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The Weather 


Today—Mostly sunny and less humid 
with high near 82; somewhat cooler at 
night. Wednesday—Fair and pleasant. 
Monday's temperatures: High. 85 de- 
grees at 3:15 p. m.; low, 72 at 7 p. m. 


(For details see Page 16.) 


— ae 
_—- 


e Washington Post FinaL 


Times 


79th Year — No. 218 


— 


- - 


* Phone RE. 


7-1234 ome 


Coprright_ 1956 
Washington Post Company 


TUESDAY, JULY 


Herald 


10, 1956 


WTOP Radio (1500) TV (Ch. 9) 


FIVE CENTS 


CLEMENT GHOSEN AS KEYNOTER 


a 


$4-Billion 
Ceiling Put 
On Outlay of 
Foreign Aid 


House and Senate 
Act in Voice Vote. 
Disregard Ike's 
Restoration Plea 


By Wilmot Hercher 
Associated Press 

Congress put a $4-billion 
ceiling on foreign aid spend- 
ing yesterday, even as Presi- 
dent Eisenhower appealed 
for restoration of a substan- 
tial part of the money cut 
from the program. 

The House and Senate passed 
& compromise bill authorizing 
a foreign aid outlay $900 mil 
lion below what Mr. FEisen 
hower had proposed for the 
fiscal year which began July 1 

Action came on voice 
in both chambers. There was 
no debate The authorization 
bill now goes to the White 
House 

Between the time that 
House voted and the Senate 
took up the measure, the Presi 
dent issued a statement in 


votes 


ine 


Martin's Fluff Stirs 


General Laughter 


m Y. Pera e Yeu Se: 7 

Rep. Joseph W. Martin Jr., 
(R-Mass.) House Minority 
Leader, startied his col- 
leagues yesterday when he 
said he based his views on 
foreign aid on “the judg- 
ment of the President and 
General Motors.” 

As laughter died down, it 
became apparent that the Re. 
publican leader had meant to 
refer to the “General Staff” 
—a term he uses interchangé- 
ably for the Joint Chiefs of 
Ss 


-_- ——_-——- ———— a 


Gettysburg, Pa.. saying “there 
ean be no peace” in the world 
without a strong mutual secu 
rity program nurtured by for 
eign aid funds 

But Mr. Eisenhower's plea 
appeared to be directed more 
at a pending appropriations 
bill than at the authorization 
measure. 

This appropriations legisla 
tion—the actual foreign aid 
money bill—provides for only 
$3.6 billion, or $1.3 billion less 
than the President had re 
quested. 

“It is my earnest conviction 
that the successive slashes that 
the committees Congress 
have made in mutual security 
funds are not in the best inter 
ests of the United States of 
America,” Mr. Eisenhower said 

The mutual security pro 
gram, he said, is “one of the 
wisest and most necessary” this 
country has ever undertaken in 
the fieid of foreign affairs 

Mr 
continued 

“The mutual security pro- 
gram has positive, concrete ad 
vantages for our people and 


See AID, Page &, Col. 5 


Today's Index | 


Page 


of 


Amusements 
Childs 
Classified 
Comics 
Crossword 
District 
Dixon 
Editorials 12 
Events Today {6 ;$ 
Federal Diary 15 Sports 
Financial .18-20 TV-Radio 
Goren 32) W 
Herblock 12 Weather 
Horoscope 32 


~~ Mr. Rogers 
Sells Boat 
For $250 


“Calls kept coming in long 
after my want ad sold the 
boat for $250 on the first 
day,” reported Mr. Tommy 
J. Regers. 3 So. Early st., 
Alexandria, Va 

You. too, can sell anything 
faster—fishing boats or sofa 
beds — through The Wash- 
ington Post and Times 
H erald—reaching 382,000 
families daily. over 127,000 
more families than any other 
paper in town. Simply 
phone— 


RE. 7-1234 


4 


Picture Page 
Sokolsky } 
374 
4 
~s 
/ r 


amen ¢ 


3 
5 
6 


ee 


Eisenhower's statement 


Algiers Rebels Cut Off 


Fresh Water to Oran 


ALGIERS, Algeria, July 
9 W—The coastal city of 
Oran, with a population of 
300,000, was cut off from 
fresh water today after Na- 
tionalist rebels blew a 
breach in the aqueduct sup- 
plying the city. 

Authorities feared it 
would be about 10 days 
before the aqueduct is re- 
stored. Water was sharply 
rationed and the residents 
restricted to washing in the 
salt water of the Meditet 
ranean 

The aqueduct runs some 
70 miles from the moun 
tains near Tiemcen. The 
rebel attack was the 
mountain area 


in 


Kidnap Hunt 

Bogged Down 

By Hoax Calls 
2 Men Seized, Admit 
Sending Mother 


On Futile Mission 


WESTBURY, N.Y. July 9 # 
[he search for kidnaped Peter 
Weinberger bogged down today 
in a welter of hoax calls. from 
heartiess meddlers 

No trace of the 5-week-old 
boy has been found since he 
was seized on July 4. Nor has 
been a scrap of hard evi 
that the child still 


there 
dence 
alive 


is 


men were arrested 
New York early today. Police 
said they admitted hoax tele- 
phone calls that sent the 
baby’s mother, Mrs. Beatrice 
Weinberger, into the night in 
a perilous, fruitless search for 
her son 

With $5000 cash on her to 
meet a ransom demand. the 
tiny Drunette mother spent 70 
agonizing minutes parked at a 
lonely Queens intersection in 
New York City 

Even as she waited, police 
said her two tormentors were 
phoning her home at least 
three more times from taverns 
and drug stores. They poured 
more anguish into the heart 
of Mrs. Weinberger’s husband. 
Morris, with their misleading 
information 

“They said they weren't in- 
terested in the money.” an 
official said. “They just wanted 
to see the cops run around.” 

The fake phone call had as- 
sured Mrs Weinberger she 
pick up her baby in a 

Catholic church in 
Jackson Heights after she had 
paid the ransom in the adjoin- 
ing Woodside section of 
Queens 


Two in 


could 
Roman 


Whea it became apparent 
the kidnaper was not going to 
Mrs. Weinberger 


drove on to the church. 


snow ul 


searched the 
to bottom 


and cilergyme 
edifice from 
rhey found no baby 

Meanwhile, the added phone 
calls had the undoing 
of the two hoaxers. The tele- 
phone calls were traced and 
New York City police seized 
the men 

The pair, a 24-year-old unem- 
ployed Queens resident, Gor- 
don T. Rowell, and a 26-year- 
old parttime Queens  bar- 
tender, Robert F. Giebler, were 
booked on charges of giving 
false information and attempt- 
ed extortion Both married. 
they face up to 10 years in 
prison if convicted 


top 


proved 


3 Wisconsin Primary Fight 


Eisenhower 


Conferees’ Job Unfinished 


Aske Burke Action on CTC Sale 


Airport 


Weeks Asks CAB 
To Designate 
Friendship as 
Alternate Field 


Robert E. Baker 
Siaft Rew 

President Eisenhower 
asked Congress yesterday 
for $34.7 million to start 
construction of a huge air- 
port at Burke in Fairfax 
County. 

Immediately following the 
request, Commerce Secretary 
Sinclair Weeks asked the Civil 
Aeronautics Board to desig 
nate immediately Baltimore's 
Friendship International A\ir- 
port as an alternate to congest- 
ed Washington National Air 
port 

Weeks said that even if 
Congress appropriates the 
Burke funds in these closing 
days of the session and con- 
struction on the Burke project 
begins at once, the new air- 
port would not be available 
for traffic until Jume, 1959 

Meanwhile, he said, Friend. 
ship should be available for 
excess Washington traffic 

The President's request al. 
ready has been forwarded to 
Senate Appropriations 
Committee where, a staff! mem- 
ber said, hearings on the con. 
troversial measure will be held 
later this week. _ 

This spokesman said there 
would be enough time in this 
session of Congress for ap- 
proval of the Burke appropria- 
tion. A last-ditch fight by long- 
time opponents, however, al- 
ready was forming. 

Sen. John Marshall Butler 
(R-Md.) said he world .“vigor- 
ously oppose” the request and 
he forecast its defeat. Sen. J. 
Glenn Beall (R-Md.), who noted 
he had been a consistent backer 
of the “Eisenhower program,” 


By 


rier 


the 


said he “could not disagree any 


more than I do with the re- 
quest.” 

The statements by Butler and 
Beall both called on the Ad- 
ministration to designate 
Friendship as an alternate to 
National Airport, and were is- 
sued before Weeks requested 
such designation 

Beall said the President must 


See AIRPORT. Page 8, Col. 3 


Resort Weather 


Police | 


’ 
| 


Faces F 


urther Delay 


By Richard L. Lyons 


Stal Reporter 


Congressional transit con- 
ferees met for 1‘2 hours yester- 
day but got only about halfway 
through their job of going over 
a proposed franchise under 
which O. Roy Chalk would op- 
erate transit here 

Kept hopping by roll--call 
votes in each chamber, the 
House-Senate Conference Com- 
mittee met an hour late at 3:30 
p. m. and broke up at 5 p. m 
when the Senators had to go 
to vote 

Conferees said they agreed 
on nothing definitely, and wil 
meet again at 2:30 p. m 
Wednesday to try to finish the 
work 

It could take more than one 
meeting, because the group has 
not yet come to grips with the 
one big question it is expected 
to fight over—whether to cre- 


ate a public authority to run 
transit if Chalk’s offer to buy 
is voted down by Captita!l 
Transit’s stockholders Aug. 3. 

The Commissioners have pro- 
posed creating a standby au- 
thority to be sure that transit 
keeps running if something 
should happen iP the Chalk 
deal after CTC’s franchise dies 
Aug. 14 

Rep. Oren Harris (D-Ark.), 
ranking House conferee, and 
some other House members 
don't like the idea of a public 
authority and don't want it in 
the bill in any form—even 
though it becomes academic if 
CTC’s stockholders sell to 
Chalk. 

Harris prefers to assure con- 
tinued service by letting CTC 
continue operating until Janu. 


See TRANSIT, Page &, Col. 5 


Voleano Adds Devastation 


Quakes, Tidal Waves Hit 


Aegean Isles; 


42 Killed 


(Map on Page 6, Picture, Page 10) 

ATHENS, July 9 (“” — Earthquakes and giant tidal 
waves struck a group of islands in the southern Aegean 
Sea today. Forty-two persons were reported killed, while 
more than 46 were injured. Property damage wes high as 


the earth shocks 
from the sea crumbled homes 
and business places. The cas- 
ualty figures were released by 
Greek nava) authorities. 

Worst hit of 12 islands af- 
fected was Thira, a crescent- 
shaped island 12 miles long 
and three miles wide known 
also as Santorini, where an 
erupting volcano added to the 
devastation. 

Reports from Thira said 32 
lives were lost and 20 persons 
were listed as missing. The 
total population of the dsland, 
the southernmost of the Cyc- 
lades group, about 10,000. 
Most houses there collapsed 
and the rest are uninhabitable, 
a Government report said. 

[At Pasadena, Calif., the 
United Press reported, Cali 
fornia Institute of Technology 
instruments showed the quake 
had an intensity of 8.0, “among 
the top two or three quakes of 
the 20th Century in Europe.”| 

los, which some legends say 
is the burial place of Homer, 
was hard hit, too. That island, 
12 miles long and 5 miles wide 
north Thira, reported 10 
dead. Nearly all] houses on the 
island collapsed and additional 
victims were feared buried in 
the debris. 

The quakes were felt in 
Athens, but no damage occur- 
red in the Greek capital. Gov- 
ernment authorities sent 12 
naval vessels and planes with 
doctors, medical supplies and 
nurses to the stricken islands. 

The pilot of a Greek air 
force plane that flew over 
Thira said most of it was 
shrouded in dust and clouds 
with the adjoining sea “vio- 
lently disturbed.” The volcano 
there erupted strongly after 
the quake and slight shocks 
continued into the afternoon, 
the Athens observatory said. 


is 


of 


Wiley Calls for ‘Honest Elections’ Law 
In Citing $150,000 Fund to Beat Him 


about “the mysterious $150,000 finance meeting at the Wiscon 


Associated Press 

sen. Alexander Wiley (R- 
Wis.) yesterday called for pas- 
sage of the “honest elections” 
bill, and linked it with a re- 
ported $150,000 campaign fund 
to defeat him in the Wisconsin 
Republican senatorial primary 
contest. 

Speaking for the measure 
which, among other things. 
would require more detailed 
campaiga expenditures reports, 
Wiley said; 

“The full spotlight of pub- 
licity must be shed on the whole 
shadowy question of United 


” 


States campaign contributions.” 


Turning to his own case, 
Wiley said that “all over Wis- 
consin™- people are 


} 


; 


campaign fund reportedly 
pledged to my opponent at the 
GOP State Convention for the 
primary campaign which will be 
climaxed on Sept. 11.” Wiley’s 
opponent is Rep. Glenn R. 
Davis (R-Wis.) 

“I say that this $150,000 mys. 
tery is but a symptom of some- 
thing even more serious—deep 
behind the scenes—the arro- 
gant grabbing for power on the 
part of a few reactionary would- 
be bosses, would-be kingmakers, 
who are determined to sabotage 


Dwight D. Eisenhower and his 


team,” Wiley said. 


> 


~ 
tA 


sin Club in Milwaukee. He 
added that: “Tomorrow another 
of the individuals involved in 


the story has invited prominent ph, 


Republicans to a ‘stag picnic.’ 
“Apparently the wouldbe 
‘kingmakers,’ rudely shaken by 
ihe reactions thus far, are des 
perately trying to fulfill their 
attempted purge of me,” he 
said. “The would-be political 
bosses are still trying to pull 
strings for their captive candi- 
date, their puppet .andidate in 
the Sep‘ember 11th primary. 
“But I say, having now 
visited once again—extensively 


Wiley said that within a few all over my state, I am more 


talking campaign fund) would hold a. shock—a complete rout.” 


J 


of the 


and waves’ 


Ike to Confer 
With GOP 
‘Hill’ Chiefs 


By Edwaru T. Folliard 
Staff! Reporter 

GETTYSBURG, July 9— An 
office has been set up here for 
President Eisenhower, and he 
will start using it Tuesday morn- 
ing for a conference with the 
Republican lceders of Congress. 

The office is one normally 
used by the president of Gettys- 
turg College. At the moment, 
ile school has no president, al 
though Gen. Willard S. Paul 
USA (ret.), is scheduled to take 
over on Aug. 1 

Sen. William F. Knowland 
(Calif.) and Rep. Joseph W. Mar- 
un Jr. (Mass.), Republican lead. 
crs of the Senate and House 
rospectively, along with other 
tup GOP members of Congress, 
we scheduled to take off from 
Washington in Aero Command. 
ers at 6:50 1 m. Tuesday and 
to arrive at the Gettysburg Air. 
port about a half hour later. 

White House Press Secreta 
James C. Hagerty said Presi- 
dent Eisenhower would meet 
with the leaders at 9:30 a. m. 
to discuss the legislative pro 
fram now before Congress. 

He said that the President 
would be at the college for 


about an hour and then return) band playing American and) 


lo his farm 

It will be the first time the 
Uhief Executive has met with 
the Republican legislative lead- 
eis since his operation for an’ 
intestinal obstruction on June) 
%. Ordinarily, he meets. with 
them every Tuesday morning 
while Congress is in session. 

The President today put in 
the longest work session of his 
convalescence. 

Meeting with seven top ad 


visers, he signed 36 bills, and’ 
sent to the Senate a request’ 


lor approval of the retirement 
of Gen. Alfred M. Gruenther. 
NATO commander, with the 
grade of full general. 

One bill atthorizes a tem- 
porary increese in the legal Fed- 


eral debt limit of $3 billion,| 


For Use as Embassy and Chancery 


iperty running from S st. to| The Davis Mansion was the 
| Decatur place. ' 


from $275 billion to $278 billion 
until next July 1 


Lightning Kills 
Mitchellville Boy 


Lightning killed a 14-year-old 


terday, Prince Georges County 
police reported. 

Emory Johnson Jr.. 
a tenant on the farm of Alfred 
J. Coleman, was pronounced 
dead on the scene after Bowie 
Rescue Squad workers tried for 
more than an hour to revive 
him. 

Police Pvt. Arthur M. Kriner 


. Pormosa. 


son of: 


Dwight F. Davis before 


Nixon Tells 


Asia Red Aid 


Can Enslave 


Vice President 
Answers Nehru’s 
Remark His Talk 


Was ‘Undemocratic’ 


KARACHI, Pakistan, July 
9 “»—Vice President Rich- 
ard Nixon wound up his cir- 
euit of Pacific and Asian na- 
tions today with a warning 
that a governnient accepting 
Communist aid runs the risk 
of having a rope tied around 
its neck 

The Vice President's declara 
tion, voiced here before he 
took off for Turkey, was a 
rejoinder to Prime Minister 
Nehru of India and a defense 
of his own July 4 speech in 
Manila in which he described 
neutralist policy toward com- 
munism as a “fearful risk.” 

Vice President Nixon ar 
rived in Istanbul tonight on 
the homeward leg of his Asian 
goodwill tour and was wel. 
comed at Esenboga Airport by 
rurkish President Celal Bayar 
Premier Adnan Menderes and 
other high-ranking officials, the 
International News Service re 
ported 

(The United States Vice Presi- 


‘dent later dined with Bayar at 


his official residence. It Was 


j}understood they discussed the 


Middie East situation as well 


|as Turkish-American relations.) 


Nehru, who strongly defends 
his country’s neutral policy and 
acceptance of both Soviet and 
American economic aid, said in 
London last week that tolerance 
of differing views was the basis 
of democracy and that Nixon's 
speech was undemocratic 

“Nehru is entitied to his opin- 
ion,” said Nixon today, “but 
if he reads my speech carefully 
he will find it the very antith- 
esis of undemocratic thinking.” 

Anyone ‘who suggests Ked 
assistance is not inconsistent 
with freedom is reading history 
incorrectly,” Nixon added at 
a news conference. 

History showed, he con- 
tinued, that Soviet economic 
and military aid is given only 
for the purpose of winning a 
“Red satellite economically, 
politically and militarily 

“Soviet Aid.” he concluded. 
“is offered not with strings— 
but with a rope. And the 
recipient runs almost the cer- 
tain risk of having the rope 
tied around its neck.” 

The fact that Nixon flew 
here from the Philippines 
South Vietnam and 
Thailand without stopping in 
India also was likely to stir 
resentment in New Delhi. 

When Nixon and his wife 
Patricia, stepped from 
plane there was a full Pakistan 
honor guard on hand with a 


Pakistani airs. A reviewing 
stand, decorated with flowers 
and the Stars and Stripes, had 
been erected. 

President Iskander Mirza, his 
Persian-born wife, and acting 
Prime Minister Ismail Chun- 
drigar escorted him to the Pres- 
ident's house, where mounted 
lancers in white uniforms and 
blue turbans were lined wp at 
the gates. Prime Minister 
Chaudhri Mohammed Ali is in 
Europe. 


their | 


Associated Press - > 
GOV. FRANK G. CLEMENT 
. « . Democratic keynoter 


AlienProperty 
Bill Advances 
In Committee 


Senate Judiciary 
Unit Votes Return 


Of Seized Assets 
united Press 

The Senate Judiciary Com 
mittee vesterday unanimously 
approved a bill to return to its 
original owners about $500 mil 
lion worth of alien p operty 
seized during World War I! 

Most of the pro~ertys 
owned by German and 
nese aliens 

The measure also would pro- 
vide for payment of American 
citizens and companies for war 
damage claims against Ger- 
many and Japan for property 
seized by those countries. They 
would be paid in full from pay- 
ment made by Germany and Ja- 
pan to the United States for 
postwar economic assistance. 

The Committee bill provides 
for return of the full amount 
of seized alien property and 
assets. The Eisenhower Admin- 
istration had recommended a 
$10,000 iimit on returned prop. 
erty. 

Committee sources said the 
Alien Property Office now holds 
property and assets worth $500 
to $600 million 

The bill would ban return of 
property owned by Japanese 
and German war criminals. 

It also provides for sale to 
United States owners of any 
property which the President 
decides would be adverse to the 
Nations interest t@ return to 
foreign ownership 

The measure provides for re 
turn of alien property and as 
sets over a five-year period 
At the end of that time, the 
Alien Property Office would go 
out of business 

Among Major properties it 
now holds are the General Ani- 
line and Film Corp. plants in 
New York and New Jersey 
Committee sources said the 
corporation assets in Germany 
are now valued at more than 
$100 million 


Ft. Meade Soldier 
Dies After Fight 


A Ft. Meade soldier died yes 
terday in Walter Reed Hospital 
of head injuries suffered dur- 
ing a fight with another soldier 
from the Maryland base, Meade 
authorities said. 

Spec. 3d Class Harry Single- 
ton, 37, of the 2d Ordinance Co 
struck his head on the pave. 
ment when he was knocked 
down by Pvt. Duaine L. Mason 
21. of the 504th Air Borne Regi 
ment during an altercation Sat 
urday night, a spokesman said 


was 
Japa 


_ 


Residence of Tennis Cup Donor 


Tennessean 


To.Start Off 


Democratic 
Convention 


Selection of Young 
Governor Seen as 
Boost to Adlai’s 
Nomination Hopes 


By Tom Nelson 

CHICAGO, July 9 UP 
Democratic Party chieftains 
today picked Gov. Frank G. 
Clement of Tennessee to de- 
liver the keynote speech 
which kick off the 
Party's National Convention 
next Aug. 13 


National 


will 


Democratic Chair- 
man Paul M. Butler emerged 
from a <3hour meeting of 
13 members of the Party's Con- 
vention and Arrangements 
Committee to announce that 
Clement had been picked out 
of 17 or 18 possible keynoters 

The choice of the youthful 
Tennessee Governor was re- 
garded as a boost for Adlai E. 
Stevenson's candidacy for the 
Democratic presidential nomi- 
nation 

Clement, at 36 the youngest 
of the Nation's Governors, has 
been a forthright Stevenson 
backer. It was earlier believed 
the leaders would pick a key- 
noter who had not yet declared 
himself on a nominee. 

Butler said he did not see 
any particular significance in 
the fact that Clement is a Stev- 
enson man. 

He also hedged on whether 
Clement's selection might rule 
him out as a possible vice 
presidential nominee. 

“I would leave that to any- 
one else's interpretation rather 
than my own,” the Democratic 
chief said. 

Traditionally, the convention 
keynote speaker is not a cardi- 
date for any nomination 

Butier told newsmen that 
Clement's youth and the fact 
that he comes from a border 
State “had some bearing” on 
his choice. He predicted the 
Tennessean will cower the 
racial segregation issue “in a 
way that will not be offensive 
to any segment of the popula- 
tion” and will speak “fluently 
and persuasively” on the farm 
problem and other issues 

[An Associated Press dis- 
patch from Nashville said 
Clement told reporters: “I did 
not expect this assignment. 
There were many other capable 
men who could have done an 
excellent job, but I'll do the 
very best I can to represent 
the Democratic Party and the 
American people.”} 

Earlier it was believed Gov. 
Edmund S. Muskie of Maine 
would get the nod 


President Signs 
Sewage Plant Bill 


President Eisenhower signed 
the new Water Pollution Con- 
trol bill yesterday making Fed. 
eral funds available to help pay 
for constructing municipal sew- 
age treatment plants. 

At the same time the Presi. 
dent pointed out that Federal 
aid will not be available to all 
communities desiring it. He 
urged communities with suffi- 
cient resources to pay for their 
own treatment projects to do 
so amd pot to postpone construc- 
tion because of the possibility 
of receiving a Federal grant 


es 


Laos Buys Davis Home for $225,000 


(Picture on Page 36.) 


The Dwight Davis mansion at 
2222 S st. nw. has been pur- 


y who was mending a fence chased by the government of| 
on a farm at Mitchellville yes- Laos for use as its embassy and| 


chancery. The purchase price | 


was $225,000. 

The four-story brick house, 
one of Washington's show- 
places, was the home of Mrs. 
her 
death last Nov. 28. 


Officials of the Laotian Em-' 


bassy said negotiations had 


facilities. 


The first floor contains a! 
large entrance hall and a din- 
ing room as well as coat rooms. 
The second floor has a living 
room, library and another din- 
ing room. Four master bed- 
rooms are on the third floor 
and two more on the fourth. 
The servants’ wing ~of the 


‘house contains 10 rooms in ad- 


dition. to kitchen and pantry 


The Laotian Ambassador, 
Ourto R. Souvannavong, hopes 


said the boy and Coleman were been under way for several to move from his present quar- 
putting up barbed wire when months and that the heirs of|ters at 2875 Woodlawn dr., nw., 
rain drove them under a locust'the Davis estate agreed yester-|to the new quarters in a few 
hours one of the, individuals'confident than ever that the tree about 5 p.m. A few mo- day afternoon to the terms of weeks. Laos opened its first em- 
“involved in this story” (of the bosses are due for a complete ments later a bolt hit.the top 


tree, 
‘ 


7 


the sale. 
; 


The house is located on pro- 


b 


i} 


bassy in Washington in July, 
, 1953. 


‘ 


(1945 


scene of brilliant parties in 
former years. Mrs. Davis, a so 
cial and political leader noted 
for her fight against prohibition 
in the late 1920s and 1930s was 


‘known as a perfectionist. Her 


home was once described as a 
‘dream of lightness, airiness, 


good taste, and quality.” 


Mrs. Davis was the widow of 
Dwight F. Davis, who died in 
Mr. Davis had served as 
Secretary of War under Pres- 
ident Coolidge and as governor- 
general of the Philippines un- 
der President Hoover. He was 
an internationally known 
sportsman and donated the 
Davis Cup, famed trophy of 
international tennis. 


ION POsT and TIMES HERALD 


Tuesday, July 10, 1956 eeee 


THE WASHING 
o 


oo 


ae 


a 


Fiouting of Congress 
On Trade Is Charged 


—~ 


hae’ 


| 


4 


Associated Press 


Eisenhower Catch 


A giant 30-pound muskellunge is exhibited by Milton Eisen- 
hower, his brother-in-law, Roy Eakin Jr., and Joseph Dewyer 
of Eagle Fever. Wis. (from left), after a recent fishing trip 
in Eagle River. Eisenhower, the President's brother, va- 
cations regularly in that area. 


’ By Rowland Evans Jr. 


N Y¥. Herald Tribune News Gervice 


{ strong report charging 
that the Eisenhower adminis- 
tration has “flouted” the will| 
of Congress on East-West trade 
and terming Harold E. Stas- 
sen “arrogant” and “evasive*is| 
under study by the Senate! | 
Permanent Investigations Sub) , 
committee, it was learned yes 
terday. ) 
| The draft report, written by| 
the Subcommittee's staff, is 
‘understood to have the ap | 
proval in its major findings and’ 
| recommendatigns of at least 
three members of the seven 
man subcommittee. Sen. John 
L. MeClellan (D-Ark.) is chair. 
man. 

Two of the Subcommittee’s 
Republicans, Sens. Karl E 
‘Mundt (S. D.) and George H 
| Bender (Ohio), are insisting 
‘on major changes in the report 
ibefore they will approve it 
And two Democrats, Sens. 
Stuart Symington (Mo.) and 
Henry M. Jackson (Wash.), be- 
lieve that in its present form 
the report is perhaps more 
critical of the Administration 
than the facts warrant 

Sens. Joseph R. McCarthy 
(R-Wis.) and Sam J. Ervin Jr 
(DN. CC.) were understood, 
lalong with McClellan, to be 
| satisfied with the report's scath- 
ling conclusions and recom- 
| mendations. 
| Thus it was probable that 
‘some slight changes would be 
imade before the report is sent 
to the parent Government 
Operations Committee for ap- 
proval and thence to the Sen- 
ate itself. The almost certain 
prospect yesterday was that 
Mundt and Bender would dis 


Associated Press 
Gina's Prise 


Actress Gina Lollobrigida 
holds her “David,” awarded 
for her performance in the 
film, “The Mest Beautiful 
Woman in the World,” dur- 
ing a reception in Rome. The 
award is made annually to 
the best actor, actress and di- 
rector of Italian films. 


Great Britain and other Ameri- 
can allies. These modifications 
downgraded various items, re- 
moving them from the list of 
embargoed strategic goods and 
permitting their shipment to 
Communist nations. 

The McClellan Subcommittee 
held two months of hearings 
early this year to study the 
1954 negotiations between this 
government and Western Euro- 
pean nations that led to the 
downgrading. The Commerce 
and State Departments, which 
together control the American 


Leaders Map 


Looking to Adjournment 


By Warre 
United 

Senate leaders yesterday laid 
down a definite legisiative pro 
gram in hopes the B4th Con 
gress can adjourn before the 
end of July 

Senate Republican Leader 
William F. Knowland (Calif.) 
told newsmen he still hopes for 
a wind-up by July 21 

Senate Democratic 
Lyndon B. Jon lex re 
fused to set any adjournment 
target. but he listed a group of 
bills as the Senate's “must” 
legislative program for the next 
two or three weeks 

Johnson's list included the 
foreign aid authorization and 
appropriation bills, Social Se- 
curity legislation, bills to au- 
thorize the Fryingpan-Arkansas 
and the Hells Canyon projects, 
{a judgeship measure, and a sup- 
‘plemental appropriation bill to 
provide last-minute funds for a 
number of agencies 

(The Associated Press quoted 
Johnson sa saying he doubts 
Congress will pass any Federal 
School aid legislation this ses 
sion and “doesn't know” wheth- 
er there will be final action on 
@ bill to raise postal rates.) 

Johnson saic. he anticipates 
considerable debate over the 
eontroversial fPomination of 
Solicitor General Simon E£E 
Sobeloff to be a judge of the 
‘Fourth Circuit Court of Ap 
peals. 

Some southern Senators con 
tend Sobeloff could not rule im 
partially on integration cases 
which might reach his bench be 
cause he argued the Govern 
ment’s schoo, anti-segregation 
ease before the Supreme Court 

Johnson told newsmen the 
Democratic Policy Committee 
has cleared sbout 50 other bills 
for floor action. He said they 
would be called up if they have 
any reasonable chance of pass- 
ing the House 

House Democratic leaders 
yesterday vetoed use of an un- 
ustial parliamentary device to 
force House action on an Ad 
minstration-opposed housing 
bill. 

Informed sources said Demo- 


Leader 


nson 


isent vigorously. 

The draft report declares: 
‘The Subcommittee believes 
that the Executive branch 
wished to conceal from the 
| American po the fact that 
iforeign (Allied) nations receiv- 
ing (American) aid ... are in 
iturn helping the Communists 
ito arm themselves against the 
United States.” 
correct way to bring the, The draft states that the 
bill to the House floor. The bill American negotiators in 1954, 
has been bottled up in the working under Stassen, empha- 
House Rules Committee, which sized the economic aspects of 
voted 6 to 4 to reject it 11 days trade. it says the Administra- 
ago tion “was evidently more inter- 

The Democratic leaders. it ested in the economic aspects of 
was learned, agreed to try to Strategic trade with the Com- 
reach a compromise with Re- Munists than .. . with he im- 
piiblicans on the bill, which'Pact on the military potential 
would expand public housing of the Communists 
far bevond President Eisen-' Stassen, now President Eisen- 
hower’s recommendation howers Special Assistant on 

As it came from the Banking| Disarmament, was chief of the 
Committee. the Democratic bill Foreign Operations Adminis- 
would provide for construction tration in 1954 when extensive 
of 180.000 Federally-subsidized changes were made in the list 
housing units over the next of goods embargoed for export 

'behind the Iron 

three years. Mr. Eisenhower 
asked for 70,000 over the next! 


Program 


n Duffee 
Press 


the 


embargo machinery, offered the 
Subcommittee the entire secret 
minutes and proceedings of the 
1954 negotiations, but refused 
to allow their publication on 
grounds of damage to American 
foreign relations. 

The draft report charges that 
the Administration was guilty 
of a “cynical perversion of 


congressional intent” in allow-| 


ing the relaxations in the face 
of a proviso designed to deny 
American foreign aid to na- 
tions that trade in goods 
deemed “strategic” by the Ad- 
ministration. This provision has 
been made a “farce” by the 
1954 revisions, the report con- 
tends 

The 1954 revision removed 
some 200 items from the list 
of strategic goods 

Overall, the draft report 
charges Stassen with having 
“misstated” the facts when he 
testified before the Subcom- 
mittee Match 9. as wel! as with 
being “arrogant, evasive, wun- 


Curtain “By 'candid” in that testimony: 


two years. 

Consideration had been given | 
to by-passing the Rules Com-' 
mittee through use of the s0- 
called “Calendar Wednesday” | 
procedufe. Under this Uttle- 
used device, Banking Commit- 
tee Chairman Brent Spence (D- 
Ky.) could have called up the 
bill. 

Democratic leaders expect 
Republicans to offer a substi-; president Fisenhower will 
tute housing bill, cutting back 


or eliminating public housing definitely run again and has 
from the Democratic bill. It decided, instead of making of 
was then expected that thea dramatic personal announce:| 
Rules Committee would be|ment, to let his aides reveal | 
asked to send both measures toi+,, fact to a waiting world! 
the House Soot later this week. 


Internationa! 


4 
' 


: 
This was revealed yesterday) 


N. 4 Senate Approves i by a highly-placed White House | 


. . source. who told this corre-| 
Rent-Control Bill ciao that the President 
TRENTON, N. J. July 


9 «mast Friday told three officials | 
The State Senate suspended its | Assistant President Sherman | 
rules tonight and approved, 15, dams, Press Secretary James 
to 0, a bill to permit rent con- ee te Ambassador te 
trols in some 30 New Jersey India John Sherman Cooper— 
communities. "i receiving the 


that he will run 
oper, on 

The action came about ON@\ word from the President by 
hour after an identical rent-jiong distance telephone, 
control measure failed by on€}promptly entered the race for 
vote in the Assembly. The legis-|Senator from Kentucky. 
lation also provides for a | The source said GOP strate-! 
per cent rent increase for land-| 


Writer Says High Aide 
Revealed Ike Will Run > 


By Ruth Montgomery 


News Service 


gists are considering two ways 
to make known Ike's decision 
to run. One would be for Hag- 
erty to reply, during a press 
conference at Gettysburg later 
this week, in answer to the in- 


Steel Talks 
Scheduled 
By Mediator 


__ PITTSBURGH,. July 9 &# 
|The Federal Government pre- 


/pered today to draw union andis 


management back into contract 
negotiations in an effort to end 
ithe Oday-old steel strike that)i 
is spreading unemployment 
across the Nation 

In addition to 650,000 strikin 
steelworkers upwards of 50,000. 
employes in steelrelated in- 
dustries have been furloughed. 
About 30,000 coal miners in 
steclowned operations will be 
idied when vacations end at 
| midnight. 

Clyde Millis, Assistant Dis 
rector of the Federal Mediation 
|Service, said a decision on the 
‘date and place for the new 
jround of negotiations will be 
‘announced shortly. Neither the'j 
‘union nor the companies had) 
‘any immediate comment. 

There were some indications 
here that the new series of ne-) 
gotiations would be in Pitts-\3 
burgh. Union. officials 
expressed opposition to moving 
tne talks away from Pittsburgh 
again. 
The prestrike bargaining’ 
sessions that ended in a dead-' 


lock were held in New York,'@ 


,described as “neutral ground.” 

Mills said mediation was de-|% 
cided on after separate meet- 
ings with both sides convinced 
‘the Government it would have 
to take the initiative in sch 
uling further peace talks. The 
disputing parties have not met 
since June 30 when the nego- 
tiations were broken off in New 
York six hours before the steel- 
workers walked out of mills) 
producing 90 per cent of Amer-| 
ica’s steel, 

Railroads alone have laid off 
more than 30,000 workers. 
Freight hauling by rail and 
truck has dipped sharply wie | 
out shipments of finished steel, 
iron ore and other raw mate- 
| rials. 

The Nation's 200,000 soft coal 
miners were on vacation when | 
the steel strike started. Some) 
30,000 employed in captive—| 
steel company - owned — mines | 
already have been told they 
will have no work until the! 
strike ends. 

There are a few exceptions, 
however. U. S. Steel Corp. 
said it will continue to operate 
‘its Robena mines in Western) 
Pennsylvania. A few § steel! 
‘firms not affected by the strike) 
also will resume mine opera-| 
tions Tuesday. | 


Reds to Show Wares 


Rey' er 

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaya, 
July 8—Goods from Commu-| 
nist China will go on display in| 
‘Malaya for the first time Tues-| 
day at the annual trade exhibi-| 
tion here. Forty-nine exhibit-| 
ors from many countries are! 
taking part. 


’ 
- 
7 
: 
- 


have |@ 


125 minutes*| 


from Pennsylvania Avenue 
to Peachtree Street | 


NON-STOP 


ATLANTA| 


*2 HRS. S MIN. 


“VISCOUNT 


World's First Turbo-Prop (jet-prop) Airliner 


NO FASTER WAY! 


Your choice of deluxe First Class or economical Aircoach flights 


Also VISCOUNT Service to 
BIRMINGHAM 
NEW ORLEANS 


MOBILE ¢ PHILADELPHIA 
NEW YORK 


Call STerling 3-3000 | 
or your Travel Agent 
Ticket Offices: Cor. 14th & F Sts., 
(Willard Hotel), 

Statler Hotel Lobby and 
Sheraton-Park Hotel Lobby 


Capital Z 


AIRLINES 


: 
; 


evitable question, that nothing 
has happened to change the 
President's announced 
uuon to run. 

The other would be for 
Chairman Leonard Hall of the 
Republican National Commit- 
tee to reveal that the two men'| 
have agreed up “so-and-so” to 
make the nominating speech 
for Eisenhower. 

This agreed-upon strategy) 
would serve to lessen the 
health issue by projecting the 
idea that Ike has never con- 
sidered his attack of ileitis se-| 
rious enough to impair his use-| 
fulness for another four years’ 
in the White House. 


inten- | 


lords and would apply only) 
to those communities which pe- 
titioned the legislature for per- 


eratic leaders decided that the 
maneuver would not have been 


mission 
ordinances. 


—— —_ ee _— eee ee ee Ce _-_- — 


to adopt rent-control 


FOR SALE 
1956 PONTIAC 
STATION WAGON 


‘2676 


Deluxe, 3 Seats, Hyd., R. & H. Used 1,000 miles, 


new warranty. 


FLOOD PONTIAC 


4221 Connecticut Avenue . 


SPRING & SUMMER SHOES 


Were 
$ 6.95 Ball Band Commodores 
13.50 Hand Sewn Loafers 
14.95 Hand Sewn Softies 
EOL Oe PE Pe 
22.50 
25.00 
27.95 
29.50 
34.50 Dow 
We don't have all shoes im all styles, but there is «4 substantial 
savings for you, your ze. 


J. M. Stein & Cu. 


CUSTOM TAILORS 
For Hand Boned English and 


1416 
H St. N.W. Demestic Shoes of Distinction 


aL DEES SE EEE ee SD EE, SE EE Ee ee ee eR Re Re ER ee ee 
~*~ 


Se i i i 
> 7 > 


- ts... s+... sj] TT TTF rTF rF * ~~. - © 


-_ es =s,jfeere ere rvejeevr*.7°}} FFT pewreroe'=rfrerreerr--.., 


2 A 


District Income Taxes 


To Be Taken Out of Pay 


L. Martin, the President's 
action implements a provision 
of the new District tax bill ) 
which permits tax withholding! 
and is purely a “routine” step. 
The District tax law provides | 
tary of Treasury to enter into|for tax exemptions of $1000 for | 
an agreement with the District|single persons and $2000 for 
Commissioners to deduct taxes couples. 
from all Federal employes who; 
live and work within the Dis-| 
trict. Members of the Armed! 


Forces and legislative employes | Today's a la Carte 
are exempt | 


According to Assessor James! LUNCHEON 
SPECIAL! 


| Braised Short Ribs of 
Beef in Casserole 


Fresh V Jardiniere 
Rissole Potatoes 
Tossed Mixed Green Salad 


1.75 


lete Six-Course 
rome from $2.50 


Served from 4:30 te 9:30 P.M. 


Including 


FREE DINNER PARKING 
From 6:00 P.M. te 1 AM. 
At Capital Garage Opposite 

Longchamp: 
Alse Large a La Carte Menu 


President Eisenhower yester- 
day signed an executive order 
which clears the way for the 
‘withholding of District income 
taxes from the pay of Federal 
employes, beginning Oct. 1. 

The order enables the Secre 


ee ——— 


Red Advisers in India 


NEW DELHI, India, July 9 
p—A four-man team of Soviet 
experts arrived here today from 
Moscow to advise the Indian 
Government on the heavy-me-' 
chine industry. The team was 
headed by B. K. Priholdo, So-| 
viet vice minister for the heavy- 
machine building industry. 


ENGINEER 
GOVERNMENT 
RELATIONS 


Prominent Nationa! Manufac- 
turer of Automatic Tempere- 
ture and Humidity Controls has 
opening for recent engineer 
ing graduate. To contact gov- 
ernment design and construc- 

with new 


| 
’ 
) 


T1117 Mt NY. Col WA. 68-0108 


DIRECTORS 


EDWARD C. BALTZ 
WILLIAM H. DYER 
WILLIAM L. KING 
W. S. MARTINDILL 

THORNTON W. OWEN 
ROBERT O. SCHOLZ 
SAMUEL SCRIVENER. SR. 
SAMUEL SCRIVENER. JR. 
4. HORACE SMITHEY 
CARL C. SMUCK 


ADVISORY 
BOARD 


F. TRACY CAMPBELL 
DONAL L. CHAMBERLIN 
CHARLES T. CLAYTON 
ROGER W. EISINGER 
CHARLES C. ELDERKIN 
DILLER 8B. GROFF 
WALTER S. HARTMAN 
WILLIAM B. HOLTON 
SIONEY S&S. JAFFE 
WALTER G. KOLB 

J. JEROME LIGHTFOOT 
ALBERT LINDSTROM 
WILLIAM A. LUDKE 

C. BAYNE MARBURY 
WILLIAM L. OREM, JR. 
FREDO. E. SHOEMAKER 
PAUL C. VAN NATTA 
WILLIAM E. WILEY 
LLOYD J. WINELAND 


: BRANCH OFFICES . 


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Sees 
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we » b kaoe- : put ‘ear <; ¥ 'w . 
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= 4 x : P , é 
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4 v . ? . a : £ 4 4 


JUNE 30, 19586 


RESOURCES 


First Mortgage Loons.........+.+++++ $207,856,483.12 
U. S. Government Bonds.....+.-ssee4s 1,887,668.51 
Federal Home Loan Bank Stock........ 2,696,200.00 
Office Buildings, Equipment and Land... 5,094,238.84 
Other Resources. .....cccccccceveees 815,783.55 

16,775,556.46 
$235,125,930.48 


Err PeTTTTITT TiTriT tit 


LIABILITIES 


Due Savings Shareholders »seeee $201,246,047.82 
Construction Loans in Process. .....+++. 7 532,530.48 
Federal Home Loan Bonk Advonces..... 6,550,000.00 
Other Liabilities. ......ccccescsceeces 1,348,724.83 
Surplus ond Reserves... secscssececes 18448,4627.35 


$235,125,930.48 


MEMBER: 

= y 4 ~~pheee 

Bort om 

Federel Sevings and 

Leen Ineurence Corp. 

ond Leen leoque 

District of Columbia Sevings 
end leon leeque 


Sevings end loon Foundetion 


PERPETUAL BUILDING ASSOCIATION 


ZOWARDO C. SALTZ. PRESIDENT 

MAIN OFFICE: tITH ano € STREETS, HW. WASHINGTON © C 

ANACOSTIA OFFICE 1108 6000 HOPE aD. £.€ PRINCE GEORGES OFFICE. 7118 maRLsono rind 

BETHESDA OFFICE 1a wiscomsm avenue =: SILVER SPRING OFFICE: Groncis And WAYNE AVEKUES 
ESTASLIGHED 160) 


Rites Held for 67 Air 


FLAGSTAFF, Ariz., July 9 a? 


Crash Dead 


Funeral services for 67 victims 
of commercial aviation’s worst 
disaster were held here today, | 
with burial in the “Grand Can- 
hg Memorial Plot” of the 
‘lagstaff cemetery. 

Sixty-seven coffins, contain. 
ing remains of victims aboard| 
a TWA Superconstellation that. 
apparently collided in flight and | 
fell with a United Air Lines 
DC-7 into the Grand Canyon, 
were lowered into a grave, All 
128 persons aboard were killed’ 
when the pianes fell into the’ 
Canyon June 30. 

Seventy persons were aboard | 
the TWA airliner, but three of | 
the victims were to receive final | 
rites in their home towns. ) 

About 1800 persons. including | 
some 350 relatives and friends| 
cf the victims, attended today’s 
service, Catholic, Protestant. 
Jewish and Mormon clergymen’ 
conducted fhe mass burial serv-' 
ice 

One coffin was a tiny one for 
the 3-week-old baby of Mr. and 
Mrs. J. Maag of Los Angeles. | 
who aiso died in the crash. 

The plot, 72 by 24 feet. will! 
be a perpetual memorial to| 
those who died 
Meanwhile. the Nation's air- 
traffic control system was) 
under fire. | 

Congressional and Civil Aero-| 
nautics Board authorities still 
are piecing al. the evidence to.' 
gether ) 

David Halperin, chairman of! 
the TWA Central Air Safety! 
Committee of the Airline Pilots| 
Association, said his group was: 

“Fully aware that the basic 
eause of this accident is direct. 
ly attributable to the complete- 
ly inadequate and obsolete air 
traffic control system.” 

Rep. Oren Harris (-Ark). 
ehairman of the House Com- 
merce Subcommittee that went! 
to the crash scene and Las! 
Vegas, Nev, to conduct a pre-| 
liminary hearing into the cau 
of the crash. said: 

“This accident makes clear an 
imperative need to take a look 
at air safety.” The Subcommit-. 
tee planned to continue its in- 
vestigation. 


Pender Man Held 
On Rape Charge 


vy | 


Tallahassee Bus Outlook | 
Called ‘Fairly Hopeless’ 


TALLAHASSEE, Fla., July 9 except for one 3-passenger seat 
»—City Commissioner W. T. reserved for white patrons. 
Mayo today said rejection by Mayo said “the people of 


| 


whether to amputate at once or 


Internationa! News 


Row upon row of caskets—that of a child is in foreground—are shown during services for victims of the TWA plane crash 
— —-— — Se ee eo —_—_ —- - . -_- |) 


Fire Reuts 30 
7 Buildings 
In Illinois 


Capital Burn 


Landlady 
Convicted in 


Morals Case 


Ann Roberts was found guilty 


THE WASEMNGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
eagh Tutsday, July 10, 1956 3: 


——, 


Wife Maintains Minister 
Said He Was Unfaithful 


Ist Severe Cases 


A-Ray Burns 
Are Repaired 
By Surgery 


NEW YORK, July 9 —The 
American College of Surgeons 
has reported that the first se- 
vere atomic radiation injuries 
to the arms, hands, legs, and 
feet have been repaired surgi- 
cally without resort to amputa- 
tion and without permanent 
loss of function. 

What to do for such injuries 
had been an unanswered surgi- 
cal question through the first 
years of the atomic age. The 
surgeon's dilemna had been 


MIAMI, Fia., July 9 (”)—Thes° 
wife of a Canadian-born Pres-| a 
byterian minister, fighting his 
divorce suit, admitted from the) 
‘witness stand today that she 
found and read some of his’ 
letters but denied opening and 
resealing them before giving 
them to him. 

Mrs. Phyllis Northcutt, who 
\is asking separate maintenance; ~ 
and custody of their three chil-| | 
dren, said the Rev. Thomas 
Graham Northcutt, 36, told her) 
he was unfaithful with two 
women. 

Mrs. Northcutt, who said her 
home is Princeton, N. J., de- 
nied the minister’s testimony 
concerning an alleged episode 
at the Lincoln Hotel in New 
York with one of her fellow 
missionary students 

She testified that students 
went to her room in groups to) 
bid her goodby because she 
was Abandofiing the training at 
Nyack Missionary School, and! 
one, Rev. William Carey, lin-| 
gered after the others had) °° 
gone. ) 

“He wanted to be very famil- ' , ” 
iar with me.” she testified, «y|When I married Mr. Northcutt 
cried and threatened to call the| The couple, married in To- 
hotel clerk and he left.” Sheironto, Canada, in 1941, sepa- 
said that was in February, 1943.' rated at Christmas, 1954 

In answer to a question if} (He was pastor of the now @e- 
she had ever been intimate|funct Kenilworth Presbyterian 
with other men, Mrs. Northeutt)Church at 1320 Kenilworth ave. 
replied: “No. I was a virgin! ne. in Washington in 1949-50) 


Raleigh Haberdasher 
Salutes the All-Stars 


On the occasion of the 23rd Inter-League Base- 


to let nature take its course 
and treat each symptom as it 
appeared. 

The answer was supplied by 
Drs. James Barret Brown and 
Minot P. Fryer of St. Louis, 
who took part in the treatment 
of four employes of the Atomic 
Energy Commission. These em- 
ployes suffered radiation inju- 
ries to their hands during the 
first atomic bomb tests at Eni 
wetok in 1948. 


Like X-Ray Burns 


Their hands received heavy 
emissions of beta and gamma 
rays. Medical science knew very 
little about what such rays did 
to human tissues and the hu- | 
man body. It knew, however, 
what X-rays did. 


The X-ray effect is that of a 
deep-seated byrn. Such proved 
the case with the atomic radia- 
tions of beta and gamma. Smal! 
blisters appeared during the 
first few days, and spread. 

Within 30 days the blisters 
ran their course, and then began 
opening and drying. The treat 
ment so far had been largely 
one of dressing the wounds fre 
quently. At about the 40th day 
the areas of destroyed skin and 
open wounds could be distin 


United Press 


REV. T. G. NORTHCOTT 
. accused of miscondact 


ball Classic, Raleigh welcomes to Washington 


guished. 
In the seventh month, the 
surgeons began cutting out the 


all the fine athletes participating in this great 


Tallahassee Negroes of a com- Tallahassee do not want inte- event 
promise proposal for ending gration and they are not going 
the bus boycott made the sit- to have it.” He added 


uation “fairly hopeless.” “If they (the Negroes) 


yesterday of contributing to the | purned areas and “resurfaced’ 
delinquency of a petite 16-year-| with thick skin grafts. This in 
old who ran away from home/volved several operations, the 
and lived in a common-law re-|last one about two years after 


\ Fairfax County grand jury 
yesterday indicted a 20-year-old 
Pender, Va.. man on a charge 
of raping a 16-year-old ward of 


SPRINGFIELD, Ii, July 9 
r—Fire swept seven buildings 


We at Raleicgh are great believers in sports 
are / in the downtown area early to- * g 


At a mass meeting last night not willing to accept the situ- 
the Negro Intercivic Council ation as it exists in Tallahas- 
reaffirmed its determination see and accept something less 
to do without public transpor- than full integration the situ- 
tation until Negroes get inte- ation is fairly hopeless, be- 
grated seating. cause the City Commission is 

The group voted down a re- not willing to change the fran- 
newed offer by the City Com-ichise to include full integra- 
mission to permit Negroes to tion.” 
isit where they wish on buses| No new meetings between 
the City Commission and rep- 
resentatives of the Intercivic 
Council have been arranged. 
An estimated 500 Negroes at- 
tended last night's meeting. 

The Rev. David Brooks, a’ 
leader of the Negro Intercivic' 
Council, reported the Commis- 
ision offer, which was wunani- 
jmously rejected. He said he 
‘understood Negroes would not 
be required to stand while the 
white seat remained empty 


the County Welfare Depart 
ment 

Paul Dean Stokely, a service 
station attendant, is free on 
$5000 bond. He is charged with 
attacking the girl in his auto 
parked on a wooded side road 
off Arlington bivd. last June 
10. Stokely enteged a plea of not 
guilty. 


Airliner Propeller Snaps, 
Kills 1 Rider, Injures 5 


WINDSOR, Ont., July 9 @: tions, and stewardess Rita To- 
A piece of propeller snapped bin, 24, suffering from shock. 
off one of four engines on a| The plane limped in to an and that if it were occupied 
Viscount turboprop airplane | emergency landing without mis- bh Negroes before whites 
18,000 feet over Michigan today.|hap, despite the fact the pilot boarded the ane the ewhite 
It knocked out another engine was unable to brake the craft. would ee ih 


s er 
and then ripped through the; Ambulances were waiting at passengers 


stand. 

An offering taken up to 
meet transportation costs pro- 
duced $412 to add to $2198 re- 
ported already in the treasury. 


Brink’s Suspect 
Dies in Prison 


| WALPOLE, Mass., July 9 @ 
‘Stanley Gusciora, 33, a suspect 
in the $1,219,000 Brink's rob- 
ibery, was found dead today at 
the Norfolk Prison Colony, ap- 
‘parently of natural causes. He 
iwas found by a hospital at- 
'tendant. 
| Gusciora was one of 10 in 
idicted and charged with armed 
robbery and conspiracy in the 
\Nation’s greatest robbery. The 
| trial is set for Aug. 6. 


’ 


: we 


— 


: 
Associated Press 


A Rochester, Minn., woman was sitting here aboard a Trans- 


Canada airliner when a piece of propeller ripped through 
the plane’s cabin. She was killed and five were injured. 


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cabin. killing one passenger and the edge of the runway when 
injuring five others. the plane landed and they 

The Trans-Canada Airlines rushed the injured to a hospital. 
combination jet and propeller, Trans-Canada Airlines head 
plane landed safely here on two'quarters in Montreal said the 
port engines 10 minutes after plane carried 31 passengers 
the freak accident. a ™ 

A married couple and their 
child were among those in- 
jured. 

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Robert Lippert, wife of Dr. 
Robert Lippert, pre; 
Minn. She was sitting in a front: 
a and her two children, Rod- BE 
ert, 3, and James, 21 moaths, 
were beside her, airlines offi- 

als said 
Robert was taken to the hos- 
pital, suffering from slight 
shock. but his condition wés re-| 
ported good. James was taken | 
to the home of the airlines 
supervisor, W. D. Hind ) 
The injured aboard the plane, | 
bound from Chicago to To- 
ronto, were identified as Chris- 
topher Dumbell, 29. Dubuque, 
lowa, compound leg fracture;| 
his wife, Donna, 24, a leg in 
jury; their son, Donald, 3, a leg 
injury; Donovan Stevens, 47, 
Mundelein, Ill, neck lacera- 


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day, causing an estimated $750,- Mrs Roberts’ home, 826 New- 
000 to $1 million damage. About ton st. ne. 

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The fire occurred only a 
block away from the historic 
Sangamon County Courthouse, 
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TOYKO, July 9 W— Six! ton st. address. 

United States Sabrejets at- The roomer testified that he 
her father “thinks she i 

Base in a thunderstorm today young to be hea” Rae 

and only two made it without 

mishap. But all six pilots came 


Aptil 29, and that she he 
tempted to land at Itazuke Air wanted to marry the girl but 


11 Die as Building Falls 


NAPLES, Italy, July 9 
Eleven persons perished today 
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The F86 fighters, which had 
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on the runway and blocked the 
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three planes tried 
to reach alternate bases but 
ran out of fuel and the pilots 
bailed out. All were reported 
safe hours later. 

The disastrous day cost the 
United States Air Force about 
$1.6 million in cracked-up 
planes. 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES,HERALD 
4 Tuesday, July 10, 1956 eee 


oxw— 


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| 
| By John 
| 
' 


a public report 
recent trip to Russia 


Air Force spokesmen said 
that an unclassified summary 
of a secret report that Twining 
will make to the Senate Armed 
Services Committee this morn- 
ing will be released after the 
closed door session 

Twining gave his 
ithe House Armed Services 
| Committee yesterday After 
\ward, members refused to dis- 
| close what he had said, but 
several indicated that it 
tained nothing sensational 

One member reported that 
his visit provided little oppor- 
tunity for a realistic estimate 
of Soviet air power. 

Another said there was no 


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GENEVA, July 9 
Justice Earl Warren of the 
United States and Mrs. War 

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Twining to Tell 
Of Russia Trip 


Biel Reporter 
Gen. Nathan F. Twining, Air,discussion of whether the Air 


Force chief of staff, will make/PForce should spend the addi- 
today on his 


con- 


G. Norris 


tional $8900 million Congress 
voted over what the Adminis- 
tration asked 
| Meanwhile, the Senate Armed 
‘Services Subcommittee on Air- 
power met briefly yesterday, 
but reached no decision as to 
recalling Twining and other 
witnesses it heard some weeks 
ago in its effort to determine 
| whether Russia is forging 
ahead of the United States in 
the air 

Chairman Stuart Symington 
(D-Mo.) charged last week after 
questioning Defense Secretary 
Charlies E. Wilson that there 
were “direct conflicts” between | 
Wilson's testimony and that of | 
Twining and others. Repubii-| 
can members opposed Syming-| 
tons demand that Twining be 
recalled. Yesterday, Senators 
making up the group decided | 
to wait and hear Twining at 
today's session and question) 
him then before deciding on re- 
opening the Subcommittee 
hearings i 


- oo - —_ _— 


- Speedup in 5-Year CAA Safety Plan 


Called Possible, But a ‘Money Issue’ 


Civil Aeronautics Administra-!committee yesterday, Lowen 


tor Charles J. Lowen told Con- conceded: “This program could 
fress yesterday that CAA’s definitely be stepped up... We 
forthcoming five-year airwayican buy time ... It's just a 
modernization program could |matter of dollars and cents 
stepped up—possibly to' Lowen said manpower train- 
three years—with extra money.|ing problems would preven 
Referring to the Grand Can-'CAA from doubling the pro 
yon air crash which took the gram’s acceleration during the 
lives ot 128 people on June 30,’ coming year. But after that. 
Lowen said: “Sometimes these indicated, it would be just 
tragedies can be a blessing in'matter of how quickly the ne 
disguise if they will help wus essary funds were provided by 
speed up our program.” Congress 
CAA's new program is aimed Subcommittee Counsel Je 
at blanketing high-altitude air rome Plapinger asked whether 
space in the United States with the CAA had ever requested an 
radar eyes.” Lowen said it increased appropriation for 
would keep even the high-speed speeding up its new safety pro 
jets and advanced piston-engine gram. The question went un 
lanes under positive control anewered. 
at all times. . | One part of CAA’s new pro 
The CAA requested $40 mil-| gram, according to Lowen, will 
lion of the program's ultimate be to use three Air Force jet 
$246 million cost to get things | nianes—a B-57 and two B-47s— 
started during the coming fiscal tg work out high-speed traffic 
yea. : control procedures and to fa 
Under questioning by a House | miliarize ground personne! with 
Government Operations Sub | urure safety problems. 
——} He said CAA’s new program 
\would provide direct communi- 
leation between control centers 
and pilots, even when the pilots 
are as far as 150 miles away. 


, 


he 


a 


“In this way. we will elimi- 


nate the time lag invoived in 

relaying messages, which will 
CONTAINS ont 
tawoLin Ue intolerable in controlling 


— _———- 


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Gen Nathan Twining, Air Force Chief of Staff, is greeted 
by Rep. L. Mendel Rivers (D-S. C.) as he arrived to give thé 
House Armed Services Commitice a report on his trip. 


Small Nations Fight NATO Expansion 


By William H. Stoneman 
Chicage Delly News Service 


OSLO, July 9—Vague sugges- 
tions from the United States, 
Britain and France that NATO 
should turn into something new 
and different are not likely to 
get anywhere. 

It is the conviction of the 
smaller members of the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization 
that it should remain what it 
Was supposed to be in the first 
place — a defensive alliance 
against Russia. 

They will oppose any at- 
tempts by France or anybody 
else to shift its efforts to the 
economic field 

They think that aid to “un- 
derdeveloped areas” and eco 
nomic cooperation between 
NATO members should be 
handled by the United Nations 
specialized agencies and OE EC 
(Organization for European 
Economic Cooperation). 

The United States and the 
other big powers will be asked 


to talk turkey when definite! — 


discussions of NATO's future 
begins this summer. 

These discussions are due to 
be conducted under the direc- 
tion of three of NATO's leading 


figures — Norwegian Foreign 


|Minister Halvard Lange, Cana- 


| 
| 
| 


' 


United Prees 


600-mile-an-hour aircraft, 
Lowen declared | 
Lowen told the Congressmen 
he ha@ an appointment sched. 
uled this week with “a very re 
liable firm that promises it has 
a device to prevert such a col 
lision as we had in the Grand 
Canyon 
When the sessio 
Lowen identified 
Meipar, inc.. a Westinghouse 
Air Brake subsidiary in Falls 
Church, and the device as a 
proximity indicator.’ 
The CAA e¢hief was 
tioned closely on the TWA- 
United Air Lines crash, the 
worst in commercial airline his-| 
tory. He said the final verdict 
will be up to the Civil Aero- 
nautics Board 
Lowen said the TWA pilot at 
first had been denied permis- 
sion by the CAA controller to 
climb from 19,000 to 21,000 feet 
because the United plane was 
fying at the 21,000-foot level. 
The TWA pilot then was per- 
mitted to ascend through 
“holes in the clouds.” He was 
not ordered down once he 
reached the 21.000-foot level 
originally desired, Lowen, 
added. ' 


" was over. 
the firm as 


ques- 


Is Being Developed | 

Scientists at Melpar, Falls| 
iChurch subsidiary of the West-/ 
inghouse Air Brake Co., yester- 
day said they have been work-| 
ing for four years te develop’ 
an airborne device that warns 
pilots of impending midair col-| 
lision ) 

No such device has been per-| 
ifected, they said, but possible | 
approaches show promise. It 
would probably take a “crash”| 
program with full cooperation’ 
of the military and the Civil 
|Aeronautics Administration to! 
perfect any such warning equip- 
ment, they said ) 
| Such a device, the scientists 
‘said would have to distinguish | 
| between planes that are merely | 
‘close and those planes likely! 
ito run into each other because 
of their directions of fight.' 
This complicates the scientific | 
| problems, they pointed out. 


| 

News Guild 
Sets 4-Day 
Week Goal 


Crash-Warning Device 


|vestigation proves 
| United States and 


\determine what, 


dian Minister for External Af.- 
fairs Lester B. Pearson and Ital- 
ian Foreign Minister Gaetano 
Martino 


These “three wise men.” sad- 


died with the job by the great 
powers, have conducted their 
operations with great serious- 
ness. They have no intention of 


presenting NATO with any far-' 


fetched dream-world blueprints 
for its future. 

No plan at all will be pre- 
sented unless preliminary in- 
that 
the other 
powers are really behind it. 

Two means will be used to 
if anything, 
the Big Three and other NATO 
members are really prepared to 
do to strengthen NATO or to 
broaden it. 

First, a questionaire has been 
circulated to all NATO coun- 
tries with a request that it 


should be answered by Aug. 20.' 


Second, representatives of 
the NATO countries will be 
asked to attend an oral quiz in 
Paris Sept. 10, at which the 
“three wise men” will seek 
clarification of the answers to 
the questionnaire 

The questions are still confi- 
dential but the main points are 
known. What the NATO gov- 
ernments will be asked to an- 
swer, in general terms, are the 
following queries: 

®* What can be done to im- 


| by doctors’ observations. 


the | 


| ough that sufferers were able to 


tional economic policies being; tions it may be possible to pre- 
pursued or planned by NATO/|pare a report on NATO"s fu- 
members? ture. 

® How far are the member) Meanwhile, the hope is ven- 
governments willing to go in|tured that something like Cy- 
cultural cooperation? One| prus or the Algerian problem 
burning question is whether| won't blow the whole project to 
the big powers will join in pool-| pieces. 
ing their resources to promote|-— ne sae 
scientific education throughout! hee ee ee 
NATO to match Russia's great Now 


scientific educational program She Shops ' 
® What can be done to im- & ” 
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lic relations work of NAT Without Painful Backache 


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n one hemorrhoid case after 
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narcotics, anesthetics or astrin- 
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| TORONTO, July 9 wW—The 
American Newspaper Guild to 
‘day set ultimate goals of $200-| 
|per-week wage minimum and a| 
ifour-day week for its 28,000 
imembers in the United States 
and Canada. 
| “I don’t think we will attain! 
these objectives immediately, 
but we should start moving to- 
ward the larger goal,’ ANG 
President Joseph Collis said in 
this opening speech at the 
‘Guild's 23d annual convention. 
| Collis said the Guild is pri- 
marily concerned at present 
with establishing a $150 weekly 
wage minimum, already in ef- 
fect for key employes on many 
publications. He said about one- 
third of the membership is cov- 
ered by contracts providing for 
‘a 35-hour week 
| He said that the newspaper 
industry could afford to meet 
the ultimate ANG goals because 
it is at the peak of a 10-year 
period of prosperity. 
| Collis also urged members to 
prod the industry into shakin 
loff established patterns and fo 
low the lead of other businesses 
which are secking new ap 
proaches or developing new 
iprofits or techniques.” 
| He said some publishers were’ 
guilty of wasting newsprint in 
ithe face of a world-wide short- 
jage 
The Guild, an affiliate of the’ 
[AFL-CIO and the Canadian 
‘Labor Congress, represents em- 
ployes of newspapers, news’ 
magazines and news services in| 
Canada and the United States. | 


) 
Murders Up in Italy 


Reuters 
ROME, July 9— Official fig- 
‘ures issued today said there 
‘were 450 murders in Italy in 
the first three months of this 
year, an increase of 26 over 


the same period last year. 


Ms 


Britain over the Cyprus ques. 
tion. 


As long as such questions are| 


outstanding it appears ridicu- 
lous to talk about “strengthen- 
ing NATO unity.” 

© What discussions can use- 


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Around the World 


Socialists Gain in Japanese Vote 


International News 


Commander-in-Chief | 


Britain's Princess Margaret lew 


makes a charming Command- 
er-in-Chief of the Ambulance 
and Nursing Cadets of the St. 
John’s Ambulance Brigade. 
She opened new head. 
quarters of the 
Portsmouth, England, o ver 


the weekend. 
. . > > > . . . 


TOKYO. July 10 (Tuesday) #) 


ment plans for rearmament and 


revision of the United States 
occupation-era constitution 


With near final results from 


Sunday's balloting pouring in, 


the Socialists and their sup 
porters had taken 51 of the 127 
seats up for election in the 250 
seat chamber 

Together with the 33 
already hold 


they 
—~not to be voted 


on again for three more vears 
ithev 
third needed to block Premier 


had more than the one 


Ichiro Hatoyama’'s Conservative 


coalitidn 


By late yesterday, leaders of 
Hatoyama’s Liberal-Democratic 
Party already were talking of 
defeat 

“I personally think we got 
licked. We'll have to accept it 
as sharp criticism of the con- 
servatives,” declared Nobusuke 

Kishi, Secretary General of 
\Hatovama’s Liberal-Democratic 
'Party. His goal had been 200 
ats in the 250-seat House 

“Even if we get two-thirds 
in the House, we cannot force 


|\rearmament through right away 


inow.” said 


Deputy Secretary 


General Masanosuke Ikeda 


brigade at | 


rhe latest tabulation of can- 
didates elected and leading un 
decided races for 127 House of 
Councilor seats peing filled at 


Troop Cutback Too Small, 
Eden Replies to Bulganin ' 


LONDON, July 9 —British 
Prime Minister Anthony Eden 
told Soviet Premier Nikolai 
Bulganin today that Russia's 
promised 12 million-man 
armed forces cutback 
enough to inspire 
national confidence.” 

Eden, in a letter to the So 
viet Premier, said the unilat 
eral arms cuts announced by 
Moscow late this spring is 
“helpful.” But he added 

“I do not think, 


that they are of themselves suf 

ficient if international confi 

dence and security are to de- 
velop as we wish.” 

, promote such confi- 

* Eden added, “it is es- 

that disarmament 


was not 
“inter: 


howe, er, 


should take place under an in- 


ternational agreement which 
provides for effective control 
and inspection and for ade 
quate measures for protection 
against surprise attack.” 

Eden also declared there 
should be “comprehensive ar 
rangement” to take into «ac 
count both disarmament and 
urgent political questions, es 
pecially German reunification 
The Russi. ans have been insist 


ing.that disarmament PUES 
come,ahead of German reuni 
ficatior 

The Prime Minister's letter 
was delivered at the Kremlin 
today. It replied to Bulganin’s 
letter to Eden last June 6. tell- 
ing of the Soviet arms cut 

Eden told Bulganin that Brit- 
ain itself had made “substan 
tial reductions in its armed 
forces during the past three 
years and previously had made 
even greater cuts after World 
War Il 

“My own feeling is that wni- 
lateral reductions of this kind 
are helpful,” the British leader 
said 

But he stressed the need for 
an over-all international dis- 
armament agreement with ef 
fective control and inspection 
provisions to enforce it 

“During the past 10 years the 
Western powers have made 
persistent efforts to bring 
about such -+an agreement,’ 
Eden told Buiganin 

He declared the British gov- 
ernment would continue to 
make every effort to reach 
through the United Nations 
agreement covering “limitation, 
reduction and control of arma 
ments, including nuclear weap 
ons 


‘and. minor party 


antes .@ amu 2 ..aAa —————— a eee 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Tuesday, July 10, 1956 5 


this election indicated a pos-'ed fire on the Nationalist out- 


Japanese Socialists today won, ‘sible new Conservative-Socialist post island of Quemoy at 8:50 
enough seats in the upper house | split of 168 to 8&1, 
of Parliament to block govern-| |tant religious leader apparently in nearly two weeks, the Chi- 


with 1 mili- a. m. today in the first barrage | 


‘elected. The old split was 171 to nese Nationalist Central News 
73. with 6 vacancies. agency reported. 

The unofficial results elected| Nationalist counterfire _ si- 
55 Liberal-Democrats plus nine lenced the Red guns after an’ 
pro-government independents hour and 50 minutes, during 
men, 38 So- which a total of 42 shells fell 
cialists and one Communist on Quemoy, the agency said. It 
and one Independent expected made no mention of casualties. 
to back the Socialists. Oppo- ) 
sition candidates already had Ba Cut sip) tem: Rejected 
equaled their former total of 
40 members in the 127 seats up 
for election. Conservatives 
needed 12 of 22 undecided seats 9—President Ngo Dinh Diem of 
to keep a two-thirds majority. South Vietnam ‘today rejected 

Leading for these 22 _WeTC) an appeal for mercy by Ba Cut, 
13 Conservatives, eight Social-\ro-mer rebel warlord who has 
ists and an Independent of UN-\ heen sentented to death, it was 
certain leaning ‘authoritatively learned here. 

In the half of the House not The 32-year-old rebel. who led 
up for election until 1959, Con-! fighting against the South Viet- 
servatives claimed 90 support-.4m government last year, will 
ers and the leftist’ opposition}. ciot within two days. ac- 
33. But observers felt several .o-ding to South Vietnam law 
women Conservation Independ 
ents would abstain or vote “no” Hotel Prices Rising 
on such a drastic issue as 
amending the present “no-war’| 
constitution to speed rearma-| 
ment 

Socialist and 


Reut 


Reuters 

PARIS, July 9—The French 
Hotelkeepers Union today said 
Communist’ holiday hotel prices will go up 
candidates bitterly fought Hato- by as much as 20 per cent in 
yama’s proposals to rewrite the | France this week, the first in- 
American-sponsored constitu- crease on room prices in tourist- 
tion, scrapping the provisions class hotels since 1951. The 
banning military forces and in-'cheaper hotels will increase 
creasing the power of the Em-|their prices the most, it was 
peror. expected. 


The turnout was the lightest! 
of any of the 10 postwar elec-) Don’t Just Ask For Mineral Oil 
For Highest Quality...DEMAND 


tions in Japan; only 31,095,869 
votes were cast, 62.1 per cent 
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Its smartly nubbed acetate 
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Above: Long-line, 5.95 
Left: Bandeau, 3.00 


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ALEXANDRIA: 615 North Woshington Street, King 8-1000 
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AL NER = een 


6 | 
Tuesday, July 10, 19546 


Be ss WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


| At. ui rem Tu a 


zu 


401 
Shorea so ll 
gsr eae 


A439 f. Eastern Ave. 


Seat Pleasant, Md. | 


“aan eG AIR-CONDITIONED FOR YOUR COMFORT 


PLENTY OF FREE PARKING AT ALL TIMES 
Prices effective Teday and Wednesdar. July 16 and tt 
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JUMBO “BLUE BANNER” 


ROUND 
STEAKS 


FULL SLICES—SWISS STYLE 


39: 


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SPARE RIBS 


aes’. 3Qe 


BAKE OR 
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STATUTE miLES 


-_* 


Associate), Press 


Where Earthquakes Hit 


The underscored islands in the Aegean Sea, off Southern 
Greece, were hit by earthquakes and repeated tidal waves 
yesterday, with upward of two score killed and at least a 
score missing. (Stery on | Page 1. ® 


U.S. ais Food Offer 
To Poles Via Red Cross 


By Don Dixon 


: 


'made 


‘ite offer 


Internationa! 
The United States renewed 
yesterday to supply 
free food to relieve hunger in 


iCommunist Poland. where riots 
irocked the cit 


y of Poznan 10 
days ago 
Renewal af the offer was 
in a letter from Acting 
of “State Herbert 
te Harold 


Secretary 


Hoover Jr.. Starr 


ican Red Cross. The letter was 


| 


. 


| demanding 


Yt Hopver adried that 


t Saturday and made public 
sterday. 

A previous American offer to 
send large amounts of surplus 
wheat, flour and other food to 
|Poland was curtly rejected by 
'Polish authorities last week as 

propaganda.” 

The offer was made after 
workers in the industrial city 
of Poznan rioted for three days 
“bread and free- 
dom.” 

President Fis enhower is 
known .to have personally ap 
proved the food offer, which 
was made by Hoover and trans 
mitted to the Warsaw Govern- 
ment through the International 
Red Cross 

In his letter. Hoover said he 
“deeply appreciates” the co 
operation of the American Red 
Cross in transmitting the 
United States offer of assist 


when the 
United States first made its 
offer.,“we stood ready 
good faith - be of help to the 
Palish, 

He t sald? *Our offer to 
be of assistance in relieving the! 
— in Poland remains 
ope 

There was little hope that the| 


Turkey Hints 


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es Cyprus 


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RED 


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ripe Pre 


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er 


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: 43° 


NATIONALLY ADVERTISED BRAND 


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Lf si 69: 


ap 


LONDON, July 9 @- 


in all 


| wifee” 
genera! counsel of the Amer?- gifts 


: 
: 


| 


| 
| 
| 
| 


. 


Official | 


sources today said Turkey has) 


threatened to quit the NATO 


alliance if Britain permits the! 


union of Cyprus with Greece. 
The threat of Turkey's loss 


to the Western 


| 


: 
alliance has | 


caused concern both to United’ 


States officials and the leaders 
of the British Commonwealth 
nations, who conferred here 
last week, the sources said. 

As a result, they said, there 
is a growing realization that 
Turkey must be “taken into 
account” in any settlement de- 
termining the future of the 
violence -torn Mediterranean 
island colony. 

The officials stated that Tur- 
key's firm stand has necessi- 
tated a redrafting of a British 
plan to offer Cyprus selfrule 
as well as the prospect of self- 
determination within the next 


This plan is now dead, the 
officials said. BritSh officials 
were expected to disclose a 
modified new plan shortly, 
probably later this week. 

[A masked man shot to death 
‘a Greek Cypriot tailor today 
\as the victim left a coffee shop 
‘at Dhora, in North Cyprus. He 
iwas the third person killed by 
ithe EOKA underground in two 


(10 or 15 years 


idavs 


| 


[British security forces found 
six small bombe 


lof arms and ammunition hid- 
den under a bridge in Pahpos.! 


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| 


News Serv cre 
Communist authorities ruling 
Poland would reverse their 
stand and accept the American 
aid 

The Polish Ambassador to 
Washington, Romuald Spasow 
ski, said last week that Poland 
does not want “charity and 
and added that his coun 
try is willing and able to pay 
for the food it needs from 
abroad 

At the same time, Spasowski 
conceded that “to a certain ex 
tent” food shortages had been 
responsible for the Poznan up 
rising 

Poland has applied 
American agricultural 
But under the law. Con 


to buy 


from the United States on 
same 
tions 


the 
basis as free world na 


Refugee Says Czech Reds 


Defied Zapotocky in Public 


| LONDON, Juy 9 —Czech tech Vogel, former conductor 
Communists recently insulted of the Prague National Theater 
‘President Antonin Zapotocky Opera, in an interview with the 
at a public meeting in Prague London Daily Mail. 


and demanded he fire his Cabi-| 
net because of its Stalinist con- 
nections, a refugee Crech sym- 
phony conductor was quoted as'of East 


saying today 


The report came from Vol. 


Vogel recently fled to Britain 
with his English-born wife and 


family while on a musical tour 


Berlin. The Home 
Office is considering his appli- 
cation for political aslyum. 


Since im... REL§ KA’ 


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Enjoy the luxury of fine 
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and intriguing desserts 


® SUNDAY BRUNCH e 


served from neon Kl} sm 


stocKxs 
Amunist | 
countries cannot purchase food | 


Seshet 


Spasowski last week protest-| 


ed the State Department's 
description of the Polish bid ‘as 
a “phony” because Warsaw 
never took advantage of 
freedom to buy American 


its 


igrains through United States 


commercial channels. 


3634 16th Street N.W. 
Reservations: Hidsen 1.4400 


~ Free Pertine While Dining 


Let the deerman gerage reer car 


WHAT MAKES CHESSTIE 


superb dining at the 


GOLDEN STEER 


Enterprise Federal Savings 


and Loan Association 


\ Report 
of Progress 


STATEMENT OF CONDITION 
AS OF JUNE 30, 1956 


$16,887 ,105.10 
167,181.01 
195,057.38 


. rc? Mortgage _cars 
Loens on Sewirgs A 
Office Bu 


. 
. - ‘ure > x? 


ding. lees Genreciat 
res, Eour 


26,908 03 
350,000.00 


lees Georeciation 
n Federal Home Loen Bank 
ernment 
$741,500.00 


Hand and w= Berks 528,317.59 1.289.817.59 


$18,856,069.11 


LIABILITIES 
$16,505,126.09 


Say ar | ade ook 
A tA ancesg trom 
Loans in Process 
det oki Pavah'e 
Smecific Reserve 


sceneral Reserve and 912,167.25 


$18,856,069.11 
OFFICERS * 


COOK 


Peer “aet 


DIRECTORS 
GEORGE 1. BORGER, J 
THOMAS F. BURKE 

MARTIN A. COOK 
CECIL F. GIBSON 
PATRICK F. HANNAN 


MARTIN A 


FRANCIS J 


yiwe Pree 


MAYES 
end Secretary 


PATRICK F. HANNAN 


Treerorer 
TIMOTHY A 


Aeet. Seer 


5 \ WORTH 


? sre 


e’ary- ire 


FRANCIS ) 
BERNARD F. LOCRAFT 


HAYES 
JOSEPH a GAHAN 
Ast r‘ee Treers 


ENTERPRISE. /¢/aul Savings 


AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 


813 Pennsylvania Ave. N.W. 


'S RAILROAD GROW? 


One of a series telling what Chesapeake and Ohic is dong te make this a Ingger, better railroad. 


unlimited perking, eesy; | 
trensporietion te oll Mew 


How ona industry attracts 
others: Hooker Electrochem- 
scal burlt a plant 
on the C&O at Montague, 
Mich., right over a thow 
sand-year supply of salt. 
Umon Carbide and Du Pont 
—both large users of Hooker 
preducts—burlt next 
doer se gases and liquids 
could be prped tn. 


— 


Synthetic 
Lady 


Everything the lovely little lady is wearing 
from the roles of her slippers to the ribbon 
on her hat is a product of the chemical in- 
dustry, made out of such ordinary materials 
as coal, salt, sand, wood-pulp and natural 
gas—resources found in great abundance 
along the 5,100 miles of the Chesapeake 
and Ohio. 

The chemical industry is growing at a 
tremendous rate, with many of its new 
plants going up along the Chesapeake and 
Ohio. Each new or expanding factorymeans 
diversified growth for Chesapeake and Ohio 
—not merely the raw materials that go into 
the plant and the finished goods that come 
out, but homes, schools, groceries for the 
people who come to work there. 

As one result of such industrial growth, 
C&O's merchandise freight business is four 
times what it was twenty-five years ago. To 
better serve its booming industry, C&O has 
spent a half billion dollars in the last ten 
vears expanding and modernizing its trans- 
portation plant. Equally significant is the 
fact that 80% of this vast improvement pro- 
gram has been paid for out of current in- 
come. And last year, the annual dividend 
rate was increased to $3.50. 

Another $100 million in further improve- 
ments is programmed for this year: At 
Newport News, Va., a new bulk cargo pier 
that can unload over eight million tons of 
import ore a year: and a new addition to 
the great coal docks that will increase their 
capacity to 2% million tons a month. At 
Russell, Kentucky, a new $5% million classi- 
fication yard. 222 new diesel locomotives 
and 8,000 new freight cars. 

Every day in every way, Chessie’s rail- 
road is growing and going! 


Write for new booklet describing industria! resources and opportunities in CAO territory. Address 


Chesapeake and Ohio Railway 


3819 TERMINAL TOWER, CLEVELAND 1, OHO 


Di. 7-5835 


_ Adenauer Foes 


To Meet Today 


BONN, July 9 #—West Ger. 
many’s Socialist party meets 
Tuesday to hammer out a pro- 
Sram aimed at toppling Chan. 
cellor Konrad Adenauer from 
power in next year’s general 
elections. 

The annual convention 
Munich will draw more than 
300 delegates from the coun. 
try’s second biggest party, 
which claims 600,000 members 

As always in German poli. 
ties, the questions of reunifica 
tion of the divided country, re- 
lations with Russia and re-| 
a>mament overshadow all else. 

The big election issue is like- 
ly to be whether West Ger- 
many should continue the Ade- 
nauer policy of undeviating 
loyalty to the Western alliance 
or seek another way opt of 
what the Socialists call a frus 
trating blind alley 

The Socialist National Com- 
mittee’s foreign policy pro- 
gram, to be submitted to the 
convention, calls for diplomatic 
recognition of the Soviet satel- 
lite states and closer contact 
with Moscow 

The committee also advo- 
cates a new approach to Rus. 
sia, the United States, Britain 
and France in an effort to win 
reunification. 

It suggests a trade treaty 
should be concluded with Rus- 
sia as a first step toward better 
relationships with that coun- 
try. The Adenauer government 
so far has refused to consider 
such a pact until Russia aban 
dons East Germany. The com 
mittee also wants closer eco- 
nomic and cultural contacts 
with the East zone without rec 
ognizing its Communist regime 

The Socialists oppose Ger 
man membership in the North 
Atlantic alliance, claiming it is? 
the biggest single obstacle to 
Russian agreement to reunifi 
cation. 


in 


Turks Accuse Menderes 
ANKARA, July 9 (%—Tur. 
key’s three opposition par- 


ties haye joined in charging 
Premier Adnan Menderes’ gov- 
ernment with taking measures 
“leading to the establishment 
of a totalitarian regime.” 

| The joint statement, issued 
last night, was signed vy Ismet 
inonu,- former. President of 
lurkey and leader of the Peo- 
ple’s Republican Party: 
Lutfi Kargosmanoglu of the 
Freedom Party; and Osman 
Bolukbasi of the Nationalist 
Party. 

It declared the three parties 
were “firm in their joint de 
termination to continue to the 
very end in their struggle to 
save democracy in Turkey.” 

The three parties’ 60 dep- 
uties waiked out of Parliament 
10 days ago during a riotous de 
bate over a government bill to 
restrict political meetings and 
demonstrations. The measure 
was adopted 281 to 2 The up 
position has boycotted sessions 
of Parliament since 

Menderers’ Democratic Party 
has 450 seats in the 541-seat 
Parliament 


Soviet Woos Greece 


Reuters 

LONDON, July 9—Russia to- 
day launched its campaign to 
woo Greece away from the 
Western bloc with offers of eco 
nomic aid and an exchange of 
scientists and students. 

The Communist Party news 
paper Pravda said the Russian 
offer contained “no conditions 
whatsoever that might affect 
Greece s sovereignty or nation- 
al dignity.” 

The offer, which came on the 
heels of Russian Foreign Min- 
ister Dmitri Shepilov's tour of 
Greece and the Middle East, 
was for “mutual cooperation 
in the development of Greece's 
economy, the exchange of scl- 
entific and technical experience 
and the training of specialists, 
including exchanges of stu- 
dents.” 


Fevzi | 


Assoctated Press 
Near, Yet Far 


Although living only 10 miles 
apart for the past four years, 
Mrs. James Bosley and her 
brother, Frank York, hadn't 
seen each other for 35 years. 
The other day, Mrs. Bosley 
of Fairfax, Calif., quite by ac- 
cident located her brother, 
who lives in a nearby town. 


Pravda Assails U. 5. 
Reuters 

MOSCOW, July 9—Pravda 
today fiercely attacked the 
United States for allocating 
funds to intensify “seditious 
activities” in Communist coun- 
tries. 

(The Communist Party news- 
paper referred to the U. 8. Sen- 
ate’s approval of a foreign aid 
bill amendment to spend $20 
million on “encouraging the 
spirit of freedom” in Eastern 
Europe.) 

Pravda said “the decision 
leads to the spreading of mis- 
trust and hostility between 
peoples and amounts to a crude 
act of interference in the in- 
ternal affairs of sovereign and 
peace-loving states.” 


FOR YOUR 
Surprise Liquer Bargain 
CALL ST. 3.7517 


—— 


5 


JERUSALEM, July 9 © 
Three persons were reported 
killed today in new violence on 
ithe IsraelJordan border. 

| Tension gripped the Israeli 
sector of Jerusalem after re- 
curring reports that Jodan was 
massing troops across the bor- 
der. 

An Israeli army spokesman 
‘said two Israeli travelers were 
|killed when their car was am- 
|'bushed in the Arava Valley be- 
itween the southern end of the 
| Dead Sea and the Fin Hussub 
isettiement, near the Jordan 
| border. 

In Amman, a Jordan army 


: 


spokesman said a civilian was 
|killed in an exchange of gun- 


fire between Israeli and Jor- 


3 Reported Slain in New 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES seep 


ein 


Tuesday, July 10, 1956 


Israel Border Violence | 


dan forces in the Jerusalem 
area. 

An Israecli military spokes- 
man said the driver of a fron- 
tier guard vehicle Was wounded 
tonight in an ambusf attack on 
the Ouadi Arra road near Um 
El Fahm, close to the Jordan 
border 


F 


| 


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An Isracli army spokesman 
said automatic fire was aimed 
today at the Israeli Ramath 
Rachel settlement south of 
Jerusaicm. No casualties were 
reported 

The spokesman also said two 
Isracli policemen were wound- 
ed when a mine exploded last 
night near Wadi Ara village on 
Isracli territory. 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERA 
Tuesday, July 10, 1956 ri, 


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ihave acted on “terribly inade- 
‘quate and misleading informa- 
tion and advice.’ He said he 
was sending Mr. Eisenhower 
information showing his posi- 
ition. 

Rep. Joel T. Broyhill (R-Va.) 
said he also would oppose the 
‘request because he does not 
want the Tenth District.(Alex- 
andria, Fairfax, Falls Church 
and Arlington) “in the cross 
fire of two major airports.” 

Broyhill has conter4e4 that 


| Map shows relation of pro 
posed Burke Airport te Na 
tional Airport. 


the airports now in the Wash- 
ington area—Bolling and An- 
drews Air Force Bases, Ana- 
costia Naval Air Station and 
National Airport—would be suf- 
ficient with proper rearrange- 
ment of traffic. 

Ernest Reisner, head of the 
opposition group of residents 
in Fairfax County, said his or- 
ganization would appear at the 
hearings “to fight to the end.” 
Henry J. Rolfs, head of a group 
of Burke supporters, said his 
jorganization also would be 
| present. 


Nine Days After Crash 


| The President's request came 
nine days after the worst com- 
mercial aviation disaster in 
history—the collision of two 
transports over the Grand Can 
yon of Arizona with the loss of 
(128 lives—and a resulting re- 
inewed interest in air conges- 
ition. It was recently reported 
there were 24 near-<ollisions 
,over National Airport here dur- 
ing the month of April 
| Burke airport originally got 
‘its impetus fronr a 1949 colili- 
ision at National Airport be- 
tween a P-38 fighter plane and 
a civilian transport. The dis- 
aster took 55 lives 

Congress authorized construc- 
tion of a supplemental airport 


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and appropriated $1 million, 
enough for the Civil Aero- 
‘nautics Administration to ac- 
quire about 1000 acres of the 
5540 acres needed at the Burke 
| Site. 


Leng Dormant 


| Citizen opposition to the site, 
\with concurrence among key | 
Congressmen, however, proved | 
enough for Congress to refuse) 
further funds and the project) 
remained dormant until re-) 
newed activity on the part of | 
the Senate Commerce Commit- 
tee last fall. 

| Ten members of this Commit- 
tee, not including Butler, di- 
ireeted the Commerce Depart- 
iment to come up with 2 plan 
‘for relieving congestion at Na- 
jtiona: Airport and strongly sug- 


_A4\ gested Burke. This came de- 


spite previous Department in- 
dications that no more airports | 
should be financed wholly with 
| Federal funds. 

According to CAA plans, the 
President's request would pro- 
vide sufficient funds to com- 
plete two stages of the Burke) 
Airport. This would include | 
|acquisition of the remaining 
land and construction of two! 
North-South runways (one 8000 TRANSIT—From Pg. I 
feet long, the other 8500 feet 
long and both 200 feet wide)! 
land one East-West runway 
|(7000 by 200 feet). 
| Also included would be a 
jlarge terminal building and 
laccess highway to the airport 
The $34.7 million figure 
includes no money for hangars. | 

The airport would accommo. 
date jet aircraft and would be 
expandable for future needs 

An additional $10 million’ 
would extend the airport to its 
complete development. if 
needed. Most of these funds 
would be used to extend the 
itwo North-South runways to 
10,000 feet in length. 


the Colladay firm, which is 


: 


ary, if necessary, when Con- 
gress would be back in session. 
Senate conferees, who orig- 
inally voted to create a public 
authority, don't want to extend 
CTC’s franchise that long. In 
fact, some of them are opposed 
Included in the $94.7 to the Commissioners’ parposal 
yoamest 4 pony nt a, ,~ that CTC be permitted té oper- 
land acquisition, $8 million for #*¢ for 30-day periods up to 
grading the site, $10.5 million |three months past August 14 if 
_ a. bg million ae the more time is needed to transfer 
fon for the access read "the business to Chalk 
CTC union officials, who sat 
outside yesterday's conference 
mecting, also oppose any ex- 
tension of CTC’s right to oper- 
ate. Their contract with the 
company runs out August 14 
They fear there would be lay- 
offs of employes if CTC stays 
in operation beyond that time. 
Chalk, New York airline ex- 
ecutive, and his Washington 
associate Morris Fox, said yes- 
terday they thought they could 
complete the title search and 


U. S. Dairy Tour Slated 


TOKYO, July 9—The Jap 
anese Agriculture and Forescury 
Ministry today announced 12 
leaders of the Japanese dairy 
industry will leave for the 
United States on July 10 for a 
2month tour to study Ameri- 
can milk processing and distri- 
bution methods. 


—_- - 


AID—From Page I | 


/ | 
Congress Puts 
Ceilin id 
| g on Al 

our friends throughout the 
'world, both at this moment and 

S ‘for the future.” he said. 

SEE | “It is not enough to put our 
‘money for defense only into 
jour own armed forces. We 
‘must continue building mutual 


security through cooperation 
withour friends abroad. 


| “We must never forget that 
‘the Marshall Plan saved’ Free 
‘Europe from communism. This 
| Nation spent $12 billion in this 
‘effort. Today, were it not for 
‘that program, we would be 
‘Spending more, much more, 
each year to maintain our po- 
sition in an impossible world 
situation.” 

Despite the President's state- 
iment, House Republican Lead- 
‘er Joseph W. Martin Jr. (Mass.) 
jamnounced there would be no 
‘concerted GOP effort to in- 
‘erease the $3.6 billion figure 
recommended by the House 


your bome will be fowsng fresh! 


|Appropriations Committee. 

| W “we believe the Presi- 
dent is right” in saying the bill | 
cuts too deeply, Martin said, 
the chances are better for a 
restoration of funds when the| 
‘bill gets to the Senate. ) 

The theory was that a strong) 
record vote in the House 
‘against increasing the appro- 
'priation would hurt prospects 
of getting more money from) 
ithe Senate. Final House action | 
is expected Wednesday. 

“We believe the Senate in) 
its wisdom will increase the 
jamount and we will have a 
‘better chance to increase the 

money. through conference,” 
|\Martin explained. 

That was the way it worked 
with the appropriation bill. The 
House voted June 9 to authorize 
only $3.8 billion. The Senate 
voted June 29 to raise the ceil- 
‘ing to approximately $45 bil- 
lion. 

Then in a Senate-House con- 
\ference the compromise figure 
iof $4 billion was agreed upon. 
‘It was this compromise, author- 
‘izing about $200 million more 
‘than the House had approved 
originally, that the Senate and 
House acce yesterday. 

Commen on the chances 
of the Senate raising the appro- 
— mee Sen. Mike Mans- 

id (D-Mont.) indicated that 
the, would be improved if the 
Administration told Congress 
more about what was being 
done with the money. 

“If the President desires such 
‘fmereases,” Mansfield said, “I 
am persuaded that his appeal 
woul be much more effective 


air minimizes dust and dusting— 


General Electric Home Heating 


than it is now likely to be if] 


he would be willing to assure 
ss that all officers and 


By Wally McNamee. Staff Photographer 


D. C. Superintendent of Corporations Alfred Goldstein 
(seated) examines incorporation papers for the Chalk-Fox 
transit group. With him is James R. Stoner, a lawyer for 


representing the group. 


CTC Sale Action Faces 


| 
More Delay by Conferees 


other work necessary to take 
over the transit company by 
Aug. 14. 

Chalk’s lawyers yesterday 
filed papers incorporating the 
new company as D. C. Transit 


System, Inc., with the District/ 


Recorder of Deeds. Incorpora- 
tors were a dummy group con- 
sisting of lawyers Edward F. 
and D. C. Colladay who have 
represented Chalk and Fox in 
Washington, and Theodore I. 
Seamon, Chalk’s lawyer on 
civil aviation matters 

Chalk said officers of the 
company will be announced 
later. Chalk has signed a con- 
tract with CTC President J .A. 
B. Broadwater agreeing to pay 
$13,540,000 for all CTC’s assets. 
The $8.6 million down payment 
will come from the TCA Invest- 
ing Corp, a subsidiary of Trans 
Caribbean Airways in which 
Chalk holds 74 per cent of the 
stock. 

Chalk told reporters yester- 
day he proposed to reverse the 
declining trend and expand 
transit here and make it a busi- 
ness that “will be profitable 
both to the public and to us.” 


Avoid ‘Thinning Out’ City, 
Trade Board Head Says 


‘senior vice president of Wood- 


Washington must revitalize,determine a minimum Federal 
rather than “thin out” its down-|employment level essential to 
town area and be wary of at-| support the citys economy. 
tempts to disperse Government’ The committee also expressed 
agencies outside the city, the | fears that Zoning Consultant 
newly elected president of the| Harold M. Lewis’ proposed new 
Board of Trade warned yester-\code, which would curh down- 
day. ‘town building, “would undoubt- 

In an inaugural statement of edly materially reduce the tax 
objectives, Philip M. Talbott,| base of this community.” 

The committee recommended 
“continued careful study” rath- 
er than immediate rejection of 
the Lewis proposals. 

The committee also: 

® Recommended a “maxi- 
mum possible amount of budg- 
et” for programs designed to 


major policy report presented improve the health of down- 
to the Board by the Committee town Washington. 

on Planning Activity, a self-ap-| * Urged contirued support 
praisal group appointed by the for legislation to enable Dis- 
directors in May. ‘trict residents to vote for Pres- 
| The unanimously-adopted ident and be represented in 
committee report stressed “the Congress, but oan ee ~ —_ 
great need for increased atten. S°Und” home rule proposals, 
tion to the job of retaining 


existing employment, particu- Roly Sounds Sirens 


larly in the field of govern- 
ment, where there is an in-- LOCKPORT, NX. Y. July 9 
creasing interest by many agen- (—A bolt of lightning shorted 
cies to decentralize and/or dis-'the wiring of the town's air 
/perse.” raid sirens, setting off ail of 
| Committee Chairman Victor them. It took electricians more 
'O. Schinnerer, who presented than an hour last night to sil- 
the report, urged the Board to ence the sirens. 


ward & Lothrop, urged local 
business to redouble efforts to 
improve the central business 
area, rather than’ accept the 
premise it needs thinning out. 


Warnings against dispersal of 
employment were repeated in a 


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THE WASHINGTON -POST and TIMES HERALD 
Tuesday, July 10, 1956 9 


Lobby Inquiry 
To Be Widened 


‘= > 


A Stake in Oil 
Military Use 
Of ‘Shelf? 


Associated Press 

The special Senate Lobby In- 
vestigating Committee yester- 
day directed its staff to look 
into the lobbying activities of " 
a number of oil and gas com-'| Aaa SS 
panies. er 

It also decided on other steps Sf ‘t 
designed to broaden its inquiry 
beyond the fight over the bill 
to free natural gas producers 
from direct Federal price con- 
trols. The bill was vetoed. by 


Questioned 
President Eisenhower last Feb- 
ruary. | 


\ssistant Interior Secretary Chairman John L McClellan 
\. D'Ewart said yester- | Seeeas oe newsmen after a. 
that p ciosed meeting of the Commit-| 
at proposed military res-/ +o. that information relating to | 
ations over the Gulf Coast/“some specific instances of | 
inental sou campaign contributions” mz 
would |was discussed. 
impor. Bia) 4m | He declined to elaborate on | 
devel- . | i this, except to Say that “ 
\preliminary inquiry” was be-| 
ing made. He said it was too! 
early to tell whether it would! 
Téad to anything of substance | 
The Committee was set up 
last February -in- an aftermath | 
of the controversy over the gas| 
| bill. It was allotted $300,000 to; 
r search for any illegal or im- 
D’Ewart ‘proper attempts - infeenes| 
of water off Louisiana Senators or other Government | 
Texas alone for gunnery officials through lobbying or'| 
14 missile ranges. campaign contributions and to 
recommend any necessary cor- 


Featured Now At 


SAFEWAY * 


a 5 
So far the Committee has di. \Aans 
| prospecting and drilling Ange attention chiefly to; ice ineapp e daa 
amp e lobbying activittes for and| 
wed to continue in the| acsinst the Natural Gas Bill . s. 
But McClellan said after yes-| 
said the Department has terday’s meeting that “now we! ineapp e vice Dole 
& 


ted about $253 million on are broadening the field to go | 
DEL MONTE 


into other areas .of lobbying.” 
oo rag 


He said about a dozen oil and 


hee ath eh cae cat cae iden cette hie, aie eh atin eli it i 


Taste a Bit of 
Golden Sunshine 


From Hawaii 


VT 


Trniied Press 


esiey 


told the 

se interior | 
ttee that 
fense De 
tment agen- 
are asking 
space reser- 


acres 


ime. 


Pineapple: JUICE to tan 
Pineapple JUICe te ton... 
Pineapple JUICE pet monte..... 
Sliced Pineapple ts tanv.. 
Sliced-Pineapple ts ts. 
Crushed pifeaBble’ Dole 
Pineapple Tidbits ts ton 
Crushed Pineapple tv - 
Sliced Pineapple ox. 
Pineapple Tidbits... 2 4° 


Frozen Food Treats 


DOLE FROZEN BEL-AIR FROZEN 
Pineapple Chunks | Lemonade 
my 4 & 49- 


Doren 23C 


ihe ( on 


tinent al Shelf 


the so called Tidelands gas companies had been se-! 


ibmerged Lands Acts lected for @ study of their lob 
assed in 1953 bying operations. | 
the tid hs McClellan said the Commit- 
‘he tee will write to all state attor 

and set up a Federal leas- neys general asking for infor 
system for land under mation about State lobbying! 
er waters. . laws for possible use in revising} 


F Federa ion. 
Ewart testified on a bill to deral legislation 
lire congressional approval 


defense withdrawals of Rape Is Charged 


ireas of public land larger than At Piney Point P adios e ” Chunk 


) acres. The Committee post | Da: }2' 
ned until Tuesday action on|..4 Piney Point, Md., Coast : 
e bill an@ on a proposed Guardsman was held at St 
Marys County Jail yesterday 
nendment to make it apply to| charged with the rape of a 24 
e Continental Shelf year-old Piney Point woman 
The Committee did adopt an| Deputy Sheriff William E 
amendment to make Federal Sanner arrested Harry L. Oli- 
neral laws apply to mining vas, 29, one of two Guardsmen 
and oi! drilling on military res-| stationed at Piney Point, a few 
ervations taken out of public hours after the woman reported 
inds. The Navy earlier had in- the attack 
ed that # had gained owner- The woman, mother of one 
‘ip of oil under a reservation child, told Sanner she was 
eo San Nicolaus Island off the asleep in her bedroom when a 
nia Coast man cut the screen on a win- 
’Fwart indicated his belief dow and entered the room. He 
that exploitation of oi] under forced her to submit to him) T Star Kiet Fone 
the Continental Shelf is just after threatening ber with | und Licht Meet 


ee peters eoueees, Soe weit._| -. Colapy Coathars : 

Hydrox Cookies s: 

Corned Beef 00.2. 

Biscuit Mix sei... a 

Tea Bags si 

Cream of Rice 
Porty p- 4e 


SHERBET 


: 


The acts 
lands to 


V> Oz. 
oe 


Safeway Budget Balancers | 
Cinnamon Crisp ‘set... ‘ae ol 
Corned Beef Hash «-o 
Vienna Sausage » 

Potted Meat 
French Dressing ’ 


‘ alifar 


-»3 


te 31° 
prs 45° 
wn 42° 
fia 67° 
pak a 


Tariff Measure Cleared 
For Senate Floor Action 


Associated Press 
The Senate Finance Commit- The Treasury would figure a 
| of values for items 
tee yesterday approved the double set 
, saute On the list as it does now, one 
Fisenhower Administrations based on export prices and one| 
embattled customs simplifica- 


ee Green Beans 8 Si FSS soe 2 eo 35° 

Beef Steaks-pecn ores 3> co 1.00 | 

Pot Pie i 
Minute Maid, Frozen 


ye Juice 


“Pineapple ay Po Feten 
1EDrange Juice 


Baby Lirias Ae tram 


22, 


w= 


is. 
pxgs 


MMonor House, Frozen 
Turkey, Beef or Chicken 


Safeway 


on domestic prices in the for-| 
tion bill which has been stalled eign country. These lists would | 


be forwarded to Congress for 
guidance. 
The fourth 


in the group for a year 

4 9-to-3 vote to clear the bill 
for floor action represented a 
qualified victory for President 
Fisenhower. who has urged 
Congress for four years to pass 
the measure 

Rut the Administration had 
to make concessions to dislodge 
the bill. These will have the ef 
ect of postponing its full effect 
indefinitely. 

Principal purpose of the bill 
is to simplify the method of 
sluing imports for customs 
purposes. Under present law 
the duty is imposed on either 
the export value—the price put 
en the goods for shipment to 


this country—or on the going) 


price for sale in the exporting 
country, whichever is higher. 

The bill changes this so that 
only the export value would be 
used. However, under the com- 
promise formula written in by 
the Committee yesterday tariff 
cuts of more than 5 per cent 
n value would be postponed 
indefinitely 

The formula would work this 
way: 

For the next four years the 
Treasury would annually make 
up a list of items on which the 
eut in value would be more 
than 5 per cent by switching to 
export value solely 


items 


— ee +--+ ee 


Respherry 


MEAT LOAF 


Guaranteed 


28 45° 


The new. 
system would not apply to these | 


be the final one 
would remain on 
standard 
Congress acted at that time to 
put 
value system. 


would| 
Items on it 
the double 


indefinitely unless | 


year list 


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Address replies to Box 692 Post-Times Herald 


enthusiastically en- 


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A 


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Cranberry Sauce 37 °o." “vig FB san 
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10 Tuesday, July 10, 1956 . 


Jam Session 


\¥ 
. wh *.* 
eteetedn ee s . - 


+,” ’ . 
gereerre ~—s 


Tnited Press 
This is the Island of Thera off Greece, which was the hardest hit area in yesterday's 
earthquake. Reports indicate more than two score dead. 


ans 


= 
. ‘ 
‘or oe - 
=, 
- 


r a 
? ; » 
, ae , > : on 
, A. 
7 
aon a ky . : 
ed 


¢ 


Stall 
: © al 


2 
An electric cable was sev- : 
ered as the old Highway 
Bridge swing span was 
open yesterday to permit 
passage of an oil tanker 
past it. It was almost an 
hour and a half before the 
swing span could be closed 
manualiy and southbound 
traffic on U.S. Route 1 re- 
stored. The photo above 
shows workmen extending 
a cable from the D. C. end 
of the bridge (at right) to 
the swing span. The cable 
subsequently was attached 
to the truck at extreme 
right, which helped pull 
the swinging span back 
into position as men 
cranked the auxiliary ma- 
chinery (see photo at 
right). The trouble started 
when a heavy piece of 
metal fell into the gear 
machinery which opens 
the bridge. As the span 
swung open, the fouled 
gears chewed through an 
electric cable which brings 
power to the machinery. 
A new cable was installed 
last night. Coming after 
the morning rush hour, 
the accident caused a rela- 
tively slight traffic jam in 
back of the bridge (see 
photo below) and as far 
north as Independence 
ave. The AB&W Transit 
Co. said three of its buses 
were trapped and there 
was a disruption in its 
schedules for an hour. 
After the initial jam south- 
bound traffic was detoured 


over Memorial Bridge. George L. Giannetti puts finishing touches to a clay model of the national seal for 
the new Belgian Chancery here. Giannetti, whe is making the 12-by-15-foot seal in 
his studio at 1416 N st. nw., says it will be one of the largest ever made in one piece. 


Stal! Phote 


—_ ——_~,- 6.-- - -_—Oonrro- /- piece | 


4 


Internationa! News 
Mine : eat: tial ange : Giving New York a preview of their charms before heading for the “Miss Universe” contest are, from left, 
- ye hs, < is | these hopefuls from Belgium, Sweden, Canatla, England, France, Germany, Iceland, Italy and Turkey. 


’ am 


¢ . 


4 


Congress Votes 


Milit iary 


Legislation authorizing §$2.-, 
138,886,000 in military construc- 
tion, including almost $50 mil. 
lion for expansion of existing 
facilities in the District, Mary. 
land and Virginia, was passed 

both houses of Congress yes- 

lay and sent to the Presi- 
| for his signalure. Pdssage 
oth houses was by voice 


inds for the program either 
een appropriated or will 
ncluded in future bills 
\ $4 million airfield for the 
| Academy. once approved 
the House, had been cut 
the bill by the Senate and 
1s not restored. The Senate 
id added to the bill $275,000 
laintenance gt Washington 
ational Airpor®€. 


—— a 


June kmploy 


Peak of 66.5 


Ass 
Employment reached an all- 
ne high in June with 66.5 
million Americans holding jobs 
across the Nation, the Govern- 
ment reported yesterday. 
rhe report by the Commerce 
and Labor Departments showed 
155,000 more persons at work 
last month than in the previous 
record month last August, when. 
there were 65,446,000 job) 
holders 
At the 
nloyment 
300,000 in 
or 42 per 
labor force 
You summer workers get- 
ng of school or seeking! 
ost-graduation jobs accounted | 
for the increase both in em-| 
ployment and in job seekers, | 
the two Departments said 
The June total of jobholders 
$ approximately 2.5 million) 
lan a year earlier. It | 
epresented an increase of 
1.265.000 over the May total 
of 65.238,000 
Increased 
reported in 
and non-farm 
young summer 
ccunting tor 


same time. wunem- 
increased by 
June to 2.8 million, 
cent of the entire 


“~ 
~ 


+h 
Out 


ry te uw ’ 
: 


employment 
both 
ac 


was | 
agricultural 
tivities, with 
WOrkers ac- 
nearly all the in- 
creases in both categories 

Since the report was made 
yr the period ended June 16 
and the steel strike did not 


PrP 


’ 


Md. Shopping 
Center Given 
Pike Access 


, apveted access to the pro 
posed $6 million new Marlboro 
Pike has been granted to a 
Prinee Georges County devel- 
oper against the recommen- 
dations of the engineers of the 
State Roads Commission, it 
was learned yesterday 

The access was granted just 
four days before the State 
Roads Commission was recon- 
stituted by Governor Theodore 
R. MecKeldin on June 15 

After turning down hundreds 
of similar requests for access 
to the four-lane controlied 
highway, two of the three mem 
bers of the Commission agreed 
to allow access for a proposed 
shopping center on the old 
O'Donnell farm west of Forest- 
ville 

The proposed shopping cen- 
ter will be built by j 
of Chariotte. VN. C 
in-law, David Clark 
operates the new  Eastover 
Shopping Center at Indianhead 
Highway and Southern ave. and 
Fairfax Village at Pennsylvania 
and Alabama aves. se 

In granting Goode access to 
the highway. the Commission 
went against its own longe-stand- 
ng policy which was to allow} 
only those roads to enter or) 
cross the new highway which 
were in existence prior to 
April 1954 

The access was granted after 
Goode agreed to dedicate 7.46 
acres of the 120-acre farm for 
the new highway right of way 
and waived his right to damages 
on 27.7 acres which will be cut! 
off from the main tract by the) 
road. 

The value of the 
and the damages 
about $50.000 


dedication 
was set at 


Georgetown 
Alley Building 
Suit Heard 


District Court Judge Josepb 
Cc MecGarraghy yesterday took 

ae advisement a suit in- 
tended to stop the construction 
of yo dwellings on Orchard 
la. nw 

He also began consideration 
of a District Government fre- 
quest to throw out the suit. 

The complaint was filed by 
Attorney John J. Dwyer, repre- 
senting 21 residents of the area 
near Orchard la. The alley runs 
east and west between 30th and 
Sist sts. nw. in the block 
bcunded by P, Q, 30th and 3ilst 
sts. nw 

According to 
alley originally was 14 feet 
wide, but the District Govern- 
ment accepted a gift of land 
which would widen it to 30 
feet. Under District zoning 
regulations, an alley must be 
at least 30 feet wide before 
houses may be built 

Assistant Corporation Coun 
sel Hubert D. Pair said the 
compiaint failed to name a 
necessary party as a defendant 
He argued that J. Francis 
Harris Lil, builder, should have! 
heen made a defendant. Pair) 
also argued that since the Dis 
trict accepted the land to widen 
Orchard la. on June 15 the issue) 
is now of. 


Dwyer, the 


' 


funds 


Other authorizations 
ed were: 

Andrews Ajir 
$7,335,000 for 


includ. 


Force Base— 
operation, com 
munication, transportation and 
supply facilities, housing and 
land acquisition 

Ft. Meade 
pital buildings. 
heliport runway 

Walter Reed Army Medical 
Center—$4,209.000 for an addi- 
lion to the Army Medical serv 
ices graduate school, 
dormitory, and a new 
and chaplain’s office 

industrial College for the 
Armed Forces at Fort McNair 
$4,111,000 for a new building 

Housing for the joint chiefs 
of staff—$180,000 


barracks. and a 


chapel 


ment Hits 


Million Jobs 


ociated Press 


begin until June 30 
refiect any layoffs connected 
with the steel walkout. Offi 
cials said the July report would 
refiect such layoffs but that 
strikers would not be listed as 
jobless 


t did not 


$5. 885.000 for hos- : 


a visitors’ 4} 


Milton Korman 
\City Legal 
Aide Given 


Promotion 
teitiehl 


Korman, 51, chief 
Proceedings Divi- 
sion of the District Corporation 
Counsel's Office, yesterday was 
named Princ 
pal Assistant 
( or p oration 
Counsel, effec 
tive Aug. | 

Korman was 
appointed by 
the District 
C om m ission- 
ers to succeed 
Chester H. 
Gray, who be- 
comes Corpora- 
tion Counsel 
Aug. 1’ on retirement of Ver- 
non E. West 

Korman joined the city’s 
legal offices in 1937. He has 
handied every type of case, in- 
cluding school desegregation, 
which he argued before local 
courts and the 
Supreme Court 

Korman'’s present salary is 
$11,680 a year. In his new post 
he will get $12,900 

Mr. and Mrs. Korman and 
their three children, James Wil- 
liam, 13, Edward Neal, 9, and 
Sharon Hope, 7, live at 3314 
Stevenson pl. nw. 


Aiilt 
of ¢t 


m Dv 


Civil 


| 


When else could you drive home a better bar- 
gain—with your present car now worth more 
than it ever will be again—and while Buick 
prices are within easier reach of more people 


ee 


Its only Juiy- 
SO Why miss the fan ? 


(Its a great time to buy a Buick!) 


N ALL truth—when would be a better time 
to buy your new Buick than right now? 


than ever before? 


And when else would you get more good out 
of it all? When else will there be better weather 
—more hours in the day—more yen for going— 
more places to go—more fun on tap—more 


sports in season’ 


United States — 


Prentiss 


Lauds New 


Road Plan 


Reduced traffic hazards and 
increased business activity in 
Washington will result from the 
new highway program recently 


enacted by Congress, Ma). Gen. | 


Louis'W. Prentiss, former Dis- 
trict Engineering. Commission- 
er, predicted yesterday 
“Decentralization, flight of 
trade and reduction of property 
values” are associated with traf 
fic congestion, Gen. Prentiss 
told more than 150 members of 
the Washington Building Con- 
ference at a luncheon meeting 


‘in the Mayflower Hotel. 


Out of a total District appro- 
priation of $54.8 million in road 
funds for the next three years, 
$14.3 million will be matching 
funds contributed by the Dis- 


trict. Of the Federal approtria- 
tion, $29.4 million will go to 


Advertisement 


may be the couse of or 


oo Sot 
For quick pa get... wis 


" Glyco-Thymoline 


build interstate highways in thejing to get it built” for some 


District, Prentiss pointed out. 
|'These funds will be added to 
the $9 million aiready available 
for highway construction here. 

He said the Inner Loop super- 
highway circling Washington is 

expected to cost about $270 mil- 

lion and that even with the “ae- 
celerated program we're not go- 


— - _— ———— 


time. 
Gen. Prentiss, vice president 


of the American Road Builders’ 


Association, predicted that the 
Inner Loop highway will reduce 
traffic congestion in downtown 
Washington by 25 per cent, and 
with other street construction 
will step up retail business ec- 
tivity in the downtown area. 


FOR 


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WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Tuesday, July 10, 1956 11 


——[_—_—_———————— TD 


. THE 


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Wirtetit te band 


The Washington oe 


aaah ated MEYER. Chairman of the Board 


AMES RUSSELL eo al Vies Presipene and Exrecutive Editor 
ROBERT HB. ESTABROOK ..«., B@ttertal Page Editor 
FRIENDLY Manaying Fditor 
Conrriduting Editor 
Secretary 

. President Broadcast Division 


N INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER st 


Dragoon in g Mr. Coo per 


Did President Eisenhower fully consider the 
effect on Indo-American relations of his request 
that Ambassador John Sherman Cooper relinquish 
his post to run for the Senate? Mr. Cooper has done 
enlightened and effective work in the Senate in the 
past, and unquestionably he will be an asset to 
the Administration if the voters of Kentucky see 
Gt to elect him in November. But it is sad that a 
man who has given such dedicated leadership to 
rey Saag between India and the United 
States, an who has won the confidence of Prime 
Minister Nehru and other Indian officials, should 
be withdrawn at this moment. In the disappoint- 
ment over the postponement of Mr. Nehru's visit 
this will seem a double blow. 

In some measure the President's direct plea to 
Mr. Cooper, which the latter hardly could have 
turned down, reflects Republican political despera- 
tion. It is an anomaly that even with the prospects 
for emphatic reelection of Mr. Eisenhower the out- 
look for Republican control of the Senate is dim. 
Mr. Cooper, who was defeated by the late Sen 
Alben W. Barkley in 1954, probably could have won 
against most other possible contenders. Because 
of Senator Barkley’s death two seats are at stake 
in Kentucky. No doubt the Administration hopes 
to gain. two progressive allies in victories for Mr 
Cooper and for Thruston B. Morton over Sen. Earle 
Clements. But even if the Republicans should cap- 
ture Kentucky, the question is whether the dragoon- 
ing of Mr. Cooper to take part in a political gamble 
is worth the diplomatic disruption it will cause. 
As Marquis Childs points out, Mr. Cooper was most 
reluctant to run, believing that his work in India 
was unfinished and required delicate attention 

So it does, particularly in light of the disastrous 
propensity of Administration spokesmen for lectur- 
ing Mr. Nehru on neutralism. Vice President Nixon's 
barbed comment from Karachi yesterday was both 
undignified and unnecessary, ard it is sure to cause 
a new wave of bad feeling. Indeed, Mr. Nixon and 
Mr. Dulles seem to be doing their best to undermine 
the quiet, patient work of Mr. Cooper, who 
ceeded in reviving the enthusiasm generated by 
Chester Bowles and was himself responsible for 
ironing out many a misunderstanding. Has the 
Administration any plans for replacing Ambassador 
Cooper with a man of like sensitivity and percep- 
tion? President Eisenhower had better take per- 
sonal hold of relations with India lest others undo 
his policies. The very least that is called for is a 
new effort to hold the deferred talks between the 
President and Prime Minister Nehru in September. 


SuC- 


Answer in Advance 


Fears that the House District Subcommittee 
chaired by Rep. James C. Davis is preparing to do 
a hatchet job on the District school system 
ere not diminished by its recently announced choice 
of a chief counsel. The subcommittee has named 
to the key post William Gerber of Memphis, a 
lawyer who has served in a variety of city and 
county jobs in the area controlied by the Jate 
Edward H. Crump but who has had no experience 
whatever, so far as we can determine, in education 
and no familiarity at all with District problems. The 
kind of inquiry contemplated by the subcommittee 
was pretty clearly indicated by the revelation that 
it had considered as counsel Leander Pérez of 
Louisiana; the impression conveyed at that time 
now seems confirmed 

Mr. Gerber has his work carefully cut out for 
him. The sponsor of this wholly unnecessary 
investigation of the local schools, Rep. John Bell 
Williams of Mississippi, has already made perfectly 
clear what he wishes the investigation to discover. 
And the chairman, Mr. Davis, has said that integra- 
tion—of which he has always been an outspoken 
foe—will be investigated “to whatever extent that 
may be involved in the operation of the schools.” 
Apparently the inquiry is to be aimed at producing 
propaganda to prove that integration is responsible 
for all contemporary educational ills. Friends of 
the District schools and all those interested in 
promoting an orderly pattern of desegregation 
throughout the country had better begin the mar- 
shalling of facts to counteract this propaganda. 


Stars Fall on Washington 


Well, &. today at least, as we don't need to 
remind you, Washington is also the capital of the 
baseball universe; and for once there will be no 
difficulty about filling up every seat at Griffith 
Stadium. It is exactly 19 years since such a thing 
happened here, and—barring providential inter- 
ventions, such as a pennant @nning ball club and a 
consequent world series—it will be at least another 
16 years before it can happen again. The obvious 
moral, therefore, is to make the most of this 
fleeting moment of glory; particularly since the 
augurs of the Weather Bureau report, at this writ- 
ing, that the auspices are altogether favorable. 

When the 1937 All-Star game was played here 
in Washington, some of the players who will 
participate in this afternoon's festivities were barely 
out of diapers and none was of an age to require 
the use of the razor and razor blades that nearly 
all of them will be earnestly recommending, be- 
tween innings today, to the millions of television 
viewers throughout the Nation. The Second World 
War was still a good three years away from Europe 
and nearly four and a half years away from Ameri- 
eans. Here in Washington bonded whisky could be 
had for $1.39 a fifth and butter was 35 cents a pound 

Not much of this, to be sure, bothered the high- 
priced practitioners who gathered that afternoon at 
Griffith Stadium. But before the business was 
finished they had other things to worry about. The 
losing pitcher, Mr. Dizzy Dean, had been badly 
injured by a line drive and never regained his 
former efficacy. The winning pitcher, Mr. Goofy 
Gomes, overstrained his arm, but had recovered 
enough of it by October to beat the Giants in two 
games of the 1937 World Series. Then, as it will 
be again today, the American League lineup was 
heavily loaded with New York Yankees, among them 
Gehrig, DiMaggio, Rolfe and Dickey. It was the 
fifth All-Star game; and when it was over the 
reckoning between the leagues stood 4 to 1 on the 
side of the Americans. Already their supporters 
were beginning to refer sarcastically to the National 
League as the “bushes.” 

fm more recent times, as you. know, has been 


PHILIP L. GRAHAM, President and Publisher 


...». Wtee President and General Manager 
Vie President and Advertising Director 
bee vy 


PAGE 12 


— 


TUESDAY, JULY 10, 1956 


quite another story. The National Leaguers have 
won five of the last six All-Star games, and appar- 
ently the only reason that they are not this year's 
betting favorites is that the American Leaguers, as 
the home club, will have the opportunity to bat last. 
But of course any prediction about the issue of any 
single ball game is no better than the blindest of 
blind guesses. We shall see what we shall see and 
shall see it with our own eyes; so let us be grateful 


‘for an opportunity that can hardly come oftener 


than three or four times in a normal lifetime. 


Intimidation by Inquiry 


John Cogley, former editor of The Commonweal 
and author of a recent report on blacklisting pub- 
lished by The Fund for the Republic, has been 
subpenaed to appear today before the House Com- 

The Committee 
has said that he 
wants Mr. Cogley to discuss the report and to 
divulge, in executive session, the names of enter- 
tainers blacklisted and the names of the blacklisters. 
This is, we suggest, an inquiry of dubious propriety 
on the part of a congressional committee 


mittee on Un-American Activities 


chairman, Rep. Francis Walter, 


The» Constitution expressly forbids Congress to 
make any law abridging the freedom of the press; 
and implicitly it forbids Congress to abridge free- 
dom of the press by calling an author to account for 
what he has written. Freedom of the press would 
be very seriously abridged if writers stood in fear 
of being haled before a congressional committee 
whenever they expressed opinions on controversial 
issues. Statements in the report have been chal- 
lenged by certain individuals; whatever the merit 
of these challenges, Congress is not the place to 
resolve them 

Moreover, the Un-American Activities Commit- 
tee has no business trying to make a writer 
reveal names which he has undertaken to keep in 
confidence. Freedom of the press would be seriously 
abridged if committees of Congress ignored the 
obligation of reporters to maintain the confiden- 
tiality of sources of information 

If the Un-American Activities Committee wants 
assistance or advice from Mr. Cogley, it is, of 
course, at liberty to invite him to come and testify. 
An invitation is very different from a subpena. 
The tactics of the Committee invite the supposition, 
however, that its intent is more retaliation than 
information. Presumably Mr. Cogley has said all 
that he wants to say on the subject of blacklisting 
in his voluminous report. 

Even a courteous invitation may raise some 
questions, depending on the circumstances. A 
couple of weeks ago the House Appropriations 
Committee invited a representative of the St. Louis 
Post-Dispatch to come to Washington and answer 
questions concerning an editorial entitled “Losing 
the Peaceful Atom.” The newspaper declined the 
invitation, explaining its stand in these words: 

If an editor were to answer official questions 
as to how he formed his opinions and to describe 
the sources on which they were based, his con- 
duct would encourage other committees to make 
similar demands on editors. Such a develop- 
ment would place freedom of the press under 
fear of congressional inquiry and thus restrict 
the information of the people. The-consequences 
could be far-reaching and ominous. 

We earnestly suggest to Representative Walter 
that he and his committee colleagues read Mr. Cog- 
ley’s report—and that they leave Mr. Cogley him- 
self alone. 


Put Down the Ax 


It is time for the House to be reasonable on the 
foreign aid appropriation. The $4-billion authoriza- 
tion ceiling voted Monday cuts President Elisen- 
hower’s request by nearly a billion dollars. It 
would be unconscionable for the House to make a 
further slash in’ the actual appropriation, as the 
Appropriations Committee proposes to do. What 
member of Congress wants to take upon himself the 
responsibility for weakening NATO, which is still 
the prime shield of free nations against aggression? 

Congress has already registered its misgivings 
about the format of the aid program. If the Admin- 
istration is wise, it will pay close attention to the 
complaints, some of which come from men who 
are longtime supporters of international coopera- 
tion. Let the Senate approve Senator Mansfield’s 
plan for a thoroughgoing study of aims, techniques 
and performance as a guide for action next year; 
and let the House join promptly in backing such a 
study. But let Congress recognize that until there 
is something better to put in its place the present 
program remains imperative to safeguard American 
interests in the free world. It would be perilous 
indeed to ignore President Eisenhower's earnest 
plea not to risk our investment in world stability. 


Cooperation in Virginia 


The cémmunities of northern Virginia have 
shown a good deal of enterprise and ingenuity in 
pooling their resources to build a children’s deten- 
tion home that will serve Arlington and Fairfax 
Counties as well as Alexandria and Falls Church. 
The need for such an institution has been pointedly 
demonstrated recently on several occasions by the 
confinement of juvenile delinquents in jail for want 
of a more appropriate institution. No oné of the 
cooperating jurisdictions has funds to build an 
appropriate detention home of its own, but by 
acting together they can solve a common problem. 
The Virginia General Assembly wisely set up ma- 
chinery for creation of a regional authority to carry 
out the project. If there is equally good judgment 
m the selection of a site, and in its acceptance by 
adjacent property owners, this important venture 
in intercommunity cooperation can now go forward. 
indeed, it could well serve as a model for a cooper- 
ative response to jivenile needs elsewhere in the 
metropolitan area. 


Campaigns Under the Rug? 


It is now 4% months since introduction of the 
Johnson-Knowland honest elections bill which sub- 
sequently has been indorsed by 83 other Senators. 
The bill still has not been brought to the floor. Are 
85 Senators powerless to obtain action on a measure 
so directly and vitally connected with their ex- 


pressed interest in cleaning up campaign practices? 


“Don’t Mind Dickie — He’s Just Getting 
in Practice for the Campaign” 


ate = Btioc x. 
Ook we 2454587 Pr Ko 


Letters to the Editor 


‘Schoolrooms Denied’ 


I was sorry to see your es- 
timable paper contribute to the 
confusion about the Powell 
amendment in your editorial, 
“Schoolrooms Denied,” of July 
5. In effect you blamed the 
amendment’s supporters for 
killing hopes of Federal school- 
construction aid by their zeal 
for settling the “abstract” issue 
of race relations. 

Haven't you put the finger on 
the wrong party’? The Powell 
amendment would not compel 
any state to desegregate its 
system. It is no “legislative 
fiat.” It would, however, ex- 
tend Federal aid to those states 
which moved toward compli- 
ance with the desegregation 
decision and keep it from those 
which did not. Any state might 
maintain a wholly segregated 
system and pay its full costs 
or it might take steps toward 
desegregation and receive fi- 
nancial aid in its educational 
program. 

This seems a fairly “pragmat- 
ic” choice to set before some 
Southern voters. But the Sen- 
ate segregationists, rather. than 
offer such an honest choice to 
their home states, would rather 
deny Federal educational aid 
to the entire country. Isn't it 
just as reasonable to condemn 
this group for the denial of 
schoolrooms? How many con- 
cessions must be made to the 
segregationists to earn the ap- 
proval of a “liberal” newspa- 
per? 

How can a member of the 
Federal Congress vote public 
funds for the support of a state 
school program to be carried 
on in open defiance of the Su- 
preme Court decision? Shall 
the Congress subsidize nullifica- 
tion of the Constitution? Can 
it, in fact, lawfully pass a school- 
aid bill with anything less than 
the Powell amendment?’ 

BERNARD C. WEISBERGER. 

Washington. 


“Wilson's Sound-Ojf” 


It was interesting to read in 
your July 3 issue the opinion 
of the professor of law, Charles 
T. Collier, that Secretary of 
Defense Wilson had in mind a 
“political .. . sham” when he 
characterized something as 
“phony” during a press confer- 
ence. This is probably a good 
background thought, but it 
fails to describe what Mr. ‘ il- 
son was talking about. To un- 
derstand what he meant, we 
must put ourselves in his posi- 
tion at the time, and likewise, 
he must put himself in his 
former position to think 
through what he meant. We 
must visualize thé actual envir- 
onment and let our thoughts 
arise from that actual situa- 
tion. Here it is. 

Mr. Wilson has just com. 
pleted a meeting of his most 
high-level military and civil- 
ian staff. He has received rec 
ommendations on the ijcfense 
of our country from the ,artic- 
ipants, and he has informed 
them of his reasoned and con 
sidered judgments which might 
be termed his “orders.” He 
has answered many, many ques- 
tions from representatives of 
the press, with nearly all those 
questions relating to military 
defense and preparedness. 

Now comes a question from 
a representative of the press 
which both asks a question and 
at the same time suggests the 
answer which the reporter 
would like to have. In sub 
stance, the combined question 
and answer is this; all to a man 
who is responsible for the op- 
erations of our Defense Depart- 
ment, and who has just com- 

leted the stating of his pol- 
cies for the operation of that 
Defense Department during 
the ensuing year: 

“Mr. Wilson, .. . you are 
more interested as the watch- 
dog of the Treasury in this 
matter of defense, than you are 
as Secretary of Defense, aren't 
you?” 

and 


Thoughts answers on 


Wilson: what was the answer, 
how should the questions be 
answered, was the material of 
reply top secret, etc’ But here 
was a “knife in the back.” a re 
porter asking Mr. Wilson to 
admit that he was more inter 
ested in the responsibilities of 
the Secretary of the Treasury. 
than he was in his own (Mr 
Wilson's) responsibilities of the 
Secretary of Defense. The only 
reply possible was “That's a 
phony —meaning “That's a 
phony question and answer.” 
I would like to ask the re- 
porter a question, and see his 
answer printed herewith. The 
question is this: “What did the 
reporter have in mind when 
he asked the question, and 
what did he intend to do with 
the answer if that answer had 
been ‘yea,’ as he indicated he 
wanted?” 
PEYTON G. 


NEVITT, 
Washington. Senet FOUR ret 


Bus Conversion 


The results of the transit sys- 
tem fiasco illustrate two things 
The first is, that regardless of 
how many letters of protest that 
were sent in to your paper, 
against conversion to a bus sys- 
tem, plus the many scientific 
reports by outside men called 
in to verify this stupid move. 
you have dutifully sided with 
the “few” against the “major- 
ity.” 

And secondly. the results 
show Barnum was, and always 
will be, right—there’s a sucker 
born every minute! The people 
as usual are the suckers to allow 
several sets of money-nuts op 
erators to bid on something 
vital to their daily life, and then 
allow them to tace that transit 
system and convert it to a bus 
system which will best fll the 
treasury of the company 

It would be interesting to 
make a survey of the type and 
numbers of automobiles driven 
by the “bidders,” and perhaps 
also by the operators (top ones) 
of the local papers, plus a ques- 
tion as to how many times in 
the past ten years have these 
individuals used a bus 

Yep, the public is being taken 
for a terrific ride—on a bus’ 

DR. MILTON J. COHEN 

Washington. 


Editor's Note: Respecting the 
contributors to this page, the 
answer to Dr. Cohen's last ques- 
tion is “datly.” 


‘More Money for Air’ 


In reading your editorial of 
June 28. regarding the increase 
im appropristicon the Air 
Force. and the further fact that 
the Senate had reduced the 
present request for more for 
eign aid. H struck me that zp- 
parently the Senate knows the 
feeling of the people far Detter 
than the Administration. 

First. | motice you say that 
Secretary of Defense Wilson 
was probably might im some 
measure in charging the Senate 
with political motivation 

Second. you admit that the 
Administration failed te pre 
sent a good case to Congress 

Third. you agree that if the 
money for air defense should 
be increased. then money for 
foreign aid should. at least. be 
as )«€©6©mechl 6as «€CUhthe«€6AAGminis 
tration requested 

First. regarding Secretary 
Wilson, be would have been 
far better of & he had kept 
his personal thoughts to him- 
self 

We Americans may not be 
kept up to date om ihe reasons 
for foreign aid: the fact re 
mains that if a vote was taken 
the American people would vote 
&5 per cent against any foreign 
aid. and we certainiy are for 
having a strong sational de- 
fense 

You admit that the Secretary 
of the Air Force says that we 
dont have the number of planes 
that Russia has. apd I think 
you will admit that it is a fact 
that the Navy and Army off) 
cers agree with him. 

As to foreign aid 
has been done to enlighten the 
American people of the neces 
sity for foreign aid’? |. for one. 
think that charity should start 
at home. and taxes should be 
reduced, and | am told by peo 
ple who have just come back 
from visiting im Europe that 
a lot of our forcign aid is going 
to rebuild hotels. In fact. my 
sister has just returned from 
Europe. where she was trevel- 
ing for two months. and I wish 
you would try te sell ber on 
foreign aid 

The real 
this Administretion 
doesn't keep the American peo 
ple advised: i just goes ahead 
telling us what theyre doing 

FRANK L. WARFIELD 

Annapolis, Md 


for 


just what 


complaint against 
is that it 


Honest Elections 


It was with a great deal of 
interest that I read your edi- 
torials concerning the so-called 
honest-elections bill. I note that 
you have editorially simplified 
the bill as one that “really re 


quires only the honest report- 


ing of election contributions.” 
Your editorial characterizes 
this legislation as “the very 
minimum that citizens have a 
right to expect 

This is the grossest kind of 
oversimplification, applied to a 
problem which has the rst 
complex ramifications, especia)l- 
ly when vou consider that the 
election process is such a vital 
part of our way of life 

Nowhere do you mention one 
of the major stumbling blocks 
to the enactment of any wortb- 
while elections bill—the labor 
bosses who refuse to even 
acknowledge the existence of a 
problem concerning the mora) 
ity of compulsory union dues 
being used for politica! 
purposes. Instead, you would 
have the Senate blindly pass a 
bill upon which no hearings 
have been held, thereby bypass- 
ing the legislative safeguards 
which are essential to good 
laws. 

In your later editorial of June 
27 you again ask for passege of 
incomplete legislation. You cal! 
the honest-clections bil! one “of 
limited objectives designed to 
achieve honest reporting” I 

would most certainly agree - 
it is limited—too limited. 
fact, to be of much use. As ro 


honest reporting. I wander what 
is so “honest” about some of 
the failures of this or present 
legislation to effectively enforce 
reporting of all contributions. 
especially those made by labor 
bosses from compulsory union 
dues 

Going one step further. you 
say thes legislation is “sot the 
proper wehicie with which te 
settle an assortment of related 
| would point out that 
all these “related tesucs 
tremely important : 
hcnest-iections bill, and they 
must all be considered fully by 
ihe proper groups in Congress 
in order that the American peo 
ple have the kina of elections 
law which they deserve 

At present there & no com- 
prehensive bell before the Sen- 
ate which woulc begin to meet 


}asuers 


interestec 
might well be turmea toward 
solutions, rather than stop-gap 
measures which fail to meet 
the situation as it row exists 


BARRY GOLDWATER, 
CT @ Gereter free Areccs. 


GOP Strategists 
Seek Pro-Ike Senate 
By Marquis Childs 


sistant Sherman Adams, working in close 
blican National 


for the Senate on the 
Eisenhower-Nixon ticket 
in November. 

Adams is using the ar- 
gument that if the Pres 
idemt is willing to run 
despite his second major 
liness in nine months 
then surely he can expect 
the cooperation of those Childs 
who believe in him and 
his program. That argument was used to 
persuade John Sherman Cooper to over- 
come his reluctance to leave his present 
position as Ambassador to India and try for 
the Senate seat in Kentucky left vacant by 
the death of Alben Barkley. 

But with Cooper, a man of strong con- 
viction, it tool a personal telephone call 
from the President himself to get him to 
change his mind. While Cooper sat in 
Adams" office in the White House the call 
was put through to the President, conva- 
lescing at his farm at Gettysburg. When 
Cooper heard from the President himself 
that support of the Eisenhower policies in 
Congress was of paramount importance, he 
had no choice but to agree to yield to the 
draft of Kentucky Republicans. 


cos 


ONE REASON for Adams determina 
tion to strengthen the ticket wherever pos- 
sible is the recognition that the President's 
second illness has raised doubts about his 
capecity te run for reelection. There are 
indications this has taken some of the edge 
off his great popularity. 

But, in his dedicated loyalty to the Presi- 
dent. Adams goes further than this. With 
an acute awareness of the President's 
struggies in the first two years of his ad- 
ministration with hostile Republicans such 
as Sen. Joseph MeCarthy of Wisconsin, 
the deputy President —Adams is hardly 
less than that—would like to see an Eisen- 
hower party with the balance of power in 
Congress. 

After weeks of persuasion, initiated by 
Adams. Gov. Arthur B. Langlie of the 
State of Washington agreed to run for the 
Senate acainst Sen. Warren Magnuson. 
\thbough he ts a Democrat, Magnuson has 
had the support of influential Republicans 
because of his proved ability to get favors 
for his home state. Langlie has been made 
keynoter of the Republican National Con- 
vention in San Francisco in August in an 
effort to build him up 


The effort has not been abandoned to 
persuade former Gov. Thomas E. Dewey 
of New York, twice his party's nominee for 
the Presidency. to run for the Senate 
against Sen. Herbert Lehman. At the end 
of bis fourth term as Governor, Dewey 
announced that he was leaving public life 
to enter the private practice of law so that 
he could provide properly for his family. 

The argument has been used with him, 
it is said bere, that he need not give up all 
his law practice but merely the foreign 
clients he represents. The government of 
Turkey is one of Dewey's clients, from 
which, according to his statement register- 
img as am agent of that government, the 
Dewey law firm receives $150,000 a year. 
Many members of Congress, both past and 
present, have retained connections with 
their law firms back home while serving in 
Senate or House. 


cos 


THE PRESSURE put on Cooper is ironie 
im view of his own past relationship with 
the White House. Elected to the Senate 
for a two-year term in 1952, and running 
for reclection in Sh. he was disturbed 
about the effect of the Dixon-Yates private 
power deal in Kentucky, where low-cost 
power from the Tennessee Valley Authority 
i 2 political factor. At that time Cooper 
tried to see the President to tell him per- 
somnally that he thought the Dixon-Yates 
Geal was wrong and that it would have a 
harmful political effect. It was reported 
them that Adams refused to give him ss 
presidential appointment. 

On another question of basic policy it is 
hardly a secret that Cooper has been de- 
cidedly unhappy about recent statements 
by Secretary of State Dulles and Vice 
President Nixon criticizing India’s neutral 
policy as “immoral” Urgent telegrams 
that Cooper sent to the State Department 
from New Dethi recommending means for 
bettering relations with India are said to 
have been treated as routine “file-and-con- 
sider™ dispatches by Under Secretary of 
State Herbert Hoower Jr. 

Conceivably the Eisenhower party, with 
the masterminding of the AdamsHall 
combination, could win control of Con- 
gress. But, if the past record means any- 
thing. this would be no guarantee of action 
om the policies identified with the Eisen- 


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The Washington Post Compary 
The Anvoctatetd Preas w entitied eeclusiveis te aee for 


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Rer wise «credited | 


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I 


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watt 


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Today and Tomorrow . . 


Candidate and Leader 


TO JUDGE BY what is hap- 
pening in Congress to the Pres. 
ident’s legislative program, he 
is the unanimous candidate of 


heavy major. 
ity of the Re. 
publicans, act- 
ing contrary 
to the Presi. 
dent's advice. 
have just vot 
ed for the 
Powell amend- 
ment which Lippmann 


mace it impossible to pass the 
bill to give Federal aid to the 
public schools But for the Re. 
publican defectors, the Demo- 
crats could net have gotten 
Congress to overule the Ad. 
ministration on the size of the 
military appropriation. and in 
effect to pass a vote of no con- 
fidence in the President's mi! 
itary judgement 

dent's very 


rhe Presi 
modest 
to liberalize international 
trade are stalled because of 
Republican opposition. The 
foreign aid bill. the kewstone 
of Administration foreign po! 
icy, is being given what “Life 
Magazine describes ac ‘a fu 
ous kicking around None 
this would have happened if 
the President had a reason 
ably united support from his 
own party 

Yet he has such overwhelm. 
ing support for his running 
again that he will probably be 
renominated by acclamation 
The same Republicans who 
oppose his policies and his 
measures are a chorve crying 
out that the future of this 
country, the future of the 
world, depend upon his being 
a candidate. What are we to 
make of this contrast between 
his candidacy and his leader- 
ship? The obvious explanation 
is the cynical one, that the dis- 
senting Republicans do not 
believe in Eisenhower's polli- 
cies but that they need him to 
win the election for them 


THE RELATIONS between 
the President and his party 
in Congress are remarkable 
His enormous popularity and 


proposals 


of 


By Walter Lippmann. 


prestige have made him, as 
he was far from being in 1952, 
the undisputed choice of the 
party for President. Yét he is 
as little able today as he was 
when he took office to unite 
and lead his party in support 
of his policies. The is on 
which the party will not unite 
behind him are not small is 
ues. They are the crucial and 
major issues of foreign pol 
icy, defense, education. What 
takes some explaining is how 
though he and they are divid 
ed in Congress, they can be 
united for the presidential 
election 
This is possible because in 
General Eisenhower's concep 
tion of the American Govern 
ment, the President is not the 
leader of the system who 
makes it work but the officer 
who presides over the execwu- 
tive branch. He exhorts, he 
preaches, he proposes meas 
ures, he pleads for them. But 
he does not lead the Congress 
In his book there are no re 
wards for men. like Senator 
Wiley, who takes risks in 
to follow him: there are no 
penaities for tho », like 
Senator Knowlan: en 
oppose him. Yet in order to 
lead a party it is nece 
onivy to talk |! also t use 
a discipline of rewards and 
penalties 
it is General |! 
unwillingness to 
party discipline, his virtual 
neutrality between those who 
oppose him and those who sup- 
port him. that account for his 
inability to lead Congress. His 
. 
. 


sues 


order 


“ of 


sary not 


isen! 


owers 
insist upon 


personal popularity, which 
his partys. pl asset 
freely available Repub 
licans without any reciprocal 
obligation on their part. So 
the Republic ans onnosed to 
Eisenhower want him for Pres 
ident. being under no ob! 
tion to follow him 


THE 
system 
well when the Presiden 
passive and unable to giv 
strong lead to Congress 
the American Congress is like 
other legisiative boties as 
example. the French National 
Assembly It is almost in 
capable of dealing success 


ime 
** all 


AMERI 
has r 


AN p 


rVeT WO] 


far 
Tor 


Washington 


Pig in a Pork, Tenderloin 


ASSISTANT White House 
Press Secretary Murray Sny- 
der announces that during 
“Operation Alert 1956" Wash- 
ington COTTO- su 
spondents 
will get all 
their news of 
what goes on 
in Govern 
ment from an 
* undisclosed” 
press head- 
quarters more 
than 100 miles 
outside Wash- 
ington. 

Where does 
he think we've been getting it 
all along” 


EARLY 
train from 
Chicago served pork tender- 
loin for dinner. This turned 
out to be the most expensive 
meal on record. It cost $72 
million. 

The train dumped the pork 
tenderloin leftovers at Chey- 
enne, Wyo., where they were 


Dixon 


a de luxe 
Angeles to 


IN 1952 
Los 


Seene ... 


fully with big questions except 


under the leadership, which 
includes the discipline, of the 
executive On measures 
where the national interest is 
more than the net sum of op- 
posing loca! interests, the ex- 
ecutive. that is the President, 
must be the active political 
force 

He cannot drop the big 
measures into the legislative 
assembly. making an occa 
sional public comment. and 
doing some private lobbying, 
but on the whole standing 
aside in an attitude of respect- 
ful neutrality For the big 
measures are almost 
to be ground to bits by Con 
gressmen responding to local 


pressures from their constitu- | 


ents. These measures can be 


saved and carried through the | 


legislature only if the repre- 
sentatives can feel behind 
them, and can point to, a na- 
tional pressure which is 
stronger than the local pres 
Except when there is 
an upheaval of popular sent) 
ment, only the President can 
generate the national pres 

sure 
The Kelley bi 
aid to the pubik 


sures 


li to give Fed- 
schools 
Ihe na 
the Presi 
it. ealled for 
the passage of this bill. It was 
krown to all that there was 
no chance of passing it 
through the Senate as agvinst 
a Southern filibuster, if the 
hill contained the Powell 
amendrrent denying Federal 
funds to states resis*ing inte 
gration. But a heavy majority 
of the Republicans in the 
House. joined by a third of 
the Democrats from the 
North. nevertheless voted to 
insert the Powell amendment 
Thus Federal aid to educa- 
tion was Sacrificed by some 
148 Republicans and some 77 
Democrats who believed they 
were appealing to the Negro 
voters their local constif- 
uencies. The President alone 
could have forced Congress to 
face the grave national need 
in this crisis of the American 
public school system. With the 
President absent, or passive 
and silent. the national in- 
terest could not prevail 


in 


~ Y eral Triheme News Service 


= 


fed to hogs. The meat was in- 
fected by a disease which 
does not affect humans but 
takes a terrible toll of swine 
This malady. vesicular exan- 
thema, killed the Wyoming 
hogs and spread through a 

dozen states 
It cost the Federal Govern- 
ment $36 million and the 
states an equal amount be- 
it was brought under 


did something else. It 
caused every state in the 
Union, except New Jersey and 
Connecticut, to pass laws re- 
quiring that garbage must be 
cooked before it is fed to 
hogs. Cooking destroys the 
vesicular exanthema germs 

The cooking law seemed so 
good as to be unassailable. But 
up came a group of hog rais 
ers in Massachusetts with a 
campaign to repeal it. The pig 
men said it costs too much to 
cook garbage 


ONE OF THE most powerful 
pleaders was a piggery owner 
named Robert Moran. He told 


the Agriculture Committee of 
the Massachusetts Legislature 
that the law was working a 
terrible hardship on poor pig 
ra'sers. He almost brought 
teers to the eyes of the leg- 


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| 100th anniversary ef the birt 
’ Justice 
na BS. 3732. te previde insurance acainst 
Gameace. 130). # 
. 


e By George Dixon .= 


: ale 
a 


end 
ifer ¢t 


: propriation 
429 


pore 


ment 
men 
restricted 


islators when he said brok- | 


eniv: 


“I am so poor I couldn't 


afford to buy a little candy | 


or Christmas presents for my 
children last Christmas!” 

The poor pig man went 
sadly on his way. leaving 
wrenched hearts behind. A 
few weeks later revenue 
agents raided a piggery in 
Aorth Woburn, Mass. They 
found the first floor of the 
piggery occupied by 100 pigs, 
but the second floor by a 750- 
gallon still. 

The agents found sixteen 
275-aallon drums and eight 
500-gallon tubs where 5000 gal- 
lons of mash were in various 
stages of fermentation 

The piggery-istillery was 
on the property of poor pig 
man Moran 


(Ceorrient 
s 


1954. Kime Peateree 
-eetirate. The 


These Days........ 


A Good Administrator 


THE PHYSICAL faculties 
of men in public office seem 
te bother political opponents 
more these days than s®em to 
be warranted 
by the facts 
of tte. For 
‘instance, I 
note this par- 


York Times: 

“His (Her-. 
bert Hoover 
Jr.s) shyness 
reer" from 
two iscon- 
nected events. Sokolsky 
Deafened as a boy, Mr. Hoo- 
ver must depend on a hearing 
aid. This puts a halter on 
easy conversation” — 

I have been conversing with 
this man these past 20 years 
or more and never nave noted 
that the use of a hearing aid 
lessened the sharpness of his 
mind or his capacity for wit 
and humor. Bernard Baruch 
and Charlies Edison employ 
hearing aids which Lave ap 
parently not interfered with 
their careers any more than 
wearing eyeglasses prevents 
a man from reading or writ- 
ing, from being a philosopher 
or a banker or a professor 

Tt used to be that when a 
gang wanted to smear a man, 
they whispered about his sex 
morals. Now it is the fashion 
to discover a physica! defect 
and rake a man over the coals 
for that. 


IT WOULD appear that Her- 
hert Hoover Jr. has displeased 
those guardians of the State 
Department who look back to 
the halcyon days of Dean 
Acheson as the time when 
ideas were batted about at all 
levels and some were even ac- 
tivated, to use such parlance 

Thus. the New York Times 
artic'e says 

“His warmest admirers de 


e By George Sokolsky 


not credit Mr. Hoover with 
imagination or sureness of 
touch in dealing with political 
problems. He is not an idea 
man. as Dean Acheson was in 
the same job, His main 
strength lies in administration 
and in carrying out policies 
once they have been decided.” 

The job for which the 
Government hired Herbert 
Hoover Jr. is administration 
of a sprawling, uncoordinated 
department in charge of the 
very serious business of for- 
fign relations. So far as a box 
score can be arranged, Her- 
bert Hoover Jr. has not made 
more errors than President 
Eisenhower or Secretary Du! 
les, it being taken for granted 
that changes are so rapid 


today that it is not always pos 
sible to meet each situation as 
possible perhaps in the 
time of Talleyrand 


TODAY, suddenly a Khrush 


was 


chev or a Nasser appears on | 


the scene and all the presump- 
tions of a month ago are no 
longer in focus at all. 

Final decisions concerning 
American policy in the Eisen- 
hower Administration are nat 
made in the State Department. 
They are made in the National 
Security Council and the 
White House. But the State 
Department does need com- 
petent and constructive ad- 
ministration and that Herbert 
Hoover Jr. can give it. 


iCeorvrieht. 1954. K Peetures 
Bradicate a 


7%. <} 


— 


Srovk RI cliff 


a Ree Se 6h eee 6 oO 


The Black 
Empire Sheath 


The bodice veiled 
with dotted nyion 
net and iced with 
pink satin. Black 
rayon crepe superbly 
cut to sheath 
your figure 


$35. 


Jellet?’s French Room 


terter 


ate Wi 
“ls 


infermation en 
po! 


Ss m@ uce 
anc dis 
rea. estate preiects J) 


* end Cerrener. 16 
000 providing for 
m commemeration. of 


‘ 


Leute Dembits ; randeis 


; therisatien bil) 


we pereeee the 


Tetiens 10 
subdcom mittee 


Ye 
eqpotenentase, on 


itte 


Broek 
ramen 
Tis 


+ 
| * 
1437 pe le 

end tncelear Afeire. 106 & m@ 


. we've plenty of room, dear . . 
came in one car, s0 they wouldn't mind sleeping 
together in one bed!...” 


;irust iaws 
S.\'te Srife suit 


rm 
ttee Bills 


Brief. 
chief | * 
trip 


4 com- 
sudcom- 


Rivers 


3-A. Old 


. 

the striking 
; 

of the 


* 
4 authored fer this pur- 
iM Bid 


rt- ald approvriations 


By Lichty 


, ‘Ae 


. they all 


* on matkup A 
t withcrawals : 


fective 


approved 
rees bills 


mtil 
ana pending 
Exec 


8 
Jed@iciary. 10 & m@ Pull 
tlee pe ’ 


> open Cellier 
3697 and H R. 11360 
toe supplement the United States enti 
' to enable automobile draiers 

t autemebiie manu- 
facturers tf at 


and nationa! 
wlll be heard 
Pest Office & Civil Sefvice. 
open ul committee on 
Increase retiremen' 
5 of act : 
Joseph Campbdell. Comp- 
the United States 
commissioner 
nistration. wil be 
pear 213 OW 
Peblie Werks 
Ten comte 
pending bills 
tnm-Ameritecan Activities 
Tn hea Jon n 
he subie 
5 bieckilistinge of Communiet 
‘\raveiers ; 
& Caue 


ie wary 
Ware & Means 
ontider ers 


annect 
m 
16:30 6 mm 
te consider & Ww) 
Information and Educa 
Exchange Act Committee Roos 
Fieer Capitel 


YESTERDAY 


Benmate 


ever 
United States 
trena! 

Oalery 


the 


conaressi 
billion 


er at ® 
i late Benators Parkle 
- ' ligore 
Tr et ed 
compromise 64 


as) eetion on 
orelen ai4 €0 
oved and 


sent te White Houwee 
per 


: DDT 
comoromise bill providing scresater 


alt fer narcotics violators 
tive ree compromise bil! ore 
postma revisions im social security bene 
; 
et In nieht searton 
Heute 
ec and eent te Senate com 
promties 84 billion foreten aid authorize 
' ii) 
83.400 000 foreien 
Aporoves and sent to Senate com 
omise 1) erevidine ereater penaltic: 
or Rarcotics violators 
te Senate com- 


an mt 
138.886 authorization for 


debate on 
bt 


Cotyendie bile in 
7 Cc. Commis 
aintain order 


fur 
nest Years oF ential 


imaurure- 
thor 
Adiourned at § o m. wntll meen tedar 


. 


' 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


Tuesday, July 10, 1956 


3. 


Security Misgivings © ee By Murrey Marder 
a 


Court Ruling’s Results 


ALTHOUGH THE Adminis- 
tration is backing a law to 
nullify the Supreme Court 
decision limiting the Federal 
security pro- 
gram to sensi- 
tive jobs, 
some of the 
Pres ident's 
most enthus- 


| lastic support- 


ers ave 
strong misgiv- 


_ ings about the 


' 


wisdom of 
this support 
One staunch 
E ise nhower Marder 
Republican, liberal Sen. Clif- 
ford P. Case (R-N. J.), on Sun- 
day publicly criticized the 
Civil Service Commission for 
misrepresentation in state- 
made in support 
the legisiation 
Case avoided any 
of the Administration. itself, 
pithough the White House had 


approved the Civil 
statement 

Similarly. he made 
cism of the Justice 
ment. which also had said—in 
language suprisingly far less 
certain—that it backed the 
legislation as an “interim” an 
proach, if Congress wishes to 
make it clear that both sensi 
tive and non-sensitive jobs 
should be covered by legisla 
tion 


ments it of 


eriticism 


Service 


no criti 
Depart 


THE BILL before the House 
to apply the program again to 
both sensitive and non-sensi- 
tive jobs, was offered by Rep. 
Francis F Walter (D-Pa 
chairman of the House Com 
mittce on Un-American Activi- 
ties. In the Senate. bilis for 
the same purpose—sponsored 
ov Sens. James O. Eastland 
(D-Miss Earl FE. Mundt (R.- 
S. D.) and Joseph R. McCarthy 
(R-Wis.—are recommended 
by the Internal Security Sub- 
committee 

Case said (on “Face 
Nation”’—CBS) that he was 
‘deeply disappointed” by the 
letter Civil Service Commis 
sion Chairman Philip Young 
sent to the House Civil Service 
Committee on the Walter bill 

Young had said in part-that 
the Court's decision “limits 
drastically” the security pro- 
gram; he warned of problems 
he said it raised in eliminat 
ing Communists end Commu- 
nist supporters from Govern- 
ment by other means, and 
called for “speedy enactment” 
of the bill to wipe ouf the im 
pact of the ruling 

Case said, “intentionally or 
not, and I believe it was prob 
ably NOT intentional,” Young 
“gives the impression” that 
limiting the program to sensi- 
tive jobs “destroys the Govern- 
ment’s ability to protect it- 

oo 


the 


Aere & é4 —THE BOOK THAT'S STARTED 
A RIP-SNORTING RUCKUS 


% ’ x v ne 
. 2 ee . as 
es, rk Coa ; ¥ ; hy | 
a OEE. 


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PT. 
SF 

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Wiad te 


- 


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waren waren se “eer 


q 
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2 a 


| 
$a 


IT INCORPORATES “THE MINUTES OF CABINET 


MEETINGS AND A LARGE NUMBER OF OTHER 


DOCUMENTS INVOLVING CONFIDENTIAL PRO- 


CEEDINGS WITHIN THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH... 


TRANSACTIONS OF A SORT THAT HAVE IN THE 


PAST BEEN WITHHELD BOTH FROM THE COURTS 


AND FROM CONGRESSIONAL’ COMMITTEES.” 


Second Fleer, F Street 
Silver Soring end Conn. Ave. 


~The New Yorker 


An “unprecedented close-up. .It is hard te see how informed argu- 
ments either for or against the Eisenhower Administration can be 
carried on hereafter without wide reference to this book.” 

N.Y. Times Book Review 


GET IT AT YOUR BOOKSTORE «+ $4.95 


HARPER & BROTHERS 


self from Communists tn Gov- 
einment, from deviates in Gov- 
ernment in non-sensitive posi- 
tive.” 
“This,” 
true.” 


said Case, “is not 


CASE SAID other laws on 
the books—which the Supreme 
Court pointed to in its 6 to 3 
decision—make it “perfectly 
possible to take care of 
any kind of improper person 
in Government service.” 

The impression created by 
Young's letter, the New Jer- 
sey Senator said, “is a most 
unfortunate one, and I think 
if not corrected could set back 
the further improvement of 
ine program to a very serious 
degree ” 

Young was asked yesterday 
by this newspaper for com- 
ment on Case's criticism. He 
replied, through a spokesman 

First of all, the Commis 
sion’s letter is a report on cer- 
tain bills and speaks for itself 

“The letters -of Chairman 
Young and the Attorney Gen 
eral reflect the position of the 
Administration on these bills 
his position, basically, is that 
the security program which 
has been operating well for 
the past three years should be 
preserved pending the recom- 
mendations of the Wright 
Commission, (Commission on 
C,overnment Security) which, 
it if assumed, will take into 
account the report of the As- 
sociation of the Bar of the 
City of New York 

“A principal point of con 
cern is that failure at this 
time to pass the Walter Bil) or 
similar legislation would re- 
sult in a basic change in the 
program, but a change brought 
by’ default rather than as a 
result of thorough study’ and 
constructive action by a Com 
mission established by the Con- 
gress for that very purpose.” 

YOUNG’S STATEMENT 
made no reference to Case's 
claim that the Young letter 
created an untrue impression 
that the Government is now 
virtually powerless to deal 
with actual security risks in 
nonsensitive jobs 

Awaiting the report of the 
Wright Commission also was 
cited by Attorney General Her 
bert Brownell Jr. as a reason 
fur passing “interim” legisla 
tion. That could be a pretty 
long interim, however 

The Commission created 
over opposition by the Ad 
ministration which felt it was 
unnecessary —recently has 


asked for a six-month exten- 
sion of its life, to next June. 
It has yet to make any poD- 
lic report 

The New York lawyers’ 
study, now being given close 
scrutiny in Government cit 
cles, Was made public Sunday. 
It urged exactly the opposite 


approach taken by the Waltt 
bill. 


PREPARED By a committee 
of nine prominent attorneys, 
both Republicans and Deme- 
crats, that report saiéthe time 
has come to stop ying to 
operate a security program on 
a piecemeal “crash” basis 

The Government could 
achieve more security, and 
restore traditional individual 
rights, said the report, by a 
7) per cent reduction in the 
jobs under security programs, 
That is. it urged cutting down 
all existing program s—néow 
covering six million em 
ployes—to 1,500,000 workers, 
by limiting them to really sén- 
sitive jobs. A host of proce 
dural reforms were also urged, 

\ spokesman for Attorney 
Browneli—who incidentally jis 
a member of the bar associa- 
tion which sponsored the re 
port—yesterday said Browne 
ell intends to make “a very 
careful study” of its findings, 


Ohioan Elected 
Ruler of Elks 


CHICAGO, July 9 Waa 
Zanesville, Ohio, businessman 
and former newspaper editor 
today was elected grand exalted 
ruler at the 92d convention of 
the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks 

Fred L. Bohn. editor of the 
Zanesville Signal from 1828 
1938, defeated Cyril A. Kremsef. 
56. Cleveland, Ohio. in the first 
contested election for the Elks’ 
top office in 29 years. Delegates 
gave Bohn, a 3l-vear man with 
the Elks. 1333 votes to 745 for 
Kremser 


Saar Flag Adopted 


Rew 


SAARBRUCKEN, Saar, July 
8 The Saarland Parliament to 
day unanimously voted black, 
red and gold to be the colors 
of the Saarland flag, similar to 
those of West and East Ger 
many. The flag will be intro- 
duced next Ja! 1 when the 
Saar officially becomes part of 
Germany 


ers 


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EXecutivoe 3-4349 


. WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HER ALD er av | d | Bonn Names Envoy 
Tuesday, July 10, 1954 , , 
Bill on Propaganda agrigioew yma b agin ne ey 
TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY . C 


AT BOTH LOCATIONS A Assailed as Censorship ~ 


now consul general in C hicago, Ravaria, who is retiring 
«hast Eo memeuses:  & ‘A Justice Déepartment-backed in compeling clerks on the Lon There were no committee hear- 
7 bi bill which would compel dis- 49m Times and the Economist ings ang no opposition when 


ister as foreign ents. 
seminators of foreign literature sat meena pera? 6 the measure hit the floor foi 
tin Lett , William H. Osborne, attorney a vote . 1 ( J EARANCE 
 regisver as alien represen’ tor the New England region of hoe wg 
alives was assailed as censor the American Friends Service oe oF U ED $ 
ship on several fronts here Committee (Quakers), testified clares any person disseminat aM HIN 


yesterday postal officials “secre im (9g “political propaganda” 
pounded and partially de. from abroad must register as a 
list stroyed pamphiets it ordered foreign agent before the litera 
mauice § FOreign agents regis from England during the past ‘ure can be received, House = 
tration section, said an Attot) three years Judiciary staff members said eye ae 
ne ‘neral opinion in the Osborne said the literature the language is broad enough Fa 
earthy 194 /s gave the Postmas- was part of the Quaker group's to include people who merely 
ter General the power to im peace promotion program. te mail letters from abroad 
United Presse =, pound any illerature containing! reported Abe McGregor Goff Yesterday, Lenvin said Jus 
, oreign pelitical propaganda. Post Office solicitor. ruled “the tice now thinks the bill should 
llome Is the Traveler But to avoid any doubts. Lenvin pamphiets followed the Com- be modified to compel registra 
indicated Justice wants this munist line and were question. tion only for those mailing 
Three-vearold Nancy Bobu- power written into the books able for circulation in thisiliterature from abroad which 
la hugs her mother on return 45 4 Statute country.” has not been solicited by peo 
ing to her Twin Lakes. Wis. " Lenvin'§ appearance before a The Justice Department ple within the United States 
heme after she was missing mouse Judi ou! sudcommitiee backed bill. in the form of an Chairman Edwin F Wills 
twe davs. Nancy disappeared , i mately challenged by amendment to the Foreign (D-La }, Of the House Judiciary 
rving Ferman, Washington Agents Registration Act of Subcommittee. recessed yester 


SJ ; re ah : , . "” 
Saturday when a member of presentative of the American 1938, passed the Senate May 21. day's hearings indefinitely, 
the family. unaware Nancy | Liberties Union 


was asleep in the car, drove Ferman ‘said the statute - <= _ = — — | ¥ BIG BARGAINS “s Bie SAVINGS 4 


te Brown's Lake, Wis. The “W°Ula result in censorship and 


ata dia cade ha 5 per Peggle Voy, B. ) , | ALL RECONDITIONED AND GUARANTEED 
CABINET MODELS 


Nathan B. Lenvin. chief of 


1@ Mails material which advo- 
her. She wasn't missed until cates treason insurrection or 


Sunday—the family has 13 forcible resistance to United & PORTABLES SPUHETS - DESK WOOTLS 


children States laws 
a . Verner W. Clapp, Assistant : + i © \ GR PEmeD 
Librarian of Congress. said the Convenient Daily Service ne «aap 


NEW AIR CONDITIONERS |News Order "== Ss'sss"ni iam? Shs sere: SQ 


in Original Factory Sealed Cartons! . Bivefiel 
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CHRYSLER AIRTEMP 311 TOP BRAND oe ; In Dying Patient Role | Beckle , W.Va. ot ony machines taken in trade ~ you'll find amazing values n 
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’ " : > eter 
2-TON S$] 87: ¥, TON Reuters ome consoles in such perfect condition they actualty carry Singer's 
CASEMENT 4 IE ei . MINDEN, West Germany, 3 ; . h ; — of Singer used 
000000eeeees . ‘ . luiv 9 A young German ama-| Dan Vv al ro Vv a. woth sy ™ ”" my ™ ’ 


> ** DAO OOOe 884 J D efente Devartment teur actres died of achines 's 
$009900000004 ony : tress a heart at- 
wa $399.95 742 AMP. spokesman said yesterday an tack today while plaving the y Mt Singer can you bey 2 seed Singer machine with sock asserenee. 
OP BRAND Flush Meunt. w Thermostat order that news releases should role of a dying patient Coll District 7.1800 or Your Travel fl comt TO Your 


1 TON s s make a “constructive contribu An amateur group was stag- = 
CASEment ; ; a te ng Doctor and Patient when Lb Agent For Reservot: 1Ons, Information. 
w Thermesiat ion ‘9 the military program someone shouted “For heavens ) 

. rr ’ “i ’ 7 " : : 
%OOO400440040440000040404 as aimed at holding down cake she's reall, dying.” A doc. (sted @ the telephone Book under SINGER SEWING MACHINE CO 
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PHILCO 7 TON ce to discredit another. side, could only confirm that 19- | 


Assistant Secretary of De. Ye4r-old Marie Vieker was dead 


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rome SQZY 
VARA eaarennenneesasneessee' for Secretary Charles E. Wil 


Regular $389.95 Regular $529.95 son. assured a@ House Govern 


: oo BRAND TOP BRAND 2-TON ment Operations Subcommittee 


Pluck Maunt s that the order was not designed 
“TON, 7:Amp. § races «5298 : 
4 to cover up any wrongdoing 


> 


Regular $349.95 | Regular $369.95 ] Pay Reser g nati wc 
HOTPOINT — VICTOR . 


and the public in response to 


4 TON CASE " 
Push-but. Centre's $187 VW TON questions, he said. He said it 


covers oniy manustcrinte 
Regular $319 95 CASEMENT _ Trermoastet “4 
speeches and news releases 


f 
RCA %4 TON ‘7 y i coming from Army, Navy, Air 
Flush Mount s Force and Marine Corps per 
w ‘Thermostat 179 sonne! 


Reguler $499.95 Subcommittee Chairman John| 


a ler $299.95 : ' 
MITCHELL HOTPOINT E. Moss (D-Calif.) has criticized! 
; TON 1! 72 TON $9927 what he calle excessive pre 
I | S$] &9 a holding of information by Gov- 


e> Me ~e s , 
ston at ernment agencies. Yesterday's 
Regular $259.95 Regular $239.95 hearing opened a Subcommit-| 


tee inquiry into Defense De-| 
Frigidaire TOP BRAND =F periment information policies | 
V4 Wilson. who refu ed an invita 
“a or S$] aR : - TON S$] 59 tion to testify "Sclaned Ross 
Reo 


w Thermertet “FRioses said the Defense! 
Department believes in making | 


as much informati blic as 
Regular $349.95 1 TON § ™ oe 4 . : _— m # ae 
TOP BRAND Flush On $ of national security He re! 


ferred to a disputed Wilson b 
OT i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i a i direct ve of Via rch 29 1955 that 
material releas sed by the serv 
SAVE ON NEW FANS ices should “constitute a con-| 


) 
: 
~ Fo * 18.88 S4°S GE 6 inch 4 structive contribution to the! 

' 
XMAUST FAN $ OSCILLATING FAN $31. 5 primary mission of the Depart. 
4405 VORNADO $38.88 795 GE. UTILITY 5 5.70 ment of Defense.” | 
TWIN PAN . FAN 7 


Ross was questioned about | 


65 LOMO GES.O9 | SiciSfor" $34.99 F viory appearing in The Wash, 
FAN Seecie : . ng - ~atp ¥ ington Post a nd Times-Herald | 
39 °S VORNADO 20)« 2G e round ’ Dec ' 
SXMAUST PAN $23.99 PEDESTAL FAN $34. $9 ast Le reporung —- m4 
TURN-ABOUT PA 7 99 se °S GE TWIN-FAN clamps had been secreuy im- 
2995 WESTINGHOUSE $1 88 8° 95 Tee Bread 20.) ~ $39 99 adocut new weapons until they | 

K. then Vertileter FAN 4. PEDESTAL FAN . had been in service for & year| 

3993 GE. 22-inch 22.8 19 95 Tee Brend 12-in by issuing “verbal instructions” | 

SYHAUST FAN 5 7 Osc ATING FAN $11.49 r 


to this effect to security review | 


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af this sort are written. 
SUPER SPECIAL! SPECIAL! Seana ‘ied, hemi kn ar WV 
Res. $22.50 RONSON Regular $169.95 any verbal! orders, ; ubeom- 


mittee Counsel John 
ELECTRIC RAZOR Top Brand $ ell began reading the Post 
weld which appeared under the| 


or by] of Reporter John G.| a G 2 ——— 
‘ Norris. Rep. Clare Hoffman { , 
RCA. EMERSON, CBS, PHILCO, Norris immediately objected,| : ESTABLISHED 1780 
“ ZENITH, MOTOROLA & demanding that if the group ts 
REMINGTON, SCHICK OLYMPIC Se ase ht ee 
J , ° Ta) mace a ' : 
SUNBEAM and NORELCO 40% te 60% sapers, it should also call the| 
40% to 60% Off! DISCOUNTS! eporter and require him to| , | 


| divulge hi i. sources 
2¢ va Ete. : - -* 
i “ “hairman Moss sa! 4d the subd '| 


Pes. $49.95 eommittee was “without au 


" eee " Regina thor tw” to call representatives | 

: h : and force them to 

4 REFRIGERATORS WAXER 4 $36°97 ai e- FE ghant sources He said 
& FREEZERS : POLISMER the group's job is to invest igate | 


5 New ADMIRAL 9 « piv tex I the information policies of Gov- 
Re eernict : " ernment departments Further, 
questioning of the Defense offi 


soe. Cores cial on the alleged news siamo | 
GRUNDIG-MAJESTIC was put off until today.! 

wir) AM OM $ Moss said the Subcommittee | 

® About a Wilson statement 

that the Armed Services had| 

: S benens Bow in propaganda in in-| 


— oe pM terservice rivalry over guided 
ft POWER MOWER missiles and eoperenty had 

Mew peepenses o, Da KP given out secret materia 
contaghag ot hyo awd : ans & Stratton $69 ® Why Wilson originally 
$995 New ADMIPA : | kept secret the letter from 
1Gcu. f. UPRIGHT FREEZER >} General Ridgway when Ridg- 

G AIR PHLCO GE j wd Why, is 
oe aaat : , WASHERS & DRYERS ew ay, ie wey ~ 6 — <> 
sad bape lA ane a : pr lpg . $119 wonwey inetty a : mforenainn 
AUTOMATIC WASHER 5 uy! 

-_ 99S New BENDIX WaASHE® B withholding classification as) 
10% to 30% Off 7 _ top secret. ° ‘secret” and “con- 
<r we PANT i? or ven fidential,” the Military has used! 
other classifications of its own. | 
-also——— 119.9S New aC 9" (Moss said Subcommittee inves 
| ; tigaters have found many in- 
COMPLETE LINE OF HOUSE. ye - > stances of separate informa-| 
WARES & TRAFFIC APPLI.- FLECTRIC DRY tion-withholding classifications | 


ANCES. & GARDEN EQUIPMENT no alg ci — uae 7 gg ang Me 


0 ' pa an yy le naan Only.” And the Pentagon tele-| 
30% to 30 0 Off! ee oe phone book. he said, was. 
G.E. SUNBEAM, UNIVERSAL, | BE WESTINGHOUSE, FRIGIDAIRE, § S*4™ped: “For Official Use”) | 


*® What role the Commerce 
KROMEX, RIVAL, DAZEY, WEST- G.£., HOTPOINT, MONITOR, § 1. ariment’s Office of Strategic: 


INGHOUSE, WARING, OSTER, APEX, CONLON, BENDIX Information (OSI) may have : | —— —_—s = sie 
ete. 30% to 50% Off! § played in withholding Defense) These men place a premium on character...in people and in the products they use. Phat’s why of all whiskies 


Department data that was not 


7 stamped secret for security| they prefer bourbon... for its individuality, its bold and ardent nature, its unmistakable, smooth flavor. And 
EASY . TERMS > | among bourbons they prefer JAMES E. PEPPER. For in it, all the true bourbon traits are realized to their fullest. 
: Laborites in East Zone JAMES E. PEPPER is the original Kentucky bourbon... literally born with the Republic in 1780. No other 


Pe , ore 


BERLIN, July 9—The Com- bourbon gives you such a firm link with tradition,,or such a secure feeling that you're drinking the greatest 


munist East German news 


Downtown Discount House scount House y ADN reported today Of the Kentucky bourbons. xentucxy stra 6 YEARS OLD, 86 PROOF - JAMES E. PEPPER & CO Ky. 
816 F ST. WW. S108 Witeen Dactendid Th tte e oene ot eich, Sean y GHT BOURBON WHISKEY, OLD, 86 PROOF : LEXINGTON, KY, 


OPEN TUES. & WD. ¢ TO 6 OPEN TUES. & WED. 10 To 9 members of Parllament arf. 


ved in East Berlin, yesterday | 
for a visi to East Ghrmang. | : " 


—- 
” 


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* 
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lt Be i ee 


+ 


- 
Ee Pes 


TTT " 


—— 
a a a 


7 we 


nT me man 

. ¥ ¥ 

» oly . 
ox 


~. 


Nurses Get 


Increases 
In Minimum 


— Starting Pay 
Defense Department | wr, - 
| $35 Monthly Hike 


Included in Pact; 


Studying Problem of 
Holding Civilian Staff 


DEFENSE DEPARTMENT is' 
ng a broad study into the 


making 
salaries and fringe benefits of 
1,200,000:man civilian staff 
which comprises half of all Fed~ 
employes. ‘ 
Insiders hint that the survey Washington and nearby hos- 
will put the department into . ane 
the position of spearheading pitals are getting a $39-a- 
sweeping reforms in Federal month raise in minimum 
personnel. The recommenda. salaries. effective on J u | V 
tions made by the study com- , ; 
mittee will be relayed to Con- payrolis, it was announced 
gress next year by the depart. yesterday. 
ment. | The new agreement between 
The committee will look into|the nurses and the hospitals 
many problems which cause/will cost the hospitals an esti 
the Army, Navy and Air Force| mated $700,000 a year 
difficulty in recruiting and; The extra costs will be passed 
keeping able civilian employes.|on to patients and hospitaliza 
It is expected to look into sal-|tion insurance companies, a 
at retirement. working spokesman for the hospital said ) 
hours, the proposed senior civil; The average added cost to the! 
service, professional status for|patients will be about $1.50 a 
scientists, military supervision|day, he said 
and security, among others In many instances, present 
Charles R. Hook is the chair- hospitalization insurance con 
man of the civilian study group. tracts will absorb all or most! 
He serves under a top commit. of the extra cost, but eventually 
tee headed by Ralph Cordimer, the agreement between the hos. 
president of General Electric,'pitals and the nurses may in 
who is making a study of De- crease the monthly premium 
fense’s over-all manpower prob- rates charged for hospitaliza 
lems, both military and civilian. tion insurance 


ie Immediate beneficiaries of 
TRAVEL: The Budget Bureau ithe agreement are more than 


has issued new rules for Fed-| 1599 
eral agencies which will take nurce 
some of the red tape and paper: Othe, 
work out of employe travel. work 
After Aug. 1, these two M4)Or with the Hospital Council of 
changes will be in effect the National Capital Area are 
No receipts will be required expected to benefit as salaries 
for minor expense items such are raised to the generally pre 
as phone calls, cabs, ete., where vailing scale 
the total is under $15. Announcement of the agree 
Employes will be allowed to ment was made jointly by off 
buy tickets under $15 with their cials of the Hospital Council 
own cash and they will be re- representing its 16 member 
imbursed (promptly, I hope) by hospitals, and the Graduate 
Uncle Sam. Nurses Association of the Dis 
trict of Columbia, representing 
TRAINING: CSC and €-|\the nurses. The agreement was 
ploye leaders yesterday asked reached after a 10-week study 
the Senate CS Committee to! The new minimum starting 
approve a bill to give Federal salary for general duty nurses 
agencies the authority to train|ic $270 a month : 
select groups of employes atiminimum, set two years ago 
outside institutions at Govern-\was $2935 Other benefits in 
ment expense. clude increasing the bonus pay 
CSC Chairman Philip Young for evening nursing from the 
said the training would cost present $1 to a new $1.50 an 
$842,000 a year and would be hour, and the night shift bonus 
absorbed by the agencies. The from $.50 to $1 an hour 
objective of the bill, he ex Also extended were periodic 
plained, was to keep employes merit increases of $5 from the 
up to date with new develop. present three-year limit to five 
ments in scientific and similar|years, bringing the minimum 
tields. salary for continuous nursing 
The training would be lim-|Service to $300 a month afte 
ited to a year for each 10 years five years 
of regular work. An employe| Miss Louise Moser, R. N 
wohld have to agree in advance | Vice president of the D. C 
to remain in Government after Graduate Nurses Association 
his training for a period equal Said the new pay scales consid-| 
to three times the length of his|erably lessen the differential’ 
training. The bill wouldn't pro-| between nurses’ pay Here and 
vide training for typists and|!n other major cities, and will 
provide “a living wage” for 
Committee many qualified former nurses 
‘who may now feel they can 
afford” to reenter the profes- 
sion It also should provide 
CSC's newifurther incentive for high 
reemployment' school graduates to enter nurse 
xt| training schools, she said. 


Cost Estimated 
At $700,000 


By Nate Haseltine 
R'atl Reporter 


eral General duty nurses in 


ies, 


graduate professional 
in the Washington area 
hundreds, however, who 
in hospitals not affiliated 


The previou 


stenos. 

The House CS 
also plans to take up the bill 
later this week. 


JOB RIGHTS: 
program of 
rights will go into effect ne 


Aug. 1. jag we pen 20 Karrick Hits Elimination 
rights under the present sy ‘ 
, Of Intern Pay Raises 


tem must either use or lose 
them by next Feb. 1. Those) pjstrict Commissioner David 
who fail to return to their old|p Karrick yesterday said 
jobs (few are expected to) Wil) House action in cutting out pro 
continue as permanent em- posed pay raises for interns at 
ployes in the agencies where|r C. General Hospital will in 
they're serving. On and after crease the hospital's “critical 
Aug. 1, job rights will be | intern shostnas 
granted for a maximum “ye Last Friday the House Appro 
of two years and they will be priations Committee announced 
confined to special cases it had slashed the proposed 

Earl Lamson, personnel di- $126.000 from the District 
rector of Interior's Indian At- budget for raising the pay of 
fairs, has been given a $900 su interns and residents at the 
perior job award .. . John Dan- municipal institution. It also 
com retires today at age 70. disallowed $14,500 proposed to 
He's an information specialist pay first-aid men to ride am- 
at the Army's Surgeon General bulances in lieu of interns 

. CSC has boosted the start- Commissioner .Karrick said 
ing salary rate for tabulating the proposed substitutions 
machine operators in the De- would release six or seven in- 
treit area from $3175 to $3345 terns for “the work of caring 
_. , William C. Doherty of the for the sick.” 
AFL's Letter Carriers says; Karrick said that although 
CSC's amendments to the Sen- the hospital could employ 54 
ate approved Johnston retire-|interns, only 36 medical gradu- 
ment bill would “completely ates have signed up to work 
emasculate it.” The CSC pian, there for the new fiscal year. 
he added, would ry ee 
aid employes and he declare , sas oe 
CSC's estimates of the Senate's James Splain Sworn 
bill cost were “inflated.” The As 
House committee meets again *™ 
today on the bill... The Sen-| James F. Splain, 62, a lawyer 
ate CS Committee may approve in the Justice Department's 
a union recognition bill today. Office of Alien Property, was 
It is holding an executive seS‘sworh in yesterday as United 
sion .. . The cOmmittee meets'States Commissioner for the 
Wednesday on the executive District 

pay raise bill. Employe groups; District Court Judge Joseph 
hope to get it amended to pro C. MecGarraghy administered 
vide general increases for both the oath of office to Splain 
classified and postal employes. who succeeds Cyril S. Lawrence 
in the $9200-a-year post. Splain 
was appointed by the District 
Court judges to serve a 4-vear 
term 


Commissioner 


ever find a 


_—_ 


Bulk in Seeurities 


Henry Benning Spencer, a 
railroad executive for 53 years 
and father of Samuel Spencer, 
former District Commissioner, 


share in FIRST FEDERAL 
left an estate of $2,926,840, 
when he died July 4, according 


dividends! 
ie ‘to a petition filed in District 


| |Court yesterday. 

| The petition, asking probate 

‘of Spencer's will, disclosed that 
> ithe bulk of the estate is in se- 
* \curities. Spencer was 83 when 
he died at his summer home in 
Narragansett, R. I. 

Under the terms of the will, 


baal feeling when youn, 


610 13th St. MW. et FRG) 


a 


equally among Spencer's son 
and two daughters, Violet S 
Thoron of 3019 P st 


” BeTHesoa & 
. 8206 


Pb ie. 6 Ly 


P-7-10-56 


‘ ’ 


tive funds set up by the state. 


Henry B. Spencer, Railroad Executive, 


Leaves $2,926,840 to Son, 2 Daughters 


City. The former Commissioner) $871,903, according to a petition 


the estate is to be divided 


nw. and | necticut, 
Louise $. Cortesi of New York the age of 80, left an es 


The Washinaton 4’ 


Times: Beralad 


ity Life | 


AREA NEWS 
OBITUARIES 


FINANCIAL 


TUESDAY, 


JULY 


10, 1956 


: 
: 


' 


: 


House Passes 


Central Span, 


Stadiu 


8 Other Measures 
Affecting District 
Approved; Three 


. 


Go to President 
By Richard L. Lyons 


Stafl Reporter 
The House passed 10 
District bills yesterday, in- 
cluding one that may get| 
work started soon on the 
long-snagged central area 
Potomac River bridge near 


building 
ginia ave 


m -Bills 


Senate Hearing 


State Asks 
$55.6 Million 
For Building 


The State Department's re 


quest for $55.6 million to quad- 


its main 
and Vir 
relatively 


of 
st. 
had 


the 
at 


size 
Zist 


nw. 


ruple 


the west end of Constitution <mooth sailing yesterday at a 


ave. 
The District already has au 


‘thority and part of the money 


By Joe Heiberger. Stal! Photosraphe 


Washington’s Newest Railroad Inaugurates Service 


road, will help guests get around: the 16-acre grounds. It's 
powered by a 6-cylinder gasoline engine. The beauties, not 
part of the regular cargo, are all Miss Washington con- 


Loaded with bathing beauties, newsmen, hotel officials— 
and a few guests—the Sheraton Park Hotel's “Cherry 
Blossom Special” makes its first ran on the hotel's grounds 
yesterday. The train, which runs on an &-foot-wide asphalt 


> 


For Gifted Students 


Md. Cenclave 


P-T AOtfictal 


Lauds V ote 
Of Lanktord 
About 360 of the Districts 


PTA “officers 5100 tenth-grade pupils will be 
assigned this fall to the school 
system's new and challenging 


{ group oi 


from Marvland was told yester- 
day that Democratic Rep. Rich-\)o.. curriculum. 


asd E. Lankford of the nearby) Assistant Superintendent of| 
Fifth District was the only) Schools Carl F. Hansen, who! 
Maryland Congressman who| announ the assignment,.dis 
voted right” on the Kemly bili elesed that he hes asked 

The bill, desigried to provide — - Finn 
Federal aid to @dweation, was’ prog! 
defeated last week im the House fiscal year starting 
by a combination of Republican! Hansen is in charge of the 


, ; city’s high schools 
end Southern Democratic votes.| Tne new teachers would be 
Edna Cook of the legislative assigned to the new basic cur- 
committee the Maryland riculum, which will take its 
Congress of P-TAs told a work-\Place alongside the general. 
ya : i 8 _\regular college-preparatory and 
shop meeting at the University) ponors programs this fall. 
of Maryland “the voting record! -Only the most gifted pupils, 
of Maryland Congressmen was Who have demomstated their 
ot too good.” About 255 P-TA|#bility, have been picked for 
he U the 12 honors classes, which 
officers are meeting at the Uni). in) stress academic subjects 
versity for a three-day summer and limit the number of elec- 
conference tives. The 360 in this group rep- 
Mrs. Cook pointed out that resent 7 per cent of the tenth- 
a ge grade pupils 
only Lankford voted against the About 1140 pupils, 22 per cent 
Powell amendment, which of the total. will be enrolled in 
would have limited aid to non-\the 38 regular college-prep 
segregated schools, and for the pa gay ae a 37 tee 
. cent, wi e in ene 
Federal Aid bill 2 ee 
Robert Dubel, ex 
excutive secretary of the Mary- 
land State Teachers Associa 
tion. told the workshop the 


classes; and about 1710, or 34 
Powell amendment was at best 


per cent, will be in the 57 basic 
classes 

unfortunate and said some 34 4 : GC als 

Negro leaders agree. He quoted 89 ArMY Vener 

Win Promotions 


Hansen said several criteria 
one leader as saying education 
The Senate has 


is needed so badly in the Deep 
President Eisenhower's recom- 


of 


assistant 


South that it is better to have 
it segregated than riot at ail. 
The group was also told how 
to get the most state aid to 
help local school needs. Mrs. 

Cook pointed out that in ad- 
jor General. 


from Brigadier General to Ma- 
dition to the basic state funds . 
They are: Brig. Gen. William| 


all school districts get auto) 
matically, schools may obtainic. Baker Jr., acting Deputy! 
sizable amounts from the $0 | Chief of Engineers for Military 
called equalization and incen- | Operations and Assistant Chief 
of Engineers for Miiltary Sup- 
iply at Washington, to become’ 
Commanding General of the) 
United States Army Training 
Center, Engineer, at Ft. Leon- 
ard Wood, Miss., in August. 
Brig. Gen. C. Rodney Smith. 
Assistant Chief of Engineers 
for Personnel at Washington. | 
Brig. Gen. Gerald EF. Gallo- 
way. former Assistant Com- 
manding General of The En- 
gineer Center, Ft. Belvoir, Va 
and now Missouri River Divi- 
sion Engineer, Corps of Engi- 
neers, at Omaha, Neb 


The former is designed to aid 
in the operation of schools in 
communities with a dispropor- 
tion between the assessable tax 
base and the pupil load and the 
latter to aid in school con- 
struction 

Dubel also told the workshop 
that a proposed $400 across 
the-board raise for teachers 
will be introduced into the 
next session of the Marviand 
legislature. A similar bill was 
narrowly defeated during the 
last session ° 


— ——- -_—_— —— ee ————__ 


lives at 4814 Dexter st. nw. 

Spencer's father was the first 
president of the Southern Rail. 
way. He began railroading in 
1895 on graduation from Har- 
vard. Spencer was instrumenta! 
in organizing the Fruit Grow 
ers’ Express Co., which helped 
railroads make more effective 
use of refrigerated cars. 


filed yesterday in District Court 
asking probate of his will. | 
Bingham, who had careers as) 
an explorer, author, scholar, 
businessman and politican, left 
the bulk of his estate in trust, 
the income going to his widow, 
Suzanne Carroll Bingham. 
Under the terms of his will, 
each of his seven sons is to 
receive $1000. Upon the death 


Hiram Bingham Left of his widow, the trust estate is) 
to be divided among Bingham's 


Estate of $871,903 | | grandchildren. | 


_ former fte-- Bingham, who served for two 
| ee yswons from Con-\7°** * chairman of the Gov- 
publican Sena OB ernment’s Loyalty Review 
who died June 6 at| Board, also left $10,000 to Gro- 
tate of ton School, at Groton,Conn. | 


testants. 
- 4.2 


were used 
signments 
mination has been made by the 
placement 
selors and using achievement 
records and sta test 
results. 


14 new gradey-but pupils will continuc 


5306 Jay st. ne.. 
at 
early yesterday, where he went 
after being wounded by a shot 
gun blast. 
housebreaking, 


7% of D. C. Tenth Graders 


To Enter Honors Classes 


in determining as 
Mainly, the deter 


people and coun- 


few 


nh 


AD me 
e 


three high school grades. 


Hansen said 14 «new 


teachers would be used to re 
duce the average size of basic 
classes from 
pupils in these remedial classes 
need more attention. 
quest has been sent to Super- 
intendent of Schools Hobart M 
Corning, who 
forward it to the Board of Ed. 
ucation. 


30 to 25. since 


His re- 


to 


is expected 


Injured Suspect 
Held in Burglary 


2. listed at 
was arrested 
Hospital 


Harold Cross, 


District General 


and charged with 


Prince Georges County Po 


lice said Cross was shot in the 
right side and arm by Leroy 
| Snowden, a bartender at a Col. 
lington, Md., tavern. Snowden 
‘told police he was sleeping in 
4 
confirmed he heard breaking glass 


room adjoining the bar when 


Snowden said he shouted at 


mendation of promotion for an intruder who tan. The bar- 
three Army Engineer officers) tender | 
'Cross’ condition is listed as 
’ 

good. 


then fired. one shot 


Death Penalty 


Stringent 
Narcotics 


Bull V oted 


r 


A ale eas 
Congress yesterday put sharp 
new teeth in laws against dope 
peddling by passing a Dil per 
mitting juries to recommend 
the death penalty for anyone 


who sells or gives heroin to 


. children under 18 


The death penalty is not 
mandatory, and applies only in 
those states that have capita! 
punishment 

The compromise bill 
passed first by the House 
the Senate. It now goes 
President Eisenhower for 
expected signature 

The compromise of separate 
bills previously passed by the 
House and Senate drastically 
increased all penalties for nar 
cutics law violations. 

It permits the death penalty 
for persons who peddle or give 
heroin to minors under 18, if 
a jury so recommends. Without 
such recommendation, the pen- 
ality could be 10 years to life 

The bill would outlaw heroin 
—called the “slow death nar 
cotic’—in the United States ex 
cept for research purposes. [1 
would require that all heroin 
be surrenderec to the Treasury 
within 120 days. 

Other increased penalties in- 
clude: for possession of narcot- 
ics, 2 to 10 years and a $20,000 
fine for a first offense; 5 to 20 
years and a $20,000 fine for a 
second: 10 to 40 years and-a 
£20,000 fine for a third; for sell- 
ing illicit drugs, 5 to 10 years 
and a $20,000 fine for a first 
offense; 10 to 40 years and a 
$20,000 fine for a subsequent 
offense, with no suspension of 
sentence, probation or parole 
| permitted. 


his 


a 


They Help the Blind 


Harrison C. Alper, field representative of. the “Pilot Guide 


Dog Foundation of Chicago, 


and his “eyes,” Nanka, are in 


town “looking” for other sightless who may benefit by free 
training and the gift of a guide dog. Persons wanting in- 
formation on the Foundation's program may contact Alper 
at the Sheraton-Park Hotel through Saturday. 


to build the bridge. But it de-,>¢®- Allen J 


cided a year azo to seek permis- 
sion to swing the District end 
slightly upstream and pass the 
bridge over the downstream 
end of Roosevelt Isiand. 

The Senate passed the bill a 
year ago. The House held it up 


: 


D. C. Payment Hopes | 


Pinned on Senate 


The District Commission. 
ers decided yesterday to 
make their major effort for 
an additional $3 million in 
Federal payments in the Sen- 
ate. 

Commissioner, Robert E. 
McLaughlin said: “The Com- 
missioners are in agreement 
that it is probably too late to 
do anything about it in the 
House.” 

In action last Friday the 
House Appropriations Com- 
mittee refused to grant the 
District the additional $3 mil- 
lion authorized by Congress 
in March. McLaughlin said 
he has talked with House 
members about the matter 
and already has discussed it 
“with a couple of Senators.” 


oo 


to give tunnel proponents their 
last inning. As passed by the 
House yesterday, the bill in 
cludes an amendment requir 
ing a draw span, which the 
Commissioners oppose. This 
could delay the bill further if 
Senators decide to try to knock 
out the draw bridge provision 
in conference 

Biggest floor fuss yesterday 
came on passage of a ill to 
make the site of the Nationa! 
raining School for Boys her: 
available for a national sta 
dium, when the school moves 
The bill also directs the old. re. 
activiated stadium commission 
to meke a cost and design study 
aid report to Congfess by the 
end of 1957. 


“Giveaway” Charce Made 
Rep. H. R. Gross (R-lowa) 


‘ said the stadium project looked 


like a “giveaway” plan to him 


and he forced a roll call vote! 


which passed the bill. 287-80 
The Senate is considering simi- 
lar bills 

One bill was sent back to the 
House District Committee on 
a point of order which momen 
tarily seemed likely to kill 
action on the other 10. The bil! 
would have let chain stores sell 
beer and wine at each store 
instead of just one store in 
each chain as now It is op 
posed by small grocers and 
retail liquor dealers 

Rep. Samuel N. Friedel (D 
Md.) sent it back to committee 
on the technical point that the 
committee had approved it 
when the House was in session 
and the committee had not ob 
tained special permission to 
meet. A motion to shoot the 
10 passed bills back to com 
mittee on the same grounds 
was overruled as coming too 
late. 


3 Go to President 

Three of the bills had al 
ready passed the Senate and 
went to the President to be 
signed. They would 

® Free railroads from paying 
any of the cost of the Fast 
‘Capitol street railroad under 
‘pass, since it primarily bene 


fits their highway competitors 


® Let the Philadelphia, Balti- 
more & Washington Railroad 
\Co, ruti a track across 2d st. se 
near I st. to serve the planned 
new building of The Evening 
Star 
He.- 
for 

f 


the Washington 
brew Congregation use 
cemetery purposes a strip 
land beside its cemetery on 
Alabama ave. se. near Congress 


Five other bills were sent to 
the Senate for action. They 
would: 

® Change the formula for 
isharing costs of building high 
\way grade separations at rail 
‘road crossings to provide that 
| railroads could not be required 
|t6 pay more than 10 per cent of 
ithe cost. Under present law 
| they can be forced to pay 50 per 
| cent. 

® Name the western 14th st 
bridge the George Mason Me- 
\morial Bridge and name the 
jeastern span the Rochambeau 
Memoria! Bridge for the French 
general who aided in the Ameri- 
ean Revolution. 

® Give Metropolitan police. 
men five longevity pay in- 
creases after 28 years service 
regardless of time spent in one 
grade. Under present law, a 
policeman gets a $120-a-year 
raise only after spending five 
years in one grade. If he is 
promoted in four years, he 
starts counting all over again 

© Make permanent resolu- 
tions passed every four years 
giving the District Commission- 
\ers authority to hire special 
police, grant special licenses 
and other actions during the 
inauguration of a President. 

© Make it easier to make gifts 
of stock and other securities, to 
| children. 


iscattered 


Senate Appropriations Commit- 
tee hearing 

It drew a few grumbles from 
Eliender (D-La.), 
State 
lose 


because 
would 


but only 
mated it 


than make money on contracts 
to 
“A ay 


in the - 
Ellender 
materials in 


buildings 
addition 
value of 


demolish 
of the 
felt the 


the buildings should more than 


pay for the cost of demolish- 
ing them 

Department icials said 
that consolidating agencies now 
among 29 buildings 
would save the Department $2 
million a year. 

The House Appropriations 
Committee voted $449 million 
for the project last week and 
indicated it would approve the 
rest next year if needed 

The Senate Committee spent 
less time on State's building 
than on a request for $113,500 
to find more office space for the 
Administrative Office of United 
States Courts The Office is 
housed in the Supreme Court 
Suilding in space which of- 
ficiale said is too small and 
which the court needs. Ellen- 
ier suggested cutting the staff 
nstead of increasing its work 

The House Committee 

out these funds. 

Senate Committee also 
under advi ement a State 
-epartment request for $064.. 
200 to pay the Vatican for ac 
eidental bombing damage done 
by American planes in 1944 to 
Castei Gandolfo, the Pope's 
summer home near Rome 

The Vatican asked for $15 
million in 1948. The United 
States Arm: Claim Service 
made a repair estimate of $064. 
210. State Devartment officials 

uid the Army did not take into 
eccount artistic values of the 

roperty The House Commit. 
tee approved the $964.200 

At an afternoon session. 
nes E. Meyer. chairman of the 
District of Columbia Andito- 
rium Commission, and Robert 
V. Fleming, its Finance Cammit- 
tee chairman, asked the Senatal 
committee to approve $150,000 
to pay the Commission's costs 
of planning a national civie au- 
ditorium here. The House com- 
mittee voted the money. 


of! 


: - 
tM 


A g- 


Marylander 
Given a Year 
In Road Death 


A 21-year-old Deale, Md.. man 
was convicted yesterday of 
mansiaughter, drunken end 
reckless driving and speeding 
by Hyattsville Court 
Judge Grover D 
E 


Police 
Small. 

John Waters of Drum 
Point rd. was sentenced to one 
year in the Maryiand House of 
Correction and fined a total of 
$300 and costs 

Waters was accused of crash- 
ing nis auto into a concrete 
utility pole at East-West High. 
way and Riggs rd. on April 29 
resulting in the death of a 
passenger in the car. Arthur J. 
Caputo, 16, of 1000 Hopewell 
ave.. Takoma Park. Waters was 
injured 

Waters’ attorney, Oscar Park- 
er, said Waters had no memory 
of the accident and therefore 
could not testify Witnesses 
placed Waters as the driver of 
the car and testified Waters 
and a youth in another auto 
were “discussing drag racing” 
just before the crash. 

Waters was released on $1150 
bond after Parker told Judge 
Small he would appeal the de- 
cision , 


Today’s Chuckle 


“Jim is a fast talker.” 

“Well, why not? His father 
was a tobacco auctioneer and 
his mother was a woman.” 


KEEP COOL 
THIS SUMMER 


with 


JOHNS-MANVILLE 
INSULATION 


ATTIC FANS 


ALUMINUM 
AWNINGS 


Call HU. 3-6400| 
for FREE Estimate 


in Alexandria Call. KI. 9-9130 


Fea 


1834 Wisconsin Ave. LW. 
Over 26,000 Satisfied Customers | 


THE 
16 


] uesday " 


WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
July 10, 1954 


Light Vote Seen 


In Va. Primary 


Lee County, Va. 
Official 
Ousted, Gets 
Same Job 


ae 


---—e—eooo 


JONESVILLE, Va.. u 
(Spl.)}—Lee County Republicans 
agreed unanimously 
meeting tonight that 
Rowlett should accept 
appointment as 
we@aith’s attorney 
which he was ousted last 

Rowlett and three 
publicans 
County offices last 
and then removed by 
a special three-judge 
which found the GOP 
gaged in illegal 
of poll taxes 

Circuit Judge George Mol 
ton of Appalachia, who was not 
a member of the three-judge 
court, was called upon to make 
appointments to fill the vacated 
offices. He chose Rowlett and 
three Democrats for the jobs 

The Democrats challenged 
the election last November and 
charged that Republican coun- 
ty treasurer ©. T. Combds re 
fused to accept the Democrats 
$7500 check for the payment 
of poll taxes for about 4000 
persons. The GOP, however, 
was allowed to make mass pay- 
ments of poll taxes, the Demo- 
crats contended 

“I made my decision on ac 
ceptance of the appointment 
after consulting with the rank 
and file citizens and after thor. 
ough consideration as to what 
fulfills my duty to the citizens 
and voters who elected me. 
Rowlett said tonight 

“I did not ask for any con- 
sideration nor did the Repub 
lican Party of Lee County ask 
for any consideration in these 
appointments,” he said 

Judge Morton named the un 
successful Democratic candi 
date to the other three posts 
They are J. K. Newman, treas- 
urer: Joel W. Robinson, com- 
missioner of revenue; and 
Creed Chadwell, sheriff 

Republican officeholders 
ousted were Robert Belcher. 
sheriff: C. H. Evans, treasurer; 
Peter C. Chance, commissioner 
of revenue, and Rowlett. 


July 


atl a mass 


B 


judicial 


Harry 


( ommon 


the )obd from 
week 
Re 

to 


Novembe! 


one! 


were elected 


oraer ot 
court 
had en 


bioc payment 


“waged 


A light vote is predit@ted for 
the primary elec 
ginia's Tenth 
sthe only Congressional 


voting 


Democratic 
tion 
Distr 
District 
day 
\ 


in nearby Vil 
ict 


in the state to 


has heen 
two montns 


quiet campaign 
the last 
three candidates 


nominat 


in 


by the who 


seek the ion to oppose 


Rep 


in 


cumbent Republican 
Joel T. Broyhill 
The three are Morten 
Beyer, a Capital Airlines 
ministrative assistant 
Brenner, partner in an 
ton bakery. and Warren 
Quenstedt, Fairfax attorney 
State Sen. Charlies R. Fen 
wick, chairman of the 
District Democratic Committee 
predicted the turnout today 
approximately 14,800. However 
an even lighter vote has been 
predicted by observers who re 
member the 1954 primary when 
voters numbered only 10.415 
in 1952. when a rough-eand 
tumble campaign was waged 
approximately 31,000 Democrats 
voted m the Tenth District 
which includes Arli Alex 
andria, Fairfax Fall 
Church 
rhe 
6:30 a 
lingtor 
( hure! 


y time 


Ss 
ad 
Julius 
Arling 


) 


ngion. 
and 
will be open from 
7:30 1 

Fairfax 
The opening 
g of Fairfax 
reported imcorrectly yesterday 
In Alexandria, polls will be 
open from 7:30 a. m. to 8:30 
Dp. m 


polls 
to m 
and Falis 
and cios 
polis were 


ie 


Assateague 


Park Seen- 
By McKeldin 


ANNAPOLIS, July 9—Gov 
Theodore R. McKeldin 
Marvyiand may have a public 
ion area in operation on 
Assateague Isiand by next 
mer “if all goes well 

He said yesterday the State 
hopes soon to acquire one mile 
of Atlantic Ocean frontage.and 
two miles fronting on Sinepux- 
ent Bay from negotiations now 
under way with North Ocean 
Beach Inc. 

The 540 acres being sought 
by the State on the northern 
end of the island is among 668 
acres it sold to Leon Acker 
man, Washington real estate 


says 


recrecat 


sum- 


The Republicans said after| promoter, for $4,500 in 1951 


the special court decision that| 


their removal would have & b 
influence on the Ot, distri 
congressional race in which 
former Republican Rep. Wil- 
liam Wampler is at pting 
unseat Democratic ep. . 
Pat Jennings who ousted 
Wampler in 1954. 


Isabel B. Jones 


Isabel Blakely Jones, 88, a 
former music teacher, died Sun- 
day at Suburban Hospital! 
Jones had been visiting her son, 
William B. Jones, a Washington 
attorney. 7702 Meadow liane, 
Chevy Chase, Md., since Decem- 
ber 

Mrs. Blakely spent her chi 
hood in Cedar Rapids. Iowa. In 
1902 she married James P 
Jones. a businessman and farm- 
el and lived in Denson, 
lowa 

Prior to her marriage 
Jones taught piano and 
in Cedar Rapids 

in addition to he 
Jones leaves a siste! 
Blakely, Cedar Rapids 

The funeral will be Thurs 
day in Denison, with burial 
there 


Mrs 


td 


Mrs 
organ 


son. Mrs 
wLUzabeth 


Ackerman has offered to sell 

ot the 540 acres for $6.75 per 
approximately what he 

. for it. There has been 
some ee of legality of 
t a ee however, aad 
- offic have indicated 
court suits may be necessary to 
clear it up 

McKeldin’s report that nego 
tiations are going forward 
came after the National Park 
Service had noted that much of 
the nation’s seashore is rapidly 
vanishing from public use for 
recreation. It said only 240 
miles of the 3700 miles of gen 
eral coastline from Maine to 
Texas are now under federal 
and state ownership for public 
recreation purposes 

Maryland presently does not 
own any of its 32 miles of At 
lantic coastline 

Plans already are in the 
works for a public park on As 
sateague,. which lies in the At 
lantic off Worcester County 
but McKeldin said final action 
on them will have to await 
acquisition of the land and corn 


istruction. of a bridge between 


the mainland and the island 

The Public Service Commis 
sion has approved eonstruction | 
of a private toll bridge and test! 
| borings have been made for it. 


ati 


|Bossingham, Elgin, N. 


Tenth 


Indian Misrilal Jayaswal, around-the- 
world bicyclist, dismounts long enough in 
Lafayette Square to accept a new bike from 
the District manager of the Pep Boys, Lou 
Griffith. Jayaswal has been on the road 


more 


date. 


Around the World by Bicycle 


than four years in his world tour. 
covering some 74,000 miles so far He hopes 
to make it.home by December, 
the school inspector and newspaper. 
man has received 21 proposals of marriage. 


Col. Dixon ¥ 
Dies; Served 


In Two Wars 


Col. George P. Dixon, 67, 
former vice president of Inter- | 
national Telephone and Tele 
graph Corp., died yesterday at 
Georgetown 


| 


‘He lived at 20 
Belfield rd. 
Belle Haven, 
Alexandria. 
orn in 
Worcester, 
Mass., Col. Dix- 
‘on graduated 
from Worces- 
ter Polytech- Col. Dizon 
nic Institute in 1912. He joined 
* ithe National Guard and served 
' jwith the Army Signal Corps in 
‘both World wars. During World 
|War II he was chief signal of.- 
ficer for the Eighth Air Force 
‘and director of communications 
fot the U. 8S. Air Forces in) 
| Europe. 
| His long career in the com. 
munications field began in 1912 
wth the Pacific Telephone and 
Telegraph Co. He continued 
with the Bell System, the West- 
ern Electric Co. and the New 
| York Telephone Co. unti! 1929 
He then took charge of com 
munications for the Nationa! 


4 
3 
“ | 


By Vie Casement, Stal! Photographer 


1957. Te 


G..B..Goedhart Dies, 
U. N. Retugees Chiet 


GENEVA 


Switzerland, July; Then he said his record “proves 
n(;. J. Van Heuven Goed. beyond any possible doubt that 
55. the vigorous and con- 
troversial Dutchman who head- 
ed the United 
Nations world- 
iwide refugee 
program, died 
while playing 
, tennis, 1. was 
lannounced to- 
day 
Mr. Goedhart 
died a few min- 
utes after he 
collapsed i a 


game wilt - 
deput' a : G. 
Reade unday 
news was held up unt 
be 


q 
hart 
ously been a strong anti-Nazi 
and an equally strong anti- 
Communist.” 

He had a long record of re- 
isistance egainst the Nazis be- 
fore and @uring World War ll 
He was a target of violent at- 
tacks from the Soviets after the 
war for his role as protector of 
the world’s refugees 

He had been schedu to 
defend his program ois this 
week before the U. N. Council 
meeting here. He had threat 
nee to resign as high commis 
of the ref ugee program 
if member governments did not 
supply more funds 
: An edit and Mr 
Opens ; iO! ru CGoedhart was co<e¢ditor wv. the 

conom ‘S wartime underground Nethe 
lands newspaper Het Parool 
The Watchword). Later he was 
justice minister in the Nethe 
lands exile government in Lon 
don. After liberation of the 
Netherlands he became editor 
in chief of Het Parool and in 
1947 was elected to the Dutch 
Senate. 

The U. N. General Assembly 
elected him High Commis 
sioner of the refugee «rganiza 

for three years beginning’ 


ed 


i 


J. Goedhart 


evening: The 
it could 


ione;r 


or lawyer. 


j CORK 
Lnited States 
Eastland 
(;oed hart 
pro-s¢ vet 


Sen. James A 
[)-Miss.) attacked Mi: 
eariier this year as 

But Henry Cabot 
Lodge, United States Ambassa- 

to the United Nations 
ongiy defended him for 
Soviet pressures on East 
refugees to return 
to their satellite homelands 

Mr. Goedhart ignored the 
controvery until lest month 
when funds for his refugee pro- Jan. 1, 1951. and reelected 
gram were under discussion for five years starting 
the United States Congress l, 1954 


SS 


Clarence W, Dahl 


. 

Clarence William Dahil, 60. a 
reti! linotype operator who 
was active in fraternal organiza- 
tions. died yesterday at St 
Mary's Hospital, Leonardtown, 
Md.. after a short illness. He 
lived at Coltons Point, Md 

Born in Washburn, Wis... Mr 
Dahl worked on papers through- 
out the United: States. Prior to 
his retirement in January. Mr 
Dahil has been employed at the 
Government Printing Office for 
30 vears. During World War I 
he served in the Infantry 

He was an active member of 
Columbia Lodge No. 3 of the 
Masonic Order and Edgar Eu- 
banks Post R7 of the Amer 
ican Legion and the Columbia 
Typographical Union 

Surviving are three brothers 
Lloyd and Harold, both of 
Grand Coulee. Wash.. and Me! 
vin of Park Falis, Wis.. and 
two sisters, Mre. Frank Brice. 
Grand Coulee, and Mrs. Harold 
D. 


«tr re 
=) sting 


Furopean 


he 


-™ 
—_ 


Frank A. Knight 


SOUTH CHARLESTON. 
Va., July 9 #®—Funeral services 
were conducted here today for 
Frank Anthony Knight. 48. edi 
tor of the Charleston Gazette 

Requiem high mass was cele 
brated in Blessed Sacrament 
Catholic Church by Fr. M. J 
O'Reilly 

Mr. Knight was stricken with 
a cerebral hemorrhage at his 
home Friday. and died in a hos. 
pital three hours later. He had 
been with the Gazette since 
1929. 


ed 


\ . 


Today’s 
Events. 


Events scheduled for today 
(asterisk denotes event is open 
to the public): 

LUNCHEONS 


Garden 


eternal 


of 


beaut? 


The Garden of Love is one of the 


many scenes of quiet, 


which characterize Cedar Hill, 
ington's most beautiful cemetery. Among 
the other scenes enjoyed by visitors are 


the lovely Garden of 


Bridge of Life, and the Cupid and 


Swan Fountain. 


Write or phone for Illustrated Folder, 4000 Suitland Road, S.E., W asbingion 25, D.C, 


(e dar Hill is mot expensive ...ism 


peed W ashington's Most Beautiful Cemetery 


lasting beauty 
Wash- 
To visit: 
Memories, the 
Main Gates. 


bus schedules telephone JOrdan 8-4000. 


Drive out Pennsylvania Avenue, SE. to 


. Civitien Club. Mayflower Motel. 12:90 
pamanes Club. Washing- 


gt 15 
t Cit. Mayflower Hotel. 12-15 


SPECIAL EVENTS 

*Clhassical Rocgreing. Jewish Commu- 

ne washing 7, =e 15 

ot tish 
Thomson . es Pipe Band. 
‘. nit E. mneker Center 
. *susarte Chorus. Cardeose Center. & 
h for Fun. “advanced Roosevelt 
Dp 

noe. “4 _ Leathercraft. Cardese Cen- 
bag *Pedera, Chess Clap, YM YMCA. : . z= 


Center. & m 
‘ol t Suave se Group. Rooserell Cen- 


Amer! can dancing. Cardoso 


ng. ghereees, wat 4 color. ef! 


4 , me! ' “Cent er. 7s 
eed & Ciud oose, Center 
*Sketening. wat er coler 
Thor Ss 


be 
, mearroicery. 
30 


charcoa e) 


Banne 


*Celest! al Chora! tire ip ardese Cen 
ter. & 
*Oerman wgaverest onal Grey none 
reli Center. & , » Hees 
eae FNTIOVWS 
Amer'carnr Bee ter ef ale . 
a ~ ’ Appraisers. Mar 


: 
' 
: 


j 
| 


_ Wasbington end Area: Todar—Mos' 
: peas A nn 
er 
pleasent. Mondays re at 
Maximum. 96 «at : 
at 


io’ to 85 east 


* esa > a ‘sieht Wednesday—PFair 


is ay—Fair. somewhat coo! 
ess humid preceded 


D.easant 
Visibility: Good 


Open until sundown. For 


not sold out... 


ah PIP How 
fe @ to wee > -t>- 


SS3ssd 


Mrs. Adams 


I have consistently and continu-' 


National Weather Summary 


Temperatures and rain for 24 hours ending at 8 p. m. Monday: — 


City Bank of N. Y.. and was 
with the bank until 1940 

After World War If, Gol 
Dixon was made a vice presi-| 
dent of International Telephone 
and Telegraph Corp. He spent 
18 months as regional vice pres- 
ident in Brazil. At the time of 
his retirement in January 1950. 
he was staff vice president in 


Dies; Headed 
Cotton Milly sar 


Laura Page Adams, 72, for-| Following his retirement 
mer president of a eotton milj|from IT&T, Col. Dixon was 
and a collector of antique dolls, named executive secretary of 

‘the Armed Forces Communica- 
died Friday at Washington San-|tions Association here (now the 
itarium.. She jArmed Forces Communications 
lived @ 6 and Electronics Association) 

Parkside frd., He also served as editor of the 
+Silver Spring. Association's journal, Signal 

Mrs. Adams At the time of his death, Col 
had suffered Dixon was editor of Signal and 
from cancer executive vice president of the) 
fo eight Association 
years. She was Among his decorations were | 

he widow of the Silver Star, Legion of! 
Willlam Hope Merit, Bronze Star and Army) 
Adams, who Commendation Ribbon His 
organized the foreign awards included Order 
Rudy Cotton Mrs. Adams of the British Empire, French 
Mill in Gastonia, N. C Légion of Honor, Belgian Croix 

After her husband's death de Guerre with Gold Star and 
more than 30 years ago. Mrs. French Croix de Guerre with 
Adams took over management two palms 
of the business. first woman to Col. Dixon was a trustee of 
be head of a cotton mill Worcester Polytechnic Insti- 

Mrs. Adams lived in Silver tute from 1936 to 1948 He 
Spring nearly 20 years after was an honorary member of the 
her retirement. She had a large French National Academy and 
collection of antique dolls and'a senior member of the Inati- 
was a charter member of the tute of Radio Engineers. Co! 
Dollology Club of Washington.' Dixon belonged to the Army 

Surviving are two brothers:and Navy Club here. 
and two sisters—Gus Page.’ Survivors include his 
Louisville, Ky., John rege. 1400 Edna, and daughter, 
Somerset pl. nw.., meets F Hop-|Ann, both of the home addres 
kins, 1319 Noyes dr.. § Silv er Col. Dixon also leaves another 
Spring, and Emma P. Rhodes, daughter, Mrs. Richard Haas. 
New Orleans. Fairfield, Cenn.: a son, Peter A. 


Dixon, 2802 Olive ave. nw., and’ 
Maj..Gibson;  irriciear. Mae?) 
v Held Many 
Va. Offices 


‘held at 10:30 a. m. Wednesday | 
.at Arlington Cemetery. The pro- 

FREDERICKSBURG Va 
July 9 W—Maj. Edwin Henry 


cession will form at Memorial 
bs . : 
Gibson, former assistant attor owner, died Sunday at his 


Gate at 10:20 a. m 
Michael J. Cook 
néy general, and member of 
the House of Delegates from ~ 
’ 


Michael J. Cook, 84, retired 

foreman in the D. C. Sanitary 

Department and former tavern 
Culpeper, died today at a con- 
vaiescent home after a short: 
illness ) 


- 
: 


wife, | 
Penelope | 


Mr. Cook and 
his wife, Cath 
erine, who sur- 
vives him, cele- 
brated their 
sixty-first wed- 
ding anniver- 
sary July 2 
They came 
from Ireland 


The 85-year-old Culpeper 
native, once prominent in a Vir 
ginia movement for repeal of 
prohibition, retired in 1044 
after 22 years of service with 
the state 

He was the son of Confeder- 
ate Celone! Jonathan Catlett Mr. Cook 
Gibson, and Mary G. Shackel-'and were married soon after) 
ford Gibson. He was graduated, their arrival . 
from the University of Virginia} After prohibition, Mr Cook | 
law school in 1800 at the age| Worked for 20 years in the) 
of 20. , Washington Sanitary weary 

He was first married to the) ment. 
former Miss Janie Agnew| Mr. Cook was a member of 
Grigg of Richmond who died| ‘the Holy Name Society of 
in 1904 and afterwards married |Sacted Heart Catholic Church, | 
Miss Beulah McCandless. 16th st. and Park rd. nw. and 

Maj. Gibson served as Cul- oe Ancient Order of Hiber-; 


peper County Commonwealth's ™4"5- 

attorney for 12 years until he "Besides = a es 
. s e : 

entered the House of Dele A., 4447 Harrison st. nw.; P. 


gates in 1916. He represented Michael. 8002 Eastern dr.. Sil- 


first Culpeper and then the | ver Spring; James yey. York’ 


expanded Culpeper-Rappahan- 
nest district untit-1904 City; Richard F., 4 Center 


ist., Chevy Chase, Md.; Paul F. 

He became assistant prohibi- | * Arlington Heights, lL. and J.) 
tion commissioner in 1922 for’! Bernard, 7401 16th ave., Ta-| 
Virginia and was named assist-!yoms Bo 
ant attorney general in a? | 


Maj. Gibson was a 
mental commander in the Vir. * John R. Thomas 
Funeral services for John R.| 


ginia National Guard for many 
years, holding the rank of'Thomas. 86. former building 
major superintendent of Philipsborn's! 

Survivors include his wife, store, will be held at 10 a. m 
four sons, a daughter, nine|today at the Robert Pumphrey 
grandchildren and one great-\funeral home, 7557 Wisconsin | 
grandchild. ave., Bethesda, with burial in 
Fort Lincoln Cemetery 
| Mr, Thomas died Saturday at 
the home of his daughter, Mrs 
Raymond Weber, 3604 Plyers, 
Mill rd.,. Kensington, Md 

, native of England, Mr 
20 Thomas came to Washington as 

a boy. For 35 years he worked 
as a steam engineer, then for 
the next 22 years he was em- 
retir-| 


—— Ee 
a 


wi nds Re * ? a es a’ 


, Departures from normal vester da: 
cx eo 
: }—-. amu 
"Excess bince ployed at Philipsborn’s, 
se ing in 1953 

a Besides his daughter, Mr. 

um rises 5:5 
Moon rises & B3 Thomas leaves a son, William! 


m | ce —tsh R. 214 Massachusetts ave. ne.; 
* Potomac River | a sister. Mrs. Charles W. Jones.| 


| Pals is muddy. (Corp. of Engi- 
Arlington, and one pence 


4 egree 
egre re 
195 2.91 mene 
*Womperstsre one year aso—FHigh., 
cegree : 
Moon and "Tides 
35 m 


Pres. |. 


woe 


For the LATEST WEATHER 


wp to-date every hour | 

=) dial WE 6-1212 

< For the CORRECT TIME 
dial Tl 4-2525 


5, fre 
‘S) 


YP OSs? © VP)-1@ 
SAS & BHD -s- = 

FT pm. 3—-PO@ -1-22 DH ww 
: Oh wevu 


>< Sm 


‘aa 28 ete » 
e- a FOD’"“O— wD 


Jmington 
* | Yume 


HARMON. WILLIAM A 
©. Meacows 


Died 
Prayer for Today 


Our Father, whose work fs 
always good yet never done, 
we thank thee for every op- 
oortunity of these summer 
jays for rest, relaxation, and 
enjoyment. We are glad for 
the beauty of field, forest, 
stream and sea. We thank 
thee for family fun and per- 
sonal ease. In quietness and 
confidence may we fite 
strength; in Christ's name. 
Amen 

~Russell S. Hutchison, Pitts 
burgh. Pa., minister, First 
United Presbyterian Church 
of Wilkinsburg 
1986 by. the 

Fd 


th repose 
Ariiasten La Tatet Cemetery. 


SUE RUST 


Felson ry ‘ 
— 


a 2 
interment Ivy aia why to. 
hg 


PMMA JANE, of "4 
na eae 5 Va On July 
Di: ision 
National 
of Crrist 


afinn 


right 
an 


¢ ere hes 


; 
interment Arlington Nee 
ry 


S 4! 
tional Cemet 


= TMom as epane — Gaeteoy 


John J. Gordon MAS 


PETERSBURG, Fla., July 
m—John J. Gordon, 90, for-| 
New York Times police re-| 
porter who retired at 75 as the) 
newspaper's oldest newsman,| 
died yesterday. He came to 5St.' 
Petersburg on retirement. 


mer 


Dp. m interment ck Creek Ceme- 


Saturday. Ju 


DR 
Hosvitel. 


3. &. On 
, Arlington 
in Memoriam 
| STAREE Liu TE E. 
A mite = see way y biel esa! Ju 
eT A REE, whe vs ed ‘ ™. Interment Flint mu ‘Ceme tery. 
Ve 


P 
Five ave passed dear wile and! Oakton 
Mins, 
18 by 


_in memory i" our | 


LILLE & 


; 


rears b 
mothe: On Monday, Juls 


&, sve F 
: Nationa! Tnstitutes 
LLA Myr 


n ' at 
Hami! ton. Als. ednesday. 


i and 
Daughter MARIE On Bunday. July 


Bird 


rT ae — 
16 


ae ae , oe. A 
954 


th r 
valescent Home BIRDIE A PA 
idow of the iate W 
mot her of Mrs A. E 
ADAMS. Ww nd > WwW. ke 


Ju.¥ 


Maine Funeral 


termen . Bt Mary 


— CECELIA, MA Bunday?, 
11 
day ; ] interme 
Gastonia. N. ¢ 
ADAMS MARY M. On spender 
195 . ’ 
M 


anc Maastathusetts . 
gery eee wil be held Wedne 
>. m. Interment 


ay. ” duly 


a 
Boss. Ltt por A! 3936 uthern ave 
So. ane mas Pe ne} 
We cher - 


vrother a Vers 

an Mrritie 

mbers Punera! 
.* 


Tt, 
itthe- 
i. 


lem mass Will be ofte 
} ome, 


cermen) Soringe 
Va 


ypere Fea) 
A, ,. ls on ednesday. 
—_— neste! Beasete sp termens Ate 
SLOVENSKY, JOSEPH 4, 


‘ I AREN( r Leo On S§un 
56 ENCE LEROY 
Eiwoo 


ANORLL of 4612 


at _© hampers 


wih 


P 
Inter ment Ced it 
ae 4 ey “WILLIAM >. 
-) my on AREY HW 


SOLOMON 
july & HARRY H 
4 of Tillie 


On SOLOMOS 


5 . 
Cec ar Grove Semnet er (new 
CLAVELOUX MARK ave 
July 8. 1956. at his 


8) wae Spring. * 


ran t. 
; STONEST REET. ANNIE G. On Sunder. 
her reside a r - 
; ; ae Go at oa 
; fe of ; Btone 
IG ; \e mre is 
: Stone ‘ 


PP ; ame 7 
a * 
abriiaser’ 9 
ary's Cemetery, 
osary Tuesday evenine a 5 
Fe b On Ba he ay. 
56. at his home. 36 - 


aft 


es C a. Bld on "a 
Broke” Seaste 


et THOMPSON, | EARL (PETE). 
Chi. ue. ae ay 7, 


rt 
Tams ss 6S. ~(6UCoo 
Richard ry Cook. 


nas 
16th 
ment 
Re etives and 


ss 30 . ig? rr 
* the Shrine of the Bac red Hear 
¢ Park rd. on al ter 

Por Lince! - Comet uu 

friends | 

OK. 
istrict 
ern ane 


: , 2 
Arlington am: torts an 
ColMmmbDisa pik {ote rme 
TRACET wRLL 
1956. of ] 


nt 
C MAEL J. Men bers private. 


oara An ' rder 


ofr tne 
re 
r brother Mi 
: requested to meet 
anon Pu era Home 
ave ‘ee Tuesday Juiy } 
for recitation @f prayers { 
of his soul 
WA Fr. DALY 
JAM A OWLING 
DAML. CLARENCE Ww. 
D Cc and 


ou 
ar 
r toe repose 
President | 


Recretary 
Wash ne 
Ma 


; 2D. m ‘perking Beil 
pplerment Eveneser Cemetery, 
land Hil! : 
Tom. _. . 
at Docters 
v 


af 
On Sunday. Jul 
Hospi'ta! TH 
wile of Leon 
Renee Callies rs 

james and John 
sister of Ous Stratia of Dayton, 
Pre s ) 


sills, 


brother and sister 
AN FRANC nm oO four srendchildren 
Vv , é ape! 


(paw ere cn 


al 
tional Cemeters 
DANNE JONAT! 7 cs 
Gay. July & 


4 enner! venia 


. fe 
where prayers wi, 
at 


oP 8 m 
Const ‘ant ne an Helen 
. Church Spee ne 
ners) servic heid 
interment Gicenweed” one 


LLLY ANN. On Gaturdas. 
404 peoreys oN. ~ 
‘parking ; 
offered for the repose 6 
Wednesday. July 11 
St Jenhn’s Catholic 
ace, Md. Interment 8t 
ter 


rt 
Vallance Friends are 


t the 
y 0 A. 
DANTZLER. OAR SILA, Teo Tose Becherga, ad. where, services wi 
“perhesde Naval Hospital. CAPT interment Pertlace Gocette: & & 
TILLMAN TROTTER DANTSLER. of “ Cemetery. 

1201 North Dreraseen st. Arlington see. JERRY J. On unday, exe % 

Va eved hush ° i UM 1956. ’ 

Denitzier. father o. tr 
ntsler, USAP 

n of x 

and ww ot G 


Jobn & Ceme- 


f Ani : . 
Orra) ~ sington. = 


Jt. 


pneime tathes Jer 
rbara ¢ Je 
Bei c +? rey Alaa 
brother of Seanes War 
Hines Co 
= — 


ini erment Arilnaten” Retles 


Ward 
Ann ae 
Char 


a 
: ra si Come 
sneral wee WER, Vip’ unde. 
aera int char 
Ceme.- 


il be wa at (1 
interment “Arlington National 


DEL vz CaO, DommICO On Men ae 


°o ww surviv 5 
néchi id Services ot th 
& Bon 


‘ne on roe he Home seat 
Interment Shey clea * 
mours! at 01 


Abe cad ant JANE at aig 
a Mrs tea? 


een ee 
[ a 7t st. 
patnpe Bonacorsy and Aca'te Tr 
enio riends per ny 
nerel Home. 4th = 
unt) 4 T ' 
til be strered at 
h Chur , a’ 5 Ww 
et Ceme rr? 
DIXON. GEORGE P. On Monday 


peorgetown He 


. n¢d nde 
in vit Int orment "For Lincoln eens 


wWOoOtsTon LOLA M. Suddenly. on - 
160) Pistees ave 
of . 


icine eerie > Heights save 
M4 | Notice of funeral later 
ee dite 


Low 1S PREP) AN be. oved 


ana 


on Tuesday 
s Interment 
Ledge Cemetery 
nh n 


Apt 


m er 
e Punera! 
m * ts ave 
“be 


sen 
, 4*7Rar° Funeral Designs 
seontiala , bapther George Shaffer, Inc. 


ervioes & - 
SIT 21th at Bxpressine Sorel bu 
s 
+“ £.8°%4! p sie oon 
DB. 4m st. as 


fh re Celer As diindkeed 
BERSCHEL. ROSE EPITH 
day. Ju >, at 
Funeral Directors ee 
J. WILLIAM LEE’6 SONS CO, 
FUNERAL HOME 
CREMATORIUM 


Com etery Lots 


NATL. , PARK—? 4 rave alten. 8450 


ednesday “cash 30 13701 


Interment washinats on clonal 
tere 


* "Ea 


$*per of Helen r 
° fiia Henderson 
pers) neral Home o 


| Gave 
a te > 


)ver ring 


8905 yA se Lewis Borin Ma 
othe Weretneal 


a 
rienas may «a 


pe hes, 


sm. us 


| Daylight Thugs 
Evade Chase 


Three brash daylight thieves 
evaded police efforts to: head 
off their escape on foot yester-. 
day after snatching $98.46 from 
8 cash register in the Specialty 
Market at 300 E st. ne. x tel 

Pulice said two of the men’ 


entered the store and told cash- 
ier Lillie Mazur they wanted 
to buy something at the meat’! 


counter In the rear of the build-| 


ing. Mrs. Mazur, who runs the 
store with her husband, started 
toward the counter with them. 
She heard the cash register 
ring and turned to see a third 
_ scooping money out of the 
ti 

The three men ran into the 
street and west on E st. Four 
police vehicles responded to an 
alarm in an attempt to head 
off the thieves. The three men. 
one with a white bandage on 
the back of his head. were seen 
dashing through Union Station 
Plaza and again at the under- 


the guns since 1045. 


pass at 2d and H sts., but they 
got away. | 
| 


Dimples Jim in Court 


On Firearms Charge 


James W. (Dimples Jim) 
Hunt, 46, of Hunt's Tourist | 
Home, 1318 Rhode Island ave.| 
nw. and 608 Kenyon st. nw.’ 
appesred at a hearing yester-| 
day before Municipal Court) 
Judge Thomas Secalley on' 
charges of possession of fire- 
arms after conviction of a) 
felony 

Hunt was arrested March 28 
and {reed on bond. He also is| 
free on bond after a recent) 
indictment on a series of ner. | 
cotics charges. ) 

Hunt's attorneys applied for 
a dismissal yesterday of the| 
firearms charge on grounds) 
that after Hunt's conviction 
three years ago of a similar 


Hearing Set 
At Marlboro 


For Prevatte 


A preliminary hearing for 
Billy Ray Prevatte, 14, on mur- | 
der and assault charges is 
scheduled for 10 a. m. today in 
Prince Georges County Court 
at Upper Marlboro. | 

Originally set for yesterday, | 
the hearing was postponed | 
when  Prevatte’s court-ap- 
—" attorney, Wilmer D. | 

y 


les, told Judge Nita S. Hin-| 
man Crane the hearing had 
come as a complete surprise to 
him. | 

Judge Crane granted a con- 
tinuance to allow Pyles to pre-| 
pare his defense. 

Prevate was returned to the 
Upper Marlboro jail July 2/) 
after undergoing a series of | 
mental tests at Spring Grove | 
Mental Hospital 

A month ago hospital psychi-' 
atrists reported that the boy! 
was not psychotic then or on! 
May 4 when he allegedly shot 
one teacher to death and 
wounded two others at Mary-| 
land Park Junior High School.| 
They said he was able to par-| 
ticipate in his own defense at! 
a trial | 

Since then, a second set of 
tests was made by a private 
psychiatrists for Pyles. 

Prevatte is accused of kill-| 
ing Frazer K. Cameron and) 
wounding Francis’ D. Wagner! 
and Robert Hicks after being) 
reprimanded for truancy. 


Too Youthful 
Courtship 
Hit by Priest 


A Catholic spokesman yes 
terday decried juvenile court- 
ship as “dinhealihy” and “dan- 
gerous.” ) 

The Very Rev. Francis J 
Connell, Dean of the School of 
Theology, Catholic University, 
added, “It is bad psychological- 
ly and morally.” | 

Speaking of a Family Life In-| 
stitute at the University, Fath- 
er Connell said “steady com- 
pany-keeping” should be per- 
mitted only “where there is a 
possibility of marriage.” 

The priest also criticized 
early marriages. A man of 22 
and a womap of 20 are too 
young for marriage, he as- 
serted. They should wait un- 
til they are 25 and 23, the 
“ideal” ages. “I think that in 
the present-day setup a young) 
man has not had sufficient time! 
to stabilize himself after — 
ing his education—he is not 
prepared to struggle in oe 
world, until he is 25.” he said | 

Defining the conditions for a) 
happy marriage, Father Con-| 
nel emphasized that a couple) 
should understand the social! 
nature of marriage. “Marriage! 
is primarily for the welfare of 
society rather than the individ- 
ual,” ‘he said | 

The Catholic Church, he said, | 
opposes interfaith marriages 
because experience has shown 
such marriages frequently end 
on the rocks. Two persons of 
different faiths often marry) 
without “sufficient reason,” he) 
said. The Church grants dis 
pensations for such marriages 
“reluctantly.” 


Soldiers Asked 
To Give Blood 


The Military District of Wash- 
ington announced yesterday 
that all military personnel in 
the Washington area had been 
urged by Red Cross to donate! 
blood to help relieve District 


asium to re- 
nors today from 
8 a. m. to 4 p. m. i 


Two Indicted in Attack on Woman 


used as a bird 
into the playground at 4th and bath, from the home of Ceylon 
O sts. nw., where the attack oc- Boswell, 11 D st. se. | 


cured. Two men were indicted on 

A first-degree murder indict- charges of carnal knowledge 
ment was returned against Jo- They are General M. Hendrix. 
seph Isler Jr., 37, listed at 1230 33, listed at 311 Farragut st. 
Owen place ne., in the strangu- nw., who is accused of having 
lation death June 1 of his 33- relations with an 8-year-old gir! 
year-old estranged wife, Beu- on May 25. and Eddie L. Rus. 
lah, in her apartment at 1710 sell, 31, listed at 1209 Florida 
Trenton place se. jave. ne., who is accused of hav- 

Grand larceny indictments ing relations with a 14-year-old 
were returned against Morris Sit! on April 7. | 
—— has not been sen-| King, 41, listed at 1375 Est The jury 
tenced. \se., and George E. Jackson, 37. housebreakin agains . 

The ‘woman told police she listed at‘13'2 Ist st. sw They man Mitchell. diet 1900 Can, ee re 
was seized when walking home are accused of Stealing a $204 gress place se. ‘Another is the Buen a B-17D 


‘ THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
| ve Tuesday, July 10, 1956 7 


1% 

Airplanes Lose B ttle! 
Souvenir hunters and the 
weather have little respect for 
famous airplanes, Paul Garber. 
head curator of the National 
Air Museum, sadly commented 
yesterday. 

Four of the museum's 160 
planes have suffered losses to 
the elements and vandals in 
their open air storage space at 
: |Andrews Air Base. One is the 
ignored a charge of Enola Gay, the B-29 that 


Two young men were in- from a church play and dragged bronze statue, 
dicted by a District grand jury 
yesterday on charges of raping 
a 20-year-old woman May 14 on 
the Bundy School playground. 

Eugene S. Dixon, 18, listed 
at 1644 6th st. nw., and Melvin 
Strothers, 22, listed at 1206 5th 
st. nw., are accused as two of 
the six participants in the mass 
attack. 

Another defendant, a 17-year- 
old, who was found guilty on a 
rape charge last week in Ju- 


Flying Fortress built from the 
remains of planes partially 
destroyed in the bombing Of 
Clark Field in the Philippines 
at the start of World War ITI. 

The other two planes are a 
P61 Black Widow, representa- 
tive of the first night fighters, 
and the XB-43, first jet-powered 
bomber 

The planes have lost instru- 
ments, parts of control panels 
and sections of outside surfaces, 
probably to souvenir hunters, 
an Air Force spokesman said. 


firearms charge District Court 
Judge Alexander Holtzoff or- 
dered the guns returned to 
Hunt. The attorneys also said 
the felony law went into effect 
in July 1953 and Hunt has had 


Scalley took the dismissal ap 
plication under advisement and 
ordered both defense and pros- 
ecution attorneys to submit 
memoranda on the felony law 


Stal! Phote 
LILLIE MAZUR 
. +» heard register ring | 


MORE AND MORE YOUNG FOLKS ARE DISCOVERING 


jee Med idee” 


There’s no thrill like the high-powered 
thrill of commanding the Rocket ! 


y There’s no feeling like the secure feeling 
of piloting an Oldsmobile ! 


b There’s no investment like the solid 
investment of owning an Olds! 


PY And there’s no time like the present time 
to get the most for your trade-in ! 


"88" HOLIDAY SEDAN 


, A : 
Cot lu ow, GET THE FACTS! GET THE FIGURES! GET OUT OF THE ORDINARY... 


K—"“OLDSMOBILE 


A QUALITY PRODUCT brought to you by AN OLDSMOBILE QUALITY DEALER! 


Alber Oldsmobile, inc. 
4630 14th Street HW. 


Get ovt of the ordinary this summer .. 


Setimoan AIR CONDITIONED 
OLDSMOBILE! 


Come in ter detalis — 


Oldsmobile 
1241 éth Street WE. 
Washington, 0. C. Li. 7-9340 


Suburban Cadillec- Oldsmobile Co. 
adley Shopping Center 
Bethesda, Md. OL. 67700 


BE CAREFUL... DRIVE SAFELY! 


Capital Commerce 


Cap. Airlines Orders 
15 More Viscounts 


By S. Oliver Goodman 


Financia) 


Bditor 


ital Airlines of Washington has ordered an additional 


BY. 


ount airliners at a cost of more than $15 million, 


Presi- 


dent J. H. Carmichaec! announced last night 
This will boost Capital's fleet of four-engine jet-prop Viscounts 
to 75. The airline has received’ 


delivery on 29 Viscounts of its 
original 60 order, with the bal- 
ance to be delivered by early 
1957, Carmichael said. Deliver. 
ies on the new purchase of 15 
will be completed by August 
of 1957, he added 

Capital moved scheduled air 
transportation in the United 
States into the jet age when 
it introduced the jet-prop Vis 
count on July 26, 1955. Since 
then, the company has report 
ed record traffic gains in each 
market in which it has been 
introduced 

Capital revealed recently that 
based on operating experience 
to date, the break-even load 
factor for this British-made air 
liner. is between 53 and 55 per 
cent. The Viscount, according 
to company records, has main 
tained load factors excess 
of 70. per cent 

Expansion of Capital Airlines 
has been especially rapid dur 
ing the past 12 mont Route 
extensions and new equipment 
have resulted in -over-all em 
ployment rising to a current fig 
ure of more than 7000. as com- 
pared with 5000 a year ago 

In the Washington area. em 
perenne of Capital Airlines 
148 Jumped to 2609 on June 30 
from about 1500 on the same 
1955 date. A spokesman indicat 
ed that a further employment 
increase here is likely as new 
planes are received 


Struble in New Post 


Adm Arthir D Struble 
(retired) has been appointed 
special adviser to the Hamilton 
Watch Co. Struble. the com 
pany said, will 
concentrate on 
company plans 
for an expand- 
ed research 
program on 
guided missiles 
and rocket 
components 
Struble retired 
on July 2 as 
chairman of 
the United 
Military Dele- 
oy to the United Nations. 

Intil that date, he served also 
@s commander of the Eastern 
Sea Frontier and commander 
of the Atlantic Reserve Fleet. 
During World War II he served 


mi 


is 


Adm. Struble 


> terly 


| Ine.. 


as chief of staf! to Adm. Kirk 
for the Normandy invasion and 
later he commanded the initial 
landings at Levte Gulf and 
many of the assault landings 
throughout the Philippines 


Petroleum W eek Set 


District Commissioners have 
proclaimed August 19-25 as Na 
tional Petroleum Retailers 
Week here. The action was tak 
en as forerunner to the annual 
convention of the National Con 
gress of Petroleum Retailers 
to be held that week in the 
Shoreham Hotel Representa- 
tives of more than 200.000 ser, 
ice stations throughout the Na 
tion will attend. Host will 
the local Metropolitan Retail 
Gasoline Dealers Association 
headed by James D. C. Gouldin 


{DMF Dividends 


Directors of Atomic Deve! 
opment Mutual Fund, Washing 
ton, yesterday declared a quar 
dividend of 12 cents a 
share from investment income 
and 26 cents a share from capi 
tal gains. Both dividends are 
— Aug. 8 to stock of rec 
ord Jul y 20 


he 


Whos News 


Louis M. Tulman has been 
elected an officer and general 
manager of Weatherguerd Als 
co, Inc.. makers of aluminum 
products. The 
firm has moved 
to 1133 9th st. 
nw . Robert 
H. Davidson 
retired news 
service managz- 
er of Chesa- 
peake & Poto- 
Telephone 
has bvbeen 
appointed pub 
lic relations ah 
of th 
Credit Union League .. 
Paul Kasky has been appoint ed 
employment manager for Erco 
Division of ACF Industries 
in Riverdale. Md.. R. H. 
Gillespie has been named fleet 
sales manager for GMC Truck 
and Coach Division, succeeding 
A. S. McEvoy. who will handle 
special assignments for the 
general manager. 


Tulman 


GENERAL 


— &) Coe ow a ewe 4 6 ee 


_ 


® 3-15 TON 
® FLOOR OR CEILING MOUNTED 


© AIR 


WE SELL & SERVICE DIRECT TO THE CONSUMER 


CUSHWA 


BRICK & BUILDING SUPPLY CO. 
Heating-Air Conditioning Division 
1355 LEE HIGHWAY, 


ELECTRIC 


OR WATER COOLED 


ROSSLYN, VA. 


Che Washington 


Times Berald 


ton Post 


TU 


18 


te — 


—— 


GE Awarded 
$107-Million | 


Air Contracts 


CINCINNATI, Ohio, July 
*—General Electric Co.'s 
crait gas turbine division here 
has been awarded two 
Force contracts totaling $107, 
540.320. 
| The announcement was made 
today by Gen. E. W. Raw 
lings, commander the 
Materie! Wright 
Patterson Base. 
Ohio 

One the 
Si02.415.320 for 
This engi ne 
heed F104A, 
est fighter 

The second 
$5.125.000 for 
with an 
> development 
facilities will 
equipment and 


of 

Command 
Air Force 

of for 


nes 


contracts i 
J79 ene 
powers the I 


the world's fast 


— 


contract is fo! 
ta li *s { 
advanced 
project 
consi 
machi 


nected 
ein 
new 
test 
tor ;s 
rhe 
mean 


ne 


J79 engine contract will 
further llization of 
plant operation but only a mod- 
est increase in employment 
George E, Fouch, general man- 
ager of the Evendale operating 
department at General Elec 
tric's jet plant here said 

Not all the manufacturing 
operations under the long-term 
J79 contract will be carried out 
at the General Electric plant 
Fouch said there will be an ax 
uve sub-contracting program 


Phelps Cuts 
Copper Price 


‘tah 


6 Cents a Lb. 


NEW , 
Phelps 
largest 


YORK, July $ 
Dodge Corp. second 
United States cope 
producer, today announced 
will cut its copper orice 6 cents 
to 40 40 cents a pound 
with tomorrow's shipments 

The cut is the first change fo: 
amajor domestic producer 
since the price was established 
at 46 cents a pound last Febru 

ary 20 

There was no immediate an- 
nouncement of any price cuts 
from the other two major 

United States copper compa 
nies, Kennecott Copper Corp 
and the Anaconda Co 

The Phelps Dodge price cut 
brings it more in line with for- 
eign prices and with those of 

United States custom smelters, 
who last Friday reduced their 
‘copper from 40 cents a pound 
to 37% cents 
| Skidding foreign prices had 
left United States copper the 


, : 
yh r 
> _ ee _~ 


| highest in the world for the past 
lseveral months. Copper on the 


London metals exchange today 
was quoted at about 35 cents. 


Chicago Livestock 


CHIC AGO July 
3 ad! 


o 


5 


Pune 


Burke 


ESDAY, JULY 186, 


usiness 


1956 


Suburban Deposits 


Edge to New Peak - 


Midyear deposits of 31 Washington suburban banks totaled 


$450,204 .877. 
but still a new alltime high 


However 


little changed from $448.735411 on Dec. 31. 


1855 


the June 30 total was S35.589.563 or nearly 8 per 
air cent higher than the mid-1955 figure 


The 14 nearby Virginia banks showed $208.6184519 in Grposiits 


on June 30. 
$192.040.372 on June 30. 1955 


compared with $207,695.135 on Dec 


si. 1956. and 


The 17 nearby Maryland banks reported deposits of $241.506 


30. 
17 


1955 
dD. Cc 


574.821 on June 
Including the 
30. 1956 
This compered 
670.048 on June 


banks 


4 
30 


1955 


Deposits of individual suburban 


the 48 area banks show $1834693.843 denoos 
ith $1.825.569 582 on Dex 


Air 258 on June 30. against $242.100.676 on Dec. 31. 1955. and S2Z 


deposits of SILJB4 338966 on 
31, 1935. and $) “37 


banks compared ast follows 


VIRGINIA 


» Trust Co 
National 

tr oO Ar randale 
and Herbert Bank 
Citizens Bank. Herndon 
(Clarendon Trust Co 
Fails Church Bank 
First and Citizens, Alexandria 
First National, Arlington 
Mount Vernon Bank and Trust 
Pank of Fairfax 
Old Dominion Bank 
Shirlington Trust Co 
Vienna Trust Co 


and T 


Total 


4.014 761 
5.653.459 
2 466 680 
16 310.063 
14.301 697 
42 368 £98 
9.581 958 
8511522 
7.183.206 
3053.722 
85194811 
6.031.337 


$208 618.619 


MARYLAND 


Bank of Bethesda 
Bank of Damascus 
Bank of Maryland 
Bank of Silver Spring 
Citizens of Laurel 
Citizens . Maryland 
Citizens of Takoma Park 
Farmers Bank and Trust 
. and Merchants, Upper 
rst National of Gaithersburg 
Fi rst National, Sandy Spring 
National, 
Germantown Bank 
Montgomerv County National 
gs Institute, Sandy Spring 
te Bank of Laurel 
Trust Co 


‘) 


Say ") 
“ST 5 
Suburban 


Tot 


Rockville 
tariboro 


S$ 17.170508 
24484353 
16.427 214 
14.357 481 
S578.415 
23.307.180 
9 376.415 
> 732478 


Southern Maryland 


$242.100_676 


Corporate 
Capital Sets 
New Peak 


United States corporations 
had a record $105.6 billion of | 
capital to work with at the end 


of March, the Securities & Ex-| 


change Commission reported 
yesterday. 

This working capital figure’ 
‘reprepresents the difference be-| 
tween corporations’ total cur) 
rent assets of $205.4 billion and 
current liabilities of $988 bil 
120). 

Assets 


include cash, invest- 


to ments in Federal Government 
© 


ie securities, 
to 
* 


sty 
~~) 
7160 


, 
i= 


few 
most 4 -500 


er 

¢ er 

ac Pew 
. i 

271 oe 

hotce steers 

6 siandard and good 


one : 
heice heifers. 17 50 
commercial cows 


debts, 


: 
Dividend Actions 
Pe Sth. of Paw 
Rate ried Record able 
sviar 


7s 2 
Ls 0 


$12 
Lo 

eis 
: 


‘ff 
i 
, 


i 


: 


LY 


i 


AM 


Oo 


DIAL 


BROAD 


BLL 


HOUSE 


‘t) | 


WTOP RADIO 


- rations 


+ Maryland Tobacco 


5 Service 


bills and loans owed 
the companies, and inven- 
tories. Liabil#ies include the 
companies own borrowings 
and bills owed, Federal income 
taxes owed, and advances re- 
ceived on Government con- 
tracts 

Assets declined during the 
first three months of this year. 
but liabilities declined by a 
greater amount, so working 
capital increased. Large tax 


2% payments accounted for part of 


the drain on assets. 

At the end of March, corpo 
had less ready cash 
available, in relation to their 
than at any time since 
the early 1940s, the SEC said. | 

They had $50 billion of cash 
and Government securities 
against liabilities of almost 
$100 billion or $1 in cash for 
every $2 in debdts. Three 
months earlier this ratio was 
$1.10 to $2. 


UPPER MARLBORO Md. Jue 8 
Tobacco saies were heavy in volume te- 
eay at the southern Maryland suction 
cameers. the peseser State "Market News 

repor 

One ss "the , ws head mere %- 

“ld be handied 


and thas 
“> ellotted ol ‘ling time The 
ty o eades sod «@ nese 


usemen 

bought a few ret 4 37 | 

| Sc me nondescript sold fer a lew of S12 
s 


After 48 dave of ogine turnover on | 
he 


bid, averages rer 
tm titted num her ae 
B. e« ades ' ere 
— 
Grece 
Heavy Cree 
Good cherrr-red 
Petr cherry-red 
Low cherry-red 
Tips 
va! r cherry-red 
a -~ 


: sy% : 


a°P 
ner 
BSP 


w green 
Loe red 


> c : 
‘se rea 
-econds 
Pair eperrs- red 


Nendescript 
Best thin 


YOUR RENTAL 
PROPERTIES 
WILL PAY 


Commodity Index 


Ee TOM. toy 8 OTe Gece 


_|Werld of Finance 


Byers Co. Increases 


All Prices by 7 % 


PITTSBURGH. July § @—The A. M. Byers Co., the world’s 
largest manefacturer of wrought tron, today announced a 7 
| Der cont incresee in the prices of ol ite products 

A company spokesman said the increase was made in antici- 
pation of am imcrease im labor” 
costs afier a settlement of the 
current stee! strike. 

Byers has continued to oper- 
ate Unrouwgh the strike om a con 
tract extension that runs from 
July 1 te July Zl. The agree 
ment with the Unaited teel- 
workers provides that when a 
new contract is signed it will 
be retroactive to July 1. A com 
cam, spokesman said the firm 
crsicmariiy waits wetil the! 
Stee workers =Erron reaches 
agreement with the basic steel 
n@ustry before signing a2 new 
contract 

The strikecrippied steel in 
Gustity will operate af 127 per 
Tend of rated capacity this 
=eek tare out Jil net 

agots and steel for 
American iron & 
“itute reported today 
institute said actual pro 
@Guction last week. Grst week of 
the strike amounted to 302 000 
toms @ 123 per cent of cape 
(iy. ©.leiepet was confined to 
smaller mils { « the most part 

. menth ego the industry 
operated at S24 per cent of 
capecity, turning cut 2:909,000' 
toms. A pear age the mills ran 
at S12 per cent and produced 
220 O tons 
Dividend Increased 

SEW YORK. &—Phillics Pe 
troleum Co declared a quarter 
y dividend of 42% a 
are ef Sew commen stock. 
payable Sept. 1 to stockholders 
of secord Ace 3 This is eauive 
<e8 te & cents on shares out 
Sandimg proor te a recent stock 
an en which company 


paid 73 cents quart 


Sperry Rand Offers 
Stock Via Rights 


Sperry Rand Corp. has set 
a $20.50 a share price on its 
257 MGshare offering to 
stockholders. The big issue 
will be sent out for subscrip- 
tion im the ratio of one new 
share for each 10 held of 
record July 9 after re- 
ceipt of clearance from the 
Securities and Exchage 
Commission. U nd erwriters. 
led by Lehman Brothers. wil! 
purchase any stock left over 
at the close of the subscrip- 
thon period on July 25. 


{le 


ported from Italy and Switzer- 
land end has just added a new 
ume of low-priced machines 
made in Spain 


Featuring: 


Lap seams 

Heok Vent 

Plain Trowsers 

In wash-and-wear 
fabrics. Dacron and 


crn r< 


> "? 


Treax Traer Net Up 


Treax Treer Coal repe 
rens@lidated met income of $3.- 
71226. equal te S251 a share 
seer end ng w 
fompares wih STIR or 
Si71 a share. for the previous 
rear. Predection af I7 

mereased &6 per cent 

7 28 


°OGs 


oo ris 


Decrer end Cotten 
Tom, Ghee end Grey 


nae tia {A ori! 
- 
eter Pac 7s 


ood Beret Gross 


‘Sry, / 


wow 


mines wane 


Necchi Share Bigger 


SEW YORA The Nec- 
chi Elma Sewing Machine Sz2ies 
Corp. reported Es sales in 18 
months ended June W amount 
ed te $65 millien. of I7 per cent 
of the United States market for 
swing machines and parts. 
Necchi Elma seils machines im- 


Arthur A. 


822 15th $e. NW. 


‘-ereege 1419 


Pipe Line Case Starts 


Power Commission (FPC) 
hearings started yesterday on a 


tproposed $105 million project 


to pipe natural gas from Texas 


to Florida, with arguments for 
and against it cropping up at 


27,50 

" 38.15 
wn’ 38.15 
Grey 45.00 


sioe Agents for Sox 


Rooms. single from $8 00, 
dovble from $172.00. 


Imomned gte Rese-vaton Service 
a Lincoln 6 4040 
P4426 <0! lect 


“Belloue 
BFOAD AT WALNUT ST. PHELADELPHIA 


Our Classic Look 
by Haspel 


Adler 


ch Bwits 


MA. 8-3358, §-4575 


FREE CUSTOMER FARE Ne 
“. 5. 


Ere 


Clesed Saturdays Through August 18 


BIG ppbortunitiee at 
Fhe inthe WEST 


PHOENIX, ARIZ. 


RIVERSIDE, CALIF. 
worx in a WACATIONLAND 

(your family will love year-round outdoor living) 
WHILE YOU ADVANCE YOUR CAREER j= 


Here are the country’s newest and most complete Electronic a3 


“Go Wat” never hed grester eppeal (or grester rewards) than 


MOTOROLA IR 


it does TODAY! 
PROERIX HAS HEED FOR 


MOTOROLA IN RIVERSIDE 


HAS NEED FOR: 


Electronic ee Mechanical Engineers, 
Physicists and Mathematicians. 
RESEARCH (asORATORY 

© Military Operation Analysis 
e Anciog Computor Flight Simulation 
© Digite! Computer Analysis 


© Digte! Computer Design 


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© Circuit Design 


© Microweve Systems ¢ Serve Mechenisms 


© Missele Systems 


* Aeroph ysics 


ae at 25 , 


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53330 indians Ave., 


Keasol, 


Dept. 1 
Riverside, Calif. 


There are excelient opportunities with Motorola in CHICAGO, too 
Mr. L. B. Wrenn, Dept. 1 


urtle &: 


4501 Augusta Blvd. 


Chicago 51, til. 


For full details and personal interview in WASHINGTON JULY 9, 10, 11 


CALL District 7-2852 10 AM. to 7 P.M.—MR. LEN SERWAT 
FOR DAY OR EVENING APPOINTMENT 


(!) MOTOROLA 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
ras Tuesday, July 10, 1956 19 


Big Board Finds 


mnt 


"-"W omen, 


“4 


(1) Mogh iw 


Stocks Continue Higher in Quiet Trading 


Associated Preas . . . . . . : : . . > . . ° 
Total sales 2,180,000 shares: ; oh 1d 


i822 Rails Prove Exce ption EB: 
1955 to date aaa 1954 nd 


Young People 


Dow-Jones Stocks 


new YORK, Bae 7 
Ope 


Transactions 


totay 


(190) High Lew Ciese 


oo A oo 
ie ” 4% my 
“ 3 1% 1% 
4 87% 81% 


Abeett 1 
sac (Vea 
act ind 4 


~ 


NEW YORK, July 9 (‘#®—The stock market 
plugged ahead routinely today for fourth 
straight advance 

In a trading session notable for lack of 
leadership by any particular group, pivotal 
stocks improved by fractions to a point 

Here and there some issues advanced 2 or 
3 points. There was a scattering of losers, too, 
particularly among rails which were on the 
downside all day. 

Steels once again rose moderately after an 
uncertain start as the market began its sec- 
ond week under the shadow of the Nation 
wide strike. Motors, which made a virtually 
motioniess start, picked up some trading in- 
terest and moved ahead a bil 

The market was following through from 
rise of last week and brokers saw infilatio: 
signs contributing to the performanc« 
Governments report of an all-time high in 
employment today was added to such factors 
aS an expectation of another round of price 
and wage rises following the steel settlement. 


he 


The Associated Press average of 60 stocks 
rose 40 cents to $185.90 with the industrials 
up $1.50, the rails down 90 cents and the 
utilities up 20 cents. 

Standards Brands, by virtue of one big 
trade of 38,000 shares, stopped the most-active 
list, up % at 38% on a total turnover of 39,600 
shares é 

The session was also notable for the fact 
that bullish items of corporate news had 
little if any effect on the securities involved. 
General Electric, recipient of a $100 million 
\ir Force contract, wound up with a loss of 
s at 61%. Phillips Petroleum rose more than 
a point on news of a higher dividend but 
closed with a loss of “4. A. M. Byers increased 
prices of all its wrousiel iron products 7 pet 
cent bul registered a gain of only *s 

drop in copper prices by Phelps Dodze., 
second largest American producer, was an 
ced after the close but apparently was 
not anticipated during the trading. The stock 


closed off % at 61%. Other copper stocks 


teres 


53% 
“1 
O44 

bb) 

t 

“'s 


© iM ore Stock- 


ws NEW YORK, July 9 @ 
ot X Women, people under 40 and 
w+» residents of smaller towns and) 
eae cilies are doing an ever larger 
a share of the Business on the 
1T%e+ e New York Stock Exchange. an. 
—. & » exchange study reperted today. 

Keith Funston, president of 


the exchange, made the dis 
‘ownership in their plans for the 


—_ 4 closutes In the exchange’s lat- 
p + 4 est — transaction seriea| 
112+ ‘se The 


'3* 


,a picture of market: transac 
Sees t tions on March 14 and 21. 
eS m Transactions each day “totaled 
; about three million § shares, 
slightly more than the daily 


sszygue 


ee 
~~ 2 


Minded 


contrasted to 13 per cent in all 
previous studies, Funston seid. 

“Younger people are evident- 
ly taking a greater interest in 
personal financial plennsing.~ 
he said. “In addition, surveys 
by the exchange indicate that 
younger people are becoming 
more disposed to include stock 


future.” 
“Only two of ten major cities 


‘in volume by public individuals 
and institutions in March, 1956, 
as compared to June, 1955.” 
Funston said “Seven cities 


average volume at the time. A showed dGeclines and one was 
1@— % total of 86.000 transactions were unchanged. The decline in the 
ae. reported on the two days. irelative amount of business 
120% — * “The increased use of the ex-/ originating in large metropoli- 
change’s marketplace by wom- tan centers may indicate an in- 
en is not surprising in view of creasing Mmvestment interest 
+1 the preliminary findings of the, among people in smaller tewns 
H\— “ exchenge’s 1956 census of share and cities. 
~ ay: owners now nearing comple “While the facts we have at 
Mie tion.” Funston said. “For the hand thus far are not concle 
te first time women shareowners sive, the figures we do have 
he+et OulNUmber mea—52 per cent could be interpreted as refiect- 
tatve+ Sn against 48 per cent.” ing a further —e of a real 
r+ S| Women accounted for 23.7 grass-roots capitalis 
int we per cent of all volume by pub-| Otber highlights yenerted by 
“ lic individuals during the two ate were that public in- 
os » | days, he said. ividuals accounted for 
=—* Share volume by people un - per cent of the business and 
et der 40 on the two days studied that 87 per cent of the public's 
—.¢ »| was 16 per cent of the business|transactions were for invest 
J + we done by public individuals, as ‘ment purposes. 


hints that President Eisenhower would re were mixed 

affirm his decision to run and evidence Chrysier 

further-credit easing ls 
Volume at 2.180.000 shares was exactly the 

same as on Frida; 

45 114 117% 119 e ; - ue ; } ty ' f sf ‘ . “a 


7? Wa a hs % 198) Megh Lew Close Cig Lew Close Che 

ines bon ase 1) Ge Oe MARKET VALUES UP aiet e? 
tockson New YorkExchange 

© $225 billion at midyear. 


<s 
‘te 


rr S&S & fe ae te Be 
~ 


was traded actively and gained 
Ford advanced *s. Montgomery Ward 
and Sears Roebuck each gained on news of 
record sales. 


4% «601% 64S 
me is 6 (tts 
| 1% 8% 9%+ % 


“2 eft ia S$ 
i 


44% 
5) 198% 197% titteaem CS CE 
38 11944 118%) 119% 4 a, CP Gt 


Py > SS & eS a he ae ae me 


Market Value of Stocks 
On N. Y. Stock Exchange 


41% 4+T% 

“a — 
2. | 
s+ ty Ue 
Ta's 


Mackall & Coe 


Members 
New York Stock Exchange 


ry 
1s . % City tevest 
Am teoees 608 {t+ a, City Pred 
dm teks 1.800 City Str wh 
Am Cures ' . ' ; %$ ” “ BY 
Am txport m ta END OF YLARB DATA 


so. 88. - 


Y Sect Lechoneeo Merme Kets 


Clumas 

Cluctt Pea te 
Ciwett FP of 4 
Ceca Cole ts ; 
Coig Pole |} ; ? ; : : str ? = 
tei &§ An : r / ’ 
Cele Failr 2 g 


Ss 7 1% 
1 117% 117% 117s—Th% 
. 


5 t% 

3 7% 179 
28 10? «0618718? 

7 M% 14% 4% 

‘ 6% 16% 


— 
i 


--1 
+1 
+ 


100) Wight Low Cleve Che 


~~ 
ed 


Ss 1% 4% WF +? 
6 6 = ' 
bs ee 
» 8% Get a SO! Pict . 
Cel Care 1.48a 
Celi & S08 Cf 


Néw York Correspendent—Clerk, Dodge & Company 


626 Woodward Building 


REpublic -gek 


¥ 
Conde ast 
Conse Milk 
Conge eum 


aul 


INVESTMENT FACTS 


A MUST for Investors—compiled by the New York | 
Stock Exchange—Indicates over 291 Listed Stocks 
which have paid cash dividends every year for 25 to 
105 years. 


o- i. = — . . 
se eases ee eae ee ee & ee = = 


$425 “4 
199 19%) 138 «19%4+ 
S 18)" 81% “182+ % = 


Leche Ave 
leew's = CT 

lese & Com 2s 
‘tere S$ Gos 1 


LD =e... 


8 = a 


— 
t+ & 


3=% 


se = = 


: 


Cell or Write for Free Cepy 
© OPEN SATURDAYS © EVENINGS UNTIL 9 P.M. 


Jones-Kreccen « Hew 


Members N. Y. Stock’ Exthange end Other Leading Exchanges 


ot. 
ow 
Kl. 8-5700 


15 Most Active Stocks 


17%+1's) WHEW YORK, fely © @—Sales, closing prices 
20°4+1% ood set chances of the 15 west active stocks 
“ today 

73.600 Std Breeds 

92.600 Cen Metors 

24.608 Sperry fond 

22.508 Seuth Pree 

71.600 Thetch Gi 

71.700 Meet Ward 


Loweasterm 


” 22 “ 
letess § tile ’' es «CF? e+! 


What Stocks Did 


Advonces 
Dee ines 


teat sees 


i 


-— = we 
se a oe Ge we 


_ 
r- 


‘tee 


33'e— ‘s 
het © 


16.008 Unit Wallpes 
15.600 Westing Clee 
15.306 Nat Contomer 


2 2 ” 

‘ 7% 27% are ' 

ree 666 Oe ' 
1 6% 87% 

Tt 160% 199 


T.— ‘se 
1T\g— % Cestawer 
Cent Bat 


° 
’ 
‘ 
is 
$2 
. 
f 
aa 
33 
? 
' 
’ 
5 
1 
Pa | 
; 
73 
’ 
” 
4} 
’ 
14 


fee MM pf 


Beprt 2s 
Babcockia 
Bald Lime 
Set Gat 
fet 6 of8 48 samp tn 


77 


- i a TY a 
1. . ~ ” % 37% 


‘ ; . eS + % 2% 
4 ; Wise 
Wie 
Wootward'r 
Wee'rert® 
Werthierton 
ae! 
9 35% 95 That's the story of airlines—one of 
the fastest growing industries in America 
today —-a major attraction to thousands of investors. 
That's why we've just published « thirty-two page 
report on airlines that answers nearly any qnestion an 
investor might ask on the past, present, or future of 
commercial aviation. 
The booklet begins by tracing the phenomenal rise of 
our airline industry . .. underscores the tremendous 


strides since the war. 

It discusses the importance of “pay later” plans, coach 
flights, and executive travel, tells about fixed costs and 
financing . . . thoroughly explores the promise and 
problems in the coming switch to jets. 


Yeleklow 
Yoe & Tow 
, Teore SEW ta 
Yegst Seat Gs 
Yegst & Or 
 Jeath fed 


» on 1s 
i? 34% 
138 


1338 


46% 4%+7% Core & of fe 
1% 17 1l*e— ' Pet 
¢o% St's 73 
748 1042q 104°) 104%+ 's 


Suerred 

_ rt 
Beat Fe pf 458 —_ 
Reomslt @ ir 


1 We 
Peckmesiost§ 8 87t 


t- wai of wading 


Sesfeway St 2.48 
Safe St cvel ; 
Safe i pt ' ’ “si 
St jes Lead 3 . esas oe Gridests i 

tebe «6re)|6fenee! «6 isbersements 
tee tert eeerterty of sem-snneel 


tea Uetecs etiberwise seted 


a 
éeciere 
wetnt 6 


1%s— ‘s Cunee Press 
& 327% 32% 2+ “se Corte Pub .200 
1 50% S0% S%+ Cor Poe pf 7 
41 155% 153% 155%+1% Cor Pub pr pf 
} 35° oo exdiwidest of e1-Gistridutios éate 
tsi ¢ ' 11 Le uw fe ' i Pold lect year. &—Declered of gan 
Lg ' stock Giidesd of spilt os. &—Dectered ov 
94d, sant 1% 
- & 
7% 2+ ta | Daves 
26\a+ 4 Caystrom 
te Then it has separate reviews on thirteen major air- 


lines, similar studies on leading helicopter companies 
and cargo lines, all from an investment standpoint. 

If you'd like a copy of “Armies,” just ask. There | 
isn't any charge, simply call, come in, or write— 


ex-¢istr bution 

464+ % 

7? - % 
sw Me 


clé—Catied ré—ts 
5 


ow receivers® 
eater t oph: eptcy 


ow securities ssremed By seek com 


- 


0+ ‘e 
” + 
13 
1425+ | Siam 
ty Dee Mat 
vy | Diana gtr 
C Ses 


Department DM 41 


Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Beane 
815 Fifteenth Street, N.W., Washington $ 
Telephone: EXecutive 3-2121 


_ 
“We @& @ 4H we 


14% 
+h “ - 
a s+ 


~ 
J 


Foreign Exchange 
: 


—_* 
~ > 


wEwW YORE ~Fereige tuchaenge retes 
fellew 
, Comedies Geller it New York eoee market 
> 21/8 per coat -7re er , Uarted 
States cents op 1/37 of 
Great Brita (pound) s2.Foe. wecheage? 


- — eee ee ee Le — = 


isty OF 


—_ 
~ 


——— ee 


% Gress ine 3 

: Sreerys (‘88 
4+ % Oeplee 105 

t+ % Oo Pest I 
és Pont 4.50pf4 58 

‘ 


Veter Wheel 
Wetorsia 861 8 
Mesiler Gr 2? 
Muetwrw 


s im m+ * 
? 


13'> 


aT’, 


Tbe ad verti oment appees oaly a 4 matter of record. 


$ 10,000,000 


» 7 
are) 067 8a 


. " Noethy 
vel tk alk ok 
w— % Hope 


T?%— ‘> Mess 


Cast 
6 


State Loan and Finance Corporation 


t : Pay 
35: | +1" ? — “Peed 
a 


1790 187% 101% 107 : 
7 @% 1% He be i vat 


4%% Promissory Notes due June 1, 1971 


Private placement of the above Notes bas been arranged by the wnder:igned. 


ff 


24%—+1% tet 
1Ttet ont 
2) 


37 


eon 
43 
bs 


o% 4% G+ % 
MW We Mier % tet 
’ ; ' 

See WR leet ban a 
32 + &% Fanstes! Ste 1 51% B% Site+th oe 
77% — % Fowick Se 5 Wr Thy + 
a+ te fede Geog tte 

S?% G?\%s~— % Fed Mecwi ta 
S’%a+itty Fed Pee ti 
— tet Poe Ot 

—' fet 3 Ot 
y Pa ron & Ter 


% 13 + % Ferd Mer 
% Fawch ft s 
t, Faictatt 6: 

+3% fom Fu 


Johnston, Lemon & Co. Union Securities Corporation 


ee 


+ +1 


* © F 


1 


ee 


3°32 


July 10, 1936 


‘se 


Sess Bue 8S. 8e2SS-...85~2 


pe 


| 


sen 


At 
ih 


HN 


jury 2 ws 


331 15k & EW. 


COdl ar Vie® ... 
HOME 


Glee, Forge & Ca. 
Laced Fees & Ca. 

Haligeees & Ca. 
Reseciés & Co, In, 


moe 
Lane, Space &Co.fec. Avthor M Roresky & Ge. ioc 
Ferns & Company 
solcracie of an vier 2 


Van Alstyne, Nori & Ca. 


couner) ~— 


liam T Gossett vice Te 
Port. urged Congres: te wtth- 


Feuitebile Secanties : 
Cecqecatsa 


Shearson, Hammill & Co. Walsten & Ce. inc 
Pame, Webber, Jackers & Carts 


ony wf pening bile Ge 
- glee frenchiee? cecteiiens Oe 
te the O Mahon ant 


bills 


st &@ teberd 


and 
egslatwe acter um! £ 


oo 


Spokesmen for Genera! Wie 


ters and Ford appereret mm op 


_ 


Cele 
Wi 


hoid 
car 
may ofe: shars co 


@ me, a2ccely ofe mee owt @ we Swe. 


Company 


a os — : 


Umon Securtes Corparatem Whar, Well & Co. 


jet coe seer scerrt om oe Foret owt clara 


ere. 


> 


I a 


Kidder, Peabody & Ca. 
Clare, Dodge & Co. 
R. W. Preeprich & Co. 


aa" ferent. 


S gstte i 
j |, 7 sol 


Yeu e@vertumwre: toet owl to weor wr crower @ bt conte 2 
on clei of Ghee ecole fr atk o « cities of oo ete & 
bey ony cf mck secre: Tie cftereg 2 em oxy fp fe Pope 
Cope: of chee Peospecu: wert te choot om ome Sow ob Ore et of 


ices 


LeTTocs— lone 


ed 
Dastroct 


% fe ui a 


: LC rie 


ee 


at<g Tings pial? 
: iss cael 
eos 


ch fs 


A. C. Allyn and 
jaly 14. 196 


(Par Value 50¢ Per Share) 


et to be comstened at an offer to ell or aa 


_ 
- 


i} ite 4 il f GGEGE Cekh CREE Genk EEECE corny 


oo oe oe rrr = rere or oe er secce 


it L» aces CORE GEER Giby EREEE users 


Se i eel rrr e rere |, ie 


b ehhE EFEE wknd reness 


“re rrr oe SEesce 


GEG Gta Rhy FEEEE nen 


“rr rrr = 


—— a2 


Hornblower & Weeks Eastman, Dillon & Co. 


Harruman Ripley & Co. 


- 


2 NO 3 GO 
—Jum bo % 


6 00 77 10 


F. S. Moseley & Co. 


STeCcas 
omn 


diteen 


or ee Te 


buy any of these securities. The of ermg made only by the Prospectes. 


ehornae 


—erth Carolina 


“a wt) sete 


ite ‘ °. 4 a e* 
i i ii cutee 
‘ith tenets ¥ eee oo 


rem fi 
Bh 


os 


rFTri.Fyaoam«:s. B 
rena 
+P 


Tbe Prospectus may be obtarned m oxy State m2 whee the: evnowecemest = creculated trom ony cub 
of the undersigned or other deder: or brohet as may lawfally offer thee securities ae cach See 


ae 


Yesterdar s 
m Washinrton 


D. C. Produce Pr 


as reported by the Asricucture 


* CANTALOU 
¥ 
:|_ Saveene 
ns 


4200 cases by track.| Sottey aot 121 tt Se 


on 2”. 


Rs = 


Holders of the Company's outstanding Common Stock are being offered the sight te subscribe xt $0050 
per share for the above shares at the rate of 1 new share for cach 30 shares held of second July 8, 29%. 


Subscription Warrants will expire at 3:30 PM. Eastern Daylight Seemg Tome, on joiy 25, 2956 
The several Underwriters have agreed, subject to certain conditiom, t© purchase any umber’ 
shares and, both during and following the subscripuon period, 


as set forth m the Prospectus. 


nd 
the 


7) 
Bo 


‘oree. whites 46046 brown and mixed. 


A 


This announcement is under mo corcamstanr 


r 
modates | 
Department 
that the | 


William Neill | capa 


an adjoining ™ 
has been named general man-| 


market, wan eat 


~ an ali-giass front, has 27,000). 
rd in the local) 


Food Fair's growing chain. 


features of the 


in Fairfax, Va. 
newest Food Fair Super Mar-| 


al 
3 


American Stock Market Prices ate é : 
| pens 


Washington yes 


terday opened its largest store iva 
3 per cent 


tou- sithe soailest acreage since * 


Wertheim & Co. Dean Witter &Co. Johnston,Lemon & Co. AC AlpeandCempery Geo, Sees & Co. 


Smith, Barney & Co. Stone & Webster Securities Corporation 
Drexel & Co. Hemphill, Noyes & Co. Carl M. Loeb, Rhoades & Co. 


The First Boston Corporation 
Goldman, Sachs & Co. 


Union Co. of East cous (1m 


N. J. 


feed Food O Mat. 


Associated Press 
1} GO@ 14 50" and o 
> Balttmere. 
te retailers: Grade 
nites py brown end mixed 


lot that accom 
The 100 per cent self- 


\ service meat department has 95, 


‘limeal feet of display space and 


-" 
ae 


bow ym 


c of the new outlet, which 
cows. 


Grand 


Paterson. 


RN sByl: ner e: 
TTTTTT 1 Rey ae Le. aa ie EPPPESES army TTTITITNTTT Te i 


Food Fair Super Markets of 


The area chain is a division *"* 


: 
: 
t 
| 
4" 
“ss 
‘ 
is} 
24? 


The new super 
A gravity 
The Agriculture 


is one of the 


he cutting and preperation 
._ room is in full public view. 

oda Dead utility heifers ¢own 

caumers 11.60: most utility end 


™ the smallest acreage since 


on Lee highway 
is the twenty-thi 


about 200 cars. 


Metropolitan 

* square feet and 
parking 

a reduction of 
leutters 16 00 17 50 


ket. 


iJ oa! 


age 


: “ta! 


of 


“ 


1 Sal Cotten Acreage 
= At 70-Year Low 


63 Ivered fo 
— 


7’... 


As v3 e y eeree & meri d7, 
TT vr hi 2 Beece*n*ce re *s*ec errr rr 


ee ibpiciteg: fis bceshil ueREaeptennerenenerces mone p77qqqaaqaae 


erre “+ “eae 
he heh ta cl belt tated chai tit ahe | oooh eaht<.ngeneen” 


z| 2ee2.e##28 wee ene *. #8 & 
j ceegecggeegectegaes tundé,cadfecnegatye 
a RERRERBRERRRERS BGGE- AE SECKEELC.662 08 anfals L ilodhe fe *Q6stGtafofSGS46Qeh. biel abbaphs 
B MengepanegneneceengegateytKeneeT cate’ abies B banhGCEEEE-geakpphlafbl pi lekige bidefebbapts 


oe hoe aA eenene Pics’. . teams te toc 


+-% 
r+l™ 
“ 


" 
wr 

‘ 
ae 

ss 


tota 


5 


a 


RE hue RARRERES 
SPS KeReasseeeee 


tk in mf 


if 


vii! 
) . “ 
i 


A 
va sin | 
=209f 


to 
acriageway. TO feet i 


Department 


Narrows Bridge, Perth 


he ¢ 


~ 


7s mh Se 


a enonene evuge"?’ nn” BSR eRe RE 


W eneee RUhne BAG HHeTARARer 
fs - REEL EP ERLE 


ae 8 tre a ooo — 
Se2 “Hf tre SB Ge GF 
2a 2e ttn 


esse 


“"ava* agean 


pat 


i 
, yesag 


° 
~ 


~~ prewude 2 a 
with and tee cetheers. cach 19 feet in whith The 


lain Road 


: 


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eee =f Howard Law Student Sues #07 : of Trade {Talbot County Polio Seare|_“"" “SS *recso iti 


internet H To Erase Arrest Record —Merrick,Carr Is Ended, Official Says | VODKA & TONIC 


Sy Luncheon | Two f ' | | 
| , rm sidents of the 

A. Howard University law Precinct, fingerprinted, photo-| w chem mre ym | An outbreak of polio in Tal-cases for all of the state east | 
d 1 Rendezvous student arrested March 28, staphed, placed in a police sagen ewe of Trades 


; were elected chairman and vice bot County, Md. “seems to/of Hagerstown except for the 
we f a | 1955, and released the next day Pa neat Gy han ees chairman of the Greater Na- have run its course,” Dr. Louisjareg around Washington. The 
> 


=~ 

| asked District Court yesterday ; tional Capital S. Welty, County Health , ; 

d to order the Metropolitan Po Oe eieien ter tole ie . = Committee yes- Officer, said yesterday. mespital superintendent, P. a.) 

| i Ma jlice Department to erase the) «vise. disregard” of his terday Dr. Welty said nine Sat les talon cabioes te bo 

\ | Roy C. Wright, 27, of 211 Elm nin. t0 apply for the District Merrick, presi- but there have been none since The | ; the Vodke of Vodkas 

» | | Denghefut informaticy Z St. ow., in a suit sponsored by Rar and will have to mention dent of the Mary A. Schultz, 17, of St! ey — Tail, cool « 
the American Civil Liberties|ine arrest Board of Trade Michael's was stricken June 24.\8¥78¢s to care for polio pa , cool, delightfully “dry” 
Union and filed by Attorney! Somkin said after Wright in 1953-54, was Miss Schultz, one of 15 chil. “@mts and other hospitals have | ++. with the true tonic taste 
Fred Somkin, complained that|was released he asked the elected chair--dren of Mr. and Mrs. Leo rg by furnishing nurses, he — it leaves you breathless! 
he was arrested “arbitrarily Police Department to clear the’ man. Edward Schultz. died Sunday at City ™* . 


and capriciously” and unlaw- record. but it did not do so.| R. Carr, who Hospital in Baltimore. She was ee | . 
fully. | ended his term one of three iron lung cases, ——— —— 
According to the complaint, Ancient Fortress Found | M on June 30 as admitted to the hospital from 3 Times Faster When 5 
Wright was arrested by two errick §= resident of St. Michael's during June. 


; Reuters 
= |Second Precinct policemen| CALTANISETTA, Sicily, July the Board of Trade, was elect-- None of those contracting the Gas Crowds Hea the greetes! name in VODKA 
while looking for the rental’ 9—Italian archeologists excavat-'ed vice chairman disease was inoculated with 
agent of apartments in the 1600 ing a hilltop near Mussomeli in| Merrick, 8003 Kerry lane, Salk polio vaccine. Since the Cavtified taheretery ess orove SOs 08 & 188 prest. Gectified trem grain. Sis. Pierre Smirnsti Fis. (Div. of Heublein), Rartierd, Cone, 
block of 7th st. nw central Sicily today unearthed’ Chevy Chase, is vice president outbreak, approximately 3000) Sere acideay un ene qntnate ao many 
™ | The suit stated that Wright a hitherte un a , . , . ots h given tablets Sell-ens —— iia 
eg ett tet | i\was booked at the Seoned tress or tee 9s cane cc ne aa gS  caamatans ay ital edie tosay lor tee tastest knows rebel 3. Call RE. 7-1234, ask for Circulation, and order The Wash- 
16th & Penasytvecic t : century B.C. Advertising agency. y pitals es polio StLL-Ans TASLETS ington Post and Ti H | home delivery 


—— 


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happy vacations begin in a Chevy 


‘"] a You'll love to travel in it, because tt loves to travel! When you 
4 a get this Chevrolet out on the road, you'll want_to keep going— 
and so will the whole family. 


KOHAVAD) 


Of course, even in a Chevrolet the happiest vaca- § 225, the Chevrolet moves out like a whiplash, 

tions may involve one or two minor problems. for safer passing. And with it you've always 

America’s Like fidgety small fry who want gallons of got that solid feeling of stability. Chevrolet’s 

largest selling car— water and keep asking if you're almost there. famous for its roadability and sureness of con- 

2 million more The big things, though, are beautifully taken trol. It set a new round-the-clock performance 

owners than care of by this roomy Chevrolet's smooth and record at Darlington (S.C.) Raceway just so 
any other make! easy way of going. there wouldn’t be any doubt about it! 

The fact is, few cars at any price hold the Is it any wonder that more and more people 
road with a Chevy’s grace. That idea about the who used to buy higher priced cars are chang- 
best riding cars being great oversized affairs ing to Chevrolet? You'll be happy to see how 
went out with the introduction of Chevrolet's easy we're making it to start your vacation in a 
outrigger rear springing and low, precisely new Chevy. You've got 20 models to choose 
balanced chassis design. With horsepower up to from. Stop by and pick your favorite. 


AIR CONDITIONING —TEMPERATURES MADE TO ORDER—AT NEW LOW COST. LET US DEMONSTRATE! 


See Your Authorized Chevrolet Dealer 


THE WASHINGTON POST, end TIMES HERALD 
_2- Tuesdey, July 10, 1956 


Democrats Void 


County 


Falls Charch 


Council Sets 
Hearing on 


Street Plan | 


Following a citizens’ petition 
the Falis Church City Council 
voted last night to hold a pub- 
lic hearing at the earliest pos 
sible date on a proposal to ex- 


tend Maple ave. from Lee high- 
way at the Arlington line to 5 
Washington st 

The proposal, which also 
calls calls for widening Maple 
ave. from 30 to BO feet. was 
included in a recommendation 
from the Falls Church Pilan- 
ning Commission to the Coun- 
cil for the 195661 capital 
budget 

Stuart A. Rice. retired chief 
Government statistician and 
spokesman for a group of 18 
residents of Maple ave. and 
Great Falls and Little Falls sts., 
protested the plan on the 
grounds it would alter the char- 
acter of “old Falls Church” by 
eliminating shade trees. (Great 
Falis and Little Falls sts. also 
would be widened, but not ex 
tended, under the proposal.) 

In other action, the Counc! 

® Named Edgar F. Vandivere 
Jr. and Carl W. Clewlow to 3 
year terms on the Falls Church 
Library Board. 

® Promised action next week 
pending an engineer's report 
to relieve residents of N. Cher 
ry. E. Columbia and E. Jeffer 
son sts.. whose property is be 
ing damaged by drain over 
flows after heavy rains 


Parley |} 


¢ The Fairfax County Demo 
voted last! 


cratic Committee 
night to rerun its district mass 
meetings and County conven 
tion to select delegates to the 
July 27 State convention. 

While filing was reopened. 
delegates who filed previously 
will remain qualified’ for the 
district meetings and conven- 
tion to be held at 8 p. m. July 
23 in the Annandale High 
School. The deadline for addi- 
tiona) filings is at midnight, 
July 18 

The election of a record 84 
delegates to the State conven- 
tion was challenged last week 
by Fairfax Attorney Charles 
Pickett in a formal complaint 
to the Tenth Congressional 
District Committee. He charged 
that the June 19 district mass 
meetings were not publicized 
10 days in advance as required 
by the Party plan. and declared 
the elections null 

At iast night's 


of the County Committee, con 
ceded that technically there 
was insufficient advance publi 
cation of the meetings. Recom 
mending the rescheduling of 
elections, he said “there should 
be no shadow of a doubt that 
the delegation to Richmond 
represents the Democrats of 
Fairfax County.” 

He added that county Demo- 
crats should resolve the prob- 
lem rather than resort to ap- 
peals procedures. 


Bolt Kills 7 Cows 


MECHANIC SBURG, Pa 
July 9 (INS)}—Seven cows were 
killed last night when a bolt of 
lightning struck a tree beneath 
which the animals were stand- 


ing. The owner, Jacob S. Ston- | 
were | 
have to be | 


er. said four others 
stunned and may 


destroyed. 


———— —_— 


Vienna Council Asks Bids 


For New Sewage Plant 


The Vienna Town Council 
voted last night to advertise for 
bids for its controversial $110, 
000 Bear Branch sewage dis 
posal plant 

This action was taken with 
out the approval of Fairfax 
County zoning officials who 
earlier this month deferred 
action on the town’s applica 
tion pending a recommendation 
by the Planning Commission 

The Commission last week 
reco denial of the ap- 
plica oh grounds that the 
plane Was not needed by the 


serve | 

she the 

to annex. 
Vienna 

maintained that 

needed by the town to replace 

unreliable 


GLASGOW; Scotland, 
wants The British deepsea tu 


ceived approval from the State 
Health Department and State 
Water Control Board. 

Last night's action was 
prompted by a Saturday night 
explosion that leveled a sewage 
pumping station on Lullaby 
lane just outside the town 
Mayor Louis N. Moore said 
yesterday that the explosion, 
which is possible in any pump- 
ing station, showed the need 
for new facilities. 


Ship Tow Started 


Reute: 


J i) 
rinia has left the Clyde River t to 


spokesmen have tow two new ships more than 
the plant is 8000 miles to Rangoon, Burma 


t was announced today. Two 


sewage pumping more ships towed by the deep- 


stations on the Accotink Creek sea tug Dexterous are éue to 
watershed. Tre town has re- leave Tuesday. 


— 


TASTES MELLOW AS MOONLIGHT! 
. and I'm back with Cascade... 
— there ere plenty of good Kentucky 
bourbons. But there isn't one thet can match the 
Cascade formula that George Dickel created back in 


“T've tried ‘em all.. 
for keeps! Sure 


meeting. J.! 
Fletcher Wellemeyer. chairman'| 


Associated Press 


Penny Proves Her Worth 


Two-year-old George Woods of Warners, N. Y., thanks Pen- 
ny, whose frantic barking helped save the boy's life. Penny 


led searchers to George, who was sinking in a swamp. 


PUBLIC 
SALE 


OF VALUABLE 


OCEAN RESORT PROPERTY 


The undersigned owner will offer at Public Auction on the premises, | 
south side of Redney Mreet, near ocean front, Dewey Beach, Delaware | 


WEDNESDAY, JULY 18, 1956 


AT 1:00 O'CLOCK P. M. (D.S.T.) 


THE FOLLOWING REAL ESTATE: 


Ali. That cert — nm lot pi ece ane parce! of land. L vate in aus and Rehoboth 
Hundred. 8u Co rn : knoe as nose. 36 end 32. im dDleck & 
as shown on > ‘ete of nomad me of yeoet ad im the office 
of the Recerder of Deed asse x County Deleware. in deed 
vol. 296. page 233. and more particulariy bounded amd described as follows 
wit Bosinaing at @ point om the southerly side of Redmey Avenue at the 
as stemce of 450 feet easterly from the easterly side of Ocean Boulevard 
southeriy alongs the division ne between lots nos. 28 and 3 
with Ocean Boulevard al feet te a point thence easteriy parallel with 
Rodney Avenue 50 fret thence northeriy alone the division Tine 
between lots noe 22 and ™ “od paral el with Ocean Boulevard 195 feet te « 
point on he sald southeriy sice of Rodney Avenue. and thence theresy westerly 


i = -~y Le —_ 


oc fr In A-l condition. 
ONE or THE rEW HOU sks NEAR OCEAN OBTAINABLE 


TERMS: 20% day of sale. balance within 
te comply with these terme, the percentum 
be forfeited. The purchaser will be requ 
and Revenue Stamp. 


IMMEDIATE POSSESSION—For information sainaried ‘gale 
real estate, contact 


G. Francis Wilsen, Auctioneer, Georgetown 2274 


ELEANOR MARION SMITH, Owner 
SOLD BY G. FRANCIS WILSON, Auctioneer 


— ———> 


lve tried em all, man... 


/M BACK TO CASCADE... 
its REAL BOURBON ! 


1870, from the life and vigor of the grain! it’s REAL 
BOURBON, man — full six years old —the smoothest, 
drinkingest bourbon you could ever hope to taste. Go 
shead and treat yourself!" 

GEO. A. DICKEL DIST. CO., LOUISVILLE, KY. + 86 PROOF 


YEAR OLD 
KENTUCKY STRAIGHT 


BOURBON 


a’ 
sun deck. Twe | 
: 


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For the budget-minded, 
American also offers a 30 
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via one-stop DC-6 Aircoach. 


Ciwre Berelt 


ANOTHER TURBAN TWIST, this one by 
John Frederics. who summarizes his collec- 
tion, “tall, turbaned—and tremendous for 


Wholly Hats: 


TUESDA Y 


Jor and about WOMEN 


SL 


’ 
- 

ove 

* 


» JULY 10, 1956 


SOCIETY 
CLASSIFIED 
COMICS 


2.3 


° 
e 


® 
oa 


dinner.” This turban is of glistening tur- 
quoise satin and braids. It’s a tall, conical 
Moyen Age crown. 


Now It’s Turban’s Turn 
To Top the Fashion Trend 


By Evelyn Hayes 

NEW YORK, N. Y., July 9 
Hats have certainly made 
the first headlines in the fash 
jon story for fail as it is be- 
ing unfolded to the country's 
fashion editors here for 
fashion press week presented 
under the aegis of the New 
York Dress Institute 

Saturday and Sunday a few 
of the top milliners presented 
their collections to the edi- 
tors before the showings of 
clothes started today, and it 
certainly appears as though 
the new hats are an impor- 
tant key to the look for fall 
1956 

They look so new they 
would even update last year's 
coat and suit—if you were 
smart enough then to buy an 
advanced style with soft lines 
and perhaps a bloused back 

The bigger bulkier hat is 
definitely most important, 
but. as in clothes, the lines 
have been softened and gen 
tled with drapes, folds and 
manuipulations And the 
brims have been lifted every- 
where to show the eyeline 


“TALL, TURBANED 
tremendous for dinner 
John Frederics’ summary of 
his collection, might also be 
used as a capsule version of 
other collections — with a 
couple of fashion hats added 

Hats tower to height for 
day wear—but with heights 
softened by draping or by 
its interpretation in soft silky 
beaver felt deep-piled velours 
or fur. There is rarely a 
stiff rigid look about them 

John Frederics shows the 
Belle Brummell hat—a fem- 
inized version of the Beau 
Brummel—and Sally Victor 
shows the “dandy” hat—real- 
ly a dashing side-rolled pos 
tillion — especially effective 
in a wonderfully rich emer- 
ald green silky beaver felt 

There are cloches for day 
with high draped crowns and 
daytime fashion’s also beat- 
ing the drum for the drum 
major hat—this in fur with 
fur muff to match. Black fox 
and black lynx (this fur stag 
ing a comeback) are used 
most often for this 

There are also many toques 
of black or white fox and an 
equal number of large black 
platter berets with rounded 
cushiony edges. Also in fur— 
or in fur-looking material are 
round little hats that sit 
dome-like on the head giving 
a feeling of smal! bulk. 


STEPPING into a fashion 
era of luxury, there are lots 
of fur hats and feathers, too 

Sally Victor shows a big 


and 


crushable beret — soft and 
worn to one side—in®very- 
thing from raccoon to mink 
to chincilla and an all-fur 
draped-rown cloche in leop- 
ard, another in lynx 

Furs are used for trimming, 
too, as in a high-crowned 
cloche with wide band of 
leopard at John Frederics. 


EMME’'S collection, de- 
signed with Adolfo, is called 
“thousand and one nights” 
and naturally makes a big 
point of turbans—in striped 
wool jersey draped high, 
sometimes with scarves at- 
tached to drape about the 
neck, again with jeweled dag- 
gers piercing the high crown. 

Outstanding bere is a 
bloused turban—actually not 
a turban in the usual sense 
This has a small brim and 
a bloused crown with up- 
shooting feather in front— 
looking rich and luxurious in 
deep-piled felt. 

Many hats that look like 
fez@s and toques are being 
called turbans this vear—but 
they're all in the picture of 
the hat that tells a tall tale. 


PERHAPS the most fun and 
excitement is in the dinner 
hats—usually large and cap- 
tivating, most often trimmed 
with ostrich or fake aigrettes. 

Laddie Northridge shows 
two sizes of black velvet wat- 
teau-effects—both, he says, 
inspired by “My Fair Lady.” 
Perhaps his most memorable 
large hat is a swooping blue 
that is reminiscent of Lillian 
Russell's is trimmed with 
matching ostrich which falls 
softly over the brim onto one 
shoulder 

At John Frederics, these 
large hats are called “gala 
hats” and he says that these 
hats will change the decor in 
this country. “The chrome 
and leather has to go.” We 
also suggest that if women 
wear these outsized brims, 
they'll have te widen doors, 
too. But it may be all worth 
while because these new hats 
are the most fabulously fiat- 
tering this generation has 
probably ever tried on. 


NOT ALL gala hats are 
commended. For dinner—and 
for devastation too — are 
toques and turbans made of 
draped maline and tulle, 
these often decorated with 
feather fronds or jewels. 
There are also little caps by 
Emme. She calls them her 
“wicked caps” because they 
were inspired by the caps of 
the magical Genie who flour- 
ished in tales about the East 

These are essentially little 
skull caps that shine with 


Wedding 


MARY ANN RADZIEVICH 
—DANIEL M. PAGANO 
Miss Esther Marsden an- 
nounces the marriage of her 
niece, Mary Ann Radzievich, 
to Daniel Michael Pagano, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Michele 
Pagano of Brooklyn, N. Y., 
on July 7 in the Church of 
the Annunciation. The bride, 


‘ 


the daughter of the late Dr. 


and Mrs. Joseph A. Radzie- | 
vich, is a graduate of Saint | 
Joseph College, Emmitsburg, 
Md. Her husband was grad- | 
Saint | 


uated from Mount 
Mary's College, Emmitsburg, 
Md. They will live in Alex- 
andria, Va. 

4 


jewels or have a bowl of 
feather sweeping down one 
cheek. 

Just oge word about feath- 
ers—and it won't be the last 
word—because they are 
everywhere. 

Part of the return to fash- 
ion on the romantic pre- 
World War I period is an em- 
phasis on feathers. There are 
sO many different kinds of 
feathers this year that even 
an ornothologist would be 
baffied — maybe he, most of 
all, since many of them don't 
look like what they were 
meant to be. Particularly is 
this true of aigrettes which 
are illegal in this country. 
Shown again and again on 
smail dinner hats, we find 
that, in one collection, at 
least, an “aigrette” turned 
out to be vulture feathers. 
Be alluring if you can with 
this thought in mind. 


Bertha Adkins Addresses ‘Girls Nation’ 


Politics Is a ‘Privilege’, GOP Leader Says 


By Elizabeth Shelton 
and Eileen Summers 


POLITICS is not “a dirty 
rotten business,” Bertha Ad- 
kins, assistant to the chair- 
man of the Republican Ne- 
tional Committee, told 98 
members of the Girls’ Nation 
and their leaders last night. 


THE GOP director of wom- 
en's activities told the civic- 
minded youngsters it is the 
“privilege and responsibility” 
of every American to be 
actively intérested in politics. 
Politics, she said, is the “me- 
chanics” of selecting the very 
best candidates, those most 
able to represent the people 
—and those with the best 
chances of winning. 

Miss Adkins told the girls 
representing the 48 states, 
District of Columbia and 
Panama Canal Zone to go 
home and become active 
party workers on the precinct 
level. 


“THERE ARE countless 
jobs to be done in your local 
headquarters,” she _ said. 


TURBAN TREND—From the Emme collec- 
tion for fall titled “Thousand and One 
Nights” comes this Prince Turban creation. 


Mrs. Mansha Candidate 


Candidate for the office of | 


Department President for 
1956-57 of the Ft. Belvior Unit 
313 of the American Legion 


Auxiliary is Mrs. Joseph N. | 


Mansha. 


REG. 3.95 T. V.. LAMP-PLANTER 


Reduced from stock . . . you save during 


Our store-wide summer clearance! 
ramic planters to fill with your favorite 
plants or flowers, soft-glow lamp. As- 
sorted colors, brass plated base. Buy for 
for gifts! (Plants not in- 


yourself . 
cluded.) 


us dozens of 
riment... 


Ce- 


yh 


pe ew Raghu oo 


big savings! 


* 
4 


“Send out mailing material, 
talk to people, post signs, or 
baby-sit. It’s not the kind of 
job that’s important but the 
fact that you're adding your 
bit to the freedom of elec- 
tion.” 

She pointed out that wom- 
en outnumber men and can 
“control every election,” not 
only by numerical superior- 
ity, but by their ability to in- 
fluence others. 


“The women of this country 
have a power and importance 
they have not begun to use,” 


Miss Adkins said. 

The speaker received a 
large round of applause 
when she mentioned “our 
candidates” without naming 
them and quipped: “You'll 
notice my lapel pin says 
ILK-E and you know those 
are my initials.” 


DURING a question and 
answer period, an Arkansas 
delegate queried the lady 
politician on the 18-year-old 
vote, and elicited the reply. 
“I think the 18-year-old often 
is just as intelligent as the 


68-year-old. Age is no crite- 
rion.” 

Asked by a Wisconsin dele- 
gate whether a voter ought 
to stick to a straight ticket, 


Miss Adkins replied that 
“chaos” would ‘ensue were 
all voters to “vote for the 
man regardiess of the party.” 

Discussing the role of 
schools in preparing young- 
sters for citizenship Miss Ad- 
kins remarked that teen- 
agers active in the 1952 cam- 
paign “went home and got 
their families registered and 
out to vote.” 


THE QUESTION of 16-year- 
olds voting is one of the 
measures the Girls Nation 
will discuss when committee 
reports are heard today. An 
Other bill in committee pro 
poses Home Rule for the Dis 
trict. It was introduced by 
Linda Weakley of Washing- 
ton. 

One measure proposes the 
death penalty for narcotics 
“pushers.” Still another re 
vises the electoral college to 
make its representation pro 
portionate to the population 


It is of pale beige velvet and boasts a 
jeweled pin ornament on the brim. 


remarkable purchase 


17.95 COTTONS — 


10.95 


Galey and Lord 

drip dry shag bark, 
checked cottons, white 
woven cottons and 
bordered prints. Light 
and dark colors. 

Sizes 10 to 20 


Sunbacks with Jackets 
Princess Styles 

Scoop Necks 
Shirtwatsts 


a ki ad 
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Second Floor Ne tee Wy 
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The measures were intro- 
duced during a Senate session 
Sunday. The 11 committee 
chairmen are all members of 
the majority party, the Fed- 
eralists. 


MRS. EVERETT Dirksen, 
wife of the junior Illinois 
Senator, introduced Miss Ad- 


kins. The other speaker, Mrs 
Bowden D. Ward, national 
president of the American 
Legion Auxiliary, was intro- 
duced by Mrs. Charlies W. 
Gunn of Portland. Ore., di- 
fector of the 1956 Girls’ Na. 
tion, Mrs. Ward held the post 
five years ago 

She flew to Washington 
vestérday from London after 
visiting 10 countries in the 
Far East and Europe in 20 
days. Mr. Ward was in the 
audience, having come from 
Kingwood, W. Va., to meet 
his wife's plane 

Mrs. Ward told of playing 
Tico Tico and jazz on the 
piano for 1400 girls in Korea 
in an Amerigan-built audi 
torium. She said the Girls’ 
Nation chorus singing “My 
Country "Tis of 
brought tears to 
after hertravels 


THE TEEN-AGE delegates 
to Girls Nation were guests 
of their respective Senators 
when they toured the Capitcl 
during the morning. Among 


her eyes 


Thee.” 


their hosts were Senators 
Sparkman, Hickenlooper, 
Bridges and Monroney. . 

Senator Everett Dirksen 
of Illinois took part in a tele- 
vision program later in the 
day with the delegates from 
his state. 

Valerie Butler of Denver 
was “thrilled,” she said, at 
being shown the desk of Dan- 
iel Webster in the old Senate 
Chamber by Colorado's Sen. 
Gordon Allott. Valerie, «a 
delegate from the “National- 
ist.” is thinking of running 
for office in the current 
Girls Nation 

Joyce Harrington, the other 
delegate from Colorado, is a 
member of the “Federalist” 
Party. The District of Co 
lumbia’s delegates are Linda 
Weakley and Erica Collins. 

The afternoon was devoted 


‘to a joint session of the two 


parties and briefings by the 
two instructors in Govern- 
ment—Mrs. Everett Dirksen 
and Mrs. Robert Heid. 


TODAY'S program includes 
a trip by boat to Mount Ver- 
non. The delegates will nom 
nate a president and vice 
president. Tonight, they will 
hear a talk by Mrs. Norton H, 
Pearl, regional civil defense 
director and past national 
president of the American 
Legion Auxiliary. 


(Related Story on Page 24.) 


FURRY FUTURE~Qurs and feathers are also fashion news 
in hats. Here is one of white beaver mousse by Walter 
Florell. The high brim is indented with a braided skein of 
gray, black and white wool—embroidered with a sparkle of 


silver paillettes. 


price 


$410-9* 


This beautifully fitting sheath belies its tiny 
Washable spun rayon in black, white 
and beige. Sizes 9 to | 

Charge Accounts 


\——— Open Evenings ‘til 9; Mon. & Tues. ‘til 6——— 


Bareohoak Sheath 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HER ALD 
24 Tuesday, July 10, 1956 


For Both Marilyn and Arthur 


Their Thirteenth Year 
Most Significant 


Was the 


By Jim Cook 


IF an impressionist pafnted 
a picture representing Mari- 
lyn Monroe's childhood. it 
probably would be a thing of 
mingled lines, distorted pat- 
terns, and clashing colors 
against a forbiddingly dark 
background. 


A portrait of Arthur Mil- 
ler’s childhood would have 
some troubling brushstrokes, 
too. But, in comparison, it 
likely would be as sunny as 
a Norman Rockwell cover for 
the Saturday Evening Post 

The new Mrs. Arthur M/f- 
ler (born Norma Jean Mor- 
tenson) grew up without a 
home. She was an illegiti- 
mate child, a ward of the 
city of Los Angeles. Her 
mother was admitted to a 
mental institution soon after 
her birth. She flever saw het 
father. 


THE GIRL who became 
Marilyn Monroe had 12 sets 
of foster parents, all of them 
poor. The folks in one home 
were religious zealots who 
'mreatened her with hell-fire 
when she displeased them 
In another foster home she 
was given whisky bottles to 
play with as dolis. She does- 
n't like to remember most of 
the homes she lived in. A de 
mented neighbor once tried 
to smother her with a pillow 

In contrast, Arthur Asher 
Miller grew up in a closely 
woven family. Until Arthur's 
teen years. his father. Isa 
dore Miller , was prospering 
as a@ manufacturer of ladies’ 
coats 

Miller and his brother and 
sister—Joan, now 33 and an 
actress, and Kermit, now 43 
and a sales manager for a 
carpet company—were born 
in New York in a comfortable 
home on 112th st.. between 
Lenox and Fifth ave 

The Millers were conven 
tional and middle-class 

“My maternal grandfather 
who lived with us was always 
a vocal Republican,” Miller 
recalis “and | remember we 
had Herbert Hoover's picture 
in the house. If I had an: 
ideology at all it was what I 
had learned from Hearst 
newspapers.” 

Rut there was no indica 
tion, specs and piano 
notwithstanding, that he 
would deyelop any above- 
average iftiteliect or artistic 
sensitivity. He spent a great 
deal of time playing football 
and baseball and reading boy- 
book thrillers. 

“And when I wasn't doitg 
that, I was swimming,” says 
Miller. “Pl was a very prysical 
kid. As for studies, | was do- 
as little as I could get by 
with.” 

The family was Jewish, but 
religion did not play a dom- 
inant part in the Miller fami- 
ly’s life. Both Arthur and 
Kermit had their Bar Mitz- 
vahs though, and the Jewish 
holidays were always ob- 
served in the home 


THE WORLD of Arthur 
Miller In the 1920s was an 
orderly one. Then one day at 
the end of the decade, it was 
given @ biow. It was a biow 
from which Arthur and his 
fami y never fully recovered 

“The depression ¥ ped out 
father's bus ness.” Mille 
Ny family's 

position was 

natter of days. 

ymplete overturn 


had believed 


, 
ifsso 


The Miller family had to 
give up its home in Harlem 


and move to Flatbush. Soon 
they were established in the 
little frame home where Mr 
and Mrs. Isadore Miller still 
live today 

“We never wanted for 
food.” Miller says. “But I 
learned that the first question 
being asked about anyone 
then was: What does he do 
for a living? In that question 
is a whole attitude toward 
life 

When I was 13, 14, and 15, 
the problem was not whether 
a person was happy or un- 
happy—not whether he was 
making the best possible use 
personal resources 
The question was how to sur 
vive 

| didn't feel persecuted or 
betrayed he reflects. “Il 
never pitied myself. It -eemed 
perfectly natural. | was shai 
ing the fate of everyone I 
knew 

If vou lived between 1930 
and 1934—I don't care who 
you were—you were in tne 
clutch of necessity 

His sister remembers him 
as an even-tempered, if not 
necessarily jovial, boy He 
seemed much more _ inter- 
ested in batting averages than 
social conditions 

But apparently he was tak- 
ing it all in.” she has decided 
Something must have been 
fermenting in him 

On the surface Arthur 
seemed always too busy for 
deep reflection 

He was very handy with 
tools.” Joan recalls He 
built the back poreh on our 
house, and some of the roses 
he planted in the back yard 
are still blooming 

The two-family house oc- 
cupied by the family of Willie 
‘oman in Miller's “Death of 
a Salesman” is a carbon copy 
of the family some 


of his 


The afternoons of his high 
chool days—at James Madi- 
son HS and Abraham Lin- 
coln HS—were filled with odd 
' . 
the farthest 
thing from his mind. But he 
did make one venture into 
the Sarts during high school 
davs—-as a crooner 

He somehow got a chance 
to go on network amateur 
radio shows.” says Joan. “He 
practiced for days. Id accom 
pany him on the piano. He'd 
walk around the house, carry- 
ing a lamp as if it were a 
microphone, and singing. He 
had a sort of tenor-baritone 
voice.” 


Drama was 


Arthur didn't win the com- 


petition, but a whole Nation 
heard him croon. 

“He sounded quite nerv- 
ous, but he acquitted himself 
well.” says Joan. “I remem- 
ber he sang “East of the Sun 
and West of the Moon.” 

When he was 16 or s0, 
Miller abandoned singing in 
favor of football and giris 

Because he never had 
enough weight, 
beyond the scrub squad in 
football. A scrimmage session 
caused him to miss the serv- 
ices in War Il. He banged 
up a knee so badly, that 
he couldn't pass a physical 
examination when he volun- 
teered for the Navy at the 
beginning of the wal 

Arthur himself credits his 
mother and brother with gi 
ng him his first artistic lean- 
ings 

Mrs. Augusta Miller always 
had a fine fiair for story tel! 
ing and drawing, and is—in 


he didn’t get 


iCo right 


words—“a darned 
good letter-writer.” 

Kermit in those days want- 
ed to be a poet. But the pres- 
sure of the depression turned 
him to sales work after a 
couple of years at NYU. 

“Kermit didn't particularly 


Joan's 


try to be, but he was a great 


influence on me,” says Miller. 


“There was the fact that he 


had books around. Kermit 
was more consciously literary 
than I. The idea of being a 
writer became normal be- 
cause of him.” 

Miller was graduated from 
high school in 1932, the bot- 
tom year of the depression. 
Because of the family’s finan- 
cial condition, any idea of his 
going to college was out of 
the question 

But by then the notion of 
becoming a writer was grow- 
ing in Arthur. When he took 
a jod in an auto parts ware- 
house (similar to the one por- 
travyed in his “Memory of 
Two Mondays’), he saved 
$i3 of every $15 pay check 
toward college tuition 

After two and a half grimy 
years as a supply clerk in the 
warehouse, he had enough 
money 
sity of Michigan, because he 
learned that literary prizes 
were offered there 

Filled with enthusiasm, he 
made his application to Mich- 
igan—and was promptly 
turned down. His high school 
grades were too poor to meet 
the school’s entrance require- 
ments 

But the officials at Michi- 
gan had a change of heart 
after Miller wrote a letter 
pleading that they forget his 
past days, when he was too 
interested in football and 
knew not of Dostoievski. He 
was admitted to Michigan in 
the fall of 1934. 

His entrance into college 
was his departure from the 
closeness of his family 

In choosing the most sig- 
nificent year of his life, Mil- 
ler selects his 13th—the vear 
the depression hit the Miller 
family 

By coincidence, the most 
significent year in the life of 
Marilyn Monroe was perhaps 
her 13th 

That year the girl who had 
not iong before been called, 
“the human bean” borrowed 
a blue sweater from a friend 
She wanted something to 
wear other than the dowdy 
dresses supplied her by the 
welfare agencies 

She wore a skirt and the 
blue sweater to school 

When I watked into the 
classroom,” she remembers, 
“the boys suddenly began 
screaming and groaning and 
throwing themselves on the 
floor.” 

It was the first time in her 
life that any close attention 
had been paid her 

Many more troubled years 
lay ahead of her before she 
would become an actress with 
a high salary and incredible 
fame. But the days when no- 
body showed interest in her 


had come to an end 
1985 New York, Pos st & Mir 


Entert Cc All reser -~ Hy 

(Wednesday: Miller's mar- 
riage te Mary Grace Siat- 
terv; Marilyn's marriages to 
Jim Dougherty and Joe Di- 
Maggio. Miller's develop- 
ment as a leading drama- 
tist, and Monroe's emer- 
gence as the national sex 
symbol and her battle te 
become an actress as well.) 


He chose the Univer- 


. 


est boy friend... 


™~ 
asiesed 


“T hear she broke up with her new- 


Small Talk 


“The X-Ray specialist? Oh, 


By Syms 


I knew 


he saw right through her 


MARILYN GETS SERIOUS 


The new Marilyn Monroe, 


whose five-year-old romance with Playwright Arthur Miller 
climaxed in marriage last month, proves she can be “serious- 


minded” as well as glamorous. 
she stopped by a live-radio microphone, 


At a premier recently, when 
she passed up 


questions about Hollywood and the glamour set and chose 
to talk about Dostoevski's writings instead. The contrast in 
Marilyn's and Arthur's early childhood is told in today’s in- 
stallment of the Miller-Monroe Romance 


‘Lower 


Echelon’ 
Aid Urged 


MRS. BOWDEN D. Ward, 
national president of the 
American Legion Auxiliary, 
just back from a goodwill 
tour of the world by air, 
would like to see a greater 
number of “lower echelon 
people, students and educat- 
ors” going from this country 
to countries receiving United 
States aid. 

“A lot of them are scared 
of these top echelon people 
we send,” she said yesterday 
at a press conference held at 
the Statler Hotel. 

Mrs. 
her from a vocational school 
for orphan boys in Seoul, 
maintained by the local po- 
lice; to the Formosa home of 
General and Mme. Chiang 
Kai-Shek. And on again to 
the Philippines and a confer- 


ence with President Magasay- | 


say 

She found Mme. Chiang 
Kai-Shek busy with a veter- 
ans’ housing project and her 
Women’s Anti-Aggressive 
League, a voluntary service 
organization. The Philippine 
President was apparently im- 
mersed in “The Power of 
Positive Thinking” as his 
current book choice. 

In Korea she visited some 


of the homes for the 32,000 | 


children fathered by Ameri- 
can soldiers, she said. Some 


of the children have devel | 


oped TB and other diseases 


and have been taken into the | 


homes of Americans now in 
Korea to build wup 


for adoption in this country, 
Mrs. Ward added 


Ward's journey took | 


their | 
health before they are offered | 


-_-- 


Town T opics 


All the Comforts of Home 


MRS. FLETCHER Warren, 

whose husband is our new 
Ambassador to Turkey, is 
stopping off in Washington 
from Vene- 
zueia, Mr. 
Warren's 
last post, be- 
fore going on 
to Ankara. 

While she's | 
here, she is 
living in the 
Jack Neals 


Mrs. McNair 
the State De- 


partment) are on a Caribbean 
cruise. And Mrs. Warren is 
very grateful for the appur- 
tenances of a car and a maid. 

Ambassador Warren whose 
diplomatic posts have been 
almost entirely South Amer- 
ican, has telephoned twice to 
his wife since he arrived in 
Ankara. He's most enthusias- 
tic about everything, Mrs. 
Warren says, finds the peo- 
ple very cordial and the em- 
bassy itself, comfortable and 
attractive. 


DURING her stay in Wash- 
—_ Mrs. Warren is seeing 
— of her old friends. She 
end ed on Sunday with Mr. 
and Mrs. Juan Ceballos at the 
Westchester and will be guest 
of honor at a luncheon today 
at the Sheraton-Cariton to be 
given by Mrs. Preston Me- 
Goodwin 

On Thursday, Mrs. Charlies 
P. Cabell, wife of the Deputy 
Director, Central Intelli- 
gence, will have a luncheon 
for her at the Army and Navy 
Club. 

Sunday. she'll leave for a 
week in New York and will 
sail July 21 aboard the Con- 
stitution for Naples 


Ladies at Lunch: 


EVERY year, Mrs. Edward 
R. Burke gives a luncheon 
for the Senate Ladies Club 


ee 


who sew each Tuesday for 
the Red Cross. 

Mrs. Burke, as wife of a 
former Senator, has retained 
her membership in the group 

Usually when it's dogwood 
time, Mrs. Burke asks her 
colleagues to sign up if they 
would like to come to the 
luncheon. This spring time 
slipped away and the dog- 
wood had come and gone be- 
fore Mrs. Burke was able to 
plan her party 

Yesterday more than 30 
Senate Ladies were guests at 
a luncheon given by Mrs 
Burke for Mrs. Walter 
George, wife of the retiring 
Senator who's going to Paris 
as President Eisenhower's 
Ambassador to NATO 

Among those there were 
Mrs. Eugene Millikin, Mrs 
Clinton Anderson, Mrs. Lev- 
erett Saltonstall, Mrs. Alex- 
ander Smith, Mrs. Spessard 
Holland, Mrs. Olin Johnston, 
Mrs. Iph Flanders, Mrs. 
Tom Connally, Mrs. Lester 
— 3 and Mrs. Andrew Schoep- 
pel 


Decoration: 


EDWARD Tomlinson, the 
noted writer and broad- 


caster on Latin American af- | 


fairs, received the Petion and 
Boliv medal for his 
tributions to Pan-American- 
ism from the Ambassador of 
Haiti, Mauclair Zephirin, 
yesterday. 


con | 


In California 


Mr. and Mrs. Marion Der- 
rick Boat are now residing in 
Menlo Park, Calif., following 
their June 14 marriage in the 
Stanford Memorial Chapel, 
Pal> Alto, Calif. The bride 
is the former Duley Klein- 
man, sister of Mrs. Richard E, 
Graun of Palo Alto, Calif. Her 
husband is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Marion L. Boat of Wash- 
ington. 


———————- —_—— —_— -—— 


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The medal was bestowed in 
a brief ceremony during a 
reception in Tomlinson’s 
honor at Ambassador and 
Madame dZephirin’s apart- 
ment at the Sheraton-Park. 
The decoration, which dates 
from 1939, is bestowed by the 
Haitian Government for out- 
standing service in the fur- 
therance of Pan-American 
understanding 


Checking Out: 


CONSTANCE McGoodwin 
is spending about a week as 
the guest of Mrs. Kingdon 
Gould at her summer estate 
in the Catskills 


Reside in Germany 


Lt. Lawrence F. Ayers Jr., 
USA, and Mrs. Ayers ‘are 
now residing 
following their marriage on 
June 4 in the Wiley Barracks 
Chapel, New Uim, Germany. 
The bride, the former Mar- 
aret Lowe Cox, daughter of 
r. and Mrs. M. G. Cox of 
Independence, Va., is a grad- 
uate of Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute. Her husband, the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Law- 
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Keep in Trim 


Reducing Clubs § 
Make Diets Fun 


By Ida Jean Kain 
FAT IS untidy and in hot weather it's intolerable. In 
summer quite suddenly you decide to shift to lighter fare 
to beat the heat and the pounds. Happily you call a friend 
to tell of your slimming intentions. 


PSYCHOLOGICALLY, talking it 
over is an excellent plan. In fact, 
One overweight did just that and 
launched a new reducing idea... 
duo reducing clubs, telephone style. 

But let's hear about this in the 
words of a triumphant homemaker 


from a Washington, D. C 


, suburb— 


West Hyattsville. 
“I'VE noticed that reducing clubs 
are usually in terms of a group. I 


Pe 


‘— He ad 
Ida Jean Kain 


thought you might like to know of 
the method we use here in my area. 
This is for those mothers who can't 


get out but still need the incentive to ‘stick to it.’ 

“My neighbor and I each wanted to lose about 25 to 30 
pounds, and had been on faddy diets, doctors’ diets and 
just plain diets, to no avail. One morning on the phone we 
discussed what calorie extras we had eaten the day before 
and what foods we could have eaten in their place 

“Lo and behold, the second day—almost as if by mutual 
agreement—we discussed diets again. AND, don’t laugh!!— 
but after that whenever I'd go to reach for that extra 
cookle during the day or plan on finishing the children's 
lunch, I figured that I'd have ‘to tell all’ the next morning— 


80 no extras. 


“The reward—my friend now wears her normal size 9— 
from size 13—and I wear size 13—from 16%. Better still, 


we've started three other ‘duo clubs’ 


neighborhood!” 


in our immediate 


THE PRINCIPLE of reducing clubs—whether there are 2 
or 20 members—is to provide moral support and put a spirit 
of competition into the reducing program 

The camaraderie of the venture prevents the feeling of 
aloneness and self-pity that leads to failure. Reducing with 


a pal make life more interesting... 


and is guaranteed 


to take the boredom out of dieting 


If the head of the house is your reducing 


partner, give 


him man-sized portions, and a good start for the day with 


an energy boosting breakfast 


Breakfast 


half melon 
Broiled bacon—lean 


Cantaloupe 


slices Canadian 
Mr.—2 long strips 
Poached egg on 
thin slice toast 
Mrs 
buttered 


Coffee 


black 


Luncheon 
Cold Plate 
Luncheon meat 
Mrs.—1 slice 
Mr.—2 slices 
Cottage cheese, 
and lettuce 
T n slice bread 
*(,1ass 


*Note 


Dinner 


green pepper) 
Corn on cob 
Butter, % pat 
Asparagus, 6 spears 


buttered 
Fresh peach 


Iced tea with lemon 


Total calories for day 


Weight Whittling 


For Mr. and Mrs. 


Mrs.—1 long strip or 2 small 


Thin slice toast, lightly 


Tomato slices, ceiery hearts 
slightly buttered 75 


of skim milk or buttermilk &5 


If day is chilly, use skim milk in 
or add cup of bouillon to menu 
4:30 Pickup—Orange juice, 6 oz 80 80 


Savory meat loaf, 2 slices 
(lean ground beef and veal and 


Tomato aspic (no dressing) 
Mr.—1 thin slice bread, lightly 


Coprright. 19546. King Features Syndicate. Inc 


480 


hot soup, 


395 


45 
0 


410 
1045 


Child Behavior 


By the Gesell Institute 


“DEAR DOCTORS: 

“4 couple of months ago, 
our most happy event turned 
into the most shocking news 
a mother could stand. When 
we took our now 5-month- 
old son for his regular check 
up, his pediatrician diagnosed 
him to be a mongoloid idiot 
Our doctor he has un 
usually sianted eyes, very 
poor muscie tone and short 
thumb At that time he 
couldn't hold his head up and 
had no grip in his hand. Now 
he seems to hold his head 
up pretty well, and has a very 
tight grip 

“To us he appears norma! 
He. seems to understand 
When we talk to him, he 
answers back with a smile 
and laugh. He plays with his 
crib circus and rattle. Our 
doctor has advised us to place 
him in an institution, but the 
expense is far greater than 
we cou'd afford. Therefore 
we have decided to keep him 
until something comes up 

“In the meantime, we are 
not aware of what we are up 
against with his presence in 
our home. Although we love 
him very dearly, we are very 
concerned whether his pres- 
ence will in any way prevent 
the older girl from growing 
up normally and happily as 
any other child 

“Is it a shameful thing or 
something to be embarrassed 
about? What am I guilty of 
in giving birth to a mon 
goloid? Not taking vitamins 
and milk regularly? 

“What are my chances of 
having another mongoloid 
- fdijot?” : 


says 


SO FAR AS we know any- 
one, any family, may have a 
mongolian child. Nobody as 
yet knows what makes this 
happen or why. So it is not a 
disgrace and it is not shame- 
ful. It is very tragic, but not 
in any way disgraceful. Nor 
is it anything that you have 
done We dont know why 
it happens, but as any- 
body knows, it is not anything 
that the mother or father do 
It is one of the mysteries of 
growth Aimost never does 
one mother have two mon 
solian children 
Many children of this kind, 
not as intelligent as 
normal children, do grow up 
to take a reasonable part in 
the family life. They are often 
very lovable and nice, and 
other members of the family 
usually come to love them 
very much 


so tar 


- 


thougn 


YOUR SON'S presence in 
the family should not be a 
handicap to his sister. Just 
be frank about it, and don't 
try to hide the truth from 
her or from her friends. They 
should be able to accept this 
just as if a child were blind 
or had some other handicap. 

If as time goes on. he be- 
comes too difficult to take 
care of at home, you may 
want to make some other ar- 
rangement. But many mon- 
golians can be cared for at 
home as long as they live. 

There is very little written 
for parents on this subject, 
but in this week's columns we | 
shall discuss some of the | 
things that are known about | 
it. 


Coprright. 1954, Gesell Institute Ine. | 


\ 


» 


IT’S NE 


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the woman on the move, 
comes in three 


~_ — ee 


W—*“The Beachcomber,” a leather- 
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It features 


The set op- 


Mary Haworth’s Mail 


kather Flees 


DEAR MARY HAWORTH 
lis is about a young friend 
mine whom I shall call 
He husband. was 
in the 
they 4 : 
son Pr ss 
whom he nev- 
er saw. Filen <. 
made her 
home with her 
mother, to 
whom she was 
devoted, and 
filled her life 
with church 
work, Scout 
~eork ane Mary Haworth 
kind deeds to others. 

When her son was school 
age, she went back to work 
and eventually became en- 
gaged tO marry a splendid 
young man. But then her 
mother was stricken with can- 
cer and died soon after. and 
her fiance was killed in a 
tragic accident. 

Six months later, Ellen met 
Ron, who was some years her 
junior, and who courted her, 
insisting the age-iifference 
didn't matter. In her heart- 
break and bitterness she 
turned to him for companion- 
ship and became pregnant. 
When she informed Ron, he 
planned to marry her, but 
wanted to keep the news 
from parents for six 
months 


te 
-—-mUChS 


his 


ELLEN in 
ents must 


sisted his par 
know the truth be 
fore the wedding. and wrote 
to them. They began at once 
to dissuade Ron from marry 
ing her, and even had the 
chaplain and legal officer at 
his Army advise him 
against it. Meantime, Ron's 
squadron was sent to sea and 
Ellen turned for help to her 
only resourcée,—a brother, 
who happens to be an offi- 


bh 5 i 


eer in the same branch of 
service as Ron 
Ellen's brother agreed to 
pay for her care, on condi- 
tion that she have nothing 
more to do with Ron, and 
write him that the baby died 
at birth. So that is what 
Ellen did. Her child, Dorn 
some weeks ago, is a lovely 
little girl 
Would it help if someone 
close to the story were to 
visit Ron’s family, or the 
chaplain at his base, and get 
them to see Ellen's side of 
the problem? She could take 
her baby home, without dis- 
gracing her son, if Ron would 
marry her. She used to be 
quite religious; but now she 
seems to feel that nothing 
good in life is meant for her. 
> Me 


DEAR V. Y.: Perhaps some- 
body ought to give Ron an- 
other chance to think 
straight, and do the decent 
thing, in this situation. And 
the decent thing, in my 
opinion, would consist in his 
helping Ellen to pull her life 
together again, so that both 
children could claim her 
openly as mother, in a s0- 
cially acceptable arrange- 
ment 

Taking your story at face 
value, and assuming that 
Ron's chaplain—as well as 
his family and his legal ad- 
viser—did counsel him not to 
marry Ellen, then I feel that 
Ron has been almost as much 
sinned against as sinning. 

It seems well nigh incredi- 
ble that a reputable clergy- 
man, concerned to restore 
and maintain the health of 
men's souls, would use his in- 
fluence to induce a bachelor 
father-to-be to desert the 
widow who was bearing his 


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child—when marriage 
were already afoot. 

The icy anger of Ellen's 
brother is more understand- 
able, in terms of manly feel- 
ing in the painful circum- 
stances—when he agreed to 
help her, on condition that 
she have nothing further to 
do with cowardly Ron, and 
let him suppose the child 
had died at brith. 

Obviously, it was intoler- 
able to the brother's pride, to 
be party to meek solicitations 
that might seem to “put him 
at the mercy” of a fellow of- 
ficer so deficient in honor and 
magnanimity. 


THE OUTSTANDING fact 
of the case is that, in all the 
pulling-and-hauling about 
what to do, the welfare of the 
two children has been over- 
looked. Apparently Ron's bat- 
tery of advisers were of one 
mind, in conspiring (senti- 
mentally) to keep him weak, 
infantile and irresponsible, as 
regards his problem with 
Ellen,—at the very time when 
she was trying, with mistaken 
gallantry, to “play fair’ with 
his family and him. 

It probably would be lost 
motion, to visit Ron's parents 
in hopes of winning them to 
Elien’s side. Their first re- 
actions to her dilemma sug- 
gest that they are closed- 
minded, self righteous zealots 
—@ager to justify 
“mom”-type determination to 


plans 


keep their son on leash, as | 


their puppet. If he is to be- 
come a man psychologically, 
he must break wish them, to 
make the grade. 

A talk with Ron himself, 
and an appeal to his chap- 


lain's second thoughts, might | 
turn the tide im Ellen's behalf | 


—if you speak with tact and 
honest fervor. 


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THE WASHINGTON POST 
and TIMES HERALD 


Beware of Paint 


Baby Might Chew 


BEWARE of painting any- 
thing baby might chew on 
with ordinary paint. A read. 
er warns the do-it-yourselfer 
who wanted to paint toys: 

“Never use regular ename! 
or paint on infants’ toys or 
furniture. Always use non- 
lead enamel or paint. The 
articles will then be safe for 
baby who will probably put 
them in his or her mouth 

REGULAR READER. 


POETRY PROBE 


THE POEM requested by 
R. W. is “Sea Fever” by John 
Masefield. It is included in 
“One Hundred and One Fa- 
mous Poems” edited by Roy 
J. Cook. Libraries probably 
contain collections of Mase- 
field's work. Here is the first 
three verses: 

“I must go down to the sea 
again, to the lonely sea 
and the sky, 

“And all I ask is a tall ship 
and a star to steer her by 

“And the wheel's kick and 
the wind'’s song and the 
white sails shaking, 

“And the gray mist on the 
sea face and a gray dawn 
breaking.” 

POETRY LOVER, 
Martinsburg, W. Va. 


THANKS to Penny Walker 
and other readers who an- 
swered this request. 


BOOK FINDERS 

IN REGARD to the request 
for 
Madeline Brandies’ books, I 
have four. They were pub- 


information concerning | 


lished by Grosset and Dunlop | 


of New York between 1928 | 
I could not part | 


and 1935. 
with my copies; however, that 
firm may be of assistance in 
locating the books for her. 

Mrs. I, W. F. 


their | 


Engaged 


KAY D. PHILLIPS 
—DAVID STUDENICK 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Clarence 
Phillips announce the engage- 
ment of their daughter, Kay 
Dolores, 
Studenick, 


son of Mr. and 


to David Kenneth | 


Mrs. Frank Philip Studenick | 


of Silver Spring, Md., 
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. Miss 
Phillips attended the Wash- 
ington School for Secretaries 
and is now employed by the 
Civil Aeronautics Board. Her 
fiance is a graduate of the 
University of Maryland and 
is now with the Naval Ord- 
nance Laboratory. 


JOSEPHINE TILTON 
—JOHN B. BERTE 


and | 


Mr. and Mrs. D. Henry Til- | 


ton announce the engagement 


of their daughter, Josephine, | 
to John B. Berte, son of Dr. | 
and Mrs. Joseph J. Berte Sr. | 


of Brooklyn, N. Y. Miss Til- 
ton is a graduate of the 
Woman's College of the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina 
Her fiance is a graduate of 
Spring Hill College and is 
now attending Georgetown 
University School 
cine. 


of Medi- 


NANCY LOUISE ROBERTS | 


—R. O. NIEDOMANSKI 
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene J. 
Roberts announce the eén- 
gagercent of their daughter, 
Nancy Louise, to Rodney O 
Niedomanski, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Bruce Niedomanski of 
Silver Spring, Md. 


Tuesday, July ‘19, 1956 
4:>= 
yay | 


| 


THE OPPORTUNITY Shop 
of the Women of St. John's , 
7341 Wisconsin Ave., Bethes- 
da, had two Brandeis books 
recently. They may still have 
them. If Mrs. V. D. T. would 
call and leave her telephone 
number with the shop, they 
would call her whenever the 
books were available in the 
future B. P 


FLOOR PROBLEM 
MY HEAVILY traveled oak 
dining area has no rug. Has 
anyone solved the problem 
of keeping hers respectable 
looking without having to use 
soap and water? My desired 
hard waxed finish doesn’t last 
through one meal with two 
youngsters droppinng food. 
K. &. F. 


THE ORIGINAL ORY VODKA 

Product of U.S.A. Booto Komponiye, 

IN THE SWIM Schenley, Po. ond Fresno, Colll. Mode 
CAN ANYONE tell me © trem Groin, 8 ond 100 Proof. 


where a working mother can | 

get swimming instructions 
for a S&year-old daughter in 
the evenings or on Saturday? 
We live in Arlington, s0 
would prefer a place in that 
general area. M. B. | guaranteed home delivery. 


Call RE. 7-1234, ask for Cir 
culation, and order The Wash- 
ington Post and Times Herald 


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HOME PLAN 


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pesitive are we that the acteal results of the 
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BETHESDA SILVER SPRING CONN AVE 


Fall Fashion Newcomer: 


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Ensemble 


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gentile detail, subtle color, 
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The Swit: 


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Handsome imported 
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The Steamer Coat: Plaid tweed, 
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Brown, green or biwe, sizes | 9 
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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD | ARTICLES FOR SALE 
26 Tuesday, July 10, 1956 eeee 


12) RIPLEY'S BELIEVE IT OR NOT 15) 


A 
Must Sell! Must Sell! 


Sigem out entire stock new 996 
Cc aryense 


HELP, MEN 


AFTSMEN 
MECHANICAL 


or 
Ex- 
ees 


iy ons. 


: we 
a ware - i 
ia. 


ut 


duets coal 
THE WASHINGTON POST a AND ceoreaee 

AND 
TIMES HERALD 


Local Rates 


4 ington and 
Ente $6 .) *s of the 
of Columbia 

he one-time rate, 60¢ 
aoplies on skip ade or 
meervions. Minimum ad 


Potn's 
Distriet 
r line, 
ree ilar 
two 
lowing rates afe for con- 
insertions: 


time 


7 
times times 
F0¢ S4e Ac 


; 7 
Words Lines time times times 
4 67 


‘ 
4.20 
. beef 
7 304 
nate ankione . TAtL 
ADING ZON 
(80 mile Gaius of ‘Washinetons 
[3c Per 
‘Minimum y Mites 


PHONE RE. 7-1234 


DEADLINES: 
SUNDAY EDITION: 10 P.M. Pri- 
cay 


DAILY EDITIONS: 4:30 Pm 
Preceding da 


SIFIED 


Apartments 
Articles ter Sole 
Articles Wented 
Soles 
Avltomobrles 
Aviaten 


Avuctheon 


Bonkruptcy Netices 
Beds and Prepeseals 
Rocts Sports Section 
55-S6A 
47.54 


Pusiness Oppertunities 
Rusmess Property 
Business Service 
Construction Equipment 
hild Care 

onvelescent Homes 
Degs ond Pets 

Forms 

Farm Machinery 

Form end Garden 
Finencel 
Found 
Helm Wanted 
Livestock 
Houses for 


Horses, 
Rent 
Houses fer Sale 
Houses te Build 
Instruchens 
Investment Property 
legal Nefices 

Lest 

lots 

Machinery end Teols 
Motor Travel 

Moving ond Storege 
Official Notices 
Office Spece 
Persono!s 

Personal Loans 
Rabbits 
Reo! Esote Locns 
Real Estate for Sele 


Reoms for Rent 


Poultry 


Sittucthons Wonted 
Stores for Rent 
Trevlers 

Trust Notes 

Vacetion Places 
Warehouses e 
Woterfront Properties 


RE, 7-1 


an NOTICES 5 
Re: BLIC gg HAVING 


ee oF 


as Mavs 5080 8091 9092. 
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SPECIFICA- 
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AVAILABLE FOR 
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SAUDI ARABIAN 
EMBASSY, WASH-_ 
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na N Pre 


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WILt MARE children’s dresses or 
ove shir Li 3-0340 


ARTICLES FOR SALE i 


ADDIN MACHINES—TY 

Gon r choice. only fg 
“ee cane a BM, Call 
Ww 2398 poe. 


PIANOS—Recond 
up. Mr. Seltser, JV — 


PIANOS FOR RENT— yor used | 
ron 4 vy 

extra - 

nila, "Corns 


spinets. consoles 


3-9400) ; 
ee Hat 


= 


wa Be. a 
Budu 


« ton, 1968: 


ir st on) 
yy NG mi Nee. a Lag ae 
} 


. 


Alm COND. RCA 
rr JA a 


ays 


hild. LA. 6-4617 | 
. s 


| B00 
for st peente 890 | 


ts 

FISH STORY OF THEM ALL/ 4 

“ 
KNOCKED A HOLE IN HER BOTTOM ON 
A REEF AND WAS SINKING FAST 
WHEN A LARGE FIGH LODGED IN THE HOLE 
"SAVING THE VESSEL ANO ALL /TS CREW/ 
near Valparaiso, Chile 


roe North Selangor. Malaya 


ARE FED A MONTHLY RATION THAT 
INCLUDES 3 DOZEN EGGS-2 QUARTS 
OF BRANDY ano /2 QUARTS OF STOUT 


daughter of the 
rst Earl of 


ty ee 


HER COFFIN - 
‘ AND 19 vEORS | 


/ 


MOURNERS A ar | 
HER FUNERAL / 


SHE LIVED To 
THE AGE OF 
92 


ered igeracors 


gas Tangs and 
ane. rs NA 8.2679. 


nt mis ; Tig. . 
sac rt 7? OF Rees > ‘Y) 
PANO Neg ou. GaNE— Te turned 
say 


from at 


Osis TA NO rigared. 


ve now 


your FR . 1 
ded 


A KAHN, 
“4 YEAR aT 935 P_ST. NW. 
OLD ; ASHIONED ic 


Brine 
Giscar 


be 
SA\ 


. 4 ‘ 
tleu et y “hy 
PAko Piers ¥ DRYER. 
q Ca : 
* Fito Por. pvt 
s as reason 

PIANOS = iNTED—Caab 

D we Deis er au 9-4 


ove . ; 
AD 33: 10 . 


INSTRUCTIONS 
AIRLINES 


RA. j-$2i2 
PIANO—6t ein way - 
hogany. compieteiy 
fully euear. $2-in 
CAMPBELL MUSIC 
nw Deaier 


of -o 
2 to 


1108 rs] ot 


AIR TRAVEL AGENCIES 


NEED 


MEN and WOMEN 
(is : yy 


full werboard. coéa- 

instruments in very geod 
con tien. $395 7 down 
Ww, | Phone o ‘Yu and re Sts 
| 00.) 

PIANOS JORDAN'S have values 

in arr 

; TRAINING 

W.. Wash... D 

Radio-TV) 
on} : 


fe 
str ne 


n 


Suburban etores open 
Sa’ rears Parke in 


nie oe - 
riced at — | 
arran 

fos G 


condi ‘tion 
udge' termes 
, MUBIC CO. BAININ in beauty cul- 
ture ai! sublects taught approved | 
d small , modern eregde Bde. | 


; 5] 
NU 
| 100 women. wanted 


sureing. ©! hite or . 
escen. home 


t® leare 
for con. 
docters and pri- 


ISTANT 
at 'LY CLASSES 
r fr bookie 
wees | Instit 
fictor ia 
Capebart Pat 
a $90 bo a 


NGE. Ket more. 
mostat oven Pprec'tica.ly 
exec! cond.. must sell. §8 


arDtCIwa — mache machir ine 


yoo New 


elec 


. Weles-aA 
Sell fer sis 


nel SR Ah te — 


Reconditioned Sverentecd ) Year 


PEERLESS SALES co. 
_ 


sizes 
ear 


allt 
7 


re some ¢ 


ma 
n 
Admira es 


eomoeres 


visit. write epee} 
ite «of Nurs 
909 G Pi we 
— _— - }- 67 i _ — 
WOMEN—ALL AGES 
Get a Better Job 
| Shor MORE MONEY—LEARN 
horthand and Typing 
SPEEDWRITING 
“TIN: SIX WEEKS, 
Waitin os “dy: Placement 
Ineuire 9 to Pr 
. Phone ‘T 3- 5686 
Washington's Only 
peyse 428 | Speedwriting 
Secretarial School 
5.6 up 
; ine sock A ive 1406 G St. NW 
ely Tay Lor, used 7 RADIO-TV ANFOUR cg 
moved, do not $100 Rance Be = 7 ot 4-: 
4. 2: et at ee 


of 
“abs, “lex 


ne 


Credit Terme Arranged 


Washington's leading wu efrie 
erator dealers have res 
4 ” ar of Westi aanouse. G an 


Pri 
SPARK LING LIKE NEW 


2-YEAR GUARANTEE 

NIVERSAL 
ew an 
RG} 


Ne = classes 
1 ne. Shor’. 


HELP, MEN ‘S| 


Now in B r arg 
G 


m s°ore at 
4900 nw 


1306 
x ’ eonditi anad 


| es Aacy,., 
e N.Y. Ave NW. Room 


) Por jeca!l newspaper. Must 
, 


pproved | 
Radio and 


neg 

shorthand ' 

Alt: conditioned “PENlbus gc SKOOL 
L. 


A & E MECHANICS | 


15 
» 870 
need 
saler- 
25-50 
Ds “tet 
ia S54d) * Welcome 
CCCOUNFANT Te junior desiring Rud. 
experience: ASas K st 
ACCOU Stay SAL OPEN 
AUTO MECh PEN 
WHIT AND COLO ato” 


D C EMPL EXCHANGE 


tion (4) top "ap 
~ lass o better. 

: ss" i) 

at ttendamts ; 


slik and woo! Teo 


fur n exp 
Hotel 


NSN OFENT 
Res‘aurant 


and 
oth Bt } 
HO 


t« 


ACCOUNTING 
GRADUATE 


We have an unusually 
g@00d Opportunity for @ re- 
cent college graduate with 
a degree in accounting 
Man selected will first be 
assigned supervisory job 
credit section. Must 
have appearance which 
commands respect and be 
| gkillful in handling people. 
Excellent opportunity to 
move up to more respons:- 
ble job in accounting. Give 
ace, education, height, 
weioght and brief state- 
ment of experience. Write 
Box M-462, Post-TH, 


nm 


ACCT. FINANCE MGR 


Controlier exe pases e. 812.000 
Ac wha! x Ar $6000 


100 


"Bigdenspurs. 
| Asst 3 
OTHER POSITIO 
Admin. maa, anne. type 
| $e 


$7 
mF 


ane 75767 


vertising Salesman 

be ex- 
ave ~t saiary ps a 
Permanent git) 

leodias 'p mana -<¢r we 3- 61 a" 


sae 


ce of mations finance or- 


cation req 

tion ven 
interv} ~~ 
nished 


app: ‘call Mr O Grillin 


arreceee nee. 

eiitin. "Fa" a hago.” | 
ARMATURE WINDER 
and 


SERVICE MAN 


haulre 
’ 


or leeal and out of | 


xce lent o 


ortunity 
At 


cent ery *xD 


POSITIONS "INC 


YING CENTRE. 6111 1334 Mass ave. at Thomas Cir 


BA: ee Di. 7-9217 

Dp red secon r 7 A TRACT Rs MD: = ; 
See ABBEY First 

ariiyn’s is going aut of business. NW. 8ST 3- tr 


ust dispose of “i st 
mirrors, 


ROTO-TILLER FoR RENT—Nenial 
oon & F nt Cy 


po 
from 
SING 


nt 95 eanenies from $42 50 
R SEW 
Oer reise ave 


SOFA — Two- 


re sales Aviad 
file cabin 

ma ne. 5 

ner, oftce chairs. | 


MARILYN'S 


m4 


2853 


duty vacuum c 


= 
) 
ive? 


reer e 


su 
id Cook downtow 
sad ; ees — 


gets ay Bek 


ve 
Ocean ci 
"Catholic 


Ze 
oS 
*—< 
o> 
v 
--* 
2 eee. 
$5606 485 


NCH 


1-6659 


'*? 
church 
ort a 
" “CR 5000 hotel 4 

ang soedy man 
$130 
Aol 
Clerk. * anives, grocery 0 
Cook. Tiaian sige. night 60 
We BXCan ith & BOOKKEEPERS 


THERS 


COLUMBIA "EMP. SERV. | 
134) St. Suite 294 


ME 8-362 
auditing for CPA 


NATIONAL 


Employment Service 
Rashington s Largest Agency 
ALES 


» wears lige new 

67 ‘, ] ae 
vice ™R 
9850 


‘Ge ALL 
WRITER SALE 
Large sroup ef trade-in type- 
writers are 

public ' 
$38. in geod 
dit) 


Ope 
6 pigrRic 


C Hosts retr wt iu 
xi 


et 3 
£ 


positions | 


Wes igh 


PARTIAL tas TINGS pm ¥ 
res eee iA. ig 900 
4 ine ang 

7 "00 

Cc >. $300-§ ne! 
: nes D “ee 

To drue stores a2- ‘oO re isf8- $460 | 

uldéing produ 

Trainees {30} 

reinee 

Trainees 


va OG filter flew : 
t once. Best ooltex 


o507 $ Walter Ae 

2507 § Walter Reed dt Apt. 1. Arl 
GROOT D INDU QT RIES new store 
1229 20th NW the Bar- 


office cauie 
ole i a5 ne 
Natl 


. of Wa sh Trainees. fox rar plus 
$i, children " o ond men s . | 
furn at eau uy 
Oven Pri eves me! 4.36 arc insurance underwriter + 
oaee 
7 6 6&7 2700 | 
ouites. office 
BA 6. 


RA 6-297. 


rial exper 
Intyrance special) agent 
O wg! 


0 Am. 
ve an 
ro My 
tf. des. pe to 35 yrs. 
treve . 
kkeepers-Accountants te 
. Mmeide — 
> 


ie ee 
ona 


CASH 


Drnamiter. overseas, 
nees 


APPLY 
9am.to 40m 
Monday Thru Friday 


NATIONAL ELECTRIC 
SERVICE, INC. 


901 King St 
Silver Spring, Md. 


ASST. MANAGERS — 


Younes men—permanent— excellent | 
advancement | 
leads 
Extensive 
experience | 
sential during! 


initial tral ning 


American Finance Co 
(See Mr. Heinecke) 
7932 Georgia Ave. 


Silver Spring, Md 


(Mr. Norris) 
4702 Mariboro Pike 
Coral Mille, Md. 


(Mer. Mottacker) 


3308 Rhode Island Ave 
Rainier, Md 


M 
“ASST. TOM ANAGER | 


ial 
"= 


, 


TI need an assistant te learn 
branch operation end séi¢ 
lete.y Man * 


| time Ca 
5-$701 onder for seppeint- 
oP siuett 
{oseie’s, Ante Body, “i Biadens- 
at ealary 
Bring tools ready for work wane 
o colored. Jessie Ate y 
5 Biadensbure 4 NE 
s 


3} —— 
~ ability: te. 
Hy- 


TT ’ 
evenings 


~ managerial 
salary.. $213 Baltimore ave. 
aiteyi)) 7-460 
ite. exe. 
v . ) 
—Full or Fy lime. 70% 
-cond op. Alexandrise 
y. re 


man. good 
comm Silver Spring 


: 
835 
$35 
7eY 
‘ 


2-5512 


‘Top 


tient on  Ahamute to | 
Jackson, brick fore- 


mperienced | ~ boners 
s BUPPL 


ate Cue 


in 


CAB DRIVERS 


heave an identifica. 
imetruct you for 
Men 6F women 


BOB’S STUDIO 


131 15th 81. NE Li 


de ft 
card. we 
cokers teat 


if vou 
ion 


3-5103 
 $90- Hi 38 


Abii to techs i 
MBAGrtadi, af HR 

_F iret Fiser. 

cv. ENG., MARLBORO, OPEN 
D Mati | ner radio frequencies 
hermodynamig 8000 

ti ets HIEF 
NR. eee. no fre 


Fag subdiy 


U MDL SERV, | 
sh ‘wie 


W. ST. 3-220 
smoager sti sty! le dei 


wade. 


eslety. 
N MAN | 
With small loan experience 
inside Work, Good Pay 
Advancement 
Company Benefits 
Excellent Future for 
Right Man 
Old Established Firm 


JU. 9-4529 
COUNTERMEN 


Excellent Chance | 
Advancemen' 
Company Benefits 
Available 
Experience Not Necessary 


LITTLE TAVERN. 
SHOPS, INC. 


‘Famous for Hamburgers’ 
OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY 


5100 GEORGIA Ave. NW 
Between 10 and 1! A.M 
Monday Thru Friday 
Monday Evening, 7 to 8 


or 


bus 7s . £25 uD 
ve $40 


Short order ceo 
AKD. COLO 


" 
we POL TAN 


er i+w Inc... NA. 8- 


exper! enced 
will ne 


ener order are 
Bioc 


ciks 
Liguor “sere de! 


Weide 
WHITE 
Ttallan styrie 
All ‘round ne 7 
Serv. sie atte te. $265 + comm 
NATIONAL EMPL. SERVICE 
Lilt & NW a6 f 


ELECTRONIC 
TECHNICIANS 


To 


Service 


summer r 


boy 


Chef 


f oor 


DIGITAL COMPUTERS 


IF 


You have @ good training 
in electronics plus 3 or 
more years of experience 
in ary branch of elec- 
tronics, you Mey quality 
for positions in this ftast 
growing industry 


IF 


Your present 10D Goes moe 
tax your talents. we have ) 


one that wi!! 


IF 


present job does not 
premanency and sta 
we heave that 


IF 


Your present job does not 
offer growth and is not 
fascinating, we have one 


that is. 


You wonder how you can 
get the necessary training 
in the Computing Field, 
Burroughs will give you 
the finest training at its 
Philadelphia Headquarters 
and at full pay, too. 


THEN 


Come in and Talk This 
Over at Your Convenience 


Your 
otter 
bility, 
does 


ore 


| Well Equipped Shop EScilities | 


SALARIES TO MEN OF 
PROVEN CAPABILITIES . 


PERSONAL RECOGNITION | 


/AND GROWTH FROM WITHIN 


| RELOCATION EXPENSE FOR 
YOU AND YOUR FAMILY 


We Mave Openings in Almost 
Every Major City in 
the Country’! 


For Interview, Cal! 
JOSEPH CHEDAKER 


a’ 


ME. 8-2626 


MONDAY thru 
WEDNESDAY 
9 A.M. to 10 P. M 
Or Write 


COMPUTER SECTION 


BURROUGHS 
CORPORATION 


1616 Walnut Street 
Philadelphia 3, Pa. 


LIGGET 


Lavout Men and Detailers 


Work with efeineers & scientiste— 
mroceeting projécts in fen 
detelopment of precision electro- | 
mechanical contro) eauipment, Op- 
portunities for advancement. Ma 


cLAUGHLIN 
RESEARCH CORP, 
1424 K ST. N.W, 
ST 3-0986 — 
DRIVER-PORTER 
Te clean and service branch 
stores and other general pepncs | 
work. Free hoapit alization and life 


insurance. 0: her et) 
piy = ry. 4419 faiti- 


and service life 
MAN te and 


urance u 
and comm wT nec. On- the- 
MAN. WITH GAR _ 


-openine 


MAN, col. 8-20. for 4 poun' er; 


| Miller sat 48. 5 ‘Bt Market. 
MANAGER 
TRAINEE , 
NEW INCREASED SALARY 
ANO OTHER EMPLOYEE 
BENEFITS 


Fxupanding chain of sconsumtr 
finance 0 Reed wm. a): « 
¢ 
r. 


ae er 


: ; 
eres Rey. 
Ave... Mi 
| Rainer. LJ 
nay mornings 
can 


iM oF 
e"}, Be rivers ° : 


_ 
. s aun 
: 4 com- 
dD Cc. Tfeute 
son 


pany. established 
jaranteed oe ie 
25>. married Call 


“DRUG CLERK 


Part-time position evailabdle for 
Must be willing | 

and weekends 

6854 New Hampshire Ave 
Takoma rk Tuesday 1-5 5. m. OF 


ae 


journeyman . 
license 
a 


commercial 


tain 


90. 
“hichols Alta 4 
MEN 
WANTED 


Supplement your present 
#26-860. pe week by = 


sitio ne 
stantial! 


Oath at 


EMpr 


SLECTRONICS 


RCA 


MISSILE TEST 
PROJECT IN 


FLORIDA 


Radar Engineers 


income hy 
Sa tew 


siso available wit? 
greater income Oppe 


Te 
this evening at 7.30 p 


NIGHT ENGINEER 
6TH CLASS 
apt. bigs. Pull-time jot new rs 


m oul ourner 
itiener 5 > a“ e- 


aly for iter ioe “SU 


MGR... insurance 
, bookkeeping 


Commun cations Engineers wan a 
PAINT MAN 

Ls pone preferred. but #j con- 

iar man wiiine warn 


xcellent ‘eetartene Anpis WR 

Winslow Co. 923 New York are ne 
PAINTERS 
hhions pee peace, 


‘s ue 7 
co ob. 
1424 


Personne! 
Ks n® 


- : 
e emerry Eng reers 
Optics Engineers | 
Instrumentation 


Opto-Mechanical Engineers ; 


| garalts 
| PANTRY MAN 


| CiGGETTs EMP. SERV. 
3404 N i ; Ave. NW. ST. 35-3894 
‘PART. TIME opportun! ty white or 
| colored With car. net canvassing 
Farnings paid while training. Ap 
proximateiy 20 “ wee 
appraringe appir 3162 Me 
St. Pw. 7-6 


Field Engineers 
Radar Technic ans 


“ 
Communications Technicians 


Telephone Technicians 


Mathematicians 


7 neat 
Pieasant 
A 


. nmterec? ng s ignments 
mn Bahama islands for Tech- 
Bonus, food and 


urnished 


rcians 


jodging f 


- ’ 
Ur swat 


f* for apt 
in ana meinerater work 
Ta) See manager. Arline 
” ne B va 


at. 


| PORTERS 


INTERVIEW | 
WASHINGTON | for 
CALL MR. R. LLOY 
AT Dl. 7-4800 
WEONESDAY THURSDAY 
JULY 2 
2 P.M 9 P.M, 


Opportunities for 
Protessional Advancement 
road, Liberal RCA Benefits 


Relocation Assistance 
SONAL 


' FALLS CHURCH LABORATORY 
oF Falls Church residents 
ferred Permanent . 
tions in Falle Church. Ret. 
erences required Many 
ernploye benefits. 


pre- 
1] or } 


to 


Or Send Complete Resume to 


Dept. N-269 
RCA Service Co., Inc. 


P.O. Box 1226, Melbourne, Fie. 


ENGINEER | MELPAR, | 
Pate Cun 


2-¥ 
to 


PRESSER 
Saperienced only: good hour 


@ conditions: transporte 
“= rion 20 Be 
ar 


APPLY IN PERSON 
SAM. TOMP M 
MONDAY THRO FRIDAY 


Employment Mgr., 


App.y personne! 


SSADOR HOTEL, 1434 > | te 


ith 


. 


0 
(Ta Arnol4 bus from 1 
Coma. Ave, | and Y nw plant ensran 
oO 
j Apt | 
aw Chief 
s and 
n 
> 


— 


person 
] ‘Conn ave. ow. ond ask for 


bet ne | experienced an trou 
position excellent work 
top bey A modern plant 


NO A CLEANERS 


. 
: 

; . N — Alert, Conditions. 

yorker Promise of 


ate preferred. for dove fi 
ta 


bold, other — pesiti .. 


= HOUSEMEN—COL— 


KO ¥O 
x oh ihe Hay 


nw T 4 . 
mechanic “noe 2 
’ orm 


“dayt 


— te ouper vise co! 


t enis. morts 
Socmepee in 
rapie. but t 
coailennt 
erial backs Fringe bene- 
APPLY PER- 
AF 32 co 


vacation 
it am - and 

. ly as, i reen 
Varied Metal Bales Go 4i06 Geer | 


akXrfo ae hour so Kiezandeis | 


pt 


and 
nia 


ry 5-3968 
PROPERTIFS, 
SALESMEN 


know 


Experienced 
With Small Mechanisms 


A 
MAJOR APPLIANCE 
REPAIRMAN 


Cc. ares 
; 


| Capable of Working to Close 
Tolerance 


ms fdlh ste aie 
were AUTO Aiomy co, 
| REFRIGERATION 
Mechanics & Pycaie 


Wages Commensurate With 
Ability 


Many Company Benefits 


Aoply in Person 
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 
8 AM. to 4 P.M, 


MELPAR, INC. 


BW TLD A, 
Miceli 


Tan Arnold 2-¥ sus f 
an 4. ow We Slant en 


ee. ae ~ Resume to 
' Box 698 —Wash. Po “et. TH 
) 


Ao interview day be srranzred 


‘ 
your cosvenien ' 


CPFRVIEOR 


ny a + aA, food service and 
con 


MACHINIST 


full-time position 
machinist 
rience it 

Apply in person. 


PERSONNEL OFFICE 


AMERICAN 
INSTRUMENT CO. 


| 
8030 Georgia Ave. | 
Silver Spring, Md —“Rour 


Permanent 
firet-c aes 
lathe ee 
ance Wor 


xperienced 


to install 
ng Oye # 


Siag roofs Mr 


"Aue CLERK-CASHIER 
| i ae, ss 
wir Son itlenine 


45 pre 
PPOIn' ment 


L DUPONT PLAZA 
ROUTE 


Good _ Sporty ity 


Sida ) 


for 
Taylor 


N LAUNDRY 
G ST. NW. 


a 
and I. ne 
cash th 


. ————— wv ing 
MAN alter 
iors perienced vacuum 
or ssleried t 
* 23-40 with car 
feraish goed referen 


cleaner man 
Ls] open 
ane able to | 


I want 6 geod cleam-cut ma 
my eeristant whe can handle 
"i" of men field 


oo Walvis Faas — 


; 


—— = poem sai SaaS 13 )MELP. Men _!S| HELP. WOMEN 16) THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
SERVICE STATION atectent sea “OPPORTUNITY IN| “ACCOUNTANTS $70, | **** 
SALESMAN pe sanesy Sens . service man. sigh work. all os. 2 | wR RS beard. 3 here | UNI IN UNTAN ) Tuesday, July 10, 1956 oT 


e typing. Ins. ¢o., Cowntovs, 
LANDSCAPING Br. Feat estate, BW. HELP. WOMEN 16/ HELP, WOMEN 16 
} Previous sales experienc e benefi- 02 3 eysteims - National organization witil pay the . ne 7 aneee — 
og I QR ord ay sa move | TRAINE man $7000 & year or more| Acc’ Dekpr 2201) $65 CLERK rt 
icant FO MB of d 1. POTOMA : = a Ties itn at c s : px. wens in| snventor, nw, . 860-865 | hr. <cring, aoare time. Car. 
; : : T?T"e Ca me an sales | kpr.. UN 
with larte permanen' Jait'Wueon ~~~ . MEN. bench work aa | No ag necessary ) c as Nos ving. ape tom agents es, department 
urer ror int a ; : a) rite Bon M469. st shhd * 3690 | wit nowleage oO ing. 
ieapped pe , { KE 787 : STOCK BOY ell ae te: eee — R—| Beer creceot. 8 Ati’ Sesp-ago| dge of typing LADIES—PART TIME. 
r eferr se 18 c store at Navel Re“¢ ‘bench can loolerea: Becy -recept ood sh 
INDUS- | ceiving Station. 40-hour week. sick se madie 14an ghey. ys FF PERMANENT POSITION 
TRIES, ones yn 4 V |; \ nual onetfits Pek ndee (S05 2 Tm as ae EP 4 Age 20-55. $1.85 per hour. in your 
R a office, > ) SALESMEN | . 4 ia! joave w uel benefits AF ice man _ cales COLLEGE d 8: ee 73 | S.DAY WEEK ite experience or car 
A 7 noon Mon. thru Pri. | piy Mr Bateman, Navy Exchanee| “4ecr ot nat i | - vo nt nr OT 1-440. 
: 1 a Pe le’ Food Pp] Store. Na 4 Receiving Station aa start a: on ua 3% ‘ | Steno tet ¢ .. £70 uo LIBERAL VACATION AND steady income  -* WL. 17-4400. 
AL You na inside work | Op es an : ; tia, DC : : iy 55-870 , 
ney’ priming. $260. POTOMAe oe F 7 ie. Cok, veutaun we GRADUATES | Bee HUL 1-6 mo. to $46 EMPLOYE BENEFITS LAD YES. 40) 
iA 53000. ison bivd. ari 4} Oto $450 men whe need te arn ILOR— - ITTER ; ospitalinat a = sate t. exp £05 un HAHN SHOE STORES ~ om To chiefly handle telephone 
BALES A Wi th some x. h y . P > +. ace or . e to a. : © , . 2i1- 2 : ie Ar’ ' . . : 
xperience Hone ; ay of shop m : ; rade : 3 : > oe oe on , < be A a om J 
selling rac ‘ hospitalicati ia. eames oe a ; “2 ~- ~ wy +--+ PENTINGS FOR YOUNG MEN . ) 0-$55 Sts “PART. TIME—3- a M, 
estate: ; : net a Hon ae li . h com or hop ric . aRD ct OT THES . rt : he ts . : Oo 2 * Vv \ E Recent graduates wanted : : ; ° ; xt M° mead & Ph 0 Probe ; ‘ 
simi) items : popular ve : mond a . — - . —_" — ~ = bh sie , 7 re B65 one . a 
makes of Zianos nd tlectris Rome Ot Bhone 65-8 ib. | TEACHERS — White, for Ane pubic! 359.5 m- Swi ints} UNTERESTED 0 LEAMDONG | OS ory gectiant otter | Pig che ie oat i | Pak TXPIOT, research Ubraty. | CAUNDEY—Oir rat Di T4400 
’ ve tty scno POs n mn mew ciencr = upervisorv siti tte } : : . . 
ie salary and’ "casetiiensnt te SALESMEN. Enaiian, "art, manic. inde arin | #MC aw THE HIGHLY LUCRATIVE | fd cet parted of intensive | Boece cabin: (900) 911 Ring Stn Ales 1, 9-00808 | Sd Song 
rangeme Bee Mr. Satter)s r W t salesmer ’ - , a - —- & .oT | Saleamen 30° es , = tiles _ '¥ & sof ¢ o % _ ie ; T 
DAR PIANO C orner i3th and salary plus commissior DAMS TRADHTRG = orter. driver ; training in our m d i eetetalh eal ean CLERK-TYPISTS 


ADA VS TEACHERS Jf 
5. for permanent interest- 


NW RE 77-3908 ' —_—~¢ tend ens FIELD OF DRAFTING and poncies A PAE Tress ‘egg —@q? ° $-day 


’ uit see od — a CENTRE TEC P _ =e : - iA : ah The wren wi | he . 4 ‘ LA C ' E 23s ere e ' ; " ; : - on! ‘ eRe , AL 
. » an . a ~ neces p.- 7 . ’ large! On the Pass : 4 wv om Sir air ond dbutidin PP! Person ' * office Experienced 
SALESM EN : are OP Ber imi tie ~~ : $ / “ Si DORESTOG RAPT GR NVieda ee +e t +S sae > 7 lient t e to assume 
LEY MOTOR CO Lost . gow face , dent leadershio aqua _- perat A 20-35. Exceationa! ans irance ©9 St. ‘| spor lity and meet people. Per- 
ws Seo 6 “ WRI | ERS piere ‘=: tions and managerial po- pportur in i kne sort a.m. 10 2 2 8 -| @ state experience. qualifica- 
ke care of ihe 4 i __ : AT LEAST ONE YEAR OF) tert! 53 sie ompany 5-day, fiat | CLERK-TYPIST (white), young ledy| {i Mh. Poste 
ee - _ ‘ oS AJ entia M NT to ost 
a ¢ Come in time permenert pecitten wah “ . Washingt: iss cn : o urate ane iver mse ‘Me ical Technologist — 
6—HEAR aD LFARN ; . — , :, . so , o— ae mah ave 0 6<comprere pi call DE. 2-4800 Pull ®&r part time EI 98-1622 
Why OUR salesmen are making bie to men between 21 and 2 ; . penses oe 3 HIGH SCHOOL tion as ft educati aoe 1 S-6 wi .or SD LL FP. Steuart, Inc, 1660 a 4 pe mare good job for depend- 
more money learn th . mor : ~ and ins? ores edurts on , rt tn . “ ‘. 4 - wy? ally t Pwr a ma. 5 Ser } ’ iw = | a ‘ — ing worker. Call TE. 
raf — . . re - : : jipment ry ; "pe 7 ee he - " re. 
al ed sbucth Wit Wich EACH | Rdacatgn (7 letronice ang wren. Secien Rricrdliaent thea Ba MECHANICAL eight and weig $300 recdbi: 
RENAIRE we ‘LL 7 ; . . be held in ctrict c 
101 EYE ST ¢ f POR a Wl u learn on| OUS technical Griting experience’ = a ples will be Admin. Secys., to $6000 T NEWSPAPER. CLERK 
‘ ’ ‘rf \ . . . ° " = P San ; ot Stam and or ‘oe - 
Corner New Jersey A Eve e . “are . : _ »- : = ; mtoe ing ane rha’ ow g' ne i. t. DRAWING COURSE cor ten eo . y B * al por ’ 1< PT baal wT ; CLERK YPISTS 
3123 NO. WASH. BLYD. aARt er — waste , nt om diversified prod P. ° . M.4463. Post-TH o : wer ) 
Across From Post Office eee spitalie . full information ~— I . !. S 7 
a ali a " WROL! ERK TYP <Ts. vo to RL 
_— \ 
a bf : 
is , — _ , f _ OO Positions available in an @x- 
ON ANDLEY FORO : LE ) — _ SECYS. oud. elation be . 
: , | =e i SECTS... pi tior brie? 
et 2 38 YEARS 4 PORD DEALER APPLY IN PERSON : - perv Leer coz ‘mer, res BAS panding research organization ’ 
a905 4 >. ve wu : . pod knowledge of trping 


IRGIA AV! eipertence ‘ : - tT G d ? 2 -g . : 

MONDAY THRU FRIDAY . ' v vv Co ege raquates : herthand Opportunity for advancement ' 8 ' together with an 

Tork au liged lead furnich SEC RETARY- 6300 mo. route. un “BA “TO wr the right mas eT = SECTS. ja' to vy . li a to varied clerical 
good sten ist. youn 4P S08 SECY egisiati ... to 880-585 ties ive-dav 40-hour wee 

$55 rk. up kkeepers to $75 up M. one Y ru 8 <a % tion. sick leave. group 


. 
M s8 Be! 2 YI cor 12% PERSOVVEL OFFICR Career Opportunity 5 * ihe a ' Conver ent sub urban : ree e benefit air-conditioned 


me? wma 


\ 


: “ CEEPERS — ; - rv ewe " - — in * faa) > m. 
a . “ 
MELPAR IN Awe _ + PRIDAY ; ‘ . loca wre : Per onne, Department 

;* - ry . " ‘ : ™ 7: 1. pL ake eek 7 . cy : 
; C. INSTRUMENT CC —— . yw > ane on CUR TYP Cat , $275 Decmanant resident of 
. "io P °o . ; ne A : ~ rDe oon ° . 
LY i - j-rounded " 4 ; 


this area preferred The Washington Post & 

. Times Herald 
she aft shouse ' + ‘ ir ‘ 
local or trave > ; a ae ae + ener - MAN , eee select ' | ts Suie APPLY IN PERSO” 1515 L STREET NW 
Transportaton enichea na. | terres ‘ ; Air Brake Company some ose ¢ - wants : i, —* 2 . eemeinen Annette D. Tatelman MONDAY THRU. FRIDAY Mig 
Room 410. 724 th at uw” | SERVICE STATION altendant 7 i aaatestin tn alte’ te ae Ee 235 Woodward Bid. RE 7-441¢ $00 A. M. TO 4:00 P.M 
BALESHAN "With cai, experienced. | (me. cures Rie. & Pairfax Circl we masve jecere Thies ; | UNIVERSAL EMP SERV 3 15th st. NW. at F 
: ccevic J STATION TENT 3000 Arlington Bivd : : ience wi > he pfs ONC ; 191e 9TH 2. AD. 2-8100 ’ rr iy SEC. : 9390 MELPAR INC. NEWSPAPER 

d part time, lubrication — ewe XS Pri VERS o30| Sort with sort and STENOGRAPHER 

, es : RIPRS DISHWASHERS $35 . under ah ) 


$35 re ce 


Falls Church, Va. s 3: ; a3 oo > Su MMER ctaphone Opr A Subsidiary of | apenepregsns 


MELPAR : ave clear as : : ' WESTINGHOUSE Air-Brake Co 
P OPPORTUN! ITY estine “ang Varied subject matter AANA 9 fe Aik 


ae ne a —— , | a DLL , _ RECEPT — $260 : PP EPP. DAVIS WY: athe, 
positions fear men experienced INC. mee al . Above average appear | | Si sm to E in. pee . 
in the following fields. ENGINEERS PARTICIPATE 2 SPECIAL EDt LIBRARY CLK. TYP. cTRRE-TYFIR] rs ig MENT 
MER LOR mine Corea siae - i Type 35 wpm : CHEVY CHASE ee ee and 
3000 Arlington Bivd. on TRAVEL. IF DESIRED. “el K -TY PI oT. —$270 a ) ets nat ; . $335 1515 L STREET NW. 
Sheet Metal Layout And . CULL TRAINING SLIPPLIED | fetict and “non-routine au 


, % SL 
f"t. 


F ofl V r wh Fes CLE TPIS Tt. f on “PE 
as Vrurcr, a. Call Mr NC ei PIFL Ex 3 on -y : 7 to _| SUESE—E to 


' aoe ; ae PROF Pen sone: 
Machine Parts Inspection SUPPORTING PERSONNEL EX. 5-446/ AIRLINES Int eter Hee * ‘rrnexpenienced * Bep 


Melpar’s expansion 


= BEPORE NOON : rr 4 ENC [ea NEED RA OER ry EMP I aN MENT ‘SERY ate selrooi. for rt ~y ‘dr 
es vom COLORED SALESME -N Se ! ions Iv 9 } by Virgin! wr ‘e Sos \- 
Instrument Assembl! 1. — Aft : hh Bt. NY ‘ sD CLERK FYPisT Youn ae OFFICE. CLERK HS grad 
P 2 ' allie week => ; . ™ ~ - ' : r © rain for sed Pp , . * : J gra 
y sig us Refere : aM) ASST, “TO MANAGER : gt on Gs0-455. No ree fee. EMPL Stie tie FOTO uM + 
MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS mt BL ‘ATION Product 


: 7 qupment HELP, MEN & WOMEN 5A :- at to bere cur) Ime. Faite, 1001. Weshinates 
ERC ony ee HI Assembiers-— ~Technicians | protery. Vismem severe ! CLERK TYPIST Real est a 
MELPAR INC Soe or eet a een ea el orcas) seta, Nat ate ce eR Ae 
’ t Thay a yee : art ereantration Mus mr : a fo 3pm. Telecode| must have 20 houty or more pe CLERK-TYPISTS 
7 ceaso~med c : or t-.< a ‘ . . , > coatre - . = m3 aa rs oki? pat time ; SECRET ARIE- _ 
1311 South Fern St. pportunities es well, z 2 ay Ly s-Bfoi, “Monday. tor ‘appoint-| *™2EiYEe AND HS GRADS. | National orcanizat 
x : ‘BANK BOOKKEEPERS COME | ek coven | Benge nes 
; a?® > . ] Sa ; . Pat r A 4 . a . SECYS ou re ca L girl gry Sachin ngh' J 
At present our needs are fo NO EXPERIE SSARY | Sie o 50 ite demens Yo £ perier ce pre ferred:| SECYS_ 60-$70 | NW Pr -T : PRX ; __ Mature. 
CALL MR | 13 loth s te ee | ee ee * 5 MAG EMPL 2354 Wil 
(1 blk. off Jefferson Davis Hwy EX 3 a ee RMAUNSEY “TRL ST CO. ne : t¥rist 3 20 
, .- @ c S40 +1: wow ; . —s ay wesser, more 1329 E ST NW LERKS. : $240 BB s aks re 
oute | at South [5th St.) AERODYNAMICIS aces = wEEt To eran? a oo a ans BANK “TRAINGES—E: yw) p! CASHIER, Rec rts. + Cheb Ne eB 
aud . . , " 2 +8, -BY.~ Ty TRA NEES. no | ; 225. POTOMAC in —e whe 
DIG ITAL PROGRA MA MEK YOUNG MAN, 12.35 HELP, WOMEN gain cra 2th i 6) De. RSON #ECKEATION. WORKER Colts eee 
—— en YUNG |! <a ABSTRACTORS : a : CEE we ‘WOOD - myaiea) education _ maser 
Experimental iarldinlate ELECTRONIC ENGINEERS , a A... - See ABBEY First ea coed $-8 sirl for 222 801 THERN BLDG. DI 732 REGISTERED NURSE. psychistrie 
in ; 4 : _~A Br . ; ’ ; —- wet ° bu Ss tor rar be ’ : : = - residen' ie 
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS — = c ~~- sible! Teieghone inior. cle $5\ Alnert Gay. Mair Stylist. Li oidh chi 
2 . : . >" : ; T . —t-¥ 
=e ' ' - F ; 260) Ti . “olored expert 
Experimental machine shop of MECHANICAL DESIGNERS TONE PAPER TUBE CO.| Sat See ee 32 $8 ses ine a 
uided missile development or- , Asst B&kpr-ty Dis ~ ae ee ee 
: smn g DESIGN DRAFTSMEN — YOUNG MAR ——| Biter" Betradehe ao0o0:2 $93) SWty pensonnry 1398 Bre Xv 
ganization has several openings - ‘Ser pe i . 


BAPE Kins 
tor qualified experimental ma- CATALOGERS => _ perieme? |) Watttenes aioe kh Ww A pen et Cee ee HADLEY HOSPITAL 


Arlington, Va. 


e s ‘ 4 ; : ” 
‘ee ow ec “- i ers ’ £300 OM Us 4 OMAC EM? : ree an Qo} eine | 
J : BOOKKEEPING | wi AC ticast PER A- . 
= . . “eo , . =upo Lath $5 : abie Some yping and shert- an} 5 
chinists. for oe a imerested =| Trou. aiding $240 . | eauit Pie $401 Wichole Ave ? 


acant 


salary, See M : Bing at | BOYD . morking com Hons _ Meany compas v | RENTAL ASST. 
. ‘ Di 77-2900, ext. 261 
BR to 10 years experier » " @ Tover , . : 


rkasa Morris af ME 6-2784 Dustrict 
mode! maker, tool maker, etc., is required; stable em- INTERVIEWS 9 A MA mg p MA fot . = ee lows " one 
ployment record and good references are essentia! —sie 22 %2.2% Bish sBeel) Guw | S-s Se rer CLERK- TYPIST 
: tr a4 : : : , L 3 £19 a - ob ge ‘ "* ‘ ed in office o 
Those who qua Fy will be offered continuous empicy- Monday Through Fridav - ; — - a r ~ oo : Sore 45> ) A. a . 

: . for : » ’ : me - mie — ~ - wn . 7 : 
ment on a 40-hour week basis with benetits, including 4 . mee . ak eh . ka tenant? Anolis % - > tor ide. in ft - see p=. a 
vacation and sick leave, voluntary retirement and insur. Other Times by Appointment SR i sinters, ‘Apply BOG ohanter| ban. tn rear 


SNES FER ENG Group NcEpNerzewon. vanc oe 00 ER—-Betwren 25-35 to work CLERK-TYPIST—18-00. permanent | ager i . 
PERIODIC INCREASES BASED ON MERIT. * bur tnsarance Co Bis 14:n| PICTAPHONE STENO wh 53543 Said cacctiony’ imsufanes| pifiee 37ta-heur week. Apel i a 
™ | ERCO DIVISION hl eae ee a? See 

EXCELLENT WORKING CONDITIONS phinaton's largest _elice supsiy) TYPist stauistical --. 1 = CLOTHING hoes di. Col. Ocean ty. 560. 
Se ee eee ane « m FOLLOWING POSITIONS | CASHIER. Knowl bkkpe N. Give! exper. ry cleaning inspection | § Y¥—To se and dem 

Machine shop will be relocated within « year to ou ACF INDUSTRIES, INCORP Reeser Soci Peseta: | SiR una TAINS “Etae| Gwen FO FOMAG Le) i ttre Rersets ol 
Howard County bu te on new Rou te 29 appro» — wer % _ IF 3 ) 0 ~ - fice. 1229 th 4 » ia ani . ne 
mately 25 minutes fron Silver Spring t car Rj, rd Md \ A -_ 4444 ; ' . - a4 : rat . . : CASHES. ~~ ~ = cm 20s $55. ag devon ‘> ry Fri 1 . TALPSLADY 
vercale, | . —_ fvancement for serie néec COLU MBIA EMP. RE 5-6000 ext 1% 1 oo | 


708.8 oe “CASHIER TYPIST " Comptometer Opr., 


J ; 
A Ww ninas Also Exist for _— ; uM tor BCCOUNTANT-BKKEEFER 
Fe Ope 9 > nl : : re s160 sk Cometr real estate $60 wk. 


MACHINISTS : Sa a a ree i . * sito’ 


TA i 
Tar) wk: VF 


. - "Ted ’ ’ nol. 7 once or sem 

el . ' : ’ ~ Ae rope! Mi is s 9 ; Ss ekifiee , Ase anes 1: = 20th 

_gaghe mote cana ENGINEERS Aecoontias | fia moe tant | HA gg | vee Be 

a 7 2 . i ER DoT RE vA me RETARIES— 665 wk -85000 37 

PLEASE APPLY | BOOKKEEPERS CASHIER-CHECKER 131) @_st. (Personnel) a %, 
9AM. TO 3 P.M ESAPE & POTOMAC eee ae TS we «tj | ©) Sis. ne 3340) ‘esi. 40 998 

dae ; _ - — . - SE A iE ii P nt is irl , ee 
Select the co pany selected by the Depart ent COMPANY EC PENINOR : , ; nt enentna t fete aide” Hoa in ' 7 S. SECRETARY. STENOCKAPEEE— Te 


. . * Defense to build the EARTH SATELLITE ming -.t + cS éurina lumen | wees eS 
The Johns Hopkins Universit . Tr TIMICAS cTic TIAL List—35-HR. WE a4 Mond ) roug ia) Witte AND COLORED as 
im : and he INTERN. SLT i a a i “Zoe Te tiyo| DOVER ART sbnVichet 2 METROPOLITAN fel Mi_ cole. 8. 
APPLIED PHYSICS LABORATORY | MISSILE. The MARTIN Company offers chal- | SENS SaMneS oeea | MEE Sir che wo 8 Bains per tomy, Ne. Xenon |sheubb nt Saad og 
lenging opport rmuries On these excrt ng pro = porrvr °s ¢ que ed Per ’ ' TYP ; 4 gC ‘ ASHIER BALESG IRL ndbags eric v3 Ri a Ae AY Ext t 


8621 Georgia Ave., Silver Spring, Md ects for persons with training in the following ap ot ty : A oY ith employe! Experienced jp ceneral dros gore ~ SECRETARIES 


/ : D> 
fiel ; aay. 3 ' ; ap Dee ; ie or holid Advance Experienced for work in 4 Sete 
JU 9.7700 ie'cs c- . recs . ’ : . a ; : @u mer profit ——— posseess A er 
' ) > - ERK -TYP! Hoop. REKAI 19 ©O setion Un © Je ars 
MPLOYMENT INFORMATION . : 33 eT! r0 Co Ess NW }OOd short an 
E oa . - =» cot NTERGIR: — (Whit with mrable 3-4 
c c 7. 26) ee ks . . : id cperience f dry-cleaning ' 
- AERODYNAM CS A UCL FAR Ler Le 930 vat _— onal y > in office! o ~ A nA ‘ 094 5016 New Hamo- 
a . > : : °a - .¢ . 


‘ Ae 7 a —~ o. 4 d e . ret = ve " re ave. oe , -8100 —— 
AIRCRAFT WORKERS | WIND Tow, ertmoo OY Bre “eet EF ng | Apoir™ Personnel "bes rhe] CRMTES and talle  wallreaee : a rests a 
STABILITY & REACTOR DESIGN ? ure , : pees. ee irst 
| CONTROL SYSTEMS . 2 HF $31! Pountain «iris 33 ; fh oft sT 3-0199 
>” hs an . rs juth office 


_ é ; 


' ) : | ; VW 
' 8 w sD INGOT r ne ; - rmbas at 
le need men th knowledge me “en TE [moe \ o| 8 working conditions. compa: Couple. Pa 6 LOK ‘Tm. de . t. “Hyatiovt 
We ted 4 w = av > : 2S. s , ~ Pt APPLY PERSONNEL OF ) le 
structural ana assemo'ly work. Mus 


ler ‘ FICE n tion 
| STRUCTURES | Easereorowe panane, |SHERATON CARLETON] Bret name sur. Mé. te. - @ Q) Bieno. Girl friday Yak. Me Soa 
WELDERS PF it ire, SEM , ENGINEERING Dts COOP COPTER aed TE: HOTEI ook fo Bi: 


r 1LFPRK Por dry eaning atére. Ad is nes ~. . 
: CTR . / “ “ . nt 
STRESS ANALYSIS ct __ GRADUATES sp eatier "5 50, ‘Tomas ‘Cietasre | Reumiaie Sire 
- ’ ‘ »?? . . 7% ' 

os re : liah?t 4 rer “a 4 7 ; | San ae « NATIONAL i — [ith . : 
For oas a J c ae on . -_ ’ VIBRATION & FLUTTER ANTENNAS & RADOME : : rer: DYMENT SERVIC CLERK. 7 19 jith St NW 

luminum. st De adie TO work Trom Divepr Pr. ad : i | : y ;' , ‘ cE clephone work. Late J " ) DENT AI ASSIBT ANT 

a U - i ~ ' Loo -— nf 7 : ex ; ‘(je Some yoir J a days REC FP "TI ¥ : 

POSITIONS m™c 13 CLERA. #f typin 


: 
As et ge By SCRETARY 
CORTES > CHANG _ CRETARY New Hamp? 
. : Cc 1330 


"hat Rainier a 


me 
vers 


—w - Tr 7 
INSTRUMENTATION MECHANICAL a fis a : R600 
lah .) mechan : nmioy rae récisi0 ‘am we Pase Av . ae ; Ot TN SIL VER SPRING 
, 1 po me * Seiahal as re TELEMETERING MACHINE DEBIGS I Counter gir ILVER SPRING Rock 
wor ty xD rm : U : - " " " , a4) ’ 


AUTO-PILOT ATR CONDTTIONI WG 3 3 eine ’ saad c 
) | INERTIAL sot SOS cham ae to 435) Y; lady to train FOUNTAIN Gi RLS REC corr pagan TPE wT 
INSTRUMENT MECHANICS NAVIGATION Li@CID ROCKET poundry workers, ait tyeei”.- $38| nel and payroll office.| MOMOUAICCERY Uitm, | CanE-Furzere 
) ~ a girte ' _ NEW IN WASHINOTON? & 
st be able to tye and LIGGETT EMPL. “SERV. ERV 
“wr ; nomen ~n MA 3? he ~ ¥ ’ r 1 a! ; cic , tr . = — . - nave 000d handwrit ng Per. nH ~ y. UF i a 4 : ONES EMPL > RV 
F instrument assemoD'y OPERATIONS ANALYS 5 ; : , is " i. 9 ST_ 32-2257 
machine shop practices and read Diuepr 4 aii. : A f & Good closers Lat Dp. 2-5 manent position. Good salary wor Ak PARENTS Toliege Ereds-|~ 
WEAPONS SYSTEMS ° . . "?T : ~ . . Day r+ Weer tar "4 ar " ane Grady a . SECRETARY.STENO. 
. Pl. ~“NING CONC TY TS rr Accountin _ M . Cr one tor a! ¥ . OF moe a pry 
) mf : " KIND x one R . . Age to 0 Some research bactk- 
ELECTRICAL INSPECTORS ss a acide a es 9 | Hus B FURNITURE CO. /SRaRCARRe i ote | Malt Mat aE Be 
: y rs. "> SS oa ———EE ’ 704 408 ; 
ley e's and carry saiarves in excess -+ > 250 | Need Clerks ZA... - = 7 Vash ngton Bo ard of Trade 


Must be able to use test equipment in testing “is Kot. Mw 


electronic units from Diveprint anc specs | 4 PART TIMERS nd eo ae CLERKS LADIES | Mr acer, ST. 3-3598 
| SECRETARY 


y 


feea —Wanceer’ 


WASHINGTON INTERVIEWS wis acc, etuae te eect ram | he ee 


THE MACHINISTS | > = wip m= suris aoina Cenveulant ube mpust High School Graduates | 
TURRET LA ) ) JULY 10, 1] and 12 : = ay. © af wns Experienced or inexperienced | mS bess vis Dieasant wo 


, : : mo +4 : . | | pave benefits af aes 3 ths 
SPRAY PAINTERS EN ae 7 = rt DAY-FRI Eno we) TELEPHONE — | Soot" Piao, 
9 A.M.-3 P.M ve ee ee Rated a8 aS racks ™ . | Bema cam rae] © CANVASSERS | MAYFLOWER, HOTEL 
PER VIEVED 7 AMS TM. | Ube on @ covfdetiat eve yas ace | STUDENTS WHITES ¢ TENG | Sat eset: “hans tl | tage te 
| on @ confidential leve you are Calling from your own vate secretary te eqrenive, ja ‘e- 
Monday Through Friday unadie to contac? us Pere, please commrurucate with = il time rs by , FOR APPOINTMENT | home. Salary. 4 hours « | saa Me pecker 
bs 7 - \ . J ’ sere : : In 
" : De Me ne cal cay. w 
imes by Appointment FikY Vit fils per ee POE: Be ) 
Other T s y Dp PROFESSIONAL EMPLOYMENT , wo. 4 * 3000 Av Agron Boulevard Call 


* > -_ - 
e- - - 
ie ’ 


: 


. Pleasant voice and willing 
FALLS CHURCH, VA to 


ERCO DIVISION et ips, |e Sas ae = Ot 282 | FoR APPOINTMENT 


ons ceaiiiane oe Plant Entrance tt t els 5-day week. is | CALL JA. qa 5959 
MARTI N - eepetnumen: | BEGINNERS Fivileges. ‘sary 0206 month ASK FOR MISS HENTZ 
ACF INDUSTRIES, INCORP. ayaTS orric , own ; anant firm ! 11 A. M. te 1 P.M, 
BANK working con tiions —— 4 congenial | 


Riverdale, Md 3 WA. 7-4444 BE COBALTIMORE 3, Maryiaerd oC | Fre. oO sexren f= Fr: or 
EMPL. SERV. | (ansoin ce 4 gree 
00 F ot "wo Bide Prt) idren 
/ 


6 : 
- 


Sromen: 


tten 
a .. EE >| 


STENOGRAPHER " ; 


a te 4 
“celleee. tre sraéuate 
-o- 
S-% Tae. EY 
anterientiier real @etale 
whe heve imitietive ana dé 


“re © meke moner Car ix cecre- 
experience ne pneres 
be ip!ui For appoint- 


Sep end fact hich 


peece-rort 
Tete and guaeratice. « reortk 


Der 7 he. Bor uses o ond vocatien 
Rovers taseers Te F . 2Y. 
SHIRT PRESSERS 


Feperienced o'r 


restacre " 
Ape!y Crees Re*\eures 


#cTrerss Fiperencec 
6 K Noe 
WAITRESS - 


Rew’ auresi 
: a 


ee, 


> 
ws Eattern 


: @ayieme astigneer : 
no werkence or evening? 


RA . 
WAITRESSES 


EXPERIENCE AND SWEAT 
arrLy is Fr eT FS 


CLERKS 


Drug—Cigar—Candy 
FULL TIME 
Permanent Positions 
18 years or over 
Pleasant and Interesting 
Working Conditions 
Many Employee Benefits 
Paid Training Program 
OUR FEOPLFS DSTO seTOSeee SF Porro 


EMPLOYMENT res 
mm eee GO Oi BW Tet Bs 


PEOPLES DR UG STORE 


8.30 AM % 4PM Moerda 
“HO 7. 1234 


2 
7h fee Ye 
are 734 BA 


-ountarn 


APrPLY AT 
ind Peer. 


f er 


eh. 


SECRETARIES 
STENOGRAPHERS 
TYPISTS 
We heave interesting career apenings for the sbove positions 
tor those who qualify. 
WE OFFER 


Selary commenwrate « 
Work week 8 te 4 39. Morey 
Excellent leave plen 
Ernrowahie working CAMA ~™| 
Aor -comditmed ottce 

) Access to good public tranaportation 


TO QUALIFY 
(1) Good 


a a” ~, 


work record wieckh ell be rm estrgated metore 


empioyment 
(>) High schoo! education o, better 
(3) Recently employed preferred 


APP LT 
OPERATIONS RESEARCH OFFICE 
The Johns Hopkins University 
7235 WISCONSIN AVENUE—BETHESDA. MD 


INTERVIEWS 
MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY 


if you want a really interesting job in a growing 
and exciting industry, consider the Telephone 
Company. What a thrill to be able to say 
you're a part of the communications system of 
this country! You'll receive good starting pay 

. Many opportunities 
Other attractive benefits 


Make new and 


. Regular increases 
for advancement . 

Vacations with pay 

Come see us 


interesting friends. Don't wait’ 


at our employment office’ 
ijn ve NW 
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 


725 


8.30 AM. te 4.30 PM 


The C. & P. Telephone Co. 


SECRETARIES 
TYPISTS 
STENOS 

PERSONNEL CLERKS 


Various Openings—Iinteresting Jobs. 
Excellent Pay—40-Hour Week 
Air-Conditioned Offices 
Numerous Benefits 


INTERVIEWS 9 AM.—3 P.M. 


Monday Through Friday 
Other Times by Appointment 


ERCO DIVISION 


ACF INDUSTRIES. INCORP. 
Riverdale, Md. 


WAITRESSES. _ 
HOT SHOPPES 


EXNTATIVE OF TEE 


| 

S36 st 

> >. Soper 

| boute cere io 
bra? i 2 


cromets New Bompehi re ave 
t 2nd RA }-4809° 


EMPLOYMENT OFF ICE 


GRRE Exe SERV con 


Se 


ee a 


1341 G ST. NW 


er; ‘he 
= 
ss a 


co 3871 Kendal ne. Van s 
pri Ss? = si 


HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS 


me. | 
tid 


y N 
hth and Kearne 
tremep. Rees 
»- 6990 


nd $29 50. 
t = wider Share ae Pm. a | 

bh i: $10 CO S-s702 
. oe. New dee. rm 
om. Li +3990 
96.50 per ek 


27 


‘aan. ‘Peet 
RA. 3-2)18 
e 


bath 

upper NW. section. | 
AIR-CONDITIONED 
CARILLON HOUSE 


2500 WISCONSIN AVE. NW 


— SS 


i mon LJ +4005. 


nice fura 


: 
ates 


Vic. WASH BLYD. 


ene ar AVE 
ae Floors | Be rm. kit. and bat In apt 
Ee ry ee TA aude oe ons 
: — or ve _ 
mae te ‘T.. 


t BEDROOM—$68 & $77.50 


Si ad. be attrac. cha | ae Ah, 1 0208 
= SBI = : 


nee 
elecets. “modern Pike 72 by te $120 


$010 Lee Bola 


ARLINGTON, Ni — 


LEBE an. | 
l-bedrm. apt... 870 thet utils. Kit 


cause a. J and rest iperaser 
au ° ryer im _ isunpdary. | 
a Tune 6 so 


hed- 
ind) - 


rking and 


=“ 
- -me 


iclenciea, }. > and 
r Gr Dole 


, : r 
vic “Suse RD 
- bee DROOM APT 


wtils nary faciliti 
1o “sho pine and bus 
end Pentagon 


M_ T Broyhill & Sons 


a. 4-1300 


EFFICIENCY APARTMENTS | . 


jeted 46 fireproof 
bout ful : cc, + and 
Doro Drape 


A 
buiidine 
furnished by 


DAILY BD Occup 


ma ae 


Secretarial service. sundeck ever. 
jeoking entire city. am plified mas- 
ter television antenne srstem. ge- 


recen' 
jecation 


. 


~ IMEEM vane TIME 
ba wer ~ — = — 
. ~—+ an? -~— ce @ oes > 


—_—_—_—_————— 
. rr ACerS exc chanee compenionsn o 
pro 


— 200MS WITH SOARD 
ae —Ams 


race facilities i2 minetes 
White House 


Your Inmepection Invited 


CALL EM. 2.8800 
“SCREENED PORCH 


2-bedrm. apt 


‘ea ~. & fer room 
Reo. _ Port - 


2? 
exuce) 


mea. : 
im. er bus JA $2105, 
eat 2a. on ‘Nice 
sic-cond. TY: ge 
peopie_ co s- 2499 


Car 


t 


yo. 


Si4 ek 
ot rox ‘Tow —— 


> 
@urre tor te. 
> eee 


American Finance Co 
SEE MR. HEINECS 
7932 Geoeroe Ave 


s wg Md 


or 


vy bHntt, or 
2298 


yr 


YOUNG LADY 


rae Seart Ave 


ye 


= 
-~2a7 er 


2-BEDRM. APT... 
1-BEDRM APT. $95 


og oy 3387 0 te ee 


Mrs 


BI GGEST AND BEST 
That's HARTNETT HALL’S 
claam besed on good food... 
gud -. pleasant 
roores and tots of enter 
tanmment and companionship 
$14 per week and up 
HARTNETT HALL 
1426 21ST ST. NW. 
HU. 3-5432 


ry 
churches end jr st or 
on premises 

PHONE 


TS MIN Ae ae TOWN 
EFFICIENCY APT. 


TW AMSTERDA APTS 
2701 14TH § 


decorated apt 


Creme CARE 
am «(ONE estey infants te 6 


rj ; 
‘3r3 ey 16_ 3A 8-49) y = 
Gi. de = a6 peers 


” @ther 
ieee wg es ses “Seek. 


oa (perenne 


s ~ 
> - “Bo ye eee eet. 36. Meee 


Se PART TIME 
CAREER LADY 


.u' Somer cet cart 1469-898 
ore Sours ee me 
“e »“2ua 


*® Serer pace ane 
> 


: oo .” @ ¥Farse Ce mmc 60 dretres stpady 


_MARYLANO MOTHERS Bail. em 


-eceo™mine ar —t,- a > end «rv. 
“me cus @erzarct a vw omar 
Ca 
108 773 sT «Sw 
COUN ‘Tie GIRLs 
wTale’ GIRis 
Wy. ALL 


ot ? 
oe orm i di oad e — 


a>. 23-5008 
= 


5 
= ‘ dans 


ROSSLYN, VA. 
HOT SHOPPE 


WAITRESSES 


rz ry dea 
se @aewter begroe 


, =. . § bode * 


Promotion Dept. 
. 7 - : c*7e8. private 
CLERK 2 st. =z. 713 Shee rm. for man. 
bemme grivs. Li $0639 na 
PCronxT CR — Barter 


—— rms. 
—2 soc 


— s*s) 452 
oft 


“Se MeL 
The wane ington Post 


1.B.M. Operators 


Eaner em-ed 
a+ 


Card Puncheng 
-e rg 


- 
~ *» 


an? a 
Ch tered Fac. 


J See 1 


as. 
Excellent 


| 


- 
-.5 ~r« ~g { ane ¢ 


~~ 

AsnnD» 

SAM 
M-—-—4ay 


m Pew 
te 4 PM 


rough Froday 


MELPAR, INC. 


Sul. - Y 
7 > 


ot Wee ngnouse 
Brake Compary 


| Basis mess sor 
-. Tes « dee 5 


-# 
Pitts na i-y 


rant ou. a= 2 and 4 win 


NEW YORK AVE 


BLADENSBURG RD NE 
HOT SHOPPE 


WAITRESSES 


Bear 

az¢ res: SE ef WR- 

| out bit: leeeerr priv OO. 5-596 

even mer after 6 10 weekends ary- 
STay AY Tag 


HAWTHORNE ae 
2134 G ST. NW. RE. 77-4027 


wt 
2 


WA, 7-4444 


31 


“my tToundc 
10.8 “Os 
care 


nee 
desk er CALI 
BORMAN BERNSTEIN 8rne¢ 


2-, 3-BEDRM. APTS. 
HOUSE TYPE 
Completely Furnished | 
JEFFERSON VILLAGE | 


i7s4 ARL. BLYD. FALLS CHURCH 
DAILY § TO 5. GUN. 12 TO 4 


JE. 2-5500 


Sa" 


eo mes sf : ihe *' 
+ bome. mother « ates 

fer ch. -7 4-Or. or 

¢ay care Country bome HE 49464 
Der care ranch. 10 ocres 


TURN. or UNFURN. 33 
= -5 room ap" 


aa 
per me 


pt seas 
RA. 6 "Ds 


E boost AND. 


-coend Ultramoders .. de 


« 4 rm 53 kitch 
eth. Adults. = 1-83 7 
ALEX Acts. wel ! ~~ A. 


*i@ mansten — 
a abs 2- 1910 "a1 


We 


RA 


1701 16TH St NW. 
BACHELOR APT..$64.50 
1-BEORM. APT... .$110 
2-BEDRM APT $140 


a®acd eTts. iis Vt oe —Levely ely furatshed spaciow 
ort. beth 
> eguits an “qiane te everr- 


——e, 2 rm. fern 


ox 


etc sue stew «at ; 
Gece or CALL MRS 
"-1000 


ORM 
DEMAN 


DON NA LEE 
Suburban Living With 
City Convenrence 
Extra Large 2 Bedrms. 
Bus, Schools, Shopping 
Children Welcome 
Closets Galore 
Soundproof, Fireproof 
PETS PERMITTED 


Furn.-Unfurn. 

RESERVE NOW’! 

CALL R THOMPSON 
je 3-123) 

~ EFFICIENCY APTS. 


IMMEDIATE oce upency - lar “ ant 
i , 24 ’ 
tud 


$73 TO 


cooling | eure 


B ea 


show wers 


s7° 


tie 


BEDRM 
TRANS? *'Goop PARKING | 


HYATTSVILLE, MD. 


om 
special summer rate if 
them alse evellabic WF 
| and linens furnl ae 
elev end switchboard 
don Wa 


oe street. ideal 
2-778, ot. Gay 
bt royT 

L231 Fist 


.~ 
ie 


side 
Nice! > turn. | bedrm 
nel, 55> month BA. 6-798). 
rT. —im. RIL S10 wk. 2413 1Sth 
ae Ra 3-271. Sd er oe 
aS prt 
Urilitves De 


st 


~- ice fare : 
evci cn st Sot: 
> — 


—3 
5793 3 


Attractivels furnished 


m 
3a 
bac apt "pine 
with frep! - 
ove. ent... 6125 me 


orking mother 
vt. home with eme 
or chilad during day 


: 
See 6-7 


‘ALEXANDRIA 
eon Lg? BELLE VIEW 
1t13—Small apt 

BEAUTIPUL __ VERNON 
Re Pe ool PAY RGURDS 
ALL PREMISES 


SWIMMING POOL 
WADING POOL 


EXCL, se wd POR RESIDEN 
AT BO ADDETIONAL Cos 


mile south ef 
rom ¢ewntewn D 
ain pave and 


ivoir 


At 20 min 
Cc. Pent 


4. 


a’ mosphere on 
ereunds im country civ’ 6 
sii city conveniences 
partin \owes’ rent 
above leaturts in entire area 


iBEDAM Apt tos 38 


3-8 7... APT 
i IL es INCL epep 
ALSO AY 
Rental Office 


S01 Belle 
or _ dally” taroue rough 


Resort 


ee Bivd 
Prides 4.4 


apts 
sevh a2 
>. 


entr ro wansp 


. Se near 
attic fan. gar- 
reh. private 


Air-Conditioned | 
DE LUXE KITCHENS 
1 and 2 Bedrooms 
RESERVED FOR ADULTS 
Calt JA. 7-6660 for Appt. 


OoOOLrY 
Shoreham—} rms 
age Gwpess. son 


Trimm poo 
POR 
$160 . 
te 
MAD 


BOLLING 
: 1. »ed 


| 


'2-BEDRM. APT 
BATCHELOR APT. $72 


is w=in. "er 


incivuding 


i 
rear screened 


& rms 


A assed - 
st 
a 


tractive 


Remocried and rede 
_ vine ro 


3051 


Sil 16h ot. aw 


ana 2 bedrme 
control New 
ecjein Army 


pat " 


E<bA “the ll & ret Amore 
nartnh. ¢ 


Bea 


° 
rLe 
Tm. « 


a8 Weici? “Ai = 
ap + 


nad) : 
a OE APT 


= n” 7 
ne 


srr 


DISTRICT HEIORTS. MD 


LOWEST RENT 


1 BEDRM—$63.25 Up | 
wag.|2, BEDRMS. —$75.00 Up 
FURN. APTS., $81.50 Up 


INCLUDED 


PER Visa Fs 5” commer 


‘Cal RE. 5-8000 
FOR BROCHL AND 
FURTHER INFORMATION 
DISTRICT HEIG 


7a? 
‘sé 
Dalle 5-4 


~ 
x > 


HTS 


Henghts Pkwy 


Sat 10-3. Sunder :-4 


DUPONT CIRCLE AREA 


Fw yo By 5 


= ; ey 
ied re ae 
iia SEAR WICt 
IDAHO AVE. NW. 


Le AND CATH aves. 
rm ain 


Loree srs 


(BET 


4-.% 


Dath e yyy includes 
WN 


GE 
GARDENS 


2700 QUE ST. NW 
$130 


aes poe Al =F UT TLITIES 
diag aroum 
an -\ 
reciated 
ook service 
iy Ses oF 
‘Dp 21466 
NORMAN meee Syndicates 
ARVARD wo- 
“hy 


room nitthes ain - 
a 


4207 nes ‘Tf 


Chapel rea 
“eders. Kitchen 
On PREM com 


SMITHY C 


ST_ 3-3300) 


<4 


pa 
H 


. ving t= 
sna bath 


=) 
ae OM ARMS—-Soecious 
wing Tm cming rm 
httchon ema beth: wtilities 


LORCOM ARMS.—Unusuallr 
2-ded rm rs: vine om. seperate 
a = chen end bath. ut 
ities ura $95 

apts. Save Pe . 
~ and fact 


ae oe 


: jae 
ie. Real Estate ding 


N PARK 
OXON TERRACE MD i 


we .-cep' 54 on: 

Bo. ng are 
Navy Research. Cen 
ee ° 


—~ 


— 
rm.. dinette xste bath 
neat “hoo! a ane 
2 ~* 
ties 


ocreened perc 
shMoprping center 
lus wttli D-a296 


. e 
and 2 bed : 
dew an 
7 mach Nr s ca IU * eons 
A —intire Gre, foor 
im new j-an ite aree | 
: — "o . iy aac can 
. 


trance 375 
| 


ee S anEERREEEe 


KIRKWOOD 


| Bedrm. $73.50 
2 Bedrms., from. .$81.50 
\includes All Utilities) 
~~ 4 ArT. On DisP't 
a .e 
Yeroundés 


OPEN DAILY. @UW ‘TIL SP w 
Free Brochure on Request 


ay 
mh Ae 
* Sho 2D. “ Cen ere 
Menic Grove BcPheos 


AP. 7-418 2733 


. 
bedrm 


+ 


r=. 70 up 
_ 


= gl 
ntiand “clin. Boe pe taled 


eves 


issoc it Real 


dinette kit 
s"2 


VERMONT AVE. Xw.. 
town > Inte 


bi "ELIETON' TERRACE” 


heat and het water] 

Cen Bi) 

SHAN NON a LOCH 
-234' 


NE vay Pentagon 


‘ 


Atha 


2-BDRM. HOMES 


LA SALLE 


fares SH: ee OEE 


serv 


iv. rm cal ta wo 


| 2yas. oh 14tn “ot 7. oN 
ie = HOT ER EARDERE 
coe oS a 


igundry fa lerely rete ) ide devine. 
exce) 
1 _ 2 a ae 


2 Bedrms.—$89 

3 Bedrms.—$105 
oe ATi APLF 

ate ssi 


eee 
ews 


iain at} - sual deren 
THE WARWICK 
3051 IDAHO AVE. NW 


etils. f Mu Ant CATE AVES } 
Levew i rm ne* 
‘bids 


———E o_o " y 


secretarial service 
Naylor Gardens 


halls 
churches, geed transs. end s>oo- 
1 BEDROOM, $74 & $77.50 | 


US LIVING ~ 
2 BEDROOMS. $88 & 92 in_an Atmosphere 
UTILITI@S INCLUDED 


Found Only at 
THE WOODNER 


12 MING mee “ 
FACING RF 
Now vailable 


Efficiency Apts 
1-Bedroom Apts. 
2-Bedroom Apts. 
Air-Conditioned 


dintne 
"i 


cats t 
ste. Dow 
ie co-operstive : 

ne 


| bear m 
bath let fir 
pilus utils 


ee 


ss 


reserved  - eae 


hear 
ter ce 


co 5.7744 


724 


Ariandria— 1 -bed.- | 
apt. completely redec. 868 50. | 


rms 


pyi pein 


ah cnee prt 
ne < 
inea 


i> = 


aki 
shopping 


25 30TH ST. SE 
iA). 2-6100 


$68-$73.50 
rilicrest Meignts 


iO. 8.5140 
6TH eT NW 


oi CONDITIONED 
' , = eos HY 3 seee HU. 3.4400 


¢3- | SRMBLURE sasklnd oleasani vine 
conditions within reaseneble os: 
Gtcsesee oy & balanced bucert 
SOUTHERN HILLS 
300 LIVINGSTON TERR. SE. 
‘CcCONY =) * ANDFETWas 
EFFICIENCIES! ‘AND 2 
BEDROOM SPACIOUS APTS 


4 | 


Md 


recom 


- 

% 
he. oe : 
ed 


treet park — ye 


REAI wy. co. oF 


ARLINGT 
[A 5-090 
REDECORATED 


CLOSE TO EVERYTHING 
NEWLY DECORATED 
2- BEDRM APT $81 50 


SCLUDES UTILITIES 
TERRACE aPre ie 1D : 
: ; 


, - we 4.%9.)9° 
MOS HO 2.4020 


APT HOTEL 


1-BEDRM. APT 
aa See APT 


., 
- 


ROG! 


hd AL K TO WORK 


~ = 


ha ~ an 
th oat n as 
one rr 
tne : Al Gesk aid CA. 
we AVAILABLE 7.9 LL 
[zk 8-216 


Phone M 


Re “hooens = 


ON ' 
SHR: rt OHot NORMAN BERNSTEIN Syredice:- 


Apartment Homes in Good Hope Hills 
10 Minutes Drive to the Capitol 


LARGE PORCHES 


Overlooking Suitland Parkway, Oxon Run 
Park. Picnic Pyaar and New Golf Course 
Open to Public, at these Reasonable Rent- 


| BEDRM. & PORCH—$71 to 85.50 
2 BEDRMS. & PORCH—$81 to 94.50 


BUILDINGS 06 detached 4-farntiy 
sf come nm tome . pape e* ee . & 
earcen 
@uiet 


an¢ 6-famiie bul iding: 
oe. hon od ‘ome reserved for ac 

-apec. Fh heme , 
triendly neighbo: hood in suburban setting _ = mospne ; 


chti¢-e@ 


cress-ventilation te every «ot. 


APARTMENTS Three exposures. 
high elevation and open surroundings make the lerge ary rooms 
space. La ac- 


wnurtualy cool Laree y rm. and dim rge porches 
prieing bedrm. end kitthen make poentbin outdoor thine. dining 
enc sieeping in summer fenced -'n 
sate olay Unusually : 
Frances; plembing 


; 
vidual for weehers; cutside drying 


Wired for alr condition 
incletes gee, hest end 
menis S@vailad.e fer immediate eccupanc 


ph gy Short walking distance te 9 ene-fare bus 
shopping centers. schesls and theater Cumvenient to 
Navy Mydregreshic. Andress and Rolling Pields Waval 
Laboratory. Navy Yard. and éewntewn. Off-ctrect Parkins 


LOCATION: Geod st Ditties open every [mn oat 


. 
anc wieinity. Renta! flee open every ae: 900 
30th 2c. BE LO. i-3300 ~ A roam? Tatian INC 


few desirable apar 


| 


BRENTWOOD 
VILLAGE 


GARDEN APARTMENTS NEAR 
THE HEART OF WASHINGTON 


..FROM $62 50 
FROM $80.00 
Open Monday thru Fridey ‘Til 8. Seturdey, 9.5; Sundey, 
1311 RHODE ISLAND AVE., NE. 
DE. 2-3202 


PRIVATE HOUSES 
OR, 


DUPLEX APARTMENTS 


First Floor Large Living Room, Dining Room 4 Kitchen. 
second Floor: 2 or 3 Bedrooms and Bath. 

Each House Has Front and Back Yards, Lawn Care. Gar- 
bage_ and Trash Removal, Gas, Water, Heat, Laundry 
Facilites and Repairs Provided Free. 


SCHOOLS AND SHOPPING CENTER ON SITE 


2 Bedrooms, $93—-3 Bedrooms, from $109.50 
ALSO FEW FURNISHED arre. 


JEFFERSON VILLAGE 
1734 ARL. BLVD., FALLS CHURCH, VA 


; » cr 
JE. 2-5500 Ds fount: \ ede 4 


Sn 


GRAND OPENING 
IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY 
= PARK SHIRLINGTON APTS 


Come! etely Air Conditioned 
Free Private Swimm Poo! 
Wading Pool for Children 
IGM OFF SHIRLEY HWY. IN aRLENOTON. va 
a“ 
| and 2 Bedroom Apts. from rom $1 14.50 
ALL. UTILITIES AND SERVICES 
Spacious room with an sbundance of closet and cabinet 
space Roomy kitchens with Gerbege disposals exhaust 
9.|-cu_-ft. freezer-top Westinghouse refrigerator, sep- 


arate >room closet 


12 


to 


—_ 


fan. 


MASTER TY ANTENNA 
PRIVATE PARKING ACCOMMODATIONS 
TILED CORRIDORS AND MANY OTHER FEATURES 


CONVENIENT p> PENT N EXCELLENT snorrr 
URCHES AND noo. ” 


MODEL APT FURNISHED BY MAZOn MASTERPIEC TS 
OPEN FROM 10 AM. TILL 9 PM. DAILY 
‘7 ° Shirley Her te Ghirt ri'agten 


— an ar ts ri nee, Re 

PHONE OR WRITE FOR FREE BROCHURE 
KI. 8-1900 

4503 3ist St. South, Arlington, Va. 


shops" pe 


reugh = 
on 3ist st. South 


oe —<—————— 


f, 


Contineeé on Pellewing Pace 


<< ae 


APTS., UNFURNISHED 346) APTS., UNFURNISHED 36) APTS... UNFURNISHED 36) art 1 64'SALE. ©. C. HOUSES (THE WASHINGTON POST end TIVES HERALD 
my Hosa 


A D, $89 - =D sece Taesdar. July 19, 1956 oD 
3 RATES, i wear ) ny : | VYecent. 3- sow erick, beme! fiver ro 2d De 
ae inland 7~oeRD 


r : th. . not water. 
av a is, ak is Pe Bot : " hs ae a. es NATE REALTY - ’ g : | Pon ain — ~ ew - (x 18. ou & 
ae Se 8 eal 4 Kester an ETS Be, 2 "| Upper N . Hampshure Ave 


ose lea &- : 
(emee A ane cept ei - DIAIZ Lat C ” - ; -. — ana Je sod 8-reom houses WE and st : * Th ma. . an a ans a. led ~ aPraotED at . ate Ca) af s tyle bun talew 
1-Bedroom Aots $81. 50 attract ay ant a VB os a ea ,. --— a i a ¥. E ‘ Be ee oe nt te . ; ' | cquahed-in evpamaadie at: 
tor . APP : » level 
roums Patio! with terms | BEtowd. bi 9 stat 508-4363 | Secared’ on’ rection BF ecres| SKALMUS REALTY. z = 
2 Dedreem Pots —$91 50 ™. dining ores, bedrm.. moder: - - ve Exc ol maker ' ; 
Hiss ties tncinds | Bt, wae Ria 44) can | wr WO caprro: er  -¥E_*-fi%8 IP 3-0 
; giass jalousits 13th and SPRi “NG ROAD 


rm 
) ‘ bedrm ; 
) Aa: M } . : N ; & is . . — — 
conter rma. elo ont to shoppine . A SROADNOOR—Cen ‘i moat rf ; — <= “4 bat $13 9S0—$950 DOWN 
[= min. Ww downtown Wash APT ae . ons iM ec ven! : te} i 3 — = d s ™ 
~ : . ar ; ay . RA 


SALE SUSUR. HOUSES 67D. SALE SUBURB. HOUSES } HOUSES 67MD. . 
ee (eC —~ ¥ i ae 


te Pentagon and : ike 
WwW Annex mips. | ting is a Ad ero! Shopping Center 


WASHINGTON-LEE APTS. or cOLABAR he LT ereetine a bed | to Dec. 31 by auaistant secretary of ‘ , purehas cone | nice yard ee wenn ‘cee meds 
x ~ carpetin in : Th ' . , : ~ . ’ "ce ; om = er . ae 
a Sana Ac | — nena a sl idle Ta Peatentiaee:| RA. Ak, RinrS wedrtoees ont S| sat RORacttacs Wimtiv"ie.| 2 COMPLETE APTS. | © cme 2 : 
ys « Pore 0-1 mm. _— us ane a av _ PEE ORLY e958 DOWN is A "HU MPHRIES 
beng PRANDT Wine aT st ROSEMARY ' rus ) r. dining nes : | .4 . " TRUST MOTES WANTED 61a mm we & Cc STS. BE 


Ree’ 
Sa ———— m @ Titet-clast Bele nbeor > Wee ~ we 1 h(6hh | 
A PROPERTY MAMAGEM T 44A “ILL BUY O§ PLE 00 tron "7 2&8 | 2 " 
2 BEDRMS.—$79.50 | Da rt ents Property Management 


£m | MR. JAMES—DI: 7-1655) tome. teow perch Full rile? 
nm. TOOms. Gimost\new bide ae |. Ze. 3-BEDRM APTS ‘ PHILIP T ATKINS SALE. INVEST. PROPERTY 62 “i : *: " | $750 DOWN 
178 


NIDAD AREA 
ans. Vitis, JO 3.8 


aA... Pp “ ; _ " r + COLOR ZD— Dut «. BED nanc 5 a ress Lesuie 
DELUXE APARTMENTS | Make Your Selection Today | fine oo, MA etek DE 24087 sR RSP ay Nerbean marry} «= LUXURY HOME =| om. eruce. 2 
SO White Pr st Very larse 1 MOVIN ' D> STORAG > , a ginia Rea als Needed up.ex = & -J 14TH & KENNEDY ST WW oe a ee 
bedrm” wep rm “Heth «1! SWIMMING and BR ae ee | Jk 2-3 dees. Fh digg ALE. ©. C.. HOUSES * ae ome se so. tema i. techn gore oe mew fe ~~ -- 
rm are ig Kew 4 - Mane. WADING p LS SA-T MOVING Sma: or Fig oo ‘— n ceduneatne Park . : .s : [3 : , , as. bok te ane tf oe 4 
v ( { ) any time as rates LY merncan mr r r porrh. . . oo - 4a = — “ Cad 
chi este Moveks— saomical | YOu Are Considering NEW SPLIT LEVEL , . : 1. - im <2 - 
ANACOSTIA i Private Bus Service to Capital CAL Pas esnyume. JO. &-85)7 > : f the cond - , : : -— 2 LOHR 
= 7 st = ir Transit & Silver Spr ng Shopo' ng ime P o 7 4 a ie yn aban ) : Er ARK : : ovr os . 
ae -O#c ’ . , 1e = a : ; : . _— 7 = s —~ ’ ™ " be — : { ba - 
; ‘is C “Re-d IDEAL FOR CHILDREN fr) ds & ences. ste. AD. ¢-0617 Ry » bet Pee ae = - SA ont eter ices 7 ) Two FAMILIES 
EEE Cai 099 RAST-WEET Hwy pide Lr BG AREAX REALTY INC od 2 baths. a few sven y  Mastioy semis ag 
SILVER oe ro. | any place . gn “ ) ¢own to fas amily rm c- 000 DO . . a ' 
— <0. 363 ; STRICT ; Ties : ~ —~sz " ' 7 & Weshing' & °° ~ 2 ned = orerc: * ra - $2 WWN The e._. Bis 
V_ 4-898 ' . > = Pails Church 5 rage r ss D 930 : . oon 4 time offered. A sriect ée- 
TEMAS TEM CALL JU 8- 1170 é rms, low as 990 pe a ae 


gered ~ 8 WR \o 
cred 


—— 5 t . ——— | : - —_ ' 
HONE : a «xt or * wal)- ) garee & et = ; 5 , . - - : — ; 
DONNA LEE FOR PAB BROCHURE | HOUSES FURNISHED : er AMER CAN UN UNIV. PX. Oe eS Se eS 
‘ ‘ : arse 2-BR Fe nee mot air-¢ . : , al 50D sect? eS Di 4 ; 
Suburban Living With Large tecention halt iiins teow burcsandy Village Ares arking Hear Diy te , t knetty-pi “ret! am CT Cline — Wiens | HOMES 
bath Hess flaar of da ° det. he -| ot ten Mow AAD A. SCHA- _ “SS c n 2 = 
City Conver cre ) > Mi 151 Cc en a , nts me . “a 9! w —s reecent Hebe ang peweer rm De-!| 699 = S508 a. a! ~~ = soe ars ee I ) ROBERT E LOHR 
Extra Large 2 Bedrms Aye soigie” ab ail + oh around house.| os lower” t sts. 2 one Sa. | oe. din rm. fall bem | tet sepsis oaregs ‘E be geen br) oe — 8S Se oe wt ere BE. 4-000 THs PM RA, 6-2008 
Bus, Schools, Shonpin SHA! ” Jc - Lath mo | Le BAR 1CO 0 LAS pe >< ° te ice Velley shops. | aor 9 ss CHE fi) == ——- . 
CHILDREN WELCOME | Aa BA. £808 : = = — ez iO Sitices 0 pe0- 2! ‘4 Fash onable NW ction } 
semenom, | GRE hogs PS, Ro A ZOBk| Srnat alae =| GLEN ECHO HEIGHTS | row er ge ie, Bet CASH BOYER OR 
Soundproof, Fireproc ENWAY rend PS pee ee A mi-det foc. 1 + si" tres . Many ¢ oul a - ane 3 6m . i 2 crane = | pring. 1) 
ners . . a... 7 - : " Bias ona is ; 4 a 23 . as -~— tr ul A joors - - +¢ ~ . ei ;, pS 
PETS PERMITTED A carnrrs Deve orumrr | bouse . eet 1 Silice ar} Ment Army Map Servies. cotr 2-| mirrored "wall parted | __SOUTMEAST REai Tx | = Se > ACRES — $19,950" 
Ave. and A St. SE ‘mae : rm Will, oe peter to] peer coves. wcosengl = | DIRECT FROM OWNER : a 8 
Furn.-Unfurn Esa ol BAKER & SON I Mrs. Arn-| or WO s-05. ag Se Fe - EF cL mat oop yr er apmeeme’ cat) RAMBLER—CLOSE IN 
: Le THAN 10 wcre - M . st. Ale “ | 7 s Knotty 
RESERVE NOW! VIA NEW £ CAPITORN BRIDOS | | " ATTENTION “OROZCO & BALLIF | ome: Hi “Gentle 
CALL. MR_ THOMPSON ho ee ; 


~ if sal Tear " mer oe 2 
; — 4 ek. trom ; : 3. a ; ; a ; ? ning 
Beautifully Decorated -_ . DOCTORS- DENTISTS trom Ga op. ME _ RS ma _ = fas leant Sem ? teen. pasenen 
; | - > “BAR NASY WwOoos ; . ——r : _ ' 
JE. 3-123) 1-BEDROOM APT. FROM Near bus to Per +d e use being ¢- | RIGHEST ce —— 


carport 

water ard heat, 

- BI Soar ha to Branco ee eee er eee 5S a | Same ang ee, SRAM 0 Cs 
CLAREMON | $63.50 be . . RIVER” HOUSE ~- . ’ ‘a o oa —_ fait . Fike 3 ovathaie ——— a - — 3 Tet —wer eRe TwERY op.sered 


DOLOR / an : _ arp rambier 
2-BEDRM. APT FROM ever vail -orn t aed : : . : o ‘iz be — 


i 


- . . : Tn 3 : , 
" n D m Aft . orest aa, : Lecem & Gr f2 >. BA. 7s = ;, — . = — os l bieck free: ce 
Simplex & Duplex Apts $78 Fe Ry Torn, alee seve mi nel §; — t brick apt 


evel ‘7 - = See ol | BUDNET pry coh Ss aT me. : . 4 Graham & Co .& 
; ; _— ; ' 7 ~~. . _—ea—t aree stwuce . x ~ —o one «~t r anc ? me ¢ * r We : e- s = — ———, ae ; 
; ” ~ . : : : > : . - : . . : hy +... r i ‘ _ 
2 BR 9 re Sas Be | Fame on ae On cea location. Sueer' must . 7 F pepeeee So Tes.| “FOUR BEDROOMS” 
. . — of ne i To . + M Q ie. rm. ee a a - ' ‘ & . ' . 2s *o . ae i rom 2 — A — .. = . _ r .- Ont ~d ve . | ; , 
INCL. ALL UTIL. EXCEPT elec . ‘ 


aa 4 = 4 
pletely iurt ‘23 ; Isc eo, BS, ' a 16.500. “Tr Eni — Ht Aes. — ° <¥ 
+ , = ; - pie bE | ter : ; OINOr ve 
Thru vrentils on : . RIGGS PLAZA Re 4 : , - - . ht. Boke any ’ a. on rms 3 bach = : 
modern &i' n ipment W CAPRITZ DEVELO MENT cI Caly 3 lex from ai’ BUSINESS PROP. RENT : IDOE RD AREA eer 2) 
Dienty i J | v- ‘ te Are. an4 Ham) ten NE &r > irvel cont Berarsp Bran peer. Love 4 years 
chopping cent 23 thre rm 2 yy 3 ee u A—2 new stores gr offices siten u m uni e - 
\elopmen a 


premp' 
aap 4 "he vith dre et weve Kew —- : ; Al aoe. Lf 
an EXCEPTIONAL july 


. - . Jiu BRIT 4 ; +- aor 
. : CLOSE-IN Riocs Paki ety S~Rer — ™ ae Te . = |. 908 
ABOUT OUR FURNISHED LS years lease MM : - | | 2 sccvithas APTS . —_ HABE “TREES 
wnt - : WW : t 
a WIRED POR AIR-CONDITIONING sonrm ARLINGTON fa-iG| $ a — +> CHEVY CHASE B C—s-roem >| PRIVATE ENTRANCES |... SPOT CASH . yp a Eo 
: BEDROOM APTS 7 50 La ; replace t parking = along — ire = ar iinaaits MODERN KIT. & BATHS oa os : 
ar : 1. 2-8003 2-BEDROOM APTS.—$1 aa Sacake iss KE G-O007_ | Soist, "Phone PE doh Mr RES 20 fo. a. 5S Full Bsmt., Oi! H.-W. H.|~ 0; ox ACT Nn 
Wkdys. 9-8 — en el ee WOODL * oe REY CHASE—Owner must sell, . ~ UICk (ON 
o~— — . Rent Includes Ges. Heat and - - All O O — ris . : om : : vous 0.6 " $495 DOWN Cech of Comoe = 
AIR-CONDITIONED Hot Water 3 ™" c ; eves furan rT ne oor i ; t ah oad ess. Jposson RY Ai TOR _s »! — ate. 
' otire top Goor, IT3T & st. aw! 6 ; bat - -f- Spot , tHorme 
CARILLON MOUSE fear dent Shep. and Sche Artax Realty ik . Oi s , for immed D< Lach : a i 25 Pen ~“COLORED— WOODRID SOR 4 EN = = 
2500 WISCONSIN AVE. NW RENTAL QPPICE OPEN Da SPRING VALERY ABER le 0: Juz) space. aporex. 36 ft, by 313 ft_| WC 2 we} , | DETACHED BUNGALOW SPOT CASH + Same eareeel Property in 
" os n St. KE RA 604) = 4 aE Comp forat shed ‘- Air-coné!' . »0 — ug? _ 4 3 -betl . vt mm is > - 4 =. : = "Sas = : e 
]- BEORM APTS COLORED—$55 i ~ —s 8195 eb ® } bee =_s. ing ecoust. . ~— , 3 eon goed concttics . : : ; 3 beens : TE> BR : - . a _— ——< — JAMES ral CON ¥ & CO. 
ith ever 4 LIKE NEW. Nr..E. Capitot . ee ' oor tie, 150-. Beer! Die [| Comm. ove G nt 10. VACANT A Comsenwnce . yi 
rm. kit. dine ; oh = ‘ NC ; -— - “NEED 4 “BEDROOMS? - 
ice Redec : refrie. . Fee yy. Ld ‘ cf exe: vie , ms DOU GLASS € BULLOCH & C , i’ ts Basa an ROOFS mBatey > s4s9| E.! 
Ay nter gs, -$9 iia at Or pel ’ = pt ee) | ee rm . 4. ~ have select group ° a 
feb Aer antenna. | ILORED | if. moer. BUSINESS PROP. SALE 48) recrestion =. = | and ‘COLORED VACANT _ or Fat A: — 
mspection Invited Benning rits. Apts. . iv. rm. din rm. 3 bedrms.| SETEESDA-WiE for Jost) SHANNON & LUCHS CO. ‘KE | 1327 Jefferson St. NW 
CALL EM 2-8800 . : ‘ usiness we . : 


7 : 
: Your's jease : cel ent ues Geergctews re sivma” Wieased Detached—Beautitul 
La one made easy! Exce! BEDROOM—$67 | Me mond. EM. 3-is00 on Tr re \ "Zocsendert a, comet School = Prices 
fe DC, shows > : Sa) ae oe oe 2 a under 630.6 . : 
Seiad 4-3400 : . BEDROOMS—$77 bri Pew deo : _ ie ————- CO  --  * : _ 
: ; . re . =. r = raic 
ive Within Your |“ OT tcu. a ment eS oh AQ to pb -— et sireet ita "sOeeRT GRAY Co. 
Budget at Th . eS iwc SPros Mite Wick a : S| 2o6_Miarerth Dn Sire Seine, 
ese ’ See | OS - or ‘men . — : ater hall Cotenia a“ yey Fe pt ne 2 3 a = Prince a County 
Rentals i. beth. $79.50 “ann ee ee ee Se prox. 1500 se. ft. near *;. oa cm. Las. if —Modern bri x - = ome’ j-Setee | ADeLPee saEs—)- bedroom brie 
MODERN NEWLY- | Sit-Bike bath. ier anit 78186 month. Ko ext iat deer DE Spee __| eae a | 


DECORATED APTS . _and 3 tetres - » | edry. i — _—~ ~ , Hats = ef Pun. an at 


Mii : 


_ 


Pani 


: 


a. 4 
’ need is? Sele - 


a” 


\e pew 


pas ot te Mere AIR-CONDITIONED 
| ) | - tfice hous ome ment, Attract a “tr ie : 
. . + . ‘ —_————_—_——— ee ° . +8 . ws ” > 7 : a " ~ oN . re . rT " t ad ° — r ; R« or 
Chillum Heights Dare AD 48742 Bren . | HOUSES, OUENINED UY : . | nhed game’ rm in escet emt:| JAMES CARR EX 3-7e00. ; + ee ETS = + — ys a — § — > pore on 
APARTMENTS 742. WEINE ERG & "BUS H, Inc. ar im excel & | ores ) Ambrose 
1520 CHILLUM ROAD Tao etary aE kee. S-bed-| WARVHe oF it GE | charming he ~~ st $28. OL MICHIGAN F > ~~ re +. er + Pei NCE GEORGES PROP. 
8 . LA no = more omes | as een: | 

JUST OVER DS LINE BETWEEN! [Pn Sa m. to 8 pm. Key at| 3-bedrm. h C $113 mo. tn “SHOPPING CENTER ; LSURBAN. 3M 2-3490 | MODERN 6-RM BRICK 


“> & : 

’ = | 

YD OU , n 333 62 N basement + i esting? Dr: location for beker7. de ' : Pac new 6 Providence ~ 4 
CHA PEL RO: A . - ous na a her. d: or retri , one a : : sports shee. paints) brick home is on . “en Beavtifu. spacious ft OPEN D L 


7 included Lo 4-8589 1D) chia! son. 36) Kt Rigas pac 
eal 


FROM ; rol © nt - ounter Ke pi val vre ee: ihe storage | " . 
78 50 APARTMENT VAL VES | C uding pus. Coen} W EiNBER Bish , Inc \ th re dow *h Moers. | ‘ had _ :e | = 
4 " 7 ; hon ae tan = . — gl a , 7 eont mo ‘Nee 
a? oo + tm. & ‘ me Seances s i , - 1Tx100 al WO ¥. 0° i'rm. beth brick. H ~ 
' st Corn Be erct 


> ané 3 @n4 
— ; - , ad . - —3— | aaier~s - "y Real 
- - lame’ bia ~ — Ré SE -becrm _ Beundproot a's Pull octal ahaman st coms ing By "s ot éinina om nohen den | , — zu ‘he bom NEW SPLIT-LEVELS atte : ng = vd Clinton — IStric ’ Heic 
2 BEDROOMS heat. hb a re. At ~ ' shoe- et =! burtan | ’ p ; a a Rte . . 
+ ¢rooms bas : > Mues RAM 


NW —2 rms. kit 


~ 3 : i, a 
= - 


| Seto. oa 
All Utilities Included | 2 IRD ST NE.— 1 rm... kit 


_————_—_— ’ 
. 7 : iy # er = = -2190 COLORED 
. : P : 
eas APTS. AVAILABLE ] “Mt ri W iw om. hed ge * he alr. ing‘on : Ma ows—o Te ~ b at oF 1) TT “Ty Nw 
; OCCUPAFCY) in rm kit g 50 SPY eee +f ost ma ; éream rit cond 50 m >i. ’ _ 
| so: - : TI , t irs “ full Set ~ 2 bait “patine: wwe YING Cl — one 
Agree ee sg featuring : : rm... ; | Yr, wy .* bec iT Dra fn4 8 °. 9M x : orm 7s) ° Pre ° rs 74 a AS. eoul'? - - - - aa — - _~ — - " : IR > >t J x - TOR DICK 
% fenceg play| ¢282_ MT. V L m.| Remit. attic, Idee! Jes. KB can divide to # ter = Gener. HO 2-120 “inte Novels howe consis =x - . ee “a in oe : 200) iol 
gives Api POOL for children ' : xt and bath #6856 : i and streets 8! ready i= a. ; ‘sé sem Cot 8 = es : " - A COTTAGE CITY —Nee) 
Le tonic AREAS. A safe) ya tT. SS im. i min. Pentagon rm house remodeled ap am tant. aeaaeere 
ace 


ete ulsite m >4- . . oe 
Fas | oo : : ' - f-e = ¢ BL . —_ — ent o\ eated porches. ces ‘- CROSS = “PERRY, 1 
| aed apts raise out onl rs near 4 Pe Bedrm . tiv./ 7.271% WE INBERG & & SUSH, Inc a7 co. val . saraet , ie 


bath $83 so CA .-bedtam ba a ol sor es oe Sw <- S.enee “hers $45 HO_ . 
Rental Off SN gag: AVE Kw 2 rooms ting | Yay Forest, bedi, Deine $80 | APARTMENT SITES $4 GEORGETOWN F on a - Feces: ist Gr, petem & Bech, Lox | book cunts ge os pcre me 9h orestville—Reduced 
y Dey Until 8PM, [OU ASMPHRIES & SONS | fe S:tipi #8 722i) One,ef the few remaining suchen | MOT ACs— srr POUAMAST | Sieh” Sins Ser oe Gareer ox eae ems | BEDRM., GI—$11,973 
orery, Soy Vent © P.O. ail LU. B, Soerimen’ in 8 ES 5 05 i ) — pet, ine rm i" : PROMINENT CORNER wer i “$ i—- Ask : 
24 a : 


Call WA. 7-3948 House Grounds 


A 9. SMiTHY ox PonE—s-hecrm. apt nw. S68 1 F ies || Bash, denies ‘= =z tem gl SE - Sits 2001 Klingle Rd. 
— Se | ie is 43849. ~ | dt hi ond paved sirerts siready ip LARGE SEMIDETACHED 
SES BEST LOCATION | ‘Utils, furn“2"rms tt and beth.| © a Per See Ez me x =. 
. : ! Evy fa a >edrms, ‘De 7 lar = —, : . -» be ™ sro . _- . an " = -s A, 
oe Wash ington BLS a5E | unghie nice toc " :. Fit 2e* RT| Scere, or ist f. “Weed-burting| 6 Bor Sa xe WOU ERVIN REAL CO. 
Dupont Park Apts. | . ? ait. anc bet " Bensaee i D A -_ a? ler sale eir-ce “' wai . 4 fires! : ~¥- — ; Lz: pe 701M 
and D ST. AF pus ‘te >, G08 Mat ne A.) S80 We Ave Be arn by mai ne er. A ear ie * se as a | porter ie IGHTS — 
"rf da ra .| 2s A- ‘ER 1 : n Fe ~ : sul : 
Avaiiabi © for i n COLOR : aut 1 4-bedroo - C ‘ or -trevees |. be sbe "MILLICENT CHATet 2 Mass. Arve pS A_f-2e0 : _ = a . Tree - H : A 
meats - | urban Hom ity 16 mi. trom hington : D- | EREETS - = | , 
BESSON — 9730 en aaa $ba—t cellent br! ie, “operating periner. Wri ) errace ie et ‘ caréen 3 ' HOM VALUES . - _— so 
N . rest- i's ' th . ; - " - 7, “ - 7 ——_ es 3 
aon Fh ae | raat “na 7 nie at 22 | wae ms ” ” 3 os .¢ NE.—6@ rooms and bath . , s.5 so. Ss cee MAS 
LU. 4-168 COLORED Todd ¢ BL he be 3 Ta ae me 2-08) a . “ape 7 ’ 2 , Gus ot HWS cms. one Pi wa —~—_ —_ bxs 
® oO. eMiTuy c so. Lin: hoo! mary nen tary 7. | : 532 st. kW —* rms. 2 bathe : : 
| 3 Ys ae ae rs : s * . be abe 
Sit isch Gt. NW rT. 3-3300 ae ph oo I zr LEY tore im choos nter . : | | 


S rkid : 4 or Oke 7 ’ ' “$73 . 1. RA . A. HUMPHRIES & SONS | | 2-416 at > 128 
eB ioe ta at tooling, | Bene Me —n| Sanetce | neat Se a paity co 
sy | incl uite. MU. 9-3470. ae |) BaDeMs. § ( vent e we low ose MER _. ham gun ears _— F — = Lee avarrsviile ine > 
“Ol. at : EC a | ; : - ; : « o) - " > te " =>. cunt ‘ 5 ; - | fi c : nt fail bem and nis level ‘ot ot? 
2051 N. WOODSTOCK 1, $93 and $42. ¢ ered YO . Lath and res =. ie sont. eat S| ore ue 8 Ges sits | & a “Gronoe 
ro kit, bath. all utile 1 Ny 7 Anes CO ISTO BUSINESS SEA Hite! Com ck bome in| if See) DE 2-tt6) | ROMER ISON | | pe OF oath KENTON 1} _hesores 
1 Bedroom—$80.00 | Hani. nt, BN 2-Sube: 10. 2°58 | yess cs senbale nad'basizees Goe-| qaam Ment a sin Tm Crave mete festa Sel | CURE ALR ns BOT | Fema = ag ae 
2 Bedroom—3$9 3 50 -BBCORED Tors h :  aobsied dtu; x Cal is | step” sheopl or St y Ho | door with . ’ erre ° — =I 


+> 
INCLUDING UTILITIES MODERN 4 ROOMS AND BATH baths. sae heat, storm 
> Ai 


vT 
. - <a 7 Call s- , 
Pood. mi ~s = ~w ROOM T BRIC ‘ . & ~ : ' 7 ; - ™ — 

D - J 4 : “800 : ; — ~ us — : . - ! $500 oe aneeene. OF 

3 “ier REALTY: RE. 5-7) ceemnel ing « sr ‘*o | 7 tas es a. . knchen 2 a ve —e Cone nec on or 
; - , 4 : t< : ; ’ . : >. —s : : 5 t “mY oe : ; £ 

T NATL. R LTY cueyy CHASE yw AY gn h ; i LL LE : : ; T Pi if = ¥ =e = . *) ost Toe 2 eet ’ ¢ ' 

, , . ' nee: stoc ~~ 7 ; 


| $69.50 per mo WM. J DAVIS. 
OnLy eo, FN abe ,GAPTTOL 800 FT st NA 3554 


tal) 
BYDOES. TV. 2-299 
LARGEST IN SE. bin ae ES oo Bio eat thE are ws |ESTATE—MAKE OFFER! | i | te ove pee | “Ferre 
BEAUTIFUL 3-EXPOSURE APTS S0l Pusles Tae sy et peCATUR st. 100 Kensina’ ‘REA FePATE “OFFICE 1305 JUNIPER ST. NW. COLORED —SEMIOET. bemt. Goubing OF Suret, | Sexuceme mgs ire 815.960 | +, becma on | bean 
Buena Vista Apts. nt a "bath. 865. Di. 7-se06 oe on. cme! Pally seul Ts Exceljent | lease | fine praghberbes taftte :. 2- inne 


: : ince G nr 

a St Past. ali| WALKER & DUNLOP. ine Co.| foe v = 218 a te ] 00 | Downes. | a =. ~ tee ate try re 2 

gttls. incl. i rm. k. & be ewly | 5-02 ns ; Tengon) Write Bex 2 8_Pu Te vurself i> Tacee > o- Gi— 2, 0 . BOO per van 2 —_— ane a 
3223 BUENA VISTA TER. | 30 mo. W FALLS CHURCH A rT aie! bree with Taree, Lares <= ; mae m-| decrm t ievel Washingtos 
| . st ow 2556, . ~ lot . . * Sex detached Brice Ibo . . coon oe “as ~ : .- waa 
- ” os : ie | : oGern res cludu - mar : : rambler = 
SMALL PETS ALLOWED COL | 2 x | — os oon herewood feots ectrective ms Pr A : 7 aires te ane 
INO . 1415 CHAPIN ST. NW URC r ) OWN | , — . front a pa ; : . . tke let & mree bami.. oo spe anes and fan. 

aan | A we *4 ag = AND THE HILLSIDE : _ y liad) i L ERY NJ REAL Ty co - ! S72 77 -? a “Oo TO a re = , - wren °% are " s1009 down may a 

- y\e0 Mra iy ta. Ee = — "-1232 UM. 44-4488 WA. 7-099 Mou. EX. 3- or me ee 8% ust —_ o>.) aed oer 

es ae asl NEWLY DECORATED ' -bed: ran 7 3-582 : rm : | SEC 


; " : ‘ .* : } 3 O ~  s 
INCLUD on ad - 7 te mute and refer. ches $1 a : 2. ee oe ar YOUR OWN “TOPS IN ‘COMFORT FRED A SMITH CO. a cs Pre 4 Tas 


AREA AND HVOE 


. 
_ROOMS. 4 beth PF ) Ri ; | p A‘ rock 14th . 2 “oo 2 pe .2 : oXG6 BHT . | bedrme Yara 
t on at rom| MANNAS R , See a- ae all we wr. + Se°5s het. Os 
Virion 3 7ASO to $82'90 “Avail Tor mame | SB bk ha BUSINESS Palin mee CORES —wongemses — |S iene paca saenier os level pecan at Ge Doest| | 
RI occupan . ; > " . : it ; Ce 
Pas te, CHA mae EXCEL LOCATION—ELEV. BLDG.| fo" + family. At ty r rasous kit. & 90 : $500 DOWN | se smote ’ —s2 eee HOLDT ni. 1-88 Ae 
1-35 ADULTS ONLY eermas,. 5 Sette. & rened poren | is bert; master berm. air cor Semidetacned trick. 1 block from! Sectres e —— : ; 


hts ers D he 
SEE JANTTOR IN APT. 3 a sath Beas, Senses wall-to-wall cat . 5 node isigné ove Beacious + 77 ce ede cceep perch fin r_Resite 
nu — heme 


; bu ’ . - , ee 
o MIPHY COMPANY ae. | ; -s yee. re lecki ' , = S > ms me Broom Ce ae oe eet cert ce f OXON HILL AREA 
BED Ri . ose 2 a sa00 ete uce EREALTY Of “Or $-606" : e < ~ rae co. Ie jer .. b rm ose Git ine - 2 | OC one - a ewer po "| Com. to Bolling, Andrews AFB 
th fenced yard: walk ; . : Lovely corner brick facing Pa. Ave ne Spec: a . » . : 
ipuitid 2505 ISTH ST N W . ~s ns. p= ’ B bs " , oa SZ Centre! hall wincous . tes ; 
an ; oe 0 | —_ to. ns \ ik , “~ aa . J —— . oat 
1701 v4TH. oT. ; 2-BEDRM. APT. $95 ' ried tr a” 


ual ' 19 : * 
Newly decor aes . o it - + -- satis located eleva- nirc sane’ ab. se. 6440 Fe 


4 


ors Sine 
sun 


4] : 3 e. Cc >* 
; _ pemne sae . 
See eitvalor “oat b 3 ok ‘ ot tate ee 307 MARS AVE. NEL | TDA ie F—* 
7 wtichboard! gan. ea ape wy = Pat Baicg REDOCED 5 stone ¥ be ‘st0< 
“‘e _— | are Cc -_ od a . erm 
| - OPEN DAIL 


he 
‘ 


+ 
O 


el @ieda «iu neha acd stop- 
Bernstein Synod! cates 


La a % an 7 : ; ° sel house ct : ; , 
ry Exe. DU. 7 COLORED deiea vehi be Cw ” eve & ———e we we ¢ — MAGING THIS opie ut: | goes rent by door . 
“ Th V Id ea Colonia Oe, te ae te <s* iio | MICHIGAN PARK ‘sane: ee gure mt | OXON HILL REALTY 
LLOYDS APT. = CiGa =| Sethe: tal bepement” sae Betai: pe Pane Ne peony mes - 1 = tes BARGAIN—$12,500 | ss See tl * JU | $555 Livingstone Rd. 
heat: svail. shou! July 15 . , ets ~~ : — - —— & want - % y ; e —— — ~ lo. 7-300 
800 TENN AVE , ALEX 24 WH ST. NW rt x (ER C9. “8 ko . ~pty : prosram = oS - - : . yy 2 . =. 3 dbedroms D ’ - t i vies ie A— Brice Cabe Cod. 
IGHW AY $4 9 50 8. ter 7p Mr Aussie: y and nesé Top Mes three pend © = iced rit : . ful : : rer : , ¢ D ? — ad -- gg # ee , = ti Ga. 
UMPUR "metas aie Our moder service statsens . a Exclus: ; é: , ‘— . . ee. ro | Soll a _ : ~ = ge?rm 14 on pine sown 
NFURN. | STUDIO APARTMENT a - —Oll Georeia Ave ay s. Am N_AND COMPANY 7 De fone. | home ceneentet act im Seen er oe 2. th Fe = 
os a bedrms . 4 , , o ant £ . - 

NEWLY DECO DAT cD DoF NTOWN LOCATION z ca cor “ 4 , IST ‘COMM — | 40h ST NW s = : 


23 ‘a 
, ~— ww rt .cor . 
ATOR SERVICE ery. bre > rms. 2% beth ~ , ct ot IRECT? Dene = es xX —- : eniilie — 
1 Bedroom 50 aromas LAGNbaY Facizrrins afi Hat Bind gs ae Ay 2 3 BEDROOMS—MODERN | ‘Sor Wincenan mie | eel ere ges bee esl] = WEST HYATTSVILLE 
2 Bedroom * 


7 — 9 50 s Man , LEO M. 'BERNSTE! N CO. 
ALL, UTILITIES IFYCLY ite, \p : pe + fist “aici A eS TSS soving such incomes 20v “ee 
te “re soome pasiel ae: | nepect re anitor on premises : . 
1, conv. scneoi 


3-389 | be ; ; SaLREA & . 7 A a c ‘ | imeudins choene 
MPHRIES & SONS p INLE ? alt 223 a en cep ngs ante Magy 2 vis SIT LOHR HOME ¥ pe Sted vets mri vacee , ’ + ion Soe a — —— evel 
REALTORS Avail Die wens diat enact? aracter. Cesire ee -90480 Lak. tu-2g 
oak s 5970 Va eciately. and sincere purpose CL EANL INES = 
cate sete FALLS CHURCH AREA a 


3 or 2 ne , i? ™ .- Des! A.» , ir——3-bedra frame ram. | Por detatle. shome Ciiies 
SHIPLEY PARK | or call TRACY co HY. 2-6 | tio . [mm : +7 Service OF8§ Ce. JA. 4-1100 " 
) COLORED ; «201 Crest 3 1 ing ena i-fare 
were i3! LMONT 1 "Min be” rd. omp!} B kitchen rec- si dining reom 
+ ~ from 30 r | $135 , svailable immediate.) _— “het-eater heal. earase 
BF arta ‘ from $80 00 rr it — rit : C —— —~ ; “. re Seas SERVICT STATION. of 26 , prirset e )_ ae ca. 
' , . ) ’ HE 4-4000 


IzS INCLIDED’ 134 R cin tm. full becement Avaiabdie rent 
150 ummeciately. $140 


o ree °30e . 
Artax Realty, Imc., | avail immed ire ROBERT E LOHR 
. ‘et “ ro- fn Teer ar tte + MBA eee! | RE 7. Aa) “ae 4.3422 
4 oars . ~- | WALK TO UNIV. OF MB —S-Set-| * > So — 
4 . OTH | . = A. 3-82 . eed. kit. £ : comer 2 domestic at ne OR SOLED ERRLIGHS “DOUBLE SPECIAL 
¥ Nes washe . ice furniture apd 


QUIET APT. ete artee Beet okt Sain 6 Beers. $750 De. sn firecuse tw, 
. wo - | 


PARKWAY’ ESTATES 
)-Det roe 
co 


semidetached brick home bes) 1 corner. i 
i : 


t 


SALA SveUeD, WOUBES 67M, | SALE SUOUR. ROUIES ETVA. | SALE SYOURO. ROUEN TVA. ALS SYOURS. NOUSEE-TVA. | PAnv LAND, SALE 70 
_ARTLAND VIRGINIA | VIRGINIA — VERGINTA ead : J 30 Tuesday, July 10, 1956 3 
Prince 2s FALLS CHURCH. AR mys;| SHERWOOD PARK | YouR SHARE of me Good BT . P for 41 senile and effeciiceaie , —GTomoenEs, SALE = 


bier 


| set; ced * ; 
heantif asa sey 30-YEAR LOAN "Sem statery MO ome | fer $10.000 Over = of & . wan Cc c— . 
HIGHLAN L QaNEn ea abe “Br away {ire GE « iately heme. oa Se .; oa “SETTOR PUPS A =| Fas. Re & OF Aer ~ GREAT ri) Wu bey ighest cosh price for Fully equipped incl. eles matching 
ALLS RCH sed. Beautiful sew 3-bed blers. | : 24 : : a = oo Ve) coats : 
OVER 200 SOLD FALLS CHURCH Cane Cos. 4 att soe Dietre. seattere.| & : rishcas fine.| DC. white comm. TE. 6-413 ok: Brick, Prespect. KE) (7S, se ’ aa for ,Soacbern gotlet, KIRK MO-| jnterior, spotigas throughout. 633 


WORTH FORESTVILLE. uD ~~ - ¢ i aavight bert. eat? al “Worx pany ited F : 
. rm. fu ide a 3 "a finished rec airfax County Estate | = BILE AKERS OLDS-CADILLAC CO, 
"Qn few left. 914.250 and up.| level ies - se lots. 9 ea. {ull basement with finished rec ty callow nace = see, | one Prater, a. oe ‘CASH FOR CARS| 


te veterans pilus settie- JE OPEN 57 ACRES—#52.500 een ington Shopping mew 

‘ment costs Come out and inspect ~ : te work sh REAL BUY «s! This Colonial home . lack sta | 4 miles no " : { A -0359 

cna Open (Ul dark PAIRPAX COUNTY Di ice ston By t 50 tars vide. Inc aa EAE| beauty of the past. I "AKC ret. descendants of Chan- * be Fete os Ri 301 BROWN, Mot TORS CADMEAC. — 1984, a yan 
: * ad ' * rooms. 4 rooms | pions intelligent ew r 

e Co., mn Springf ield, Va. Shere Lee & heat. wide pine Moors. 2 fireplaces y . ey AMERICAN 6 We NW | Dev y a Fy 5 

r . adtulae’s mo . Same 


Stille PPR besa) loean Seancey ey THE PICKETT CO VA APPRAISED. $12,500 | han sie “ajumes become, ies. PEP Waa = TOP VALUE 


wonder: u! community of en with 


2 
Hom - ; DeT : , or : “ 7 4 .- . : 7 
UD or trade on — = hed home owser Ne one wan: ‘1° ber Giape ‘he eats = a Tod Shalt BRICK trees: on --s- +e! read. 22 miles _ 7 ~9253._ — MOBILE HOMES WILL AY 
Dickey L L PAM Y = 


ne 3 : . Washington ement. § av. s 
AP. 1-3 : om Here rowr d 2 tenent houses i : ) 
jonial w! is XY — i rs —ae Dave a fre chete SLEEPY HOLLOW ‘nice —wearens beth. storm _ $ : esr Rt of j- $6 SPORTSCRAFT TOP DOLLAR | 
Gitiona, Duliding with lee open! $1 @ 821 : “RRA? resent trust 7 13 —'49 r sed 
Boe STE 9 REET coe US on Cop. Ser tee | ARBY"ABAMS | eRe 
} berms. fall tamt. ine. ree. rm | Parker, ith & nell) Annands’s V.. pone or. 6.2200 reham. Jr. MO. 3- R.A... SA or best offer. BO 23-5858. 
[FALTO - ~ - : 4 37-8817 m Labrado tries Georgta *: 
-. 4.9 — : ee 3 a : ter Pen . ved a _ _ meanaiene ie oe 5-35 1 CADmLLAC- Se "62" sedan 
ALLS “CHURCH up Bice quiet street on EAL VALUE! LOTS FOR SALE “t sar? CO $-O5i6 alter 6B. 5 * at Mente. fn yes EES piete includes w.-w. tires. Naturally 
“ - oo Distt wiat ASY TERMS 
¢ Gl APPROVE . a ~~ or bon caumauel mn choice Non tH MARTTAND Cadillacs ees AKERS OLDS- "CADILLAC co. 
house, tobacco bars ” acne 4 ~ . .. | fen | ACCOREER—Lots from $650, wood- SHETCAND PONY and Western ‘SS NEW MOON Pairlington Shopping Center 
eae mage 7196 FOR NO MONEY DOWN : Ns ae ne am 387! school sop n | sah ha sor 314i —— sroses $135 4-7 no Foiroomes PENNY MOTORS Alex — oe 
de TO QUALIFIED VETERANS | = "PROPERTION | Brae ¥. Se WITH PERE- ltteer Winton tr cre $4995 ' 260 Rt Ave NE LA. 6-22 ‘ ‘DMLAC- 52 i" apecial 4-dr. 
: c SEs Cheap : - : Rad, ; fate ydra- Matic 


7 - . A 7 . uw" a! . 
CHA NCEY REALTY corr -_— on ; Waterfront privil 9 . : joni = rere 6 Persons Was WE NEEs CARS—GTATION WAOG- - 
AP SRL PEAUTY SOB ben page eet R:| Reis "ies "dns eds me 2 | fomyliee care, 8 feel amar] vewiora ‘al'Sdcral Rhcnen. | "Oud “Pickees WOCMGoTUMe | custom frat contre, sonuttal Bk 


ms. } 
ONLY. $400 CASH, GI | 5, Eas Saat (RAE int Wl | Reese cS fat vault Senet fe 
ni Uv $78.82 PER MONTH 
"S18 050° Parker. “Cmith & Donnell! tar ution. 93 FIER DOWN PAYMENT oo PAY HIGH aie INC CREP REA 


. BY ONE 
baths. $13 


SO TS is 7-887 | 1950. %. ton picks ae FAC” §6| LARGEST WASHING 
' ded ths —ey—vee ety’ JO.| egstom panied rides." 9450. or ASK | “FLOOD PONTIAC | SaRORST Wastils 
the few hemes avail 1 + caer Gib Tull . 2043 Mon. LEASE PURC MASE "PLAN . “62” 
at. Mot in « = , me bide “Enrr aT. 4221 Connecticut Ave. ADILLAC- 1954 62” convert Sa convertible 
Ma. or varieus pat recks «( the lowest price SE Witt ct — upe Ligh =. 
"KAY REA % ; NICHO _ me AMERICAN TRAILER ~#-,- oe mel = i a7 eauloped, 5 rentes.. 
Jones Pont Bridge Area -° Neen — CO., INC | Soon eee eS be 3.2004. Capitol "Cadillac. ‘Olds Co. 
: T-ten var Te > oa wat ‘ = PB. 3-32 — : 
Sher se less than £1000 an sere. Call Mr. A OL 4.7000 belore 7 5020 WIS. AVE. NW » | 1222 224 St NW. ST. 23-2600. 
or gcree , < : . . ~ t impertant must . ’ 
inv} ne) MURRAY mR F seg = gee 8 . Wil pay cas SAN FOR! 
nan | Combination. ‘Tires moter ane bed vO 2 ite 5h. mw, TV 2-4 | / 
| ssial Be ET | RSL S| oom ss wena =| Will Pay Up To: 54 CAD. 
——. PARK ere, »-oeEr : ae Ott of emia . . sore | | Li ss ey " iL - ’ 
—_ as & oI * a= I ~ ~ »_ oan a | & : Iime such 8 * ise ‘ ss S&S shane ar AUTOMOPILES WANTED 96 sos ch e rxe = —e _ FLEETWOOD” 
: 2 


¥ _ $595 DOWN 


oener. ci susteus driven Show- 
. F 


eae Part 
7.3900 RostnY & DAvVis 


—~ | 5s© 
aa ata : a Park 
D shite rambler |) foe 5 , - . - ' , n . 70 min A yw. . — 1 . — ac —‘ vos a ol 2 
tke new: | arge picture window in COLUM ‘ —_ SOCIAL STANDING snops ~—y ose. Call *' m- i tote. City water bavee = os C | ie . & dees eaier + 4 
iy rm. sep din. ra a, Jetterson Vi ' 2 : 1167 ' Adeauate basi Be restric- > Soulhes . . (our ~y _ ‘aTTsy DLE avTo $6.5 
with breakfast bar. full bem Se.) mune oad frame Cod Cod. 2 2 BELLE HAVEN AREA < Palle Church JE 23-3708 Reasons Convenient Cal Sees _aiver - = = Ears 2 BS 1280) 3 56.5 
il seca " 4 wh pRiNed ——sg> Finished ¢ormiter : ad : wore MM. LEO STORCH sP tin Contiverd os _ : . aerr 
. — ees = *r : . . " . : . _ - s - . , ’ = 
“5 v ti r REALTY. 5 - . . : Palle Church 3 B m LAKE BARCROFT 100x196 ch Lewenerd ender Smell Lees Lewes ofnerd ender Smell Lees Lewes BLASS | % CPARK |: 
N PAYMEN EESSURG Pik = mod. kisches im coler 3 1 Se nent maeeietelS redecc- | ith Rarger Dr. see, TE. 6 i N. CAPITOL & FLA. AVE. NE. 
weeded yard $20.95° ois s oe. aod Pia. Ave ¥E AD. 4-9882 
, mice | and sheseine PW Reaity co RESTRICTED Po'omac iver : STED a: % to "Ss. Any 
wet. Only £29 500 ; —— S orast motel Donald Motors. 145 
7 Bher ere 3 88 * we es. oe — . 
~ On $900 down and , , + - 
To wn & & ountry Realty amreaS with immediate w- mentor a w Ve ‘ec TesRN ee « need « CADILLAC—1948 “62” 4- “, r. and 
TE 4 1415. 9 Ti q 9 . ‘ esperately "are ' 4 Mvyecra » -@ tires xcelLlensg 


? e ‘7. % : stat a we | eomd@itio: . 
+ ae Se -- a earl WEE WH W CAOGHEIN. Wealter| kirchen. ful be . tn ACREAGE. wT ; vitug. A Add sales at A M “KEE PONTIAC 
. {1500 _ 4 na f McLear eng ies Proverties -- - Des | miss ime © - TA ; P NTTAC MEANS McKEE 
By DiCREY. AP. > 60 ARL INGTON REALTY ~ FULL PRICE '$5550— nd 00g locatiog. ROUTE, ROB 6 ACRES CASH FOR CARS 5335 Wis. Ave. ST. 3-710? 
; - Bi 4000 ADJOINING LAKE = Any Make CADILLAC — 33 “s convertibie 
EBERHIOn ~ Lorcom 4 >-BEDROOM HO ME Wonder!) eppor' amity her ert BILL DENIS, INC os * 
ALEXANDRE er cr ' " a ort , 
: chen" funy equipped, Atr-eved | IVE ILLER REAL ECTATE : 3 ay; 
- . | ANE seve “or Js. 7-120) Ja 5-444 rol 2 “3p : Fe aves. 
RENT FREE WATERFRONT, SALE 75A : HIGHEST thee PRICES CADILLAC i953 a 
4 Bedrooms WGP ) = 


5 
5 
- 
5 
> 


—- _rour CLEAN . \ 
power ~ en 2 


This exceli-at 2- . t t ad ‘ishing : , ~ a. ' e a 
Mannas Rity e 4 > 3110 — Port} wand tert = . t , an “ARR "DISCOU NT. INC ral mners al ond itioning. 


cpporiunity with its level amity. bath ateries: yy * 3345 BENNING RD. NE. Capitol Cadillac: Olds Co, 
Pagano gaa Pemeet Gia | Ba oS LU. 1-1236 
7 = aa garage het : 7 wei a av BOTH | | CASH Ff FOR “CARS 
‘Gievecey Rest Co Eetetieat Sai "for your each today! |amttty MOTORS | 4:Dr. SEDAN 
Bak rhs ; ‘ CE ARS $95 DOWN 


w Ls NT ‘ 
Beant 7 a med. cn ; na ne oF 
rip 500 “ “a ‘ x a3 . pred rom 1-Gept. a. i . w= - A Vi } VY EI NTELY 74 hehe adler 


‘ty for the thrifty. All 
beach- treat otiare “'.. 
front and > | FINANCE CORPORATION OF ARLINGTON ies-cham ent re sOur Northwest Location) 
me. ‘ for ~ 


“i Write 1e Mrs. Cle! 2907 Wilsen Bevieverd «+ Arlington, Virginie * ae = Say SS Cue ee eee ¢ Api iae 958. T pass. “Beauti- 
. ev hast Pu 


We eusrentee fou more money i iy equipped, 


eu Telephone: JAckson 5-8885 your pocket afar Setar rege : iow me age private owner Req 
: my. dont ¢ eoek tet: cuseens, lee won : OAL w—} | Sai stems or fer te 0 ~ hae hg Suburban ‘Cadillac- Olds 
. ner ied. pedrms. large ns come te your home for immeciate| _.BRADLEY SHOPPING CENTER 
oa | st Prize 2 | - ut . #0 om wes rhe oni You an eet Your Parments* — is BETEEGD A MD. Oly 6-709 
Sih edt hor pet oases cau S BRICK RAMBLER ee ee $850.00 $48.33 “LU. 1-1236 te ga C7 
USEOs ibalty. ne 3 Contemporary $19,950-—GI Colonial Realty Co. | J ee eS SON. | ae oe 
ALEXANDRIA. DEL ‘Bar. ie ; JA 5.6200 vest dee bath. kit $600.00 $34.44 45 BENNING BD >} 


—E peosen * RA 6-4136 
BURBAN | Doss Pers. KENNELS Ta ~~ $250.00 $16.09 1 ractes mses maid tr mn 
ARM HOUSE” ‘Sie : * Above leans entas tr are on . caer of cur two big loca- Convertible 
J , a»  |SOXERS — Re . ' = ive omel leans % N RME 
_neaeee SS | ae ate 74 eat Sepp OaERSON 8 Om $495 DOWN 
mag screened porch em- | gy Px | rte ca 17th and M Sts LW 
‘ Ss 


1-owner oF ™ \,esce, 
rer amért co 


Deena *|| VACATION LOANS on Just Your Own Signatere ! 
os. 7 


 3-Bedrm. Rambler 


$12950—6l| Seater | aR STATE LOAN COMPANY | a7. ton 


| r ‘|| 4801 WMDIAM HEAD ROAD (festever, Md) LOgen 7-1300 | RT ROA le wn mn 
GEORGE ) RUCK | = Bae | 4700 MARLBORO PIKE (Coret Hills, Md.) JOréen 8-9220 en SPORT ROADSTER "60 * <—o, 
| 1003 S. Courthouse Rd. JA $-8583. 3300 EHODE ISLAND AVE. (Mt. Reinier, Md) eet COUPE ayy Re A yea 
mman pap. | 7892 GEORGIA AVE. (Silver Spring, Md) 3B mks es com | conditi 
Bat er we 113 S& COLUMBUS ST. (Alexandria, Ve.) JACK PRY, LTD. 
Ave 


Sea) ind bald pleasant livting— 


esc | Move In Today |e Bttin De he. 1200 LEE HIGHWAY (Ressiyn, Ve.) 1238 C 


tmmac ule e }-bedroom brick ram- re , 6 * Above toans ower S30 are meade weeder Md Industria! Freence Lew 

= YEONAS REAL corner ia , Oped til & P.M. Fridey—CLOSED SATURDAY 

T : : ; is en . Ds : - na Bb 
$05 nm UE “ é; sec aoe Ty! ; irk Mot .. 4000 Ge. 
2513 Wien, Bind ak. o-snen) temps (4 GERMAN a Seine ate Bie mono | Are NO TA 3-48 

a. ALTORS _— M tity “ve 2 7944 Std_up 7 Ju “ = 208 7 7 - . - . ‘ Prokp MOTORS Lea ; >5 Air 8-cyle 
-$01 Co 3 Pik : ot ; farcto convertible. Besu- 
" contrast- 
ter 


| 7 . - —continned on 
D Cand Pent 3500 a COUNTRY CLUB HILLS AGTomosme ix LOANS 90 
(mer sly. so don't éelar my ' $31, 950 “ on or 
hur L. Walters, Inc. geaers cee res mec =, Located on © desutiful lot having a Mr Sarter. ¥ 
S Randolsh op .. te — << . +) — prepa —— 
at - it. " foneod re 7 par ments of $80 cheerful liv _ Selousied —— D “MONEY? NEW 1956 MODELS FRANK SMALL JR., INC. 
JA. 77-5200 - > Let os show you this’ Siceed ch "ean be, used 9 : romp! it tonn 126 Good Hope Rd. SE Lt J-tee7 
—~ SALT _Desst : a: ize G@ining | r. neater ire overarive 4 2-d 
N” ARLINGTON ~~ Town & Country Realty) rm tnd well erransed Kitchen: r box and other exire 
Cae aa TE 61415 9 ‘TH 9 = ih vasement 
SPLIT LEVELS & RAMBLERS | ——"""_ >= oe peenarenes 


WRITER "S RETREAT Eis" tor apoe. to agenect 
1 ACRE George " Mason Green AY 


foge. _ Price SF. . OF PRECIOUS SHADE! Euctysive Agents __ 
ss + ye ; 
ng, OPEN DAILY AND SUS- - Pe ieser, tases $500 to $1500. )) 
' Dec” ooh ; orn ’ ; 


other 


ois ee aod 
nieed July. 4 special, 


rue - AF 26 are » 


“210" 4-DOOR 
WE CAN FINANCE 


$1065 


WO RED TAPE « TERMS TO SUIT You 956 MGA | OR BETTER 
ee, 7 ates atts) 292, DOWN 
3" cna s| GAC FINANCE | inci? oP ee 


CORPORATION L ‘ :| Ul ; d.tion ft 
MT. RAINIER 1914 ICLER ‘MOTOR CO 


i6 FLORIDA AVE 50 


3510 Rhode lnlond Avenue”. .... Tel. APpleton 7-2800 i 72700 
3317 Rhode Islond Avenve**.... . Tel. HObert 2.5028 nd new 1556 JAGUARS fo : | A-' 1306 
Branch. 181 : . 


| ‘ 
(O2337 RL Ave. UN. 45172; 


ss = a ; aa a rambiers 
coat’ cary ang consenien' ut jeve! bef) )7896 Georgia Ave. JU. 9-28524 
ARLINGTON REALTY . 
een a . = 


Edwercs 


A = =~ 


, . aE 
THis i TT 
shen Ou 


‘off Lee hwy.) 


hen. \arze baci ; bes 22 “> | " HYATTSVULE “5505. Fairfax Bran 
Commonwealth Properties =CGOL TREES 4 "BEDRMS “sea Fone rT 7 ie A. ww tirade sc Ene Musbwas a: Merrin 
ZA mm EN. Gide Bd ih 2-0058 BSMT —GAR — | EE j 
reat ‘Foom ai Ww | L ng Is + “Easy LUXURY LIVING 4 ra ening. quail a : pecans | bas © aril Le y 55 CHEV. 
ivi = 6 Sees ; <f vine? = s*ing = bis mm : ‘SCRE Ss : 
‘RRL INGTON REALTY Bia Gertwone sasmulg: | ESdictoed ia tae be | Be cue OP SeSieenees| | FORE S CORNER, $393 TOTAL 
sient — <! = “4 * 2 with b at . : med) oF ents [co ty ea dim fe Saat “a Se — ; SRB. 3, } r I »-f404 Sedan 6-cyr! ns fairly good Not 
" ° ° beset re . “ , B- te a 3 ~ ¥ a ~ - t 


ay “ : ate renient te 2 iv - 4 ' . - : >| ; : 
rs . ; rae ’ Sis “Pri ae - 7” > " - odrmn - - — th rarker, Smith & Donnelt Luipc oa V Cc : ‘owners ’ n Por eB .. 


ar. 813.950 bedrms and 2 bathe on 2¢ ft BR | —«BSON. 3 Mowhed Rood*...._.. Tel. Great Mills 3673 hie 
ei PoRESY—Brick Cos-| “ART | ‘INGTON REAL LW Sead” Prised tar bios ‘repreger: ey * “ACRE ESTATE amen nar “ae lleeellien BLASS & CLARK 
tee , 128 West Brood St. (Up to $600.}. Tel. J£fersen 2-4643 equipped. radio. heater. Dynatiow | CO" ™ CAPITOL & VEN. AVE. HE. 


es = INC CHEVROLET — {553 De 
TERRIFIC E woU ‘ee IMPERI AL : ; 
Richardson & Hall Ss ame | Foe Seen ti oe ‘ Pelee a LS ay 
LINGTON NORTH ichardson - c rame rambler situated om isres enth. See “ Cyese snd $2 om | i Heart of 
Air ‘Conditioned Radio Rita. Ari 8 78108 | peibiandsenced corner tot; | “*** MASON HIRST : | Sol bade lang Ave Brent: | CHEVROLET —Iosy 

amie POMPONIO ae sine ma tes = . so Nomar wn “Ee ' " os | x 

3 a bie Qo) mo. inet. ; | Water For ¥ 

ar yea: “ton hes A REA! PRESENTS second trust 0 7 

ER a Vernon Realty, KI 8.3106 


ie : CSINC| NATE L ION SORSERBUMER SS setts is 
. = Pe pee gE fd sient gt do. 


AuRORA HILLS—D 
> 


— 
se eh eee eB Od 
ASS i 
Tree ee ee Se eS 


7 


ti 


SLEEPY HOLLOW 


TE 6-1415 


ats 
tl 


| > 
24 fe ? ore : — - Ff : 
- J ~~ is zr 
arge bedrms baths Pais , » of rust.ls on = aim 4 i , : ; - d 
gracincs 3 lare: a - ned : > a e1ti — | ith : me . = ; P , - & one ‘ 
ort nt “ , er amb) sl com ag . mouth Crunbrock 4-<d 
bessmen' and - = ; ‘ea o + : - enter r 2 J bem ' — : : nm Coronas 4-dr $200 PALI 
_ " - . 7 4 " . -_ : . +) : - or : . 2 J _ - one i aT o. YMOUTH 
ROBEINs RBAL STAT I th ’ es Geer : Ewe , . ntr Lee , " bees od Bre & Lee hey J 2-230 


3S ti : . te see this on aRD 
“restion Tm = § BRings sitter 14 §-8402 instalments. ' / / 
ras! < ast real bs . CALL 55 BUICK 
_- _ . 4 or cece ” DOWN ON APPROVED CREDIT 
FRE EDI GEORGE Realtor ARI INGTON | AND . $1787 TOTAL 
(ares lot. con ven noo XC . — ae a NO pepe | | sank dtecaiie net Uliek ce ad Chevrolet 
fe dh. 5-280. 2 | ———_——__— . — . — mmerheod of nn ‘ry BUCHATAD ' Ee - ~ecre ac ae 4 on DF WOMEN’S LOANS ke ’ comune A terrific our’ | ; =~ 
PAIRFAX COUNTY ag Ng - yr *™ 4 7-43 3 ks 8 ere aed , Our Specialty! = — Ny Re Ananced 
4 BEDROOMS {faé se LEAVENWORTH axtomrrwarm a we can mane | aD BLASS & CLARK 
ie caece 3” Bavuost AND MAXWELL | “WILL BUY PROPERTY YOU A LOAN IN COR. CAPITOL & PLA AVE. XE 
4, ACRES | Sao bese tse, =~ FIELD OFFICERS! eae we | AD. 4.9082 | co aeaee abe 

pe Military fais LAND, SALE 76 stKK <- — rman ge . re 

‘ 16.1 26 e $395 evireq Oy officers Por cre : a>2- 


a BICK WILLIAMS 


LI. 6-314] 


i731 BLADENSBURG RD. NE 


us THREE BED. ve 92852 6.76 
. . ROOM. _FwO- BATH Srick remoler stee Bows, $50 mo. burs for 69880 ‘ : SUITLAND Ww 
i . . , «9 - pasement Large “ti ~~ bd. ra near Belvedere ’ HEELER, INC. 
DS eed on & geal : 23 = close-in i <5 to all A , CHRY SLER-PLY MOUTH -IMP IAL 
. a 7 , +e Booth $0 mi so DC TE. 6-410) PHONE. PHONE  CARGEST WASHISOTON ALEP 
an SY EM 2 400 


ACRE Scar Pi eae e.g) ARLINGTON REALTY | SACRE FARMETTE ve E tee ecTHesoa <= ig Ne Coord 
¢ od 10 tor Best. and L , rO J ALTY » CENTREVILLE, VA. | —— CLARENDON-AmLS "Dope. power steering and cee | 


exce lent conéition' Hurry si 
4-de¢rm 


end is priced at ony 


$19,950 Pomponio 


son Bird. Artiastesn. Vo 


WALKER & DUNLOP | ya" 


Inc etter ering 
O30 ©. Mouree 6:. Ja $-2400 ‘ ' we ot @h LI 


AUTOMOBILES, SALE 97, AUTOMOBILES, SALE 97 AUTOMOBILES, SALE 97 AUTOMOBILES, SALE 97| AUTOMOBILES, SALE 97 AUTOMOBILES, sabe 97 THE W ASHINGTON POST’end TIMES a a 


———— oe | M0 Vd Cub coupe FONTINC 1050 Chistian "S_ PONTIAL—Igs@ V3 Buarchiel Cals: — *H ©. | VOLKS miles Tuesday, July 10, 1956 
crt vROLET-— 1951 Strieline ée juse ene car aie ity 33 and eee ruboer. As Is Spe- line sedan “Ho : : a — orca ae as alten 1 La ar ia he , ‘ “se "Ghlel de iy good pase: , Ca nut evenings | ; 

~ 8 r 37 ~ v-%.' eal 5 malessen. power » peribe rakes : ' : “a 
aoe i Povereude. Te- Church’ De” Bors Reman. ten McKEE PONTIAC be R. SUar~) seer Vy Eee lent pi sseattion J ers via <-eane wits. | “ hae 

Fa BONTIAC | wees Ave and Lee Nez. JE 2-2 00 PONTIAC MEANS McKEE” | NEIL PO — "St "¥-8" | club| overhead V ine, $445. PINEY 

rTAC MEBANE MekKEFr” réer.r and b 7s ' 5335 Wis. Ave ST. 3-7107 0000 | ; eee MEANS Mc . Baduipped. $10 gown | 8 . RANC st y hts iney Br, 
Ave. ST. 3-7107 St Tuder Cust “4° and b.| sgNYEAe Se ious 5335 Wis. Ave. ST. 3- 107 . | Motor | &. 
: lke new $399 a4 Tater. equig a yy we ate — ; j Bh va Me. aes . suze 
8 . y a Luse 44 aT 54 “8 ation | cars rly aS RAL ct 


79. Sa , an ‘vee Sere ; a: . PONTIAC—1953 De 
<¥ > ( si on trie: réer. ¥ ie Bree. Gn ave TA h._Mydre. ' wagon auto transmie- 
HEV. " ane bh. 8) «fe ‘iiakee * « snee , — a “. ~ "84 85 ‘én $32 mo.| Sleek fame n $1 oo t" petitul| ston xe 8 . TL. 1S 9 PA. AV 
»C ; OL 
Repossessed 


| €o , . — MO ; SS a 
: nee RNER ass ; an Mca : i955 Be Sadat fae ARCADE PONTIAC 
; oon R nur . cathe ete: 1457 Irv 5 nN ~ 7 4 4a” CAR , $ 
$249. 80 Total ve >. we ae “= ae aoe ' FONTTAC— ‘} <ecan. x 5 
c *urn . r o> + \ A\e@ “Ol 


WORTH 


: MWe, Aye OL, £0 ax SAL | 
DOYLE “MOTOR SALES rowtine aa : x : ett | dio, eaters he? rena, . has NO REASONABLE ‘OFFER 6 can deliver te you a 
FORD Oe View ote sedan two Tent = rin} nit a * a >! +k. - Capitol Cadilac Olde Co. | ) 56 Plymouth 


ipcladt @ goeer siterine Like nee ae Wee-ane Wile dea ware FOR ONLY 49 


s or trade #8°7475 


‘ alert 
; . Oe Ave =o slete ceteetion Loew 29% dower 2436 Wilsen peskevere “ 
, C : . * Per Res ate fin«inetia iT 

. as ce neve 7 let , _ > 480 a a . ed ee . yr ade Por nk fr n 7 ier and Whee. i. 


snag | AKERS OLDS-CADILLAC CO hachee BBNTIAC ‘5S Chevrolet—$1,799 ponte a. ral! 
sai J Putcinst Ge 3.8388 $ | 88 eae ee eee re Station Wagen. Low Gown perf + ene HARCERG | a la 
ole RTT Wis ee ae 335 Wis. Ave 7107 FB mens” Resetitul twe-tone Pine BETHESDA MOTORS | | . 
JAcksen ¢. . 
‘ee acs e e - ere Ve Ree us hy 


ere cle atl 1 Skin caudate’ ‘OL. 410004 ©) DELUXE PICNIC OUTFIT | 
air Gaeie ‘8 55 PONT. ay eset 'e Ooastin ——=—=e , my| FREE WITH THE PURCHASE 


thai’ Chevrolet” | 532% amet PONTIA =o 
: i thee” | BS Weave 'st-37107 Catalina Coupe ee BOX ; RE enone | (OF ANY MANDELL 
srs ae a HARDTOP_CONY. | * aro WN "MOTOR ¢ ae sows bapa eh | ie USED CAR! 


” WoO. &£-9400 and officers " . 


For Further Information BRAND NEW ! ' ' Thermos Jug ond meee 
Cat se. : : 


Pleesure Chest! 


y JET MOTOR SALES SS . 
= cit 1156 PONTIACS| |; Y 
2 ~ Vieusur 


16314) | SUUCR p1954 mal nee | 2 
LI. 6- 314] Hardtop 1 aed sthor extras, even ‘bheet 4 


= se gtper omer Raven black 
NEW 1956 MG-A Ce a ee | Chevrolets 
arate Auto | 


"$2399.85 
CONVERTIBLE CATALINA 


Styles 
all Body Sty Wimbes oo. field. biraic. Sedan Cestem ter Chief 
t. rére-Matie. radie Simbos grey ond nvaten biwe 


‘ ~ 
Many to Cheese From _ . ives Strate-Flight Hydre 
skirts ete. “wes, = ebrome power how and brakes *.- 


. 
) 
i‘ 


7. ter 


$2899.95 $2955.00 


Set. |IMcKEE PONTIAC] | 55s 5 


’ 
We Havre Them! Call for Credit Approval lf vou ere looking for « In Washington, D. C., Pontiac Means McKee 


PACKARDS f! we. 8.0674 |] soc wa” | LIS2BLST.N.W. ST. 3.7100 11395 


Prem ‘tf te % hed? these priced from 
stvlee One-oener 


| ———— 
COVINGTON MOTORS wy: art | $9O95 | ea 2 ae cee — — — | § ed 
Bie Fi mya an os of a mers 1) cow pown parments GF LOW $ .00 TOP QUALITY 
ona “cy gee Bolance Easy GMAC Terms} i) 4 © OWN CARS b A leben 
mance Cher nd 


. a chgh rok “tai taxes ATTENTION Andy Kelly Addison Chevrolet | ON APPROVED CREDIT i} “9 
m Be NERC. SERVICEME 129 K St. NW. ons | wae or Monthly Payments | a tard $195 
aes -— : . oy | ERS TO SU IT Y ia. ‘Vv #9446 

MONTCLAIR BesBer aiermration al ou We Sell 


HARDTOP LLOYDS SALE: ‘55 Plym. -.$45 Dn. ‘51 Olds. ...$5 Dn. 9 39 cadillee §69$195 Land Trade 


= _ -s Saver 4.4 6 a4 Folly — , 107 
WE CAN FINANCE = : OU GET A equipped with radio. heater, §uner OSA" 4-dr_ sedan. ide. 91078 Al Mahe end 


. tires see vooms plece Radio 
$1840 : BETTER USED CAR Facrata oan Mehta Bh) bate He 
ATTENTION at 54 Pont. - $45 Dr, ot Pont. ...39 Un. pte ve em 
vdra 


eauipped. Leeks and rene 


OR BETTER | 
STEWART " aie, 9 ret ‘48 Pont. 
3199. PoE Aj apaneiaatign BUICK SB Chev. $45 Dn. 3! Buick $5, Dn.) Tas, on "aes 


convertible. redie with redic 


er , piresin, Fall price $495 “4 
eet Cal Fete cessor. Nant Caveats Val cokes 48 Nash $99 
; ttle $45 Da. 50 Chev. : $5 Da. ‘ 4.4¢ -) | 8 
LLER MOTOR CO. on Hardtes coeve ’ ‘-4r. so@an _ ome Renter 
. D . - ; this ; 
NO $ FLORIDA AVE XP ina saged of 18 meh ; ’ bjoct ‘seach. Sue” Adtran “convince |) |) “49 Cheveslet $7 9G 
4 4 SerSties,, wtianowr argains Galore! boy wey Sirments™ ae 
= seal tee’ ae a = ree Wanwy others te Cc se from. 


Cash Needed 4 MERCURY a ‘SS. BUICK ‘SS OLDS | rere com mel cre te ie Peet $908 our 


’ Asorc Inctudes 
. 


Insurance 


, , = aw triers. | $9495 ar Motlaer & $9545 aan. onNet lnetades 

te ‘ —_ . ¥ 0s ae BG on Boot ime —— | } {. MOTO N ~ M reves 

24 FOI 3D MOTORS Loving Chevrolet Se. tires t.tone tinh. | Wa-w. ures, Stone Mints noe img aig 5 aa bond acme *145 
* 1729 Eaeet.W est f 


thver Sertne. i “soos Open D ity 9-8, & . 10 AM. ¢ 5 P.M. 
"oe a LINCOLN — —_ i onli _— =_— ee ‘30 Chevrolet $995 BRING YOUR | 


: ae - 4 — SO ___ __—— __—_— __W—_, 4dr. Din. #1121 ; 
TODAY'S ora wane & $395 |! [Derenpance | He, pera " mL nei 
BARGAINS erereriee ‘SS BUICK — By F395 F tor. we wil por oft the 


2-dr. “VS @880 
> . 


‘55 Thunderbird $2795 ‘ST BUICK aoee_ Biriers 7 9239 5 


Reaetifel Neht ereee oth cee spectet ap@r 
beck tee Ferdemat « Pell dan ‘ Riack s 
power nan & real seperty ae 1 . te Entre 


ay Packard 4 
“her D #1029 *85 


cor. bhe new te every «6 € . ' ; 
’ g 7 P 
pod GON ape, Senbileaee ype? ~- aT a eaoiise WS S$ | ie ‘52 Pontioe $695 


ace =W TA Inspection. 


$5 FORD cn te iB co 
WE FINANC L |. 4-2396 
$1460 ST PACKARD—$5 ON. 1995 -- 


“Lae 
OR BETTER cif — $4es $i. = . 


$135 DOWN |"EeSeereea ce] $5 DOWN 


eee. I. ieee. * WHEELER. ING Call new for Credit Approval. 


< a 
grec cené taae 


a toto $895 
eat ak 
52 Chewelet $495 
7a og SO 
on ee 


Chevrolet 
ton eee 


. Y PL ouTu 1 ear 
rn. er ary morthir parm€mests Eid 7 : . NOTOs 

‘MILL TER ‘MOTOR CO es ai ee ANDY ADAMS 
6 FLORIDA AVE FE *stier So guipped 


eral —r-+ar-gasarses | 3720 Georgia Ave. NW. 
ct. a 2396 “WHEELER, TU. 2-3515 


ite 


rorB—I"ss- i veda: ; “WHEELER, 4c 


~~ YwoT ty reper a! Price 


cr ASMINOTON Deal Pr 
. / 7s 


iin 


’ / 
\ - 
; ea Smart twee ae. 3 ® ene * ° 
. . - —— - ve 7; 
._ = z L rs se 
¥¥ ~ » 5 a - : “a - . a ,¢ 
"' , Gr “de . 2 - - . 
ae a AO - : © ; ” - “7 °- 
> =£+2”7 . . 
$3130. et - . 


on at; prt. owner. J | "88" 2-dr.. beautiful green 

Foan— SSS Wallner “S" Tad pe oe ti me : ean & white, R.AH., Hydra; ox- 
neetg ‘Tse. - ‘Monn ~4 yoa> Ah. ~F & ee JTORS | cellent condition. 

‘52 FORD | witie RN 
REPOSSESSED ape: aye 

$449.50. TOTAL eee 


‘675 


Full Price 


‘D3 Plymouth . | oe 
OBTLF i986 Ar ‘34 BUICK Be } | res $195 
we x33 woe be | | bec 47 Pete $109 
finish ready te ce mieciocn oo Goi 'S4 Chev. os $1095 's3 Chev. . $995 : 2-dr #1031 
Winter $40. 8. 6 8 ‘53 FORD Gestom, beater. “Powsttnde,'s eo | ie “AP Pore $1451 snd Finance Charts 
Seapestion ne ' ' hev. 1 
sRSAN (2ere) ‘SS FORD poe an $4 Chev. BER eee See 
TU. 2-4100 inne: s Riviera: on will be om sale wee Ne 
og 7 95 we 9745 LE ® ‘SS Mercury ..$1795 32 Dede §=—- $4 MEN 
DOYLE RaG¥OR SALES ?, ) * ae p | .« 2 nerpor ue a ers “Mergematie. m mans ; | ‘$0 Ch let FINANCED 
"Ss 1955 »0 Others Equally As Clean and Price orresponcamgiy i P. c. inepection etarenteed mileare falls eusrenteed. Car | bor 7 a $395 
OLDS 1525 WILSON BLVD., ARLINGTON (Opposite Mayflower Hotel) a . Site 
| JA. 5.7350 Closed Sundays JA. 5-735) Visit Our Two Used Car Lots: 18th St. Between Land M ff) | © 
| $799 Oger Weekdays 9 AM 9PM Open Saturdays 9 AM 5 PM RE. 7-7887 Easy GMAC Terms a "$3 Cadillac $9595 ) 
= a a = S58 a dan. 8-cylinder. | eS aEEEEREEEEEEEE = 
peat ets $95 DOWN | a eee Sai dIA CS cdddctcecttk | Se Tt nsw om eee 
i ee 
t 4-dr. Cus #317 2 
+ F ONTIAC ‘S1 Chevrolet $eQe | USE MANDELL'S | 
t 2-deer Sedan, equipped; 2-tone blue. A 
"SS Buick 
Merdtes ont PAYMENT PLAN 
* guarantee. 7 4 . $2695 
Easy terms ae for anyone with )e 
Open ‘til 10 P.M. for this Special Sale + 
Fell Price 7 
a 
Custe ; N T7178. Seld aos ie t 
, 85; 
53 Vict. *5 x 
sIQRE * 
56 Ford ‘1285 
‘55 195 
Mont. 
x 
- 
x 
sot 
+ 
x 
x 
f 


Ne Cash Needed 
on Appreved Credit 


Servicemen All Grades Financed 


a. Bi 
=" xe _ : . vers. ‘55 CHEVROLET yee many veers. ac Waeehingtoe’s eldest Cherreiet Dealer. we 4dr. Cor, #1127 
. 2? — 
48 Chrysler : ‘51 KAISER "S10" dr. twerr ever bine “T10" 4-deer, trerr ever bier Inciug 
kwnd ‘mechanieatiy “Paretion- re-tow shes $795 true value. Car Ne. 3 or with confidence. Car Ke. | Sp. Coo. #995 
3540 14th St. N.W. ‘51 BUICK Bescttriurs-sienas” {ie wag" | Gee Wig one before yon'bar'ear | fo SS" 0%” SERVICE 
l ewner ~. tires: +a taterter. ‘50 Ford $295 t.deer. t-tene Slee: eeulened f 4 or #73) 
; 
STEWART BUICK 1130 CONN. AVE. N.W. 
FULL PRICE Mainline 4-dr. se- —————— Open ‘Til 9 P.M. Conv, 9958 
: "SO Buick $ 
Tuesday: '54 iortan ge 
_ 
"> ‘5S! Ford 
ragteme te 6 VACATION 
nice car. Seld with a 2-day, money-back 
good credit 

‘55 Ford ‘785 
Ford haerdtes ‘ Seld os 16 Car Ne. 7714 
Mercury “8” herdtes. One in 6 miiile 


2-day money-back canidlionn, “Complete 


‘a 


oy 


Satisfaction is our motte.’ Discount fer cash 


buyers. 


Financing Arranged 
for Military Personnel 


ATTENTION: 


Financing Arranged For Military Personnel 
And Out-of-Towners. Officers Neo 


For Credit | Call 
Payment Required or Credit Approval Ca 


IRV MARTIN 
NA. 8-4455 


12th & K Sts. N.W. 


For credit approval call 


TU. 2-4200 
BILL ROSS ii thax sts. nv 


7400 Georgia Ave. N.W. oy deadator Pellthenn 


Open 8 A.M. ‘til 10 P.M. for the : 
Working Man Open 9 THD 


ee 
7 through bal Ipen Seterder “1 © 
rider tt “ eM Sunder 


2241 Nichols Ave. $.E. LU. t- 1051 


i wMew Cor Showroom 1800 Nichols Ave Sf iW. 44400 


Mek "y BS NTIAC Call New Fer 
PONTT Me BON MKF Credit Appreral 


. la "7" AF 
$335 VA os a -* ‘ J 


= FoNTTar aaa ane ob ME. 8-2674 


C LA 
"ARC Bask "PONT! A Military Personnel and 


A ie aaa | ‘t , sw <i Loere Out-of-Towners Financed 
cae weve *| Andy Kell 
jeri .,| ANGY neny 
. on : 4 rend 
” 


129 K ST. H.W. 


— 


FERNY NVREREYYYYYEEENYYNY ESS EEDERMMEEEIA 
PORTICO RTT RTT TO ROT TAIT DTI AA AAA A AAA AS A AO 


: 
: 


eh ee ee eR a ieee ial | 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD DICK TRACY , = Chester Gould 
» ys , 
pe Tuesdoy, July 10, ' 5 | BE INTERESTING 


i | I THINK WELL: WRAP UP 
The DISTRICT LINE by BitlGold Sane 


Harman or Harmon. is a dandy reference work, at the number of District 
eee en, pra green Linere who wrpte in to say 

, ; . rootreadaers are Oo Careriu 
Everybody Wants — Pr oa be they agreed with me that par- 
It Spelled Right Not long afterward he’s ents are nol “selish, brutal 
THE quickest way to make likely te be on the manag- and vengeful” when they use 


@ man angry ym ve! ] ing editor's carpet, getting their control of the family 
. : . ~ , ° ' fe - P — 
his name. A fr iend of mine chewed out again rhe 
Samed John Taulmun ¢ telephone book contains 
. -— 4 stata wn , . 

mio a oUwild many intentional § errors, 
Taze ey ‘ wats : he discovers. ten to parental advice 
& ry ley , ‘ . . (nhen” TTT, Vv " fell haw 7 
Aime he gets i 4 lo you pelt Coher But my heart fell when, at [-0-Se 
mw letter ; | it KRohen’ Cohn? Kohn a party Sunday, I found my- |———— ~ wees 
d re cece 7 d to e-. ; . : a ' \\ in a name self ei ated right next th REX MORGAN By Dal Curtis 


» spelled sevet : al menage f 
Zailimun, none : al Mary Haworth, whose column ——— er 


. == —_ ae | : 
allman 7 ve: Ses wee Se on the subject had touched ee Be eens | een lf? YES, MR. \ i IN OTHER WORDS, Y SHE MARRIED NEIL WHY DID vou 1T---1T WAS AN 


purse strings as a means of 
getting their children to lis- | 


at ' - 
_ 


Taulman or any busin ist because his Gtr the discussion. “Now,” I | BARKER / YOu OON’T THINK BECAUSE SHE WAS -- TEAR UP DAD'S BF ACCIDENT! I'LL 


uston ) miliar - 7 , 
any of the i bis Gere chalte a ;;, thought, “you're really going | YOU THINK TM ALL LILA MARRIED NBIL | AND STILL IS---IN CHECK, LILA? INSIST THAT HE 


dozen other ~ Aaa pe to catch it WRONG ABOUT LIL | | FON MY MONEY ? LOVE WITH HIM / | WRITE ME ANOTHE 
variations rg oe But 


which turn 


. rent se aihentean; mk: alee ciously and said, “You're en- | : ORGAN | , 7 ; . ae | LARGER ONE / 

ll ie in is , " . tit) re | t¢ . ~ —\1 " : \ os. : 

Bill Gold saler, is listed in the phone ea wo your own opinion, | - : ~—* 

mail practi- ok ohen Chas and We're still friends.” , ae > ‘ ~ - .. «} iz } 


Mary just smiled gra- | DON'T YOU, DR, <. | ; «-= PERHAPS A 


cally every day. He throws 
such letters into a waste 
basket unopened. and 
most are advertising circula 
anyhow, there is small loss. 
except to John’s frayed 
patience. ques h telephone 

By the time he has fin- ympanv not only bi busi- <6 

ished his first week on the necemen but by doctors, PUN FUN 

job, a cub reporter has lawvers. and others who Norman M. Davis of 4915 
learned that most people don't want to miss calls mere- Chevy Chase bivd. calls it 
are stubberniy insistent ly because a prospective c! “daylight slaving time 

that there is only one cor- ent or customer doesn't know bi 

rect way to spell their how thes spell their name cos By Al Capp and Bob Lubbers 
names. Usually he learns it Under the circumstances, GENTLER SEX 

in the course of being the reader may wonder The modern version: If the | Res “ns - NO I [ DONT WANT TO LISTEN DANY 7 / iF ONLY I COULD FIND 
thoroughly chewed out by how newspapers handle shoe fits, try a size smaller. you BET I pom a PLEAS FROM HIS FAMILY S7 SEND THE GENIUS WHO DREW 
ae, oer whe - many thousands of at ah HOME OF , 7O HANG HORSE THIEVES. THE LITTLE STINKER UP [01 — \. THESE C RTOONS SY 
fearinetive view. Stam Repertor. Merry Gab: FRANK FONELONE,| THA “ll Scarmame aur 

The cub who plans to re nett hes his ewan version of | ~- 222 AND YOU'VE LD BE TREATED ANY 


main in the newspaper field an explanation. Says Har- an, : CAUGHT THE THIEF € OIFFERENTLY LF 
then settles down to an eve “ ; ’ — FINE Ad < 


a ; ' rc 
oh Chas.” Simi- I was relieved, but also . : . Ss és ct 
Hechinger , a bit disappointed. This 

sterials would have been a much 
more interesting item if she 
had crowned me with a 
plate of cold roast beef. 


; : ry We simpally have to 

asting struggie to get all the lurn to be eksepshunally 

facts straight, especially the good spellers.” @ ON BRIDGE 

names. He learns that when aot 

? , j in : h Nat 

sents name I its ore n sUD iol S BIRTHD A} s vt 

Killebrew, but that if the tr oy me | , 

United Press feature writer Pie . il a NORTH 

is the subject of his essay the Pog of oe ae - &Aws8 7 

Harmon becomes Harman as “™* m. SUUEES SE 5 

in Harman Nichols ) 864 

And he discovers, also 

that no man can keep al! 

these spellings 

and that he mus 

know where to 

curate inform: 

them. r a oo “fee tee 

him that the telephone boo r 4688). Nice kittens: | | SEE HOW YOURE 1 MEY OO NOT ASSIST Us By 

im that ine telephone DOOK gree; OA ice kittens, * INOW. STU-DENTS'..IN ” " EXPECTED TOTELL} THE , | 
—s on Hospital (Hobart 2-1829 after FRENCH, NOUNS ARE WORD ---8UT "APPLE THEM APART: YAND THE TROUSERS? 4 

Uy Yili // p.m.). Housebroken whi | ALL MASC! aeray OX TREE” IS A GIRL WORD! ede 


Ne. 


Gi ) a iif-Manx Kittens live , The bid g vN “BOOK” 15S MASCULINE, 
] Seuath West Fast : BUT’ PAGE” iS FEMININE. .% 


; . - | diamond Pass 
BF eee Giecacay nating on ERY Le” Se FE 
Your Give-Away listing will 3 Pass labs Pass 


| diamends Pass Pass 
ot be published if you have 
hot be i : Opening lead: Nine of spades 


abbreviated the name of your ; en ae 
No visit to New York City is 
telephame exchange; please ever commiete until & sesenmel 
f spel! it out. Listings must be |, ae © aa 


rth-South vulnerable 
South deals 


i<a 
toll — been extracted from 


TOT me aE ey liar Bbc soerad de 
written name ane : ) tor of the Mayfai r Br ide re club 


y All. ah 5 
submitted b) mail The toll takes the form of a 


VA 
‘\ 
Taste ey leal for imn and his | 
POSTSCRIPT fferings are never lacking i , 
g ig i »\ 
, l was pleasantly surprised dramatic \% : Today's co ' conn -- . — —————————— 
Chew refreshing, : , ______|tribution was accompanied bs | SMILN Se ‘ By Zack Mosley 
delicious Wrigleys ;, oponmaptony, | a apology. its an old one | 1 THE OFFICER WAS V I'D SURE HATE To Bs | e JuDee THROW 
he pleaded. But it will be see > 25, . os 
Spearmint Gum. ~ o 4 SS It’s Eas to learn f : SEMOUSLY KUURED }) "ME SPEED-cRaty THE Book AT WHEN 
Pp that age has not deprived it 
; af am "y or . ; : : my : . “ eae a SLew Oro pore HE'S CAUGUT I Jt v2 
; oO r lustre . FOR AT! 9 | 
J The Manhattan maestro gave BRIDG hay tS a . ger: Mi’ Don TY, 
it everything he had as he and it’s i . , a Sy FINISH YOUR. 
emptied both barrels during YOU FEELING WELL? 
the bidding. Sitting South he FUN . | 
opened modestly with one dia- 


Z Fr ’ ; ; \mond. West overcalled with one CALL AD. 4-0116 


heart and North temporized Por Your Complimentary 


Lesson and Anaigsis 


I tes eee9 


, iwith a bid of one spade 
Ze VST fe Sd ‘ GAs Vt T Iba Ms A dil hdtddttdlldddddee When South made a jump 


shift rebid of three clubs. 
North showed the diamond sup- 


port and though South's cue , qv, 4 | eee 


bid in hearts subdued the effect SCHOOL OF BRIDGE eae a r 


itA 
I 


*) 


, 
Ww mm Of North's king, he had suffi 
tf 4 os cient remaining values to justi- 6 Dupont Circle 
ornel Cu , fy showing the king of clubs. Air-Conditioned 
“mA i F Fishbein’s leap to seven 
seems to exemplify a bit of 
Caring ie ch is not foreign to 


’ 


The little spade “a R% 


: mo shou har iad a sobering in 
l Vv . ac look eisewhere for to ountain 
‘ so ays text 
Without t] , 


WT ashineton's Finest Maker of 
Sli p« overs ® Draperies ® Reuph pistering 


it the spade lead de Coolness 


4 clare! ; ; pe wo lid ne Hh find 
' ey ‘st with the queen and jack AT AMERICA’S 
77 me Of spades as well as the ace’ MOST DISTINGUISHED 


of hearts and squeeze him out RESORT AND SPA 


7 | me. Of his possessions. But since 
5 ee East is marked with the spade : 
\ mm honor Fishbein projected his ee . ‘s : == x -. 
ss 3 squeeze in that direction Ry . am ’ j . : — x. — = . J ‘ ¥ , 
| m= reversing dummy he could | _ ' = : . =r 
S a ’ = = : — . ' oars : “ 
\ IK s m cash 12 tricks without ruffing mabe A 6 Pa : 2 <= ~ i = < v \ . Peo. et ~ as . 
> os , . 7 . . . ' ; ve a» ~% : - ~ ; . be oo and e “™* < 
o ie won the opening lead with >. ‘ f ” — , lebes oe meee af y Pe Neh: Q ' , 
"3 h ace and ruffed a heart with ” TC ha ics * eS, Re eae ied : Paes 
' » Ilithe trume nine. A low dlamand at : By McEvoy and Striebel 


$75 000.00 of First we ‘ne rmt put dummy in to ~* 5 DON’T YOU it I WELL, SUPPOS! NG NOT HERE / 

] Quality Fabri : ‘| Be ruff ther heart with an if 17,000-acre estate is & i) WHAT'S $ E M KNOW WHAT'S } COUL l TELL YOu ALL RE 
Being Sold at ‘2 | Ge or. Declarer returned with aderful place to enjoy the WITH Hen ?? Ma snd y par bys Sel ERING 1 hee LIA Oe 50 

. Prices... or Less! oe «| : , o ————— — Le ENT s To DO wi HER ? OUT A : AND SWEET f 


he queen of diamonds to ruff; *¥°"Y days and cool nights 


4 ; - GO “ : , VA 
j : ’ . a BS the last heart He then cashed fr if the Virginia s $ | i= | wo N,] D 
Every Yard Marked With = @ the nigh diamond and the hiah| 4 Ri ody 
_ . j m spade. A club to the king / The Homestead is famous for 
Original Price, Deduct I, cco = rm onal in to bee: ihe han b.. its superb sports facilities, its 
. ; . 2 <9 ay, a alneai al . easant scenery, its smooth 
See Your Sav james: my and East must part with the, focchern service. If you a® 
Or nign spade or wi e ‘up his club thinking of a fine vacation 
DRAPERY FABRICS 93. a" J rection pe bY wren 
> 50 a, “opyrig 1956, Chicace Tribu + ations, or for rates and our 
172 a illustrated folder. 


Antique Satin, Print: $5.95 
Fortisan Boucle, with mete threads 9 
9 


Fortisan ay 1.52 me | 

Barkcloth ty sunfast prints ‘ > ws DALE CARNEGIE 

Hundreds of Others at. (> Price... Or Less! SUMMER CLASSES 
SLIPCOVER FABRICS di Conditioned anp covsnest 


Linen Prints Starts Jaly 24th Hot Springs, Virginie 
Prints 7-& ] 65 New York Office—Plere 8.2490 


Plains CAUSE IT'S 
Modern Prints 


Damask AOL SEC NOT, V2, “4 SHALLER " 


| A so Be : | AN YE sang 

Mmikeds of Gibers i 1 Price.” -OF Low? (A I | Echt oe bi] arene) Ber ep 
UPHOI STERY FABRICS — & 1) | YONDER, Nanny oe 
Naugehyde Plastic, Rp ‘3 eae ' j 
Nylon Tapestry es 13 00 “es q I c £3: 


By Fred Lasswell Bas 


—- - - - - - 


Nylon Relined 4 Wheels Complete 


Velvet, se FINEST QUALITY LINING 
BUICK SPECIAL Thru ‘51 


PONTIAC.6 § 
OLDSMOBILE m %, a 45 


uWVuow 
ococw 


Linen, 'moorted 
Tweed. Rar | 
sean it of Others at 


FREE HOME ESTIMATES 
in M VA. & D. C. 
Call DE. 2-837] PR ng Sve a Made 
All Fabrics Now ‘2 Price pnraprrRiprs 
.. « Or Less! <1 IPCOVERS 
You MUST Savel’ = RET: PHOLSTERING 


AP AM ND te Ms 


eee “PR ee 


A 


» 


Other Cars 
Equally Low | - : 
QUICK, sevienatis FREE BRAKE | sty Baath dec Hea Sel stage tee wee Mele esl oot gab BeTaar nateas aa tes 
Service by Experts ADJUSTMENTS 7 oroscope iy gut meat tally os usual. Think well sored. 24 to NOV 22 (8 : 5 ‘De better, Keep aoreast o 
' >} - oerotis ron 4) 


“¢ Scorpio! — 


JUNE 22 te JULY 23 ‘Cenacer)—a | ** aspect ot where Saturn is f 20 to MARCH 20 (Pieces) Cone 


- . “ s ™ ~- ° : 
Rivet] . bf y clear prosperous read ahead if you aHcer sed ‘This reatric ive nfluen z 4 ty aoc pleasant events in 
ss on e inings ; Lao s the section tn which your show your inmate keenness and sept... 9°°** es _care in haeazar . wor ai din your at ars 1 e sa - pportuatties 


comes and Gnd what your out- tude Home interests. work. BSOusiness “OS Machinery. oou. © Day other- ‘for s ven ement. Me 


Ks b! | oUs.b : : neoura in vit our me. tron) > | ne 
tL H ; Upholsterers Be 4 “ Latest Pressure Bonded Lining Equipment | ae . A) t0- . ve a | mptess._ bighi ly tmvored for gain, new 2 ae in traging. imvit : . b i y guter eet sali faves od Bs ae. 


i 


eee ee ee ee ee De 
i i i 
7 yyrYeereeeeeeeeeeeeee 


* Du lica é 24 te AUG 23 (Leo)—What op Jubil ; yo ; 
and % Pp te D. C. Testing Machine S| MARCH 21 to APRIL  Wuslgeae. i gene held oh ee DS TA mnatever Top Jupiler and other asp Thet YOU BORM TODAY have many taj- 


D ' a | q u mopreving pre)- oan escomee® poe, & Bearch for new 84- | cheer se s hed mine MCs mbine re ane | fee hee See Seeeees 
é : n confter- cleverness LBith na mo f é Ns 
ecora ors ; FNFRAL BRAKE SERVICE ) eeping as AUG. 24 t arr 2 (Vise) Better ful intents te obtain good resu) eser to arn. 
pace us. Use extra care in Gengerows anancial securit Trough 2 to JAN. 20 (Capricera)— al the ‘answers. A. i 
1954 eg St., N.W. DEcatur 2-8371 spall, $1 te = fatto ig | det carn’ ’ pesttion  basgest et ith oa ont 
— Venus is wel aapect- bes yg oe r ik the. ue, f ould be path should. ~~ pw . 

Open "Til 9 PM. Tuesday, Thursday & Friday 903 5 ST ' AD y, od at now rt “an be ae proving failure 1 ever t beips. ior aii You , shou 

Open ‘Til 6 P.M. Monday, Wednesday & Saturday | . a. . -§803 complished: ew eel a JAN “pt - ieee’ ze 
) ———— ak“*t 2 23 = vers se Oh Sead por, your @ Hh t and on. (Coprrigh 
ra ea Toward tor sna atts them srous wil mtr ras. Get © euch Sroka ine, Pentare 


' ‘ ‘ i 
; 


ADDING MACHINES How lo | THE W pagar see Tadyes ams a. 
| ORPHAN ANNIE | oy Montd die 
Keep Well 


| YOu’LL FIND, JUNIOR, THAT 
* TERMS ARRANGED *% TRADE-INS By ['r. Theodore R. Van Delien| DECENT, HONEST, AND VERY SMART 
ACCEPTED | To the limit of space, questions| | PEOPLE STILL RUN THIG COUNTRY 
* REBUILT AND pertaining to the prevention of “NOT A FEW CHEAP HOODLUMS = 
GUARANTEED a RENTALS-REPAIRS \disease will be answered. Per 
ON ALL MODELS sonal replies will be made when 
return stamped envelope is in J ~ 
SALES @ REWTALS © @EPains clored. Telephone inquiries not 
accepted. Dr. Van Dellen will not 
make diagnoses or prescribe for 
mndiridual diseases 
THE VIGOROUS OLDSTER 


2019 14th St. N.W, HU. 3- 5121 | THE NUMBER of men and 


women over 65 has risen tre 


~~ 


iimendously during the last 20 
}TABLE-P years. The situation has been 
viewed with alarm, particularly | —— nomgiag . —_- —2 
*~ 
L & from the social, economic, and By Chic Young 
’ eC aa 2 » ‘ f ~ , 
medical points of view. Bu ae |} ade HOW MANY ATWO ADULT S-- OD NOW -- A 1M SORRY 


the problem presented is not SE : ADULTS | A y ris VO ; SUT THERE'S 


|a8 great as we are ied to be- 
f lieve 
| More beds are used in chronic 
s N 7 disease hospitals and there is 
, a shortage of nursing homes 


and homes for the aged. This 
is keeping with the time 
oo i and cannot be blamed upon 

- Mest ened veeteensen! Smartly designed more sickness and disability in 

uP Citi wed Mirror Centerpiece this age group. In my opinion 

FINEST grain or : me every Table our senior folk are doing a 
WORKMANSHIP floral designs OS eouee, marvelous job of taking care of 


themselves 


Phone or write. Ovr representative will call with somples ond 

measure your table free of cherge. Phone calls taken dey or eve- , 

ning up te 10 P.M. We make calls within 20 miles of Washington despite their years. They serve ay vg | ee epi pena ' ar 

: as a good example of how the oo 7 — 
UNITED TABLE PAD younger generation should live. | - 4 

& @uase Co secrete ye apenas sega ' = ” : srw } | GUNG BLABBER e . 

422 Washington Bidg. during the prohibition era and ' a ne vO THE WORLD -” , 


the per capita use of cigarets CANTT SLIP. KIPRPING : . 1 GUNG §CRIMM 
mac not reached oh og ~ / TSISTER'S TSIKRIT DOLL/"— LISTEN, DOLL!’ /p . IT FROM HEVERY 
sia ering proportions. ine . ; . - ° ; , 
alain got mare sleep» and LOCKED IN My HOTT. TSISTER'S TSIKRIT IS . HICE BERG TOP’’ 

MEN OF LIBERTY—No exercise because there was Icss | GOTTA TELL . 
electricity and mechanization 
9 in their youth. The death rate 
from infection was high when 
todays olders were children, 
and only the healthiest sur 
vived 

Retirement can be pleasur 
able, providec the change in 
the mode of living is made 
gradually by preparing for the 
transition. Boredom kills \ 
machine rusts and deteriorates 
when it is not used and an un 
occupied house falls apart. Man 
must continue to do something 
to survive and for thic reason 


some type of work is desirable " THE PHANTOM 


What is done is not as im 
portant as to whether he | EW) /))//)) me GaP LW Civ © AAULED | [DONT KEEP AGKING THATS aur | [m7 : TONGO CHIEF: _| |FORVEARS WE ITON 
derives satisfaction from what . FROM THE ME EVERY TWO OU KEEP - — —— —. ENVIED THE RICH VA 
| ome |FATHER, THE GIANT IS AWAKE, 
h doin Much depends _ — | a aan Guat | AMBES! NOW. | 
son his thilin, health, ond need ANNOUNCES ~, Af ¢ PGGINGS IN THE | | | SECONDS IF FOUND Jai? SAVING. | | pur WE ITONGO ARE vr zs cer iT 
money. Mnrid Sey (|| |L_ SACRED GROVE’ |ANY DAMONDS VEIL Seer) | NO RICHER NO , ae 


Many are happy and healthy 


tw 
ap 6( 956 by Uamed 


t as important as worl nae : 4 ; . Ai 
ne sc. The proper 1! ‘ ST 
amount will lead to a mini- em mag las _ 

mum of fatigue and wear and ! | 


tear. It should not be over ORIGINAL | es ONLY . 4 re AMI mneny 


done, as too much stiffens the 
joints and slows circulation Pormes: +S lined Merl Hi 


- Diversion also appears to be \WATE 
r} ssenti | oa if ATER whe ATER I 
oergeant Jasper an e “4 al ingredient of lion- =f Ih 


gevity t makes no difference 12? wire ml 
what the pastime is. so long as 
wars are so full of incidents of individual bravery. that only it keens the mind and body ac -, | 
’ : 


e most outstanding are recorded. Our Revolution, however, dif tive. It may not be easy after 30 CAL. “SIZE 
red from other wars in this respect. Among the early actions 65 to be moderate in eating, c - . ' 
that war was t} < Rr tish bombardment of Ch irleston At th if drinking, working, playing, GASOLINE ALLEY 
ve each of the colonies was fighting under its own flag. During smoking, and resting, particu- ' 


e¢ height of the battle, the Carolina banner was shot down 
z larly when the retired person) 
young sergeant named Jasper braved the shot and shell tu | 


. is lonely or fea s! AQ 
retrieve the fallen scarf and set it upon a makeshift staff. This — fears losing friend: CA. SIZE sure.1 can be ready. 
or becoming disabled. 
deed stirred the defenders to make a greater effort, and Charlesion Ss 
was saved. Why don't you make a greater effort to save? Open, TONORROW Where are vou s ' | 


an account at the Liberty Building Association today macationing? 


“\ : 4 iT. + 
t at this time of life rest ouuy — | 1 4 lai al mull | DIFFERENT 


DIAGNOSING HAY FEVER PLUS 
C. V. writes: Do doctors have INSTA'* ATION 
certain tests to administer 
which will tell whether a per- 
son has hay fever” $ 
REPLY J 
Diagnosis is made by the pa- LO. $-8970 


A SAVINGS INSTITUTION tient $s story and his nasal con- ps 


\y 
« gestion, red evelids. flowin elesa, 4 ¥ i L- 
G STREET MOTH WEST © ST B-8888 tears, and spells of sahanient EW 4 ///!/// umm \ = 
Tests are done to determine the 10313 KENSINGTON PKwY A \ 


enecif 
pecific allergen. Kensington, Md. 


terms os low os 


iCop she 7 Chicage 7 


cee Be ees | Es By Jimmie Hatle 
Daily Crossw , a (pare = — | = 
y Crossword Puzzle Portraits eae es BR 


| 
ACROSS Solution to Yesterday's Puzzle AG NEVER PLAYED THIS HOLE, “& ’ So GOOD OL 
J - James J. Metcalfe { SO ITLL TELL YOU ABOUT IT % WINOBERRY 
Fire-Qght- 44Force off “4. |. ¢° aes + : ich | T'S SORT OF A DOUBLE DOGLEG~’ i 4 SHOWS HIM 
Replace That Slow , a Roe a _ Course — ad ' | riendship Club IF YOU HOOK YOURE IN TROUBLE ~~ 
Water Heater paratus. he 5 ope an a, =e ne pemee e oFROUBLE! Goris wior monte 
With a New Fast > yawns ‘6Mrs. F.D.R. FF we ee MP aye OVER "THE FAR END OF THAT 


14 Eee shaped . With no initiation fee 


. 
15 Exile ‘sle 47Girl’s name 70 ft | ... Or any dues to pay 
15 Heron 49 Ribbed ... It is a great fraternity 
17 Singing fabric ul re Whose membership 


ALCOA(®) ALLOY amoureux 51 Thrice 4046 extends . To every 


9 Christmas 52 Acquisitions : ; human being in... The 
AUTOMATIC GAS . meg we the sun 0 C 0 circle of our friends 
WATER HEATER 20 Vestige 54 Supreme - . There are no stated meet- 
SOLID '21 Drinks little monarch : ings, and . NO gavel 
ALUMINUM | by ‘ittle 57 Part of | . has to pound... hh 
23 Pastrv circle simply get together when 
24 Worldlv 58 Accurate : . » » Some others afe 
ALLOY °F Part of foot 59 Ghost 1L1A driving 40 Emperor around ... The only min- 
TANK r , motive 42 F k ‘ 
28 Monkey 63 Strike 2 Fib utes that we keep. Are 
’ iv : ine ’ ar rit he heart... 
Red 31 River in 65 Endowed 12 Uncanny 43 Dullard written in t 
eal ny ’ Scotland with royal 13 Form of iron 48 Fntertains Of helping one another, 
= oF 32 Painter's authority 18 Want " as... Each member does 
Any temperature you gear 68 Mortise 22 More 50 Mail his part It is the least 
want up to 180° 34 To coin joint lustrous v2 Try flavor of i ' ere 
, money 69 Roof over- 25 Successful 53 Having time is all we spend... 
repens Sang 7 0 | 36 Chum hang defender weapons And there is no require- 
to ordinary Line 138 Brook 70 Summit °6 Back 55 Thin-shelled ment... Except to be a 
® Steel Tank type. 41 State of 71 owe gory °7 Hair color nut friend 
Aluminum Ce. 10- ear Warrant being unen- '2 Kind of bean 28 Among 56 Amer Copyright. 1954 Field Byter- - - 
" y y durable 73 Part of leg 29 Maine's tree ostriches Drises. inc Ail rights reserved © ma ares Peatuere Syren 


n | ee a 
of Americas Easy Terms 30 Fascinating 58 Even 


wade 33 Frosecute numbers se DENNIS THE MENACE 
1 Multitude 5 Veadow 35 Adult tad- 60 Roguish ts wines 


a 
2 Above 6 Aged _ poles 61 Half: prefix aA aS 
SF DR's ” Stout 37 Disappear 62 First garden 
Arata ing phenom- 64 Part of foot 
mother 8 Of the sea enon 66 Late Peron 
4 Choose by 9 Jewels 39 Anglo- 67 Energy: 


. - — | vote 10 Past Saxon slave slang 
A, - 4} Wal 3 a Od 1 tt [02 


A Quality 

Cabinet of 
Beauty and 
Durability 


tn — 
a 


W 
AP WM. H. GILLIAM, INC. 


PLUMBING AND HEATING 
2400 WISCONSIN AVE. N.W. WO. 6-8501 


Call RE. 71-1234, ask for Circulation, and order The Wash- = 4 ) Te, 


Seat ses Tees Meese ganaeees: ame delivery. | “Remember, if you keep yelling at me all afternoon, “You know better than fo leave the engine runnin’ 4" hile 
you won't have very much fun!” that mule’s around... They hate each other!” 


* DIFFERENT! 
*« MORE DELICIOUS THAN EVER! 
*« MADE FROM CREAMY HOMOGENIZED MILK! 


—, — 
ee oes 


TRADE MARK 


See a circus every Saturday ' 


G i A D t A 12 Noon, Channel 9— 
Sealtest “BIG TOP” 


Goopr™™ 
GgooDr=«"" 
oop.,™ 


ac $e smooth and chocolaty! 


You stert ge for n-—every 
Enjoy It cold or hot it's "08 


ra! Sealtest Big Top Chocolate 
t proteins, minerals an 


er drinks §ou can & 


rich goodness. 


body loves its 
ily refreshing! 


Milk is nourishing. 'ts whole 


vitamins make : 


+ one of 
And mothe it o 
milk—and its importan 


thermost wholesome Summ 


erve. SO 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


34 Tuesder, July 10, 1936 


— 


By Paul Nicho's 


WSLE IN ANOTHER ATTORNEY $ OFF CEA FEW 


By Milt Canvff 


—_—_ 


By Ham Fisher 


TAME TS Out Ba 

t COME MERE T HELP THE 
cFacm TEAM SETTER Gera 
TWERE FAST-~TM JERRY LEEM 


ee 


RAIDERS 'S DEPENDIN ON wE 
7 p Lv wa TN ON 


weo'’s TELLIN’ WHOT TH’ ee OT ae 


WHAT IT & 
SAW iN HIM... 


WERE ! GO T’ TH’ PARTY, JAN" WHO SHOWS UP BUT & 
EXPECTIN' T’ HAVE A ITH’ WIDOW JONES — AN'SPOWL 
DANDY TIME ”’ MY WHOLE AP TERNOON.. 


may aoUY . 


OY WEARIN' AN APRON” 


oj betele] Wy a - 


MILK 


Your family deserves the best. Get Sealtest—at your door or store. Or cal! 


CHESTNUT FARMS. oem 2-101 


WEEPECS A POSTTALCD 
FROM SOUTH AFRICA. 
IT }AS NEVE BEEN 
& WRITTEN 
lg ON. A 


T NOW Wu a? TB 06 wits 
THi4 . THAT OBIF ELWOOCD, 
WILL BEAK OuR 

WILL HE ? 


4 ya 
By Carl Anderson 


J 


- 


MARK TRAIL | me “= By Ed Dodd ume Washington Merry-Go-Round | THF WASHINGTON POST ond TIMES HERALD 


Tuesday, July 10, 1956 bik = 
SHOW, MISS DAVIS, BUT You 


By mt | | =a yee ae [= \\Testimony Cited Open Monday, Thursday and 
eset anipentanee k < Ny % sah Do4 In McLeaish Case Friday Nites ‘til 9 


1 WARNED 
TO STAY OUT OF THIS HORSE. 


Stores Open 9 A.M.—Phone Orders—Lincoin 71-9400 
By Drew Pearson Other Days Open "til 6:00 


The manner in which the ought to show why you request | 
Eisenhower Administration ed Mr. Hansen's resignation e ' 
fires its officials at the drop of You say for that record that ec in r 
-- ile the hat when an official stubs it was because the program was 
oo —— his toe was re- gee not operating as you thought . 
vealed in the | it should in Montana? 


I'M PLAYING A = TUAT'S \ AMAZING! 7 pease Givi McLeaish: Very frankly, we 


; a e 
= ier — . . : S . " : 7 . 
me WHAT? WuATs | Sreacean, | |Goateunte Dasaan. Msi ip f - mittee peabo ll had a meeting of Mr. Scott, 
HAT YOU SAY, MR, | MISS DOQUN AS 0 of the Farmers Mr. Farrington, and myself and) 
CORBY? HOW 6 MY a MOS TAGE, Ov | 
. — —— ; . | 
STRANGE 


BANK IN DANGER? Home Admin- 3 " ‘another, and they reported to 
: istration me that the report looked! 


On March 21 pretty bad and that we should) 


this column re- remove Mr. Hansen from office. | ° 
ported certain lL. C. Bryan, Senate investi 
facts about gator: May I ask whether you 
Carl O. Han- Pcarson could not form that conclusion 
sen, Montana on your own respogsibility?| 
director of the Farmers Home That you had to be*™*told by 
Administration—.how he did pri-,higher authority that the re 
vate wool-buying on the side, port looked pretty bad’ 
how he was a part-owner of TV’ McLeaish: Of course I didn't ° 
Station KOOK, how he wused get the report nnerspring 
government money to make pri-- Brawley: When did you get ' 
~™ |vate phone calls and write the report’ 
private correspondence. McLeaish: I didn't get it un : 
The sworn Senate testimony til some weeks—I mean my aise ounge 
. - ‘ | which follows tells what hap- copy of the report—until some 
somupoo? mona, } LORD ts AY Oiwy pened a few hours after publica- weeks after Mr. Hansen had . TS) Take-With Price 


OVER SOMETHING... I Wish USH YOu. MY ‘ . tion of this column: been removed 
LORO PLUSHBOTTOM WAS ; PT sos - DEAR ? -2 . ae | HH. W. Brawley. of the Senate; Brawley: Did you actually re 
=e OM Wey O10 I LET _—* | ; | ; ey ' Committee, asked: On March quest his resignation on the day 

1M : 121, 1956, a newspaper columnist /the coluron was written’ 

: published charges ef miscon-| McLeaish: I think we did 

duct against Cart do. Hansen, Brawley: Why did you pick ~ 
former FHA Direetoe in Mon-ithat particular day to request { —_ ’ 
tant. Within a very few hours it? py . 
after that columm was- pub-/| _McLeaish: Because that was, ‘\y 
lished Mr. Hansen’s resignation |thé Gay that the report was dis. 
was announced. Did you in any ‘cussed. ee 
way force or request that resig- Brawley: Was it discussed @ 4 Positions 
nation? after you saw the column OF From Upright te Flat ¢ 


| R.B. McLeaish, head of FMA: before you saw the column? , 
— =e lt requested it co sir atin McLeaish: It was discussed @ All-Aluminum Frame 


Brawley: On what basis did 2fter we saw the column Lightweight, Newer Needs Paint 
rgard | voy request it? Brawley: In other words, the) Delivered 


WHOME tht Pa.mt-trees cast soked \ontll conc esnanal "The te the case af Call HARES 18, pi jn ae : +96 - 


Shadows on the § ver tind, 7 : . ‘should consult counsel. The in-\the case of Cash Hansém in 
ia knelt Leade me ~ and #6 » "ae y ‘vestigation of Mr. Hansen is Montana? © @ Full innertpring back and seat 


hea COMPOSURE , eek tame a ay le . 
AECORRED. i teak your trembling hana +] {--sS 6 ont 2 not complete. There are cer-- McLeaisht Yes. @ Rubber tired wheels 


L£é — 5 w —< tain aspects to it I think which Red Bows 
: : , | vv% : Copyright, 1988, Bell Sroaimate “Gee © Comes ix or Green $ 
| MOVES AMONG Ww would prevent me from testify- ra Y herd T Weekly 


WE TABLES : ' 
CARES SING WITH | ing in enemering that question | 8 So EE eee SE , . 
"ER VELWETY ; In other words re may be Chaise 31” wide, 80" long, Rubbet-coated 


| | $4-95 
OWTRPALTO Tue 2 mo 6 7P : : some additional y a or) MAKE YOUR Cover heavy green fabric with tie tapes 


| ~AWTING WORDS 7 De ' - |procedure in court that might! 
| OFA POAL Aa ‘ ibe affected 
” BALLAO~ if : . . | Brawley: Do you “oy hme x 


7 
ithe first you knew of Mr. F Id 
isen’s misconduct was ee Lowe : LOOK o ing 
you saw in the newspapers’ 
McLeaish: We had had some. AND WEAR | Al a Ch ; 
rumors before that, not about UmMminum air 
‘misconduct Very frankly, I LIKE NEW | 
peeee gy Se Em —=idon't know yet, of my own , ~~ 
By Lank Leonard knowledge, of any misconduct ‘a \ Take-With Price 
| Brawley: Why did you re-| 


Me his resignation? 7" e ~e § 
McLeaish: I think I have an — 
| swered that question before, by -_ 
isaying that it is a question 1 =F e 


can't answer. 

Sen. Carlson of Kansas: Do 1| 
understand, then, Mr. Me. 
Leaish, that this case is atill be : ; 
ing taken under consideration 8 / Delivered Price 
and study by the department | 
or your agency” ; . $3.99 

McLeaish: Could@y§” let. my) 0, i Bes 
counsel speak for that? . a ' Made of polished 

Brawley: Unles¢ tion) . | - = ALCOA Aluminum 


oe a ‘ — re , With seat and back 

i> canner the @ Py . Pig of FIRESTONE 

i. o-oo : this Committee. , 7 J VELON. Wonder- 
ranner | sen. Laird of West e ie = fully lightweight . . 


ves AND MES $0) WELL_DONT PRET, |Mr. McLeaish has testifi that Restc your faverite folds compactly for 


HONEY. SOME ihe discharged Mr. Hansen, and , : 
ARTISTS ARS i think it is proper for him to club chair to like-new ' ; the | " 
LIKE THAT/ J ace smn ‘tell the Committee why he dis- comfort and beauty | maw OO 
WS — bee charged him y Get: | ' . camping trips. 
| MeLeaish: In @ general way ou 7@ . ' wa" 
we thought the (Montana) pro-| * New coil and padding _ « 
| gram was being neglected some. | Springs re-tied | 
Brawley: Do you mean the All laber costs 
FHA program in Montana? Choice of five colors in denim 


~ ‘ > - 
| MeLesish: Ye som! 2 aemereet Salngs — and Saran Chaise 


'you requested Mr. Hansen's res Pick-up and delivery 
ignation’ Larger Pieces Re-upholstered Made of Heavy-Duty l-Inch Tubing 


| MecLeaish: There has been a At Equally Low Prices 
\preliminary investigation re | Take- 
port filed which daes show some An expert will viel? your home With 


MAT MAK ES storage or for tak- 


: 
' 


evidence of misconduct, prior at ne cost or obligation te give 
r ———|to the Drew Pearson article. | You o* estimate 
By Frank Godwin Brawley: Prior to the Drew| CALL LA. 6-2616 
COTTA we Pearson article? Delivered $19.95 
. By hi wy yhuy te BUT HIS HE BOSS TOLD ME McLeaish: Prior to the Drew s 
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2 WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


Tuesday, 


July 10, 1936 


Davis Mansion to Become an Embassy 


The Government of Laos has purchased this 
building, the former Dwicht F. Davis 


Union Aide 
Sentenced as 
Dynamiter 


James Shelby. 39. of 2407 
Kimberly st., Silver Spring, was 
sentenced to three years in 
prison and fined $1000 in Jack- 
on, Miss., yestorday on charges 
oi conspirin? to dynamite tele- 
phene installations leased by 
the United States Government 

Shelby, an assistant to the 
vice president of the Communi 
cation Workers of America, was 
arrested in Chicago last Janu 
ary by FBI agents. Three other 
men were sentenced with him 
by ft S. District Judee Ben 
Dawkins, the Chicago Tribune 

‘ryice reported. They 

nvicted June 22 
g the trial, U. S. Attor 
tobert Hauberg said Mi s 
telephone communica 
vould have been “wiped 
off the face of the earth if 
Sheiby and the others had been 
successful ihe Government 
eontended that installations 
scheduied ‘or had 
a communica 
ting post 
(“or mar? 


cestruction 
included part of 
tions network lin 
the Stratedic Ail 
"Shelby was one of the lead 
nf ymonth strike ad 
fhe Southern Bell Te 
ana tleilegraph Co. last 


._ of 


mst 
ephone 
year. 


Criminologist’s 
Sonls Heldin 


> ¥ > 

Tourist Slaying | 

ELKO, Nev. July 9 Au 
thoriti : today held the adopts d 
son of a nationally prominent 
criminologist it connection 
with the pickax slaying of a 
Baltimore tourist 

The’  victin Paul 
about 45. was found in 
town alley in nea! 
Saturday nicht with a 
Geep wound behind 
Dist. Atty Grant 
said David Clark Sellers, 
was found near the scene, a 
bloody pickax at his feet 

Sellers is the adopted son of 
J. Clark Sellers, handwriting 
expert whose testimony helped 
convict Bruno Hauptman of 
the Lindbergh kidnaping, trunk 
murderess Winnie Ruth Judd 
and California liquor boss Ar 
very Samish. He was a student 
ast year at Utah State Agri 
cultural College 

Sawyer said Sellers admitted 
drinking with Brooks the night 
of the slaying The victim's 
son, Ronnie Z cs. 23. said 
he and his father were en 
rout: from Mountain View 
Calif. to Baltimore 
stopped overnight 
mote! 


L.S. to Offer 


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RANGOON, Burma, July-9 
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District of Columbia 


The Artington Independent 
Movement opened a “Blevins 
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night 

Lucas H. Blevins. 
dentist. is the conservative AIM 
nominee for the County Board 
vacancy created Dy the retire 
ment of George M. Rowzee Jr 


\riington 


SAR te Hear 


Sigurd Anderson. former 
Governor of South Dakota and 
now a commissioner of the 
Federal Trade Commission. 
will speak Wednesday noon at 
the monthly meeting of the 
Society, 
Sons of the American Revolu 
tion, at Hammel’s Restaurant. 


Anderson 


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BASEBALL 
AMUSEMENTS 
TV-RADIO 


TUESDAY, JULY 10, 1956 


a= | 


37 


rican Favored in All-Star Game 


GEORGE KELL YOGI BERRA 


é 
7 


MICKEY VERNON STAN MUSIAL ROY SIEVERS 


RIP REPULSKI 


Br Joe Meiberger. Staff Photographer 


KEN BOYER BOB FELLER 


Major League Greats Here for Today’s All-Star Game Who Attended Touchdown Club Luncheon Y esterday 


This Morning. 


With Shirley Pevich 


MODESTY WAS RUNNING riot at the exercises lead- 
ing up to the award of the Player of the Decade trophy 
to Stan Musial yesterday at a pre-All-Star game klatsche 
at the Touchdown Club. It was Bob Feller who hit the 
high note in low esteem for self as speaker after speaker 
shyly dug his toe in the carpet and said he was glad 
to be part of it all. 

Feller, honored with the role of introducing Musial to the 
gathering, started reciting the nu- 
merotis records held by Stan The 
‘Man and then abandoned the whole 
idea Shucks,” he said, “the only 
record safe from el is my record 
for walking 208 batters in a single 
season.” 

Musial, who has played in more 
All-Star games than any other man, 
alive or dead, nevertheless, attempt- © 
ed to discredit himself, and made ea 
horrible flop of it. “I couldn't play 
the outfield as well as DiMaggio, and 
I never could hit as well as Williams, 
and I couldn't pitch as well as Fel- 
ler. I'm sure I lucked into this 
award.” 

There were others who weren't so sure that Musial lucked 
out in the balloting. One speaker was positive he de- 
served the award. “A couple of years ago,” he sald. “Leo 
Durocher was saying Willie Mays was the greatest player 
in the game. Birdte Tebbetts had an answer for that one. 
Tebbetts said, ‘Mays might be, but it's going to take him 
10 years to prove it.’ Well, Musial has showed ‘em for 10 
years already.” 

THE TROPHY that Musial lugged away was a beauteous 
grandfather's clock, symbolizing the time element in the 
award. It was the gift of J. C. Taylor Spink, publisher of 
The Sporting News, who originated the Player of the Decade 
award and conducted the balloting. 

Yogi Berra, who figured high in the balloting won by 
Musial, was intrigued by the uniqueness of the prize, the 
latest number in grandfather's clocks. “Hey, Stan, too bad,” 
Yogi said, “if they made it just a Ifttle bit bigger you could 
hide from your wife, if you had to.” 

Neither could Berra resist the counterpoint when Musial 
remarked that he had played in every major league park 
except Washington, and was looking forward to the new ex- 
perience. 

“Yeah,” said Yogi, “I know. You don't come to Washington 
until you hear they shortened the fences in this town. Then 
you begin to show interest.” 

“You're wrong, Yogi,” Musial said. “I know what this park 
looks like. Even once in 19 years is too soon for a left-handed 
hitter to want to come to Washington.” 


THE TOUCHDOWN CLUB was crawling with All-Stars, 
and one by one they stepped up to acknowledge their intro- 
duction. President Al Lujack reserved for Early Wynn a 
special sort of accolade. “He's a great pitcher, a great switch- 
hitter, and an ex-Nat.” 


Wynn responded with better than characteristic modesty. | 


“It comes to me,” he told Lujack, “you could be wrong on 
two counts. The only point I'm going to agree on is that I 
am an ex-Nat.” 

Frank Lane, the general manager of the Cardinals, who 
got a glowing introduction, commented brightly, “He gave it 
to you just as I had written it for him,” Lane, the baseball 
writers’ friend, was disclaiming responsibility for some state- 
ments attributed to him in the papers 

“Don't get me wrong, though,” Lane said. “I'm not saying 
I was misquoted. You'll never catch me doing that. I'm 
too afraid you won't quote me at all and I can think of 
nothing worse that could happen to me.” 

Spike Briggs was there, too. He was fending off reporters 
asking for latest developments in the bidding for the Detroit 
franchise. Spike was whipping out a small document of 
calling-card size on which had been printed: “There is noth- 
ing new on the sale.” 


AT THE ALL-STAR headquarters in the Statler later in 
the day, Manager Casey Stengel was slightly on the de- 
fensive but not for long. He had said he wouldn't be afraid 
to use Billy Pierce, Whitey Ford and Herb Score, all left- 
handers, against the National League batting order. 


“Against all that National League right-handed porary | 


they asked him. 


“There are all kinds of left-handed pitchers,” Stengel said. | 
“Just say I'd like to own Pierce and Ford and Score and | 
be glad to take my chances against anybody's batting order. | 


See POVICH, Page 39, Col. 7 


| 


Stengel’s Pitching Better 
Pierce Faces Friend; 


Mickey Mantle Starts | 


By Bob Addie 


Seals Fire 


Joost, Name 
Joe Gordon 


— FRANCISCO, uly 3 The Washington dateline todas is the All-Star Game as elec- 
Joe (Flash) Gordon was named tion year and the graver policies of the Nation are thrust aside 
manager of the San Francisco for the 23d renewal of baseball's own Mardi Gras at Clark 


Seals today shortly after Eddie Griffith Stadium. Game time is 1 p. m 
| Joost was fired from the job. “Mostly sunny” is’ the weatherman’s light-hearted promise 


Gordon, once a great second ang a maximum temperature of 85 degrees is predicted. The 
Yankees, suit ah. as al? ass have tabbed the American League a se 7-51 
Washingten literally the baseball 
— siheeihit the Seerameste Statler, All-Star hea ~ A standing room crowd of 29,000 
is expetted today at ll park. 
range & yok ~ Coast League Casey Stengel, manager of the American League, an 
ae ae 192. e3 __ he would start Billy Pierce of the White Sox, while Walt Al- 
es on gigs Fd then ston, directing the National Leaguers,. picked the sensational | Pittsburg 
‘.. | Bob Friend of Pittsburgh. 
ae gy ‘ of -~ a, a Stengel named Mickey*Mantle as his center fielder, bat- 
— us rGon wit report © ting fourth behind Ted Williams. But Casey cautioned that if 
“id maining why Joost was tle Yankee slugger showed signs of still being hobbled by his 
~ re y . “injured right knee, the lineup would change drastically. 


dismissed in mid-season, Dono- 
ivan said: “He is simply not 
|getting the most out of the 
‘ball club. I think we should 
be doing better.” 

The Seals are in* seventh 
place in the Pacific Coast 
League, 14 games out of first 
place 

Joost simply 
shoulders and 
can | say Im out. Thats it.’ 

Joose played short for the 
Boston Red Sox last year and 
took over the management of 
the Seals this spring 

Joost’s firing followed by 
only a few hours an announce- 
ment by Leslie M. O'Connor, 
president of the Pacific Coast 
League, that Joost had been 
suspended for 10 playing days 
or 20 calendar days, which ever 
is shorter, for his part in & 
disturbance at Seals Stadium, 
June 24. 

On that day the Seals lost a 
doubleheader and Joost, who 
made the last out in the last 
\inning of the second game, 
hurled the ball over the third 
i base stands in what appeared 
to be a display of temper. 


apparent in picking Pierce, a 


Order of Events 
For Today's 
All-Star Game 


10:30 a. m—Gates open at 
Griffith Stadium. Concert by 
the Goldman Band. 


10:55 a. m—American 
League batting practice. 


the Chicago ace would be fol- 
lowed by the Yanks’ Whitey 
Ford and Cleveland's Herb 
Score. Like Pierce, Ford and 
Score are lefthanders. This 


shrugged his 
asked: | What Starting Lineups 
NATIONAL LEAGUE AMERICAN LEAGUE 
TEMPLE. 28 (281 RUtHH, SS (354) 
ROGINSON, LF (319) FOR, 78 (286) 
MUSIAL, BF ( ee) Wel iams, LF ( 3e8) 
BOYER, 38 (321) MANTLE. CF (371) 
SELL, CF ( 28H) SERRA, C (281) 
LONG. 18 (308) RALINE, BF (789) 
BAILEY, © (.395) VERNON, 
MCMILLAN, SS ( 282) SELL, 38 (328) 
FRIEND, P (11-7) POERCE. PF (13-9) 

UMPIRES: GERRY (AL), POMELL! (M1), BUR 
LEY (AL). GORE (WL), FLANERTY (AL) Axo 
IACKOWSK! (NL). 


11:40 a. m.—Natienal 
League batting practice. 


12:25 p. m.—Field is to be | 
cleared of all persons with | 
the exception of participating 
players as National League 
takes fielding practice. 


12:35 p. m—American 
League fielding practice. 


12:45 p. m—Starting line- 
ups to be announced over the 
public address system as 
groundskeepers put finishing 
touches on field. 


12:52 p. m—March te the 
| flagpole by Presidents Will 
| Harridge and Warren Giles 
| of the American and National 
| Leagues, Managers Casey 
Stengel and Walter Alston of 
| the twe teams and the United 

States Air Force Band and 
an Air Force color guard. 

12:57 p. m—Commissioner 
Ford C. Frick throws out the 
first ball. 

12:59 p. m.—The public ad- 
dress announcer asks for a 
moment of silence in memory 
of the late Clark C. Griffith. four lefthanders for 


1:00 p. m.—PLAY BALL! See GAME, Page 35, 


means Stengel is looking be- 
yond the startin National 
League lineup to 
reserves. 


such power hitters as Cincin- 
nati’s Ted Kluszewski, Milwau- 
kee’s Ed Mathews, Brooklyn's 
Roy Camparglla and Duke 
Snider, and the Chicago Cubs’ 
Ernie Banks. Not one of these 
was voted to the first team but 
each has hit 40 or more honrers 
in one season in his career. 
Kliuszewski is a lefthanded 
hitter. So are the devastating 
Mathews and Snider. Stengel 
figures to get the percentage) 


‘Harper Jailed 

"s 
For 12 Months on 
Vagrancy Charge 
: > 
| OAKLAND, Calif. July 9 & 
Maurice Harper, 24yearold 
welterweight fighter, was sen- 
itenced today to 12 months in 
jail for vagrancy. 

Harper, who last week scored 
a unanimous 10-round decision 
over Joe Mice}i of New York in 
a national TV fight at Oakland 
Auditorium, was convicted May 
26 on two counts of vagrancy.| 
Municipal Judge Edward J. 
Smith today sentenced him to 
six months on each count, the 
sentences to run consecutively 

The fighter, once rated eighth 
among welterweights, was ar- 
rested Apri] 1, 1955, on charges 
of stealing a letter containing 
a check. He was given probation 
on that charge. Eartier this 
year Harper was arrested on a 
charge of burglary but was re- 
‘leased because of insufficient’ 
evidence. 


the power-packed, lefthanded| 


hitters. 


Col. 1 


500 Standing Room 
Tickets on Sale 


Five-hundred standing. 
room tickets for the All-Star 
Game will geo on sale at 12:30 
p.m. today 

Tickets” will be priced at 


TO YOUR SEAT—This chart shows the seating arrange 
ment at Griffith Stadium by sections. It may help you get 
' te your seat quickly for today's All-Star game. 


i 


for a perfect baseball day in which the humidity will be lower, 


e Stengel’s strategy already is| 


8 ( 326) | 


Sitting on the bench will be 


Majors 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 


be + ttn 


W. 
$2 


. 43 


‘Creve Cleveland 


_ 
40 


~ 


3 


WASH. 
Kansas City 


28 


_ G.B. 


Game Sidelights 


Injured Manile Still 


‘= «Star of the All-Stars 


yo 19% 


47 17 
AM 18 
383 22 
368 23 


YESTERDAY'S RESULTS 
No games scheduled. 


Cidehanatt . 


eee 
\‘Brookiyn . 
St. ~ ll 


eta: 


New York 


31 


30 
30 
32 
39 
37 
40 
43 


41 


a 


TODAY'S GAMES 
No games sched 


| YESTERDAY'S RESUL 


No games scheduled. 


TODAY'S GAMES 
lefthander, and announcing that! 


'5 


| only 20. The starting first baseman for t 


before 


| Only 169 for the junior leagu- 
| ers 


All-Star Game 
On Radio, TV 


Disappointed 
couldn't get tickets te the 
All-Star game at Griffith Sia- 
dium today will be able te 
follow the action via televi- 


sion and radio. 
23rd annual classic 


The 


fans 


will be televised by 
(Channel 4), and broadcast by 
WWDC (1260 ke.), beginning 


at 12:30 p. 


m. 


who 


WRC.TV 


By a Stal Reporter 


THERE ARE SOME interesting sidelights to the 1956 major 
league All-Star Game at Griffith Stadium this afternoon. 

Young Frank Robinson, the Redlegs’ outstanding rookie, is 
he American League, 
venerable Mickey Vernon of the Red Sox, a long-time Wash- 
ington favorite, is 38, and was already on the road t6 fame 
R was born. 
te the greater reputation of the National os asa 


ay one wa 
Stan Musial - 
Gets Player of 
Decade Award 


Stan Musial, St. Louis 
Cardinals’ star, yesterday re- 
ceived the “Player of the 
Decade” award from Bob 
Feller in a _ pre-All-Star 
game bighlight at the Touch- 
down Club. The award, spon- 

| sored by the Sporting News, 
was the result of a Nation- 
wide poll 

Bob Feller, who originated 
the idea, made the presenta- 
tion of a grandfather's clock, 
a replica of the actual award. 

Povich, Washington 
‘Post and Times Herald col- 
umnist, introduced Feller 
who in turn introduced Mu- 
sial. The presentation was 
televised over WTTG with 
Bob Wolff and Al Lujack, 
president of the Touchdown 
| Club, sharing the job as 
master of ceremonies. 


merican 
a. vers. Despite Mantile’s 
individual brilliance in hom- 
ers, the National Leaguers 
have an overall edge in that 
specialty, too. The senior cir- 
cuit has blasted 236 homers to 


Mantle is the star of stars 
No other player can match his 
371 batting mark. He leads 
both leagues in homers, with 
29. and in runs batted in with 
71 


This is the fifth straight 
All-Star squad selection for 
the 24yearold Mantle who 
first was picked ig 1952 but 
didn't get into that five-inning 
game, cut short by rain in 
Philadelphia. 

Pierce ts the winningest 
pitcher of both squads with 
13 victories. Six of the Amer- 


See SIDE, Page 39, Col. 6 


Shirley 


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In the starting lineup will be| 
the Na 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and 1{MES HERALD 
38 Tuesday, July 10, 1996 eeee 


Bob Addie’s 


Column... 


Touchdown Clubbers who hosted Stan Musial yester- 
day when he received the “Player of the Decade” award 
from The Sporting News, were impressd with th articu- 
lateness of the baliplayers Perhaps the most touching 
moment was the spontaneous ovation given to Mickey 
Vernon who was slightly embarrassed by the adulation 
heaped on him. 


-—— — -—— 


.. They don't make them any nicer 
than the real big leaguers like Musial, 
Vernon. George Kell, Rip Repuiski, 


A pro is always a pro 


Ken Boyer, Bob Feller, Early Wynn, 
Roy Sievers, Yogi Berra, Fred Hutch- 
inson and Frank Lane who were gra- 
cious to everyone 


to autograph a ball 


was a bit embarrassed at having been 


given the task. 
Kell 


all,” 


I don’t mind at 
“Just think is 


this 


said 


going to make some youngster happy 


so its ! 


' Addie 
be broken. But, 


cial 


eally worthwhile.’ 


Feller. in giving the award to Mu- 
remarked “Records are made to 
he added with a sly dig at himself, “I have 


one récord nobody will ever equal—208 walks in one season.” 


People strolling downtown 


on 24th st. in front of the 


Hotel Statler, headquarters for the All-Star game, did double 
takes when they recognized such stars as Robin Roberts and 


Yogi Berra taking in the air 


-- 


WHAT DO BALLPLAYERS 
of course 


together? Baseball, 


talk about when they 


Theyre allowed 


get 
to 


fraternize at this time of the year and they talk of incidents 
which happened on the field when they were opposing each 


other 


It was a great thrill for Roy 
Roy grew up with Berra and always idoliged 
Don't you believe it when people say baliplayefs 
They're as starry-yed as small 
like Ted Williams, 


All-Star team 
Musial. . 
don't like their own game 
boys, even veterans 


Sievers to be selected for the 


Musial and Berra 


who have been all through this several times before 


Bob Considine. local boy who made good, conducted a 


unique broadcast yesterday 
interviewing Ty Cobb 
original touch 


Some ivy-crusted records could fall 
handed hitters take a bead on the 
instance. 
three homers in an All-Star game 


Griffith Stadium For 


iwho is in California 


had Mickey Mantie 
.,. lt was an 


He 


today if the right 
left-field fence at 
nobody has ever hit 


Arky Vaughan, Ted 


snort 


Williams and Al Rosen have hit two 


THIS IS A NEW experience for Birdie Tebbetts and Fred 


Hutchinson 
previous All-Star games 


both of whom were American League players in 
. This time 


they find themselves 


on the other side of the fence as National League coaches 


under Walt Alston ... Hutch 


the National League 


made it in his rookie year in 


.. Reporters remember the personable 


Cardinal manager as the long-time American League player 


representative at these games. 


Speaking of the new home run. haven in Griffith Stadium. 
it may be well to remember that mot a single homer was 
hit over the short, left-field fence In Boston's Fenway Park 
in 1946... Williams hit two but they went the other direction. 


In case you're making friendly wagers on this one, don't 
bet that the All-Star game never has been played at nicht... 
It was for the first time in 1943 in Philadelphia and again 


in Pittsburgh, the following year 


. The idea was that 


nobody wanted to take any war workers away from their 


important tasks 


Musial doesn't comsider 13 unlucky 
13th All-Star game and he'll 
record for such appearances . 
last vear's game in Milwaukee, when he hit a homer 


. This will be 
be improving his 
Stan the Man broke 
in 


his 
only own 

uD 
the 


12th to give the National League a 6-5 victory 


Let's not forget the man to whom this game is dedicated— 


Clark Griffith 


. He would have loved this one in his own 


back yard because he was, first of all, a real baseball fan 


— 


Famous last words 


of extra tickets, do you?” 


_— 


R. A. Glendon 
Dies at 86 


Niass.. lulvy 9@ 
Dick) Glendon 


HYANNIS 


im~m—Richard A 


86, whose crews at Navy and champion Rocky Marciano. hos- | ®*eeke 
Columbia paced eastern racing pitalized since Friday with a|™ané. 37, 


in the first three decades of the 
century, died last night at Cape 
Cod hospital after a cerebral 
hemorrhage 

A requiem 
celebrated at 9 a. m EDT 
Wednesday at Holy Trinity 
Catholic Church, West Harwich 
Burial will be at Concord 

A native Cape Codder born 
at Harwich in 1870, Glendon 
went to Boston in Nis teens and 
began coaching schoolboy an 
club rowing on the Cnharies 
River. In 1903 he went to 
Naval Academ: where 
stayed for two decades, captul 
ing the Olympic title in 1920 


mass will be 


ine 
he 


Trov Gains 
Split Decision 
Over Luedee 


NEW YORK, July WW 
Willie Troy, 161%, started out 
slow but gained momentum 4s 
the bout wore on and came out 
with a split 10-round decision 
over Jerry Luedee, 1634, at 5! 
Nicholas Arena tonight 

It was a mighty narrow 
squeak for the 24-year-old Troy 
Judge Frank Fullam called the 
bout a draw, giving each fight. 
er five rounds and awarding 
each five points under the New 
York State supplemental scor- 
ing system. 

Judge Leo Birnbaum had 
Troy ahead, 6 to 4, and Referee 
Davey Feld also saw it even 
in rounds, but he gave Troy 
eight points to five for Luedee 
The AP press scorecard called 
it in favor of Troy, 541 

In @ preliminary bout, Nickie 
Gadeon, 135, Elizabeth, WN. J. 


r 


ted Harold Smith, 131%. 
wanngion D.C. ip a az 


T 


——— 


“You don't happe@ to have a couple 


Rocky Faces 
Dise Trouble 


BROCKTON. Masse 
Retired 


Juiv 9 UF 


heavyweight boxing 


back injury he thinks he suf 
fered while playing with his 
S*2-yearold daughter, today 
underwent tests for a possible 
Slipped spinal disc 

Marciano’s physician, Dr. Na- 
thanie! Gould, said X-rays have 
not provided anything definite 
and that he has not been able 
to determine if the injury is a 
slipped disc 

Dr. Gould said even if it 
were, the injury would not pre- 
vent a ring comeback by Marci 
ano Many a slipped disc has 
been repaired by surgery,” he 
said, citing operations on work- 
ers in heavy industry. 


Kenny Lane 
L psets Dupas 


NEW ORLEANS, July 9 wW 
Southpaw Kenny Lane of Mus- 
kegon Mich jumped into 
lightweight title contention to- 
night with a 10-round split de. 
cision over Ralph Dupas of 
New Orleans, the No. 2 light- 
weight contender. Lane 
weighed 138%, Dupas 139 

The victory was Lane's 40th 
in 45 fights and probably 
earned him a spot in the divi- 
sion’s top 10. The loss was the 
first for Dupas in a New Or- 
leans ring in more than a year 
and a half. 


Andrews Beaten 


PITTSBURGH, duly 8 © 
Wilf Greaves, a Canadian im- 
port, scored an unanimous de 
cision over Al Andrews of St 
Paul, Minn. tonight if a 10- 
comes —— ge Be 

le reaves " 
Andrews 160. 


The fellow | 


Peacoc 


Four Teams 
Shoot 67s 


In Pro-Am 


By Maury Fitzgerald 


S'ea7 Panarrte 


Koger Peacock Sligo 


professional, and District Ama 
teur champ Bobby Brownell of 
Chevy Chase, chiseled seven 


strokes off par for Woodmont 
Country Club's course yester- 
day to get @ half share in a 
|\Maryland State Golf Associa- 
tion pro-amateur tournament 

Peacock and Brownell were 
‘31. 34 over the par 3636—72 
course to finish in a tie with 
| Andy Gibson and Kenny Scales 
of the Country Club of Mary- 
land 

Played from scratch and as 
a preliminary to tomorrow's 
36-hole Maryland State Open, 
the tournament drew a record 
field and produced an unusual 
collection of low scores 

Peacock and Brownell, who 
had to play the last two holes 
of their round in the rain, will 
meet Gibson and Scaies in a 
playoff tomorrow night follow 
ing completion of the Maryland 
Open. Four more teams, tied 
at 67, also will compete in a 
quick<death playoff to settle 
third and fourtl place. 

The Maryland State Golf As 
sociation decided upon the un- 
‘usual playofl when heavy rain 
rendered the course unplayable 
moments after the last team 
had reported its scores 

Peacock and Brownell fired 
individual rounds of 70 over the 
par 36-36—72 layout and both 
contributed fdéur birdies. Pew. 
cock birdied the second, sev- 
enth and 16th holes, Brownell 
the first, sixth and eighth and 
both got birdies at the 14th. 

Gibson and Scales, out in 32 
and back in 33, collected bird 
les at the first, third, fourth. 
ninth, 12th. 14th and 16th holes 

In a tie for third place were 
Clif Spencer and Bobby Ler- 
ner of the host club: Harold 
Oatman, Norfolk professional 
and Frank Michalek, a sporting 
goods salesman from Balti 
more; John Jendrasek and Bob 
Lumsden, Mt. Pleasant. and 
Bill Clarke and Maury Bailey 
of Hillendale 


Reger Peaceck. Slice Park. and 
Brewnell, Chevy Chase 1.4 

Andy Gibeon sed Ken Sealen. ©. € 
ef Marviend. &°. 35-65 

Bill Clarke end Meerr Batler. Hillen- 
33. 3467 


Bobb, 
. 


Hareld Ostman 
Michalek. All View 

ciuerr Spencer and 
Mecodment & 4 7 

Jehan tend 
Pivasant. 5° 

Prank Tenner. White Filet. end Phil 
Buescher. Argrie. 34. 34-68 

Steve Tebesh sad Dick Lebess. Fort 
Meade. 35. 35-—#8 

Harry Grieemer 
Regart. Chevy Chase. 34 

Art Jenes. enattiached. end 
neser. C. C {f Marviend. 3. 


Jimmy Bellicsit and Billy Martin. 
Washington. 4‘. 1-69 


Nerfet. end Freak 
aa 344" 


Bebbr Lereer 


rasek end BR. Lemeden. Mit 
35-—67 


Beitheeds. cond Ralohk 
34-44 


Ta Fia- 
14—~+A 


Joba Morgan end Jack Deser, Weed-' 
ment. 37. 3°2-—49 : 


Billy Gilbert sad Beeb Martine. Ar- 
sot. 36. 35-68 
(eerge Pigett. Bainbridge end Jeo 
Resan. Fast Petemac. 34. 33—469 
Walter Petter. Bethesda Naval 
Billy Dudley. Bethesda. 35. 34-—69 
Clarence Deser and Dr. Jerry Feeter. 
Vi ceodmen't 45 1‘—_+49 


John O Dennell. and Billi Cele Mi 
Pleasant. 33. 36—49 


Cheries Bassler and Soencer Overton 
Y—pvy 


Relling Bead. 36. 5 


Ward Bersess. Chery 
Deck. Eaet Petemac. 3 


Mex Elbin. Burning Tree. sad © 
Reenie Kelly. Congressional 34. 37 


Clare Emery and Claede Wild. Wasehk- 
. we 33 18 


Cheese. end Bill 
4. 26—760 

el 
78 


meten Gt 


Dick 


lames and Levi 
House = 


a4 7 
Fread Belten 
Rix MeAatliffe 
(oe 
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Teder.. Coert 
GCliemment Renge send 
White Filet. a6. 35—7I 
Tise end Nick Cente. Bennie 
sa 337] 

Rech MeLellen Prospect 
Hebert Heff. Weedment. %5 
Walter Reman 
Paltiimere ¢ ‘ 
bbe and Del Tedd. Beck Creck 
} 


Keller end Tenr MeGewan 
34-71 


nit. end 
——s 

* end Marre Parr TV 
a6 33.....3 | 


Bill Cre 
4 37 ——7 
Lievd 
Manner, 37 


Cart Raenic. College Park 
Reman, Bethesda. 34. 35-—7i 


Eddie Stevens. Ariandria Range ond 
Geerse Thernten. Manner. 34. 347! 


karts Hecen. Hocan's Rance and Sam 
Parts Arevie. 28. 34.77 


Fasten and Beb Chandler 
.» —T72 


and Del 


Chartes 
Ceneressional, 34 
| Bitly Welfe Glenbresk. aed Bill Me. 
Terren Jr Maner. 37, 34-73 

Henri Van Gesh sod Frank Mallter 
Ceuert Heuse. 37. 36-73 

Bille Phiss 
Winchester. 43. & 

Teddy MeCandiich and Den Salliran 
Arevie. 37. 36-73 

Bill Gehring and Alex Kaaoe. Balit-. 
mere C C.. 37, 36—-7% 

Dick Treen and Pddie Johncten. ¢. C 
eof Marviand, 37. 37-24 

Dewey Ricketie and Velmery Burnett 

Manoer Ye TN 

Tarr and €£. 
39—%5 


aries Meck and Reser Horton. Belle 
Haven. 2% 3— 36 

Jack 
ment. 37 ’ 

(eer Difftentbeach and Meare Fits. 
serald, enweed. Se car 

Smitty Padgett and L. Hardesty. Glee 
breek, ne cards. 


Billy Celliins. Glbeen 


5. 33-76. 
irvin and Chies Canter. W . 
; ~ nte aad 


Williams Says 


. 


Pilots Should 
Pick All-Stars 


Ted Williams said vesterday 
that the selection of players 
for the All-Star baseball game 
should be given back to the 
managers 
| “They should give the selec. 
tien of players back to the man- 
lagers.” said the slugger who 
will be appearing in his 12th 
| All-Star game today. 
| “They (the managers) know 
the players in their league 
They know who they should 
pick. 

“The fans have been doing 
all right up te now. They've 
picked some good teams. But 
this year, the voting was a bit 
lop-sided.” 


Sports on TV, Radio 


TELEVISION 
BASEBALL — All-Star 


Game, American League vs. | 
WRC.TYV | 


National League, 
(Channel 4), 12:30 p. m. 
RADIO 
BASEBALL — All-Star 


k, Brownell Tie. Gibson, Scales With 


65 


—— 


. 
= 


If New Stadium Approved 


Navy Would Shift Big 


Football Games Here 


By 


Maior collegiate football games mays 


Martie Zad 


Sea" Benorter 


come to Washington if 


the much-discussed municipal stadium on the National Training 


Park School grounds becomes a reality 


The proposed park is expected to house major league base. 


ball and professional football 


since the Nats and Redskins 


already have said they would play home games in it | 
Navy now has joined in and said it would consider moving 
some of its football games to the Nation's Capital. The Middies 


haven't played 
for 23 years 

Navy's upcoming games with 
Notre Dame, Maryland or even 
the annual service classic with 
Army could be played in Wash- 
ingtori, if the new stadium is 
big enough. Athletic Director 
Capt. Elliott Loughlin said yes 
terday. 

In addition to Navy, George 
Washington wouki move its 
home games to the new park 
The stadium also probably 
would be used for the annual 
city high school championship 
football game 

Navy's schedule is made up 
through 1960, but the Middies 
would shift some home games 
here if the park is built. In addi 
tion to the Irish, Terrapins and 
Army, Navy has games coming 
up with Minnesota, Miami 
Southern Methodist, California 
and George Washington. 

Some of these games might 
very well be played here. The 
proposed site of the stadium is 
just a few hundred yards away 
from the entrance of the new 
Washington-Annapolis highway 
which will be completed in 
February 

The proximity to Annapolis 
and the nearness to the College 


in Washington*® 


Park campus may induce Mary- 
land and Navy officials to move 
the 1959 and 1960 Maryland-| 
Navy games now planned for 
Baltimore. | 

Navy has a home game with 
Notre Dame every other year 
These “home” games now are 
played in Baltimore. But it 
wouldn't take much persuasion 
to move the game here if the 
proposed stadium seated more 
than 60,000 

Loughlin added. “it is hard 
to make any definite plans 
until more about the park is 
known—the size. the rental and 
other conditions.” 

New stadium or not, 
will play George 
in Washington ih 
Middies and GW haven't met 
since the two schools first 
played in 1908. Navy won that 
one, 17-4. 


Industrial Off 


The sandiot game 


Navy 
Washington 
1957. The 


between 


Jack Pry and Federal Storage 


in The Washington Post and 
Times Herald Industrial League 
yesterday was postponed on ac- 
count of rain. 


With Lions 


/Krouse 


Ray Krouse 


Won't Sign 


By Jack Walsh 
Btal Reporter 

Glib Nick Kerbawy. general 
manager of the Detroit Lions, 
failed to convince big Ray | 
Krouse he ought to play tackle) 
in the Motor City at a confer-) 
ence here yesterday. | 
Krouse, five-year vet with the 
New York Giants who was) 
traded to the Lions 
season, is reluctant 
He wants to stay closer to 
home— preferably with the 
Redskins or Colts. | 

Reeskin Coach Joe Kuharich, | 
who says he has no serious 
signing problems, let Kerbawy 
and Krouse use his office for 
their confab. 

After it, Kerbawy said: 
“Krouse is satisfied with our! 
terms. His problem is personal. 
I'm trying to help him resolve 
it.” 

Krouse agreed with Ker- 
bawy'’s version. The 270-pound 
native Washingtonian said: 
I'm having trouble making 
people understand I mean'| 
what I say. I made this decision | 
months ago and am sticking! 
with it. I don’t want to go to! 
Canada. I may have to retire if| 
[ can't get the opportunity to/ 
play here or in Baltimore.” 

Kuharich expressed interest 
in obtaining the services of! 
“He's a top football) 
player. We're always interested 
in one.” 

Kerbawy'’s next move would 
appear to be to make the best 
trade he can with the local pros 
or the Colts. 


in the off| 
to report. 


: 


Only Four Break Par 


Mrs. Miller Wins 


Mrs 


‘had a 77, 


McBeath Leads Qualifying 
In Public Links Golf, 69 


SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., July 9 @—Salesman Scotty Me- 
Beath of Palo Alto, Calif. a fellow who does most of his golfing 
on the weekends, today shot a three-under-par 69 to lead the 
field in the first qualifying round of the 3ist amateur public 
links championships 7 

The 34-year-old former North- 
ern California champion who 
selis sporting goods, put to- 
gether rounds of 34 and 35. He 
collected four birdies and 
didn't go over par on a hole 
until the 17th. 

Runners-up with 70, were Lt 


Dick Stearns of Portland, Ore., 
the Air Force champion, 36-34, 
and San Francisco Airport bus 
idriver Fred Corvi, 33-37. 

Vern Callison, Sacramento, 
Calif.. tavern owner, had 36, 35 
—Ti in the exclusive list of 
four subpar shooters among the 
field of 150 over the par 36, 
36—72 Harding Park course, a 
6683-yard layout. 

The 18hole medal pley 
rounds today and again tomor- 


Gibbons Golf Trophy 


Mrs. I. N. Miller won the Jim 


Gibbons trophy on the ‘second |row determine the 64 qualifiers 


hole of a playoff at Washing-jfor the match play beginning 
ton Golf and Country Club,| Wednesday. . 
beating Mrs. G. W. Calvert. Daniel Sikes Jr., of Jackson- 
It was reported Saturday that ville, Fla., former soldier at Ft. 
Calvert had won the|Meade, Md., fired a par 72. 
trophy with a net score of| Earl Marcey of. Arlington, 
82—5—77, but Sunday it was/Ve., shot 76; Julian Williams of 
discovered that Mrs. Miller also| Washington, D. C., 77, and Pete 
|Sitnik of Alexandria, Va., 84. 


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FRIEND AND FOE—Billy Pierce, left. of 
the Chicago White Sex and Bob Friend of 
the Pittsburgh Pirates touch an ice carved 
figure at the Statler Hotel fer good tuck 


Associated Press Photo 


in today’s All-Star Game at Griffith Sta- 
dium. They will be the oppesing piichers 
at the start. Lefthander Pierce has a record 
of 13-3 and Righthander Friend, 11-7. 


| For TV Fans 


\Numbers, Averages 


| Tattors 
Nos. Fiaver am and Cleb 


erch 
fectansti 
or. St Leuk 


- 5 
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rs 


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\Of All-Star Players 


Here are the complete batting and pitching records of play- 
ers selected for the major league All-Star game: 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 


BATTING 


mR OF Oe RAE 


; 
’ a 


eo ee oe Po Pe eS 
ee ee ed 
“22ST eee? 
ee ee " 
‘-_ oon 
t= Wee ae oe | Be 


te ' Piwee 


VF 
2 hs | 
Sieve 


al 


io om whee 2 “ 

— ee oth oh 4 6 OS cad 
‘a 

oe -. es 


— 
- 
= 


nA BO 40.” L 
. _“ : : 
5 ul 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
BATTING 


SS ok ire FF 


=F J) waammme BO y wee 
=—=9 


PITCHING 


e2e-xz2-- 


=] 


> 
-— 2 v—SEsg 


FP-t-t— BBA— ~ 
ON ite A hee) ” 
2-— —<— -_ 

“_ 

é 


a 


American League Favored; Pierce vs. Friend 


homer over the rightfield fence 
although Manile hit two over 
the center-fie!d wall 

Friend was a doubtful starter 
until a press conference yester 
day when he denied reports a 
sore throat would keep him out 
of the game. The Pittsburgh 
righthander, who has an 11-7 
record, said he had been “only 
slightly bothered by a sore 
throat for the past ‘ew days, 
and insisted he felt in top con- 
dition 

Manager Alston may use Mil- 
waukee’s fine southpaw, War- 
ren Spahn, as his second 
pitcher. Stengel will have con- 
sidcrably more variety in his 
starjing lineup which shows 
four lefthanders ‘(Nellie Fox, 
Williams, Berra and Mickey 
Vernon) and three righthand 
ers (Harvey Kuenn, Al Kaline 
and George Kell.) Mantle. of 
course, is the dream boy, the 
star who is equally dangerous 
from both sides of the plate 


GAME—From Page 37 


League: Stan Musial, 
Dale Long, Gus Bell and Ed, 
Bailey. Stengel apparently isn't 
worried about the righthanded 
hitters like Johnny Temple, 
Frank Robinson, Roy McMillan 
and Ken Boyer. Robinson and 
Boyer are the long-ball hitters 

Stengel appears worried 
about righthanded hitters 
reaching the shortened area in 
Grmith Stadium'’s ieft field 
This year, the distance down 
the foul line was cut down 39 
feet to 350. The homerun line 
extends from left to center with 
the farthest point in front of 
the flagpole only 380 feet 

On the other hand, there has 
been only one home run hit 
over the rightfield fence, which 
is 30 feet high as the target 
area for a left-handed hitter 
Washington's Whitey Herzog 
has been the onlv player to 


tional 


~ WILLA an 


While the National Leaguers 
have the more prominent 
names. Stengel has some fine 
reserves. Casey picked them 
eye toward reaching 
the leftield seats. Thus, such 
right-handers as Roy Sievers, 
Gil MeDougald, Vic Power. Jim 
Piersail and Ray Boone will be 
available for pinch-hitting or 
full duty after the compulsory 
first three innings According 
to the All-Star rules, the line- 
ups selected by the fans must 
piay three innings except in 
cases of injury 

The Washington Baseball 
Club, host for the game. an- 
nounced that 500 standing room 
seats, at $2.50 per ticket, will 
be put on sale a half hour 
(12:30 p. m.) before game time 

While the American League 
has a 13-9 edge in the series, 
the National League has domi- 
nated for the past several 
years. The senior circuit has 
won five out of the last six, in- 


cluding last year's thriller in 
Milwaukee. On that occasion, 
Musial’s home run in the 12th 
inning gave the National 
League a 65 victory. 

Sievers is the only Washing- 
ton player selected—or at least 


eligible to play. Chuck Stobbs a 


and Pedro Ramos were named 
to pitch batting practice while 
Stengel selected Manager 
Chuck Dressen as the Amer- 
ican League's third-base coach 
The game is being designated 
as “The Clark Griffith Me- 
morial” in honor of the late 
owner of the Nats who passed 
away last October. This will 
mark the return of the All-Star 
Game to the Nation's Capital 
after an absence of 19 years. 
On that occasion back in 1937. 
Manager Joe McCarthy of the 
Yankees had Buddy Myer and 
the Ferrell brothers, Wes and 
Rick, available. However, Mc- 
Carthy used only 12 players 


as the American League won, 


3 

That 1937 game is remem.- 
bered chiefly for the incident 
which hastened the end of Diz- 
ty Dean's great career. Dizzy 
was hit by a line drive off the 
bat of Cleveland's Earl Averill 
nd the ball broke his toe. Dean 
was never effective after that 
and soon retired 

There will be some strange 
comparisons in this game which 
originated in 
of the late Arch Ward, 


sports 


| SIDE—From Page 37 
Mantle Star 
Of All-Stars 


ican League pitchers already 
have won 10 or more games. 

Brooks Lawrence, of Cin- 
cinnall, 
ord of 12-0, probably the only 
undefeated pitcher ever to 
be selected for the classic. 
At least, no other pitcher has 
won as many games without 
a 108s coming into the game. 
Friend is the only other Na- 


tional League pitcher in douw- | 


ble figures in the victory 
column. He has an 11-7 ree- 
ord. Johnny Antonelli, Clem 
Labine, Joe Nuxhall and 
Robin Roberts complete the 
pitching roster. On paper, 


the American League appears | 


to have the pitching edge. 


IF THE GAME is post- 
poned this afternoon, it will 
be rescheduled for 8 o'clock 
tonight. If again postponed, 
it will be rescheduled for 
1:30 p. m. tomorrow 
game isn't played then, it will 
be cancelled but don't bet on 
it. There’s never been a con- 
cellation yet 


In the absence of President 
Eisenhower, convalescing on 
his Gettysburg farm, the tra- 
ditional first ball will be 
tossed out by Commissioner 
Ford Frick.—Bob Addie. 


100 Players Enter 


Post entries will be accepted 
for the District Golf Associa 
tion’s 2-man team medal play 
handicap 


day at Argyle Country Club. 
More than 100 players have 


| entered the 18-hole event. Com- 


petitors can play either day. 


Loses After 25 Years 


LONDON, July 9 W—The 
longest victory string in tennis 
—maybe the longest in sports— 
has come to an end 

Warsaw Radio announced to 
day that Jadwiga Jedrzejowska 
has been beaten in Stalinograd 
in the Polish national women’s 
singles championship for the 
first time in 25 years. 


has the fantastic rec- | 


If the | 


tournament sche d-' 
»-/uled for tomorrow and Thurs 


THE WASHINGTON POS? and TIMES HERALD 
ere Tuesday, July 10, 1956 | 39 


POVICH—From Pg. 37 


This Morning... 


When you strike oil, you don’t care what side of the field 
| it comes in on.” 

Stengel said he was putting Mickey Mantle in the starting 
lineup “because he’s saying he’s ready and he’s the only 
one who can really know how he feels.” Mantle wouldn't 
play .more than three innings, Stengel said, “because we got 
a pretty good replacement for him in center field.” 

“Who's that?” they asked Stengel. 

“Piersall,” Stengel said. “Except for one thing, he’s great. 
_ But he is weak on those balls hit outside of the park.” 


Military Credit Pension I ae 


Major league baseball owners 
will be asked to give vilayers 
pension credit for military serv 
\ice during the past five years. 
Commissioner Ford Frick an- 
nounced yesterday 

Frick said his recommenda. 
tion, agreed to at a meeting of 
the major league executive 
council and pension commit-| 
tee, will be submitted to the 16 
‘club owners at a meeting in Au- 
gust 

Charles Segar, executive sec- 
retary to Frick, said approval 
was anticipated. 

Baseball players who entered 
military service since Sept. 30. 
/1951, have not received any 
credit for it toward their pen- 


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Ward conceived the game as a 
feature of the 1933 World's Fair 
in Chicago and the fans em 
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cally it was perpetuated and 
the All-Star classic now takes 
its place with the World Series 
as one of the annual highlights 
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Only in the war year of 1945 
was the All-Star string inter- 
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i \ 


THE 
40 


Tuesday, Ji 


— 


Avent The Tracks 


Horses and People 


By Walter Haight 


ARTHUR GODFREY'S HORSES 


Derby or an Santa Anita Hand 


WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


ily 10. 19354 sere 


havent won a Kentucky 
icap, But they are winning—at 


Charlies Town. that is. The famous redhead's Beacon Hill Farm 


colors have been seen in the wi 


nner’s circle twice at the infant 


meeting now in progress at the West 


Virginia track 
Cala Dice is the stable's star. 


accounted for both victories. W 


in a row, 
Godfrey horse. He's the first th 
bred owned by the TV-radio 
have: a winning streak—and 
more, if memory serves, this 


having 
ith two 


Gala Dice stands apart as a 


orough- 
Slar to 
whats 
ine 


is 


first time the barn ever accounted for 


two purses in so short an inte 


rval 


Godfrey's horses are in good hands, 


Virginian Shirley 


Payne, who condi. 


tions for Godfrey, also has horses for 


other owners. At this time. 


he is far 


In front of the Charles Town condi- 


toners with nine winners 


Perhaps Godfrey should keep as far 


Haight 


away from his horses as possible. At 


least, it was while he was in 
chose to run. 

I'm not sure, but it seems 
track when one of his horses w 


‘Needs Rest’ 
Needles Skips 


Nashua Race 


OCEANPORT, N. J.. July 9 
W—Nashua drew top weight of 
129 pounds today for the $100 
OOO-added Monmouth Park 
Handicap. But Mr. Millions will 
not meet Kentucky Derby 
Needles in the big Saturday 
Tace. 

Needles, the eccentric Flori 
da-bred colt who is headed for 
the JZyearold championship 
throne, drew 117 pounds for the 
mile and one quarter race. That 
is three pounds above the 
weight for age scale, while 
Nashua, a 4-year-old, also is 
three above scale. 

Hugh Fontaine, World War ! 
fiying ace who trains Needles 
for the D. & H. stable of Jack 
Dudley, Stillwater, Okla. and 
Bonnie Heath. Ocala. Fia.. said 
“no thanks” shortly after the 
weights were issued by John P 
Turner, Jr.. Monmouth Park 
racing secretary 

“He has been in five $100,000 
races in the last five months 
said Fontaine crisply 

“He won 


hero 


four of them 
Needles has had a hard spring 
and early summer of racing 
He needs a rest. We are not 
going to try and beat Nashua 
“His next start wil! Be in the 
American Derby at Washington 
Park in Chicago Aug. 18.” 


Jo Ann Batc helor 
Wins Golf Playoff’ 
Over Miss Diggs 


Jo Ann Batchelor defeated 


Barbara Diggs in a playoff after' 


finishing in a tie with 84s in a 
Women's District Golf Associa- 
tion junior girls’ yester- 
day at Argyle Country Club. 
Ann Kincheloe and Pat 
Lyons,, Belle Haven clubmates, 
tiled for net with 
20—76 scores. Miss Diggs won 
third net with 84—7—77; on a 
draw from Toni Kekenes, 98— 


—7 

Janet Henry, Belle 
110——36—74: won the 
division net. Other 
were: Florence 7 fupnik. 
mont, 115—36—79.: Les! 
Woodmont, 121—36 
Dunn, Kenwood, 
and Kathy Baker, 
127—36—91 


Ch arles 


ancie Publ 


event 


Haven, 
one 
inners 
W ood- 


ie Gli r 


Belle Haven, 


Cooryr 
WEATHER 


FIRST BACE—Char' 
eer 4 anc Ut 


couree 
at ._* 


'™- 
= 
4 
7 


- 
-_ 


yy 


(sO? 40 


ientical 96— 


CLEAR—TRACK FAST 


Sen Francisco that Gala Dice 


Arthur never has been at the 
on. Good Chance for somebody 


* to prove me wrong 


CAPT. EWART 
STON reports 
phaned when Royal 


JOHN 
colt or 


Busin 
turned 


his 


died last spring, has re 
to Clay Hill Farm near 
Va.. and grow 
iealthy specime 
you remember the who is 
by the former Brookemeadc 
runner Sky Ship. Set. Odin 
Johnston. informed that Roy 
al Business had died, offered 
his mare Quick News, whic! 
lost a foal, as a foster 
ry 


Boyce 
is ing into a 

perhaps 
colt, 


months 
farm is now at Clay Hill, and 
will be separated until 
the weaned... Capt 
John Quick New 5 
the yvoungster sne 
w a Stranger to get 
The Virginian still 
ill name the Sky 

Business colt 
Royal despite my 
protest tha e little fellow 
already has had enough trou- 
~ 


ie 


not 
colt 1s 
rye aye 


. : : . 


‘ iose 
ne w 
Roval 
Haight 


, ?) 


INnSiSts 


Shin 


ASSOUR, the 

graph opera- 
ries Town. takes 
pride in being tagged “a Dig 
city boy George is from 

~w York where he has lived 
and wor! for years. AS a 
Gotham lestrian. Nassour 
has walked a zillion miles 
around the big town without 
figuring in an accident. Last 
week, he was struck by an 
auto in Charies Town 
And. ironically, the car had a 
New York license tag 
Charlies Town friends of 
Willie Hartack are rooting 
for the boy who is having the 
hot hand at Arlington Park 
They can hardly wait for the 
morning paper (our's ~ of 
course) to find out how many 
winners he rode... 


GEOR 
Mornin 


tor 


ked 


ne 
ve 


DON TEAGUE, working 
hard to keep in the jockey 
race, has his weight down to 
112 pounds, the lightest I can 
remember since he was 
apprentice . .-The hors 
formerly piogrammed 
Montchevalier new ) 
cially known as Magnetic 
Makes little difference in thi 
era with tote tickets sold b 
numbers However, in o) 
days when buyers asked f 
names, Montchevalier woul 
have been a tongue-twi 
for some of us In Mar: 
land many years ago there 
was a thoroughbred named 
Hymkymyous. He was known 
in the betting ring Simply as 
“Him’ Holly Mutuel must 
have over-bet herself on the 
daily double. She went big 
with a roast beef clubhouse 
lunch, but her dessert was 
ice cream—on a stick unde: 
the grandstand. 


ani 


is ( 


Dr. 


Favorite 


Scores by 


ive Lengths 


By Walter 
moe 
CHARLES 
Dr 


eight sta: 


Ha ght 


Rep ° 


July 

in 
le operating in sm 
pany, found five 
could handle tox 


Link 
whi 
so-so Ti al 
lay and was 
easy winnet 
The chestnut colt 

Washington's Milton 

nas past pertorman 
made him a standout and th 
favorite players flocked to him 


had to be sat 


Po 


es 


in droves. They 
fied wit 2 
he gave tT 
nents in the and 
al . Sstazes 
at was in the 
ess Purse 
aes “the DUS 
sition. He fil 


ate 


red R 


i) 


featu 
that 


rari on ime A 
Uix in third 

Saddled Dy ur 
Hacker, a key. Dr 
Link was ridden by Sammy Pa 
lumbo and was clocked in 1-27 
or the about seven furlongs 
over fast track and befor: 
4869 fa 


‘ainer Kevertl 


iormre oO 


Were ft 
faded 
took \ 


Hiowever turned 


« rf Ary 17 o . 2 | he 
responded hand 


ARLINGTON RESULTS 
Ctark Ra 
{,eg) Hy rtack 
Rr roek « 


Hect mann 
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DAILY DOUBLE PAID £1428 %0 
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An Operation Beached Veteran Skipper 


‘Pop’ Wells, Seawall Sailor 


R " 
Ry Peggy 


‘From Harpers Ferry to Weverton 


The Washing 


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TUE SD AY, JU LY 10, 1956 1] Almost any Sunday during 


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? 
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red 
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white ; 
By Aubrey Graves 
Out ava 5 
SET UP FOR SUNDAY (uly 15) is a “white wate canoe 
cruise that should furnish fun and thrills to both the expert 
and the “intermediate” paddlers he cru up in two 
parts. Those with experience gotiating fast. swirl 
rapids will meet at Ts 
and proceed to llarpers Fi 
bile. There they 
on the Maryland side b 
The intermed who |i 
the beginners stage but who still are not 
highly proficient) will meet at Tenley Circie 
at 8:30 a. m. and plan to joi th the 
experts at the Potomac Appala rrail 
Lemp at WV Lol 
From the dai n above 
the confluence of the P 
andoah, the b 
Between these the currents ct 
suple of miles 
rect. the entire four-mile 
Weverton is dangerous and deli 
a except experts The 
spread out and in 
low water it is easy to get 
hung up on the rocks ‘ 
In high water these same wat neha : | oe 
an cause so much tu rock | bin ar a. ; - ) : ~~ Ab. Se re 
buler that even the best : 
canocist is tikely get 
swamped and have difficulty 
ey out satel 


cf is set 


in ne neg 


niey Circie 


wili | 


lates (those 


iorces \ 


~ ,4 ’ . 
Graves She n- 
oadening stream is full ol 


irve and swirl for 


. ; 
az ’ 4 {) 


nded fcr 


Play if Sale: 


ANU 


yf re 


river is 
pT nh 
roe a5 
ce 


"aAVING | ; 


nh 
some ve iT 


enor” +7 
getil 


Phete by Peesy Reyooids 


had cannibalizes Standing on the seawall at Hains Point, Eliet C. “Pop” Wells, 
beaten-up boa watches the progress of his Chesapeake 29 sailboat, skip- 
pered now by his son, Tony. 


THOSE PUTTING in at 
Harpers Ferry can gain easy 4 2 | deale 
access to the river by sta) = -s , rie) : , a" the old 


ing on the highWay on the parts for his 
"< ¥ : 
i 


Maryland shore line, going Rine Water After re 


men, among them Ned Flash, 
Jim Morgan, Gordon Hamil- 
ton, Jim Alger, Jon Ericson, 
and Jack Lynch. The sailing 
fraternity believes that Pop 
has his boat so well tuned 
that any reasonably good 
skipper can take the tiller and 
win races. 


mighty close, and he is uswu- 
ally ready with a stock of 
spare parts at the seawall. 
As for racing tactics, Pop is 
a sailboat Svengali. Before a 
race he holds a skull session 
with helmsman and crew, 
planning the start, reviewing 
wind and tide conditions, and 
in structing 


the 


The lake at Cacapon State Park (W. Va.) gets Hagers- 


PRESENTLY. P 
the “toe test” from Mrs. Catherine Fratianni. Pop and Tony 


are completing the tedius 
task of applying fiberglass to 
Strutaways hull, to fortify 
the old boat's strength and 
to stop leaks and thereby, 
probabiy. win more races. 

In a few days Strutaway 
will be sailing again, and Poo 
will be back at his old stand, 
coaxing her on from the sea- 
wall. Of course, he would 
rather be aboard, but no one, 
anywhere, gets a bigger 
thrill owt of a sailboat race. 


By Aubrey Graves. Outdoors Editor. 


b wt 


bank 


underneath the raiiroad everything of value 
bridge. and then on up the sold Strutaway to | 
hill until the road makes a ™ song 
sharp turn to the right bot ha Refore 
nort! $0 at Peo responded 

At that point parking spa the coveted Old Do 
is availabie, and jit is a shor , nec awit " ot Trophy away ee Blue 
carry over the C. & O. Cat oy | ' Peve “8 
and down to the banks ot | | Bang : oat, i Bobby 
Potomac. Putting in dDefore nand se youl ‘ | cede’ In ] op underwent a 
9 xpect to : © te 
5 Oe eS Goerten 7 She lives at 170 W. Washington st., wes We 
one hour later, There they { be taken town, Md. 
will rendezvous with the | nage to the can 
ciers planning to run 
atively safe 10-mile c 
Point or Rocks, Md~ t 
some beautiful scenery 


. As Adertons Plan Round-World Cruise 
Hostelers Plan 

| —_ _ Sunset Rides 

TO REACH the PAT‘ 


a -Pa1 Ride Broody Duck Usurps Att-Deck 


tion at Weverton, cross the me ends, members « he Ry We fished on a flood tide 
tracks and the canal and fo! rican Youth H stel wil calm water and fog 

low along the road upstream uct “after-work 
about one-third of a mile to es each Wedne: 

vw banks of the river ing at 6:45 p. n 

After joining forces here, bers are invited 
both groups will continue point will be the Titanic : * 
down the Potomac to Pointof Memorial on Rock Creek 
Rocks, arriving there in mid- Parkway at New Hampshire at 
afternoon : ave. and E. sts. nw. Cost: 35c. 

While the cruise is pri On Saturday night (July other wild mallard families 
marily for members of the 14) the hostelers will craw! are paddling around the near 
American Canoe Association, into sleeping bags and camp - | bes 
nonmembders will be welcome ou re de Grace. On , 7 
Anyon e wishing lw go aiong Sunday thew ll swim at Fik 
should telephone Andrew J. Neck State Park of out- 


t e c hniques 
of handling 
sheets on 
Strutaway 

Then. he 
bends on the 
sails himself, 
and, if pos 
sible. checks 
their set be- 
Strutaway puis out tw 
race. Afterwards retires to 
the bank and spirits his boat 
around the course. 


Don Carpenter 
TOM AND EDNA Aderton 
South Down Sh near 
Woodland Beach. Md. who 
are working On a schooner to 
Sail around 
the world (or 
least to 


During the last cold spell 
and the subsequent hot 
weather, the eggs were al- — 
ternately chilled and “boiled” BEST CROAKER cat 
to a deep blue color. at this time are betwe pULIY is 
Point Lookout and the Chop tit rn mut se of th f 
tank River from mid-bay to 
the Eastern Shore. Some, but 
not many, of the hardhead 
were caught in the mouth of 
South River weekend 

At the red and biack buoy 
shoreline between West River and re silver 
Although the eggs’ hatch. 20Ut® River, an ang ng party wu — : @ 


Satur lay afte rT ”) auni f 1 Da : u . ; " 
ing deadline has passed. yy : a 


bicycle 
jay begin 
merm- 
starting 


ores« : 
_ 
Reynolds 


Non 


Te 


— i. 


he 


JOSEPHINE nevertheless 
continues to sit on them duti- 
fully and hopefully, while 


bast SOME MEASURE of Pop's 
wizardry is indicated by the 
collection at his home. 
e Perpetual Old Dominion 
lague is a fixture. 


t near Ha. 


: 
the ote imost 


Cost the first weakfish ail snap 


Thomas (Oliver 42600. exten- 
sion 207, during the day, 
at Oliver 2-9065 after 5 p. m.) 


or 


54.50. Meet at 10 a m. 


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a 


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bodies. Herte furnishes 
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low rate includes all gaso- 
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in , 


Carpenter 


has laid 
two batches of eggs on the aft 
deck of the schooner 
Tom's hammering on the 
boat does not bother the 
duck. The probiem is how to 
break the news to Josephine 
that she ng to natca 
Out any 


is not go 


duckling 


Adertons, when they gofora 
sail, park them in the dingy 
at the mooring. Jo sits on 
them then until they are put 
back aboard the schooner on 
he Adertons’ return. 

Can anything be done for 
Josephine? One thing is for 
sure: those duck eggs are 
going to have to go over- 
board, and soon’ The Ader 
tons think perhaps some 


aiong with 
the schooner to some 
area 


then 
exotic 


1on 


WITH THE POTOMAC 
and many fresh-water fishing 
places nearby muddied by re 
cent heavy rains, the immedi- 
ate prospect for [ishing is not 
too bright 


per bluefish I have heard of 
in the Upper Bay this season. 

t shouldn't be long now be- 
fore the blues and trout will 
follow the spot into the Upper 
Bay to feed on these rich, 
small fish, 

THOMAS JI.SHEA . 
9801 Rosenstec! ave 7) 
Soring, Md.. recently t 
out of Indian River. Del., with 
(apt. Uvide lett on the 
Renie. H f 
cluded Ed 
ton Dick 
Franzoni and “! 
They boated 


Jones. 
42 six-pound 
bluefish and then trolled for 
tuna of schoo) tft Ca 
May. hooking lice ones 
weighing — t 

po wuunds. The 

brutes. 


fe«,** 
©fiLy 


re 


before the 


AN ENGINE 


boat 


Taces 


ER with the 


Bureau of Yards and Docks. 


Pop has a eciet 


to Salling. In hi 


forts in 
perfor! 
some 

trial, whi 
carefully 


20 skip} 


fro 


5 


will sly 


tre kk 


Part of the W 


ning theories 
ing the boat's 
ening spars 
floorboa rd 
wherever possi! 
considers the 


ie sometimes 


improve thx 
nance, h 


tific approach 
s constant ef. 
boat's 
> usually has 
weapon” on 
" guards 
other 

5S Con 

w. Pop 


off the 


race-W if 
ive reduc- 
tL. light- 
lines, 

e tiitke 
While Pop 
safety factor. 
scrapes § it 


having reposed on the Wells’ 
mantle for four out of the last 
six years. Numerous series 
prizes and Presidents Cup 
Regatta trophies are along- 
side. Last summer Strutaway 
entered the Bay regatta cir- 
cult for the first time, and 
brought back a gleaming first- 
place prize from the popular 
Miles River Regatta 
Although most of the tro 
phies have been won by Wells’ 
son Tony and, earlier, by his 
daughter, Peggy Jean, Strut- 
away's remarkabie record has 
rested on a variety of helms 


| Boat Directory 


ize. cabin —— 


truck —whether it's for an 
hour, day or longer. Rent- 
ing’s quick ‘n easy: all you 


Chesapeake Bay fishing is 
also in a rut, especially the 
Upper Bay, where there are 
mostly only plenty of small 
fish to catch. The only news- 
worthy development is the 
of large spot that hit 

astern Bay last Friday. 

The best prospects are for 
Jumbo spot near 1A, Dlack 
par buoy (wreck buoy in 
Eastern Bay) My party 
caught 65 large ones and sev- 
eral hundred small ones Sat- 
urday, sometimes two at a 
time. 

The bait was bloodworms 
(scarce last weekend because 
New England diggers took a 
holiday over the Fourth). We 
did not get a single eel or 
toad, but the small spots ate 
most of our bait. 


@ Tastest Credit 


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Your Partner 


LAST FRIDAY afternoon 
aboard the Betty M, with 
owner Milton Miller, Mrs 
Miller and “Pop” Paska, I 
chummed with live grass 
shrimp just north of Thomas 
Point Lighthouse. With just 
three pints of the precious 
“grasshoppers,” we caught 
more than 60 pan rockfish 
and 15 white perch 

We put all the rockfish and 
most of the perch back to 
grow some more. They were 
under the ll-inch minimum 
required in Maryland waters 


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SEE OR. PHONE YOUR CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH DEALER 


THE WASHINCTON POST and TIMES BEEALD 
4° Tuesiox. July D0, POG 


----_ 


One On the Aisle 
Danny Wants 
Another Turn 


ANNY KAYE pulled a novel sunrt @o he eve caing Se 
D night after his rereré4resiorg 13 pevbecugeces 
trees of Rock Crerck Park 
come back thal werk 
enteTlaime, «ff 


urday 
ler the 

“Cant I 

ugust’” asked the 

: : 

The bors cou A hardly he lee 
what management wouldn't pla; 
could get him” 

Just because Danny warts to come bark and 
him te doesnt mean bel be back Gis Slee. On 
part. there are plans his manager's been maior Ser hom 
manager's now in Durope and when Demy eres Doo oe 
Paris he'll try to juggle things. As Sor the Peids Seep ee Oe 
working on attractiem for fe Geet peo 
from Aug. 16 to 28. Though is ifr. oem a cea Oe ee 
pext mor 


von st heeewt oo 
thee Carter Bacved 


theer cer, Beceue arr 
Demy Rape ary tore 


tie Fert war 


Lz + 


Sar’ 


Se VET ai 


Tir Orv Is 


be able te play to Ge peepee 


thmking of the 15.001 


Te Fa 


c” >liamed 


Star Keeps Secret of Her New Ring 


NEW YORK. July 9—Mari- 
Mearces sew sister-in- 
lew Gf am actress, too. Arthur 
Willers younger sister works 


~~ 


>uyuTg ot from an mdepend- 
ena giver whe walis te re 
and the current asking 
reams from $15,000 te 


‘rT? 
ree 
$14.08 

Nightmare stuff A] Hibbler 
get all the war down te Co 
unhe S. C.. for am engage- 
ment tefere ke discevered 
: bis orchestrations had 
ween tt m New York A 
“ast; plame trip by his man- 
acer Great te susie just 


- 


in time ... Rhonda Fleming 
is being frightfully mysteri- 
ous about the brand new dia- 
mond and emerald ring she's 
wearing on the most impor- 
tant finger. Hasn't told a 
soul whe the donor was. 


ELVIS PRESLE'YS ever- 
present aid. The Weasel, ac- 
companied him to the barber- 
shop of the Warwick Hotel 
the other day and literally 
stood guard over the barber 
during the entire clipping 
episode. His mission, he ex- 
plained. was “to keep the 
scissors away from the side- 
burns.” Shoplifting must 
be growing ever more popu- 
lar as a profession—or hobby. 
One of Fifth Avenue’s. most 
glamorous stores for women 
just hired 12 female detec- 
tives. 

Julie London's album 
“Lonely Girl,” is recommend- 
ed as the perfect gift for the 
man who has everything—or 
even the man who has practi- 
cally nothing. Julie's breathy 


voice and intimate quality 
make it just the. thing for a 
bachelor’s hi-fi set... Car- 
negie Hall, of all tallowed 
places, was the scene of a 
Stag party that was raided by 
the gendarmes. The strippers 
told the police they were 
“singers.” 


LAS VEGAS really must 
be looking for young blood 
Barry Gordon, 7, will play an 
engagement at one of the 


nightspots there this summer. 
(But who'll lift him up to the 
dice table? Christian 
Dior and his staff are grow- 
ing noticeably absent-minded 


about selling identical dresses 


to leading members of the 
Internationa] Set. 
result that the ladies have 
been arriving at big galas as 
if ordered to appear in uni- 
form. 


‘Copsricht. 1954. Kine Peatures 
By 


ndicat 2 inc.i 


Show Times For Tuesday 


sTacet 


CARTER BARRON aw eo 


we aremstveme oad Rie Al 
NaTIPON AL —Dart 


OLNE -“. Ne Cent Take BR Wik 
so 


You 

ure 
et ta — ,.” 
ant  CoSEMA > fr rr 
; p : = 
of the “Bars ~. _ 
7 5 is 
CariTa.. — K:ng emd ¢ 
. vt . = ot s 


with the 


‘a Ae CONOTIOMDD THeaTRes 


oe ae 


“THE SESTr’ 


> Cormed, —) af 


RTE 1 aE 


er 
— . 
MP TReer err as — 


~e Ae se “3% CaP —o-— De 


> 
Onmato 
TT anO® coy 


. 
nthe last three dass af 3 - 0aD x wm 
7 


ive tad -@ 


.nme wondte ~~ 


es 


zz. know win 
1 never got around te 
Vi ashington before this 
[we met and 
eeen from the slage 
is one of the happoecsi 
of my ie 
® was Bowe 
thester annals 
pliaseet te a 
a two-month run 
he National and he probabis 
could have played twice as jong 
Mistter of fart. before Dam’ 
imprise request Saturca) gm 


_ > 
err 
PuayIne and th Treeetr le mT 
but mi 
onet So wer oe = 
Carter Bere Tet werk 
Wire« W dure eT Ter 2 
agr aries 
“SAF S27" S511 5 you 


wee @ bore taret Pict mm 2 
eCupar Osi? ©V IT Sul se omg 


the Trier? . : vet? 


Javne Mansfield Rises to Stardom 


THE GREATEST movie fan 
we have in this town is ex- 
King Michael of Romania, who 
loves movies and admits it./ 
He was given a private show- 
ing of “The Mountain” by Di- 
rector Edward Dmytryk. and 
after it was over he went to 
Lucey’s with Dmytryk and dis- 
cussed the picture for an hour. 


1964. be 
News Service) 


people 


S) Gest Come Ive sung im pubiic.” 
sme sand 


REN MUREAY bas himself 
=» wouderfal new TV job with 
SS. Hell de a series of spec 
teculers. end the O@ret of these 
=a be “The Git ef Laughter.” 
tracumg comedy from its incep 
== op te the present day 
2oPcut sa" makes people laugh 

me wil bere Laurel and 
Mardy. And be bepes to get 
(reurte Marx plus ether top 
rme@iens and comediennmes 
Reem reteras te town July Ii 
& take some of bis shows. And 
— 2 —_ . ‘em beck te the Riviera Hotel 
Bavthara hard: nerd : ‘ . > Las Veces im August to con- 

UX WERITTES PLAY me with bie “Gileckouts.” 
SucaToore + SEED wriirYg — a 3 ; ; — 
thee werd’ . 
fiass fer 2 


coe ber I 6 


“A WINGDING!— 
EXCITING? 


Coo OST 1 = 


a “ares 

ihe run als 
Washington 

D: nm} S seems MICHAEL REDGRAVE 

equiva DIRK BOGARDE 

ANTHONY STEER! ial 

NIGEL PATRICK — 

LANCASTER CURTIS 

me ™ b 

ac -=—- 4) be man ao 

PAIR CONDITIONED ee " 

Q J E cence mel 

OLMEY OPtninc = TRAP ny | 


aa. a 


i, 
PAMEASSADOR 


VW gwshimgie cemes art 
um calegr <luders 
Bavhars + gm 
Ey UF ———s 
ative ary 
Mature egur 
Rerh » Bur. 


(‘Copmrrieh+ 
Internet - 


1 orIewws 


> 
“a 
. ar*>tr 


Trevi” INEmaScoPeE 
Come Be De levee es 


NYDIA e~ ‘TMAN 


foer 


22 
el Pa te bh) Nu 


by Kaufman 2 Bart 
Hilariocas Summer Entertsinment 


S BEEN a long time since 
.irus Sewth bas made a movie. 
Saget [ set mow te play 


Te gulltle oes 
Tres Wir 
Ireare?y CMOmrge a Lia 
, ri. Sere fF « . ; : 
s grt-@wey Was spec sienil — , - T 
be west a2 Dl 
had 


2 Famous 
ALFRED HITCHCOCK 
Thrillers Return! 
MONTGOMERY CLIFT 
in “1 CONFESS” 
By —F--- Plus—Farley Granger 
JORDAN'S “STRANGERS ON A 

TRAIN” 


rs 
shes al 
te Geet Mere. Joumy Walker 
"Beew James” with Bob 
Jeoe and Vera Miles 


tte House adres 

embers of the cipbometic 

4 half-hour after jem 

e stage be was on the 

hop of a flight te Pars 

- the UNICEF film that be 

and Ed Murrow will show on 
TV come fall 


PERNELL'S 
When Perne 
the I rerty 


dent plays a 


a> You” eure 
Tan temught a2 the 
try Thewter 


"eee" 
ary Czun 


200° ar =a vel 


The Monroe-Miller Romance 


PETRI CHIO- THE INSEE SIGE oo Se “rarer of ore 
Roberts took t. ivan Moww ant Actar Wile 
f Merviend ste | Ceck cuttliimes teder ao Paar 7 
few years ago he | Wemen’ss Sectem 
r where the step : ee & Col. 
was ame fir None too Sack.” be — jn Je be rust on . 


sure he wanted to be an acter Te 
AVALON 


anyway. he signed up at Arena 
CRANE.” 
e1 8.06 


-sets War- 


SIDNEY LUST THEATRES 


PARKING 


FREE 
ail AIR-CONDITIONED 


STANLEY WARNER _ 
ame A CONBUTIONE 


lett le *? 
*** 


‘wo 6-2608. 8612 “wean 
ape-Co. or 


0. 6. —— 
Mitzi 


CALLED prren 
Stage where he met hs wile, 


Vera Mowry, once of the GWU 
farulty . In Arenas “The 
Taming of the Shrew” he was 
Petruchio to Anne Chodells 
Katharine . . Now hes been 
signed to do the part agam, a 
Connecticut's Stratford, where 
“The Taming of the Shrew” will 
enter the repertory next month 
iwarded a Drama Desk 
salute as one of off-Broaédway's 
performers, Roberis 


t . ores Gee Gobel 
Vacation Mar: nee Garnor = 
B “ 


Miz.” Pins ist Chepter of Ser 
MONSTER ABD 7 TH ll APE “MAN.” 
y ores Parking | 3- S300. 
TRDS THE 
as.” Genet #15. 5 oN POST- 
MARK POR DANGER.” Terry Moore 
‘6 


THE 
Techni- 
=e Barbera 
MAVERICK 


Technicolor at 6.30 


* 
rE ox ear “ Son se a b Gene M4 ME 
EIGN INTRIOUE Color = & Deors Oper 2 45 F = 
Near Parking aa +. onal 
= TEGAS.” Den Dalley < oe 
vaghet of BS 2 comer. | ke soo * Jane KA Wa 

ry lar am ' 

the City Cemer's | RA 
revival but , 


uD 


FAMILY REUNION: When 
arry Douglas arrives Monday 


ope -C o.0T 


_ th 


 ?..988. wt 


6 56ae “BHROWANI 
“TTO" < Gerd- 
VES ick 


wa. 6-7 
srt. G 
BROWANT 
Color et 


a « aos —— 
NATIONAL ° r aS. BE. WOW 


“AMERICAS PERST THEATRE 
os oe 7 - eve 


THE SEARC CHERS™ 
Viste-Viston— hnijocoler 
"ers c*‘s 


1730 Wihon Bivd. 
WILSON Ag 3 


John Warne 
“THE SEARCHERS 
Vista-Vision— Technicolor 


BUCKINGHAM *","* ox * 


JA. 7 Oaee 
Ava Geréner and Stes art | 
OWANI JUNCTIO 
CinemaScope —c ler 
Matinee 3 > m 


VER be 
“BHOWANI wu NC TION 
“THE MAVERICK QUEEN" 


_ Barber _ Star - f - 


| te 4 SPECIAL SHOWS # 
Matinee 2.30 Wed. duly 
7 PM Sundey Shows 

July 22. July 29 & Aug S 


LARRY SEITY SUSTER 
pOUGLAS OWE WET 


Pree Partive RA. 3-431 
P REIGN : 
Mitchum 6 , 30 
z ~ ~~ 
‘Epec =| Mar 


Rene: 


Go 
fomerro =. | 


5-1 200. 
—_ om , 
rTy 1, 
we, 6-5000. Near Parting 
oN THE THRESHOLD 


oF 6ract.” os "4 ison. Johns Hodciak 
2-06. 3:35. §.55 3 50 


‘iB THEATRES 


APEX 413 Mon. Ave. WO 64600 
FREE PARKING 


MAPS, ¥e, 


2. 635 ; 
DASGER Te 2 ‘00 


RES: Pl Mido Ave SE 
? 77 


JEFFERSON <. Bivd. & Annon- 
aS<ope dole Od. H. 2508 
3 and 9:35 3. @ 


5700 


“we 4 
Grenaet Ave Gaercner 
UNCTION Cc) 
"at i 


rt Tavier iz 
“D-DAY THE SIXTH OF JUNE” T® Coeneiieese amt coler 9 OF 
CinemaScape—Color a S577 CHANUAZS MaRS wad 
a a mL 


- JA >on John Wayne Mantes « LAST OF SUMATRA” 
7 - - ee : za ae o 
and 9 ‘3s >. = “KISMET” aces Techs: : - : 


a v 
8725 Plewer Ave CinemaScrxpe & Color 
Ann Birth. Howard Keel 
Br'n ; ha > / De 
uve” (Cin saScope a ca) et 7°} or at 


__BEST THEATRES =| | Sa8eo 
his ALL STARS SYLVAN *°.°° Fumptrey 
DAVE BRUBECK 


Bogart. “THE HARDER 
THEY FALL 
cot RT JESTER 


Be» ~~ AeM @ OD Pm 


Of .co Oper 


Var Johrnseen 
TREEZT 


. 


subjects at 


Short 
6 @ end 3:06 co. m 


Jah and Ale. Ave. SE 
BAYLOR >" Pasting 2.4008 


. * 
Stee ert Sr des 


.. Ger¢ner | 
“BROW ANT SCT! wem a 
o os 10 

> - 


The Hell-Bread 
Sandeich 


- of Sorte? nee coerret 


LADIES “NIG = “TONITE 
GIXA LOLLOBRIGIDA 
“WAYWARD WIFE” 
= — >= 


SILVANA MANC NANO 


he to 


BOW. ANI 
JUNCTION” 


Cimema-Sceove-Coler! with sews~ ' 
as Gardner et 
ILVER 


his NOs OT eovc core Tt 


petectior os The Mofo 


"ANCE 


FRATOR \...2°*......er 
ters 
3- 
"a . = 7 
IPE i” _ BA! 
AND HIS TRIO 


POREION 
SENATE " George Gobel. “THE 

BIRDS AND THE & 
Ave © « == Gare- 
AMD HES ALL STARS ) Ase SOmeP ION” 


LESLIE c ARON 
MICHAEL WILDING 


“THE GLASS SLIPPER” 


Li. 6-4308 Susser 
CR 
inters CASH ox 


Daany Kave. “THE 
ul “9-900 
featuring 
rare eae 
awe A ’ 7 7 
Satire Y 730 (en. “LAST ¢ 
GOOD SEATS AVAIL. a, Pg . 
PRICES $1.25. 1.75. 72350. 3.60 Tax Inc. 


Peck “THE MA 
THE nA Poowtiea SUTT Roe 
PAUL DESMOND 
———. DARL 
Yo 
- THE DUET $30 


Camer PIGHTING CHANCE 
GENE KRUPA bor aE 
and his ORCHESTRA 


es THREE BAL ‘18. 


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i. - ) 4a. . a2 


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“Man Against Crime’ 


138 np m—WERCTV. Jim 
Simpson: Warmup commen- 


All Stars vs. National League 
All Stars baseball game. 


is np m—WERC TV. All 


.o 


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Tuesda y Telerision Programs 


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Star Baseball: American 
League vs. National League 
at Griffith Stedium. Mei Al- 
len and Al Helfer are an- 


ro _— -- 
aw ~« cers 


'_ npn m—WTOP-TYV. The 
of Stare: The crime of 
student backfires 
of careful planning 


3 » m—WMAL TV After 
. - Pestiva! Stanieyv 
Folio stars in “Fast and 
4 man looking for his 
fe mects an ex-ciri friend 


7p m—WTTG. Steve Don 
wen: Deowglas Kennedy. as 
Marshal Donovan. uses ven- 
trileeuism and spiritualism 
te catch the “Crystal Gazers.” 


7:38 p m—WMAL-TV. War- 
ner Bros. Presents: Cheyenne 
his pal Smitty outwit a 

bend of rustiers in 

Julesburg™” Clint Walker 
portrays Cheyenne 

72 pn m—WTTG. Water- 
Preston Foster saves 
the nephew of a friend from 
» gambling ship with “Tailor 
Treubie.~ 
So. m—WTOP.-TY. Phil Sil- 
how: Set. Ernie Bilko 
fewgns a rare and fata! disease 
s order te escape “Bicouvac™ 
maneuvers. He goes to 
the hospital and wishes he 
sad gome on the bike. 


’ pp m—WTTG. The Eve- 
Movie: Martha Ayer 
m “Oriental Evil.” An 
can im Japan gets into 
trouble for mistreating his 
wife and for trying te cheat 
the Japanese 


wn m—WERC-TV. is 
+ Show Business: Guest pan- 
mclude Abe Burrows 
and Jane Kean 

es pp m—WMALTV. Wy- 
att Earp: Hegh O'Brien pur- 
sues @ fellow ft rugged 

wii¢derness. The “Marshall 


finds that he, himeelf, is being 
hunted 


So. =m—WTOP-TV. Joe and 

Joe gets & surprise 
takes informatio 

‘e about & man 

m he beliewes is a robber 

5 P ” —WEC TV. Sneak 
Pr sma »oys 


prevent 


‘ar 
Sllege 


tmite 


=~ 


T nose 
. 


and 
willy 


front 


Made 


—s & 


ard 


stars 
Amer 


>"... 
: 
> 


e ats 


_ T¥o 


trying te 


tary for the American League | 


' Tulme the 


Télevision Preview 


robbery of a widow. witness 
an unbelievable miracle in 
“Merry-Go-Round.” 


5 p. m—WMALTYV. G. F 
Summer Originals: James Ma- 
son, Pamela Kelline and Scott 
Forbes star in an 18th Cen- 
tury drama revolving around 
a “Duel at Dewn” 


sw op. m—WTTG. Master- 
piece Theater: A story teller 
tells @ young English girl a 
tale of mystic Indie in “Jon- 
le Book.” Sabu is the main 
player 


3 p. m—WTOP. TV. Spot 
heht Theater The Stalking 
Horse™ features Jeanne Bates. 
Ann Lee and Pamela Duncan 
Story comeerms a young po 
liceman whe mveéteriousiy 
acquires 2 lot of money. but 
cannot explain where M came 
from. 


9:38 p. m—WERC.-TV. Circle 
Theater: Leora Dana and 
Harry Townes Star in an “ac- 
tual” drama, “Man in Shad- 
ow.” This is a dramatization 
of the problems of treating 
mental ilimess 


5:33 p. m—WMAL-TV. Cav- 
alcacge Theater: “Sunset at 
Appomattox” stars William 
Johnstone as Gen. Robert £ 
Lee and Henry Morgan as 
Gen. U. S&S. Grant 


lL: pp m—WITG. Fes 
turama: Milt Grant intre 
duces filmed short subjects 
including “West of Key West.” 


11:15 p. m—WTIOP-TY. The 
Late Show: “The Dark e~ 
features Maxwell Reed 
ward Underdown and Tatedes 
Perry. A sudden and double 
killing turns the spotlight on 
a peaceful seaside town 


11:15 o. m—WRCTV. Jaws 
harial Nehru: indias Prime 
Minister makes a speech 

1a 2. =m. — WMALTV. 
Nicht Show: Hedy Lamarr 
and George Sanders star in 
“Strange Woman.” Story com 
eerns a beautiful woman who 
lives of men who 
love her 

11 a2 m—WRCTV. To 
night: Bill Cullen is host. His 
guests include Ariene Fran- 
cis and Jonathan Winters. 


WALTER WINCHELL ap 
pears im The Washingten 
Pest and Times Herald on 

| Mendar. Wednesday. Thers 
| dav. Saterday and Sendar 


Tuesday Radio Programs 


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WMAL 
camsé3o Fm 1073 


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TUESDAY 
7:00 P.M. 


—WRCTV Channel! 


Federal Judge Dismisses 


NAACP Plea 


BALTIMORE. July 9 
complaint that the St 
County Board of Education had 
failed to integrate its school as 
directed by the UU. S. Supreme 
Court was dismissed in Federal 
Court today 

Judge Rosze! ©. Thomsen 
ruled that the Nationa! Assoc 
ation for the Advancement of 
Colored Peaple and 66 Negro 

ildren hadn't exha 
rignt appea!s 
jocal authorities 

Last March 16 
said im tts Pederal ( 

t the County School Board 

Genying the Negro chi 
dren their constitutional rights 
to an imtegrated educatior 

The NAACP 


nA 


of 


- -* 7~ 
. <o 


sand the St 
Marys board had not inte 
grated its school and didnt 
have a plan for doing so. The 
NAACP sought an injunction 
against continued segregation 
and an order to require a plan 
for integration 

The Board, through its attor- 
neys. said the NAACP failed to 
prove that it hadmt made «a 
Start toward integration of 
classes and the NAACP hadn't 
exhausted all legal and admin 
istrative remedies 

Judge Thomsen agreed in his 
opinion He said the NAACP 
should appeal to the county su- 
perintendent admission of 
the Negro students to “the 


» 


for 


in St. gt be 


school of their choice.” and 


Marys then Zo to the State Board of}, 


Education 
should 


if the county board 
render an adverse deci- 


Thomsen 
NAACP and the Negro stu 
jents until New. 15 @o file an 
ar nended complaint after they 
take ft 
Rear 
eee erie 
~ Raar 
NAACP 

n. decid 


sige gave 


i of Education. or at 
mn &) days after 
qd makes a ruling 
said it hadn't 
ch se 


nse! 
cour 
a 


Federal Court Recesses 


In Prince Edward Case 
RICHMOND, Va.. 
\ three-judge Federal 


one district judge may now! 
take over the issue 


If it should rule in favor of | 
a continued three-judge ‘court, | 


- 
Sept i. 
J. Parker 
+ 
peals announced 
Judge Parker | 
the three-judge court 
If one judge should he de! 
cided unon. Richmond District! 


Heart Grou p Gives 


7 Research 


4 new program of 
research traiming 
has been isunched by 
Washington Heart Association 
through grants to seven oul- 
Standing scientific students 
bere 
The program and its Grst 
recipients were amnounced yes 
terday by Dr. John M. Evans 
of assoc:ation § 
zg commit 


suU™TMmMer+r 
fellowships 


- 


Lhe 


- >» 
man - 


17-45 
Star 


>» m—WWDC. 
Game: Bob Wold 
Bod Neal the piay-by 
play description of the 23d | 
hinesiene Leama 20 Nate : 
al League AleSter base Saul 
game at Griffith Stadrum 
535 p. m.—WGMS. P 
SS \o-= Wo 
nade; Persichet The | low 
Mea; x Korsakov, 
Dance of the Buffoens 
ae > a — WEEAe. Mel Al 
TH 


Slare 


ad 


an »eTe- 


len: Highlig ~ e 
LAr DaseOa!! Zame 
S pp. m. —Wror. 
n \ ocalist 
ta Ke 
,eojenn»n 


ty Dillard are feature 


:5lCUp CU —-WGMS. Syo 
phony Hall: Mozart. Flute 
Andante, Mendelssohn. Sym- 
phony Ne. 3 in A minor: Ga 
brieli, Canzona fer Double 
Striag Orchestra 


a p m-—WIOF. Rock 


PM STATIONS 


Tac ea Sse ar oe oe te FE 


wrorm sh. wel « o@ 2 wohe-r™ 


- Se =F « = & 
had 

wht = sl = —T « =@=. t oole- 

Was (1665 wec.)—Derlight oaly* 


? F 


whale 


Awards 


Howard Uni 
phar- 


chilled hearts. at 
versity s department 
maco] 

Alan C. Levy, candidate for 
master’s degree in physiology, S™ 


of 


4 


the | 


heir appeal to the State 
any 
the 


to 


July 9 
Court 
today recessed the Prince Ed- 
ward County school segreges-| 


tion case for an indefinite pe) 
riod while it considers whether! 


is a member of 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
Tuesday, July 10, 1955 43 


be heard, Judge Parker 


{ 


_The court action came after 


Judge Sterling Hutcheson will| threw out racial segregation in 


announce when the case is to public schools as unconstitu- 
sar. war 


tO in the schools this | 
September and get the job|® '-Meer 


ports im the meantime, 


The September, 1957, date My 


completion 


completed within a year. They 
also asked interim progress re-| 


of desegregation | 


1® Sets ed in your heme 
'? An 


© Sephicing D.C. ma MA. 
Li. 4-0047 


came as a surprise. Briefs of | *"™ 
the Negro altorneys had indi- 
cated they would seek comple-| 


tion by this fall 

The Prince Edward case 
one of the original five 
which 


ll be heard some-| 
Chief! 
of the 
4th  Ciresit Court of AP 


| 


ee 


WHISKY 


George Washington University. 


to study physiological aspects 
of bleed flow fviscosity). at 
GWU department of physioloe 
gy Also at the same univers? 
ty. Jurgens Piper and Thomas 
Mould, both second-vear medi 
ents ww conduct spe 
at the department 

= 
to, fourth-year 
(,eorgetown 
of Medicine 
research on an 
for use 
and irwin 
Wilham Pogue 
cal students 
"ogen me 


= 


pun p 


there 


\ew 


a RK Part) 
time i Sian Freed ana 
tenor phome jazz virtu 


eso Sam (The Man) Taylor. 


ss p me -WRC, Boe 
raptucs in SopndstH. LL. Menm 
cten 


.* 


the sw diect 
program a 
K nop! 
Cooke, 
author 
Herbert Baya 
5-65 p. m—WTOP. My Son 
Jeep 4 10 . cal oe trip 
on the first day of vacation 
is an ambitious undertaking. 
10-65 ». m—WMAL Mys 
r john Giel lgud and 
son star in 

of Sherlock 


dart 


~ 


De. 


18-65 p. m—WGMS. Music 
From wdon: Deesen. Him- 
meriand; Mozart. Symphony 
No = (;ranados Three 
Spanish Dances 


16:38 p. m—WWDC. Treas 
ury Agent: The speech of a 
“Pining Pitchman™ who 
works for a traveling carnai- 
val is not enough to convince 
agents of the validity eof his 
slibi for homicide end tax 
evasion 


-—————. 


ene O11 at——F «. ao & FD 
‘5 at-6@ 3 « ao. te 
O56... ae.)—6.99 « =o. te 2 
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WraXt—!°o te —Deriicht cals * 
*“—Agtberterd te seperate seuup te ree- 


—E Te ke —S 


| WIN S— 1 ee ac —Darviaght - 
éewe 


Programs printed here conform to mformation 


furnished by stct: 


mms at 


ftme of publication 


on exoficolly becut 


aipaoistERY 
OR SLIPCOVERS 


SOFA & CHAR 


Ca--en~er* 
Bere teers of 


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We jee ee ee 
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is 
in 


the Supreme Court 


NO. 7-3111 


2414 14ST.N.W. 


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~A Post Exclusive - 
1] 


You know him as the 
charming moderator of 
“Whats My Line?” on 
CBS and as the serious 
news. analyst on ABC. 
Bet do you know the 
man petwork executives 
find among the hardest 
te drive a bargain with? 

This week, read the 
inside story of TV's 
John-of-all-trades' Learn 
how he manages his 
amazingly different 
lives .. why he 
thought he had no fu- 
ture in television : 
about his work with 
Arthur Godfrey! Don't 
miss “The Lighthearted 
Battler of TV™! 


“Our tax laws 


make us 
dishonest” 


Hes the widespread tax 
attitade of “legalized 
cheating™ got out of hand 
—es noted writer Cameron 
Hawley claims? Is this 
shameful situation even af- 
fecting the mora! structure 
of eur way of life? 

In scathing words, Mr. 


corporation heads say 
about their dubious tax de- 
ductions ... how our present 
laws encourage cheating... 


invite corru ptioa. 


Dees our trial system in- 
sure justice? Under our 
current setup, could you 
be imprisoned for a crime 
you dida’t commit ? 

Don’t be too sure until 
you read how Rey Eaton 
spent sixteen years in the 
Illinois State Prison for s 
crime he never committed 

. bow he was tried end 
convicted with complete 
legality! Learn the de 
fects in many states’ laws 
that can allow innocent 
men to go to prison! Be 
sure to read “The Case of 
Prisoner No. 16688"! 


IN ALL, 7 articles, 4 
stories, 2 serials. 


Get tedey—on al newsstands 


POST 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERAL 
‘ Tuesday, July 10, 1956 . 


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