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§ 
, Nee 


The Weather 


Today—Sunny and pleasant with low 
humidity and high in lower 80s. Thurs- 
Fair and somewhat warmeér. Tues- 
High, 
low, 68 at 3:10 a. m 


aay 
days temperatures 
p.m 


see Page 16.) 


Pad 


79 at 4:15 
(For details 


The Washington 


imes Herald 


219 


79th Year — No. 


Phone RE. 7-1234 


— ee ee 


Cworrieht 1955 
The Washineton Pose’ 


company 


Post FINAL 


WEDNESDAY, J 


ULY il, 1956 


WTOP Radio 


(1500) TV (Ch. 9) 


FIVE CENTS 


7 


NATIONAL LEAGUE WINS, 7-3 


American 
Stars Bow 
As Musial. 
Mays Homer 
Bover Thrills 
Mantle. 


Williams Hit 


(rowd: 


For 
Bob A 
Nal 


ike 


ional 

Al ls 
won 
om 
lineup 


ray 

" 7 © f. 

pame . Ai 

an League 

looked rather tired and 

in Griffith 
um yesterday 

Except for one 

xin inning 

ng Dats of the Am 

effectively silence: 
rrated pitching 

tionals 


r* 


brief 


took 
pregame 
American 
because of 


perts 


rash 


a 
ii] prea 
| lal 
would win 


the 


got il hits an 

two home But 

ie difference was in the pit 
mg. 7 American 
League touched 
; a 


i¢ 


“re 


ly 

nre 

al burned 
down 

Billy Pierce 


suse had 
who made only 
One mistake #y walking Roy 
McMillan in the third, got the 
loss. McMillan later was driven 
in by his Cincinnati teammate, 
Johnny Temple. and that one 
run was enough to hand Pierce 
the loss 

Bob Friend Piltsburh. 
who wavered a bit in the third 
but still blanked the Americ an 
Leaguers. walked off with 
victory. Warren Spahn took a 
heavy bombardment in the 
sixth when the American 
4.eazue unleashed five straight 
hits including a two-rin homer 

Ted Willi: and a 
t smash by Micke’ 

tie. But Johnn nell 
inroug 

Por 
Wi if 
wo et 
blasted 

The 
least led 
{ asevy Stenge 
his fifth All-Star 
tries attempted 
his “let 
his 25 players 


STARS. 


af 


the 


Taek 

* e. 

‘ial 
Ca ° 


Mia‘ 
rat aT 
homer 


Amer 


game 
give evel 
ase’ used 


uding 


Cel. 4 


nne 


21 of 


eT [ 
lie 


See Page 27, 


Today’s Index 


nie — 
“QW < 
7. 
« 


" . 
> 


“7 oe 
Swe wD wo} 


Stadl- 


‘the campaign 


SLNDAY 


ston Pos 


Heral 


whine 


Limes 


” ry WEEK = 


: 


TV 
ce’ ary ad 
handiest, 
casiest-t >read 
gunie—lmsting 
chan- 


tor 
in 
mont 


show . 


ww 


rT 
on all 
long 


“ye Ss 


: 


- : 
Lit Ween 


rectures and stories of 


IV stars and shows. 


Phome REpablic 7-1284 


for home delwery 


House Quorum Lags 
All-Star Game 


During 
United 

The House ha 
lime mustering 


yesterday here was some 


Kast German 


Reds Arre 


U.S. Flights 


st Into Russia 


“senses LS, *Agents’ Charged 


Quenstedt 
Nominated in 


LOth District 


Li 
Leaves Brenner, Beyer 


Far Behind Winner 


ght Virginia Vote 


Broyhill (®) in the 
genera! election. The 

he said. wil tace 
“whole and not 


Rep 
November 
Democrats. 


Joel T 


divided 
With all 106 precincts 
porting, Quéenstedt had 
Morten S. Beye: 
line employe, 2380. and 
Brenner, a baker, 790 
lightly than 8000 vot 
ers turned out. conti 
31,000 who voted 
contested 1952 


re 
4851 
ail 


votes an 


Julius 


more 
asted with 
im the hotiy 
party primery— 
ne then 

10.400 wih 
campaign 
eturn this 


which has 


opponent and 
nledge of 

ene 

goal 
lL. He 
“ rT 


the Re 


rOViii 


Lat 


of i came from 
0 declared iw 
pecause that ; ine 
ae 1] hav He will 
oie ' 4) Live 

repea ted. 

nat Quenstedt 

of a machine headed 
aid and Anne Wilkins 
Broyhill selected 


\ note disco! 


Bre! nec wl iar) 


mm 


oniy 


VC A 
thing 


a campaign 
is part 
by Don- 


the 
en! 


was as 
>a. a ret 


He 


Quick Action Saves 


Western Newsmen 
Invited to Trial: 
Buffer Zone Set Up 
On Polish Border 
An 


cecTe, DOLCE 


Julv 10 


BERI 


between 
Poland and 


who cannot 


forb! 


| Gern 


a 
lany 
aid any westerner 
properly identify 


area will be 


hree-da' 
}? 


work 
land 

n vspaper 
today that ! 


house 


2s! 


repaving taxes 


lected from workers at 
Zispo factory in Pomman, scene 
of the bloody June 28 riots, 
Reuters said. The Potnan news- 
paper Gazeta Poznanska said 
that taxes totaling $1,625,000 
will be repaid. To date, fearly 
5000 workers have already been 
paid back, about $350,000.) 
Bormann insisted that Amer- 
ican “agents” were responsibic 
for the Poznan uprising, despite 
the fact that the Polish Com- 
munist Party last Saturday ad 
mitted that party “mistakes 
and “bureaucratic irregulari 
ties” were to blame 
[The alleged agents will 
on t in East Berlin soon ar 
the Western press has deen 
vited to attend. Reuters 
ported Fritz Beyling, 
German government 
chief, said Western correspond 
ents accredited in West Berlin 
can examine eviden 
Rormann also accuse 
Lnited States of carm 
espionage and subdversi 
tivity against Czechosio, 
ast Germany and 
nal 
Bormann 
(merican 
‘ested was train 
States Armys 


the Dig 


"jal 
in 
rTP 
East 
press 


- 


othe: 
te ions 

said the gi 
agents recentiy 
ed by the United 
in West Germany 
and sent into East Germany 
with counterfeit East German 
and Polish identity papers 
said one alleged agi 
Kari Schreiber, a barge 
operator on the Oder River at 
the border who smuggled Amet 
ican agents and orders into 
Poznan. Presumal Schreiber 
was one of those arrested 

Bormann oduced 
identified riorst 
said he merican 
who fie 
May 20 
secre. | 
intelligen 
Derg 

Premier Otto G! 
Parliament Ma’ 
docu 


police 


oun f) 


lie nit 


“as 


Ly 
a UWerman 


lieese who 


agent 


ror? 
ck 


> » 
Lile 
- 


Protest Declares 
Military Planes 
Violated Borders 


3 Times in Week 


ed 


uf 


hare yesterday 


rican Ll] 

flew deep into West- 
ern Russia three times with- 
in the past week | 


violation of Soviet 


Am 
acting instruc 
Moscow, lodged the 
in a formal note handed 
to Secretary of State John Fos 


et Dassador Georgi 


Zaroubin on 


tions from 


protest 


ter Dulles 
Zaroubin 


lege d 


denounced the al- 
overflights as 
our air’ and said some 
flights penetrated up to 
kilometers, 200 
de Rus 


these 


“an inva- 


sion of 
of the 
320 


7 
miics 


or apout 


sia 


“Some of planes fre- 


mained there two hours and 


one half.” he told reporters 


Denartment 


ted 


iv. ale 
knows 
with 
in ine 
There 
nediate commen! 
Devartmen' 
said a 


. 


the latter 
Dulles made no reply, 


iV ? 


spokesman, when Zaroubin told 


him through an interpreter 
whet was in the Russian text 
of the note which he delivered. 
Zaroubin, unsmiling and 
grim, told reporters after call- 
ing on Dulles that the Amer- 
ican planes flew over Minsk, 
Pinsk, Kaliningrad, Vilna, Lau- 
nas and Baranovichi. 
Kaliningrad, Kaunas and 
Vilna are in the former Baltic 
republic of Lithuania, seized by 
Russia im 1940. Minsk, Bara- 
novichi, and Pinsk are in White 
Russia, a Soviet republic which 
borders Lithuania 
\ Moscow radio broadcast 
eard in London yesterday said 
the planes came from Western 
Germany by way of Communist 
East Germany and Poland 
The broadcast said the pro 
test f Washington declared 
Notewort in this connec 
iact that the ahove 
of Soviet air space 
craft have 
stay in tne 
of Cerman 
nmander f the 
Air Force. Gen 


tiates 
' ‘= 


t) 


ms the 


ie 
Republic 
Lo iL 
States 
Iw 
ng stopped over in Ger- 
en route home f) 
' tto Moscow 


Killed as Jet 
Crashes in Ohio 
VILMINGTON. 


[wo 
r.33 


om a 


Ohio, July 10 
Sir Force men aboard 
jet tra were killed 
when it crashed on an 
oach to Clinton County Air 
ree Base, the State Highway 
ol reported 
rhe patrol said 
urred when the | 
neaded | tne DAS “ 
icing “flAameout 
ihe aircrait cras 
on the J 


aqcioin 


ner 
sf : 


the crash 
ne 


in 
la was 
lle prac 
landings 

ed and 
Denver 
he base 


Cleric Balks Ex-Airman From Leaping 


To Death Off DuPont Cirele Building 


ction « 
saved 


a Met 
he 


(> 


1346 Connecticut 


¥ ntified by police 
»s Donald Seaman toid the Res 
cE. B. Lé@wis of the Union Metho- 
dist (nus he came trom 
Benton : Mich bie 
taliked Vv 1 police {or mor 
than an hour but discouraged 
bl] attempts to approach hin 

\ crowa 150 
cheered as the man 
from his perch. — 

The night elevat onerator 
'David Byrd. 33. of 815 E 
tol st.. said he tite 


aruot 


) 
oT persons 


~- 
was pulied 
or 


: 
OOK man 


(api- 


iientified as Seamal 
10th floor 


nigi 1 


snort ¥Y Delo 


Byrd me down on the 


the build 
back about 
minutes and Byrd 

the 10th floor again. Sea- 
man handed Byrd a dollar and 
said Youll be famous tomor 
row 


elevator and ijelt ing 


10 
took 


Seaman came 


late 


were called at 12:15 
en a passerby saw Sea 
naiing Ris legs from.a 
th floor window. Police Pvts 
R Hill and ©. H. Thomas 
of the Third Precinct. began 
pleading with Seaman to leave 
the window 
“Get away 


Lice 


vA 


H 


from me he 


4 


screamed lf either of 
comes near me, I'll jump 

He then asked Hill to call a 
minister. Mr. Lewis arrived 25 


minutes later and pleaded with 
Seaman to think of his family 
and himself 

“Give me your hand.” Lewis 
said. Seaman hung his head and 
the minister inched closer to 
the window. The minister con- 
tinued to read from his Bible 
Suddeniy he ltunged and 
grabbed Seaman's leg as Sea- 
man: was about to dive 

Rescue Squad workers 
police who aiso were in the 
room rushed to aid the min- 
ister. Seaman was taken to 
D. C. General Hospital, for 
mental observation. 


you 


and 


5. 


Un 


‘ed Press 


President Eisenhower crins as he arrives at his temporary 
office in Gettysburg for a meeting with Republican congres- 


sional leaders 


The President revealed 


that he had not 


changed his mind ; about seeking reelection. 


ae 
Citation for 
Miller Asked 


The House Committee on Un-' 
American Activities voted yes-| 
terday to call for contempt of 
Congress charges against prize- 
winning playwrighit Arthur Mil- 
ler, the bridegroom of actress 
Marilyn Monroe 

Action against Miller 
based on his refusal, on June 
21. to name those who attended 
several meetings of “Communist 
Party writers” in 1947. Miller 
said he went to the meetings to 
find “where I stood” on Marx- 
iem. The famous writer testified 
his own activities. put 
said his ence would no! 
permit him to involve others 

Given 10 davs in which to 
purge himself of contempt. Mil 
ler still declined. In his defense 
his shart s cited precedents 
that not all other witnesses in 

milar cases have becn cited 
for ‘eotiount stressed Miller's 
gencrally cooperative attitude 
and emphasized he had avoided 
the “safe” expedient of invoxk 
ng the Fifth Amendment 

The Committee’s recommen 
dations against Miller now go to 
the House, and if it approves 
contempt action, then to the 
Justice Department Miller, 
meanwhile, presumably will be 
able to use a limited six-month 
passport he recently obtained 
to take Miss Monroe on a Euro- 
pean honeymoon starting on 
Friday 

Miller's Washington attorney 
Joseph L. Rauh Jr.. yesterday 
made available a four-page ap 


was 


anDout 


corms 


peal written by Miller on July 6 orological Observat 


to Rep. Francis Walter (D-Pa.) 
See MILLER, Page 13, Col. 1 


Heads Foundation 


Henry T. Heald, head of New 
York University, has been 
named president of the Ford 
Foundation, effective next 
Oct. 1. He will succeed H. 
Rewan Gaither Jr., president 
since March, 1953. (Story 
on Page 13.) 


Twining Tells 


U.S. to Sp eed | 


Alr oe 


| By John G 
BStad Revpertec 

Nathan F. Twining 
warned yesterday that the 
United States must step up its 


Norris 


Cen 


alc development program to 
match a “massive” Soviet -et- 
tort which may give the West 
“technological surprise in 
new weapons.” 
Making his long-awaited re- 


rort to the American people on; 


is visit to Russia, the Air Force 
(Chief of Staff said it confirmed 
prior assessments that, “despite 
undeniable strides.” the Soviets 
have not outdistanced us” in 
warplane quality 

, 6000-word expurgated sum 
mary released after Twining re 
ported to the Senate Armed 
Services Committee behind 
closed doors made no reference 
to the Alr Force chiefs views 
on spending the additiona! $900 
million which Congress voted 
cver Administration objections 

But Sen. Stuart Symington 
D-Mo.) said that under ques- 
tioning Twining indicated dis- 
agreement with Defense Secre- 
lary Charles E. Wilson that 
there is no need for the extra 
money. He quoted Twining as 
saying that if he were a Sena- 


See DEFENSE, Page 13, Col. 1 


New H-Bomb 
Blast Reported 


TOKYO. 
day) (INS)- 


1] 
Centra! 


(Wednes 
Mete 
in 
stru 


July 
The 
ory 
Tokyo 
ments 
States 
nus 
rovi 


said today its in 

dicated the United 
has exploded another 
Car aevice at its Bikini 
grounds 


Olin 


()dbservatory 
if 


iais Sa 
moson . 


i al 


ry 


Ignored Bulganin’s 


Ike Reaffirms 


Candidacy for 
A Second Term 


By 


” 
Sa 


GETTYSBURG, 


Edward | 


ft Reporte 


July 10—President Eisenhower 


Folliard 
~~ 


is going 


ahead with his intention to run for a second term. He plans 


lo wage a “‘vij 


gorous campaign 


for reelection, despite his 


heart attack and his subsequent abdominal operation 


The Chief Executive so informed Republican leaders of 


Cong 


ress when he met with them this morning in his tem- 


porary office at Gettysburg College 


Sen. William F 
leader of the Senate, 
fateful “yes” 

“He stated,” 
referring to the President 
“that he felt that he was 
better shape than he was when 
he announced for a second 
term in Fébruary. 

“He and we are looking for- 
ward to a vigorous, active cam 
paign under his leadership.” 

A reporter broke in to Say 

“Are you telling us that the 
President told you that he will 
keep his hat in the ring’ 

“I am telling you precisely 
said Knowland 
Rep. Joseph W. Martin dr 

Massachusetts, Republican 


ry 
| 


- 
Lnhat 


of 


Word From tke 
Has No Surprise 


Republicans relieved; 
Democrats not surprised at 
| Mr. Bisenhower's decision to 
seek second term. Page 2. 


leader of the House, said of Mr. 
| Eisenhower's reaffirmation: 
“I think it is wonderful. 
think it means that the Repub- 
lican Party will have a iand- 
‘slide victory in November.” 

[President Eisenhower in- 
formed Senate Democratic 
\leader Lyndon Johnson of his 
continued candidacy aimost 
simultaneously with disclosure 
of his plans to Republican 
chiefs, the International News 
Service reported in Washing- 
ton 

Johnson, asked for comment 
on Mr. Eisenhower's decision. 
startied newsmen by saying 

‘| nave just had a telk with 
the President on the telephone 
Hie told me he felt good. I am 
happy that his health is such 
that he is up te an arduous 
campaign. It will be an arduous 
campaign 

The President itiated the 
phone call to Johnson, who left 
a closed-door session of the 
Senate Armed Services Com 
mittee to talk with Mr. Eisen- 
hower.| 

All of those at the mecting 
with the President agreed that 
his second yes came out casu 
ally, or. as Sen. Leverett Sal- 
stonstall (R-Mass.), said, “just 
bubbled out.” 

Rep. Les Arends of Ilinois, 
Republican whip of the House, 
and Rep. Leo Allen of Illinois, 
ranking Republican of the 
House Rules Committee, told 
reporters they had been talking 
to the President about various 
pieces of legisiation that have 
had rough going in Congress— 
the school construction bill. the 
mutual security bill, end others 

Then. they said, this colloquy 
Look place 

The President 
tend to take 
our canipaign 

Sen Knowland 
ter than the Heg 

Knowland. as 
and the otners 


reierring 


See IKE, Page 2, Col. 5 


; " 


“Well, I in- 
up these issues in 
this fall 

That is bet 
rty smile 
the President 
knew, was 
happened 


well 


io what 


Knowland of California 
announced the President's second 
at a press conference 
Knowland said,; 


| 


Republican 


Fund Report's 
Editor Denies 
Red Defense 


By Warren Unma 
Stam Reporter 

The House Committee on Un- 
American Activities and the edi- 
tor of a Fund for the Republic 
Report had a low-kc yed wrangle 
vesterday over whether people 
mentioned at Committee hear 
being blacklisted 
movie, radio and 


s end 
by Americas 
'V industr 

\ Fund Report om Blacklist- 
ing published June 25 says they 
do. It declares the blacklisting 
practice is so prevalent it has 
affected the morale of the en- 
Lertainment world and the live- 
\Mhood of a good many perform- 
ers. 

Committee Chairman Fran- 
cis E. Walter (D-Pa.) yesterday 
told the report's éditor, John 
Cogley, he had doubts of the 
reports objectivity because the 
views of his samt * ‘were all in 
one direction.” 

_ Walter went on to say his 
Committee “has for some time 
been concerned with ascertain- 
ing whether the Fund for the 
Republic stands as friend or 
foe in America’s struggle 
against communism 

Fund President Robert 
Hutchins, in a statement re- 
leased from New York, immedi- 
ately challenged Walter's Com- 
mittee for switching vester- 
day's hearing “at the cleventh 
hour from an executive se«<ion 
involving only Mr. Cogley to an 


up 


ing 


rs 


M. 


‘open hearing on the Fund it- 


self—in 


ihe atsence of Fund 
officers 


directors and coum 


Hutchins went on to say that 
See BLACKLIST, Page &. Col, 1 


— oY! 


j ‘Resort Weather | 


httle warmer 


| fret Revel 


~~ 
. 7 


“as Dore: U. S$. Weather Bureev 
Weshengtee Pow end Temes Mereld Map 


‘Shut Up: 


Vodka-Laden Khrushchev Insulted 


Associated Press 

American sources reported 
last night that Nikita Abrush- 
chev insulted almost everybody 
within earshot at a recent Mos- 
cow party attended by Gen 
Nathan F. Twining and other 
Western leaders 

Officers with Twining said 
after the vodka began to flow 
Khrushchev, the Communist 
Party boss, succeeded in offend. 
ing representatives of the big 
powers, the little nations and 
the Red satellites 

Twining could not be reached 
immediately for comment but 
‘several Senators said the gen- 


eral told them about an alco 
holie dispute between img ot 
chev and Soviet Premier Bul 
ganin. 

They quoted Twining, United 
States Air Force chief of staff, 
as saying Khrushchev insulted 
American. British, French and 
West German air leaders who 
were present. 

They said interpreters told 
Twining Khrushchev said at 
one point he “liked President 
Eisenhower but disliked the 
men around him.” One Sena- 
tor related: 

Bulganin climbed into a row- 
boat and demonstrated what he 
called “the Volga stroke.” 


All at Party, Twining Aides Reveal 


Khrushchev became angered 
and started a speech on the 


- bank amid a throng of diple 


mats and airmen, Bitterly, he 
derided Western accomplish 
ments in comparison with Sov- 
jet programs while Bulganin 
shouted at him vainiy to 
“shut? up.” 

Other Russian leaders 
asked the guests to 
Khrushchev's remarks, which 
they said resulted from “too 
much vodka” and his tempera- 
ment, 

Twining's staff members de- 
seribed Khrushchev's antics as 
“a display of bad manners, to 
put it mildly.” 


later 
forget 


THE WASHI 
9° 


ae 


WT ednesday, 


NGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 


July 11, 1956 


~ |ke’s Declaration Elates: 


GOP; Nobody Su 


rprised 


By William Theis 
International News Service 


President Eisenhower's 
‘affirmation that he wiil run for 


a second term elated Repubil-|ihat the only aid he gave the from 


leans yesterday and drew from 
|Democrats only a mild warning 
ithat he faces an “arduous cam- 
paign.” | 
The announcement cemented. 


prospect 
Dick” 1956 ticket. 
Neither Republicans nor 
Democratic leaders were sur- 
prised but GOP Legisiators 
were plainly relieved. ) 
Some Democrats made it 
bluntly clear that the issue of | 
“parmtime President” now is 
certain to be in the campaign. | 
In Chicago, former President 
Harry S. Truman said he did 
not regard the President's an-| 


of an “Ike and | 


Free Speech Cited 


Red Seeks 
VA Pension 


[in Appeal 


By Liz Hillenbrand | 
Stat Reporter 
Convicted Communist leader 


: 


a : 


re- Robert Thompson contended Feels 


yesterday through a lawyer 


enemy during 
the Korean 
war was in the 
realm of free. 
speech 

T ho mpson’s 
attorney, Rob- 
ert Z. Lewis, 
of New York 
City, made the 
statement yes-! 
terday in an 
appeal of @ 
1951 Veterans 
Administration decision re 
scinding the World War II vet-! 
eran’s 100 per cent disability 
pension. 


Thompson 


IKE—From Page I 


Ike Says He'll Run, Plans ‘Vigorous’ Fight 


by anybody else—about the, hower has said he was “de 
candidacy of Vice President| lighted” that Nixon again seeks 
Richard M, Nixon, who again is|to be his running mate. 

‘after the No. 2 spot on the| The President later played 
OP ticket. some chip shots at golf, prac- 
There have been rumblings ticed putting, and atl p. ~ Igo 
against Nixon by some Repub-| down before a television * ° 
licans, but they have been) watch the All-Star baseba 
largely under cover. Mr. Eisen-' game in Washington. 


AE 


confirmation” with great en-| 
thusiasm. | 

Had the President, he was 
asked, felt that it was necessa 
for him to reconsider his sec- * 
ond-term announcement of “ 
President for. the first time|Feb. 29. ) 
since his operation. Hagerty re-| “The fact remains that he is 
fused at the time to say whatiin the race,” Knowland said. 
he had learned. but his all-out | “He just felt that it was a con- 
smile was eloquent testimony |tinuation of.the statement he 
that he had heard good news. | had already made. 

Knowland quoted Mr. Eisen- 

Better Now hower as saying he was going 
Washington on returnito carry on a vigorous cam- 
the Gettysburg confer- 


paign. | 
ence, Sen. Styles Bridges (R-| “What sort of campaign. 
N. H.) said that in response to|would he wage?” a reporter 
Knowland’s comment, Mr./ asked | 
Eisenhower replied: “Whatever is necessary to 
(“Why shouldn't I run? Last} Win.” Knowland said | 
Feb. 29 I surveyed all of the} Knowland said that nothing; 
reasons pro and con when I/| Ws said by the President—or 
announced my decision. I'm in|. 
much better condition today! 


here Friday when White House 
Press Secretary James C. Hag- 
erty told reporters that he had 
“talked politics” with the 


r. 


me = 


SALE 


CONTINUING OUR SEMI- 
ANNUAL SALE OF FINE 
MEN’S CLOTHING 


ie _ 
— —_ ~< 
a 


[In Closed Saturdays, July & August 


than I was then. ' . 
[“I have had a condition that | 39 Recei ved 
has bothered me from time to) ~~ 
time for years and my doctors| Into Knighthood 
say that I am better now than a 
I have been before.” By Elizabeth 

[This was an allusion to his; ~-+ 
intestinal operation. LONDON, July 10 ®—Thirty- 
[Both Knowland and Bridgesimine. persons, including a 


said there was no mention of 
Vice President Nixon in con-| 
inection with the Republican! 
ticket. Both said they expect 


nouncement as “headline news"| “The only evidence that he 
and repeated his belief that Mr.|rendered assistance to the 
ey A has been A enemy was his political criti- 
‘time President” since 1952. cism,” Lewis said at a public 

| Adali E. Stevenson, front-\hearing before three members Nixon to be on the ticket.) 
irunning Democratic president-\of the Board of Veterans Ap Planes Bring Leaders 

‘ial contender, said he is “de-\neals. VA action against 
lighted that the President feels|\ Thompson was taken under 
in good enough — to run'Section 4 of Public Law 144, 
again for the presidency.” enabling the Veterans Adminis- | . 

Sen. Estes Kefauver (D-\trator to cancel pensions in —— pinche we wage Foe 
Tenn.), also an aspirant for the cases where a veteran aids House staff, from Washington 
‘Democratic nomination, aw enemies of the United States. . 
according to the Associat 
|\Press, “I'm glad he feels well $150 Per Month | 
enough” but added: | Holder of the Distinguished 

“I hope it's a decision he and Service Cross for heroism in 
Mrs. Eisenhower arrived at| World War II, Thompson was 
free of political pressures. By getting $150 per month in dis 
that I mean I hope he is notability pension at the time it 
| jeopardizing his health as a re--was withdrawn. The President's éolor was| 


sult of political pressures.” | Thompson, former dumialcan than it was 10 days ago’! 
Gov. Averell Harriman ofiof the New York State Com- when he left Walter Reed Hos- 
New York, another bidder for|munist Party, was among the/pital. But he still appeared 
the Democratic nomination,/frst 11 Communist leaders somewhat thin. | 
commented that “Mr. Eisen-jconvicted in 1949 under the| The conference lasted little! 
hower announced last Febru-\Smith Act for advocating over-| more than an hour Afterward, | 
ary that he was a candidate and|throw of the Government. He Hagerty then announced the’ 
[ have assumed that his recent jumped bail, was caught in Republican leaders would hold| 
illness would not affect that de-|1952 by FBI agents, and is 4 press conference, and the re- 
= now serving a 7-year term in) porters went to the President's 
(Sen. Robert S. Kerr (D-the Federal Penitentiary, Semmeney office. 
Okla.) said he was not surprised |Atianta Ga. | 
to learn of the President's de-| In asking for reversal of the =2°Wland Tells of Talks 
Knowland said that in the 


icision, but “I don't think he|1951 decision and restoration! 
of some $9000 in back pension! conference they had gone over 


Four Army Aero Command-' 
ers brought Knowland, Martin 
and the other GOP leaders. 


to Gettysburg 

President Eisenhower came 
to the conference attired in 
cream-colored trousers, a beige 
shirt of rough material and a 
green tie with white figures 
He had on an old brown fedora 
and tan shoes ) 


Associated Press 


Harry and Adlai Take Stroll 


Harry S. Truman (left), whe knows a bit about the White 
House, is shown yesterday with Adiai Stevenson, leading 
contender for the Democratic presidential nomination, as 
the two took a morning walk in Chicago. 


lean be re-elected.” 
| [Sen. John J, Sparkman (D-\to Thompson, Lewis contend- the legislative situation on Cap- 
|Ala:: “What comment is there|ed the VA decision constituted! itol Hill. 
to make? He's been running all) political censorship of his cli-| He said they “certainly have 
along.” ents’s right of free speech un-' not abandoned” hope of putting 
(Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey|der the First Amendment. He through a school-construction 
(D-Minn.): “That's like Macy’s\siso contended that the VA bill. He said action would be 
announcing Christmas is com-|had no right to “convict”|sought on a bill before the 
ing.”) | ‘Thompson when, after the 1949 Senate Labor and Education 
Rep. Emanuel Celler (D-N.|Smith Act conviction, no court: Committee, and that the House 
Y.), said: “The President will|of law has found him guilty of| would be asked to go along if 
reign but still be a part-time similar activity. it gets through the Senate. 


Secrecy Tag Bars Public 


From Vast War Data Pile 


By Lewis Gulick President. No man who has|\..,, “T think we will have a good 
| CS Sua suffered heart occlusion and | 4's Opinica substantial batting ooh be- 
House investigators heard! The sinking cost 880 lives. The jleitis, which are subject to re-| Hearing Chairman James W.'fore we adjourn,” Knowland 
ay that 100,000 drawers Defense Department later! currence, can ever have an ab-|Stancil pointed out that the said. 
of World War II military docu-|cleared the story for the Satur-| gence of a fair degree of worry|VA was not adjudicating un-| “Was anything said aebout 
ments are stored away under a day Evening Post — but after agbout his physical condition.|der the Smith Act, but merely the President and a second 
secrecy tag because there is clearance by the Defense and/This will affect his whole out-|performing its legal duty in term?” he was asked. 
neither money nor manpower) Navy Departments the captain|iook and will emphasize the|determining whether Thomp-| “There was,” Knowland re 
to see what should be made)still got a letter of censure) parttime aspects of his presi-\son assisted the enemy during plied. “The President was in 
publie. | \from the Navy chief of person-| dency.” ‘the Korean. conflict, in viola- excellent spirits and good 
Still secret, but for another) nel | Republicans voiced joy over|tion of Public Law 144. humor.” 
feason, are Gen. Douglas Mac-| Moss said, under present reg-|the news and said there is no| “This board is concerned| Knowland then went on to 
Arthur's papers on Pacific war ulations. “the Navy is in a posi-idoubt that Vice President)with the gravity of forfeiture,”|quote the President as saying 
, including whether the'tion to censor history.” Richard M. Nixon will be on'he told Lewis. “We do not ap-‘he felt better now than he did 
Russians should have been! 5 The Library of Congreg| the ticket. \proach this case with any on Feb. 29, when he announced 
brought into the war against ..mnied 200 secret Senn ates Sen. Everett M. Dirksen ®-\thought of political censor-|that he would seek reelection. 
Japan. Robert Ross, Assistant)s.... the three services to see | DL), told reporters: “Spell it in| ship.” The decision will be ren-| Knowland said he and the 
tary of Defense, told &)i¢ any of the documents carried |¢aps—wonderful.” He said he dered at a later date. others received “the word of 
ouse Government Operations), .:stement showing when they | bas ‘no doubt” that Nixon witi ee 
Subcommittee the MacArthur might be made public, as pro-| be on the ticket named at the 
papers were Gechnically nom) id.q for in a November, 1953,;August convention in San/ 
secret from November, ‘order by President Eisenhower. | Francisco. ; 


ee ne eae 


until April, 1955, when a news 


cricket star, were received into 
knighthood today by Queen 
Elizabeth If in a Buckingham | 
Palace ceremony. 

The new Knights Bachelor 
were among 220 men and wom- 


HABERDASHERY AND 
STRAW HATS: 


‘en who received the insignia of 


decorations awarded them in 
the Queen's birthday honors list 
earlier this year. 

One of the Knights invested | 


This sale offers substantial savings 
includes ONLY merchandise 


selected from our regular stocks. 


and 
today was Sir Len Hutton, one 
of England's greatest cricket 


|players. Others honored today 


included Sir John Kotelawala,| 
former Prime Minister of Cey- |} Alterations At Cost 
ion, made a Companion of |/j)) 
Honor, and actress Peggy Ash-| 
croft, invested as a Dame of the | 
British Empire. 


Agents for Hickey-Freeman Clothes and Cavanagh Hats 


GOLDHEIMS 


1409 H STREET 


Established 1875 


African Parley Planned | 
| 


Reuters 

JOHANNESBURG, South Af.-|/ 
rica, July 10—A national con-| 
ference of African leaders will | 
be held in Bloemfontein later, 
this year to discuss the South 
African apartheid (racial segre-|| 
gation) legisiation, it was an-| 
nounced today. 


man asked for them. 

The Army then reviewed the 
10-year-old papers and decided 
“they would divulge war meth- 
ods and war plans and war 
operations.” He said “pertinent 
excerpts” were made public last 
October Dut the rest was with- 
held. 


| dential,” 


/Not one contained guch a stale 
ment. 


) Subcommittee investiga- 
tors found many types of secre- | 
cy labels not provided in the) 
Eisenhower order. “Air Force) 
‘Eyes Only.” “Official Use 
i\Only.” “Private Official Coné-' 
and “Confidential! 


Hit 


Sen. Frank Carison (R-Kans.),! 
who was Mr. Eisenhower's 1952) 
campaign adviser, said: “This 
is a big day. You've got the All-| 
Star game and Ike's announce- 

What more could you 
ant.” 


Senator Lehman 


EON FOKINE } 


School of Dance > 
1811 COLUMBIA ROAD, NW. & 


—_—-—- 


ll 


7 


uy 


Eight Week Summer Course 
Begins July 11th 


AULA 


Subcommittee headed by | Modified Handling” were some 


aus if,)| examples. 


Rep. John E. Moss (D-Cal 
also was told that: 


1. The Navy last year barred 


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= ae -——— 


on Mitchell, eubcommittee| Ls Undecided on 
counsel, qu Arm istorian) 
: 2 Whether He'll Run 


R. A. Winnacker as saying there’ 
GW. Cankpbell, Novy in,|were 100,000 file drawers full of 
formation officer on the World World War II classified papers Ieternational Mewes Service 

Wer II einking of the cruiser stored away—so many it was Sen. Herbert E. Lehman (- 
Indianapolis on grounds that ™echanically insurmountable”) w y ) said yesterday he has not 
publication would dampen the|‘o Teview them for removal Of) decided whether to seek reelec- 
Gesire of young men to enlist. the secrecy stamp. tion but he will be “very ac-| 
' | Ross said a panel is being tive” at the na 
| created to see what can be done tional conven- 
Seke Served & I’ shout making the material tion in behalf! 
piaagrtipd of Adlai E. 
Stevenson's) 


Cuss || available to historians. 
COOKED AT YOUR TABLE He said he is “fairly certain”; 
bid for the) 
pres idential 


a a number of World War I docw-| 
{Jede\ 5a eeu) nomination. 


ments are still classified, and) 7 
“possibly” some from the Span-| 5 

1018 Vermont Ave. H.W. ‘ish-American war, too. The 78-vyear- 

Por Res. EX. 3.5474. Sun. 5-10 ) old New York- 

. er told Inter-) 

national News! 

Service: “I 

have informed 

Carmine G. Desapio, New York 

‘national committeeman, that | 

will not serve as New York rep- 

resentative on the Platform 


— 


——~— 


= |Announcer for Radio 
Redefects to Soviet 


York News Srndicate 


MUNICH, July 10—Radio Lib- 
eration, which broadcasts only'| 


‘to Russia, announced today that | Drafting Committee. I wish to! 
one of its announcers, ris < : 

Vinogradov, had redefected to dapat = Aanag nny Nd 
the Soviet t nion with his Gem halt of Adlai Ste ¢ n’s nomi-| 


man wife, Sonja. ) ; 
Vinogradov tried and failed nation ae the presidential ean- 
to get an American visa last Jan- : 


juary. Radio Liberation, spon- 

sored by an American group, | COOOewowwrvrve | 

\said Vinogradov had no part in| | 
Today's a la Carte 


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not connected with Radio Free 
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THE WASHINGTON POST ond TIMES HERALD“ 


Outbreak of Crank Calls ES vn SR Sees me 
Hampers Kidnap Search Drug Wisdestlare 


—~ 25° —~ 
WESTBURY, WN. Y., July 0) The FBI is expected to throw cepted the caller as the kid- 2 Others At I ested 


PP. : 
bm walle tne wel of cfank ‘ele: its full force of crack manhunt ge oe . ' bina cos ' 
an ws ut the intrusion into the . é 
agony of kidnaped Peter Wein.\°TS ‘"to the case Wednesday, 1.0 Gf hoax telephone callers | A Northwest couple, de 
berger’s parents. one week after the baby boy has cast some doubt on the ; scribed by police as ranking Fishing for Tire 
Seventeen telephone calls|Was snatched from a carriage sincerity of the Friday call. | i among the “largest heroin 
Mang received at the Weinberg-/0n the patio of his home Held Wi ae J wholesalers” in the Washington 
thout Bail a 4 | ; Sto! 
* home in a matter of hours.) G-™Men can move into a kid. . -* . ‘ : 
} : area, were sons | 
All were from cranks. All were [ap case alter seven days or lwo men accused ef such a ; . rei Rony wens re oY il S, 
anonymous. They came from as after the victim has been taken hoax call were taken into e oe) i arrested yesterday. | | 
far away as Chicago and Pon- across state lines Queens Felony Court on . | | Paul Parker, 30. and his wife, Pivosivis i Li 
tiac, Mich | The kidnaper ieft a note on charges of attempted extortion Georgiana H., 50, whose ad- = , 
As far as police were con-the Weinberger patio demand- and giving false information to dress was listed at 1708 5th ’ 
cerned, the search apparently ing $2000. Last Friday, a tele- police ca | 7 | ihe type cole tr a wee C & 0 Canal 
was at a dead end. The best phone caller upped the ransom The pair, Robert F. Giebler. 4 | (Af — home and charged with violat- 
they could do was plead with demand to $5000. At the time, 97 4 jongshoreman. and Gordon . 4 2 fea ing the Harrison Narcotics Act 
the kidnaper to give up the §-\the child's father, Morris, 47 Powel) 24 « railroad clerk. : = Det. Sgt. Joseph Gabrys,) A year-old boy drowned in 
week-old baby. wholesale drug salesman, @@- sre accused of luring Mrs »~ 3 . oe | assistant chief of the. narcotics the C. & O. canal in front of 
a —— — |Weinberger out on a false chase 2 — : squad, said that detectives 3067 Canal st. nw., yesterday 
‘ Sunday night and early Mon- 3 » 4 | | “g © al marked money when he fell in while rege to 
: in The toe alee tae = ee BPE another $528 aa ome and, held fish an old tire out of hte water 
’ ~ ae > which the men were booked) | " - |, 1 victim was Philip S, Brit- 
3 Classmates Describe carry maximum penalties to- ) " ceeds of crime. The marked chell, son of Alexander Mit- 
. ; + jbills were what remained of a'¢nel) 1037 33d «t. nw. an em- 
gether of 25 years , $460 pay ’ fa te ten oe a : en 
’ payment mace Dy UNGEeT-' niove of the J. E. Dyer Co, of 


Judge James E. Lo Piccolo to ohnso 

Youth’s School Slaying ws serts i sass fee oe Goapememel arto  ) Oe 
mapeted So Ge: pale ty tas The Strykers Didn’t See the All-Star Game used four cane of herp ge he canal with his sister, Janicg)1}, 
’ , rev ‘ae s ~ointed | " ‘ ‘ ey ‘when fhe fei in e crowne: 
intent Beg Ry me, it my hae CAP see ee ewes, — Chief Pharmacist Mate J. J. Grohowski | form into the path of a truck driven by A Ry we og ag alg near Lock 4 where the water 
of his former classm tes testi-\said, “I grabbed my side and case for arraignment next Mon-. fsives first aid to Mr. and Mrs. Walter J. | Charles Monroe Spears, 18, 3224 15th place ‘breaking here, police said Hie is about 8 feet deep Two 
fied they saw him shoot and fe™ to the floor day before another judge Stryker as they lie on a streetcar platform se.. Police said. Stryker sold his lower wife also was reported to have men dived in after the boy but 
kill Frazer Cameron, Maryland) Robert Hicks, a seventh Mrs. Weinberger, haggard) at Georgia and Florida aves. nw. after being grandstand seats for $8 te Grohowski, who served time for petty offenses. ne gee - = muddy 
Park Junior High School teach- grade teacher, told how Billy with strain and grief, was in a| struck be a truck. Stryker. 66. and his had a seat im the bleachers. The couple Also arrested by narcotics ites of op ihe: Boo _ 
~ the + a vounagstes ny Mags soe =a map dy) oe a ar gn og compen wife, Mildred, 56, of 511 Faber drive, Falls were treated at Emergency Hospital for es Se ae istoent and William James of 3218 © 
showed no emotion as two of his classroom to investigate intense sorrow. she managed a Church, were going te the All-Star game COS GBS Bruins ane cemneee. Ceryaer & riantafillos. 39 listed at 4206 st. nw. Doth are employed by 
teachers at theeschool told how the disturbance. Wagner was nod of sympathy for the weep vesterday when they stepped off the plat- manager of a rendering plant. 32d st Mount Rainier Mid the Jefferson Spring Service 
he shot them the same day woundeJd in the thumb ing wives of Ceibler and ‘ ani ‘ - ; ies r iwho wae charged with violat.- Co., Inc., 1054 Thomas Jeffer- 

Following the. day-long pre-| 4 13 earcld pupi. in Cam-|Rowell jing the Marijuana Tax Act -— os 7 
Triantafillos, a watchmaker Fire Department Rescue 


comer Rang wy Ba Boe! ‘che erons room said he looked up Seeks to Amend Law W if 1} Is 10 W > (| | , >, . s Lit ' . Squad No. 1 searched for Philip 
i } 0 to see Billy Ray standing n ine | ¢ als omen in er cs eC: * as picked up at the corner of with grappling hooks They re- 


grand jury doorway , ’ rif} , M hil Wash ton ou Vv ' 
rway with the rifle in his meanwhniie. in a ingtor th and sts. nw. when pouce ~" 

Overriding objections by Pre- : _ Rep. Francis E. Dorn (R-N. Y ‘wed a tin that . covered the body at 5:30 p. m., 

hand. While he matched. he p ; " Lip (nat he had mari- appreximately four hours after 


) ~ . . 
vattes courtap pointed at- sig the boy raised the rifle|$aid he will introduce legisla- : H \ i i A i H | I search. disc 

. y ri tl Cc > | ws iy uS possession. A 
Soeney,.wamer D. Tyas, Stina ; umped be-/tion Wednesday to permit the avs e& At miuttec AC ul lel \ inl 0 e lsearch disclosed that he was|"® °°¥ f¢4 in the canal 


Ma , \ cs H and fired. Cameron slum | 
. oo oe, ~ athe yo hind his desk Federal Bureau of Investiga eo : style 4 tetehen or ae 
rane mn pper mar &r . ve- tion in move immediatply i) ssaekiedien B. rs. ‘ 
. : : , . . " " ‘ _ . " ™ ’ " : . ‘ 4 : aid 
nile Court waived juvenile Searched for Principal kidnap cases. The bill would MIAM qu y 10 \ min-'lighted the hearing in which!band and a blond p . \ fourth suspect, William H FTC Reports Record 
uri ate : " , e iste . mel iy ife toogayv nar d the ey Northcott g seekin wealthy Mrs Zorn da Pe k : | : . | js ' 
The first witness eal one eng Ay LY. ee eS ee La ean atti cee | bag a egy Me ~|New ¥ eee eee | Briggs, 31, listed at 1330 Ver-- Fraud Crackdowns 
ihe first witness called by Pp dies : ’ emhil reir 1p women with whom & he «aid ita end his stormy 15-year mat ew ork. carried on an affair a | 
: - earson said the sh r which pronivdits transporting in : : ‘ le iy ne | ’ — 5 nt ave. Nw... was arrested on United Press 
Deputy State's Attorney John curred while Bill law was interstate commerce persons "©' "45 sand had been “over\riage. Mrs. Northcott is asking|openly in. Long Island, N the 1100 block of O st. nw The Federal Trade Commis 
litchell was y , ‘ , pay 2 famill She charged his al-\$150.000 separate maintenance|at the time Mrs Peck was. : ; ; 
an oe Sa 2 searching for Sch ‘rincipal unlawfully seized It would ‘4 . “te , ’ 5 : r o p . , ryt when he dropped a package sion reported yesterday that it 
ner a physical education ner i! that wu }) . } .leged liaisons scandalized every iand custody of thei! three ithe ministers secretar’ ont -- 
; John Hrerc specify that use of the mails or 7 “S) “4 Pp containing 53 capsules of sus-|/made a postwar record tum- 
teacher ot the schent, whe tes telephones | r mint Presbyterian parish in whk young c iildren me (airs eck) told me s nected } ; 
' i. to th At the conclusion © Spoons SS wwupere vr is c ’ loved my husband that she |.’ ec heroin while being ques-\ber of crackdowns on decep- 
; _ ™ " | > FF - » , : is > ‘ 
~~ ne “ ent ~ © princi Pyles urged Judge at dence of interstate commerce € Judge Rav Pearson recessed ecatnch tues’ Masindead tioned by 2d Precinct Privates tive business sractices Gurind 
. ’ ~ | - Silas : . >) ry - : is rie . 
Shooting and found. re tte | decide the case in her \s a result of the kidnap- Speaking softly but precisely,|the hearing until 10 a. m. Thurs » of hited hath af. \ cent Shybloski and David the past 12 months 
shooting and found Prevatte , » all 2800 New Yor Mrs. Thomas Graham Northcott > - Later. she testifies oth ad-| 5 n° m : . | : ae : 
nding the Oe) pacity as a juvenile court judg ing. all 2500 ew York police a a dinate mitted to having intimate rela ot © is charged with a The crackdowns included 150 
aneing Lasse WHA 8 <S om. argue that “this i4ve aad detectives will take one-week Princeton, N. J.. des ed Mrs. Northeott testified the — Sw 4 Harriston Act violation formal complaints and 133 


rifle - aoe : nhilandering | 24 . : Do tions at hotels and other places . . 
boy ought not to be in , courses in the techniques of husband as a philandering | 36-year-old ninister was Un Included in the list of he rhe suspects were arraigned “cease + and - desist orders 
and pr Ler who carried on 4 faithful throughout their mar = 


before the United States Com-/against firms for such things 
’ retions ' ore ~ agai tt ' 
ranging ol : age eh en “ hile preaching =~ ga - meio ~ os -. a ssioner and are being held AS pnony f laims for products 
News “an open flirtation” with a bankithe gospel” at Presbyterian ye Brit eee ey 3 - usi or action by the grand jury.|fake pricing, “bait” advertising 
rk kr sses | chure rach : ena itchard, who lived with yt ng. we 
the details of the fatal shoot- the murder charge and the two oefvice reported. The first in clerk and back-porch caress churenes in W ashington, D. ©.. the Northeotts briefly at Ox- Bond was set at $6000 each for and other deceptive practices. 
ing and the woundin of two charges of assault and ntent structions will get under way a teen-ager to contessed | Ossining, N. Y¥., and Trenton ford . NJ She { | the menet the Parkers. $1500 for Trianta- his compared with 125 com- 
, . : : : : . . - 7 . . : capia . ' sii - : 
~ & Ae 0 : Mane to kill facing the bo: Wednesday. ] h room adultes ? ae 4 . nae ieshemnd end the aict enbe- nlios and $1000 for Briggs plaints and 8° orders last year. 
© ' eacners unio e brown aire woman's Nir < Northcott. testifving on ' : 
WW _— sai’ he sent the bov Judge (rane disagreed point : . - __/— a ey tems hi day h h ly displayed their affect ion n ; a , . 
to the principal's office for|ing out that the County's juve- F a en — re Bigh-|her Souh Dirthday, said Her AUS 1. house, in the family car and [~—"""""~=- RALEIGH_HABERDASHER ————— 
principé 8 u Extend Bank's Life-Term * RE | he family car al 
failing to complete an assign- nile law has no provision cover- — . -- —_— — lon walks through a 
ment on the morning of the ing a penalty for such charges Associated Press She testified that every year 


shooting He said he later The boy has, been judged sane’ The Senate Banking and Cur- a . AA. when she and her husband va 
saw the boy leave for home. and able to stand trial by Mary- rency Committee yesterday ap > f d cationed at their cottage at 
Wagner said when he saw the land State psychiatrists. A re- proved a bill to extend the life ud e O USES O , Minden, Ontario h 


boy in the principal's office, he port from a private psychia- of the Export-Import Bank of 'Northeett insisted on 


; ae , | 7 ng : y “i r : r na oe 
a xed —_ Boy, wnat are you — ~~ awe ed _ y Ray . a c — Ss sa 30, 1963 New rem wr > f s PS d erent —_ along to 
going to do with that gun? as not been submitted. rom June 30, 1958, ( S () me with my housework 
in RAMEY 28 a” ; She said the minister would 
spend long hours away from KE , | > ae - 
prom Bowe Bnesktnes «eggs pe Mi ae tr Ae Our Exclusive Tropicals by 
ATHENS, Greece, July 10 Kassos about 80 miles from! pnder euch preterses as “spir 
An official communique tonight! Sanotini No human bdeings itual counseling.” 
hoosted to 44 the death toll in were killed. but the tidal wave Others named as being 


yesterday's violent earthquake damaged sea fronts and/«¢.jengiw” with Northcott were 
; . " ; ‘ ¥ . 
on the island of Thira, Of drowned 30 goats and sheep. Marjorie Saville. Rose mary 
|} southern Greece [wo villages were damaged. Corvo, Margaret Graham, Mary 
The communique indicated A United States destroyer|Cooper, a girl identified only 
| the counting was still going on.jplowed toward Thira_ withias Hilda, Natalie Gehman and 


Meanw nil e grief stricken ae nea yo ~y In- Georgine Friccius. | 
islanders today went about the | ternationa e ross at Gen- y ~ ~s A 
, | grim task of burying eer re also Offered aid to the . W ere 69.50 lo 19.50 
dead. | Greek Red Cross in housing an| 
| Greek sailors today combed) ema ed 12.000 persons who! 
the ruins of shattered howses lost their homes on Thira and VODKA & 


World's First Turbo-Prop Airliner on the Aegean island. epicen-| neighboring islands yesterday. 
ter of the volcanic quake, look-| The Greek refusal of last 
NON-STOP z HRS. 20 MIN. ing for missing victims. Relief|night’s offer of aid from the} 
‘parties distributed food and’ British was headlined in the) 
drinking water while doctors’ London press today. Newspa- 
land nurses set up canvas hos-| pers implied, without saying so 
pitals outright, that the rejection was 
A light tremor shook Thira the result of Anglo-Greek | 
again this fternoon, crum-| bitterness over Cyprus. 
bling walls and causing sed Officials said women and' 
ments of cliffs to fall into the children were the. principal 
casualties because they still 
“echo” earthauake were at home while the men 
and tidal wave today hit the, were heading for the fields) 
Call STerling 3-3000 islands of Karpatho and when the quake struck at dawn. | 
S NON-STOPS DAILY of your Trove! Agent Py ea. * at 
Ticket Offices: Cor. 14th & F Six. ) | 
“The Diplomat” eee 8:30 om (Willard Hotel), Stetier Hote! Lobby ® leeves ven bencthtecs | 


mentee i iiitaren | Sasemhermtaa Doctor Warns Retirement Smimoff. 


“The Constitution” .. 6:00 pm 


“Nightnow Aceech 1120 pm Capital Can Be Fatal in 2 Years |, Sr, vooea 


oO 


Calm at Hearing adult jurisdictior h ttor. Kidnaping investigations 
ney maintained that Ju }andiing of confidential in ‘ iTs 


Prevatte, dressed neatly ; 
moe Rogge Crane had jurisdiction both on formation, New York 


blue serge suit, sat quietly as 


FLY THE 


: 
: 
’ 
: 


(All depertures ere Eastern Day! ght ' we) _ Smornoft Fis. (Div. of Heublein), Hartford, Conn 


IRLINES | ii 
ANN ARBOR, Mich., July 10| Last night, Dr. Lowell T. Cog-; 


#—A Detroit doctor said today | geshall, special assistant to the! 
, ren wo fail at | . 
that persons who fail to adjust Secretary of Health, Education 


well to retirement can usually . 
, bout two and Welfare, said the Govern- 


expect wo ilve just d e 
years after they qu.t their jobs.| ment is taking a new interest in| HOT SHOPPES 
har] rs told the/the problems of the aging. He 


| Dr. Charlies Sellers tol 
jnint h annual Conference on Ag-|said new building and research Featured 
jing at the L niversity of Michi-| programs point up that interest. 
gan that the ar>itrary age of 65) — | aa / 
esaril. Cane? ontght 
hing necessarily a good age to} HOW TO KEEP COOL D 


| Speaking at a workshop on IN ANY LANGUAGE Choice of Appetizer 


Air conditioned classrooms 


| 


ithe physician's role in heiping make suromer lenguage study 

lolder people keep their health, ‘A Berlitz « pleasant way to STEAMSHIP 
the said retirement for reasons | ® beat the heat. Start now on any 

. lenguege you went to learn. 
lof disability was quite another! 
thing SeRUTE 1701 «oe NW 
STer! 
| “Retirement is not the bliss- am - _. srerting 3-010 
s ‘ful state that some hard-work- ae oe - db BEEF 


ling persons envision,” Sellers! = 
said. “It soon becomes a great — JOB French Fried Potatoes 
ibore, a dreary existence, and Pandnn: Cank Webe 


AVERAGES 118.37 M.P.H. FOR 24 HOURS AT wo agg Cage rome > ” PINCH aoe re Butter fabrics: included in this choice group are 
t t= it inner ssert . 


cupation, Ge ression se erry zephyr-weight Dacron*-wool and Dacron” -woo!-si!k 


} “ 
“Thes perso! who fail to & Cc t de Ri Sund ' 
BONNEVILLE SALT FLATS! WITH SPEED KING AND TF seae Bo cose adjustment lobs. like shoe«. pinch when * grin ee a blend, lustrous mohair-wool and silk-wool blends. 
(Chilled Ambrosia Colors feature rich Mid-Tones plus deep and ight 


SAFETY. EXPERT AB JENKINS AT THE WHEEL, A ap oie gp pA nerd nmarerdays 4 pp Naar te gee he Devil's Food Cake 
years arter yt eet idjeness of your career and do some | Fresh Blueberty Pie shades in solids, patterns and textured weaves 
STOCK-MODEL PONTIAC PACED OFF UNPRECEDENTED for been ‘Infated |B Ghgg shun tno 
Fours . Pts + viet = Whatever your Present Sal- # 
2,841 MILES IN JUST 24 HOURS, SETTING NEW MARK emounta t sia rection sll Sy" may Le i you hee $1.90 tailoring: these tropicals were tailored. fo 


‘ ee roe management or professional 
ee, ee ne) Te eh us with all of the nationally famed skill and art of 


AT AVERAGE OF 118.37 M.P.H. AND AGAIN PROVING pocus —_—e = ie me igge l. Send hee buss list of key TS ae EE cghe Oe Hart Schaffner & Marx. A special lightweight con- 


ly and physically capabie 
continuing useful activity executrve search” com- 


PONTIAC TODAY'S LEADER IN PERFORMANCE, | esters tt said should advise panies DOWNTOWN struction adds to your coolness; “Trend” styling 


jbcth employes and employers Request appointment to , accents tall trim and natural lines. 
ENDURANCE SAFETY! ‘of this fact. ducuss your situation, ‘ Make your shopping oa 
Past reer . without fee or obligation. | pleosure—take time out 
| pee ge Re ol wo re ees Gur & value: rarely do we offer such outstanding sav- 


; counsel is neither too | 
COME IN AND DRIVE AMERICA’S ENGINEER prod tor you, nor wo ex: | Met Shoppes downtown fF} thing of this caliber. And with so many 


GOVERNMENT pensive. ( at 14th & G , : 
| or write ” hot months ahead, you'll do well to buy right now. 
NEW PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMY CHAMP! } RELATIONS [ff “of HOT Car nG! SRLURE sony in for bt select 


Prominent WNatione!l Manufac- : ! 
turer of Automatic Tempera- 9) + } *Dupont Polyester Fiber 


‘i ture and Humidity Controls has 

or opening for recent engineer- Bil) ? | : 

ad T . 

cic anon wd crane |) ME S747 BS. || RALEIGH HABERDASHER 
hon agencies Penta with new J £ ; Job . * 

, department. ttractive com- Bernard Haldane, yvesaent 

oe pany benefits. ; 1026—17h St. NW Restevronts & Pontry Houses 
SEE YOUR PONTIAC DEALER - Johnson Service Co. 2 whew a nnaaten OS prview 


article by Mr. Haldane revealing | 
2117 M St. WLW. Coll WA. 80008 , the EJC epprosch. CHEVY CHASE: Wisconsin near Western Avenue 


DOWNTOWN: 1310 F Street _ NAtional 8-9540 


7~ 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


Wednesday, July 11, 1956 eee 
WEDNESDAY THRU SATURDAY 


Cath Save You 


MONEY ON YOUR 
LIQUOR SHOPPING. 


FOR DELIVERY 3] HOUR FREE PARKING: 


RA. 3-2880 


5609-11 Georgia Ave. N.W. 
, PICNIC SUPPLIES 
. . Kendle ae 


Napkins Cups 
. Table Covers *® a. ye 4 Spoons 
WHITE GIFT BOXES, CLOTHING BOXES, all sizes 
GIFT WRAP Papers in Commercial Rolls & oe 
KRAFT RESALE ROLLS ® “SASHEEN” RIG s 
PAPER BAGS 
otion and Millinety 
GROCER BAGS . Kraft Sacks: Heavy-Duty & Regular 


Lodge Assails 
Gromyko Stand 


UNITED NATIONS, WN. Y, such strong words that veteran 
July 10 # — Henry Cabot/Commission members said East 
‘Lodge Jr. today accused Rus-| and West are farther apart than 
sia’s Andrei A. Gromyko of| ever. 


Britain's Anthony Nuttin 
showing contempt for 56 U. N. ‘ola ey - y ~ — 


members who had indorsed '4i5 appointed in Gromyko's 
| President Eisenhower's acrial stand. e appealed for Gro- 
‘inspection plan as-a step to myko's approval. & 
‘disarmament The principles, backed by al! 
Lodge, chief United States ‘of the Commission except Rus 
. sia. are intended to serve as 
delegate, told the U. N. Dis! cuigance for a Snation Dis 
‘armament Cc mmission that|srmament Subcommittee when 
Yresident Eisenhower's “open|it resumes work. The Big Four 
sky” proposal would go far to-|and Canada compose the Sub- 
_ward preventing surprise at-/ committe. 
‘tacks. He asked Gromyko if} Nutting also proposed an ad- 
‘the Russians are opposed to dition to the principles to pro 
‘making surprise attacks impos-| vide for limiting test explosions 
sible. of nuclear weapons soon after 
Gromyko, Deputy Soviet For-|proper safeguards are estab 
i ign Minister here for the 12-/lished in a comprehensive dis 
' 
' 


—— 


PEEREEEEEEEEE EE EEE EEE EEESEEEEEEEEEEEEESESESEEES 


TWINES AND CORDAGE: 
for Commercial Use & boxed for Resale 
Jumbo Balls, Reels & Cones 
Cotton —F lax——Hemp—!ndia—Sisal 


HEADQUARTERS 
Frozen Food Packaging Supplies 
In single units or case lots 

© All-flexible Plastic Containers 


Locker Meat Wraps end Freezer Tepes 


Polyethylene Bags and Rolls 
Round Paper Cans, All Sizes 


ha, 


PARK-SHOP 


Found Alive 


Alice Nicisen, 75, of Salem, 
Ore. is pictured Monday 
after she was found by res 
cuers on the east slope of Mi. 
Heod. The meuntain climber 
became lest Sunday. 


PHONE Around the comer on “G” 
MR, FOREMAN Street Lot, next te Lutz Lug- 


NA. 8-3320 Perk snd Shop” lott 


DISTILLED IN 1948-—BOTTLED IN 1956 FAMOUS 


YR. WATERFILL & FRAZIER 
OLD Straight Kentucky Bourbon 


Rich, Dark coler . . . Smooth, every drop. 
719 


bee died’s de de te db ted bt ee de he dh hk hk hh hh. dh S.A. eh i bi hi Ki i i A A i = = © 


nation Commission meetings,| armament scheme. 

lsat impassively as Lodge spoke.| Lodge was particularly 
Last week Gromyko calledisolemn as he reminded the 

Commission that every country'sky” plan of President Eisen- 

im the U. N. but Russia and its hower at the last General As 

satellites indorsed the “open ‘sembly 


: 
: 
’ 
| 


i 


Call RE. 71-1234, ask for Circulation, and order The Wash- 
ington Post and Times Herald guaranteed home delivery. 


ee 


»* 


: 

j Wathil 
ithe Eisenhower proposals “no 
‘torious.” He attacked the West- 


S yrs. or more old . . « just about the best ern disarmament position in 


Bourbon money can buy. Eighty six proof. 


Special. 
1]-25 


AAS | 3 
FULL QUARTS 
CLARK’S 90 PROOF 


BLUE LABEL 


DISTILLED DRY GIN 
3$10 3.39 


CLARKA’S OWN SPECIAL 


KENTUCKY BOURBON 
35%] 3.09 


SS preet; FIFTH 


SUMMERTIME SHOPPING THE Easy waX 
CENTRAL 


OOTP 
_ 
- 


i ae 


\e Nerisswevrs 


© One Bill to You © Convenient Locations 


® One Check to Write © Speedier Shopping 
® No Cost to You ® National Brands 


' Borton's | Bae ete aig merges Langley Men's Weer . ‘Fagelson Hardware & 
: 7 @m . = '-Age se Apoe ei) 

5518 Cone, bee. BO” WO. 6-4408 3 Southeast Area ; sect N. ameckive Ave ME. 6-S010) seytans ‘i 9 Every Might) 

Casual Corner Music Time st. EE’ >-o404 

Records Record Pi 

eos NS Rampsbire hve. 


4 Rockville, Med. 


Abode Hardware Co. 
wire Screens & Accessories) 
* WwW. Middle Lane PO. D cscs! 


Albee Shoes 
sa Washiacten )—4 
ae —~ . Center 


Sub-Teens’ Gece? 
s : , m4. Are. 7 
Greta Stevens 


omen’s Wear 
sy Wachtesten Lis 


Joeman’ . 


OPEN A 30-DAY CHARGA-CARD 2 ACCOUNT 
wherever you see the CENTRAL CHARGE EMBLEM 


Purcha@e clothing, home furnishings, suto re- 
pairs, eccessories, plumbitig, and many other 
items and services 


Distilied and 
Bottied tn Ken- 
tucky, 


Distilled 
Bry Gin 


OLD FASHION SOUR MASH 


WATERFILL & FRAZIER 
STRAIGHT KENTUCKY BOURBON 


+4 YRS. OLD, EIGHTH SIX PROOF 

, , 

, , 

: 7 3 we $] 0 3.49 
FIFTH 


BOTTLED IN BOND 100 FROOF 


yrs. SHERWOOD 3 39 
OLDSTRAIGHT RYE . 
Fifth 
3 fer $10 


or 
T'¥2 YR. BOURBON 


BOTTLED IN BOND 100 PROOF 

BLOSSOM SPRINGS 

STRAIGHT KY, .09 
Fifth 


35.85 Case | BOURBON 


FOR SUMMER DINING 
IMPORTED FRENCH 


CHABLIS 


(PETITE) 
99° > 


Fine dry white Bur- 
11.85 | 


gundy to serve for 

summer dining. 
BOTTLED IN SPAIV 
ROLSON’S SPANISH 


DRY SHERRY 
Pan ] 75 Case O90 
1953 FRENCH 
“ROSE” WINE | 
c 24 or. 


6.95 CASE 5 bot. 
“ROSE” WINE 
SAN JOSE 


NW. Downtown 
Shopping Area 


| 9811- is Kine 


WE totes Herby’s Inc. 
(Ford Gales & Gervict) 
1600 Duke St. KI. 9-0574 
Joe Phillips Mercury, Inc. 
Sales & Gervice 
200 6. Fairfax St. TE. 6-340! 


|Lee’s Kiddie Shop 
(‘Tafante’ & Children’s Weer) 
106 Kies at. TE. 6-t317 


‘Linda Lee Shoppe 
Pom, s-sase| dpecigiiang = Tal Women = 
Market Tire Co.. Inc. 
alk res. pameres ‘and © ee a 


old Dominion Body Shop 
301 Mediocre st “ or 3-24626 


“ & Wouse!’ ural ish nes) ‘Rosenberg’s Dept. Store 
mS ” Washinstes a PO. 3-181 | Aprare for gi. wees, _ 8 
Jaye’ . Bootery ; 
_ he Pam !ir)  Tickel Mo 

PO. 


oe I ‘Toon 614. ‘Autemobdiile 
Nedley 4 Co. | See — 


ya? 
= Jane "ans 1389 Conn. Ave ‘Turk’s Men's Shop 
eeelers-W 2] kere ‘elans) 
ne cntgomers A ey +4555 740t Mi. Vernen Ave. 


, . ? Williams Luggage & 


Brinsfield’s Druc Stere 

: 7755 Seaeth Canttel Ss JO 38-3400 

. a" The Clothes Mart 

Como —— ha _ tr. +eeer 

| & Cantteel St. SS 70. 34084 
Congress Park Dept. Stere 

wo. 7-2108 i8°7-29 Seraneak S. SF JO 3-98!) 

Grand Paint & Hardware 


Harfvsare Housewares 
La 6-3083 
5” 


Separe'cs) 

Dt. 7-a5e0 
| a) 
a 


swear 


(Spor 
168° Cean. Ave. FY 


A & N Trading Co. 
(Men's Sportewear-Wort Clethine- | English-Pomerey 
oo ® Gh oe -useaee me 9.2565 Corset Shep 


Ambassador Drug Store A | tes Cone Ae ave .w ee 
1 ee i Tile: | FOee ape <0 
o— ‘Sports Store | tre aan Ave 
“~ Piehing Tackle Firearms) Jean 

977 .¥ st. x_W. ME. §-2457 (‘Ladies Reedéy-te-Wears 
Baskin Furs pn Conn Fa a . 
Cor ot oa ee we A 6-sett 
The New “Bresiau” is ’ 
ou. ma ne © Os cose Me 
Capital \ Wall Paper Ce. 


allpeper end 
714 12th yy n.F. 


Cariten Casuals 


= 


BOTTLED IN BOND 100 PROOF 
FORTUNA Straight Kentucky 


Bourbon 17 


5 YRS. OLD Fifth 
37.95 Case 


BOTTLED IN BOND 100 PROOF 
7-YR. MR. PORTER 


STRAIGHT 99 
BOURBON Fifth 


BENSON VALLEY 


STRAIGHT KENTUCKY 
BOURBON 69 


4 yr. old 86 preot Fifth 
BOTTLED IN BOND 100 PROOF 


6 YR. OLD McPHERSON 


STRAIGHT 79 
BOURBON Fifth 


IMPORTED WASUM 


FINE QUALITY 


RHINE & MOSELLE 


Bot. Case 
139 «(| 4-95 


1°9 7 4-95 
1-69 T 7:7 
}49 16°75 
1-99 ya 95 
1-79 19-5° 
1 69 18: .50 


23 oz. 


me 11,50 es 


Reg. 1.39 IMPORTED 
WASUM GERMAN 


“MAY” WINE 


Delightful Summer 
Wine, add fresh cut 
strawberry & serve 
chilled 


Bqgts-te-Wear 
: ‘ 5A. &- 


tes. also 
pions) 
* ©. tf. 1-3588 . 6-212) 


Ray's Lads & Dads 


Women’s Weer’ 
S404 Coen ‘one Le 


—S ro. 8-4196 
Market Tire Ce. ay 


Tires Potteries ace Seat 
ave. 6.4. a” +7086 idren) | 


-9a71 


Ine. 
rvice and Repairs) 
Ra KL. 9-602 


th 4. Kl. 8-506? 


1953 RUDESHEIMER 
REISLING 

1953 NIERSTEINER 
BERG 

1953 PIERSPORTER 
GOLDTROPCHEN 

1953 BERNKASTELER 
REISLING 

1953 SCHLOSS FURSTENSERO 
REISLING SPATELESE 

1952 SCHLOSS JOHANISBERGER 
RED CAP 

1952 SCHLOSS 
VOLLRADS 


1953 MOSELLBLUMCHEN 
1953 SCHWARTZE KATZ 
1953 RUDESHEIMER 

1953 ESP RA SENLES 
1952 REISLING * 


en's Cietaias & Furn 
22 14th “x suheond | sete neck, 6 


Pw.) 
CL. 6-1300 


Deg aimee 
ie Be s Metropolitan 

er Inc. 

Sc5 itth St NW. 

Knic ot. s-18e0 


Prete: soma ’y 7 oe a =~ 

Wie cwete re 

re _Leon's Sen's Shop 

1209 G Street N.W. : 

Kramer's Men's Wear 
iCle & Haber 

m158 oO St. ® 


Lane’ s Luggage, Ine. 3066 16th Sevess +" 


| Levitan’s Men's Wear 


: o@ee Lae - 
Ray Koontz Men's Wear 
‘fas 7 = 7 Bade: one: 


ineenes. pére’s Wear. Spor, Coee we wa Tan xo 
‘S15 tenes. Ave. LW. 
- ‘ ; Bethesda-Chevy Chase | Capitol Appliance C peers Hardware 
1205 G Street A DE 1-0266| 95, back Be 
Cc ernpike 
(Suecessor te £4 Beam) ayes Seiten be SW. pase - Weedment Ave. OL. 6-799! scse Colesville Road 
& Radic H. L. Green Bept. Store ae 
s-sT80 
os Ready-to-Wear 
Li 8-008 
Home Accresories—O'ifts 
Dr. 
5 
‘Tires. Recapping. Geet tog 
High wey A. 77-0612 
Paymer & Phillips, tne. (Childrens Apparel) lea 
Silver Gt Shop 


A 
Fogel’s Washington esse 
~ Ben Hundley Tires 
o 
‘Appliances & A. & Supply 
Huntsberry’s Fashion ~ 4-885 Adier and Mandel S5TT Georgia Ave JU. &-3400 _ 
s900 we. p-cass|Bereen’s Men's Shop 
NO. 13-9609 . 
21 ~t St. NW, DL 1-063) Factory mayes's Otren’y Apoare!s East-West Motors 
S49 Colesvilie 
“ae ‘Enunine, tess Accessories & 
a307 a — Ave | -+- nat | ak be 
a Ready-to-Weer) (ones WN. Fairfax Jk. 2-5458 
othes and Uniferms) te, Conta > \ose8 Lee 
ting-Body Work-Sest Cer ae we e086 28th 
+ ” | Handee's “5 and 10” 
Sto 


Pr . ‘ . 
. ; 
aa ~ SI 
aiforms and Liagerte' anal o¢ Ghees for the Pamir) A d J y 
Goozh Gifts 441 2h Street 5.5 Di. 7-118 Silver Spring, Md. nnandale, Va. 
Dt. eed | 
omen's Wear) | yéa's 
, Sw. aD. en spuncey 10-2 
Footwear y Shee Stores Auto Seat Covers @ Tess) Clark's Flowers 
. Next Deer te Pest Office Jt. 4-4760 
, eel EE a ue on 5-201: = ovms ies” Best Wees -— bichwe? 90° TS 
Music 
’ Kepy Kat 
Matt Ogens Browse About Shop. 
i 
JU. 8-1150) - } 
| Dresses Bpor'se 
e ses 7 
ow“. 3-5 mis Coleovithe Bead \z , Shop of Shirt 
he (-ecorgts 
JA. 68-1177 


e573 Georsia® pA —— 
910 1ith Street. NW. eee) eis Quality Shop 


Liberty mnoge 


nek Tr 
ph 1th st. NW. 


Lynn Jew elers 


IMPORTED FRENCH 
ESTATE BOTTLED 11.50 rs 
COTE D’PROVENCE ra} FIFTH 
IMPORTED 1953 
CHILEAN REISLING 
(BUX BOTTLE) ¢€ 23 ox. 
bot. 


Wright's Jewelry 
Silver. Diamonds. Wetches? 
venee 


c Outfzters for Men) 
-—— \ aon Sea e ncgg 8575 Georsio & JU. 9-444 


Acconseries? Suitland, Md. 


Ladies Weer & Accesporirs) 
A i? Lane Shops 


C 23 ot 


aw Mecdiavest ose Nee eet & Pernighings) 


SCOTCH BARGAINS 
CREAM OF BARLEY 


86.8 PROOF 
39 


49.50 } od 


Cose ‘ 


Dumbarton A 


10 YR. By PROOF jy 
58. 00 } 


1 Coe 


| 
] 


\ 


Inverness Royal 


39 


80 ; 
PROOF Fifth |! 


KINGS GLEN ° P% 


86 PROOF \ 
46.50} Shinn 


AMICOS 4 YR. OLD 


VIRGIN ISLAND RUM 


GOLD OR 7.19 19 


pity 
IMPORTED 10 YR. OLD 


PROOF 
FURNAS BRANDY 
.88 


See, 


8] 
PROOF 


9 OE 
. 


rr 
¢ 


Ce 
«At tt baad be OR SPARK. 


"rman Pe 


SPECIAL~—Reg. 2.99 
RUBINOFF VODKA 


For Martinis, SAVE 60c BOTTLE 
Screwdrivers, 39 
Vedka & Tonic. ° 

FIFTH 


80 Proof 


GRAVES COCKTAILS 
READY-TO-SERVE 
MANHATTANS 


| 


4% | . 
(bingy | VODKA COCKTAILS 


DAQUIRIS 
DRY MARTINIS 
Ready To Serve 


48 
PROOF at 


. 


FINE VINTAGE 1947 IMPORTED 
CASTELLANE 


BRUT CHAMPAGNE 


An ecutstending vintage year in 
French Champagnes. IT'S A BUY. 


37.50} “19 


FIFTH 


Grand Bouquet 
AMERICAN 


CHAMPAGNE 
.69 


FIFTH 


BURGUNDY 


MER ys - 19.75 CASE | 
703-14th St. N.W. 


STORE HOURS 
10 A.M, to 9 P.M. 


QUANTITY 
RIGHTS RESERVED 


Areas 


Rite- Way ‘Auto Tep Coe. zr 
. 3 ens Tectereee 4 “<a “he S-4545 
aS Congres & Avie Tope), soa, ] on i} M ° Ce 
iPord = 

Georgie TTR oso 
10 F St os oF tT A louie Shops 
Saltz F St. In Chi aaron s . i: 

. of Alezendre, Ltd. st .. case 
snail Mga's 2 Sopa ~ rursiahinge, » | fea E 
Schmid’ s Emporium of Pets 


Everything Per Your Pets) 
nw ME. 8-T119 


Dresses, arte 
LW. 


‘TM. t-s008 
Petomac Table Pad & 
Euiever ar C0. Inc. 
Mien. Ave. ©F. 
Roval Moters, Inc. 


‘Chrysier Pivnost Re es 
ave 


o41-48 Eve St. 


Seely 


‘Sportin 
a UD US. AW we. 1-5008 


Surplus Sales Co. 
‘Clothing. Shoes. C 
ets nam Ave. i. = 
as 


Tall 
‘Women's Wearing Apparel) 
oe ith &. NW. Di. 1-t507 


Town — Casual 


Tt? Si) ed <7, 
Silberg Bros. Men's Wear 

‘Clething. Purnishiags 4 Da 
po ie Ree wd 

8 Ce. 
« gotten song oe, Se are Co. 
| NE. Shopping 

Area 
‘Bowman Hardware Ne. 2 


; 
1-2648 


st th se ee ele ay Sine 
U ear Lusti 


rdong Bros., Inc. 
(Ladies’ Ready-to-Wear 
oe F st. Aw 


Van's Men's Shop 
met oC eM. Aw 
Vincent et Vincent 
Hairstylist 
Sit tith St. NW 
Ww r 


(home, Purnishings: 


(Dress & 
1961 Wickhis Ave 2 oe LA. 6-1908 
Thriftee +. 


| 7525 New York Ave. &. &. LA. 6-a08) 
‘The Wardrobe 


NA 686-0855" 


Z 2-Sees 


Connecticut Ave. 
Shopping Area 


Beyda's Conn. Ave. 


036 Cone yo we Seer | 3 eres 


Bootery, 
108 toes. ‘Sven RW ER Danes 


weston a fer ts ie Vater’s Shoes 


Sander are 
Tors 


Tae Fate yx 
Nelsen Heeters 
vie & a vs 


ae ~~ oad oom ts 
Standard Pontiac, Inc. 


ore 
ts 


£ Ea ast t Riverdale, Md. 


c—_ € — 
“eve eS r= , 


_. 


fi Hs yettsville, Md. 


Gallows st 4 Baie. Ave. WA i-t008 
Fashions 
& Chiléres'’s rw? 
sare y= SE ace WA 


T"nr fs 


‘Matiomally Adter ised Bra at 
5°18 Geeres Chaeed Be 


\Derting 
hese SE a i Se eens Det Sess 


| Wheaton, Md. se 5 


‘seve, Drug Town 


s-ecee Fashion-aire 


Wear) 
» ema7 —— at sac Her 


\Tickel Motors, Ine. 


S008 be Mile Man Dee TAP A Thess 
oe ee a 

e and Gifts 
‘Vater’s Shoes da. o.taes 
Sasa onal grees pe for ne Aw vfs 


The Wardrobe 
(Women's Wear) 
at 
| PaaS Pesce 


Netiona! Brand Sees for the Aw v4 
(0 Sertland sO 


Your Rexall Drus-Dept wil “Shene 
. 


131 Rendeiph ‘Reed. 


‘Women's and Children’s Wear) 
wtt4 G Avenee Lo. 
Grubb's 
2081 Viers MU Ba 

y Shee Store 
aR 


11008 (-cergta 4 
The Sandman a Sleep Shop 
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U.S.S.R. Parliament | 


Opens Session Today. |}, 


MOSCOW, July 10 — Theljonce a year and confined i 
U.S.S.R. Supreme Court (Par- self to formal adoption of a 


liament) will 


convene here}budget 


Wednesday for a summer ses-| The present practice, how 


sion in line 
with post-Stal- 
in policy of 
broadening 
Pp arliamentary 
Participation 
in the conduct 
of the nation’s 
affairs 

The new ses 
sion, however, 
was not expect 
ed to produce 
any sensational 


| 
ever. calls for regular sessions 


and the setting up of perme 
pent committees to draft cur- 
rent — 

| Premier Nikolai Bulganin 
‘toid the United Press recently 
ithat the main business will be 
introduction of a new liberal 
lized pension law 

| President Alexander P. Vol 
kov of the Council of the 
inion. one of the Supreme 
Soviet's two chambers, said the 


Volkov lagenda probably would im 


developments or major foreign clude these other items 
policy pronouncements. But ® An appeal to parliaments 
some aspects of Soviet foreign of the world tc work for gioba! 
relations may come up during disarmament 


the debate 


The session will be the sec- crees passed by the Presidium 


cond in seven 


® Ratification of interim de 


months. Under of the Supreme Soviet 


the Stalin regime. the Su °® Considerstion of a Jap 
preme Soviet usually met only anese appeal to world power 


to hah bedregren bam tests 
informed seurot: said tie 
Supreme Scwkt cat ae 
take wp the guesiies of grant 
mm oer aes 6h! hUOe 
16 constrwem repels wt 
make wp ' 


Egypt te Get Sabs 


CATRO. Jus 
newspaper Al Shae 
Eevrt experts 
number of sultan ° . . 
neki ie’ Gaye B ins Vemination 

Barren D. Quenstedt yester- 
day ven the Demercratice nom 
matiesn fee Cengress in Vir- 
seis Tenth District. The 
cievuen was marted by voter 
ethlergy. (Glory oo FP. 1) 


“Imes and of 2 number of Polish- 
het «6«dGestrevers recentiy re 
weed bere whem be returis 
frome @ visit te Yugesizvia. 


® Enjoy the fi lighter, nag for Western Europe's de 


milder version 0 Cet Sa mucary weal 


Spanish Talks te Open 


Eden to Visit Soviet; 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
Wednesdey, July 1, 19% 


Commons Cheers Plan 


LONDON, July 10 #—Prime newing our conversations with 
Minister Anthony Eden today the Soviet leaders. There will 


also, I understand, 
announced that he and Foreign ;. nities to visit Lenin and| 


‘Secretary moony Lioyd will perhaps other areas of the So-| 


visit the Soviet j viet Union.” 
Unien next The text of Eden's statemer® 
May. : was broadcast tonight by Radio 
Announce Moscow. 
ment of the iC Eden emphasized his inten- 
visit on an invi- tion to visit “other areas of the 
tation extend- Soviet Union.” 
, He seemed to anticipate get- 
ting beyond the confines of the 
Kremlin to meet the people of 
Russia first hand. It would be 
brought cheers 


from beth 
sides of the Anthony Eden 


House gf Commons Dogfight off China 


what was described as a peace. 
selling” tour 


5 Daily Flights 


Hugh Gaitskell, Labor Party 
leader, said Eden's statement. TAIPEI, Formosa, July 10 # 


would be welcomed. X\ Chinese Comunist MIG-17 jet! 


Eden said his party would fighter was damaged today in| 


leave London May 5 , , , " 
Eden accepted the invitation - awaute dogfight we et 
to visit Russia during the visit tionalist Thunderjets off the! 


to England by Premier Nikolai China mainland, the National-| 
Bulganin and Soviet Commu- '*t Air Force reported. 
nist Party Chief Nikita Krush-. A communique said three Na-| 
chev. But he said then he tionalist jets clashed with eight’! 
would not immediately fix a Red MIGs between Matsu and 
date because of previous com- Shuang Feng Island. It said the 
mitments as Prime Minister MiGs jumped the Nationalist 

Im his announcement. the fighters while they were out | 
Prime Minister «said he and patrolling. All the Nationalist | 
Lioeyd “look forward ... to re-' planes returned safely, it edded. 


Roanoke, Va. 


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NMADEID. Soain, July 1 


Hug? level talks epen here Wed-| 
secdas scoerentiy to lay the! 
soum@werk for inking Spain| 

rectly te the strategic pilan- 


rr ne . 
Participating will be Spanish | 
ani Porteguese leaders and 


=m acrvwed last migtt for the 
ake, wich are scheduled to 


ast four ¢avs Heading the mis 
nom is Mah Gem Francis Dev. 
amous . . representing the United States 


‘ $+ in - Chief. Europe) 
rw Et Rh 


" Senta = not g member of the 

, SNerth Afiantic Treaty eorgani-| 

ott {71 Oni ties (SATO. The American’ 
, rommamd here reports and re- 


at a lower pr 1Cé a cubed te Spain by the Iberian 


tem «f mutual defense prob 
‘eouts on the strategic level be- 
ween CINCELE and the Ibe- 
rem countries, end arrange-| 
ments ‘er assuring the security 
of mulltary oustallatiens en the 


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no freee CINEL ER. Portugal is’ 


Pat «of Sal 
Infermants sai? the egenda 
‘or the talks inmeludes coordina 


of Pakistan sid today his gowv- 
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med Natheas Security Coun- 
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coli regerters Gefore iraving 


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imta er Pakistan. 


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THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 


c__ reimnvnet French Kill 18 Rebels, Japan Puts Brakes on Arms Plan 
Question 200 Moslems 2. * WS 


situation changed 
tive plans to roll back several’ “The United Stetes should — 
Reuters —————————————— ee eee lbee——?'reforms of the post-war occupa. "OW coy 2 heiped the 
ALGIERS, Algeria, July 10— "e : = i. tion and create the full-scale Socialists in the elect — . - 
; - : It was thoughtleseness ed) 
‘i French se urity forces have “aon !FINLAN j 


Aret 
D. army and navy urged Sy the torjalized the generally pro 
<2 ao United States. American Tokvo Shimbun 
ave + | Sunday’s national election| ecent pt sana announce 
Moslems for questioning, ac- ~~ — ef e igave the Socialists—aided by ™C™*S 07 Okinawa military land Cone 


a at ‘ policy and new arms aid ——s 
cording to reports reaching here ie PL Re aa, Gees two Communists—one-third of Janan were balloaned by the eet 
today. | | . “*. ~~ e-: A . 2 Ty the upper house of Parliament. Socialists and Communists inte vee eas tamiTs 
The French suffered one =" a ae + This is enough te block ata re] Po . 
casualty in the attack on the ' " ee, : changes in Japan's anti-arms BUT WOW! STEEL 
- : : . -- 


killed 18 insurgents in two 


clashes and detained about 250 
: 


|insurgent forces, which took : =, : - ‘constitution until the 1959 elec- _ a ee 
iplace yesterday in the Con * Te s. ’ rh tion 


As rT | 
. stantine departmen southeast -* “j . fk ina | unofficial resw I ' 5 Adworti sed l i) AS 
of here. They detained the ? ; . showed Prime Minister Ichiro 
iMosliems near Beni-Mester- ) Hatoyama’s Liberal-Democratic LI LIFE THE GREATEST MAME Ie 
Insenmage, newth:.af ‘Samneat | 2 Party and its independent sup AUTO MUFFLERS 
| after they discovered a stone - ' “ porters captured 165 seats in 
® a 8 barricade on a nearby highway ' ae the 250-member chamber. So Far Superior te the Origins! Matfer That Qaue Sie Bear €or 


At the same time the French 7 cialists and their supporters 
began combing an area south) E = -* " ' pngigent” — “1 | got 8 
and east of here today for , ;, . : The conservative coalition 
insurgents who shot a young ‘ , "2 |formerly held 171 seats, the 
woman and a prominent farmer pe ¢ leftist opposition 73, with six 
last night and who killed seven! [: ee . oF «a AS vagancies 
French soldiers traveling in a =< “ lroanically, many Japanese 
imilitary convoy yesterday =P . oe oe —_ er omy —y ~ This Guaranter ls Honevet Pram Gone ar ( 

AY -ordaing : reports reach- , - : P ne “OC iaLIS aqavance on w TION IN 29 MINUTES 
| ing here today, the convoy of 4 x United States, which forced INSTALLA 
ltwo trucks and « jeep was ; ; yy Japan to adopt its arms-re- 
iwinding its way up the bed of ° = q . inouncing constitution during 
\a dried-up stream near Guer 
irouma. Suddenly, about BO 
imen crouching behind the 
bushes on both sides of the Associated Press 


road opened fire gga Map locates the area which the Soviet government claims This angered the Social Dem- 
three men rossfire from rt 


hanke caught othere ac they, 2% invaded” by American planes this month. The protest ecrats ng ta allied with the 
, * —_ . . 2 1 > . : af 
camoed and tried to take cover, Said U. S. planes had flown over underscored cities of Coristian Democrats in the & 


- ' power center coalition govern 
| Police reportedly seized four Kaliningrad, ,Vilna, Pinsk and Minsk. (Stery on Page 1.) ing the nation. Tupini turned 
|\Communists in western nigeria 


down the job to mollify them 

today and sent them to res Last night Tupini received 
ient camps n an wnaznown the votes of the Center plus il 
Jietrict. Three of the men. ac ‘Rome , ain Picks Tu in} of the 15 votes of the far right 
: to police. were party Since the entire right wing did 

m close contact not vote for him, it was hoped 
‘ational Liberation ROME, July 10 #® — The;member to the ancient post for the Social Democrats wouldn't 
of the insurgent Christian Democrats hope this the second time in a week. object. 
organizations «an Algeria time Sen. Umberto Tupini’s| The first time Tupini, the Italy's other two big mavyor- 

In the port of Oran, the election as Mayor of Rome will Christian Democrat candidate, less cities also got their chief 
leader of Nationalist dock stick received the unasked-for votes officers last night. Milan's City 
workers’ union was detained| The new City Council lest of the neoFascist movement Council reelected Dr. Virgilio 
by police and accused of organ- night elected the 67-year-old' and the Monarchists. Since the! Ferrari, a Social Democrat. The 
lizing a dock strike in Oran on former journalist, wartime re- Christian Democrats don't have| Venice Council reelected Chris. 
July 5 sistanee leader and Cabinet'a majority on the Council, it tian Democrat Robert Tognazzi 


« 


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- 


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him 


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Conscription-Abolition Issue _{|mersteca= cua] U. N. Chief Jeoge (JHE WASHINGTON POST ad TIMES HERALD 
Put Before German Socialists |G°7™2"s __ | Will Visit 


3 ' * 
MUNICH, Germany, July 10, Bonn republic, decided to put, The first draft is to be called Fa) Fribute Middle Kast 


@™ — West Germen Socialist 2 resolution to this effect up next soring in the govern To Hoover 
to raise S000 | | BELGRADE, July 10 
men for the North Atlantic A} United Nations Secretary Gen-| 


COLOGNE. Germany. July 
tence be TOG0 ; . w—Foermer United States eral Dag Hammarskiold ar-| 
The Socsalists ave ale ers Precedent Herbert Hoover was rived here today en route to} 
oppesed German membership homered today by the West the Middle East on a suddenly | 
in that allaance German Fed... 


extended tour of world capi-| 


In a foreword te the Sorialist eration of Im =| | tale | 
cect auteteted tose ounces for | 518 9th S “if (9th St. F) 
Yearbook. dis puted aed, le he rem ; Belgrade was to have been | ft. * near 
‘Chairman Erch Offenheetr aered Ger. | Hammarskjold’s last stap on a) 


| eid Inds party's imenediate task many's ecom - tour that took him to Moscow HEART OF KENTUCKY 


was to prepare for a new start SS 7. and four other Communist capt- grey Straight “SOUR MASH” 
Pri 


im German poly and Sed a tals. But the United Nations’ 


: mz Berg - 
way out of the “foreign political .o. ident of the announced in New York that 
blind alley” imte which. be said. Indestries Fed , he will make a surprise visit aD tn 
the country hed been ied by Tate, | to the Middle East next week. 
oo - 7 . 
hamceiler Kenrad Adengucr. * , oe His visit to Cairo and Jeru- ‘ 
7 ‘ _ yy i- = ae od > res . : : lw >) z CENTRAL Ss 
he (.eTmeme irwetira - . , saie™m., July 19 to 22, has noth- 
ao Cred tj tuetionss Goower, after World War I 
“tT eo fruitiess international “ - on eier stetemmed” wan,| ee % do with reports of rising 
erangling over their heads tatesman”™ recension in Arabisracti rels- 94.4 root “LONDONDERRY” 
ome yw Ry wel , ognited the seriousness of Ger- , — 
x fute : pol tions, a U. N. spokesman said. 
many s ecomemic situation. 
+ naa» . cs Today Hammarskjold was —=—s . 
Bere recalled the Hioove sented of Bal 4 t by “ =——— - 
torsum ” which helped set greece St Deigrece Sport oF . Sa 
. Germans’s financial prob. Foreign Secretary Koca Popo-| § 3 = 100% GRAIN NEUT. SPIRITS 
ue ; —_——o vic. Hammarskjold scheduled 


: —em 
-_ - 7 a 6 : _ 
lems and laid the foundations . onference with President IMPORTED 
country ; economic 


- - 
gates ret - * sons . : ‘ Tito , _ 
registcred bers of ¢ par-| Sees? - , Earlier, he said at Vienna > Ome Sour - ic —— OF STUART 
- i Reners for Heover that he would not comment on . 
Other main questions he C2@e at the 25th anniversary/ +. Poznan rioting that oc- a, . 
mentoned were of the announcement of the) -urred during his visit to War- _ PRO SCOTCH 
Scferm af the cariel welfare morat oriam. the Federation saw, the Polish capiial. LAalad | nt : | 86 P 4 
services to provide s@curty for Hammarskjold said he was ; ' . 


all into old age A iSvetume leather-Sound informed “by the Polish gov- ~ ) STROGOFF 
Effects of “the second indus CO™tCUen of German pee! ernment” of the uprising. But 


Pa rr . 
“PICNIC utth trial revetution aeught ahout — S WOTksS WH De SOME 60 he refused other comment “for 
he stemie gower on the lees (he German Ambassador if two reasons : 
and living standards of the pro 4“ ashimgion. Wilhelm Krekeler “The Poznan incident is of 
: ole who will deliver it as a tokem polish domestic nature, and on 
= * om oat it: . ; 

U $ co Is ‘ed The COT OT DON COT? 2m oes UR os (,eT man se ude 2 4 the other hand | do not discuss 100% GRAIN SPIRITS 80 PROOF 
‘ VERNMENT pect ea) Seterds: ormer Repubican President. discussions I had,” he said | 


In bis letter. Berg aise 


thanked Hoover for his firm _ e | 
r in (hiekene Drunken Driver Jailed stand after World War w 5 Arrested as Spies =, 3 “ 
: mantiing of Ger- ‘rT 
| KALAMAZOO. Mich. July ~ ag = ae Cums 2S SEOUL, July 10 #—South BOTTLED-IN-BOND 1 oor 
Frying oe 18 _ : man imdustries Korean police today announced 29 CENTRAL FAIR 09 apy 


jegiens man whe WESTERN TRAIL 


moves around on 3 roller «kate the arrest of five men accused 


platform began serving « 4s Geod-Will Visit Ends of supplying information on the KENTUCKY STRAIGHT 
tho ONLY kind G \ s\\¥ Gay jail sentemce today fo Reuters South Korean army to the F YEARS FIFTH KENTUCKY STRAIGHT 
_ S i\isis VV) \\/ Grenk driving Goren the center HAMBURG. West Germany. North Korean Communist re (case cens } BOURBON OLD 
Cri D at... WAT S - of a main highway. Leo Doyle July 16—Six United States gime. Police said 15 others be-| }*°* Us" = Ceo 


told officers he was on bis way warships, led by the cruiser Des lieved to be members of the 


r the “Powder Moines. left bere today afier a same spy ring are Ddeing BOTTLED-IN-BOND 100 PROOF : 
one-week goodqil! visit. sought. 3° } CLUB 518 84 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES. HERALD 
8 W ednesday, July il, 1954 eee 


———— 


Cogley Denies Defending Reds 
In Fund’s Blacklisting Report 


RLACKLIST——fFr. Pq. Jiwas “an unprecedented inva-, Hutchins said he was in full 
sion of freedom of thought and agreement with an editorial in 
the Committee's subpenaing of\expression in the United yesterday's edition of The 
Cogley “to justify his study”) States.” Washington Post and Times 
Herald which declared: “Free- 


eee ‘dom of the press would be very 
OWNTO Park Free Anywhere Downtown seriously abridged if writers 
PARK-SHOP Vv ‘ : stood in fear of being haled be- 
. acation Fashions lead up te our fore a congressional commit- 
tee whenever they expressed 
: . opinions on controversial is . 
Coordinated 177 ‘ sues International News 


| Yesterday's witness. Cogley JOHN COGLEY 


: 
Quintet with ‘is a soft-voiced, 41-year-old resi | 
ident of Baldwin. N. Y¥.. who . + « defends his report | 


the Linen 1 ook formerly edited the Catholiclay' _ 


magazine. Commonweal. and . 
now works as Hutchins’ per member of the Austrian Social | 


: _ ae 
sonal assistant. Cogley ended Democratic Party 


: ; , aw , 
three hours of prolonged ques A, ogn ee nen 2 aie 
tioning by Committee Counsel that we — . P 


Richard Arens with a 12-word "OUMced accent. On inquiry, 
‘question of his own: “I would ‘ State Department later | 
like to know. if I may. why |! the Social Democratic) 
orane led? is a predecessor of the 
was calied aly 
ialist Party in Austrias 
Quizzed About Fund urrent staunchly anti-Commu- 
nist coalition Cabinet 

Thumbing through the 593 
page report, Arens wanted to 
know why Cogley hadn't foot- 
noted his blacklisting references 
to actresses Gale Sondergaard 
and Uta Hagen with mention 
of their affiliation listings in 
the Committee files. Arens 
aleo wanted to know why Cog- 
lew referred to Singer Paul 
Robeson as a “political person” 
in quotes instead of as a lead-| 
ing Communist 


Arens had wanted to know if 
Cogley in undertaking the 
Fund report in September 
1854. was “aware” of Fund 
'President Hutchins’ “position” 
on.employing Communists if 
‘they are properly qualified and 
lean be watched.. 
| Cogley said he had never 
jheard of the Fund for the Re- 
| public before being hired and 
| was familiar only with the edu- 
jcational views Hutchins 
lespoused as president of the 
University of Chicago Cogley Complains 
Ivy Style Jacket Arens wanted to know if Cog Cogley said there were many 
ley was aware his personal a&|\ wove to write a report, and| 
, . sistant on the report, Michael/inic happened to be the way 
Matching Slacks To a mom ~ “eon” She cctanet bis one 

° SOCIAUS | posure briefly to complain: “It| 

Contrasting Slacks : Arens explained seems a little unfair to me... .| 

, the key philosopher of | to take a book that a man writes 

Communism, has said that So and then rip it out of context 

Vandever by (andid were , cialism is only one step inthe | and imply that somehow 

transition from Communism.” I was hiding Communists.” 

octdsnatrs wr 16 | Cogley said he knew Harring- When Arens wanted Cogley’ 

ton had been a Socialist, and he tg identify code references to! 

also knew he had written 30 blacklisted persons who had 

Practicality plus Ivy ;anti-Communist articles in the| given Cogley their story in! 

League luxury. Note the |\Catholic press confidence, Cogley made a flat 

bold Roman stripe lining, “a Questioned Most Others appeal to the Committee mem- 

even on pocket flaps .. | bers to see if they would “in- 

the cuffed sleeves of the Arens wanted to know if Cog-' ict ” | 

jacket. Pleatiess matching ley was aware that Paul Jacobs, Rep. Clyde Doyle (D-Calif.) 

—— and jacket make a formal suit, contrasting who worked on the movie &a% sided with Cogley: “There is 

slacks and jacket a sport outfit. Add three more en pect of the report in Hollywood, no inference that this witness 

sembles by wearing the jacket with other slacks, and had been a member of the La- ic subversive nor is there any 

by wearing the two pair of slacks with other jackets bor Youth League claim that this (anonymous) pub- 

and shirts. Rayon Acetate in brown, 5 SO Cogley said he knew Jacobs jic relations person (who help- 

beige and grey. as a “knowledgeable anti-Com- ed some of the blacklisted gain 

munist™ and after hiring him clearance \ is subversive “ : 

learned he had “briefly” be Reps. Edwin FE. Willis (D-La.) 

longed to such an organization and Morgan M. Moulder (?D- 

22 years before Mo.) agreed with Doyle and 

Open s Charge | Arens wanted te know if Rep Donald tL, Jackson /(R.- 
Cogley was aware Dr. Marie Calif.) went along with ' 

Account—Take _Jahoda, a report member from’ reservations : certain 

in New York University’s Re-| The hearing resumes 
4 Months to Pay search Center for Human Rela-'a m. today . - ae 
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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


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\._ EVERYTHING ELESTRIGAL UNDER THE S08 
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TINY TERMS 


The Washington Post 


RUGENE METER. Chairman of the Board 


JAMES RUSSELL WIGGINS, Vice President end. freceutive Editor 
ROBERT H. ESTARPROOK ..... Editorial Page Editor 

FRIENDLY Maneaying Editor 
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CHARLES Cc. ROYSEN .... Secretary 
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PHILIP L. GRAMAM, President and Publisher 


JOHN W. SWEETERMAN . Vice President and General Manager 
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HARRY EYRERS Production Manager 
G. STEWART PHILLIPS : , Comptroller 


AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER san 


, 


WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 1956 PAGE 10 


Ike’s Second “Yes” 


Mr. Eisenhower's decision to remain a candidate 
for reelection following his operation will cause 
little surprise. For some days the news has been 
full of glowing predictions by friends and asso- 
ciates; all indications have been that the President 
likes his job and is more anxious than ever to make 
the race. Mr. Eisenhower has promised to be 
frank with the people about his health. There is 
not the slightest reason to doubt the sincerity of his 
statement as relayed by Senator Knowland that he 
feels in better shape now thar? on Feb. 29 after his 
initial decision to seek reelection 

This newspaper adheres to its belief that if Mr. 
Eisenhower's first decision following recuperation 
from his heart attack was right, his recent opera- 
tion for ileitis, in view of the apparently altogether 
normal recovery, should not have disqualified him. 
It would be less than realistic not to acknowledge, 
however, that his health has become far more of an 
issue than it was before June 8. There is some 
disagreement among doctors about the likelihood 
of recurrence among persons who have undergone 
surgery for ileitis. Presumably Mr. Eisenhower's 
decision was made in light of the honest advice of 
his physicians. But it would be preposterous to 
believe that a major operation following a heart 
attack has had no effect on his physical condition. 
There has been a large dose of political medicine 
in some of the attempts to p ortray the President as 
more fit than ever as a result of his operation. 


Mr. Eisenhower's political associates, particularly 
the Republican leaders and candidates who expect 
him to pull the party to victory, will be cheered to 
celebration by the announcement. Mr. Eisenhower's 
friends irrespective of party will hope that both 
of his affirmative decisions have been made in the 
best interests of the country and of Dwight D. 
Eisenhower as an individual as well as in the 
interests of the Republican Party. His countrymen 
now will have to give new scrutiny to the prospec- 
tive Republican ticket, weigh the risks of reelecting 
& man who twice in nine months has suffered 
incapacitating illness against the advantages of 
continuing Mr. Eisenhower's influence, and compare 
these with the qualifications of the strongest team 
the Democrats can nominate. 


Meanwhile it is splendid to know that the Presi- 
dent is feeling so vigorous. His well-wishers will 
hope that he will soon be on top of his job again, 
for his guidance and unifying talent have been 
sorely missed. In part his fitness may be judged 
by how effectively he exercises his leadership be- 
tween now and the close of Congress. 


Realistic Postal Rates 


The House did a good piece of work in its 
surprise approval of the bill to increase postal 
rates. House Democratic leaders, who opposed 
the increase, deserve credit for bringing the bill 
to a vote in which they were overridden by Repub- 
licans. This newspaper has supported the bill 
vigorously for two principal reasons: (1) our belief 
that among all the hidden subsidies granted by 
the Government there is perhaps the least excuse 
for subsidies in artificially low mail rates that 
often serve to benefit, not the impoverished in- 
dividual user, but commercial business; and (2) 
our conviction that newspapers and magazines, 
which have for years been favored with ridicu- 
lously low second-class rates, ought of all groups 
to pay their own way. 

It is a pity that passage comes so late in the 
session and that the Senate has not held hearings 
on the controversial measure. Nevertheless, per- 
haps the example of the House will serve to stir 
action in the Senate, which passed a similar bill 
ufianimously in 1951. We suspect that there is 
less political dynamite than legislators may fear 
in the proposal to increase first-class rates to 4 
cents for regular mail and 7 cents for air mail. 
Few persons really would like the idea that when 
they stepped to the stamp window they were 
accepting a Government handout—which would be 
the real meaning of continued failure to place 
postal rates on a cost basis. 


The New Transit System 


What kind of transit system will result from the 
current transactions and prospective legislation? 
A large question mark remains over the D. C. 
Transit System, Inc., because not much is known 
of its principal figure, O. Roy Chalk, who is a New 
York airline executive. If Mr. Chalk should under- 
take a milking operation, the city would have reason 
to regret his emergence as the successful bidder 
for the assets of the Capital Transit Co. If, on the 
other hand, he carries out his proposal to expand 
transit service here and to make it profitable to 
the public as well as to himself, the city will be 
highly gratified by the change of ownership. 

At this point there are many reasons for taking 
an optimistic view. In addition to Mr. Chalk’s plan 
to extend transit lines and to make the business 
flourish, he has pledged himself to accept arbitra- 
tion of unresolved labor disputes. His operations 
will be subject to regulation by the Public Utilities 
Commission. Undoubtedly he sees an opportunity 
to make money out of the local transit system. 
Reasonable profits are a basic.essential to the opera- 
tion of any private utility. it will be the business 
of the PUC (with the District Commissioners and 
Congress in the background) to see that those 
profits are kept within reason and that the quality 
of the service rendered remains high. 

Some of those who are*expressing fear that 
another “Wolfson” chapter is about to open point 
to the fact that Mr. Chalk is paying $9.6 million 
in cash (the remainder of the total price of $13.5 
million to be paid in bonds) for a company that 
has $7 million in its till. This means, they say, 
that Mr. Chalk is taking control of the company for 
a cash outlay of about $2,600,000, and that he will 
be in a position to reap enormous profits on that 
investment. To say-the least, this is a gross over- 
simplification. 

One device Capital Transit has used to increase 
its cash on hand has sharply to curtail spend- 
ing on repairs and maintenance in the last year. 
Presumably this means that the new company will 
have excessive repair bills in the months ahead.. 
The company’s financial position has also been dis- 
torted by its attempt to write off in the last year 


of its operations the entire value of its street rail- 
way facilities. This was done on the assumption 
that its successor would operate buses only. Under 
present plans, however, the conversion to buses is 
to be extended over a seven-year period. This 
suggests that some drastic adjustments will have 
to be made in the bookkeeping allowance for de- 
preciation, which will leave the new company in a 
less favorable position than CTC’s accounting now 
suggests. 

No one should forget for a moment, moreover, 
that the new company has taken over the obligation 
to repave the streets when the streetcar tracks are 
removed. The cost of this obligation is variously 
estimated from $3 million to $8 million. In addi- 
tion the new company assumes numerous obliga- 
tions for taxes, wages, severance pay, reserve for 
injuries and damages, payment of current bills 
and so forth. It is true that the Chalk group has 
purchased assets with a bookkeeping value of nearly 
$19 million for $13.5, but neither these assets nor 
the cash on hand can be viewed apart from the 
liabilities and obligations that accompany them. 

Fortunately, there is every reason to expect that 
the sale of Capital Transit will be ratified by its 
stockholders and that Congress will pass the neces- 
sary franchise. Enough uncertainty in the out- 
come remains, however, to justify the Commis- 
sioners’ plea for standby authority to set up a 
public transit system in case present plans should 
miscarry. The inescapable fact is that Congress 
will have gone home before the CTC-Chalk deal 
can be finally consummated. Failure to give the 
local government power to meet an emergency 
might conceivably leave the city without trans- 
portation for six months or more. The present 
favorable outlook is no excuse for taking such a 
gamble. 


Stardust 


Well, the great affair at Griffith Stadium yester- 
day afternoon turned out to be largely a matter of 
muscularity; and the result, when taken in conjunc- 
tion with the fact that the National Leaguers have 
won six of the last seven of these All-Star contests, 
seems to demonstrate that the preponderance of 
muscle is now on their side. It suggests a radical 
inversion of the order that prevailed when this 
annual festival was instituted nearly a quarter cen- 
tury ago. Then it was the American League, which 
included among its luminaries such redoubtables as 
Ruth, Gehrig, Simmons, Foxx and so on, that had 
muscular preeminence, and the National League 
that specialized in pitching and defensive play 
generally. And just to show you how topsy-turvey 
the whole world is nowadays, in the year of the 
first All-Star—A. D. 1933—our Senators won the 
pennant. 

Still, even such generalizations as these about 
the issue of a single ball game are a bit risky. There 
will be many to remind us that of the four 
home runs hit yesterday two were by American 
Leaguers—the Messrs. Williams and Mantle—and 
had there been a few more runners, say a total of 
five, on bases at the time, the story would have 
certainly been longer, and might have had another 
and happier ending. 

We say “happier” because, after all, this is an 
American League town; and though loyalties in 
these matters are not as fierce and as passionate as 
among the spectators at the Byzantine Hippodrome 
—and have happily, as far as we can determine, no 
political connotations whatever—they nevertheless 
exist. Anyway, in the matter of All-Star games 
played here in Washington the two leagues now 
stand with honors easy; and this should give an 
extra interest to the next All-Star game to be played 
here in A. D. 1972 or thereabouts. We shall look 
forward to seeing you again on that occasion. 


New Chance for Burke 


Evidently the concern sparked by the air tragedy 
over the Grand Canyon has pushed the Administra- 
tion into action on the Burke Airport. The $34 
million appropriation request by President Eisen- 
hower, though very welcome, is also very late. The 
question is whether it comes too late for Congress 
to act on it at this session. There are some who 
suggest that the request was deliberately *delayed 
in the Department of Commerce. We prefer to 


think that the Administration has acted in good 
faith after finally becoming convinced that there 
is no realistic alternative to a second Washington 
airport. In any event, we hope that Congress will 
face the facts more quickly than did the Admin- 
istration. Interim use of Baltimore’s Friendship 
Airport for overflow traffic, as recommended by 
Secretary Weeks, will be a palliative but can in 
no sense be considered a permanent cure for the 
congestion here. 

Construction of the Burke Airport has an indirect 
bearing on the broader question of preventing 
collisions through electronic methods of air traffic 
control. A committee under Maj. Gen. Edward 
Curtis is studying this problem as a follow-up to 
the Harding survey for the Bureau of the Budget; 
we hope that the committee will come up goon with 
specific recommendations for tying in new facilities 
with the air defense radar network and that it will 
suggest a formula under which users of the airways 
will bear part of the cost. The 24 “near misses” 
reported over Washington National Airport point 
up the problem here. Irrespective of the meaning 
of these reports, the early construction of a second 
Washington airport will be of real help in reducing 
present and potential hazards in this area. 

Views differ on just how great these hazards are. 
The National Airport manages to handle an amaz- 
ing amount of traffic in good weather, though no 
one can be sure just what is the saturation point. 
In bad weather, however, the facilities are severely 
taxed, and relief is imperative if the delays and 
cancellations are not to grow worse. The continued 
growth of air traffic, and the imminence of jet 
transport planes, make further clogging inevitable. 
Prudence and foresight call for Congress to end 
the five years of costly indecision, overrule the 
special interest pleas of Maryland legislators who 
are trying to pawn off Friendship as a substitute, 
and start construction of the Burke Airport now. 


‘ Ti } 


‘were during 


“Situation Unchanged” 


Letters to 


“Portents and Prophets” 


Regarding your editorial of 
July 3, entitled “Portents and 
Prophets,” allow me to take is- 
sue with your conclusion that 
“to accept the hypothesis that 
the repudiation of Stalin is just 
another grandiose deception 
would be to credit the Commu- 
nist leaders, both inside and 
outside of Russia, with a great 
deal more imagination and 
cynical ingenuity than they 
have ever previously exhibit- 
ed.” Admittedly, Stalin was the 
author of many blunders, but 
the new Kremlin leadership 
has shown just that talent for 
clever ingenuity that Old Joe 
consistently failed to produce. 

Our biggest danger is to be 
lulled to complacency as we 
the Communist 
“United Front” in the 1930s 
and the disbanding of the old 
Comintern midway through 
World War Il. Perhaps Khrush- 
chev and Bulganin are having 
more trouble than they expect- 
ed with the destruction of the 
Stalin myth, but it would be 
folly to presume that the Soviet 
Union has abandoned its goal 
of a communistic world com- 
munity. 

This is not to say that the 
printing of the Daily Worker 
article in Pravda was com- 
pletely planned, but a little 
reasoning will show that this 
incident does not indicate the 
crumbling of the Soviet em- 
pire as Secretary Dulles would 
have us believe. Mr. Shepilov, 
formerly the editor of that pa- 
per, was appointed as foréign 
minister only a few weeks ago 
to provide a sacrifice for Tito’s 
visit. 

Now it can hardly be argued 
that the Soviet leaders are in 
so little control of their coun- 
try that they did not have the 
power to appoint a successor 
to Mr. Shepilov who would be 
agreeable to their point of 
view. If this statement is ac 


cepted, then the reprinting of 
the Daily Worker article was 
part of an over-all plan. 

It should be the job of our 
Department of State to find 
what that plan is and what are 
its objectives rather than crow- 
ing about the evident difficul- 
ties that the “plan” entails. In 
a time when the Russian Bear 
has found that he can gain 10 
times as much allegiance as his 
growls formerly did, in a time 
where we see in the course of 
the last few years the neutral- 
ism of Ceyion and Iceland, the 
growing intimacy between the 
Soviet Union and Afghanistan, 
the “gradual” invasion of Indo- 
china, the weakening of 
NATO and the growing spread 
of self<etermination of colo- 
nizec peoples all gver the 
world, it seems an expensive 
pleasure to sit smugly back and 
gioat at Russia's temporary set- 
backs. 

JAMES JAY ATLEN. 

Krlington. 


Burke Airport 


An airport at. Burke, Va., 
would be so close to National 
Airport that it would create 
hazardous air-traffic conditions, 
with the possibilities of air col- 
lisions greatly increa’sed. Be- 
fore any decisions are made, 
the CAA should issue a map 
showing what they propose as 
air-traffic patterns over Arling- 
ton, Fairfax and the surround- 
ing counties, the patterns to 
show both incoming and out- 
going traffic from National Air- 
port and the Burke site. 

We have no assurance that 
air traffic at National would be 
decreased as a result of having 
another airport. Any decrease 
would be only temporary, until 
more airline carriers are char- 
tered and more schedules in- 
augurated, and the dangerous 
congestion at National will con- 
tinue unabated. 

CHARLOTTE FLECK. 

Arlington. 


the Editor 


“Bad News for Phi Betes”’ 


Well! I see that Reader 
Harry R. Lee, in his letter of 
June 30, is all upset because 
changes in American clothing 
design threaten to dislodge the 
key of the Phi Beta Kappa 
from its traditional resting 
places. Rarely have I seen such 
a blatant display of envy in the 
press. I recognize the symp- 
toms well, because years ago I 
was not voted into membership 
in a college fraternity and have 
since salved my wounded vani- 
ty by uttering all sorts of un- 
kind things about these organi- 
zations. 

The interesting question is 
‘as to the reason for Mr. Lee’s 
snide attack upon the ancient 
and honorable Williamsburg 
society. 1 offer three possibili- 
ues: 

1. Mr. Lee himself recently 
emerged from college and there 
failed to be accepted into Phi 
Beta Kappa, although he felt 
he posses the q ations. 

2. Mr. Lee is a father and his 
son recently (or even long ago) 
passed through the same or- 
deal. 

3. Mr. Lee harbors a guilt 
complex about having gone 
every Saturday while in college 
to cheer for Old Siwash while 
future Phi Betes were pound- 
ing the books in the library 
or were forced to miss the vic- 
tory dance that night because 
they were preparing Monday's 
lessons. 

At any rate, whatever the 
reason, it is evident that reader 
Lee is pining for some tawdry 
adornment with which to perk 
up his morale. I am herewith 
posting to him my only remain- 
ing Orphan Annie Secret De- 
coder pin (with secret compart- 
ment), 1937 model (I also have 
1936 and 1938 versions, but the 
1937 is the best), so that the 
absence of a Phi Beta Kappa 
key will no longer be a source 
of chagrin to him. 

GLENN G. MORGAN, 

Falls Church, Va. 


United Nations: Man’s Best Hope 


The paralytic effect of “Pac- 
tomania” on our foreign pol- 
icies has never been more bril- 
liantly stated than by Walter 
Lippmann in his column June 
in under the subcaption “A 
Depressing Visit,” meaning Mr. 
Adenauer'’s. Necessary policy 
adjustments to Russia's “New 
Look,” according to this analy- 
sis, cannot be made for many 
months because the 80-year-old 
German Chancellor is in 
political trouble at home. 

Having fallen for the classi- 
cal argument of “negotiation 
from positions of strength” so 
persuasively advanced by the 
old traditionalists, Mr. Dulles 
and his immediate predeces- 
sor, the Chancellor feels quite 
naturally he is entitled to some 
pay-off by the materially most 
powerful nation on earth re- 
gardiess of the effect upon the 
other members of the “cold 
war’ alliances. All foreign of- 
ficers and competent students 
of international relations know 
full well, however, that the 
balance of power under the 
state system makes completely 
unrealistic the unification of 
Germany inside NATO. It is ex- 
tremely doubtful that the most 
ardent advocates of permanent 
German partition could have 
devised a more effective plan 
for accomplishing this than 
have the would-be architects 
of her unification: Acheson, 
Adenauer and Dulles. 

Elections, free or otherwise, 
are not now and never have 
been considered in themselves 
a quid pro quo for the surren- 
der of power under the state 
system. The American and 
Russian people need to be told 
that the apparent conflicts 
among the little people of the 
world are mere reflections of 
the greater conflicts between 
the super powers. It is for this 

that Kashmir, 


[> 


Korea, 
can- 


sues dividing the United States 
and the USSR. And such a set- 
tlement, however unpalatable it 
may seem, is eventually neces- 
sary if World War III is to be 
voided. 

If there is no alternative to 
peace in the sense that war 
is now considered irrational, 
there can be no substitute for 
cooperation, It is for this rea- 
son that the Russian alliances 
and our 40-some-odd outside 
the United Nations probably 
constitute the greatest threat 
to peace today and tomorrow. 
All military pacts outside this 
world organization, which is 
almost universal now and 
should soon become completely 
so, promote conflicts instead 
of cooperation and may in the 
end, if not dissolved, prove 
fatal to civilization itself. The 
recognition of this basic fact 
is responsible for the world- 
wide movement toward non- 
involvement in power blocks 
by the uncommitted and ex- 
trication from them by some 
of the responsible leaders of 
the committed ones. 

It is in this light that Ice- 
land’s, Morocco’s and later the 
efforts of others to cancel our 
agreements for-military bases 
must be viewed. It is, also, be- 
cause of this that England, 
France and others are deter- 
mined to reduce armaments. 
Since armaments can no longer 
provide security, and since only 
the United States can appar- 
ently afford both arms and 
butter, the other nations are 
choosing the latter. This vine 
ment may be ex 
gather momentum until, tke 
the avalanche, 
comes 


writer, for the United States 
to present to the world now our 
own face of “intransigence” as 
a substitute for the one so 
long assocjated with the Rus- 
sians and’ to close our own 
doors as they open theirs, It 
is not sufficient any more to 
simply parrot ad infinitum; 
“But you can’t trust the Rus- 
sians,” for it is well known in 
every foreign office that 
sovereign nations under the 
state system can be expected 
to keep their agreements when, 
and only when, it is in their 
vital interests to do so. Rus- 
sia, they believe, should prove 
no exception to this generally 
accepted rule. 

It can easily be shown that 
it is in the vital interests of all 
nations and peoples, especially 
the Russian people, to relax 
tension and improve living 
standards through cooperation 
now that war is no longer a ra- 
tional policy. Complete insula- 
tion, even in the most _totalita- 
rian state, is now impossible. 
The maximization of interna- 
tional trade, greatly increased 
cultural exchanges and con- 
tacts, improved communica- 
tions at every level and mutual 
assistance through the United 
Nations may be expected to 
penetrate the densest “curtain.” 

Only through cooperation 
can poverty, ignorance and 
bigotry be abolished or even 
greatly reduced. These are 
the real enemies of man. 
Tyranny in whatever form is 
a symptom, not the cause, of 
man’s maladies, ang coopera- 
tive efforts, looking Wward the 
eventual establishment of a 
one-world community, their 
only cure. The United Nations 
is the one laboratory in which 
these cooperative efforts can 
be fully tested and developed. 
Full support of this world or- 
anization offers .America her 

nest. opportunity and.man his 
greatest hope. 

HUGH B. HESTER, 
Brea" General (Ret Ret). 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Danny Kaye: Clown 
And Diplomat 
By Martin Agronsky 


From an ABC Broadcast 


A CLOWN has beén here in our town 
for the past fortnight. He is Danny Kaye. 
Like the good clown he is, Mr. Kaye has 
been making people laugh. This is his 
trade. 

An interesting testimonia] | as to how 
well he plies it was provided the other 
night by one of the most distinguished of 
our Supreme Court Justices—Felix Frank- 
furter. Mr. Kaye employs what is known 
in show business vernacular as a gimmick, 
It consists of repeatedly asking his audi- 
ence near the end of his performance if 
they've had enough and are ready to go 
home. The idea is for the customers to 
yell—“no.” Mr. Justice Frankfurter led 
the nay shouters with unjudicial abandon, 
And he is not a man to suffer even medi- 
ocrities gladly—let alone, fools. 

The audience as usual in this capital 
city was polygot. There were some from 
the Diplomatic Corps whose English would 
certainly not have been equal to the oc- 
casion were the comedian’s appeal pinned 
entirely on how he used English words, 
But Mr. Kaye speaks the international 
language everyone knows—the language 
of laughter. The conjugations and declen 
sions—the grammar of his “esperanto”— 
are a sense of humor. 

ow 

AN INTERNATIONAL clown like Kaye 
has a unique ability. It’s to communicate 
“person-to-person” on a level that leaps 
with a laugh the usual geographical and 
ideological differences that confront the 
diplomats and statesmen. It offers a 
tempting question to those who feel the 
problem of communication is one of the 
most difficult barriers across the road to 
peace. Could the statesmen usefully swap 
their striped pants for a clown suit? 

The trouble is there's a defect in such 
rosy imagining. The clown’s talent is not 
the only one that everyone understands. 
Toscanini is a citizen of the world. The 
Russian ballet would be a hit in New York, 
Shakespeare is appreciated in any lan- 
guage. And so are Tolstol and Whitman, 
Mathematics has only one language, no 
matter where it is studied. The same is 
true of the scientists’ symbols. So humor 
is not the only universal language nor the 
only vehicle for the kind of “people-to- 
people” communication of which Presi- 
dent Eisenhower has spoken. The arts 
and the sciences have long provided the 
potential means for international under- 
standing. And like that which humor cffers, 
none has yet succeeded where diplomacy 
has failed. 

Mr. Kaye is a jester but not a fool. The 
experiences he has had in the past four 
years—particularly in trying to make un- 
fortunate children laugh in many lands as 
a voluntary envoy of U. N. I. C. BE. F.— 
the United Nations International Chil 
dren's Emergency Fund—have not made 
him feel the time has come when the dip- 
lomats can be laughed out of business. Yet 
one encounter he told me about does seem 
to justify wondering if it might not be 
wise for all nations to require of their dip- 
lomats that they be able to demonstrate 
not only a sense of protocol, but also a 
sense of humor. 


eos 


IN AUSTRIA recently, the comedian 
was honored with an invitation to meet 
with Presidént Theodor Koerner. As Kaye 
told of the encounter, the Austrian chief 
of state came alive—an old man, 82, slight, 
with closecropped head of white hair, a 
wispy white goatee, a gentle quizzical 
smile, a feeling of strength beneath out- 
ward frailty. 

The comedian had been ushered through 
one immense chamber after another—all 
souvenirs of the lost grandeur of imperial 
Austria—to await the President finally in 
a vast, high-ceilinged reception room. At 
the far end a door opened. The Austrian 
President, walking with a stiff-legged limp, 
came slowly across a great expanse of 
gleaming floor. Formally the comedian 
and the statesman met in the middle of 
the overwhelming room. The comedian, 
oppressed by the atmosphere, made un- 
comfortable by the feeling he was taxing 
an old man’s strength, discarded protecol 
to ask—“Why don't we sit down?” To this 
the President replied quietly—“But I was 
supposed to ask YOU that,” and led the 
way to his office. 

In this more informal atmosphefe, Kaye 
reminisced, the dialogue began like this: 

President: “I know why you wanted to 
meet me, Mr. Kaye, you wanted to see an 
old man.” 

Comedian: “No, Mr. President, I wanted 
to see a GREAT man.” 

President: “Well, Mr. Kaye, now I must 
offer you some of our fine Viennese coffee.” 

Comedian: “Thank you, Mr. President, 
and would you tell me something? Would 
you have offered me coffee if I hadn't said 
you were a great man?” 

President: “I think so. And now Mr. 
Kaye, what would you like to talk about?” 


The Washington Post 


Times Beralad 


Pupiished every Gay in the rear 
The Washington Post Dad 


The Associated Press is B enimies excl 
republication of usively to use tor 


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1515 L. Ot. 0.W., Washington 6. D. o 
Telephone RBEpubiic 71-1234 


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BY MAIL BEYOND MAR 


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Detores of ta 


Matter of Fact 
Stalled at Dead Center 


THE AMERICAN Govern- 
ment these days is a bit like 
a messy kitchen, with the un- 
washed dishes piled high in 
the kitchen sink waiting for 
the cook to return. The cook, 
of course, is Dwight D. Eisen- 
hower. And the dishes are a 
whole series of basic national 
policy decisions which are 
waiting to be made. 

To be sure, the Govern- 
ment doesn’t lool: like a messy 
kitchen, During the Presi- 
dent's current illness, as after 
his heart attack, all seems to 
be going rather smoothly. Yet 
this appearance is deceptive. 
In the American system, only 
the President can make the 
really tough decisions. If the 
President is ill, or operating 
on a part-time basis, the really 
tough decisions simply do not 
get made. 

Moreover, the President's 
two serious ilinesses have 
coincided with basic changes 
in the world situation. There 
have been, for example, the 
upheaval within the Soviet- 
Communist empire, coupled 
with the rapid development of 
the new, adventurous, danger- 
ously flexible Soviet policy. 
These changes are both an op- 
portunity and a challenge, but, 
partly because of the Presi- 
dent's illness and partly be- 
cause this is an election year, 
the American Government has 
not really responded to them. 
It has gone on acting as 
though everything is as it was 
before. 

Below the deceptively quiet 
surface of the Government. to 
be sure, there has been a great 
deal of painful, fog-bound 
groping for new policies to fit 
the new situation. But notb- 
ing much has come of all this 
groping. 


FOR EXAMPLE, one group 
tn the Government, which in- 


By Joseph and Stewart Alsop 


cludes men like Presidential 
advisers Harold Stassen and 
William Jackson and chief 
State Department policy plan- 
ner Robert Bowie, has gen- 
erally held that the changes in 
the Soviet regime are real and 
meaningful and that every op- 
portunity of testing Soviet in- 
tentions ought to be taken 

A contrary view is held by 
men like Under Secretary of 
State Herbert Hoover Jr. and 
Secretary of Commerce Sin- 
clair Weeks. The first group 
has maintained that this coun- 
try should take the initiative 
in breaking down the Iron 
Curtain, that the more con- 
tacts with the Soviets the bet- 
ter, and that the gains in- 
volved in such contact far 
overbalance the risks. . The 
second group has wished to 
maintain an impregnable iron 
curtain of American manufac- 
ture. 

Largely, thanks to William 
Jackson, the first group scored 
& partial victory when the 
President approved a modest 
“exchange of persons” pro 
gram. But even this smal! 
policy decision took weeks of 
negotiation and feather- 
smoothing And the basic 
issue—just how far to go to 
test Soviet intentions — re- 
mains undecided 

Again, some of the younger 
policymakers have favored an 
aggressive policy for exploit- 
ing the new strains and 
stresses in the Soviet camp 
resulting from the de-Staliniza- 
tion policy. For example, alft- 
er the Poznan riots, a serious 
proposal was made for a sort 
of Monroe Doctrine for the 
satellites, in effect warning 
the Kremlin against using the 
Red Army to maintain its 
satellite empire. But this was 
rejected as too risky, and the 


policy now is to let the dust 
settle as far as the satellites 
are concerned. 


AGAIN, TAKE the foreign | 
economic and military aid | 
program which is a chief but- 
tress of American foreign pol. | 
icy. The revolt in Congress | 
has alerted the Administra- 
tion to the fact that it is not 
good enough just to ge on of- 
fering the same old program | 
year after year. But, even be- | 
fore the congressional revolt, | 
there was much worried talk- | 
ing in the Administration 
about the need for a “bold 
new approach” to meet the 
new Soviet challenge in the | 
foreign-aid field. 

A speech for delivery by the | 
President, modeled on former | 
Secretary of State George 
Marshall's famous Harvard | 
speech which initiated the 
Marshall Plan, was drafted by 
a group headed by former | 
Presidential aid C. D. Jackson, 
and submitted to the White 
House. But. partly because no 
one had decided just what the 
bold new approach was to be 
and partly because of the Pres- 
ident’s illness, the whole idea 
came to nothing. 

Add the bitter, still unset- 
tled defense debate, the drift | 
in Asia, the policy vacuum in 
the Middle East. the failure to 
breathe life back into NATO 
you then get an impression of 
the American Government | 
stalled at dead center, display- 
ing a somnambulistic tendency 
simply to go on doing what has 
been done before. There is 
only one man who can get the 
Government off dead center, 
which is another reason for | 
hoping that the news from | 
Gettysburg continues cheer- 
ing. 


- Coprriat,_ i 


1084 
T ribune. Tne 


Eisenhower Cabinet 


A Remarkable Continuity 


DURING its three and a 
half years in office the Elisen- 
hower Cabinet has shown re- 
markable continuity. 


There have 
been only 
three changes. 
Two were in- 
volu ntary— 
that is, 
initiated 
the President. 
Secretary of 
Labor Martin 
Durkin re 
signed over 
differences 
about changes 
in the Taft-Hartley law. And 
Secretary of Health, Education 
and Welfare Oveta Culp Hob- 
by resigned for personal rea- 
sons. The other Cabinet change 
was encouraged by the Presi- 
dent, when Secretary of the 
interior Douglas McKay re- 
signed to run for the Senate. 
There are not expected to be 
any changes from here to elec- 
tion. If Mr. Eisenhower runs 
and iselected, there are likely 
to be several shifts among top 
officials of the President's 
team. 


There would be two reasons 
for such changes. More than 
one member of the Cabinet is 
‘known to feel that, having 
served strenuously for a full 


ithe Powell 
i'tentatively knocked out on a 


e By Roscoe Drummond | 
‘did not subside because mem- 
| bers kept clamoring for action 
| on other amendments, on both 


term, he would prefer to re- 
tire from public life. Further, 
the President will very likely 
wish to add some new blood to 
the leadership of the “team” 
and, since the resignations of 
the entire Cabinet would be 
automatically on his desk at 
the end of the first term, he 
would find it convenient to 
do so. 

Members of the Cabinet who 
are understood to prefer to re- 
turn to private affairs include 
Secretary of State John Foster 
Dulles, Secretary of Defense 
Charles E. Wilson, Secretary 
of Agriculture Ezra T. Benson 
and Secretary of Commerce 
Sinclair Weeks. There could 
well be others. 


THERE IS NO DOUBT that 
Mr. Eisenhower is sensitive to 
the widely accepted criticism 
that the Cabinet is overpopu- 
lated with men of business. 
But he is not casting any of 
his official family adrift on 
the eve of the election. His 
own view is that, while this 
criticism has some appearance 
of validity, it does not have 
the substance of validity. 

Good argument for the Pres 
ident's side exists. There are 
no businessmen at the top of 
the White House official fam- 
ily: The President is a former 
general and university presi- 


fas a weil-qualified and well- 


sides of the segregation issue. 


dent. The Vice President is a 
former Congressman and Sen- 
ator. The powerful assistant 
to the President, Sherman | 
Adams. is a former Governor 
and Congressman. The chair- 
man of the Council of Eco- 
nomic Advisers (Mr. Burns) is 
a university professor. The 
assistant to the President for 
economic affairs (Mr. Hauge) 
is a former magazine editorial 
writer. All the other presi- 
dential assistants are drawn 
from law, politics or military 


e. 
The Cabinet posts sami 


especially for executive-admin- 
istrative talent—Defense, 
Treasury, Commerce and the 
Post Office—are reld by men 
drawn from business; But 
other Cabinet positions are 
not. Secretary of State Dulles 
and Attorney General Brown- 
ell are practicing lawyers. Sec- 
retary of Agriculture Benson 
is a farmer and former farm 
cooperative official. 
of Labor Mitchell is a former 
department store personnel 
manager. Secretary of the In- 


terior Seaton is a former Sen- | S34 


ator and newspaper publisher. 
These are reasons why the 
President considers that he 


balanced Cabinet, although he 
does not assume, I think, that 
it cannot be improved. 


These Days © @« « « « « By George Sokolsky |p 
It's Not So Long Ago 


THE YEARS pass quickly 
and what excited men a few 
years ago seems of so little 
importance today. 


cation for | 
Democracy in | 
Our Time,” by © 
Prof. Jesse H. © 
Newlon of 
Teachers Col- 
lege, Columbia 
University, 
ang me in 
1939. Professor 
Newlon ex- Sokoisky 
pected our country to change 
more rapidly than it has. 
The trouble is that in the 
intervening period we went 
to war with Japan and Ger- 
many; then we had the Korean 
war and the cold war with 
Soviet Russia and an inflation 
of our economy and now we 
are bogged down in the Eisen- 
hower prosperity, and what 
most Americans want to 
change most are the models 
of their cars and their tele- 
vision sets and refrigerators. 
Some, ording to the mar- 
riage d divorce statistics, 
also are busy changing their 
wives. 


THIS IS WHAT Professor 
Newlon wrote in 1939: 

“It would be misleading to 
suggest that the issues are al- 
ways clear, that the individual 
is always conscious of whether 
he is working for the common 
good or against it, or that the 


AF at Berlin Begins 
‘Operation Kinderlift’ 


actual! purposes and tendencies 
of the various organized 
groups or of the various social 
classes or interests are always 
clear to the individuals that 
compose them. But the array 
of forces for and against the 
democratic ideal is, neverthe- 
less, perfectly clear. Arrayed 
against democracy today are 
all those forces striving to 
maintain the economic status 
a 

But the economic status quo 
is never desired by reaction- 
aries. They wart to become 
bigger and richer all the time. 
They also change their prod- 
ucts and the machinery they 
use. For instance, since Pro- 
fessor Newl_n wrote this book, 
at least four new industries 
have been developed in the 
United States to proportions 
heretofore hardly believable: 
they are synthetics, elec- 
tronics, pharmaceuticals and 
the atomics 

Professor Newlon said: 

“It is essentially a relatively 
smal! group in our society that 
owns or controls most of the 
productive, industrial and 
business wealth of the coun- 
try, that opposes needed eco- 
nomic changes. The middle 
class is confused and divided 
in its sympathies, but the 
status quo is defended by 
many members of this class 
who still have faith in their 
own future under the existing 
economy and each of whom 
hopes some day to become a 
capitalist. The defenders of 
democracy are, on the other 


_ — ———— 


hand, largely drawn from this |° 


same middie class and from 
the ranks of wage earners.” 


THE DISTINCTION which 
the learned professor makes 
* *tween those who believe in | 
and practice capitalism and 
those who practice capitalism 
but believe in democracy 
seems at this date not only 
untenable but a2 play on words. 
The professor does not mean | 
political democracy, which in 
the United States we accept | 
as being of the nature of a rep- | 
resentative republic as de- | 
fined in the Constitution. | 
What the professor apparently 
refers to is industrial democ- ' 
racy, a fancy term generally | | 
adopted by Fabian Socialists S 

If an American sees the} 
word socialism, it is a red'| 
flag to him and he is liable to | 
discount the writer's ideas, 
which is not the best way to 
approach any problem. Never- 
theless the term “industrial 
democracy” is a euphemism | 
for socialism, and after having | 
read this book I have reached | 
the conclusion that when Pro- 
fessor Newlon uses the term | 
“democracy” he means the. 
Norman Thomas variety. 

It is quite a refreshing and 
even encouraging experience 
to read this volume, published |! 
in 1939, in 1956. Apparently | 
back in those days lots of 


people were scared. The only (3 


things that really frighten 
mankind today are the atom 
and hydrogen bombs. 


iCovsrieht. 1954 Kae | Peatures 
Sync 


cate 


—— 


Rental Property 


' amendment 


Secretary | open 


ig. 


“WF hen you're married awhile, Linda, you won't think it's 
unromantic ... you'll just be oan he 
isn’t going over bills instead! ...” 


Washington Seene . . 


The Influence Peddler 


By George Dixon 


behind him and tapped him 
on the shoulder. 
“I can get you a card to get | 
n.” I said. “Il got influence.” 
“I don’t want to go in,” re- 
plied Speaker Sam Rayburn. | 
“Everything's too fouled up!” 


WHEN Theodore S. Strel- 
bert, director of the U. S. 
formation 


THE HOUSE chamber was 
seething. The members were 
debating the dynamite-laden 
of Rep. Adam 
Clayton Pow- 
ell, Democrat- 
ic Negro Con- 
gressman 
from New @ 
York, to deny 
Federal 
school aid to = 
Southerna 
states which 
refuse to abol- 
ish racial seg- 
regation in 
their public 
schools. 

Nearly every member either 
| was in his seat or on his feet. 
|The vote finally was taken and 
amemiment was 


es Ui 


ant, appeared before the House 
Appropriations Subcoinmittee 
to explain how they were 
spending money to spread 
American culture around the 
world, they got into some real 
show business shop talk with 
the subcommittee chairman, 
Rep. John J. Rooney of New 
York. 

Representative Rooney: I am 
sure you will pardon my cul- 
tural ignorance, but exactly 
who is “Tom Two Arrows” on 
whom you would spend $1800 
in entertainment money?” 

Mr. Seebach: He is an Indian 
who with his wife puts on 


Dixon 


But 
confusion 


close one of 122 to 120. 
the malstrom of 


ican Indian culture, dances. 
songs, legends, stories, history. 
religion, and all the rest of 
_& 


The long lobby off the 
House chamber usually is 
thronged with Congressmen, 
their legislative assistants and 
reporters seeking special in- 
terviews. But this time it was 
virtually deserted—except for 
a short man who was standing 
back of a swinging glass door, 
peering into the chamber. 

He was behaving like the 
most rubbernecky tourist. He 
stood on tiptoes and squinted 
into one corner of the chamber. 

There was something about 
the back of his head that 
seemed familiar. I came up 


Representative Is 

this one act? 
Director Streibert: 

whole show. 
Representative Rooney: Is 


it a sight act? Do you under- 


Rooney: 


He is a 


body here know what a sight 
act is? 

Mr. Seebach: You mean it 
has to be seen? He does that, 


oo. 
(Coporiapt. )900. ine Peatures 


Activities in Congress 


TODAY fern 
Fe 


Benate 
niger international wheat agree. 
a bi 8, Bromene pe | 
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populated areas. 


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McConnausahey 


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am exec Ay B......, business G-16.| 
‘Rut and Administration. Rie x, | Bae 
committee bus! i Sen. | 


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eat pgbeommiiien. 
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R. 1211 
- re-| provide for me otocmtment ¢ , 
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committee 


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m exer, DC ficials 
Transit -38 Dis fet Committee Room ice 
Meets at 10 « 


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and Seustrte 
| York City, wilt be beard 
Pull ’ n-Amertean Ac 
‘bea “Ge am aa tha | Investi¢ating recentiy publ ned und fo 
screage reserve provisions of th Boll Te oss : Denes  Gabeduied 
> “Ss to permit inclusion of crm ° oy old rater ‘o a? on 
S) Gaye prior to harvest. = Foal & . rh Aantisetamation League 
we! -Fa- ripps-Howard 
| Seus oe O'Neil! 
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-- Jam 
American Legion 


open Anfuse 
opesais for Mas- 
Various or- 


be heard | 


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mittee r ~g Py eae Rat ws - _ thorize Canadian vesesele to be emplored 
Wier subcomte. on bills to authorise = eT eee ae »AyS- 


wider distribution of books, and lecement of the @&. America. 219. Old 


YESTERDAY 


Senate 
Not in session s 


Met at noon 
reesectes routine business 
Adjourned et 1:25 until 10 6. m. te 


will 


Ty. eautPorisin 
\veaselse to Pract! 


instructional mater! 

- aos tO imere@ase the sppropria- 
oS Suthorizeqd for this purpose. 429 
ld Bide 


 erament Operations. o 
Dawson (Til: subcom te on exec- 
ote and tesisi ative reor 
mo bilis. 1537. 


exec r committee on din bill 
| 1801, New Bids. pending a Pe 


In- | 
Agency. and Julius | 
F. Seebach, his special assist- | 


demonstrations of the Amer- | 


stand what I mean’? Does aay- | 


Bs chance of Federal 
-| school construction for this 
-| Congress. 


istration a 
" eS beara 1a 
Ps Rid pm. repreve ibe 


. | and those 


| mathematics and physics 
|_American schools. In con- 
| trast, all the reports on Soviet 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 


W ednesday, July il, 1956 


1] 


IF THE steel strike does not 
go on for too long, its effect 
or. the economy, in the view 
of most Administration advis- 


ers, is likely 
to be benefi- ~ 
cent. 

E x ¢ essive 
steel inven- 
tories wil’ be 
worked down 
and perhaps 
also the back- 
log of auto- 
mobiles in 
manufac 
turers’ and 
dealers 
hands. Throughout the spring 
this backlog was an acute em- 
barrassment, with the gloomy 
prospect that it would still be 
hanging over the market as 
sutomakers began to prepare 
their next year’s models. 

But June and May were bet- 
ter months, with the inven- 
| tory moving down well below 
the record level at which it 


“ee 


had oeen. If the strike can be | 


ended in, say, three to four 


weeks, a lively new boom will | 


'be touched off, accelerating 
toward the end of the third 
quarter and the beginning of 
| the fourth, with the dutlook 
good for the sales of 1957 cars 
that will be brighter and 
shinier than ever. 

The expected upswing is 
likely to obscure, temporarily 
at least, the inevitable rise in 
the price of steel. But that 
rise will further complicate 
the problem, which at first 
glance may seem to have little 
relation to a booming econo- 
| my and more and ‘nore shiny 
automobiles, of getting 
enough schools built to pro- 
vide for the education of 
America’s rapidly growing 
school population. 

A 20 to 25 per cent increase 
in construction costs during 
| the past year has stopped many 
'sthool districts from going 
forward with school projects, 
| since the amounts provided in 
school bonds already voted 
|were not sufficient. Reports 
o* such delays have come from 
various parts of the country. 


A BOOST in the price of 
steel will send construction 
costs up again and make it 
‘even more difficult to build 
schools. A further handicap 
has been the tightening of 
the money market through 
the action o8 the Federal Re- 
serve Board in raising the 
rediscount rate which, in turn, 
confronted schoo! districts 
with interest rates beyond 
their capacity to pay. 

In the face of « grave crisis 
In American education, the 
House of Representatives in a 
legislative shambles killed the 
help for 


Republicans are 
blaming Democrats and Demo- 
crats are blaming Republicans, 
will be the loud 
seers in the campaign this 
fall. 

But the harsh facte of both 


1} economics and politics make 


for a situation in which it is 
scarcely an exaggeration to say 
that the future of America 


over the long pull is directly 
| at stake. 


One observer after another 
hes returned from Moscow to 
report startling statistics show- 
ing that Soviet Russia is turn- 
ing out half again as many 
scientists and technicians 4s 
this country. The output here 
is equal to only about half of 
the 50,000 needed for industry, 
education and research. 


THERE HAS BEEN a steady 
decline in the teaching of such 


basic subjects as chemistry, 
in 


education stress the emphasis 
put on these subjects in the 


-| basic 10-vear course. 


Another sharp contrast is in 
the number of above-average 
students in the Soviet Union 
and those in this country who 
go on to college from high 
school. In America, the avery- 
age is said to be less than 
half, while in the Soviet 
Union it is estimated at more 
than 85 per cent. 

The overcrowding in Amer- 
ica's schools penalizes not only 
the pupil but the teacher. It 
is one of the reasons for the 
alarming decline in the num- 
| ber of able teachers. 


| JOB 
PINCH @ 


Jobs, like shoes, pinch when 
they’ re too small. This pinch 
is your signal to take stock 
of your career and do some- 
thing about it. 

Whatever your Present Sal- 


, 


af Py 
asl 
o " 
« 


— 


; 
—— 
= 


- 


‘= 


Frank Rfolif 


eye? eenedie Ghaite So were COm of 


‘ 
a 


7 
' 


Steel and the Economy 


| 


Washington Calling 


By Marquis Childs 


The longer the steel strike 
lasts, the more nearly will -n- 
ventories be exhausted and 
the greater will be the pres 
sure for steel when the strike 
ends. Schools are iikely to 
come at the end of the waiting 
list. 

This is the way education 


and the national well-being are 
related to the economics—ind 
the politics—of a boom. 

The Republican slogan is, 
“Everything's booming but the 
guns.” To be accurate, they 
may have to add. “And the 
schools.” 


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BERLIN, July 10—United Management 
States Air Force planes today 
carried the first 600 of 3000 
Berlin children who are to be 
given a five-week holiday in 
West Germany, some of them 

American families. 

e children, most of them 
from poor families or refugee 
camps, were »eing flown to 

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homes. About 300 of them will) 
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THE WASHI 
12 


NGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
W ednesday, July 1], 1954 ° 


oqw—— 


Mental Case Rules Set 


United States Attorney Oliver 
yesterday 


Gasch announced 


the formulation of a 


ministrative 
at keeping 
St Llizabethns 
their sentences 

rhe procedure will 
those persons conv! 
q 


Hospit 


centenced rY 
later 


and 


are f 
comn 
institution 

The tin 
Elizabeths 
served on 
sometimes 
insane when 
been completed 


ie 


ar maiy 
his 


procedure aimed 


insane crim 
al 


nave exp 


sentel 


id 
new ad 
nal in 


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: 


I 


e has t 


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Gasch said the new proce- The petition, together with 


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Health Commission 
This procedure was 
upon. Gasch said, at a meeting 
Monday attended by Gasch 
wr the Corporation Coun- pistrict Court Judge Richmond 
ome. ding on PR. Keech. Dr “ nfred Over 
prosecuted the hols superintendent 
at Eli 
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be prepared and 


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Waish. chairman of 
the Mental Health Commission 
and Dr. Thomas Griffin, chief 
of the court's Legal Psychiatric 
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George Launches 
Last ‘Hill’ Battle 


Sen. Walter F. George (D-Ga.)| 
said yesterday he hopes to cap 
his 34-vear Senate career with 
a victory for his proposal to set 

up a program 

of social secu 
mrity benefits 
afor disabled 
persons 
(,corge, re- 
tiring from the 

Senate at tne 

end of this 

year at 7&8, in 
troduced Mon 
day the com 

nromise a 
. mendment on 
which the Democrats are pin 
ning their hones for a Senate 
triumph on the disability pro- 
gram 

“If we can get 
then I am ready to go away 
from the Senate.” George said 
He told a reporter he does not 
regard his plan as a final 
answer to the disability ques 
tion, adding 

“But it will be liberalized and 
improved over the years, just 
as other parts of the social 
security law have been.” 


George 


this through 


George has been either chair- 


man or a member of the Fi 
nance Committee, which han- 
dies social security legislation 
through the 20 years the system 
has been in existence 

The veteran Souther 
he believes his compromise will 
win the support of most Demo 
crats and also o° a number of 
Republicans, despite Eisen 
hower Administration opposi- 
tion to the disability program 

The social security bill, 
which George's proposal wouid 
be a part, is one of the 
nieces of business remaining 
for the 1956 session. [It now 
expected to come up for Senat 
dehate next week 

The disability program 
new concept. The social 
rity system heretofore has pro 
vided only and sur 
vivor benefits 


ner said 


cert 


retirement 


of * 


The House last year voted in| 
its version of the bill to set up! 
payments for persons totally 
and permanently disabled at 
age 50 or higher. But this was 
knocked out of the measure in 
the Senate Finance Committee 
this year. The Administration 
objected to the cost and said 
the program would be ex 
tremely difficult to administer 


Oak Ridge Sale 
Cleared by U. S. 


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The g and Home 
Finance Agency announced yes 
terday it is ready to go ahead 
with sale to private purchasers 
housing and commercial! 
properties in Oak Ridge. Tenn.. 
Government-dullt atomic en- 
ergy community. | 


Today’s 


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Twining Warns U. S. 
To Step Up Air Effort 


DEFENSE—From Pq. I ity of output” at plane factories) but we are a peaceful people.” 


tor he would have voted the 
funds. 
Symington also disclosed that 


(~~ Twining will be called before 


his Senate Subcommittee 
which has been investigating 
whether Russia is outstripping 
the United States in air power, 
for closed<ioor questioning on 
Friday. He will be quizzed 
about what Symington calls 
“direct conflicts” between prior 
testimony of Wilson and Twin- 
ing on the point 

In his public report yester- 
day, the Air Force Chief of 
Staff said he and his staff 
gained “no new information of 
Significance” in Russia to aid 
in appraising “current and 
potential Soviet air strength.” 
Nevertheless, the trip was 
“illuminating and profitable,” 
Twining said, giving these new 
data and conclusions about the 
Soviet air force: 

® The Red Air Force has the 
technique and equipment for 
acrial refueling of jet bombers 
at least under development and 
test. He said two Badger 
bombers (the counterpart of 
our B-47) were seen with a hose 
hook-up for inflight refueling 
and that conversations with 
Soviet air generals made it 
plain they were working on two 
such systems and are “taking 
full advantage of advances 
being made in this field 

(Prior to the Twining 
Air Force officials said 
was no evidence that the 
Soviets were extending the 
range of their jet bombers by 
aerial refueling—an accom 
plishment that would greatly 
increase their ability to launch 
nuclear attacks on the United 
States. Wilson has testified re- 
cently that there is no evidence 
Russia has aerial tankers.) 

® The “most important” of 
10 new type warplanes shown 
for the first time was a twin 
jet “allegedly supersonic light 
bomber” which the United 
States now has designated the 
“Blowlamp.” It is a replace- 
ment for the jet 11-28 “Beagle,” 
of which the Soviets have 
“thousands” and which are 
being given to Red satellites. 


Variety of Gadgets 


® Another new plane shown 
was a turboprop naval torpedo 
bomber “curiously hung with a 
variety of external gadgets and 
armament.” Twining also men- 
tioned seeing a training table 
layout demonstrating an air at- 
tack on a naval carrier forma- 
tion during a visit to the 
Monino Air Academy, as well 
as a mode! of the United States 
carrier Roosevelt, and models 
of the B-52, F-100, F-101 and 
B66. This gave “limited in- 
sight.” he said, in some areas 
“manifestly of interest” to the 
Soviets. 

® Still another plane shown 
was a twin-engine gtound.-at- 
tack jet bomber “said to have 


Visit 
there 


protective armor plating.*’| 


Three new delta-wing fighters 
shown appear to need still 
further test and development 
before they can put into pro- 
duction. Red designers seem to 
be “having trouble achieving 
stability at high speeds,” he 
said. 

® Nevertheless, the “widen- 
ing variety of aircraft already 
in the Soviet operational and 
experimental inventories 
is clear evidence of a broad 
understanding of the state of 
the aeronautical art and of So 
viet determination to advance 
thereir on a very wide front.” 


® “Production «ch eduling.” 
“worker discipline” and “qual- 


| Twining said that while “the 


visited impressed the Ameri 
can Air Force experts as 
“being good.” While no big 
aircrait stamping presses or 
other high-speed automatic 
production gear were shown 
Twining said he concluded 
“the Soviets possess in high 
degree the ability to apply mass 
production processes and tech- 
niques” to plane and engine 
output. 

® The visit to the Zhukovski 
Academy was the “most illumi 
nating single facet” of the visit 
because: Some 2500 picked, ex- 
perienced officers spend 5 years 
there under top instructors; 
ihey train with wind tunnels 
that can produce conditions 
of 3 to 5 times the speed 
of sound and other equipment 
of a “laboratory” caliber. Such 
equipment only is found in re- 
search institutions in the 
United States. observers noted 
It indicates that Russia is aim 
ing at a long-pull drive for air 
supremacy in their opinion 

® American officers were 
able to form an opinion of the 
professional competence of 
Red air commanders 
They conciuded the top com- 
mand is composed of “tough 
agpgressive resourceful 
leaders.” 


senio;’r 


“Vigorous, Confident” 

® Soviet aircraft des 
and productions chiefs 
found be “enthusiastic 
vigorous and confident, but not 
averse to learning what they 
can from work being dome out 
side the Soviet Union 

“I feel that our visit substan- 
tially strengthened our previ- 
ous assessments that the 
USS.R.. while certainly not 
abreast of us today,” said Twin- 
ing, “can and is progressively 
narrowing the technological’ 
lead of the West generally and 
of the United States in particwu- 
ar 

“The factors supporting «this 
judgmem include their empha 
sis On a thorough technical 
training of a large number of 
carefully selected personnel: 
the widening variety of aircraft 
junder development; their abil- 
i‘y to squeeze the maximum 
jpotemtial from a jet engine of 
Western origin and at the same 
time to develop powerful new 
‘engines on their own: and the 
rapid rate of progress they have 
shown during the last few years) 
im the research and develop-; 
ment field. | 

Twining suggested that the 
“nature of the Goviet over- 
tures” to get him to come to) 
Russia “indicated @ definite de- 
sire on their part-to establish 
a pattern for the exchange of 
military information on their 
terms as a possible alternative 
to the President's aerial inspec- 
\tion proposal which they con- 
itinue to reject.” 
_ He declared, summing up. 
‘that “we must in prudence} 
reckon on the possibility of 
their achieving a scientific 
breakthrough and consequent 
technological surprise in new 
weapons.” 


gners 
were 


to 


welcome mat was laid out with 
a fiourish, a careful hand was 
|kept on the door” during his 
ivisit. He ran into a “bdiank 
\wall” trying to find out some- 
| thing about Soviet bomber pro 
duction, guided missiles and| 
nuclear weapons. ) 
| When one of the American | 
‘generals asked Marshal 4 
i‘kov about Bison heavy bomb- 
ers being in quantity produc- 
tion, he got @ propaganda an- 
swer, Twining said ; 

“Oh, they are in production | 


MILLER—From Pg. I 


Miller Contempt Citation 


ToBe Asked by Probe Unit 


chairman of the House Commit- 
tee 


In it, the man who won a 
Pulitzer Prize for his “Death of 
a Salesman.” described himself 
as “a person devoted to demo- 
cratic institutions,” and added, 
in part: , 

“The meetings in question 
eccurred nearly 10 years ago 
At that time the Communist 
Party, as far as I was aware, 
had not. been declared @ con- 
spiracy but was legally recog- 
nized... Association with it at 
that time entailed no criminal 
penaltiés ... Only shortly be- 
fore. the United States and 
Russia had been wartime 
allies. 

“I have no knowledge of any 
crime or criminal,” said Miller. 
Instead, he said, he was meet- 
ing with fellow writers, uncon- 
nected with Government work. 

“My recollection,” he said, 
“is that stories and poems were 
read at these meetings; current 
plays, novels and authors were 
discussed with an eye to. per- 
ceiving which were ‘Marxist’ 
and why.” 

Miller said he neither was 
“tricked” nor “misled” into at- 
tending. 

Instead, “It was rather that 
history—my growing up in the 
depression and maturing in the 
midst of war, and many forces 
in my personal] life—for a time 
led me to seek in Marxism a 
fount of authority from which 
might flow a stream. of values, 
ethical, political and drama- 
turgic, in which I could wholly 
have faith.” 

What Miller found, he said, 
was something far different 
“What I sought to find from 
without I subsequently learned 
must be created within, name- 
ly a standard of values and a 
persona] vision of what is and 
what must come to be in s0- 
ciety and the world.” 

To bring the names of others 
tnto this disillusionment offset 
by a new-found faith, he said, 
“would be to blame them, and 
in my estimate this would dis- 
tort and falsify my history.” 

Miller said he came away 


} 


knowing Marxism was “diamet- 
rically opposed” to his view.) 
sand that it is “that kind of| 
‘quest for ultimate truths which | 
jin itself is perhaps the core of | 
imy character and my talent .. 

“What I would protee® here,” 
he said, “is not Communists nor 
wrongdoers but my responsi 
bility for my own action .. 
believe myself to be a patriotic 
c‘lizens, and my works a credit 
to this Nation: if that is true 
then I am, like any man. at 
least the sum of my experience 
and | must accept my ur ‘ise 
\acts with the wise... | 

Miller said if his willingness 
or unwillingness “to answer a‘ 
‘single question” is now to be a) 
“sudden standard” to judge his| 
life, “then it means to me that! 
the labor of revelation lasting| 
iover 20 years is brought down | 
to nothing in a single moment. | 
and the daily struggle I have| 
waged to speak clearly and in 
the most public of places—the 
American stage—is altogether 
mocked...” 


| 
| 


VITAMIN-D 
GRADE A 
HOMOGENIZED 


MILK 
76... 
HIGH’S 


* 
§) There's «a High's Store Nea 


You. 
| OPEN DAILY 
| 9 om. te 11 p.m. 


Zhukov said 
lo boast 
weapons 
bility.” 
Twining'’s statement and 
Democratic Senators’ comment 


“We do not want 
about 
and 


our offensive 
offensive capa 


on his entire closed-door testi 
mony indicated th 
ly does not see eye-toeye with 
Wilson on the question of the 
adequacy the Administra 

L110 § air power program. . 


at he certain 


Vice President Richard Nixon talks with Pakista 
dent Iskander Mirza during a visit to Karachi. 


or 


Sn 


Aa es ; 


n P 


Pre 
res 


rs 
i- 


GTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Wednesday, July 11, 1956 a 13 


Nixon Talks Business at the Beach — 


PALMA, Mallorca, ; Martin Artajo and John Davis: fend the West” and oppose the 
| Islands, July 10 \®—Vice Presi-| Lodge, United States Ambassa- “subversion and dividing tactics 
dent Richard M. Nixon and dor to Spain, greeted the Nix- of international communism.” 
‘Spanish Foreign Minister Al-\ons at the airport. 
|berto Martin Artajo talked over [Nixon said the “Spanish-| 
Spanish - American problems! 4 merican union” which has 
ranean see today. fe r-aid agreements is contribut- 

The Vice President arrived ing to “world peace and pros 
by plane from Ankara where perity,” the International News 
he discussed Turkey's economic] Seryice reported. 
problems and the Cyprus issue -” 
with Turkish leaders. After a (The Vice President, 

United States and Spain have 


four-hour stopover, Nixon and 
wife flew off for Washington. 'a “joint determination 


THE WASHIN 
eee 


[Nixon spoke on the eve of 
Spanish-American talks in Mad- 
rid on coordination of Spain's 
defenses in Western Europe.) 


This was Nixon's first visit 
to Spain. He has been on a 
round-the-world trip which in 
ithe past week has taken him 
to the Philippines, South Viet- 
nam, Formosa, Thailand and 
Pakistan, 


said the 


to de 


Leave Washington 10:50 am (1) Arrive 


Houston 2:00 ‘pm (cs) 


(Direct Connections via PAA to Mexico City—arrive 6:45 pm) 


Firsts Come Naturally 
with DELTA 


These other Delta services were the first 
to be established in each area. 


I, First DC-7 Service between Washington and 


Atlanta, New Orleans. 


2. First DC-7 service inaugurated between 
Chicago and Houston, 


3. First DC-7 service established between 
Chicago ond Miami. 


4. World's first DC-7 intercontinental service, 
Chicago to Caracas via New Orleans, Ha- 
vana ond Montego Bay, Jamaica, 


5. First ranking carrier in proportion of DC-7 
service to total seat-mile capacity (34%). 


6, First four-engine service, Chicago-Miami. 
7. First Non-Stop service, Chicago-Miami. 


8. First to file for coach service between Mid- 
west ond Florida. 


9. First airline to offer packaged summer vaca- 
tions to Miami ond the Caribbean. 


10. First scheduled jet deliveries for service to 
and through the South, 


0's Pioneer 
oh Amer Ln 


DAYCOACH 
FARE ONLY 


7 
i 


Less THAN SIX MONTHS after being authorized to serve Washington, Delta is 
already providing this city with twelve departures daily, the newest of which is 
a non-stop Constellation daycoach to the Texas metropolis. 

Now you can leave Washington at 10:50 any morning, be in Houston by 
2:00 and save nearly $25.00 off regular fare. Flight makes direct connection to 
Pan American’s 4-engine Rainbow service non-stop to Mexico City. 

On August Ist, Delta will inaugurate the first 4-engine thru-plane service 
between Washington and two other important Southern cities, Jackson, Miss. 
and Shreveport, La. Also a daycoach flight, this will raise the proportion of 
Delta's aircoach service to 43% of total seat-mile capacity. 

To guarantee continued leadership in the years ahead, Delta now has 
$110,000,000 in new equipment on order. New Super Convair 440 Metropolitans 
and 10 more DC-7’s will provide additional service on Delta's routes in 1956-57. 
Douglas DC-8 jets will link Washington with such cities as Atlanta and New 
Orleans in the fall of 1959—6 months ahead of any other carrier. 

In early 1960 Delta will receive delivery on a fleet of 607 mph Convair 
4-engine jet aircraft to give Washington its first short-to-medium range jet 
service to the South, with operation possible from existing airports. 

Delta is first choice for service South both today and tomorrow. 


OTHER AIRCOACH SERVICE FROM WASHINGTON TO 
ATLANTA........ $22 “JACKSON........ $43” 
CHARLOTTE....... 17° “SHREVEPORT..... 527° 
MEXICO CITY...... 92° DALLAS/FT. WORTH 54° 


Pefectve August | a. o" fores pis toa 


Phone: District 7-9463 1519 K Street, N.W. (next to Statler) 
ond Willard Hotel Lobby or call your Travel Agent 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
14 WF ednesday, July il, 1954 ° 


TAKE HOME 


CCHUTZ CummerThiret 
6-PAK 


Half Quart Economy Size 


Summer thirsts are bigger. Here's 
the answer! The Schlitz 16-oz. sum- 
mer size can. Holds ¥3 more beer, but 
doesn’t cost % more money. Brings 
you Schlitz quality at a saving. Take 
home a six-pak. Never filling. Never 
bitter. Just the kiss of the hops. 
World's best-selling beer. 


©1986 Joe Schits Brewing Company, 
Miwsukee, Wis, Brookiys, N.Y. Los Angeles, Cal, 


| 
: 
: 


’ 


Double Retirement | 
Benefits Opposed by 


' 
Comptroller General 


DOUBLE RETIREMENT ben. 
efits for Federal employes were 
opposed yesterday by Com 
troller General Joseph Camp-| 
bell 

Testifying before the House 
Post Offiice and Civil Service 
Committee, Campbell ex: 
plained that numerous retired 
Federal employes were paid 
benefits by both the Civil Serv 
ice retirement and Social Se- 
curity systems. 

He joined with Charles IL 
Schottiand, director of Social 
Security, in describing the dual 
benefits, in many cases, as “un. 
reasonable.” Campbell also 
told the Committee: 

That he opposed the provi 
‘sion in the Senate-approved 
Johnston bill to allow Federal 
employes optional] retirement 
after 30 years of service: 

That the Senate provision to 
permit free survivor benefits 
on the first $2400 of an annuity 
was “too liberal”; 

That he assumed the CSR! 
fund is “solvent” even though 
it had an unfunded liability es 
timated at $13 billion, and, 


That the Senate bill, S. 2875, 
provides no solution to the 
roblems of double retirement 

nefits and those created by 
employes who transfer between 
the Federal service and private 
industry and frequently lose 
benefits offered by both CSR 
and Social Security. : 

Russell Reagh, a member of 
CSC's board of actuaries, 
agreed with both Campbe!l! and 
Schottland that the “proper”! 
and “sound” approach would 
be coordination of CSR with 
Social Security. He said there 
is “no logical reason” for ex- 
cluding Federal employes from 
Social Security, and he ob 
eerved that Congress had in- 
cluded under Social Security 
coverage nearly every iarge 
bloc of other employes. 

Reach made a vigorous de- 
fense of CSC's S454 million an- 
nual “level cost” of the Senate 
bill which he said was “reason 
able.” The figure is under at. 
tack from employe groups as 
“inflated.” Reagh alse said that 
CSC's estimates of cost in the 
past have been “too low” be. 
cause of basic pay raises and 
other 
eonsidered. 

The Committee hopes to 
wind up its hearings Thursday 
wher CSC members will be 
heard. 


UNION RECOGNTTION: 
Members of the Senate Post 
Office and Civil Service Com 
mittee are wee pee on it. A 
majority can expected to 
okay the bill to direct agency 
heads to recOgnize employe 
unions and to set up a system 
to arbitrate unsolved employe. 
agency problems 

The Committee will open 
hearings Tuesday on the House- 
approved bill to boost postal 
rates more than $400 million’ 
annually. Many employe groups 
are supporting higher rates. 


AFGE will seek to boost 
membership dues at its conven- 
tion here next month The 
move will be fought... VA has 
directed its offices and hospitals 
to discontinue any operations 
that can be handled as well, or 
better, by private contractors 
... THE ARMY recommended 
Albert W. Small of its Security 
Agency, James A. Lambie of 
the civilian personnel office, 
and Richard A. Hertzler of ‘he 
Office of Assistant Secretary, 
for the career service awards 

iven by the National CS 
ague ... Leverett A. Mea- 
dows is the new president of 
The Association of Senior En- 
gineers in Navy's Bureau of 
Ships. . 


Sen. William Langer (R-N. D.) 
has introduced S. 4171, a bil! 
to boost the salaries of the 
900,000 classified employes from 
6% to 35 per cent... OASI 
employes in Baltimore will be 
reimbursed for $3800 in ex- 
penses for out-of-pocket ex- 
penses in connection with the 
proposed move back here of the 
agency which was blocked a 
year ago by Congress... Na 
tional Advisory Committee for 
Aeronautics was allowed $789. 
000 by the House to boost the 
pay of wage board employes 
The increases will be retroac-| 
tive back to April and June. 
Budget Bureau was given $375,- 
000 by the House ($30,000 less 
than its request) to bolster its 
staff. 


The $988,000 
Challenge 


Questions: 


Did you save? 


Did your savings 
pay as well? 


; 


} 
610 13th St. MW. (Bet. FRCL | 


RETHESDA BRANCH OFFICE 
~ $216 Wisconsin Ave. 


Resmi Ma 


P-T-11-46 


factors which weren't | 


Employes | 
Of County 


Are Given 


Pay Raises 


eae 
wee ity Lite 


—— 


AREA NEWS 
AMUSEMENTS 
FINANCIAL 


WED 


NESDAY, JULY 


Montgomery Board 


Grants 9 Per Cent 
To Police, Othets 
Get 4 Per Cent 


The Montgomery County 
Council voted yesterday to 
give pay raises to all county 
workers. 

Four per cent increases will 
go to all employes except mem- 
bers of the police department, 
who were given a 44-hour week 
with a raise of about 9 per cent 

[In a separate meeting, the 
Montgomery County Board of 
“ducation approved 6 per cent 
teacher pay hikes 

\ public hearing was set for 
Aus. 2 on an ordinance which 
would prevent dogs from “run 
ning at large.” in the suburban 
district of the County. It pro- 
vides that dogs would be con 
fired to the property of their 
ywwhers unless under the “im 
mediate control of the owner.” 

The ordinance also specifies 
that no dog be allowed on 
school grounds when school is 
in session from an hour before 
school starts until an hour 
after it ends unless the dog is 
on a leash or muzzied and un 
der the control of its owner 

Any dog caught would be im 
pounded and “disposed of by 
County authorities in a humane 
mauner” if its owner did not 
claim it within five days. Coun- 
ty Manager M. L. Reese said a 
new pound will be opened at 
Lyttonsviile in about one 
month 

Manager Reese also proposed 
tWo amendments to the County 
charter. Both would have to ap- 
pear on ballots in the Novem- 
ber elections as referendum 
questions. One would change 
the County's budgeting pro- 
cedures assure budget ap 
proval ‘by April 15, about 2% 


to 


months before July 1 start of ~ 


the fiscal vear instead of June 
dU as at present 

The other was a proposal to 
amend the charter and raise 
the amount of County expendi- 
ture on which bids are required 
from $500 to $1000. The coun. 
ty attorney's office is studying 


) 

Representatives of the City 
of Rockville asked the Coun- 
cil, in other action yesterday, 
© sign what they called a “co-| 
operation agreement” so Rock- 
ville can build a tax-exempt! 
low-rent public housing project 

Edward J. Farrelly, Executive 
Director of Rockville’s Housing 
Authority, said the town hopes 
to build a 60 to 70-unit project 
probably in the form of one- 
tory row houses, on a five-acre 
tract in the Lincoln Park sec. 
tion. He said it would be fi- 
nanced by 40-year tax-exempt 
bonds and would become the 
property of Rockville after the 
40 years 

Farrell said rent for the 
units must be 20 per cent below 
that of near-by private dwell- 
ing and persons who earn more 
tian five times the amount of 
the rent would not be allowed 
to live there. The Rockville 
request was referred to the 
County Attorney’s office 

The Council voted four to 
three to take possession of prop- 
erty at 815 Easley st. Silver 
Spring, owned by Mr. and Mrs 
Wayland Talley despite objec- 
tions by the Talleys. 


6 Traffic Counts 
Cost Autoist $615 


ANNAPOLIS, Md., July 10 
—A 36-yearlold motorist, 
wounded by police gunfire 
when he tried to flee from the 
scene of an accident, has been 
fined a total of $615 and given 
suspended sentences totaling 
six months. 

Magistrate Robert E. Dam- 
meyer convicted George 
Graves of Brownwood on the 
following charges Reckless 
driving, passing three stop 
signs, exceeding 70 miles an 
hour, turning off his lights.to 
avoid identification, operating 
on a revoked driver's permit 
and unauthorized use of a 
vehicle. 

Graves was wounded by 
Patrolman Curtis R. Strength 
April 29 as he fled from his car 
at the end of a police chase. 

Dammeyer told Graves he 
would send him to jail except 
that his children would suffer 
more than he would 


* o 


Request by Ike 


By Wally McNamee, Staff Photographer 


New Citizen Under a Free Flag 


Helene Erickson of 3710. Columbia pike, 
Arlington, shows her happiness in front of 
District Court vesterday after taking the 


oath of citizenship with 112 other new 
Americans at naturalization ceremonies. 
Mrs. Erickson was born in Odessa, Russia. 


| 


La) 


For a Cleaner Potomac River 


Alexandria Sewage Plant 


To Begin Operation Monday 


By Ralph F. Reikowsky 
Stam Reporter 

One of the major causes of 
pollution in the Potomac River 
will be ended next Monday’ 
when Alexandria's new $4mil- 
lion sewage disposal plant be- 
gins Operation 

The plant will give primary 
and secondary treatment to 10 
million gallons of raw sewage 
which is now flowing into the 
river each day. The system will 
handle sewage from all of Alex- 
andria and the eastern part of 
Fairfax. 

The plant is 
handle ‘sewage from a popu- 
lation of 150,009 persons, a 
figure predicted for the area by 
1973. Provision has, been made 
to enlarge the plant to accom- 


designed ta 


imodate an expected population! Cincinnati, who will be assisted 


of 230,000 persons by the year by George E. Hoffman and the 
2000 plant chemist, Eugene J. Mea 
atta . David Auld, Chief of the Dis. 

J. J. Corbalis, director of the/trict Sanitation Division, said 
Alexandria Sanitation Author-|,nother major pollution source 
ity, said the equipment at the| wil] be ended in August when 
plant is now being tested andijines from nearby Maryland 
adjusted. At the same time,iwhich now dump sewage into 
work on the city’s extensive the Anacostia an will 
$4.2 million sewer system iSitied into the District system 
being completed for Monday; He said modernizatian and 
also. enlargement of the Blue Plains 

New trunk lines have been|ireatment system which will 
connected to the sewers which/ handle sewage from both 
have been discharging raw sew-| Maryland and the District wil! 
age into the river, Hunting not be completed until the 
Creek and Four Mile Run. summer of 1958. 

The trunk lines also will) When. the enlarged plant is 
carry sewage from Fairfax|opened and gives primary and 
County. |secondary treatment to sew. 

The plant will be operated/age, Auld said the Potomac 
by Samuel W. Shafer, a sani-|waters will be cleaner than at 
tation engineer formerly of\any time since 1920. 


Passage to Permit S 


pawning Committee Chief 


Fishway Opens Way 
For Little Falls Dam 


Engineers estimate total cost at 
$350,000. 


Potomac River fish again will, 
be able to swim upstream for 
spawning as a result of the re- 
moval yesterday of the last bar 
to construction of a fishway on 
the Little Falls Dam. 

Sen. John M. Butler (R-Md.) 
said he was as “pleased as could 
be” by the receipt of a ietter 
from the Army Engineers 
Corps. which said that approval 
had been given to the Washing- 
ton engineer district for design 
and construction of fishway 

Butler is one of the leaders 
in the year-long fight to include 
a passage for fish in the dam 
now being built to supplement 
the city’s water supply. 

Under an agreement reached 
last week, Federal funds will 
finance $200,000 of the fishway 
costs, while District water rev- 
enues will pay the balance. 


‘been solved for them. O. Roy 


Protection Rule Voted 


House Group Clears Bill 


For Military Buildings 


The House Rules Commit 
tee cleared the session's last 
money bill brought to the floor 
yesterday. A rule was included 


to protect the big military con- 
struction program from being 
chopped up by technical points 
ef order. 


The problem was that the | 


bill* authorizing the $1.4 bil- 
lion construction program had 
cleared Congress on Monday, 
and probably will not be 


signed by the President by the, 


treme the money bill comes up 
later this week 

That would put Congress in 
the position of voting to spend 
money not yet authorized. This 
is against the rules, and the 
imilitary construction program 
\could have been knocked out of 
ithe bill by objection of a single 
member. 
| To guard against this, the 
(Rules Committee granted & 


tule preventing such techni- 
cal points from being raised 
Money could be cut or added 
by a vote, but not by a single 
objection. The House will have 
to vote on the rule before 
taking up the bill. 

Last year ir a similar situa- 
tion the Ru'es Committee re- 
fused to grant a rule. That 
made some members of the 
House Appropriations Commit 
tee so angry they stripped the 
hill by making points of order 
on the floor just to show what 
could happen. The money was 
later restored by the Senate 

The bill contained $163 
million for District projects. 
some of which also is subject 
‘to points of order. Cut from 
the bill by the Appropriations 
Committee was $3 million in 
additional Federal payment to 
‘the District authorized by the 
Revenue Bureau last March. 


t 


(‘Commissioners 


Smuck Head 
Of School 


| Finances 


r2’ Bel, Solem CG. Mattinn | Carl C. Smuck, savings-loan 
executive officer of the Wash-,“*®c¥llve and new school board 
ington district, said that about |@Ppointee, will take over as 
nine a ’ _~ —— chairman of the Board of Bdu- 
complete fina ans for c ' 
— a a coahekie ns eae committee for 
cut through the dam close to ng year. 
Snake Island, near the Mary-| Board President C. Melvin 
l.nd shore, Sharpe announced assignments 
to eight standing committees 
yesterday without major re. 
shuffling. 

The two new members of the 
Board — Smuck and Ruth B. 
Spencer — will take over the 
committee posts of Robert R. 
Faulkner and Margaret Just 
Butcher, whom they succeeded 


Conterees 
Set tor New 
Transit Try 


Congressional conferees will 
meet at 2:20 p. m. today to take 
another crack at settling the 


District's transit problem. | 
Big part of the problem has 


chairman of the student activ- 
ilies committee. 


The three-member .commit- 
tee assignments (with the 
Chalk, New York airlines execu- My ond ey Ed S 
tive, has contracted to bUY!wijliams and Walter N. To. 
Capital Transit Co. subject to|,.i,., Legislation — Rowland 
stockholders’ approval. He alsO\p yiris Mre Spencer and Col 
has won approval from the West A. Hamilton. Rules—Col. 
reer pepe ame Pr eng = Oa Hamilton, Mrs. Frank S. Phil- 
vanes seem 2 du ips, Smuck. Personnel — To- 
franchise dies Aug. 14. briner, Mrs. Phillips, Williams. 

he House-Senate Confer-| puigings Grounds and Eaul 
ence Committee is now going t—DMrs. Phillips. Col He 
over the detailed Chalk fran-|iton and Mrs, Monsee Bat 
chise bill submitted by theitit student Activities — Mrs 
Commissioners. One question 'snencer, Smuck and Mrs. Pet- 
which could keep them talking tit. Athletics—Mrs. Pettit. Mrs 
all afternoon is whether te set concer Kirks Complaints and 


up a standby public authority | aimee 
to run transit if CTC’s stock- ee wee Kirks and 


holders turn down the Chalk 
Rockville Girl, 2, 


deal. 
Takes 50 Aspirins 


House members of the con- 
ference want no part of a pub- 
li: authority. The Commission- 
ers recommended it, and the 
Senators, who orginally voted 
out a public authority bill, pre- At 2-year-old a Rockville girl 
sumably would approve.it. had her stomach pumped out 

Chalk passed up taking his and was sent home in good con- 
wife to the AH-Star game yes- dition from Suburban hospital 
terday to make an inspection yesterday after she swallowed 
of CT. property. 50 aspirin tablets. 


ae Yost, ag Dean dr., 
” ‘Rockville, got e tablets by 
Teday’s Chuckle climbing up on a chest where 

Sign on restaurant wall: “We her 4dather, George R. Yost, had 
have an agreement with the left the unopened kage of 
First National Bank: They will| children’s aspirin t for 
serve no sandwiches, and we Linda's ailing &monthold 
will cash no checks.” | brother, Ralph. 


For Money Facing 
Difficult Going 
Before Congress 

By Frank R. Kent Jr. 


Staff? Reporter 
Opponents of the proposed 
Burke Airport were mar- 
‘shaling forces yestefday to 
| block President Eisenhow- 
/er’s request for $34.7 million perland, Md., under terms of 
to begin construction. legislation introduced in Con- 


The President's request was gress yesterday. 
made Monday as Cpngress em- The bill, sponsored by Mary- 
tered its drive toward adjourn- : ; 
‘ment, but arrived too late to 
tbe included in the supple. 
mental appropriations bill re- 
ported to the Houge on Friday 

Rep. Clarence Canfion (D- 
Mo) chairman of. the House 
Appropriations Cem mittee. 
said yesterday only way 
the request coul@ be put in 
the bill by the House would be 
‘if it were offered from the 
floor as an amendment. He 
isaid he did not think this likely. 
| Cannon said the best chance 
ilfor action by Congress this 
session would be for the Senate 
'to include the requested 4 Broken line indicates gen- 
eral proposed route of park 


‘as an amendment to ,the sup-| 

plemental bill when that 

jmeasure reaches the other road paralleling Chesapeake 

chamber. The Senate Appro-| & Ohie Canal on the Mary- 

ipriations Committee has, land side from a point near 

received the request officially.|. Paw Paw, W. Va.. to Wood. 
mont, Md. The route should 
be on hich ground overlook. 

ing the canal, according to 

legislation introduced yester- 

day. 


Historic Chesapeake and 
Ohie Canal and adjoining land 
would become a national park 


a 2 


_ 


WOODMONT.. 145 J ' 


MARYLANC 


Ns 


Le | 
Was 


= ) ; 
hington 
~) — 
AW PAW 
\ V/RCINIA 


—————— a 
t-TH Stall! Map 


‘et <e; 
=~ Z 
WEST 


Washington P 


Butler Opposition 

It was reported yesterday 
that Sen. John Marshall Butler 
\(R-Md.), an opponent of the 
Burke project and.an advocate 
of Friendship Airport in Mary- 
land, was seeking to line up 
sufficient votes in the Senate 
Appropriations Committee to 
block the request 

If the Senate acted favorably 
on the request, the amended 
bill then would go to a House 


land Republicans Sen. Glenn 
Beall and Rep. DeWitt S. Hyde, 
would authorize the Govern- 
ment to acquire about 10.200 


Filed in Congress 


Bill Plans Park 
On C&O Canal 


between Washington and Cum-. 


Burke Opponents 
Working to Block 


unds for Airport 


acres along the 185-mile route, 
The Government already has 
4800 acres in the area, Hyde's 
office said. 


The measure would author 
ize construction of a scenic 
roadway running for about 20 
miles between Maryland Route 
51, near Paw Paw, W. Va., and 
Route 453 at Woodmont, Md., 
in Washington County, No cost 
figure was mentioned 

Hyde's office said the pro- 
nosed road, traversing high 
jand bordering the canal, was 
\worked out in consultation with 
ithe National Park Service. An 
earlier route, proposed by the 
Park Service, would have gone 
lalong the canal. This provoked 
conservalionist opposition. 

Maryland plans to widen and 
repave Route 51, providing 23 
miles of additional roadway 
aiong the canal northwest into 
Cumberland 

The Interior Secretary would 
be empowered to work with 
Maryland in exchanging land 
and obtaining rights-of-way. 

In a statement, Beall and 
Hyde foresaw the C&O national 
park being developed for recre- 
ation wilderness conserva- 
tion and wildlife propagation.” 

There is doubt as adjourn 
ment nears that Congress can 
act on this bill they said. Even 
| they continued, the meas- 
ure will give the jurisdictions 
involved time to study the pro- 
posal and submit reports that 
could be acted on in the 
future. 


so. 


Deeded for ‘Park Purposes’ 


ahd Senate conference, and 
the conferees’ report would be 
subject to approval by both 
bodies. Butler, and foes of the 
Burke preiect in the House 
also were reported seeking to 
iline up enough sentiment to 
defeat such conference 
report, 

They had, a powerful sup 
porter in Rep. John Taber (R- 
N.Y.), ranking minority 
ber of the House Appropria- 
tions Committee. Taber said 

esterday he visited the Burke pons ; dies 
she Sunday. He found it “rough quarcers location at Langley 
country” which probably would Va., set out yesterday to read 
cost a lot of money to level off,| the law to the secrecy-shrouded 
he said. He also said he found, agency 
the best route to the site was; Roger D. Fisher of neighbor. 

miles and required 55\ing McLean said the proposed 
ymifutes of driving at legal} building site is “bisected” by a 
speeds. strip of land which was deeded 
| Separate Air Control 20 years ago to the Government 


| under a statute that forbids it 
| Taber said a safety factor In| to be used for other than “park 
which Friefdship had an ad- 


|purposes.” CIA could not be 
vantage was that Burke. would! reached for comment. 
ibe in the same air control) Fisher, who is an attorney. 
‘range as National Airport.) .ontended the “little Pentagon” 
| whereas Friendship had an Uh! could not utilize the strip 
dependent air contro! unless Congress specifically 


aX) pt. or we authorizes it or unless the tract 
| iis declared “eucess to park 


\Interstate and Foreign Com- 4 
imerce Committee's subcom-| 2°©°5 , 
mittee on aviation, said the; © Said this position is sup 
Commerce Department “has| Ported by Donald Chaney, gen 
been dragging its heels” on | eral counsel of the National 
‘every matter affecting the con-| Capital Planning Commission 
igestion over Washington's Na- After a conference with Fisher 
‘tional Airport. Monroney’s| Yesterday, Chaney said “at the 
‘Committee has been prodding| Present time this land could 
the Commerce Department and/ not be said to be excess to park 
the Civil Aeronautics Admin-| needs.” 
istration to ask for funds to| Owners of homes in the Lang- 
begin the Burke project. ley-McLean area object to 
“I am glad to see the Ad-| building on 140 acres of Gov- 
)ministration finally has seen|ernment land there. However, 


CIA From Si 


mem-| . 
| A foe of the Central Intelli 


gence Agency's proposed heaa 


Attorney Say 


s Law Bars 
te at Langley 


By Wes Rarthe!més 
Btat® Repor 


some commercial interests say 
they welcome CIA 

At CIA request, NCPC mem- 
bers were to be asked by mail 
ballot to approve transfer of 
the building site from the Na- 
tional Park Service to the 
/ agency. is 

But Director John Nolen Jr. 
Said last night the transfer mat- 
jter would be taken up at the 
‘August meeting of the Commis- 
sion. 

“It's involved, complicated 
and mora! issues are involved,” 
Nolen said. 

Fisher said he is hoping In- 
terior Secretary Fred A. Seaton, 
a spearhead in the months-old 
controversy, would block trans- 
fer unless Congress decides oth- 
erwise. A CIA request for $49 
million in construction funds 
comes before the Senate Appro- 
priations Committee today. 

According to Fisher, the land, 
65 acres in all although only 
60 feet wide, was conveyed to 
the Government under the 
George Washington Parkway 
Act. The act, he said, contains 
a provision making such land 
acquisition subject to another 
law prohibiting erection of any 
building without congressional 
assent. 


the absolute necessity for a) 
IT hope Washington airport, and) 
' 


Part of ‘4-Lane’ Curriculum 


Secretary of Commerce Sin-' 
air Weeks, in a letter released) 
at the same time as the Presi-| 
dent's request for Burke funds. 
‘asked the Civil Aeronautics 
‘Board to designate Friendshio 
as an alternate airport while 
Burke was under construction 
|A CAB spokesman said yester. 
day the board had not had time 
‘to analyze the Weeks letter. 


“Timing” Denied 


| Under Secretary of Com- 
imerce Louis S. Rothschild, yes- 
‘'terday said the timing of the ficials for the next term 

request for Burke funds had| Dr. Carl F. Hansen, assistant 
“absolutely no connection” |superintendent in charge of 


I hope it will not be another 
perfunctory gesture,” he sid. 
Cc 


High School 


| A split work-study program— 
jaimed at pupils who drop out 
of classes when they reach 16— 
is being planned by schoo! of- 


icrash June 30. It was reported ' 4 ‘ 
‘that Commerce forwarded the |* Seeeee, See ‘sepreneass 


Civil Aeronautics Administra |t!ves of the Children’s Bureau, ' 


i'tion’s request for the Burke Employment Service, Labor De. 
funds to the Budget Bureau|partment, and business, trade 
— a few days after the/and civic groups 
crash. sts = 
Rothschild also declared) T* “Work experience 
there had been no undue delay &™4™ probably will get under 
by Commerce in processing the way on a limited basis in two 
request. Informed there had high schools for the first semes- 
been reports the request haditer School would 
been before Commerce since 
May, Rothschild said he could “°T* With Washington employ- 


pro- 


officials 


Pi not recall the date. But there ¢Ts. 5° would hire pupils for 


ithad been no delay other than | half-day duty on unskilled jobs 
ito make ae oe pone ween School credit would be given 
correct and cow stand any _ 

iscrutiny to which they might for the wae eereger 
be subjected. The work-study plan is tied 

Sen. Harry F. Byrd (D-Va) to the “four-lane” curriculum 
‘said he was opposed to an air-\'0 be offered for the first time 
‘port at the Burke site. He rec-|this fall to tenth-graders. This 
‘ognized the need for additional Offers four basic curriculum 
|facilities and he was concerned Sequences: honors, regular col- 
‘about the safety factor, but he !¢s¢ preparatory, a general cur- 
| thought Burke, which is approx- riculum leading to employment 
imately 12 miles from. National, 4fter graduation, and a basic 
was too close for safety, es curriculum for retarded pupils 
pecially with high speed jet tO prepare them for unskilled 
trensport planes in the offing. |J0Ds. 

The Air Transport Associa- Those under the “work ex- 
tion, voice of the commercial perience” program would 
lines, however, said it believed spend mornings in classes in 
jthe No. 1 project now was “to arithmetic, reading, language, 
‘get Burke going.” An associa-|arts, and social studies and aft 
‘tion spokesmen said the or-ernoons at work. ) 
ganization felt advocates of| The big problem, the confer-| 
Friendship were “beating a ees decided yesterday, is to find 
dead horse.” He said Friend-| job opportunities for pupils 
ship might serve as an interim who have no special skills. 
terminal while Burke was be-|Teachers would work closely, 
ing 


’ 


: 


built. \with employers to develop good 


Work-Study 


Program Gets Approval 


habits among the student-em- 
ployes. 

The “worketudy” program 
would be a pilot project in Dis- 
‘trict schools. Some of the voca- 
tional high schools have job 
class programs, but these re 


with specially selected pupils. 
Retailing classes, for instarice, 
have sent pupils to work in 
stores. 


TROY 
RUSTLESS, 
ALL-STEEL 


AWNINGS 


& CANOPIES FOR 
DOORS & PATIOS 


coolest—strongest— 
most beautiful— 


Phone 
RE. 7-6262 


for home demonstration, 
8 a.m. to 9 p. m. 


or 
PARK FREE 
at Showrooms, 


open 8 to 5:30 
(Sat., 8 to 1) 


The Shade Shop 


Tilt tk 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES 
W ednesday, July 11, 1956 


_ 36 


HERALD 


NAACP 


In County Suit 


Prince Georges 
107 Negro 
Pupils Ask 


Transters 


SEE 


—V7—-___ 


Parents of 107 
their 
to 


schools 


asked that 
children be transferred 
formerly all-white 
nearer their homes in Septem- 
ber 

The County Board of Educa 
tion gave School Superintend 
Schmidt author 
approve or 


sters have 


ent William § 
ity .yesterday 
deny applications he felt rep 
resented clearcut cases and 
told him to present any doubt 
ful at the next Board 
meeting, set for either July 
or Aug. 14 

Under the Board's year-old 
integration policy requests 
from Negro pupils for transfer 
to white schools are granted if 
classroom space and school bus 
transportation are available 
Last year, when the policy was 
inaugurated, the Board fre- 
ceived 97 transfer requests and 
approved 67 

Schmidt said he had received 
requests for transfers to the 
following schools: -High Point 
and Laurel Junior-Senior High 
Schools; Bladensburg, Suitland 
John Hanson, Maryland Park 
and Oxon Hill Junior High 
Schools: and the Carole High- 
lands, Accokeek, Bladensburg 
Seat Pleasant. O. W. Phair. Lau 
rel and Beltsville elementary 
schools 

The Carole Highlands 
keek, Seat Pleasant and 
ville schools had some 
young esters 
schoo! 
were transterre 
not need to reapply | ' 

rhe Board scheduled a pub- 
lic hearing on its proposed two- 
year school c ruction pro 
gram tentatively for Aug. 29 in 
the Bladensburg High School 
auditorium 

Thomas 8S. Gwynn 
superintendent in charge of con- 
struction, said original plans 
are being reviewed because an 
initial survey indicated the pro 
ram would cost about $11 mil 
en The Board at present has 
suthorization for 


to 


cases 
25 
f 


Acco 


Belts 


year 


i< 


oriat 
; 


assistant 


only $9 mil 
lion more in school bonds. 


Mary McCloskey 


Mary ©. McCloskey, mother 
of Washington attorney Cath- 
erine McCloskey, died yester- 
day in the Sheraton-Park Hotel 
where she had lived for 35 
years. She was 86 years old 

Born in Elmira, N. Y., Mrs 
McCloskey came to Washing. 
ton some 50 ye ago. Her 
daughter, also of the Sheraton- 
Park, is with the firm of Sur- 
rey. Karasik, Gould and Efron 
with offices in the Woodward 
Building 

Miss McCloskey 
Immediate survis 
mass will be celebrated at 
a.m. Friday St 
Apostie Catholic 
ment will be 
Cemetery. 


st} 


sé 


ars 


the only 
tequiem 
10 
Thomas the 
Church. Inter 
in Mt. Olivet 


1s 


of 


in 


Lee Roy Ross 


Funeral services for Lee Roy 
Ross, 64. of 3936 7th st 
b. held at 1:30 this after 
the Chambers funeral home. 
2400 Chapin st. nw. Mr. Ross, a 
retired Federal building guard, 
died Sunday at his home 

Mr. Ross was a Mason and a 
member of 20th Division 
Association survived by 
his wife Ethe! two sons. 
Thomas RB. and David at 
home: and a daughter, Mrs 
Betty A. Bahr of Salem. Ohio. 


ne. will 


noon at 


ie 
lie is 


G 


Capt. James W. Tobias 


Funeral services for Capt 
James W. Tobia LUSM( 
who died in the crash June 30 
the United Air Lines plane 
Grand Canyon be held 
today Ft. Myer 


Interment will be in 


wil! 


ry? 
: 


of World 

lobias was sta 

at the Marine Barracks 

pnia. He leaves his 

widow ana his 
mother 


- 


Prince, 
Georges County Negro young-| 


lies 


Rep 


The attempted intervention 
of a Falls Church attorney into 
a to end segregation in 
Arlington is improper, §  at- 
torneys for a group of resi- 
dents who brought the suit de- 
clared yesterday 

John G. Epaminondo last 
month sought dismissal of the 
suit in Alexandria Federal 
Court on the grounds that the 
plaintiffs were not the true 
parties to the suit 

He contended that the Na 
tional Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Colored People 
was actually the true party and 
the suit should be dismissed 
because the action by 
NAACP attorneys in bringing 
the suit was an “unauthorized 
practice of law.” 

Spottswood W. Robinson ITI, 
attarney for the plaintifis and 
for the NAACP, stated in an 
swer that Epaminondos mo- 
tion to intervene introduces 
issues having no relation to 
those presented by the original 
complaint 

He also 
torney sought 


suit 


stated that the at 
relief against a 
corporation and _ individuals, 
the NAACP who are not 
part to this action.” A date 
for oral argument on the mo- 
tion has not been set and will 
not be. according to court offi- 
cials, until after July 23. 


Ohio May Bar Funds 
To Segregated School 


COLUMBUS, Ohio, July 10 # 
Atty. Gen. C. William O'Neill 
ruled today that the State 
Board of Education has au- 
thority to withhold state funds 
from any school district or 


i¢s 


board of education which per- 


mits segregation 
term “law” as used in 
revised Ohio code. forbid- 
distribution of state funds 
hool districts which have 
“conformed with the law.” 
O'Neill, embraces the ag 
of all those rules and 
principles enforced and sanc- 
tioned by the governing power 
the community 
He said such term embraces 
the equal protection provision 
the Fourteenth Amendment 
of the U. S. Constitution under 
ch the segregation in 
schools of pupils according to 
race is forbidden. 


he 
the 

ding 
to 

not 
said 
gregate 


»4 


of 


wh 


Mary Howe, 
Ex-Resident, 


Dies at 74 | 


Mary Lucy Duncan Howe, 
74, a former Washington resi- 
dent who was active in volun- 
teer work, died Monday in 
Greenwich Hospital, Green- 
wich, Conn., after an illness 
of two months. Mrs. Howe had 
lived in Greenwich since 1947 

Born in Columbus, Miss., she 
was the daughter of Robert 
Perry Duncan. She attended 
schools in New York and Eu- 
rope , graduate of Agnes 
Scott College, Atlanta, she ob- 
tained her masters degree in 
library science from Columbia 
University shortly after the 
turn of the century. 

After her marriage in 1907 
Mrs. Howe lived in New York 
City until 1914 when she 
moved to Yonkers. She was a 
founder of the Chaminade 
Club in Yonkers. During both 
World Wars Mrs. Howe worked 
as a Grey Lady. 

After World War I Mrs. 
Howe moved to Washington 
where she lived for about 20 
years. She was a member of 
the Daughters of the American 
Revolution and various cene- 
2logical societies. Mrs. Howe 
was a collateral descendant of 
the George Washington frmily. 
She was active in the Society 
for the Preservation of Vir- 
finia Antiquities here. 

Music was among Mrs. 
Howe many interests. She 
was an accomplished amateur 
pianist. During World War I. 
she raised considerable s iwms 
of money for the American 
ted Cross by sponsoring con- 
certs 

Vrs 
wich after World War 
I] Although she made her 
home there, Mrs. Howe con- 
tinued to spend much time in 
New York 

Shé@ leaves four daughters, 
Mrs. Wallace Donald Brock. 
305 Cameron st. Alexandria: 
Mrs. Lathrop Douglass, Green- 
wich, and Mrs. Daniel Ravenel! 
afid Mrs. Beverley M. Middle. 
ton, both of Charleston, S. C.. 
and five grandchildren 

Private funeral services wil] 
be held today at the Fred 
Knapp Funeral Home in 
(;,reenwicn 


shortly 


National Weather Summary 


Washingtos and Ares 
ww Bun ; ' 


, 
cay—Fair 
re ative 


Temperatures and rain for 


L. Pree 


meee 
. 
we 


IP lDBDLOI 


>_- rr 


PLP I DIP POP PIO P 17 


s3 


Visibilits 
Departures nermal) 
smu late efficiency of tempera 
since 4. degrees 
e Jul 13 Gegqrees 
ted taf precip! tal 
hes eed 


Sun r 
— © 
. 


vesterday 
r 


ney 
594 104 
‘ose oe 


Meon and Tides 


nh since 


1 Sen 
a na 
J 

lhe 
Engineer 


a] 1s 'D n 
iy (‘Corp 


ry? 


24 hours ending $8 p. m., Tuesday: 


L. Pree 
Montgomery 70 
trea 


re Pu 
P>vYBwo 


ve 


“a 


gan Pranei seo 
Savannen 


Erteve ees 


washin cton 


yi 
Tum 


Pee - em © 


a te - 


§RDS 199) PW» BD -:-) 
"PO ODPODIMD Dt DS” 


. 


a 
_ ng(on 


-o 
om 
Opests 


* 


the | 


nent 


Howe moved to Green-' 


‘then 


Tractor-Trailer Noses Into Four Mile Run 


Traffic on Shirley Highway was tied up for 
more than an hour yesterday when this 
tractor-trailer nosed inte Four Mile Run, 
north of Shirlington, after hitting two cars. 


Col. MeBr ide 


Dies; Arms 
| Developer 


Army Col. Lewis Mitchell Mce- 
‘Bride, 76, a prime mover in 
weapons, development for the 


Chemicat 
Corps, will be 
jhelu at 1 p. m 
today in Ar- 
‘lington Ceme- 
tery. Col. Me- 
Bride who 
‘lived in Ar- 
icadia, Calif., 
| died June 30 in 
Long Beach 
Calif. 

From 1921 to 
1926 he was as- 


Col. McBride 


part of that time he was head 
of the chemical division. 


municating gas masks. With 


this mask 
‘talk and Ki 
theard. Col. 
iresponsible 


make himself 
for 
which is in 
prisons. 


The McBride gas gun stirred 
up a flurry in the District Build- 
ing Jan. 3, 1922, when it acci- 
denta.ly discharged while being 
demonstrated in an office. News- 
paper reports indicate that 
scores of city employes fled 
their offices and there was “not 
a dry eye in the District Build 
ing.” The gun was adopted by 


used today 


ithe Metropolitan Police Force GRANGER. , MARBIET GERTRUDE, | 


" riot squad duty 
Colonel McBride's proudest 
‘achievement was his part in the 
development of the famous 4.2 
mortar which was used exten- 
sively in World War II and the 
Korean action. The 4.2 grew out 
of his invencion in 1920 of one 
of the first rifle mortars. 


Phote by Francis Neal 


| No one was injured. Olen J. Kittrell, 39, of 

| Cope, &. C., driver of the truck, was charged 
with reckless driving. Police said Kitttell 
told them he lost control. 


Louis Freeman Dead; 
VA Publications Head >¢¢ret#y 


Louis Freeman. 57, a Govern- 
oficial who was com- 
mended for hic management of | 
the eastern publicat ions depot 


of the Veterans 


was recovering 

a heart 
attack suffered 
several months 


ago. He had ex- 


pected to re- 
turn to work on 
Monday 

In 1940 Mr. Freeman began 
his Government career as a 
cierk-typist ir the Adjutant 
\ieneral’s Office of the War De- 
partment. He soon achieved a 
reputation for finding short. 
cuts in administration. As a 
specialist in publications dis- 
tribution he was assigned to 
the Veterans Administration 
where he reorganized the east- 
ern publications depot 

As manager of the depot he 
received various awards for 


Mr. Freeman 


later worked intensively on the 
4.2 mortar project 

From 1937 to 1944 when he 
fretired Col McBride was 
assignec«. to the Army Chemical 
Center in Edgewood, Md. Born 
in-Manchester, lowa, he was in 


Louis Florey, 


1918 to 1920 when he trans- 
S ferred to the Chemical Corps 
He also served in Boston and 
Ft. Sill, Okla 

Surviving are his 
secretary Doris, of Arcadia; four 
Lewis. died ters, Mrs. Frank L. Miller, 4452 
Burlington place nw.; Mrs 
Janies C. Gerhard, Bel Air, Md.; 
Women's Air Force Lt. Marian 
T. McBride, and Mrs. Daniel 
Wickham. both of California; 
two sons, Lewis W., a cis il engi- 
neer in Greece, and Paul L., of 
California: a sister, Mrs. E. D 
Stevens, Denver, and seven 
grandchildren, 


Noted Authors 


Florey 
in the Air 
private 


esta 

a 
estab- 
in the 
the first 


innovations which he 
lished to save time and 
(yne of his ideas led to 
lishing conveyor belts 
depot warehouse for 

itime. 
| A 
Mr 


63. a 
Force 


Louis rE 

Vilian offi 

,no was once 

to novelist Sinclair 
yesterday at 
Georgetown 
University Hos- 
pital after a 

long iliness. He %, 
2642 


mery 
* widow, 


daugh 


of Hoboken, N. J.. 
worked for 4 
time with the Metropolitan 
Life Insurance Co. of New 
'York before coming to Wash- 
ington. 

Mr. Freeman participated in 
‘community drives and devoted 
imuch time to the American 
Relief for Korea Inc. He was 
a charter member and former 
vice president of Friendship 

odge. 

He leaves his wife, Lucille. 
of the home address; two sons 
‘Jonas H.. New York City, and 
| Harold, 8800 Plymouth st., Sil- 
ver Spring; a brother, C hick. of 
New York City: a sister, Mrs. 
Leo Diamond, also of New 
York, and two granddaughters 

Funeral services were held 
yesterday at the Danzansky 
funeral home, 3501 14th st 
inw. Burial was in the Friend. 
ship Lodge section of Mount 
~ebanon Cemetery. 


native 
Freeman 


oo 
' J. 


ime 

of his ~ death, 

Mr. Florey was 

technical advis- 

fr on publica 

tions to the Air . 
Adjutant Gen- Mr. Florey | 
eral. He had been with the 
Air Force since 1941. During 
World War I Mr. Florey worked 
‘with the Army Signal Corps di- 
vision of aircraft production. a 
renege gr of the Army Air NITA. ENA. PRED BOB and. 

orps, At that time he edited : . 
the first publication of the mili. "So. darling 4 aust 
tary air arm. 

During the 20s Mr. Florey 
headed a secretarial firm in 
New York City. The firm Died 
catered to authors. From 1925 ADAMS, LAURA PAGE 
to 1937, Mr. Florey worked as 7 Hos ar ve 


in fiemoriam 
WALLACE, JAMES F. In memory of 
br “her JAMES F WALLACE 
° azo today. duly 


our 
who 


nine years Li 


hope of Heaven 
tr? 


ved & 
cay be seen agar 
¥y mir 


> 
MOTHER AND DADDY, 


Domenico Del Vecchio. 
SE Delicatessen Owner 


Domenico Del Vecchio, pro- 
prietor of Del Vecchio’s Delli- 
catessen, 500 13th st. se. for 
the last 45 years, died Mon- 
day morning: at 
Casualty Hos- 
pital after a 
F ? we 68 wae 
He was 


from a heart 
ailment. He was 
the father of 
Jeannette Bo- 
naccorsy, whose 
husband. Lt. ™*- Del Vecchio 
Nunzio Bonaccorsy, has charge 
of the Metropolitan Police De- 


partment’s Fifth Detective Dis- 


trict. 
His store was a familiar land. 
mark to residaits of Southeast 


private secretary to Sinclair! ADAMS ang’ & 
Lewis, helping the author on 
literary research and accom: | 
panying him on trirs. Mr.! 
Florey also did work for Ursula 
Parrott, Michael Strange and 
other literary figures 
During the Mr 
worked as a free lance 
secretary 
York City. 


r 
ve 
‘A 
Florey day °..s 
literary 
in New 
1939-40 he was 
empioved 3: tne ANew York 
World's Fair as manager of the 
Displamore Division which dem 
onstrated new display equip. 
ment. Mr. Florey was a native 
of Fairhaven. Vt 
Surviving are his widow 
of home 
daughter, Mrs. J. 
Kensington, Md.: 


") 
JUs , 
raccoon ‘. 


aNDSEGON De rite 


a, 


ort ces 


Mr. Del Vecchio it 
0 several fenera- 
tions of Southeast residents. 

Mr. Del Vecchio. who 
‘at 3615 Carpenter st. se.. was 
born in Messina, Italy. He 
came to the United States as 
a youth and established a shoe 
repair business here before 


Washington 
was known ft 


“Genesee. 


lived gH 
ery 


BARBON Rte A. On Sur 


’ 
otn 


as. BARRON. by 
| Newton C Barron 
J Beron Pri 


Mary 
res 4 : 
address; a ~ DeMair ne Funeral 
W as 


F. Donelan 
a sister, ida jens day, July 13. at 11 
\opening the delicatess>n. Bursey, Rutland, Vt.. and a/ ‘terment Arlington National “Cemetery 
| Besides his daughter, Jean- brother, William Florey, Fair BE ANE. DORSEY RICHARD. Op Tues-| 
|mette, who lives at 500 13th st. haven | SL. nw. DORSEY Rich. 
'se., Mr. Del Vecchio leaves his| Requiem mass wil! be offered And eae eloved Buspend of Julie 
widow, Concetta, of the home at 10 a. m. Friday at the Cath. i Mrs 
address: another daughter, olic Church of the Annuncia aienne 
Mary Di Trapani, 6224 North tion. Burial will be in the Gate 
Washington bivd., Arlington. of Heaven Cemetery, Silver) 
and three grandchildren. Spring 
High requiem mass will 
offered at 9 a. m. Thursday 
St. Francis Xavier 
Chureh. Burial will 
Mount Olivet Cemetery. 


nos may cail at 
Home, 520 Bouth 
Berv- 

saves Cae an 


the 


and 
.. age ne Beane 


Bt TLER. WILLIAM D 
he WILLIAM | 
at 
Catholic 


be in 


Fire Chiefs to Meet 
The Maryland Fire 

Association will hold 

annual re mS ida 


Chiefs 
ite 7th 


at Tol 


ry 
“Mii 


Plane Sabotage Suspected «i= poe 
At Congressional Airport | eat 


Civil and Federal investiga- 
tors yesterday had under in- 
vestigation several instances of 
apparent sa»otage involving 
light planes operating out of 
Montgomery County's Congres- 
sional Airport. 

Four of the planes were 
owned by Frank Rosenberg, a 
retired Marine pilot, of 1409 
Fenwick lane, Silver Spring, 
who leases them to private 
pilots. Two of them have been 
involved within the ‘ast three 
weeks in forced landings. 
tosenberg said foreign mat 

which could not possibly 
have been introduced acciden 
tally into the gas supply has 
been found in each instance 
In several other instances, he 
said, fuel tanks were found to 
have been tampered with be- 
fore takeoff 

“It started out about a month 
ago With grass seed in the 
tanks,” Rosenberg said. “Since 
we've fourd mud and a 
paint-cleaning compound. Un- 
til this thing is cleared up, I've 
cautioned all pilots to stay 
within gliding distance of the 
airport in case of trouble.” 

One plane out of Congres- 
sional made & treetop landing in 
Rock Creek Park July 1. A see- 
ond force-landed i} a Herndon 


ter 


(Va) field. Only slight injuries 


lire- 
m 


"(Ea Ir 

efy Bealetor 

‘RENE 
' Waite 


chester Beach, featuring ; 
mens parade at 1:30 p. 
Seventy companies from 


( emet 
CRAIGH 


foul 


ENE HH. CRAIGIE 


ITI IIH 
Pr 


A Gawler Funeral | ; 


DAHI Washington 
tp 


were suffered by two survivors 
of the Rock Creek landing. No 
persona! injury was involved in 
the Herndon mis! ap. 

Rosenberg said insurers of 
his planes had submitted sam- 
ples of the gas tank residue to 
authorities for analysis in an 
effort to pinpoint the source 
He is awaitirg a final report 
om the probe which has in 
cluded an augmented watch on 
all craft based at the airport, 
he said 

The FBI said it had not been 
called in on the case, but ad- 
ded its laboratory facilities 
would automatically be avail- 

le to county or Civil Air 
Patrol investigators alike 


CLARENCE W ' 
: s Colten's Poin 


id OT j lv ia 
rment Arlington Na- 
Cemetery 


Is Distinguished 
by the Tradition 
UVANTZLER. CAPT. TILLMAN Rg hh 


Of Service at Beth a Neve 4 Ak CAP 


rTER "DAN Tal ee. of 
prareer in 


Of 1000 consecutive 
Gawler Funerals, over 


bali cost less than $700.—~ 


253 cost less than $400 
325 cost $400 ta $700. 
347 cost $700.ta $999 
75 cost more than $1 000. her ra 
National Ceme- 


fe . : sve 
@ ceniury of service DEL VECCHIQ, DOMINICO On Monday 


4 956 Cc He 
DOMINICO Det VECCHIO of 


Veeet io “fauner’ on “Mrs 
id ary Di 


Emma 8S. Groom 


AURORA, Ill, July 10 
Emma Simpson Groom, 101- 
yearold widow of one of the 
three founders of Inland Daily 
Press Association, died last 
night at her Aurora home. 

Her husband, the late Col 
J. K. Groom, died Sept. 20 
1933, a year after the couple 
celebrated their golden wed- 
= anniversary. He was 76 Courtesy Porting Opposite 

rs. Groom, who was a seéc- Telephone; NA. 8-3512 
ond cousin of Gen. Ulysses S arking facilities will 
Grant, had said one of her for- cee pat —_— 


mulas for living was “workin AV eHey Mitts Earhatic 
like the dickens.” . ® Holy 


Me he 
en 4 bee ‘4 hate Md is- 
at ¢ 


church cem 


ma . 
6 and — atather of John and 
| May aa Bona 
anio Friend 
nera! Home 
ne 


AML: 
ase © 


WLER’S 
ca a 


INC Intermen 
FEDERLINE BELEN N 
at 


> 


| be oftered at 8: , B..- 
© Cc? at os. ™ 
M> ‘Comat ery 


AW. 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
The f No More 


1756 Penn. Ave. N.W. 


" Olivet 


west Costs 


Home 


he 
on 


While in Washington he de 
veloped one of the first com-' 


; 
; 


Graveside services for retired 


signed to the office of the chief! 
of chemical warfare here. For 


a person could FRANKEL. * 
McBride was also! 
the develop-| 


rent of an advanced gas gun! 
many | 


He aenecest 


the Army Engineer Corps from nousr. 
J 


On ~ areay: 


On Monday. July oS 
TTLER. at 
’ 


Silver Boring Mé | 


Prayer for Today 


Almighty God, King of 
kings and Lord of lords, 
through the fog of our faults- 
and follies we see dimly thy 
kingdom of love of which 
Jesus was the herald and the 


living symbol. Help us to sur- 
render to the spirit of that 
kingdom with complete aban- 
don so that we may want 
what thou dost want and love 
what thou dost love. Amen. 
—Alfred N. Sayres, Lan 
caster, Pa professor of 
practical theology, Theolog- 
ical Seminary, Evangelical 
and Reformed Church. 


the Di visio 


-ationa 
Chris 


FLOREY. Lov m EMERY 


Hosp ‘al 
hu 


Siiver 
| age Ae, 
5 


prin 


Ee. On Moends 
"HY & STRANKEL | 


met ery 


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‘Gordo n "Frankel sist 
m m: also survived 
shildren and t niec ~ ' 
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hase uneral Nome | 
Md 


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Rock ‘ reek ‘Cemetery 

al i re Sree 
56. at George 

rt ICE SPEER 


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sister 0 
: 


G Ant Oo 


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liam  Soeer 
e Lee snera! 
i, penusrtte ave 
ne h on 
, > , m 
Int erment washinat on National eeme- 
tery 
of 
eiehtse. Ma 
bel oved wife of John 
mother of Car ¥ 
sehter ad Mrs 
of Mrs. Arthur 
Briges Mrs A am 
Milton Reo 
er endémo' wy 
Pr 


Pr } 
at! “Int er nent Godar Hil) “Cem- 
etery 
Ross EDITH On Mon- 
| iiver 
Ma. Rose gpitH HERSC 
890$ @udbury ra Silver Springs. MG 
be! oved mothe ‘Cc. Lewis A ¢ 
ister of Lau + 

ora 

betery “Prankfort 

Juivyv ia at 2 m 

at ‘ae Takome Fu- 
Carron st. aw. ‘park- 
Wednesday. July 
m id . m. untill 2 p 


af 


Jeeeere EM On Tweseday : 
5 al Saberben Frese a! 
USE 


Lynda Muir House Notice | 


acer 
of 480! 
b pan 


sAC OB Jt + A 


‘of Henri 
brot? 


july iD 
tiona! te emort + "par x Cemetery 


vuescar 


LANGE. oss An. G 


ties Inter ment Fort incein Some- 


tery 
MAR TEX. 
rin Ly 


c ATsceS Fr. On Twesdary 
CATHERINE Fr MAR- 
ahaa Bunker r 
: ed 


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may call at pile s) 
7 Rhode aka | 
re 


a\ 
be held Friday 


ntombement 
Li neoin Cemet er y 
oo “ge aa ASS 


Cc Os Tuesday 
: ne 


Prida 3. 
“Tn terment Mount. Buvei Ceme- 
tery 


| 
the Nazarene 
Ariing(on ~ 
: , ° 


8. On Monday. Ju 
MILLER 
Md 


MELER. ANS ¥ 
95e : 
Rethesda 


held v 
Interment Cedar Hii) | 


A | 


POTTER. GEORGE W 


* 


Gy 


apecial 
Pe: 


a 


GEORGE 
cS. € HUTCHINSON 
REID — of 3907 Lawrence 


Md. on July 9. 1966 
t W. and Isabelle Rei 


PER. Master. 
Sec. - 


st 


UIT iz . 
Port Lincoin Cemetery 
MA On Sunda 


hureday 
Intermen' 
REST. CECPLIA 

Juiy & }° 
M- 


Massachusetts 

cee will be held Wednesday 
11, at m. interment Glenw 
Cemetery 
ROSS ise Bey of 7th 

jw. . : 56 nussand : 
ther ‘of Thomas P 

Betty A Bahr 


3934 


Chambers 
oit, 8) — 
Interment Aslinsten 


Na!‘ onal Cemei ery 
ac PELs Ineas, 
da 


le 
ni ne  agranaehlldsen 
' Nalley's Puner 


ti 
} "nt erment 
coin Cemetery 


SHEP —— yer 


maths of "Mrs 
and sister of 


, of 1812 


? ‘Oome ler 
As 


Cedar 
aT a Te a 
7 


rs 
i from the Muntt 
’ me 
30 


Rreant Own at 
ary's Camctery : 
e m : 


Interment &t 
uescay evening at 


sf 
Rosary T 


J. WILLIAM LEE’6 SONS CO. 
FUNERAL HOME 
CREMATORIUM 


<7 AY MI EHO 


On Twesday | 


Died 


TONESTRE THOMAS ROY. 


prea 


> Notice 


of 719 6th st. naw 
fs _Anpie 
mbe u- 
- se. oa 
0a Inter 
Washington National Gometers. 
THOMAS. SAMUEL F. On Friday. July 
. 1956. SA LD F THOMAS, at 
Hoboken 


Cc mas 
Thomas end Virginia T 
om the ont wu 


a Mrs 
survived 4 we grandchildren 
nes ce puperst 
14th Wedne 


nw 
; a ’ mas 
Interment” Eveneter Saleoters. 
On Sunday, Jul 
rite § 


st 


James 
Tsilis. sister of Gus Stratle S. 
Ohio, She also is 
brother and sister in — 
four grandchildren. Friends may 
at Gawiers Chapel, 1756 Penner vania 
ave. nw (courtesy a. Me ° 
where nrayere vt | be said on 
day, 11 <r e e 
Sts Toxetuntine” 
Orthodox Church. 4115 one 
where funeral services. Will 
at 2p. m. interment Glenwood Cemeé- 


me eg: 


“ LLSON. A 
n 
vee ae 


A 
ae.. 
wi 


SARAH 
tt aA 


ay 


ay 
serv! ces wil 
satila.m Rei 
ted iI 


far nterment ort Lincein Ceme- 
Ty 


—DEATHS— 


Announcement ef 
Services by Chambers 


Meiride. Lewts M 
Cel, TSA 


4 4 S4444 4 saagaaa 4 
SS A8a84 4 Saaaaaa 4 


Orancer, 
Shepard 
Stella Hi. 
Shusher (Strether). 
__ Sey oa 


Punecel Designs 


George C. Shaffer, Inc. 
Expressive Goral tributes Mode 
prices. Oven daily Gundares ond & hols 
Gave. Phene orders also sccepte 
io 9 D. m. 900 14th ot ow. RA oie. 


LEGAL NOTICES 4 
Peal J. Bailey & Haneerd i. 
Presiey. Atterners. 

St? i5th St. NW. 


UN Pg STATES Dis I at o fampte. 
rict oe ay 


Heffeifinger. MeCarthy 
drick. Attorpere. 
nvestment 


Te STATES DISTRICT COURT 


Barten,. 
& 


U Ni 


: vouchers 
authenticated, te 


eaicg estate 
pond this ben bday of of gels 
CAMERO A 


Distrie Ce- 
e Probate Court. 


lumbia oo 
s. eee Attorney 


UNITED STATES Dis 


> 
Cle 


6 

s Ros er 
tien No $9990 Address of Petition. 
er 701 Atwood Street, District 
Maryland Ord der of 
n PPiica’ion havin 
‘ for euthority 
te te 


Gaye and legal occurring 


ho.days 
4 publication 


successive 
Washington 


of Colum 


7 , N 
; : ct 
bia. Clerk of the Probate i 


OFFICIAL NOTICES 


o June 26 1956. ther 
the followin- 

provisions 

7 


‘ 
of lic te the 
Spr'd Dec. 15. me the street and 
area a oon iin een 


orn 
said. ‘closings 
ointiv ef 


Closi ing of 
Pia P. 
ounds 


tse ‘Convent of th <> 
nv ° e pace ti 
e Georsetoen Un ~4 ta of 


Cem 
(3) ylegng of _pueiie elieys 
} ~. 
wolic aller: in 
war 


Mediator Meets 
With USW Boss 


Federal mediators conferred 
for more than an hour last night 
with top officials of the strik. 
ing United Steelworkers. Chief 
mediator Joseph L. Finnegan 
said nothting happened to 
change his view “of the grav- 
ity of the situation.’ 

Finnegan, director of the Fed. 
eral Mediation and Conciliation 
Service, nevertheless expressed 
confidence that both the union 
and management are ready 
cooperate in new bargaining 
elforts to end the 10-day-old 
strike that has idled some 730.. 
000 workers 

Last night’s meeting was a 
step toward resumption of joint 
union- eneduanniniod lations, 
which Finnegan said would get 
under way Thursday in Pitts. 


to 


J. McDonald. Steel 
workers president, said after 
the session that the steel in 
dustry “forced” the nation. 
wide strike but that the union 
is “ready and willing to enter 
into collective bargaining at 
any time.” 

Finnegan 
inary” metting with 
leaders at a downtown 
would be followed by, 
Session today with a 


said the 


prelim 
union 
hotel 
a similar 
man 


THE SCRE RIVER 


age- 


® 


the greetest name in VODKA 
Ls) 4 190 Pree? Die? fram grain 
Smirnott Fis. (Div of Meudieir 


Sty Pierre 
** -_ ~~ 
Mar 'é¢.L ean, 


INSIDE 


POLAND 


What's behind sudden ri 


ment team headed by John A 
Stephens, a vice president of 
U. S. Steel and the industry’s 
chief negotiator 

Following the conference. 
Finnegan emphasized to news- 
men that the government has 
no “magic wand” to solve the 
bargaining deadlock 

“This is a collective 
ng probiem,” said _ Finnegan 
“Our function to help in 
whatever way we can 

“A solution will be worked 
out only by bargaining between 
union and management repre- 
sentatives. It will not be im 
posed by the Government.” 

Finnegan added he would not 
term the strike a national emer 
gency at this time 

Also attending the session 
were Clyde Mills, assistant di- 
rector of the Mediation Service. 
and Arthur G. Goldberg, Steel- 
workers Union counse! 

Today's meeting with steel 
officials will be held in Finne- 
gan's office here (11 a. m.). with 
the scene shifting to Pittsburgh 
the following day for the joint 
talks 


bargain- 


1s 


17 Finish Puff Derby; 
Winners Named Today 


FLINT, Mich. 10 WF 
The last in the 
race zoomed over the finish line 
in quick succession today to 
beat the deadline in the 10th an- 
nual Powder Puff Derby 

Official winners in the 
mile California-to- Michigan 
handicap race will be an 

wed Wednesday after 
judges figure elapsed fiying 
time against engine hors 
power. The final entry winged 

Bishop Airport today an 
hour and a before the 5 
p. m. deadline to bring to 47 the 
number of finishers in the 49 
plane field 


July 


women pilots 


2226 


nou! 


into 


hnait 


(Always a Beginning 
ST. JOSEPH. Mo., July 10 
; under treatment 
hip injury 
| yesterday 
learn to 


ted his 


s 


while he was trs 
ride a bievecle. } 


age@ as ic 


banks 


| 


ota in Poznan? 


Are the Poles really striking for 
freedom? The current issue of LOOK 
tells the graphic story of Poland today, 


the story of a brave people 


reasserting their love of 
10 years of communism. 


) 


| 
Press Barred 


Ernest Graves, a painter, 
auditorium stages of the old 


looks 


i “ain ~~, 
= 

@taf! Phote 

inte aleoves under the 

Pythian Temple, 1012 9th st. 


nw., where five skeletons were found. 


Five Old Skeletons Make 
Rattling Good Mystery 


By 


Five “bodies” yesterday 
caused a flurry of consternation 
the corner of 9th and A 
nw, 


7 h ey 


at 
sts 
were skeletons. cas 
keted for maybe 5O years be- 
neath the auditorium 
old Pythian Temple, 
9th st. nw 

Members of the Carpenters 
Union Local 1590, which bougitt 
the building last September 
boxed-in skeletons 
enovation. 


nr 


stages of 


1lOlZ 


the 


found the 
during 1 

Union member L. M. Fair 
telephoned police 
What do we do with some 


— 


‘At City Hall, 


Writer Fined 


READING, Pa.. July 10 “* 


Reporters found it tough going P 


reporting the news from City 
Hall yesterday. They were 
locked out of the press room 
and one was arrested for 
“creating a nuisance 

The Reading Times and 
Eagle, morning and afternoon 
papers in this city of 110,000 
called it part of a “large-scale 
harassment” of the newspapers 
by Mayor Daniel F. McDevitt 
and the city police fofce 
) McDevitt declined to give & 
reason for the action and he 
warded off all interviews. Po- 
llice Chief Bernard F. Richards 
also declined comment 

But City Editor Richard 
Peters of the Times said he 
believes the mayors action 
stems from stories the jointly 
owned newspapers printed re- 
cently about pinball-machine | 
raids by United States eatin 
in the city 


freedom after 
From 


9 pages of text, 16 on-the-spot 
pictures, find out the background 


that clarifies the Polish 


situation. 


Today-—get mele). 


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rt 


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Ox? = 


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= vee 286 


ar PEOPLES 
DRUG STORES 


One of the spots raided was! 
ia tavern formerly owned by 


\McDevitt but now operated by 


his brother, Nathaniel, the 
newspaper said 
City Hall Reporter Charles| 


Kessier of the Times was ar- 


his picture taken on City Hall 
steps by a Times cameraman 
Today he was fined $51.25 or 
30 days in jail. The fine was 
inot paid pending an appeal to 
ithe Berks County Court. Kes 
sler was released in $200 bond, 
posted by the paper 

The only witness at a jammed 
courtroom hearing was Bernard 
Richards, chief of police, who 
said that when he looked out 
his window traffic was tied up. 
He said he started out to in- 
vestigate when the mayor came 
in and ordered 
arrest Kessler. He did 
cifically, Kessler was charged 
with disorderly conduct 

Attorney Charlies H. Weidner, 
representing Kessler, contended 
that Kessler was charged with 
the wrong section of the ordi 
nance. He said Kessler had 
not created a disturhgnce 

Another example the “ha 
rassment.” the Times said, was 
mass ticketing of newspaper 
delivery trucks by police. Some 
20 tickets were handed out in 
haif an hour, the newspaper 
said. for such alleged offenses 
as double parking, stopping in 
bus zones and biocking cross 
walks. A newspaper spokesman 
said the trucks were merely 
stopping to drop off bundles at 
newsstands as they always 
have. 


Foes of Ponce Clash 
With Police at Quito 


| QUITO, Ecuador, July 10 
‘Police clashed in ts 
there last night with demoi- 
strators protesting the apparent 
lelection of Interior Minister 
Camilo Ponce as Ecuador's next 
President 

Eight persons were arrested 


‘Down with Ponce”! Although 
the outcome of last month's 
election is not yet certain, the 
atest official returns give Ponce 


C. Huerta. 


. 


rested yesterday while having! 


the chief to 
Spe- 


Demonstrators paraded for) 
hours, shouting such slogans as’ 


174.867 votes to 169,500 for Racl| 


Jeanne Rogers 
Stal Repor 


‘eT 
bodies we found . how do we 
get rid of them? 

Homicide Lawrence 
Hartnett responded. So did the 
Morgue wagon And so did 
many residents of 9th street 
Rumor ran like wildfire. It was 
a quintuple murder' 

The letons, according to 
fficers of various fraternal or- 
ganizations which have oc 
cupied the building since its 
erection in 1904. “must have 
been part of some organiza- 


| * 
7% 


™ 
Sk 


' tlon’s ritual—no doubt an initia- 


tion 

The ritual and the organiza- 
tion was not pinned down by 
police. They really didn't care 
after they discovered the skele- 
tons were of the wired-together 
variety found in medical schoo] 
classrooms 

But when the call first came 
in and police arrived, there was 
an element of suspense in the 
old structure, which had its 
brown walls patched with plas 
ter to the point it resembled a 
Charlies Addams spook-house 
cartoon 

, brown wooden casket was 
pulled from under the stage 
The top creaked open under a 
ry There lay a small-sized 
skeleton 
was opened and there lay an- 
other—but this one had on its 
breastbone a dues book of a 
German fraternal order—date. 
1887. Another was covered with 
papers bearing Italian words, 
costumes and dustcovered 
metal masks 

Morgue officials said they will 
turn the skeletens over to a 
District medical school. 


Gallery as Use 


The second casket’ 


For Civil Service 
Quarters Asked 


A bill to convert the Civil 
Service Commission building 
‘into an art gallery was in- 
troduced in Congress yesterday 
by Rep. Frank Thompson Jr. 
(D- N. J.) 

The building at 7th, 9th, F 
and G sts. nw. for years has 
puzzled Federal planners re- 
\sponsible for its fate. 

A request for funds to put 
up a new CSC headquarters 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
=—* W ednesday, July 11, 1956 tT 


either near the present site or 
at 19th and F sts. nw. under 
a lendlease arrangement 
pending before congressional 
committees 

Thompson's idea is to give 
the old building when vacated 
to the Smithsonian Institution 
for the National Collection of 
Fine Arts. American artists 
“deserving recognition” also 
could exhibit, according to the 
bill. 


is | 


; 


TODAY'S FAMILY DINNER 


Choice of. Cup of Chicken Noodle Soup, Tometo, Grapefruit or Orange Juice 


Barbecued 
Breast of Lamb 


e Whipped Potatoes e Buttered Carrots and Peas 
e Freshly Baked Rolls and Butter 


e Steamed Pudding with Hard Sauce Special Cake : 
« Gelatin with Whipped Cream  —s_@ Ice Cream or Sherbet 
e Hot Coffee o Pot of Tea @ Orange Drink 


TODAY AT YOUR NEAREST 


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THE WASHINGTON’ POST and TIMES HERALD 


T ednesday, 


i 


County Grants 
Teacher Raises 


Countyas soon as the Attorney Gen- 


The Montgomery 
Board of Education voted a 6 
per cent pay raise for 200 
teachers yesterday at a cost of 
about $550,000. 

The Board deferred action 
on a 4 per cent pay raise rec: 
ommended by the County Coun 
cil for school principals and 
supervisors pending a ruling by 
the State Attorney General on 
legality of the Council recom 
mendation The question is 
whether the Council is invad- 
ing the statutory authority of 
the Board 

Helen M. Scharf. president 
of the Board of Education, said 
the Council ruled their recom 
mendation was a resolution of 
intent and therefore the Roard 
is not legally bound to follow 

Dr 
intendent 
indicated 
principals 
raise of 6 per 
4 once the Attor 
ruling is made 

Mrs. Scharf said if the super 
visory staff members received 
a smaller raise than teachers 
it would “destroy the 
for the extra responsibility.” 

The Board will meet again 


Forbes ti. Norris. super- 
of County Schools 
the supervisors and 
should receive a 
cent instead of 
ney General's 


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Headquarters, two blocks from Grand 
Central Terminal and three from the 
East Side Airlines Terminal. 

Private park, restaurant, cocktail | 
tounge 600 outside rooms with bath. 
Singies from $450 doubles from $8 


Write for folder W3 


304 Bost 42nd Street, New York 
MUrray 478-3200 Guy P. Seeley, Manager 


July il, 1956 


reward 


‘more than 


eral s ruling is received 

Rose Kramer, chairman of 
the School Buildings and 
Grounds Committee, reported 
on a recommendation for a) 
more liberal fee system for’ 
use of school buildings by out- 
side groups. The Board de- 
ferred a vote | 

The fee system is based now! 
on charges ranging from $2 to’ 
25. The new recommendation 
would make changes more uni- 
form 

The Board also received a| 
resolution from the Poolesville 
Parent-Teacher Association’ 
against integration in the! 
Poolesville School. 


Navy Expects 
Atom- Missiles 
Ina Few Years 


Associated Preas 
The Navy says it will be only 
a few years” before it will be 
firing ballistic missiles fitted 
with “high-yield nuclear war- 
heads.” 

Progress in the eld of Naval 
missiles was disclosed by Adm. 
John E. Clark and Vice Adm 
Thomas S. Combs in testimony 
given to a S@nate Armed Serv- 
ices Subcommittee and made 
public yesterday in highly cen- 
sored form. 

The officers said the Navy 
has spent 10 years developing 
its missile arsenal and has 
achieved a “significant reduc- 
tion in weight of high-yield nu- 
clear warheads.” 

Clark, director of the Navy's 
guided missile program, testi- 
fied the Navy's fleet ballistic 
missile, Jupiter, being devel- 
oped jointly with the Army. 
will be in operation in a “few 
years’"—long before the ex- 
pected perfection of counter 
measures against the weapon 
which traveis many times 
faster than sound. 

He said submarines are 
definitely under consideration, 
that large cruisers could be 
used and that a battleship may 
be the best type. 

Much of Combs’ testimony 
at the hearing last month was 


censored out of the published 


report for security reasons. 
But he was permitted to say 
for the record that the Navy's 
new carrier-borne medium’ 
bomber, the A3d, has a speed 
of about 600 miles an hour 
and an operating ceiling of, 
30.000 feet 
Combs is Deputy Chief of 
Naval Operations for Air. 
Adm. Clark said that by 1961 
the Navy will have 47 guided! 
missile ships, enough to pro-| 


He estimated the Navy will 


be “respectably missilized” in|/United Givers Fund by Presi-| vesterday 


the next four or five yeats 
“both offensively and defen! 
sively.” 


Combs and Rear Adm. Jamesics to join with .me in making/a special assistant to General 


'charges that military 


Over Public Lands 
House Grou p 


W ould Curb 
|Military 


tTnited Press 

The House Interior Commit- 
tee voted yesterday to set a 
5000-acre limit on public lands 
that the military services can 

take over with- 
out congres- 
sional action 
The bill also 
would compel 
™ servicemen as- 
signed to duty 
on defense res 
ervations 
carved out of 
public lands to 
obey state fish 
and game 
Engle lowe 
Committee had heard 
stinkers” 
were staging mass slaughters of 
game animals in defiance of 
state laws. 

Under present law, the mili- 
tary services may apply to the 
Interior Department to take 
over public lands. The applica- 
tions usually are granted since 
the military services plead the 
land is necessary for national 
defense. 

Before approving the bill, the 
Committee amended it to re- 
quire that a serviceman or offi- 
cer must be stationed on a base 
for 30 days before he is eligible 
for a state hunting or fishing li- 
cense. 

Chairman Clair Engle (D- 
Calif.) said the amendment was 
“aimed at 
trips.” Rep Lee Metcalf (R- 
Mont.) said it would prevent an 
Air Force practice under which 
he said, officers “from all over 
the Northwest” are moved inta 
Great Falls Air Force Base for 
a few days during the hunting 
and fishing seasons. 

Before voting, the Commit- 
‘tee also approved an amend- 
ment applying the 5000-acre 
limit to submerged lands under 
the continental shelf—the area 
beyond the 3-mile belt owned 
by the states. 


quesmeseed 


The 


MacNider Promoted 


Associated Press 

The House yesterday passed 
by unanimous vote a bill elevat- 
ing Maj. Gen. Hanford Mac 
Nider to the rank of lieutenant 
general on the retired list. The 
bill. which now goes to the Sen- 
te, does not affect MacNider’s 
retifement pay. Rep. H. R 
ay (R-lowa) sponsored the 
bill. 


weekend hunting, 


New Education Group to Emphasize Basic Subjects 


loverriding need for quality injin every possible way to be ef.) says the position of the Council | 
the training our young people fective teachers; otherwise, our|\is that “American students of | 


| Associated Press 
| Organization of a Council for 
Basic Education was announced 
yesterday. Its aim is more ef- 
fective training of teachers and 
students in such basic subjects 
as English, mathematics, 
‘science, history and foreign 
languages. 

Arthur Bestor, author 
“Educational Wastelands” 
“The Restoration of Learning, 


must receive if we are success-'young people will find them- 
fully to maintain our economy |selves 
and 


cultural progress. iplex sociological 


more good teachers and keep- 


of 


and 
~ also a matter of assisting them 


in 
An introductory pamphiet 


inadequately prepared ‘cational opportunity equal to 
and security and assure our for life in an increasingly com-|that offered the ablest in other 
techno- lands. 

“The crisis we faced is not |logical world. This lack, in fact,/the education of the able stu- 
just the question of ‘getting is 4 frequently heard complaint dent is both a denial to him of 
from employers, and it partly equal 
them’ (in the words of the/@xpiains the current shortage and a threat to the security of 


ting out a book to spell out the 

type. of courses public schools 
| Should offer their ablest stu- 
de nts. 


What foot Doctors 
«tired, burning feet 
Coreen 


high ability are entitled to edu- 
Any leveling down of 


democratic opportunity 
en this trae: 


ine to neh i eciee S 


the Nation.” 
The CBE is considering put- 


and professor of history at the) 
University of Illinois, has been 
elected president. | 

Harold L. Clapp, professor of 
romance languages at Grinnell 
(lowa) College, is taking a leave 
of absence to serve for one year 
as executive secretary. 

Other officers are Paxton 
Blair of New York, vice presi- 
dent, and Howard A. Meyerhoff| 
of Washington, D. C., treasurer. | 
Meyerhoff, executive director of 
the privately-financed Scientific) 
Manpower Commission, spear-| 
headed organization of the | 
Council 

Others in the founding group | 
include Maynard M. Boring of) 
Schenectady, N. Y., General | 
Electrie Co. official and presi-) 
dent of the American Society for) 
Engineering Education: Sereck| 
H. Fox of R. P. Scherer Corp.,| 
Detroit; Harry J. Fuller, profes-| a 
sor of botany at the University 
of Illinois; Sydney Steele, in-| 
dustrial assistant to the vice 
president, Atlas Powder Co..| 
Wilmingtor, Del., and authors’ 
Mortimer Smith of Sandy Hook, | 
Conn., and Howard Whitman of) 
Westport, Conn | 

Meyerhoff said the Council 
plans to expand its present) 
membership of 110 educators.) 
editors, writers, industrialists!) 
and others, as soon as a Wash- 
ington headquarters can be es-| 
tablished. A $114,000 grant from) 
a private foundation will cover! 
the Council's expense for the | 
first three years, Meyerhoff 
said, adding that the founda. 
tion is one which asks that its) 
name not be used in connection 
with its gifts 

“Last fall.” Meyerhoff said, 
“the White House Conference 
on Education brought the prob- 
lems of our schools forcefully 
to public attention. In meeting 
the crisis posed by numbers 
we can too easily slight the 


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| 


Rebels Seize Towns 


MUDON, Burma, July 
Three hundred rebel 
tribesmen attacked and cap-' 
tured the twin garison towns 
of Kya-in and Seik-kyi, 54 miles 
southeast of Moulmein, today.| 

First reports said the garri-| 
son commander and 30 of his! 
men died defending the towns | 
The rest of the defending force | 
of police and army was over-| 
powered. 


in 
Karen | 


Mitchell Named to Head 
United Givers U.S. Unit | 


Secretary of Labor James P. 


jtect three carrier task groups.'Mitchell was named chairman 


of the Government Unit of the 


dent Eisenhower yesterday. 
The President said: “T! 
should like all Federal employ- 


of United Givers Fund total 
goal of $6.6 million next fall. 
The Fund also announced 
that William  E.' 
\Colye, director of advertising 
‘and public relations for WRC 
‘and WRC-TV, had been named 


S. Russell, Chief of the Bureau this community fund-raising ef-/Chairman Carleton D. Smith,| 


of Aeronautics. said the Sea- 
master can land and take off 
in waves up to 6 feet 


fort an outstending success.” 


The Government Unit -ex- 


high. pects to raise about 40 per cent ' FM 


and that Ben Strouse. presi-| 
dent of WWDC and WwDc. | 
would head a Public Rela-| 


_ jtions Plans Board. 


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from agencies that wish to par- 


The One-Fund Drive among’ 
District employes set its goal 
}at $200,000, the same as last 
iyear, and announced it was 
‘ready to accept applications 


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CINCINNATI, OHIO 


Y’S 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
aac fing Wednesday, July 11, 1956 19 


a Henry T. Heald Is Named 


Head of Ford Foundation 


‘Slight Inread’ 
Ford Gitts 


1 Dies, 2 Unhurt 


to the welfare of society can nology in Chicago in 1927. Ten 
scarcely decline.” 


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Kea er 


7 


DISTRICT TRAFFIC TOLL: 
1956 deaths to date.... 
1955 deaths to date 


. 
Total 1955 trafic deaths....72 


‘Klingle rd. nw 


Dozier Lee Minick, 37, listed 
at 126 D st. se., died yesterday 
at Emergency Hospital less 
than an hour alter he was 
thrown from his car when it 
careened into a chain fence 
bordering the Washington 200 

Police said Minick, a Dis 
trict Sanitation Department 
employe, was driving east on 
at 230 a. @ 
when he apparently lost con- 
trol of his car, struck a traffic 
sign and then went through 
adout 300 feet of Zoo fence 
before coming to a stop, 352 
feet east of Adams Mill rd. nw 

Sitting in the front seat with 
Minick was Mamie McDaniels. 
37, listec at 138 C st. se.. who 
also was thrown from the car 
but was uninjured. Minick’s 
brother, Nathaniel, 36, of the 
D st. address, was sleeping in 
the back seat and was not in- 
jured 

District Coroner A. Magruder 
McDonald said Minick died of 
a fractured skull 


Alexandria Boy 
Killed by Truck 


| A 10-yearold Alexandria boy 
idied of internal injuries yes 
| terday two hours after he fell 
ibeneath the wheels of a lum- 
ber truck in the 500 block of 
\Franklin st.. Alexandria police 
ireported 

Reginald Thomas. of 619% 
S. Pitt st.. Alexandria. was rid- 
ing a bicycle when his jacket 
caught on a truck driven by 
John BK. Sisson. of 110 John 
Roberts Homes, Alexandria, po 
lice said 


Driver Held in Death 

\ coroners jury yesterday 
held Ronald Walter Smith, 26 
listed at 105 2d st. ne.. for grand 
jury action following an it 


‘form 


In Same Crash | 


Wa? 


Washington Post and Timer 
Mersic Btal 


| Map tecates scene of fatal 
accident on Klingle ré. uw. 
Police said that Dezier Lee 
Minick, 37, the victim, ap 
| parently lest centrel of his 
_ecar and pleughed through 


fence. 


: 


quest into the traffic death of 


Jesse Sylvester Johnson, 55. an 
unemployed 
|worker 

Johnson of 406 


construction 


ih «tt of 
was killed Sundaw as 4 result 
of injuries suffered when be 


iwas struck by Smith's car as he 


was stepning off a loading pat 
at H st. and New Jerse; 
ave. nw 

Police witnecsee test ifed 
that a test one bour after the 
accident showed that Smith. a 
painter, had .39 of 1 per cen 
aicohol in his bieod. while 
Johnson hed 28 of 1 per cent 
(For legal purposes .15 of 1 per 
cent is considered te indicate 
intoxication.) 

Witnesses differed as to the 
speed of Smiths car at the 
time. with testimeny given 
which vwaried from 15 to # 
miles per hour Smith was 
going in a Z>mile zone. 


4000 Cheer Everything 


Satchmo Does at Concert 


By Tony Gieske 


BStalft Reporter 


Louis Armstrong came to Car- 
Barron Ampitheater bast 
to an audience of 4000 
that was all ready for him 
They chuckled as the star of 
an eight-day “Festival of Amerfi- 
can Music” did nothing more 


ter 


night 


than swat a mosquito ' 


They applauded warmly as 
the sound of Satchmo's trum- 
phet—one of the 


friendliest) 


turing Billy Butterfeld and 
Lou MeGarrity 

Condon'’s outfit leaned inte 
their work with gentleman/s 
pleasure on “How Come You 
Do Me. Like You De, Da. De’” 
The effect was like a shot of 
bourbon 

Also featured on the pro 
cram wee a graving 
Krupa, whose old-ashioned 
but swinging drum work 
sparked a group that featured 


menca 


fox « 
. 


memorr an opponent 


present 


cr 


To Schools 
“AC hallen ge’ 


WHITE SULPHUR 
SPrinGas. W. Va. July 1 
Only the slechtest imroad” on 

low college fac 
elite <aleries was made by the 
Ford Foundation +s »alf-ballion 
AcNiars in gifts tast year, a 
spokesman said today 

Pr. Joseph M. McDaniel, sec 
said the gits were 
as «6«“challenge grants.” 
2 the 40th annual 
the American 
Public Relations Asso 
he called upon the bus 
community and other 
to accent the challenge 
toe help solwe the probdiem 

Later at the convention ban 
ouet awards for distinguished 
service to higher educaticn 
were presented to the Ford 
Foundation and to Dr. Arthur 
S Adams. executive director 
of the American Council on 
Education 

In the judging of exhibits of 
public relations aids. the U.S 
Naval Academy received the 
to> award for sports booklets 

The Ford official called on 
the association to help drama 
tige the fact that “In terms of 
the this appropriation 


need 
last salary grants) is 


the problem of 


’ 


retary. 
“we an? 
So ekrng at 
COMET ton nf 
( ollege 
ria" on” 
‘Th << 


monors 


years 
remotely as Dig a8 i may 
“em 
Dr. McDaniel cited the fol- 
fecal facts of life 
Ford money applies 
private colleges and 
unrners! ys 
some FAO faculty 
members of the Nation's 750 
[38 are difectl aided by 
funds 
. 


only 

S tiie 
the 
Tw selery 


messible are 
mer? on 


imcreases made 
really “back pay 
reduced purchasing 


‘power 


School Study 


Group Named 


In Fairtax 


The Fairfax County School 
Board last named a i1¢ 
mar committee to make recom. 
toms om reorganizing 
‘he sro. sv lem 

The commlZltiee will organize 
at 8 no. m. July 19 im the Fair- 
county Courthouse. It ix 
pergea with considering d 


night 


viding high school pupils into 
sar wanes 
reorganization on 
comsiruction program 


and the effect of 
the school 
The Board itmvited as 
to 
school system. 


o 
the 


with 


the stated purpese of sacaquir 
Gene ir 


g “all eiements of thought 
at the beginning” te aveid later 
jictem. The Board woted to 
include Harlew Williams as « 


| president, effective next Oct. 1.) 


sounds in the world—floated'young Eddie Shu on tenor sax- representative of the Virginia 
out from the stage. He and the ophone, harmonica and trum- Citizens’ Committee for Better 
other five members of the pet Schools 


combo kept the audience in the 
palms of their hands as they 
nlaved a group of old jaz 
favorites including “Sieeoy 
Tirne Down South.” —fast tempo 
Back Home in Indiana” and 
ral blues numbers 
outfit was the featured 
group in a program that i 
cluded several other combos 
fresh from the Newport (KR. | 
jazz festival 
Musically 


, ne 


seve 


. 
iLAOULS 


the best playing 
was furnished 
by Eddie Condons septet, fea- 


of evening 


The Dave Brubeck quartet 
played several carefully ar 
ranged “Improvisations” not 
very deeply in the jazz vein 
The most interesting was a 
“tridute to Duke Filing! 
which first imitated Ellington's 
piano style and then went 
a very minor-ckeyed “Take 
A-Train.” 

Louis Armstrongs show 
closes Friday Benny Good 
mans Orchestra takes over th 
econd four days of the festin 
on Saturday night. 


+e 


ae el . 


Line 


7 


—— —»—— . 


Rockville Council Plans 


Low-Cost Housing Project 


(‘Related Story on Page 15) 

Plans for a 6O0-unit low cost 
housing project in Rockville 
were advocated last night at 
City Council meeting with the 
passing of a cooperation agree- 
ment with the Rockville Hous 
ing Authority. 

The Authority, according to 


BRAND 


WESTINGHOUSE 
AC-DC MOTOR 


Sews Forward and Reverse 
Sews Over Pins and Seams 
Knee Control 

Attachments inc!uded— 


@ Trade-in Allowance 


Brand New 
“7 1 
limited 
’ 


Here t «a wonderfa! 
Seeing Machine pricec 
ortable We are 

t thie intred@uct w 


Machines Selling 
for 119.50 and More 


Call Li. 6-515] 


JUST ARRIVED 


SEWING MACHINES 


NEW 1956 CONSOLE 


Oper Dally 9 30 a.m. te F p.m. 


E. J. Sarrelley, executive secre 
tary. is having trouble obtain 
ing the “only suitable site” for 
the project. five acres at N 
Horners lane and W. More st 
owned by the Eureka Taber 
nacie Noe. 2 of the Galilee 
Fishermen. 

Sarrelley said the Tabernacle 
turned down what he termed a 
“reasonable” offer last Frida, 
He said the Authority had con- 
demnation powers, but did not 
say it would use them 

The project. to cost about 
$400,000, will be masonry roe 
houses, according to Sarrelie: 
Tenants will be restricted to 
those whose salaries are a maxi 
mum of five times the annus 
rent, estimated at $35 a month 
Federal help is planned for the 
project 

In the agreement. the 
pledges to provide water 
sewer facilities and street: 
return for 10 per cent of ' 
annual rent in payment 
of taxes 


= 7 , 


* 


Colmar Manor 
Chooses Hill 


Candidates 


Two candidates backed bs 
Colmar Manors new mevor 
Harry W. Hill. were elected to 
the Town Council 
Wilbert W. Yoho Jr. defeated 
William B. Colbert. 70 to 66. and 
Aibert J. Kiein won 
Charies J. Kenny. 75 to 13 
The victories by Yoho and 
Kiein broke a 32 split on the 
Council, which has existed since 
Hill upset former Mayor John 
N. Torvestad last year in @ 
write-in campaign. Torvestad 
and Mortimer E. Ryan, a coun 
cilman who was beaten by Olin 
L. Merchant. said the writen 
vote was invalid 
Their claim was backed by 
the Prince Georges Circuit 
Court, but in May the Maryland 
Court of Appeals reversed the’ 
decision and Hil! and Merchang, 
were installed. Hil! now has the 
backing of four of the ive votes. 
on the Council 


yestercazy 


over 


Taylor 
the Fairfax 
- 

schoolteachers 
on 


Mermfe'4 


Tw nr" 
{ate > 


Clede W. Gh 


[vr acne, > 


Crest 


Board members also invited 
Willians t represent 
Teachers Ascsoci- 
an organization of Negro 
tie 


Ja Lorn 


om 
6s principal 
Hiigh School 


* 
so? & = 
i . a 


(Miers _- the CO™m Mm "ee are 


ny Cotler. Samuec! 


Law 


—* 7... " 
: aidile 
ro? Vi a 1 q 


: oo 
_ 7 


De 
Almo 

i Shands 
Rnhe rt ~S 


and 


3D 
> he a a‘ 


7 


—-_ i. 


mert 6F. Dawis 


acon 
The Board awarded c&ntracts 
ons to Framconia and 


nood elementary schools 


The Foundation was organ 
ized in 1936 as a non-profit or- 


NEW YORK, July 10 i~—The| formerly was president of the| ganization to receive and ad-| 
Ford Foundation today named|Iilinois Institute of Technology| minister funds for scientific, 
Henry T. Heald, head of New and was active in Chicago civic | educational and charitable pur- 
York University, as its new and philanthropic circles. ‘poses for the public welfare. 

The National Juniér Cham-| its assets, estimated at $2.5) 
ber of Commerce named him billion have come chiefly from 
one of the country’s 10 out- the Ford family and Ford Motor 
standing young men in 1940 Co. stock. It has spent or ear- 

“The Ford Foundation,” said marked about $875 million since 
Heald in a statement, “with its its inception, including the, 
vast resources dedicated to the spectacular grant of a half 
public good, will play a most billion dollars to universities 
important role in education and and hospitals last year 
public service in the years| Heald, 52, was born in Lin- 
ahead. The invitation.to serve coln, Neb. A _ structural engi 
as its president is one which aineer, he joined the faculty of 
man whose career is dedicated the Armous Institute of Tech- 


: 


Heald will succeed H. Rowan 
Gaither Jr. president since 
March. 1953. Gaither took on 
the chairmanship of the multi- 
billion-dollar Foundation’s 
beerd of trustees last May. suc- 
ceeding Henry Ford II. He will 
continue as board chairman. 

Heald went to New York Uni- 
versity as chancellor (now 
president) in February, 1952 
He is resigning the post. Heald 


years later he became its pre¢si- 
dent, 7 


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9:30 p.m. 


10:20 a.m. | 11:15 om 


Stotler Hotel ond National Airport. Reservotion 


service 24 hours « doy —coll Sterling 3-4700. Or cof 


en outherized trove! agent. 


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THE WASHINGTON POST ead TIMES HERALD 


0) , i ee 


oe — 


— 


Jute 11. 1956 — 


One on the Aisle 


f 


> 


uo 


Russian Cats 


Dig Satchmo 


THE GREAT SATCHMO~—otherwise knoen a: Loecis 
sigomg—moved inte town yesterday 
in Reck Creek Park 
| just esi 


jazzy four nights 
up his life succinct) 
get my rest and blow the horn 
last winter 
as “Porgy and Bess 
lingual 
sharper way of 
Rasasian cats 
coe. to prove 
hasd@ at internatior 
23 7ears ago— 
an Glaborate ritua! to 
cies “im never 
nee to watch my 
especially that ho 
them with a white 
now labelled 
Mannheim, Germans 
winter he bought 
tims of the stuff 
played that famed * 
swam 
Spirits oOo! 
the fever 
hazel, “which 
hing nice and c 
lous guy. this Lou 
months ago had a Lor 
ence which il i4ed 
Margaret .. Ke ve 
ef our special fans 1 a 
house.” growled the Saetcim 
“so @ere really 2 th 
ene on for the Princess 


SEIS DONT DIE: When 
plays close in Gotham tory Tre 
sometimes storec. more cilien 
bumped. one of these union 
regulations that keep the tbe 
ster from any sane cconem, 
. »w. But on the road Hs a 
different story, except some 
times producers have a toug® 
time finding an outfit willing 
to pay the cost of carting ©m™ 
from the theater It 
a Washington probiem 
for Father Gilbert V 
speech and drama depz 
at Catholic University 
is Willing and able to ut 
earded scenery Lat 
the Michigan ave 
ere Peter Larkir 
“The Teahouse of 
Moon.” which wou 
performances Satu 
et the National . 
house and its paraphernalia 
will be working in \aried guises 
for years to come 


ADDED LEGACY: Also 
behind from “Teahouse” is a 
contribution te CARE from 
Ster Eli Wallach . CARE s 
Cpening night sponsorship 
prompted Eli's interest and be- 
fore he left town he contributed 
some seif-heip tools for both 


iGeologica! and 


=eet = 
; n¢z 


ee 7 - 
amped © ire 


that musa 
tours 
at 3S 


_ 


Armstrong 


> 
‘aa 
‘oo Hae 
healt? 
rT = ust 
nee 


’ 
ARTS 


riter : 

ana tt 
makes 
. 


> vw 


- 


wT 
-_ . 


lay 


Tw 
* 


left 


Armstrong proved as vahant 
The record shows that hr jarz ignored 
natronal 

“When I plaved Ber’ 


is stronger 
-he biaged hes first trail 
= bee 
care of his lips. cheeks and chest and 

never too 


«rr ° 


Arm 
ih hic Ars 

The Satchmo sums 
food take my medarine 
Blowing > m Europe 
a goodw!] ambas<ador 


. trumpet for 
om | 


. Soarn 


hownderties bet Lows has @ 


m = lot of them 
= fet 
Ln ol 
to Europe 

Hes got 


hear Setchmo 


than natoenms 


Femee to 


>> 


1 coms .0us 


red. never too eothing 
ps are the Majer worry 
gmt ana Gay 
Lnsatz74 reme but 


The 


sneen as 


omiy temporary He writes 
There are many servicemen 
the Washington area wil 
fori 2 sete of 
mittee rema 


_ 

Fro 
-_-. | 

n< 

Mer 


= 


oF hha 


be daubs> 


Monarch at Work 


Yel BSrvnner presides at reval deings in this splendifcrous 
state im the Capitel’s spectacular screen version of “The 
Ring and I.” Repeating his original stage role. Brynner 
sceres rears majer newcemer hit opposite Deborah Kerr. 


—— 


>Mr. Wonderful’s Dad 
Knows All the Answers 


af 27 oO 
Youre! te | 
on Pom ma 


Tha* 
hereby seconded. Mr« V 

FINAEGANS CAKE 
trary to the criginal announce- 
ment. Grengpe Sycamere of 
Oiness “You Cant Take It 
Wah You" & being played OF 
Edward Finoegas Actor 
FPimeecen. one of Boston's ad 
mured Bra 
at (mes 


Con- 


ia 


tile Players. ap 


seveTa. UM Met s 


NEAELY BOME. Emily Hors 
ley has numerous Virgitua fam 
cornertiIons bat [| oe a 
Switzerland t 
ose to homme as @ 
Maryiand stage tbe Mountain 
Theater at Bragdock Heights 
where she opened last night as 
Sabrina Fax y went 
to schog Switzerland. took 
to Gim sectimeg there. wh ; 
clecged “Heidi” and ingrid Bere 
man's “Fear” . An of -Broad. 
way procuction of “He Whe 


avy 
atime sar 
ot ber as Cc] 


emi 
- 
. 
--= 
. 


- 
i2 


Gets Slapoped™ introduced her 


to her frst American audience 
. “Sebrina Fair.” which made 


NEW YORK. July 
cast of 


on the thoroughbreds 
ether than 
Sammy Davis’ 


( and Lor 
etta Young’ Miss Kilgalien 
Alen Jay Lernes. one of the 
geniuses responsible for “My 
Pair Lady.” is negotiating for 
the stage rights It would make 
an enchanting musical 

Teny Canzoneri and his ex 
wife have been dating almost 
every night. The fighter con- 
fided te Edward G. Robinson 
that therre considering «a re- 
conc: lation The wild rumor 
sweeping the crowd at Lindy’s 
puts Frank Sinatra s percent- 
age—when be plays the Para 
mount in person—at 75 percent 
of the gross... Manny Frank. 


6—The | less 


bullfighting 


none|use a2 sword with a rubber|signing for Dean Martin to co- 
| Plunger in place of a point. At/star in “10,000 Bedrooms” for 
a recent tryout in Denver, the/| joe Pasternak. Years ago, Joe 


exhibition conducted without|/made the first test ef Dean. | 
killing the bull 


proved a great 


success, and those working on 


the venture believe if the idea | Richard Thorpe, who is direct-| 
$s approved by officials here, it|; g the epic 
would draw the biggest crowds | ' 


in 


best restauran?’ 


*he 


the history of the Garden 
Jerry Brooks. owner of the 
in Miami Beach 
Luau—will waltz 
aisle with hotel 


the 
owner 


Larry Tisch’s pretty secretary 


. 


a 


. Yul Brynner has scheduled 
series of conferences with 


Darryl Zanuck. who wants him 


Lo 


of 


star in “The Secret Crimes 
Joseph Stalin.” 


Education Aid 


Noted by VA 


th 
sé 


Tuited Press 


The Veterans Administration 
estimated yesterday that more 
150.000 children of de- 


at 


to Madison | 
Mr. Wonderful” knows|Square Garden. In this version | 
where to go for marvelous tips/of the sport, the matdor would | 


down 


Louella Parsons 


Whole Town Fights 
Over British Charmer 


: 
HOLLYWOOD, July 10 GINS), Italy to find four beautiful Ital- 
With British Diana Dors the | ian girls. 
most discussed actress in Hol-| Joe, whose book “Easy the 
lywood since Marilyn Monroe|Hard Way” has been smuggled 
departed, and behind the Iron Curtain, has 
every studio in had an offer from Budapest to) 
‘town bidding have it published in Hungarian, | 
for her after jand he'll accept. He has many | 
she ‘inishes “I friends and relatives living! 
‘Married a there who will enjoy reading 
Woman” with about the Hungarian lad who 
George Gobel ‘made good. 


—who gets 
her? THE TALK around Las Veg- 
Donna Reed as is that Martha Raye has re- 
Ae d dad y 3 joumed her romance with Al 
wen ve : 
Isnagged Diana Miss Parsons Riddle, a dealer at the Sahara 
com-|\ Where Martha is entertaining. 
“The| After Riddle’s name was men- 


fo. their independent 
pany, Todon, to star in 

Long gp a. _ at moms |tioned with Martha's he went 
town, London. Columbia w . 

release the picture which is a ren = oe her. Then for a 
sexy drama about a girl who|*!me, things cooled off. Now 
works in a roadside cafe and a/he’s escorting her about the 
truck driver. Know who they | Nevada resort and seems to be 
want for the truck driver?|head man in her life again. 


Marion Brando = 
| Maxwell Setton is the pro-| A VISITOR on the set of 
\ducer and Kenneth Hughes the “Amastasia” in Lon ion was 


' director. 


| JOAN CRAWFORD, who is! 
loft to New York and London) 
| Thursday, has a date Wednes- 
‘day to discuss with Robert Al- 
drich “The Monkey Doll,” Jack 
Rosenstein's book. 

It’s the story of a columnist, | 
a composite picture of three) 
famous gossip writers. ; ti 

“I haven't seen the script'] LARRY BETTY BUSTER | 
yet,” Joan told me. “But if it’s ) 
as good as it sounds I'll do it. 
Bob Aldrich is in New York, 


ki Cond. ioned —— 
NATIONAL 4 WS. BEB. MON, 


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Yul Brynner’s 17-year-old step-:Kornakova, one of the stars of 
sister, Catherine Brynner. She the Moscow Arts Theater 15 
has been in London majoring years ago, and young Cather. 
in languages and had never|in.g will play a bit part in “An- 
seen her brother on the stage astasia” with Yul. 


or screen. 
(Courriaht. 1956. br 
Her mother International ews Service) 


was Catherine 


a 


yw 


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“The most effective screen version of an opera 
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BOB'S NEW HEART 
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“THE SEVEN LITTLE FOYS” 


12:30 


ceased veterans will be eligible So Di h 
for Government education as- me is ! 
)sistance under a new law 
The law, retently signed by 
President Eisenhower, stipu- 
lates that only children of vet-| "™4ts your fa- 
erans whose deaths resulted; VOrite dish? 
from military service will be| (Food, that is) | é : 
MECHT AND Lancastte 


eligible. Collegeege survivors; If you have a 
will receive up to $110 a month! favorite recipe 
o even ' 


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to complete their education | bring it to Cen- | 
The VA _ said applications | ter Market | 
LANCASTER CURTIS | 
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LOLLOBRIGIDA 


India and Pakistan 


COURT PROGRAMS: The 
1S® annual summer series of 
See end musical numbers im 

cogevelt Center, 13th and Up 
shum sts... starter tonight at 8:30 
moving into the Roosevelt audi 
torium in the event of rain ... 
Pauline Eaton Oak directs the 
Roesevelt Masquers in Renald 
Elwy Mitchells “The Gobdiin™ 
es the first of the summer's 
eight one-act | 
trict Recreatio 
this of 
mmission 
danc! 
morn 
night pr 


“JIGGS” SECONDED 
ing the work of Mrs 
Vogel and the Armed Services hewed te , : . : | 
Home tality ‘ ce success of Marilyn Monroe by 
F nue smyr adv) to be a 
‘7 - alee 7 . : 
pleats and weer guts ovens jthings in town, 

s 2 a ts : nouzH at ; ‘ . 
0 hat is ) 

lanpbods'’s case. It's the date of sao" Food, that is, it's} 
‘2 persoms birth that reaily al patt \ 


counts. and the guidance of ' 
<= Center Market City 
5th and K Sts. N.W. 


sg When | 


a happy film for Audrey Hep-)ex-busband but stil] manager of 
barn. will contioue through | ¥ Irian Biaine. is running true 
Sunday night with Leis Barden |to form now that Viv's back on 
Dorothy Lee Tompkins, Clayton, Broadway in “Hatfuil of Rain.” 
Fields, Jack LeGrend and Peter | Just as he did when she played 
Breck im the leading roles. im “Guys and Dolls.” Manny's 
idriving the company daffy 
COLLEGE PAEK SHAW: «ith cuecestions for cuts, die 
The University of Marylan@Sijoeue additions and cast 
Summer theater workshop pre- changes 
semts Bernard Shaws “Arms! The Colony’s face-lifting job 
and the Man” tomight through ~ij] include soundproofing for 
Pricay in central auditorium onithe main room Nobody's 
the College Pa . 


The PLAYHOUSE ae 


should be filed at VA reg onal) city, Sth and K 


offices. 
se Streets, N.W. 
Deposit it in our 


nd NEW YORK CiTY \special barrel. 


Ficaotety NiR-CONDITIONED to yor Conan 
RKO KEITH’S ::’ 
STARTS TODAY 


eavescrop 
table 

European chums wonder 
VMM knows titat an astrologer 
named David Sturgis ts getting 


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“i -- r . 2% ; > ‘ » > ™ | 


om 


bend or i - a 


_ 


can 
4 


iif your recipe 
'is selected, you'll 
| win two tickets to 
TRAPEZE with 
Gina Loélobrigida, 
now playing at 
Loews Palace. 


st street |For the freshest 


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aa 


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Coler by De Luxe DOORS OPEN 10:45 Am, 


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vosenpn . gas i>nrm mow sng 


rer 


Show Times For Wednesday 


“Tacs ° me ao 
amr? rARROS aVPrerres + 

. a . o a [oe one ° = LsTTts u- 

__ 

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earned of her 
ber—and I was 
attract at 


- 
Me ATRI & a 
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—_ " = 2 
ME TROrOLIT «4% 


— 
cow J 


ONE OF NEW York's top 
talent booking agencies is ser 
ows 1m its intent to bring blood- 


If you missed Danny Kaye at the Amphitheater 


any « mt “MA . . . 
ciens— you can see him now at the Little. 


of the Barons 
cCarirToe 
: > s 
et Fie 
S'ranerms o 8 
COLA MBIA Pe 
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Ty? 


reese 16% 3 : x. | : ® a NON-STOP © ay STEPPED-UP 
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SAMUEL GOLDWYN ~~ 


DANNY VIRGINIA 
KAYE - MAY 


~~ GOLDWYN GIRLS « 


fee WALTER Mitty’ 


Air Conditioned 


ee ee ee 


Bay | MPRITHEATER) 


Performances thru INN W4th 
rica WViusie Piva 
foie LOUIS ARM 


and his 
ALL STARS 
: DAVE BRUBECK QUARTET 
, featuring PAUL DESMOND 
yw Fal’ 
vA 


. 

PrroenT Meteme FF esti 
| - > is ‘oo m4 : 

BEries+— The Delt onc 


The Monroe-Miller Romance 
THE INSIDE STORY on 


fivn VMonrne ana Art? us 
Cook 


Women's Sect 


the romance of newlyweds Mar- 8:30 PM Nightly SAMUEL GOLDWYN .... 


mee A bag ornate ym : Tivos GARY COOPER 
= the For and About 
ex “mansnaat nat [9° ERR EAL 
HOLT stanrs 


AMUSEMENT PARK 
oe ae 
wasGe aoe 


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THIS IS THE HILARIOUS SCENE 
EVERYONE'S TALKING ABOUT. 


YOU MUST SEE IT FOR YOURSELF! 


. r- . - . 
rontinues tods rage 42 


2—= 


Porieng @ Pier 


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Thriflers Return’ 


MONTGOMERY CLIFT 
in “t CONFESS” 
Pilus—Farley Granger 
“STRANGERS ON A 
TRAIN” 


The story of events that 
made a bold woman out 
of a lovely young girl... 
and brave fighting men 
out of daring boys. 


Pe eer 
wa SE 


[NEW MAGNIFICENCE! 
NEWS | 


Tue 


GENE KRUPA & HIS TRIO 
Eddie Condon & His All Stars 


GOOD SEATS AVAILABLE! 
PRICES: $1.25, 1.75, 2.50, 3.00 Tax. incl. 


Benny GOODMAN : 


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Daylight Time Extended Until End of October — 


The District Commissioners 
extended the city’s Daylight 
Saving Time season for a 
month yesterday in a cere- 
mony calculated to memorial- 
re their hard-won right to do 


sn 


: 


: 


: 
: 


The action, authorized by} 
legislation passed over the tra-| 
ditional opposition of farm-belt. 


Foregathered at the District most major cities in the East 


Buildin for th eremon were | Still had a month of it to go, al 
Sen uae “4 < poo y),|Situation which raised hob with 
nage *“~itravel plans and other inter- 


CH % Jong 


By Pau) Herron 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES 
ae W ednesday, July 11, 1956 


leaders im both branches of|who sponsored the Senate ver-| 
Congress, puts the District injsion of the enabling legisla 


state schedules. 


Concert baritone Paul Arnold fiddle.” He gets by admirably 


Standard Time at 


step with other East Coast! 


‘metropolitan areas for the first! 


summer since the extra month 

of DST became fashionable. 
Under ferms of. their procla- 

mation, Washington returns to 


’ 


“2 o'clock! 
ante meridian on the last Sun- 
day of October, 1956,” at which 
time DST “shall be returned to 
the Standard Time now appli- 
~ ey to the District of Colum- 
ia.” 


this Thursday night. He's go- 
ing to be aboard the §.S. Mt. 
Vernon . 
sails d 

iriver 


tion; Philip M. Talbott, who . . 
represented the Board of Trade, Retired Builder 


and Robert E. McLaughlin, 

president of the Board of Com-' Found Hanged 

polsstoners who made the proc-! : 

amation. ‘' | The” body of William E.'hopes to enter- 7 
og vote of oa? toa Owens, 65, a retired builder tain the entire 

pa e extension Di as family 

month over farm bloc strategy|#"4 Plumber, was found hang-O ny aigor. 

which included.an amendment ing last night in the basement ent type of en- 9 

that would have abolished fast| garage of his home, 4700 Upton tertainment® 

time completely in the area. st. nw. has been chos- 

President Eisenhower signed it; Police said the discovery wasien,” says the 

into law a week later. made by his son, Paul E./Wilson Line, 
Original fast-time legislation| Owens, who reported that nit | ‘in response to 

permitted the city heads to pro-\father had been despondent | hundreds of re- 

claim it locally only until the over the gradual loss of his eye-' quests for shows more suitable 


takes on a pretty hefty task with a remarkable economy of 


|Price 


bow. It's a fascinating perform- 
ance. 
ow 

DANCING will return to 
night to the Glen Echo ball- 
room. General Manager Gerry 
has announced that on 
| Wednesday, Friday and Satur- 
iday nights the area's energetic 
‘may trod the ballroom boards. 
Thursday nights have been 


set aside for Jimmy Dean and 
his Texas Wildcats, whe will | 
star in a Country and West- | 
ern night performance. 


inieh WWiey 


last Sunday in September.|sight. He also is survived by and appealing to the whole fam-| An attempt to turn the ball. 
'When EST returned last year, his wife, Helen. ily ... and to provide some-jroom into a skating rink has| 


‘thing other than ‘rock ‘n’ roll’|apparently- failed and roller! 


: 


and ‘popular-recording’ type of|skating has been discontinued, | 


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COLLINS MIX 


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Penn Ave af 18h SN. W 


—————— 


t 

| > performers normally booked.” 
hat OPENING MON. JULY 16 | Yesterday, Arnold, who is 
o® master of ceremonies on WRC- 
TV's “Footlight Theater,” said 
he hoped to sing current and 
old-time favorites but might not 
get into his folk ballad role 
Everyone thinks of him as a 


The Dancing Star of “Fanny” 
‘folk singer, says Arnold, but he 
would like to impress Washing- 


a \\ VA ATES tonians, at least, with his tal. 


ae ents a ee ig Anatom 
‘6 . ” ae! Orchestral accompaniment 
The Turkish Delight eee ifor Paul will be furnished by 
ee Eddie Pierce Music under the 

© idirection of Frank Garner. 

ow 

se FOR YEARS I have been a 
mistanch admirer of violinist 


Direct from Broadway! 


LOUD) @ IEC 


PLUS a fabulous new revue 


Ladies’ nite Monday night 
— Free Admission — 
no cover—no minimum 


for all ladies B \in the night club field. 


e \Joan Fields and consider her 
one of the most accomplished|;pursday through 


‘at least for the balance of this! 
season. | 
| os 
| RESTAURANT ROW—The 
‘Golden Parrot Restaurant is! 
now open on Mondays for! 
luncheon, cocktails and dinners 
|... During July and August the’ 
‘Charcoal House Restaurant will’ 
NOT serve luncheons on Satur- 
days... Phil Gorman at the 
Village Inn, 1606 Rhode Island 
ave. ne., says he has excellent! 
banquet accommodations for) 
folks who go for hard-shelled| 
‘crabs, shrimp and other seafood | 
specialties .. . Newcomer to the) 
restaurant scene is the Vine-| 
yard at 1516 Connecticut ave.| 
nw. Jazz music is featured) 
Saturday | 


violin artists plying her trade|nignts at the Vineyard under 


the direction of Dick Williams. | 


ENOUGH MAX 1 BACH aatén 
BOTTLE FOR 22 DRINKS ast! Som, 


Easy to make! Add required Ir 
liquor and soda. That's all! 
Other Holland House Mixes: 
Manhattan, Dry Martini, 
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Fashioned, Side Car, Bronx. 
AT FOOD, DRUG, DEPT. and 
LIQUOR STORES 


s 


Sl OPK DK OHKON KON KO KONG KOONCE 


However, this jis to report | 


Sis: vm ae -— sates Se ESS = eS | that she now has some se- > | 
: Pp, oe Se. }| rious competition in the form Ike Again Asks SS 
. . el | 
$4 Billion Aid) 


of Rady Baron, now the high- 
Funds in Cash | 


light of the Old New Orleans’ 
summer show. . 

=| I won't say that Rudy is as 
“t\galented a musician as Miss! 
= |Fields, but he’s every bit as| 
= \good a showman—in fact, he's 
= | better. | 
aus | Rudy is apparently an advo- 

. 87700 cate of the “short bow and long 


RRB wan | ian | 
be qe Pee 


STARLITERS 
Op gf 

EN AiR ao United Press ) 

President Eisenhower in-| 
formed Republican congres- 
sional leaders yesterday he will 
accept a $4-billion foreign aid 
‘ceiling. But he considers ity 
vital to U. S. security that Con- 
|gress appropriate the full $4 
billion in actual cash 

The President's views were 
reported by Senate GOP Lead- 
er William F. Knowland (Calif.), 
who with other GOP leaders 
conferred with Mr. Eisenhower 
yesterday at Gettysburg, Pa 

Knowland said the Chief Ex- 
ecutive listed the $4-billion aid 
appropriation among top prior- 
j ity legislation he is anxious to 
have passed before Congress 
adjourns. 

[Meanwhile the sponsor of a 
| heavily cut foreign aid money 
bill said he does not expect the 
House to increase its amount 
despite an appeal from Mr 
Pisenhower for a “substantial” 
restoration of funds, the Asso- 
ciated Press reported 

(Rep. Otto E. Passman (D-La.) 
referred to scheduled House 
action today on the $3.6 billion 
foreign aid measure approved 
by the House Appropriations 
Committee. The bill is some $2.4 
billion below Mr. Eisenhower's 
request. 

("I do not anticipate an in 
crease by the House,” Passman 
told a newsman, adding if the 
Senate later votes for a bigger 
amount he will not “capitulate” 
in his efforts to keep a Senate- 
House compromise close to the 
lower House figure). 


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sun-Tone drip-trays clean with ease 
Rocket-Speed oven burner 
Fluorescent lamp e Deluxe chrome grill 


More Armory 
Exits Urged 


The District Commissioners 
recommended yesterday that 
the Armory Board make plans 
for additional exits at the Ar- 
mory as a safety precaution, — 

At the same time, the Com- 
missioners ruled no exceptions 
will be made to allow more 
than 5310 persons inside the) 
Armory for public events. This 
figure is based on one national 
formula for public gathering 
places. In the past, different | 
Boards of Commissioners have | 
permitted audiences to exceed 
the 5310 figure. | 


Man, 76, Found Dead 
With Wrists Slashed 


Robert E. Herndon, 76, was 
found dead with both wrists! 
slashed last night in the bed-| 
room of his home at 2862 28th 
model ® 52-446 st. nw.-Police said they had 
been told Herndon was de- 
spondent over stomach trou- 
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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
22 W ednesday, July 11, 1956 @ 


ana 


Have a good time Sunday with 


THE WASHINGTON POST 


AND TIMES HERALD 


TV WEEK MAGAZINE 


What fun! What convenience! Washington's easiest-on-the-eyes television direc- 
tory is packed with news and views of the video world. Plus that, it lists all 
shows on all channels for every day of the coming week—and Sunday's high- 


lights appear in larger print right in the regular schedule. 


A THREESOME OF MAGAZINES 


A widow reveals the brighter side of institutional living in “I Live In An Old 
Ladies’ Home—<And Love It,” in the Americah Weekly Magazine . . . authorities 
explain a controversial medical tool in “The Truth About What Hypnosis Can 
Do For You,” in Parade Picture Magazine *. . and Dick Coe holds up a mirror 
to audience manners in “The Customer Isn't Always Right,” in The Show 
Magazine. 


2 COLOR COMIC SECTIONS 


Plenty of laughs, plenty of adventure, plenty of human interest. Two big sec 
tions—in full color—featuring America's most popular strips. This jumbo jam- 
boree brings you more comics than you'd find in any other metropolitan news- 


paper in America. 


AND MUCH MORE 


Including Edward Folliard’s story on what President Eisenhower plans to do 
in Panama, in the Outlook Section ... and “Profile of a Working Wife,” how 
she plans her time and energy to do two jobs well, in the Women’s Section. 
Eight global news services, seven more than service any other Washington news- 
paper, provide you with the most complete national and world coverage in the 


Nation’s Capital. 


The Sunday Washington Post and Times Herald 


Ct CRE ee 


Pilots Denounce 


CAB Inquiries 


United Press 


Floridans 


‘Unrealistie’ 


Move to Curb 


Oppose New 


ke on Air Coast Airline 


The men who fly America’s gress strip the Civil Aeronav- 
airlines said yesterday they will)tics Board of its authority to’ 
renew their demands that Con- investigate air crashes. | 


A spokesman told the United | 
Press the Airline Pilots Asso- 
ciation, representing 11,000 cap-| 
tains and co-pilots, will ask for 
rebirth of the old independent 
Air Safety Board that was abol- 
ished by President Roosevelt 16 
years ago. 


The ALPA official said most 
pilots feel the CAB, which sets 
|air safety policies as wel] as in- 
vestigating crashes, is in effect 
investigating its own regula- 
tions and whitewashing itself.” 

He indicated that the June 
30 Grand Canyon crash—worst 
in commercial aviation history 
—ignited fresh pilot protests 
against the CAB’s handling of 
— disasters. 
mirroll in tometo i -- ea ey re already blaming the 
$ ~ nmi 8 TWA pilot before they know 

what really happened,” the 
a pilots’ spokesman said 
A “The CAB can't be both judge 


and jury in cases that may di- 
the greatest name in VODK A 


‘Tectly invoive the Board's own 

regulations as being ult.” 
0 © 100 Prout, Gta, elle ante, Sia. Saaee 5 eing at fault 
Sm rroft Fis. (Orv. of Hewblein), Hartford, Cena, 


He said he was giad the chair- 
‘man of CAB promptly dis 
‘claimed the investigator's state- 
ment. 

Meanwhile, William B. Davis. 
director of the Aviation Safety 
Office of the Civil Aeronautics 
Administration, told a House 
Government Operations Sub- 
committee that collisions be- 
tween planes in flight are “a 
growing hazard.” The Subcom- 
mittee is studying air safety 
problems. 

Davis said the “ultimate an- 
swer’ to air safety may be total 
jcontrol of all flights by radar- 
equipped control towers. He 
said all planes should be re- 
quired to carry radar sets to 
show how close they are to 
other craft in the area 

Davis blamed altitude meter 


eee eee 


BLOODY. MARY. 


Associated Press 

Former Gov. Fuller Warren 
of Florida said yesterday “sev- 
eral hundred” employes of 
Eastern and and National Air-| 
lines will be “thrown outyof a) 
job” if a new airline is author-’ 
ized to carry passengers be-| 
‘tween New York and Florida, | 

He told the Civil Aeronautics 
Board (CAB) that certain other | 
lines “just want to get in on a! 
good thing,” and “make a quick 
Okla... coun dollar” in asking to join East- 


tered that it is ern and National on this East! 
designed to | 


2 Coast service. 
ney Pv gre Warren testified at a CAB) 


Rothschild (hearing on an examiner's rec 
ord. star. cham- . 
ber’ Ww ommendations for new routes 
ie — nite) trom New York to Miami. 
The bill would restrict the) Among those asking to 


President's review of Civil 

Aeronautics Board (CAB) deci- 

sions on foreign air routes to) 

cases where foreign policy or 
, fOLV : 

national defense is involved lmembers of Congress. 


It would require the Presi) Speaking for the senators, 
dent to report to Congress OM igen Frederick G. 


Associated Press 

A move in Congress to re- 
strict the President's powers to 
pass on foreign air route 
awards is “unrealistic,” Ad- 
mistration 
spokesmen (tes 
tified yester- 
day 

The .meas- 
ure’s sponsor, ~ 
Sen. A. S. Mike 
Monroney (D- 


east Airlines. This line’s ap- 
plication got a strong boost 
from all of New England's 12 


and also would make represent-|handie the steadily increasing 


atives of the United States Ait) demand for expanded New Eng: | 
\was presented for study to the 


transport industry parties tOijand air service. 
foreign route negotiations. I Wf Northeast were permitted 
In testimony before a Senate'to add a New York to Miami) 
Aviation Subcommittee, headed | run, the congressmen said, New | 
by Sen. Monroney, both|England would receive “ex-| 
Commerce Undersecretary! panded and additional service,” 
Louis S. Rothschild and Deputy and the airline's losses would 
Assistant Secretary of State/be offset. 
Thorsten V. Kalijarvi opposed! Besides former Governor’ 
the bill “in its entirety.” \Warren the Florida point of 
They argued that every cer-|View was expressed by Reps 
tificate or permit dealing with|D. R. Matthews (D-Fla.) and 
foreign air transportation in-|Paul G. Rogers (D-Fla.) 


igranted this service are North. 


senators and 21 New England) 


| Payne (Re) 
cases where he did intervene,/saine) said only Northeast can} +), 


volves foreign countries and 
therefore touches on foreign 
relations. | 

“It is unrealistic to assume,” 
Rothschild said, “that national 


errors, inadequate cockpit visi- defense and foreign policy can 


bility and the high speed of 
modern planes for the increas- 
jing danger of flight collisions 
He noted that two 600-mile-an- 
hour planes approach each 
other “faster than the speed of 
‘a 45-caliber bullet” and leave 
pliots little or no time for de- 
cisions 

Under present law the CAB 
—an independent agency itself 
—establishes air safety policies 
which are in turn carried out 
by the Commerce Department's 
CAA The old Air Safety 
Board operated outside the 
jurisdiction of other Govern- 
ment agencies involved in avia- 
tion policy and dealt only with 
the subject of air safety. It 
lasted only 18 months 

“The CAB is too much con- 

. he! , cerned with the economics of 

insect bites, prickly heat! commercial aviation and is 

Just fill a tub with warm therefore unqualified to set up 
water, stir in a generous cup- yee _— the ALPA official 

: ' eciared. 

ful of soda. Gentle soda eases “+i. spokesman said the 
tinging, itching ALPA has filed demands for re 
~leaves skin opening hearings on three fatal 
clean and sweet! 


‘with baking soda boths! 


Now—enjoy in your own home 
a cooling alkaline bath—the 
kind of bath you'd luzuriale in 
ut famous health spas! And 
what relief baking soda baths 
bring to summer skin problems 
like sunburn, poison ivy, 


crashes officially blamed on 
“pilot error.” 

a | “We have evidence to indi-| 
cate there were other reasons 
for these crashes,” the spokes- 


Your 
Household 
Trecsure 


be considered by the President 
as completely isolated factors.” 
Kalijarvi said the President 


Speaking for Maryland ear- 
lier in the complex case, Gov. 
Theodore McKeidin and the! 
State's two senators, G. Glena) 
Beall and John M. Butler,’ 
strongly supported Pan Ameri- 
can World Airlines’ application 
for a New York-to-Miami run. 


Benson Picks Iowa Site 
For Animal Disease Lab 


Associated Presse 


Secretary of Agriculture 


Benson yesterday picked Iowa 


Routes Hit | yet 
State College at Ames, a school| ducing areas of the country. 


he once attended, as the site 
for the Gov- 
ernment’s new 
$18-million an 
imal disease 
laboratory. 

In a_ state- 
ment, Benson 
said this loca- 
tioh had been 
r e commended 
by a livestock 
industry advi- 
sory committee 
which survey- Benson 
ed a number of proposed sites. 

Congress now has under 
consideration a request for 
funds to set up the new center 
which is planned to provide for 
research on 25 animal diseases. 

Ames is in the center of the 
Nation's hog and cattle feeding 


¢ 


Draft Plan Urged 


In Prince Georges 


A draft plan providing for 
e reorganization of the Prince 
Georges County government 


Intercommunity Council of 
Southern Maryland Monday by 
its president, Fred Spinks. 

The draft calls for division 
of the county into seven dis 
tricts, each electing a county 
commissioner and delegates to 
the board of education and to 
new sanitary and park commis. 
sions. 

The draft urges that Prince 
Georres County no longer par- 
ticipate with Montgomery 
County in sanitary and park 
commissions. It also urges the 
employment of two county 
commissioners on a fulltime 
basis and the autonomy of earth 
district to join or not to join 
county commissions. 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERAL 
“— W ednesday, July 11, 1956 


Advertisement 


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Benson said Ames was se- 
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“should be jeft free” to act. 


Beaudoin Will Remain ‘ 
As Speaker in Canada 


OTTAWA, July 10 @ 
Speaker Rene Beaudoin has de- 
cided to hold onto the gavel in 
Canada's House of Commons. | 
The resignation he submitted | 
last week as an outgrowth of | 
opposition heckling during Par-| 
liament’s debate of a Govern-| 
ment-sponsored gas pipeline 
bill is off. | 

Prime Minister Louis 5t. 
Laurent, just back from the) 
London Commonwealth con- 


ference, had a talk with Beau- 
doin yesterday and announced 
the reversal. St. Laurent said 


Beaudoin, Speaker since 1953, 
agreed to remain in the office 
Beaudoin, a member of St. 
Laurent’s dominant Liberal 
Party, has served in Commons 
from a Quebec district since 
1945. 


‘ 


David Gable Says: 


hi 


The Washington Post 
and Times Herald 
to 67 out of 82 
Homes in the 8th 


Street 


Arli 


David is 


man who makes sure your 


ad is on 


The official circulation 
figures* show that The 
Washington Post and 
Times Herald reaches 
thousands more people 
EVERYWHERE. 


Post & TH Star News 
Thy ond Retell Trading 328,557 | 245.3821 170,149 
Otel Circulation .... 382,456 | 255,454 | 171,153 


City Zone Carriert 208,302] 158.364) 96.433 
City Total Circulation. . 280,897 | 210,388 | 158.800 


"Publishers statement te the Acct Buorese 
ef Circuletion for siz moms srerage ending 
Marea Fi, 1954. 


of the homes in that area— 
in time for breakfast. 


And though 82° home-deliv- 
ered circulation is something 
to be proud of, it happens on 
many more blocks than one. 
Many of David's companions 
deliver The Washington Post 
and Times Herald to an equal 
proportion of families. 


What's more, the remaining 
18% probably buy The Wash- 
ington Post and Times Herald 
at the newsstand. For in sec- 
tion after section of Greater 
Washington, most families 
read The Washington Post 
and Times Herald . . . while 
only half read the Star... 
and but a third read the News. 


O 


| Deliver 


to 4th Street 
Area of 
ngton, Va.” 


the ambitious young 


the doorstep of 82% 


Washington's favorite home newspaper 


© More circulation everywhere 


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New Mobdilgas R is an entirety new grade 


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of cars that have been using premium- 
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‘Yet, New Mobilgas B sells at regular 
price! 


—— | 


Capital Commerce 


~ 6-Month Auto Sales 
Top 3 of 4 Years 


Oliver Goodman 
Financial Editer 

New-car sales tn Washington totaled 13.903 in the first six 
months this year, 12 per cent less than the record 15,722 in the 
same 1955 period 

However. the total was substantially higher than in the 
corresponding periods of 1954,° te eee 
1953 and 1952. District new-car 


registrations were 12,392 in Low Piggyback Car 
1936's first half, 13.544 in the - 


like 1953 period and 12,120 in Uncorks Bottlenecks 


i 

the 1952 period American Car and Foundry 
National reports that new-car| announced it has developed a 
stovks in dealers’ hands are; railroad filatear 10 inches 
dwindling cheered the trade.| lower than standard types 
Supplies of new cars slid from) for piggyback transport of 
900,000 at the end of April to) truck trailers through low- 
700,000 by the end of June. | clearance tunnels. The new 
Makers are reported gearing) car “pulls the cork out of ex- 
isting tunnel bottlenecks,” 


output as closely as possible to 
said S.M. Felton, president 


visible demand because of the 

desire to avoid forced selling of American Car. a division 

near the end of the model vear. of ACF Industries, Inc. The 
company calls its car the 


Reports that 1957 models may 
“Lodapto.” 


bear higher price tags also are 
said to be stimulating current As an example of present 
demand tunnel bottlenecks which will 
New-tar titles, as reported by 
the Traffic Bureau here, totaled 
1914 in June as compared with) 
2598 in the same 1955 month./| 
Titlings here compared as fol- 
lows by months 
19 


By § 


Felton cited the Baltimore 
tunnel in Baltimore, Md., and 
the Virginia ave. tunnel in 
Washington. 


J 


1954 
1,227 
1.311 vertisink and credit. He was 
2952 associated with the Washington 


546 department store for 28 years. 


130 

2206 WPBA Loans Spurt 

: | Washington Permanent Build- 

Alexandre Aide Here ‘ing Association reported mort- 
Fdward Stoner is the newly| gage loans totaled $20,205,478 

arrived representative of Alex-| as of June 30, 1956, an increase 

andre Ltd.. British men’s wear|of 13 per cent over $17,851,964 

chain which recently bought/on the same 1955 date. Other 

Saltz of F st midyear figures compared as 

and its branch follows: 

Clarendon, 


1955 
January 


" 
~ 
cal 
— 
5 
— 


7 


Ww, 
iS - 
412.686 


#22 
: ;) ooe 


* “3.030.540 1.967.918 
President Julius A. Maede! 
said that the association hopes 
to settle the purchase of the 
building at 1421 F st. nw. later 
this month. After extensive re- 
modeling, WPBA plans to oc- 
cupy the new quarters by 
early 1957. Present quarters are 
at 629 F st. nw. | 


ustomers 
m @ asurements 
will be taken 
‘here, cabled to 
London and 
garments flown 
by BOAC back to this country ' . , 
Stoner. 35, is married, has two Who's News 
children and now lives in Brad. Harry Steinman, former 
lee ‘Towers, Alexandria, Va. He) Wor of two New Jersey furni- 
has been associated with Alex- ,.,.. appliance stores, has join-| 
andre’s for seven years and pre) .4 4 jnerstein Department 
cers lle igo 1 we Stores of Wash- 
branches in’ f _ ington as mer- 
| chandise-adver- 
tising director 
.. 4. W. Dietz 


Stoner 


was 


Oxford s' 


‘ iously 
of the 
London. 


be eliminated by the new car, | 


ifarmers who toured the Soviet 


| 
’ 


open 


ington 
Times Berald 


yusiness 


World of Finance 


9 
~ 


4 


WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 1956 


Soviet Challenge . . . 


Goals Lead to Quantity, Not 


| SHORTLY AFTER I arrived? 
‘in the Soviet Union, | was 
turned over to a Mr. Gregoriev | 
| by Intourist, the ministry which 
'“takes care” of 
| foreign visi- 
tors. Or maybe 
I should say, j 
Mr. Gregoriev | 
\was turned) 
|over to me. 
For nearly 
three weeks 
‘we were daily- 
jexcept-Sunm 
‘day compan- 
‘ions. He was 


Editor's Note 


J. A. Livingston has re- 
cently returned from a six- 
week tour of Russia. This is 
the second article of a series 

| in which he appraises the 
Soviet Union's economic 
| strength. 


‘ 


Intourist had even run out of 
Russian-speaking interpreters! 
This overloading of Intourist 
,is symptomatic. Too much too 

a one-man Livingston (soon is a Soviet trait. As you 
‘Thomas Cook's. He made ap-' travel around any Russian city, 
pointments for me with Offi-\ you've struck at once by the 
cials, served as interpreter, rub- volume of construction. New 
bernecked me around Moscow, | apartment houses, new commer- 
tutored me with my smattering| cial buildings, new factories, 


Quality 


———*375 million metric tons of coal 


; 


By J. A. Livingston 


planned, 390 million tons were 
mined; 44 million tons of steel 
planned, 45 million tons pro- 
duced. Electric power went 
over the top by 3 per cent, but 
pig iron missed—by 2 per cent 
These industries have first call 
cn manpower, machinery, and 
raw materials. In the Soviet 
economy they're priority items, 
what bomber planes and syn- 
thetic-rubber plants were to the 
United States economy during 
World War II. 


Not so the consumer goods in- 
dustries, with these results 
Cotton fabrics missed the 1955 
goal by 6 per cent, woolen fab. 
ries by 7 per cent, silk by 9 per 
cent, leather goods by 
cent, household 
by 50 per cent, 


7 
refrigerators 
washing ma- 


of Russian and helped me map’ now hospitals, new schools, and Chines by 29 per cent, bicycles 
out a travel route to see various | extensive repairs to old build-|>y 16 per cent, radios and tele- 
factories and collective farms/ings You say to yourself, “This Vision sets by a considerable 


iin Rustavi, Tbilisi (Tivlis) place teems with energy. It 


margin. Agriculture consist. 


charge of merchandising, ad-| Kharkov, Kiev, and Leningrad.| won't be long before they lick ently lags behind the promise 


Alas, when I returned to Mos-| the housing shortage, the goods 4nd effort that goes into it. 


cow, gone was Gregoriev. He shortage, the school shortage 
iwas assigned to the Oklahoma 


Union. Effect: For me, a succes- 
sion of inexperienced inter- 
preters, often ill at ease with 
the English language and 
Americans. When I called on 
Deputy Premier V. V. Matske . 
vich, who has the ultra-ritica! _— 

assignment of stepping up So-| ‘hese are shortcomings of an 
viet agricultural output, In-/CcOmomy of “planned strain 

tourist assigned me a_ giri.|/" the Soviet Union, production 
about 23, whose sole function £°#'S are set just as in a capi 
was to see that I didn't get lost talist» society sales managers 
going to Matskevich's office set quotas for salesmen. Minis 


cement-mixer stands idle. o1 
that workers, often women. are 
standing around waiting for a 


supply of sand or cement to 


’ ; ™ 
Matskevich was to provide his |*®™S are Charged with the task 4)... 


of meeting those goals. Failure 


own interpreter. 
means uncomfortable penalties 


I came to this 
Communist Party Leader Nj- 
kita S. Khrushchev and Pre-|quality, they're 
mier Nicolai A. Bulganin bit| with quantity 


conclusion 


least 
leads 


at 


This 


not 


If goais can't be met with they'll have 
met methods 


The Soviet Union is like an 


Then you note that only afew @w*ward giant, a Primo Car 
workers are on the wood scaf- "¢'4. 
folding laying bricks or that a ‘T@!™ing improperly propor- 


size, power, skill, and 


tioned. 


THERE'S a theory —and it 
makes sense—that Khrushchev 
and Bulganin, having in mind 
“world conquest” by economic 
expansion, have been forced to 
“open up” the Soviet Union to 
the West. If Soviet scientists. 
engineers, industrial executives 
are to achieve the tall objectives 
the sixth five-year plan, 
got to exchange ideas 
with Americans, Britons, 
Frenchmen and Germans 
to introduce new 
rain millions of *ex 
peasants and wheel-barrow 


: 
: 


. ’ ? , : . 
off more than Intourist could only to shoddy work but also pushers to modern machinery 


the to technological procrastina 
political decision to Uon, “Dureaucratic sistance 
the Soviet Union to to the untried. Suppose a plant 
tourism. As lilacs and tulips | is shut Gown to install improved 
sprouted in Moscow, Leningrad machinery. Workers must learn 
and other cities, so did foreign- new ways. This might slow pro 
speaking visitors—all wanting duction, beget criticism from 


chew when they made 
strictly 


up 


counsel, guides, transportation, the Ministry, eliminate bonuses , _ 


hotel accommodations, and sery- fOr exceeding the factory's 
ice simultaneously. Conse- goal. This last means persona! 
quence: Not enough guides or Out-of-pocket loss. 


cars to go around. At the Na-| , : Es gi ' 
tional Hotel, main Intourist HIDEBOUND seatwarmers 


ff 


Ol 


The advantages such ex- 
changes are obvious to the So 
viet Union. In industrial and 
agricultural technology, the 
United States far abead 
Russia. Our technical teams 
have little to learn from trips 
Moscow. And yet the advan- 
tage is not all one way. For the 
first time since the thirties, the 
Soviet intelligentsia—the men 
and women on whom progress 


1s of 


per 


bui 


mission reported yesterday 

Sales in the first quarter 
came to $71.9 billion. The profit 
was $7.4 billion, before allow- 
ing for payment of Federal in- 
come taxes. Profit after taxes 
was $3.8 billion. 

The records of the last quar- 
ter of 1955 were: $73.6 billion 
sales, $7.6 billion profit before 
taxes, and $42 billion profit 
after taxes. 

All but two of the 23 indus- 
try groups in the SEC report 
showed better sales in January, 
February, and March of this 
year than in the same months 
last year. The two were manu- 
facturers of instruments and 
motor vehicles. 


The largest sales gains were 
chalked up by producers of 
iron and steel and other metals, 
and non-electrical machinery. 
Metal and machinery makers 
were the only groups whose 
first quarter sales were higher 
than the fourth quarter of 1955. 

All but six of the industries 
had larger profits after taxes 
in the first quarter of 1956 than 
in the same quarter of 1955 
The stone, clay, and glass 
group's profits were 85 per cent 
higher. Industries with lower 
profits were motor vehicles. 
other transportation equip- 
ment, lumber, electrical ma- 
chinery, instruments and 
leather. 

For all corporations taken as 
a whole, the first quartre prof- 
its after taxes were equal to a 
12.2 per cent yearly return on 
stockholder investments. This 
compares with 13.5 per cent in 
the fourth quarter of 1955 and 
11.4 per cent in the first quar- 
ter of 1955. 

For every dollar of sales 
there was aftertax profit of 
5.4 cents. 


Reserve Head Named 


CHICAGO w—Carl E. Allen, 
51. Muskegon. Mich.. industrial. 
ist and former New York City 
banker, will be the new presi- 
dent of the Federal Reserve 
Bank of Chicago. Allen will re. 
tire as president of the Camp, 
bell, Wyant & Cannon Foun- 
dry Co., a division of Textron 
American, Inc.. before taking 
his new post Oct. 1. He will 
succeed Cliffora S. Young, who 
retired last February upon 
retirement 


the age 


Industry Registers 
“Best First Quarter 


U. S. manufacturing corporations did their best first quarter 

ness in histery this vear, but slipped below the records set 

in the last quarter of 1955, the Securities and Exchange Com- 
> 


|102.1199 for a 3°— per cent cou- 


Kennecott Also 


Slashes Copper 


NEW YORK, July 10 & 
Kennecott Copper Corp. the 
country’s largest copper pro- 
‘ducer, today cut its price for 
|the metal six cents a pound to 
40 cents a pound, following the 
lead of Phelps-Dodge Corp. 

The new Kennecott price, ef- 
fective tomorrow, leaves the 
Anaconda Co. alone among 
major producers holding to the 
previous 46-cent price. 

The slash from 46 cents to 
40 was the biggest price change 
on record for United States 
firms and the first change of 
,;any kind for the producers 
since Feb. 20. 


eee ee 


RETAIL GIANTS 
A.& P.. Sears, Safeway 
rank 1-2-3 nationally, 


Sales of Largest Retail Firms 
Peer he OF DOLLARS 
a s 


BUSINESS-GOVERNMENT 
EXPERT AVAILABLE 


Yourg men with varied beckground in 
Government organiration, practices ond 
policies desires job with fiem or trade 
ossociotion in odm., reseoerch or liaison 
octivities. FP. ©. Bex 23, Wash. 0. C 


Special Purchase! 


100 2-Drawer 
Lega! and Lefter- 
Legal and Leftter-Size 
Wood File Cabinets 


$7.00 


500 4 Drewer 

Legal and Letter Sive ” 
Wood FILE CABINETS sie ap 
250 1-Drawer Steel File with Roller 
Bearing 755 e. 
500 Wood and Gteel Card FILA 
CABINETS. All Sires. 1S¢ per drawer. 


Free Deliwery & Parting 


MANHATTAN OFFICE EQPT. CO. 


639 New York Ave. N.W. 


Se - 


First Boston 
Group Wins 
AT&T Issue 


NEW YORK, July 10—Amer- 
ican Telephone & Telegraph 
Co, today awarded its $250 mil- 
lion of debentures to a Nation- 
wide group of underwriters led 
by First Boston Corp. and Hal- 
sey, Stuart & Co., on a bid of 


Reasonable Rates 
Prompt Service 


We will buy Setond Trust 
Notes Secured on improved 
Property 


NATIONAL MORTGAGE 
INVESTMENT Corp. 


1312 NOY. Ave. NW. NA. 8. 


pon. 

An opposing bid by a group 
managed by Morgan Stanley & 
Co. was 101.439, also for a 3% 
coupon. 

First Boston and Halsey. 
Styart are expected to reoffer 
the debentures at 102.75 to 
yield 3.73 per cent 

The mammoth issue will pro- 
vide a test of the new financing 
market whose tone has been 
heavy recently. 

American Telephone & Tele- 
graph reported net income of 
$152,700,000 for the quarter end 
ing June 30, equal to $2.75 per a 
share, compared with earnings | 
of $134,417,000 or $2.66 a share, | 
a year earlier. . 

The Bell System consolidated 
earnings report showed operat- 


AIR CONDITIONED 


OFFICES 


We have ever T50 


Riggs Dividends 

Directors of Riggs National 
Rank declared regular quar- 
terivy dividends as follows: $3 
~ share, payable July 16 to 
stock of record July 10: $3 


reaching 
of 65. 


Bank Bill Progresses 


The Senate Banking Com- 
mittee approved a bill to allow 


is Khruslichev's phrase for fac- #94 production depend — are 
tory heads who regard new ¢ing exposed to ideas and 
ideas as “a lot of trouble and people from the outside world 
unpleasantness.” Obviously Their political isolation and 
all's not hunky-dory rapport be- terror are ended. These persons 
tween the industrial executive-| can alter the course of and even 


ing revenues totaling $1.440. 
352,000 for the quarter this 
| year, compared with $1,303,158. 
000 a year ago. Consolidated 
quarterly per share earnings. 
which include A. T. & T. re. 


has been 
named presi-| 
dent of The) 
Training With 
in Industry 


headquarters in Moscow, the 
personnel was frazzied with 
overwork and Americans, 
Frenchmen, Englishmen, Ger- 
mans, etc., etc. 


Foundation, a 
% nonprofit re-| 
) in search and 
$10-Million Loan Placed Ste Oe con ee organi 
State Loan & Finance Corp.,| 2#4on iltiam A. Willis, 
,Washington-headquarter small- Washington Oat ge . 
loan firm. reported yesterday Mutual Life Insurance . ate 
‘Snat $10 million of its 4% per|New York, today ~~ 
cent promissory notes have fortieth anniversary in We if- 
been privately placed. The surance business. 
‘notes. due June 1, 1971, were 
placed by the investment bank- 
ing firms of Jonnston, Lemon 
& Co. and Union securities 


‘ orp. 
Buckingham Elevated 


Denaid Buckingham, former 
vice president of Woodward & | 
Lothrop, has been elevated to'ing on a $1.8 million contract 
Robi executive officer of J. W.| for two F-101B flight simulators 


‘s share, payable Oct. 15 to stock 
of record Sept. 26. 


Notes 


term borrowing costs declined 
ito 2.387 per cent, lowest since 
ithe end of March. Last week a 
isimilar issue 
2.409 per cent ... Melpar, Inc., 


‘Robinson Co.. one of Los An- for the Air Material Command 
‘geles’ leading department). , . Fred S. Gichner Iron 
stores. Buckinghan left Wash- Works. Inc. has ‘been ap 
ington three years ago to be-| pointed Washington sales repre- 
come president. His recent pro-| sentative for utility motor truck 
motion followed the retirement bodies made by Reading Body 
‘ef Edward R. Valentine as Works... Resources of Metro- 
chairman and chief executive politan Federal-Savings & Loan 
officer. The Robinson store is @ 
division of Associated Dry 
Goeds Corp. Buckingham, with 
Woodward & Lothrop, was in 


Mutual Fund Prices 


$2.772.818 as of June 30, an in- 
crease of 31 per cent over the 
same 1955 date. 


Asked 
os 
13.44 

1. 
1.98 


wew vous, iely 1 (AP)—(Netl. Asse 
Securtiies Dealers, it.) Siete Street tev 
; Telew Elect Fae 
Texas Fd 


Uert 


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AM ited 
in Ses 
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Fa 
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a 
fa 


Acces 
Cent 
income 
Sc.ence 
fa Co 
Line 
Lime 
Struma! 
Met ite 
Weltmgtes fa 
Whitehall fea 


11.92 
2.4 


r¢ 787 
lacome 6.71 
14.57 


Reurtion St 


’ 
$7 Covernment Bonds 


niw YORE. iely 8 (AP)—Cles 
counter ¥ Gove 

bit. ached. 

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‘Chicago Livestock 


CHICAGO. July 10 @ (USDA)—HOGes 
Saladie receipts. 9500; fairly eective 
closed sieow. uneven: generally steady to 
25 higher on butchers end sows: good 
shipping eutiet: most mixed gerade iets 
Ne. 1 te 3 190-250 is. butchers. 16.254 
1675: few lets No. 1 and 2 200-220 Wb.. 
167621700: with sreund 200 head in 
two lots No. 1 | 


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Treasury Department's short-| 


drew a rate of| 


of Falls Church, Va., is work-| 
| DETROIT, July 10 ‘®—The 


’ 


Association of Bethesda totaled | 


s 
£2 


zs 


OFTEN you'd go into the /4riat and the planners 
room and nobody there could) The 1955 report card reflects 
speak English. One American, the champagne eye of the plan 
with ironical mirth, charged in'ners and the beer pocket- 
and demanded: “Does anybody| book of the factories. In the 
here speak Russian’” Things'heavy industries, goals 
had got so bad, he wondered if made and ther. some. Examples 


ch 


erated 


ange dictatorship. Their eyes 
and ears and minds have at 
least been liberated. Being lib- 
they can be liberalized 


THURSDAY 


Livingston 


were descusses some Soviet achieve- 


ments. 


’ 
’ 


Of Cars Total 
2,548,710 


Nation's new car retailers sold ~ 
2.548.710 units during the first ? 
five months of 1956, official reg. 
istration figures disclosed to- 
day. The total compares with 
2,840,532 registrations’ in the 
same 1955 period. The figures 
‘are published in the current The six-month total value of 
issue of Automotive News. new construction represegted a 
Factory output for the first two per cent increase over the 
five months of the year came old mark set in the first half of 
to about 2,762,000. Of this total | 1955. 
‘about 125,000 cars were for ex-| The report said that outlays 
port. Thus the auto makers in the first six months, if con. 
geared production more closely |tinued at that pace for a full 
'than ever to the retail market.'year, would result in about $44 
| Of this year’s five months (billion worth of new building 
registration total, General Mo. around $1 billion above the rec 
‘tors’ big Chevrolet division ord last year. 
accounted for 656,560 and Ford; Practically all types of new 
division for 545,037 cars. Buick construction shared in the May 
was 
Plymouth fourth with 214,294. although 


esterday. 


cent from May, a joint Labor- 
Commerce Department report 
said. 


spending for new 


In the same period last year houses and apartments contin- 
, 


Ford division had a small mar-\ued to lag 
gin. over Chevrolet, 600,913, Spending for privately fi 
registration to 593,411. Buickinanced industrial buildings 
had 311,805 
water facilities hit new monthly 
irecords. Those for highway 
Balti Market iconstruction, commercial! build- 
timore Markets ing and public educational con- 
| BALTIMORE. July 10 & (USDA 
| CATTLE—Receipts. 150; early sales con- 
ned about a load of canner and for June. 
cutter cows in & price range of 3.006 
12.00. epost greedy on Beaters trade. | 
t ts, &.0 gerer- ~ 
» few lots choice and prime construc lion. 
225.50. 50% ¢ and privately financed home build- 


(66. commercial down to!! . 
to 11.00 end oda|ing in June was $1.2 billion, up 


ipts. 
barrows and 


» BDout steady cent under June of last year 
s US. Ne. 143 : 
ond gis In the first six months of 1956 
140. these outlays totaled $62 bil 
10 per cent below last 
years first half. 


© tor good 
moderate. no 
Hen 
“se*t than June a year ago. The re- 
port showed the total value of 
new public construction the 


first six months was $5.7 bil- 


tion rose 10 per cent from May 


rried supplies from yoneas 
type fo steady ho 


ype 2 light ty 
/ Pullets 35. Caponeites 


bs 
BOGOGSG—Market fully steady Pr 
Monday 
from 
id 


pie. 


rs 

Ar- 
. “continues Same period last 

light mai continues Ss ‘ear. 

fair te good. Offerings am Receipts P ? 

j}moderate to heavy : 

evapes pare by Oret receivers. delivered 
°. & itimore, cases included 

Whites. um 60% A 

. mum 

mixed, 

A quality. 42% 


m 60% A quality, 364,| Reserve Bank of Chicago re- 
© retailers: Graded according| POTts that farm prices rose 

large. 

wea: 


t 
abe BE stece a Siatiaa 
Mess ‘oe : 
| (Bese im eartons mostiy 3 cents| Said in its weekly agricultural 
| ‘letter that farm prices have 
Dividend Actions 'point of last December. They 
Pe- Sth of Pep | Were above the previous year's 
1s ws time in nearly four years. 
ms © | 


rad 444 46, | consecutive month. The bank 
higher). 
risen 11 per cent since the low 
Rete ried Receré able leve] in mid-June for the first 
os .. 
AB New York Cotton 


Farm Prices Rise 


Gua!l- 


mediums, min 
ces 


| iis 


= 
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beh 


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| ; ‘ 
5-Month Sales ‘Construction Attains 


New construction of all types put in 
sonally to $4 billion—up 8 per*~~ 


' 


New Six-Month Peak 


Tnlted Presse 
Construction activity rose to an all-time high of $20 billion 
for the first six months of this year, the Government reported 


place In June rose sea- 


Chicago Grain 


with smell 


CHIcaAGe. tely 18 W—Mest greet ended 
sivences os the Geared of Trade 


tegey. Sesliegs were quite active 


te + cest tewer, cere 
, sets % lower te “ bigher 
te “ lower, seybeaes Pq lower 


te % begher. 


lew Clese 


wear 


j 


third with 248,134 and to June rise, the report said, | 


and Plymouth public utilities and sewer and ™ 


small supply (| Per cent from May but 14 per , 


Public spending for construc- }4**. 


to $1.3 billion, 9 per cent higher | the 


ilion, 4 per cent more than the | * 


through mid-June for the sixth, 


-Crop 
cherry-red 
| ’ rry-red 
La red 


2.305% 
? 08% 
7.17% 
7.14% 
2 


ly 


ee 
+ Oh Soe 


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ee 


Tit 


22223 SEES 


7 


S332 #22 


or. 
sa * 


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“ 


struction registered new marks : 


. 
Housing is still the drag on 
The value of new “ 


2322 «61S 
Case GeAIn 
ely 1 (P)—Whest We 
1 mmed 2.95% 
teybe ans 
1 seybese meal 54.58. 


cwicace 


Maryland Tobacco 
UPPER MARLBORO. M 


> 


Pus? 
a . 


; “ 

n and tips showed 

the Pederai-State mar- 
rted 
5! ous a *r-el) quality of i 
beceo showed little change 
Auctions Monday amounted 
‘Ss ar 


. 
cents higher than riday 
5 oe totaled 159.414.9600 poun 


reporting beard today re- 
Bret estima e ae to the sige of 


60% ; im 
larse.| CHICAGO (~The Federal ¢ 


. ind 
largest. crop ever raised The record was 
| 1946 when 467% million pounds were 
produced 
Auction bid averages per hondred 
U. 8. grades ws 


oe 
4 


Tuesdar 
Jaly ie 
rry-red 845 


Pair che 
a ry-rec 


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Fr 


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cherry- 
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ir 


bes 


iti 


a 


the Government to block bank 
mergers which would unduly 
reduce competition. The new 
bill would forbid mergers with- 
out the written consent of the 
Comptroller of the Currency, 
Federal Reserve Board of Gov- 
ernors and the Federal De- 
posit Insurance Corporation. 


Graflex Deal Approved 


NEW YORK W@ — Stock- 
holders of General Precision 
Equipment Corp. voted to 
amend the firm's charter £0 
that the firm can acquire Gra- 
flex, Inc., of Rochester, N. Y. 
General Precision would ex- 


change one-fourth share of the t 
new preferred stock and one-|from a French manufacturer. | 


fourth share of common for| 


each share of Grafiex common. 
Each share of Grafiex pre. 
ferred would be equal to five 
shares of common. 


Record Lincoln Sales 


DETROIT #—Lincoln Mo- 
tors reported today its re- 
tailers sold a record 22.617 cars 
in the first half of 1956. The 
previous six months’ record 
was 22.550 cars sold in the like 
period of 1955. 


N. Y. Bond Prices 


Associated Press 


Total sales, $3,610,000; year 
ago, $4,594,000. 


wperp 
ao 
$3299S 
cinw «4 
cry fe 

3 


Celanese 
cusrr 


5:99 
3.625578 
s?? 


ds? 
test S&S St! 4.ScTi 
trie 4.502015 
Firestese e681 


GMetac 3.507? 
GMette 3.75079 
Gee Yel Cp as?1 


~~ 
~~ es we 


Me? 4.2557085 
a Tes 3.5008 


mer? 

Nertares 7s 
POLE ish 
Peete 4.5005 
aca 1.S088 


fie 


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sults, are $3.36 this year and 
$3.19 for 1955. | S competitive 
Pennerivrania 
Bids... 1th ond 
Commodity Index 


NEW YORE. luly 18—The Accecieted Prous 
wetted whelessle price iedex of 35 com 
medities tetey rece te 176.95 

Gey 176.24, week age 176.98, mestt 
age 1778), year ope 168.27 
1058 1953 


Pra) 92.37 177.4 179508 181.79 
Lew 170.79 160.25 168.58 17855) © 
(1928 everage eqpels 160.) : 


Ave. s 


Pa. Ave 
@ Machinist 
at Conn, 


Reaitors 
Our 58th 
Anniversary Year 


137 Planes Ordered 


PARIS #—West Germany's 
national defense ministry has 
ordered 137 transport planes of) 
type called Nort Atlas 2501 | 


te 


ANNON ‘4: LUCH 


Enjoy the maximum 
return on your real 
estate investment by 
selecting « capable 
property management 
agency. Choose your 
rental agency as 
carefully as you choose 
your initial investment. 


H.L.RUST CO. 


BRS 


property 
management 


MORTGAGE LOANS 
INSURANCE 
PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 


Siseleutiel ss: 


1001 4 Sth St. NW. NA. 8-8100 


_rr,F,rrYrrPrererererrmeereereereerere,mhmcemcemhemheemhleeheeeheehmehUhmehemheheheeeeheh eh 


Government of Western Australia 
Main Roads Department 
Narrows Bridge, Perth 


Preliminary Announcement to Contractors 


The Commissioner of Main Roads intends to invite tenders 
in November of this year from experienced civil engineer- 
ing contractors for. the construction of a precast pre 
stressed concrete bridge to be completed by April, 1959. 


The bridge is to provide a six-lane carriageway, 70 feet in 
width, and two pathways, each 10 feet in width. The total 
length is to be 1,100 feet, divided into five spans, the 
longest being 320 feet. 


In view of the character and the magnitude of the project, 
it is proposed to limit tendering to contractors who have 
had extensive experience in previous major concrete and 
major bridge or maritime works. 


Interested contractors are invited to inspect preliminary 
drawings of the proposed structure either in Perth or in 
London and to submit both to the Commissioner and to 
the Government's Consulting Engineers, G. Maunsell and 
Partners, by September Ist, 1956, a request to be included 
in the list of invited tenderers. This request should be 
accompanied by such supporting credentials as the con- 
tractor wishes to be considered. 


Alternative designs for this project will not be considered. 


AEA ADAA SD AAD») LAD) DDD DD DA 4 DDD A A AD DD DD A DS A DD DS DD DDD DA A SD DA A A DA A DD 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD. 
ages Wednesday, July 11, 1956 °* 


Stocks Climb Quietly on Definite Ike News 


ees : . ak Sharp Drop Forecast 


nian aren = Steels Lead Late Upturn In Crop Prospects 


2,429,540; Jan. 1 to date, 311, 
The Agriculture Department) million bushels, compared with 


001,547; 1955 to date, 378,838, 
422; 1954 to date, 256,666,015. NEW YORK, July 10 #&—Definite word that | upturn téday and were joined by motors and 

reported yesterday that crop 234 million in 1955, Durum pro- 
| Prospects as of July 1 point to\duction is expected to exceed 


~~ A | President Eisenhower would run—anticipated | other heavy hee pe shares a uk 
_ for days by the stock market—caused barely The Associated Frees average © — . . 
"™\a 1956 total production “con-| last year's crop with July | pro 
ile siderably below” last year’s rec-| pects indicating 31 million bush- 
- Ve) 


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Dow-Jones Stocks 


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pe 
z 


rose 70 cents to $186.60, with the industrials 
a ruffle for nearly two hours today; then in- | ahead’ $1.10, the rails also up $1.10 and the 
-. ord but close to the average of els. The 1955 harvest was over 
s+ | the last five years. 20 million bushels. 
13% 


dustrials led a moderate advance. utilities unchanged. 

Ran market had been slightly higher from Today's session was noteworthy on two 

the start but was turning mixed when the | counts. The 1176 issues traded made it the ; ' 

news came from Gettysburg. Prices fluttered | broadest market since June 8, the day the che pepercments rep re Estimated rice production of 
slightly upward then settled back again | President suffered his intestinal ailment. It 

Brokers said the nearly two hours of hesi- | was the heaviest trading day since then, also, 

tation which followed convinced traders that | but not by much. 

(108) Wigh Lew Close Cag.) people with big profits were not going to The day's volume totaled 2,450,000 shares 

Stars med cash them as they did on Feb. 29 when Eisen- | compared with 2,180,000 yesterday. ' 

entatt “8 4% 4% omy—y| DOWEr announced he would run. On that day | Caterpillar, one of the beneficiaries of the 

®| profit-taking took over following weeks of dis- | 33-billion-dollar highway program, scampered 

% counting the news. | ahead 7%. Aluminium Lid. rose 3% and 
Today's. news came after a rise of more | Reynolds Metal 1% as the Aluminium stocks 

than four weeks on average. The rise today | resumed their recent advance. 

, was the fifth in a row. Again the market had Aircrafts were down. Douglas lost %, Boe- 
been discounting the news that Eisenhower | ing % and United %. Montgomery Ward 
would make a final decision to run. There | and Sears Roebuck continued to gain follow- 
were bullish economic factors, too. in@ news of their softening prices in the in- 

Steels, which had been spotty, led the late | dustry. 


222382 
=. 


3% 


$395535532338353 


teas, Porting board said acreage of 46.3 million bags falls 14 per 
+14 all crops harvested will be cent below last year’s crop 
“w+ “ about 1 per cent less than in chiefly because of a 12 per cent 
17% 1955. This drop appears to be reduction in acreage. 
%+ % the same as it was in 1955, the) The Department said that the 
me 3 Department added. combined expected tonnage of 
u .| Production of all wheat is ex- wheat, rice, and rye is only 3 
ly pected to total 922 million bush-' per cent less than last year's 
wes % els, 2 per cent less than in 1955 figure. 
4+ %\and 20 per cent less than the) The 1956 corn crop is ex 
~\average annual production of] pected to be 3.3 billion bushels, 
— % | 1,148,000,000 bushels. /about the same as last year. The 
=f Winter wheat output is esti-|77.6 million acres expected to 
%4— %| mated at 717 million bushels, 14, be harvested is down about 3 
1 +7 ‘million above 1955. The spring| per cent from last year to the 


“| wheat crop is estimated at 205 smallest figure on record. 


—— 


: 
$°35953*33"39952 353° 


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MR. FREDERICK SCHWAB 
is now associated with us 
as a registered representative 


HARRIS, UPHAM & C2 


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Folger, Nolan, Fleming—W. B. Hibbs & Co. 


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If you'd like a regular look at market conditions 
together with our opinion of various securities, 
-— phone or write us. You will receive our 
Market Letter every other week—it is yours 
without charge or obligation. 


We will be open Saturdey—9 AM. till 1 PM. 


APR 
AUCHINCLOSS, PARKER & REDPATH 


129 15th Street, N.W. © NAtional 84322 | 
Members New York Stock Exchange and Other Leading Exchanges 


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May was $1,697,800,000. This was ; $6,337,600,000 for the corre-jgain, the department said. tn. 


26 ome oy 6 nates U. S. Exports $122 million higher than the sponding period last year, OF creases were registered by ma- 
=6 renee ne te March record of $1,575,600,000,|an increase of 17 per cent. chinery and vehicles, vegetable 
es Gains in four of the 11 major | food products and beverages, 


In Mav Soar The May total represented as ‘commodity groups were largely miscellaneous ae ties and 
increase of 13 per cent over responsible for the April-to-May |metals and manufactures. 


7 . ~ . | e 

| ° April and was 28 per cent. , 

Prices on the American Stock Exchange 70 New High |i. 8.27 2 

& shipped in May a year ago. ) 

, Associated Press Exports shipped abroged under | 

Ne ; A we ee Se S| The Commeres Department|the mutual security program, 

Total sales, 780,000 shares; (iis ha a0 i 3 i 3 + Ww Paw lore ” eg Pa United (Chiefly military goods, totaled 
year ago, 820,685. ____ | Kahack Str 8 12%ob %% Panewast Pat w yesterday reported United/<is, “million, up about 72 
ah: ~~ (100) High Lew Close Che. — = . pane p 4 : % States exports set a new high) millions from April. These ship-| 
heme Alem ih & Mm... ! tien jin May, 8 per cent above the) ments were included in the May 


Aieswerts = 158 Leonari 2 : whe 4 mat fs : iy time 18 %| previous record reached last| total. Re. 
aren edge 1% , 2% 1 ” “March. The department said United 
Ajax Pet Piper Aire 1 dle States exports in the first five 
Als Gos 158 sste+ ve ined Op : «| che department said the/ months of this year, including 
Alecks = Air ‘— ei ese value of domestic and foreign|mutual security goods, totaled 


Alleg Air merchandise shipped abroad in | $7,420,300,000, compared with) 


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Export Curbs Lifted 


OTTAWA (®—Canada has vir- 
tually lifted export controls on 
shipment of 18 non-strategic 
products to the Soviet and other 
Communist countries in Europe, 
but not to Red China 


THE ZEALOT 


Leaps like a gazelle when 
he spots a soap box. De- 
nounces everything from 
ref irestation to women in ; 
slacks. Usually comes out Se eh alt 
for the underdog staunch . - 
Pittsburgh Pirate fan. 
Terrified of getting lar- 

is. ingisete on wear- 

underwear all 

year round Raises hazn- 
gstere, teaches Leather. 


craft at local girls sus- 


wer camp. Hugs parchin | : | 

songs when preoccupied. A 

And tute advertiser f th J h KH Wilki * 

in acme ‘ete os A 6 e O n 5 | n S Oo. 
- 


ness humming when they 
use TOP Radio. FIOP 


* % 


gives ther the largest 


average share cf audience - 3 
hae oh et Purveyors of (yd To Leading Hotels and Restaurants... 


wine (3) Washington's post 
popular personalities and 
(4) ten times the power of 
any other radio etation 
in the FVashington area 


\WTOP RADIO. 


AT BROADCAST HOUSE 


Musial, Williams, 


antle, Mays Hit Homers 


But Boyer Steals Show as Nationals Win, 7-3 


Associated Press Prhote 


A DAY OF ACTION—Reyv McMillan. Cincinnati short 
stop, in left picture, opens the scoring for the winning Na 
tional League team by registering the day's first run in the 
third inning in yesterday’ s All-Star game at Griffith Sta- 


Tincs ngton 


Bort 


WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 
PICTURE PAGE CLASSIFIED 


sere o- 


1956 4 


This Morning... 


With Shirley Pevich 


GRIFFITH STADIUM, July 10—The first 
the 1956 All-Star festivities is committed by Mr. Eisen- 
hower. On a day when the Nation is baseball minded, 
Ike's announcement that he will stand for reelection 
could wind up among the Sally League results 


error of 


There is a hands@cross-thealisle tableau in the royal box 

section a half hour before game time 
as one cameraman, bucking for the 
Nobel Peace Prize. persuaded Ken- 
tucky Governor Happy Chandler and 
Baseball Commissioner Ford Frick to 
pose for a picture. Chandler had the 
assurance he now holds one job that 
is safe from Frick’s ambitions. 


For the 28.843 fans who lucked out 
in the scramble for tickets, it was 
the dream game. But for the 3000 
would be standees who were marooned 
outside of park after the 500 
standing tickets were sold. it 
was merely 


ine 
room 
aA mirage 

Povich 


led record of 48 con 
patil 
g benched tm favor of the Army 
of the Air Fo 


te that the band has 


(,oldma! ! ins tool 
Beculive sé a 
band befo 
music The 
but 
wing 
THE INTENSIV! 
noted on the march to center field for 


mos ‘ g-npractice 
Air 


in 


amous ri 


baseballs 
Ferce 
be doubt 


added a new 


e he 
7 
adequacy ce may 


it is Col yr lO hi 
g of the Air Force Band i« easily 

the flag-raising cere- 
skiy 


ion, 


drilling 
slightly out of step with those bri 
Casey Stengel and Wait Ais 
Wit] Harrgdge and Warren Giles 


are onlv 
ists, managers 


monies. The 
prancing n 


and Major 


LiiLal 
League Presidents 
asks for ts 
lence in 


McDona!d 


f reve 


and ge 
tribute 
game 


Grimith. the 


Arch 
da moment 
late ¢ 


Master of ceremonies 
from the big crow 
to the memory of the ark Gl 
is dedicated. It is an exclusive for 


gily silent moment the day 


rent si 
Mth to whom the 


the late Mr 


+ 


0 
They announce the lineups and in the 
division it is a triple tie among Ted Wil 
and Mickey Vernon the applause 
Godfrey will bring ‘em all back next 


liam 
on meter, 

week 

’ _* “es zt. 
lar manager now stands 


to under 


Casey Stengel's record as an AllS 
at four defeats, one victory, and the fans begin stand 
why when the AL batting order shows George Kell hitting 
eighth. The suspicion is that Case; ipped a disc some- 
where 

THE ALL-STAR GAME 
the Cincinnati Reds are making a pret' 
of it. Five of them are in the starting lL 


nas § 
is supposed te he ail iT 
personal affair: 
neup of the * 
ind he for 


a 


Pierce is the starting pit he 
lead-off man Johnny Temple on thre 
curve balls, Piercé on the last 
out of his bat which went sailing past 


Hutchinson. 


Billy 

nes 
urved 
third-base coach 


strike < Iemple 


Fred 


In fact, Pierce strikes out the first two National Leaguers 
to pop their noses into the batters’ box. Stan Musial, out 
No. 3, emerges as the batting star of He hit one 
almost out of the infield. 


ine inning 


Pitcher Bob Friend of the Pirates fans end 
the AL first inning and Mantle to start the AL's second, which 
is rather good pitehing. He gets Mantle on three pitches, 
the third of which he takes with his bat on ulder and, 
according to the lip readers, Mantle is asking himself who 
needs a Friend of that type 


Williams to 


Nis sho 


American League 0. at end of third 
is sacrificed to second and scored on 
The element of surprise pays off, 
in there because 


SCORE. REDS 1; 
Roy McMillan walks, 
Temple's single to center 
what with McMillan and Temple ostensibly 
of their fielding ability. 


Friend is unperturbed by the day's humidity until there 
dre two on and two out in the AL third 
Williams coming up, the weather suddenly becomes stifling | 
for some reason. Friend calls time, mops his brow and finally 

See POVICH, Page 39, Col. 1 


Then, with Ted | 


By Dick Dercey Stal! Phetesregher 


dium. Frank Robinson (20), alse of Cincy, waits at bet. The | 
| catcher is Yogi Berra of the Yankees. Center, Left Ficider 

Stan Musial of the Cardinals and Third Baseman Ken 

Bover r cM), alse of the Cards. go after a shert fir off of Ted 


Murphy 
Eager to Buy 23d All-Sta 
Out Griffith ——=. 


VW ashin 
latter came 
Early 


gton'’s Rew Sievers. The 
in as pinch-hitter 
im the ninth 

| popped Boyer 

ihe American 
suers whe didnt make 
Casey's own hotshet Gil 
Deougala. of the Yanks: 
troit's Chariie Maxwell 
chers Johnny Kucks. of New 
and Frank Sullivan. of 


for Wynn 


to Ken 


reported fr 
reiations 
pre 
Rasehall Clu 
Murphy. large 


tre kholde - 


on.’ Lee 


of Calvin 
Was) 
and HH 

tof the mi 
ght 


Me 
Ne 
and 


ient of the 


- 


was Drew Vork 
eraa’ 
long reported to he 
th Griffith over club 
policy. was quoted by Dan 
Damel, New York World Tele 
gram and Sun baseball writer 
lin a published interview as 
saying he was “sorely disap 
jpointed” with the results ob 
'tained by Griffith 
Murphy also declared. ac 
cording to the writer. that he 
was eager to purchase the Grif 
fith interest and take over the 
Washington franchise 
Following publication of the 
story here yesterday, Murphy 
absented himself from the Grif- 
fith Stadium box in which he 
had been sitting with Mrs. Mut- 
phy at the All-Star game. and 
was unavailabie to reporters 
He tore himself away from 
e¢ reporter who asked him 
the Daniel 
the comment 
to get the paper 
all about myself.” ‘Thereafter 
newsmen found themstives on 
a cold tra 1 their effor 
locate Murphy, whose 
ifliepnone Was not ans 
during. the evening hours 
Griffith, miffed at the timing 
of the statements credited to 
Murphy. said they were “em- 
borrassing” on a day when vir 
twaily every important hase- 


See NATS. Page 28. Col. 3 


All-Star Box Score 


Here is the bexuscere of the TZird 
piayed yesterday at Griffith Siadium. 


NATIONAL LEAGUE AMERICAN LEAGUE 
AB RH Ebio AB ERE RBO 


nie ihe open vest 
Murph: 


at odds w 


Rost: 
Aisten tses 17 Men 


Walt who thwarted 
Stengel in the last Wertd Se 
ries, used only 17 men. Alston 
employed eniy three pttchers: 
Stenge! used six. Pierce started 
for the American League and 


4 iston. 


son. of Chicaco. Tom Brewer 
of Boston, and Wynn and Score. 
the Cleveland aces 

Pierce gave up one run and 
two hits: Ford two runs and 
three hits: Wilson ope run on 
two hits and Brewer three 
runs on four hits. Ford gave 
up the homer te Mays. Musial 
tagged Brewer for his four- 
bagger. Spahn wes the victim 
of both American League hom- 
ers. Williams hit his inte the 
rightfielad bdulipen Mantile's 
was a line drive inte the new 
seats in left 


Three Strikeeuts fer Mantle 


Ma smash carried one 
third of the way inte the iefi 
field hleachers while Musial. a 
lefthanded hitter. clowted his 
inte the lefificld seats 

Mantle was something of « 
disappointment -.to many fans 
who had only read of the 
Yankees boy wonder. Micary 
the muscleman struck out three 
times and only his line drive 


on 
adout 
wilt 

and 


ra 


wered 


annual All-Star game 


Kuenn. ss 
Pex, ib 
Williams, if 
Mantle. cf 
Berra. c 
c-Leliar, ec 
Kaline. rf 
Piersall, rf 
Vernon, Ib 
h-Pewer, ib 
Kell, 36 
Pierce. Pp 
a- Simpson 
Ford, p 
Witsen, p 
e-Martin . 
Brewer, 
| Boone 
Score. Pp 
Wran. p 
)-Sievers 


Temple. 2b 
Robinson, if 
d-Snider. cf 
Musial, rf, if 
Aaron, if 
Bover, 3b 
Bell, cf 

b- Mays, cf, rf 
Long, lb 
f-Kiwsz’ski, lb 
Railey.c 
Campania, ¢ 
MeMillian, ss 
Friend, p 
c-Repulski 
Spahn, p 
Antonelli, 


— 


~~ua Owe’ wwtw ee & be ae 
Seeceeeeceee ewe Ce @ Cte = 


eecocew @OPw on tunw Cu SC eS ue 
e@eceneenwsee Swen Cow 
Seecoececeoeeew Owe oe oc oe = 
~eseooeoc @Ow—Wwie HW i H& @ lV et = be 
Seoeuwewoeeeew eo eoeew 


Tetals 


b-Homered fer Bell in 4th 

c-Fouled out for Friend in 4th 

d-Flied out fer Rebinsen in 
Sth. 

[-Doubled fer Long in 6th. 


se@eaeeeee @ Owe @ @ ht we be ne tO me 
eeeeeeceecececeeeceecoee“nee 
*eeeeececeecewn@eoeeenweecew 


~@Ge-eeewtaeanwn"www * & & Ww 
efeeeeececePaeeceteeece”. = © 


Tetals 


a-Struck out fer Pierce in Ord. 

e-Grounded eut fer Wilses 
im Sth. 

g Singied fer Berra im 6th. 

h-Flied out fer Vernon in 6th. 

i-Lined eut fer Brewer in Tth. 

} Popped out for Wyun in Sth. 


eRe TSK YK Ty. 
eee00300 6-3 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 
AMERICAN LEAGUE 

2B—Kluszewski 2. HR—Mays, — Williams, Mantle, Musial 
SB—Tempie. S—Friend. DP—McMillan, Temple and Kius- 
zewski. Left—National League 7, American League 7. BB— 
Pierce 1 (McMillan), Ford 1 (Bailey), Brewer 1 (Mays). Scere 1 
Temple). S0—Pierce 5 (Temple, Rebinson 2, Bell, Leng): Ford 

2 (Musial, Leng). ‘Wilson | (Mays), Brewer 2 (Tempie. Snider, 
Seore 1 (Antonelli), Wynn 1 (Mays); Friend 3 (Williams. 
Mantle Simpsen), Spahn 1 (Mantle). Anteneili 1 (Mantle. 
HO—Pierce 2 in 3, Friend 3 in 3, Ford 3 in 1. Wilson 2 im 1. 
Spahn 4 in 2 faced 3 batters im 6th), Brewer 4 in 2. Scere 6 
nl, Wynn 6 im 1, Antonelli 4 in 4. R-ER—Pierce 1-1. Friend 
Hs Ford 22, Wilsen 1-1, Spahn 3-3, Brewer 3-3. Score 646. Wran 

Antenclli 66. WP—Brewer 2. W—Friend. L—Pierce. © 

teers (AL), Pimelli (NL). Hurley (AL), Gore (NL), Flaherty 
a Nya i (NL). I—T:25. A—ZAB44. Receipts igross)}— 

105 


Willies bat im the eighth inning. Mesial makes the caich 
as be falls te the ground. Their feet tangied and Mesial ap 


Associated Press Phete 
Berer. brilliant aficld and auther of three hiis. is out at 
secend base en an sttempted steal! in the second inning. 
Harvey Keene, Detroit, takes Berra’s throw for the puteut 


peared te be injered fer a moment. ht «as nothing sericas 


for the Americans. 


bet Musial was withdrawn from the game anyway. Richt. 


National League Wins Casey Scoffs 


r Game 


homer saved him from an 
minious showing 
There was ao threai 


ig7© 


of 


an ominous black clowd wad. 
died lazily ower the Seld. Every 
aveliliahie inch of the old sta 


* were dium was jammed as the two 


Warren 
and Will 


league presidents 
Giles of the National. 
Comp'icte page of prrtures ta 
Sports Sectoon, Pege Il. 
Harridge of the American. led 
the Air Force Band to the fag- 
pole. accompanied by the rival 


was followed by Ford, Jim Wil’. 


Because of the limited space. 
this was the third smallest 
crowd of All-Star history. The 
smallest was the gathering of 
3S which saw the fourth 

me et old Braves Field ix 

20 years ago. 

There was @ brief moment of 
silence for the late Clark 
Grifith, for whom this game 
was dedicated Silence bung 
over the stadium as both 
squads lined the baselines with 
heads bared in memory of the 
late Washington owner. 


First Pitch a Strike 


Umpire Charlie Berry then 
signaied for Pierce's frst pitch 
and Billy burned ower a strike 
on Temple 

Poerce was newer better than 
m that Grst inning He struck 
out Temple and followed by 
whiffing rookie Frank Robin 
son Of Cincinnati whe, at 2. 
was the youngest player im the 
game Musial went out on a 
routine grounder 

Borer, who got three hits for 
the day. singled in the second 
for the first bit off Pierce whe 
struck out Gus Bell. and Dale 

Boyer was cut down at- 
tempting to steal 
Natvenals Break Ice 

Yosi Berra singled in the 
second inning bet was ieft. in 
the third the Nationa] League 
broke thr nh 

McMillan walked with one 
out and was sacrificed by 


Friend. Temple drilled a singic | 


rain 
during the fielding drills and 


meek S— 


good pitching 3 you can win a Jonnny Antonelli 


=u @® 


Alston, Bailey Laud 
At Jinx Talk Bob Friend, Antonelli 


By Martie Zad 
Sat Reoe + 

“IF I HAVE to pick one Mickey Mantle was 
outstanding player, TTl take “°° gave the crowd its 
Ken Boyer.” National League pg tee Teecdey 
All-Star Manager Walt Alston oe 
ssid im dressing room yester 
day at Griffith Stadium after 
his team beat the American 
Leaguers, 73 

“That boy got three hits end 
made several of the days finest 
fielding plays. Who can beat 
that” Alson asked’ 

“There were some other key 
plays. too That pinch-hit 
homer by Wille Mays put us 
Nah. this is in the driver's seat. We got 
ere gems. way eo iti pi vehiag from Bob 

Frena” w and 

Except for 

two home run > those guys 
were in charge,” be said. 

: Despite homefs by Mays and 

thought the only balls well hit Stan Musial and American 

‘See AMERICAN, Ps. 3%. Col. 3 Leaguers Ted Williams and 


By Jack Walsh 
Ss? Reoorwr 
Subdced was the word for 
most of the athietes in the 
American League dressing 
room after yesterday's All-Star 
garme 
It was @ matura!l carryover 
after what the Nationa! 
Leaguers did to them 
Generally garraious Casey 
Stengel, now 2 five-time locer 
im six managerial perform. 
ances, summed it up succintly 
| thought my frst piicher 
(Pierce) was pretty good. And 
Wynn didnt do bad. That was 
about al! 
“A jona for me’ 


Boyer 
tis 8 4 


7? 


ner 
Hie picked on Avenn again in 
the Gfth with a brilliant diving 
hack-handed stop of a hit down 
ihe line. He got up in Ume to 
make the throw for the out 
At bal he rattied three con- 
secutive singies. batting in «a 
run in the Afth inning ft was 
the fourth run for the National 
League and proved to be the 
winning one 
Boyer was the main attrac- 
tion in the dressing room. He 
was living his biggest moment. 
Hardly listening te the ques 
tions being fired at him he 
kept mutt ering. “Great, greet 
great.” The 2 -yearold 
Cardinal called it his biggest 


See NATIONAL, Page 28, Col. 1, 


8: to9 « 


course. we didnt deo 


ON SALE AT ALL 
4 MARKET TIRE STORES 


to center bringing in McMillan ¢ 


with the first rum of the game. 


The American League took 
beart in Rs half of the third 


when Harvey Kuenrn and Nellie! 


Fox singled with two out. The 
crowd reared im anticipation 
as Williams came to bat bat 
Ted's best shet was a harmiess 
grounder to Long ending the 
inning 
Ferd Takes Over 

Ford took ever the pitching 
im the fourth and got Musial 
on a third strike. But Boryer 
singl@i past Kuenn. Mays 
batted for Bell and missed the 
first strike. Willie then lashed 
a long drive inte the leftfield 
bleachers scoring Temple ahead 
and increasing the National 
League lead to 34 

Ford wasnt quite out of the 
woods yet He fanned the 
obliging Long but Ed Bailey 
walked and McMillan singled 
before Rip Repulski, batting 
for Friend, fouled out 


Increase Lead te 44 


-Again the senior circuit 
struck in the fifth. Temple sur- 
prised George Kell with a bunt 
down the third base line. Duke 
Snider batted for Rebinson and 
flied to Williams. Temple ad 
vanced as Wilson was tossing 
out Musial Boyer came through 


with a single to center te bring 


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2 
: 


THE WASHINGTON POST 


end TIMES HERALD 
W ednesday, faly If; 1954 
ne! eee 


—— 


KRUCKS MAKE CATCH—Ted Williams tewerlmc ' 
home run in the sixth inning of vesterday’s All 
Star game sails inte the centerfield bullpes at 


—- ———-—- 


Griff) Stadtem Pitcher Joba Backs Geres) | 


of th Vasher. warming op i Ge balipen, National Leaguers look on at the barrier. Others 
Gashes ever ané cebches the Gree os catfietders 


_— 


Dell Routs Sylvia to Gain Middle Atlantic Semifinals 


ror re ore < Pao - ome a 


° eng ee 0 <p - oan © * ¥ 
de d 
anit ¥ 


Don Meets ALEXANDRIA’S tiie 


‘the se 


|Gessner, 6—0, 6—1. 


’ 
: 


‘years, will 


; 


6 


United Press Photo 


Duke Snider (4) and Willie Mays (24) of the 


im ballpen are American League reserves. 


STARS—From Page 27 Afrer Being Picked Fear Times 


National 
Leaguers Win 
With Ease. 7-3 


Kluszewski batted 
end faced Brewer. Big 
tremendous arms bared from 
the shoulder down | 
long drive to ieft 
liams retrieved near th 
pen as Cincinna' 
moved to second 
flied out. McMillan 
hit over Mickey Ver 
as Kiu took third 
eontrol of the 
pitched as Kiusz 
home. Brewer cut 
ther scoring 


y- 


Long 


hi« 


oer? 


ws 


dr 


nor 


opped a2 


; head 


gWilliams Homers 

The American Leaguers had 
their moment of glory and be 
gan to zero in on Spahn | 
belf of the sixth Fox 
with a single to ieft 
12 count. Williams 4d: 
long, soaring fly into the bh: 
bulipen in scoring Fox 
ahead. 

The crowd, which had been 
more or less politely applaud 
ing, broke loose for the first 
time with a mighty roar. Man 
dle. up next, cracked a hom: 
into the leftfield scats to close 
the gap 33. 


Antonelli Relieves 


**eir 
lead a 
_ “aa 

“ - 

ww 

seal j 
: ba 
rigay 


Manager Alston called time |° 


and brought in Antonelli. At 
the point there was the rare 
sight of a man batting for Yosi 
Berra. Sherm Lollar went in 
to bat for Yogi, who had im 
jured the little finger of his 
right hand on a Kluszewski foul 
tip in the top half of the in- 
ning 

Loliar humpbacked a iline 
Grive to center for the fourth 
straight hit and the crowd 
whooped it up when Al Kaline 
continued the streak with a 
single to left 

Mickey Vernon went up 
the plate but was called back 
Kansas City's Vic Power went 
to bat for him and flied 
George Kell then grounded 
to a double play to dash 
American League hopes 

The National League wasn't 
to be denied and came back 
with two mare runs off Brewer 
in the seventh. Musial homered 
with one out Mays walked 
after Boyer had grounded out 
and, on the hit-and-run, Willie 
made it all the way home when 
Kluszewski “hung out a rope 
as they say in the trade, by 
doubling to right. That made 
it 73. 

The last chance came for the 
dying American Leaguers in 
the ninth Power scratched «a 
one-hit single to Temple and 
Kell lined a one-bagger to 
right. Sievers batted for Wynn 
and got a loyal ovation. Roy * 
couldn't quite come through 
and ienned to Boyer 

Kuenn, the American League's 
last hope, grounded to McMil- 
lan. who flipped to Temple 
forcing Kell. and the 234d All 
Star game was history 


: 
‘.) 


out 


a1 


he another 


Tebbetts Asks, 


Lollar Finally Makes All-Star Game ‘What Do You 


SHERM I 
Sox Tina 

up yesterdas 

h Stadium after hs 

trip te the migeur- 

baseball classic 
“Once before | almost 
~¢ = 


mer 
gm 
said 


McBeath 
Wins Medal 


SAN FRANCISOO. July } 
McBeath of Pale Alia. 
today won medal) honors 
fying play of the Zils 
r Puble Links cham 
with a 36-hole score of 


hail rty 


(aul 


The 3yearold McBeath fin 
shed’ one stroke m 
lavern owner Vern Calli 
Sacramento, Calil. whe carded 
a 71. 71—i}42 ower the Harding 
Park course wilh iis par of 3 
36—72 

A threesome 
Tenn. 
cham 
Hard) ng Cup with an agrregate 
score of 445 strokes for the 
‘two days of play 

On the witmung team were 
Junie ‘Buxbaum } 
Gene Frase. 7 
Adie Langert, 7 

Best i6-hole 
qualifying cam? + 
yearold college studen 
Gallardo. mer Los ‘ 

ity champion, fired a 66 to ge 
him a 143 

Defending champion Sam 
Kocsis of Detron withdrew and 
flew home because af the Geath 
of his father-indiaw 

Earl Marcey of Ar 
had 76—74—130. Juliar ; 
iams, Washington. D sheer 
77 for 14. Pete Stink 
\iexandria. Va. was 34—77— 
161 

The two rounds of medal play 
cut the 150-player field to & for . 
the match play starting tomor- 
row with two rounds. A score of 
155 qualified. 


Lightburn Fights 


Zulucta on TY 


NEW YORK. Ju » + 
Lodwig Lightburn of Brith 
Henduras, and Orlande Zule 
eta of Cuba. will Box @ the 
1O-round main event in Mad 
son Soauare Garden Friday 
fight. The bout “ill be tele 
vised nationally 

The fight replaces the Joey 
Giambra-Rocky Castelam bout, 
which was postpenecd watl 
Aug. 3 when Gilamare com 
plained of a tender. ieft hand 
plained of a tender, left hand 


Ison af 


from Memphis. 


round af 


Gay 2s 


> . 
sv 


ungton Va 
uv 


. 


loss.” grumned Sihecm Camry 
Sienee! gall am « ab KUT 
oer meetin ieee te 
game Jim Taree. Cams 
ach Ses gee ear Ge 
\agpenal League fiters wit 
us when Soengr irwte 2 andi 
Lor + = 
The impertam thm 
ma 4 wre peocthers 
VoL” 
pir. 


—_ 


°e 
ie 


said 
er as eee oe FOU 
Can Eee «es the 
hall—anct gel ther ap 2 ime 
= the bells BE fer Ge vem 

Shee ve gett Gees tt 
an Mase” €@aeerr cal ie 


- 


> 


Weill tet You! tell us shout 

Musial, said Stengel “They 

gal around im the winter.’ 
“The Ot¢ laugh came when 


Causey told the pitchers I was | 


their friend on low pitches,” 
Sos Lollar 

1 Leilar gets inte the 
game be ll help you on those 
lew cues. said Casey. 
“*Hiere’s the way be catches 
em Stengel struck a pose 
ater Wing down on his 
stomach om the clubnhouse 
oor 


~~ 


| FBI Wins 


Sports en Radic 
1? Tedey 
TELEVISION 

BOXING—Léiie WeMshes 


rh l ht ee Le PO. 
7. Nine DVelics (2. TS be 


and etxth rans form Caries 
Teen. BLST OF be) and 
Wistryw OSS ach he 
tween 365 and £55 p oe 


Wan ts Nats 


bal 
Cama 

“You mer be care I wid tale 
> Marphy abeat ties” Griufich 
cae. “FP aries 
ID reserve cence” 

When asics ie opment on 
NMurpiy s <a «2a 
Gew>s ener etm, 


a 


{ the Washingees warm sad ¢ 8F Goo 62 


xis 


Tht aut Muaryis 
Rnevw abou 


a we | liver Luoms Us Breaiing 


sersor” 
Griffith family owns 
af th sieck op tie 
cam with .Presiiest (Cele 
the family Wes 
areimetes I ger me 
bougr fem Jeie Jaxitga 
1350 Be sok’ of SD shaces & 


Grifith the suminal head af Backs Bookout, | 
Marys ow 


feure eas = Ge Sates — 


= t= 
Lim tiat | want a ir 


the z 
sme efficial + | 


Eighth in Row °: 


The Federal Bureau of In 
sfigstion )«06WomlhCUits)h—ClCeignth 
craight game im the second 
salt of The Washington Post 
and Times Herald industrial 
League, defeating Colonial Res 
taurent. I14. on the West El 
ipse yesterday 

Billy Carroll was the win- 
wimg pitcher. his eighth straight. 
neiuding two victories in the 
Srst Balt of play. 

Catental Reve 


Cr Othe -Peare® 
eer ew COU ww ~@ 
a 


a6 Ses 


0 
' 


0 
0 
9 
0 


COuw~w “ew sew 
: id | 
@8O OYVQv wtits 


} 
Tories wi 12? Torais 


eGrounded wit for 7 = as +2. 
"Gesunde vur for 


eT... 
Brills 


‘ 


: = 
“Ts... 


te 


Tt e1e tee—t1 
; 


>| with any of them? 


‘leoach and 


Think Now?’ 


By Dick Young | 
B® Y¥. Dally News Service 

Birdie Tebbetts wanted to 
know “What do you think 
about them now’ 

Ted Kiuszewski said the 
same thing. challengingly: | 
"What do you think about us 
now” 

They. the league-leading Cin- 
cinnati Redlegs. had taken 
over the National League All- 
Star clubhouse numerically 

wy had taken over the 
game with six of the 11 NL 
hits. And now, they were inter- 

pre ing the 73 NL victory as a 

ication .foretheir belief 
that . thew are prepared to take 
over;r the pennant. 

To Tebdbdetts, and to the other 
Reds, the result of the game 
was a vindication of Redleg 
squad domination which had 
come in for so much criticism— 
five in the ae lineup, and 
eight on the squa 


Leok at Them 


Tebbetts, stripped down and 
smiling, swept a histrionic hand 
past the row of lockers where 
sat his All-Star Redlegs, and 
said 

“W hy 


not? What's wrong 
Look at 


them. They're all good ball- 


: players. McMillan is the best 
Zi 


defensive ballplayer I've ever 
seen.” 


He referred to his third base) 
added: **‘Jim my} 

Dykes says the same thing, | 
and he goes back a lot further | 
than | ao.” 
Big Kiu. who had sliced one 


= double to left and pounded an- 


- Yor be 


TS a i. Be 4 “arre. 
LP —Turner (6-} 
VE GAGZZA LEAGTE 
ie 4. <. 5 


that” Be bes only Sretece, : 


i teow aad 


Green Bay Signs 


Joe Johnson | 


GREEN BAY. Wis. July 10 


the ete Clerk Gelic> G g°*® ~The Green Bay Packers 
the Grille Gomly comtretl. & said today that a pair of half 


rears igt Wie 


me geued becks Bill Bookout and Joe 


irom the Grits 2 tre johnson, have signed contracts 
fusal optuem o£ tier ck Was for 1956 


for sale. ) 


Seixas Advances 

INTMAS APOLES 
Tepaeedied Vir Setazs of Pini 
aéetphs rar noe cay Toudie 
with 3Becerolrt Maacvrl 
of Logierilic. As 
ng rennd 
més Chammunsiigg ‘eriir 
sa. ts iE game gure 
62. 62 tira 


Tt Tig ope, 


Ken Boyer Steals All-Star Show | 


NATIONAL—Fr. Pg. 27 


thrill in baseball 
went right; ‘twas 
days you always keep oping 
for. Its my biggest day tll i 
get into a world series.” 


“Everything 
2 of a 


MUSIAL said 
homer to the left field bleach 
ers was no suprise. ihe icit 
handed slugger said he used 
to hit to left a lot when he 
first came up and recently 
has been hitting the wide 
pitch to left field 

Musial left the game m@m 
the eighth inning when he 
made a diving catch in short 
left after colliding 
Boyer. He said he wasn't 
injured. It was just that 
Boyer kicked his thigh and «tt 
was a little stuf 


that his 


‘h 
Weiki 


™ ) < 


f.eld- 


make an; 

takes on defense. That 

important with 

and those’ two Cin 

cinnati boys that infield was 
tight.” Alston said. 

He was referring to short- 
Stop Roy McMillan and 
second baseman Johnny Tem- 

le. “They're the best com- 

ion in the game.” 
said and then went through 
the mebbed dressing 


“We didn't 


the g2me 
to come 
he sara 


he did not use in 
“lis 2 long wes 
and not play I know 


But. we were abead and that’s 
the way I wanted te keep 2.” 

He explained that he didnt 
use Roberts because be fel 
he had to go with his i-f 
handed pit against @ 
lineup packed with icfithand 
ed hitters 


cnerTs 


ROY CAMPANELLA wae 
tossing his praise out 
nellis way. He threw anh 
ene curve and twee change 
ups in the lest twe innings.” 
He kept giving me that fast 
one and ber was he quick 
said the relly-polly Brooklyn 
catcher 

Antonelli sai@é because he 
had a good iead te protect 
he didn't want te walk ans 
one. “] kept throwing & m 
there and # worked fine” 
the Giant pitcher explaimed 

Willie Mays seid he “met « 


Ante 


room . curve ball nice ‘» even” for 


and apologized 
te each of the 


individually 


eight players 


bis 400-foot-plus home rus 
| Asked who was the toughest 


$. 


pricher he facet Ean 
wr? rus aS = 
| Gent ee 
Ther sere 


tary: Wyn 


ie. 
Tr 
so 


Tas 
ee 
bed % 


c Tae tre? 
3 Ge aS 


or™ * 
: 


ime are  Ganisie a “ie 
rigmived ime be euperted 
“Tt wae @ fet Gectibg’ be cad 


Scorer had 


Bockout. Sil. 185 pounds. 
\teeite infe the Packer lineup 


\om defense last year. his rookie 


sasom He played college bal! 


hiy Dex Obizfoma and Austin Col- 


ege. He's from Wichita Falls, 
ex. 

Jennses. 2 twoe-vear veteran. 
the Dest day of his pro 
career last year when he ran 


the Wester> Tee @p 7% yards against the Chica 

tut ge Cardinais 

‘or @ Callege player. 
a 


4 former Boston 
Jebusen lives 
© Bouberm Masa. 


Mrs. Sammy Kane 
Wins Carbert Cup 


Mrs Sammy Kage won the 
Ciase A Carbert Tropity at Ken- 
wooed Gell and Country Club 
yesterday. lap to par. Mrs. 
George Nobile and Miss Daphne 
Duttes tied for sesond, both 
evew var 


in Ciges B. Mrs. J. H. Bald 


L*SE COIPPITH WEMORIAL LFAGTE 
'tere siorace § Fat «4 


‘Musial hit one. and the 


other sharply to right, nedded. | 
“That's right,” he said “I guess | 
we proved we're no mistake.” | 


tyr. What De You Think 


He pointed his challenging | 
chin at a reporter who regu- 
largly covers the Dodgers and 
said: “What do you think now?” | 

Nobody, standing within! 
breathing distance of the pier- 
pilings Kiu uses for arms, 
would think of contradicting | 
the Cincy strongman. | 

A brave man might have! 
isaid: “Let's not go overboard 
on this thing. Let's try to re- 
member that Willie Mays hit a| 
two rum homer, and Stan’ 
last 
time they were seen, neither 
Mays nor Musial -vas wearing 
those jazzy little vests that are 
part of the distinctive Cincy 
uniforms.” 

But a mere man nods and 
says: “You did fine. You don't 
have to shout about this thing 
You've beaten Brooklyn often 
enough this season to have 
proven your club a genuine 
thing.” 

That didn't seem enough for 
Kilu or Tebbetts. They harped! 
on the subject as though it had | 
become a complex with them: | 
as though they wanted every-} 
one in the world to confirm! 
their faith in themselves: and) 


\im their ability to win the NL | 


flag. 


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Top seeded Hugh Lynch of 
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Lynch defeated Glen Adams 
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Thompson 
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Fred Kell- 


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BOSTON, July 10 #—Rich- 
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The Minors 


AMERICAY yore 
P Ts 


33 

ie | te 
bs os s ov ite 

Peal 67 4@ St? Charts 

set LEAGUE 


Bob Addie’s Column... 


has accused our pitchers, with the exception of Chuck Stobbs, 
| of being able to place the ball where they wanted it. 

The large crowd was looking for Mantle, the Baseball 
Bunyan, to rocket another of his pfodigious wallops out of 
that you “sleep with your rifle.” | > Ma on mye = ¥ ‘iitth Stadion wore He: as 
Pet L eet Certainly, Ted's bag of bats occupied ° | tremendous clouts in (or out o ri tadium. 
iS rrp 13 £5 at) | 
4a:| 48m honored place at the foot of the | 
wm | bed. 

“I only hope I don't prove a bust,” 
| Ted said thoughtfully when somebody | 
wished him good luck. “I'd 
| foul up at this stage 

Everybody assured hi the 
| Only bust he would be would have to 
. wait for a few years. And that bust 
would be in the Hall of Fame. Ted 
gave a quick grin as he fondied his 
Aavorite bat and announced he was 
going to get a super-sized steak and 
go to bed. 

Williams wasn't exactly a washout in yesterday's All-Star 
game, although he delivered only once. That one time was 
what the crowd wanted. It happened in the big sixth inning 
when the American Leaguers shot the works with five straight 
hits and Ted parked his big blow off lefty Warren Spahn into 
the rightfield bullpen. That's a fair country wallop 
| FOR A MOMENT, Williams entered the record book again 
when he hit that homer give him a total of four 
for his All-Star appearances etching through 12 games 
Only Stan Musial, lll oceupy a niche along with Wil- 

liams in the Hall of Fame some day, had hit as many. But the 
man from St. Louis rubbed out Ted's name before the ink 

’ was dry. Musial hit his fifth All-Star homer in the seventh off 
Boston's Tom Brewer and again remains alone 


ts ' 
4a = : 
Ss AS) 


ree | 


4 rite 


2 eas | 


"24 “? 


TED WILLIAMS was sitting around his room in the 
Statler the night before the All-Star game and was 
watching a friend swing his bat. As an ex-Marine, Ted 
probably took to heart the old tradition of the Corps 


oe ieee 


fan Antente 1 
COAST LEAGU: 


rac 

wt 

Ll. Anee’s 3} oe Re , : : 

A ae WILLIE MAYS, virtually a forgotten man, provided a big 

thril} with his pinch-homer in the fourth off Whitey Ford. 

Willie took the distance honors yesterday since his long blow 

landed about one-third of the way up into the leftfield | 

| bleachers 

Thus, it was ironic that the only “cheap” homers were 

hit by Mantle and Musial. The latter. of course, reached the 

leftfield seats lefthanded while Mantle was batting from the 
right side against Spahn. 

Before the game, there was many a gag about the Ameri- 

can League playing the “Cifcinnati All-Stars.” Five Redlegs | 

| started the game and the alleged banjo hitters like Johnny 

Temple and Roy MeMillan played an important part. Team- 

| mate Ted Kliuszewski, who didn't make the first team, con- 


INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE 
Pet WwW L Pet. 
oat Ceolems 41 47 ores 


Teer RDAY'S RESULTS ' 
Rechester Mertreal nat ew 
sot THE RN ASSOCIATION 
uw“ Pret 
Rirbem We 5 m that 


Saeeheitie 89 ft 


TFs TERDAY . 
{ haltanceea 


ak 


Addie 


who carried his slump right into the All-Star game 

From a local standpoint, it was trifle disappointing. Our 
man, Roy Sievers, got in as a pinch-hitter in the ninth and 
popped up 

But it was a great thrill for the crowd to see so many stars 
in one game at Griffith Stadium. Too bad. we can't pick up 
the option 


to 


In Swing Goll 


—— 


Harvie Ward 
Low With 68 vx 


game couldn't have been called ‘ 
’ , +) ’ . % - ’ : 
dull. Except for a fact that there was the unusual sight of SAN FRANCISCO. July 104 
ery | sriffith Stadium il , i 
— rn Per . : . cae : be oo there ve t _ . National amateur cham- 
u“ : [aitntul must have thought they were w ’ : 
A’s play the Nats on some drowsy Saturday afternoon oa had 
| The game picked up steam as it went along and you could nate & 4 on - 
er or i roi’ 
| say the climax came when the American League made its elebrit . 
: : c Drities par©rticipatin 
one boom and then fizzled. This was mostly an Ameri€an . . 
. , weeks United Swing 
League crowd. If you could have registered the vocal 
' on , Tournament 
emotions. It was a “hep” crowd, too a 
: . ry hia t rney 
For instance, there was a disgruntied boo when Vic Power this tourt 
went in to bat for Mickey Vernon in the sixth. That's when 
Sherm Lollar and Al Kaline had extended the hitting streak 


Patty,Stewart Gain 


In Irish Tennis 


DUBLIN, July 10 #—Budge 
Patt y and Hugh. Stewart. Cali. 
ians who live in Paris. won 
wir second round matches to- 
ay in the Irish Lawn Tennis 
championships 

Patty, 1950 Wimbledon cham- 
‘tow pion, defeated H. Barniville of 
and Ireland, 7—5, 6—4. Stewart. the 
. ta.4/heoe irish champion, defeated 
m "Ll Bowen, Ireland, 6—1, 6—0 
Clud Gil Shea, also of Los Anzeles. 
beat Victor Gotto of Ireland 
§—2, 8—6 


who WwW 


As a spectacie, this All-Sta: 


r 
pion Har 
cisco, Wilh 


the 
the rs 


o 


a 


golfers across 
the Nation their 
scores, less handicaps. with any 


of the 14 by a donation fo the 


could match 


Four Groups|: 
Make Bids 
For Tigers 


' 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Wednesdey, July il, 


m) 


1956 


, 
DETROIT, July 10 # ~The! _ LOS ANGELES, July 10 # | 


Detroit Tigers have turned over 


iwere the four bids submitted 


| tributed a pair of doubles for poor Dale Long of the Pirates | 


Powerful University of South- 
ern California and UCLA 
joined forces late today in 
a strong move aimed at re- 
lieving drastic punishment 
meted out by Pacific Coast 
Conference faculty represent- 
atives against football play- 
rs 

Dr. Fred D. Fall of USC 
set off the movement wiih a 
sharply worded telegram to 
Dr. Robert Gordon Sproul, 
chairman of the Presidients’ 
Council of the PCC. 

He urged the presidents 
meet within two weeks: and 
agree to suspend all pending 
ineligibility bans imposed on 
athletes in the conference. 
He also asked the presidents 
develop a new athletic 
purity code 
Dr. Fagg swung into; action 
as an aftermath of punishment 
handed to USC, as well) as pre- 
viously to UCLA and Washing- 
ton, by faculty representatives 
at San Francisco last Sunday, 
and before that in other meet- 
ings 


to the American League pres- 
ident and the commissioner of 
baseball a list of four prospec- 
tive purchasers of the fran- 
chise. All the bids su>mitted 
are in the $$-million bracket. 

Walter ©. (Spike) Briggs, in 
Washington for the All-Star 
game, consulted with President 
| Will Harridge of the American’ 
League arid Commissioner Ford 
Frick last night 

Detroit newspapers said these 


Bill Veeck, former owner 
of the Cleveland Indians and | 
St. Louis Browns. bid of $5.- 
250,000 


Fred Knorr of Detroit and 
John Fetzer of Kalemazoo. | 
radio executives, bid of $5 
million 

Jack Cooke, owner of the 
Toronto Maple Leafs base»all 
team in the International 
League, $5,180,000 


Robert Goldstein. Hollv- 


$5,050. High point of the faculty | 
fathers’ decisions was the in- 
eligi bilit y ban stamped on foot-| 
ball players, including 42 at | 
USC 

“In view of the faculty rep-| 
resentative'’s interpretation of 
our directive of June 18, which 
interpretation | am s@ure is in 
error, | earnestly request that 
you call a meeting of the PCC 
presidents within me J next two! 
weeks, ’ the wire sak 

“I earnestly insist that it is 
imperative that at ¢hat meet- 
ing we do two things 

“Suspend all _— sanc- 
tions that affect player eligi 
bility until after naw rules! 


wood movie producer 


After clearance by the com 
mission it will be up to the 
trustees of the estate of the 
late Walter O. Briggs Sr. to 
select the group that will as- 
sume control of the Tigers and 
Briggs Stadium by Oct, 1 


WAL Wins Lacrosse 


MANCHESTER, Engiand., 
July 10 #—The Washington 
and Lee University lacrosse 
team. on tour through northern 
England, took an 8&4 victory 
from the University of Man 
chester today. 


— 


PCC Presidents Asked 
To Suspend Bans 


have been developed and in 
the light of those rules. 

“That we develop the essen- 
tial principles of aid to athletes 
that will apply in the future.” 
The telegram read in part 

In Berkeley, Calif., the Uni- 
versity of California publicly 
warned football cotch Lynn 
(Pappy) Waldorf ig any fur- 
ther violation “would not be 
tolerated.” California was fined 
$25,000 for aid t» athletes in 
violation of conference rules 

His contract ‘here has one 
more year to rn, his tenth at 
California. Sch@ol officials said 
he will remain as head football 


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to five straight batters. Power popped up and George Kell 
grounded into a double play and that was that. 


United Voluntary Services 0: 
ganization, which provides golf 
facilities for veterans’ hospitals 
and military bases 

Those who chose to match 
scores with Bing Crosby and 
Bob Hope had to better 69. The 
crooner had a 73 which, with 
his handicap of four strokes, 
gave him the 69. Hope had 76 
with a handicap of seven 

Other net scores: Patty Berg. 
78: Gen. Omar N. Bradley, 72 
Cary Middlecoff, 73: Fay Crock- 
er, 72 Chick Evans, Jack 


WHEN MUSIAL WAS scraped by Ken Bover. who earned 
the ‘appiause of the fans for his great offensive and defensive 
work, there was another storm of protest. You see, Stan the 
Man is quite well-known here 

Mickey Mantle could have been the biggest flop of the 
All-Star game except for that one line drive in the sixth 
which landed in the leftfield seats. Whatever the National 
| League pitchers were doing to the young man who is the 
| Scourge of the American League, they were doing it well. 

Mickey Mantle struck out three times. Bob Friend hung 
him in the second inning. Warren Spahn fanned him in the 

_ fourth and Johnny Antonelli in the eighth. 
Chuck Dressen, the Washington manager, who was coach- 


Loo 


THE ORIGINAL 


MANNY, 


75 


MOE AND JACK -— 


Harrison, 81: Pat Lesser. 77 
Gen. Floyd L. Parks, 73; 
Rodgers, 72: Louise Si 


and Fred Waring. 72 


ing at third for the American League, must have been paying 
strict attention to the pitches fooling Mantle—undoubtedly 
storing his information for a day. But then, nobody 


Ph 


Roote Lomperye. 
ond Fresno, Cet. Meade 
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Schesley, Po 
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iggs, 


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“oe e"/Marciano Has Ruptured Disc, May Require Operation 


—— 


‘ 


AMERICAN Fr. 27. Ph as 

JinxTalk |) ne pry | 
| . . LEAGUE Hoad, the Wimbledon’s new | five days and I just can't fit 

Scotted at To Decide in re RS oo . tennis champion, is one of the | it into my schedule.” 


world’s busiest 21-year-olds. London mewspapers and 
He is so busy that he does not | several tennis writers advised 


52 

| , ‘Ch ines ae f 

By Stengel Two Weeks | sa 7 : have time to go to Moscow. against the trip. 

oe im. | 34 ' | The big, blond from Glebe, Meanwhile, Fred Perry, 
33 . 

| 31 


Majors Hoad Spurns Bid to Go to Moscow 


LONDON, July 10 #—~Lew “The trip would take about 


| Raltimore ... | New South Wales, was in- | Wimbledon champion in 1934 
126 yg ~ Regge ngley pe BROCKTON, Mass. July 10 oot he Ke vited to Moscow to give ex- | 35-36, said he “is still negotiat- 
\s f : # -Rocky Marciano, retired ty . hibitions for Russia's young | ing and ‘considering the Res 
two we bit, either. heavyweight boxing champion,| YESTERDAY'S RESULTS | crop of tennis players. Today | sians’ invitation to go to h<os- 


| 


HE pen Te caer eae “— hospitalized Friday when he! Ne games scheduled. he seid he “could not make | cow and Leningrad and teach 
st n = a couple of times — a ot igg oe « args play TODAY'S GAMES it.” | their tennis‘inc* +2.” 
ing with Ris Syearold daugh-| No games scheduled. 
v0 :* might have got a rally ter, suffered a ruptured disc in| “s 
Stengel explained he had|‘he lower part of his back, his) NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Sherm Lollar bat for Yogi Berra |” “gr pe hero uid anid 
in the sixth because Berra's An : OUNG 5256 | Cincinnatl .. 
finger was hurt on a foul tip Marciano will remain in Brock-| witwaukee 
“He told me it was numb,”|°2® Hospital for at least “two “pe 
Stengel said ’ jor three more weeks” to under-ig¢ touis __ 
nge ‘ |go “conservative treatment” for | Pittsburgh ta 
Roots for Sievers =e injury. Cc lee 
Berra, watching the ninth on| Dr. Gould said if the rup- 43 
i ithe TV set in the dressing — = ho ag coepeud 30 41 
we ~ | | 'room, forgot his sore finger Suc reatment within at ‘ 
~ f 1 | when the 9 te had two period, surgery “will have to be| YESTERDAY'S RESULTS | 
teh oe ie mes on and Washington's Roy | considered.” No games scheduled. ) 
y \Sievers at bat Marciano is suffering only TODAY'S GAMES | 
f \ ; \ “Hit one, Roy, hit one,” he Slight pain while in bed. When| New York at Milwaukee | 
| i : q rooted audibly. he rises the injury causes pain (night)—Gomer (5-8) vs. Crone 
Hite 4 ROM Ar TNE 7 ey How was the finger? “Swol- in his back and right leg. (8-5) or Burdette (9-4). | 
Associated Press jlen.” Yogi grunted. He iced it} Dr. Gould said the rupture (Only game scheduled.) 


> and thought it would be all was “a fresh injury,” and had 
WHAT WENT WRONGT—Casey Stengel, manager of the right in = day or so. ‘nothing to do with Rocky's ca. 


losing American Leaguers, scratches his head in bewilder- A’s F Pl 

rf When somebody commiser-|reer as a boxer. Ast farm ess 
meee Se dressing reom after yesterday's 7-3 victory BY (sted with Sievers for popping} An operation would require|) KANSAS CITY July 10 w 
the National League at Griffith Stadium. Stengel’s record (up he said: “I had the pitch, extended convalescence, D T.| The Kansas City A's lay nn 


now is one victory: and five defeats in All-Star games. too. Maybe it was too good.|Gould said, which might mean} ) 
oe ~ Still I was glad to get in the six to eight months in the hos-/NOunced the optioning of util-| 


game. It was a big thrill for| pital for the former champion. ity infielder Rance Pless to 
am POVICH—From Pg. 27 || me. | Tracing the injury, Dr. Gould?pichmond of the International 


Measured by Ted Williams’ |s<id: 

° bd testiness, the defeat must have| “Rocky told me he noticed a League. He was hitting 262 | Fat! 

This Morning .. . |b ite ese! Tod : 

€ a civil, Williams even|two wee ore com to the 

barked at the gentleman from hospital, and, in doing some T ays Events vv~ BA A ey T ; ae xR 
- — the New York Times. That was calisthenics in Bermuda, it be- SERVICE BASEBALL 
goes back to work. Williams grounds out and it is equ nt | when he was asked if he real-|came much worse. SO = nie naiar woe SRD ) ; 
to a fresh breeze for Friend. ized he had batted 20 times in| “Several days before coming SANDLOT BASERALL | | | no ty Cc © T ¢ bg 


|All-Star competition without'to the hospital Rocky was play- Wash. 


. Stiver Hilt Unier Printers. 
30, National League, im the fourth. Boyer singles and /titing a homer before his blast ing with his daughter, Mary|Paes, wun” see el 
Alston wins a battle of managerial wits with Stengel by in- (in the sixth. Ann. Oxon HR ee Atchison-Keller. Pair. 
up, caught her — » me Gaver eo 


Willie } iu Yo Williams snapped back: “Ya| “He tossed her 
ging ile Mae a x ich he fr Gus Bi, Yoo | Teer ee es easleeneente a Pe ME, meee | 
pee Cas os 8 ee — J P tan average of better than one) ing touches to it. and zane Spam ot Westmont Gott 


as a memento for some fan half way up in the left field [homer in 20 times up over a! 
bleachers. jseason? I'll tell you who. T. S. 
|W. Nobody else, Musial or no- 


40, National League, in the fifth. Third baseman George |S. sean Gide tins tm ai 


Kell is very much alive on Johnny Temple's bunt but the | sh.u: one for 35.” 
fer eee ane ces a core hare ae eee 
’ . ae _ Asked if he knew he had tied 
Musial briefly as the All-Star 
50, NATIONAL LEAGUE, In the sixth. Ted Kluszewski, | homer king with four, Williams 
who isn't supposed to hit to left field, does, for two bases, | Said: “I knew it, acme -7 as 
MeMill : , guys seem to orget tnat 
yarn Pang ma ti aa t vps ges . be secon Seacw in aol four of these things.” 
All-Star Games, ge u home with a blooper over Vernon's i thon Boston’s great slug- 
head. ger was busy posing for cam- 
era addict Early Wynn and die 


Will) a Nel cussing camera lenses with an- 
Ted Williams, in a little tableau entitled—“Seeing Nellie ether amateur photographer. 


Home,” scores Nellie Fox with a homer into the right-center Smiling Wynn was one pitch- 
bull-pen. Willie Mays and Duke Snider missed the catch, |er holding up his head. Wynn 
which was made by bullpen pitcher Johnny Kucks of the (told a comedian: “Sure I knew 


Yankees, who played Williams perfectly behind the protection |I had a no-hitter. I knew it ling 
of the fence. when that first man came up y hau 


Me 


in the ninth. 


“It was lots of fun being here. 10° 
“Williams now has tied Musial for most All-Star homers (I'm glad I got to pitch.” ° tra, 
with four,” the official scorer announces, se it must be so. m 


Clark Griffith Ti, = of ma d 
Calvin Griffith, president of 
Mickey Mantle follows Williams’ clout with one of bis | the Washington mS aseball kes five: 
own into the left field seats and the AL has three runs for | Club, had the thrill of his life IN MOTOR TRANSPORT 


the inning. Mantle took the short route and the only need | when Basebal! Commissioner 
for a tape measure on that one was to establish by how ar at Gece aad a —_ 
many hundred feet it fell short of some of his best homers. first ball to the 15-year-old 
grandnephew of the late ang, 
“=. 


53, NATIONAL LEAGUE, at the end of six. There is | president of the Nats. 
more trouble for the National when Lollar and Kaline follow PR a, — ig ge _ LEADS THB WAY 
Mantle’s clout with singles, and none out, but it evaporates | Cieveland pitcher, Herb | 
when Kell grounds to shortstop. McMillan, who works there, | Score, standing with his 


starts a double play to get Antonelli out of the inning. teammates on the first base 
line. 


—_ 


7.3. National, at the end of seven. Musial, reacting like MICKEY MANTLE was one 
the Player of the Decade should, reclaims the All-Star home-/| of the last to dress ... Al- 
run championship from Williams by getting his fifth, left- | though he limped perceptibly 


handing it into the left-field seats off Tom Brewer of the Red | Towunding the bases on his 
homer, Mickey insisted his 


Spx. knee was O.K. ... Bob Friend 
Brewer gets rid of Willie Mays by walking him, which he was the pitcher the boys 
shouldn't of done as the saying goes, because Kluszewski | praised the most... Even 


, Bobo Newsom was talking 
uses only part of his muscle to drill a two-bagger against the | 1). impressed he was 


right field wall and get Willie home. . . « Said if Friend had a 
windup like “Ol Bobo” he'd 
KEN BOYER. who is supposed to play only third base for really be unbeatable. 


Pitcher Jim Wilson, whose 
the Cardinals, but is really empire-minded, goes out into left skull was fractured and 


field for Ted Williams’ short hoist. He misses the catch and | career nearly ended when 
comes up with a mouthful of sod. But Williams is out because | Hank Greenberg conked him 
Musial races up to make the catch Boyer missed. with a batted ball 11 years 
7. Se why m= . FP 

Walt Alston doesn’t like the way Musial landed and takes | » hard fm heck io die aecee 
him out of the lineup after the play despite Stan's insistance | by Stan Musial .. . Genial 
he isn't hurt. It is a nice gesture by Alston, anyway, because Mickey Vernon admitted he 


, ' would have liked to bat in 
it gives the crowd a chance to cheer the exit of the valiant | |. | sixth when Stengel sub 


warrior. stituted Vie Power... “Still, 
it was a good spot for a 


The Washington uniform finally makes its appearance in | Tighthander” Mickey said . . . 


: Keminded of the boos on 
the All-Star Game with one out and two on in the ninth, worse Stengel’s maneuver and told 


luck. Stengel asks Roy Sievers to pinch hit and he pops to | be stil) had a lot of friends 
Boyer and the cheers flicker out. here, Mickey smiled: “] hope 

so.” ... Detroit's Ray Boone 
rejoined: “He ought to. he 
pores here 19 years, didn't 


oe SC - 


oom 
WANTED =f Miguel Ties x case 87" 
Reliable Parties J Yan Donck, 137 | Boat Directory Cuts Tr 


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To Take Over | 10 #—Flory Van Donck of Bel- Pooks "tun but © yeh rune sand 
Payments On This |gium and Angel Miguel of| "#4. Solomons 


r 5 5 FORD Spain fired two sub-par rounds; "SA" BUSBER — BOA 
\today in the first half of the 
|French Open champion- “oar bea bath dh, Teese, 
ship to share the 36-hole lead sted Pees oe ; 
2-de. Soden at 137, seven under par. oO F 


John Jacobs, British Ryder 
$78 5 Total | Cup player, was in third place : 
‘with 68-70—138 and Antonio WT brides deck cruiser TOU 
Cerda of Argentina was fourth i sleeps 4: bath saliey: Year. 
with 68-72—140. ; fal ea : Per 
Christy O'Connor of Ireland. own and en w 
‘Carlos Celles of Spain and d = ize pow 
Ricardo Rossi of Argentina) - vere ig og rarity: make meet the 
ied for place at 141. -time “Y 


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But, Alas, 


Here's Ken Boyer of the 
St. Louis Cardinals—field- 
ing star of yesterday's 
game—in action. The 
photos, made in rapid suc- 
cession, show Boyer spear- 
ing a liner from the bat of 
Harvey Kuenn of Detroit 
in the first inning. Boyer 
was playing third base for 
the National League. 


—> 


These were the -manufac- 
turers of three of the four 
homers swatted by the All 
Stars yesterday. The pho- 
tos show (A) Stan Musial 
of the Nationals scoring 
after his blast in the 
seventh inning, (B) Ted 
Williams tallying for the 
American League in the 
sixth and (C) Mickey Man- 
tle duplicating teammate 
Ted's feat a few minutes 
later. 


__ 


As Baseball Commissioner 
Ford Frick watches, Clark 
Griffith Il, grandnephew 
of the late Clark C. Grif- 
fith, tosses out the ball to 
start yesterday's All-Star 
game. f 

| Paetes ty 42 0nd OF 


ene: a . eo 
t Our Nats 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


Wednesday, July jl, 1956 31 


Tribute is paid to the mem- 
ory of Clark Griffith jefore 
the start of yesterday's All- 
Star baseball game in Grif- 
fith Stadium. American 
League stars are lined along 
the first-base path at right 
and the National Leaguers 
along the third base line. 


Tnited Press Pho’ oe 
oe - — . 


AL Pitcher Billy Pierce (top) 
and. Catcher Yogi Berra 
race for ball as NL Pitcher 
Bob Friend (19) lays down 
a sacrifice bunt in the 3d 
inning. The play moved"Roy 
MeMillan to 2d. base, from 
where he scored a moment 
later for the National 
League's first of seven runs. 


me. os - =. - - 


By Arthur Ellis. Staff Photographer 


Willie Mays of the New York Giants is congratulated by Ken Boyer (14) and Dale Long (right) as he crosses the 
plate after hitting a two-run homer in the fourth inning. At left is American League Catcher Yogi Berra. 


oe. 


Ad 


te 


Peer > ener 


a al 


ae 


“4 rer’ 


weer 4 


bx; 
wae il 
ws ‘is Ri Smart 5 Hi Beef owe 
nthia 


a m ooee- an 
Aceparade li 
) Psychotherapy : | -. 
6—1; 
2-year- olds pores | Mary's ubbie 
15 + Dede te nnv o. ‘ 
115 Show ‘Hero ark Dan 
Randali 1g! Emory Mal 
ait Maynuan ‘aa ine ha’ idence 
. 
+Mise Patience oO ‘ » $20,000 


Noir. mp u 
all Leaves U e ‘ eipassaae eee js 
ROLL ESA dis 20. 83.60, 82.40; | pcatcolds mo cle, | paswer Oe 


DIE. $2.60 £ .* . * 
joeest to the pace te the strated, eeee . y< _. une 
ive ~ 


jg att nine _|F litter Girl | Racing Charts at Charles Town nak ut er ie ines 


WOO. 
t+} wa 


ee eS 


WEATHER ye yey FAST 
ine. plece Winner, H. N. Dickinson _Jr as br. f. (4) by , 
FIRST RACE Charen I Tow pou a f Eauistone—R ling Glory. Trained by J. P. Simpson. *OGann’s Jewel 


Horses and People|, +. _ Re a oer 


By Walter Haight———_____ In k eature E fie (rieneh 


HUBERT KERR. who celebrates 52 “Be Kind to Animals” 

. cron By Walter Haight 

weeks each vear has invaded Charlies Town for the first : 
time in several seasons. However, he left the dogs, cats | Be ~y Bec ret (Herman! aad alion nie the rail and euttougp t Joe An’ ira in | : 
os ’ LES OWN Ww, Va | —_ “ 7 took command al the «ta fon well ta ne stretch . : eo. —Leet & 
and birds in the area of the Bowie track in good hands, he HARI I Wh, |, MISS EL MONO. 422.20, 810,20. 06.20; RED PLUSH, 49.20 atten bes : pti PWNS BES aE easter. re ae 
says... Kerr, who sometimes ex- ; July 10—Flitter Girl, who until /s2.40; SCOTCH KNIOG 85.20 iden ie cl uo im the drive San ESbob: s-yent-slas We, Awe, KE 
pounds 


° 
~ 


| ked pest 
: | (Co ht. by Triangle Publications. Inc.) riIrTH & pee About 4% f For 4- i¢ ad up: ess : 
Around The Tracks Pays S 4 5 err. 1908. be Trinaste Pe ee Roe Oecd) ies 


* eT 


oc 
a 


uc de 
ortersvii le 
s ti 


wo OB 
“6-17 IF Ow .. 


~ 
a 


Start Reporter 


55253385 


ee ee) 
” 


T) Mone. unhurried to the stretch care oe" resolute! ’ ) Ac bout % furlones per 4-vyear-olds : J 
plodes when he believes horses are today had raced only at the cu hori he st the concluding | UP: : f pt 4:18. Start ooor Won isiar Rover ida oes moekee 
mistreated. is known throughout the Wheel , . , st Rod Fi way torware 6 * displaced bar le _ tr, Siem ‘Dy ' 

“Pre, ‘» : é' eelin rac showed shes um ive in th ° win. rained b verbat 
trade as “Dynamite”... The veteran : ner Boot Tune clased halle Gn the emteiae tm the take | ~ jockey Wal. PP % Bt: 
.¢ nea misase ; 
, ni} 120 8 } 


trainer currently is conditioning two % * still at home as long as shes ; 


: Darcey LM $30 
horses for Aaron A. Horwitz, one- . -. in West Virginia by winning SECOND Boce~ ner “hycoo. Off st 2 Pt She gee BP J ieee, $02 © hog €; & GOan 
time unofficial mayor of the town of a aa is | Won driying: piace same. Wi Mrs. M. J. B br un Brand jorden) 117 5 & ¥ 
Bowie. The horses are Dear Richard om ‘ the Royal Prince. featur ing tne if ct Bive Brandy ‘Treined by G yrne im 44 ; B ' i , po H ¢ 
and Patricia Lynch. He expects to Tuesday program | , Wet % Str Fin Odds |& iCevniee | tee of se oo ae 
have them in winning form soon, and | &. The daughter of Hasteville,' *ooo.."hes is 1 1 i‘ oan mpoodie mtr i | ii} 
for a campaign on the Maryland ° rrof : m ¢ Tused . 
ie 4 5 30 ros . 


} 
: 
12 

. who reached the winner's circle | Sieipner i 22 40. 62 20 “RO [NT . 7 40 

minor tracks after Charles Town a he ‘Pindell) 1 cross §£ $5.00, 8) 40 
i 


DARCY. 82.60 
RACE TANDEM. $3 80 
Waercy. off well and tien early 


Although Dynamite has had some “—_ at odds of 13-1 and 11-1 in the 
good equine meal tickets in his day, a only other victories of her ca 


, : * + : ' 
' in : ds id thi st Ah and arew clear t n ri 
‘ aor ) i : jlthe atier fought th ti for As. acy t% . | . . 
the best known hereabouts was Dizzy ’ reer provided her scattered = = ATTACK 63 00 6330 62 a a Og , retch > = e sli pt h rive. Race Tandem 
" - a Ks : . > ' - © ' 
Dame who once won four straight at backers with a $45.20 win pay- «7% DOLLARGOPABT. £4.80 SEVENTH RACE Charle sen Ci > S.enbeete 
the West Virginia track The old ; off, second largest of the local 7) MISS EL MONO gr? . — vin - Poluch's ik. bf “ 
mare when turned out to graze, session Double (3 P we $107 60) Hasteville Mir Helen x Tra! ned , . ° . | J S 
. Haight (1) CLOSE ATTACK ’ Horse Jockey Wai ir. Pin 
: hit »» UAT : is #8 i? | } 
) Bar : " . ; : ; 
Vv v Te 


28 gern 
= 


z 


He 


3 ganesssee 


would follow Kerr like a hound dog With a fast track under het 
| want to thank Tom Sheehan Horseman's Jourmal for | fo irst n nee she 
* * : . ’ e r tne nm? : ’ ie + ice STre 
: . j ACE—About 7 or 3 -o1 im- 
naming me among the best ten raeing writers who didn't | made her debut last September. wo er aioe Ont at 238 Start ge pe BN 
h the o : : : « Winner. Colin Mac ak. b (3) bs ¥ 
ave a piece in the book “Best Sports Stories of 1956” (F. P Flitter Girl carrier the colors 2. ener. Some maets od ats . tae." . , Wi 
Dutton, $3.75) , Apparently | some horsemen don't like of Pat Polu nd wire two - lochen Wai BP 
money. At ieast there's a en lengt ’ ef Milton tlieh 
notice on the racing secre- ’ Pplinger’s neit Song the 
. — : . : » 
lary s office board at Charlies Paddock Picks favorite in e field of elgnt 
Town which reads: “I am Fi Mv wi Third money went to Mrs. R. Tt 
still holding small purse ive More Ww inners Campbell's Tolna Rose for 2 ' 
. : » Bes 0 
hec r rile . In the race exclusively for : 
checks fo the following Paddock, The Washington ...... oa Ailics Flitter Girl was | $4 80, $4.00, $3.00: METISSE. $8 00 
for the 1956 spring meeting Post and Times Herald's clocked in 1.17 for the about six rollie! ommend soon after the start steadiir tm 
(signed) lHiorsemen's Book handicapper, picked five win- furlongs an was in charge of . en ) he «et "closed 's = 
Country Like Farm. Bel Air. card at Charles Tewn born and fr: d ~< who is rot RT RACE. OH Bh Set MBS vear- ods and ’ 
\ . . ow transplante irginian ( mie 6. Wor oi 
id.. is the new president of The dean of selectors at = in eddit a fic ae loam r b oy piace dt coene. soot, Tare. ee gs eA "Byte CROWS #0. $2.60. $2.20; CHARLIE FORD $2.80 
" sat) : ‘eo? . 4 * 
tne Maryland Horse Breed- the West Virginia track put victory.-Ardu rode the after- us : a took command at pace. 2 igen his, eppest tion 
“¥ 7? Morse . ° ar . easily 
ers A sso lation } oung Pons, his stamp of approval on noon s shortes pi iced Winner Lady Cross arian _ ' ’ ' the winner 
; caialeail roms Ollt ACEO " 
from a family prominent in | cyos, Attack. $3.80. in the |'™ the previous race, the day's > and ue ~ avs Al Purse, 
thoroughbred racing and secondary feature, the Liberty ‘nr tee i 
second; Toilich, $4.80, in the | tow, reates iti Market 
breeding for many years, ‘ o we mE 
succeeds capable Danny Shea third; Roll Equal, $6.20, in To the satisfaction of the 
: > « , 
, F P 3 . D the fifth; Darcy, $2.60, in the | favorite players, he scored with 
. Former Jockey anny “tating . ci .’ Dare hn 
tieden ‘tian Sedna cam sixth and Very Special, $3.40, | *T@™* Siems’ Darcy, which paid DY CROSS. §820. $4.20 63.00; CROSS OLITE. 86.40. 
; 


a mere $2.60 84 rey NEDD JONES. ~* 20 
in the eighth. 
Junior, who doesn't want to 


‘ ; Lady Cross took comm efter th 
Arduini made it three win- u Sane but th T man. oe itterbit 
} Aa. . wi : 
be president, but yearns to ners for the day by taking the) if*t, Grive and was, eateni A the winner at the fink i 
ninth event with M. Tyson Gil- Needies Jones rallied in the late stages GORA, #2 
become a race rider. He = an" 
; JAMAICA ENTRIES pin’s Agora, a $13.80 shot. 
weighs 40 solid pounds at t: #3000; 4-yenr-oldy up: clmg | Darcey had an early tussle| 
this writing... D. Graham, reli 116 Ire ... 10 disposing of F I Brown's | AR 
x : : > “as . : ~. . = . ? . 
guest handicapper last Mom (sia, ti er le Bun 733, Cross End, but finally prevailed Ocean Downs Entries oe LINGTON ENTRIES 
day, led the pressbox horse redueti ALD OO |} getting home two and one half) Ninth Night of 24-Night Meet —- See eens WD: cing. 
pickers at Charlies Town, Har " 8 | Down Home ii¢ lengths ahead of the longshot FIRST RACE—1 mile fpece): purse 
rs or 'ts . : _ aa ’ : 
| —— ~ ai te immer 5 Rnol 3 Third in the field of nine was 9600. Class 25 
CARMEN FRANCIOTTE, | ®esset Ore: iC. S. Quigiey’s Race Tandem.'"{ wortham h Was: CONSENSUS 
for Eddie Cnhristison fe farm -Jacob Varcy making it two out of Spite teeee Bs 
summer, has teamed up 2 |: $3700: 2-year-olds:; claiming. | thre or the year, Was clocked 
I aay + + | ePull-Mum 1 rmigera .. 334, in °5 ir the about four and 
addition to being | #f™S... iil Prinses Miller one furlongs regex ( a 
3-vear-old champion of J Rats 2 st n ert) ,olde ivi i: Aceme} » *8"T ens 
. h , om 7 ; mae Ql font hd Bea Windswept (W. Hye - <= . 
should end the season areal "Cs. Cerar Mise ‘9. o ula "ty : 

e gost rested colt of the ; 0 year-olds up. maider Ocean Downs - SECOND & aces mile (trot); purse Wirctns me shtine Harp 
am dane Ghee Gankes . : 17 err : Nt wriy (il), ferend . : 
year, now that Trainer Hugh |: Pe a. T R ; Lockbeart Seowa) ‘G. Wichel).. (7). Mad Marie (5) wacem) 63%: 63250 
Fontaine has announced the |! Lt } I i rot esults | 2 Lucky D (B. Offuti) erdan- A), Ripever (iT), Ches- Piamene Ned 


| 3 Bilton Hanover = ee id) 
Leneart Hanover ALU (?7). Whateber (8). Poet. 
: : e peorrt (7) 


7 

. - 

t uesa be (14). Pegem Kim (10). My- 
‘arf 

. 


re 
- 


21 
: 
. 
be 
19 
wa 
N 


. 
= 


ITTER GIRL, 845; 11.00. 85.20  PENSIVE 60 
— _ : 


7 


~ 
2B -rOanwoOF-- _ 


-- 


ow dP-I BOF 


_ after the start. held on 


7 
T ae eee Ded 


oooo°oso°o°od* 


: 
~ > 
~ 


O-Kr ODBMVOW-~-_® 


"~ 


' 


, Jockey w mt 


a 
- 


; 
Peewwrs-wo't 


Seesusss 


20, $8.00. $6.20 


i) consensus eee. |) Yes, when it's FLEISCHMANN S GIN, 
t ME te in tame on), 3 ta race mone’ A'S $O SMOOC you'll like it straight! 


C4 eet ee eo & 
OF DW BwWwDAA 


@ IF wSU/b) 


AS beers) 
oy) es Alfred Boulder 


brie (19). Blue Recket (17), | aE 
eucin 


Fis rida-bred wi | be “rested” is I : ; : ii mile a >erse 9900 Cc less 
until the Amertean Derby a8: of 8. ime, 1 Track 4 
next month. At what amounts |» , . noc + Tose D tN ‘asey) 6.00 3.80 . “0 
to weight-for-age, 117 pounds | Qestacie |. fr OE ae ht, Hydra- AT JAMAICA 
to Nashua’s 129. the Mon- nd | as vear-cl4 metdens na R Hones e Rikineter se RD RAC ot mile (pace): ree 1-—-Martryr (19), Ham Bene (16), Rus- 
mouth Handicap on Satur- teau , ; purse, 9600; Class, } Emalou By: , x Myer Ry see te a alee 
day, which promises to be a Us 

fine race anyway, woGld have ies Jeronime (18), Brown Sedge 


; 
. 
15 
i 
been one of the vear’s high |bBehavier .. 1S ¢Mid Mour Josedale Cita Red Cruiser (20), Gentle Keeck 
; is ; . su 
15 
14 
. 


atteyv 


; 's ; 
ot eet here 


wove) 
Pr Jones) 


Re ect Bor , . 
Mies White Wear {Amate) 6.40 3.28 ¢.68 Ss? aron ‘May Birect *  ptubbard 
I My 4.80 S40 Mr ' 


Yee ee? OO 4 
’ ' 


' : 
te et et et ete 


points... Harry (The ee 5S. sreness acto Peet (15), Magte Spel (11), 
pe : as erest (8) ; 

lriggis. who has been so } 6—Farn (26), Orrteack (11), Harback 
, 

}—Pelgneir (17). Tereuiiie (14). Boua- 


biew @). a m Line 
i—<nelle Chief (11), Blee Penell (16), 2*** ..122 Hedgewood Miss° ii 
Michaels Aneel (7) 117 
AT MONMOUTE 
Bolsing 22. Micht Smert 5. 


—Hare 

aS Sal 
; tt. Ge Ceel 12. See ieb 

a | nson entry, 

. Ie : - 
=i eabetepeadepleditce to cet t ocx ies 
wee ee 1}, Painted Clown 6. Jeri- aie = Super at rfl 
runner oehl ; 
oBacter St. Prince Mervi 13. Fiving Smoke Screen Better Goods . 
Chief ? Hassevampa 


a i 17, Leash Ree 6 Akb 
Khan 5 ” —_ -) >} allowances 


a 
aSancie v 
Stable-Bice! DAILY DOUBLE (3-6) PAID | 540 sol4 Banner ‘N. German) 


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; , : Pembrox 
since Laurel's Spring meet- aiitn @: \—] mile (pace): $700: 2-084 OURTR Race—! mile (trot) 
ing, visited Charles Town for Tate entry, Boral Kitty (Davis m a2 C Ctngaiiies 
; c Webs entry Rose Marie Woollen (Ruffine) Neidie 
luesday program. How- aWheatiey Stable entry ibble ( Relete 4 2 Santa Pe | 
his docto | €&—%%; 64500; 4- year-olds ~~: r McEliece rarlet Direct si > Follow ezilen t 
eady to allow the popular | Hast 12 


= 
> 
. 


vo 
c 


. 
se 


PPyeeroune 3 


+} Geom etric 

r ‘ker : 113 Model Ace 1i3 
acetracker to resume his | baa! x .. 113 Power Rider M3 Dp 

, | : ‘+ . ; 

jockey agent's duties. ~ POE, ; ‘9 

—_——_ wet . Den : 

~y Momestretch | one? Myth, 2 te Belle. /— EB . 


DUKE ZIEBERT, the ree (Huis nua | 114 Tareul  S—1 mi : Tse, $1500; Class RA ACE} mile (trett; pu 
tauranteer, has a horse-play- sy. ‘ 08: , 
ing waiter. One evening last 
week comedian Danny Kave 115 4, h} ‘ 
wac exnected aS a dinner ace ie .e Les & oe) . ; fs Eden " gieenaet retch 
. : ad} + : : 4 2 amie 
-guest. Ziebert who had been | W>ence Hie we By. - >= — 
es ic Chi (trot); purse: $1) 500; ‘on 


Darlington Scrutinised 


a 
° 


; 10 : ime 20 
rclay Stable entry 19.68 : 4 5.0 


~ 
v VOPVOPOY 


’ 
Oe led ee ee 


2 ewe 
ye 


‘ ee ; 
a &* Reo 9 oe poet 


Kave come in?” 4 > Lybree oti) 408 aecttiog —Jipe Jae 2. Fighting Harp 11. Al-| 
ke ; .. ’ er 
r donna... 3 ) 
know? I left after | no relation to the Adois |Extra Special (crs nk 160 2.00 | : Michael Dee (W. Sheat maly~) Veit ¢ Bim 103} DISTILLED FROM AMERICAN GRAIN + DISTILLED DRY GIN + 90 PROOE 


ciir Smurohy Wapover Me (red ¢ So Walker 1. Poss enen & Se: 
Shamreck Bennie (Wileutts) lingten ) we G. Stabile a Wood iew Porm THE FLEISCHMANN DISTILLING CORPORATION, NEW YORK ciTY 


neat, Creasy 18, Colemy Dame 16, tr i : , loliday } | A d . tl t| k 
iT : mi ; ‘ an see unn! , | : 
in the office signalled : 10:2 eats 74, Tangeria (T alters) AT ARLINGTON perrington 14 a ee a4 it gin _—_ smoo Mma ES 

. Mailien Jr.) 79.20 19.90 5.60 | 

iter fresh from he nde wept Peter idust. Rhoda Long PT ant Broo 

Town. shrugged is | 0 hors ey rye _— Hearts 

z | grow faster than your es rw purse i 1000, “ase  Wedlecitus 16. Jolie Fille 14. Beas a 2. 
ta : | . +—Nirgal 2, -| ent 
Peat | Harry Lyons . . . Molly Mu- |Victer Low (ay en) 4 SEVENTH RACE—1 mile (pace): purse. | biguens § nae SS, Govetitutess 20, Am-ieney.., eieeenes Goimet 
my nursery- | tuel , almost had the daily («..".....°s ose | 98 Delaware Poultry Laboratories asseyamps 22, Degeen 11, Smoke ’ ween 


ter eka laim wish ; a l—Be Bet Me 18, Heir Appare Tropic ne te ; Chance 
er and a ked. “Did Fomestreten Pappy ‘Jones).. 4.60 3.20) 700. OF Rees mile (pace); purse. Es werent 25, T C li . | 
a perfect Tom Collins every time! 
and replied, “How | run” cracked I h un York (@. Jer a 
; | er " run crac e syons, WwW 0 is -BR ssified “” 54 13 ‘ Ho pestrotam Moris “yh Jiileutts) Tous tas | SEER 
BR Classified Scree 


> 


4 
23 
=f 
< 


a little | double yesterday, being beat- |~,—; oaaahs Sanne iin } “Foric KING 29. Our Holiday 1.| ¥s 
Cra 


nal “+ m 
unalle Now all | en by a nose in the key races. | classified, of 11:16: time, 2; ay A eee at Fe . 
plantation, a | She said, “My horses rocked weed (The 5.80 at as ecutt! ait | me ‘. Sass Shas 
: f cotton. a dozen mint when they should Rave rolled Fr . Rhyth . rise Ho nest: n a~ * a5 
julep and a Confederate and rolled when they should |? ter Head ris. Colcet ' aa Bebomia "Garation 8 ARLINGTON RESULTS 
“The tree probably will | have rocked.” | facial qtteddance, 067) vel Don (J. Hor . 10-1]. 1—-Sip furlongs; $3000 
p ¥ i Mutual handie, $131.401 Morning Surprise in Wetton t tage “Bel (Martack) ia” 
a oem S0Onts RACE—1 ‘mile (pace); cc te > us a 
o ' uburn /P. Chappell) 7-2 
; Be Hom Eas f 
Paddock Picks’Emat . harles 7 Ren ee es ate 
1¢ ¢ ar ss OUT ee ‘eche © Them pe 2—< furlongs $3500; 1:12 
osem c im , 


@ Is we wore 


Quille (Cars 
Fietter (Skelly) 
Mr. ¥ 


;*% 


@ 37> Pewrne 
et oe ee ee tlt 


Betty Az (2 o 


Evi . ‘Dedson 
vier) trees Gould Dare, Als "Pu 

are Se Ss 5 Se ES FOR MEN 
JAMAICA RESULTS ' ~ hag : mean AGmiral and Grey 


i— 5% furlongs: $3000: 1.06 DAILY DOUBLE PAID 877 
Boodlette (Weegnasee) 71.58 11. wo +. . 


- : Pi —— Again ' : 3—5', furiongs; $3000, | 
4-vear-elds and ep: ‘claiming: — Johnston ec eerin) 7 76 ~ +g Agems) 18. 30'V.90 = tS 
(Duhen) ; 


Post Time—2 P. M. (DST) 


PIRST RACET—Puree. $1000; S-rear- ode eed op: claiming 
abeat feur and pne- half terionaes ‘ 

’ Bhould handle Epese 
Will be 


ee fring be closer 


rain 


’ 
+ wee os oe ee 


tl R20) > oe 
oveoeo ¥Yrorw 


Om OP BOT OP ap WO 


r if start 
May need this 


eee - 
- 


Elliott's Drea ‘Mar 
Story Gettemnow, Miss = We y - Camden 6. 
tior Gallop a. traning Hors Pine RS ne, Reman. popeteess 
air. ORinee -Dow ert tr or am Fieet. ia- 
k-Dou r 2 SS? mond Joy. Solarite and a ott 


2—6 furlongs $3000: 
Bellamy ‘ eollicuss 4% 3-38 3.90 $——i "mile; berg ] 
Pepite M. (Are ver -» 618 ble Sante wes f ind) et ‘oe 528 6.00 
Hialeah's Best (Leste sking (Bald 57.80 x 
Vernal, Pirst Exit Baciri Bive ey (Martack yes 
Betty's Pet. Gaeisad. Jungle iar). Re Jo Clare, Bad Margie. 
Creek. Karen Girl. fiwe Please, 8 Peace Admiral. 
py irl Arnold Piela TERS # jJake. Village Smithy. One 
Tunasman (Servi DAILy DOUBLE PAID 873 1 alin see FS 
a ‘ — —_— miles 4500; 1.-38' 
SIXTH BAC 5—Purse, ‘$1500; 3-year-clds: allowance: about ~6 turiongs: $3500; 1.12% Attics (Brooks 
seven furlongs (# See tea wikee : ‘ stele (Rorventine) meee + 12s yo Captein hin Morgan «F (Martech) 
Hewitt ie - Tit. > >| teween Tewn (Sterling) ; aoe Pleat 
. : ; c unt. ‘Bes pat. 


++ Rapid Co 
(Palumb it be righ th i} ' rame oe na ¥ eioty er. Springlike. Lady Veronica and Oolasah 
ry t har , : 


c e 
Needed recent effort 


he outsider Best effort needed 


— 


Fe 


2 


ee | 


“ie =» 


A hee he 
2FPOOVOSOvYVY OVO 
2S 5 aU Oo 7 GUVvew 


~ 


JI OI OD eee oe 


SOO ow 
’ " " 

~ 
tt et tt et et 


eel ee ee dn 
" 
~~ ss 


Fs 


‘star ' 


SECOND RACE—Perse, $1000; 3- year: olds and Sp: 
s bout four , * ene-half furieon 
At ora 


New ; : 
High Tyattic (Shirey) 
No Ror) 


tl 
oo 
is) 
hf 

< 


ese 


NOC OCHNHC DO COSBAOZOS 


Se ee 


Figures very close 
eacy. 60 we 
Chance off Best races 
Ran poorly last time 
Pair races Wheeling 
Chance if ready 
Needed last 


> oo ot oe ge > 


~~ 
-“®\ bo bo 


PrOBUSOCOVdYVods 


ss) 


$3700: te ~ | catine pearomes: $4750; . i? : 
ez, Treat "¢ (No Boy d rece he ‘a. inka Dinks pes. Guerin) te b+ a tae pogding (Heckmann) 
. Necromancer ( Atkin s! areward (Carstens) 
SEVENTH RACE—Parse. $100: i-yvear-olds and ue: ailew- nn Peiner ont , ‘ 1e. Lady, Brookwood Hv y Me Colone! 's 
104 - ai i . Ki z Ranch entr ry. dWoods acon preees ' £5559: : 


(Shirey) 
oy 


ing Hare ‘Bo Boy? 
c? Bhaefter Closer if starts 


one eee 


-® 


-— tJ 
2 FOVYRBYOSO Bee Www 
Owe 7@wW Ie 
= 


ie 


Longshot Daily Double 
LITTLE CUPE and F. B. CEE : 
miles $5000. “4 aa ‘ v9 


Me —- 1 
THIRD RACE—Puree, $1000; S.vear-olds; claiming: shout | O* ” . ie ire | | Stipend (Usserr) t.90 
feur and ene half Sertence (ia ‘e . 4 BL. & ; = (Andersen) ® 7.98 
ay Pr Needs only ride } . * £1G aeTs RAC = 81000; 3-vear-clds and up; claiming: md (Arcare 2.38 
; - end one-sixteenth miles (#8) + , Sea. Wi how Wind and Powder 


109 
114 vit 4 furlongs $4000 1 11% a6 80 
every (Areare 
Hastege (Glessner? 4 5.00 5.30 Sceariet Piash. Or mees Attavar 
Postornie Ada and Get For Hom 
ight 


: red jek 5-1 | -S Deerae ibe)! 3 MONMOUTH RESULTS 
i otwee) Last 1 120 26-3 _ year-clds and ep; ela 741A ‘les: _ 
Btidham lardiy t _ 115 20-1 one and one-sixteenth miles © 60; cotuing Tm=1v'p miles: $6000; 1:44 fu wi $3000 Te 
h y K \ stead ‘ 16 20-1 rn ‘ ‘Palumb< tht " 119 4. “Mr Terf ' }eertn) ' 4. 7.46 z. P sreen 
» - co : ne ta heat 1Ae éhBrown ter (Useerr) _~ :- 
FOURTH RACE—Paurse. £1700: 3-year-olds; claiming: abou Battle | 4 Too form n . < GhAlibhal Lashes | nd) 7.40 
four and one half furlongs (14 } le rate 1 er : Grover B. and River “jordan adhDe ’ 
sat Teag Needs only repeat last 611 4. ™ : g) ther ; >i heat for’ 2d + 
" W : : f : t+ < ee 


Rey s best bet 1 
| : ow } 
, 


-wo ” 


. 


| hes 
State. Round yen and * 
= lve miles $3750, 


4? 
Her Presto. Kin 
Thunderbird II and 


&o 
16 
Ao 
acd 


. 7 ——— Shirt and Yon \\) 
3 eauet : PUP ' 
G » 24 furien $3000: 
’ +. , ' races } 19 o! erie ¢ weste? lets 5-73 3-3 3.0 Polly's Ace (Clark) 9.60 75 000 PAIRS — MEN’S SHOES 
orkers recommend 133 0-1 ' No Boy) ot her if arting “Ce mbest ibe Lid horn) 5.40 KAA of 
ad ims me : Best Bet—ALBALU Memmy Ls ae Pinuhts, Assistance 


Due for improvement | —_: Re \ 
J i and Coppe sac your ulia. Bi Pigewater. . net from re vlor st { in our 


tT Anew and 


Radian Selections at Charles Town Seco tet, a 125 men’s stores 


Am r } : 
re : ~~ my 
_ PADDOCK _—~xRAILBIED OLD BONES ___CeOCeEns BENNINGS AP CONSENSUS Heathertone. Base Runner Pamisater 
| id Chan Little Cupe Grand Moon iavy Brat  iatvetee € 6©—limsia §@6©§© | ee see ee 
Br Musty Ina Musty Inn Musty ina Musty I Sure To Stag fu 7! ee j 
ty inn Herndon Navy Brat Mizar tp The .* ver a - 8D *) ‘ * 
pe ues - 


“Ao pd 
o . . 
- oe 


oe 


+ 
‘ 
‘ 
S 
s 


ak ed 


; Buddy Acres 
Rooby's M iss Poult Vendor Wil larene Pnut Vendor Pr. B. Ce 
Iriomark Scotch Nobie Black Molile Lone Oak Belle Oey Filer 
At Rea vest At Request At yoo At Request Pout Vendor 
Terrifie Zacin Zacin Bive Rocket Terrif! ode ols miles. $5000 
Millie Jessup Peer) Prim Quatre Pass Pry Pr n Snaen Pom Cavert i) s. 
Tease Blue Rocket Pesgy Prim ibe Jessup Pighting Upset Sanday Pitch (Nelsen) 
: ~~ ES: ~ | SRE re Our Dance (Culmene) ormer y to 9 
nagain magain Catrydier ome er C ATY DLER ee snc 4 gh = ton : 
Catydier Catydier Tnhagain ttle Olg tle Olf eit Nn ae SE 
Corny Miss Beacon Lady Nip Mab fe 4 Teese bh «- J. $5000 

; —". ep mae : . oente “After Batch’ teri iso ‘ - . 26 
Referendum Kingpoise New Dice Shy Girl Lady Virginie : wid (Culmene 6.40 3.60 ona s es 
Lacy Vireinia Referendum High Traffie New Dice Referendum = s 6 
Mike Terry Mike Terry Mike Terry High Traffte High Traffie iaen ue. : +4 

ee —s . -- ee TTT — - - i ’ : San d Hyper: : ale } 

Ripever sian Ripoves a ROYAL L BIPOY FR Ripover Roya! Rim Tatula aki lion- Ros. ya Parm er entr 7 nc ng ON MESH 

hestnut eral stnut King an iiverdan Ripover _~ 
Roya) Bim Chestnut King Ripover Sash ne Nob.e Dream Chestnut King pooas*s miles. $2500 


1:48 

Alva H Piint Night Potpourr ba! lint Night Bea V vleck)....... © G No Exchanges 

Whatatey Albalu Wnatatey Wratstey Ave He aint (Blum) » OM Fas No C.0.D.’s : All sales final 
Flint Night Whatatey Albalu Potpourri Powourrt Sar-Har. Man O'Day. Lyomar. x. | 


Y ns Quesebe Karts Jacodaricer Hyattsville Hyattsviile | Seced “Broker Bill. L Script, B-Twelve and Pari 1315 F ge rey Open Thursday Evenings 
Jacocancer eng ae ——— Stiorste a forate : . 
eae pete once Pagan Kin ; ‘ 
nh Bunale ee Winging Alone nine Place Pianile ae -; 3840 10-90 1880) 9210 14th St. NW. 4200 Wilken Bivd. 4050 28%h_ 3. 
Bache B28 ne to Sia beta | Sree ia, ll ein wine’. Sse ce ik a eg 
i 


, } 


eal wat | (62/9 | 


House Group Votes Probe’ a 
Of 1954. Federal Tax Law #22"255 = | artist i 


United Preas 


The 


mittee yesterday authorized a 
broad election-year investi 
gation into the operation and 
effects of Federal tax laws 
The inquiry, which could have 
wile political repercussions. 
will be conducted by a special 
subcommittee. In 1951-52 a simi- 
lar group exposed several tax 
scandals that played a big part 
m the 1952 presidential cam 
paign 

It was considered likely the 
new group will confine its in- 
quiry to a review of the 1954 
revision of tax laws. It prob 
ably will be headed by Rep. Wil 
bur Mills (D-Ark who pro- 
posed the study 

Democrats have charged the 


Irish Honor Nehru 
Reuters 
DUBLIN, Eire, July 10—In- 
dia’s Prime Minister Jawahar 
lal Nehru returned from a 
short trip in southern Ireland 
today to receive the honorary 
degree of doctor of laws 
the National University 
land here. 


of ire- 


ARTINI 


@ leoves you breoth/exs/ 


Oomimoff, 


the greatest name §@ VODKA 


80 Proef Dist from grain. Ste Pierre Smirnoff 
Bis. (Div. of Hewbiein), Hartford, Conn., U.S.A, 


11954 tax law favors corporations| 
Democratic - controlled and the wealthy at the expense 
House Ways and Means Com. of the small taxpayers 


trom) 


| BUSINESS SERVICE 


inisnine 


» | pain'- 
carpentry 


OR SANDIN 7 as vs 
and minor repairs, initia 
1 Li 6.3687 tay aE ool watch Dai apne 
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FLOOR WAXING  SERVICE—Sovre- attached. 


achee ule ’ 
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Hamilton, 
N ise 

4-2995 , Ree ME s-3011, Dt 915 
WRIST WATCH Lady's. Whitnavuer 
Met nw. Reward 


painting au TM. des 
FOR , BIE , FORE call 
Ha LV 1047 


MOVING | 
area. © 10A 
FAINTING RETRIEVER vith red co 
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paling n per , me 0 to 5 wm. JU. 5-583 
ansine. repair n COCKER &F ANTEL 

ef UEANERS , me Wise ave. Beth of " 
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s 1-64.42, | COOKER _ SPANIEL. male 
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BUSINESS SERVICE home 
PIPELINE 
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SAINTING. floor sat Ry 
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Lowest es ~~ ; , " —- onal : H © ident ve - 79029 
wi ech at ; FRENCH POODLE 
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PAINTING Int . seni nite 298 
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carpentry & painting 
Work ever LO 77-3855: LO : " 
4 RECREATION ROOM ¢ ; es ne EXC) 
lo 495 11 ire cu Nw & 
= : —- 
ROOF REP AT ~ f Witt NOT Be 
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17 A - Pad aor 


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RRICKR (OA WEHHING AVNVOUNCPEWENTS 
po es - : AT YY q . " 


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CARPENTER pe RIDERS 
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ARTICLES FOR SALE 


MACHINES 
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= 


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uw co aoe 

John “uston's . BY 

305. 5:15 25 . 3 


6.7608, S46) 
NW e 

DA € , 
Ou Madison. 6.15 YS 
MAN FROM LARAMIE ® Jaw. es Siewar 


._v ria 
“THE 


Bite” 


Coen a 


55 ‘ 
MONS ER axD THE APE ler 
PREE PARKING ul 
3-2200, enka DA CRANE 
Simmons _ 70. 9:35 DAY OF 
” Dele Robertson. § 00 


ARK NG oO 
ty ns TH 


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7 upese LD A 8 SP RY 


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NEAR PARKING ME 
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6-650 
KENNED EDY TO BAKER 
Va Jo 00 , 
WAR OF “MAJOR BE NSON 
Heston. & 
— “PARKI wo Li 
P HILDA CRANE” 
on 5. o> DAT 
Baie fhoberts son 4°55. 8:1 
ROU NDUP OF RHYTHM” Bul 
Comets. | 00. 4:20. 7.40 
CO. 5-4968 
F tras 
“SHAMED” Vilterlc Ose 


WOMAN” Enic 
“ 6°30 5 3 
7:30 


nA 6 2400. Sone -- 
T} ARESHOUD "OF 


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Cartoon Bhoe 


FREE PARKING 
SILVER "50S 
“JUBAL 


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fing x4 GOODBYE 
son. . 7 56 


TRIO Our Robe 
DESTIN A ATION. ‘Gon! 
mark. 8:00 


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Our Madison +15 LB) 
ny” 


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50 


ALEX.-ARLINGTON, VA. 
for infermetion CALL E&I. 9.9000 
23 ne St 
REED "eh 9.3048 
Tor is. Colleen M 
Tee HIDE YEARS . 


nico.or bit ae 
CINIA “ me. Vernson tuvd. & 
viz Sirce Se, KI. 9-6199 
z= rr D nNay 
pe - “ 
oie eixT i or UNE Robert ray. 
lor, Richard Todd aati 


RICHMOND °C 
CinemaGecope and © 


LANCE” ' Le 7 
Cen tinu 


CENTRE rr 


Stan) : 
QUEEN or M 
Te 


saton Shoo. Center 
TE. 6-1000 

: { Reagenr 
NTANA.” 


; 


SHIRLINGTON *: cw. OV. 3 2300 


HILDA 
nemaSc one 
NE Guy Ma 2 sin 


and he 
Jean 


mons 


ROTH THEATRES 
SILVER SPRING "2 °°," 
AT 2 PM 
Special Vac on Ma nee. 
BOWERY " BOYS IN 
“JAL OPT 


Plus Our 
~ 


TODAY 


(rang 


Cartoons 


“THE SIX TH 
J NE" 


Color 0 

PARK ‘Sch eed Sevannah Sis 
1 Bik. off Ala. Ave. JO 
“HILDA CRANE” 


our a son, Jean nom 
7 5.30. Pius at 6 


“D-DAY, 


“5 6 50 


“WHERE THE SIDEW ALK 
ENDS 


indreews. Gene Tierney 


Dans 
KIDDIE one" sd Lom PM 
The Talk - rRANCIS 


COVERS tic” ‘bia TOWN 
iue Cartoon 


a-) 
Jean 
> 4" 


FAIRFAX 3 
"Pfiovert t A e Richard Todd 


Ros Penne rm nw, 
4 


Rt 
. 9 A, Last dar 


WALDORF 


WALDORF : me. 
Midwey 5.314! 


| “THEY 
i Maro. “CONGO CROSSING” | Warce - mee “THE GREEN BUDDHA” Bredy. Raymond , 


va CMO a WEAMNIG 


DRIVE-IN THEATERS 
pans CHAPEL 


Vl tie a 


SIDNEY LUST THEATRES DISTRICT THEATRES 


PREF PARKI m Por int 
AIR-CONDITI NED 


~ BELTSVILLE ag IN 


‘Pree 


ay Call NO. 71-3008 
A naitioned 


BOWARB ‘oa 


Doors Oven 


& Tf Se NW 

7.0 PM 
omy from 7 ren " er 
SrRFET 
rogers 


Bteweart 
Oardnert 
cCinema- 

: : - over 
‘a 2 Bied *, Kias Pree Thurs 
1343 You St. NW cay RF i Ss OF LAREDO 
wr > , 
MOST DICK with Oresery Peck 
Ri Baschar on SUNSET DRIVE-IN ‘see 


Richare 1453 You +. NW At e) 
Toda: “D-DAY. THE piit Or TONE BOOKER To. Doors Open 12:30 Pam, | | BATS and 
Be pe-Color «a 0 THAT CERTALN Alexa ria 
ELIN with Pearl Bai BOD 


HYATTSVILLE | A, helene. Hope. Joris 
D With od & ban . t 
LANGSTON Doers 0 ae. a “e~ 
te} iN. 
~ Mitehin BRANCH DRIVE. IN Re. 6.6666 


Stes r Rio ; MU JAGUAR, ; 
A ' . ; tos 4 
, be - Ma 


_ ne i4 - 
yo en. Ceorge — 
Sone. Mits! Gaynor 
oink ews SAND ah BEE 
coier 


Tech 
UN _4-e100 Robert 


yr Rea : . — 


Our xD Cinen , . 
9°50 4 THE ATOMIC MAN 


Wa 717-8896 


MILL, 1 ruse. vas ||[ WINELAND THEATRES 


"Efe Woe ditag Spt | | ABC DRIVE-IN 719 354.5 
iar ante a as | 23 || LEE HWY.-ARL. BLVD. 


” Fer 


Pete db'pore ||| DRIVE-IN THEATRE | 
HILLSIDE DRIVE-IN , 


e 


GHBORHOOD 
THEATRES—ARLINCGTGN. 
FALLS CHURCH, VA. , 
, : ris 
Polls Church ’ h ; Pre ’ TT — AZING With GLORY 
—_ i. 2.1888 red tn THE MAN 1 THE ¢ ' THE SEARCHERS” 


: 
: 
. ™ 
Plus Cartoon : a 
| e.F. °F ‘>? Rg 


, Pic 
ANACOSTIA 1415 Good Hope Rd “WAR OF THE 
64.46 
MATINEE DA! VY mm oO OC® Tn eee, . 
reorece (OD = THE 
IRDS AND BEPs re OPEN 7 —CHILD! 
- a as PLAYOR 
BLACK 
SUPER CH Head 


+ 
MAN 


Aa 
“Tan SEARC! H ERS 


v st av ‘ior 48 
i730 Bivd. 
WILSON ‘ non 8 


r » A ve 
“OUR MISS BROOKS” 


——_ 231 Cc Rd K 
BUCKINGHAM *)," °s* 


7 0444 
Awa Severs Oranser 
,? > 


[IzNCe 


“WORLDS” 


THE rw rrr... 
m p 


Oardne ° Power : THE 
araner » : ’ . “ ry 
BHOWANI J »N = 


__Cinemascope—Coler = 2533 Pa. Ave. SE 
ARLINGTON Columbia Pike LY. 4-731) 


7.2999 
THE Rane HERS’ 
Viste Vision Techni ” 


GLEBE 27130 Ne. Glebe Rd. 
JA — 
Mario Lar 
“SEI aw Al DE” > Te 


Hi 
PORFION I> 
Ari. Bivd. & Ann ° 
JEFFERSO wi Wd ea 


Kut ci Ro 
WITH F ODN " 
UEN'T DURWARD.” | 


South Capito! & 
Atiantic Sts 


JO. 3-3000 


ATLANTIC 


— PARKING 


8042 


(be ree . 2931 N hols Ave SE 
“THE BIRDS JO. 2-8777 

VietaY Richard <d. Dana 

— nay Tu $e ee Ot 

104 Seuth Weynre Street 2 ’ ~ 2 - xT HM 


BYRD jA. 7.1733 ‘_ : Pius LAND OF THE 
KIrSaurrT Mremee 
Ar Biyu oe as ; 4703 Mear'bere Pike, Md 


: Mit Carmor 
‘nD THE BEES” 
n lechnicoior 


Ee. M. LOEW'S 


IO : 515) Free Pork: “e 
shart dyer ¢ 
yt NOT ’ 
* 


MT. VERNON OPEN-AIR 


Woshington s First Drive In 


NO. 7T- ~ Hu Rte | Se of Alex 
t 


ey 
HARDEE TREY PAt Danny 
n “TH OURT JESTER 
LI 3.9616 
Pe in a 
IN 7 GREY “PLANNE SUIT 
u A Fig! 


Wr pl rey 
THE 


Kaye 


Capito! Heights, Md 
Rod = 5.8244 
CHANG : LL? UNIDENTI PIED PLYING 


SENATOR, !":,.: teria “Ss #00") || Bp Te 
INTRIG ; ' ree 9g 
HISER BETHESDA 7 wg? | | ora cba ay” Garter, Dan 


George Gobe 
BIRDS +3 > THE BEES " 
5S AND THE 


ATLAS ' ; > ge e Ruseel Humphrey Bogart Pre} “rec cd ean ai 
Prancis in “THE scanLet coat’ ||“HARDER THEY FALL’ mcs 
MN. FM. Ave. & Univ. Le 


YORK — = MEET Mt} in LAS mm. oe Oey | LANGLE) NE. 4.5700 

_Montelben 4 “GUN THAT WON : 

_ THE WEST” UNE” 
URT JEST 


' 7pm ow 
_ FLOWER 
MA VER li 


3-087 . | e se QUEEN no 


K-B THEATRES 


Air Cenditiened 


S413 Moss. Ave 


"ee P ' Bite : ~ 7 
" POR : 


2 te hard 


sIxTH oF 
, 

so a 
8725 Flower 
ree Parking. JU 


Ave 
8 \4466 
~~ IN 
ih at & 9 45 
& > @ 


- - ; 
Short sut 6.45 


28th & Ale. 7 


KAYLOR , 
PO 2-937 — - = Lu 2.4000 
LOUIS BERNHEIMER meee ce gam || hes ws Raa 


7-4 sa 1307 
— " 
: 


nemas 


STANTON ** & "o= 
; 1 4458 
e106. 9 : NORTMEAST ART THEATER 
vara UNTAME! 4 aTR-OONDITIONED 


LADIES’ NIGHT are tint E C “OBE i 
TONIGHT "Teen THE BIRDS AND TRE 
SILVANO MANGNANO | i eoeae Beek, Dale” Giberinen 7 
: Try OP BAD MEN st 11 6 .. m 
‘GEORGETO eee an 


GIRL! 
Washington ertory 


"i? | LESLIE CARON 


Ave. N £. 
PACES 4 
. 


bara Stanwrc« 
TOMORROW A 


The most 


seats , the . tion 
Ki. %-t4é%4 = 
Jean Simmonr ‘“ ° + ty 
HILDA CRANE.” 6.00. 7.45, 9.28 OUTLAW 
: « “ 4 


JESSE Oven Fr 


Newton & 
THERE'S BPRS 
) 7 48 Plus 


A 


Sat and sun 


One of 


| iveune € 45 Pa. Ave. SE 
FAIRFAX. VA. AVENUE GRAND Mer 
3 


| 
| 


: 


me tase eecten, Sef MICHAEL WILDING 
“THE GLASS SLIPPER” 


Tec! 1 | oo oT) 
wl 
ee Was. Bisa 
“Won ertully: Neharmine’ = x ¢ Feed 
6-05 530 


“Parks oe at wtikeresa'e 
onsin an 


“GREEN M. AGIC” 


EACH LADY ACCOM- 
PANIED BY A 
GENTLEMAN 

ADMITTED FREE 


‘Taurs.- vrisey' Stanton Theater under new management 1229 
heruegeeree Now Ooen 7 Daya «a 
2405 ‘Michels Ave 


Air Conditioned. 10. 45844 CARVER- ALEXANDRIA 
G £% J 


“ROAD TO DENVER” WERE YOUNG 


AIR CONDITIONED 


New Cooling Pient in Operation! 
Gary Cooper THE WESTERN 
Rory < “albou r 


BEHAVIN':” color 
13th Horror Show 


; Sones 
THE RAY 
oe. Color, 


Joba Parne 


+ 


pods 2 


_ 


FOR = 12 


ee +6 1955 


ret —aims oe ee 


,enre 


Buildir 


956 ed 
other real 
- Friend's Rook Shop 
8. 9402 


1g Materials 


MARTINIQUE HOTEL 


CE WRECKING CO 


LU. 4-0500 


nic Your ai gif 
$39 
CAMISETS. 


BICTATING ry 
A 


445 : 
— $2 4 
DINitG RM 
‘5 4 


M 
; : 
: 

. : 
DRVER 
e 7, 
PENCE 


PENC ea 


CHAILN 


1 INK 
_ 


De ia De © ar 


Pine rLaAct 
fe 


» 
FOAM RUS 
PLAN 

c 

RA 
rrEN 

‘ 

. 


PURN 


PURN 


POP 


antec 
; 


FUENTT CRE. 1 


Al ne 


FURY — 


ner 
. Maytag Wash : 


‘ 
FoRNti Cue 


—F§ ibe - «4 
° + [fa 


“FURNITURE 


3 


ROOMS 


BRAND-NEW 


ONLY 


FOR 
° ILY 


$245 


NO MONEY DOWN 


- 


errs 


SWANK. FURN 


rT RN 
‘ar? 


“2.270 


Uncusee =! 
: arly 


repal inte, 


as 
STERERS 


447 


‘FURNITURE 


3 COM 


PLETE ROOMS 


BEDROOM 


iTy 


fe OOM 


i= 
WV 


DINETTE 


TERMS 


$5 PER WEEK 


NO MO NEY DOWN 


THE 


PURNITt RE 


27 


ay RANGES — Nex 


Gat , «ut 
Pa Be: 
s 


: 


- 
nibe-4- Bi 
a n. & 
aft 


KITCH 
i 


tasthe 


Porrtr 


Lope ve 
HURRY 
Or S 
TEA! 
ra Bilver 


LIVING 
pace c 


he 
LOVESEAT 


“OFFIC 


Refin 


ac 
ry 


ines 1286 
Hf CARING 


° ; 


9 


CROWN CO. 


TTH ST. NW 
Bo ge 


PD a 
Ds SA 4-895: 
BS 
’ ~- 
In exee 


4tD ZL 
>. 
‘ 


EN CAD) NET AND 


[PM 


. ne . Vo 


ve ~~ 


of sine 
aaher 
‘ 


n ar uris 
WHiLe ‘7 
a 


imncays Los 
KTTCHEN 


Borina 


ROOM 
irve £0 


dd cond 


RE 


: 
4 
a-Sec z 


E FUR NI TU 


Pree @ 
* whan K « “BON 4i4 


~ Office Furniture 


Kl 
The parr 


. 
be c feared 
pr 


sacr, 


Bake vol anit? “es 


‘(phone sU 
ahway. 


D) 


TIONED 


Rook 


ase¢s, 


ota AND "PIANO on 
TIS 


La ae DEL [XG : 


, aD ' 
Oreans and piano 
KIT? SB i33 


and 


7. 
5-1 108" 
Ariington, Va 


mahogany 


gran A excellent playing 


ia Oo #. 
4 


MPBELL 
ow. Di. 1-464. 


Suburben stores open 


urgey. Park in front 
‘er baby 


an <. a 


must be cieare 
REMODELING 

macrifice price 

tL ow RE. 7-6212 
PIANOS AND couse Ret urned 
from rentals at 
ors must : bed oet 


Foo | be 
MODELLING BALE le 
KI 6. 1599 RE 


ane 6D A 
ljmw UG 
O—Steis nwary, mode 


compietely 


Mu ~ 


Dealer Li 
| 


fu Vv Har 

CAMPRBELI 

a ed i nwa) 
RAG 


plixos Used 


pr ry . n . «> 
»+ £05 te $195 
at onditioned 


P) eT 
PIANOS ORDAN'S 
of ae’ 


+, 12] 


PIANO 
PIANOS 
. : > 


PIANOS FOR RENT 
, ts 


- 
RADIO 


RADIO-.PHONO COME 


- 


IGERATORS 


mrt RiGERATORS 
. . 
r RA 
ETPRIGERAITORS 
— : ‘ , - 
REFRIC. 
j REFRIGERATOR 


> »f P K 
REFRIGERATOR 
+ : . : 
-FRATORS 
Arr anged 


ROTISS? 


avs 


SEVING 


wACHINES 


: ‘ ~ Ay. 
ap ok sant _ 
WE 


rirt REcoR DERS 
. 


3 "95 
PENNSYLVANIA AVE. SE. 


TIRE SALE! 


ae new! 
0x15 

CE TIRE 
oF SO 


rea rar oo. 
: . 

. ALI 
‘(7 aye 

TR! WKS AND LOCKERS 
7 : ry .|0 iocxe ¢6 95 


SERV} 
RA 4 


sa 92 . aines sweet 
e in D. C. TEXD ~s QGeor- 


"TYPEWRITER "SALE 


Btand- 
pewriter 


; >. 
TI PEWRITER- 
; LA 
TYPEWRITERS 
7 : 7 ‘ 


vac. ~~ 
> lu 

. N HOUSE 
VACTUM CLEANER 

‘ 4 atta 
. LA 4. 
WASHER 

- 


HPOcCTORS. MED! 


an 
val ’ : ience 
nw NA &-757¢ 


ARTICLES WANTED 
BEDROOM din ins . 308. 
Hl) 7-0513—RA. 6-2977 


BOOKS BROUGHT 
ALBION BOOK 6H 


c Asn 
‘ ; 
an‘\iaue . : 

7s F gh? i EXCHAN iz 


® -O885 
AYR SIDIFTER aa led. 
SO 


: ave 
PAID 


' | oon - 


8922 - 


(RE WANTED 


oer 2-66/7 


vusN? provincial furniture went- 


" 
5 WANTED [ny amount slee 


eed re‘rigeracors wt" terry and 
i. me 


at - . “as 
Pako PRINT DRY EE, 
PIANO. ms 
PIANOS | 


T\s 5 


ne te ie 
AIRLINES 
AIR TRA VEL AGENCIES 


phone nurpver 
iON wan DS 


crit SERVICE 
nenc 
" r . - 
£.00 _* 
ne YD. sae 


ri i ¥ Howes — 


23 {> sty 


NURSES NEEDED 


100 women wanted 7-45, to i-ern 
white er colored. for con- 
doctors and pri- 


write. phone 

Ne natitute of 
Victor ‘bidg $00 

ey 


, 


THE’ WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


+ ‘ies "6 6] 
OL, 23-7783 
voDrEN TRAINING in beauty « 
all subjects } yg approy od 
_ GI trotnia asses 
Ww FLY Bestrty * COLLEQOE. 


oO st 
Bi RADIO- 3 ANPOUNCING— 


Training and piacement 


tronics, 


ss 67h COL 
or mach! VF Pie nd 
Air-conditioned Tr HOOL. 
1328 OG st. nw. . 


A & E MECHANICS 


mot req Por jocel and out of 
xce.) opportuni' 
R- een military exp 
“*s ol &r "0 tart 
G 


eee Hi es INC 


734 Mase ave. at Thomas Cir 
Dt. 7-921/ 
ABSTRACTORS (MD. $3900 


ABBEY First. 


accantaln " 


er ee si. Bp 
“COLORED BRAN 
1K NW 


m 
. food 5 te 
Oc4ean ¢ 


aro & 
* ernhe os 


ATLAB AGCY 400 N.Y. A 


accot NTANT-BOOKKEEPER 
$l. A imiors ana expel 


ACCT re 
MA PMPT 
. : ’ 
ACCOUNTANT 
riperience i4 


‘ 


ACCOUNTING 
GRADUATE 


bie }OD in acc 

age education 
weignt and 

af expenence 


M-462, Post 


ment 
Box TH 


ARCADE EMPL. 


ar 
r _ 
pers 


RUC H4e0 
.e 4“ « 
~vee - 


eT ~~; 
A M. S07 10th St. NW 
wr 43 28 SAI 


AND coLorED - 
D. c EMP EXCHANGE 


: 


xs 

attencants 
Carpenters and helpers 
ror ‘ . 


| om. ion 7 ’ 
ex , ; 
Renae) OPN IN 
and Restaurant 
on St. AW 
HO 


COLUMBIA 


PARTIAL LISTING ONLY 
MANY OTHERS , 

¢ tr rT Ss i¢ fs) 

FOOD MARKET MORS st 

RESTAURANT MORS te 

JUTE SALESN 57 
"EMPL OYERS PAY FEES 

ILLOW | i ett ION 


and 


$00 
4680 
6000 


7i.. aud oe fer CPA $5.2 

NATIONAL 
Employment Service 
: Largest Agency 


«i bh fcures 


LLANEOUS 
| .Te —y 13 
* 0 
. ae S P eches ; 3 
- rota” bile. expe 
Ratios AL SMPLOT Ma Cs 
3108 16 st o.w. atl x . 0 


ADVERTISING 


We have sales open ings for career- 


ARMATURE WINDER 
and 
SERVICE MAN 


APPLY 
Fam.to 4 Bm. 
Monday Thru Fridey 


NATIONAL ELECTRIC 
SERVICE, INC, 


90! King St. 

Silver Spring, Md. 
ASST. TO MANAGER 
T need an assistant te ieare our 
branch operation end sales wore 
compiete.y Man selected will 


under direct supervision 
No experience 


ASSISTANT 
MAIL SUPERVISOR 


Young man over 24 to act 
at assistant supervisor in mail! 
room. High school graecuste 
and supervisory experience 
necessary. 
$55 oer week, minimum. 

We pay more for experience. 
5.day week, 9:30 to 6 p. m. 


GOVERNMENT 
EMPLOYEES 
INSURANCE COMPANY 


14th AND L STS. NW 
PLEASE APPLY 
8A.M.TODP.M, 
-AT . STREET ENTRANCE 
‘ 


W ednesday, July ll, 1956 
~ INSTRUCTIONS 14 


33 


} NT. » must 
know double ry pookkeeping 
for active bullder in over Sprina. 
Salary pen. 


ASST MANAGERS 


Young men—permanen —excellent’ 
. adv aRoowPens. 
ne program 
top ereculive oe’ sit ions 
compan’ bet No 
ar essential 
training. 


astensive 
éxperience 
aduring 
iniiiai 
American Finance Co. 
(See Mr. Heinecke) 
7932 Georgia Ave. 
Silver Spring, Md. 


(Mr. Norris) 
4702 Marlboro Pike 
Coral Hills, Md 


Mr Hoftacker) 
3308 Rhode island Ave. 
Mt. Rainier, Md 


ASST. MANAGER 


TO BE TRAINED for executive 

position in national finance 

ganizatior Age 21 Ww WO 

se) | gracuate or better 

have car. Good salary Pius expense 
a ' : 


allowance ar 
benefi' be 
APPLY IN PERSON 


PUBLIC FINANCE CORP, 


AUTO MECHANICS 


We eve 8 

age ior le mech 
organizet Wor 

- — 


CALL CARL. INC. 


1250 2 24th ST NW 


ATT WET HANI SW 
é ror eur erced 


air > 
atTo POULTSHER 
° . at 


5° TO METAL MAN 
. - 


. 


Ria or » irg 


AUTO SALESMAN 
USED CARS 


a7 ; . aT aT : 
ADp.y / ')6hOUMr. Pore 
FRANK SMALLL, JR 
rORD a 
BANK TRAINEES — 


; . 5 
RBARAER 
s ary 
. ; : 
RARSER 
RARBER 


a "n 


BRRPS OFF ; uG LS - 
aBhi PERSON mi 


ELECTRONIC 
TECHNICIANS 


A 
ae Bre 


To 


Service 


DIGITAL COMPUTERS 


e 
+ 
. 


IF 


You have a good training 
in electronics plus 3 or 
more years of experience 
in any branch of elec- 
tronics, qualify 
this fast 


you may 
for positions in 


iy jJustry. 


IF 


Your present iob does not 
faients, we mave 


growing 


tax 
one that will. 


IF 


Your present lob does not 
offer premanency and sta- 
bility, we Rave one thet 


ooes. 


Your present job does not 
offer growth and is not 
fascinating, we have one 


that is 


You wonder how you can 
get the necessary training 
in the Computing Field, 
Burroughs will give you 
the finest training af its 
Philadelphia Headquarters 
and at full pay, too. 


THEN 


Come in and Talk This 
Over at Your Convenience. 


your 


TOP SALARIES TO MEN OF 
PROVEN CAPABILITIES 


PERSONAL RECOGNITION 
AND GROWTH FROM WITHIN 


RELOCATION EXPENSE FOR 
YOU AND YOUR FAMILY 


We Heve Openings in Almost 
Every Major City in 


‘7 


the Country!! 


For Interview, Call 
JOSEPH CHEDAKER 
at 


ME. 8-2626 


MONDAY thru 
WEDNESDAY 
9 A. M. to 10 P. M. 
Or Write 


COMPUTER SECTION 


BURROUGHS 


CORPORATION 
1616 Walnut Street 
Philadelphia 3, Pa. 


W ednesday, July 11, 1956 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD! HEL’, MEN 
5 


HELP, MEN 45) | HELP, MEN 


ELEC 
eo 
ower desien wor for ~— —e 
: so inca) “code oC Warren 
204 onsin ave nw. 


Broad. Falls Ch JE. 23-7272 . Coun y 


x. Broad 
’ >..799 
Ma as - > 


es arts f "rota 
tuaiies XNNEL 133 fie rw 
tech rn 
pn Overse ear $7 +00 
YS a 1108 16 


TEC ms — Abie 
types wunies 
nes ae ST 


. 
conatruc! on work 
ev 7 


pest “Bel hesda navel 


nute c. 


an Ch 
Jackson Bb! ot fore- 


exper er ~* sonore 


= “slat Hotes st UPPt ¥ 


hat. 


—_ #——-- 


ENGINEER 


CAB DRIVERS class, snoat ntown hotel” 6th 
WY vou do om have ea id 
tién rar a " i 
hackers test. * wen or women 


entifica. 


hen erson 
for AMBASBAL Som MOTE! 1424 n 


Ss 


NG A 
familiar with interior and | 
7 


To 
EL. FCTRIC TAN’ 5 HEL. teeta 
& rac 
Patt s|- 


Many} 
nfice 


1s 
| LAB 


Sader Bn Ry lesen! dee ust be 
and apdlication. 


ALTER H. KESSLER 
ices er 
| Biemrtme Litt # law PEELE 


j NENAL EMPLOYMENT “SERVICE. 


"MECHANICS 


overtime 


4200 Branch 


*| MACH | N ISTS 


Experienced 
| With Small Mechanisms 


$30 6060 


BOB'S STUDIO 


131 15th St. NE Li 
Try ~ all around man 
> 


theroughiy ¢zp : power ma- 

em ner? and Stanley trimmer. cood 
for right men. Apply 
riebama ave, se 

~4 anc coons. wht 


coal 


, Ave 
}-5109 AY 
man 


ton Tower e 


PRCINEERS 
$35 A New 


Westinghouse 
Department 


ENGINEERS 


$99-8\7° 
ve) ea 

coor tor col S175. apt 
COMMATS. t nv + 30- 
Emp. Bet. 519 61). 


CHEF 
(SOUR CHEF) | 
1ST CLASS HOTE! 


~ enced if 
eferences fr 


BONNEL OFFIC 
Sheraton Carlton Hotel 
CLERK DPFICE Responsible _ pos 
ag 20-2 

~_* 


Vuet eS OF 


‘ 


PT Sit Lie in. 
eat VES 
OL sY8T “ee 


WELDING AND 
Metallurgical 
Engineers 


| Quality Control 
Engineers 


CENTRIF 
LAYOUT. 
CONT 


INSURANCE We have opening 6 
ve 


ar “ belare plus commis 


lence neces 


Le 
Hes NTFR MAN— “Kos 
exp 


Manufacturing 
Engineers 


_ BALTIMORE 
"INTERVIEWS 


Prida ; 13 
rday and Bun? ay 
9 


‘Telechone. 
s, LExinaton 9- 8422| 


ris ne i 
Sspt' a.itation | 
ly dD Cc i 


Bee 
. 


ental Lab. tech: 
rx white. fr 
Crm prom eter oor mt “ Sat 
Rote saleamen 


BOYD'S. Cor. 


~ wae 

rters, stock boys 

were. #2. De pers 
Short order cook 


METROPOL RR 


AQOENCY Inc 


A - 
eh & S 
“rs 535 

$4 

os0 j 


NATL : 
ww Ex | 


ENGINEERS 
rece: | RECENT, 
eae toe “12th & G GRADUATES 


ELECTRON ICs | 


RCA 


MISSILE TEST 
PROJECT IN 


FLORIDA 


ELECTRICAL 
MECHANICAL 


and 


ENGINEERING 
TECHNICIANS 


Desiring to Achieve a 


Design and Development | ' 


Capable of Working to Close 
Tolerance 


Well Equipped Shop Facilities 


Wages Commensurate With 
Ability 


Many Company Benefits 


Aoply In Person 
MONDAY THRU PRIDAY 
BAM. to 4 P.M. 


MELPAR, INC. 


CTH FER 


RN 
b Avis aw } 


‘Orr JErr 


Pauls Cut 


FTON BLVD. 
aCe. VA 


HELP, MEN 1S | HELP, MEN 


T -'. Mason's 
posit s ot Berm 
-day wk. M4 wera 


other 
Apply ce, 610 Siete 


”SALESCLERK 


FURNITU RE esclline experience pre- 


r 
ae * 


Vv 
WASHER-REPAIR 
eevietse of automa tigs espontiol 


—_- - oper ity 
men who oua Work or we eniarged 

) > week 
an 


service dept. 
be Py &- com gear 
’ t eceassar Able to’ 5 ta ar ~ ra 
elt Ay steps " Onder or ‘hysteally — for your car use. Apply in 


handicapped person prefer “ivoua- SEARS ROEBUCK & CO 


“ay wk. Apoly y GOO! ‘hagas 
TRIES 


route 
benefit ts. 


rsonnel of 
ec. new 12 


cn rg STRUCTURAL STEEL 
| CHECKER- DRAFTSMAN 


cleaners 
| Must be fully experienced. Profit 
sharing. 5-day 
commission =e. and other 
Mr Satterily. JOR- 
eormer 13th and 
between °& 


triple 
low . nnel A Sl 
gg sprees 
tor fully all ad 


Inter 
and moving expe 
open 


SOUTHERN ENGINEER- 
ING COMPANY 


DA | PIANO co 
f, ae mornings 


m 
cALERMEN Ritchen equipment io 
al’ on bDuildere: Mist be oe, > 


read _ piuepr: nts call for appt. Lu 
6-5500 Mid-Atlantic A. A. 
In 


~SALESMEN 
beer. sese, Food Plan 


134) G ne 


TECH. 
WRITERS 


ite 

to $550 mo. ADA 

s bonus plan. Ifauire at 
ichmond hey Alexandria. 
hone BO. nay, §-7745 


SMEN 


We want salesmen now. We var & 
+ slue commission and 


‘Oo manaeere 
GER SEWING 
‘a ave. ne t 


p | Preparation of instruction mane- 
als and inetalliation procedures on 
electronic equipmen 
Education tn electronicesand previ- 

nical writing experience 


Interesting and chellengeing assign 
ment on diversified problems or 
]} information 


SALESMAN | | 


Our men average 8700 per week 
. j 4 © 


APPLY IN PERSON 


MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 
8A. M. TO 4 P.M, 


r appoin men 


etem EN 


‘Take Arnold 2-¥ bus fro T1th 
and £ sts. ow to Slant en renee.) 


Excelier good references | 
Pro 
chk "' col lect ond 


af income 
Ae 135 
iife in 
salary. 
On-thne 


—s 
cyt 2000 
No ezper. pec 
trating NA. #1374 
WAN With CAR — Eace 
abdlishe ut 


General Motors) ? 
Radar Engineers 
Communications Engineers Ca reer 
Telemetry Engineers 
Optics Engineers 


Beginning With 


Instrumen tation 


COMPREHENSIVE 
TRAINING 
PLUS 
STIMULATING 
ASSIGNMENTS 


FOREIGN 


and 


DOMESTIC 
FIELD 
ENGINEERING 


Planning Engineers 
Opto-Mechanical Engineers 
Field Engineers 
Radar Technicians 
Communications Technicians 
Telephone Technicians 
Mathematicians 


Also interesting assignments 
in Bahamas islands for Tech- 
riciens. Bonus ¢ and 
lodging furnished. 


' 
Unusual Opocortunities for | 
Professional! Advancement ) 
Broad, Liberal RCA Benefits. | 
Relocation Assistance | 

' 

| 


Airborne 
Instrumentation 


FOR PERSONAL INTERVIEW | 7 a 4 : 
IN WASHINGTON ectronic-Mechanical- 


ervo m t 
CALL MR. R. LLOYD servo Computers 


AT Di. 7-4800 
WEDNESDAY or THURSDAY 
JULY 11 of 12 
2 P.M. to 9 P.M, 


These responsible liaison engi- 
neering essignments require @ 
personable individual with «a 
high degree of technical abil- 
ity, interest and ingenuity. 


Every conceivable career ad- 
vantage... Pay... Position 
~ » |. Permanency . . . Oppor- 
tunity .. . Offered Young Men 
Who Can Quality. 


Or Send Complete Resume to 
Employment Mor., Dept. N-269 | 


RCA Service Co:, Inc.: 


P.O. Box 1226, Melbourne, Fla 


Confidential 

WASHINGTON 

THURSDAY, July 12) 
Phone Mr. F. Holtz 


Company Representative 


EX. 3.5033 
| 
| 
| 


For Interview jr 


ELECTRONIC 
TECHNICIANS 
Immediate Openings 
for 
Overseas Assignments 


Alr- 

14 

Call or write 
HY 


ARTIN 


Nationa! Scientific 
Laboratories, inc 


2010 MASS. AVE 


BYOINEBSRS 


Recent Graduates 


Thursday, July 12 


NW. 1-5 P. M. or 7-9 P.M. 


Or Wr te 


AC SPARK PLUG 


and 


Senior Engineers THE ELECTRONICS 


a 
L 


VISION 
Electrical-Mechanica! 
GENERAL MOTORS 


THE ELECTRONICS DIVISION 


‘gn Development work on Alr- 
E ectronic- 


General Motors 
Corporation 
Milwaukee 2, Wis. 


ani 
Engine "Puel 


hired wil! 


Set 


enios working 


| REFRIGERATION 


too men at She 
e ith the *. res 
esearcn ey 
ow and development : nearby Va. sec D © 
' Geos. i =F €o 
end good y PPiy im person 


eae. standing policy of on. 
Lion creates individual and ask fo! 


entra.) 
epportun!: y and recognition 


Washington Interviews 
THURSDAY, JULY 12TH 
Phone Mr. F. Holtz ate preferred. for — in Protes- 
Coney Representative bold gther bow sal position. BA. 
x. 
Thutedey, July 12 
1-5 P.M. or 7-9 P. M. 
write Mr. John F 
ee of womrieg 
N 


raon e) 


Mi experienced 


tech. GASOLINE STATION ATTENDANT 
; Working conc. |; 


your conven 


Ali tocer wa cer 


a : 

surance ‘ane no« spita ligat lon 
r company benefits . 
reese oe ancement ‘for 


*9-4529 
MANAGER 
TRAINEE 


NEW INCREASED SALARY 
AND OTHER oy LOYEE 


mie iles PICTURE 


PRINTERS AND INSPEC- 
TORS S75 2? 


LIGGETT’S EMPL SERV. 


1404 NY. Ave NW ST 3-363 
Olt BURNER MECHANICS 


_ 
fut = ve Me ¥ OtOMAc 


dani wel: a 4 
?Ts 
a8 


sicer young m 
Exce} 


PA INTERS, exper enced 

~ 

POR TERS— Tani \tors for ‘act. clean- 
e 


ane. = nerator ore: rm 
aaeer. Ar) ington Tow- 


or new work 


ob 


PORTERS 


for 


ALLS 
ALLS 


CHURCH LABORATORY 


Falls Church residents pre- 
ferred. Permanent posi- 
tions in Falls Church. Ref- 
erences required Many 
employe benefits. 


APPLY I= PERSOR 
sa MM TOAP. M. 
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 


MELPAR, INC. 


3000 ARLIN PLYD. 
FALLS CHURCH. VA. 


(Take Arncte 2-9 base from 1ith 
and Es nw. te plent entrance) 


SER for wool stead 


iy at A —s ww ae "hap 
hepeey ae a ee pay 
PUBLIC RELATI ONS 


Under 35 3 85000 ..2 pieravener | 


BOY’ 5 ‘Cor. "T2th &G 


RECREATION WORKER — Cols one 
ca oso eg maior ch 
= s home 2992 
Real Priate Salesmen 
T can ee euperionced aa! oemen 
familiar + da Che 
Chase — Ampie 
houses Ex- 


a: 
cellent 


w BR Writ ‘iP The | 
a SC ee full =< 
Ci ofice. Call» WEAI tH ent Ih S-toes 
REFRIGERATOR & 
MAJOR APPLIANCE 
REPAIRMAN 


Pra 
WESTER RN AUTO. ‘SUPPLY co 


Mechanics & Assts. 


wou Lure o DE 


ave 
Tick 


ipl se 
TION 
CONDITION ING. 


Send Short “esate to 
Box 698—Wash. Post-TH. 


An ‘mterview tll be arreneed af 
ence. 


turer of hydreulie and Dr @umetir 
to 


ANN LAUNDRY 
623 G ST. NW. 


4 


SSS . So ova 
MAN WANTED WITH CAR ) ‘aes 


foremost 


Ei MELPAR, INC. 


Tl one of Amer ca 


appoiniment _ 


SALESMEN 


An estat ished br okesas e firm 1 
We ee D f 
re a re 


far 


A Subsidiary of Westinghouse 
Air Brake Company 


o ahi) 


BF 000 Arlington Blv d. | 


Falls Church, Va. 
| 


PERSONNEL 


‘ime work for men stationed 


TELEPHONE Fxr —Main'te- 


To ged Oy 
2000 
6th «s 


a 
syst 


“— 


ww > ; 
RA loge on sa les 
cept of nat. core 7436 loca 


tart at ence, Me 8- “>. 
Tuten baivens. <: ‘0 
erter 


Mr M It on No phene ina i. man 
ies. please Top 3 sraeders pre- 
fe rr? ec 


ser A te eo REPRESENTATIVE — 
ed 


STAND 
62) G 


| Pull 
geo ood 
eed denenhdabie «& 
Wilh petentia! 
s pospens HAL _ 
rs. is . 
~Experienc ed for 


SE"m| YOUNG MAN 


‘Spr’ ine Ma. 
CCOUNTING 


SHOE Al r <M AN 
eancellatio 


’ ehe re’ 


Silver 


| 
a br roi. eT Cook. ne 
Resta, 


For exchanece store at sores Re- 
ceiving Station — hour weer 
nd annus ray sue benefit . 
Apply Mr “Bateman. Navy Exchance 
eceivin Station 
A Cc. 
ine ni _ schoo 
nr 


s ost ~ 5 

pent atten y 
rain yor 

laworth 

iISURYVEY PARTY CHF. OPEN 

ean noe fee $400 

te on subdiy ir 


"LLOYDS | EMPL. SERV. 


1420 N.Y. Ave NW 3~2 207 


ust plus factors 
ae 'magination. but rour feet are 


ee ee : 
road. service man, night werk. PrP. O. Bou Joes. 


cons 
qoureets Ss 


Melpar’s expansion 
has created new 
positions for men experienced 
in the following fields. 


Sheet Metal Layout 
Machine Parts Inspection 


Instrument Assembly 


MELPAR INC. 


1311 South Fern St. 
Arlington, Va. 


(1 blk. off Jefferson Davis Hwy. 
Route | at South ?5Sth St.) 


ENGINEERS 


And 


SUPPORTING PERSONNEL 


We desion and manufacture sirborme arme- 
ment, flight simulators, machine tools, elec- 
tronic devices. We also maintain this equioment. 
Because we do « complete job, opportunities 
at ERCO embrace aimost every technical cate- 
gory. There is a particular need for young 
engineers who like to get out and do things 
The well-seasoned old timer will find excellent 
opportunities as well, 


At present our needs are for... 


AERODYNAMICISTS 
DIGITAL PROGRAMMERS 
ELECTRONIC ENGINEERS 
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS 
MECHANICAL DESIGNERS 

DESIGN DRAFTSMEN 

CATALOGERS 


INTERVIEWS 9 A.M.-3 P.M. 
Monday Through Friday 
Other Times by Appointment 


ERCO DIVISION 


ACF INDUSTRIES, INCORP. 
Riverdale, Md. WA. 7-4444 


1S HELP, 


a Ce a 
from com "Wash Pirnvrar beuntey 


Locally OPENINGS FOR YOUNG MEN 


Nes paid Salary | 


~ |AT LEAST ONE YEAR OF 


| 
' 
| 


<a 28. San for active 
y wk. 
acts A 4 .* = 


“excellent workin 

ons in a well-establishec. 
rowing organircation. Apply 
overall undry 
ighwWay, Ariling- 


stockroom. 
is 6 On ODp- 
ee re yous 


TRAINEES 


incentepl 
21 


DRAFTSMEN | a2 


o MAN 


for mertesce 

. high “ahaa 

as a construction | 

apector and to interview ene: 
eppizing for 
Abilite 
people. know eeee of nee for pocss- 
& Freellent or c . 


INTERESTED IN LEARNING 
THE HIGHLY LUCRATIVE 
FIELD OF DRAFTING 


neurance 
oA. mM 


YOUNG MAN 
18° TO 28 


WHITE 
To Oss' at Manager im local branch 
oast east organization Must 
ae ment in appearance, willine to! 
ern, one able t converse intel. 
ligen 
MINIMUM HIGH SCHOOL 
EDUCATION 
NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY | 
CALL MR. MILLER 
EX. 3-4467 
BEFORE NOON 
$100 PER WEEK TO START 


REQUIREMENT: 


HIGH SCHOOL 
MECHANICAL 
DRAWING COURSE 


EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY | “Washinetme's white, 


FOR ADVANCEMENT IN 
in 

* alte 

, outside 


AN EXPANDING RESEARCH 
ORGANIZATION 


APPLY IN PERSON 


Voune “Men > 


THE 


| CHESAPEAKE & POTOMAC 


8B AM. TO 4 P.M 
FRIDAY 


MELPAR, 
INC. 


3000 Arlington Bivd 
Falls Church, Va. 


MONDAY THRU 
TELEPHONE COMPANY. . 


Offers excellent career op 
portunities for qualified 
young men seeking regu- 
An 
est in mechanics or elec- 
tronics is desirable. Must 
be high school graduate. 


lar employment inter- 


EMPLOYMENT OFFICE 
725 13th St. NW. 


Anoly Monday Thru Friday 
8:30 A. M. to 4:00 P.M. 


| WANTED—One firet- glace ert m ear 
penter a am 
a.9780 


(Take Arnold ? 2 V Bus from 


ith & E Sts. NW 


1A 
, mJ on 


“aul 
to plant) Ask for 


Experimental Machinists 


Experimental machine shop of 
guided missile development or- 
ganization has several openings 
for qualified experimental ma- 
chinists. 

8 to 


mode| 


m close tolerance work a5 @ 


10 years’ experience 
c stable em- 


maker, tool etc $ required 
proyment record and good reverences are essential 


mae @r 


Those who qualify will be offered continuous employ- 
ment on a 40-hour week basis with bene tits, INcluUcING 
vacation and sick leave, voluntary retirement and insur- 
ance plan and group hospitalization. 


PERIODIC INCREASES BASED ON MERIT 
EXCELLENT WORKING CONDITIONS 
Machine shop will be relocated within a year to our 


Howard County building on new Route 29, approxi- 
mately 25 minutes from Silver Spring by car. 


A Few Openings Also Exist for 
MACHINISTS 
At Least 4-Year Formal Apprenticeship Required. 


PLEASE APPLY 
9 AM. TO 3 P.M. 


The Johns Hopkins University 


APPLIED PHYSICS LABORATORY 
8621 Georgia Ave., Silver Spring, Md. 
JU. 9-7700 


EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION 


ENGINEERS 


Select the company selected by the Department 
of Defense to build the EARTH SATELLITE 
and the INTERCONTINENTAL BALLISTIC 
MISSILE. The MARTIN Company offers chal- 
lenging opportunities on these exciting proj- 
ects for persons with training in the following 
fields: 


AERODYNAMICS 


STAREITY & 
CONTROL 


NUCLEAR 


SrIELOING 
REACTOR DESION 
SsYSTEMs 


STRUCTURES 


ATRPRAME DESION 
STRESS ANALYSIS 
VIBRATION & FLUTTER 


ELECTRONICS 
avermun 


SERVO and 
INSTRUMENTATION 


TELZEMETER INO 
AUTO-PILOT 


INERTIAL 
NAVIGATION 


MECHANICAL 


OPERATIONS ANALYSIS 
PLANNING & CONCRPTS 


Many of these positions are et responsible supervisory 
levels and carry salaries in excess of $12,000 yearly. 


WASHINGTON INTERVIEWS 
JULY 10, 11 and 12 


Phone Mr. David Trott at EXecutive 39-5888 on weekdays 
from 10 A.M. to 8 P.M. to arrange an appointment. 


All inquiries will be on « Confidential level. if you are 
unable to contect us here, please communicate with: 


PROFESSIONAL EMPLOYMENT 
OFFICE 


MARTIN 


BALTIMORE 3, Maryland 


, 


15) HOLE, MEN 


-* | atic Me teal 


13 
RECENT 


ENGINEERING 
GRADUATES 


Uuysee! opportunity for 2 m on with 
71-year-old nation ae ee 
sation with of tees in Rng citien aii | 
n 


over the wor oes 
of omperature and| 


mULY 11, 1956 
CALIFORNIA CO. 
EXPANDING IN EAST 


OFrere vente married man over 
nity to own end man- 


umidity 
"| ohnson Service Co. 
2117_M St. NW., Call NA. 8-0104 


WANTED 
8 MEN 


21 ty 35 wears 
495 tt 
all RA 


EVENING WORK 


Part ftime positio 
credit and meee “oftice 


MD 
With cars tenes” 
of sage No canveasin 
2930 of" month to start 


6-118 


oure 


onday unroush 


SUMMER 
OPPORTUNITY 


PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 
The Washington Post & 
Times Herald 
1515 L STREET NW. 


FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 
AND TEACHERS 


EARN $1000 THIS SUMMER 
PARTICIPATE IN SPECIAL EDU. 
PROJRCT THIS SUM. 


R TRAVEL iF DESIRE 


FULL TRAINING SUPPLIED 
Call Mr. Norman 
EX 3-4467 


BEFORE NOON 


organization ° 
plete record of education. empjor- 
ment experience. - Ay nd = 
rea tired 

Post-TH 


AIRCRAFT WORKERS 


We need men with 
sfruc 


knowledge of sheet metal, 
tural and assembly work. Must read biveprints. 


WELDERS 


For oas and arc welding on light metal including 
aluminum Must be able to work from biveprints. 


INSTRUMENT MAKERS 


lok. far mechanics wha eniov high grade precision 
work of an experimental nature 


INSTRUMENT MECHANICS 


For instrument assembly Must be femiliar with 


machine shop practices and read biveprints. 


ELECTRICAL INSPECTORS 


Must be able to use test reqdipment in testing 
electronic units from biuveprint end specs. 


TURRET LATHE MACHINISTS 
SPRAY PAINTERS 


INTERVIEWS 9 A.M.-3 P.M. 
Monday Through Friday 
Other Times by Appointment 


ERCO DIVISION 


| ACF INDUSTRIES, 
| Riverdale, Md, 


INCORP. 
WA. 7-4444 


Electronic & Mechanical 


ENGINEERS 


Physicists 
An Invitation 
To a Better 
Way of Life— 

From Melpar 


Many factors combine to make for « better way of 
life for engineers who join Melpar. Located in 
suburban Falls Church, Melpar is set in peaceful 
surrqundings ewey from congested traffic ereas and 
within easy commuting distance of Washington. 


Should you join Melpar you would tle your een 
professional growth to that of # company which hes 
doubled in size every 18 months for the pest decade. 
Meipar maintains a policy ef INDIVIDUAL RECOGNI. 
TION which enables our engineers to progress accord- 
ing to thelr own timetables, not prearranged ones, 
Ability and performance primarily determine ad- 
vancement. Age, tenure, length of experience are 
only secondary considerations, 


Melpar's unique “project team” system allows each 
engineer to experience the OVER-ALL APPROACH 
te an engineering problem, thus enabling him te 
broaden his experience and background, essential te 
eventual directorship responsibility. Each project group 
is responsible for an ENTIRE problem, from initial 
conception to completion of prototype. 

Complete facilities are at the engineers’ disposal. Our 
new laboratories encompass over 285,000 sir-condi- 
tioned squere feet and offer, in addition to « Central 
Model Shop, supplementary facilities, test equipment 
and personne! aveilable for immediate use within each 
project group. 

Engineers wishing to work toward higher degrees may 
take advantage of the fully accredited graduate courses 
available at Melper, 


If you would like to learn more about the 
unique growth opportunities at Melpar, call 


Technical Personnel Representative 


JEfferson 4-6000 
Or drive out to Melpar and inspect 
our laboratories at your convenience 


OPENINGS EXIST IN THESE FIELDS: 


Metwort Theory—Systems Bvaluation—Microwave Technique— 
Vary. VEP or GHP Receivers—Ansiog Computers—Magnetic 
Tape Hendling—Digiteal Computers—Rader and Countermeas- 

Electronie Equipment—Pulse Circuitry—Miec- 
ra Fight Simuletors—ser hant Sub 


imitaé ““ ~ 


Test 


teal dl 


Design—@®ma!l] Mechantoms 
Engineering—Antennse Design. - 


MELPAR, Inc. 


A Subsidiary of Westinghouse Air Brake Company 
3000 Arlington Bivd., 
Falls Church, Va. 


aaa" ty Contre, and 


nisiinieabiaccy bse Continecd om Following Paso 


-_ 


wel See WOMEN See WOMEN 16| HELP, WOMEN 16) HELP, WOMEN 16, THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


A ‘TAN “ C Ec "ER. C s ER . nd table Weltresses, T-cou W TRESS : sece ednesd 
ROFESSIONAL $100 w real cc n K ASH! | COUN = = ae piene bide. in hearty ve, Bieter tans | NTI ; W ednesday, July i, 1956 . a 
ris ) . rt Eeverience nece One of openings woman with e Permanent posi- xperienced soy Apply ake your pumene esious! Make) 7 -<"emeee en 
eners., paint exp i roe a Ky Ovp's ae "to Wachinnton’s Pinest ‘Rote; pleas-| Go ok lL. days secosede OT @ tl and raneey Resteurant, 116 Kennedy to £100 per week. part time. HELP, WOMEN aT 


. OH cor 2 , ete iin eal : d-87 * As | ork your Own hours, In you 
\VISIT-WELCOME) today. | benefits APPLY PERSONNEL OF. “Emp. & th ew.| Va calls pie Ree te day work| Community: no experience 415,000 
a PLY P : TE pe we suns fen-Penn | ary. we Will train you free. “Call d 
Lx Nat SIGE|SHERATON CARLETON Serre Bi Boe. ex: LESLA youn ott! Apply, Fen-Peon| S57 sii ue. Je 2 Sih ROSSLYN, VA. 
L. EXCHAN . SILVER SPRING Rock, ‘mp i thee and sehall accessories ‘oppose. Fai e AN EXTRA $100 for vacation is Sunday 
ty hae JU. 9-4446 | in furnishing dept. im fine men’s WA 5 ours’ Gee AVON personne HOT SHOPPE 
e —y ) ‘ store St salary. pleasant air ector and let her apie} mn the 
eg A fo} we EXPERIENCED AND NEAT st. service plan DIL 7-G221 Ci lati 
As 7, a ew if ’ ' ; ; . be. _ — 
NAT "EMP SER\ Lif APPLY Me  NOMNSON APPLY 1305 NW BUSINESS GIRLS . WAITRESSES ircu a ion 
Bit: A. 2- i210 . . ' LEWIS 4 THOMAS SALTZ . Dart-tame) $15 m next 
33 EnIT. ‘AST. vne 100 | cho ; om : B. NO. | AVON customers where you work 
. + io Ne ee | : _ 1409 G ST. NW ; | Lve ESTAU~! Call Di. 7-0221 for info. __ ere Te ; 
' i LERK.TYP T BPCYE Sp. 7s, : aah aw 6250 - you onrenien 
mbermaids exper : = i>tD> ) rypists +4 = » ig at ae NITY in small ) . 
te ids aor nes: te : SECRETARIES ar - ” On SALESL LADY, . expe ren ec oo ma —. ww — oa _ 7 fo irl ’ ; who is] ’ ; d concucting n for Washington Post and 
undry worters all tyve 14 4 , te ; : Ir } P : : : > en 
press operators . 835) BERG OLLEGE AND REPES TER so Haggerty. Erp! po 7. 7% " SS K Thurs sh. Eo ~w gone n yw) Ze : n } mt : A pik, 9°. " ; _ Times Herald classified ad- 
é Bi }-or-town ‘orEx1 Jt COLLE ANE Pa a | 18 2 i. ry, +m oe LSTARDARD J EMPL ft) hour wees. Good starting sa}- yt wastes ay 
_ mote Restaurant COME . TALK ys = vER AS . Handicano d bat: st ; . “a mace pie nt rkine cond! 
up och | Orr Be’, “Ah : + Or) en ra, CLERK, ber > eager women & iris. 1 4.3 capp “y WAI RESSES WANTED | estment Bide. 13th & Kn 3 PPLY DIRECT t 10 for Sund 
> nx : >. ing = t . Fi se , 0 ; a: Ww Be aie) rood Wl Ls ft : is food ongs oi ce rv ve PART. TIME arcy —_ 50 h THE SiO) A A ne ho irs Ww 2U ay 
ACCOUNTANTS ED. Di TAPHONE SECYS. &/0 GB rv HOTY Pr-ADDRESSOGR AI - 6 12 moon Men. thr [S01 rte & on : ie orRino- ROCK VL F Phone 
rin? Tre rj oP per “ST a5 | LL OS & = -* : pe n pas Va Apo) ; 1803) = .. JV -4446 
WO. f- 9 . BOOKKEEPERS ERE TPRATE nz, 895-88) Se etier CONSULTANTS. Inc.| SEC RETARY- STENOGRAPHER—1 cate i : miy. Tull end Al SECRETARY, « $5000) 
SRTUNITY iN : CLERK. TYPISTS ; Lt RRS. <0. _ bypit 7 7 *~ hinegto 2 ™ : + act eo sae’ - “+ . : - ” ia . . 7 ’ eae Promotion Dept. G a Eo: eLec lity sas ) REpublic 7- 1234 
LANDSCAPING ) SECRETARIES rELLE . INE : ‘+ rd oF | 16) K 1 WHITE . App -. rson } Fes £3 SOS SU TST 
n t | ; R 1S POR | LEDGER CLES ony ' D ’ , r ; wii -_ Whi ; eri ced CLERK a’ ‘ panes »N eee RE’ ‘RY young s! TUATIONS, DOMESTIC 2 
ey eG a 


: 
“MANY OTHERS 


means quicker sales results 


vertisers. To place your ed 


0 
+ ine ¢ . th ; ; , : ' = , j Dp : children im my 
. . - : we V¥. WOOD PERSONNE’ fe ana aherti peed ju : s ; Ww ina 920° Penne * others DATI nauire “M “ seer aa ther works fy ea 
cesta: — ~~ : Si sal ¥ ° EE AI W NF ' ING | & nditior rice: 5 ' Nw | Grant. ST. 32-3606 (Fat. 42 9 : ; fav ~ 201 Eve st. nw 
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+e TYP #) 233 4 . | 2) RANT JANIZATIONS — is merican Hed. . or interesting interviews; 1 be} pro t office for young ¥ a y | foune 4 (—teilres opr ae 
‘MIN. sh . 805 iSTH S71 LW. Al Hi : INC fOP-CALIBER _ Room 283. _ a= | pers able an mee , as rho is fast and eccurate wi is- ROC KVIL iF SEC Y a lady. ee as ‘snes. 
COLLEGE | : } , . te : CLERK-TYPIST S Witt POT TIA! ; ; ) rs bo Ui hou! os m-i2 oon hin al siator essential Fis £1900 EXECUTIVE tyne excel oote i . _ 
: 4 a : . PUTURI M : 2 ~ leon AY iA ~ ad : N wets , , a fort | 9 : : . tw theadA etar mune 
2 ~' 82 BETH ESDA ' On} re rTIOM! 1G 5.20% va between 2-5 » n - cor pany benefit ~~ 4 sine iber 7. w= 60 penis nes DAILY oe 
CLERK.TYPIeTa <i <a eos | ALA® COVMENST r 3 , ~~ - ; n ~~ va ; ’ 4 finest In@uire } Gat wt 
R AT ) O KEFPE! “ ; | interesting ad ' RAT rr? i f AND EA- POTO! AC EMP! 23 a “ei 2 ms abi p. to do *%ei . : PERSOLNEL Apply Mg Miss Oren aen } me 
GRADU ES | BRK BW so} 82 sont ence esseniial, Unde SRIENCE | DAY OR on bivd.. Ari. JA 5-200 Mr OY Yb’S S, Cor ‘Oth So a SS 
CLE.-TYP S| 22. G benefits bE Pet tet Ff Barber. BA. 39-9112 The ididibvasen's Post ‘ 
. R PURNISH 


; & Ad 
et srs available Mrs £51 CAN 8 Moe OPULAR Col womals 
‘ OO a ; a ; 


aocts ' on) oS 4 c 
acc TS We kp? ne ; ; L. ; 3400 : : - and Times Herald cle re) y : ; ean 
or riseptre-y . be : - - T Was 7 4s) J . be i « ra ry. 
. oraduates wanted “4 , ~ : CLERK TYPIST we oe . ' EAE : 57. aM YOUNG LADY , ‘ be : = ~A : Mews TOR GCYTRL war 
é . : $55. POTOMAC EMP . “ue fon hee rue 7 . 1515 . STREET rit ; : a 
nea responsibie Si BNO... is uJ tyo “ . 4 = _< F : } POR he . = > inte ' . " ‘eo 35 7 . : i ; ico! woHlhe 
nositions after wi) PRinhie eee ee corn Tiras ‘Kee 3 Dt-| «6Vierr S EMPLO! oe Se " “ | OL 
| Sf AD ERIE a : >» on + rae to Tre School graduate, for combined | — - COL Woes 


: YT AD _ & b. 
ve r . iD LET - 950-855 of accounting clerk and re 
; 


: o- w a S MANA }E} c = ‘ iTa | ; A! JOO om aed — 

os ' . in a >i > inet : : HOT SHOPPES ) lweli : ; ; lie a™ Operator Some bh h SYSTEMS oe LADY a mants sb*, 5.g078 
NATIONAL cle kk TYPIN¥s ; | 3 41 G ' ’ ' —hecent so : : knowledge w | B M. Operators OL. 9 gir | ae loaves > rk of any kind, 
| RP g R | pieasing pers ‘% 


7“) ; rH : ; ’ . ; - nterestir " = — 
EMPLOYMENT 8&3 VICE SILVER "RINC ; ; ~/ : mt fice 1 “ Experienced Card Punchin wants, baby sitting, 8 
ion if : nw at I a 2 oe lead o | a4) oO J pro) r ; ; rs ; is ‘ “ 4 - ‘ = ’ A A ween. LJ ~J114 
ACCOUNTING CLERK. 5-4 san | Clone “byt poToaae any” | SOCRE_ PARENS eee eradu-| ee Mine pe | a condi | , ane Veritying | | cpool girl desires beby 
. Bee = - ; . . e 4 N e 
Mer mF « 4 Lh BM A a ‘ 
; . > “ e 
. BOO KEEPER - ime 5 | “f 
. HOUSE MOTHER : + an Ot ' "oa : Or Ss. Sheitor Sue nt We © eines werk 
JMBIA EMP. SE ERY. Vastenn > Grae in eeees , Fee : .s , m ) : tween the ages | OLORED TADS 
7 - 7 : 7~ 7 " - { re 
f : - pave fice SAP OLOmED: rit 
3 . ' 


Accounting ped san Rene gy ers Rew LADIES | Renee eek | Parr time] pr shoul be ie ne. CSE 
Clerks rth: Poa or Ae pobLie heedet 2 CiaL CAREER LADY MELPAR, INC. view clerical employes to de- | cue Eby 
a . ¥ r uP Ti , = —" » t hee bart 


IVING IN MD 
. earn 440 7“ Subsidiary Westine! 
: ’ ma 
iividua rf Brake Company 
a — 
7 
DI 


APPLY IN PERS cEBKS — Gatco opr 6. : HOT SHOPPES, INC 
8AM TO4P M ne | aa OVER 25 YEARS OF AGE ¥ a ae ae NINE . lead ay 
ra, | —— ——| and pleasant and 4 Rt NEW YORK AVE y ) , CLEVELAND “PK 
MELPAR | eT one With Pleasant Voice | SECYS.-TYPISTS pense. Work im your own neiah- and on oe ae | 
, NC. + ‘ | Cand’ Sol | . See ae First ene Posne Di tats. | BLADENSBURG RD. N.E.| 92" mie | 
CO MANES ACTIN alary 38 Eve St 3 | | ; 
: A Subsidiary at PERMANE NT PO das ‘ | ~~ 4e!. 400 UNIVERSAL EMP SERV HOT SHOPPE " salary requirement, 
Investment Comy Westinghouse Air-Brake Co ag PR Call AD. 4-3648 | ona Ave. 3) Se ie ey, | puesta. $35 
vestment Company | BERAL VACATION AN go: frre cscs cake) Ea Reve, BL WAITRESSES (Beagts wi 
— rington Soulevard tax : For Apot. 10 AM.-4P.M.! € reqeptie ist 00 | GE “Aer Wok a LEASE REPLY pt Post ss 
, } HAHN SHOE STORES Seno. nr. Shoreham 200 PART TIME tative ) PERSONNEL OF- | IN WRITING TO 


» & : - Sis \ 


shopping and 
after 


c< Hentz 


> 
CLERK-TYPIST 0 : pas’. BOOS - at tt , . —s D4 ; ie c peR< J a 
7 > he , : a : RNer r . , ~- * ; > ; : ’ : ; . 
cana; _valany bin Begin, typist. Mt. Rainier ~'siso| [air-conditioned office od wages, pleasant work “VIVIAN HOTEL 
| Phone EX 93-7856 ;' . » o 7 i GOVERNMENT Quiet : 
1ege Graduates | Select positions in PUBLIC REI CLERK TYP Uy op SECRETARIES, $e5 | w . é ce 4 | EMPLOYEES 
4 » * ’ : pe ERK TYPIsTs: ge $e ) INSURANCE CO 


reer Opportunity |CUERe TYPIST Many to $7 P dey cate’ treks Tastinen| Secessary Pleas my S| NEW IN WASHINGTON? SEE 1 SECRETARIES | | 
| , 7 STENOGRAPHERS 3 0 
TYPISTS COCORED GIRL 


LAUNDRY ; Avi mh secs .  etir 0 : ut be oo 


vias. 
- 


4200 , ‘are 
4 We ~ave rter est "9 career anenir 


" i « P sod anent 7 oat - . 
: e * expe Visit [mmedie te tor those who qualify. HELP, DOMESTIC 
Ders 9°] ee F , : 
LigAl SECRET AR ' ~ CHILD TARL- Hv 
Mi 9 Mf , <- 7 | a ’ . / - WE OFFER fw « ° o/s 4 


‘ ae 
LIPRARY CLERK 


* 
+ 
Ss ary commen eat th ’ : ( OOF i. 
ANY OTHERS : : ; , : . x ' , Z Wo IG 
Various - « fields io os ; ' ‘ dd bul " we k week & : = CHOt 
, 1 : ' txcelient leave FAM 


HOUSER 
Annette D Tate! man ice MR TUGWEL MR nh we as pita ns i) En . e. ne me. oer. é “AVE sf 


a0 Wor "9 conditions 


- iy Z > ‘ ne , ~ a " ‘ : 7 e 
Z , . \ . PARTS ; / : ne a - 3 a one : - ce ’ joanna ‘ a) " A s woot? oned office . s) - eM . : - cvs Ww 
: , & *¥ a‘ : : . . . 9 . : .. 
: . : \ ; : : re ' ‘ . * ° . ~ ~~ . Access ~" on pubic tranmsportat ww : . : . . “J Ty a Sh 
NOTICE, MEN | apm CLERK-TPYIST 80 To 8 Pi sea’) 8 100 Rhode Island ave | — ‘ | TOOK (Trt oe i ah 
) : ) ph nn BX pits Yenc TO QUALIFY | Fecwot, rele uve ip. geod salett,| Good 
Cc | Som: Down-| | on 4 a on, in export tela 5 ‘S| | berm. TV. Cell Mrs Scott. Of 
Sta rting Salary ) Ca \f a i ling h ) woe da tie ince - | : ‘ » . {| roe Renee recora whuch will be investigated before pots —Woreian maint man 9 
7 eon ice ne- r = ] Eo. : —~—- 1 ~ | : 3° ° 
$86 50 Weekly | ave « nee. Inte -RENAIRE CORP. | cellent Bw *- yy ~-*: are tenes... | Drs Tice (2) High school education or better me, AD. for the aioe i. 
a * nye ap hacen nadie hanent, state c perien O° : er-| ATLAS AGCYS 1430 8 YX Ave KW 3) Recently employed preferred | DOMES TICS—col. «1 QU** NS PY ) 
~ 5 CERK-TYPIs = ——— are desired sbcye = : . . oo N. x. At vw Rm $1) 
RE CEPT —$2 60 ct r : . . » Box VW 4 ‘ p t-TH . LVER SPRING Rocky a5 APPLY ae | mn. reliable ties 4 
9-4 b 


‘tele pe spews cverace appear: af on. Free, ip "Ses. Ca Medical Technologist | dee arrany” 21-46 “Por a ion of OPERATIONS RESEARCH OFFICE ; ' —EE 
“LIBRARY. ‘CLK -TYP He Coeon Bdge 14sh Oo) ears, 93622. | ent hotel Bon =a e apart = oe (erW ST NW. Tes Business wom 


: : ave interest ‘ R LER : rs 5 "st. 90c N NN Et 
pan clin Maot Dare peterest| lt E-eeps TYPIST -| NEWSPAPER CLERK Ferriss tliaeedt pce The Johns Hopkins University eis ame i 
Ee "CLK.-TYP! sT—$270 NO EXPERIENCE NECES Ipege te nike ey *-! 7235 WISCONSIN AVENUE—BETHESDA, MD. Sy 
as ING on tad i rout! eel regu: pere ‘ i | part af for 6 ; ; : " ; 505! ~ NTERVIEWS v — hile. | ATR. nt botNG— rie: erifl 
National Cemetery ELDS | AGENCY ne, | sutetanding explore a Mu sicerucp ‘Khe. Washinton | not coventia.. bes” at 865, Bure MONDAY THRO! 2-088. 


4101 S$ LAND RD 


ice 
: sinsio room: or. dbalh iv  ghowert 


UGH FRIDAY + | Bx = GORBON wore: ‘ mT 
- . 490 ' T ; Janttor-cl fleur 

SitwT . Papen row pie ra S300 @ Tm 3 . ‘ ’ ‘ost ; YOURAPHER § 00 AM O 3 00 P MA. ! ; . ne i 

Pee : Ne PUBLIC = FINANCE ‘CORP duties “pive-da reek. | {ermagbo™ with established exten —_—— | itis AD. cannes! WESLEY HOTEL 
= = 3233 RHODE In AVE - Bide Multis 


MO. __| Sitters 9 0 m te | = > a isl iitronmed ‘an. 2131 O ST. NW. 
Ai" EM. service | | | eS "sowed GIRLS $50 per Week | © veas ouronr circus 
i floor CLERK-TYPIST | 75 7 PL. ft | ‘ b! 
“AIRLINES | The Washington Post & feta ee ty #27 HOUSEKEEPER | Modern, Comfortable 
| . aleeerme » | edt we & . i. mes Herald my “onenian “fot ex * | 5 CARE Living That You Enjoy 
SYSTEMS Ad ' tioms | ds ne ’ : ees mes-| 5 L STREET NW. ) od shor tha , and cosine fe. If you want area y interesting job in a growing CHIL 


AVIATION mainine ? Should eo orkine with pia $60 SINGLE PER MONTH 
. wu “ : . ’ 


» 


o ; aie MANACER | Knowledge ‘of a: Se. essen'h —— | bs 7 ee loca S| and exciting industry, consider the Télephone Foreign Born te in | HO. 2-9100 

| rp ; sirable. ome typing anq ' 8 slaty Call Bice. bMaeore by | Thursday and Ever — . 

ANALYST | I need am assistant to tear | hand required. Pleasant NEWSPAPER afer $30 a mm Company. What a thrill to be able to say Other Sunday Or CAIRO HOTEL 
mpi : STENOGRAPHER | 


you're a part of the communications system of 


1415 Que Ot. NW. Lee 
" . * th $10 ta Speci 
" ‘rom > per 
s Ee Soles cxrortony_ nel Serer. Nie Ber | WP-TH BOX 702 | fini tet Pind 
er. (CLERK -TYPIEST, 18 to 3 r young won Bisel sh. 32-1213. __ this country! You'll receive good starting pay 
ax rocedures good tp i: | $1.00 per br. bonuses aid’ va | HAWTHORNE HOTEL 
“snaad . . ak ir ad red : } : on i ion. 
‘ , : fice and . pan’ Ronert tt ; ww 62OC(l. «e .. Regular increases... Man rtuniti 
ler: falas) ices | : 9 beanie | 2134 G ST. NW., RE. 7-4027 
for advancement . . . Other attractive benefits revorn for Tm. beard. and smell; Why? Bet reneteractit bes Single oné 


| SILK FINISHER | . . Vacations with DOV « «6 « Make new and 


\V ‘ I, " D 4 pertienced aualitys ' . ‘ ~~ l s iy Lin n Or 7 . 210 for “sunshine 
yvasnin ow »<? ry ' pa G Bosit son ‘Appi ; , : , : Pe ; : restf es 
— . I 70 Nw interesting friends. Don’t wait! Come see us ext. 707, 9-5. CL 7 ath, 6:30 | Reasonabi rat es irom $9.50 
mt imes Herald STATISTIC aL i ser Age er — ay 
erp | Sav. & MAN of the family Care & “ GEORGIAN d 
>. STREET NW MENT CONBU r a at our employment office! “idpen in exchanse for room. |=MeRS-G Alt snditioned room 
. Was gion ag 143 * | 


& _ eirls : ce. 1 9 20th * n = | NW rat perm ponent wsicome. 
ry Pr —_ W - - —— | 
rosa Yor tata p = STENOGRAPHER 

BANK eonste 4 a 4.3 =rere.| Paley open. Ste- day week. tring 725 | St. NLW. 


Experies 


t ; er ac ; : De ~ PRON’ " Shirline 
5-da eek er insuram in : Mass . ne ton Trust C 5. 1 v MONDAY THRU FRIDAY ; burniahet. - 
, Vailres da «i Oo ‘ Y q : , ur Diss . 
Maid . $30 ur 9. : - : ver 5 , . COL ' 
“MU JNSEY TR UST CO Wil : LORE! urse | STEN OCHAPRER , ee - 8:30 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. | CHEMIST— La: rnish ~| tn bade Odiet fio ME. nto “Leah 
i, ‘ ‘ ; - open mar Do a. ~ Advancement th ins formusat } OL . a! vw 
BEAUTICIAN. Man : man. | _— oe ; - 4a 2k a Ye BON? L- 273 pportunity. many employee bene ». : x 7104.) 5 . ; 
: A ; ; ; - ~ oe NK . F . “ NCL ASFRY ‘ ; ae ar J . ’ 4 : ( 4itioned office RE - - . . —— - VL P : no pet 
SoMa ves ’ : . os : . . - en ' ' 730. ext. Zio , abi a -< : Please i? | Me. any 2 .* eS | 
BEAL rie Lan ; girl its - , a oy, Soe. tos reed SO: SWITCHBOARD operatér. secre C &. 2» 1 aes a we haat | 
| chop: top euaraniee. per-| ‘Oyalid. Exp. Must be kind Write Box M-o68. "tara service, tn Re The C. P. Telephone Co. ccd Weir 
: =, bet ,, Mew j Ree . 2» days. ¥ a . ; nee ; r night 1 CR 
PLEA -— REPLY i 52 — | . ppiy 308) Idab ave. ne | Se oe. pea 
; WA/OITIAIGC TO | BOOKEEI ae rye "“S-day.| °° br . a ' ; Be demon ese 
ii~% . 
iN Whi ' | uw rR — 004 : 


PERSONNE} SERVICES | Wasi ; 
AX : ' a ty att 
COUNTERGTRL—D ry ea is 

ef 4 


' c. POT OMAC EMPL. ie . 
: th 1 N * A LA , NC EA IsT ‘lO ‘ r Y, nbet ew = 
GOVERNMENT nAKPR tac mPL. “16 4 NY om a0 COBNCY no. is As a rpacmbns 
EMPL OYEE S aKPR a =| CREDIT INVESTIGATOR Kher 0-4. one 
Os bonus, POTOMAC EMPL | Desirable oe ion . , : Telephone Solicitors 
INSURANCE CO inet sho RE ACRE it Sree 12 a ae ae P 


| Sit Kine & | 04 ton Nicely fur; —tAh_$-3897. 
» ; : mm . : . 2 Box ul ‘ XN 7 : or e 
Se Ale vee) Ure Sliver Spris , o1 IN VA, MD. WASHINGTON bia ‘DEST desires work aller 3 i A cept 1 child io A 
°xa ' — ne orkin ann 44 lame + : f. : ’ ’ This is the opportunity for vou YPIS S " 5a Ln mis Te) : 
» Bos i 478. We + , woeege Snes many edt 8 tee : sdies to earh money on & part | as —t11 a aR _ 
. 4 : ’ ’ - 


CAS : R - bef ~ x 4 tin —, Exper ‘ence not mec dine wits MES ;. ny » a ate A NO 
r G * z : ary u teh th. - your n » anywher , + and nearness 
: , OMAt ‘ MIP wa +4 _ Morma' lor j pe . on Ot 7 cme Con tran yo os 


9 . na . , Mr. Cosmo ai - | for any is vidual or of A 6h, : 
" ¥ ways | RECEPTIONTS TYPIRT. me 20 528 Rhode Island NE. | STENOS |e: MAN, a: Port ‘ per | Se ah ‘sale °: yr * 
10% 10 288 Be | : . DICTAPHONE PTIONTST-TYPIRT. mae 5 MAN. reliabl : ib le hi =, 
ao , Sw: — . : OL. ii Tne. ! 
76, Serna. Boe» Se ® ’ Tz CO. 1406 K st. OPERATORS _ [steers ~traa eg pex.| Telephone Solicitors PERSONNEL CLERKS Porras WOMEN = 
HELP, MEN & WOMEN  15A COsUihningion spews nd most | Pig SSL, Ale RL $035. od callers enin rk 10d. | CALL QUEER’ $ AG wif RE, T0388 

SRE Tease meni sen’ “ASR! EXPERIENCED |MerPheiicry Vist votes 75) strred"intnne “Call BU fe fase slat. ble | cB 


achers ° - or : - PO! mA 


cot. —Wi oe srems ; 


Aac 927 1088 8 : : : ™ “Cl 2 = Hi ‘A 3 : a ; Dd, is }ept ety POT ssp. : | : r . ee) ¢ week- Li © 
BOOKKERPER i (CHRISTMAS | SALARY UP RECEPTIONIST — =I" EMPL 5534 Wilson bird. Ar. JA farious Openings—Interesting Jobs. sec Aut Li $-4464 afier 5 i 7 


| . + 2008 TOUsE TaD iNG ROOMS 
"CASH ER- TYPIST | Age 18-25 ‘. SO Mr W 1 , x. yur pd accurate. | ret, SO wpm LU. A-ieee, 
po ARID INGTON va TO $80 WEEK | RECKEATION WORKER “1 a4 Ber a2 a > » Bans wk Excellent Pay—40-Hour Week io e sittina i « OL ii “iad, NW. 


1754 
mete] ~=DEPENDING | siesta" Ni Fehon ibn ct a ie 


‘ ° home wa wo? : " 
REG ISTERED NURSE F atri ‘| Air-Conditioned Offices 
ON ABILITY 5 es idee > , ente 4 > Mr. * oe ee ) me C Bth 


ris Sirdar ral elin- | CASMEEW—Weatel ofc come UP- | | er ee Write Box M-S6?.| PRIVueeS acetal, ecad cal Numerous Benefits 


a) 


. ‘ . . . —_ , n ovr iatr® . rq 
medica! \ —* Waeb : ; ’ a. a Al : tA > 2009 - REé GIstt RED SLESES 
EM 2-9500_ | Interesting work in ; i] 


math wm | ae yseit toeEr teeitla:| Fogaion ¢ “ast” an" tal PC | Paraee—sor wee | == INTERVIEWS 9 A.M.—3 P.M. 
TRACTORS 'M 30 1AM te2 31° TKI r 7m 
ee ABB | a0 . lia i REGISTERED N "NURSES paced. Good salary tips, Dan Monday Through Friday 
“WwW. ST. 3-0190 me Pe ss bu Na a ‘duriz a OFFICE aw ; ow : 271 400 ope 
for. clerk 7 Beri 8-40. te Pal? HADLEY HOS 3 A WAITRESS | ° Other Times by Appointment 
>. 2 mod- 


"see ABBEY Fin rs 
" Ave SW 


. e T INC ; ‘ 60 / oa 
SSvEnkuce "stn ces NC GOVERNMENT RE NTAL AST Ex Dent, ae osit ~ F 
+ asurer caikactnt — Hand>baer FAA PLOYEES Crown Rest 
hosiery ez per 


: | position in : ‘eA Ay 32te 
NSURANCE COMPANY | ft: ay to 8) wba, + ‘rp. WAYTRESS—Wiperienced [Eatewss CO VY S O 
sen De | Ag pee t. ore tad Many Co. penehis Apply person. witht irks os | ER Di | | N 
CHARWOMAN | | denier Hew Resiasyant meviare Move. Sorina ACF INDUSTRIES, INCORP. 


: pad t t PLEASE APP’ y : ae er In der . ea ol pouse : 
ieerrienet. pe : Be nicroughiy exp. in office | , | he ae TRESS |. od yea del 
EST ORED BRANCH "| sae geen ow BME! BAM. TO3 P.M ake denapeets. oe, ne ie papergen toot god cepetee: sas Riverdale, Mie. WA, 7-4444/50 100 "ious tas Sasha | 
iol? K St NW. eT. 53-6650 iv Per ot CAPRITZ. operation, 90-ynit encelien: t na & te = ss oS. 
| AT L STREET ENTRANCE seation Apply 30st Sagbe 


ook Rte iwat Le _ nome - 
f) $23-835 ave. oF 
GE nt Bd ‘rei nm.) 225-6300 LEEDS emp, "tee. 32-2460 ' 


fy 
) 


rele. TA 8-108 


-“- 


- 


- _——_- — 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD a UNFURNISHED 36! APTS., UNFURNISHED 36| APTS., UNFURNISHED _36/APTS., UNFURNISHED _36) APTS., UNFURNISHED _36/ APTS. UNFURNISHED _36 UNFURNISHED 4 
ednesday ¥ . —s i ; We have severai one | "NORTH ARLINGTON : se e DOWNTOWN ELEV. BLDG. : APTS. by Walter ¢ a. ~ ave. ne. hy 
__ 36 Wednesday, July 11, 1996 Resa bed rin apis. Jn in downtown ares. pO aagilll ae = u furn seat, rape hey 443 50 nel meee 2 7m ie 4 oxpeseres. | Benn ry ra Mod i vedr “mana + rec, rm. and 3-car 
APTS., FURNISHED arena renting irom. 968 6 Pa. “ie kitehen "ana bath: fh Sole janitor. 1138 3 gies or TU. 2-9568, | -° 58 AGY ob AU. — , ne ese’, Fens te 
) as ; stow TU. 2-010% 2-5 | conanaie sani Die wh, Oe. bot 1 : 
382,000 | Room ¥.~ Bed Re —~ *-| 6.1400. AL y ' . ’ pt {ieina = a my = SHIRLEY PARK SE that peg pros. pw ee R Pentagon. Ariandria—}-ped. | off Benning rd fewly y. Geese. rms. wi * Garage 
tion n ; [| 508 N ware ey ti kitchen afd bath: utilities furn.; APARTMENTS HE. 4-69 i > 8! , miove, retrig., ‘atl utils. ; 
Daily | ties Included. ce Resident sane- , ; Sbedrmn apt iiving rm, separate ROCK CREEK GARDEN PARKGLEN “REN vi EORGE H. RUCKER CO 
Ci | tj 19TH A BELLE VIEW | ies ae ene ghee SahQen-t tyre APTS > i= KA 8-78 JA._5-8585 
ircuiation bath $5: ine ; ‘oils, RA 6-2036.. REAUTIFUL MT VERNON oa “and Tagnat” eefities pend Furnished or Unfurnished 1- seneen & Apts == $61. 59 modern | ’ 


on Sun Deck 
, , 19h AP FSTS. NW BLVD. SCHOOL. PLAYGROUNDS Arledae Rea! state Corp p a sii7 50 | Bedroom Aots —$91. 50 - ; 
means quicker sales results ree 1. bedro COMPLETE SHOPPING CENTER. 9: Sy Ae Bivd.. Arlington | Includes All Utils, Recent Blectrieity| | and 2 BEDRM. APTS. — : eee © : my ue i 


' vai! 53 a 
mle : : 4 N PR 18 SES ; es ‘ 1663 4 ; " 
tor Washington Post end | Reiss i™es f fonrg)| ALL © att ASG: eves. 98 31 a, Mettns nentitisa Sroogz| UTILITIES INCLUDED me A oo | 
we . : : ae . : : 
: ith r dinettes. Bi . S FOr ee, | OR. a“ “oa pe Cod 
Times Herald classified ad- 1019 15th «tne. NA. &-0580 SWIMMING POOL from Hecht’s. walking dist —- = | for sir —y~ Shopping Center in APT. 1 " — snd a — e Wanb 


. : ae ¢ : air ¢ M4itjieon) : ' : ; iA 5- 514 w « e 
. AOTER fl i . aa WADING POOL 1 bedrm. $80. bed “$35 inc : : . wre 3n ae | Development rea , Columbia pike past $428 DEAN AVE. WE OWARD - 

vertisers. To place your ad i atils. nei EXCLUSIVE FOR RESIDENTS atil Mr. Conroy on; in Ot- idual | Center, turn) . 1 ANP Fen 5 na 31 

. ’ . mo bide : v 


EF 7 
? mwrnrr . oe stor . press con 
A cnfbor HOTEL Conn ~ ave AT NO ADDITIONAL ST : “y S625 senction. | ’ | Coavenient to Schools and hierar TY co vay 56 ahd $61 mo ay all} ; 
Phone £ ° : ; Ale 20 min : ——— i parkin utomatic and | at  LeepU RG 4h . ; on the bus line: he Rune. wi : ; 
. ar ola i also. ettie. a $945 : -_ : r = Per om d . 1 laundries eff lent ma, Transportation . 4-66 | = : ; ; ff, for MA e : 
» Berry. snes ror ' Ye rvice, some with pri vate | ; 
REpublic 7-1234 eek CTENC eS, picey turn. irang., main Peavy on iin. to Port OXON TERRACE, MD ntras | | st. pe. FED » RENTAL CO. —2 bedrme. Ei 
‘ UUis. incl From 845 & Severs . BEDROOMS. 877.50. ONE BED- EXCLUSIVE Rental Office on Premises at is WN ' w BA. 8-7 i bath, lee. vd.: or, NIM; 890 
as N as - . — 1OM. $66.25 and 872. includes| Bright ompietely squip 8327 GRUBB RD 2. SILVER SPRING 
atut APT ev ; M f lospne + st es’ new well-kept bide ony } Gisposal and retriger = ; — bath A 
29 19). rou . Nae ee ett etreet| transp. to Andrews. Bolling. APB,| ®‘or. steel ets, S88 range and SILVER SPRING a CAPRITZ DEVELOPMENT furnished. Ne AD-| 3 and 4-bedroom houses. $130- + 
BOWNTOWN al t x ANDREA Purn-' ° ' ~ on , : . ro. Navy Resear Cen- uss an. . ) In the City—Single Fare MOND REAL ESTATE "TU > 6161. haps Home Reality. OL. & 
89 5 0 adine ' intn: also new Sears Roe- 2 THE CHILDREN Eves, BM a7 if 
: 4 raif irse : pies 


890 
JU. 5-4030 12 MIN. TO DOWNTOWN COLORED a Ww. Fint® speise s- ANDREWS Say Fences | ed a 


: 7. es : as Te 
nw. 132 = : . ?; : : \ yet > Biid nd 
- fand , T . . - __ z *. st) - “or * : : : ce . }- ‘ RMS SOME U 4 
2 U E | 4 P g ) Ht hd r : . Ra = ok ced our ; 2 Blocks Prom Naval Research Lab SEASONARLE RENT. M 4941| Close to ‘schools “and basiove 
Q RM AP . BOONES - ' MONTGOM- ; p.ayerounds sarety? / - , ——— 5 Min. From Bolling Field URCI Lo REALTY ses | zine BRO VHILL 6 a 


7 sleeping porch with 


— 


ROOMS WITH BOARD 


Centineed From Preceding Page 
——_— 


CLUB MAS ON }-BEDRM. APT $112.50 ty! _ - in ie OLC 6 we 

7 ALI TILITIES IN DE. 3 — C- "CONVENTENT .TO E SERE E COLORED 2407 13th St. NW. liv 

1726 New Hamp. Ave ta mode ~ > Ae sec a FURN. APTS ALSO ak. itchen. bath and Schoo). = routes, TH N 3% Large Rms., $72.50 | rm rm. _ige ese es TR | i rambler: 4 blocks from 
> rms prt ba Tor ; re a . fer - 7 : oe . " ; . ; ; : ’ ; ~~ ie = Oe : . - ' hat | 
phone in roon te rvices | — iy 34-3402 ental ef oo bee shopping ter, 963.00 te OTe pert eT 4 een tare fen R - 3 BEDROOMS 4\> Large Rms P $84.50 janitor Y rkae NB "CO Di. 7-8688 

on. : PLEY PARK Sat. 9-5. Sun. noon ‘til ‘a > ~¥ prem 1400 8. 2 " “ a STORIE COLORED—4918 Ames st. ne. 
Cc NE GO. &-8000 and &- . ie - PUL ALL UT Ls AND TV ANT INCI cor: 2 rms. kit 

CHILD CARE : 7 2.REDRM. APTS PHONE 80. 8-8 _. . my. io es. mer. it | DIRCTIONS =o POWDER RM. 1ST FLOOR Res i Galvesten tt se. R we" ~* CAPITOL HILL—By owner. 10 rma. 


(ee , . ALE RANDRIA — © } 
ARC Nt RSERY Infar , ; rT iow en Waeenit = - ee ett ‘ te r= rf. Rite : st JO) 63RD : and «4 tile except elec at 3 bathe as heat. storm windows, 
free n £UP BF ’ st : »* " : : 4 . + ’ ‘ , L Tt from $132 50 T nt rr A > a. « - at ne No 3 >. | ger... £14 , RE 5- 7192 —_~—_—- 
Gai.. hot mea MI . , ' QUAKER LANE ~ Sout ong re i'M a BROY HILL & SONS All Utiliti Exe opt Elec. Included i heh Te 3 7 so 0 ge New Tore cary? b a. A bright cheerful. 
CHILD CARS Lee ; ' Lares | wane TH) soto LER HWY Ja 41300 1-2 Bedrooms, $7 5.$81.80 : -_——- ewly “bedrm ause;, evail, 
rr LJ » conte e ) ; RESIDENT MANAGER ME. 4-2117 iL v IN ‘LUDED COLORED 

Mee eB arsenate ates 2 BEDROOMS, $105 "$69.35 te . mod, tp 
ree tine Lit fast: HONE J : (UTILITIEG, INCLUDED? . ao RIDGS RE | pes avers” | oe.” fms —~g~ hy ‘- COLMAR MANOR—2 bedrms._ itv, 


| TAL OFFICE OPEN | Laree att ve ¢ completely | ADt. 307; mo ‘pide. | fees ties CHATEL:. Ds. 17-1137. 
U M P 
INCLUDES Als, UTILITIES eo Green _ 269 25 AND $80 at N. A. as «| we } aod ioe ssipp! 4s - ee L elec yf « ue bik ks chi By AS. 


fren wehis 
’ . : . ti , » : an @) : * Ff > ; o 
EXTRA 4 AROE _ CORNED opknk = M oe | or rm it. bath: jew 7 ts. at 797 BEDROOMS FURNISHED come. $90 m¢, AP. 7-7352. af. 6 Pm. 
- 4 ar ae | fl in a | @ is facilit SS “7 AND UP ~ NA 8.7416 — | CRESTWOOD—Ciose-in Approved, 
(eM «TU. a distinctive com. eat Reck Creek 


COF IBNCE. SES THEM 1 ) Sitel st. she Du hoals % H. O. SMITHY Co | | di ' 
: ig i eke, eS Woks | EP Beg et] aaa RRA GE aoe! LARCHMONT | apaatatctvatues | fe dae Side sede a 
Apply Res ident / M anager 011 ish y SMI THY = ) | CONV. BOLL NG FIELD | GARDENS , , , an4| ideal for entertaining. Upstairs. 


BEDRM. APTS 


, . LN P - “ KE 3 MARLBARG “GARDENS | J re 1. A im modera | be i a ne. tah el se ths. Atirnctive fem rms Le 
~ % | myTS | : ~family bids to (rag cath oa) | Rent 8250: immed “ine 
arts “FURN. or UN NFUR 33 SOUTHEAST | ay LY _REDECORATED shopen — Red aan nd oT NE. 1 rm. kit. ond segues. call PAUL P STONE. RA. 
‘TH ST. NE 73? , . A NT VALUES : : 37 Forrest BS. Prederick St. at Columbia Pike dba $45 “923; 
easonenvie . *. 107 7 WwW : : . to bedrm 
is tw - ; : Cc — " . ~* ; 1326 Downing p ne let fleor } 10) NW ’ Aran ’ ' large a rm = - 57 
Erenen tnd ba LS é “CXOL—OUTSTAND ar. Port Myer. drm. ai 1917 MINNESOTA AVE. | icarcom une fun DEMAND ITEM 2, and 3-bedroom units of larwe| {10 "Bi ST. XW hedrm | 5 4 a 
Fo RT ANI ' : y sir-cong. | ramodern bids : bas : 1925 MINNESOTA AVE. — : 6 - ee tion piarer het . : me a? oe Ay SE aera} oe 
? ] : +5 mi - T iinette -- . cone eemtnt ~» 48 — - 
ath. Adults on to stores. BUN DECK 1609 21ST PLACE m screened porch DONNA LEE extras, Immecuiate. School buses cm ving | mALBAN-VIENNA — Several _ choice 
per A 0 : ' ‘) : . ; : : er * Em b : a “7 , , rn arn aT r mo, 
iP 109 —— " MI Park. 1475 Buca At-Canditioned interested tm eodteining 2? : Suburban Living With 2-Bedroom Apts $94 Usp sn9 RI De ve or “yw Bedr , =. . yo A & -~- BM. ta. 
Ave a —f—- KipROOMS Mi " Cc XE KITCHENS tment wen! , loca cit. bath #652 ) City Convenience ~ AILABLE IMMEDIATELY ai" he ave nw si, = LEAN esi co. EL. 6-41 72. 
: ua . ' -_ WE LL : —e ‘ 0 — Y 
at u) Li “ ’ . : ‘ , ~ 7 ’ ww 7 c , > & 
| ED FOR ADULTS those 1 “and others! fms. bath, utils, furn., $50 me Bus, Schools, Shopping ew AST —— comity. Aerecive SP ae 
ss 4 > pe -* are sc - . Wi OR ELCOME ALSO SOME FURN. APTS. COL, —2225 M st. ne opt. ee screened poren. 
6660 tor Aonpt 4 . | SIT Decatur «et oo Second fioer. | C LDREN WEL ; Foun on , ome ; ’ 


A schools, 


per mo.) tuitie mite wh “s ' re ' lot 
Ee . ' th — it : . n hedroom Ar " , e : 2.0 * r : 5 w - ae | : $i? B) 
APTS., FURNISHED — ; BR’ IT Ss vt ) ne _pedroom.| 2 bedrooms, $73.75 month CLOSETS GALORE Resident Mor., JA. 7-0300 0 ber mo. WM. J NC.| pus ond perk 011) ne ae is ease 


f . ; 8-35 
-M err ; rn bath and also! . n> So mdoroot Fireproof — — $00_H st_ne 
BAS f refrigerator, Rents are $55, 962.50 age ee ' . ee COL.—4628 Washington pI N. ARLINGTON—3368 HN. Dicker- 
Se : find transporia-| ROGER MOSS—HO. 2-6020 PETS PERMITTED 3218 8TH ST. Se pide. 2 pms. Kit. and bath, greoip| son st. Country Clue Mager 2. 
, n va 952 NC basement; immediste possession 


; . ir” ‘2 " ’ M . 4 Or * at . 10 s. mt _ - : . ner —S. Ss . 
ves wna porch, new fur, | 1. shoppine and bus line: 18) Frags LOR APT. Furn.-Unfurn. = | rent, ites on quiet trees! Pais $180" OHORGE MASON OREEN 
AMES ST. NE. sor Ja " et . ges , MA T S. svhil if.’ — To nD , hone Lt : a7, | 2 lar ro a th pris te det RESERVE NOW’! aon * rr’ ioe COLORED Doabie bt kit. and . 
m onit, a7 ) 410 Lee IA. 4-1300 . elient nw locatior > in. coms CALL MR. THOMPSON iv Res. Mar. JO. BL —Close-in Twwacious,| Sins Tonced yard: walk to | 
ANDREWS ley ~ , , . TEM ai f me Saccens * = is . SAUL CO >. >. rent in ion JE 3.1231 " . Lach sy wR 1. ; ot . 7 : nA pes ‘apt 87 2.50 and “anarews ARB. =. oA 
> ‘at > oo , EMAND 11 , vee OS. et and on 925 15th ST NW NA. @-2! Madi: t 3 | | ah ee a nee | OF Ay = 
DONNA LEE | fen ivisrziaig ies fomsltt:| TaNOMA FARE.—Siipe Sen REYFUss eros. | | Beautiful T-Bedrm. ABE! Hillwood Manor | ‘et cnt sk me ti afatt | baietrid Polen - 
— : : my ne t.unit bides > ~? : 7" Shem « . CHAST' On ; : Am _ . - ’ 
. : As * : ' ' . anG "bat 4 " a _ ; ~ . ; . > «hed 1701 16th ST. N W i. AN > 2 Rt -DROOM APTS. ; , ar r~ 4 es a am = me ae a. F Bae: 
vy ith ‘ net 3 . ' Fe 5) ar ‘4.7 , ra — . ran $i . . ‘ - ‘ " SOME rURNISHED - eT a ’ she ig jah, ll 


lot son DEF . al oe ~ rah ” mid.toen ' ’ ‘Ti Us SERVICE me jocl. ar. 


Fo; form : 2 th pvt , - — , n MH Haeener & Co tor - tive. levator apt. bid : ABAW mi So gg cs | ’ | = cor. Cape Cos sty 
wen eeeeatioend: with. Rai-| fe "So "eaggi “*  /COOL COOL COOL! il ite Seven "pure scn:| AMD SHURE, | aamnat ene a 
N ry TAKOMA PARK. 126 Lee Ave —Lir CR VENTILATIO beaut ~ RATES FROM $8 | nepect se Jan 
and 2 bedrms.. din. f eit HOMELIKE | apply desk + CALL MRS. PICKS DED 
* : _ sf J . 
. . n : a : 


wash mach Nr s rT , _orman Bernsen Syndicates 


FAROMA re. —) rm 
20. * Wiltshire Parkway 


near ha. Dole. Ges ROE ae JONES REA! , INC a or? . 3701 CONN. AVE Pe asc : soe ll | a fis wtil R 
> 80 2 1% Nichols : > bai ° La . ; H AND MASS 
4 7) p ae BRANDT WING st — + ae ; > : . ~\ A A 2 CONDIT ONED : ‘ ‘The “Velda “Gee ioe * ~* 
_ > - . ’ : . ~ ‘s : 4 nA ” mmr : _per mo . 
Arlington Towers GRAND Wik * a wevy Annes. rejnting is cur he AVAILABLE AUGUST 1 cit.. Se. wii 06 TH ST. NW. MODERN in Good Repair 
~~ — o- a. P “So . J . >. , 61 1° > « al 
' ’ weaturine individue eans ,| Roce. ent, im beau plus rf ie : bedrm ._ it OF dining ares.) Po. = sia ADD! ‘Ash | $49 50 Corner ala ms aiteage 
AT " mmediste bus) Seed oe tee S1ie . ane AIRV jEW APTS. $130 2 4818 STUDIO APARTMENT : 
-“ . . . . . -* va > Y 400 P 3. 735 —- ST a8 : 10 MA NU TES 
| MANOR r) x or NY. ise ww. 2 DOWNTOWN Locerie™ 
: ; ; ' , . . I ett: lency riment ’ 4 AD : OR SERVIC , 
yard Pentagon, D. | GLASS “complete shopping center on) podria. utile, fur cone. | | BEDRM.—$72.50, | Savttorii“grensetrer "Ser “Mares| FROM THE CAPITOL | sonedtt™ Uwbay FACiLIImes x ne AT CORNER 
‘ant .  —_— ULTRAMODERN satura FIC cl tOM ).00 2 BEDRMS ——§/9 50 "389 50 | 4 ‘f\. Ant , - $9 50 = 
ATLANTIC 67 : ists sean t8B 88 Cony. ay 7 200m ot : GLASSMANOR | ffs: gen te! fies, ¢ 


’ \ a 4 ’  - : > .v : BEDR vee : : > : ' : ‘ % roomy moet ew bid 2 
: ea. .PET . i t PENTH > R to Conn and J f iima . . of * Dect see janitor om premises| spece for several cars. $106 me 


ji. Ty. "Was 4 . on ; URE ' ~all JA &-S800 for information hr nal "ful CAN BE FURNISHED ePIC! ANT or HTD 95 
BOLLING PIFLD—NA\ RD o DRA! PER Sitch —_ iz batt DELU XE “APARTMENTS 4 “Rooms. De Rn A. H MPHRIES & SONS 
r ; . ’ : ; ni . pe ; noe . Pt SE __ Very lar ee 1 A . les ~e Ty pe 4 - etn gs fet a ¥. REALTORS ROGER ‘MOSS md =! 6020 


5 ed expre yo “G ARI . - was =. 1. Witttams. Di 039 ’ | wetial servic auto. jaundry “ ; 
NW ) ' FQ PED 2 AY- : me ; c rm rm! 2% ay teck arage a. va lable. Call RATE. 8 in 2 Maes. Ave 
ean ST. St t , Le : + : . . refris - PMWPRAON —, =_— =. yf! . — at "Nee Lng —- “ art At om ao — ay + .* 8282. Enrcg eoge 4 
ode 2 STORE { . ; as! ars indr kitchen. bath ' as bid if dults ¥ » ites IWC. : Rees al. hen - 
fe close 7 204 . ING = ul A 4.1908 ee ie e pow “LL YD AP | COLORED + | (2) Bel Alr—®-bedrm. frame rame- 
= | ot | : 2| £5 pers | ANACOSTIA 800 TENN. AVE., ALEX.| ottice 10 winthrop st. soft 4900 9 PORED. ee 
EArITON BELL 220 ’ — my, \| Isaac Pazornix Estate | 1838 Galen St. OE. 1 bedrm OFF SHIRLEY HIGHWAY 9 Pon +n. L 
——- —— Bick 5 oO HARVARD SY. SS : 5 MINS TO PENTAGON ; at LIKE NEW. Nr. E, Capitol a = , p. re 
ao —- Re dij : : ; 7 A . Ss ~ “a. bee ned tl ww is — am. na. a tio available immediately. 
ea Pr 8, © RLS min Rentacon. Exiza-ise | bedroom. living room. kitchen, FUE” GABLES CO FURNISHED OR UNFURN. |———® —| Reinert 8" Real i brats 
CAPITOL HILL—194 11°h ‘... oun. 14: | sep. dining ’ ‘tu pO per mo. Btls. inciudes, aver | 14 3-60 LU 2-99463 NEWLY DECORATED |ANGLEY ’ Lemp = | Se “0 “tae nenante 
Attractive stu -. ow. ims pie . ocoupancs r , D>. A cece A CAPRITE DEVELOPMENT ' 2. trom $73.50 ED | din. rm. ful pa L. Availabe 


Bedroom 


Al - = ave st 


ae. rm 
epcinand porch. bullt-te sarees. 


e ' Y . -_ | Colum! HO. « } ; 
: ves... 2h at 2 ht 1 bl urn rigt Missot ni “Ave. Nw 2 . 7 | Led 
Earrgor i —coarp oe oe ai ta, “SK | eis t:| AGER TERRACE |? “ci"eruinis Sexes] PARK ae Realty, Inc., 


cy Suit. 3.be sliors. FP " bath and Ne y , beara apt . ide “Washer. 4: rver 
i. seo. incl util. 31) A Oh me d bbe expos: ott iB bat wit ear i. y Ao os r st — 
i! mapect. call BARBARA HELD. | kitehe: petie. beth 3 ep “Cte ns MCAP ITO Ras cae ee ineY | Ti? AP Pes renfiaclon store t eager APARTMENTS COU — Meridian 
zo, taps ‘ TS curt ave Lge 3-rm . ord gg 7 ye | 2 BEDROOMS is! "Bae Wey SW 
CHEVY CHASE en C.—Attre 15 MIN. OWN W | _ APARTMENTS ] = 7 senites ail shew at LOWEST RENT IR} AREA Bhirtington . Ag center 4/8201 N. Hampshire Ave ALL UTILA INCL. IN RENT ‘ ™ xIz ALTY . MA. 
good fart excelent | ».| EFFICIENCY APT $75 =* . ; . Kit bat! 1158. “ene 1 BEDROOM $49 50 Gans. Sai = oF ¢s ‘Tice 1 S.5 dally: 8-12 Sat COLORED—Kewis redecorated 4 
dHibriditter rcs | BEDRM. APT. .. $110 cption er, pervonpel of) aie iy tise | 9 ST 4-t9l8 3:2 sm | Unencetied Suburban Living be set bream Lowes SF sil. Se 
OUR dae” hams _ STERDAM APTS penseees ee; ba te he ee , a 2 BEDROOMS—$81!.00 These Reasonable Rents OP. a 7 | ; 
pt - ey 2 270} | Ath ST. NIV ' R _ Pr ri. + 810% hoee A i. te ela alse eo i : a SHIPLEY PARK | ¢ rt KRastle we “pear ‘oh 

CONGRESS HGTS.. «: el wewlp decorated apt. - Be luxe kit. storage locker, pai 7 [S1S—} bedrm =) ALL UTILIT INCLUDED ORSIRABLE SE LOCATION ] Bedrm ~$73. 50 i Deen - room 

t ' ' ’ Vir . On - y er : Opposite s ches! bus at door. Res 1-Bedrm ‘ from $68 50 
0 | ‘ 


‘ 7264 ~ We.- ed sieve 2 DI R - : oa. a -- 
eens Het : | for “ape. bide.» ivehbe | | ae tern save fichiean| 2-Bedrms., from $80.00'9 Bedrooms—From $83 
og LE’ MRS. ROGERS, OT, 4.9410 REALTORS OT. 4.9410 ai FTON TERRACE wits vase SRST ALTOS Utilities Included 
- Pi. ° - ’ TT" : 


osets sherene rac . = iz . ois. buses. stores. sfis AD. 


2.1450 


r = 7 < => = _ >> - . peru . , 
o a. a — > otr a a T ped 4 ation . rms im. facil bus stop in oro) G o ING N " h r is at 
2 be n. | 4 : rghes. schogis. shops. | TWO LABGs Gert ce | ne. Mas .... -SSLORED—2-a SA 


. . mis th Daiconies. Bwitch-| weer, chu . D WN dinu r bedrm 
EFF ICIENC Y _APTS. yee + whe 2. s) : inci ser reser ad rkine | i fiee —_ a | : ' = : * closet oanel an 
aree apt BOLLING FLD iS Wella: room, § nei | | 3400 STH ST. SE. > BUS ON ALL! blind exposures. and Solarium 
auton ‘ cen as ote im 7% : . ss mgs JO. 2-0135 APTS NEwWwtuLyY DECORATED with glass )/a:0U5) 
| : Ops. Ie Ry as BA ROOM APT sda FURNISHED SAMPLE APT 
ome f? Para) —— a" wy 7 1 en — BROADMOOR—Owner \earine city. | oree* roc Apps, tty 
EALTY 


' : ‘ " » 9o% tud “ ps ra . [~# > a) 7 . 
— naryet BOLLING. FLD orrest ne. NA 345 2- BEL ROOM APT Siege tinia tre : : 
Carita Hh, Sa Bits DRM. APT. TO $75 m. apt. 965.50 2% —| goeciedes best. water Gnd one fers this truly beaut Wahine ST NA 
Ac ' , . rx A ; < ‘ ~~ ry 6 OPEN 2-0 . « 

a chins . t. ba — mt en . -— BRENTWOOD MD.-_N ) i ann aA Dally 9 AM-T PM —@on. 1-7 PM in purchai r : | afiape Paw a aes “i rms 
° 7 ) J a. » -o . 7 eet » - peting 5 becrm . P 
tn call Ct becects OES ee ia | BRI esate EDROOM. $74 & $77.50 oe Fe R E Apa rt ents Phone HE. 4-3200 ~~  ~A  air-condit chen. , oe ittxins co. is 

— "YT - CLR >i . : OO a be 7 ~2OT p. a4 Ga.es J " ae 7- BABA 
FORALL, -- ’ . + - - cot __™ : ‘= , 4 CONCORD GARDENS “ OOMS saa 2 92 : BUS T rEhOUGH PRO) © ion I<, 2-, 3-BEDRM. APTS "Oo SMITHY co : riy 0. ne os * : . Has. TH Quebec Pi Nw. . 
o . > - - . . TIRS INCLUDED : ru RNT SHED APTS ALSO AVATL Ri) 15th b ot N M“ ST 5 3300 + : pt . 
eb “AVE. = Rranc 7. Co — , My OR ~§, 4, ut al -cooied I -- ; . Also Purnished Apt. Pisa Make Your Selection Today | 7A) > gia "A e NW assure privacy of cecupsn able © responsible person 
ro ipetve 2 ° . : , a ae > ’ : : a ' NOt ll.elae uteghes. prt ror v ~ + 4 - . 
a COL—Rm, Kit. $10 we. 2413 18 ' Apt 103. RA. 6-0986| jocker rooms: within walking Gis- oboe ot rg api te SWIMMING and ! 412 Georg payments ou trust” maintenance | RG , I 

cos vy — . — : gs > to bus Cal) Now Ki. 8-5100 —_wo7 WADI! NG POOLS | Idea) loca or _t ; carage ‘Wanrep To tot a 

: ~ Uiliiee._D i 2725 30TH ST. SE. | Washington Circle pts eee, ee ee oe SHOWN by appt. by EDMUND J WANTED TO RE 44 

COLORED—Attractt 3 mien | 2430 PA. AVE. NW. > aaer Bus Service to Capital | 10 R Ae iN ri Ns Sa 
NE al VW 5 ; Dp in@ulr : : 


ru ho wanted 
, , 4} a, 19 N O48 B.5¢) SS. e 
0 Transit & Silver Spring Shopping cou = 3596 — APARTMENTS WANTED 38) 5. a ee ro 


a en ag pag. she 2-BDRM. HOMES) AI!R-CONDITIONED — FOR wa whit Det. $70.b0" hee janitor | GWNERS—T hare whitey tenants| NM. At, leeat_ ) pedremmy end. 3 
oer ront al $1 AVAILABLE $468-.$73 50 Efficiency Apts. 682.50 to $91.50 o. Bi t : | 


r ape yp 
of CADE AD. 4.3400. A per month. LL 
"ING, Ae 6700. ext. 558 
Rental includes all utilities aff Tue DISTRICT COLOR COL —L Ak ROOMS AND a), 
] Br. $75 up Beauti fy! Hillcrest Heights Md | Ind vidual lly “ennaeetied air cond ' Rik 8-1 ¥ibg Ss bedroom epertments D RA. 3-02 HU -§94) PROPERTY MANAGEM’T 44A 
“ ; JO. 8-3140 eer er WISE, MA ‘NACER Se, _ ITE and 50 MOVING AND sfoaaae 39) oa : 
kdys : Sun. ii MRS MAN AG . : r r ana rr 
AIR AIR CONDITIONED -_ . _— «| PREE BrocHe RENE ioe | anc ie ' 44-1 MOVING—Sma.ll or laree jobs perry gemen 
tis Re _ . 


PHILIP T. ATKINS 


wn 

~ 
. 
> 


CAPITOL WILE. opp. 1 Gon , Re ae Bara MR any time Reas. rat u. 4-5335 | 
TOL WILL. ee otis a.) HERON tis 12, Arlinaton.. 1 bloc | ae : i DE. 2-4087 


cit and o 


: ' ; : 
. as nad : ’ } A ae ‘ m.. | ' , ving ‘ ' ‘ : ot sf — ‘ st , also Hub _ Se 
CATHOLIC U. ARP as Webster) wide oven . laree refrigera- rie Manor Gardens spect 8 & m to & Dm. Key ai ye endadie ime,_J0. 6-801 if You Are Considering 
v9 re. 
rental of you ' 
: r 


jee 87 ' tise MA ‘ atihe 4 ' } ston : ' Lt int "ANDY MOVE ee Couches 
Rede } stil laundr fa ties aaa Fa & end te. AD. 4-0617 


is ex 8 r Bi 52) stor e Off street o . , f =é , : . le Pe 
CONGRESS WGTS: ARE — Avail} OL DNIAL etiniiain at" ai 3 BEDROOMS—1’%2 BATHS OLORED—Tip- Gh BENE. ARC HOUSES FURNISHED 40 
__ ARLINGTON | ales mane eet ate | A sursanes A lage Ares, “ tal Ee hee HC service 
r bec room e' : 
7 n ~ 


OE Rie Tg =CONN, AVE. KPT. oat Ih, 2-209) $133.50 MONTH AREAS INC. 


semi 4 Hea “he th gr oe 1615 18th St SE. Apt 4 INCLUDES HEAT, HOT WATER AND GAS by A eee 


$) 
GEORCETOWS 


: : A ‘ $1 pt ‘ | ‘ , ~ ies . —— a: . i NE vy 4 i ia TE 

Gwt areal lis J , ry 6.249 nt ~ “= ars . > 2s pet ott nt ; "aad ity farn hed oS A P | MOVE IN At ONCE p RIC .NDS 

HPEON tow TAI Also __sificienc 74. | te net | Completely Air-Conditioned rN rN 

COND... modern ! earm pt, + APTS. HOUSES TO SHARE 35 a ; a screet pore! . 4 NEW CAPRITZ DEVELOPMENT 
Ah . DSSTRICT SEIONTS, ED - | utilities Pree laundry facilities. private FLOOR: tae. liv -di Alabama Ave. and Stanton Re. BE 


st 5 Md —Purn. or unfun ; F ) ir nd | \ 
" : mod : 7 pect ret " pt ape rear entrances, guict ; : : . ™ rhage dis TE. 4 , . ee Fs 
home ed cole, LOWEST RENT ys ¥ | ed plas —~-y Sy ‘a “BEST BUY IN TOWN | 6.1400. Al "BAKER ‘hk BOM "we we ch winor light, immed = 
os ~ he : ; playgrounds bus , [ well af- on N Wash Alex i ; o 
eine ae ‘si my: heels. shopping nearby. ef- roo huge sliding cw CHASE—Re mar Schl ee . 

8 F sat CO | ciemt janitor service door closets and bath. SINGLE PARE BUS | rms oie eamnd y athe den 
r* $115. OL 6-5519 


: i6tTh ST Gi ni . 
ahi or 7 : emt , ; athe uu prvi I ] BEDRM —$63 25 Up 225 : a : S 
GONROE taci iil " ey ath. “Lat ol it 4 3:3 | r’ | os $273 5 RE DR S $75 00 Up EL MAR C n RDENG See Mrs Guy, 2512 Holmen Ave. 37 2 ROOMS e *eivEbeD LE ena 98 one PRESTIGE ADDRESS 
my, Pts e7. NW. 3360 ri sxhaiels $a Sait, FURN® APTS., $81.50 Up nat ra tenteatens % "eset | Ph, JU. 8.1297 $68 and $70 | prick, Retecorates. Nexer rented) 1025 Conn. Ave. 
| 2 dl . UTILITIES INCLU DED nes and shopping. One : one . . A’ > ROOMS G ‘tae rm. din Excellent location near Mayflow 


A : ' ’ ar R . te 
on ; “ lodern «6 - < > "e Tr aval . menova : apa . ve om .« & tat) léea! for 4d 


, : ac i ' 7 
: ' hegrees oe Taveet yu Apt 530; Hamilton -s GRORGIA AVE. PAST SILVER SPRING TO FOREST GLEN RD. LEFT plete furan cond ; 
5 sre : - >) EF 
LADY ire i =.) oe "4 wr =wenites «| Apt. AP. 5698. or GHANNON | ES EN LZ ' OCK TO GLEN (OR $81 75 al id $84 50 hoa 
£000 ns HE r? 408 ed shooping. Free super A CHS. 724 14th st. aw. NA ON FOREST GLEN TO HA PL. RIGHT 1 BLOCK G MAX ais, TLITIES INCLUDED WYP ERSON ‘Attrar—wr ae ing remodeled que bosons ated = 
' UTI NCLU! hy joes )=6—have i cel —. A. 
4 
* 


way Ore load ens summer day camp 
? PLEX APARTMENTS ee ik ie ; naturel darlieht. are 


. 2 : . , : 24 

440 Lae Et COXURY 1] : : th reene: 
Ast PLE SANT “th. a. & + APTS. ae CALL RE 5. 8000 TYLER GARDENS weresry, = ont, Gasont ae gonnes ead’ pe ? 7. i : —— L ~~ specious ane wel! eneed ~ 
A & Ry - \wW : : ALEX AN SDIiA FOR BROY = tl QE In Heart of Palle Ch th : RA 5p IN ; i nens Ave Ju yi ' : i} this in mest 

ele & ; ‘wh wfTuitit at . GG RENTAL OFFICE. JO. 32-2990 . ’ . 5135 sual Dbulicding and priced ver 

Pe any : AIR CO NIDITIONED FURTHER INFOR MAT J -. ud ~ - < es RM yf, owns pen Mon to Sat J. Mteo6P.M 14. Hom iF ie Te a a A ay tte i "Stoae Ca 

A ‘  . — . ™. - aa re mp — te sn , ' » ’ ul ' ; | 6 

so BROOKVILLE | oistrict HeicHrs Aprs. | alkite soho = mans | IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY OK Wise Ra SE Stas 1 beg-| siplompt, 6 rms, 2 baths, malts ¢ AMOR OFFICER ot Dts Cape 


ly redecorated—3 be pe ottice 
otty pine-paneled: 


we ebueweviicD | rm. furs | Q 9099 Gratiot balehte Wen. aintained— ideal ¢ ee, | hep._cen' , - on GTO ' ocation an 
W caritor. ‘st ist. Cj uy fm. ? Ao ag ge ad! Lg tog Sat 10-3 adie gar es i" ‘Bed : at > PARK SHIRLINGTON APTS. MN children - fenced — rd -esn rec. aon ye need Jo. 9-tiss ot JU. 9-408 
ba nit. § - 7m. — Con bo ever yinap hed Li ! ed so al a be 
ater =aiiras.  mederaste| == «1% BATHS SUPONT CIRCLE AREA gy er wry a Completely Air Conditioned ol. 12 Lamont @t NY 0 ARLINGTON BUILDING 
seit EAtaNT Nes ; ‘ WITH OR WITHOUT BASEMENTS La ae set o! 4 new! 7 dec: - 3 Bedrms ill 05 Free Private Swimming Poo! til inci a> « "Y ; m a ble: ’ ee 1025 Vermont Ave. NW. 


oe heal xi iinet atn ad +9 r 

FURNISHED ” - Wikbeoe MODEL APT Wadin Pool foe Children - .7h aod © st. nw. Bem Available im ENTIRE 46 

OR UNFURNISHED | nave SY SECTION SORNISHED APTS. AVAILABL pn ential ESE PE SOE 1 . * ‘La. 6-6. oem | Artax = me: > 1450 WIRED } oR in- Conptrlokina 
THE WARWICK Salis” ay ve 8 30 8 —or ney _ east: i : v $s “sl Wal TER aEED Vic. rms ae WILL DIV 


—_— Be —y . : iinet ar a ba x re . we large yard. Very 
FROM $102.50 UP 3051 IDAHO AVE. NW. |—eggadey Benign — 1 and 2 Bedroom Apts. from $114. 50! 3 | ‘A 6-306). | rene RA. 3-634 before LL S| weane WINmten MG 
Cota Secs’ Closed ‘Sindave | (BET. MASS AND CATH. AVES oe ION LL UTILITIES AND SERVICES INCLUDED) utieo tedem a Y  HOUSES, UNFURNISHED 41 ut Vermont Ave 
. . LON BLY 2 tier > oes Gonos, THE WARWICK inert . t 86 . tEé 5 |e aan betel . ait-c, _ ad 
Spen Dally Mon. Thru Pri. 9-5:30, &! oa —. Sas So . ‘ ft 2 5 “cond 


ee of cl rn 7 mo ~— LEXANDRIA 
. _seoretar vice. near 3057 IDAHO AVE NW Spacious room with an abundance of closet and cabinet , ; . Pe K i WARWICK VILLAGE 700 sa. tt ; 


a 


FOR FREE BROCHURE CALL ne good || ransp. and shop- (BET MASS. AND CATH. AVES space Roomy kitchens with garbage disposals, exhaust ae ————— rae ™ m. homes. $115 mo. Indiv ia-| 5 ieee | excel 
FL. 4-9400 rT. *orres DRIVE we Slit. ome) iit, peth. Biev bide. Air-coole fan. 9.1-cu.-ft. freezer-top Westinghouse refrigerator, sep- r onth 601 before 5.30 Westinanouse) wove 7° . parking atee, $28 
sour) ave > ~~ = ~ + Yas ae te sery , aoa a. ; po . . . : bon 
NEW Swi! To} NG oot UNDER -— | gee kat were ure me ranap. and arate Droom coset [ORED NeW APT. m ’ - playgrou ~ A . 8 In 
ONS ON JACENT TO > NA 8-12365 Bit : . ener j 2 schools 7” 
ROPER 1 etter ur eftic.. Arep GRA Me “wRa- MASTER TV ANTENNA — oa 10 min. Pentagon. 26 \™ 
eas ‘4th " 4 »_| » oa _ . ie rc nN ie ‘ * en « . ine ludin ir 
Azzon jan, tree Bs GAT | Memngrme” | sags mncueaie cuatenae ran “vein ree | AI! On One Fl 
. SG Found Only at | TILED CORRIDORS AND MANY OTHER FEATURES Xs Asda" — ne oor 
2700 GUE St. NW. | THE WOODNER | PARKCHESTER COURTS De a 
700 SUE ST 'N W | CONVENIENT TO PENTAGON EXCELLENT SHOPPING Saad { . ns Lee 
9.Bedrm. Apt 12 MINS PROM WHITE HOUSE CHURCHES AND Ont 2600 BLK. NICHOLS AVE. SE. | ree 3: aragce. 9225 
sake ps ae oo ge Be. ~~ Peele MODEL APT FURNISHED BY MAZOR MASTERPIECES rete “SaLicEine cate yee. 
1-Bedrm. Apt Now Available ’ Ai ee Now available, a few desirable 4 ae Soe 3-48 ae “, acoustic eS 
Rie. Be Ett, 5 Efficiency Apts. OPEN FROM 10 AM. TILL 9 P.M, DAILY garden type apts. oligts, new foer tile, 186-I. Seog 
gercen court that m ~ 
mei: ster: through irlington entrance pes oppe 4 Res ‘| 391 . 
2 Bedroom Apts. = dist st. South; continue Jist st. te Park Ghirlington Aote. ? BEDRM. UNIT, $79.50 os ene 


nec 
smeeenes "Ber f Air-Conditioned G 7 Weed OF- 
pp > WT | PHONE OR WRITE FOR FREE BROCHURS APPLY MOR in. Pe *) bedrms. beth, 
ae BRO 66 FOR PT OSMAN Sh , # | td bem? with 


ta o.enes t @mart sh int pom * 
th room apt 
> bedrooms al) Loder ee $0 AP = ; Ais with! tn dg 5 KI. 8.] 900 
nr Mem. orial Bri idge mole Sw apt. itm, mod we Se er 
t « néry ilt and betp hea: and or water. dest 4503 31st St. South, Arlington, Va. 
’ we! SF OFS HY. 3-5600 HU. 3-4400 
; | i 


% beth. 6125 


JO. 2-9300 


center. Ap- | BARNA 
me . 3- ded roo 
oz4 500 Piashere ‘and nee 
tory coum, recreation room vith 


near ree ape 
t Ample parking 
[= Es A.-? rage 
ce yard 5p , batay- 
: 2 2216. Merryfie!d 
Re to 
: s 
signed white Colonial or 
; bedrooms 3% baths, 20-ft 
it repiece 
earage 
Priced 


+ Tiredive "a glass ir x 
WEINEERE S BUST. Inc 
{Oth & No Y~Ave NW. 


. Ave Ww 

: fh. pertitioned into 
= windoe. or 

t central 

Dw 


seen 


rente. outetan ding vaive @ an 


uM 
ou 
REALTORS 
re, 3. 


“al 
eves 


a 
thy ores "9 mpleted sti! 


an ighliy — alas” | 
Wei BERG & BUSH, inc. 


NA. ‘7. 

“Gavltal se. 17 5100) 

for any kind 
». LO 


el 


STUART & MAURY 
wi 


ft ne 


COMMERCIAL 
onan. 2 BEST 


In4us h Segetien,. Alp A. acres 
can water 
one streets eels Ciese 


WEINBER ES BUSH, Inc.| 


Lo, Ae. NW NA_ 8-5500| 
APARTMENT SITES 


Apt. House Grounds 


4 4-099) 
_ 
RESTORED 


3 ic .U ve 
=| BARBARAHELD 
: 


* BARBARA HELD 
Rewdiie Lo 


°c an 
md ferty ; bes 


ia 1-08Tt i 


Sha weed car jot Sor 8-15 

¢ Reedy for CHEN CHASE » 

. 38. er . ‘ 
firs 

LTY 


tL -, OwNES 
‘e 


RESTAURANT—Modern 
os well-trave & bh 
or at 
ner, .Write 


USED CAR LOT 


_ eo iacuding ‘ah's 
ready uGing ents. | 


SANNO ‘ = 7 


" CHARE—= ner 


ta che car nee 
" “ 
wr) 


veo hich , ; 
prevent tune. Write Box “- dite Wed vedr om : 
a 1? 

mest 


see F 1 
Center er | ee 


}-bath 
fon. 2 
Le She ¥I 
"Real a 


ras with 
in 


ios )=6K attr Ep 

M RERNS TE! _ =| 

333 for appointmen' 

ror SALE— Advice and! 

mote! SSS tree epectatn. CLEVELAND PARK—O Wis. 

erine Seoemenanene on best a hed: 

bu tels Sos Wes JOB 4.) 
asduerd Bice 

OWN YOUR BUSINESS |“ 

Major 


if 
“9 ESTATE OFFICE 


ease o— Worth Ar 


st 
4 


company has new rervice 
Call | 


URGENT SALE 
2 APTS 


Reme end tares! ment 
Gherehem Ho in 
ofan 

ore and ote 


fneer ; 
top-noteh 


on 


7s (Oa Cost 


SHANNON & LUCHS CO 
EE 17-1800 TRLTP.M 
CONNECTICTT T ase AREA ol = 


YOUR OWN 
BUSINESS 


looking for 
bites men of integrity 


6 (ars 759 Dn. 


garage 
con 


Beast 


, Purnloned ‘Five! 


whe want to bulld their 
een tusiness I 6 serure 
fotuere in the ol] Industry. 
Our salaried training pro- 
erem will afferd you the 
necessary knowledge to op- 
erate end bulld your ows 
Desiness with one of the 
mest progréasive of] com- 
pen 7 


um one 


sone «an 
the o* 
this area s " 


center hal 


We ate preeentiy encased 
im the most dynemic ezpen- 
sien proscram tm our hie- 
tory ond seed Tow Mea. 
Over modern service stations 
are ready for yeu. Annus: 
earnings reaeinege from 
87508 te 620.000 are not 
uUnpeommen in todars mer- 
bet. Many dealers are - 
jeving such incomes nov. 


| cs 
robo With vo aa . 


Investment eapite! is ser- 
endgdary wo character. deetre 
and sincere purpose 


° 


cl bap IC abs 


One of the few remain + euthen 

Federal Houses to Se estored 
isrear 

pws heat om 

’ — Liem ing 


“H. A. GILL & SON 


pa’ 
-2060 


Por detetie. shone Cities 
Service OF8F Co. JA. 4-110. 


Miss ” Wateon 
1673 


“auttidbher “TARE. 


ne FrOW 
Corner 3515 and N 


cupen 


7 
5i6 or | 


; edia 
; th, d Riserva. nA 7S 
lis Bottled Ges end 1ooe 
ity Yo Ty 
—Tansles-Aae-| .2 5. ane 
ar Expanding community | 
Levis city sea «for 
| OWNER SAC ARK 
»* tr fer s ‘ 
. . 00 
eosuse 7 of. 4s ecress 


ass 


aT mais Heigie 


yaday : 
Termes ’ 
NA 
) 8-6440 
Bi DEE z MENSE & CO. INC. 
RESERVO! R ROAD AREA 


FS C'Chatel HU 3- “3356 
| SEEING VACLEY— Basi “value, f 


bath: ackine $39.5 
PARTY co 


sum 
shave ac. 


“Fichir BEDROOMS” 


Price 
= ™ ni 


all | 
’ - 
wn . 1908 
ise . : 
2 nue (Fo 
Ser “ments 


; a. 
eparate 
7 Oe ? ower 


ae 
TY ee) KON AND COMPANY 
NVEST. PROPER 62, 24 SEVERAL CHOICE 
aS 7 


enter 


Waw el iil 
39 __2-8000 LY. 1.0760 
pt 7.) hone end mmcome 2 apis 


" 5 ~~ TT 60 
. . ater od tenants 5a 
¢ ortbeast 2 
Saaleg 25. 2-23 patric 
iCK APARTMENT 
$22,500 


ach consisting of 


‘ untie eac B.. 
fed ets Segre ir 
READMOND REAL 


SALE, D. C.. HOUSES 


bed rn . Lone 
come of 63460 


ESTATE 


$200 


fas SLED 


CAFRITZ HOMES 


PEN D brik! yt TO 


full om r. Et. 
int ahed P tas rm 
fenced Air 


> Only 


2 "Eres, Ba, 3-2190 


ces onenpe. 


“SSTS9950185" 


1D “HAL! 
CALL Sane 


ie 


etn _herTirne 6S CI 
PORT pt PORT PARK a : 


col iL ORED ma 
same 
Her 


Sra Boe tat 
SEMIDETACHED ‘BR 


9500 TO $750 I 


TE 


ED 
3 CO MPL ere APTS 


oh eS 
2 COMPLETE APTS 

PRIVATE ENTRANCES 
MODERN KIT. & BATHS 
Full Bsmt., Oil H.-W. HA 

$495 DOWN 

FLLIS® KOSBOW REAL 
wr. 3-44 
COLORED—VACANT 
1327 Jefferson St. NW. 


Detached—Beautiful Grounds 


TOR 
a4) 


* PRED FHRLICH 
1012 i4th St. NW ST %3-0450 
__Atier 6:30 P.M. DU. 7-7998 
COLORED 
Emerson 


rat 
ck 
ar a 


tenc ed , Panes 


"3-7 100. 


eas oa | 


storm 

JAMES CARR. =" 
54-36 

co” ORED _BROOKLAND 

295 DOWN—689 MO 

Vaca r 

nr : 
_ 


sixpt ER REA! TY cO. HO 
“ALL TIME 9 TILI 


nee. Gi APPROVED 
“74 YOU oT. NW 


*» * 
. 


— 


* OL YRED 


= : 
F, ashionabie NW Section 


FALTY CO. # . 
CALL. ANYTIME. 9 TIL 9 

COLORED—MOVE IN 
WHAT WILL YOU HAVE? 
ANY ONE OF THESE HOMES 


$495 DOWN 


VARNUM &sT 


s07 10TH ®& 
54 TRBANK 

LLTOP 
AL A 
or 4 


“COMPANY 
Li. 3-5305 


DETACHED 


Woeedrides ~— Am tmoressive tan 
™ ' Wide iving 


; | : a 
beautiful jot. About 63000 down 
brick on & 
coms spacious 
ritenen enc rec 

floors throughou?' 

Asking $i i8 $00 with $3000 cash 


BRADMAR paeiry co 
AR “TAYLOR NW 
DOWN 


etworth—A = utiful 


- 


cetac med * 
oo 


WE “MAKE TRADES 
KALMUS REALTY 


ME #-0194 4-7942 
TTS OETA: cite 
LUXURY HOM 

14TH & RENNEDY ST. NW 

This beautif home must be seen 

te be appreciated room 

kitehens. 4 batts i bem! 
porch laree lovely yard. 
earece. auto. heal. excel con 

a = 3-3625 TILL 9 soit 

~ COLOREO—WOODRIDGE 

DETACHED BUNGALOW 


tached corner brick nome let 
rm kit 
cellent 


livir dinin 
i 
‘er . 
ROGERS REALTY 
NA 


_ 
cet 


’ 
= 
bath 


: 
’ 


|. 
Be 0 


; ws 
‘\ ACANI 


roy 
co 
8.0904 TA. 9 3459 
TN ORT WOOP : 
FED HOSPTIT 
DETACHED BRICK 
$2000 DOWN 


time offered 


NR 


First 


COLORED—Modern brick home f 


' 
many extras. Call ° 
~ ate 


80! CRITTENDEN ST. NW. 
BEAUTIFUL CORNER 
CENTER HALL PLAN 

4 bedrooms. ne | in living rm 

—y reont un heat: 

7. b bulll-in garage. 
with Sowers. Low do 

easy monthiy permis al 


R. A. HUMPHRIES 


ne | Maes. Ave, Resttors BA. $90 


Colored—Brightwood 


GI--$14,500 


3 Bedrooms—Rec. Rm. 
Beau' ful Colonial row brick with 


3-656 


atte CO. 
veanvt ICHIGAN PK. 


HOME VALUES 
5s. ue 


., ~# rooms end beth 
225 GUE ST NWS rms 
on. 865 

oie STH ST. NW —#8 rms. 2 bath 
R. A. HUMPHRIES & SONS 


end | 
5 
2. Mas ae Ws 
~“COLORED— IMAGINE ‘a 
NO. MICHIGAN PARK 
GI BARGAIN——$12,500 


arce semidetached betes nome bp bes 


\- 


n new. ‘ho mee | 
N\ = : 


SALE, D. C. HOUSES 64) 


307 MASS. 


large rooms, deter: 


NE 
2-2101, 


e 
ba, REDUCED 


& 
CELLINO, TU. TA 


& 
dbrk. bide. ar 


“ee oo New 
ts. plu 5 sleep. 


mp 

rms. 

er. in 
‘i sep 4in 
all-eiec 
hae] 
! _ your 
brea eway! Lee 4 ° “erg 
lot “beite the 

ee voy, hardly nieve, 

rough 


completed, 


if: den." carport, ni “Rice tot, 


center. 
rms 


1 aga bed em 
pe : e- 


vy so 2 a 
E & MOORE REALTORS 


Gi—$1 4 500-—$725 DN. 
LOW MONTHLY PYMTS 


| with 
oncrete colonia! front 


rear we yard: fui my ath 


re rm ‘. bad | new Bouse con- 
Giti on 
R A. HUMPHRIES ¢ 
N 8 -5020 | 
totahien: 
COMPARE Ain HOME Patt AN 
901 Mving rm 


oe het > 4 
nab 
Bos itiful 
orate and vrou'll 
when vou know 


bed - 
rm. Drick residence is just $23. 980' 
: A 


Colonia! 
Living room. picture window 
and prepsec. Dbalit-in corner cad 
: 


amily-size dining room, 3 
2 rch 


} wl - Bigui site yard oh 
enruns 

READMOND REAL ESTATE 
‘TV, 2-616) LO, 4-7087. 


| COLBEN 


OPPORTUNITY 
PRICE REDUCED 
FOR Quick SALE 


owers 
“CHEVY CHASE 
Coat er = = lee 


P SPLIT LEVEL 


iv. rm 


tEO" ™. ‘BERNSTEIN "CO. 


q 
CHASE a... 
$21,400—VA Approved 


Spo’ less red Drick eoionial ‘(oniy 
rs . om lovely level jot 
3 twin-sised bedrms.. 
; rm dinine : 
attached earese 


ie hrs 


2 COMPCET 


+ not ae 
bat wa 


if 1o-Fa 
BS re modern KNOTTY. PIN 
[RM ' 
Le 


ck 


8 Bin. a pei oe ih 
~~ COLORED—-VACANT 
| 509 Rittenhouse St. NW 


_ ~~ ps 7s. 6 rooms 


“PRED “EHRLICH 
1012 14th Bt sT 31-0480 | 
AL a Se BDU: — 
COLORED—UP 


3 BEOROOMS-—-MODERN 


$275 DN. 


Semidet. brick. & yet 
a I v 
Call 


$495 dn. Move In 


ISTH & PARK ROAD 
| stry bri 5 


modern Caechow den and screened 


TEs—Jar- bullt 


— — 
od ecountry- 
y 3.950 


2-bedrm 
> -.4 = 
‘ 


an LO. 8-368 
ERTIES 


CHEVY CHASE MD. | 
Gi APPROVED. $16.800 


on vated oa 8 bequtirul 


nm) 1500 
emt BUBL RBAN OP. 
ok 


rms 


'wo-? ne brick 
tio 
rune nD OERRER 

3315 Connecticut Ave 

4 CORNERS 
1950-431 for this apsrep- 
home Pull omt.. 

excellent neighbor: 
to shopping and trans- 


R&CO. LO.4 8) 
"Tw -— si? 

om ae } rambier: | 

* is reom 

em! rOOD. 

inc JU. 90-8645 


_ ——<— 


: at 


Gal y 8) 
tj bric 
rivete yard 


COLORED—Ols close 


Serie 
2“BATHS _ | 


UPPER NORTHWEST FOUR Le 


SLENMO 


$14 950-GI 


| 3-bedroom ric rem 
bamt An har fenced 
* maous ana doors 


4-| $1 1 Y50—NON-GI 


2- vodros a 


"ERED A ten CO. 


full 
‘oo storm 
nice condi. 


OLORED—3-UNIT BF 
INDIVIDUAL, GAS HEA 
$595 DOWN WILL mee 


: - bed 


in and out 
Owner. LO 


HOU ———-- - WANTED, to BUY 65 
A CASH BUYER OR 


a 
"dotTHbast "he AL 


DIRECT FROM er 
Bice Prince dtindes co. 


Mad Free Ltrs a ey or wight. 


‘eres 
and 


SIGLER & CO. IU. £8383 


| KENSINGTON x Immaculate brick 
. Le) 


rooms bem! 
laree kitehen 
cash Kast BS bens be is 
; . FOR 

RAMBLER—$23,750 


24 hours Mr 
sh 
A d's .deoe 
S-year-old red im 8 very 


Your pom +. apt lot. oF ScrTe-| trees on & 
ave clients with cash. 20) 3 exeellent 
‘the bu siness aesures you ful 


tent action yuan) 
S . 
JIM BR | ay aa ie 
4920 INDIAN HEAD. 


yuk & D> 
“TOP CASH—D. C. OUSES 


T susclen direct fvem owner. No | 
cha SF -NE 


in 
or 


siipkt rps 
WH $872 bt 


BR. $- 


size dining rf 

wien breakiast ae 
sul you! . B 
}- 


983; 


NT 
Smal! Estate $37,950 


Almost 3 Acres 
Priret of tation of this fairiy 
priced pr ty with an attractive 
white brick residen contain 7 
2 baths ———F a Gen pues 
r 
| 3.car carace. 
qe utbal dine: 
i370. eves 


re 
notes, screase. Va Mé. . 
- seo. Cui A. Rea 


vickK N 


Once. BN we ings 
—H. a "Greentiel 4 a, 78 
Spot Cash for Your — 
| £O2 & CO r tk , 
ee ASH ) ea ~ sharmies =f ine-cin 
ne . 
IcTOR DICKEY AP | area with bric al) 
to sell sae rent. | vars 


bamt. 
1.950 KO 0 


omes 


firep 
Expo 


, featuring 
or ST. 3-7368._ tb 
“top qo T cash—an ey: 
sect! ef the city. Quick action | this 
no commission charge N 
& CO. CO. 5-4 Fi OL. 4- 0 6.| 

area: ¥ 


SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67MD. | Bxerijent ory 5 pee 
MARYLAND | SBle buss 


5150 emark- 
” buy at on! y .500 

Montgomery County SIGLER & CO LO. 4- 8383 

Pv) THESDA og Fn prick home 


specious 


rick 
vie home ins ; privat . com- 
exceptionally 


ert Prac vy R L. 
232-2326 gu ote 
rent Ideally locat 
ae pects. +. bed rc m4) 2-b 
an fam room 23 
~ “ ry ine ares. completely 
itehen, secluded terrace 


oO. EM 


~ co ed 
consider 
finan: 


+ 


++ OF 
stall he 


Eves. vt 


poms 4 
“2. 483! 


Wise corner lot 
ubder 3 if 
2 bah finished bemt 


ood foors. maid & room 
CHEVY ae REALTY 


LING — c 
with beautiful sir ’ 
. 


an on , ~7 ve 
WRIGHT. EM 3 3600 
— 5 : - heven garden ris- 
hg a oe $14,500. A rare find is the hill. All 
oid trees. in 


yerd bedrooms 

nd ated r reom 

acuilate condition Away from 

the madde ame crowd but just & 


5 tep to the . 
eee 


Precty brick rembier on «@ very 
well ilandet - P nw ar 
. 2 oe 4 rms 

it 


and 
a 
fetle tots 


hiv 


ath ' eat “a a¢ 

ocaled peeah pando og the | Sa 
above-erade 

fireplace carport. 

“NI 
alge fi ) xclusive 
iV ram er 1 pacio 
‘ edsanans den A a =a 


home has ever “luding 
time. 


conventent location 
$12 2 "$50. 3 b bsdre 


CASE vee | Separate din. rm.. 
: windows, fenced 


: bed | lot, 150 ff 
DPecern All, MvVely! 
P W BERENS JR “mopeRt 


Bialik ena 
Turse Ne} Sub. irben oe- 
ly 615.250 


Ay 


room with fire-| lovely» 
pane ed dining| new-hous 


asemen s| Beer sc 
E BOOLET |  OBORG 


17.9 
RS 
7 bu 
Separate 


| wal vikine Many eriras. 


dis-| 
ated : 


home 
Co.| Demt 
Dart piace wer 
| 600 KOR FENDOR PER 


ties Bradle ov mi fs —s- 
1008 4 
- . y " : 
rn Atal ~— 
“ey Liv. rm. with 
urning ree + gg -—, = 


5-Bedrm. Split Level Viste cond. Near 
9.950 


Bi 


SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67MD. 


| SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67MD. 


M Cc 


DEN & POWDER RM, 
A a year-old brick Cole- 


2%» baths. 
rec 


his \. 
nial ce containing 
gar reened 
oy room I 
Ns 4%. 0 Call 4 
EK. +1370; eves HO 
Ai 


MAURY, REALTORS 


Sores an 
aculate 


oo. 6 
er - 


‘olon!al bh 
- 4 oo as 
ecreen oe 

Socer Senetle Hy s 
Vr onstr. orp. 
0 ¢_¢- 7308 


7 
a... oor 


living 
RUENCY 


HMOOK — Brick rambler. > 


bedrins rm.. full bamt.. 


Prince Cc 


791 H AVE. 
GI—$275 DOWN 


room 
i 
Cen- 
Call 


bedr 
nerte, — an nd (in rec 
Near par buses, schools, 
1 block © " Adelphi ey 
ter «elo University jane 


$11,500 
5S ecres partially cleared. fruit 
trees, good garden. Older 5-bedrm 
house Seperteaity for bane and! 
— +) - > eae or for builder or in-| 


enc!. po 
ings igo 
tre 


ee iv 
“s) in pape 
OBERT L 


fireo! 
se 9300 


Ss riced 
a JU 
oom ee rin “hee ‘be 

my B 


WOODS! 7MEL ER | 


corner lot 


EM. 2-9000 | 


1 BLOCK TRANSP. 


Brick, and rad eK large | € 


neled | 
. > d- car sarane 
financin ) 
al’! artistically § ian 
cape RAHAM & CO JU. | 
ooriemianaaiin 
hall Colenia] iocated in 
our choice close-in nels 
| ag ‘everyini rf 
baths bed: 


center 


breakfast room. 
room fin 


27 
ltor 


_ ~ g* 


Ed Asking - 
TER H. KELLAR. JU 5-| 


— Well brick 


ov bon a4 
, appraised. By 


ne, aniaanmads | 


> on screened ' 
* to elementary 
y -* JU 93-3472 
our twin-sise 

full 


baths. laree 


porch overlooking a lovely vrard in| built-in gar. 


conservative 4 


cits (X ra 


mL. 2 é-pedres 2-bath. brick 
Cape ith large Ti Tien room, | 


IN NOW” 
Th Colonial: living rm. | 
with fireplace separate dining rm 
full basement 


ompletely fenced and ae 
financing conven to 
ie oan and transportation: aeten 


JAMES C. CONLEY & CO 
MODERNISTIC. 


$ $1 aed BN. 
auk 4 
led =e 


, Bargain for 


ato ° 
schoo! mi mates to 
try te At your 
payments anmouete oc- 
cupancy Be Sorry. on 7 like — 


FREDERICK Ww. BERENS 


SALES, INC. JU. 7-7700 


S17.550—A beautiful paneled rec- 
separate dining 
oom 


brica rambler 


lot”. Name your terme 
-* 


the. eraund- level 
Tm. bh 

mh view. @ 

with raleed 

-to-the-minu 


on 3d 
ly ti¢ 9450 Dp 
ili Georgia ave 


OPEN 6 TILU DARK 
pail 


AL 


ve 
a Out Ga. ave. to “y tent 
gar a 


ware 
AQAM! REAL 
HE BUY OF A CIFETIME | | 
Convert Your Rent Receipts 
INTO A HOME IN 
ROBINDALE 
HOMES COMPLETED 
MOVE IN NOW 
3 LEFT 
 Yineneing 19 Ben- 


r Gl wan to Vets. 3- 
thee al Aig rembiers. 2 ¢e- 


os a + 


Sut, gor 
left. go 2 
entrance. r 
or — on 


oe ty 

m Parkland drive 

~—o~ drive. Follow 
mode! 

ROBIN CONSTRUCTION CO. 
WH. 6-98665 RA 3-3606 PO. 32-4794 
BACKS UP TO THE PARK 

TRE 


Large family lst floor 
Thermopane presage winds 
Citas | 


spec 
rms off+ 
close te schools r 
says “sell!” J tenes 
13.266, aesume 1% len. and) 
own this ree close-in | ares home 


laree et We omit! to “hes ad sot 


course. 
, 


ba beve a select group of choice 
genttal 
Bpri 


visit our of. 
fee to ‘discuss your needs? Office 


“ROBERT GRAY CO. 


Ph x) 


19, 7} 
ris LT 9.0 MF 


ave. 
few 


L t Georgia 
ett on Viers M rd., just « 
blocks to Winleor Model “open” 


sien 
1212 ores i Maan 
brio® ot i Geka > sir? be bee. 


a. . | —. 
Howers 


ve 


bm orieed 810.800 
tere ow Georgia 


rooms «en ne 
spacious home a 


“lee bel 
a 
uchanan’s Best 
Select & Buyable 


$11,950 


ROCEY! Le 
An tmraculate }- m™m. Rock Crest 
rambier; nuit i 


PR ince GEORG 


ee 
terms 


rooms. 2 baths. 61: 
Bonen = 


iNT N ARPA — homes 
Dangerfield ra and OOS) aere | 


Radio Station Open a ark 
Clinton—District Heights |” ts 


FOREST HEIGHTS 


RMB 
Take anwe ige ol T igen from p 


na dryer, disposal. eye-ievel oven 
aanier ~toe eec range, powder rm 
e : 


MOORE | MOORE, REALTORS 
ae }. ¢-bedrm 


xtre | 


— s 
Very ise. liv. rm. with Sreoi 
twin size beerene all elec. kit 
bemt.; ood 


2 bi 
Oo 


} ; e@ es sy pe 
bedrm spilt level jashington 


—PBric . 
with many extras. de luxe 
Giehwasher and fan 


rms... 
kit 


P 
SRoRGES. PROPERTIES 


athe. h~ a. 


ADER 
ADERHOLDT we a 


ones.” 


6019 ge ab AVE 


bath seer | -inclosed porenh. 


AP_i-0014; Bves.-Gun.. AP, 7-081 
SUITLAND 


= wa~ 4 


Tully fon 
E& Sat A itrons| 
BRE. 6-8060 
WEST HYATTSVILLE 


ly 
sea ot HL. 2 SS z "2. ath 
ae ion <—— = 5 
lot 


areas: us. 


pepeooc ete: evel 


barbecue pit 
PARKWAY ESTATES 


/ for vete 
rambier 


THE PERRY BOSWELL CO. 
WA. 17-4500, REALTORS 


vanes TTE—I6 acres 
ciiy water ~ft ae 5 
‘A 0196 CE. &-696) 


& SELL 
Cad T PINE 
scr. pon 


SBic cor, Cape 
exp. attic pees =: 
n e: 


ONLY $500 DOWN 


Rure thie fine R- bedrm. modern 
| m oil} 
: lot | 
ecnecs and 

tion close 

SUBURBAN oy ig 4 co 

ariboro Pike SF 8-8290 
, ia rs A) 42 é- “em modern, home 


’ te 
Bureess RE. 6-5200 ‘til 8:30 


2 rms 
dining area. tiled kit 
bart 
lampten & Hegarty Co. 


2-bedr 
jaree al 
nit.. t iy eat “lares dayiig 
bamt ents only 
per “ay 


ER REALTY 
, 7 1232 
cy ne a 
Under GI appraisal corner 

divi a pete 2-car 


reened RA ‘hel F porch: bs B 


. 
ste 
7 as 


S-BEDRM B BRICK 


Keke ichve Reh Be 3 é Ra 


fnanc. can) 
Lie ‘. MOORE, macros 


white clapboard cottage 
berheed of fin 

knotty pine 

shaded 


"Ree CHICKEN FARM 


.500 
acres. Ideal retire- 


1% 
men Bae | — ~ 


19 ‘Guten 
Charming whine cottage a ~~ 
terme ‘to quali! HUGHE 

W._R HES Co. 


in en 
VISIT 
LEWISDALE 


cleas 


$9 
delightful 
spot. hi 


coo 


all-brick | 


5 
our amily re 
ere at HE 


LOHR 
TAKOMA CAPE COD 


wait 


oar 
home ts siting you; 

ocated for family peipe on 

oo 


all 
ideally 
a deenliy © 
arranged to as, ene P byagets Bric 
is $14,950 now 
for en Mm 8 


HOMES 
nome E. LOHR 


homes With 
Ervin Realty 


HA Nis 
ture hy Pit apsres. oy 
i-ft oe =. 


lS apd 
o Gi of3 
ev “x te.. Ap oe 


nt 
proved ae 72 


oy oe f 
Nr. sehook, 
and 


Y om 
Cemt. ,» Cauipt. 


MOORE & MOORE, REALTORS | 


"| Wood 
Bi aeer yy te 3 Fh Sg ath 


transporta-| 


8750 dn Anyone 


| JA. Some 


W ednesday, 


SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67MD. THE , WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


July 11, 1956 37 


| SALE SUBURB. HOUSES iS 67 MD. 
“MARYLAND 


Count 


white rambler 
ee ee window in 
rm lee e 


Prince 


cv } 
ike new: 
with ‘or ee 
feta As 

9 a.3 © 
HIGHLAND RAMBLERS 


; ful ibemt ; 


to veterans Dittse settie- 
Come out ana imepect 


Boswell Co., Ine. 
AP. 77-1111 | 


HYATTS  - «—}- bedrm ; 
am! 


l take back ba 
1 VICTOR DICKE "AP 


OUR Tor value. immediate poss 


Bureess. RE 6-52 


THERE'S lots of for the litile 
Y " 
rm sep n 

ig? porch and a- 
dad: price $10.900; terme 
Ap 7-6292 
aime 


lot 


+4 


dames Cc. Conley & Co 
RFECT for enter al 
enial with sep a 
dd tional, & 
it 
‘8 


p 
+; 812.525. @u posse 
Prac * GEORGES Reki TY 
: WA. i -@655 


shopping ane ognoe! oe 
RINCE 


NO"BOW w N “PAY Y 


MEN 


iy 812 
OFoRoEs 


Lovely ed 
brick ‘ha 
" ;~-8333 


In Suitland “ll DI 


SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67 VA. 
| __ VIRGINIA 


__TOP LOCATION 


the extreme. pop 
Heights on s beau’ 
mm. Ce 5 


overiooks 
many roe bushes. 
fruit trees. etc. Storm windows and 
doors. cet. sarege An — 
wii convinces you of the lue 
250 


ee Realty Co 
114 No. St. Asaph St. TE. 6-4828 
‘ 8-86.06 
Del Ray 


eonens for something . 
ner 


Convenient to omer tay ne 
gown O Ca he i conver 
tional. Call J - MOTON REALTY 
Inc 2309 Mt. VYertion Ave. OV 
AREA —4-bedrm “| s OT 

lent location 


re hea 
A 


ALEXANDRIA. DEL RAY 
—— me avenie 


les 
wat er heat 


Dit 


ALEXAN 
mers Lane 
choicest 
e homes featu 


*ally 


ALFRA ‘ro 
raters « 9 


og coe owner 
* and 
le 
im. ree 
"real ned Seren 
io desd~ena surest oe. s- 4638 
~~ — 


Cape ie 


*. © 
vrick 


ay. 


Sed 


? 


~ on 
Seay a a 


on 
easy 
ATED BROM. 


ALEXANDRIA VICINITY 


= COOL BREEZES 
| REAL LIVING 


yon 

‘en 

one floor. Huge st erage attie above 

_ uated on bee if ope: 
ref 

best planned 


me *¥ 


: “\ rsie 


bur ban 
er 
fp 


ne ~ 
4 wnique - 
rs 


mn BA Hy BARRY ORG 


2306 MT VERNON AVE 
xr 9-3630 99-0078 
Eves. Mre. Browne 80 5-5506 


ALEXANDRIA 


$14,200 


vee = oe So and 600 ve 


hear and os 


Call us today to inepect 
these outstanding values. 


c.08e 


ARLINGTON, NORTH 
Excellent 4-bedrm. brick Colenta!l 


just 2 Bbiecks Jrom schools. stores 
end tranep Sn be bought for 


$850 Down 


or 


’ 
or seeume 
reasonabie 


t] 


pee Ra per m 
ean after 


doen poyuent 


Walker & Dunlop 


“ N. Monroe # 


a ee ee Aro...  )@=3FS—t—=s 
$14,750-GI 
bedroom bie. i. my al 

bem most 
venient Sosatlen “st 3 Taylor Rus 


Park 
“MILLER REAL ESTATE | 
dA, 5.2448 


4 BEDRMS.— BATHS! * 


BSM 
Weii-loca 
ULATE 
5 toon with mY 


noo oy 
ih 46eatinag spece | 
meester room 
on 33-FT 
a oe fireplace 
fui) 
betta shaded “ evel 


a| bath x it 

to schools. 
OnLy OUTSTANDING 
Parker, Smith & Donnell | 
he be 


— 7 new 


aree 
Ei boats ‘bat x ge 


822.750 b 7%. ho 

_Seulpned. Titeten ba 
. r ba 
m Act feos 


2 tite. 
See 7 
> REAL ESTATE 
fey in 5-6 bal 


eveiy Lyon 


true center — : 

rate dining Da 

overlooking pr 

fully equipped tchen. downstairs 
drm. anc — ior den’, 2 very) 

large bedrms the and floor 

Full basement with recreation ro 


“window 
~ihe back yard. | 


| well wo the 
rf vel = Dae é 
firet *) 


vm Re a 


REALTORS AP. 17-0582 | 


* im @ lifetime do vou have the 


Ac 


415, 000° 
Sunday 
Circulation 


means quicker sales results 
for Washington Post and 
Times Herald classified ed- 
vertisers. To place your ad 
for Sunday 

Phone 


REpublic 7-1234 


m 
S| SALE aS HOUSES 67VA. 


INIA 


owner. i-bedrm. brie 
PHA financing ath - 5 
principel terest 


: “iiicou, iA. 1-3034. 


Brawatic P BaiCR i 
3 


nou end she 
mG 6 OTR 


NON ORALTY. KL 
ARLINGTON 
nia 1% rm 
eh 


afea in full 
roved. $15,100. F. & 


iA. 6+ 3086 NP + «, oil > 
ARLINGTON- brick Cole- 
nia Pull walkout basement. Close 


>.bedrm 


eats" 
. Sees ick sot oe 


4 Bo obe Rd. 
ee ee 


POR sci Ost) 


ra 


TIT?! TONED 


ALLINCTOL. Vout ”~— CO 
Assume 4% Loan 
si700 down and se a me. bure 

ped 
; ; Pri ce $13.9560. 
‘CROWELL & co. INC 
J 
ACROKA WiLL —Distine ive 
livin 


BROYHILL FOREST 


1¥% BATHS 


large screened poren. Tu 
a + >. 790 wit , 


panci o€ 
*Désigvra hans 


CALL JA. 4.1300 
M. T. nascnts & Sons 


CRESCENT HILLS 


Worth Waiting For 


3-bedroom rick am- 


Lovely 
wr 


45 
) ~ A Oct 


Call JA. 4-1300 
M. T. Broyhill & Sons 


th 
ree byine 


Pig be hools ond 


conven! 
tras sporteve 


G appraised 


Ww Y 
$16,100 GI 


= Lg 


level H 


Ins 


fireplace in the 

7 is & especial attractive 

ure There are } bedroom ith 

dGoub.e close com pact rt kitehen 
with waaher ‘aaticiont radiant 


ana a covered tio 
R’ Rowland 


Stanley 
| 330 &. Broad St. Palle Church. Va. 
a 


J 3- 
rx COUNTY 
ae ton r r ; 
) Lor” op 
BEAUTIFU "3 
ff ~ to. ope 
; Bo! yeood 


oNtT ~~ 


hao _ Va. 


WEAR SHIRLEY 
My of of slit} 
one Wants 
military: oréers are 

£0 He 


~ou 


$1 « to 821 980 
“LYNCH BROS., 


may assume. 


INC, 


brick 


rambier 
yarc join 4 


e - 
pocks e with oe kit 
| ven gees. Ey, 
jefterson Vil-_S15, 
errerson 


Brick an 
rms. ist in 
rm tnd Besement. fenced 
yard idea! for youngsters 


Ltn 


ou 
water and «¢ leotricity: “aoeere 


aX ae REALTY 
4300 Wiison Bird. JA. 7-0300 Wi B 


N ARLINGTON 


“NICHOLS 


REAL ESTATE CO 
134 5. Wayne St. JA. 5-1213 


N. ARLINGTON 
VALUES 


$12,000' 
PURSE-APPEAL 


te on_stiractive 


lvine rm. with fires ace 
Orwner insists we submit all 
offers. Make vyourfa today. 


$18,500-GI 


In soect i. be convinced 

thet tol ms. 2-bata 

¢ soe Coq packs . ented. 
, f -@ining 


v con, 
vatar’ tek 


enc mevect ke our ies 
Yeonas Realty 


rR 
3313 Wises . $2108 


“HE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HER. ALD SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67VA. | SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67VA.| LOTS FOR SALE 


Vv GINIA 


COUN "ives Coes 


Fashington 
burs ve and Hernd 50 a 

ith oid welling aaa outbulld. 
modernize 


W ednesday, 


38 
382,000 ~ 
Daily 
Circulation 


duly Il, 1956 
"| SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67VA. 
NA | 
PICTURE BOOK 
SPLIT LEVEL 


PERRY BSI ae 
CLOSE IN! 
WRITER’S RETREAT 
1 ACRE 


OF PRECIO 
wh 


means quicker sales results 
Washington Post and 


Times Herald classified ad- 


for 


PLUS ADE’ 
7 


vertisers. To place your ad 


Phone 
REpublic J ~| 234 


ALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67 VA. 
VIRGINIA 


Continued from Preceding Pace 
t- ee Toe. 
: 


| eal “ae ty 


Be 
Assume $ | 


| 700 Loan 


REALTY 

; Riva JA 

Beautiful Ranch Hous 
On 40 Acre 


ARL "INGTON 


-sere 
bn 


“Ni ARLINGTON 
COUNTRY Cut B AREA 
SPLIT LEVELS & RAMBLERS 


hese homes are & 


ra 


. 


‘Sf ith & 
$250 
DOW N PAY’ MENT 


GI OR NON-GI 


' 0” 


ker |) ' 


VOnne 
. 


ry 
n 
; 
Par 


€ ~~! 
a 


Tontfemporary 
WOODED WONDER! 

of > : 

4a 


ANT 


_ 
' ; rund 


ace 
sone Was 
toe 


yee | 1s 5 Easy 
IN A CREST W OD RAMBI : eh 
Arthur rc 


Wt 


Walters. | 


Ran Ue de 
1A 


LEAVENWORTH 
AND MAXWELL 
FIELD OFFICERS! 
FRA pied 


4 
TY 


* anc ; rice 
ale at $70.950 Te - 
ARLINGTON REAL 
Wilson Bivd. JA. 7-900 “Ty 
SHERWOOD PARK 


13 


7 


“ WN. 30-YEAR 


es 


STV LISn 


‘ mN 
NP AR MeLFEAY® 


"THE PICKETT CO 


4 
. 


s 
he F 


fember Vi 


‘Bo © 


LEEPY HOLLOW 


NGI ON | 


- 
ARI 


OLR SHARE 


sifnee POWN 
: . 


CEEPY HOLLOW 


NON REALTY & 
NEW BR! re. RA‘ BL SMAL' TOwUN HOtas 


4198 Crece mi 


Miller Real Estate 


: . Ca ‘ 
STAT SERVIC 
pebe rea i? | 
: 


‘COOL SHADE 
TREES 


> 


OPEN 


LYNCH BROS.. INC 


—s © coTr ts 
> » 


PROV ‘ c 

IN SHREVEWOOD 

3 and 4 Bedrm. Split Levels 
3 Bedroom Ramblers 


ETTE Q SOME ES REAL TY 


oe NTE} Dy ale 


~ R + 
; 


5 
| or FHA TERMS 


LURIA BROS 
Biv iA. 7 


- . 


. ~ 
r \ 


HOMPSBON 


POMPONIO 
PRESENTS 


MILLION 


eT 


sku 


711A 


MELER 7 


Lo Sik 500. Es 
t n a 04a son 
5 ' | 
IWR ACT 
= “are 


Near 
James 


“SOCPAL. STAN ®) ING 
BELLE HAVEN AREA 


TINCTIVE ADDRESS 
eve’ Thits ne vad 


own & 
TE a | 
$500 DN 


VALUE LS 


SETTER HOMES REALTY 


aeaiiors JA, 3-9400 


Buchanan's Specials 
Featuring all br homes with 
3 bedrms 
and rice yarc 


_* 
or more Basement: 


$s 


COLONIAL REALTY CO 
JA. 5-6200 
ONLY’ $400 CASH, Gl 


tr'er $26.950 


weete— = pony er 
vceanoe n 
d 


vi «se, POMpPONIO 
JA. 7-6660 


RrEP YOUR 


. 
. 
. 
; 
" 
. 
. 


PONY 
oie 


ra 


. 


+ 
LEAN 


JE 


THE 
with 


Mannas Rity.. 
rous vine or 


-3}) 


- ~-4 ¥en 
WESTERN WOODS . . 
: - ae 


arr’ cr @ 
rryn TH NTA ay 
aca ue 


2D FLOOR 


$44 


TH 


PRI Ne TAXES &. INS 
VETS—NO MONEY DOWN 


OPEN DAILY 


UNFINISHED 


pa 
HN CH 


é 


4 
V 
a 


ap i. 
APMIAN & BON 
4 ing? - 
RIFTY 

rf A/ 

’ 


WV V¥ 


N 
wa te save” 
aor & Deekuti- 
‘a 


ower 
INCT 


e! Biu 

+ 2* ay ARAL OE rr 
| us semen 

Sase Doarc 


Por eniy 82 
fly DEFIES 


PAR 
WILLIAM KAGAN CO 


ARLINGTON TRUST BUILDING 
iSiS N. COURTHOUSE RD 
JA. 5-8850 


hot.’ 
a 


© 
in 


plem 


e 


hh 


& 


re & at Realty 
TE. 61415. 9 “TIL 9 


~ COOL TREES | 


LU XURY LIVING 


ri BATHS — Boa - 

ea wee Custom bu 
4 BELLEVUE POREST 
ne 


Y 
MANASBSAS PARK Al (D 
ME 
PHONE MANASSAS 663 


patna Realty Co. 


— ————————— 


WHI TE CUTEY 


fOr EY REALTY 


5600 Lee Ewe. KE 6-5950 


fou a Country Realty 
TE. 6-1415 9 ‘TIL 9) 


cenit HOMES REALTY | 


7A. 38-9400 


A 
' 


iE 4 490 0 ler * ’ subu ~ or Three | 
oO : a te ining 


VIRGINIA — 


= assume OY —T; 
briar Count 
{t. Individua 
oitwoer leaving July 


ar West 


25th; 822 
et Tho 4-pedrm. brick Cape Cod. 
tlled Base. 
fenced rt 

| m.., 


SI Hee 
BASEMENT Where elise 
an vou * a PD 
ly lo plenty at 
Teéeaarnted Bus 
a0 5 the 
anepe are ose Call no 
SCHACH REALTY. 1107 
: Palle © : h. JF. ’ 


‘on eart 
ta . 
: 


atree 


Oniv $900 
La. 


MILITARY 
11> me 


Earn $8500 or More? 


ARE YOU 


Eligible for a GI Loan?) : 


Would You 


Inc 
EBE 


sm ose 


LPR Al 
-- 5200 


Fe mpd L 
504 N. RANTLE Gl 
JA 
sitee DOWN 
saree and 
sis 


oo 4% 
7 ' 7 


or 
hed 
Rec 


a ACRE 


4 n wth 


CROWELL 8 co. 


he Fa 


Exactly 


“As You Like | 


Pa nur ' 
PROVED AT 
Arthur L. Wal ters 


“™ SN 


TIP-TOP 


_ LOCATION 


ale 


ne Brot iv | Walters. inc. 
$04 N Rando! ~. pi abe 


Move In Today 


wlate 3-bedroom brick Tram 
th ea 


Ff. 
‘i 


ah 


. 


Tm mac 
Ariine ton 
_— s ane 

shoppin 


“MM NAILEY JE "21944 
$500 to $1500 DN 


ARLINGTON 
NO DOWN - AYMENT 


» 
NON-¥ 
. " 
fenced 


o 
. 


°° heterwm 


rm™ 


4 
tier 
: 


SALE, 


OUT-OF-TOWN 
VIRGINIA 


HOT SPRINGS, vA 
A} s ad 


. 

ac 
’ 

‘a R |) | 


SEAL ESTATE WANTED 
WILL BUY PROPERTY 
Rrick or ! e. white P Quick 


_ 
~ 


. en a) - 
| ever LA 


FARMS, LAND, SALE 
MARYLAND 


,\ ACRES. n Piata 


7! 


A 


‘ Tactnta 


- 


“4 


- 


a0 ™O 
7 « 


sion NOWN 
(A - ’ ; 
y rr 
siee WO 
ately ho 


o 


a if 
oOo DN 
wo @.rn 


. ; 

buve 
: : 
line 


Le 


S-ACRE FARMETTE 
CENTREVILLE, VA 


_~ 41 


con 


‘BOYCE JE b> g4i) 


135 DN. “S50 WG. base Tor $1545 
d rd. ine. 75 mi 


Daneman 

’ spor as 

Bes idinas 
$17,500 

INC 


wRICHARD- 
Fairfax. V« 


“PERTILE ACRES 
len" retreat peau 


- .* ALL. 
.- 


CR. 90 
RARGAIN—OT 
hMdea!l for retire 


6500 Bet 
EDWARD REALTY. ui 
Fairfax County ee 
87 Ace 
' on alle the 
& laree 


16 
7+ 
> 


has 


© - mac cedam 


rf.s 
mm 


ciusive! 7 
MASON HIRST. 
Annandale. Va.. Phone Cl 
CLOGGED SUNDAYS 
LOTS FOR SALE 7 


=| 


Ac COREER—Lois ine “$650 
10% mo 


Brae i 


with water and 


as 


lese thran 
water and 
ine. OF 


vin sf, BoA 


er acreace 
yr, 78 
Ld. 7-344 


$4 
950. | 


COLORED. 
y : 


_ | 8800 uP for fine 


81009 an sere. | 
as Within 


: 


73| WATERFRONT, RENT 758 
fine bide, a2 ee? oy | NO mon ey 


Md various 


A 6-6136 


VACATION PL PLACES 75¢ 


LEO STORCH. &P 


nee Park— ttace on Deep Creek Lake. UN 


4. otn32i5 

DOGS, PETS, KENNELS 
BOAERS., AKC brindle m 
lawn, Tieshy, reas “ne 5-8622 


nes . Pawns 
— A \ 1-4604 
ARS aloce 


G en wood 
0 ~ 


a ded 
eet 


76 


4500 

VIRGINIA 
BARCROFT 100x136 choice Show day 
oo Dr. $9000, TE. 6-:39) | poxers 
JULY BARG AINS | S88 
FPRANKLIN POREST 
manda eas 


Wasi 


BOXERS 2 
=. “AP 
reg... oe 


WoO « is 


LAKF 


\e AK Sire 
; newai' UN 


BOAER PUPS 
i<.0n , Her! 


hey 
“5% Lon 
4-154) 
we 


> 
rn 
: 


ASC 


©? UP. 
PUPPIES, 


noe Tour - 
FAR M nemenid 
me : 


THK 1 


ane 


“INE 


- = iS 


& M cay 
. 
WEST VIRGINIA 

RESTRICTED | 


crn ceR spar ; 

Realt S18 emch 
, COLLIE LeerTina 
rau nar 
Alf tis : 

mre o> ody 
Von Ma lust 
s+ Pooule Pups 


~ 
® papers 


SREDSERD 
FE rie Pt Ps 
Br Pri 


q Shen erad x 
ACREAGE. SALE CRRMAN 

VIRGINTA 
TO BE SUBDIVIDED—s 


‘Mer read 


iF ‘< 7 
o a. “a 
POODLE PUPPTFA 
AKC ree. desce 


oll Meas 
" Lee Dia _ 


n > 


; pets 
POODLES 
7SA)\ Tavern. L 


rtacd 


WATERFRONT, SALE 
HOT Ly 


DR.. COVEPOINT BEACH PUPPIES 
siaming an ob 
aterr 


re Dp 


: 

a + erreen 9 : . " d - 

roo’ e > ae Com 1A MERE —Fi oe sped o 
; - act ery afte tionat 

aina rein 


a1 ‘ Mi sF KITTENS 
DE 
sri SF RVic 
7 *T 


Madcen Mat 
Mis J) 


: - wh at - 

SEW RIVER PRON ‘ 
tian Rive le ie OFA 
23 


; © 
an Mat a M 
ie Pedlareec 
pid ane AK 


506 Riu 


Zs : 7 = ae 
T? _— Saws OTT 
. al vTs 


: 
vr 39° 
TOY Bobi a PPigs. -ARC : 


224 
vor 
ace 


ned 


WATERFRONT nent 


Ney 


. 


738 


ova one 1? want 


‘ 
. ne per 


DUPPY or 
* JA .. 


PERSONAL LOANS 


7 renee 


LOANS 


ON YOUR SIGNATURE 
ONLY 
COMPARE! SAVE! 


™ 
Menthir 
Parmente« 


$5.59 

9.08 
13.97 
17.47 
20.96 


rates teelede itntereat 
neipal. The interest rate te : 
menth ef the enpald balance 


PHONE JAckson 5-8885 
for your money today! 


FAMILY 


ef Ar 


RP 
wake 


nal ONT ai Reach 
a 


a 
KENWOOD meAcH 
. =~ 


RrACH 
: 


« 


NOR 


RFROROTH ner 
> 
T 


he 


: 


: : : 
DIRECTLY FACING BAY 
@ 


ra 
Pa - 


ie 
neat 


PERSONAL LOANS 


Centinaed an 


[$3SSS SSS 
QOuick-Confidential 


LOANS 


MARYLAND CASH LO 

7898 Georgia Ave. 
3337 R. I. Ave. 

UN. 45172 

PO SFOS 

anette “a etc teeta tet,’ 
CONFIDENTIAL 

LOANS BY PHONE 


On Your Signature Only 
Suburban Finance Co. 


soma, CF. W. Res. OT 
®sn79 8 fT. Ave iN 
= 7908 Geereta Ave 


Above 
Pr 


per 


and 


: 
AN 4 
, 
t 
, 


> 
, 
, 
> 
, 
> 
> 


: 


Finance Corp lingtea 


2907 Wilson Blvd. 
Arlington, Va. 


ai 


a ee 


ON YOUR SIG- 
NATURE ALONE 


WOMEN’S LOANS 
‘Our Specialty! 


WE CAN MAKE 
YOU A LOAN IN 


2 Hrs. “x. 


Now 
ONLY ONE TRIP NECESSARY 


Suburban Finance Co. 


7900 Geergta Ave 

T3589 Rhode teil. Ave 

46008 East-Weat Hwy 
o 


MARYLAND Cash Loan 


7TROR Geerglsa Ar 
1337 Rhede isi 


Get $25 te $4600 
> The 
makes 
loons, gives you fime te 
repey nm iene 
amo » Get 
st ne extre cost: SIN Conselide- 
tien Service, Netionwide Credit 
at over 1,000 offices. Phone for 
w wan 
or come m te 


nve 


monthly 


> ™ yet 


Leens $25 te $600 


FINANCE CO 


FOOMEPLY PERSONAL foment ° * * 4. 1 


Wheaton Finance a, 


11031 Viere “ill Rd. 
lL). 5-3006 


706 KING STREET 

2nd Fleer + Alexandrie 
Phone: King 85854 

Ope even. mgs 


m ¢ 


Bone tor howrs 


Residents’ 
7s RF Are 


Finance Corp. 
Lees: wes te of 0) verreendng towan ar. %-2220 


PpuRPOoM 


On Just Your Gwe Sigreture 


Yeu 
Can Get 


$850.00 
$600.00 
$350.00 
$250.00 


* Above loans wnder 

on a 20-mentn pin 

law which limite email | 
$600. interest charges are 
monthly unopaia bale 
3300 or less and -on 
rmainder 


American Finance 
Corporation 


5477 Wise. Ave OL. 47731 
Chevy Chese, Me 
4702 Martbere Pike 10 


Your 
Payments* 


$25, $100, $200 
up to $1200 


for any worth 
purpose. 


whale 


© On your seme only 
or other plans m | doy 


elf you wish, take up 

to 20 months to repay. 

° 
the 


on 
Come is or, fe seve time, 
phone frst 


MOUNT RAINIER 
3233 Rhode Island Ave. | 
ADams 2-3500 


SAVER SPRING 
$61 Bontfant St. 


» Biock east of Georgia Ava 


JUniper 8-1500 
7906 Georgia Ave., 


Riaam “i F inor 
jUniper 8-1111 
in Virginia, Berrew up te $600 
y ARLINGTON 


1407 N. Garfield St. 
at Wilsen Bivd 


JAckson 5-5400 


PUBLIC FINANCE 


Se 2 oe ee ee, | 


Pte Oo pur toa 


i‘s 


4803 7.1200 


. 
3308 Rhode 2.4510 
Me 
317 King 


st) 


301 
$2200 


Alexendria, Va 

Bivd JA 

Ve 
JA 


3137 Wilson 
° gion, 

7021 me Moeoere S 
Ross! yr 
7932 Georgia Ave wu 
Silver Soring, Md 
ams ’ ene 


It 


7 9510 
Ve 


7.72700 


* Above 
tae 7 


are 
riai 


er Mad 
nance ae 
Formerly Levee 7 Zz 7 


o. So m. Cleeed Seat 


ooo SS EE ee 
AUl FOMENY ; MTS —Modern 5-rm | 
¢ 


'?. WHEEL. 
box ; 


é 


.«» MAY BE A SENSIBLE SOLUTION 


You may be able to take pate yn 
of bargains with cash 
up te $1000 for any good ee 
Take up to 24 months to repay. 
ALL DRESSED UP AND NO CASH TO GO? 
See your friendly HFC maneger todcy 
Life insurance on ail HFC loans at se extra cost te you. 


OUSEHOLD FINANCE 


wT. RAISER 
S235 Rhode Island Ave. Ind FL 
PHONE UNien —67@ 


SUTTLARD 
612 Safftend Roed 
PHONE JOrden 8-9384 
—_e 
7444 Wuesnen 


onc ce SLVER tn 
ville Rd 12 
PHONE: JU dies basse 
7914 Georgia Ave...Ground 
ONE. JUniger 
Vm the Clarendon and Alexameria o%cer lname are Memitad 00 $600. latevedt charges 
ave 24% monitiy on balances @ 5200 ond 14% moni his om amy remaunda. 


76A! AUTOMOBILES, SALE 97) 


Res ALFA 
New 1956 
SPIDER SPORT ROADSTER 


AND 
RM Sal COUPE 
MET ane an eny 


JACK P LTD. 


2-1926) 


HORSES, LIVESTOCK 
REG. 


Tenn. Walk. mare & colt 


' an ertern 
if mos. broken; $195./ 


| MACHINERY and TOOLS B3A) 
L ary 

400 hrs.. new cond $1200) 
over. RA. 3-284 

TRAILERS, SALE 

5 

- 5 

Call CY. 

STAR—'S 


 gasete. 
Cc 


red wih 


ROSENTHAL CHEVROLET | 


29- ft house 


ehe ats & Coijumbia Pir 
aris JA b a 
Ost eaters SS. Reduced, | 
685 n¢ 
a ha OTE ALEY - eouall 
Many other imported aports 


t sale prices. We 
ok rate 


Manhattan Auto 


2384 af 
; 2-dedrm } ; 
‘offer S> ~9382 : 
TR — ae x? 
*. Vir 


\eT 


10 
. Peat 55 
r linaneoce a 
ficic H~} We 


TRAILER—U'til! 
goed cond $45 


DETROITER 
. $1495 


4x6 
CR 


RS 


at if * mL 
CAIT TINE’ Aina 
Ave. Bethesda. Ma 
he ch _§-5009. 
BUIC 
STANLEY i NORNER eR 
HORNER 'S CORNE 


4 a a 
: 


~ | 


~ 


‘Downton ) Dr 


PERSONAL LOANS 


cr under sr 


d . 


ase -) ne OF ret 
Mr : 


AP 
Cc Asm Loans Puc ' Sey 


(INION AUTO ‘CREDIT 
1450 Fis. Ave Ul 4.-66R4 
NEED MONE’ ? 
Kraft cy 


Loans 


hard- 
a as 


4-C oor 

heater 
“ener 82195 
BUICK 


hesda. Ma 
6-§009 


rs pe alg 
"700 Wis Ave Be’ 
WL. €-5012-—-Oh. 


‘55 BUICK 


REPOSSESSED” 
$1787 TOTAL 


mer 


Call 
TRUCKS. SALE 
NE , Rot 


ET —Peace-o! -s 
: + the | 


| a. 

- ae ~e © ra? - 
NICHOLSON CHEVROLE! 
o Ps 

DONG? 
Cail Me 

DiL™P . 
‘ae ; ™m 

© 454 ” r race 
FORD : a ’ 
' ext financed 


‘ere 


BLASS % "CLARK |S 


AVE. NE 


ano 
or 5000 


FRAN K SMALL J 


INFERN ATION 
Fxce na. Beal 


mile Specia 


IN 
. d¥ tno _ 
at « Pr o% 


eage ' cities ~ ieee — 
CAITHNESS BUICK 
ow } A Be hesda one 


7 
won 


Atick as 


ream 


Road 
) 000 : 


o 


Dyna — 


54 ford V4 
pickup 


r Suverd conc 
22090 6=HORNER S&S 
ii ain st. = 


*895 
*595 
*595 
*495 
*495 
*395 
*295 


ROSENTHAL 
CHEVROLET 


Glebe Rd. & Columbia Pike 
Arlington, Va. JA. 7-676) 


50 Chevrolet 
‘a-fon pickup 


$0 Chevrolet 
a-fon pickup 
49 Chewrelet 
‘2-ton pene! 
53 Chewrolet 
sedon delivery 


49 Chevrolet 
o-f. stoke 


‘49 Internet. 
walk-on 


CADILLAC -45 4. 
era 


res 
- on 


Name 


‘34 CAD. 
“FLEETWOOD” 
$595 DOWN 


an 
We 
+A 


D }4 
e- 


AUTOMOPILES WANTED 
CADILLAC—'54 


a’ 


BLASS. x ‘CLARK 


Of. BN PTTOL & FLA. AVE. NE 


"AD 4.9882 


Fi | 
atten CARS 


ran MOTORS 


$356 WM ¥Q. 


WILL PAY 
TOP DOLLAR 


ALL MAKES & MODEL 


ANDY ADAMS 


3720 Georgia A’ 
TU 415 


Cadillacs Wanted 
PENNY MOTORS. 


A 

+ > 

. 5- 

¢ams— ST ATIC : A‘ 

Ick 7 MOTORS 
Wis “IVE ‘Ww i4 


WILL PAY HIGH 


"FLOOD PONTIAC” 
4221 Connecticut Ave 


WE WANT 
nadel ear 


CADTILLAT.— 135 
seurtr seda : 


755 CAD. 
Convertible 
$495 DOWN 


_ 
- 


00 
> f\ 


7 


CADILLAC 

plete iu ide 
7 Se 

AKER 
ra 


s 


a 
ry) ry Ta . . 
are CADILLAC 


tone 


; 
Ri Y 
we Tho 

rs , 2 g? 

: : eT 


o 


see 


pitol Cadillac: Olds Co 


"52 CAD. 


4-Dr. SEDAN 


‘ oH 
OR wit “TRADE OP on DOWN 


BLASS is CLARK 


14 
in for aul x orec’t ap 


The Auto Center 


thweet 
ou .K i NW 


‘ aoe 4 Fleetwood 
Beout ea" - + 


La 38 

» 6624 
. iw 
ning 


be 
rondi 


R edu ed 


J ” 
° _ 


mi lease. 


n Cadillac-Olds 


SHOPPING CENTER 
* ; <7 43) 


CxeH FOR CARS 


Any Make 
BI LL DENIS, INC. 


rT) 
‘os 


.e 
Suburbs 
ADL YT 
THEBDA =. ; 
CADILLA 188 Cust ' 


poe 

ve 

. 
‘ 


ries 


; al 
NEB MOTOR 


adens ry 


Eee EGR CARS 


ANY MAKE ¢ Ma ‘A 
PENNY MOTORS 
a LA sae 


1620 RL. Ave 
NEEDED 
IMMEDIATELY 


a >. 
- 


* kes 


Capitol ne - as Co. : 


sa4 Sh. Be a i 


£ 


gos CHEV. ; 
$595 TOTAL 


Sedan 6-cvl. Ronse fees, goed, ® 
ol We 


a cone 


BUYING os 


Beery) aan 
Mighest prices paid for used of financed ror 
cars. Brine r ¥~ title te ppr 


simerstourtonsme- Bi Bl ace g CLARK 


tion 
COR. MN. CAPTTOL & FLA. AVE. NE 
AD. 4-9882 


La 
home 


“LU. }-] 236 
CARR. DISCOUNT 


os 
tewners aad 


EMERSON & ORME 
(BUICK) 
i?th ead M Ste 5LW 
| tation fully equipped. 
AUTOMOBILES, SALE ye Meine 
A 4 MACE” ay OL ; 


we wilt BPS 
wees . A low i 
"JACK FRY, LTD. 


Pe Alt AREA ont 


5 how ADs 
+ nites 


Ye oe ge AGEN. 
c 


gtProko tl ot 


0090 
the Hear 57" Bethesda" 
ROLET.! ‘4-door stat —) 
Brest me: motor 
MOTORS me 


Spring 


wire 
l-owner 


, er 

pages lL owner 

hocy SUBURBAN 

951 Pershin 4 Bi.ver 
4. IU. 8-2 


7 1926 
rr 
TRI- 


ineton. 


"ROSENTHAL oh 


( 


ee me 
a.m 1 Li. 4-600. 


on | afiee Beet “s Coiumyis oo 


' 


SALE 97 


fa 
lattes Noni 


AUTOMOB 
= 1983. 
r joer apcen 
tiful formire ue 
cessortes oter 
cellent nomy vate 
this one Suet son aA x Stafford. 
StohIman & rolet 
3270 M ST. NW. 

_AD 204 ss ($= ADD. Bas 
1956 CHEVROLET CORVETTE 
2725 horsenpoer srandare 
tran anission lmure tiate Gelivery. 
Rosenthal Chevrolet 

Glebe R4. and Columbia 


cours Vor: er Crate : 


bs - a 
gTho OF Lid aMs, 8 Bice. poh 


“752 CHEV. 


Repossessed 
$249. 80 Total 


. - 
for eauiek creat 


Fhe Auto Center 


(On theest Lecetion) 
moth & i yt nw ST. 3-8624 


lg HEVROLET — 1956 
: 


ry 
HORNER . Bt 1c 5 Midtown 
14th st. nw. Di. 7.38935 
CUEVROLET- —‘*$$ Bel Air 4-dr 
tres emission Pe 
tires: cleanest 


au- 
A 
H or 6! 
torn 
ROSENTHAL CHEVROLET 


Glebe Road & ColumPia Pike : 


c ett fy SF Bel Ait Hafdion: 


tough washebie 


pholstered 
this 


and vor? 
> rfect far uy ¢ 
extras. Just $114 See Mr 


Stohiman Chevrolet 
3270 M ST. NW 
2-46 14 


Y 


AD 
‘ —> 


dr Sport 

new ures 
7. ic Going over unae 
$45 Wonderful 


bud 
cw VaoteT— ae Be 
mn 


. ae 
ye 


pearan 


CWENROLET 


‘ CORNER. ‘Buk x peak 
Ce ; 


Pp 
Pairtas 


}- to 

cuey — +, © S.dr 
a 009 mM) 

CHEVROLET 


wd Weer is exe 


ta 


Ave .. | - 
CHernOL RSs 


740 Piney Br. ra 
as? 


Whee! mobil e tree. Wale 


WHEELER. INC. 
n.PLYMOUTH.-IMPERI 

' ASH INC ton BRALe 
— NA it 


mo 


"HH 
APRA ES 
CHRY st Ft. - 


On ner ; 
i ‘$405 899 Gr 
.™ ine 


>4 on 
[NEY BRANCH 
- 


CHRYSLER — 


s,s“ er aveer,T 


ni 
ine "si 995. 


"Cadil lac- O ids 0 


NW 
Cin ystrEs— o] 
Lire 


"4 
. 
cr 


- 
..4aD tol 


: een 
. JTORS 
S iver 


- 
CwRYSLER 'y Baralcca VO 4-0 
dan. ) trans &h twe- 
lene ver c Will sacrifice, 
£05 Br owns a-n} 
a sot o—1 933 V-8 4-48 
a” sieering 
MC tm 


ean 
7 


RNR ¢ “COR 


Se 
pt SOTO —T" Sa 
ra 
“PH ACK PR 
LA 
¥ 


7) 
nm 


“CATTHNE 


$205 
5” 


res. 


J OE 
' Meadout D a 


pooGt =—i9 
— : 

> 

. 


“ioe 


Retheod » Ma 
= 


19 
LA 


- 
ENG Gio “yoRD 


PR — WW co vertible. Pvt 
my & . © : 


-w 
’.79e@? 
 9-door 


ar 
a salir 


REPOSSESSED 
$449.50 TOTAL 


fini. VS engine. 


> 
1 


7 
yy? Soet credit ‘approval cali 


« SECURITY MOTORS 
Ath and N. Y. Ave. NW. 


"54 FORD 
~door ue finish 
R SALES 


— tres a 
cougert 


payment oto 
ee 
tal uh eli ater 6 


7 
> 


DOYL LE MO 
Oéed « 


$88 


DOWWN ON APPROVED CREDIT 


‘55 FORD 
Victoria 


and yore. V4 with Forde. 
J 


own payment re- 
by, otsieass For cred) 
ca 


DICK WILLIAMS 


LI. 6-314] 


i773, BLADENSBURG RD. HE. 


il ewer ae 


/ 


97; THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


AUTOMOBILES, SALE 97 ‘| AUTOMOBILES, SALE v7 dha h SALE 97 AUTOMOBILES. SALE CS 97 | AUTOMOSILES, “Ss 97, AUTOMOSBILES, SALE 
| . edan. RK. and Hf wear Wednesday, July 11, 1956 


.* eat cover ‘ _ &., a. ; = rON -4 
| throne cate pet NC. re th a Set rete ion | AUTOMOBILES, SALE 97 AUTOMOBILES, SALE 

mt “Castomline ne lision new. | WILLYS- 10m Today s economy car 7 — 50 al station wag- 
ements oe ee 


ve 30 
tame | Blue Pontiae Convertible | ° ROSENTHAL CHEVROLET ee eed pe. ogee a8 t 
ATFHNEss BUICK JAGUAR— 35 XK-140 MC opnverti. wounts | 7 : 
bite Ang 3 ts hite with req leather im-| 6.7 
FoRD— 


ter! - $279 
r ce ROSENTHAL CHEVROLET 
Foves drive, Bay ster 
2590 mi. Dip) omat ) y 


xce 
Ae paint: pvt. ovune. 


Ervin Pord, 
21k, Pairfax, near thea- 


VOLKSWAGON—1955_ 17,000 miles. | 


co SD or 
* > en aranice mithhs . 92-6761 D | 
*| Capitol adillac- ac-Olds Co . 2, Smithsbure, Md 


weer } Seas WAGONS, 19475) 


: 
a — onveruble R.| 
7 ~ 
Brat Road & Columbia Pike a 52 , oa an vagon oun = 
~~ tion. Va Ja 67 RI 
R48 une and looks 
Bi ae Roper 


or : 
ers ' ce ats " nt re 


SER VICEMEN 
NO DOWN PAYMENT 


This apetics te tet three gerade: 
and officers 


Por Further lafermation 
Call 


JET MOTOR SALES 


1594 Pean. Ave. 6.4. 
a-1219 


A ranrion 
SERVICEMEN 


This avoeties © firet th 


station 


sh. : . 
Toth “ond h.. aute. tranasmis- “4 


55 MERC. | 


MONTCLAIR Suntate yellow 


Lupped mil Lew = wl Ge? . 3] 
dient a a een Slaw 
HARDTOP tee ; ae Se - . @* -#-~—_ 5 4. —w-? —» ar sh Sis-A. i Bex ie Ford. | 


ou — cfire e-car ¢ uar : | 1025 Bind Ra. NE. ee 
WE CAN FINANCE | Sil ate ful> sguipees & oma mien —— Ee ftv te 3 | — 
CAR Is 


oe re = Ta75 46 YEARS | 


OR BETTER 
ony ibid ie of selling used cars 
P.B. and pewer wit 


z| $19 DOWN 
* ne ye- WE OFFER -ox 


Readies. heater. Mercomati ’ 
no-cost 30-day saber ane mat ter a! 
FOR ONLY $49 
po ng "s tofar. reduced Bf the finest in town 
Olmstead Motor Co. : 


aly guarantee onth 
oo. t ‘payments Pee 
SMML 4 rove 
bi a ‘MILLER MOTOR CO 
RANK FINANCING 
SEPWESDA ' 
' atin °* mater Powersiite. beater art. Olds Beeler Since 1938 NORTHWEST "7 
tan: new-car cond No. TT) ay. Bere rete fmanctne. 5000 Wileen Bivd re 7.4400 17th AND Mm STS. N.W. 


16 FLORIDA AVE FF 
; "MOTOR SALES ROCKET AWAY Coast-in Pontiac ‘ ewe | ae Seve ee 


PILI. 4- 2396 |: 
SEO 20008 TO MORE ™ OT Fuctte tre 38 Lt 672008 ; _ "55 Buick $2, 297 


ee’ ee i 
an ‘ : = os. feos SUMMER - S-On bardtos: drynafiow 
ces ee 
steer! | nd = ay Pally powered FROM a 

Roa Ke - “ , aichune esther | + " bok ott * ° i aes 

ntertor. Ne . | tern . oanet - . 
ford i337 Mast-Weet Mwy. Gliver| |. b-27 BL ee ee ae FRANCIS & PARSONS | 
= a e RI NE ; 4 
DS— 49s. 52s. Se and : r , oes > 
, ‘ae Fordors 


Seper hardtep; Drna. 
$1347 
and hardtops, from $6245 up Erwin | 55 Buick 


"53 Buick 
$997 
irfax near | 
agon roy BRardtes ( enter leaded o fib 


Convertible: Draafliew 
$697 
A eee : = MOR 
Pordo. ; steering. © & ; = cenipmernt bier and & hite fir w " oe : bs ND MORE dal 
too S isso, "Raines A aoter ‘Co To : hh. Like ore - eo 2 wie seechee 4 
ile pean Tsk : 


53 Buick $1295) ne teense “Sete Be GET THEIR NO} | AP RAISAL 


‘-@e sedan 
$347 
Bar détep &uaper Preelice 
2825 Wilson 


B22 ee FD 


fiiag weson Ke 


CaN eM Gteveoter 
lebe Road & Colum 


fagon; r. and 

poye: ; toda ~ ea + Rg. 
his = toda . s 495 Wo. | 
644- Roe. FORD 1237 Bast ‘| 
Weil fey. Silver Spring. dU - 


iF YOUR 


Tee 
4-400 Stamos with purchase of car at 
Rh ently S7895 


“om” De Lene Molidas 4 door 


ROSENTHAL 


Gieve 


oun: _ ontLe 
> 
Victoria seda 


7- tres - 
including 4 * oor ne i ‘Sy bow 
Terms or tra 


AKERS OLDS. CAD LLAC co. 
, Pairiington Shopping Center 
Vv. 3-0350 


tn , 
wi features | the futere, incind- 
green with 


"SS Chevrelet—$1.799 


“eter Sacee Lew par- 


3 ‘OLDS mene Beeetirel twe-tone ties 


MORTHEAST 
616 RHODE ISLAND | 
AVE. N.E. DU. 7.5208 | 


"SS Buick .. 


Centers hardtes. Fewer eteer 
ing. Pewer trakes. Drove. 


‘54 Buick $1597 

Sedan: Dreaflew. 

"53 Buick $1,297 

Seper sedan: Drea. 

‘S!) Buick $697 
$497 

$347 


Hardiesn§ Drea. 
‘50 Buicks 
$647 


—— 


Toda) Ss super Silver 


_ Sorines 
PRANK SMALL JR. INC. |MEReUBE te Bs on fete 
1726 Good Hope Rd. SE LU 31-9647 bine pete ivore, top. : 7 ANOTHER SCOOP 
W eat hwy Rilve Soe. JU. 5-704 


Crestiine 
RR @& 


convertible ' 
Pordomat 


Sedan Dreaaflew. 


‘49 Buick 


Seper FPedanetic 


“55 Chevrolet 


Sedan 


‘52 Chevrolet 


Lom ine 4-door 
adet biue Cont rast ine 
246 anc heater. ov 


$25 DOWN 
Will Purchase 
These Cars 

"SO CADELAC 


Fuilry ecuteoed 


£000 es waeranteed. Special to- 
PRANK SMALL JR., INC 
TARR oR Rd 


on. Biue, fully equipped. 61395 


ree 


‘33 Ply Plymouth 


* deer 


$847 
$2,397 


(estem Catalina 
steering ena brakes: 


NEW 


Yoe Sanne “> -eg? 
Dodge-f yt » Dew 


FRANCIS & PARSONS 


— ‘ ale = ‘ - _ Teo a u 
N 1566 i. = . very ~~ . Pairt i.e 
FORNER'S ‘CORNER . 
Fis. ave. ne. at 6th! on Lee Mist 2116 Wichels Awe. SF 
— . — = y t 
. Aa. | Buper weep wat. — LU 4.2880 Lv ’ 
Hrdre fr and -" co ab- 


" ’ eretes end of*hrere§ stea- 
ssintely tuperioe Beet ofter MUL 1°SS BUICK $1207 ~ themed snveter 6 


i tae TOR CO so ks Qo a 


"S5 
CHEV. 


2-Dr. "6" Cylinder 
SOLD AS 15 


"S1 Chevrolet .. 
Tedder Sedan 
‘52 Plymouth .. $697 
Sedan ydra 
All Cars Thoroughly Reconditioned 
N—S4 per jet sedan.| American 
¢. Hydra iy sshe $95 dn 7TH ANO | A STS. NW: 


*S1 Buick 
$997 
‘30 Chrysler 
power steering. power brakes 
Boulevard 
BRANCH MIRS.. rel —_ EMERSON & ORME 


$597 
"EGE 1a. 25000 
YORI IIIA IAI IAI IAIAINS 


, 30 Buick 
$2295 : ; -dr an 

$497 

3] Hudson ... .$497 
clran ieee es 
1956 MG-A § SS Dodge $1695 
apitol Cadillac- Olds Co.| 
ARLINGTON / NO. j Dealer 
"54 


49 Buick 
‘Sz ‘Chevrolet 3 
$747 
‘SS Ford Ferd a; wring 047 
$2195 nap aia ee ‘55 Pontiac 
full price Roper ‘Good | Manhattan Auto 

2-door Sedan, equipped; 2-tone blue. A 
nice car. Sold with a 2-day, money-back 


Sedan 
Creee ieterta coupe: Porde- 
wer 
NE Guiles & Service imported ar 
Pe 3 
guarantee, 


mey Br 


4 “a7 


” MERCURY ~ == 5 


1777 tor 


Feile equreved 
“Sieg pewer steering 


clean; $290 
py Dealer 


~ 


viene «f tee tiree 


3 DAY 


SALE 


Open ‘til 10 P.M. for This Sale 


est sh oe 


Repossessed | — 
EME RSQN & ORME ‘53 aoe inamil el BURRELL MOTORS 


ith 2M Ste. VO nT 7.8196 ; 


OLDS KE. 7-1308 


Po veh Wheraee 
“SS” 2-d¢.. beaetifel orece 
k white, 4H. Hedre~ eee | 
cellent condition. 


Convertible fark merece Tie 
| Mack tee redie heater 
ther 


Pontes Ee. BE. 
Li 6-418 


7 ¢ee OF 


ANOTHER SCOOP 
FROM 
FRANCIS & PARSONS 


"55 Dodge $2095 


Seberbdan. aie 
tene bive 


55 Ford ‘2.2. i 
fol tuteme Sitch Mot $1 


cow. Se? wet bee few 
Sevoy 


95 Plymouth "=... 


ea. oped Awormo't:c trons 


rm asor ot we 61 BAR 

eooreciete. | owner 

54 Pontiac SS". 
lune 3 a 

Mycra Metric 


"54 


& * 


~ ww. Gree. Muse? see te 
@porec: ote 


'50 Chrysler *.',"~- 


sect covers Must see te oppre 
cate Three t© select eee 


4 too 


SI Dodge wx n-== 
flush equipped 


PONTIAC STEEAMULMER 2.08 
CADELAC “62” 408 

STUSE. “VS” Cius Court 
UNCOLN CLUS COUFE 
FORD 


heater ?- 
sel new br us 


65 Hudson $1795 


Rambtier: redie beater ?-tene 
sreen, lew mileage Like Oe 


"50 Chev. 


4-Deer Seburbdan. 


FRANCIS & PARSONS 


Were £-E te Deel Wits 
2116 Wichols Ave. $.E. 
LU. 4-2880 LU. 1-1777 


WANTED 


Reliable Parties 


To Take Over This 


‘53 OLDS 


"98" HOLIDAY COUPE 


‘895 


Full Price 
Call for Credit Approval 


ME. 8-2674 


Military Personnel 
and Out of Towners 
Financed 


Andy Kelly 


129 K St. N.W. 


*45 


Call New Fer 
Credit Appreral 


ME. 8-2674 


Mibkctary Persornel and 
Out-of-Townrers Fimanced 


Andy Kelly 


128 K ST. OW. 


99 FORD 


Cer Me. 2178. 


‘675 


$595 Full Price 


"OT Been “cea sec mn, 
& hh. sew coef covers $245 


Priced fer this sole 
beautiful te 
49 Lincoln >: = $295 
¢ Bb. 5 
"52 Plymouth “* "| ' soda 
ym : 42 Cadillac “°° 
too. Fully equipped A dec! $99 


sow cond-coeeee sn... OOOO | ter bo @ cnet oll poten 
40 OTHERS TO SELECT FROM 


© LOW AS $5.00 DOWN, UP TO 24 MONTHS TO PAY 
© TOP DISCOUNTS FOR CASH 
© WMMED. DELIVERY ON APPROVED CREDIT 


$12 
"33 Plymouth “=~ sod. 
$845 


power te ene 


Ne Cash Needed 
on Approved Credit 


Servicemen All Grades Financed 


‘wi bive 


ae ow sect covers. Mydre 


Financing Arranged 
for Military Personnel 


cvers 


For Credit Approval Call 


IRV MARTIN 


WO CASH NEEDED 


Ne Small Loans Required 
Subject te Credit Approval 


with « 2-day money-teck 
guarantee. 


‘53 FORD 


VICTORIA 
“V-8" Car #2214 


585 


with « 2-Day 
ce Back Guarentee 


CALL NOW 


Power steering, brakes, 
Hydra-Matic, radic, heater, 
w.-w. tives, marcen finish. 
A nice car. SOLD “AS 66." 


TU. 2-4200 
BILLROSS 


7400 Georgia Ave. N.W. 


1955 
FORD 


Mainline 4-dr. se- 
dan. 8-cylinder. 
Nice Car. Sold as is. 


Call new for Credit Approval. 


ANDY ADAMS 


3720 Georgie Ave. N.W. 


TU. 2-3 51 5 


199 ec 


$95 DOWN 
AND TAKE UP SMALL 
MONTHLY PAYMENTS 


ATTENTION 
MILITARY PERSONNEL 


Ali gredes flmanced Offirers 
ené@ first 3 credee. ge Geen 
payments 


® Bank Financing 


MILLER MOTOR CO. 


316 FLORIDA AVE. NE. 
Ll. 4-2396 


Repossessed 
‘54 
Mercury 


Custom hardtop “S" 2 real 


995 = 


Me Cash Needed 
No Small Lean Required 
Subject to Credit Approval 


CALL NOW 


TU. 2-4200 


IBILLROSS 


7400 Georgia Ave. NW. 


Subject te Cred Approval 


TU. 2-4200 


NO MONEY DOWER 
Me Smell Leese Meeded 


CALL NOW 


‘51 Stude.. *37? 


Cheese. 2-2 


Por Peek 


785 


‘51 Ford..*57* 


Vietors “F 
Cer Woe 


‘51 Buick . . $7-"? 
Rivera 2-Dr. 


rer Week 


‘51 Pack... *4° 


£n. Vou ean. £.Br. Uitranatic. 


‘49 Chev. ..*3"° : 


Cowrtesy Car Furnnhed 
> 


TU. 2-4200 
BILLROSS 


7400 Georgia Ave. 1H. 


-RE. 7-1664- 
Circle Motors 


2401 PENN. AVE. N.W. 


EAST-WEST MOTORS 


CHRYSLER—PLY MOUTH 


1137 EAST-WEST HWY., SILVER SPRING 
JU. 5-1340 JU. 5-1341 


NA. 8-4455 


12th & K Sts. N.W. 


2 blocks from Creyhound Bus Saticn 
in downtown Washington -—— 


Open 9 ‘Til 9 


reper tcens reenter oreeris cart in eran 


. 
* 
«© 
x 
+ 
x 
a 
+ 
. 
x 
x 
oe 
x 
x 
¥ 
- 
: 
x 
* 
S 
x 
* 
* 
” 
: 
+” 
+ 
_ 
- 
= 
+ 
x 
x 
* 
x 
* 
* 
+ 


h.¢.2.9.9.9.9.9.9.%.2.9.9.2.9.9.2. 2.2.2.2! 


a car for every pocketbook—75 cars te cheese from 


‘55 Ford Conv. 188 
‘55 Pont. Catalina ‘243 


55 Buick Riviera 291 
wn 


Super ful pewrr 
™~-@er Wher ont cere Guarentee Dieeeeet GS coe Severe Liberal Orme erreneed 


‘54 Chev. Sta. Wag. 
wersti@e leaded 
eos 

fer militers persenee! gervrerTnamert emete—s Grd est «of Be 

Officers 2s 6068 parweet recered Feo oo e@S seers 


LI. , 6-3141 


orty ¢ AM rsa. oe 


‘53 DODGE ST Ph pce 


Convertible yellow wth tlectk ine. pewer btrekes. Drenefliew 

tee New - tres. seute r end &.; 

matic trans. ‘Sone clean, Special 
ate 


Alcorn Motors 
sone Lee Bighror 
Artingten. Va. Jt. 2.5086 


eream @with black 


"50 CHEVROLET 


j A veal share convertible. Light 


green with dack creen tes. 


PAGE-BHUGHES BUICK 
ST! Artineten Bivd. JH. 4-1199 
Falls Charch. Va. On Reate 


‘49 FORD 


Riese: white tee: w ©. tires 
and b.: exeelient nr A 
aberve sverage threusheu 


$395 
Erwin Ford Ce. 


Ris. 79 and Ti! VPairfaz 
st. &-577) or CR. 8-1888 


‘50 Studebaker 
Gnapoy tvery finish, 
heater bran 
lent cendities 


$395 
LOVING CHEVROLET 


1599 East-West Her.. Silver Spe 
JU. 9-8008 


a radie and 
new Wei j- 
ee ince "tas Me. 1196 — 
$595 
Oven Evenines 
; Chevrolet 
téth and Fla. Ave. 5. 
BO. 12-3508 


"53 Pontiac. . $1195 


Cenvertibie. F a " yara- 
motte Reastifal green ek, 
* res 


Star Motor Sales 


JA. 86-3272 


1953 MG 


coene. Mart TH: slack fin- 
excellent cenditien. 


$1045 
ERWIN FORD Co. 


Ris. 29-f11—Pairfax 
Ja. &-S7T27 or CR. 53-1890 


Spert 
ish, 


“Home of ne? Claud 


eed « 
1728 Wie. ave. we, OL. 4-100 


"65 PONTIAC $2295 


Star Chief convertible: ¢. end 
h vdra-Matic. gsewer steer- 
ie. brakes. =o. tirets Seen 
tife!l gray finish: execelient con- 
dition 


McKEE PONTIAC 
“PONTIAC MEANS MeKEE” 


5335 Wisc. Ave. ST. 3-7107 


*S3 BUICK 


Riviere Sueer Hard Tes: telly 
eavloped. t-teme creen & tvery 


$1095 
ARCADE PONTIAC 


1437 Irving Ot. WW. A 
Also 3469 14th M4, | pang 
RA. 43-9678 


"54 BUICK $1997 


Convertibie: 3-tene red 
white fimich Meck top: 
leather interior: r. and b.. Pree... 
pewer steering and brakes; very 
clean. 


EMERSON & ORME 
(BLICK) 
616 BL Ave, NE. DU. T-800 


PONTIAC 


. &-9678 


‘Sl FORD... .$697 


Gonvertibie: bine finish; redie, 
heater and everdrive: thoressh- 
ly reconditioned; very ciren. 


N & ORME 
(BUICK) 


1th & M Ste NOW. DT. 1-888 


54 BUICK 


oecial: radle and beater. Weht 
vee with back tes. One owner. 


$1695 


PAGE BUGRES BUICK 
Fale Coureh . Va. pare hn sis f. 


. TH * ‘Saterday “Ta «. 


; 
4 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
© ednesday, July 11, 1956 


TODAY! WEDNESDAY! 
ALL GEORGE'S | STORES! . 


PACKED IN ORIGINAL FACTORY SEALED CRATES and CARTONS! ors 


; : bd ya “$ 


AF FC hr ARMS ERO OP Oe ah 


— a alt 


Bt RB ae reer a 


PR : re E H i ieee 


Reg. $109.95 Brand New 1956 Brand New ‘56 Top Brand 


FOLEY 20-INCH (21-SERIES TV 
\ POWER MOWER With uU HE 


AIR CONDITIONERS nore Fe dase | OT 


FOR 24-HOUR DELIVERY & +e = nw rc wood oot Table Model TV Console Model 
INSTALLATION! =O “sags ||144°7|15167-* 


@G.E. 
APPLIANCES 


AT WAREHOUSE PRICES! 


Reductions on 


FANS 


NEW FURNITURE 


Reg. $499.95 New Rowe Saree 3-Piece 


Rea. $379.95 Brand New 1956 Res $389.95 Brond OM SUITE 
Mes Me OST WIETOR || nai: auc [ecm 


New te Cretes $159.95 


Reg. $339.95 New 1955 ee Se Seats al a 
CHRYSLER AIRTENP $7 87 peta ] 69 ¥, Ton ‘94° 


a 
ee 
ee 


“4 TON CASEMENT w/2-peed fan & ther- Flush Mount eee teen 00 dea tee ot — BRANO mses oF 80x 


P mmeostat. 


eumerted tepertry 
Res. $299.95 Brand New — Reg. $399.95 New 1955 7 V AMPS $79.98 eeytiie ‘49 ° O/ orf 
MITCHELL $ CHRYSLER AIRTEMP $ - kT SOFA LOUNGES—WIT sect three 20% * 51 * 50% °" 
% TON Flush Mount Model % TON & Push Sutton Controls ond sleep one. . . od $9] Double dresser, chest and bookcose 


5 Aa juste te full length wed te ai 
bed. Our Reg. $59.95 i 
Reg. $259.95 Brand New mre Fe Sate Reg. $369.50 Brand New New In © 4 ~ Fag Ow Res ‘] 50 
FRIGIDAIRE * 66 RCA 3/4 TONS 9 g convert 004 — Ove | SREHRSGR HATE So 
pink 


Regular $9.95 


G.E. BUDGET IRON 


Stream i -ed far 


*reacse dd efticiency, s 72 
7 


bolerced fer sereeter 
wer ng ecw 


Regular $11.95 


G.E. VISUALIZER IRON 


Pobre deal lets 
select «606the Ol corr cot Ss .99 
paren tor the 


tobric © be ironed 


i i hee ks 


a a ee a a a 


v2 TON Casement or Regular CASEMENT w/Thermostat 


S55 e057 [Fer mane 144 meme. \fl==s== 974 


a TON Flush Mount Model 


er agape ——| DEHUMIDIFIER | $ | secon ce oe 
Chevelad Airtem 7 Reg. $319.95 Brand New now = opens © deep twa. 9 
wr matching choir. 
eee PHILCO $ ‘ Sos 9 
t: 1 TON Flush Mount #28 eo 
size sofe ond —_ 
Reg $349. 95 Brand New 1956 Mew ta Cretes Res. $459. 95 Nea 1955 Mew tn Crotes matching choir. = S109 


Famous makes? 5 7 CHRYSLER anrenP$1 QQ PR GUA = ~ WT | 


Reversible 
WINDOW FAN 


ee eee meme ee 
_-,”"”"”"”"”"”"”"”"”--eeeerrrrrrrew. 


Regular $17.95 


G.E. HAND MIXER 


Ligh? = ergh? 
Stow ana S ‘$¥Q- 42 
Regular $27.95 
Pad -_ PURPOSE MIXER 


5 coat £ $47: 99 


ee i 
eee ee Dee ee 


12m. Deluxe $9.95 


OSCILLATING FAN 


AE AAAAAAAAAS © 4S SSS bb A Ab AD AME KL ie ee 
ee eee ee ee 


Regular $89.95 [ae 
"20-inch 4A) 
ROLL-a-BREEZE £b be. J 
Portable == 


Fan 
on stend 


1 TON Flush Mount Model 1 TON Flush Mount end chair to metch tn 
w ‘Thermostat 3 nylon end feoem rub- ] 60 
ber. Our Reg. $279.95 
soveomt STTAL cr RCA ; 
MODERN 3-7°C. BEDROOM SUITE— 


HOTPOINT HOTPOINT s whe eins bless «ne Fata ee legs. Our Reg. $59.95. 
1% TON Flush Mount = / Thames aed techence hea “3135 SERTA INNERSPRING MATTRESS or 


34 TON Flush Meunt w/therme. 
w Thermestat 


Reg. $329.50 Brand New sow Se Crates oa ms . - blonds. Reg. $219.95 tice of alo — 29 
Res. $3! Br “ ow in Crotes me 
RCA 1 TON $ RCA 1/2 TONS 5 Spay Fa 
Flush Mount w/Thermostat erdovns « paungei vs mo Ma 
CASEMENT w/Thermostat sctdsc a Wp ST 8 c 
Res. $349.95 ne Se See a $249.95 
Reg. $399.95 Brand New New In Cretes 
HOTPOINT $ Reg. $159.95 Brand ALUMINUM FOLDING ROCKERS — 
w/ push-button controls TOP BRAND $ Now 1996 med Gis the. $ 
1 TON CASEMENT COOLERATOR $9.95 $29 
Reg . $329.95 Brand New 1956 rene en , 
Reg. $379.95 New 1955 New In Crates 8 ERIE cnney acdiaieiee 
EMERSON CHRYSLER estes $3 | 5 DEHUMIDIFIER 


"TT"... 
ee ee ee ee ee eee eee » 


Regular $27.95 
aE Aute. Coffeemaker 


collee the 


woy > me i — § 55 
voy tn — 


coat usc $542 


doe: * avtomot< ow 


Regular $19.95 
G.E. AUTO. COFFEEMAKER 


i i i 
7errreeseseeeeeeeremeeeeerermrermermrmerereeereeeeeeeeerrr. oo] 


ELECTRIC V4 TON CASEMENT 13,000 ox. ft. capacity, G.E. DISHWASHER James Dishwasher 
a “aie” Dette male” “ADA | Accete *929 


Bho 5147 HOTPOINT T &6 79 if DOOR CRASHER! 


1-TON Flush Mount Model 


~— ~~ ~wwr~rTrtTee *9.95 HI-LO SIZZLER 


SAVE on NEW TV & APPLIANCES! ena | FREEZERS | ae Eee. 


| $249.95 New ADMIRAL 9 cu. ft $ 
ION $219 9S Grend New 1956 ot a New 1956 MAYTAG ] 
TELEVIS jes TV 121 Aut 
ADMIRAL .21 Series $159 ae! pall $149 


_ REFRIGERATOR w/door shelves oatiees Calin cane 
sag | $299.95 Brand New 1956 CROSLEY 16 cu. | pombe: =" ; Grill 
S149 9S Brand New 1994 $95 $149.95 Srend New 1954 $187.95 Grend New FRIGID $112 ‘4 y u 7 _ ‘ 


ADMIRAL 17 Series TV TOP BRAND 17.Series TV $Q3 | AiRt ELECTRIC Onven & we hevetmys A $] 74 welletion Just 200 .99 
% service @ x tre , ‘S4- 


= ge al New 1954 Portable Model $269.95 trend New 1956 ®8CA 
WHIRLPOOL AUTOMATIC WASHER z $229.95 Brand ‘New 1956 ADMIRAL 10 ™ : re oon roe 4 a at 

fs cu. fF. UPRIGHT | $] 69 4 hes 
> FREEZER ‘4 
prone $189.95 Brend New 1954 KFL 
$179.95 Brond New 1956 _— ee $126 | $299.95 trond New BCA WwHiel 
. & butter keeper 


CROSLEY 72)-Series TY $119 $359 95 Brond 

$249.95 Brand New FRIGIDAIRE 10 cu. ft. © 
os gh greed $114 $349.95 Grond New 1956 VINATOR ELECTRIC DRYER $107 
ADMIRAL 2)-Series TY $126 ; ad a 1986 yr — $183 

* $279.95 New DEEPFREEZE 1 49 3 


VORNADO: 2 $99.26 


Reversib'e 


i a 
_errPrPrPPePeeeeeeee.,memermcermemcermermermcermerermermermerereeererereeee eee eee 


i 
i 


Regular $17.95 


. ue eure TOASTER 
eres, S99 
tram grt te en 


Regular $17.95 


G.E. AUTO SKILLET 


oe, 


breeh ta" 12 
: 


New 
PHILC >) .See TV Ze w temperatur 
Cersoje Mode “y ~ sagan por ne a * $186 ee gy segs $166 
5) 68 00 frend New ov 
pode! MAKE 2!\-Sertes TY 3-WAY COME. yt AUTOMATIC WASHER 

Teble w/AM-FM redie and $259 w time line control $144 
$169.95 Brand Mew 1954 ; 
. : REFRIGERATOR w/hydrator $ ps 
59098 trend New 1956 MOTOROLA 2i-Series TY = @OTT | $499.95 Brand New 1956 BEND Key & door shelves 

. WASHER .ORYER 
age MAKE 17-Series TV S77 $169.95 Brand New OCA COMBINATION $296 | Z $279. 95 Brond New G E. 10 cv. 

= Mece 
’ REFRIGERATOR w/door shelves $7 68 | 

Ebery Teble Mode! PHILCO . 2)-Series TV | 
517925 trend New 1956 Console Medel $157 oe wow MOSSE BLS. $ $1 4 fe 
Teble Mode! 24-Senes TY 3-WAY COME. $277 $2739.95 Grend New FRIGID. $137 8 cu. CHEST FREEZER 
$199.95 Grend New 19% w/ AMF radio & Phone AIRE AUTOMATIC WASHER , $199.95 New NORGE 8 cu. fF. 
FAMOUS MAKE 21-Series TY $95 $289.95 Grond New BCA $219.95 trend New NORGE $115 
Teo'e Mocel , aatons Dever 


frend New 1954 MAYTAG 
$139.93 trend New 1954 AUTOMATIC 


ZENITH 17-Series TY $105 WASHER 
ae a ree get a $229.95 Brand New NORGE ELEC. 
New 729.95 Ne BENOIX AUTO. 1c ORYER w ilhuew: peted 

BRAND 2!-Series TY 3.WAY $179 poet WASHER $118 time-line Control 
COME. wo redie & prere $139.95 New ~ = wRinG. $349 95 Brand New 1956 mCA 
S197 95 Grend Mew 1954 PHILCO ER WASHER with pene $ 69 aaicane ta ed $217 
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SOCIETY 
TV-RADIO 


COMICS 


WEDNESDAY, JULY 11, 1956 ety 


THE SLEEPING FRENCHMAN—Tuckered 
out after a 2000-mile cross-country tour of 
the United States, Maurice Caucheteux 
from France, goes to sleep beneath his hat 
shortly after arriving in McLean yesterday 


Ball Photos by Bob Burchette 
where he is a guest during his Washington 
visit. Looking on is Turid Smedberg, left, 
of Sweden. Both are American Field Serv- 
ice foreign exchange students 


Thayer's Tell-A-Seope 


Shell Be Brazil’s Best Bet 


By Mary Van Rensselaer Thayer 
WE PREDICT that the new Brazilian 


Ambassadress will be the most popular 
diplomatic lady m Washington—at least, 
as far as Congress and Congressmen are 
concerned. Due here 
next week, she's Al- 
zira Vargas Peixoto, 
daughter of Brazil's 
late President Var- 
gas, and as smart as 
her famous father. 
Back in 1953, when 
Alzizra and her hus- 
band, “Ernani Do, 
then governor of Rio 
de Janeiro province, 
were visiting the 
capital, they dined at —_. cee 
the White House with the Elisenhowers, 
Senora Peixoto was seated next to the 
President. During dinner, Mr. Eisenhower, 
in a genial mood, asked her what Brazil 
needed from the United States. Economic 
aid, a loan, was surely the answer Ike 
expected. Instead, Vargas’ bright little girl, 
in a spontaneous gesture, threw her arms 
wide and sighed “LOOOOVE"! So it's easy 
to see why the Brazilian Ambassador's 
lady will be very popular indeed up on the 
Hill! 


TTS INDIA’S LOSS that Ambassador 
John Sherman Cooper has decided to re- 
turn to national politics and run for the 
late Alben Barkley’s Senate seat down in 
Kentucky. It's a United States hostess loss, 
too, because Lorraine Rowan Cooper has 
done such a wonderful job as Ambassadress. 


In scarcely more than a she re- 
decorated the drab Embassy charmingly. 
trained a perfect domestié staff, planned 
entertaining so efficiently that in her ab- 


year, 


sence from New Delhi (this is the second 
time the Coopers have returned to Wash- 
ington this year) every detail concerning 
Americans at the recent coronation in 
Nepal ticked off like clockwork. The Em- 
bassy Fourth of July party was managed 
down to the ultimate sandwich. Besides 
these triumphs on the domestic front, Mrs. 
Cooper, whe possesses tremendous chic, 
made a great personal hit with Nehru. 
She's politically shrewd and has the adtied 
bonus, handy when presiding over an Em- 
bassy, of speaking perfect French, Italian 
and Russian. She was to have met the 
Indian statesman and his daughter, Mra. 
Ghandi, when they arrived and would have 
done much to have made their visit here 
agreeable. ... With election time so close, 
the Coopers will not return to India. They 
came here on a quick turn-around, merely 
for Ambassador Cooper to undergo a minor 
operation. So now their possessions, in- 
cluding most of their clothes, are still in 
New Delhi. It will be quite a problem to 
get them packed and returned . Lor- 
raine, who married the one-time Senator 
some eighteen months ago, was the former 
Mrs. Rowan Shevlin. She hails from Calli- 
fornia, moved to Washington nine years 
ago and owns a delightful federal house 
on N st. which she purchased from the 
Benjamin Thorons. She's rented it to fel- 
low Califofnians, the State Department's 
Legal Counsel and Mrs. Herman Phfleger. 


Mrs. Stengel Took 
Chance on Box 13 


By Millicent Benner 


IF SHE was a believer in 
signs, Mrs. Casey Stengel 
might have had some {fore- 


warning about the outcome of not to be 


should always be on time for | 
games,” she smiled 
fair to the paying customers 


“It isnt 


Studying 
All of Us 


CROSS - COUNTRY CHA- 
PEAUS—Showing off the sou- 
venir hats they picked up in a 
three4weeks, 2000-mile, cross- 
country tour of the United 
States are these four foreign 
exchange students (in the pic- 
ture above, right) who ar 
rived yesterday for a four- 
day visit in the Capital. They 
are, from left, Oya Demirtas, 
Turkey; Erik Svarrer, Swe 
den; Bilgin Kaftanoglu, Tur- 
key; and Maurice Rennotte, 
Belgium. 


Perle’s Story 
Hits TV Screens 
In the Fall 

NEW YORK, July 10 & 


Columbia broadcasting sys 
tem said today it had ac. 


quired the.rights to the life | 
story of Perle Mesta, former | 
Minister to Luxembourg, for 


a TV show. 


The story of Mrs. Mesta’s | 
career as industrialist, Anan- | 
cier, politician, diplomat.and | 


Washington hostess, will be 
presented on “Playhouse 90.” 
a weekly 90-minute dramatic 
series scheduled to begin in 
the fall on Thursday from 
9:30 p. m. to 11 (EST). 


Mrs. Mesta said the money | 


will be used, in part, to sub- 


sidize the foreign college stu- | 


dents she has brought to the 
United States 
An actress will play the role 


of Mrs. Mesta, but the former | 
minifter will appear as her- | 


self in the final scenes 


—_ 


Thousands 
of Shoes 
Reduced 


& 

A ‘. 
AUTOGRAPSS FREOM AROUND THE WORLD—Synneve 
Voliset of Norway didn't have to go around the world to get 
autographs from different countries She just passed around 
her autograph hound among a group of the 653 foreign ex- 


~ 


Pa wh bea eh) | 


change students from 25 countries, who arrived here yester- 
day for a visit. Here, Graham Pope of England adds his 


pame at a convenient spot, 


yesterday's All-Star game. 

But the wife of the famous 
New York manager, who likes 
to be on the winning side and 
usually is, ignored the num- 
ber 13 on her box at Griffith 
Stadium yesterday, crossed 
her fingers as usual and 
hoped for victory. 

It never came. Casey and 
his American League team 
went down to defeat. But Mrs. 
Stengel, who usually takes a 
backseat when it comes to 
baseball, was at her husband's 
defense 

“IT don't blame him for los- 
ing.” she said. “He did all he 
could.” 

Mrs. Stengel had arrived at 
the balipark at 11:15 yester- 
day morning. “I think people 


EDNA (or Ed as Casey calls | 
her) met her husband at a | 
ballpark 32 years ago. “I went | 


to the game—my first—with 
some baséball wives and 
Casey was playing center 
field for the Giants. He saw 
me when he was running in 
from the outfield and asked 
to be introduced.” 

A year later they were 
married. Most of the court- 
ship was carried on via 
correspondence, 
Casey was away with the 
team Yhost of the time. He 
even proposed during a long 
distance telephone call, says 
Mrs. Stengel. 

“Everythi-z I know about 


See STENGEL, Page 43 


because | 


5.95 ‘ 
7.95 


Distaff Soviet Leader to Bow in West 


MOSCOW, July 10 #—The 
West this week gets its first 
close look at Katerina Furt- 
seva, the world’s No. 1 woman 
Communist. 

Mrs. Furtseva will head a 
16member delegation on a 
visit to Britain at the invita- 
tion of the British Parlia- 
ment. The group, which in- 
cludes members of the su- 


munist Party group. a su- | 


preme Soviet deputy and a 
candidate member of the 
Communist Party's powerful 
presidium. 


MRS. FURTSEV4A,; who | 


looks much younger than her | 


46 years, took over the post 
as secretary of the Moscow 


L.E. 


Spring A 


ale 


nd Summer Shoes 


~ 


SIZES 1 TO 15 
AAAAAA TO EEE 


Included in the Sale 
Reduced from our own stocks 
» « « thousands of pairs of beau- 
tiful light and dark shoes ... 


many suitable for fell. 


Higher -Priced Shoes 25% ot 
One-Hour Free Parking 


AS SEY coe i2 


Where the Bus Steps af F 


we ve invented a 
new look and feel 


for summer! 


We took a remarkable new fabric— 
looks soft and tweedy, yet is crisp 

and cool (Acetate and rayqn, as never 
seen before on land or sea). Shaped it like 
this — slim, gray, devastatingly easy to 
wear. The bow —a haze of 
organza. 7 to 15... 19.95. 


> 
a 
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eas 
7 


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4 


> WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERA 


Wednesday, July 11, 1956 


ee 


n 


\rriage to Miller 


Will Marilyn Find 
Happiness Now? 


(EDITORS NOTE: Arthur 
Miller recently became the 
third husband of America’s 
most publicized glamor girl 
They. first . while Miller 
was himself still married to 
his first wife. This, the third 
in a series, tells of the cou- 
ple’s previous unsuccessful 
attempts at wedded bliss. 


By Jim Cook 

ARTHUR MILLER'S first 
marriage went on the rocks in 
1951—the same year he met 
Marilyn Monroe.  —s_ 

Friends are quick to say 
that their first encounter had 
nothing whatever to do w'th 
his departure from slim Mary 
Grace Slattery Miller. This 
could be. 

It is true that he remained 
married to Mary Grace five 
years after he met Marilyn 
in Hollywood—until he was 
grented a divorce in Reno 
: last month. 

It is also true that Marilyn 
experienced her own second 
teur of matrimony, to Joe Di- 

, between 1951 and the 
' dime Miller got his divorce. 
' Om the other hand, he was 
the mood to establish a 
buddyship with a y~ 
) ung movie stariet in 
Yoel. the routine of his life 
‘aan unspectacular husband 
end father in Brooklyn no 
longer filled his needs. 

The marriage had grown 
difficult for Mary Grace, too. 

“They simply grew apart, 
emid the marriage started dis- 
integrating in about 1951,” 
one close friend observed. 
“Mary's interests remained in 
the home and children. Ar- 
thur was interested in them, 
too, but he was advancing to 
other things.” 

By 1951, Miller was one of 
the most famous playwrights 
fm the country. He had re- 
cently written his best hits, 
“All My Sons,” and “Death 
| Of @ Salesman.” 


| (WHEN Mary Grace Slattery 
met Miller in the mid-1930s, 
both were struggling against 


poverty in an attempt te get 
through the University of 
Michigan 

In her spare time, she held 
odd ‘obs as a waitress and as 
a secretary in college offices 
Miller had worked for two 
years in a dingy auto parts 
warehouse and lived with his 
family in their twodamily 
frame house on East 34 st. 
Flatbush, to save money for 
his tuition 

When spring vacation came 
in his sophomore year, Miller 
was too broke to attempt «a 
trip home and decided to 
experiment 

“It was the first time I'd 
ever tried to write a play.” 
says Miller. “I wrote all 
three ags in four days—or I 
should say four days and 
nights, for i was young 
then.” 

He took the mafwuscript te 
Prof. Eric Walter. “I blue- 
pencilled parts of it merci- 
lessiy,” Walter recalis, “but 
Miller took it well. He gen- 
erally took criticism well 

After it was polished, this 
first play of Miller's—‘“The 
Grass Still Grows”—won both 
the College's Avery Hopwood 
Prize and the Nation-wide 
Theatre Guild Award 


TWO YEARS after his 
graduation, in 1940. Miller 
and Mary Grace were mar 
ried in the perish house of 
St. James Catholic Church 
in Lakewood, Ohio. The place 
for the ceremony was chosen 
by the bride, who is a Catho- 
lic. 

In the early years of their 
marriage, Mary Grace worked 
as a proofreader at Harper's 
while Miller was getting his 
start as a freelance writer 
They were living in a little 
apartment in Brooklyn 

Once during this period a 
terrible temptation was dan- 
gied in front of the poor Fiat- 
bush boy 

“Arthur came home one 
night and told us he had 
been offered $600 or $700 a 
week to write a soap opera.” 
his sister, actress Joan Cope- 


MAMA PATS A CALA—Tbe former Mar? 
lyn Moenmree. now the bride of playwright 
Arthur Miller. poses with ber father-in-law, 
mocher - us - law, 


Isadore Miller. 


land remembers. “Tt was 
hard te imagme ss Exe 
money 

“Bot Im wot going te do 
nm” Arther told as. TE Ge 
that way.” The family theught 
he was a tile crazy.” the 
sister reGects 

In 1944. a prodwerer decoded 
te put ope of bis pizys oo 

ay. Bot the prodec 

ten of “Ibe Man Whe Had 
All the Leck.” 2 cumbersome 
sery of amp auto mechanic. 
folded in a week 

“Focus.” a2 novel oa the 
theme of amtisetTatzsm c2me 
im 1965. His Critics Circle 
Award wineer, ~All My Sens.” 
came two years ister 

Strikingh 
Cherryi Creeford 
down the chance to stage 
bers next pier. It was “Death 


— 


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bridegroom 
home 


and the 


It is likely that much of his 
mac‘erial for ‘Death of a Sales- 
man” came frem the Slattery 
family. Until be died of a 
beart gttack Il years ago, 
Mary Grace's father had 
spent a lifetime traveling 
ever the state of Ohio selling 
life ins i1Tance 

Behind “Salesman” came 
“The Crucivie.” with witch- 
craft im 17th Century Salem 
a3 ES Overt topic 


MR. AND MES. Arthur 
Miller bad a daughter, Joan 
Eien. im 1994. Then Came a 
som. Robert. in 1948. 

As late as 1950. the Miller 
marriage seemed tranqu!! on 
the surface. Miller's decision 
te diverce Mary Grace and 
marry Marilyn came as a con- 
siderable shock to many of 
theu friends. 

“When I beard about it. I 
bed a heart attack.” said Mrs 
Slattery. “Firemen had to 
come and revive me.” 

it was ebviews that Willers 
trip te Nevada for the divorce 
was made with Mary Grace's 
agreement. © sot her ap 

2! 

The kids spent several days 
with their father and Mari- 
lye just before the marriage. 
Marilyn displayed abundant 
affection for them, and they 
apoeered te think she was a 
good buddy. 


MARILYN'S frst wedding 
came @ iittle less than two 
years after Miller's Grst. She 
wes barely 16 at the time. To 


After a few zgloomy months, 
they seperated and she dli- 
vorred hime im 1946. 
now speek of their marriage 
as of @ were something that 
bappened in another life 

Marilyn's second marriage 
was. 26 much as anything. «a 
manifestation of her old lack 
ef emotional security Joe 
[DiMaggio was the first ap- 
pealing fellow to convince her 
that she was being admired 
for herself 

Ther marriage lasted only 
from January. 1954. until Oc- 
tober. 1964 


MORE than one friend of 
Miller bas found a similarity 
between Mary Grace Slattery 
ana@ Marilyn Monroe. The 
paysiceal structure is con 
ss@erabiy different. Mary 
Grace, 3. is «2 willowy bru 
Bette 

“Bat both women are sim- 
ple. unaffected and quite 
sky.” ome of Miller's Broad- 


| Way associates remarked. 


at Millers 
Miller’s parents still live in Fiat- 
bush. VN. ¥.. where they moved during the 
depression of the ‘Thirties. 


Both | 


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MILLER stands today as 
Americas most widely pro- 
duced playwright. And more 
of his works are in the mak- 
ing. Another play is nearly 
completed, and while he was 
waiting out his recent divoree 
cabin near Keno, he 

rths of a 


in a 


new novel 

The flurry of activity and 
publicity accompanying his 
marriage to Marilyn Monroe 
has forced him to keep 5 
typewriter in case 
last few weeks 

It will be interesting to see 
whether his marriage to one 
of the wor! reable 
ind ef- 
is crea- 


tae 


, 
iis 


1S most des 
any prvi 


Thursday: The influence of 
the depression years on Mil- 
ler’s political thinking. The 
facts behind his links with 
left-wing groups. The evolu- 
tiens of his epinions which 
led him te the witness chair 
before the Heuse Committee 
en Un-American Activities. 


Superstition Party 
Superstitions will run ram- 


pant at the party the Junior | 


Y-Teens of the Bethesda- 


Chevy Chase YWCA Cottage | 
are having at 7:30 p. m. Fri- | 


day, the 13th. Guests will 
bone up on their pet super- 
stition whether it be black 
cats, walking under ladders, 
4-leaf clovers, salt over your 


shoulder or wishing on a new | 


moon. Party information is 
available from the Center Di- 
rector, Marjorie Sumida. 


In the Poconos 


David Bradley of 3105 Mill- 
tary rd. nw. is spending the 
summer at Lenape Village, a 
resort in the Pocono Moun- 
tains, near Tafton, Pa. 


Back Home 


Mrs. C. Sedgwick Moss of 
4614 Yuma st. nw. has re- 
turned home after a two- 
month visit to New Orleans, 
La., and Natchez. Miss. 


| 
Nancye Fleming 


325 South Washington Street 


Alexandria, Virginia 


MID-SUMMER 
SALE 
NOW IN PROGRESS 


OV. 3-3910 


Also: An Attractive 
Selection of Spring 
Coats, Suits, & Dresses 


Hours 9:30 to 5:30 
Thurs. 9:30 to 9:00 


ss 
a Se 


Call RE. 7-1234, ask for Circulation, and order The Wash- 
| ington Post and Times Herald guaranteed home delivery. 


i 


‘TD. 
7 ds 


Sale! One Thousand 
17.98 


14.98 


Summer 


At Both Our Silver Spring and F St. Stores 


Cottons, voiles, eyelets, ginghams, chambrays. . 


solid pastels, br 


selling styles from our top 


dresses, Dbutton-fronts 


WASHINGTON, 
SILVER SPRING, 
BOTH STORES OPEN 


1 
Sizes 7 to 15, 10 to 20, 14% to 24% 
ont and dark shades, prints’ All are best- 


maxers 


, in tailored and dressy versions 


1224 F STREET 
ELLSWORTH DRIVE 
TONIGHT 


19.98 
Dresses 
98 


checks, 


Sheaths, full-skirted 


Girls’ and Pre-Teens’ Summer Clothes 
COST AND LESS! 


JOSEPH R. HARRIS 


AT 


——— 


19.98 Evelet. 11.98 


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can bardly believe your eyes! 


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A Miracle for Diapers, Baby Clothes! Sra-Pur makes diapers and 


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_ 


Town Topics 


Shipboard Party on Chart 


By Marie McNair 

THE S.S. Silverstar, Wash- 
ington's only Bermuda cruise 
ship, was manned last night 
by Mr. and Mrs. Haney 
Davidow and bie cca 
about 400 
uests 

The Davi- 
dowstook 
over the ship 
for a “twih 
light dance,” 
beginning at 
7 and going 
on until after 
midnight 

The Silver- —" ws 
stardidn' Mrs. McNair 
sail last night, but instead 
stayed anchored in the Po- 
tomac at Pier 5 

Music came from aft-deck 
where the ship's orchestra 
played for dancing end Er- 
win Devron with his accor- 
dion was among the strolling 
troubadors during dinner. 


THE RED carpet was 
spread on the wharf for ar- 


riving guests who were asked 
to sign the guest book and 
received a “welcome aboard” 
card from “Pebble and 


- - — 


Harry”; destination: fun and 
frolic.” 


Colorful serpetine stream- 


ers floated from the decks 
and the Silverstar’s blue and 
yellow flags were strung 
broadsides 

Mr. and Mrs. Davidow wel- 
comed their friends in the 
social hall, Mrs. Davidow 
wearing a light blue starched 
lace dress with yellow 
throated white orchids pinned 
to her shoulder. 


THE CAN CAN bar and the 
Grotto cocktail lounge were 
meeting places before dinner. 
|. S&S. Treasurer Ivy Baker 
Priest and her husband Roy, 
joined friends in the Can Can 
room. I saw the Ceylonese 
Ambassador and Lady Gune- 
wardene, the Bolivian Ambas- 
sador and Senora de Andrade, 
Mrs. Dennis Chavez and Mrs. 
James O'Donnell Moran in 
the dining salon, enjoying 
plates of cold turkey and 
roast beef. cold lobster and 
ham, salmon and a green 
salad. 

Others aboard were Engi 
neer Commissioner and Mrs 
Thomas Lane, the Dominican 
Ambassador and Senora de 
Salazar, the Joseph Cascare!- 


las of Baltimore sitting with 
“Manny” and Charlotte Le 
vine; Mrs. Raymond Clapper 
in a long black sheath; Mr. 


and Mrs. Thomas Carson, Mr. 
and Mrs. Arthur Bergman, 
Mr. and Mrs. William H. Dyer 
and the Ray Garritys. 

Mr. and Mrs. John T. Kava- 
naugh came over from Balti- 
more and, dancing on the aft 
deck, were Mr. and Mrs. John 
Davis, Tom Krock, Kay Han- 
son, John Ferry and Ellie 
Loutzenheiser, just back from 
Florida. 


VIRGINIA Warren. daugh- 
ter of Chief Justice and Mrs. 
Earl Warren, was in a group 
that included Mr. and Mrs. 
George Dixon. Mr. and Mrs. 
Philip L. Graham, and Mr 
and Mrs Alfred Friendly 
were among those taking 
their coffee to the promenade 
deck for a view of the new 
moon shining in. a clouded 
blue sky 

Then there were Col. and 
Mrs. Jess Bryan Bennett, Mr 
and Mrs. Samuel Hecht from 
Raltimore: Mme. Viadimir 
Rybar and her son-in-law and 
daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Eman- 
vel Dimitriu 


For Girls Nation President 


— 


Carlson, Morgan Nominated 


By Elizabeth Shelton 


NO SMOKE, but much ex- 
citement filled the rooms of 
American University’s Hurst 
Hall last night as the Na- 
tionalst and Federalist par- 
ties of the Girls Nation se- 
lected their presidential nomi- 
nees 

Ann Morgan, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Mor- 
gan of Marion, IL, was-se- 
lected on the lith ballot to 
lead the Federalist platform 
She was chosen over Jovce 
Ann Huges of Minneapolis, 
Minn 

Emotion reached a high 
Pitch during the ballotme 
and a tie between the two 
candidates was broken by 
ehanging from a two-thirds 
vote to a simple majority. 


A PERSISTENT tie in the 
Nationalists’ balloting. like 
wise, Was finally broken when 
a majority vote was taken on 
the fifth ballot. with Donna 
Carison of Minneapolis win- 
ning, 27 to 22, over Marianne 
Magovern, Saratoga Springs, 
4%. 

The Federalists dubbed 
their convention room the 
“hot box.” It was warmed 
both by lack of air condition- 
ing and heated discussion 

The. Nationalists had the 
air-conditioned auditorium 
for their conventioneering. 


DONNA Carlson is one of 
two delegates who have been 
song leaders during the four 
days of Girls Nation 

She is the daughter of 
Minneapolis alderman, Clif- 
ford Carison, operator of a 
retailing clothing store, and 
Mrs. Carlson 

“I feel kind of lifeless,” 
Donna said upon winning the 
nomination. 

The Federalist nominee's 
comment was, “this is very 
unexpected.” 


BOTH WILL campaign to- 
day for a platform contain- 
ing equal rights for women 
Both also have planks aimed 
at combating communism 
and for preserving natural 
resources 

The Nationalists also have 
a Federal aid to education 
plank in their platform, deal- 
ing with institutions beyond 
high school. Another is aimed 


at the older generation in | 


advocating vocational guid- 
ance for adults. A “fun” 
plank asks for Capitol pages 
for official Girls Nation's es- 
corts. 

The Federalist Party has a 


Engaged 


CHARLOTTE FRIEL 
—DAVID H. CASE JR. 

Mr. and Mrs. Norris R. Friel 
of Camp Springs, Md., an- 


nounce the engagement of | 


their daughter. Charlotte Eu- 
genia, to David H. Case Jr., 
son of Mr. and Mrs. David H. 
Case Sr. of Baltimore, Md. 


MARGARET A. HUTTON 
—DENNITS H. SHEIRY 

Mr. and Mrs. Archie L. Hut- 
ton announce the engage- 
ment of their daughter, Mar- 
garet Ann, to Dennis Henry 
Sheiry, son of Mrs. Doris 
Sheiry. A November wedding 
is planned. 


Advertisement 


— 


“No secret — but a 
fact 
of life? 


How true that 
some facts of life 
seem like secrets! 
Then, one day, we 
learn that women 
like Mrs. Hersh- 
field follow the 
proper methed of 
yes ve with a fountain svringe, 
using an effective yet safe solution, 
like ZONITE. ZONITE is an effectiwe 
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Costs pennies per douche. 

’ 


plank establishing “Girls 
United Nations.” 

Girls Nation election will 
take place tonight after an 


> a “> > 


address by Katie Louchheim, 
director of Womens Activi- 
ties. Democratic National 
Committee. 


42 were Fe ye 


By Dick Darcer. Staff Photoeraepher 


NOMINEES for president of Girls Nation are Donna Carl 
son (left) and Ann Morgan. They were chosen by their 


respective anmmin last Semeneant 


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59 Plastic Quilted Pads . 
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2.98 Beacon Crib Blanket, satin bound ..1.99 7) 
59c Tie-Side Shirts sizes, 1-2-3-4 39 | 
1.99 Nylon Sun Suit . 
3% Knit Wash Cloths (2 in pkg)... 
2.25 Sani Sheet (27x36) wetproof 
3.98 Plastic Bath Tub 

39%¢ Socks & Anklets, 4 to 102 

49c Flannel lap Pads 

79¢ Receiving 
3.95 Diaper Pail, White Enamel 
1.29 . 69¢ Crepe Gowns and Wrappers . 
1.29 Towel and Wash Cloth Set 
3.98 3-oc. Sweater Set—Nylon 
2.99 Nylon Diaper Set, hand-made 
39%¢ Knit Training Panties 
4.00 Chrome Feeding Hot Plate 


97x27 986c Hand-Made Diaper Shirt ... 
7% Rubber Sheets, 18x27 
1.49 Knit Gowns and Kimonos 


Free 8x10 Photograph with Purchase of $s or 
More. 


SALE 
..4 for $1 
3 ter $1) 


TY 1.00 


Blankets 


TENNIS SHOES & SANDALS 


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DEPOSIT WILL HOLD YOUR PURCHAS 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


veer W ednesday, 


July 11, 1956 43 


She’s Casey's Fan 


STENGEL, From Page 41 


baseball I learned after my 
marriage,” she says. She 
never misses a home game. 
She always sits in the same 
boxseat to the left of the 
Yankee’ dugout and says she 
pays little attention to Casey 
during the game. 

She doesn't keep score or 
fill up on hot dogs and pop- 
corn either. “I follow the 
games better if I don't,” she 
c~plains. 


AFTER @very game, she 
says she and Casey talk 
things over “casually” like a 
couple of fans.” Edna says 
Casey's a “genius,” and do- 
ing the right thing at the 
right time “comes easy” for 
him. 

Both Edna and Casey are 
5 feet 7 inches tall. Edna says 
she’s taller in heels but 
wouldn't be if Casey “would 
stand up straight.” 

The Stengels enjoy enter- 


By Wally McNamee Staff Photographer taining at their Essex House 
apartment in Manhattan. 


MRS. CASEY STENGEL Edna's favorite party pas 
. she ignored the sign time is _to bring out the 


Stengel scrapbook which 
she keeps up to date with 
articles on Casey. There are 
as many that are uncompli- 
mentary as complimentary, 
she says. “They make good 
reading.” 

Does she think the Yan- 
kees. will win the American 
League pennant this year? 
“I'm hoping so,” she smiles. 

What does she think Mickey 


Mantle’s chances are of break - 


ing Babe Ruth's home run 


jrecord? She pauses, thinks 


over the question, answers it 
would be “nice” if Mantle 
succeeded, then says, “I'd 
rather le. Casey do the 


— 


Party Spells Fun 

A “Midsummer Night's 
Madness’ party will open the 
summer social season of the 
Young Members Group of the 


English-Speaking Union. at 
8:30 p. m. on Saturday, July 
14, at 320 2d st. se. 


VODKA.COLLINS 


the greatest nome in VODKA 
80 & 100 Proof. Dist. from grain. Ste. Plarre 
Smirnoft Fis. (Div. of Heubiein), Hartford, Conn, 


TROYLINGS 
FERNCRAFTS 


regularly 12.95 to 14.95 


STRATFORDS 


regularly 8.95 to 10.95 


Selby Styl-EEZ 


regularly 10.95 to 12.95 


regularly 16.95 & 17.95 
14th and G Streets only 


9: 


85 


6:*5 


% 85 
Women’s FLORSHEIMS 12°°° 


SELECTED GROUPS ALSO REDUCED 


WOMEN’S CASUALS, reg. 6.95 to 10.95 


4.85 & 6.85 


CHILDREN’S DISCONTINUED SUMMER SHOES 


Half Price! White, pastels, reg. 5.95 to 7.95 


2.99 & 3.99 


7th & K, Clarendon, Silver Spring only 


SUMMER HANDBAGS, reg. 5.00 to 10.95 


LADY LUXURY DARK SEAM 
SUMMER SHEER NYLONS, reg. 1.35 


ine. 


1207 F 

*4483 CONN. 
ALEXANDRIA, VA. 
CLARENDON, VA. 


7th & K 
"3113 14th 


3.85 & 3.85 


pr. 74: 


6 pairs 4.40 


N 


14th & G 
*SILVER SPRING, MD. 


*Open 9:30 to 9 daily 


Open 9:30 to 9 Thurs., Fri 
Open 9:30 to 9 Mon., Thurs. Fri. 


' 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
_ 44 Wednesday, July 11, 1996 


Luscious, PLUMP 
° 


Keep in Trim 


Aim to Lose Ecce Fat Only 


By Ida Jean Kain 


THE BRITISH have an expression, “Lose fat, not flesh.” 
In short, aim to lose excess fat only. 

Many of you are writing to ask about the “revolutionary” 
new low protein diet widely publicized in a national maga- 
zine. Research proves that when the 
protein tn the diet is inadequate to 
maintain the protein integrity of the 
body, weight loss will be greater— 
but health, vigor and looks wil! be 
impaired. 

The faster rate of weight loss is 
due to the tearing down of the vital 
body tissues along with fatty tissue. 

Protein is the number one need 
of body cells, for every cell has pro- 
tein as its structure. In the adult, 
the chief function of protein is up- 

Ida Jean Kain keep and repair of body tissues. 
Fuel can be used from any source—sugar and starch. fats 
and protein—but repair material comes only from protein 
foods. 

THE FIRST rule of a safe reducing diet is to include 
adequate protein and by adequate is meant approximately 
one gram of protein for each two pounds of ideal body 
weight. 

For am easy way to calculate, each of the following con- 
tains roughly 7 grams of high value protein: 1 egg, 1 glass 
milk; 1 ounce cheese or cottage cheese: 1 ounce lean meat. 
fish or fowl. The daily minimum requirement is 60 grams 
for women, 70 grams for men 

THINK of your body as your personal house which you 
wish to keep in a fine state of repair for the better part of 
a century, and make sure you eat the foods which furnish 
the materials necessary to repair and servicing. 

Never let anyone sell you on the notion of reducing on low 
protein fare. Protein heads the list of “keeping young” 
nutrients. 

When the diet fails to include adequate protein, the elas- 
ticity of the skin is diminished—you will look and feel 
older. 

For effective tissue building, a high value protein should 
be included at each of the three daily meals. That's the 
“keeping young” and vigorous way to reduce. 


Voeduard Lethiop 


Where courtesy end quality ere traditienel 


Weight Whittling 


For Mr. and Mrs. 
Breakfast 


Tomato juice, 4 ozs.. with lemon —_— 
*Fried egg, slimming style 

Mr.—strip bacon, lean 
Toast, 1 thin slice 
Se FR, Sch de coe oc cobmebe cotese oben 
Coffee, black . 


* Fry egg in “% tsp. butter or mar- 
garine in heavy skillet. Cook very 
slowly. 


LINCOLN furniture 


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Sodauae ‘a ' Netionally Famous 
Sleep Products 


SIMMONS e SERTA @ ENGLANDER 
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SOFA BEDS, MATTRESSES, ROLL-AWAY BEDS 

Ges SLEEP CHAIRS, KING-SIZE BEDS, ETC. 


Thurs. 9 te 9—Daily 9 te 6 AiR 
rge Accounts Invited CONDITIONED 


Luncheon 


For Mrs. 

Open-face meat-loaf sandwich—broil 
1% slices meat loaf 
1 thin slice bread 

Sliced tomato 

Glass of skim milk or buttermilk 


For Mr. 
Lean ham and Swiss cheese on 

2 slices rye bread (mustard—no butter) 
Glass of milk . 
Coffee, if desired 


s &| 88 


4:30 pickup. Fresh fruit or orange juice.6 on. 8 


Dinner 

Broiled chicken 
Mrs.—Drumstick and thigh . 
Mr.—Drumstick and thigh plus wing. 

Broccoli : 
With melted cheese (% oz.) 

Wax beans, liberal serving 

Bread, 1 thin slice 

Butter, % pat be 

Grilled grapefruit with 1 tbsp brown sugar 
Or—other fruit 

Iced coffee or tea 


+ 


SuUSEEsa 


Engagements 


MARJORIE MENOHER 
—HAROLD SUTTON JR. 


Mr. and Mrs. Paul Eiwin 
Menoher of Paradise, Calif... 
anfounce the engagement of | 
their caughter, Marjorie Ann, 
to Dr. Harold Griffith Sutton | 
Jr.. son of Mr. and Mrs. H.G. | 
Sutton of Chevy Chase, Md. | 
Miss Menoher attended River- 


side College and was gradu- 
ated from the University of 
Califormia at Berkeley. She is | 
nuw pediatric die.ician at the 
University of Michigan Hos 


ployed »y Zimmer and Fran- 
cescon in Moline. A fall wed- 
ding is planned. 


~ 


Total calortes for day 1040 


i 


Ceorriaht. 1994. Kime Peetures Gradicrete ice 


-_—_- 


Residing in Washington Residing in Bethesda 


SUMMERTIME, and the livin’ is easy . 


Mr. and Mrs. William Bond 
Roberts are now residing in 
Washington following their 
June wedding. Mrs. Roberts, 
the former Ruth Armeda 


Mr. and Mrs. George Doug- 
ee gga ule he 
Bethesda, 


pital, Ann Arbor. Her fiance 
is a graduate of Amherst Col- 
lege and the George Wash- 
ington University School of 
Medicine. He is now a resi- 
dent im surgery at the Uni- 


with this short, cool, easy to manage 
Cut and set from 6.00 


Beauty ” | ee 


605 14th St. N.W. RE. 


versity of Michigan Hospital. 


BARBARA SUE SMITH 
~—ROBERT K. HOLDEMAN | 
Lt. Col. Kent H. Smith, USA, 
and Mrs. Smith of Alexandria. 
Va. ammounce the engage 
ment of their daughter, Bar- | 
bara Sue, to Robert K. Hoide- 
Pell are now residing in man, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ver- 
Washington following their non L. Holdeman of Moline, 
——- June wedding. Mrs Pell. the Ill Miss Smith is a graduate 
former R. Paula Platt. isthe of Mary Washington College 
Gaughter of Mr. and Mrs and is now attending Lehigh | 
Albert H. Platt. Her husband University. Her fiance is a 
is the son of Mr. and Mrs graduate of the University of 
Edward Pell Cincinnati and is now em- 


va Apthwop 


Bhere courtesy sad euatity ere traditional 


Carroll, is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Ivan 
Carroll of Republic, Pa. Her 
husband is the son of Mrs. 


Harriet B. Roberts. He is & 
graduate of Wharton School, 
University of Pennsylvania, Mr 
and the Georgetown Univer- 
sity Law School. 


tore Hours 9 to 6-—Thursday 9 to 9I—Open All Day Saturda 


It’s Very Evident 


that Washington Women like 
and Appreciate REAL BARGAINS! 


CLEARANCE 7 


OVER 3150 Pairs 
This Spring & Summer 


summer hair-do. 


. and Mrs. Gordon J 
7-4303 


——— eo 


Women’s Shoes 


junior figures find 
cool control in seamless 


SILF SKIN 
GIRDLES 


For active sports, Silf Skin tallies a 
_ high score. Full-fashioned seamless 
elastic briefs and girdles. They even 
go swimming with you. White in 
small to large. Detachable garters. 
Featured: elastic ruffle brief, 5.00 


Above: longer leg pantie girdle. 
14” length, 5.00 
15” length, 5.95 
Other styles, in nylon, 5.95 to 7.50 


W4&L—Junior Lingerie, 4th Floor 
. » also Chevy Chase and Alexandria 
t~—~Use This Coupon to Order by Mail-—7 


. Woodward & Lothrop 
Y Washington, D. C., I. 7-5300 
For Silf Skin Girdles, call extension 528. 


6” ss -? 


WERE 10.95 to 21.95 


The Best Yardstick by which to determine the Success or Failure 
of a merchandising event of this kind IS THE RESPONSE BY 
THE WOMEN SHOPPERS WHO REALLY KNOW THEIR VALUES. Over 
the years, this store has always stood four-square for sound footwear values, 
modern, authentic styles and painstaking, expert Fitting Service. 


All Your Old Favorites in Reliable Footwear 
e Rice-O’Neill e¢ The Station Wagon Group 
e Cantilever-Ground Gripper e Anzella 
e Tweedies 


In this Mid-Summer Clearance you will find ALL SIZES IN THE ENTIRE 
GROUP—4 to 12, AAAAA to C—but not in each make. Special racks have 
been provided, for easy selections of size, color, make and style. 

All Sales Final—No €.0.D.'s, No Refunds or Exchanges 


ne Since /878 >| 
=. Mantsberrgs 


One How 
Free 
Parking 


BLUE GRASS 
SPECIAL 


by Elizabeth Arden 


2m 


2.98 Flewer Mist with 
180 dusting powder 


3.58 Flower Mist with 3” 
158 dusting powder 

Clouds of this favorite fra- 
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prices, too. 

Please add 10% Federsi tex. ~ 


W£L—Coemeticse. tof Floor 
~ lee Chevy Chase end Alexandris 


EXTRA SHOPPING HOURS AT WOODWARD & LOTHROP 
WASHINGTON: se, te. # 2nd 6 tm 1, termes 7 5000 
Manders and Veonday, 10 te ®, other vant dom, 9.20 te 6 


Successor to Ed Beam 
52) llth St. N.W. Just Below F 


CHEVY CHASE: weceses ond Warten tn. Cw «0 
amenter Vhenter fate 9 He 8 te weet ter FO 


ALEXANDRIA: 695 test Weshiegres Steest, King 1008 
"Manders, Thontom, Faom, 930 950, ether wach dae. 9.0 % 6 


7 


‘ | : | ’ 


- 


My Fair Lady’ Steps Out in Style, Takes Fashion Spotlight 


. SS - : 
interesting neck and shoulder News 
details. Suits are predomi- 2G, 
nantly slim-skirted with anes 16 10:78 


By Evelyn Hayes 

NEW YORK, July 10—"My 
Fair Lady” is not only the 
smash hit of New York's 
theater season. It has ob- 
viously SCOT ganes 
ed in New 
Yorks fash- } 
mon season 
for fall 

From a 
fashion 
stan dpoint, 
{ 
’ 
| 


Harrison and Julie Andrews.” 


Set in 1912, Beaton’s costumes 
incorporate almost every new 
trend for fall. Indeed they 
seemed to have moved from 
the show on West Sist st. to 
the showrooms on 7th ave. in 
their entirety. 

Perhaps the most memo- 


rable scene in this play is the 
Ascot scene in which the girls 
are all dressed in gowns of 
the period done in black and 
white. It is said that the wom- 
en of that year did go to <As- 
cot in black and white, this 
being the year after Edward 
VII died and they were, con- 
sequentiy, observing  half- 
mourning in their dress 
Whatever the feason. this 
scene reminds anew that 
there’s nothing more strik 
ingly beautiful than the play 
of black on white 

Here were’ ite la. tunics 
over long tarered black 
skirts, skirts that were draped 
and wrapped and slit vay up 
to there, skirts of tiers, hob- 
ble skirts. All with the 
graceful bodices with high 
wrapped wiistlines. 


IN THE beautiful gowns in 
the ballroom scene you see 
the prototype of many of this 
fall's lovely evening gowns. 


Here are the exquisite soft 
pastels of the period blended 
in heartcatching gentleness 
and beauty. Here are the love- 
ly soft fabrics — often di- 
aphanous—graciously draped 
with the high-wrapped bod. 
ices that were so typical of 
those years. 


GRACE AND femininity 
are the twin keynotes to the 
look of clothes for fall. In 
dresses, the sheath is still 
predominant, but is no long 
er the rigid-looking severe 
sheath of last year. Many de- 
tails soften the line of this 
fall's sheath, not the least 
of which are the many 
wrapped and tied effects 
seen everywhere. 

Wide sashes and crushed 
bands, often heightening the 
waistline, add to the soft 
grace of the look as do the 
bloused effects and general 
use of drapery 

Soft bows and. drawstrings 


Show Proves Housework Can Be 


ATLANTIC CITY, N. J.. 
July 10 (INS)—The latest 
housewares are designed to 
make the homemaker more 
comfortable when she works, 
plays and rests 

Some 580 manufacturers 
are currently displaying their 


-_- oo . -— 


Honors for Oldest Member 


The Louisa Adams Chap- 
ter, D. C. DAR, will meet 
tonight to honor its oldest 
Mrs. William A. 
(haflee, whose 102d birth- 
day will be celebrated this 
week. The chapter members 
will meet et 3851 Legation 
st. nw... home of Mrs. Brink- 
ley E. Callicott, Mrs. Chaf- 
fee's daughter. 


member, 


housewares at the 25th. and 
biggest national housewares 
manufacturers exhibit at At- 
lantic City. And many of the 
100,000 iterhs are designed to 
make life around the house 
more comfy and-cozy. 

If you've got cold feet, then 
there's one new item that's 
literally made for you—an 
electric blanket with a built- 
in foot warmer. 

This operates by’ using 
separate wiring for the bot- 
tom two feet of the Blanket. 
The special wiring heats the 
lower haif of the bianket 
seven degrees warmer than 
the top. 


ADDED WORK comfort is 
provided by a carpet sweeper 
which features a switch for 
adjusting the height 


—_ -_-— — 


front wheel for thick or thin 
pile rugs 

Part of being comfortable is 
living in a pleasant atmos. 
phere and the housewares 
makers have come up with 
some items to prettify the 
home 

There's an artificial fire- 
place log affair, for instance, 
which looks as though the 
“flame” is leaping up out of 


also soften the fashion line. 
At Nettle Rosenstein, for ex- 
ample, they show a dark gray 
jersey with a high soft bodice 
arranged ‘via a drawstring 
under the bosom—the effect 
suggestive of Kate Green- 
away 

There had 
black dresses, 
Rosenstein’s name always 
having heen synonymous 
with the “little black dress.” 
One soft black silk had a 
side-draped skirt caught un- 
der the hem in a harem 
pouff, another had soft fan- 
folds falling from the 
waistline in back. 


several 
here, Nettie 


to be 


More formal was a group | 
of “black pearls” with slen- | 


der skirts draped to large 
poufs at one side of the back. 
Most dramatic 
“vampire”—so called because 
of back panels which spread 
wide like wings when open, 


high 


was tne | 


or fall softly over the skirt 


when closed. 


THE DIOR collection this 
morning made news in that 
there was no whisper of “fair 
lady” in any of the commen 
tary on the clothes. Neo. 
ciassic is the look they talk 
about with emphasis on the 
“epee look”—the rapier-like 
clean cut slender lines of the 
fencing sword 

High waist-lines are fea 
tured here too, with many 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


W ednesday, July 11, 1956 i 


= 
5 


jackets that often have collars 
that stand 
neck and some 
effects subtly 
through belts, 

Many jackets are blouse- 
backed 

4 couple of suits with box- 
pleated skirts looked interest- 
ing in a season when suits 
almost invariably have 
straight skirts. 


away from the 
high-waisted 
achieved 


PERIODIC PAIN 


’ 


Comfy 


The “flame” reflects 
whole fireplace, 


the logs 
against 
giving it a rosy, realistic glow. 
their part in 
the good-looking-t hroug h- 
, new one 
transparent 


Clocks 


La 
has a 
gold 


The works of these electric 
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wits id si isting in this paper 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


46 Wednesday, July 11, 1956 


Mary Haworth’s Mail 


Mr. Big Lets His Hair Down 


DEAR MARY HAWORTH: 
My boss comes to our com- 
pamy dances alone, when his 
wife is ill or out-of-town. And 
he @oesn't 
ug® drop in, A 
to show good 
wihl bat 
st@ye the 
whele eve. 
ning, dance 
ing vigorous- 
ly and rather 
showing off, 
trying to be 
young and 


Mary Haworth 


mom of being unfettered. I 
ca understand why, as his 
w is a good dancer and 


th seem quite happy to- 
ge r 
© boss seems to lose his 


dig@@ity and decorum on these 
on and dances with 
z abandon with the young 
wotmen, including me (his 
secretary). He will dance 
with me more than once in 
turm, much to my husband's 
anmeyance, who has said to 
me confidentially: “Why isn't 
he loyal to his wife, instead 
of making a foo] of himself 
wit® all this hilarity’” 


OTHER MEN and women 
m open comments, behind 
his)Pack, and the men seem 
ratBer embarrassed by him 
They laugh self consciously 
an@ scowl when he dances 
wit® their wives. Once whet 
he didn't come to a dances 
several of the men remarke 
(in dancing with me 
was a relief. that 
could all relax 

Still we all like 
fact I guess it is beca 
like him and his wife 


that 


now 


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feel dismayed about this one 
Some- 
seem 
we) he- 
some- 


aspect of his behavior 
how it just doesn't 
right. Am I (or are 
ing unfair in sensing 
thing amiss, and feeling curi 
ous? 
for over two years and know 
him rather well 
overstepping to tell 
what people are saying’ 
- 2 
sent 


DEAR K. F.: You've 


two letters in’ the same mail 
one hand- 
written, the other typed, each 


on this subject. 


telling much the same story 


of your employer's Peter Pan 
behavior at certain company 
isn t 


wife 
ms a puz 


when his 
And each 


dances 
present. 


zier; not as regards the boss's 
vigorous prancing, the mean- 


ing of which seems fairly ob 
vious: but rather. on 
score of your really 
emotional! 
performance 


But 


possibly it is 


(good or bad) 
fellow workers 
explains your 
sense of 
rasment, both as partners to, 
and witness of, Mr. Big’s gai 
loping dispia' of vitality on 
the dance floor, when he 
in solo.—and spends 
Il sup 
nor 
good 
either 
, eh 
conspicuous hav 
a ball, cutting a rug w 
young women employees at 


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| have worked for him 


Would I be 
him 


the 
undue 
concern about his 


natural 
for a conscientious secretary 
to feel emotionally identified, 
for better or worse. with her 
employer's popularity rating 
in the eyes of 
Perhaps this 

unconscious 
spotlighted embar- 


psychology 


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CONVERSATIONS 


and what does a man do to make 
his jacket hang better ... he 
pads his shoulders, of course ... 


The ideal Sarterial Form Simply Doesn't Exist... 


or. is so rare 
doesn't 
to broaden the 
achieve the p 
male fashion 
anatomies 


but 


that fer practical purposes it 
It's standard operating procedure 
shoulders 
roportons 
ignored by 
The distaff side finds 


with padding to 
handed down by 
most male 
itself in 


the same anomalous position. 


The 
is just 


Lean, 
not 


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for the fashionably 
So, be happy! 
perfect figure 


Thin-to-the-Bone 
mutually compatible with the 


You have the 
And. fortunately, these days 


Vegue Sithouette 


It's perfectly natural 


thin to be flatchested 


basis for a 


it’s a lot easier to add curves than it is to 


subtract them 


The padded bra today is an 


accepted part of the fashion silhouette. And 
what wonderful padded bras there are! 


They are Natural-Leoking, 
Centowr of the Wearer’ 


Proportioned te the 
They're cool, wash 


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for evening decolletages, for day wear, for 


after-five 


in every fabric, from every 


one of your favorite makers. One of the 
most popular is Peter Pan's “Treasurette,” 
pin money member of the Hidden Treasure 
family at 2.50, in cotton broadcloth with a 
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See it. and dozens of other famous- 
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THE HECHT CO. 


Washington, Silver Spring & PARKingtos 


4 


office parties when his wife 
can't be present. But as I get 
the picture, he isn't being 
slyly disloyal to his wife at 
such times. Indeed it occurs 
to me that she may contrive 
to send him aione to these 
dances occasionally. just to 
give him an unfettered” 
feeling in relation to her 


AS FOR the significance of 
his cavorting, no doubt it is 
very innocent: It is my guess 
that he hadn't much chance 
at youthful pleasures when 
he was young, anc now feels 
impelled to make up for lost 
time He probably slaved 
his way to the top. and look- 
ing beck, would like to in- 
clude and good fellow 
ship, and gayhearted friend 
ship with women, in his suc- 
cess repertory 

»omehow it doesn’t seem 
right, you say; but perhaps 
inappropriate” is the word 
you mean. Mr. Big’s “hair 
down” capering after office 
hours jolts the staff's real 
respect for him, a respect 
based on working knowledge 
of his sound capabilities on 
the job, I suppose. You are 
discuncerted by the contrast 
between certain mature, 
versus certain immature, 
aspects of his character, it 
seem 
My advice is, don't try to fit 
persons into grooves in your 
‘thinking. Observe them as 

try to understand them 
ne a Husvbody 
shortcomings. 


M.H 


fun 


a Seate 
If the cut of his jib shows a bulge neath his bib 
When he dons soup and fish for a spree 
Best attribute the failure to tailor, not rib, 
Or home for the evening you'll be 
Console him, condole that some unskillful wretch 
Has destroyed the fine line of his* torso: 
And pray that some day there'll be jackets that stretch 
To accommodate torsos grown morso 


Ellen Wise 


= 
| 


Advertisement Advertisement 


Anne’s 
Tradin 2g 
Post 


A TRIP by train might be 
a vacation to road-weary driv- 
ers Dut to mothers of young 
children holds terrors un- 
known. Can you help these 
wondering women? 

“An urgent request! Will 
some kind reader please give 
me some suggestions for 
traveling with an 8month- 
old baby? I am leaving soon 
for the West and 
would especially appreciate 
any advice concerning the 
water and milk supply on a 
train. Is there much variety 
in the water as you travel 
across the country? Is one 
brand of whole milk similar 
to another? Is it a good idea 
to travel in a bedroom or 
compartment as opposed to a 
coach or Pullman? 

Traveling Mother. 


DOUBLE TROUBLE 

HOW DOES one amuse a 
2%-yearold son anda > 
month-old daughter on a two- 
day train ride to the West 
Coast? We've made the trip 
with one, but what about 
two? Mrs. lL. W. F. 


GENEALOGY 
TO N. E. | 


Loast, 


who wanted 
information on genealogy: 
Contact the Congressional 
Library, Genealogy Room, 
either in person or by mail. 
I have received help this way. 
B. Z 

I SUGGEST 
Maryland 


you try the 
Historical Society, 
201 W. Monument st. Balti- 
more, and the Maryland 
Room of the Baltimore Public 
Library Zack Spratt. 


GREEN NOODLES 


2 eggs slightly beaten 
1 teaspoon salt 
% cup sieved spinach 
2 cups flour 
3 tablespoons butter 
2 cups medium cream 

Dash paprika 

Dash nutmeg 

“% cup grated Parmesan 

cheese 

Combine eggs, salt and 
spinach. Stir in flour grad- 
ually, mix until smooth. Turn 
out on floured board and 
knead well. Divide dough and 
roll each half out on well 
floured board into very thin 
sheets. Cover with towel and 
let stand 20 minutes. Sprinkle 
dough with flour. Roll up and 
cut into strips about % inch 
wide. Toss apart and allow to 
dry. They may be stored in a 
covered jar 

Drop noodles into boiling 
salted water and cook 10 min- 
utes or until tender. Drain 
Cook lightly in butter: add 
cream, paprika, nutmeg and 
2 tablespoons flour mixed 
with a little cold water. Cook 
until smooth and creamy, stir- 
ring gently, Season with salt 
Put in buttered baking dish 
and sprinkle with cheese 
Bake at 425 deg. for 10 min- 
utes or until lightly brown 

Mrs. D. B 


THANKS to Faye Siegel, 
Mrs. J. A. Gallant, Mrs. 
Henry A. Herz, Mrs. Alex 
Perrin and Mrs. K. K. B. who 
answered this request. 


Sew for September 


More than 135 prizes, rang- 


-ing from savings bonds, sew- 


ing and washing mdchines to 
sewing accessories, will be 
distributed to home sewers 


who stitch up school ward- | 


robes judged best in a con- 
test sponsored by Parents’ 
Magazine. The contest runs 
from July 1 to Sept. 30 
.and entries will be judged on 


| the basis of photographs of | 
| children modeling clothes cut | 


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Women: Marines ‘Train 


It is back into uniform for 
approximately 30 Women 
Marine Reservists in 
metropolitan area who left 
Saturday night for two weeks 
of summer training at Camp 
Lejeune, N. C. 

Members of the Women's 
Disbursing Platoon, 13th Inf 
Bn., they were led by Ist 


the . 


y Ae 
WIL-K ILL 


WATER BUG 
DEATH 


lA. Grace A. Overholser, 
who resides at 2005 N. Fair- 
fax drive, Arlington. 

The platoon, only organized 
women’s reserve unit of its 
type in the metropolitan area, 
has several openings for 
women between the ages of 
18 and 36 years. It meets 
every Tuesday night at the 


Naval Gun Factory. 


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TIPPY STRINGER’S 
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JIM SIMPSON’S 
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~------------------------}--- 


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ARLINGTON 
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INGA’S 
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Radio & Television 


Lot of Physical Action 
On the Spiritual Cireuit 


By John Crosby 


RELIGION HAS always ! though he was unquestion- 

been a highly salable com. | ably part of the bunch that 
both in the movies. won ae ty armed robbery 

preceding it 
il B. DeMille has After a bit of vigorous 
cou sleuthing, the rabbi managed 
for to Save the young man from 
the electric chair. However. 
before this laudable accom- 
plishment, there was a good 
deal of tough hoodlum talk, 
some activity with a switch 
blade, and a shooting of a 
cop—none of them activities 
of a specially pleasant or 
spiritual nature 

One of the forthcoming 
dramas is about a Baptist 
minister who :muggles bibles 
through the Iron Curtain 
That should give you some 
idea of the sort of plots that 
occupy the attention of 
“Crossroads.” none of them 
likely to cause any conver- 
sions in the home audience, 
or even to cause much souwl- 
searching. The reason is that, 
in spite of their high-minded 
aims, they are pretty routine 
dramas with some painfully 
ordinary writing. Some good 
actors, including Paul Kelly, 
Luther Adler, Pat O’Brien, 
Vincent Price, Arthur Franz 
and Richard Denning, have 
struggied manfully with the 
roles of ministers, rabbis and 
priests on the program, but, 
possibly because of the limita- 
tions of the material. I have 
yet to see anything I'd call a 
memorable performance. 


ANOTHER NEW ABC-TV 
adventure series is “Combat 
Sergeant,” tales of the second 
World War, which just pre- 
cedes “Crossroads” (ABC, 
WMAL-TV, 8 p. m., Fridays). 
spiritual affairs of the parish The stories so far have been 
have also to be pretty good | confined to action in North 
orivate eves. lawyers and Africa, and the tales range 
even cloak-and-dagger intelli from run-of-mill war stuff to 
gence operatives. The em- | S0me Wildly implausible ad- 
phasis is likely to fall on their | ventures which will probably 
adventurous activities rather | MTitate a great many veterans 
than their spiritual ones of North Africa 
though, of course, there’s a However, what 
good deal of that, too peries apart 
used the old 


Qn od ty 


where 2 


the television | 
not been blind 
appy mixture of box 
and uplift, but no one 
has ever managed a TV re- 
is program that has 
ed the people to flock to 
as they have to the book- 
stores or to the movies’. One 


of the most spirited attempts 
so far has been ABC-TV's 
“Crossroads” (ABC, WMAL- 
8:30 p. m., Fridays) which 
won a number of prizes, 

I think, for high pur- 

rather than achieve- 


have 


roads” is a frankly 
rcial series based. ac- 
ng to the narrator, on 
stories of the adventures 
ministers and rab- 
If vow see two or three 

hem, you're likely to come 
with the impression 

that the men of the cloth. in 
addition to conducting the 


Pere 


sets this 
somebody really 
bean here—are 
AS AN EXAMPLE of the actual war shots which make 
sort of thing the clerics run up a large part of 
into. a recent one concerned gram. You see those old Lock 
a rabbi who is giving spiritual need twin | fighters, Nazi 
comfort to a young man Messerschmitt even 
doomed to the chair for mur- dive had 
der It is the rabbis convic- me collector's items long 
tion that the young man ore the war ended 
didn’t do the actual killing, ' Pi. *, ine 


the pro 


and 


omobpers which 


night 
WFAN «10065 


lp. m—WTOP.TYV. Theater 
of Stars: A young man runs 
into trouble when he returns 
to his home town. 

3p. m—WMAL-TV. After- 
noon Film Festival: Anne 
Crawford stars in “It's Hard 
ta Be Good.” An ex-army offi- 
cer’s efforts to do good end in 
his involvement with crooked 
politicians 

3 p. m—WRC-TY. Matinee 
Theater (COLOR): John Bara- 
grey and Frances Reid co-star 
in “Marriage by the Mil 
lions.” \ woman marriage 
counselor finds she cant 
manage her own marriage 

7 p. m—WTTG. Long John 
Silver: Long John (Robert 
Newton) plans a big surprise 
for Purity on her birthday. 

7:30 p. m—WMAL.-TYV. Dis- 
neyland: “When Knighthood 
Was in Flower” stars Glynis 
Johns and Richard Todd in 
the story of Anne Tudor and 
Charles Brandon. Part I. 

7:30 p. m.—WTTG. Federal 
Men: The Department of In- 
ternal Revenue learns that a 
“poor” junk man is actually a 
loan shark who lends money 
at high rates of interest. 

8 p. m—WTTG. The Eve 
ning Movie: Ralph Forbes 
stars in “Phantom Broad- 
cast.” When a singer is killed, 
the fact that his accompanist 
fiid his singing for him is re- 
vealed 

8:30 p. m—WRC-TV. Fa 
ther Knows Best: Kathy An- 
derson gets a magic set and 
feels endowed with super- 
natural powers 

5 p. m—WTOP-TY. The 
Millionaire \ white-collar 
worker desperately in debt 
receives a check for $1,000, 
000 

9 p. m—WMAL.TV. Screen 
Director's Playhouse: Linda 
Darnell stars in “White Corr? 
dors.” A tourist sees a hom? 
cide in a London hospital 


-_- —- —— 


' 


ee 


|Televiston Preview 


8 p. m—WRC-TV. Kraft 
TV Theater: John Ericson 
protrays a clerk in a store 
who is enticed by a pretty 
stranger to take her to lunch. 
In his absence the store is 
held up and the owner killed. 
“The Long Arm” also fea- 
tures Elizabeth Montgomery 
and Phyllis Love 

9:30 p. m—WTOP.TV. I've 
Got a Secret: Guest is Pier 
Angeli. 

9:30 p. m—WMAL.-TY. 
Eddy Arnold Show: Singing 
star Anita Ellis is guest 

10 p. m—WTTG. Unco' 
ered: A wealthy young lady 
never returns from her blind 
date in “Stranger In Town.” 

10 p. m—WRC-TV. This Is 
Your Life: The life of Mack 
Sennett, “The King of Com- 
edy.” is presented. 

10 p. m—WTOP-TYV. The 
20th Century-Fox Hour: Thel- 
ma Ritter and Gene Lockhart 
co-star in “Christopher 
Bean.” A English country 
doctor and his housekeeper 
discover that their boarder, 
now on the brink of death, is 
a great painter. 

10 p. m—WMAL-TV. Box- 
ing: Eddie Machen vs. Nino 
Valdex, ten rounds, heavy- 
weights. 

10:30 p. m—WRC-TV. The 
Ina Ray Hutton Show: Miss 
Hutton’s guest is Yma Sumac, 
the Latin-American singer 
with the remarkable vocal 
range 

11:15 p. m—WTOP.TV. The 
Late Show: Edward G. Robin- 
son and Ruth Warrick star in 
“Mr. Winkle Goes to War.” 
An ex-bank clerk passes his 
physical and goes off to war 

11:20 p. m.—WMAL-TYV. 
The Nicht Show: Linda Dar- 
nell and Greg McClure star 
in “The Great John L.,” the 
story of the rise and fall of 
the great boxing champion 


FM Stations 


| WRC-FM ‘95.5 me.)—8:30 « 


|wror. PM (06.3 me)—6:90 a @. te 2 


wase. PM «97.1 me. 9 a. 


> 


| wou. via $3.7 me.b—7? «& @& 


=e.) 5 « @& 


=m t I 


te @ld- 


“se? & @ 


woes r™ 


= te 10 — iM 


we sT. r™ 

~~ 

whtat FM (1607.5 me.)—<6 a. am. te 12°50 
> mm. 


101.1 me)—7 «a. @. tb 
SFM 


(106.8 me.)—7:30 « 


OTHER STANDARD STATIONS 


GMSs—570 ke. - te 
: Rd ke \ Dartichs Onty* 


’ 
theorized te eperate stnusp 


.—1840 te—S «o. mm te ! 
AM 


te | 
midnient 


| WPGC—1580 ue. -—Dariis 


| WINKR—1600 ke. —Daviizht Oniy* 


te sendewn. 


Programs printed here conform to tnformation 
furnished oY stations at time of ere 


(106.5 me.)—6°30 «o@ oe. te 
(106.1 me.)—3:808 «0 mm. te 7 
=m. te © 


Shoes 
Belafont’s gitter player is con- 
victed 
icotics rap) Belafonte can't use 
him in New 
llaw prohibits it 
\crat becomes Prez Mr. Truman 
will be the new Secy. of State 


‘name 
|author Nat Hiken (owner of the 
| program) 


: 


| 
i 


i OSe. 


Phil will read the small print. 


| Sherwood (she Sher-Did'): 


Walter Winchell 


..- OF NEW YORK 
Man About Town 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
vherten Wednesday, July 11, 1956 


Rae Bourbon (father of two sons), who recently became a 
has a 10-karat engagement ring from his 
sepiember groom-to-be. The scion of a rich Dallas family .. . 
Leslie Crane, a 
| Wonderful”) 
to California to try and forget pjay, 
him 

actress, 
i\Pertwee are melting 
merge 
will marry NBC 
ithe Belle of El Morocco Satdee 
lat 2:30 a. m 
mamboing and yelled their glee 
as she showed the experts How 


female (via surgery), 


mode|l M, ho 


has flown* 


lovely 
Carter, 


hoped to wed Jack 


“Orpheus,” 
Valerie French, film 
and author Michael! 
He'll re- 
Nanette Fabray (who 
this week) was 


permit her 
5 months 
film 

(prexy of U 


to do it 
on B'way 
Col. Boris 

Ss. Vv 


oniv Z 


The crowd stopped 


Room at Hampshire House. 


It Should Be Kim Smith, a click in 


(Wow'!) 


Done Without 
If Harry 


phoned Eduardo 
gem king 
night. To come 
with scads of bagels and 
from the Stage delly ... 
Mullins of “Fanny” 
"Mrs. Bert Smollet 
erite) July 15th 


in Philly Altman, 


(on the nara- 
York. Our cabaret 
If a Demo- 


. Phil Silvers cannot use the 
“Set. Bilko” unless 
permits. Next time 
Description of Roberta 
She 
Who 


charges... 


Sings For The Lovers 


old Jill 
British 
; 


Melford. 
actor Jack 


dghtr 


The President plans another Melford 


| talk to the Nation on how he 


|feeis 
| Lady Korda, widow of the film 
producer, is 
David Metcalfe. 
best-manned at the merger of | 
the Duke of Windsor to Wally 


fachin’ 


| 


i\Tennessee Williams has a new 


ee 


Highlights 
On Radio |—— 


= 4 ; 


ght 
— —<=»D oo —_.__ ee —_—— 


_ Wednesday Televis sion Programs 


—1 "ie Men TARO) 
WTTG MAL-TV 


mA ednesda y Radio Programs 


“"WWOC (MS) | WTOP (CBs) | 
AM 1260 __|AM 1500 FM 96.3 


Claude 


(CBs) wre (NBC) 
_TWTOP.TV 9 MM 107.3/AM 980 FM 93.9) 


oe — me 
G 

Will seaum : 
Jr 6.6. Captain 
Kan gareo 


0 Little "Rascals Sien On: Thousht Mark Evans Show 


Breakfast C) uma! 
th 6 Ras — Bart oon a Glub 


Cc 
ithiAl noes iEncore-Gallaher 
Brown Open . 
wae 


30 he mper 
y -45 Romper 
oe Dit ne pone gen 
pe 


ri Stepier 
tory) Veekday: McBride Fred spe éirey Show 
Veekdar red ank Parker 


iNew Weekdar Frans —s Fisk isters 
Weekaar ‘Pred Fiske 


Mave 
oe certs & A Jimma) Weck ay 
45 


Weenday Pr : 
nae! Fe ie : Weekday > / 
00 News aust c lpatte gar 


Hig>ie Btudney 
3 rt tty A 
Cen: rt Cay 


~h, 


as ernie oorene . Kaleiée ae iia’ ea Arthar Goedtrey 


ma} * id oecope ” ripus Godtrey 
wu néow Co Hibur Ma 
n e Fr of int erest' ne trike It 


subjects 


— : “Tate 
— =" r ‘eet = wi mh Ea <= ag 
ee oa ach’ with Ee” _ (Our Gal Sunday 
ered ae 
e a.cone 
30 Town & Catry| Date in 
Jimmy Dear 


IChub 1360 Read of Li » 
Pre 4 iske Aunt Jenn 

News: Clud 1260 (|youns Dr 
Pre a Fiske®! ul es Light 


Washinetor| 


sre 
t Entert’nment 


ouse Part 
en Me Linke letter 
Mark | 
‘ vans Show! 
lark eam 
8 

Rob Dalton 

Bho 


00 Matinee Tr ee Ladi es ‘Be Seated | Afternc 
’ es Be Seat ed Fi 
; Matinee Fees Tea Time Theater 
45 Matinee hea tea Time Theater 
00 Gueen for a Yes day « : 

5 DavySecret Storm Film 
for Dayle Be Announced jAftert 

Romancesio Be Announced | _ 

omedcy Time amo Bersion Mic 

; rt Lamb 

la & Beaesion M cre 

Ann Sotherntamd:; New 

A 00 Pootlight Thea Looney Tunes 

+; Pootlight ri 


The 
m Pestiva 
M SM Sten feekday 
ord Doctor’ s Wite 
trong Wom in My House Club 
(music en ro 
Jimma Journey Inte 


New: Tort 


| 
10 Queen 


ack Rownzile 
Road News oe 
uaes Pan Am 
We ormick ro Woilt 
240 Band 
Bandstand 
Ww 


re 
‘& Simm = wT 

ton | Ra. News 

Mickey site 
wees 
Cc K 
vantry 5:30 ' Spe ig 
AUS? iD. ‘Edwards. 
Ramar of 


Wea ous 
Lowell Thomas 
[Ames “rn An 
Music Ha’! 
ime Crosb 
Edwa ara R \eurrow 
Eady Arnold Show 

Joan Hager 


ht 
News 
ve Jungle Coffin eg "Baxi er! 
Bandstand 
___Fiicks Bandstand 
Arthur Godfr ey 


Arthur Godfre) 


pas News Car avan 


reas 
1s Conference 
0 Father 
ows 


' est Ra) ph Porbe 
06 Krai: t Theat er Th . Ever ne Movic 
+ re! 


z “Th e i 0 
; 


a Ross Tris 

. News meet * ; 
Re re or 

Fi ad Con te 


how Best of Groucho 
Guests Groucho Mars 


. Music 
0 Purple veered “A 
alga shes 
ont 4 oo 


ring is 
le Machen (News 
sb. yaides 


» Bon Jeep 
bane Dellar 
7 p28 Ocorge 


o--— - 


peajone 


ng New Orleans : 


ob Dalton Bhow 
| 0 SOT Eis Your, ‘ 


a ye . 
AY round To a Pootstens 


Oane 
pen 


4 


Ed Walker) House 


) : 

Sine Rea The 

$3 ‘tuts Lion Show! The Hunter 
Wews nPres giNews Peal ul ama |News: os 

1A w o fat iran Wea 

- TT? - .* 


m 
a 
S Co 


od. 


oe 
S5Ow 
+> 


iJ an 
Music Nigh’ vere. Beagnep 
Music Inspiratics i-6 L. 


NTER-CITY TV INC PENN TV CO. 


5] 50 ® Sets fixed in your home 


LU. 4- 6600 


Robinson 
h parr ck 


it to 
Late Bho San 


mA, AS YOUR 
KODAK DEALER 
IN SILVER aid 
we send ai 
KODACHROME PROCESSING 
to Fastman Kodak 
CAMERAS INC. 
8567 Georgia Ave. 


TV SERVICE 
DAY and NIGHT wtiis 
ARLINGTON $] .50 
HOME CALLS 


PLUS LABOR AND PARTS 
| AIMCO TY SERVICE 
JAckson 8-7800 


® Servicing D. C. and Md. 


fit for « king is 
served in king-size 
portions at 

Duke Zeibert's! 


(Newspapers and tv)... (CW Professor Given 


stead y-dating 


| Medal by Foundation 
His fadder | : 


Languages 
forcign 


Romance 
Elaine Aiken is no longer to 
for Tony Perkins. Her 


newy is Mark Damon 


viser 


city, 

the Eloy Ajiiaro 

Foundation 
Deibert 


| who has 
|foreign students at GW 
1931. received the Eloy 
| Medal in recognition 
iwork Eloy Alfaro was 
esident of Ecuador 


of 


11:30 a.m—WTOP. Kathy 
Godfrey Show Bishop J 
Waskond Pickett tells how 
Christianity has been helpful 
to the peoples of India and 
Pakistan 

1:15 p.m.— WWDC. Fred 
Fiske: Lawrence Welk's al 
bum “Say It With Music.” 

3:15 p. m.—WRC. Weekday: 
Wilma Soss, President of the 
Federation of Women Share- 
holders in American Busi- 
ness, discusses “Women and 
Money.” 

6 p.m.—WDON and WASH.- 
FM. In the Concert Hall 
Bizet, L’Ariesienne Suites 
Nos. 1 and 2; Gluck, Act ‘II | @leover you brectiless! 
of Orpheus and Eurydice * 

73 p.m—WGMS. Master- 
works: Stravinsky, the Sacri- e 


fice, from Rite of Spring: 
Rogers, Soliloquy for Flute the grestest name la VODKA 
80 & 100 Proof. Dist. from grain. Ste. Pierre 


and Strings. 

$:05 p.m.— WGMS. Smirnoft Fis. (Div. of Heublein), Hartford, Cona. 
phony Hall: Chausson, Sym- 
phony in B Fiat; Liszt, Hun- 
garian Fantasy in E Minor; 
Strauss, Mail Express Polka. 

8:38 p.m.—WTOP. Sus- 
pense (new time): “Want Ad” 
tells the story of one man's 
deadly way of earning a liv- 
ing by a newspaper, a tele- 
phone and a weapon 

8:30 p.m—WRC. Recollec- 
tions at Thirty: Recorded ex- 
cerpts from pre-1938 broad- 
casts 

9:05 p.m.—WTOP. My Son 

A 10-mile canoe trip 

Allison and his son 
proves to be a test of man 
against the elements 

10:05 p.m—WMAL. B ox- 
ing: Eddie Machen vs. Nino 
Valdes, 10 rounds, heavy- 
weights. 

10:05 p.m—WGMS. Music 
Room: Handel, Passacaglia 
for Violin and viola: Leclair, 
Sonata for Violin: Lalo. Au- 
bade from the King of Us 

10:38 p.m—WWDC. Gang- 
busters: The case history of 
one of the Nation's most 
fabulous mail thieves is dram- 
atized. 


VODKA TONIC 


Sym- 


My father 
used to take 


me to 


Harvey's 


That's 
what 
my kids 


will say. 


Let's go to 


v 


Air-Conditioned Restaurant 
1107 Cennecticut Avenue 
Next te The Mayflower 

Our 98th vear—and 
better than ever! 


PE Tae OE ae 
RENT a 
LARGE SCREENS 

CUT-RATE RENTAL CO. «| 
DI. 7-5941 


hrs. 9:30—9:00 P.M. 


FOAM RUBBER 


any type or quantity fer Mat- 
tresses, Furniture, Bolsters, Cush- 
ions, Benches, Boats, Autos, etc. 
Buy direct at Washington's 
foam rubber warehouse 
Latex Foam Products Co. 


The Feam 
807 H St NW. District 70587 


30 AM py - DIAL 1500 BROADCAST HOUSE 


WTOP RADIO 


ZEIBERT’S 
RESTAURANT 

1730 L ST., N.W. 

Twe deers West of Cone Ave 
Reservetions STerling 3-17230 
Opte ‘h/ Madani gnt . Suedey mite m. 


Deli ghtivily Aw Conrduiened 


a 


a - — 


BELMONT 
TELEVISION 


SERVICE 
NO. 7-3111 


2414 14ST.N.W. 


HALVES OF 


CASHEWS 


HALF « 
49 POUND 
Planters 


PEANUT 49° LY. 


CANDY me Ane a 
MR. NUT 10° 


PEANUT TRAY 


=e > Me i Oe Sn Ein Si 4 Bn Ga 


Complete 
Lamp Repair Service 


© Rewiring-Mounting 
@ Drilling 
© Replacement Parts 


Lamp & Shade Center 


Lad 1010 F ST. N.W. 


(Oppesite Weedward & Lethres) 


705 15th ST. N.W, 


(Betwees G A N. Y. Ave.) 


(“Mr. 


for Magnani. 
tealizing the strain it is for her 
in the English language) he'll 
or 
Then a 
Burns 
itamin Corp.) 
and model Rosalie Vernon pre- 
fer the corners of the Fountain 


sum- 
mer stock at Litchfield (Conn.), 
the 
in the middie of the 
up next morn 
lox 
Molly 
becomes 
(Westchest- 

Anti-De- 
famation League exec. A. For- 
ster will testify for the Gov't. 
in the probe of the Fund for the 
Republic's TV-H'wood blacklist 


| Ty Power is rushing 23-year- 
of 


Alan T. Deibert, professor of 
and ad 
students at 
George Washington Univer- 
has received a medal from 
Internationa! 


advised 

since 
Alfaro 
his 
twice 


| Enjoy full length top Fo 
m=} films with top stars —™ 
- six nights a week 


TONIGHT: 


Edward G. Robinson 
Ruth Warrick 


‘Mr: Winkle 
Goes to War’”’ 


A shy, retiring bank clerk receives his 
droft notice and, to everyone's surprise, 
passes his physicol! 


WTOP-TYV 


o! Broodcos! 


House 


I} bom Sores Gg eninge & Soy 


EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORY] 


Scheels taterested te edverticing t thie directory are 
The Pest Scheel Department. REpubiice 1-134, Extension 551. 


ABC Shorthand 
EMPLE SCHOOL e4 1908 


Learn te write 90 te 100 rés & minute im siz 
‘Si2 weekly) or 12 weeks eve. session ‘sé wkiy.) 


py row Rg A 


Air Cenditioned isc8 GC Rt. NW. 
NAWUena! 86-3258 


weeks Cay seenion 
Typing tncleded. 


Accountancy and Financial Administration 


ENJ AMIN, FRANKLIN UNIVERSITY 
ang ening courses is rie aod financts) sdmints- 

to BCA and MCS aoe bes ~ i tralnitt> 

Ze accounti ne and eaditing mesiions—ternis edvance- 
ment te executye positiems requi o Py m accounting. 
lav. finance. and taxat EE or CPA examinations AD- 
prowed for Veterans Ask for 50th Year Book. Applications new being 


ted for Fs jase 
16th 8. RE. 17-2663 


OUTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY S088 @ Streed H.W. 


Centrally located. evening classes, co-educational, = nable retes 
friendly experienced instructors Course of study inc) eee L. * phases 
Administration B.C B.—M.C 8B. 
view Course Bpecia) students ate 
Veterans approved. Write er call for 


vay 
10 


accep 
1100 x4 


RB 
Piexibie programs. 
catalog. Enroll now 


TRAYER COLLEGE OF ACCOUNTANCY 


Thirteenth and F Btoente LW. NAtional &-1747 
Professiona! BC - and MCS. ere conferred, raining 
programs Accounting and PA ra- 

Time rea’ ri ired . year és 3 ana 4-year evening programs. 
Apply now. dSegin Sept ember 18 ofr 2 


Beauticians 


HE WASHINGTON, D. C.. BEAUTY ACADEMY 


A profitable and exciting career awaits you Beauty Culture 
Migh lifetime earings for men end women. * entrance fer 
ioe Bet. NW Air Cenditiened ST. 3-1087 


Beauty Culture 


ARELYNN BEAUTY COLLEGE ,,, 22. 3,5)."-9 
LEARN BEAUTY CULTURE LOPERATORS JIN GREAT Me Distries 1-1763 


Business and Secretarial 


OYD’S SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 


EPRESHER and INTEN eqinn.tf 
ypewriting, Com ie ni etrie calculators 
ing English. Book keep ing hate inting 
RAPID pr 
Graduates 
VED “or 


AP 
ls veteran bimeell. New es starting. 
. ae Et 


TRAYER COLLEGE of Secretarial Training 


Thirteenth and F Streets 8.1748 
Open all the summer, new classes twice each month. 6- a . ate 
Shorthand and Typewriting for college students; refresher 
and speed building classes, teen-age typewriting in specisl summer 
classes. Gecretaryship with choice of four programs: Executive, Legal 
Medica! and Private. Visitors welcome without appointments. 


Z| LE SCHOOL Ahir Conditioned 
VE CO 


Temple Specializes in INTENSITV URSES 

in 10 weeks 2) Ss Cpertbené » 5 sa . 

(3) Typing =e vidua ve auent: (4) enotype 

(5) Brushup clases Pigs Day or Eve.: nen New 


= _ “. nN... 
Howard's 
wi ‘- rth TH ‘ 
Vocabulary bulld- 
to 1 time. 


achedules 


Feended 1905 


“Business Machines” 


EMPLE SCHOOL 


+ J vi 
nigh 


Feuended 19066 
Als Conditioned. 
sy. short courses. 3 te 6 weeks , 
PUNCH “Temple is «ohiy echesl wi 
COMPTOM n. Pees 

aie , F nieht end $10 weekly in Gar 


1338 G 


~-- A Die” 
tration vlus & 


Drafting 
—— TECHNICAL INSTITUTE Air Conaitioncs 
Verment Ave. ot © Mt. 5.W ME. 8-s6ne | 
Day or Eventng—Start New—AR SBranches—<Sth Year—Veterse Approved 


ge rige TECHNICAL SCHOOL ‘35 "3: 


32-09% 
Complete Mechanical Drefting 6 WEEKS FEVENIN 
McLaugh Co 


Oo course. 
Inetr sectors Individual teaching. 
rial nethods 


_ Wednesday, 6-59 FM 


> 
on oy 


wer naw 
‘“OLUMBIA TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 
( ME. 8-5676 or 5677 Verment Ave. ot © &t. NOW 
Shert Koecialiced Evening Units—Start Sept. 11—Veteran Appreved—46th Yr. 


Languages 


ONVERSATIONAL ENGLISH 
A For adults from foreign count Private lessons 
the Jarvis School Bureau Rates upon request 


& DUPONT C 
AD. 4-06 
neanatend 


Le 
bt 


Radio Engineering 
ILUMBIA TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 
&-5476 ef 8677 


4th Year Ave. at & Ww ME. ‘ 
Short Eve. Shep- MA Cour oe OF otort Sent. 17~—Vet. Aoo'é 


‘APITOL RADIO ENGINEERING INSTITUTE 


Accredited Technical pnatetate Cerricels 
seta 16th @t.. NW Cerner Park Re 

EVEN! NG CLASSES now forming (start at once: 
Electronics. Engineering ye qn Te! oie on 
clalized college level courses > ate 


Study Courses 


Secretarial and Court Reporting 
TENOTYPE INSTITUTE wow ets oh 


MACHINE SHORTHA 
write 60 te 300 wp. 


receives «6 

pon thee fee 

HAND BCHOOL— 

road coma age ey ig ghey ory 


EMPLE SCHOOL i 


aay yh earn mory than 


ove b ae =. goons 


I home delivery. 


. 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
48 Wednesday, July 11, 1956 


“ROYAL TYPEWRITERS 


% Magic Margin & 
59850 


Automatic Tabulation 
SALES @ REMTALS @ REPAIRS p 


= 2019 14th St. N.W. 


' FULL KEYBOARD 


EPIANOS: 
6 MONTHLY AND UP 


Plus Hauling Charges 


STORY & CLARK GEORGE STECK 
CHICKERING § MASON & HAMLIN 
HM. CABLE WINTER STEINWAY 
WURLITZER HUNTINGTON STIEFF 
GRADBURY MUSETTE CABLE-NELSON 


‘te Trade-lns Accepted 
Other Used Machines up 


IW end USED 
Iastruments, olf 
in goed condition. 
Over 100 te cheese 
from. Rental or 
Rental Purchase 


#JORDAN’S©™ 
cx : Wares 
* 


Rb a A eal wats 
~Tith & G Sts. NW. 9332 Ge. Ave., S. S. 5169 Lee Hwy., Ari. 
STerling 3-9400 JUniper 5-1105 Kenmore §-5060 


TYPEWRITERS 
100 Reconditioned 


Machines 


Reg. *79°° & *89°° 
Now being offered for 


ve 195) oF loter models 
(TERS THAT TYPE RIGHT 


District “Office Equipment Co. 


723 11th St. W.W. DIAL ME. 8-1001 
RENTALS (Between G and H) REPAIRS 


Thers. “ti! 9 P.M... Sat. “8 6 P.M. 


WOULD YOU LIKE TO HAVE 


Thicker HAIR? 


Don't fail to consult us no matter how badly your 
hair may look and feel to you. We cannot perform 
miracles but we have produced results beyond expec- 
tations. Dandruff scales never faze us and we've 
brought comforting relief to itching scalps. So let us 
decide whether you actually have a serious hair or 
—ecalp problem. We can tell you in a iiffy. following 
your FREE CONSULTATION and EXAMINATION, 


The Hair and Scalp Clinic has 
30 years’ experience in treating 
all types of hair problems, the 
majority of those vears treating 
local people and thoroughly un- 
derstanding local conditions. 
More Washingtonians have con- 
sulted RAY PLASTERER per- 
sonally than all the other hair 
éxperts combined in the city. 
Dial EX. 3-3832 or EX. 33833 
and make an appointment, if 
possible. Better still, visit the @ 
office of The Hair and Scalp 
Clinic. No advance payment re 
quired, Reasonable fees. 


A 
<< 


Director 


We Use the Exclusive VJIJ Formula 
Phone EX. 3.3832 or EX. 33833 


HAIR AND SCALP CLINIC, INC. 
Suite 203-207 Bond Bidg., 1404 N. Y. Ave. N.W. 
Hours. 9-30 AM. to 7:30 PM.—Saturdays, 930 AM te 4PM 


Portable 


dishwasher 
= o+-In exclusive 


Coppertone 


ag only dishwasher of 
its kind . . . styled in the 
modern trend to fashion. 

» able copper . . . blends 
with any decor! 


-—- 
-_- 
- 


Never touch dishweter egein= 
with this wonderful new Am- 
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o-matic’'! Triple-rinses, 
washes, and dries dishes hy. 
gienically clean, jewel bright! 
it's a big dishw asher—easily 
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in dishwa hes — 


+ aS OT plu 
it 10, connect hose to sink, vod 
the “Roll-o-matic” does the 
rest’ Eatire cycle is automatic 
washes, rinses, dries, turns. 
itself off. Holds full day's 
dishes for average family. 
Costs far less than plumbed. 
in dishwashers—see it today! 


FREE! 


$386® valve set of 
fine Syrecese Chine with 
porchase of “Rell-e-matic’ 


46-piece starter set of famous 
Syracuse China—free with new 
*“Roll-o-matic” | Plus over 6 

months supply of DISH} 
WASHER ALL! 


WASHINGTON WHOLESALERS 


2052 W. VIRGINIA AVE. N.E. 


Phone LA. 6-9100 


And Ask Dick Jenks for the Name of 
Your Nearest Dealer 


“" Gall RE. 7-1234, ask for Circulation, and order The Wash- 


imgton Post and Times Herald guaranteed home delivery. 


; . 


. 


How to 
Keep Well 


By Dr. Theodore R. Van Dellen 


To the limit of space, ques 
tions pertaining to the preven 
tion of disease will be answered 
Personal #eplics will be made 
when return stamped envelope 
is inclosed. Telephone inquiries 
not accepted. Dr. Van Dellen 
will not make diagnoses or pre 
scribe for individual diseases 


VACATION AS YOU LIKE IT 


There.is no substitute for a 
vacation that offers rest, relaxa 
tion, and diversion. In America 
there is no want of a place to 
go we are blessed with thous 
ands of miles of seashore, beau 
tiful lakes, and national forests 
Some prefer the mountains and 
others go to New York, Chi 
cago, or Washington, D. C., for 
their change of scene 

Our Government has set aside! 
180 million acres for forests and 


|State and national parks. These}. 


jareas have accommodations for 
every pocketbook, varying from) 
‘luxurious hotels to comforta 
ble camping sites. A vacation 
in a tent is inexpensive and 
made to order for children 

The youngsters love to rough 
it and enjoy the romance of! 
living as their forefathers or 
Western TV heroes did. Park 
lofficials have eliminated the 
inconveniences of frontier life; 
by making drinking water safe| 
and bathing facilities available. 
But they cannot guarantee the! 
weather and the camper should 
be prepared for a cold or wet 
spell. 

Bring plenty of clothes: they 
can be removed when it is hot 
but you cannot add what you 
ido not have when it is cold 
For more information send 25 
cents to the Superintendent of 
Documents, Washington 25. 
D. C.. for the booklet, “Na- 
tional Forest Vacations.” 

I understand that camps for 
elderly individuals were start 
ed several years ago by the 
Salvation Army. All the camp 
ers are past 60 and they spend 
their time fishing, playing 
games, swimming, and loafing 

Last year we mentioned an-' 
other new trend—the farm va-' 
cation. This unique plan is 
managed by Farm Vacations 
and Holidays, Inc. 500 Fifth 

Avenue, New York. Their bro 
chure is obtainable by inclos- 
ing 25 cents 

This organization has several] 
hundred farmers on the list 
who have agreed to take city 
folk into their homes as pay 
ing guests. The farmer makes 
a little money and the urbanite 
gets a healthful and inexpen- 
‘sive vacation, It satisfies the 
‘farming instinct for those who 
‘have always wanted to work in 
the fields and barnyard. 

But that is only a part of 
the story. The vacationer need 
not take part in farm activities 
He may prefer rural life and 
spend his time wandering about 
nearby communities attending 
auctions, square dances, 
county fairs 

Most farms are within driv- 
ing distance of a golf course or 
ipicnic grounds. The nights are 
iquiet and conducive to rest and 
ifood is good and plentiful 
|\Reservations are needed. 


| TOMORROW. 
comes and goes 


| SPLITTING NAILS 

W. L. writes: I have double 
\toenails. They do not bother 
me except that I run into diffi- 
culty filing and cutting them 
Can you explain this unusual 
condition? 


Hip pain that 


REPLY 
Separation of nails into lay- 
ers is likely to occur when they 
jare dry and Brittle. This may 


and 


DICK TRACY 
> 


SEE? THERE IT 


REX MORGAN 


oe Os 


oe \ ae: 

hte poe ee 

gn? Srey ha) 

“ii PB iry 2 
< e 


STINKY LITTLE 
BLUE RIBBON? 


meg. @ Mer Ae. 
RES? SEE es 


, Tyere’s 
| FOR US TO TALK ABOUT, 
NEIL’ NOW WILL YOU 


Tsu LEAVE?! . 


\ 
rN | 
+ | 4 Sef 


alee Oe ep 


| 
' 


ty wee 


NOTHING MORE 


WERE IN LOVE 


” Ww 
“4 ch 


THEN WHAT YOu 
TOLD DAD WAS 
TRUE --- YOU NEVER 


IM SORRY TO DISILLUSION 
YOU --- BUT THATS RIGHT ! 


“JES O., 


SOW. oO 


~ LONG SAM 


. SORRY, MAC. 
THE OWNER 6 
. DETERMINED a 


oi sy 


— 


—F 
——_ 
— 


i 


te tee .¥) 


tm 
Com | 036 by Un ted Peano byeticnme me 


STEAL HIG CAR | IF ONLY 
I DID WRECK HE COULD 


KID WHICH SIMPLY 


HIS HEAD AT 
ANY 


YOU AINT A CRIMINAL AT HEART. 
NORMAN, NO@ ANYTHING LIKE 
THAT. YOU'RE A GOOO KID. A 


AN’ VANTED TO BE A BiG SHOT 
TD HIS GOIL — AN’ WHICH LOST 
* WHEEL - LIke 


FELL IN LOVE, 


MARY WORTH . }3}”© 


| BONN’SOIR, 6 


OOD NIGHT, 
MiSs LA VOY! IM 
ALREADY LOOKING 
FORWARD TO THE 
NEXT LESSON: 


WALKED OUT! I'M AFRAID 


— 


iT WENT VERY WELL, SUZANNE! 
«-BUT LMSORRY GUY MARCH 


YOU WERE MAKING FUN OF HIM! 


oye}, 


BuT, IN SCHOOL, | 
t ALWAYS 
MAKE JOKES 


WITH THE 
coca, 


ME FELT 


ISN'T ALITTLE 


Boy! 


bey ALL MEN ARE 
4TTLE BOYS. MADAME WORT! 
-EVER SINCE MAMA EVE THAT 
rm : NOWN! 50, TOMORROW. 
THE TEACHER TAKES THE 
PIL AN APPLE ! Oud i 


result from the use of chemi- 
cals or from infection, poor cir- 
culation, or deficient thyroid 
secretion 


STRONG BREATH . 


A. A. M. writes: What causes | 


smell on 
. have to deal with 


a gariic 
breath” 


peoples | 


the public and find this condi- | 


tion quite annoying. 
REPLY 
Garlic. This substance is ab 
sorbed by the blood and elimi- 
nated as a gas through the res- 
piratory passageways 
(Copyright. 1956. Chicece Tribune) 


ee Se rC 


ALL FENCES 


Berrali-Jasper Fence Co. 
Phone HUdson 3-7300 


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ACROSS 


36 Character- 
istic 

7 Hesitant syl- 
lables 

38 Strictly 
domestic 

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sound 

43 Greek lyric 


| 1 Hurried 
5 Potsdam's 
“Sans—” 
10 Wait 
14 Rav State 
feature 
15 Burning 
| erime 
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goddess 
17 Sacred ob- 
| jects: Old 
| Test. 
/18 Mark 
119 Famed flag- 
| maker 47 Little ones 
'20 Pope Pius 50 Oklahoma 
| Kil oil town 
22 Mute 54 Circle 
quality 55 Now: Sp. 
24 Dancer's 57 Actor 
supports Jannings 
‘25 Quickened 58 Musical 
| pace work 
26 Sp. card 59 Was author 
of 
60 Siestas 
61 Man's nick- 
name 
62 English pot- 
35 Time table tery maker 
abbreviation 63 Bird's home 


DOWN 


SRare furs 

6 Perfume 
hase 

7 Land of the 
Free 

8 To force 


46 Security 
given 


games 
129 High repute 
33 Bewail 
'34 Disserta- 
) tions 


1 Porgy 

2 Brazilian 
state 

3 Great work 

4 Goddess of 
marriage 


Solution to Yesterday's 5 “Puzzle 


slolsle MMi Jo lo a [Pie 
a 6G ciale 
ojo] 


. 
’ 


= ireic ie ies iw he ia 


pe 
au) 


fer fae | — fe fae [ae bow |e fae fe 


§8Circultous 36 Encroach 

10 Bishop's cap 39 Heavenly 

11 Mine prod- show 
uct 40 Unsmiling 

12 Saucer 41A grating 

13 To be: Lat. 42 Complaint 

21 Deserted 44 Holiday 

23 Given up march 

26 Midwest 46 Disclosed 
metropolis 47 Mercantile 

27 Deficient place 
creature 48 Prisoner of 

A Its capital Zenda” au- 
is Rangoon thor 

°9 Seafood 49 Defeat 

20 Details 51 Persian poet 

31 Rudiments 52 Prepared 

32 Venture 53 Otherwise 

34 Transport 56 Africa's Rio 
vessel de 


" ol dls 


> ——— 
+ + 


pH - 


: 
; 


SMILIN’ | TACK 


wey OO you TURN 


7 
ore WELL~ ER--Mom-- 7 O1ON'T 


THinN=x YOU LED To HFAe 


IT SWITWED "OC Some MAPPY | 
\ Rock AN ROLL MUGiIC ! _ 


ABOUT TRASIC HINES so~ | | 


SYAMINGA WTO 
SPACE? 


~ DIXIE DUGAN 


ee 


AND BRICK HAVE A 
’ < 


By im Messick 


‘- ee ee 


cy awe. 


’ {TALL ADDS UP To ONE THING 
~MILLY IS IN LOVE WITH WOU 


I was gust Vis THAT ?- 
a7 wos ons * 


oy AN N HONEST FACT! © / EVERY ty TIME, 
bt Bye te FEET +B 


~ BARNEY GOOGLE 


WAAL, GOODY 
JUGHAIO JUST \ WRITE NORE PAW 
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Evenings 
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~ _ 


he section tn @hich veur 
find what veur out- 
: 


is aceeordinge te the stars. 
Wednesday. July ii 


ARCH 21 te APRIL 30 (Artes) 
for the kind 


you Musi 


APRIL 21 to MAY @i ¢ rus)—Don 't 
et others distract _ yeu 


rom <u 

Think josicals and don't be care 

about Geiails. In otmper words. doen't 
in ailves 


pines OY 
71 (Gemini —A 
7 at firet be- 
te comm s 
beep goed order an 
Go take advantasce of every possidic 
opportunity 


) 22 to JULY 23 (‘Cancer)—Mildiy 
fenerous aspects. YOu may Dave 
openipes. so be friend! 

sOubnd advice mony 

ber fellow balf-way will 


LY 24 to AUGUST 23 ¢ 
traction Geviaiioms are 
encies FOP YOU be caret) 
et others divert rou 

a ate th 


an : prea 
| eracious however 


Painful 


AUGUST 24 te & mm 72 
(Virgo:—Well-piaced werds will do won-} 
Gere today You can carve & nt 
personal Riche 

peried. Rumors. } 

ceiving: rely on Enown facts 


pe 
i fou make up rour mind te de x 


ter out careful ‘ 
siowly—Get with haste of! 


23 ,*° DECEMBER 
ne 
. 


come vour ws 
te JANUARY - 
Ss Gays senects af 
*® anc feretpoucht 
Penetite cam be derived from @ 
managed activities 


(Capricorn | 
s hee 


oat vo" con 
yoward restlessness and) 


mN TODAY 


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potent wit @ 
Dun 


1956. King Features. Ine 


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NEED SPACE? 


a 
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TERMS toS yrs. 4" ' * 
Mortgage Loans $995 
EDGAR KEEFER %:° 
RA. 64298 «x JU. 9-6882 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
. W ednasdas, July 1, 1956 49 


BLONDIE 


tf tik 


' . 
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er Rigg o> Co's 


| 2000 K Street N.W. 


Portraits 


By James J. Metcalfe 
No Wonder 


I wonder what I would 
have been... And what I 
would have done... If 
l had pever met you, dear 
.+.» Beneath some moon 
or sun... And as I won- 
der, 1 am glad... Because 
my heart is sure... There 
could have been no other 
love... So likely to 
endure ...I picture other 
creatures, and... Ne 
vision can compare... 
With your good qualiti 
that I...Am fortunate 
to share... How could 
success and happiness... 
Have ever come to me... 
Without your patient guid- 
ance and... Your con- 
stant sympathy? ... How 
could I tell myself today 
... My dreams are coming 
true ... Uniess you had 
returned the lowe -..I 
always had for you” 


Coprright. 1934 Fiels Beter- 
prises. Tec. A’ rietts reserved 


“Whew! This is the hottest dey we've hed in... 
j DENNIS! PUT YOUR oy & onr 


—_ _ 


7-Aa 


wesc 


EEE 


company w « duck call?” 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


AO) 


W ednesday, July 11, 1956 


The DISTRICT LINE by Bin Gold 


Her Master's Voice 
(In Absentia ) 


BEING a lawyer, James B. 
Goding of 7010 Braeburn pil., 
Bethesda lives a well-or- 
dered life in which there is a 
rule and a 
procedure to 
cover practi 
cally ever) 
thing, and 
every body 
respects core 
stituted al- 
thority In 
fact. In this 
yp leasant 
sensibly reg- 

fo of 
———. weg 
just one jarring note — a 
stubborn female named Inky 
who has mighty little regard 
for either Jim or orderly 
procedures 

Inky is the Goding doc. 
She's fat and lazy. and 
terribly insolent. She has 
never been known toe obey 
Jim, but she does tolerate 
him in her own patient 
way. so there has never 
been any real trouble be- 
tween the two. 

Besides. Jim soon discov 
ered that his daughter, Jane, 
had a way with Inky. So 
whenever Jim got tired of 
calling Inky all he had to do 
was say, “Jane, call that 
mutt of yours.” and Inky 
would suddenly appear on 
the double 

As Jane prepared to leave 
for summer camp a few days 
ago. Jims legal mind began 
anticipating the various con- 
tingencies-that lawyers get 
paid for anticipating. “How.” 
he mused, “are we going to 


af 


| at about 1 a m 


Meals 


Yet never rich 


get Inky to mind while Jane 
is gone?” 

In this electronic age, the 
solution to the problem was 
almost automatic. Jim hauled 
out his tape recorder, set up 
the mike in front of Jane. 
and said: “Record all the 
standard commands that one 
uses for a dog.” 

Jane thereupon recorded 
about five minutes of com- 
mands, and the next day de- 
parted for camp. Since 
then, when Jim wants Inky 
he just turns up the volume 
and plays the appropriate 
section of the tape. Inky 
comes bounding heme on 
the fiy,. and you'd have te 
say that the system is work.- 
ing out fine—for everybody 
but Inky. The poor deg is 
going nuts trying te ficure 
out where Jane disappears 
te after she calls him. 

>) 
TODAY'S BIRTHDAYS 

Greetings to Ralph Black, 
John S. Battle, Rep. Clyde 
Doyle and Rep. George M 
Grant. 

ow 
GIVE-AWAYS 

Affectionate young female 
dog: $1 inclosed for Chil- 
dren's Hospital (Columbia 
5-0516 after 6 p. m). Male 
kittens (Union 40047 between 
9 a. m. and 5 p. m 

cos 
PERSONAL NOTES 

L.. T. Samuels, 1610 16th st 
nw.: At intersections which 
have “Stop” signs in addition 
to traffic lights, you are sup- 
posed to obey the light dur- 
ing those hours fit is In Opera- 
tion. and the sign when the 
light is turned off. At some 
intersections the lights 
switch from their usual cycie 
and go inte 
a blinking routine. A bilink- 
ing yellow means “caution.” 
A blinking red means “Stop” 
and the price for failing to 
come to a full stop is $19. 

eo 
THIS IS WASHINGTON 

It was one of those hot 
summer nights, Don Gleason 
reports, and everybody who 
had the price of a movie or 


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Special Norge Automatic Electric Dryer... .88.00 
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Aluminum Picnic Jug 
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NEITHER OF YOU WANT TO 
GO AHEAD WITH THIS. 

a drink had found his way to © 
an sirconditioned establish | 
ment. 

In one local pub. an old 
gaffer sat nursing a stale 
drink for about ap hour. look- 
ing out the window in gloomy | 
silence 

After a while a bunch of 
servicemen came along and | 
piled into a bus. Their sing- 
ing and obvious good spirits 
seemed to nettle the old guy 

As the last of the men got 
aboard, the bus driver start 
ed the motor and began to 
move off. As he did, the lez. 
end on the side of the bus 
came into full view: “The 
United States Air Force.” 

The old man sat up with 
a start. “Air Force, huh’ 
he crunted as he tock «a 
swig of his drink. “TU bet 
cha they never even cet 

that thing eff the cround.” 
oo 
YOUNG AMERICA 

Caskie Stinnett of Holiday 
Magazine tells about the 
Yisiter to New York who 
stopped two teen-aged girls in | 
blue jeans to ask if they | 
could direct him toe the Em- 
pire State Building 

“Sure.” said ene of the 
giris, peinting down the 
street. “Straight en dewn— 


WALES AWAY FEOM 
THE AIR FORCE BASE 


_ 


THE END OF A FISHING POLE! 
IF YOU FEEL THE SAME WAY 


WHEN YOU RETURN, TLL FILE.” 


| | SHE S$ NEARLY RUN DOWN BY 
TRAFFIC 


Ue 


you can't miss it. It's right 
across the street from the 
recerd shep.” 


(TOUGHTTA BE EASY 
TRIND ME A MICE PLACE 
T’STAY THIS TOWN * 
HEY... THERE'S A 


coe 
VAGRANT THOUGAT 
Practically anybody can 
learn to keep his mouth shut 
if he works at it, but few 
peopie ever learn to recog- 
nize the appropriate moment 
for it 
ow 
GENTLER SEX 
Isn't it strange how the 
same gal who uses a sun 
lamp in the winter insists on 
a beach umbrella in the sum- 
mer? 
oo? 
SUGGESTION BOX 


BUT IT STILL / THEN PERHAPS I 


AWAY FOR A WHILE, BRANDON.” 


OF WEEKS 7 


By Paul Nichols 


ILL ADMIT I 
THERE'S NOTHING LD NEED / FEEL PRETTY BEAF 


} YOU FOR IN THE NEXT COUPLE A UP EMe 


‘ 


— —— 


eT AWAY.” 


ONALLY .” 


VIOLIN LESSONS BEFORE 
GETS HOME...YOU KNOW HE 
CAN'T STAND LISTENING 
, TO 


If Capital Transits new 
owners switch to an ail)-bus 
system, well have no further 
need for the streetcar under- 
pass at Dupont Circle 

The District Commissien- 

ers ought te consider seal- 


ing the passatfe off and 
seundpreefing tt fer kids 
whe want te listen te their 
reck-n'-reil records. 


+. a | 
ON BRIDGE | 


West round. The bidding. thereafter. 
was routine 

West's opening lead was the 

king of hearts. followed by 

prompt shift to the three ol 

diamonds, hoping to put de 

clarer to the guess if he did 

not hold the queen. Deciarer 


Fast-West vulnerable. 


~ FERD’NAND 


BUT, MOMMA= Y NO EXCUSES, NORBURT- GET ON 
IT'S THE LAST . 
INNING ANO 
THE SCORE 
IS TIED... 


POPPA 


=m 


‘| DONALD DUCK 


won with the queen and took la + 


the spade finesse 
North was critical of this play 
lcontending that .the finesse 


should not have been taken with 7 


10 trumps. South referred to the 
ipercentage tabies. to show that 
the finesse was the proper pro- 
cedure. “After all.” he pleaded 
“I didnt have a look.” North 
was right, but not for the rea 
son he assigned. He. too, had 
missed the point 

It is true that percentages 
favor the finesse with 10 when 
the king is missing. But de 
clarer had a better clue 
the percentage tables. At the 
end of trick two, West is 
marked almost to a certainty 
with the ace-king of hearts and 
the ace of diamonds. If he also 
held the guarded king of 
spades, it is quite inconceivable 
that he would have chosen to 
pass as dealer. East is 
fore. marked with the king of 
spades and the only hope is 
that it is alone 

To pick off the single king 
would have been a good illus 
tration of playing by ear 

Copsr ght oe. Chicage Tribane 


Opening lead: King of hearts 

In attempting to guess the 
location of missing honors or 
the distribution of a specific 
suit, it is our policy to resort 
to percentages, or probabilities 
only when no other evidence is 
available. Any clue picked up 
at the table should be assigned 
more weight than an abstract 
mathematical proposition. To. 
day's hand illustrates what we 
have in mind. 

West chose to pass because 
of the probable difficulties that 
might be encountered in find 
ing a rebid. North elected to 
open with one club because a 
spade opening might present a 
rebidding problem on the next. 


there 


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MARK TRAI | ) | THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
MA L . | | By Ed Dodd (The Washington Merry-Go-Round : eoeens ! Wednesday, July 1, 1956 51 


Russians Press Sie. Meoden, Tetley a 
Education Plans Friday Nites ‘til 9 


OTHER DAYS OPEN ‘til 6:00 
OPEN EVERY DAY AT 9 
| While the House of Repre-) In other words, Russian | 


PS dy: ‘sentatives was defeating the youngsters will be compelled! > d 
S24 Ses SRB) *| |school construction bill hn to take three years of high: ec in er S 
aa = Se ee jweek, here is — was 54P"| <chool. In most of the United| 


ea vena ——————— | pening to edu- 
By Alex Raymond ore in Rus States high school is not com.-| 


sia pulsory. 
Forty years . | This 10-year program is al- SMASHES the PRICE on 
ago under the ‘ ‘ready in effect in Russia's 
Czarist regime, : larger cities. Emphasis is “ . ii 
Russian illiter- > |placed on science and technol- 1956 Clinton 
acy was about ogy. During the past six years, 
40 per cent of the curriculum 
. : has been devoted to science 
that ij and mathematics, with six Outboard Motors 


‘in Russia lyears spent on foreign lan . 
day is about  ‘Pearsen | guage, usually English, to help We've Even Outdiscounted the 
the same as in ‘Russian engineers keep abre " 
\the United States, maybe even of Toute science. Discount Houses! 
‘less. The reason is a seven-| Asa result of this concentra- Automatic 
lyear system of compulsory pri-|tion on technical training, the na : 
‘mary education, which under|U.S.S.R. is already ahead of us Rewind 
the new five-year plan williin turning out engineers. Starter 
}soon be extended to 10 years. ji coprright, 1956. Bell Syndicate, Inc.) 


By Drew Pearson: | 


Pan American Reply 


(The following statement ‘the governor drive shaft had 
was issued by Pan American failed just as the Hamilton 
| World Airways ™ reply to @ Standard Propeller Company 
| column by Drew Pearson had warned.” 
| which was published on July ANSWER: The fallen motor 
| 9, 1956.) was retrieved by PAA person- 


: . " 
) by mel according to the CAB's 
Drew Tite Beet rg records. It was also PAA who 
American Airways, we feel that found that the governor drive 
Pepe ee te shaft had failed. Hamilton 
the current one questioning the ~* :; ; 
'planes warrants an immediate Prior to the accident were not List Price 
: reply. Parenthetically, these at- warnings—they were recom- $159.95 
— —— _— = , — tacks usually coincide with im- ™Mendations that they be in 
STEVE ROPER i aes : ~~ |portant cases involving Pan spected and that if they passed ALL PARTS ARE 
ae - — - lAmerican appending before the inspection operation could be FULLY 
[oS At Geet DO Mix! fy . Civil Aeronautics Board for de- continued. The CAB report ONLY $10 DOWN GUARANTEED 


. TSS MmCaCORue s . e “2° isi ; shows that the particular shaft TL @.DAY 
| WHAT HAPPENED? | ‘ ~ ie a Aeenient, weehehty hes involved was One that had been) 99°95 S etaniear ine 
AAOLNO w FOR MONTHS warTius > | ; ; é oI . 

aes tee oe - more safety awards than any submitted to new heat treat WARRANTY 


ment and used as a fact . 
other carrier in the commer- TY Wve ak ae ae 
leial air transport field dating replacement for the shaft with | 


i from 1944 through May of 1956. which the governor had orig-| 


7 


‘ inally been equipped. 

A list of the awards received|"*" © quip | 

by the company are as follows: & PEARSO N: “The CAB 

| Inter-American Safety Coun-|¢*#miner further reported: *A In Every Way 

‘cil Awards to PAA in 1044, to Teview of past governor drive A Tep-Grade Motor By 


‘Western Division and four af-/554ft failures of this type re) This Famous Maker 
filiated companies in 1941, to vealed four others that OC-\e whoa ever believe you 
Fastern and Western Division C¥rred during October and De-| could get « full 6 


“ ’ wer outboard or lie 
and two affiliates in 1942, to cember, 1955 ) then $100! But you can! 


Latin American Division and L\NS WER: Only three |e Air-cooled engine means no 
six affiliates in 1946. to PAA “others” had occurred in these ney 

; ; _ al in 1946: National Safety Coun- months, one of which was on > - y a 
~ MICKEY FINN cil Award for System 1946, 1947, Dec. 26, according te CAB rec-| tank . 

1953, 1954, for Atlantic Divi- ords. The same governor drive| © Attomatic rewind starter 
sion 1940. 1944: Arthur Williams shaft is used on all other = ., wolls to minimum 
‘Memorial Medal of American DC-7s and other aircraft. Hum © Hasexciusive built-in quiet 
Museum of Safety, 1942. Passen- dreds of thousands of houfs contro! 

ger miles flown up to May 31, without a trouble record had | * 4! parte costed for eait- 
1956, without injury since Ore- been accumulated since 1947) « etal poles eit freese 
gon ditching, 3,449,000,000. and prior to the first failure during @uck season 

| Pearson's comments and Pan on Oct. 8. 1955. 


American replies follow: 7 PEARSON: “In other 

1. PEARSON: “Buried in the words, despite four failures, 
files of the Civil AeronauticS;the CAA. which enférces safety 
Administration and the Civil rules had not grounded the 


Aeronautics Board are reports pcC.7B— until the propeller shaft! . 
on near tragedies in the air defects could be remedied.” | 
that don't make pleasant read- ANSWER: It was the best 


ing. “Maybe that’s why they), | 
lare still buried.” judgment of the most com-) 


F Le eae tent technical personnel of! 
> he | ANSWER: This is simply not tne Government, the manufac- 

ey gi ‘true. The reports are notiturer and the airlines that! 

_ @Y Sranner =| “buried,” they are public prop-| grounding was not required. | 


. 


jerty available to anyone. The) » prapcon: “Only after: 


column itself uses public acci- the near tragedy over Venice 

\dent reports and has misquoted! .. nec 28 did the CAA act. On ’ 

from them. The reports also|j., i¢ 1956 it made the 

lare published in full by avia- change mandatory.” S 


ion journals. ANSWER: PAA already had 

2. PEARSON: “They 8180 reniaced all governor drive 
show inexcusable negligence shafts by that date. As an 
on buck-passing on the part of extra safety measure, PAA in- 
Government officials and OM | stalled “propeller pitch locks,” 


the part of some airlines.’ hic} t excessiv | 
| ANSWER: They show nothing eee’ ar tho suaaaiier. 1956 Scott-Atwater 


of the sort. Where a pattern| There is still no requirement 


of reports shows that a safety’ for this added precaution which 
measure is advisable, airlines, PAA installed voluntarily. U oar ° ors 


the manufacturers and the 9% PEARSON: “Another trag- 
Government see to it that it is edy that could have been pre- 
immediately applied Where vented occurred on March 17. 
safety is involved there never 1955, when a Pan American 
is hesitation. ae 377 was ditched 35 miles 
- ne ‘ans . « off the Oregon Coast while en 
avira WORK, EH © LL. S. BEARSON: “in view @! route to Australia. The plane 
SO TuEIQ HARD WoRK [| the increasing congestion of | , 
pp Soes FOR NAUGHT” the airways. with near misses "#4 Jost its No. 3 engine and 
in collisions happening severa) "#4 8°ne out of control. Three 
times a day, here is some of PC°Ple drowned and one died 
the disturbing information in| ° *2°ck.” 
the CAB-CAA files.” ANSWER: The accident hap- 
opm agaelly = gh pened March 26, 1955. The 
| ANSWER: Calling in the cur-'CAB report definitely states 
y rent concern over congestion “The aircraft was ditched un- 
on the airways is an attempt to der control.” Nineteen persons 
build up a weak story. What) survived the accident. 
|the column is about has nothing) 10 PEARSON: “The CAB in- 
to do with the congestion, col-|vestigation revealed that the 
lisions or air traffic. pilot had been unable to increase 
4. PEARSON: “In November,|the power of the three good 
™/1955, the Hamilton Standard engines in order to compensate 
\Propeller Co. had informed all|for the loss of No. 3 due to 
DC-7B operators that it was re- electrical failure.” 
placing the drive shafts of its) ANSWER: The CAB report 
propellers on the DC-7B with ™ade no findings that electrical 
an improved part. However, failure was responsible for 
the CAA did not make this oe failure to increase power in 
change mandato and Pan/|¢ remaining engines 
Atheriean World yp (od con-|. 41. PEARSON: “Here again} ALL PART 
tinued to operate its DC-7Bs Py nbn the CAB had) ARE FULLY 
until such time as it was pos. ~*~ | 
sible to change them.” Bg Dec. 21, 1953, the pro GUARANTEED 
ANSWER: The correspond. Standard, "loll csatieaion te 
ence concerned not “propeller its Service Bulletin No. 283 that 
drive shafts,” which are Dig the circuit breakers and fuses 
enough to require two men tO be reduced in order to prevent 
lift them, but propeller gover-'.u-h fzilure ” 
‘nor drive shafts which weigh) ANSWER: Once again, the 
less than a pound. These do\pulletin was not a warning 
=§ mot drive the propeller, but &/ The Bulletin was issued to cov- 
jmechanism controlling the er » routine change in circuit 
ce. eee nae snarl — <a infor.| breakers and a fuse in the “syn- 
me * " Te ‘ ' *, chronizer to wi “ 
TERRY AND THE PIRATES ‘By George Wunder | mation ‘concerned mapections |S raeenceg Sik itn FACTORY 
only, and the recommendations change be made by the operator a 
for inspection were rigidly ad-\~at its convenience.” CARTONS 
‘hered to. The first information| 12 PEARSON: “However 


issued by Hamilton Standard/CAA did not make the change THE MOTOR THAT LOOK AT THESE TWO 


to DC-7B operators, that pro-\mandatory. And, while Pan | 
peller governor drive shafts american had made the change BAILS YOUR AT! "TERRIFIC BARGAINS! 
should be replaced was on Dee-|/on its DCs, it hadn't gotten) A sleek, powerful new LIMITED SUPPLY 
29, 1955, ome day after the ac- ground to altering its Boeing) CnateAgwater enaahe time TV. H 

~ 2 orsepower 
cident later cited occurred. 37735. itless good times on the 
| On Jan. 16, 1956, the CAA| ANSWER: The DC4Bs were water for the whole 1956 MODEL 
jissued a directive making 1¢- coming off the assembly line at family! Pleasantly soft- S 50 
iplacement of the governor'the time and it was simpler to| spoken even at high Regularly 
jdrive shafts mandatory, but at make the change on them than| speeds $243.95 
‘a later date. By the time the on the Boeings flying the routes. JUST LOOK AT THESE . 
directive was issued, PAA bad Other airlines had not made the FEATURES 10 Horse power 
‘already completed replacement changes on their DCs, Boeings, Power Bailing , 


‘on every DC-7B operated by or other aircraft affected. ately Seong ‘$' 50 
,. ‘“ : Aquamu o ” uU 
PAA. 13. PEARSON: “Only on! Stowaway Tanks Regularly ° 
$318.95 


5. PEARSON: “On Dec. 28, April 21, 1955, after the acci- Complete Shift 
1955, a Pan American DC-7B dent, did the CAA force all air- Twist-Grip Speed 
caught fire in its No. 3 engine lines to make this change in Cararel Liberal Trade-in Allowance 
while flying between Tehran the Boeing 377. This, however, Snap-Off Hood 
and New York. The plane was was after three people had been 


about to attempt a forced land- drowned and one died of shock FREE DELIVERY—PHONE Lincoln 7-9400 
THWEST 


‘ing by moonlight on the beach in the water off the Oregon 
at Venice, Italy, when the en-'C 


oast.” 
gine fell out and it was able to| ANSWER: Once it was ascer- eole Georsia A AN 
\continns and land safely at tained that this may have been eee LiF ian 2s yeh Siehgie Ase, 
Rome 


a factor in the accident, CAA 
| “CAB examiner retrieved the and the airlines acted with all PALLs CHURCE Plenty Free Parking aval Bane oe 


9 


\fallen motor and found that speed. | ai Wulesed 400. Sead 


b 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
52 Wednesday, July 11, 1956 


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