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Don't Miss the Special 24-Page All-Star Game Section in Today's Issue 


¢ Washington Post 


Times Herald | 


SUNDAY, JULY 8, WTOP Radio (1500) TV. (Ch. 9) 


Mother Appeals to Kidnaper 


24 Near-Collisions Over National Airport 


~ enat e Unit By Pilot — Official : 
Votes Funds Haphazar d Flying, Or Message 
ToProbe AidEquipment Blamed At Chureh, 


-Haphazard flying by commer- year, states that the problems ' 


cial pilots and cumbersome associated with high density 
$300,000 Approved const She Pleads 


ruction in the planes they traffic, including the near colli- 
For Checkup by —_ {3 nearcollisions over Nationallington as well as other loca 

Outside Experts ; All Faiths Help; 
Report Due Jan. 31 Mrs. Weinberg 
Promises Police 


Airport in a 30-day period. tions. 
By J. W. Davis 
Won't Interfere 


Plan Your TV Fun 


It's easy with TV WEEK magazine, 
your handiest and most complete TV 
program guide in town .. . listing 
all TV shows on all channels for all 
week long... with today’s Washing- 
ton Post and Times Herald. 


The Weather 


Today—Mostly sunny with high around 
86. Partly cloudy, warm with scat- 
tered thundershowers at night and 
Monday. Saturday's temperatures 
High, 84 at 3:15 p.m.: low, 70 at 5:10 
a.m. (For details see Page B2.) 


7 


79th Year — No. 216 °**** Phone RE. 7-1234 


Coprright 1956 
The Weehington Post Companys 


1956 TWENTY CENTS 


ee ee 


Reported 


Leave Baby 


Conference 


Postpones 


Signing of 
CTC Paet 


9 Lawyers Have 


of the Aircraft Owners afd) mercial pilots are the best in 
Pilots Association, and @ mem- the world and part of the blame. 
ber of the Government-mill-'for near-accidents is caused by 
Committee, said the Me&af-\-ontration required in taking 
misses were “mostly careless-\o¢@ and landing. 
ness.” ' 
“They say there will be modi-; 
The Committee set up @ test,’ «ations in the new jet aircraft, 
the first in the Nation, establish- being constructed for commer-| 


ing a high density zone around purposes,” said, 7 (INS)}—The grieving moth- 


ee ee ee “and that will help immeasur- er of kidnaped Peter Wein- 
speed, ” berger again took to tele- 


tions and visibility require-| 2 | 
vision tonight to appeal for 


ments on aircraft penetrating’ . - 
the area. The trial period ends Pilot has poor visibility in his' tn. anductor of the 35-day- 
old infant to return him to 


July 21 cockpit and there is so much to 
4 report. based on two sur- do when landing or taking off his h 
veys conducted during the See AIRPORT, Page A-i, Col, I iS ROME. 
Mrs. Morris Weinberger 
pledged that police will not in- 


terfere with the family’s at- 
tempts to get the baby back. 
Her choking, dramatic ap- 
peal, presented on film over a 
New York television station 
(WCBS-TV) at 11 p. m., called 
ot. the abductor to make use of 
churches or synagogues and the 
clergy to return the infant. 


Marathon Parley; 
Chalk-Fox Near 


Max Karant, vice presidefit) karant explained “the com-| 
Sale Agreement - 


sociated Press 

The Senate Rules Commit- 
tee gave its approval yester- 
day to a proposal by jhe Dem- 
ocrats for an investigation 
of the foreign aid program. 


It approved a resolution set- 
ting aside $300,000 for the study 
and directing the Foreign Rela- 
lions Committee to determine 


By Grace Bassett 
Sta Reporter 

Signing of an agreement! 
for the sale of Capital Trans-| 
it Co.'s assets to a new op-' 
erating firm was delayed 
yesterday by round-the-clock 
session of lawyers. 

Attorneys for CTC said the) 
long conference involved work-| 
ing on details of the 16-page 
draft agreement calling for the 
sale. They declared that no 
major disagreement had arisen 

The meeting began at 9:30) 
a. m. between two attorneys for | 
tne CTC, which is slated to go 


out of business Aug. 14, and) 
seven representing the new op- 


By Jack Lotto 
WESTBURY, N. Y., July 


“Right now.” he added. “a 


how the multibillion-dollfr pro 
gram “serves, can be made to) 
erve, or does not serve the na- . 
tional interest.” Tax-Trial Cooper to Run 
The Senate is expected to act | 
on the resolution next week.| | K k 
The measure calls for a report Judge Shot | n entuc y al 
by Jan. 31. a 

The Foreign Relations Com- To Death Ike S Request 
mittee would be | 


erating group headed by O. Roy’! 
Chalk and Morris Fox. Chalk, 
a New York financier, and Fox, | 
a Washington trucker, both are| 
also lawyers and took part in| 
tne discussions. 


Fox arrived at the session in 


assisted by 
outside experts who, Sen. Mike 
Mansfield (D-Mont.) said, “have | 
no axes to grind.” He said the 
investigation would he con-| 
ducted wholly independently of | 


“We know that you must be 
N : very much concerned and per- 
GOP Nominates haps afraid of a trap,” she said. 
Ex-Senator After He (“Please believe us when we 

tell you, with every bit of sin- 


Announces Willingness cerity at our command, that 
the police have given us their 


St. Louis Jurist 
Believed to Have 
Killed Himself 


| 


the Colorado Building offices of | tue Administration. 
Edmund L. Jones, CTC counsel, | 
at 10 a. m. and announced that 

the signing of tbe contract 
could be expectedemomentarily.| 

The long - awaited signing} 
would climax more than a year | 
of mounting transit problems: 
that have beset Washington) 
since CTC operators went out 
on strike last year. A dispute 
over the strike led to congres- 
sional action lifting the CTC 
franchise 

Sale of CTC’s 
transfer of them to the new 
firm, D. C,. Transit System, 
Inc., hinges on the issuance of 
a new franchise by Congress 
and approval of holders of two- 
thirds of CTC stock. 

Attorneys for the Transit 
company between spurts of 
work on the agreement yester- 
day. busied themselves writing 
a proxy statement concerning 
the sale which will be sent to 
stockholders before their meet 
ing Aug. 3 

The agreement 
transfer of CTC assets to the 
T. C. A. Investing Co., a sub 
sidiary of Chalk’s Trans Carib- 
bean Airlines. for $13,540,000 
The investment firm would pay 
$9.6 million cash and liquidate 
the balance in 15 annual pay- 
ments of about $200,000 each. | 

The CTC was represénted by 
Jones and Joseph Glicksteih 
J. A. B. Broadwater. president, 
and E. Cleveland Giddings, vice 
president, also sat in on the ses- 
sions. 

Attorneys for the new opera- 
tors. in addition to Chalk and 
Fox themselves. were Edward 
F. Colladay, D. C. Colladay, Har- 
vey M. Spear, Emil Rogers and 
Theodore |. Seamon. Spear was 
identified as legislative counse] 
of the new and as-yet-unincor- 
porated D. C. Transit System. 
and Rogers as genera! counsel 
for Chalk’s airline 


LOUISVILLE, Ky., July 7 # word that they will not inter- 
The Senate has rejected a} _ _ |John Sherman Cooper, a Re-fere with our attempt to get 
Republican proposal to create! ST. LOUIS, July 7 #—U. S. | publican strong man in Demo- the baby back. 


(Picture on Page A-2) 


By Jim McNamare. Stal! Pholocrapher 


By the Beautiful Sea 


—Rehoboth Beach. For more color photo- 
graphs of Washingtonians having a wonder- 
ful time at the Delaware resort, see FP. Fl. 


Yeareld Dianne Magee, daughter of Mr. | 
and Mrs. James W. Magee of Washington, | 
plays in the biggest sandpile she’s ever seen 


Heuse Group Counsel 


assets and 


calls for 


, 
: 


made arrangements to meet 
Mrs. Weinberger at a nearby 
rendezvous. However, Mrs, 
Weinberger met no one when 
she drove to the appointed spot. 


All Faiths Cooperate 


Catholic, Protestant and 
Jewish clergymen immediately 
voiced willingness to go along 
with the Weinbergers’ appeal 
that the churches and syna- 
gogues be left open as a haven 
where the baby could be left. 

Mrs. Weinberger begged the 
kidnaper to make use of the 
collection box in any church as 
a means of making contact, if 
he fears a trap. She appealed: 

“Tomorrow being Sunday, all 
the churches will be open. 
Many people will be in at- 
tendance at the services of 
churches of every religion. The 
priests, ministers and rabbis 
have promised cooperation. 
Please use the church and the 
clergymen anywhere tomorrow 
in making contact with us. 

“Drop a note in the collection 
box. You will not be detected 
that way. 


a 


‘ 
Fourth of July Weather Bomb 


Record Rain of 1.23 Inches in Minute 
Claimed for Unionville, Md., Storm 


- 


he 


LOOKING FOR 
A HOME? 


—~—-—-——4 


Men.: Worm, 
thundershowers 


minute rainfalls of 0.65 meas-, Unionville is about 12 miles 
ured during a storm at Opids northeast of Frederick and 
Camp, Los Angeles County,|about 33 miles northwest of 
Calif... on April 5, 1926, and | Baltimore. 
0.69 inch in a storm on July| Basements and streets were 
10. 1955, near Jefferson, Iowa. flooded during the storm. Mrs. 
Total precipitation for the Von Elff, wife of the weather | 3 | United vane 
July 4 storm during which the observer at Unionville, said, “It | od | The House Committee on U 
cloudburst record was set was enane so hard the gutters | |American Activities yesterday | republic 
3.60 inches, which fell in just and rainspouts on a warehouse | e ' 
less than nine hours, from 2:47 building were unable to take an | Also called for re ae 
p. m. to 11:30 p. m. (EST), Engel-|the water, which cascaded off ae ba : “4 rea PA nb rgperwe | te apse hs - 
‘ rit ague e , w . 
soley Sg Rg Pe A pe oy Mg ; he sontiibaied secretly to a.re-| York World Telegram and Sun) 


Most of the rainfall, or 2.84 The rainstorm was the heav- | | ay 
inches fell during the 50-min-|iest for the Unionville area - port alleging widespread|who has protested that the re 
“blacklisting” of 
the entertainmen 


BALTIMORE, July 7 # 
What appears to be a new world 
record rainfall was set at 
Unionville. Frederick County, 
last Wednesday when 1.23 
inches of rain \vas measured in 
one minute. 

Howard H. Engelbrecht, 
state climatologist uf the U.S 
Weather Bureau here, reported 
the record rainfa!’l today after 
extensive investigation of the 
July 4 cloudburst 

Pending a thorough investi- 
gation, Engelbrecht said, the 
‘measurement made in the of- 


Whether you're 60k 
ing for a house or an 
apartment, you're sure 
to find exactly what 
you want in the big 
Weekend Want Ad 
sections of The Wash 
ington Post and Times 
Herald. 


'closed doors Wednesday in con-| 
nection with its investigation of 
n.| the report which was issued 12 
days ago by the Fund for the 


By Vincent J. Burke 


thundershowers 


a commission which would District Judge Rubey M. Hulen, cratic Kentucky, finally yielded Ciges Exhausted 
for United States Senator. | went in front of the cameras to 
sional auspices. ‘Truman Administration of-| A nudge from President Ei-|record the television appeal, 
\ficials, died on the operating to 
to give up his post as Ambassa- ete arouse ne ray hed 
dor to India. ‘worship as a place where t 
Plush Home clude the “proper “ehjectivess| emer tan name | 
re ° | came less than four hours after |tervention an indication that he hausted all clues, issued a 
~ | N d ini id, . den hat th 
Yields Major Tennessean Name the United States to extend aid,| ae eas than four hours after |i “Gofnite plans to seek re- denial that the family had re 
: 
tions to make effective use of , 
1) ~ : fy | practiced marksmanship. clincher to land Cooper on the afternoon. Officials said what 
ope uspec ts or D. C. School Probe « assistance they receive. He had been given prelim- Republican ticket in Kentucky. Was thought to be a second con- 
By Wendell Bradley states that “since the incep- inary treatment at St. Louis er at 55, will oppose the Demo- 
jon of foreign aid programs,’ County Hospital and rushed to rats former Gov. Lawrence W.| The first phone call received 
Narcotics Squad detectives Stat Reporter » , from the abductor on Friday 
on place in the world situation , ' 
res t “maior vin! A 57-yearold Russian-born:toward education, Including 9 gency operation. He died while Senate seat of the late Alben 
have arrested two I ‘ and in the relative strength of W. Barkicy. Four years remain 
: , first contact made between the 
rying on a wholesale business named yesterday as chief coun-| schools. | friendly toward the United) Judge Hulen, who physicians Teaming with him in a sec- family and the party who stole 
in heroin in a plush private Se! for a House inquiry into; Davis, an outspoken foe of States at County Hospital said was ond Senate race will be Thrus- 
Latet ill cover “the entire oper-| Programs have had a hard time ; ho Westb July 4 
TI ’ ‘ked up Fri-| delinquency in the District. oo - . . , .| been given a blood transfusion W%° quit as Assistant Secretary Some at Westoury July 4. 
As ee por gt ned a “a G Petes ' q lation of the schools” and said!" Congress. Only on Friday R of State to run against Sen.| It was revealed that the sec 
tive Sgt. Joseph A. Gabrys said,'ber of Memphis was announced «+4 whatever extent that may|Mittee called for an investiga-| second hospital. ; 
on a commissioner's .warrant)by Rep. James C. Davis (D-Ga.), 4. involved in the operation of tion, saying that the programs| ; git A. 
: " ton | , in a telegram from the Am- 
100 capsules of heroin at $1, Subcommittee which will con-| ' vague way and sometimes with gardener, Ivory Robertson, who '” 
anole ‘duct the investigation. He said| Davis said the probe should 01). ono consideration of told police the jurist was on bassador just before the Com- 
a} ‘including advance staff work. - lv his left f When I returned to the 
session of heroin are Donald among the two Democratic and | ‘ne " countries concerned volver near his left foot. Ay | 
(Pancake) F. Cole. 21. and three Republican Subcommit-|e reported an assistant coun- Mrs. Hulen said the judge| United States several weeks 
1 oe , , No date has been set for open- . pital today f 1 physi-| in Kentucky to become a candi- 
waived preliminary hearing be- special meeting yesterday. The Appropriations Commit-|P! ay for a general phys : 
fore United States Commission- Gerber is a stocky former ing of public hearings. ee recommended foreign aid cal checkup. She said he had date for the United States 
A jwork about Wednesday and oni. began la : M Hul id the i because I was the appointee 
ss Gri rf ‘ adi 2 A t Sunday be|' Mrs. Hulen said the judge 
Miss Gray was released ©n and county posts during the re | added that he will have to start held to i 920 000. ‘aie on told her that he would re- and representative of the Pres- 
der $4000 bond tical boss, Edward H. Crump.’ a % wy 
In the raid on the First at He said he “wholeheartedly ac.iot the schools. “I don't like to on the foreign aid-authorization | Ser drawer where he kept it had obligations to him as well 
, ‘measure recommended a ceil-/because he didn’t want any-| a8 personal beliefs about my 
cepted” the appointment and)... talking about,” he com- 
“plush and modernistic nar-'promised to “undertake to ented ’ ' “T had Soo gn 
coties squadmen seized 119 . Eisenhower had asked about) She said he then took the ae eames 
revolver to the spot in the yard,|President about my work and 
prejudice.” prise,” Gerber said. Davis de- 
the wundercovermen, Gabrys . oe pt eam Py —- h 
saicd He said he “will endeavor to | clared Gerber had been recom- Subcom-|where he occasionally prac- part. 
to make/ticed shooting at squirrels and|) “Yesterday, the President 
: , st 
pengyne cn pete Gerber firmly declined to golray (D-Tenn.), whose district is|“S TePOTt 07 @ § uy 
ers, reported they found a sofa bevond his prepared statement’ ea " his jarmament proposals , 
with Zebra-striped upholstery,' -,°.. ; adjacent to Memphis ‘been told to deliver it prior to recent trial of Matthew J. Con-|the Congress ®f great import- 
| Davis said other subcommit- The Rules Com- nelly, Appointments Secretary ance, and that he would be 
See RAID, Page A-15, Col. 3 |vestigation and his attitudes See SCHOOL, Page A-15, |tional $32,000 for the study; the|and T. Lamar Caudle, former jfor the United States Senate, if 
— — ‘subcommittee previously ob-)head of the Justice Depart- this was desired in Kentucky 
IE Bsn fraud the Government. desires to nominate me.” 
| Resort Weather | 
78 to 82 
phon. Scottered 
Anti-Defamati ’s Counsel 
fi-Vetamation les Uou 
report and former editor of 
in a closed hearing. After he 
was subpenaed last week Cog- 
question him about “confiden- 
tia! sources of information.” 


to weeks of urging today and 
study the aid program under “"° presided during the con-| 7 ; ee 
, ' ‘accepted his party's nomination; Only a few hours before she 
Administration and Congres spiracy trial of two former top P —_ re 
Areas Outlined senhower swayed Cooper at the the Weinbergers a 
7 - | table today after he had been|11th hour from his reluctance all religious denominations to 
S ied | ; 
pecific areas to be studied! ¢ounq shot in the yard of his| 
. eal State Republican leaders! baby might be left. 
clude the “proper objectives | The 61-year-old jurist’s death|drew from the President's in-| Police, who have virtually ex- 
of foreign aid, the capability of 
and the capacity of other ne-|.. election. Such assurances, they ceived a second phone call from 
| pacity er B®! his yard where he occasionally theorized. might have been athe alleged abductor Friday 
A preamble to the resolution ooper, a vigorous campaign- tact turned out to be a false 
! alarm. 
Stall Reporter By Jack Eisen | 
fundamental changes have tak-| Barnes Hospital for an emer-| Wetherby in November for the 
hiked the ransom demand from 
lators” who they said were car-\lawyer from Tennessee was racial integration in the puDlic countries both friendly and un- ‘his was in progress. n the term iret’ euahant-aabiie amen tie 
; : ’ i 
' integration, said the investiga-| ‘nm recent years foreign aid " mal oe Sey fem Ss ert = 
home in the Northwes school conditions and juvenile & » 5 ell shot in the left temple, had'ton B. Morton of Louisville, the patio of the Weinberger 
The selection of William Ger-| i :egration will be investigated |the House Appropriations Com-|in an ambulance en route to the Earle C. Clements for Clem.|ond telephone caller who identi- 
fied himself as the kidnaper 
after an undercoverman bought chairmen of the House District the schools.” |have been conducted in | The judge was found by a was received 
Charged with sale and pos- the choice was unanimous) ‘#ke from one to three months,'1),. needs of the country or) nis back with a 32 caliber re-|mittee meeting. It said: 
Dorothy Mae Gray. Both tee members who attended a’ S¢! will be chosen to aid Gerber. | Request Cut had planned to gq@to a hos-/ag0, | was asked by my party 
. t 
er Cyril S. Lawrence yesterday. athlete who served in key city’ Gerber said he will begin'..ending in the fiscal year|not been ill. Senate. On June 2 | declined, 
$1500 bond, and Cole held un- ai; " i « i. 
; gime of the late Memphis poli-|.+ the beginning in his study Friday, Senate-House conferees Move the revolver from a dres-|ident in India and as such, 
house, described by police as talk when I don't know what) , 
ing of $4,014,575.000. President|one to get hold of it.” position, which I stated. 
make a fair and impartial in-| ten aribali ' 
capsules of heroin and 4 yestigation, free of any bias or! tbe invitation to — the in-| $4.9 billion. 
marked $1 bill from the sale to quiry came as a “complete or vid In a separate action yester--about 50 yards southwest of the general policies and pro- 
day, the Rules Committee gave|the house near a wood pile,|gTams of which my work was a 
, ie ae ia Foreign Relations 
John R. Panetta and Guy W marshal the facts and Peo mended highly by several per- mittee until Jan. 31 
Holeomb Jr.. who led the raid- them to the Committee /sons, including Rep. Tom Mur-| of dis-| rabbits. told me that he considered the 
It had| Judge Hulen presided at the support of these programs in 
f acceptance to discuss with| : 
pine-paneled basement with . . _ of jlast Sunday. 
newsmen his plans for the in- Col, 3 mittee also approved an addi-jto former President Truman, |pleased if I became a candidate 
tained $35,000. ment’s tax division, who were 1, therefore, will become a can- 
eonvicted of conspiring to de- didate if the Republican Party 
south erwy_||' Fund For Republic Report Investigated 
oa, : 
: 
showers, worm 6 | . oy ° s b 
House ‘Blacklist’ Probers Subpena 
the Catholic magazine, Com- 
monweal, will be questioned 
ley protested that it is not 
“right” fer the committee to 
In wives 2 the inquiry, 
Committee Chairman Francis 


lurn now to today's 
Want Ad section for a 
fine selection of homes 
and apartments in the 
District and suburbs. 


ute period from, 2:47 to 3:37|since May 21, 1942, when a left-wingers in| port made “false” charges p water (D-Pa.) asserted the 
‘ficial Weather Bureau record p. n:.. Engelbrecht added, and total of 2.90 inches of rain fell t world. against him, .report “levels very grave 
‘ing rain gage operated by G./included the record one-minute|in one hour and 4.80 inches for’ The committee said the wit-| The og ny oo af charges against organizations 
Plitt von Eiff at Unionville, will |fall »which occurred between|the 24hour period ending at ness, Arnold Foster of New Tuesday when ys og oF ne! See LIST, Page A-l5, Col. 4 
shatter the priveous record one-'3:23 and 3:24 p. m. 5 p. m. on May 22. | York, will be questioned behind Baldwin, N. Y. author o ’ ' 


4 A 


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. 


7 


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‘4 my 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
2 Sunday, July 8 1956 pit 


Rep. Dodd to Oppose 


Bush in Connecticut 


———® HARTFORD, Conn., July 7 
(INS)}—Rep. Thomas J. Dodd re-| 


ceived the Connecticut nomina- 
tion for Senator today to op- 
pose Sen. Prescott S. Bush. 

The 49-year-old Hartford law. 
yer won uncontested approval 
of the Democratic State Con- 
vention which concluded a two- 
day session today. ; 

Dodd's name was offered to 
the 1700 delegates by Gov. 
Abraham A. Ribicoff, who was 
defeated in the 1952 senatorial 
race by Bush, a 60-year-old fin- 
ancier renominated last month. 

The convention also elected 
#@ National Convention dele-' 
gates, pledged to Adlai Steven-' 
son, including Ribicoff, Chester! 
Bowles, former Governor and 
‘Ambassador to India; former) 
Sen. William Benton and State 
Democratic Chairman John M.) 
Bailey. 

A state platform. becordesats 
|ing strong labor and civil rights 
| planks, was adopted. It included 
high praise for Gov. Ribicoff's failure” when the old court- 
antispeeding program of auto- 


matic license suspension. Union Deties State Suit bomaed 300 tienee stuck” and) 


Dodd, a former Nuernberg eye . 
war crimes prosecutor complet- | G Utilit Strik 
ing his second congressional). ni as y e 


term, promised to expose “big|' 
money and big business” con-| 
trol in the Eisenhower Admin 
istration. 


- ‘Steel Strike to Idle 40,000 Coal Miners 


PITTSBURGH, July 7 (INS) | Pennsylvania Labor Secretary,{continue for the duration of off applies to all affected, only 
The economic paralysis of the to estimate that compensation the steel strike. : ‘the lower echelons would take | 


—— poten “yh yh payments in the state may| In @ move to compensate for advantage of it. 
tightened its hold on transpor-|Teach $1 million a week if the the loss of pay, the company; Earlier this week PRR laid 
tation and construction. strike drags on. bam § grant Ry — — < Re more P= ee = 
. month for those a ause of cu 
en cnthtetnns dead en| _ rorquate reported that 7000 | py the slash. It was under-| due to the Nation-w steel 


oe onl nee = appteaions ter jobless benefits|stood that although the time strike. 
ave n . . 


seph F. Finnegan, who said he 

will contact both sides some| The Railroad Retirement 

tiem next week. ‘Board estimated that rail in- 
Meantime, an estimated 40,- \dustry layoffs since July 1 

000 coal miners in western reached 40,000 to 50,000 

a ~~ 2 ae Virginia p . 

an entuc will join some Pennsylvania ilroad 

65,000 workers across the Na- y : Railr 

ton who have been idled by Cuts Non-Union Pay 

ithe walkout. __ PHILADELPHIA, July 7 @ 
United States Steel Corp. and The Pennsylvania Rallway to- 

Jones > a Steel an-\day ordered a 10 per cent pay STORY & CLARK GEORGE STECK 

associated Press | DOUnced they were closing their|cut for all non-union employes CHICKERING MASON & HAMLIN 

mines Monday night, when the of the company as an economy 

Fatally Shot bituminous coal industry's an-| move in the steel strike. MH. M. CABLE WINTER STEINWAY 

ys ‘nual 10day vacation period| ‘The cut applied to about 7000| “UMLITZER HUNTINGTON STIEFF 
M. Hulen, who presided at a | Only the 2200 miners at/hourly paid employes, from 


/United States Steel's Robena 
recent conspiracy trial of two | pit, the company’s largest, Selidcen, Wks compen , hw E30 RD A Nw’ s - ee 
former Truman administra. (continue to stockpile coal. ‘that the cut went into oteet | ; % ap | 
tion officials, died shortly Unlike the 650,000 strikers, | jase Sunday, July 1, and will) !3th&G Sts NW. . 9332 Ge. Ave., 5. 5. 5169 Lee Hwy., Ari, 
STerling 3-9400 JUniper 5-1105 Kenmore 8-5060 


FULL KEYBOARD 


FPIANOS 


$2 MONTHLY AND UP 
L 6 


Plus Hauling Charges 


after he was found shot in (the furloughed miners will be 
the head, in the back yard of | °!!8!die for unemployment com-| 


: | pensation. 
his suburban St. Louis home. |" zogmin unemp} on8 
(Stery on Page 1.) R ployment Clock Is Ambitious 


| Prompted John R. Torquato, SIOUX FALLS, S. D. 
ssriking here called it “a 


JOHN G. WEBSTER SAYS: 


Prepare NOW for WINTER and 


SAVE MONEY 
ge 78 oars 


NO MONEY DOWN 
Phene ST. 3-5500 


Our Switchboard Is 24 Hours « Day, 
y Dove 2 wosk, Yen; 


G. Webster Heating Enzineer wil! 
complete check of 


anh expert 
Ro obtie. and heating requirements at 
ATION on your part. 
We Specielize in Hot Water and Warm 
Air Heating Systems 


Jou G. Wasstm 


627 F St., Across From Hecht's 


striking example of mechanica] | 


ST. LOUIS, July 7#—Defiant | against @ unien for each day 
“\strikers approved mass picket-|that it strikes & public 
ing of Laclede Gas Co. proper utility after state seisure. 
. ties and gave their negotiating 

Jenner Cool to Bid committee a vote of confidence West Coase Airline 
Of ‘Independent Plan’ today after the State of». 

f " Missouri filed suit to collect Pilots Set Walkout 

CHICAGO, July 7 —A $35,000 in fines for their refusal} CHICAGO, July 7 %~—Clar- 
move to place “conservative’'to return to work under a ence president of the 
independent electors on the seizure order. | Airline Assn today an- ° 
Nov. 6 ballot in Illinois ran into; The two actions came at a nounced that @ strike of pilots: 

has 


difficulties today. ‘union meeting. Previously the on West Coast Lines, Inc. 

The movement, called the In- picketing had been by small been set for 11:58 p. m. (PST) 
dependent Elector Plan of Illi-'groups. The strike started Wedn . West Coast tis a) 
nois, was circulating petitions local se line in Idaho, Ore- 
under the names of Sen. Wil- 
liam Jenner (R-Ind.) for Presi- 
dent and Sen. Harry F. Byrd (D.- 
|Va.) for Vice President. 

But Jenner said he had no in-' company’s attitude as arrogant. | &™@™. 
terest in the idea. And the chief/Ht said the union had’ made “4ting 
clerk of the Illinois Secretary'six propdsals in an effort to 4am. 11. 
of State's Index Department/reach a settlement but that the 
said Jenner's name could not/firm had rejected all of them. 
be placed on the ballot without; The court suits, filed under 
his written consent. ja state law banning strkes in 

“I'm not a candidate for any-|public utilities, seek penalties 
thing.” Jenner said at his home/|of $10,000 each for failure to 
in Bedford, Ind. “I'm a United| report fer ~wock: jestaccdepay 
States Senator and I'm going | against ae ota 8 the 

, . to finish out my term.” His term) union. Fines o each are 

Baggy oom Eisenhower's pestel cagee Se Sass, expires in 1958 sought agaianst five union of- 
rate increase apparently is some publications had already ) A 
doomed in the Senate's adjourn- notified him they wished to tes-| Under the Plan the electors ficials, including Appelbaum. M4 
ment rush, but may be revived tify against proposed increases|Would be in a position to sup-|fine of $10,000 may be sought 
and passed next year, an in-in second<lass mail rates im-|port other possible candidates; 
{urmed source said yesterday. | posed by the House bill, which| than Senators Jenner and Byrd. 

A member of the Senate Post- went even further than the Ad- 
office Committee told the ministration asked. College CoP Group 
United Press that the $430 mil-| The House bill, approved by Supports St - 


Another Godfrey in Radio 
Concluding a week of broadcasting his shows from North- 
ern California, Arthur Godfrey offers some mike advice 


te his son, Richard, at radio station KCBS, in San Francisco. 
Young Godfrey is sports director of the station. 


Bill to Hike Postal Rates 


Is Doomed, Senator Says 


By Herbert Foster 
United Press 


1-DAY 
INSTALLATION 


Now is the time to 
1 Ges 


ef VILLAGE and VER- 
NON IN Mevie Diree- 
tory. 
VILLAGE 
Ava Gardner in 
“BHOWAN) JUNCTION” 
, 22, ba, Ba 


Orns 


VERNON 

Ava Gardner in 
“BHOWANI JUNCTION” 
1:45, 4:18, 6:60, 9:22 


ENGINEERING 
IUATES. . 


Unusual eppertunity fer 2 
men with @ 7\-yeerold ne- 
tionwide organization with 
offices in 100 cities afl ever 

Auto- 


Soft rayon chiffon subtly 

4 .. pleated for figure flattery. 
Bodice accented with 
hemstitching detail. Under- 
lined with full rayon taffeta 
slip. Black, navy, also white 
polka-dots on navy & black. 


a a a a 
“ 


m be « . 
Sa Fa AS 


i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i ~~ 


117 BO... «66 OA. 60108 


— 


lion annual increase approved'a 217-to-165 vote would nearly 
by the House Friday “will never wipe out the c 
get through” the Senate unless| Department d 
Congress stays in session much been run 
longer than it now plans. Au-\4 year. 

gust 3 is the adjournment tar-| It would raise first<lass mail 
get from 3 to 4 cents and airmail 

But he said “we'll probably/from 6 to 7 cents an ounce. 

do something next session.”| Rates on second<lass mail— 
This would require introduction | newspapers and mag 

of a new bill which also would) would go up 30 per cent over a 
have to pass the House again. | five-year period for reading mat- 


cit which has 
ut $470 million 


The Senator said, “I find no ter and 120 per cent for the ad-| 


enthusiasm” for the bill which vertising part of the publica- 
would increast the cost of first- tion. The Administration had 
class mail and air mail a penny requested only two annual 15 
an ounce. |per cent increases. 


nic Postoffice | 


Associated Press 
| A group of college-age Repub 
licans yesterday launched a 
youth movement to nominate 
‘Harold E. Stassen for Vice Pres-| 


‘ident—or as head ame GOP) ENJOY a 
ticket if President nhower | 

doesn't run again. HOME TRIAL 
| The campaign was announced 

iby H. Brooks Baker, next year'sift at No Cost 
lundergraduate student body ‘ 
president at Trinity College, ‘ 
\Hartford, Conn. He said it was 
isupported by about 100 other 


|young people in the Washing- 
ton area representing over 30 


¥ 


1956 PONTIAC 
STATION WAGON 


‘2676 


Deluxe, 3 Seats, Myd., R. & H. Used 1,000 miles, 
new warranty. 


T 4:95 


SIZES 1812-26) 


Please, neo phone 
er mail orders. 


He added that the Committee; It also would increase third-; 
would almost certainly need to/class mail rates to bring in ee eee = 
hold lengthy hearings before)|other $77 million a year. Although the group described 
itself as “the Young Americans 
for Eisenhower First and Stas 


716 Tith Se. N.W. 
Betweee G & H Sts. 
RE. 7-9732 


FLOOD PONTIAC 


4221 Connecticut Avenue . 


Section A—Main News and 
Features 
Section B—City Life 
Federal Diary, weather. 
obituaries, local and world 
news, education directory. 
general features, garden 
news. 
Section C—Sports, Business 
and Finance 
Great Outdoors page, finan- 
cial news. 
Section D—Classified 
General news and features. 
Section E—Outleok 
Editorials, area and world 
news, book reviews, art 
news. 


Table of Contents 


| 
| 
| 


Section F—For and About 
Women 


Travel and resorts, Stampinanced by older and experi- 


news. 

Section G—TV-Radio Week 
News of television and 
radio, comments and logs, 
crossword puzzle. 

Section H—Show 
Drama, music and amuse- 
ment features. 

Section J — All-Star Game 
Special 24-page tabloid 
giving all facts and figures 
on Tuesday's Major League 
All-Star baseball game. 

The American Weekly 


| Parade Magazine 


Two Big Comic Sections 


Rea! Estate Section, formerly carried in the Sunday Post 
and Times Herald, now appears in Saturday's editions. 


Features 


Sec. Pg. 
Bob Addie in ; 3 | 
| Lawrence Laurent . 


Robert C. Albright . E 1 
All Star Game. 1-24 
Alsop . ‘ 5 
Anne's Trading Post 
Art Calendar 


Irston R. Barnes ... 
Book Reviews 
James H. Beattie 
Franklin R. Bruns .. 
Business Outlook .. 
Richard L. Coe 
“Country Livin’ ” 
John Crosby .a@..... 
Crossword Puzzle . 
Death Notices 
District Affairs . 
Editorials 2 he 
Education Directory 
Herbert Elliston ... 
Engagements 
Federal! Diary 

Eddie Gallaher .... 
Gallery Glimpses .. 
Garden Clubs. 

Golf News as ee 
Goren on Bridge .. 
Aubrey Graves .. 
Walter Haight 

Nate Haseltine 
Mary Haworth 
Evelyn Hayes . 
Herblock 

Paul Herron 

Hedda Hopper 
Horoscope . ~ 
Horses and People . 
How to Keep Well 
Hunting and Fishing 
Walter Hubbard ... 
Paul Hume 


an 
Ia 


ee 


NOQVQaaVve QOnwnevwneeweqe#--OWwOsenwnwnwoan woo a 


w 


Robert P. Jordan ... 
Ida Jean Kain 
Walter Karig 
eep in Trim . 
rothy Kilgallen . 
Jerry Kluttz 


‘ 


by” 


Lab. Casebook 


| Letters to Editor ... 


J. A. Livingston ... 


| Magazine Rack .... 


\ Music Calendar .... 
| The Naturalist 
| Night Club ........ 
| Obituaries 
| On the Town ; 
| Louvella Parsons ... 
| Drew Pearson 

The Philatelist 
| Pinfeathers, Pegasus 


| Katherine B. Pozer . 


| TV Backtalk 
| TV People 
| This Morning 


Bi! ePReres 
| TV Movies 


| Maryland Affairs .. 


Dorothy McCardle . 


| Winzola McLendon . 


Merry-Go-Round ... 
Movie Guide 
Benjamin Muse .... 


a 
— 


Leslie Judd Portner 


Post Mortem 
Shirley Povich 

Race Results * 
Radio Music: Today 
Recipe Box ¥ 


| Record Player 
| Paul Sampson .... 


Service Set 


| Show Times Today . 


Stamps by Bruns 


| Stock Market 


Sunday Radio Log 
Tennis News ... ; 


Qo 


TV Color Shows : ts 


©) 
- 
~a 
2 


SU GEE ac ckoasos 
Dr. Van Dellen .... 
Virginia Affairs .... 
Voice of Broadway . 
Weather Table 
Weddi 

Walter Winchell ... 


Aa WOMBAD 
~ S 


- 
- 


+ 
“IO th 


Ve NGIAAMeV-I SON SO 


WNUNAaae—-A-WHD sa 


isen Second Movement,” its 
leaders said they had no formal 
organization. The group's state- 
ment added that if such an or- 
ganization should come into be- 
ing “it will be guided and fi- 


enced persons.” 

In calling for the nomination 
of Stassen, President Eisenhow- 
er’s disarmament adviser, the 
group's vice chairman, Arthur 
J. Phelan Jr., said it has become 
“more and more obvious” that 
there is “a tremendous lack of 
confidence and belief” in Vice 
President Nixon. 


You may have e Chord Organ In 
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Phone or come in for full details. 


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0 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
NEN: Sunday, July 8, 1956 As 


RALEIGH HABERDASHER, WASHINGTON AND CHEVY CHASE—— 


STARTS TOMORROW AT 9:30...BOTH STORES 


3 Lose Lives in Maryland 
Smashup of Auto and Truc 


Three persons were killed** * 
and three injured early yester- 
day when the car in which' 
they were riding side-swiped a, 
tractor4railer truck on Route | 


301 in Upper Marlboro, Md. 
Prince Georges County police 
listed the dead as Buster Ru- 
fus Mitchem, 32, Newark, N. J.. 
and Lucille Ravall, 32, and 


Washington Area 


Traffic Toll 


Deaths Deaths 

threugh threesgh 

—_ ; July 7 
Alexandria 
Arlington 
District 
Falis Church 
Fairfax 
Montgomery 8&8 
Pr. Georges 32 


~I 


a | Suvsohanmed 


Area total 80 192 


——_____ - a 


a three-year<old girl whose last 
name is Mitchell, both of New 
York City 

All died of head injuries, ac- 
cording to Dr. James 1. Boyd. 
Prince Georges County Medical 
Examiner. Mitchem, the driver. 
aiso had a crushed chest. 

Injured were Danny Mitchell, 
12, of Newark. N. J.. believed to 
be a brother of the dead gir'. 
Ollie Weldon Hefter, 36, of 
Newark, N. J. and Brutus K. 
Brown, 32, of New York City. 
The Mitchell boy and Hefter 
were admitted to Prince 
Georges General Hospital 


: 


' 


This 1956 auto struck the tree and stone | 
wall after a collision with a mail truck at 
Sherman ave. and Euclid st. nw., yesterday. 


Driver Ruth Hall, 25, of 707 


: 


| 
’ 


| “ : ai > a 
Police said the car was going) 


south on 301 at a high rate of 
speed when it hit the truck 
driven by Roosevelt Stokes, 43, | 
of Williamston, N. C. | 

The entire left side of the} 
car was torn off, police said. ) 


: 
: 


AIRPORT—from P. I 


Near Collision 


SEP Told 


his concentration is 
with aircraft 


thal part ol 
being 
equipment 

“There is no air 
problem,” Karant said, “there 
is plenty of room, but even 
with space, a pilot can't fly at 
500 miles an hour and expect 
the peak in saiety.” 

A 180-mile-an-hour speed 
limit is in force near National 
Airport at present, and other 
réstrictions also are in force, 
bat the committee is calling 
igor more 

rhe Aircraft Owners and 
Pilot Association is asking for 
a central control over a 25-mile 
radius with remote radar 
antennae, and fixed radio re 
céivers and transmitters at the 
outer edge 

The group also is calling 
“mandatory the installation 
of a recorder in every commer- 
cial aircraft. This is a device 
already on the market costing 
about $2500. it maintains a 
tape recording showing speed 
altitude, changes, compass 
reading and gravity force 

the planes that went 
Grand Canyon had 
these de aboard 
Karant explained, “there would 
be a lot less mystery as to how 
the crash occured 

The equipment is waterproof 
fireproof and can take 100 Gs 
(gravity force), he said 

Getting back to those near 
misses,” he added, “we know it 
is pilot error because in many 
of the 24 instances, the careless 
ness of the pilot was pointed out 
by other pilots who were in the 
air and near the aircraft at the 
time.” 


taken up 


space 


ices 


| 
Train Heroine’s 


Memory Honored 


BOONE, Iowa, July 7 (»—The 
memory of Kate Shelley, a 
legend in American railroading 
was honored Friday on the 75th 
anniversary of her heroic act 
which saved a loaded passenger 
train from plunging into a 
flooded creek 

Kate was 15 years old when 
she crawied across a 500-foot 
trestle to flag down a Chicago 
& Northwestern express, carry: 
ing 200 persons, bound for a 
washed-out bridge 

Harry H. Olmsted of 1025 5 
Oakcrest rd Arlington, Va.. 
a grandson of A. T. Olmsted, a 
fireman who lost his life on the 
pusher engine which had 
cracked through the weakened 
BG. gl 6d ee SA 
ceremonies. 


Man Hit, Robbed 
Of Money, Watch 


Thornton L. Johnson, 25, of 
143 R st. ne.. was robbed of $9 
and his wrist watch last night 
at North Capitol and R sts, by 
another car. 

Johnson told police he was 
hit on the back of the head 
Police broadcast a lookout for 
two Negroes, one 20-25 years 
5 feet 7. 150 pounds; the other 
20-25, 5 feet 6, slender build. 


Columbia St. Man 


Held in Stabbing 


Joseph Briggs, 33, listed at 
1518 Columbia st. nw. was 
stabbed in the stomach last 
night during an argument near 
his home. 

Willie Scott, 32, listed at 1534 
. Columbia st. nw.” was charged 
with assault with a dangerous 
weapon. Briggs was admitted to 
Freedmen's Hospital, where 
his condition was listed as good. | 


peesent- for the +b-Ark + at<n sard 


In another accident yesterday, two Quan- 
tico Marines were injured when their car 


struck the side of the 14th st. 
driver, 2d Lt. Rebert Vandel. 


~~ 


By Jim Curtis 


nw., and a passenger were treated for in- 
juries at Garfield Hospital and released. 
The driver of the mail truck was Thomas 


Randolph st. L. Pryor, of 1011 Fairmont st. nw. 


By Perry White 
internal injuries and head cuts; his com- 
panion, 2d Lt. Arthur Cook, 21, fractured a 
collarbone. Police said the car was travel- 
ing on the south-bound span. 


bridge. The 
22, suffered | 


I'WA Cratt to Blame in Crash, 


CAB Chiet 


By Bill Becker 
LAS VEGAS. Nev. July 7 WF 
The Civ A Board's 


chief i today indicated 


ronautics 
spector 
that the pr 
sibility before the Grand Can 
rested 
pilot of a Trans World 


imary flight respon 
lune 30 
airline 


The 


auion Carry! 


big TWA Superconstel- 
ng 70 persons ap- 
illiided with a United 
Airlines DC-7 carrying 58 high 
over the canyon. The two planes 
crashed within a mile of each 
other. killing all 128 in ‘com- 
mercial aviation’s worst disas- 
ter Both planes were ecast- 
bound from Los Angeles and 
took off only three minutes 
apart 

William K. Andrews, director 
of CAB’s safety investigation 
division, told a House Com- 
merce Subcommittee 

“TWA was advised 
United Air Lines was traffic 
There is no indication that 
United Air Lines was advised 
TWA was trafic 

By this, Andrews meant that 
TWA pilot had been advised 
that the United airliner was 
flying at 21,000 feet before be- 
ing granted permission to 
change his elevation from 19, 
000 feet to “1000 feet on top” 
of thunderciouds 

The top of the thunderclouds 
was estimated at about 20,000 
feet, which also put TWA in the 
21. 000-foot range. 

Andrews. first 
subcommittee 
ed over Dy 


parently et 


that 


witness at the 
hearing presid- 
Rep. Oren Harfrris 


IFR (instru- 
control as it 
crossed the airways. The TWA 
captain was free to go up and 
down as he saw fit because he 
was on VFR (visual flight rules) 
Pressed by Congressmen, 
Andrews agreed that the only 
safety factor under the circum- 
stances was “the sight of the 
pilot given the VFR clearance.” 
By this; Andrews said, he 
meant that it was the TWA pi- 
lot's responsibility to be on the 
lookout for and avoid the 
United plane 
The subcommittee flew here 
yesterday to conduct a thor- 
ough inquiry into the disaster. 
Andrews, who heads the 
CAB’s investigation at the 
seene, about 135 airline miles 
from Las Vegas, said no wit- 
nesses had been found who saw 
the crash—either from the air 


“Lnited was on 
ment ficht rules) 


or the ground. 


Andrews said he understood 
there were several other flights 
in the area within a half-hour | 
of the time of apparent colli-| 
sion. But he added, “there was' 


no congestion im the area at the! 


time.” 


A 


> 


21,000-foot altitude and that it! 


Ins pector Indicates 


the crash ‘on top of all cloud formations. 


Investigators at 
scene have reported finding If a pilot is going through 
evidence that the giant trans- clouds, Garrison said, under 
collided. The evidence VFR he must be able to main- 
they said. consisted of paint tain 2000 feet horizontal clear- 
marks from one plane being ance of any other plane. 
found om fragments of: the Rep. Carl Hinshaw (R-Calif.), 
other. talking with reporters at re- 

The -CAB investigator re- cess, said he was inclined to be- 
viewed the preliminary report lieve at this point that the. col- 
made by the Civil Aeronautics lision probably was a result of 
Administration. This report a combination of errors, 
indicated that both planes left; “No accident I've ever inves- 
the California border and CAA tigated has one single cause,” 
control jurisdiction at about .siq Hinshaw. With 18 years of 
the same time. nd 

TWA. which had left Los | °*Perience, he is the Subcom- 
Angeles at 10:01 a. m. (PDT) | mittee’s senior member. 
peg ors mye yy over He called attention to the 
ake |! Vv + - ) 
ae Fm ree AR a ‘*1.008 fact that at the point of colli- 
feet. United. which had left =o both planes were north of 
Los Angeles at 10:04 for Chi- their plotted courses. The CAA 
cago, reported over Needles last week estimated that United 
at the same elevation at 10:58. was about 25 miles north and 


Both planes gave an estimat-| TWA five miles north of their 
ed time of arrival over the | fight plans. 


Painted Desert, Ariz., check Other subcommittee mem- 
point of 11:3la.m. They never bers in attendance include 
reported. Reps. Carl Hinshaw (R<Calif.), 

Asked were customary John Bell Williams (D-Miss.), 


ports 


if it 


for two large airlines to fly Torbert MacDonald (D-Mass.).| 


at the same altitude, Andrews Olin Teague (D-Tex.). John J 
replied that he did not think|PFiynt (D-Ga.) Walter Rogers 
it was unusual, “because one (f).Tex.), Morgan Moulder (D- 
was on visual and the other on Mo.), and Robert Hale (R-Me). 
instrument flying rules.” Work of combing the wreck- 
Wiliam M. McNamara, CAB age of the DC7 continued in the 
safety investigator, Washing-' gorge. 
ton, explained that the Painted’ Swiss mountaineers. flown to 
Desert designation used by the the canyon yesterday, today 
CAA is not a fixed point on| worked on a radical new tech- 
the map but in this case a line nique they hope will make it 
approximately 100 miles long. possible to lower a man by rope 
McNamara estimated the two into crevices containing parts 
planes, according to flight 
filed, were expected to/ 


hat the shattered plane. 
, ‘: sel ee & pe’ oF “TY-") 
line roughly six to eight miles'rofean transfer” the technique 


apart. The line was about two|consists of winding numerous 
or three minutes flying timeiturns of rope around large 
east of where the airliners came rocks on the dangerous ledge 
together. and using it as an anchor for 
Studying Transcripts ‘a rope dropped into the crev- 
McNamara said the CAB wasiices 
studying transcripts of the con-| No additional bodies were 
versations its various control flown from the UAL wreck 
points had with the two planes.|scene today. A total of 13 have 
Chairman Harris agreed no dis-|been brought out so far. . Six- 
closures need be made at this teen bags of remains were flown 
time. from the TWA site earlier. 
The Cab investigator also 
said both TWA and United had 
been asked for records from 


2 Passerby Catches 
their ground stations. 


John A. Garrison, chief of Bo 
facility operation for the CAA Falling Ys 7 
in Los Angeles, verified that’ NEW YORK, July 7 ®—A 
TWA requested a change of its seven-year-old boy fell from a 
flight plan about a half-hour |\third-story window today and 
after. taking off. Garrison testi-'was caught, uninjured, by a 
fied United had priority at the | passerby. ) 
The boy, Edwin Talavera, was 
was the responsibility of the/left unattended “for only a min- 
TWA pilot to “observe and be|ute” by his mother. Victor! 
observed under 
regulations.” pounds, saw the boy falling and 

He defined the basic visual caught the 46%-pound Edwin. | 
flight regulations as requiring | 
a pilot to have a three-mile-wide to a hospital for checkups. Both | 


: 
' 


visibility and to stay 1000 feet were dismissed. 


f 


7 


» 


ae flight |F ernandez, 22, who weighs 145) 


Fernandez and the boy went} 


RALEIGH, HART SCHAFFNER & MARX AND 
BROOKSTREET TROPICALS REDUCED FROM STOCK 


| | 


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DOWNTOWN: 1310 F ST. PHONE: WNAtional 8-9540 


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EXCLUSIVE WITH KITT’S .. . SPECIAL SUMMER PROGRAM 


Proposals or Cyprus Complete Course of 


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tn INSTRUCTION 


LONDON, July 7 — Primejcypriots demand union of the) 
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This Special Offer Includes: 


ernment is expected to make| Speaking at Barry, Wales, to- 
|a statement to Parliament next day Foreign Secretary Selwyn 

Private Lessons @ Practice Time © Use of Organ 
Professional Instruction (Conservatory Graduates) 


‘week on recent plans to settle Liayd said “the importance of| 
Enrollments Limited—Come in or Phone Now for Details 


the political future of Cyprus) Cypeus should not be under- 
which were rejected by Tur-) Lloyd added: “Tt is some- 
T' Ss 1330 G St. N.W. 
K ! T REpublic 7-6212 
“RE. 7.1234, ask for Clireulation, and order The Wash- 


key, authoritative sources said times suggested that a NATO 
Times Herald guaranteed home delivery. 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERAL 


Around the World 
A 4 Sunday, July 8, 1956 be 


——— 
a 


British Hail Unity at Parley 


Re 

LONDON, July 7—The Nine 
British Commonwealth Prime 
Ministers who ended a 10-day 
conference on world affairs 
here yesterday felt it was one) 
of the most useful held since 
World War II, authoritative! 
sources said today . 

In virtually all crucial for- 
eign effairs issues there was 
more agreement than disagree- 
ment, and there was a large 
degree of unity among states 
men representing nations with 
such different interests, they 
said : 

The one snag was on recog- 
nition of Communist China and 
its admission to the United 
Nations. Britain, India, Pakis-| 
tan and Ceylon give diplomatic 
recognition to China while Can- 
ada. Australia. New ‘Zealand a 
and South Africa do not. 

The conference was dom- 
inated by a searching analysis 
of Russia's intentions toward 
the Non-Communist world fol- 
lowing the denynciation of! 
Stalin by the new Soviet lead- 
ers. They unanimously warned 
that there would be no lasting 
peace unless the major causes 
of international tension were 
removed 

{ communique 
meetings dealt. with world 
problems area by area But 
it avoided any mention of the 
controversial question of ad 
mitting Communist China to 
the U. N 

The conference 
Ceylon could stay 
monwealth once it 
republic like India 
tan Britain . also 
hand over her naval 
force bases in Cevylon 
eyionese government 

British press comment called 

conference everything 
essful to the “most 
g yet held.” 


" 8 eee ee —_— 
syeis > 


A $50 
Value 


at 
~ 


= © mg 
ok ais “ty 
a. a | 


agreement on a British proposal ern Europe depends today, and 
that Cyprus should be granted will depend for many years to 
selfdetermination in 10 years, come, on oil supplies from the ogy 


| today. ‘base on Greek soil would 
‘the sources added. Greek Middle East." | ingten Post and 


Talks between Britain and Suffice for us. That cannot be 
SHOP MON. NIGHT, TOO 


| , so. Much more than NATO is 
Turkey, the colony's nearest involved ... our country’s in- 

© Southeast & Northeast, 9:30 to 9 
© Silver Spring, 12 to 9:30 


neighbor, failed to produce| dustrial life and that of West- 
® Downtown, 9:30 to 6:30 


ve . 


» 


4 


« a a a 
i — abo es io.) . 
usted Press 


A French patrol leads captured Algerian rebels to a police station after a clash. 


® 312-16 & 427-33 7th, NW. © 2324 Penn., SE. © H at 7th, NE. 
@ Colesville Rd. & Fenton St., Silver Spring 


German Draft Passed French Battle 
After Hectic Session New Wave of 


° 
— |Rebel Raids 
BONN, Germany, July 7 /West German draft, the United 


West Germany's lower house ores gocher Red Ber/, ALGIERS, July 7 @—French 
approved conscription for the) ,,_ Br epg dy tear dle of (roo battling a new wave of 


after the 


agreed that 
n the Com- 
became a 
and Pakis- 
agreed to 
and air 
to the 


, lin said the draft dodgers aske , 
country’s new army today over/for political asylum becau oo oy Meee pnd” poe 
bitter protests by Chancellor|“they did not want to serve fn|)ig. ana today shoriti 

. . —_— ) NATO army.” erday an oGgay, @ULnoricvies | 
Konrad Adenauer’s Socialist| the N. nore sameunced 

ennonents (The Reds were quick to : eld 
fut er ' ‘seize on the draft as an issue| Five loyal natives were 

The controversial draft law | +9; might reverse the tide that Wounded in a guerrilla attack 
now goes to the upper house,|has sent scores of thousands of OM a bus in southwestern Al 
where a solid government ma-| Germans westward through the |S¢Tia. No French losses were 
jority assures final approval. (iron Curtain to escape commu- reported. 

The draft law will make 12/| nism. A French patrol killed one 
million German men between; (Communist Boss Walter Ul-' guerrilla on a road eight miles 
the ages of 18 and 45 subject to|bricht began urging West Ger- south of Algiers. Eleven more 
compulsory military service.|mans to dodge the draft Thurs- were killed in a clash at Mou 
The Bundestag, the lower \day, and the Red organ, Neues saiaville. 38 miles southwest of 
house, passed M by a vote of|Deutschland, echoed his call here, seven in a bombing raid 
270-166 on third and final read-| today.) that set three houses afire in 
ing. The vote in the upper In the showdown ballot, the Bonfarik, and three in the 
house, the Bundestag, is sched-|three parties of Adenauer’s western city of Tlemcen. 
uled for next Friday. coalition government voted! Tie new outbreak of violence 

Sixteen hours of stormy de-'solidly for the law and So- ontiy de 
b apparently was ordered in re- 
ate preceded the Bundestag cialists and Refugee Party ;,ijja+ion for the stern French 
vote. Adenauer, usually heard| members against it. There were . hme tie ' 

? punishment of natives who sup- 
in respectful silence by the | 20 abstentions. ported Thursday's anti-French 
lawmacers, was interrupted by| The Bundestag opponents of «-i.. ” 
jeers and laughter when he the draft had considerable pub- iti . 
urged the draft as the only/lic support. Thousands of West poe sgn ge aera “or _ 

. shops and all the Arab cafes 
means of building the 500,000-|Germans expressed opposition ;,, Algiers for closing while the 
man army he has pledged to/to creation of new armed .... ... * ’ 
North Atlantic Alliance de-|forces, fearing rebirth of Ge ECES Was OR. TTIvenS CENpTEy 

° #€t- ors fired more that 2000 Arabs, 


fenses. man militarism. 
P aris and scores of native officials 


wT) .,UuCc 


disappointir 


Nehru in Dublin 


DUBLIN Prime Minister 
Nehru arrived in Dublin today 
for a five<iay visit as guest of 
President Sean O'Kelly 

On hand to greet the Indian 

flew in from Lon 
> Minister John 
and former Prime 
jon DeValera 
‘a t.” Nehru 
Loere are no 


Ireland and 


r 


LARGER WOMEN’S & 
MISSES 159 te 2.89 
SHORTS. All Sanforized! 
Sailcloths, chinos, twills, 
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MISSES’ $1.59 BABY-DOLL 
PAJAMAS. Cool, work-say- 
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shorty top plus matching ruf- 
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MISSES’ & JUNIORS’ 
199 TERRY ROMPER 
PLAYSUIT. Pert and prac- 
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cloth ... elasticized waist, 
bloomer leg and neckline. 
Tie-shoulder. 5S, M, $ 
L. 


Israclis Fired | pon 

JERUSALEM An Israeli 
spokesman said Jordanians 
opened fire today on an Israeli 
patrol inside Israel territory 
in the Castel area west of Jeru- 
salem The fire was not re 
turned and there were no cas 
uaities, he said 


- 


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MORTON'S — All 4 Stores 


BARGAINS for BAB 


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Ceylon-Red Ties Due 
LONDON Ceyion'’s “neu 
tral” Premier Solomon Bandara- 
naike said today his country will 
establish diplomatic relations 
with Russia and Red China 
“very soof 
He added } 


Lewest everhead in the Wash- 
ingten serea ‘according te Ford 
factery recerds) 

°. One car shewreem 

3. Owner-eperated—tformer factery 
men Save Yea mene, 
Cenvenient lecation—mest com - 
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lente fer service werk. 


It's The Truth! 
TAKOMA 


700! Carrell Ave 
Tekeme Park, Md. 
8 Years at 


This Locetion 


jU. 9.3000 


Ex-Red Leader in U. S. 
Turns Up. in Peiping 


LONDON, July 7 @®—Irving 
Potash, former Uniked States 
Communist Party official who 
went to his native Poland last 
year to escape prosecution un- 
der the Smith Act, turned up 
in the Red Chinese capital of 
Peiping today 

Peiping radio announced his 
arrival but did not say where 
he had come from. Potash 


‘ 
is government also 
may establish diplomatic rela- 
tons with other iron curtain 
countries \t the same time. 
Bandaranaike said: “We will 
welcome any further aid from 
the United States—with no 
strings attached 


Opponents of the draft ar-| But the Chancellor insisted micee . 
gued large armies are unneces-| the new forces are necessary to oa oe mame Oh oe ms 
sary in an age of streamlined |help protect the West against; ee 
armed forces and nuclear = Communist aggression 
weapons Although youths of 18 may jah. : 

[The Communist radio re-| be called up under the law. the Polish Americans 
ported today 18 yuvung Ger-| government plans to draft only Sf; ati 
Argentines to Flect mans have gone behind the those who have reached the Stage De MOnsTratlon 
BUENOS AIRES .m—Presj.| fom Curtain in the past 24/age of 19. The first 350,000 are’ , NEW YORK, July 7 UNS) .—= 
dent Pedro Aramburyu an-|20UFS to escape the proposed'to be summoned April 1. A group of 500 to 600 Polish- 
ue JO 9 ay Americans staged a marching 
ee, Sena first na- ’ demonstration in midtown Man- 
te of J - D. P ae wane Polish workers, but “agents of} bee oe at a ill TE ee one 
ov f Juai er ; . ‘. ‘against Comm Ss 
be held some ti) n the last | subversion” who fired on ‘ne| Holland Charges ae ie my a 
three months of 1957 lrepresentatives of the people's) . . ° lish riots 
Aramburu said his caretaker| authority,” Polish Ambassador’ U. S, Bias tit Air the demonstrators paraded 
regime, which ousted Peron!F. Milnikiel said in a letter-to a ibefore the Soviet U. N. delega- 
last September, would remain group of British Laborite legis- Route Grants tion headquarters and the Pol- 
neutral in the election iators. ish U. N. delegation headquar- 
rhe President said the elece-|/ “You will agree that those) THE HAGUE July 7 ®#—The ters. Leaders of the marchers 
tion was being delayed because responsible for the lawless dis-| nytch government today ac- wore Free Polish uniforms used 
would be impossible to clean /}turbance of public order and for eysedq the United States of ai during World War I! 
the Peronista influence in: bloodshed in the streets of Poz-|«..rjon< form of discrimina- 
election machinery before’ nan must be brought to justice} tion” for failing to grant aamed 
: ‘OF their deeds,” he added. routes in the United States in | YOU GET AN 
provisional government has| “The government of the Po-| +. ri Royal Dutch Airlines 
decree since lish People’s Republic approach| Three Cabinet ministers said , r 
from theithis matter with full considera- in a joint parliamentary state- EXCELLENT 
is in exile in| tion, ae feeling of re. ment that the government felt 
venge,” he added. “deep disappointment,” espe- | DEAL 
Fifty Laborite legislators had shlkt clues “¢Er was the ye FROM TAKOMA FORD 
appealed to Polish authorities est foreign client of the Ameri- 
“to exercise generous restraint) .ay sircraft industry : Because We Have— 
in dealing with the workers and) = «america's reluctance in ' 
citizens of Poznan. granting the Dutch company 
new routes in the United States 
while giving permission to other 
European countries to operate 
such new routes can hardly be 
seen otherwise than as a seri 
ous form of discrimination,” 
the Ministers said. 


He Has an Excuse 

PITTSTOWN, N. J. 
When police asked Julius Berk- 
man why he had been driving 
44 years without a license, the 
64-year-old farmer replied: “l 
never drove far.” 


Pt) 


7 se 


Hammarskjold in Prague 


VIENNA @®—United Nations 
secretary General Dag Ham- 


back 

3 fer $1 
3 fer $1 
ie vive pe 2 1.00 
54 


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Soft cotten flannel. 
IRLS' & TOTS’ $1.19 
LOUSES, SHORTS & 
HALTERS. Cool no-iron cot 
ton play shorts! Trim sileeve- 
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broidery trimmed, peasant 


halters! 3 to 6x S 
and 7 to lf ? for ] 


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ie Baby Undershirts B 
Tie-side or slipon 


Rirdseve Diapers 


det 
2.49 values! 27x27" sises 


4il 4 Stores 


—= 


marskjiold arrived in the Czech 
yf =—=—=—_____—— 


capital of Prague today on a served one prison sentence 


for platting violent overthrow 
of the United States Govern. 
ment. 


two-day official visit, Radio 

Prague reported. He will con 

tinue to Vienna 
Hammarskjold’s presence 

Pr 

{) 


on 


This 79.50 
Co-Ordinate 


in 
reports 
that the 
5 so concerned 
Poznan-type up- 
has armed its 
force and can 
ieaves security 


ague coincided with 
rom Czechoslovakia 
government wa 
over possible 
risings that it 
workers pD e 
celled all 
troops 


Wife Slayer in Britain 
Escapes Execution 
Reuters 

LONDON, July 7—Charles 
Garrett, 57, sentenced to death 
at a two-minute trial last month 
for murdering his wife, was 
reprieved today, four days be- 
fore his scheduled execution 
He will serve a life sentence 
instead ‘ 

Garrett pleaded guilty to 
killing his wife, Ellen, with a 
razor last May after he learned 
that she was going to leave 
him 


for 


ith sof 
Reds Reject Leniency nee 

LONDON —Communist Po. 
land brushed aside tonight Brit 
ish pleas for lenien and said 
leaders of last week Poznan re 
bellion “must be brought to jus- 


cashmere 


revoit lea 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Sunday, July 8, 1956 Ad 


Prices On 


OPEN NITES 


Monday, Thursday Tuesday, Wednesday 
and Friday @ Open and Saturday @ 
From 9 ‘til 9 Open 9 ‘tl 6 


Hechinger 's Smashes 
Power Equipmen 


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AN 


a 


CHROME ALLOY AND SELECT STEEL, FAMOUS MAKE 


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Designed for “Do-It-Yourself” 


Az” Skil-Saw 


Here Are 7 Reasons Why We 
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Ss 1. We have one of the most com- 4. We deliver to all parts of 
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2. Our manufacturers are among arranged to suit your budget. 
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3. We service what we sell. you properly. 


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. Si-pe. Set 
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' 21-Inch Ges 
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® MOTOR. Power-packed, universal type motor is specially 
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® DEPTH OF CUT ADJUSTMENT. Built-in single adjust- 
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@ Oll-tece type 
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@ Adjustable oir 


Y%”" Electric Drill 


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rices | 


22" Belt Drive Fan 
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CONTROL. Electrically reverse 
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sh 99 


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se 
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heavy rubber-tired wheels 

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Power Reverse And Separate 
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» Poort cheia driven twin 12x 
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wheels 
© Height of Rd edjustable from 
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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
J Sunday, July 8, 1956 eee 


Cambodia Links 
Future to Reds 


. By Stanley Johnson 


MOSCOW, July 7 #—Prince| 
Norodom Sihanouk concluded | 
an agreement with the Soviet 
Union today for economic and| 
industrial aid to his Indo-| 
chinese kingdom of Cambodia. | 


He declared the hope of his peo- 


ple “rests in the Soviet Union| 
for the realization of our de- 


sires for peace and prosperity.” 
A communique signed in the 
Kremlin announced that Prime 


Minister Bulganin, Communist! 


Party boss Nikita Khrushchev 
and Foreign Minister Dmitri 
Shepilov had accepted an invi- 
tation to visit Cambodia at a 
date to be set later. 

The prince is a former king 
of Cambodia. He resigned as 


premier last March 30 but re- 


mains the country’s foremost 
political leader. Formerly one 
of the associated states of Indo- 
china under French rule, Cam- 
bodia has been drifting toward 
closer relationships with the 
Communist bloc, first in Pei- 
ping and now in Moscow. 

At the Kremlin communique 
signing ceremonies, Sihanouk 
pledged his country to live in 
friendship and brotherhood 
with the Soviet Union. Later at 
a@ news conference he added: 

“The people of the Soviet 
Union have shown us astonish- 
ing hospitality. This for us is 
proof the Soviet people sincere-| 
ly desire there be a true under- 
standing among people. It is 
also proof the Soviet people 
love peace. 

“As for the leaders of the So-| 
viet government I have been 
privileged to meet, I am able to 
see their dynamism, clairvoy- 
ance, realism, charming simplic- 
ity of manner and remarkable 
comprehension of international 
relations and understanding of 
the aspirations of the Asian peo- 
ples.” | 

Cambodia, a country of al- 
most four million population, 
covering about 70,000 square 
miles, has been receiving Unit- 


ed States economic and military 
aid. For the 1956 fiscal year this 
amounted to about $50 million. 

When Sihanouk resigned his 
premiership he charged the 
United. States made it impos- 
sible for him to conduct a neu- 
tralist foreign policy. 


Resistance to Red Rule 
Found Gaining in Tibet 


KALIMPONG, India, July 7 
‘#—New reports of spreading 


resistance by Tibetans to Chi-| 


nese Communist rule have been 
brought to this north India bor- 
der town by travelers from that 
isolated country. There are in- 
dications a strong resistance 
movement may be in the mak- 
ing 

Chinese Reds are still send- 
ing bombing missions daily to 
hit at “resistance centers” in 
eastern and southern Tibet in 
an effort to stamp out a revolt 
that started in early April, ac- 
cording to these reports. 

Travelers refer to Mimang— 
the Tibetan Peoples’ Committee 
—an anti-Chinese political 
group organized in 1951, a year 
after the Chinese Reds occu- 
pied Tibet. Among those arriv- 
ing in Kalimpong are former 
Tibetan officials who claim 
membership in Mimang. One 
report said Mimang is prepar- 
ing to establish its own pro. 
visional government inside 
Tibet in opposition to the Chi- 


nese. | 
The Dalai Lama, Tibet's spir- 


itual and temporal ruler who 
is under the thumb of the Chi- 
nese Reds, is reported leading 
the opposition in Mimang. How- 
ever, open rebellion is being 
preached in nearly all the im- 
portant towns throughout the 
country, the travelers say. 

Chinese Reds are reported to 
have more than 150,000 troops 
inside Tibet and 300,000 others 
ready to send into trouble areas 
if needed. 


i SS 


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DIRECTIONS: South of Woodbridge, Vc. on U. S. #1 to Lyn 


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Sales by 


QUANTICO REALTY Co, 
TR. 5-2840—TR. 5-6445 


: 


io 
indicate size of the 12x15 cell in which the 
Communists held him prisoner. The Catho- 
lic priests are from San Francisco. 


The Rev. John W. Clifford (right), freed by 
_ the Chinese Reds along with the Rev. 
| Thomas L. Phillips (left), holds his arms to 


Rearmament F reed Priests Bring 
AtStakeas (News of Red Victims 


By David J. Roads 


Store hours 9:30 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. 


- Clearance 
of Men’s 


Clothing and Furnishings 


- 
Exceptional savings for summer shoppers on our 
quality clothing and furnishings for men. Suitable 
for immediate wear, all groups have been taken from 


stock and greatly reduced. Not all sizes or colors in 


ee ee ea ee Os a AO 


any one group. 


MEN’S CLOTHING, Second Floor 
Were 
Si £66. b00'dé once eee .39.50 and 39.95 

50.00 
65.00 

69.50 to 75.00 
95.00 

115.00 and up 


7, 


WROD CVE DG WHC D 


Now 
29.50 
39.50 
52.00 
56.00 
75.00 
90.00 


Japan Votes Associated Press 


‘ HONGKONG, July 7.—“My/by 19 Chinese 

By Pe Communist cell can only be) priests. 
he . described as a place of no hope,| He said the Reds questioned 
| TORYO, July 7—Some 30 nut 1 put my trust in God,”|him repeatedly in futile ef-| 
million Japanese will vote to- said an American priest today/forts to get him to confess to! 
morrow in parliamentary elec- after Pg ged Chi pa Fi ne ge ea ae the 
ears ina ne inese - State and “disrupting t ac- 
tions that will make or break * The Rev. John W. Clifford,'tivities of the tone | 
the government's hopes to Te 39 of San Frarittsco, told news-| He said the worst period of 
arm Japan. ‘men he was forbidden to say|his three years in four Shanghai| 
At stake are 127 of the 250 the Rosary or pray during his prisons was spent in a cell next! 
imprisonment. His guards told to a raving maniac. 
him there was “no freedom of; The churchman said he was! 
religion in prison. Your churchitaken on a 25-day tour over 
is bad and so are all priests.” (some 3000 miles of China with 
Father Clifford arrived here three other imprisoned Amer- 
today with the Rev. Thomas|icans. Accompanying him were 


and foreign 


members of the House of Coun- 
cillors, the upper chamber of 
the Japanese Parliament. 

The government's Liberal- 


> FOF OE WO ID) CT WOI DE WRL OE WOLD CWO DCW OCW OCT D 


Also a limited group of sport coats, slacks and raincoats reduced. 


MEN’S FURNISHINGS, First Floor 


Were Now 
1.65 
2.65 
3.65 
3.95 


4.95 


2.50 

3.50 and 5.00 

6.00 to 7.50 
SHIRTS 

7.50 to 8.50 


Also a group of sport shirts, golf jackets, 
robes, bathing trunks and pajamas have been reduced. 


ALL SALES FINAL. NO APPROVALS. 
NO MAIL. PHONE OR C.0.D. ORDERS. 
ON SALE AT OUR MAIN STORE ONLY. 


JULIUS GARFINCKEL & CO. 


NAtional 8-7730 


F Street at Fourteenth 


CABA2 CPAAD CPWAD CPIRAD CAME CARL CARRS CARED CPRAD CA 


Call RE. 17-1234, ask for Circulation, and order The Wash- 
ington Post and Times Herald guaranteed home delivery. 


Pe ae ae - - _ 
aw : a : a 
s 


a 
4a! 


2 a 

p panes 
Pos 

; 2 ae 

. az ne 


me 
f 


. 2 
“3 


ot 
4) GAR 
errs | 
rue 


o 


= 


Eaton's “Home for Thinkers” |i») 
went into operation last sum- |) 
mer when a group of educators,') 7, ~~ 
writers and industrialists came | oe go i 
here for a similar conference. || 7") 95% 

Among the college presidents |) > sa) s a 
i . ‘attending are Otto F. Krau-/ Siege 5 
Rebels Kill American \shaar, Goucher College, Bal- De) 999) 99" 

BOGOTA, Colombia, July 7\timore, Md.; William F. Quil-| Price eke. 2 tha 

w— Anti-government secs ct a ee on ae 
5 a 


% 
Z 


Domesres very and or roan Phillips, 52, of Butte, Mont.,| Bishop Ambrose Pinger of 
servative allies hope to win two-| 1. also was imprisoned three|Lindsay, Neb. the Rev. Ful- 
thirds control of the House in years in Red China. The two gence Gross of Omaha and a 
the first step to amend the Roman Catholic — Se Lutheran minister, the Rev. 
’ sti first Americans free y FelPaul Mackinson of Baltimore. 

each tahini deoue trem 20 ping since two Presbyterian) Father Phillips, relating what 
arming. missionaries were released last/he knew or heard about Amer- 
| w¢ they win, the Conserva- December. Eleven other Amer-| icans imprisoned in Red China. 
tives will be encouraged to dis-|©4"5 still are prisoners. ‘said: 
'solve the lower house, possibly; Father ¢ lifford said when he| Bishop Pinger was suffering 
imext year, and try to gain the “5 “rst jailed in June, 1953,/from high blood pressure. Fa- 
few additional seats they also| te prison cells were Occupledither Gross appeared in good 
need there to complete passage health. The Rev. Mr. Mackin- 
‘of the amendments. |son, good health: the Rev. Cyril 
|, The Conservatives are about 13 College Heads Wagner of Pittsburgh, suffer- 
six seats short of the two-thirds ng asthma attacks, the Rev. 
majority in the upper chamber Ponder at Home Joseph McCormack, New York 
now. The Liberal-Democrats ‘ City, good health: — Rev. 
confidently predicted they For Thinkers John Houle, Glenda ec, ——— 
would keep the 64 they have at spinal trouble; the Rev. Charles 
stake tomorrow and add a few. PUGWASH, N. S., July 7 @ McCarthy, San Francisco, good 
more. A “no shop talk” order went ee ee ee ee 
| Most newspaper polls gave out today at millionaire indus-'; oe OS Serene Sears Saar 
the Socialists the best chancel... « . is free in Shanghai, fair health. 
‘of sinin = = = at i on trialist Cyrus S. Eaton's “Home 
Ipense of the » middle-road/f0F Thinker’s,” where 13 United 
“green breeze” party States college presidents are) 
) The Socialists have stirred discussing liberal education. Pte eee 
‘popular resentment to the con-|_,©#t” e mec yg ome ion a eee ye 
|tinuation of American bases in|Of the Libera ucalion COM-| Bisa: 2 
Japan, three years after inde-|™ssion of the Association of| Rim 
‘pendence. They branded the American Colleges. They were © 
government leaders as puppets invited “0 spend eight days 
of the United States for its starting yesterday, discussing 
|modest rearmament policies. “the philosophic and psycho- 

The Socialists also have logical bases of liberal arts ed- 
seized on the clamor against — 
the recently announced Ameri- 
ean land requisitioning plan on 
the United States-administered 
Japanese island of Okinawa. 


*% 


v 
= 
<e ¥ 
Li gr: SE 


a» - 


guerillas lan, Randolph Macon Women's & 
in the Magdalen River jungles College, Lynchburg, Va., and 
of central Colombia murdered| Richard D. Weigle, St. John’s Rae 
an American named Jesse R.|College, Annapolis, Md, he 
New and an unidentified Euro-| it ; 
pean this week, it was 4an- 
nounced today. | 

The two men, both engineers, 
were hacked to death with ! 
jungle knives in much the same | 
way as was Santiago Berrio, a 
Colombian engineer killed by! 
guerillas in the same general’! 
area last month. 


AR LINING, 21 


SALE Mon.-Tues..Wed. only 


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CONDENSED STATEMENT OF CONDITION 


JUNE 3O, 1956 


RESOURCES 


Cash in Vault and Due from Banks 
U.S. Government Securities 

State, County and Municipal Bonds 
Business and Personal Loans 
Conventional Mortgages 
Partially or Fully Insured Mortgages 
Banking Houses 
Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment 
Other Resources 


‘TOTAL RESOURCES 


$ 16,392,619.59 
29,028,433.58 
4,232,847.50 
26,984,020.20 
13,406,767.23 
16,942,390.63 
1,273,810.76 
497,270.42 
193,515.91 


- $108,951,675.82 


LIABILITIES 


DEPOSITS 
CAPITAL FUNDS: 
Capital Stock 
Surplus 
Undivided Profi 


TOTAL CAPITAL FUNDS 


Dividends Payable .......... 
Reserve for Losses on Loans 
Reserve for Taxes, etc. 


TOTAL LIABILITIES 


$101,574,954.56 
$2,000,000.00 j 
2,500,000.00 
1,661,428.65 


ts 


$ 6,161,428.65 


75,002.80 
723,208.29 
417,081.52 


$108,951,675.82 


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DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION. 


i‘ % a ce ei Bus Bombed as Costarill Walkout Paralyzes Calcutta a ee wy 8 
U.N. Chief Visite Pragines| "7 tts cerares rico | Eat 


CALCUTTA, July 7—Dem-' trolled the streets. . 
onstrators stoned buses and a Seven hours after the strike sts. Teenagers Are Given Sentence of Work 


bomb exploded when an 11-| began police had reported one| Police also said that earlier) SAN RAFAEL, Calif. ®—Twojin the county and rescue fin- 
Ca to QO gy 1 eas hour general strike call today person injured by a bomb ex-|'n predawn raids, they hadic., Rafael teen-agers, sen-\setling trout from the evap- 
largely paralyzed Calcutta, | taken nearly 1000 people de-|, ced in Marin County Juve.|0Tating waters of Paper Mill 
India’s biggest city and one of | scribed as “rowdy elements” “©” n n Loumy duve- 
the world’s largest, police re-| into preventive custody. nile Court for shooting five rare | _ - 
| Reuters |is keeping in close contact with| ports showed. ‘Greta Europe-Bound The strike was called by the egrets, were sentenced to a t prada ag aay 
| PRAGUE, July 7~—Dag Ham- headquarters during his swing Buses, streetcars, : semen! WEW YORK. July 7 ctor a ictaian tea te po meron of work os a fish and! Famous Esther Williams : 
0 te docks and commercia ouses NE, . y * organization Comm " to re- tree-p anting project. 
+ hte mong wo baapery ne bone we ~ “ap Curtain but os were affected. Long distance mer film star Greta Garbo was cord “the people’s protest”) Superior Judge Jordan Mar- SWIMMING 
yG , y | underst to have received In'i sing were halted by people en route to Europe today for @ against the latest Indian gov-|tinelli, knowing the law forbade POOLS 
air today from Kiev, Russia, 9n|Moscow Foreign Minister squatting on the tracks. month-long vacation. Still want-| ernment proposal to re@raw the egrets in private possession, 
a two-day visit to Czechoslo-|pmitri Shepilov’s assurances he| Armed police pickets took|ing to be alone, she tried to boundaries between West Ben-|couldn’t sentence the boys to RA 3-9112 
vakia. He is touring Europe. | wil be sped by plane to the!positions at strategic points!dodge reporters at Idlewild Air-/gal, of which Calcutta is the/raise five baby birds, so he di-| 
Foreign Minister Vaclav Middle East if trouble arises. (throughout the city as the port before taking off last night.' chief city, and the Bihar States.| rected them to help plant trees é As advertised in LIFE & LOOK 


> 
David, foreign diplomats and) PPPSeseseoeoososoeosoossoooet 
reporters were at the airport to | ~ DAP s 2 ; 


meet him with a erowd of about| | DOWNTOWN | @ | CLARENDON | @ | NORTHEAST 


Hammarskjold, who will have! 
talks with David during his | 
stay, said: “We have no agenda 
to discuss. But I know that by 
/broadening our exchanges of 


! | views on all matters of concern Qua inc 
‘to the United Nations a fur- age Symbol of lity Ss e 191! 
ither basis will be laid for our é 
work together for peace and 
ithe purposes of the United 
| Nations.” | 
Afterwards. Hammarskjold | 
left by car with David to call) 
on President Antonin Zapo-j 
tocky at his country residence 
at Slany 


U.N. Ready to Help 


In Middle East =| pe Chie ' Yet To Come ...and Here is 
IONS, N | ED Fe ' | 


July 7 UNS Western VU. N 


ources said today Dag Ham : > - . y : W hi P Cl thi Cl i 
“e ' ol r ild be prepared , ’ - ~ a : as ngton s °o ng ass € 


Creek during the dry season. 


erreeoro ore 


Summer’s Hottest Days 


hi« present Iron 
> and hasten to the 
to help restore 
ting breaks out be- 
tween the Arabs and Israel 
The VU. N. Secretary General 


United Press 


Refugee 
screts Li Lite anives in USEC Opera 


AAA A i WAN ni « 
Pretest wines nim t Chief Flees | ie a Store - Wide 


whe has made 63 films, is un- 


: 


der contract to producer : : 
Cecil B. De Mille. She comes To Bri fain | 


AWD as 
it att a Deval til Tue 
under the Refugee Act from , ) = Pe | 
Hong Kong, to where she fled LONDON, July 7 #—V\ oy ! re 
from Communist armies in °S*!, conductor of the Prague | oi 
1948. National Theater Opera, ap-| Y 
plied today for political asylum + oe 
a . in Britain. : 
, (" The Czech, 34, told reporters | ' 
Nixon MAPries on arrival here of his escape ip : 
after appearing in Communist | - 
fast Berlin May 23.° | 
Assu rances of Fast B 1 May lie was met >. . 


by his English wife ) 
he said, 


Ike to Chiang seem tO nave a the | 
‘ 


comocaence that my ife and | af .— : . d 
A : ' two children were out of the . s ae Begins Mon ay A.M.—See Store Hours Below 
TAIPEH,. Formosa (Sunda country when they let me go to ¥ re a 

July 8 #—Vice President Rich Pact Berlin with the opera com- | ‘ : 

Tt : for oes # , ” : ’ ; 
ard Hines, of iving hove for . pany ee S GES : , 4 Planned to bring you America’s finest famous-make 

a eakfast with Genera 5 “ : i . : lrthes , 
Sun v ze Kai-shek. brought) °t Very, adventurous ' + ” - clothing in unexcelled selection, at unequaled savings . 
— - anex, Orousn*) “7 just took a train,” he said.| an ‘ : : Timed to temper the torrid summer heat at its height 
a letter from President Eisen- «7 oo¢ on the train after the z : ers 


hower assuring the Chinese Na- last performance (on : 23 in This is your best buy by every standard—the YMS famous 
tionalists of steadfast American East Berlin) and sinc® then I labels, first in quality at regular prices, first in value at 


have been in West Bertin.” , 

a we “admiration for “T am very happy to have got sale soving Be Wise, be here, be early, tomorrow. 
your unyielding stand against 4way from Czechoslovakia. The 
communism,” the message told main reason was because my 
Chiang: “Let there be no mis- country did not satisfy me as 
apprehension about our own) an artist and as a man, and my 
steadfastness in continuing to| country was threatening to be 
support the Republic of China.” | the grave for my aspirations, 


“International communism al- “I could not stand the inter- ; > ; (OP « oe 
ters its tactics from time toiference of the (Communist) . a TS Ete. OVER 1000 FAMOUS MAKE SUITS 
sime, but we have as yet no evi-| Party with the cultural life. I e, : 5 be w Me 
dence of any change in its ob-'was not allowed to Use any ren ie. ue 


jectives,” Mr. Eisenhower ad-| Western musical works. I hope 
ded. “The American people and to be able to get a job here.” 


Government realize this.” —— | aa Bs Zia 2 § 3 $32.50 & $35 FAMOUS MAKE SUITS 2 3 


< « 
ie . 
ee Paes ———" 


— an moseees pee 96 — . & ss 4, A fo. Crisp cool cords and smart smooth-weave fabrics in 
coe set: quarters in watch the convoy pass despite | % es a in ad light to dark tones. 
saipeh about the future course the late hour. 


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snd Nixon had scheduled departure for Bangkok, Thai- | : and shantung-look fabrics. 
az | land in order to have a longer 
Delivers Ike's Letter talk ith the General issimo. | 


Chiang personally by Nixon im pected to stress that the vest! , Rich-textured mohair-worsted blends and luxurious 
mediately after his arrival late pocket war over the offshore | . , é Dacron-worsted tropicals. 
jast night at the Generalissi- islands of Quemoy and Matsu, > , 


, 4 etre Chis hile t ly genet in recent , | 2 : 4 
and. his wie. apparently ‘had months, could still explode dam - | $59.50 & $65 FAMOUS MAKE SUITS 49 


etayed up to greet the touring gero f the Communists | LF Tropical worsted, mohair-worsted, silk-worsted and 


we letter was handed tol In this talk, Chiang was es | : 7 = $49.50 & $55-FAMOUS MAKE SUITS 3 o 


Vice President and his wife Pa ~ sale to att aaie ; at any time His | 
cricia instead of waiting to see view is that the danger can be| 
them at breakiast le nomad only by a firm Ameri- 


en ey : 
After a long flight from Sai,\can commitment to defend ee | ‘a ee e™ $69.75 & $75 Benchwork, Timely Suits 5 9 


Dacron-worsted fabrics. 


gon, capital oc Vietnam, Nixon them. | hes 2 Tropical worsted, mohair-worsted, silk-worsted and 
stepped out of his big Super-| Nixon was expected to as-| i Noes | Dacron-worsted fabrics 
eonstellation at Pine Hill Air- sure Chiang that the Geneva ie as » . 
rt looking fresh and in good talks were directed at the re- y 26} <2 
umor. A crowd applauded lease of Americans still de- a te » we o72.50 to $115 STEIN-BLOCH SUITS 
He was welcomed by Vice tained in Red China, and at Te, Te : t “ : . 
inister George Yeh, U.5. Am- ing of the use of force in the oo AY % Dupioni silks. only 
Bassador Karl L. Rankin, chiefs Formosa area. 3 P 
of U. S. military missions here 
and others. Members of the dip- i 
. Jomatic corps stood in line to Drugs Raids Trap il 
thake hands. | 
Accompanied by Chen and| SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico, 


Rankin, the party left immedi- July 7 “—Seventy-one persons — | : ; \ FURNISHINGS SPORTSWEAR 


stely by car for Chiang’s sum-|were arrested last night and 


itt. wwsindwasa 3 | $3.95 V4 Sleeve Dress Shirts ......... 3.15 $3.95 Cotton Polo Shirts 
were gathered in the street to cotics raids 


io eS . bane | Ps ‘~~ an = $3.95 Summer Dress Shirts ........ 3.15 $3.95 S$. $. Sport Shirts . 


y | See 2 | cao ; $5.95 imported Fabric Dress Shirts .. 4.46 95-95 Imported Batiste Sport Shirts 
a a —— a4 . im if f ~ ° : , 
MAZE ais Sn: a WR :\2 $1.50 te 2.50 Neckwear $1 to 1.69 94-95 Imported Cotton Sport Shirts 

. Ze , J 


$10.95 & 12.95 Femous Make Slacks 


fa @ $1 Stretch Hose (solids, patterns) 
> MARLAN HEIGHTS ; sii 4, : tease $16.50 Dacron and Wool Slacks . .. 


, . “ $2.50D 
CHOICE HOME SITES ; ‘f' oom ; J £ $2.50 Dacron and Cotton Shorts , $55 Pure Silk Sport acts 


| %, | | $1.50 Pima C B ROT iva cadi ts 7 = oe Ony 
ON MT. YERNON BLVD. -« ae ty iP : Pee Re $37.50 Irish Linen Sport Coats 


Close-in Alexandria | im | AS i A At rd $1.25 Fine Combed Cotton T-Shirts... .. 9 at bases ante 
| | ; J & $1 Cotton Argyle Hose : $37.50 Silk and Cotten Sport Coats 29.95 


PF St. Store On! 


For the individual cu 


home. You may choose your Ft a) me) ee aN t $5.95 Cotton Plisse Robes .. 
architect and builder ' : | 


‘+t = om © 


can, Af EN, ! 7 a4 $3.95 Batiste Shorty Pajamas ........ 3. SHOES 
‘ee en: PR SIT — ” oa Ya Ve $9.95 Dacron and Cotton Pajamas $17.95 to 28.95 Bostonians 14.85 to 18.85 

Beautifully wooded half acre lots ' Ss OE ieee > wos BE Men’ 

leith all utilities and peved streets a ia | a Sm mcd ba’ 50c Men's White Handkerchiefs 5 for 1.95 $13.95 te 15.95 Mansfields ......... 11.85 

in an established area of fine homes. : ‘ ~~ | , ee | << 

MARLAN HEIGHTS -% e, \ aa 


CHECK STORE HOURS BELOW 


iwoee 


Directions: Drive south of Alexandria on 
ft. b ernon Bivd te uN est Urove 
entrance, follow signs. 


mt th peeit tite 


CLARENDON 45th YEAR AT NORTHEAST 


3 PAN ig : mW N. Highland St. 1319 F St. N.W. 3942 Minnesota Ave. 
; : | : | , See Pe, 0:8 Open Mon., 9 to 6 Open Mon., 16 te 6 


The ie Realty a! a ‘ | | 1 How's tres parline os accounts CARK 
= s« CORDIALLY REE 4 the YM. Northen & 


. = Purchase o 
— ———_ rr | of $200 or more INVITED Clarendon Suburban Stores 


Til ha ePta. “ 


t 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
and TIMES HERALD 

Sunday, July 8, 1956 

_ AS . 


Farm Hands 
Cry ‘Foul’ 


In Louisiana 


By Bernard D. Nossiter 
, Bie Reporter 


Organized labor's cheers over 
Louisiana's recent repeal of a 
“right-to-work” law has been 
marred by a dissenting note 
from a small farm workers’ 
union. 

The Nafional Agricultural 
Workers’ Union has complained 
to the AFL-CIO command that 
its members were sacrificed by 
Louisiana labor leaders to win 
the repeal. 

The agricultural union has 
charged that these officials 
supported a bill retaining 
“right-to-work” for farm hands 
and some processing employes 
in exchange for repeal for other 
workers. 

Victor Bussie, president of 
the Louisiana State Labor 
Council, said yesterday that 
such a deal was made. But he 
said it left farm workers no 
worse off than they had been, 
that it brought more than 200, 
000 industrial workers out from 


under “right-to-~work” control) 
and was the only way of reach 
ing this objective | 

“Right-to-work” laws bar the. 
union shop by making illegal 
any requirement that union) 
membership be a condition of 
employment. These measures 
are bitterly opposed by labor 
Supporters of the laws call 
them protection against com- 
pulsory unionism. The AFI- 
CIO lists repeal of the 17 laws 
still extant as a major goal. 

Labor’s Louisiana victory is 
tainted, says H. L. Mitchell, 
president of the Agricultural 
Workers, who claim 50,000 
members. Last month, he tele- 
graphed AFL-CIO President 
George Meany and Vice Presi- 
dent Walter Reuther about “the 
sacrifice of agricultural work- 
ers in securing repeal.” Mitch- 
ell complained that they had 
heen used as pawns for the) 
benefit of highly skilled, well! 
paid trade, craft and industrial 
workers 

Meany’'s office said yesterday 
that he had never seen the tele 
gram. Reuther has reportedly) 
promised Mitchell to take up) 
the matter at the next meeting | 
of AFL-CIO leaders | 

Behind the scenes, the farm | 
workers are hoping to get! 
enough labor support to get) 
Gov. Earl Long to veto “right- 
to-work” for farm employes 
Slightly varying versions have 
been passed by Louisiana's two 
houses, and differences are now 
being resolved in committee. 

Mitchell's union claims 5000 
members in Louisiana, Its lead-| 
ers say that singling out farm| 
workers will cripple their hopes | 
for organizing more. They' 
charge the price for repeal was | 
exacted by sugar cane and rice) 
interests. The union is particu- 
larly incensed over provisions 
of the proposed bilis extending 
“right-to-work” to mill em-| 
ployes processing sugar, rice 
and cotton 

Bussie said the agricultural 
union claims are exaggerated.| 
He said the Louisiana Council 
collects per capita dues for) 
only 48 Agricultural Workers 
Union members. | 

“Representatives from farm | 
areas told us,” he said, “they! 
would vote for repeal provided | 
we went along” with a measure | 
to keep farm workers under'| 
“right-to-work.” Without the 
agreement, he said, no repeal| 
would have been possible. He 
added that only a handful of 
processing workers in mills 
would be affected. 

The Mitchell union estimates 
that the deal may have cost it 
up to 50,000 members in sugar 
and rice. Cane-field workers.,| 
says the union, get 60 cents an 
hour; non-union mill workers! 
the $l-an-hour minimum wage 
and union men up to $1.30.' 
Rice-irrigation workers receive | 
about 50 cents an hour, the! 
union figures, with $1 in the! 
non-union and $1.05 to $1.10 in| 
union mills. The more than/ 
100,000 cotton workers are con-! 
sidered virtually union-proof. | 

Bussie contended that the re 
peal will so strengthen the 
rest of labor in Louisiana that 
it will be free to help the Agri- 
cultural Workers to organize 


Information Center 


Gets $105,000 Grant | 


' 

A Ford Foundation grant of 
$105,000 has been made to the 
Center for Information on 
America, it was announced to-| 


day. The grant is for five 
years 

The center, located in Wash-| 
ington, Conn., is a 5-year-old| 
non-profit organization whose! 
purpose is to further knowledge | 
and understanding of America| 
by Americans. The grant will 
be used to strengthen the cen-| 
ter’s instructional and infor. 
mation program, particularly in 
secondary education. | 


a " } 


If you cant 
migrate 


Insulate 


for a cooler home! 


Ne Down Payment. .. 36 
Months te Pay ... For Free 
Edimate .. . 


Call ME. 8-4840 


1413 N. Y. Ave. N.W. 


SAVE ‘41° 


SAVE: 


At All 3 HUB Stores! 


“ fy 


ka 


> 


GENERAL 
jhiapiie 


—————— 
. 


~ - 
one 2 pe ae ; 
at A ” Ads, Pele ra ws ; 


« 
we mr 


7.7 CUBIC FOOT 
GE REFRIGERATOR 


Brand new model Genera! Electric packed with 
deluxe features! Big full width freezer holds up 
to 27 packages. Full width chill tray is for meats, 
cokes. Shelves are adjustable too’ All plus color 


styling, interior lite, 2 cube trays, porcelain in- 
terior, 5-year warranty. 


~-a 


Reg. 
$199.95 
Now Only... 


Liberal Trade-Ins! Free Delivery! 


GENERAL ELECTRIC 
Automatic Washer 


Reg. 
8; $1. QQ-93 
Now Only 


it’s completely automatic from wash, to rinse, to 
damp dry, to shut off! All you do is dial it. 
Features easy top loading . . . amazing GE wash 
action for really clean clothes . . . and it is so 
simple to install. Free delivery! 


Easiest Terms! 


25% TO 70% DISCO 


Specially Priced! 
Dreamrest 
Mattress 


$999.88 


Double or lwin 72 
Only 19 at this } 
yearly low price gee 
Our Reg. $54.95 
>. 
. Hollywood 
Bed 


$3978 


Innerspring 
& box spring on legs. 


<—. 
Ss ~ 
EE 
SSS 
. PS : 


mattress 


Our Reg. $9.95 
Goodyear 
Foam Pillows 


$6 * & 
Solid foam . . . percale bs 


rippered covers 


Our Reg. $59.95 
GE Twin 
Window Fan 


a4” 


Thermostat 


cont ra 
; 


cools several rooms 


Our Reg. $12.95 
te $59.95 


Table Lamps 


V4 off 


Modern and tradition 


Our Reg. $7.95 


Aluminum 


Chair 


$5.88 


Plaid saran plastic seat 
. . tolds flat. 


Our Reg. $5.49 


All Steel 
Porch Chair 


$4.49 


All.metal in green, 


red or yellow enamel 


, 


V/A Our Reg. $14.95 
Lawn Mower 


11 


14° mower with five 
English stéel blades, 
wood handie. 


Our Reg. $29.95 


Wax Birch 
Crib & Spring 


18% 

With droo side and 

adjustable springs. 

Our Reg. $34.95 
Mahogany 
Bookcase 


$9 3°97 


Has double giass 
iT joors, 3 shelves. 
Our Reg. $24.95 


Parquetry 
Top Table 


$1488 


Finished In Attractive 
lumed oak blonde 


— Our Reg. $14.95 

ra Utility 
Cabinet 
$9.84 

z Ali-stee! cabinet in 


white enamel. 
Our Reg. $29.95 


Open Arm 
Rocker 


$19.99 ‘ 
Covered in beautiful > —— 


new metallic fabrics. 


)\)) 


Wh ee 
= 


Our Reg. $29.95 


_ 18" 


: 
Channel back style 
with colorful new 
fabrics. 


: 
t 
Hy 
* 
: 


SOFA-BED SUITES 


169° 108° 
229° 158% 
] 89-95 ] 2 add 
2 39-95 164 .88 

59-95 29% 


2-Piece Sefa Bed Suite 


With flered erms, metelile febrice .. 


Nylon & Foam Suite 


Sete bed & cheir in aview end team 


2-Pe, Wrought iren Suite 


in pink, lime or persimmon febrice . 


Foam Rubber Sleep Sefa 


By ftemows Ecliose in meteliic cover 


Modern Sleeperette Sofa 


in emert meteliic cover, sleeps ene 


Modern Convertible Chair 


Opens te bed, innerspring mettress 


169-75 99°*9 
Lawion hrm io bed 49% 4944 


BEDDING BARGAINS 


Our Reg Now 


69-95 3 8-76 
59-95 34:5 
64-95 44: 
54-95 99-*9 


29-95 21 87 
] 9-95 6°" 
59-95 99-9 


Sealy “Ambassador” 


Deluxe Mottresses, only 27 te sell... 


Eclipse Mattress ae 


Prebullt Borders, only 17 to soll 


“Eclipse” Smooth Top @ 


Prebwilt inneripnng maeftress 


“Syicon” Mattress 


Prebullt berders, fine ticking, ben 
springs te metch Only 14 te soll 


Rell-Away Bed Outfit 


Metel bed with mettress, folds wo 


39” Headboard with Lite 


Upholstered in plestic, very sturdy 


Sealy & Eclipse Mattress 


Only 16 of this low price! 


Dining Room Suites 
Our Reg 


299-75 
249° 188 
249° «+178 


6-Pc. Modern Suite 


limed eck or chercee! modern finish 


Mahogany Dining Reem 


Teble, 4 choirs, bullet ar chine 


Limed Oak Dining Reem 


Teble, 4 choirs, buffet or chine .... 


T-Pc. Ash Dining Room 


Buffet, chine, teble end 4 cheire 


44995 298° 
on Coton is toy an 449% $348 


RUGS OF ALL KINDS 


Our Reg 


325° 


168 


5x15 Plaid Fibre Rugs 


Assorted petterns. 7th & D enly 


27x54-Inch Fibre Rugs 


Discentinved petterns! 7th & BD enly 


9x12 Fine Chenille Rugs 


Beautiful colers. 7th & D only 


69-95 
6x9 Felt Base Rugs 


8-95 
Beovtiful colers. 7th & D only - 


9x12 Axminster Rugs 69-95 


Teone-on-tone design, thick pile ... 


9x12 Felt Base Rugs , 7-95 


in beovtiful new tiles & flerels 


Our Reg 


69-95 


69-95 
49-95 


99-95 
129-78 
89-95 


5-Pe. Black Iren Dinette 


30x 40x48 table, 4 metching cheirs 


5-Pc. Chrome Dinette 


Piestic top extension table, 4 plastic 
ond chreme choirs 


5-Pc. Wrought Iren Set 


lLimed Ook Plestic Tes Teble. 


5-Pc. Big Chrome Dinette 


Medern Chrome 364860 Teable—4 
Heevy Chreme Cheirs 


7-Pe. Giant Size Dinette 


3448260 extension chrome teble, § 
side ond | erm cheir 


5-Pc. Chrome Dinette 


3040x060 extension table, 4 colorful 
matching cheirs . ; a> te ot 


Our Reg 


69-95 
89-95 
] 39-95 
54:95 


Foam Hollyweed Bed 


Foam cush:oned innerspring mottress . 


Sealy Hellywood 


Mattress god bex spring on lege ... 


Eclipse Hellyweed Bed 


Orthe-fiem welt, extre fine quelity.. 


Maple Bunk Bed Outfit 


Twe beds, 2 springs, lodder, rail... 


Limed Oak Bunk Bed 


Selid cok with rich lime finish 


. oe 
Maple Spee! Bunk Beds 


98-95 
Solid maple in levely Celenic!l style 


SUMMER FURNITURE 
Folding Aluminum Chaise vr Peo 


Hes seren plostic sect, folds far 34-95 


Folding Aluminum Chair 


18.strep seren plastic soot, folds ... 9-95 


Hammock with Stand 1495 


Muliteoler febricea, hes headrest 
69-95 


18” Power Lawn Mower 
59.95 


6-*4 
to 
54% 
46+ 


Gasoline engine with retery bledes . 


Famous Bunting Glider 


With colorful, innerspring eushions .. 


py wg KFS Fee 
: =, oo © PPD 
"ide I 
: 7 b/ Lf Le " 
ec $ we ‘ 
“Wy, , “4 
" “7 q sa 


£ 
‘- 


3 


bs am “"’. ‘' 


Stores Comple 


Bargains! Bargains! BARGAI 
sands of dollars in the BIGGES 
Washington! We made huge 
display samples. Here's every 
at Lowest prices. 


4-Pc. Double Dresser Bedroom 


98° 


Modern 
pane! 
tadie 


fiver Reg. 


5 i £9 9 r 


3-Piece Limed Oak Bedroom 


Deluxe double dresser 


bookcase bed and chest 


in lovely med oak bionde 
Smart new modern design 


Our Rez. 
$249.95 


178 


6-Pc. Limed Oak Dining Room 


Modern extension table 
chairs and chrome of cher 
capinet or butte? 


buftet or china 


Our Reg. 


$249.95 


7-Piece King Size Dinette 


30x48x60" chrome table. 


arm char and 5 side chairs 


im two-tone rec and grey 


or chartreuse and grey 


Our Reg. 
$99.95 


$69" 


2-Piece “Rowe” Living Room 


Luxurious new sofe and 
arm chair in modern me- 
tellic fabrics. Choose in 
rose or turquoise. 


~ 
“fn 


Our Reg. 
249.95 


159 


7th AND 


Re ae LU 


RLY SALE’ 


ely Air-Conditioned! 


S! The Hub saves you thou- 
DISCOUNT Sale ever seen in 
purchases of close-outs and 
hing you need in furniture— 


2-Pc. Nylon Living Room Suite 


184 


some Lawson arm 

gota ‘and lounge chair in 

cautitwul red, oréen or 

beige nylon. Sofa Bed 
te also available 


Our Reg. 


$249.95 


“Dreamrest’ Innerspring Mattress 


> ag 


This is @ good innerspring Salk 


Priced! 


mattress Dy leading maker 


Double or 


twrn size 


Modern Lawson Sleep Sofa 


its @ comfortable sota in 
128” 


Our Reg. 
$189.95 


beautiful tapestry. Opens 
to @ double bed with 
nerspring mattress 


2-Pc. Modern Sofa Bed Suite 


s sofa and arm chair in s¢ 9. 94 


Our Reg. 
$149.95 


modern fabrics make a 
heautrtul living room. Sota 
nens to big double bec 


2-Pc. tee Rubber Sectional Sofa 


Two matching sectionals in "1 188 


Our Ree. 
$219.95 


lovely grey or lime lurex 
fabrics. Has genuine solid 
foam rubber cushions. 


3-Piece Walnut Bedroom 
Pe. $i Starlite Bedroom 


se dresser ches = chest, boor 


French Provincial Suite 
na pere! bed 
3. Piece Walnut ‘Bedroom 
Dresser. mirrer. chest. end sare! bed 
Double Dresser Suite 
3 pieces in cordeven or timed ook 
Pearl 3-Pe, Bedroom 
Modern dresser, ches boekrose bed 
Coral Mahogany Bedroom 
Trigle dresser. chest, bookease bed 
Charcoal Modern Suite 
bookcase bed 


Triole dresser, chest 


LIVING ROOM SUITES 


2-Pc. Nylon & Foam Suite - 


Modem design, very comiortebic 


2-Pc, Living Reom 


In smert new vuitra modern fabrics 


2-Pco, Lawson Arm Suite 


Ped. oreee, beioe lon, foem seats 


Matellasse Georgian Sofa 


oe foom seet 


California Bi Modern Suite 
Wreught iron Outfit. 


obD'es 


2 Pe. Sectional Sota 
Krochier Sectional Sofa 


Te sections. in metallic woo! boule 


Or 


; Reg 


229-85 


979-95 
359-95 
209-75 
239-95 
209-95 
368-75 
449-5 


Our Reg 


999-95 
169-75 
298-95 
249-5 
399-95 
149-%5 
349-95 
349-79 


BEDROOM SUITES 


Now 


+166 


+169 
‘278 
+139 
*188 
*158 
$248 
$298 


7178 
“128 
*188 
*138 
+276 
98° 
$248 
$244 


CHAIRS A ALL KINDS” 


Modern Tweed se 


in off colers, fimed ook finish erm 
Modern Armless Chair 
Ebory legs, richly colored fabrics 
Modern Cccasienal Chair 


tweed of Wefeilic o'er ™ govers 


Metallic Lounge Chair 


lowsen opm. Hich mete! 


Lawsen Arm Lounge Chr. 
Mos thick T-coslien, domosk ftobrics 


Tweed Contour Chair 


Wonderfully relexing’ Ped of oreen 


Plastic Top Tables 


( »oose ocata ee toble 


Leather & Mahogany 


cro er tee 


18th Century Tables 


‘> rosewood Porcer . 


Big Plastic Tep Tables 
Parquetry Top Tables 


emo & steo in ed ook 


Limed Oak Tables 


end erd cocktoi! tebies 


Famous Duchess Washer 
Toke 8-ib. load, hes sofet ringer 


Whirlpeo! Automatic 


’ weenes, frinees, Crees 


Frigidaire Washer 


Frigidaire Dryer 
GE Automatic Dishwasher 


Srend sew mode y veror teed 


. 39. 95 


29°95 
44-95 
39-95 
49-95 
69-%° 


21°95 
99-95 
34-95 
29-95 
24-95 
19-95 


O sf Reg 
109-79 


249-95 


239-95 
] 79-95 
999-95 


Now 


24 
18° 
26° 
27-29 
29-% 
39° 


- TABLES OF ALL KINDS 


Our 


188s °*° 


189-5 
108-7 
1495 


TELEVISION VALUES 


Emerson W Series Ww 


Brand new . te & a 


Sparton 21 Series TV 


Beoutiful moh gor <corso'e com: ret 


Emerson 21 Series TV 


Finest TY recent 


Bendix 21 Series TV 


Brond mew toble mode! erd boxe 


Admiral TV- Combination 


TV set 


. BDiee@e consew 


Raaie mene end 3! 


Bendix a Series TV 


1o'e caobire? 


)REFRIGERATOR BUYS 


C 


Famous Make 


1 i Cu. Ft. . Frigidaire 


yeor worronty 


Broo new, 5 


Admiral Refrigerator 


? cengcty breond teu mode 


g, 1 Cu. Ft. Frigidaire 


De'vxe model, hes tets of spooce 


ur Reo 


189-%° 
239.95 
459-95 
299.95 
629-95 
249-*° 


249-9 
195-95 
] 89-95 
259-95 


Frigidaire Refrig. Freezer 369-95 
Huge 10.3 cu.ft. copecity, brend new 


STORES SINCE 1902 


D STS. 


18° 
166° 
298° 
169-° 
388° 
186° 


167° 
136° 
147° 
199. 
268° 


\ ARLINGTON STORE 


Our Reg. $12.95 
te $24.95 


Nite Tables 


$ 5-88 


Assorted styles left 
over from saute: 


Our Reg. $29.95 
te $39.95 


Twin Beds 


Our Reg. $199.95 


6 Cu. Ft. 
Refrigerator 


$7 16° 


Brand New 
Samples 


Fleor 


Our Res. 8369.95 
10.3 Cu. Ft. 
Frigidaire 


‘268 


Muge capacity af an 
amazing low price! 


Our Reg. $49.95 
9x12 Cotton 


Lime, green or beige. 
Very long wearing. 


Our Reg. $14.95 


Double Door 
Wardrobe 


$] T .88 


ll-metal in rich 
brown enamel finish 


Our Reg. $8.95 


16-Piece 
Linen Set 


$386 hs 


Sheets, cases, cloths, 
and towels by Cannon. 


Our Reg. $249.95 


8 Cu. Ft. GE 
Refrigerator 


$] 58-°° 


Brand 
Electric 


new General 
Guaranteed 


——e Our Reg. $189.95 


T egeteygarane 
i 


— 


————— 


Our Reg. $239.95 
Sparton 
21 Series 
Console TV 


"166° 


Big picture in maho- 
gany console cabinet 


1 1 
° 
> 


f y 
Our Reg. $279.95 


Automatic 
GE Washer 


$7 99°" 


Washes, rinses, damp 
dries automatically 


Our Reg. $19.95 


Venetian 
Mirror 


$9.99 


Fine plate gcless . 


has 2-way hangers. 2 


Emerson 17 
Series Table TV 


118° 


Compact portable TV 
big 17 series screen 


Our Reg. $89.95 


Wringer 
Washer 


+68*° 


Brand new model by 
farnous maker! 


a 


Our Reg. $229.95 
Whirlpool 
Dryer 


108° 


Automatic elect: 
dryer, brand new! 


Save on Famous 


3-Speed, Turnabout 


WINDOW FAN 
Our Reg. 


$64.95 549-79 


With 3000 c.f.m. Capacity 


This powerful window, fan cools several large 
rooms quickly and quietly! It blows hot, stale 
air out... reverse it with a flip of the finger 
and it pulls cool outside air in. Operates at 3 
speed F »ws 2612 to 3634" wide. 


No Money Down! 


At All 3 HUB Stores! 


-e« os 
WitiG 


‘Chelsea’ 


20” Window Fan 


With 2600 c.f.m. Capacity 
Our Reg. 


$49.95 $9) 9-88 


it’s an BEENG value at this low, low price! Cools 
several big rooms and operates so quietly. Pow- 
erful 20-inch blade blows out the hot stale air 

. . pulls in cool air outdoors. Has 2 speeds, 
fingerproof safety fits windows 26 5/8” 


to 36%" wide 


No Money Down! 


guard, 


Easiest Credit Terms! 


FREE Electric 
20-INCH WINDOW FAN 


Our Reg. $49.95 
of a switch. has three 


speeds. Guaranteed! 3 hi 


No Money Down: 


Biows out hot sir, 
pulls in cool air like 
magic! it is electri- 
cally reversible at flip 


THE WASHINGTON POSi 
and TIMES HERALD 


Sunday, July 8, 1956 
: AQ. 


Guardsmen 


Begin Yearly: 


Training 


Nineteen-hundred D. C. Na- 
tional Guardsmen left Washing- 
ton early today for two-week 
training periods at Bethany 
Beach, Del., and Indiantown 
Gap, Pa. 

The 260th Anti-Aircraft Artil- 
lery Group will train 700 men 
at Bethany Beach. They will en- 
gage in target practice with the 
120-millimeter anti-aircraft gun, 
firing at radar detected targets. 
The remainder of the men will 
go to Indiantown Gap Military 
Reservation to receive training. 

Units at Indiantown Gap will 
include the 163d and I7ist Mili- 
tary Police Battalions, 140th 
Engineer Battalion, 91st Army 
Band, 115th Evacuation Hos- 
pital, 102d Ordnance Company 
and the Headquarters Detach- 
ment, D. C. National Guard. 

On July 15 the 317th Infantry 
Regiment, largest Army Re- 
serve Unit in the District, will 
begin its annual two weeks’ 
summer training at Indiantown. 

Approximately 500 officers 
and men will participate in a 


three-day and two-night bivouac 
under combat conditions. With 
a tank company, they will as- 
sault fortified positions with 
live ammunition. 

The remainder of the week 
will include weapons training 
and testing. The regiment will 
return to Washington July 28. 


it takes money 

to take trips. 
Money accumulates 
fast in your liberal 
dividend-paying 
savings account 


at Columbia Federal. 


CALL REpublic 
7-7 

FOR YOUR 

POSTAGE-FREE 

SAVE-BY-MAIL 

ENVELOPES 


FREE PARKING 


INSURED SAVINGS 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 


_A 19 


Sunday. 


July 8, 1956 


eR 


BERLIN, July 7 ®—The tet 
lish Communistic Party today) 
took the blame for the Poznan | 
revolt in a breast-beating con- 
fession of “irregularities” and 
“mistakes” that apparently pro- 
vides the basis for the current 
purge of party members, gov- 
ernment officials and police in 
the tense city. 
| The rioting reportedly result- 
ed in 500 deaths and injuries 
to 2000 

It its efforts to soothe dis- 
satisfied workers, the Party ac- 
cused the local leaders of ne- 


giecting to heed legitimate com- 
plaints. The president of Po- 
lana, meanwhile, promised new 


Polish Reds Take Blame | 
For Revolt; Purge Looms 


freedom in “ever-growing meas- 
ure” for all citizens. 
Western travelers arriving in 


Berlin from Poland said the 


purge of those authorities who 


either supported the rebels in 


last week's uprising or who 
failed to crack down -quickly 
enough had filled prison cells 
with, “seores” of Party mem- 
bers, union officials and police 
officers. 

They said security police 
made wholesale arrests in a 
series of raids on the homes of 
suspect officials 

More arrests are being made 
daily and as many as 3,000 per- 
sons, both rebels and official 
supporters, have 
they said, 


TH 
Thi« 


Spike or 
Sma! 
Sizes Ooniy 


labor 


SPECIAL! 


Ladies’ 


HEEL LIFTS 


| Cuban 29: 
E PRICES MONDAY ONLY 
amazing price 
and 


ncludes a 


your ch ce prime 


leather or durable composition 


ut Vamps 


fe WOMEN 
Cc 


2.50] 


been jailed, | 


PUBLIC AUCTION 


Valuable Collection of Silver 


4 from the 


GUSTAVE WERNER COLLECTION 


139 E. 57th St., N.Y.C. 


valued at ‘75,000°" 


MANHATTAN’S PIONEER SILVERSMITHS 


Comprising 
/ AMERICAN, ENGLISH & 
CONTINENTAL ANTIQUE SILVER 


. 


to be sold at 


STUART KINGSTON GALLERIES 


Rehoboth Beach, Delaware 


Commencing Monday 


July 9th at 8:00 P.M. 


Sales held nightly except Sunday 
until October Ist. 


wy vic Cusameniemastreotowrsooes | THE HECHT CO. DOWNSTAIRS STORE 


Washington Store Only 


Call RE. 7-1234, ask for Circulation, and order The Wash- 


third-fl led tsid 
attempt to Sump test mga’ Sem & “~ «eee , ingten Post and Times Herald guaranteed home delivery. 


his room in the Grant Building at Soldiers Home. 


-————— +--+ ee C—™ 


MEMBERS OF NO. 2 
disabled 


RESCUE SQUAD prepare to lift a 
veteran onte a stretcher after thwarting his 


eee 


- ee a — — — —— 


‘Firemen 


Thwart Leap| lf 
By Veteran 


A disabled veteral 
on the f his 
room mn the 


’ 
if dge 0 
Sold 


ground 
against 
gashed | 

The vetera 
he had been « 
ly. He said 
briefivy at abou 
when he ; 
mate Was on | 
“I'm going to end 


Labor Party 


Tells Wealth 
Sharing Plan 


F 
LONDON. July 7—In 
jor poll 
ish Labor 
a farre 
weal 
enact ine 


hee 


tatement. 1 B 
Party today outline 


Woe 
wealth 
bene! 
many 


> RrOoOW it 

numerous, ownership and sav 
ing becOme mo! idespread 

The Party als aid it was 
considering a tax on spending 
for the “wealth minority 
those with annual incomes o 
over 2000 pounds ($5600 But 
the Party confessed the scheme 
may prove impractical 

To transfer private | 
to public ownership, | 
warned it might 
duty 
cash.” 


In propert 


Argentina Police Seize 
Arms in Raid; 12 Held 
LA PI 


ATA, Argentina. Jul 
‘Z ? rrovineia ; : : 
police arrested 12 pe 
coniiscate 
ply of arn 
aganaa 
Banfield 7 
In disc! 
in a contil 
actions aga 
porters of 1 
Juan D. Peron 
tive counter-revoli 
in June, authorities 
ther detaiis. 


Radio Grant Stayed 
For Leesburg Station 


ia‘ed Press 

The Con ations Com- 
mission yes rday temporaril 
stayed its von of last : 
to Richard Rield Lewis Jr. fo 
a new 1290-kilocycle radio sta 
tion at Leesburg. Va 

The Commission said it « 
have to determine 
station would interfere with 
1280-kilocycle Station WHVR 
Hanover, Pa., which is curr: 
applying for a | 
increase, 


whet 


Slain by Red Guard 


BERLIN, July 7 ®—A Com- 
munist East German policeman 
ghot and killed a West Berliner 
today at a border control point, 
the East German radio an- 
nounced, 


ENTIRE STORE AIR CONDITIONED FOR YOUR SHOPPING PLEASURE’ | 


i 


Jans Lansburgh frit Co, 900 7 ; 


THE BIG FURNITURE STORE GROWS BIGGER AND BIGGER 


Julius Lansburgh EXPANDS anil The Bates Jewelry Co. 


moves out... and JL takes the whole street floor of the big 


Ninth and F Street building. That's not all! We're remodeling 
the entire store, too! That means thousands of dollars in brand- 


new furniture on our floors must be sold immediately to make 


room for the workmen. Prices are slashed storewide 20% to 
70% off in the most spectacular giveaway of really fine furni- 
ture Washington has ever seen, Many famous names reduced 


for first time. Only a few of the hundreds of items listed! All 
for immediate delivery only! Starts tomorrow, 9:30 a.m. 


All Sales Final! Sale at F St. Store Only! No Mail or Phone Orders! 


All Neass ‘Subject to a Sale 


SAVE FROM 
20% TO 70% 


Open Daily 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Thursday 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. 


Rare Aspen Woed 40° Console Table 
68° Acacia Buffet 
Genuine Aspen Wood Extension Table 
6-Piece Modern Dinette Set. so 

hairs with spring seat 
choice of rdovan mahog. 
Solid Birch 7-Piece Dinette Swite 
Solid Feudal Oak 7-Piece Dinette Swite 
glass china lg 
Twin-size Hollywood Bed with woven tick- 
ing . , -¥ 
33” Duplex Bed by Simmons .. 
Viking Oak Kneehole Desk ........-- 295.00 
Ottoman-Bed, grey 
metallic tapestry 120.00 
100% Nylon and Seon Rubber Cushioned 
Innerbed by [Eclipse 
Regency Konvertible Bed i Karpen, in 
tine matelasse (‘sorled) . 
Lawson-Style lnnerbed in mo 


ww rh , wr 


complete with bolster 


299.00 


398.95 


jern tweed 


Modern Satinwood 6-Drawer Chest 

Pink and White Kitchen Cabinet and hutch 
top, on wrought-iron legs 
All-Weel, 3-Ply Twist, 
Sa. Yd. 

American Oriental Patterns, 
Cotton 


grey, green or 


beige 
Hook Rugs, avai'ladie 


Wool Face Axminster Rugs, assort 
9 ~ 2 


. Viking Oak Bedroom Set 

nand-tooied 

ple dresser 
stano—'ess 


leather 
cnest on 
tran 


Genuine Nylon 2-Piece French Provincial 
Sectional Seta, Grand Rapids Made 
Antique White 3-Piece French Provincial 
Bedroom Swite (dresser and mirror, chest 
full-size bed) .. : eka 
Solid Mahogany Shemmniteidiead 
Panel Bed 

60” 18th varsitid peheaiiad Samal and 

Mirror 298.00 178.94 
Walnut Twin-size Cane Back Bed 200.00 36.88 


595.00 299.78 


"489.00 269.85 


Full-size 
79.95 47.42 


18th Century Mahogany Open Stock 
DINING ROOM 
| 54” Buffer 
| 62” Buffer 
| 53° Breakfront China 
| Corner China 
| 38x53" Extension Table 
od «64° Extension Table 


taxes 


Custom-Made Antique ‘White Living Room 
Tables, gold decorated hand-painted tops 
48” Cocktail Table 1299S 69.88 


129.95 69.88 


Regency Crotch Mahogany Breakfront with 


mirror doors 
3.Piece Medern Sectional Sefa by Kr 


ler 


Modern 2-Piece Sectional Sefa, deep tufted 


ck, foam rubber Dumper cusmwons 


Ts atid Mahogany Regency Cocktail Table, 


5 nand-tooled leather top 


Mahogany Regency Carved Twin Bed .. 


French Provincial 52°° Breakfront, genuine 


Acacia 


Regency Mahone Occasional Chair, elab- 


Orately carved frame 
Genuine Rattan 
saiicioth cover 
Heywood-Wakefield 2- Steals Rattan 
tional Sofa 


prone Provincial ‘Console Pao 


) Cenaine Top Grain Leather Lounge 


Slee Walnut and White 18° 4-Drawer 


Bachelor Chest 

Regency Mahogany Bedroom Suite, 72° 
triple dresser with murror, chest-on-chest 
+f. size peo 


a yea Provincial Fruitweed Side Chair 


Rubber 


cnartreuse Drocatelie 


Seta, 


Aqua Lounge Chair—Foam cushion, | 00° 


Cheney nylon 
60” 18th Century Mahogany Buffet 
30° Trundle Bunk Bed, 


springs, mattresses, ‘adder 


compiete 
guard rai 


t OPEN STOCK 
| Modern Grey Bedroom Suite 
| Single Dresser and Mirror .. 
| Triple Dresser and Mirror 
Chest . 
j Modern Limed Oak Knechole Desk .. 
| Panel Bed, full or twin size 
| Nite Table . 


Lee ee ee ee ee oe ee oe 


ulius Lanshurgh furniture 6 


Our Reg 


een 


3-Piece Living Reom 


Sec- 
249.00 158.45 


rare 


1295.00 744.00 


Sale 
Price Price 

Custom-Made 
795.00 344.00 


spring 


499.95 378.91 twin beds 


695.00 448.91 


| 
120.00 48.44 | 


charcoal, 
on-chest 


250.00 aiae 
795.00 289.95 
149.00 49.95 


"229.00 174.12 writing pad 


349.00 98.62 


i 
249.95 154.40 ! 


149.00 68.63 
2-Piece 
trarne 


ber cushions 
Nylon Covered 


| cusrMons 


89.95 22.74 | 


9.drawer van ry 
seat bDenc? 


French Provincial 
Vetted Back Twin Bed, soiled 


Mahogany-Finish Kneehole Desk 
—_ Cherry Victorian Organ € Desk 


Regency Lounge Chair 
Huge Regency Fan-Back Chair 78.00 1 
Modern 


Barrel-Back Chair, ful! 


Bedroom. 


handsome 


18th Century 
ang mirror 
chest-on-chest two 
Antique ivory 
329.90 


Thomasville 3-Piece Modern ‘Bedroom 
triple dresser and mirror 
tull-size bookcase bed 
Eclipse Extra-Firm Box Spring, twin 
Lawson High Back Lounge Chair, 
ity brocatelle cover 

Fan-Back Chaise Lounge 

French Provincial Lady's Desk with leather 


nmest- 


size 69.95 
tine qual - 

119.95 
119.95 


89.95 
49.95 


Hepplewhite Bedroom 


189540 $88.60 


49.44 


469.00 299.60 


38.44 


68.77 
64.78 


69.95 
34.82 


78.00 148.72 


11900 Fos 
189.00 129.8 


78.00 1 


Sectional Sefa, biond 


23.10 
27.16 


270.00 126.00 


Mahogany Frame Lounge Chair with rub- 


129.95 
Lewnge Chair, foam rubber 


wed construct 


2-Piece Wide Arm Genuine Rattan Living : 


T-Cushion Lawson-Style 
4 


229.00 7 


| 27x54" Rug Samples, cotton 


19.95 
139.95 
rr 


140.00 


woo!s Axminster 


Solid Mahogany Victorian Loveseat 


No deliveries 


2-Piece Foam Rubber Sectional Sofa, sage 


green 


189.95 132.71 
89.95 66.71 
59.95 44.72! 
49.95 34.65 | 
44.95 29.92 


| 
124.95 89.75 7 
! 
| 


Room . 
6-Piece Bleck 
buffet, table. 


.. Open Daily, 9:30 a.m. to 6 


FREE PARKING 


909 F STREET N.W 


Famous for Furniture Since 1878 


Thursdays, 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. 


nner cushions 


30” Black Console Table 


429.95 


Wing-Back American Provincial Sofa, foam 


91.75 


$4.10 
49.88 


66 00 


250.00 196.40 
299.98 


329.00 224. on 


Web Constructed 2-Piece T-Cushion Living 


298.95 
and White Dinette 
4 chairs) 

69.95 


168.00 
398 00 °298.00 


39.88 


(Aa 


pD.m..., 


ARLINGTON STORE 


Corner Wilson Blvd. & Randolph St. 
Parkington Shopping Center 
Open Tues., Wed. and Sat., 


10 a.m. to 9 p.m. 
Mon., Thurs. and Fri, 
10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m, 

FREE PARKING 


Sale 
Price 


Our Reg. 
Price 
Colony Court by Glebe, Grip Arm Lown 
Chair and Ottoman 
Modern Rubber Cushion Lounge Chair 
Modern Armless Occasional Chair 


ge 
119.95 69.92 
149.00 69.91 
59.95 34.87 


, Odd Lot of Regency Mahogany Mirror 
j Frames, elaborately carved; some wn- 

tirusmed; less than manutacturers cost | 
i 

8500 6.50 ! 

Nylon Matelasse Lounge Chair, 
T-Cushion 99.00 59.87 
Modern Tight Seat Lounge Chair, toast 
color 99.00 58.79 
Hepplewhite Black Frame Occasional Chair 89.95 37.46 
Your Choice of Mahogany-Finish Tables, 
, End, Step, Drum, Cocktail, each 19.88 


Lamp 


by j 
250.00 177.99 j 


Modern Limed Oak Dropleaf Table, ex- 

tends to take one 12° leaf, complete with 
mode! home sample 149.95 88.12 
| imported Perobs French Bedroom Set ' 
9-Drawer Vanity and Mirrer, Huge i 
| Chest on Chest, Hand-Tufted Back, / 
| Bed, Bench and Nite Stand 1895.00 795.00 

Modern 7-Piece Cherry Dinette | Set ‘buf- 

table, 3 side chairs, | arm 
498.95 297.49 

with bol 
114.95 79.95 


fet cruna, 
rrair e* 
Studio, complete 
sleep two ‘as is) 
Modern Lounge Chair by Karpen. Beige 

ver with black frame 169.95 118.56 
peated Leunge 5-Piece Dinette Set 
round table, 4 captain's 

hairs upholstered in leather 500.00 298.00 
é pees Black and White 

ftet,. tabie, 4 chairs 


30° Black Console Table _ 


Innerspring 
ter ooerv * 


ina oax 


Willet Wildwood Cherry Dining Room and Bedroom 
Furniture—10 % OFF 


eee em me! 


Marble Top Cocktail 
119.95 69.87 


Selid Mahogany 
Table 
Biack-Lacquered Chinese Decorated 9-Pc. 
Dining Room Swite (buffet, china, t 
4 side chairs, 2 arm chairs) .. 
7-Piece Cordovan Mahogany 
nette Set (buffet, china, 
chairs 

Silver Fox 5-Piece Dinette Se. 
Grey Mahogany Wardrobe ...... 
2-Piece Sectional Sofa, charcoal 
‘26 (CS 

3-Cushion Sofa in figured linen cover 
Casual Cherry Modern Pembroke Table 
5-Pc. Twin Bed 
Bedroom Swite, Dowble Dresser, Chest, 2 

Twin Size Beds 398.00 288.06 
Silver Fox 5-Piece Dinette Set . - 1499S 99.87. 
Grey Mahogany Wardrobe ..«+ 129.95 $9.08 
Medern 7-Piece Cherry Dinette Set (buf- 
fet, china, table, 3 side chairs, | arm 


chair) 498 6.95 297.49 


Provincial Fruitwood and ores } 
its, 2 side chairs 249.95 98.73 i 


SET ine eee by “Karpen. 
et bs 118.56 


table, 
1295.00 895.00 
Junior Di. 
table, 4 side 
349.95 287.49 
149.95 9947 
...129.95 59.88 
grey, 
349.95 178.42 
289.95 216.40 
69.95 43.95 


cover with Diack frame 


=x 


a 


Honest-Poll 
Bill Chances 


Grow Dim 


By Robert C. Albright 
Staff Reporter 

With congressional adjourn- 
ment about three weeks away, 
the Johnson-Knowland honest 
elections bill, once formally in- 
dorced by 90 per cent of the 
Senators, appears in dire dan- 
ger of being lost in the rush. 

The corrective legislation, 
designed to substitute modern-| 
day campaign expenditure re-| 
porting machinery for the out-| 
moded corrupt practices law,| 
has made virtually no progress | 
since the party floor}! 
leaders jointly introduced it 
four month’ ago | 

Senate Majority Lea der| 
Lyndon B. Johnson (D-Tex.) is | 
represented by members of his 
staff as still hoping to overcome 
some of the obstacles to passage 
that have developed around in-| 
dividual provisions. But sup-! 
porters of the bill say time is! 
running out, particularly since 
no action whatever has been 
taken in the House 


To Seek Action 


two 


Art Class 


In the next few days Johnson 
ts expected to contact some of 
the key Sepators interested in 
Various aspects of the legisla- | 
tion for a check4ip on the out- 
look for passage There is even | 
& possibility the bill will wind 
up in session-end hearings. to 
satisfy requests made by labor'| 
leaders and some other groups 

The bill was launched with 
the multiple-backing of 85 of! 
the 96 Senators in early March | 
a the height of the furor 
raised by Sen. Francis Case's! 
disclosure that a lawyer inter-| 
ested in passage of the natural! 
gas bill tried to contribute 25 | 
$100 bills to his South Dakota 
campaign 

The bipartisan-backed leader. 
was referred to the 
Senate Rules Committee, which 
earlier had reported a much 
more drastic measure by Sen 
Thomas C. Hennings Jr. (D-Mo.)! 
overhauling the Federal elec 
tion laws. The Johnson bill still 
is pending in the Rules Com-' 
mittee, but could be called up! 
directly in the Senate as a sub 
stitute for the Hennings bill 
now on the calendar 


ship bil 


The summer school art class of D. C. 
Teachers’ College held an outdoor art ses- 
sion on the banks of Reck Creek, near the 
Park Police lodge house yesterday. Fifteen 


Miss Jean McCann found a quiet spot | by t the he quiet creek, 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
Sunday, July 8, 1956 A 11 


By Wally McNamee. Staf{ Photographer 


Invades Rock Creek Park 


students attended, some bringing along the 
wife and children to make it a family out- 
ing. Above, the brush-wielders put down 
in paint maeral impression of the creek. 


Adlai to Have 
Va. Delegates 
As Supporters 


RICHMOND, Va.. July 7 @ 
Adiai Stevenson will have the 
support of a majority of Vir- 

. iginia’s delegates to the Demo-| 
cratic National Convention. sev-| 
eral state party leaders agreed 
today. 

The Virginia delegation will 
follow its traditional course and 
go to Chicego uninstructed 

But growing sentiment for 
Stevenson appeared sufficient 
ifor the prediction by several of 
jhis leading supporters that the 
iformer Illinois governor will be 
ifar stronger this year within 
i state delegation than in 
] 


_ 


At the moment. Stevenson's! 


Heart feature of the bill is a 
modernized campaign expendi 
ture report ing system. The bill The Gallup Poll 
sets “realistic” new ceilings on 
contributions and spending 
No campaign committee could 
spend in the name of a candi- 
date without specific authority 
from him 

Another a 
equal opportunit 
political par 
and televisi 
age wide 
anotner 


provides 
for major; 
to ei ain radio 
ntime. To encour 
public participation,| 
provision exempts 
from taxer campéign ¢ontridu-| 
tionse of up to $100. An alter- 
native proviso would provide a 
flat $10 tax credit small 
conil 1.erTs 


Obstacles Listed 


g the reported “obdsta- 
ssage are (1) objec- 
labor leaders to 

ly “author- 

collect 


ties 


Director. Almerics 
Pu 


PRINCETON, N, 


for 
convinced that, part from Pres-| 


is no factor now on the politi-| 
cal hoizon that might spell 
defeat for an Eisenhower-N ixon 
ticket in November, three out 
of every 10 can see some pos-| 
sible dark clouds ahead. 
The top three roadblocks to 
° a GOP victory, these leaders!) 
GOP Senators that would have |say, are complacency, the farm 
the effect of preventing labor problem and a recession. 
unions from making political) Views of the Republican| 
contributions with money col-' county leaders were sought by 
lected as dues, (3) objections by means of a confidential ballot 
some network spokesmen to sent to 2900 chairmen whose 
the bill's provisions on radio names were obtained from offi- | 
and TV time and (4) a proposed cial GOP sources. To date re-| 
amendment limiting the plies have been received — 
amount of campaign funds that! 1535 
can cross state lines The ffrst question in today’ s| 
Supporters of early action survey read as follows 
arcue that only by bringing the “If Eisenhower and Nixon are! 
hill to the floor can all of these the Republican candidates for 
llateral questions be solved President and Vice Paneer, 
he normal legislative man- can you thimk of any jac . 
in this way at least other nen Eisenhower's health. 
bill could be which ght cause their defeat?” | 
this session, late as' Of the 1535 Republican coun-| 
the hour is. w chairmen, 


lise 


Md. Delegates Favor Adlai 
If Estes Loses Ist Ballot | 


Maryland's delegation to the Baltimore City College with 
Democratic National Conven- the Missour! Senator in 1916. | 
tion. bound by law to vote for -— ~ ee City College with 
Bctes Kefauver on the first iliiam C. Abell of Indian 
ballot. will probably cast its 18 Head said he thought Syming- 
votes for Adlai Stevenson if the | ton and Gov. Averell Harriman 
Tennessee Senator doesn't get Ae BN ye. 

, 
» oe cong ae both the North and the South. 

In an informal poll of the John Wood Logan, delegate 
state’s 36 delegates to the con-~ from the Eastern Shore. sald he 
vention. it was found that a al of Te Sen. Lyndon B. Johnson 
none Sereres switching O Del lone Cesce 
3 Kefauver was the lone candi- om came > ie he felt the 

ate o h rimary ticket iniee”. — 

- ed ow people voted for lennesse Senator 

him than for an ufinstructed 
delegation Under Maryland 
law. therefore, the delegates 
must back Kefauver on the first \ 
baliot i 

After Stevenson the choices 
ewitched to Stuart Symington, 
Senator from Missouri and for- 
mer Baltimorean 

Mavor Thomas D'Alesandro 
of Baltimore and Julian B 
Carrick. political figure in Balti 
more’s Sixth Legislative Dis- 
trict. both said they favored 
Symington. Carrick attended 


Abrecht of 
he dele- 
the 


{r. and Mrs. 
the 

SUMMER 
DIET 


you've been waiting 
for. Ida Jean Kain tells 
you how to be slimmer 
this summer in her 
l4-day diet starting 
Monday in 


—_— - - 


Skouras to Study 
Russian Movies 


Reuters 

JOHANNESBURG, SOU TH 
Africa, July 7 Hollywood 
movie magnate Spyros P. Skou- 
ras, president of 20th Century- 
Fox, said here today he would 
visit Russia in October to 
study the motion picture situ-, 
ation there and try to interest 
the Russians in wide-screen 
film techniques. 

He will see F. Alexandrov, 
head of Soviet entertainments. 


The Washington Post 
and 
Times Herald 


For home delivery phone 
RE. 7-1234 


Most GOP Chairmen |=: 
Contident ot Victory 


| By George Gallup 
m Ins 

bic Opinion 

J.. daly T, various factors 

—Although a majority of Re-\lead to a defeat for an Eisen- 

publican cousty chairmen are hower-Nixon ticket 

ident Eisenhower's health, there by 131 GOP chairmen 

by 116 county leaders. 

named by 87 


| mentioned by 38 of the county oT. 
peees then asked 


lacans can use agamst the Demo- 
cra , 


443 pointed to quent 
' —_ 


strongest backing has appeared| 
iim the 8th. 9th and 10th dis} 
itricts. But he has also received! 
indorsements from local party! 
units in other parts of the Old’ 
Dominion | 

Stronger by far than in 
deciared Rep. Pat Jen- 
nings of the 9th district. “Peo 
iple are accepting him now be- 
cause they know him better.” 
| Rep. Howard Smith of the 
Sth district agreed with Jen-| 
inings 

Smith's district has indorsed 
Stevenson, along with former 
Gov. John S. Battle of Virginia 
as a running mate for Vice} 
President 

State Sen. Charles Fenwick. 
10th district chairman. said his 
northern Virginia delegation 
The farm problem was listed ,55eared to be ° overwhelming- 


ly pro-Stevenson and Battie.” 
An economic recession W&S' State Democrats will elect 


chairmen. 30 delegates to Chicago at a 
Anti-Nixon sentiment W&S convention in Richmond July 


itute of 


which might 


Complacency was mentioned 


leaders. 


Republican Count Chairmen| . : 
' Italian Strike Ends 


Reuters 

ROME, July 7—A two-day na- 
tionwide strike of four million 
Itelian farmhands and tenant 
farmers was called off tonight 
59e following an agreement by 
57 \landowners to discuss griev- 
ances. 


“Wheat it your optnion, is the 
strongest argument the Repub- 


ats this year?’ 

America at peace 

Country is prosperous 

GOP-KIke record vs. 
Democratic record 

Integrity in government 

Anti-New Deal, Fair 
Deal 

Democrats are war party : 

GOP foreign policy 

Other argurmcnts 


19 
eee a 


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520 10th St. N.W. 


OPTICAL CO. RE. 7-5150 


Come on out and visit'with your friends and neighbors during Food Fair’s 


review Showing 


1 P.M. to 5 P.M. 


NO SALES DURING PREVIEW HOURS 


rw. ABEL 


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ad 


> «< 


SUNDAY 
JULY, Sth 


LEE HIGHWAY 


Fairfax, Virginie 
at the intersection of routes 50, 29, 211, 236 


For Over 20 Years—A Better Place to Shop 


FALLS CHURCH” 


; 


CONVENIENT TO RESIDENTS OF 


ALDIE CLIFTON GERMANTOWN MERRIFIELD 
ANNANDALE CLIFTON STATION HAY MARKET MIDDLEBURG 
ARCOLA * DUNN LORING ‘al NOKESVILLE 
BURK FAIRFAX STATION OAKTON 
CENTREVILLE FAIRFAX TOWN PENDER 
CHANTILLY GAINSVILLE STERLING 


FREE PAVED 
PARKING FOR 
200 CARS 


eat hin = | 
leep. Cet MENDAGO ot. éruge | 


Bring the whole Family for an Afternoon of — 


Fun! ent! 


ment! 


1 00-5 :00 P. M. 


LUKE GORDON 
and the “DRIFTERS” 


Playing and Singing Your 
Favorite Country Style Music 
in Real Toe Tapping Style 


1:00 P.M. 


HOPPITY © 
SKIPPITY 


CHANNEL 5's 
“Weal Live 
Wabbit” 


Dancing 


ENJOY OLD-FASHIONED SQUARE 
DANCING IN THE PARKING LOT 
AREA ... WEATHER PERMITTING 
_. . IF NOT, ENJOY THE MUSIC 
INSIDE THE STORE . 


RALPH CASE ONE OF THE AREA’ 
MOST POPULAR “CALLERS.” WILL DO THS 
“HONORS.” 


2:30 P. M. 
PAUL 


WRC.-TV 
Host of Footlight Thecter 


The Green Mountain Cloggers 


will do exhibition clog dancing during 
the afternoon. 


3:00 P. M. 


RAY 
HANEY 


WRC-TV 
“Toll Texen” 


DON OWENS 


Singing your favorite country and western songs 


MERRY-GO 
ROUND RIDES 
FOR THE 
KIDDIES 


3:30 P.M. 


BROOKE 
JOHNS 
WRC-TV 


ster of the 
“Brooke Johns” Show 


-.. 


SOFT DRINKS 
LF HOT DOGS 


gt 
G 4°) “ICE CREAM 
iw MILK 


ah GF, 


inet Tallamay oleae 


ae B.A rE a. Ae 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
and TIMES HERALD 
Sunday, July 8, 1956 


A12 . 


Negro Quits 


Passed |” Killed 


e eported by 5 


Committee 


CONGRESSIONAL , BOXSCORE 


MAJOR MEASURES IN 84th CONGRESS 


Debate 


x Signed & Set Aside TT 


Fleer Conference >) 


Vetoed €) 


Conference 
Report Approved a) 


a -_ 


FHA Post. 


| SENATE 


NAME OF GUI 


Sounds Merchen! Shop 


f\ 
AL 


Bricker Amendment 


Hits Policy 


NEW YORK, Ju 
. ngage  Seendinn 
rienne R. Mor K! a 


—<$—$<$$— $$ 


Negro who ws Core of Service ) Dependents 


reinstated 
racial relat 


Federal! I Customs Sump Seation 


ese ee %, 


tion. The 


year. Debt Limet Reduchen 


. vo 
She charge Defense Produchon Pewers 


resignation 
“stands firmly, 


Bice: oster insurance 


tion of gover 


: e | 
tioned racism Electoral Reform 


States Excises, Corp. Tones 


<><) \Ii@ \ 


Mrs. Morrow wv ged — 
by Housing Federo! Mom Plents 


bert M. Cole ;« 


in what (oie ¢ ae Furst borm Bil 


tion in force n — 


Forerqn Aid 
Service Co 


so 7 ce es 42 6'0 6 


‘examining of Foren And (Appr ) 


reinstatement 
her job 1 
lated 

She wrote | 


Meils Conyon Federal Dem 


Aedvtonem Commiseon 


the agency's | 
that des} 


Central Aree Bridge 


found it 


ohe 7 
conscience Dey. ume 


services Wi ‘foal ly Court 


ernment _— 

By discharging 
Cole acted “'t 
reject the 
racial relat 
tion of the fed 
housing progra 
she had been 
193 


Mome “i 


Jones al Bdge 


Local Rewenwe 


Started ia 1955 Sesstes 


lv 


, 


se se 97 4 88 e 


—_+ 


DiNIN S\N 


— 


— + 


a 


Washington Post and Times Herald Chart 


His action, she s 
open invitation f 
lenged pursuit of 
grams and pol 

to restrict the right 
minorities in acces 


ig promoting a *‘ 
ing program < ved 
counteract the effect of the RI 
preme Court's decisior ng rural Virgil 
for public school } itior 
The Federal! 
Home Finance 
gaid, “persistently | 
effective gimm 
the demands 
for proper hom 
game terms .; - — ) 
available to all other citize: ah etn Paget 


uniy sco 


D, Va., July 
unty whose 


' -_ 
aco 
rns vow they will 
rather than 
moves Monday 


. " 
</ eS 


t Court bere to 
oOols de- 
bw September with 


ports petween now 


4 Crosses Burned 


MOBILE, ALA. July 
Pour crosses about 1 
were burned in the M 
Jast night. Officers said ¢ 
mot know who planted t 
set them afire, or ! 


pose. 


BY FECL LAL! oy ent white, 50 per cent 
© area $ more on the spot 
other southern com- 
the segregation fight 
The Supreme Court's decisions 
f 1954 and 1955 outlawing seg- 
ation in public schools were 

ai i Specilically at it. 
3 Times Faster When And the county has had a 


year to make adjustments since 


Gas Crowds Heart t Cote Dist lered by this same 


hed strict Court to move 
Pert laboratory test sprove Be!ll-ans , 
mevtraliize 3 times 2s much regat lon “with al i] 


mies acidity im one minute as many iberat te sp ee ; : 
. Gigestive tablets Get Rell an Nation . se 

day lor the fastest known relief. 25¢. _ penne A Station yo 
aul-ans TABLETS WITH CHARCOAL nt of Colored reo 


inity in 


Advertisement 


toward dese 


1314 F STREET N.W., 


SUM OOD GMM 


Za Prince Edward Suit 
"Fine Admin tration, st _ ot she for New Hearing 


» Edward County—50) 


High Court 
Gets Va. Park 


Racial Issue 


RICHMOND, July 7—Vir 
ginia has told the U. S. Suwu- 
preme Court that Federal 
Judge Walter Hoffman exceed- 
ed his authority in last year's 
Seashore Park ruling and has 
asked that the decision be re- 
versed. 

Details of the state's brief— 
almost identical with the peti- 
tion filed months ago with the 
4th Circuit Court of Appeals 
- and rejected by that tribunal— 
ume were revealed last night by 

ttorneys for Prince Edward Atty. Gen. Almond. 
and the state assert the county! Judge Hoffman's ruling last 
is awaiting the formulation by a — — ~ eg om 
é we could not legally lease 
the commonwealth of plans and Seashore Park unless it made 
policies. certain the lessee would not ru 
Four other segregation suits 


the property on a segregate 
have been filed by the NAACP 5asis. 
against Virginia school boards’ 


Almond’s petition to the Su- 
preme Court contends both 

this year, all seeking desegrega- 

tion by this fall. One, against 


Hoffman and the 
court went beyond their powers 
Charlottesville, is to be heard 
in Federal court there next 


in trying to “dictate” to the 
state the condition under which 
| Thursday. One against Arling- it could lease the park to an un- 
ton is not yet set for hearing, 
and Nov. 17 has been set to! 


known person. 
The 

hear cases against Norfolk and |State cannot operate Seashore 

Newport News. | Park as a facility for white per- 


sons only. 
Defenders Offer | 
Own School Plan New Book Written 


RICHMOND, July 7 #—The By GW Professor 


Defenders of State Sovereignty 
and Individual Liberties has| David S. Brown, associate 


recommended a school program|Prefessor of Public Adminis 
that would withhold state funds | ton and coordinator, Air Force 
from integrated schools in Vir-/A@vanced Management Pro 
ginia. ‘gram at the George Washing- 

The Defenders. a prosegre|*on University, is the author 
| gation organization clziming 4 
membership of 12,000, advo-\the University of Alabama 
cated a four-point program in| Press as part of a case program 
lan effort to keep Negro and/ Series. The title is “The Public 
pw! ite pupils apart at the class ——— Board and the Tariff 
lroom level. stem 

It represents the organiza-| “The study deals with the ef- 
tion’s answer to the student as-| fort made by Averell Harriman, 
signment plan suggested by the 
Gray Commission. 

The Defenders’ program: 


4 


ple lawyers have told the court 
hese has been little or no 
progress toward desegregation 

They have said Prince Ed- 
ward County will continue to 
operate segregated schools “un- 
less specifically ordered (1) to 
make an immediate start 
toward desegregation and (2) to 
complete this desegregation 
within a prescribed period of 


istrator, to utilize fully his 12- 
member Public Advisory Board 

@Enactment of legislation! 2"4 of the study of U. 5. trade 
providing for segregated #™¢ bo: a policy undertaken by 
| schools throughout the state. the oard at the President's 


iw re ene the state's er nsent 


for local school boards to be Mailman Ha« Storv 


sued 

®Enactment of legislation; DENVER, July 7 #—Rocky., 
for withdrawal of state funds a Boxer dog, sailed through a 
for support of integrated plate glass window after a mail- 
schools nan. But she’s recovering from 

® Enactment of legislation to multiple cuts. “I don't know 
| provide for the state to assume what happened to the mail- 
jcontrol of local schools when-|man,” said Mrs. Sam Stone, 
lever suits may be instituted owner, who was absent from 
ifor the purpose of forcing in- home at the time. “I'll ask him, 
tegration under court decree. iif he ever comes back.” 


Save on Imported English Bridle Leather 


TWO-SUITER G COMPANION 


What a hand 

tion of their regquia 
nished Eng 

made with Ar 
how. Leathe 

ble locks 

extra wear! 


req. 42.50 
29-95* 
‘ om panion 

req. 52.50 


35-95* 


.-suiler 
*plus tas 


ore 
¢ 


ir WR ata 
os 


17.50 envelope 


reg. 22.50 brief bag 
’ 12-%5° 


Top-grain 7 to 8 oF 
hide with Yale | 
top seller 


erveiooe with 
pocxers, 
zipper 

“plus tag 


handy 
Sturdy 


'o size 


18° size, reg. $25 ........19.95°" 
“plus tax 


MAIL AND PHONE ORDERS FILLED—District 7-4454 


P 


5 


. . . cow ide 
msice | 
three-s: de 


SUBSTANTIAL 
SEMI-ANNUAL 
EARNINGS 


paid to owe Savers 
JULY FIRST 


Without ony effort on your part, the 
money you save with us eorns extra 
imcome for you twice a yeor. 


New six-months period is starting! ; 


Open your Prudential 
savings cccount NOW! ...in 
person or by mail. FUNDS 
RECEIVED BY JULY 10th 
EARN FROM JULY Ist. 


fe] Yrudential 


ICIATION 


= 
1338 G Street. N.W 


appellate |; 


petition concedes the | 


of a new book published by'' 


hen Mutual Security Admin-| 


“THE BIGGEST or DISCOUNT MOUSE J iv Town!” fo 
Ss SS Swe 


2.? 
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EVERYTHING NEW 


Spectacular Savings on Famous Brand 


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NEW AIR CONDITIONERS! 


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Y%-TON 7'2-Amp. 


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PHILCO 
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CHRYSLER. AIRTEMP 
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egular $259. 


FRIGIDAIRE Ve TON 


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TOP BRAND 


1 Ton 
Casement 


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MITCHELL 


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RCA 
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Flush Mount 


a KK 


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G.E. % TON 


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w Thermostat 
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VICTOR 
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39.95 VORNA 20- 
inch EXMAUST FAN 


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rurs-asour tan .. 942299 

Kitchen Venton tan Pe eO 

399.95 GE. 2W-inch $22.87 
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59.95 GE. FLOOR $34 99 

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ch PEDESTAL FAN. PODODD 


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5995 GE. Roll. 
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393.95 G. £. TWIN.FAN 
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Reg. $22.50 $9.88 


RONSON ELEC. 
TRIC RAZOR 
—_als o———_ 
REMINGTON, SCHICK, 
SUNBEAM and NORELCO 
40% to 60% Off! 


Ne Trades Necessary’ Even Leas 
With Trade! 


COMPLETE LINE OF HOUSE- 
WARES & TRAFFIC APPII- 
ANCES & GARDEN EQUIP- 
MENT. 


30% to 50% Off! 


GE. SUNBEAM, UNIVERSAL, 
KROMEX, RIVAL, DAZEY, 
WESTINGHOUSE, WARING, 

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EASY TERMS!! 2 


Regular $349.95 
HOTPOINT 
CASEMENT 
Push -But. 
Regular $529.95 
TOP BRAND'2 TON 
w Thermostat 
Regular $499.95 
HOTPOINT 1% TON 
w / Thermostat 
Regular $349.95 
TOP BRAND 1 TON 
REFRIGERATORS 
and FREEZERS 
9 ov. %. REFRIGERATOR .. 
249.95 New FRIGIDAIRE $167 
399.95 New GE. 11 ow. f REFRIG- 
ERATOR w/evte 
529.95 New NORGE 13 ew. ff. 2-dr. 
Avtomotic 
REFRIGERATOR $267 
$149 
419.95 New DEEPFREEZE 12 
cv. %. UPRIGHT FREEZER 
—al so—— 
FRIGIDAIRE, PHILCO, G.E. 
30% to 50% Off! 
Washers & Dryers 
499.935 New BENDIX 
WASHER.ORYER COmS. 
AUTOMATIC WASHER $169 
319.95 New PCA-WHIRLPOOL Sw. 
149.95 New BENDIX 
ELECTRIC ORYER 
1469.95 New Teo Brand 
ELECTRIC DRYER 
G.E., HOTPOINT, MONITOR, 
APEX, CONLON & BENDIX. 


REFRIGERATOR 
779.95 New DEEPFREEZE 
$194 
299.95 New ADMIRAL 10 
HOTPOINT, CROSLEY, 
2729.95 BENDIX Medel $119 
2799.95 New MAYTAG 
preme AUTOMATIC 
Seecic!? Mew NORGE 
on g3 | § Qe 
30 to 50% Off! 


os) 


aetna cpap oS, Ms 
RRS 


RR A BG a Be 10 BBR ee. 
oy 3 ae § ? 
bs = = ee 


iN ORIGINAL 
FACTORY-SEALED 
CRATES & CARTONS 


DONT 
WITHOUT 


FAM 


Regular $39.95 
GENERAL ELECTRIC 


20-1N. WINDOW 
EXHAUST FAN 


codes ne of 
Ne radio or TY interferes ee. 


MAKE ARB 


BUY 


SPECIAL DISCOUNTS “ON 


GENERAL & ELECTRIC 


ALL NEW! 


In original Factory 
Sealed Crates. 


. 


Regular $29.95 
GENERAL ELECTRIC 
Year-Round Kitchen 
Ventilator 


Ne tImstaliation costs. See-thre 
Penele FExhaastse bet. sereaey 
kitehen air i a Hfty. - 


fan hes many ether use 


47" 


Regular $59.95 
General Electric 


TWIN FAN 
VENTILATOR 


Portable’ 

yee sutematic 

eet the thermestat snd when 
the temperature rises, the fan 
terns fteelf Ont when temper- 
atere dreps, the fan terns iteclf 
ort. 


si hn hh hh bb bh he he hh he ee ie ie i 
7"eeereeeeeeeeeeemhmeermemeemeeeeeeeeeeeeee 


BOYD’S SPECIAL! 


Delexe Medel with 


poreus 
ent wire handle at tes eof 
nme steeping te ft fan 

er mot ot twist of knob. 


GENERAL ELECTRIC 


Regular $54.95 


16” Oscillating 


FAN 


self - aligning 
brense bearings. : 


DD DDD DDD DD DD DAD DDD DDD 


$9.95 
GEN FERAL. ELECTRIC 


Utility Fan 


_Piastic cose) 06with 

reme -t base. Small, 

creme com pac = ool — fan. 

Sealed - a. -s needs ne 
clling fa © 


$5.70 


eguiar $59.95 
GENERAL ELECTRIC 


Roll Around Fan 


ls easily from room reom 
— — te aay Sricht from 


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lar $59.95 
GENERAL ELECTRIC 
AUTOMATIC 


_WINDOW FAN 


pe eae in portable win- 

prevides constant 
A with «en  sutemeatic 
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and what's mere, it's electrical- 
ly reversible. 


s 40° 


Regular $59.95 
GENERAL ELECTRIC 
Floor Circulator 


Acteatiy twe fans tn ene with 
ite heavy-duty meter. Sturér 
—— 7c helds ep te 80° 
pounds 


‘34° 


G.E. Appliances for Delivery in D. C. and Va. only! 


REGINA 


waAxrR& 8 §§ 97 
POLISHER 36: tez 
$299.95 


SRUNDIG—-MAJESTIC 
HL-Fl AM/FM 


Reg. $69.95 
EUREKA 
VAC. CLEANER ¢ 3.99 


w / attachments 


Reg. $149.95 
22” ROTARY 


POWER MOWER 
le, 2% WP. 
sree’ saaten: mtr, SOD 


Reg. $319.95 
HOTPOINT 


psnwasner 9198 


a a a = = = 
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SPECIAL! 


Reg. $169.95 


TOP BRAND 


17 Series 
Portable TV 


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——also—__.. 
RCA, EMERSON, CBS, PHILCO. 
ZENITH, MOTOROLA & OLYMPIC 

40% » 60% 


DISCOUNTS 


i KS KL SS, EE 


Reg. $279. 95 


G.E. 
4139 


PORTABLE 
DISH W ASHER 


34-Ton 
Controls 187 
Flush Mount $298 
Flush Mount $92 7 
Flush Mount ‘7 74 
249.95 New ADMIRAL $137 
10 ow. © REFRIGERATOR 
detrost 
499.95 New PHILCO 12 ev. #. 2-door 
8 cu. %. CHEST FREEZER 
cu. ft. UPRIGHT FREEZER $169 
KELVINATOR 
WEM AUTOMATIC WASHER 
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rick and eres E Brepese: edjutant 
> " 


Miller Again : 2» {Earl Watters Wins Award From Legion —_ [i ee ee MES Hea 


Cc 
Terpey, and membership of! and TIMES HERALD 
be set Buitains Sunday, July 8, 1956 
_ The D. C. American Legion’s\outstanding, unselfish example! Newly elected officers by | Pend Corp.: P ; ag P. Lester: eee 


| ‘ , ce pres , rt L ‘ 
a | i Watson B. Miller Trophy for/of service.” posts are: | ae Be eo AI3 
€ Uses ist | . a> | ‘ this year will be awarded to| William Y. Terrell of the|ponsil"O_ Gartner, View) commanders ‘liam phages of. Ned &. olean 


. A 
\Donald O. Gartner: vice, commanders.|and Charies H. Pier 


| | 
7 | | Earl Watters of the Henry C.| Navy Department post has been | and Wet 8 Frediam, ° e. And 
. : ic . 3 an ' ; 
Spengler Post, according to| appointed chairman of the 11th) Ragan reeant-at-arms. ard ~ s Helps Heal Clear 
\\ j . | , . le- nuts 
Of riters o ' ¢ Dante Guazzo, department) term American en 4 ee: fnance 5 Wi oes: poor Pe aa amg yy e 
* | sion Institute o 1e part mas: oy N, W. Va, (—A | 
B ng: + re and ment of the District of Colum- office mi am Ht. blood | thief who broke into an eating Skin Rash 
y Paul Southwick | awaras bia American Legion. The insti- , a Post: Com-/@Stablishment here recently , : 
Arth sync: Press Watters, of 14001 Mills ave.,'tute is an educational program =. et. -Dougies. BD Hi . com-| knew the exact location of the |Zemo, a mer tad . om ety. Ore. . 
an! ol ° , er, Marilyn Mon Silver Spring, is director of the|for lhegionnaires, with classes leseeh Be ot , tices: | “@ough” he sought. From the promptly relieves itching, stops 
S paywright bridegroom drum and bugle corps. The|twice monthly at the American|Erpest F, Mechiin Jr. and membershi>| bottom of a machine marked /#ratching and so helps heal and . 
refused again yesterday to give ; B ilso 


officer. Lioyd n 
House investigators the names 


W J : 
award is made annually to the Legion Clubhouse, 433 3d st. hurch Depue Post: Com-|“doughnuts” he took an esti-/cler surface rashes. Buy Extra - 


| : legionnaire showing “the most! nw mes Michae} J. Bochetto; vice com-| mated $205. Strength Zemo for . 
of persons Mécadiag «@ Com , | manders. Jesse L. Coen. Henry 8. Mer- | stubborn cases! 
munist writers’ meeting in 1939 | = | — . 


or 1940 
Chairman Francis E. Walter 


mail, “seems to me” to be 


(D-Pa.) of the House Commit : 9 
tee on Un-American Activities 
said that Miller 's refusal! made ’ . 
by ) , ' . 
“inviting” a Citation for con : F ' 
tempt of Congress —- = wR! . ae 3 

Miller's latest trouble came ’ , t —— - , 
just one Gay after he had =: x. ) A L WwW AY $ F R > u Q U A L U v ; 

‘ 


cleared one hurdle keeping 
him from a European honey 
moon. The State Department 
announced Friday that it had 
issued him a six-month pass 


port after he answered ques co. ‘ , ; ' 

tions re garding derogatorn in ~ 

formation” that kept him from fl 

getting a passport two years By Frank Hoy, Gtaf{ Photosrepher | es ° 
ago | | 


’ 

Whether the congressional’! ? N O i 
threat would keep Miller at He's No rdinary Dog 
home while his glamorous ac 
tress wife goes abroad was not This is a hyena-dog of pyeeey. ee St se ees Ooo Se 
known immediately. However the Washington Zoo. Also called the Cape-hunting dog be- 

| e P win , r) : 
pe eedure for citing a perso: cause it hunts in packs, the animal differs from the typical 
or contempt is drawn-out and 
might not interfere with the eg in having only four toes on both the fore and hind 
trip 

Marilyn sails for London a 
week hence to make a movie 
with Sir Laurence Olivie: 

The House had given Miller 
an opportunity to answer the 
questions by mail and thus 


purge himself of the contemot x - % rs < adiusts to 3 positions! 


limbs. It preys upon cattle. 


threat He refused to name 
the writers when questioned as 
a witness on June 2 


Miller's lawyer, Joseph C 14 ' ¥ . 4, . 
neu sot" ice"2e S| (RRR | OUR CHAISE WITH 
client's behalf. It cited legal 1 ont i ~~ ‘ , 
precedents against penalizing é eee oe ‘ \. 
the playwright for contempt ~ ; : = \ oS oe ~ T 

Miller in testifying before ° -~ SECTIONED PAD 
the Committee taiked freely of t : re, j " ; he = 
his own past associations with > aT ” 
Communist-front organizations 


*) . [ ’ ; , ° _ - ; 7 4 
But he said his conscience et » Ty OF ST U R DY D UCK ! 
would not permit names. 2 : ; 


Walter told newsmen: 


“If that’s his answer to the 


opportunity offered by the * et > j _ 

Committee to avoid ec mtemopt e : | : 
then it seems to me he is in. ww ’ ' 
vViting it.” A hw ‘ = 


Vote Record s 
Of Nearby Real Cool! for Driving 


. For Lawn, Beach. Porch 
Legislators full length 23/2 by 74 inches! 


Roll call votes of the Mary. Air Cool sectioned felt-filled pad covered in 


land and Virginia ce egatiot si 


cy a pe Seng eee sturdy water-proofed duck! 


. 4 £ 
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upholstered seat and back, car or chair. Inter- 
meshed steel coil wire with cool fiber covering in 
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Auto Seat Cover Dept. 


Ath Floor g Lower Level 
Washington Arlington 


DI. 7-7200 


Compare Penney’s price! 
Baby Burned 


When Smoking ) | ; i 
Mother Dozes oe he ALUMINUM CHAISE! 


4 haby’s feet were burned 


other fell aay amen = WITH INNERSPRING 
mother fell asleep smoking . I NI 
hed the District Rea Cros i 
Safety Services reported Br 2g 

The report covered 121 home 4 , - ' 
accident cases treated at hos . qe | MATTRESS! 
pitals last week. A breakdown >. 
showed 52 falls (one fatal), sev : 
en burns. five poisonings, 5'x 


foreign objects in ear, eye or . 

throat. one contusion and 26 2 —* : | 

other mishaps yp Es , 
Five children were poisoned : 

by eating or drinking kerosene : 

aspirin, pills, disinfectant and ) 


toadstools. Two aduits were 
treated for bones stuck in thet: 
throats 


1956 lead 4. ‘ast ty TH FE INSI DE STORY | ADJUSTABLE—to 3 comfortable positions! 


Se tes Bh aon ter STURDY—rugged 1 inch aluminum frame! 
in contrast to 3266 this year ON < HE MONROE- 

Fatalities in 1955 were 78 while COMFORTABLE—100-coil, 2-piece inner-. 
as of July 6. the total stood at 


’ 
105 deaths in the locality due MILLER ROMANCE Spring mattress: 
to home accidents i 


SMART—meoattress covered in a gay floral, 
My -look in red, green! 

Marvin W. Topping i te = or a leather loo 

Takes Wesle; va Post Che marriage of Marilyn Monroe With mattress stopper! 


Marvin W. Topping, 43, 726 and Arthur Miller came as a sur- 
Jackson pl. nw., yesterday wa: “ ; ummer relaxation! 
‘ ; ‘ ‘ r} . Ai ? } SUTTi TT) ' on: 
named to cirect Nebrask ' ' ras Vaiue in . r relaxati 


= wise to people all over the world 

Wesleyan University’s develop | | . fa 
ment program. Topping wil = te : nrine mm wae! If van care for cam 
hegin his duties in Septembe: y ou 1] get the story of their ro- Sisk mattress .: If , tu Care for comfort —_ here 
and Jeave Wankingson alter six it is! lt's lightweight ... rubber-tired. 

ar - . 2 ; e secr ’ : »f . 
Suangtep set tone ga ot engage a AP mance—how Miller met and won 
the American College Publi 
Relations Association : 

Before joining the Associa Hollywood's blond bombshell. 
tion. Topping held public re 
lations and development posts : ; 
at Union Coli ge in Kentucky Starting Monday 202 the 
and the Medical College of Vir 
ginia. 


. try out the body-conforming inner- 


ye | 
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AL_.-— ‘ ss his 


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f A , 


School Prober 
Aide to Crump 


By Phil Thomas 
Memphis Commercial-Appeal Reporter 


MEMPHIS, July 7—The coun- Gerber: “I have never heard 
sel for the House District Sub-|one word of criticism of At 
committee to investigate Wash-| torney General Will Gerber. He 
ington school conditions is ajhas been an energetic, hard 
fiery Memphis attorney wholworking city attorney. He is 
was a top lieutenant of the late not only a fine lawyer but a 
Tennessee political boss, E. H.| good citizen.” 

Crump. The years from 1940 to 1948 

William E. Gerber. 57, came were full for Gerber. He .be- 
to Memphis as a child, the son|came Crump’s agent in the 
of Russian immigrants. He State legislature. It was Ger- 
financed his education by work-|ber’s joB to carry Crump’s ad- 
ing a8 a newspaper delivery) Vice to the Shelby County dele- 
boy and later as a railroad|@tion. | 
clerk in the mid-South city.|, His powers in court were! 
After his graduation from a fruitful. From 1941 to 1947 he) 
Memphis law school in 1923 he 4nd his assistants stacked up a 
served two years with a local "ecord of 8776 cases tried with 
law firm before being ap-°Mly 469 aequittals—a convic- 
pointed an assistant attorney|“0" percentage of 94.43. 
general of Shelby County, Following defeat of the Crump | 
which includes Memphis. jonpperted candidate for Ten- 


inessee Governor in the 1948 | 
eau Oe ith eat cal Power! primaries. Gerber resigned his School Probe | 
Head Chosen 


supporter of Crump’s political | 2% of attorney general and 


WILLIAM GERBER 
..+ D. C. school probe counsel 


SCHOOL——From Page ! | 


ae “ 
er gy ee he got into a fight’ ial = py a Lay. 
pee py Fag ye of Gerber, Rond and Gerber. He 
1926. Other battles at the ns| O88 been there ever since. |tee members who concurred in 
followed in 1927 and on oo roses Rage 1948 have his nomination of Gerber were 
Taken into court as a result| per with one A hn Bm Reps. Charlies R. Jones (D- 
of the 1928 fracas, with a news| p,' got into a court room|. C.), A L. Miller (R-Neb.), 
seal Gal or ee ood tan,|2auabble last month with Fed-|Joel T. Broytill (R-Va.) and De 
gled with the Ssparten’é _ eral District Court Judge Ma-\ witt Hyde (R-Md.). 
torney. This resulted in a con-|r se anayc ine man whom he) ‘The sixth subcommittee, Rep 
tempt of court charge that torney general in ‘ry ’ John Bell Williams (D-Miss.), 
meres Fags way rs the Ten-| Active in community affairs, was absent. Williams, who first 
coat Gerber a $28 —" all his adult life, Gerber served proposed that the committee 
In December, 1934. Gerber|*" president of the congreg@|)... into alleged “lowered 
, ’ tions of Memphis Baron Hirsch a 
was named an assistant city at- Synagogue from 1941 through | Standards in public schools 
a a Memphis and 11/1945. He was named “out-|following integration, is in Ari- 
oe ~* ater became the city's! standing Jewish leader of the|zona taking part in an investi- 
1940 re ume city attorney. In| community” by several Jewish gation into last week's aviation 
a © was named Shelby/fraternities in 1949 and has disaster that claimed 128 lives. 
ounty attorney general to fill| served as president of the Shel-|Born in Russia 
on are term and became | by County Bar Association. | Gerber was born hi Kishen- 
+1 "an s right hand man. If William E. Gerber acts'eff, Russia, a small town on the 
aid rst test as a political |true to form during the coming|Black Sea near Odessa. His 
oy idate came in 1942 when |committee hearings, the chances|parents came to the United! 
e Ants elected attorney gen-|are they won't be dull, in the States when he was 6 years old| 
era , opinion of his Memphis and settled in Memphis, where 
At that time Crump said of! friends. ihis father conducted a mercan- 
na? tile business. 
| The new counsel was educea- 


| practice. 


LIST——From Page I 


Anti-Defamation 


Aide Is Subpenaed 


and persons in the entertain- 
ment industry” who have 
fought the “Communist con- 
spiracy.” ) 

The report alleged that the 
radio and television and movie 
industries have been subjected 
since World War II to a Com- 
munist-fearing blacklisting 
It told of an alleged 
“security clearance” system 
through which suspected r- 
formers can become rehabili- 
tated. It suggested that the 
blacklisting practice had af- 
fected the morale and livell- 
hood of many performers. 

\ spokesman said the com- 


Henry Morgan when Morgan 
was having trouble getting 
work in 1952 after he had 
been listed in the book, “Red 
Channels.” 

“This reporter wrote a piece 
about a radio actors union 
meeting in which Morgan 
blasted Reds.” Woltman said in 
a recent article assailing the 
report. “It was a legitimate 
news story. There was no ‘ar- 
rangement’ which, of course, 
implies some side considera 
tion.” 

The Committee, in its 1955 
annual report, said it had found 
no evidence of institutionalized 
blacklisting but had found evi- 
mittee wants to find out wheth-idence of Communist penetra- 
er Forster is the unnamedition in the radio-television in- 
“public relations expert” who) dustry. 
is quoted extensively in the re- 
port about his experience in 
arranging for the “clearance” 
of artists falsely suspected o 
pro-Communist leanings. 

The spokesman said there! 
has been widespread specula-/ PORTLAND, Ore., July 7 # 


tion in the radio-television in-| The National Education Associ- 


dustry in New York to that ef-| : 

tion today filled several offices 
fect port was is|* 
ae Guse me fe rr not taken care of in the NEA 


sued. . 
convention this week. 

Miss Corma Mowrey, Charles- 
ton, W. Va., director of profes 
sional services for the West Vir- 
ginia Educational Association, 
was reelected to the board of 
trustees; George Beer, Baton 
Rouge, executive committee; 
John H. Palmer, Marysville, 
Calif. and James A. Cullen, 
Mount Vernon, N. Y., budget 
committee. 


Additional Offices 
Are Filled by NEA 


“expert” was quoted in 
report as saying he had 
guided more than a dozen once- 
blacklisted performers to the 
“right le” to help get them 
cleared. He named Jack Wren, 
an executive with the advertis 
ing agency, Batten, Barton, 


in arranging for such 
clearings. 

The unnamed expert 
said the clearance process 
sometimes involved getting 
“affidavits” from such writers 
as Woltman and newspaper 
columnists George Sokolsky 
and Victor Riesel. 

Woltman has denied ever 
giving such “affidavits.” 

The report also, without at- 
tribution, asserted that when 
“arranged” for Woltman to 
write a Commentary feature 
story about radio comedian 


—eo oo C;r:C rrr err 


also 


Rain Stops Forest Fire 


ANCHORAGE, Alaska, July 
7 w—Rain has done in two 
days what a firefighting crew 
was unable to do in two weeks 
in western Alaska. It stopped 
a forest fire that blackened 
more than 63,000 acres of spruce 
and brush country. Lightning 
was blamed for the fire along 
the Yukon River, near Nulato. 


ARVINS JULY C 


-_ 


Ike Relaxes on Farm 
During Quiet Weekend 


By Jeanne Rogers 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
end TIMES HERALD 
Sunday, July 8, 1956 


che Alo 


Rock Slide Kills 5 
ones APRICA, Italy, July 7 @—A 


GETTYSBURG, July 7—Pres-jof-the~week political talk with) £T*#t Tock slide roared down on 
ident Eisenhower began a quiet and Sherman Adams,|Workmen standing outside a 
ential assistant. jtunnel high in the Italian Alps 


’ 

'weekend today just “taking it| 

easy.” | “Did he have any comment today, killing five and injuring 
James C. Hagerty, White'te make on the stories about four. Other workers were 

House press secretary, told|the Hagerty smile?” a reporter ‘Tapped for half an hour in 

newsmen during a morning the tunnel before they were 

conference: “I haven't got &| “yes he had some comment,” dug out. 


single thing. The President | Hagerty said, adding, “it was a| 


doesn't plan to do anything.” 
P y < |personal conversation ee CARPORTS Aa PATIOS 


The President, who was dis-/him and myself.” 
Hagerty next was asked if 


charged from Walter Reed Med-| 
ical Center, Washington, a week Mr. Eisenhower was “dissatis- 
ago following recuperation fied in any way with the inter.) 
from a June 9 abdominal opera-|pretations?’” Hagerty replied: 
tion, expects no visitors at his “Personal conversation.” 
farin. | Newsmen reported Hagerty’s 
Reporters asked Hagerty if face-splitting grin when he an- 
he had talked any more politics nounced that Mr. Eisenhower 
with the President, referring to had talked politics was a fair 
the Secretary's elated indica-| weather barometer reading that 
tion of Friday that Mr. Eisen-| his boss intended to stay in the 
hower plans to run for a second presidential race. 
term. Hagerty said: “No.” | Hagerty said he had nothing 
Hagerty said the President'to report on the President's 


* wt 


| Relocating factory. Everything mart 
| cos fetime 


ihad seen the morning. news- plans to end his convalescence 
| papers, which described his end- and return to Washington. 


Ee 


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——— ‘ > ow 
aa a. 8 


2b. eee Me oe Bae 
an" dd - iad 


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7 . ant , 4 oe 
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“an 7 “as ~~ 
—_— ) orn” 7 
A fa - ~ : > 
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a8. Res Oe 
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fre Mn San Wo, ‘e 
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ted in public schools and the 

1923 until his appointment as 

Assistant Attorney General of 

iP— The purr of perfectly tuned excitement as she took off in torney of the county in 1940, 

engines filled the morning air|"¢™ first all-women transconti and resigned eight years later 
the first leg of the 10th annual 
Powder Puff Derby. ) 


+ 
Univ ‘M whe 
39 Women Fliers Start Sc. M2esns 
In Powder Puff Derby = See" 
° He became city attorney of 
at San Mateo County Airport 
today as 49 light planes carry. 
The three<ay cross-country 
race will end in Flint, Mich.. 


iin private law practice from 

SAN MATEO, Calif. July 7;Hauk’s eves were bright with; Memphis in 1835, district at 
ing 89 women fliers took off on 
with . mandatory stops at 


nental air race as co-pilot for 
her mother, Mrs. Ardell Hauk 
of Salinas, Calif 

A little more nonchalant 
were race favorites. Mrs. Fran- 
ces Bera and Mrs. Edna Bower. 
who planned to let their auto- 
pilot do the work while they 
“play canasta in the back seat 


Amarillo, Tex., and Fort Wayne,|—most of the way.” 


Ind. However, the pilots may/| 
elect intermediate stops for re- 
fueling or repairs. 

Most of the small planes, 
limited to 350 horsepower, car- 
ried two persons. However, 13) 


of the women fliers elected to Isabelle 


jin ] 
iin 


The combination won the race 
955 yhile Mrs. Bera won 
1953, finished second in 
1954, and was co-pilot to the 
1951 winner 

First to take off were Mrs. 
McCrae of Lemon 


“go it alone” on the 2366-mile|Grove, Calif.. and copolit Mrs. 


to reenter private practice. He 
has been admitted to practice 
before the Supreme Court. 

Gerber said he has not gone 
on record publicly concerning 
school integration. 

“We have the finest schools 
in the United States in Shelby 
County—white and colored,” he 
asserted. 

He is married and the father 
of two sons and a daughter. 


RAID—From Page I 


2 Arrested 


flight. Betty McNeil of La Mesa, 


Little 17?-yearold Caro! Calif.. in a Beechcraft Bonanza. 


In Dope Raid 


indirect lighting, and high-pol- 
| shed hardwood floors. 


— a a ee ee Se ee ee ee ee ee Pe ee ee ee ey 


| she counted 27 taxicabs calls 
at the house in one four-hour 
iperiod during the early mor- 
ining hours. 

Gabrys described Miss Gray 
and Cole as “major” violators, 
\selling.to pushers who in turn 
sell dope to users. A pusher, 
\he said, pays $1 for a heroin 
capsule and gets $1.50 on the 
“retail” market from addicts. 
| Gabrys said Miss Gray was 
‘convicted in 1950 on a narcotics 
charge and served five years. 
\Cole, he sald, was convicted in 
(1952 for a narcotics violation 
‘and sentenced to one to three 
years in prison. 


Yvonne de Carlo 


Awaiting Baby 


| SANTA MONICA, Calif. July 
7 u—Actress Yvonne de Carlo 
entered St. Joseph's Hospital to 
day for delivery of a baby she 
‘hadn't expected until the fall. 
| The 34-year-old movie star be- 
| came ili last night on her way 
to Del Mar, Calif.. to join her 
\husband. actor Robert Morgan, 
'41. They married last Novem- 
ber in Reno. 


r 
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He Found a Diamond 


PROVO, Utah an.—Mrs. 
George A. King told uphol- 
|sterer Guy Overman to refurb | 
ish her living room set and jok- 
ingly added, “If you fin’ any 
diamonds, be sure to return 
them.” Overman found a die 
mond In the lining of a chair 
It had dropped out of an en 
gagement ring 12 years ago. 

husband 


Mr. and Mrs. 


the 
SUMMER 
DIET 


you've been waiting 
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Monday in 


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THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERAL 
‘A116 Sunday, July 8 1956 . 


"FIRST IN SELECTION FIRST IN SAVINGS! 


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4 


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1 | | ‘4 ‘ 


Compromise Needed 
To Get Passage of 
CS Retirement Bill 


No one will admit it publicly 
but work is progressing behind 
the scenes on plans to compro 
mise the hot fight over liberal 
ization of the Civil Service re 
tirement system 

The issue must be compre 
mised or cise a CSE bill will 
stand very little chance of be 
ing enacted inte law this year. 

The Administration opposes 
the Johnston retirement bill as 
passed by the Senate and the 
hints are now broader than 
ever that it would be wetoed if 
it gets to the President 

On the other hand. Sen 
D. Johnst Ds ' 
threatened to block approval 
of any diluted substiiute bill 

On the surface. neither side 
is in a mood to compromise. But 
in case a more conciliatory at 
titude develops, as expected 
suggested compromises will be 
offered and here are some of 
them 

ANNUTTIES: ‘To 
ployes the option of c 
annuities on the | 
per cent of average 
times years of service 
service through WU 
year, and the use of a 2 per cen 
formula for service beginning 
next Jan |! The Administra 
tion has suggested a fat 1 
per cent; the Senate Dill pr 
vides 1% per cent on five years 
of service and 2 per cent on the 
remainder ; 

EMPLOYE COST: A 6&6 
per cent employe contribution 
beginning next Jan. 1 is an o> 
vious compromise The 
ate bill would boost the pres 
ent 6 per cent rate to per 


Olin 
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: 


» 


: 
- 


Sen 


. #F 
cent. The Administration wants 
it retained at 6 per cen 
FREE SURVIVOR benefits 
on the first $1200 of an annurty 
and a 10 per cent reduction on 
any é€xcess is another comp 
mise suggestion 
The Senate bill 
the retiree free a! 
survivor benefits on 
$2400 of his annuity and 10 pert 
cent reduction in his anvuity 
on that part in excess of $2400 
The Administration o> 
posed to any change | 
present system which requires 
the retiree to elect to prewier 
for his wife. in event she sur 
vives him. If he se elects, Dts 
annuity is discounted 5 
cent on the first $1500 and 10 
per cent on any cxcess 
THIRTY -YEAR retiremen' 
as provided in the Senate bill 
is the most dificult provisson 
to compromise. The feeling on 
it is strong on both sides. The 
Administration is most em 
phatic in its opposition to the 
provision. Its supporters be- 
lieve the 30-year provisson 
would give the President an 
excellent opportunity to vetec 
the Senate bill, particularly = 
view of the upward trend m@ 
industry of retirement ages 
The employes. however, have 
eagerly sought the benefit for 


ro 


> 


" 


aa’ a 


many years and this is the ,., 


best chance ther've ever had 
te win it. They'd hate to love 
‘ now. In fact, some influcn 
tial employes look on it as the 
single most important prev> 
sion of the Senate bill. 

Frankly. the odds 
pear to be against enactment 
this vear of any bill with the 
20-year optional retirement pro 
vision regardless of age 

HOUSE ACTION? Meantime 
it may be another wees oF 
longer, before the House Post 
Office & Civil Service Comm 
tee approves a CSR bil! 

The Committee may be able 
to wind up its public hearings 
en Tucsday, or Thursday at the 
latest. An executive session 
aise is slated for Thursday and 
there is some hope the Com 
mittee can agree on a bill at 
that time. CSC officials will 
meet with the Committee & 
help it work out a bill 

In any event, the House 
won't be able to act on a bull 
wntil it’s periously close to ac 
journment of Congress, and 
the dispute over CSR may not 
be settled until the very last 
day of the session 

TRAINING: The Senate P st 
Ofice & CS Committee will 
hold a hearing Monday : 
3287. the bill to 
agencies the autor 
select groups of «mpic 
outside inmstit fier Z 
training. — > 
reau officials 

MAJOR MEDIC AL 
ploye has calied attent 
general practice 
ment which he sa) 
looked argumeén: 
the Presidents pian 
Federal workers and 
lies free insurance 
heavy medical costs 


now sD 


~ 
a 


Or 7 i) 
Budzet Bu 
naGorse ft 
AT 


and 
_— 


‘ 


~ 


~ . 


‘ese - «= _~> 


a 
against 


In the Grst six months of this os tf 
year, he recalls, he bas pot a * 


total of $26 “in the hat” te help 


. od 


per i 


* Jame< 


The Washington 


Times Berald 


“ity Life 


OBITUARIES 
SCHOOLS 


GARDENS 


SUNDAY, 


JULY 8, 19 


26 


ae. 


Lane Urges 
Change in 

U.S. Grant 
To District 


New Method Asked 
To Eliminate 
Congressional Veto 
On Prior Actions 


Engineer Commissioner 
Thomas A. Lane said last 
night he hoped to have re 
Stored to the District budget 
the $3 million Federal! 
payments which Congress 
authorized last March 

The Howse Appropriations 
ttee lusecd to pay the 
t the mai SS mil 

on taken Fridays 
v4 | Wik 
the Peo 
recommended anew meth 
f handling the Federal pey- 
( oner 
Federal pey-) 
ment authorized by Congress, 
should be as firm aos thei 
taxes imposed on local citizens 

Congress boosted the ceiling 
of the payemnt from $29 te $23 
Revenue Acti 
azo. The 


- 


: 


n 


Om rre rr: . 
: _ Co 


( 


a2ocdcit 


Lane on the raco 


- r> 
program. “Report te 


ple 


ment 


stressed 


T% ™ : 
The mmissi 


o>) Bee 


just 


vo - ha 
ae y 


u ihe 
passed four 
ame law 
oy S10 mm 
“The art 
Appropriat 
Genying the 
payment 
2Zzain _ 
a satisfactory 
genera! 


the TT) 


. a 
rmncns 


raised i 


on , 
aie! 


a 


‘ 
increased Federal 


rn mim. <« we or - 


our ftailure 


- 


lon 


rT *.' : 
Lane said 
Lane offered 
the 
seems we need a different 
a of e¢ Federal pay 
when a balanced 
s Geviseed. the 
ii be pest as 
‘7 are 


rr 


~/ 


pr Her OU “- 

met 
~ - ’ — 
nanMriiing : 


that 


. 
DPAVIMNe Tt 


ment <= 
iscal 
Federal payment « 
2s the teues 
mpesed upes the citizens 
Frends ef the District in the 
House, meanwhile. made ready 
to carTy the fight te the floor 
(aey ste any chance of wit 


firm wh 


John L. MeMillan (D 
>. ©). chairman eof the House 
District Committee. said how-! 
ever, he did not like te inter 
fere with House Appropriations 
Corgmittee recommendations | 
that the $3 million be cut. 

The Appropriations Commilt- 
tee flatly denied the $3 million 
on the recommendation of Dis 
trxt Subcommittee Chairman 
Louis C. Rabeut (D-Mich 

Rabaut’s explanation of the 
Geletion to the House is ex-! 
pected to influence the attitude 

District-minded Congress 

the Goor debate Ra 
claimed the money 

a sur 


- 


FRANCIS OWEN RICE AT WORK IN HIS LABORATORY AT CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY 


Welfare Dept. 
In Arlington 


Feels Pinch 


Lack of Fumds May 
Force Curtailment, 
County Beard Told 
The Arlington County Wel 
fare Department may have to 


curtail its facilities drastically 
this year. according te John G 


iHowell, superintendent of the 


Department 
Howell warned the County 
Board yesterday that the De. 
pertment. already a “starve 
thon operation. must have 
more funds er cut Ms program 
Howell said the Department's 


s budget request of $500,000 was 


t created a surplus 
had mace wr 
Congress 

he added 

Uncie Sam should support the 

Dist: as strong’y as possible 
Rep. Antonio M. Fernandez 
DN. Mex a former member 

of the Rabeut committee. said! 
he would have opposed the cut 
“I will vote for any effort to 
restore the payment on the 
foor.” Fernandez said 
included on his 
that suthorized 
ana tax program 

Oren Harris (D-Ark 
O'Hara R-Minn 
Wil D-Miss.) and Henry 
O. Taille (R-lowe). all of whom 
are considered open-minded op 
Lee Mistie#r 


not Be nis 

much 
meet 
- 


7 


‘rut 
. ~.% 


John 


iarns 


cut to $415,000. and the State is 
expected to remege on its share 
of the matching-fund 

The state last year defaulted 
on 2beut $40.500. Howell toid 
the Board. This amount was 
then taken from County funds 
to keep the program going. 
Howell added 

The Board asked Howell for 
a full repert on the Welfare 
Department's present facilities 
Boerd members also 2greed to 
query the State Department of 
Public Welfare on its local ex- 
penditures and on its opinion 
of the Arlington welfare pro 


ram 
ee 


Ft. McHenry Gets Aid 


BALTIMORE. July 7 @—The 
birthplace of the U.S. national 


lanthem. Fort McHenry is to 


School Signs 


FTC Accord 


The Federal Trade C« 
yesterGay announced it 
reachea agreement with 
\. MeCorwer. who for 
marketed a Civil Serwic 
wresponGcence course 
wherebw McCorvey would 

maxing faise claims 


te. t mey 


7-7 « 


‘10n 


had 


ri¥ 
4 


- 
ase 


= 


>. = 


which operated 


ing anything about 


, 224 


3 the course faisely guar 
Civil 

ae 
isTepresented 


- 
* 


several of his cowerkers whe * 


have had majer ilinesses seach 
as heart attacks and cancer and 
whe faced persenal Snancial 
disaster because of the beavy 
costs invelved. In cach of these 
cases, he adds. the emplores 
basic health policies proved in 
adequate te cover théir costs 
His comment: 

“The Presidents plan would 
not only relieve the 
fear of «personal bankruptcy; 
because of a lingering illness 
but it also would save us literal 
ly thousands of dollars annual- 
ly which we now contribute to 
help our less fortunate co 
workers.” 

PS: In that same vein, I was 
told the other day of three em- 
ployes in this city who are 
faced with long and costly ill 
nesses and in each case their 
colleagues are being asked to 
contribute to help pay their 
bills. ve 


us from 


‘ 


Thief Snatches 
Store s $1000 


7 res (60E approximately 
fronr manager of a 
tockville si Sore last night 
me Was taking the days 
eipts to a bank. Montgomery 
CUNY police Teporiec 
Everett Burdette. 32 of 
Gaithersburg. manager of the 
Shee Mart at 101 N. Washing. 
said he had locked up 
his store about 9:30 p. m. when 
aman told him “Hoid it" and 
grabbed the ba@g of money 
Burdette said the thief 
jumped inte an cld-model car 


_ £ 
ets ihe 


Oe 


7 


a a! — 
; > Pa 


two Negroes. one about 175 
‘pounds, 5 feet 7, wearing dark 


- 8 


have $100.000 muprovement as 
part of the National Park Serv- 
ce'’s 10-year park development 
program. it was disclosed today 


| 
| 
; 


Leng Ride. Theugh 


’ 


Free rocket fuel for return 
fight to earth may well be 
Walling on the planet Jupiter 
for daring space travelers from 
our own small but habitable 


New and still preliminary 
laboratory studies here of the 
long-puzziing bdands of color 
worn by the distant planet sug- 
gest the free supertuel possi 
bility 

Expermments to support a 
new theory on the composition 
of the color-banded atmosphere 
surrounding Jupiler were re- 
iperted recently by Francis 
Owen Rice. bead of the chem 
istry department of Catholic 
University of America. 

Strangely. the possibility that 
Jupiter may possess unlimited 
natural reservoirs of rocket 
fuel had its origin in a human 
frailty—ciumsiness. 

One of the chemist’s assist 
ants, a graduate student who 
was processing a mixture of 
| gases, accidentally spilled freez- 
img nitrogen over the labors 
tory apperatus. The mishap 
| produced an immediate colored 
\deposit on the imside walls of 
i‘tramsperent quartz tubing 
\through which the gases were 


| The gases under study, the 


i\chemist said. were those that 


astronomers have identified as 
present im the Jovian aimes 
phere. And the colors of the 
cold-formed deposits visually 
matched those which first de 


It could be that a big brown 
eyed boxurr named Duke is con 
sidered a traitor te his canine 
kind. but hes big enough to 
keep most of his kind from do 

Duke, nominally the property 
ef Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Thais, of 
Dresden st. Kensington 
Md. likes maiimen. Not up 
usual. you might aay. because 
most of his breed agree that a 
mailmans ankle is the most 
toothsome morsel on the block 
—eny block. 

But Dukes regard fer the 
postman—any postman—is akin 
to Damon's for Pythias. Al 
phonse'’s for Gaston, or for that 
matter. the average dogs for 
his master 

Daily. Duke can be seen lop 
ing beside a mail truck as it 
makes its pickups. or riding 
proudly on is front seat. Next 
om his schedule & a trot 
hrough the community with 
one of the carriers as he makes 
hus appointed rounds Deliveries 


finished, he's back at the post- 


office until closing time when 
one of his foot-weary buddies 
him home. 


brings 

| “I feed him his breakfast.”' 

waiting nearby and drove off Mrs. Thalis admitted, “but thenicther driver found him next 

Police broadcast a lookout for|I don't see him again until the | 

 postoffice closes.” : 
She says i all started about’ 


six months age when the fam- 
iy pet. now 18 months old/ 
struck up a friendship with the, 
Thalis mailman. Devid Mi 
Smith. 22 Smith said he petted’ 
Duke a couple of times “and he 
started following me.” 
companionship lasted all the! 
way back to the station, about! 
a mile from the Thalis home. 
and it's gotten so Dukell buddy 
up to amybody with a mailbag 
Kensington carriers think! 
Duke's conduct may provide | 
ithe answer to the mailman-vs-| 
dog problem, a national sols-| 
tion for which Postmaster Gen-| 
eral Arthur Summerfield re-' 
portedily would give his nl 
right ankle. No carrier Duke es-| 
corts is ever bothered by the! 
other dogs on his beat. Duke’ 
romps with them mostly. but is! 
capable of snarling seriously | 
toward any member of his own’! 
clan who simply wont be’ 
kidded out of a customary snap) 
at the postman's leg. 
| Duke even wound up in the 
‘Bethesda station once by fol- 
Jowing a substitute mail carrier! 
and another time he left a truck 
‘im a strange section of town and 
couldn't find his way home. An- 


Traiter te His Kind 


Dog Becomes Postman’s Best Friend 


This) 


‘Morning, waiting patiently be- 
side a mailbox for hi ride back 
to more familiar surroundings. 


“ 


By Char'rs Del Veechic Stal’ Phetesrapher 


lighted the eye of Galileo when 
he turned his tiny telescope 
Jupiter-ward in 1610. 


Rice reported his findings. 


and theory. im the June issuc 
of Scientific American. Jupi-' 


ter’s many colors, he pointed’ 


out. have long suggested that 
its atmosphere is made up of a 
varied and wnousual array of 
compounds 

Concerning his own work, he 
reported 

“Analysis of recent observa 
thoms permits us 
Jupiter has a relatively small 
core of rock and metal. This 
may be covered with a thick 
layer of ice and frozen am- 
monia. Perhaps a huge sea of 
uguid methane overlies the 
ict. and i may be. finally. that 
the planet is enveloped im an) 
atmosphere of hydrogen. heli 
um and vapors of ammonia and 
methane.” 

Chemist Rice stzted in his re- 
port that the only facts scien- 
tists are positive about are that 
methane and ammonia are pres | 
ent in the outermost layer of 
Jupiter's atmosphere and that 
the temperature of this layer 
ranges from Minus—222 to 
Minus—292 degrees Fahrenheit 

In his mew theory, ultraviolet 
rays of the sum may rip the 
molecules of ammonia and 
methane apart. producing their 
molecular fragments known as 
“Tadicais.” the ingredient of 
rocket fuels. just as heat ap 


to suggest that | 
wart the Commissioners did not plan 


eS 


Lane Opposes 


Gas May Be Free eae Span 
On Planet Jupiter 


By Nate Haseltine 
Saf Reporer | 


or Bridge 


Censtitution Ave. 
Structure Will Not 
Need One, He Says 


Engineer 
Thomas A. Lane said last 
he sees no need for building 
draw span as part of the 
stitution ave. bridge. 

He indicated that he hopes 
this requirement will be ei 


- 
+ 


to the People.” He said 
for the draw span at an added 
cost of $1.9 million because the 
Secretary of the Army had 
ruled the proposed height of 
the $7 million bridge 
adequate ciearance over the 
waterway.” 

The Senate has approved 
building the bridge without the 
draw span. But a requirement 
that this feature be included in 
the planning is included in 
bill as approved by the H 
District Committee. 

Gen. Lane also said the 
ly completed traffic lane 
west side of the Key 
will be opened to traffic 
Work has begun on the e 
side. creating a bottleneck 
Washington-bound traffic at 
Rosslyn end of the bridge. 


Today's Chuckle 


_ Leve is pretty much like eat- 
img mushrooms. By the time 


ig 


if 


i 
x 


5 
Bm 


AT 
a 
: 


vs 


plied in the laboratory produces you find out whether it's good 


the same fragments. 


for you. it's too late. 


Duke, maiiman’s friend, rides 


ai 


te work with George Baume. 


7 


Commissioner 
night . 
2 
Con- 


’ 
| 


' 
: 
; 
' 
: 
: 


| 
| 


Multiple Injuries 
Perplex Probers; 


Clues Lacking for 
Murder or Suicide 


By Harry Gabbett 
and Alfred E. Lews 


Stel’ Repor vers 


An intensive two-way 
probe of a violent death here 


day—-with the big 
still unanswered. 


queston 


ceive his fatal injuries” 


It was 3-25 a m. on June 


oo" 


-s 


Mystery Death 
In Underpass 
Baffles Police 


Elementary Level 
D. C. Seeks 
16 Special 
he ng 


Br Jear Bie 
Sa? Beer 
Scheo) ofieuak wil tack == a 
regees: fer 6 epecual fear ‘ters 
fer the clemeectay «atecis me 


i Ghee erties 
will be ackiow Ser @ Gottel! of SD 


by the dechibeard clack On 8D special tee hen 


through 
takes South Capite!l 


S. wnder 


\grotesquely—so sudden}y thes 


wey 


to swerve to avoid } 


\Just 19 minutes later. He never oy 
consmousness 


f 


: 

i! 

i 
ek 


iP 


bi 


an 


ay 
rT 


fol 


" BaV€ the 


later. 
trance 


|A | newspaper 


ie 


oa fF 


af 
ty 


: 
i 


hand was 


; 


epee 
tf 


_ S222._—o mile 5 elem 


il 


ee 


7a the sectond 
operating gudret reueests sor 
57S sear oe 


. the carrest Sarge 
The 4 sperma! gate sctunl 


af 


—as = sah 

retin }h + - 

milben of wtort £2) miliso 
would go fer indian «tunis 

The measure alt au ter-aes 


= oor 


to June BD 


TRAM nats ant t(yeracnn 
i J 


. cwisuters 
Sen «ft the District reruies. 


THE WASHINGTON POST ond TIMES HERALD, (ASTI Russell Simmons, Dies at 101 J .D. M’Rorie gen ene 


. ie memory 
band and father whe 
jue ares years ago te- 


B2 
Edgar Hoover's Born Slave, Dies at 110 ||Mrs.Clark |\Dead; D.C. rata 


bd We fnew that al are watching 
Millie Russell Simmons, torn father was sent to Richmond Service Set 


more ave 
ves 20 full of love. 
And your love will cuide us, Daddy, Cw er 
Toe God . abov ra : 


. + F or Monda Executive YOUR, DEVOTED (WIPE ANN Twn. Cemetery 3 , 
HAILER. FRED E. In memory of FR ING ct. ursdsy. Jul 
Sister Dies ) — ie John David McRorie, 65, of| eo tur 3° DS reas “Eatin pth st 
hours. a 


Private funeral services wili/20%2 Amberst ave. Silver Te oun LOvENe Sea ma | cee’ clber pt, Lies Bees Fi 
be held Monday at Pumphrey’s Spring, Md., retired credit man- AND SISTERS , FP 
Funeral Home, Bethesda, Md.jager for Maloney, Inc., died) SCHWALENSERG. HENRY. In nem 
for Mrs. Reuben Clark, a Wash-|Friday at the National Institu- okie ebaR myoana.” HERAT 
| on resident for 33 years. = eae 

irs. Clark celebrated her|** of Health. "are 
10ist last November,| Mr. McRorie had been a pa ® joday, though ' 

She Fri at 5816 Chevy tient there for nearly six YOUR LOVING WIFE CLARA. — : wort: ~ i190 & 
- Ow. the home|months suffering from a heart Bird lensteig, Remains pt Cham 
uy 3. at I | 
terment ri oa 


HH 


of her daugh M 
ter, > 
McPherson. Burial will in | Simeone end arthritis. He n, | ALLEN, LUCRETIA E. On 
Mount Olivet Cemetery, Fred-/‘urned home last week, where hive 
erick, Md. he was stricken with a hernia 
ng | hemorrhage which proved fatal pegs = 
after readmittance to the hos-| Helnicke. Prien gre lnviged te 
pital. ’ Robert A Pumphrey "Rockville. 
He retired due to fll health| js: 20.5. at 3 5 =. inverment 
in 1953 from a post he had held! se:7. rorre ) 
for 23 years, frst with Hunter) > i.<° 
"| Brothers and then with their Ps Constance Hurlock. sis. 
purchasers, Maloney, Inc. Walter oO ent Wiinam J 


Ei 
g BEES 


af he 
i 
i 
ith 
Hi 
: 
i 


7, 

i} 

ii 
5 


i 
en 
fe 
ie] 
gf 
5 
is 


1 
1} 
fe 


was superintendent ? 
Youth Division and very 


if 
ii" 
uh 
il 
pi i 
pis br 


i 


Leader ot 
Protestants — 


| 
NEW YORK. July 7 xs) 


a 
Mr. McRorie came to Wash- ere at mc 


ington from his Statesville, N. 
C., home when he was 19. He at- 
tended military school and col-/PLAKEWORE, | M4R softer = 
lege in Charlotte, N, C., and — Bel eau Aer Cc ete In eu of Gowers. © 
served with the Marines over- SORE: wits of the che a Blake. make contributions o the Ame 
seas in World War I. services on Vlondes. “duty ; . RU 30 MeALEER, ALONZO W., of 1610 
Funeral services will be held Church. Cameron ils ra Agxandria ‘cae M.S 
Tuesday at 9 a. m. in the War. . duly 30. 4s may call at 
ner E. Pumphrey Funeral Dy he . ent fos kine ens ome. 517 
Home, 8434 Georgia ave., Silver 


» J 
t 
= on r. July . at 2 
BROWER. ANNA A. ' = eshington wat 
Spring, followed by requiem| 24 Maul Moe 7. 
,| mass at St. John’s Catholic) *°G ower 


AX, et 5 
P r ° 

Mines ome. 290 
"ur “McRorle i aurvend by a  e EN Pe aivciand “ «ep a he. om : 7. 
his wife, vay | Hunter Mc- a CAPARDI. wife 3 Nick ral 20 om. (Parking jacivtigs> Ip 
Rorie, daug r of John Hunter Inton ua. ye rs. Paul McRORIE. JOHN DAVID. On 
the original owner of th A Mein ae July © 1956, at the National o 
eral equipment, feed and hard. Nome” 191 tith 5 eee, Doe ‘Konik of ike 
ware concern, for which her i». =. Re tives and friends 
his sister, Mary Trott and broth- 
er, Robert A. McRorie, both of 


7 
vi ave.. Silver . 

» .|Greensboro, N. C., and another ee Ciark. mother, of g facilities) Mase will 
Va. Methodist brother, T. Hugh McRorie of lam FR - i 2 % 10. 6t.9:30 Sm. Oi, 
9 oie te irises Sloery Chace foneras Maps| Enic "yh “bares, Snes doen 

Ponder July boot 1 pocn Tater 

co CASA ©, & - ay. 2 

a 


fit 
f 
af 
4 
iff 


t 


nd 


EiF 
i 


‘ 
sek 


i 


cherect @ a, 
eas : : 
te@es by the 
Neaetiesai 


ily 
| 


st ff 
FE Bekk 


5 
STonde C 
r " 
ati 


ti 


Baffles Police === 


ber. tee it was ber fingernadl 


f 
2 


Hh 
iF 
i 
if 


il 


istends. His wide, Giogys, was finally f1 
B38 &= 

A former emociste of Secre -. 

tary of State Jotm Foster Dulles we 


i= church work, Dr. Van Kirk foment was s simple spat born | Mr. Harrison, | Leader, Dies | caaries d. sigsbee 11 


clergymen : — Dr. Graveside services will be 
Sevet Rests lest Merch He’ ' _—y . - The Rev. Dr. Hawes Palmore 


- — a held Tuesday at 10:30 a. m. at 
was scheduled te leave ca Mon } eae Clarke, a Methodist leader in), National Cemetery 


é2y for Arncidsbeim, Germany... Virginia for 34 years, died last | for Charlies Dwight Sigsbee III, 


night following a heart attack 38, writer and television pro- 
in Alexandria Hospital. He was| gram director, killed June 20 in| "> g. Parkine tectllties, | 
71. an auto crash near Lexington, ment Glenwood Cemetery. 

In May, Dr.-Clarke complet-| Va. ee COX. BORE, Bam's” ds. Ve Pa 
ed a three-year term asamem-| Mr. Sigsbee, wife and rs, Ze Monday. July 9. 0% m. ‘perk. 
‘ber of the nine-man Judicial/four daughters, were driving ar Veo aod © ox a et ee 
aton Council, Methodism’s supreme | home to Columbia, Mo., after wey ort, Gon Pett as © C. of 3220, Mist pl, 


. PET 
nd ; 1956 
court. He also served on sev-|&@ visit here with his mother-in-| Se site a, og Dy ynree brothers Chambers Paxersi Flome bee 
“ on 


Lik 
i 


Hines Co 
4th oft pe. after 2 
rom 


eral jurisdictional and general|law, Mrs. Martin Shepherd, 721] ag SA a ee 
. 


{ Pieris kr m Mass &. Co 
the law-making Jackson ave. Falls Church, _ * a il sien Church. 4115 16th st. nw. at 
Fort Lauderdale. Fla, where and policy-making bodies. | | when the fatal collision with a] §,J.asi Monorial bark S| Levosa es See me 
be spent his winter vacations. | During his ministry, he was truck occurred. DE MUND ro 

Mr. Harrison was one of the/ district superintendent of the! Mrs. Sigsbee and the girls 
founders of the Wheaton Cham-|/Lynchburg, Danville and East- were hospitalized for 11 days 
\ber of Commerce and a charter|ern Shore districts. in Lexington. Mrs. Sigsbee, the survived. by five 


. Dr. Clarke’s long term of former Georgie Shepherd,| 201 isp st. aw. on ger ices ak Chambery Pune 
eric. Dead Civitan duty, during which he devel-escaped with a broken mose/ inierment Arlington Me Come} oie Le ae 
nh 
el 


s “a 6 4 


ii 

elt 
nh 
Fake 


° 


ed @rvrearcod womas 


: 
: 


, 


loped a reputation as a strong 2nd foot. Cheryl, 12, and 
a 
oa 


7 
preacher, included service as Brenda, 1%, suffered lacera-)POnNms. am. On ares 
; wn of i a 
folk, Petersburg, Norfolk, 6%, a concussion, and Karen, A = gt tie sisters 
i 
' t 


ER 


He|minister in churches in Suf- tions and shock, Marti Jean, wi 
.| Portsmouth, Lynchburg, Wash-|Cheryl's twin, serious shock) #5. . ne. = 
ington Street Church in Alex-|and a broken jaw. . Parkas 
andria and Calvary Church,| Mr. Sigsbee was program 7 in Mes “flows: 
Arlington. director of station KOMU-TV ; 
He was born in Cumberland|at the University of Missouri = © - ett elm 
County, Va.. and educated atisince 1943. Before that he . etworin 
Randolph-Macon College and/worked six years at the Bailti- 4 fer. ~ dels 
Vanderbilt University. He held|more Sun TV station, WMAR,/ 2’ r- 
an honorary degree of doctor|and wrote features for the 
of divinity from Randolph-|the Sun's Sunday section. He 
Macon. Dr. Clarke served as | was Tape Critic for Tape Re- 26 
a chaplain in the Army inicording Magazine, Severna : 
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World War I with the rank of| Park, Md. ee Say 3. lise PAUL Pri 
first lieutenant. He enlisted in the Army at > Durnis Me sige te survive py | ew ot fewers the fam 
He was a member of the/ig. He will be buried beside; (f" ae smother, Mrs! Sind where: tas 
held| Kiwanis Club in Alexandria/his grandfather, Rear Adm. Psert Pr dey, Juls 6. 
m. in the Rob-| 2nd a Mason with membership Charlies D. Sigsbee, one-time; Mendsy. Juiz 9 af | eepjtal. NINA ef Derches- 
in Ruth Lodge, Norfolk. captain of the Maine. His) Vo “fithccs,  Artineton i] Wenerak Salk? di Ss 
He is survived by his wife./father died of flu as an ensign| Cemetery * > > & Cee Prends war cat os 
the former Jessie Ham of Rich-\in World War I. ECHOL FICKLIN. Mines Oo, Funeral Home t i6th 
mond, with whom he lived at} He reinlisted in the Army| ? | * of oa 6 =| &t Metpneny Episcopal Chureh” 13:7 
400 Commonwealth ave. Alex-|sfter Pearl Harbor and was! ths ‘i stant aq James To55 gts. “Entorment asteanten nee 
andria; a daughter, Mrs. S. Nel-| discharged in 1945 as a first toma! Cemetery 
son Gray of 624 Oakland ter-ilieutenant. He attended St. 


race, Alexandria; a son, Lam- zohan prep school in Annapo- 


buth M. of Ashland, Va. and/ii« 
four sisters, two brothers and; Mir. Sigsbee also is survived 
three grandchildren. by his mother, Mrs. Charles 


Dwight Sigsbee of Lebanon, 
2 Wallets With $880 |** 


Reported Stolen ~ |Deaths Elsewhere 


, rs. » 
Two wallets containing a| The Very Rev. Vincent 3.) $,,A050°%,"s! Louis. Me. 
*}total of $880 were taken from Flynn, 55, president of the Col-| 9% trrcr.5) 2 & om 
the apartment of Stanley J./lege of St. Thomas and St. hl 
Janulewicz, 26, at 4010 Kansas Thomas Military Academy of , ; 
ave. nw. y. St. Paul, Minn. president of saay duly 16 ot ise 
| Janulewicz told police one the Association of American aitariem Port Linesin Cemetery. 
lwallet containing $580 was Colleges in 1949, formerly; +. = 7 bd A CMR Pion 
taken from the dining room chaplain of the National Fed- of tise et oan tather c. 
-\table and a baby’s purse con-\eration of Catholic Students} .. ane W 
— also taken in St. Paul. > hs ie 
rom room. Janu-| Prof. Lawrence Preuss 
lewicz was away from home at 7 SI. ae 
1 


of the University of Michigan, ~y Se ah waskineton | VALANCE. LILLY ANN. On Saturay, 
died Thursday. | poe Cane Sp Se Se widely known political scientist 2 ee beets hh a EY, Rie 


Mrs. Cook, 2 Washington Nina Romeyn in the field of international law, folk, Ya. shore ore aise a) fees . 
since 1990. was; wine a , Marine Battalion was twice on the executive 
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Taking Enlistments member of the board of editors Bi arrine Wd.  Watorment . Fugeter. Jule 6 st 1p = 

| The 13th Infantry Battalion, of the — Journal of In-| 8 — pond + Seige ee een Cumetasy 
Marine Corps Reserve, is ternation w; in Ann Arbor, SOM. Cmmuaniention of 
nester accepting enlistees from 17 to Mich. we. 238 
118 for six months’ training,| The Rev. Herbert C. Noonan, 
"\beginning Aug. 3 '81, president of Marquette Uni- 
at| After completion of active versity, Milwaukee, from .~ 
Fort Scott. Kan duty, they attend regular meet-|1922, and at one time on the 
om & ene lings of Organized Marine faculty - ee ew 

\Corps Reserve units. The 13th St. Louis University and 5t ; 

operates from the Naval Gun Mary's College in Kansas; in) ™4"\§% 4\"iiie Rowglial SOLtA & | 
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where geryices wit held on Mon- 


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— vert. ‘*) | Merta mp “Tome, 1500 | MATL. MEM. PARR—2 grave cites, 6450 
COURTESY PARKING OPPOSITE : ond ea ering ht mt | aeenrarog, are sHIyOTON a: a Y. 


7 


10 Boys Charged in Eight Thefts 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Sunday, July 8, 1956 B83 


By Norman Driscoll. Staff Photographer 


One of Pepco’s steam locomotives goes about its business ai the big Alexandria plant. 


Locomotives 


Puff Steam 


The arrest yesterday of 10, Don's Cafe, 2315 18th st. ne., 
| scenaas boys has solved eight when a nimble thief snatched 
's outheast housebreakings his wallet containing $200 and 


'which occurred in the past four|**" ram Te Yemenees 

) | Miller, of 2310 Ashmead pl. 
months, police reported yester-| ww. told police the man was 
day. ‘about 29 years old and of thin 
| The boys, ranging in age from build. He wore a white cap, 
113 to 15. were rounded up fol- khaki shirt and pants, and had 
lowing the arrest Friday night|@ “very, very long nose,” Miller 
of three members of the band. $aid. 


|All. have be h d h 
nemssheesiind. ee ee Gunman Holds Up 
Clerk in Laundry 


| ets. Bernard J. Panetta, Har- 

‘ris L. Faircloth and Ancil Do-| 

linger were cruising when they! A gunman held up a clerk in 
saw three boys behind a serv-\the Blue Ribbon Laundry, 110 
ice station at 61 M st. se. and Florida ave. ne. yesterday and 
heard the sound of hammering.’ escaped with $24. 

The boys fled, but were cap-| Police said Margarita Reid. 
‘tured in the rear of 62 N st. se. 23. reported that the man 
Police said the boys were in forced her to hand him the 
‘the process of bending copper money from the cash register, 
pipe which had been stolen'then fied. 


from the John G. Webster Co., 

1309 Ist st. se. | Seven Children 
After pounding the pipe out 

of shape, police said, the boys Snatch Purse 

would blacken it with fire, then 

sell it as junk. Two sales 

netted them about $10, police|Tanging in age from 5 to 12 

said. snatched a pocketbook contain-| 
rolice said some of the boys\ing $3 from a 5l-year-old wom-| 

were involved in an attempt to , 

open a safe at the Capital Egg an Friday night. 

Products Co., 901 ist st. se., on|, Bewlah L. Ramsey of 1525 

16th st. nw., told police the chil- 


Four boys and three girls| | 


i'May 29. 
) + - ‘dren came up behind her in the 
| Other housebreakings oc P 

| at the Brandywine 1600 block of Q st. nw.. knocked 


curred h 
Frozen Novelty Distributing|"** PUrse to the ground and 


Co., at 14 L st. se.. where $30,7@" Of with it. 
was taken; Everybody's Carry 


Out Delicatessen, 86 N st. se. Woman, Son Held 


At Pepco 


Deplorers of the fact that the 


nine cartons of cigarettes and 
$25 worth of meat: the Van 
|\Ness School, 4th and M sts. se., 
‘an electric fan, phonograph, 
baseball] equipment, electric 
heater and suitcase, and Shul- 
man's Meat Co., 77 I st. se. $1 


In Arlington Raid 


A 56-year-old woman and her) 
38-year-old son were arrested 
on liquor and numbers charges | 


romantic steam locomotive is 
on its way out may be cheered 
to learn that three of them in 
the Washington area are on 
their way in 

True, they're not the old-time 
huffing, chuffing iron monsters, 
but they do huff and they do 
chuff. They sport a bell that 
rings plaintively and a whistle 
that shrills confortably in the 
night—and they're not in a mu- 
seum. 

The three steam engines 
switch coal cars at the Potomac 
Electric Power Company's three 
generating stations here. Gaso 
line and electric-powered en 
gines that were used to do the 
job gave way a few years ago to 
the steam engines, which have 
proved more efficient. There's 
passerby and then went inside|other at the Buzsards Point 
her house to telephone police.|»jant and a third on the north- 
But before she could the hos-|ern edge of Alexandria at Pep- 
ipital called and asked if she).... potomac River plant. 


' rep 9 
As News of Wife’s | called and ts 
wou notify oman oO is . 
Wife's death. They're Slightly Ersatz 
railroadman of 


Death Arrives | Remind a 
them 


them and he dismisses 
PHILADELPHIA, July 7 Copter Crews Find with. “Oh. those .. .” He insists 
A 70-year-old man collapsed 


Net equipped te make its own steam, the engine is charged 
with live steam from the plant by brakeman John Evans. 


Man, 70, Dies 


yesterday in a pre-dawn raid on 
in change. their home by Arlington police. | 
The boys are held at the Re-- Mary Elizabeth Kenny, listed | 
ceiving Home pending action| by police at 1614 South 10th st., | 
by Juvenile Court. |Arlington, was charged with | | 
Diner’s Wallet ‘operating a lottery. Her son, | 


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James Theodore Kenny, of the| ~—— 


Seized by Thief same address, was charged 


Irving S. Miller was about to|W!th operating a lottery and 
pay his bill Friday night at|possession of illegal alcohol. 


Call RE. 7-1234, ask for Cirewlation, and erder The Wash- 
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now you can enjoy a range that thinks for itself! 


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. . the closest steam locomotive in 
and died on the sidewalk out- Bodies of 6 Airmen commission is operated by the/| 


|'Pennsylvania Railroad in yards 
near Philadelphia. 

Pepeo’s steam enginees are 
ersatz in that they don’t make 
|their own steam. Known to the 
imen who run them as “Thermos 
Bottles,” they are charged twice 
a day with about 2200 Ibs. of 
live steam bled from the plant's 
igargantuan supply of the stuff 


side his home early today just; , a 
as a hospital telephoned to give|_ ST. JOHN'S, Newfoundland, 
him the sad news that his j}} | July 7 w—Helicopter crews to- 
wife had died. ‘day found the bodies of six air- 
The dead man was Walter|™* killed in the crash of a 
Sho ater giant United States Air Force 
pars Pau! 68, had 'Stratotanker plane — ex- 
is wife, Pauline, 68, had en- rer the rugged moun- 
tered Einstein Memorial Cen- ee of Lauweter. ” 
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weeks ago. She died at 1 a. Mm. | ported in Gander today that the 
today. ‘helicopters landed in the crash : : 
Mrs. Mary Johnson, a neigh-|area, near Mealy Mountain, 45) The Potomac oe ee - 
bor, was summoned by a miles east of Goose Bay. the newest. It's a ton affair 
with 15,300 Ibs. of tractive force 


— === /(Grawbar pull) and it operates 


on a standard gauge track with- 
Featured at Campbell's in in the yards. About half the 
Washington & Silver Spring 


Otherwise, they're the McCoy. 


length of the average coal car. 
it can pull 15 of them loaded— 
or about 18 times its own 
weight 

The three move about 1.4 mil- 
lion tons of coal a year to Pep- 
co's furnaces. 

Crew of Two 

Crew of a “Thermos Bottle,” 
consists of an engineer and a 
brakeman, both of whom hold 
District engineer licenses, since 
they and about half a dozen 
others are rotated in several 
jobs. 

The engines tan be viewed 
only from afar. since all three 
Pepco plants are high on the 
national security list and are 
inaccessible to the public. 

Even so, a Pepco spokesman 
said, the company receives fre- 
quent requests from railroad 
enthusiasts for permission to 
watch the little Iron Horses 
from close up. 

“There's something 
steam coming out of a moving 
stack that gets them,” he said 


Girl, 18, Recovering 


From 9-Day Ordeal 


SALT LAKE CITY, July 7 @ 
The condition of 18-year-old 


nine days without food or water 
pinned beneath a wrecked car 
in Parleys Canyon, was Tre 
ported “much improved” today 

Although she had a fever 
during the night it was reduced 
by morning. Condition of her 


at toes, on which some of the skin 
, was affected by gangrene, was 


described “about the s ~. 
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The Washington Post 
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RE. 7-1234 


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Jean Margetts, who survived) 


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REPUBLIC 7-3275 


Pope to Vacation 
Among the other fine groups 
that appeared were Duke El- 


‘Free-Lanc ing’ 
Inventor Boosted | 


United Press 


Wins Divorce 
FAST LANSING. Mich. @) 


. 
ime _ _ . : . 5 
THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD» Not a Hot Tin Roof? Couple Married 
BA Sunday, July 8, 1956 arin RENSSELAER, N. Y., July 7) . 
| | In 2 Wheelchairs 
} P F H f EF d : alarm of fire last night. Fire- 
, . p Se +4 ove Jazz an as ts 0 n urance said the cat apparently pulle raplegic war veteran and a 
Law el Bu - aper F a open the door of the alarm box | Pate victim were married in 
| oa ‘:mudholes into which a tokenappeéarance with a sextet that |and tripped the signal with its) wheelchairs today in the chapel 
’ : Stat Reporter | 
NEWPORT. R. 1. Jul gibeen sprinkled. A capacity |top form. {box to the ground. tion t.ospital at Chicago. 
NEWP ) Me le  Ouy crowd of 10,000 attended and) ©The Charlie Mingus Jazz) The bridegroom was John 
The American jazz festival at\another capacity crowd was! Workshop, a relatively unher- Rubber Smuggled Out | Roscoe, 32, of Cleveland, Ohio, 
Reuters . : : 
BOSTON. July 7 #—Boston Editor John Mannion an- « endurance of the jazz fan. isame conditions tonight. garde jazz with real zest. | JAKARTA, Indonesia, July 7\was injured in @ hunting acci- 
Attorney John S. Bottomly to-, nounced that the paper was dis- tn In the past - | Newport Is not well supplied students Disrupt Concert Attorney General Suprapto to- dent eight years a0. _ ee 
day announced the purchase continuing publication. - - three days this & 5% | with hotels since most of the| e The Modern Jazz Quartet. day said that owe-third of Indo-|was Mary Lou Jordan, 26, 
of the Boston Post from finan-| ..~ owner would attempt to Ihas been as- stayed in the famous 70-room |, huge field before a noisy audi- 745.000 tons last year was Michael Jordan of Chicago. 
cier John Fox, All labor unions!resume publication immedi-| sailed by cold “cottages” built by the Vander-\ence nevertheless communi- smuggled out of the country. | They met and fell in love 
involved agreed to return t0/ ately—less than 24 hours after) rain and chill \bilts and other luminaries of|cated some of its subtle excel- ' when Miss Jordan, a com- 
Bottomly’s statement came a\was dead through traffic many visitors had to stay in| ie ‘pital to draw pictures of ailing 
few hours after he made what on streets laid private homes. The typical rate! VATICAN CITY. July 7/Ve-erans. 
he termed “a final offer’ for out before the \was a relatively reasonable $10 lington’s orchestra, the Chicago Pepe Pius XII will leave the| sateen iain - 
atican for a visit to his sum-| 
daily. The attorney said he pur. jammed with N \where two persons paid Hamilton Quintet and Louis mer A 
chased the paper on a 24-day 10.000 others. : ‘night for a room. . dolf ‘ ; 
pe Sampson 3 more jazz and did less clown-|@0lfo at the end of July, the 
option so that he will have op- ‘and been ex- — Jazz enthusiasts tolerated ing that usual. Vatican announced today. 
financial] status The principal drawbacks to , 
He also went into immediate 
conference with C. Stanley 
Typographical Union, over con- 
tractural, agreements. Whyte 
charged vesterday that Fox had 


Rai ‘Ss ” Townspeop! 
ain. Wind and are’ Townspeople | 
r P—A cat turned in a false) 
‘men in this Hudson Valley city) CHICAGO, July 7 (INS)—A 
BY Paul Sampson 
) e loffering of wood chips had included Buck Clayton, also in (feet when it jumped from the|4¢ Hines Vetgrans Administra- 
On 24-Day Option 
Newport is a monument to the|present under virtually the! aided group that played avant- ‘a World War Il veteran who 
Indications were that the!) hardy breed town’s original summer guests! not a group heard at its best in nesia’s rubber production of daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
work at once ‘announcement that the Post wind, crawled ‘the gilded age. Consequently | jencies. \mercial artist, came to the hos- 
the 125-yearold Democratic Revolution and ‘a couple but there were cases| 
_Armstrong’s band which played residence at Castelgan- 
portunity to examine the Posts) ploited by townspeople charg-|(not gladly) this physital and 
Whyte, president of the Boston 
“consistently failed to meet his 


Don’t underestimate the neigh 
borhood workshop wizard if 
he’s trying to build a better 
mouse-trap. He may build it 
One-third of all patented in- 
ventions are made by persons 


Arieen Gatti, 19, is shown in 
a Chicago court where her 
husband sought a $10,000 set. 
tlement for the privilege of 
ending their marriage. “When 
a woman wants her freedom 
she should pay for it,” his 


commitments over the last two with no scientific or tecnnical| lawyer argued. The judge, 


years 

Bottomly. an Eisenhower Re- 
publican, said he planned to re- 
turn to the policies “of the first 
Mr. Grozier, who was an inde- 
pendent Democrat.” He added 
that he would be “a publisher— 
not an editor.” 

News of the announcement 


training, says Jacob Schmook-} 
ler, Michigan State University) 
economist | 


About 45 per cent of all in-| 


ventions can be credited to 
persons who don't have college 
degrees 

Schmookler said it isn't 
that all discoveries are made 


salaried scientists 


$20 a week support. 


however, ordered Gatti to pay 


Goose Step 


LONDON, July 7 


w—Czech 
true |workers are making shoes and 
leather accessories out of goose 


ing as much as $30 for a sieep- 
ing room 
Thursday nights opening 
concert was preceeded by an 
allday rain that continued 
through the night. In spite of 
the steady rain, often driven 
by brisk breezes, about 


cert which was held in a large 
athletic field. 

The audience carried every- 
thing from beach umbrellas to 
iplastic tablecloths for protec- 
tion. Several women lost shoes 
in the quagmires that quickly 
developed in the main aisles. 

The rain stopped Friday 


3500 
persons turned out for the con-| 


‘financial discomfort in order to — 
hear and see an anserblage of ssPigeation stem tat 
the best big bands, small) sy! , 


, iharsh and often made the piano 
combos and vocalists perform-| sound like an electric guitar 


ing jazz today. Whatever criti-| 
o> h genet be Sede of the festi-/2%4 the hordes of college boys 
val ; 44 /and prep-school types, who en- 


it cannot be said that tered laden with beer, shouting 
skimped on the quality and) ; a4 

to friends while the music was 
quantity of the music. AMON),j ving and treated the whole 
ithe many highlights were: playing 


concert as just another sprin 
© Ella Fitzgerald, who ranged ’ pring 


. outing. 
from the sophistication of 


- There also. were two pane! 
Miss Otis Regrets” through idiscussions on jazz as commu- 
the rowdy joy of “Roll "Em, 


oS "nication and the future of jazz. 
— with consummate artis-| The second panel was preceded 
ry. 


| by a concert by three groups 
| © Coleman Hawkins, the su-| including one led by Friederich 
perb veteran of the tenor saxo- 


WILLIAMS 


POOLS 


Seaowhaievndencestialaeiinaicn FREE 


SWIMMING 


RA. 3-9112 


Ask te See Our Full Color 
Motion Picture About this ) OF 
Pooi—Right in Your Own 


: pe Clift : 
WASHINGTON 


CATHEDRAL 


"A House of Prayer 
for All People” 
SUNDAY SERVICES 
8 a.m., 9:30 am, 11 am. 4 pm. 
CATHEDRAL CHOIR 


MEN AND BOYS 


spread quickly among the Post's) by expert 
800 employes. They were|working in the laboratories of |@%d turkey skin, the 
stunned last night when City!large corporations news agency reports. 


Czech Home. 


Guida, the Viennese classical 
night but it was chilly and the phone, who swung the hardest/ pianist, who also plays surpris- 


grounds were still dotted withof anyone at the concert in his ingly good jazz. Wisc. Ave. & Woodley Rd. N.W. 


tf sangeet" 
speete teeetey 
cet oigeees, 


At Todd’; Famous “Kj 


ing Size” 
Northwest Warehouse 


25th & G Streets, N.W. 
AND 


NORTHEAST WAREHOUSE 
3045 V Street, NE 
reer Sf te * 


USE TODD’s 
EASY PAY PLAN 


tf o 
Now You Can Have A 
wa @ 


FULL %4 H. P. AIR CONDITIONER 


without the added expense of wiring . .. thanks to 


1956, 499.95—12 Cu. Ft. 


PHILCO 


DOUBLE DOOR 


Refrigerator 


‘248 


automatic defrost 


Special Group! 17 Inch TV 


rable Models 
& Consoles 


"48 


Emerson, GE, Philco, 
cratters, Westinghouse 
Zenith’ 


199.95—-1956 


PORTABLE 
17 inch TVs 


129 


With leather carrying cose; built-in 
entennre. Blue end white er red end 
white coses. Aluminized tube. 


Refrigerator 


automatic defrost 


Halli- 
and 


269.95 21-inch 


RCA “SUPER 


SERIES” 


Console TV 


149 


Aluminized tube. Beautiful 
Cabinet, Mounted on Casters, 
1955 Model. 


249.95—1956 


HALLICRAFTER 


229.95 


Hamilton 


id 
aad Automatic. 


127 | 118 


299.95-——1956 
MAYTAG 
AUTO. 
WASHERS 


249.95—1956 


Console TV 


138 
With Fingertip Tuning 
Special 


! Brand New 1956 
199.95 to 239.95 


Rl-Fl CONSOLES 
‘88 


© Webcer * Sylvania * Ad- 
miral © Emerson * Olympic 
3-speed phonos; 2 and 3 
speakers: same with AM and 
FM radios. 


329.95 21-inch 1956 


Sylvania 


TV Console 


133 


HALO-LITE! 


549.95 Nationally Famous 


16 Cu. Ft. Upright 
FREEZER 


All Aluminum Interior 


339.95—1956 


WHIRLPOOL 


“Imperial” Automatic 


WASHER 


‘199 


1956—17 Inch 


Nationally Famous 
Table Model 
TVs 


‘84 


Beautiful colored cabinets; 
modern designs! 


319.95—1956 


WHIRLPOOL 


“Supreme” Automatic 


WASHER 


178 


399.95—1955 


CHRYSLER 34-H.P, 
r 


Air Conditioner : 
159 


ee i i i 


LEADER AND PIONEER OF 
BALANCED COOLING 


| 


399.951 HP. 


Air Gond 
The Mest 


Just @ few 
Open Pieces. 
369.95——1956 Famous Make 


7¥2-Amp. %-H.P. | 
Air Conditioner 


= 498 


| 
1956—299.95 


RCA WHIRLPOOL 


148 


RCA ‘/2-Ton Casement 


‘169.95 


RCA 


} 
, 
J 
, 
, 
] 
J 
J 
, 
High Fidelity } 
, 
, 
, 
, 
, 
, 
, 
J 
, 
, 


KK i i EE KL EE EE 


stot, 


2-Speed Fon 
129.95—1956 


Wringer-Washers 


= ‘J 


1956—279.95 


PEHART 21” 


Thermostatic 
Operation 


CONSOLE 


‘98 


3 speed phono and 3 speakers 


} 
Constant 
Power! 


Flush Mount! 


Feather 
Quiet! 


HORSEPOWER 


no extra wiring necessary 


1956—399.95 


ONE-TON 
CASEMENT 
AIR CONDITIONER 


‘249 


With 2-Speed Fan 
and Thermestat 


Special Group! 10 Cu. Ft. 


Refrigerators 


Seme Auto. Defrost. from 
269.95 to 299.95 


157. 


® Hetpeint © Admiral © Kel- 
vinetor © Merge A few at Bech 
lecetion. 


With 
Aluminized 
Tube 


349.95 —1956 
Coolerator 34-H,P, 
Air Gond 
$ 


=. 166 


Thermostet 
1956—549.95 


WASHER 
1956-—485.00 
- CAPEHART 
HI-FI, AM-FM 


Tape Recorder Combination 


’ 
’ 
’ 
Automatic 
’ 
’ 
J 
’ 
) 


2. ee, DY YY SY YY DK DD Dd DDD ieee 


1956—299.95 


AM-FM oh inch TY Special Group! 1956—¥4-HP. 
Combination Combination 3-Wa AIR CONDITIONERS 


119 |: 157 


1956—14 Inch 


GENERAL ELECTRIC 
PORTABLE 
TVs 


‘82 


' 
‘ 


72 AMP. ROOM 


"360" Sound 


SMALL APPLIANCES 


eK DL KA KD KK 


AIR CONDITIONER 


@ Plug it in anywhere! @ No expensive rewiring! 


© Big % horsepower! 


AT THE SAME LOW PRICE AS AN ORDINARY AIR CONDITIONER! 


Here’s Vornado’s answer to low - cost, hot weather 
cooling for the thrifty buyer. This super de luxe is 
a 34 HP. unit that plugs into any house current. it 
brings you tremendous cooling power without the 


extra cost of expensive rewiring! It has all the famous 
quality features that have made Vornado the leading 
name in comfort cooling. There's no reason now to 
let your family suffer from the heat because you fee! 
that air conditioning is too expensive! 


14.95 Telechron Kitchen Clock with 
Night Lite and Appliance 5.95 


Outlet 
$8.95 General Electric Ship’ 4:95 
oad 


Wheel Clocks He 
3.95 Cooking Timers; tim 

1 to 60 minutes ......... 
3.95 Set of 8 12-0z. Colored 
Aluminum Tumblers 


34.95 and 39.95 ADMIRAL and 
PHILCO Fully Avtomofic 9 4:95 


] 79 


39.50 and 46.50 Hamilton-Beach 
and Oster Electric Food y] 4-95 
Mixers, Blenders ery ss 

12.95 insulated Picnic 7-95 
ee a n Nee 

2.98 insulated 1-Gallon 49 
Picnic Jugs ea ] 
Webster (Webcor) and Admiral New 
1956 3-Speed Automatic 95 
Phonographs ..... 39 
49.95 Double-Brush Electric 95 
Floor Polishers sexsi 29 
1.49 ice Cream 

Scoops 79: 


29.95 Quilted Comforte?, rayon 
covered Dacron filling; double bed 


size in rose or 7:95 2 for $15 


29.95 All Purpose Floor Polisher; at- 
taches to any tank or canister 7 


vacuum ...... 
6.95 GE Telechron Electric 3:47 
49? 


97.50 Hoover Constellation 
Vacuum w/attechments .. 


TODAY—SUNDAY-10 A.M. TO 6 P.M. AT 


, 


| Chauffeur Decidés 


Auto Is Here to Stay 
BOSTON @#—When Joseph Plastic Poles Praised | 


= eh ‘cde thin Gtner 8 aw sont - dia . '3 in Family in Crash 

. sonnson 100 © wheel for N 6 maga ’ 

the first time in 1905 he didn’t| zine Chemical Week says that} FALL RIVER, Mass, (p—In 

think the automobile was here plastic telephone poles, made | an auto accident, Manuel L,. 

to stay. of ere gee gg Fp and | Souza was injured. Manuel L. 
“] ht it just a .|weighing about pounds, | Souza was the driver of one of 

ae poten rae ‘promise many advantages to/the cars involved. Manuel L. 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
stats Sunday, July 8, 1956 ae 


Veteran Donates With United Givers Fund 


senior vice president and John| 
S. Hayes was chosen vice presi-| 


AOth Pint ot Blood am" j Daniel W. Bell was elected 


A 30-yearold World War II 
veteran, William T. Mickens. 
620 L st. sw., has joined the 
Red Cross Washington Regional! 
Blood Center's Five-Gallon 
Donor Club with the donation 
of his 40th pint of blood. 

An employe of the Veterans 
Administration Veterans Bene- 
fits Office and the father of six 
Mickens has been a recular 
donor since 1948. The Center 
reported he is the second,in his 
office to reach the five-gallon 
mark. 


The Regional Blood Center's}, 


weekly report showed a total 
of 1761 pints of blood 
tributed in the District and the 
communities served by blood 
mobiles in Maryland, Virginia 
and West Virginia. 

report listed 732 


pints dis 


tributed in the District. 330 in| &> 


Maryland, 380 in Virginia. 94 in 
West Virginia and 225 outside 
the area. 

Donations in answer to the 
emergency appeal for blood 
two weeks ago have alleviated 
shortages in all but the nega. 
tive blood groups, regional of. 
ficials reported 

In addition to the regular 
weekly bloodmobile schedule 
for collections. Red Cross don 
Ors May give biood at Garfield 
Hospital daily from 8 a. m. to 


a 


ee 
— LT 


dis-| wa: 


A further breakdown of the | thesda Ma 


5 p. m., Monday through Fri- 
day; at Freedmen’s Hospital, 1 
to 8 p. m., Monday through Fri- 
day and on Sunday afternoon 
from 2 to 5 p. m.; at Walter 
Reed Hospital, Monday through 


Friday, 9 a. m. to 4 p. m. and 
on Tuesday evening from 7 to) 
9 p. m.; and at the Washington 
Regional Blood Center, 2025 E 
st. nw., Monday from 1 to 9 
p. m., and Tuesday through Fri- 
day, 9 a. m. to 5 p. m 
The bloodmobile schedule for 
this week is: 
Prince Geors 
T-3- 
D. C. Chapter 
ave Room 


ono m Arlington 
Myer. Va.. 3 6 


er Coun- | 
7. 3:38 
Ma! 
2541. | 
Port | 
m. to 


n 


7 20 a. m. to 3:3 
Myer Grm. Fort 
4 e 

wednesday. July 11: D. C. Chapter 
Pentagon, Room 4A-750. 10 ao. m te 4 
>. m Montgomery Count Our Lady 
: Church. 735 Pearl at 


2uw 8 p.m 
12 Prince William 
Schoo! ; 
yp 


recay. July 12 

: Garfield High W ood - 
a. il m to 7 Paucuier | 
Par 


Nat 


‘ : tone! ; 
rt Meade. Mad. 10 6 


Then It Rained! | 


CORNWALL. Conn "Colo! 
nial-clad women had to post- 
pone a celebration marking the 
100th anniversary of a covered! 
bridge which withstood the! 
ravages of last year’s floods. It 
rained, 


ae 
2 
~, 
2 
* 
: ¢ 
~ oe | 
7 
* od 
: 
’ : 


7 ; " 
é \ wl News 
To Get Blood 


Two-year-old Linda Tanksley 
of Richmond, Calif., has been 
made a ward of the court to 
assure she gets the blood doc- 
tors say she needs. The little 
girl suffered injuries to her 
throat when she swallowed 
some kerosene and her par- 
ents, who are Jehovah Wit- 
nesses, objected tothe 
planned transfusions. 


There's Money to Burn 


BOSTON «@—The Federal 
Reserve Bank of Boston con- 
sign about $500,000 in worn 
and frayed bills to the flames 
every work day of the year. 
The old money is destroyed in 
a special oven that generates 
1800-degree heat. 


dent of the United Givers Fund, 


K. Morris, presidet of the board 
of directors. 

Bell, president of the Ameri- 
ean Security and Trust Co., 
is chairman of the District 
‘Chapter of the American Red 
‘Cross. He is a former Under 
Secretery of the Treasury and 
lhas served with many civic 
| organizations. Hayes, presi- 
‘ident of the Washington Post 
Broadcast Division, is serving 
his second term as president 
‘of the Community Chest Fed- 
‘eration. 

Both the Community Chest 
and the Red Cross recentiy be- 
‘came members of the United 
'Givers Fund. 

The Board also reported on 
‘progress of the UGF Chapter 
‘Plan which has 164 firms en- 
irolled in the “one-campaign-a- 
\year” plan. The firms repre- 
isent almost 30,000 workers. 

Members of the Chapter 
Plan will receive identification 
plaques signifying participa- 
tion in the program. They 
pledge to provide employes 
with an installment payment 
method of donation and to pro- 


vide an annual corporate gift 
* 


: 


it was announced today by E. | 


| 
| 


Bell 


ee 


Charlottesville Man 


Is Found Drowned 
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va., 
July 7 #®—William T. Northern, 
48, a salesman for a Charlottes- 
‘ville auto parts shop, was found 
‘drowned today in an Albemarle 
County farm pond. 
| His car was found parked 


near the pond and his wallet 
|was lying on the car seat. 


| Dr. Harvey D. Smallwood, 
medical examiner, said suicide 
was a “definite probability.” 


A Caruso Sings 


DETROIT @#—Enrico Caru- 
so, 26. not related to the late 
Opera singer, confines his sing 
ing to lullabies and he gets 
plenty of practice. His wife 
has presented him with a sec- 
ond set of twins. 


Warehouse Sale! 


RCA 3-H.P. 
Air Combination 


149 


Deluxe flush mount: 
lan; thermostat heat: 
hutton controls 


449.95—1956 World Famous 
German !mport 


HI-Fl, AM-FM 
Short Wave 
Combination 


*227 


3-Speed Aute. Phone 


Double-Door 
Refrigerator 


Special Group! 499.99 to 
549.95-—1956 


De Luxe 


229.95 De Luxe—1956 


21" TV 
Table Model 


“117 


349.95—1956 


1 H.P. De Luxe 
Air Conditioners 


"199 


Very popular brand! 
ostats! 


With 


1956 — Nationally Advertised 


GAS 
DRYERS 


‘98 


1956—21 Inch 


HALLICRAFTERS 
TV Consoles 


| 


1956—299.95 World Famous 


SUPER DE LUXE 


AUTO. 


WASHER 


138 


1956 Sauere Tub 


MAYTAG 
WRINGER 
WASHER 


"107 


299.95—1956 
Nationally Famous 


11 Cu. Ft. Upright 
FREEZER 


1956—499.95 


Kelvinator 


UPRIGHT FREEZER 
18 Cu. Fr. 


Brand New 1956 


Automatic 
Washers 


All Famous Names! 
Your Choice 


Brand New 1956 


ELECTRIC 
DRYERS 


ABC, KELVINATOR, 
NORGE 


299.95—HI-Fi 
21-inch Capehart 
De Luxe 


Table Model 
With 3 Speakers. 
Aluminized Tube. 


1956 


Admiral 


21” Table Model 
With Aluminized Tube 


1956, 179.95—17-Inch 


PORTABLE 
TV 


Beautiful Carrying Case 
With Handle 


s.r hCU rCmC CrCmCCmCmCmCmCmCmCUCmCmCmCUCmCmCcCrmCcCrmhCCrmrmhCcCrmCCrmhCcCmrmrCcCmrmrhCcCrmrhCcCrmhCcCrmrmrhCcCrmrmhCcCmrmrhcCrmhCCrmhCrmrmChCcCrmhCUcrmrhCcCrrmhcrhcCrmhCcrmrmhCcCrmhCcCrmrmrmhCcermrmhCcerermhUcerermh eee ee ee 


25th & G Sts. 


ONLY 


Entire Stock of Floor Samples 
from Todd's Furniture-Sleep Shop! 


up to 


50% OFF 


limited quant:tes. 


179.95 SLEEP SOFA 109°” 


- WASHINGTON WAREHOUSES?! 


Many one-of-a-kind 


t 


CAPEHART 


3-speed automatic record 


New 1956 
Hi-Fi Consoles 


“119 


player, 4 speakers. 


Mammoth 


1956—449.95 


1% TON 


SUPER 


AR 


CONDITIONER 


‘216 


Special 


BRAND-NEW $850 


OLOR 


TELEVISION 


Magnificent Mahogany Cab- 
inet with Deers! Only 27 
Serry, none sold te 


Pieces. 


Dealers. 


29.95 Columbia 


s-Speed { 6” 


‘199 


REIDY SLE 


21.95 New 1956 


WESTINGHOUSE 
Ama 9” 
TOASTER 


f 


‘ 
2 
a3 


69.95 to 99.95 
GENERAL ELECTRIC 
LEWYT & UNIVERSAL 
VACUUMS 


35 
a 


New 1956; 
with eff 
ettechments 


REDUCED! 


Plays 


CAPEHART RADIOS 


34.95 Capehart 3-Way 
PORTABLE RADIO 


AC-DC-battery. Over- 
sized speaker; choice of colors. 


FAN 


Fan 


Fleor or Wall Fan 


New 1956—19.95 


TABLE RADIO 


$7 2-98 


Capehart 


Plays on AC or OC; 5 tubes 


: 


12,000 Ce. FP. 


44.95 20-inch 2-Speed Window 


84.95 WESTINGHOUSE 
All-Purpose Floor, Wall, Ceiling or 
Window Fan, ‘2 Price 

54.95 20-inch 2-Speed Electric 
Reversible Window Fan 

9.95 Electric Thermostat; for any fan 7 49 
or air conditioner up te 4 hp. .... 

34.95 VORNADO 2-Speed 


159.95 New 1956 


FEDDERS 
DEHUMIDIFIER 


719 
SALE! 
19% 


capacity; 
1/6 HP. 


44.00 20-inch 3-Speed All-Purpose 99-95 
intake, Exhaust or Portable Fan ... 
79.95 EMERSON 20-inch 2-Speed 
Rollabout Fan on Wheels 
26.95 VORNADO 2-Speed Table, 


] 6° 


De luxe 2-Speed 


4947 
99-95 


| periment,” he said. a“? - | 
P'Now 73, Johnson has been offset a high initial cost. |Souza was questioned by po- 


chauffeur for the Ratschesky ‘lice as witness to the mishap. 
‘family for 50 years. ‘The Souzas represent three 
| What is the biggest improve-| days when you stared the mo- 
iment ever made in automo-'tor with a big crank that had 
| biles? ‘the nasty habit of occasionally 
| “The self-starter,” said John-| kicking back and breaking your 
son, who recalls the long-ago’ arm. 


| generations of the same fam- 
ily. 


_ 


Pe ee | 


lamonds 


from KAHN-OPPENHEIMER 


Approximately ¥2 carat (48 pts.) 
blue white, latest cutting. 


$185.00 


Estate, brilliant flawless 
diamond weighing over 23/5 
carat (268 points). $],500.00 
Prices Inclade Fed. Taz 

Descriptions given are for loose diamonds 


Prices Taclude Setting in 14K Yellow or 
White Gold 


Mr. and Mrs. 


the 
SUMMER 
DIET 


you've been waiting 
for. Ida Jean Kain tells 
you how to be slimmer 
this summer in her 
I4-day diet starting 
Monday in 


From 


The Washington Post 
and 
Times Herald 


or prices that beat all competition—See us 


KAHN-OPPENHEIMER | 


JEWELERS OF EXPERIENCE AND INTEGRITY 


RE. 7-9823 917 F St. N.W. RE. 7-2075 
The Parking ~ FREE PARKING The Parking Gerage 


iS oth Street 
-44 oth & D Streets NW. 


For home delivery phone 
RE. 7-1234 


es 


Todd's 


NE, 1 


2 
' 
| 


' 
' 
’ 
' 
' 


=? 


WAREHOUSE, 3045 V St. 


densburg Road. 


New NORTHEAST 


block east of Bla 


2 BALTUAORE Peaxway 


taNWEs 


FOR EVERY 


HAS A COMPLETE LINE OF 


CONDITIONIN 


PURPOSE! 


, 


© 
3 


| 


: | ; 


7’%2 AMP. 
CASEMENT 


Completely inside the 


room air. 


, 


I 


1 
-. 


Can be installed in three different ways: 


half out the window, (3) Can be adapted to a 
regular sash window with a simple kit. Quiet 
as a floating feather. Fiberglas filters clean all 


rrrertitcre 


7 
: 
: | 


MODEL M75 
Ye HORSEPOWER 


Can be mounted through the wall, in the win- 
dow, or on a portable stand. Vornado’s exclusive 
vortex action pressure circulates cool, dry air 
to all parts of the room. Spring-mounted in rub- 
ber, reducing vibration to a minimum. Fiberglas 
filter cleans air, 


Y% H.P. FOR 
WINDOWS 


(1) 
room, (2) Half in and 


Take Your Time Paying... 
USE TODD'S 


EASY PAY PLAN | 


—_ 


‘ 


| 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
_ B6 Sunday, duly o 1956 


How to Keep Well . 


By Dr. Theodore R. Van Dellen 
(Coosrieht. 1056. Chicacoe Tribune) 
To the limit of space, ques 
tions pertaining to the preven 
tion of diesase will be answered 
Personal replies will he made 
when return stamped envelope 
is inclosed. Telephone inquiries 
not accepted Dr. Van Dellen 
will not make diagnoses or pre- 
scribe for individual diseases 


INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION 

PROGRESS RUNS into op- 
position when it leads to fear 
or affects the livelihood. Wagon 
makers and blacksmiths were 
bitter about 


substitutes for the real McCoy 
by manufacturers who feared 
competition. 


But technology is the key to) 
abol-| 


and while it 
jobs it creates 
The first multiple 


prosperity 
ishes some 
many more 


spindle machines introduced in) 
de-| 


the 18th century 
stroyed by the workers. Yet 
these devices could manufac- 
ture a thousand times more 
yard goods at a cost that even 
the poor could afford 

Automation is the latest de 
velopment in electronics and 
we may hear more and more 
objections to this indu trial ad 
vance. But if histo repeats 
itself, these newcomers will 
add to our present standards 
of living, health, and happi 
ness. The dull may suffer be- 
cause, to survive, man must be 
smarter than machines 

Automation involves 
chines that control or operate 
other machi! These me 
chanical brains can sum up 
the situation and make adjust- 
ments without human direc 
tion and hand operations, as 
are needed on the assembly 
lines. 

Man wil 


were 


is 


l no longer team up 
with his machi ie: he su 
vises his me han ical genius 
from a distance but will not be 
involved in its actual operation 
In other words. he will work 
in an automatic factory. Robots 
never get sick, suffer fr 
hangovers, or worry about fan 
ily problems. 

What 4oes this have to do 
with medicine? The poverty 
stricken worker of a few cen- 
turies ago derived a s 
accomplishment from the 
he did every day 
but happy. Mode 


mm 


ttle 


man comes 


the automobile;| 
and plastics were regarded as) 


his creative urges. 


the same can 


added responsibility of keeping which may be obtained by send- "= 
the machines in repair com-\ing a stamped, self- addressed| 
pace of envelope with request. 


bined with the fast 


he jperation 
But there is another side to’ 
Through automa- the dimensfons of the tallest’ 
workers are relieved of and heaviest women known to 
back-hreaking jobs and medical history? 


the ledger 
tion 
dirty, 
they have no problem with ven-' 
ee, temperature, humidity, | 
nois 


NEURITIS FROM ALCOHOL 

M. M. M. writes: My friend, 
who was a heavy 
one time. 
leg. The doctor who is treat- 


. By Dr. T. R. Van Dellen 


There willing him says it is from alcohol. 
be no place in industry for\Is there a cure for this pain?) require 
these men and women unless 
they can learn new skills. The 


4 


Yes, if the nerve has not been devotions. 
acquisition of new techniques damaged beyond repair. Your) apan, 2: ro may 21 (Taurus)—No} 
may lead to mental strain, and friend might be 


min r 
he said of the our leaflet on alcoholic neuritis! matters and your soul's 
le new activities. but don’t engage | 


| AMAZONS 
F. B. C.. writes: 


REPLY 


The tallest woman! have read me 4 seem 
about was Miss Marion, billed 


las the Queen of the Amazons. 
At age 18, she stood 8 feet '%| 
inch in her stocking feet. A 


drinker at Baltimore woman of 850 pounds 
has neuritis in one seems to hold the record for 


heftiness. 


Goren on B ridge 


Both vulnerable. South deals. 


The biddin 
Se North fest 
2 ~~ trump aes 


Opening lead: King of hearts. 

West in today’s hand refused 
to act upon the principle that 
one in the hand is worth two 
in the bush. Inasmuch as he 
needed “two” for his purpose, 
ly refused to settle for 


ne j roper 


less, even though he might lose 


what he held in hand 

South, holding 22 points and 
a balanced hand, opened with 
two no trump, and North held 
the textbook requirements for 
a raise to three; namely, four 
points 
West opened the king of 
hearts which was permitted to 
hold, but declarer took the sec- 
ond round of the suit. He lost 
no time developing the club 
suit, leading the ace and fol- 


nse of lowing with the jack. 


East was helpful on these 


. He was rene two plays. On the ace of clubs 


he played the eight, the start 


into the world eq tipped with Of a high-low to show exactly 


the same emotio 
his ancestors and vw 
lacks a sense of 

ment, he is unhapp: 

In my opinion, t 

the reasons nervous 
are so common in our yo and 
ace. Even the uns kil] ed worker 
needs to play a part in his com 


nal 
hen 


accomplish- 


need« as two cards in the suit. 

he tion acquaints partner with the! 

exact distribution of the clubs 

and permits him to make an 

q i one of enlightened decision as to the 
sorders defense. 


Such ac- 


When the jack of clubs was 
led, West, reading his partner 
for two clubs headed by the 


munity and find an outlet for eight, placed the queen in the 


— a 


MILLER 


“Preparing > 
Military 


SCHOOL oF 
ALBEMARLE 
k and aed 
Cs) wee Prepa ion tn 

'. ineluding ten and mR. 

to mechanics poem a, 
r ty Grades 5-12 

c.udes uniforms B., on . 


ys to wor 


i}i Tat . 
sah Pian- 
P. Miller gebect Pr. oO. Va 


nheean. Dept 


___}e¢losed hand. Whereupon he ran 


up with the king in order to 
block the suit. 

The natural impulse at this) 
time is to cash the heart tricks! 
and hope that partner in some) 
fashion can produce the fifth 
and setting trick. After a 
moment's reflection, however, 


"it became clear that cashing’ 


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me ~—— 


heart tricks at this time could 
operate only to the advantage 
of declarer, for on the last 
heart South could discard the 
blocking queen of-clubs. 

Since everything seemed to 


\depend upon East's having the ° 
West decided ine 
to lead the spade at once while ceeds 
retained a heart. ‘ 
/South had no choice but to let) ;: 


iking of spades, 


East still 


interested in + for uncertainty now 


What were, 


Horoscope 


in the section 


ovtiook is according to the stars. 


Sunday. July & 

21 TO APRIL 20 Fagg 
me in the early hours 

astute handling. But ~ 
alities and «a desire to experi- 
peat. Use this a. m 
make sSilans for a happy 


MARCH 
ifew problem 


eep 
nd for 


needs 


eady 


em without thought. Be sensible 
MAY 722 TO JUNE 21 (Gemini)—En 
jee uraging rays Spiritual 
you to e better. more fruit- 
eep disposition genial. emooth 
Be + entertaining 
JUNE 22 TO JULY 23 { 
up your head and smile 
to mequrens, 
vbett he tte: 
| trom sincere efforts 
jehar table enterprises 


LY 24 TO AUG 


aee ? 
fime period fo 


73 (Leo)—No teak | 


Sunday and don’t avers the — m de- 
talls necessary 
|Start the P right ber ‘oetag. to chureh, 
then spend e with family. friends 
AUG. ™ ~ SEPT 
ther a dull 
Get away from weual , routine ape in- 
eulge in some healthy diversion. «4 
hobby. enlivening ent ertatament. 
| cenial social activitie 


SEPT. 24 TO ocr. “4 hae + wes 
igious home ‘s 
should come first Meetings to ‘better 
cai yY environment — nun 
children's and tee agers’ prob! ems 
urged We ARE our bre thers’ keepers 

OCT. 24 TO NOV. 22 


23 ‘Virgo)—Ne! 


days mixed vibrations could werk out 
ia your geet Pu i much depends upon | 
ow you duties perhaps some 
add ed peabenel ibt littes. Cheerfulmess. era. 
cioushess very important 

2s F DEC 21 


Nov (Sagittarius) 
ott’ b dignif: pleasant. 


sensible self) 


Ting new respect and cooperation | 


-~6Time te Plant Again 


from others especially thos who you 
wish to please. Start day with prayer 
DEC 22 0 JAN 20 icorn 


—_ jerrupt ~* ns 
n 
some are useful 


+ igfore smart 
Prayer, 


to ‘de aay . r 4 
pasere- 
a.so. 


rest, rec rreatie 


(oe ust on 
se 


\the spade ride, and when East } 


took the king he returned a 
heart, permitting his partner 
ito cash the setting tricks. 


| We pay cheerful tribute to 7) 


|\West for his alertness, but de- 


clarer might have made it a’ te 


little more difficult if instead 


you and encourage 

PES. 20 TO MARCH ™» Pis 
may find neen or 
' Meas today ' 


ourself 


of cashing the ace of clubs first |! 


he had played the jack immedi- 
ately upon obtaining the lead. 


It would not have been wey | tion 


an easy matter for West to run) 
in with the king, and South 
might have gotten away with 
the contract. 

(Copyriaht. 1956. Chicage Tribune) 
) 


Montgomery 


Office Bids 
Found High 


Bids were opened Friday for 
the Maryland-National Capital 
Park and Planning 


| old, 
aai-| Jate 


: “possible roud 
ie into aret meat s you don’t 
rust in God an 
ees and. | 
best. stop be 
nack with children 
(Copyright. 1956. 
King Peatures Syndicates Inc.) 


You have s 


Veteran Benefits 


Hit $82.7 Billion 


In 180 Years 


| A total of $82.7 billion has, 


been’ paid in benefits to vet- 
erans and their families in the 
last 180 years, the Veterans Ad-| 


sion’s new Montgomery County | $1 billion of it has gone to ben- 
office building and all were | Cficiaries of wartime service. 


found to be higher than the | 


Commission had hoped to pay. | 
The lowest of the 10 bids, 


The VA pointed out that 
peacetime veterans are eligible 
for many less benefits than 


that of the H. O. McAlister Co.,|those who serve during war- 


of Wheaton, was for $489,410. 

Architects had estimated the) 
cost of the structure at about 
$400,000 and that is approxi-| 
mately the amount the Com- 
mission has to spend. A $500,- 
000 bond issue is being sold to 
finance the structure, but some) 
$75,000 of that has already gone | 
for land acquisition, test bor-| 
ings, and architect fees. 

The Commission has 20 days 
from the time the bids were 


| time, including such items as 


‘educational benefits, hospitali- 
zation, and nonservice<onnect- 
‘ed pension payments. 
Expenditures for benefits to 
‘veterans breaks down as fol- 
lows: Korea, $2.6 billion; World 
|War IL, $46.2 billion: World 
War I, $20 billion: Spanish- 
American War, $4 billion: other 


|wars, $8.9 billion. 


The VA observed, however. 
that the difference between the 


‘opened to decide whether to/$81.7 bilion paid to wartime 
accept one or to reject them beneficiaries and the $1 billion | 
L to peacetime ones may be al-| 


The proposed 
building is to be located on a 
two-acre tract at Georgia ave. 
and Alton parkway, Silver 
Spring. It will provide office 
and working space for the staff 
now housed in a building 
owned by Montgomery County 
at Colesville rd. and Georgia 
ave. 


Time Capsule Laid 


| GARY, Ind. ®—A time cap- 
sule containing a letter from 
‘Mayor Peter Mandich to the 
‘2006 Gary mayor and the his- 
‘tories of numerous Gary organ- 
‘izations was buried in the 
northwest corner of the city 
hall lawn, to be opened in 50 
years. 


‘the larger peacetime forces 
now being maintained. 


600 Expected 


In Conventions 


Two conventions will bring 
some 600 people to Washington 
this week the Greater National 
Capital Committee has 
nounced. 


praisers opens a four-day ses- 
sion at the Sheraton-Park Hotel 
today through July 11. 

About 300 persons will attend 
meetings of the Society of the 
Third Division at the Shoreham 
July 12 through 14. 


— 


EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORY 


The Washingten Pe Poot as and _ ay Scheel ecrerteine Set. ‘haeebhe 


7- patty — 2. rot reserding | rates. 


ABC Shorthand 


SCHOOL 


Tere = to 


Founded 1905 
Air Cenditioned 
write 90 te 100 words & minute in six ae day session 
eekly) of 12 weeks eve. session ($6 wkly 


io S os. NW. 
tional 8-3258 


). Typing included. 


Accountancy and Business Administration 


ENJAMIN FRANKLIN UNIVERSITY 


Dey and evening courses 
Cc 


for 


tise 16th a NW 


Sccountancy end fmencies adminis- 
Ss spec 


RE. 7-396 


ARDNER SCHOOL OF BUSINESS, INC. 


‘miper 7 


71-9062. tn 
pring. Md APPROVED 


4 Fleer, Ele mide relk Colsoriie Reed, Silver 
FOR VETER 


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Centrally located. e* ening classes 


1736 ., wee P atate 
NA. &- 


co-ed ucetional reasonable rates, 


~ ‘seer div experienced instructors Course of study 


ccountancy _ Bus 
8 B.A M.B.A 
accep" ed 
catalogue. 


ar 4 
poases 


Pie 
Enroll” now 


ness Ad strat 
and CPA Re 
osgrams. Veterans approved. Write or oail 


eview C \ rse Special adente 


for 


TRAYER COLLEGE OF ACCOUNTANCY 


Thirteenth and F Streets N.W 


Professional “ ¥ ces. B - al 
rograms— Business 
repare tion T me requi am 


prosrams. Apply now. degin 


NAtional &-1747 

are conferred. Training 

Accounting PA 

venee. Cay: 3 end 4-Year evening 
aanteeees 18 of 26 


ane MCs. 


—————————— 


Beauticians 


Tue 


prof and 


exc 
h fet iene or nings or 
foe: x 


Ww ASHINGTON, D. C.. BEAUTY ACADEMY 


1s career Ry ts Bn, in Beauty Cwlture 


men | Low eptrance fre 
Air Conéitiones ST. 3-1087 


Beauty 


Culture 


Wane AYNN BEAUTY 


LEARN BEAUTY AH 


LTURE. OPFRATORS IN GREAT 
AY AND EVENING CLASSES 


718 G St. XW 
District 17-1762 
DEMAND 


COLLEGE ®s> 


Business and Secretarial 


-—. SCHOOL OF BUSINESS, INC. 


tad Fleer. 


r Typing 


oa 


Goring. Langley Park a 


Pig Bid 
for 


BP mong ~ 
asters 


Reed. Silver 
begin July. Oth 
Bethesda Accelerated 


eens. 


§ week shorthand course available in Silver Spring only. July 6 


TRAYER COLLEGE of Secretarial Training 


Thirteenth and F Streets 
the -« mmer 


ail 
intensive oct hedu ‘ 
refresher 


. meses. Soc: and 


new... Classes twice each month 


NA. &-1748 

B-wrek 

and Tyrpewriting for coliege students: 
teen-age 


Private. Visit tore welcome without 


Bs SC HOOL 


OF COMMERCE. 
me aan 


7) 1th & NLW, 
Over Howards 
inners courses in OR ‘ 
Po nae Cele ulators, Vv 
SAVE ‘« to “% weual 
years. Positions 


TEMPLE SCHOOL 


a ge wy 


Feunded 1 
Alr prone Me hd 


poise dda ely tevahts (0) 5 woes 18» 
} ~y ip jividu Lowe 4) type achine 
AY rEES 


1888 G WN. 
Nationa r* 3254 
1)o Ghorthan4é 
100 a Ss & minute: 
Shorthand. 


Business Machines 


EMPLE SCHOOL 
Jobs waiting. Eas 
weeks night. KE 

equipment DICTAPRONE 

istration plus $5 


Vermont Ave. at N St. N.W 
oy 6of 
Appreved. 


Feunded 1905 
Alr Conditioned 
ao short courses. 3 
UNCH—Temple 
COMPT 


1338 G Be. N.W. 


NA. & or 
to 6 weeks de » i2 
eniy school with PR, "eM 
re $10 reg- 


Pee 
weekly at night and $10 weekly in day schoo! 
Drafting 
LUMBIA TECHNICAL INSTITUTE ir conditiones 


ME. 88-5626, &-5627 


Evening—Start New—All Branches—<ith Year—Veteran 


Languages 


ENGLISH FOR 


FOREIGN-BORN Ex. s-co0s * 


1t22 Connecticnt Avenue N 
Blectrente Languese Laberatery, Helen 


hee. Vees. AB-MA. 


Private 


Schools 


ne and Dey Schools 
Camps (near and far) 


JArv IS SCHOOL BUREAU 


Military Academies 
Catalogue. no obligation 


3 Dupont Circle. AD. 4-6111 
Pree info aten = Board- 
Jr eses, Summer 


HARLOTTE HALL 


8 

Making 

Washineten on Route 
Business and penenay courses 
Pireproof buildir Indoor 
piece band Ric 


" extracgrr 


swimming } 
ey pres 
ario al ‘s  accnedtind. educates 


. Ber 
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Radio-Television & Electronics 


Charlotte Hall, Marviand 
Southern Marviend’s Noted Preparatory Schoo! 
invites your per = * a 


for Men 
SRisiy tive 


tm the 

miles from 
and Lew . Academic 

“panervined ateay 300-acre 

Bports - Pw 


campus 
Thirty- 
adittion, 

the 


ert 
gee. Principal 
Md 


(CAPITOL 
coredited T 

W. (Cerner 

Fiectronicse Engineering. Bro 

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now formin 


level course leading 
4 ree ma. od visit school for detalis 
i} 


enings 
a and he. Study Geumeen S. I 


RADIO ENGINEERING INSTITUTE 


HObart *-1520 
istart at once im practical Radic- 
adcast and Television Engineering 
“Associate in Appl 


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Secretarial and Court "Reporting 


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GTENOTY PE INSTITUTE 


gn oy SHORTHAND (Ste 


Gay class Aus. 


Walker Bids.. 734 15th St. NW. 
. &-8820 and NA. 58-6375 


demonstrations = 
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6, new night Aug 


TEMPLE SCHOOL 


I ee Re 


Founded 1905 
Air 


in which your 
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A 
ay 
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your. 


essential | 


devot ions | 


impossibie this senero' as | 


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Explore, 


interesting self, | 
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n ie | orders 


jertaking.| 


nor an whninteresting dav. | 


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Commis-| ministration said today. All but | 


An- 


The American Society of Ap- 


three-story |tered in the future because of | 


| well 


More Popular Than Ever 


By Katherine B. Pozer 


BULB CATALOGUE time is 
here and already many daffo- 
dil enthusiasts have their or- 
ders in the mail or—even ear- 
lier — placed 
their orders 


fer substantia 

o 

placed 

before the rush 

season begins 

Their advice is 

to make early Mrs, Poser 

| selections of new varieties 
— are often in short sup- 
ply. 

Interest in daffodil growing 
continues to increase in the 
Washington area and through- 
out Maryland and Virginia, for 
this is “daffodil country.” The 


| Washington Daffodil Society 


‘Scorpioc)—To- | 


tells us: 

“Gardeners in the Washing- 
ton area are fortunate that one 
of the most rewarding of all 


fowerlhg pleats, the the daffodil, 
ere well here. Many other 
ulbs, resenting our heavy soils 
and moist summers, will give 
out in two or three seasons, but 
daffodils continue to grow and 
multiply happily year after 
year. They are harbingers of 
spring, queens of April's gar- 
den, the inspiration of the win- 
ter-weary gardener.” 


IT IS DIFFICULT for the 
novice to make selections since 
many varieties seem so similar, 
but a look at a catalogue will 
reveal a great difference from 
a budget standpoint. Bulbs of 
the same type and coloring will 
vary in price from 15 cents to 
$15. The more experienced 
grower can distinguish the dif- 
ference and is often willing to 
pay much more for some of the 
new productions. 

Here we might warn the nov- 
ice that almost every daffodil 
grower soon becomes a collec- 
tor and it is a fascinating 
hobby. Collecting, fortunately, 
does not necessarily mean get- 
ting into higher price brackets 
—many of the finest and most 


Here’ s the Way to Make 
= Garden Do Double Duty 


By James H. Beattie 


THE SOAKING rains of late 
June have brightened the pros- 


. rf pects for late-season gardens. 


Although summer is less 
than a month 
it is too 
to plant 
some important 


/vegetabies.; 
| However, there 


is still time to gg 
have ai well-.3 
rounded vege- 
table garden in- a 
cluding a num- 
ber of the most 
desirable food 
plants. 

Prompt action is necessary 
because the deadline is here 
for some of the best vegeta- 
bles 

In most cases, the planting 
of a late-ssummer garden is 
done on space vacated by early 
plants. This second-round use 
of garden space usually in- 
volves comparatively little 
preparation of the soil and it 
may also make an economical 
use of fertilizer residues left 
over from the first crops. 


THERE IS no reason why 
one cannot start with land not 
previously used this season, 
but this plan involves more 
work. 

Although about 20 vegeta- 
bles may be planted now, or a 
little later, with good chances 
for success, only a few will ap- 
peal to the average gardener. 
For immediate planting, seeds 
of beets, sweet cofn, bush snap 
beans, Swiss chard and plants 
of tomatoes, sprouting broc- 
coli and cabbage are suggested 
as particularly worthwhile. 

During the last half of July, 
seeds of beets, bush snap 
beans, summer squash. leaf 
lettuce and turnips offer good 
possibilities. Still later, dur- 
ing the first half of August, 
beets, bush snap beans, kale, 
leaf and head lettuce, mustard 
greens and short season sum- 
mer squash are suggested. 

For the last half of August, 
all those suggested for the 
first portion of the month with 
the possible exception of 
squashes and beets, may suc- 
ceed. Spinach may be added 
to this list but it is an uncer- 
tain crop. 


WEATHER, especially the 
moisture supply, is the most 
important factor governing 
results with the summer and 
fall garden. 

Fortunately, the recent rains 
have materially brightened 
the moisture situation. But 
it nearly always pays to sup- 
plement rainfall with at least 
some irrigation. A little arti- 
ficial watering, with the thrifty 
use of the water around the 
plants, will do a lot to insure 
success with plants grown in 
the summer garden. 

Soils having a favorable 
texture, that is, those of a 


_joamy to clayey nature and 
supplied with organic’ 


| matter, are well adapted for 


fall gardening. Sandy soils 


to require very liberal ferti- 
lization. A good treatment 
would include the application 
of decayed animal manure, or 
compost plus commercial ferti- 
lizer. A surface inch of the 
manure and about two pounds 


. of mixed fertilizer to each 100 


| will require more attention to) 
| trrigation. 


| ing 
| easily 


Although the preparation of 
land already used for garden- 
this season should be’ 
accomplished, extra 
its preparation 

Thoroughly pre- 


care in 
desirable. 


pared soil provides the condi-' 
_tions needed 


at this season 


_ for the germination of seeds 
| and the starting of transplant- 
| ed plants. | 


| one crop this season is likely ° 


LAND THAT has produced 


is) 


square feet of surface should 
be suitable for most places. 

Heavy .feeders, such as the 
cabbage group, should have an 
additional application of the 
same quantity of fertilizer to 
each 50-foot row. 


Because of unfavorable con- 
ditions for the germination of 
seeds that are likely to pre- 
vail at this season, special care 
is needed in the planting and 
eare of the plants until they 
are up and well-established. 

In addition to the thorough 
preparation of the soil, favor- 
able soil moisture conditions 
are necessary. If artificial 
watering is necessary it should 
be done a day or two before 
planting in order to allow the 
water to become distributed 
and the soil dry enough to 
work. 


COVERING the seeds to a 
uniform depth in accordance 
with the requirements of each 
kind is very important If 
the soil is of a heavy nature 
that may harden or crust over 
the seeds, they should be 
covered with a light-non-bak- 
ing material, such as a mix- 
ture of peat and soil, or soil 
treated with a soil conditioner 
to lighten it. 

Wa 


and shading of 
each row or each hill is desir- 
able to maintain a uniform 
soil moisture condition favor- 
able for germination and 
growth. Light mulching of 
seed rows with grass clippings, 
straw, loose compost er other 
material is usually desirable. 

Shading of the seed rows 
with leafy branches, with 
boards supported a few inches 
above the seed rows, or by 
other means is a Sas prac 
tice. 

Plants set in the garden at 
this time require special care. 
If possible they should be 
shifted to the garden with 
large clumps of soil around 
the roots. Soaking the plant 
bed a few hours before shift- 
ing the plants, careful firming 
of the soil around the plants 
and watering with a starter 
solution are desirable prac- 
tices. 

Shading of the newly<et 


plants for a day or two helps) 


them become established. 
Leafy branches that permit 
circulation of the air, yet 
provide shade, are ideal. 


Versatile Mixtures 

Balanced plant food mix- 
tures, either organic or chem- 
ical, will feed all plants. It is 
not necessary to have a differ- 
ent mixture for each flower or 
vegetable. 


Advertisement 


ATTENTION 
GARDENERS 


If vou're interested in entering 
your vegetables 
hibition contect 
master at Center Market City 
for details. Valuable prizes will 
be given for = best in each 
category: Tom Squash. 
Corn, Beets. Carrote. ‘ Bxhtbition 
market will take place 
To be sure 
of your entry, make your reser- 
vation now. 


Center Market City 
Sth & K Sts., N.W., DI. 7-5039 


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so they 


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Free Perking on Our Own Lot 


A Rewarding Plant, the Daftodil 


popular daffodils which con- 
tinue te win awards are very 
inexpensive. 

The classification of daffodils 
at the shows often seems -diffi- 
- to visitors, but the study 

a growers’ catalogue will 
a. make one aware that 
these classifications simplify 
the selection of bulbs. The 
classification system used in 
America was adapted from 
the Royal Horticultural So 
ciety of London. 

Each type of daffodil has its 
classification number. Under 
each number there are lettered 
divisions denoting color combi- 
nations. For instance, Division 
1 is for trumpets; 1l-a, for peri 
anth colored (varying shades 
of yellow, trumpet colored, not 
paler than the perianth; 1-b, 
perianth white, trumpet col- 
ured (usually yellow); 1-c, per- 
janth and trumpet white, and 
14, any other color combina- 
tion (such as trumpet of a 
lighter shade than the peri- 


All the larger shows have 
the classification printed in 
their schedule to assist exhib- 
itors and the visiting public in 
distinguishing the types. 


IT IS ALWAYS interesting 
to have a list of winners at the 
shows. At the show of the 
Washington Daffodil Society, 
the award for the best in the 
show went to Ludlow, a superb 
white trumpet which is in the 
moderate price list. Canta- 
trice, another white trumpet 
in the same price bracket, was 
several times a winner, and 
Corinth, a lovely ivory white 
also was in the winning Lists. 
Mount Hood, a great favorite 
with growers, as usual won 
ribbons. This is a good daffo- 
dil for cutting and aoe 

In the yellow trumpets we 
Kingscourt, Goldcourt 
Gold Digger, Trousseau, a 
white with a soft yellow trum- 
pet, won first and second in 
its class. 

In the large cupped, division 
2 in the classification list, Vel- 
veteen and Tinker won awards. 
Dunikeld, with a vivid orange 
scarlet cup, is a great favorite 
with all growers and a consist- 
ent winner. It is an inexpen- 
sive daffodil and one which Is 
always an addition to every 
garden. 

Other 
classes: 

Chungking, a very beautiful 
daffodil of golden yellow and 
deep red. We have found it 
a very free bloomer and long 
lasting when cut. 

Geranium, a tazetta daffodil 
which bears from five to seven 
florets to a stem and is very 
gay with its orange red cups. 

is a good budget item. 

Green Island, an interesting j= 
variety in the large cups. It) 
is white with greenish lemon! 


winners in various 


e Queen 
The foo uillas are very satis-'* 


factory Their clus 
ters of bloom and fragrance 


Garden Club 
7 o . 
Activities 
THE GREEN THUMB Gart- 
den Club of Pimmit Hills, 
Falls Church, will meet at 
8:30 p. m. Wednesday at the 
home of Mrs. K. F. Osmus, 
2206 Cherri dr. Mrs. W. H. 


Youngman will speak on 
“Flower Show Practices.” 


THE BURNING TREE Gar- 
den Club will meet at 10:30 
a..m. Thursday at the home of 
Mrs. William B. Shattuck, 
8509 Burdette rd., Bethesda. 
Mrs. F. F. Smith will discuss 
“Flower Arranging.” 


THE NATIONAL CAPITAL 
Dahlia Society will meet at 
8 p. m. Thursday in Room 43 
of the National Museum, Con- 
stitution and 10th st. nw, 
Henry C. Parker will lead a 
discussion on “Timing Dahlias 
for Show” in preparation for 
the society's annual exhibit 
Sept. 29 and 30. The group also 
will hear Wilbur D. McCiellan 
of the Ornamental] Plants Sec- 
tion, Agricultural Research 
Service station at Belts 
ville, Md. 


THE HILLTOP Garden Club 
will meet at 1 p. m. Friday 
at the home of Mrs. Lioyd 
Wineland, 3819 Suitland rd, 
se. A show of garden clothing 
fashions will be held. 


CENTER MARKET CITY 
will hold a garden produce 
show during the first week in 
August. Prizes will be given 
for top entries in the exhibit, 
which is limited to squash, 
tomatoes, carrots, beets and 
corn. Exhibit reservations may 
be made with Henry L. Kron 
stadt, public relations director 
for Center Market City, Sth 
and K sts. nw. 


be PlasticRocksforGardens 


MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. @ 
Most gardeners say that noth- 
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flowers like the contrasting 
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always Be found to dress up a 
flower bed. So the oil industry 
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tic rocks. The American Petro- 
leum Institute says they come 
in several natural, permanent 
colors and are made with 
metal prongs to lock them in 
place. 


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MOST vegetables will droop 
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Va. Democrats’ 


Campaign Quiet 


As Democrats of nearby Vir-; 
ginia head for the polls Tues-|in the primary campaign as it 
day, they are likely to remem-|has in the past 


Not even a 


State politics did not appear | 


ber the present primary cam whisper was heard of the Byrd! 


paign as one of the 
recent history, despite a flurry 
of last-minute fireworks from/| 
one of three contenders for the 
congressional nomination 

The charge of litical “bos- 
sicm” was eaten tenia the os" the fact that none of them has 
test two days ago at the close | **Tved in public office. Of the 
of an otherwise calm two} ree. Quenstedt, a.44¢year-old 
vw of campaigning by the | fairfax | na cna bo am 
candidates Pe 

rhe three—Morten S. Beyer. civic activities in Fairfax Coun 
Julius Brenner and Warren D.| 

venstedt—are seeki . 
nr District's ne he has led bond drives for 
nomination to oppose incum.| School construction and headed 
bent Republican Rep. Joel T.|‘2¢ Save Our Schools Commit 
Broyhill . jtee, which campaigned against 

F the Gray Plan uenstedt lives 
Beyer broke the calm Friday hin ~ 


with his wife and their 4-year 
when he called Quenstedt the! oid son. John Warren. at 1307 
“mouthpiece” of Fairfax Coun- 


, , a - Admiral dr. Wellington 
ty political “bosses Quenstedt | Heights. 


refused to comment on the! Reyer 34 is administrative 
charge, Saying merely that he/ assistant to the vice president 
would not engage in “name call-} jp, charge of operations of Cap- 
ing ital Airlines. A native of New 
However, the rest of the cam-| York City, he has spent most of 
paign was marked by harmony,/|his life in the Washington area 
with the three hopefuls con-|and is a member of several Vir 
centrating on the major issues|ginia civic and P-TA organiza 
of taxation, foreign policy, gov-|tions. Beyer lives with his wife 
ernment employes and educa-|Jane, and their four children 
tion lon a SO-acre farm near Hern 
On only two local issues were| don, Va 
the candidates found to be| Brenner, 35. is in the baking 
clearly divided—Burke airport | business with his father and two 
and .the Central Intelligence|brothers in Arlington A na 
Agency. Brenner and Quen-jtive of Norfolk, Va., and a Navy 
stedt are opposed to location of|veteran he is married and has 


the controversial projects in| two sons, aged 4and 5. He and 
Fairfax County 
them 

At the national level, even The three candidates stands 
the controversial subject of|on foreign issues, as stated in 
public school integration failed|their replies to a recent ques 
to produce clear-cut disagree-|tionnaire of the League of Wom 
ment. All three consider the|en Voters of Virginia, are a 
Supreme Court ruling of 1954 | follow s: 
“the law of the land.” but be-| Beyer: I am in agreement 
lieve it should be implemented/with those aspects of our for 
om a gradual basis with dueiecign policy which further the 


consideration for problems of|economic and political devel- 
the localities. 


litical 
Harry Byrd (D-Va.) 
Another common 


In addition to his civic work. 


| st . Arlington 


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Daily 
Thurs. ’ 
9.30 te 9 PM. 9:30 to 6 PA. 


quietest 10 / organization, strong state po-| 
group headed by — 


denomi-| 
nator of the three candidates is’ 


Beyer favors'his family live at 5952 N. Firsts 


: 


Quenstedt 


opposed to the vacillation, inde- 
cision and confusion which 
have characterized the actions 
of the current Administration 
| am opposed to pronounce 
ments in the field of foreign 
\policy which are intended for 
ipartisan political advantages at 
ihome, and which create mis. 
‘understanding among our 
friends and give unwarranted) 
propaganda advantages to our 
lenemies 

I favor complete frankness | 
with the American people con- 
cerning international! relations 
| favor the restoration of a 
truly nonpartisan foreign po! 
icy. I favor the development of} 
freer trade and lower tariff bar- 
riers in Order to promote the 
self-sufficiency of friendly na 
tions and thereby reduce the 
need for foreign aid. Where 
foreign aid is necessary, I favor 
emphasis on technical and eco 
nomic assistance 

Brenner: The only aspects of 
United States foreign policy| 
that I am in agreement with is 
that of military defense. The 
most critical is that of foreign'| 
aid. | believe this Administra 
tion has adopted the policy of 
charity with foreign nations.) 
and this tends to destroy friend 
ship. There is no better way to) 
destroy a man’s pride than to 
give him charity. 

Quenstedt: [| am most in, 
agreement with those aspects 
of our foreign policy which are 
a continuation of policies adopt-| 
ed on a truly bipartisan basis 
during our previous Democratic | 
Administraton: namely, a policy| 


; 
: 


’ 
' 


lopment of the free world. I am| 


world to limit the spread of| 
Communist influence and domi-| 
nance | 

Under the Republican Admin-| 
istration. however. we have 
idrifted far from bipartisanship 
land have substituted instead a'| 
\policy of one-man diplomacy in 
which expediency appears to be | 
jour central inspiration and con- 
‘fusion our product. Our foreign | 
policy should be democracy as | 


_ Tenth District Democratic Conoressional Candidates 


Sen. James H. Duff (R-Pa.) 


Government sell 24 coal-burn- 
ing Liberty ships to a West 
German firm solely to carry 
U. S. coal to Europe. 

He said he would introduce 
legislation Monday to authorize 
the Secretary of Commerce to 

sell the World War Il vintage 
) ships from the mothball fleet. 
surance for individuals andiHe said the vessels were built 

for the British, returned to the 
a United States after the war, and 
| Improved arterial and sec-| 


Brenner 


Duff Proposes Measure 
To Increase Coal Export 


Taited Press 


proposed yesterday that the; pose 


‘expansion of Western Europe. 


have no value for defense pur- 


.. 

Duff said his measure would 
relieve unemployment in 
United States coal fields and 
develop a new market for 
American coal in the industrial 


He said the German firm. 
the American-German Coal 
Transport Co., is ready to buy 
the ships under an agreement 
to use them only for coal ship- 
ments and not to compete with 
United States vessels. 


ondary highways, with empha wee 


, 


Second Half Doers 

Have Spot in Britain 
LONDON, July 7 @ 

| British statisticians includ- 


sis on the urgent needs of our| 
district. Conservation of our} 
natural resources Liberali-| 
tation of the Hatch Act to per- 
mit voluntary participation by| 
Federal employes in local pol- 
ities | ed this list of odd occupa- 

Brenner: Taxation—I be-| tions today in a report on 
lieve that the U.S. Government| various types of jobs: 

as abused the system of taxa- Rhubarb forcers, old 
tion and created a means of| ‘!quormen, sagger grog 
graft and corruption through-| ™aekers, skull men, dribble 
out the Federal Government.| ™é€n, decomposing men, 
This, in turn, has led the states} waste devillers, waffiers, 
and communities to become in-| ¢austic firemen, exotic gar- 
debted by bond issues and| @eners and second haif 
excess taxation; which has led| eT. 


Neighborhood House 
Plans Camp Opening 


Southeast Neighborhood 
House, 324 Virginia ave. se., a 
Red Feather Agency, will open! 
its fifth annual Vacation Day 
Camp School Monday. The 
camp will run five days a week 
until Aug. 30. 


Children 6 through 12 are 
eligible. 


to critical hardships on every-' There was no description 
one. I believe that once the| Of what the jobs consisted 
Federal Government relieves| Of, Dut the statisticians re- 
itself of all unnecessary activ-| ported all are being active- 
ities it can eliminate or reduce| ‘Y pursued in Britain. 

the Federal individual income | 
tax, and in turn relieve the|-—— 
pressure of the states, and then | 


the communities | -. 
@uenstedi: Mere then any. Mlaryland Student 


thing else, I will fight to pro-| Jailed for Assault 


tect, preserve and develop 
America’s most priceless re-/ BALTIMORE, July 7 #! 
I. Smelkinson, 20-year- 


source—her children. I will| Ernest 
work for a constantly improv-'old University of Maryland 
from Baltimore, was 


ing program on education. With | student 
me this is the top-priority,|sentenced to 30 days in jall to 
number-one domestic jssue. day for “assaulting and grab- 
I believe the Federal Govern-|bing” a woman in the Mount 
ment can and should assist the| Royal area last night. 
States in the field of education,| The woman, Ariene Bender, 
testified that she was walking 


and I am confident that it can 
—and I am determined that ititcward her home when a car 
stopped near her and a man 


must—render assistance with- 
got out and grabbed her, say- 


eee 


interfering with the his- 
prerogatives of the states.|ing, “I want to talk to you.” 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
- Sunday, July 8, 1956 B7 


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idiplomacy. We should have a/| 


ipurposeful, planned 
| policy. 

| Today we are constantly re 
acting to Soviet foreign policy 
‘instead of acting pursuant to a 
ipolicy of our own. Thus, where 
we should provide leadership to 
ithe free world, we are instead 


foreign 


constantly on the defensive 

On domestic legislation, the | 
candidates gave the following 
replies: ) 

Beyer: 1 am in favor of im- 
proved status, security and fi- 
nancial incentives for Govern-| 
iment employes. Reduction in| 
‘Federal taxes for lower income | 
‘individuals and little business, | 
and balancing Federal revenues | 
‘through elimination of special 
tax privileges and loopholes. A’ 
farm program which will en- 
‘courage the small family farm) 
and strengthen the agricultural | 


: m Ul 
Pa 


economy of the Nation. 


| Labor legislation fair to em-| 


iployes and management alike, 
and facilitating the icollective| 
' bargaining process. Federal 
laid for construction of schools 
‘in needy states, and increased 
Federal contributions to im- 
ipacted areas such our Tenth 
District. 

Assistance In the education of 
mentally deficient children, in| 
order that they may become) 
useful citizens. Provision of 
ibetter mental health facilities. 
‘Provision of proper job oppor- 
\tunities and care for the handi- 
capped and aged. Extension of 
(‘minimum wage and social se- 
curity coverage. Disaster in- 


‘AIM to Open 


Headquarters 
For Blevins 


Res- 
$229 


ene 


7-PIECE 
BEDROOM 
OUTFIT 


The Arlington Independent 
‘Movement will open its “Blev- 
ins for County Board” head- 
quarters at 2204 Wilson bivd. 
Monday night 

The opening will xick off the 
conservative AIM campaign to 
elect Arlington dentist, Dr 
iLuke H. Blevins, to the county 
board in November. Blevins 
opposes former school board 
member Curtis Tuthill, who is 
running on the liberal Arling- 
tonians for a Better County 
ticket. 

In announcing the openin 
icampaign chairman W. 
‘Blackman said. “We know we 
will have to work hard... in 
the face of the strongly organ- 


g. 
7 


ized liberal group which now} 
system | 
complete | 
county | 
through election of the balance-| 
of-power member of our county | 


controls our sehool 
and seeks to gain 
domination of the 


board. 

“Il am sure, however, that 
when AIM'’s party workers 
point out our groups policy of 
moderation, as contrasted witb 
the opposition’s liberal views 
on spending the people's mon- 
ey. Dr. Blevins will be elected.” 

’ 


Two Vessels Collide 
In Fog Off Britain 


LONDON, July 7 @#—The 
Panamanian steamer Scotia and) 


the 8000-ton Turkish passenger | 


ship Karadeniz collided in‘ 


dense fog off Portland today. | 
The 6907-ton Scotia reported | 
it was shipping water in its | 


forward compartment but was) 
inot in danger. There was no 
immediate word of the Kara- 
deniz. 

| The Dutch tug Oostzee sped 
to the scene. 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
, Sunday, July 8, 1956 ~ 


Outdoor Drama Tells Wilson's Li fe 


STAUNTON, Va. July 7 (Spe- 
cial)— This city of Woodrow 
Wilson's birth was in readiness 
today for a two-week outdoor 

dramatic trib- 
ute to the 
World War I 
President. 
“The Eleventh 
Hour,” a color- 
ful representa- 
tion of Wil- 
son's life will 
open Monday 
inatheater 
created especi- 
ally for the oc- 
Erma Wigheld. cs sicn in 
Gypsy Hill Park. It will be 
shown nightly except Sundays 
through July 21 beginning at 
8:30 p. m. to mark the 100th 
anniversary of Wilson's birth. 

A dress rehearsal preview of 
triple stage 
measuring 130 feet from wing 
to wing, revealed it to be a 
closely woven, well-paced his- 
torical portrayal : 

It was written by Dr. Kermit 
Hunter, who also is the author 
of “Chucky Jack” now playing 
in Gatlinburg, Tenn., and such 
other notable outdoor dramas 
as “Unto These Hills.” “Horn 
in the West,” and “Voice in the 
Wind.” 

The story of the life of Wil-| 
son is enhanced considerably 
by Hunter's narration. The nar- 


the show on a 


A group of Staunton participants gossips | 
gaily in “The Eleventh Hour.” From left te 


rators role is the continuity |— 
theme of the play as it moves | 
from stage to stage during the ographic direction of William 
course of two acts and 16) Hooks of New York. 
scenes. Split second timing is| The horses are real and the 
an essential element in a pro-|1913 Pierce Arrow which ap- 
duction of this sort. in which pears in several scenes be- 
lights take the place of cur-lionced to the President. 
tains. | The costuming is authentic, 
The cast of 90 persons is'too Only three costumes had 
centered about a handful of to be rented for the occasion, 
professional actors and ac-\aside from German and Amer- 
tresses, with the balance of the ican World War I uniforms and 
roles filled by local residents.'|Confederate uniforms. The ap- 
Donnell Stoneman does a re-|parel came from the attics and| 
matkable job in portrayal of trunks of homes throughout the; 
Wilson as a gradually maturing area 
personality. His voice and fea-| The play itself has 
tures bear a striking resem-' described as “a living memorial! 
blance to the World War I\not only to Wilson but to 
President. Cast as Joseph Tu-| America itself.” Its timeliness, 
muity, the President's secretary |in the light of present day in- 
and constant companion, Valiternational affairs, is almost 
Balfour, carries off a difficult 'frightening. There are times 
assignment with ease. during the presentation it 
A Staunton girl in the role word seem the viewer is look- 
of Ellen L. Axson. Wilson's first ing into a mirror of the times. 
wife. does a magnificent job.|\Only the costumes are differ- 
She is Erma Wigfield. who was 
a student last year at the Mar- 
jorie Webster Junior College 
in Washington and was selected 


, Navy Man Kills 
Shoko ended re bh . = ee rs . If 
ney Seomom Festival, -- | Wile SIG EAmmse 


is Richard T. Hull of Roanoke, | 

who performs in the dual roles| PHILADELPHIA, July 7 
of a New Jersey party boss and|(INS)}—A Navy ‘petty officer 
that of Col. Edward M. House. | murdered his wife with a shot- 
Other professionals include gun blast today and then killed 


Maurice Geoffrey as Sen. A , > 
bert B. Fall, Ann Kelley as himself with the same weapon 


Edith Balling Galt, Curt Low-|in their Philadelphia home. 
ens, cast as both actor and; The victims were Cornelius 
dancer, and Robert Buzzell as' J. Ahearn, 46, an engineer first 
Adm. Cary T. Grayson. class, and his wife, Hazel, also 
The several dances, which) 46. 

provide pageantry and lilt to| Police said neighbors told 
what otherwise might become|them Ahearn drank excessively 
a heavy dramatic production,|and had previously beaten his 
are performed under the chore-|wife while intoxicated: 


By Emory Toepring 


right are Ruth Judy, Evelyn Simmons, 
Marguerite Argenbright and Alice Zeliff. 


ent, the problems remain the 
same. | 


The story begins with a Con-| 
federate Memorial Day in Co-| 
lur-bia, S. C.. where Wilson is 
introduced as a college youth 
who questions then the nec- 
essity of war. The saga then 
moves along as the youth de- 
velops~to the point of world 
leadership. Only to exhaust 
himself in his efforts to carry 
his message of hope for ever- 
lasting peace, through a League 


been | eam 


OPEN 
CLOSED MONDAYS. 


of Nations to the American 


people. 

“The eleventh hour” is the 
summer highlight of the 
Woodrow Wilson centennial ob 
servance here. As an outdoor 
drama it ranks with the best 
in current production. It is 
specifically billed as a dramatic 
effort with a limited two-week 
run, but hope has been ex- 
pressed that it may meet with 
such a reception as to warrant 
its revival here each summer. 


CLOSED SATURDAYS in WASHINGTON 


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in crystalline form. 


Useful, Work-Saving Home Values, Sale Priced 


34.95 9-Drawer Unpainted Chest 


Kiln dried knotty pine chest, 


ready to paint or stain. 33x42x 
14” with 9 drawers, Colonial 


style meta! pulls. 


Reg. 38.95 10-Drawer Chest 


with corrugsted sides for 
extra strength. Galvarized 
steel. With snug fitting lids, 
convenient side carrying 
handles. 


2.98 10-Gal. Garbage Can 1.98 


: 


24” 


29.99 


18.95 Tool Set 


| 295 


Ekco kitchen tool set in- 
cludes turner, fork, spoon, 
egg 60 bigsater and potato 
masher. Stainless steel 
bledes, bleck heat-proof 
handles. With well rack. 


14.98 22-Line Outdoor Dryer 


Plastic lines wipe clean with damp 
cloth, aluminized steel center post is 
rust resistant. With ground box. 


Reg. 19.95 30-line Dryer 


oe 


Qs 


6.98 Arvin Metal Ironing Table 


Perforated top for speedier; . cooler 


ironing. Turquoise and white enamel 
finish, sturdily braced legs prevent 


4,98 


wobbling. Folds flat for storage. 


a ae 
Ba 


ee ee tee em ee mnie: 


3.98 Shopping 
Cart 


y he 
Heavy wire shopping cart 
holds loads of groceries, 
handy for laundry, too! Big 
rubber tires make it easy to 
roll, folds flat for storage 
when not in use. 


Lansbur gh’s—HOUSEW ARES—Washington, Sixth Floor; Langley Park, Md., Lower Level 


Washington, 7th, 8th, and E Sts. N.W., NA. 8-9800 Langley Park, Md., New Hampshire Ave, and Univ. Lane 


Local Beauties Take to the Trees t 


Matching their limbs with those of a tree at ton, DeLois Ann Myers of Silver Spring and 
Hains Point are Miss Washington hopefuls Barbera Freeman of Washington (from. 
Emita Kennedy and June Cook of Arling- left). The first judging is July 16. 


THE WASHINGTON:POST and TIMES HERALD 
ee Siinday, July 8, 1956 B9 


Monday Store Hours: Langley Park, Md.,-12.30 to 9:30 P.M; Washington, 9:30 
ae Pe Ci, & Rik ly Bik Nig is a ga a ena 


to6 P.M. 


fie ~ 

BAB ie 
r 4 ad . ~ 7 ae o 4 

2 Wie... © Gebers 


WASHINGTON D C. LANGLEY PARK, MARYLAND 


By Arthur Bilis. Stal! Photographer 


County K. of C. 
Contribute to 
Education Fund 


The Prince Georges Council 
of the Knights of Columbus 
has presented Archbishop Pat- 
rick A. O’Boyle a check for: 
$300 toward education of a 
priest. | 

The check represented con- 
tributions made since January 
when the Council pledged $50. 
a month toward the fund. Next | 
June and in following years,| 
the contributions will total 
$600 annually. | 

John D. Rourke will be in-| 
stalled as Grand Knight of the| 
Prince Georges Council at 8 
p. m. Monday at the Council | 
home. ) 

Other officers to be inducted 
are: W. Howard Ball, deputy | 
Grand Knight; Richard W.| 
Cooper, chancellor; John E.| 
Fanning, warden; Thomas F. | 
Rosewag, recording secretary; | 
Edmund L. Dulin, trustee: 
Claude LaPointe, treasurer; | 
Paul M. Steffy, advocate; Fran- 
cis Tracy, inside guard; and' 
Charlies Kenney and John L. 
McLellan, outside guards. 

Msgr. James E. Cowhig of 
St. Jerome's parish, Hyatts-| 
ville, was named chaplain aa 


the coming year. 


SAFEGUARD Your POSSESSIONS 


WITH 
FIDELITY 
SAFE 
STORAGE 


Fidelity Meets your needs £.) . 
for safe storage of any— mt 14 ° . 

or all—of your household ee % ; “8 Olle Prints 
goods. Private locked >» ¢ . | + 

rooms and open storage 


4 Me $ . s ‘ f 
for furniture, linens, Os sf - 
draperies, etc. | > 1.19 Value c¢ 


. Crease-resistant and washable Yd. 


. © Fa 
Neat, tailored motifs fabrics” Reeves or Peter Pan 


LOCAL and LONG DISTANCE MOVING » bes sts Be KS Be an 4 othe 
"Door To Door Service The World Over” a  s pretty resistant, picture. 


* Florals, geometric 
conversation prints 


® Need 
36” — or no ironing, 


Unpaid Dividends 
Other Liabilities 


Reserves: 


Surplus 
Contingent 


Julius A. Maedel 


Francis J. Clark 
Stuart O. Thompson 


o 
Accountants, a6 well a6 


Federal, Savings end 


1881 Seventy-Sixth Year 1956 


: rs soft 
BUILDING ASSOCIATION | eee , ats 3 
629 F STREET NORTHWEST wast 
Washington 4, D. C. 


Condensed Statement of Condition 


Office Building and Fixtures ....--ceseseeess 46,445.23 


Accrued Interest ...sccceccecsecesess oe , 81,371.39 eat : : 9 
Other Assets 20,073.11 i Cc a ~ 8. 
Stock: —Federal Home Loan Bank ..-ceessseeecsesee pece 335,000.06 . | yd. 


U. S. Government Securities 1,039,906.2S _ : 
Cash on Hand and in Banks ...ccecescessrseecerceceses 684,412.11 27 50 Spools Straw-sheen, 


Federal Insurance .....+««ees i dc abalsieebnes $800,000.00 


Francis J. Clark, Treasurer Taylor Fussell, Asst. Secy. 
Stuart O. Thompson, Secretary Edwin Shelton, Attorney 


Hermann H. Bergmann William L. Moore Edwin Shelton 


Under Supervision of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board, Washington, dD. C. 


i eal ciler, Buchanan Mitchell and Mares. Certified Public Portable 
ecords are vegwiary ucts’ by omnes of the Federal Home Loan Back Board. 


District of bia Gevings and Loan League 
Pederal Home Lean Bank System Se tnes Sevines and Leas Leemue 
‘OFFICE HOURS—Daily 9:00 AM te 4.00 P.M. Closed Saturdars 


Stunning Prints, woven fa 


| Ncies, s 
W ASHINGTON PERMANENT : = goras: Bates bed cottons. Large @Ssortment of thease and cool sheers i, @asy-wash 


ints, 


Crease-resistant, drip dry summer texture and colors 


the alla 
or no ironing. 36” wide. re 


and need little 


98e Value Bemberg® 59e to 2.98 Values 


, 1956 | 
Prints Clearance 


. anon ubatneeesbeesoolt & $20,205,477.81 


UY lus . 
“Sunkist” sheer prints, so |son. Skeire’ wlan’? ***" 


$22.412.685.90 Ps) cool and comfortable tl 
7’ you # yarn 59¢ V 
_ want several fashions in this 100 — Straw-glo, slue .. 
LIABILITIES LIP lovely fabric. Crease-re- 2 150 Shen S $! Velue ag 
ee las. sistant, practical for sum- aie nes Me ative 
$19,063,438.05 : mer. Many designs and 80 Skeins Nomotts Cran” ’ 
398 561.7 j color combinations. 41’ Tweed yarn, 85- Value 


" F 9 
wide. hat kits ¢ 
2.98 Value ssl make, 


Construction Loans in Process O00. 1.69 Nylon Tulle 98< Yd. 100 Pre. Pillow 


5 Cases, to 
FABRICS—W ashington, Third Fl. roider. $1 Value ._- 


Advance:—Federal Home Loan Bank | ART NEEDLEWORK 


~~ ashington, Third Floor 


800,000.00 


430,540.00 2,030,540.08 

$22,412,685.90 | Quality Construction American Made 

OFFICERS F WHI EF] . " ‘s 

Te ric Sewing Machines 
Julius A. Maedel, President Fritz R. Sauber, Controller E to $80! amous ecl Cc e 

Hermann H. Bergmann, Vice-Pres. John H. Thompson, Asst. Treas. ) j 


Our famous White sewing 
| machme th 
’ 
DIRECTORS 
—— 
Clyde H. Miller Fritz R. Sauber 


Everett G. Phelps Robert P. Tiffey 
C. Rammling Louis F. Bohraus 


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Lansburgh’s—SEWING MACHINES—W ashington, Third Floor; Langley Park, Md. Lower Level 


Washington, 7th, 8th, and E Sts. N.W.—Phone NA. 8-9800—Langley Park, Md., New Hampshire Ave. and University Lane 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
B10 Sunday, July &, 1936 : . 


First Offering wins wide acclaim for the 


a0/0 ie 


AW 
‘new concept of this haven for ATA t 


year ’round country club living 


NORTH: CAROLINA 


...@ controlled resort city 


on Oo miles of 


unspoiled 
Atlantic Ocean 
beach 


Nature’s Most Bountiful Gifts have been lavished on 4 =, 

Corolla. 5 miles of wide, white beach slope gently into . Enthusiastic response greeted the initial offering of residential property at Corolla. 
the ocean surf. For years, grasses and trees were im- | 
ported and planted. Aloof from the humdrum world, i 
Corolla’s natural assets have been jealously guarded to ae resort city for year ‘round country club living. Here is far more than a beach 
provide an invigorating, refreshing setting for family life. ae 


For here is what discriminating people have long sought—a carefully controlled 


development, far more than a private club. Here is the answer to your desire for the 


utmost in seclusion, tranquility and gracious living. 
Every Modern Convenience is incorporated in Corolla’s 


saa rn Goumtey dik ennai Geaieien aaa ie ; The Corolla of today is a priceless rarity ...5 miles of virgin land between the 
schools, amusement facilities, hotels and motels will be vee: ahs & we Pa Atlantic and Currituck Sound. A $25 million transformation has begun to create a 
accessible but have been planned so as not to infringe on wise ta — = 

the sacheston of the sedidedtial asoak. Bp cemmechansiin Pe OWN lavish and luxurious resort community. The master plan, which took 17 years of 
is Corolla’s development that 2 landing strips are a eal meticulous development, is being followed with the utmost care to preserve the area’s 


provided for those who would commute by air ee ae ; 
majestic beauty—to prevent over-commercialization. You who desire the highest 


| : 7 refinements of life for your family are invited to investigate the magnificent oppor- 
Everything Under the Sun will be available for the | 2 
health, happiness and relaxation of Corolla residents a tunity that only Corolla affords. 
...an 18 hole golf course with its own club house... : : 
the millionaire’s lodge that has become the luxurious 
yacht club... the marina for boating enthusiasts... 
swimming pools... the world’s finest fresh and salt 
water fishing = . safe beaches... fishing piers... 


Residential Sites .. 
shooting points on The Sound. ; , 7 esi en 12 [ es are now available. Membership in The Whalchead 


Club is a requisite for all purchasers. All sites are at least 10 feet above sea level. Only large sites are 


A Protected Future is the keynote of Corolla living. All 
residents must become members of The Whalehead 
Club and sensible restrictions have been imposed to 


maintain a high level of congenial family living and to | ; *2,500 to 110,000 
: | a 


available to prevent residential congestion. To encourage immediate building, initial offering prices 


have been established at misimum levels of 


preserve property values. Those who reside at Corolla 
are assured of congenial association. 


For Full Detdils on the Availability of Corolla property and for 
color brochure, write, phone or visit : 


H. GLENN GARVIWN Roland P. Harrington, Sales Mgr.- 


EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR WASHINGTON, STATE OF MD. AND NORTHERN VA. 


1534 CONNECTICUT AVE. PHONE ADAMS 4-9133 
Washington, D. C. 


—_— 


pam 8TH BOT ES G .5-.6:4 
Rit | 


Agents for The Whalehead Club, Inc., Corolla, North Carolina 


' 


Yankee Homers Blast Nats, 6-3. 


This 


Morning... 
With Shirley Povieh 


To Whom It May Concern: 


THE SATURDAY EVENING POST has outbid Look 
and Collier’s for the Rocky Marciano Story in a package 
deal that gives the retired champ the movie rights 
The new favorite to wind up with the Tigers’ franchise 
in the Detroit Derby, eight entries, is Fred Knorr. Mr. Knorr 
owns the radio station that broad 
casts the Tigers game and, more im 
portantly, has as a 15 per ceft partner 
in that enterprise, Tiger President 
Spike Briggs... Joe horse 
racing author and analyst, reports 
that the daily betting of the average 
person who went to United States 
race tracks last year totaled $74.19 
.. » Lew Fonseca, American League 
official and former batting champion, 
explains the increased output of home 
runs: “Present-day hitters are swing- 
ing lighter bats and getting more 
speed into the swing at impact. My 
Movie cameras gauge that speed of 
the average fast ball at 75 to 85 miles 
an hour, but the bats are traveling 100-125 
point of impact” Fonseca points out that Babe Ruth 
swung a 45-ounce bat, Mickey Mantie’s 34 ounces. He 
adds. “The picture studies show Mantle has great wrist ac 
tion. but Ruth’s was better. Ted Williams is a sweep swinger 
Ted Kluszewski has no great wrist break, clubs the ball with 
powerful arms and shoulders” 4 new contract with the 
sponsor, National Brewing Co., assures Station wwWDC 
the broadcasts of the Nats’ games for the next three years 


Estes. 


Povich 


miles an hour at 


of 


FORMER WELTERWEIGHT Champion Tony Zale lost out 
In the casting of Hollywood's film of Rocky Graziano’s life 
because he couldn't pass his screen test, for an odd reason 
Zale was unable to pull his punches in fight scenes with the 
actor in the title role . When Zale was beating Graziano 
in two out of three fights for the title a few years ago, Rocky 
best described Tony's Body punching: “It's like getting hit 
with a red-hot poker that he leaves in there’ The Na- 
tional Steeplechase and Hunt Association uppity it 
Gescribes its race as 3 miles over Brush, with a capital B 
Teams in Montana's Basin League boast famous baseball 
names. Pitching in the league are Paul Dean Jr., son of the 
former Cardinal great. and Dave Moriarty, whose dad was 
the noted umpire. Freddie Lindstron Jr.. is catching 
The fascinating sketch of Griffith Stadium in today's special 
All-Star Game edition of this newspaper, was made available 
by J. G. Taylor Spink, publisher of The Sporting News... 
Evidence that the human race is growing up is the announce- 
ment from Australia Olympic authorities that of the 5000 
athietes in the 1956 games, 58 per cent are more than six 
feet tall... Incidental Olympic intelligence: The United 
States will be leading the field in warships at Melbourne 
with 11; Britain will send seven, and New Zealand and Pakis- 
tan two each . The pigeons will have everybody out- 
numbered, with 5001 to be released as a symbol of peace at 
the opening ceremony 


Ss so 


THE WASHINGTON BASEBALL Club will net approxi- | 


mately $20,000 from concessions at Tuesday's All-Star game, 
which will be its most profitable contest since the opening 
game ...The Throughbred Racing Association turns the 
clock back 25 years to report that in 1931: Fifty British book- 
makers absconded after Cameronian won the Epsom Derby, 
an Australian track star named Jimmy Carlton sped 100 yards 
in 9.9 to beat a trotting horse by 3 yards, Jockey Sonny Work- 
man was hospitalized with a broken ankle and New Broom, 
which was bought for $75,000 as a yearling, at four years old 
was launching a new career as a polo pony... Chicago 
Insurance Executive Charles O. Finley, one of the bidders 
for the Tigers’ franchise, has as his backers Philip R. Clark 
and Lester Armour. the same Chicago bankers who financed 
Bill Veeck’s purchase of the Indians 10 years ago... Bill 
Werber Jr.. owned by the Reds and a slugging sensation in 
the Southern League, has been slowed by a fractured toe 
suffered when he chased a fou! ball into the left field bieach- 
ers ...None of his fair-weather friends among the base- 
ball club owners invited former Commissioner A. B. (Happy) 
Chandler to the All-Star game. Now the Governor of Ken- 
tucky and a rising power in national politics, he will be the 
guest here of the Roger B. Doulens.. “Inside Mickey 
Mantle” should have been the title Ben Epstein’s revealing 
article on the the Yankee slugger in the new issue of Look. It 
is the best of the many current Mantle articles 


GOLF DIGEST POINTS out that despite the fact Julius 


Boros has won only five tournaments in five years, only Carey | 


Middlecoff has won more purse money. Boros’ total of $127.- 
436 is only $4000 less than Middlecoff’s ... For young Herb 
Plews of the Nats, who has four hits in 28 times at bat this 
season for a .143 average, the irony is he made five hits last 
week in an exhibition game with the Phillies when it didn't 
count... The No man on Arizona State Teacher's Col- 
lege golf team is 40 years older than some of his teammates 
He is Bill Davis, 60, back to complete his college education 
interrupted by World War I... Mickey Mantle will have a 
powerful argument to toss at the Yankees when he talks 
contract néxt winter. On their recent road trip, the Yanks 
drew crowds averaging 30,000, with Mantle the unquestioned 
magnet ...It is nip and tuck whether Ted Williams will 


- 
‘ 


get in the 400 times at bat that is one of the requirements | 


for the league batting championship. The only other require- 
ment is that he have the league's best average 


--@ 


Nats vs. Tigers Epo Het 
Box Score 


Fairtax Joins 


In ‘Kids Game’ ® 


, Be 
join im 
‘ 
program 


— 


SKReoevewnwivrs 
= 


esceecew-Sowy 
- 


Fairfax 
the “Kids 
sponsored by The Washington 
Post and Times Herald and the 
Washington Nats tomorrow for Rots 
the July 14 game at Griffith 
Stadium between Detroit and 
the Nats. y 

Five thousand tickets will be 
distributed in Fairfax, not in- 
cluding Falls Church, Menday 
at 38 elementary centers and { 
six Teen centers. The Elemen- 
tary centers start distributing 
ticket? at 9 a. m.; the Teen 
centers’ distribution time is 
5:30 p. m. Fails Church young- 
sters will get their tickets later 
in the week 

The July 14 game will be the 
only one Fairfax youngsters at- 
tend. The Fairfax Recreation 
Department i¢ a part-time or- 
ganization which operates {rem ' ti Wechingtoe, 
July 2 to Aug. 6 and thereby Bibb colte Pasceat a Mcbere 
misses out on other games. | Seowars |, Gatisse 3: NETO Tes 

Five thousand tickets in other |is ‘3. Stewart 41 
areas will be distributed later | BME dscbermet 
in the week and the time table Eeecss!, 5-4. Stewart 


: : eris 6-4. WIN 
and locations will be announced t PR Pascesi mel 
in this newspaper. tevens, Runge, Bommel 
> 


youngsters 
Game” 


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WASHINGTON 
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>i reended eat fer Stewart in 
eGreeunded eut fer Griecs tm Sth. 
aDeubdied fer Brerty in %th 
NEW YORK 14 2H 
WASHINGTON oo8 106 
TWO-BASE HIT —Herres 
RUNS—Sikewren McDougald 
FICES — Siebern Bauer 
FLY—Serra. DOUBLE FPLAYS—MeDese 


gald te Coleman te Skhewres 3: MeDew 
te 


SACRI 


> 


11,9273. 
’ 


MeDougald, 
Skowron Hit 
Ball Into 


ce 


~ 
ori—s 
HOME 


SACRIFICE 


Bleachers 


By Bob Addie 
Siaf! Reporter 

The Yankees again demon- 
strated last night that they 
| didn’t need Mickey Mantie—at 
‘least not against the Nats. 
| With Mr. Wonderful 
ithe bench again to rest his in- 
jured right knee. Bill Skow- 
ron and Gil McDougald took up 
ithe slack by belting twin three- 
run homers. One came off Ca 
milo Pasqual, the other 
Bunky Stewart. 

Mickey McDermott almost 
‘went the distance for the first 
time since he joined the Yan- 
kees. The big southpaw looked 
more like the  fast-dalling 
pitcher the Nats gave up in a 
winter trade as he breezed 
through the first cight innings 
on a five-hitter 


Three Hits for Fits 


McDermott walked Ed Fitz 
Geraki, who got three hits. to 
start the ninth. Casey Stengel 
quickly called out the reserves. 
Whitey Herzog later blooped a 
double off Tom Sturdivant, Mc- 


=" 


- 


The Washington 


Times Beraid 


deat 
~ 


ports 


FINANCIAL 
BASEBALL 
RACING 


SUNDAY, JULY 8, 1956 


Cl 


riding 


off 


Dermott's relief. but the Yan-' 
kees were too far ahead to be! 


caught 

The New Yorkers only got 
eight hits but they seemed to 
be able to make their big wal- 
lops count. The Nats got six 
in all and Herzog’s double was 
the only extra-base blow of the 
game 

Pascual again pitched a 
“three - hitter” against the 
Yanks. You may remember that 
last Sunday he lost a 3-hitter 
to the American League cham- 
pions. Last night, he gave up 
three hits in the three innings 
he lasted 


Five Off Pascual 


The only trouble was that he 
gave up a few walks in between 
as well as Skowron’s homer 
Pascual gave up five runs and 
Stewart the other three. Hal 
Griggs and Bud Byerly checked 
the Yanks after the damage 
was done. 

McDougald started the Yan- 
kee scoring in the first inning 
when he singled, moved up 
when Norm Siebern walked, 
took third after Joe Collins’ 
long fly and scored on Yogi 
Berra’s sacrifice fly. 
MeDermott walked to open 
ithe third and McDougaid 
| singled. Siebern sacrificed and 
‘Collins walked to fill the bases. 
Berra popped to Joe Valdivielso 
in short and when  Valdi 
dropped the ball, McDermott 
‘scored. McDougald was out 
‘trying to make third. Skowron 
ithen belted his homer to give 
ithe Yanks a 5-0 lead. 


‘Mc Dougald Belts One 


| But the New Yorkers weren't 
finished Andy Carey and 
Jerry Coleman singled in the 
fourth off Stewart and Mc- 
Dougald homered. 

The Nats got their firsterun 
in their fourth. Pete Runnels 
singled, moved up on Roy Sie- 
vers’ walk and scored on Fitz- 
Gerald's single. In the eighth, 
Eddie Yost and Runnels walked, 
then Sievers singled Yost 
| across. 
| FitzGerald walked to open the 
ninth and Sturdivant rushed 
in. Karl Olson and Valdivielso 
popped up. Herzog batted for 
| Byerly and sliced a ball to left 
| which Siebern couldn't quite 
get 

See NATS, Page C4, Col. 3 


With All-Stars | 


Mantle Stull 
May Play 


Manager Casey Stengel still 
isn’t ruling Mickey Mantle out 
of the major league All-Star| 
game Tuesday at Griffith Sta- 
‘dium. 

Mantle, the New York Yan- 
kees’ home-run swatting center- 
ifielder, isn’t making any pre- 
dictions, but.let Stengel know | 
he was ready to give his injured | 
right knee a try in the Yanks’) 
game with the Nats last night.) 

“I wouldn't let him,” Stengel | 
announced. “He always says 
he’s all right.” 

But Stengel, who will boss 


for the sixth time in the classic, | 


woukin't say he'd decided on 
anyone else to take Mantle’s 
place. The expectation has been 
that, if necessary, he'll take Jim 
Piersall of the Boston Red Sox 
or Harry Simpson of Kansas 
City. 

“I'm not saying till we see 
how Mantle is,” Stengel said. 

Piersall was second choice in 
the fans’ voting for an Ameri- 
can league center fielder. 

Mickey said the knee felt 
much better last-. night, but 
added dismally, “I still can't 
run.” 


nc 


All-Star Game 
On Radio-TV 
Disappointed 


fans whe 


couldn't get tickets to Tues 
day’s All-Star game at Grif. | 


fith Stadium will be able te 


| = 38 | 
72:00. a=, 


| 


: 


| 


| 


IN MEMORY OF 


GRIFF—The major league All-Star 
Game at Griffith Stadium Tuesday has been designated | 
as a memorial to the late Clark Griffith. Above is a repro- 


Ww 


Herb Score 
Joins Stars; 


Narleski Out 
With Injury 


Casey Stengel, manager of 
the American League in Tues- 
day's All-Star game at Griffith 
Stadium, lost one star and 
gained another yesterday. 

Beset with worry as to the 
availability of the injured 
Mickey Mantle, Stengel got an- 
other shock when he learned 
that Ray Narleski, relief ace of 
the Cleveland Indians, had in- 
jured his elbow and would be 
lost to the squad. 

However, Stengel trumped 
the Cleveland ace by coming 
up with the sensational Cleve- 
land southpaw, Herb Score, to 
replace Teammate Narleski. 

Another high-level problem 
was solved yesterday when 
Baseball Commissioner Ford 
Frick agreed to perform the 
traditional ceremony of throw- 
ing out the first ball. 


President Can't Attend 
Ford Frick 


Commissioner 
said he didn't mind being 
“fourth choice in such distin- 
guished company.” Originally, 
Presidert Eisenhower hed 
agreed to toss out the first ball 
but his illness makes it impos- 
sible for him to attend the 
game. 

Vice President Nixon natu- 
rally was the second choice but 
Mr. Nixon is out of the coun- 
try and won't be back in time, 
Then Chief Justice Earl War- 
ren was approached but the 
country’s No. 1 jurist is leaving 
for his native California. 

Yesterday, Calvin Griffith, 
president of the host Nats, an- 
nounced that Frick had com 
sented to perpetuate the tradi- 
tion of throwing out the first 
ball. When Washingon last was 
host to the All-Star game in 
1937, President Roosevelt did 
the job. 


Umpires Named 


Commissioner Frick also an- 
nounced the officials for Tues- 
day's game. Charlie Berry, vet- 
eran American league umpire, 
will work the plate for the first 
half of the game since the 
American League is the home 


duction of a button made in Griff's honor by the Baseball 
Writers Association. It will be worn by baseball people, 
including the commissioner, officials, players and press. 


| 
Fry Captures 
‘Wimbledon 


Singles Title 


| WIMBLEDON, England, July 
7 W—Shirley Fry's 12-year 
quest for a major singles title! 
met success today when the 
steady veteran from Ohio won 
the Wimbledon women’s cham 
pionship, one of three honors 
salvaged by Americans on the 
final day. 
| The 20-year-old Miss Fry. her 
backcourt game bristling with| 
accuracy, cut down Britain's! 
Angela Buxton in a workman- 
like, 50-minute final, 6—3, 6—1.| 
The American never lost her 
service. 
Later Miss Fry, born in Akron 
‘but now a resident of St. Peters- 
‘burg, Fla.. teamed with Vic 


It fell for a double as Fitz| Seixas of Philadelphia to cap-| 


ture the mixed doubles, beat-| 
ing Althea Gibson of New York 
and Gardnar Mulloy of Denver,| 
2—6, 6—2, 7—5. | 

The sensational Miss Gibson, 
who fashioned an 18-tourna-| 
ment winning streak stretch-j 
ing halfway around the world) 
before Wimbledon, was not 
denied her moment of glory. 

The tall New York Negro gir! 
paired with Miss Buxton to win 
the women’s doubles with a 
6—1, 8—6 triumph over Fay 
Muller and Daphne Seeney of 
Australia. She thus became 
the first of her race to win a’ 


See TENNIS, Page C-3, Col. 3. | 


NEW YORK, July 7 #—Pittsburgh Man- 
the American League All Stars) ager Bobby Bragan today put the rap on his 
star hitter, Dale Long, accusing the first base- 
men of “trying to be Babe Ruth” and being 

responsible 


Pirates’ 
spin. 
“If 


again, 
right,” 


: os Pittsburgh 

| tes said, in trying to ex- | 
plain the Bucs’ fall | 
from first place in the | 
National League to 


| fifth. 


“Dale is a 280 hitter normally, and that's | 
where I want him to be—normal. Right now, 
| he’s at 300, but it’s a skidding 300. He 's made 
only two hits in his last 53 at-bats and none 


, 


in his last 17.” 


chosen the National 
baseman in Tuesday's 
g 


——“When He Quit, We Quit... .And We Need His Big Bat’ — 
Bragan Longs for Long to 
To Be Babe Ruth, Blames Him for Tailspin 


Dale 
would stop trying to 
be Babe Ruth and 
start being Dale Long 
we'd be aill | 


This was the second time this season that 
Bragan has chastized the 30-year-old player 
who came from nowhere this year to be 


League's nae gy 
major league 

ame. : 
On April 18 Bragan fined Long and out 


fielder Roberto Clemento $25 each for care- 
less play in a 5-4 loss to the New York Giants. 


Musial Gets Award 


Stan Musial Named 
“Pla 


| ' ST. LOUIS, July 7 (P—Stan (The Man) Musial, veteran 


yer of the Decade’ 


St. Louis Cardinal outfielder-first baseman who owns a hat- 
ful of National League records, today was named the player 


of the decade by the Sporting News. | 


The national baseball weekly reported Musial won the 
honor for the period 1946-55 in a poll of 260 players, club 
officials, umpires, writers and sportscasters. 

Joe DiMaggio, former topflight outfielder, of the New 
York Yankees, was second in the balloting, and Ted Williams, 
the Boston ned Sox slugging outfielder, was third. 

*" Musial received 2654 


points, DiMaggio 2433 and 
Williams 2312, on the basis of 
14 points for a first-place 


vote, nine for second and 
running down to one fr 
tenth. 

Bob Feller, righthanded 
hurler for the Cleveland In- 
dians, who suggested the 
award, was fourth. 

Stan will appear in his 13th 
allstar game Tuesday at 
Washington. 

The six-time league batting 
champion and _ three-time 
most valuable player, Musial 
owned a lifetime batting av- 
erage of 342 before the cur- 
rent season started. He is 
aiming at 3000 hits, a mark 
achieved by only six other 
players. Musial now has 


Here Tomorrow 


Stan Musial will receive 
his Player of the Decade 
award at the Touchdown 
Club luncheon Monday at 
12:38 p. m. The award is a 
$400 grandfather's clock. 

Shirley Povich, colum- 
nist of the Washington 
Post and Times Herald, 
will introduce Bob Feller, 
star Cleveland pitcher. Fel- 
ler will make the presenta- 
tion. 

Members of the National 
and American League All- 
Star teams, in town for 
Tuesday's classic at Griffith 
Stadium, will attend the 
luncheon. The program 
will be televised by WTTG- 
TV, channel 5, from 12:30 
te 1 p. m. 


| 


| 


Other pie vers Ww 
ebin rts. 


Phiiadeiphia | 
esi Berra. Ye 


period. pad Hal Newheeser,. 
seuthpaw pitcher of the Detrelt Tigers. 


——— 


Quit Trying 


Off to a hot start which shot them into first 
place early in June, the Pirates have lost 15 
of their last 19 games to fall below the .500 

| mark. Long, who set a record of eight home 
for the | runs in eight straight . 
recent tail- | games, hasn't had a 
| homer since June 9. 
Bragan said Long's 
slump had not af- 
fected just himself 
| but also pitcher Bob ° 
Friend and the entire 
team. 

“Friend is the best 
pitcher in the Na- 
one League, but he tee, ie 
n s runs to win,” 
| the Pirate manager Dale Long 
| added. “Bob has lost three in a row, but some 
hits by Long could have made a big differ- 
ence. 

Bragan admitted that Long carried the team 
in the early stages of the race but added that 
the slugger’s sudden fame brought distrac 
tions. 

“Wherever he walked he was idolized,” 
, Bragan said. “He was getting phone calls for 
all sorts of appearances. The fans at Forbes 

Field had him do encores. It was the kind of 

thing he'd never faced before. 

re’s no need kidding ourselves. When 
, he quit, we quit. The way we're constructed, 
| we need his big bat.” 


Long 


brash | 
skipper 


the 


first 
Star 


vod 


+. 


Hartack Wins 
$95,000 Race, 
Four Others 


)1:11 3/5. 


price. 
‘Twe Seconds 


day today with five victories, 


\day. Aside from Leallah. Har-! 
;/tack won aboard Arete (2.80) in 


CHICAGO, July 7 #—Piloted 
by red-hot Willie Hartack, un- 


defeated Leallah stamped her-| 


self the Nation's top 2-year-old 


filly today with an easy four-| 


length victory in the $95,180 
Arlington Lassie Stakes. ) 

Tt was the fourth straight) 
1956 triumph for the Chariton’ 
clay filly who nonchalantly sped 
the six furlong distance in) 
There was no show betting. 
ran second, 2% 
ahead of Frank's 


Leallah, which went off a 14 
choice in the crowd of 24,539. 
retrned only $2.40 and §$%.20. 
Splendored had a $3.00 place 


. Twe Thirds 
Hartack ran in the money all 


including the Lassie Stakes, 
two seconds and two thirds. 
Winning Willie ran is string, 
to 171 triumphs for the year,; 
22 in the last six days, 17 in 


ithe last four days and 32 in 
recetved votes in-|the Arlington meeting. 


He rode in all nine races to-| 


the third; Bardestown (2.80) in 
the fourth, and Smoke Lore 
($5.20) in the seventh. 
Hartack finished second on 
Cargo in the ‘first race and 
second with Which Way in the 
ninth. He finished third in both) 
the fifth and six races aboard) 
Liberty's Son and Royal Sting. 
Nantua, owned by A. B. Han- 
cock Jr., a nephew of Chariton 
Clay, set the early pace but 
folded under Leallah’s pressure 
in the far turn and wound up 
sixth, behind Prophet's Bell! 


See HARTACK, Page C-3, Col. 2 


‘in the seven-horse race in which) ' 


‘Splendored 
lengths 
|Flower. 


club. After 4% innings, Babe 
Pinelli, of the National League 
staff, will take over. In addi- 
tion to Berry, American League 
umpires named were Ed Hur- 
ley and John Flaherty. Hurley 
will work the bases and 
Flaherty will be an alternate, 
stationed on one foul line. 

Artie. Gore, of the National 
League, will be another base 
umpire while Bill Jackowski, 
National League, will be an al- 
ternate like Flaherty. 

Lyall Smith, Detroit Free- 
Press, president of the Base- 
ball Writers Association, Burt 
|Hawkins, of The Washington 
Star. and Bob Addie, of The 
Washington Post and Times 


See ALL STAR, Page C4, Col. 4, 


Order of Events 
For Tuesday’s 
All-Star Game 


10:30 a. m.—Gates open at 
Griffith Stadium. Concert by 
the Goldman Band. 

16:55 a. m—American 
League batting practice. 

11:40 a. m—National 
League batting practice. 

12:25 p. m—Field is to be 
cleared of all persons with 
the exception of participating 
players as National League 
takes fielding practice. 

12:35 p. m—American 
League fielding practice. 

12:45 p. m.—Starting line- 
ups te be announced over the 
public address system as 
groundskeepers put finishing 
touches on field. 

12:52 p. m—March to the 
flagrele by Presidents Will 
Harridge and Warren Giles 
of the American and National 
Leagues, Managers Caséy 
Stengel and Walter Alston of 
the two teams and the United 
States Air Force Band and 
an Air Force color guard. 

12:57 p. m—Commissioner 
Ford C. Frick throws out the 
first ball. 

12:59 p. m.—The public ad- 
dress announcer asks for a 
moment of silence in memory 
of the late Clark C. Griffith. 

1:08 p. m—PLAY BALL! 


Gl 


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PAG 
AW 


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STORY 

OF THE 
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In the YMS 12 Yearly Sale! 


YOUNG V 


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THE WASHINGTON POST 


vunivtn”|Post, Kluszewski Homer, Cincy Defeats Cards, 5-2 


Phils’ 5-Run Meee Lawrence Majors cr ee 
Surge Beats 5. -~ | Registers | AMERICAN LEAGUE Shuts ut 


' w. 
‘'New York... 51 


Dodgers, 6-3 eee ee we 12th Victory Cevnd $3 at ts 


PHILADELPHIA, July 7 @ ee ae 432 itd ST ielinns cananh sae: hos 
A, July | one ‘Detroit ‘ Lew Burdette spaced six hits 
The Philadelphia Phillies broke! | | CINCINNATI, July 7 ®—The |wagm'GTON 31 308 81% | niet and drove in the win- 
lgose with five runs in the! | ae 4 wr 4 ’ Cincinnati Reds exploded two!Kansas. City 28 me ining run as the Milwaukee 
séventh inning to break up a| st | — homers good for three runs in| vesTERDAY’S RESULTS (Braves scored their second 
* battle and beat the’ * me CS. ng SNe ented N York, & WASHING: straight shutout victory in beat 

| . ' _, 4 . ’ h ‘ : } ew 0 a : . - 

klyn Dodgers, 63, before eS. : pa tae ae Sete ee eee Se 6 ing the Chicago Cubs, 5-0. 


a crowd of 26,575 at Connie | | | night to trim the St. Louis! petroit, 12; Chic 
Fis 4 me a | ; ago, 8. Only two Cubs reached sec. 
p Pg meptheny ated il * <2 = “” , i toe Cardinals, 52 and strengthen; Boston, 4; Baltimore, 3. ond base as the Braves came 


seventh despite a five-hit pitch-| <2 cn —— 2 ies % ee. a os their hold on the National; Mamsas City, 5; Cleveland, 2. yy with three double plays to 
img job by veteran Saul i “4 . “a oe ee eS League lead. TODAY’S GAMES |keep Burdette mm commend. 
Ro the Phil t 10 . ' It was Burdette’s ninth vic- 

the plate in their big seventh. | | a ae. Brooks Lawrence starred in| piitimore at Boston (2);| tory in 13 decisions and it kept 
They, Smibined five bite witht | Fie. 2% —— +a = a relief role for the Redlegs,| 5.) on (3-4) and Moore (65)\the Braves in second place, 
tWo walks to knock out starter) § wes et od “t .* ; holding the Cards to only one/ys. Sullivan (7-3) and Nixon |only three percentage points 
Roger Craig. The aroused Phils . ‘eo ~ EY . hit in the last four innings to (3-2). behind the National League- 
continued on reliefer Clem La a 3 > a take his 12th victory without a’ New York at Washington, 2 leading Cincinnati Redlegs. The 
bine to clinch the game. | : a es hee ’ Pp. m.: Byrne (3-1) vs. Stobbs lanky right-hander struck out 

Philadelphia's Solly Hemus, ‘ if a ee ae — 75). two and gave up two walks. 
bating for Rogovin, started the mam 5 a “s 4 pe \" Wilmer (Vinegar eBnd) Mi| Detroit at Chicago (2): Pierce’ Bill Bruton doubled and 
big inning with a single. Two "9 4a Se wz zell held the Reds hitless until (13-2) and Wilsen (114) vs. reached third on an unsuccess 
walks filled the bases and La - , , : a lthe fourth inning and scoreless Trucks (3-3) and Foytack (5-6). | ful fielder’s choice attempt and 
bine came in for Craig who had ; ‘ | j luntil the sixth | Cleveland at Kansas City: scored on Burdetie’s single in 
been touched for .seven hits) .? ‘ ) 7 ‘Wynn (9-4) vs. McMahan (6-2).' the fifth. Johnny Logan singled 
including Marv Blaylock’s fifth baal . ; It was a homer by Wally Post, 'to fill the bases and Eddie Math. 
inning home run already . . , f . , that started the Redleg scoring. | NATIONAL LEAGUE ‘ews sent another run across 

Del Ennis beat out a hit to ee , : In order thereafter, center-| GB, | With a fly to the outfield. 
shortstop, scoring pitcher Stu a i fielder Gus Bell smacked out o The Braves scored twice 
Hiller, running for Hemus = ee “‘~s 4 a single and came home on Ted me og . ;. more in the sixth on a single 
With the bases still loaded, _—_ So See ‘ ee eee, ee eee sep 11, | by Joe Adcock, Del Rice's dou- 
Willie Jones singled through poke, ey eRe gl Wee “lig a 4 rae belt of the season rr Lele . 2/ble and O'Connell's single. 
the middle to put the Phils in| eS te pele we ina ve © oe ere “3 Three hits put together in Pittsburgh ; qy,| Im the eighth, the Braves 
front, 43. A single by Granny| © > ee ae a SP ae I~ i. ite Gear: : , ee ~ 2: eS a opening inning gave the Cards Chi , *\ scored their last run as Bruton 
Hamner and a bunt by Ted| a 20 lead. After Don Biasin-| oo as ‘ *\singled, stole second and con- 
Kazanski drove in two more Tebb 8 Reds Readv for G |game and Alvin Dark singled,| Philadelphia tinued to third on a low throw 

! ) 

suns before Labine could retire e etts, y or Vame — ~agll Reon Blasin. New York |. . by catcher Hoby Landrith. Bur. 
) ew sin 


: Imeost body Cincinnati team mye gle and é, y Bos , 
Giants Rally, A every on the will be on the Tigers Pound Dark scored on Boyer’s double YESTERDAY'S RESULTS nen sacrifice fly sent him 
> 


play grounder. New York, 3; Pittsburgh, 2. Cubs’ third baseman Don 
. ST. LOUts Milywaukee, 5; o, *. 0 was ej le 
Down F ading Chisox, Smas Bias ame empl Cincinnati, t mt. Loam . \eame during the fifth inning 
.- ° H \Bover' 3 
Pirates, 3-2 Four Homers |. . 


’ Philadelphia, 6; Brooklyn, 3.|)"°" he protested a play at 
, third. 
TODAY'S GAMES | CHICAGO MILWAUKE 
Smith ¢ 
' NEW YORK, July 7 #—Pitts-| CHICAGO, July 7 #—The De- | Titisan.’ » 
Totals TeUw Tetels Buti 


A 
Brooklyn at Philadelphia | {¢**?? Povaeh.s & 7 
: a. burgh Manager Bobby Bragan’ troit Tigers (10-5) vs. S. Miller (4-5) or Ne- 
= --e @—y a i ovan with three successiv gray (1-0) and Meyer (5-4). 
Sa a] oe is faltering Pirates to task} ' today, matching a major league |»— Ran tor Janionski ‘Law (38) and Kline (6-9) vs. 
Priledeiphia 


(2); Maglie (2-1) and Newcombe 

in 7th ) » 
) @€-Grounded out i) mn, |t0OK first baseman Dale Long home runs in the fifth inning | .“Srhencea Jackson Pittsburgh at New York (2): 
we 0 bx -4 before today’s game with the ao ee EY zoom | Worthington (4-7) and Gomez 


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Bnic 
‘le ire , . this a 7 ; 
~Raganshi. RBI ~ Ramer ia, little good as Pittsburgh lost Brewer Wins by —Biasingame. Dak. Fx al Kies) St. Louis at Cincinnati: Dick- eGrounded out for Hecker in 8th 
Le * 5 J 


ider Jone [Camp 9 . popes son (67) ws. Nuxhall (5-8). bRean fer Adcock in 6th 
~ §-Craig. DP Hamner. another, 3-2. Al Kaline had tied the score,|Grammas. it -Rebinson, Hi-Kiussewst)| Chicago at Milwaukee: Rush ccc tie 


vs| Bragan, angered at the Play Orioles ri ith |$- Br —Biasingaspe | and Musi (7-3) vs. Conley (4-4). Mitwewker ""-°..°°"""! See O28 otx—s 
§ lof his team, said Long was “try- er _Yawrence |. 80-Misell 6 iets P—Hoat, Pandriun, “rpomes: 
-\ing to be Babe Ruth,” and : , Jackson mi Sins) ,. . ' i—Burdette 2. Mat ees. ice O'Con- 
For No. Ll ; the aay || ect ales ie|4'* Sign Two Players tpt St tees fader fe 
iman for the club's tailspin. _| KANSAS CITY. July 7 a! rence 08, Kuder od. BAP ee tae) =ANSAS CITY, July 7 ) —Chicago Milwaukee 10, 
| Long did not start the game. BOSTON, July 7 #—Boston's The K os ' Betley ! Signing of two 19-year-old Ohio < 
National Division Hank Thompson rejoined the Tommy Brewer, an All-Star | s City Athletics de Billy Hoeft, who boosted his! is. Gere, Jackowski 4-\baseball players for minor) @P Sas PRY isk 


' : feated Herb Score for the \ette (5-4) L—Hacker (2-4). U 
ve t hos- lectio survived ) record 06 thoug ili lea l @}ii. ess _ 
Wins on Theft of Home tid sah Seheh 6 tenant sib leetes Goth tent ,time tonight as they bh started off the Diast gue play was announced to- ipa" Secews. Vine. P35 

| nei 


shaky fourth inning for his 11th’ . . . day by the Kansas City Ath-| 
The National Division All- gle in the eighth that won thelvictory of the season today ~ Rf of a single after one out. (Quantico Marine letics. James Edward Dunn of 


] . 
— wry es game and continued Bob | the Red Sox ‘ed the came = homer 1s Leads Pistol Shoot Dayton, . righthanded pitcher, | 
vision, 2 i, in Innings yester- , ; edged ; uenn, Earl . t 
day to advance to the district Friend's winless Charley HARRISBURG. Pa.. July 7" will go to Seminole, Okla., and 


started back on June 16. 50 James Edwin Hakes of Colum- 
layoffs in the Babe Ruth ) leaninst the A‘: lect A many Me ey BS ioe ato Meetehen Gee All-Star Game 


ague. | Ed Bressoud, young NeWinecoming the third American’ | 
of the Pennsylvania State Pis-\Island of the Nebraska State BEACON TV 


tol Championship at the Harris- 
me|OUrg Hunters and Anglers Ciup|“**s"*- | AD. 4-4688 
| 


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had posted two victories 
ason 


“ y The Kiwanis-Falls Church York shortstop, tripled to the 
, hurler to reach 11 in 
% Babe Ruth League, for young- Pirates bullpen with one out in League Rar them this se 


: 
2 


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gi 


sters age 13-15, sends its Na\the eighth to start the Giants *>¢ Victory column preceded 7 2 ; 
tional Stars to Front Royal, Va.. on their victorious rally. After Chicago's Billy Pierce (13-2) and! on but s —s up 5 
for the district eliminations. Don Mueller flied out. Willie Jim Wilson (114). The Cheraw, one Score. G 


ti 
>» range. a 
° d nial hit a home tl 'T/Set. D. W. McClure, sta- VACATION SPECIALS! 
The Nationais won yesterday Mays was walked intentionally. ht hander has lost! 
when Mike Dech stole home.| Bill White then walked to fill, ~* “© ™™ Athletes, raising 


at the Quantico, Va., RELINED WHILE YOu WAN § 
Dech had walked, moved to the bases before Thompson |“*®*- total to 11 arine base, walked off with| BRAKES BONDED AS LOW AS... 15.50 


) ' ; , ithe highest aggregate score for 
third on an error by the first singled. Thompson has been in| After three innings Boston) staked the my and Hoot Evers did it in poebeny ~ tty =~ 862 with Guaranteed 20,000 miles . . . (also riveted) 
baseman and then stole home./and out of the lineup since mid- held a 40 advantage when 35 bulls-eyes. ALIGN FRONT WHEELS ... $4.45 & $7.50 


June because of headaches and Brewer hit a rough spot. A sin MOTOR TUNE-UP, 6-cyl. Saebhe a tae 


. dizziness that followed a bean- le and a walk set up Tito Fran Hect T ‘] Defeat 
The Minors ing. Today he played ieft- S na’s run-producing single. | Lopez utwiler Veiecats 8-cyl. Te RE Re $7.60 
arden Pies st ncted feld instead of bis ewied KO : torre Kiaus|® : sc | | Campbell, 3 and 2 MUFFLERS INSTALLED FREE ... $7.00 up 


wire W.t. Pet.| Dale Long, Pittsburgh’s'made a double error on Billy : , ixi WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, . 
Bt St: Sas oeisrite Hii 4 home run hitting first baseman, | Gardner's grounder to let in an- — ‘|W. Va.. July 7 Ed Tutwiler OPEN SAT. 7:45 AM-1 P.M. G4 ST. ONLY) 
Chartts 5349. ad 


‘aps 4 
Peel 


* sié 
Sirs §% 


: {33 | came off the bench in the ninth| . | 

40 39 as | other tally and pinch hitter Bob . of Charleston won his seventh 

SESCEEDSSS Sceenes jto drive in the yy my Fenn Hale's sacrifice fly brought ' many runs as 10 batters took|State Amateur Golf champion. ‘é a BRAKE, STEERING AND 

coms... Charleston {FUR with a single. His blow f0l-) nome the third. scored on a double to left by| their turns. The key blows|ship today, defeating. Bill ELECTRICAL SERVICE 
INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE lowed singles by or~: = clude their offensive work. Vie Power. Power moved to|were a tworun single by Ka-| Campbell, of Huntington, 3 and 1909 M St. AW ST. 3-2066 

aateeet tt ts creases 1 Roberto Clemente. te I s aN third on a wild pitch and came jline, his third hit of the game,/2. It was the fourth time Tut-) : ° ° 

$36 Ercan ss was only his third in his ijast 54 in on a single by kizas. jand a tworun double by Ray|wiler has beaten Campbell in 611 Md. Ave. SW. ME. 86232 


orente 3 59 45 464 
schest'r $6 37 354 the finals. | at 6th and Independence Ave. 


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YESTERDAY'S RESULTS PITTsst — NEW TORE 
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" 


Princeton Takes Thames Cup in Henley Regatta 


oe 


7 


Sunday, July 8, 1956 


THE 


WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD C3 


MARKET TIRE CO 
WASHINGTON'S LARGEST 
DISCOUNT TIRE CHAIN 


HOTELS in the city are 


Star visitors, many of whom won’t get any nearer Grif- 
fith Stadium than their TV sets. | 
Almost as jammed will be the party given in honor 
of Chuck Dressen at the Woodner tomorrow afternoon . 
Chuck merely intended to have “a few 
old friends” .. . About 401 accepted. 


Everybody has fun at the All-Star 


games 


. « They don’t get much chance to 
relax... 
Club is doing something unusual in 


giving 


tomorrow... 
Bob Feller, George Kell and Mickey 


Vernon 
already 


The first non-network broadcaster 
of an All-Star game was Arch McDon- 
ald, who is still airing the Nat's stir- 
ring struggles .. . 

1938 game and, of course, did the 1946 World Series... 


Wolff of WWDC will be doing 
the Mutual network... 
friend, Capt. Bob Neal, for a 
10:30 to 11 tomorrow night. 


Bobby Walston, 
Eagles, incidentally, 


of the law .. 
relation to the ex-fighter) is a 


DR. WILLIAM G. SPRAGUE (among others) reminds me 
I was in error when I said Harrison Dillard was essentially 
Dr. Sprague points out that Dillard’s specialty 


a sprint man... 
was the hurdles and when he 


trials when he fell, he competed in the dash... 
the 100-meter dash in the 1948 Olympics, 


Ewell by a step. 


Joe Cronin and Hank Greenberg will be formally inducted 
in the Baseball Hall of Fame at Cooperstown, N. Y 


23. 


Al Sherline, former Bethesda-Chevy Chase high and Uni 


versity of Maryland basketball 
tor of physical education and 


(Ill.) grade schools and basketball coach of the high school. 

A card from Japan from those two Washington tourists, 
Eddie LaFond and Joe Bunsa, 
Hope and Crosby in those road shows .. 


ton sports figures have been 
Far East .. 


. boxing rules now in use. 


LAUREL RACE TRACK (or 


has three former United States Ambassador among its direc- 
.. James Bruce’ was Ambassador to Argentina... 


tors 
inridge Long held the same 
Garrett in Ireland. 


Bob Addie’s 


Column 


Wolff will team up with my old 


star end for the Philadelphia Eagles. 
equally adept at catching speeders and forward passes . 
Bobby is a deputy sheriff in Tattnall county, Georgia 
seem to be making a pitch on the side 
. One of their rookies named Billy Conn (no 


.. This year, the Detroit Tigers and the New York Giants 
will play the annual exhibition at baseball's shrine. 


. Bunsa writes that he and LaFond were the 
guests of Maj. Gen. Ed McGaw who fathered the collegiate 


D. C. Girl 
Wins Third 
AAU Event 


reported jammed with All- 


TYLER, Tex., July 7 W 
Shelley Mann of the Walter 
Reed Swim Club, Wdshington, 
D. C., smashed the world record 
for the 100-meter butterfly to- 
night in winning her third cham- 
pionship of the Women’s Na- 
tional AAU Swimming Meet. 


She made it in 1:11.8, which 
\was 1.8 seconds under the world 
‘mark of 1:13.7 set by A. Voor. 
ibij of Holland in 1955. 

AAU officials said they would 
isubmit the record for recogni- 
tion and saw no reason why it 
would not be accepted since the 
pool meets all specifications 
and all conditions are ideal. 

Miss Mann, who previously 
had won the 400-m@ter indi- 
‘vidual medley end the 200- 
‘meter butterfly, bettered the 
Arch broadcast the |AAU and American records 

Rob ithis afternoon in the prelimi- 

' inaries with 1:45.5 
the radio part of this one for | The old record was 1:15.0 set 
by Betty Mullen Brey of Wal. 
iter Reed in 1955. Mary Jane 
iSears of Walter Reed was sec 
iond with 1:13.3 and Mrs. Brey 
ifinished third with 1:14.33 

| Carin Cone, 16-year-old 
ischoolgir!] from Ridgewood, N. 
J.. won her second champion- 
iship of the meet in taking the 
100-meter ackstroke with a 
itime of 1:14.5. This was a new 
AAU and American record, 
bettering the 1:15.5 set by Miss 
Mann in 1954. 

| Miss Cone previously had 
‘won the 200-meter backstroke 
with a new record of 2:43.8. She 
broke her Own record of 2:45.6 
iset in 1955. 

Another world record was 
set in the 800-meter freestyle 

Sylvia Ruuska, daughter of 
| a Berkeley (Calif.) YMCA swim- 
ming coach, Weikke Ruuska, 
won the event in 10:54.5, which 
'was not an AAU record in me 
iters, but in’ doing it she bet 
itered the world’s record ‘for 
|880 yards set by Loraine Crapp 


except the players selected 
However, the Touchdown 


a luncheon for the players 
Yogi Berra, Al Kaline, 


are among the players who 
have accepted. 


special pre-game radio show 


as 


. The 


Newark, N.J., policeman. 


failed to qualify in the 1948 
Dillard won 
beating Barney 


on July 


‘of Australia in 1954 

The pool, which is a foot 
illonger than 50 meters, meas- 
jures 880 yards over the 800-| 
imeter route. 


player, has been named direc- 
athletics for the Taylorville 


: Alaska League 
President Quits 


who seem to have replaced 
. The two Washing- 
giving boxing clinics in the 


FAIRBANKS, Alaska, July a| 
=— American colleges don't 
have a corner on the athletic 
subsidy problem. The president 
of the Midnight Sun Baseball 
League has quit as result of a 
hassle over the recruitment of 
college athletes. 


“course,” as we say politely) 


Breck- 
post in Italy and George A. 


TENNIS—From Pg. C-1 | 


IN A WHIRL—America’s Shirley Fry is all 

arms and legs as she goes after the ball 

in her match with England's Angela Buxton 

in the Wimbledon championships in Eng- | 
**« > © 


Fry Defeats 
Over Recruitment Buxton at 


Wimbledon 


Wimbledon title, the most cov- 
eted in all tennis. 


Miss Fry’s one-sided triumph 


| Ren Holmberg, 


title, 


Holmberg Takes 


‘Junior Wimbledon’ 


WIMBLEDON, July 7 # 
18-year-old 
Brooklyn player, salvaged 
something from the wreck- 
age of American men’s tennis 
prestige today by winning 
“The Junior Wimbledon.” 
The big, blend New Yorker 
defeated Red Laver, fiery 
redhead from Australia’s Is- 
a State of Tasmania, 6-1, 


In his letter of resignation, 


Two of Dave Sime’s four major ambitions are shelved for 
the moment... A couple of months ago he said he wanted 
(1) to make the Olympic team, (2) break the world record 
for the 100-yard dash, (3) play major league baseball and (4) 
become a doctor ... It’s conceivable he may still break the 
dash record but not this year ... He'll have to wait a bit 
for his major league ambition . . . Dave tells friends that 
his idol was Bobby Brown, of the Yankees, who put himself 

‘through medical school playing major league ball. 


nessman, said it was 
face these kids every day” in 
reference to unemployed ball| 


from him. It was 
charged that athletes from Pa- 
cific Northwest schools has 
been lured to Alaska with'| 
promises of $1009 a month 
jobs 


Buzz Brazeau, Fairbanks busi- 
“tough to 


players seeking a loan or a job 
previously | 


and success tn the two minor 
doubles classes. brought a 
Slight lift to waning American 
court prestige, jolted by a com- 
iplete shutout in the men’s 
division. 

Australia's Lew Hoad won 
the men’s singles yesterday by 
‘beating teammate Ken Rose- 
wall and today the two 21l-year- 
old Aussie Davis 
nega off with the men’s dow- 


Holmberg had to fight his 
way through a field of 20 na- 
tional junior champions from 
Britain, Europe, Trinidad 
and Pakistan te 
title 


“Junior Wimbledon” has 
been going since before the 
war. 


Another American to win 
a trophy was Hugh Stewart, 


Cup mates’ 


Sime, who is giving Duke 


tobacco man for whom old Trinity College was renamed, is 
from Fair Lawn, N. J., and his dad was a baseball and basket- 
ball semi-pro star on several Paterson teams... 


major competition was as an 
Silver Skates tournament in 1 
title. 


Colleges represented on a 
banks area teams include Or e-|° 
igon State, University of Idaho, | 
iCentral Washington and Cen-' 
itralia Junior College 

League treasurer John Titus 
said the “stranded athletes” 
were not the league’s responsi- 
bility and that job offers had 
been made by individuals and 
not by the league. 


more publicity than the late 


Dave's first 
ice skater in the New York 
950 and he copped the novice 


Lopes H eard 
Referee Counting 


But He Wasn't 


NEW YORK, July 7 ‘#—This 
may come as news to Joey 
Lopes of Sacramento, Calif., 
who wound up on the floor last 
night when the 10th round 
ended, giving Italy's Paoli Rosi 
a unanimous decision. 

“Does Rosi punch hard,” 
fellow asked Lopes. 

“Naw, just fair,” he replied. 


“Tl heard the referee count.” 
For your information, Joey, 

the referee never did count. 

The bell sounded too quickly. 


Rocca Wrestles 


Von Hess Thursday 


Hartack Rides|Gore’s 


SARTACK—Fr. P. 1-¢ |D. C.’s Mairs Ends 
Streak at 
Old Dominion 


pioisieaal and Orlando Sirola 
of Italy in the final, 7—5, 6—2, 
i6—1. 


a warm sun, 
the final program of what ten- 
nis-loving British call the “dedi- 
cated fortnight.” 


Five Winners 
MANASSAS, Va., July 7 


and Romanita. Aim High fin-\Jimmie Mairs, Washington, D.' 
ished last. iC. won the 25Jap feature} 
Leallah, ge a sportsman car race here to 
«Rena ote Paris, Ky,|misht. Don Carter, Falls 
owner, raising her earning for| Church, Va., was second. 
four straight triumphs to $78,| Wally Gore, Manassas, was| 
965. forced to withdraw from the) 
Hartack easily swooped into feature in the seventh lap be- 


a safe lead in the stretch and | cause of mechanical difficulties.| 
won easing up. 


Nantua. ridden by Steve 'He watched Mairs end his! 
Brooks, displayed good speed streak of six victories here. 
for a half mile and then! In the 25lap midget auto 


stopped badly to squelch @ pOS-ifesture Nick Fornoro. Dan- 
Conn., nipped Ed Schaef- 


sible second upset by owner ary. 
in 7:14 


Hancock over his Uncle Clay. | 
In the Arlington classic two fer, Floral Park, L. L., 

years ago, Hancock's Delta/ minutes. 

scored a photo victory over 


Antonino Rocea meets Karl 


Von Hess in the feature bout) 


on the wrestling card. at Capi- 
tol Arena Thursday night. 
The match will be a 2- out-of-3 


falls. 60-minute Ume limit af-| 


fair and will start promptly at 
9:20 p. m. 


Today's Events 


SANDLOT BASEBALL 
OLD DOMINION LEAGUE 
ofiibingte Keller ve. Jack Fre, 


irt jon ot Forestvitie. 3 BD. ™. 
mF siriax x Lerten Sex at a io. m= 
Celenial 


McLean. 
> =. 


West 


Restaurant sat 


scene CAR BRACING 


tock rs 
_ eat” ssttmere a. | 


" SAT BOATING 
Pe Washes ra Recatts. An- 
“fismoten Vachs “cis Recatta. Hamep- | 
ten. Va.. 19 
pRac RACING 
; d +5 
Ps aa doeet war anes. coevemy, OF is 
‘ I gy er een RACING 
Throttictwisters meet. New 
Vis i. } RM on VYieta. Md. 1 Bo. @. 
AREA TENNIS 


Middle Atlantic Clay Courts cham-' 
ips. sens singles end deubles 


” 6. @. 
AREA GOLF 


mbin member 


-ceest teurnemen 
bis Gell and Coentry Clad, 19 


Clay’s Lea Lane, a full sister 
of Leallah. le ae 
Splendored, ridden by Jonn- a 

ny Heckmann, saved ground in 91-Mile Trophy Race 

moving up near the stretch and| BEVERLY, Mass., July 7 # 
easily pounded down to the ‘Carroll Shelby of Dallas. Tex. 
wire to beat the others. 

Leallah will make her next 
start in the $100,000 Princess 
Pat Stakes at Washington Park 
in August. airport 

Hartack Lp ey hap psy his| Shelby wen by chou tad 
sixth race of the day Dy a nose | , 
when Which Way was edged! ed of a lap over the 2.6 mile 


Carroll Shelby Wins 


91-mile 
Beverly 


featured 
in 


the 
race 


won 


trophy the 


=" Fleming Wins 


./races for runabouts, 


out by Relet in the ninth and 
closing race on the day's pro- 
(gram, 


Masten Gregory of Kansas’ 
City in his Monza Ferrari was'| 
second. Sherwood Josnston of 
Greenwich, Conn., in a class D) 
Saguar was third. Shelby aver-' 
aged 75.9 miles per hour. 


‘Twice at Langley 


LANGLEY AIR FORCE 
'BASE, Va., July 7 #—Buddy| 
it 18-year-old mechanic | 
from Edgewater, Md. was a| 
‘double winner today in the out- 
lboard division of the second) 
‘annual Langley Yacht Club 
Power Boat Regatta. | 
| Fleming drove his Bad 
News to victory in both A and’ 
B stock hydroplanes. In, the 
Tommy} 
Young of Wachapreague won!) 
in AU, Carlton Seay of Rich-| 
mond in BU, Carl Dowe of Nor-) 


New Device 
Guaranteed to 
Remove Scratches 
and Repolish 


xv 
c, WINDSHIELD 
SCRATCHED? 


HERSOW 


72 FLA: 


Auto ating 


Lc: Savin 
COLL s ‘AV 


__-seseseseeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeemrmrmCm,mCmC,CmcC,CmcGmrmr rrr rrr 


folk, CU, and Richard Ellis of 
Falls Church, Va., in DU. 


They trounced Nicola 


> 


A crowd of 16,000, baked by 
turned out for 


Miss Fry gave them a per-) 
formance they won't soon for- 
get as she laced winners down 
the sidelines time and time 
again, relentlessly attacked 
Miss Buxton’s unsure back- 
hand and coasted home under 
wraps. 

After winning the first game 
on her service, Miss Buxton 
lost three games in a row, 
dropping her service in the 
third game. The British girl 
fought back gamely, winning 
the fifth at love, but Miss Fry 
broke her again in the ninth 
game for the set. 

The American then reeled 
off five straight games of the 
second set before Miss Buxton 
finally won on her service. But 
Miss Fry closed out the match 
in the seventh game, twice 
drawing Angela to the net and 
leaving her looking at a zip- 
ping passing shot. 

Miss Buxton’s backhand was 
miserable, and the new Wim- 
bledon champion hammered 
away at this weakness cOnstant- 
ly. Miss Buxton repeatedly 
netted backhand shots, some 
of them so weak that they hit 
halfway up the net. 

Forehand Clinches Match 

The match-clinching shot for 
Miss Fry was a beautifully- 
executed forehand down the 
sidelines which caught Miss) 


Los Angeles. He beat Gard- 
nar Mulloy, the veteran from 
Denver, Col., 46, 64, 64 in 
the Wimbledon Pilate — the 
consolation event for those 
knocked out in the first twe 
rounds of the tournament 
proper. 


Associated Press Photo 


land yesterday. Shirley quickly won the 
6—3, 6—1. Miss Buxton was the first 
British girl to reach the finals since 1939. 


St. Petershurg 


Shirley Fry 
Claims Pier 


ST. PETERSBURG, Fia., 
July 7 —Shirley Fry of St. 
Petersburg, who was prom- 
ised the City Pier if she 
won the Wimbledon Women’s 
singles tennis championship, 
cabled Mayor Sam Johnson 
today: 

“Coming soon to collect my 
pier.” 

Johnson said Shirley likely 
will be made honorary owner 
of the pier, inasmuch as he 
“wouldn't want to embarrass 
her with its revenue.” 

“I would hate to cause her 
to lose her amateur stand- 
ing,” the mayor added. 

The million dollar pier juts 
out into Tampa Bay and long 
has been a favorite fishing | 
spot and recreation center. 
A television station also is 
located there. 

Shirley defeated England's 
Angela Buxton, 6—3, 6—1, to 
win the coveted tennis title. 


Colteryahn Signs 


BALTIMORE, July 7 


Penn Bars 


Halfback Over 


Financial Aid 


PHILADELPHIA, July 7 # 
The University of Pennsylvania 
disclosed today it had barred a 
member of its 1955 varsity foot- 
ball team—a third-string half- 
back—from future athletic par- 
ticipation because he had re- 
~ unauthorized financial 

Gene D. Gisburne, vice pres 
ident of the University for stu- 
dent affairs, said the action was 
taken by the faculty committee 
on eligibility. 

He said that Penn policy pre 
vented disclosure of the stu- 
dent's name, but a source close 


ito the university identified the 


player as 19-year-old Franklin 
Rodgers of Johnstown, Pa., now 
a junior. 


Staying at Penn 


Gisburne said that the stu- 
dent planned to continue his 
studies at Penn and that “the 
financial assistance awarded 
him by the university commit- 
tee on scholarships and student 
aid will be continued.” 


The action by the faculty 
committee merely barred 
Rodgers, for whom Coach Steve 
Sebo had high expectations in 
the next two football years, 
from intercollegiate athletics 
and not from any other univer- 
sity activities. 

The source said that Rodgers|-. 
had been receiving firancial aid 
from a Penn alumnus living in 
Johnstown, and this is in viola- 
tion of the university rules. 

The rule states that a scholar- 
ship student shall receive finan- 


or from Government if he is| 
a service veteran or member ag 
the ROTC. 

Gisburne emphasized that 
Penn does not give athletic’ 
scholarships but admits athletes 
jand provides them with finan- 
jclal aid if they meet the 
\school’s academic standards. 

Penn's football team has 


been withodut a victory in the 


past two seasons. 


cial support only from personal’ 
or family resources, by employ-' 
ment, from the university itself | 


TODAY—SUNDAY 
N.E. STORE OPEN 
10 A. M. to 4 P, M, 


All Stores Open 
aily 


Princeton 
Crew Takes 
Thames Cup 


HENLEY-ON-THAMES, Eng- 
land, July 7 —Princeton Uni- 
versity’s undefeated lightweight 
eight rowed to two victories 
over the wind-whipped Thames 
River today to capture the 
Thames Challenge Cup of the) 
Henley Royal Regatta. | 

Expertly stroked by J. E. 
Kaiser, the Princetonians elimi- 
nated a crew of fellow Ameri- 
cans, Kent School of Connecti- 
cut, in the semifinals, then out- 
sped the Royal Air Force oars- 
men of Britain by a length in a 
thrilling championship race. ) 

Princeton was timed in 7 min- 
utes 38 seconds for the semi- 
final test over the mile, 550-yard 
course, made difficult by ca- 
pricious winds, and was clocked 
in 7:10 for the hard-fought final. 


Kocerka Retains Title 


Theodor Kocerka of .Poland 
successfully defended his dia- 
mond sculls crown »by beating'| 
Britain's T. A. Fox in a stren- 
uous race. The day's other win-| 
ners were the French Army 
crew, in the Grand Challenge 
Cup for heavyweight eights, 
and the British Army Engi- 
neers, in the Wyfold Challenge 
Cup for fours. 

The British Army crew won 
over the crack Brockville, On- 
tario, four in a wild race which 
saw the Canadians bang into 
the marker bopms of the 80-foot 
wide course four times and 
then ram into the judge's stand 
at the finish line. At that, the 
Canadians were beaten only by 
four feet. 

Princeton's lightwe ig hts 
rowed well within themselves 
in the morning, beating Kent's 
schoolboys by a length and a 
quarter, but went all out. 
against the RAF in the after- 
noon. 


Leads All the Way 


The Tigers leaped off to 2 
small lead which never was re- 
lingquished. Halfway home, the 
British crew started to spurt 
and pulled almost even with 
the Princeton bow. 
But at this point the Prince- 
ton coxswain, D. C. Schall. 
called for a faster beat and the 
Tigers surged back to the front. 
The edge gradually increased 
from a half-length to three 
quarters and then to a full 
length as the boats shot across 
the line. Princeton was be- 
ginning to open water at the 
end of the race. 
The Princeton crew gave 
away 9 pounds to the man to 
the British fliers. The college 
boys averaged 159 pounds, the 
British 168. The RAF had de- 
feated a crew of English steve. 
dores in the semifinals, 


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Washington Wins 
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Washington Golf and Country! 
Club routed Prince Georges, 
6-1, yesterday at Washington in 
a Men's Interclub B League 
tennis match 

SINGLES Rodney 


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SET OF 4 


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—_—— 
—_— 
a 


Sports on TV, Radio 


RADIO | 
BASEBALL — Washington | 
vs. New York, WWDC (1260 | 
ke.), 1:45 p. m. | 


TELEVISION 
No events scheduled. 


Nats vs. New York 
TODAY, 2 P.M. 


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driving a 4.4 liter Ferrari today| Buxton completely off balance. | Lloyd Colteryahn, offensive end) 


As Misses Fry and Buxton ‘picked up by the Colts as a’ 


ran to the net to shake hands, | 


disappointment. 


free agent three years 


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Sports car races at the Beverly| both had tears in their eyes—jsigned today for another sea-| 
(One from joy, the other from/son with the Baltimore entry | 
Miss Buxton'in the National 


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was England's first Wimbledon/|League. The former University | 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


Sunday, July 8, 1936 


Redskins May Find It Tough Matching Last Year’s Effort 


_" 


Pitches and Putts 


By Maury Fitzgerald 


ee 
> 


VICE PRESIDENT NIXON carried fond memories of his 
best round of golf with him on his-trip to the Far East 
The Vice-President went quietly out to Congressional the day 


an 84 


host 


; 
| 


club 
Tom K. Wheeler and Rep. Jack West- 
land (R-Wash.), 1952 National Amateur | 
champion 
selected 


before enplaning and, using a brassie off the tees and never 
: once straying from the fairway, had 


His playing companions were 


orofessional Wifly Cox, 


Two of the 13 youngsters 


to play with Washington 


against Canada July 27 at Toronto in 


the 


seventh 


annual Simpson Cup 


matches. are sons of professionals 


They 


are 


Ronnie Jamison, Coose 


Creek. and Jack Doser, Woodmont 
It’s comical the way they tell it now | 
at Prince Georges but it was very un | 
funny to Dr. John Haught who had to 
swim for dear life up the middle of the 


18th 


Fitzgerald Gil 


fairway 
cloudburst 
Willett, 


during a 4th of July 
. A few moments later, 
Prince Georges 


champion, was racing for cover and in his haste tried to leap 
the swollen creek at the 18th but landed in the middle of the 


water and he, too, had to paddle to safety 
manager. reveais tests to show 


U. S. Rubber golf ball sales 
that the clubhead travels 110 
miles per hour at impact 
and the ball leaves the tace 
of the club at 170 miles per 
hour when hit by a good 
player . Washington area 
youngsters lucky enough to 
qualify July 24 at Baitimore 
for the ninth junior amateul 
championship of the USGA, 
Aug. 7-10, Williams College, 
Williamstown Mass will 
have a chance to watch the 
veteran Wene Sarazen « 
duct a opening-<day shotmak- 
ing clinic . Eddie Graefe., 
golf pro at Sherwood Forest 
and part owner of an Annapo- 
lis gas station, is also adept 
at delivering babies The 
other day a car screeched to 
a stop in his gas station and a 
wild-eyed driver hopped out 
yelling, “My wife is about to 
have a baby and I can’t make 
it to the hospital] in time,” ... 
Graefe climbed into the back 
Seat with the expectant 
mother and performed like a 
doctor. 


or 


ROYAL SHEPHERD cele- 
brated the opening of Lang- 
Btons new nine by shooting 
the layout in an even par 36 
».- Vie Oberhammer, pro at 


Dezendorf. 
Connolly Win 


At Columbia 


Medalists A. G. 


Dezendorf 


John Sproul, 


e-- 


and John Connolly of Washing-! 
ton combined their talents yes-| 


to fire two-under 


terday 


and John Jankowski. 


par 
golf and defeat Harold Harwood 
Prince | 


Georges, in the second round of | 
Columbia Country Club's mem-| 


ber-guest tournament, 4 and 3. 

All four surviving semifinal- 
ist teams were under-par. Three 
of them were two-under and the 


other finished one-under. 
Marty West Jr. 


and Bob | 


Chandler, Congressional, were) 


Quaker Ridge Country Club 
(N. ¥.) for the past 17 years, 
a brother of Woodmont 
Country Club manager Er- 
Oberhammer . “My 
poor little three looks so all 
alone wailed Mrs. Irving 
Rosen when she put it down 
on the scorecard along side 
the two's collected by Phyllis 
Kebock. Mrs. K. S. Giles and 
ida Feldman at Indian 
Spring's 150 yard 14th hole 
. | Dr. Thomas Leonard 
thought he had been bitten 
by a snake the other day at 
Congressional on the third 
hole when he reached down 
to identify his’ ball in the 
rough and came up with two 
neat holes on the back of his 
hand Instead, he dis- 
covered it was only a wood 
thrush trying to protect its 
nearby nest .. The next 
meeting of the Mid-Atlantic 
Association of Golf Course 
Superintendents will be held 
Tuesday at Fort Meade. 
Dr. Milton Klow last week 
became the second golfer in 
Bethesda Country Club his- 
tory to reach the green on 
the 585-yard 14th hole in two 
shots... Jim Barnes, win- 
ner of the 1921 National Open 
championship here at Colum- 
bia Country Club, Freddie 
McLeod informs us, has come 
out of retirement to teach 
and give playing lessons at 
Baltusrol (N 
Manero (1936) and Ed Furgol 
(1954) won National Open 
titles. 


is 


nesi 


EAGLE 
Bob 


DEPARTMENT— 
Hendrich drove the 


green and Don Date holed a | 


wedge to get a pair of deuces 
at Bethesda’s 290-vard Ilith 
hole ... Foster MacKenzie 
wedged one into the cup for 
a three at Congressional’s 
par-five fifth ... And further 
proof that the wedge is golf- 
dom’'s mightiest weapon was 
produced by Dr. Jerry Cope 
and Jim Travis at Washington 
... Dr. Cope used a wedge to 
get.a two at the first hole and 
Travis knocked a wedge shot 
into the cup for a deuce at 
the 16th. 


Club 


J.) where Tony | 


Teeuwen (right), trainer and 


Controversial 
District Golf 
Team Picked 


A controversial 16-man team 
was named yesterday to repre- 
sent the District of Columbia 
Golf Association in its annual 
imatch with the Virginia State 
Golf Association at Columbia 
‘Country Club next Sunday 

Selection of Lt. Col. Walter 
Davidson. Army Navy. and Lt 
George Wisler, Quantico, also 
caused more than mild eyebrow 
lifting. Neither player is gen- 
erally known among the tour- 
nament regulars 

Karl Kellerman, head of the 
District selection committee, 
named two alternates, two sel 
ior and two junior representa- 
tives to the squad 

Ralph Bogart, one of the 
area's outstanding players, 
turned down an invitation to 
play on the team because he 
iwill be out of town. 

Pairings for the 
matches 
| Bobby Brownell, Chevy 
| Chase, and Rep. Jack Westland, 
‘Burning Tree: Claude Wild, 
Burning Tree, and Gil Willett, 
|Prince Georges; Col. Rennie 
‘Kelly, Congressional, and Lt. 
iCol. Davidson, Army Navy; 
Perky Cullinane, Bethesda, and 
Jerry McFerren, Manor: Buddy 
'Sharkey, Kenwood, and George 
‘Thornton, Manor; Mike Jan- 
i|kowski, Prince Georges, and 
'Bob Chandler, Congressional: 
iW. B. MeFerren Sr., Manor, 
iand J. Tyler Bowie, Columbia: 
Joe LaSalle, Belle Haven, and 


four-ball 


PUMPING FOR CANADA—Washington cyclists are pump- 
ing hard these days in preparation for the four-day 500-mile 
championship race in Quebec, Canada, Aug. 23-26. Dottie 


+ EE i ORS. ime aR, > 
Ee Lt 
oh Me a ph eT 


bam i ry 
eae eee Ae 
ne 5 


a . r | i <a . b: ¥ 4 ’ a oe | £ 
oF ww = he x r, & ; . 
> SRR A a ; 

right) Larry Herman, Gerald Teeuwen and Oliver Ward. A 
fourth Washington fider who also will compete, John Clay- 
ton, was not present when this picture was taken. 


coach, watches over (left to 


| 
| Ward, Teeuwen, Herman and Clayton 


D. C. Bicyclists Hope to Use Canada Races 
As Stepping Stone tor Olympic Squad 


By Jerry Davis 
Stef Reporter 


Four Washington men, who 
hope to pedal their way to 
the Olympic Games, will rep- 
resent the United States in 
three Canadian bicycle races 
in August 

Oliver Ward, D. C. bicycle 
champion, Gerald Teeuwen, 
Larry Herman and Johnny 
Clayton will be the only 
American entries in the 
races, which they hope will 


By Charlies Del Vecchio. 6taff Photocrapher 


attracts the best bicyclists of 
Canada. 

The Canadian team which 
won the race in 1955 has dis- 
banned, and Ward and his 
teammates are sure they can 
make a good showing against 
the Canadians, who take 
their bicycling rather se- 
riously. 

These Washingtonians are 
quite serious about the whole 
thing, too. They get together 
in Rock Creek Park and prac- 
tice for two hours every 
morning before work. After 
work, they convene again for 
a 30-mile session. 

Ward, who will compete 
for an Olympic berth in the 
bicycle trials in California 
in September, is the only 

veteran cyclist in the group. 
) Clayton, a college student, 
| is 19; Herman is 22, Teeuwen, 
| 21. . They figure they can 
make up for lost time by get- 
ting plenty of practice. — 

The team leaves for Cana- 
da Aug. 17. Its members 
will make the trip by car 
with their bicycles strapped 
to the top. 

The car will be used in the 
races to follow the riders and 
distribute food and water 
along the race route. A 
bicyclist can't waste | time 
stopping for lunch. 

The car also will carry 
spare tires and bicycles. 
Blowouts are frequent along 
some of the bumpy courses 
the riders must pedal. 


be stepping stones to a berth 
on the Olympic team. 

They will compete against 
amateur riders from Canada 

| and Mexico in the Quebec to 
Montreal (170 miles) race 
Aug. 19, the 25-mile Mont- 
real race Aug. 21, and the 
500-mile Tour of St. Law- | 
rence race Aug. 23-27. 

Ward is the only member 
of the quartet who partic- | 
ipated in the Canadian races | 
last year. He finished tenth | 

| in the 500-mile feature, which | 


At Weodmont 


Blue Sparkler 
44 Teams Wins Easily 


ompete it | At Monmouth 
Pro-Am Golf | OCEANPORT, N. J., July 7 


(®—Woodland Farm's Blue 
Forty-four teams will tee off Sparkler scored a runaway) 
Monday at Woodmont in the'victory in the $28,500 Molly | 
Maryland State Golf Associa- Pitcher Handicap before 31,837 
tion pro-amateur tournament at Monmouth Park today and 
held annually as a preliminary vindicated herself for a poor’ 
to the Maryland State Open'showing at Delaware Park last 
championship. Saturday. 
Most of the 98 pros and; The 4yearld chestnut filly, 


amateurs listed to compete in owned by Amory, L. Haskell,| 
Wednesday's 36-hole Open are Monmouth Park president, led| 
listed to play in the team from start to finish in the mile 
event. The pairings and start-and a sixteenth jaunt for 


9 


| J Canadian Open 
Kuharich Finsterwald 


Must Fill Takes Over 
Two Holes |Lead, 203 


| By Jack Walsb ' | POINTE CLAIRE, Que., July 
" Btaft Reporter 7 (P—Dow Finsterwald of Bed- 


: 
' 
; 
; 


ued: “On paper, we're not a 
‘championship contender — too 
many shortcomings. Still, it’s 
possible we'll win it. 

“But we still feel it will be 
a near-miracie if our squad is 
able to give us the same effort 
it did last season. 


“Went All Out” 


“It did more with less than 
any squad we ever saw in foot- 
ball. In order to win, it had 
to go all out at all times.” 

Perhaps it's natural for Ku- 
harich to be wary. He's been 
on a roller-coaster in his brief 
two-season career here 

Two years ago, when he be- 
latedly took over after Curly) 
Lambeau's abrupt departure,| 
Kuharich’s club finished with 
a 3-9 record. Including exhibi- 
tions, it lost nine in a row 
One of the league games was a 
623 pasting by Cleveland 

That year also saw the tragic 


A man with considerable|ford Heights, Ohio, today 
stake in the fast-approaching moved into the lead of the Ca- 
Redskin season appears.to be|nadian Open golf champion- 
eyeing it warily. ; ship with a five-under-par 67 

With the squad’s equipment|for the third round and a 54 
already California-bound and hole total of 203. 
he and his staff leaving in a! kage Pe <i) ~ yr 

' rain an : ; 
week, Gene Joe Kuharich remendous torrential down- 
said: “We're not optimistic pour that halted play nearly 15 
nor pessimitic but are trying inutes—Finsterwald came in 
to. be realistic late to snatch the lead by. one 

A plural pronoun guy from | wo roke from Marty Furgol of 
way back, Kuharich contit-|r amont. Til. 

a Dick Mayer of St. ae. 
rs j Fla., playing in the same three- 

Pros Will Use some as Finsterwald, tied Fur- 

; . gol’s 204. 

Sticky Football Furgol shot a brilliant 66 for 

When the oldtimers say ‘his third round—best score of 
football isn’t what it used te (the day—to go with his 36-hole 
be, they're right. This year|total of 138. Mayer shot 69 to 
the pros will employ a brand- (add to his 135. 
new one. | At 205, two strokes away 

Redskin Coach Joe Kuha- from Finsterwald, was Doug 
rich explained that the leath- |Sanders, amateur from Miami 
er is chemically treated to | Beach, Fla., and at 206 was Mike 
make the ball stickier and Petchik of Mahopac, N.Y. 
give the passer a better grip. | Doug Ford, also playing out of 

“Little Eddie LeBaron may 'Mahopac, had 207. 
be helped more than the | The leaders yesterday at the 
other quarterbacks,” Kuha- halfway mark—Bob Winninger 
rich said, “because his hands |.¢ Qdesce Tex. and Gay 
are smaller. LeBaron has had | power newcomer to the pro 
trouble in the past with a | from Cincinnati. 
wet ball or one gritty with dropped back. 
gh s oe Sees the | Winninger took a 71 today for 
new _ roe Bi OE a kee 4 |Sthole total of 208 and was 
s ee tells me he likes  ibracketed with Bill Nary of 
a |Wayne, Mich. who held the lead 

for awhile today until the sub- 
par wreckers got to work. 

Brewer, yesterday's sensation 
with a courseequalling 65— 
seven under par—blew sky high 
to an 80 today. His most dis- 
astrous spot was the par-four 
second hole where he was in 
the rough twice, in two traps 
and finally took an eight. 


Joyce Ziske 


Breaks Par 
Again, 142 


SYRACUSE, N. Y., July 7 # 
Shooting a sub-par 71 for the 
second day, Joyce Ziske of 
Waterford, Wis., will have a 
three-stroke lead going into to- 
morrow’s final 18 holes of the 
Syracuse Women's Open at the 
death of Tackle Dave Sparks, Drumlins Golf Course. pre 
jheart attack victim shortly) Heavy winds blowing across 
after the second Cleveland) the fairways, still wet after two 
/ game. |\days of rain, bothered many in 
) ithe field but Joyce clipped two 
Got the Breaks strokes off par for the first nine 

Last season, nearly every-| with a 36 and parred the second 
ithing went right. The Red- nine for her 71 and a 142 total 
iskins were the surprise of the/ after 36 holes. 
pro league and made the great-| + ouise Suggs Third 


est form reversal in NFL his-| 

‘tory with an 84 record and| Three strokes behind is the 
second-place finish ladies PGA champion, Louise 
| Kuharich was voted UP pro Suggs of Sea Island, Ga., who 
coach of the year and his East had a 73 today after a 72 on 
All-Stars won the Pro Bowl Friday for a 145. Louise had 
from the favored West, 31-30. two birdies, two bogies and 4 


Lt. Wisler, Quantico. 

FOR THE SECOND | Alternates: George Cornell, 
straight year, Eastern Open Congressional, and W. B. Me- 
officials will kick off their |Ferren Jr., Manor. s3 
$19,000 tournament with a |_ Seniors: Martin F. McCarthy, 
pro club champion-celebrity Columbia, and Gene Pittman, 
tournament Monday, July 23, | COmsressional. -- 
at Baltimore’s Mount Pleas- Junio Johnny Grubb, 's 
ant course... The Eastern |Mamor, and Keith Bowie, 
Open. scheduled for July 26- | Prince Georges. 

29. is being underwritten by 
the National Brewing Com- 
pany, the profits going to the 
Maryland Heart Association 
fund ... National amputee 
champion Jack Harrison will 
show his wares for free today 
at Prince Georges, beginning 
at lp. m.... The exhibition 


two-under in eliminating Frank 
Ewing and Fleming Bomar, | 
Congressional, 4 and 3. Chand- 
ler was four-under on his own 
ball through seven, but slipped 
to a 70 for the round 
John Harding. who won the 
event last year as the partner of 
Deane Beman, whipped up 4 
one-under par round as an aide | 
to Col. Rennie Kelly in expell-| 
ing John Walker II, and Bill! 
Deck, Bethesda Naval, 3 and 2.! 
i] most lopsided victory of 
the day. a 6 and 5 victory over 
Frank Weller and W. H. Yeat-| 
man, Manor, was chalked up by) 
R. T. West, former Princeton! 
football star, and George Vass.,' 
Farmington Country Club, 
Charlottesville, Va. West and! 
Vass, who play Harding and 
Col. Kelly today, were two-| 
under 
CHAMPIONSHIP 
im 


© 


rs; > wi an 
Gilbert. Aravie 
vie. D158 &. G.—tete 
. Bainbridge and Josenh . 
° a Crabbe. Rock 
oc 


Ralph Bogart, | 
Brownell Win 


MAMARONECK, N. Y., July 
#” — Defending champions 


. = hartes M. Easton. Cone. 

Chandler, Cong. < uit Sgecere 

and Behe rer oodmen 

. @ a W Kelley. Manner 

Lewis A. MeGewan, am a q 

Tysen. CC. C. of Md. and Ed. Jehneten. 

aR ef Ma. 16:33 «. m-——Bill Gebring, 
Mimere ©. ©. of . 

, s 

and Marry 

16:46 «. me . 

end Dr. ©. Andersen. Wine 

Jendrasak. Mi. Pieasant Reb L 
on, Mit 7. arr, 


‘ 


CONSOLATION r 


w 


1. 
and Claede 


Congressional. 
H. Bair. Was 
en K. Barry-Cel. A 

Army-Navy. 5 and 4 


Ypallahber, 


hingten de- 
H. Allen. | 


Washington Plays 


Diplomats in Polo : 


The Washington Polo Club 
plays the Diplomats this after- 
noon at 3:30 p. m. at Barnsley 
Field. Olney. Md To reach 
the field, drive out Georgia 
ave.. extended, to one-half mile 
south of Olney Inn ) 

Captain Don Bradley, Dr.| 
John Keeler, William Beall and 
Halter Cunningham wil] play) 
for Washington The Diplo- 
mats lineup includes Col. John 
Neilson, Col. Jim Johnson, Col 
Jeff Krummick and Major) 
Chris Diggle Nelson, John- 
son and Diggle are British. 
Krummick is from South 
Africa. 


' 


Herb Score Re 


places Narleski 


will be the official 


Girls’ Mid-Atlantic 
Tennis Opens July 23 


| Entries can now be made for) 
ithe Middle Atlantic Clay 
Court tennis championships 


Play August I! at Norfolk 


ing times: fillies and mares and ended 1. 
eight lengths better than Rico " 4 " Suis, Chouge, is another yesr.| Pe” 
; | Pimlico Revives more conscious of what he titleholder, Marlene Bauer 
and Clear Dawn fourth in the Hacks than what he has. Hagge of Asheville, N. C., with 
®-\field of nine. 
| | 1955 season off the pace. Betty Jameson 
51 for the Haskell filly, which last | re eye-opening ro ee. 
: , onio, Tex., sh 
,,\weekend finished seventh in Race Dec. 15. jaoteaey wen’ Se Sees. eae . SS ae 
al | aig .. |Halfback Bert Zagers are in with Joyce Ziske but had trow 
Today she spotted rivals as} BALTIMORE, July 7 (®—Dis- service: Halfback Jim Mona-jble on the second nine today 
of 8 hag + . _ = t00 | vived Dec. 15 with the renewal/retired: Defensive Halfback/148 total. 
eo oS See Sepernsem. lof the Pimlico Cup at 21-16|/Dick Alban is now with thes ...4, shoots 29 
way by Ovie Scurlock, was the’ 
mestitop choice among bettors and| "The Con ct aie milies when Seudero Wants to Act ley, Calif., winner of the Wone 
Backs Joe Scudero, Dale At- en's Western Open last week, 
be —— in 1:443/5 on a such a rarity in 1949 that even keson, Ralph Felton and End had putter trouble and took @ 
Siow track. the savvy jockey, Eddie Ar-|Charley Jones haven't signed.79 after a 74 the day before, 
junction with the United [Brownell of the Chevy Chase | -| Stakes triumph for Blue Spark-| “ie was out in front aboard.an aspiring actor who will give;was up among the leaders with 
Voluntary Services tourna iyq Club won mabe easy | John ler at Monmouth Park, having Blue Hills when he started to up pro ball if he lands a Holly-'a 74 yesterday but skidded to 
- - ne. Gid-) > 
States, will include Gen. |into the quarterfinals of the . Nav. Mos.|Weeks ago. The victory today|the gnish wire, thinking the|gling. _ |fecge, Sate. Wis. | 
Floyd L. Parks, John C. Lar- |20th Anderson Memorial team Dr. Jerry s|her winnings to $39,775 in four|72°e #5 °Ver- Before he real-| The Scooter’s loss wouldn't Mer  Kaeer ee, N.C. 13 
ee} tration. and host club champ |Golf Club. | Steve Tebash. Ft. Gee the mile track, he was passed kickoff returns and was be- » Ga. ..... 
‘| Gil Willett Woodmont | The Washington. D. C.. in-'G \e pd BFC Dick Lobes, Ft and was lucky to finish second. hind Ollie Matson in punt re- party Wanese, + 4s 
urance partners finished eight Burn. Tree and Col. Renpie Kelly, Cone. Motorecveles Race ris "Petrh teil. . 
scene of a Maryland State | SA, A. A Ty y put up $15,000 for the Cup'Scudero raced for 940 yards Til’ eccc: Pi. we 
Golf Association scratch pro- |ing past two home club units. erton, RE Fred Belton. rs which was originated in 1919. and two touchdowns. It was Armstrong. Calif. 
| With both taking turns at‘ - on Tse | 5 mead at Vista 
row ... The 36-hole Maryland a —v gts _Yeew,| VISTA, Md., July 7—Newt| tor, won the first three. sive shot this season. r nm tc”. 
open was originally scheduled Owen ae Jr. ana berets. om. mor. 1138 | Swift of Portland, Me., heads a Kuharich gave this picture: “SBenotes smateur. 
i\James Martin, 5 and 4. this'% : . @he , 
postponed a day because of Park and Bobby Brownell, Chevy Cheee:iday’s eight-event motorcycle | Olympic Skier Wed ‘We lose both right halfbacks,| : » 
the All-Star baseball game at |S0lid 5 and 3 triumph over the ) nari Meune. CHATEAU D’OEX, Switzer-|Zagers and Monachino. It's Police Can l 
prominent Winged Foot team) sereid. Ken.: m. Jock Girvin.| Park Speedway. T 
Gehlicsser claims that Bus Renate tan tae nite Frank te J ry tar Switzerland's 1956\know who your No. 1 right) ouch Podres, 
Q ' ™m 27s . 
: lam A 
= neha dete nase w iterfinal they were matched | >reet is eterten Wolfe. Glen-|one hour later. The track is hill skiing, was married today, “To our mind, a genuine 
estbriar a secret because he | : . 12:04 Jin | 
was ent ef against the long-hitting Long Wash. Eddie Stev lea George Palmer Highway. veterinarian. ‘like the Rams. They'll step on| CHICAGO. July 7 #—Johnny 
andicap . : e District- | 
P and Johnny Humm of the Rock- same unit that took the title of the 1955 World Series. hurled 
bia —~ Sunday —_ be a The Washington champs’ who jlast year. If a rookie breaks fve innings of shutout ball to- 
“— : 5 
very interesting conflict ..- |have won this deluxe tourney ball player f 
that the selection committee po gen running, were 26) * | partment defeated his Glenview 
es ' | Strokes under par in taking the ‘ ' 

a he opinion is that he still won't , Podres gave up one hit, a 
local team .. . As one official pte last year ; “Our defensive halfback pic-'jeadog in the ‘fth iain 
put it, “after Bogart and it w 

morning and six more this' Herald, Thus, it would appear that has been traded, Scudero 18 walks He threw 68 pitches to 
' pick contest.” ' anal , ' | 
par-busting bid by bogeying| In another late development, |'Boston’s Jim Piersall as the ,. : ) | 
three par-3 holes this afternoon.| Walt Alston, who will direct istarting centerfielder. Piersall Norb Hecker as an offensive oye from the eae. ey 
one Other man reache on 
‘nounced he would substitute jtire game since the American on returning servicemen. They j, the fourth 
in ourth. 
'phia Phillies, for Catcher Del ‘to equal his fielding brilliance. aane we hawe finished up, 
Crandall, of Milwaukee. | | It's certain that Stengel has cario. a boy we got from the Police waited until the ninth in- 
~ | e Vi . . F b I] ition for several days with an) ys 3 Pas, ‘ny a. \stitute for Mantle. In effect, defensive back: Ends Paul Dek. ning when they scored all le 
injured left elbow. He was; we Meilinger, 
, ; jtourney is scheduled for Edge-'nind Ed Bailey, of Cincinnati,’. . . Named to All-Star Game| American League squad. But,’ 
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va., July selected from players in the|moor Club, July 23 through | nominated = the tena: and} Ssoke Leon Heath. 
y 2 e Stengel has intimated that he "sUre #. even a one-legged ‘man Jim Schrader may join us| Miami. West Virginia’s Freddy 
Washington, D. C., area today] nounced next week. Girls, under 18, are eligible! nella 5 Mantle is superior to the geM-\ during the season but their Wyant may do it at quarter- 
West in Virginia's first Joho Marshall of bmend, girls, under 15, are eligible for/29.900 fans, expected to jam) fans but at the same time Casey) Dignitaries from all over the able. back. 
school All-Star football . “Lee, and Carl the girls’ division. Entries must Griffith Stadium Tuesday forjis hesitant about riskingicountry have begun to pour| “Sitting at this desk, we Great Line Is Back 
r » : ' 
“Eiristicy Andrew Lewis, 08Fd, 6318 32d st. nw., Emerson | Star classic, continues to cen-|Mantle who is limping on an sioner Frick is due in this after-|good boys out of our eight top fle when he conceded his ter- 
iter on Mantle. injured right knee. ‘noon along aad ag Harridge,|rvokies. We think we may get rific line and linebackers will 


iri c i | In third place is the LPGA 
At Reto. Another World was third i a, Se i . Marl 
. 
| . ini 72, 74—146, only four s 
It was a complete turnabout Long Distance Fh ag of the 33 who finished y stroke 
| jugli the first round lead yesterda 
the rich Delaware Handicap.) terbeck Ralph Gugilelm’ and ; weed 
‘much as 15 pounds while carry-|tance horse racing will be re- chino and Tackle Mike Davlin.|and wound up with a 77 and a 
Blue Sparkler, hustled all the miles, the Maryland Jockey /|Steelers. | 
and Boy Beverly Hanson of Apple Val- 
ae | 
returned $6, $4, $3.40. She ran it was discontinued in 1951, was 
match, being held con |pginh Bogart and Robert! c.| It was the second straight) sro lost track of the distance.|Most questionable is Scudero,Alice Bauer of Sarasota, Fia., 
s . : : 
ments throughout the United | matches today and marched Ghe-|won the Regret Handicap three pull up the second time under| wood part for which he's an-|81 today. 
=. 10:34 @ mi was worth $19,450, increasing 
Vet Adminis- ; ij — | mer, Umseeey 
son of the Veterans minis- |tournament at Winged Foot de ton. lraces this year. ized it was once more around be light—he led the East in ef, ey ; 
Hill and partner mad rt erty Hanson. Cant 
' Country Club will be the ‘The Maryland Jockey Club will turns by four yards. In all, 
‘under par for the day in strok-| {g=#,%. O'Donnell. Mt. F r 
amateur tournament tomor- | W! 11:29 «. m, Cos Tise, Bonni The great gelding, Extermina- planned to give him an offen- te 
\birdie-shooting, they stopped ad Nick Cos 
Breeoke Maner; 
to follow on Tuesday but was ser 8 a 4 ie field of over 40 drivers on Sun- “We have two gaping holes.! 
morning and continued with a H 
ow : rt Mewe.iracing program at New Vista 
Griffith Stadium .. . Milton |Prominent Ce  Oemir in Baer, Fis lond, July 7 — Madeleine tough to go to camp and not 
S ser claims | of Joseph Gagliardi and Arthur ‘an Ernner. White Flint and Warren| Time trials begin at 1 p. m.,| Berthod, ~ gl 
am ke is hole-in-one on ; ont; m. lwi ‘ wi c. 
p In tomorrow morning’s quar Beck "Wale Chase im Wii with the first race scheduled |Olympic gold medalist in down-|ha But Win 12.7 
rier t because } 0d dienes Bellissi. Wash, and Bity| located on Defense Highway at\to Jacques Chamot, a Swiss championship threat is a team ? 
was afraid it might effect his — 1 ay =. 
Island, N. Y., stars Tim Hollang ™**** **¢ Geerse Thernton, Manor. the practice field with the|Podres. Brooklyn Dodger hero 
Virginia golf match at Colum- ville club 
lin. you know he’s a good foot- day but the Chicago police de- 
Especially in view of the fact 
ls * Hecker at End Air Station team, 12-7. 
took so long in picking the ALL-STAR—From (C-I 
: : , be able to run normally. 
They bagged six birdies this . ture is quite cloudy, too. Alban struck out nine and issued no 
Brownell, it was a hunt and , | 
afternoon but wrecked their! scorers. Stengel is intending to name 'sountful and we'd like to use the 17 men he faced. 
‘the National League stars, an- ‘undoubtedly will play the en- ~".,,. . 
| oy It's difficult, too, to count podres and that was on an error 
\Stan Lopata, of the Philadel- |/League will have no one else may need more time. Good) when Podres 
. , include Art De-\Gienview was ahead 40. The 
Six Area Boys Named to West : . 
= Crandall has been out of ac-| ‘no intention of naming a subysSteelers who may make a good 
. \Casey is paying tribute to his per and Steve of their runs. 
for girls and junior girls. The) picked as the No. 3 catcher be- Herb Score Harry Jagielski and} 
as. Stengel and everyone else| “| jttle Billy Wells and Line- Oregon, and W 
7 W—Six players from the Tidewater area. It will be an- July 28. |\Brooklyn’s great Roy Campa-) | * a : ou West Virgiohae Preaay 
were selected to represent the The West squad: as for the junior girls’ division and| uch of the attention of the 4°¢S0't want to disappoint the ers) crop of outfielders. value then will be question-back or as a defensive half- 
Rie 
Stewart, Gw ef be mailed to Jeanne L. Hub-the 23rd renewal of the All-\further injury to the brittle into Washington. Commis think we ought to get a few) Kuharich’s eyes lit up a tri- 
_|3-3874, by Friday, July 13. 
| The 24yearold pretender to| Mickey has been taking lim-|president of American help- from End John Paluck, be back. “We had the best av- 


End Tom Hyde. 
Malcomb Minor of Washington- 
Lee, tackle Wayne Stewart and Gerald Roberts 
quarterback Mike Agee of) **empes. Sth ie Tingle 
George Washington and baCKs Jefferses. and Check Beene. 


Don Gardiner of Wakefield and whe a ores Eoctmes 
‘Rip) ll 
jten. Andrew 


ward 


Pepe Senior Champions \Babe Ruth's homerun crown|ited batting practice but watch- League, and Warren Giles, the Pitt; Tackles John Miller, Bos-\erage against rushing in the 
.|_ Police Boys Club No. 11 de-\is determined to get into the|ing him in the field, it’s ob-| National League prexy. ton College; Gil Moreno,ileague,” he said. “Guess our 

: | feated club No. 10, 84, for the All-Star game but it's doubt-'vious. that he would be foolish} The game starts at 1 p. m.|UCLA, and Erik Christensen,|defensive unit was the decid- 
y Ner-'senior baseball championsbip.'ful whether his role will be/to attempt to -~ a, the — bine we 4 a hg anes ae meen ae aeettT ingest in — , ee. 
ps a few day's weather forec or “pos- | Halfbac zerry anutis, “They ought p us P 

interesting.” 


"Wanefieid ef In another league game, club| greater than that of a pinch-' up. alfh 
me? No. 5 defeated No. 4, 7-2. hitter. will help Mickey but private sible showers.” Michigan State: Dick James. it close... and 


7 


Joe Shaeffer of Fairfax were Martingy 
named to the squad | 
The 22-man East team wil! be 


A ten: 


Jefferson. and Joe Shaecfier, Fairfas. 


‘ P ’ , é ee, 


AO Shot, Wi 


ins Saranac Handicap 


TIGERS ON THAMES—Princeton University’s crew (right) 
strokes past the finish line one length ahead of the Royal 


_ Winning 


Air Force. eight, 


Elmo Langley Favored 
Today at Marlboro 


UPPER MARLBORO, Md.) 
July 7—BEimo Langley, who has 
won two of three pas‘ races for 
the John T. Chaney Memorial | 
Trophy, heads a field of 30 
@rivers in the fourth annua! 
trophy race Sunday at Mari-| 
boro Motor Raceway. | 

The program begins at 2:30 
Pp. m. 


yragencoan engvodl RESULTS 


i—6 furlongs: $30 
‘' (Leb —_ ” r 
=k ) 
(Merene) 
the Loose, Mythical | ; 
Hill Princess. Miss Zami 
Tedd ’ ying Fo 


7% 
avr wv 
s.4 


On 
worl 
tying 

—§ urlone S35 07 
come k ae ide (Corse) u's 14.0 7.20 
ell Seasoned (1 seery A 60 
Mary ‘N’ Lib (Cutter) ~' ; rat) 
lee Bro. Town Bast Rrook 
Ersase Bustle. Miss felmdel. Two Ton 
e 


: 


DAILY DOUBLE PAID Si52ic0 
31% miles; $3500 
mot me (Smith) 
Shamrock (Perr) 
Gechite (‘Batchelier) _ 
Cosinus. Galarch Sirens. 


“ 1.47% . 
13.20 6.60 3.98) 
. ‘ 


8400¢ & le 
ovine “barr 
(Meoren 
— Reretbate) 


fur nes - 
$18.00 7 
‘m= 


mn ” ies L:1) 
os eS . 
. 


Keke Deseo “Ce 
The Gentus 
Cut, Cut, Busher's Bea 

"e—1 ; — 000 

(Coustech) 600 = 546 
taha > ~ > Pog 
{Boulmetis) 

Clear hey 
— ~~ Valve 


Ba ‘See "Whatt! edy 


~ 
Rice Rete (Cu 
Seother World 


Jimminetty. Myrtie’s Jet. 


Dieddorine, —_—_ Volt age 


3500 i 
" thegaibute) 15 vy is K 6n 
40 4.66 
£ (Boulmetis) 7.20 


Champ. Old 
Currit 


. Topside 
Proctor, Bis 


H 
uck, 


14, = mnilea. 83.000, 1:50% 
.. 19.80 11.08 6.06 
nier Chie (Smith) 
, Ne gg 
etty's Belle. Alb Dont Look Now 
ri. &- ae e Jone Air 
ec t Village Snow and oyai 
soma)! 


a -Dunn-Doubie H Stable en 
BELMONT RESULTS 


1—7 furlongs: $3700: 1:24" 
Derk Armor ‘Sanches s 16 ‘ ae 2 an 
5 


a 
Father (Areare) 
Chie 
ane Mig) r ra 
ter, Gatieran rning Watcl 
iene 
" a6 }—6 furlongs: $4000. 1 10% 
Gielen Heuer (Glessner) 14.46 
sen 10.38 


wevire Moa o Leds. 


U 
News aWhitnmey entry 
DAILY DOUBLE 1! PAID | _ $95. oo 


. i 000; 2:2 
.~ a - 10.30 4.90 3.30 
7.30 


sinder endence, 

epur. Avon Lady <= sh entry 
— Sappenes: ~ 9600 104%, 
Prince eoinea, 530 5.78 2.90 
@h- ixiake (Vincent) 3.70 4.20 
4b -Black Roce a BY a 3.40 4.00 
Bauared ere Jac k. Diving 
Board. dh- Dead ‘heat — seco 


fur) ones 
i 


Binn we 
riqauest. b-Jim Berger 
trong Point. f-Tones 

b-Brown entry f-Field 
$4500 1:49 
7.28 4.70 3.08 
( Areare) 7.30 4.40 
( Met reary ) 5.70 
Ror oF Will 
Shines 
en‘rTry 


Wtr , 
Tire 
Bri ght. Let's Fly 1 McHue! 
®: 25.000 - 
iley 


M< 
a- 


dd 4, 
7 se Te 7) : an 
i! 


Phantom. {-Pie — : 
miles: 83500 | 45° 
(Athineen’) 4.99 


i 
aP 


Claret Bymmetri a ‘Border - 
enwy 


the 


Thames Challenge Cup | 


of the Henley Royal 


Regatta 


; 
; 


— 
a 
| 
; 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
and TIMES HERALD 
Sunday, July 8, 1956 


eee Ch 


34.293 See Pundonor Wins Easily 


Belmont’s 
Closing Race 


NEW YORK, July 7 #—Ricci 


By Paddock 


BiafM Reporter 


CHARLES TOWN, W. Va.., 
July 7—Magnolia Farm's Pun- 
donor, who once flaunted the 
— of the fabulous King 

anch of Texas, cut loose with | 
: brilliant stretch finish to win 
the High Fleet purse, before a/ 


‘Tavi, came within two-fifths of crowd of 8923 here today. 


INP Radiophote vie Boundphoto 


The Tiger | 


' 


yesterday. 


crew covered the mile and 550-yard course In seven minutes 


and 10 seconds. Kent was third. 


) 


Around The Tracks 


Horses and People| 


By Walter Haigh 


THE NEEDLES PEOPLE KNOW their horse and apparent- 
ly are willing to allow other 3-year-olds to battle it out for the 
$155,000 distribution in next Saturday's Arlington Classic. 
Trainer Hugh Fontaine will pass up the famous race, figuring 
Needles wants no part of the competi » 


tion at a mile. 
In fact, Fontaine prefers 
Needles at Monmouth Park 


to keep 
for the 


Monmouth Handicap, even though it 


means sending the fabulous 


F horida- 


bred against older horses—but, most 


of all, at a distance he likes. 


“The absence of Needles should help 
the size of the Chicago field. True, he 
wants more than eight furlongs to 


be in a better running mood 
the Preakness, 
threat. 


| show his best but, even so, should he 


than in 


he still would be a 


As the race now stands, the field will 
include three of the country’s finest 


3-year-olds, including Fabius, 
Son and Head Man. 


The interesting angle is the season s first meeting of Fabius | 


and Swoon’s Son, although ? 
they clashed twice last year 


as 2-yearolds. Swoon’s Son 


| was the winner on both occa- 


sions. However, Fabius, at 
that time, wasn’t the colt he 
has since shown with his 
memorable Derby try behind 
Needles and his Preakness 
victory over the current > 
year-old champion. 

At that, Swoon’s Son could 
rule the favorite in the Clas- 
sic. He has won four straight 
with what amounts to the 
greatest of ease, and seems 
a bit more consistent than Fa- 
bius, who has tossed off some 
good chances, for instance, 
his second in the Ohio Derby. 


HOW NEEDLES FARES 
against older horses remains 
to be seen. Nashua was un- 
able to cope with his elders 
last year in Belmont’s Sys 
onby. He wound up third to 
High Gun and Jet Action. 

While Nashua failed in his 
brush with the  oldsters, 
Swaps made good against 
more seasoned horses in Cal- 
ifornia. When Nashua was 
voted the year’s champion 2 
year-old, the West Coast fans 
tossed that fact back at the 


| Nashua gang—and justly so. 


the Nashuans 
could point to the colt’s 
match race victory when 
Swaps ostensibly wasn't him- 
self at Chicago. However, 


Of course. 


| they couldn't discount Swaps’ 


Derby triumph and the fact 
it came at a time when both 
colts, from all appearances, 
were at their tuned-up best. 

If Needles proves he can 
dominate all ages at the long- 
er distances, then Nashua's 
days as the all-time money- 
winnering champ could be 
numbered, providing, of 
course, Needles stays sound. 


AND SWAPS. if he can con- 
tinue to be patched up and 
kept raceable, also is a 
threat in the monetary race. 
True, he didn't make much 
headway toward Nashua on 
July 14. He took down $57,- 
700 in winning the American 


Swoon's 


Raight 


Handicap, while Nashua gath- 
ered $55,900 in taking the 
Suburban Han liicap. 

But Swaps has been win- 
ning much more often than 
Nashua who only recently 
dropped two in a row. If he 
can continue to throw world 
records at ‘em, there's no tell- 
ing how much he can up his 
bankroll. 

Swaps, on the holiday, 
jumped from 18th place to 


eighth on the money-winnings 
list and among those he 
bounded over was Needles. 

Nashua, Swaps and Needles 
are the only horses in the 
first twenty still campaign- 
ing 

Here's the list of leaders: 


Rise. 
Om 


»— 
. 


y 
te ee hee Se oe ee ee 


1,085.7 
918.4 


Native Dancer 
| Assaait 
| Social Outcast 


Mark: ve Well 


ee es et OO RO et ee te et ee 


onder , 
Crafty Admiral... 
High Gen oeee 


wine Menty won le 
81.158,765, 


Lgie| Bize 7 
siete 


a second of the Belmont Park 
track record. today when he |, 
swept down the stretch to cap- 
ture the $30,400 Saranac Handi-| 
cap before a closing day record 
crowd of 34 

The bay son ‘of Rico Monte- 
Sea Snack, by Hard Tack, was, 
ridden to a — and a half. 


F requent Losers 


OCEANPORT, N. J., July 
7 ®—Gweny’'s Kin, who had 
not won since last Sept. 29, 
and Comes A Tide, never 
previously a winner, 
bined today for a $1524.20 
daily double at Monmouth 
race track. 

Gweny'’s Kin, a 33-year-old 
gelding, won the 6 furlong 
opener and paid $82.00, $30.80 
and $16.80 across the board. 
Come A Tide took the sec- 
ond, a five-and-a-half furlong | 
dash for 2-year-olds, and paid | 
$41.00, $14.80 and $7.20 


‘victory over B’s Sky Boy by 
Paul Bailey: in the smashing 


‘time of 1:42 1-5 for the mile and 


a sixteenth. The track record of 


ARLINGTON RESULTS 


7 furl $3000: 1-252 
as -O-Lee (tr) | 6.0)» 
rteck) 


) 


26 2.86) 
6 7 4 
le 
DP. ra ir! an. "ilies Be Bo. 

‘ o—~~y Ryan 
ner oa 


B86 3.20 200) 
4403 


Montev 


oe ehd wey. ‘Ser ion 


a hk 


San DOUBLE PAIp 820.460 
3—1 mile; 730: 1: 
Beekkeeper (Hartack) 
Checkered Flag (Heckme 
Ever syesens { rd 
Paro Ban 
Senator Blane and Will bee 
4—6 furlongs: $4500: 1:09 
artack) 2.26 2.20 
esent (Jessep) 2.26 2.206 
(Bartle) 7.80 
__Tipoquill_ Outsmart. Mark 
s-+«4 [artones: 


2.96 2.40 22 
nn) 3.26 7 


ee 


Jet. 
Ploc x "Herbie Pat 
. = 
The 


’ mer Alessi. Mandolin 2nd 
Monk _ Shoe and Dance NSing 


urlongs $50 
(Berteck ) 
(Heckman) 
wer. (Carsten 
Wiehe Phophet's ort 


000 added. 111% | 
2.4 2 20 Ost 
‘of “.3e 


Romanita and 


84 Pg 
aeved 8 on i so 
Hehe me 5.2 tale 


= “Pop Spinner rom Direct No 


a TOWN oe 


“ miles (turf : 1:51% 


J 


— 
wees 
Sh ol 


«Based 


| Patricia Lynch 

*Connite QGOiri 

| *idie teers 
5— Abt 


epee speval 


ed 
ee | 


elm 
rother , 


. . 
Ce end 
Pe 


Bweet Zarge' te 
7—AbBt 5 


de 


ramble 
“year-olds up 
ink 


we ooo oe Oe ge oe pe ee wt oe ee 
+ or a-2-@ CCOvs90 aun 


—e 


Dix . 
ae le 


a wer, ¥ 
Eouneer entry 


. 
" . . . 
meee ee re | te et mt te 


oe ee eee 
~ 


__... DAILY DOUBLE 
$24.60 


feocpenseces 
Ove 


== — 


- 


|1:41 45 wag set by Parlo a year 


ago. 

Frd@hk C. Rand Jr.’s St. Amour 
2nd finished third, beaten by a 
neck by Bill's Sky Boy but he. 
Saved the show by that same 
margin over Laudy Lawrence's) 
Beau Diable. Mrs. Walter Gil-| 
se'roy'’s Oh Johnny, the favorite 
finished fifth. 

Ricci Tavi, who carried sec- 
ond top weight of 122 pounds, 


‘paid $17.40, $10.50 and $7.80. 


Bill's Sky Boy, owned by the 
Elmendorf Farm, carried 114 
ipounds. He paid $11.90 and 
$9.10. St. Amour 2d packing 116 
pounds, was $7.40 to show. | 


Ocean Downs 


> 
Frost Deb! e Wainut 


| e 
7.60 4.40 3.96 
7.20 3.68 


5.40 
Roral re Adele's 
. Miahty Lybrook. My Dixie. Cam- 


on Warrior 


PAID (1-7) 


= patie $700 
Cel. Redn 
Master Rott ‘ 
Janie 
a ort . , 
— on “Netiona! — 


ie: $\32% 


he oa =e aR 


cer 
Walnut. | 


ajor’s eae bul) Han- 


a mile (pace): $1200: 2 
len Henever {Ore nk) 6.00 4.20 
nglishman (Marker 5.08 34 
Yourse easkestes 
Gypsy Gal ove! Ro secroft, 
ae York. Direct Waln 


Hanover. 


Ojr 
“Rose York 


$600. 


Mighty 
e mile (pace) 


Gene 


Titan Ebiis. Rocky Castle 


— — 


109Tndictment 


Come Alone . 
iepeerees A 


| Red 
108 | Bon 


_ came 
Blenhour 


Warlock— rain 


iP suit Cross 


ye co 2 i Bhore . 


tabler 


Rreuse 


Time. Ex ie ime sens 


Jockey W 


pant. “Teenie. 


oo BAST H OR $19.80. $6.80, 83.60: 
$2.40 ER, FOUR $3.40. 


r Hour wm ook. while forwardly placed S costs Cigred 
h wn 


as 
| resahuee y om the outsice 
Ba -\3 in the concluding 
remecy near 
not stave of 
outside im the late 


yen A BA 5 — About 4% furlongs 
|; uD: claim Winger” 
re, Vash 


War'h —~ sa 
armony— . Trained by & 


& 
iF itagerald’ 
(Uneer) i 
‘Gorden 14 


Ocean Downs Trot Entries 


POST TIME—%8:30 ad M. 


Oo. Class K AC a — 


one ft 


xy Liner rm 
rudence Darn) 
eadow Midas 
roecway | i ‘@ 


_—  — 


SECOND RA‘ E-—One 


> 
purse 


ht - 
et ‘Lyan. vie a ‘Ceetanc 
ea bard ; 


“& ye 
uity amover ‘Bel ote 
ma es' 


Foun TH SY t 
ce « 
re 


ne = 


Btattord | av. . 
© iCherr 


RACE—One mile pace 


ican Direct A 4p tts 
Elkington ‘Ba 
i Matthews) 


lA “a 
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800 assitie 
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olutely and qutguanh’ P Palmer 
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rive, closed 


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the final sixteen 


Savage . 


a the stretch 
the winner. Navy Brat rallied | 99 


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entry 


hearakin in the late stages and 


ly jieaty in the concluding strides 


ops Charts at Charles Town 


‘Coprrizht. 1956. by Triancle Publications. Inc’ 
WEATHER CLZAR—TRACK FAST 


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The gelding, out of the Ken- 

tucky Derby winner Bold Ven- 
‘ture, defeated R. L. Pearson's 
Olay by one and a quarter | 
lengths, completing the Charles | 
Town course in the good time | 
of 1:15 2/5. | 

Pundonor was ridden by 
\Jockey Charies M. Clark who 
— |was the riding star of the gfter- 


The crowd, largest of the 
‘meeting, shoved over $500,000 

in the totalizer on the nine-race 
card. 

Favorite players had a Ro-| 
man holiday when five choices | 
‘graced the winner's circle. 

Gala Dice, owned by Arthur) 
‘Godfrey, radio and’ television| 
star, made it two in a row at 
the meeting, the Virginia- 
owned and bred colt won the 
Pavot purse, secondary feature. 

The first casualty of the 
\meeting occurred in the third | 
race when Mrs. Vernon Arthur's | 
Stayer fractured his left front. 
leg and was ordered destroyed 


come | 
| 


noon with three winners. He 


‘now has eleven for the meeting. 

Earlier in the day, Clark was 
handed a three das 
by 


suspension 
the stewards for 
riding” 


ee 


Don’t Trifle With Safety! 


“careless 
astride Rollin Warm. 
winner of the third race Fri- 
day. 


by the track veterinarian. 

Stayer, ridden by Jockey Joe 
French, was racing head and 
head with Hunter's Union when 
he broke down midway down 
‘the backstretch. The 5-year- 
old gelding had won two purses 
‘in 13 starts this year. 


SAF-T-MILER 
TREAD 


“‘—goes a long way te make friends” 


670x15 
710x15 


Plus 


*] 
*] 


“Cummings General Tire Co. 


“Tires tor Every Purse and Purpese” 


8-95 
9.95 


Tex and Casing Exchange ; 


OPEN A 


23rd & M Sts. NW. 


- end rushed to contention early | 


was Grae 


Latter challenged repeatediy te the 


furlones. For 3.- 


Olt | at ¥ 8 
Beacon 


Fraime ea by 


year-olds 
Won Bi 
c 


m . 
& Time. 1°27 


eid on courace- | 
ain "Bice 
erdan 


r 4-vear-olds end | tee 


~ a 
Well Mark ec 


GALA A DICE, | an wy mr 


Gals. Dice ‘ 
verean rall 
fives clear i. 


m 
ir took command at the «tart held on well for a halt- 
tired gradually 
—(neries Town Course 

2000. Off «a 


elie’ and 
REVENT 


a drive 


RACE 
owance 


cyteide for for | Wen S; piace 


sa 
by Bold Venture— 


key Wet 


SILVERDAN, 84.00. £3.40 
of Dorsair easily alone the backstretch 


teh for the winner 


For 4-vear-olds 
. t 8:06. Start seod 
. ‘inner. Maenolia Porm's & «£ 
erguensa. Trained Sy J _Greceo 


aradually 


owleesha 


Double 


(8) EASTER HOUR 
(1) WARNESSA 


oy Knight. 
| High _ Ronda 


$70. 60 


| THIRD 

claiming 
ing: Mace 
Sewing and éway—Marshs 


AC E—About miles 


Trained by 


22 Ls 


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rt geod pod. Won arty . 
Pa bekeo's x 


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Stayer 


SEVENTH RACE 
$1000 

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2 Cas Key 

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One mile (trot) 
The Gunther Trophy Han- 


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+ 22) 


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early responded willingly 
own Olay sracualliy te gai 
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‘tnd was unable to stave off the winner 


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$00 


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rince ‘Floyd: 


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$5.00. $3.00. 62.20; HUNTERS UNION. 63.80. 


and epee, Saver rene down 


tween he os : pox teh stride 
cals u cou ne’ ma atr s 
. Winds ‘Taced evenly and could not serious! 


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mine. Purse. “$1200 Town Geeres. Por 4-vear-olds 
| a = » 3 iming urse ieee ot at 3:36. Start 
_ One mile (pace) 1 Pee driving: piace sa nner L 
assifie Sw way—Laciia. Trained by owner 


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staved oft | 
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NINTH HORACE ww he Ge BH 
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SILVER OMAR. 86.20. 63.60 


rallied stronaiy when 
ins on the stretch turn 
; mar ar 


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sed of Robby ear) 


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and tired 

For 4- pear -aiés and we 
6-65 200d Won 


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Paddock 
Picks Five 


CHARLES TOWN, W. Va., 
July 7—Paddock, racing han- 
| dicapper for The Washington 
Post and Times Herald, se- 
lected five winners today at 
Charles Town Race Track. 

After being shut out in the 
first three races, Paddock 
correctly tabbed Bellfounder 


($9) in the fourth, Thrifty 
Cross ($4.20) in the fifth, Gala- 
dice ($4.00) in the sixth, Exec 
($4.40) in the seventh and 
Sure Toss ($5.60) in the 
eighth. 


Party Honors Dressen 
Chuck Dressen, manager of 
the Nats, will be guest of honor 
at a cocktail buffet to be held 
in the Park Room at The Wood- 


‘ner Monday from 4 to 7 p. m. 


— 


CHEAP 
QUALITY TIRES 


are NO BARGAIN 


at any price! 


Get The 
Quality, Safety 


and Economy 


GENERALS 


° * 
~~’ 


BETTER QUALITY 
TIRES 


at 


BETTER PRICES 


a 
BARGAINS 
GALORE! 


CHARGE ACCOUNT! 


ME. 8-6300 


—— 


Eat, Drink 
and Be Merry 
For Monday 


You Diet 


on Ida Jean 


Kain’s 


New Mr. and Mrs. Plan 


Now's your chance to slim . . . yet enjoy every meal 
Ida Jean Kain has a talent for making 


to the hilt! 


low-calorie menus 


tasty. 


Her two-week trimmer 


features many favorite summer foods to keep both of 


you cool, refreshed and satisfied. There’s a new figure 


in your future... 


Starting Monday, July 9th 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
AND TIMES HERALD 


For Home Delwery Phone RE. 7-1234 


THE WASHINGTON POST 


Sunday, July 8, 1956 


C6 


USC Under 
Study for 
Illegal Aid 


SAN FRANCISCO, July 7 (>! 
The Pacific Coast Conference 
today studied charges of illegal | 
payments to athietes by Univer- 
sity of Southern California 
alumni and boosters but after| 
seven hours of discussion a) 
spokesman said there would be | 
no announcement until tomor-| 
row. 

Dr. Glenn P. Seaborg of the! 
University of California, acting! 
as spokesman for the faculty) 
representatives and athletic di-| 
rectors, said the entire day had' 
been spent discussing the U SC} 
case and that it was not yet| 
completed 

Questioned by newsmen after 
the closed door session, he 
added that both the University 
of California and Washington 
State College would be under 
scrutiny. 


State Offers Facts 


He said that Washington 
State’s representative, Prof 
Emmett Moore, the conference 
president, had volunteered to- 
day that he had information to 
Submit before the two-day 
meeting ends. Seaborg said he 
had no information as to what 
the evidence might be. 

It was not clear whether the 
discussion would be confined to 
the three schools mentioned 
since Dr. Seaborg said that 
“several” were being con- 
sidered | 

Previously handed stiff pen- 
alties by the conference and 
placed on probation for “slush” | 
fund or “under-the-table” pay) 
to athletes have been the Uni- 
versity of Washington and 
UCLA. 


Continue Sunday | 


The athletic directors and 
faculty representatives are con 
tinuing their meeting through 
this evening and will gin 
again the first thing tomorrow 
morning Seabdorg said there 
would be no further announce- 
ment until deliberat are 
completed 

Fie said that all of the 
ports from member schools on 
athiet payments, asked by 
July 15, are not yet in: that no 
specific athletes were named in 
today’s discussion of USC finan- 
cial aid, and that Stanford Uni-| 
versity is one that has not yet 
submitted its report 

Dr. Seaborg declined to com- 
ment on whether Bureau of! 
Internal Revenue information 
was being used in considering 

athletic - under - the-table pay 
ments or whether if such in- 
formation was used the confer- 
ence might be liable to legal 
action. 

“Those are things which will 
have to wait until final deter- 
minations are made,” he said 
“Any disc ms now would be 
getting ahead of the story.” 


No Outsiders Present 


He added that no legal repre- 
sentatives of institutions or 
persons outside the regular con 
ference membersship were pres- 
ent. 

Last May Washington was 
placed on two years’ probation 
and UCLA three. During that 
time neither can win a confer- 
ence championship, play in a 
post-season game or share in 
the Rose Bowl receipts. This 
will cost Washington about $52,- 
000 and UCLA $78,000. In addl- 
tion. the Uclans were fined $15,- 
000 for refusal to allow the con- 
fere! commission to make a 
study the situation on the’ 
campus 

Football 
were assessed 
years éligibi 


and TIMES HERALD | 


he 


ions 


re 


USS! 


ce 

ol 
players at UCLA 

the .loss of a 
ity unless they 
could prove they did not re- 
ceive aid which wasn't allowed 
by the conference rules. 

J. Miller Leavy a UCLA! 
alumnus then cha! ged a “blue 
book” group of USC alumni and 
supporters had raised $71,235 
which had been paid to 60 Tro- 
jan athietes over a two-year 
period. He said tax information 
at the Bureau of Internal Reve-' 
nue backed his contention 

He also charged California 
with a “phony job racket” in 
which gridders received off- 
campus jobs with 
little or no work 

Officials at 
the allegation but 
cases involving “technical vio- 
lations” had been discovered 
The total sum involved was said 
to be $1100. 


pay 
nvolved 

California denied 
said about 20 


Galopone Wins Titan 
Trot at Historic 


GOSHEN, N. Y., July 7 
Galopone, son of Bill Gallon 
owned by William T. Maybdury 
of Dexter, Maine, won the $8600 
Titan free-for-all trot as Grand 
Circuit racing cl 
Track today. 

Galopone 
Walker, won 


driven by Robert 
the first and sec- 
ond heats in 2:052/5 and 
2083/5. He was second to 
Newport Star in a 2:07 2/5 third 
heat. Airliner, owned by Al- 
wood Stables of Far Hills. 
N. J., and reined by Ned Bower, 
won the $13,950 Goshen 2-vear- 
old pace in straight heats from 
Valter Chandler's Great Adios 
from Decatur. Ga.° The times 
were 2:09 2/5 and 2:07 3/5. 


Bilko Hits No. 37 


For Los Angeles 


LOS ANGELES, July 7 (INS) 
Steve Bilko, 30-year-old first 
baseman of the Los Angeles 
Angels continued his amazing 
hitting today as he biasted his} 
7th homer to belp the Angels! 
to a 4to3 win over the rival 
Hollywood Stars 

Bilko, former St. Louis Car- 
dinal first sacker, also leads 
the Coast League in hatting 
with a 381 mark, and in runs: 
batted in with 97. The Chicago 
Cubs own the Los Angeles club 
but do not own Bilko’'s contract. 

i . 


: 


lits nearest rival. 


but with! Sn 
4 


sed at Historic 2. 


7 | 


Demas Plays 
MeNair for 
Men’s Cup 


’ 

) 

Fi By Bob Alden 
' Stal Reporter 
| Donna Floyd, 15-year-old) 
‘Arlington schooigirl, rallied! 
late in the deciding set yester-| 
day and captured the Middle| 
‘Atlantic Clay Court women’s) 
‘singles championship at Edge- 
| moor Club. 

Donna defeated No. 1 seeded 
| Belmar Gunderson, 6—3, 5—7,| 
/7—5, and became the youngest, 
champion in the tourney’s his-| 
| tory. 
| Top-seeded Fred McNair and | 
Lt. Bill Demas, pride of the’ 
| Marine Corps, advanced to the’ 
men’s singles final and will! 


| 


meet today at 1 p. m. 
| McNair downed No. 4 seeded| 
‘Steve Potts, 6—8, 6—2, 8—6, 
land Demas stopped No., 2 
\seeded Donald Dell, 3—6, 6—4, 
| Donna, United States 15-and- 
under girls champion, captured) 
the first set, 6—3, after break-' 
‘ing Belmar’s serve at 5—3 in a 
game that went to 11 deuces 
jand 28 points. 
‘Belmar Has Streak 

Donna nioved to within two! 
points of victory at 5—3, 30-15, 
In the second set. But Belmar, 
who upset Louise Brough last 
summer in the United States 
championships, puttogether 
one of her noted streaks and 
‘took four games in a row and 
. the set. 
“33 | Both Donna and Belmar at- 
'tained their greatest heights of 
play in the deciding set. Bel- 
mar, who stands 4 feet, 11 
linches, but pounds the ball like 


aes, oe » Sele % ae , > ‘ # ‘ Fit ft 


By gn 


24 


By Wally McNamee. Stal! Photographer 


in their championship match in the Mid- 
Atlantic clay courts tournament yesterday 
at the Edgemoore Club. Miss Floyd won in a man, scored on sharp volleys 
three tense sets, 6—3, 5—7, 7—6. and overhead smashes. DonA&a| 


also volleyed well and made) 
NATS—From Page C-1 | points on excellent passing and) 


Sun Imp rmucourt perehand she 
Takes Pony Yankee Homers Again’ 


Show Lead Slap Down Nats, 8-3 


took a 54, 30-love lead on her 
service. Donna rallied for eight 
successive points and a 
lead. 
Five in Row 
WARRENTON, Va., July 7 , P D d d the first th 
Al he crowd gave Donna droppe e first three 

r—Sun Imp, owned by Waver- ' ser Phe points in her service, then cap- 
ly Farms of Warrenton, took a oe Ti cag by popping of him an ovation ... Berra = ‘tured five in @ row for the 
commanding lead in the ped in a horrible slump... He's |match Donna won her seventh 
championship division with! <1neBA R S—Pascual | had only six hits in the last ‘singles crown in eight starts. 
gy gcc pry nce ha already has tied the all-time | 65 times at bat He’s She defeated Belmar for the 
opened here today | Washington mark for yield- | dropped from .357 to 276 |Middle States women Pay mart 
a » Imp’s victories came in| 198 homers in one season—19 | . McDermott holds no |pionship a week ago, 5—7, 6—0, 
ile lauder hunters and junior . » The record was set by | terrors for his ex-battery- i" » bs 
warmup events and gave the, Bob Porterfield in 1953 ... | mate, Ed FitzGerald ... In | —~ who + ty = 4 ~ m. 
10 ts.-four ahead of | Runnels extended his hitting | the las} six times at bat over (yesterday morn ng or duty at 
pony poin | streak to 16 straight games | two games, Fitz had hit Mac | Quantico, Va. was no match 
_. « Myrt Power, the lady | for four singles and a homer (for Dell’s powerful serves and 
who won $32,000 on the | and drew a walk... There Now placed volleys in the Arst | 

000 quiz program, with | were six double plays in the |s¢ 
baseball” as i specialty, | game, four by the Yanks | Demas rallied in the sad 
dropped by to see the game . The teams wind up their (and third sets as Dell's serving 

. . Sievers made a great | series this afternoon and if |>egan to fade and his own vol- 
catch of McDougald’s long | you want to be sure to see |leying began to pick up. Bill 
drive to left i the ninth . 9 bat, come out at 1 avenged his defeat to Dell in 
Roy bounced off the sereen om. when the Yanks take (the final of the recent Colum- 


| their batting practice. ‘bia tourney. 
in left field and held on to gp 1. . See 


misbehavior hampered him in| 
earlier matches, was a perfect. 
gentleman yesterday. He ac 
cepted without demonstration 
the calls and breaks that went 
against him and politely 
soothed Demas whenever the 
Marine was a victim of bad 
breaks. 


Potts Rallies 


GOING AFTER IT—Donna Floyd, far court, 
races te her right (arrow indicates ball) to 
return an attempted passing shot from the 
racquet of Belmar Gunderson, near court, 


scored. Yost ended what hopes; the ball, 


Thirty-four classes are Listed | 
in the pony show which con- 
tinues tomorrow and tomorrow 
night. | 

Farnley Gremlin, a hand- 
some stallion owned by Mrs. 
Mackay Smith's Farnley Farm 
of White Post, Va. took the 
breeding championiship, 


SMALL PONY WARMUP—i, Smoker 
Joe. Bill Bey : N steracker. Richard. 
Zimmerman. :. ‘Pretty Penny: 4, Famer, | 
Frankie Owens 


LARGE Fon “ 
pete. Jen ) TAL ne, 3. "Tremp 
t 


Carel pe ee ‘Richers jee Ford Plays Viar 
. ~ In First Round in 
Lie Gattitie ‘keane “" “4 National PGA 


rs. Danbridge ‘kennedy 
STALLIONS — I. 
FParniey Farm: tf. 
Hollow Stables: 3. CANTON, Mass., July 7 
«) "t, *°* | Defending champion Doug Ford 
meet Buddy Viar of 
Charleston, W. Va. in the first 


Ed. Moylan Plays 
Bartzen for 


Tri-State Title 


CINCINNATI, July 7 #—Ed- 
die Moylan of Trenton, N. J.) yionair fought off a deter- 
ranked fifth in the Nation, had|mined Steve Potts in gaining 


round of the National PGA golf|to extend himself today to ad-jhis victory. Potts rallied from 
tournament at Blue Hill Coun-|vance through the semi-final|'a 5—6, love40 deficit to cap- 


niey Gremun. | 
sz! via'g Comet 
ber my arniey ae 
BROOD MARE Snert 
Bellew Stable: 2? Pate rniey 
Farniey Farm: 3. Mistletoe, anthens | will 
Rives: 4. Sneowsterm, Feu Hellew Stabic. | 
FOALS—tI, Ster Crest. Fee Hellew 
aw oy >. Troubadere: 8. Farniey Ma- 
urke. Fearnley Farm: = & 


Donna Floyd Captures Mid- Atlantic Tennis Title 


Across The Net 


-By Bob Alden 


a 


CAROL McCORD, who preceded Donna Floyd as the area's 
leading girl tennis player, has been invited to play on the 


University of Kentucky men’s varsity next year . 


Carol re- 


cently finished her freshman year by winning the university 
women’s singles, doubles and mixed 


doubles championships. . 


She also 


won a majority of matches ‘with Ken- 
tucky varsity and freshman males... 
Carol will be competing in the South- 
’ eastern Conference that has produced 
‘such outstanding stars in recent years 
as Ham Richardson, Jose Aguero, Jack 


Tuero and Steve Potts... 


veteran Edgemoor Club performer, 
served as a ballboy in the noted New- 
port Invitation tournament a quarter- 
century ago and earned for his labors 
a ball autographed by two of the lead- 
ing tennis personalities of the day... 


They 


were the 


great Bill Tilden and Clayton (Ted) 


Carol McCord 


Burwell, then one of the nation’s top 
twenty players. 


. Burwell, who later 


captained Oxfurd as a Rhodes scholar, made a stirring come- 


back this week in the Middle Atlantic men's doubles. . 
seeded Burwell, former Southern and Middle Atlantic doubles 


Un- 


champion, and Col. Nick Powel advanced to the semifinals be- 


fore being eliminated ...*~ 
| C. Alphonso Smith is recover- 


ing from an elbow injury and 
should be able to return to 
competition in a couple of 
weeks. 


ALEX KEILES, mayor of 


Mountain Lake. Md. whose 
| Secretary of Justice, Labor 


name began to appear in areu 


rankings 30 years ago, was | 
busy this week at the Middle | 


Atlantic tourney soliciting en- 
tries for his town’s big tourna- 


| ment later this month .. 


Mountain Lake is host to the 
Western Maryland champion- 
ships ... Another Betz girl 
embarked upon a _ tennis 
career this week ... Virginia 
Betz, older sister of Edge- 
more pro Mrs. Pauline Betz 
Addie, participated in early 
rounds of the women's singles 


, and doubles and mixed dou- 


bles in the Middle Atlantic 
tourney ... While Pauline 
was winning the United 
States and world amateur 


Virginia was capturing the 


ery championship ... The 
Washington area was repre- 
sented at Wimbledon by three 
players, Maicolm Fox, Casper 
Nannes and Peter O'Reilly ... 
Only Fox survived the pre- 
liminary rounds and he was 
ousted in the first round by 
Vic Seixas. 


SHORT VOLLEYS — Vet- 
eran campaigner Henry Foss, 
with a voice that carries a 
mile and eyes that respond 
alertly to the toughest deci- 
sions, has emerged as one of 
the area's finest tennis um- 
pires ... Phil Neff and Steve 
Potts became so engrossed in 
their exci quarterfinal 
match in the Middle Atlantic 
tourney that they had to call 
on a reporter to set them 
straight on the score of their 

ttle ... The area tennis 


crowd celebrated the Dia- 
mond Jubilee of organized 
U. S. tennis this week with a 
dinner and party in the ball- 
room of Col. M. 
new mansion... Col. Erana, 
and Welfare in a World 
War II cabinet of Philippine 
Islands President Sergio 
Osmena, is host to an an- 


nual tennis party during 
Independence Day week... 
Former area champion Bar- 
ney Welsh, who is determined 
to win the United States 
senior championship next 
summer, plans another come- 
back in the D. C. champion- 
ships. 


Public Parks 


‘Tennis Tourney 


championships in the 1940's, | 
Opens Saturday 

National Intercollegiate arch- | ' . . 

Entries may be made for the 


anpual D. C. Public Parks tour- 


iney today through Wedne@flay 


| 


night. The tournament is open 
to all men and women players 
who are not members of pri- 
vate clubs. 

Winners and runners-up of 


the tourney that begins Satur-: 
day at East Potomac Park will 


be eligible to compete in the 
national championships at Cin- 
cinnati in August. 

Entries may be made by call- | 
ing Bill Shreve at The Tennis | 
Shop, 1126 19th st. nw., 
tional 8-5165. 


San Francisco Wins 
QUITO, Ecuador, July 7 # 
The touring San Francisco Uni- 
versity basketbal] team today) 
defeated the Quito University! 


‘League champions, 62-55. 


Bill Grady, | 


late alltime tennis | 


A. Erana’s | 


Na- 


a 


~ 


Porterhouse 
Wins at 
Hollywood 


| INGLEWOOD, Calif., July 7 
("7 — Porterhouse, the class 
horse in the field and the 
favorite with a crowd estimated 
‘at 45.500, came up in the 
‘stretch to win the $27,300 Lakes 
and Flowers Handicap at Holly- 
‘wood Park today. 

Held off the pace in the six- 
furlong feature by Jockey Milo 
‘Valenzuela, Porterhouse re 
‘sponded to urging in the drive 
‘down the stretch to win the 
$15,000 purse for Llangollen 
Farm of Virginia. 

Scent, racing for Hurst Phil- 
‘pot and the Monaghan Farm of 
California, was second, one and 
a half lengths behind, and his 
stablemate, Moolah Bux, was 


third in the field of seven. 
| The time was 1:09 flat. 


Porterhouse’s opposition was 
a little less than distinguished, 
but the Lakes and owers 


ener for the Gold Cup Handi- 
cap, with its guaranteed $100, 
000 prize, next Saturday, which 
features Swaps. 

Jockey Ray York sent Moo- 
lah Bux, lightweighted at 108 to 
Porterhouse’s 124, out on the 
pace. Scent was close behind 
and Porterhouse maintained a 
respectable distance during the 
early running. 

Moolah Bux still was on top 
entering the stretch but he 
couldn't hold off Scent, and 
then the charging Porterhouse. 


‘could be regarded as a § 


Results 


CYO BASEBALL 
MIDGET piven 


|e 
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JUNIOR DIVISION 
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Washington 
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TOURNAMENT 
Indian Spring Country Club 
JULY 13th 8 A.M. 
Must Be D.C. Residents. 17 Yoars 
and Under 


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PICK STEDMAN 


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OPERATOR 


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try to arrange yes 
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Jackson. 


| STEUART PETROLEUM CO. 


2015 W. Virginie Ave. N.E. LA. 6.5190 


Sprinz House Farm 
YEARLINGS—1I, Sliver Slippers. Fox 
Heollew Stabdic. ¢. Snew Walte. An Heol. 
low Stabdlie. 4. Fenten Leve enir 
GET OF SIRE—1. Get e. rarale iz Se 
cou. raley F 2, —. 
3, etty Penny. 4& sites , ox| 
Hollow Stable ' 
~-YEAR-OLDS—1I1. Silver Seals. Fou 
Heliew Siable. &. Farniery Jewel. Farn- 
m. 4% Bad's Bambi. Fou He —— 
4. Ledy Leudeun,. Fenton 
PRODUCE OF DAM—!. Silver pestt 
*. Preducve of Farniery Sun Shade. Farn- 
ley Farm. 4%. Pewder Peff. Lelly Law- 


‘try Club July 20 according to|round of the 57th Tri-State ten-|ture the first set at 8—6. Steve 
ithe match play pairings an- nis tournament. rallied again after trailing 2—5| 
_| nounced today. | Moylan’s win gave him ajiin the deciding set and tled | 
The 38th annual PGA cham- chance against defending cham-'the match at 6—6. 
pionship will run through July|pion Bernard (Tut) Bartzen of} McNair won the next game 
24 and be preceded by two days|San Angelo, Tex., in the finals and then broke Potts’ service 
of clinics, exhibitions and prac-|of the clay court event tomor- at love for the match. 
‘}tice rounds. row. Dell and Ted Rogers gained | 
Three-time PGA titlist Sam! Moylan had to go the distance |the men’s doubles final with a’ 
gm 1 ‘Snead of White Sulphur|before conquering third-seeded 6—2, 6—3 victory over Clay- 
VIRGINIA HORSE SHOW Ags r1a-| Springs,, W. Va., encounters|Grant Golden of Chicago, 4—6, ton (Ted) Burwell and Col. 
FER SEAT EOUITATION || Jack Weitzel of Columbus, Ohio|6—3, 6—2, 3—6, 6—1, while|Nick Powel. 
e Marths Sterbak. ye in another of the 64 first round Bartzen eliminated fourth-seed-| Judy and Sue Devlin, dibandl 
. _ "| matches which begin at 7 a. m.|ed Johann Kupfenburger of Mi-'from Baltimore, won the wom-| 
2 (BST) with pairs leaving the|ami in straight sets, 6—1, 6—2,'en’s doubles crown with a 
4. first tee at six minute intervals. '6—0. '6—2, 6—4 victory over Ann 
'Gray and Charlotte Decker. 
MIXED DOUBLES RESULTS 
Jock and ¥ 


Penso Ties With Bill McClure Ee eee 
et In Penquin Class Races Fe 


and Mildred 
| $i. Pewel ond 
ot Ta Setesle. Bob Seger. 
terville; :. fee Jay. Tim Maiene. 
. . 


3. + 
Sere R. Wits. 


MODEL PONIES—!. Silver poate. 
Sterm Peak. Mountain Gien 
Mere Better. Anne and Billy en 
Dewn Wind. Besined Farm 
JUNTOR HUNTERS —1. n im 
Aort! Bowe. yonter. Equitation Seheol, 
Mis ave ir Marchan ; 
Windward. 2 ~~ ™, Glen Farm. 
SMALL GREEN HUNTERS—I!I. Fare- 
lev _Reveilie, Lee & Groenewes. _* Rome | 
Willard fF mith 
Mountain on oni 
Naney Ha 


Rees GREEN ‘WU 4 — |? 
Snew 


~ High Barbaree. joe "Fa —_ 

JUNIOR WORKING HU vTems — 1. ANNAPOLIS, Md. July 7 

:, Apes ‘Trinket, skippered by L. E. ne 
Penso, Washington, D. C., and|™ 

foheey | Lil Darlin, piloted by Bill Me-| 


Davia and 

| Ne Li, Bill Demas and 
Cc 
mobile, Geerse Bard 


Denn 
Flora defeated Guriey and Guriey ane 
reville. Md. 


— TER .« PN ALS: | 
lman, iin. 
vd 
RATIONAL OC ONE BEsiGn—t, 


iph 
oa Wag "Beka, % Adele agi om 
Bees i. Mike Ph lilies. heve nod Me ete 


an 
“~ a Gaseher ‘Clure, Severna Park, Md., tied’? a orn Park: 


* ° 
Reck a Bi. Joann Kos Setootee Tt Powel and” ire car. i.) 
Bets 
hi Bill Flee oe Annapolis. 
LARGE PONY wUNTERS—~1. ness tOday for the championship in) sTARs-<t. 


SMALL PONY Be NTERS—!. 
Cake. Waverty Pa Fan 
ae Anne and Billy Doyie 
oe 


nateraee pa ham 

| = A. TNALS % 2x 
cNelr « 

ae “hath = eit idee" —' 

as an Dell 


The oom ‘= va. 
Bets match will ow at & an 
he winner wt Wale | 
e 


, 7, 


Pitt Plays Holy Cross 
PITTSBURGH, July 7 @& 


Bf pg finished one over par with'today announced it will meet 
a 71. He was two-over on the Holy Cross college on the foot- 
 ltvenk nied with 96 aad eneihell guides in The 
under on the back with a 35.\Panthers will take on Holy 
The Old White course is a 6497: Cross in their home opener) 
yard layout. 'Sept. 27. 


pee S| 

h Lite Weithe bterbolt ttn 20°51, Vanity Ww. 
Yacht Club. 

Oxford 
Adios Harry Loses The larg 4 

a a WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, 
N today to seore a 2-and-1 victo 
driven by Joe O’Brien, rushed rom the Netthwest greeted the WENOUINS-—1. Trinket L y ry 

$, Marthe Libb 

a length in the $7500 Monitor| mishaps. = tap tho 2 at ‘row. 
led until the last 10 feet. 1.“ Sherw Chase ‘up in the tournament she never 
Candide, John Porter, Center- 
ville, Md. | 
; looking for something to do,| 
gram at the Old Dominion my 
announced that on Wednesday | z. 


| 
W. Stretes. Ox- 
t. Upstty.. the Penguin Class of the 19th /ferd: 2. . Baltimere; 
5, Snow Denee.| snnual regatta of the Aon os y WB 
Senehey ts gg gy 7 - wy aleer fe: —_ heenmgd ‘Charlies 
snow Plucne Cathioen Na, One hundred fifty-seven sail- aisites— Goteovts os. Galenvile 
boats started in the 7-event 46 sat *\Lo Wi 
|program that was held on the ity, ne trae oy ng Wins State 
Andia® oe. 
The larger boats, cruisers, Ste Wa _—_ a — ‘Amateur Golf Title 
ae , 'racers and deltas, finished their 
In Last 10 Feet ‘|racing series today. The small- ts ies Suught-Vinen.| W, Va. (%i—Huntington’s 19 
WESTBURY, N. Y., July 7 wer boats compete again Sunday. Terry we pit year-old Berri Long fought off 
Diamond Hal, a $47.40 long shot| Light and variable winds (ffs, Apssesi: % Revel o> temt-'a ‘late rally by Sally Carroll 
skippers in the morning. A Washi D 4. Dera pal and win the women’s amateur 
up in the stretch tonight to beat|moderate breeze continued in "Giggum'9Phioe eieet—1. wanx S°lf championship of West Vir- 
-_ Harry by three quarters, the afternoon. There were no —— nnapolis; 2. Jim 0 a ginia for the fifth year in a 
des in 2:01 1/5 at Roosevelt) , CRUISING, CLAss Taal; Sportagnt. | For Miss Carroll, 4 29-year-| 
Raceway. B’'Haven was third.| Theme ‘Brick . a * Snead Shoots 71 ‘old Wheeling competitor, it! 
Adios Harry, the 1-to-2 favorite, | °*"**. " Latrs iwas the fifth finish as runner- 
herwood. ae he Ma 3. Using Only 3-Iron ; 
Us. Bil MeFoy, Annapolis; 3. has won. Four of her defeats! 
Fg aie SULPHUR ng ae have come at the hands of Miss 
. ‘vt a 
Drag Racing Today se eee Speen 1. ‘ Dr. Va., July 7 #—Sam Sne Long. 
MANASSAS, Va. July 7— Sires, ins he toured the Old White course 
The weekly drag racing Pro-| eens with a 3 iron 
The Slammer used nothing | 
Speedway will be held here 
Sunday at 12 noon. 
Race promoter Al Gore has) 
night, beginning at 8:30 o'clock, . hn 
Joie Chitwood and his dare-|¥eith. Fs Ma. 2, C., 
devil show will appear. 7 : 


opreose 
© fer the championship “as 7) 


J. || but a three iron, even for putts, The University of Pittsburgh) - 


o_o 


é ie 6 Riot vee * 


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——New Book Shouwid Delight Light Tackle Fans 


Fishing With Natural Insects 


fully waded for bass, fished 
live bait from a double-end 
boat. 


weenie oat Outdoors 


1956 


By Don Carpenter 


A NEWLY PUBLISHED BOOK, “Fishing With Natural 
Insects,” opens up a new field of lures for light tackle fans, 
the simon pure casters who look down their patrician noses 
at worm or bait fishermen. The author is Alvah Peterson, 


SUNDAY, JULY 8, C7 


THE SHENANDOAH at 


Hiker “Stood Up’ at Salmon Stand 


By Aubrey Graves 


Outdoor Editor 

THE ARRANGEMENT was that 
Grant Conway and Justice William 
O. Douglas would rendezvous at Gus 
Slathers’ smoked salmon stand at 
Forks on July 5. 
4 Then they'd pro. 
. @eed to Neah Bay 
across the strait 
from Vancouver Is- 

land. 

Next day (with 
Slathers as guide) 
they would start a 
four-day hike down 
the rugged Wash- 
ington State coast- 
line, inaccessible 

y road. After a 
stop at the Indian village of La Push, 
they'd continue to the Hoh River, 
then strike inland to Mt. Olympus. It 
was to be “every man’ for himself,” 
with all needs carried on their backs. 

So, 10 days Or so ago, Conway and 
his lady, lone, loaded sleeping and 
camping gear into the family petrol 
buggy and headed west. 


Graves 


ON JULY 3 A NOTE, written from 
Spokane, 
catch a plane for Seattle and Victoria 
tonight and cross the ferry to Port 
Angeles tomorrow noon and then. as 
lone continues to Walla Walla by car, 
I'll start looking for Gus’ stand.” 

A second terse communique, dis- 
patched later that night, announced 
the Douglas trip was off. “Somehow 
he pulled a ligament and is sacked 
up in @ Portland, Ore., hospital, with 
orders not to walk for some time.” 

So, like a bride unaccompanied at 
the altar, this veteran member of the 
Appalachian Trail Club was, as it 
were, left standing at the salmon 
stand, 3000 miles from home. 


ACTUALLY, Mrs. Douglas got a 
message through to Conway before he 
left Seattle. It would August 10, 
she said, before the Justice could 
hike. Conway, who has to get back 
here and help Secretary Humphrey 
run the Treasury Department, 
couldn't wait that long. 

“I didn’t suppose Anything 
could bring that rugged character 
down!” Conway exclaimed. But this 
inveterate foot-slogger is not one to 
let even this surprising devclopment 
turn his transcontinental trip into a 
wild-goose chase. 

UNLESS SOMETHING ELSE has 
intervened, Conway this morning is 
struggling along the Hoh River, with 
468 pounds of camping and photo- 
graphic gear on his back, heading 
for Mt. Olympus, alone. He is on 
light rations because, for reasons of 
added weight, he scuttled all his 
canned goods. 

The coastal stretch was ruled out 
because Conway “couldn't figure out 
how to cross the rivers” that empty 
through steep gorges into the Pacific 
Ocean ... “at tidewater, they are 
as wide as the Potomac at Washing- 
ton.” (Apparently, the man also 
scuttled his water-wings.) 

How the Justice intended to nego- 


reported expectantly: “I . 


Professor of Entomology at Ohio Univer- 
sity,.Columbus 10, Ohio ($6, postpaid). 


The 


Professor tells what insects fresh 


water fish eat, which insects are best for 
bait, where to find them, how to catch 


them and keep them alive 


Also, which 


insects can be raised for bait, how to kill 
and preserve bait insects, and which insects 


will be best for ice fishing. 


He discusses 


imitation insect lures now on the market. 
Illustrations help the beginner understand 


how to use insect baits. 


But don't take a 


copy to streams reserved for “fly fishing 


only,” or you will be as popular as a 


Carpenter 


striped woods-pussy at a garden party! 


PETERSON’S BOOK brings 
back to mind the long ago 
when I used to fish the old 
C & O canal from George- 
town to Great Falls and be- 
yond where it still is possible 
to catch quite a variety of 
fish. 

I used a long, light fly rod, 
small hooks and frequently 
a float or bobber. Usual baits 
were live grasshoppers, crick- 
ets, grubs of the “sawyer” 
kind found in old apple trees, 
and sometimes a bit of: bread 
from the inside of a-slice. 
rolied between the fingers 
into a cone to cover the point 
of the hook. 

I caught Mill Roach with 
the dough bait, also an oc- 
casional “skill-pot”—a most 
unattractive form of turtle. 
Large and small-mouth black 
bass, “goggleecyes” or rock 
bass, crappie, and of course, 
fat fighting sunfish, yellow 
perch, with live grasshoppers 
and crickets. Catfish were 
steady customers at our hook. 

All these and now an oc- 
casional wall-eyed pike may 


 — 


still be caught in 
toric waterway. 


the his- 


PRESIDENT Grover Cleve- 
land made the Potomac River 
area just below Great Falls 
famous when he joined the 
Old Anglers Club at Wide- 
water on the C & O canal. 
Cleveland in summer rode out 
to the club weekends and was 
pushed around the river in 
a punt to his favorite bass 
“holes.” 

Fishing around Great Falls 
is not as good for bass as 
in Cleveland's day. However, 
it is still better than many 
well-advertised places else- 
where. Said Julius Fletcher 
this week: “I think something 
should be done to restock 
the upper Potomac regularly 
with bass. There is a lot of 
water there and not enough 
fish for the present demands.” 


. 

FARTHER up the Potomac 
River at Seneca small-mouth 
bass fishing is good. At 
White's Ferry, Harpers Ferry 
and on up to Antietam and 
Williamsport I have success- 


Lover's Leap near Paris, V&.. 
was a regular “haunt” of 
Judge Edwin Porch Mor- 
row, former Governor of Ken- 
tucky, who caught many large 
bass there. On the North 
Fork of the Shenandoah from 
Riverton to Woodstock and 
also on the South Fork from 
Rileyville to Overall, small- 
mouth bass fishing is as good 
as anywhere in the East. 


George B. Cochran of Box 
No. 3, Lincoln, Va.. who has 
been fishing the Shenandoah 
for 20 years, writes: “I guided 
a party of six anglers last 
Saturday and Sunday, and all 
of us caught our limit.” He 
says he will guide parties on 
any Saturday and Monday all 
day, and other weekdays for 
a half day only. He has bait 
and boat and can be reached 
by phone at Purcellville 7002. 


Fort Stevens Tour 
At 2 p. m. Today 


An historical tour of Fort 
Stevens, only restored fortifi- 
cation in the Civil War de- 
fenses of Washington, start- 
ing at 2:30 p. m/ today will 
include a visit to the nearby 
Battleground Cemetery 
where 40 of the Union dead 
who lost their lives during 
the battle of Ft. Stevens, July 
11-12, 1864, are buried 

Historian John M. Sander- 
son of the National Capital 
Parks will lead this walk and 
will tell of the Confederate 
attack on Washington in July 
1864 when Abraham Lincoln 
stood at Ft. Stevens under 
enemy fire, the only President 
of the United States to do so 
while in office. 


The turtle held by Justice Douglas was handed to 
him by Allan Eckert (second from right), a Boy Scout 
at Friends School. At far right is Al Farwell. Phote- 
graph was made at the start of a hike from Fort 


tiate the rivers is not clear «at this 
writing. 


EN ROUTE WEST, wrote Conway, 
“our surplus mountain tent was 
pitched at interesting locations. We 
carried extra water and MW firewood 
wasn't plentiful, the Optima gasoline 
stove cooked the meats. . Numbered 
sacks of food, purchased in advance, 
avoided confusion. 

“Adequacy of facilities is a gamble 
in unfamiliar territory, as our experi- 
ence near Billings, Mont., will testify. 
Two Indians with Arizona license 
plates were also shopping at the 
supermarket. Indians away from 
home will know the best camp- 
grounds, was my first thought. 

“Where is a good place to camp 
near here?’ I asked. ‘Hiway Motel, 
air-conditioning, T-V, good camp!’ one 
Indian grunted. This terse reply set 
us back on our guide books.” 


THE TRAVELERS took in Custer 
State Park, which covers much of the 


ANCOUVER I. J 
| & 


Sys 3 
"Ray Of hem eo 
ete YUAN OFC ai: ‘ 
MAKAH ue UCA © 
IND. RES. ~— 
Slathers 

s FORKS oked 


~ ~ % Imon 
and 


PUSH 
nor 


PORT 
ANGELES 


¢ we 
Sour *”aMT 
% Fork OLYMPUS 


>» 
ns 
oh 
7 
S&S 
bs > 
> 


Dotted line shows course of plotted 
Douglas-Conway hike. 


scenic Black Hills. “Camping is re- 
stricted only in areas where elk and 
buffalo roam,” Conway wrote. “No 
warnings about the begging Rocky 
Mountain ‘canaries’ (burros) and 
mountain goats were issued. 


Phote by Aubrey Graves, Outdoor Editor 


Frederick State Park earlier this year. Inset: Grant 
Conway, whe waited in vain for Douglas in Wash- 
ington State last week after a torn ligament forced 
the Justice to postpone their coastal hike. 


“We stopped along the highway at 
the edge of a deserted campground 
to snap pictures of a band of seven 
goats. Cautiously, we watched a 
white-bearded patriarch stamp his 
feet, but he did not approach. 

“Virgil Miller of Bethesda, Md., was 
not so fortunate. Every time Miller 
stopped, the old billy stood on his 
hind feet and tried to push his head 
in the car window for a handout. 

“Finally Miller gave up trying for 
a picture and was driving away. He 
heard a crash and his car jolted for- 
ward. Later he found » dent on his 
rear bumper where the charging goat 
had caught up with him.” 


CAMPS PARTICULARLY recom- 
mended by the Conways include Fort 
Frederick State Park in Maryland; 
Ohio State Parks along Lake Erie; 
Palisades on the Mississippi, five 
miles north of Savannah, [lL; Back- 
bone Lake near Strawberry Point, 
lowa: and all the camps in the Black 
Hills and in Oregon. 


Lil Stays: 


GOOLE COT 


| “What's the guarantee?—is a ques- 
tion often asked by our new custom- 
ers. Our old customers never ask that 
question. They know they can trust 
us to do the right thing in case any- 
thing goes wrong. An impossible, 
unreasonable guarantee is a sure sign 
of an unreliable dealer.” 

‘noes comes comes cemue cenes cuss: Guuues Gennes SE J 
“When it is Tires, Batteries, or Capping, you can 
depend on us for the best prices on the quality 
you want properly fitted to your car.” 


The Naturalist 
Starlings Wage 2-Way 
War on Jap Beetles 


Brought Estenians Across Atlantic 10 Years Age 


By Irston R. Barnes 


President 
STARLINGS have always 
been avid eaters of the Japa- 
nese beetle grubs. Many star- 
lings, multiplied by large ap- 
petites, have been an impor- 
tant factor in beetle control. 


But the real story begins with 
an epidemic. 

Whenever wildlife, includ- 
ing insects, move into a new 
region where conditions are 
favorable and natural checks 
are absent, the wildlife multi- 
plies prodigiously. The Japa- 
nese beetle did, to our sor- 
row. But whenever wildlife 
populations increase and 
build up high-density popula 
tions, predators gather, dis 
ease breaks out, ferti''t~ 4e- 
clines., Tu . 

The Japanese beetle first 
appeared in damaging num- 
bers in New Jersey. And it 
was there that Federal and 
state entomologists concen- 
trated their intensive studies 
of the beetle’s life cycle. 

Then in 1933, field workers 
in central Jersey noticed that 
some of the grubs appeared 
unnaturally white—a milky 
white. Microscopic examina- 
tion by G. F. White of the 
Bureau of Entomology, and 
Plant Quarantine showed 
that the body fluid of the 
grubs—their blood—was 
swarming with millions of 
tiny bacterial spores. 


THE MILKY SPORE dis 
ease was new to the Japanese 
beetles. And like white-mans 
smallpox among the Indians, 
it cook @ fearful toll. But the 
disease was not spreading 50 
rapidly as the beetle hordes. 
Could the disease be spread 
artificially wherever there 
were Japanese beetles to be 
controlled? 

When the diseased grub 
dies, as it soon does, the 
spores remain in the soil, sur- 
viving extremes of cold and 
heat, of dryness and mois- 
ture. As other grubs feed in 
the same soil, more grubs 
contract the disease, and in 
dying, add their millions of 
spores to the soil. 

The fight against the Japa- 
nese beetle was won when 
Dr. S. R. Dutley perfected a 
technique for infecting grubs 
with a culture medium of the 
spores, keeping the grubs at 
68 deg. F. and feeding them 
on sprouted grass seed for 10 
to 12 days. Then the grubs 
are stored at 35 deg. F. until 
needed. The ground-up spores 
become the milky spore dust 
used in “infecting” the lawn 
to be protected. 


’ 


Audubon Society of the District of Columbi« 


INVESTIGATIONS of the 
milky disease by Dutley and 
Ralpb T. White revealed that 
the disease organisms will 
not develop at temperatures 
above 97 deg. F. so they do 
not harm birds, wild animals 
or man. 

Experi mental feeding of 
diseased grubs to chickens 
and to starlings showed not 
only that these birds were un- 
affected by the milky disease, 
but also that the disease 
spores passed through the 
birds’ digestive tracts without 
any loss of potency. So here 
was a new natural means by 
which the milky disease may 
spread. 

The starlings feeding on 
the beetle grubs in the lawn 
are not only destroying the 
grubs they eat, but by their 
droppings they are establish- 
ing the milky disease in new 
areas. Field workers in Ohio 
discovered a new colony of 
the disease that was 60 miles 
from the nearest treated area. 
A bird was apparently the 
agent by which it spread. 


THE MILKY SPORE pow- 
der, sold commercially, offers 
much the best means of com- 
batting the Japanese beetle 
Chemicals kill not only the 
beetle grubs but some bene- 
ficial soil organisms and its 
poisons remain in the soil for 
years. 

Lawns are treated by plac- 
ing the spore dust in a grid 
iron of spots throughout the 
lawn. It works slowly at first, 
hence in badly infected areas. 
chemicals are sometimes 
used to save immediate dam- 
age. But once established, the 
milky spore disease is there 
to infect grubs at any time 
during their nearly 10 months 
of life. 

Will the Japanese beetles 
develop a strain that will be 
resistant to the disease’? They 
have not yet. 


400 Caverns Listed 


THE WEST VIRGINIA 
Geological Survey of 1949, 
by William’ E. Davies, Spe- 
ieologist, and Paul H. Price, 
state geologist, describes 
and locates exactly more 
than 400 caverns in West 
Virginia, with a discussion 
of their economic value, 
hydrology and origin. It in- 
cludes a reference list of pub- 
lications. Of the caves de- 
scribed, 129 are located on 
the Potomac drainage. 


‘Freedom Ship’ Is Tied Up Here 


By Peggy Reynolds. 

TEN YEARS AGO, a band 
of 16 Estonian refugees 
crossed the Atlantic under sail 
in a 37-foot 
Swedish pilot 
boat, rather 
than face for- 
cible return 
from Sweden 
to their Rus- 
sian-dominat- 
ed homeland. 

The 120-day 
crossing was 
no yacht- 
man’s lark. 
The little Reynolds 
sloop, intended for use in 
Swedish coastal waters, was 
ill-fitted for an Atlantic cross- 


ing. She carried no modern 
navigation equipment, her 
auxiliary diesel was not 
usable, and she was badly 
overcrowded. Food and water 
were exhausted well before 
the voyagers reached Amer- 
ica. 

The landing on VU. S. shore 
of the ship. and several others 
like her, caused one of the 
earliest cracks in the rose- 
colored glasses through which 
many Americans had been 
viewing a wartime ally. These 
Estonians were neither aris- 
tocrats nor capitalists, yet 
they had fled the “worker's 
paradise,” under conditions 
which no man would choose 
short of desperation. 


THE LITTLE GROUP in.- 


cluded a G65-yearold woman 
and an infant. Eventually 
after much legal maneuver- 
ing, all were permitted to re- 
main in the United States, 
and four of the men prompt- 
ly enlisted in the U. S. Army. 
Today, their boat, the Erma, 
lies in her slip at the Hartge 
Yacht Yard, with a “For Sale” 
sign hanging from the mast. 
Her present owners, the John 
C. Bortons of Alexandria, 
bought the Erma shortly after 
the Estonians made their 
landing at Little Creek, Va. 


THROUGH the offices of a 
friend, Wallace Russell, then a 
major in the U. 8. Air Corps, 
the Bortons learned of the 
Erma. Russell, now an Alex- 
andria lawyer, was one of the 
first U. S. citizens to meet 
the 16 Estonians and help 
them obtain legal entry and a 
new start in this country. 

Built in 1923 in Koster, 
Sweden, Erma’s clinker-built 


hull is of unmistakably for- 
eign appearance. Watching 
her roll gently in the West 
River swells, it is hard to 
imagine the stubby bow crash- 
ing through North Atlantic 
waves, the broad deck awash, 
and a group of determined 
people huddled below. 


SINCE THEIR PURCHASE 
of the Erma, the Borton fam- 
ily has spent sailing vacations 
aboard. Now, Mrs. Borton 
says, the children are grow- 
ing up, and other activities 
are crowding Erma off the 
schedule. 

With her matronly lines 
and weathered spars, the 
Erma appears in sharp con- 
trast to the sleek racing ves- 
sels in adjoining slips. How- 
ever, this latterday May- 
flower need feel no shame. 
She is the Freedom Ship. 


THE CAPITAL Power Boat 
Association's annual regatta 
will be held July 21 and 22 on 
the Potomac between Memo- 
rial and Highway Bridges, it 
was announced by Francis 
Racioppi, chairman. 

Races will start at noon 
both days, and continue until 


5 or 6 p. m. Spectators may 
watch from either the District 
or the Virginia shore, free of 
charge. 

Saturday’ races will be ex- 
clusively for outboard classes, 
including the JU (Junior Util- 
ity) for children of about 12. 

Sunday, the racing out- 
boards and the inboards will 
take over. Inboard classes 
will include POD’s, 48s, 136s, 


135s. 225s, and the 125-m.p.h. 


266s, the largest limited rac- 
ing hydros. : 
Sanctioned by the American 
Power Boat Association, the 
Regatta is held annually 
through the courtesy and co- 
operation of National Capital 
Parks, according to Racioppi. 


THE AMERICAN Boat and 
Yacht Council, standard-mak- 
ing body of the recreational 
boating industry, is urging 
that for purposes of simplifi- 
cation, all boats carry naviga- 
tion lights in accordance with 
the International Rules of the 
Road at Sea. 

Until this year, a boat which 
operated both in international 
waters and on United States 
waterways was required to 
carry two sets of lights, to 
comply with both Inter- 
national and Federal regula- 
tions. Now, the International 
lights may be carried inland 
upon the boatman’s option. 


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a 


The Soviet Challenge 


In Russia You Go 


Where It’s 


By J. A. Livingston 


The writer has just returned 


The following article is the first of a series which will appear in 


thig newspaper. 
THERE are three Russias: 


The Russia you have with y 


Russia of your preconceptions. 
kindness after yo 


F Re 


ital the real 


When you 


stores are well stocked with merchandise— 
radios, TV sets, vacuum cleaners, bicycles, 
women's dresses, 
this poverty and hardship you've been reading 


about? 


You're smothered with attention. 
the brusque manner, the “nyets,” the steely 


harshness of 


Livingsten Soviet Unioh 


government-operated Thos. Cook's, takes you in hand to the Roosevelt gave George T. Cur- 


limit of its now overtaxed facil 
has your room ready, provides 


Do you want to see Lenin and Stalin in their tomb? 
day later it’s arranged. As you* 


’ 


approach Red Square, you see 
the quarter-mile queue. “Gosh, 
I dap’t want to wait that long,” 
you tell your guide. “But you 
don't have to,”.is the reply 
“You're a foreigner, a guest.” 
The flick of a pass, a police- 
man’s salute, and you go to the 
head of the line. 

Similarly, with a visit to the 
Kremlin, or a trip to Moscow's 
famous Tretakof Gallery. At 
the Hermitage in Lenigrad, the 
museum founded by Cather. 
ine the Great, you march in 
free, while Soviet citizens pay 
admission. Once, on a trolley 
ear in Leningrad, an elderly 
woman offered me her seat. 
Was I so obviously a foreigner? 
Was the cut of my clothes such 
a giveaway? 


ALL AROUND you are citi- 
zens in grim postwar garb 
better than three years ago,| 
they tell you at the American 
Embassy. But drab. Stucco 
peels from buildings; iron grat- 
ings on streets show cracks. 

Once, just outside the Savoy 
Hotel in Moscow, I supported 
a ladder that broke under the 
weight of a woman window 


cleaner. Had I not been there 
she would have fallen 15 feet 
to the ground. 

It's hard to hold on to per-| 
spective—especially when you 
live in the hotels. There you 
get caviar and plenitude, huge 
pats of butter along with your 
black bread and borsch, potato 
salad. beef stroganov, cucum- 
bers at $1.50 a throw. You never 
lack quantity, even if sometimes’ 
you feel bilked on quality and 
variety. 

With a well-planned look of 
helplessness, you can often get| 
filet mignon, even though it 
isn't on the menu. You're a 
guest, entitied to all that’s in 
the larder, and so well treated | 
that you forget the crush of 
people in bakeries, milk, and) 
grocery stores, the struggle af 
the everyday citizen to get 
served while the serving's still 
there. 

Not until you leave do yoda 
appreciate Russia. In this, I 
was lucky. I'd planned to go 
out by plane frem Moscow to 
Kiev, then from Kiev to Vienna, | 
and Vienna te Munich, site of 
the Institute for the Study of 
the Soviet Union, a private or. 
ganization financed largely by 
Americans. I wanted te check 
my findings on Soviet economic 
prowess with experts. But 
Russia's economy - of - scarcity | 
and government - by - economic- 
decree “re-routed” me and gave | 
me a sense of the mysterious 
power behind Soviet bureauc-. 
racy. | 

Intourist was abjectly peni-| 
tent. They'd put me on a special 
flight they were arranging to 


u've been there awhile. 
Russia, 
after your mental shakedown, after you regain 
perspective, after you've departed. 


macy? You discover you're a guest of the|your eyes and ears open. 


‘est. And yet the Eastern Zone) 


usin 


SUNDAY, JULY 8&8, 


Allowed 


1956 


8 


Css | 


Washington Success Story 


from a six-week tour of Russia. 


ou when you arrive there, the 
The Russia that blunts you with 
And, finally, there's 
that remains 


the Russia 


Furniture Business 
Outstrips Moving, 


Storage Volume 
By S. Oliver Goodman 


Financia! Editor 
“Keep your mouth shut and 


arrive, you're surprised. The 
Where's all 


men's suits. 


Where's 


Molotov in international diplo- 


Intourist, the Soviet Union's! That's some advice Theodore 
ities—meets you at the airport, 


a guide ‘tis in 1904. Occasion was an 


Yes. A\appointment that the then | 


‘President of the United States) 
| : ‘obtained for young George. 
a railroad station if | “It was a job in the District | 
ey , Water Department as janitor’s| 
tour entities you to - a ; “tata | 
deteke tapuueniilinn There. “ty - mt ye ogee oat 
aan a day, bu | 
ae. eS SS ee and sible for me to live at —— 
an 
West—telescope economic dif. wee — 
ferences. In the Western sector, Before 
the shops glow with cleanliness drummer 
and with merchandise, the nice- , 
ties of western civilization. 
Automobiles of all Sorts and 
Poe 7 a ee ing you,” he reminisced. S4 
wey, OS . as ‘was in the spring of 1904 that 


that, Curtis was a) 
or traveling sales- 
man, for an Alexandria whole- 
saler of china dishes. 

“Talk about the Lord guid- 


Sideline Now Mainstay 
As Curtis Bros. Grows 


By Vie Casamento, Staff Photographer 


GEORGE T. CURTIS SR. 
..» His Chief Assets: Sons, Not Dollars 


Porsches, Chevrolets, Piym- ;, 2 
ouths, Fiats, Buicks, Austins. aaa Bann, HF oF 

Che food stores are crammed Virginia. Suddenly a little 
with sausage, veal, beef, bread,'..:-. came to me. ‘What are 
fresh fruits and vegetables. A you doing down here, far from 


comfortable shopping contrast |}ome and your wife and chil-| 
with Russian cities, where meat | qren?’ ’ ithe Curtises in 1936 opened a 


is scarce, butter hard to get,| «1 didn’t have a reasonable *mall retail furniture store as 
and customers crowd counters|ancwer so I hurried back to| 4" adjunct to their moving and 
for the meager supply. Alexandria and went to work |Storage business. This was in 
THE EASTERN ZONE i for the Water Departmient,|the 2000 block of Nichols ave. 
ano ; NE 1S ®\ thanks to a friend who had an|S¢» near where their ware 
pallid Russia in miniature. Men/in at the White House.” /houses are located. 
and women look as if life were| Curtis heeded the rough-rid-| The elder Curtis remembers 
hard, grim, and forcibly earn-|'"g and rough-talking Presi- their furniture start. It was in 
dent's words. an ancient three-story farm 
“I didn’t have much formal/house which they 


tis Bros. 
| houses. 


of Berlin, because of its prox-| 


io. ti tiem. When , | education,” he said, . 
mity to tie west, 15 much’. lot of listening and watching|furniture business soon was 
more attractive than Russia it- 


self. The shops are fuller, the earls eng ne Sia gl pment y~ Re The yt 
people are better dressed. At| Water Dept. Veteran ‘furniture store and some ad- 
once, it smashes home what the| So well did he absorb tech-' joining buildings were razed in 
7. Sed sich | ical knowledge that he served 1938 and a large modern store 


in 5-year pians and promises, from 1913 to 1948 as chief Siege 


ene new 5 A of nope plenty of anecdotes about that and Arthur B. 
tal we Fran tate a Se) period. But this is a story about | Enlargement Completed 
; ‘Curtis Bros., Inc., a household 

row. It's a capitalism ne plus! . ame in Washington for furni-| JUSt recently, the Curtis firm 
ultra under the name of Com-|..+. and moving and storage. |COmpleted a nine-month re- 
munism. The proletariat “owns”|  ; i. many another now fa-|™modeling and enlargement job 
the tools of production, but the! __... Washington business,|°" the furniture store. A new 
Commissariat decides what the Curtis Bros. had a humble be-|4!!-glass front and 25,000 addi- 
tools shall be used for. ginning It all started in| Uomal square feet were added. 

Compared to Lenin, Stalin, | arch of 1926. Curtis recalled. |The store now has 150,000 
and Khrushchev, as we shalliwnen he staked two of his Square feet of display space, 
see, United States capitalists young sons for the $250 price largest in the Washington area. 
are petty bourgeois, very petty.|4¢ g Model T Ford truck. The| One of the Curtis brothers 
They don't plough back into! sons George T. Jr. and Fred P. who figured prominently in the 
plant and equipment nearly as | went into the ice retailing | beginning of the business failed 
much as the Soviet rulers. It’s business. ito see the culmination of the 


a society with glistening Zim| The elder Curtis chuckled as|/#‘est expansions. Fred P. Cur- 
or Zis cars, private chauffeurs,/he outlined the next growth US died two months ago of a 
dachas, servants, vodka, and/step. “I found another truck in|D@@ft attack while on store 
caviar for the few, and slowly-|a junk yard. It had a $2 price|>USiness. His widow, Anne I. 
rising standards of eating and|tag on it. I offered $1.75 and/CUTtS, remains active in the 
dress for the many—so that/it became the second truck in| ®™™ #5 second vice president in 
the future beckons and the/|our fleet. Of course, the boys|*®¢ bookkeeping department. 
present is bearable. |had to do a heap of tinkering), NOW 77, George T. Curtis Sr. 
'to make it run, + run it did ‘5 Still full of plans. He eyes the 
IT’S A LAND of a new relig- | finally.” newly established parking lot 
ion — Marxism-Leninism. The} While on their ice rounds |adjoining the furniture store 
high priests, Khrushchev andthe Curtis brothers found that|2#"4 "visions additional store 
Bulganin, promise a 20th cen-|moving things like trunks and|5P4e with parking on the roof 
tury and of milk, honey, and/furniture was more lucrative |°U"¢erground. 
industrial supremacy, a Soviet/than selling ice. Besides, the}, >'™c¢ 1946, he pointed out, 
Union greater than America.\ice buriness was too seasonal, | .Urniture sales have more than 


Communism uber alles. It has| 
the space, the minerals, the 
population, and a double-edged 
plan: To become supreme, if 
not by military means, then by | 
economic prowess. ) 

And that’s what our chil. 
dren's children face: Commu- 
nist expansion, Communist de- 
termination to make the Soviet 


Alert to Opportunity 


That's one thing about the 
Curtises. They're not sleeping 
when opportunity knocks. In 
1927 they bought their first 
moving van; in 1928 two more 
vans. Then they noticed 
another curious public phe- 


doubled, with a 33 per cent in- 
crease in the past three years. 
“In recent years,” he em- 
phasized, “we've gotten away 
from a neighborhood store and 
now do business all the way 
down to Leonardtown, Md.” 


A Sentimentatlist 
Gray-haired and with twin- 


or acquired until in 1945 Cur-lactive in the Anacostia Lions 
owned five ware-|Club and the Junior Order of 
‘American Mechanics. He is 


Alert to new opportunities, | 


lso a director of Anacostia Na- 
onal Bank. 

He’s considered an adept oil 
painter and has turned out 
some professional-looking land- 
‘scapes and sea pictures. These 
he gives to relatives and 
friends. 


Third Best Year Seen 


By David 


million will be assembled in th 


industry’s third best year— 
from the production standpoint. 
The indicated total of new car 
assemblies would have a whole- 
sale value of about 11% billion 
dollars. | 
Industry analysts agreed at 
the start of the current model 
year that the 1955 record-| 
smashing total of 7,920,000 car 
assemblies could not be 
matched this year. Within | 
couple of months they agreed 
the 1950 total of 6,666,000 was! 
too much to hope for this year. 
But most of them indicate they | 
expect 1956 factory output to 
—e. the 6,117,000 unit output of | 
1 


The auto industry has| 
reached almost fantastic pro-' 
duction levels since the end of 
World War II. Since mid-1945) 
when postwar production of| 
civilian vehicles began the fac- 
tories have rolled out nearly 54 
million passenger cars. That's 
almost one-third of all the cars 
built in the last 56 years. 

The current weekly produc- 
tion level of slightly more than 
100,000 cars probably does not 
indicate an over-all output of 
6% million units this year. The | 
weekly rate will go even lower 
during the July-September 
quarter. 

But the industry's top execu- 
tives are counting upon near-| 
record production of 1957 
models in the final quarter of 
the year to make up for volume 
lost during the model change-| 
over period. Some of this will 
affect September operations, | 
but it will be felt in the assem- | 
bly plants chiefly in October. | 


be heavily against any wild 


When the elder Curtis counts | 


remodeled. | ates his sons and also a grand-| 
“put I did| The Curtises found that the|s0n—Charles Curtis, who is the) 


’ 
: 


By this time, three more of| tour, 77-year-old Curtis insisted 
but poor, terribly poor, in pres-|gineer of the Anacostia Pump-| cu tiy sons had entered the|on showing this reporter every | 
ent-day remittances tp its citi-\ing Station. He can tell you business — Harry L., Archie B./square foot. At the end of the) 


his assets, he ignores the dol-| 
lar signs and merely enumer-' 


first of the third generation to 
enter the business. Charles is) 
advertising director. 

As previously mentioned,| 
there are 150,000 square feet in| 
the expanded Curtis Bros.| 
store. On a personally guided | 


tour he wasn’t even breathing 
heavily, while the winded re-| 


divan. 


going model cleanup. 


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Auto Trade Lowers 
06 Output Sights 


J. Wilkie 


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DETROIT, July 7—Nearly 3% million cars rolled from the 
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work in a VACATIONLAND 


Budapest. The plane would go 
from there to Vienna if I want- 
ed. Imagine Trans World Air- 
lines or Pan-American making | 
a special run te accommodate 
three passengers—and at stand- 
ard rates! 

An alternative was to go out 
by way of Berlin. It was quick-| 
er since it avoided a stopover'| 
at Budapest. I agreed. And so 
it was that I saw East Berlin 
and West Berlin. I saw the con- 
trast between a capitalist so- 
ciety and a so-called socialist 
society. [ had my judgment 
jammed back into place. All 
the efforts of Intourist to be 
helpful could not erase this 
fact. The Soviet Union's a 
police state. You go where 
you're allowed. 


nomenon. People like to store | ;); 
Union the greatest, most pro-|furniture and other things. So manG Catt, Ce: eeee. Se 


ductive, most dominant nation |i, 1930 they acquired their | inds it hard to look the part 
on earth. Fi . ‘first warehouse. \of a hard-boiled businessman. , 
Mozhno?” Is that oremngy od More warehouses were built|That “Kiddy Korral” on the 4 


To answer that question, to ‘lower level reflects his love of 
analyze the Soviet Union's deb- ‘children and the “Community 


its and credits: That's the! ‘Room” for public use mirrors 
objective of this series. New York Bank Stock his desire to be of public 
WEDNESDAY — Livingston) MeO" Jev 1 Tee. lstest quotations | SEEVICS. : 
discusses economic management i _ deosestleug sateen Bie = Asked A sentimentalist, he likes to 
in Soviet Russia. | 29 6s7_:~«| Watch television programs that 
Chemical 
| Coat i (Chi 


*® ‘tug at your heartstrings. He's 
Trends of Week |. vt 


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comfort in the most modern and well instrumented laboratories 
... with liberal employee benefits, including an attractive profit 
sharing plan and association with men of the highest technical 
competence. 
To top it off, you'll be moving to a spot where there’s room to 
grow (moving and travelling expenses paid for family) . . . where 
there are planned communities, with modern shopping centers, 
advanced schools, and many fine buys in homes available. Living 
will be easier, more relaxed and more fun in Phoenix or Riverside. 
“Go West” never had greater appeal (or greater rewards) than 
it does TODAY! 


MOTOROLA IN PHOENIX HAS NEED FOR: 
Electronic Engineers, Mechanical Engineers, 
Physicists, Metallurgists and Chemists. 
RESEARCH LABORATORY SEMI-CONDUCTOR DIVISION 


Microwave Antennas 
Pulse end Video Circuitry 


hattan 
Core txe 


13.8 
735,282 
15,948 
68,674 
265. 


Aute pred (enits) 
= teal pred (teas) 


Eogimeering 
Paper pred (“Sef cag) 
Paper beard pred 


I WANTED to visit Magnito- 
gorsk, beyond the Urals, home 
of the Soviet Union's largest 
stee| works. The officials said. 
“Nyet.” I wanted to go to 
Ivanovo, not too far from Mos. 
cow. It’s a textile center. I 
was informed by Intourist. “Ne 
mozhno,” its not possible 
“Why?” Because they have no 
proper hotel accommodations 

I countered, “1 can sleep in 


“ NEW YORK (INS) — Union 
‘ me Carbon and Carbide has com- 


5 

Steck sales (shares) 7.873.808 nena pleted plans to build a $285 

ry Sales (par veins) $12,318,008 $17,032,088) million plant in Puerto Rico to 

yg A tetlewiagh | make ethylene glycol, known 

flee per pred (kwh) 11,488,008 16,198.008 cOMmercially as Prestone anti- 

Bonk cisarings $28,213, “y \freeze. The plant is scheduled 
$n 


Demand depesits . to be completed in July, 1958. 
if. x 

i 

I 


Susimess § lenes 
78.008 
* > 


7 


MOTOROLA IN RIVERSIDE HAS NEED FOR: 


Electronic Engineers, Mechanical Engineers, 
Physicists and Mathematicians. 


RESEARCH LABORATORY 
@ Militery Operation Analysis 
e Analog Computer Flight Simuletion 
@ Digite! Computer Anclysis 
@ Digite! Compvtor Design 
¢ Dynamics Anclysis © Circult Design 
e Microwave Systems © Serve Mechenisms 
@ Missile Systems © Aerophysics 

Por above postions write: 


Mr. C. Kexiel, Dept. 1 
8330 indians Ave., Riverside, Calif. 


MIAMI, FLORIDA 


Excess reserves 
Treasery geld stock 
Srekers ‘eans 
Mesey | circelstion 


471, 
$2) 808. 
$1,988, 
soe 


CATS and DOGS 
ENJOY 
AIR CONDITIONING 


In An Alexandria, Va.. Animal Hospital 


Give Your Family A Break! 
WORTHINGTON 


Transistor Applications 
For above positions write: 


1 
5005 E. McDowell Rd., 
Phoenix, Ariz. 


Mr. R. Coulter, Dept. 
3102 N. Séth St., 
Phoenix, Ariz. 
There are excelient opportunities with Motorola in CHICAGO, toe 
Mr. L. B. Wrenn, Dept. 1 


4501 Augusta Bivd. 
| Chicago 51, Il, 
For full details and personal interview in WASHINGTON JULY 9, 10, 11 


CALL District 7-2825 10 A.M. to 7 P.M.—MR. LEN SERWAT 
FOR DAY OR EVENING APPOINTMENT 


) MOTOROLA 


distributing 
financial industrial fund, inc. 
is pleased to announce 
that its Washington 
branch office 
will be moved from 
1025 Connecticut Avenue N.W. 
to 
1304 Connecticut Avenue N. W. 
(Machinists Building) 
on or about 
_ August 1, 1956 


write to: 


Residential Commercial 
AIR CONDITIONING 
Phone for Free Cooling Survey 


FOUR YEAR EXTENDED PLAN AVAILABLE 


General Heating 


5101 CRESTON ST., HYATTSVILLE, MD. 


UM, 44744 


Stocks R 


NEW YORK, July 7 (—Sales on the 
New York Stock Exchange this week 
wesk Seeder shares; previous 
week 9, ; same 
11,565,490. oe 


K Lew 


PEAS" mien Lew Last Che 


-—A— 
‘S% 29% Abbett L te ” 
109% 106% Abbett Lo opt «4 
4% 13% 480 Vere’ 
s7%) S8% acr 


? 
1% 13% 
' 


™ ay 2 4+% 
WET%e 10859 + 16. 
is ie— % 


ise in Face of Steel Stri 
Reach Peak Since Ma 


stride of the stock market this week 
as it rolled up its fourth straight 
weekly advance. 


The gain-in average was the best | 


, since the week ended June 16. That 
was the week when President Eisen- 


| hower’s condition was reported “ex- 


cellent” and the 
made up for its loss of the preceding 
week when the President suffered his 
intestinal attack. 

This week 


average of 60 stocks rose $2.70 to 
| $185.50. This was a new recovery high 


since the May low but was still $6.00 


% below the all-time high reached April 
6 


a 
Als Ch of 4 
Aigte FP COTS 
w Alem itt 1a 
S Meee 128 177 123% 118% 1199 — % 
™ Amel Lesth ™ 


A ‘es 
* ay B4— % 
108+) 


7 
118 110% 168% 
' 63'>» 
16% dm Al of 3% 
5 in Geer fe 
ta of a 


| stocks should not be sold on strike | 


: 


“The market seemed determined to 
prove the old Wall Street adage that 


news. 


Brokers believed that the steel 


strike was, essentially, an inflationary | 


event if it does not last too long. 
Smaller steel companies unaffected by 


| the strike surprised some in the fi- 
| nancial community by raising their 


prices on steel products. This was one | 
factor in the recovery of steel shares | 


market more than | 


the Associated Press | 


lower. 

Sentiment in Wall Street seemed to 
be that the strike would be settled 
sooner rather than later. Meanwhile, 
good news exceeded bad. 

On Thursday even the rails came to 
life and the market fairly breathed 
confidence as its volume rose to 2,240,- 
000 shares—not very much as big 


ing since June 8. 

Continued favorable reports about 
Eisenhower's health, the start of medi- 
ation efforts in the steel strike and 
other news helped. 

With this sort of atmosphere per- 
meating the stock exchange, the mar- 
ket ended the week yesterday with 
another decisive, though modest ad- 


| vance. 


The Government's freeze order on 


| critical steel items, assuring defense 


producers of warehouse stocks as long 
as possible during the strike, boosted 
aircrafts to a position of leadership. 
Chemicals also were pace-setters, con- 
tinuing their strength on good earning 


reports and plans for big future ex- | 


pansion. 


The five most active stocks on the | 


| volume days go, but the heaviest trad- | 


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Peoples Drug 
Has Record 
June Sales | 


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4 June sales of Peoples Drug 
.+ Stores, Inc., spurted to $5,156,- 
+14 623, an increase of $579,604 or 
net 2112.7 per cent over the same 1955 
» period. Last month's volume) 
“was a new June peak for the 
4 company. 
+% The chain is in the midst of 
la record expansion program 


33s 
7s 


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+ 


“ 


s — this year, which contemplates 


i% 


“ + , the opening of at least 20 new 


President George B. 
Barrus estimated the capital 


me * 
e+ outlay for his expansion at $2 


& zrumillion. 
pb 
seve pared with 157 in the same 1955 


During June, the company 
‘(operated 161 stores as com-| 


pe : 
For the first six months this 

' year, sales reached $29,057,969. 
8 new record for that period | 
and an inerease of $1,764,932) 


 +'%lover the corresponding period 


st tailast year. 


at ni Establishment of the Jim Me- 


THE WASHING 
** 


Sunday, July 8, 1956 . 


7 


NORTH AMERICAN CONTRACTING CORP. 


(a Maryland Corporation) 
NOW ENGAGED IN CONSTRUCTION OF BRIDGES, ROADS, 
UTILITIES AND GENERAL SUBDIVISION IMPROVEMENTS 


Equipment yard—9480 New Fort Road 
Prince Georges Co.. Marriend 


Offering 285,000 Shares 


Non-aseessable common stock—paer velue 60.10 per share 


OFFERING PRICE $1 PER SHARE 


‘ety ‘Offering Circular may be obtained from —--— 


. 1526 
| CO. $-4992 
' 


NAME .. 


THE MATT 


HEW CORPORATION 


UNDERWRITER 
Connecticut Ave. N.W. 


CO. 5-2060 


Washington 6, D. C. 


Please send me. without obligation, offering circular on 
North American Contracting Corporation 


| ADDRESS Aiea gg eo ge ana g A 


TON POST and TIMES HERALD» 
Co 


MO 


Ww 


ASHINGTON 


38 y2*3393%93°929"92 °¥-23929"592352922932- 


MUTUAL 


+m Kay Chevrolet dealership in 
Wer— Fairfax, Va. was announced 
1™+ % yesterday by James R. McKay, 
, president. The 
dealership re 
places one for- 
merly held by 
Logan Chevro-| 
let. Both new 
and used cars 
will be handied 
by the firm, lo- 
cated at 201 
East Main st. 
MeKay is a 
1949 graduate 
McKay of the General 
;t| Motors Institute of Technology 
win Flint, Mich. He came to 
' | Washington in January, 1950, as 
rt used car manager for Hicks) 
+ “Chevrolet and in 1952 shifted to 
me athe new car sales force. He is 
e+ %) the individual leader in Chevro-| : : ; . 
m+Milet sales in the Washington. 
we |Baltimore area for the first six 
1+ * months this year. Treasurer of 
2 —|., the new firm is George Fogarty, 
nutty who is president of Hicks 
arp e Chevrolet at 5959 Georgia ave. 
v , 
a ‘ Who's News 
121% 10— 1a! Robert Wilner has been ap- 
“pointed advertising manager of 
w2oseph A. Wilner & Co., custom 
tailors since 1897. He is a grand-| 
. son of the 
founder... 
Boyd B. Si-. 
bert Jr., gradu-| 
ate of the Nav-| 
al Academy 
and the Har- 
vard Graduate 
Schoo] for Bus- | 
iness Adminis- 
tration, has 
joined the in-| 
vestment bank-| 
ing firm of Fer-| 
ris & Co. as an account execu-| 
tive ... Southern Railway Sys) 
tem has appointed John A. 
Rust as general manager of 
Eastern lines and Henry R. 
‘Moore as chief . main- 
‘tenance of way and structures 


after their initial losses this week 

The market suffered the first im- 
pact of the steel strike on Monday 
| Not only steels but rails, the close com- 
| panion of the steel industry, took 
losses as the railroads began laying 
off thousands of workers as steel trai- 
fic virtually stopped. 

On Tuesday, however, the steel 
shares came back and more than 
wiped out their losses of the day be- 


American Stock Exchange were: 
Cuban-Venezuelan Oll, up “% at 2% 
on 305,500 shares; Cuban-American 
Oil, up 2 at 6%; Trans-Cuba Oil, up 1 
| at 348; North Canadian Oils, up 11-16 
at 6%; and British Petroleum, up % 
at 24's. 
The five most active stocks on the 
New York Stock Exchange were: 
| Panhandle Oil, up 1% at 19% on 
134,000 shares; General Motors, up 1 
fore. A declaration by top mobiliza- | at 46; U. S. Steel up 1 at 58%: Kaiser 
_ ion officials that the steel supply situ- | Aluminum, up 1% at 56%; and Boeing, 
ation was not serious as yet helped | up 4% at 04%. 


a 
- 


233 
“tae 
: 
3 
t 


3333 
“333 


a managed investment in 

70 to 100 high-grade com- 

mon stocks selected for 

income and long-term 

growth possibilities from 

the List of Legal Investments for Trust Funds in the 
District of Columbia 


Prospectus may be obtained from your desler or ibe undersigned 


JOHNSTON, LEMON & CO.___- 
Member Philedelphia-Baltimore Stockh Exchange 


SOUTHERN BUILDING 11S MO. ST. ASAPH 
WASHINGTON 5, 0. C. ALEXANDRIA, VA. 


Pivere 4 without obligation prespectes on WASHINGTON MUTUAL 
INVESTORS FUND 


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This important bulletin gives a definite Stock | 
Market Forecast for the last half of 1956, and out- 
lines specific “BUY” recommendations for many 
special situations which they believe offer unusual 
possibilities for profit. 


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Formation of the National 
Mattress and Furniture Co., 
with factory and offices in 
Muirkirk, Md., was announced 
Me— yesterday. Sam Posner, presi- 
| + ident, said the new firm will 
‘e+ % Matrufacture mattresses and 
Me... \distribute furniture and allied 
me witems. The firms, located in a 
te+5%e 15,000-square-foot building, ex- 
sy pects to be in production early 
+m in August. Posner until recent-! 
m+ ‘ly was sales representative for | 
"the Englander Co. in the Wash-| 
Me—Mlington-Baltimore area. As-| 
+ “isociated with him are Aaron 

% Goldstein,, formerly plant man- 

lager for the Englander Co. in 
|Pittsburgh; Louis M. Denit,| 
a director of the National Bank | 
of Washington. 


Hoppi-Copters Elects 


G. Kenneth Adams, Washing- 
ton advertising executive, has) 
been elected vice president of) 
American Hoppi-Copters, Inc.,' 


; 
1% tee which includes Adm. George. 
"SA. Lange (retired), corporation 
president; Robert S. Moss, vice 
“president and general counsel, 
and Brigadier General Ray 
* Dunn (retired), a director. The 
~ frm plans to manufacture and 
sell a one-man, coaxial heli- 


WASHINGTON, D. C. 
Cofrits Bidg.. 1625 Bye %. 
Di. 7-5700 
BETHESDA, MD. 
7730 Wisconsin Ave. 

OL. 4.3000 


ESTABLISHED 1990 


ALEXANDRIA, VA. 
Weshington ond Prince Sts. 
Ki, 8-5700 


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FITCH SEMI-ANNUAL FORECAST 


Gives answers to these and other vital questions. 
Also points the way to profit-making opportunities 
over a broad scale of industries and equities in the 
stock market. 


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725-15th Street, N.W. STerling 3-5252 
Washington 5, D. C. 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD | ae Livestock. , 
C10 Sunday, July 8, 1956 “ MORE OPTIMISM oe tu, 1 DON’T WAIT! 


: in at bal incorporations an |g you are interested in 
_ Week’s Range on the New York Stock Exchange — eee || sees pees ie a 


§ 09 ee oi cows, Gis 0. bulls,  Opnition for your initiative 
(Continued from C-9) 19: ees pes Saies : reers, 18.00819 06" stocker piers. too and ability—want to live in 
alee teh tow Low Last Che lnaioe Low Sajes High Low Last Che Mie Low Fish Tew Last Che! vat 00: stock cows and heifers, 6.006 a pleasant suburban area 

100s High Lo ‘ , = | te ie Unit M&M th xt 
“ roy in i he Tas ; 265 g ran Yn ee es a Us Pk OC Min St 1% Deb Ve = fat yom ony mg 1530 5 s30*.2n° convenient to N.Y.C., Phil- 


: ™s & 50% Smith, AG 7.100 51 1% so 78% USEFer ' aL) mon te opeice 15.00 @ 24 7! pearitinas. 
ie we ae ee yr 390 | ‘" ' 2% Smith Cor 1.88 4 42 24\y pal | 10.00¢r 19.00; ewes. -25004.78 adelphia and seashore and 
Natce (80 3 


714 Smith Dea 1.28 “a 2 2%+ % Te 34% ms Me fae PM bens he Lecce - ountain resorts, 
56% Seceny 2 160 } 59%4+1% 21% Tn | ; | ee 'T) 


Selar Aire 1 718 ' 39%—1 ite today 

" siar Aue 7 V im 8 ” + STEEL SHEL Call oe _ ' 
“ V ES . 

ph El pret 5 5% B% 38 3 s? ~ Ss oe s mF + | Immediate positions 

| a | il 4 ; © om £ : . 

—— a DS Sm ot ? ’ a aM ae it Mee Re we we | available in: 

Phitce pf 3% . ”" +t * py >. 1T!¥e—@t JAN.JUNE OF EACH YEAR EST] | 

Philip Mer 3 198 one 8 | ' DESIGN & LAYOUT 

STRUCTURES 

STRESS 


n+! 


v me 39’. 
Poll Pet wi 403 Lb) 5 1% ar 
Pheenin Wes 1‘ Ry “ po pete Utreprest AERODYNAMIC 

ft itis 7% Ry ™ US Steel pf 60%» ieee "ss Ths isTs 
en —ium be " : , We 3 K. to 128 et Wie Ne Tellier Ban apa * shed | _INSTRUMENTATION 
: -% & nn Ss or win fore © Speetal stsen, te 


order @ on esr prem LOFTSMEN 
ie “SFor 5 Years | *@ Free ptanning service. SYSTEMS 


Flectrie Components to Order 


wick Service Cont : MR. R. Cc. WARD 
ge ‘9 In New York van srReenere 


a ‘ 
HARCO EQUIPMENT CORP. 
inet % NEW YORK, July 7 (®—'§ 2473 SHERMAN AVE. WLW. NO. 7.1919 weerenes bor Fk ° ao # 


3 +m /ellier & Co., a large Jersey 
ma + City, N. J. stockbroker, has 
Tl ¢ been barred from securities 


su+4 (dealings in New York State for 
im fe nitive years. 
as te «©The State Attorney General's 
4 +4 
‘% i 


-2~ 


aw 
36% Pittstes ee 
1) Pleegh % 
10% Piye OW 1.608 


Advertisement 


13% Medi 
1$4— Nersner 
n 


office erroneously announced 


o Thursday that a permanent in-| 
“junction had been issued’ 
S 68 , we fy 3: = 8 wiagainst Tellier by State Su- READERS Gl MORE 

; 2 "a a Mish 4 9% 3%... |preme Court Justice Harold 
= + & *' Stevens. 
37% Pure Ol Ate s4u+ % .o on We | Instead, Stevens specifically 
~« " ~ % declined to make the ban per- 
- os oe i + ti 162 33 Saapece | |.a0e + manent. The ban superseded a 


‘ Many a Se A ite 7 . s atworth ‘ ‘* temporary restraint ordered 
Ap —" . oo ; mS we last Jan. 4. By a Subscriber how to interpret business and 
1a RCA pf 3% _- m : | government trends a little better 
S346 Raybest 2.S50 : Since I started reading The Wall than they do. They wonder where 
12% Rayenier 1.48 «Chicago Grain s J l, my i has imal 
sz — 1 : de a . £ , treet Journal, my income ‘a I get my “inside dope.” 
11% Reading Co 2 : i Piper CHICAGO, oly 7 =A revival in feet creased from $9,000 to $14,000 a This story is typical. Because the 
~ ay! Cap that } 7%) + ' % 38% Reading 1 of 2? 8 ‘ * # 3972+ “se busmess the Sells @ wheat s happy year. reports ie The Wall Street Journal 
’ tral 4 ’ 8? ‘e th : ’ : 
- — ( “% 35 Readio ~ ba) IA ' TK gy this week. Prices But aS = 7 = A. come to you daily, you get quick 
’ 99 Syly ‘ 2 ory. Ane JOUrna! MOL Only tes warning of any new trend that may 
as — st 1 OSe Sym Gould te : Me +>) to $l ‘behers” ceeds _ ree to —_ more money —it affect your income. You get the 
" rRotion Toleett 1.28 -™ i SES ee : so ~ sme hee 7 more value facts in time to protect your inter- 
: ’ ’ ; 
Ts: Pepeb Pict i» A 6Ma 7 5 4 over the —_ reée's expert plant were - 7 pose 2 — ‘ . ests = s profit. The Journal 
a a = | te wae AA wok Iie to 38% ieher,| article in The 3 - th ak tae “ trang — yt sy ~n 
2% ™% ‘ “ ‘| article In ihe Journal he me making $7, to , a year. 
west 2 mat iy YT » 4 ts mye tie te Tie higher, seybenes tue teeny, trade in my old car at the right It is valusble to owners of small 
47% Norwich Pa 1.60 : ae Gas ek ies tera tower , a te 27 cents @ hundred time. An article on building sup- business concerns. Jt can be of 
ste Chie tai + 20 ‘. on v4 “e 40% Reyes Met pf 2% = ' | plies gave me ideas on remodeling _ priceless benefit to ambitious young 
iy #10 ame Sey Te 5 38 = me) = my —_ and showed me how to men. 
save The Wall Street Journal is the 
287% " : 
Articles on food and clothing complete busi DAILY. Has 
1.10% Pp ness . 
2.14% point out the things to stock Qp largest staff of writers on business 
; A on in order to save money. Articles and finance. The only business paper 
| on taxes guide me on what to do served by all four big press associa- 
: om v2, to keep my taxes down. 
139% The Journal also gives me a bet- 
1.43% ter understanding of what is going three months for $6. Just tear out 
on in the world. In conversation this ad and attach check for $6 and 
with other men I find that I know mail. Or tell us to bill you. wr ts 


Address: The Wall Street Journal, 44 Broad Street, New York 4, N. Y. 


332% 


Starrett. .§ 1% 
Stauff Ch 1.800 


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34% 8; da 
T3% Piege! & ie 
18% Bitter Ce 1.208 
1 ese Ant Ste ‘4 
7'% Feb Fultee 1% 57 
79% Peck GEE sew 1.88 87 
7? 3 Beck Spt n 

‘fete “8  ? 


. ~~. = 
ckuoesd.t2?=. 


Tetede E¢ 
Si%< Owees tf! 6! 7% . a —_ = 
330 Oxford Pap 1.802 ‘y 19%9 Royal 
Sv *Oxt Pas of 5 3 . ' »4 1 Treesemer | 480 
4 ” 


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Ueyiite *s Ye Wyse Wer .e 
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7% Yale & Tew 1) 
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» * 
e199) 141% 1? =6Tenith Bad te 4 es) 8611+ & 
‘ Vert 


" o wedge tee shores of soles ie tell 
rte % Retes of Gividends im the foregeing table are annas! dis Maryland Tobacco 
based os the last quarterly of semi- UPPER MARLBORO. Md. July 
u 
etherwise ected, specisl o entre oot erades of southern Maryland 


~ B0id ae steady to Tices 
ples = steck this "week 0 i. 
idend 


SEusssessecsesusze2t.Sux 
- 


_ — 

r the balance of the 
ecera)-@Gtate Market News 
: {f the se@ies was 


eek ending July 6 
of four sales days. amounted 
‘ “a met pounds 


hun 
te is steck/#1.95 ender 

g volume was sround 50.000 pounds 
ing Jighter. The markets wert qpened on July 

Veit BP . Pr 4 in observance of the hoa! 

a e _ . tion ae aver 

Welt €! Coal 7 2644+! o—Ex rights. : ounds on snrarates pe of repre- 
pal Uet tog & F OM 14+ “eo we—Whee = distribeted. issued. o6-—Wext G27 sentative v S. grades were as follows 
, elt freit 3 St\+ % a - Changes 
Hn Sienete 3 on Ue Gas Ce 1% 36 +1 ete best ow fecetvership of being reer. endin — 7 
45% Simmons 1.400 % _Us Ges im ? 37% genized wader the reptcy Act, of securities spsemed rede ” Uv , Previous 
1% Petrol Ce 308 18" ' 1h’e+ “es The SSM Simonds § 1.800 1% 74% T8%e+T% Tp The Volt ted Ce 3G t« by suck companies. ~~ wees 


usakuss 


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31% 
1% 
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169 
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3% 
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Heavy -Crep 
Wood cherry-red Bar 


Pair cherry-red 
‘Low cerry-red 


Over-the-Counter Current Prices on Mutual Funds  ®e::~ 


OW greenish 

« Low ted 

ewing es 6were §«sttgines? from Merchants Traesier & Storage pid . rep 
mn. = members of the Wetions! Associ. | Metre tes . KEW YORK, July © (AP)—(Natl Asse.\Gromp See Cap Grit } Mass lev 1 Ge ved. cherry. red 
tien of Secerities Dealers. They are intended Mourt Vernon Mortgage Corp Securities Dealers, tec.) mess ine M6 boy old ly red 

Os 8 guide te the approrimete range within Maensey Trest Co 15) vow red Cc! 0 . 
which these secerities could have been bought National Metropolitan Bank Affiliated Fe ‘ 2 +>" ' " ® 3-15 TON 
air , 


or sold at the time of thelr compilation an WNetiens! Press Be ding common cherry-red 
july 6. Old Dominion Bank 4\> com pr ptd ® FLOOR OR CEILING MOUNTED 
© AIR OR WATER COOLED 


BONDS O'd Deminion Bart commen 
B4 Asked Pepsi Cola Settling Leng island 
. Pepsi Cole Betti Washiogtes 
Fesorel Storage 3/67 63 a Persona! iadaustrial Bashers ents 


Haydock § fund 
Persenal tedest Bankers 7% pfd aye 


“enw & @& 


* 65 ‘ | 
nm Commodity Index | WE SELL & SERVICE DIRECT TO THE CONSUMER 


15 Security Sank bd en tay a .- 8 — Rw ae | 7 #—The Associated Press | 


2/6? 
Shirlington Trest Ce Pa] lavesimest Ce : ’ smportont : 
euth 0 a = Southern Oxyges Ce i lavest Tr Gest oe 1.0%, waned ter 
aw. State Levee & Fimence C! A com s] Jehastee = Mut , i 
~~ ys — SF. sed yb State Lear aM Ft ¢ aa Keystone Cust 1% ; | 
STOCKS jiate Lose “| Timeece §* : Keystese Cust M4 
5 


Tews (Enterprises lwesteck, graies . BRICK A BUILDING SUPPLY co. 
med and Ges- Heating Air Conditioning Division 


= Second National Bank 1 lacere laceme 


\mericas Fire leserance : Keystone Cost 
een ~, Washingtes Gasebell Clad . Textiles dect 
muarteae Mereary leserence Washington Medica! Boviding Corp 169 ee 13,25 “Ores metals Dit s new lew fer the 


macestia Nationa! Bank , Kcystene - 
a a 0.33 \s5 commetition _ m a P 1355 LEE HIGHWAY, ROSSLYN, VA. 


leek oof ee 
12.85 industriats 


Vr . 
eat Virgio Berkshire Hathaway tovest Neystone 5.14 Feed 
spital Films : Canadian Seserier Oi! de Verh Mat Fa Keystone 11.43 Livestect ee 
eatral Mutual ‘Telephere Ceatral Maime Power Deleware Fund Keystone 12.35 Graves & cottes 1 8 


‘itizess Bak of Mary\and ? Deihi Tayler Oi! f Divers Grih Sth Feystene ’ 17.70 Textile Call RE. 71-1234, ask for Circulation, and erder The Wash- 


1609 
First Besten Corp : “% Geers tavest fa Knickerbocker 717 Nenter meta! L pe 42 : ' Times ald aranteed home 
Gec Service Ce 3 Dewidend Sars Lexieetes Tr : soe see) 6} ew 1956 lew aoe Post and Her gu delivery. 
tr T -- a ——$—— 


leterstate Moter Freight ‘“e Oreyfes Fea 
jack & Weiets tatitew Bal 
Stee! commen ta & Hew St Welliectes Fe 


l 
: ond 
es it 3 eto ee FOR ASSURED INCOME NOW 
Seectiaeled Tile Ce pre ) Lithiem Cerg of America Fidelity Ae , 
easelidated Title Ce commen Lediew Mig & Sales ‘ Finan led Fa 


* >. > 
. New England Gas & Electric Founders Mut Fé — AND 
—_—— eee 7 Pacific Pewer ‘ Light Fundamertai lew - - - - a 
tA, 4 Securities old 11 Pioneer Wateral Gas Sas 0 6(ledest Fad | 
istrict Nations! Secerities com Public Service New Hampshire 


wont 2 Oo Mi | The Investment Bankers Association of America 
Suburban Prepare Gas a 


LSS 
Tease Gas Trassmissies For tives ‘ . 
Texas Eastera Treesmessies ecommends 


(hana ah a Over 100 Producing Wells... {ji gp 

= See oe AVINGS BONDS, SERIES H 
First Nations! Bask Seuthers Md 27 united Utilities Diversified Oil & Mining Corporation © ° f 

pevernmen ; 


Geveramant Cmpleyess Crs a 2 New York Cotton . , .. Your interest checks are delivered every six 


Grittith Censemers Corp commen 17 NEW YORK iy 7 Cott wm prices « Large rimary and secondary oil reserves 

set a. 5, ' De . wy s--—, —* P ’ ‘ -~ months by mail. 

merty Less Corp =~ » e Friday, active futt © $1,100,000 estimated income o 

oe tees the we % © -H5t> change raneed from 81.10 0 bale lower income on present . Guaranteed 3% interest when held to maturity 


2 rodue : 
Menace: ‘eat commen” "ty | fhe intotat net satan reonred ree | (? years, 8 months). 


Moavtacturers Creat pte ovement @as sh mB by the distant “Plus DOM is selling its oi! to the Texas Com s 
. : eee ou to pany, Mandard Oil, 
Merchants Traester & Storage com Phillips Petroleam, Continental Oil, Bep Paselaum end Cone . May be redeemed at full face value after: 6 


| Service. months from issue date on 1 month's written 
We feel it would he to your financial advantage to learn more notice. 
shout the potential growth opportunities hased on DOM’s 
reserves. We'll be happy te send you latest lacts on DOM. i i " " 


set Bhd deans Holy .» Available in convenient denominations—$500, 


| $1,000, $5,000 and $10,000. 
Mai Mr. S y , 
SAFETY Se ee Your investment broker or dealer will be glad 


611 Warner Bldg., Wash. 4, D. C. REpublic 7.3589 | to assist you in the purchase of Series H Bonds 


i. | MeGrath Securities }}. Safety... iberal Yield... Guaranteed Current Income 


FEDER AL Members American Stock Exchange (Assoc) | This advertisement is sponsored by the following members of the 


70 Wall Street, N. Y. 5, N. YY. © WH. 40173 a> 
Investment Bankers Association of America 
SAVINGS Please send me information on Diversified Oi ; 
Auchincloss, Parker & Redpath Alex. Brown & Sons 


AND LOAN ASSOCIATION oy ¥ ky ae : Folger, Nolan, Fleming—W. 8. Hibbs & Co. 
| ae abe data ih daly eel es hes oo tin ein | tchaoat , wae: 
* . | . ' 
Libere! dividends credited semi-ennvelly 931 15th St. N.W. | des os . . . Jones, Kreeger & Hewitt 


201 PENNSYLVANIA AVE. SE. LI.3-1647 $ NA. 8-4131 at Merl Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Beane 
—————————— 


| Reuse, Brewer & Becker 
TESS EB EERE BeBe eee eee eee 


h \ ¥ ) 


- 


leek Of Marviend . American Marietta Ce : on eee 
leek of a Spring ‘ Bank of America WT & SA eystone 
ef moa 


“wee nana @ a 


—— 


inic «= Properties 
olomaia 


ACCOUNTS 
INSURED 
UP TO 
$10,000 


METROPOLIS 


Building Association 


ORGANIZED IN 1866 


By seving regulerly you ecquire independence end security 
Lump sum sevings ere else eccepted 


The Washington 


Times Berald 


Jost 


cs 


lassified Advert 


Ising 


415,000 


EVERY 


CIRCULATION 


FOR YOUR AD IN THE 
POST & TIMES HERALD 


SUNDAY. 


SECTION D 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
AND 


TIMES HERALD 
Local Rates 


and Potate 
wiata “i pies the District 
lumbia. 


The one-time rate. 60c¢ 
spplies on skip ade or rreeulat 
imimum ad is 


8 
The following nana are for oon- 
secutive insert 
i we 

time times 
LINES €0¢ 54 
1 S| 
Words Lines time times 
10 2 120 6326 
. : 1 80 +36 : 
240 «6 344 
RATE BEYOND RETAIL 
TRADING ZONE 
(50 mile radius of Washington) 
S3e¢ Liane 


7 
times 
eae 


‘Minimum 3 times) 


PHONE RE. 7-1234 


DEADLINES: 
SUNDAY EDITION: 10 P.M. Fri- 


day 
DATLY FDTTIONS: 456 PM 
preceding day 


EX”. -. 


cess 


bh —— SERVICE 


SUNDAY, JULY 8, 


1956 


PAGE D1 


PERSONALS 


. porches partition 


Dbulli-in cabinets Free 
& 


Biori Na—a' tthe 
orches ec = 
urn, F A fin 


— re 


carport . 
a est p! ans 


to. 8-62 4° 
4 types ome improvements 
aluminum lewuste ecreen: 
all work guaranteed free estimate 
Call DL. 7-555) : 
Asbestos Shingle Expert 
cares and email jobs. Free est 
Werk guaranterd. HE 4-1985 
CaMEBa ae an ims Anish 


rms 


A 


i-2$ 24 


General jo 
provements and stor 
die Howell, BRA. 6-9) 

. : 


pain ing 


 ) Dade a fe 
Basemen's 
_ ST 


si¢ewa a __ water 
anc out ‘er: 


ports O65 
riLrc Tit al weak ti censed 
bended Pr Georges Co. AP 


FENCES | 


fences awe 


ALASKA "FENCE CO 


. 33-384 OT. 4-7300, NA. 8-5885 


12 
1 


s adc “r a Patios 


rLoos SANDING and refinishing 
o. & -44 


. ext , Al 


le ‘me ) 
oor sancing 
net on rates 


paltyive ii R +4. i 


ic 


, ork 


t ONTINGT N De 
est BO) 5-64 


32 PAINTING — ii ' 
. 


pws 
| Atak ABB Ra ae general | 
; ams. AD. 4-1908 


AND PROPOSALS 
WILL BE REC 


fhe 7 A U D T ARA- 
BIAN GOVERN-|é 
MENT IS ACCEPT- 
ING BIDS FOR THE 
CONSTRUCTION 
OF A ROAD BE 
TWEEN ARAFAT 
AND TAIF, AP- 
PROXIMATELY 45 
MILES IN LENGTH 
SEALED BIDS WILL 
BE OPENED ON NO- |; 
VEMBER 4. 1956. 
SPECIFICA- 
TIONS AND PLANS 
AVAILABLE FOR 
$168 FROM THE 
SAUDI ARABIAN 
EMBASSY, WASH- 
INGTON, D. C. 
AUCTION SALES 


AL AtrCTION—» 
' streets I Cen” 


Lata S acres ft 
ré revise Ww 


*. * 
BUSINESS SERVICE 
as 


FREE ESTIMATES 
A COMPETENT 
GEN’L CONTRACTOR 


+ types home improvements 
and remodelins. additions. settica 
porches. rec. rms xitchens. Spe- 
cial prices anc ‘erm 
ALBER BOND 
Eves. JU. 8-0545 


erat lone. ches 
feretions. (porch 
77 


of 


sanipesen sewers sins : 


ouetes. rehes. 

food: all werk 
to so” Re 

4 “e 
Kitchen spec 
of cour or 
Lpee 


). modern - 
4 5 
2” gALee. 


verms 
Jo mer 


_ ; 
gat 6404 
oh toe guaranteed up 
12 rears on Workmanshio an 
~~ aterial. Phone for free estimate 
SFARS oe & 
a 


estima :.e 


— 


Fe 


ing. 


amt AD 
trimming: tots sheared Mr ¥- 
N 7 


— vate ofr Deel Pr n- 
a work aan all 3- 3928 after 6 
OPHOLETERY “CLEANING 
Recs. carpets cleaned i your 
home All work guar. TU. 2-5266 
WINDOW. wall flogr cleen sand. 


$F boos! 


bd 
MA te ae Prt Lows 
UDIOS Newest Health ethods 
st ACE STERIL m= 


Lr 7 


New Jersey Ave 


2810 


n med 


naie Duffs 


D 13226 

. MM WH 

’ mans bdiloca, " olpp 

hep tical case. Rew. HE. 4-195) 
ou Cts 7 <i wih saD- 

. Rews EM. >-2497 
fein “ChinrAHUA 
ck 


ct ne 
$2159 Reward 


obalt b. ue. banded Ris 
Fast 


vicious but 


Masonic card 


wenbixc: BANS. 
Yer ° jlamonas vic Dixie 
P ¢. rd rew WA 
WEist WATCH —Lodics Hamilton 
Thurs. Pp. m awa! RA 3-72770 
10A 
biac« 
age 


” ee = whi ie ‘and 


> oe 


TERRIER—Male. sma 
1950 rebies anc te 
ae 2-6 


banded 
90 


room 


eee 


vacancies €006 
conval. persons 


Re- 


"hams 
; . 7 


Nt BSING 
iu. Pa S 


VOCATION at THN BELING 


or 


preparec 
appointment 
On 
SERVICES. toad Conn. ave. 
7-$159._ 


singing course ‘8 wk 
with well known ashington voice 
te er ir j- 


ated at ‘the foothilis of a beautiful 

mountain where your loved one 
ts the very best of care ; 

and day 24-hour 

Mix cream sand t 

Guermeer cows. tresh coun stry egrs 


“sr. 3- 73920 
Ww 


ABLE bring them te 

= ve no Seprensce t® make them fit 
‘y ae remode! 
pa a : a shoes ane + New 


7-437 > 
* deliver. 


o 
t. 


PROVE | ine 


ed. PERSONAL rv 
, a’ 


JAP BEETLES | 


GR. 3-5682 
HA. 2-9521, 9 to 6 
Univ. of w acricult ure! 


offering compe peertle 
CONT HOL PROGRAM 


“Fede. sute 
a 60 6Uheome, 


0340 
woulp LIKE GLOuRD “MAN with 
e ts ive ridine eeens 
> .196) 


MOTOR TRAVEL 


atsPONSTBLE r 1. 
“can Mo 4- 3 


lull? 


Ra! 


ARTICLES FOR SALE 


— ect 


1T! 


cracus's . 
SPRAY | 


: 


> | 


—_—_—_—_—_—_—— : 
aC CORDIAN—White Rijs 120 
base. Fine cond. Reas 4-732 


el *~ 
LL 4-2) ~.—_ 
portetie. Vic- 
~*>. 
| 


Tg i i ae 
Alteration Sale’ 


Must D of © 

ntire ~ k 
REDUCTIONS UP 30% 
All Nationally Adw Brands 
4 Ton Emerson (208 Volts) 


PRICE $358.95 


spose 
> 


Dt 70% 


; 


- 
iat 


OUR PRICE. 3179 BICTCLE—Bor's 


RMS A 


“ALPERSTEIN'S 


Mon 
ATR. CONDITIONER. 
Must Sell! Must Sell! 


C\esing out en 


; operation os 
4422 
Ate os —— — 2 vrs 
Br & Arey 
Sas. “ener — ave :~ > J 
iuTsGUG8-—Come im anc see Bhat 
you curing BEL) 
HINES 
b= 


ANTIQUES What | si" 
EE PEDLAR prot des at 

s your sochesbenk! 
¢ iscrim! mately } 


Open Sun : 
ANTIQUES 


shops filled 


rane 
WiLTER REED 1. a 


6640 OGCceorgm Ave 


aNTiat s—3. piece Vict 
; nu Lj ay fal 
ion of an 
: C 
his lave. Pai 
signed ‘ok. ¢ 
Th rH ® cou bh A 
e co apes 


{oor 
aenticove 


nD 


pressure cooker 


rt “aa. 
BABY “CRIB av ike 


Guaranteed Lowest ag 
INN VIRGI 
CRIB AND + 
$ 38. Thayer o6 86 
Chilerens 823.47 
with Be notary wee 
New and Guar. 


” BABY LOWN 


tha Ts. _ ue .Y 
“BABY FURNITI 
neg No ab oy 


jo« 


ALL 
Cc HANDISE ‘PRICED LOW — NOT) 


tsied ee CO. 


355 Cecar &t 
BABY FURNITURE 
AND TOY SUPERMART 
“SAVE 30-60% 


“LOWER PRICES 
- aaa 
7457-61 18TH ST nw 
‘one mite Ambas sacor The eater’ 


Ope mn Eves Mon Theres and Pri 


PARADISE 


hildren’s Supermart 
Sth and K sTs. ww 

(Oop. Center Market. DI 7-3421) 

Open Mon... Thurs. Pri eves, . ey 

MPLE PARKING ee 

we wd. $25: studio couch si5: 

rid 815 rat $35 venter $19. 


Wheaten 
BED— “Hollywood. single, foam mat- at 
tress. box springs, rollers >: 
lows slip covers: almest sew 8100 

JA 53-3675, eves 
i -. 4-poster, 
ae matte a mates 


Bhoppine Cen er 
LO. 4-6800 


4-D 
tein pry 
we 


mahog 
ches’ 


or credit 
fieen 


girls. ie-inchs, —" 


Adit ree F 
3c. $2007. 


| 


TAR. | 
ee | 
Reur 


sal | Geeey a ae eas sal 


| J* e-iaie 
cask. 


Spoc. 
castmaster. priced Rvs 


: 
’ 


| ont cone, Tes 


Fas ~~ 


BABIES’ DISCOUNT at a ee 


The Trend Is To The Paper 
That Produces Best Results 


Again, during June of this year, Washingtonians 
showed their overwhelming preference for Washing- 


ton Post agd Times Herald want ads. 


They placed 


11,652 more lines of want ads in The Washingwa 
Post and Times Herald last month than during June, 


1955. At the same time. the other 


?<day paper los 


78,514 limes, and the 3rd paper lost 28,368 lines. 


Because they get quicker and better resules, Washing- 
tontans continue to place more and more want ads in 


The Washington Post and Times Herald. 


Your want ad in The Washington Post and Times 


Herald reaches 382,000 families daily. 


415000 tami- 


hes on Sundays—over 127000 more families daily 


and 128,000 more families on Sundays than i 


reach through any other peper im town 


could 


Phone REpublic 7-1234 
To Place Your Want Ad 


© A 
too: sollte mahec 


“ARTICLES FOR SALE ARTICLES FOR SALE 12 


ARTICLES FOR SALE 


28-epch FURNITURE 

and whi NEW FINE QUALITY 
FURNITURE 

At Warehouse Prices 


GUARANTEED SAVINGS 
OF 20% TO 70% 
Be Sure to Show Us 


Before You Buy 


i ® cha) 
5562 Oakmont sve Bethesda 


our? cosine anc craiier ‘ss KI 
“S wie —EE iS 
Building Materials 
MARTINQUE HOTEL 


Look at These Bargains 
$440 VALUE 


217 
Job Phone AD. 4.7776 
Saremen oe Be 
ALL MATERIALS 
FOR SALE 
AT REASONABLE PRICES 
ACE WRECKING CO 


LD 4-0500 


$249.85 Complete 


$3 oe at ce 
Me 


bet. compiete wid 
raxce soe 55 


“ yur 
beetfbeert and 


a 
SITS ow 
Cen a.ne 


3S VALLE 
Ret 


BURLAP (NEW) | Satect ies" cktth san take 
Per paving contrecters. comstrec- oe a r 
comtrecters ena other users 


Great Rapids Furn. Co. 


t 
or The Beresiea Steere of Waehinctien 


8 ore 
— 
must saocriice. DU | ones Stadion 


Look What You Can Get For 
18 PIECES 
ps. t¥ | Brand- New Furniture 


ee 
IVING AM. SUITE 


NO MONEY DOWN 
EASY PAYMENTS 


- 
’ -2- dec biscx = 
anc white :weed uphol Good ceneé 


inte tet. sora 
409 te 1e 


SrEcialL 
se BQILYWOOO SEDs ss 


Sn ===! SAM BROWN’S 


ie 
or . carat | solitaire. | “Fine! 


. 
_ 


| Le. «4 
. ~~ Opes Deils ti & SGaeterdar 


FURNITURE _ 


13009 A, LA 


lems cm cule. 
ee 


. tor youn 
starting bis oct Neecs 
os. J 4-420 
Gr. GE. exo ceed 

wit $ 


Very reas. price. or 
.« 


érummer 
ene hesd 


FURNITURE MART 


es 


FURNITURE 


Your Signature Is Worth 
3 COMPLETE ROOMS 


$219.95 
NO MONEY DOWN 


Eaw Terns, Free Det 


28 
xO 


— 
tr .4 


specia. 


HERES WHAT YOU Get 


° 
carTits §-rrer 
ce- 


oe 5 wks 
wil heve sterilized acd 
- ext 


¢-easer ; 
ef srawere ésubio-<ciee sed. pilus 
Racwn etc 


D-erte 
A wpoders $-ooece eet set 
Deal Direct With Pat Regal 
No Finance or Lost 
Comparves lewolved . 
SE CATER TO SFR VICEME 
You Get bermmediste Credit 
Aocrowai and Del very 


REGAL 


4600 Wisconsin Ave. NW. 
Wo. 6-6534 


a5 — ar __ FURNITURE SALE Clothing SF Furniture Co 


puemendous taniees 62 heneé-Gen-) LUCEY 731 


Gere roam | 


FURNITURE 


BRAND-NEW 


‘7 


I*xCLODD WITe THE 
PURCHASE OF 


room 


Living Room Suite 


2, oe 
——e 6a! 


FREE” DINETTE 


be 
* 


BLES 


aArINTID RE 
Derive Op te the Deer of the 
Gp sToxe 
Re near Preece 
@Geurtewn Wash 
> &£ San 
ravtera <over- 
= 


23 Az@eepcr!s 
Crest «' 


era 
‘7 <¢demaced worntinn 
ir ave Tokens PF Park. 


sma. sowe: tenis ani Motors 


a8 canvas © > 
werth gdouble HARE 
La “. oe 
‘ 
enanes_ + Bp esuD 


x= 
opt reee 5 =, cl 


*"? 
oe Deees. Fuss. TaA- 


: KARD 4 
c ee BE 


OFFICE 
FURNITURE 


Reconditioned 


DESKS——-$1250 UP 
CHAIRS—$3.00 UP 


Bookcases, sofas, storage 
cabinets, filing cabinets, 
card tiles, and many 
other items 


arcirecs 4g --- Shey, ark Most Inter- 


Oem amis! _ maec => oa. “—_ 


SELLING OUT 


MUST VACATE So Rie 


var 
a 


; 


hahaha 
: 


Fa) 
> 
Ps] 


EASTERN FURN.CO. 
309 H ST. NE 
(MIDOLE OF png 
OPEN EVEN! — Ti. 
SATURDAYS “Ti 6 30 


Easy Te ree Delwery 
SWANK  FURN. 
1715 # ST. NE. 

_U +5700 


: 


esting Display of New and 
“Used Office Furniture 


FREE DELIVERY 
BUSINESS FURNITURE 
SALES 
ME_ 8-1586 


Arlington 
OKO } an 
Silver Sering ‘phone 
Suburben stores open 


Georgia save 
sU 
Sa’ urdays Park i 


~LD@5) 
ani 


Used spimeta. $195 and up 
63295 Over 100 pianos 
fro 


¢ st the LANO 
MART. i015 7h , i ust 
above the Li brary? OPEN THURS 
Saturdays unt. Sept 


PIANO Baldwin Acrosonic 
eny. A-l condition a ed 
Budge ter 

ELL. MUSIC “CO. 


‘a 
“2 } 


PTANea—Badry Grand 
mehe.. tar cond $100. JV 
PIANOS —- Used small, modern grands 


THURS EVES Closed Saturdays 
_wntll Septembe 
riaNos— Recon¢ 


it a 


felt 
PIANO—Spinet. dik. 
: 


anc Marine personne: 
ead District w~ yt 
7 on 


nds of mm 
ar " PIANG MART 
Ww j ine 


heaaline Gace, st 1-600 PLANO 
T 10) & 


; wat 


OPEN THURS 
unti) pt 


sae. brand 


= csr sre ot Utteeet 
cat omp : 


ARTICLES FOR SALE 


q up: man 
Brown $08 uw 


n 5‘ & 
abies. $25 up “Your cheice on 
nek. Pree home 


mains 


vlec.. 
carria * Bargain at $90 
J. ABRAMS, 124 L et. ne. RE. 7- 
hohe - 
TYPEWRITERS — 
r Pa. 


rac = 


9 


geney's 


910 
NT HOUSE, S101 


A 
Good ¢ 
w ASHING MACHINE _- wie ama 
s arin er. . tome 
auto » ¢. 


hs a Ae : . Easy Whirldry. 
a 
Wiring. 6 e 


WASHER —Avtomaile Bendix. excel- 
lent ¢ $55 of beet ‘olier. 


S s —Good ad 
39.95 wu ge “Some & ute 
ope_t 
aie type mith pam amp. 
Excel. cond $35 dei PO 25 
WW ASHER. Kenmore writeer ty 
with pump and = om 
AD. 2-3 


orlp er type: 7 yrs. 


wile 
bed 


A must sacrifice BDli- 
ances h irs dr r. 
4 ing ou 

heuseboid furn. and russ. RA. 

ale model TI” - 
son at yy + roses or air tr 
— 0a ont ’ 
che also) articles 

crai vem nip in trers wood and 

clot comme. ” DE 


WAR SURPLUS” 
10.000 BARGAINS 


MAN SAWS. $2.50; PI 
Ll; Fk 


‘TOR 
" TARPAULINS 


450; DROP- 
oxi? 


duke 43 
J. H. GICHNER 


ased 
| 2513 M st 
win- ARTICLES ANTES 3 


im, > idder. 
6th 

x Sided 

new. 

—< eon 


aus* 


cond!i- 


tic 


ned - 


—— lent 


4jaeran * | Year 
50 

PEERLESS SALES CO 

sia Ave 3 


“97 cases. reach-ine 
werehour ® reas. oer 


sme seltvered 
; vt 
Stewart 
stove Arcola heater all 
° ofier 
' : Li 
cone.tien 
> TOR — 850 
S10. aood cond. Cail 
Bardia —ii-cu 


vv. 


‘la " 
oil 
x© 


‘Bervel 


revolving 
Practical 


riz res 
SPARKLING LIKE NEW 
2-YEAR GUARANTEE 
UNIVERSE co 
New i car sew and larger store et 
ee AV nw 
e822 
SI9LE Reminctor 2 calmer mode! 
“i gee meester > GeEes amime 
<) ma) G — kar 
Maze You Went a Discount Pri 
“oq money Gove . te 36 mont hs 


te Par gar < oe 
LEVENTHAL & NITORE. co 
> 200n 


RUGS. 


SAVE 20-50% 
Raom Sere of Wall-to-Wall 
ANY FABRIC—ANY COLOR 


Factory Outlet 


be 3- 
Tues 
atGs — Orients! 


forward send 
Ovaraentee 


round bobbin. seve 


reverse attactd 


aer 

samp es and demons’ t\rators: 
uarantee 

“Cx! 
Silver Spring 
ley Shop Ctr. 
ladensburg 
‘ente 

See's k Ave Rocky . Me 

. 22-4756 i 
Savi — Giattable rec. room. $i5 
a* = wo-piece sectional! frieze 


an 


wu 
Chae. $10 Call "Ho ° 
Wei] 3 reeular 
vane <combination. hesvy 
uminem. custem made 
oD terms. Li 


~ 
(hermes. oven 
; 


duty vacusm - mw, > ce chai rs 


MARILYN'S 


Guar. re gh 4418 
-i, Motorola, | 


guar) 
AD. 4 


: 


eum | ar 
Cent conditions ies "ell $200 


ANTIQUES 


© 1 your valuable 


ANTIQUES 


AND 


Furniture 


WANTED 


JA. 8-9630 
JA. 35-8814 


TOP CASH PRICES PAID 
WE BUY EVERYTHING 
ONE (TEM OR ENTIRE ESTATE 


SILV FURNITUR 
GUNS Tse. § 

PIANOS. COI 
ETC 
ALSO DEALERS’ STOCK 


FLEA MARKET 


200 LEE HWY. ARL.. VA 


t=| JA. 8-9630 


fine 


cubeavasined T chers. 
1418 Wis ave 


st 9 - 
| need refrigeraiors if ranace an 


tal gold. platinum 
ry. We cask. 


MAGAZINES 
70c PER 100 LBS. 


CAST IRON 
$1.50 PER 100 LBS. 


WASH RAG & BAG CO 
215 L &. SW. DIL. 7-600T 


Brine your 4 
Giscardea jewe 


ti} 


aii Kl 


__ en Ever 
Piano—Please 
-Por 


504. 


‘LEARN TO DRIVE IN 
AIRLINES 
AIR TRAVEL AGENCIES 
NEED 


Cor. i2tm — 6 


1o- ; 
leensed itnatr “Brenine class Jul 
73. Grantham Gchool. 821 19tm 


2514. 

Fae a class” elec tromics. radit, 
32-7783 
“siey 


a3 
4 . "pret 
ade and exciting me Bg 

ee 


ists at 


PROT dl FNCTIRW— Wetter con- 


and persone! os itive 


Cult 4 ~! sell. rove- 
LINOTYPE ObERATING 


$essons oF teacher" 
GET BROOKLET WO. 18 
™ Y. Mergenthaier Linotrpe Be 
ddbeus ¥witwiee 2 
uty ou 
; ~ ny taught approved 
, Bes 


hy "Sot tat 


weed’ tor Game 
pursing. white or -y% 
wecent hom 


doctors = 
vate duty: exce 
t classes. & 


ree Dookie 
4 #: ona civgie. “J 
Victor 


sae 
Get a Better — 


a) yam Mona, wom and Typing 
SPEEDWRITING 


i INS x WEE KS" 


ees in | ae 
(| ELECTRONIC SALESMEN WANTED 
TECHNICIANS Both New and Used Cars 


SALES EXPERIENCE PREFERRED 


Unusual opportunity to join staff of long-established 
dealer. Excellent commission with guarantee. Ex- 
cellent prospects for the right men. 


! Be Agere FOR FULL DETAILS, CONTACT: 
MISSILE TEST} Scr" : JERRY SLAGLE 

PROJECT IN , Bendall Motor Sales, Inc. 
We there =o emusually experience level 


METHODS | Se comgs gute oun | a) DIGITAL COMPUTERS | FLORIDA 162s wears STREET 


degree © sccounhng . 
San saad oat fear se | Se : Phone Overlook 3-1600 


Please Apoly 9 A. M. to 3 P. M. 


Commannatne Boren | UNIVERSITY | ELECTRONIC SPECIALIST 


LABORATORY 


Opmcy Engineers 
, STANDARDS AND 
ranula Ogun “Siver Song, Md SPECIFICATION SECTION 


Opeo-Mechanical Engineers . 9-7700 
a Must be able to read and interpret sche- 
. Feld Engineers sEcInEEns matics, blueprints and know electronic 
Rader Technicians CONTROL SYSTEMS components. Knowledge of military speci- 
) Corermurmcamors Techno fications desirable. 
: ans lop- } 
Cetashane Veshuisions a Deve Salary based on length of previous ex- 
| Aircraft peechete perrence. 
| INTERVIEWS 


Also interesting assignments | 9 to 3—MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY 
=» Galerme telends for Tech | this » 


ae towns | MARYLAND ELECTRONIC 
| mmat Opvrnenten ,| MANUFACTURING CORP. 


eee ? 5009 Calvert Road, College Park, Md. 
WA. 7-9200 


i 
i 
; 


th 


: 
: 


i 
y 
: 
; 


| 
i 
tH 


ies 
= 


2 


Marrematic ans 


FOR PERSONAL INTERVIEW 
IN WASHINGTON 


aT Oe 7-000 meaross | R & D Talent 


or « . pore a | 
RALLY 11 eo 12 TESTING Requiring Advanced Skills in 

2PM wer mM paps Science and Engineering 

’ cn BL =s CR tree. ge 
4 7-921 BEE TI oo | a en <i eur et | aSbotarde: ng tage Orannegs Dt Tag weet ger tpn yo 4 iis cual 
=~ L ° w or va 
See See ABBEY First é A pate Sees FEC a | | of dren ages J GAS Notna tathareurd end Wherest te high-tembeniets 
a oe a | a ome a a : RCA Service Co., Inc. Sam’ iiss a gaseous reaction kinetics for unclassified fundamental 
* $0 rer os roniteer : 


P.O. Geox 1226, Melbourne Fle.) sone = ony SE - euiiteen ot flame-kinetic investigations designed to reveal mechanisms 
ADVERTISING 


">. om ss "Bes : bee! a of fame ae hina of results 
COPYWRITER | Engineer-Electronics | ‘* *owser® 
Du can produce vigorous o oF : THIN ELECTRON Outstanding Oppty. As | PHYSICAL SCIENTISTS 
~ | phe nat Instructor MS. in neonate « demied cemaeing sore fe 


transfer and differential equations fo theoretical studies 
in interior ballistics, heat transfer, and dynamic systems. 


Soe | = ‘ B.S. or MS. in physics, or mechanical engineering, good 
iti nal : : . : g - ; theoretical background in thermodynamics, basic physics, 
a. eee a | " OCLE : L DEORE electronics for mechanical design of special apparatus and 
: Advertsing Office, 4th Ficor = . . Th Back experimental studies in gun development. 


: metitutiens) . ' : 7¢ ’ 2 
LANSBURGH’S | Sin: See | : . ee DEVELOPMENT CHEMISTS 
; EXCELLENT SALARY 8. S. to PH.D. with 2-6 years’ Ss tor laboratory 


: techniques. Familiarity with resins desirable. 
i2s10 icfioem Devis Mghray FEDERAL CHEMICAL ENGINEER 


: WEDNESDA BS. in chemical engineering with up 

Fe OATS S23 73 an Me | | | : cE. DOSS i ig 4 ence. To assist superintendent of field 

o iiZe | : | containing solid propellant-rocket and 
velopment facilities. 


PROJECT ASSISTANTS 
LaARY | : To conduct design and development investigations on rocket 
Seen ) : “oy components and solid propellants. Recent graduate chemi- 
“aa aCCOUCN ANTS : ‘ , cal, mechanical engineers or chemists, with up to 2 years’ 
ARL METON. ALEX _ANNETTE D experience. : 


FAIRFAX FALLS CH. ' , cue SALES MAR —Br~ ser | | in the following fields. 
mee . hae commis: = ts t ; . 


—-=_ a 


inM anole . 


rein 


Please send deta led resume of experience, education, 
protessiona: references and salary requirements. 


Sheet Metal Layout Call Ki. 9-7500 for appointment 


Machine Parts Inspection Atlantic Research Corp. 
901 North Columbus Street 
Instrurnent Assembly Alexandria, Virginia 


POTOMAC EMP. 
ie 


| 
kanowat siecTeic | GENERAL ELECTRIC UNVEILS MELPAR INC. ENGINEERS 
PAS a dy New T-58 Turboshaft Engine 1311 South Fern St. gi 


Select 
; ; : of Defense to build the BART Sar SATELLITE 
Bay eS sadite INTERCONTINENTAL BALLISTIC 
ny offers chal- 
(T bik. off Jefferson Davis Hwy. lenging opportunities on these exciting proj- 
Route | at South P5th St.) = persons with training in the following 
ie 


s AERODYNAMICS NUCLEAR 


| 
ING 2SSiQrmets GaSe > cms of ability at the Small Air- ENGINEERS aan * REACTOR DESION 
cratt Engme Department! of GE ) CONTROL sYSTEMsS 

Tre Enoreerny Gert @ he Sra! 4uccaft Ex~gere Oe- | And 


Jarret Dil vor wee—ar 
PUBLIC FINANCE CORP. 


3233 Rede ited Ave “nar mes SUPPORTING PERSONNEL | STRUCTURES _ ELECTRONICS 
cA, =) , overeue 


. fhght semuleters, machine tools, elec: 
Ge~wvces We also marta this equipment 


SERVO and , 
There i& @ particular need for sume INSTRUMENTATION MECHANICAL 
who tke fo get out and do things 
-seasored cid tireer will find excellent 
= well, 

At present our needs are for... 

OPERATIONS ANALYSIS 

werner nF eel gmeweens hae soho om AERODYNAMICISTS FEN S Cters 

DIGITAL PROGRAMMERS state <0 Sienb: gun eat siameidili: daditartiae 


wth oman aiiity = te Sinng oom ELECTRONIC ENGINEERS ee en eee 
@ Mechanca! Desgr , © Aeadyramcs 
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS WASHINGTON INTERVIEWS 


® Combos Desgn ani | 
Ana\yss 
| | MECHANICAL DESIGNE 
| | os JULY 10, 11 and 12 
CA Phone Mr. David Trott on 
TALOGERS 4 at EXecutive 3.58688 semnine 


DESIGN DRAFTSMEN 
from 10 A.M. to 8 PLM. to arrange an 


a 


All ries will be 
INTERVIEWS 9 A.M.-3 P.M. ushte $0 content wo Wh ots amma 
Cees wee comamerr att) Gerveres Cerctrec 5 tu! 7 
Fetert Par to rer | Thr Frida 
| Poor ser pemmuare sue act corer saree ) tenance Aides, se ite 4 PROFESSIONAL EMPLOYMENT 
EMPLOYERS PAY FEE | ES ess -- Shcsen vattin: Ben enitiiilinen On | Other Times by Appointment 
=e? aad | OFFICE 


Zosrriome | Svs pa wr. 7.5 cS | 
see we Sone ; : SMALL AIRCRAFT ENGINE DEPARTMENT | ERCO DIVISION MARTIN 
"ed Root a Po WD" Sree == GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. ACF INDUSTRIES, INCORP. 
Be pane Nowe @s | Riverdele, Md ase WA TOO 


BALTIMORE 3, Maryland 


See i) ae , 


ee Pe ee a ee a A A nce ea eae: a, ie. A ey, i I ee EE EE ER, HP om Oe OO Oe 


p 


382,000 


Engineers ENGINEER 

Daily white . . mR. | 1830 

Circu Would You Li Bena rete JA) nora oX EXCELLENT SALARY So a oreo 
irculation ould You Like learning With potential, earnings) EXPERIENCE UNNECESSARY NERS 


ENGINE OVERHAUL Inspecror) S<o*S'e. “ie, ICK ADVANCE TO 
ope your sec-) QU MGR. a | 
means quicker sales results LOS “ANGELES SAUDI ARABIAN AIRLINES | gales work” Por interview call Mr. fornia. Kitchens offer you i. Vernon svt. Alex. 


ce a c 
4 opportun! this 
for Washington Post and _ se ih, Ok dite init inthe temtatnne Ene — iife , #,. executive UBLI LA J 


A 
Health . Under 
Times Herald clamitied o@ | CALIFORNIA | Sremestsice. rift ot uses tise Seat, Min ant Be 
: ORED—For apt rty | . : 
& in COL e, ich extend from coast te coast Atisnte, | 40.96 


; Hyattsville =, te 
vertisers. To place ad wnt thee : *| drinker and steady worker sthould | 
your ositi is } ed ‘ : 


be able to make minor repairs in- Mr. Desher ; , REC 
| Siting, mer | eledine some vetetian blind work | COPPER SKILLET wi de Assoc ; skilled tn Drest 
Phone NORTH ROP ; g : Housing | ryatem. i bedym apt a and good | 1234 CONN. AVE. NW riety ie ie ES 
| oo : ont sal ; m - : 
REpublic 7-] 234 | Now Offers Career | immediate! weioay» tor. femiti ies.| 29-40 ; tem | MEN, COLORED ; 
ren 9 and 10.30 s. m.| 


HELP, MEN 15) ? 8 HELP, MEN | WELP. sere 15) THE ' WASHINCTON POST aed TIMES HERALD 
— gL. Sunday, July &, 1956 D3 


Mt 


: 


Hi 


: 


i 


i. 


a8 
: 
’ 


1" a 


and 


ENGINEERING | Development 
Apply In Person 


BLL NOT REGU | | rea rill te ou hes - z . 
TECHNICIANS | 7 nee | onnar ee oe od, 
G Analytical Bie Pon Apeiedied ar) MONOAT Tune rue | Sermo prnon i Pie Pe “ENGINEERS — — SCIENT ISTS 
Desiring to Achieve a ENGINEERS ce at | INSTRUMENT CO. | L ECTATE— A ree ee TES 
N MELPAR, INC. | 8030 Georgia Ave. | ter to supervise “collections “nd IES TO $22,000 
General Motors) 2%: ONLEDOR sont. | Siiver Springs, Ma atte | E a aes : 
AERONAUTICAL | gpCase| 43 ROUTE ween ee pelican! has real cstate man-| Selig. Tek tosthbrushes Secure A Professional Position 
Ca reer : PAINTERS \ fits and benus plans . be | A p : 
| MECHANICAL MEN ex th [D BEN 5 ape #2 N L svP- | Perm. posit a yA immed « ety Brg aes ag a Te Washington” ri rofessiona! Manner 
Beg ning Wit | | roe ‘ abronet MENT aT ay (Take Arnold 2v pee from 11th eee et REFRIGERATION f i-- — A FREE 
BLES HRN = a, Cg ae Sas bere coma pee pomrenseay: pny a teetesstasce | ENGINEERING PLACEMENT SERVICE 
COMPREHENSIVE | ELECTRICAL | seria "Wert Mentar'' MACHINIST —| BE bem | COVERING THE COUNTRY 


Opportunities in the | wenire an ee | day pets _—— $75 weer ence reuuired. Bergman 2; 
MELP, MEN | | | aw . St, at 3 p40 
-- memes} SNARK SM-62 mith Solas a Bins | LIQUOR SALESMAN | Scie Wa pittitecs sre chevy | Real Estate Salesmen | 
NSAS_CIT MISSOURI _ Fxeecrience necessary. Phone Cal-) & : ONE OPENING 
| GU I DED ) ENGI NEER vert Licuer Shop EM. 3-8668 19 90 ® m. opuy I rae. sieady solid. tn: 
PRS SAL. : come with the leadin | Bets 
| MISSILE, | Newspaper Dealership | ian are comahtent’ credence. ter]. Saat 
Th Wash Pp d| camee they are paid resuiariy . 
ENGINEERS |THESUPERSONIC! GoverNMENT | MACHINISTS | tines tips « home de| Pb y thats dita) 
TR | livery dealership available in re 
AINER 6 JET RELATIONS | Experienced | District of Columbia. Truck eal tstate lesmen | = 
RECENT AIRCRAFT With Small Mechanisms | 474 cash bond required. Ex- T cop wsegexperionced, salesmen | 
| PROJECTS ST Automatic Tempe erature and He: | cellent earnings. Apply Mr.| Chase in northwest area Ample 
| at ee . Curtis, sixth floor, Washing- edversinene Plenty of houses x | Compan 
GRADUATES ! re rn aginecring | ; Capable ge het to Close ton Post building. a Siour Bei Wate | Tire 
—e rg are shite ant tive om es “REAL ESTATE SALESM we 
Ow vailabie or pany benefits Ni Foie EN 
JOHNSON SERVICE CO. ' OFFICE MGE.. insurance $350 
ELECTRICAL Resea rch | 217 M St NW. Call wa. 8-0105 Well Equipped Shop Facilities Orie mer peokkecping ee | 
| S. SILVER SPRING Rocky! Emp 
MECHANICAL a : ‘ Wages Commensurate With S413 Ga. ave - JU. 9-4446 
. = | man 
Design | OPTICAL GRINDER || Sosiy offi" wittenis ares 
Many Company Benefits An Mice Eddie Cori dr___| saa ‘yoce 
i POLISHER = Pat Vee sosheed ss occa $< 


Permanent full-time position ter) 
im opti 


Tu o onda rouge 7 t i 
TRAINING Priday 6-5 | =? <a on | “AGENCY EX. 3-2508 | TO pis. our Youqigness if Sun anne COs! OBLIGATI TO YOU 
PLUS | AERODYNAMIC] Bi!°eS5Bunaits EStanse | Brreciees machinist "wom torre ee Pion ha : NO OR GATION 
Personnel. 11th & P Sts NW. | inthe experience i tales | PHOTOGS | Call for appointment or send 3 resumes to Dept. A 
| ENGINEERING— SCIENTIFIC OfVISION 


STIMULATING and EXECUTIVES. oP farte oof gestae | = wer hen edlve sce nls Pha KEL YOU ARE OPPERED THE 12 months outside sell NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 
| | empl at, FO "Lt | ERSON! yeni ted lame. | addre POSSIBILITY J MAS . 
ASSIGNMENTS STRUCTURES | Bosrex”™ no £3 nod AMERICAN | PROMOTION OP rok wee’ “receed “of uales | 1108 16th Se NW. ot & EX. 37270 


tion ' 
| | Be emoles TS INSTRUMENT CO. | FROTOGRAFRER — Breer ome! 
FOREIGN | ENGINEERING | ae hed Wares | | 2 he | IOERATION AND 
AS 


Come in and talk ii ever, 19 te 4. | 8030 Georgia Ave. 
n | , | FORM SETTERS—Cury and gutter | PHYSICIAN NDITION! xcelient ’ , 
and as Well as oncrete fimishers. Lone contract Silver Spring, Md. wanted. desiring retirement from Send Short Resume to " nished. free EMERSON 


| strenuous activities; operate Wash- 


DOMESTIC FOUN AIN TAANAGER MAGAZINE MEN New open clubs. | ingtun DC ottice limited hours Box eWeek Post-TH 
MATH., | - 4 st : " nutrition ie - : > ee : ius) An interview will be arreneced at 
FIELD PHYSICS nights no Sun aye ‘ Bee A x a Suet » “ amnion ent Bes Ma) eT ~ iT AORIA TG Hak: es oe oti Biete im arin 
ENGINEERING and [Tourhiy experienced. temporary) Seutnenee netteanry 'eaig Si per| for _chplenging ponition im ibe! ROOM CLERK ASST. cqroung' ve Bex Misa. 
weeks 


WEAP . S-des _ Pr service _prerage 6-8 services . dav —_ Fo of townere — | ety : 

Airbo ON WOODWARD 4 LOTHROP Per-| psch.n2! $13, ,averace per skit, | Come ‘in as soom 88 possible, No| carer pa a se, ¢neee SENIOR PROJECT LEADERS 
pire: Ps SYSTEMS eM Y ANALYST | KS Se Re PALMER HA YNES. SUITE 223, Excellent opportunity: 8 rs. | 

Instrumentation | ANALYSIS . 7 program data for IBM unit vil ; 1 7, tT ee HO 3.7 — Gammetouns r air oy r ~~ IN 


f ; - _ < 21 eae mm ~ : 
fajer oti company located y Ts: nd “- N fo 9-12 PORTER: anitors for . i clean th F ‘Fervon og 
oe la ve NE me onda i2 e a3 on . MANGER * ANNAPOL im I 


e 7-4 yler ; and imcinerater - 
ith 2 : “As— _ 60. sssist mer. ist-clase See manager. Arlington Tow- ELECTRONIC AND 
- : | ; iB} ; in lated eat » cr SOUTE FALESHAN— arer . Je. 
Electronic-Mechanical- Cal | Mr. John Andre at rien udm: is| Switchboard. NO 7400 | lished laund: ix °. biishec y beninc 
eupertenes ' : ' ' 


Servo Computers cript te Replies nident jal. 


7 tr "a a, * : j Las _ [7 am t. mes on of at aager calther We 
; MEtropoliten 2503] rset ot ay : : Ace : : €: te plus | : . - ec meneeers MECI IANICAL ENGINEERING 
hese responsible liaison engi- Due to « omeotion. a large con-| ae ne ey : . us ; Pr ice! | ou 
e e — WASH NGTON, | centrated gedit is ‘avatlable to an! : Fin : tt | PORTERS 


neering assignments require experiencec. capable salesman of | - ‘ 

personable individual with a/| D. C. roott Me = he resulss and | pare or full’ ownership tte 

high degree of technical abil- | ‘' ‘. il r : , -| PREDERT AU 

ity, interest and ingenuity. | INTERVIEWS | the highest & . du | MANA euNical v6 i up he 
| Sat., Sun. and Mon. finest ats contr sis | es greds. 22-28 yrs. Local Fels.) e411 ¢ oi emis LABORATORY ag A a 2 a4 

I 4 - ‘or car furn.}. .* r ; 

Every conceivable career ad-| July 14; 15 and 16 & —+- start. N e x _ Sera 

vantage... Pay... Position| fury a0 -2 MANA NE Falls Church iden waned ant. end ful tt err 

. . . Permanency . . . Oppor- Bon p——— vil = schooled at ails resi ts pre- 5 1o 54h s me. ° MI ° 

tunity ... Offered Young Men Firm Offers Mav Be sibilities = which nes 7 over Sinooo| ferred. Ps ape ne posi- GUIDED SSILES FUZING 

Who Can Quality, Made at This Time | a 2 ee ee 

| WAT A SALES CAREER | emp benef} roni i ection 

Travel and Moving | Rirke “ox cE pasts on Besey. AD. 4-9768. Men. 9:30 te ‘oye =. Electronic & Mechanical 

For Confidential Interview in Expenses May Be Paid | M=nit? APPLY IM PERSON QUALITY CONTROL AND 
| Alva, and. Bacon. established | Geet par. overtime. | permanent ; ENGINEERS 

WASHINGTON schoo! beck publisher ~  — F | eA M TOSP. M 


Write nt on i > | lable Apply at 4800 vane ) ¢ 
THURSDAY, July 12 Northrop | Aircraft) Ei": soe Sie ee eee: | Are pee Wit, Sea | PRODUCT ENGINEERING 
oT cs. icra __ | Fete seat Solna aioe ipl "SReraemas chr", Sas Physicists 
Ha = pore. + i ¢ leq . ore (essors— . n 


| STRONG SAL ME! a - = : , 
Company Representative} Recent Graduates |* ee eres Sart, § >. if't "se tbe ly _week nee An Invitation 
vA. 


iy 


Heath 


es ae Cine ieee 
im the following Hele . . 


COMMUNICATIONS AND NAVIGATION 


! 


ar 0 CO c 
EX. 3-5033 S - , : & Sur re - TE} TU —We have f T . 
enior En meers | ITH PROFESSORS AND) s#es organization. 2$- To Eng reers at a! levels of expemerce ee ao needed. 
Thursday, July 12 g x NEW CoREEe On TO BUILD) ff, ’slus commission and bonus er-| Linke Arnold 2-¥ bus from 11th ' Better Compery beret ta mcluaeng g-etuete study progrars. 
eee | Electrical-Mechanical | Stit, 220" neckeround.. business) £2°Gncement for men whe are am-|_ oe : ore ae labie 
1-5 P. M. of 7-9 P. M. | wosea 7° one PO ee xperiance helpful but mot seces- PRESSER Way of Life— 
) GENERAL MOTORS PaNttsi tion provided :-- in per | Experienced 


‘ enly: good heures and 
' arrett. Sineer wine achine’ workine conditions: transportetion 
ne ‘ 
n-Develop nent 


" a - “ ri " Whit wna aD 
Oy 'THE ELECTRONICS DIVISION, lus I-bedem ‘Rearty, Vp hes salary) Co. 306 test Monteomery sve..; furs 7. — St Oe . From Melpar TU. 2-6800 
Design -De' ' 
AC SPARK PLUG Mech: nical-Ser "Ce 


Write Dius | Osa | Si.| Rockvule Me Vienn 

i mcriahaain mentions a ae “as mercial "System ACF NUCLEAR ENERGY PRODUCTS Many factors combine to make for» better way of ~ 
, en hard Se ante MEME DIVISION OPENS NEW Ses Se ee le Soman Bt EMERSON RESEARCH LABORATORIES 

= planets sec uel ogee surroundings awey from congested traff and : =" 

General Motors} ® 2 | REACTOR HEADQUARTERS semaines soy tom emgased tes ere tis icein beh. wed ae 


Corporation | Spervunity and ‘recorasiion 1 IN WASHINGTON, D. C. Should you join Melpar you would tie your own A division of Emerson Radio & Phonograph 


Milwaukee 2, Wis. | THURSDAY, JULY 12TH! The Nuclear Energy Products Division of ACP industries, Incor- doubled in size every 18 months for the past decade. 

Phone Mr. F. Holtz | porated, is currently expanding its facilities in the Reactor field. Meipar maintains a policy of INDIVIDUAL RECOGNI- 

Company Representative Our Nuclear Division, headed by outstanding scientists and engineers TION which enables our engineers to progress accord- 

Th a tes + 12 who have made exceptional contributions to this field since its estab- ing to their own timetables, not prearranged ones. 
ursday, July lishment, offers these unique opportunities for professional growth Ability and performance primarily determine ed- . ae 

ENGINEERS 1-5 P M. or 7-9 P.M and future potential. usncemitt. en, tease loth Experimental Machinists 


Or write vot, John FF. Hefflinger only sootodians plane eg 
YOUNG Superviwecr ¢ pasese tod_pereon pe: SCIENTISTS 


Spark ELEC : 9 le Sd P 
Thon! cS Div {SION GENERAL Melpar s uriaue project team” system pilows each : ‘ 
; CORPORATION. Mil Reactor Physicists « 
ENGINEERS MOTORS, “ stathamnaliding BA. or MA. engineer to experience the OVER-ALL APPROACH Experimental a shop of 
LET US HELP NOIR WE a EE to an engineering problem, thus enabling him te guided Missi development or- 
YOU DEVELOP r MECHANICAL ENGINEER— broaden his experience and background, essential te garuzation has several opernungs 
YOUR CAREER. RRACAL COLLEGE 10 ween’ pistes tered, ew od pense On, eventual directorship responsibility. Each project group for qualified experimental ma- 
If you are 30 years = | GRADUATES equipment specifications, supplier liaison; shop + ee er eee Sey Cen Oe chinists. 
or younger and ond fabrication and field construction experience conception to completion of prototype. 
have interest in RIENCED desirable. Complete facilities are at the engineers’ disposal. Our B to 10 yee experience & clout tolerance work oe 
automatic flight lhe ENGINEERS new laboratories encompass over 285,000 air , model megker, to0l mwker, et. = requved, stable en- 
coravel for high MECHANICAL DESIGN ENGINEER— Sanad setinth Geet end elie, th atttaieeies ployment record and good ‘eeeces re cuenta. 
performance air- She tene-tanes eupenéing re- 5-10 years’ experience stress analysis, fabrication Model Shop, supplementary facilities, test equipment Those who quality ol! be offered commmucus enpicy- 
craft, opportuni- : a es Ne sl Or space techniques; some experience as project engineer and personnel available for bemoans ian eiitiet each. ment on @ 4) how ween Dens em berets, mcluarg 
ties exist bliched ee responsible for design, fabrication and test. weil ania en eeee eave rte -e rere rd cus 
large estabiis : | interest | 2 group hespitskastion. 
business for grad- work cal projects in “ine = MECHANICAL ENGINEERS Engineers wishing to work toward higher degrees may 
f& nce field. Thi si 

uate engineers in. separta nt = the | jen r 5-10 years’ experience, general mechanical en- take advantage of the fully accredited graduate courses PERIODIC INCREASES BASED ON MERIT 


lenging assignments. recogni- ineasi n vailab! Melper. 
—SYSTEMS | See “evurd’ tad. encosrase- gineering background. en ee EXCELLENT WORKING CONDITIONS 


DEVELOPMENT employes. ~ 5 . rf id like to } Qn 
MECHANICAL ; arting __faleries are commen- HE MODYNAMICS ENGI NEERS— you wou Ke 1O i€arn more about Mathias chap wlll “ atten oti. «alte 6 on 


\ PRODUCT DESIGN x ins small prove ect. grou + Mechanical or chemical engineering background. unique growth opportunities at Melpar, call 
He your, con't ye a 


—ELECTRICAL feos, regents. « - Pu: RECENT GRADUATES— ee R ve 
PRODUCT DESIGN| **adine bene® Sidhaatetialh hasaleiniediaiidicaheieetehitinaes did nical Personnel Representative 
—SYSTEMS pa By LL IN eT ee JEfferson 4-6000 
. 


EVALUATION RES ee DRAFTSMEN— Or drive out to Melpar and imspect MACHINISTS 
All along the way F: oP y= 5 years’ general layout, mechanical design, our laboratories at your convenience At Least 4-Year Fornal Agprentices ep Required 


, ter Ordnanc ‘ 
your professionaf ~~ — -M-- mance Projects electrical, or piping layout experience. 


development will — ae oe Components and 
eal A Poti ENGINEERS IN technical school graduates with 2-4 years’ Network Theory—Systems Bvalustion—Microwsve Technique— 9 AM TO 3 PM. 
3 experience. UnF. VEF or GHP Receivers—Anesiog Computers—Magoetis 

. through #550- Ot eardiantion Tape Handling—Digite! Computers—Rader en¢ Countermess- 
ciation with ex- vo. pp licatl =e i Salaries Will Be Commensurate With Experience. ures—Packaging Electronis Equipment—Pulse Circutery—atie- 


perts in your field, war te The Johns Hopkins University 
courses at the We invite you to invest gate these terest , ; 

rT . ’ mreresting positions 
plant, 2 Full Su 3 ean ca by forwarding # resume of your experience and education, APPLIED PHYSICS LABORATORY 


ition Refund Plan . nvenient to ail the eal or call TUckerman 2-6440 for an appointment 


for graduate study tural end sporte activities th: 8421 Georgie Ave. Silver Spring, Md. 
and trequent NUCLEAR ENERGY PRODUCTS DIVISION MELPAR, Inc. JU. 9-7700 


achievement eval- IN CONPIDEN TO: 
uations. pacer neering y Adpintstration ACF INDUSTRIES, INC. A Subsidiary of Westinghouse Air Brake Company EMPLOYMEXT INFORMATION 


Naval Orde 


ern rier CONF:DENCE GENERAL $08 KENNEDY STREET, N.W. | 3000 Arlington Blvd., 


en ELECT ae | WASHINGTON, D. C. Falls Church, Va. 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD) HOLe, MEN 15) HELP, MEN 15) HELP, MEN gt he noe 15) HELP, MEN 15|HELP, MEN 15 


nce bens eter an Oi) Fohgd P Py Ay YOUNG MEN | SARS SCRA SEVERAL EXTREMELY” AT 


HELP, MEN 18 TRASH pick up man: t: : TRACTIVE POSITIONS NOW 
: Experienced in Selling TECH. he, BF a Srallabit, “"Wacionsi chain ef| education. Home every paiehi Gar prevent WITH SUN LIFE 
| SALESMAN Mens Furnishings ’ 


; se ‘ 
; 5 : . . INSU . e OF “ 
’ YEARLY TENTIAL Apply Personne! Office | tei : i508 Ne : pe : eer, RANCE CO AMER 
VigeP- OPPORTUNITY 2ND FLOOR WRITERS ce os a fore eee] = rer 3 Ais Post-| ICA. 


| ; Over 65_yeare old new and grow 
Circulation AGE 28-38 LANSBURGH’S | Pe Pee a aay | Gein Prince Georee County and 
ao salary sae hotel all Scene turn LANGLEY PARK STORE ) ration of tnstrection mane-' @8¥. 40-hr. week. vacations Kies xpert & thoroughly Opp ortunities With STARTING SALARY 


Preps 
Liberal commission with) ais and imetaliation procedures on PAY. Ostd hospitalization. m ay) xpe epair. S75 week ples commission éuring 
means quicker sales results | ee Ran an commence, NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE electronic uipm . 21-30 e r. wa ' c h r training 


territory. Execelient op AND UNIVERSITY LANE Education weieteon! tes and orevi- 1o : iy oo man. Perm position. A. NUCLEAR OPPORTUNITIES | 


= ork 
for Washington Pos rn tumiti for alert. sgeresrive, ~— technica! writing experience a , 
= gr t one eusiified man te sesociate — pecessarv rig —_¥ 7 KAHN, INC ; 935 F St | Seal yy Seowauy tor of ad- | HO. — 


Times Herald classified ad | — oaaans wo ge Be ony com. ——— pe" --—J ow a2 a ver ~ S m Set ft & <4 1431 “Okie | NW ME 8-0869 in sales manasement) ACCT. “ty $70 
ae ~ a) to sell’ ull formetion es Es —- : z VV ‘ A 6 compe expe 
vertisers. To place your ad | Shine Sinaewame. @ verwere. i SALESMEN gak. . | Galecmen.. hewor. a wh =" a7 | — PONS ™ EMPLYOEE BENEFITS | 
| tere and furnishings, i : 4 Porter. ériv --,838| ATTENTION MEN | Bone tres lite insurance and bes-| 
Phone goods. janitor suppiles to hotel Direct selling expe- | APPLY IN PERSON em ‘STANDARD EMPL ary . EARN $30 A DAY RESEARCH AND Ditalization | 
rok pokey — rt ize Va. Arve v.30 0858 6 men needed at once 9 DEVELOPMENT QUAL IFICATIONS 


5 ”* ' sts “ ’ " 40% ” ‘ _ ¥. r ‘ . . f te 
REpublic 7-1234 able consists of Washington. Mer-| rience helpful, but | MONDAY THF AY “TV PARTS working.» ambi. LABORATORY on, ee 2? Be pet 
Ariinaton area 8A. M. TO ri P.M. northern Va. has | tious fellow whe : ried = public contact work wit | 
. profit shar a retirement tote ag A “i . ™ ' to make sacrifices of time 
) ~ hospitals ation and os a! not essentia! Car estab! territory . . 7 ag ee FOR elilert te insure success . 
HELP. MEN 15 nefit Current mode nines Phone | — sa: _ “4 8. O-1h a These positions are unespally at- 


‘ ior @e & helo finance one 100 e in itts Mult -44 
Ne «wt eep all correspondence necessary, > . * , m noon Te : er NGI NEER . 
acd From Preeeding Pace S ooh ometel Sette fell particulars ME] PAR, ING undey {1 : o7 ef. Ra WANTED. «at once Rawicich dre! 


nacer at 
caret in a Arling* .. a. neer- am) : Miyartsvitie wd or Otc. mer. patent 
wy w etka? 48 writ epartmen' rec * - - 
AA y eek draw;. bonus, DOG. 19-8 Richmond. ¥. Electrical, Mechanical, Aero-| ghont UNS $4718 Recent. type. PBX 


Phil ee 
Cc ON Sho bom & COMPANY WIREMAN 4 amutical, and Quality Control, a a Pe Ya 
01 Sou e ? . oi one . ast. a 
SALESMEN uae Seago ie tiles pre vows A Subsidiary of Westinghouse SUPERVISOR Swe ee College Graduates hac aM: PBS 935-8, 
Air Brake Company ee oie Construction rclerka. mo Bu néstrand a4 * 


ALESMEN Tst-class production wireman PHYSICISTS AND | ik some 
1 pep Ra vi peiators feud Plan Call Sunday, July 8 0 a : 5 4 i eres ce. Excellent copert unit? OVERSEAS MATHEMATICIANS Career Opportuni ty Ry tAS Agcy. .R E 7-5) 67 
goressive, have a good ap-| Sisc'SSbado ser we. must be neat 11 a.m. tol p.m, ONLY S00 tie athay sg 7 see" WAEDIATE OPENINGS FOR At All Degree Levels —-. By “ela ofrsaies and ae ADMIN. SECY., $350 
to | ane, ae Bee ee MR. PRICE | wept pean pees» OT ee | bien Taptirede for manage ernie, Pos mat, frm, isi ofc. Will york 
powers ENG 6 . ti hee *. - ne | WA 7.1488 Falls Church, Va. AMERICAN Des etent a “+ ; EXPERIENCED | ors rami — office sffice and home — aie sonditone 5 a 
sonality it will pay yo or phone 806-4198. § Peas Pitti ci Se ee INSTRUMENT CO. iment up “Sa | DRAFTSMEN | be ‘between 20-30, collese ared-| - SECY., ART TIM 


om . 
‘te siz +30 piu orer- Déesion and Detail , oad ex 20-hour mh Work for 1 a 
8030 Georgia Ave. ‘ ’ . et | Good skills req. Downtown. Stert 


Silver Spring, Md ; _ Civil Design Engr IN Am Earepe. © 815.000. Fave! | SECY.., $325 
| wart st. 


7 10 ; " ATC WM AKER ; “ Des ee or eaulvaien Por large co oe Average pais. 
” : ; " > ah - pr rienced Qa! if ed va’ ch. Tr aa ; | NJ Ex ° 
; os.) ae only. Pull time. Call RE 730 ndt increasing bus!- a a. ‘ experience. caval Gens gr A bu verque Mex. 
SALESMEN 5 eA ans. $73 oe ey ‘UP mo f m a — ear — opportunity. 20% Se-ary 887 $10.422 s 9 Q , Pit » A 
. - . _—_ ° be ocx nt n ‘ ; oan  . ted Por educ ° 
Inq = ~~ - ~~. Above-aversge 


’ 4 , - ns hed : > ie ce, part ¥ |; many bere . 00D ; : : Sendia Cor wation. a sub- ; : r wk Excei. 
qualified les = cor 13th loom ce] ‘all Tu. 2-85) am) mi Se Pe BOR wARD| Transportation paid Dor pep. tor . . popens. se 


; _ ma. & Livine Allowance fully covers waGary of the Western mec : ie Dictaphone Opr ; $310 
AL ESMEN toe ; wor ; h rd . at en \- i oh ree pos: tion --.., wm Sick . Electric Company, Ss ow : 4 : our Must bave govt clearance Inter 
Men's Furnishings cw in sa = oo ~ . P.M nae geced im research and we ¥. = geting ane a 1 subject matter. 
, o . « eam mis : : ». , . - u omplete resume showtn . = ™ ~ a 
Seen See Saal tats| Se! Aad Saat eat ies Seat | See | ERE RGI Saeed | cevelooment of muciear | Bead shes. Bonet sieee | ASST. BKKPR., $65: 
employ m ent ocopertunity y for adwane ent.) permanent. full ti ae weapons for the Afomic | oo Knowl of calculator and adding 
THE HECHT CO sood sxlaty pius pooes: mem & st Positively be abi OW M. VAUGHN. AE REP Energy Commission. Ad- Rhode isiaad ave. helpful Some type. J5-hr 
Wash r fa “ Ttha vw . " ce benefits eee _ _* set 2 i! bs “ss E V N.. week ntown 
: nF Be aT : CSE ior SSbotat-| Mac oheee SEES SES! ~HEDRICK-GROVE | Yared, laboratory facil RECEPT., $260 
set! th eae ale iD WILBON ALY ¥D 4 oe . Y 3 ¥ hes and metropolitan }. SUMMER Por nat mie fir m4 wit train on 
it -. TRAINEE to ublications. -arverace appear- 
Heavy natior local Dass aptitude test and have clean Sf t 2 ee ~ ELIZABETH “TRAINEES . radio or TV. But a | 346 Broadway, N 3, buquerque’s nationally-fa- | OPPORTUNITY & -. ™ x ~~ 
pase setitue “URE “ PIN = ON —« or past pies fan rw _ ie 
advertising Deikrry INSURANCE CO. Por Services. 1025 Conn ave. nw Di ire sinaetantl ous climate (low hu- | FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS LIBRARY CLK. TYP 
“ yntment phone Mr. Suter. | 74150. ar 4 : : want te “ . wld days, cool AND TEACHERS | Some eotnge. West eee.  -— 
774 mM } it ' " 3 
Previous Sales Exneriénce | SALEEMENS U1, ohila Jor outel “SERVICE asider an adequate | mat , and year-around | 8: Sat ee 
tbtere rammtmmeeaingd BR PERSONNEL Thm fc nam ne) make working | EARN $1000 THIS SUMMER | ILLU TRATION CLK. 
Nin - tei raiebe S ork en statione > . ae 5" Dat cornine a ons (| PARTICIPATE. IN SPECIAL EDU- at. publics Some typing. 
Helpful But Not Eranspoftaiton furnished. Apply, Pert-ttme work for men stat ; DRAFTSMEN YOUN a ee “te : | CATIONAL PROJECT THIS SUM. | Lier of ars Bes pre! 5 2900. 
Entirely Essential! > = —- 2 U G MAN or tae call . WaRick iil 0.00 she TARY NEE P., $250 
Sa78 ae SALESMEN “Mr. Milten. & 0 inguis 18 TO 28 poses a a ey RK 1% YOUR LOCAL AREA) HS ered qa @uties. Prefer un- 
' : = os —_ — Wet. Kish commission and den paid vacations and I - RAVEL IF DESIRED. 
, SOOREESIVE . Top 3 eraders weITS | | elds Agcy., EX. 3-2508 
Car Necessary | 3 , days: liberal sick leave, re- FULL TRAINING SUPPLIED | “ie gcy., 
al co nex , iy ne r c 8 is : mus ~ Ts oo —y tn local Aa NIGHT SHIFT tiremen? and msurance C T M NJ —_ herein Bide. -7 wee 
" . — ‘ a le ‘ > w = . ~~ as ' : rganiva’ 
FOR APPO NT MENT ir . ES Lo i: 7 aT ae < ve ante — * Dealt in eppearance willing to prograrns Housing 'S -ead- 4 ‘. orman ARLINGTON AREA 
if you are looking ¢ an-| Must be experienced in all INTERESTED IN LEARNING  (#28fn and able t converse imtel-| EX. 54467 
n nA sen t 
Call Mr. Presaraves ’ 


| ily obtainable, and reloca- 
- nmsal Yy ° CRATIVE , 4 DAYS : teow a lowance 's$ pe 5 
* rt some est ablial 59878 0 5 7084 — MINIMUM HIGH SCHOOL | 7 ‘TiL 10 P.M | Sandie has a record of no 
Va.m.tollan ar necessary. Fringe bene. | SERV night manaeer ’ _ EDUCATION ) 
®:. | emits eh - Ff  ~ S * e — 4 23 NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY 
5 rk itton Pp oati CALL MR MILLER _ | you hove 8 cas and could | 
LI. $8153 PFO Ph rayanle IMMEDIATE. | Wisconsin Ave. Chevy Chase, Me | EX 3.4467 jocks come tp B40! ¢ LOCAL INTERVIEWS 
“appoiz , he } ! y,2 >, ore necnasert BEFORE NOON Monga s ping st 7 2. = WILL BE ARRANGED 
- WASHER-REPAIR y eee $100 PER WEEK To START’ | "7 Dame, FOR QUALIFIED 


now! e of automatics ) essent . titi lie : ; ' ADP ANTS 
tees Sak fot our enlareea AT LEAST ONE YEAR OF YOUNG MEN Ln 


r enilars 
3 Bers 


corviee Gepe, Ween, 8-4 TRAINEES " - LLL 
é njoy many She pany _ = nite “ 
mm. iG i2 men needed st once for our ed- ¢| WAN ED | " : soas 
Sete ie’ Rarer Ge ieee a| . HIGH SCHOOL vf eas ‘ | MR. A. C. HARSHMAN | "COLUMBIA EMPL. SERV. | 


SEARS ROEBUCK &CO.| MECHANICAL blows thas ie aaa ithe a fe Employment Division 1231 | 1941 0 1. Quite 208 MR 6-300 


ture Ap 22 18th «st ; APVERTISING manecger for Resen-. 


tial J ? e ce fist, 5-1) 5. monly baum's. Cumberland. M¢d.s largest | 
Li “wi AND LUBRICATION DRAWING COURSE 12 MEN Positions for draftumen are| auntiment sare: mons be Gon © 


ecessary (BISHOP BL SUNOCO *TA- | YOUNG MAN, 18-35 also available af cur new fee nvout. copy production | Ap-| 
Hor Fives noe ie boy a branch in Livermore, Califor-| Bit te Sresrt Resenbes | 
t sive design Appiy 33809 McKinley st. ow. EM ceo of cur Branc he iis pleat! wun cars white 21 te 35 years) 7, im the San Francisco eres 
‘paid. engineering pro- Sie, SALESMAN Experienced Tor | EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY | ese’ oi Seine helo PM“ possibic| of See, No canvassing $490 to $739, Write for details 
; advanc ‘ement to exped : & month te start Cal & 


: i. a> . or - ‘ ty : +. v - 
Lieperm , = ‘Ss FOR ADVANCEMENT IN — O-neur week 


53 


fF -) 


FPODQVEeAYVOOVOS CO 


oa 


lavotfs m over nime years 


POA en P on Ferre 
a MP PIMPIN 
—<t 


OS Ly 4 


Pw a 


We are offeri ne anoth 
. As : 


. ; - Ole 
. Po . Ae Instit , ianted. Ap- AN EXPANDI? — RtSEaRrCcH STONE "PAPER T TUBE CO. | TH HECHT co. 
raduate Center near ly between the hours of 11 and 2 wwe a - 200 FRASELIN NE . 
é Mexico Rest courant. 2603 Conn . A FUTURE 336 wilsce Bivd. Ari. JA. 5-20 
re os | ORGANIZATIO exceilen Kine 8 my bp" 9- 


KESTER. exper 
port mae ag)? + YOUNG MAN IN SECURITIES | CORPORATION Fat “ = = 


Inc. 1 gees pre at Thomas % TO 20 


| Young, expanding brokerage | Albuquerque, New Mexico 
1° om pep ational | Steward—Night—Hotel APPLY IN PERSON th mechanical experience te house requires 


- 


1 Mechanical Engineerine Experienced STEWARD =: ted: | eras ;Uipment resses. counter girl 


inst 4 of an engineer . at ’ — ® dat a - | boys. t river. 
' ay ae > . ~ Opent nas are med —en | nee wil c= ne saint - ou c— -: reful _ 5 SECURITIES men wor *"hecs , fi Me Hil " 
| compeny benefits after ni See gant ' : a “es SALESMEN _ _ . *, ’ ee 
emp.ioy ment 8g A M TO 4 p M =e x: 10. . “ - eontact 
MINIMUM INTERVIEW REQUIREMENTS | j shorthand 


APPLY PERSONNEL MANAGER 


& BA. or BS. degree from an seccredited college | Sheraton-Carlton Hotel MONDAY THRU FRIDAY Atlantic Research Corp. for executive-type salesmen 
od math theceah G@ereniiet cat tet | 6TH & K STS. ¥ ALEXANDRIA. VA The firm will furnish all nec- YOU 
. —_ — —_ ——=-| @¢sary facilities This i& an 


These are full-time positions 


| STITETICUN ) 
Addit onal for business charts. Mu 4 YOUNG MEN outstanding opportunity to be- 


r ated science sub ‘ ies mae euperience and know cer of | ME PAR wo. Pieesant ' : . “ charte * of _ = woes _ 
| Sources of economic and burine | mer or full ¢ c come aiec r-member ; ot 
ee cour ‘ “Cc es i a Write givin ret —_ Corie State Personnel ter. 
a science courses with @ “C” or better. | and deny a~— bg ; ce} J 1408 G st oe ot hil _ a tull-scale local pager SE! | P) ate Cetico Building. Rartiord | . . 

a. 4 average in ell undergredute work roa Casitel Wil ion YOUNG — MAN pa red ———— ° a "Tal -s sand tn 4. rr = 
- re lary AND! NO nterview HEL WOMEN interesting 
40-WEEK PROGRAM | MAF ibo Emp” Ascy. Suit INC AGE 18- 25 —- 


| porn, sone soni Call: | Tact Gat mgs aa:| Annette D. Tatelman 


oniien ones $1 <x. ’ 
Tt’ vou hare Ld RA or BS dearee but do not heave oll of the |8 — tO WOrk With} Dt must have teins vertisine. 25 others : RE. 71-4414 
above st Feau urea ents yOu may be elisible for cur 40-week | eet ~~ the ‘Sine. rs ns et: ray reese | MAR. WILLIAM PAGE| EARNINGS | —. be as t cor 12th a —_ — 
seferemce eteen 4 —_ hes piet 1 scat , t ; rx nm ™ : APPLY In ori ; : - statistics. cece. wou. 
vr co , | be | who sve com ered co.urege ed ation : : ofits . ~o ot 3000 Arlinaton Bivd. Western Auto upply SALES MANAGER : UNLIMITED S ABBEY Fi rst Br. wk. $41.20 start 
leone tithe oo 3 hen aualified Apply Person . LI2) Bbode Island Ave. BE. ; ee - 4 pad. SECY Varied lew practice. gir 
e , al : 0 co, rec i 2) 4 on) - " apne y ' 
readily available iE CO “g045 3th St Siive Falls Church, Va | YOUNG MEN _ NATIONAL 8-0423 | A te oss rimchsmdegg 
; oe ver 
For an interview |i Alas a termina an ree nace fas | Te SECY —Coliece background eles. 
WASHINGTON AiR —errreR 4 ; x b consulting =| U. — E r ' ._ 4 hy ’ Sees ” see typewriter: sir-cond. bicg. 1375 
od v in res mm rv i —- , tr : ie ets , 
paeat Semel (Toho Aeneid 2 fin fom hae ne mpl. Service| :  Siteevirinee << gap] BEGIN NAGS “IRS “seen 
Apply HOWARD. ‘CLOTHES 1ImAE Sts NW. to olant) | 1724 F STREET NW ri s 
Sf =e | Please address reply EBASCO KO PEEs TOURS 240-6605 
sted. $3460 o Balto TRUCKMEN Conpaact Lar Washincton & i c. atv HOTEL-RESTAURANT & SERVICE ING reeph ie roses Bute o > 
- rni . pera tic: x . TRAD 3 Bkkpc wack os as 


at! C salary 
phone calls Ae. cee, THIRD FLOOR 


. s il nd 7 m a 
P 7 
Bal Pht MY S . : 7 i. ~ " PS . : " — ~ ~ me ~~ . ‘ ; t os & ww tnd y { Dp to . 4 - - ; : 
sCHOO its " Math at - b— —- ye FOUNG WAN lor mortgage loan Ty ; tetiie 
Trench and Latii : iatr ; : tha & efits Men division : . hi > m hool —- 378. experience 4 inte ligent 
‘ Languas es idd) ch ub- " ood seteres . Sva license to be so hr co ena 


25- : Cc ~~ si Derien 
General science and mat L nied Pu » tone “ ~~ ned as & constructi on fan in- {— 30-55 / * Bot essentia 


-: S lL Some 
2 S36 ay tine B- node! a lor. 5 0 _| sector and to interview applicants! Cooks. D t ” niaht hgurs . | Bess ,r = Hy sary. Morten's ; 
iC SCHOOL t . ; ally i Call or write Mr —* a : . : Eo —— 
yb HERS Jj R. Holtz between the hour ~~ ne i nent | Countermas a S ceieail a2 ; rane 
| AGCY ha) Ge 2 - ise of | CHI ' 


ypin EF SURVEY PARTY, OPEN a = 
on Jni ' ‘e. : : Di nmel. Aer nett ; - . rivore Co e - 
' a i a . Serv. 1108 et * “=k Co iz n dianepoli ndiar yy BP Cd Sia te athe Ege J ee ee 1 COPYWRITER 
East Hartford 8, Connecticut Fito jeirone "7-331 ee Lap eesranee_ | ATTENTION | Draftsman cigs $400 | Counter-erit! eirt. SW. 4-12 9m. | 


; : 22 2. me. afisme 
designer and builder of aircraft engines » 30 3 Neat rance | Por the rt-time joe wal iteyi ee EMPL. SERV. 
ARE YOU ’ t , d : u te . 50 - on@ay 4 Americ call i oe Menday 1 4 . =y . ACCOUNTANTS a a a ——s 
=. a Rnd Tuesiar. Cac. White, Over 2 : ‘ c you nave 
ees aaa Young Men a ee eee panier) Ste white. $1. CLERK TYPISTS | rt department store ee 
, : ee « « o | Some. Rotel experience mecemery. ~ ad eeek to sta | si " mae 
AIRCRAFT WORKERS Unlimited Opportunities in | g I ge OR SS Sid dense Ae. SECRETARIES Being Pag deren = gh gong 


emp ore . ; 
: air-conditioning rats FART. Vile a Ss ae MANY FOR “ 
THE for appcintment. HU Ear - a, ~ Fa vate te wnt . 5-day, 40-hour week, 20% 


’ A a , pressma‘e.y 20 hours se eat discount on purchases. Apply 
We nee men win en wredge of sheer metal, | CHESAPEAKE s POTO C HOTEL DUPONT PLAZA anpes®: ne. ‘pont iy 3162 Mt FP lecasant withe les of your work te 
ee ee ee eee | PART TIME FULL Gk. PART TINE—Oer . : 
| - ; Awa - -i. ~ Ele 
TELEPHONE COMPANY .. . 69-30 PM | shal Pie niig-owned ) - na . Be Advertising Office, 4th Floor 


WELDERS Eight meat-appesring young men — =, aa: simtea - ; 
MA H EMA S? | Offers excellent career op- division of” Siope motional concern | musrested ip 2 - more SBcY Derm, compnts to $317 *| LANSBU RGH S 
| | C . | Sortunities for qualified | Servicemen Dege students! # our cualificatic: a on Co, & | WASHINGTON STORE 


enin Lo = a ~ ; nec 
; young men seeking regu- | @ eality Pos inter —. ‘rvs Per ssoemtment| Sk ERE ee Tth. th and BE Sts NW 
| tar employment. An inter- liam<¢p m “ie pec tee Ast R-PBx. ne type. ts AGENTS WANTED © 
4 | ) ° , a nt Know! bekpe to A WA 
- ARE YOU... : ieee pay wer ng sans Tork a — tas zrrseee. tal PBT. at eccts to eaas | 00 extra tn your spare 
INSTRUMENT MAKERS . , interested in working with real | be high school graduate. FRIDEN 
and challenging problems of science, . CALCULATING MACHINE 


high grade precision industry and government? | EMPLOYMENT OFFICE CO., INC. 


. » » @ bachelor, master or Ph.D ) 725 13th St. NW PF Open nes is cove soe Gepartment for , _— ; ™ ' 

, . fd ; ’ rt neustt omen tm ® J oe Aira Aint ve AL- 
' : | — a > m=ieis s: : . . 
NSTRUMENT MECHANICS engineering? Apply Monday Thru Friday assign ment after training ‘weekdays ct 


. 24 WIRCONGIN AVE ew oy as ee ttt BOO od en . ore. degree. Writi 
sa . . . between 20 and.38 years old? toaes He. a oe “Ho. 2-088 COLLEGE 2 Boy ous CoP OF Lig t ee 
rec Seaiog + IF SO | GrapuaTes | NAT ~~ 4 Ree 

| s108 ; ti at at — ity ‘handle sh 
ELECTRICAL INSPECTORS DESIGNERS. and RWS PEE IMS ae ec pe 


Recer? graduates wanted Py ee ee : 
r ahyie tc use test equipment es testing to De asgred respons0'e ASST BOOKKEEPER 
onic units from Diueprint and specs supervisory postions after Varied rw A Ae - Seevine sf 


ana lyeis of 
INVITES YOU to consider these items 


we cing wry ' * aii metal including 


’ ’ 
be able to work from blueprints. 


a set cervod of miersrve recorés 


Openings in the Following Fields | wong mn cur methods 
TURRET LATHE MACHINISTS ond polos 
Jet Power Plant ' 
Engine Controls | The men will be selected 
69 giant electronic computers now in use ° 9 | largely_on the basis of evi- 
SPRAY PAINTERS 208: cieceatin ‘deat: ecttedinhons ‘dnin'‘tn teu Fuel and Oi! Systems dent leadership qualifica- 
Heat and Vent Ducting tions and managerial po- 


INTERVIEWS 9 A M =—3 Q M INTERESTED in what this could mean to YOU. here engine Aacemeries inate! ~— 


cr elsewhere? Control Surtaces Give complete intforma- 
Landing Gear Insta! tion as to education, age, 
Monday Through Friday MR MR hetsbe and wslabe. All re: 


of ples will be held wm strict 
Other Times by Appointment CALL OR WRITE att : confidence. Reply Box 
(GIVING QUALIFICATIONS) che M-463, Post-TH 
G QU CATIONS) TO All Types of Aircraft Structures 


ERCO DIVISION | Dr. Liston Tatum, Manager CALL OR WRITE 


Applied Science Division C. A. BAKER, OL. 4-7630 ent st A. 
: ” congen a! sarround. 7 ia round. excel sal 
ACF INDUSTRIES, INCORP. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES THIEBLOT Aircraft Co. =| eipes'Eie' eet 2 ote es 3 


: 8. Oo. 
Riverdale, Md. WA. 7-4444 1111 Connecticut Ave. NW. RE 7.2705 > a. Painters yr. found work, $62 wk 


elem style . oS wp 
4924 Haripden Lane, Bethesda, Md. 
NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 


] 


HELP, WOMEN 


HELP, WOMEN 


° 
HELP, WOMEN 


16) HELP, 


WOMEN 


CLERK 


Young lady to train in 
sonnel and peyroll 


beascn oP 


actistant te learn 
agen and les 
oman lentes Sih vi 
supervision o 
rience required 
oe to start but applicant 
20 hours or more 
ase et os aver- 
kiy. tim ses 
Sorenamal mane 
onday, for ap ~ 


have good handwriting. Per- 
manent position. Good salary 
5-Day Week 
Apply Miss Crone 
HUB FURNITURE CO. 
TTH &AD rw 


CLERK 


With knowledge of adding mea- 
chine and trping Permanent 
position 5-day week. Many em- 
ploye benefits 


HAHN SHOE STORES 


wok for wee 
pe o 


~~ ioe 
AXK FAINT now!) 
future 


if 


tA 


wens. . 


BEAUTY aGPERATORS (3)—Expe 
steady 
a §, both a workers. #60 D/us 
ntl Beauty Fatilor 3921 South | 


col neat and 


li size for shampooing in white 
~—- salon. NW. Top 


BEAUTIC IA te Colored 


a 


saiary.| 
: 


7 = 


CLERKS 


High School Graduates 


Experienced or inexperienced 


To train for manual and mocht ne] 


senate concern 
eek: hours 
MACHINE OPERATOR | par messages sickneny ane retire. 


Permanent 5-da week 
peers) Mary embleres 


HAHN __ SHOE STORES 


Position 
vacation 
A 


FOR APPOINTMENT 
Call 
iid naan res} estate] NIA 4.9900, Ext 


Co act be exp Some. Sypine req 
Pieasan rorkin 5 da 
re hrs 


| 
282 


CASHIER. CHECKER 
PART TIME ' 
A. M. w 2:30 P 


ee: ER’ K-TYPISTS 


74 
as 


Permanent opening in cafeteria tn 
govetp mee iidin 


Monday 
Ase 


Hache sknVicks INC 
~ CASHIER- TYPIST 


ARTI ROTK »N 


CLERA.-TYFIST—Nationa! 
—s desires capable youn 
c ert 
& da 


’ 


oress: . 
s For 


a wk 
benefits ‘a 64474 
CLERA =- 


SIL. ae hs 
Tak. Park-Beth.-Ch. Ch 


ar 
Appiy Mr Lisseth “JA. 


sini 
€ i ell SACESGTRE - | 


aes | 


> 
+ tions 


: ; eo - 
wAcoknty ¥ EMPLOY MENT SER \ 
B10. 3-3040 


iie| CLERK-TYPIST |: 


Under 35. for advertising veseareh 
Gepartment of national news a 

azine Should enjoy working wt th 
figures and detail working 
nowiledge of arithmetic essentia! 
Calculating machine experience de 


~2900, ext. 261 


bet ween 3 and 5 


Cc .ERK. TYPIST, | whit 


yA : 
tashea a “4 6- 60. 


CLERK. TYPISTS — 


permanent position 7? 
" aokm « 


YRS 
some typing 


TRAINEES. no fee $220) 
MANY OTHERS 
OOD. PERSON 
SEE MISS WOOD 
232 SOUTHERN Waris: 2 


CLERKS» 
Drug—Cigar—Candy—Fountain 
FULL TIME 
Permanent Positions 
18 years or over 
Pleasant and Interesting 
Working Conditions 
Many Employee Benefits 
Paid Training Program 
APPLY AT OUR PEO STORES NEW DOWNIOWN 


PLES DERU 
EMPLOYMENT OFFICE 
Sond Fieor, iith and GO Ste NW. Entrance on tith 


PEOPLES DRUG STORE 


8:30 A.M. to 4 P.M. Monday through Friday 
HO. 2-1234 


more LAUNDRY 
? NW. 


a) , 


BS 


Over Bis | 


’ 


GIRLS ¢ 


If you want a really interesting job in a growing 
and exciting industry, consider the Telephone 
What a thrill to be able to say 


you're a part of the communications system of 


Company. 


this country! You'll receive good starting pay 

. Regular increases . . . Many opportunities 
for advancement . . , Other attractive benefits 
Make new and 
Don't wait! 


at our employment office! 


Vacations with pay 


interesting friends. Come see us 


723 13th St. NW. 
MONDAY “THRU FRIDAY 
8:30 AM. to 4:30 P.M. 


The C. & P. Telephone Co. 


SECRETARIES 
TYPISTS 
STENOS 

PERSONNEL CLERKS 


Various Openings—Interesting Jobs. 
Excellent Pay—40-Hour Week 
Air-Conditioned Offices 


Numerous Benefits 


office. | 
Must be able to type and’ 


=e. 


Pe tee 
"hee 


ie 


tion 


n, eupert- 
ing ma- 


t 
x. Air 
r Pium- 


* 
“call 


CLERK-TYPISTS 


| Positions available in an ex- 
panding research organization 


Opportunity for advancement 


Convenient suburban 
location 


Permanent resident of 


this area preferred. 


APPLY IN PERSOF 
MONDAY THRU. FRIDAY 
8:00 A. M. TO 4:00 P. M 


MELPAR INC. | 


A Subsidiary of 
WESTINGHOUSE Air-Brake Co. 


1911 SOUTH FERN sT 
(Orr JErr. DAVIS HWY) 
ARLINGTON. VA 


3000 ARLINGTON BLYD 
PALIS CHURCH. VA 


CLERA .- Se ae Alsernes . paws 
each wee Dm <. 
pm «1! a 
permanent 

<er's offic 


“Toth snd Penneyi- 


- mn. 
cond! itions 
Appiy mans 
Washington 
ADA Aye. De 


mm 
pesitios 7m, 
Ho 


CLERK-TYPisT 


lady femiliar wi S general 


ery interestine work 
plus rotit sharing pian. Call 


sce OM 
DIXON DE 
VTO PARTS 


etite 


2- 

1430 P at 

NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY | 
Meet the public. Interesting varied 
work. regular inereases sea On 
merit Paid and other 
outstandin S benefits 
Must be hi ool graduate. 


APPLY IN PERSON | 

PUBLIC FINANCE CORP. 

3233 RHODE ISLAND AVE. 
MT, RAINIER, MD. 
961 BONIFANT ST. 
SILVER SPRING, MO 


CLOTHING GRADE RS Handi- 
——— ——— wrn pest’ 
inspection 
ore . ‘sales apply at 
tages es Personne, of- 
5 12 
+ Pr ri 

COCKTAIL wattress Por info 

RE. 5-8900. ext. 84194 
COSMETIC yn BALESL ADY 
xperiencea | _— J atk 
seies work to lary 
ay" nights A. hou days 


cjothin 
can 


No #8un 
Advance 


Soe RE CALL 
Lot AS 


COPYWRITER 


DRt 9 CO 
5 


ine experience 
State ace experience. 


nd salar y expected te Box M-4)9., 


grill colored 

-+y c ter. col 

any co obs open cally 
|_CONw AY'S Emp. Ser. 519 bth Nw | 


= up 
$30-835 


J 


COPYWRITER— 
Preferabiy with dept. store exper'!- 
ence. Must have fair 

st oftice mee 9 
THE HECHT CO. 
Comptometer Opr., , 
$60 Wk. 


FASHION— 
cay weer 
Pst AT TTH RW 
Tt pine a) 


331195 


(Cou he Or. «an 
ton week id vacation | 
Roberts, fe Son. 435 KR st. oF ; 


cS"; nin th some enpe- | 
rience for dry-cleaning pliant «4 
5016 New Hampshire ave. | 


CRER. exp eT ave. | 
EY rE eis enw 
ie INVESTIC 
position 


(Personne) 
seamstress 


ft 
-| 


36 Eye 
TiGaTOn _ Att rec- 
it ne omen 
with « nis} xhool edueat 12 an 
[ typin 3 Passi 
Bot 
env! ronmen 


i 


enn) ores 


¢ RI i OnE sgt Georgia 


DEPARTMENT HEADS 


Youne women with 
beckaround and retell! 
trem é=ifer 
Apoly 
EMPLOYMENT OFFICE 


THE HECHT CO. 


SILVER SPRING 
Penton St. & Elleworth Dr 


ome eo 'ege 
experience to 
meranandise careers 


| 


. 


trainees 


and 
hon 


Practical nurses 
PROFESS! or Nw PLAC "EME 


IN sia oe SeRING. 


SILVER SPRING Rock’ 


Se ter oiRECTOR” | 


To promote proeram in loca! youth | 


agency. College dearee. experience 
desirable. Write givine ace educe- 
ence, relerence to Wash. | 
Post- -4 
Rue sourlag C CLERK 
WHEATON 


Interesting. varied work for cape 
man. 5-day 40 hour 


available Apeiy Monday 
os ve. Wheston. Mec. 9 


K—Becinner. 
ery. 330 


5-day, $6 
Fa. Be. 
Youne. experience unnecess no 
typing required. see Mr. leoe art” | 
ford Accident and Indemmpity Co.. 
Age Vermont Ave. 3.W 


HOSTESSES 


G RmETAUe 


| ts bead 
OFFICE PE ALLY 


HOT SHOPPES, INC. 
1341 G St. N.W. 
TU. 2-2000 
~Housewives—Attention 
CAN YOU USE AN yt $390, 
$40 OR $50 a week for -time 


Gay or evening work’ call "BT AN-| 
Y HOME UcTs. Th. & 


MANAGERIAL ASSTS. 


A POSITION WITH A FUTURE | 
SALARY, $400-$650 PER MO. | 


Slenderella Internetional offers ox-| 


INTERVIEWS 9 A.M.—3 P.M. 
Monday Through Friday 
Other Times by Appointment 


ERCO DIVISION 


ACF INDUSTRIES, INCORP. 
Riverdale, Md. WA, 7-4444 


\ 


for high- 
a 


executives are emong 
the world. 
new 


Prerequisities include college back- | 
srounc. executive saies. abi) 
well « attractive epeest- | 
ance. fieure. 


ais’ io. Ses 


openings Im oar salons 


- ashington § Metropeuten 
area. 


| NURSE, 


| fs 
ee 


5. Some resea 
| sirable: Diy 


LADIES—PART TIME 


20-55. $1 In your 


Ace 5 per hour 
sare a. 


ork 
a 


Medical Technologist 
_Full_or pa 


NEWSPAPER 
STENOGRAPHER 


Btenographic — avall- 
able for young woman with 
good typing and shorthand 
exilis Air-conditioned of- 


| 


ns ko ern) 
PERSONNEL DEPAR 
MENT 


Washington Post and 
Times Herald 
1515 U STREET NW. 


NEWSPAPER CLERK 


Clerical Sésition In promotion de- | 


partment for alert young 
} t her busi- 
The 
knowlecee of * 
together 


Cc v 
insurance benefits. air-conditio 
ice 
Interviews 9% 


. 
Personne! 


te 2 
Department 


The Washington Post & 


Times Herald 
1515 L STREET NW 


Nt BSE — R yy with <deasree, 
; instructor 7 
student 


: Convalescent 
Bunker Hill Ra. N 


NURSE—PFor sur oon e office 
<1. excel sal nd bours 
RN—Por summer 
tion relief lso or part-t 
and night aut y rei “on ta: 
rector in 
Conva! escen 
Hill Ra NE 


nt RSE. PUBLIC HEALTH 
; ubliic Resith 


see 
auti exp 
bec 


vaca- 


Prof es- 
nurse. 
visite and if 
a valid Vir 


0] 


y City Pers onne! 
405 Can eron at — I ; 
erie. Va 


POLICY WRITER for fre and cas 


Shane 


RECEPTIONIST 


‘(AGE 24-34) 
WASHINGTON 


s° EN ~~ LA INTERNATIONAL 
Tr > 


ur 
@ experience or car 
Pies nt ‘ with 


rt time. Bi. 89-1622. _ 


’ 
Washington | 


Tx. 3-0600. | 


SECRETARY 


For director of asscciation. Bx- 
perience on ¢lec. typewriter and 
dictaphane. Shorthand required 


Interesting work and assured i 
petent individual . 
or conciseness office 
Park ares 


RA, 6-651] 


EMBASSY sec... pres tige pos., 
and. e213 1 mo. ME. &-6009 
jakeman. A-1 Associates, a 

SECRETARY- ~White, age 21 to 35 

for hotel sales manager: pleasan' 

working conditions; employee ben- 
t 


efite «a 
Net gg office, Mayflower 
otel. Conn. ave. and DeSales 


SECRETARY —Paten: Atorney. with 
abou re- 


oar rent 


Box M.- 430. 


SECRETARY 


MUST BE EXPERIENCED. One of; 
Washineton's finest hote pieas- 
ant work! ne + acces full com - 
pany beneti 


APPLY PE 
Sheraton- 


sirable 


NNEL OFFICE 
ariton Hotel 


SECRETARY CLERK 
Permanent position in ereas office 
Typing roauires Pleasant working 

THERN DISC “OUNT 
me rt Mr Scot 
at RETARY—Shorthand desirable 
ogton: 83 Phone JA. 5-5600 
Su bs } 


} cond CoO 
DY. 


SECRETARIES 
JUNIOR STENOS 


wah AND EXPERIENCED 
AND H. &. GRADS 


interesting. 
ne shorthand, me 
"Sictastons and others, 


EXCELLENT OPPORTUN! TEs. 
wis won OTHERS 


Ste ‘MI SS 
232 ee ae BLDG. 
OS 19TH ST. NW. AT * esman 
SECRET ARY - STENOGRAPHER — 
erm. pos. With established concern 


of na- 
tional trade a Excellent skills. 
diversified . 
Ra 


ona 
sal. $4200 


yices. 1025 Conn 
7-415 


SEC RETARY—Labor union, 
yping work on pension 
: — ros A ‘— dut 
benefit Bes 
ELIZ \RETH PI NKS 
Counseling 
_Ave. NW 


sood 
.es 


<a 
SfoN Personne! 
Services 1025 Conn 
DL. 7-4150 snes 


ECRETARY 

Pia... contractor 
quires followine ouassseasene 
years college trainin age 24-34 
excellent in shorthand. use of elec 
tric typewriter 
chine —- 
Ppieasing persona!'t 
minded end defini tely iy abie 


' 8 
; Jacksonville 
: 


' 
| 


RECErT oe Hos o| 
PROP. PERSO ME g-2000 


ERSONNEL 
RENTAL ASST. 


Diversified position in 


ears ve 
with exp 


. one calls piease 
“REGISTERED NURSES 
FOR ALL SHIFTS 
HADLEY HOSPITAL 


rental dept | 


SECRETARY 


RE LOOKIN 
PIDUA 


RESIDENT MCR 


Rafergaces A 7 Mon. 10 te & er 
: 


|» 
beeen Sears 


fi A “ony. 
HOTEL. Springfield Va 
Fi. 4-9696. 


SALES 


Set y >a Part & full time 
a”) 5-404. 


SALES 
VIRGINIA RESIDENTS 


2-30". m.- 
Jensen, 


Saeet ent eppertanity for dig- 
Ned eellens a arecuate or equir- 

ai interesting. \easant 

work In specialty saies fe bave 
thorough training program. 


| 


ar 
person Monday ONLY 
1:00 and 5:00. 


RENAIRE 
101 EYE ST. SE 
CORNER NEW JERSEY & FYE 
ASK FOR MRS. KAHLER 


SALESLADY — 


wanted. must be 

medium to better-price 
ary open. Greta Stevens Shoo, 
W. Br st : hurch., 


YY 


y 


JE. 32-3212 


+ 


SALESLADY 


(Experienced) 


: 
} 


Interesting Work 
Specializing in 


BETTER DRESSES 


Earn With Prestige 
Full Time 
Srporiences 


week, ral 
emp.orve "Senefiis 


Pive-day, 
discount 


40 - hour 
ana other! 


: 
| 


Apols Bolo: orment Office 


RALEIGH 
HABERDASHER 


1228 PF St. NW. 


SALESLADY—To sell and demon- 
strate A ey Bervice hs - or | 
part-ti Appr 3162 Mt. Pieas- | 


week 
working 


Gave and vacetion. 

Gowntown Wash end Ariin oe 
Va one NA w-0365 9 to 10:30 
mM. except & 


FANNY. FAR MER 
CANDY SHOP 


SRUERLADY “Part time, | igoeais 


Spf rta- 
—- Beyda 4, 
Ph 


SALESWOMEN 


' 
Permanent. Openings for experi- 
enced saleswomen or we wil) train 
women interested in m ne seli- 
Many interest- 
opening 


DINCOUNT on Pal WEEE 
Benenis 


Many Other Company 
+4 
EMPLOY Ment Orricas 


THE HECHT CO. 


Ae aeTaRy 


| 
Fr 


W_IN WAS 


LLOYDS 


eet 


for work 
“telentife 


egos SEE 
+ nv 


7 
nual lesve. 15. days sick 


SECRETARIES 
CLERK-TYPISTS 


: 
| 


| 


Positions available at both 
SILVER SPRING and 
HOWARD COUNTY loca- 
tions Howard County 
Laboratory is located on 
Alternate Route 29 ap- 
proximately: 25 minutes 
from Silver Spring by car. 


Excellent working conditions 
Liberal employee benefits 


Please Aooly 9 A.M. to 3 P.M 


/THE JOHNS HOPKINS 


UNIVERSITY 


APPLIED PHYSICS 
LABORATORY 


862! Georgia Avenue 
Silver Spring, Md. 
JU. 9-7700 


ECRETARY—Recevt. Good ist | 
with pleasing personality +t. = 
ar 


. mm 8e 
ton Tewer Apts..| 
Phas calls, please. 
ational magazine 
Nac mediate ning ' 
a Girl Priday. 
5 D and 
eulired Air-conditioned office 
convenient owntown location 
Congeenia! ogrroundines Paid bs 


Call "Wis. Sieere. EY | 


fe Ets Rope — 
See ABBEY First 


1338 Bye ~ NW. ST 3-0190 
~ te flee $4400 
ss 


70 

$3400 
$3400 up| 
Px. $238! 


$3900 

en st. $260 up 
good with fies.. 00 

Kenilworth 


' 


at 
SF — “Hryasiaviile 
Medical secy.. . 
Steno - “ree ry 
sone. Gir Reiter Tak 
Ste 
Dictaphone eecy 
Recepti oniet secy.. asen 


te 
typist, 2b. 


SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE 


Rainier. 


of eDortunity for | 
= and 

eee sracuate. | 
Extensive on-the- 9D training bdro-| 
srem. Cai ise Becker. COURTESY | 
ABBOC NA. 68-1412. 9:30 te! 
5|.. m= 


Un wpual ca ster 
ted 


real estate| 
initiot ive and ée- 
neces 


WASH Pr eT AT TTH NW 
PA INGTON- Amt. VA 
Giebe Rd. & Wilson Bivd. 


sses Handicapped 

women & sir. skilled or sem)- 
skilled. Apply Good Wil 
tries Personmel office. 1} 
noon 


Indus 
s 20th 
nw. 9 te i2 


st 
Pr 


ound de- | 


—— “Washine- 
ele ‘ 


un 3 


ton 


ec 
‘tee , 
Becretary’ e “wr J fee 


WALTER He “Kessi 


type- 


diy 


‘| SHIRT PRESSERS 


. aru) 


enc 
but delptul. 


Exp. and fast. high Rp mg 
rate anc guarantee. x 


; 


Pxeperienced only: min. $! 
— peopmens pe nah - Hub | 
ss. ena Eastern | 


Excellent es 
sion and draw 
a 0 | of 


THE HECHT CO. 


., short- 
Mr.) 

er 3 month's employment 

Ss at.) 


4. | SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR 


Personne}! 
} 


insuraace y) : 


5 3900 ) 


Or We Will Train Skilled Typist 


$50 5 


be have severa 


raphers desiring 


STENOGRAPHER 


Needed at once Type 45-50 wo 
8h hand wom. Air-con 
tioned office om 


leave 
privileces. Call &- 
226. 


3600 


RATC 
luxury-type air-conditioned bide 
must have secretarial switchboard 
experience: good 

conditions 
| PARK , ‘ie 
NW. or call EM 
Str CeBOaRe OPK... wht. 
Waitresses 


Fount taln g@tris, tg 
ort-order coo 
162F DARD EMPL. 8 SERV 


top sal 


Os 


c iw 
ganctes listed #3400- 
chers Agency, dt Charles 
’ 


ite 
SCHOO! positions in 
chemistry anc ph 


ence 
ROARDING SCHOO 


Positions 
Va 


in English Soanish and | 


tions paying top salaries 
ACHERS AGCY 1341 
RE 938 


i* oes 
Must ty 
BETH PIN 

— 


AM 
G naw 


OPE “recept_ Will ra 
Age x ei £280 Liz 
Per 


reogne! os 
G08 Conn 


ae ~85 
Evans at BOYD's. cor. 12th & 


| “TYPIST-CLERK, $300 


Mature rapi advancem ; 
cy ASEEY PERSONNEL 1300 La Tre Nw 


TYPIST 


Fepertence with TBM nom ne nec 
Top sal for exp son 0 6wwhe 
snows copy prep 


) ack at Boyd's. 
i2uh ~ ao NA. 8-2340 


VARITYPIST 


Por publication dept 
neering fir 
good command 


of Engi- 


hine 


Interviews FAM to 3 P. M. 


bilit to 
copy on a D P mac 


Maryland Electronic 
Manufacturing Corp. 


S009 Calvert Rd 
Cc lege P. Md. 
WA. 7-9200 
WANTED white 
over she ry paw 


A 
rE OLD Brtin 
1339 Conn. A y 


WAITRESS. 


shif App’ 
MAY?! Ow ER DON 

Ss} OP oD rst ae. ean 

“ Vid t ati cf — Whit Pari -iime 

dinn \ person. No 

Resteurent 

Spring 


WAITRESSES 
HOT SHOPPES 


REPRESENT ATIVE 
orr 


WAITRESSES 
per 
tips 
> mm 


te 


Night 


reson, 


8250 Georgia ave. Silv 
> = 


— TH 


cUSs 
TUESDAY. JULY 
Tw 


} - SHOPPE, 
4340 CONN. AVE 


Apply directly to the Shoppe 
APPLICANTS IN 


3. oe ED. 
EMPLOY MENT OTHER 
pop — SHOULD AP- 


HOT SHOPPE 
EMPLOYMENT OFFICE 
1341 G ST. NW. 


WAITRESS" 


— po pos! tion in last. nos- 
resteura 


' 
oo 
Apply Crown Restaurant. si? i 44 
: 

fe 
white! exper 


Cou 
xc tive yy “salary 
No Sun, work. 


Pietcher's — 
fisconsin 


’ im person 
521 LO Branch ave 

Walt = axeert 
nrs.. 5 te 

Rest Bae, AS ark 


are t— stp enced E 
Rest. 
= 


| 
enced. | evening | 


T2.'s 8p 7 


rine. 
ite. part- time, 1i- 3 
er ly 


office work 

im downtown Usic store 5-¢da ay 
week. See r. Dixon, JORDAN'S. | 
cormer 13th and @ sts. sw. | 
WOMAN to work in erill. 40 to 
rears of ase. Part time. UN. 4- 


for iuncheonette 
e@ experience necessary 
advancement Apply Hyratte-| 
vil je Bowling Alley. 5503 Baltimore | 
attervilie. Ma. 


A... 


LADY — Nea intelligent. | 
“with, , ability to r* telep One | 
cont ~ Good Mr. | 


YOUNG LADY 
PERMANENT POSITION 
Excellent opportunity for advance- 
ment Pleasant working conditions 
Ne Saturday work during summer 

month Many company benefits, 

typing essential. 

American Finance Co. 
(SEE MR. HEINECKE) 
7932 Georgia Ave. 
Silver Spring, Md. 


(Mr. Hoffacker) 
3308 Rhode Island Ave. 
Mt. Rainier, Md. 


YOUNG LADY 


poont office of national) 
as 

ant young lad 
pany war 


For 
JU 


7. 18 t : 
congenta) stal! 
M> Grifin. 


4 


YOUNG WOMEN | 
time ane part time opportun!. 
ao le sotenei chain os 
mee studios: 35 hour 
aS. 1336 New York | 
lil « @ | 


bi 
a5. Appi f ‘s 


Hy a y Pe uly 5 


operation of A-ray equipment ene 
deve. gpment of tilm is pubi: 

health d ossession of & va. id 
license as -y registered X- ~K. tech - 

experience re- 

p hours 9-5 

~~ per anoum.| 

t. 406 


Apply ity Personne! 


i- 
im 


ence peoscsere. Costs no othing 
try teday for sampics 
eal Greeting 
ie. ich. 
PART TIME 
CAREER LADY 


partes | ab-mour week. Hours 7a 560-680 


; individual 
and 


ms 


q 16\HELP, WOMEN 
Tees crass, ren 25, “hae ew 
+e Ke, _ h. hy. 
This mu aad did opportunity it] » 

x ¥ 
7. ti 


temporary em- 


m 
di-; 
Airline 

Ext 


for 


5| BOYD" 3 “for. 


ar 


Ave 


"duplicating. 


16)THE. WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
MARYLAND “MOTHERS | ema rt A et 
Bad staat il ie FT work. 415,000 
your ow Sunday 
Circulation 


means quicker sales results 
for Washington Post and 
Times Herald classified ad- 
vertisers. To place your ad 
for Su 


Phone 


DOMESTIC—Live in 


Scr. Burin Ai Aasoctat adv. 


“8 69196. 


hildren 1 yr. and 
interv) w between 
315 Holbrook «st 


tor-chauffeur 


ay. $16 Wk 
children 
DIES Ex- 


GIRL to care for 
, yrs... S18 wk. 
an Pp. Mm. 


' 


fe 


local 


per 
— nterview. oe appointment 
ware Theos. MAN AND WIFE—Janit 


and m _ 2 for ofoe ees 


Reis, 
WHITE NURSE—2 roun 
save $200 mo. 


| REpublic 7-1234 
— —Man & wife. age 40 to cs| ROOMS, FURNISHED 24 


60. 
‘ household “duties 
& waitin : 
DUPON CIR.—Excel. rms 
$35. + bath, $70 Maid 


K EN NCY. © wants wom- 
choo! district for spe- 
cial work of petiens) ; rtan 
full or part time UN. 4-5 
— POPUL 
neighborhood = 
n AVON fr and sery- 
icine Yates cosmetic demands 
i) 


$3900; EXE type: excel.” 


CUTIVE 

opprty. Bethesda secretary, young. | ¢ baby slitins. washing 
ines DAIL Y—ail LU. 232-5613 

Finds” Gpest 


% city—Ineuire aT 

‘12th RG SITUATIONS, MEN 19 
= | ADMINISTRATIVE ENGINEER 
| ¥ m , BS gen. ene 
TP gg TIME 106d; cupertenced in assuming ed- 
sire. spepmance®” Rout Sponaibtity” tn’ position associated | GE 
— ours with techates! operations. Box 58) 

604. Post-TH 


in. Ligh 
fain cooking 
es. Phon = 


COL. \ ees Sze. care enstdten 
Live in. 5 day $i2 wk. 


$25. 
serv. 


$8-810 
running 
193, 


rms > 
Nnen. 


Fr ST. ohh tae | 
. wants wk. Ma Serv. 
and ironing ’ 
© ST. NW., 1723--DOWNTOWN 


VIVIAN HOTEL 
Quiet home-like: nice lobby: TV 
hr b= ore : J water 

> s 
oes, inten. "tans. 


. VYR—FPrt. tm. 
~3294, FE. 3-307 


for 
re.«! 
Nenible 


A 


ee 


Promotion Dept. 
CLERK 


exper 


col.. G. 
rest yrant 


in bakery 


"pote, 


shopping area 
out kit.: laundry privis 8-5 
evenings after 6:30. weekends ane 
‘ime 


_ + script. ex- 
perienced , @. 4 whe § night shift 
quiet, quaiity house. x 693 


COL, young man wishes oe Job 


bus driver or wv 


' 
ee all ottice. ' 
ayrToll. tax. costs. | 
' 


MASS AVE. hw.  o5Lee 

frt rm lee 
pices fur 

serv... refs 

Call owner, 

8-9 0. 


Position evailable in 
an \ 
with fic-| rM 3-020 or ME. 
Box 696, 


nouse-yardman, 
hoor & Epi civen. 
+ | eg par’ 


student, ie 
ad >» EM 
M. per 


ren 
. = D Enotch ever 
ai 


furn. 
laree Wine 

in rm 

shopping 


CAP. ST. NE... 5613-—Beaat 
rm 4 


9 n 

The Washington Tess Laundry done. 

and Times Herald 
1515 L STREET 


ae Greene rm. away from 


crosse-ventilation : 


| A pp ahr 
ie feign. ee 


rec 
abill 
PA 
-time sustainin 
olfice & part time. sec 


associate desire 


© IB ce — | rm.. kit shane 
(3). itetime ye re- " 
*f —— - bales jou bed, $0 exp. 


Wintht a 
Bartender-mar 2 


|.B.M. Operators $48. 
Experienced Card Punching 
and Verifying 


She hcs: clean 
water, $6.50 


N 
eee Wis—Tee. sin 
Dp. 


for gentieman; trans 


gi- 
neer. » a ok rs tehes domes- | 6 
tle or fore} : ‘itlilation in devel- 
— vended inter —Bed-sittinge rm. pvt entr, 
Suburban Location phone. TV: close everything. 
Air-Conditioned Facilities 


Excellent Working Conditions 


* seepine fms. 


eet 
a Wenteutter ene 
i ¥ks 8 from out of 


neatly 


new bed unlimit te 


rm. 
"phone. 
gg metab eth hom . 


Apply in Person RA 
8B AM. to 4 PM 


Monday through Friday 


MELPAR, INC. | 


Subsidiary of Westinghouse 
Air Brake Company 


urD 304 — > 
divria' JOR in in, refrigeration field ’ “ae. bay fri. 
echa ; Tee: kit. pris.: pvt. home, 


iid pb 4T- aw. 1iit—Ofe 
det hom 


6thr Se! 
stat Home ‘orivis Bus at door. 
I 


(Com “TE. “school bow desires 
time or part-time work. LU 
oe.y 
in 
month, 


’ 
bath phone 
$40 50 


ae & b ate. 


Bk ND Ro ' ve ‘ 
| SITUATIONS, WOMEN 20) Foomi man only: 


BOUSEWIFE desires werk, ot home H J ue: 6t0 
addressing envelopes other a nice) ae 


itu oat. 
39 ~ “DU. 7: 9310. 
er sek 


3000 Arlington Blvd. 
Falls Church, Va 

‘Take Arnold 2 V_bug from 

& E Ste. NW. te F pian 


7 yb. W.. 
> e 
any (yD Redee 
rm.; mr. 


” fare 


ae. PeAcTic ic Nak 0 
COLLEGE GIRLS ation, 
BUSINESS GIRLS 


trapsportati eg 


with refs 


_§o ag a t mel p 
HAWTHCRNE = EL 


2134 G ST. NW., RE. 7-4027 
Why? 


nurse r col 
53-4461 


STENOS-TYPISTS 


YOU WANT A TEMPORART 
jOB FOR A DAY. A WEEK OR 
A MONTH 


a: os yet 7 accurate 
; daughters would like) 
anase 3 apt. bide. JO 2-99'0 
0 © do at home. Lroning. ad-| 
dressing envelopes an cards by) 
hand an pephone soliciting 


YPING and fi! ing 
Tr BA. 3 
with 2 


ve 

single aad 

ooms 
sunshine 

“Tom 89 50 


$12.50 WEEK UP 


Lae. dbie 
Also 


JOIN THE STAFF OF 
"adarenpoeraah. +6 re) 


“KELLY GIRLS” oo ABY ass ex 3-868 


es auntain or acoun: 
WORK FOR US IN WASH- cor cal eae et sr 


soit = 
INGTON’S MOST BEAUTIFUL gant os peatorses. | 
AIR-CONDITIONED OFFICES 

IN GOOD LOCATIONS. 


EARN MONEY ON YOUR 
VACATION 
WORK FOR Us ON OUR PAYROLL | 
NO PRE FOR PLACEME 
RUSSELL KELLY 
OFFICE SERVICE 


REPRESENTED BY 


FIELDS AGENCY | 
ST. 3-5448 


723 SHERATON BLDG. 
| 711 14TH ST. NW. 


’ 
Ae BEEK -AY 

IN VER Christ. 
° oma pe alized 
Profite to 

book me. as 

PR ift 

“N 476 


-F.. 


* os, es 


| we 
day or “evening: 


) eon 
c ristion woman Gesires night 

work as char-woman or ges work 

4 Gays & SP 


Maid 
Conn ve 
town i 
adity GEORL 
week. 3-647 


| nw. A 
SITUATIONS. SSC 7 Bist te 


Lee 
| * A & nw. 
twa.: attr. repe.; ithou 


5 days & 


=) 


BABY 
| & 
5 


SITTER. LNW... 
ay oF Blehis. 

iss for ; 
Ne one weekly work 


b rm 
share tats . 


~14) tiles 
eye aoe f.Be., Des 
ti4 wk TA 8 
; 


$135 per mo. Call 


—<ol. Woman des for = 


ree 


bottom 


wk 5 or 6 irl: 
EB. 2-0118. COL. — 
ouse clean-} to share with mar 


What have ieee tm mkt -2041. 
ome _ 


se 
vile. ur thee” 
2. ck rm. with cross 
— good x AD $1 49, 
wi re 
OmL cou D weats week | 5 bgt 
er oo ®, week cook 


sii 


Gen tieman 


re. 


- Ma . 

on 

mas Carts fm. £9 by La 4 3265. afi’ > 

Clean rms. "a2 30 mo. Li. 3-3115. 

desires nae week en "SS at 22-430 2 rm. for man. 
2-231 UV. 7-i9i7 

in vour 

301 3- 


wood, Dept 


_——»— — 


GROW WITH 
FOOD FAIR s py | 
wishes day Os aa and clean-) 


COMPTOMETER | | dil eete - Sy ms "atin 6 
OPERATOR |% Wek 


Our expansion has created 
an excellent position. The 
person selected for this 
position must be a well- 
experienced Comptometer 
Operator, capable of as- 
suming immediate respon- 
sibility in our staff offices. 
Experience with Felt-Ter- 
rant equipment necessery. 


EXCELLENT STARTING 
‘SALARY 
REGULAR INCREASES 
VACATIONS—SICK PAY 
BENEFITS 


aso weekend "gare: 
wants Job. hw. for elderly 


wie desires & Gays work «ass 
sting Experienced De- 
eferences . 


home. 


an 
em . yy rge jront 


er. N . 
| or. trans. 


wants 
bemsowert sand, child care 


al 
L 


—Ne: we. frt rm: privet 
nr. trans empl. perso Lt. 4 
$ 


Gesires s day wor colo Py D—i 20 pth et Be 


’ 


iD 
wants ree-| 
Thursdays 


6 ol. experience 
uiar work Weds. 
work or 


full time Cal i'w 
oo i dexlres a mother's 


N wishes dish wash- 


- 
dbie. rms All 


. i 
2 rms. Cony 


ea: Brith “Co. 


4 
rras 
“it a, Bb Yaa 


° rm pvt 
near 


rc om = it) 
te oe 


4) 


esires 


Fone i privis.; ‘{renee. 


home 
ié6 Quincy s. nw.—Sele £ i, 
By oan exci , 


st. ue 
furn; 


Ly. 1 ae 


care 5 das, ath § on. ; ——. 
mothers e ansp im -4978. 
eri. we deel ira or unfurn.: se 

LI. 6-6395 


| of Kitehes. 


COL, ——- rms. urn, 

and | use gs kitchen, 
Confidential Interview 
Apply in Person at 

2060 W. Va. Ave., on July 10 pias 

Between 9 a. ™. and 5 p. m.| children 


care of 


he. 
Y wants « ; days. | 


live im oF out; ROOM ’ UN URNISHED 
estes 1 h.w.. child care. COLORED—Kendall St. NE. 1871-- 
798 < money jss' 2 adjoining rms. retrig. LA. 6-9189 
ocktfla GP sree PAM ag as SOT ANS OOuS 
t a Bs £9 xe st onl ig — —— 
com eB 1h 4-190 c a ee Mee 


—_ — 
ds. woman wants position. 5) 


io a ‘Bis hours « Gar: eriy a her 
vaca ; 


a Bt Ee 
money. 1310 16th Si. ‘Apoly Men-| -¥ 


» ar * ys 


Bupoat 


& par 


a - vic. — 
urn.: refri¢. 


 Paee tie 


ooms. 


2 Ff nicely 
rum. water. Li. 4 


nurse “deeirs 5 


CHEVROLET DEALER | 
HAS AN OPENING FOR ecent refs. 
7 os 5 daze work ouw 


al care | : 


Live in or eu 


ar ve. S8.- 
ere | refrig. erili: 


: —K ms ball 0 Bece 
tions. Security rg 


| dots pi-9. 


As 
semi-pr. bth $13.50 iu 6-38#1. 
ARD 29 


mS WITH 
| eee a? 


wt oo ah. 3-2084 


Fase di 
merit "Warnier 
from 


cae a 5-643 | rms. Bui ” good Ge 


| ip Reniagen. bus cor Ot. & ae nw. A distinct heme for Yung 
HARTNETT HALL 


iA rm... 2 
CAIRO HOTEL 
Good food; pleasant accom- 


modations and lots of social 

| activities. $14 per week & up. 

1426 21st ST. NW. 
HU. 3-5432 


; 


AN EXPERIENCED PBX | €6t. « iF 
OPERATOR. PLEASANT bes? me des. re 
WORKING CONDI- bo 
TIONS AND VACA | he . 
TION WITH PAY child ¢ 
MRS. McDONNELL. bares 
ADDISON CHEVROLET, | ¢ 
2303 (15TH ST. NW. L 
U.S. Empl. Service saa 
1724 F STREET NW. | oe Coline 3 et 
NO FEES Call Bun.. except from i-6 Dp. @ 
HOTEL-RESTAURANT & SERVICE A 
CE 
THIRD FLOOR Cam 
Cashier. Hotel, resteurant or drug) A 
store tap 
Pastry— 25-45 yrs. 
+ ys 


7 
21-45 gyre. hotel, restes-| 
ex so? 


| some with Bpecia 
7 r 40 9tt rates Hey $10 $0 per wx. @ 
res. "i845 yrs ll or might 2- 
rs. full or part 
: RP ‘ non REPRO _ 
olored Saleswomen 
Neat ing. 25-45. te take 
care * cor oulieel anatauners il 
Mon 9 te ll. 900 F a 
AIRLINES 
= TRAVEL NEED 


ee POST and TIMES HERALD 


Sunday, July &, se: nal RRS 


APTS., FURNISHED 34 


382,000 
Daily 
Circulation . 


means quicker sales results 
for Washington Post and 
Times Herald classified ad- 
vertisers. To place your ad 


Phone 
REpublic 7-1234 


CLUB MASON 
1726 New Hamo. Ave. NW. 

rms... ne paths for 4 
hon Rotel services 


rree 


ewly -dec 


Hi, pret ath £55. RA. 3 
ony « 
lager 
tm bent ot 
R ¥ ww i7—1 | 


elevator 


ec.; t 


furn.. redec.. 


apt _ with Pe beth: 
Pry. git 
roun 


ov wi. enter 
90d edult 


; Driv. entr 


—§ girls. ron 
) leas; pvt. bem and entr.; conv 


sistein ave ave 


. ' ve — 7a 
. , sh ith 
wi Mo. FF ekers or drink- 
Pina 9 ela | 
ABC NU to 


>| 


| auiet 


a rms. liv. tm. din : 
th. pvt. entr.: new Soaps: utils 
er, §) a f.380 


ut & ou ft. , fetria. ¢ 
ine 


4 
8-7 
. nd one tables haya ae 
‘ fea and ae ae 


tors 
for child 
dik. off 


Ga. | 


id 5- Pi ee --) or! 


_ Gay care Country home. 
HOM 


: = 
v FR ey Fe usa Reda Ph, thu 6 


orte bs 


acres ‘tal 


3 Shoreham—3 


vie pare 


aring 6 Sale $12,000 
a 
on wily 


me Pree Rent 


ed 


are ' 
| apartments 


- phy . iv 

rm. ae oad t} 

rte Be. voit and D. ©. Avail 
7 Com! 2 or 3-rm 

ar... ‘prt . semipvt bath conv 

a 037 


A 
rm bedrm 


~~. — 


; ak 
RA 


’ , —3d fi 
kit Stile inel 
, 3901—Gerden apt 
— liv bed arm kit -din bath 
entrance. $75. util. inci Le 


beth: sood 
rit 1326 


con - | 


Pare 

i , = 

«BLS hall: ideal 
Box 695 


picely rare. nape 
ing 


| tor “August visitors 


N. ARLINGTON 
LARGE EFFICIENCY 


OUTSTAN $o>. — 


/RANDALL H. HAGNER, INC 
| 132, CONN. AVE 
WOODLEY PL. NW. 


r attic fan. ca 
, Ln 


oes aeepee 


; ds. x 
rch. 

' Phila inv) ted. 
furn. tiv 
ci. batr. 

4. : ”» 

TT 

: Liv rm. .. , 

rn child welcome 

i Nw rm Et. 

h. uti inet oe” children eac- 
i ve. 


iti sT iT i ms all 


rm. 
Open 


bedrm 


' 


| pert bath; bk ered: ri 


Lae. dbedrm.. 
ils. ine! . cony. +t 


. e658 per mo. up 
| Ditales ~ teh apt... 4.50 per mo 
Utvities included. resident 


OTH SE Nw 1333-—Mid~ “el ity apts 
| _ reel. 


ak tiowm, Jovy 
7 ine) 
nd beck ent Newty ase "HO | 
eet oT. WW.. ilt—Bikieae 


peated 


prt. ent. ist ny a wtih. “nel; 


I 
| irt 


bedrms.. liv. rm. kit 
i A 


spel wti xh oat 904 14th 


vey 


v entr —— bath 
, close to every- 


: > -Tm : 
tils.. telephone. yard aunaes 


at 


c wp, 8 i. 7 2- bar 
reh 
eek. mo. r 


2- - wees for ‘aie-eend i pe een | 
te-wall carpet; TY rets $110.) 


: - Priv 
bedrm. kit... iv. fF 
facil : close shops: 
bec paren. comp +i 

Quiet neighbor- 


ate | 
entrance. m 
bath: wash 


A. 
A 


vely ; rm. 
beth. newts, édec.. new furn.. 0 


" and tA: also “Me. $538, | “ot 
o | ey turn. Trans 


| 


. ~ s = 
16th & Irving nw. beaut — Liv 
epithet toe 
occu cy 
5 | ecArthur Bivd. th. kitchen- 


iving rm. bedr dineite 


tls. fnel. From $45 mo. 


 GARDEN- TYPE APTS. 
GLASSMANOR 


210 Winth 
block south Capite 


+.\i ANG T BEDROOMS —Mod 
dec..| active turniture: $91 to vos bo 


foyer, 
ig 


.. iy. rm. dining 
bath: all wtils.: 
n e 


except 
et ormation, 


$c pm, -. 


528 23rd ST. N.W. 


New. modern efficieicy apts. in 
immaculate powasowe ont bidg.. 
| | seen distance verything. 
$108 te $155. nae “utils. See 


Brand-New, Air-Cond. 


oR. 


AIR-CONDITIONED 
CARILLON HOUSE 


2500 WISCONSIN AVE. NW. 


EFFICIENCY APARTMENTS 


en neg A , ~ MR 
furnished by Dorothy Draper. 


: iv om. - érm.. 
». well maintained bidg 

; MP US. tear 
> rm... ro. oe es 
$s ~~ 


Cool , harming 
_ Dlus 
over 
leronees 


ra 

@llent 
erate entrance ze. 

perch overlooking 


.. 
with charm and antiay 


t.. “bath. 
utilis. ; 


evision antenna eystem. ca- 
Pe.. facilities: as minutes from 


Your Inspection Invited 
CALL EM. 2-8800 


11332 BRYANT ST. NE. 


(Nr. 13th & R. I. Ave. off 
Brentwood) Apt. 3, 4 rms., 
bath, porch, new furn., twin) 

beds; see to appreciste. 
| ee 50. On Premises, 12 noon 
to5o.m 


AND 2-BEDRM. APTS. 
to downtown Wash 
furan. 
MS) 
dows. onoe a 
cony 


is min 


2-, Fs soe 
HOUSE TYPE 
Completely Furnished 
JEFFERSON VILLAGE 


“DALY sto 8: Go Fo a 


JE. 2-5500 


> ad 
7 


ee lete 
. sep. comp 


saa 
Petes 


rm. aloes 
bide. See 
S57 —I-rm 
tranep. at 
evel: 18t5 


— at = mee: ist ‘£785 | 
Che by RE rita 3 nice! 


ne «| 2-3600 
~ 3133—1 


rood 
rch. priv ste | 


Apply Apt. 4 Baws 


_ APT. BOUNTIVNG 
selections ail parts 
Ro ice, MANDEL, AD. 4 


eet 


. 3. 
| Sie eitie. @& i-bedrm. abte. TU, 
COLO — 


DONNA LEE 


Suburban Living With 
City Convenience 
Extra Large 2 Bedrms. 
Bus, Schools, Shopping 
Children Welcome 
Closets 0a 


Soundproof, Fireproof 
PETS PERMITTED 


Furn.-Unfurn. 
RESERVE NOW! 


noes (am bX} i 


EFFICIENCY APTS. 


IMMEDIATE occupancy: large ® ¢ 
bidg.: automatic eer. 
auiichboard: tile ub showers 


| 865 50 
“BED APT. $73 To natin 
| EXC RANSP GOOD [ 


NICELY furnyshed 

con pt hotel, } 

will sublet for 2 years: idea 
business executive, senior «6 
embassy official: aval. Aus 
| EM. 2-4723 


| (ROMANCE JN THE AIR’! 


| Cong ress House 


w seme \N *: BOA 
ARD BV 


fers California and Florida type 
urnished studio efficiencies. Pri 
vate ba: con! es ar each apartment 
be stars reakfast | 
terrace. dine eut- 
ender eandiel ight 


; 


| doors 
pee ot Door 
Decor 
ost ptrest Parking 
Antenns 
—~ Kitchens 
nin 


arpe "Corridors 
Super Closets 


$105 MONTHLY 
1-BEDRM. APT., $125 
INCLUDES UTILITIES. 


LOCATED AT THE TOP OF 
THE HILL AT 
3970 Pennsyivania Ave. 5S.E. 


™% Block from Howard Johneon'’s 
And 3 Adiscent Shoppine Centers | 


| SEE RES. MOR. ON PREMICNS 
LU. 4-8638 


SIONEY Z. MENSH & CO. 
S NA. 8-6440 


eco oe apt. ahd eas 
ese 


eat ere oft. . xX 2 be 


ARLI tage 
Economy Plus ce 


914 So. Buchanan St. 
te shopping center and 
+, to save Ann 'x 


-epan, 
oom, living 
tchen and beth. 870 per 


at miter 6 eerense 
venga ‘og at) or i. . 
Ust CS. 
| 100 ya, a _ _ NA. §-8100 
ARLINGTON 


MODERN BRICK APT. B 
Attractive 2-bed a 
Pollard St r 


OF TRADE | 


ala 
3804 or ‘call 
724 14th 8t 


; ac ye \s 
ak 
) sh ANON y ideas’ 


IF 
Ar ington Towers | 


Featuring a 


Ymmed ly c- ro! — 


ice. Sum decks, laundry rooms and 
& complete shopping center on 
ro . 
Erric 


NCIES .... 


¢ 
Rd 

closets. podera $72.50 te $120 
1-BEDROOM—$68 & $77.50 
Lee. cor. apt... cool and ulet: 
parauet floors. *. closets: ample 
porsme: us. shop. center: 

min om send Ari. all 
Gults. JA. 8-26 


LOCAT!I 
1028 CONN. A 
1 room. Kit. and beth for I er 2) 
weekly: also) 
: on _ bath offered 
rates: air 


um 
ditton ~ Ay aval able. 
and = (I furn 


nene ish 
elev. and Switehboara service: 
beart of downtown Wash 
HO) ME 68-2161 
rig DG. she Exce! 
wn 


con- 

aid service | 
-h 

in| 


=| BELLEVUE. 


GARDENS |: 


1-FPARE TON 
4688 NICHOLS AVE. SW. 
1 Bedrm., Unfurn... 
| Bedrm., Fu 
EPPiCTENCY~ sO 
2 Bedrms., Te eany $76.50 | 
(PLUS UTILITIMG) 
omple tely modern: large 
y= 


: 


' 
| 
Gamond fawn, plarero round bell 
PHONE JO. 1-2700 
Open Daily, 9 to 6 P. M. 
Sunday, 1 to 6 P. M. 


co... isso 
furn 


Ingleside Terr. WW — 
| . kit 


| st. ne; 
h 


vic 
LASALLE APT. HOTEL 


Incl, utile. leuendry feectiities 
bleck te sh 


ay ap pnegring at | gus ——. 
M. T, Broyhill i. Sons. 
4610 Lee Hyy my, +- “ane 
ARLINGTON, 


“bedroom duples apt: 
rear entrance: livi 
ining ares ond 


second nept) 
in rent 

tor 
Sw rd. Ari. Va. or 


H. L. RUST CO 
| A201 15th NW, _NA. 8-8100 | 


BOLLING xb at an 


538 eed 5 
. = Gimette. kit. 


beth —_ rice pereh. Move in now 
w rent Rey at 541 New- 


VA. and 


ritenen 0 an es 


. Vic. 
rm. apt.; utils 


on hi 


BRIGHTWOOD 
CONCORD GARDENS 


cunts aly toc ed end Au- 
5 ; r-c — 
me fe Ir . > ident Mt 
ults 5 — Manaee 

Pf uri ave. ae. eer. 


PD. r. Co 
Indep. ave. se ~ aes. or bus.: ~. 
4 rms, kit end b.; 3d un 


» 2 
bedrm. liv. rm.. kit.-din.. 
Redec.. $75 . witle NA. | 


LAREN 
3138 N. 10th ST. 
ARLINGTON, VA, 


| Newly decorated 1 
Te ona’ penne : 


. LR. 
1 bedroom ing 

Kitchen and beth: vs eth: 
ties oy = 


he: 


god PS pri 


“Gin 
plus 
Apt. 1. NA. 8-2000.' 


vel y furnished 
_ inauire 


) 
| 
— | 


ee ei 


SER uple wi 
ren wo - J te erent 


able — Cal Mrs 
’ 


* chil- 
esrocm 


okes. = ia 


GTON, ©. — Two geallemen 
vous like to share a nicely furn, 
with enother. Cony. icc. 


. tA an- 
; in heres cony. to 


(white) 


z°¢ 
er Sire. ace 13-22. fern. apt. “Arh 


: stru 
yw Aa, tn i 
© with private rms. and 
19 mene. 


oaiy 4101 wn yt we 


apt.: 


’ re re “ 
Q uti ne Bae 
aa. ie wi 

| 4 1 une, x 
> SORTS 36 


at Fae 1 dedrm.. “aa ew 3 | 


BELLE VIEW 


ON SEA MT 

a BP pion tate 

SWIMMING POOL 
WADING POOL 


EXCLUSIVE POR RESID 
AT NO ADDITIONAL cost 


mA 


ey — Te. 


ms 
rm 


e. Ari. JA. 


y turn. 


conv. . location. 


air-con 


mile south of. Alea: 
rom downtown 

main , oe and 20 
| Belvo 

atmosphere 

| re grounds im country ig 

all city ee 
) pode aug in entire 


Dactous 

rea with 
reet 

ine ludine 

area 

. “495.898 


Merit ate 


FU 
ort 


1659 W ST. SE. 
1 BEDRM., $77.50 
phar tiou orn,” Fi. bane 


Eg Fae a 


te éeun tov. 


‘ 


se bar Mo. | a "ANAEOS ye 


Se ut ised 


1 BEDROOM, $77 


ser sal 7-9080 


wie's67-50 Sci Tits. 
| Bee Resident Manager, Apt. 2-0 
CONN. AVE. APT, 


. kit, bath. 967. rm 
weilities Available immedia 


4 rm, apts: 


HEI 


tractive 1. 


) 
3339 10th PL. SE. 


1 lars 
ils.) ONE MO. RENT FREE 


Ist FL. 1 BEDROOM, 
2 BEDROOMS, $85 


$75 


LOWEST RENT 
IN THE AREA 
| BEORM.—$63.25 Up 


ALL 
yt 
wurden living. 10 
cooler. Direct bus downtown on- 


raee 
ay 


CALL RE. 5-8000 
FOR BROCHURE AND 
FURTHER INFORMATION 


DISTRICT HEIGHTS APTS. 
RENTAL OFFICE 
7812 District Heights Pkwy. 


p18, hes 


eed room. an 

yee. gca¥4 bee. ou 2 mo. See 

anitor & 7. oF 

OOoreEes 4 MONTOOMER . DL 
U 


ee . Bide. 
rm. iv. rm... 


Fog Boog = 
A 
THE WARWICK 
3051 IDAHO AVE NW. 


(BET. MASS & AVES.) 
Lovely eff cy a Wwe) bide. : 
serv 


air alls; secreta 
ee near iene = yt. 


7S: 

coms. cl. utils: 

eac apt. with 3 exposures. di- 

netie: private pe y ares: 

aisos vocasse fore. -& ‘Out Conn 
Re 5 


to 206 | 
call| oe ea BE. 3-3300 
| 


g 
‘S-) Attr ant with liv 
;| kit. end bath 


Pigutllities Taefaded rm.. kit 
F500 be. 


"Beott ae alte SS] at 
2 mm. & . ~ . 
a ette, 4 Ges imei. 
Janitor. 


SLIGO PARK 
APARTMENTS, INC. 
1-2-3-BEDROOM UNITS 


| ta at CA 


a Apts. in 
Spring park ares. 
3100 plus 
+ ge 


t 
date y2 blocks 
OFFICE: 8 Piney Branch Rd. 
Silver Spring 
Office Oven Sunday. 1:30 Till 
JU. 5-7000-—JU. 7- 5552. 
| Southeast 
Laree 1 room, dining room 
69.35 


INCLUDED) 
swt aE 


‘EL AF 
itl st. to Miss 
carite -.. mm gies 


(OTH. 
Bowling 


ome Nal 


on fat 
center) 


SE.‘s BEST LOCATION 
| ONLY 10 MIN. TO. TO CAP OL 


Dupont Park Apts. 
Corner RIDGE RD. ond USs. 
Avaliable for ‘in: 


"T"BEGROOM—$71.50 


’ 


= Ter 
sirabie and astepetive a 
now. large u 


LINKINS 


| , ant 
di ie oa 


i rm 
incis. 4 and 


= loca- 
ton. >. Bie Snel. ue wills. pee 
Res 


or call Wala a to ara 


eervies’ LM ¥ cal te. Pyise ts 


and bei 


| fee ies wet i. 
C. H. PARKER co. 


i on Oh ane bo, te eee 


peerte ss 

- o . 

w'ix _A - 56. 
us - ° rner 


CLUDED 
goestmnen*., Supd- 


ames | CLAREMONT. 


CARETAKER 


urn for ans 
— yt 


SE bide. No rent collections 


Simplex & Duplex Apts. 


2 BR. $89.50 


INCL. ALL UTIL. EXCEPT ELEC. 


moderns Bekttek private entrance, 


en togee. phaversunde 
— © ‘center Bus de- 


velopmen 


ASE JPooT OUR FURNISHED) 


2733 6 ter Dr. 
Wide. 38 Sat, 9-5 Be es 
pag VA. AVE. NE. 


: Open Monday thru Friday “Til 8. Saturday, 9-5; Sunday, 10-5. 


=v 
7 


- 
?7TSa 


|_APTS., perenne 36 APTS., UNFURNISHED 36 
PRIVATE HOUSES 


OR 


Air Conditioned 
1 BR. APT. 


$95 
1414 UPSHUR ST. NW. 


RES. MGR., APT. 113 


4500 SOUTH CAPITOL 
1 BEDRM., $69.35 


nace aa ae 
SER Aiea ay 3 


L-BEDRM. APT. 224 36TH ST. S.E. 
$72.50 INCL. UTIL. 


329 34TH ST. S.E. 


MINN. AVE. 
we ® , oo dining 
wy oot ree closets. 
on fast bus meee 
Resident A, Apt. i101. 


THE HIGHLANDS 
1914 CONNECTICUT AVE. N.W. 


T CALIFORNIA 


COMPLETELY MODERNIZED AND REMODELED 
AIR-CONDITIONED EFFICIENCIES 
AND 1-BEDROOM APTS. 


AVAILABLE FOR IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY 
FROM $89.50 
ae 
MODEL APTS. OPEN DAILY UNTIL 9 P.M. 
Resident Mgr. on Premises—NOrth 7-1240 


SHANNON & LUCHS 
724 14th St. NW, 


BRENTWOOD 
VILLAGE 


GARDEN APARTMENTS NEAR 
THE HEART OF WASHINGTON 


1 BEDROOM FROM $62.50 
2 BEDROOMS FROM $80.00 


New! y 
area. m 


NA. 8-2345 


1311 RHODE ISLAND AVE., N.E. 
DE. 2-3202 


DUPLEX APARTMENTS 


First Floor: Large Living Room, Dining Room & Kitchen. 
Second Floor: 2 or 3 Bedrooms and Bath. 

Each House Has Front and Back Yards, Lawn Care, Gar- 
bage and Trash Removal, Gas, Water, Heat, Laundry 
Facilities and Repairs Provided Free. 


SCHOOLS AND SHOPPING CENTER ON SITE 
2 Bedrooms, $93—3 Bedrooms, from $109.50 
ALSO FEW FURNISHED APTS. 
JEFFERSON VILLAGE 
1734 ARL. BLVD., FALLS CHURCH, VA. 


JE. 2-5500 Daily, 9 to 5; Sat. 9 to 1; Sun. 12 to 4 


LARCHMONT 
GARDENS 


S. Frederick St. at Columbia Pike 


Viett Arlington's finest garden eee development, 
enly 5 minutes from the Pentagon 
Choice efficiencies 
1, 2 and 3 bedroom units 


Newly decorated 


Plarvcround «@ 

Laundry facilities 
Cross renee 
c) ? er TV entenns 
Exhe ust fan tdoor A, Picnic sreas 


CONVENIENT TO TRANSPORTATION. SHOPPING AND SCHOOLS 
Efficiency, 1, 2 and 3 Bedroom Units 
$65 Uo—All Utilities included 
Resident Manager . . . JA. 7-0300 
1012 S. Frederick St. 


Several Furnished Apts. 


ideal for Children 


large living room 


Glen Manor Gardens Apartments 
Modern Country Livin 
IN BEAUTIFUL SILVER SPRING 
Completely Air Conditioned 
3 BEDROOMS—1% BATHS 
$133.50 PER MONTH 
Includes 


UNIVERSITY CITY APARTMENTS 


2 Bedrooms 


ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED . 
STORES AND SHOPPING CENTER 

IN IMMEDIATE VICINITY 

Near Schools and Churches 

Convenient to University of Maryland 
CHILDREN WELCOME 
20 MINUTES TO CAMP MEADE BY CAR 
OFFICE and sample apt.: 2213 University Lane 
HE. 4-7070 
OPEN SATURDAY AND SUNDAY 


LEE GARDENS 


COMMUNITY OF APARTMENT HOMES 


A tew onimanent ~:~ 1 ¢ ~~ es ree 
1 BEDRM. APT... @ 50 
Meee. Pe tadinsccesscaan< $99.50 
All Utilities Included 
Adjacent te 


Myer. ts from Pentagon N 

Annex, just minutes te ihe heart with octen 

DIRECTIONS: Across Lincoln Memorial Bridge. follow 
turn right at , By. Clarendon 

one-half block te entrance. loca ted 


Sunday 
Apply Office, 701 No. “AS St. 
Adlington, 


Va. 
Rental Mor. JA. 5-6546 
Office JA. 35-6986 


Living Is Easier and Less Expensive 
at the 


NEW 


AIR CONDITIONED 
OAKTON APARTMENTS 


NOW RENTING 
1 Bedroom Apartments 


Directions: Out Mew Wemechire evenue extended 1 mile past 
Lencley Park shopeing center te Poa ctreet. right on Fou sires 
1 block te rental office om ieft. at 1904 Fou Street. 


Magazine Realty Co., 


WOODWARD BUILDING 


ME. 8-6055 


CARR 7. 9080 


High off 


kitchens with garbage 


PRIVATE 


OPEN FROM 


GRAND OPENING 


IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY 


PARK SHIRLINGTON APTS. 


Completely Air-Conditioned 
Free Private Swimming Pool 
Wading Pool for Children 


1 AND 2 BEDROOM APTS. FROM $114.50 


(All Utilities and Services included) 
Spacious room with an abundance of closet and ¢abinet space. Roomy 


Westinghouse refrigerator, separate broom c 


MASTER TV ANTENNA 
PARKING ACCOMMODATIONS 
TILED CORRIDORS 


Convenient to Pentagon, Excellent Shopping, Churches and Schools 
MODEL APT. FURNISHED BY MAZOR MASTERPIECES 


ees Seat ae PA to Shi 
Shirlington entrance past Hot Shoppe—beer 
Slat &. to Pak Ditngien Age. 


ee ee oo: 


4503 3lst ST. SOUTH, ARLINGTON, VA. 


HOT WATER — GAS — HEAT 
FREE LAUNDRY FACILITIES 
FEATURES: 


Private Front and Rear Entre 
Beautiful Kitchen with Sreaktest: Bar 
Walk 


and Gerbage Disposal 
to Schools, Shopping and Traneportatica 


5-Minute Dri ve Gen Anhber 
20-Minute Drive to Naval Hospital and Walter Reed 


OPEN FROM 8 A.M. TO 8 P.M, 
SEE MRS. GUY 


2512 Holman Avenue 


TO SAVE TIME 
CALL JUNIPER 8-1297 FOR APPOINTMENT 


DIRECTIONS: OUT GEORGIA AVENUE, PAST EAST-WEST 
HIGHWAY TO FOREST GLEN ROAD, LEFT ON FOREST 
GLEN ROAD TO HALE PLACE, RIGHT TO END OF GLEN 
ROAD. OFFICE ON LEFT. 


Fairview 
UNIVERSITY 
Apts. 


Langley Park, Maryland 


Strikingly different modem 1 and 2 bedroom units— 
step out your own front door or from your living room 
onto your private balcony-picture windows—gracious 
surroundings 


COMPLETELY AIR-CONDITIONED 
Rentals from $84.50 to $97.50 


Hot-water included 


WITH LARGE EXHAUST FAN 


Rentals from $74.50 to $87.50 


1 block North on Riggs Rd. pest Univ. Lane. and follow 
the signs to Model Apartment. 


7920 18th Ave. 
HE. 4-2073 


CARL M. FREEMAN 
Management 


Apartment Homes in Good Hope Hills 
10 Minutes Drive to the Capitol 


LARGE PORCHES 


Overlooking Suitland Parkway, Oxon Run 
Park, Picnic Grounds and New Golf Course 
Open to Public, at these Reasonable Rents: 


1 BEDRM. & PORCH—$71 to 85.50 
2 BEDRMS. & PORCH—$81 to 94.50 


BUILDINGS: 9 detached 4-family and 6-family buildings: 
weicome in some groups of vides —some reserved — <¢ oo ome 
garden- tifully ~~ —_. — tmosphere: 
quiet, ‘ri endy — ghborheod in suburban se 


APARTMENTS: Three exposures, ¢ross-ventilation te every apt.. 
high elevation and open surroundings make the large siry rooms 
Snusualiy cool. Laree liv, rm. one dinin 2 Large porch . 
joining bedrm. end kitchen mak outdoor living. ‘dining 
end sieeping in summer. Rear a to A. fenced-in lawns Se 
safe play Unusually large closets; venetian blinds: new 
ranges; plumbing im €itchens for washers; outside drying: indi- 
vidual storage lockers; bidgs. wired for air condition ; excellent 
maintenance service. Rent tmeclades ges, t end he » & 
few desirable apartments evallebie for te 


Short walk ya my te 2 ene-fare bus fined, 
shopping centers. schools « Cumvenient te Census, 
Navy Hydrographic. Andrews soa te val Research 
Laborstory. Navy Yerd, and downtown. Off-street parking. 


LOCATION: Good Hope Wills ts weet of Narior Bd. at 30th Gt 
and vicinity. Rental Office open every  f yous 2 Dp. m.. 
LU \ A ¥ TATION. Inc. 


Shirley Hwy. in Arlington, Va. 


disposals, exhaust fan, 9.1-cu.-ft. ieinendep 


AND MANY OTHER FEATURES 


10 A.M. TILL 9 P.M. DAILY 


shopping center—through 
on 3ist St. South—<continue 


8-1900 | 


CHILLUM HEIGHTS 


APARTMENTS 
1520 CHILLUM ROAD 


GET RELIEF FROM CITY HEAT 


2 BEDROOMS $78.5 20 


] BEDROOM 
(Rent Includes All Utilities) 


Offering: 
Corner, newly decorated apts. 
Stores and shopping centers nearby 
Bus at project entrance 
Attractive surroundings 
Picnie areas and ball field 
Wading Pool and Pley Areas for Children 


Rental Offices on Premises 


Open Every Day ‘Til 8 P.M. 
1520 Chillurn Road WA. 7-3948 


eee Een RE ONES SS aE 


rd, right to 


H. G. SMITHY COMPANY 
S11 15th St. NW. ST. 3-3300 


wm ra 


j i 


Coatinsed on Vollowine Page 
} 


s 


APTS., UNFURNISHED 36 


Naylor Gardens 


1 BEDROOM, $74 & $77.50 
2 BEDROOMS, $88 & 92 
UTILITIES INCLUDED 


ree rooms. all-elec. kitchen, pvt 
ta within wa King dis- 
a 428 ac ~“n 


ah in : 
=. ate s& thea- 


| Woodstock 
Bil 15th 


2725 30TH ST. SE. 
LU. 2-6100 
10 MINUTES 
FROM THE CAPITOL 
SEE MODERN SUBURBAN 


GLASSMANOR 


A 
EericiEn OF hail ED. 2-BED- 
“Wea NISHED 


AND 
» tie 


“aoa 
10 Winthrop st 


Office 
lock Capito! st mn. thru 
»ocam- » HF 9 ams 


P4 
LO. 7« 
SUN. 12:30 TOS 


~ ROSEMARY 


Apartments 
OFFERS 
Suburban: Living 
At Its Finest 
1-, 2-, 3-BEDRM. APTS. | 
LIMITED NO. AVAIL. 


FPURNIGHED APTS. ALSO AVAT. 
Make Your Selection Today 


fof ft 4900 


> 
. 


. 
! 
’ 
| 


Vacation At Home 
In Our 


SWIMMING AND 
WADING POOLS 


NOW OPEN 


¢ 


or 


Private F s% 
Transit 4 Ss: 


e to Capital 


c 4 
ver »DrTinGg »f OD ng 


All Avail. to Our Residents Only | 
IDEAL FOR CHILDREN 


hack er 


row 


Numerous play 

ball courts. indo 

picnic tables, barbecue P rs. 
i wet weet 8 


ve DiBTRIGT mt » 


ALL JU. 
OPEN 
ONE OR WRITE 
____ POR PREE BROCHURE 


$61.00 


Efficiency Apts. 
1 BEDROOM, $85 | - 
2 Bedrooms, $99 


Newly Decorated 
Conveniently Located 
Modern Elevator Bldg 

1833 New Hamp. Ave. 


~~ CHESAPEAKE 
GARDENS 
184T AND CHESAPEAKE STS. SF 


WIRED FOR AIR COND 


LARGE 2-BEDRM. COR. APTS 


areas, 


Or Day rvs 


black fram express 
at 2 twin-« 


mast er “TV ant cane. 
$92 50-$97.50 PER MO 


INCL FE Vee OF 
AUTOMATIC. “ a sH! Ae MACHINE 


APT 3B~-i ' 
a 


TU 


BEE JANITOR 
ist 
MAN REALT 


MO RENT FREE 
2-BEDROOM APT 


(With Private Balcony) 
$89.50, Including Utils. 


4010 Livingston Rd. S.E. 


4 


159 


OOo 


: 
Leree modern » newts, Gecorat ed 
pt h ima ar 


Resicent 


Rite UPLEX- RDEN 


GARD ENS 


es Chu 
{VIDUAL 3 - “Be RM "HOMES 
che . lose! 


front and rear ent 


"man ager 


"y ranees 
walk to schoo 
completely redecorat. - 


, co) ore 


a 7 mei 
2 Bedrms.—$89 
3 Bedrms.—$105 
Liat QUR prposy ATAn: 2 ' 
ie sO Broad 8+ - rs 
Dally, Sat % >. 


“UPLAND 


CAPRITZ DEVELOPMENT 
*< the Citv—@ingle Fare 


12 MIN. TO DOWNTOWN 


830 8 


Re sooar eh Lab 
Pieid 


3% Large Rms., $72.50 
4% Large Rms., $84.50 


vine AND TY ANT INCI 
57 Galveston st. ef 
og & ‘Capitol at. JO, 53-6800 
OFF CONN. AVE 
THE DUPONT 
IT1l7 2ta ST. NW 
- rie bedrm. in r yy remod- 


“CAFRITZ—DI._ * Manacer 


8 Biocks From Nava! 
5 Min. From Belli 


7-9080 


GRACIOUS LIVING 
In an Atmosphere 
Found Only at 


THE WOODNER 


12 MINS. FROM ITE HOUSB 
PACING ROCK CR PARK | 


Now Available 
Efficiency Apts. 
1-Bedroom Apts. 
2-Bedroom Apts. 
Air-Conditioned 


21 FLORIDA. ARLINOTON 
3" ikures FROM PENTAGON 


OOLER. SUBURBAN | 
away from traffic: | 
wing room — k. — 
vent, 
oe 1 toot Pi .. window 
Unfurnished and Furnished 
1 and 2-Bedroom Apartments 


Columbia Pike 
Tom 4 to 
corner 


DIRECTIONS: Out 
right to next 


-7336 
COOL “COOL COOL 


VENTILATION 


ee 


BEAUTIFUL YARDS 


* heave nice large } ~bed:rm we’ 


c ™ 


fares i eases ’ “aare : 


to sho — he 
=a i min te soupievs 


Nasir Bette ace 


APTS. 
North Warne By va. 


\ 


: 
Li 
lat 
ic 
. 


| oa 


6656 Georgia Ave. NW. 


Apt JO. 2-6192 
‘Washington Circle Apts 


APTS., UNFURNISHED 36 


V N 
TERRACE 


2051 N. WOODSTOCK 


} Bedroom—-$80.00 
2 Bedroom—$93.50 


INCLUDING UTILITIES 
Laree. newly decorated apts. tm 
modern apt. bide Te inspect, see 
resident manager ~ 302. 2051 N 

at 1A OBS 
G sw {thy oo 
Ss. NW ST 


THE ARGYLE 
3220 17th ST. NW, 
‘AT PARK RD 
Modern Elevator Bldg. 
Wired for Air Conditioning 


Efficiency—$68 
1 Bedrm.—$89.50 


Choice corner apt.: 
den 


3-3300 


huge liv 
and 


rm. bedroom, 


$ii2 


sun 


oeck, 


LA SALLE APT. _ HOTEL 


1028 CONN AVE. NW 
DOW NTOW 


WALK TO WORK 


and 5 
-m offiel *Ticiee with bat 
rm. ss ak full R. : 
a’ 7.50 


$9 ic] 
6 te DI Ft OWN AY ait irs 
HRO UGHOUT Phone ME. 8-2 


Live Within Your Rea 
Budget at These 
Rentals 


MODERN NEWLY- 
DECORATED APTS. 


Chillum Heights | 
1520 CHILLUM ROAD | 


JUST OVER D Cc. LING LETWREN 
RiGGS ROAD AND _ eens 
CHAPEL ROA 


2 BEDROOMS | 


rm 


— 


ve tnd | 


EDROO?} [ APTS 


POR FUTURE OCCUPANCY 


eurr undings featurine | 

grounds femneed pilay' 

ADING POOL for children 

PARK AND Pi CNI c AREAS A sale! 
om 


corner apts “Bhopp! ~~ cent ~ s near- 
by 
- 


Rental Office Open 


Aa sie 
CAFRIT2, DI. 7-9080 | 
PARK CRESCENT 


7901 18TH ST. NW 
irm pt 


pen h in 


c 


CAFRITZ. DI 7-9080 
“OGDEN “GARDENS — 


1445 i. A a ST 


bed 


at Tie Beg mae 


4@ 


se “ see 


xe elev 
* 9 


7-9080 


“CAFRITZ. Di. 7-9080 


FAIR 4, EW RIGGS RPT 


ON RIGOS RD 


SOUTH OF UNIV. LANE 


APTS., UNFURNISHED 


CHALFONTE 
Sohimbiat rd. a.)=-ge-hour  swit sreiteh- 


— peautifelly p= = aaa 


36 


We Are Not New, But 
Charming and Dignified 


EFFICIENCY 
1-BEDROOM—$90 UP | 


Larce Rooms. Dining Aree 
Bome With Porch 


it, Reaves. AD. 4-8700 


Al ILABLE 
| £0 


ea 
— _— or 


BRANDYWINE 
TERRACE 


| BEDROOM, $67.50 UP) 
2 BEDROOMS, $77.50 Up| 


Ali Utiflies Included 


APTS., UNFURNISHED 36 


| 1. . 
5740 13th St. NW, 


ner apt. 

, ae ern transp 
ome | , 50, plus 
manager, ' 


ctions r “C. shown. 


diate occupancy 


sperenttons : jet ‘Vor ath st. to Atian-| 
ie 


+e, — at. pient L, 
Brandy ~ apt 
mar 718 sntseme st. af. 


ry 


A 


& F, MANAGEMENT CO. | 
JO. 32-2661 


ee 


GREENWAY | 


A CAPRITZ BOPMENT 
Minn. Ave. on A St. SE. 


AN a® Pry’ DOW 
APITOL BRIDG 
" adaanie Decorated 
1-BEDROOM APT. FROM 


$63.50 


2-BEDRM. APT. FROM 


spree tLe 


DAILY 


dhe 703 5 . 
sux s. 
53 “LO. 2- S250 


WIDRICH ‘COURT 
Lge. Rooms, Huge Closet 
Parquet Floors—Play Area 
Convenient SE. Location 

NEW EASTOVER 


SHOPPING CENTER 
EXPRESS BUS AT DOOR 
2 BEDRM. 68725 


: 
| 
' 
: 


1 BEDRM. $73.50 
JTILSA INCL 

4628 LIVINGSTON RD. OF 
._ a-$5ii J0._ 3- 8634. | 
Looking fora Bargain? | 
Try thie 1-Dedrm. apt. for only $70' 
Penn ave. ati 
large )iv- 


kitehen and bath and iaree 
wee pes jJaniter for! 


ern 
dining ar 


NNON rr LUCHS 
7 “ath. r Nw NA. &8-3945 


A CAPRITZ DEVELOPMENT 


AGER TERRACE | 


» | West MYarteviLLE, MD.” 


LOWEST RENT IN AREA 


| BEDROOM—$69.50 
2 BEDROOMS—$81.00 


ALL, UTILITIOS INCLUDED | 


at door. Res | 


posite school: dus 
& dus 


Oo 
Mar 2016 er tae 
from Eastern ave Mich igan 
© to Ager rd nA "2. Tail. 
FAIRVIEW APTS. 
713-7258 BRANDYWINE ST. 88 
Rental Office, Bast Ride 
] 


BEORM.—$72.50 
2 BEORMS.—$79.50 


Clean roomy. al meee new bi a6 
Bo ling rans. Ut JO. 3-8) 


BEDROOM, $65 
NEWLY DECORATED 


2024 NAYLOR RD. S.E.| 


i-Dedroom apt. with 4 J 
plus utils cs. a 

schools 
right nest Seer: oot 


nr 
3 


: BECOME en ert 


’ BEDROOM 
£44 50 

: BEDROOMS 
$79.50 87.50 
MRS. PAT McDANALD 

RES. MGI 

HE 4-8220 
ASPEN COURT APTS 


baree luxurious ear den apts 


cond 

2- BEORM APT. ‘ON LY $1 
[RCLLUDING UTILITIES 

See Resid Dn Manager. } 


1103 ‘Bellevue Terr. 


Large 1-bedroom apt.; mple clos- 
ets + a mary fa 
ei] living reem 


8nm4 manager 


=| 
| 
| 


2430 PA. AV 
AIR-CONDITIONED 


_ 


cE. NW, 


te 881 30 
u ties 


olled 
ping and trans 


WISE. ine Ag 
FOR THE | 
Discriminating | 

| The Georgetown 

2512 QUE ST. NW. 


Overlooking Rock Creek Park 
NEW AND MODERN 


Completely Air-Conditioned 


EFFICIENCY 
$94.50 UP 
1-BEDRM. APT. 
$139.50 UP 


Also Choice 2-Bedroom, Dining 
Room Apartments, Some w/Den 
$195.00 UP 


COMMANDER APTS. 


COCKTAIL LOUNG “4 AND 
RESTAURAN 


NEW DE LUXE 
AIR-COND. BLDG. 
WALK DOWNTOWN 


: W . 


1225 13TH ST. 


EFFICIENCY 
$80-$85 
UTILITIES 


INCLUDING 


SECY. & ELEVATOR SERVICE 


AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY 
INQUIRE DESK 
__ DAILY 5A M-10 P M 


| HAWAII AVE “ME 
2-BEDROOM 


HOMES 
$68-$73.50 


NO sou: OL PROBL EMS 


| L1_ )-6866 


Com 


Beautiful Hillcrest Hots., Md 
15 MINS TO DOWNTOWN AIR! 
ES : 


AU NDRY FAC 


te Branch 
te Cole- 


AREAS 
Out ve. _ ate a 
right n Bran 


a ta! office 
5 


AIR CONDITIONED 


. Bw ELEVATOR BLDC | 


modern i-bedroom apart- | 
full kitch 


‘ ing. minutes 
ore wiih to $135 canine ti 
}- ~ Ha caretaker, Apt. i. down- 


ish White Fi. Ss 2 vee i ee I 
irm sep. cin 
ily-stze kit “se baliaing 


s 
Gene to = an. & Penn. ave — 
ified ac 


ANACOSTIA 


1538 Gelen St. SE. 1 bedr'm 
lee. cit. New bids 


ste Fie it ce CO 
LU 2-996) 


NEW HORIZON 
APTS. 


Beautiful View 
Overlooking City 


liv 
oc 


rm 


Large Roorns and 
Ample Closet Space 


1 BEDRM., $94.50 AND UP 

2 BEDRMS., $110 AND UP) 

INCLUDES ALL UTILITIES | 
SEE 5 Repecsentetive, ap | 
i} rd. se. 

| WEAVER BROS., INC. 
we REAL BANKERS 

LTORS 
WASH. BLDG DI. 71-8300 


RIGGS PLAZA 
A NEW CAPRITZ DEVELOPMENT 
Dekote Ave. afd Hamilton 8. NE 


ONLY LUXURY APTS. In 
CLOSE-IN RIGGS PARK 


WIRED POR AIR-CONDITIONING 


1_BEDROOM APTS.—$77.50 | 
2-BEDROOM APTS.—$102.00 


Rent Includes Gas. Heat and 
Hot Water 


reg 


+1 


Near Excellent Shep. and Schools 
RENT 


L orrice OPEN DAILY | ya 
_ 5130 ath __RA. 53-4443 


1 BEDROOM—$62.50 — 


3313 DU BOIS PL SE 
(ott Minnesots Ave. at D St. and) 
Kim ool). Beautiful 2nd / 
| ay apt in well-kept bide oe | 
auth os. Bey ot Apt. 1. NA. 68-4972 


MIRAMAR | 


130 18TH STREET WW. 


Several attrac. newly remodeled | 
efficiencies in de luxe elev. bids 
with ewitchboard service. $73.50 


‘CAFRITZ, DI. 7-9080 


GARDENS 


1-FARE ZONE 
4688 NICHOLS AVE. SW. 
Redrm . 


} Unturn.——$65 up | 


1 Bedrm., Furn.—$88 up | 
CL oRa Uv ITI 
EFFICIENCY 50 
ey Unfurn.—$76.50 | 
(PLUS UTILITIES) 
letely modera larae closets 
acious pie’ground bel). 
mond oy ‘children and sedults 


PHONE JO. 1-270 
Open Daily, 9 to 6 P. 
Sunday, 1-6 P. M. 


~ AIR-CONDITIONED 
CARILLON HOUSE 
2500 WISCONSIN AVE. NW. 


1-BEDRM. APTS. 


Lexsury livine with every mod- 
bea A) tig LY 


- 


Abt | 


RANDALL HIGHLANDS, D. C.| 2 pedrm 
Bee 


3051 IDAHO AVE. NW. 


1 


NA 
| LL 
‘800 TENN. 


| Includes utilities, 
\WIRED FOR AIR CONDITIONING ineinerator on 


TAKEO 
Lee 3 


BELLEVUE | =e"? 


| JUST &S MIN. VIA SHIRLEY HWY 


focsivine sun 
eck antenna, laundry 
ities ond garage. 


Your Inspection Invited | 
CALL EM. 2-8800 


oe wae 
Ww. 


Bedrm., 


The 

o woese # Sth ot a 
Ae 

Se es 


| 
| 
| 


x 


ete | oes 


ir. edrm., 
] Bedrm., $87. 50 
BRIAR MANOR 
4829 N. CAPITOL oF. 


Convenient te Cat *°~ Univer 


st 


fan and garbage ducpeeal. . 


| Se 8 H 
APARTMENTS 


Piney Branch Rd. 
lver Spring. Md. 


Newly Decora 
our choice of ensy- a tile | 


or 
AD NEW PARQUET FLOORS | 
ross Ventilation in Every 


roe <9) | 
BEDE a 
=. Pe re a 

4821 4TH . NW. 


Apt. 2. 2 bérme. liv. rm 
kit. apd bath sai 50 ine} 
Bere 


7.9080 


s72 


n. 
jan 


- | 
off n. YT 
rm apt 

perch and 
ag yo. $61.50. Key at Apt. i. | 


ND ITEM 
DONNA LEE 


Suburban Living With 
City Convenience 
Extra Large 2 Bedrms. 
Bus, Schools, Shopping 
CHILDREN WELCOME 
CLOSETS GALORE 
Soundproof, Fireproof 


PETS PERMITTED 


Furn.-Unfurn. 
RESERVE NOW" 


ee bk) 


APTS., UNFURNISHED 


: 5828 CONN. AVE. 


| DER: South on Me. 1 hichwar to 


46 
PARKGLEN 


1-Bedroom Apts.—$81.50 
(With Sun Deck) 
2- oareen Apts.—$91.50 


RE SB 
x Oe iit. t, bet. das’ heats $60 50. 


rms. 
p—— 


to tagon 2 
$125 thru August 12. JA. 


C.F PARKER CO. 


Brand-New, Air-Cond. 


CHOICE 3-BEDRM. APT, 
2 BATHS—IMM, OCC, 


ALSO 1-BEDRM. APT. 


Ree Mer. at Building 
_ CAPRITE MANAGEMENT 
1 BEDRM—$57.50 
254 35TH ST. NE 
Just off Minnesota Ave. next te 
ator Theatre Shopping Center 
Has wens porch - extra bedrm it 


Key at Apt. 2. NA. 8-4972 +e : 


«ss - faye Me | 
MONROE ai b Maa A AVE ates nee tee 
NELSON 


R A. HUMPHRIES & SONS 
ease = ERE 
ALEXANDRIA’S 1417 Belmont St. N.W. 
LARGEST 
3-BEDROOM APTS. 


Assree. 3-rm ” a ~ baw ont. 
\ tereened 
ONLY $129.50 PER MO. te 


or | * 
iy 
utilis. 
All utilities Included: near schools, 
churches, buses, shopping center; 
wonderful jocation. 


en wes 


- ae —3 rms, kit. and) 
x tw 3 ree. kit. and 


ae om pe i rm, kit. end 
abare 
Liv. rm... bedrm.. 


tor mec kit. 


a 


1315 BELM ST. ww. 
Efficiency t. 847.50 
1208 EVAR ST NE 


$65 
1 bd liv rm. t. bah 
vty MORSE, or fe 
b Sotrm . iv, rm. » and tom. 


will show 
WALK R& & DUNLOP, 
11 


5-0222 
Girard 
rms. kit 


COLORES — . of. 
ea Ft 
Li PLACE 


4523 

UTILITIES INCLUDED) | Apt. 1, Living rm. Kitchen. din- 
ree rooms, pastel decor, picture | ette. 2 nusualiy 
: rage. tse aot ine 
storm windows and 

-- ae pius wtilities 
OPEN ae & TOMORROW 
t bus to 46th at.. right 
S - ey * @ Benning 


Monroe ave. in Alex., turn right te 
Commonwealth and left te 1516. 
ALDON M man AGEMENT CORP 

NA. 8-574 cI. §-3550 


SHIPLEY PARK 


DESIRABLE 8E. LOCATION 


1-Bedrm.,. from $68.50 
2-Bedrms., from $80.00 


3400 2 


2 2- a 


STS 
A rc TOWERS 


15. 


3 see 
Attrae ~ R t Site ir incl. wtile 
in de luxe elev Class —_— ewitch- | 


board service See ma 
CAFRITZ—DI._ 2 9080 


Meurilee Apts. 


ON. ) 
nots, BHOP. 


53rd and DEFENSE HIWAY 
NEWLY-DECORATED 
1 Bedroom—from $72.00 
2 ve UERITaRS, INCLUDED 50 
Lite, Mook chase 
Ye wees 
WA. 7. 3721 
The 
BRADLEY 
BOULEVARD | 
APARTMENTS c 
| Bedroom 
2 Bedrooms 
Including Utilities 
i have « few I. 
>» ayacal -- sl 


end 2-bed. 
for duly if 
Ottice hours. Monday through Pri 


ay. am. to & om Saturday 


. rs A 6pm. Sunday, 12 noon til) 
6 pm. 


6701 HILLANDALE RD. 
CHEVY CHASE, MD. 


al 
r see yanit or at 37 | 


“— "WILLIS & SONS 
210 Investment Bids, | 


1-BEDRM. APTS. | eat AND HOT WATER 


$75—INCL. UTILS 
ALL NEWLY DECORATED 


JO. 8-514) 
1ON 
THE WARWICK 


ND OATH. AVES.) 
. liv rm. dinette 


’ 
4 


COOL, AND STILL 
CONVENIENT TO 
EVERYTHING 

BIG ROOMS 

2. LOADS OF CLOSETS 
MANY FEATURES FOR GOOD 
LIVING 


| Bedroom—$87.50 | 

2 Bedrooms—from $109.50 | 
INCLU 

5070 14th STR 

res MANAGEMENT CORP 

5740 9-70 


0 4 Eves i 
YD AP 
AVE., ALEX.! 
OFF SHIRLEY HIGHWAY 
5 MING TO PENTAGON | 
FURNISHED OR UNFURN, 
NEWLY DECORATED 
Bedroom .... from $73.50 
Bedroom from $87.50 
ALL, UTILITIES INCLUDED | 


Large roome 
ven filation. store 


ete mone 
i 
eeler errace, inc ~ 3 

1217 VALLEY AVE. SE. 

1 Bedroom—$70 and Up | # 
2 Bedrooms—$82.50 and Up 
newly painted, 

laundry room, "3 
h floor, conven-| 

shopping and schoo 
Saneser, Apt. 8-1. 2-4717. 


JO 
8608 FLOWER AVE. — 


2 


pastel decor. cross) 
na coom. — ars | 


chu 
~y esnter nd 


fice hour 
neon or call’ C 


yard, 
each 


2-bedrm.., 


om? a wit with 
e U ING fhe 931 a at. 


1 rm. 
fo . 
whl 


reer , 
os 


-| J014 18th Bt. Nw 
-| Colored—! Bedrm., $67.50 


. ear 
5 moe.; 


COLOR 


Includes heat. water and ¢as 
WNEWLY D 


ae 


THE WARWICK 
3051 IDAHO AVE. NW. 


(BET. MASS. AND CATH. AVES.) 
. iv. rm. dinette. 
7. bide Air-cooled 

serv ear 
ches. good trensp. and \Op- 


| ine. 


THE VERONA 


S601. 13TH ST 
(CORNER aN orELLOW) 


Air-Conditioned! Hurry! 


Se cant e=be 73885 | Few Apartments Stilt Available! | * 0 
1 Bed 450 Brand-New—With Elevators’ 


] Bedrm., $!07.50-—2 Bedrms., 
from $137. See Res. ne or 


VEL E. BOGLEY, 


Lo 


es apt. ca eT. N 


Sanaeeen nae ORED—sii0 4 “. 
orf Central eve.; 


xii. bath. § 


ad t 
aa | kit OED rod A -wh. 660. LIN- 


Cc 
rms. 


po 


h : 7 
—A210 18th St ny re 


MODERN LAU NbeY 


2 Mass. Ave 


ditt -a nesola ave. be. 
4 1-bedroom 


| @rea. modern kit 


| tewa ite 


¢ COLORED. 


w. —_ 
: ee BS 


bath 77 = 
Re 412 res “st 


rams, zt 


: bus at your doer | 
era! Rental Ce., 915 


: =» chiléren or pe 
nad sw market. A 
ae i. 
rm.,| mo. ke retin 2s 


ss. ow 


stores 


ray vin | | FAIRFAX V 


SOMERSET —Bea 
almost nner + Ml, 
built: ig fireplace d 
cerpenel ‘pore 


SPRING V 
charmingly furn 
3 bedrms 


din rm. ‘screened 
with wall oven, dishw 
bace dis 
laundry, weak ay 
tenants, Lease 
pelle A U 


tran chur 


Garage. Cony. to 
EM 


rm. rh ‘wre, Ciyde c. 
QL. 232-2635, EM. 


tage on old ya. Bet. Liv. 


& rms. 3 bathe 
vitorary, ige. édin-rm .. 


w.—Ting ivy oor. cot- 


et. 


ys 3 miles from. "chain 


with dres sing 


rm. 26x: 
IONAL. $8200. 
lease. 


Year's 


leve| contemporar 
8 


_ So oa 
va u 
MILLICENT 


ly $139 


ae? per 
—Beautifully furnished. 


(ae = 


. 2 dbatha, liv 
rec 


BURT c 


1.) 

furn.; ef 4 

ity. din. -. 
es. " wt 


fae ‘i tale 


study pnd’ 2 baths, pao HO. 


rm. (fi 
porch, pink 2 
asher 


.——— 
rms, email arden 3-4 


—¥ Te, 

Sieh 
eo re: 
sii 


ALLEY = ~~ d- house 


», | a. 
WHEATON hay oe and up. Im- 
8315 per : mediate eecupancy - B meng * eo 


MMINGS, 


gir 


| PARKLANDS 


New 4 bids.: apts ie — a a NEW CAPRITS 
869 $0 and $81. mo. incis all pita. A.abame Ave. and Stanton . B. 


wood «firs. and closets: or “BEST BUY IN TOWN” 
342 ROOMS 
$68 and $70 
442 ROOMS 
- $81.75 and $84.50\4 


ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED | 


28 RE ANS, ie re 


OLoRED ‘Independence |» gre. se se A 
ean "“Lunkixe co. Dr 


| Nursery schoo! wpeatas | conten and A 
bath if » suis elem. ecb at Be 


* “sb 


Rit. 
«$65 mo. 
OFFICE. JO. 2.9900 
te Sat. 3 A.M. tet P.M 
weer M 
~ Gales 


RENTAL 

Open Mon 
Sun. | 

pl. ae. ne. 23. 4 toe a 2006 


—Llose-in ol. spacious. 
beth apt. 672.50 


2-room, kit 4 barbs 
Biodié B ow. | and 2 
semibath 


— 


;_ redece : 
. INC.. 1115 Eve ot. 


= Js 
133 be 


16TH ST. NE, 
$70 


INCLUDED IN RENT 


a kit... dinette, 
and lige. ser porch apt 
Jenitor, 1204 ‘Tem ne. Amt. 3. 


POMEROY ROD..S.E, 
$57.50 


it.. dinette and 
Us whites, 


-* pea 
a a ‘ ati fa. tds 


3 | 


a Fe, 


bedrm.. liv. rm. 
rch apartment 


Gee Janitor 2618. Apt. 4. 
YOUNG & CO., INC, 
32-2660, __ 


The Velda 


126 WTH ST. NW. 


? 


over 
STUDIO APARTMENT 


WNTOWN ipa OC eTiON 
“(LEVATOR } a 
Effie. Apt . 29 80 
- Apt 59.50 
inspect see — »r on premises 
or ~ HU. 3- 
A. HUMPHRIES & SONS 
REALTORS 
_NA, 83-3080 


ASK AROUND 


LOOK AROUND 
COME AROUND 


AND SEE THESE 
5 | 
cE 
FROM $64.50 
SURREY HOUSE 


y COLORED 
Benning Hts. Apts. 
443) a 
1 BEDROOM—-$67 
2 BEDROOMS—$77 
Als, UTILS. INCL. IN RENT 
Olfice nour. 8-5 dally: 8-12 Sat. 

LU. 2-1222 
a. | 662 ” Acker St. 


NE 1 _effic. 
_— $5050: bemt. apt. : 
kit. share beth, 860 ic. 


noin 
$75; 
oF 
co 


rms : 


ook. 
4th St. 
= Arco 


5 ay? 
. CO-OP ADDRESS 
DISTINCTION 
OPEN 2 ‘TIL 6 TODAY 


2500 MASS. AVE. 


Piret and exclusive otserine of a 


e 
bide ° oe” ant 
idee — 2, AVE wE 
t Olivet | & Montelios Ker at 


1206-B 
Ae 7 E. $59 50 
(47th and Meade: Ke .. 1209-B 
sts.) 


A at 1 l7th 
AROn. ve! Bd 


“THOMAS ig RYON 
NA. 8-4972. 


Newly decorated apt. with dining! ! 
qd bath: close! 
On down- 


732 5} st ST. NUE. 


=OLORED CARETAKER | r 


Rent free on modern 2-bedr apt | AVA 
in Northeast Washineton oft East| LEG 
Capito! st. in exchange for main- 
~~ gt eae c ‘es Gat ies. Hus- 
ime outside 
3 ie we > mm 


an 


om on eac 4 
_ snaomt ns ctreular driveway. elevator. 


and individual ¢66- 


te school 


f , SOOtmES 
«f° Won 


18 PRIVI. 


Y RARELY Is 
AA, ARTM 


ED LOCATION. 


This one ts ‘“heuse -— one 
completely charmin he 
floor it has North. West “a Both 
exposures. There is «a ere. 
cious reception peer, 

room with S weee- eae 


Sah * VIEW 


ote A NATL. HA iW 
Cae 


CLOSEST-IN 
NEW APARTMENTS 


ditleninn svallabie. 


Geen on on weekdays br , eppeta tment. 
Lie oli Si 
EDMUND J. FLYNN CO. 


Co-Ge. i, 1 he 5 
—q Ag ys 


wanker 
WA 


APARTM = 


OU EVARD "APTS 


140 FINILWORT) u AVE Oe 
inspect phone r. Brook. ~" 
} or call a or) lce 


423 Benn 
NW. 


0105. 


NEWLY SEMCDR ED BLDG. 
bor wet 


bdr - on 
oe Nr 


semicet . 


brick rambler. 
school & 
gees $115 


ANDREWS. 
bedrm. : 


~% fall bemt 


s rms, 35 
— 


AR ~ 
bar Se 


WARWICK VILLAGE 


$115 mo. Individ- 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Sunday, July 8, 1956 D7 


415,000 
Sunday 
Circulation 


means quicker sales results 
for Washington Post and 
Times Herald classified ad- 
vertisers. To place your ad 
for Sunday 


Phone 
REpublic 7-1234 


OFFICE, DESK SPACE, Rent 46 


ATTENTION 
DOCTORS—DENTISTS 


RIVER HOUSE 


Virginia's new WOU air con- 
gow. be ing gree Kp — o> 


me. 241 


fh aw OT 


bedrms.. 
bath, fu 


liv. rm. 
~ 2hoois 


vi Gall ave —}-bed- 
which are on ist 
urches 


110 r me. year's 


we: 
098 


g Fay wy 
rms.. 


rTCHIE 
gaiow. 5 
v 


KVILLE—3 
rm... kit. 
eareee: 
center, 


et 


26 
floor); a 
transep. Oniy 


est Glen rd. New 3-bedroom C 
Cod. Colonial Ad Tm. din ae 
| ail. bout Jul 7 isd ties 
ava abou 
oan er 


heat, 
r moe. on 3- “Tor 2 
. at yo - , 4. 


69734 or alter 7 Dp. x M 
rick. 3) town joc and 


. 


-9080 


t Gown 
‘partion area; 825 


BLE—j-room suite 
Bes 7 15 nw. 

cond. partiy furn- 
ished ‘tone ‘of short term lease, 


All N 
Single rms. or suites immediatels 
avaliable in an air- yar 
office in Falls re ‘pacious 
end airy; 15 minutes to ‘downtown 
Washington: bus stop on corner: 
plenty of free perkine on our own 
big lot; will partition te suit ten« 
ant, reasonable. 


Larchmont Realty, inc. 
Jt 71W Broad 8 


g| Egy ° Fea ist 


and 2 golf courses. 
, iv 

Securities 

Carpeted 


carport. $150 per 


14th, Ei Wwe 


re ee i aa 


- alae rooms. —=.4 “OFFICE ate WANTED 46A 
ay oli © ARKI Reet. 582.50. | pe ATENT ATTORNEY, 
' KER CO. time win 


Box M-45h 


sirad 
24: an BUSINESS PROP. SENT 47 


| SET EESSe—s | new 
' 


room 
aco] 


& 
ns clean. ae 


and j- 
4198 IG 


~~ a or = crs, 
WE mo. 


"bins 


roper 
‘ poner of "Rock vite 


VER SPRING 
SHOPPING CENTER 


GA Ave. ee 
PRI 


ESVILLE RD 


Ts FoR Tor 


vg Most as 


645. aporo 

es te Route 612; last 

ee aY "y 

road 
ie 6Church Ve. 


Call JE CORNER iN 


Rai = Sober 3 EIO # McKEEVER 
Sete baatte. ivi oe 
ATIONS- 4800 «4 , ground us 
A | ’ ear Ss ior ars se 
)» e 
Immediate Occupancy w r withous 
In Suburban Va 


Falls Church & Alexandria 


4 for retail 
Ou wit 


BUSINESS PROP. SALE 


Close 
| All 
a 


‘tow h 
9 daily. including Sunday. 
Vernen Ave. & Kennedy 8&1. 


equi. kit... 


.—Jeferson 
bem. 


lt 
$85 
Larce x 


Same type 


extra ine- panelea 


—_— 2- 


, oT 


“ 


rms 


or Ren pkwy 


Bolling, | 
home with din 


. 2% baths. kit. 
porch. ree. 


with 


din. 


: lease 
. BO, 17-8139, 


schis., bus. x “<< $90 or 


bedrm 
ad} 
& shopping. exe. neighbor. 
house i 
13 


$ 
ov 


Suitiand— 


rm. 


rm 
ar ach 
ter. 


3 bec 
‘% bath. 


ial. feneed ace vere. 


TY. shoo 


k ramble 
‘ be 


ible July 2 : 
ramb)er; 


- = bedrme . 1% "baths 


| ME Same tn owner's ee: 
ent de odd jones in 


t oy f large family *iemily i! 

e oo Lee a v 
with serven rental. 

2-908 ; 


ge Be 5 ve on 
~o DSS, bese CS rams srt PROPERTY MANAGEMT 44A. 


S| anaes See a 


washer 
fenced 


4 
. 10489. Avail 


ad apts. T Pave ent in BC c-ess.| STEL SPEUART EROS. INC 


L 7-M34—DI T-se8s 


4 


OPEN SAT., SUN., 
: al r 5 


1-6 


rolling. tree-studded acres 


sae ” oer 
gil reh. 3 } rollin iree-studded acres 
~~ © 


+, = age 


2% be baths. Pie ie) 


136 
AES 


©°.| WANTED TO RENT 


| 


46) } 

. a4 ‘bid | 

s ot air con . 
| park Ls rt af : 


viiite a 


te stores. buses and peheots 
newly ous 
was. Wi canente ' 


Lo 22.000 «sa heart af 
business section Pershin Ae 
cal any cay ‘til > A. 
9105 2175 ' at 1142 

Ew BARBER hs 43 ot : o 
Larchmont Realty, Inc. |" Owner's health ust opene 
JE. 4-3900 JE. 3-8389 JB. 3-1830) SS" ch 
ARMING 


deco 
er without 


- 7 - ey 
uic m $800 cash 


310 ES, RENT 


c Sree. aA — 
50 r un 


| bar ‘SHOPPING 
Off} ce space 1400 sa 


Colonial stone he 


impv Elec Reenes . 

arepd piano “a2 5s a i 
one }- > 
COUNTRY FROME <" wide 
view of surrounding coun - 


AIR-CONDITIONED 


and 
and Soles +A, vo | Store $5280 with pert selling base- 
Aute -. ' ractive - — \. Bue 


ioe children im the middle of yoo- tremely bus 
RG & BUSH. Inc. 


acre LS Por further went WEIN NBE 
| "SHOBPING CENTER” 


call ed 8S. Zeller. Broek 
Dynamic lecation for bakery. deli. 
ho ss aports shop. paints 
lances Tw 
Deautitel pores sat comatose atiht 
avaliadie in hishly pu ul eho 


pig NibeRe's BU Bis me, roles 


rm ' 
WEIN , ine. 
Pic &. 
bias c 


&@ personality J siz- a *. $508 
ideal 
tion started on ao new ade 


with 


personall —* 
“nit bath. 


& 
able rms... 
Near 


ap Aperews| 


ocation 


your own business, and save . 
will cost. Idea! losation for nde-” 
pendent operator Af eres. sade 
ware. Sar an eT) 


ai | 


amen. bakery, TV renais. wenise sheen 
3-bedrm. rambler. fu 
ul a . 
5) 


well» eau La chmont Realty, | 
——F rcnmo eaity, inc. 
_ to milion: JA. 7-117 gol 835 JE. 4-3900. RA 3-6 
| COLORED. B st nw. Py & rms. | INDUSTRIAL paovtkTY 52 
Re ms and on * 


sept A ° » 2508 : - Ss AOeee Uiroad wr s 
$65. 3 ; month 


any day until 
from ow Hospitel. 


Ariingten. within 4 mile 
me 


COMMERCIAL SITES 33 


Alexandria 
COMMERCIAL LOT 
14,800 SQ. FT. (60x246) 
FACING 3 STREETS 
Woodward & Lothrop Ares 


: 
os-i Priced for Fae = sale oF 
will Du fo you 


CALL PRED THOMAS TODAY 
POR ACTION TODAY 


Ab Art Post, <> 


lee 
hools, buses, - A. is: 


t. 


rms... t + | 
i2 on Dix 
upper 13th "et 

s 6 apis. or rms As 
he _T 


M 
8 
A 


me by leaps 
reaf}ic. Look at 
Broad «si... 


or entire | 
DIX property opposite, 
' then call owner, 


NR 4 


unfur 
rerevolution. Colonial. oy 
= oo of = 7 
a WY ettractive oe 
all Mrs Stephens. & 
SStonlel 3-2611 extension ‘iT en 
44 


RA = fh, we 
Call’ “a Col. ete. “4 
, PAM. 


te rent uous or| send paved 
th yard. furn..| Ideal location. Cail 
~~ bedroom 


Industrial location. Almost 6 acres, 
can divide to sult. Sewer. water 
and po prready ~ oe ed. Close 


WEINBERG & BUSH, Inc. 


i707 A St... WW NA ‘2-5500 


APARTMENT SITES 54 


Apt” House Grounds 
High density. 
’ or mm 


ouse. 
ols, Mi 
— 


s 
furnished 


rooms) near) or JA. §-6576 
vay ad 
PO: | BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 55 


laren, On 
pt Jack son—onlv 
4 this aree * suitable for man an 
Va | wite er oy equipment med. 
pepeess a to Treseponsibie 
by pesrtae 2: Y W. 
who wants ‘o owe 
Mw own business. 


ie, ee a 


mor 


Property Management 
PHILIP T. ATKINS 


DE. 2-4087 


pantmant reoutred. Call 
5D. 

: —E — Compiciely 

tecked Nice neighborhood. 85006- 

th’ be oqniepes 


RECTAURA 


. Tent $150. lon 
‘. Py _gecte 


mo Treason 
¢ 9- 


iv 


BCHA- 


ce 84008 
FOUNTAIN’ LUNCH 
And 19 rooma, bus ’ St 


iy Goim@ a nice sines 
Garg Nicely eau ‘ip Reas rent 
és 3406 


10 STOOLS—$ 100 DAY 


—“ tak 
sot Real 


ARD. “n 
SILVER SPRING 
8707 GEORGIA AVE. 


air-conditioned high- ig 
| 


New 
epeed elevator bidg 
ranged to tenants needs Stra- 
tegically located Call WEAY- 
ER 


nch, 
Siainiess eS enue 


heat 9- Teer 
sr 3-1500 


ees maxer 
strict 


Suites ar- 


BROS, INC. DI. 17-6306, 
Bide. phone JU. §-0004. 


Cd. YOUNG, S 


erTmo . 
. Pountain “Quete "f1000 wily. 
ACH & CO. RA 3-6662. DI. 


SILVER SPRING 
Colemont Office Building 


8719 Colewille Rd.—1! Block East of Ga. Ave. 
FULLY AIR-CONDITIONED 
ELEVATOR AND ALL OTHER 
OFFICE SERVICES 
Entire Floor of 9,000 Sa Ft. 
SINGLE OR SUITES OF OFFICES 
$60 AND UP 


Convenient to Transportation, Parking, 
Restaurants, Banking, Etc. 
Agent on Premises Daily, | to 5—-JU. 8.5806 


H. G. SMITHY CO. 
ST. 3-3300 811 15th St. NW. 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD SAUL 0. C_NousES 
D Sunday, July &, 1956 


382,000 
Daily 
Circulation 


means quicker sales results 
for Washington Post and 
Times Herald classified ad- 
vértisers. To place your ad 


Phone 
REpublic 7-1234 
TUNITI 


° 


$$ REriwaNce ¥ 


—~ REAL ESTATE LOANS 
. 


or va, “rite 
ite Washington. BD 


esired 
exclusive 2-yr s 


oreisn amp PO 


we 
consultation by 


Ad 
fe ae mote =": 


exctu 


232 WOODWARD BLOG | 


zh Money Wanted 


JE. 3-3998, Day or N 
MOTEL 
40 UNITS + 


SWIMMING POOL 
owmo 


a lance 
1230 00 month!y 


ata : in 


B HOLLANDER 
W. E. THRIFT 
MOF AT 
x raat | 


‘- 


uéing lights 


JULY 9, 1956 


CALIFORNIA CO 
EXPANDING IN EAST 


Offers ambitious man or 


Cotes vats ia ee Com 
4 
ee” r 


a- arrange ae, 


PROTECTED 
OPPORTUNITY 


Revetutionary ered vert Be 
bou ne we- 


De 
rite Box i. 


YOUR OWN 
BUSINESS 


We are lecoking for am- 
dbitiews men of iniesgrity 
whe want te bulld their 
eva Dusiness In & secure 
future in the «il industry 
Oar salaried training pro- 
sram will afferd you the 
necessary knowledge to op- 
erate and bulléd Four eva 
business with one of the 
mest prearessive e¢i| som- 
*penies. 


We «are preeentiy encaced 
im the most dynamic expen- 
sien procrem im our his~ 
tery and need Too Men 
Our modern service stations 
ere ready fer yeu. Annual 
earnings reaneiae from 
87600 te 639.000 «are not 
wneemmen in tedays maer- 
ket. Meany dealers are on- 
joving such incomes now. 


Tevestment caottel & see- 
endary te charecter. éeetre 
and sincere purpose. 


Por details. pshene Cities 
Service OF“; Co.. JA. 4-1100. 


vern and pr pri- 


with living 
ness 
ner im i 


vote as 100 a. 
or 


aus 
20 yrs 


ner igh 

with substantia — 

Can be hed for steck end equip 
‘ 


fe ened 2 bs Bay 


er 


wy 4 Avail 
mesere 


ton, Ryeal 

A aden 

for sale for 2 or 3 

persons Profitable. estad- 
eccounts Reasonably priced 
s + ~ end 


t 

vice #a- 

tien. 2 Ky) eckipped = 
are 


TF. oy and 
retirme 
16 
Ma 


ner 


Reoly Box 
i. Ma Secryvit 


fax sas 6 ciniributdianio. Sout Southe” " :| WOODWARD & NORRIS 


resent Dusiness “Pr, 


see 87 or best ofter Call 
— 2- Shore 
nt 


or uth 
Bottled Gas and 


parting. 17 apts nm. 
‘rf guerantee buyer zoe mert- 


iehts. signs. offi ce 
ness vor I "pay cer 
rice 442 4 


sel, for 
2 te @uick buyer 
te 


freee for Plorids 


lec 
“~y 


letely sft Ge 


2 _cxpane Cait 


- car 


’ 
: 
: 


Pe 


nt 
nusi| fat 2, 
stiness | 


| est cash yo Monthly 
CEORCET OWN 


; a ata 
Test mney Ap 2.210 
: yy - and 5 Covers plete: 
u 


a4 
| BR 


Pe a epee = 


| Be =| NO. Cl 


Scant wre Om 
r ™ wr 
* poset 


w 


WANTED...ccrist mil! tn ration 
or idle. BC ‘ PD 
7. Box 452-A. Richmond Virginia 

$7 


CAPITAL WANTED 
VARIOTS hieh-reters. shert- term | 
4nd ‘nvestment opportunities 


vetlobie from time te time 
| 3182 Post-TH 


MONEY TO LOAN 


wrestles 3 Searees pine. mesem 
with bome-lever supes! As 
west com- 


Peteches steces. ar 
harin rms 
ist "fiser 7 pune 


Walter Reed 
aitches end bea 
om the 34 
medis‘e possession 
~* 316.000" with * 


ono 
417 
Ties er 


=~) 
~ a* — 


ed 
cash 


eas ay 


S8A 


OUR BOME— Ped uc 
yments. sales oe cash. Cail co 
or 


.. ~ house 


inceme 
month Auer 8 
60 REALTY mince co ME 


gow ON SECOND TRUST 
e will buy 24. trust Robes dc 
nearby Reas 


ie iio Bhi 


ured on youiqunce and 147 ecres 
' -® Warrenton 


| 
ealtors. 
ana 32 


: 


. 
includes 
ne 5 ees 


Trust NO 


BAYVE CLIENTS wit 
cash for purchase of 
notes eu a 


ow >-9397 
et SPECIAL 
we STH ST. NW 
509 RITTENHOUSE ST 
OPEN SUN. 1-6 


1 semi-celteched brick 


NW 


veren 
PRED EHRL 
1912 14th of. aoe 
after 4 eo @ 


First Trust 


See EERE 
CLEVELAND PARK | Bibs te 


rT?) 


“7 


S| GoStats 


64 SALE _D. C. HOUSES 


THEY ARE TALKING ABOUT 


FOGGY BOTTOM 


Por evervone. the 
wants 6 o Ft. Seb +! 
newest 7 “*; te the 
scelf-trpe wents to start trom 

cesateh. ~ a all 


houses 
Re show you 


bedrma. | 
hte 
Parochial 


ras. with 
Level io 


2 
si) 
Coneress . 


s<¢ 
‘pose0 


mt, 
te, 
coe ho : 


cane RHEA B RADIN 


ve.. weeken 


WOODWARD & NORRIS 
REALTORS 
723 20th St. NW. 


, List YOUR HOME WITH Us 
CcaA HN M ER 


~ or La] Cpofiet 
rms 
= 


= * ar 
Price $11 


Albena ave 


storm windows. 
pense 


u won't find «a 
eae house Except'y ige. rt 
bedr sep = f=. pancie 
2% dDaths. plenty thocets 
porch: deep let 818.500 " 
Filicrest —Nr Penns ave Det 
brick. comnter hall § rms. 2 large 
ped full bemmet with rec. rm porch 
screened porch S shrubbery and flow- 
+ ire. back yard 
: Penna ave 
end beth tat 
rms. 4 Sedree. & 
rm 


O- Alebema are —Nr 
Better thar oew semidet 
fimish Sem 
porch earaae BY Ase 


—_ ms. a. oe 
~ COLORED—GI APPROVED 
74 YOU ST. NW 


$395 deen wr nO a ts 


sale vi ) 
‘e AD 2- bib. 
Anacostia omer 


= 


we “CALOMIRIS INV. COR 
- COLORED—VACA 
2 COMPLETE APTS 


ONLY $960 DOWN 


class neighbor 
ont poren. ft 
rm Ideal for 


mec. att 
et s2- ear concrete 


» & of 


COLORED 
OPEN, 3-7 
2014 LAWRENCE ST. NE. 
ULTRAMODERN 
CUSTOM-BUILT 
DETACHED BRICK 


only 4 years off 3 bBedrme= 


p 
kgotty-pine 
Btepdown he. rm. Rec. rm 
truly a home designed for fame 
ous jiving 


4014 GRANT ST. NE 


priced unbelievably jow —— 
mont hiy notes like rent ae © 

men New 

Sarenes. storm 


Gal appeaied | at $1 


326 BURBANK ST. SE 


SE-| CORNER BRICK HOME 


house off Texas 
= 


Lovely —__ 
Ave Mod 

rm ~ A. 4 
Sesemene Owner ail “ell ou ot 


2011 MONROE ST. NE. 
SPACIOUS 4-BEDRM. 
DETACHED HOME 


loca ted pear 
chools. Pireplece. iaree liv 
> beths. 3 perches det 
landscaped vara 
family. GT 
ferced te sell 


Pull 


Transferred 


SHOWN BY APPOINTMENT | 


ocated On upper Cea 


niture in apts. imc 

reasonably | 

piece of Income propert 

Por further 
7-6400 or RA. 6 
even Des and Sunday 


Metropolis Realty Co. | 


T13 NW. Capitel St DE. 2-3142 


64 SALE, D. C., HOUSES 


COLORED— VACANT 


me 
CUXURY "HOME 


see ea et 


» DET. BRK. BUNGALOW 


—_ metal, 


ra aes 


COLORED 
CUSTOM BUILT 
NEW RAMBLERS 
FHA FINANCING 
$18, 000 


= pe room te move anc 
is within easy reach 


aute. heat. excel 


ode 
| tating. powder 
| Kitehene with — A... - 
sement. rec rea. laundr y. 
eas "PAL and earee 


HO 2-9000 
OR INSPECTION 


Courtess care leaving 1605 Rhode 
island ave, oe. Sundays. 2-care 


Also 
10 STAR VALUES 
NEW HOMES 
Exhibit Home 
100 56TH ST. S.E 
Open Daily ‘Til 10 P.M. 


Low Down Payment 
brick hom es 


. eowaes 
t porch; va~- 
| 


transportation and’ 


and Centra! 
Cail BHO. 2- 


et Oe fa BRICK 
315 QUACKENBOS ST. NE 


ooms. 1', 


left 


own, 865 « 
with nice oH Bem) -det bric«. 
bedrms. TY FINANCE CO 


7 tor the Red Roos 
Campbell A Collier Realty + 


Stress | 


| 64) SALE, D. C., HOUSES 64 SALE, BD. C., HOUSES 64 
SP aden a * . ree 2 | HOME Or ves 


| 25m NE—~46 rooms aod bath. 
sT NW.—S rms. ond 
. 5W.—8 rms. 2 Bbatha, 


| is A. HUMPHRIES & SONS 


REALTORS 
| 2 Mas. wy : 
COLORED—-O SUN. 2 TO 6 
5130 HANNA, PL. SE. 
(JUST OFF BEKNING RD) 


WN! 
2? complete private apts. 
plus full basement. Mod- 
ern brick. Low price and 
terms. 


$99.50—$75 MO. 


THIS LOVELT Ee SIDE 
Sea a St a 
Call DI 7-8890 Anytime 
COLORED—SEMIDET. 
| MICHIGAN PARK NE. 


Smart 1 000 


Sem idetached — 


| 


SEE 
HALL 
408 


and ; 
ont poreh ane rar 


een only ’ 
y, m nes : Bikes or 


I A 
FRED. x SAAT CO. 
“COLORED—VACANT | 
1327 Jefferson St. NW. 
OPEN SUN., !-6 
Detached—Beautiful Grounds 


8 rooms. den "Srepia rm, Ex 
large basement. Sr 


+Uas-t 
geet . ERED 


1817 14th @t 
After $3 


Centin 


ie gree 
EHRLICH 
ww eT 


3-450 
a 
on Following Pas: Pare 


on cheice District 
Call 
NIAAR REALTY CO.. HO. 39-1257 


| AR BUY OF 24 a no 


JAME Di. 
SALE, INVEST. PROPERTY 62 


. 
for privete and trust funds 
SINDLER 


AMERICAN UNIV. PK. 


“ns WORTH PL. 5 W 
Srkw Tooat 1-4 
ly cony and imvitine stone 


on. SPG.—2 Get bri ee b.égs 
apt house 


o 
| eas cat JU «8-1908 hain 


ARS OLD $1 
= APT i 
— 


535° 
ANT 
$14.950 
4 2- 
enants par 
ils or Ronst masonry 


SALE, DO. C., HOUSES. 


$125 and wt 
au 


UNIVERSITY PARK 


Gi APPROVED—$!9.600 
$980 DOWN 
4307 ALTON PL. NW 
OPEN, 1-4 


get 


AMERICAN UNIV. AREA 
OPEN 3 TO 6 


49) > BAY ARD BLVD. 


nd ‘e Tt -bedrm 
ie 4 ” ith expands bie ni . =tel with 
bath rm with 

im Te 
om ist fir 


brick Cole 
bn 


trance. Within easy walking dis-' 
tance of irene : 
| piece Laeceted 


LeTorv \e teh. chose te Alice Deal Jr 


sti Bicen uy 2 AYP 
1137 | OFrEw bs | 

BURR N. JOHNSON, Jr 

= 3-S7TTT eee OF 


$cO 


ras fart AMERICAN UNIV. PARK| 
4518 Albemarle St. 


ek Ge rt 1‘, -Beth 
see tr, 


optN “CAT “AND SUN 
GRUVER-COOLEY 
sa cin we ees 


e. 
ae Bnerky Li eas 


SARNARY 
palhs and 
perches. siste roe’ 


ggrace nt. 
As 


ase Circle ge rieh 
Western te Area@a. et & ) at 
from | 


CATHEDRAL AREA 
CLOSE-IN 
4 BEDRMS., 2 BATHS, DEN 


OPEN SUNDAY, 1 TO6 
2720 36th Fl. NW. 


3902 Oliver 
Ly, ave. )}— -femtly 


s, BE 7 -— 


"gorest Haas. ee “ea 
2 er 
Pat . 


CHEVY CHASE, D. C. 
New Contemporary 


| Bae ieglares” 


un = 2S = 
reaching 


ora Le brats aoe orem ae 
KE. 7-1807, DAY OR NIGHT 


2% 
os ~ pai 


“= garage 


gaman- -Brawner 


ot LAND PARR 
3412 30TH ST. NW. 
OPEN 2 TO 6 
Fhis beputitul 4-de¢room 


“a 
tiful m= 


=’ soriced ; 
See  teder. 4114 Lesation 


Liis BURT CU ~os 
i-#a)). Evenings. Sent | 7 


e 
terme 


bam 
B 
sie enter. dbus 
en se r 


Dp 
errec. G 


, dee t 5422 Broad Branch Rd | 
_— . 
Se 3 


etached brick As 


oat 


"Set 


2413 EYE ST. NW 
2414 EYE ST. NW. 
OPEN, 2 TO 6 P. m. 


| lithe gems—esch tth 
irep patic ond 2 Sedeme 
pius central sir-cend (for 

summer dares. If vou're interested 
in convenience eraciousness 
coup.ed with 8 minimum of 
keeping end en enhancing 
then come im te see these 
ing town houses today ete ‘Beeraske rv 
injormatien svallable on other ‘trafic light 


in_ the eree WILLIAM : NINE Lad 
wands, “Gz WILLIAM C° SENNE 
Che Chase, t (Wel 
$19.950—10% DOWN 
OPEN SUNDAY, 1-7 
5542 NEVADA AVE 


slomial im very geod con 


Realtors a. 
or ren 
nished det. stene and prick. 6 bed 
De 


Far. ?- 


New house. dream «it 
bedrms.. 1 full bath 
_ ade ent e prt 


odeled exauichety —— 


GLOVER PARK 
CHEVY CHASE 


"A. AUDETTE 


J LBO EOLA CoO 


cy 
Kievan. NA. 68-3518 oc 


| De 
sroved base 


te HEVY 


FIRST SHOWING! § 


| be¢roome 
sow | sews sae Pw 
woorty 1 7 -y 


SE. SPECIAL 

3000 K ST. SE 

Th -652 ANYTIME 
Detached C Cod Co 


selioe with ineeme- 


WAask—S- dec 
74) center. 
wit 


. | Sete c 


us - 
with separate entrance. 
ving rm. dining rm 
bedrooms. beth en 


‘OPEN 12:30 TO 6 
2910 MILITARY RD ) decorating. ‘ac ‘pended ‘ins 


&-roem @hite brick. Im-| 
ment. geracse Delete | 


2 
— kg A on attic 


some re- 


dbetan ia’ 


eit 
AUL P. ORE 
a 27-1105 er RA 35-9233 


Sk NEAR PAIRFAX VILLAGE 
eri -y 
“ar 


reeu. s or 


i — 


0 tery re 


UAH < "SENACD 


Col USA. Ret.) Brower 


Ceen «re 


32-7155 


tile 
nette. carpeting 
ether extras. Cen 
bor Imme 
aporoved ols $00 


—— 


HASE. D.C. 
OPEN 2 TO 7 


Peat TENNYSON oT Ww 
nice ere-war br 


OPEN SUNDAY, 2-6 


NO. 20 UNDERWOOD 
PL. N.W 
Gi—$250 DOWN 


$68.30 Prin. 


See this nice home in 

eon vent jlecation teda 
roukmate’y 3 Years Ofc. Gemi- 
Steached brick. Chart re | 

inette pre 

7 sice-site 

clesets. Pull 

heat. FPemeet fear 

wt. Agent en premises 


Only 
$10,750 


han 2GI 


RA. 3-4884 
| Riggs & Co., 


porch 
; = ea belle 3-car ae. 
=e eis oe Co-r = ° 


=e 3314 ame sar . 
7.:, uate se Realty Co. 
, int. 


Taxes, 


mos 


ay. AP- 


Lar 
attchen 
am pie 

as 


we 


(Less aporaisal? 


ae ane it a 


GEORGETOWN 
OPEN, 2 TO 5 
3509 O ST. NW. 


OPEN SUNDAY. 2 
6013 NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE 
DETACHED BRICK, $19,950 
a al, 4 room 3 becroems. sep 
rm -Gining a Pireplace wits 
mirrors. well-te-wall carpet. mod 
| =n chen. side- 7m ber porch. A oy 
, -pinme rec , 


liv 


| gas heat sry 


Masbnaloy, "RA = ENS 
| TOWN HOUSE 


12015 BELMONT RD. NW.| va 


OPEN SUNDAY, 2? TO 6 
™ A MUCH 

HOW EYES, 
T ry TOWN 
Ms. 7 


BY APPT. ONLY 
pupencivet poe ate 
’ oom Rouse ith ' 


A 
HOUSE W 


1675 Wisc. Ave. DE. 2-1137) ‘ 


_MILLICENT CHATEL | : 
GEORGETOWN 


aM 
Pull 
, 


viata and ng 
MODERN KITCHEN 
or CABINET SPACE bamt 

in .- s 
To) 
FAN 


1565 33RD ST. NW. 
OPEN, 2-5:30 


. Sebuyier —_—_—_————_————— 
HOWARD | y McPECK | QUALITY HOMES 
4898 204 St _ Resitor ap. 2-1108, AT BARGAIN PRICES 

HILLCREST | Open, 1 to 6 P.M. Sunday 


ican University Park — 2903 
Ave New 
| rambler comprising 4/ 
2 beths. Gen, 

Price $34,750. 


no n.36 


bedrmes 
ku 


S319 Nebraska Ave 


HILLCREST SE’ 
2023 31ST PLACE SE. 


fome? 
fring room 


ced Ww s#ll. 
5596 30th Pi 7. 
erick Colonia! 

2 full baths 

r bedrm 

seem to be epprecieted 
ana make offer 


pip pile 
pian! _BiAN ci ce: Pa 2 58. 
“NEAR CATHOLIC UNIV 
OPEN ‘TIL 6 
903 Perry Place N E 


One the nicest }-dec 
tone heoyeses we ——y a. a' 


SUN. i-T:30 
eA - for = 4-bedr oom _— ,peruins 
n ead orikced ow bec-m 
wee detached erick | 


inspect 


, of 


tTrenmouse 2 NJ Pad 


Oper, 1:30 to 6 om 


¥ell-eeuipped x 
2 —, 


tt 

bu! : 
seo. 4m 
i) om lv 


an ‘arse rooms. | ce in 
r= 


rm 
pertecs éondi-| ree 
a. “& Gerber Realty Co. | 


sss Cena 


rm. comp. «ki 
814.400. a6 


Rr GC" ‘McKNEW CO. 


KE -2094 BO. 17-0632 


exp 
iitie ad 


DUMBARTON 
4644 Reservoir Road 
OPEN SUNDAY 2-4 
First presentation of this detached red brick house 


on good level lor An opportunity to purchase in this 
mucnm dewred location 


$29,500 
Laura Harlan & Co, Realtor 
EXCLUSIVE AGENTS 


NA. 8-403! 


Foxhall Village 
4403 Greenwich Parkway NW. 
OPEN SUNDAY 2-4 
English brick Town House—One of the larger houses 
im ths convenient location. Near transportation and 
excelient Schools. 
Laura Harlan & Co. 


EECLOSIVE AOGrTS 


‘ JOULES R SENNETT CO 


HU. 3-3316 | ihe 


Ange LIVING | 
s 
LOTS) ~ 


brick | 


3611 T STREET NW 


boxy Jvina ot et 


- 
rs. °o 
Direetions Twe Dlecks west of 


with fin nished 


m sale. ori —— : 


rm 
dryer * acl 


Direc 
Sheridan, =" te 


Realtors Di. 7-424 
OPEN SUNDAY, S60 
2840 BLADENSBURG RD. NE 


rick © - ée end 
heer ter 
,0Gern kit Tamils. site 


| ats as 3, bedrms "< * a =. 
ROGERS REALTY co 


NA 8-0906 A 9-3459 
3 BEDROOM BF BRICK 


: 
tor offer, 
on “name a fair t 
a re 44-4582 MUDD 


ALISADE 
5422 Howthome Pi. NW. 


rai brick patio. \o seceded carden, 
Mac a pair beta at Athy 
USIE V. WATWOOD | 
4. 8- 

2 


“was 
rooms. 
owner 


ner must 

ad ne You are 

. a ® 

: pts Deau 
wit sell at« A ‘nas 


yy ie PCE brite 
4212 18th St. NW. 


(Bet ochur & Vaernum Sts. NW) 
hed brick 


ABUSED 
WE THINK) * 


: 
: 


OPEN SUN., 2 30-DARK 

AD Lg HR 1 4 a 
Soa aad 
De ARES —WODORISGE 


OPEN SAT., SUN., 2-6:30 
| 3040 S. Dakota Ave. NE. 


Detached corner brick home ist 
fleor. living rm. dining rm.. Kitch- 
| en. den bath 24 fieor. 3 bed- 
rooms. bath nat 80x116. VACANT 


PROCERS REALTY CO. 


L- A, 
yard 


CORP 


| 2a get 


| Only $250 Down 


| Yes, It’s True 
Take Your Pick 


ullramodern | 


Meridian place nw —This 


m 3 ~~, 
— — pr 


ni term cel te 
FLOYD e DAV'S Co. 


DIRE t 
te Gall pti. right © idth &.. 


ae RIGGS REALTY 


NEW 
AIR-CONDITIONER 


th st. ne. VA appepved © $106.- 
1 ‘e Deaths. 


| fered im this 
one VA approved | for $1 
ultre ~ they c 
baths 


| as Bees. salt ersepany ree 
went Et ipear oe nore oe 


| “ited es af 
“422 Longfellow St. NW. 
OPEN, 2-5:30 P.M. 


re DARK | 
Gi— 363 a3 MO. 
603 FARRAGUT PL. NE. 


1610 Cody 


cz 
RAMBLER 
4601 BLAGDEN AVE. NW 
nt cus 3 tein- 
uYv on 


open j 
opening onto petic - De 
ot. Mr. Jackson. LU 4abit 


718 - y+] ST. NE 
4 P.M. 


OPEN, 
BEAUTIFUL BRICK 
, Ist Floor 


OLD 
maqete 


EALTY co. 


GOLDEN 
OPPORTUNITY 
PRICE REDUCED 


S719 IST ST. NW FOR arte SALE 


cont - y- -hall a ky ' 2-— with bedrm 


dress 


rpetina, Rec. rate brick 
esa, ook. ea 


13 
Pinkett, Inc 


ay 
}- ren 
RED. WOODRIDGE 
OPEN SUNDAY, 1 TO 6:30 
403! S. Dakota Awe NE 


IST TIME OFFERED 


detached custom->d 
+ pecrms 
room mocern 
. ishe qisposa 
Tree center hall o 
side screened porch del uxe rec 
» Sasetire 


Cee EEAITY CO 
_ =. eens LA. 6-6827 


3151 19TH ST. NW. 
OPEN SUNDAY, 2-6 
GI—$800 DOWN 


tate wogutatal 


AM KF “ 


7-< 
| S01) 7TH ST. NW. 
OWNER LEAVING CITY 


~* 


home 


Colored—Aftention 


Only $195 Down 


Don’t Rub Your Eyes Riggs & Co., HU. 3-3316 


RAMBLER—-4519 


BLAGDEN AVE. | 
1-DARK 


S-YEAR-€ LD RAM- 


D 
DECORATE 

PRICED IN MID 20's 
Directions’ Out 16th « 
aon turn jeft 2% bloc cs 
(dead- ena? “AN 


Gl Approved 
Brand New 
44 46th St. NE. 
Only $250 Down 


tomes "Taree rooms. 
: > war. Bre = i 


te Deca- 
ts ®'« = 


D LZ 


5 
ae H RYON 


NA #&8-4975 LO 4-8054 


— 


ave 


dey 
COLORED NE 
Gis | ! ! 
WHY PAY. RENT ??? 
OPEN SUNDAY 


ation 


"Oo as to 


RA. 3-7274 Buy this levely home ith mod- 


iy. cm. dm. em. equip 
t. 2 mice-sieeg bedrms. mod 
full bamt. 


be” 1% 
eckson. omall Dn. Pymt., $68 Mo 


rriniéed ave. p+ —Brieg| RIGGS RIGGS % & CO. RA. 3 3. 4884 
ago ke 


COLORED 
OUPOPEN, 28 7 EC TIONS 
COLORED—VACANT TE iar 
OPEN SUNDAY 1-6 4651 Easy Fi. 5.E. 
CORNER DETACHED 
POWDER RM., REC. RM 


To nniy 14th ST. NW” 


. porehes, 4 bed- 
Go. a-W. E 


~ a y B+ 
Saat “Res EHRLICH 


bodes 


may 
dorn er conventions! $2009 
2-5449 evenings 


4459 TEXAS AVE. SE 


‘an 


2 Dat ren 
term DIR : i 
. | te Texes Ave zs Bens ime Re! 


DIRSC TIONS Out 
ar 


N5 : NW. | Wi) fl bi Sa 


4 BEDRMS., SEMIDET. 
OPEN TODAY 3-4 
ima ee ve betler type home 
cane perches. Gee beet. Ooly “tr OPEN SUNDAY — 


ONE & MARCELLINO | semi-der Brick. 


TA 9-263 TU. 2-2101 we 


Céloned 


BLAGDEN AVE. —COLORADO AVE NW 


PF FROCK CREEE PF 


Chien Sunday, 2-7 
New Split Level—Ramblers 


PRICED FROM 


$25,500 to $27,500 


Select Your Lot Now 


24th ST. OF 
Gece. S-rm.| 


> 


| 


A two-family house tm excellent 
si medern =- 


condition. with 
| provements, Fe yours 
terms 


pescenet® prices and 

be t your convenience 

al eres oday eof 

). . t CRE NE REALTY CO 

75 Pia Ave. NW wO. 17-6145) 

“List With Us a | 
OPEN SUN. 2:30-6:30 
— or AVE. “_. 


ae titel hgh aie 
f, ge 


1207 = 19th St. NW. NA. 8-403! 


rec 


eat ve 


CITY oF Ww 
600 AND 450 


ich "PhaSla EAnD o' seh 


Most Lots Face Rock Creek Park 


a PW 


“;nec. DE. 2-5400 


, 


Blagden Homes, Inc. TA. 9-241 1 
i J 


| bat 4 


2-6 
625 GALLATIN ST. NE 


Bengins Ra4 | 


| wA 80006 


| COLORED—PINEST WOODRIDOS 


Detached Brick 


me 2106 
2212 Randolph St. NE. 


Yes, comp) etely onamee _on ck 


ert | 
-|40 BUCHANAN ST. NW 


OSEPH KINSKY, "REAL TOR 
3-5311. Sunday BA. 35-2365 


“RIR-CONDITIONED 
LUXURY 


1928 VARNUM ST. NE. 
OPf~ TODA lower Mw 
DETACHED BRICK 
2 RES 


amg & CO. 


m4 
RU_i-om, 


OPEN SUN, 3-7 


528 QUACKENBOS ST. NW. 


Cont er- ry pan 7 we. rms. 
ith , ce 
sec sun poren. ME 
i eben Stns ods es “al 
€ 
i = aa 


' Shrubs Garace ‘Asaher 
=r Many other levely features 


8. Sydinor Realty Co. 


living 
ad- 


“4 BATHS. “ET ot 7,950 
PE L 
"1408 OTIS ST. NE. 


4722 7 ny NW. 
OPEN 2-6 PM. 
$93.50 PER MO 


ork woqee con - 
rooms +: ee- 


-2653 
+ GREE Ne REAL TY co 
718§ Pia Ave SW NWO. 77-6145 
ee SIL is and start packing 


COLORED 
OPEN SUNDAY, 2-6 
4016 E ST. SE. 
$500 Down, Low Monthly 


(Prin. Int. Taxes & ins. Incl) 


today. this 3-badrm. trk 


te +. “= " 
aed te ts ever 
: . 4 Ricse td. on ‘i 


3-4884 


| Riggs & Co., HU. 3-3316 


COLOR 
OPEN SUNDAY, 2-6 
4027 EST. St. 


$500 DOWN—$86 MO 


Prin... Int.. Teus & ims. incl) 


Ots come out and see ‘his ve- 
ca 


rick Storm windows. | 
is . hard] 


wg 


. 


bog: 
rear yard Fractious 
Se git 
RA. 3-4884 
gs & Co., HU. 3-3316 
" Colored—Real Values 
Open Sunday, 2-6:30 
cae 


oose one ef the finer homes 
ree and 4 coms. modern 
caems end bets. rec. rms. 


OI OR NOn-Or 
505! Brh Se. NE 
1239 Delafield Pi. NE 
2243 3th St. NW 
1230 Delatield Pi. NW 
733 & 757 Gallatin St. NE 
Por Further iInfermation. Call 


ROGERS REALTY CO. 


ec 


LA 6-194) 


| 
BIG SALE—$495 DOWN 


7 cg 
AWK st sf 
MANY OTHERS FOR SALE 


re Ber ‘ ir) 
Tg 


COLORED-——-DET. 4 BEDRMS. 


cont «om a a ON. 


£. ae- Cerner 


cs Ri picrcacen CO. 
fy iLL 6 
50 DOWN 


ae See 
J 


SALE, D. C. HOUSES 


‘e = 
t! hen 
SLB Sh Rath 
6 


5-407 | 
ES 
i =f pera: +e, Nr. ~- 


| 


z 


COLORED—VACANT 
Low-Low Down 
Payments 


SOME CAN BE SOLD WITH 
Nothing Down 


SOUTHEAST 
1523 Independence Ave. SE. 
4 rms. Beth: redec.: 879 mo. 


NORTHEAST 
811 AST. NE. 


con athe eee . bath: 
70 EYE ST. NE 
(2 apts). Uke new. 897 50 mo 


1623 Montello Ave. NE. 


& fmt COL. TL. Beh. 693.50 mo. 


a 
. 


like 


NORTHWEST 
6214 5th ST. NW. 


3 becrms.. pertitiened bemt.: front 
perce: $115 mo 


4009 Marlboro Pl. NW 


rms. 23 Kits.. 2 baths; col. pch 
$120 mo 


2312 19th ST. NW 


10 rms. 23 Baths. full bem 
mo 


1742 Hobart St. 
4 bedrooms. 3% bathe 
sisal Me 


1722 2 Kilbourne P| 


sis 


NW. 


rec 


NW. 


Colonial 
| ae ow as 


Tecate 


For Immediate 1s a to Inspect 
Realty Mortes 


Investment adi 
1004 VERMONT AVE 


NA. 8-3480 | 


Eves., AP. 7-82467, RA. 6-8489 
o _ 
a tection. 
Cen iiw * i. oe 8195 — 
from ii 


ise. 


yard 


porch 
commmeanal 7 redecorated 
gas) | hheat need-in 
¥ 


PPER WW 
3 BEDROOMS—MODE RN 


$295 DN. 


Semidet. brick. 4 rms full 
as Bh. Levely vers 
ev- bow se condition 


eae 


AN &T 


Mr 


e700, SA 
ear NE 
TAL a4 “abe 


det 
jaf bert 
ry co & 


—J-story brick cemidot 
bath. vowd 
~-y A 


ana financing 


me 


veond 


di 
ner I 
priee 


4203 3 16TH eT NW. 


tiful brick home is priced 
ssle with 6) the 
} pet 


22 Baths, Rec. 3 


DETACHED—WOODRIDGE 
2606 Rhode island Ave. NE. 
Vacant—$895 Down 


Other hem im al] sections 
a our paleame " enrtime 
Mus 


insky RA 6-6912 
6 
OPEN 


4707 
38 HAMILTON ST. N.W.| 
2 


Bemidetached huge 
modern oolened fue's 
+2 


Lovely home. 4 bedrms, 3 bat he. 
er rm. Rec. rm. Modern 


B. Sydnor Realty Co. | 
TA. 9-6706—TA. 9-6372_ 


BRIGHT WO" 
oe om 


ne semidet. brick hom 


RE. 7-353) 


” 6008 SRD. 
* BETACHED i a a 


tae home with forer entrance and 

powder rm. Liv. rm. wi a 
amily sized mn. 
th all mod 


de 
~ es aprewes 


50 «o 
only, $22,980 28 sioat “Co 
444 


+ a BATHS 

TL ‘er 
NDLE 
060 


TOUSES WANTED, te BUY 65 


+-4i64, "SAND Doz, INC 


~ COL—$295 DOWN 
Fice $12, a 


UN. 4- we 


HOUSES WANTED, to BUY 65) SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67D. | SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67MD. 
IN M - : 
| Mon 


I buy fo direct cr eaaas 
state c 
hop = BC Houses $22 500-3 ACRES 


bay ae from ewner. Né comm , 
- th eider 3- Rays, bath me 
fi a y . ANYTIME house C2) heat re}! 

= ra 
Raves nearby 0 
a} Ie ave “qubstantial cosh Mrs 


r 3-bedrm. home ndece road 
fo ey gocupancy 
¥ wo 
any ROC K one ihiix 
5 aha 
La 


6-9325 
‘iteelf 


= Thi s super ) Real 
a 
rooms from 7 
v 


— 


te" din 

t.. hea 
a - a "oom room. 
room, 2 baths. wt) tor $19.- 


¥ RA BLANCHARD 
Bs JU. 8-8600 


quapenemaea | 


yee. front en 3 
4 = 


€ at 4. 

a in full separate 
seem. walle ectric 

= “ec * ioe ot. fin 

recre 

work 
950 


o.lar—@ | cash 


rr) 
section of the city 
CO Cen ¢ aree 


SALE SUBURB. Outs s7mb. 
MARYLAND 


ee Rpatahen world e 


wn. Mk. 


 ecre 
nique aporeciat an shade trees: 
a) Unawestion 
Sanebt er avai lable 
9.275. 


Prederick 
pevation and 


Su 5 Thege 
oe 


= EXPANSIBLE. E 


bedrooms. livine 
all Helgctrte. ki Kite- 


fee | 
for | 
thie” 


P condi tion “er IF 


lent to ie. 


WOOBSIDE FOREST. 


Brick Colonial. Three twin- sized | 
vedrooms _ step-down aving rom. . 
firep 


: Vv APPR fenced Sioa. Galt 
acre——more | 
ANNE ARUNDEL Co soCKVHLE 
ba | R bee 
indo 
extres 


$450 town 
mode rn 


ape I ae se 


ure replece. carpor' 
Kiar  . MR PRANK. LO 

$i 
ROCK VIETER 510.08 Aitreetis . a, 
with bart 


ore Cape oe 


Con venient 
schoo! 


FAIRWAY HILLS 
| 6505 BARR RD. 


ndorter-built brick C 


Scree 
with 615 
Out Mac- 

lis en 

to 


r 


TEVENSON, 0. 5-4363 


SMALL _L ESTATE 


aoe a E.. for Py -#-. but 


on n 
ome KO 
RPFER. OL. 44-8111 tt 9 


$25,950 


CLOSE-IN, SILVER SPRING 


| OPEN SUN., 1-6 


gned for Gracious Living | 


2 2 NOYES COURT | 


Owner transferred and leaving Uys 
and large brick a bene = 
| Waelkine distance ito nee : spring 
oppi oe CW ect © cy 
TR J a a win -aine Cedreeme tao 
aths. tremendous living room with 
ireplace, extre-larce. seperate din- 


t Cost ie i, 
oo COWS 
ps . 


Pivein-s rat 


din 
Except: onal ay lagen 
7 


or fed 
hontnomery County 


BETHESD _- Attractive Coloniai jo- 
n 


in hoice neighborhood 
soait tion to 3 


Pisawi Resitors 


Pes. 
Ex 
“sil.ae Only $7 580 dn 
; . 


windroos 
ne 


atts 


‘br teed. ris teVeo 


Fyvv(ste CONL 

9525 Ga.Ave >-4154 

RAMBLER —PBrictk "texturing 
1g Too 


CoD 

or 

ol. home 
—--— —-— mi wi 
ocetion "Et BURBAN PR . 
4 AF — Twi nbroo 

in 


owner must 
house we) 
VA. Gnancine os ee able 


tors 
eal 
4 


MPANY, Rea) 
200 


; 
LAO 


19,980. woo ‘ 
9.30. 


ing room. full partitioned bare- 
ment and enciosed porch _— 
en t 


oy ; —, 


e bave « mos group s ghetes 
t bedree oom bh in the Wee 
ential ne 


of 
Spr! 


end detach 
Ave. right 


Ges Geary fas open JU. 5-6550 


price 


on almost two scores 
réc. room see 
four-bedroom 


“ehtenen. f fireplaces 


enter- 
with * wet Pieler babeboard t besfing 
ea ‘= & co , 


fase ; ous 
7 ae visit our of-' 
fice “> Tewees you ds? 


a 


mree 
and 


ROBERT GRAY CO. | 


$16 Elleworth Dr. Giiver Spring 


SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67MD. SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67MD.. THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES Do. 
: ee ee 


Sunday, July 8 1956 
SALE SUBURS, HOUSES 67 MD. 
it’ pic-. MARYLAND 


tae’ sndone in "ving room and Prince Georges County 


recreation wood 
7913 S5TH AVE. 


415,000 
Sunday 


Wik €:9085- WH. 6-734 PO. 2-4704 | 


Circulation 

means quicker sales results 
for Washington Post and 
Times Herald classified ed- 


vertisers. To place your ed 
for Sunday 


Phone 
REpublic 7-1234 


ark ares Ciant-stze. piegieetrie 
a 2- — Oe cm &¢- 
A REAL GEM Gl—-$275 DOWN 
12809 MATEY ROAD ., tet compicte, 
WHEATON, MD. Ras Weta 
nette, Kitch 
in Tah: 


3-bedroom bri l-level rambler 
@alking distance to 3 schools and 
boas Bolling. Suitiand, 7 bed- 
ic wi e 


trade tee Call 
Immedct ate pesssesien. 
sum 


—_— oo jemer.t 


bal eae 
obir n : Conat ruction Co. 


$12,750 | 
$650 DOWN TO VETS 


ANDREWS. Suitiand, $250 dn. VA.. 
2 bedrm. home = th expand up: | 
ce 


FORTE 


h ° os. to “5. 
part taite Anished A LISTER Realtor, J wee 


4c 
Exce) 
evel Tenees-im ves, ees vo! AUTH RD .—-68-ft —y rambler 
er ' ahop- - ys 
Dul-| fence 
every was) 
Greenwood Knolls Rity. Co. fea‘ures 


SHADE a+ a ton er ever thie spa- 


| BORGES. RE 6-520. 
CAMP SPRINGS AREA | 
—— Pmall Berti Snished a. & A od 
Owner . 


gious j-bedr 
s-acre evel 


ree loan 
4-221. 


2-deth 
2-car 
terms 


Ea, a Tot. Rew. eh, 
kaa 


REALTY MORTGAGE & 
INVESTMENT CO 


er 
easy ington only, minutes 


’ 


oft ig: Eves Aye Fics 


~~ Fentneed os Vellewine Pare 


?-hedrm 
jovely extras 


or oe 


Kensing'> 
De ~eees 


bus 
“a Geod 
pee BY. niyo 7-Bi3i for 


$1 


Austin. OL - ycwep rose 
N Ww egy, 0 OL, 4.6867 ' 
———. 


| Montgomery County 


(jun TODAY 


Aas 


ARGYLE CLUB AREA 
GREENOCK RD 


brick split-level 


| eae Bhi ae 


9313 ADELAIDE DR 
OPEN, | TO 6 


Attractive br ck ,ramb. er on 
level fenced jo 


o 
-_ ~ eft to Greenock Rd. 


right to 10021 


PARKWOOD 
10117 WILOWOOD DR 


Brand new “be - split levels ; twin 
ms liv. rm 


pre 
Co [PANY 
LO 


-. 
rn 
i568 Georgia ave 


aici SPRING- $) 43 760 
cereenes poe ae : 
bead inte one becrsa 
rec. room. Di rections 
Ceorgetown Ra 
adout 5 biocks. 
ww 6 


7 . 
and bat 
Ou >! 


an 


Willimett 
right on Ade.aide 


Billingsley Realty Co. 


ae Acre 74 
reen res, S216 Bal- ou Pra 
, hk ‘ ie sone te + eae. Ave Sight to oot 


OPEN, 11 TO DARK 
Woodmoor Agency, Inc. 


JY. 99-5585 Realtors 


BANNOCKBURN 
OPEN DAILY 
NEW SPLIT-LEVELS 
6927 SELKIRK DRIVE 


timore ave 
ot in 


Cherm ‘ne nome in excellent neigh - 
rea an pu 


Ss sca° 


rick 


ce onia! 
eae at ro ae 


. 
av er Searm oe cress) mE 
| Da a 44 


*“WooTtow 
Realtors 


re 


and 
rden Call “ns. 


j "F BEGG. INC 
| - 
rikow PURE = 


ro 
’ 


lane te Nevis rd 
Wtlisor eft en 


>. 
Nevis te Selkirk and left te OPEN 


sgn eines 
rn RANNOCKBU RN — Rambler ” 
sr oded —— brick 
> 
prov Ly 


1WiNBNOOK—« bedrm 

ot ~ ’ 
siis 50 Su te 
RONALD» E 


ee intl Ebi tee 8 yous 


gareace 
eet Gl 
. 
rar mbler on Cape 
Gi 
Nr 
owner, 


tie 


NIH 
OL 
walking dis- 
onial with 


‘By 


nerve With 
‘ance WW" 4 Br os 


bec rme 


5709 GLENWOOD RD 
Charming white rick ectenial 
with ned rec -90 
igvel fenced | 

D 


~ © 6 4een Dae 
. meen Doren. 

New! tec ted through 

000 KORZENDORPER OL. 

OL. + 7200 


BRADLEY FARMS 
9111 RIVER ROAD 


Gentieman’s estate 

brick end stone modern rem ler. 

Biate root. 3 bedrooms. 3 Baths 
bedroom suite comprising 


——— 


te iientt ully 
rch 


KOR? :EN borin Oo +. é1 
~ CHEY? Cua MARY AND 


suiect ° existing trusts. | 
anc can be 4&f- 


roo's, 
ttached "Sen or library ull 


ie ; 
fun 4ar 
PAaD REALTY COMPARY 
room, femily ite kitenen, 
» & ed and reened 


WEEATON— ~~ 060 dn. te non-vels 
Of loan. pynrts. iew- 
a -brt CAPE oD 
paul 4 
sv SURBAN tase 
re HEATON cil 


¢1'3.400 GI 


3 BEDRMS —F ULL BS MT 
et'ractive 
: Vacant 
ciate occupancy could be &r- 


Lo 44-8383 


an . oe 
At eRBACH & CO 
CHEVY CHASE—Co)onia! 
pecrm.. 1 full Daeth. te 
rm 


rm Line 
f | x rxt beyond Bred! ev 
arrangement . nd the 


911k River Rd 
eROSS 7. PERRY, ba 


REALTORS 
BETHESDA -- . Brick 
“ur «(6B Jan 


tifteate of 

435. Be sure and sce this “un 

offering in & fine section. conv 

ent te shoppl ine r* schools 
as 


en) 

LEE 
fat: 3 ee =m 

Dutcb Colonia! 

acreened porch 

erage 


} e\es 
Rober: son. 79396 
WY CHASE. —thari mi! i 


ungsio . 
+ ay shad od O° 
PISANI, Realtors 


cit CHASE —+- year-old 
colonia r 
BILLING TY 

“2326 ® Eves 


DAMASCUS 


cus’ 


e KORE 


ad EN! ORPER 


was. ove WHEATON - Hy 500, ; 5 is. 

ne J-bed- se 

‘, mt. 

caret, 
y 


earpe 

ence rou nd lewe! picture window 
hasement oulet dead-end street 

Open Sun. 1-6. 6400 Wilmett Ra 

OL. ¢ v< 
BETHESOA—SPLIT LEVEL 

4 ee DEN. REC. a 

$406 PRADLEY BLY 


vt 
i. i800 
brick ' 
#21.400 
o.. EM 


W aie cFON—S- bedrn 


’ bamt. 


G - 
j side entr im mn 

950 bor ALD _E 

wy 64 1260 


$395 DOWN 


| ne Cc we ges) 


RP i 


- Besa 


Sett ll 


rin! ishED RE Nie ‘ae Bit. gar. DIR. North Wise. | 
. to "Brag ey Bivd.. eft, ‘te open | 
ar 


WELL LEO M “BERNSTEIN co 
INCLU DES 4,38 A J wu 
sic : 

w 33 
down GI. 4- bed rm . 
rfect condition 
basement 


velue home 


‘2) B. Tt. level LAND 


r twenties Open Sun. 1 te 
$392 Oakmont Ave. Bethesda 
ETHESDA it 
4507 ELM ST. 


raee 
with built- -in ” penute So 300 
cellent financing 


JERRY COOK, INC. 
REALTOR + 
Cook-Watkins Bide > 
Neat te Acme Superm 
Damascus. Md Te sarwetes %. 2311 


FOUR CORNERS 


Spacious pewee Colontai 
d 


a 


: Mnaencing at 5% 
Wood Acres Constr Corp 

" _ OL 
fies le Ee 


2-73 
“sk "eo 
tirep ac 


ae 


ealtor. JU 


"12 TIL 6 


[—— on Wiscen- 


stone serge Sv 
lst 


> 


Weed 
locks “sor 
Walker & Dunlop, Inc 
1290. 13th a NW — -92 
BETHESDA 
“REAL LIVING” 


OPEN TODAY 2-6 
tiie grand name for your- 
ad\e5 weaner 


rw “Lothrop store) 
HEL IU $2789. OL. 32-5093, ; 
WOODMOOR, $18. 500 a 
- = Cad 


2 
h ge pan weied 
fox en 


837,500 


mortsene rg Owner. 


GI. seve int R 

old Drk. rambDier: 

equip t. tau n ; 
Nr new public. a paroch: al schools 
Elieib pool mem hip: active 
community 8 8} th. $108 fe | aed 


— moi 
ig pa Pa 563" RANDOLPH RO- 
with playrm wooded rag Own TO vers 


Rive ap 
, ss 
Hg 


QUICK SALE 
made if you have 
° in upper aris’ 


3-bed 


Can 
twood. 


room 


* 


y 
A CASH BUYER OR 


THE "TOP aha Tat pres Lom 


Bike FROW AGA (7 
ae ae 


PRINCE 
ee “aporaisal 


s ST. 3 
Pgh cash Ba bbe 


hours st 
~ +8 


no’ 
‘- eh Se 


ick A 


Cash our 


“~ 


oees to sel & rea 
Atkins Dz. 2 


nee 
abet 


er — 4&-bedroom Cave | 


Cod ent. shaded cor. ict 


2 
STar “rambler that’s 
ta ERs size ery ft. liv. rm 
ike 
u ~y fam- 


106 weg) 3 
2 | Heatas oF peat & 
2 s e¢4) oh 


iy —-* aoe 
1a ‘yard. 
$00 


x ck ‘ 
um oan. $) 


ceneacer * Knolls Rity. 
6-548 "4 ; - 
$300 DOWN) 
Silver Spring near BAe - nm eve 
2 tepn-omee degr< Gen 24-ft 
liy.-cim. ¢ fire 
of 10 ‘of 3.300. Call 
Wodpn OF "hOENCT. “inc. JU 


"GI's ONLY a DN. 


Like new . ont. les 
with a 


— 


Nit ED REALTY 
BETHESDA 
PARKWOOD 
a? 


eer 


-jm pati, 
arke 43 


oni : 


ck Cc * 
ent ~-4 porch 
3306 Oberon 


.$50 


“EXTENDED 


3 ‘eh 
' u 
¢rooms sand 


a 


BETHESDA (W vpees e) 
AFTERNOON 


SHANNON ‘& LUCHS CO. 


sockviLle — 


nr 
duced 
5 


Be RN TILL 6 


Cos Esy 


ana gies 


XTENDED 

* mo mt you 

ec. Colonial in 
to every- 


MASS. AVE 
You wil like ft ¢t 
Newsy «4 


Soi Gerie N THIS 
rick Cole- 
bet walk in 


eI hice rms 
a 


please. 5008 isteon dr. at Balto 


me. itt to 


NEW ASE\FETER 


58298 ONOFDAGA RD. 
OPEN TODAY, 2 TO 6 
fust} 


S| Seah new 5 ne rs, ta Es +, 
bal. ving rm 

=e : 
ar 


WRIGHT 


AVE. EM. 3-5600 


PRICE REDUCED 
$3000 


OrEw 1 
low for quick sale. most 


screened porch. c! 
and deth all man 


Piornepnie st 
right te 730) apie ave. ond our 
ine to 


right piock 


, 
> 


Te rlabrese Es Porest 
uly air-cond t 


5031 wis 


SILVER SPRING 
FOREST ESTATES 


bik 
Open 


ree 
from schools 
Sat... Bun. all 
bd) n 


CHEVY CHASE, MD. 
7508 TARREYTOWN. RD 
N. OFF LELAND 8T 


OPEN SUN., 2-5 


Rverveh ng special—house, neigh- 
terrace overlooking your 


r 
Th 


OPEN Sun poe tt 6 PB 
° 


FOR SAI ‘ay "Sw EF 
| $21,000 Noob FIN Antino AVA! 


\WHITE BRICK RAMBLER 


th patio 


: eget ve ] aycaded wit 
ev obs 188 To + charm 


sell 


Las Come on to oa 
5 3-325 am be z 
Wo DWARD & NORRIS 


aioe 


} attic eae mahi 
ome deviahtiully coc 


venient te public tranep. pud- 
© and parochiel schoow 
DIRECTIONS: W. en 


a 


a block rhe’ right 


»' block te 10018 W 


a breaktant | 8. Walrachel el, JU. 77-5755 | 
| SILVER r SPRING 


= |9317 OCALA 


YOUR FROMPT Ié- 
Dedrine. We Fm etyie - ° pith, 2 
SB Pi 


ave 


: | Gesemie 
drum Lane. GT approv oved. un on Ww on | 
$25.000 ow pate colonial 004 - 
situated on °& road | 
shrubbed iot @i o»* side riveway 


leadine te bullt-in garage. large 
iy. rm ith fireplace 


beurs «all Mr 


Ula 


Thomas J. Fisher & Co. 
. a SS Me eeserr 


CHEVY CHASE, CAPE COD 
3 BEDRMS., 2/2 BATHS 


Open 2-6 6-7t -old 
rit. w/table space, a 
flr ; 


BRICK RAMBLER 
$17,900 


GI CONTRACT 


EO M ASN CO. 

c pe 

OAAIEVY CHASE 

ROSEMARY SCHOOL 
LOW 20s-—OPEN 


English Tuder eetet, pome located 
evy Case 


asem 
you sy je. 
a 1 fine level ict 
—. ; 


PRI wen oe OF seu TODAY! 


Directions: Bilver 
Crive out Georgia Ave 

mi. te Prichard St... tur 
2 ee turn 


FREDERICK W. BERENS 


ve 
tragic. lig $). 


SHANNON % LUCHS co 
Be CASE VILLAGE 


7105 FULTON ST. 
“HOUSETIM 


area. $1 
44-3348. 


wR wecmeney dr 
FR down 

Buy of « 

mary school ate, fences lot 

RIAUX. OL 


* in Rose- 
av 


2: >. eat 
OL. 4-6164 


c 2a iv 5 

om... pine-panele 

. Iaundry anc work 
Soper ocr . ne c 7 

on. with flagstone 

way and carpe 

one slum beat 7 


rd Ser 

“STONYBROOK 
OPEN 

DELUXE RAMBLERS 


$17,590 


Drive out toda 
h mode) 


tie in rear ri 
Venetian bd inds 
KEN ~WOOR—As? hou cooks good dee. yane eareusd- 
by moonlicht. but this one invites an 
> be the bricht “Awnet 


or appointment. 


spacious 

on - ~~ 

bath : 
on 2¢ “Lares a ~ ied porch. base- 
1 tneulstion 


a! 


on Wisconsin ave 
left on Bradie 
ent rance te 


MARGARET puniizy” Realtor 
OL. 4-5800 
5911 MASSACHUSETTS AVE. 


opEN SUNDAY, 1-6 


to 


ond see our fur- 
enw 3 


grace 2axis 4 
ra fons 
bear te felt 3 - ae 
enter. then tallees ' 


Pa set fkk 


COLONIAL INVESTMENT CO 
923 15th St. Nw 
6550 


ou > 
to Viers Mil) 
tl M)}) | 


Ro 


ac 


beau 
nt) s dare 
Entrance hall 


fireplace u 
bedrm 2 baths. ¢ 


is 
rm egoeiions ma '’ 
yath Carpo ao caren 
trong eats line 


minutes ‘ 
JAMES L. "DIXON & CO |» 
00 EM. 2-9290 


ST. 3-7 
“CAPRI” “BAY MODEL” ~ “MIKADO” 
DAN OSTROW AT GREENWOOD KNOLLS 
OPENS 
5-B SECTION 


om 


nw 
WH. 6-9333 


RE. 7- 


$18,250 $18,250 


HERE'S OUR STORY: 
1—All-brick 3- and 4-level homes 
2—Three or 4 large bedrooms (your choice) 
3—1% or 2% baths lyour choice) 
4_—Extra large kitchens 
5—11.4 Westinghouse refrigerators 


rch laree uving 


(NEAR a MAP SERVICE) 
fireplace 


Glen Mar Park 


OPEN SUN., |-6 
$219 AUGUSTA ST. 
9 


Sanit Tarde 
NEW SPLIT LEVELS 


in Silver Soring 


check book and make on 
wick possession 
OPEN, 1 TO 6 
4502 CONIFER ST. 
1ON =. Out Conn, Ave 
ea ~y A 


right 
HARRISON, 


room with floor-te- 
sement. off- 


DIRE 
weli-eatadiished Soul 


te Centifer ores 


NS 4 


STOP BY 
120 GEORGIA AVE. 


za 


t:| <siGcer & CO. 


rent eon 800 
. HAM & CO. JU stkse 5 


room 


rai aan aes 


AND SUNDAT™ 
AMD O 4-8383 


6—De luxe Westinghouse stoves, 24-inch ovens 
7—Garbage disposals and exhaust fans 
8—Finished recreation rooms 
9—Sliding-door closets, featuring recessed lights 
10—Fully sodded lets and shrubs 
11—Off-street parking and sidewalks 
12—Close to schools and transportation 
$18,250 $18,250 
These are just a few of our features 
inspect our HOMES and YOU be the judge 
We beve avellable for immediate eccupency some 3 and 4 
level homes priced ot 817,754. 
EXCELLENT FINANCING 
LOW DOWN PAYMENT 
DIRECTIONS: Out Ga. Ave. to 13224 Ga. Ave. and our 
OPEN on 
Y 9AM. TO 9? 


GREENWOOD “KNOLLS REALTY CO. 


6-6484 


VA FHA 


y ys = 


a i EERE TOE | 


‘| Pine Paneled Rec. Rm. | 
this immecu- 


—_ —_. near A —% > 


res room above 
be ots fully sodded 


Georg! . 


Randoiph Ra 
~~ hh 

.¥ ~ # we 

schools 


DRASTICALLY 
REDUCED!! 
3601 SAUL ROAD 
ge aS 
decorate re co. sit- 


arege corner jot, featuring 
eeeey d a ope 
uy 


pequt pped 


OPEN 
SA AND &8UN 7 
$509 Priuigps 
Seartiing white-brick, 3- ems 
rambier on «& protty ot 2 be 
full dining reom ment 
; --y $30,000. Di inc! tn price of 
dley Bea ; Heh on a Witsoe ane. 
details eall 3.3439. eve- 
. Oo 


ring. Ma. 
ait , # ~ semen'—iarge 
Located for snore ne ene 

h wner on 


pen Sat. Pi 10 “til 
LAD ND REALTY COMPANY _ 
WESTGATE 


“ 
Ars 
OPEN SUNDAY 4 
. i oversine attached - 
Private ~pe ~*) a. : 
summer din Owner 

ue asking $18 ony 

. on Baiti- 


NORTH CHEVY CHASE 
8805 MONTGOMERY AVE, 
$28,500 


oon ter-hal! bier. le 
Sow te “ 


x... R~ 
00 first trust may be asgumed 
—-. ppurs, eal, Mr 

v7 7-4 
‘Orod. Out Connect! out ave 
. Tight eon Saul w open 


OPEN 1-6 


THOMAS J. FISHER & CO. 


rs 


ae oo ner 
and auto weeber re My amo. oes Seba 
te te pasta i ae 
BETHESDA—$17,950 
Gi APPROVED 


Co tion orice oe he BEN aha 

~ = ead over 
king: beautiful y an seaped ors 
Ge maste oese 


rel x 
tlle bat hon 24 @r roel 

end. st oft space Wal Ries 9 BES 
Ce 


an 
iehiten Pac 
rig on Fick ¢ | 
sem, Fi 4-251 ly shrubbed corner 
. § bedroom 2 
attached garage, ty 
| &.-¢ ' nioe. 


2903 
. Co & 


“4 


pase- 


480. 


SILVER SPRING 
OPEN SUN., 1 TO8 P.M. 
48-Ft. Brick 


Rambler 


reo ~ 
= 


~ 


THOMAS J. FISHER & CO. 


CHEVY CHASE 


ti inue s more ole . to Conway. ‘ruehe 


"RU PERT “MOHL ER. Realtor 
3 Conn NA &-4080 
S917 CONWAY RD 


van 
side 


Sor 
' Excel 


Geers! = ave 
: 2 | 


=| BEPeSBA REALTY | CO. 


sidered 
Out 
. 


> 7m . 
stone firep ae and 
ful -sige 


CoN 
. h artist 
; ct indo ; 
roor remendous 
modern “e a. 
weer <5 
baths 


$12,950 
‘| BELOW Gi APPRAISAL 
OWNER LEAVING COUNTRY 


. ame. imtiosed)= porch 
iv.o od ar - 
fares 4% loan, oaeTioné: 
ave. thesda, 

An to prone 

fs obert ; Hall Co., OL. 2-3250 

Bitte Ch. 2-3285 
mSMCACRIFICE 


i.) BEDROOMS 


76-FT. A 
ern Siened Swe 
MU 


Os of jmmediste sale “Other 
a ® $3%% hours, call Mr. Boothby 
. 


ions: Out Commecticut eve 
Block past Fast. W es 
one bieck on Club Gr... 


Neon = 


Mr 


1 A 
ett 


immaculate inside and out 
diate -- = 
Seoreia. ave. 

‘rigat on 


R.,, - lea 2. r 
rE ah FENeKooR DRL 
ty AM & CO. 
JU. 5-6010 
= = =—6hShlUc Ul 
OPEN DAILY 


1 PM. TO 7 P.M 


B=20 Mar) yo drive, Glenmar 
Th " center-hal. 


ir 
(crurieus 


SILVER SPRING 


tT say 
i) [8% 
bw ol teed brie len! 
dow room. ls 
meeen Schon with 
for erogkinss a 
foor: 3 tf 


sO700 MONTROS AVE 
Out Wise. eve. past 
» approx 2 mies = 
pipovilip rd.. Jett mile te 
dwood rd. left hou 


>| BEN 1-6 
ne | THOMAS J. FABER & CO. 
OPEN |! TILL DARK 
SILVER SPRING 
Well ya Bg Ray = 


Park in am erea of beautiful 
smee 3-pedroom brick —. - 


oy ‘te 
HUGGINS & HARRISON, 

LO. 5-1000. ___ 10815 Conn. Avs. 

AEC & B OF S 
PERSONNEL 


Gaithersburg 3-bedroom rambd 
fyll besement workshop 


e 
ove omtrose end 


| 
° 35° 0 a open. sign. 


WHAT A BUY! SEE! 


BRAND SPANKING NEW 
Ls bedrooms. i ba 
ats re 


ler 


; recreation 
Cc mi 
7. ° 


with 
wonderful 


right ‘ our OPEN 
"MO DERN 4 BEDRMS. 
INWOOD AVE 
Neat i pretty as @ home can be 
" . ode ern 


o 
20 ‘Open ‘bon oe es 


Rockville 
ick 


Futton 
wit te 


Area —_New 


rheaton Shopping 
Rockmont Co anes one o4 8 edensour: Ra 
GARDEN 4.9763; PO. 2-9530 EVES 


SEMIDET BEORA 


r PEN . 
HES ARCOLA m ign 


Lovely brick rambler on “ache cor- 
ner iot fea’ uring | a tful 


4 


MERRYFIELD & wWooos 


- WOODSIDE PARK 
75 FT. LUXURY RAMBLER 
THIS IS OIFFERENT 
OPEN SUNDAY, 1-6 
9344 HARVEY RD 


\%-ecre lot. a4) 


"CHE vy ‘CHASE. 
3517 EAST RAYMOND ST 


a 


LEO M BERNSTEIN CO 

co 54-3579 : 

CLOSE IN SIL. “SPRING 

ALL RMS. TREMENDOUS 
HOT WATER HEAT 


Pover entrance itmte this lovely 


ous room sae aree te end of street an 
r Rey omy 


* GRAHAM & CO. 
IU. 3-401 
— i = | 2408 
VISIT. LOHR HOMES 
OPEN T. uN. 2-4 
ROCK CREEK HILLS AREA 
IN wy 
OPEN YOUR EYES! 


thie Califernis ny potte 


er right 
separate 

breakfast 
; . 


éinjia 
poor les ‘oo, -- 
rs La " ain . 


street 


Con ven 


has 


}i 
BEN 16 TODAY 
7430 Piney Branch Rd. 
GRAHAM & CO 
Jv ..3-5010 Eves. JU. 5-859) 
ompletely Air-Conditioned | 
NTER HALL RAMBLER 
ON V2-ACRE LOT 
WOODSIDE PARK 
9117 FAIRVIEW RD 
OPEN SUN., tse 


perfect home of br 


. 
parking lor ti ¥ po; ches 
i¢ t6 er 

Se 
ECeing 


~~ + 
’ 


Her ex: 78 i5 


4.7001 
N SUN. 2 


11908 Colesville Road 


lac ofes | near Quaint Acres ts this 
ons'ructed 1 vr oe ‘Sree 
; 5 ahene lore: Wares 
n-cere jot oe, Bors arew. 
Din rf i} 
7 i+ firep! 


a 
spece 
9 fl whet 2” baths 


= 


< 


talk 
lease the ca 


si 


ire oy 
r 


on ww emusing (on Pre? tura 
right at Kensington Cabin Recrea- 
tien Center te our Open sign. 


ROBERT E LOHR 
R | th ‘“ F'bieintabie’ eer 
_ COX i co. I c 


Chevy i= Mad. 
Open 2 to 7 


3106 Rolling Road 
“Rolli 


s t one of the onan 
pmaculote gone 
‘on s 3 


: an rubbery garden Only 
those Gemanting & a pe : 
sTacious end itime te | 


4080 
vre) 


to sane 2a Tee 
Larae 
ng fm. opening 
da ousied be orica ! 
Attach 
1-to- al | carpeting 


2 Sets | 


to Fairview —~ 


Se CR AHAM & CO 


JU. §-6010 Eves. & Gun. JV 


REDUCED—$! 1300 


7-988 
ae a py ora 
FIN} 


Wonderful to ve cram eusrt- | 
ers behing and stretch ro im the 


must z 
Out chan ave. vast Chery 


riaht. continue te Relics 
A lovely name tn 
Detached. 


“4 105 Winnett her 


ag 
ate | yon 
ar a mae. 


ing ge oe and Pitt poate 


and our “pes 6.40 


ase Cirte to Le 


ond tern 
. end ture left te 3 end our 


od, vee oom | 

opt this jas) 

ri. 730" with lipersi f-' 

nance svalsd ' 


Open Sun 12. 6 Daily 3 ‘til 6 

5500 Park St. (Kirkside) 

4 twin Raa 
Chevy Sate Resi Co. 


Ave... NW, 


then 
and 


hi pS 


—e 
clesvile Bd. Rove 
be ve Rey ap Bot 
5 re and bat -_ 


fees pod i uhen house 
940 BERT L LoOw- 


ae e 
ag 


attractive 
avpetive f 
eer, first 


Price “8 4333 Conn EM. 3-1800 


} 


WASHING 
10 


382,000 
Daily 
Circulation 


means quicker sales 


STON 


Sunday * 


POST and TIMES 
July &, 1956 
: SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67MD. 
| "MARYLAND 
Prince Geerges County 
OXON HILL AREA 


| Conv. to Bolling, Andrews AFB 


‘ FTOWN ROAD 
: 2 or 


HERALD | SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67D. 
MARYLAND NIA 


Prince 
ALEXANDRIA AREA 


This Week's 
Top Value 


results 
for Washington Post and 
Times Herald classified ac- 
wad 


$230 dn.-$83 mo. GI! 
or $1000 dn. non vet 


This Bockne’ Manor Cape 
' oa 


vertisers. To place yo 


Phone 
REpublic 7-1234 
SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67mD 


MARYLAND 
Prince Georges County 
Contineed Frem Preceding Paar 


CHEVERLY *. - 


SO. 5-9104 
42 


i SAT.-SUN.. 10 
PECTION CALL 
WEEKDAYS 9-5. SAT 
or =.‘ 554 
CLINTON RFA — 
Danse . ar U : 0} 4 kit : It <{ MONROE parE comEn ‘ cnr 
PYLES REAL "o> 3 f ;, geo . 4 r= h ie. picta ‘ im N. Kin He? 


evstow AY Vicr BRICK 


= SUBURBS. HOUSES 67VA. SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67VA. 


ALEXAN NDRIA—Brick split levels off 
Janney's Lane. e of Alexan- 


on 
choicest “Incation s. These 
homes feature huge living 
s pastel .all-elec- 
-cabinet kitchen 
eve-level oven, table ange. 1 
luxe refrigerator, a 


reom with firepiace wall 
biock 


. 
parochia! schools. close to churches 
» Pentagon and D. C 
conventional Basic 
Ope : 


Rea ty orp Call 


ALEXANDRIA 
ATTEN 


TION 
NON-G! BUYERS' 


$300 DOWN 


liuden Settlement 
3}- bedroom 
Pull 
including 
washer dryer Refrigerator 
dispoeall, Hot-water heat 


Charee) 


churcher shopping ad- 


— project minutes from 
eart of Washington. All this 
for lees than $100 per month. 


WARWICK VILLAGE 
MT. Vernon Ave. end 
Kennedy St. 

TE. 66912 


SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67VA. 


RGINIA 
ALEXANDRIA AREA 


$650 DOWN 


ou don't have to be a veteran 
te asbestos Shingle ca 
airhaven. 
to buse 


gas _— aves rm.. 


b 
laree  ogulpaed Pee bedrms 
ena bath on ieee. slatrans to | 
= floor ae, % naaisene moda, 
A aood buy at $10.990. KI 1868 


$750 DOWN 


You heave to be @ veteran 

Attrattive aluminum-siding ram- 

bier of Duke st.. close to Quarter-| 
a 


reakfast nodk. auto. washer 
gas beat. 3 bedrmes 
rm dinin area. Venetian 
Priced at only 813.450. 


$750 DOWN 


Huntington subdivision lLareest 

et ed 

attic 

fully eau! jonea kitchen 

washer utility rm case heat 

inds storm winders and screens 
bes today. KI. 8-1868 


$10,400 


cutest cedar shineled 


m- 
Immediate 
dining 
eaulnoved | 
Disposal) | 
conventional | 
today 


condition 
Livin Tm 
bath. 
fan 
ar 
this buy 


DEL RAY 


very attractive Brick Cape 


BELL arse CO. 


K) S- 1868 


SALE SUBURB, HOUSES 67VA. | 


VIRGINIA 


ALEXANDRIA—2-bedrm. brick, den 
in basement, arate din. fm. 
osay Piney Belvoir and Pentagon 


Looking for @ 


$35,000 HOME 
FOR 
$25,000 
bon stop looking now! 
an offerine 
excellent 
Colonial wit 
entrance at 824.950 
im excellent condition 
is extremely attractive 
room bem! : 
bullt- 
Mason 
Bhown 


ean 


kitehen; 
George 
achoolks. 


in 


ai Pa ial 
by appointment 


THE M. H. BARRY ORG.| 


Alex Va 
; KI %-0078 
Old Reliable Office 


ALEXANDRIA 


$400 Down 


AND AS&SU Me parsers Or $85 
PER MO orice 
equipped 4 + i) od bat h.8 ort n 
windows and goors n 


2206 
Ki. 9 
“The 


Mt. Vernon Ave 
LATH 


informat 


| ALEX a) a bedrms " 


ull basement 2 0 
Cod on hilltop location near Be 
Haven Country C = 


GI Only $95 
BROOKS REALTY "CO., 


SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67VA. 
0 gun EEREEEEREEEEED 


— VIRGINIA 
ALEXANDRIA AREA 
MT. VERNON BLVD. 


BRAND-NEW 
BRICK RAMBLER 


7-BEDROOMS—1I%4 BATHS 


$1,500 DN. 
TO ANYONE 


This 


ayments re ow rent. 


Re Ji 
Listing "So 30. Ch 


ART POST, INC. 
KI, 8-8924 


KI Eves 


ALEXANDRIA AREA 
Gi APPRAISED AT $17,850 


rec} 


OWNER Sf o>! Ba ore. Brick | 
out 3 ms tha. 


| to Prancon 
right of 


\% mile to 70lL Norton 


SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67VA. 
VIRGINIA 


ALEXANDRIA VICINITY 
COOL BREEZES 
REAL LIVING 


One in ao lifetime o you have Se 

chance to buy 6 ne S heme su 

as this, Featuring “iy. : “ ry 
it. 3 bedrma oa 

one floor. Huge geen 4 Ab pe 

aitaaied oa. z Vest 

a. ‘i 

utmost oe living 


scaped lot nia s 
od "yniaue 

best plann oers the 

cluded - ‘the pains. owner is binge 

refria.. washer. @ Fe 


nancing aval able Give 
ene is home 


right A, 


ae 


Modern 
with the 
active family: 
level jlot—fen 
large 
area. electric 
ed ch 


por 
‘one eapecialiy 


wo. get; 


rooms. 
i as den Ane 
$19,500: EXCLY 


'Bob Duncan ‘Real 


| 322 6. WASHIP 


TON ST. ALEX. 


KI. 8-8015 


brick pe Cod 


ec | ALEXANDRIA his "bod. TH 
-bedrm. 


bedrm. rambier wi 
Pali 3 
RDI é. 'MENSH 


ho 


} : 


jul _ demi. 


ets 4055 dows. | eee Serbecug oe Bit Por c only i < 
800 _ 


BB“. eM —————EEEyEEEI™ 
—— en Following Pace 


._ = ar = A 
sear we ot LOAN 
‘ : a-ec unset 
um 4 is se e ~ ; 
Hey wWeEIcHTs 
rick ramble 
4 
ot 
| an 


| 
xX 


A. wa 
HRTRICT HEIGuTs 


oH 


per TODAY 


sex win tt 
‘ap > mecrm r CG 
termes seater 
ovely Pisx- 


- — 7 
Jim BRiit 


SMALL CHICKEN FARM 


Alex Braddock ‘Hgts 
OPEN 9 ‘TIL 9 
2809 DAVIS AVE. 


bare 


HES CO. 


M08 “TIL 3 P.M 


CED 8 LOW Gi 


mar hte. 


en 
AP. 7 Prom Allee 


rs 
rd — Pa! riington 
ave a aa 


ot & Contre Realty 
TE 6- 1415 9 °TI? 


ALEXANDRIA 
30 € TAYLC mR RUN PKWY. 
Vers low cash eut- 
tape Pymts, 


- 


c 


its firNG ats 


ram 
« 
re 


a — 


raat Wri 


1B 
<r. terms! 


-a- 


GEOR 328 PROPERTIES. aP 
Qoen 


sf ave 
_/_ 


. 
G 1 arEc sal a 


- 
- 


. A ' D1 o 
ER & SELLERS 
A PLATA 
RAMBLER 


ALEXANDRIA 
BEVERLY HILLS 
3317 ALABAMA AVE 
Ooen Saturday & Sunday, 2-5 
~-A 
90 


DET. BRICK— 


18TH AVE 
$500 DN 
‘-Weet Hw 


: Pricea ft 
ce M 
nc werten ‘=o. iJ 
[TRECTIONS. Shirley 5b 
gee ra. we spupect. 
aly oF right 
riaht os Alabem: a te ‘OPEN sien. 


HAS. R. HOOFF, INC 


1707 Dake Gt.. Alex. Va TE. 66-3466 


~ ALEX .OPEN 


KNOLLWOOD 
3-BEDRM.—212-BATH 


_ 
SFARROOKR aceee 
: 


TAR! PARA 


»MA 
: 


Pollow or gas 
@°634). 


ALEXAND RIA 


BEVERLY HILLS 


OPEN SUNDAY. 1 
}- bedrooc — : a 
sero wy slhaced 


Cts HAMMOND on SCHOO! 
=m 

FXTRAS Panel ied. 

f gar 


"= Ori 


Nr 
‘ BORG ay mEALT 


> 


OPEN st 4 To — ch san Part 


MARYLAND HOMES 


£2.. for Jn spection | 


TODAY 


Prince Georges County Prince Georges s County 
ae PARK PYLES 5S REALTY 
iy POR SETTER HOMES 

$338 OVER 100 LISTINGS 


sitthrer HEIGHTS 


BRICK COLONIAL 
& BEDROOMS DEN BATHS 
PES SU AY TO 5 


. . 
- 
a 


a : 


rec > 


LIS! 
ALEZANDRIA-ANNANDALE 
| LEFT 


BRADDOCK ACRES 
SUNDAY ‘TIL 7 P. M 


PY Les REALTY CO. 
wis AILVER HiIl 
JO 5800 


$\4. + PER MONTES FHA anorovec 
Te a Sed le = eve wot 


pai is & | a 

Why Bon t You | Look? 
immediate Occupancy 

LL BRICK 

TOTAL PR CE $15 150 
, “er > Pay 9 
CENTER 
aN »N 
_ EXPRESSWAY 


. or . 
-EAR Ee c PPING 
15 wine 7) De <—T 


. REAL Ty CoO 


Realtors Tu 


: 
6-3446. Eves., DU. 7-0131 


Al EXANDRIA 
. of Geo. Waah. Part 
ase Mason! ¢ Memoris 


Custom-Bui It 


(Or 


a 


many other special 


. 8) 
BUL. DER MUST 
OPEN "TTL DARK 
510 Braxton Pi 
Miller Real Estate 
TA JA. &-2444 
ALEXANDRIA vA. Buckne! | Manor 
-ded ' ba ths. 
000 
s7R | 
Dure “r 


? 


ARLIN 


: Assume Loan! 


payment and 


, onstr aetion L 
oice 
‘Be dem ao we have 
ome. s© beautifully 
such eaay terme’ We 
inepection Sut 


N 1-6 P.M 


Out ee Hey 


Ont 7 +1 >. 950! 
— ry >. ine 
nancea on 
*» vour 


drive 


D be | 


sign 


“ARLINGTON REALTY 


Wiisen Bivd JA 717-9900 
ARLINGTON 
Top of 


-e tea 


ee i ie 


“++ 


ROTOR. 3 
'3 Bedrms., 2 BatHs | 


’ 


the county!| 


Directions: Out Wileen Riva past 


to MeKmiery ra. right 
home 
ARLINGTON 


Key to 
Better living) 


mete ing tixt ures: | 
Fa fe variety of furni- 


dining | 


(ence 
peace + ja git ght base- 
os Cae 950! We invite 


OPEN 1 P. M. 


Direct pons North on Glebe rd 
past Gell. & Count ry Club 
te OPEN sien on rigt 


NORTH ARLINGTON 


Select Norwood 


POR Y OUR RAMBLER OR SPLIT 
ew rick homes REE 


rv Bl 
TWO TILED BATHS AND 


' 
make your 
before 


Out Lee Hw? Dast 
ston aht ‘A lahun 
and homes on right 


Arlington 
Realty Co. 


2212 Wilson Bivd JA 
ARLINOTON 


EXCELLENT 


Brick Colonial Home 


pin ' . 
sereened pore ~ On & choice corner 
7} aie. sig 56° Sp ~~. at $15.700, Sale 

L “th 


dark 
MILLER REAP Berke 
JA. 73-1203 JA. 5-340 
SERVICE PERSONNEL 
OPEN SUNDAY 
1-6 
415 TENNESSEE AVE. 
ALEXANDRIA 
sep. Gin 
wih Workshop snd 
Beautiful yard with barbe- 
Bus at 
" slenandria | : 
Gl or FHA 


f Cc Rr #-8800 
MARA UM REALTY co. 


LAKEWOOD SUBDIVISION 
ADJOINING LAKE BARCROFT 


so S yp 
y Cecorated. 
aroe y ng 


rower 


~e 2 bat 


’ unew 


ae ert 


Ye ara 


ance TO 


5-The-nrwoute 
ana wii! 
~ 


— 


Lake Barcr 


OPEN 


m construction 7 


Hie@ase he most tas 


mM open firep'ace 


Dining 


“ih vwrew oT axe 


ra? 


a Pike 


7 


rm * 
> 


SO ARLINGTON 


; 


"Gg COsrs with a key TO 


‘DD REA TS ‘* : 
“3 EN a “ie AY 


ec rr 
~? 


ry Ons 


e7r TO our OPEN SIGN 


eee 


ANNANDALE 
$9,000 FULL PRICE 


town payment and PRESTO you are the owner 


200 DOWN FOR GI 
ock the door against high rents and mounting hous 


your own nome. 
from Dusline and shopping 


Out Colurnbia Pike to So. Columbus St., 


ie biocks 


| 


: 


1-338... | 


‘Geo. H. Rucker Co. 


You must see it for yourself. 


Out 


OPEN SIGN 


ohurmb: 4 


eft om Springfield Rd 


Pike im 


to Safeway 
to Byrnely Lane 


THESE HOMES ARE 


. ‘ew 
ar sD 
- i* 
racoce 
* *~er 


.: re 


- , 
enter 
a-"ge 


*“SOUTHEAST 
REALTY CO. 


-— 


“\ 3 kt Dicke. 


=e Ge An. Bretwriie 


. 


Open Sunday From 


JA. $-1202 


E. A. BRANDT & CO., 


3418 Wises Bivd.. Aritneten. Ve. 


DARK 


JA, 7-1234 


NC. 


EVERLY 


805 N. OVERLOOK 
4 Bedrooms—3 Baths 


OPEN SUN 
Absolutely immacwlate 
ime * nite 
LARGE 
AND FU 


this charm 
features 
E 


room with French doors opening to 
screened porch over: look ine 
and aheady yard ull base 
l-car carece Shert walk Ww 


HOCCIN ALL VILLAGE! 
Attractive er nicely | 


$19,950 

brick rem 
located on beautifully A. 
srounce The bouse & imma< ul + te | 
an niaines iiving room a 
fireplace dining room. auipee 
chen ce bedrooms and “9 | 
~ gar 
"gueetlent. Teancin 

B. WwW 


501 
TO 
to Russell rd. 
to Ol Oletde 


a. 


rd “te 
on Old sit 
Tight te property — 

BROYHILL CREST 


OPEN, 2 ‘TIL DARK 


Immediate possession of « charm- 


to N. Over) 00k 


| ana open en 
M T jp Ae Aj Son JA 4 ,300 
Broadmont by Owner 


Custom 2-level br. rambler in beaut 

landscaped setting among tal. trees 

in ote of the most : 

Pall s Church. just | 

Pntr leads te specious | 

firep rm. 

3 twin-sise bedrme.. 

bathe. ample closets 

attk. we 

rm. bdath 

cupancy. Dir 

‘orners to Broad to Buxton re 
to 826 Ville Ridge ré.. last 

ead-end st. JE. 3-19 


7. n 


451 ke 
Miller Real Estate 
7-1203 JA. 53-2444 

rm ~dba th 


4 


split leve 


$16,100 GI 

In @ popular tree-shaded area, this 
redwood shingle rambler has ast 
been one “iy redecorated. A fu ! 

with fireplace im the 

ns specia! attract 
feature. There are 3 bedrooms w! 
coubie closets pact kitchen 
with washer. efficient radiant beat 
anda «@ oor patio 


. 


= 
on Weet morela 4 to ‘No 1324 and 
Open Sign 

Stanley R Rowland 


120 E. Broad & 
JE 


lot Pull 
dishwasher 


oe 
~ ai 
ees Se 


FALLS HILL 

NR. FALLS CHURCH 
OPEN SUNDAY 

Now well-bullt 48-ft 


one front rambier 
ing room. 


cen ter -ha! | 


in Pairfax County. Truly beautiful 
nelg hood. Today's best buy at 
3 PHA. 1 or ‘con ventions 
® reach: Out Arlington Bou! evard 
or Lee Hishway te Rte ( Lees- 
and right ‘through | 

to Dale Dris 


Ro and 
OPEN OUSE 


r ht to 


oad 


4%. 2- 


Hil ede Manor 
McLEAN, VA 


fall te see these new 3- 
iL. -dBasement brick 
offering 2 bath 
room with fire- 
iltramodern kit« nen 
natural 
OF serbage 
patsapevanes 
washer counter- 
even and plenty 
e-'cr ots ith ci 
water. sidewalk. curt and 
Saevprice $18.7 


JA. 53-8565 


rambiers 
ft living-dinineg 
» ace ond 

ad 


é6- 


eabi nes 
10- 


ft 


4 
and daily from 


ene n Bri¢ee 


_ Westmore and 


* BRAN ‘REALTY 


FL. 6-4640 JA 495) 


* 
: 


LAKE BARCROFT 
_ OPEN, I “TIL 6 


Ss brick rancher with 


ton rae. 
are lane and 
te 409 Morell | ar 
snnne Real uty, Inc. 


ee 


LAKE - BARCROFT. 


liehtfully different house 


decorated 


7 te main 


en to ist house 


SRICK—4 bedrm 06 dan. 
to 


LYON VILLAGE 
4 BEDRMS... BATHS 

NEW SPI . 
Conveni: ent to Everythir 


rk. 


: en 
: Lee vy 
left te ; 


HOWE A NEW! CON. BUILDERS 
ST EEBY HOLLOW 
OPEN, 1-6 
BRICK RAMBLER 
$21,450 


pier the charm ot Sleepy Ho 
: 3 d rs 


"te KI 


SLEEPY HOLLOW 
CONTEMPORARY 


3-7 


oe 


EXCITING 


OPEN SUNDAY, 


— c 
MIcLiGent: CHATEL 


JA. 8-7330 


jv) Os) + _——« 


Split Level 


ASBUME. B27, 000 PLUS ot toan 
AT 61 Ha 


itlemers and 
niy $21,500 


t 
lL TILL 
Miller Real 


1203 


~ TARA 


Open Sun. 2-7 
4 BEDROOM RAMBLER 
hea = coe 16th St. 


ARK 
rer 
JA. 544d 


se $33.500. Easy 


SPLIT LEVEL 
5417 No. 19th St. 


wee 
. 


nad 
fan .. 

“ie 7 
a iacneq #@a 
7 : r 


= shaped e ork 
pantry. complet 
Demt wh rec area J 
325,130. Owner. DY 
13TH, ARLIN CTON | 
S., GAR., GI, $14, 150) 


. 


ie) M. "BERNSTEIN CO. 


—OPEN. | iTiLe 
DISCRIMINATING 


mone towerlne oaks 
enchantmen' j nitrile 


Columbia pike 
Birchwood r 
to open sign 


Town & Country Realty 
TE. 6-1415 9 ‘til 9 


~ MANTUA 


NEW SPLIT LEVEL 


ve ] ce ’ 
Stee” TIONS Ou ; 
hroug! Beven Corne 
m | to Bart ey dr 
ai 


C a4 "MANTUA 
n tinue I 
niles heart ae r teh at Pork to dead 
d gn’ to P ai soy - ar 
Ma. ENIOET , 
FREDERICK W BERENS 
SALES, INC JA. 5-2620 
$100 | mo 


4 Abingdon. 5 
t) 7th rad. BJA 8-2 


er 
rignt for 
mat 
6-9827 


- 
“* 


i : 4 


to 461 


Career Officers 
IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY! 


NEW BRICK RAMBLERS | 


TWO RATHS AND FUL 
Nl yr £19,500! Situ 


“OPEN 3 P.M. 


TD rect ons 
Hw) 


| 


| 


SPECIAL! FHA 
eaeey Loans 


ARS AV ATLABLE 
of cus 


— 


Annancair I 
IELD FOREST 


SPT ; 


Bi-Level 
$2150 DOWN 


vD ~ iy — be NTH $21.950 
= ~ > 


ING 


» 
— 


hwy. at 
> > _ 


wt : ’ 
to Ce servi - station. right 
Besex ave. 


* ARLINGTON 
REALTY CO. 
urd JA. 7-920. 


ison Bis 
OPEN. 2 TO 6 
$17,950! 


znis_>. 


ner ei 
ACCEPTED 
PLEXIBI 


DIRECT 


SHAN? YON & LUCHS CO 
. SOth Ans Year" 
Ve 


rsary 
Afri... 


TREES. 5, TREES 


7 choc 
po $15 
Pals Ch - 


gg oe 
OPEN SUN, 2. 7 


is 
ave 
‘ 


t the ‘most critical buyer 
jreeseway ana 
horige i on 


fie 
a | 


4 


ae 
ie pe “Gl appraised | 


10 


Out Coiumbia yy te! 


GEORGE H. "RUCKER CO. I; 
“OPEN “TODAY 


vr 


from $21 500 


Mt Vernon 


407 STRATFORD ROAD 
HOLLIN HALL VILLAGE 


ADJ. WASH. GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB | 
COMPLETELY AIR CONDITIONED 


Situated tn 
Washingto: Oot 
Trambier wil be 
tion a floor offers «@ 
25x18 ltvt: room overlooking 
Pormal din oe room with eryste) 
with breakfast space 
The lower ievel 


lovely Forest Hill 


contains 


rH 828.000 


ae 


and Country 
OPEN SUNDAY 


Pour twin- size ‘bedrooms an¢ 
maid 
room and eecnen tous pons ciubroom 
tn ‘ 

' Deico-ma tic 400 
Soe 


— Weed a and sf 


a a FISHER 


the fairways 


* ce 
lovely 


’s room oath tiiit 
enlace. picture 


r. fir 
large private and tfeod- 
TRUST Avan ARS 


id Deminien Drive 
t to Open sien 


| 


OPEN | ‘TIL DARK 
1236 REBECCA DR. 


EXOTIC 
CONTEMPORARY 


Designed by one of America’s cade 
' mk ving 


mings . 
lightning. ere just 
o outstanding features 
in this lovely he 
Directions— brive. “out 
goa ] 


Ver- 
an 


it 
left — 

‘ , 4 tohew 
arrows 


Routh a Rabie Ra Real Estate Corp. 


a 


OPEN 


McLean Manor 


> 4 BAIC 

Attractive an 

= ety @ 
ustom 

e hvin rm with 

~ an brick fireplace wall rad 

iags ogne heart spaci- 

inine ouse Beauti- 

ul ki tel “y wit " dinette oo 

b enty of amart cabinets: 

gieaminge copper eye-level oven 

range. dish- 

{reeser- 


rn 
right an 


CONTEM 
RAMBLERS 
varied exterior 
eve- apes and 


¥ 
rs sec 
ous 


te eualified vel- 


$319 DOWN 


DIRECTIONS pir ross 


5% DOWN 


Gl OR FHA 


“Immediate Possession” 


Bie anc im poosies Faia |W 4 
in the Pa ay 

section of 

sized becroo 


beautifully landsca 
Oftere at the 

only $15.250. 
THAT! 


OPEN 


Split Levels 
4 Bedrms., 2 Baths 


ee 


‘rick 


evalua- 
a you 


. decorative 


s throughout 
attached Sarpes’. day) ight ievel 
recreat! oom space with 
base ‘Bietur ire window on “4-ecre 


Out @hiri\ey 
Lincoitia exit 


Ravensworth — 
Purkei. con 
model homes oa eft. 


Spic-and- Span 


Not 


at wal kout — fireplace is hving 
room : _ mt. Giaing el and tully 
te 


equ! 
ng APPROVED AT #30.150 


Tall Trees 


“And Budding 
Flowers” 


Porm the perfect setting fer 
s 


tiled baths. ample closets through= 
ous basement wit 
tien room 
orege space 
n a i 
ric “an $2 
so don’t 


CLOSE IN 


poe en Brick Rambler” 
WHAT WE 
brick ranc 
es er ~~ ol Ariington 
Huse livin oom hes picture win- 
Laree 


A 


apts 
window overlook bac 
awn. 3 bright t "bedrooms full - 
ment “8 Eeptanes F —. 

i E wimpeaiis 


of Csr, Ava 


upanacy. 


Ist Prize 
| Contemporary 


Bubb: ine with char 


for ear 
seeing this 


SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67VA. | SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67VA. | SALE shal nos 67VA. . SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67VA. | SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67VA. | SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67VA. | THE , WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD: 
| mene ~_ VRGNIA—SSS«|SS:*~<CS*éS RIT Sunday, July 8, 1956 Dil 
PAY ts oe 


ey ome eet ee Paine aa Meer asin 9 Seg NEN 415,000 


Pp >| *| on 0 On this on 
replace brick bedrm.. a brick ony 
var autres res only t tiv h i aty 


; yon wan 
afi ull bamt.. rec wi paying rent: rea! 
Individu t oceted porch. “fenced ayer yard aR. ymeate ' ba crite. trees d : cre ‘ n . . n ‘en ~~ my th & real bea ~~ os rm. Ry VACANT Sunday 
ais to 8 p m., weeken ' ae a ; rm fireplace. library. for Richardson 8 e Hall, Inc Hone wy FS ae os Th Ci ti 
Rinscres expe tomorrow. on. . , fast, rm " and esuigeea” ah = al din. tive modern Retie Bide. Ari. JA. teen . ymen 2 ove in nae r my > ircu a ion 
r ¢con- on dead-end st. 3 ars ; ‘ta ' boo attractively } - 
one fine ‘ne eae rn Beat Lens  baeiat a nase ia Y | isn mae so Feacea’y ou an beck sta Beat: J car gat. 6 box RAMBLING RAMBLER TE 6-1415 9 til Ais egg. ol OWN. GI means quicker sales results 
schoo ‘ : 
OCIATED BR E we oO Ole nt. ob  & ‘tioe actua Seek. d = . esta ner we offer this amazing bu bay, ae FE EYE CATCHER | for Washington Post end 
OKERS ARL. acapenen 3-bdrm. Colonial, | jocation, just ones | Bee for = A au a ed a ws swe & a this Cape Cod will de.| Mannas i JE. 2. 3] 10) Times Herald classified ad- 
Se. ir hs. #is-080, "sh "7 -1808. | Colonie! aug. tmimed D0 porch, an if you want to build in the Mt. oe | Wash. with ro | vertisers. To place your ad 
ARLINGTON NORTH ard 8- houses priced $7000 to $70. sarece. 2 and only 623.900. reason: | | eit, and 1 OPEN | for Sunday 
Crescent Hills tig 4 -dedrr he: brick ¢ Col, | Ber te Carver, Dari sem | BARGAIN ‘DAY own & Country Realty | side” screens ed "poreh. and sarege: 1-DARK 


a by appt , ty | 
t. hell, full emt. 9500-1 acre near Falls Church y LAL 
—— Rambler—2/ ¥2 Baths porch: cael “shaded lot: iit are the keynotes UALS 3- Sodrece | ete bedroom rambler, buse/ TE. 6-1415 9 ‘til 9 | This , glish izle» brich . the Phone 
ount Real 
$2000, cash mente. fice = joan home. Living room with firepiace.| PSS," P - ry ty | eriec ¢ home all new G8 luxury REpublic 7-1234 
ALEXANDRIA AREA Ile Dbediroors erie hmmnes- | Slosing costg. immed. nossession.| SPvened porch: "and warage. ‘Ths| sae Wucnat hs "yomis fren: @ix:| TOWN HOUSE Te 6 61415 sehen with preatiant rm. Leos) REpublic 7-1 
quiet dead-end street in excellent | 2=-a-1i Sh 2-1138. “Sie S| lawn is fan shaded.) §T4os0: 1 neer Annandale % ecre.| Built approx. 1869. this old but | , 
WELLINGTON st_ now HILL REALTY. DU. $-| ; bedrm 


ear 
neighborhood close to Washington bemt.. sarase. Eves. us ho fect for $24,950 for © 


>] : yond 
Golf anq Country Club and Ari-| RIVERWOOD TWO. B D-6216 | rm = le ra. ig Excl. buy ona king sized| bce fa % sa BL nd SALE SUBURB. HOUSES SIVA. 


| HO N 60x200 ree, 8 (th 
Lovely brick rambler on excen~ ington's newes schools Every 7 | .ter- he tl ed oom. LYN T MPSO th. Rd. ge Oniy 817.950: reason.'| 
iy beaut landscaped “10t The ee qacluding 3 a i ny x3 bash yt cher. Ya yituit bam : mt. | 4711 Lee Highway JA. 2-2121 | | pe | ot L 2 let VIRGINIA 
so. 3 me. 2 ull s on mein level. complete a r . | ONLY $550 DOWN can buy this cute 
oor + Se ee _"'=\ $500 DOWN and assume laree GI) 
rm large rear screened porch, full $37,500 tt ving rm. _carpor' ily low upkeep high: Te "61415 ; ‘til 4 af lane in 
basement with powder room Truly ' d y. $8000 cash required. 4? bedrm. brick ,home Wa > tbe rd.) si A 7 
- | am outstanding value et $24.950 Center~hell. 4 - bedroom. Om excellent terms base Loca i | 812.750 Gl—PAIRPAX. P| ". > u leads j9 aa ut finished >-car 
som. Reduced to Excellent ter Pos = - A. JOHN CHAPMAN  &| : abs on! be -stor Rm *oaut antation Rea ty WOLDS CO. IN tal price. $11,000. B 
i A or conventional » ins —— . ia pails Chirsh a Bic te berm: Beautliul ist, We : : Opin 9-6| REALTY DU 
Oct. 15 " grea, Spaciou : oo 3 pendibie attic vy with Lee 4 high hoes OR sik , Sem. JE. 4.2744 , a] 
CALL MRS. COXSEY FOR APPT.| Call JA. 4-1300 . ful >. Cane God |0ete pe hwy. J 3-2 s 


A Centineed on Following Vass 
ART POST, INC. IM. T. BROYHILL & SONS} 9&2 "s ar. 4 v. rm. has din 


' 
A 3-bedrm. Colonial nal* 4 : as eating space 


Realtors Kl. 8-6220 _ . roe =6SnG- % Loca & laree ¢ 0 o ‘ N 
= , oid; separate din. rm wll > : bedroom. , 
with rec. rm: conven ‘ D emt u ate 08 8 quiet ONLY 


by car or = walk t ar. $13,000. most tor ane 


BEVERLY Hille SPECIAL pares al and publ hools ry uip y a onet., 
; and public schoo : ’ 
$1000 D DN. —Gl > e > / —Yy-~- oa aust ‘we > + ‘Breed Bt. Pails Chu: _ TODAY 
Parc Ch hEDeED te REE x Sho 3 } assume approx $15.- 
t $87.28. prince. and int 
Car 


y loan from, « _ ‘ romaine. A 000-sa * lot in @ od. MMEDIATE— 
v ?. rida at. — A. 5-179 ; pee curroundines e OCCUPANCY 


ae | sale ae ~ ver Spacious 3-bedroom brick rams | 
ant. FOREST—#83) an. will be given consideration. featuring a2 paths, 21-ft. liv MARYLAND | MARYLAND MARYLAND | MARYLAND ———— 
. : _ ——_ ae = 
A 


=| TOP BUY {oe von om Montgomery County Montgomery County (| Mentgomery County ee. Georges County 
ter heat full ith Cee ee ee 7 
' 
| 


go gihe ; i sere wooded fo 630 E. HALBERT RD | BETHESDA AREA casts Pongal LAKE 
. ~~ 5a : Area of 0 GI . . - wit loads | 
“ 6-7343 raw = rm mm uate Wonde ok tied and 76,500 te sit rina PRICE $23 600 ALL BRICK seo tewaees, 2 Vass = aN milce neste of Pag! ge of closet space. Sen. 4 Botha." - BARCROFT 
ATTRACTIVE STONE gules on 2 streets, KE. 8-2357 Slsr one of our cutsiona- \C. M. Hailey, JE, 2-7944 — To nel. Bolidiy| ceiling : | 
*.« |AURORA HILLS—Distinctive i i R rp 28. oS. 13 tt ark.| built. or ' de 
$15,000—GI $1500 bo , Be : fete dining room. { Sturdy Stone HILLANDALE ye Jas 4-473 ERNE is rit, PHA Miliary, Conven-| 944 R-2M. ‘Lot jooxise cones | SPLIT LEVELS 
00——GI $1500 DOWN . ; -ft ving rm. _ « room, ige | , 
ves ed ris | «= AND RAMBLERS 


}1 | ion. OD | | tonal ‘Piastered walls, 2xio { : 1 Ato : 
Ze ACRES fu re oon | Ma ryweather | Foon teh dishwasher VIRGINIA | 
droom ivin ; we . room _ ull b " —— . Designed By 


modern equipped ms. 
groom Homes ai ciate sattiteeEasteskty| FALLS CHURCH WILLIAM L. MAYNE 
Ss cxG as | - en age Dullt-in 4 f £ inen< | Direc BEST BUY IN Q ed. $17.900 to $18. Gi APPROVED ‘ie 
Te. 6.1400 oa .-2e ty ne it bedr ms . el ~- own par- py as. shade. $15,950! to in- ion: Out New Ham ; _ U . , ie . NO MONEY DOWN 1954 Aw ARD W NER LA NOMB 
enty of ci et Pai vm, a ches chaser and assumes pe: BL ih tended t h rd site MONTGOMERY CTY coe a aoe oe ’ = r IFIED VETERANS DESIGN COMPETITION 
BRICK RAMEN $16,500 | Lamas, ry fully orig must be se en te 212 Wilson Bird. JA 7-930 - ti & a n't PERNER & CO. | ULOU EW Om out Conn. « Breit Cer cieieesd. “S-eetreon P 0 , 
Pull eRe: pice-sined diving | BRADDOCK HEIGHTS | 4 ra Sigh ah Bye 0. | SPLIT-LEVEL HOMES Fear” ch-type. rambers. extra-lares 


, 6406 GA. AVE. NW. TU 
ana . mocere, kitchen. . : daway 7 ’ wit 
ith $16,950 JA. 5-6800 | fers the har p-to-get_ 4 bedrms and Pi oyare ‘windows rate cin : droon >» bathe: One 


| 
- Al rs si a ROUW . 
must sacrifice before lear- SHANNON & LUCHS CO | ait — p 7 Soe ane BATION ) i equipped Eitchen hed s -~ & mastonn 
baths! “Our SOth Annive Vane" ree of mgi7.500 ‘Hick WEALTY. W | t | ‘PARED M- 1 | diniog “ares Tae focing picts ~— juipped kitchen it-in gareces 
4 ‘ u mruversary Year a , “wer ; .- aever ify ~ r carports $s end porches 

2055 Arlington Bivd. Arlington. Vs bOWN Marvelous aad 8 bret: OO , =, OUTSY KENWOOD PARK | gorse igt: severe, WHS carpe choice '2- sere Take front and lake 

v 4 | 

' 


AUGUST OCCUPANCY 


th NC Priced from §19.738 view woods es now sveilabie, 
ora: | 5, RRL —Upder S10000_ OY ab-| it tile bath fard. GILVER SPRING, M0, 6507 MILLWOOD RD. 


E a Agent on Premises Daily ‘ 
he r oe rms. ; : a > 4 rd lu fen ced. Li 0 Sund 12 to 4 > M. Direct! ons Out Lee hey hs “teuret, pinecthons Out Columbia rike 
hes n sat tha fenced” ve — yipent . ft. ght No Down Payment ye ee mpressive custom-built brick ram- 
3 Soi, food SPRING lELD road &t ich. JE. 2- GI—30-YEAR LOAN nh oe m fers let a 
: AL EYE- 
salt vk 


b past Bei ey's Cross Roads 
thee Beth ae 
mode! nome at 904 parker , . 
: f . rn 
ile. Gt payments. 25- NE. | WHERE YOUR DOLLARS : “T tetra qo Realty. Inc KAL-MAYNE CORP. 
872 26. principal and in- | , ; . Rew ‘ a BUY MORE rambier with full bemt.. rec. rm No Cash!! -1830 JA. 54-4926 
lett . | Barn with haymow,. b ONE OF THE e carport, PHA appraised at i6.- Se ; 'S Toom, bath a 90's — —-- —- 
TE - ue 32.509, Good | ser ara, ING ie \Tr 750. Where else can you find such Immediate Terms or trade TO ’ N. ARLINGTON 
; nd. , = ee i uh early 5 quality & such s guantity? Such PACH: Out Mass ave. to Qolds- BUILDERS SACRIFICE a 
AL BAKER & SON, INC. re ‘ n in as | | lovely neighborhood “all -o 9 rd. right te Millwood, jeft to ‘ take Barcroft. below % ¢ COUNTRY CLUB AREA 
$08 NM. Washington ox. AL ere. to § now to see it 3 > F ccupancy y 350 WN d n DeTeeS (IT c\ & RA MBLERS 
Mem be <—< = Parry Springfield, Va. | 5 RS old wa | ; ET 9-30 Brosd St., Pais Church ONL $ DO VA jters nA. 8 C i u ne = the “ }T LEVELS : 
— peated ake tig th an in-| 


anc sssum 


TLL B 
HW GI loa Ty DAYLIGHT BA NT TO QUALIFIED VETERANS 
PLE SHIRLEY } A! - Swim oe membersip on “several NO. ‘MORE | EARS | TRA-MOD. KITCHEN OPEN 
ANNANDALE E ted home owners » x one wants | ~~ > _ a oppor sun 4| | OUR _ TURNISHED ¥ FOR OC ANCY - larce living rm ana tinin 
~ ee “SEAL ESTATE ee? BA oin over 7500 people Just peck up end move inte this = 4,300 to $16,700 | cons Shah HOME AT RD. = taesrmancr).| | rea with double pirt ire : 
ch. £7008 —— $-0°83 | we be ve 2 few eloles| : - ++ mM, *, lenty of closet 0 n Dail 1] to th shaded rear yard,| dows. de fuxe kitchen ead wreak Habe 
Se ENNANDAL 1 A ig : bo cosees, youre ome. Someone you know lives in s Delightful + AS equip- | pe Y, | ROCKVILLE, MD wonderful for Ra “Emproved sas: >! ~~ oe ave , . : fin pes ng. opEN att Y "AND ris 
mn wal gad dy) NCE c=) pe BY ome to OPEN novEE Out 8 Basement has bath. recrea- : Ou ave. past Sil- RECTIO? ae Tee out . ™ , Weare Chatp Br sage 
tor } : ae 


lent & 4 ey Highway. ; tion foom with picture window) Directions . Sa “ oom dining om. . I n “a " rd 
ar te bedrm - pry aoane H BR INC. oe. , Weide Righ . ) ew and ground level entrance to , miles mpg Bn ~ . » r idit : ms ; fr : ud bath ONG) Athena: , a N 

has al nice ise. rm . . | rr +7000" ee Sundar my “4 a n Viere, pail. approx. i =. R4 o $16. ‘t ' ' 

house apd ached garage. Tomi | } ooD entrance on 

mouse spe oss "ARLINGTON REALTY | * | Fagin on 8 W. BERENS Tow dire ~ Ee Ee 

Pai rfax Park—5S-rm. house cn 21] FAIRFAX CO. . 3212 Wilson Bivd. JA. 7-938 tl 8) FREDERICK W. BERENS | Bi itecmreey yen ‘ ND | r ction 


t x $ to 
s - bao] hom 
SALES. INC. JU. 7.7700 | ) = ——. Tolgate terrace te Leste A “SORENSEN. Bait jer * 


stentigl. n ed. for 843 ee = “type. falls SALES, INC. JU. 7-7700 | ; ores 7 
meme aaa 7 ris. | re x AL z "| UNDER CONSTRUCTION Stvmn sPmrno wupG | ALVEN SPRING. MD | “KARE HUXTABLE |-GPEN SUNDAY THIS” 


MB ces | 
36 m =. $40,000 Open 1 to Dark | $16,950 
oak ae. woanghy sn't. often we can offer ~ boa 3-bedrm. SPLIT LEVELS 7401 Pinehurst Parkwa . : tro om ram | ter ye all- {rick 
r face ssbain —— Ra me + ; cn for zt . Pea - Ao to ys Ramblers—Colonials Adjacent to Beech Dr. and Rock Creek Park foe EXTENDED OPEN TODAY ——~ 9 : un * | - 4 2 


Ei Sin Amt] Error Migs: lapel Mie sem) CUSTOM BUILT | “oot! pereve NEW HOMES : 6 5 Aken 
aniline - pd with dish- areer IN FORE: Air Conditioned Throughout, DE LUXE OPEN 1-DARK Vienna Woods | Srsis, is 29, Rew 2 ties 
Sere let, with ioads of “re ‘ 14 ove efris 20 cu. ft, ar_ schoo! ester, fence OAK REST W un ‘i Lan Zs 
ry fram pe € ouge a Adjoining aurere Wille Solit level rambler. 3 bedrooms, den, 3 baths. The Laxery af lew cost. De Bright and our 
ce al ams ath ghar ) a minutes to Pe : dreamed of kitchen including separate deep freeze “BEDROOM ened an y : B c 


' ti . . . A a tagon ‘ 
oil radiant | a own 1-bri bier. paral $23, 200 to $31, 500 | beautiful recreation or family room. 2-car (elec. door) 


D NB. Out Hes 25 st " 
* bed: = one Mrs W LY a a 1, : A. 0 runs- ANcIN garage, and ona large, well landscaped jot. — ie fore. < ,* - My " ’ aie at - : KE “BARCRI 
mn rs. m. . ug lin, sl bemt.. 7. patio. Assu ; rs bs tana tfeute mo 4” eantinas . ' count these assets A beautiful 

ead- Realtor DIRECTIONS: Out Conn. Ave. to Chevy Chase Circle rd. (ist deft) re wooded lot. _ Only 4 split level featuring 3 dis bedrme., 

McLEAN. VA. and right on Western ave. to left on Pinehurst Park- Ee Seeing is beljer! is ree 


ve out todars 
3 and 4 i way and our Open sign. SPRINGFIELD vince yoursel? The se OF } quarters 
‘ rice of 615.950 is fs ce. Beautiful ss rigidaire, 
2 AND 3 BATHS , 3. ow mar 7s itchen ‘overlooking “ys rear patio, 
X—Assume GI loan ttractive pome surrounded by| Brick. heavy roofs. copper gutters. Chevy Chase Realty Co. DI :  * A wooded los - 
ing (te mile! 
t again 


giutmore 
7 * 


A ~'- tong 


34 a res with 4-rm. house. nicel? 
lor th bh be- 


payments tite arse cprten tn Oe air Ar framine. babi. weeting-| _ 3333 Conn. Ave. _ etn et, en ae pas ‘R, sree 
bofgns, 2, Seles: 8 Bs eemancteemshas «2 ve) Cotesia THE BUY OF A LIFETIME reg tes 
Done rec rm h 


y | homes will have valley view. 
L. out 4 


ad ri | | pasa Geena gle 
patic | laundry. baths, brick Terrific N. Ariinston me lots wooded. som J Convert Your Rent Receipts TY S yienl 
and door: | aR tine tat — | bcset he: iets a you can own one of these INTO A HOME IN ULIP HILL YEONAS REAL Gon His Hike wriuce te ont 
~ 5 ~ ame ac 


‘ a 
Oban sles oore eve. and our 


erely homes on the doorstep of 


zine Be AE empress, ras,| Sa ota Lovet? det CHESHIRE INC. ROBINDALE A EEL ae mais wie EiSirons ** *% | William L. Warfield Co. 
eet aa SF ag eae hy Smart Sthivite “tre. come HOMES COMPLETED—MOVE IN NOW Ge leet tea at ie _ 6-330 
> Fert 


| - you wWoULD TH OAK NOW” 3 LEFT 
is feations Select your of OT. 4-6400 VY na HOMAS +. 
ay yy RK to selec! _ 2303 S. Arlington Ridge Rd. LIVE FREE UNTIL SETTLEMENT. Unusual 414% financ- RYON 


: P a from. oF will use your ' GEO ; ing to non-vets. 30-year Gi loan to vets. Deluxe 3-bedroom * 8-497 2-4586 IN 100 BLOCK BEAUTIFUL TAYLOR RUN PARKWAY 
ARLINGTON Sa ef — NG love! eho em Pomponio all-brick ramblers. 2 ceramic-tiled baths; roughed-in bath 


CL catiaue in full daylight bsmt. with outside entrance. 2 blocks to F rince Georges County ALEXANDRIA’S CHOICE LOCATION 
CLOSE-IN jens than Or specie and brick rambler wit ry day! ight base- Presents St. Judes School and Church. Price $17,950. Semi-Detached Homes 


uge lot, 


~bedrm. brick Cape Cod.| fren! 3 dedrms., i 4‘ OPEN 10 A.M. TO 8 P.M. DAILY & SUN. 
Overlooking Spout Ru Pkwy. we ; é ; . > ‘| : NEW RAMBLERS 
ofter ow e : m3 . *| eays sell at 816. so N , 
Sarime. Fal a hg Fis. bath on ist ‘Rose! ¢ pine: | htitent mei et Ultra Ort Canstie Aan, So Whores tatramien Owe 18 04% HILLCREST HEIGHTS 3 BEDROOMS, 1/2 BATHS 
type windows And prised ot only | ae er and sluminum awn-| FPacous co apy Phethe or C Parkland Drive, or right on Robindale Drive. Follow signs 2014 JAMESON ST. $] 4 990 
| KLARE & HUXTABLE Pi tee rm. hage jnodern wal a ag to model home. ’ 
pega weg FACCS CHURCH i Sy? get Sl ge a. comtemporary with ROBIN CONSTRUCTION CO ures dass eh tae, tees ae 
: ea $1 th A. 7-$990. Home has ja: WH.’ 6-9865 RA. 3-2606 PO. 2-4794 re tt, Thee have eee 
$12,750 ali ay Buy, th miare Smylie, fc, | lvine = ne —— ieehate Ene laree living) DIRECTIONS: 2700 block King St. to Janneys Lane, 
ne ~ bedrm I | carpe Locate oa « — . «tlie a rit bathe’ oy follow signs to Angel Park. 
You don't need GI rights to bur ,-*, — Et buy! ac ; n : —_ ment: roughed -in | 
ae Ia TERMS | _N Lerner & Co. JA | is req. br! ck Rome in excellent re ney oo! This $I 9 990 a A are ¢ Aasnt on Promise 1 t0 6 
BS Sees . rtul de.| GI and the 7! — a _ anch sve to! 
r ‘ convenient to the Pentagon. | e att full = Cot . S me im. senaue n 614.600. This will sell fast / 4) e . center to | BUILDERS AND DEVELOPERS CORP. 
i ight to 


transportation and shopping. Phone to Jameson r 


igh Far West’ Style | Sart Satteete Historic WINDSOR SPLIT LEVEL| © = mom oo = sane|__TE 69272 ov. 34% 


Gi APPROVED INC . if Glebe ra (oft Robert E’ Lee | Prince Georges County Prince Georges County — 


—- ee ee 


s 3-bedroom 2-deth. new ram- ~~ 14.100 Lovely ‘“o-ecre : TART 
let i. located on @ gently sloping shade rees. room ate) 3 ot Be cote rons with : could have slept here! 3 KING-SIZE BEDROOMS 


ACRE Srecbooy neiehgrhood ‘cnss | ad ora, | | Hone rity Mca ees “ites 2% BATHS—FIREPLACE the 
ot 


al conveniences. Exclusive 


ntmen ng. 
sai: tis vaneless et gl REALTY 3 “Sub a a aw 2 6 thsds ring ‘Fm FAMILY DINING ROOM 


sissso” lrmpe aes REP ERM PARE CERES! \CNiricenr civine-xoon |  GEORGETOWNERS 


| W“Sisterta Cane Cod | 8: wn ‘has wed} DE LUXE BUILT-IN KITCHEN 

Call to inspect sodinn, 6-30 to 9:20 | with frepiace. 4 BRICK SPLIT- LEVELS (| bexwood . . : 

WALKER & DUNLOP j din. ra . aw % 2 5 ONLY $19 '250|! 2 of ae satiate WOODED, LANDSCAPED LOTS all brick townhouse beautifully styled in the 
mt. $13,500 MA . 


on 8 spences Eh sa. 8-200 | 35" bag. _ « i. Or Hietent to su ort ra 
Heer IUTS|LAKE BARCROFT| Char Pak | RAPER S| om, or conan ur GEORGETOWN tradition, 
rh Ser = ea so bn OPEN, 2 ‘TIL DARK | ok Bice, Wesibrat gett —e Modern bea at te se nde gta th 3 bedrooms, 1% baths. Formal dining room, full basement. 
Bhniise i] 1304 rear Dr. _ alm W. bekens | Recess cei peae etre SUBURBAN PROPERTIES , : 

ARLINOTON NORTH hom wage: ween | 7 | #18 190 414 be cane $ can pe gen 11212 TRIANGLE LANE Priced, $13,995 


Fa ince S| ls area ven! rs : oaly AL “tere pepe LO 5-3 6 8 8 
L La e + te a Be ent to) §13.950. Don’t wait! Call now! . 
sr hee +r this Porese, «i “ Bulity “les storage rm. | aped to! Sa Poe Pom Don O WHEATON Ve ts $299 Down 


ice $32 


brick 

residential, ares. 3] Ly nn Realt: Be at 39400 | 

— | dpe yates ft to, -A-WAY “tecialeaior rancher vA TR CAO (plus settlement) 
precoreads or. lett to Rigne ‘tian d yon level ‘ ; ‘Prince Georges County Prince Georges County 


tion. Features 3 twin  Ste-| WILITARY—Galy W500 down anc 
“shown mW & F CONSTR. CO. | fiance iy Belltte Sarl Sits volts "anata MONTHLY PAYMENTS UNDER $85 
= 2-35i7| - wy 2 ffs; | on HURRY 


Tm... eeuipped 


a di 
kitchen. fuil basement ‘with recre- . 


LANGLEY, VA | Ps ~< | nity shore cae ai fete ALMOST SOLD OUT lt takes years to perfect a house that really answers all needs of comfort and con 

baths se "tm fal | Fe ecter ote er oe th CHAUN NCEY REALTY CO SORP. Bixe ESTATE CORP. KI venience, and still gives you the most in value for the dollars you spend. The 
full t. ge ee- ital site fo : 

PRI e one the BRP -sa00 CASH Gr. Georgetowners are the results of this kind of development! Nowhere in this ares 

Shown by appt : ha ng Nines Chain “FULL | "PRICE $5550 _— BRICK RAMBLER THE H IGH LAN DS RAMBLERS can you find a home so thoughtfully worked out, so painstakingly built and tested, 

$16,500 ono By a, A, pte ?'B IRC eke $18, 950 IN NORTH FORESTVILLE, MD. for $13,995. The kitchen is completely equipped with built-in wall oven and 


| 

' 
: : a a very uteoott hr ¥,. be fow homes evel. for nt di r, and ‘tar freezer-chest Frigidaire. 

one throw ¢ K Bric ass ve sien rite en wily 69 Air-cond. | y—~ J = — % : . seperate cou ertop range, garbage isposer, ge * 

a 10 eth rid , sd a aa ae tove. "Seer — | iy, | BEE ath r x Open Daily and Sunday, Noon ‘Til 8 P.M. There is @ separate dining room for entertaining, spacious living room, necessary 
ely kit. inci dishes "Brevi. in liv. rm. 4-4 bathe 4 peiitnstsiieatial 
dupossl Full best rec. bran very conv. to schools. DISPLAY HOME first-floor powder room in addition to the second-floor and @ y 
ue ay “setae” ms | ley Area—-$23, Rake ‘ aati es ene te cp togtlen large unobstructed basement that offers excellent recrestions! possibilities. All in 
pepe EDRMS.—2 BATHS nas R Mannas Rity. JE..2-31 10 3302 LORRING DRIVE all, The Georgetowners ere « wonderful culmination of « fine building tradition... 


The Darby Co. rth laree | , $14,250 UP unique in this low price range! 


2319 Wilson Bird. JA. 6-9999 diay section : its beer 4 BEDRMS., 2 BATHS 
| Ie = mz Nt Plus Settlement Coste “Opposite Eastover Shopping Center 


. . op. $50 Down Payment to Qualified Veterans , 
A) Mrs, Wm. H. Laughlin,| Heke "yeu enticinate o posal, dich washer’ = 30-Year Loan—~$71.95 Per Month Just 15 minutes from downtown Washington, opposite the area's largest, 

Realtor end ou e ster | oe Te a a complete shopping center, and within walking distance of al! schools and churches. 
MeLees, V 3-bedroom ramblers; modern fully equipped kitchen, Drive cut South Capito! St. one block past D. C. line (Southern Ave.) to Glass 


mersece ceramic tiled bath, basement fully tiled and painted, 
Don't AREA $37.50: down. $650. DOWN Gi | sodded fo streets, sidewalks and off-street parking. manor entrance. Follow direction signs te furnished model home at 409 Garden St. 


5 BEDRMS.—2 BATHS | ARKgOn 4 per pe. sted. , nacre nro, tts ca sine | O08" daily "At dark 
Peie| BASEMENT a Zope, 6-200 osu Soe St . 
Vee Tice ioe LAND REALTY COMPANY 

: HARRY A. BOSWELL CO., INC., Realtors "WH. 6-6313 


AP. 71011 or AP. 17-0008 


; 


ca 


71-0817 


LOTS FOR SALE 
x TLAND 
Jones Point Bridge Area 
127 ecres: lees than $1000 an acre. | 


Other acreage availadic 
RVIN MURRAY. JR 
REAL " 
. 


70 


Sunday, 


THE WASHING TON POST and TIMES HE RALD FARMS. LAND, SALE 
Di2 uly &. 1956 GINtA 


SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67VA. LOUDOUN CO., VA. 


Parm of 485 acres. 
VIRGINIA 
SAT. & S 
PM.- 


al an ie 


- 


382,000 
Daily 
Circulation 


means quicker sdles res 
for Washington Post 
Times Herald classified ad- 
vertisers. To place yo ad 


Phone 
REpublic 7-1234 


yin Lo 
Ui’. 


ea rac? to ' 
brokerace protection 279% 
he ’ 2 41 ar’? 
: : Hop*i! 
Phoene 45 per acre RA 3-5 782 
COLEMAN 
235 i ake BAR ROrT 100x136 
$5000. TE 


WARREN 
; . ’ OWN ER Eo 


ro “HOME. 


uf 


LE SUBURB. HOUSES 47 VA 
Coptivucd From Preeeding fae 


VIRGINIA 


NEED SPACE? 


a &F 
Sta 


LOTS WANTED 


Pri 


acTes 


as 


S 


Realty 


K 


¢ 


orr : SL EE rv 


Pr 


RD * ANTE 


e ( e#orre 


Cail JO 
ACREAGE SALE 


MARYLAND 
RIpGre SUMMIT 
ide on tat 


HOLLOW 


BLIP 


BRICK RAMBLER 


4 


mt 


er 


BROCK HALL 


A 


R 


| sler 
CM HAILEY G 
NON GI © 
Ver 


; 
Jt 
—— 


PU ' ; » dies —_a Norman Rea ty 
Low . wn Payrn -s - poe 
alance Like } 


frontage. 300 


__ ae 


Aa4 


Va 


Mf 


440 ACRES 


» th 


Arrange | a 
ar [bu 
to this _- ar 


COLUMBIA 


. Pr >. ‘ark. 
M. LEO STORCH 
ne Nevelone eP 3.4: 


OMESITES—1 


to 
ex ' 


. - 


vs 
. 


YEONAS REALTY 


nse 


“MAC LINDSEY 
2-6000 
LOTS FOR 7 


DIMmeTRICT 
CRESTWOOD 
. « _ 


OF COLL MBIA 


PTR A 
VW 


House 
vel 
i. a. 


[R. BEAL €-8108 


AILLICENT CHATEL 


DE 


RA 
COLORED 


: ac t- eve 

MARYLAND o-8i58 
ACCOKFER— ls fror 

_ ; > 


VIRGINIA 
COUNTY 


OUT-OF-TOWN 68 
MARTINSBURG 
‘ ‘ : 


WARREN 
. acre 


r Broger. Fs . 
BRIGHTSEAT ED 
wN Ave 3 acre : > 


HAMP 
“A 


> 0 "=*64 
71-2400 * - 398 
CALVERT MANOR - tree ti 
) F Jay H Ss 

PA 2.4) 


‘ APITOL Rat —BU 


B: 2 
0 


PENNSYLVANIA 
ESTATE 


7 
_ 


DIN 
bi 


+ SI 


Ty 
> . 


CAAA 
wet 


— 
‘WALDORF MANOR 
CLOSE TO NEW U.S. ROUTE pee 
3 TO S-ACRE ESTATE 


Charies 
of Wald 


—= are recirine 

» cA ~~ Bon 454 

1 ACRES. 
5 ™m oO 
ec 


ACRES 


Shir ey Bvv. about 
Sprir «! 4 e : 
JA. B- 
tn wr 


nr 
owt 
2 
County 
_ ea 
ewtale as 
= 


Vernon Distri 


= 


ie Bh 


WATERFRONT, SALE 75A 
FENWICK, MARYLAND 
CHARLES COUNTY 
OPEN SATURDAY AND 


ie ending 
arker, Smith 
VYTRGINIA 


AA 
7 


Full Finished Re 
Seperate cin 
Brand-New Br: 

Frame S; 
$18, 950. 


xe | 


MORELL Th 
A. 5.3704 


rrr e 


GWIsAws 8&LAND 
vo ; e : 


, AREA 


r x« 1 . = a Boi ~ ee — L 
ar ie 


i 
tes ~~» 


: lomes x = © ih. #9 
* Pri = REALTY co. <0. BOLLE DR... COVEPOINT BEACH 
Bes . ning | Tihine of 
wester 
‘ een 


‘ 
fan 
> 


oo Ft. Meade 
Pp : Cc 
7 


WATERFRONT 


8 


HOME 
n Li a 


Mtle” large Screenea:| _ M. "TES STORCH 
mm COLORED 
NEW 
GLENWOOD PARK 


wooded 


SOUTHERN Real Estate 668A 


FLORIDA 
FLORIDA'S 


P large lots Im on 
: arses’ s3 it ‘ 
e 


os 


re 


CENTRAI , fF alone 
: wy ane the ask: né 
_ ‘ 

and her chotce preper- 

‘AN REA TY © 


Mid Phone Great 


ry ] 
"Plet-te 
Centineed en next column 

73 


LOTS FOR SALE 
__ VERGINIA 


BULL RUN MOUNTAIN 
Prince William County, Va. 


« ’ ‘yu 
Lex — Par«x 
AL ir sk ROUND 


yew 


n 


Box #287 


“LEO STORCH 
pe SP 33-4500 


VrRerv se tos 


PLAIREDA 


LAND, SALE 70 
ic “At ALOG Free’ 


TOSS prem: 


CABIN SITES—LODGES— 


Come see 
60-mile panc 


RECREATION 


with 


this wondcerliand ef sature 
ramic view 


tte wnbelleveble 


soe nearest 
nutes 
Weaesees. 


Wat 
ites 


mountain 
Mic 


resort 
are 20 min 


10 
” ond 


ingtes. which 
om c.er from Leesburs 


pri LAW ARE 
OFLA‘ WARE 


Dba ance 


. 
+ 


= . ‘“ 7. ’ 
ab SWIMMING 
‘se 

" Delmar. i ‘ 
MARYLAND Purchase © sf te mc udes use and owners” 5 of 5 


DARNESTOUN new country ChuD poo. 
. > & tv 


RORSCHACH RECREATI ON 
8107 West Br - oe 


+ rat 
a) A P 


rs 
TENNIS COURTS 
ARC -HERY—R pend 


“Thaner Anxic US 
3 Bedrms ! 


aa 
= SHU MA N SIN 


> 


nta n—Recreat wia a v "Gg at its Very Best' 


$25.00 down and as low as $17.50 per 
Lots range Y% to 


trom 2 
2 acres. 


montn 


1 


- 
. 


Arfax Real f 
STREET 
O} 


DREAMS 


OPEN ALL DAY 
SUNDAY 

OWN ON WEEKDAYS 
BY APPT. 


oa 
i 


SH 
v" = Hwy A te 


ne ¢F 
State a? “4 « so : 
toma. #) sn. Come one LF and 


Roads Are Good end Countryside Beautiful 


Class 6 


"it ao 


F ax « Realty, IE 


TREES TREES 


Division 


Bull Run Development Corp. 
OBERT B. YOUNG—PRESIDENT CLASS 
COLEMAN C. GORE, REAL ESTATE BROKER 
Phone Leesburg 235-J-1 
EM. 2-2084 


s5e DN. & buys 
Wve S18 A har line 


; , ae T) 
sVeV 
ear} 5B 
- — 
~"r 


D 


~ 


hard 
Cc. Whit 
kite 
tater 
rw Ft 


1846 | 
pee 
\ 7 

my 


Te bus 
wv Dus 4 
. 


tng z 
=e 0678 et 


“TB. 6- 4i3i. 


- 
yr e 


. ta 


’ ; 4 
7.4 comm. 


oe 


ss 


73 WATERFRONT, SALE 
# PERSE, bot, 


7SA 


pteenes porch 
sO. Has 


Lafee liv. rm. 
and bath. one with ull. room 
has workshop ana carpor' 

and 9000 Reasonabir 
full lake privileges. Onir 
531i miles from Cc. Call Manassas 
33-W i-W. Open ali Gay Sat. 3 if 


MAX C. 


YOUR REALTOR OFFERS 


2-3 
kit 
otner 
sa500 
terms 


° 
‘a 


wegen. 
bed room . 


ON “WATER | 


Nee 


yy 


Mf: Pa 


‘SCHWARTZ. 


WwW vATER PRONT SPECIA! 


Dea office oF ca 


Torn 


mse Beach 


MMER HOME 


rr an | a : cy 
GRAC OUS ' 


FOr 
THE DISCRIMINATING 


LOTS 


OICE BAY 


DIRECTIONS 


_ WILL BUILD 


r beach lot t is paid for 
wh 

heat tile Dein L.A 

o.9 « 


— ve 
RIVERFRONT 
; ' = . Gf 


AD 
POTOMAC 
. y Dea 


bade adeno = 


its sl. 6 oy whaed i= bei | 
‘s HEAD c. rms. well | 


us 
| CANADIAN BEML 
| Mam 


bay) 


bates jat ter 


drive 
furnished 
rma. 3 


“A A 
1-Sept 4-hr 

—— 
~~ front cott 
bathe an 

nadix lee dish 
Make ye Write to 
16 Kirk “hey 


AY ail Aus. 


side rches. 

washer ec 
Mrs. Clarke 
y Chase. M 


Delawa 

apts 

6 persons 
and eves 


KIVTY awe WEA Cm. N. €.—Cot- 


Cc ‘ re—De- 
front 


or 


Literature 
C Manat 


— wees: y per 
/ rature 
HOPATCONG 8-0255 
Ar . 2 


le ’ . 
paNok ua oF sHENANT —— 
” ae 


aU (chad ney 8 


Aa Tud lor 
nd 


;-O014 


DOGS, PETS, KENNELS 76 
ee le ee eee eee 
—— quality f ru te 

ia 7 ema on 


aaa as 
Kennels 


sox! fa PUP pee gree 
ears 


crops 


F 
BF 


cam 


shot 


‘UPP TES _ = AKC 


> 


NES. 


B-) 
TANY spaniel 
AKC res Pin 


REG. 


. re and 
gen- 
r 


x 

Dupes 
; hunters 
' rained. RE &-7 
BULL DOG— ™ nc tr 


- 


. ros] 

BLT ‘i ~ 
ARC Exe 

c Ll 


terrier oy 
» 


Hi ut An . 
er 
‘ arnt Ane A: 
CHI Ant 4 PUP—Pocke 
(rhe AKC Cc) line 5 


\ iol — 
eu 
as 


2-5954 
Le at Rennels. Wim 


b 
‘ —s KER Pt + + —t 


‘> 

ure > red 
1-OR49 
” Beaut 

U or 
“Rome 


Hyatt 


< o¢ xER ri = AKC 
d ron CKER a Ps 
i 


Fe TA 

Cox xcres— AKC ais 
cies Vaca alx 

Dam & = . ‘ 


a. 
Q 
ARC 
‘viue 


tm. 
$15 
3. 
Va . 


| neage 
ate hy 10 4- 6325 


ch 


YL 


. Com KER “pur—3 
| he ome; fines 


el : ° to ort is n 
R BH Inc 
| Pr ince Fr ed- 
Purn 
eas 


~$9) 
REHODS ee “BESCE DE. 
ome 


“ 
— shower, 


Sample house open for sale. 
I on 


‘a rs H 
right a, 
“G Baar i 


Mary s 


a : 


ounty, Md. 


roc 


Da 


pie ' 
attractive 


cove 


ide sel lection of other wat erfront 
ar . a reactive 
’ sire- 


farn 


e a’ re 


James tachi 2 Son 


, Mars 


en and 
en’ 
‘GR ‘ 


a 


sv waFR Nowe. 


er? t{wo- 
es 


PONDER COVE - Beas 
bed roon r en ‘ 
“ef wear o “Base rr 


WOODLAND BEACH 

Cospeees year-r« 
. t pris 
e! A 


" umerous 
In homes 
rues “pear 
seh oo and 6 
STEUVART - 
Americar 
Baseboard 
nara woe OT expanc 
and many extras, Bas we $ii.- 
500 FHA and Gl approveg 


Edgewater Realty Co. 


LEVEL New EHar’y 
homes of ' acre i 


‘fr 


wa 
° Alte 


; 
neat pias 


n 
ng room beaut 
oreh x3 


pe Sirs try: < 
_aa”™ 

. . 

* 


= + 
5 


eh iy sce 
ne 46BROWNING 
TYRANT 


175 acres on navicad er 
wit ee-revolutionar? 


Re Este 
Emene zs }- 492 t 
Hwy. 1. Phone 
er cusbure vs 
class cond 


WATERFRONT, RENT 


758 


A : ‘ may’ 

fam!) er sroup. if desired 

course ‘in gymnastics DY ere 
teacher Wtiy of ijleneer 


for 
incl 
rac 
7’ & 


Beautiful 
sive . 

on. M 
miv. 7 
a urn! mod. 
ca 


way 
if wa 
. 


THREE-QUARTER 
par a 
AKC ‘wesunea 


COCKER FUPS 
$5. SO. 95-7757 od 
com KER buf? 
hampion 
’ .< 


#2. 8-5 


puse 


‘3 
5353 
COCKER SPANIEL 
wks ABC re 
ol; —_— Pupgies 
ico 1o 
and 
& weekencgs 
COLLIF “PU PAK 
at terrier, $10. Re. 
Cai —— 
| fom: home ~ Oy 
COLLIE FUPFS 
oe. Heasenaoe. 
COLLIE. AKC. at stu 
Ebony Paracer. TF 
COLLIE pups, AKC sab) rand- 
STe 0% ya, Lad. 5 sabi: 8347 
COL om puppies, ARC res. 6 wks 
nease Show vrosepects 
sable and wh! te coats 
Ee 


~ Lack male. 12 


1 BO. 53-9028 


— = sired 


a ag S80 $50 


TV show. — 
Ar. 7 
AKC ree Parader 
_ AP. 47-4359 
A’ - a 


4 
s 


a 
say after 
il wks. 


Bat HSH ND rcr ALC. 
Dam 2K. 


6 x 
palit Nb 
D. x ‘ish <>? 

KEN NEI us 2! 
NGI an sPrtfi—hps 


o 
‘Shot . 


oo 


> 


& 
Ors se be 4 


l= 
pouiai 5 ar 


“ - latmed "ter 
vis 
GERMAN 


9-0206. 
‘SHEPHERD PUPS. 
si. -$6 65 AK 


ny 
GuF at DANES 

la 
4 +! 
f % 4 
Neerbs_ CR 
Pt rs AKC. 


ius 


‘ amp on 
ti I lirti 
fh is be 

r ire . 


Pro papect 


mis 
E 
mis met i, = ere yed 


needs home with fence. LO. 4-7405 
LABRADOR Retriever pups rey 


iverside 8-688 
raiicxbor kerk inven = —~ 
MARY Take "Cult aor WACT. 

| ct of puppies 
lle Ra Su. Sor 
differ Fs iS peadle. male. 


AKC 4-467 
PEKINGESs ror 
' aper 


emace 


11109 Co,es\ 


“Forres 


service 


- 6 


2816 


“and | 


Ministure beautifu! 
muzz) a 


intjat ire 
breedin 


4 
FOODLE PUPPIES Diack r tandard 
AKC res Cham- 


descendan 


Kt | Selected 


pions — 
nile pels <i 
SB S— Min ' 
Chure cL 
POODLE: Bier 
b ss 


entertain ine 


need 


= of Windseors 
>) emt 275 
ch. stock 


Ae 
“PUPPIES 


TOY BOSTON, AKC 
PEKINGESE, AKC 
BLOND COCKERS, AKC 
WIRE TERRIERS, AKC 
AMERTOY 

FOY FOX TERRIERS 
MIXED BREED 


appl ¢ 
4 “26 


—— 


re¢g.. 


Silver Spring 
57) THAYER AVE. 
FUPPIES—Mi xed ood. wn 


on 


aflectionate 

§-49 
TOX MANCHESTER “pura, beouti- 

-b 

asi 
3 mos ole 
Deaut 
retin f you 


if 
er WeKWavs Aa or temaie’ Tor + Fr. 


i for nice 


Rte t 
ho 


“Bale Lone 


unter 


Kittens please 


iver-. 


758 FARM AND GARDEN 


108 Wilson Ave. 


MACHINERY and TOOLS 83A 


CONSTR. EQUIPMENT 
immed BULLDOZER. D-6. 


’ 


good 


ig He r ner dq 4, Paes, Tike —. | 


~ SETTER PUPPIES —Resis- 


7B 


25 ESTATE HEMLOCK—$15 


OCK. Hardy New 
pshire erown. Just like these 
estates. 18 to 24 in. tail 
this peek 265 for $15, 100 


“pa 
is shipment at any 


$50 
date 


BOB McGUIRE 


Johnson City. 


$4800. Excel | 


Dp *® 
cond. SP. 3-466 


6-8 ya. pan 
1 Gallen grader 
tractor and ilow-~-)| 
$1 for everythine. | 


ver Ss Van 908-9 o- 
AUCTION 


CONSTRUCTION 
EQUIPMENT 


suy 18 93 om. 
No Carolina a 
yard 
good s 
Hoe-Drag- “ahovel: 
“L-20 Drag; Pali 228. 18 
P ye -ya vreae: 


Ail 


T.D 
Ol; 1 
boy evasion 


i4 a ‘oro 


mostiy very. 
1] TD- 114A & TD- 
& winch tracters: 10 TD- 
winch tractors 
Cc & Cletrac PDE | 
; Biades. Whee 
2 Cat D-4 HT4 Loaders. 


& Concrete M rere 
Highway. Bridge & sidewalk Forms 
00d: Other Comerers ae ae I-R 
Compressor 
>} C-P 105. Compe 
& Air Tools: Ford Dump 
Mack Tractor & Roe 
Lowboy GOMC 3-7] UD- 
164A & UD-14A Power Unites 5 
Conveyors Complete Bhonr 
other ttems, large | 


Com - | 


al 
Without Limit or 
HOMFWOOD ESTATE 


BROTHERS 
THE AUCTIONEERS 


LINCOLN. NEB 
321 Sharp Bid P> 


MOTORCYCLES, ETC. 
v2 STATE—i 95 


— c {te 
Stik (= 
reas 


Piece 
Ridder 
~ 


86 


sail’ new $195 


niet 
ny Bi 2 ave ext 


3-7844 
woTOR a SOTER—iesT Cushman ; 
0 


ent overnau) 
Davidson 
-4 


nd. 
aikra aa inde —_ et ORV 
nd. $1 SP. 
aA 
wot ORE yer = Harley 


3018 ‘eal 


e 

it at 

ES Beltsville, 
ler 


X._Noon te 6 


0 . 
Park. Cou 


mi. nerth of 


—' 49 3 alum 

with extras; « real bargein a1 858 | 

cash. Junction Ma. 4 & 223 

4M a7 

‘3 —_ 33 tt 
AMERICAN 
TOP VALUE 

MOBILE HOMES 


ape a oareaiee are on ¢is- 


apa branch. 
By) to. Bivd. 
Col) hn Park. Md 


IBERTY. 26 ft... 
PRICE. $2.395 


I-LEVEL em sae SPTt.- 
CraL PRICE. £5.995 This is 8900 
less than eur regular price 


p.s 
which “s located 
10180 Wa 


‘>i 1 bedroom. 
FU 


The following mobile homes are 
= 1 & aD ag a. AY rome branch. 
won RICHMOND HIGHWAT 
ALEAANDRIA. VA 


"S6 RICHARDSON. 45 ft, 2 
room. FULL PRICE, 34.495 
S78 per month 


"S46 RICHARDGON ft 
room. FULL PRICE 83 o08 
ly payments. 869 


-bed- 
Only 


[* 


2-be 
month- 


These modele may be seen at our 
1 aepingten Saies Center. which is 
located at 
5020 WISCONSIN AVE. NW. 
WASHINGTON. D. C 
hy AMERICAN 


38 ft. ene bed- 


monthiy payments would ve 
$74.12 

"ss NEW MOON 5s fr 
¢ with monthly 
ents of 887.50 


OUR SAL 
AN ICAN'S LE 


m 


n MEN AB 


OUT 
= PURCHASE 


AMERICAN TRAILER 
COMPANY, INC. 


. - 3 36 
All Branches lly 2 een 


ays Pram 2 Oni 


WE ARE PROUD 
TO ANNOUNCE 


the aspeing mont as suthorizsed 
ers for 


GREAT LAKES 
Come and see the new 41-loot 
compietely 
latest 


storage ane mirrors 
uM thle for as low 


$960 DOWN & 
$70 PER MONTH 


Trade pour furniture for 
YMEN 


Shields Trailer 
is az 240 lle Ro Pred- 
pibaneont'? 2-1145 


tr 


ales 


82 | TRUCKS, SALE 


1 FORD 


FO p—H % —. marl 


fe a 


eniy 


pay- 


—'s4 me aes, dual 

wheels. new , tires, i 
Pals ect condition. ona} 10 
guar- 


anteed pies cores E 


. 
_m. Aft. 7, 
ORD—'Se '-ton vi 
blue. turn. signals 

° 


ton express pickup 
pe ae ay reconditioned 
ready to July 4 specia 


aa | FRANK “SMALL JR., 


Ave. BE. LU t, ts 

Sten. | 
" $1500 
alter 


3200 Penna 

"53 dume truck 

000 
Set 


Callvafter « _ Pp — 


tl ong oo hee! 
yess good cond. ym, 


tech; 


Brand new. less 
Must sell immed 


take oider | 
car or truck in tre 6-5.139 


de. TR. 
Selivery 7 truck. 


OR overnen 


Hwy. Sliver 
is i— i value c, 
trucks, all mod i a 

See our selection ~*y 


oe ARV 
bur 


East- West 
rin 


Dladens -4300 


AUTO, CARS, TRUCKS Hire s 


BR HIRE or 


Ford F 600 
4 aan 42 R. take. Call S| 


6 or ail Ga sadny a 
AUTOMOBILES WANTED 96) 


D-2 
D c 


AL ~~ T| 
Pieete cash wer eT caler’ . 
ersonal use Al saab. Poe g AUTO! 

ve, WA. 7-1280 


adillacs ad 
PENNY MOTORS 


CASH F Br CARS 
rae rr OR MOTORS 


$336 Wis ae WO. 6-2900. 


WILL PAY 
TOP DOLLAR 


ANDY ADAMS 


pela, a pour & 4  ~ ~ Se 


"CARR DISCOUNT - 
3348 BENNING RD. ME. 
LU 1236 


———>=_—X— 


WILL SAY FAG 

mie price for any make car 
FLOOD PONTIAC 

4221 Connecticut Ave 
WE WANT to b buy any m make. 


TERN DE eat need 6 cars 
" 


peeneres eiy. Any mate 
trucks. station Fe 
VILLE AUTO 


ons 


on 
PERSONAL LOANS 


AUTOMORILES WANTED 96 
_ 


Will Pay Up To: 


ca dare 


a to na_Fie,Ane._ EP. 

on & or model Donald Motors. Brit 

| Florida. ave. ne. ME. 8-3396 

SOUTHERN PEALERS need cars 
make mode]: 


a 
ave. Myattevilie. Md WA 


CASH FOR CARS 
Any Make 
BILL DENIS, INC. 


| 4040 WIS. AVE. NW KE. 77-1522 
roR WARM welcome and cold cash 
see HAINES MOTOR CO 3600 
_Biadensburg ra. ne. WA 


CASH FOR CARS 


PENNY MOTORS 


for Southern outlet 
| TOR CO. TA. 89-2661 


BUYING!!! 


Highest prices paid for used 
cars. Brine car end titie te 
either of our two big loce- 
tions 


EMERSON & ORME 
(BUICK) 
17th and M Sts NW. 


TOMOBIL 
as —Pre fec : 


AU 


wie 


B SOM HN to Pboko MoToRe INC. 


Pik Arlington 
"5. 9223 


AUSTIN 
HEALEYS 


NEW 1956 MODELS 

Delivered complete with tonness 
— neater. adetroster ' ' 

-speed gear box and 


—_- 


other extras 
Austin 


Mi Pe 


’ 


arrenecc 
100" arrpn WEL 


o Lemans models sliientir hiaher 
DELIVERED COMPLETE 
PRAND-NEW 
1956 MG-A 


$2195 


allowance on American 
ane 4 neve a- 


; amore ¢ 
EXCLUSIVE WITH 
MANHATTAN AUTO 


& Servi oe Emportes and 
1914 


An 
R STS. NW, 


Pairfax Branch 
Church en Pair 
wo Highway at beeniiriela 


904 PERSONAL LOA NS 


Licensed under Small Loan Laws 


Licensed under Smell Loan Laws 


Go Now ! 
Pay Later 


Teke your 
Vecehon ths 
the 


; yeor on 


F 


= pier | 


orsto iment 


4201 
4700 MARLBORO PIKE (Core! 


7892 GEORGIA AVE. 
113 S$. COLUMBUS ST. 
1200 LEE HIGHWAY (Reeslya, 
* Above loans over $500 are made 


VACATION LOANS on Just Your Own Signature ! 
STATE LOAN COMPANY 


( Silver Spring, Md.) 
( Alexendria, Ve.) 


Open till 8 P.M. Friday—CLOSED SATURDAY 


Your Payments* 


$48.33 
$34.44 


You can get 


$850.00 
$600.00 
$350.00 $20.34 
$250.00 $16.09 


* Above loans under 55) are on 
e ®-month plan under Va. law 
small tens te 
charges are 24° 
monthly en unpaid balances of 
Sa) or less and 14% on the 
remainder 


! 


LOgen 7-1300 
Orden 8-9220 
Dicetuvr 272-5553 
Uniper 99-5600 
King 99-1714 
“Ackson 2-3224 
Industrial Finance Law 


Hills, Md.) 


Ve.) 
under Md 


VACATI 


on terms to suit you 


ON MONEY 


most neede 
it later at yo 


Under our plan you take your 2 
vacation now when it is 


d and pay for 
ur Own convenience. 


correo 


$303 Beltimore Avenve" 
(res! te The Met bresee! 
__— SsuvER 
7912 Georgie Avenue’ . 
8513 Geergia Avenve’ 


4503 Knox Pood" 
crocs from The Met Shaseed 


eee 
150 N. 3 Notched Read". 


128 West Breed Si. 


-_—— — 


Opes 
7 Ste 
OPEN SUNDAY : 


IN COMPARABLE | 
SPARTAN | 


We are ¢) playing the. lar ot - 
ection of BILE | 
HOMES tn the EAST We cofdialis 
; inspection 


front and rear 

center and rear 
bedroom 

bedrooms 

ne bedroom 5495 | 

Cutaway shel)—the interior has | 

you to in 

at 


through Sat 
appoin a 


Homes Company 
T LAK 


rivate 


Shion =e CREDIT | 


1430 Fla Ave NE Li 4-4884 
PERSONAL LOANS 


LOANS pe Ag ot women a 


. MAY BE A SE 


For paying bills, medical 
other 
up to "$1000 for any 
good perpese. |The 


requirement 
for a sage oo at HFC is 
your ability to 


y 
in regular monthly 
instalments. 


G A.C. FINANCE 


MT. RAINIER 
3510 Rhode tslend Avenue’ 
3317 Bhode islond Avenve** 
MYATISVUALE 


COLLEGE PARK 


LEXINGTON PARK 


FALLS churew. v 
(Up te $4600) 
*Formerly Generel Accoptence Corp. 
**Formerly Consumers Credit Service, 


—— eee 


RATION 


. Tel. APoleten 7.2800 
Tel. HObert 2.5028 


. Tel. UNion 4.8200 
j 
SPRING 


Tel. JUniper 7-6900 
Tel. JUmiper 9-3566 


Tel. UNvon 4.0058 


4 Greet Mills 3670 


1 jJtffersen 2.4643 


ote SOLUTION 


expenses or many 


ee Bape Fina el apc dh om | 


AUTOMOBILES, SALE 


A A OMEO 


SPIDER SPORT ROADSTER 


SPRINT. ‘COU ot 
VY. DIATE ost iT 


1936 
ae 3-383 
moter hardt op. 


up. OF 
ash hy i inaide and o 


bceysrantes, 


Phoned tor “edn ap } a 
rs (© selec 


Matic *Morors 

Ma Se. ii. 
NER iy 

ORNE 


. LI 


R 


FORA S 


Fin. Ave. RE 


11 14th (Bewniawe } DL. a" 


Rick 


35 Cetitury 4-dr 
oe ipped. 


radio heater 
° tires 
tr Wheelmobdile 


“WHEELER. INC 


CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH-IMI tives 
LER 


; 
LARGEST WASHINGTON 


oi CNDTLE LAC 
sily 


L. Alter 5 & wkends. J 
Bi 1CK—'S6 Buder sedan p. na fic 
adie. beater, S150, sh, 4-38 


‘ae 
BUICK 


Super Riviera 


ON APPROVED 


97 AUTOMOBILES, SALE 


4.4090 


iree War- 


‘ LLAC— 49 4-d00 -v 
res. eras immpculate fondilion 
are or ae offer HO 
Mr. Ham 
‘ A DTLL AC — 1955 7 pass 
ack Fully uipped. Ver 
Private owner On's 


bD 
le 
5 195 Wu netall 
al ond) tion! 
Cadillac: Olds 
ING CENTER 


| 
oe 
~ ‘55 CAD. _ 
Convertible 
_$495 DOWN 


mileage 


mi ileage. 


for 


*y 


rom — same 


"BLASS & CLARK * 
AD. 4-9882 
- vient 


CADILLAC wood 4-dr 


brdramat 
‘ne oo: ¢ * — 
ve 
: i A, coy Gaet 
: me bine on.' 


rons (Ford) 


Yose “60 Bpecia! sed 
— ne 


elec windows 
with matchin 
rior spot les : thr oughout. $339 
Terms or tra de 


AKERS OLDS-CADIELAC CO. 
Pair lington Bhopping Center 
_OY. 3-0350 


Sunday 
Only 


/ 


Chev. 
$1285 Total 
$145 Down 


On Approved Credit 


aa aor 


bargain 


requ ired Por credit approval 


BILL ROSS 


TU.2-4200 


r es. 7400 Georgia Ave. NW 


DICK WILLIAMS 


LI. 6-3141 |, 


BLADENSBURG RD. N*¥ 


— 
aida 


| Air 8-cyl- 
convertible pean 


° 


. Fvwuaeae ee .-t - 
ee _ = Sipe 


beet offer ] 
Tavira 
ipped. ver 


‘2 CAD. 
4-Dr. SEDAN 
$95 DOWN 


4-a? sedar powe 
a'(eer ii: , 


The Auto Center 


SOLO SCADII LAC CO. 


‘ band me { ry 


Capital Cadi th ac- 
1302 : § aT 1-26 


CADILLAC , 
with ©. & 5 


CLEARANCE 
55 Thunderbird $2795 


Beaetifal light sreen eth new 

bieck top Ferdematic. Full 

pewer: real eperey 
r. ke new in every es 


‘SS Chevrolet . $1395 


“s10" @-dr. Favieped with 
a . ‘Pewergiid 
low-mileage one-owner car 


53 Ford $1095 


Convertible: beaevtifel tire © 
_ —_ new top, Ferdematic, 


‘53 “Plymouth 


Crenbreck 4-¢r. KE. & 

Drive. “.-*. tires be esta = 
reen -tene finish. Seat covers. 
eee seat condition. 


"61 For 


t.¢ér. sede 
lent tranepertation 


49 Chrysler 


Windser 4-¢ér,. 

green finish “ew 6 
Seund mechanicalir 

ally clean inside and ext. 


LOGAN (Ford) 
3540 1 4th Se. NW. 
TU. 2-4100 


; ’ 7 
le nileage lL own 
2249 


“Cal 


4 we il 


$896 


_ Hardtop 
finish with contras 
Radio anc heat er 
ens other 
inapec 


Suly “ special. 


BE ie SMALL JR.. INC 


1726 Good Hope R4. SE. LU 2-263? 


xe Us 
toed 


"52 CHEV. | if 


Repossessed | 


$249. 80 Total 


® hea er and 

yy ~~? ally L 
Can be bseou 

nt on 


SOLD 
with no 
por oved credit 
ick crecit 


re Auto Center 


est Loc 
- Ww 
) sedan 


‘Ou Mo 

A ‘gs 

CHEVROLET — 
ne 

: Sabet 


12% 


on } 
ST 3 -6624 


Spen 9 “t 
UPER) ay ct Cc “MOTORS 
ete 


fe more to buy s qual- 


; r S 
dealer eit our i spiay and ‘com- 
Chevy Chase Chevrolet 
7725 Wisconsin Ave OL. 4-6100 
CHE 55 Bel Air secan 
‘ oth mech. aid ap 
equip. _.- owner. "g1295.. ; 


" ROCKET AWAY 
TO MORE 
SUMMER 

FUN! 


Biss x 


/ 


We have « wide selection of 
REGISTERED ROCKETS and 
other late-model “Satety- 

Tested” vacation specials . 

all priced to sell! 


65 OLDS DELUXE, ». «« 


equipped New cor cond: tion 


‘54 OLDS DELUXE “38” 
HOLIDAY COUPE, 


equ pped TREMENDOUS VALUE! 


‘54 FORD RANCH WAG- 


ON, ¥-4, tully equipped 


fully 


$1495 
‘64 MERCURY MONTE- 
REY, «<r. & hb. 
custom interior $1495 
64 OLDS DELUXE 88, « 


dr h ydrametic, & hk, 
end block 


economy PLUS style 


mercometx, Ff 


’ 


RANK FINANCING 


Paul Brothers Olds 


Wisconsin Ave. & Ellicott N.W. 


'54 
Mercury 


Monterey Hardtop. 


Call for Credit Approval 


ME. 8-2674 


Military Personnel 


KE. 7-1308 


—m 


ener Motors 


ec ‘ EY ROLET.. 


97 AUTOMOBILES, SALE 


be) CHEV. 


210" 4-DOOR 
WE CAN FINANCE 


gi, $1065 


$95 DOWN 


16.000 actual mi car, 

with radio heater 

| > no-cost. 30-day 

meseries ruearantee 
hn 


ea uipped 

Power 

“labor 
.. 


and 
athis 
‘eo over oe . ly 
care con | 


MILLER ‘MOTOR CO a” 


316 FLORIDA AVE. NE 


LI. 4- 2396 


1989 


““FOLLIN | DReARD 
College Park. Mad. UN. 4-1500 
= ——!'S3 4-dr. eport sed exce 

' x. a nes tires low mile- 
ener 
s545 *Wondert ul 


CHEV .—'S4 Bel Air 2 


7'n¢ oyers eas. best offer "Gibson L 


700 xt. #6549 

. to . 30 Dm. or W 
CHEV .—'5@ 4-ar “hardtop . 6: Pow- 
erg@iide and brakes: extras inci. fr 
& h. Runs and looks like new. Wil 
take older car in trade, AP ‘7-5450 
CHEVROLET'S 6 2-dr. Pully 
equ! Bpee with bower ol ide vr. & 
5 mi. Cannot be told 

a, new, $187 7 PL. 4-8625 


‘55. CHEV. — 
CONVERTIBLE 
$145 Down 


harp vellow and ivory finish ~y 
| Mather interior prem! 2 

| fully loaded with al 
| Por eredit 


+ ohne 740 


extras 
approval call or come 


The Auto Center 


Our . * Lax ?' <a 
| 629 - St. N 


|'55 CHEV. 


2-DR. SEDAN 
| $195 DOWN 


Biot; very sharp; low mileage car 
Terme aripaeee Por credit ap- 
ll or come in te 


The A 
| ere, et 2-dr. "210: beau 


hite combination 
. 7an throughout 


EDMONDS (Ford) 
3298 Wilson Bivd.. Ari.. Va 
CHEVY “SA con, -- 
be ggg 


ST. 3 $624 


w/* tires 
TA. 9-1458 
— ge i exe 
1Dbea | Pos 
brakes 
Capitol” heed sae Co 
} 2 22 Ww ST. 3-2600 


Bunda) 
cunverey itt cen VE Tai 
ut ans . 


sa iTice 


ear Ra 


excel. | 
pearance : 


= FRANK SMALL ik, 


EE 


Stick shift 
m 


E p86" 


| w/ellver pane! 
guarant ee JA. | 


me -Goor 
exce, 
td 
she ioe Ty ‘- as 
"poaue convert 
“s engine Oris 
tires 


MiRs 


sedan 


Lim! 


term PINEY 
703 8” iM, } aad Br 
re) 5 Tees vs » Co 
h sutometic irens “Tike on 
895 o MOTORS. "ath & 
72. 6-650 
eutifuy 
trasting 
transmission 
very A 


' -— guaranteed 


45 
FRANK “SMALL JR., 
1200 Penna Ave. GF LU 
DODGE ~ Coronet 6-pass 
coupe 4 


INC 
2-9827 
club 


UU. 58-1977 paondas  throuss 
ca 


SPECIAL! 
LINCOLN OR MERCURY 
COMPANY OFFICIAL 
CARS 
AN OPPORTUNITY FOR 
VALUES AND SAVINGS 


Mayflower Motors 
1128 en st. N.W. CO. 6-4968 


Servicemen 
Attention! 


and efficers 
e pay- 
taken by 


grades 


ith 0 
hosiisations 


Burrell Motors 


2121 Benning RA. NE. 
Li, 4-6559 


Repossessed 
‘SS 
OLDS 


“88” 2-dr., beautiful green 
& white, R.4H., Hydra.; ex- 
cellent condition. 


*45 


Call New Fer 
Credit Approval 


ME. 8-2674 


Military Personnel and f 
Out-of-Towners Financed 


Andy ly | 


128 K fs N.W. 


uto Center | | 


'w.! Inspection 


! 
) 


/ 


The ‘Washington Post and Times Herald never 
knowingly publishes misleading, fraudulent, 
“bait” advertising. 


or 


All advertisements are accepted for publication on 
the premise that the product is properly described 
in the advertisement, is available at the advertised 
address, and will be willingly sold to the consumer 
at the price and conditions stated in the advertise- 
ment. 


lf any reader ever encounters anything less than 
faithful compliance with these conditions, 
would: appreciate knowing it. 


we 


Advertisers who deliberately violate these stand- 
ards will not be permitted to use our advertising 
columns. 

Just call or write the Better Business Bureau, 507 
Perpetual Building, NAtional 8-2727, of which 
this newspaper is an active supporter. 


97 AUTOMOBILES, SALE 


— ° 


—_—___ oe Oo -— 
AUTOMOBILES, SALE 
— 4§ Reval ~—y 
Seer 
Dri + on) . "5500 


CHRYSLER .- PLE MOU TH-IMPERI 
LARGEST WAGHINOTON DAI aR 
4600 Wisconsin | awe EM 5.47 on | 
plas Pord, Consul "51. $450 or} 
Sitt. BO. i-6794 at). 2pm | 
ENGLISH pone sae ign 


INC 
neéton 


whi te wall tires bit 
$2090 


clean. low mileage. One own- 
WE CAN FINANCE | 4600 Wisconsin ww 
sedans and pie — 
tutone _AD. 23-9752. 
7328 Gee 


Radic 
“cos? 


NOTICE TO READERS 


; my car. 


| @ral terme arra 


_— payment required. For creait 


r 194! 
vertible. Pordoma tie. power packed 


AUTOMOBILES, SALE 9 | THE | WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


Sunday, July 8, 1956 D1? 4 


AUTOMOBILES, SALE 97. eee SALE -—_—«o977 
7 


REPOSSESSED 
$449.50 Life 


Tudor. 2-tone finish en 

r h.. $4 $0 gown and tube upd 
at $2F 

For. pees ef reait approval call 


SECURITY MOTORS 
4th and N. Y. Ave, NW. 


® ton 
Treen with tires; ulp. | 
cluding wer eleer ae. ike new 


AKERS OLDS-CADILLAC CO. 
a ane Shopping ae 


udo 
pay a A the eare of outomsatic trana- 
i et late-mode . jow- 


EBM INDS (Ford) 


3208 Wisse } Pig A . Arh. Va 


SUNDAY 
ONLY 


‘53 
| Victoria 
$585 Total 


No Cash Needed 
nae to Credit Approval 


Open i) wntil & 


HILLMAN 


nd New 1956 
STATION WAGORH 


Bra 
“HUSKY” 


"04 
FORD 


VICTORIA 


$88 Down: 


On Approved Credit 


2-day money back guarantee. Lib- 
need for mil sary 
ranks. Officers 


Also Hardtops. 4- Sper secans 
Sliehtiy ji 

Dual Purpose all ete 

nes oT pieasure 


for bual- 
Many improve t- 
Wwe 


Mebcedes- Ben 
Wills — 
Overse as 


Morris Min 
Hillman 

: Alfa Romeo 
other popular makes 


del! ivery ar 
MANHATTAN AUTO 


} & Service Im erted 5 
American cars 


7th & R Sts. b NW. 


| mor back « iarantee 
cime arr ranged for militar: 

sonne Micers np down carmen 

reguired For credit apr 


BILL ROSS: 


TU. 5.45001 


5|7400 Georgia Ave. NW. | 


F 
per 


personnel. al! , : 


erritiel 
iat Ve ates % the 


oads' or. 
Neyer raced. _ miles, 
cn "55 Monterey “pedan, Re~ 


omatic drive. 
Seema ionally ciean, 
age. One owne 


099 
" WHEELER. INC 


CHRYSLER. PLYMOU TH. PUPERIAL 
LARGEST W wi tas LER 
4200 Wisconsin N =? “4708 


_ Continued on wReetee Pace 


ay 
app 


‘DICK WILLIAMS 


LI. 6-314] 


41731 BLADENSBURG RD. NE. 
: z 
+ie | 

JAGUAR—'$52 Mark-7 4-dr. sedan 


owned by naval officer: exe. cond 
$1600 or best offer. JE 35-8486 


case 


“Make Mine Manhattan” 


Washington’s Largest Dealer of 


Imported and‘ 
American Cars 
1956 MG-A 


Custom 6-cyl. 4dr se- 
Por dometic and heater } 
Diplomat leaving country 
62. 
aivlane Buniiner con- 
engine. turquoise and whi te 2 th} 
- j ' 
IF YOUR 
CAR IS 


WORTH $375 


We can deliver te you @ 


‘56 Plymouth 


‘enmo) *49 


BANK FINANCING 
BETHESDA MOTORS 


De Soto-Piymouth Dealer 
Miller and Wise. Aves. 


new pester 
4 10-day 


er. forth- HEELER. IN $995. 

rorp— $3 _* ar. “3”. | 

ine FP’ dm ‘ti \ 
] 4 Pend der — r 
| Fords to choose from 
JOHN GI irORD MOT DR ) U 
it ORS Ra & & 
- 1983. 


97; AUTOMOBILES, SALE 
NC. 
Oirror: OR BETTER 
ful “tone f 


i FORD custom “6” 4-dr adio 
CHR YSLER-PLYMOUTH-IMPERIAL 
| BT os ote! $13 : DOWN 
ts not ting seat 


automatic transmission 
|LARGEST WASHINGTON DEALER 
M. 3-47 
FORD = ae. cl Sama, Fordomatic 100%, 
ou : ar mater 
a —~ oe ie 


guaran te on md jen 
r easy +) a payments 


— 
For 


ome PER" MOTOR CO. 


316 FLORIDA AVE. NE 
& LU 1-9647 


aaa SLI. 4-2396 


. B in FORD— v- a: Wa 
Blu $1495 bcc 


> oy ppec 
"| Capital Cadillac- Olds Co. 
1222 22 “A st 3-2600 
é; sed Bunds 
rORD—' 50 =, h 8185 or 


FORD. 


t<¢ 
$605 
1736 Good Hope Ra 
FORD —'5 
he . , 
“1956 | 


fu : 


4 
" suBepala Hic’ MOTORS 
and Pa a 

19 


de Z . best 
cont rast! ng seat covers Rac 
beater. etc. A perfect 3nd 
rear anteed July 


FRANK SMALL JR INC 
3200 Penns Ave. GE Lu ~9A27 
FORD—'S4 convertible. Pvt party 
A new © “7. ' powder 

fet ori 5 he rdtop 


: pow eeTing 
a ire@s ae 


‘S3 PLYM. 4-DOOR 


*475 


AND SEVERAL OTHERS 


ke MOTOR CREDIT 

82 523 WH ST. W.E. 
SERVICEMEN 
NO DOWN PAYMENT 

Lin 5 oppiics te let three grades 


65 Chevrolet—$1,799 


Station Waren de 
a Beaatiful twe-tone 


ay- 
lve. 
oter. Pewerslide, heater. 


Bank rate financing 


Coast-in Pontiac 


407 Florida Ave. NE. LI. 6-200 


xt Further swormation 
Ca 


JET MOTOR SALES 
2795 Nichols Ave. 6.5. 
40. 2-0896 


. 


iN 


tw Waduanet 
aE) 
HINK 


yilulid shit! 


AA 
ti! 
“ 
iy 


ENE ait 

! yh 
= 

! 
TTY 


WiNhit 
HHUULAPLO AUN 


| 
eS 
’ 
’ 


STOP mm 
SEE WHY! 


MORE AND MORE PEQPIF 
GETTHEIR NOI APPRAISAL 


DIRECT FACTORY DEALER 


Sales and Service for Austin-Healey, Austin, 
Alfa Romeo, MG, Sunbeam, Morris-Minor, 
Porsche, MG-Maenette, Hillman, Mercedes- 
Benz, Willys. Overseas delivery arranged. 


GAS SAVERS 


Mest with RADIOS, HEATERS, Other EXTRAS! 


| Up to 40 Miles Per Gallon ef Gas =| 
‘S1 Morris ___.$295 __ $1985 


4-deer sedan several 


‘SO Austin __..$295 


A-40; 4-@eer sedan 


"SS Hillmen 


“Hesky” 
meta! 


"S4 Nesh 


Rambier 


"55 MG Te $1595 


Wire 


$1095 


Station Waren: all 


2825 Wilson 


Boulevard 
es 2-9000 


36 Austins _. 51695 
sedans. 5 Compees 
Oetietal i, Hea defrest- 
shee ’ Hew 

title —~y gtarantee. 


"49 Jeepster _.$395 


(Witiys) very clean. 


“HANDY-MAN” SPECIALS 
Need minor mechanical or body repairs 


*S!] Austin ____ $95 
4-deer sedan body good; 
needs mechanical repair. 


~ear 


(British Ferd) 4-deer sedan. 


‘49 Hudson _.$145 


4-deer sedan. 


‘S1 Chevrolet, $295 | “49 Crosley ..$150 
2-deor sedan. Station wagon. 


‘50 Chevrolet, $295 | ‘52 Austin _..$445 
Ceonvertibdie. 4-door sedan. 


1002 East-West Hwy. at Georgia Ave. 
Silver Spring, Md. 


JU. 9-4500 


"S56 CHEVROLET 


“T10" 4-Deer Station Wasen. Pewersiide. RB A H 


"S6 CHEVROLET 


Nomad Station Wasen V-S 
powergtiide. w.-*. tires: R 


’S6 CHEVROLET 


Bet Air *-Deer. Powerstide. heater 


'SS CHEVROLET 


Bel Air Sport Coupe. Pewerstide. 8. & H. o.~-o- 
bive and iver 


"SS FORD 


Cenvertibic. Ferdematic. Kh. & BH. Real share 


"SS CHEVROLET 


Cenvertibie V-8. Powergtide, BR. A H 


ss CHEVROLET 


‘SS CHEVROLET 


Twe deer. Heater YSLER 


"56 FORD 


Fairlane Station Wagon. 4-door 
omatic. KR. &. H., fu 


rouse steering, brakes 


Like ao Convertible V-S 


rt Rhea St ’56 FORD 


Like me 


Tewn Seden. Radio and heater. 


’SS PONTIAC 


Cotetine Hardtep. Byrdrametic 
ires, Real le 


$5 FORD 


Peiriane 4-deor. 8. A H.. 
V-&. tatene paint. 


SS PLYMOUTH 


Four-deer Pewerflite,. RB. 4&2 H.. 
tene finish. Extra clean. 


SS PLYMOUTH 


Seburban Station Wagon, 


’SS CHEVROLET 


"S4 CHR 


Windser Convertible LER Shirt. 
Heater. Power steering and brakes 

'54 

Custembline, 


a4 


Redie and 


Fully Eatupped Twe te Cheese from 


tires, 10,000 actual miles. 


pecial Fieetweed. Air ——e 
ex at full MoB SIL —E whit 


‘34 OLDS 


Deer. Hydramatic. 8 


Le 
w.-W,. tires, 


"54 MERCURY 
Foeur-deor. Overdrive. BR. & H.., 
bice finish. Real Sharp. 


ul Drnaflow. 


ay CHEVROLET - 


Two-deer. Ob s e spot light; jet 


’S3 DOD 


Special 
wy -w. 


Feur-deor. Heater. 


Open Today, 11 ‘ti! & 


Saaveax nue 


MERCURY 4-DR. 
CADILLAC 4-DR. 
PACKARD 4-DR. 
STUDEBAKER “V-8" 2 
MERCURY 4-DR 


DODGE 4-DR. 
CHRYSLER 4-DR. 
FORD COUPE 
HUDSON 4-DR. 
BUICK RIVIERA 
CADILLAC 4-DR. 
NASH 4-DR. 
MERCURY 4-DR. 
CHEVROLET 2-DR. 


Full 
Price 


Menthiy 
Pavenent 


$12.19 
23.25 
23.25 
23.25 
28.34 


OLDSMOBILE “96” 4-DR. 
DE SOTO CUSTOM 4-DR. 


PLYMOUTH CLUS COUPE .... 


$3 eWevabiiy™ 


0” Twe-dee tern signals 


53 PLYMOUTH 


Dr. Crenbreek. Heater, tern signals 


~ edie 


"52 PONTIAC 


Four-doer 


Real nice 


Rea! alee | 'S2 FORD . 


Custem)ine 4-dr Poréomati le r a 


’51 KAISER 


4-Dr 


'S1 MERCURY 


Poeuer-deor. Radice and Heater 


'SO PLYMOUTH 


Four -deor. Radic and Hester. 


’SO0 FORD 


Twe-deer Club Coupe. 


’5S0 CHEVROLET 
’50 BUICK 


Sedanceite. 


Preaflow 


roe Sibsisice 
“oR” 4-deer. Bydramatic, RB. 4 HF. 
'52 

Country Sedan, V-4, Ferdematic. B. & 


‘31 ble d 
'ae"CHEVROLET 


iaé"DbBEe Ai 


Feur-déeer. 


'46 FORD 


Four-door 


‘48 BUICK 
‘47 OLDSMOBILE 


9 : : 
eee eaea da A ore mM 


4-Dr. Stveline Deluxe. Ealepped. 


WN 
i 


7605 Georgia Ave. Northwest 
TA. $-3103 


&-patsenger 
i pewer. ¥V-& Like see 


Fordeomatic, BR. & K 


vausens 4-door. Foerdemeatic, fell power. rellow and 
whit 


redie and beater 
leage 
tern signal, +.-@. tires, 
w.-. Tires, 


Equipped 


Bel Air Spert Coupe V-8. Poewerglide. BR. & H.. w.-. 


4-Dr. Cerenet Hardtep. Tern signals, low mileage 
Belvedere 4-deer, Powerflite, o.-. tires. 


w.-. tires, Baby 


pa Hardtes. Drnafieow 


'S3 MORRIS OXFORD . 


Hrdramatic. B. 4 H.. 


" 


'49 CHEVROLET 


Most are ONE-OWNER CARS! 
Traded In on New 1956 MCG-A’s! 


MG’S ... .» °765 


Largest Selection . . . All Models 
TD’s; TF 1250 and 1500 Models 


LOW DOWN PAYMENT; BALANCE AT BANK RATES 
Bonk Finencing! Ne 


Astow § P| 
as 5 DOWN Smoll Loons Needed! 


Many one-owner cors, just troded in on our imported cers! 
Priced far below morket price! At Menhotten Auto. 


. ereen 


$195 Dn. 


Lew mileage 


4 * 

53 Keiser . 
4-decr sedan; 
oipee extras lew mileage 
Was 8705. ONLY 6895 deen 


22 Plymouth, $1395 


oitiaen 
..$295 


"50 Ford 
S45 dewn 


Ferder sedan; 


"53 Chev., from $795 
4-deor sedans, incleding Bel 
Alr models. Lew os 895 down 
"52 Pontieoc ___ $895 


Convertible: tydramatic: ail 
extras, 595 dewn. 


--$495 


radie, heater, 


*S4 Ford - $7195 
Tedder sedan: ene owner: 
eeulpped. ONLY ‘p05 


— Be 


"S|! Plymouth __$475 
4-door sedan ONLY 645 éewn. 


- $995 


two- *53 Pontiac 
4-door sedan: radie, 
ether ‘een $125 


sedan 
one ewan. si26 a. 
SEE THE 


srascaew 220 JAGUARS 


FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 
at Manhatian’s Fairfax and Alex. Sranches 


FAIRFAX, VA., BRANCH 
cn lon Higheay of tenia ve, Oh, 48962 
All Model MGs.»--°765 
(Just traded-in on New MG-A’'s} 
"52 MG __... $9951 “S2 Morris __ $495 


Well cared fer. Ceonvertibie: excellent tires 
end tee 


2° Austin -- $595 *50 Austin eee $245 


4-doer 


ALEXANDRIA, VA., BRANCH 


1810 KING ST. @ King 8-5525 
be Chevrolet, $195 “S1 Hudson _.$275 


4-deer sedans; equipped Club coupe. 


‘52 MG ___..$995 


Leaded with extras. 


‘53 Pontioe _. $895 
2-deor sedan: radio. beater: 
other a ‘Unuseally fine. 


Partial listing! Many more Imported and 
American cars at SALE PRICES! 


We Finance et Benk Reotes 


Perfect condition. 


and Out of Towners 
Financed 


Andy Kelly 


129 K St. N.W. 


CADILLAC HARD-TOP 
DODGE 4-DR. 
CHRY. POWERSTEERING 4-DR. 45.55 


74 we a re Daily, 9 tu 9 


Reineés Motor Co. 


Heine 


| 
{ 


lh 


TH 


ie 


; 
4) 
it 


binds 
a | 


i 
itil 


| 


i 


ANE 


| 


MOTTON 


my 


Nba 


i 


mete 
TT 


MLA 


i 


: - 
: ' 


MOTOR 
COMPANY 


PaaS } 


k 


a 


MANHATTAN AUTO, Ine. 


DAVID HERSON, Pres. 


7th and R Streets N.W. 
. 71-2700 


* Open 8 am. te 8 om 


Established 19 ay 


Contineed on Following Pace Continued om Following Pace 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HER ALD 
July 8, 1956 


| 
: 


D114 


~ AUTOMOBILES, SALE 


Sunday, 


7 


— 9 Coan 
. fine cond: good 
$545, pet owner 


—- ’ J 


MERCEDES BER 


BRAND NEW, LATE: T 1956 
MODELS JUST ARRIVED! 


190-SL Convertibles 
New 219 4-dr. Sedans 
220-S 4-dr Sedans 


MODER ATE 
Re 


a.Aineg 


“Manhattan Auto 


755 MERC. 


Montclair 
Hardtop 
RAL aoe 


ite 
~ _rear-sea 
he m 


iow mileage 


The Auto Center 


° if thewst Location 
sao 8 bs he Li 6-4 


Oo 


x 
MERC. 


Monterey H.T. 


$45 Bown 


ON APPROVED CRE 


3-day moner-> 


DICK WILLIAMS 


LI. 6-314] 


1731 BLADENSBURG RD 


——$——$—— 


RY 
perdt ~ 


pa Peees brah 
a RCURY 1952 
ter beaut! 


EDMONDS (Ford 


3298 Wilson Blvd. Ar 
[A 5.88 


6 

~~ . 

2606 Braoch aie se ht * Z : 
Se 


SUNDAY 
ONLY 


‘94 MERC. 


MONTEREY 


$1049 Total 
REPOSSESSED 


NO CASH NEEDED 
SUBJECT TO CREDIT 
APPROVAL 


ulén . 
DB 


eo keep ot 
> _ . 


BILL ROSS 


TU. 2-4200 


7400 Georgia Ave. NW. 


phone t ana | 
4-54 BC Basic Sct 
Va 
55 Ra : 
4-dr Sta’ as Spa;r k 
2-tone fir 
TAKOMA FORD 


8725 Piney Br rat 
B-) 
Was 4] AmbdDessa 


DSM iS6.0N .. 
Nia RAMBLERS 
2 Hy a 


wagons 


VW 4 


ww) 


Pully eauippec. A 
rice. BURROWS M 
: , ¢ 


FRANK SMALL JR 

1736 Good Hope Rd SF 
$0 Rocs i 

drama’ & 


’ * 
ii¥vw 


aon : ” 
ex e 
rY ° 


We tea Them! 
PACKARDS 


Frem “@86 te "\%s All beds 
stvies. One-owner cars! 


COVINGTON MOTORS 


7301 Wis. Ave. (Beth. 
OL. 2-920 
The Ge 


IN AUTOMOTive 


Because we give 
® Competitive 
Appraisals 
® Financial Terms 
Toe Suit You 
© Immediate 
Delivery 
® Service Before 
and After Sale 
e STOP BY 
SEE WHY! 


’ 


‘ 


st. 2 es | eo 


‘AUTOMOBILES, SALE 


FULL PRICE 


$95 DOWN 


He jay Co —pe ower ateer- 
brak Hy» -¥ 


is ae th 4 nasmnent . 
‘MILLER ‘MOTOR CO. 


FLORIDA AVE. NE. 


LI. 4-2396 


OLDS<MORILE—! 
NGRESSIONAI 


For 


1954 Ali mocgelis at 
yr vy Int 


: : 
OLia 
VU i= 


alte " I 
rat BARD 
; 

a ar Very 
5 


FOLLIN PACKARD 
PACKARD ny 


00 


Ac atic Power brakes 


TAKOMA FORD 
» } oe a & 
1 a , 


ey Rr - 

PACKARD 
' : 
PLYMOUTH 

r > _- 
: _@ 

tia be offer 
PLY MOU TH—1950 4 
Py nA 6400 JF 
2 5% Sunda) 
PLYMOUTH — 1°95 
. - _ ‘one 

eo 


Ak ERC 
ales va 
PLYMOUTH 'S 
PLYMOUTE. 
FLY OU Y 
a z°s ame i,a\@ 
*WRIEELER. INC 


YSLER.PLYMOl ‘TH IMPERIAL 
'T WASHINGTON DEALER 


‘ni 
One 


| : > - ni 

PLYMOUTH. 54 Savoy s 

ra'er rn su a) 

ass eat ers immaculate. 


wrne $10K9 
WHEELER, INC 
CWR YaLER-PLYMOUTH.IMPFERIAL 
| Ams EST WASHIN 'TON Pa 
Ww 


PONTIAC > F 
ve Bp. et 
PONTIAC 

age 


49% 
PONTIAC ~— 52 2-G! 
$ 


FON Tiac air 
7 af » 


No Cash Needed 


153, 
PONTIAC 


CATALINA 


HARDTOP * 


REPOSSESSED 


Dick Williams 


LI. 6-3141 


| BLADENSBURG RD. NE. 


PONTIAC — 


” edie 
a& real 


EDMONDS (Ford) 


= «4 Ar 


B. 4-1149, 
PONTIAC 4 


PONTIAC — S& Star ‘ 
. ar : 


PONTIAC —orand-u - Com 
plete selectic Low a8 $395 Gown. 
financed. Cash or trede. For 
the best deal see McNeil See us tO. 
day McNEIL oo NTIAC, 7320 Wis. 
Ave +)! 000 
In the ee of Bethesda” 
PONTIAC I 
“eater 
one green fin- 


rai ‘Beautiful 2-t 


"ARC CADE PONTIAC 


Sen S 


pOWTTATH 


PONTIAC ; 
ra 


EDMION DS” (Ford) 
oS Wi a0 yn  aaad Ari. Va 
at ted tee’ : if A $80. ba + besut 


FONTTAC- p>4 juipped 


"ARCADE "PONTIAC 


51 PONT. 


CATALINA 


oe Auto Center 
“— i 4600 


a ar ———— 
| cra in 


‘TRoegicta s 
iow 

S - . 
r vaemen n 

st at 
ond ear 


EDMONDS (Ford) 


TRit betel re 


WILLYS—155, ; 


EDMONDS. (Ford) 


° 


ona ‘an £5 SOSRIAE 


= dear Ae 
oon b.rd s. JA ’ 


a 


Thousands View Delayed D. C. Fireworks 


Washington celebrated 
\Fourth of July last night with 
bursts of enthusiasm and 
pyrotechnics after bad weather 
‘twice delayed the Monument 
‘fireworks display. 
| The salute to American in- 
dependence was rained out 
Wednesday and Thursday, but 
clear skies and a balmy night 
finally formed a perfect back- 
drop for the program. 

A cool breeze blew. The Navy 
Band played. Vendors hawked, 
novelties, ice cream and soda’ 
pop. And a crowd estimated by) 
park police at 72,000 persons 
fanned out from the base of the 
Monument. Thousands more 


the* > . > ° 


lined nearby streets to watch| 


the show. 


There were bobby-soxers and. 


oldsters, couples hand-in-hand, 
and parents trying to keep their 
children in hand. Sparklers vied 


with powerful searchlights and| 


the flickering gleam from 4air- 


ligers coming in at dusk to Na+ 


: 
: 


The program opened at 8) 


tional Airport 
ip m. with a concert and closed 
with an aerial bombardment 
In between there were musical 
‘numbers. the massing of the 


colors. and a welcoming address 
by District Commissioner David) 
'B. Karrick 
dio station WWDC was master 
of ceremonies. 
| Maj. Gen. Melvin J. Mass, | 
USMC (ret.), made the princi) 
\pal address. | 
In Hyattsville, residents be- 
latedly celebrated the holiday) 
lat Magruder Park with speech- | 
les and fireworks which were) 
irained out earlier last week. 


Tool-Bearing 
Pair Seized 


y [As Yeggmen 


Arrest of two toolladen men 
jin Takoma Park has soived a 
irash of warehouse safecrack- 
ling jobs in the District police 
isaid yesterday 
| Arrested early yesterday by 
Takoma Park police were Paul 


Fred Fiske of ra- 


| Maurice Crowley, 21, of 3312 
14th st. se.. and Bernard Mar- 
shall Wheeler, 22, of the Bran- 
| dywine Terrace Apartments, 
700 Brandywine st. se. 

Takoma Park Detective Sgt. 
Russell Merson and Cpl. Her- 
bert Bowers said they stopped 
the pair on Sligo Creek pkwy 
near New Hampshire ave. and 
found them carrying an array 


| Both Crowley and Wheeler 
ihave been charged with one 


itools in Takoma Park and two 


of safecracking tools. 


count of possession of burglary 
| counts of housebreaking in 
|Prince Georges County 

Police said the pair broke 
into a drug store and super- 
| market in the Oxon Hill shop 
| ping center Friday night but 
icouldn't crack the safes. 
Metropolitan police were 
called in and have filed a) 


Wheeler 


suspects 


Crowley 


safecracking 


idetainer against Crowley and 
Ww heeler. 

Safe Squad Lt. Irving Lubore 
land Detective Frank A. Di- 
Bitetto said the pair have ad 
mitted 12 safecracking forays 
in the District since May 28 
The loot, they said, tame to 
$3552. 

Capture of the two ends a 
‘special 20-man detail of “plants” 
assigned to stake out ware- 
‘houses around Northeast rail- 
iroad yards. This came after an 
outbreak of safecrackings in 
the area. 
| Police said the two were in- 
‘volved in these housebreakings 
in the District: 
| B and B Catering Co., 900 
Franklin st. ne., $150; Canteen 
'Co., 1218 Mount Olivet rd. ne., 
$40: Central Linen Service, 
2149 Queens Chapel rd. ne. 
'$1000: United Clay Products, 
3055 V st. ne.. $040: Asbestos 
|\Covering and Roofing Co., 6215 
|Blair rd. nw., $344; Kingswell 
‘Heating Contractors, next door 
at 6211 Blair rd., $211; Admiral 
TV Distributors, 2046 W. Va 
ave. ne., $546: Stone Paper Tube 
Co.. 900 Franklin st. ne. no 
money: Takoma Bowling Alley 
317 Cedar st. nw.. $350: Clay- 
mont Draperies, 325 Cedar st 
nw., $32. ) 


Silvers Hits Back 
At Val Peterson 


Robert H. Silvers, Prince 
Georges civil defense head, re- 
newed his battle yesterday with | 
Federal Civil Defense Adminis 
trator Val Peterson. who he 
said was “talking out of both 
sides of his mouth.” 

The ruckus started last week 
when Silvers termed the In- 
terim Voluntary Evacuation 
plan for the area “unrealistic, | 
ridiculous, and suicidal.” Peter-/ 
son replied Thursday that area| 
‘civil defense officials should'| 
“stop trying to get headlines' 
|... Dut offer constructive criti- 
cism and full cooveration to 
correct what is wrong.” 

Silvers said yesterday he sent 
a report on the subject to Peter- 
son. “I'm not seeking head 
lines,” he said. “I'm seeking a 
good civil defense.” 


S, Korea Asks Surplus 


Reidters 


SEOUL, South Korea, July| 
7—South Korea has asked the! 


worth of surplus farm peyed 
next year, the Ministry of 

construction said today. This 
is $17 million more than last 
i year. i 


‘year-old 


iy 


© . 


By Joe HeiDerger. Stal! Photographer 


ry shoei se. A a, stb 


BURSTING HIGH OVER WASHINGTON MONUMENT, FOUNTAIN-LIKE FIREWORKS LIGHT UP THE NIGHT SKY 


Bodies of Virginia Manand Son, 14, Sth Marine Veterans 


A Franconia man and his 14 
missing since 
Thursday, were found drowned 
yesterday in the rain-swollen 
waters of Occoquan Creek. 

Fairfax County Medical Ex- 
aminer. Dr. Emanuel Newman. 
issued a certificate of drowning 
for Andrew Little. 40. a brick- 
mason. of Route 5. Franconia. 
and his son Andrew Jr... 14. a 
Washington Post and Times 
Herald carrier boy 

The bodies were found about 
400 yards east of Ryan's Dam 
according to Fairfax Police Pri- 
vate Frank W. Jones. 

Lawson Pridgen. of Fran- 
conia, brother-inlaw of Little. 
found the boy's body lodged on 
a pile of rocks near the Fairfax 
bank of the creek, police said 

Approximately an hour later. 
the senior Little’s body was 
found in some bushes on a 


son, 


small island in the middle of 
the creek according to police. 
Little and his son left home 
on a fishing trip Thursday after- 
noon in Little’s truck, which 
carried a plywood row boat, 
bound for Ryan's Dam, about 8 
miles northwest of Occoquan 
Reservoir. The boat has not 
been recovered according to 
Centreville firemen, who re- 
covered Little’s body 
Attempts at an organized 


Are Recovered From Flooded Creek. Flect Ohio Physi iclan 


search were hampered Friday | 

by high water in the creek. Of-| ORLANDO, Fla. July 7 ‘®ivoted to hold its next conven- 
ficers said the flood was carry-| Veterans of one of the proud-|tion in Buffalo, N. Y. 

ing debris which made it im-jest units of one of the world’s} It was 11 years and four 
possible for rescue boats to finest groups of fighting men—|months ago that the 5th Marine 
move out with grappling hooks.'the 5th Marine Division Asso- |Division stormed ashore on 


Volunteer firemen from Fran.-| 
conia, Fairfax, Centreville and ciation—paid tribute today to|Iwo Jima, a cindery island born 
in the heat and flame of vol- 


Occoquan were searching the | departed comrades. 
area yesterday, along with rela-| It was the Division's seventh|canic eruptions. 
tives of Little, when the bodies/annual reunion and it ended| The Division's brief battle 


were discovered. lwith election of Dr. Bernard|record—it was created late in 


Vienna Section Rocked by Blast 


Explosion of a sewer-pumping 


station in Vienna Woods, Va.. of feet from the explosion. No| Shuey, 


last night rocked the area with! 


a bang that was heard for 41) 


miles. 


a bang that was heard for four 
from the small automatic 


‘the blast, but firemen guessed 


Botsch of Toledo, 
president 


Ohio, a8|\World War II and disbanded 


| chortly after hostilities ceased 
| _ Vice presidents elected were: —was as fiery as the forces 
iC Conds. leon Naval iraining| at created Iwo Jima itself 

Gre 5 va inin Of the 19,000 ttached 

umper was thrown hundreds Se poems 
pumpe Station, Hw ae ox Pa Hi.) Whee the Division, some 60 per 
ewar N. jcent were casualties on the 
| George A. Roll, W sshington, rugged slopes and parched val- 
fathonl and Capt. Paul Preston,|i... of the Pacific island. The 
: Wash. dead numbered 2500. But at 


Maj. States R. Jones, 
ington, >. C. was + oe eee. ithe end of the Divisions ordeal 


retary-treasurer and the group|‘"¢ Stars and Stripes were fiy- 
ry-treasurer group ing proudly from the top of 


one was hurt. 
No explanation was found for 


that gas had built up too much 
pressure in the machine. 


Rescue Squad Has New $140,000 Home 


~~ 


MEN OF THE BETHESDA-CHEVY CHASE RESCUE SQUAD POSE IN FRONT OF THEIR NEW HOME 


The Bethesda-Chevy Chase\an elaborate 2-story structure.; meeting room, a kitchen, class-, the area and 
United States for $60 million| Rescue Squad moved into its| Besides a bay for a dozen room for first aid instruction | try 
| pieces of equipment the ground and a meeting room for the 
a board of directors. 
St.. lounge for thé crew, and stor-| Chief Robert W. 


new $140,000 headquarters 
‘building at 4910 Auburn 
Bethesda, yesterday. ta | 
. The Senlienstens building is 


floor contains an office, 


space. claimed the building is 
The upper floor has a large largest and best of its kind in'since it was founded in 1945. 


Mount Suribachi. The mission 
was accomplished. 

A photograph of the men 
raising that flag, made by Joe 
Rosenthal of the Associated 
Press, was one of the most dra 
j matic to come out of the war. 


a 


a 


| Neeser Sings 
Praises of 
Hometown 


INDEPENDENCE, Mo., July 
7 #—Former President Harry 
5S. Truman said today “home is 
the only place worthwhile.” 
though every place he and Mrs. 
Truman visited in Europe was 
“fine.” 


The Trumans returned to 


Independence today after a visit 
abroad which started when they 
sailed from New York May 11. 
They visited a half-dozen coun- 
tries, including England, where 
Mr. Truman received an honor- 
ary degree front Oxford Uni- 
versity. 

“We visited many fine 
\places,” Mr. Truman said, “but 
none coujd compare with In- 
idependence. Home is the only 
place worthwhile.” 

Mr. Truman appeared rested, 
as did the former First Lady, 
He said his most immediate 
concern would be ‘ ‘steing about 
my mail.” 

Polities, he conceded, would 
possibly the coun-\occupy his thoughts this sum- 
; mer, but he said he did not 
He said the squad has out--know whether Independence 

grown its old headquarters at|would become a strategy Laan 
Cremins | 4800 Fairmont ave., Bethesda, uarters for the Democrat 
the' which the organization rented tmng this year as it did in 


i ee 


a 
“a 2 
As, ae : “ty y 7 , | 
sper, Wt” ay Ce ae Ps? y ie * - 2 , 7” sea | 
ede. 7 di ~ a ¢ 
ae Ay ME Bagi i 


By Charies De! Vecchio. @taff Photographer 


THE WASHINGTON PUST end TIMES HERALD 
° . Sunday, July 8, 1956 D115 


4 
" 
4 
B 


WOMEN’S ARMY CORPS 


” ?~ ; ; Pe, + 7 bg : 
= eed =. : a” oe S44 
a tug pee Ba : o 3M ' hE 
» .« ££ 3 
Fes | es il 7 kg ; 


. . 7 : , 
OR ERE. 2 AY wa , 
ee “Or -- ae PD gO A, ; ( > 


¢ 


ae " ee + 
ae ee 


ARMY. MEDICAL SPECIALIST CORPS AIR FORCE | \ oe 
| MEDICAL SPECIALIST CORPS 


FOR FURTHER INFORMATION WRITE TO THE DEFENSE ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON WOMEN IN THE 
SERVICES, THE PENTAGON, WASHINGTON 25, DF. THIS ADVERTISEMENT PREPARED AND PRESENTED AS A PUBLIC SERVICE BY shines RADIO 


. 


| \ \ 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HER ALD 


D16 


Sunday, July &, 1956 


iNEW AIR CONDITIONERS : 


TODAY! ” 
SUNDAY! @ 


10A.M.to6P.M. f 


FREE! FREE! 
PARKING 


on our huge lot adjacent to 
our warehouse . . . #0 mini- 
mum purchase required and 
you con pork as long os you 
Whe. ; 


- Sere og 2 
x : 
es > 


NG. All this, 


=— ae ° 
today at 


arehouse. 


plus t 
Season 
Famous W 


‘ the 


George * 


NOW YOU CAN SEE 


AND YOU CAN 


SAVE MORE AT GEORGE'S 
NEWER AND GREATER WAREHOUSE! 


In Original Factory Sealed Cartons 


BRAND NEW 1956 SERVEL *% 
TON Flush Mount w/Thermostat 
Reg. $459.95 New TOP BRAND $917 


1's TON with Thermostat 


Reg. $329.95 Brand New 1956 EMERSON 


ELECTRIC % TON 
Flush Mount Model 


Reg. $299.95 Brand New MITCHELL %\ TON 


Flush Mount 
Model 


Reg. $259.95 Brand New FRIGIDAIRE ': 


TON Casement or 
Regulor 


Reg. $349.95 Brand New GE. 


Flush Mount with 


Reg. 
TEMP 5 TON 
CASEMENT . 


*167 


VICTOR %4 TON CASEMENT 
Reg. $399.95 New 1955 
CHRYSLER AIRTEMP %4 TON 


*147 
*157 


Reg. $239.95 Brand New 1956 
a TON Flush Mount 


*167 


% TON § Flush 


Mount 


Reg. $379.95 Brand New 1956 


51671 


Reg. $369.50 Brand New RCA *s 
TON CASEMENT with Thermostat 


$339.95 New 1955 CHRYSLER AIR- 


"187 


“1571 
197) 


TOP Brand 


137! 


Model 
Reg. $319.95 Brand New “eer 1 TON |: 


*167 


Thermostat +21 7 


Reg. $319.95 Brand New RCA % TON 


Flush Mount with $ 

Thermestet .. 67 
Reg. $429.95 New 1955 CHRYSLER AlR- 
TEMP *%%4 TON CASEMENT with $997 


Thermostat 
Reg. $349.95 Brand New 1956 FAMOUS 


Reg. $459.95 New 1955 CHRYSLER AiR- f 
TEMP 1 TON Flush Mount with 

Thermostat +197 ] 
Reg. $499.95 HOTPOINT 1% TON Flush 
Mount with 

Thermostat .. $227 / 
Reg. $389.95 Brond New 1956 FAMOUS 
MAKE #4 TON Flush Mount 7): Amps. with 
Thermostat and j 


LL 


MAKE 1 TON 
Flush Mount Model 


Reg. $299.95 Brand New PHILCO % TON 


Flush Mount 
Model 


Reg. $329.50 Brand New RCA 


Flush Mount with 
Thermostat 


Reg. $349.95 HOTPOINT *%4 TON CASE- 


MENT with _ button 
controls 


Reg. $389.95 Brand New 


i] FAMOUS MAKE *%% 


Flush Mount w/Thermostat 


AIR CONDITIONERS AVAILABLE FOR 


*157 


push-button controls 


CASEMENT with 
Thermostat 


5157 


1 TON 


177 


1 TON CASEMENT with 
Thermostat 


TEMP ': TON CASEMENT with 
Thermostat 


5187 


1956 


*197 


Reg. $319.95 Brand New RCA % TON 


187 5 


Reg. $399.95 Brand New TOP BRAND 


‘2771 


Reg. $379.95 New 1955 CHRYSLER AIR- | 


217 | 


TONS] 77 


24 HOUR DELIVERY and INSTALLATION 


Big Savings on Modern & Traditional 


FURNITURE 


SOFA LOUNGE 
Converts inte full-length 

bed. Our Beg. $59.95 $30 
SOFA BED 

Opens te sleep two with tapestry 
covers. Our Reg 

= £43 
STUDIO COUCHES 

Open te twe twin beds. 

Our Reg. $84.95 +43 
2-PC. SOFA BED SUITE 

Sefe bed opens te sleep two; with 
lerge matching chew 

Our Reg. $189.95 >] 09 
2-PC. SECTIONAL 

Kaubby tweed with foom rubber 
cushions. Ovr Reg. 

$199.95 

2-PC. LIVING ROOM SUITE 
Sefe and choir te match. 

Our Reg. $179.95 $98 
2-PC. LIVING ROOM SUITE 
Seta and matching choir in assorted 
nylon covers with feem rubber 
cushions. Ovr Reg. 
ere) |? 
CLUB & LOUNGE CHAIRS 
in asserted styles & colors. 

Our Reg. $59.95 te $49.95 $99 
2-PC. LIVING ROOM SUITE 
Sefe and matching choir in frieze 
covers. Ovr Reg. 
$219.95 +] 48 


2-PC. LIVING ROOM SUITE 
sofe and matching choir in red 


boucle. Our Reg. $] 50 


$269.95 


3-PC. BEDROOM SUITE 
Deuble dresser, chest ond bookcase 


bed in welnut finish “ $84 


Reg. $159.95 


3-PC. BEDROOM SUITE 
Deuwble dresser, chest end beekcose 


bed in blends. Our Reg. $] 30 


$199.95 


3-PC. BEDROOM SUITE 
Dewble dresser, chest and bookcase 


bed m hmed eck. “$154 


Reg. $219.95 . 
5-PC. DINETTE 

Large teble and 4 sturdy 

chairs. Our Reg. $74.95 .. $49 


aaa OO oo oo oo ot 


GIANT-SIZE 
AUTOMATIC 


Thermostat 


w / Westinghouse 


Reg. $24.95 


Deep Fryer 


$6-99 


3-PC. BEDROOM SUITE 
Deuble dresser, chest and beokcese 


one an” $145 


8-cup 
Automatic 


Reg. $21.95 
universe! Coffeemaker 


$13-99 


ony. Our Reg. $229.95 
BEDROOM SUITE 


3-PC. 
Devble dresser, chest end bookcase 


bed w/dust-preef & center drewer 


cay. Our op. anes STOR 


ony. Our Reg. $259.95 
SERTA INNERSPRING MAT- 


w/attach- 
ments 


. $69.95 
LEWYT 1956 


Vacuum Cleaner 


$38.95 


TRESS or BOX SPRINGS 


Your choice of full or twin 

sires "$99 
FAMOUS BRAND INNER- 
SPRING MATTRESS or 

BOX SPRINGS 


Alarm 
Miniature 


Imported 


Reg. $6.95 


‘Clocks 
$2- 


© 
0 


WITH 4 
SPEAKERS 


ffs 


eg. $269.95 
WILCOX-GAY HI-FI 
TAPE RECORDER 


$139-95| 


w/ ler. 
guarantee 


Reg. $14.95 


ews Wrist Watches 


het 


‘| 


ee 


eet 


Reg. $28. aa 


SUNBEAM ;.. SHA a 


$14.50 


fit most 
20” sets 


Reg. $29.95 


G.E. TV BASES 


$4.99 


Your cheice of full or 
Netionclly Advertised of $39 
mattress. Our Reg. $34.95 
Our Reg. $59.95 
der. Our Reg. $129.95 .. 

but 6” 
9-PC. DINING ROOM SUITE 
HOLLYWOOD BED FRAMES 


Reg. $39.95 


HAMILTON BEACH 
BLENDOR $19.99 


SPECIAL REDUCTIONS! 


WE HAVE A TREMENDOUS SELECTION OF LIKE-NEW 


LATE MODEL FLOOR SAMPLES 


TELEVISION 


- vv eet 4 ~~ 


> ~y ns 5s  caustey 

2) Series TY Console Model 

5166.00 “S64 EMERSON 

14-Serfes TV Portable Model ...cccccccccess 
Sldy.95 36 ADMIRAL 

2) Series TV Table Model 

$169.95 56 MOTOROLA 

17.Series TV Teble Mode! 

$319.95 56 FAMOUS MAKE 

2)-Sertes TV Console Model 

5167.95 S36 PHUCO 

17-Series TV Table Mode! 

5239.95 S64 ADMIRAL 

27) -Series TV Toble Model ....ccsesees . 
$239.95 36 ZENITH 

7) Serves TY Teble Model 

$219.95 36 ADMIRAL 

2) -Series TY Console Model 

$269.95 "36 PHUCO 

2) Series TY Teble Model 

$279.95 “364 ADMIRAL 

24-Series TV Teble Model 

$249.95 S64 ADMIRAL 

2)-Sertes TV Teble Model 

5999 95 34 TOP BRAND 

2) Series TY 3.WAY COMB. w/redic & shene 
$319 95 ‘S64 ADMIRAL 

|. Series TY Console Model 

$399.95 56 ADMIRAL 

2?) Series TY 3-WAY COMBINATION 
$339.95 36 GENERAL ELECTRIC 

2) -Series TY Console Mode! 
$319.95 ‘36 FAMOUS MAKE 

17.Series TV Blonde 3-Wey Comb. w/ 
3239.95 34 MOTOROLA 

2) Series TY Console Mode! 

$269.95 RCA 

2! Series TY Console Mode! 

$357.95 ‘S64 PHILCO 

2)-Series TV Console Medel 

$359.95 ‘546 MOTOROLA 

7) Series Blonde TY Console Mode! 

$239.95 ‘S464 ADMIRAL 

24.Series TY Table Model 

$289.95 “SS FAMOUS MAKE 

2) Series TY Console Model . 

1954 GENERAL ELECTRIC 

14. Series TY Deluxe Portable Mode! 

$297.95 ‘55 TOP SRAND 7) -Serles TV 
3-WAY COMB. w/redie & phone 

$249.95 ‘S64 ZENITH 

7) Series TY Teble Model 

5367 9S “SS CBS 21-Series 
Conscle Model : 
Save 95 “S54 FAMOUS MAKE 

2) .Series TY Combinetion, w/AM-FM BADIO 


$259 
LAUNDRY EQUIPMENT 


$179.95 ‘SS BENDIX 
Semi-Avtometic WASHE 

$189.95 ‘56 KELVINATOR 
FLECTRIC DRYER 

$229.95 ‘55: SENDIX Swoer-Foat 
SLecTeic oFver 

aw 95 Whi —_—— 


Aw tre 
siz 93 NORGE mecTec Dever 
110.2 
aoe-o8 GF Mebile Maid 
AUTOMATIC DISHWASHER 


$249.95 “S6 BENDIX AUTOMATIC WASHER, 


Svupermotic Model 

$1279.95 NORGE 

ELECTRIC DRYER 

5979 95 GENERAL ELECTRIC 
GARBAGE DISPOSAILL 
$199.95 ‘SS SENDIX 
WASHER 


DIALAMATIC 


" $169.95 ‘S64 WESTINGHOUSE 
5 ELecTeic OFVER 


$2879.50 ‘36 JAMES Deluxe 
AUTOMATIC DISHWASHER 
229.93 “S64 WESTINGHOUSE 
AUTOMATIC DISHWASHER 
1799S “S46 8CA WHIRLPOOL 
ELECTRIC DRYER 


AIR CONDITIONERS 


5447.95 ‘SS CHRYSLER AIRTEMP 4% TON 
CASEMENT Deluxe Mode! , 
5319. 4 CROSLEY % TON 

w/ Thermos 

$369 95 . Tor 
Fivsh Mount 7\29 Amps. Thermostat 

$389.95 =f — ELECTRIC % TON 

w /Thermo Dede 
$319.95 S$ L 4 
w / Thermostet 
$297.95 ‘S5 


BRAND % TON 


TON Fiush Mewnt 


TOP BRAND 
Regv or 


sr OINT 


vy TON 


$399.95 S65 TOP SRAND | TON 

Fiwsh Mount w/Thermestet 

$399.95 55 KELVINATOR 4% TON w/heoter 
thermostet & push-bvften controls 

$289.95 36 TOP BRAND ‘2 TON 
CASEMENT 7\o Amps 

$497.95 ‘55 CHRYSLER AIRTEMP | TON 
Deivte Model , 

$479.95 ‘36 EMERSON ELECTRIC 

% TON CASEMENT Deluxe w/Thermostot 
$549.95 56 HOTPOINT 2 TON Deluxe 
Flush Mount / Thermostet 

$369.95 PHILCO 1 TON 

Flush Meurt w/Thermostet 

$339.95 ‘S6 TOP ened 1 TON 

Flush Mount w/Thermoste 
$349.95 “3 — ws TON 

w /Thermoste 

$369 95 3 TOP BRAND % .TON 

Flush Mount 7¥e Amos. w/Thermostet 
$359.95 ‘36 CROSLEY %% TON 

Fluch Mount TY Amos. w/Thermostet 

$349.95 “S646 FAMOUS MAKE % TON 
Flush Mount w/Thermostet 

$309.95 ‘56 TOP BRAND % TON Flush Mount 
2-Speed fan w/Thermostet : 
$349.95 ‘S64 FAMOUS MAKE % TON 

Flush Mount w/Heeter & Thermestot 


REFRIGERATORS and FREEZER 


$249.95 “S36 CROSLEY 8 ww. fF. 
Snelveodor REFRIGERATOR 
$219.95 FRIGIDAME & cw ff. 
REFRIGERATOR w/ddor shelve 

$499.95 56 CROSLEY 13 cw. ft. SHELVADOR : 
KELVINATOR , — 
$549.95 “56 KELVINATOR 13 cw. 
2 door, Magic cycle evto. Defrost 
$469.95 “55 CROSLEY 14 cw. ft. 
vorioht FREEZER 
$3579.95 55 NORGE 10 mw. ft 
CHEST FREEZER 


SPECIAL CLOSEOUT! 


NEW 1956 OPEN STOCK 


HOTPOINT APPLIANCES ! 


Slightly Scratched er Dented—All in Perfect Working Condition . . 
end oll carry FULL FACTORY WARRANTY 


Refrigerators & Freezers 
HOT WATER HEATERS ' ” 


1 yr. on off ports plus an addi- 
tiene! 4 yrs. on sealed units 
on off parte end at least 
5 yeers on the tenk 


WASHERS, DRYERS, RANGES © veer on ot porn 


REFRIGERATORS & 
FREEZERS 


$289.95 HOTPOINT 1! ow 
ft. REFRIGERATOR w/door 
$339.95 HOTPOINT 0 ov 
ft. REFRIGERATOR w ‘awte. 


Tape 1, 


$539.95 HOTPOINT 12 co. & 2-dr 


Refrigerctor on rollers with $ 
oute. detrest end dairy 328 
stor 
$499.95 HMOTPOINT 16 ecw $ 
f. UPRIGHT FREEZER with 259 
oe shelves 

$349.95 HOTPOINT 10.2 ow 

ft. REFRIGERATOR w ‘oweh $ 

butften defrest end door 

she'ves 

$497. 95 HOTPOINT 12 co. Big Bin 
REFRIGERATOR in wellew 

w ‘euto detrost, door § 

shelves 

$209.95 ‘56 HOTPOINT 77 S 

ow . REFRIGERATOR : 

$289.95 ‘55 HOTPOINT 105 $ 

ou. . REFRIGERATOR with 143 
door shelves and 2 crispers. 

$549.95 HOTPOINT 18 co 

. UPRIGHT FREEZER with +988 
door «helves 

$409.95 S55 HOTPOINT _~ 2 
co. . REFRIGERATOR 
luxe w/avte. defrost end 
door a 

$489 95 HOTPOINT Big Bin 
seraioeeatos 2 ow 
w/avte. detrost end dairy 
storoge 


AUTOMATIC 
DISHWASHERS 


$309.95 HOTPOINT UNDER 
COUNTER DISHW ASHE 
24” wide w phoentom drain 


5357.95 HOTPOINT Cue. 


tomline UNDERCOUNTER  $] 86 
DISHWASHER 


MATIC DISHWASHER with 
pump -drein end meple 
work 


$349.95 ‘SS HOTPOINT 
UNDERCOUNTER OTS HM. 
WASHER w/pump-droia.. 


RANGES 


$299 


*143 


$279.95 HOTPOINT 
ELECTRIC RANGE w/super 


= *186)=. 


$199.95 ‘55 HOTPOINT 30-inch 
ELECTRIC RANGE w/minute $86 
Se ceases 

$289.95 HOTPOINT » 

inch ELECTRIC RANOE w/ sor 2) $} 87 
$259 95 HOTPOINT AUTOMATIC WASH. 
Ee? w/oll. percelein inside 

end evt, de lexe thrifti- $143 
voter end everfliew rinse, 

Tec «6DRYER) 6w/precision 

electric timer end ee 

loin finished drum 

$799. 95 HOTPOINT Auto. $] 

deen everfiow rinse . 

$279.95 HOTPOINT 

TRIC DRYER w/Piwerescent 

lighted beck ponel 

AUTOMATIC WASHER ... 

$257.95 HOTPOINT ELEC. 

TRIC ORYER w/push-but- 

torn control penel 

AUTOMATIC WASHER _.. 

$339.95 HOTPOINT AUTO. 

MATIC WASHER w/)-cycle 

Wend-8-Diel end rubber 


$199.95 HOTPOINT ELEC. $] 14 
MATIC WASHER w/evte- 

$259.99 ‘SS HOTPOINT 

$279.95 ‘SS HOTPOINT 

finned equetetor 


$239.95 HOTPOINT ELEC. 

TRIC ORYER w/eush-ber- 

ten controls and tempere- 
selection 


$239.95 HOTPOINT Auto. 
MATIC WASHER w ‘Wend. 
®.Diel, off psercelela in. 
vGe end evi : 


ELECTRIC 
HOT WATER HEATERS 


ed Rakh WE houme $43 
‘48 


vewts 
$1e.9s HOTPOINT 30-Gellen 
Table Medel w/2 heating 


wuts . 


= 5171 


oven, Gutometic timer end 


weer 2600" calrod 


tow 72 


$119.95 HOTPOINT 40-Gellen $63 
$124.95 HOTPOINT 50-Gellen 

Round Top Medel w/2 heating 

$129.95 HOTPOINT 50.Goellen $7 | 
Table Top Medel .... 


$449.95 NORGE 12 cv. %. Customotic 
REFRIGERATOR w/door shelves 


RANGES 


$999.95 ‘55 ADMIRAL 
PLECTRIC RANGE 
$224.50 “55 TAPPAN 30-inch 

GAS RANGE 

$219.95 ‘55 NORGE J6-inch 

GAS BSANGE w/ietinitre! burners & timer 
$299.95 ‘55 WESTINGHOUSE Fvi!l-Site Deluxe 
ELECTRIC RANGE 

$249.95 NORGE BW-inch Deluxe 

RANGE 


40 wmch 


GAS 


New Dehumidifiers 


Reg. $159.95 Reg. $139.95 
Brand Mew 1956 Brand New 


COOLERATOR FRIGIDAIRE 
DEHUMIDIFIER ELECTRIC 
13-000 on. ft. capsctty | DEHUMIDIFIER, 


“$79 | $88 


59.95 2-Speed 20-inch Electrically 
Reversible Windew $34-95 


Fon 
89.95 20-inch 2-Speed $39-95 
Portable Fan on wheels. 


9.95 B-inch Desk 


COOL, COOL SAVINGS ON FAMOUS NAME FANS! 


19.98 12-inch Oscil- 


4098 (Died Ugh 
] Velotity fen .... 
49.95 S-Speed Hessock $34-95 


64.95 Vernede Cese- $39.58 
ment Windew Fen... 

ornode 
aaaid Fon Sect ake $24:95 
64.95 Vernede Reversible Windew 
Fon, meves 3000 cv. ft. $39-59 


$20-95 


41295 
$29-95 


DOOR CRASHER SPECIAL! | 


OUR REGULAR $49.95 


20-IN. EXHAUST 
WINDOW FAN 


EXPANDS TO FIT MOST WINDOWS 


JUST 200 
TO SELL 


: } 
we ey he. i ' 

, ‘ear enti BY His 
WN) My ewe Wee 


com 20 * 50% 
$59.50 

*20 
HOLLYWOOD BEDS 
6-PC. BUNK BED OUTFIT 
HOLLYWOOD BEDS 
whee, complcte with ented (rome 
table, buffet, chine & 6 theirs in 
sone th Sen gy 


SEALY INNERSPRING MAT - 
TRESSES or BOX SPRINGS 
FOLDING COTS 

Complete with imnerspring 
Complete with innerspring mottress- 
es, bex spring & headboard. $39 
2 innerspring mattresses, 2 springs, 
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del very 


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DIRECTIONS: Drive out New York Ave. to Siede 


burg Rd., N.E., left on 


Bladensburg Rd., 


under 


Pennsylvania RR overpass, 2 blocks to 24th PI. lets 


on 24th Place 


to 2146 and George’s Newer 


Greater Warehouse. By bus, take the B-2. 


The Washington Post 


Times Herald 


utlook 


EDITORIALS 
COMMENTATORS 


ART—BOOKS 


SECTION E 


SUNDAY, JULY 8, 1956 


PAGE EI 


New Soviet Line Deepens Italian 


By Leo J. Wollemborg 


Wollemborg is an American newspaper. 
im now writing from Rome 


" 
Rae in 1954, a wave of alafm 

over the fate of Italian democracy 
swept through Western public opinion. 
Leading United States papers freely de- 
scribed Italy as “an ally in distress.” 
Some went so far as to predict that 
within six months the Communists would 
be in control. 

Today, it can be confidently stated 
that Italian democracy rests on strong 
and broadening foundations of popular 
support—as confirmed by the electoral 
setbacks suffered a month ago by both 
the extreme Left and the extreme Right 
And it is the Italian Communist Party, 
largest in the West, clearly 
“in distress 

The blow that brought the Italian 
Communists’ current crisis fully into the 
open came, of course, from the outside 
— with the “leak.” through Western 
sources, of Khihrushchev'’s fierce attacks 
against Stalin But it would be mis- 
leading. and unfair to Italian democratic 
forces, to overlook the fact that the first 
symptoms of the crisis were apparent 
at the domestic level before the present 
Soviet rulers unleashed their “de-Stalini- 
zation’ drive 

In fact. that drive. he 
shaking to Italian 
worsened the 
the party has 
lost the political 
years ago 


which is 


earth- 
merely 
horns 
since ii 


weve©r 
“Communists 

dilemma on whose 
impaicd 
initiative a couple of 
The dilemma 

Limited Market 

pentane the Italian Reds keep up the 
K/ attempt to communism as a 


constitutional and patriotic movement, 
one that is mildly 


been 


sell” 


progressive” in sociai . 


and economic matters and full of respect 
for Italian “traditional values” (includ- 
ing Catholicism)—even at the cost of 
estranging militant oldtimers and dic- 
hard activists? Or should they empha 
size the openly revolutionary, “class war- 
fare” approach—which would automati- 
cally scare away bourgeois sympathizers 
and moderate workers? 

The turn in the rising Communist tide 
in Italy came just as the Reds’ iong- 
standing efforts to “reenter the system” 
scemed—on the verge of success, follow- 
ing the political confusion and govern- 
mental instability inaugurated by the 
1953 general election. 

But, as this reporter observed at the 
time, there was nothing inevitable about 
the Italian trend towards communism. 
It could be reversed if the democratic 
forces rallied around a Center coalition 
formula. the only combination which 
could provide both vigorous anti<lom- 
munist action and equally vigorous eco 
nomic and social policies offering the 
Italian masses concrete evidence of their 
stake in democracy 


A Long Skid 
ITHIN a few months, this double 
barreled approach yielded its first 
fruit. As the mirage of “victory around 
the corner” receded into the background, 


uneasiness and frustration began to 


spread among the Red followers By 
late 1954, the democratic unions, thanks 
to better organization, government sup- 
port and encouragement from the more 
enlightened industrial groups, started 
scoring significant successes in shop 
steward elections, especially in the eco 
nomically more developed and political- 
ly more mature North. 

By mid-1955, the Sicilian elections of- 


fered the first evidence that Communist 
expansion may have reached its ceiling 
even in the rural and more backward 
South. A month ago, for the Grst time 
in the postwar period, the Communists 
lost ground in a nation-wide ciection 
‘Pained’ Togliatti 

HE significance of this domestic back- 

ground can hardly be overestimated 
in appraising the nature, extent, and 
likely developments of the current Com- 
munist crisis as well as the Ggemocreatic 
forces’ chances of exploiting M to the 
full. 

The whole attitude of the Italian Com- 
munist leadership, including the latest 
pronouncements by party boss Toglistti 
and the statements by all other chief- 
tains before the party's Central Commiuit- 
tee last week betrays full and painful 
awareness of the negative interplay be 
tween those domestic factors of the Red 
crisis and the impact of the new Soviet 
line 

There is. first of all. the obvious and 
logical fear that Stalin's “de-deification, 
by shattering the messianic expectations 
of some Italian version of the Soviet 
revolutionary model. will deal a fatal 
blow to the already shaken morale of 
the best “shock troops” of Italian com- 
munism 

To soften this blow somehow, Togi?- 
atti (immediately followed by the other 
Western Communist leaders) had to pro 
duce some criticism of Khrushchevw's line 
It was carefully marginal and cunningly 
presented as a return to the genuime 
“criteria of Marxist criticism.” As such. 
it may also have been designed to bolster 
Togliatt?s personal stock as Marxist 
thinker and leader as well as to lend 


PRACTICAL JOKER 
Long tn the Minneapolis Tribune 


the Italian Communist line a veneer of 
“agutonomy.~ 

But abowe all, Togliatti and the other 
Red chicftains strove to reassert the 


basic validity of the Soviet system and 


awe 


“—, 


Electioneering Roman youths climbed a lamp post in 
the shadow of the Colosseum to raise a Socialist flag. 


performance as having provided both 
“the first great model of Socialist so- 
ciety” and the necessary “inspiration 


and leadership” to all other Communist 
parties. 


s’ Distress 


a — 


— 


The need to reassure the faithful on 
this score must be strong, indeed. It 
led Togliatti to make singularly candid 
reassertions of the basically totalitarian 


See ITALY, Page E3, Column I 


Democratic Unity Is on the Scales 


By Robert C. Albright 


S:af Reporter 
‘OME Democrats view the next two-to- 
S three-week period in Congress as the 
“most dangerous” of the entire session 
from the standpoint of Democratic Party 
unity 
If Democrats 
can 


i* | a 
without any criti- f. 


% 
cal North - South | G: llery 


split, they believe - 
they can Clit y+ A 
lariy avoid any LMpses 
crack-up at the __ jurvvueil 
Aug. 13 Demo 
cratic convention 

If, 
journs in a filibuster 
each other's th 
preserve 
the party 

At least 
present Senate 
strategy 

Republicans, for their part, would love 
to ring down the curtain on another old- 
fashioned Democratic family fight 

But they lost their best chance to pro- 
mote they failed to muster 
enough House votes to send the school 
construction bill to the Senate, with the 
Powell amendment attached 

The Powell amendment, with its fiat 
ban on aid to segregated schools, would 
have surely kicked off a Southern fill 
buster if it ever reached the Senate floor 

But when a majority of House Repub 
licans voted to kill the school construc- 
tion bill, the Powell amendment was 
killed along with it 

Instead of putting Senate Democrats on 


€-) 


survive 


’ 
SitTii 


hand. the Senate ad- 
with Democrats at 
may be difficult to 


on the other 


’ 7 7) 
;Oats. tt 


the present geographic form of 


hehind the 


leadership 


that 


s ine tneory 


Democratic 


one when 


the spot, the House action actually kept 
them off of it and handed them an alibi. 
All the Democrats now have to do is cite 
the House roll call as evidence that Re- 
publican votes stopped the school bill 


Odd Allies 


HE NEAT most serious threat to the 

Democratic bid for party harmony 
lies in the Administration's comparatively 
mild civil rights program. 

This already has cleared the House 
Judiciary and Rules Committee hurdles 
and is programmed to pass the House this 
week 

The Senate excitement will start when 
and if the program ever gets past the 
Senate Judiciary Committee 

Senate Republicans have it within their 
power to bring this about if they form 
a temporary alliance with Northern Dem- 
ocrats for the purpose of reporting and 
passing the civil rights program 

Will they form such a league, and hurry 
a civil rights bill to the Senate in the 
middle of the adjournment rush? 

The Southerners are nervous, but 
plainly don’t know what will happen. Nei- 
ther does the Senate leadership at this 
Staze 

What the leaders do know is that a 
congressional closing is always fraught 
with peril, and this year's wind-up will 
be shakier than most 

They deliberately have taken out cer- 
tain insurance against a prolonged talka- 
thon which might rip the party down the 
middie 

The having at 
least two major pieces of legislation ready 
to move at a moment's notice if a civil 
rights row gets going 


insurance consisis of 


The No. 1 hosing<down bill is the Social 
Security liberalization measure, long held 
in reserve. This could keep the Senate 
busy for days, to the exclusion of every- 
thing else. The other bill held im the 
offing is the Hells Canyon Dam project. 

if a party split on civil rights still 
threatens when these measures have been 
thoroughly chewed and digested, leaders 
will move for a sine die adjouriment 


Two-Man Team 


YMBOLIC of the new attempt to 

bridge the NorthSeouth gap are re- 

cent appointments to the Senate Demo 
cratic Campaign Committee. 

As chairman of the group. Senate Ma 
jority Leader Lyndon B. Johnsen named 
Sen. George A. Smathers of Florida, first 
Southerner in years to head up the unit. 

At the same time, Johnson appointed 
a leading Northern liberal, Sen. Hubert 
H. Humphrey (Minz.) te act as vice chair 
man of the campaign committee 


“I'll take care of the conservatives, and 
Hubert will take care of the liberals, and 
together we'll walk down the middie.” 
Smathers told a recent meeting of his 
unit. 

Significantly, in naming Humphrey co 
chairman, Johnson chose a liberal whe 
knows how to work with Southerners, and 
who doesn't believe in ditching them in 
a new party realignment. 

Humphrey beliewes the Democrats at 
Chicago will—with “ne great disturh> 
ance’ — agree on a platform backing the 
Supreme Court decision on desegregs 
wuon 

As for proposals by some liberal« for 


See GLIMPSES, Page ES, Column I! 


| 
f 


= 
_—— 


> 
iv) 


Ky 
” 


The amity reflected here is symbolic of Democratic efforts to bridge the North-South gap. That's Sen. George A, 
Smathers (Fla) at right, the new chairman of the Senate Democratic Campaign Committee; at le{t is Minnesota's 
liberal Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey, the group's new vice chairman. 


Many a Censor Slashes USIA ‘Story’ 


By Warren Unna 
Stef! Reporter 
HE United States Information Agency 
has seen a good fistful of its pet cul- 
tural projects withdrawn during the past 
year. 
USIA 


been 


Some have been abandoned Dy 


on its own initiative. Some have 


by 
the key House Appropriations 


killed outright Congress, usually 
through 
subcommittee which watches over USIA 
matters 
not been heard from 


Withdrawals of USIA projects follow 


And some projects simply have 


again 


many patterns. But two themes seem to 


predominate 
that America’s information agency may 
not be propagandizing in the best fash- 
jon: and a perhaps well-founded fear by 
USIA officials that if they don’t come to 
heel they will get no money for the less 
controversial projects in their program. 

But certainly no impasse has been 
reeched. for this year Congress boosted 
USIA’s budget 30 per cent, from $88 mil- 
lion to $113 million. This still falls short 
of the $135 million President Eisenhower 
personally requested—but USIA officials 
aren't crying. 


The Critics Speak 
EVERTHELESS, every now and then 
the Congressional Record carries 
remarks such as those of Rep. George A. 
Dondero (R-Mich.) castigating USIA for 
sponsoring overseas exhibits of what he 
chooses to label as “Red art monopoly.” 
@p Sen. Mike Mansfield (D-Mon@ ; in 


a suspicion by Congress 


reviewing American foreign policy, will 
speculate: “Suppose 20 or 30 Cambodians 
descend on your state with the printing 
presses, the radios and the other -para- 
phernalia of modern communications 
Suppose they 
day 


year 


subjected you day after 
month after month, and year after 
to an unceasing flow of words on 
the virtues of Cambodian life and the 
evils of some other way 

“You might agree, | am sure, that Cam- 
bodian life was indeed virtuous. But I 
also believe that you would begin to won- 
der why these Cambodians had come to 
your state. And after a while you would 
begin to wonder when they were going 
home.” Mansfield told the Senate this 
last February 

Rep. Don Magnuson (D-Wash.), who is 
one of the seven men on USIA's life- 
giving House Appropriations subcom- 
mittee, said the other day that he thinks 
the agency's difficulty may be in the lack 
of a positive program 

“It's very wary of stirring up trouble 
for itself. If it thinks something is going 
to arouse the hostility of either the peo- 
ple or the Congress, it will quickly re- 
verse its direction.” 
‘Political’ Paintings 

NE way to appreciate USIA'’s prob- 
lems is to look at the case histories 

of its recently abandoned projects and 
some of its special budget projects. 

The most recent example is the agen- 
cy’s withdrawal of sponsorship of what 
was to be a major overseas exhibit of 100 
20th century American adg sts. Ten of 


the artists were deemed “unacceptable” 
because of political reasons. 

USIA Director Theodore C. Streibert 
told a closed-door session of a Senate 
Foreign Relations subcommittee that his 
agency would not exhibit owerseas any 
paintings by artists who maintain doubt- 
ful political associations 


USIA originally asked the American - 


Federation of Arts, a non-profit organi- 
ration in New York, to help assemble the 
exhibit. Painters selected included John 
Sloan, George Bellows, Thomas Hart Ben- 
ton, Grant Wood. Max Weber. John Ma 
rin, Yasue Kuniyoshi and Ben Shahn 

When USIA got wind of the list, it in- 
formed the Federation that 10 of the 100 
artists selected were “social hazards.” 

The Federation said that under the 
circumstances it could not further assist 
USIA. The group cited a resolution that 
art “should be judged on its merits as 4 
work of art, and not by the political or 
social views of the artist.” 


Four Dubious Artists 

NE agency has abandoned a “Sport 

in Art” exhibit which was to be sent 
to Australia in time for the fall Olympic 
Games. Officially, the agency said only 
that it already hag a successful exhibit of 
colored sports photographs in Australia 
and saw mo meed for sending Australia 
a “similar” exhibit. 

“Sport in Art” was organized by Time. 
Inc.’s, Sports Illustrated magazine and 
exhibited at the Dallas Museum of Fine 
Arts tis sprit under the cosponsorship 


4 Congressman didn't think this school teacher was 
pretty enough— ane reason why USIA didn't distribute 
the book this picture is in, “Profiles of America,” abroad. 


of the citys Nieman-Marcus department 
store 

The exhibit was protested by the Dallas 
County Patriotic Council, composed of 
veterans and patriotic groups. Rep. Don- 
dero said the group rightfully objected 
to public funds being used to exhibit the 
works of at least four artists “having 
records of Communist and Communist- 


brought forth by the 
Patriotic Council... is the co 


tinued monopoly of American art by 
Reds and Red fronters and its danger to 
our culture and society.” 

The Dallas Museum of Fine Arts de- 
fended its exhibit. 


Pablo’s Not Wanted 
SIA, with three shows of college 
artists now on tour overseas, 
planned to add a fourth composed of 
masterpieces owned by American uni- 
versity art galleries. 


The agency resented: teifbinciusion of 


EE ————— ae a Pe ee 


The “Freedom Ship” also was scuttled, One Congress 
man figured that each overseas visitor to it would cost 
United States taxpayers $9. 


works by Pablo Picasso, France's leading 
painter and also one of her most out 
spoken Communists. Officially, USIA now 
says that it has reached “no decision” on 
sending the college exhibition overseas. 


Troubled Profile 


AST year, USIA agked for $225,000 
to circulate 200,000 copies of “Pro- 
file of America” abroad as a means of 
explaining America. “Profile” is a photo- 
graphic history of this country compiled 


See USIA, Page E7, Column i 


THE WASHINGTON POST ond TIMES HERALD The Laboratory Casebook 


r ; F2 Sunday, July &, 1954 


| District Affairs 


Chalk Up 1st-Round Transit Victory 


By Richard L. Lyons 


TT LOOKS as though the end of Wash- 
n’s immediate transit crisis is in sight 
. Roy Chalk, New York airline executive, 
ond his Washington associate, Morris Fox, 
still have two hurdles to 
get past before they can 
take over the transit sys- 
tem Aug. 15. 
They must get a fran- 
chise Sem Congress and ap- 
proval from Capital Trans- 
i'S stockholders Aug. 3 
There could be trouble at 
each stage, but chances look 
good that they will make it. 
This means buses and 
streetcars will be running 
after Aug. 14, when CTC’s 
franchise expires 
That is fine and a major achievement. But 
ft does not necessarily solve the District's 
transit problems of how to speed up transit 
increase patronage and keep fares down 
It may be that the streetcar-to-bus con- 
version program and tax relief provisions 
in the franchise bil) going before congres- 
sional conferees Monday will provide a real 
solution to these problems. Perhaps Chalk 
and Fox have some fresh ideas to lick the 
problems that have been squeezing transit 
across the country for a decade 


ON THE OTHER hand, it 
off the day of reckoning with these prob- 
lems. It will take time to see the answer 

At any rate, the District apparently now 
will get its private transit operator. And 
that seems to be what just about everyone 
wanted 

The Commissioners recommended that Con- 
gress create a public authority after they 
had searched in vain for a private operator. 
But they were always on the defensive about 
it, protesting that they really wanted a private 
operator if one would show up. The Senate 


Virginia Affairs 


may just put ° 


used the same line in voting an authority 
bill, but the House would have nothing to 
do with public operation. 

The only person involved who didn't preface 
his transit remarks with a plug for private 
operation was Rep. DeWitt S. Hyde (R-Md.). 

Hyde is as staunch a ptivate enterprise 
man as anyone. But he became convinced 
that a public authority, without taxes or 
private motive, was the only real solution. 
He said the national trend is toward pub- 
TM authority operation and predicted that 
the District would come to it eventually 


THE SLAM-BANG ending to the search 
for a new transit operator raised interesting 
questions that haven't been clearly answered. 

For nine months the job went begging. 
No one with money seemed to want to get 
into the Washington transit business. CTC 
said it couldn't mak money under the ground 
rules here. No one else seemed eager to try. 

Then, in mid-June, four bidders suddenly 
appeared. Why? Two were airlines. What 
was the special attraction for them? 

Presumably the four decided that a pri- 
vate transit system could be operated prof. 
itably in Washington even under regulation 
by the Public Utilities Commission. The 
franchise provisions as finally worked out 
between the Commissioners and Chalk leave 
the PUC's authority largely unimpaired 


ACTUALLY, FOX is no late comer. He was 
one of the origina] bidders last fall but he 
didn't have enough money then. In his 
search for money, Fox met Chalk early this 
year and brought him into the picture 

As late as three weeks ago, the Commis- 
sioners were saying they would believe Fox 
was serious when they saw his money. A 
couple of days later Chalk walked inte their 
offices with a $500,000 letter of credit and 
convinced them 

If he could raise transit from its sickbed 
as easily as be apparently can raise money. 
Chalk would be a good man to have around 


A State of Mind Goes to Court Monday 


By Benjamin Muse 


A GALAXY of legal talent, which includes 
a former Governor of Virginia and, of course, 
the Attorney. General of this State, is now 
undertaking to prove to Federal district courts 
that defiance of the rulings 
of the Supreme Court of the 
United States is actually 
compliance with them 

Incidentally. the language 
of the lawyers for the State 
when they address a Fed- 
eral court is strangely dil- ~ 
ferent from that employed 
by the State's spokesmen 
when they address the Gen- : 
eral Assembly, a convention 4 
of county sheriffs or the 
public at large. It is a far Muse 
cry, indeed, from the fierce rhetoric of Vir- 
ginia’s interposition resolution. It is a kind 
of coming back to earth, a recognition for the 
nonce that Virginia is in court and the law 
is the law. 

There is a certain resemblance aiso in the 
defense argument to the excuses of a small 
boy who has been caught in some kind of 
mischief. and some of it is on the same level 
of cogency. 


AT ANY RATE, this is it. The showdown 
in Virginia on compliance with the Supreme 
Court's decision declaring segregation in pub- 
lic schools unconstitutional is about to begin. 
The case of the Prince Edward County school 
boards will be heard in Richmond Monday. 
That of the Charlottesville School Board is 
set for next Thursday in Charlottesville 


Written answers have been filed with the 
courts on behalf of five school boards against 
which legal action has been instituted. Action 
against a number of other schoo! boards is in 
the petition stage. Officials of the NAACP 
have intimated that as many as 35 school 
‘eards in Virginia may ultimately be involved 
in litigation. 

The written argument of the attorneys 
for the Prince Edward school boards Ge- 
clares that desegregation would cause in- 
creased racial tension and possible violence in 
that county. Affidavits were also submitted, 
noting that the Negro half of Prince Edward's 
population pays only 14 per cent of the taxes, 
and warning that “the people” (meaning pre- 
sumably the white people) are prepared to 
close their schools rather than accept inte- 
gration 


Maryland Affairs 


IN CHARLOTTESVILLE. where former 
Gov. John 5S. Battle is an attorney for the 
School Board, and in the Norfolk, Newport 
News and Arlington County cases—to be 
heard later—a new maneuver is being tried 
Attorneys for these localities have asked dis- 
missal of the suits on the ground that the 
school boards are agencies of the State and 
ew the State has not given its consent to be 
sue 

In spite of the anxious interest in next 
week's possible developments, it is possible 
that nething climactic is immediately impend- 
ing. True, a decision could be handed down 
tomorrew in the Prince Edward County case: 
the decision was rendered last year on the 
day of the hearing. 

Federal Circuit Judge John J. Parker and 
Federal District Judges Albert V. Bryan and 
Sterling Hutcheson wil] first consider dissolv- 
ing the three-judge court on the ground that 
the issue is no longer a constitutional one but 
one of “contempt,” and hence within the juris- 
diction of a single judge. 

The case will probably be turned over to 
Judge Hutcheson, who comes from the neigh- 
boring county of Mecklenburg, which has a 
— problem similar to that in Prince Ed- 
ward. < 


LEGAL TECHNICALITIES and procedural 
points are shaping up in a manner which 
could delay decisions in the other cases for 
many months. Hearings on the dismissa] mo- 
tions of Norfolk and Newport News have been 
set for Nov. 17 

If these motions are overruled, hearings 
in these two cases on their merits are not 
expected before early 1957 

Federal District Judge Walter E. Hoffman. 
by the way, who will preside over the Norfolk 
and Newport News cases, was the unsuccess- 
ful Republican opponent of Attorney General 
J. Lindsay Almond—who is defending the 
school beards of those cities—in the 1953 
election. 

In a conference with Almond and other 
attorneys last week, Hoffman emphasized the 
fact that the Supreme Court had left district 
courts with wide discretionary powers in the 
details of application of its ruling. 

There is little indication that we have 
reached a point where a Federal court is going 
to Say: “Desegregate your public schools 
now The most that is expected next week 
or in the near future is a stern pronounce- 
ment to the effect that Virginia must begin 
to move in the direction of compliance with 
the law of the land 


Who Has the Say-So on School Money? 


By Harrison Hagemeyer 


THE CURRENT set-to between the Mont- 
gomery County Council and the Countys 
Roard of Education about the amount of fiscal 
control the County heads can legally exercise 
over school operations 
raises a basic question 

The School Board 
turbed over what it 
siders an “infringement 
its powers by the Council, 
has requested the State 
Board of Education to seek 
a ruling trom the Maryland 
Attorney Genera! clarify- 
ing the matter. Members of 
both the Schoo! Board and 
the Council have indicated 
they feel a court action 
may be justified to clear up the question 

The current controversy is based on a reso 
lution enacted by a 5 to 2 vote of the Council 
at the time it approved the School Board 
budget for fiscal 1956-57 explaining two of its 
actions in connection with the oudget. The 
resolution stated that the new Seven Locks 
Elementary School should not be constructed 
on the site proposed by the Board of Educa- 
tion “because of inadequate road access and 
water and sewer facilities.” and that the 
amount approved by the Council for teachers’ 
salaries “provides” a 6 per cent increase for 
classroom teachers and a 4 per cent increase 
for supervisors and principals 


THE SCHOOL BOARD, which had backed 
a new teachers salary scale that would have 
amounted to considerably than 6 per 
cent, reacted immediately with the request for 
the ruling from the Attorney Genera! 

Council members Stella B. Werner and 
J. Grahame Walker have sided with the schoo! 
authorities in the disagreement. They main- 
tain that the Council could approve only a 
lump sum appropriation for teachers’ salaries 
and could not dictate te the Beard of Educa- 
tion how it should be spent. 

The basic law that sets up the fiscal rela 
tionship between Maryland counties and their 
county school boards was enacted by the State 
Legislature in 1916. 

It requires that a county board of education 
prepare and submit to the County Commission- 
ers “an itemized and detailed school budget.” 
listing needs for the coming year. Under the 
Montgomery County Charter, the County 
Commissioners have been replaced by the 
Capnty Council, but legal observers say the 
law still applies. 


Hagemeyer 


more 


THE LAW requires county heads to appro 
priate for school needs at least an amount 
equal to that which a tax of 40 cents per $100 
of assessed property in the county would raise. 
Any appropriation above that amount is dis- 
cretionary with the county heads. 

This year’s $16.8 million budget te operate 
Montgomery County’s schools, $12 million of 
which must be raised by the County, will 
amount te $1.29 on the tax rate. 

The 1916 law contains another provision that 
seems applicable in the current dispute. It 
provides: “that if the total amount requested 
for any one school year by the County Board 
of Education to be raised by local taxation 
exceeds a tax levied and collected of 40 cents 
on each $100 of assessable property in the 
County, and such a tax is not approved and 
sanctioned by the Board of County Commis- 
sioners, the County Commissioners shall indi- 
cate in writing what item or items of the 
annual budget of the Board of Education have 
been denied in whole or in part. and the 
reason for the denial in whole or in part of 
the respective item.” 


WHETHER THE DUTY to say why an item 
was cut includes the prerogative of indicating 
what should be done with what is left is the 
question that must be determined. 

Soon the law was enacted it was 
affirmed by the Maryland Court of Appeals 
in a case growing out of a squabble between 
the Prince Georges County Commissioners 
and the County School Board. 

The County Commissioners, it developed, 
had cut the Board of Education's budget re- 
quest of $108,074.65 to $94,667.80 but refused 
to itemize the cuts or say why they had been 
made. The Court at that time ordered them 
to do so 


“THE STATUTES leave to the discretion of 
the County Commissioners the allowance of 
the amount asked for in excess of 40 cents.” 
the Court said, “and that discretion cannot be 
controlled by the courts. 

“But the law imposes upon them the min- 
isterial duty when they do not allow the 
amount asked for ... of indicating in writing 
what items of the budget are denied and their 
reason for denial,” it added. 

The Court said the law “was designed, not 
ynly to guard against an arbitrary refusal of 
the County Commissioners to levy the amount 
deemed necessary by the Board of Education 
for public school purposes, but to advise the 
County Board of Education of the items to 


whie is required to limit the expenditure 
of th tax.” : | 


~ Progress Might End 


Tooth Ills It Caused 


By Nate Haseltine 


Staff Reporter 


STONE AGE man was born 
with no better nor worse teeth 
than you were, according to 
a Harvard dentist of anthro- 
pological bent. 

But the man 
who ground 
his corn be- 
tween stones 
and gnawed 
his meat from 
bones probably 
suffered fewer 
toothaches than is the lot of 
modern man 

The difference is all a mat- 
ter of diet rather than inheri- 
tance, reports Dr. Reidar 
Sognnaes of the Harvard 
School of Dental Medicine. 

Man just became too clever 
for his own dental good 

But all is not lost. dentally 
speaking. Man can still hope, 
through research directed to- 
ward more precise wunder- 
standing of what constitutes 
perfectiy developed teeth, to 
regain sound dental health, 
Dr. Sognnaes notes. 


THE HARVARD investiga- 
tor’s research and observa- 
tions are reported in the cur- 
rent issue of the American 
Journal of Pathology 

Dr. Sognnaes did not set out 
te prove or disprove that man 
has descended from hairy crea- 
tures that swung by their 
tails in the forests. He did set 
out te study, microscopically, 
the structure of human teeth 
collected by anthropologists. 

He compared these findings 
with the more readily ascer 
tainable facts about the struc 
ture and development of hu- 
man teeth today 

What started him on the re- 
search was the fact that de- 
fects in tooth development are 
exceedingly rare in certain 
subhuman primates such as 
the wild rhesus monkey. It 
led to speculation as to wheth- 
er early man’s teeth were of 
& superior developmental 
structure 


DR. SOGNNAES enlisted 
the help of the Peabody Mu- 
seum of Harvard University, 
the Anthropological Museum, 
University of Athens, and the 
Department of Angtomy, Uni- 
versity of Oslo, to obtain his 
old specimens of human teeth 
for measurements and micro- 
scopic examinations. 

The specimens originally 
came from paleolithic Pales- 
tine, prehistoric Greece, pre- 
dynastic Egypt, ancient Ice- 


The 
Laboratory 


land, medieval Norway, and 
from ancient Guatemalan and 
Pecos Indian (New Mexico) 
sites in the New World. 

The oldest tooth specimens 
studied came from the Stone 
Age period of Palestine. They 
showed. the formation of poor 
dentin (ivory tooth tissue) and 
poor calcification, he reported. 

Dr. Sognnaes notes that 
Stone Age teeth could be 
grouped with those of modern 
man “with respect to the range 
and severity of development 
defects in the dental micro- 
structure, probably due to in- 
adequate or irregular diet.” 


ONE CONCLUSION, Dr. 
Sognnaes suggests, is “that the 
primates maintained uniform. 
ly perfect tooth structure only 
as long as they were basking 
in the sun in the treetops, de- 
pending for survival upon the 
perfection of their teeth.” 

He theorizes that the land 
apes, the socalled subhuman 
anthropoids such as wild chim- 
panzees, gorillas, gibbons and 
orangutangs, tended to have 
teeth of an intermediary micro- 
structure, less perfect than 
the monkey but still superior 
te early man. Dr. 
alse says that carly man 
proved too clever for his own 
good, dentally speaking, when 
he entered the cave and, in the 
struggle for life, discovered 
the use of other tools than his 
own teeth for the capture and 
preparation of food. 

More optimistically, the den- 
tist concludes: 

“It may be that civilized 
man, in order to withstand the 
impact of oral environmental 
conditions prevailing today, 
will need teeth of develop- 
mental qualities superior to 
those of his ancestors, both 
from a microstructural and 
microchemical point of view. 

“In future generations it 
may not only become feasible 
to prevent the severe micro- 
structural defects in dental de- 
velopment ... but to incorpo- 
rate into the teeth the optimal 
chemical ingredients (such as 
fluorine and other trace min- 
eral factors) in proper amount 
and ratio to each other.” 

In other words, man may 
some day be clever enough to 
undo the dental damages his 
cleverness got him into when 
he first shaped stones into 
weapons, tools and utensils 


Committee’s for Keeping It 


Canadians Takea Look 
AtCapital Punishment 


By GC. V. Ferguson 


Editer 

MONTREAL — While the 
British have been violently de- 
beating capital punishment 
and driving legislation for its 
abolition through the House 
of Commons, a Canadian par- 
liamentary committee has been 
making a typically cautious 
approach to the same prob- 
lem. 

The report, tabled in the 
House, will probably not be 
acted upon immediately. Par- 
liament has only just com- 
pleted a revision of the Crim- 
inal Code and the topic will 
not be reopened this session. 


THE CHIEF findings of the 
Committee are: 

® Capital punishment should 
be retained, except in the 
cases of murderers under 18 
years of age. 

®t should be retained as 
the mandatory verdict in mur- 
der cases. It should be pos- 
sible as a verdict in treason 
and piracy cases. 

®There should be no 
change in the definition of 
murder 

®“Degrees” of murder, as in 
many of the United States, 
should not be instituted. 

® There should be no spe- 
cial provision for convicted f[e- 
male murderers. 

® Electrocution should be 
substituted for hanging 

This is an extremely con- 
servative set of findings, but, 
as the Committee pointed out, 
there has been little public 
demand for the abolition of 
capital punishment. It is 
therefore retained, but the 
Committee urges that the mat- 
ter be reexamined during the 
next 10 years, 


THE REASON for rejection 
of hanging as a method of ex- 
ecution, the Committee re- 
ported, was the amount of 
evidence reported to it of 
bungled executions and a med- 
ical doubt as to whether it is 
as painiess or immediate as 
most persons imagine. 

The ideal method, said the 
Com mittee, was intravenous 
injection. This was rejected. 
however, because it would be 
difficult or impossible to get 
qualified physicians to act. In 
addition, it requires the co- 
operation of the person to be 
executed who must remain 
motionless. 

The gas chamber was care- 
fully considered and was ilse 
rejected because of the danger 
te other inmates of the prisen 
where the execution would 
take place and because of the 
strain upon the 


person. 
Electrocution, on the other 
hand, was cited as painless be- 
of care- 


aisone 


immediately unconsc.ous. It 


Pe rte inl By Mew te ee  ~er 


the Montreal Sier 


was noted also that it need no 
longer be used with the pris 
oner strapped in a chair. 


A FINAL proposal of the 
Committee was that anyone 
convicted of murder should 
have the right of appeal by 
stages to the Supreme Court, 
which hitherto has refused to 
entertain appeals if the lower 
court of appeal had rejected 
the appeal unanimously. 

Major reasons for retaining 
th. death penalty included the 
fact that it is, in the Commit- 
tee’s view, a just punishment 
expressing society's abhor- 
rence of the taking of life; Ad- 
ditional administrative prob- 
lems would arise since im- 
prisoned murderers would 
have no compunction about 
bloody methods of effecting 
their escape; A dangerous in- 
crease in crimes of vielence 
might arise if the major de- 
terrent were removed, 

The last argument is that 
most frequently heard in favor 
of maintaining the death pen- 
alty in Britain. Yet the. evi- 
dence is by no means conclu- 
sive so far as Canada is con- 
cerned. Most countries have 
done away with the death pen- 
alty for murder. France is the 
only Western European coun- 
try to retain it. Most states of 
the Union keep it and so do 
the British Dominions. 


WHY? PRESUMABLY be- 
cause of the belief that the 
death penalty is a deterrent. 
Yet the homicide rate in Cana- 
da is the same as it is in West 
Germany, which has abolished 
it. In Belgium, where the last 
execution took place in 1880, 
the rate is sightly lower than 
in Canada. In Denmark, 
Switzerland. Sweden, Norway 
and Holland—all countries 
which have abolished capital 
punishment the homicide 
rate ‘is far below that of 
Canada. 

Other facters are apparent: 
Holland has no death penalty 
but has the lowest murder 
rate. El Salvador, which exe- 
cutes its murderers, has the 
highest known homicide rate. 
On the other hand, when Brit- 
aim in 1948 temporarily sus- 

and then restored the 
death penalty, the murder rate 
im the frst six weeks after the 
seaffold was reinstated was 
higher than in any previous 7- 
week 

Up to now, organized oppo- 
sition to the death penalty has 
been slight in Canada. If, how- 
ever, the government decides 
to substitute electrocution for 
hanging, this opposition will 
grow stronger. It will focus 
Canadian attention upon the 
grisly business of executions. 

Many men and women are 
likely to say that if we must 

m of execu- 


lo ey © 


Country Livin’ 


| Burke Airport Talk Making 
: Even the Cats Air-Minded 


By Aubrey Graves 
The Squire of Grigsby Hill 


By Aubrey Oraves. Countsy Life Editor 


The startled mother cat (left) emerges from the hole in the crotch of the tree where 
she gave birth to three kittens. At right, Shawn O'Keefe counts her new playmates. 


MAYBE HER STRANGE behavior stems 
fronf all the talk about an airport which has 
been upsetting the neighbors around Burke, 
Va. for the past five years. Maybe, in this air 
age, she just likes it up there. 

But, for whatever reason, the amazing fact 
remains: a Fairfax Station cat has given birth 
to three kittens in the crotch of an ancient 
apple tree. The fruit tree stands in the back 
yard at Brimstone Hill, where live Circuit 
Court Judge and Mrs. Paul E. Brown 


GRANDDAUGHTER Shawn O'Keefe 
brought a calico kitten into the kitchen one 
day. “Where did you find it?” the youngster 
was asked. “Under the apple tree,” she re- 
plied. Despite the family's inclination to treat 
her story as a figment of childish imagination, 
she stuck to it 

The Judge thought the litter from which the 
calico had strayed must be under the floor of 
a nearby barn. Getting mother cat and kitten 
together, he pushed them underneath it. But 
the feline “reversed” him. Next morning, both 
she and her wee one were gone. 

An hour or so later, as the Judge was 
mowing the lawn, the mother cat approached 
the foot of the apple tree. She lingered there 
From time to time she glanced surreptitiously 
upward, obviously concerned but apparently 
unwilling to reveal exactly what was on her 
mind 

Must be a bird or a bird nest up there, 
Brown reasoned, as he resumed mowing. Then, 
suddenly, he spied the object of the cat's 
interest. Sticking its tiny head out of a hollow 
in the crotch of the tree was the same calico 
kitten. 

During the night, she had taken the kitten 
back up the tree from which it had evidently 
originally fallen, 


ON THE PREMISE that any unsupported 
story of tree-born kittens would cause lifted 
eyebrows even though it came straight from 
the lips of the Court, as it were, a telephone 
call was put in for Grigsby Hill Farm. 


Cenfidentially, my own brow arched just a 
trifie as the incredible tale was unfolded. I 
rushed over with both my skepticiem and my 
camera. 


Lt. Paul J. Brown, just home from Germany 
and en route to a teaching post at West Poinit, 
was on hand with his New Jersey wife, Pat, 
when I arrived 

So was Marine Lt. Keith O'Keefe and his 
lady. Natalie (nee Brown) who were also 
visiting at the farm 


it was hard for me to pull my eyes away 
from these beautiful young wives and put 
them on cats, until their husbands pointedly 
reminded me of the business for which I had 
come 


UNCLE DAN HAMILTON, who lives down 
Ox Road a little way, put a long, aluminum 
ladder in place against the tree's trunk. A 
helpful push from Mrs. Brown herself sent 
me effortiessly up the first couple of rungs. 

Aroused by all this activity, the mother cat 
crawied out and scampered away, but not 
before she had been photographed emerging 
from the hole in the tree 

Attaining the fork of the branches, I 
reached down the hole and pulled out first the 
calico, then a tiger kitten, then a mottled 
black-and-tan. 

As | arranged them in a beret (for picture- 
making purposes), Shawn shinnied up to get 
a better view of things. She was overjoyed 
when she saw not one kitten, but three. 


PICTURES MADE. the high-born felines 
were placed back in their cavity. Shawn and 
] descended. At last inspection, the furry 
ones were still up there, high and dry and 
safe from dogs and other predators. 

Because there are so many other cats on the 
place, this trie will remain only until all the 
Doubting Thomases have had a chance to drop 
by and see for themselves. 

After that, Bill Gold no doubt will be able 
to find them more conventional homes. 


English ‘Rebels’ Carry On 


Civil War Still Being Fought in Britain 


By Frances James 
Contributor 
Pe 

LONDON — Lee may have 
surrendered to Grant at Ap 
pomattox on April 9, 1865, but 
the last Confederate flag 
wasn't hauled down until No- 
vember of that year—aboard 
the Confederate Ship Shefith- 
doah lying off Liverpool. 
Hence, it’s hardly a surprise 
to find a last outpost of the 
Confederacy here in Britain, 
doggedly figLting on. 

This outfit of diehards is 
composed of Englishmen “100 
per cent rebel in sympathy” 
and is known as the Confeder- 
ate Research Club. It's a task 
force dedicated to ferreting 
out information on the South's 
operations in Britain during 
the War Between the States— 
where the Confederacy bought 
its materiel end made an un- 
successful bid to persuade the 
Britain lion to become an 4ac- 
tive ally. 

At its Portsmouth headquar- 
ters, the club has collected 
Confederate relics that show 
how deeply its research work 
has gone. Here you may view 
items—such as a photograph 
of Wade Hampton's desolate 
Seuth Carolina mansion after 
Yankee reprisals — that you 
wouldn't expect outside Dixie. 

Beneath a Stars and Bars 
presented by the Sons of Con- 
federate Veterans, club secre- 
tary Patrick C. Courtney, who 
looks like a GI and has a name 
straight out of the Old South. 
and Col. Vernon Edney-Cuff 
(a philatelist commissioned in 
the Confederate Stamp Alll- 
ance) marshal their troops 
with the assistance of the 
Royal Mail and a Remington 
portable. 


CLUB MEMBERS living 
throughout the United King- 
dom are deployed to delve into 
records that might throw light 
on some aspect of Anglo-Con- 
federate activity. From results 
of this research, reports on 


te Newspapers and 
riodicals 


south of the Mason-Di; jn line. 


Headquarters hums with ac- 
tivity. Assistant manager of a 
Portsmouth newsstand, Court- 
ney's day begins at 5:30 a. m. 
when he deals with the morn- 
ing papers, and gets inte mean. 
ingful stride late in the after. 
noon when the local club mem.- 
bers arrive to see what the 
postman has brought, and 
often remain to chew the rag 
until the small hours. 

The first result of the club's 
front-line researches is a schol- 
arly biography of Comédr. 
James D. Bulloch, Confederate 
agent at Liverpool, which has 
sold out right down to, and in- 
cluding, the proof copies. It 
was Bulloch who commis- 
sioned the construction of the 
famous Confederate ships Ala- 
bama, Florida and Shenan- 
doah. and the even more fa- 
mous “rams,” or iron-ciad tur- 
ret vessels. 

After a long search for the 
plans of the latter, the club 
recently discovered them in 
Britain's National Maritime 
Museum, while a scale mode! 
of the Alabama turned up at 
a Birkenhead shipyard 


AFTER THE WAR, Bulloch, 
not included in the general 
amnesty, remained in Britain 
He paid from his own purse all 
the debts he had contracted on 
behalf of the Confederacy. All 
members of the Bulloch family 
have been traced. On® of the 
Commander's sons became an 
officer in the King’s Liverpool 
Regiment and another emi- 
grated to Australia. The lat- 
ter’s son has been located and 
made honorary life president, 
while the club has begun a 
funs to restore Bulloch’s 
grave in Liverpool. 

Its next big project of this 
sort will deal with John 
Slidell, another Confederate 
agent who remained in En- 
tend from 1865 oy his death. 


with the Cenfederacy in Liver- 
pool. That city, England's 
great cotton port, had the clos- 
est ties with the South. 

The club is prodding busi- 
hesses into exhuming material 
from their files. The London 
stationers who designed and 
engraved the rebel bank notes 
rooted out the first proof 
prints of these dollars when 
the society learned that they 
had been kept in London and 
never sent to Richmond. The 
hitch here is that 300 pounds 
($840) is still outstanding for 
the notes—and the club hopes 
it won't be expected to pay. 


ANOTHER ITEM thus 
brought to light are the origi- 
nal proofs and engravings of 
the Scent Jefferson Bavis 
postage stamp 

The club also has begun in- 
vesUigations at the Leeds foun- 
dry which supplied equipment 
to the Macon arsenal. 


Periodical reports on these 
activities, as well as articles 
by eminent American histori- 
ans of the Old South, are pub- 
lished bimenthly in “The New 
Index,” named to recall “The 
Index,” which appeared in 
Londen as Confederate prop- 
aganda from 1862-65. 

Closely allied with the Sons 
of Confederate Veterans, the 
+year-old English organization 
is a direct aftermath of the 
motion picture version of 
“Gone with the Wind”’—and 
one that David O. Selznick 
may be proud of. It took just 
one viewing of that film to 
make Courtney determine to 
help rewrite the history of the 
conflict from the South's point 
of view 


WITH COL. CUFF and oth- 
er equally ardent Confederate 
supporters, the Society was 
founded. 

It took only a short time for 
the rebel strength to reach 
100 — art dealers, chemists, 
housewives, secretaries, stu- 
dents, historians, soldiers, 
farmers, naval officers, rail- 
way employes, gg | 
yachtsewomen, a paper 
owner and one iSyearoild 
school girl named for t 
O'Hara's sister Suellen. 


Will Socialists Kiss Reds Goodby? 


ITALY, Frome Page Ei 


and subversive nature and 
aims of the party as well as of 
its unshaken loyalty to Mos- 
cow, and this at the very mo- 
ment when the Italian Com- 
munists are most desperately 
striving to gain acceptance as 
the champions of a “moder- 
ate” and “national” brarid of 
socialism 

Here the basic factors. do- 
mestic and international. of 
the current Communist crisis 
explode into the open, strip- 
ping the camouflage thrown up 
by Togliatti.‘in his lengthy 
pronouncements of the last 
two weeks. (Altogether, they 
take up 50 columns of fine 
print in the party organ Uni- 
ta) 

The attempt to pose as stand- 
ard bearers of “the Italian 
way to socialism,” and thus 
pave the way to some up-to- 
date version of “Popular 
Front,” is but an Italian trans- 
lation of the latest Moscow 
line. It also represent® an- 
other effort to hold or recap- 
ture the allegiance of the in- 
creasing number of workers, 
and large sectors of the lower 
bourgeoisie, who yearn for 
economic and social progress 
but reject violence and revolu- 
tion. 

This effort, however, clashes 
head-on with the equally press- 
ing need to revive the faith 
of veteran diehards and mili- 
tant activists in the revolu- 
tionary nature and aims of in- 
ternational communism. 


Neothing could spotlight 
more harshly the current pre- 
dicament of the Italian Reds 
than to hear Togliatti pour 
scorn on “social reformism”™ 
and betray almost in the same 
breath his growing fear of 


The West 
Gains With 
Bourguiba 


By Edmond Taylor 


Atlantic Peatures Correspondent 
TATOUINE, Tunisia—W hite- 
skirted warriors whirled’ in a 
barbaric dance as drums beat 
a rhythm as old as the first 
nomads campfires. Blue- 


burnoosed auxiliaries, armed 
with sabres and carbines, 
wheeled through the crowd on 
their Arabian mounts. Bedouin 
women, muffled in dark blue 
robes. shrilled their weird, 
incessant “youuou”™; the orchre 
dust rose in clouds and the 
scorching Sahara wind never 
flagged. 

Then came the speeches, 
prayers and poems, the repent- 
ance of sinners and the libera- 
tion of prisoners. And finally, 
Tunisia’s Prime Minister, 
Habib Bourguiba, was hoisted 
by his admirers onto a 
splendid Arabian stallion and 
led off. brandishing a naked 
sabre, to enjoy a ceremonial 
meal of roast lamb with the 
tribal chiefs, many of whom a 
few weeks ago were openly 
defying his authority 

For all their barbaric pag- 
eantry, these ceremonies in 
this forsaken outpost, up 
against the Libyan berder in 
the heart of the wild Matmata 
Mountains, marked a signif- 
icant. if precarious, victory 
for the West over the forces 
of anarchy and primitive re- 
ligious fanaticism that are 
threatening to engulf all of 
North Africa. 

Censorship has long tried to 
conceal the gravity of the 
crisis. But it is now clear that 
the fledgling Tunisian state 
during the last three months 
has faced—and survived—a 
mortal challenge to its ex- 
istence 

In part, the threat came 
from an armed conspiracy sup- 
ported and directed from 
across the Libyan border by 
Bourguiba's self-exiled rival, 
Salah ben Youssef, with the 
help of Nasser’s Egypt and 
probably Khrushchev's Russia 
But an even more deadly 
threat was the attempt of the 
half-savage Bedouin tribes of 
Southern Tunisia to throw off 
the yoke of civilization and 
revert—as their brothers in 
Morocco have done—to the 
state of feudal anarchy which 
is their idea of the good life. 


THE FRENCH ARMY has 
given Bourguiba a great deal 
of unpublicized assistance in 
putting down this rebellion in 
the south. But military assist- 
ance would have been unavail- 
ing if Bourguiba's political ap- 
peal had not enabled his sup- 
porters to win over the less 
irresponsible tribal leaders. 

The joint efforts of French 
and Tunisian authorities may 
yet fail to restore complete 
tranquility te Tunisia, but 
Bourguiba's visit here clearly 
marked the collapse of the 
main center of organized re- 
bellion. This is significant for 
the West not only because it 
has checked the spread of 
chaos in North Africa, but also 
because it assures for the time 
being the continued ascend- 
ancy of Bourguiba. 

An informal evening spent 
with Bourguiba at this home 
on the coast near Tunis has 
convinced this writer that 
Tunisia’s leader is a superior 
type of politician by* most 
Western as well as Arab stand- 
ards. He displays an uncom- 
promising rationality that is 
rare enough in the West and 
particularly refreshing in the 
contemporary Arab world. In 
defining his attitude toward 
the Arab League, for example, 
he says: 


“TUNISIA IS an Arab- 
speaking country, after all, 
and it would be unnatural not 
to maintain close cultural ties 
with the other Arab states. 
But you can't base your whole 
foreign policy on the fact that 
you speak the same tongue as 
some other countries.” 

“| have been fighting for 
more than a quarter of a cen- 

free my country from 


being outflanked and eventu- 
ally defeated by the success- 
ful “reformism” of secial- 
minded Catholics and demo- 
cratic Socialists. 

The predicament is common 
to all Communists in the West 
It is more acute for the Ital- 
lan Reds because of a locel 
factor which so far has been 
one of their main assets: the 
existence of a strong fellow 
traveling Socialist Party. Al- 
though the Italian Commun- 
ist Party claims the largest 
membership in the West (some 
2 million), its percentage at 
the polls has always been be- 
low the 25 per cent mark 
reached by its French counter- 
part and is now down to 21 
per cent. 


ONLY the growing contribu- 
tion of the Nenni Socialists 
keeps the combined Leftists 
total at about 35 per cent, or 
fairly close to the strength of 
the dominant Christian-Demo- 
crats. Over the last three 
years, the Nenni Socialists. 
while maintaining close ties 
with the Communists in the 
name of “working class unity, 
have increasingly sought to 
present themselves as the 
champions of the homespun 
traditions of good old pre-Com- 
inform Socialism 

This ambiguous line, which 
yielded them some dividends 
in all elections since 1953, has 
now reached the point of di- 
minishing returns. In the lat- 
est consultation, Nenni himself 
admits, his party's gains fell 
below expectations, Even more 
significant, proportionately 
greater gains were made by 
the Secial-Democrats, who 
split with Nenni in 1947 on 
the very issue of cooperation 
with the Communists and whe 


have since been partners in 
the Center coalition, 

Those returns and the im- 
pact of the latest events in 
the USSR may have persuad- 
ed Nenni that the time for de- 
cision is at hand. Following 
the publication of Khrush- 
chev's report, the Italian So 
cialist leader openly ques 
tioned the validity of “the 
very structure of the Soviet 
State” whi.e proclaiming that 
“the Ttalian workers’ move- 
ment must place itself unre- 
servedly on a plane of demo- 
cratic and Socialist struggle.” 

Talking confidentially, Nen- 
ni appears te realize that his 
s.atements do lay down the 
ideological groundwerk for a 
break, however belated, with 
the Communists. At the same 
time, it is clear that years of 
faithful subservience te . the 
Communist line and te Seviet 
foreign policy cannet be 
erased by a stroke of the pen. 

The real test will come only 
if and when Nenni draws the 
necessary and logical political 
consequences, in both foreign 
and domestic fields, from his 
latest doctrinaire stand. If he 
does, the way would be open 
to gradual “convergence” and 
eventual reunification with 
the Social Democrats—and by 
the same token, toward a final 
parting with the Communists. 


THE COMMUNISTS ere al- 
ready up in arms to block an 
operation which would rele- 
gate them to political isola- 
tion and impotence. They have 
their own men in key positions 
of the leftwing Socialist Party 
machine, some of whom have 
already criticized Nenni’s lat- 
est pronouncements 

The Communists might also 
stop their reported financial 


4 


7 


contributions to the Nenni So- 
cialists. At the same time, 
they will desperately strive to 


1 
ee 


s 
a 


their electorate to the Social 
Democrats. 

Communist attempts to get 
control of the movement for 
“an Italian way to socialism” 
would be just as effectively 
foiled by the formation, 
around the present Social- 
Democratic nucleus, of a 
strong. democratically mind- 
ed and genuinely democratic 
Socialist Party. 


FUTURE developments in 
the USSR will obviously affect 
the course of the current Red 
crisis in Italy. So will the 
fight for control within the 
Italian Communist Party, al- 
though for the time being To- 
gliatti appears still able to call 
the tune by continuing to play 
the “tough” leftwingers and 
the “soft” rightwingers against 
each other. And so will the 
attitude of Nenni and other 
leftwing Socialist leaders. 

But the present trends and 
the basic domestic factors out- 
lined above offer sufficient evi- 
dence of the seriousness of 
that crisis, and warrant a rea- 
sonable optimism abeut the 


Tunisian Premier Habib Bourguiba, leader of his country's fight for independence, 


waves his sabre to a knowledge cheers as he parades in Tatouine. 


tilting up in a familiar truc- 
ulent pose. “Se you can un- 
derstand why I don’t intend to 
became the satellite of Egypt 
or anyone else. 


“I know that in order to de- 
velop her potentialities, Tuni 
sia must rely on economic and 
technical assistance from the 
West. I hope the United States 
will help us, but I expect we 
will have to look 
France and -I am fully pre. 
pared to do so. Why not’? You 
can’t found foreign policy on 
revenge.” 


BOURGUIBA'S real ideal is 
total independence or 
neutralism. Cooperation 
the West is a necessary evil to 
him. At heart, he appears to 
be more of a North African 
Nehru than an Arab Magsay- 
say 

Failure to recognize this ba- 
Sic orientation may lead to 
unwarranted disillusionment 
over the potentialities of Bour 
guiba’s experiment. An even 
greater danger is that, in re 
turn for economic aid, the 
West may attempt to impose 
political conditions on Bour- 
guiba that will undermine his 
position at home and thus de- 
stroy his usefulness. 


Another problem facing 
Western policymakers is Bour- 
guiba’s understandable desire 
to play a world role. He plans 
te head Tunisia’s delegation to 
the United Nations Assembly 
this fall if admitted in time, 
and is sending his son, Habib 
Jr., a8 a member of the Tuni- 
sian diplomatic mission to the 
United States with the special 
task of acting as Tunisia’s per- 
manent representative te the 
U.N. 

Bourguiba is obviously itch 
ing to hoist the banner for his 
own special brand of anti 
colonialism. He wants to plug 
the idea of setting up a U. N 
Commission for the gradual 
an@ peaceful liquidation of 
colonialism, and above all can 
be expected to use every op- 
portunity the U. N. affords to 
press for a negotiated settle- 
ment of the Algerian problem 


MEANWHILE, this is Tuni 
sia’s seventh lean year, and 
along roads leading south 
through tawny grain fields 
and dusty olive groves the 
visitor sees what looks like a 
low-budget retake of a recur- 
rent North African drama— 
nomad eruption 

Strictly speaking, the gaunt 
gray-bearded Bedouin patri 
archs draped in burlap sacks 
or tattered army blankets, the 
haggard-looking women in 
patched and faded homespun 
who are trekking up from the 
scorched pastures of the pre- 
Saharan stepre to seck food 
for their children and forage 
for wasted flocks are refugees 
rather than raiders. But their 
northward migration poses an 
acute threat to the newly-s- 
tablished Bourguiba regime. 


ALL THIS suggests that, 
sooner or later, Bourguiba is 
going to give both France and 
the-United States some acute 


mainiy to 


even 


with 


diplomatic headaches. But he 
may be worth quite a few 
headaches if he continues to 
promote the cause of Western 
civilization by debunking Nas- 
sers sinister propaganda of 
religious fanaticism and by 
focusing the attention of 
North Africans on the need for 
practical solutions to’ their 
economic and social problems. 


Possibly Bourguiba's great- 


est service to the West is that 
through his revolutionary 
plans for economic develop- 
ent and.social justice he is 
fering the people of Tunisia 
rational hope instead of an 
irrational hate 

Conversely, the most dan- 
gerous aspect of Bourguiba's 
experiment is the possibility 
that he may not be able to ful- 
fill quickly enongh the hopes 
he arouses. 

In many areas, the nomads 
have simply occupied the 
fields of ripening wheat lying 
in their path and harvested 
the grain for themselves. Com- 
ing on top of the. 7-year 
drought and nascent plague of 
locusts, these depredations 
are cutting further into a cur- 
rent grain crop that is 2lready 
45 per cent below normal. 


A LESS spectacular. but 
more dangerous, aspect of the 
Bedouin incursions is the slow 
drift of the nomads toward the 
big cities, especially Tunis. 
where they settle down in 
ghastly “bidonvilles” on the 
outskirts to swell the ranks of 
the rootiess, jobless and in- 
creasingly revolutionary @r- 
ban proletariat 

Tunisia, a nation with less 
than 4 millien inhabitants, has 
about one-half million unem- 
ployed (one Tunisian official 
estimates 700.000) mest ef 
whom live in city slums or “bi- 
donvilles.” Nothing seen by 
this correspendent since the 
Bengal famine of 1943 matched 
the squalor of one such slum. 

Without paving, plumbing 
or sewers. the settlement 
seethed under thick clouds of 
flies and mosquitoes feeding 
on bits of garbage lying in the 
narrow mud streets and on 
the festering sores of dogs, 
donkeys and children. 

Nearly al] inhabitants were 
jobless, and the majority said 
they had not had regular em- 
ployment in recent years. 


ABOUT ONE im five was on 
the rolis of the Tunisian equiv- 
alent of the WPA. which pays 
them about 80 cents daily for 
working on various state pro}- 
ects. “How do you live?” I 
asked repeatedly through the 
interpreter 

“I go to school in the morn- 
ing,” said a 20-year-old student, 
living with his wife and three 
children in a tiny dirt-floored 
hovel. “Then in the afternoon 
I go to the French quarter and 
beg.” . 

“I am very good at catching 
birds.” a husky youth ex- 
plained. 

“My uncle's a decker” a 16- 
yearold bey said proudly. 


¥ 


“How many children dees he 
have?” I asked. “Five of his 
own and six of us,” he replied. 

The Tunisian officials accom- 
panying me were greeted with 
apparent respect, reflecting 
public confidence in their new 
government. But there were 
usually a few sullen individ- 
uals, hanging on the fringes 
of the crowds that surrounded 
us, who served as pointed re- 
minders of what will happen 
to this confidence unless the 
government finds some quick 
remedies to Tunisias social 
problems. 


ONLY A MINORITY of the 
squatters have resources—or 
superhuman courage—to send 
their children to school. The 
ugly truth is that in Tunisia, 
as in most of North Africa, the 
number of illiterates is grow- 
ing year by year. 


The basic cause behind this 
alarming phenomenon is the 
increasing gap between the 
growth of population and of 
agricultural production in the 
underdeveloped couastries. Ac- 
cording to most authorita- 
tive estimates, Tunisia’s popu- 
lation has grown by more than 
one million since 1936, and is 
increasing by about 65,000 
yearly. 

At the same time, feed pro- 


try close te the famine level. 


THE GOVERNMENT is well 
aware of the political danger 


more capital and 

numbers of trained 

technicians than the Tunisian 

government is likely to obtain 

from any source in the fore- 
seeable future. 

Bourguiba's government, 
which represents the best 
hope of maintaining the polit- 
ical dike against the spread of 
communism and pan-Arab fa- 
naticism in the vital middle 
Mediterranean sector, cannot 
survive to launch its long-term 
development plans uniess it 
receives substantial emer- 
gency aid in the form of drugs. 
clothes and footstuffs in the 
next few months. 


(Copyright. 1954. Edmegd Tavier! 


Italian Communist boss Palmiro Togliatti (left) can- 
tiously criticized the new Soviet line to help rebuild his 
comrades’ shaken morale; Pietro Nenni (right), leader 


over-all prospects for Italian 


Apart from a relaxation of 
the political exclusion. of the 
Communists (luckily. a largely 
hypothetical danger), only a 
switch to the right could pre- 
vent the democratic forces 
from effectively exploiting 
the present opportunity—the 
best opportunity offered them 
in the postwar period 

A backtracking on the road 
te social and economic re 
forms, as advocated y still 


powerful forces making up the 
right wing of the Center coa- 
liion, would hand back to the 
Communists the political ini- 
tiative they have lost over the 
last couple of years and which, 


otherwise, they appear unable 
to recapture. 


FOR INSTANCE. a general 
strike of farm laborers and 
sharecroppers was calied last 
week. The strike was caused 
by the refusal of the Landown- 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
: Sunday, July 8, 1956 . 


ES_ 


of the fellow-traveling Socialists, openly questioned the 
validity of the “very structure of the new Soviet state,” 
and otherwise indicated some disillusion. 


ers’ Association even to dis 
cuss the unions’ demands. And 
those demands include such 
“revolutionary” requests as 
the extension of the old col- 
lective bargaining agreements, 
the reintroduction of old age 
and disability benefits abol- 
ished under fascism, and the 
increase of family allowances 
to a daily minimum of 120 lire 
(less than 20 cents) for each 
dependent 

The prime movers of the 


strike were the democratic and 
strongly anti-Communist un- 
ions. The Red-controlled Gen- 
eral Confederation of Labor 
didn’t miss the opportunity to 
offer evidence, at this critical 
juncture for the Italian Com- 
munists, of the “basic unity of 
the working class.” 

Doesn't this clearly demon- 
strate once more the actual 
dangers of a reactionary or 
even “immobHistic” line in a 
country like Italy? 


Wanted: Perch for Humpty Dumpty World 


By Herbert Elliston 


and Times j 

THE EXTENT and nature 
of the world as a community 
prior to 1914 is little under- 
stood. There were 
nation-states. And their repre 
sentatives met, Dut only ad 
hoc, with no league or associ- 
ation in constant residence to 
iron out international diffi- 
culties 

The ever-all reliance was on 
the perpetgation of subservi- 
ent colonies and on a balance 
ef power among the colonia! 
preprictors—that perilous 
cantilever, as President Wil- 
sen called it. that crashed in 
Werld War in 1914. 

However, the pre-1914 world 
in the econ®mic sense consti- 
tuted a neighborhood, rough 
but nevertheless real. Back of 
the balance of power. which 
the British Navy maintained, 
a commercial oneness pre- 
vailed. There was the inter- 
national gold standard—an 
automatic instrument for 
maintaining an international 
price level. And there was the 
“most-avored nation” clause 
among the trading nations 
meaning that nobody could 
play favorites in cOmmercial 
dealings. 

Regionally, there were other 
ties. For instance, heavy indus 
try in Europe used to regard 
itself as one unit 


ALL THIS relatedness has 
now vanished. Instead, the na- 
tions have more or less closed 
economies, connected with 
one other through a vast and 
intricate machinery of bilateral 
arrangements and internation- 
al conferences. How in the 
world’s name can you make 
out of this ordered anarchy, 
as it were, a free world econ- 


of course. 


_ 


om: How can 
Dumpty”? 

That is the problem to which 
Gunnar Myrdal addresses him. 
self in a massive beok cailed 
“An International Economy, 
Problems and Prospecis.” Oniy 
a Myrdal could have attempted 
the assignment. The Swedish 
economist is a man of great 
repute, chiefly known in this 
country for the comprehensive 
study he has produced on the 
American Necro. But he has 
earned high distinction as an 
international civil servant as 
well. 

Trained as a university don, 
he later served his own coun- 
iry as a cabinet minister, and 
then became the founding ex 
ecutive sec@etary of the UN 
Economic Commission for Eu- 
rope, a job he still holds. The 
ECE keeps a searchlight on 
economic facts and trends in 
Europe 

The scholar in public affairs, 
Myrdal has no peer in the 
theory and practice of the eco- 
nomic relations of the coun- 
tries of the free worid. How 
he has had the time and energy 
to put out a volume which is 
Toynbeean in sweep and sug- 
gestiveness and moral feeling 
is a mystery known perhaps 
only to his family. 


THE NON-SOVIET world (to 
which the author restricts him 
self) is working teward two 
kinds of integration: national 
and international. Dr. Myrdal 
shows that the nation-stales in 
the Atlantic Community are in 
the way of achieving national 
integrations. In my opinion, he 
overstates the case. The plain 
fact of the matter is that in 
none of the countries has this 
progress promoted anything 
like viability, no less than 
economic. You have only to 
ponder the state of mind of 
the middle class to understand 
this 


you restore 


liumpty 


Paris Clerks May Permit 
One to Buy a Hair Shirt 
By Art Buchwald 


PARIS—During the past 
eight years we have made a 
scientific study, of the alti- 
tudes of European sales peo 
ple toward a foreign customer 
They vary in each country ac 
cording to temperament and 
while it isn't fair to general- 
ize, that’s exactly what we 
are going to do. 

In Italy, when a customer 
walks into a store he is 
greeted like a long-lost 
brother. 

“Welcome, signer; weicome, 
signer. Piease come inte the 
shop, where it is nice and 
cool. You de not have te buy 
anything. You can just look.” 

“I would like a poplin shirt 
Do you have any’” 

“Do we have any’ That's all 
we have is poplin shirts. We 
specialize in poplin shirts 
Mama, give me the best qual- 
ity poplin shirts for these nice 

le” 


ple. 

While Mama is digging out 
the shirts the man asks: “Are 
you from America?” 

You say you are. 

“I have relatives in Chicago 
You know them’? The Qual- 
Iiteris. Look, here is their 
picture. My cousin has seven 
children. Piease to look. 


THE SHIRTS finally come 
man says: “Beautiful 
Egyptian cotton. Notice the 
peari-like quality of the but- 
tons, how the tail of the shirt 
is rounded gently, the pleated 
pocket and the firm rich fee! 
of the collar. Please to touch 
it yourself. Where, where in 
the world can you find a shirt 
like this? Take a dozen. in 
America you will thank me 
for selling you these shirts.” 
You are touched by his 
kindness. You buy a dozen. 
His wife gives your wife a 
beuquet of flowers. They 
beth escort you te the door. 
You shake hands with them, 
they shake hands with you. 
But in France every- 
thing is different. You walk 
into a shop which is quite 
empty, with six or seven sales 


people standing around. 
You wait 15 minutes end 


. > 


finally someone comes up to 
you and, speaking im a tone 
that a Poujadist would use on 
a tax collector, demands 
“What do you want’” 

You tell him you want a 
shirt 

“What size?” he asks, sneer- 
ingly. 

“Size 17.” 

“Ha!” he shouts. “We don't 
have your size. De you think 
we can carry everyone's size? 
How much place do you think 
we have here? The largest 
size we have is 16':.” 

You tell him you'd like to 
see it 

A look of disappointment 
comes over his face 

What color?” he says 

“White.” 

“Ha” he shouts. “We don't 
have white We only have 
them in colors. Do you think 
we can stock both white and 
colored shirts?” 


You say youll take a col- 
ered one. The salesman is 
furious. He shoves the bex of 
shirts in front of you and 
says: “Please don’t touch them 
or youll have te pay for 
them.” 

You select One and he 
throws it into a bag. “Four 
thousand francs,” he says 

You give him a 3000-Iranc 
note. 

“Don't you have change? Do 
you think we can make change 
for everyone who comes into 
the store.” 

Everyone looks at you as if 
you had just siapped the man 
in the face 

You say you have no change 
and there is a conference of 
the salesman, the manager and 
the cashier. They keep looking 
at you and whispering te each 
other and finally the cashier, 

tranmsac- 


The salesman slaps the: pur- 
chase in your hand and throws 
the change on the counter. As 
you walk out the door you hear 
him saying to the other people: 
“C'est incroyable. Incroyabie.” 

Coprpieht. 3996 Boy Terk HeraA 


\ 


Let us take, for example. the 
most self-sufficient of all econ 
omies, the United States 
America is so highly developed 
thet a world market is essen- 
tial to its functioning: we have 
on our hands, whether we like 
it or not, a supra-national 
economy 


A. A. Berle is only one of 
many economic scholars whe 
argue that the way te main- 
tain national equilibrium or 
imtegration is (in time of a 
satiated demand for a particu- 
lar preduct) te push out the 
surplus product te foreign mar- 
kets by a combined govern- 
ment - finance - business opera- 
tion and te concentrate at 
home on things we really need. 

Take the present state of 
things. Automobiles are in 
oversupply at home; roads and 
schools are in grievous de- 
mand \ directionality (not 
management, mind you) of our 
economy is the only way to 
tackle the problem and to pre- 
vent business slumps 

Others might stress moral 
and social factors making for 
national disintegration that 
seem to accompany the growth 
of the solid and prosperous 
nation-state, in more or icess 
isolation 


EVEN IN Western Europe, 
nationa)] integration looks like 
a willo-the-wisp. France is 
generally regarded as the 
prize example of self-sufficien- 
cy. Yet France is crouching 
beck of constantly changing 
tariff embattlements in fear 
lest the inefficient structure 
of its internal mechanism 
break down. Actually, all the 
NATO countries are in a con- 
stant state of internecine war, 
economically 

Look for example at Iceland. 
Suddenly the British de- 
nounced a fisheries agreement 
with the Icelanders, throwing 
them, economically, into So- 
viet arms and persuading the 
Icelandic parliamentarians in 
turn to denounce the agree- 
ment on air bases serving 
NATO. We could give. one il. 
lustration after another to 
prove that an island existence 
is no longer possible 

Recognition of this parious 
situation has come at last in 
the study which NATO govern- 
ments have authorized to put 
meaning into the economic co- 
operation clause of the North 
Atlantic Alliance. I personally 
see no hope of viability until 
national sovereignty in some 
degree has been abandoned, 
or rather expanded, in favor 
of supra-national government. 

At least Western Europe 
ought to be welded into an 
economic organism of viable 
dimensions. for the modern 
world. In this connection, we 
missed the bus in the Marshall 
Plan. Says Dr. Myrdal in an 
understatement, “The large- 
scate Marshall aid did not con- 
tribute toward the economic 
integration of Western Evu- 


rope,” though it certainly pro 
moted national integration 


PROF. MYRDAL says the 
major task of the free world 
is “to force economic develop- 
ment in the undeveloped coun- 
tries to the point where a more 
unified world system can be 
built up.” I would say this is 
the second of our tasks. 

Of primary importance is 
that the Western world shall 
develop a unity, functional in 
an economic sense and consti- 
tutional in an institutional 
sense. Only by a common ef- 
fort can we then tackle the 
immense business awaiting a 
solidified West relieved of its 
imperialism for the develep- 
ment of non-Western regions. 

In this matter the author's 
emphasis on a common ideal 
tying both the developer and 
the developed is worthy of 
record 

“The unity of a culture con- 
sists, however, in the fact that 
te a relatively large degree 
there exists a certain commu- 
nity of valuations, which im- 
plies that the fieid of vague- 
ness is limited. This is partic- 
ularly true of our most gen- 
eral valuations. In this book 
the concept ‘economic integra- 
tion’ has been related toe the 
old ideals in Western civiliza- 
tion. of liberty and equality 
and, more specifically, equal 
ity of economic opportunity. 
The trend of development in 
our advanced countries has 
been continually toward 
greater emphasis—and greater 
national realization—of these 
ideals. The ‘awakening’ of the 
backward peoples consists very 
much in their, too, embracing 
these Western ideals.” 

Dr. Myrdal’s work will be of 
tremendous service to realists 
and idealists alike in the field 
of international organization, 
He goes over the whole range 
of the issues—population cone 
trol, for example—which con- 
front the world in its inchoate 
state between the unity that 
was and the unity that is 
struggling to be born. Mod- 
estly, he says he has provided 
“an outline of the really com- 
prehensive study of the prob- 
lem of international integra- . 
tion that we still need.” 

I said above that I thought 
he erred a little on the side of 
optimism about national inte- 
gration. But this comment does 
not apply to the book as «a 
whole. “In the present stage 
of history.” he says, “nations 
in the non-Soviet world are 
not prepared in peacetime to 
accept the degree of interna- 
tional human_solidarity which 
would make possible progress 
toward international economic 
integration.” 

A sobering note to wind up 
on—and a challenge for the 
non-Soviet world, torn as it is 
between national and inter- 
national integration, is domi- 
nated by a split personality. 


tee (ad tae 


THROWING DOWN THE GAUNTLET 
: .. Justus in the Minneapolis Star 


* 
- 


The Washington Post 


RUGENE MEYER. Cheirman of the Board 
JAMES RUGSELL WICGINS, Vice President and Executive Eéitor 
ROBERT NH ESTABROOK . Editorial Page Editor 
FRIENDLY ee Menaying Editer 
.., Coneriduting Better 
5 


_Seeretary 
.. President Broadcast Division 


= ~= 2 a 


AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER . 


Sete ee 


~ ——— gy -- -- - 


SUNDAY, JULY &, 1956 PAGE E4 


te _——- ~— — a ee ee 


High Cost of Low Pay 


All the arguments that were used last year to 
support an increase in congressional salaries are 
now being reiterated with equal logic in regard to 
the executive pay bill before the Senate Civil Serv- 
ice Committee. Some able men were leaving Con- 
gress because they could not stretch their salaries 
over their expenses. Others were forced to extra 
labor on the side to keep out of debt. Congress 
finally saw the light and voted its members a sub- 
stantial raise. Similarly it boosted the salaries of 
Federal judges, military officers and civil and for- 
eign service personnel. The House also passed 
the executive pay bill as recommended by the 
Administration and the Hoover Commission. The 
Senate Committee finally got around to holding 
hearings on this bill Thursday, but more witnesses 
are to be heard and time is running out 

Equity alone should speed the measure to enact- 
ment. The Hoover Commission found some gross 
disparities in the salaries of top Federal officials. 
These need to be corrected in addition to bringing 
executive salaries into line with those of Congress 
and the judiciary. Even more serious is the loss 
of highly qualified men from top positions because 
the salary paid cramps their living standards. The 
Government cannot of course keep pace with pri- 
vate industry in compensating its executives. If it 
were to compete with the big corporations, it would 
have to offer Cabinet members from $100,000 to 
$700,000 a year, instead of the $25,000 proposed in 
the present bill. Men who take positions of this 
sort expect to make a sacrifice of income, but they 
should be able to live in keeping with the dignity 
of their offices without drawing upon private 
resources 

Many of the sharpest inequities are to be found 
below the Cabinet rank. For the positions of Under 
Secretary and Assistant Secretary and various lesser 
administrative posts it is especially important to 
pay salaries that will attract and hold first-class 
talent. The high cost of underpaying its top execu- 
tives and administrators should not be imposed on 
the Government for another year 


The NATO Parliament 


While the search is on for new means of solidi- 
fying NATO, it is encouraging that the Senate has 
taken a step toward developing a greater sense of 
cohesion in the*Atlantic community. It has ap- 
proved a resolution already passed by the House 
authorizing the participation of nine members from 
each house of Congress in annual NATO Parlia- 
mentary Conferences. Representatives from the 
House took part last year, with uniformly favorable 
reports about the greater understanding derived 
from the exchange of ideas and problems among 
delegates from the respective national legislative 
bodies. The next such conference will be held in 
Paris for five days beginning Nov. 18. American 
delegates will participate as individuals rather than 
as officials, and the informal conference will have 
merely consultative functions. Nevertheless, this 
sort of approach is a necessary prelude to further 
coordination and integration within NATO. Par- 
ticipation of legislators will in some degree comple- 
ment the participation of the executive branch in 
the NATO Council, and it cannot help but con- 
tribute to a greater feeling of mutuality and inter- 
dependence within NATO. 


Artfor No Sake 


Three totally undressed, impressively muscular 
but, alas, sadly agonized young men have, it seems, 
been ignominiously expelled from the Republican 
Party; but since all three are foreigners—presum- 
ably French—and therefore ineligible to vote next 
November, their expulsion should have no effect on 
the issue of the presidential election. 

By one of those embarrassing gaffes this sculp- 
tured trio by the late and eminent Auguste Rodin 
was to symbolize Peace, Progress and Prosperity on 
the cover of the official program of the Republican 
National Convention which is to meet next month 
at the San Francisco Cow Palace for the formality 
of renominating the Messrs. Eisenhower and Nixon. 
Leo Manheimer, the artist who designed the cover, 
said that he chose these figures “strictly for art,” 
which only seems to prove that his esthetic sensibili- 
ties are more highly developed than his political 
discretion. Anyway most of the Republican bigwigs 
promptly agreed with Mayor Christopher of San 
Francisco that, politically speaking, the cover de- 
sign is “not a very healthful picture”; and accord- 
ingly the program, of which 13,000 copies had 
elready been printed in two of the four specified 
colors, has been scrapped, and a new program, con- 
taining a fully clothed portrait of President Eisen- 
hower on the cover, will be substituted. 

The objection to the Rodin figures, we gather, 
was not a matter of prudery. Nude though they 
undoubtedly are, there seems to have been a bit of 
confusion for a time about whether the figures are 
male or female. This interesting question was not 
definitely settled until somebody identified the 
group as having been entitled by the sculptor him- 
self as Les Tres Hommes, which of course pretty 
well clinched the matter. What really distressed 
the Republican arrangements committee was the 
suggestion of utter despair in the attitudes of the 
marble trio; and the alarm proved to be well 
founded when it was learned that the sculpture— 
now apparently on loan exhibition at San Fran- 
cisco—is part of a sequence illustrating the famous 
passage from Dante: Lasciati ogni speranza, voi 
ch’entrate (Abandon hope, O ye who enter here!) 
This, as you can readily see for yourself, is hardly 
the sort of sentiment to inculcate among the dele- 
gates who are soon to assemble in the Cow Palace. 

The moral, it seems to us, is that art and politics 
are rarely if ever compatible; and this doubtless 
explains why politically inspired statuary agd paint- 
ing are almost invariably mediocre, and why nearly 
all efforts to improve them have been disastrous. 
We recall, for example, how the late George B. 
McClellan Jr., who was something of an amateur 
in these matters, undertook while Mayor of New 
York to elevate the quality of public sculpture in 
that metropolis. Among other things he commis 
sioned the late Frederick MacMonnies to design a 
fountain for the City Hall Park, giving the sculptor 
an entirely free hand (which is what these artists 
always prefer) in the choice and execution of the 


subject. Eventually MacMonnies produced a statue 


consisting of a muscular male figure—not unlike 
those in the Rodin group, only much bolder and 
more cheerful—designated “Civic Virtue” who had 
one of his massive feet planted firmly on the neck 
of a prostrate lady who was said to symbolize civic 
corruption. This outrageous inversion of the nat- 
ural genders of vice and virtue occasioned a tre- 
mendous uproar and eventually the statue had to 
be relegated (like the Discobolos at Montreal) to 
the decent obscurity of the Borough of Queens, 
where—as we understand it—it was accepted by 
the populace after the false but ingenious rumor 
had been circulated among them that the trium- 
phant male figure actually represented the beloved 
Dodgers and the prostrate female the sissified and 
detested Giants. 

Then there was Saint Gaudens’ equestrian bronze 
of General Sherman near the lower Fifth Avenue 
entrance to Central Park, generally considered— 
after the Adams Memorial in Rock Creek Cemetery 
here—his finest work. In front of the general, as 
you may remember, is a Nike, or Winged Victory, 
leading his horse by the bridle, thus provoking the 
late Col. Henry Watterson to exclaim: “Well, if 
that isn’t just like the old ——- — — to make 
the lady walk!” The Sherman statue has been per- 
mitted to remain at its original site; but to this day 
no really chivalrous New Yorker passes it by with- 
out sheepishly averting his eyes in the manner of 
a seated male rider in a crowded subway car. 


Seashore for the People 


The National Park Service has made an unusually 
eloquent plea for public acquisition of some of the 
Nation's few remaining undeveloped areas of sea- 
shore before they are gone. The plea is contained 
in an attractive booklet, Our Vanishing Seashore, 
published after an extensive survey begun in 1954. 
Of the entire 3700 miles of Atlantic and Gulf coast- 
line from Maine to Texas, the survey found, only 
6% per cent, or 240 miles, are now in local, state 
or Federal public ownership. Only about 640 miles 
of the remainder are suitable for public recrea- 
tional use, and the number of available sites is 
being eroded daily by the private purchase and 
development of beach lots which removes them for- 
ever from general public use. 

No less than 15 per cent of the seashore area, 
the survey emphasizes, ought to be in local, state 
or Federal ownership for conservation, wildlife and 
recreation purposes. Moreover, these areas, in- 
cluding marsh and swamp as well as beach, ought 
to be acquired quickly because prices are skyrock- 
eting. Although the report mentions suitable sites 
in a number of states, it singles out three for spe- 
cial attention: a section of Cape Cod’s Great Beach 
area, a portion of Fire Island, N. Y., and Cumber- 
land Island, Ga. Anyone who has visited the mag- 
nificent Cape Hatteras National Seashore Recrea- 
tion Area, which the National Park Service recently 
added to its domain, can appreciate the tonic qual- 
ities of beach, marine landscape, dunes and sand 
vegetation. 

We hope that Congress, which along with the 
Administration has been exhibiting more concern 
for the national parks as elixirs for the national 
health, will take an added interest in seashore 
areas, perhaps as part of the Park Service's “Mis- 
sion 66." Indeed, prompt moves to acquire and 
preserve public seashore areas would be in keeping 
with a forward-looking bill already before the 
Senate—the Humphrey bill to set up a National 
Wilderness Preservation System. This bill is de- 
signed to give status in law to wilderness areas 
already existing in national parks, forests and wild- 
life refuges and insure them against encroachment. 
A Nation of growing population and rising standard 
of living could ill afford not to provide for seashore 
and forest retreats that will remain unspoiled for 
future generations. 


Life-Saving Potential 


Why is the House District Committee ignoring 
the bill to facilitate the use of intoxication tests 
against drunken drivers? The Senate has passed 
the bill in the interests of getting inebriated drivers 
off the streets of Washington. If leaders of the 
House committee see any defect in the bill, they 
should seek to correct it and send the measure to 
the floor. 

Intoxication tests are now used in some local 
cases, but after the chemist who makes the test has 
presented his evidence it is necessary to call an 
expert witness to tell what the findings mean. Fre- 
quently no expert is available, so the accused goes 
free. In this new bill Congress would write into 
the law that a finding of .15 of 1 per cent of alcohol 
in the defendant's blood (or .21 of 1 per cent of 
alcohol in the urine) would constitute prima facie 
proof of intoxication. Motorists arrested on charges 
of driving while drunk would not be required to 
take the test, but if they should refuse their permits 
would be revoked. This is a stiff measure, but not 
too stiff, in our opinion, to cope with the menace of 
drunkenness at the wheel. 

Effective use of intoxication tests in other cities 
has led to convictions in from 95 to 100 per cent 
of the cases. One glance at the driver intoxication 
convictions during 1954 will show how backward 
Washington is in this respect. In Los Angeles there 
were 7049 convictions on this charge; in Detroit, 
1217; Chicago, 2800; San Francisco, 1051; Baltimore, 
592; Cleveland, 1349, and Washington, 178. Twenty- 
two states now have chemical-test laws. The bill 
passed by the Senate has the unanimous support 
of the executive committee of the American Auto 
mobile Association and of many individual citizens 
because of its great life-saving potentialities. How 
could the House committee possibly defend the 
pigeonholing of such a measure?’ 


Sharing Productivity 


There is a growing imbalance in the economy re 
sulting from (the) failure of industry to pass along 
to consumers some portion of rising productivity 
in the form of lower prices. Not only farmers 
have been hurt by this imbalance. All consumers 
on more or less fixed incomes, and all those not 
in a position to demand higher incomes (and that 
includes most people) are passed by in the divi- 
sion of our economic products. Substantial 
progress in solving the farm problems as well as 
the general problem of economic imbalance, 
cannot be achieved unless consumers generally 

‘ are permitted to share, along with labor and the 
owners, in our advancing productivity.—Carroll 
M. Shanks, president of the Prudential Insurance 


i of America. ¢ 
» 


“Poor Little Kid” 


Qiesh ree WAS HikCran POST & 


Letters to the Editor 


“School Encumbrance”™ 


Had you attended the 1956 
convention of the National As- 
sociation for the Advancement 
of Colored People which met 
in San Francisco last week I 
doubt that you would have 
written the second part of your 
editorial of July 2 titled 
“School Encumbrance.” At that 
convention we heard the stories 
of persons who have been fired 
from their jobs, personally in- 
timidated and, in some cases, 
forced to flee to other commu- 
nities for safety. These people 
have merely sought to encour- 
age court action to implement 
the U. S. Supreme Court de- 
cision in the school cases. 

You would also have been 
able to talk with citizens from 
South Carolina, Georgia and 
other states who would have 
told you that they reject the 
theory that new schools, even 
if Jim Crow, are better than 
what their children attend now. 
They rightly concluded that 
unless the Powell amendment 
is approved recalcitrants will 
use Federal funds to build 
totally segregated schools. 

Our delegates also passed a 
resolution declaring that those 
who oppose the Powell amend- 
ment are, in reality, voting to 
give money for what they know 
will be more segregation. When 
we strip this issue of all the 
fine words and lofty statements 
it is found to be this: 

Some are for the school bill 
= political reasons. Others are 
or it because they sincerely 
want to see the children of the 
Nation go to classrooms in bet- 
ter buildings. 

In both instances, however, 
they are willing to sacrifice the 
civil rights of colored people in 
order to obtain these ends. No 
amount of editorial] writing or 
speechmaking will change this 
dreadful truth. 

CLARENCE MITCHELL. 


Washington au 
Nationa! Association fer the Ac 
vancement eof Colered People 


Triumph in Bolivia 


I am now receiving technical 
training in the United States, 
being the beneficiary of your 
Government's policy of assist- 
ance to Bolivia. It is my opinion 
that events proved conclusively 
the wisdom of your policies to- 
ward my country, the complete 
repudiation of the Communists 
in the recent national elections 
in Bolivia being one of these 
events. Today Bolivia is a bul- 
wark against communism in 
Latin America. 

I do not want what I write 
to be interpreted as criticism 
of another country, but I have 
seen news stories and articles 
to the effect that the Commu- 
nists in Guatemala capitalized 
upon the pressing need in that 
country for reforms in agricul- 
ture, education, suffrage, public 
health, transportation, and oth- 
er sectors of the economy. The 
result was Communist domina- 
tion, followed by a rebellion 
which overthrew the govern- 
ment, and left the present gov- 
ernment with many of the same 
problems as before and, jude¢- 
ing from newspaper reports, 
considerable Communist senti- 
ment in the country. 

In 1952, Bolivia confronted 
mu@h the same problems as 
Guatemala. The people wanted 
reforms which would end the 
feudal traditions of its agricul- 
ture and control of the coun- 
trys political and economic 
system by the owners of the 
tin mines, the country's largest 
industry. The government pro-. 
posed to do—and did—some- 
thing about these matters and 
others which had been neglect- 
ed. Fortunately, the Govern- 
ment of the United States un- 
derstood Bolivia's situation. 
Your country came forward 
with timely economic and tech- 
nical assistance to Bolivia in 
a time of need. 

As a result, Bolivia has pur- 


taken other steps to encourage 
foreign investment. The people 
have been informed of the 
United States’ role in their re- 
covery, and public sentiment is 
extremely friendly to your 
country. The government and 
the people are grateful for your 
aid and both openly say so. 

As a final consequence, in 
the recent election, the Com- 
munists and Trotskyites were 
eliminated as political parties, 
since they polled far less than 
the four per cent of the votes 
required for representation on 
the ballot. In other words, the 
Communists have been wiped 
out as a political party. Thus 
far, your policies toward Bolivia 
have yielded dramatic results 
and you have achieved, so far 
as my country is concerned, a 
diplomatic triumph. 

MIGUEL OLMOS. 
Washington. 


“Dr. Malik’s Warning” 


The editorial in your issue 
of May 23 unhappily misinter- 
preted both the substance and 
the intent of an address which 
Dr. Charles Malik geve at the 
Beirut Church Conference on 
the Arab refugee problem. You 
admittedly did not have at hand 
the text of the speech and per- 
force relied solely upon the 
“highlights” which had been 
reported to you. With this 
limited information you stated 
that “Dr. Malik apparently has 
several things in mind” but 
your attempt to guess at these 
“several things” led you quite 
seriously astray. Plain justice, 
as well as the importance of ac- 
curacy and objectivity in any 
approach to the problems of 
the Near and Middle East, 
would seem to require that the 
record be set straight on at 
least a few points. 

The editorial claimed that 
“the philosopher has turned 
politician.” This is simply not 
true. With due recognition of 
historical and contemporary 
realities, the tone of Dr. Malik’s 
participation in the conference 
was definitely positive and con- 
ciliatory. He was not speaking 
in terms of “cases” and you 
yourself are responsible for the 
inference that Dr, Malik in his 
address was urging “support of 
the Arab case against Israel.” 

Even more incomprehensible 
is your claim that “the speech 
had overtones of the blackmail 
about which George F. Kennan 
recently warned.” As is well 
known, Dr. Malik has over the 
years insistently alerted the 
West to the danger of blackmail 
and his immediate aim was pre- 
cisely to stiffen people's deter- 
mination to. resist any such 
blackmail—whether attempted 
with communi$m or with the 
Arab refugees as _ political 
pawns. To countries which say 
they will go Communist unless 
they. get American aid, Dr. 
Malik would answer just as 
vehemently as George Kennan, 
“Go.” In fact, he has done so, 
and in unmistakable terms— 
holding as he does that the pri- 
mary defense against commu- 
nism is in the realm of the 
spirit. 

O. FREDERICK NOLDE, 
Director, Commission of the 


_ Chugebes on Internationa! Affairs 
New York. 


Foreign-Aid Cuts 


Our leaders in Congress 
should feel hopeful about the 
Polish revolts. Perhaps they 
can cut foreign aid still further 
to gain a few votes. After all. 
one who stands up to be 
counted in’favor of aid to 
foreigners rather than to our 
own Air Force might lose his 
office here; in Poland our 
friends were merely shot. 

It’s time we voters convinced 
our hesitant representatives 


that another billion in foreign 
aid is better spent abroad than 


not very 
edifying to know that politicians 
ble with the economic 


Forgotten Pedestrians 


The Post finds gratification in 
the fact that Washington is the 
safest city for its size for pedes- 
trians, of whom “last year, out 
of 22.270 pedestrians killed on 
streets and highways of the Na- 
tion, approximately one-fourth 
were struck down while cross- 
ing between intersections.” 

What you fail to mention is 
that in the new good-roads bill, 
under which taxpayers are to 
furnish many billion dollars for 
construction purposes, not one 
single dollar is made available 
for providing safe parallel side- 
walks for pedestrians, nor does 
any single state, thus far, in- 
clude plans for foot paths in 
connection with road building, 
the pedestrian being regarded 
Officially as non-existent. 

Nor is that all: The pedes- 
trian is prohibited by law or 
regulation from venturing upon 
any present or contemplated 
first-class highway and is sub- 
ject to arrest and fine should 
he be so misguided as to do so. 
Thus Congress and the several 
states have joined together in 
a conspiracy to threaten with 
death all and sundry who may 
still believe that walking is the 
best, cheapest and most reward- 
ing exercise known to man, and 
even indispensable to.many mil- 
lions who bravely go to their 
daily tasks without benefit of 
automobile. 

Of course, it would cost little 
or nothing’ to create parallel 
footpaths alongside the new 
roads, but nobody in Congress 
or anywhere else thinks about 
the truly “forgotten man”—the 
man who enjoys the use of his 
legs. 

Moral: The people of the 
United States should only go 
forth about their occasions in 
motor cars. As Marie Antoi- 
nette is reported to have said 
when the people of Paris were 
Starving for bread: “Let them 
eat cake.” 

ROBERT P. SKINNER. 

Belfast, Maine. 


Admiral Joy 


Our ship is in mid-Atlantic 
and the mails will be slow, but 
I would like to tell you of the 
sorrow felt by the midshipman 
detachment aboard the Iowa at 
the death of a great American, 
Adm. C. Turner Joy, USN (re- 
tired). 

They passed the word at 
midshipmen’s mess of his pass- 
ing and I could feel the quiet 
reverence descend on the mid- 
shipmen. I could see their eyes 
narrow a little as the jovial 
mood turned grim. Admiral Joy 
was known to many as an out- 
standing truce negotiator in 
Korea, as a brilliant naval 
leader, and as a good friend. 
We knew him as our superin- 
tendent at the Naval Academy 
in Annapolis, during the clos- 
ing years of his naval career 
and at the very beginning of 
ours. We knew him only pro- 
fessionally, but somehow he 
was a special friend to us all be- 
cause he had given to each of 
us a little of his faith in our 
Navy. 

I remember the words he 
spoke to us in 1953 during our 
first days as midshipmen. He 
spoke of the high standards of 
the Naval Academy and the 
naval service set by those who 
went before us. He explained 
with real enthusiasm the long 
traditions of the “Navy of old. 
More important, he spoke of 
the high standards we could set 
ourselves and his faith in us to 
build a great new “Navy for 
the future.” Admiral Joy asked 
only that we believe in our 
Navy and give it all that we 


spired many to believe in it. 
He gave it all that he had 
he inspired m to try 

He 


gES2 
Aepstsectet: 


Second Look 


Adm.King’ sService: 
A Man of History 


By Herbert Elliston 


a 


IN ASSAYING the mettle of the great 
captain of history (which Admiral King 
was) the historian John Buchan says he 
may be known by three attributes. The 
first is he must see the 
battlefront as a whole. 

It was often charged 
against King that as a 
Pacific-firster he suffered 
from localitis. A Naval 
Record, the book about 
his war record, elimi- 
nates this charge. He 
wanted first to dispose 
of Hitler (some say by a 
negotiated peace with 
the generals) while keep- 
ing up a pressure against the Japanese. 

Then a great captain must be able to 
read the heart of the enemy. Though King 
had been to Japan only once, and then as 
a young man, his estimate of Japan was 
the best among the Joint and the Com- 
bined Chiefs. Secretary Forrestal told me 
his decision to attack at Guadalcanal 
August, 1942, was perfect. A day or two 
later, and Australia might have been lost. 
“You must breakfast on the enemy,” said 
King, “before he dines on you.” MacArthur 
wanted to wait, but King insisted on im- 
mediate action. As it turned out, the Japa- 
nese after we won at Guadalcanal began 
their retreat, and they never regained the 
initiative. 

oo 

FINALLY, aecording to John Buchan, 
the great captain must have “the power to 
simplify, the capacity to make a simple 
syllogism, which, once it is made, seems 
easy and inevitable, but which before it is 
made is in the power only of genius.” King 
so simplified the task against Japan. As 
Admiral Spruance once said, an army 
man is taught that you can only win vic- 
tory by occupation. King saw with crystal 
clarity that the island kingdom of Japan, 
sparse in resources, could be brought to its 
knees by a naval blockade. How right he 
was! 

Yet the simplicity of King’s reasoning 
did not prevail in grand strategy. We had 
a mammoth plan to invade the Japanese 
islands. Russia had to be brought in. The 
President, Secretary Stimson, the military 
higher-ups, the scientific geniuses wanted 
to try out the atomic bomb. 

Take the last-named business (or, should 
we say, monstrosity) first. In A Naval 
Record it is said that King had next to 
nothing to do with the A-bomb. It was 
never discussed in the Joint Chiefs of Staff 
meetings. Having been sold on the idea 
that an invasion plan was necessary, the 
President felt the A-bomb would save 
many American lives. “But,” says A Naval 
Record, “King felt, as he had pointed out 
many times, that the dilemma was an un- 
necessary one, for had we been willing to 
wait, the effective naval blockade would 
have, in ‘the course of time, reduced the 
Japanese into submission through lack of 
oil, rice, medicines and other essential 
materials.” 


ees 


THE LAST time I was in touch with Ad- 
miral King was after the MacArthur hear- 
ings. Averell Harriman’s memorandum 
wound up the testimony. And it re- 
vealed that the Joint Chiefs as a body 
had come out in favor of Russian participa- 
tien in the Pacific war. This struck me as 
altogether contrary to Admiral King’s war- 
time standpoint. So I wrote to him in 
Portsmouth, N. H., where he had been ail- 
ing since the war’s end, and he arranged a 
meeting with me in the fall in Washington, 
He promised to go into the entire back- 
ground of the Navy's connection with this 
bad decision. Unfortunately, Admiral King’s 
condition became worse, and the meeting 
never took place. I had to be content with 
a letter from him saying: 

I was not in favor of Russia entering 

the Pacific war and subsequent events 

proved that my views were correct. It 
would not have been the diplomatic 

thing to do to publicly oppose such a 

policy. You may recall that the Joint 

Chiefs of Staff usually came to a unani- 

mous decision after all phases of a 

given situation were carefully ex- 

plored. We did not feel it was neces- 

sary or desirable to file a minority or a 

dissenting opinion as do the Supreme 

Court Justices when they do not agree 

with the majority. 

This way of working together I later con- 
firmed with Admiral Leahy, who informally 
presided over the Joint Chiefs. He said 
many decisions of the Joint Chiefs were 
verbal. They were taken sometimes in FDR's 
study. One chief gave way in one matter 
in order to get his way in another, Pity 
that these deliberations are not on record 
so that the greatest of all wars could be 
more fully comprehended in its grand 
strategy—and the stature of Admiral King 
might be appreciated at its magnificent 
worth. 


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Matter of Fact 


Democrats Oil Up Bandwagon 


By Joseph and Stewart Alsop 


ADLAI STEVENSON’s strategists are using 
the bandwagon technique to a fare-thee-well. 
There is, they say with careless confidence, no 
longer any serious question about the nomi- 
nation—Stevenson can probably have it on the 
first ballot if he wants it that way. . 

The real questions now, the Stevenson men 
say, are the vice presidential choice and post- 
convention strategy. 

The bandwagon technique is a very old one, 
of course. But the confidence expressed in the 
Stevenson camp sounds convincing and most 
observers agree that it is probably justified. 
The Stevenson men sound a good deal less 
convincing when they claim that, having been 
nominated, Stevenson can also be elected. But 
their version of how the thing can be done is 
worth describing. 


THEY CLAIM that the South. including 
Texas, but probably excluding Florida, will 
return to the fold this year. In that case. 
Stevenson only needs to win the normally- 
Democratic border states, plus a handful of 
northern industrial states. Pennsylvania. Mich- 
igan and Massachusetts are cited as examples 
of states in which Stevenson should have a 
good chance. 


But the Stevenson men assume that the Re- 
publican ticket will again be Elsenhower-Nix- 
on, and they agree that, in order to win the 
needed handful of northern industrial states, 
something effective must be done te counter 
the Republicans’ great central asset, the 
President's remarkable personal popularity. 

The “something” is summed up in a slogan 
which will be much heard in months to come— 
“A Vote for Eisenhower Is a Vote for Nixon.” 
The slogan neatly wraps up in one package the 
“health issue” and the supposed unpopularity 
of Vice President Nixon among independents 
and others. 


THE STEVENSON post-convention strategy 
is largely based, in short, on hammering home 
the Nixon-health theme. Indeed, the hammer- 
ing will start in earnest at the convention. 
which is being carefully planned for maximum 
emphasis on the importance of the vice pres- 
idency 

The Democratic National Committee has 
proposed a plan te this end. The balloting for 
the presidential nominee, according to this 
plan, would end on Wednesday, Aug: 15, fol- 
lowed by an interim day to build suspense, 


with speeches by former President Truman 
and Mrs. Franklin Roosevelt. The highlight of 
the final day, Friday, would be the vice presi- 
dential nomination, and the acceptance 
speeches of both candidates. 

Thus, for once, the vice presidential nomi- 


nation would not be an anticlimactic after- » 


thought. 
There is no unanimous enthusiasm for this 
idea in the Stevenson camp, since it is feared 


that Stevenson's acceptance speech on Friday - 


“night would be unheard by voters bent on 


weekend holidays. But Stevenson and his ad- |» 
visers strongly agree on the need for empha * 


sizing the vice presidency at the convention, 
and centering Democratic fire on Nixon there- 
after. 


STEVENSON HIMSELF will do his share of 
the firing. Stevenson heartily dislikes the vice 


president. “If there’s anyone the Governor's | 
emotional about,” one Stevenson adviser has | 


remarked, “it's that guy. If Nixon tries to play 
the high-level stuff, the Governor will needle 
the hell out of him, and he'll soon come down 
to earth.” 

This seems a shrewd appraisal of the high 
partisan instincts which Nixon has always dis- 
played at campaign time. But the Democratic 
vice presidential candidate will have the main 
Nixon-needling assignment. This is one reason 
why Sen. John Kennedy of Massachusetts. is 
currently considered the leading contender for 
second place on a Stevenson ticket. 


Kennedy is an able and attractive campaign- 


er. He is also a devout Catholic with a strong 
anti-Communist record. He is thus considered 
impervious on the “Communist issue,” which 
Nixon has used repeatedly against the Demo- 
erats. It is also felt that Kennedy would at- 
tract back inte the Democratic column many 
of the nermally-Democratic Catholic voters in 
the big industrial states, who strayed to Ei- 
senhower in 1952. 

Kennedy's vote against high rigid parity in 
the current session is the main talking point 
against him, since the Stevenson camp is also 
relying heavily on farm disaffection. 

At any rate, the vice presidential candidate 
will certainly be chosen with great care and 
a maximum flourish, and with Vice President 
Nixon very much in mind. 

But the heavy emphasis on the Nixon-health 
theme in the Stevenson campaign planning 
also suggests how hard put the Stevenson 
camp is for other winning issues. 


Corpright. 1956. N. ¥. Herald Tribune, in 


McCormack Plays Hard to Get 


GLIMPSES, From Page E! 


a geographic realignment of 
the party, Humphrey calis 
them “defeatist.” 

“The South has a great 


tic 


(D-Ga.), to be held July 
the Mayflower Hotel, is partly 
designed to help raise money 
to finance the Senate Democra- 
campaign. 
of $100 or more will receive 


19 at form-drafting group, Demo- 
crats will feel a little better 
about the chances of averting 
that split 


Contributors ° . ° 


Party of One 


PROGRESS HAS ITS SETBACKS AND ITS MARTYRS 
.»+ Los Angeles Times 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


a 


Sunday, July 8, 1956 E5 


The Washington Merry-Go-Round 


Making Life Make Sense 


On Writing Letters 


By Harry and Bonaro Overstreet 


stake in the Democratic Party 
-—-we need them and they need 

us.” maintains Humphrey 
Were willing to confess 
we have some differences. |! 
wish the Republicans would 
do the same—confess not only 
their differences, but their 
fragmentation.” 
. > > 


Money Comes First 


TWO NORTHERN liberals 
and a Southern liberal, Sens. 
Ric hard L. Neuberger (Ore.), 
Henry M. Jackson (Wash.) and 
John J. Sparkman (Ala.), and 
a conservative, Sen. Stuart 
Symington (Mo.), make up the 
balance of the new Senate 
Democratic unit. 


Standing by in an advisory 
capacity are Senate Democra- 
tic Leader Johnson and Senate 
Democratic Whip Earle C. 
Clements (Ky.) 


The campaign committee is 
dedicated to maintaining and 
if possible fattening the pre- 
sent lean Democratic margin 
in the Senate. The group 
would ride to the rescue of 
liberals just as quickly as it 
would heed the call of any 
berder state conservative, if 
the need arose. 

The first unashamed goal of 
the Senate campaign unit is 
funds. A farewell dinner in 
honor of Sen. Walter F. George 


CAPITAL TYPES #16 


(lee 


THE ZEALOT 


Leaps like a gazelle when 
he spots a soap box. De- 
nounces everything fros 
reforestation to women in 
slacks. Usually comes out 
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Pitteburgh Pirate fan. 
Terrified of getting lar- 
yngitis, insists on wear- 
ing wool underwear all 
year ‘round Raises has- 
sters, teaches Leather- 
craft at local girls sum 
wer camp. Hume marching 
gongs when preoccupied. 


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ve 


| platform-drafting 
| Committee twice before when 


tickets to the George dinner 

Underlining the party unity 
theme, invitations are being 
sent out to former President 
Truman and all three of the 
party's active presidential can- 
didates, Adlai Stevenson, Ave- 
rell Harriman and Sen. Estes 
Kefauver. 


Paging McCormack 

THESE party unity maneu- 
vers arent confined to the 
Senate 

In the House, Southern 
Democratic leaders, backed up 
by the Democratic National 
Committee, have been assidu- 
ously wooing another Demo- 
cratic liberal who knows how 
to work with Southerners. 

The sought-after liberal is 
Rep. John W. McCormack (D- 
Mass.), House Majority Lead- 
er under Speaker Sam Ray- 
burn and veteran of 16 con- 
Secutive terms in the House. 

Rayburn wants McCormack 
to serve as chairman of the 
Democratic Resolutions Com- 
mittee in Chicago. Democratic 
National Chairman Paul But- 
ler has backed up Rayburn 
with a formal offer to Mce- 
Cormack. 

Why McCormack? The big 
Irishman from South Boston 
has been working amicably 
with Northern and Southern 
Democrats alike for more 
years than most members 
have served in Congress. 

He's been chairman of the 
Resolutions 


the party faced a geographic 
upheaval, in 1944 and 1952. In 
both years, he succeeded in 
drafting a platform that held 
the party together. The big 
walkout occurred in 1948, the 
year he wasn't chairman 
But this time, McCormack 
is extremely reluctant te test 
his luck. He's teld friends that 
there's such a thing as accept- 
ing tec many encores in mat- 
ters so delicate as drafting a 
civil rights platform. 
Friends point out that Mc- 
Cormack has never been a 
rooter for Adlai Stevenson. 
the man most likely to win 
the Democratic nomination. 
He has suggestéd that the 
resolutions chairman ought to 
be a Stevenson man 

But he hasn't said finally 
and flatly, “No.” If and when 
be agrees to lead the _plat- 


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on the EC eperoach (Complete 
reprint Jie) 


iF GOV. FRANK LAUSCHE 
of Ohio votes with Republi- 
cans to help organize the next 
Senate, as he recently said 
that he might do if elected, 
he will set what amounts to a 
Senate precedent. 

Congressional Quarterly 
News Features has made a 
diligent checkup on regular 
and irregular members of both 
parties over the years without 
finding a single case quite like 
Lausche’s. 

In addition, Dr. George B 
Galloway, senior specialist. on 
American government for the 
Library of Congress, has made 
a definitive study of the role 
of so-called “other members” 
in four Congresses in which 
Senate control was at stake. 
Galloway defines “other mem- 
bers” as “those Senators not 
classified as Republicans or 
Democrats.” 

The government specialist 
found no exact precedent for 
Lausche’s proposed action, but 
did find a case somewhat simi- 
lar. On March 18, 1881, Sen 
Mahone of Virginia, a former 
Confederate general and life- 
long Democrat, voted with Re- 
publicans to organize an 
evenly divided Senate. Only 
Mahone was no longer a Dem- 
ocrat when he voted with Re- 
publicans to organize the Sep- 
ate. He had just been elected 
to Congress as a “Readjuster.” 

There is a remote parallel 
in the case of Sen. Wayne 
Morse (D-Oreg.), who was 
elected to the Senate in 1950 
as a Republican and iater 
changed his allegiance. 

Morse broke with Gen 
Eisenhower and the Repub- 
lican Party during the cam- 
paign of 1952. and tempor- 
arily took the Independent 
labe! 

Throughout the 83d Con- 
gress, however, Morse as 
sured Republicans that he 
would vote with them in any 
crucial Senate organization 
test, because of their 1952 
election mandate. 

Things were different when 
Democrats organized the 
Senate in 1955, however. 
Morse, already planning to 
move over in the Democratic 
Party, voted with the Demo- 
crats to organize the Senate. 
He had previously announced 
that he would. He took the 
position that he was carrying 
out the will of the electorate, 
inasmuch as Democrats’ won 
the off-year elections. 

Some Democrats maintain 


| that Lausche isn’t a Democrat 


in the traditional or any other 
sense. He practically admitted 
for, the late Sen 
Robert A. Taft, over Democrat 


| Joe Ferguson, in their famous 


1950 Ohio Senate race. Al- 
though he still wears the 
Democratic label, some have 
“Lauchecrat”— 


party. 


9| ‘Washington, M. D.’ 


THE CAPITOL’S news. 


+| paper, “Roll Call,” in a column 
| captioned “Hippocrates on the 
| Hustings,” 


says Ike's health 
is such a lively subject of dis- 


' eussion that maybe the Cap- 


ital should be called “Wash. 
ington, M. D.” 

“There was a time when the 
political leaders used to feel 
the pulse of the Nation,” says 


ry Roll Call. “Now the situation 


has been reversed. Today, 
voters watch the pills as much 
as the pulse and the polls. One 
prominent figure, displeased 


* with the doc’s reading of his 

“| blood count, vehemently de-{— 

“| manded a_ recount out of 
| habit.” 


Well? 


SEN. GEORGE H. BENDER 
(R-Ohio) closes his current 
newsletter with the question 


,of the week: “Again—will he 


or won't he?” ; 
‘. 


; 


-8000 in April) and there is an 


ARE YOU going to write to your Congressman’ Or to 
Mr.-President’ Or to the editor of your newspaper? Or to 
the radio or TV commentator you have just heard? Or to 
this or that public figure who has just made a speech on 
farm prices, or foreign trade, or states’ rights or relations 
with the Far East’ 

If so, you may be interested in the practice one business. 
man has worked out for himself. He tells us that he came 
to it by the hard way eof repenting at leisure some of the 
letters he had sent off in haste: angry letters, letters that 
denounced, letters of the aloof “My Dear Sir” variety. Letters. 
in short, in which he worked off a tantrum that felt all right 
te him but which, he realized on second thought, steod small 
chance of doing anything but rouse resentment. 

Then one day he also realized—with some degree of shock— 
that he had developed almost a habit of writing letters out 
of his own irritations and angers but not into anyone else's 
mind. So he proceeded to invent for himself a sort of emo- 
tional delaying tactic. He continued writing letters just 
as he felt like writing them, but before he sent any letter 
t) its intended goal, he first mailed the carbon copy of it 
to himself, received it as part of his own mail, and read it. 

When it had thus “cooled,” he tried to imagine how he 
would have reacted to it if someone had written and sent it 
to him. 


ONE THING he quickly discovered—and again with some 
degree of shock. This was that the letter he had written, and 
by which he had hoped to exert some influence, often stood 
out like a sore thumb when put into the company of the 
courteous letters that made up his business correspondence. 

The business lefters, to be sure, were sometimes stilted. 
They were sometimes a bit overdone in their pretended in- 
timacy and friendliness. Yet they represented civility. By 
and large, they added up te something very decent: a fairly 
honest and intelligent effort not only te talk out of their 
writers’ interests but alse to talk along the interests of the 
person who received them. They had something to say and 
said it, and they did not imply that the person at the re 
ceiving end was either a fool or a villain. 

The business letters, in short, belong within a rational way 
of life and daily proved their case. Was it just “good busi- 
ness” for them to be courteous? Just “enlightened self-inter- 
est?” Maybe so. But at least those letters belonged in the 
world of responsible give and take. They were not products 
of temper tantrums. | 

Before long, the carbon copies he began receiving from 
himself took on a different tone, a tone that brought the 
world of politics, and even of political differences, within 
the frame of courtesy and reasonableness. 


DAY AFTER DAY, across America, the letters are dropped 
through the slots of mailboxes: letters to Congressmen, to 
Mr. President, to editors and commentators. 

These are the democratic “ballots” that de not wait upon 
an election. The “X” with which they are marked, how- 
ever, is not that of a rubber stamp or a pencil. It is that of 
the writer's personality and his basic code of human rela- 
tionships. 

Perhaps, in time, we as a free people will freely develop 
standards for these every-day-of-the-year “ballots” that make 
up a sizable part of the mail of public figures. Perhaps we 
will develop standards that will tell us which amoh them 
are improperly marked by irresponsible emotions—and there- 
fore should not be counted—and which are marked with the 
valid sign of the truly democratic mind. 

Coprright, 1956, by John F. Dille Co. 

MAIL OFFER: The Overstreets’ new booklet, “How to Stay 
Alive as Long as You Live,” will help you gain new msights. 
For a copy, send 25 cents (com only) and a stamped, self- 
addressed envelope to “Making Life Make Sense,” care of the 
National Newspaper Syndicate, 326 W. Madison ave., Chicago 
6, Til. 


Prohibition Down the Drain, 
Swedes Go on a Beer Binge 


the expense of a meal. 

Why do the Swedes drink so 
much? Most authorities here 
explain it as an ingrown social 
habit that get started when 
times were bad. Today drink. 
ing is important often because 
it helps the Swede loosen up 
from his innate reserve. 


By Harry Heintzen 
™ Y¥. Herald Tribune News Gervice 

STOCKHOLM — Last Oc- 
tober, Sweden ended some 40 
years of semi-prohibition with 
misgivings. 

Sober citizens held their 
breath as virtually the entire 
nation made a bee-line for the 


Republican Conferees: Bailed Out 


By Drew Pearson 


DESPITE WHITE HOUSE pressure, every 
Republican deserted Mr. Eisenhower on the 
question of money for the Air Force when 
they sat down in the secrecy of the Senate- 
House Conference Committee. 

It was their job to straighten out differences 
between the House and Senate, and, with no 
one present to record their views, not one 
Republican stood up for Ike’s low budget for 
the Air Force. 

Even Congress’ chief penny-pincher, New 
York Rep. John Taber, muttered fresignedly: 
“I suppose we'll have to give the Air Force 
something. I hope we do not give them too 
much.” 

Rep. Dan Flood (D-Pa.) moved to increase 
Air Force appropriations by $1.1 billion—the 
same motion that had been shouted down by 
the House two months earlier. Flood pooh- 
poohed the fact that Secretary of the Air 
Force Quarles himself was against an increase. 

“Quaries has beautiful long hair and fat 
heels. He is an excellent scientist, but he 
shows no sign of being an administrator,” 
snorted the Pennsylvania Congressman. 

It was Georgia's potent Sen. Dick Russel! 
who led the closed-door battle for more Air 
Force funds. 

“Don't forget,” he lectured the conferees, 
“that we simply do not have the aircraft. In 
February, there were six B52s produced, four 
were accepted. In March and April none were 
accepted. .... All the infermation I have been 
able to gather directly .and indirectly con- 
vinces me this money can be and will be used 
by the Air Force.” 


$980 Million Increase 


RUSSELL REMINDED the conferees that 
the proposed budget increase “isn't exclusive- 
ly a program of B52s. The Air Force also needs 
tankers and Century-class fighters.” 

“The American people,” chimed in Rep 
Flood, “think the B52 is an intercontinental 
bomber that can fly to Moscow and back. It 
cannot without refueling. We do not have ane 
jet tanker capable of handling a B52 bomber.” 

Rep. Errett Scrivner, Kansas Repu dlican, 
tried to cut the Air Force increase in half. 

“No matter how much money we give them 
at this time,” he insisted, “it is not going to 
produce one more B52.” 

He also hinted that politics might have 
something te do with the clamer for more 
Air Force appropriations. 

“Now we have been here a long time and 
we know about political interests in an elec- 
tion year,” he remarked slyly. 

In the end, however, every last Republican 
deserted the President and voted with the 
Democrats for a compromise $9680 million 
increase in the Air Force budget. 


Note—The Air Foree is so short of con- 
struction money that it has slowed up con- 
struction of our Spanish bases. It now looks 
as if the bases won't be completed until 1963—~ 
the same year our lease runs out. In other 
words, we may be forced to turn the bases 
over to dictator Franco before we get a chance 
to use them. 


Squalls in the Islands 


ANOTHER Virgin Islands Governor is em- 
broiled in the turbulence of Island factional- 
ism. As a result, disgusted Rep. Clair Engle of 
California plans to introduce a bill granting 
the Islands full independence. 

The new Governor is able Walter Gordon 
of California, close friend of Chief Justice 
Warren and former head of the California 
Parole Board. He is the third Negro te be 
Gevernor of the Islands, replacing Archie 
Alexander, also a Negro. 

Unlike Alexander, whose salty language and 
straw-boss mannerisms irritated Islanders, 
Gordon has adopted a gentle approach. Yet, 
like all previous governors, Gordon is learn- 
ing the hard way that the Virgin Islands are 
tough to govern. 

Gordon had hardly arrived in the Islands 
before he came under attack as a “do-nothing” 
Governor, largely because he spent his first 
two months trying to learn something about 
the Islands’ problems before issuing legisla- 
tive recommendations. 

The legislators also slashed Gordon's 
budget, leaving him with inadequate funds 
to run the tourist and comptroller’s offices. 

ext, and the Legislature clashed 
over the all-important question of building two 
comfort stations, Gev. Gordon claimed they 
could easily be byilt with funds alfeady avail- 
able. He vetoed the appropriation. The Legis- 
lature wanted more money for the two com- 
fort stations and voted te override him. 

As a result, the vital matter of two comfort 
stations has been sent to President Eisen- 
hower Yor a final decision. 

Legislators Walter Hodge and Earl Ottley 
are carrying their feud to Congress. 

Chairman Engle of the Insular Affairs 
Committee hopes to silence the dispute with 
his bill for full independence — which few 
Islanders want. 


Tumulty’s Tummy 


THE NAME of Jersey City's roly-poly Rep. 
Jim Tumulty is sometimes pronounced TUM- 
ulty, at other times Tu-MUL-y. 

When finally asked the other day which he 
preferred, the 330-pound Democrat wasnt 
fussy. “I don’t care. Either one,” he replied, 
patting his midriff. 

“Just be sure the accent is on the tummy.” 


But on the Other Hand... 


Minority Forecast Counts Ike Out 


By Roscoe Drummond 


THE NEWS from Gettys- 
burg supports the nearly unan- 
imous speculation that Presi- 
dent Eisenhower is still run- 
ning. However, there is a 
minority dissent, which, while 
I do not share it personally, 
deserves to be reported. 

It is true that the medical 
reports from Gettysburg con- 
tinue te be uniformly faver- 
able. It is true that the White 
House staff is far more confi- 
dent this time that he will 
not withdraw than they were 
after the heart attack. 

I talked with a nonofficial of 
the Government who saw Mr 
Eisenhower at Walter Reed 
just two days before he left 
the hospital and he found him 
in high spirits, good color and 
eager for work. 

ut there is a minority opin- 
ion which cannot be totally 
dismissed and I am not re- 
ferring to those Democrats 
who would like to see the 
President get well and also 
decide not to run. 


THOSE WHO doubt that the 
President will accept renomi- 
nation count themselves his 
well-wishers and their reasons 
are these: 


® THEY FEEL it will be 
much more difficult for the 
President to say yes this time 
because the nearness of the 
convention does not give him 
time to test his recovery under 
normal working conditions. 
Working at Gettysburg an 
hour or 80 a’day, or even 2 or 
3 hours a day, shielded from 
all but the most imperative! 
staff appointments, isn’t like) 
working in Washington 8 to 10. 
hours a day with most of the) 
normal pressures of the Pres- 
idency focused on his desk. 

After his heart attack, Mr. 
Eisenhower went back te near- 
ly a full working schedule for | 
about twe months. He had 
taken a rest in Florida, re- 
turned toe White House and 


| 


government owned liquoria 
stores, discarding several mil- 
lion ration books. Where for- 
merly the individual was lim-| 
ited to a monthly quota of | 
three quarts, now everyone 
over 21 had the right to buy 
unlimited quantities. | 

Today — eight months later 
—the beerdrinking spree is 
still going strong. “> 

Alcoholic consumption is up 
25 per cent, having subsided 
only a few degrees from the) 
all-time high set during the 
initial stages of the “new 
freedom.” ) 


THE NUMBER of drunks 
arrested has doubled (almost 


After Five 


This beautiful line. . 
this beautiful blue . 


acute shortage of beds in the 
alcoholic wards and clinics. 
Perhaps the most funda- 
mental change is that drinking 
is moving from the restaurant 
to the home. Under the old 
system, the only legal place to, 
buy a drink was in a restau- 
rant. The law said you must 
eat food to be served liquor. 
Now, it isn't necessary to go 
to a restaurant. People stock 
up at the nearest liquor store 
and drink at home, avoiding 


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just before making his final 
decision spent 16 days shoot 
ing quail and tramping in the 
tall grass on Secretary Hum- 
phrey'’s plantation at Thomas- 
ville, Ga. He had ample time 
to measure his fitmess at work 
and at play. 

Now Mr. Eisenhower has re!- 
atively little time to do either 
before he must make known 
his intention. The judgment 
of some is that he is .more 
likely to say no because he 
hasn't adequate opportunity to 
test his stamina under a nor- 
mal workload. 


® IT IS A GREATER risk to 
continue in the Presidency 
after two serious illnesses than 
after one. Mr. Eisenhower is 
not concerned about the risk 
to himself. He could well be 
very concerned about the risk 
to the presidency. He has 
stressed that “it is a very criti- 
cal thing” to change the presi- 
dency “when it is unexpected.” 

There are those who feel 
Mr. Eisenhower would not 
subject the presidency to the 
risks of even minor ilinesses 
or to the dangerous confusion 
of a serious disability which 
could bring about damaging 
second-term conditions. 


® FINALLY THERE is the 
influence of the President's 
family. Mrs. Eisenhower and 
Maj. John Eisenhower, their 
son, have always been opposed 
to the second terms. You can 
imagine how much ag nd 
arguments they have ay 
than after his recovery from 
the heart attack. 

And what about Milton E- 
senhower, the brother to 


—_—— -———  -—-— 


whom the President most fre- 
quently turns for counsel? At 
a