cluding “Let’s Roll With 
the Champions,” an exhibi- 
tion of bowling skill by the | 


‘Pilots End Strike 


’ 
; 


‘unionized civil airlines pilots 


‘ing their 16-day bonus strike, 
‘which grounded domestic and 


others see him. Tom Poston ) 


plays Mr. George W. Who 


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A SERVICE OF i) 


in Washington 


Radio and Television 


WHENEVER LIFE starts 
getting a little too difficult, I 
turn to “This Is Nora Drake” 
for solace. The problems of 
Nora, a soap 
opera hero- 
ine, are so 
much more 
manifold 
than mine— 
or fer that 
matter any- 
one’s — that 
you're bound 
to feel a lot 
better about 
your lot after 
listening to 
hers. 

Nora came to life on NBC 
in October, 1947, and is now 
on CBS—at was once on both 
networks—at 2:30 p. m. (EST) 
Mondays through Fridays 
and. brother, what that girl 
has gone through!.Nora is a 
nurse at Page Memorial Hos- 
pital and right on the day 
the soap opera went on the 
air—a sign of what was m 
store—she got jilted by Dr. 
Ken Martinson, who mapried 
the daughter of a wealthy hos- 
pital trustee in order to fur- 
ther his career. the bum. 


Crosby 


BUT THAT was just the 
beginning. Pretty soon a tem- 
peramental writer comes 
along to woo her, but Nora 
will have none of him, and 
as a result—love in the world 
of soap opera is outsize—he 
goes off his noggin and has 
to be put away where, I 
guess, he still is. Next comes 
Fred Molina, a happy-g0- 
lucky, rather mysterious fel- 
low who woos her awhile, 
walks out on her, but even- 
tually—after she’s discarded 
one suitor and been discard- 
ed by another—marries her. 

The soap opera world 1s 
supposed to be changeless 
ard. in the sense that the 
heartbreak is unending, it is, 
but the nature of the heart- 
break changes all the time. 
Actually, soap opera is a kind 
of reflection in a distortion 
mirror of our own times. 

For instance. when Nora 
joined the hospital, she was 
a member of the general 
medical staff and the pa- 
tients generally had been run 


By John Crosby 


Irs a Changing World 
For Soap Opera Fans 


over by automobiles or were 
stricken with amnesia or 
some such thing. (Amnesia 
has always been a wonderful 


soap opera ailment. 
> s . 


NOWADAYS, FOUR out of 


five doctors at the hospital 
are psychiatrists and the show 
abounds 
jargon. The most popular ail- 
ment in Page Memorial these 
days are neuroses, of which 
they have wierd variety. 
Keeping apace with the times, 
Nora has moved over from 
general medicine to be chief 
assistant to the head of the 
mental hygiene clinie. If ar- 
terio-sclerosis becomes the is- 
sue of the moment one day, 
you can bet your bottom dol- 
lar Nora will move to that de- 


in phychiatric | 
| Chopin, 
| Franck, Symphony in D. 


Highlights 
On Radio 


Walter Winchell 
... OF NEW YORK 
The Broadway Lights 


12:14 p. m—WRC. Patty 
Cavin Show: Guests include 
jazz expert Dizzy Gillespie, 
who defines “bop.” 


3 p. m—WTOP. House 
Party: A round-the-world all- 
expense-paid trip for two or 
$10,000 in cash awaits a mem- 
ber of the studio audience or 


ese Revue” 
. The Nokays outnumbered the Okays.. 


Curtain-Time: The official First-Night opinions about “The 
(at the Phoenix Theater) were yes-and-noey 
. The new entry's 
oe is Charlotte Rae. Recruited from the Greenwich Village 


a home listener who can 
i¢entify the item in the 
‘What's in the House” game. 

6 p. m.—WDON and WASH. 
FM. In the Concert Hall: 
Schumann, Symphony !‘o 2; 
Concerto No. lL; | 


e-- 


‘and mid-town night places, She 
‘is a talented girl. One who as- 
iserts her authority the moment 
she makes her first entrance. 

‘Larry Storch and Joel Grey are liner Juné.2nd . 


made The Hit Parade. . 
. She has of-' 


‘fessional manner . . . The rest/coast to coast . 


“Second Fiddle,” is 


listless tunes and sketches, hit, 
‘Offered by Ogden Nash, Ver-|much like her ‘ 
‘non Duke, John LaTouche, Nat| Waltz” 


eral others, who Parody . 
eave tae oe hades. disc iooks like another click.’ 


7:30 p. m—WGMS. Music 
From Germany: Cavatine 
from Beethoven's Quartet in 
B Flat Major, played bw the 
Koechert Quartet. 

7:55 p. m—WWDC. Base- 
ball: Washington vs. Balti- 
more. 

8 p. m—WTOP. Jack Car- 
son Show: The Cheerleaders, 


The Magic Lanterns: “Bhow- 
ani Junction” is a romantic ex- 
‘citer featuring the words of! 
‘Love and Ava Gardner's beauty 


The Intelligentsia: 


French-made film, “Lady Chat-) 


raf 
. will be a Perry Como head. 


‘two others who displayed a pro-| fers from leading night clubs | 
. The melody | 
did their best with too many|of Kay Starr’s new recording | 
so 

‘Rock and Roll | 
the lyric sounds like a 
. The 4 Coins’ newest 


“A Kiss Is Worth 1000 Words.” 


A censor- 


ship fight is looming over the 


terley’s Lover.” N. Y. State re-| 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Monday, May 28, 1956 . 21 


MONDAY 
‘til & P.M. 
TUESDAY & 


[> @pALES. 


Li. 7 1359 Li. 7-1360 


o 
1506 BENNING RD., N.E. | Memorial 
Next te Corner at 15th & H Sts. N.E. 


3 DAY SALE | ae 


MONDAY |TUESDAY! WEDNESDAY 


Original Cartons © No Floor Samples ® Everything Fully Guaranteed 
TELEVISION EAST TERMS 


partment. 


very long. 
turned out to be a secret in- 
vestigator trying to break up 
a crime syndicate, and he gets | 
murdered by it. | 


Nora’s marriage didn’t. last 
Her husband 


NORA IS currently in love 


with a ne‘vspaper reporter | 
named David Brown and he, 
too, is up to his hips in mur- | 


der. 


His parents are just | 


out on parole after serving | 
30 years for that 30-year-old 
r-urder and David is trying 
to prove they didn't do it. His 


close pal and fellow newspa- 


| of 


vocal quintet, take over for | 


the touring Kine Sisters. 
8:15 p. m—WRC. Boston 
Pops: Delibes, Procession of 
Eacchus; Offenbach’s Over- 
ture to Orpheus in Hades; 


| Tchaikovsky, The Nutcracker 
| Suite; Wagner, The Ride cf 
the Valkyries. 


8:30 p. m.—WMAL. Dorothy 
Warenskjold and Brian Sul- 
livan are guest soloists. 

9 p. m—WRC. Telephone — 
Hour: Guest soloist is bari- 
tone Tl.eodor Uppman. 

9:15 p. m—WTOP. Johnny 
Dollar investigates the sanity 
an old wiman in “The 


war 


the Streets” is 


. “The Bold and the Brave,” a 
saga, has the realistic im- 
'pact of a bayonet thrust, albeit 
some if its episodes fought in 
the Cliche Wars. . 


“Crime in 
another shock 


fective recapture of history . 
“Invitation to the Dance” will ‘Schary saves stockholders a| 


delight those who enjoy grace-' fortune. 
fui gyrations from Ballet to | doesn’t 
'Hot-Jigitty. Its poetry of motion|mentators .. . 


fused to okay it. 
London, who won 
court decision r) 
“Miracle,” 


IN. 
treatment by young savages in! Ags’n) 
Darkest America. It is sparked) wise 
‘by Sal Mineo’s deft acting . 
‘The Battle of Gettysburg” 
|30-minute feature) makes an ef- ‘Communist opus that is pro-| 
‘Boredom . . 


. Ephraim) 
e 90 high | 
tossellini’ $| 
has been retained| 
Newly elected Pres. (of the, 
Y. Press Photographers’ | 
Pat Candido was a Very| 
Choice ... Variety’s' 


| Washington agent scorned 
(al “Thieves Paradise.” 


An anti- 
. Metro exec Dore | 


the studio' 
hire com- 


Because 
have to 


lis beautifully composed by! Voice of God for “The next 
voice you will hear” and he did| 


Gene Kelly. 


the narration for it. 


He was The; 


Also for || 


TABLE 
MODEL 


RCA 21-in. TV 22s $199 
nominal 17” $105) everson 21-i. 5169 


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Va-H.P, 7V2-AMP. FAMOUS MAKE ... 50 $177.00 
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%4-H.P, FAMOUS 712-AMP. $199.00 
%4-H.P, WESTINGHOUSE CASEMENT . $222.00 
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$39. 
SYLVAWIA 
CLOCK RADIO 


perman, Jimmy Powell, is the 
latest to be 


| Reasonable Doubt Matter.” 
added to- the | 


pile of corpses while helping | 


David out on his chore. 

At the moment not even 
the cast knows who killed 
Jimmy. There are 
four suspects. One of the 
chief current troublemakers 
is David's sister 
and she, too, 
of the changing world of 
soap opera. The oldtime soap 
opera villainess was just | 
malicious, envious, lustful, 
greedy, or vengeful. The 
new-type villainess may har- 
bor all those frailties, too, 
but it’s because she’s neu- 
rotic. Lorraine, for instance, 
is an alcoholic and she has 
just about 


known to medical science. 
(Copsright 1956. New York 
raid Tribune, Inc.) 


| tery Time 
about | 


Lorraine | 
is symptomatic | 


| 


[\WRC-FM (93.5 me.)—5:30 « 
2. m. 

 wTroP- FM (96.3 me.)—6:30 «. mm. te 2 
a = 

WASH-FM 

woL-rm (98.7 me.)—7 «. mm. te mid- tou 

© wht 

WEAN 

| Wonee—S20 ke. =~ 

every neurosis | 

\¥ 


Stairway to the Stars: Broad-|“Lust for Life” 
way’s newest Cinderella  is| Gogh. 

Cathy Carr...A Blooming. | ‘ 
dale’s store clerk less than six) 

| months ago... She — 


: Rocket Plane 
\“Ivory Tower” for a small d 
ities (in Cincinnati) which Reported Near 


2000 mph Speed — 


9:30 p. m—WRC. Con- 
trasts in Music: Elliot Carter, 
The Minotaur. 

10:30 p. m—WMAL. Mys- 
“Mike Malloy, 
stars Steve 


Private Eye” 


Brodie. 


Programs printed here conform to information ' 
furnished by stations at time of publication | 
FM STATIONS BUFFALO, N. Y., May 27 # 
a (101.1 me)—T & m f 3) An experimental rocket plane! 
weenie senaaghe emramengs eg nas been flown at a speed of 
ar nearly 2000 miles an hour, the 
WtUstT-FM (106.8 me. )—7:30 «. m. te 8 ‘Buffalo Evening News said. 
(107.3 me.)—6 a. m. to 13:90) The newspaper said an an- 
|nouncement that the Bell Air-| 


m te ? 


‘97.1 me.)— 8 «. mom. te 10 


(100.3 me.)—Darstlight Only.” 


OTHER STANDARD STATIONS 
midnight. |WOOK—1340 ke—§ 8. 
13 previous record of 1650) 


‘| miles an hour could come at 
‘any time. Another Bell ship—| 
the X-1A—had set the earlier’ 
mark. 


—De 
SH ke.—Davsticht * . 
/AX—1220 ke —Darlight Saiy.* WINX—1600 ke—Daylight Only. 
*—.agthorised t+ operate sunud te sundewn. 


Monday Television Programs 


| 


iness and financial reporter, | 
wrote that the plane had come | 


Monday Radio Programs 


(NBC) (Du Mont) 
we. Vv 4| WTTG 


| (CBS) 
7 |WTOP.TV 


w 
9| AM 630 


WTOP ee 


AM 1500 FM ‘close to its 


MAL | WRC (NBC) | WWDC (MBS) 
FM 107.3|AM 980 FM $3 om ae 


Peder; 
is 
Ne 7 8: 8: $88. 


| (ABC) 
' WMAL-TV 


| 
1E Hite Rascals i\Sien on. 


athe ttle Rasca.s | Kartoon Club 
Romoer Room | Bartoon Club 
Club 
10:2: 99, Dine poms "neo! 
ovecs | 
TUB Ernie Rovacs_ sini ovacs 
N12 Pascina 
Nae ~ Home: windows 


Thought) 
Dough tiae 


Collection ‘a 
intoreeSins 


| aptgin 


rthur Godfrey 
trike It Ric 
rike It 


“- beditetions 
?- orning 
Witt Rogers. Jr 


angeroo) 


6-10 4d ney. 130 5:30 


Cook to Dep 
Fyne 


uss. 


New . 235 


: Gisiaher 


Peg pee 


43) 10 California. He said LA. Col. 
@| Frank K. (Pete) Everest was the 
test pilot. 


akf' st Club | A 
McNeil) 
arie ae - 


|CBS News of 

Encore: ‘Gallaher 

ase 
. 


ge &: Brown! Oven Hous 


oss 
a ; a 
n 
Art B 


Coalition Ruled Out 


kday: 
] 10 82%.Fe,. $8 Fras ipstsy: 
A Giri Pia eekday 


a3] 


[pee S McBride Bai F . 
By President Rhee 
Reuters 


SEOUL, Korea, May 27—Pres- 
ident Syngman Rhee aprounced | 


tows: Piske 
Weekday 
|Weekday 


Weekday 
Weekday 


Ba: & 


1 


and “Sintne Godfrey 


thy 
poise Miller 


ekany Be 


_ Pay orites 


about Van! 


a craft Company’s X-2 had brok- 


Bob Watson, the News’ busi-| 


| 


| 
| 


anticipated top | 
speed of 2000 miles an hour in| 
tests at Edwards Air Force base ! 


| 


¥/4-H.P. 7¥-AMP. TOP RATED $219.00 


WASHERS © REFRIGERATORS @ TERMS 
HOTPOINT AUTOMATIC | 1956 10 Cu. Fr. 


WASHER $ 39 


Reg. $239.95 
eg. $319 95-1956 


WHIR +188, 

serene ae 188 

Reg. $ 

NORGE 

AUTO WASHER 
Westinghouse Pop-Up 


TOASTER 
— 


Reg. $259.95 
Norge Wringer 


WASHER ,"7,. 588 


169 


* LS. eo yee 
ADMIRAL 
5] 39 UPRIGHT FREEZER 
Westinghouse Steam-n-Dry 


The best ond most efficient off- 


The new Westinghouse pop-up 
n toaster is functional end attractive 
rn —toosts all kinds of bread and 
sprinkling time .. . 
ing bille . . « 
steam or dry . 
delicate fabrics. 


SALE ONLY 
LIST $14.95 


| features a lift-up lewer to raise 
+ small slices on extra inch for easy 
' gemovel. Severe! settings, easy 


to on 6 
ust 921.98 10° 
Westinghouse Deluxe 
ROASTER OVEN 


With “leok-in” lid and gloss dishes. Your 
LIST $43.95 


big 18-quart Westinghouse roaster will 
de everything thet on even does. Accu- 
SALE 57 
ONLY +28 


rate temperature control with signal light 
Westinghouse 


essures perfect results. Serves up te 50 
COOK-N-FRYER 


people! 
The new 


Westinghouse 
Westinghouse 
fryer fries more food with loss tr, 


GRILL-N- - WAFFLER 


Cook hundreds of recipes from 
to corn fritters with the 

new Westinghouse 
grill-n-woffler. iW toasts, fries, 


_Wisinomper BR Room | Kartoon 
an = -00\Tean, Ernie 


Kaleidoscope 
+ ee show 
e 


: W'y Warren| that he would never agree to a’ 
@ Edition ‘coalition cabinet between his’ 
ur Gel Sunder _ Liberal Party and the opposi-| 
tins ~=—Ss (tion “Democratic Party of his’ 
vice president-elect, John 
' 


said he agreed with} 
Chang, however, that a House! 
of Councillors—upper house of 


metics 
foods right et the table! Trve-temp 
contro! mainteins occurate tempere- 
tures of every setting. 


SALE ONLY $7 9-7 


News: Panning ee N's: = 
Patty Cavin Ed Hom 
atty Cavia : ” ua’y | elen 
atty Cavin with Eq | 

wo at One 

“Hs at One 

ate in 


grills, bokes waffles. Fost and 
, automotic, its ready fer duty 
eround the clock. 


List $29.95 47 
SALE ONLY 19 LIST $29. 95 


EE ek iE EE Se % "ELECTRIC FANS 


| Pete's Place . 

Losoey, Tunes] Sigwn Soruer sara 
Afternoon } lown Co f : nee 
_.._ Mi sidon Walker di : 30 Your Happy 


or| eatre o ars " arvey 


"Treat P 

ed 
Sullivan, Porn the 30 ieee & fe bry 
Donna * 


ohnny 
tare 


John 
' Afternoon Movie 


Movie 
Cadies Be Seated | ugs}es 
Art Lamb The Rus 
“Port of aejesing | Quiz ee 


ceo St 


. se. 
a. Mother 
30 ‘Ri Tiki pt ecaD 
u c 
“He Kt 41 News: Cub 1260 
s 
[Evans News; 1260 | Nora 
iPred Fiske sj Aunt denny 


i Towa 
ountr 

30 Miron Bore N 

ternoo 


Ladies “Be | nw veal 


Ladies Be Seated 
Tea Time Theater! 
Tea Time Theater 


Kitty McShane 
SSiFeatar e Piynee 
2 Atternoca 
3B Matines Th utr 
Soin 8 
ate wit ® Br ight er Day 
torm 


bh Ings 
“00 
-15'Mod. Romances Secre 
4s: Queen for ge 0 


: arrie a Camb “Session 
1 Married Joa Art La 
Lamb Session wt 


Vis owes Doody 
(Color) Lamb S's'n; 
rai sent , 7a ter Hoppity 
S| Great 
ay har ck Hel imes Willard 


ee = 


: ou 
* The Pin. "ey Voice of Firestone: Arthur Godfrey 
Pilm Pair ve Lucy 

he Evening “Movie! eatten|t | pore Tne 


ae ase oe 


News 
R. Mont Om) Boy 


: om 
: 5) R. Monsom’ | 
30\Mr District 
News 


oa tee 
ES F | Potiarome 


‘30’ Tonight Featurama 


Leve_ AlleD! Peat urame 
Yar cht iSign Off 
onight | 


Ponighs 


Gildersleeve| 
Waterman) 


oxing 
Joey y Glardello Film Pair 
vs. 
ax | Ghariie Co t $e 7 Filan. _ 


ro Little Marcie 
Gale § 


to 
Foreign er hie 
Jer “hor 


o., or Pones| | <t6 


Adventures of 
Robin 


TV s Dig’ st Burns and Allen 
TV od - Dig’st| Burns and Allen 
| Voice of Firestone Talent 


+ Bride 
S 


Pilm Pair 


pall Frome en 


be 


pouks mp! fiver 


Bordertown” 
Kit Carsop 


Hood 


Kae a 


Par 
Art Pinkletter 
| Tell Me, Dr.; Mark | Parliament — should be estab-| 


eran i236 
Jack Rowrie! 


11260, CUD ews: 
ack Rowsie| ¥¢¥s? Bob Dalton constitution passed by the na- 


_Moondial Matinee |tional Assembly four years ago. | 
die ( aher ri 

haber |The Vice President would be 

Zan te Gallaher |chairman of the House of Coun- 


Wash. ews “Rep’t| ‘cillors. 
Ay . Sports 


00 News: Strone 
15 Jerry & — F 


30)" Pop Susie * ow for in an amendment to the 


| ews: 


4 


Rees yous 
Woman in 

New ‘Twilight Tunes 
oon & mpather ‘Lig BBs sense 


z Porn ® Sivbons waient "Tunes 
sNews Ne McC , yy mick | 
Al . 


— 


ber Wolff, Sports 


+ Godw 
Ww _ 


4 Spts. 
rd Extra 


¥ Sear. 


, |Pulton Lewis JF | My" pene 
a 15: Bill Stern L G I atter bn b 
30 vente Rou nau att atter: Baseball | Edward R ke 
Bh |Heary, ops 


iiten 


“Don't diet too much, girls, 
Remember the American busi- 
ness man likes to have his 
hands full.” —MAE WEST 


- furrow 
“Washington! Jack Carso Show | 


vs. 
Baltimore 
Pew aAT 


b_ Music; 


Huntley 
Hits 


and her complete revue 
rson—week of June 4 


usic 
pant rok 


pelts ie wi 


14th & H Sts. N.W. NA. 


Mi 8-7700 


45) Milten Q. 


- ay 
| aa Rsaumais 5“ 


THEATER 
OF STARS 


RS e2 os » 


PPL LOL IL CPL ILL OP LD SIL MP 
: Se eS ie Se ; 


PRL LETS POPOL DY. ©." 


Peter Lawford 


in 


"Natchez Inn’’ 


» Ge te : ar . e oie b ae ee Tr 


tel: Mila maa P 


1:00 pm 


WTOP-TV 


seeeseaeaeeeeeeeaeseeee 8 


LIVE IN COLOR TONIGHT 8 TO 9:30 PRODUCERS’ SHOWCASE PRESENTS 


[ BEL@O@IMwR GIR Bs! 


The bit Broadway musical about Evalina. 
Starring BARBARA COOK, KEITH ANDES, CARMEN MATHEWS, PAUL FORD 
Music by HAROLD ARLEN; Lyrics by E.Y. HARBURG; Book by FRED SAIDY & SIG HERZIG 
Dances and Ensemble Numbers staged by AGNES DE MILLE. Produced and Directed by ALEX SEGAL 


A Production of Showcase Productions, Ine. F i j p 


a 

is Evalina the most 

talked about girl 
in town?” 


oa, | Mark pant lished promptly, as provided | 


' 
| 


| 


SAVE ON 1956 GENERAL B 


% ROLL- @ New Low 
2 AROUND Cost 
FAN 


List 
$59.95 


$34.95 


De Luxe 20” 


10” GE Oscillating Fan 
AUTOMATIC 
WINDOW 


~ ie iW 


<b, 
HERMOSTA $29.95 G.E. 12” $17 50 


Mod. W.4 Oscillating Fan 
$40-*7 $54.95 GE. 16 $39.12 
boys’ & 


OSCILLATING 
COOKER ple, 
ris’ 
FRYER wid ri 


Reg. $39.95 Famous (ROTARY 
English POWER 
Make MOWER 


Genuine Enolish 26” 
3 Speed Lightweights 


3-Speed geors, front ond recor 

heed brokes, Kickstend, chain 
. bell bearing pedals, 

chrome rims, de luxe saddle. 


sents its $36°°° 


$10.95 13” Tricycle, boil $5 99 
we 
$67 ll — Light- $29 88 


$680 
Reg. Rebberieed 


FAN j oral Seed 


Model N-1 blade 

LIST $9.95 
ae $5.83 . FAN 
Electrically Reversible 

List $49.95 


$28.95 


“—< 


TWIN FAN VENTILATOR 
FULLY AUTO. THERMOSTAT 


3-SPEED $3 4-95 


List $59.95 
© 4 CYCLE 2 KP, 
CLINTON 


List 
$69.95 
orice BP: WE 


ENGINE 
HEAVY 
DUTY 
20” 


kor 


Folding Lawn 
PULL SIZE 


CHAIR 
$3.99 


4 for $15.75 


cur 
Reg. $139.95 
* All Steel Base 
® Leaf Mulcher 
® Cushioned Slip Clutch 


‘Geom 59 


$119.95 18” Stearns TURF-KING REEL 
MOWER. Briggs & Stretton 4 $65 


cydle engine, recoil starter, 

clutch and throttle control . 

TURF KING 22” ROTARY acycus 2 MP. 
© Twi nie * tavind tore 9 Q 


Handle © Rewind Starter 
- $99.98 19" Rotary 1M $ 
| ahenes Canves *12 at ~ revere 43 


® All Steel Base. List $129.95. 
G.E. ELECTRIC Ree. 


@ me SKILLET *: pang 


“G.E. AUTOMATIC fet 


TOASTER 


‘now 
G.E. AUTOMATIC 


COFFEEMAKER 3195 


G.E. PORTABLE ec aoe 


MIXER $17.95 


°F vi 
e i 1956 G.E. STEAM & DRY ;.. 


TRESP $79.88 


IRON $14.95 


” SMALL APPLIANCE SENSATIONS! ‘ 


ELECTRIC SKILLETS 


$19.95 Sunbeam 10'/2-inch rtf 2.56 
$23.95 Sunbeam 11-inch. $15.08 


ae 
- Tenqreceter 


1) 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD '65‘to G dua at G det T | 54 Dentists Finish 
2 Monday, May 28, 1956 . 3 ra te allau oda | 
sien Mins. wt imam Meme? al , —— | eee : . y Walter Reed Course 
= | — Gallaudet College, the world’s be commencement speaker. |Heights, Md.; Jerald A. Malin, Fifty-four dentists have been| 
only college for the deaf, holds is | Bal ; and Eleanor P./graduated from a post-graduate Poin, Borning, Tenderness 
| De-|Stratton, Staunton, Va. course in oral diagnosis and | 
its 92d commencement today J rte olla vir. nace =I, : 
and—will confer 65 degrees— |Partment of | rapeutics ; a, 
five on foreigners. mal hearing Er ae png or Andean Peak Scaled Army Medical Center, it was ——fphlltt f= 
The Rev. Dr. Charles D.| Ambassadors to the United| LIMA, Peru, May 27 (#~—| nounced yesterday. 
Kean, Rector of Epiphany States from Britain, India, Cey-|Four French and Swiss Alpin-| The five-day course ended 
Church, delivered the bacca-'jon and Sanada will present de-|ists report they have scaled Friday and provided military 
laureate sermon last night. grees to students from those hitherto unconquered La Ver-'and civilian dentists a review 
Dr. Jackson A. Raney, presi-|co.ntries who are graduating onica, a 19-685-foot peak in the and refresher program in 
dent of Kiwanis International today. Andes. Skilled climbers have ent dental pa ures and ad- 
agn 


These seven Washington area cadets will be graduated June 1 from the Coast Guard Academy and superintendent of the Indi-| Among Phe yy ag nde 5 ab ge trying to conquer it for on oa oe osis and treat- 
gives are Dav . Neill of Villa |30 years. iment of oral diseases. 


at New London, Conn. From left, William G. Hicks, 21, son of Capt. and Mrs. G. F. Hicks, ana State School for the Deaf, 
Curtis Bay, Md.; Vernon C. ° : 

Jones, 23, grandson of Mr. 
and Mrs. Elwood Truitt, 306 
Park Row, Snow Hill, Md.; 
Thomas W. Kirkpatrick, 24, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. T. P. 


Kirkpatrick, Rt. 1, Severna | : 
Park, Md.; James I. McLeaish, 
24, son of Mr. and Mrs. Rob- § Wf e ce = 


ert Burns McLeaish, 120 C st. 


ne.; William F. Roland, 22, rd YEAR % 

son of Rear Adm. and Mrs. e 

E. J. Roland, 1429 44th st. nw.; u 

Raymond E. Womack, 22. son ° 

of Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. | 
Womack, 6617 Hudson st., VA 


- Baltimore; and Joseph H. 
Wubboild Ill, 21, son of Mrs. 
J. C. Wubbold, 5707 19th st., 
N. Arlington, Va. They will 
be assigned to Coast Guard 
cutters. 


Boley Named 
To Aid County 
Plant Drive ne 


Robert E. Boley, 30, research ry | & | | ‘e 
Beographer, has been named ' | | ‘oa H ’ Ly 


director of research for the 


Prince Georges County Indus- bre , 
trial Development Committee. ] £ ; MORE DAY 


Boley was selected to gather 
the background information to 


be used by the Committee in | . &§ eo ssf 
its mission of attracting desir- : my | = AP "oe © 
able industry to the county. \y : - - é \ ' > to register! 
| The Committee was set up y/ y 7% A 
last year by the County Com- RA, LO, 
missioners under a measure en- 
acted by the Maryland Legis- 
lature at the request of the 
County’s Chamber of Com- 
merce. It has raised $10,000 
from County businessmen and 
been granted another $10,000 
from County funds to get its 
program under way. 

Boley, a native of Washing- 
ton; a graduate of Anacostia 
High school and George Wash- 
ington University, is at present 
employed at the university on 
a research project sponsored 


by the Army to determine how 
by emironment. | CHECK THE LABEL BEFORE YOU BUY 
High’s is the only place in the Washington area where you can buy Complete with 


24 Nations Accept Grade-A, Homogenized, Vitamin-D milk at 72 cents a gallon. You cane om Yi 

Cancer Meeting Bids buy 72-cent milk elsewhere—but not the same quality. Be sure you know < . = SADDLES AND BRIDLES 
DETROIT, May 27 aNs)| What you’re getting. Don’t confuse High’s Gallon Jug Milk with sec- , 

The American Cancer Society} ond-line, “economy” milk that does not meet the Grade-A, Homoge- Don’t mies oxt’on this chance to win a handsome pony absolutely free. High’s big Anniversary 


today announced that scientists) nized, Vitamin-D quality standards. ‘ 
of 24 nations have accepted in- Celebration ends soon, so stop at High’s today and register. There’s nothing to buy, nothing to write 
—just fill out-the registration blank and drop it in the container at your neighborhood High’s store. 


vitations to the third national 


cancer conference in Detroit on ) ss , , . 
June 4, 5 and 6. You can register each time you shop at High’s. 
The conference is cospon- ; | 
net Fae a Boggy err anig ood | GALLON Adults must register for all children 14 years and younger. High’s employees and their families are - 


Society and the National Can- 
HALF _ not eligible to win. Register at all High’s stores except in Virginia. 


cer Institute of the Public @ ig 5 ee : 
Health "Service. About 100 Perfect for your picnic—buy in High’s big money-saving jug! 25¢ GALLON 


papers will be read to an audi- 
ence of 1200 scientists and 
physicians. Only Sweden de- 
clined a bid because the invited 
delegates had earlier commit- 


ORANGE JUICE = wonpay 
FIVE FAVORITE FLAVORS 


For the easiest 
Not frozen—not a con- * TUESDAY © Checelate-Veniila 


AUTOMATIC centrate—all 100% AVA aE: ’ y 
pure orange juice! * WEDNESDAY os y N ‘ = F<) MEY. @Strawberry-Vanilia © Butter Brickle 
(om. SS Ae |  @ Checolate-Strawberry-Vanilla 


, = 4 : 
SEWING ¢ Se ae 
ens We're repeating the sellout special"fea- 

. : . a couple of weeks ago—just in ti 


gj for your holiday entertaining. Stock your 
HIGH § | freezer now with High's famous-quality 
\ / ice cream at this amazing price! 
Always 20 or more flavors in @ High's store! 
FAMOUS GRADE-A et Sone ia 
VITAMIN-D. HOMOGENIZED a - | | HIGH'S NEW 
: J. 


“ 


RS | 

— m. © , | RUIT PUNCH 
meet! | MILK | S347) tors (UR mee 
a SINGER“ | VE C(( NEW cK; ]\\ See 


SWING-NEEDLE AUTOMATIC ¢ mee §6=CHOCOLATE 
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“i 19° quart & HALF GALLON 29: 
18¢ QUART IN THE GALLON JUG 44 HALF-GALLON IN VIRGINIA 


92¢ GAL. IN VIRGINIA "HIGH'S WILL BE OPEN ALL DAY res FF Shop at High's for all your last-minute holiday needs 


. «+ High’s new Sweet-Cream Buiter, U. 5. yang a 
MEMORIAL DAY TILL 11 P. M. Sous: Sates fers er tee ake ee ee 


There’s a HIGH'S Store Near You! : o 
OPEN 9am toll pm %* SEVEN DAYS A WEEK HIGHS 


MILK *& BUTTER * EGGS * ICE CREAM * COTTAGE CHEESE * BAKED GOODS 


GALLON IN 
WASHINGTON 


SINGER 
SEWING CENTER 


‘SA Trade Mark of The Singer Mfg. Co. 


4 * 


This pte 
Morning...| 


With Shirley Poevich 


THE PITY WAS THAT when Al Simmons was struck 
down by that heart attack in Milwaukee the other night 
at the age of 54, he was comparatively defenseless. 
With a bat in his hands, Simmons would have given it a 
battle, and you would have had to like his chances. 


Baseball lost one of its big ones with the passing of Al | 


Simmons. In 1935, the American 
League pitchers finally hushed his big 
bat, holding him to a .267 average. eons 
Only trouble was, it had taken them. © Bao) 
11 years to do it. And in the next © ee 
season he lashed back at ‘em with © 3a 
There was no more sinisterJooking © 
element in the game of baseball than © — 
a bat in the hand of Al Simmons. © 
Ruth hit more home runs but there 
was something glorious about his |i 
rhythmic swing. Foxx, too, hit a #97) 
longer ball, but even the pitchers he | 
hit it against could admire his muscle. 

The dark-browed Simmons, it 
seemed, regarded every pitcher as a 
mortal enemy, was always looking down their throats. He 
expressed his own philosophy about it once. “Those pitchers 
are out there trying to take the bread and butter out of your 
mouth,” he told one young ball player. “You've got that bat 
to protect your wife and family with.” 


SIMMONS HAS TO BE one of the most remembered of 
all major league bail players not for the fact that he hit 
better than .300 for ten consecutive years, or simply for the 
fact that he led the league in hitting and played on those 
three straight pennant winners of Connie Mack in 1929-30-31. 
Individually, he stood out like a 6-foot, 205-pound sore thumb, 
on any ball field. 

He was remarkable for the fact that he got his hits with a 
batting stroke that once sent scouts fleeing from his presence, 
so ridiculous was it in defiance of all batting orthodoxy. As 
the pitch approached, he swung his left foot wide toward the 
dugout, in a seeming eagerness to get away from,the danger 
of being hit. Down through the ages the foot-in-the-bucket 
reaction has been the badge of timidity that stripped a fel- 


low'’s swing of power and made him a chump for any ball |run 


over the plate. 

All of these fond baseball beliefs Simmons came along to 
refute, violently. The foot swung out, but the bat was swing- 
ing, too. And there was power in it, 
pitcher who tried to slip one over the plate against him was 
a fool. He was a good-ball hitter and he was a bad-ball hitter, 
and in 1930 he got his average up to 391, and the year after 
that to 390, and he was the best hitter in baseball. 


ONLY ONCE DID SIMMONS betray that he was sensitive 
about his unorthodoxy. That was the off-day when he wan- | 
dered into the Polo Grounds and saw Mel Ott hit two home | 
runs, for the Giants. 

“My Gawd,” said Simmons, 
style? 
out of the park.” 

A few years ago, the Associated Press turned up an inter- 
esting survey. It rated the game's great hitters over their 
best 5-year span. The Simmons figures taken for the seasons 
1927-31 inclusive showed him with a .375 average. Only 
Hornsby, Cobb, Sisler and Heilmann topped him. Lajoie | 
was rated behind Simmons, in sixth place. Ruth could rank 
only seventh. Below him, too, were Speaker, Jackson and | 
O’Doul. Ted Williams? Eleventh. DiMaggio? Twelfth. 

Simmons liked to recall particularly his second year in the | 
majors when he hit 386, in 1925. “You know what it got me?” 
he said. “Fifth place. Cobb, Heilmann, Speaker and Sisler | 
outhit me.” 


“why don't they lay off my 


: 
’ 


to all fields, and the | 
Roy had a big day. He hit a 


Look at Ott, he swings on only one foot and hits ‘em Bo 
‘in the first game. 


_|/Roy Slams 
2 Homers; 
Beats Bosox 
With Double 


By Bob Addie 
Staff! Reporter 

BOSTON, May 28 — Jerry 
Snyder and Roy Sievers saved 
the Nats from losing a dotble- 
header to Boston this rainy, 
gloom-filled afternoon wit 
their batting heroics in the sec 
ond game. 

The Nats won the nightcap, 


9-7. A crowd of 11,594 saw the 
twin bill. 

Snyder “it a three-run homer 
iwith. two out in the ninth to 
put the Nats ahead. After the 
Red Sox had tied the score in 
their half, Sievers brought in 
the winning run with a double 
lin the tenth. 
| That second game was really 
la wild one. The Nats had be- 
labored their old pal, Porter- 
field, with four runs in the first 
|and another in the second. 
‘Then the game setfled into a 
slugging duel with Boston fin- 
ally getting a 9-7 lead going into 
the ninth. 

After Pete Runnels and Jim 
Lemon singled with an out in 
ibetween, Karl Olson forced 
'Lemon for the second out. That 
left it up to Snyder who rapped 
a homer intyu the screen off Tom 
Hurd. 

Boston tied it in the bottom 
of the hinth with three sin 
but Clint Courtney and Whitey 
Herzog singled in the tenth and 
Sievers doubled in the winning 


The split enabled the Nats to 
‘remain in a tie with Detroit for 
| sixth place. 


eens Five-Run Lead 


| homer in the first game and an-! 
other in the second to boost his! 
‘total to 11 for the season. He! 
‘also got two doubles in the sec- 
ond game. The Nats so 16 a 
‘in this one to 15 for the 
‘Some pitchers’ battle. 

Pete Ramos eventually 
‘the victory although 
‘Stone did a fine job satin! 
‘the Sox in the ninth. Camilo 
‘Pascual started and yielded to) 
b Chakales who also relieved 


The Nats blew a five-run 
lead in the opener thanks to 
some weird fielding which saw 
/ all three outfielders, particu- 
larly Carlos Paula, get the 
blind statggers on several fly 
balls. 

Truman Clevenger started | 
the first game and was followed) 
‘by Connie Grob, who got the) 


loss, Bunky Stewart and Chak-|first American league home| 
irun, a double and a single and 
old Enos Slaughter had a sin- 


es. 
Grob was in the box when | 


11-10, after losing the opener,) 


Nats Split on Sievers’ Hitting 


~~ 


” 


Times ingion 


Soorts 


vv 


BASEBALL 


Chisox Win 
Over Tribe 


RACING 


CLASSIFIED 


5 


MONDAY, MAY 28,-19 


Tn 15th; Lose 


NATIONAL CHAMPIONS—George Washington High’s 
crew, which won the National schoolboy rowing champion- 
ship Saturday at Poughkeepsie, N. Y.,-hoists coach Julian 
Whitestone, after arriving home by bus yesterday. Mem- 


By Vic Casamento Staff Photographer 


bers of the crew, left te right, Dave Burks, bow; Chuck 
Torpy, 7; Bill Dalkins, 2; Bill Roberson, 6; Melvin Fortney, 
coxswain; Jim Stewart, stroke; Eugene Gardner, 3; Allen 
Bugg, 5, and Mike Ramey, 4. 


Second, 4-2 


CHICAGO, May 27 (*#—The 
Chicago White Sox defeated 
the Cleveland Indians, 54, in 
15 innings today on a two-out, 
run-scoring single by relief 
pitcher Jim Wilson but drop 
the second game of a double- 
header which was played under 
the lights, 4-2. 

Wilson's single scored Min- 
nie Minoso from second and 
ended a four-hour and 52-min- 
ute struggle that was finished 
under the lights and was only 
six minutes short of the Ameri- 
can League record. By the time 
the second game ended only @ 
handful of the crowd of 25,850 
was around. 


Wilson Comes on in 14th 


Early Wynn allowed only five 
hits in the second game to post 
his fifth triumph against two 
losses and Cleveland’s first de- 
cision over the Sox in five 
games this season. 

Wilson, making his first ap- 
pearance for the Sox since he 
was acquired from Baltimore 
several days ago, came on in 
relief in the 14th inning and 
picked up his fifth triumph of 
the year against two losses. 

The Sox knocked out Cleve- 
land started Bob Lemon with a 
two-run uprising in the seventh 
inning and tied the score at 
44 in the ninth inning on a 
run-scoring single by Nelson 
Fox. 

The game turned into a battle 
ot relief pitchers until the 15th 
when Minoso drew his fifth 
iwalk of the game and went 
ito second on a sacrifice. 


Wilson's Single 


| Fox was passed intentionally 
and Luis Aparicio flied out. 


A’ s Shut Out 
wot Tigers After 
Losing, 8 to 2 


DETROIT, May 27 (#*)—The| 
Kansas City Athletics and the 
Detroit Tigers divided a dou- 
bleheader today, with Art Dit- 
mar’s scattering 10 hits for 50 
shutout in the nightcap after 
the Tigers belted three home’ 


runs to win the opener, 8-2. 


Charlie Thompson hit his! 


Sparring Partner 


Changes Opponents 


MONTICELLO, N. YY. 
May 27 (‘»—Howie Turner, 
Brooklyn heavyweight who 
was dropped from Hurri- 
cane Jackson's camp at 
Summit, N. J., for flooring 
Jackson in a workout,’has 
joined the camp of Floyd 
Patterson at Kutscher’s 
Country Club. 

Patterson and Jackson 
will meet in a 12-round 
| heavyweight elimination | 
| contest at Madison Square | 


Garden, June 8. The winner 
has been promised a shot at 
Archie Moore for the heavy- 


| 
| weight title left vacant by league in RBIs with 33. 


‘Stan Snaps Slump 


Musial Drives In 7 Runs 


As Cards Maul Cubs Twice 


ST. LOUIS, May 28 (‘%—Stan Musial snapped out of a slump 
with seven runs batted in on four hits, one a three-run homer, 
and led the St. Louis Cardinals to a doubleheader sweep over 
the Chicago Cubs, 11-9 and 12-2, w 
12 percentage points away from fi 
- The Cardinals punished 11 Cubs pitchers for 27 hits and 23 
runs in the two games to gain a sweep of the three-game series. 
Musial hiked his batting average nearly 20 points to .293 with 
‘four hits in six trips, including his sixth home run of the season 
with two on in the seventh inning of the second game, and! 
‘moved into third place in the, 


Wilson then dumpted a single 
‘into rightfield and’ Minoso 
roared home with the winning 
run. Reliefer Cal “icLish was 
the loser. 

The game fell short of the 
American League record which 
is 4:58, set by Baltimore and 
Boston June 23, 1954, in 17 
innings. 


Mossi handled the Sox with 
ease until there were two out 
in the ninth and Minnie Minoso 
drew a walk. Lollar doubled 
and Fox singled Minoso home 
with the tying run. 

Wynn had command in the 
second game and was nicked 
for a pair of runs in the seventh 
inning after his mates had 
staked him to a 40 lead. 

Cleveland scored in the sec. 


See TRIBE, Page 24, Col. 3 


ich put the Redbirds only 
t place. 


the Red Sox scored seven runs igle, double and triple to allo 


the retirement of Rocky 


Vinegar Bend Mizell, backed 


‘by a 14-hit attack, went the dis- 
[tance in the second game for 
‘his fourth victory against two 
defeats. The fast-balling Red- 
bird lefthander struck out 10 


in the third with Pitcher Tom | | Ditmar to coast to his fourt Marciano. 


Brewer helping to win his own’ triumph in the second. | 
game with a three-run homer.|; Al Kaline, Ray Boone and | 
The Nats got seven Hits in| Charlie Maxwell hit home runs. 


DESPITE HIS DEVOTION to the theory that every pitcher 
was the batter's enemy, Simmons was aware that self-preser- 


vation was a two-way street. “Those pitchers should hate us, 
too.” he said. He was talking about the previous day's game 
when Jess Flores, 
from the Nats, with Simmons on the third base coaching line 
for the Athletics. 

“A pitcher shouldn't stand out there and take that kind of a 
beating.” Simmons said. “He should have loosened some of 
those hitters up with high hard ones. Those batters are 
stealing his livelfhood away from him. If it happened at the 
Shoreham and they tried to sneak some bread and butter 
off hf plate, he'd react, but on the ball field he takes it, even 
though it adds up to the same thing.” 

In Philadelphia, where the fans saw more of him, they 
knew Simmons’ value didn’t stop when he laid his bat down. 
There is doubt if ever there lived a finer leftfielder more 
adroit at holding the hits down the line to a single base. 
Simmons chargd the ball, used quick hands to get it up, com- 


the first game to 11 for Boston.|to back up Frank Lary’s clutch’ 
Billy Klaus and Dick Gernert| pitching for Detroit's victory in 
pitching for the A’s, took a bad beating ‘matched homers with Sievers|the first game. 


and Snyder in the nightcap. 
Courtney Doubles 


Everything was lovely in th 
first inning of the opener when sin 
the Nats scored five runs. Yost) 
walked. Runnels singled and 
Sievers walked to fill the bases | 
with one out. 

Courtrey double: home two 


runs and Lemon singled in two |‘ 


more. Jim took second on the 


throw to the plate and came in /— 


on Paulc’s single to make it 5-0. 
Boston quickly eliminated 
Clevenger in its first. Goodman 
walked, moved to third on 


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Rookie Leads’ 
Braves, 7-2 


MILWAUKEE, May 27 ®& 
‘Rookie Frank Torreemade four' 
| straight hits today to lead Mil- 
waukee to a 7-2 victory over 
we Cincinnati Redlegs as the 
Braves retained their slim hold 
ier-5 on the National League lead. 
Torre, who 


ied 
Lindy McDaniel. 
The free-hitting 


Cub pitcher Jim Davis, 
|wound up with the loss. 


Davis fanned Hal Smith 
Jackie Brandt. 


scored two others. See CARDS, 


Re Cards blew a seven-run 
in the first game, but ral- 
to win behind reliefer 


first game 
was spiced by a record-tying 
four strikeouts in one inning by 
who 


| Wally Moon started off the 
sixth inning with a double and 
stole third. He stayed there - 
an‘ 


Reliefer Lindy McDaniel! 
then swung at a third strike 


Page 24, Col, 4 


Klaus’ single and scored on 
Gernert’s fly. When Jensen | 
doubled, Grob came in and re-) 4S 
tired the side. 

Singles by Sievers and C ourt- | 
ney in the third and ~..mon's KANSAS Bains: 
‘sacrifice fly made it 6-1 for the Pintesn 2% 
|Nats. Then came the deluge | siauencer rf 
of seven runs in the lower half. Bernas 2 

Klaus opened with a walk’ if 
and Jessen dovbled him to . 
third. Zauchin doubled in the 
‘two runs. Piersall flied to 
Lemon who muffed tise ball as 
Zauchin scored and Piersall 
weund up on third. White 
doubled in Piersall. Buddin 
grounded to Yost who booted 
the “o for an error. Brewer 
hit a three run homer to give |*——"= 
the Sox an 846 lead. 


Sievers Smashes One 


Sievers’ homer i: the eighth 
cut the margin to 87 but the 
Sox caine back with a run of 
their own in the bottom half. 
\Jensen worked Chakales fur a 
walk and* moved to third on 
‘Zauchin's single. Jensen scored 
as Piersall wa’ forcing Zauchin. 

The Nats started well in the 
second game when they scored 
four runs off Porterfield in the 
first inning. Yost walked and 
Herzog singled him to third. 
Whitey took second on the 
throw. Runnels got an infield 
hit, scoring Yost, and Sievers 
smacked his second homer of | 
the day into the left-field E e| : | 

scoring Herzog and big ie 
<\3| 
Boston got two re oes runs in Zo8 2333 ing [WL | Pet |GB 
| 2| 4 
a 


ig a. he| Henry Aaron contributed 
triage three hits and Bon Thomson. 


Cri 
€4."crimian 22 two to the Braves’ 14 hit attack’ 
DETROIT 


pensated for his average throwing arm with a rare speed in 
getting the ball away. 

In 1939. when baseball announced it was establishing a Hall 
of Fame for the enshrinement of its great performers, it was 
certain there would be a light burning for him at Coopers- 
town. In 1954, they made it official after too many years of 


brush-off. 


a 


Nats Averages 


(Incheding see Games) 


ane > oe oe. ii 


Merriag®'on Art Fowler, Paul Lapalme 
and Hershell Freeman. 
CINCINNATI MILWAUKEE 


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STERDAY’S RESULTS 
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fame, 15 innings). 
Weare dates, sin 


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aed Kansas City era 2-1)! ws. Sin 


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GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES 
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147% awD L STREETS. N. W., PHONE STemune 3.4660 
Oran DAY © A. M.- OF. . ~ SATURDAY © A. Mw. - oP. 


Tennis Washed Out ott, 
Rain washed out second-i¢ 

round matches yesterday in the|r 

Columbia Invitation Men's Ten-|4 


rele. 


Se’ 


‘AUTO 4 PERSONAL LIABILITY + FIRE + LIFE « SICKNESS & ACCIDENT 
Pp 


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Resh (2-2). 


a. ¥- matches: scheduled at 4| Los 
p. m. —3 


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Beman Takes Second Straight Schoolboy Golf Title,6and4 


. 
- 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
and TIMES HERALD 

vis Monday, May 28, 1956 

at TN RE eae 


Dee, 


v 


, al ‘Indianapolis ‘500° 


0 lif 
“INDIANAPOLIS, May 27 (®: 
Twenty-eight veteran Indianap- 
olis Motor Speedway drivers 
and five newcomers from the 
dirt and midget car circuits to- 
filled the fields for the 40th 
mile race Wednesday; but 
some of the slower ones weren't 
sure starters. 
Track officials promised two 
hours of qualifying runs after 
rain washed out the Saturday 


telals and delayed today’s runs 


Es 


Sports on Radio, TV 


rELEVISION 
| BASEBALL — Washington 
at Baltimore, WMAR-TV (Ch. 
2), 8 p. m. 


BOXING — Preliminary, 
$:30 p. m.; Joey Giardello vs. 
Charlie (King) Cotton, mid. 
dieweights, WTTG (Ch. 5), 
19 p. m. 


RADIO 
BASEBALL — Washington 
at Baltimore, WWDC oer 
%, ¢.), WCBM (680 k. ¢.), & 
p. m. 


Extended 


for two hours and 35 mera 
Six cars got onto the track be 
fore rain set in again 57 min: 
utes later, 

The track will open for an 
hour and three minutes at 8 
a. m. (EST) tomorrow if 
weather rmits, but chief 
\steward Harry McQuinn said 
there can't be more qualifica- 
tions after 6 p. m. tomorrow 
because the track surface must 
be cleaned Tuesday. 

Cliff Griffith of indianapolis, 


‘TRIBE—From Pg. 23. Lehren Wins Only One Hole 


Tribe Loses Champion Shoots Fre ront Nats Divide Sievers on Hot Streak 
In 15th, 5-4 Nj ine in 3 Under Par 


ond inning when Jim Hegan 
singled home Rudy Regalado 
who had walked. The Indians 
added another run in the fifth 
on successive doubles by Jim 
Busby and Bobby Avila. 

A single by Regalado, Rock 
Colavito’s double and a single! 
by Wynn gave Cleveland two 
more runs in the sixth inning. 


badly burned in a wreck while’ 


| practicing for the 1953 500- 


| miler, moved into the-lneup at!’ 
141.471 miles an hour in the ¥ 


Jim Robbins Special. 
Other qualifiers were Jonnie 


| Tolan of Denver in the repaired 


Trio Brass Special he wrecked 
last Sunday, 140.061: 
Johnson, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, 
Central Excavating Special, 
| 139.003, and ‘Duke Dinsmore, 
bs ter Ohio, Shannon's Spe- 
cial 

the f field ‘at that point aver-| 
aged 142.507 miles an hour,! 


‘compared with last year's rec-|f- 


ord of 138.796. 


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rBeries. 


Mechanical Design & Deve 


Columbia Country Club’s long course, 


Lohren were all brushed aside 


the rain and Car! 
yesterday in Deane Beman’'s 


march to his second straight Schoolboy Invitational tourntia- 


ment title. 


The 18-year-old captain of Bethesda- 


Chevy Chase High's undefeated golf 
team, played 14 holes of the rain-swept 
Columbia course in fwo-under-par golf 
to defeat Lohren in the final, 6 and 4. 
Beman, the youngest player to com- 
pete in the 1955 national open, played 
the front nine in a three-under-regu- 
lation 32 and was four up on Lohren. 
Beman, South Florida amateur 
champion two years running, played 
the next five holes of the back nine 
in one over par to squelch the Middle 


Atlantic 


junior champion’s last hope 


on the 14th green. 


The final, 


which marked the 


appearance of both youngsters in the 


Deane Beman 


| rain. 
The hardy gallery was treated to some of Beman’'s putting 


Schoolboy, drew a er 
gied gallery despite cold 


and bedrag- 
intermitten 


magic on the first six holes. The former junior champ from 


Dai a Page 23. 


Geet ‘Cubs Twice 


onsuesrs. 4, in 2 rat iene the ball. 


‘fourth victim of the inning. 


0 the trick. 
Go 


>, Minoso. : 
Hegan. Cola- | cCh 


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a Davis ad. § v Engein 


i Hack 


‘Cards Maul 


scored. | Bethesda Country Club collected four birdies to be four 


under par at that juncture. 

He was four up on Lohren. 
Beman rolled in 10-footers 

at the first and second holes 


| and a five-footer at the ffth. 


| At the long sixth Beman 


Moon caged 
the play and McDaniel | 
‘reached first safely. Davis then’ 
fanned Don Blasingame for his' 


It was the first time since) 
1916 that it’s happened and| 
Davis is only the fifth person’ 
in major league history to turn) 


—2D>-— 2°. 3-38 S— BF Vw UVVeuws 


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it into a doudiéplay pt Davis in 7th. | 
truck out for Lown th 


010 256 — 9) 
413 611 ft 


eckson 
Vayentinet ae Minner, 
Ww isk Aho pone 


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Tetsis Totals munmé 
. "Sneg = 7 4! in 6th. 


for Davis } im Sth 


_ slammed a 25-footer across | 
| the damp green to get his 


fourth birdie. 

Beman three-putted the 
ninth green to give Lohren a 
half and then won both the 
10th and 1ith holes with pars 


| to go six4ip. The jittery Loh- 


ren, who matched Beman’'s 
long drives throughout the 
match, birdied the 12th to 
win his only hole af the 


| match. 


Beman's victory earned him 


_ @ place alongside the ate | 


Marvin (Buddy) Wofsham, 


_ Sidney Lanier and Bill Shea 


as the only champions to suc- 
cessfully defend their titles. 

Both Béeman and Lohren 
will ce ap the required 
18-year-old limit before the 
24th event next May. 


Williams batted for Buddin and) 


last — 


NATS—From Page 23. 4 Homers in Bosex Series 


With Bosox’ 


threw wild, both runners ad- 
vancing. Chakales relieved Pas- 
cual, Daley hit a routine fly to 
center but Olson and .Lemon 
let it drop between them for a 
double, Zauchin scoring. Ted) 
drew an intentional pass, filling’ 
the bases. Bolling ran for him. | 

Mickey Vernon batted for 
Kiely and blooped & single over| 
Runnels’ head, Piersall scoring. | 
Daley was out at the plate, Run- 
nels to FitzGerald. Goodman! 
walked to fill the bases and) 
Bolling came in on Klaus’ fly) 
to make it 87 in Boston’s favor. 

Bolling walked in the eighth, 
was sacrificed along and scored’ 
on Klaus’ single. That made it 
9-7. 


Runnels and Lemon singled, 
in the ninth with one out. Olson | 
forced Lemon and Snyder hit a 
home run into the left field! 
screen scoring Runnels and O1-| 


‘son. That put the Nats in front, | 


10-9 ; 
With one out in the Boston) 
ninth, Jensen and Zauchin 
touched Ramos for singles, 
Jackie going to second. Piersall| 
followed with another single 
to center tying the score at 
10-10 to sent the game into extra 
innings. | 
Courtney opened the 10th 
with a single and moved to 


third on Herzog’s single after) 


out. Runnels 
fanned but Sievers doubled 
home Courtney. HerzOg was 
out trying to scoré and the 
Nats led, 11-10. 


Today’s Events 


of ee ALL 


ret at 
wnt, 


Yost fouled 


be | 
oan a+ BS at omprce catvomers Blair. 


; HIG L 
neces a ee oy " nterhich 


‘League Championship at East Potemec. 


eeetittes vs. Washineten-Lee at Weet- 
t. Vernen ve. Geerce Waehineten at 

Belle Haven. 3 

ae Friends ve. St. John's at Chery 


AREA 4 TENN 
Invitations Secheaseas at Columbia 


‘Country Clab. twe events. 


BOSTON, May 27—Notes on the Nats: 


| The Red Sox have won only one in five games here from the 
Nats, who, overall, have now whipped Boston six out of eight 


times .. 


. Sievers had himself a wonderful series up here... 


He smacked four homers, two doubles and three singles for 


a 563 average ... He also drove in 1 
in the four games 

son's average to .286, 
when he started this series... 


was making his 16th appearance 


0 runs 


. Roy boosted his s@a- 
38 points better than 
Chakales 


in 36 


games the Nats have played this year . . 
He's been in four of the last five games and 
cias pitched 15 2/3 innings in the last four 


games he’s relieved ... The crdwd 


would 


have been at least 25,000-except for the bad 


weather ... It rained right up until 
the long afternoon . 
Roy Sievers 47,206 for the four. game series . 
Nats,were fortunate in playing the Red Sox after the 
had returned from a successful road trip . 
pitched only one complete game in five... 
numb and he’s waiting for warm weather . 
his return to the lineup with some. lusty 
games... 


His hand 


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eae Beman Takes Second Straight Schoolboy Golf Title, 6 and 4. 


For: Sadicnaneln ‘500° ‘TRIBE—From Pg.23. Lohren Wins Only One Hole | NATS—From Page 23. 4 Homers in Bosex Series 


Qualifying Extended’ tribe Loses Champion Shoots Front Nats Divide Sievers on Hot Streak 
“INDIANAPOLIS, May 27 (®\for two hours and 35 re In 15th. 5.4. Ninet Li 3 Under Par With Bosox | ia; Weeden lave oun ani aie ix tree deaia AE ee 


Twenty-eight veteran Indianap- Six cars got onto the track be ” . ig" . aD : 
peed Na who, overali, n2 Ww Whipp OSitON SIX OUL OF Gigi 
ond ine kisdeant wea’ toe ee ‘erm set in again 97 min- ond inning when Jim Hegan ) | threw wild, both runners ad- the)... Mlovens had htmaell s wondertal series hate ot 
dirt and midget car circuits to The track will open for an ‘singled home Rudy Regalado Columbia Country Club’s long course, the rain and Carl (vancing. eg 9 ser ge om He smacked four homers, two doubles and three singles for 
filled the fields for the 40th: hour and three minutes at 8 who had walked. The Indians Lohren were all brushed aside yesterday in Deane Beman's — gf 1 Age wig Be. Be : i a 563 average ... He also drove in 10 runs 
mile race Wednesday, but a. m. (EST) tomorrow if added another run in the fifth’ march to his second straight Schoolboy Invitational tourna. Jo) i, in the four games . . . Roy boosted his s@m 
some of the slower ones weren't weather jermits, but” chief ; let it drop between them for a) son's average to .286, 38 points better than 
Track officials promised two there Mog “. more qualifica- — and Bobby Avila. nA BZ? The 18-year-old captain of Bethesda- | Williams batted for Buddin and) me was making his 16th. appearance in 36 
hours of qualifying runs after tions after 6 p. m. tomorrow. A single by Regalado, Rock) — ae a Chevy Chase High's undefeated golf drew an intentional pass, filling) a Jag 8 =6games the Nats have played this year . . 
rain washed out the Saturday because the track surface must|Colavito's double and a single) ~ | ee, ey team, played 14 holes of the rain-swept the gases. Bolling ran for him. -_ 2f He's been in four of the last five games and 
teials and delayed today’s runs be cleaned Tuesday. by Wynn gave Cleveland two| 3 | aa Columbia course in fwo-under-par golf _ Mickey Vernon batted for) Wie 9 cas pitched 15 2/3 innings in the last four 
' Cl Griffith of ES lis, More runs in the sixth inning Me <*> | to defeat Lohren in the final, 6 and 4. Kiely and blooped 8 single over) #7 BPs, games he’s relieved .-.. The crowd would 
‘badly burned in a wreck eniie| 5 Beman, the youngest player to com- |'Runnels’ head, Piersall scoring. | ery. have been at least 25,000-except for the bad 
' ; , \practicing for the 1983 800. at : — F pete in the 1955 national open, played | Daley was out at the plate, Run- a. weather... It rained right up until game 
Sports on Radio, Th | miler. moved into the lineup at Buspy | of . ie the front nine in a three- under- ‘regu- nels to FitzGerald. Goodman) ‘ \ time and then drizzled spasmodically durin 
rELEVISION |141.471 miles an hour in “the grnith lation 32 and was four up on Lohren. (walked to fill the bases and) “, "a. the long afternoon ... The two teams drew 
' rae T Be South Florida amateur Bolling came in on Klaus’ fly | 7 47,206 for the four-game series ... The 
BASEBALL — Washington Jim Robbins Special. man, u 7inB ‘ , ' 
at Baltimore, WMAR-TV (Ch. | Other qualifiers were Jonnie champion two years running, played ‘to make it 87 in Boston's favor.| Nats,;were fortunate in playing the Red Sox after the latter 
2), 8 p. m. Tolan of Denver in the repaired | the next five holes of the back nine Bolling walked in the eighth,; had returned from a successful road trip... Porterfield has 


T s in one over par to squelch the Middle (was sacrificed along and scored) pitched only one complete game in five . . . His hand is still 
enex I + ee: abe, Snies” sehen rere Atlantic po chncunlon's last hope on Klaus’ single. That made it numb and he’s waiting for warm weather .. . Klaus vindicated 
c P “(King). Desten. poor Johnson, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, 9-7. | his return to the lineup with some lusty batting in both 


on the 14th green. 
dieweights, WTTG (Ch. 5) Central Excavating Special, i! The final. which marked the last | Runnels and Lemon singled; games... All three of Reames’ victories have been at | Boston . 
10 p. m. " | 139.083, and ‘Duke Dinsmore, 


= * appearance of both youngsters in the in the ninth with one out. Olson, ——— ars - ey 
Dayton, Ohio, Shannon's Spe- Deane Beman Schoolboy, drew a damp and bedrag- forced Lemon and ences poe 
RADIO cial, 138,430. e— 6th | gied gallery despite cold intermitten home run into the left fie 
BASEBALL — Washington _ The field at that point aver-\?- rain. . screen scoring Runnels and Ol- 
a Baltimore, WWDC Ve }aged 142.507 miles an hour, |¢- b The hardy gallery was treated to some of Beman’s putting /s0n, That put the Nats in front, 
&, c.), WCBM (680 k, ¢.), & ‘compared with last year’s rec ie in magic on the first six holes. The former junior champ from 10-9. 
7 =. ord of 138.796. ¢- ; run scored. | Bethesda Country Club collected four birdies to be four | With one out in the Boston 
| — = BREA y under par at that juncture. enone tg one -_ oeaiee 
| ouc , 
| 0 SOE Se Oe Sees Jackie going to second. Piersall 


ce Bs a So An cog ze. Beman rolled in 10-footers followed with another single 


;- 


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at the first and second holes tf enter tying the score at. 


‘Cards Maul and a five-footer at the fifth. | 10-10 to sent the game into extra 


) innings. 
At the long sixth Beman Courtney opened the 10th 


ae | slammed a 25-footer across ' 
tees Cubs Twice iinet ‘geet i to iteoecaean! | STUDEBAKER-PACKARD 
on sh |, fourth birdie. Yost fouled out. Runnels! 
t Ped +. 2. P| missed the ball. Moon scored Beman three-putted the /¢,...4 but Sievers doubled: S 
94 on the play and McDaniel! ninth green to give Lohren 4 }4m6 Courtney. Herzog was MOTOR CAR 
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; ur ce oD “Ybor fourth victim of the inning. to go six-up. The jittery Loh- mete ee, Ieee Years Studebaker-Packard Experience 
It was the first time since| ren, who matched Beman’s ,) . | - 
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Delaware Park Opens Today,Conflicting with Pimlico, Garden State 


9a ‘ : THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Around The Tracks. ‘Crowd Knows Nothing About Game’ Monday, May 28, 1956 ne 


Wilmington r — 


5 


Horses and P eople |Fans Hiss, Hoot Lew Hoad ‘@® MARKET TIRE CO. ,.<un" 
By Walter A at EP | Traek Runs | . : : | (gy .. ARLINGTO 
y : For Conduct in Paris Tennis taut 
request “for some pertinent. facts on Citation arrived at my 33 Days | PARIS, May 27 —Lew Hoad of Australia won the men's | ALL 4 STORES OPEN DAILY 8 


desk in a dead heat—and so I can answer with authority. — singles title in the French International tennis tournament 
_ oaltown win from Citation? No—the Calumet pair | with an impressive display of power tennis, but he alienated 
a &% = ran as an entry several times with By Walter Haight many French fans and sportswriters with his conduct during 
Citation — - a, ney er, Stef Reserter | the tourney. 
setting the early ond ry in the 1948 This is the week when racing) < — ~_ ago ol >, wae 
, , ie ’ Sweden's Sve vidson, 6—4, 8—6, 6—3, 
Kentucky Derby when they finished |in the Middle Atlantic area will) | om Saturday, but they hissed, booed and hooted 
one-two. be conducted behind an “iron . a ~=6ohim earlier in the week. Friends reported 
Citati Albert mys “ — Pon men curtain” stretching from : that the Aussie ace was not at all happy 
omar. Steve Brooks was |Jetsey's Garden State Park to| J Be 04 fa Reap cet nn ney os a 
aboard when Citation lost to stable- |Maryland’s Pimlico with Dela- ee : The po a tye elem « ca he = hg BR og 
mate Bewitch at Washington Park in ware Park in the middle. a ae had-tempered.” Hoad, in his turn 
1947. However, it is said that Cita- With Garden State having a ge oo ies sahiina thin non the court thet. 
tion wasn’t fully extended when Be- “dark” Monday the full impact | cceieainn tee R vernal 
witch had the race in the bag. Eddie |will not be felt unti tomorrow PSThe bad press and Althea Gibson's first 
Arcaro was up that day in 1948 when | when the three tracks within a Lew Hoad pts on our Gadienit Angela Mortimer in 
Saggy beat the Calumet ace at Havre | 100-mile radius will compete for y ; : — vl nage 
de Grace. ‘the running horse players—and, the women's finale took some of the gloss off Hoa ted eanup 
Haight Did Ponder defeat Citation? Yes— |incidentally, Rosecroft will of Davidson. The New York girl, wig wen ag mg hn 4 
at Santa Anita in 1950, They finished |beckon to the carriage trade. | Daments, defeated Miss Mortimer, O— oy tee irl in five 
one-two, but that was when Citation was making a comeback | Pimlico, using up some of the rt a6 Ae eS eT ea ee 

after being sidelined with an injury for the whole 1949 season. (days added by Maryland legis > Bs , 

It is interesting to note that Ponder’s son, Needles, and Cita- |lators, has saved two stakes for) _ Hoad wouldn't — og prs np oe salto hens 
tion’s boy Fabius, are battling | it out now for the 1956 sopho- ‘the confliction period—the $25,-. “The crowds are the same all over the world—most o 
more crown. -1000 Dixie Handicap on Wednes- don't know anything about tennis. 

*Jimmy Durante, of course, | day (Memorial Day) and the He was particularly incensed by one French newspaperman 
exaggerates when he says, | s*quently, des,ite his blind- |$20,000 Black Eyed Susan who wrote that the ok es angry we ee nage ‘ 
“I've got a million of ’em,” | ing speed, he hac to be run (Stakes on Saturday. walk out during ~ _— Ps me nag ye gg a - 
but there’s no doubt about | far more often on class rather | Ladies Day Today French crowds Ii “ “hi ey y= i nr egg ainy 
The American Racing Man- | than condition, and sprints While the Maryland Jockey, W45 one against t e big, Dion vee x2 ustra os ae 
ual (Triangle Publications, | rather than routes, due to the | Club lacks a stakes event today,) The situation nh oor po IS > -- out, -_ os 
Inc.). It contains the answer | lack of proper conditioning. (it will be Ladies Day with tii sisted. a ~~ 4 he a was ask that the referee get a litle 
to a million turf questions, | “And having remembered (fair customers being admitte silence trom the crowa. 
and then some. | that, an analogy presented it- (for a 15-cent state tax. [ 

a | self in regard to Needles. | Delaware Park, expected to ENS Intra or 

“AN IMPROVER of the | This being another horse that (draw well today from the Phil- ’ ARK ENTRIES - ing arces 
Breed” writes to me thusly: | Gue to his refusal to work (adelphia area, opens the 33-day reer Bases veiw purse. $2500 Perry. Candy rg 

“Leaving Pimlico Preak- | willingly, or indeed work at | meeting with a program topped year-olds and up; claiming (18) U ° C o Price ples tax PHONE YOuR 
ness Day with the multitude | all, must be run on class it |by the $12,725 Wilmington 1! ‘Landseal: _(Ne Box) ips - : i 
of other sadder if not wiser | would seem that a much | Handicap supported by the first) ,4 idetream (Net p el 400 per, vor gpa nap Boy se uli egy mig cra CREDIT 
backers of Needles, I was harder task awaits Hugh (event over Delaware's new turf (2? poss H if Ti ] P oie o ‘d's la chal tas dain, bead APPLICATION 
musing idly that I had never | Faintaine and his cohorts. | course. Oat or ulle aie de agp ps cp aelion ted. We NOW! 
seen a. orse that appezred to | For to run a horse with little | The Stanton, Del., track will PARIS. M oe Ro’ P back up with —— sotietection end 
a'slike a race track more... /|.ct no basic preparation a (ioffer the $20,000 Brandywine , ARIS, May 27 (h— “g- a them = 2 an OLiver 6-5200 
and then memory tugged. | mile and a quarter under /Handicap on Wednesday and re Los Angeles and b gerd andy ee See | 
Yes I wad, too. Back in the | stake or handicap couditions |Saturday will feature the $25, of Australia teamed t ~ ve 
years 1944-56 there was a | -.. well, Needles has already 000 Kent, a test for 3-year-olds| ~ apse Se ales Guus 8 
horse by the name of Poly- | proved himself an exception -'which could conceivably draw $ om fBterling’ 63. 6—3 ia sae. deutiinn 


i 6 | 
nesian. now renowned a. the al animal, but to this observ- (Fabius | i (Conton) ; * .’ ‘ i ‘ 2 
sire of Native Dancer and a | ef at least there are only two (Black Eyed Susan RB ag a eae fe | Premium, First-Line and First-Quality Tires 


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phenomenal number of stake | possible outcomes to the | At Pimlico on the CloSing}seconp RACE—i% miles: $3000; The victory due in no little! 
winners per issue, but then a | training of such a horse. weekend card, Calumet’s Be-| 7esr-olés an one) eee ear a ie ] Goo 
considerable race horse in “They can keep on running yond and Princess Turia, who os (enelitt is | a aa e paws gig FIRE T NE ° DYEAR 
his own right. | him, as they have been, but /figured in a recent dead heat)! Di : Meg fond zo ae of Ni > wank | ODRICH FISK 
“Polynesian won some 25 | allowing four or five weeks |at Belmont, are slated to go for Alt veg - wo ©  B er’ GO e 
races, including a goodly | between races for Mother |postward in the Black Eyed and Pc . nee se Re sn 
number of stakes such as the | Nature to repair the tissues | Susan. P Beee, (Ro Ae ie a” tend ae 4 eA Also at great savings at all 4 stores 
Withers and the Preakness | following each tremendous Delaware Park which has 2k, A, a 38 1] ~ ae aD he . 
itself, but he had a profound | effort with no “bottom” to |stuck to its “traditional dates”|{] Go West «No peonte + .% at. aan yh y) All Prices Include Recappable Exchange 
distaste for race tracks and | Sustain him. And they can (despite conflictions has more er eg a Alameda, Calif., 
could not be trained in any hope that the day when carti- |north and south competition jasil) ee ae , 
sort of normal fashion. Con- | lage and bone give way under /than ever before—six days with | 35 Hi7o"*RS siBerido Hoad, who won the singles | me? 
Slag the pounding leaves them |Pimlico; two with Garden| THIRD RACE—5 furlongs: litle yesterday, was ‘ff his game | At All 4 Stores: 
something for the breeding | State; 20 with Monmouth Park:| .7**7-°* maiden Biles «9 today. He 1 st his service four Amazing Values! 
forme ail 33 against the Maryland Money Maker oe times and not once did the Aus- 
- don't envy them the (trotters and four with Charles 'B ae are ee ' GOLD 
problem.” Town July 1 thru 4. \,! 
“onsequence | . ye . /f q 
BETWEEN RACES—When SUFFOLK ENTRIES Moria. Cline fhe Bor 116 Wilson, Anacostia | SEAL 
a paw’ Assorted Panels aliey 114 tinsommia pa FOURTH RACE—1,, miles: $3500; 4- GC If PI f Guaranteed 6 F ’ 5 
- s ir " ts ‘ ‘ iming ( . 
rial ond ‘eblored ae tae ~ + us On ene r. Gee Gee {Vin Sesstcheatehe sx Rta anton’ ‘ S 
° . 1} 4 rad f 7 
had some lines about “It’s ea oa 104 “Karamu ee an auc | f } } Til 
time something nice hap- | 2—6: $2200; 3-yr- claiming r ett ner ug t Lule , 
pened to Mrs. M. E. Lunn i : 
(former “Liz” Whitney) in | *Dream You an i Miss Haze) : Bl (Sterling) Wilson and Anacostia meet : rl 
wang . Cuantette tNada Nada 9 War Bi (Snellings) today at East Potomac Park in “¢.50x16 pPABLE EX 
racing. That’s just what /Diabelic Test aR (Sterling). . suk ‘@ «RECAP 
came to pass last Saturday |{Pai™ Zana Mel Beau. 09/11 no (No Boy! pa ap match so the senes “sHoP RECONDIT! 
when her Porterhouse nosed | Sus ny Gerry . 109 Miss sel 11k it Past (@huk) ; 111 29-1 /}S08 champlossnip. 
out Swaps... . Tough b 5, $3000; said.; clmn ital (Co ; - The winner of the match will , 
we pte. a eRe setahen she. gone Secor 1S “La Beet 108 a 20-1|play St. John’s, private school 
: : : j ‘ marist ; . 
tory for Mrs. Lunn who keeps | vil Piste *.’.. rt GF | entr mayest pag an * Ss ee 100-LEVEL, FIRST LINE Grade A Fisk AIRBORNE 
: . : : | Ben ¢ I FIFTH RACE—6 furlones uree, $4000. f e 
if right on bidding high at sales |gouire's Lady 112 Asan - «118| 3-year-olds silowance, “The Flicka” Metropolitan schoolboy team Tires Including First Line, New, Heavy-Duty Buty! Tubes 
ango 


3 Even "viet " 
} cElliotts Masic. : 


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and breeding expensive stock h , a BR 
‘ . | 15 Ort ] is) ] 5- 
16 despite setbacks that would Uy +: ing Deep Bi cath ‘Balsaretti) is 4- ee ee 
inar po *Sam 09 Rico M a): y Modest (BI ;419 (4-8) ‘le. 
se 1 gga yy A, ob \gheer’ Worth 1i4| 4 Star Bpangle (Moreno) -i| On Thursday, Bethesda, Bi- 


Bood let 
0 *eBuford's ‘Gal. 
4 
eLawrance-Hetsel entry. woman out of the game... | Spoo ; iy. 3 first Question (No Boy) b 
15- County champion, plays Wash-| ) 
49-1 ington-Lee, Northern Virginia! List $30.10 
20- 
20 


et bt Ot ee ne et 
©» 


bkrams entry + Sh 
cNash- Menaker- My oy entry. To B. F, Jo—You are right. | Resoice : = eg e Kick (Sterling) 
4—%: 34 ; lst division; allowanc : . . we 72 ~ 
hi cinatton i. tee Miss Grillo won by 100 | Greek Bind 1m e 
Bester ved gen, --116) lengths in the Bowie Handi- |«my sShoem aker | 
Tattiebogie ss .. cap, a 24-mile event at. Pim- vem ey "weet 6 Spal ~~ ggg REE 
*Dyoamic . + lico. Jockey Conn McCreary | Ladin , 
j-year- “olds ; maidens; hur-| crossed the finish line stand- ply 


dies; special weig ) : - : ° op: 
*aNight Mission is crucial .......142| ing in the stirrups and waving be. ae ae eee 5 Le Page 2 Wests rope) 
Ling 


cile Susan } } fight..1i ss Delaware (Ne Boy} 
litlists, at Westbriar to deter-' 6.70x15 


mine the other finalist. 
BLACKWALL WHITEWALL 


AP Selections tS — = A “a TIT EW 
BALMO | TIRE SIZE — ) List ~~ set | an a” 
~ 46.88 


4 
Prairie Siete. habern' Tiser, Then- e 6.70x15 Be $35. wet 00 — 

et ie 39.60 | 17.88 
tee Bea fey). yew oar 19.88 
are 72 ew [ae 
a SS <4 
Be er Dae 
RE 


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et Ot ee et eet et ee ODL 


: ackie Van . 
3 ebfareo --180/ his cap ... Molly Mutuel |" 6—«: s2200:"3- ) 
Si Reach is 143 | says, “This is a week of deci- tA gee 7 {Pecresal .. 0 te's P ny “(Zakoor) 
promes, De sion for. horse players with |Moct J mite 
Mac ttit jen-Prankel, , Pimlico. Del P , . | a Rose Capital 
pochue ne eel — a c eiaware Fark. ar- | *Gre ; soy) s . Late Retern. Bruce. Silver Rebby. . » fi 60 15 
iPhipps entry den State and Rosecroft sages’ Ereee: 4-77-ahde wp: claiming Sea Acmital (Disher) 112 15- - Betsy Tz.8un David, Enslish Lad. x 
, ’ | | Pilot .. m aL. Creswell Sr.-H. W. Shaffer entry .. SUPERS . Civet. : 
& mast ” oe 123 *h. ay ag on operating. What'll I do, | The : jr. fl SEVE! uk . uriongs. $10 000 Homeplace, Invalidate, Slash. e 8B. 00x15 
Eet | : tel divide myself by four?” Se “ oe See o sae | adée ones. id uP, i. _ Famande, Don't Move. Verhees | ° 8. 20x15 cE ee 
pastece cous oa AM, , | Bag! ou bg *Dark Strancer War Ace ‘Culmo . Cotten Tes. Jumbe Lies. Galfer. | 
70: 2400; 4-¥r-ol u 
rge<} aes i atell . ....... _ . t a | up; allo : moe . é. i0x15 on 
bd ed Hannigan "ae ; . : 105 Thee And Me + 6 16” _ 
ue Pencil - 113 Cant 7 ' Roya! Di - ~on (Boulmetis) 00x 
‘Dancing Mariie 108 aSuav N 
f » 


r 
. President Ryen. Al Laubban. Kis- , es 
ena. @ 7.10x15 
3. Billiards. Dr. Jesh. Cotenel Zere 


al 


wee RNDt a ae Sy LJ BWW &@ @w wow 
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34.10 | 16.88 
se ieee " o295 | Vor 


‘Guaranteed 2 Years. Mounted Free! 


OF ee ee et Oe nee 
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4-9r-olds 19 Pavor “Me- Me Semenes 
Might Be?) 7 ; bh ttmene » 
ePresh Meadow 113 3 Opt rinier bad CONSENSUS 13 . iy Yenlane 
and drew + t *Mamiska bbe. (Copyright Trian Publications, Inc.) tt }| EIGHTH RACE-1,. miles: purse. $4 
a Bieber entry LF 7 ont Bd + + te * Hor : oo S38 Sree 3- yee ar- olds allowance, “The Miss 
pa neer anke , ; j : ’Kingfor l t ] 

*S ibs... *7 ibs. allowance claimed. Marvin 2. gm a fe ) on ! $1 | , cate tt CE Day 

anne ver ° Sweet . Ss. *7 Ibs. allowance claimed 3 aAnth Ww iNo Boy) 115 
BALMORAL ENTRIES Weney G., ee vee 4 q 

1—6: $2500; 3-yr-olds up: cleiming 3. Fondly 25, Boodictie & Wise Miss —— Guaranteed 20,000 Miles 


ucho Frio \4 
_ HE] _ & Bemsets, ots, “bolster “he P d re ” Pi Ie y Pi ali | 2E & BETHESDA 
foe, 103 sDapper me vs, Tiser 25, Mr. Mawiey 8 aaaoc LCKS Fn ied LINLLLCO TIRE & TUBE Sait ten cae sad sent meets ae 
; es ed Hannigan 15. Full Steam 18 . ate 
Seaoneeliog > my BB c00x16 woken dived oc Rolined HM SSS aaa ay 


is 
}-ye-olds;_ claiming. | 9% OPTIMUM 28. Nemiska 9, Nishi POST TIME 2 P. M ; FOURTH RACE—Purse, $2500: filles and mares: ¢-rear-olds 6.70x15 $10.88 Wheel Alignment 
tle Boo laim! dup 6 110 sate 78 


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FIRsT RACE—P ise. $25 4-year-olds and tive and one-half furlongs $11.88 
| 109 = &-1 10x15 : 
2 4 $12.88 Special 


A DELAWARE PAR Man Ree 
LANDSEAI Libby's Pirst 11. Manner w Given the edge | 60x15 
: e 7.6 - on Electronic Visualiner 6. ey 


04 Corpy esegee é da P 

109 Fanciful Lady vy A “1. 2 aie at 

12 *Ocea ° : ein ’ ey . vuase . vomeate- These a4 first ‘fine “Grade A Includes potting BLA 

14 aPr’ sid" nt Ryan. 3. Money Maker 20. Flighty Jane 10. i ely cold rubber coca - Soo in Tire awl TUBELESS 
or improvement are - List Price 'Saje Price 


Heeosier Honey 5. nee “locker . _ lily 
aJohnson.- Heineman 4. | Geesee 10, Slige Rock 8 Cob- “: es Done lways Argue ¥ Not here ited spantity 
$3500: ne ory "Tebdens. ‘ s . Car ~ n Bo es speed yair so ence Beau-Jan «Grimm Nothing last time ) miles. ht ABLE EXCHANGE ; 4. 70x15 | 29. 50° 116.78 
we Delight i! c. . Stor Spansle 1%. Deep Breath 11. splay'’s La : Show more Ams. - : 
ase las 9] st 

olonel Zero Commodore M 24, Blue Prince 15. a ° -- -othing last Ome 

tienable ty Peak 3 d : i 4) 

War Ace 72, Duc De Fer it, Ma- j 0 a Ag 

i Closer if starts 


’. iN y) 
oo gp nerebes Bn 7t. Reval Predect 14 Rulanka (No Boy) Not here 
» Paver-Me- SECOND RACE—Purse, $2800; 3- year-old maidens; claiming: 


$2 
fiv and e-half urlongs (16 
AT SUFFOL 
Boweuet Billy LE BO Boy ~ &. Pe. : ere smart eam :pinell!) Beat this see 


i d bo ‘ 
nell’s Al ydrocarbon 
Fire 15. Little Cynthia 15. ottie Pie (Grimm). 
Diabolic Test & 


on - sme Diva 12% Bended Knee 19. oye n 

n : 

‘iy up, claiming: Rink. Cbawra 27, Wise Quest 6./"} Bell’ Rock. (No Boy)... May ‘need this 
5. Nero's Mermaid 16. Geymente 12, Caanes | us reasy 


mele ia, : Nadin 


Bred 119 &- By Herself 15. Mock Jr. 14, Gres 5. | 
* Mile e; on gr : > ommp, me . Moses Pilet 1%. Fran Jr. 13, Clear 
Phage wee ht , 
pe he. ane gel I’ Breath oa a. Thee And Me 2, Cant O'Mar 5. iss Pefieton (Vasil)... Best effort eeneed 14 
1 
15 Could Star . 


] 
oa 4 t 
Belidiver 3. Nipper (Clark) Chance if foes 9 09 
tattle Bs Ge 11 Kime For All 9. - | § PRee, Tilew, imate ; ah 2 right there 
! 
aK is: allowances. adh ‘tame Longshot Daily Double ; cae e hheeosh 
_ ** : ° 4 
_— _ ese o me —~ Patrol 15, jeaee Dan 16, En STACKAWAY and ROYAL BRM ‘ Fie : ee 
nvalidate .... ! - ppert rince ser (Asean) en racing poorly 
! &, 
Buddy inde 14, Fighting Force * pretera in here G mi) . 


or Sempr addy «Oo well 
+ ONELY ——- 73, Bene Reauest) an M ie ni off poorly last time 
. ’ ’ 
m 24, Fresty Whirl 1%. 


300 
—— 
Cal 


ore 
~J*5 ~~) 


HMOBUITLIWC 
°S 
6seeee ee 


FIFTH HBC nye $3000: 4-year-olds and up Nudion, Fass | 32.35 | 17.78" 
Needs only ride | Rta oe ~— 15 | 35.45 119.78 
Cue 1 best | Tire Special! are $1.95 d Chesrole bit. _8.00x15 | 39.45 | 22. be “ 
MOELUXE FISK 2 A 8.20x15 | 40.90 | 23. 73” 
TIRE AND TUB BRAKE SPECIAL, WHITEWALL TUBELESS 
Tite Size \List Price iSaie Price 
470215 | 36.15 | 20.78 
v ‘10x15 | 39.65 | 29.787 
ark) outsider “s pod : 43. 45 | | 25. 78 
‘ 1a Good race recently a1 a tC ui just i brakes. Men. 48. 35/28. 78 
5 P ‘ uk) - .. =o: ? 
enoce (Sbuk Chance if ready _ &. = eat . ao “8. 20x15 | 50. 10| 29.78" 


; aveNee, RACE Purse og 32800: 3-year-olds: claiming: ave . 
ey = - EP 
| 2 ngs s (turf) 9) 40x ae you welt, os low os FREE at all 4 Stores 


ONS BROS VI SS @Oevu-) 
; ; ; ; > : ’ : ; ; ; : _ ’ 7] 


to ~J -) ~J05 Bote te -) 3 ~~ Oe 


tor bh Bt eee 


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Cond ’ peaedabeins eo et th ee 


ni 
On platow’ 
se, _ poses: ” 4-year- = —_ uP: 
(Bush) Needs only repeat last 
Always right there 
Worked well Ky. 
t: could ‘purerios 


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DW -IW tS I Dtwwh © Pweew sD 
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SSSSR 


! Guaranteed 3 Years or 30,000 Miles 
120 on Premium NYLON eee _” [WHITEWALL 


List 


Airb e uxe . S a a | Price 
orne De L 


FISK TUBELESS 7.10x15 { 38.80 | 19.88/46. 70 | 22.88 


lockers recommend 
Hepert 18, Admiral Geerse 16, 7 0x15 | vy) 55 1 21 88 5]. 10 | 25. 5 
con 1, Wanatretie i3, Iridium 9. Fudee 10 Special Duty (Ne Boy) ardly and TUBE 
sJaibopate ahi 103 rie Aa Ls Mix Carel 17. Aliba 9, Fourofus 5. sa Aimoy Stable and are M Bizaser entry . Best Bet—LEN.A- CHANCE (8th race) - TIRE 8. 00x15 | 47. 40 : 23. 88 26. 80 27. 88 
iis List $35.35 18 Oo MPO rane: “Unless the tire ed “AIRBORNE 


{Welsen) rocommend 
(Gre Been racing poorly 


— 
R s2203333 


—e 
~~ 


7 


a Wilson entre 
$3000: turt course: 4-yr.-olds 


BaF 


In trouble jast time 


] 

; 

| 

claiming. ishting Force (Cook).. Go well } 
N my i 

| 

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i 


mule 


usso) . 
Glade Valley (Martin) 


2 
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4 
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WUD OODWM--Ie 
WDD ODOOLlO 


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will 1 
aBenedetto and Guaeme entry. 6.70x15 " it's met a 1956 NYLON 


ah Racing Selections at Pimlico Track 
One of the World's 


RAILBIED OLD BONES CLOCKERS BENNINGS ar CONSENSUS ' j r. g Largest Tire Dealers 


ong ——— ed 


Right .. ; 
AP Demsotiane 


at ELAWA ‘ 
ia Landseair, grow! ance. Mid- 


i ioe Reteee- Piste frteoe. 


Cobber, F Gece. Star 
TE Spey 
Horses to Watch 


PADDOCK _o ‘os 7 
Bevthyon a ne Be Fesel | BasksPrtre Ne Hale BR se Shah 
Rei | BR BSE |e | BE ee | : ion 

Be onges ae ! Ee on ; on SP ppers Fee Fee : Bas Bicomin Owl New 20m: none M St. S.E. 3300 rage ae Hwy. 


Clotted Cream ely Maid Delibertuity BI Lonely Maid . 
Pane ease Hane. i Yia Lonlely Maid ian et ream Hidden Power Orpocite Re Rone Fars On Rte. 1 fire minutes from Pentagon 
tted Cream en Power | Maséc Toes rry ddie K. tted Cream Opes | :. pte. 6PM. Opes Dolly, 6 AM. fot? M. 
= - 5 a “— - . 


ty Whirl opside 
Fay ; rigimie ea rump --A, ~4 NORTHEAST 


Oe ee eee 


y Mae 


cee | eats Biabt¥°tecse | Ritts oneres | Berka een “ag 2315 Bladensburg Rd. NE. 
ea Eke | Beak : | Ee || fe Me ee 
cet are | ae 


$ 


out. 
CAPT. KIM—Wants route fer 
best effort. 


rion 


ie 


¢ 


’ 


. 


ta WASHINGTON POST 


and TIMES HERALD 
Monday, May 28, 1956 


pl #1 ese 


French Champs Lose 
NICE, France, May 27.—Bris- 


tol City, English second division 
today defeated 
Nice, the French champions, 3-1, 


Soccer club, 


after leading, 1-0, at halftime. 


ATTENTION 
GOLFERS 


YOU MUST 
HAVE THESE 
GRIPS ON 
YOUR CLUBS 
TO PLAY 
YOUR BEST 


SE Ae wee eae, 
AA 


”~ 


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Play Todayin 
British Golf 


| TROON, Scotland, May 27 #® 
Twenty-six Americans are 
among the golfers from 14 
countries who will set out Mon- 
day in the most grueling 


‘British Amateur championship 
|shince the tournament was es 
‘tablished in 1885. 


In the field are a half dozen) | 


itop conteriders for the title! 
iwhich Joe Conrad of San An-| 
i'tonio, Tex., won last year while 
ihe was on leave from the U. 5S. 
‘Air Force. 

| For the first time this year 
the quarter-finals and semi- 
‘finals will be played at 36 holes 
instead of 18. The finalists may 
‘be called on to play 198 holes 
‘of golf in six days if their 
matches go the full distance. 

| Doug Sanders of Miami 
Beach, Fla., is one of Americas's 
top contenders. He won the 
Amateur All-American and' 
i'world titles at Chicago's Tam| 
last summer!) 
) and the Florida State amateur 
| this spring in 72-hole medal 
‘competitions. This month he} 
‘Was runner-up in the tough| 
_southern amateur in the United 
| States. 

Other favored Americans in- 
teclude Conrad, Billy (Dynamite) 
| Goodloe of Valdosta, Ga.: 
‘Ernest (Pete) Arend of Deal, 
N. J., aging but still dangerous | 
Bob Sweeny of New York and| 
Palm Beach, Fla., who won the) 
title back in 1937, 


| Conrad has played impres- 
isively during a week of prac-| 
‘tice over the 6583-yard, par} 
(35, 36—71 championship) 
course. He's givén a good) 
chance of being the fourth 
player in history and the first 
since America’s Lawson Little 
to win the title two years in| 
succession. 

Conrad gets a first round bye. | 
Late Monday he plays I. A. 
Ewen of New Zealand in the 
second round. 

The last time the amateur 
was played at Troon was 1938, 
when Charley Yates of Atlanta, 
won, 


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Area Golf Roundup 


and Frank} © 
|\Strafaci of New York. / 


| still holds the 


By Maury Fitzgerald 


Philadelphia Wins 
Mason-Dixon Trophy 


Ford Finish 


PHILADELPHIA WON its fourth cup in five Mason-Dixon 
team competitions yesterday at Congressional Country Club. 


defeating the Middle Atlantic Golf Association team, 


Rms cha ar Gay tied at 


the four-ball 
/ took eight of the 12 singles matches | 


11-7. 
3-all, after Saturday's split in 
matches, Philadelphia | 


; to win its third consectutive match. 


The 


avalanche 


where 


Brownell, 


Quaker City team started its 
in the first two matches 
Ralph Bogart and Bobby 

the Middle Atlantic teams 


strongest hopefuls, were beaten. 
Bogart fired a two-under par 34 
on the front nine to take a two-up | 
| lead on Howard Everitt in the No. 1 


match, 


but the lanky Maryland State | 


amateur champion fell apart at the 


seams on the back nine, and lost the | 
match, 
Brownell 
sto 
national amateur champion runnerup, 


turn 


Fitzgerald 


2 and 1. 
was three<iown at 


William Hyndman, 1955 | 


but the District of Columbia amateur 


titlist fought back and was only l-down going to the 13th. | 
However Hyndman tightened up his game and squelched Bin 


the Brownell rally, 2 and 1. 


Wynsol Spencer, Virginia state amateur champion, fur- | Bed 


nished the Middle Atlantic with its first singles victory in 


the third match, defeating George Rowbotham, Delaware | 


amateur champion,  1-up. 


Philadelphia areas finest 
putter, had a three-footer on | 
| the 18th green to halve the 


match but missed. 

Former national amateur 
champion Jack Westland, 
Republican representative 
from the State of Washing- 
ton, Claude Wild and Wayne 
Jackson were the only other 


Middle Atlantic players to | 


son, 2-up. Jackson polished 
off Robert Donat, 4 and 2: 
and Wild defeated Robert 
Stewart, 3 and 1. 
Heward Everitt. Philadel 
feated Ralph Bogart. MAGA, 
too aroqmes 34, iladelph 
cated whell, MA‘ 
Wrnsol _— Se MAGA. def 
m 


Stes hens. 

Wiles MAGA 

/\MAGA, defeated W. J. Robi 
delphia. ps -ap: Bebby M 

— def 


defeated 
3 and I: 
bert 


PA Wild. MAGA, 
Phi 


ae 


Me M 
Philadeiohta. 4 and *: Jehn Hendrick- 
Philadelphia. defeated atest” Bai- 
ee AG d Bates, Phils- 
del iphia. 
1-ap: Ja 
eated 


Cel. 


Rennie Kelly. MA 
COLUMBIA—W. B. West 


captured the Winslow Cup | 


.with a 72-hole gross score of 
318, finishing the final round 


in the rain with an 82. Don | 
Jones finished second with | 
319. He, too, had a final round | 


of 82. 
John C. Harding took third 
with 320. Defending cham- 


in. | 
Westland birdied the 18th | 
green to defeat W. J. Robin- | 


rt 
ayne 
AGA, defeated Re Denat. 


ne. MAG 
Tem Conber. Philadetphis. _ defeated 


Rowbotham, reputedly the 


| advanced at the expense of 
William Levy, by default, 
Wednesday for the title. 

Dave Applestein defeated 
Mickey Gordon, 2 and 1, and 
Bud Sickman eliminated 
Jerry Cooper, 1 up, in the 
semifinals of the third flight. 
Only one match was played 
| in the second. In that Henk 
Littman ousted Dr. Henry | 
Hoff, 1 up. 


KENWOOD—In a “hit the | 
green” contest held on the 
third hole for the benefit of 
the club’s junior program, 
only 34 of 204 players were 


;| able to collect golf ball prizes. 
s¢| Each player paid an entry fee 
| of 50c. and received a golf 


ball if his shot stayed on the 


el- 
salad Geencer Overton MAGA,| Steen. 


WASHINGTON — Court 
House County Club's golf | 


team defeated Washington in | 


an inter-club match, 20%-9%. 

In a Criers tournament in 
which each competitor was 
allowed to remove three 
bogeys and replace 
with pars, H. H. Hair won the 
gross in class A with 73 and 
| Clark Daniel the net with 
70—5—65. 

Dr. J. L. Humphries had 78 
for gross and Jack Benson, 
| 73—11—62, for net in class 
| B. In class C the winners 
| were: Tom Knight, 86: an 
| Stanley Burroughs, 83—20— 


pion Ray Swearingen finished | 83 


well down the list with 326. 


CHEVY CHASE—Adm. 0. 
B. Hardison and Adm. George 
A. Holdness defeated S. Park- 
er Oliphant and Peter Stur- 
tevant, 1 up,.in the final of 


the two-man team event for | 


the Treasurer's Cup. 

The 68 reported earlier in 
the week by Ralph Bogart 
lead in the 
club championship qualifying 
trials which have until May 
31 to be completed. Bobby 
Brownell is second with a 70 
and W. J. Flather III 71 for 
third. 


ARGYLE — Medalists Tom 
Shenk and Frank Clark had 
to go 21 holes before defeat- 
ing Jack Connell and Dick 
Bartlett Jr.. 1 up, in a two- 
man team championship 
quarter-final match being 
played from scratch. In the 
other matches: Earl McAleer 
and Bill Gartner def. Arnold 


| Prada and Arthur Alberding, 


1 up; Bill August and Bob 
Martino def. H. B. Miller and 
Lou Wimsatt, 2 and 1; Curt 
Turner and Allan Sherier def. 
Lynn Johnson and Dick 


Mothershead, 4 and 3. In a | 


B team match, Argyle defeat- 
ed Court House, 224. 


NORBEC K—Charles A. 
Greenberg, the sentimental 
favorite in the fourth flight 
of the club's miniature club 
championship, survived a 
semifinal battle with Dr. Kiva 
Manchester, 3 and 2. Green- 
berg plays Al Mandleson, who 


ROCK CREEK—Mr. and 
| Mrs. George Carpenter won 
| gross honors in a 9-hole 
mixed Scotch foursome with 
36. Net went to Ruth Sond- 
heimer and Russ Matthews, 
40—12—28. 
| Other winners were: Judie 

Evans and Dave Sluder, 38— 
| 8—30; Minerva Bartlett and 
Al Tueker, 41—11—30; Roma 
Falcone and Matt Jett, 42— 
12—30. 


BELLE HAVEN—Capt. M. 
F. Leslie, USN, won the 36- 
hole qualifying trials in the 
annual Randall Caton Trophy 
event with 150—20—132. 

In an inter-club team 
match, Bel.e Haven beat 
Quantico, 25-5. 

William Schumm piled up 
a total of 23 points to te the 
victor in a Point tournament. 
F. M. Rhodes was second 
with 22 and Joel Daniels third 
with 21. 


BETHESDA — Bill Dudley, 
runner-up to Deane Beman 
in the 1955 Schoolboy Invita- 
tion, three-putted the 18th 
green for a 71 to win low 
medal honors in the qualify- 
ing trials for the miniature 
club championship. Other 
leaders in the tests were: Del 
Beman, 76; Tom Manning, 
77; Frank Krawczel, 80; Doug 
Jackson, 80 


CONGRESSIONAL — E. T. 
(Green shoes) Greenstreet 
won a 12 selective holes event 
with 48—14—34. Second went 
' to Dr. B. F. Dean, 50—13—37. 


the 


them | 


Higa 


Grandstant 


YY) 


PARK 


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Clits § eaas TTT 


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(Daylight Seving Time) 


Every rece dey 


iv. Weshingten 10.00 AM 411.10 AM 
Ar. Delewere Perk 11.50 AM 4 1.00PM 
Returning, Lv. Delewere Port 


efter lest rece. 


Phone STorting 3-8100 


BALTIMORE a OHIO 


q 


Fi nsterwald, 


Stroke Back | 


DALLAS, May 27 (@—Don| 
‘January shot a dramatic eagle | 
on the 18th green to win the’! 
30,000 Dallas Centennial Golf| 
‘Open with 268 for 72-holes. 

The young Abilene, Tex., 
player, merking his first tour, 
istaged an uphill drive on the 
‘final round to score a 3-under- | 
ipar 67 and win the _ purse | 


— 


The Money-Winners: : 


3300) 


SIUSSUSSSS [A SUKSSSSAZ 


‘Mike. ‘Souchak 


money i a 2 echo over Dow 
'Finsterwald of Bedford Heights, 
‘Ohio, and Doug Ford of Maho- 
ipac, N. Y. 

Finsterwald closed out with 
\a one-under-par 69. Ford shot 
\a three-under-par 67. 

The three had started the 
day's final round with Finster- 
\wald leading wiih 200, January 
lsecon1 with 201 and Ford third 
‘with 202. January, in a thrilling 
Stretch run, banged three eagles 
‘over the 6216-yard Preston Hol-| 
‘low Country Club coutse and 
finally overtook Finsterwald in| 
it's last three holes. 

January's eagle on the 18th! 
hole was sensational. He had’ 
driven into a trap to the right 
lof the green but he chipped 
into the hole from 15 feet. That 
‘spelled the doom of Finster- 
\wald and Ford. With January 
leading by a stroke it was up to 
|Finsterwald and Ford to get 
birdies on 18 if they were to 
‘lie him for first place. 

Ford was 35 feet away. He 
‘went for the birdie and barely, 
‘missed. Finsterwald was 15) 
feet away but his ball rolled | 
ipast by inches. 

January remarked that “all I 
‘had today was eagles and 
/bogies.” And he had his share 
of troubles although he made | 
Up for it aptly with his three’ 
‘eagles. He eagled the first’ 
hole with a 25-foot putt. He! 
| banged his eagle on 11 when he 
\drove the green and was only 
four feet away. 
| It was the first tournament 
that January, former collegiate 
star at North Texas State Col- 
‘lege, had won. He rounded out 
his first year as a professional 
| only last week. On the tour 
this 
$3.41 


year he had earned 
83. 

It was a day of sensational | 
golf, featured by a course rec- 

ord 63 shot by Bob Inman of 
Detroit, Mich. Inman, who had | 
214 going in today’s final round, 
‘ended up with 277 and a tie 
for 12th place. He bettered 
the record of 64 set by January 
in the opening round. 


Marlboro Rained Out 
UPPER MARLBORO, Md., 


May 27—Rain today postponed 
'the stock car racing program at 
|\Marlboro Motor Raceway. 

The entire card, including a 
50-lap feature, will be run Fri-| 
day night, June 1, launching the) 
first night auto race of the sea- 
son here. 


Fights on TV 


TONIGHT —At New York 
(St. Nicholas Arena), Joey 
Giardello, Philadelphia, vs. 
Charlie Cotton, Toledo, middle-| 
weights, 10 rounds. WTTG-TV | 
(Channel 5), 9:30 p. m. 


WEDNESDAY—At New Or- 
leans, Willie Pastrano, New Or- 
leans. vs Chuck Spieser, Lans- 
ing, Mich., heavyweights, 10) 
rounds. WMAL-TV (Channel | 
iD 10 p. Mm. 


| FRIDAY — At New York 
(Ciadison Square Garden), 
Frankie Ryff, New York, vs. 
Larry Boardman, Marlboro, 
Conn., lightweights, 10 rounds. 
WRC-TV (Channel 4), 10 p. m. 


ENGINEERS: 


LOCKHEED 
CALIFORNIA 
INTERVIEWERS 


WASHINGTON 
May 31, June 1 and 2 


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these days) 


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Don J anuary | Eagles Final Hole, Wins Dallas Open Golf With 268 


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Miller Memorial at Rosecroft 


$21,340 Pace Draws 12 
Two-Year-Olds Tonight 


By Jack Walsh 
Stat! Reporter 


Rosecroft Raceway opens its fourth and final week tonight’, .% 


with the finale of the William E. Miller Memorial pace, richest | 
race ever staged for 2-year-olds at a night harness track. 

Total value of the stake nears $32,000. Three qualifying heats | 
were held at $3553 each so the value of tonight's race is $21,340. 

In the qualifying races, the first four horses in each of the) 
events earned the right to bid*-—"—"—" 1 
for tonight’s big share. 

The best time was made by|Miller’s charges are Great 
Jimmy Jordan's Rising Tide,| Adios and Meadow Rhythm. 
2:06 3/5. Completely Overt)  yriner won one of the three 
looked in the “ee Rising | lif ith Great Adi ' 
Tide paid $93.80 |quaiiners WwW rea ios in 

But the three-horse entry of 2:09 2/5, paying $4.80. The other| 
Billy Haughton and Del Miller’s winner was Bill Fleming's Cap-| 
two-horse entry can’t be ig-| tain Patrick in 2:07 1/5 at $6.20. 
nored. These two drivers, han-| Adios Harry tries for the one | 
dling some of the best young’world’s record eluding him—' 


pacers in the country, staked/ best time on a half-mile track— | 


the most horses. ‘in Wednesday night's $10,000 

Haughton will send a trio to Triple Crown. The last big stake 
the post—Adios Pick, Masland!will be Friday night's $10,000) 
Hanover and Fleet Commodore.|Symbol Gantle trot. 


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Watch Walsh’s Winners at Rosecroft | 


9, Peres, GOSS. Clncs 36. 


THE WASHINGTON POST and 1 IMES HERALD 
_ Monday, May “ 1956 


¢ 


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—_—_——— 


LOS ANGELES, May 28 # 
All right, what does it cost 


a college football player to | 


get through school in these 
times? 

The recent Pacific Coast 
Conference three-year slap- 


| down of UCLA for boosting 


its monthly grant to players 


| from $75 to $115 makes the 
| answer important and timely. 


The answer, in Tom Thax- 
ter’s case, is $171.35 a month. 

Thaxter, 21-year-old UCLA 
guard with one more year of 
eligibility, if the PCC doesn’t 
take it away from him, out- 
lined his expenses in an in- 
terview with Bob Oates, Los 
Angeles Examirer sports- 
writer. 

Thaxter said his present 


| cost of living includes only 
| one frill—a_ car, which last 


month cost him $23.69 to op- 
That would make his 


THIS fall, under a new Con- 
ference rule, Coast football 
players will draw $100 a 
month. At present, the figure 
is $75, plus $40 under the 


| table at UCLA. 


Thaxter, a Fresno (Calif.) 
athlete, said he doesn’t see 
how he can stay in school 
without the aid. “Without an 
income from football, I'll have 
to leave UCLA this fall and 
finish pre-med at 
State, where I can live at 
home,” says Thaxter, an “A” 
student. ' 


HERE'S Thaxter’s ¢areful 
breakdown of his monthly | 
budget: 

Board and room, $78.72; 


weekend meals (his frat house | 


kitchen closes on Saturdays 


and Sundays), $24.85; laundro- | 


mat, $2.80: laundry, $6.20; 
cleaning, $1.40; toothpaste, 
49: haireut, $150; books, 
$3.06; tuition, $10; clothing, 
$15.24; gasoline, $6.14; car re- 
pairs, $4.05; car 
$13.50; movies 
40. 


The movies (two) and malts 


ck (Haugh hton) One . 
vine’ si ses Sood 
Pulled 3 upset. 
, owe tery 
rely mausiified 
eh company 


: 
o4 
rte 
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rele 
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ina toon > oan OF ms ae re 
ST BET _DAGS! 
Trot Selections Interhigh 
1—Amit eae eaten Masen 
AMY y a 
Pine marten iene & ayoltsOpen 
DAGSWORTHY 
¢-baltevent, Abe Hanover, Pauline Wood Wil 
ee, . row ilson plays East 
—-Senset Bay, Resl Day, Tep Rese- Division runnerup Anacostia 
| Paget. . 
S—Erie’s Bennie, Sasan York, Vole noon as the Interhigh School. 
boy baseball playoffs get un- 
oe rertite Fanny Adtes. Pater York. | 
one. Merry 3 4 The winner will advance to 
anior Frank, Sister Mack, Gray the final Thursday, playing the 
Hanever. 
© es Seet, Senset Ray, Mighty | velt game W ed nesday. All 
vip volves, Eries Beunle, Susan York. Craig Anderson will pitch 
ta Amlty EEN SUS me te. syn-| £08 Anacostia, which had a 5-1 
Peet, “We*-\ losing only to champion East- 
ray Sky, Junter | 
Division season with a 60 
5—Gellavent, Caprice Hanover. Abe! -ecord. 
Rising Tide, Great Adies, Adios for Wilson, also was unbeaten 


> —_—_—e 
| Spencer. 
cial, as Pence 
\—GOra ky, Frocer Prince, Hattie West Division champion 
TF — Rising Tide, Great Adies., Captain at Griffith Stadium this after- 
| Etkingten. 
CLOCKER 
| t—Mabel Bt Le, Uncle William, Tan- ashe 
derway. Game time is 3 p. m. 
5 = DAGSWORTRY LADY, Bally 
i—Caprice Hanever. Recket Girt, Abe winner of the Eastern-Roose- 
Jet. 
SENSUS 
‘|record in East Division play, 
Frank, Sister|@™. Eastern finished the East 
et » Mingo Seot, Mighty; Jim Eichberg who will pitch 
S—Eries Bonnie, Volynn, Secan York. '" SIX games. 


Call RE. 17-1234, ask for Circulation, and order The Wash- 
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ee 


You don’t need a lot of money to buy Imperial 


—but a lot of people with a lot of money do 


why *” 


Fresno | 


| 


| 
| 


insurance, | 
and malts, | 


(four) represented Thaxter’s | 


ful outlay for amusement, 
aside from his car, which he 
also needs for transportation. 

How does Thaxter make up 
the difference between $115 
and $171? He digs ditches 
for the gas company in Fresno 
at $1.74 an hour during the 
Last summer he 
saved $550. 

How does his school week 
break down during football 
season”? 

He’s in classes 23 hours, 


| football practice and meet- 


ings take 19 hours, and his 
campus job—for that $115 
grant —requires 13% hours, 
he says. That's about a 55- 
hour week before studies and 


| Thaxter estimates he puts in 


at least another 20 hours on 
the books each week. 


Beat ‘Directory — 


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house. $10. 
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bn a between 5 and 123 6 


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2. Imperial is better tasting. 
It is made with much expertness by a famous 
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It is one of America’s most popular whiskies. So 
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23 


ul ‘ 


‘THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


Monday, May ™, 1956 


Miss Virginia Wins Jumper Title 


In 45.8 Seconds 


April Dawn 
Scores at 
Hyattsville 


By Tom Trodden Jr. 


old mare, Miss Virginia, scored 
a brilliant victory in slippery 


show at Adelphi, Md. 

The 16hand chestnut, sub- 
stituting for former national 
champion Lariat, got off to an 
early lead in the tough Modi- 
fied Olympia. 

With Nancy DiPaula replac-| 
ing Linky Smith as rider in| 


the Ladies Open Jumpers, Miss | 
Virginia laid claim to a sec-| 
ond ribbon that set the stage | 
for the closing classes and won 
the title for the Baltimore 
entry. 

Lariat, scheduled to make) 
his season debut, was held out) 
and will compete Memorial Day | 
at the Iron Bridge Hunt. | 

The Junior Equitation| 
School's 10-year-old mare, April | 
Dawn, ridden by Sara Willis, | 
made each round a winning one 
and captured the title in the) 
Small Working Hunter en 

Mr. and Mrs. Grover Ste- 
phen’s Ace of Diamonds cap- 
tured the green Working Hunt- 
er honors. Ace of Diamonds 
fell short of scoring a double 
victory when a tie resulted in 
the Green Conformation Hunt- 
er. 

In a hack off, the Ballentrae | 
entry War Bonnet captured the | 
tri-color. Wally Holly's Gin 
Rickey won reserve in the open) 


jumper division. 
GREEN MODEL HUNTERS—1, Ballan-| 
Bennet: 2. Martin Voegeli 

aster Act: 3% Martin Veeel r.’s 
Pb mem ame ay 4. jt — a Grever | 
ens ce of Diame 

OPEN JUMPERS—1. New Heove Farm’ 

t. Bebbie Gardner's Tania: 

‘se Gin Rickey; 4, 

ar Ea 


; 


tree's War 


. Den Simmens’ 
4. Mr. and Mrs. Ray Ner- | 
ten Jr.'s Aetna. 
WORKING HUNTERS UNDER SA 
DLE—1. ,% General 


r. and Mrs ’ ‘ 
rh: 4. Carele Young's 
GREEN WORKIN 

ce eof Diamends: 7 


~— I. Geeree. 

Miss Mas oe 2, Tania; 34. 

4, Gen Ricker. 

OPEN GREEN 48U! 
nnet; 


Wise. 
Rg EE, it gr 
rs. e ytle's a $ 
Tiny: 5. The Berberts’ ; 
me's Girl. 
SMALL OPEN WORKING 
1. April Dawn: 2 Tiny; &, 
m: 4 Aetna ; 
GREEN WORKING BUNTERS OVER 
NOCES—1!. Velwet Teueh: 2 Ace eof | 
monds; 3, Shadew Patch: 4. Country : 


ise. 
LADIES OPEN JUMPERS—1, William | 
MeCracken's ar Party: 2 Mise Vir- | 


- ¢ 
eivet Touch. : 

PEN WORKING HUNTERS—1I,. Sen’ 
me: *%. Edgeweed;: 3, Tiny: 4 One's. 


MALL WORKING HUNTERS OVER) 
‘CE General 


: S—1. April Dawn: f. 
~ 5. Tiny: 4, . 
GREEN OPEN WORKING UNT- | 
——i, Harvey Deve'’s Beaux eager: 
t. Shadew Patch: 3. Ace of Diamonds: 
4. Country ise 
KNOCK -DOWN-AND-OUT—1I. 
; @t Mise Virginia: 3. M 
Our Chance: 
Rebert Gibben's Bewle 


nr. 
BEST HUNTING PERFORMANCE—1,' 
mp: 2. Edgewood: P | 


Moonstene 


fen I 5. One's Glriy 
4. ar. 

G N CONFORMATION go 
OVER FENCES—i. Ace ef ; 
. Velvet Teach: 3. Warneta: 4, ar 


net. 
ERSATILITY OFEN JUMPERS—4I. 
le: ee Womans 3. Bewle Gibbon; 

nia. 
WorkING HUNTER CHAM- 
points. Reserve 


ri Dawn. 15 *: 
Com. 16 Ries 
REE ORKING HUNTER C 
—Ace s. | ts. ° 


CONFORMATION HUNTER) 
ON ecwer Bennet. el petnis. | 
a 


“iiea “whch "Tanta 
wit . 
-off). . - 


re i ie SL 


VALUE 


oU MOnr 


Lane be 1 OL 


———— 


MODESTO, Calif.. May 27 # 
Southern California’s spectacu- 
lar Jim Lea, now an Air Force 
officer, 
| quartermile record last night 
‘with a 45.8 performance which 
‘made him leok awfully good for 
a spot on the Olympic team— 
which barely eluded him four 
George DiPaula’s eight-year- = ago. 

he 
from Edwards Air Force Base, 
out in the 
going yesterday to win the)nost the 440 record of 46 sec- 
Open Jumper title in the 12th onds set by Jamsaica’s Herb Mc- 


annual Hyattsville Lions’ horse Kenley at “erkeley in 1948. 


‘Lea Sets World 440 Mark 


Four AAU timers caught Lea 
at 45.8 and one at 46 during the 


15th running of 
Relays at Mode 


cials said the 
certified for offic 


smashed the world 


lieutenant 
place on 
1600-meter rela 


speedster 
runner who got 


23-year-old 


California desert, 
A. & M., who 


all the way. 


In 1952 the Air Force second 
barely missed 
the U. S. Olympic! 


Lea last night and crowded him 


the California | 
sto. Meet offi-| 
mark will be 
ial sanction. 


’ 


a) 


y team. The 
the spot was 


J. W. Mashburn of Oklahoma) 


ran second to 2025 N. MOORE ST. 


| JA. 8-422] 


othing (doler than a 


FITZ 


MIST 


WITH 


Relax—and enjoy the easy-to-fix 


)-66 


summertime favorite of real Bourbon 
connoisseurs! Here's how: 


Fill old-fashioned glass %{ full of crushed ice. 
Add 2 ox. of Ovn Firzcenato and twist of lemon 
peel. Inhale the cool misty bouquet as you sip! 


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|1437 Irving Street N.W AD 
| CROSSTOWN AUTO SUPPLY 
14th and S$ Streets N.W HO 
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13th end K Streets NW. 

: SYD FOLLIN TEXACO 
Wis. Ave. and Q St. N.W 

1 J. FREEMAN TEXACO 

20th and WN. Y. Ave. N.W. 
MERCHANT'S TIRE CO. 
NW. 


PAUL'S TIRE SHOP 

28th and M Streets N.W. 

L. P. STEUART, INC. 
11440 P St. N. W. DE 
| POTOMAC SALES & SERVICE 
(3279 M St. NW. HO, 


NA 


HO 


ST 


i P St. 


| SOUTHWEST 


BRUCE'S TEXACO 


‘6th and Maryland Ave. S.W. ME 


JOE BELLO TEXACO 
1301 Bladensburg Rd. N_E. Li 


FIRESTONE STORES 
604 Rhode island Ave. N.E. 
| HITE’S SHELL SERVICE 
18th and Monroe Sts. N.E. 


SOUTHEAST 


| NORTHEAST 


AD. 


LA. 


4731 Mariboro Pike S.E. JO. 


1320 Good Hope Rd. S.E. LU. 


VIRGINIA 


ALEXANDRIA, VA. 


KELLEY’S TEXACO 
King St. and Braddock Rd. 


WASHINGTON, D. 


CORAL HILLS FIRESTONE STORE 


OV. 


Cc. 


4-8500 
2-9565 
8-3323 
2-3779 
3-2694 
2-3318 
4-9682 
2-4800 


2-9447 


4.5442 
2-3533 


6-9740 


8-6300 


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4-7500 


39847 


LUCKETT’S, INC. 
1642 King Street 


MENDELSON’S HARDWARE 
1100 King Street 
MITCHELL'S TEXACO 
5232 Wilson Bivd. JA 


HOUSTON & POLAND SERVICE 

2300 Columbia Pike JA 
STANLEY WELCH TEXACO 

6323 Duke St. Fl 


PERRINE BROS. SERVICE CENTER 
1836 W. Braddock Road 


KI 


Kl. 


ARLINGTON, VA. 
AMERICAN SERVICE CENTER 
585 N. Glebe Rd. JA 
ANDERSON & TEW SUNOCO 
5501 Lee Highway JE 
FIRESTONE STORES 
4043 28th St. South (Shirlington) 
FIRESTONE STORES 
1100 N. Highland St. (Clarendon) 
HECHT CO. 
Wilson Bivd. and Glebe Rd. 
BURR HEISHMAN’S 
1503 Lee Highway 
RAY WELCH TEXACO 
5101 Lee Highway 


Kl. 
JA 
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JE 


CENTREVILLE, VA. 
CATON’S ESSO SERVICE 
Browning 8-9698 
FAIRFAX, VA. 


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Feirfax Circle 


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FALLS CHURCH, VA. 
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MERCHANT'S FIRESTONE 
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MARYLAND 


BETHESDA, MD. 


SKY’S SHELL SERVICE 


7545 Wisconsin Ave. OL. 


CLINTON, MD. 
GORDON’S MOTORS 


Route § CY. 


RIVERDALE, MD. 


FANNING TEXACO SERVICE 
6238 Baltimore Bivd. WA 


ROCKVILLE, MD. 


AL'S TEXACO SERVICE 


806 E. Mont. Ave. (Rockville Pike) PO 


SILVER SPRING, MD. 
BOBINGER’S TEXACO 
Georgia Ave. & Wayne Ave 
FIRESTONE STORES 
8521 Georgia Ave 


KING'S TEXACO SERVICE 
East-West Highway & Colesville Rd. JU 


JU. 


JU 


SILVER SPRING TIRE CORP 
8000 Georgie Ave. JU 


TAKOMA PARK, MD. 
QUIMBY’S TEXACO SERVICE 
7224 Carroll Ave. 
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7301 Carroll Ave. 


N 


jue 


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Manassas 25§ 


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Ager Rd. & Hamilton St. 


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WHEATON FIRESTONE STORE 
11307 Georgia Ave. 


WA. 7-961§ 


LO. 5-3323 


: 


SPCR P CE Pee eee: ry 


ates 


3a t.. 


224 a3i%) 


ii Haititaaiiisi, 


» 
of? 


Huth: 


gerale 
Many Bone Fractures 


Suffered Before Birth 


BEDFORD, Ind. May 27 # 
Physicians said here a baby 


boy born last week had suf- 
fered from 30 to 40 bone frac- 


tures before his birth. All ex- 
cept one, apparently suffered 
during birth, had healed prop-' 


erly. 


The child, Kevin Lee Sluder. 


normal 


The 23-year-old mother 


she had not fallen or been in 


an accident. 


~ 


OPENING TOMORROW 


FLORIAN 
ZABACH 


Dancing to the music of 


Joel Shaw 


And His ORCHESTRA 
TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY 
INCLUDING SUNDAY 
Held Over By Popular Request 


June Arnold's 
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In the Capital's Smart, 
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2300 Connecticut Avenue, N.W. 
For Reservations: Phone HU 3-7700 
Deluxe Dinners from $2.50 

served until midnight 
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and television shows. 


THIS IS THE time of year 
when the local night clubs 
start to batten down the hatches|lius La Rosa, The Platters and 
and prepare to sit out the sum-|finally George Shearing. 
mer entertainment doldrums. 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard'Not so the Casino Royal where 
Sluder, was reported perfectly the management has thrown 
in all other respects. caution to the winds and hires' 
Doctors said he was suffering a quartet of costly attractions! aj day Wednesday, May 30— 
from defective bane structure. that will provide the entertain-| wemorial Day. Four complete 
said'men bill until July. 

Lead off man is Pat Boone, 
_ the young Dot Records sing- 
| er who divides his time be- 
| tween recordings, night clubs 


He's to be followed on June 
_./in the current “Miss Washing-| 


Gh, We 


By Paul Herron 

men revue, then in order, Ju-| 
> Coe 

A DINING NOTE — Long- 


champs Restaurant, normally 
‘closed on holidays, will be open 


dinners will be featured that) 


fairs starting in price at $2.50. ¢ 


; a 
iT 


4 by Mae West and her muscle- ton” 
ducted by radio station WWDC. 


day with the seven-course af-| accomplished guitarist provide 


TO THE GIRLS—Midnight,| and Diego Castillani 


beauty-talent search con- 


Entry blanks can be ob- 
tained by writing or calling 
the stations and prospective 
contestants are urged to en- 
ter the competition as early 
as possible in order to get 
adequate rehearsal time. 
cow 
Two flameco dancers and an 


n entertainment change of pace 
t the Old New Orleans Restau-| 
ant. Laura Toledo, Jose Barrera| 
headline | 


‘Friday, June 15, has been setisne new show. 


as the closing date for éntries| 


The 


a 


LUXURY LINER 


presents 


GAIL KING <2: 
No Cover 
MOTEL 


12th ond M Street, N.W, 


our. 


COCKTAIL LOUNGE 


@ No Minimum 


Vietor recordirg of 


EVER TASTED 
NURNBERGER 
BRATWURST? — 


yee 


es 


a 
e 
Come in for dinner or after 
the show tonight. Authentie | V 
German dishes... Vien- 
nese music . 
atmosphere. Cocktails cerved 
‘til closing. Gemuetlichkeit! 


town Strutters’ Ball” 
style) 
buck” have been record hits, is 
the star of the current Lotus 
show, 
through Wednesday night. 


room to present his fabuous re- 


new production is a humdin- 
_Continentar | @er. It's supposed to be a “high- 
flying” adventure and you'll 
find out why when you see it. 


ow 
LOU MONTE, whose RCA 
“Dark- 
(Italian 
Huckle- 


and “Italian 


scheduled to be around 


ows 
BIG NEWS! The new show 
gt the Shoreham Hotel opens| 


tonight. All festivities will be 
held outdoors on the Shore-| 
ham Terrace and the abund- 


nce of space has given hotel 
xecutive manager all kinds of 


ues, Advance reports say the 


Corner of 
ISTH & EVE N.W. 
NA. 8-7169 


ERSON 


Be 


r A 
ie 
Wee. 


se 


LADIES’ NITE TONITE 


FREE ADMISSION — NO COVER 
NO MINIMUM for All Ladies to See 


THE RAGE OF THE NATION 


-4 PAT BOONE 


©: America’s No. 1 Recording Star 


plus a fabulous one hour 
and fifteen minute revue 


NO MINIMUM—NO ADMISSION 
Shows 7:30—10:30 
12:00 


$i Cover 


LEGAL NOTICES 
U 


ASURY 
ce of Assistant Regional C 
sioners. Alcohol and 
ax. Baltimore. Marviand. 
May 28, 
y siven that on 
one—1941 Plymouth 
Luxe.” 


will be for- 
of ac erates 
Bist QnT REGIONAL COMMI6- 


U. 8. TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 
Office of “ens neseng: Com. 
missioner. Aicoho 
Tax, Baltimore 
of Arst sulieation | 
ce 


e Code. Registered 
owner: Taft Korne ay. 315 E B.E., 
Washington y pe rson 
claiming an interest in said prop- 
la n 


7. 1956. otherwise the prop. 
l) be forfeited and disposes 
of caccordin ae law. LOUIS DE 


ANT REGIONAL 
COMMISSIONER : 


STANLEY WARNER 
THEATRES 


ALL ad te WARNER THEATERS 
ARE AIR ee 


AMBASSADOR 4. Sok h sls 
a mn Warsn Jef. 
unter, = ie w ood be 00. 3 05 


wo. 6- 2600 


rt. 3-3300 
1E 


4 dt 
THE. "HOUSE. 


ree Parking. WO. 6-7345 
N.W 


oe es 


Tae p- 
SHOW! 
“MIGHTY 


na 
G "AL! 
HORROR 
OF WAX.” plus 


Near Parkine. ME. 6-264) 
TH Fr CONGQU ERO 

1-00. 5:15. 9 oP. PORRID- 

Waiter Pide 11:20 


an EXAN- 
REAT.’ 


RA 66-6600, 

DER THE 

ichard Burton. 6:00. 9:50 “INVADERS 
uM ate Helena Carter, 8:30 


ere Par Li. 71-5200 
git EXANDER. THE GREAT.” 
PEN are Bu 05 5:45 9°30 
Seer 3 4 Ayeosn ‘ Bil Williams, 


1:00 


voy CO. 5-4968 ad 
“l’LL CRY TOMORROW” 
Bows Hayward. 6.00. 9:20. “RED SUN- 
ow Rory Calhoun 5 
RA. 6.2000 
GR. AC E KELLY 
WA! Ss. 9:40 
yEpERE UNG rns ’ Zz 
Free Parking 
IU. 9-5500 
GR: ACE KELLY 
“THE SWAN” th, Alee Guinness. 
3:10. $:20. 7 35 9:50 
T Pree Parking 
A. 3- 


, 
4 


K 4312 
ANNA MAGNANI 
Academy Award Winner 
“THE ROSE TATTOO” 
yet Burt Lancaster. 7:30 T 
AN BACK Ludie Murphy 
61990 “AT ae 
HERE THE SIDE- 
eae Andrews, 2:45 
WO. 6-5400. Near Parking 
“ALEXANDER THE 
Richard Rurton Fredric 
9:30 


—$ 
2:00, 7:00 


FREE PARKING 
AIR-CONDITIONED 


. Balto 
U 


; n L owt 5. 
MODELS. 


Ri 
HIGH WATER.’ 
9.2222. 


ALLE? SONG 
Technicolor at 7 
BETHESDA «x. sane 
ness. “THE SWAN. od Pan 
Color at 7 

HWEVERT. ?* +" IN. i $-0168. 
Sapeent Lgecastes 
9:25 


HYATTSVIL 


“THE eg 73 es tg , 


Walt 


KAYWRON WA, 188%, 


“THE SWAN.’ 
at 7. 30 a 


Lancaster 


Megnaal. “ROSE TATTOO.” at 


Morgan 
ch aid ‘Won "THE W WEST 


BELTSVILLE DRIVE- IN 
Bivd. «(U. 6. 
of Md Children Freel 
‘ARTISTS AND 
Bag lor at 8:50, — 


AND 
CinemaSc ope-Color 


Disney's 
oe a SOUTH" 


Grace 
Guin- 


Burt 
Anna 
“ROSE TATTOO” at 6:50, 


LE 71-0552. 
Dagny Kaye 
Rg ane 


Grace 
Alec Guinness 
CinemaScope-Color 


WH. 6-7800. Burt 
Anna 


f* 


APEX 4013 Moss. Ave, WO. 6.4600 


ae day! Grace Kelly. Aiee G n- 

Louis Jourdan r 
SWAN. " Cin emaScone-Color. ot 1:15, 
3:20, §°20, 7:30 and 9:35 


HE. 
Richard Burton. Claire Bicom., Fred. | | 
Ma “A DER bby | : 
GREAT in Color. at i: 80. 3:50, 
and 9:35 bp 


FLOWER ,.. 8725 Flower ya ag 
Free Parking. JU. 8-1666 
Jourdan wetty, Alec Gus nness. 
“THE SWAN.” Cinema- 
Scope. 7:10 and 9: e's m _ waees 
subjects at 6:35 and 


NAYLO — and Ale. Ave. SE. 


| 
ee Parking. (LU. 2-4000 | | 
Richard Ma Claire Bicom. Pred. | | 
March in ALEXANDER Ez 
GREAT in Bolen at 6 oO and “ 10 
p.m. Short subjects at 6:15 
8:55 Dp. m 


ROCKVILLE DRIVE-IN 


U. 8. Route 240—Rockville. 
te ge ane. ar 
how at 8:35 


ont ALEX AN DER THE 
GREAT” 


with Richard Rurten. 
m. 


fin Color) 
rs) 


m. Cartoon at 86:35 p 


Falls Church 


STATE J€. 2-1555 


Richard Widmark. Donna Reed 
“BACKLASH” 


Richard Widmark. Donna Reed 
| “BACKLASH” 
BICKING Aisghy vw 
alt Disney's 
SOUTH" 
chnicolor 


“THE SONtS OF THE 
Mat ines 2P.M 


Grace Kelly Alec Guinness 


CinemaScope-Color 


Grece Kelly. Alec Guinness 
“TH ‘* 


Cinem aScope-Color 


Bill Ha The Fiottere 
“ROCK Knotnp THE CLOC 


BYRD 104 South Wayne ee 
Ferrer 


JA. 7.1733 
Trevor Howard 
“COCKLESHELL 
Technicolor 


Arlington—Falls Church 


1730 Wilson Blvd. 
WILSON Prag sy. 
231 N. Glebe Rd. 
Columbic Pike 
ARLINGTON “*lvr»iz rs 
2130 No. Glebe Rd. 
GLEBE la’ ?-ame 


JEFFERSO Ari. Blvd. & Annan- 
dale Rd. JE. 2.8040 


BEST THEATRES 


SYLY NO. 7- oem, Susan 
7 
TOM 
a 
3-9616. Van Het- 


aru , CRY 
RRO W.” Lovejoy. 
RMAN."’ 
ACANEMY ji. *CSca7 Taree 
AND PRAY.” Arthur Kennedy, 
KED DAWN 


SEMATOR 'Wi.ti8 Bic 
LASH.” Jane wm. e| ‘OXPIRE.”’ 
Tt. 6-8200. at praley ond 
its Comets and The aan 
s. AROUND THE Cl 
Richard Basehart, “CANYON Choas- 
ROADS.” 


 hreak 


lard 
cK 


’ 7” RA 4377. 
Pt 


3- Ki ry. Doug! as. 
NDIAN 


vive OUNS 


ROTH THEATERS 
SILVER SPR 8242 Ga. Ave 


oe 9-112) 
uesda 
“ALEXA S ‘DER THE 
GREAT” 
Peatures at 7:00, 9:40 
Pree Parking AIR-CONDITIONED 
P icth and Sevannah Sts. $.E. 


Ample Parkin Air- ANT oned 
ANNA MAG 
Academy et phe 

“THE ROSE TATTOO” 

At 6 and 9:45. Plus at 8, Jean Peters 

MARLON BRANDO 
“VIVA ZAPATO.” Last two days 


FAIRFAX, VA. 


paca erie Main and Arthur Honnieut 


-” gee $.6. 


Soe rg 


Bight “FINS OF Re RO! "and eke 


LOUIS BERNHEIMER 
THEATRES 


VILLAG Richard Burton, 

DER 
GREAT" 
tame. 


Crace 
NEWTON SWAN.’ 
Lex Barker. DUAL ON TH 
SISSIPPI,” at 3:05. 


“APACHE AMSUGH.” 


_ Kelly, 


“AL- 
TH 
at 6 ry a 9:20 Wil- 

t 8: 06. 
“THE 


6:14 & 8:34. 
BE. MIs- 


The moat 
the Nation's 
urTos 


Capital and 


comfortable seats in 
sub- 


VERNON ; ag os te 


GREAT,” 6 2 Fs > ‘0 


“AL- 
DER “THE 


JESSE Open Fri.. Sat. & oun. 


s 


WINELAND THEATRES 
7100 Ind. Hd. 4 
ABS, DRIVE-IN 2'0° '~2. "2. hy. 


Open 7:30 Dp. m mhddaes Pree. Car- 
toon at 8:40. 2 Technicolor Hits! 
Grace Kelly. Alec Guinness, uls 
| eg) .' . E 


poope. 8 
LAW Ys ‘SILLY THE KID.” at ate 04 
| Always Best Food at ABC Tit Ma 


1415 Good Hope Rd. 
ANACOSTIA '*"° Seo 


iv 
Matinee datlv at 1:00 PM Walt iB 
Disney's “BONG OF THE AOUTH 
bo ae op at 1:30, 3:20, 5:20, 7:26, 
9:20, Also Cartoon Bhow! 


2533 Pa. Ave. $e 


CINEMASCOPE! Gracr 
Guinness, Louis 
; Tec hnicolor. 


Williams in “APACHE 


Kelly, Alec 
“The 


h 
» 9:20 
AM- 


a RCKNBER FE THE GREAT” 
LANGLEY * * 4:- v8 Uri ‘te. | | 82 


Playeround. 


Lout B 
~~ ‘TH 
“PORT YUMA, “at 11:28 


| Washington's oy? Drive-in. 


Md. ha in “TEXAS LADY. 11:28. K 
2-6186 | DIES ALWAYS 
| PLAYGROUND! 


| Sinatra and Marion 
| and Jerry Cartoon Revue 


‘AIRPORT DRIVE- 


“OUYS 


| Jane 
| RAIN.” 
LU. 4-731) | LAST FR 


PALMFR {t,**i1" 
SWAN 


| Grace 
t 8:10. | Peter Graves, 


UEENS CH St. W. a. 


Joen Vohra. “FORT 


r Graves. rt: 
10:05. Kiddies 


usk Cartoon, 


6200 Mariboro Pike $.E.. JO. 8-7266 
7:30 P.M. Kiddies ‘Pree Cartoon 
0 Two Technicolor Hits! Richard 
ur.on, Prec ric March in “ALEXANDER 
E GREA CinemaScope. at 8:47, 


M. LOEW’S 
MT. VERNON OPER. AIR 
1 Se. of 
suPEn CINEMA. 
aoe Sypee. wae q P. . Richard hae 3 
Reed ASH.” 
47 Also “Claude: te Co! Ibert: Barry gui 


FREE! GIANT FREE 


ree 
Starts 8:50. Frank 
Brando en “GUYS 
Sy ay 9°40. ** 
8:50 


UNSET DRIVE-IN ‘3% 


Sete o 
| Bailey's Cross Roa 
7:45. Two Tecnniceior Hits’. *“RE- 
ASUR ISLAND.’ 


and “RICOCHET RoO- 


} ARLINGTON 
OT. 4.8100 
(CinemaScope). | 
Ek 


AND DOLLS” 
rion iehee. dean Simmons. 
“CABE OF 


e+ : 
8. Route ust over the 14th 8t. | 
ridge Kids Pree 


CHIEF neice ules Ser | 
Indian Head Her 


Wyman, “MIRACLE IN THE 
~ 45 ~~ Madison, “THE 
” 8.35. 


oe 83-4111. Geo. “Palmer 


Kelly, THE 


“FORT YUMA,” 


Nichols Ave. at ren 
- 5000 


Willams in “APACHE AM- 
USH.” at 8:25. 


CONGRESS 2981 Nichols Aw “Ave. SE 


Walt n 
9: it te 
—~“7703 Mariboro Pike, Md. 
JO 8-515) free Parking 
INEMASCOPFE' Greece an in “te Alive 


nposnt — THE 
“Peosineoler A 6:15, 7:55. 


miles west Palis 
most BBA: | 
; ated between 7 Corners 
irfax Circle via oer rline- 
lvd. (turnin = t Gellow Jo 
Hwy. — Worl Largest’ Screen. 


“GUYS & DOLLS” 


Marien, mands. Prank Stnetre 


— -= 


a wea SAS 57 b 
Open 7—Show Dusk. Kiddies Pree 


in 
a: ate 35 


Lourel, TS ies at 
PA. 5.2113 


CIMEMARC PE! Gregory een Jen- 
a er ones. repeenie. arch in THE 


MAN NN 
SUIT.” , &. mM. oY oS os. 


iv rv md. 
CAPITOL ‘>; we 


ACADFM 


oT aE 
WEST.” Technicolor. at 


EISER-SETHESD 


| WALT DISNEY'S 


“SONG OF THE SOUTH” | 


1:00, 3:10, 5:15, 7:30 and 9:40 


rare Wis. Ave. | 


For Information Call NO. 71-3000 
Air Conditioned ne 

HOW 7h & T Ste. NW. 
Doors Open 12 Noon 


Above proeres will continue thru - 
Wed. wy 30-—-Matinees Daily at Taylor 


Per ‘ Ruth Brown—The C 
lace — irbans—Spence Twins— t 
lor—Choker Campbell and Or- 
dnasiee. 


2 and Color: 
RA PLA 
Peatures 6:35 and 9:2 


VIRGINIA “* Vernon Bivd. & 


First Se., Ki. 9.6133 
Walter Pideron. Anne Francis 
et ; ie RACK” ie : i 

RICHMOND *\' “v3: 

Ki. 9.6566 

Alfred 5 Ya “THE TROUBLE 

T Few 4d Gwenn. 
yer acLaine. | 


tinee 30 


1215 U St NW 


Acetone ward Winner 


“THE ROSE TATTOO” 


with Burt Lancaster. 
Ben Cooper, at 6:50. 9: 


CIPCLE *' Pennsylvania Ave. N.W 
RE. 7-0184 


arise Pavan. 
. Last day. 


CARVER-ALEXANDRIA , °:,, 
Burt Bg ams Vxqnenl 


Beers Open 18:08 7 
ARCHERS’ 


Open 12:30 P.M. 


Mall SR ch Rae 


1 Y . NW. 
BOOKER TS. Sha 


eT Hh ane 


Grace Kelly, at 7:05 and 3:35 PM. 


caestan a FE 


GEORGETOWN "2 wens, += 
AD. 4-1800 
Scenes en 


Washington » 

ALFRED Re CocK 
MONTGOMERY CLIFT 
“] conor 

ter. Ki aes 


sere 


4 


- ’ 


B. Bmih. 
pu ster Willis for the 

reais of Columbia. a 4S 3 the 
robate Co ourt. Mayi4 7'.28 


ees 4. rath, ——— 
1012 arner bide. 
Washingtes. 


STA TEs | DistRICT 
K District of 


Wita t 
egally authen- 
° 8 becribers. On oF 
th day of November. 
. 1956: otherwise 
by law be enelases irom «a 
fit of said 
our pends this 7 
lvoe OW ARD art, 
7612 Kilmer Street. Hyattsville, 
Ma. O30 ay {TN RBAN, 
ares 


“Th wv 
£LL, "“Raaithes of Wills os 
the District of Columbia. Cierk of 
ioe Provate TCourt 
Mayi4. 21, 28 


U. TREASURY DEPARTMENT, 
Gide Of Assisiant Regional Com. 
missioner, : 
Tax, 
ol Grst pubiication. 
Notice is hereby given 


cated, to 
geteee the 


2 . ar 
. for ve ames of ont internal 
Revenue to 
7502. sternal ‘Revenue Gods 


Oaks, Maryland. Any person ciaim- 
ing an jmterest in said property 
fle a ciaim and deliver « 


oo. otherwise whe prop- 
erty will be iorfeited and dis 
of according to iaw. LOU 
ISTANT RBGIONAL 
_COMMISSIONER 


E. Willard 
i11@ 14th 


UNITED STATES $ DISTRICT COURT 
Y 
ELLA, 


jhiterney 
NW 


May, 
1906, orcered. that the delenaant, 
ILBERT M ,AURMELLE. cause 


occurring aiter 
r puDiication 
; otherwise the cause will be 


UNGER. Deputy Cierk 
Ma y2l. 28. June 4 


e “B. i Prebilich. “Attorney, 
2022 Nichels Avenue, 5.2... 
jashingten. BD. &. 


ATES 


' GARET J. 


has obtained ne t 

Court of the District of Coamyis, 

wer Testamentary on he 
Ostrander. 


to su 
“the 7th day of Novem- 
1956: otherwise t ev 
rom ail 


o\ 
SAE, May 14.21.28 
J. Pentaine Hall. Attorney 


UNITED STA TEs DISTRICT 

Court for the District of Colum- 

~~ nolding rrobate Court. No 

831, - Administration. This is 

that the subscriber 
ead 5 


to give notice 


approval of the 
trict Court 
Columbia 


Deputy Resieter of 
a a ct A Lee | of the 
Mayi4.21.28 


—_— 
BIDS AND PROPOSALS o 
UNITED io - 


2 i, Tene Matas 
will be recety his ‘othice watt 


1966. for furnishing stationary Bo 
the use the United 6tates &cr ate 
for the cal year ending June 0. 
1957 x of proposals. 
showing the quantity and quality 
of each articie and the for of 
— be sien? ed 7. =e. a 

and sureties ie office on 
plication ‘to This fice. proposals 
reed “Proposais for 


asnould be en 
tationery ter 
Senate” and be 
ST 
on. D C 


PUBLIC AUCTION OF 


New and Used Household 
FURNITURE 


Living, Dining, Bedroom, Ta- 
bles, Chairs, Lamps, Rugs, 
Antiques, Washers, Gas Range, 
Lawn and Baby Furniture, 
Luggage, China, Silver, Brass, 
Bric-a-Brac, Office Furniture, 
etc. 


TONIGHT AT 7:30 


‘ MONTGOMERY AUCTION 
GALLERIES 
11308 Fern St, Wheaton, Md. 


FURLIC LE WILL 
901 bs. ie 
aton 
230 «a 


ADDIN G MACHINE - Te 
roughs, desk model, 
RAL. 2078 Litp it pe mame! 
A ADIO— 

. after 6 p 


vA 
wr 
. 


‘inde tiie eaning Supplies 

ro NOPG.. cleans and  bieaches 

score ~. operation . 
SUPPLY. ¥a> 


rm.; 
paint. 820 rm. Li Tbs AD 


epair, 


efinish, 
touch-up «6 & ocielt James L. 


gardens and drive- 
‘Datimetes JE. 44-2693. JA. 
J “9771. 


utside. Wall scraping. 


ways. 


wo 
"3-4595._ 
AT Pa 5. 
m_ $20; free 
ets Small 
- or exterior. 
white moshen s. free. “ont., impos- 
sible e A mg on price. JO. &§-8605. 


cw B JU. §-1600, RA. 3-739" 

— Painting. Wa 

scraping, plaster patches. Li. 6- 
“Oh ’ 


rash ay ay ee 


guar aint- 
— 


Silver So 


your © 
Speedy row 
Moderate price 


-90 508 
SPRING Aut ato City. abe special 
ar ogrrice 9451 


or mine 
service 


ags one and cement, spe- 
claliging in walls and patios 
walks. etc. Free estimate 
% L0_1-4736. 
— ne—Ghost writing. 
pand-tne-cloel gery Mod. Prices 
o , J 


, —Repair @nd ciean- 
ing. Slipcovers and draperies made. 
JU 98-6992. 6-77) 

cleaning, Wax- 
co 51 


ing pend ng, painting 5-0514 
JOH SON. co. S13 4 A mR 7, 
LOST 10 
an’s br. lesth.; 


‘ los 
ardens, om JA 4. 6078. 
our Ty 


BILL 
vic. Lee 
ners. Ma Call Melvin. :. 


CAT — Male siamese child's 3 
powers: 6423 Oxon Hill r 


mo old: je. rust col- 
; only collar fost. Wed. AM. 

rard. JU. 9-87 a ‘ 
PARAKEET—Not nded excel. 

aiker: own by Rr. girl; vi 
Lewisdale-Parklawn $10 


use. Name 
~ Ari A Cae. JA. %- “5004 
K, 1956: Dink: hard 
. r A. 3555 
PUPPY—Male, blac 
i Ra 


collar. vic v 
rw + rd. Ans. to Mac. Rew 
-6 


” Vie 


oe chain 
Slee 


WEDDING ioe 
fra IONS—ANNOUNCEMENTS 
INS, PLA CU DEC'NS 


Includes -all miezoee © ¢xXams. 
!so0 MR 


pid advan eumen ~+ 
science is ereating a b 
for aualified techs 


asrpaece. Grads plecea. Tr 
WASH. SCH POR PAYS pss 


O28 20th & : 7- oe 
rad SiPcovVE 
0 w. _ ee ; 
e 


T be responsible for any 
debts ineurred b anyone other 
Han py GaX ETT G 


mA Same. ware. 
Bea ne 


Bee nt ie 


I won't have vour clothes nda 
en I 


MACPHERSON’ ‘s CLEANERS 
2106 PENN. AVE. NW. 
BUMMER tutoring. elem. Oo . exD.. 
persona! interest: reas. 3-2 T° 
Tee BA NUEL Rest it 

Vea Hiss 
AN? 


INVITATI 


Co 
able 


Co 
71434 (Eve- 


* 3 &2; Lus- 
trastik 86.50 ©. 5-6199 
TOR TRAVEL 111A 


to Denver. a bet. June 
1-4. Cen take JF ¥, Refs exch. 


inneapo! _ ‘about 
lec 3 aa to 


ress cur... 


NG to 
June 7. take 2 
share en] enses. J 
is or Minneapolis: 
lady ) »B. S passengers _—— 
drivi o. javine June 1 at nn 
co 
ets FOR SALE 12 
ALE—-bBur- 
50. CEN- 
mos. LO. 5- 
yY ce 55. 
995: mattresses. $6.84: pla 
92: ~ wae’ eeeize. $4.95: 
DISCO 
'SCHUL MAN’ 
ne 


Seer Be FURNITURE 
AND TOY SUPERMART 
SAVE 30-60% 


on all pass. adv baby furn. lay- 


lar 
‘Juvenile 
3+-6697. ’ 


@ have no 


chs 
NO | LOWER PRICES 
ANYWHERE 
2457-61 18TH 8ST. 
Opposite 


PARADISE 
30%—70% OFF 


nde are still raving over 
senevery oF of B . penentiones 


he 
reest (40, o "tee eaters 
Supermart—at 5 
list price 


Nothing ever b) 
ve up to a -' nat’ ‘big: 
ds of Cribs. Caszieees. u 
s. troller Playpens. 
chalr mp) selection. state 
‘& children’ s clethin up te size 14. 


Pacnest oun - 
THING - by Serge a 

CES In VU. 6&6. A. 
uge discounts on AAvsit Bs 


Summer. Purn. —_ = 


pers! rs 5 Supermart 


Pactor 
, 


’ 


“Vas VAsmineTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Monday, May 28, 1956 29 


BEGINNERS. 


DON'T GO OVERBOARD 
FURNISH YOUR 3-ROOM APT. 
COMPLETE WITH 
BRAND-NEW 
vada —- oe 


$245 


IMMEDIATE FREE DELIVERY 
Nothing Down—Easy Terms 


WE CATER TO SERVICEM 
STATE FURNITURE CO, 
207 HA St. NE LL. 6-84 

tis Sth St 


FURNITURE 
3 ROOMS 
BRAND NEW 
FOR ONLY 


$245 


NO MONEY DOWN 
Easy Terms, Free Delivery 
SWANK FURN. 


1115 H ST. NE 
i! 3-8700 


lece liv. rm 


suite and 
Very reas 


smoking > 
takes all. - 2-0324 
FUR! me stom bit 
drapes. sarden ] 
household pores wi 


rks: » buffet “china closet, server 
les. misc. RA. 3-2232 


] a 
jton rug. 9x12 


I arm set. com- 

plete: RA 

FURN, Liv rm. -dinine rm. 2 bed- 
ew. ime aA. 

mo and pots, a at OE 4- 1458. 

abies Din. set. t-pc. walnut $25; 

ry ee suite. 


5 piece, 
6-2756 


3-pe liv rm. set $17: 
maple *65 Also misc 
rm suites (2). din. rm. 
liv. rm i chairs. 
end). | rae 
302 Lonstel w 


eF packs, drabes 


‘ A incl. TV, 
* perf. cond.; $600 
CO. §-2092. ‘s 
~ of 
: innerspring a 
j s 


aet maple 
tables ( coffee, 
studio ‘codeh. etc. 


desk -cheir, 
np -top coffee table 


restoring, 

0 job 

terms 

18th 

tt nv. . 
FURNITURE— 


Look What You Can Get For 


$219 


18 PIECES 


Or 
Brand-New Furniture 


NETIE SU! 
1-PC LIVING RM SUITS 


NO MONEY DOWN 
EASY PAYMENTS 


SAM BROWN’S 


FURNITURE CENTER 
1209 crocs Hope : =. 
fAnacostia 


Open ‘Daily ai 


ut >: ‘Saturday ‘i 7 


RN. La sofa bed: 2 i. 
chairs: blond’ Ginette ext. ta- 
©. 4 chairs, omer seats. Sell 
’ Ki 
ine ptle oe 


= 
rollaway bed :. 


“FURNITURE 


For Your 3-Room 
ALL BRAND NEW 


Con aipting of sofa. match- 
ing chair. 3-end tables. 
Maple dresser. 
‘of drawers, 
spring and mattress 
5-piece dinetie set. 


ine, ‘tlec:: 
77 


chest 
with 


The Difference” 
Budget yo livery 


FURNITURE MART 


215 ming St.. Alex. Va. 
I. 8-93 


-in 
town. i 
used: guaran- 
Acme Stove. 
8-8952_ 


$75: desk and sette 
and Victo rian. 


nt ; 

._ NO. => -9108. 
A rE if” reel with 
Briegs-Birat on motor, 850. Good 


G : C 
lec fully aute.: so ews 
will take 3250. old pew 30% 


-tube. flexible-arm 
55: dble.-pedestal. 3 
~ | a se refin- 


#2 Ss: 
new ce 
Re 
uriitser spinet. 

model. "ter sale at a worth- 
govins over the new price: 
ition cal Mr. Satter- 
JORDAN'S. corner 


late 
while 
in good $e 


ts. a 
AN ile spinel mode 
] pope 2 ts 
S—Save uo to i. on rental 
1955 models and recon- 
Gitioned anes , Budget 
} . 


upright 
case and .. 
Oo a. 


1ANO—Steck cran _ ous 


+ selecting 
ene see be * aoltinate 

urlitger mosirente lene. j 
pip. xeluss ve wit , ‘Bs. 13 


Se han 
there to 
A c 
t pe alesse 


> exeel. sca. 38 4-1 


ANTIOU 
a, jewelry 


“ARTICLES FOR SALE 
$5 DOWN. DELIVERS 
sarees Sy itd 


eras 

gt da oolonte s ates xs. 
ex. cong. 
» 06. 5-84 


matching Shalr wih «& ~ 
ee plus ona chair: good con 
~ 76 
"eu b rion New 1 Sone 
u have cash an wan 8 
u cai.” 20s a a et RAMOU ot 


5 deste. loni4 
venings. 


oer His new “ 1 

os ie ate ser, ooré,, + x . 
7 % 

335 da ave. ke 94 ~ - Sarvics © Tire Co ° 

a 


repair. trade 
ypewriter Co., in 


PEW 
pstpeins. 
Pa Chu 


2019 14 th st. 9 ¥. 
~Your cholee. only 

Cali Clark N 
for a free demonstrat! ion 


CTROLUX. #955" with 
they Yast: 50 te. sell. 
Kennys Discount House 2101 


enmore_ auto. used 

19, 2 

Noree 
sacr 


semi-auto. "56; 


#100 


push-button. 
; ia DA, 


: —Must sel. eaute 
wash. refrig. Best offer EL. 6-3212 


TT 
ARTICLES WANTED 13 


agg tS bric-a-orac, Sili- 
rie piel objects. paint- 


ashes 

SEA to wit 
suite 

re rigerators 


du "FSst3 RA 8 5077 
sR Pe BOOK BHC P h7és Penn 


mmed. removal for 
Ty, refs. 3 stoves, 
a “Close on 
engigu ieiattiG E EXCHANGE 
no Tih 0583 


FURNITURE WANTED 
EM. 2-6677 


PURN. tenenpators. a2 emount: t; alee 
ato 4 an 


nore refris 
teces 


Bring your dental gold. platinum, 
discarded jewelry. We pa 

a A IN 
P ST. NW. 
clure frames, 


, 


INSTRUCTIONS 


AIRLINES 
AIR TRAVEL AGENCIES 
NEED 


MEN and WOMEN for ground and 

flight opportunities everywhere. 

Coast to coast and overseas Free 
service after 


Call rr person 12 m. 
m.. WRITE O AY 
Ben 4 name, address. age and phone 
Sumber. y Room 

AV ATOR SI NTRS 


tor- ignition technician. Learn he 
to use modern automatic ‘esting 


and tune-up eau 
time home sone shortens shop 
tllities Bn¢ 


tra! ning att [es nst. 


2 
night ‘Class June 
19 Grantham School. 821 19th st. 


, 14 
N TO DRIVE IN A WEEE 
ADDTA "Driv ‘ing 8 Schoo|, ME 


NORGE ES NEEDED 


100 women wanted. 17-65, to Mara 
nursing: white or colored for cofe 
valescent home, doctors and pri- 


Nationa! institute of. fur 


Victor Bids. 
vw 6 et cell 


Classes, | ky ‘<: Ame _~ s outstes 
arecst genres. 7 

2: cost; bodeet 
uar Pathfinder Schl. 
ad 737 11th st. pw. M 


TEEN- AGERS 


e your vacation to learn 4 Yo- 
cation. Study to become a 
and Radio staff saneupesr. writer 

~ 


Get a Better Job 
so MORE MONEY—-LEARN 
horthand and Typing 
SPEEDWRITING 
Uses ABC’s—120 Words Per Minute 


IN SIX WEEKS 
Jobs ttne—t7e Placement 
inatire 9 A P. M 
ot ST. 3-2086 
. Washington's Only 

dwriting 
Yecretarial School 
1406 G St. NW 


WANTED 


omen to train as announte 


short courses: placement. 
Northwest Radio & a 


HELP, MEN 


CTORS :MD.) 


See ee ABBEY First 


ak. Px. 
Drivers 5 oe 
Pountain mers. SE and Do 
Drug Clks SE 


attendents. exp. 


“aga 
Gas aut, ee os 


1017 & NW. 


i Ath ae 


4 iy Th Mabe | x ee 
“ 


~ * 
f 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD wa 
30 Monday, May 28,1956 ACT 


ar 
rie 


HELP, MEN "| ier 
r Bei a i t Vt ; 
7 ? v 


for ; ' 
a ct a2 age ELECTRONICS 
ENGINEERS | | sesfsucnssate alde,¢ 0 cea 2 
EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY | feilon”"Sad” morte SPfs;| construction we poem) roms ie TECHNICIAN 
IN A RAPIDLY GROWING | PLACEMENT FE M- HNICAL aes 
ORGANIZATION ne tandir | a NAVY 7 FIRE fits. ILLUSTRATORS Fér Electronic 


SEVERAL OPENINGS FOR CONTROL MEN eR oes WRITERS Manufacturing Plant 


ge go : ne | 
oleate ong with smell DESIGN AND Fane ae a ausiltied for +. ogg Minimum of 10 years aay on ‘ APPLY 


and « with . = Oe Engineer DEVELOPMENT MEN AT 1341 G St., Suite 224. ME. 8-3629 ¥ to 1 Beptgnes. a a " ; We stin g h ouse 
ND OTHER or Chemist aig 5 gia ENG Be ate beboo “rout | permanent | positions. | convenient JET ENGINE Monday Thru Friday, 9-4 
location. attractive lar d 
N INEERS your ee in “3 joration.” attractive “sal nt _ a MELPAR, INC. 


we have orders covering hundreds CIRCUIT DESIGN AND DIVISION 
positions ie 
; SUB-MINIATURE PACKAGING 
Ba tor expert Yat m solv. With up to 3 years expe- yy rete te DESIRABLE ee 2 ary. cal tm pesly in Percon ADVER NEMS CLARKE 
gn ha * 8. oe 2090, ARLINGTON, BLVD. TISEMENT IN| 919 Jesup Blair Drive 


salary iev u 
ITION rience for position in in- oy 
CB. * EMP. SERV. formation agency serving | peRMANENT OPENINGS ON elopment Send Resume SPORTS PAGES SILVER SPRING, MD, 


"1 : 10 pues 224. ‘bk -3629 U. S. silent propellent pro- Preliminary Design 
ed, young DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM Combustion FOR APPOINTMENT 


penings wk Work places emphasis on MISS ARNOLD Gearing 7 Lubrication Experienced @ : P ICATION 

RACE DUNN” -2828 organic chemistry and ex- on RE. ph Controls With Small Mechanisms Corvey Poy tags - REA Jobs O At 
U tensive personal contac} OR SEND RESUME TO Metallurgists Nanda Cece pen 

TO WORK ON TECHNICAL 


with propellent scentists. , 
Outside collector with 1 yr ex-| C. W. BARBOUR Bee Capes oe relia PAINT STORE | rapio AND RELATED puB- 


perience contacting delinquent ac-| Excellent opportunity in HOOVER ELECTRONICS CO. We st n h ous LICATIONS. MUST BE ABLE 
counts, Automobile exper, pre] Small professional OFOUP — |3640 Woodland Ave, Balto. 18, Md. g | We Equipped. Shop Facilities MANAGER AS WELL AS TO FIT IT. FIT ERCO 


within large university re- Must be experi 
Served, Age 23 to 27. seedy tdneinen JET ENGINE nd future x Yom he ILLUSTRATIONS, PROOF- 


) ; rT. -+4J a t 
ETTIZENe BANK OF MARYLAND Uineen Conn rate With 5. "fhompson Paint Btores. Inc.| READ, AND ASSUME FULL 
we teom x01 | SEND RESUME TO poncg ty ecb nins, Oily | RANG arene arse] RESPONSIBILITY FOR FOL: 
TECHNICIANS | ADVERTISEMENT IN in Wheaton area. Mill] LOWING MANUSCRIPT 
PROFESSIONAL 


ADM. ASSISTANT : iS dedtteiene oO. tos te INTO PRINT. A. LITTLE ; . 
Many Company” Benefits ffice. PERLMUTTER BROS., Ran- | 
lege eraduate or RH student, Technical schooling plus a SPORTS PAGES ns oe KNOWLEDGE OF RADIO, TV, Engineering 
tion. or economics maor. for posi-| STAFF APPOINTMENTS. | minimum of 7S See Apply in Person ABILITY TO MAKE OR RE- 


OR ELECTRONICS AND/CR 
tion in the : in wiring, construction and APPLY JAFFE PAIR LINE DRAWINGS WILL 
iat ai lite oop me Room 300, testing of prototype electronic EXPEDITOR MON. TUBS., THUR. FRI. ar. BE HELPFUL. ABOUT $80 A AERODYNAMICISTS 
Taunt st. ; equipment preferred. } ust sober an ais 
The Johns Hopkins Permanent full-time position for 8 A.M. to 4 P.M. perienced: $16 per day. Apply WEEK TO START, PLUS AD- 

tor with manufac Buligers sob" Gall evenings. "HA.| VANCEMENT AND SUB- DRAFTSMEN 


en 58506 | | : 
P accordance with quali- - ' 
A-| NSSOCIATES ” cation and ability, aig My Rae p* -/ seatemtitanmemetteass STANTIAL. DeNerits. IN RE- 


Hp = PLY, MENTION AGE, EDU- 
University be a aa a ee te MELPAR, INC, —White 485 SE! CATION, EXPERIENCE, AND DESIGNERS 
Development Program offers AMERICAN RAP - es Saaees OO Sean wen DESIGN CHECKERS 


APPLIED PHYSICS allengi wi , ome sit must have car. EM 
os von na fre peered me INSTRUMENT. CO. (Ore Sey. Davin HWY) .  eagecsutmmans HAVE. DONE. DIGITAL PROGRAMMERS 


ment. 8030 Georgia Ave. mute Cionen vA.” 0. 
LABORATORY ' ody =n a ew vwtew_sxs@|PRODUCTION| wasnineton, 0. ¢. ELECTRONIC ENGINEERS 
8621 Georgia Ave. PLEASE APPLY aoe | RESEARCH ELECTRONIC TECHNICIANS 
ee yam 13 EM 1 FOOD CLERKS | Be, iid Bisa. “tte. oe. Be ax MATHEMATICIANS | 


Glewanee: r . : " 
am ite, insurance Co, 44) “COLLECTION MAN | The Johns Hopkins N.W. AREA - ‘ 
aiden ce : fasts wultenss wese| §=Planning |propucTION MECHANICAL ENGINEERS 


Good opportunity for experienced ‘ . 

Ts TC =cieed p Benaient patie oy tel hone. University : J AR | Bes. ur: é rs i J | 
ti iy ETS , a iiss Biss. Suns. ¢ alae = ft APPLIED PHYSICS a at hee Ny ~ se Byatts Opportunities PHYSICISTS 

pp iance Serviceman High quality Builder's Supere LABORATORY 21 AND 35. Al $908. Tues. only. | , as TECHNICAL WRITERS 


Experienced on automatic wash-| residential ‘Speretion’ in Were 8621 GEORGIA AVE. HAVE. A +)" up catalogs and take mre at e-| CHANCE VOUGHT : 
ERATION A e BPcaaid “oEny- fal ausliciattoas tesoetience: | SILVER SPRING, MD. eral) nee. Rraining turn. ¥a week AIRCRAFT PLANNERS TEST ENGINEERS 


_| start, Apply 


educati y ; 
All replies see rietiy confiden- “ -| 911 Wat onal 
rienced: to work in Washington 28 Post-T.H EMPLOYMENT INFORMATIO : F or phone DI. 7- 

exa arto 4477 or r T5468 DALLAS TEXAS 


A 
sch "Phone TE. tract Estimating Dept. JU. 9-7700 © , SAN WANTED WITH CAR 


ria: 
roject. Phone TE 
roduction of the CRUSADER 


; 6-1831. for inmter- APPLY r fet 
view. 2 1 diate epenings. gov. ord- cellent income: good references. ; 
N Associates nance ané estimating work. Also Phone JU. 5-13 a = ~ pee 1 — INTERV] 
— ere, ee missile and planning cE OLE THE 
must have drivers permit. Apply | Otympic 1-4100, > ne; _ ELEC. SUPV. ENGR. —IANAGER TRAINEE Preased requirements for ‘manu-| DRAMARATION HASE 
a srieSigt wai soa'eas]| ~SAFEWAY |» , zs a ae : 
RAPTSMEN, psubdiv. work to $80 an selected will be schooled & . D : : Monday—F ri 
A O MANAGER CONTROLLER PA TOYDS £ EMPL. ER ve a AR -- 000 pn ocatiened Dallas plant s : RINTS Y : day 
oung man’ (white) to assist man- xist now for per ee itty the y REVIOUS (RIE! ; 
dir Sires ™Graart can eet;| Retatl service company, Must LLOYDS EMPL STORES, INC. | szes.ges. 1clibwie” exparlen ) 8—3:30 P.M. 
and increase opraings by 75 excellent accountant and good tor th good v4 : aC 


ore rvisor. ermanen tion G ; 
Bon hues, eve, 30 seth Bc| fie"rahe geren. Yon? feo gil EMPLOYMENT OFFICE | Baser'st "3-100 Wondms: 50) TOOL PLANNING | Cifiin bit Re Saturday by Appointment 


be kept confidential. Box 6. YOH s > m 
d}oot. > ae To plan operation sequence for 
Office Manager-Book - Bost-Ta. 404 iY. fabrication and assembly) 


keeper for office of large down- PRR ae i N. Y. 
ae suonmie Sure: cll ORE, i aad et S| = NIFEDS wee aa TOOL DESIGN 
ave experie a nter grill me 
otive bookkeeping; excellent ‘ Except Sat.. Sun. & Holidays 
oppor ian! P geet r em. some ‘iatfan To design various complex tools. 


$6 
wed "Ph = sages ack Be | ENGINEERS Tat Shee, Bay) 10 Hours Per Week ied Ee asl coe ERCO DIVISION 


vatation with Bi See Drivers exp. a - DESIGNERS deat —amy EERO WTCH HAN few grenings & week and Sat {9 2 TOOL RESEARCH Apply In Person ACF INDUSTRIES, INCORP. 


f 
Herson's an ance is! was ers, bus N pols sen y es service. (To develop appropriate too ff a 
elem aro | faa cae t's] DRAFTSMEN | dtetty cere szso | merits Psa | iy ee omen ae] mow. vom. oem, ae, |"INTNDANS MP ne 
tion acta 3a Bert. sia, snd main men. % ©. FROM foods ; Opportunity. MEN—Bpare or Tull time. 2 or 1 sae 
Mirae ast| Pee ee acca 8 WASHINGTON | Biss titan Stes Be EE hs ists Sl| TOOL ESTIMATING] 141) 4 co ge 3 
Pe AETROPOLITAN AREA PERSONNEL SERVICE and FORECASTING Electronic & Mechanical 


prepare and maintain tool- 


EMPL. AGENCY, INC. NA p-tse3 


pen | bos doch Be NW _ near N. ¥ Ave} AERODYNAMICISTS GROCERY CLERR—WIR, | crirer' ing forecasts. @ estimates and statis- 
MPL Peas wh: COOK ELECTRONIC Besley, Market, call, ris 02) NOTICE INDUSTRIAL | oy Pe ENGINEERS 


Lab , ates ing conditions. no Sundays. App'y| ENGINEERS Arlington, Virginia 


aus Maytair Restaurant. 527 13th xt— 


rll mm Pecentiy y _gpened Wash.-Va. fac- 
Sd man. dey of Omics) : - at ML hes of national manu-| (To develop and improve manu- 


od pay. rapid ed- MEC HANICAL. 3 iateres sted in filling fol-| facturing methods) 


Shop. 1499 


eae cae xt to ENGINEERS , gp 1M QUALITY CONTROL (1 bik. off Jefferson Davis Hwy. An invitation 
ELECTRICAL ersonne enager (To maintain end develop con- Route | at South 15th St. 


CORRESPONDENT DESIGNERS GUARDS trots “as related to electronics. 


Sales Manager peteliars + quausiates or statis- To A Better 


To dictate informational and ; 
collection letters, handle of- Ex-Servicemen with recent Co. Representatives (2) Send detailed resume to: 


fice routines and detail, and PRESSURE VESSEL military police experience Bin Gantetins ender! Salary Employment Melpar Inc Way of Life— 
/ 


head his own team doing this desired. “i ty 
work. He must be results- DESIGNERS ave our-own trainine pro: CHANCE VOUGHT 


. ALL, TY 
1512 9th Bt. NW A 
t. “Ho 2: $812 es face problems as a| ELECTRO-MECHL. PHYSICAL EXAMINATION er ie B aise willis | AIRCRAFT From Melpar 
challenge and be ready to DRAFTSMEN Monday for per- 
nding and tapping. ‘with REQUIRED Incorporated 
oe s fice jeense ERs B person even bg age a S ntoy — | P.O. Box $907 Dallas. Texas 
a7, aitemore imself, Me shou we | , 
ITO SALESMAN — enact 5 SN gt peor. OVERTIME INTERVIEWS. DAILY Many factors combine to make for a better way of 
— ept. of new-car deal ’ ong eeuty , : , life for engineers who join Melpar Located in 
call ‘cnentien. Oppettie. ingiue- with people. Experience vad (Up to 60 Hrs. Per Week) 6 — 3:30 Engineers “e's Scientists suburban Falls Church, Melpar is set in peacefull 
sccount : : experience picterred. making adjustments, handling . 
ecessars, call g Benerne Aange ooaggytes Fae- $400 PER WK Stes B = . surroundings away from congested traffic areas and 
fs PASTE ott HORNER. , on sine fos a os = Pe . urday Sy Appointmen , within easy commuting distance of Washington. 
14 700 young mon to ge Trent. 35 it will be. difficult to fit = oe GENER L ELECTRIC S ld Mel 
spring and brake work. Exper if Should you joi you ld tie you 
mot necessary es or man looking for} YO™ into our program. We wi on oF etch ERCO DIVISION S pecial Defense Projects Dep >. professional pawl so thee of  aaenieiata v hich ‘hea 


doubled in size every 18 months for the patt decade. 


ition. Apply in waive a college degree for in- 
eer SPRING SERVICE fidential Personal Inte E Industries. | 
, 1054 Thomas Jeft g.| telligence and strong personal |? AC naustries, inc. ' 
for ere | cutcatom. To nts mn|'® WaS INGTON ARER ern md WA 7444 MOVES ITS GUIDED MISSILE PROGRAM|  es‘eatinsszln crtaaunracson 
Sentere emer $80 ~- posit! ue we offer security plus the | Paul Bievenour. y Sonnet TION which enables our engineers to progress accord. 
Pe 1334 Mass. ave. nw. Dr chance to learn and grow in a) | MONDAY, MA 28th, to Phj ladelphia ing to their own timetables, not prearranged ones, 
posit tions “Yael. tellers. local organization holding a 3 to 9 Ability and performance primarily determine ad- 
tratnecs, cits. messeneere. HS. leading place in our industry.| | ORD CALVERT JANITOR creating top level oppor- ee chy tame Anat ti oe cep 
4 Mass. ave. Di 19317 ‘| Please make your letter of ap- sea tg : : y tec ry considerations. 
Epi da ot | Maen cecner eg] MOTEL se at on tunities for engineers with ex- a : 
wanted. 15 k ion, . : : . . ; elpar's " tt as t i 
starting Monda Tah personal circumstances, and T ayer’ 220 Must have excellent work perience in the following fields: : pete anc tay Bt meg the OVERALL APPROACH 
persuasive—make it sell your: | Co ege Park, Maryland record and personal back- to an engineering problem, thus enabling him te 
self. - OR SEND RESUME ground which will be INSTRUMENTATION MISSILE SYSTEMS ORDNANCE broaden his experience and background, essential to 
> ) H. 8 YOH HCO. Inc. thoroughly _investigated ; i ainl eventual directorship responsibility. Each project 
w; 5 Box ee 311 Wal ‘ St , before employment. -& TELEMETRY DEVELOPMENT Arming & uzINg group is responsible for an ENTIRE problem, from 
ashington, VD. C. ainu ree . , | ’ | 
or. Dart-rime eu a, sigan uasion SUNGLO Philadelphia 6, Pa We offer excellent leave . TELEMETRY Operations Research Devices: initial conception to completion of prototype. 
est. nw COUNSELOR tor Simmer Camo in ot Pig plan and good salary. Systems Reliability Studies pepe, : 
pune. must be good balr- | ie New York, five tele bone num- ENGINEER Transmittets Systems Developments zim ming Complete facilities are at the engineers’ disposal. Our 
105 8. Alfred st., Alex. CRANE pees ATOR-—Experienced Antennas Systems Analysis eae new laboratories encompass over 285,000 air-condi- 
| rmanent year roun Recent Graduate APPLY Commutators Advanced Concepts Electrical Systems tioned square feet and offer, in addition to a Central 


~~ Wy 
guer.. A — - ae yment Tite Box “ 45” ‘| Large Rectern | fa 
urs. 437 9th st. EX.) company Bb Multiplexers Flight Test Planning Power Supplies _Model Shop, supplementary facilities, test equipment 
man ‘aa AN Te uel Bed. , eolieet agcressive. ‘wert Scart OPERATIONS Systems Specifications Systems Test and personnel available for immediate use within each 
’ id rel omuaee,5 RESEARCH OFFICE INSTRUMENTATION | ; 
y. $50 and commission 1650 | . partmen r so Analysis & Synthesis project group. 
. NO. 1-0770, “tg uction processes and mi Data Recording Call Mr. B. Warriner, Mgr. 


plus , ! m fa 
sala ty * insurance many other fnvolv Castine. rolling. draw- ‘ and Stor 
See: ediatsis. wi lara = company benefits. Call KI. 9-6369 BE and exirestes. | F lu The Johns Hopkins = waiver. 2 Systeme Engineering ae Engineers wishing to work toward higher degrees may 
aii9 sunranter Slax com: rafood DAY. Box 82, An-| snee ft Bry a desired Universit Conversion Circuitry Weapons Effect eee ee eee 


mS A. BV. J Transponders Operatiéns 

gpertment house: night werk: pre- oone mary 8 Microwave Beacon ; 

on] ee a ee Oa ee thesda. Maryland Data Processing Call Mr. K. W. Murray, If you would like to learn more about the 
oe 4 Recovery Systems Mgr. Arming & Fuzing 


— Truck 
ghey, Aa, is only. Current : tat 
a Night’ wo ber he bea “ $34 er. yrs 7 oye. smal restaurant e em ea a:30'§. m- fo 3:00 pm Antennas Engineering unique growth opportunities at Melpar, call 
Deem NW. ru 


week. Write work Bistory and refer- day w ° . $32 day | 
ESh SA" 7-82 3733, etter’ 10-3 om. Call Mr. F. W. Anderson, . | Technical Personnel Representative 


N peed ee pepe ma Instrumentation 
with to al ar. 
meet epecemept in| LAYOUT a K M OTHER ENGINEERING AREAS: 7Etrerson 4-6000 


Fils ler interviog eopean| DESIGN 
. or interview appoint-| DETAIL 5 tei nee ae 0 dri t to Me! di ' 
ropuision Evaluation , ’ r crivé out to Meipar and inspec 
Airborne Power Supply tet 4 ois 
Transonic Stability 


anent 2° Ve = Guidance Systems 
in Heat Transfer 


Sa ‘ 
Patera te Piatide eres our laboratories at your convenience 


See 


, r 
Westin g house proudly offers “€all Mr. Ethan Smith, Mgr. 


JET ENGINE. TECHNICAL POSITIONS Professional Employment OPENINGS EXIST IN THESE FIELDS: 


NO M PAY UNTIL WE Salaries are based upon the individual's contribution : SoC Ee re ss 
i, Sy) $40 DIVISION in Washington, D. C. to program. 100% tuition refund. Liberal benefits. UMP, VHP or BHP. Rectiver—Ansiog panne ota ce 
Tape Handling—Digi Computers—Radar and Countermeas- 
ae cco $45) ADVERTISEMENT IN to ures—Packaging Electronic Eauipment—Pulse Circuitry—Mie~ 
rae EMP SERV . V rowave ae ae Pe Simulstors—Servomechsnisms—Bub- 
sk avatar iowa] SPORTS PAGES MEN 19-30 WASHINGTON INTERVIEWS Tintartion™entr= Mecania!” Deena Mochane 
Vernon i sera fy aa VERS, $55. porters. $45: ofder- With High School Education and training in either May ~ wi “es 7 Co Y 


ote a a RICIANS| © MECHANICS at District 7-3000 ~ MELPAR, Ine. 


Fave ad identi PI "eat S =. Bee ‘rou ELECTRONICS speci AL DEFENSE PROJECTS beer. A subsidiary of Westinghouse Air Brake Company. 


Journeymen 82.7 


ist ain en i> STUDIO Selsey & Exparace | 3000 Arlington Bivd., 


re * 
ONS, Inc., "941 Mass. ave, 
BUS 17. 


GENERAL ELECTRONICS, age Paid While Training 


oe EM 24300, INTERVIEWS DAILY GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. Ce "Falls Church, Va. 


SL eS Business Machines Corp. 
RE: 7-3708 1220 19th St. NW. 3198 Chestnut Street | arcana ct Rian | ss ae 


“ | GOR A 


Memorial Day 
Interviews 


ENGINEERS 
PHYSICISTS 
DESIGNERS 


UNDERSEA WARFARE 


Our work on this frontier of 
increasing importance to the 
national defense involves new 
concepts in Torpedoes, Mines, 
and Sonic Detection. Here is 
a challenging area of study and 
development work for Physi- 
cists, Mathematicians, and En- 
gineers. Some of these posi- 
tions are for people of senior 
status. | 


GUIDED MISSILE 
SHIPS 


Our work on Guided Missile 

‘ Ships .and Systems for the 
Navy's new fleet has created 
many openings for Engineers 
and Designers on all levels of 
experience. Here are excel- 
lent opportunities for persons 
interested in Fire Control, Sys- 
tems, and Missjle Engineering, 
both Electrical and Mechani- 
cal. 


FLEET BALLISTIC 
MISSILE 


Our work on the Navy's “FBM”’ 
ships and systems gives Engi. 
neers and Designers an excel- 
lent opportunity to get in on 
the ground floor in a new and 
exciting field. Here is where 
creative engineering will con- 
tribute directly to the national 
defense for many years to 
come. 


LAND BASED 
MISSILES 


Our work on Land-Based 
Guided Missile Systems for 
continental air defense com- 
plements our work on Naval 
Weapons Systems. This is an 
area of new technology with 
excellent opportunities for both 
experienced and inexperienced 
personnel capable of tackling 
new problems. 


The opportunities at Vitro are for 
Openings at our Silver Spring loca- 
tion. They do not require relocation 
in other areas, field assignment, or 
job shopping. We are expanding our 
permanent staff and facilities to meet 
the increasing demands of new pro- 
grams growing out of guided missile 
and torpedo work performed at this 
location for eight years. 


Our Technical Staff will be on 
hand to discuss projects and 
programs from 8:30 A.M. to 
3:00 P.M. 


Vitro Offers 
FULL RANGE OF 
BENEFITS, 
EDUCATION 
ASSISTANCE, 
GROWTH, MERIT 
INCREASES 


For information and arrangements for 
interviews please call 


JU. 37200 


Personnel Department” 
All interviews confidential 


VITRO 


Division of Vitro Corporation of America 


962 Wayne Avenue 
Silver Spring, Matyland 
. 


Route salesmen 


no 
ataet Ri cttnacee spat 


PERSONNEL OFFICE 
ARCADE-SUNSHI NE 


713 Lamont &t 


~~ Real Estate Salesmen 
en le t-moving 


‘eve 


AS 
_3-5960. rece 
es 


salesman ver $3000 
ince Jan. 1. Call . tt A 
or appointment. R , 
A ha F448 
REAL ESTATE SALESMEN — We 
need 3 oo real — 
z. 


salesmen with or Sil. 
multiple. listing office. Expr. not 
med. J. BLANCH- 


tart im 
ARD REALTY. 8435 Ga. ave nw. 


Immediate 
men or wom 


We have 


SALESMEN 
OR 


xpansion tion now under way 


FOR INTERVIEW 
IN WASH. & MD. CALL 
LI. 6-3300 
IN VIRGINIA CALL 
JA. 8-4444 
RENAIRE CORP. 


IN WASH. & MD. CALL 
Li. 6-0443 
IN VIRGINIA CALL 
JA. 8-4444 
RENAIRE CORP. 


nt of 
. mar- 


the Washington area. w 
4 se} 


. te ra 


SALES 


CAREER 
SALESMEN 
WANTED FOR 
EXCEPTIONAL 
OPPORTUNITY 


One 56 Se Be ee or 


izations in the country 


rnish car and 

furnish ambition 
‘ability. Guaranteed sal- 
3-7894 


and sale 
See ST. 


ary whi 
Call > 


COLLEGE GRADUATES—TECHNICAL 


(Engineering, Physics, Mathematics, etc.) 


Young men graduating from college, sep- 
arating from the armed services or other- 
wise interested in the attractive oppor- 
tunities offered through permanent em- 
ployment in the BELL TELEPHONE SYS- 
TEM are invited to call MR. NORWOOD 


for an interview. 


eid that is is 
t mak e money. 

rested we 
ay ike te ey you for 
an 


HOME FREEZER 
FOODS 


growing EE 

ME. 7-9900, Ext. 2043 
Monday thru Friday 
8:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. 


r ware deperiment. 
nside sale 


Melpar’s expansion 
has created new 
positions for men experienced 
in the following fields 


ances i} rm credit, 
ing “No oe: Drawing ac- 


SALESM N 
Excellent opportunity. Experience 
preferred, but will consider young 
man who is willing to iea Apply 
Winslow Co., 922 x ¥. ave. 


SALESMEN 


E: Evenings and Satur- 


Sheet Metal Layout 


W. R. 


Machine Parts Inspection 


Electro Mechanical Inspection 


making $100 and 
gh appt. colt wae, - “7488 "anti te 
Monday and Tuesd 


gixunthan adhe aeeaaed 
vancement assured for wi wide ewes 
man for inside saleswork,. 


Precision Assembly 


MELPAR INC. 


1311 South Fern St. 


Arlington, Va. Gg 
fa on cota 


ul 
qnhatten, “kato A Radio 


1706 7th « 


SALESMEN— Ali ocatine anes 
retail) sales. lumber, hardware. etc. 

salary. Paid vacesyens. pone 
it s er 


many 
fits. baring ang m opportunity | soe ad- 
vancement with pr ve 
d. a ae 


pany. oe Mrs 
Company, 15th ond H St 


ith oleae 
wkly. during Yrainine 
sponse should ine 


(1 blk. off Jefferson Davis Hwy. 
comm! 


Route | at South 15th St.) ear expense, Write qualifics- 
, 7. Ne Howard 8. 


WE ARE EXPANDING, AND WE NEED 


ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS 
PHYSICISTS 
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS 


New fields of activity such as automation and guided missiles, 
plus the continued rapid expansion of other projects and facili- 
ties, create immediate opportunities in the following fields for 
PHYSICISTS, ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS and MECHANICAL 


FIRE CONTROL 
PULSE TECHNIQUES 
MICROWAVE TECHNIQUES 
GUIDED MISSILE COMPONENTS 
ELECTRONIC COUNTERMEASURES 
RADAR 
GUIDED MISSILE FUZING 
SYSTEMS ENGINEERING 
PRECISION MECHANISMS ° 
MECHANICAL COMPUTING DEVICES 


QUALITY CONTROL AND RELIABILITY 
ANALYSIS 


HIGH-SPEED AUTOMATION MACHINERY 
ELECTRO-MECHANICAL PRODUCT DESIGN 


SHOCK AND VIBRATION ANALYSIS AND 
SIMULATION 


PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES 


Persons at all levels of experience are needed . . . Emerson is a 
steadily growing organization, and offers challenging assign- 
ments. Come ompany benefits, including on-the-job graduate study 
programs are available. 


INTERVIEWING MEMORIAL DAY 


Evening or weekend interviews will be arranged at your convenience. 


TU. 2-6800 


EMERSON RESEARCH LABORATORIES 
701 Lamont St. N.W. ° | 
. Washington 10, D.C.” - 
A Division of Emerson Radio & Phonograph Corporation 


pi ‘MEN 


ENGINEER 


For Contract ste 
te elect 


“Bom 
2 a 


ay for reliable 
vere! ae 


SILK SCREEN 
PROCESS PRINTERS 


Have . experienced 


anent 
Eons ests with pay. 
apoliye in person, 
+s st nw 


SPOTTERS 


Experienced on westene. or large 
dr Oa Apply PER. 


RCADE- RUNSHINE 


NW. 


STOCK CLERK 


Experienced in working 
with electronic stock de- 
sirable. Should be familiar 
with basic electronic com- 
ponents and have strong 
ability in dealing with 
people. 


Excellent worxing condi- 
tions. Liberal vacation and 
sick leave. Suburban loca- 
tion. Convenient transpor- 
tation. 5-day week, Com- 
pany benefits. 


The Johns Hopkins 
University 


APPLIED PHYSICS 
LABORATORY 


8621 Georgia Ave. 
Silver Spring, Md. 


crt STOCK CLERKS 


evious stock experience Gosiradie 

ut not ww: Perma t posi- 
tio ith pending Teseareh 
organization. 


REGULAR MERIT REVIEWS | 
MANY EMPLOYEE senents| 


APPLY IN PERSON 
MON. TUES. THUR. FRI. 
8 A. M. TO 4 P. M. 


MELPAR, INC. 


cnission. | A SUBSIDIARY’ OF WESTING- 


HOUSE AIR BRAKE CO, 
1311 SOUTH FERN ST. 
(Off Jefferson Davis Hwy.) 
ARLINGTON, VA, 
or 
3000 ARLINGTON BLVD. 
FALLS CHURCH, VA. 


TECH. 
WRITERS 


Freperetion aff instruction manu- 
and aoe ation proced 


— t 
on tn electronic or previ- 
cal writing experience’ 


essary 
interesting and challenging ass 


ent on Sivesetiie’ oblems. 
ull informat ” 


APPLY IN PERSON 


MON., TUES., THURS., FRI. 
8A. M.TO4 P.M. 


MELPAR, INC. 


A Subsidiary of Westinghouse 
Air Brake Company 


3000 Arlington Bivd.| = 


Falls Church, Va. 


TOOL pawns 


Degree in Mechanical En- 
gineering or equivalent 
training plus five to eight 
years experience in tool 
designing. Also requires 
knowledge of shop meth- 


ods and practices. 


INTERVIEWS DAILY 
:30 


Saturday By Appointment 


ERCO DIVISION - 


ACF Industries, Inc. 
Riverdale, Md. WA. 7-4444 


SENIOR SYSTEMS| | 


job with re ana oppor. 
petty 7 


ures on| 


NEED 5 MEN 


b WASHINGTON post and TIMES HERALD 
Monday, May 28, 1956 31 


= ABBEY irst 


sses. downto ma goed 
ing. nr 


YOUNG MEN 


(WHITE—18-28) 
DBRANCH 
$125 PER WEEK OR MORE "ST. 3- 


Waitresses. down town 
Cook, private ex 

200 rivat 
F ook, Ari., 2-1 
] $35.4 


Proven to You in the Field 
” on =, = 
ers Sof on of se? Reams girl. su. 8 
andw h- BkReRe i $43.20 


ss 
POSITIONS, INC. 


NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY | 
1334 Mass. Ave 


WE TRAIN YOU 
AT OUR EXPENSE 
CAR FURNISHED ih’ publications 
CALL MR. GREEN ECEPT. TYPIS a pub te 
EX. 3-4467 TYPIBT. ‘inert = Sto 
Before Noon Te. »voriee all ese 


BEEPR.” poe. auetast ve men’s 
$100 Per Week to Start 


. 85 


25-835 
450 


snop. matur 
a AND MED. lab. techs 
NCR 3000 and 2000. 
will icate Beth. can Wash 
areas. No fee $2800 
KFYPUNCH aipha and num m 
. $243 
WAITRESSES. 
table exp. 
good SY fr ¢ ah* 
SALES TRAINEE. er “busere. 
retail $50 


COLORED 


Salad girls. oxD. Beth... Ch. Ch 
area mea 
WAITRESSES: fountain and table} 


| "CALL ol y £ 9217 
ACCOUNTANTS... 
D.C. EMPL. EXCHANGE | 
WHITE & CAGED 
| Lab. technician 
“| Stenographers 
Clerk-typists, 50 w 


work. 5 days. 40 pay, 
ain. | 


ight 
unity to 


ce in anes mee busi- 


+ de ~ o national | 
school etaduate| 
ga a 


4 bugines Ei vy 
ar tu fohod supe nt- 
ae _ 97900. Univers Cit. 

° 


tureierably 4 
rried, to work a vn Arlington 
ieee st 


‘ 4 “Sth "Bier 


backaround, 


count er 
Pv ype J furn.. 


an 


ness rn with foes 


y spate time, 


showing educationa! 


te $350. Call 


mee know and ‘wh ripool; | 
$45 
ant your own usiness?| Wait tresses, wht (10), Waitresses 
We have new service stations for; 5) (10) 
fT) Counter girls ..... 
Fountain girls 
Cooks .. 


Investment recuired. Cail! 
= | 4 


UNI 


or part time in our a 
ver 


over 


; to 
Laundry workers. a! types 
Shirt prose caeulore 
ork. | Salad <«iris 
: MANY OTHERS. 
1512 Sth St 
HO. 2-1572 


ALT 
NW 


For apt. “on JA. 5- HO 2. 551 2| 


» cem 
canvassing. 


‘ea. 8n0 uD. 
nN ine. * P5a" Mass. ave pecs Payable Clerk 


panding engine ring: firm in, of .st 
| we neers firm in 

PART-TIME : 

6-9:30 P. M. 


8 neat-appearing reuns men. white, 
work. in research library division of | 
large nat'l concern. No experience | 
necessary. vnad he icemen and 


co 
ese, ss. yor $19 per eve. 
ew. “aia udson 


bo x 2 - aie Scene me Ba 
Bids. 4-5 p 


Attention Students 
Pull or part time summer employ- 
ment. Heraings of $60-$90 weekly 

3 D. m. rm. 7 


Pr 
nw. Di. 


ier roune Ae 
‘epaduat e .-* schoo!) 
© £00d y + st. Lib- 


-hour w 
At lantic pt Corp ia 
Ex 106. 


-7500 


| ADMIN. SECY. 


Some public contact Sing 
Y.—$375 


| Mature person. Some bkkps. 35 


} CLK BEGINNER—$250 | 


Gen 


723 Sheraton Bidz. 


Admin. Secys., 
Select positions in PUBL Cc 
TIONS. CA 

UCA 


or our landscaped products an 
design services make it ee eee 
to add & m 


énces. Experience in our field i 
not required. As this century old 
company will train and pay you! 


MMER , 
CLERK-TYPISTS, Many to $70 
p. Hill to $5000 | 
: relations 2s $4200 | 
(mer a rep.) $85 | 
s. (oll) contact |||. ° 


or 
te build a future. F mee 
pe. shorthand | 


terview call ’ 
3-7700 Monday, 39: s m. t 


: is! 

legis lication) _ 

(transportation) 

¢ (gvistion) 
Export 
ak. -TYPISTS. Cap ‘mur. 
RECEPT Siete : 
REGINNE 

| HIGH BCHO 


? Bee us; co me | 
by early pefere. the jobs are gone.) 
Sure Employment Agency, 915 Fia.: 
ave. nw 

guarantee; 
ca or over 7-5038. 
A | 
White ung me for superior 
pai aitterent. dignified evening | 


"Phone HU. 3.6109 
NOTICE, MEN) 


Starting Salary 
$86.50 Weekly 


Dignified, permanent career in| © 
growing 20-year-old organiza- | 
tion. Highest earnings in D. | 
C. area. Public relations and| 
sales. Personal interview at 


Washington 


»-| National Cemetery 
4101 SUITLAND RD. SE. 
RIGHT OFF 38TH ST. 


PHONE 3 Jordan 8- 7220 
T. 10-5 


Various a 
select offices. 


Annette D. Tatelman 


hse iy $320 
ARLINGTON A 
-TYP.. train on eo 
P. yn attract... ; “38 


ADMIN 


2 WwW wi WPI MED ID 


«et te tiet et Pee 


PRIRFAX FALLS CH. 


RECEPT -TYP.. Pa! . hs 
RECEPT .-TYP 


Culm toy 
ALP EOS Sten Bpow! noes wr 


POTOMAC aT pie, tail S. 0 | 


EMP. AGCY 


2334 Wilson o Ari. JA. 5- 2000 


Auto Washer 
Rees. Let AL Exp. only 


hr 
e301 ADMIN. aa to MGR. | 
Open | qe a pues 6 gocrotars ‘$360 
Agency YPIST, 
‘LLOYDS EMPL. ‘SER 


ede | 
well-known gton ‘manu-| 1420 N Y Ave. NW ST. 3- 2207 
., . ted. 


ees Gee inge ublimited use AS! ST. HOU! USEKEEPER 


Car necessary. For appt Cal 


Wa rebouseman see 
Long Driv 
Certified ployment 


HAVE YOUR JOB 

apaaiak “3 retined 
r 

work. Guarpateee 


ae: for local 
ST. 3-3434 


1404 N. Y. Ave. NW. 


Ped udes. end com de- 

ils as well as your qualifications 
be disc per- 

sons! interview. For appointment 


om <a 
iA Cleaner manager .., 

. *-* . $35 | 
ort order cooks . 


Who Tate 
ies go By: me, 
J ‘Wrour u i 
.. aU 


ra rset Tuesday: 


dealer 
@ title cler - 
and ~~ car 


On 
with car. Your spare sown P 
. turned to weekly 
} Four name, : pleas- 
to 2 ant working conditions. hir- condi. 
further in- ogg office Apply in person to 


| Addison "Chevrolet Sales, 
Inc 


t Te EAR 
| oth ae a 


Laree downtown atilomobile dea!- 
ership has an opening for a clerk- 
bookkeeper, Ro need in service | 
rts mmary wor 
Tienes requir 
conditions; 


‘ity you 
er mad, i. 
12th 


futw uture, 


ag. mar. 
ot at BOKDs. my sts. 


& Ga x. rson 
RO 
NC., lath at. 


have some e 
| fas eens. Apply in 


BAKERY SALES 
CASHIERS 


POSITIONS OPEN IN 
SILVER SPRING, MD. 
LANGLEY PARK, MD. 
SHIRLINGTON, VA. 


For presentable women, 25 to 


Conese at ina pels.” to as 
PIONS, Re 


1334 Mass. ve, 


16 45——as salespersons. 


pave Ame NED 
IR 
= Bang APPLY 


HOT SHOPPES 
OR 


EMPLOYMENT 
OFFICE 


16 


$7 
S6u 
& A . good = 


, watare att 
£65 


at Thomas Cir 


| Work In , Se teterie in Navy 


| 
' 


f 
[IGGETT’S EMP. SERV” 


e of Washington's largest down-| 
shits has) 


Uniforms | 


: 


ria $59 | 
mos f $43 HELP, WOMEN 


ee 


415,000 

Sunday 
Circulation — 
mears quicker sales results 
for Washington Post and 
Times Herald classified ad- 


vertisers. To place your ad 
for Sunday. 


Phone 


REpublic 7-1234 
16 


5-day 


BA 
Age 21 to -re ecperies enced, , A ho 
; h 


$35 
$33 A peg 


| Bxperienced. Salary open 


; at tcetient advance. | 
eek. salary | 


$400 | 


on | No shorthand. Wor, for 1 per son. | 


EX. 3-2 
711 14th Nw 


| Immediate permanent o 


ANY OTHERS | 
d interesting fields in| 


235 Woodward Bide om &HNW | 
=~ Pi se — 


Whit $45 
NO MONEY TO PAY UNTIL WE sinGER SEWING 


saos| 1341 G St. N.W,, Rm. 200]. 
Ave. 


spply to to The City 


STS Vincent et Vincent. Hair 
in new Eastover “shop! ne 


ter. salary pilus commission 


in busy No. Arttnsten. salon: Fibers 
income must have reference. Also 


and 1 part time 


piv Atlantic 
paeury. A da wil"s a At 


weak iralnees HS Grad 


A.) ASSOC! ‘ore. 


ror RW, “°Miss Rag 


er. 
rienced, $day, wk yo tim 


oa CEEPING. 


MACHINE OPERATORS 
rn. 3 
person sseneas Me 

., "neon : ist Wat onal 
Arlington. Va.. 249 
JA §-6300 sine 


Bank aa 
Giebde 


BOOKKEEPING 
MACHINE 
OPERATORS 


Wwe have sever al openings in 
posith Bank experie 
preferr ed but. ‘not essential. We 
rain these with sutapic previous 
sapartonse Ase 18 to 


5-DAY, 40-HOUR WEEK 


working conditiens. Ve 


Excellent 
ad many other 


cation with ow An 
employee ben 


Apply now for a job with 6 


Future 
in Washington's 
Oldest and Finest Bank 


THE NATIONAL 
BANK OF 
WASHINGTON 
1337 Conn. Ave. NW. 


NO PHONE CALLS 
“BRANCH SECRETARY 


General Motors Corp. 
Kr owledge of out omobile finencial 
tatements helpful Secretar 
perience re 
qualified 
fritz Bide.. 


diercon a TVA 


student for 


ence. pleasant wor 

days. Come: In to see 

g wepeay May 729. 2 
s Room GEORGE 

NG INGTO = Preceric 


~ CASHIER-CHECKER 


MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 
penin 

t ria in Gevernment bullding. 
I t mental addi- 
rly daytime hours 
Age 18 to 40 


™. 
WASH- 


hou! . aan 


Government Services, Inc. 
‘1135 2ist &t. NW 


CASHIERS CL —Neal, white 
co\l. girls: up to 860 wk. Register 
with Sure Empl. Agency. 915 Fia. 
ave nw. for guick jace : 
CABHIER—Day shift. 7 5 
person Mayflower Denut 
Pst. NW 
: and 
time Exce! workin cone 
salary Spply Me rs fast 
Cc nd Soa. 
CHECKER for Aude? 
ar exper good 
hooly PEDE AL SUPER TAR 
2430 Pen ee A 


CASHIER- CHECKER 


12:45 TO 9:45 PM 


Pull time 


Bul! Ae 
Constitution Ave. 
iW.. Monday throug Friday. Ace 
20 to 40 Apply to 


GOVERN ithe 2) eo | wealth INC. 


ing at 


_— 


CLERICAL 


BETHESDA 


Interesting joboratery office: pete 
manen t Need stenoereper. 
1 typist only Ideas | 

40 hrs... $60 "pins benefits, abertes 
Interviews for 


available 
can be srranged, 


Sa and Sun 
Mes Jones, OL. 4- 
CLERIC AL— -Young lady ‘te % 
— xk in large 


on; 
ee + 
our wee 


40- compa 
tits and paid vacation whee weale 
ied Chance for séveneets ent. 
son only te 
\CHINE Co., 


per workin 


pel y slendas in 
8045 t.. Sliver 
2 blocks fra = 
L —U 
in recor rds 


— 
position 
Typine 8 not can aquired me 


pg 


1 
RCADE EMPL. i nant BoPiiate™ of oe third” vn 
‘CLERKS —Por—« 


Clerk-Typists. 
Secretaries 


INTERVIEWS DAILY 
30 


Saturday by Appointment 


ERCO DIVISION 


ACF Industries, Inc. 
| Riverdale, Md. WA, 7-4444 


CLERK-TYPIST 


must 
-| PERMANENT postion Ir OUR 
3209 MAIN OFFI 


EXPERIENCE NOT 4 
BUT SHOULD BE ABLE TO” pe 


MANY | 
Loin ORDUP IN 


Pb Ue Ae 
CREDIT UNION PACT 


5-DAY. 40-HOUR WEEK 


APPLY 


SAFEWAY 
STORES, INC. 


EMPLOYMENT OFFICE 


1845 4TH ST. NE. 


re ge 
i 


ng 


I 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD \} ” SERA | Ae ___16) HELP, WOME | : | 
__ 32 Monday, Mey 38, 19% : cr er peaés| Hoare Sts Sa EG we Settee] sa sue eee | ~=—6 TELEPHONE 
382,000 * Se ee Hotel | RAN RCER A ea ; SOLICITORS 
Daily CLERK-TYPISTS |__ - | ex Bat as Wang 
fs Ly tf 00 for _apooin . era i r 
Circulation CLERKS aia not te Sipftg ene suncede roeuret. JO | ‘Protestant arena af| Ambitious adi |B an sees re 
| -|"General otic th ae “Teldbhone. voice palpi ae fat ps gare ia 


means quicker sales results | positions available in an ex- 
for Washington Post and panding research organization. 
Tienes Hewld classified of Opportunity for advancement. 


vertisers. To place your ad Pintcideih suburben $a 104K te i i ,-1-7aee | >t. : , P ” 
: Meni AOE iast| SECRETARIES (2) | gt Tae, ata eines. «| Becta Mi Shay AB Reo a a 
" 7; 0 


e location. , 
Phon Permanent resident of ; - | SPeeeNGERS fT ae , 4 Dp. m. ngle room with 
\ . ; sees ot eS . sor am- 7 > ™. te " ’ — D. wi uble room with wine 

REpublic 7-1234 this area preferred. : , 4. S98! youne lon. Matt’ $4756 | Engineering and consult- a Poe. > : 

pu : ce a Be « 1334 -- week. ality. an _¢ to i Sa «eve Sun. POTOMA c 

Er ing firm in Alexandria de- ep- ’ 
; =. Dt -typ- 102 jer- ve ep wi ¢ ren. 18TH AND H STS. NW. 
EN 16 Mon TUES — THUR PR « rusty “ day and ‘atght tauty Ganteas ; sires an alert and person- t. t : _ by: st, mont Ave. N.W.. ite ‘0. on- 3 -day meek ref a aes acm L* bath apt to suites, 
| oon TO 4:00 P SECY. , Welfare work. Ga. oe nursing service, bi ' open " See | aly. aE : 
dren's valescent Home. able girl as secretary and OR 2340 Wetsoms . : ; 6 anita, te care tor 2 children | carlin 


! Boyt ' . 12th & ra. . spusewerk IO. 8-6248 | “HAWTHORNE HOTEL” 


BCRP. Typ. Dr.’s of¢, | i n %= 
‘ oral sureeon’s assistant to purchasing + Lady with car. Your spare time can 
pay checks 600 ou for gen. houseworker. | 2134 G ST. NW. 


seeacemut x: MELPAR, INC.|¢ A SE Sa, Pa 
ee ty - --* or ‘ EEO, Ses ot ae voll to «tart. ‘Gre 7, 7-7 agent. Excellent oppor - $40. Pome f a . ' a 2 children: salars; after 
i © ee At | mora pt TYPIST ’ name. ad ‘ nd | p 3293, ra bao al decorated. Sy seracety 
S "medical studies. ERTY EMP. ‘SERV’ er tunity. 5-day, 40-hour hone number to Box Post- wa 5 =Li eS joed. Attrac. sgle. ad db! 
: TH for. further. information pe , a ve “ie ~a0 yTs perm anent and transient. “Phen 
w rE urs. and) elevator. maid service 7-40 oT 


cotons or related | re ca writtie. nder 50. 
Must be) A Subsidiary of mn Elisworth Dr. Silver Sprine | {°° — ut n g i , 1 
see versatile and cap: | WESTINGHOUSE Air-Brake Co. "anos v1 ial ~~ den roy ao ' a i week, salary open. For full-time typing; ARE Rr, ay ae + you 44 anf perienced need 4 rt ane 2: 441. a3 ESL TEL 
: ee fcthuted™ oft TH — cin duate: LAUREL, hte ce white; permanent posi- money for craretio te whrr + val Nias | VW FY "HO 
: y yo n-/! ’ 
at stat 8 rine salary PP eer z pradue ag women. ive im, private| Interesting position in per- tion. Must type 50 wpm.) Bir it'avon. vie 7-0221. 8 ‘ , a a Pri: 2131 O ST. NW 


: ry PERN & 
Big ie . wae} «= “OP RinaTON. va. KITCHEN HELPERS ALE CLERK | «sonnel and sales group. | S-day, - 40-hour  week.| forempiored peos SS ok hater RE | 


Oterview ca. Aq) 
Intelligent young woman with ap- Involves working on. re- Sick and vacation leave.| Ar ington y= 900 | Tion’ YR” “ME | NEAR DUPONT CIRCLE 
ur . 


3000 ARLINGTON BLVD. Openines—night shift—for kitch- me ‘yping ° Cash bonuses: air-condi-| 1 girl office, age to 50 be] 
y cruitment and other per- “Sec —- : ) 
pe , Conn. Ave. Upper y - a of. 25. ye 3, ie 6535 | Modern, Comfortable 


CLERK-TYPISTS FALLS CHURCH. VA. en trainees: night differential pay, esse : ae 
Sas meas ene uniforms ee ete Aeely  perven- sonnel correspondence. tioned building. Call Capitol Mill Secy Ion ee Li : 
50 new openings DAILY —inquire SITUATIONS, MEN 19 iving That You Enjoy 


FILE CLERKS CLERK-TYPISY—Por _cdiiarial of APPLY MOT 

- yp EL STATLER Personnel experience de- HO. 2-2476 in ton welcome Miss 

fice. Good typing ae 2 ET $9940. (Est, 40, yrs) ith) OE 

B-day. gee A a tas ote BL. —_ B HESDA HOT SHOPPE a a sirable but not necessary. BOYD’ S, Cor 12th au G iY Bields. including journalism. public | $60 SINGLE PER MONTH 

Ey = S | office, Bit did ee benefits, RE. 7- College or equivalent gt gy iment analy + 25. mar. HO. 2-9100 
AMBITIOUS MOTHERS | | 


Many Compary Benefits —Tittractive PAYROLL CLERK back \ firm 5-day wk. pleasant itt -— 
ground. Extellent op- im Georgetown. 4) ; riting and re-| STAY Al THE FRIENDLY ~ 
interesting py EMPLOYMENT OFFICE wks. vac. itn per. sick leave.) ole inch ni Cialis haat ee i 218s, | 21346 ST NW E RET 4027 


increases. vacation portunity to advance. Sal- - N | 
h while emplove 1341 G St. NW., Rm. 200 Kes opening. 1 ty mE oe h routine oflice experi- several ladies to work 3 hours per | ate “35 male— ial Why? Because we he 
Wa Ee systenr and ary open. e ao day at own convenience. Average m pale , driver, smal) | Clean. attract 4 single and 


/ 
ib 
n Shaw for. sivancement A gy $25 : . k driv white, 2S 
No “ear For inter-| © ly, QUEENS, RE Air-conditioning 


it 
es ay INS. Ome | COMMERCTAL wi ase bes hinr ayaa Gnderlying work, 8 ould woot , neu g plan: permanent posits Br. 

| re-| 1341 G@ St. Suite 224. ME. 8.3629 working wnsenaitons: air-condi- CORP. Storage Co.. OL itt tan- sanrron’s jo and os a Beautiful patio tor sunshine 
| ° - “ D tioned builldi TYPIST. “TERK b te. Home Products have openin 71-0620. Reasonable "rates from $9 50 

~estad. fipencial institution , Bdustries. - 2900, 3 263 901 N Me Stross. Alex., Va al Estate. bank. morteage. or) 840 week A two evening 8 OUNG ACCOUNTANT. BCS and per week up 
Ped lady aeed 18-| sonnel Office. "aa 58 st Call Dil. /- xt. 9-7500, 106 oe Alexandria « area. ser and = two mornin Cal i MCS. desires part-time accts c | BACHELOR GIRLS RESIDENCE” 

oP to 12 neon, } through Pri. IN MARYLAND BETWEEN oA MASP we cermeneey, var? .. TT eS Ets for interview | prs. , Dublic . nd tax ex INTERRACIAL 

fo Pri. 9 to 5. ' 71058, Box 576. Post- “4863 A Ra. uw DE. 2-8399 


tee? HOTEL—916 isth st, nw 


| esapiores fit rit A *: 
all Miss Pings N. 4- CONTROLLER mbitious Women | 
Jpts Tor appoininent———__— ‘ve | PERSONNEL ASSIST, ——Recest,| ——SECYS.-TYPISTS | Ty : i 
RSO Is iS > PISTS (3) EMPLOYED LADIES | SITUATIONS. WOMEN 20 aan tir mé.; with. without 
: ERT PETER INI 


i ouble room: near 8 


Air-Conditioned Offices 


CLERA-TYPIST 


age | Just What You've ‘ 
CLERK:TYPISTS excellent accountant and good su-| Beer Looking For | parted post vison See ABBEY First | EXPERIENCED 7on ECTE, Basse ce Gee | 
5-2000 | Take cosmetic orders for national Rie awit. QUEENS. RE. 7-5328 


excellent accountant and 
r *ermanent position for | E E M . 
; ig! rson. Your reply will | arn txtra oney ene hes . . we. en | firm: our employed representatives Also fer summer employ. 33 DE. 2-1885 
Typ! speed not essen-| .. confidential. Box 5866 , Our continued growth requires 1200-81500 ' " ; PERMA ; 
{i - per Year extra| ment. Typists. teachers for a! NENTS on 
i Former e ihiee experience mio) oet-TH. OH bic Mi from Your Home PBX OPERATOR | ev Bes $0 | more typists. Must FAST part-time employment: types of ‘placemen ASONABLE 
he week 8.3 | Bec.” plush pitice esteee LEA 50 wpm.) nd ACCU. popes eer Por in- UDENT COL CORED,” /y. rT RrT Se aw, 
ual and sick leave. Must Have Pleasant y., legal 4 RA Varied, interesting | duties | bare ep ehogt P S ST @ went work Re wi. — x 
, economical cafe- 8 | Tel Voi Permanent full time position for ..§65| im our air-conditioned of- “H CY CRAD. | m8 vous counselor Pub. School, | 
air- i oe 4 ea ; e ephone oice experienced PBX trator. 5-de Secy., . Ari . Ask about our Seeral” bene. y" 6UL ‘ee, “Cpl. o oat LS ont priv, 
Sok, Spree comers hme | ERs Teen wooo | ANG So gy" bem | Re RP ea Gd 
s - st. ne. : tet ms 


es. 
: y pereoae ae sala 5- 7 
hird RQUITABLE| Dodd. "Hechinger Co. isthe and i Good rtunity for | Apoily in person ener. 8. 
E Oppo y To poly b R = 4 WAIThERAP -| Clerk-tvpist, 18 te 22. general of- | pending on ‘tuture. BA. dearee.| rn; cook. privils. - 


* INSURANCE CO. 816 i4th| sts. ne Ae 
COOKS superionic ced Saiad and Alert Women PERSONNEL OFFICE Beginner sten s , ; . | Widely traveled. Background inc! ome seater at oe ae 
CLERK-TY salary aE " * ttlame AMERICAN oy TEES "igh 83 ed n uly 1. No eaneaaund Be x °2 § i3th «st. nw. er 
E D PIS Hunting Towers pee cee. LU. 4-8982, 7 to 9:30 P.M, INSTRUMENT CO C Dist, G'town ....... $3200 fall or part-tia e; pt nings tt _— -480. Post-TH sinele RAS okae al das Bn Sunday. 
raat, ert a eT ST SE. APT tatistical typist .’:.’./..$250| weekends. STONE Hier. ye CITIZENS BANK OF MARYLAND | rotestant, exp. woman ¥. 
F house mother) oe 10s Marvargs rr = ~ a, 
ooming house.| rm. oo -onb 


Exp. on on erga and collection work | iia Va. R98 Bivd., Alexan- 8030 Ga. Ave., Sil. Spg., Md. fa ornera, nity er_ 8 one, = 
arly 
the best time to. get * 100 _ Sure | Write Box. M-121, Post-TH COLORED o- 330 ¥ st. nee a cely 

furn for gentleman. 


ist ADoV * aver~- 


' Cali KI . 8 order, col. ..835- 
Sepastae? isa Fountain siti colored  .”|$30-638 LIBRARY PRX OFERATONFaliel operator Position combines some advertis ; eEeErerer mre 
resses. white. day. nig ° or busy boa us 5 e ciet-| in uc wit secretarial NW - 
i — eth ts leal work: day ¢ time 7, 8-hour| "Holds. long-range pt ge tng Warn EEL Na “Appi x RED SITUATIONS, DOMESTIC 21 COL. om ate Home. 
andicapped | for qualified Good steno- st. nw. ” ' as Seamstress: | BETTER class Girls, maids, coons. | COE Seay pee 
Cc & 50 


OUR | | L ref waa 5 
. erred. A ie Forsenne! Of- | 3 — Se | ; 
al att Sondivion of-| Permanent position in credit of- ASSISTANT Fice 1229 “oh 9 to 12) 5 Some ex SSES——(2)" White. Pull or be ples tine: emp, feuntal S*c| instant maid service. Call GSA! = Me te 50 & $10.50. Li. 
Tice “pacelient “salary. 2 Experienced| fie¢; pleasant working conditions: Monday throush ‘Friday. ' ge to 35 gf > Saas —-y M5 >and tine . five Washington, ‘Be rg of 23282 ne -—1320 A st. nw.; f 
. typin d - , : : SF ’ __ 32-0826 ” riv a ° *% * 
M ¢ require Southern Dis- “reer | 8300 $-day pyeetk. Anca acoT? KEY COPPEE : z, wk. $7. Manning's 1910) eaae-po on 029. oe OL. 1881 rT 
fast) sonnet Oitice, DI. 7-3330. ext. 424 | WA tb | avail, White  urse. also it.: 


t mor Call r , 
< “tor interview unt, 50) Rhode Island Ave 600 goth st a ee ee 
RESSES—wW ite, 6. neat and COLORED | hekprs. W 


DU. 7-847! 500 
ENERAL "SERVICE DENTAL ASST—Exp. and trainee nde isi teno. Miss Grant 4 Bovp's. 700, Ss | | e W. age 23 
LIFE INSURANCE CO Medic Becys. djctaphone oc U f supervision of com- 12th cor. G. A. 8-2340 ae / Nationa! Geographic 1ety a ap << » seems SALES REPRESENTATIVES. super-| mother’s helper ¢ needs training 
RN's, Dr 3 ood. ~ open pany librarian to take Fi EPTION T sth pond M St. aw, = < . staurant, visors and mers. Must be ambi- QUEENS. 5328 p 
| Med Dr REC IONIS bk 21-35 years, experienced | tious. Have neat appearance. Perm. COOK, L.A_W.- Sleep out: no Sun- (COL. > 2 
e |  PROPESSIONAL "hci? * : charge of oe routines Neat « rine youne | women & nach, ee many other office age sie meee. emp! peed, Harving ee -| “dave: reference a 4-0219_ im” 142 23 wae Wi 
of research organization der ars AGCY., Bye. NW.| andria Va. KI 9-69 eX-| tions, health ins ge ATION A) -——Days.| housekeeping rm ° 
, graphic eof our ad 19-6990 t Pina ON) J $92 + $4) 
Seune teas for clert-4ypina pest: fer — < id : library handling classified ministraiive oftices. Exceptionally icy. as biked wartel 8. counter girls. coahiers.| ieee ca sive TE NEED HELP? — Co CO... a ™ 2620 wk, 
condition , nteresting work in air-conditioned | as. L rk-t t; mu | it- ig 
tion in attragtive | off, ces - “d8¥) ter. ‘MeL ii. Post-TH. and unclassified reports office: good starting salary, S-aay| HOUSEWIVES AND OTHERS WAT MERA wee $1.50 per hr te leoriee Pri. 2 ony houseworker Soares nea ya nw. SECTIONS —eeia.. 
| DICTAPHONE OPERATOR | ° and books principally in ,, STATLER EXPERIENCED AS 5640. I "Weawooa | Mon, mornings. -915 Pia. aye. i exe AP. NO {-9908._ | oay Room pext to ‘bath, quies 
4 


won Building Assoc. | 
io Good typist. for position in rapidis| physical science and en- s om Expert. MELP, MEN & WOMEN iy B-. “he be r 

eas- os ARIES. STENOS. ) ; *i8 849 

a A. 378. for gentleman: priv rr 6 4 ae 


_——-- OG St. N.W — | a . c , ’ ' 
CLERK. TYPIST ant ine AP. .. Oe 4° working gineering. Office and li- RECEPTI ONIST - Te J A aecre. CALCU kris OP PERATOI WA ; | i om | 
| ne re walter 4°p pm vu» NW.—Nicely furn “iit se 


Spmetiote opening for young lady fi ay eral UN oye brary experience and ced. at lobb ; 
ef average ability must be accu- rv . rillon House. an ditioned White, for aiens Rast Rtg = Hom 
te: S-dav, 40-ht. week: air-con sur ©.| training more important ment building 25 35. Pa tase) ACCOUNTING | oy Bor $3 4 zs hiwt mai Lb Neatly fra. Yet tan Fm. sel. of 
oft ¢, liberal employee Bie h hnical . 2500 Wisconsi . mw. Secre-| Call immediately. W lvani ye 
PPLY is 711 than technical experience; tarial, telephone service: hours 3-| you te balance your ve, —o ss oa. Are RW ide ) vee ae, ae : it 
Ss Ne BAPER TUBE co ave. sw so both will be useful. ll Dp. m.; cellent environment. ! os Ws -_ pite.. it om CLERK  Meaeee set he 1-00. §:9324 
ORU 2s coer coe permaneni position sod good salary PART-TIME OR potion es Lhe 4017 care; part = 
900 FRANKLIN ST st office duties. Salary an toh ; e an n . or full time 
| Sade Bikeepctgastiane Pasame| Position olforde 0 diversity | syes. Jyppens 2 te SUMMER WORK Ea ior max’ 5-Day, 35-Hr. Week hie aE ee ee 
r uerla , , ’ : or ; wan domestic work 2 7 ann nw Geckos 
CLERK ete avy schedule Apply Rock of activity mn technical li- to 9 in the evening except A neat large ond small rm Home nent 
“ ~ ence. over 21 —- Gesires athe en and } 
Rene with date srocping Pet greet Bt? 8309 Grubb rd. ots brary operation and would peueesar, Set eppetaent te be COLUMBIA EMP. SERV. toe stust be est excelini Are you now employed by GHW exper. refs. LI. 4-1912. <Empl cols. Reasons tia AD 2h 
C is ; panes enc t- 1341 G St, Buite 224. ME 2- son. @ he Old . 
: ont FILE CLERK |. SS Gees pene a's mist —— someones eel ey ce te ee SOoeaS, FURNISHED 7 A Seb 


ublic; “PBX ‘opr.-t t, 
Lady between 35 and 40 veare of isfactory pay for a person 4° P-| Secreta St S—White. | portunities are limited? If . ; 
° ; x , - n r ph hift. Excel. sa! - ; 

See MRP OH DER Me entering Worery work a 8 fitn'cor G@ iover Howard's, a ee staurant, JU. S280" ‘cell’ att | $0, we would like to talk to|“to bath ail new: at airport. $12 | COe abe By a eos 
623 o st. ew - or Practi seal Purse for able and capable Soe See . White, over 31; must) YOU Re B SAE VEN HO Sey . 4 Colonial terr, nicely “aan or couple. peg 2 snildver 

GENERAL of¢ wk. voaR ~ WE. Our organization is cur- room aad camp: $300 hs: ropner urate shorthand ant be =o is time. Apply in per | company. This position cfters mn priv. home for gcen- Li 4-064. 
: rreit, Dent so-t : es Call OTis “3428 eth: rently expandi its re- Ser. a a <phoee. = cont “er ppertunit dor, navance | | stat Dupont Garci excellent opportunity for ad- ARUINGTON'S- het tee es. | ° COL.—Monroe NW it! tT. JR 
s.. a : ‘ ; y ng ' ans TAMA GER. experienced. or visi ’ WAITRESSES | vancement. insurance account- oe room. private bath. twin beds, Cou: POO yeasonable. TU . 2-0 i 

search program, for o0-anit elevator und secr. , ald service; private entrance ms : ge. rm; & 
NW. ide. ing experience and some Parking JA." 8-8910 priv.; nice home. 62 

‘- 


ar chin ma ion of tw a whit & Dt. «Box ey Poti ACF ELECTRO smmerjoneet, Sor 48 te 8 knowledge of IBM dure | A A  Wasktine: 

. con , R NICS ger r a. mM, D. ™. now eo procedure | eeping rooms for gir 

; ites Bp rms.. r Atlantic Research Corp. : vier. "h 719 ith 1305 Leslie Ave., Alex.. Va he beautiful HowarB JonNson desired but not necessary.| fo," ee oie Washin | 2 

s N A i CO. | —~- n os ‘ ? ~ ~ ALEXANDRIA. VA. ¥ ir. KI ’ ” . 7 ie atta, Many company benefits, air- is G », 1348 Madison ze frt. rm, $7 wk. AD. 2-4550 

nis : ° — all oF part me : 8-4400 i sts : RM . privs.; $10 wk. LL 

——20_EBANKLIN 5 | part of salary: may be ri 9.7500. Ext. 106 eatessen: csaitine SHIPPING CLERK for dry cleaalne w a 2 nt ea conditioned offices. “APITOL WILL ox | ‘|ROOMS, UNFURNISHED 26 
- ; ft. -| plant. experience helpful b , COL _ 

ja33| plant. ex cod ai iv gan: | “Wight " must be APPLY fer M B.] 12013 “Se-aneg. untie’ wom pan all priv — 

: ne 


6th 


Ca! “ ‘ 
_CLERK- TYPIST i 13 30 5-9 > m. XCeD perienced es cl 8 a Whe “girl unit, ; zs <roon = Pa. ave, ~ 6). oF dbl mit. priv ve ROO 
: to M : ; ik. 
vee leading — oes HOPEL PBX OPERATOR MACHINE ssion. 37 “ * oe exp. am, ‘hr. oa ipemnties W; . & H PEOPLES LIFE INS. CO. COLUMBIA RD i ; - LA a ‘CiPiroL vic — = = 
rae ples. 0 ~ ae other ven eeees ostesses Room 706. 1343 H Bt. NW. COW WE Wie en, AD. 44330 | © rt yg Md ofa. fhe 


t Dupont Cire ea : SEP ERIEBCED D d : 
i te + oa Oot ape 8 ast be ex a 68 : COLUM  NW., 1254—Redec. 
or ed 2 H ES BOOKKEEPER AL L steady work pay. Wagnon night NEB TUR NE =: M : —— be A rm.; ref. it; fan. AD. 4-0341, 
RESTAURANT Wath me ‘te entail tee enemas 000 00  CAPETERIA™ MANAGER | | t pvt DEL AFIELD PL. NW... 1329—Lee 

) E STS. NW. Expeading OUF organization: we). 5 , : 30, | Dright bedam. kit next to. bath: 
ny benefits NIGHT AND DAY SHIFTS c 4 der 35. Excel candy shop sein ines in Arling-| resses, evenings and night work. ai AMD E © je an offer excellent opportunit CONN _ :. 37 B~e closets; for 2:3." RA 6-8458, 
| Pall or part ime open! e in Be. xperiencedc, under . cel- eys Crossro te. {ast, experienced only.| excellent y RANDY. for top-flight men or women ex-| ~ FP st. NW., 2143-—Clock-radio. TV: 

L. 77-2900. EXT 263 shesee. Md wormenes. ut ; lent working conditions pe ana panama taetion and. other Midwa -47 h perienced in complete operation} valk hom sirfoam $6. AY EX. 3-0653 
tite ey Ty ae pien- tween 10 and 12. JU 994738 for| ne experienced 1, tt + 21. excellent ‘tips. aitcond. 7° Mt + OM ONN. A trent . 27tt- ~Eixquisitely MASSACHUSETTS Aye, NW. 35— 

- r . r corn 5 a. ¥ ; 

sppointment for interview or| wool: wt st teady 47 at wo‘ staurant. 52500. Co record ie fo leave town: be wines yt. bath. DE 2-4145. (Also smali.| apartment; half free rent for take 


ol, rl. JA 421. . 
ny company benefits. .*t |! . 
WAI person, leaves Food | CONN. ‘a —NWice home: pvt ASS. a 
CO ee hot plate; $8.50 © 


Local branc = pious pe LS " Wate , lee 
Tea en seeks ° ee = wil mer sf NATIONAL GIFFORD'S = GAM ILK NISHER Experienced. Full or pers time. ice Corp. 8405 Ramsey ave bath fav: 56-3222 aft 
SAVINGS AND r Hy ond working conditions: gig: | METROPOLITAN” CLUB | RUE Apting. Me oy Tar meas cote AVES “Ize & — bed MASS. AVE. Nw.” 8 bevels, 
L ‘ as 


interesting office) 
oO dit ed 
pia iit | HOT SHOPPES a a mt : Fy Ry 
; ; . . : ine - , 
i lots of fun if aa aa take | YMENT OFFICE TRUST CO. Abe a Beeler 108m. ts, Vienn | shuren. in BE. section | $58" mo! es. ex elo itis: 3 av "lav. NEWT tN a eo rm. 
yourpelt 20 una Gai! Re EMOTO . eg gl OF R LP S| loset; $15 wk Dé. 2-05 96. "| $8.50 $10 for 2; adults 
r ; do not phone. West SNACK BAR logical and biood- oA fools ‘to | DUPONT CIRCLE roe 7.306, ey 
CO. 5-9692 


round "Ga RE 7. 134] G St. NW.. Rm. 200 | 193 A need; plece work rates; ox-| 
9 for appointmen - bana ga, 2° Ww Al TENDANT come ovorking pay Appiy | Mee Sigel, ex.“ 3-o00,. 2s alk to work. 2 biks. Mayflower free rent: girls. 
"Ger isen. MAN co..: dD ter American a0 Red, mt Motel; scle. & dbie. rms... newly a. = ate SE... 1004 — Yo turg, : 
NOERS. FILE CLE | 3 rm ‘ s LI. 4-29 


card 
: IGE “abet fe Inter- 
: 28 F a Ave. N | , J 

CLER KS ott a YARDS & DOCKS bitte g Ave. IY “exper, over houg young. Ht HS § s ‘ 

» : : " ryers 
Drug—Cigar—Candy—Fountain accessories in fine yo store anne ARLINGTON, VA, #, i Agency. ois ris, Ave. NW.| bath & shower rere crowd. $8 jivwu 1888 Cena a ed 
salary plus commissions and PMs. WOM EN U. 7-0478. | per wk. 1315 20th st. aw. DU * HU. 3-3040 ° 
FULL TIME pate vgeoen and ad company bene. Permanent position for busy units 60 mo. for eves. afl) 77-6644 _.. | T#f ST. NW 28S —Nicely furn. 
p 7? T in sove ment t building. No week- Bat. $3000 in @ wes. immer is | DUPONT ci —Tvin,_ aby 7" frig., hot plate, bathi 

Pleasant and Interesting A | COVERS cist a aw TNC: PHYSICIST Box "3203. %. "C, of phone UN bag ° 16x2 te bee NW a3 Pri 7 

sitar Beaten” a SICISTS | S3i0i on csetye ae ste | uni tans 


Working Conditions F HIN | AL : ——Pleasant Work, seed erga ee Mathematicians e le. ave, se. 2 lige. rms. and yard Gas 
Many Seemiyee Renee . Hiitlgs Pyeoce rons VA | tat mpraine egeaitons "hoo 104 | TRANSCRIBER | 22, *s3) 3 * | SOL oRED Rn ang a5i. 
° oun . ; _ ’ : Saee _— TA ana apts 
Paid Training Program ‘ wa ston Bids. 13th & New! 1 ecticate the challenging | ete. Sra om S228.—.-| ons. Security Realty. § 
J ; , NEW DOWNTOWN : -| | ‘ , cht bh 
ay AT Un PmEUPLOYRENT OFFICE AIDES fe wes Same Erne | Comrty meaiable at Mal! ror sey nee manag, rat Slat 173 DOWNTOWN 


pe. NW prance lith #&. 0 Bt n Leave Dame with Miss Grant h, de d' 
4 Fi e - 

fin hyn oie gee sg . ce thesda ot "BOYD'S. 700 12th. cor. G is Oe an wen on s 8 office "guties VIVIAN H TEL 
Quiet. home. slike: nice lobby 
i4-hr PBX 


perience for 
PEOPLES DRUG STORE College level training in math Biee "Cha Resi ort och * | ae. development of electronic | eral office experience: tape record- 


m } 


oc 
erred; full time; 5-day w equipment. For full infor-| ing experience preferred. A mini-| rm.. 24- ; 
all rms.: baths 


il r 
eek. 
A d of 6 ; 
oe ae ee necessary. Recent training or| Sew Suuulser APU ieee] — STENOGRAPHER | ™ation Bris Pans tcf "oting i ocr | oN ny Teen ae aap 
So = work experience desirable. APPLY IN PERSON ing conditions in air conditioned | m. Good transp 
Cc : loyment ex Whit to work in dry clean MON TUES THURS ERI building: many company benerits ee kL at $40 per 0. a5 i Re ne ey mools:, Coxe-te 
: ontinuous emp , -| *. exp. to wo - . , & a : ; 2 ‘ ” , . : 
HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS cellent pay, 5-day week, re-| ing store: | ro gned, persone cotant, § oren ize i 8A. M.TO4P. M. “Teun 6 9 reve Fi sae A oa 3a oila, B15 colviania a. By 
vrerant and iraurane ln sthEss | Seahisegmt |MELPAR, INC. _ Hier athe EY Sh 
vacation and sick leave bene- ‘FREDERICKSBURG (VA) 1 | Kwa gt 


DRAPERIES fence. perm | FRESE ? AREA ; ‘ ‘ 
fits. Age up to 50, U. S. citi-| Rept post grerase as A SUBSIDIARY ‘WESTING- vacation Sealice telat oe fc MARS . 1a00 Sel, Fre. | MASS. AVE. 


A NUMBER OF DESIRABLE PERMANENT POSITIONS ’ « 
renship necessary. STENOGRAPHER HOUSE AIR. BRAKE CO. ence, pleasant wo new ae 98 wk. up. HO. 2-9589. | : 
ARE AVAILABLE FOR QUALIFIED JUNE GRADU- AR Jmmodiste for alert facial 3000 ARLINGTON BLVD. 29, = be, tut on he ee a AVE ® " 
5-day. 40-| Business Room, Ns ate mod Wash. | l. & Dbi.r 


ATES. NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY. GOOD xperienced in bandling| lady in Order Dept - FALLS CHURCH, VA. meter ip single 
STARTING PAY. REGULAR INCREASES AND The Johns Hopkins | sz ca! Br, eek. "air-conditioned settien: . | PRON SN ._Prede = . ee cr 

, ; ouncin ast - 
CHANCE TO ADVANCE. SOME JOBS OFFER OPPOR- University RA.| Cent peas PAPER TUBE CO. | oune-camy—eercar gate want | ing Og erg aiaugae e fee ale, rma, = 


. PRANKI iN able to ty and -_s d Calif Call DE 2 ut) week ome 
TUNITIES TO USE TYPING, STENO for genera a5. as cent a4 “= grad wh intensive training course stertin oT wee: eo” et iach "singie and double aad ist young 
une 4 Nations! Acade o Clean sgie rm. : ioe water; 87 up. | 4 M 


or te Sete 
e 
APPLIED PHYSICS ours 9-5, vace- ition for real pe 
tien. v POST- . ‘Broadcasting, 3338 ‘eth ot. av. ala 
a Zi" Qur “Nice ee eon Now available in a centrally lee 


LABORATORY wrt A te : 46 good paving MM ; hom = osphere; avail. | 
THE CHESAPEAKE & POTOMAC ce -| ; ee weekends. S-day 7-9340 lems or ‘Tuesday COLORED June ene - rm. avail. now. ws nn oe ge he and. double 


Competent and personable. 


s with private baths. 


CO. , » ee Pall ST 3-3555. d must be between 21-40. App SUE ST NW. 16s owst a. ist 
Silver Spring, Md. art $6¢ 4 “Industries ‘a sewine,| SALES REPRESENTA TIVES. SU- frm: also singles, 86 vk. vidos lounge’ Air “conditioned din. 
: ay Pee.) Oe niooen’s » fastest-grow SERS for | SUE EF NW, 1786_Redec, ccle.| meals To! see, come to 
enaet tty 4 "oth ._ nw. @ + ee room. adi. bath: 86 50 week ‘ 


GMPLOYMENT OFFICE: 725 13th ST. N.W. JU. 9-7700 : non -p Inc. A Pield ow R pete 

. tion ; ie 12 noon, Mon. through Pri 

Open Monday Through Friday, 8:30 AM. to 5 P.M meepiatioh, So, alee aatat-| Reslingy scabs, ° wladerstrace ee gatagio. 68. Via Ni | Conlneed ew west lowe | De 
, NW, ‘HELP, MEN & WOMEN 17 


THIS SATURDAY, 9 A.M. TO 4:30 P.M. Employment Information | dist. a Weal Hst-| ks, Ouaran Shae,’ os it ‘ | 
a ome) YOUNG LADY : 1426 21st St. NW. 
or next fall. A THE EXCELLENT 


SALESWOMEN (eae hi. “Wweehs- ian 2 § N FOODS! ROOMS! (SERVICES! 
ASSISTANT i aaa fe $64.00 QUESTIO 4 eR WEEE 


Based 


BETTER DRESSES : SOENCY, 1341 -G NW. RE 1-2998 
o% Se ae tor mod- ste" MR. SHERIDAN DO YOU WANT oma + EW 


SPORTSWEAR nea 3157 WILSON BLVD. : ° Wainy ‘wes | 
THE VERY ACTIVE AND ATTRACTIVE cae Sid ath, Sa tnd!” ARLINGTON, VA. Weekly earnings of more than $64: I Fg 


CORSETS AND BRAS SPORTSWEAR DEPARTMENT . iq "HOSPITAL, “Cat ens. Permanent employment close to home? | 3 astle z et 
bg tg time showing World s eduea-| Day or night work? 


ITIONS TO BE FILLED : Sok 
OTHER POSITIONS TO - lon, | Must aso thy . interviews ‘bay UB to Teach - olds. UN. 4-417 
with 30 hrs. whiv, Cail { ee WAITERS—WAITRESSES | eticed mother, permanent care. 


FITTERS / sand’ geeation wie nan" 4 FULL On PERT PIM One 8 SF ‘ craacemncmetasrb 
AND J ELLEFF 2 ih Boat nat all “spoon 3 refined Answer these questions yourself APTS., FURN. or UNFURN. a 

L interested tudes rovi uni empl. mot y= ; co 

SEAMSTRESSES SILVER SPRING STORE CANVASSERS nae dee hat ee eee eee ee ae ian 


yoallie for ee ¥ peqiden wet : or unfurnished 
RE Work om oN oot ag ee, : APPLY very inexpensive. 


CASHIERS THIS IS A TOP-RATING JOB 7 Met Se, 
* ea Sy ee win of SeAPT work HOT SHOPPES 


__Monday of Tuesday | iin 8, Ma .ariae EMPLOYMENT OFFICE 


' APPLY 
ee or JELLEF F'S TELEPHONE AND : 1341 G St. B.W., Room 200 


SIXTH FLOOR 
F STREET STORE seis ena Interviews 9 to 3:30 weekdays 


J ELLEFF’S PERSONNEL OFFICE | Sat. through noon 


F STREET STORE ; SIXTH PLOOR 
j 


“oeeeveme |B Sa naeg etter, Sedaka’ | fhe ous Droge 
's Everything TAP, Mees a | PRE AD A) Sigler £00.15 Lines 
—LGE 2 BEDROOM. ar cie\ (SW NY) SY ARPERS will move you. Ress. CO. | mms iRTY_MANAGEM - ae 
—WE LOVE CHILDREN Hicken sod bata tile shower’ snd) MAYES 1 or over 80 yrs: iSbedim. Waiees, | "Pe stick, courteous. a-| Circulation 
ft. bath. 885 ms. - ort *) aide enemas | -llao_stijetenetes _11¢ — , ia Mio |S oa —— on Bi, Alek 2-864: By JA, 52604] means quicker sales results: 
ry CO., 412 Lag os 1th iotids ave. ow. NO 7-0104 | € + or purchase of | ! for Washington Post and 
oe re oa a ig te tS Apart t : oa| SE Bot Times Herald classified ad- 
et ® Bivik id coteaee. POOFFERS i rite vh ‘est His| TRUST NOTES WANTED GTA) vertisers. To place your ad 


me ey wi gener. ; 
st. —IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY. OFFERS “hy > tm. : ‘ o for Sunday 


1629 


iE. $-148 ESF cor paRK _ Si i Tpourson Suburban Living ” adhaoeewen 2 ._ 7. 
2 he lg ay | At Its Finest Vays R. HOOFF, INC. | SALE, INVEST, PROPERTY 62, Phone 


aay Vane | aaa ha Seaall at EMO | | Bedeee Ane $69.50 up Y Rrner ern wee R. HOOF erry : 
Tiras beep talngee Sieh |2-Bedrm, Apt. $96.50 QUINC Vs ips BEDRM. APTS. | sine Sat Guewacuten ‘Ce Se a Bile = 2900, 8, Nig seven Spetteon anfe’| REpublic 7-1234 
t., 50, incl. utils sep. ¢ | ‘ani ie. Lt $199. Bigs. to eco ae oh is. i... MAN R aan seam. 4 —— es ow rental ‘ 
1 bus sare; arden apts. 28 Bic suishe empleo S—= is, v PURNISHED A : -w Be , 
sb re rdan, res | tr ep ied By ie mie a Ree fae Sin ick r 1-408 ts | ye Make Your “Selection. oday fa 2 + 1% aranteed is ; . einiene center, 2 a 
ces eer ee ¥ newt everly, 2 a gene NW. | launderette, 1 bik.” from 
CONCORD GARDENS Ca Ab gf “s : $ excel. Teanep, arte Gropping bp aca ae, sate: fos ail 398 f te an eflices oF the, ex cele ¥ Exibont Sires pros te 
erm avail. a near churehes| . ut a Ta and vat: ' : sli re te J at. sontes in entirety or Een Pe, at «39 romit 
9 i901 Missourl ave. ‘3e.. Apt ) . : ag a o ah cane Con LopPinE 2-Bedrm. Apt.—$66-$74.50 | WADI] NG p LS! y weréen o “4 je 2 : R ae: 20 
Pg Sas 45 i: ue x raw | Lap ema MA ws 3-BEDRM. APT.—$90 | OO j Fie a 4 r Oas. NY ‘ sulle ea Bait at a $395 SOWNL EMO £ iN 
FTO! She 3 9 | COk= Is iD a at RW a rm | LOWEST RENT saratee Vere oe ee | Opens May 19th | $135: June to Oct. AD. °2-0334 on on cinvestinent of around $90, Bo 3rd & Rhode ls. Ave. NE. 
bath. 


of 
IN THE AREA 3 o& 
‘bath. beet tet | RES MANAGER ON PREMISES 4 RA | ease one ' 
. bath. kiteh.. dining rm. ip o A TO SHARE 35 1 BEDRA. . $63.25 Up Private Bus Service to Capital J bens. 2. ea oo fox Oors. levator. nts 8 payme poe devour 


consisting of 


, "+ Ou i incl. Lease until TEE—oen wl sharp Team rections: Halt mile. be ¢ Transit & Silver Spring Shopping | paves tomb. TV. | ¢ Very weil built 3 story brick bide 
or a-c bY summer 2 BEDRMS. $75. 00 Up Gross on Defense to Cheverly ;, ap prin BC. WEIN ERG & ter Inc. Jeee than 5 ech enters fe 


ression-| #P" er turn tient block to 

ne | aetna, 8-5564. Bun “alter |FURN, APTS., $81. 50 Up! project: [3 minutes Lover new Ail Avail. to Our Residents Only | varw -AGE—t . ' s.sago| blocks 1 Tabs Cc. transp 
Will share “Ps NCLUDED Darkway to Port Mead ishes. 7 dam a TR ).. : | eee bath. ck: x es best 
e oh. . A. *'* il ; 


fi8T & ¥ STS. N L UTILITIES 
ar Sarden ‘apariments q RENTAL OFFICE OPEN IDEAL FOR CHILDREN trans. 


~\ with lady. ase 35-45. by June 
ooler ‘hoppis 
ou ot | 
Pate ats VI §| DAILY not elubrie Bar! A SUN.| Numerous play areas, basket- eae cool gare big ; : oa at 


| Pr byate bedrm.. kit. privileges. ME 
rm 


8-07 
essor 
oe rent 2-bedroom. June 
. 10.; 20 min. downtown Wash # DREADING SUMMER'S HEAT? A | ball ¢ ind ol . rang plans. L.-T. 
; ww Te. Share an air cond. apt. on 4-acre CALL RE. ee ose a HA As 5 sMITE. =. : "aa tables, barbecue pits. ences bas ee © 


| estate. well landscaped Ag creek. FOR BROCHURE AND ~ Westmoreland Hills — 7, fee , + corner 
| is y by, mid-July FURTHER INFORMATION ELMAR GARDENS tien 4 RENTAL —June 15-Sept, | sree Pixtu v._ 3-847 
ide IU. fie’ 7 


' . n ; 4 cee 2 2. : 
| @u io; — creened sleeping r ; 8. 
. a’ de entertaining utet mi DISTRICT HEIGHTS APTS. - ‘{2, vechgofs. buses and shop- compl. furn. and equipped, BUSIN PROP. SALE INTER.| This r dream come 
th; feces F 6. | dguntown ready ; ~ aerials ion. OFFICE , nares “Bu OPEN mo 79 —Desirable commercis! : HOUSE. FUL that. sou aes for 
~ & 16TH —Soac.| 50°36 $35 RE. 71-7468, ext. 13) 7812 District He hts Pkwy. | vat ‘spect oes | Apel sem. PHONE OR WR location, 8500 sq. ti, with bes : | WINDOWS. 
furn. 2-bedrm apt.. 4 girls or ies — = 2 4. ° ’,, ae te a ae Sats | POR PREE BROCHURE vome Fite in Ietely furnished $42, Te — WAN & FO- 
; WAN to share 2. tu fa. bed N A ) SHANNON “Luc . 


zg204 ; . DIN. RM LE 
SE.. attract _ kit. bath Cir | ! STORES, ; MS. TH: TNE § 
TV.: $84.50 et 2s 5300. mh iys hme - orrenaeiti terse i bide.: newly decor: 1 1 -bedtm.. retin HERES Wea at DON’ T B U YY sae — — H era Gy G8. ems 1 . E: 


¥ to cbare ant. wit th lad rm.. kit.. dinette, . 
Irving st DY. ¥ 2803. | _with shower, Also effic RE. 7-5299 Key pt | er Newcoomb st_ s¢.. apt ALEX.—Hollin Hall. 3-be rm. ram-| Rd $175 mo rm. 2-bain brick ome i is 
& D 


sag! to 
1D GEO a omen fo| GEORGETOWN P. Ic "|-Save your money— BASF gone auto, ane pool. I! 7 N AVE. trans. excel peighborncod afi 
and garden tis 3- "Boas" or AD 2- Zager Place Apt. B&B we ik min. Brier. 20 min t. a M, 3-18 Sites 
2383 ‘ we wt} do au of the following tor | _LE..6-2768 ME (Barnaby Woods) 
YOUNG MAN hes comfortable. air ving room. 4 dint ay the an schoo! Taeai atsrective and brick home. tech 


0 
Laree liv « area. electr A fo sf. ae 13t—Lee store | 
conditioned « to share with en. : ' ' tied ba WARW Vi GE cond., 
$89 ay itchen. foyer, : . A | K LLA qetai low rent. 4 PR. shru 
DL. 7-6575 a O. $68 menth. Convenient to every ew veur . par 3-bedrm. homes, $115 mo. to vid. oF ai a Fo SE 5, ra ics ai biel Bf den: fyl 
ce. store on REALT af app ie 


° 
thing ate occupancy pes An , m 2 cs, ual ; 
wa er, 1 hbor 


tae 


l & N, 
Ey acta aM rl inate te 222m, pain 4 eee LO 
gery. . | oF om. | Attr. apts. wi 
2633 Woodley pl 5 2-8000, ext HIPLEY PARK. | kee posal. Soup roo! walls: Pull maint : lease ar- 
' ~ fireplaces. Liv bedrm.. kit.. as _ 
r Butler, eves. NO. 7-2947 { these up and see if you wns, piaysro 3. in | ranged to it tenant. LU atts 4.3 aks 
WILL share ny nice home with ret eh al schools. : aad om at 0 ene i brick. 


' 
ewly furn. bedrm | yee. gee i NOHER.| . DESIRABLE 88. “a on public. Dar bak 
iv. rm.. kit. with sundeck and | -§3 fter 6. | w ee 4-2 1-Bedrm., from a8 0 , Pentagon. 20 . ~ n. 295. off Conn Ave Large house in 
BaP si-| Sh argc te % Headndspaac ate aatig| Eee! Mek Pekan , : c re] Raat 
. | $00 
4 Ae? ar 


share act. with an- ith st. 
A ‘turn. $190. a ole | | ' OF put ssel 2. Bedrms., from $80. 00 thera S center ayy ain. go Gown- - % ain de niin O. 4 Tu. | 6 -* + +5000 i PR, 
| A 36 arge room ana Oye “he inhex of. 3 bus. lines. px —vmnlin oe” c N 


. aft. h Hus. 3- $54). g prs. or charming semidet. house with 
5 ee Tipe HYATTSVILLE: | Cony, chut ee stop fn BFR | 200 North Wavne St., Arl., Va. ert bere ara wd | SP iseiarden and tastes Mitert| 1997 UNCOLN RD. NE. 


—Lage 
A dinette, | . : corated i bedroom apt.: avail- 3466 254H 5 olf on COL. Toy Rhode Toland Ave — wal i ands —2-s "Selonsa| | Busy. _ ighiy, su successful hopping | . and 2 baths on second 
5 bus lines ns. to t.) NW. 3 dar Waar BI. NW Apt t= . rm. ep +o | ores still ay yatiable. c $49.500. Week- 
i 47 | , sah Liv. bedrms., dinette, bath.| with rec. | x rear yard. bakery. delicatessen. . 5.| ends ca ho" 2-2911. , w 
ALEXANDRIA — Veraum ~~ LAST T WORD | $82.50. kes at 437 Manor pl. Apt pow. 159. | tind t . paints and Ipaper. Low MO. PA . 
AIR-CONDITIONED | 0 paca ar *. KE {or velame bosinees, opportunity GILLIAT & CO. somes DI. 7-1655; eves., 
: aot bide on AUE LE Ro. Elevator bide... reas. rent. verly Tl ; Os. 2-2770 
BROOKVILLE "3204 Otis st.. Apt 2 Redec. attrace, an © ee mer t. 22. 1343 fleas rm. din kit. den. 2 be arms Weinberg & Bush, Inc. ‘ORC j Alas $9" SA 
DUPLEX APTS Mt: “See. recpt hall: 1 'cartare.| sori locstign st! COL i061 | sole aye ne of bedrm cesaeine Sa i fir : ROT RY s Ra PRE ACE Rent 50 Or So DETACHED BRICK 
: ise, recpt. hall; gartare.| Meridi . ; all. vitra- | x4 screened porch. patio, fenced back | , Rent A y at 
r or Loc 


2 AND 3 BEDROOMS po ga AE faunas faglitises. yecy. set arasé iio.| Bepnine 4. ety, a Pat e hoi ee | §000-15.000 80. FT. being con- N 
ndent, 2 tm at ba an 1% BATHS po a Ah “ereLiD eB : nn (C8 —Nr. isth and 6 fn “| 3 split evel; aise tote “i30: | Ssiitae hetsht Beary. “hoor a1 Gee moe SO ee Be Bee = A 
screened porch: near 8 ‘oo ‘| sible adults: me ult” ai 140 18th ey iat and bedr rms., $90-8 pesconable priced. Call Mr. Dodge ; . ay 3-38 
* ME B- —Colored-Attention 


» terrace, frepi. Call DU. 7-6439 WITH OR WITHOUT BASEMENTS! Shopping center, $62.50 ¢ Is g pts. | x lors: 
FURNISHED month PVE: I x 2430 PA. AVE. NW. . WEAVER BROS., ou s shop with generous 
1-bedrm. spt. for $73, 25. including $6 9. Aes 2-bedroom ‘gorner “house. $97 00 REALTORS _— low down cellent we) Veterans! Listen! 
OR UNFURNISHED | julie slice Pevy. Heer'eal 38:| AIR-CONDITIONED | _ INCLUDES ALL UTILITIES | Agee cr, see rae tno gs AB New! New! 
CRY TERR. St c ie - - | ee $102.50 UP * WALKER & DUNLOP. INC maitenct nes anges Fear cis Based Nagle BH ve . 2 | m: od J. LEO K sive CO. 2-Family Home 
eae ee Gite ied? dukes |—“TAROMA PARK | pitidtayrcpteaic a cone Pee ee ee gl armanerot ior xen| Only $250 Down 
Convenient te she anor APARTMENT VALUES ci “fireplace: 26 min. "Sean NON & LUCHS CO, Realtors. 124 one . 2 deths i apt iy pene Near 15th & H St. NE. 


WER AVE 
secre 0 estate. J open Dally Mon. Thru Pri. 9-5:30) qnus alt 2 ge air-cond.. 3 ) MRS. WISE, M 
and 1-bed ts $97 50 RHODE ISLAND ment. tlusive. Cha ow would you like to buy a home 

5 fipor, "a and meatine 


4 
 jove- rm. apts 59 AVE. Fw. 
iy grounds a hag ot mo FOR FREE BROCHURE CALL p= elec, bid«.: aioe J ' | ‘ beth aa 1 rm. kit. ‘ARL.- vera! | *Peeritthee” 4 R floes 3S 
gene ee 8 ena 12 Pairview| 2,.20¢7ms. $99.50-6108; 1 bedrm.. Ban | S03 SSS be Sees Soe aitices Avall- 
Sunes. a. a “Send 1 FL. 4-9400 | $86.50-$89.50, utils. inci; living Tt. NE—3 rms. kit one) sAbk-Oal neat = 1 abi ter se. . ay yments 
3-008. Mees ee $9 an. $89 56 be | * tal MR G.I. 5% DowN Peete ales Ber Mo: ? 


eo s; 2 rms with kit. and 
NeW NG POOL UNDER | See a " rm. 22x12, kitchen, dinevie. ample! [351"iiTH ST. WW.—1 rm. kitch-| baths. nr. pudfic = Nate put. 048s ‘| Large 6-rm. brick. Only $13,800. 
cons ERUCTION ADJA | 60. Recr. rm., fron 
. } 


mL closets. storage locker; close shop- vail. J 5. 

bedrm.. kit.. bath: ‘wills; conv Tri fem © Ker Boies ase o Rist STs Bedrm.. living| 2-1683: eves. Sonik, fe WEAVER BROS, NC, sag =f Fenceg lot and te jo- 

DIR: Across 4th to | — “| “LYON PROPERTIES A. HUMPHRIES & SON BETHESHA=3—bearma 7 bate Pe Re Boe LE 7 
Tigges Bt 8 “707 Ave. Real nlee ah ee scr. bore, er | ee WAREHOUSES | 3-fis8- > MTT OO. | conor RNC ne OE twice ah 
"Cony Nr a good job 


por ; 
ation can't 
Shirley hwy. irl nay, = bed 3004 Lee Hwy JA. 2 0 
7 Nr hools. $165. 
:| follow Sr feet te n lett ap sed od t sted Gony to, 2A 71-0650 Eves. JA. 5-8119 ditt 3 2 pes . wi (1). 6000 sa including office ‘ ‘ .. ur door, If you hay 
apt | tre inepect. see Janitor in OXON PARK p . coeae A-Sliver Sprin, " sarees | and s p3-000, Swicer, | MR sa 
A. 9-6592. PLOYD ) & 4- homes: $90 63 Loadin r. o 6a2b. 4 with 
PS ALEXANDRIA E. DAVIS CO.. 1629 K st. nw. NA.) OXON TERRACE, MD. » kik, ang bah. All pvi.| gage SHAE : 544) 13) 12.000 sq, ft. Light, dry. two SE.—2-family row brick: eT Bice: | 
; , 2! Be | Rictadeeoutiies ‘en pe iy ct see ana] Poae™ Sage ners Shes | Lior. RRR. SUUEP chont| ast Sed RPras: Shawn, by 
— : arwic " bedrms. 77:30 : + re fies | push: a8 2K 9-179 | “en W is. wo. | of bide. Nice ae Ng EX : s only. | 32; eves. U 
o . well-kep “ umbia = - . ; : : = 
a. cn. trs >. . Spring and transp.. lavely laree 1- gndre ws Sige nk ary rms... kit.. w © utils. furn.; $65./ 90], $100 iene wend 13,000 sq. tt. New. modern oe soepaieal cn |" ‘ 
— Vi | la e posure 2- tls “So. bis a ana ai tn aa. pow om course cat eo See FALLS c “—3 nice bed-| warenouse, nae ditionad aifices| Semi-detached brick home. $11.950 fg Fw ke ug pespnens. I 
shower, kit. util biog, Soo m7 et Pe J aot Office, 2607 Southern ave. Office Sa end ne “9h02,| 7@%~ onl baa , liv a a “fa inciuded. Tailboard loading. wil) = os _DI. 17-6501 cuenat ve eaaregi. love in a i 
4 ory. sn - - , vs n ‘ 
Mas wb xt) lives quietly. NEWLY DECORATED redec.; exee!. location. near shop US 9-497 7-4979 - as. stairway to, ioe. ster. oF playr De ready sbout *B hy Wa . D. —— Lavely de- 
8 t 119.98 utils. Ld. 409" | KOONES % MONTGOMERY, INC. } i _ kitchen and 4 on 24 ff. vas, $123_ iE JE 2-263 | Weinberg & usnh, Inc. + lust off rooms, Sb Conn $ ig DN. 7 
‘ TT” VW... ‘aon Tee shu - ‘ - rms.. * 5 "07 - NA. 8-5500 4. | a a A 
dio rm. and kitchenette, “bath: util: 5 : WAL D . hou Aniined_ i 0 Tin 0 
transp ; utils urn.; quiet tenen 3 Bedrooms Homes miCDerB ey fe Meurilee Apts. = ais a qoulp. Hitchen with | COMMERCIAL SITES 53 as. Cal UM 4 , : Oleaming hardwood flee throughs 
Oo mo : - ’ 9 - JE 4-7 468 4 r “ 
: $1 15 Month ii ame ‘| 53rd and DEFENSE HIWAY $e mam, Gronarrown — 2nd commercial. lan, 2 baths. concrete ene h. - 
vw at NW ‘ 7 P 155-ft. front. 18.600 sa. ft. LIN- a 


.. NEWLY-DECORATED od. apt. ldgs A mo. : 8 , - de e fenced ya 
INDIVIDUAL BASEMENT sod find has ee los. 1 Bedroom—from $72.00 it utile: sree. foarte eot| | tow = + }A18 N ne. DI 71-9688 ON-VETS pte faces eens apie? “7 
| a WESTINGHOUSE utile a 2 Bedrooms—from $89.50 eniiworth, bus. Key in . 8 mo. CHATEL. Sac Bes A pe ae wren sninale rombley: fenced Zend; larse COLD. 1302 A &t. SE. 
OL hee WASHER, DRYER rooms, kitchen. bath. heat & hot! » Abi Bery.| RENT 918 ie ork ave. PP., OUT-OF-TOWN 56| ‘als ere $300 DOWN 
160. EM. 3-0891. A ' ter. $80 J. WALSH. INC., wit Ta oo axws OPP. | Majestic corner brik. 6 huge rms 
Refrig., Garbage Disposal . NA. §-6468. : Re im. de ; $ ON FEL. with Near Westchester Apts. | full bsmt. sarage fine 
SOUNDPROOF WALLS ’ bedrm.._ scree poreh.| 3} :R 389.80 phis ‘ut Mls. 90. 7-6573. Res. HASE — Attractive Se isome,. oppotiia. with 4) somiacteckak older Yius o*ot soa-| C Call a 5 ee Bee ney 
FULL MAINTENANCE Demet, _ an a Bail on Cape 2 “ apartments and % Br to rooms: di Burt co ST. 35-7368 
ae rshors —_— REA co. $623.50: 2-bedrm. apts. 872.50: ad: fu if base . E ; a, ‘8 Rou t te 2) be a sone. 6x16: sun room, 12x din ° L RED—VACANT 
Public, Parochial Schools ost. se.. —_i 4 gf COLORED | iren'a sats Arent’s OE, Write . attic room ‘ . ONLY $195 DOWN 
; *| ye e inclu C. O’Conor Gooirick and ; + 4 . bu 711 UPSHUR ST. NW. | 


Adjoins Project Blocks to bus. $185 mo ’ Pr 
° anklin. ttorners at 
aw 2 TH i bur 


S—34 front, liv r h: ; $12 we 
> ond 9 MIN. TO PENTAGON. 20 MIN. 1 Beautiful Hillcrest Hei hts, Md. w, Fr t rb n 
at Next to pan: @ ‘6 DOWNTOWN WASH. BY BUS RAL ? t » CO.. JO g 3140" itor on prem - 50 mo. A rs | in low 4 I nearer. “Prise by, qiaviz 1S ee prick 
= iclene nb wiield Te 8-74 nade a bie . &- Tanto a we q more Washingto a Dey. Ae nie BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 5 iBspection 7 hout ¢ obligation, Cap- 6 larg °, i Te, tile wo ate 
>. kit. priv » © is- é a : Red -bedrm 7 3HT, -w. . te . Must v 
th se0, kit, private bath and ANCLUDING BUNDAY) curl ave. Las. 3-rm. apt.: lovely ARLIN N and bath: #82 50 “mo ho: heat’ and| rambler: liv. rm., dine -Kiteben, ¥ small secured inves: pases | aan : good cred . 
RK bidg.; exe. transp h. w gn ises, bath and utility room. $105. ; 2? * ok lar 
ak eEY a es ~— oe &! gests Per ww ¥ me yulak a > 3 MINCTES. eres: ae AEN - bedrm. 3. ate couple © Dyer 7 a oy nicely @ Hy portunity 2 APTS 
- ° - o.i-— . A Sd ® 
48 win to doumtoun Washineten. . 6-6912 aan ee mth wonting Arepi | 4-MIN. RUG: oak TEE EPSZAGOS only, $67.50 to $69 mo.; heat and pal or exp, person. RE. 7 areh.| tp, exeetent conatt 619 Maryland Ave. NE. 
tivel and redec small apt. bids.. hot Taier geray cious living: 4 5. recr.| = — ition. 5000 Block! Act {ast on this lovely 
‘ERG hoo . . es on for hot plate; all utils furn.:| Gracious suburban living: air-con-| 4 Apt. 3—-Newly! rm.. maid's rm , £a- me owne years. retiring nw, 20-ft ~ om brick home: 3 bathe, ou 
. ° c play park: 3m, sre mt, apt.. mo Key’ r «15 and barrel. Only sete Kits. & sa hf bsmt 
| in bookcase, with $1000 dn. Excellent op- sae ’ 
ati Beck yard. Auto 


3 . ’ ’ . : ° TOR aoe | 4 | rruaity See today. Call Mr a 
: ' ‘ ' . lub port mas Real JA. eat easones . 
Pyaar. VIEW 3° See cae catetial ities | Coe 5 Spat As," 199, | PoTRD a NICHOLSON ie ae | recedes: Sanenetinen BAR REALTY CO, 1252 Columbia Rd. NW. 
“Unfurnished| press elevators. Senary tectitties: me. bE. Cnctts beth , ' . Tedec.. gas heat, HARDWARE STORE . TA. 9-6800 Larne Ropers room g trict heme: 


mg eS ooms and bath. priv. beautiful 

aeons. y landscaped unds: rp . mo. Apply Jaffe. 911 
CYR oe reiNG CENTER UNDe eT oF 20 decor nthouse and effices evailable. 3th st. | .Osmi,. verd. s95_ dV. 62908. | Desinons. $78.00 “ods : 
ALL ‘ON P ut, ie oP dinette. "rit sete ew| rm., eauip kit.. full bemt, fenced bought for price . FAS ABLE NW. SECTION 
. .$80-$92.50 _ schools. trans. LO. fixtures no g00d will. Outstanding English stvie semide- CALL OWNER 


Hea nw. 
and th. Bran w 
| Efficiencies -w. h. an Ml Not 


; 
SWIMMING POOL ote rh pros Sv "| IMMEDIATE eS T3th's a -_ Gos om net a welcomed 3-beare nga- . - “vestibule. with” fuer | te an oan iS 
: oor. 
WADING POOL Ping elevator bids, — Beautitulis|! Bedroom -_. $102-50-$145.00 265 oe: ase fenced yard: eet gg r. enormou living rm. vite 
EXCLUSIVE FOR RES scaped. _ ides ee IMMED. OCCUPANCY AT $112.50 $0:” wilt rédec.” Key ADtn 2. aps 8-9. 20% up and better. b eumemend 

ADUITIONAL COST , COLONIAL CHARM | Can be bought. ‘with 815.000 down. on tree he “i Ridiculous 


AT No 
— Atiractive Em., $69 
th: BR.. £70.00 he a Open For Inspection, 9to? ‘ FOOT! arain part of charming old Colo- priced at $22,000 plus stock. colon : al Yeu can’t ber @ euctit 

ey. We 

charm 


} mile south a at, Alge:s 2 min Mer. at . ; nisi stone house and estate ; 

-7065. | main Navy ai and 10 min. to Port CO" 5-7744 or call SHANNON &| Located one-half mile across Me- £08, —b. , :| NW. 30 7 MD. DELICATESSEN rm. wi y Foo 

= {008 .__ on ae LU HS. 724 4th st. nw. NA.) morial Bridge, directly across from ; Q} 8 rms, 2% baths. 4 la Business $2500 per week. Works! mera at 7¥ 
R- the lwo Jima Memorial her, | 30° ross profit Located) tion curate hom 


. bem 

} washer ® phone privis.: _ 

; i sT. NW.. 25: Frm. Oet. wr. Central and B. Cap st : A hinges | 
gape les Zadila. Ba co R.3 ns crounae ipecany ce area wiih El tila. inclu. CO. $2391, 3A “Call JA. 35-5500 a Kit i ous lawns and, ee docs, beat Set got aie aie 

and be | ) - 91 | F. 
: parkin ding eeler Terrace, Inc. de | eg: Rohner: EM 3-3002. "| Seed 
| sbove features in entire area. 1217 VALLEY Ave. se. |Dominion Gardens\C | aera | _* M BLANKEN . ny * COMTEETE Reanpunnte 
NAVAL WOSPITAL AND NIA AREA. ves 8u 
1 Bedroom $70 and up . | 3800 MILAN DR., ALEX. Ol MODERN 3-RM | 3105 a Bastord re rd., Kens — 3-bedrm.| __Ottics phone ME. Sa only rent down ond, oe * Der me, CO. 5-4056 
t 


aot 
sasete Soaraae. 897.50. 


2 Bedrooms $82.50 and up kit; inclosed yd ocery, Only one 
.. 4 tnclosed play yard, “faundry room. ‘sae rtongess sapere Bg rer Ne ay aa hea me an on lie ct Seti ene. use OT 3.9626 Till converted| — COLORED—BRIGHTWOOD 
ige. closet. nr stores, incinerator on each floor. conven- rm. » exclusive | PA tractor es. V sinerhtink taaeies'ths Wisi 
: 1. wtil lent to she oppin a” oan ua. i Thomas,G sg 0B. 1.1838 community Bethesda ® wil on- than « le to do. Will sub- m ely section 
-— a oe 7, 9-9 Re er. | j seo 2 Bedrms. $88.75-$91.75 eer qeepeneme party one Con. contract pe o ee | > oe Gi APPROVED PE Sirlited's — inclosed 
be 


T= 


ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED p ARKLAN DS an, tag Patio. den. r and helper. al ateriais AB, ONLY $200 DOWN fa tt bemt. twit 
$7 


hid, CO. “5.5198 a . , : 
bear on cen ee LER GARDEN CHURCHES. TRANSPORTATION | 4, NEW CAPRITE, DEVELOPMENT pate carter at shee mor eee am TAKE YOUR PICK dow 


_ ih Bit, “prt. | Saching kitchen. ait P| id ut of Pails Face  BRIC nt $1800 worth of co 
ai 18th | a. se LU. 1 3807 > ainple sclosets Om ene toe Py. my | a “BEST BUY IN TOWN” B | &K K HOME. | eck sad: eautpaien Pevent call La. &- Only 365 Per vi. this semid 


prt. f rear entranc 
nee pvt ire 2 | | ho - is. mith ws a ond ates, fayndty eds esare “a i vis Pam volta rod gees. pres ah” $69—N. W. TAVERN, ving quarter cat se 1738 P as NW. 
Seller | dee tee ereacse| Seppe gee gig |~ LLOYDS APTS. 2 BEDE ne. ay rt. para| isla, Ceo ngage Ouaer nets| 6217 2ND ST. NW. | $300. foptisa!2 gone. + ally. 
vate bath; $17. opeiency with Bris | eisai ro. pe control Kew swim- | Bedrm. —$ 0 OFF SHIRLEY HIGHWAY $68 ". 8 $70 mE NAT! a REALTY This iss real & wih terme Gal ice 407 16TH ST. SE. Ti. tees, 16. 262, 
NW. VIC —3) fanc ste-| 2 Bedrms.—$89 ney , MW. RE. 1-3534) Brown with “Y “Realty, Ji ~ ai Independence Ave REPOSSESS 


tance Wave Rhy Og 
-bath : bed 


Tee AND NEWTON as . 
we bet = ¢ ~~)" ma adi. t to Army and avy oe ‘ a . bts Bb | eee SE. 
ari, | 8 edrm renting ae Pp pee $81.75 and d $84.50) eal cas ae +9798 D MS eae | '1058 Quebec Place NW. aaa Ge 


Atty bath; 8-unit bldg. 3. bik DI. 4 
kijchen en pat mo.| Hecht’s Sis Bee Mr Brown, THT i . ae. ; . om. ain. eo J | | Seve tm 
ttle adults. 2-0864 pm Sse Daily, Sat. Sum. 6:30 & m. to | omcs rs co. ifs Ba) ORIGINAL CONTOUR Por th ——e THLY 
CRORERAM VIC — NT eely fur.) nen ails saree! see TA ey : Eagat a CHAIR-LOUNGE CO 2205 ear 
re! Yor cupers! ala consider DE. Bride | gon. se fais 3 st WIDRICH COURT a8 ‘ | cee UR. 12 to 6 ail REALT “to. 412 Sth HAS EXCLUSIVE bor i. ae ahs *S witH Hg. :| MURRAY LEVINE Seat ‘3 
726 or OL. 2-5570 a Ae O0 Colu BS Pike, | Lge. Rooms, Huge Closet SILVER HILL APTS. Ps ; : A FRANCHISE AVAILABLE OME | 8 ML pm. MR benseue 18 
beter rms.: pape BU ine 


rOLORE 


EFFic. & | Bedrm. rem at and 3 Parquet Floors —Play Area ~ ne. is.| lee just paper 
es £. excellent transp | “Wh, DE, Glebe S130. “3710 Col. Pike. Bit | Convenient. SE. Location 1 BEDRM. APT. py. Si]. 30}, Rite ‘ft ee fe. varies duct tua tio ' nei aia 5904 and ST. NW. 
a oRth isa coe se ris! ts thet 
— Shiv l- BEDRM. a NG fie A St 6 E Semi- | 
EFFICIENCY —$65 EXPR ) 9738 ees i pom ey ~ rick ; ' bedrms.. i ree | ~ te. 33 to 175 squ IT 1S CHEAPER TO By ~F use finished attion aoc 
poh .. geet amd enlet: inc it & 4 pain 5 mo | feet to p 4 BUY, THAN RENT Orated inside and out; full base- 
a ne Re i 4227 SILVER HILL R OLOR ares 4 i NW.| Sistine personnel or hire sutt-| BE YOUR OWN LANDLORD | fcreene 
eh ) D. liv. rm. t ~-¥ > 3 Ms me ' | able people tof run this department. MT. PLEASANT ayees, $13,500, with 


(NR. ND. MD.) 9T w. ry 
"SO. | This a high . gal calibre product 19TH ST. N renege 3-sto : ‘STONE & MARCELLINO 
to rm 


Se 


HOUSE TYPE. 303 NeWEy Lares | te were oy eae BS ms. lust, papered and 
eee Furnished w. N eS apyiobs | re. ‘Su X ye | 208 requires 15,060| tapestry brick home; 10 rms., 
JEFFERSON VILLAGE | #hy,4% ta? ) =P Ay o rat, pent) Grae, eal his-| laree family or ? families, Gell for ee 
ge. dinette. , | ¢:fam y house: 2. bath ' 2 — fi A aE, — aanily oF 3 Som for WN ICK 


, $89. 


ATI ARL. BLVD. pala cuuRcM| & : hs Stason PRIVATE HOUSES 412 Sth st Sw. Lag . Ne EAti * Oa —p i PETWORTH Peete 
A ull, dry | 


i ‘e iD. : pag eo ye W.—Semi-det. 
OR a4 mo. " 50 mo. ) ady to go incl lights. ip rede. Pull bemt. with "exite 
me) Pak : shower bath. Colonial fren 


A 
2 GeoRSOm AF = hs DUPLEX APARTMENTS Rah Ni Moy a Gene The Pe Oe Taree arte Ge] (NEOLN Pa 
us line: 1 aM *- ae ’ A n¢ R,B-5h20.| ¢ jen me “4 
een sues First Floor: Large Living Room, Dining Room & Kitchen. m. kit. . 4-024 s, || fentals Repls ae eee peg brick, Completely redecorated 
Second Floor: 2 or 3 Bedr and Bath. . es i ia, path: Bee sae Wash Pos y 
ARLING N, Each House Has Front and Bock Yords Lawn Care, Gar- OLORED—Se “ye SAL ESTATE LC | EGITOL HEIGHTS sored A PINE REC. ROOM 
— ent to bus. LL 4 ie | panos = le os - 4 es ereane 
bage and Trash Removal, Gas, Water, Heat, Laundry . aM redecors M traps. pr 

Facilities and Repairs Provided Free. ollect your rent rr th ST, SE. vomstas eam Me 
SCHOOLS AND. SHOPPING CENTER ON SITE | jig ny han : Mnfoo matty oo 
2 Bedrooms, $93—3 Bedrooms, from $109.50 |OLORED—tandiorgs tg sear you! 2 vr ne ae Sia 


| taker] RY | €blored: 4 Bedema, 2 Bathe. 
JEFFERSON VILLAGE io sre TORAG iN fubiaston Bt. Alexandrid. Ya.” MENT CO. 
1734 ARL. BLVD., FALLS CHURCH, VA. rm opt $28. Lt 4-08. w 24, trust notes. Dc Fyes. AP. t- PT A 

JE. 2-5500 Daily, 9 to SxBHMD to 1; Sun, 12 to4 "Da-ht. services cho whe and se. 800 mo| “TNVESEMENT Con  icatlcans ca Welaton Wate” 
' . . : Sues on 


x,» "4 : Dx rar 4. 


_ WHE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD] sats JRURS. HOUSES 67MD. | SALE SUBURB. HOUSE JRB. HOUSES 67VA. | SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67VA. 
34 Monday, May 28, 1956 : : - . Gin . 7inGip , ae... Sao 
"382,000 | EERIE Meesvpan™ cress, | bere tiem god gurreer. nC Bel etna, wend fo rer Ni 7 | se | Ssamtinne oh gery 
Daily bo it, 2 ‘SPLIT LEVELS” | EEE RBIS Seno al Fea 
. AONEY RS 
Circulation 3% Dn. Gl wie 


| results rm. your a i TORBC POL ‘ i . : 
ge gon ro m ~ or ) . ion-| feature pore ng oot : " cis On Jest your own sienstre. ‘ se MOTORS 
Times Herald classified ad- igs. | Ss eis, Az’ 1-006 1 ERS rater | . x 1 ment, dual ea nee ir | 
vertisers. To place your ad iT. : } ie A eRe : ' on the and ram atte vp com- routes tn ms at > sand m i 5 2 ind guar 
Phone ; "6906 18TH AVE. NE CESE ce oy sh RRO ey fe eaunty aoa tn tes ~ 34 Slit IN | 
‘ . ad ee ' more ava le clea ear t ve 
) NOT JUST A HOUSE a Tse Je: feel] $85 Wa sewrored, at 72-000. 28-) Bare, "Aases'*as00 down, Wainnce| Pole nt BILL. DENIS, INC. 
7. 


REpublic 7-1234 4 bath. Ba — ~~. i It’s a Home! “ * | < < , ~ 
tein nines extacaee. feed-in toi! Tn an . CLOSE-IN it 2 nda on 8 : Va, Phon . ond; } owner, LO. 5-03 " va AS oH 
— : —— rae ; “ar os ht ec: te Mag own an COU NTRY aT ay | 73 ‘bap 0. TE. 6-1566 


Any make ‘or 
ation 


move right inte this 3-bedroom Aah —— MAKE OR 
front rambler being nape 5 , me PENNY” MO 


Acre 


R HILLS recrea “tear Gat 
tatthon phic“ omes’ ia “aes “CHEVY CHASE . a Se r-apveur—areae=| Custom Rambler, “Pook ‘point on main reed. musi afer ne 
ses Teint te tem RRCINGTON. REALTY mit Age £7 Ma Roa ay tl a ‘eh 
COX, LU, 2-8136. and spacious ) ler. rms. : i a a bps, v0 8-7 ss oe i 3 Ce 
2 ts| ite. ThE 3 pape | eee ates oe spe, Papen ood dtl |OCT st ened ns, oe oA | 
$125 DON.—$89.50 MO. floor: ¢ ms and heated sleep- rm. me eau. <9 d- Scarce as Ponta Teeth tu besement. wens chur gee aoe oe cr in, Fairfax Co.: protected ares. are 4 
eders,. semidet, brick arden ot itehen extr M.'s Frew '| A new rambler of this oti clove Bag poeta fully londpondead gcre' las com. N A DODGE Eee cal | 
1 ant ull | demt.. alee | with dishwash 7 isposal. Nice GEORGES 40-y “4h gt, - 5 -t - more ‘expen individual and Lis. COUNTRY GLUB ; a G. Webster Co.| 


st “ , +. 4 ay. t isn’t ave age | Priced at $16.500 for « quick 
bas RA 3.2120] uae el et | ee a me Zit er ageptat gel] WHOLESALE | RES g omesnitit) | 3850 P08 ACRE FW pasta 
BUYING!!! 


se ree livin din a beautifully wooded 46 tract 
Clas —aeheiaee mY cane “Solon with Papeted srvenes 2eteh es Hrs | Tenet ay, Mate ott MARKET Tall sieareind whe si00; fot ‘oad | AUTOS & plck-ap tracks wanted 
$7 sian. Lae, 13.750. already OG! appraised, _ rm. ed TERE VIRGINIA S BEST BUY sreatage.  — oP qubtiviston ate ; igpes + ete det o ten 
: AR PT Seance on THQ ft SHADE __ | ft seetetintotin = eat eee fee neat 
;, , - : our ° - 

den Breezewa ‘ [net Tei, Fireplace hapeh—a acre. i ft HIGH tion 
deep. FOR LATE MODEL USED CARS | EMERSON & ORME 


ft. : 
pine paneled oe 
re i i © IT NOW! $ axs| cA a | Sa eer HERSON’S aUIEK) 
rambier. a oo | : o'| WATERFRONT, SALE 75A | 
RIST HOME | Baterien!* oatinsaa *t DO IT NOW! re darecaged tot a 9 St Sir Wr Sth. 80 NW. DE. 2.4700 fe Wiad Haat BE ns 


Sse eee aeaee neon os < tt us ciaes| Commonwealth | ale tra set ans: "| yh mes Mtr, ha ois 
ay sate i wl aites:| 1 Sera sere te al INGTON REALTY || 76N. Soe te ee | 4 Bedrms : Hea are trea ealy iE sPiaaget a, ste 
MELO Pea cae | a a aot Pan nds, eer AS BS ; ap i ae | rattan Auto 


—, n out rd. 

ba . sc re Chicke l 
hy oe om : ; eaten i ~ evry "ig Oe. Hit. use, Beiween MeLean and Pails ond? Baths es . to. . ) WILL PAY Sales & Service 
— By owner. a 4 pea: si¢ boo dn Tiab was as as: Manras as Rity., JE. 2- 3110 andsome brick home. = a OLOEED—i wile o TOP ae at S 

TU. 2- 9200 _ rm roots » ~ . : 9 LOHR ok tone een mda ) 4 OO uuper, conven i nelghbo , * nd Be arias yor | ,OLLAR Alex Branch. 1810 Ring St.. Alex. 

~ AQAE OH ee t ols shopping, ‘recreation sen: Sai rea BE ROOMS ter to large. living a ee of thade AN DY A ADAMS | rairtax oe “lee Highway 

; ° SPLENDID BUY" | Bisbee’ like ea = times aint by a| window, te mily « dining | x. s | 372 ys orgs Act nw. fie) icine. cad 


515 entina 


this home for ot ‘| you: ® Sneed & ia oc Ye e kids x ., e B PORC | Uentineed on pollowian Peas 
ip ee er: - =, © Beal: “ales | geet 3 a er sty it Bh lee sie te room| ol hot-water peat, 7p * paddock, Fences ris aL ae aan to Scrappers, AP’ 7.6805. Test sale Jest ~ A... 
wi . being fA * [A nv legal. ter , 1 indian | mak aT a = aa febesing | aay | tcensed under Sma oan Laws 
c. Oo 80 Cont) N 10th st. ‘ed 


ik 
of ¢ sed 
e@ terms ' Pe ett "htacs Motors, 3201 | 


a airea 


of! ewood : t style. It is close to 
tice “is n be liv a ed rk. hes ts : schools 318.7 & rere op mors. ae A a , . i —e 
= BOREM) in | ee te gh ites rg ON REALTY | ois toutes ee atctes ah] Xu * Snr yf. JUST OPENED | 
REMAN & CO. pe Cod. Living foom with ‘fire-| this oA, eee ot ow * Se "=o nmualhataina teenies “es: Spee ieee FEN ALT, eth aces | |) _A NEW LOAN OFFICE 
: = separate aim , kiteh- : mi, — drm. ° . a nae, koe ced eash price for any make car RESIDENTS’ 
TaN TT Exe pe peaeaaG| HOMES i fimes| ANSWERS | JA. 7-5200 | fiat Biker Bete] L000 PONTIAC’ | BPSr iT eaien 
ouse. =e ROBERT c. LOHR —&, pee ° amilia ve me  gibhe CITY ¥, Mp Rew ts. 1 —— = a 
30:0 m showroom.) 't need. fret . Ro sah a8 yl “em| Cadillacs Wanted LOANS IN 2 HRS, 


fresh air,” 


fishing B spe 
ieitb. 8 around $20. Ure HE fed 1% ; : . . 
Be ILL ee TE at fie Pes i} We 3 Tank Biiveey, tnd, seclusion,” : 8. J. — Rms. PENNY a — 
y i th ¢ . $17,900. one. A 3-bedrm aoe Soe tustom op ce Seautitul = ded wk.: MOTORS | loans to women 
, 67VA. ry| immaculate hout. andscaped lot near conv 4 A820 BR. 1. Ave. NE. LA. 6-2200 3225 Rhode Island, Ave. | 


n . Li. 6- Cod. le . umbier, 9 -yoerm, ) wy. 3 ; 
eer Fvinbrook sec. 3d bedrm. desienes Or fon rm. Tull basement, side sereened| fireplace. ining’ rm. a: | nGeatined om next column || Mt Rainier Ma.” ” AP, 7-208 
Cc EHRLI a f *” . lan “| ALEXAND VICINITY—3-bed- vies to ane pe. tr you? $23. . I con- ib 74 Pets! a Tori : “! al. sa:.; | PERSONAL LOANS 90A 
. . 4 : ° ; tracts accepted. MUST ‘to . , equipped, aa 
. as low as 817 - or pet shop: fish ir 9.4139 | Licensed under Small Loan Laws 


ef ob proper nr. elem. school, 1% little” “Th bain ‘Town tot n- clusi ' . home |b piusive wi ey 
9 dh mala ee a el Pano Gite Bitz? Shere E| ARLINGTON | kesh sesh gh ie Mitte Mora | LOANS 
i pool. By; f Gai? buys a wks. Ca an, Jo 
hauncey Re orp. i core Eistee ‘| Semi-Detached Homes Retiring— Newlyweds AKC +. 1 eva. Hoss 1% 


shrubs and fh 
, x. CG * ? roy F ee Church cit . 
we x Cc i0-ees Bi-2- Metre. tte down. Bea ee Pal — Ake Champ piocdtine| ON YOUR SIGNATURE Blagg 


, b 2 —2% Masonic i "caeg ner rt vine “es Lhe OM Sa = ; 008 eck and blond x - — gipraadio cor 
"| Bric Ling at. eae es san arede schoo! YEONAS REALTY ao a 7 ln COMPARE! SAVE! WOMEN’S LOANS 


a 9 rep payment 
2313 Wilson Bivd.. JA. 8-2100 Our Specialty! 


oo ; 
3.100. “YN "REALTY, JE. 2- a — || SOREKMAN #EK pubs, A Monthly 
CUSTOM COLONIAL ' ie. & rust, m. & f. BR, 8-9893. S80 $5.59 You K LOAM In 


; N 
ALEXANDRIA eae meine ail =) l-vr.-old home features 24- GERMA PRERD PUrs— | 
Gee, Swe | Ee RE ter 31 12 Hrs. "sc 
LO. jocasen oo ate No Down Payment : arch. bedrms. and bath . p26. 7 — : e.' . 17.47 | rs. Now 
; af tara ne Ari hi 20. 96 ONLY ONE TRIP NECESSARY 


top ° r . 
of the city. ick action, Mitr mm. 2 be tb bre. P, 
i RFMAN) Cape os w/tel bems., f level ,,' 
oof Cave Oot Scotian Ot 3% dows omponio Beckers sa ] Suburban Finance Co. 


—" ~ st PR E SEN 5 all standard | principal. The interest rate is 244% 
ged. to ~- ‘ 2-901 8229 Rhed i N 200 
rms. UD » J ems. bet ‘S : , | per month of the unpaid balance. § 1608 East-West Bey, | Bethesda 
lot Ko 2. "34 


bedrms. rms... th in / — 8 wei 
eg ee met. “Aagame ps 4 a ae Th = elaine PHONE JAckson 5-8885 IT MARYLAND Cash Loan 
_ with, gin rir . for your money today! §a37 Rhode Isl Ave, UN. 2-anv2 


living —.- - = | , shots s © : : 
New Colonial homes; 6 ewipment: eas beet: inndey em | ~= WONDERFUL bedrme pen i] he rege: new) @-aWEEY litle kittens free. As- FAMILY | Wheaton Finance Co. 


end 7 
; fas, * Pn nae SWIMMING POOL BUYS “PRICE S000 50. wi! . Kam TUT were = Finance Corp. ef Ariington | 11031, ylers Milt Rd. 
Wood Acres Constr. Corp. PLAYGROUNDS ] me AEESSP 0 A. O€ tA. SABY CHICKS—Getwuaty NV | 2907 Wilson Blvd. Residents’ Finance Corp. 
. - . _ Mannas ‘ity. JE. J 10 —~ or Karred Rock 7 %* x- ___ Arlington, Va. | Va. t 3275 R. AP. 7-220%8 


Month ments like rent Md. WA, _4- isas. _ 
Se Sart exclusive | ram | bedroom rambler of spit-level on FARM AND GARDEN mens oc —— 


ler in exclusive low 31500 
- Larchmont Realty, one. : bir FoR’ ac t she ows ie iLL NANCE AND ~ft. ‘ ' th fi . POWER lawn mowers (3): excellent | 
JE. 3-8969. CL. 6-3163. KIL. 9-4189 ' mendous ee wel wait i% beths, se . eeges $63 . ne 
tions: Out ight | Geriient Basement with ‘s lot; $1698 i fil dt ok ane OS 


CUARLES CO e J t it le Bese ee tiful ae c0t — 
E i ciade trees. Someries Siat| aes ae beset Pee “Seer ener ee} REMODEL ae pie ie] $25, $50, $100 $1200 (MONEY IN 1 DAY 


dn a * . te Weodbin rg bedrm.. living rm. screen 
er, PA. 2-S141, ecorated nside 8 to ou SIGN at 1413 Wood- rob, full ent bungalow and Mannas Rity. J Mt 2-3110 | On your name only Ichoose sania iain, ieee ae 
; 2? E lots at i = Porson *. gi or ether plens ipay ... Take up to 20 months 
B 


SILVER SPRING— 961 Sonifont St. JUniper 8.1500 
7904 Georgie Ave. JUniper 6.1111 


1073 wn o 
MOUNT RAINIER— 3233 thode islend Ave. ADams 2.3500 


SWIMM rm., .. : : -in : ; eh schools. 4 bed- . : 
ths e Forest; 90 prema te rms 2 ba tial : ARLINGTON— 1407 WN. Garfield St. JAcksen 5.5400 


} ° 
as four year o , d s room, tremendous ki 
ms om © 5@ your . 9 oversized gar aS |! ! 
rhe . " 2308 ~ oC 7M, by owner. 827. soo Call BO In Virginia, Borrow up to £600 


a eae Srcy aco. LINTON OL s Eats Sita : ood Rar a] He Sassen Mapa MOTORCYCLE 8 PUBLIC LOAN 
a freA Res oe eee Be “ — cata 
es COLONIAL cat sre teeee pret bow s:| TRAILERS, SALE &7 


: M , | WITH spe are. Pe 3 at connidgred "} sonata. Sagmnaee of, tg, bas: FRAMES 29 1 pedre bert ot 

Es sod” Gaus ain ichardson Hall, Inc. . BO. 8-7732 afte 

"Colon eaereened rch, me, ‘ rece eThacater| macine EPs Se in bornood “3 Bedrooms SALE, OUT 68 -_ 

beeen eres ee eS | ee 
pi 


CABIN. J EE a oe ; tion dou 4 ae ALL ON ONE FLOOR 
nique ine ideal tae te, publ rochial "ARLINGTON REALTY ran ren te 4290880 _Pertect ae a Fnctudes 
OR A 

. rm. . ee. ed 
ey ee ee mae f ol: See ase 
$24. or iCROWELL & C 7 vine, tres fret | aa Ma tal 


J 
? 100’x200’, private lake trent. 
_. Giese meighbors are 


$3.695 
& 
of 


$203 BAI BiVD 
UN. 4 9000 


ee er Tom 

with’ brick fireplace tae HIDDEN CHARM 
bathe and day! ht t. i WAIT! Don’t m ke » ent Bact. ely 7 furnished. off heat, suer| ¥ 

steel dock just built 


enn, t approach is =. *Z.4 
alone ic "Potomac ; snug { an _ m year, Cottage built in 1949. 
500| “"* possibly r $1200 eegsens © }-barm. t| Zor further wet eve aren Cher | a. eer fi ~ 


rolet Co., Prostb American sce Co., ‘ine. 
Wis ove. nf. ey) 


, be that y den 
fig) PRICE, 54950 50 mponio His cal JA" ht. us Ee mn moors | sro) moe ae. | rath a 
ri Biers enfaeura | Se ae tesa ina =| JA. 76660 ) ) age yr 


: t-Water Heat! WELL & CO., INC. 
ere Sa aad i ee hee 


lonial, 


din. = table ye kitehen * 
0.| full bsmt. with n room and R . 
ly hort oil ies water Treat: 2 : . 
porches. det. garage. Level yard 
with trees. Cony. -” —. 1 bus +5 


fare and shope ' ” COMPLETE PRICE 
—_ gz. PF. . . a C POR A 2-BEDROOM HOMS 
TO UNFINISHED 23ND FLOOR 4 


cee 
$44 Bu, Bp. ce . mda se 


"$20 to 1000 


...FOR THINGS YOU NEED AND WANT 


@ You Parga with 3 able to take advantage of 
cash. Ap 4 for any amount up 


CONFIDENTIAL 
— tak to 
LOANS BY PHONE to ion = any ay, Bog up 


‘ ~ 


A MONTH 
INCL. PRINC., INT. TAXES & INS. 
VETS—NO MONEY DOWN 
PROPERTIES, INC. 
OPEN DAILY 78 N. Glebe Rd. JA. 5-8968 x — 
DIRECTIONS FROM WASH: “HOT! HOT! HOTT young 
ap 3 730) Sea BR pays eo | ame ae 
ae os i Ox Ee : . Biot? ’ owners, 
= ep ot ati PO. veel yee puown manaseas op == | DS Loa : a | 
Arlington Realty Co. BROYHILL CREST 


a y ( < / a 
1 ELECTRIC KITCHEN 
| _|3 12. ACRES). isu ge 


MONTHLY PAYMENT PLANS 


Bg 


=| Santor “Gourt } | _ In-Town Subdivision 
SE"! IGE BRICK RAMBLER| Bi Bath tev ose 
CLOSE-IN J & SENNETT CO. 


“toors an © AYA * ced, 
201 Rhode Island Ave. 
Sect. Ma AR. 1-800 


‘52 CHEV. 
$185 FULL PRICE 


‘54 BUICK 
$1585~$85 Down 


ake up payments, 
o 


PrYBLASS & CLARK 


Cor. NW. Capital & Ray Ave. NE. 
AD 


oa 


STANLE 


FISRRIER: é CORNER 
- i (ith Downtown “Dr. #-3983 
ae 


om - Super Conv » radio, 
wer windows, top and 


ara. Bes tire $156. or best 


—— 1954 Super ae power 
2 A aa oes and aie 
atee 

enditioning . A Bie. car for the 


bot gas ahead 8 CADILLAC CO. 


me, Va 


BYICKS BUICK models. vals arn, 4 ° eal. 
9 


- x. thoroughly “reconditioned 


fe +e fit pg 
nanc - 

OMAC nnane! 

D 7-8 

9 


sy etbook. 
me. 17% Dea!l- 
sis. nw ae yc Dp 
ro 
4- + 

full power equipment. 


yne - 
flow transmission. w.-w tires, tu- 
‘s } white, very clean, 
ow 


ile 5 
WHEELER “CHRYSLER-PY UTR 
LARGEST ASH DE 
4200 WISCON an 1 NW. 47 
CADILLAC 1954 Coupe 
slue fully eauipped, 49595. 


Capitol Cadillac- Olds Co. 


; 


nd bra Lik 
Thacker hee Res. ioth ry Rn. I. ave. 


nt. iA. 6-699. 
83 CADS. 
Conv. or Fleetwood 


$195 DN. 


BOTH CARS EXTRA mr wit 
Fowen AC. a UIEMENT 


if 4, a 


FOR Quick CRED 
North west Loess ee 


THE AUTO 
eK Sts. NW 2 


A 
steer- 
guarante 


‘Cadillac. Olds Co. 


c Mice ar 


t 

. 6606. 
n Com tele easipeed 
tone grey "a : ‘ 


inet i? & 1 eSeis 


AKERS “OLDS-CADILLAC co. 


Pairlington Shoppin enter 


5 e 
tful “Wedgewood 2-tone. fully 
wiped, Ptah me eo? — 
4 


Capitol “Cadillac. ‘Olds 


Ani sh Hike new Must 
preciat Call or come now 


Tr credit ‘approva 


he Auto Center 


or 


AL r Pos new 
NW 


[AC SLL: ‘ * con 
blue wit th white 
. power steerin 
wees: ene apecia i $3995. 
COC guarant 


Capitol Cadillac- Olds Co. | 
enbictat—“is86 5 


- “coupe 
bight gre power eering. power 
rakes ana electric "Windswe Ap- 

ced 
AKERS 


Onin a3 
Fairlington Shopping 


Va 
Atus— s hardtop 
aaore ey and © 
dra power “seortas ans | 
be i os RAM. 83895 
Trade and terme. a 
CHEV ROLET. 3 399 Bast-Weat hey. 


‘OL BS. CADILLAC co. 


| Matic 
tT) 


‘a! spare tire. 62995. COC guaren- 
Capitol Cadillac- Olds Co. 


ST. 
eAbit Lapis | Pleeiw 


autifu’ ii 
oonait joning 


ow Cadillac-Olds 


' ission 
tires outetanding in conditien. "and | 
Sppegrance Worthwhile guare 


WHEELES ure R-PL 
WASH. DE 
of 


sipped 
rakes. 


OTR 
4300” 708 
CADILLAC -1 


dawn «rey. 
ing er 


Ponitel 


apito! Cadi!lac- Olds Co. 
322222 


TT COSTS no More to ae . 
ity used car from Teputable 
dealer, visit our disp! ay 


‘Chevy Chase maa 


he ‘Muito Canter 


13 CHEV 


$45 DOWN 
$1195 FULL PRICE 


utiful iets 


THE rh one" pee 


‘54 CHEV. 
$375 Total 


REPOSSESSED 


NO CASH NEEDED 
ops to credit approval 


cSt 
i lliams 
cr 6.3141 


co | 


he ‘Auto Center| r: 


‘Our Ww west tien) 


‘54 CHEV. 
$375 Total é 


REPOSSESSED 


NO CASH NEEDED 
Subject to credit approval 
‘ over ow moots payments 
Tone ; maak. is stiock a 

soeviocmnen all ranks 
Soprevel c1 


BILL ROSS 


rei TU. i 


7400 Georgia Ave. NW. 


a Seri We 4 
Lt. “Chevrolet 


$395 FULL PRICE 


4- ! EXCeLLENT. 2 any Bt) Se 
is “AUTO CENTER 


(Our Northwest Loc tiga) P 
}-66° 


rw" sedan 
equ steerine 
brakes; coc cuaran- 


sea |Coito Cadillac Olds Go. 
wat 


5 sedan: poe 
een condienes. 


z= ; 
uipment 
is, -w. tires, very 


re whee 
$3 


HARDTOP 
He Boe 


CUSTOM ROYAL LANCER 


Say Dore ri t,f Bch 
$275 pan 
Bg ee 


PNA. 8-4455 


poeta) 


‘51 OLDS 


3700 Penna Ave. SE. LU. 93-9827 


$195 Dawn 

| fesse | blue body. der on top. 
en sation Ws penenee 

}] tras A 

TK ean "MOTOR C 


$585-$50 Down 


fF opeogel Bat a 
BLASS & CLARK 


Cor. N. Coniiet A Big Ave. NE. 


‘49 FORD 
$199 TOTAL PRICE 
L4 Pordor bia . F * i. ert 
™* PRIO MOTORS 
5304 GEORGIA AVE. NW. 
‘52 FORD 
REPOSSESSED 
$299.50 TOTAL 
-@r ; 2-tone bi pe Rated 
little 
e reatt. 28°30 per. mall LA A ebOad 
UCK MOTORS 
“ BL ENsSURO RD hae 
OPE 9 SUN 1o ‘'T 
‘FORD— D—1958_ T Thunderbird. red 
= . owner "ended a's new Jag- 
JACK PRY, LTD, 
1509 14th oe NW 
Raiearogm, 4218 eed er o - 
Mercedes - Jaguar 


env 


ner’ required For eredit | 


‘55 FORD ' 


NO CASH NEEDED 


Convert ‘?" Pordomatic. eauip- 
n sola is Lib. 

ed at service- 

ficers a0 dowa 
| Dayment ,reauired Por ¢redit ap- 


CARR DISCOUNT 


LU. 1-1236 


|3345 BENNING RD. NE 


reali 
j eral site as 


low i 


‘95 FORD 


Su 
ee 


with cieth and hardto 


Pull ulp 
a* “1354 
1951 station 
tation Wagon. 


* c 
Rp toTORS INC 
a t 


Pert 


wagon. 


Pike. Ariingtes 


cond. | 


+665 Total 


NO CASH NEEDED 
bject to credit approval 


+ wase we monthiy pay- 


car “a9, as 6M 


Btoc 
ay so se gor, yedan terms. are arranced 
for servicemen ai) ran 
no down payment requ! a "Wes 
credit approval. call 


Dick Williams 
LI. 6-3141 


1731 Bladensburg Rd. NE 


. “5B 


Sy ep planes at 
imm 


° 
low | 


51195 Total - 


ON APPROVED CREDIT | 


48 
+ a x “a 
) 316 FLORIDA AVE. £0 


CONGRESSIONAL MOTO 


40 Commerce Lane 


LI. 4-2396 


"pardon i aot B 
bp agp: 


odore “8 
ie fr. and h.; 
an Ses SSX DBRS! 
av. Wo 

eh = 
HyDsON— 4a Com modor + S; 4 +. 


ave 
, everdrive. turn 
very foomy: née for evel, "S25 


euaranier 


Wis & pee ae a 
‘se 


OLDs 
re a 
“Gpholstere 
oA res aced New- oar condition 
Whitehall 6-4546 


vAR- “Marg vir 
"pas oe $1395 


' 
4 . | equ 
109 14th St. NW Biel 
| 1218 Co ’ 

ce 


ry or trade. 


XK-140 M blue, red OLDR—195 y 
° Stak whee; 3.700 mi 


Holiday Coupe 


Sie and 
| 
Ow 
Rho 
8740 it Br rd. 8.a 
5 
sa Be lune. “Sa 
ck “tally equipped, 61605 


“Caditlac- Olds Co. | 


ned n. 


Capi 


OL 
4-dr 
heater. custom 
tiful two-tone sgrewone and 
Ver low ailonae 
: Safety testad for your pre- 
tection with 4 soe oer. sueree nte 


saute 


tol 


0 —' 54 
MOTORS __ LI Bo. Hydra-Mg 
“¥4 ; 
1 owner. $3995 ‘ 
gray with 
low mileage. 


"JACK PRY, LTD. 


1508 14! 7 S NW 

argon 1218 Conn. Ave 
Distr ibutors for 

Mercedes-Benz. Porsche. Jaguar 


oF ‘ie 

Fi a 
mile 

| 3964 soda 


per paver. 


Bales 


“98"" HARDTOP | 
ee TOTAL 


Pulley eau! ipeed. nepeae 


“Bipt . pee fawn avail: 


“MILLER MOTOR CO. | 


316 FLORIDA AVE. NE 


REPOSSESSED 


‘54 MERC. 


MONT. H.T. 


$875 Total® 


NO CASH NEEDED 


SUBJECT TO CREDIT | 
APPROVAL 


over ematll mo 


4-2396 


OL — i556 “Sa” 

oliday coupe. special bronze and 
white. = “4 equipped. power steer 
ake $1000 


ccc guarantee 


Capita Cie ics Co. 


tifat sala green finish with white | 
excellent mechanical — 


and take lem very clean in every fe 


A.T.A. warranty. Sale price 3908 ps doles 


” Poharica Oldsmobile 
Was gt on’ : Oldest Olds Dealership 
201 


do 
quired For credit approval, call | 4; 7- 1003 | 


—1955 
ck and wh 
brakes 


| coupe. Bia 
| steering and 


most attra 


| BILL ROSS 
AKERS OLDS. CADILLAC CO. 


TU. 2-4200) sa Bases 


7400 Georgia Ave. NW. ARES 


° 
power: ss ‘tinish. 
R.An 


| OLDEMOBILE— 53 8u a6” 4- 
MHrdra-Matic radio. and heat 


t 37 Mon terey 2-dr 
Yverdrive radio and heater . 
tremely clean inside and ou 


ir prétection with a 30-day 
guarantee 


eat SE ae RE? 
ont te alr. Thara | 


aivwdrnt i mi.. l-owner. 
— cost wi ae trade wi 6- bars 


by MERC. 

| Monterey 
HARDTOP 

$45 DOWN 


Pullv uding rad 
eater “Tereomatie” sy 


’ 
protection, with a 30-day euaran- 
ateering. As 


UL BROS. o 
a 
icy Bhieis8 cay “te 
orgie 5 _ 
‘a oning 
Capitol Cadilae x 4t7 Co 
| £222 220 8 ie ST. 3-2600 


' 


| $785-$50 Down 


Dp porments. x clu 0 2- 


"eo m 


‘55 FORD * 


$665 Total 


| ‘56 FORD | 
y * Dr. we: | 


"| $195 Down 


onthiy ed 
ine sedan. An 
with r. and 


Tak ver low 

on t is a A 
ve car u 

pees 7 2-tone fin 


ti 
ee Liberal terms ar 
r ow wr = ranks 
ment re- 
hay call 


K WILLIA MS) 


Li. 6-314] | 


1731 Biedensbure BA FE. 


‘51 FORD 
VICTORIA |\s 
$185 Total 


REPOSSESSED 
No Cash Needed 
| Sublect to credit 


BILL ROSS 


TU. 2-4200) 


7400 Georgia Ave. NW. 


MEMORIAL DAY 
Sale of Entire 
Stock of Used Cars 


NO CASH NEEDED 


Subject to credit spat 


| And take over omell monthiy pay- 
ce 


ne down payment require 
credit approval ca! 


BILL ROSS 


= TU. 2- 4200 


7400 Georgia Ave. 


ap 5 Pord- 
ees, Denier, $3'Dn so" - ene 


FORD— 55 Victoria sedan: tutone 
raven biec hite 
with vinv! 
rier’ com 


-8. 
hite. my equipped. . 


- a ww. 


iF YOUR 
CAR Is 


ut $375] 


We can deliver te you « 


‘56 Plymouth 
wamo) “49 


BETHESDA MOTORS 
De ge ang Dealer 
Miller Wise, Aves. 


OL. 4-1000 


wrwvrvrvwrwrwe+ytwyws 


STATION 
WAGONS 


‘SS Ford 
ans. SE vacdomshes. 
‘SS Plymouth 


Please &-deor, 6-crl. 


& hk. 
‘$4 Pontiac 


4-doer, 5 sea te, r. s x “~ 
Hydre-Matie. 


‘$2 Chevrolet 


3460 14th 84. NW. 


SILI. 


Victoria coupe. | 


tol Cadillac- Olds Co. : 
F 


ll Oaded 
ood {tien “Really wades Cor. LASS & Ch mK NE 
ank Pen e r @, For cred- AD. 4-9882 
it approve! 


MILLER MOTOR CO. 


316 FLORIDA AVE. NE 


4-3396 § 


i955 Bel: yedere v-a 


oa Pally 


sacril 7 oo 7 tr 


‘56 Ramblers 


Comevany Official Care 
Waesgens end Sedans 


$600 off 
Burrows Meter Ce., Inc. 


Washington's Oldest 
Hudson Dealer 
78 mM Hh. SF. lt. 46900 
Ovepesite Nave Yard 
Oven “tH & FM. 


| MG's. 


| Siee. Ss several tn sock: fro 
aiso selection of ‘34 and % 
“T's from #81605 efi 
Selection of 
rs. Dealer fer Aus- 
| Healey, Aust! n pores piimer 
| MG acnett an 
Mercedes- Bens eons. Wil ys & 


vy 
ANHATTAN AUTO 
7TH AT R STS. NW. 
NOrt 
Alex Branen 


Alexandria. Va 
Pairfax Branch: . hw 
| 29-2 Merrifield. ¥ 


Finance te. 
Repossession 


‘54 FORD 


2-dr. “6” Sed. Fully equipped. 


ERVICEMEN 
DOWN PAYMENT! 
my 1 
ané = * = Saves qveces 


Por Further temas 


JET MOTOR SALES 
40. 2-06 


We Have Them! 
PACKARDS 


From ‘t"e te "Sée. All 
styles. One-owner cars! 


COVINGTON no 


7301 Wis. Ave. (Beth.) 
OL. 2-9200 


“The Garege with 6 
Conscience” 


FULL 


$385 mice 


NO CASH NEEDED 
with geed «credit. 
for cred apprevel. 


Cell new 


Militery Personne! and 
Ovt-of-Tewners Financed 


Andy Kelly 


129 K ST. WLW. 


ME. 8-2674 


ev 
with untnes, 
Was 615956. 


Now $1,295 


1 Year er 16.000 


FEES ESEEESESEEESEE SEE 


peer reas f 
FINANCE COMPANY 
Repossession 


‘54 my 


Monterey Hardtop 
Fully equipped, Mercomatic, 8.44. 


875 TOTAL 


No Cash Needed on Approved Credit 
to Take Up Payments 
call 


For credit approval 


RE. 7-3890 


OLDSMOBILE—1956. All models at 
RS. inc 


a 
for vour oretection with a 30-day 


W. KE. 7-1308 


eT 


oom and Continental y spare wheel. 
ar : 


53 PLYMOUTH | 


Ay: omen f hie 


brakes. | 


oo smal! 


seat covers Beas: | 


ae OLDS ME. 8-2674 aiiak ie 


| 


oy 


de luxe | 4800 “WISCONS ie cu 


$199 Full M. | 
N P Can. 


_- 
R | RAR. windshield hE. 


HE AU S'CENTER 


LOCATION 


*./%. tires. per eet 
Low 


dow 
bank financing MeNEIL | 
PONTIAC 7320 Wis ve 
“Ip the heart of Bet nesda* 


'53 PONT. 


| CATALINA 


'55 PLYMOUTH ‘$565 Tota 


2-DR. SEDAN | No_Cash Needed Subjec 
$655 TOTAL | To Credit Approval 


A nice ca as is 
NO CASH NEEDED 


car Soild 
| 3467 Liberal termes afrance 
| pervs semen, j ranks 
6 40 peyment required. 
credit al eal 


and take over low Ww saryments 


oon as 


fet 3 grades military necpenaedt. 
Small monthiy payment nd ver 
down payment . einer | 
military personne), 


LI. 6-314] | 


1731 Biadensbure Rd. NE 


CALL 
ANDY\ KELLY | 


wis. & liso OM RE. 17-1208 FOR CREDIT APPROVAL | 


Fic 7 ay ays'ts zg 
aaa SEs ri “Bed 


officers 


Por 


WITH GOOD CREDIT Dick Williams 


Seiden. Mav zn, 1956 


i : 
a 


Circulation 


means quicker salés results 
Post and 
Times Herald classified ad- 
To place your ad 


‘96 Pontiac 
Conv. 
$195 Down 


0 PPROVED 5 
N APPROV 


And take over emall month! y pes AUTOMOBILES, SALE yi 


Fa peed with dou oS EO Gta, ORE 
- — see 538s rat ‘StBaylep #¢Z 
a. Ave 


2-2022 


for Washington 


vertisers., 


for Sunday 


t 
son 
ren Ks 


miles Libe term 


r service mee g: 


“si PRs 
TU. 2-4200 $5 DOWN 


7400 Georgia Ave. NW . mo. 


%9 BUICK. "*- My 
‘ mo 


L ae dr. “ot 
+ Hig: LB, A ar. 
49 LAC ‘>. dr 
SOME OF 
IN TOWN: 


"iner. GO ARANTERD. 
L STREET MOTORS 
224 & L 9us NW. NA. #3376 


mo. 


4-dr. Like new 
PINEY BRANCH Mo: 
soflem Rd. 

“a 30. 5-852 


bie eed 


convertible | 


ocKEWacds 2 or best offer 


at Stewart Buic 
A 


son bivd Fie Ve aK’ §.7350 


42. uv 
inc.. Wil- 


PACKARD CUSTOM 2-DR. 
| OLDSMOBILE 4-DR 
. LINCOLN 4-DR. 

BUICK CONVERTIBLE 
LINCOLN 2-DR. 
OLDSMOBILE 2-DR. 


gt) ont me 


bile 


ty. $1695 
WHEELER, “CHRYSLER PLYMOUTH 
SH. DEALER 
NSIN NW... EM. 3-4708 
1955 Starchief convert- 
aut 6. tr 


Finance Co. 
Repossession 
‘55 CHEV. 


2-dr., Arctic white, 
and tubeless tires. 


PONTIAC 

tole &H 

tires, —— 

Lew down payment 

me neg PONTIAC, 7320 Wisc 
“In the heart 


n Low 
McKER "PONTIAC. 
Wis ave. ST. 3-7 
1954 “ae jux y Club 
H t transmission 
ner car 


$335 


heater 

a ~ tl ires, like anew, one-oOwT 

$1395 Low dow payment. bank 

jnancine McNEIL a's "8 bs = 
ve.. OL 4-8 “In 


co of Bethesd 


NEW 1955 
FORD 


B-cyl. Fairlane Club 
Sedan. Radic, heater, 
Fordomatic, w-w tires 
and other accesse- 
ries $1,995 


EDMONDS 
FORD 


3298 WILSON BLVD 
ARLINGTON, VA. 


Full 
Price 


‘787° 


$5 DOWN 


with good credit. 
for credit approval. 


| AndyAdams 


3720 GEORGIA AVE. N.W. 


TU. 2-3515 

| Benoasessed | 
Repossessed 
Finance Company 


‘55 Victoria 


Ford Hardtop 


Seld as is. #1851. 


Call now 


Fordematic. A nice car. 


1,165 TOTAL | 
No Cash Needed With Good Credit 


To Take Over Payments 
For credit approval ¢all 


Bill Ross 
TU. 2-4200 


BUICK 4-DR. 

DODGE 4-DR. 

CHRYSLER 4-DR. 
PONTIAC CATALINA 
NASH CUSTOM 4-DR. 
HUDSON HORNET 4-0R. 
WILLYS AERO F-HEAD 
MERCURY 2-DR. 

BUICK CONVERTIBLE 
NASH CUSTOM 2-DR. 
BUICK RIVIERA 
CHEVROLET DELUXE 4-DR. 
DODGE STATION WAGON 
PONTIAC CONVERTIBLE 


73 Others—Open Daily 9 


eines Motor Co 


1840 Wilson Bivd. 


ch ® 


Arlington, Va. 


1955 CHEVROLET 


é-cyl., Del Ray Club Cpe. spent R. 
Vinyl interior. Tu-Tone ivory « 


1954 FORD 


6-Cylinder Coupe. Radio and Heater. 
LOW MILEAGE. 


1953 CHEVROLET 


De Luxe 4-Door Sedan. Heater and 
Powerglide. 


'53 CADILLAC $1995 


Sedan—R. 
siock Finish—One Seca 3 Liileoge 


1954 1952 
BUICK DE SOTO 


40r. 8. & 4. w/w Firedome ‘8’ 4-Deor 
Tires. tv/Lt Blue R. & H. Aute Trans. 


ower Steering 
$1395 "5695 


LOW DOWN PA YMEN/ SANK aT TMA 


Hicks @ 


ov29 SEORSTA AVE Phone - 43-0100 


PAAAKRIAAIAAAA IAAI 


1395 


7400 pace ll Ave. N.W. 


NO CASH NEEDED 


ON APPROVED CREDIT 
FULL PRICE 


‘56 FORD "1169 9; 


sa BucK 1065) 


55 PLYM. 8691) 


‘59 CAD. 14691 
75 OTHERS. TO CHOOSE FROM 


4-deor Sedan: tally cavipped. 
X MILITARY PERSONNEL, GOVERNMENT FM. 


PLOYEERS. MEDIATE DELIV 

cag feece cae Scr ieaae 
Bank Financing available. _— yore our 
3-day trial and 100% no-cost, 60-day or 


1,000-mile labor and material guarantee on 
normal use and service of car. 


You Can't Go WRONG If 
You Go RIGHT to 


“THE ORIGINAL” 


AUTO DISCOUNT 
HOUSE 


1510 RHODE ISLAND AVE,, N.E. 


“~;* 


A a oe 


(= 


We Pi henest values. ne 
high eressere. We here 
the care we edvertice, 


Customer 
Satisfaction 


*.dav mener bark euar- 
antee on otf care 
advertised. 


SALE 


- 


FULL PRICE 


785 


FULL PRICE 


$53 FORD = 335% 


‘53 rar 58 5: 
12853 


Piymeouth hardtop: equipped. 
L Price 


‘55 VICT. »-$ 
4/53 WILLYS »- ‘47 P) 


»‘55 Hardtop »- $ 


Nash Wetrepolitan; — f. 


equipped. 


wu ae SG 


falas ius Tas aah 


Ford “8”: Fordomatic; equipped. 
- = 


Sedan equipped. 


ervicemen all grades we give you the sam 
uick credit service we give Washingtonians. 


Immediate Delivery 
On Approved Credit 


= Martin 


ate & K Sts. N.W. 
anne WA, 8-4455 


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fold GCE irict 


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Weekdays 


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er is Robeson Called Tuesda y 
Fight Against U.S. Communists Fea In House Passport Quiz 


Associiited Presa | be in the interest of the United 


7 : ‘ a Paul Robeson, the Negro - . 
Held Back by Tangled Rules | pg SiB ee erie hier cost cia ence sre noe A 
AR 7 ; re oe bdo S ; h b a t ° 
ncatieaeir ma oe Boag Neg caro i The Committee aiso sub SPRING CLEANING 
: ; - on Un-Ameri- i pena to Nathan, executor 
(First of two articles) | gress has labeled the Party “an | reach back beyond 1952 to cut can Activities of the estate of Albert Einstein, AF) FOE RNITERE REP UR 


international conspiracy.” | of fit a | ; 
By Murrey Marder There can be little doubt Con- off benefits based on wages New Issue gis 9g | a to appear Wipe The Com- DONE IN LESS THAN A DAD! 
ee mittee listed Nathan as sponsor . 


Staff Reporter ess intended “harsh treat: | earned prior to that year. That 2 | 
I 4 Tas new lScemt Encepend: ithe Committes 5 lof the Cultural and Scientific 


, b restoged benefits in 13 cases. 
IN ITS ZEAL to bit toe | ee er ene ating about | Still. pending, however, is a| ence Hall stamp will be |statted an in- 7) es | Conference for World Peace in| 


| 

, ; , date it has said nothing about 

Communist Party with every | Social Security benefits for | decision on the basic issue of | placed on sale in Philadel- jauiry eee of New York in 1949. ) 

possible weapon, the Govern- | Communists—or former Com- | Whether Communist workers | phia July 4. ith * er oe | A third witness called for 
ment is operating with a tangle | munists turned anti-Commu- | should be treated as employes | ee PR ieee, “fe ae atoll oF fF, | Tuesday is Henry Willcox. 

‘ef a foreign government when | le ing issue & rs The Committee said Willcox 


of laws and | nists. f 
eerule'l it‘comes to Social Security rm jance of pass- . & |and his wife attended the Octo- 
oe ' | ning benefits. ir German A-Plant |ports should gr ‘ber, 1952, peace conference in| 


Call NA. 85100, Ext. 5397, and The Hecht 
Co.'s Home Service experts will come to your 
home or office to: 


J ileal SU FS a_i ee 


te Porky | LAST WEEK, in an interim And meanwhile. the tax col-| BERLIN, May 27 (»—Russia'5e strengthen- Re , |Petping. ® Clean carpeting! Wool, sq. :ft., &e 
cont? a| unding, the Social Security | tector is still collecting those |will help Communist East Ger- ¢4 and wheth- beso ‘The Comenitice teard ‘ains| © Clean upholstery! Sota & 2 Chairs, 24.95 
™ dict each | Administration reversed a por- | taxes. As far as he is con-|many build and operate its first'¢™ American passports have! witnesses last week. 
ion of its 1955 ruling. cerned, taxes are taxes, |atomic power station. An East) been misused. : | Most witnesses, declined to ® Re-web furniture! Chair Seat Botte 
whether they come from Com- _German Government announce-| Robeson’s passport was re-| answer the question of whether || 9.95 
ample is the | munists, gamblers, or anyone ment says the plant will begin voked in 1950 on grounds that ‘they had attended the confer-| 
present co n- | limitations, SSA could not’ else with legal tender. ioperations before 1960. ‘his traveling abroad would not’ ences. i 
tested: Social —---—-- _—— Laimeenesiondnanesyitnsttin ne intteceepnatliettinacsiipc PIG 2 heii De Set ee Fa OR a 
Security rul- 
ing that the 
Marder Comm ww |! 
nist Party is “an‘arm of a for- | 
eign government,” and its | 
yemployes are therefore not | 
entitled to pension or sur- 


vivors’ benefits. ! | 
If the same theory were.ap- 

plied by Internal Revenue | 

Service, inquiries disclose, the 

Government's whole tax case 

against the Communist Party » ' 

could go out of the window. 


Under the Internal Revenue 
Code, the income of foreign 
governments in the United | 
States is exempt from taxation 
here. 


other. 
A prime ex-| _A hearing examiner ruled . 
| that, because of a statute of 


ow 
SIMILARLY, WHERE the | 


United States has a tax rect | a 
procity: agreement with a for- | : 
eign nation, employes of that 

country—except if they are 


United States citizens—are ex- 
empt from taxes. Revenue of- 
ficials said this country has 
such a tax agreement with 
Russia. 


Fortunately for the Govern- | s v 
ment’s tax lien of $386,265 ' 
against the Communist Party 
(and a lien of $46,047 against 
the Communist Daily Worker), * 


the Social Security Adminis- 
tration’s ruling against the 
Communist Party has no legal 
effect on the Internal Revenue 
Service. 

But, ironically, while Social 
Secufity last August cut off 
employes of the Communist | 
Party from old-age and sur- 


megs ee | Once again the engineers who design and build 


from the Communist Party. 


When asked for an explana- 
tion of the inconsistency. 


Sigivamea America’s cars choose Blue Sunoco as their 


boil down to each agency pro- | 
ceeding in its own separate | 
path. 


ena, 16 ae pe favorite over all other gasolines! 


ing is that the Government, 
through one agency, eyes the 
Communist Party as “an in- 
tegral unit or arm of a foreign 
government,” but the tax col- | 
lector, as one official put it, “is 
not going to resist collecting | 
taxes from somebody who 
wants to pay it.” 

The Communist Party, at 
least theoretically, could apply i 
0S Tepensacrleagl sang eee af vate We recently invited a large group of automotive engineers to try New 1956 


Se : xes. 0 « . . ‘ oe . . . a 
et Social Secariie Re me r Blue Sunoco, boosted in octane, in their own cars and give us their reactions. 
The results of this survey, compiled by an independent firm of certified pub- re mM j U m | r every 


them a foreign agent 
I ti ; h J - th t is . , . 
eet shout the last thing the lic accountants, make New Blue Sunoco the favorite. See chart below for 


Communists would do, because : : 
they would never acknowledge official tabulation. 


that they are agents of a for- ~ 
clgn power A 43% already are users of Blue Sunoco “$ way and if still 


That is exactly what the Gov- 
ernment has been trying to 


prove to force the Party to Of the 1,166 engineers who reported on 56 Blue Sunoco, 43% told us they 


register under the Subversive . ‘ 
Activities Control Act of 1950, were already users of.our gasoline. This was a far greater number than 


The Subversive Activities Con- | . ; : ° 
trol Board did rule the Party reported using all other premium gasolines combined—perhaps the greatest sel Is at reg yl ar 


was controlled by Moscow, but | testimonial any gasoline ever had! 
the Supreme Court has sent | . 


that case back to the Board for | , ; ‘ 
 reruling on some disputed Blue Sunoco is recommended for the newest high-compression cars when 


Tame chet ence tm Milena owners’ manuals recommend a premium gasoline. ° | 
for six years, it has been par- | . : gas rice 
Hesterty striking thet the So : Premium octane at regular gas price 7 


cial Security Administration— | 


on its own—went even further - ‘ , . : : ; 
by an administrative ruling | Blue Sunoco is premium in every way, still’sells at regular gas price, gives 


that Communist Party ¢m.- | . : , 
ployes are excluded from its many more miles per dollar. Follow the lead of automotive engineers. Make 


coverage on grounds they are | " ; 
are Sie tha aeanhew of 0 your own 10-gallon test today. 
foreign government.” 

When SSA made that ruling, 
in August, 1955—to compound | 
the sepercussions—it hit not | 


nists as 75-year-old William 2. COMPARISON CHART 
Foster, the Party's national | 


chairman, but it penalized the This i# what automotive engineers reported after comparing New 


family of at least one anti- . . . . : . : 
Communist far more. 56 Blue Sunoco with premium-priced gasolines in their own cars 


HIT HARD by the decision 
was the widow and three chil- 
dren of the late George T. | 


Hewitt. A one-time Commu- say Blue Sunoce matches 
nist official, Hewitt renounced | of, or excels premium-priced 


the Communist Party and 
served as a Government wit- | a 


ness against the Communists | 
in several cases. His family of 
four had been drawing $120-a- 
month survivors’ benefits, 
much of it based on his Com- 
munist pay. ete Sunoce ' 

At a hearing earlier this say Blue matches say Blue Sunece matches ¢ SUN OIL COMPANY 
month in New York, where % or excels premium-priced or excels premium-priced Philadelphia 3, Pe. 
attorneys for ginerd and six brands for anti-knock brands for miles 
other plaintiffs challenged the 
Social Security ruling, the performance ) per gallon 
Government attorney argued 
that Congress intended “that 
the Communist Party is to he 
accorded nothing but harsh 


Mis Peters! sttorney sted America’s Greatest Gasoline Value! 


numerous laws in which Con- 


Sea NAR SF 


Wrestler MacFarland 
Gets 8 Years in _—— 


axe The only gasoline that meets new higher premium 


acFarland, 30, to eight years 
fn prisen for a hotel jewel rob- 


cms Octane standards and sells at regular gas price 


pearance, was found guilty of 
staging a $13,000 jewel robbery 
in the famed Imperial Hotel of é , 
Tokyo with three accomplices. 
The accomplices, a Japanese 
and two Koreans, were given 
ded sentences. _ 


MRS. ABBA EBAN’S first dance partner of 
the evening was 88-year-old Sen. Theodore 
F. Green (D-R. I.), who whirled his beauteous 
blonde partner around the ballroom of the 


She Sewed Parachutes 


Scientist’s Widow 


Recalls First Rocket 


By Eileen Summers | 
these couldn't be | 


THE WIDOW of Dr Robert 
H. Goddard the man who did 
most of the pioneer work in 
the field of guided missiles 
and earth satellite vehicles, 
has been honored with the 
first life membership in the 
newly formed Auzxiliary of 
the American Rocket Society. 

Esther Goddard, who was 
her scientist husband's per- 
sonal assistant, addressed a 
meeting of the society in 
Washington this week. She 
is a house guest of Mr. and 
Mrs. Milton Lehman of Gar 
rett Park, Md., and is work- 
ing with her host on the 
biography of Dr. Goddard 
which he is preparing. 
BACK IN the ‘Thirties, 
when most foreign scientists 
were confining themselves to 
mere speculation on space 
flight, young Esther Goddard 
and her husband were get- 
ting up at 4 or 5 a. m. and 
driving out to the site of a 
rocket launching tower at 
Roswell, N. M. There, in the 
cold, desert she would record 
with a movie camera the 
flight of one of Dr. Goddard's 
high-altitude rockets. 

he told in an interview 
last week how her husband 
worked for teh years at Ros- 
well on a Guggenheim grant, 
after his experiments had at- 
tracted the interest of Col. 
Charles Lindbergh. 

“IT helped him in the way 
a wife would have helped. I 
took notes, ordered scientific 
supplies, kept the accounts— 
even sewed the special para- 
chujes forthe rockets be- 


cause 
bought at that time.” 
The rockets were equipped 


- 
ss 


Sheraton-Park Hotel for two numbers 
without stopping. The Ambassador's Ball 
Saturday night was given to honor Israeli 
Ambassador and Mrs, Eban. 


Times Berala : 


or and about WOMEN 


WOMEN’S NEWS 


COMICS 


MONDAY, MAY 28, 


1956 


At Ambassador’s Ball 


Stars Perform 
To Honor Lbans 


By Millicent Benner 


NO TWO PEOPLE had a 
better time at Saturday 
night's Ambassador's Ball 
than its guests of honor, the 
Ambassador of Israel and 
Mrs. Abba S. Eban. 

“Tt’s wonderful . . . so mov- 
ing,” the popular diplomatic 
pair repeated time and again 
during the evening of stellar 
entertainment planned for 
them by the Washington 
Chapter, Trustees, @ponsors 
and Guardians of Israel in 
the candle-lit ballroom of the 
Sheraton-Park Hotel. 

Certainly, nothing was 
missing. For laughs, there 
was television comedian Dick 
Shawn. Songs were sung by 
Metropolitan Opera bari- 
tone Robert Merrill and 
French songstress Denise 
Darcel and dances demon- 
strated by exhibitionists Ar- 
tini and Consuelo, who start- 
ed their ballroom repertoire 
with a Charleston and closed 
with the current Cha-Cha. 


MRS. EBAN’S, first dance 
partner of the evening was 
none other than Rhode 
Island's 88-year-old Sen. 
Theodore F. Green, who had 
no difficulty keeping step 
with the bouncy rhythms of 
Meyer Davis and his orches- 
tra. 

Between dances, Ambassa- 
dor Eban and his beauteous 
blonde wife, wearing a gown 

_ of pale blue silk, received the 
i crowd of close to 800, on hand 
to pay their respects, at their 
ringside table. 

Sitting with them was 
America’s first Ambassador to 
Israel and Mrs. James G. Mc- 
Donald; Mrs. Allie S. Freed, 


OEP LALO Mg 5 
” 7 4 


. ~ ag ~ her 


-_. 


By Jim McNamara, Staff Photographer 
AT RINGSIDE—Among guests seated at ringside tables 
at the Ambassador's Ball Saturday night were Sir Senerat 
Gunewardene, the Ambassador of Ceylon, and Mme. Tran 
Van Chuong, wife of the Ambassador of Vietnam. The 
ball honored Israeli Ambassador and Mrs. Abba S. Eban, 
who have been at their diplomatic post in Washington since 
1950. More than 800 guests were on hand to pay their 
respects to the popular pair. 


ball chairman, and Sen. and 
Mrs. Herbert H. Lehman. 

Others from the diplomatic 
corps seated at tables around 
the dance floor were the Am- 
bassador of Ceylon. R. S. 5. 
Gunewardene, the Ambassa 
dor of Vietnam and Mme. 
Tran Van Chuong, Bolivian 
Ambassador and Senora 
Blanca de Andrade, Icelandic 
Ambassador and Mrs. Thor 
Thors and the Ambassadors 
of Haiti and Cuba. 


DURING the program, 
which started with the na- 
tional anthems of Israel and 
America, Master of Cere- 
monies Joel Kaufmann, pres- 
ident of the United Jewish 
Appeal read a cablegram 
from Israeli Premier David 
Ben-Gurion congratulating 
Washington's Jewish com- 
munity on its work on behalf 
of Israel. “We regard your 
ball as a warm tribute to our 
young state as personified by 
Ambassador Eban,” he said. 

Inside the programs given 
guests was a written tribute 
to the Ebans reading: “For 
incomparable service to the 
cause of freedom as eloquent 
spokesmen for Israel before 
the peoples of the world at 
the United Nations; For 
sustaining the joint heritage 
of Israel and its sister democ- 
racy, the United States of 
America, both hewn out of 
the wilderness by the in- 
domitable resolve of people 
yearning to be free; For em- 
bodying the eternal spirit of 
Zion reborn, to which we 
have dedicated our endeavors 
and pledged our treasure.” 

In his thank-you speech, 
following the entertainment, 
Ambassador Eban said that 
the gathering was “a tangible 
representation of universal 
solidarity.” 

The evening ended with a 
bountiful buffet that includ- 
ed a large ice cream cake. 


AMBASSADOR EBAN’S dancing partner 
early in the evening was Mrs. Allie S. Freed, 
chairman of the ball Saturday night honor- 
ing Israeli Ambassador and Mrs. Abba 


Eban at the Sheraton-Park Hotel. The ball 
was sponsored by the Washington Chapter 
Trustees, Sponsors and Guardians of Israel. 


Party Time 


Rain Runs Afghanistan Fete Indoors 


By Frances Rowan 


A meant-to-be outdoors 
party turned into a gay in- 
door affair yesterday at the 


Afghanistan Ambassador and 
Mme. Mohammad Kabir 
Ludin’s buffet supper. 

The party, celebrating 
Afghanistan's independence 
day, was originally planned 
for the garden but rain 
forced guests onto the ter- 
race and into the Embassy's 
drawing rooms. 

Leaving their raincoats 
downstairs official society 
went upstairs in droves to 
greet the Ludins and their 
two elder and very poised 
youngsters who stood in the 
receiving line with their par- 
ents. Mme. Ludin, wearing a 
yellow organdie cocktail dress 
with a green and yellow 
striped taffeta bertha, intro- 
duced her children,. 10-year- 
old, Soraya and her brother 
Hashim, 13, to the older gen- 
eration. 


LOOKING on from a couch 
nearby were the Ludins’ two 
other daughters, 7-year-old 


Fawiza and Syearold Hom- 


yra—two brunette, brown- 


eyed misses in identical party |) 
dresses of blue and white | 


cotton. 
The 
been set outside on the ter- 


| 


} 
' 


with scientific instruments to | 
record scientific data and the | 


parachutes helped ease the 


impact of the rockets’ de- | 


scent. 


IT WAS a rocket first de- | 
veloped by Robert Goddard | 


during World War I that be- 
came the bazooka of World 
War II, Mrs. Goddard said. 


During the second World | 


War, he was director of re- 


search on jet propulsion for | 
the Navy Department's Bu- | 


reau of Aeronautics. 

Esther Goddard had no 
special training for her work 
with her husband, beyond a 


B. S. degree from Johns | 


Hopkins and a master’s de- 
gree in history from Clark 
University, Mass. It was at 


Clark that she met him. She | 


was secretary to the president | 
of the university and he was | 
head of the physics depart- 


ment. 


“Not only are the princi- | 
ples underlying jet propul- | 


sion well within the under- 
standing of women. The 
challenging and aesthetic im 
plications of this work have 
a special appeal for wom- 
en,” she says. 


Dr. Goddard died on VJ-: 


Day, 1945. Since then, his 
widow has edited and pub- 
lished the notes of his ex- 
perpen under the title, 
Development.” 
Whenever she can, she ac- 
aoe wg to talk og 
s wor ore groups 
engifeering students. 


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... in Mallinson’s air-cooled 


race which sheltered by an 
awning overlooked the out- 
doors. Almost everyone made 
their way there from the 
crowded drawing room to ad- 
mire the green, green garden 
which was being deluged by 
rain. 


ASSISTANT Secretary of 
State for Inter-American Af- 
fairs and Mrs. Henry Holland 
arrived at the party and 
waved to the Indian Ambas- 
sador, G. L. Mehta. The 
South African Ambassador 
and Mrs. J. E. Holloway 
were talking to Mme. Noto- 
widigdo, wife of the Indo- 
nesian Ambassador, who said 
that Indonesian President 
Sukarnov had been very fa- 
vorably impressed with the 
United States during his 
visit this month. Joining the 
group were the Italian Am- 
bassador and Signora Brosio 
and Edgar Morris—the latter 
chatting with the Ceylonese 
Ambassador, R. S. S. Gune- 
wardene. 

The Dean of the Diplomatic 
Corps the Norwegian Ambas- 


buffet and bar had | 


Panama Cloth, a cotton- 
orlon-and-acetate blend 
that washes and drips dry for 
carefree wear. Bamboo 
log buttons, easy skirt, 
set-away collar and sleeveless 
styling make it a little gem 
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Blue, beige or lime. 


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Shown with it, our shiny white 
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sador and Mme. Morgen- 
stierne were there looking 
over the buffet. So were the 
Saudi Arabian Ambassador, 
Sheikh Abdullah Al-Khayya; 
Sen. Leverett Saltonstall; J. 
R. Wiggins, vice president 
and executive editor of the 
Washington Post and Times 
Herald; and the Iranian Am- 
bassador, Dr. Ali Amini, who 
was talking with the Iranian 
Press Attache Ahmad Minai 
and First Secretary Ali Reza 
Haravi. 

A whole roast lamb, cold 
salmon, chicken curry with 
seven kinds of rice and 
molded turkey made up the 
long buffet. Clustering 
around were the Regional Di- 
rector of the International 
Cooperation Administration 
for the Near East, Far East 
and Africa and Mrs. Henry 
Seager—he's just back from 
Ethiopia; the Bolivian Ambas- 
sador and Senora de Andrade 
and Syd Ahmed, Pakistani 
Press Attache. 

The Pakistan Ambassador 
and Mme. Mohammed Ali 
went down the line and took 


places on a near-by sofa in 
the drawing room to talk 
with friends. In a corner was 
the Pakistan Naval and Air 
Military Attache Maj. Gen, 
Hayaud-Din talking to Asso- 
ciate Justice and Mrs. Wil- 
liam O. Douglas and Corne- 
lius Engert of the Export Im- 
port Bank. 


DINNER AT EIGHT: 

Courtney Johnson and his 
daughter, Virginia Johnson, 
entertained at a dinner Sat- 
urday at the Chevy Chase 
Club in honor of Dr. P. E. 
Thompson-Hancock, head of 
the Medical Department of 
the Royal Memorial Hospital 
in London and Mrs. Thomp- 
son-Hancock who heads the 
News Department of Lon- 
don’s famous Harrod’s De- 
partment Store. Among their 
guests were Mrs. John F. 
Simmons, wife of the Chief 
of Protocol; Rep. and Mrs. 
Ross Adair; Mr. and Mrs. 
John Selby; Judge and Mrs. 
Evan Howell, and Mr. and 
Mrs. John Hancock. 


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PHONE: NAtional 8-9540 


—_— 


THE WASHINGTON POST 


and TIMES HERALD 
Monday, May 28, 1956 


38 eeerR 


Weddings 


BRUNHILDE GROSS 
—JAMES MATHESON 

‘Mrs. Jakob Gross of Wangen, 
Germany, announces the mar- 
riage of her daughter, Brun- 
hilde Elfriede, to the Rev. 
James Leonard Matheson, 
son of Mr. John C. Matheson 
and the late Mrs. Matheson 
of Mt. Gilead, on May 26 in 
the Hannah Brown Finch 
Memorial Chapel of Greens- 
boro College, Greensboro, 
N. C. The bride has com- 
pleted her second year at 
Greensboro College. The 
groom is a graduate of Duke 
University and Duke Divinity 
School, Durham, N. C. The 
Reverend Mr. Matheson is 
the Pastor of Corkran Memo- 
rial Methodist Church, Wash- 
ington. The couple will re- 
side in Washington after 
June ll. 


MARILYN MILLER 
—STANFORD W. BERMAN 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Miller of 
Forest Hills, N. Y., announce 
the marriage of their daughter, 
Marilyn, to Stanford W. Ber- 
man, son of Mr. and Mrs. Hy- 
man Berman, on May 27th at 
the Hotel Delmonico, New 
York City. The bride is a grad- 
uate of Brooklyn College, New 
York. The bridegroom is a 
graduate of the University of 
Maryland and the George 
Washington University Law 
School. He is now a partner 
in the patent law firm of Mc- 
Morrow, Berman & David- 
son, Washington. The couple 
will reside in Washington. 


- Se 


A SCHENLEY 
PROOUCT 


THE ORIGINAL DRY VOOKA 
Product of U.S.A. Booto Komponiyc, 


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@ tom Groin, 8 ond 100 Proof. 


By Educator 


Kisenhower 


Plan Is 


Questioned 


DR. ANTON PEGIS, one of | 


the foremost Catholic schol- 
ars, questioned last night 
whether America has the “in- 
tellectual strength” to go for- 
ward with President Eisen- 
hower’s recently expressed 
idea of American colleges in 
various parts of the world. 
He was talking at the com- 
mencement exercises at Dun- 
barton College of the Holy 
Cross. 
American cultural traditions 
seem practical, rather than 
speculative, Dr. Pegis said. 
“This,” he added, “is a philos- 
opy” which had been in- 
herited from Europe. It does 
not, he said, fit the youthful 
energy and vigour of the 
American people. 
“Nevertheless,” he con- 
tinued, “it will be difficult 
to ignore the challenge that 
the President has made to 
United States educators and 
institutions. And it should 
not be viewed as trying to 
impose American culture on 
the rest of the world.” 


PRESIDENT Eisenhower 
made his proposals, May 26, 
at Baylor University, Texas 
when he was awarded the 


| degree of doctor of laws. 


Dr. Pegis is professor of 


| history and philosophy at the 


University of Toronto, 
Saturday was graduation 


| day at Dunbarton when 34 
| young ladies gathered in the 
| college’s flower-banked audi- 
| tofium for the traditional cap 
| and 


LEARN TYPING 


gown ceremony. 


‘Typing at Temple 
‘is taught by Paul 
|'Stokes, former con- 
tender for the world 
typing ch a mpion- 
ship. Mr. Stokes, 
an expert teacher, 
personally instructs 
all students. Tui- 
tion is $28 monthly 
in day school, $14 
at night. 


TEMPLE SCHOOL 
1338 G St. N.W. 


PAUL STOKES 
Temple School offers special) 
‘summer classes for adults and! 
'teenagers in Typing, Stenotype, | 
Gregg or ABC Shorthand. The! 
School is fully air-conditioned. | 


NA. 8-3258 


Wtodwa i. / Seth Up, 


Where courtesy and quality are traditional 


ee 


SITTING THIS ONE OUT—Mrs. Estes Kefauver hasn't 
been campaigning out on the hustings this year, as she did 
in 1952 to help her husband's bid for the Democratic Na- 
tional Convention. But there's still plenty of political work 


Nancy Is Content in New Home 


it Rate re 
= wee. 


732 


Internationa! News 


to do at home. Here she prepares campaign literature with 
the three Kefauver offspring, from left, Diane, 8, Gail, 5, 


and David, 10. 


Puts Family Ahead of White House 


This is the second of siz 
articles by one of America’s 
most widely honored women 
journalists bringing you the 
intimate, personal stories of 
women who might become 
the next “first lady” in the 
White House. 


By Ruth Montgomery 

THE BEST campaigner 
among potential first ladies 
is sitting out this year’s pri- 
mary siugfest. Green-eyed, 
red-haired Nancy Kefauver 
has had it, thank you! 

Four years ago, Nancy rode 
planes, made speeches and 
pumped almost as many Dem- 
ocratic hands as Estes Ke- 
fauver in his famed coonskin 
cap. This time, Estes is going 
it alone. Even the coonskin 


| cap has been left by the way- 


side. 

If the homespun, Yale- 
educated Senator from Ten- 
nessee should actually cap- 
ture the White House, how- 
ever, Nancy would grace it 
with talent, beauty and 
charm. 

She would also break prec- 
edent by becoming the first 
foreign-born wife to serve as 
First Lady. Nancy's Irish par- 
ents were actually born in 
this country, but moved to 
Glasgow and subsequently 
gave up their American citi- 
zenship. Years later, her fa- 
ther became Sir Stephen Pig- 
gott, was knighted for his 
work on marine turbine en- 
gines and shipbuilding. 


NANCY, born to this pros- 
perous family 45 years ago, 
met the lanky future Senator 
on a blind date in 1934 while 
visiting her mother's rela- 
tives in Chattanooga. 

Estes fell hard. As deter- 


mindedly as he has later pur- 
med the Presidency, he fol- 
lowed her to Glasgow and 
won the hand of Sir Stephen 
Piggott’s pretty daughter. 


The Irish lass, between 


babies, has spent most of the 
intervening years campaign- 
ing—until now. This spring, 
insisting that the four Ke- 
fauver moppets need her 
here, she has stoked the 
home fires and caught fleet- 
ing glimpses of her fast-trav- 
eling husband on an aver- 
age of only twice a month. 

It’s a different story from 
1952, when flushed with the 
Nation-wide success of Ke- 
fauver’s Senate crime-bust- 
ing investigation, Nancy cam- 
paigned so exhaustingly that 
on awakening in strange 
hotel rooms she had to look 
at the telephone book to re- 
member which town she was 
in 

The charming redhead 
never spared herself during 
any of the seven campaigns 
that brought Estes first to the 
House of Representatives and 
then to the upper chamber. 

Should Estes now replace 
Ike in the executive mansion, 
the familiar odor of linseed 
oil, turpentine and tube paint 
would remain, for Nancy not 
only paints, she teaches it— 
at her own studio near the 
Mayflower Hotel. 

The busy senatorial wife 
has long since graduated 
from the amateur status of 
fellow artist Ike Eisenhower. 
Eager students jam her 
classes, and Washingtonians 
pay well for portraits exe- 
cuted by Nancy. A product of 
art schools in Glasgow, Paris 


and London, Nancy wields a 
deft brush. 


TO THE amazement of her 
friends, she has also found 
time to redecorate the new 


Kefauver house in suburban 
Spring Valley, make her own 
draperies and slipcovers, and 
sew for her three lively young 
daughters, Linda, 14; Diane, 
8: and Gail, 5. Ten-year-old 
David, the other youngster, 
was adopted in babyhood by 
the Kefauvers. 

Until the presidential bug 
bit Estes, the family had a 
rollicking home life. Now, be- 
cause the children adore their 
father and loathe the cam- 
paigns that. keep him travel- 
ing, they bitterly resent pub- 
licity and run like fleeting 
deers at the sight of a photog- 
rapher. 

To know Nancy is to admire 
her. Although she vehemently 
opposed her husband's presi- 
dential candidacy this year, 
she has accepted it with calm 
good humor and has thrown 
herself unstintingly into the 
combined mother-father role. 

Four years ago, friends jok- 
ingly accused Nancy of covet- 
ing the White House simply 
to acquire enough bedrooms 
for her family. At that time, 
the Kefauvers lived around 
the corner from Vice Presi- 
dent Nixon 
crowded that the older young- 
sters had to sleep in a con- 
verted attic which they 
reached by pulldown step- 
ladder. 

Now, with a new home of 
her very own, Nancy is per- 
fectly content to let someone 
else do the honors as First 
Lady—if Estes will just stay 
at home. 

During the '52 primary cam- 


paign bachelor Senator Rich- 
ard Russell of Georgia, a rival 
contender for the presidential 
nomination, laughingly de- 
scribed Nancy as Kefauver's 
“secret weapon.” Estes ami- 
ably conceded that she was 
his most effective one. 

This year he is taking the 
plaudits and the brick-bats 
without her. 
should smile on him in Chi- 


cago this August, you can | 


safely bet that the one-time 
Miss Piggott of Glasgow will 
ride out the campaign trains 
with him—fighting every step 
of the way. 


(Tomorrow: Marie Harriman) 


(Copyright. 1956. br 
Internationa) News Service) 


Pre-Civil War Homes on Tour 


Three contemporary homes 
will afford points of contrast 
when the fourth annual Old 


H poe aeteone 
St. Paul’s Episcopal 


urch takes place from 10 
a. m. to 4 p. m. on June 8 in 
Berlin, Md. 

The tour features pre-Civil 


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Engagement Announcements 


JOY LEE LEWTER 

— JAMES E. SIMPSON 

Mr. and Mrs. Willis Darwin 
Lewter of Arlington, Va., an- 
nounce the engagement of 
their daughter, Joy Lee, to 
James Enright Simpson, son 
of Mrs. Mary E. Simpson and 
the late Mr. Louis R. Simpson 
of Arlington, Va. A September 
wedding is planned. 


OLGA M. MAMULA 

—J. EDWARD KAISH 

Mrs. Mildred Mamula of New 
Alexandria, Va. announces 
the engagement of her daugh- 
ter, Olga M. Mamula, to J. 
Edward Kaish, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. S. S. Kaish of Syracuse, 


N. ¥. Miss Mamula now at- 
tends Syracuse University. 
She is also a first lieutenant 
in the United States Marine 
Corps Reserves, associated 
with the 2nd Tank Battalion, 
U. &. M. C. Reserve Center at 
Hancock Field, where she is 
education officer. Her fiance 
received his B. S. and M. S. 
degrees from Syracuse Univer- 
sity, and is now a radio an- 
nouncer with station WFBL in 
Syracuse. 


PATRICIA SMITH 

~—JOHN TICER 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Gordon 
Smith Jr., of Alexandria, an- 
nounce the engagement of 


their daughter, Patricia Key- 
ser, to John Tennesson Ticer, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Edmund 


Fillmore Ticer of Alexandria. 
Miss Smith is a graduate of 


Sweet Briar College, Sweet | 


Briar, Va., and is employed 
by the J. Walter Thompson 
Advertising Agency in New 
York City. Ticer, an ‘Alex- 
andria city councilman, is a 
graduate of the School of 
Engineering, 
Virginia, Charlottesville. He 
is now associated with the 
Westinghouse Electric Corpo- 
ration in the Gas Turbine Di- 
vision. The wedding has been 
set for July 20. 


University of | 


Newest discovery from the laboratories 
of JOHNSON’S WAX! 


_ ONE BUG KILLER FOR 
BOTH HOUSE AND GARDEN! 
oy fn 


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Kills House Insects 


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New Discovery! . 


Kills Garden Pests 
Raid protects roses and other 


Raid clears rooms of flies, 
mosquitoes, gnats, flying in- 
sects. Kills roaches, water 
bugs, silverfish, crickets, 
ants, spiders, centipedes, 


flowering plants, evergreens, 
vegetables by killing such 
chewing and sucking insects 
as aphids, red spiders, thrips, 
leafhoppers, Japanese bee- 
tles, caterpillars, cutworms. 


smart... pretty 


that’s every graduate’s goal. 

Jules creative talent comes into 
play, creating a hairdo that will carpet beetles, bedbugs, fleas 
just “do the right thing” for your and other crawling pests. Py 
graduate’s charms. Why not a Be ‘ 
permanent for a graduation gift! ‘a 


more than a make-up 


more than a beauty treatment 
.1.50 and 2.00 


Haircuts..... 


FLUID GOLD MAKE-UP 


by John Robert Powers 


Permanents ......from 7.50 


eeps bugs from the air... 
attacks bugs as they crawl...and kills them dead! 


unlike ordinary household sprays, Raid 

will not harm plants. Raid’s new combi- 

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Use Raid sparingly! Its remarkable for- 

mula is so effective that a little goes a 

long way. Once you’ ve used Raid in your 

house and garden, you'll never buy any- 

thing else. For you’ve never had such 

complete protection from a single insecti- 

cide before. So, to kill both house insects 
and garden pests, get Raid today! 


You know it’s safer—it’s from JOHNSON’S WAX! 


a 


Hair Coloring Analysis—No Charge 


Mr. Wayne Hutchinson, of John Robert 
Powers, will be in the Washington Store, 
today, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday to 
help you with your beauty problems. 
This make-up with the new beauty dis- 
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treatment, as well as a lovely radiant 
look, all day long. It reactivates nature's 
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Ips hide imperfections. Come in and 
have the Powers Cosmetiscope select 
your perfect tone. 5.00 
Please add 10% Federal tax 


Saves you buying several 
single-purpose insecticides 


‘Why buy one kind of insecticide to use 
inside your house—others to use outside 
in your garden? Use Raid’s revolutionary 
new formula in both house and garden! 
Raid hunts bugs down like radar! A few 
Shirlington Business Center KI. 8-7400 : ’ short bursts and Raid gets into every 
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Hair Stylist 


109 N. Washington St., Alex., KI. 8-0070 


WEL—Cosmetics, Ist Floor 
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LOOK AT THAT—The Aus- 
tralian Ambassador, Sir Percy 
Spender, points 

course for the 

Class at the 

Horse Show to 

Howrey. “I used ride a bit 
in Australia,” Sir Percy said 
afterwards, “but my 
interest in horses is confined 
to an annual visit té6 the Fair- 
fax Hunt show 


-— 


, 
lately 


Luncheon May 3] 


THE LADIES’ DAY 
gala luncheon at the Y.W.C.A., 
takes place 31. More 
than 70 housewives who en- 
rolied for a sports and exer- 
cise program during the year 
will be the 
Health De- 
partment. 


OUT 


May 


the 


and 


guests of 
Recreation 


a 


GALS, 


Speaking of Figures 
Don’t Miss 


“Mr. Universe” 


anid ten International Adenteecs. 
The Werld's Mest Spectacular 
Musclemen. 


Norma Gerstenfeld had no w 


> 


The 


LAMP SHADE SHOP 


* . - 

You Will Love 
® The Fine Workmanship 
© The Low Cost 
® The Beautiful Designs 
® The Wide Choice of Materials 
Of Our Made-To-Order and 
Ready-Made Lamp Shades 


] 740 Wisc. Ave. at $ St. 


Phones: DE. 2-3746, CO. 5-3617 
Bring this ad for 20% discount 
on made-to-order shades, 10% 
on stock shades. 


7” 


in the fabulous 


MAE WEST 
REVUE 


I Week Only 
Beg. Mon., June 4 


Casino Royal 


14th & H Sts. N.W. NA, 8-7700 


Store Hours: 9:30 A.M. to 5:45 P.M. 


Streamer conscious . 


this summer. Rayon with 


a linen look moulded 
with sleek, flanged edges 
and boasting long, slim 
streamers. Black, natural 


or white 5.95 


Hat bar, 


MX ond Spring Velley 


First Floor / 


é 


Julius Garfinckel & Co. 


F STREET AT FOURTEENTH. NAtiona] 8-7730 
MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE AT 4qTH, EMerson 2-2255 


i —_ 


| supposed to 
| proved in a few months. 


| recipe for that 
| favorite, Caesar salad? 
Mrs. G. L. 


| BUNDLE FOR BABY 
TO 


| lowing: wrap-around 


large enough 


orries when it came to jump- 


At Faitfax Hunt Club Show 


Straw Hats Vie With Horses’ 


By Muriel Bowen 

CRISP cotton dresses and 
cartwheel straw hats got as 
many glances as did the 
horses at the Fairfax Hunt's 
annual horse show at Sun- 
set Hills, Va., Saturday. 
Mrs. Lisle A. Smith, who 
was entertaining the Aus- 
tralian Ambassador and Lady 
Spender, wore a striking pic- 
ture hat in coarse scariet 
straw. Also, very much in 
the hat stakes was Mrs. Row- 
land S. Marshall's - floppy 
brimmed natural straw which 
was admired by guests in 
her box. The latter included 
her daughter, Mrs. Raymond 
Norris, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard Smith. 

With entries from far 
afield, and many of them, it 
was one of Fairfax’s most 
successful shows ever. Vi- 
vacious Mrs. Ramone _ 5. 
Eaton, this year’s chairman, 
made several new innova- 
tions and was up at 5 a. m. 


Saturday supervising the 


final preparations. 


EARLY ARRIVALS were 
Hunt president Robert D. 
Graham and Mrs. Graham, 
Assistant Secretary of State 
and Mrs. Carl esley Me- 
Cardle, whose daughter 
Marcia won several events 
riding her horse; Tara's 
Theme; and Mrs. Franklin 
Wing who was watching 
Franklin, Jr., compete in the 
jumping. He is a very pol- 
ished young horseman and 
may well follow in _ his 
famous father’s footsteps to 
compete in the Olympics. 

Mrs. Wing is nursing a 
broken. arm having been 
pushed off a chair, on which 
she was standing, by one of 
the Wing horses while she 
was plaiting its mane! 

Hunt Master James 0. 
Pease was host at the judges 
lunch held in the clubhouse, 
an attractive building with 
oak-beamed ceilings and walls 
with fox-hunting pictures. 


~- 


Photos br Wally McNamee. Staff Photographer 
Hills, Va., Saturday. Norma is the daughter of Rabbi and 


Mrs. Norman Gerstenfeld. 


Guests included Dr. and Mrs. 
Henry S. Murphy, Charles H. 
Tompkins Jr., who is master 
of the Casanova Hunt; Mr. 
and Mrs. Alden -McKim 
Crane, Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
Macomber, Mr. and Mrs. E. 
Howrey, and George Gray 
who has been assigned to the 
Rome Embassy. Prior to his 
departure in early June the 
Hunt plans a farewell party 


in appreciation of his work on | 


committees. 
DURING LUNCH news 


came of the marriage of Hunt | 


member Randolph D. Rouse 


to TV personality Audrey | 
Meadows and glasses were | 


raised and guests drank to 
their health. 

Judge and Mrs. Charles D. 
Hamel brought along to the 
show several friends who had 
lunched with them earlier at 
Meadowbrook, while other 
Hunt members, included Mr. 
and Mrs. Talbot W. Jenkins 


- mee 


e 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


Monday, May 28, 19356 


Winners in Arts Club Fair 


CHARLES MILLER won 
the award for the best-in-the- 
show with a landscape at the 
May Arts Fair held by the 
Arts Club of Washington Fri- 
day. 

First prize in the still life 
section went to Beverley 
Hoge. A special award for the 
best oil painting went to 
Dorothy Galer and the prize 
for the best in the print and 
pastels section was won by 


Lucy Gommersall. 


THE EXHIBITION was 
held in the James Monroe 
Park and was sponsored by 
the club in cooperation with 
Woodward & Lothrop, and 
the Interior Department Rec- 
reation Association. The club 
gardens were transformed 
for the day into a sidewalk 
cafe, and Friaay night, a 


dance for members was held 
outdoors. 


ee 


VACATION BRIDGE 


You can learn Bridge or improve your game... 


for vacation fun... 


in 8 weeks summer classes be- 


ginning June 5, 6 and 7 at the Y. W.C. A. 
Fred L. Karpin, nationally known expert, author, 
“Point Count System,” will teach, classes for be- 


ginners, intermediate, and advanced players. Special 


day classes for students on vacation. 


Actual play. 


Blackboard explanations. 
fied and enjoyable method. 


Simpli- 


For further details or reservations, call ME. 8- 
2100, extension 29. Registration now open. 


ing the log fence at the Fairfax Hunt horse show at Sunset 


Anne’s Trading Post 


Wants kasy Way 
To Learn Reading 


TEACHING children to 
read well is important to 
parents, teachers and the na- 
tion. Recently, there has been 
a furor about modern teach- 
ing methods. One reader in- 
quires about reading im- 
provement through recorded 
lessons. 

“Do Anne readers know 
anything about records that 
teach children reading? I 
refer to an album of records 
which teach reading by the 


| new phonic method. If used 


daily, the child’s reading is 
be much im- 


“The records cost $25 and 


| would be quite an expense 
| for me. As I know little about 


the results. I would like to 


| hear from someone who has 


had experience. I would also 
be interested in buying a 
used set. Does anyone know 


| where they are available? 


“It breaks my heart:to see 


| my child trying so hard to 


read. He is 11 and in the third 


| grade. I am sorry I waited 
| this long.” 
Mrs. E. D., Riverdale, Md. 


CAESAR SALAD 


CAN anyone give me a good 
West Coast 


M. K. K. who wanted to 
know the least number of 
items necessary for a new 


_ baby living in a small apart- 


ment. 

I suggest three of the fol- 
shirts, 
kimonos or gowns, receiving 


blankets, waterproof flanne! ‘ 


lap pads. You will need two 
or three of these: bath towels 
to envelope 
baby, wash cloths, crib blan- 
kets, crib sheets: Also on the 
list are a bunting, safety pins, 


oil, powder and cotton swabs. | 
Booties are necessary if the | 


child won't stay covered. 


Bottles are perfectly sani- 
tary if washed with a good 


detergent and rinsed with 
boiling water. Unless 


all the equipment is surplus. 


I believe a crib is a neces- | 
sity but many ‘refer a small | 


basinette on wheels which can 


be moved from room to room. | 
Apartment cribs which can | 


be movea from room to room 
and can be used for 18 months 


are available. A small chest of | 


Crawers or one large drawer 


will hold all baby’s belong- | 


ings. 


are an unnecessary cruelty 


‘ to an infant. Only use water- 


proof, well ventilated, bloom- 


er style panties when going — 
visiting. Diaper service is | 


wonderful. 

When baby is old enough 
to sit up, a play table with 
a swing seat in the center is 
a good idea. They are a good 
height for feeding, provide 
a place for baby to play and 
fold flat for carrying. 

ie 


SHOELACE TIPS 
WHO KNOWS how to keep 


the ends of shoelaces on | 


children’s shoes from break- 
ing off? I spend many im- 


patient minutes each day try- | 


ing to lace up shoestrings 
with frayed ends. 

A Reader 
STARCH 


IS THERE any additive | 
in starch | 


that can be put 
made from powder which 
will make it last like liquid 
starch? 

M.B., Arlington 


Air Force Girls 
On Job Here 


IN ORDER to get a better 
understanding of American 
travelers 50 Air France host- 
esses will work for six months 
on Allegheny Airlines flights, 
starting June 1. Idea behind 
the move is to further stimu- 
late international air travel. 


Stauffer 
System 


WORLD-WIDE 
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Not so with Stauffer passive exercise! Your muscles 
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Stauffer also helps to reproportion your weight 
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Call your nearby Stauffer Salon for a 
free trial visit and figure analysis now. 


Budget plan available, 


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a 


the | 
baby is on a strict formula, | 


To my mind, rubber pants | 


Amazing New Creme Shampeoe | 


Re-Colors Hair 


, 


All the bath needs can | Siasco 


easily be kept on a corner of 
your dresser. A bathinette is 
unnecessary. A clean kitchen 
sink is satisfactory for bath- 
ing until baby is four to six 
months. Then they love the 
big tub. 


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76 Sewe Your Faundy ZalBe- 


> 


oe. 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
40 


Monday, May 28, 1956 


BEAUTIFY and COOL Your HOME 


————— 


a’ = - 
=—"* 
Zephyr All-Aluminum Window Awnings 
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EVENINGS 

OV. 3-4302 
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How to | 
Keep Well 


‘By Dr. Theodore R. Van Dellen| 
| To the limit of space, questions 
[pertaining to the prevention of 
| disease will be answered. Per- 
sonal replies will be made when 
‘return stamped envelope is in-| 
'closed. Telephone inquiries not 
‘accepted. Dr. Van Dellen will not) 
make diagnoses or prescribe for) 
individual diseases. | 


CHARTING OVULATION | 
| Charting the body tem-| 
‘perature may help the house-| 
wife who is having trou 
ible getting pregnant. This 


DICK TRACY 


= 


Or 
\ 
ai 


Ne [5-28 ~ oa 
~ REX MORGAN” 


Reg. U. S. Pat. OF: 
@ 1986 by 
The Chicago Tribune 


By Chester Gould 


F 


— 
a 


—_.— 


WE HAVE TWO CAMERAS 
TRAINED ON THE FRONT 
ENTRANCE AND TWO ON THE 

BACK. OKAY? 


PERFECT? 


ee 


ew 


THAT WAG VERY 
THOUGHTFUL OF 
ANXIOUS TO f 
SEE NEIL, 
LILA! I THOUGHT 


IF YOURE LOOKING / I WASN'T 
FOR NEIL --- HELL / PARTICULARLY 
BE RIGHT BACK, 
MISS GALE / 


INTERRUPTED 
ANYTHING YOU AND 

NEIL HAD PLANNED | 
THE EVENING, 


1 HOPE I me | 


PLANNED ? WE DON’T 
PLAN ANYTHING, MISS GALE/ 
AT LEAST, I DON'T/ 


i 


By Dal Curtis — 
7) 


4- 


OV. 3-5600 ‘method of overcoming sterility | \ FOR \aer 
is reliable, harmless, and inex- 
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| going into more costly proce-| 


—ACME STOVE CO. 


‘dures. me purpose is to deter- SUSPICIONS BECOME 
1011 7th St. N.W. NA. 8&-8952 mine ovulation time. | 
Open 9 to 6 Daily 


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vs Normal body temperature | 
Friday & Sat »9io7 Fi : 6O 
ae aturday r ' varies throughout the day. The | JUNE COMES TO THE 


| APARTMENT / 


‘reading is lowest in the early| 
Ep 


morning and reaches its peak) 
~ MARY WORTH 


NOT REALIZING THAI 
NEIL HAD ASKED 
JUNE GALE © VISIT 
THEM, LILA BARKERS 


3650 Wheeler Ave., I'D STOP BY TO LILA / 
Ba VISIT BOTH OF 


YOu! 


Used Refrigerator Sale! 


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Available 


in late afternoon or early eve-| 
ning. Thus it may be 97 or 98 
degrees F. on awakening and 
98.6 just before dinner. This. 
temperature pattern usually) 
occurs in children, men, and 
jin women after the menopause. 
Variations of a few tenths of| 
‘a degree are normal and incon- | 
sequential. In women of the 
childbearing age, however,| 
there is a change approximate- 
ly 13 to 15 days after. the begin-| 
ning of the last menstrual pe- 
riod; the morning temperature 
‘dips one-half to one degree. | 
This slight drop corresponds 
to ovulation, when an ovum 
ruptures from an ovary. The! 
level usually remains down for 
a day or two and it is at this) 
|time that milady is most likely} 
to become pregnant. By check-| 
| ing the temperature and doing | 


(51GH !) I GUESS I CAN WAIT... 
TILL AFTER COLLEGE!..- SORORITY 
PARTIES-- «DATES WITH FOOTBALL 
PLAYERS. -NEW CLOTHES-- -MY OWN 
CHECKING ACCOUNT ---I WOULD 
WANT TOMISS ALL THAT! 


SHIRLEE, MR. BOLLEY 
WISHES TO SEE YOU AT ONCE 
IN THE PRINCIPAL'S OFFICE! 


& 


IN STUDY HALL, 
SHIRLEE 
DAYDREAMS 
OVER THE MOST 
RECENT ENTRY 
IN HER DIARY... 


Largest Selection! 
Lowest Prices! 
Old Box Accepted 


As Down Payment 


RENTALS As Low As 25¢ A Week 


: Plus Service C 
Ls FREE PARKING 


LIMITED ONE 
TO A CUSTOMER 
NO DEALERS 


what comes naturally, the 
chances of conceiving are good. 

To determine the ovulation 
period, obtain a rectal ther- 
mometer with wide spacings 
that make it easy to read. This 
is vital because small fluctua- 
tions in temperature are sig- 
‘nificant. Record the readings 
ion a standard temperature 
\graph. For basal readings, tem- 
‘perature is taken at the same 


C AM E io) Oo L AT E ieee | time each morning, before get- 
ting out of bed. 


Custom has thousands of yards of surplus |PRAAAtsase se Banari 
GA TCU ACU ECCI SEM | (2.50), (e maximum reading. 


Certain extraneous factors may 

elevate the temperature; these 

include staying out late at night 

and drinking too much. Smok- \\\ i \ ; ; | 
MOVIE 


ing has no effect but infections 
GAELS movie 


raisé the reading. 
Wanted! 


Attention to these details is| 
We pay cash! or Trade! 


necessary because it is impor- 
Brenner 933 °'"".:: 


tant to pick up the first dip in 
Ope. Jest. Dept. Open 9-6 Theres. 9-9 


~ LONG § 


a 


IN REAR 


_ 
i” 


SMILIN’. JACK 


TORGNY SEES 
A PICTURE OF 
SUMAN JACKS FAMAY AT MOE 


‘temperature. This indicates eee ton pak on 
that ovulation has occurred. If 
the temperature fails to return 
to the pre-ovulation level with- 
in a few-days, the possibility 
is excellent that the woman has 
conceived. 
Otherwise 

turns to its 
until a day 


* Topestry REDUCED $99 per 3-pc. suite 
* Motelasse REDUCED $80 per 3-pc. suite 
* Damask REDUCED $65 per 3-pc. suite 
* Comporable REDUCTIONS 
on oll fabrics 


SOFA & CHAIR 
REUPHOLSTERED 


STAR THEN ME JILTED 
ME / Ye 


: OV BREAK 
MIS NECK! 
OISGUSTECLY, 
TORCHY 


the reading 

previous level 
or two before 
menstruation, when a second 
drop takes place. Here, too, 
if the temperature fails to 
dip, pregnancy may exist. 


TOMORROW: The aged who 
\do not eat properly. 
| (Copyright, 1966, Chicage Tribune) 


re- 


OPEN ‘TIL 9 EVERY NITE 


PRICES SLASHED! 
o” POOLS! 


Inflatable 


~ THE “DYNAMITE “LETTER #6 
“SOON W/INGIVG /75 WAY 
FROM CALIFORNIA To FLORIDA! 


Oe 
> 


Plastic Peo! — 
40” in diameter. 


~ BRENDA STARR 


ALL DAY AT WORK BRENDA WORRIES 
ABOUT: FUP DECKER wenn ot WO 


FOR AS 
LITTLE AS 


Better 
Fabrics at 
Greater 
Savings! 


Open Sundeys 
10 a.m. te 2 om. 
iP ii? 


AATLSON 
““TOYVAND 
1315 King St., Alex., Va. 


ST 


1952-1956 
Cars 


1500 H St. WE, 
Li. 4-3664 


FREE PARKING 
NEXT TO OFFICE 


$ 


Starting with the bare frame, Custom | 
rebdDuilds to thrilling new beauty—in 
our bie new-furniture factory. All| 
new filling and padding added. Guar-| 


> 
OPEN. 9 A.M. TO 9 P.M. 

anteed Cradiled in Steel Construction 

For as little as $69. you get complete 


SALE! R $g-50 
8-step reupholstery. Labor material | - eg. ~~ 
7 =e 


"% 


“7-7 e eee *% ee OO 4 Oe 4 OOS 


ii ~+ + eee ee ee ee rrr re ee eee Oe 4% So SOO OS 


Saree | el ne non 
MADE-TO-ORDER SLIPCOVERS NYLON UNIFORMS? 


. * eagle : 
in guaranteed washable fabrics OURS EXCLUSIVELY AT THIS LOW (7 
VAs | 


SOFA & CHAIR osiittleos $ 5&9 PRICE! Crisp, carefree uniform of & 


I CAN HEAR Him BuT 
I SURE CAN'T SEE HIM—| 


MORMAN NASTOR, 
GROUNDED AIR- 
DEVIL, BREAKS 
RULES BY FLYING 
WITHOUT 


100% Dupont opaque nylon. Flared 


a tr $6 5 .. 


blouse effect, 2-way 
collar, set-in waist. 
Plus speed stud but- 
tons, White. Get two 
38 to 44, $6.50 
For Mail & Phone Orders Add 25e 
Postage. Delivery Within 10 Days. 


—one to wash, one to 
) / 
2904 14th St. N.W. 


we ta) " _ ¢{hi Sg 

hey. oath by vate 

wear, Misses 10 to 1s 
eter 


. 
. 


~ 


WHETHER YOU 
BUY OR NOT... 


accept this attractive 


Weather 
Forecaster 


ME AN’ HIM--WE'RE 
FRIENOW AS A 
BASKET OF 
KITTENS 


a Mae 
OT 


makes you a 


fine-nousched 
pd 


hances in the weather 


niso an fF Ting wall looks tikes 
ABSOLUTELY ata The for aiving UD ; little time fo 
s No Obligation Fabric Sh wing iin your home) 


Cali 9 am to 9 om 


s 2-9000 


ornament 


By Carl Anderson _ 


cae... 


eupnol ery or Slipcovers 


Doul Quality 


mie 


AD 


: | aes THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
wo Horoscope | | Monday, May $8 = 
Today! Tomorrow! Always! ORPHAN ANNIE aye Z : By Harold Gray 


mn the section in Which your 
| birthday comes and find what your out- 


Washington's Leading Discount House pay wendy: May 2k 


i ae 20 (Aries) —A | 
| Home Appliance 
& 


tal | 
Oe T wee 

| APRIL 21 TO ‘ 

| resolute, adroit and 1, ts 

lall maneuvers and transactions 

| agnere hard work, difficult trades. han- 
. >. * lin machinery tools. railroading. 

nat — iding an e like 

MAY 22 TO 


° mm le u0 us be 
easily th j 
HOURS: JUNE 22 TO JULY 23 (Cancer)—Day | 
¥ 1s Put petty tle th and | 
; wy n't t t , 
Daily 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. @ Thursday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. grievances aside y-., pac ttle things 
ULY 2 1G. 23 


») — Saturn 
spect ted) hj aignt iy honors min- 


OPEN MEMORIAL DAY ag PS be ae 
9 A.M. to 6 P.M. 


All Merchandise Pully Guaranteed tirely easy — meh for br ight ceone | mu Chic Young 
Sealed Cartons rertisine. journalists. rit ] | rT . | rms 
24 TO 2 : | 


NO-~THATS YOUR I°TELL YOU 
OWN PENCIL-- PENCIL~I DION T THIS IS YOUR 


4 — 7 : ae - > 7 / 
farmin wo oneg-ti ; 
rT cts. uc _ ty ‘but iding roads, dams. IT HAVE MINE HAVE ONE - PENCIL 
’ 5, oe j ! q 
OCT. 24 TO NOV 22 (Scorpio)—This ’ 
frOUR day for achievement at } J 
but u can't n wt by verriding | j nae 4 . uy 
other COOT liste s 4 , : j 
* $ : wa ; | 


n "to sound 
tackle, 


adv! t i 
ssignments 
Pp } 4g 2 ‘ 21 ‘Sagittarius)— | 
t prospects for worthwhile 
NEW LOW RICES I: row work for iasting 
. will be susta! helpful plane- 
M ch 
You Can be SURE if it’ ze | 
can start new ventures or 
' Mat ters a) pene? start 
¥ ’ , 


Westinghouse 


. t n st me in d eam- P 7 - — 226K ng Peetures Send x ane 4 ria 
uina_©?< h ing A. fine day for difficult work, Ee en . 
—— \ Vestin OUSE valk My BORN TODAY wil naire Stan: LI'L ABNER a _— 


AUTOMATIC te ie Lop ee wand ‘Venus | b ME. PUNCH MAH ’ BLT IT GOTTA AH JEST 
jent, artistry. a fine memory and out- a —. OWN, NATCHERAL- f LOOK LIKE CAIN'T /”- 
ents eo great responsibilities and some| | WE GOTTA MAKE YORE CAPTURE BORN SENNY-TOR Li AND WE‘LL BOTH | | YO’ PUT UP YAH LOVES 
T A ourish restlessness or fickieness they) | A REAL SPECTACULAR S”- IN TH’ NOSE? GIT SOME A TUSSLE!’ } AN’ RESPECKS 
Sent possible for sou. AH GOTTA LOOK BEAT UP ” VALUABLE. YO" TOO 
ne POeeTTEnt. 1956. | r : PUBLICITY DEEPLY 7- 
Reg. 21.95 i . f ? OUTA ITI 


Functionally styled Citizens for Ike 


Made like fine watch ; , 
“yy , . y — 95 Name Alexis Doster | 
ult nm anaies . Alexis Doster, 3316 R st. nw.. 


Extra Lift-up for has been named deputy director 

' and chairman of the budget 
small slices committee of the National Citi- 
zens for Eisenhower, John D. 
Ames, finance chairman of the 


} A 4 h iced. 
Westing Ouse go a Connecti- Yj oie op 
cut fact d f y ty 
=a ret emg yg ws of the! & 
STEAM & Economic Cooperation Admin- -Y/ 
istration. Giedehdiitidiataainbatinigiasasbinats 


DRY IRON CAPITAL “SUPPLY COMPANY "%) THE PHANTOM 


Reg. 14.95 SS = Sunmaster | yt A NATIVE OF ANOTHER TRIBE SEES 


| ‘S, | | THE TROUBLE IN THE GROVE - 
Seem er dry » «18% mare $9-95 Teas Ss AWNINGS | (so ¢ 1 (ease ) 
f / Sry r ih SS : 


steam ... turn dial... extra 

Only Sunmaster Gives You 
Alcoa Aluminum Built-in 
Ventilation 
No Down Payment 


lose NS FE = _ tenses eat Omani 


vents... open handle, 


Choice of 22 
Featuring Exclusive 


KF FRY PAN [femme *: “age 
Tate eg Reg. 22.95 , oe 
lav tam e A : NOW! 4 f 
heat right where the food is $¥ 4.4 | 


cooked. Cook easier—Cook bet- wanted! LI. 6-710 Sorvey” GASOLINE ALLEY ‘ : ) si agasoose: oS Oe i tee By King 3 


fer the modern way. | ae But we'll have to 2. 4 Neah, maybe \ We'll go back 
802 CONSTITUTION AVE. N.E. e. have more than that FG f | ‘6 \ he left some] and ¢éarcn 
eatin eat Diane , But » ae - st tne house 


; | -—-s« BUY DIRECT 
Westinghouse oUY 


COOK-N-FRYER —_ FACTORY 
Reg. 29.95 | e TABLE PADS 


Fries more food with less fat y 50 a ig e GLASS TOPS 
Becerra os e WALL MIRRORS 


Temperature control-temp. chart 
PROMPT 


SERVICE 


VW . ouse ; . \\ | FF LAP ati PR A cil PR Tes BIE te ath oem hee 2 Sant TRS ae ition 
estingh | THEYLL DO IT EVERY TIME , By Jimmie Hatlo 


‘timid, __> — cn AR CES 
GRILL-N- ® Heat & Waterproof Pads At Pre-Seasen Discount Prices ~ a 


® Selection of Colors & Patte a ee eee Puicanoer’s HOME FROM THE CONVEN- So S4ID PRINTS JUST ARRIVED~ “AND 
WAFFLER Special Offer © Our Reasmneabatien will a doe KAISER FENCE CO., INC. TION-SO BEFORE SENDING HIS DUDS TO SOMETHING TELLS US PHILANDER WAS 
| pec or evenings with samples MD. & D.C.—CALL TO. 9-6625 THE CLEANER, WIFE UNLOADS THE POCKETS HAD HIS FINAL FLING = 


—_ age FREE! FREE ESTIMATES VA.—CALL JA. 5-0258 | ™BUT-WHAT HOP WHAT'S THIS? 
$¥ 5° Beautiful mirror LU. 4-4300 DAY OR NIGHT =e 


crerr table ‘pd 

, | TABLE PAD & MIRROR CO H H | 
Westinghouse 4020 Minnesota Ave. N.E. Public Notice: 
Charge it At Ne Extra Cost Te You. All Residents of 


ie taiphaepenrltperaagg | on nn zz | CONGRESS, HEIGHTS 


Extra power for heavy mixing e * 26 Be ee ee Oe ee ee ee ee 
Light weight . ee ee ee 


Speed Selector Dial » 2 2 ‘2 : We're offering spectocuvlor savings on 


Large beaters——storage hanger CROWN'S INSTALLATION * | fine furniture during the opening of | ~*~ 
our new store end hereby pul you on 
$¥ Qo SPECIALS! notice te visit we ond see for yourself, | 


-ARMSTRONG’S pasos bert tote Us 6 


te fries, it grills, ft toasts, 
it bakes waffies—Automatically 


PFA 
VAS 


J - > 
a x 
/ . j 
De . S 
; , 


* ASPHALT TILE : On = HAMPSHIRE HOUSE 
GENERAL MK, 100 SQUARE FEET —— 2 FURNITURE COMPANY 


S15) 


@ Cemented to Concrete 


23.35 @ Bathrooms. Laundries excepted 


20” Window Fan (Exhaust only) ...........39.95.. 


20” Electrical Reversible 94. ..28.95 a - PLASTIC 

10” Oscillating Fan : ... 10.49 | +f +1444 

12” Osgillating Fan ‘ cee 17.50 | : Sesse - ¢ WALL TILE 
20” New Deluxe Window Fan 95...40.87 Bm “i gibstitittt tp 670 SQUARE FEET 

Casement Window Fan (Twin Blades) 95...34.95 . WG) aseeerens © Wide Range of 50 
Floor Circulating Fart (Twin Blades) 95... 34.95 : f 0 Fare. = a 57: | 


All Purpose Fan .........-- : wTerTrcr, o : ... 17.50 r Y}) “2 ae stain or warp . 
Kitchen Ventilator Fan .95...17.50 32 COMPLETELY INSTALLED | 


20’ New Roll Around 95... .36.64 
ie RUBBER TILE I 


Also Westinghouse and Lau Fans seb seuane pear 
: wg COMPLETELY INSTALLED | 


+ tea age? “~ 
a °. in Consumers orator ors. $ 
‘Schick “25” se eo te CALL LI. 4-4700 


| .88 
tate ipa neh 8 FOR FREE ESTIMATE 


F.H.A. TERMS—NO MONEY DOWN 


Large selection of Chrysler, Fedders, 

RCA, Hot Point Air Conditioners. | : CROWN 
HOME APPLIANCE |f.." LINOLEUM gone 

208 FIM Steet MW." 7A. 63165 b* B 


SDAYS : A alt 
fear sen: ‘ “ : 7 “] don't care what anybody offers, you ain't tradin’ 
| | ) “Mr. Wilson, how come you don’t like me?” Oncle Rafe for no eS eer 
. | 4 


ae ‘ F 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES 
42 . Monday, May 28, 1956 


‘ 


HERALD 


: 


The DISTRICT LINE by 6in Gotd 


Plain Case of Assault 


And No Battery 

WHEN I left-my car on a 
downtown lot Saturday, my 
ears were assaulted by the 
torrent of rock and roll 
“musi c” 
which poured 
from the 
radio of an- 
other auto 
parked there. 

The attend- 
ant who had 
been leisure- 
ly washing 
the other car 
left his chore 
for a few 

Bill Gold minutes and 
came over to collect my park- 
ing fee. I noticed that he had 
his car door standing open, 
which automatically turned 
on the auto’s interior lights 
plus two side running lights. 

“I wish I had as nice a 
wash job on my car as you 
have on yours,” I said. “But 
aren't you afraid you'll run 
down the battery?” 

“What do you mean?” 
asked. 

“When did you start wash- 


he 


battery,” I pointed out. 
“Aren't you worried about 
not being able to start your 
car when you're finished?” 

Oh, don't worry about 
that,” he said, brightening 
visibly. “It’s not my car.” 

As I walked away, he went 
back to washing the car, hap- 
pily singing along with the 
music that came caséading 
through the open door., 

cos 

TODAY'S BIRTHDAYS 

Greetings to Marie, Cecile, 
Yvonne and Annette Dionne, 
Lee Hills, Morris Stirman 
and Ewing Cockrell. Belated 
greetings to Hospital Corps- 
man Arthur Nimetz, who 
celebrated his birthday on 
Saturday while recuperating 
from an operation at the 
Naval Medical Center in 
Bethesda 

cos 

GIVE-AWAYS 

Beautiful kittens; $5 
closed for Children’s 
pital (Juniper 9-5942). 
deliver kittens; $2 inclosed 
for Children’s Hospital (War- 


with a U. S. Grant. 
cos 
GIANT ECONOMY SIZE 

About a dozen - people 
were looking in the window 
of Clark's liquor store on 
14th st. as I passed, so I 
stopped to look, too. 

The attraction, I discoy- 
ered, was a display of huge 
bottles of whisky. Some 
held two quarts, some a full 
gallon, 

Most states forbid the sale 


JUDGE PARKER 


4 


of liquor in very large or 
very small bottles. In the 
District, you can legally buy 
anything from miniatures 
and half-pints up through 
the giant economy size of 
your favorite brand of hard 
stuff. 

Actually, you save very 
little in buying the gallon or 
half-gallon sizes. They're sold 
mostly to folks looking for 
gifts or novelties. 

Come to think of it, those 
gallon jugs probably aren't 
very practical. After three 
drinks, the average con- 
sumer would be in no con- 
dition to lift that huge bot- 
tle to pour his next one, 


ee 
ee 


v : 
t 


' 
By Paul Nichols 


- 


HEY, THUMBS! 
-DON’T CLOUD 
UP AND BAWL! 


\w 


LLL BPD TAU IPSS PGE” 


y~ 


—_— «= «= 


Regetered U 3 Parent 


Copyright 1904, Field Enterprises, lnc we 
o« 


W-W-WHY SHOULD I cry ? 
HE SAYS! HE MERELY AskED 
ME A $-SIMPLE QUESTION: 
HOW LONG HAVE I 
BEEN IN LOVE WITH 
SHANTY TOWN @... 


BE WHERE I 
CAN REACH YOU , 
FRED.’ I MAY WANT 
YOU TO DRAW UP 
SOME LEGAL PAPERS 
-- QUICKLY .” 


LORETTE, FRED.’ I’M 
ONLY ren OF 


~~ 


By Milt Caniff 


I'M sorry, THUMBS! Y WAS I THAT OBVIOUS 2 
.«. THE NAME ‘THUMBS’ 
IS NOT MERELY A CON- 
STEP INTO THIS EMPTY | TRACTION OF THUMHILL 
—ITS BECAUSE I’M 
—— ALL THUMBS ! 


-I DIDN'T MEAN To 
HURT You! BETTER. 


ROOM BEFORE WE 
DRAW A crowop! 


~ a 


STEVE, IF SHANTY OR DORIS \ WELL, IN CASE 
OR ANYONE ELSE SUSPECTED ) ANYONE HAS 
THIS,ID NEVER BE ABLE T SUSPECTED. LETS 
TO FACE ANOTHER HUMAN /YOU AND I. HAVE 
A DATE! IMA 
GOOD LISTENER! 


—— —— 


= 


ow 
AIN’T IT THE TRUTH? 
Ki-Grams, published by the 
local Kiwanis Club, observes 
that many a man comes out 
of his shell only when his 
wife eggs him on. 
cos 
GENTLER SEX 
Statistics show that wives 
do two-thirds of the family 
shopping, and Mae Nelbach 
thinks she knows why. Most 
husbands can’t afford to. 
coo 
Rx LAUGHTER | 
The Current Medical Di- | 
gest has a cartoon which 
shows two doctors consulting 
about a patient. One medic 
is saying to the other: 
“Eating slower cured his 
indigestion, but now he’s 
suffering from malnu- 
trition, He lives in a board- 
ing house.” 


field 78496). Cute tiger kit- 
tens; $2 inclosed for Chil- 
dren's Hospital (Oliver 
6-5632). Black male kittens; 
$1 inclosed for Children’s 
Hospital (Redwood 5-9238). 
Beautiful, healthy, house- 
broken kittens; $1 inclosed 
for Children’s Hospital (War- 
field 7-3369). Puppies; $1 in- 
| closed for Children’s Hospi- 
tal (Jefferson 2-4852 after 6 
| p.m.). Bright, cheerful male 
| kitten (Union 49101). Sweet, 
affectionate kittens (Juniper 
9-4683). 
Please SPELL OUT the 
name of your telephone ex- 
change; do not abbreviate. 


cw 


ing it?” I inquired. 

“About an hour ago,” 
said 

“Has the radio been going. 
all that time—and the door 
open?” I asked. 

“Yeah, sure,” he replied. 
“Why?” 

“That's a big drain on the 


he 


| JOE PALOOKA 
OIA Cy AND IN THIS CORNER, 
158... THE 


>> WEIGHING 
INTRODUCING AT 186 2... Z> ve 
TH’ FORMER MIDDLEWEIGHT <3 SENSATIONAL NEW 


_—_ 


ee 
e**.” * . 
ee Oe) 
#0%%e%.%?, 


PUN FUN 

Leo Leahy Edmunds knows 
a Southern farmer who re- 
fuses to accept Federal sub- 
sidies because he doesn’t 
want to have anything to do 


4 SPEARMINT 
CHEWING GUM 


*¢¢ 
o- 2. 
_F . = SOOd) 
eae 
; > 
7 ,* 


* 

*~*_ 7° 
OK OO KO 

IO o.*.%,%,9 O70" 0" e' sates RXR 


Ad i 
e*,*. %eg%e? 
\ i 
" . 
ORAS 


+,"« 


= 


OOOO 
ba * 
> 


7 
J 


++ 
os ee" 


o%" 
> 


; 


AA Oe 
* *,%, 


@ ON BRIDGE | 


BRIDGE QUIZ | ANSWERS 
Q. 1—As South you hold: ' lL. Three no trump. A bid of 
4K 943 YKQJ53 52 & 106) three hearts would be pointless 


OR bidding has proceeded: | inasmuch as partner would 


ispade §=3¢el surely have made a take-out 


bs Pa 
| What do you bid? | 
Q. 2—As South you hold: double had he possessed any 


4Q 10874 982 ¢J963 #AK | values in that suite Further- 

The bidding has proceeded: | more barring unexpected spade 

th North ast . , 

I ee strength in his hand, he will 

ys . < ‘surely be forced to return to’ 
6 tke ee en te | four clubs and the shorter road 


4K 54 ¥AQ10 @AK9 &KJ87\tO game will have been by- 

The bidding has proceeded: passed. Expedience dictates an 

| South ) ene ponte = Fast ues assumption of diamond protec- 

’ What do you bid now? tion in partner’s hand which is 
a reasonable supposition. 


Q. 4+—As South you hold: 
4AQ3 95 @AQ32 &KQ962 £2. Four spades. Partner's raise 
| to two spades is an invitation 


The bidding has proceeded: | 
est'to go on to game and is made 


East South 
~_ “*'in the light of your previous 
pass, Partner could hardly ex- 
pect anymore from a passed 
hand. 

3. False pride in the posses- 
sion of 20 points should not in- 
duce you to assume any risk 
at the level of three on a hand 
\which does not present the re- 
‘motest hope for game. Nothing 
can be deader than the hand 
of a partner who could not 
_ keep open a bid of one club. | 
| 4. A temporizing bid is indi- 
cated. You have _ sufficient 
strength to warrant a jump re- 
bid but the trump holding is 
not quite adequate for a jump 
in spades. The best solution is 
a bid for two diamonds intend-| 
ing to support spades next! 
round. This bid is known 4s a 
reverse (a rebid in a higher | 
ranking suit at the two level)) 
and describes a hand.worth ap- 
proximately 19 points. 


+.* 
oe 


i 
' 
' 


- 
OO 
*.. 


mx 


These are friends in need 
but expensive indeed! 


DONALD DUCK 


ass heart 
, spade Pas 2 spades 


Their services. cost money— 
and, though it’s worth every 
penny these indispensable gen- 
tlemen charge, sometimes even 
well-budgeted families just 
don’t have the money right at 
the time it’s needed. North 

When this happens to you— 1 spade 
remember, HFC pw prompt What do you bid now? 
loan service for just this kind 
of emergency. 

A quick look at this sample 
payment table tells you loan 
amounts, and repayment sched- 
ules. You may borrow any 
amount from $20 to $1000. 

For prompt, courteous atten- 
tion, phone or drop in. 


eats 
SPRING 
SPECIAL! 


Life insurance 
protection on all 
HFC loans without 
extra cost to you! 


WATER HEATERS 


COMPLETELY SAFE! 
COMPLETELY AUTOMATIC! 


YESTERDAY 
WE T 

TEN Over 
THE LIMIT / 


MONTHLY PAYMENT PLANS 


24 
Pavents 


$24.62 
48.44 
Payments chore include costs of the loan ifr 


, repaid on schedule. Charges on ms ahore 
are made under the Industrial Finance 


OUSEHOLD FINANCE 


SUITLAND 


| ; my | WHAT A 
: ~ “4 CATCH /f SIX OVER 
Vt Mea Ae at eee Si a rh THE LIMIT /// 


sear engerernmmgs 
MAKE YOUR '—~GRANDMA 


SOON WILL BE SWARMIN'| [ANYTHING THAT'LL SHOOT, ANY- 


LOOK WITH KIDS, UNCLE MOSE/ | | THING THAT iS SHARP... 


SHED 
AND WEAR yy ‘4 


Bch . Fi, as: rt a. 
2 


By Chas. Kuhn _ 


...OR A STEPLADDER 
ON TH’ PLACE // 


AN' T' MAKE THINGS AS SAFE FOR 


SURE, GRANOMA | 
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Adlai Ca 


By Drew 


Long-distance telephone lines 


ington over the question of Ad- 
lai Stevenson's pcm 


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~ STEVE ROPER 


_— a 


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WILOCAT BIT MY FINGER / 
GET HER WW THE CAR’ 


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IT'S TEN AFTER EIGHT NOW, 
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Ne 4 


DON'T BE A DEAD HERO, CHUM! ---- 
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NEVER MIND WHAT HAPPENEDS 
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HOW “THE KIDS WOULD 
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| FOUND OUT ? 


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YOU'LL GET ALL THE 

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UNDERSTAND F 


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By George Wunde 


TERRY AND THE PIRATES 


WE ARE FORTUNATE, COMRADE, Y TRUE. THE CENTRAL \/ THE BLACK-HAIRED Jl 


THAT THE SEARCHED FOR PLANE es ek Cee cee dee oe mw LOVER OF BEAUTY 


r 


| 16 Market 


record on old- “2 
‘age pensions 


‘Governor of 
| Illinois. . 


‘up the tele- 
phone were 
harassed Pat 
|Brown, Attor- 


a8 ney General of 


California, and 
worried Paul Pearson 

Ziffren of Los Angeles, both top 
strategists of Adlai’s California 
campaign. They called Dick Fin- 
negan, Adlai’s campaign man- 
lager in Chicago, to say that 
George McLain, powerful lead- 
er of the old-age-pension move- 
ment in southern California, 
had published in his “National 
Welfare Advocate” a scathing 
review of Gov. Stevenson’s pen- 
sion record, showing that he had 
vetoed a bill for a 10 per cent 
in Illinois’ aid to the 


| raise 


needy. 

| Brown and Ziffren were wor- 
iried sick over what this would 
'do to the vote for Stevenson in 
southern California. 

Dick Finnegan promptly did 
some telephoning on his own. 
He called Congressman Jimmy 
Roosevelt and Cecil King, both 


friends of oldster-champion 
George McLain. 

Roosevelt and King promptly 
ibuttonholed McLain in Wash- 
‘ington. They were in a good 
|position to do this because both 
\have introduced his bill to over- 
‘haul the entire public assist- 
‘ance section of the Social Se- 
‘curity Act. This pertains to aid 
i\for the aged, the needy, the 
‘blind, the physically handi- 
capped, and dependent children. 


The ‘Shame List’ 


What puts Stevenson some- 
what on the spot is that Sena- 
tor Kefauver is the sponsor of 
this same bill in the Senate. 
Quite a hassie followed be- 
tween McLain, King and Roose- 
velt, despite the fact that Mc- 
Lain has been a stanch backer 
of both Congressmen, and went 
down the line for Jimmy Roose- 
velt for Governor in 1950. 
Finally McLain compromised 
by publiching a statement by 
Congressman King praising 
Stevenson's record for old-age 
pensions. McLain also omitted 


Stevenson’s record in okaying 
the “shame list.” the list of 
oldsters receiving government 
aid, which is made public in I!- 
linois and which oldsters bit- 
terly res2nt. 


However, McLain also ran a 


caption 
the Needy,” while on the edi- 
torial page he ran a letter from 
‘Warren Lamson, president of 
| the Illinois Pension Union, giv- 
‘ing Stevenson's record on pen- 
sions and on the shame list. 
| When McLain was asked by 
ithis writer why this inforra- 
iticn had not come out regard- 
ling Stevenson in the 1952 cam- 
|paign, he replied: 

“I did not know about it until 
I spoke in Chicago this spring 


By Pensions Issue 


when he was a a | 


| First to pick =_— | 


from southern California, both) 
Stevenson delegates, and both’ 


a previously planned account of | 


full-page photo of Kefauver on! 
~~ |Page 1 of his paper over the’ 
“Kefauver—Friend of | 


mp Beset 


Pearson 


and wart shown pictures of) 


have been burning up between | members of the Illinois Persion| 
California, Chicago and Wash-| 


Union picketing the executive 
‘mansion when Stevenson was 
Governor. I then investigated 
the record in Springfield and 
published it as soon thereafter 
‘as I could. 

“My organization has 23 radio 
‘Stations in California which are 
‘broadcasting: the Stevenson 
record—almost every day.” 


[Defense of Stevenson 


Congressmen Roosevelt 
‘King, ‘Jlefending 


and 


‘ture of Illinois tried to pass 
bills for roads, bridges, pen- 
sions without appropriating one 
cent to finance them. Governor 
Stevenson insisted that the 
funds be appropriated before 
he would approve the bills.” 

The facts, as tabulated by 
the California Institute of So- 
cial Welfare, are that on Aug 
3, 1951. Stevenson vetoed House 
Bill ‘No. 85 providing for a 10 
per cent increase for “food, | 
clothing, and personal inci-) 
dentals” for the aged and the 
needy. 

But one month earlier, June 
30, 1951, he vetoed amendment 
2 of Senate Bill 556 carrying 
a $14,300,000 appropriation to 
pay for this 10 per cent in- 
crease. Thus he vetoed both 
‘the appropriation and the au- 
thorization. ' 

On July 28, 1951, Stevenson 
signed Senate Bill No. 485 
which required each county 
‘department of welfare to pub- 
lish monthly reports of those 
receiving pensions, disability 
assistance, blind assistance, and 
aid to dependent children. This 
is called the “shame list” and 
was passed contingent upon 
passage of a similar law by the 
Congress in Washington. 

On Oct. 1, 1951, Congress 
passed the Jenner amendment 
which activated the “shame 
list” in Lllinois. ’ 
Illinois vs. California | 

The California Institute of 
Social Welfare also compiled 
figures showing that pension- 
ers in Illinois received ah av- 
erage of $60.50 a month, as 
against California’s average of 
$70.11; that Illinois requires a 
‘lien on the oldster’s home while 
California doesn’t: that Illinois 
‘allows a single person to have 
only $400 in personal property 
and $600 for married couples, 
‘while California permits $1200 


for a single person and $2000 


for married couples. 

Stevenson gave as one rea- 
son for vetoing the increased 
assistance bill in 1951 the fact 
\that oldsters and blind people 
had an effective lobby while 
the children did not. Children 
/\were omitted from the bill. 
| He has also said: “We ought 
to work out a system that en- 
courages an older person to 
work if he wants to instead of 
discouraging him. We ought to 
have a program for training 
people who have finished their 
regular work to do things they 
want to—things for which their 
age will be an advantage in- 
stead of a handicap. 

“It is high time we started 
rebuilding this whole program 
around the central idea that 
we want to make life mean- 
ingful and worth while, all the 
way through.” 

(Copyright. 1956. Bell Syndicate. Inc.) 


Today’s Crossword Puzzle | 


3 4 5 6 7 


1) 12 5t3 


is 


ACROSS 
43 Diamond 


44 Carry 

46 Famous 
Quaker 

47 Vote in 

49 Defensive 
barrier 

51 Lackluster 

52 Irritate 

53 Business 
transactions 

55 High priest 

57——— Allen, 
announcer 

59 Regret 

60 Friend: Fr. 

63 Chicago 
district 

65 Associated 


1 Tll-bred 


person 
5 Titleholder: 
colloq. 
10 At a distance 
14 Seaweed 
15 Come back 


17 Outline 

19 Highland 
garment 

20 Weeding 
tool 

21 Wire 
measure 

22.And s0 
forth: abbr. 

24 Kind of 
bread 

25 Disordered 

27 Buffoon 

29 Abuse, 
verbally 

32 Recluses 

36 Upper crust 

37 Loot 

38 Nickname 
for 


fox: 2 wads. 
68 Chills and 

. fever 
69 Lake craft 


71 Avian resi- 
dence 


with Aesop's 


70 Make better 1g Eg¢ dish 


‘ Ail 
Ais LIE 
’ E 


play of 


10 Question 
colors 


11 Products of 


45 Environ- 
: a comb. 
' 4 orm 
12 Unite with 48 Vegas 
13 Network 
actress 
23 Piece of 51 Measures 


machinery 


| THE WASHI 


42 Bank clerk | 


50 Miss Novak, 


—2P 


NGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Monday, May 28, 1956 


43 


Open Tonight ‘Til 9 
Open Mon., Thurs., Fri. Nights ‘til 9 


OTHER DAYS OPEN ’til 6:00 
STORES OPEN AT 9:00 A.M, 


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headquarters for 
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| Stevenson, | 
isaid: “On 134 occasions in four! 
‘years the Republican Legisla- . 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALI 
44 Monday, May .28, 1956 - 


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