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The Weather 


Today—Mostly sunny with the highest 
temperature around 78 degrees; con 
tinued fair and cool at night. Tuesday 
~—Fair and cool. Sunday's temperature: 
76 degrees at 12:01 a. m.: 


High 


e 


low, 


68 at 8:28 p. m. (Details on Page 20.) 


nem 


o. 238 


ee er 


79th Year — N 


Che 


ashington ost FINAL 


Cimes Berald — 


ee 


Phone RE. 7-123 1 


Coprright 1986 
The Washington Post Company 


MONDAY, JULY 


> 


— ye 


30, 1956 


WTOP Radice (1 


500) TV (Ch. 9) 


FIVE CENTS 


19 DIE AS 4 OIL TANKS EXP 


Blasts Injure 


o2 in Lexas; 
Flare Seen 


For 4.0 Miles 


Many Are Trapped 
By Wall of Flame; 
Volunteer Firemen 
Workers Victims 


By B. F. Kellum 


DUMAS, Tex.; July 29 (#) 
Four huge petroleum tanks 
exploded today, trapping 19 
men in a wall of flame and 


killing them in their tracks. 

Thirty-two others were hos- 
pitalized with burns. Some 
were hofribly seared 

The towering explosion fire- 
ball was sighted in Amarillo, 
40 miles away. 

\ hundred or more specta- 
tors watched. terrified, as men 
with clothing ablaze stumbled 
moaning and erying from the 
tank farm of the Shamrock Oil 
and Gas Corp 

Victims mainly were oil 
workers and volunteer firemen 


Terrific Heat Felt 


The heat 
was beyond 
said 

\ workman in a 
yards from the first explosion 
was scorched \ railroad 
bridge a quarter of a mile away 
was burned completely 

Some of the bodies were so 
hot long after the explosion 
that they set fire to blankets 
used to wrap, them 

\ boy about ll, wearing no 
shirt. stumbled from the heat 
with his naked back burning 
fiercely 

A report quarter mile 
from the explosion, found his 
hair blazing from the heat 

Most of the dead were taken 
to the National Guard Armory 
where townspeople attempted 
to identi reduced to 
charcoal 


32 in Hospital 


fire-blast 
survivors 


from the 
belief, 


shack 300 


a 


, 
‘)*% 


Hoa lies 


This Texas Panhandle town 
of 8000 was not geared for such 
@ disast But less than four 
hours after it started, all the 32 
burned survivors had been 
taken to the Moore County 
Memorial Hospital 4 

The explosion and fire 
on the tank farm of the $75 
million McKee plant of the 
Shamrock Oil and Gas Corp 
with headauarters in Amarillo, 
Tex, it ad the firms Me. 
Kee Refine: which was not 
damaged 

Che ta Ti 
Rolocaus! 8 
barre! ixing 
Glied « highly 

entane used in gasoline 
Seine 


was 


caused the 
199, a 15,900 
arrangement 
expiosive 
re 


at 


" 
‘t) 


losion set off a chain 
ind fires in surround 
some used for crude 


was blow 
flames from two still 
ng tanks away from the 
eld of other tanks 
narillo Fire Chief Roy Hill 
a shift of the wind could 
ite a dangerous situation 
emen were standing by 
ther tanks were emptied 


See BLAST. Page l 


i tonight 


.s oL 


Todav’s Index 


Page 
Horoscooe 3} 
Keeping Well 30 


by, 


Page 

Ԥ 15 

ssements 17 

lite 19 

sssified 23-28 

. 30-33 
word 30 


r ie cy on )2 


0 
Dix 0 
Fa ais 
Everts Today 
Federal Diary 
Financial 


Gor er 


14 
20 
19 

6 
32 


Ad Finds 
40 Buyers 
For 1 Ford 


"Earty people called to buy 
the “48 Ford | advertised with 
@ want ad,” said Mr. W. K. Pat- 
terson, 3006 Adams st., ne 
Whether you want to sell a 
used car or baby crib, you're 
sure to get faster results 
through The Washington Post, 
end Times Hereid—reaching 
$87 000 fafnilies daily, over 
927,000 families 


eny other 


more than 
paser # town 


¢ ply phone 


RE. 7-1234 


‘ 
»m 


~ 


Following explesions, black smoke pours from refinery near Dumas, Tex., yesterday 


DALLAS 


~ 


* FORT wonhe’ 


~ Abilene 
t Cc 


"2 
. “eo 


San Angelo 
> 


of Waco* 
™ “~ 


\ 


; 


| 

* 
Sen * 
Antomo 


TEXAS 


Corpus 


ee 
STATUTE miles 


29 


Cross marks explosion site. 


— —— 


Last Survivor 
Of Union Forces 
Remains in Coma 


DULUTH, Minn... July 2 
r—Albert Woolson 109-veal 
old sole survivor of the Grand 
Army the Republic, was 
near death today in St Lukes 
Hospital here 

Hospital attendants said the 
former drummer boy's condi 
tion was critical and that he 
was not responding to treat- 
ment. Woolson has been in a 
coma since 4 a. m. yesterday 

Woolson’s three daughters 
maintained an all-night vigil 
at his bedside. Attendants said 
they took turns sleeping and 
watching their father. 

Woolson is the only survivor 
of the Union Army of the Civil 
War. Three veterans of the 
Cinfederate Army are still 
alive 


90-MPH Blow Worst 


mignt 


—_— — - —S ——=— — ee 


As Girl's Father Weeps 


Sailor Who 


Saved Her 


Calls on Linda Morgar 


(Picture on Page 3 
By Jack Kell) 


— 


NEW YORK. July 28—Ed 
ward P. Morgan, Washington 
newscaster, wept openly here 
today as he embraced the 
Spanish seaman who rescued 
his 14-year-old daughter Linda 
rom. the murky Atlantic the 
the Andrea Doria went 

down 

Almost protectively, his arm 
about the seaman’s shoulder 
Morgan led the slender seaman 
to the bedside of his daughter 
in St. Vincent's Hospital 

“This is Senor Berncbe 
Planco Garcia, my dear.” Mor 
gan said Vo you remember 
him 

The child looked at 
without speaking 

He saved your life, Linda,” 
Morgan said 

Linda smiled and grasped 
the strong hand of the seaman 
with her uninjured right hand 

“Thank you,” she whispered 

The child lay in the bed, her 
left arm and both legs encased 
in bandages 

The father 


the two 


anxious to know 
all the details, spoke briefly in 
Spanish to the seaman and 
asked him to describe what hap 
pened 

Garcia related the harrow 
ing experience—how he had 
freed himself from the wreck- 
age and was crawling to safety 
when he heard what he de- 
scribed as “a small child cry 
ing for its mother” ~~; 

Crawling onward, he made 
his way over the twisted steel 
of the bow of the Stockholm 
and came upon Linda, blood. 
spatterec and lying beneath the 
wreckage. He freed her. 

As gently as possible, Garcia 
carried her off the bow deck 
and left her at the ship's hos 
pital. He retraced his steps un- 
der the asumption that he had 
seen another form on the 


ee ee 


in Vears | 


Y Deals Wews Bers 


. 
crushed bow. It took him about 
10 minutes to make the trip 
again, but he could find no one 

Garcia had arrived at.St. Vin 
cents Saturday. hoping to see 
Linda. but she was then too 
ill to see anvone. He returned 
today and was greeted as a 
hero , 

Awaiting Garcia was Sister 
Loretta Bernard, administrator 
of the hospital. She presented 
him with Our Lady's Star of 
the Sea. a medal designed to 
protect seafarers. He accepted 
shyly. saying the rescue had 
only been part of his job 

4 native of Cadiz. Spain 
Garcia fought for the Repub 
lican Army during the Spanish 
Civil War. When Francisco 
Franco triumphed, Garcia was 
exiled to France. During World 


me _ — — 


Doria Victims Sought 
In Stockholm’s Bow 


A spekesman making a sur- 
vey of the liner Stockholm, in 
dryvdeck in Brooklyn fer re- 
pairs, sald last night that 
the damaged bow of the ship 
may contain bedies of victims 
from the sunken Andrea 
Doria, Page 3. 


— a — 


War II, he was captured by the 
Germans and placed in a com 
centration camp 

After the war, the Red Cross 
got him into Sweden and into 
a job sailing on Swedish ocean 
liners. 

Garcia will fy home to Gote- 
berg, Sweden, Monday. As he 
left the hospital, he kissed the 
girl whose life he saved. “She's 
the bravest little girl ive ever 
known,” he said 


Severe Storm Whips English Channel; 
Many Ships Capsize, 12 Lives Lost 


LONDON, July 29 # A 
terrific storm roared up the 
English Channel today, capsiz- 
ing scores of small ships, un- 
leashing landslides inland and 
blowing down trees and build- 


ings. At least 12 persons were biown to his death off a ladder peting 


reported to have perished in 
churning seas which caused sus- 


yard of his home at Dunton 
Green. Kent. Sir Richard was 
former chief industrial adviser 
in the Ministry of Labor. 

Four other persons were 
killed when trees toppled onto 
their cars. Another man was 


at a London dock. 
The British coastal steamer 


seamen, won the International 
Sailing Race from Torbay to 
Lisbon and was on her way 
home to a triumphant welcome. 

British warships fought high 
seas to assist 22 yachts com- 
in the crosschanne! 
race from Le Havre to Ports- 
mouth. Sixteen of the yachts 


pension of commercial sea traf Teeswood sank off Dungeness. were still unaccounted for, 


fic between Britain and France. 


Coast Guardsmen and the Is- 


Brest radio said three sea- 


Hail and drenching rains rode rgelj tanker Haifa saved al] but men of the Greek freighter, the 
the big blow, called the worst gone of the 17-man crew. The Aliki, had been swept over- 


Chan..el storm in years. Gusts 
were clocked at up to 90 miles 
an hour. 


Teeswood was carrying no pas- 
sengers. 
Thirty miles from Lizard 


A yacht capsized in Sandown 
Bay. One person was 


“Dozens of ships are limping Rock at the tip of Cornwall, but two others were reported 


in.” said T. A. Cotton, harbor the ketch Moyana went down, drowned. 


Another yacht was 


master at Newlyn in Cornwall. but all of her crew of 23 were blown ashore at Bognor. 


Sir Richard Lloyd Roberts; 


saved by the British ship Clan 


The storm did major damage 


cousin of the late Prime Minis--McLeod. The 106-ton Moyana, to crops and fruit trees over a 


fer David Lieoyd George, was 


killed by a falling tree in the 


manned 
cadets 


15 teenage sea 
eight experienced 


A 


wide area of southern and west- 


j 


; 


| 
Stassen 


Sees ‘Open’ 
Convention 


Herter's Name Sure 
To Be Placed in 
Nomination, Says 


White House Aide 


By Lee Nichols 
United Press 
Harold E. Stassen pre 
dicted yesterday that Gov 


|Christian A. Herter of Massa- 


chusetts would be placed in 
nomination for the vice 
presidency at the Republi- 
can Convention despite 
strong support for Richard 
M. Nixon among party 
leaders 

Stassen 
WTOP 
program he 
convention 
convention’ as a result of his 
leampaign to substitute Herter 
for Nixon as President Eisen- 
hower s running-mate this year 

Stassen, the President's dis 
armament adviser, said he 
thinks Mr. Eisenhower himself 
has not made up his mind on 
the vice presidency but prefers 
an “open convention’ and will 
wait until all the “facts are in 
before making up his mind 

He also disciosed the names 
of all eight Republicans he said 
were included in a poll of senti- 
ment for a running-mate for the 

ent 

This iz th. poll whch Slassen 
has said showed an Eisen 
hower-Herter ticket would be 6 
per cent stromger than an 
Eisenhower-Nixon ticket 
Stassen has already revealed 
his name was on the poll along 
with those of Herter and Nixon 

The others, he said. were 
Ambassador Henry Cabot 
Lodge Jr.. Presidential Assist- 
ant Sherman Adams, Treasury 
Secretary George M. Hum 
phrey Senate Republican 
Leader William F. Knowland 
(Calif.) and Gov. Arthur B 
Langlie of Washington. 

Stassen said all except Nixon 
and himself were regarded 
“favorably” as potential run 
ning-mates with the Chief Ex 
ecutive. He declined to say in 
what order the others were 
rated, except to say Herter 
ranked highest. 

Stassen reiterated 
poll verified there 
“strong wegative’ factors 
against his own vice presi 
dential candidacy and for that 
reason he had taken himself 
out “as firmly and categorically 
as possible.” 

He said that like the famed 
statement of Gen. Sherman. he 
(Stassen) “would not accept 
the nomination” even if it were 
offered. He added he is like- 
wise “foreclosing any consid. 
eration” by himself of the 
Presidency and Vice Presi 
dency in 1960 

He also cited another 
which he described as 
“Wageearner Forum” con 
ducted by Dr. E. R. Smith. as 
showing that 34 per cent of 
wage earners questioned op 
posed Nixon's candidacy for re 
election as against 43 per cent 
favorable to the Vice President 

He added that this poll of 
both union and nonunion wage- 
earners had been right on Tru- 
man vs. Dewey in 1948 and 
Eisenhower vs. Stevenson in 
1952 

Stassen’s “dump Nixon” pro 
posal lras caused a political up- 
roar that was climaxed last 
week with Herter’s announce- 
ment that he himself would 
nominate Nixon in the belief 
that Mr. Eisenhower favored 


See STASSEN, Page 2, Col. 6 


Resort Weather 
Seuth 


CRS 
ry 
GOP 


~ Open 


said on the 
Natior 

thinks 
will 


“Face the 
the 


be an 


that the 
would be 


poll 
the 


Pair, 


7 


a rr 


U. S. Expresses Concern 


Dulles Ter 


ns Nasser’s 


Action ‘Sertous Blow’ 


Ry 


Hienry 


Ravmont 


United Press 


John 


de 


Secretary of State 
Foster Dulles vesterda’ 
nounced Egypt's seizure of the 
Suez Canal as a “serious blow” 
that could become a matter of 
deep concern” the United 
States as a maritime powe! 

Dulles also held an “extended 
discussion” with 
President Eisenhower on the 
Suez situation. The White 
House said afterward there 
were no plans “at the moment 
for Dulles to go to Gettysburg 
in with Ms 
Lisenhower 

Assistant White House 
Secretary Murray Snyder said 
quite sure Mr. Eisen 


'f 


telephone 


in conter person 
\ew 


he wae 


Ike Attends 
Church, Walks 
About Farm 


President to Confer 
With 


Premier on Thursday 


\ustralian 


By Robert G. Nixon 

GETTYSBURG, July 29 (INS 
President Eisenhower attended 
church today for the first time 
since his illeitis operation seven 
weeks ago and prepared to 
plunge into a heavy schedule 
of White House work after a 
weekend rest at his farm 

The President, accompanied 
by Mrs. Eisenhower, went to 
10:45 a. m. services at the Civil 
War Presbyterian Church in 
Gettysburg Abraham 
Lincoln worshipped on Nov. 19 
1863—the day his Gettys 
burg address 

Mr. Eisenhower looked pgle 
and thin as he entered and left 
the church. He held the First 
Lady the as. they 
walked down the steps of the 
church after the services. 

It was beginning to sprinkle 
rain as the Eisenhowers Ieft 
and the President remained in 
doors alter his return to the 
tarm 

Before church services 
President took a brisk morn 
ing walk out to the gate of his 
farm 

News Secretary Murray Sny 
der announced that Mr. Eisen 
hower still plans to hold a 
news conference Wednesday 
morning. It will be his first 
since his abdominal operation 
on June 9 

Snyder also announced that 
the Presidefit will confer at 10 
a. m. Thursday at the White 
House with Australian Prime 
Minister Robert G. Menzies 

Menzies, who is returnfing to 
\ustralia from the British Com. 
monwealth prime minister's 
conference in London, will ar 
rive in Washington Tuesday 
Snyder described his meeting 
with the President as an “unof.- 
ficial visit.” 

Snyder also said Presidential 
awards would be conferred at 
the White House Thursday on 
24 Army helicopter and fixed. 
wing pilots who participated in 
the dramatic recovery work at 
Grand Canyon last month at 
the scene of commercial avia 
tion's worst disaster. 


where 


of 


bv arm 


the 


‘Based on Mistaken 


spending the weekend 
farm, would keep in 
Dulles by telephone 
situation Mr 
return to the 


or Tuesday 


hower 
at 
touch with 
today “the 
Eisenhower il] 
Capital tonight 
morning 

[The U. S. Sixth Ficet 
eastern Mediterranean 
“presumed beyond ques 
be on a standby alert 
ready to move to protect 
ican nationals in case 
violence ir the Canal 
an informed Navy 
quoted last igirt ihe New 
York Herald Tribune News 
Service. It was added that 


See POLICY, Page Coal 


his 


oT 
W 


can pe 


tion to 
DAaSIs 
Ame! 
of 
dispute 
source was 


hy 


t hg 


3 


» 
-, 


Soviet Agrees 

To Exchange 

Entertainers 
Billy Rose, in Moscew, 
Reveals Deal for 


VOsSsCOV 


S. Stage Talent 


~ 


RR ovse aid 


agreeme 


nan Billy he 
had 
principle with 
for a large-scale 
American and Russian 
cal talent 

it will 500 American 
artists bere and let 500 Russian 
artists travel the United 
States during 1957 

Rose said a draft agreemen! 
was initialed for the Russians 
by Georgi Orvid, Deputy Min 
ister of Culture 


he reached 
the Soviet | 
exchange of! 


theatri- 


bring 


to 


American 
ine agree 
tnat oul 


rhe diminutive 
showman declared 
ment expressed hope 
separaic troupes irom each 
country would visit tl othe! 
during 1957. with the premiere 
performances in \ew York and 
Moscow on New Year's Eve 

Hie said the Russians acreed 
to commercial sponsorship of 
Lelevision performances by 
their artists in the United 
States. and to devote their own 
radio and television networks 
to carrying program DY 
American artist 


ie 


the 


The performers would appear 
im six cities approximately 
ihe same population in each 
country 

In addition to ts 
Rose said he would like to bring 
in a coupie dozen long 
stemmed American beauties 


>' 


tne Arvist 


19 Are Trapped 
On Mount Hood 


PORTLAND. Ore July 2 
INS)}—Nineteen mountain 
climbers were reported trapped 
tonight in a crevasse on the 
side of Mount Hood. between 
the 9000 and 10,000-foot level 
Rescue teams were converging 
on the scene 

First reports. unverified. said 
four were killed. The Hood 
River County coroner has been 
called to the scene 

The Red Cross is rushing 
blood plasma to the scene and 
three hospitals in Portland 
have been alerjed to await any 
injured. Helicopters are being 
assembled at McChord Aijr 
Force base to fiv to the scene 


Belief’ 


y g 


Keypt Curbs 


Its Sterling 
Trade. Then 
Backs Down 


Rice and Cotton 
Orders Unloaded 
Are Now Allowed 
To Be Delivered 


By Charles P. Arnot 


CAIRO, July 29 (INS) 
Egypt did a surprising about 
face tonight and suddenly 
withdrew an economic coun 
terattack against the West- 
ern Power 

. 
Mini Ab 


Suny 


Finance ter du! 
Monein that an 
earlier-issued order banning all 
goods are 
sterling has been 
canceled and that there are no 
“restrictions.” 

However, Egypt's naval units. 
Russian - built 
s, continued to patrol 
ance of the 


K 415 said 
wre the 
payable in 


longer any 


including new 
destroye! 
ihe northern ents 
Suez Canal 

Soviet-made ships and 
units steamed 
Alexandria 


Said. where 


The 
light fleet 


need 


al base 


othe 
full from 


na io Port 


" they were reported to be patrol- 
ion 


n a 24-hour alert basis. 
The action came as a wave of 
nationalizaltion fever appeared 
to be breaking out across the 
Arab world. 

Earlier, Egypt had ordered a 
ban on all exports to a sterling 
area unless they were paid for 
in the currency of a third coun- 
try trading with Egypt 

rhe was immediately 
reed on four vessels carry- 
shipments of Egyptian cot- 
and Britain. The 

signments were unloaded in 
Alexandria 

Then t 
ment said the four ships would 
be reloaded and allowed to pro- 
ceed to their destinations. 

After a five-hour conference 
with the Commerce Minister 
Kaissuny said the government 
had no intention of freezing 
British assets in Egypt 

But the Finance Minister's 

tatement denounced Britain's 
blocking Lgyptian sterling 
in England as contrary 
‘rnational law 

It was also charged that Brit 
ains decision to deny Egypt 
access to its sterling except by 
specific permission of United 
Kingdom exchange controllers 
a violation of monetary 
agreements concluded hetween 
the two countries in 1951 and 
amended in 1955 
The statement said a French 
overn ment announcement 
concerning freezing of Egypt's 
assets was “incomprehensible.” 
since Egypt has no assets in 
France and since Egypt did not 
use the French frane in her 
trade dealing with other cout 
iries 

(The London Daily Express 
reported in a Cario dispatch 
that all Egyptian army officers’ 
leaves had been canceled and 
that they have been ordered to 
return to the Suez Canal Zone 
where the garrisons are in a 
State of alert) 
Canal traffic 


ordel 
enti 
ing 

19 


Lon rice 


con 
Pe 


Layplian govert 


orf 
4 »* 
assets 
; 


iv) if} 


‘as 


today was 
See SUEZ—Page 5, Col 1. 


re- 


Scientists Urge Relaxation of Rules 
Curbing International Data Exchange 


United Press 


The Federation of American 
Scientists urged President E! 
senhower yesterday to do awa) 
with present regulations re 
stricting international exchange 
of basic scientific and technica! 
information. 

“A free exchange of ideas is 
essential to stimulate the in- 
ventiveness of American tech- 
nical minds,” the Federation 
said. 

It issued a statement indors 
ing three recommendations in 
a report by the House Govern- 
ment Operations Subcommittee 


John E. Moss (D-Calif.). 

The recommendations called 

for: 
1. Amendment of the Export 

Control Act of 


unclassified scientific informa the 


now handied by the Commerce entific communication 


Department 

2. Reactivation 
Department s 
program 

3. Elimination of the Com 
merce Department's Office of 
Strategic Information 

The scientists said a regula. 
tion uiring an export liéense 
“sym on unclassified sci- 
entific correspondence mailed 
outside the country is “poorly 
publicized and inconsisteagtly 
enforced.” 


of the State 
silence atllache 


the 
it said United States embassies 
overseas “could function more 
effectively 
qualified attaches were availa. 
ble to assist” 
policies. 


United 


States technical supremacy wil! 


somehow be preserved,” the 
Federation aid 

In calling for reactivation of 
science attache program, 


and efficiently if 
with scientific 


The group's statement said 


the Office of Strategic Informa- 


The statement said many sci- W485 5¢€t up in 1954 to promote 


entists are “unwittingly violat- 


“yoluntary efforts to prevent 


: , ing the law.” When complied unclassified strategic data from 
on Information, headed by Rep. with the Federation said. it being made available” to un 
has a “nuisance value of slow. friendly nations. 


ing down and reducing the 
flow of information.” 


“Peacetime attempts to -ex. 


tend voluntary controls to any 


“The export contro] regula. unclassified information are un- 


1949 to exempt tions are apparently based on realistic 
mistaken belief that, by dangers far greater than the 


and fraught with 


Weceagree Pew and Tomes Mould Mp tion from export reguistions restricting international sci presumed benefits,” it said. 


# 


, 


® 


THE WASHING 
= | 


TON POST end TIMES HERALD 
Monde, July 30, 1956 


B-52s ‘Attack’ 


In Mock Raids 


Re Elton 


C. Fay 


Acree ated Prew 


The Air Force i« using B-S2s 
te test our defenses against the 
comoerablie Bisen btsomobders 
which Russia would use in an 
stteck on Notth America 

The bic. jet-ocowered 6-S2s 
are being sent out with “raid 
ma forces” which make unan 
nounced. stabbing probes of 
the continental aircraft warn 
ing and defense system 

They fly from directions and 
et altitudes and speeds which 
the new and powerful Russians 
Risoms could be expected to 
fhoose in transpolar and trans 
oeranic strikes at L nited States 
and (Canadian cities 

Increasing fsumbers the 
B32 Stratofortresses are being 
assigned te these missions as 
the number of deliveries to 
operating units of the Strategic 
Aur Command expands 

= many as 2) of 2 strate 

bombers—the BG2s the 
lium B4is and the older 
are owt inte inte air te 
attacks. simulta 
from different 
are oitted 
earning networks 
tor and aircraft 
=e of the Continental 
mimarnd 
ne BO? hac @ range of 
an Gar) 2s. without 
Its speed 


of 


5" 
and 
The 
the 


iat¢ - 
Defence ( 
more 
aerTia! 
er 650 
can 


nm ¢uress 


; our ang 
ft an aitituce 

* Siraioior 
car hydrogen 
‘oe Bison 
with 


roe save tT 
rom parable 
~ ates t "ar ‘re 
tvoe 37 bomber) of 
t air £ carrying & 
and bomb could reach 


Te eat 
“ae 


area 


‘ot 


States 


= : 


% gro 
th raca 


two refueling: could hit 
target im the United States 

Officials conducting the 
defense tests say that certain 
safety requirements prevent 
absolute simulation of an ene 
my air attack. 

Gen. Earle E. Partridge. 
chief of the Continental Air 
Defense Command. has cited 
the impossibility of using 
countertadar equipment of 
the strategic bombers in the 
mock raids. If the bombers 
“were to turn on their elec 
tremic countermeasure (—CM) 
equipment. they might jam not 
only the warning system of 
ground and airborne defense 
installations. but also the navi 
gational equipment used in 
commercial air traffic. 

Special arrangements must 
be made well in advance even 
lo permit the attacking bomb 
ers to operate without running 
lights during a test 

Obviously one of the weakest 
points im the present incom 
piete defense system is the 
“hele” in Distant Early Warn 
ing Lime (Dewline). Official« 
have estimated that it might 
be as much as two vears before 
the radar stations of that chain 
aiong the northern rim of the 
continent are ready for opera 
then 

Curiously. one of the best in- 
stances of warning came from 
that area where there is no ex 
isting radar. Late last year 
SAC bombers made @ series of 
“strikes” from the direction of 
the Arctic and from the Pacific.’ 

In one instance. the Air De. 
Command had a five 
hour warning of the spproach 
of a formation of bombers— 
. of two Canadian 
und observers. unaided bh 


any 


fer 7) 


“ork 


12 Members Elected 


Dramatic Rescue in a Rainstorm 
die photo, another rescuer, Robert L. Stev- 


Nomination 


| 
| 


’ 


' 
' 


; 
; 
: 


| 


Of Herter 


the Vice President as his run- 
ning-mate again this year. 
Sen. Karl E. Mundt (R-S. D.), 


the latest Republican to attack | 


Stassen, said yesterday on 
WTTG's “Reporters’ Roundup” 
that hig move was “untimely 


land unteamly,” and said he is 


' 


convinced Mr. Eisenhower him- 


‘self wants Nixon. The Presi- 


; 
’ 
; 


\which he will undoubtedly be jj 


: 
’ 
' 


; 
’ 


dent is expected to have a press| 


conference Wednesday at 


asked about the Stassen-Nixon 
controversy. 
Democratic National 
man Paul M. Butler, who has 
said Democrats were sitting on 
the sidelines. chuckling over 
the GOP dispute, said yester- 
day on the ABC-WMAL televi- 
sion program “College Press’ 
Conference,” he was “inclined 
to think” White House officials 


are behind Stassen’s move. 


Asked if there was “any 


White House support” for his’ 
drive, Stassen said he had not. 
“asked for any support.” Asked |i} 


| 
| 
| 


' 
Chair-| 


/ 


) 


Hh} 


Closed Saturdays, July & huguet 
Open Monday through Friday 9:30 te 5:00 


) 
l 


| 
LA COSTE PULLOVERS 


These fine French lisle pullover sports 


shirte are cut long in front and still longer 


in back to stay securely inside vour slacks 
or walking shorts. They require no ironing, 
just wash, drip dry and wear. 


| $7.95 
ih 
i 


La Coste Matching Long Hose, $3.95 


if.any White House officials Wil Sole Agents for HickeyFreemen Clothes and Cavanagh Hots 


had “volunteered” such sup-| 
port, he replied, “No, they have | 
not.” | 


Stassen informed President 


Eisenhower in advance before | 
announcing his “dump-Nixon” 
campaign. While declining to 


reveal the President's reaction, | 


ihe said yesterday that if Mr.| 


Eisenhower had said “I don’t! 


iment,” then “I don’t think I'd 


Associated Press 


| 


have made it.” 

Stassen continued his refusal 
to name Republicans, behind 
his drive, although he said 
former Gov. Thomas E. Dewey 
of New York was not among 
them. He identified his backers 


as a “strong and sincere group” | 


of GOP leaders. 

Renewing his charge that 
“button down” the 
GOP Convention for Nixon, 
Stassen said he believes the 


Republican headquarters” had 
itried to 


think I'd make that announce- || 


i 


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HH 
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WASHINGTON, D.C. 


the celebrated 
air conditioned 


As rain water on a fleoded Philadelphia | 
street creeps up on her stalled car, Mrs. | 
Jack Weldon leans from windew (tep photo) | 
teward « rescuer, Leonard C. Dill. In mid- 


Convention “will now be open” 
jas a result of his campaign. 
He said it is not “my place” 
‘to nominate Herter, and added 
it was “premature” to decide 
\whether his backers will nomi- 


enson, reaches out a helping hand from « 
raised sidewalk. Bottom photo, Mrs. Wel- 
don's car starts to sink out of sight. 


To CED Trustee Board 


» * 


A: Nathanael V. Davis, pres 


i president 


D. Zellerbech 
na coy 
and education 


ona. 


pres 
San 


of Aluminium Limited. 
Boston: Donald C. Deyton, 
of Davton’s Minne 
apolis. Charlies T. Fisher Jr 
president of the National Bank 
of Detroit: Fred CC. Foy. pres 
ent of Koppers Company, 
Inc. Pittsburgh. William A 
Hewitt. president of Deere & 
Co. Moline, IL: Homer J. Liv- 
ingston. president of the First 
National Bank of Chicago: 
Aksel Nielsen, president of the 


ident 
Ine 


Brannan Hedges Over A cceptance 
Of ‘Down-on-Farm’ Cam paign 


Associa led Press 
DENVER, July 29—Former 
Agriculture Secretary Charlies 
F. Brannan today was ready to 
step up to Republican Dan 


"tempt to debate, in particular, 


pensions and the treatment of 
our elder citizens, educational 
legislation, foreign policy and 


nate the Massachusetts Gov- 
ernor. Pressed as to whether 
Herter’s name will be put in 
nomination, Stassen replied 
“I believe it ili.” 

He said that as a result of 
the new poll he and his group 
are taking and the “whole evi- 
dence.” he believes Herter's 
nomination “will come about.” 

He added that a “great ma- 
jority” of delegates to the GOP 
Convention are not pledged to 


4 gala, glamorous cruises 
to BERMUDA HAVANA ond NASSAU 


. . + All expense fares include round-trip transporta- 
tion; st inimitabl insatel culsion, top 


swim . 
for less thon 


| Th. 


ming, deck sports. 
Grotto N 3 


all the rest of the real issues,” 
he added. 

Thornton, who less than a 
month ago was named to head 
the GOP national campaign for 
farmr votes, charged Brannan 
was a failure as Secretary of 
Agriculture 

The Gunnison cattleman and 
rancher declared there are 248 
crops from which American 
farmers derive cash income. He 
said six.of these were “social- 
ized and subsidized” while 
Brannan was Secretary of 
Agriculture 

“These are the only six that 
have a major problem.” he as- 
serted. He listed the crops as 
wheat, corn, cotton, tobacco,' 


Thornton's debate platform but 
would not commit himself to 
any “downon-thefarm”™ con- 
tests suggested by the western 
Colorado cattieman 

Thornton, golfing companion 
-of President Eisenhower dur- 
ing his Denver vacations, in 
vited Brannan, Democratic as 
pirant for Cotorado’s U.S. Sen 
ate seat. “to a cotton-picking 
wheat - shocking. cow - milking, ~ 


calf-roping, or calf-branding,”* 
contest Pueblo, said he assumed “the 


“I'm not a synthetic. farm- voters of Colorado are interest- 
er,” Thornton told the Colora- ed more in my intellectual ca- 
-* do Republican State Assembly pacity than my physical prow- 
Mollohan wrote Attorney yesterday in accepting his par-ess. Otherwise, the Repubii- 
Herbert B. Brownell (YS 20mination for the United cans should have nominated 
: States Senate seat vacated by Man Mountain Dean (a wres 
Jr. and Comptroller General) sijing and retiring Republican tler) for the U. S. Senate.” rice and peanuts | SIMONIZ SPECIAL! 
them Sen. Eugene D. Millikin. Brannan, who must win the) Meanwhile State Democratic een 

The 46-year-old, two-time Democratic nomination in a Chairman Fred Betz Sr., termed Reg. $9 95 ford, Plym. 
ion Ceres 


Three 7-Day Crusses 


Bermuda 


Sasleng 


Special 9-Day Cruise 


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NASSSAU 


Sailing Aug. 26 Aug. 11, 18; Sept. 4 
trom $1 50) vies saxes trom 9711S vies rexes 


Make your reserrations new at your 
lecal trare! agent or contact... 


Nixon and can “reevaluate” 
the situation between now and 
the Convention which starts 
Aug. 20 


Title Guaranty Co Denver 
and Alden G. Roech, president 
of ColumbiaeGeneva Steel 
S. Steel Corp., San 


Boesc hen 
stein. prewdent of Owens orn. 
ing Fibergias Corp. Toledo. 
igen T Connor. president of Division. I 
Merck Co. Inc. Rahwer. Francisco 


. 
— 


. 
State Aide Resigns I 


The State Department an-i- 
nounced yesterday that Smith 
N. Crowe Jr., assistant to the OD 
Legal Adviser, had resigned ee 
to practice law in Columbia, % 
Mo, Crowe joined the Depart- ) 
ment in 1949 after serving as 
‘Assistant Attorney General in 
Missouri. 


A 


Inquiry on Swing's Triy < 
By Administration Urge 


tT. « 
Rep Robert H. Mollohan (D 

“. Va) said yesterday be has Genera!) 
asked the Administration to in 
vestigate charges that Immugra 
tion Commissioner Joseph M. Joseph Campbell asking 
Swing improperly used govern-to make their own investiga 
ment equipment and personnel tion 


ceil! 


711 14th ST., N. W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 


MEtropolitan 8-1520 


Colorado govenor offered to de- Sept. 11 primary race with for--Thornton a “guitar-strumming $15.00 
for hunting trips in Mexico and 46 Swing. who admitted he used bate the farm problem with mer Congressman John A. Car-c4ndida te w political 1195 
Canada a government plane, jeeps and Brannan, Secretary of Agricul- roll, declared, “I have milked strength Is glamour and show- 
4 House Government Opera an airconditioned trailer on ture under President Truman, more cows than Thornton has Manship. 
tions Subcommittee headed by the trips, insisted hunting was “on any platform in Coloradoever seen. I! have shocked 
Mollohan charged in a report only incidential. He said he or outside of it” more hay and I have worked al- On State Visit 
tact week that Swing was guilty took the trips to confer with Brannan, told of Thornton's most as hard for fair prices for “ 
Reuters 
VIENNA, Austria, July 29 


a = susine government prop- Mexican and Canadian border challenge while attending a consumers and farmers as he 
officials Democratic women's picnig at has worked against them.” 
Now general counsel of the Prince Norodom Sihanouk of 
here today 


er’y 
Gf, . y, |\National Farmers Union here, Cambodia arrived 
ost . cup ‘) Brannan said he would “glad-'by plane from Paris for a three- 
ly” accept Thornton's debate day state visit. He was met by 


What Estes Really Said ... on Dry Law | ts.2t.2 nomen —** Lecoota rig ana State Secre 
It WAS a Skunk... Lauds Stonewall 


just the farm problem.” tary for Foreign Affairs Dr 

“I would like Thornton to at- Bruno Kreisky. ’ 
an elector of the Hall of 
Fame, I cannot escape your 


influence. I have véted for 
Stonewall Jackson.” 

The Confederate genera! is 
buried at Lexington, Va. 


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‘en 


7-1234, 
ost and 


Pittsburgh's just « breakfast eway 
on Northwest's convenient Flight 
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Southern Senators who voted 
against the confirmation of 
Solicitor General Simon EF 
Sobeloff to be a judge of the 
Fourth Circuit Court of Ap 
peals might be surprised to 
know that Judge Sobeloff is 
en record as & champion of 
Stonewall Jackson. 

It all deweloped before he 
was nominated for the judge- 
ship. The Maryland chapter 
of the United Daughters of 


- *e the 


°e? 
weck’s eaetwesl seus 
been gothered dy the reporters 
The Werkingtos Post end 


i an 


-erve 
here 


i 
Temert Hered 

Kefauver President 
headquarters is troubled over 


fer- 


Ministerial . 
the Senator as telling a Fior- 
ida questioner he “certainly 
would real severe 
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—who previously had been 
chief judge of the Maryland 
Court of Appecis—in further- 
ing the nomination of Jack- 
son for a place in the Hall 
of Fame. 

Sobelof wrote 2 letter of 
recommendation to the Hall 


a headquarters 

spokesman said. Kefauver 

favors states’ rights in this 

feld—and is opposed to na 
| prohibition 


A normal, active child literally burns up energy 
in the course of tHe day. To keep him well and 
must be Plenty of 


Frankfurter, who wrete Sobe- ) 
lof: “Even in my capacity as | 


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19KilledasTexas Oil Tanks BlowUp 


BLAST—From Page I ~ 


— into the pipelines. A num- 
r of railroad tank cars filled 
with gasoline were inside the 
lant and couldn’t:be moved 
ecause of damaged tracks. 

The fire started as a small 
one. There had been some 
tank 199. It didn’t look too bad 
~ flames were shooting up 50 
feet, not unusual in this type 
of fire 

Firemen from Dumas and 
Sunray were fighting the blaze) 
and others from surrounding: 
towns had been called to stand 
y 

Then came the ex plosion and 
the wall of flame. and more 
tanks went up 

Bill Lask. news editor of the 
Moore County News. who was 
covering the original fire, wit 
nessed the explosions 

“Firemen from the 
Volunteesw Fire Department 
were fighting the blaze close 
up. Volunteers from the Sun 
ray were helping them,” Lask 
said 

“Suddenly there was this 
terrible explosion, a thud like 
&@ rocket going off in the ajr. A 
moment liater 


Dumas 


ing tank had exploded a nearby 
tank. Then came a series of 
Several more explosions 
“A bright orange mushroom 
boiled up, floating in heavy 
black smoke . 
Ss2id some spectators 
were injured 
He estimated 100 to 150 pet 
sons were in area when 
the explosion erupted 
National Guard units in the 
Texas Panhandle were called 
out. 


Lhe 


Texas Blaze Victim 
Married to D. C. Girl 


“fXne of the victims of the 
devastating oil blast in Dumas 
Xas. vesterday was the hus 
nd of the former Jean 
Whose perenis 
a4reMr. and 
rs. George 

'. Senge, 3643 
Warren st. nw 
The dead 
Than was R. S. 
“Cotton” Wier. 
27, who met his 
wife while 
Rationed at Ft 
Pelvoir, Va.. as 
ulieutenant in 

e Army 
were mar 
( athedral 1946 

here for about a 
Pefore moving to Texas. Wier 
S graduated from Texas 
Tech in 1948 and was assistant 
@onstruction superintendent of 
Die oil plant which caught fire 
gesterday 


Wier 

at Wash 
and 
vear 


! 


~ Mrs. Wier graduated from 
oodrow Wilson High School 
Wi 1940 and was a Government 
gorker before her marriage. 
«The couple had two children. 
— 8, and Peggy, 4. Mrs 
jer's father is a plant superin- 
dent with the Chesapeake & 
tomac Telephone Co. Mrs 
amy brother, George IJr.. 
ves in College Park. Other 
Furvivors include the victim's 
perents of El Reno, Okla., and 
two brothers and two sisters, 
ali of Oklahoma 
Services for Wier are to be 
held in Dumas today. 


“HOT SHOPPES 
Stecial 
| Family Dinner 


Choice of Appetizer 


HAMBURGER 
STROGANOFF 


over Noodles 


( risp Garden Saled 
Hot Roll with Butter 
Taner Dessert 
Coffee loe Cream 
Fresh Peach Surprise 
Strawberry Sundae 
Orange Chiffon Cake 
Hiomemade Apple Pie 


Beverage 


the concussion’ 
hit me. The heat from the burn-' 


ee 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
— Mendes, July 30, 1956 © 3 


This picture of the smashed 
at a Brookivn drvdock. illest 
between the Andrea Doria 


Doria Victims Sought . 


In Stockhol 


By Cla 


aN e at 


bow of the Steckhoim. taken 
rates the force of the collision 


and the Swedish liner. The part of the ship extended an 


- 


ms Bow 


ire Cox 


United Press 


NEW YORK, July 29—The 
possibility was raised today 
that the bodies of some of the 
victims of the collision of the 
| Stockholm and Andrea 
Doria be buried in the 
sins of the Swed 


OM 


ne 


mangied rem 
ish lime! 


\ 


— 
S Iding 
OOK a2 news 


Rethlehem phu 
Co. oficial ¥ 
man a tour of the de 
molished area indicated sev 
eral places where bodies ma) 
lie beneath twisted steel, wood 
and furnishings. 

The Stockholm, whose bow 
was sheared off when the 
liner crashed Into the Andrea 
Doria Wednesday night, deal- 
ing the Italian vessel a mortal 
blow, is in drydock for an as- 
sessment of the damage before 
the making of repairs 
} Three Stockholm crew mem- 
bers are missing and pre- 
sumed dead in the wreckage 
The Bethlehem spokesman 
said it was possible, but not 
probable, that bodies of some of 
the Andrea Doria'’s 18 missing 
passengers also might be 
found in the Stockholm’'s bow 

Two bodies of Andrea Doria 
passengers have been recov- 
ered. Eighteen others are pre- 
sumed to be dead 

Additional passengers of the 
liner, which sank off Nantucket 
Island Thursday morning, may 
have gone down with the ship, 
Italian Line officials said 

The bodies of two of the five 


mo 


mori 


night for reports on the fate of 
70 persons who had not been 
accounted for brought many 
telephone calls today. Italian 
Line officials, clerks and tele 
phone operators were hopeful 
ly awaiting still more calls 
Reporters who toured the 
ckholm saw an unbelievable 
mass of clothes, bottles. blan 
kets, magazines, toilet articles 
and other items strewn 
throughout the wrecked area 
On the top deck were a broken 
telephone and part of a roll of 
toilet tissue that Bethlehem 
officials said. almost certainly 
were from the Andrea Doria. 

A ship company spokesman 
said wreckage was heaped so 
high that it would be impossible 
to uncover any bodies that 
might be under it until the re 
pairs are started 

(The Associated Press report 
ed that a crewman aboard the 
Stockholm said today the 
vessel's powerful foghorn was 
not im operation at the time 
of the Stockholm’s crash with 
the Andrea Doria. Bernabe 
Polanco Garcia, a Spanish 
cleaning man on the ship, in- 
sisted he could not be mistaken 
about the foghorn. He said that 
when it was operation, its 
sound was overpowering 


Man Admits 
Garcia was the man who 


rescued 14-year-old Linda Mor- Killing Girl, Ds 
gan, daughter of Edward P - 
After Attack 


— 


Swedish ship's bew from her 


Morgan), Washington, D. C 
newcasters, and stepdaughter 
of Camille Cianfarra, Madrid 


New York ewe 


: 


workman stands where the bew of the Steckhelm ericndéed 
—at the water line—before the crash. The mest forward 


additional 78 feet. 


Unrest Prem 


Linda Morgan, 14-veareold daughter of Washingtes ares 
caster Edward FP. Mergan, thanks the seamen, Serusbe 
Polance Garcia. whe saved ber Ife after the Steckbole 
smashed inte the Andrea Deria. Linda, knocked inte the 


Andrea Doria statrreem. © 25 


found lying beneath the wreckage by Garcia. (Stery, Pg 1) | 


ing be waented te “fad 
what this is afl about.” 
Under continued questionmg 
Lugo finally tbreke down and 
comfessed. Deputy Chief Ic- 
spector Edward Byrnes, sand 


. 


ee 


Stockholm crew members pre- corres , 

pondent of the New York 
sumed dead have been recov- Times. from the wreckage of 
ered. the Stockholm’s prow.] 

The number of passengers’ In Genoa, Italy, the Italian 
unaccounted for was cut to 47 Line announced that the liner 
today with word that one per-Conte Grande will make two 
son on the passenger list never special trips to New York to 
had boarded the ship at all carry passengers stranded be- 
and that two children had been cause of the sinking of the 
taken to Toronto by their par- andrea Doria. The Line said 
ents without reporting to aU-'the Conte Grande would leave 
thorities when they reached Naples Aug. 27 (and Genoa the 
New York. following day) on its first run 

Some persons had been listed 4 similar trip will start Sept 
as unaccounted for because the os 
passenger list carried their 
names as they appeared in pass- 


NEW YORK. July 23-—A 
laborer who admitted raping a 
three-year-old girl and hurling 
her to death from the roof of 
a six-story Hariem tenement 
nearly was mobbed tonight by 
an outraged crowd of 2000 
shouting, firstchaking nocigh- 


Ready Made $27 50° 
Custom Made $95 to 

He was saved by seven detec- 
tives, who surrounded him. 
drew their guns and forced 
an opening through the crowd 
to their wailing cars ; 

The prisoner is Diego Lugo, 
24. of Manhattan. The victim. 


FARNSWORTE-RELD isa 
S16 Seventeenth St. ou 


ports, while the passengers 
gave different names to steam- 
ship officials on arrival here 


Jeanette Ribot, was snatched 
from her crib in her mother’s 
apartment at 4 a. m. carried 


Midnight Ride 


Police Grab | 
Fugitive in 
Zany Chase 


i: te 


we meke @ 


a record {or pemwiresi tr ant. 


rebbery. bad beet grrested for 
farcing tos wey ime tos fate" + 
samumeer cettege a Sorte 
Beach Beasee His father 
wouiést gue bre amr were 
Be was arrested Trarsda 
migh: 

Friday nigh eo the iz 
watchman ses esiaeg Gomer 
""T re > 2a os 


r —- — 
Wu- me 5s * _* 


= 
«= &) Laren 


o- 


tald éetectries sora g ‘« 
pry that be bad gues a Jare< 
Varphes a tra“e trite 2 mer 
ooo and be kere Ghete W 


Tramieas Sctee 
freme>raly cabled the @sowce 


Sherctis after. Marsies and 
‘our compamers Crore eo anc 
were arrested Polre saad t'ree 
of thee beiped m@ the era 
60 are beaeg bee <. 
ga wat. 

The thee 
arrived at tbe Yorth Beart » 
ht Se te meee (O06 
‘nupd mo ame —uetTe so Ore d--! 
Ss oak the eee 
nadung Murprt; ost 


——_ i = = — —_ — —E a 


=T> 


a 


- 


~~ 


wh re 


i pea weed fect af. baruer 
sTvere. o¢ faragce crac. 
call RE. TGR, tee OF Bei 
shle A PF. Weedee Ca Oar 
Serve cect is reasemaebice aad 
guarantee’ Bedert arcewets 
nalilehice We arve DC. Me 
and Va 
ca pepe © The C00 Belial 


A. P. WOODSON CO. 


Nm. eae Kw. © SE F-Seee 
A 


4 


Scythe Those Weeds! 
It's Hay Fever Time 


the weeds without official 
action. ~ 

He noted that hay fever ts 
caused by airborne pollen of 
ragweed and other weeds. 

“Unfortunately,” Dr. Heath 
continued, “the average person 
net plagwed by the disease is 
inclined to pass off the ‘hay 
season" rather lightly. 
But to those who suffer, hay 
fewer is a most annoying and 
serious matter.” 


Destrert resadents were asked 
tecday t cul the weeds on 
prope r* ws 
The aeeaal pice by the Dts 
trxt Health Depastment came 
theese @Gars SGefore Aue | 
sootiare—Sat. for many. un 
camifertabie—dbernaing of the 
nay fever seasorc 
Behar? the sugges“ ion. voaced 
by De Prederikc& © Hegth. Act 
img Dérector of Public Health 
= the peeeteity «of mveking 
socalled “weed Ineo” —a 
? Reaters Drown 


KRENWERL NA. Me. 
teenagers drowned | 
la boating accident on 
the Mi sm River. The bodies 
f Dewid Emmons. 18. of West 
Kennebunk and Gerald Hut- 
19 of North Kennebunk- 
were recovered. 


> : 
‘ew 


the 
fever 


t+» 


July 2 


* 


ao 


— 


> 
- 
and eaforrement prom 


inneow. Ve urge 


. co a ae | Ps rg 


take 


4 ° am | °4 eourT =3°2 more 


~ ae 
RALEIGH HABERDASHER 


Advance Fall Sale 
Starts Today... 


om a Fall suit or topcoat 


SurTrrner sounds 


« Adqvarte Fa\ 


teiec. 


We ane? Sas? trv 
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2 tte users 


Sale makes qood sense ° 


~——2 . = 
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225m 


no e+ s the finest col- 


ncluded cur Sale Ss year 
ection of Raleigh, Hart Schaffner & Marx and 
Srookstreet suits, outercosts and sportswear that 
“e “eve ever Deen Also a prize 


Here are 


> ~**or 


an'@ 


- a “A 
. 


~f. 


collection of Back 


2 ew 1a 4s 


S65 Raleigh Tailored All Wool Swits and Ovter- 
coats now 43.75 


$65 te $75 Sests and Outercoats Taslored of Im- 
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S73 te 89.50 Sucts and Owtercoats by Nationally 
Famous Hart Schaftmer & Marx new 68.75 


~ - 


ur selection early while 
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uncer one oF cur wee mverwent pay- 
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—_- 


i ~aero 


- Mate Seore: (mre Merodis theoagh Frvdey 
Spring Salley Score: Open I oredr, through Seturdey 


re Bouce 


: a= oo +45 =m 


—- oo 


a -_ a 


up the fire escape to the reof 
and over the rooftops. Her 
A i13-yearold runaway boy nude body was Tound at the 
from Woodbridge, Va., was cap- bottom of an areaway an hour 
tured by police last night at the and a half later. . 
Iwo Jima statute in Arlington’ Only a few feet from the 
after he stole a 24year-cold child's crib her mother. Mra. 
Shetland pony and galloped 3% Josephine Mirindi Ribot, 22, 
miles in a midnight ride. and Lugo’'s brother, Jerminio, 
The boy stole the pony from 21, who lives with her, slept 
Richard Hagan, 13. son of J. undisturbed 
Foster Hagan of 1030 N. Buc-| After questioning Mrs. Ribot 
hanan st.,, Arlington. Hagan and Herminio Lugo the police 
saw the boy mount the pony, turned their attention to Diego 
_ break a fence and Lugo when he appeared say- 
‘ride off into the night. He ‘ 
called — P ange found - pay, 
boy resting pony at p 
statue, 3% miles from Hagan’s Churchill at Races 


; Re. 

Police officer Leonard H.| DUESSELDORF, Germany. 
Brown Jr. reported the boy July 28—Sir Winston Churchill 
said he had run away from arrived here by air today from 
home. He was placed in the London to watch his colt, Le 
Arlington Detention Home un- Pretendant, run in the Grand 
til police can contact his par- Prix of North Rhine West. 
ents. phalia. 


aboard rescue vessels. Of Runaway Boy 
An appeal sent out Saturday’ 


1.35 


HOT SHOPPES SAVE 40% 
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FOR SALE 
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"2 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
Monday, July 30. 1996 a 


OPEN EARLY ... OPEN LATE 
Shop Today, Washington Store, 9:38 am. to % p.m. 
Chevy Chase and Alexandria, 9:30 a.m. to 9:39 p.m. 


Where courtesy and quality are traditions! 


I ea ec trn 


| GENERAL ELECTRIC 
_APPLIANCES AT SAVINGS 


; Imeertsicre Ses 


ae pet ape | Flowers Welcome New German Troops | 


a “miracle” ... 


the birth of a drug | Seateerieg flowers, a gict rashes cat te wel wenges. West Germeeey. The treepe ore 
come German soldiers on thew recent ar- smeeenbers of the D6> Infeetry Battelice of 
4 Tt was Tmiace possible by ski” DeTeeTe Tar. rival te establish 2 eew garrisee sear ED the aew Beet Germs eres 


Gedication and a jot of money 
Our “miracle” starts with a young pharm: Areund the Werld | 


ceutical chemist whom well call Dr. ¥ 


‘tLe “e=*  |Japanese-Russian Peace Talks 


To Get Under Way in Moscow 


B> i-- ending the techoiral state of airport. Shigemifes Geciared : | 


~*~ 


MOSCOW. Jules —J span 
. = = , war thet st exists Setewees “The paerpece of ay visit bere 
ese Foreica Minster Mamoru the two countries is te sermalize relations be | 
Stugemitsa arrived here today Shisemites will meet with , 
— Toor 2ar* | . peace » ‘ Russ av? counmeT par Qe 
talks with Russia sieed af poreign Minister Dmitri Shep Ustien by terminating the tech 
sical State ef war which still 
. Me arriee! wee beraeleéed be exicte betuces the tee coun save 4.96 and do 
owner" , - ar 4 
ee — eee = cries moce than ten years after 
toump: for Sewet Comms . s -_ ; , h 
Party Sc" ary \sk"2 K Pro-aw wwe CPSs wee 6 es 7s ’ \" vour ironing VN it ease 
chev ‘fer WwW ments of Iz the peeseoce of Sheoctior | ’ 
previews peace talks came t© 3 be thee sold: “T may add that 4, | ~e . , IR ; 
Scodiae? lost March i Lee , f / : | G-E STEAM and DRY ON 
gon, Abrushcary managed aot 


=e 
- only to get the talks resumed “ S*atesmen of both countries f/ ' 
= te thecr peoples to establish a j \\ 


teers Jecem sed the Soviet ’ 


++«But because he showed so : 
his undergraduate cays, he received a grant 
from the American Foundation for Pharms:- 
ceutical Education —supported by ITS Orms 
in pharmacy — to carry on his graduate work 


. list price, 14.95 Q-” 
last September whet be ont amg mo rox of ill feeimmg for the 


> Several years later tor . 5 a phar- “rr an <= + =A, =< or Ve German Crance Der Are fstsre ~~ mal You iron easier with a GE >tearr and Dry 
Tai ye Doctor otned rs . Sonus the kat " “. . . O@eervers bere feel & a 
ee eS SS os ae oe rad Adenseer te come te Mes | Iron, for it lets you steam-iron everything 


maceutical manufacturing firm and became ee Sos ow for negotiabems mm whack PTesest talks, jest as the ones 
a member of a research team a = sage teckese Sal "= diplomatic relations between “SCeR Adensuer and the except heavy cottons, linens and starched 
things without sprinkling and without using 


— cpies Sah cent wall =v che former enemies were esta> - 
se 8 ~< 


a: ed <s Fi on Se some Regey rein nS € eae ve 
ge One of his assignments was to in. +i cate aitiegs hove caieed Ser cow 69 sears |dishod tiene Th “ik a damp press cloth. Switches to dry ironing at 
the medical possiblities af, *-4 ~«« >. = . the flick of a button 
ordinary herb. 
WS Snail Appliances, 3rd Fic North Buridong 


3 In his work. Dr. ¥ used research fecilities aso Alexandria 


costing millions of dollars. Everrthing he 
needed was proviced —electrom mirroscopes 
electronic balances: soundproof: Serie 


rooms for laboratory work 


' Time end again, Dr. Y and his co-workers 
felt they were close to something good. oni; 
to have it fade away. With infinite patience 
they Keep up the search 


a ~, . ofege. it's ome of the wot ie 
"eal Perla slepe yore | ever Lear 
in Gtieen. Se doa 
sae . Gay . t pet & oe 
— “ 
Ges Ss “Ss 4 * 
> S ; : 
¥ 
Fam A a 
») | : - | 
- = ‘ Adeturg (4650 
+ — oar a ung | serutuses A seecestz04. 
7? Se SS 
Se 
: they find «1 ey seek —a : 
Grug that will bring oe to miliecs of 
sufferers 
eos But is it read) ior ibe market? Not pel. The . 
drug has to pass many testa, and its toxic 
reactions, if any, known before it can be ap- : 
proved, produced and marketed 


if The drug stands up—it shows greai prom- 
ise. Now more money must be spent te 
purchase mew equipment te predece it 


in quantity. 


>> Now it is ready for the market. Regresent- 
atives of the pharmaceutical Grm cerry 
samples to physicians. Medical journal and 
direct mall advertising publicizes the drug 
and tells how Kh werks and bow © should 
be used 


save 110.00 and take the work out 


of your wash day with a new 1956 G-E 


| AUTOMATIC WASHER 
CLEAR-VUPLASTICMD 199.95 


Save yourself money and wotk with General Electric's big, new auto 
matic washer. This G-E washer with big capacity, is designed to gives = 
you clean, bright washes—al! automatically. The famous GE Active- ‘ 
tor® washing action dips, flexes and gently cleans clothes, piece by 
piece, as though washed by hand. You have pushbutton controls for 
easy selection of water temperature and washing time. The machine. 
will hold up to 9 pounds of clothes, and the water saver saves Getergent : 
and hot water when washing small ‘loads. Includes manufacturer's 5- =; 
year warranty WA-4656N ; 
Matching G-E Clothes Dryer, DA-626N (not shown), list price, 239.95, 

159.95 


Other New 1956 G-E Appliances at Big Savings 
“Filter-Flo” Automatic Washer, WA-750N, list price, 329.95 259.95 
Automatic Dryer, companion, DA-720N, list price, 259.95, Ins .- 
Automatic Washer, WA-55ON, list price, 299.95, 199.95 
Automatic Dryer, companion, DA-520N, fist price, 219.95, 139.95 . 


W8L—Mayjor Appliances, 2nd Floor, North Burideng 


® Prescription departments in drug slores and 
hospitals all over the country acc the ner 
drug to their stocks to be ready for demand 


«Js this the end of our “miracle”? No. indeed 
It is the beginning of a | snd eve 
greater miracie 


"st a2 teaeee «© « 


++ Someone is i in your family, su™ering roa 
a disease for which the new drug is specific 
Your doctor prescribes i. end soon the 
drug, which cost thousands of dollars to 
find and produce—and for which you pay 2 
relatively low price—is helping: your loved 
one vo recovery 


ae Ths i something to think about when yo 
ask the pharmacist. “How much. please?” 


++» Peoples Drug Stores 


At & locations in the j of 25.00 or Just 10% 
Washington area Prescriptions. : hal in budgeted thi tall : | 7 
Capr-e>t Brug Shores. lec - neeiindieaaniin 
ww Peer Pert (teen ee eS i ee ee ee J 
7 . 
- “ 


Jue WASHINGTON POST end TIVES HERALD 
Monde. Jule . 1956 > 


veyPt ered a5 < BoD te ft Beost 1 inh UU. S. Trade ~ 
Export Order | , LA a 4 Vith Sovict Ureed 


SUEZ—From Page I 


ils soch Pease t the 
Communists” 


 Kitchens— 
new colors 


; 
although offf-Western powers issued this 
cials of the new nationalized statement after a 5-hour ses- 
operation were privately con- cion 
cerned that serious problems “The meeting was in agree-| 


ported normal. 
) Tete? Pres 


Mikhet A. Chekmerer. Eos He seid Russia and the «satel 


might arise shortly as a result 
of Britain's sterling crackdown. 
Some diplomats were encour- 


ment about the gravity of the! 
situation and the need for pre-| 
serving the use of the canal in 


“ies eew economic minister to te countrie can be “tremen- 


markets for 


aged by an Egyptian announce- 
ment that it was appealing Brit- 
ains sterling freeze to the 
Court of International Justice 


the interests of all maritime ‘eited Ststes and the Soviet doubts the Russians can Ge 

nations as an international ‘IU mien iver on some of their trade 

waterway, in accordance with : a te promises ) 
Chekmarer = ac inter 


i 


| 
| 


If goods valuable te Russia's 


at The Hague. They said this 
indicated that Egypt was adopt- 
ing a more moderate line fol- 
lowing Presidént Gamel Abdel 
Nasser's slashing attacks on the 
West and his violent threats 
and warning: 


Powers Study Crisis 


But Take No Action 


LONDON, July 29 #—Brit 
ish. French and United States 
policymakers discussed without 

fom = tonight a course to 
free the Suez Canal from sole 
control of Egypt. The British 
and French were reported 
Pressing for strong counter- 
measures 

Spokesmen of the Big Three 


Tibet Revolt 
Gains, Delhi 
Pa per Told 


Reuvers 


NEW DELHI, India. July 29 
A full-scale war of independ 
ence is raging in Eastern and 
Northeastern Tibet and Chin- 
ese troops have been driven 
out of 13 Tibetan provinces, ac- 
cording to a letter in today’s 
issue of the Delhi newspaper. 
The Statesman, signed by Thup- 
ten Nyenjeh. co-governor of 
(syantse (Southern Tibet) 

The letter, dated July 19 
from Kalimpong (India) stated 
“I have only very recently 
come down from Lhasa (the 
Tibetan capital) and my at- 
tention has been drawn to re- 
eurring reports in The States 
man and in the press abroad) 
ef the disturbances in Tibet 
and of ‘revolts’ in Kham which 
suggest that the gravity of the 
situation t« not fully known 

“A fullecale war of inde 
pendence in now raging in 
Fastern and Northeastern Tib 
er 

‘Only the heavil fortified 
airbase of Kardzeh holds out 
against the Tibetans who now 
control an area of approximate- 


the terms of the Convention of 
1888 ” 

"ut the spokesmen empha- 
sized that no firm decision had 
been taken so far 

(The convention 1888. 


of 


signed in Constantinople, guar-, 


anteed that the Suez Canal 
should be open to all nations in 
peace o- in war. Russia was 
among nine signers of the con- 
vention.) 

While the Big Three were 
meeting, the Egyptian em- 
bassies in London and Washing- 
ton issued a statement giving 
assurance that Egypt intends to 
keep the canal open to all ships 
under nationalization 

The Egyptian statement in 
London blamed the United 
States and Britain for forcing 
Egypt's President Gamal Abdel! 
Nasser to take over the canal 
by withdrawing offers to help 
finance the Aswan Dam project 

Egypt has publicly recognized 
the validity of the Treaty of 
1888 

The delegates ee 
length implications an 
Egyptian = en ee ‘to 
rescinded, that ships using the 
canal will not be allowed to pay 
their tolls in checks drawn on 
British banks 

The delegates assigned. sev- 
eral expert subcommittees to 
coordinate the view of the 
three powers on legal, financial, 
m.litary and shipping problems 
arising out of the dispute 

Robert Murphy, American 
Undersecretary of State. was 
reported to have asked dozens 
of questions of British Foreign 
Secretary Selwyn Liovd and 
French Foreign Minister 
Christian Pineau. 


Japanese Fishermen 
Released by Russia 


KUSHIRO., Japan, July 29 
Two Japanese salmon fishing 
boats with a combined crew of 
34 arrived at this eastern Hok- 
kaido port yesterday after a 
month's imprisonment in So- 
viet Russia 

The 54ton Taihei Maru and 
5S0ton Kompira Maru No. 3 
were captured June 24 and ac 
cused of entering Russiap-pa- 
trolled fishing waters without 
a license. A Russian court 


Meeting in Lenden on the Suet Canal ot | 
United States Depaty Selwyn Lievwd and Freack Fereige MWimester 


uation yesterday. 


Under Secretary of State Rebert Murphy Christian Pieces (gesterwri 


’ “Dulles Calls Egypt's Seizure of Canal 
Grievous Blow to World Confidence 


POLIC\—Freom Page I 


precautions in no sense carried 
the implication of a possible 
commitment of American 
armed force against Egypt.) 

Dulles denounced Egypt's 
seizure of the Canal in a state 
ment which also carried an im- 
plied warning to Egyptian Pres 
ident Gamal Abdel Nasser 
against any action that would 
aff< the operation of the 
Canal itself.” He issued the 
statement upon his return from 
a Latin American trip 

“I have been particularily 
concerned with the Egyptian 
action In purporting to nation 
alize the Suez Canal Com 
pany.” Dulles said “Such ac 
tion strikes a grievous blow at 
international confidence 

“The action could affect not 
merely the shareholders, who 
as far as | know. are not Amer 
icans, but it could affect the 
operation of the Canal itself 
That would be a matter of deep 


his statement te reporters a 
National Airport. Dulles mrt 
with his top advisers end then 
conferred br telepheme wilh 
Mr. Eisenhower 

Suyder said after the tele 
phone conference that Dulles 
would not go to Londen to pom 
Deputy Under 
State Robert Murphy im emer 
gency conferences on the Soez 
situation. In fact. he said the 
question was not discussed by 
Mr. Eisenhower and Dulles 

Dulles statement was the 
first official United States crt 
icism of Nassers seizure of 
the Canal. While other officials 
had privately condemmed the 

thesr public statements 
limited to replies te “as 
ser's “inaccurate and misiced- 
ing” charges against the lL used 
States 

in declaring that Nasser had 
dealt a grievous blew % com 
fidence im international agree 


action 
weTe 


sane weuld ect bend ever F 
concessions te Earet eat Nox 


7 


Murpiyv 


cal 


that be was takeng @e specie 
prepesals fer éraimg euih the 


new Meédie East crus 


Secretary a@f ~ Laned 


He saudg 
S2te%4 wes cooetb 


sew ie the U. S. Chamber of 


Cemmerce monthiy publication *2° machine were traded ever 
thet bis country is willing to O@ 2 Umited scale, McCielian 
ead is Minister of Foreign saad, it could cause “deteriore 
then of the control« ever ctret 


‘talks &f the Waited States takes “2 “2teriais that might get 


‘Trade. Ivam Rabanew. Sere fer 
the “miiietive / creaimg con 
@itiees fer trade negotiation: 

He also said the Sorvrt 1 mon 

i “eager” te exchange informa 
mem en mdustrial uses of atom 

energy. He seed Rosie “is 2 

for 

ze 


ae 
terview with Harold C. MeCie! 
lem, aecietant Secretary of Com 


(right) talks with British Fereige “ieister 2 merce for mternationa!l sfairs 


te anewer Chekmarey 

Met tetien said the Comms 
mosts im thetr new emp asix on 
vade and ecosemic reiation:s 
with other countries “are cha 
vegieg ot im Geids where ve 
eaucel. The & clearly @ new 
aterna.iona!l game of matroing 
ecomemmic wits.” 


i 
atylieit 


Most By Doctors—Available 
Now Without Prescription 


Ree Teck. & F. Chee — 7 
fermeals powerGed mere “tee ony 
ether by Gecoerts fer Ther pereee 


pe t's 2 tee re The 


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suferes SO hes Poe Tg ar 


Medica! 188 "8 Poreeet cts 


‘errs 


Tleps estemse & ats fF Tce ee 


~thimk there is great dancer in 


4 
a 
a 


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1 
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ui 
iy 
9 


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SW tole ail : Seth ip 


have vour watch cleaned 


while voure away on vacstion 


QUALITY 
WATCH REPAIR 


Grve your watch a chance to recover from 
Gry, ight surmmmer dust, beach sand. and 
sat spray Dy “evIrng us 
youre away 2s 
watchwnakers give your watch a thoroug> 
Clearurg, anc at the end 
weexs De r@acy 
your busy tall season 

Woodward & Lothrop s quality 
pair i guaranteed for a year 


- ean * a oe 


an 
om wacarter wr 
a ee) 


> a wre es Tew 


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“atch re- 


*--7e¢ 
> 


ly 210,000 square miles. This ments, Dulles apperentiy re 
grows larger as the fighting 


spreads steadily towards 


found them guilty, confiscated concern to the United States, 
their catch of 45.000 salmon as one of the maritime na ferred to an agreement be 
and fishing equipment and tions.” tween the Suez Canal Company 
fined each man about $2000. ‘ Immediately after handing and Egypt. Under &, the Com ; - ; v= 


sw =‘nor 
Acanve 


Pece 
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Wa. — ieceiry 
as0 


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ENDOCREME 
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sightly wrinkles, Endocreme Liquid's ex- 
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cause skim doesnt tee! oily an «Ore 
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Piease add 10% Feeders! tex 


WEL—Coemetcs. Tat Fico 
siso Chevy Chose ood Alexants 


now ... Dana's newest 
creation for your Tabu lipstick 


READY-TO-USE 
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Excitingly new, non-messy wey to change 
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COSTUME JEWELRY SALE 


1 to 15 


Glorious choices; many one-of-a-kind. If they were in our 
regular stock, they'd be 3.00 to 30.00. But now you pay just 
¥2, for beautiful pieces you'll wear year-round. Come early to 
select from a rush of gold-color and silver-color metal. al- 
wayS-smart mock pearls, chalky whites, flashing rmunestones 
and smart colored stones with semi-precious look. 


Please add 10% Feders 


W4L—Costume Jewelry, Ist Floor 
» « « Oise Chevy Chase and Alesend is 


=| 


Lipstick 


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1.50 


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« . . also Chevy Chase and Alexandris 


" 4 ” : ~— # a + 
; mg © tay oe <n gy a % . eT * a) hae ey BG, 4 Flee, ae Geni ote ve : ray ae 
Teh Bye? Batt ro peat er. ES Mk gg PETES: a3 6am 

| | - a2 bite 5s Es et e a ake 


a seer ha as . ’ vs ™~s a ai FO wp 7 lity one 


iain Ee SHOPPING HOURS AT WOODWARD & LOTHROP .... 
WASHINGTON: 10m, 100, F ond'G Se. HW, Dixteict 7-530 ALEXANDRIA: GIS North Washington Strect, King &-1000 

Mendeys end Thurséoys, 9-30 to 9; other week deys, 9-30 to 6 Mandays, Thandeys, Fridays, 9-30 to 9:30; other wack days, 93D te 6 
— a 


— —_ —— a 
CHEVY CHASE: Wisconsin ond Westers Aves., Oliver 4-7600 
Mondays, Thursdeys, Frideys, 9-30 te 9-80; other week deys, 9:30 te 6 


es 


1 Senators Want 
Oil , Import Limits 


od P-ess 

Thirty-one Democratic me to the Government yerterdas 
ee Senators appealed for acsurance that it will take 
S action to limit imports to 
16.6 per cent of domestic prx« 
duction 
The 
Defense 


oil 


oe aga 
MAN AT A DESK! 


«~~ 30 CONVENIENT, Teo 


in a letter te 
Mobilizer Arthur §& 
Flemming, said imports 
have continuously exceeded 
this ratio despite Flemming's 
efforts to obtain a voluntary 
restraint on through 
appeals to the importing com 
panies 
it our under- 

standing the Senators said 
“that the future programs of 
these companies show great 
er excesses in scheduled im 
ports at a time when domestic 
production is being curtailed 

Sen. Frank Carison (R-Kan 
one of the signers of the letter 
told the Senate last week that 
he would lead a fight for 
mandatory quotas on oil im- 
ports next vear if the Admini 
stration does not succeered in 
obtaining voluntary agreements 
to limit imports 

Carison said Flemming 
formed him that the Admini 
stration was reluctant to im 
pose quotas on grounds of lead.- 
ing to regulation of the whole 
petroleum industry. But C€ari- 
son reported Flemming as say 
nz that there would be no 
alternative but to start action 
for mandatory restrictions if 
importers fail to restrict the 
flow of foreign oil voluntari! 

The Senators said no es 
dence is available that oi] im 
ports have been or are being 
restrained the | 
determined 
im the mierest 
fense 


Senatore 


oil 


imports 


is further 


Oxford 
PENDAFLE x” 
desk drawer outfit 


This new style filing ovffit 
fits in your deep desk drawer 
The hanging Pendaflex folders 
can't slemp or seg. Gives 
you instant ene hand refer 
ence to desk data. Ovtfit con 
sists of steel tray and 25 Pen 
dafiex hanging folders with 
printed headings—alse biaenk 
to make your own 

Come in today and 


8.45 


in 


inserts 
headings 
see 


“ fhaon mite 


ns nece«escam 


ff national de 


fail 


tus. 6 STOTT « co 


NA 6418) 
WASHINGTON 
Ave 


Bank Aide in Japan 


TOKYO. July 29 (INS 
' H. Dorr ef A 
Ranks Asia and Middie and 
Near East Department. arrived 
Tokyo today He will econ 
loan talks for Japanese 
irrigation and steel pro 


a core 


of the Vy 


¥ , treet NY in 
SUVER SPRING ALEXANDRIA duct 


’ 
8408 Geor King St. (ot™ 


ge Ave. i/ii 
pects. 


The Wastinalon Host 


i Tusiness 


f 


MONDAY, 


JULY 30, 


1956 


|Kennecott Copper Corp., 
‘largest United States copper) 


Keonomie View ..... 


Divergent Opinions on Trend 


IN SURVEYING the diver 
gent opinions about the busi 
outlook one find« two 
respected schools of 


nees 
highly 
thought e¢om 
mg tw oppor 
ing conci 
sions based on 
their interpre- 
tations of the 
sarrne set of 
figure« 

[here ic one 
group of Dusi- 
analysts 
iudg 
influ 


v,efry 


ness 
wrhnoete 
merit 
enced 
strongly by the changing re 
lationships between variwur 
iterns of the money and credit 
statistics and the relationship 
heftween some of these tems 
and other economic data. In 
the past sik montns ofr so 
some of these ratios have 
heen developing a pattern that 
in the past has carried im 
portant negative implications 
about the outlook for Dusiness« 
One of the numerous ratjo+ 
used by these analysts i« the 
relationship between mons 
ipply and the economy's need 
money as measured ty 
National Product. Your 
decisions spend are prob 
ably influenced by the surplus 
or deficiency ef your cash in 
ation to your normal need 
The same is true of the econ 
omy a6 2 whole 


is 


OT 
(,Tross 


: 
io 


re 


fiwer ine naact wear eS 5 > 


noney supply (‘demand 
npius Currency) hae 
ne a6 rapidiy as th 
money (measured t 
(roses Nations 

| can tt daemon 
on an historical basie 
declining 
supply to 


neyt 


ratio Oo 


money GNP has 


joften been followed—sooner 


By Harold B. Dorsey 


or later—bDy a decline in the 
Federal Reserve Board's index 
of industrial production. On 
an empirical basis, therefore. 
there would seem to be a rea- 
son for deriving a negative 
conclusion from the behavior 
of the money supply/GNP 
ratio 
ow 

IV CONNECTION with this 

ubject. however—and most 
germane to the. situation at 
the moment—we quote from a 
seech given by the former 
oresident of the Federal Re- 
serve Bank of New York, Allan 
Soroul, in Atlantic City on 
May 24: 

“There are those who would 
discard or discount the evi- 
dence of the figures of bank 
credit if it does not jibe with 
certain formulae concerning 
the optimum relationship be- 
tween the socalled ‘money 
supply and the growth of the 
economy. They are inclined 
to believe that the money sup- 
ply has been lagging during 
the past year or more in which 
the Federal Reserve System 
has been following a policy of 
credit restraint. and that thi« 
may be slowly strangling busi- 
reese 

| must confess that IT have 
little confidence in these me 
chanical formulae [ think 
thre one. te the extent that it 
* applicable. is only applica- 
ie over long periods of time 
it produces pretty effective 
haris the past 30 years. 
nut doesnt tell you much 
about the next 50 days or even 
ueeks It cannot be dicre- 
garded as a component of our 
economic well being. but it is 
only one factor in the complex 
of monetary and credit phe 


of 


. nomena which must be viewed 


7:45, 915 AM AND 500 PM: 


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WTOP RADIO 


together. 
eo 

THESE OBSERVATIONS 
are Most appropriate nov 
when many of those who base 
their conclusions on the his- 
torical behavior of the mone- 
tary ratios are anticrpating de 
teriorating business condi 
thons, whereas 


who are in @ position to influ- 


ence money supply seem to be 
| more worrted about inflation- 


ary pressdres than deflation 
It seemed completely logical 


to presume that credit policies 
| today would be much easier 


than they actually are if the 
Federal Reserve suthorities 
were judging the business out- 
look to be threatened by sig- 
nificant deterioration. Evident- 
ly then, the Federal Reserve 
authorities are recognizing the 
negative implications of the 
momentary ratios only as in- 
dividual items “in the com- 
pilex of monetary and credit 
phenomena which must be 
viewed together.” Devoid of 
empirical relationships, the- 
ories and historical patterns. 
other practical conditions are 
probably influencing the con- 
clusions of the people at the 
Fed 

Such considerations pro> 
| ably include the prospect that 
wage and price increases re 


sulting from the steel strike | 


settlement will spread to other 
industries. This condition will 
constitute an inflation pres 
| sure 
Furthermore. while there is 


some opinion that inventory 


| liquidation might tend.to re- 


tard a snapping back of busi- 
ness activity 
quarter, the preponderant 
| opinion seems to be anticipat- 


ing @ recovery phase for that | 


| period—probably accompanied 
by higher commodity prices 
ows 

| EVIDENTLY, the monetary 
| authorities who determine na 
tional credit policies believe 
| that the very practical pros 
| and cons are likely to balance 


the authorities 


in the fourth |tommage 
struction for U. S. operators | 


tionary pressures in the | 
autumn and early winter—the | 
historical record of the mone- 
tary ratios to the contrary not- 
withstanding. 

There is no intent in this | 
discussion to disparage the | 
monetary ratios as tools which 
are yery valuable to the busi- 
ness analyst. But most of us 
have to concern otirselves with 
the treacherous problem of 
timing. The monetary ratios 
have not always been too help- 
ful in solving that particular 
problem, because the money 
and credit factors at least 
temporarily are’ often offset 
by non-financial forces. Ap- 
parently, the latter forces are 
deemed by the majority opin- 
ion to be in the dominant po- 
sition at this time and for the 
balance of this year. 

But. to quote again from 
Sproul’s excellent speech: “It 
is always possible for 
reasonable men working with 
the same set of facts to come 
to different conclusions in the 
still imprecise field of eco- 
nomic analysis. This is par- 
ticularly so when the economy 
is moving along a high plateau. 


and when there is no clearly | 


apparent and dominating force 


which is likely to cause it to ' 


fesume its upward journey or 
to send it down into one of the 
valleys of recession that lie 
along the way ... Our glimpse 
into the future are still those 
of men with imperfect fore- 
sight and with imperfect 
knowledge of how millions of 
human being<« will react to 
various economic stimuli and 
deterrents.” 

There is something very il 
luminating in 


when it is made by a very in- 
telligent man who has devoted 
most of his life to the analysis 
of business and financial con- 
ditions. Many people with less 
intelligence and less experi- 
ence have yet to learn that 
business forecasting is not an 
exact science. But it is healthy 
that they should keep trying 
to make it so. 


| against 
poses period. 


National 


such a forth- | 
right statement of humility 


Kennecott Copper Soars in 6 Months 


NEW YORK, July 29 w— 


| producer, today reported earn- 


lings for the six months ended 
iJune 30 of $89,119,165, equal to) 
1$8.24 a share. 


| 


This was an increase of $65.- 
430,468 or $6.05 a share, over 
the similar period of 1955. Pres- 
ident C. R. Cox attributed the 
increase to the higher price for 
copper, which averaged 45 
cents a pound during the pe- 
riod compared with 32 cents a 
pound in the first half of 1955. 

Sales were $327,134,077 as 
$282.362,229 for the 


Union Bag & Paper Corp. 
Reported record high sales and 
inet income in the first half of 


|1956. Sales reached $68,235,131 


‘compared with $61,751,434 in 
the first half of 1955 and net of 
'$8.781.635 compared with $7.. 
155.294 a year ago. The net 
was equal to $1.65 a share on 


- — 


Douglas Chosen 
By Pentagon for 
Transport Award 


Tnited Prese 

Donald W. Douglas. 
aircraft builder, yesterday was 
named winner of an annual 
award for the “most outstand- 
ing contribution to military 
transportation.” 

The award given by the 
Defense Transporta 
tion Association, a military- 
civilian group. The winner is 
selected by the transportation 


1s 


committee of the Joint Chiefs 
of Staff. 

Douglas, board chairman and 
president of Douglas Aircraft 
Co.. has contributed to military 
and civil transportation for 
more than a third of a century 
the Pentagon said in announc- 
ing the award. It said 52 per 
cent of all the world’s commer 
cial airplanes were built by 
Douglas 

The newest Douglas trans 
port to begin flights for the 
military is the C-133, the 
world’s largest transport plane 
It is powered by turbine en- 


gines harnessed to propellers) 


and capable of nonstop inter- 
continental missions. It first 
flew last April 

Last year the award was won 
by Charles H. Weaver. wha de 
signed ithe submarine Naut 
nuclear power plant 


lus 


Demand for Tankers 


Heaviest in 


The United States Merchant 
Marine has less idle tanker 
tonnage this summer than m 
any since 1951, it was reported 
yesterday 

Unused carrying capacity 


amounted to four per cent, or 
about 216.000 deadweight tons. 
of the fotal tanker fleet. the 
American Merchant-Marine In- 
stitute said 

The active U. S_ privately- 
owned tanker fleet totaled 350 
vessels of 5.868.964 deadweight 
tons on duly 1. This was 12 
vessels fewer and 147,600 tons 
less than Jan. | 

The institute said 


foreign countries of 11 tankers. 
the loss of one in a marine 
accident and the removal of 
another from U. S. flag opera- 
tion. One new tanker was 
added to the active fleet dur- 
ing the first six months. 

The institute said the market 
for new tankers is “strong.” 
At mid-year, 
on order or under con- 


the de-| 
cline was due to the sale of 


the total tanker 


Five Years 


was 611.00 deadweight tons. a 
gain of 112 per cent since Jan 


ithe common stock compared 
the, 


famed | 


Overat' aA 


revenue 29.9°94.376 
© 


with $1.35 last year. 
Otlter corporation reports in- 
cluded: 


Transcontinental Gas Pipe ny Cerp 
for cheese months — June 


ended June 30 


Net imeome $493.218 
of 1.04 


on 
oes wee 
nea States 
Cerp. for six mont - ended P 
75 | Net income 7.647 
A share 


Opers 
reven 


ad 
et ‘neome 931 27-7 775 


956 
$2 arr 411 
A share tle 


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Solanentet Air Lines for six months 


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_ 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


| — 


The new $250,000 Fairfax Methodist Church, 


Church Move 
Set After 
134 Years 


When the Fairfax Methodist 
Church moves next Sunday, it 
will be leaving a site it has oc 
cupied for 134 years 

The County's 
odist per a nee 
well services ye 
S. Payne st 
Fairfax Court 


oldest Meth- 
held fare- 
terday at 301 
across from the 
house, on land 
that has been a place of wor 
Ship since a log cabin chapel 
was built here in 1822 

rhe County's mushrooming 
Population has forced the 
abandonment of the historic 
aite 

The building that 
on Payne st. was built 
for a congregation of 72 
bers. Although addit 
made to the white frame struc 
ture in 1928 and again in 1947 
ihe growing congregation and 
Sunday schoo] more over 
flowed the 200-seat edifice and 
its crowded site 

Last July, ground was broken 
for a new church and school 
building at Kenmore dr. and 
Stratford ave. near Route 29 
211. That building, a $250,000 
project that seats 425 in 
sanctuary and has 21 class 
rooms, will be consecrated next 
Sunday at services conducted 
by Alexandria District Supt 
Dr. Roland P. Riddick 

The exact date of the found 
ing of the Fairfax Methodist 
(Church is not known hut 
Bishop Francis Ast 
tioned preaching in 
early as 1784. That 
year the American 
(Church was first organi 


now stands 
n 1876 

mem 
ions were 


once 


Methodist 


the - 


s whose descendants. 


7eq as 


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By Aubrey Graves. Country Life Editor 


On the steps of the old church, in which services were held 


for the last time yesterday, 


are Ashby Graham (left), a 


member for more than 40 years; Samuel Lee Rosenberger, 
ll, & more recent member, and the Rev. J. William Hough. 


an indpendent unit, with Bishop 
Asbury its first ae 

The first building of Payne 
st. then called Ox road,.-was a 
log cabin known as Duncan 
Chapel, built in 1822. The land 
was given to the congregation 
by Bleeker Canfield, one of 
Ashby M 
Graham. is a trustee of the 
church and has been a member 
for more than 40 years 

The log cabin was replaced 
in 1843 by a frame church, 
which served as a stable for the 
Union Army during the Civil 
War before it was burned later 
in the wal 

The cornerstone of the pres 
ent building on Payne st., laid 
on April 27, 1876, by Henry Ma- 
sonic Lodge, has been carried 
over to the new church and 
was laid a second time by the 
same lodge last March 31. 

The present minister, the 
Rev. J. Williams Hough, and 
the chairman of the church 
board, Dr. Fred M. Everly, both 
Masons, officiated at the cere 
mony 


Loyola Honored 
At Historic Church 


ST. INGOE’S, Md., July 29 
(Spl.)—The 400th anniversary 
of the death of St. Ignatius 
Loyola, founder of the Society 
of Jesus, was commemorated 
here today on a historic tract 
owned for more than 300 years 
by the Jesuits 

4 mass in observance of the 
anniversary was said by the 
Rev. Paul J. Rock, S. J., at 166- 


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year-old St 
Church here 
The church is on a site in St 
Marys County owned by the 
Jesuits since 1634 Built in 
1790. it is the third 
church on the tract. It-is said 
to be the oldest property in the 
world that has been in contin- 
uous possession of the Society 
of Jesus 
The church was 
church until 1922 
Michael's Church, at 
Md.. became the center of 
parish life. Since then, St 
Ignatius Church has gradually 
assumed the status of a shrine. 
The Society for the Preser- 
vation of St. Ignatius Church 
sponsored today’s«mass. The 
Society, made up of Catholics 
and Protestants, was formed 
several years ago to assure pre- 
servation of the landmark 
Father Rock 
St. Peter 
Church at 


Ignatius Catholic 


a parish 
when St 
Ridge. 


Claver Catholic 


Ridge 


Loyola Mass 
To Be Held in 


Leonardtown 


A field mass commemorating 
the 400th anniversary of the 
death of St. Ignatius Loyola. 
founder of the Jesuits, will be 
celebrated Tuesday at 7:30 p. 
m. on the grounds of St. Mary's 
Academy, Leonardtown, Md. 

The Most Rev. Patrick A 
O’'Boyle, Archbishop of Wash- 
ington, will preside at the 
mass, and the Very Rev. Igna- 
thus Smith, retired Dean of the 


School of Philosophy of Catho- % 


lic University, a 
will preach. 
be the Very Rev. William F 
Maloney of Baltimore, Provin- 


Dominican 


cial of the Maryland Province 


of the Society of Jesus 


The service will mark the of. : 


ficial close of the Ignatian 
Year. The mass is sponsored 
by the Fourth Degree Knights 
of Columbus of Southern Mary- 
land, the Father Andrew White 
General Assembly. Coopera- 
ting are the Catholic Daugh- 
ters of Southern Maryland and 
other Catholic organizations. 

The history of the Jesuit Or- 
der in the United States began 
when the Rev. Andrew White. 
the Rev. Thomas Altham, and 
a lay brother, Brother Gervase. 
arrived in Southern Maryland 
with the original settlers of 
the state on the “Ark” and the 
“Dove.” 

Another event marking the 
close of the Ignatian Year will 
be a special lecture and ex- 
hibit Monday at 8:30 p. m. at 
Blessed Sacrament Auditorium, 
5841 Chevy Chase pkwy. nw. 

The Rev. William F. O’Brien 
of Georgetown University will 
speak on the life and achieve- 
ments of. St. Ignatius. The ex- 


hibit, open afternoons and eve- 


nings .through next Sunday, 
will feature all existing biogra- 
phies in English of St. Ignatius. 


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The celebrant will 


Monday, July 30, 1956 


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8 
THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


» 


Guess 


Mandayv. July 38, 1954 


ow to Raise a Barn 


By Bob Burch t+. Stal! Phetecrarvherr 


\ Manassas. Va. lest week 
hundreds ef farmers. basi- 
nessmen. housewi\es and white 
collar from Prince 
William Ceunty relied up their 
sleeves and staged an old fash- 
- , jened barn raising 
They didn't Step at building 
ene barn. however. When they 
were finished after three davs 
ef back-tbreaking werk in 
Steaming weather four sturdy 
cattle barns steed on the new 
county fair greunds just eut- 
side Manassas on Ri. 234. 

The fair has been operaicd 
fer the past few vears “fer the 
kids” by the Prince William 
County Veteran's Farm Clab. 
The club is composed mostly 
ef veung veteran farmers whe 
teok om the fair as a civic 
project 

Last vear the fair was neariv 
wiped eut by twe hurricanes 
which scattered and damared 
their huce cattle tents and 
equipment. They lest $1708 as 
a result 

The less disceuraged but did 
net defeat the veunc farmers. 
whe fleated three leans and 
bought 2 64 acre farm tee 
miles east ef the town fer a 
fair site. Last menth thew sent 
out an appeal te the residents 
fer help. 

“What happened was won- 
derful.” Fair Manager Joseph 
Johnsen said 

» County residents from far 
and near breught power saws. 
shevels, hammers. tracters and 
trailers. and mest important of 
all te Jehnsen. themscives. 

As a result of the rare com- 
munity spirit, the barns will 
cast a total of about $8000. Twe 
of them. 361108 feet cach. are 
fer beef = and the tue 
others, - 48x108_ feet. are for 


dairy cattle 2 


Volunteer workers assemble heavy roof trusses for one ef the new barns 
on the fair grounds just outside Manassas on Route 234. Two of the partis 
completed cattle barns can be seen in the background. A special crane was 
built by Arnold Hines of Bristow to help hoist the roof trusses inte place. 


workers 


Acting as water “bey.” Mrs. Ned Sutphin pours for L. A. Fester and New- 
man Hopkins. The ladies, led by Mary Reseberry of Manassas and Mrs. 
Robert Beahm of Nokesville, also provided hearty picnic lunches fer the 
workers. 


a 4 


After completing his mail-carrying route, Ted Ritter takes hammer im hand to 


> 


- 


Grim-ipped Billy Youns. &. was the voungest of three ceerraitens of Yournc:s petri m on 
the bare raisings. He beiped out br carrying bober fer the seaweed bods 


Another hammerer is 14-veareld David 
Hersch. Befor? the building got under way, 


help in the project. The next step will be to build 2 permanent building to | contractor Raymend Spitties beavy equip- 


house the home economic displays during the annual fairs. 


1S 


Morning... 


IT IS CLEAR NOW that the Louisiana Legislature 
legislated the Sugar Bowl right out of importance. 
More often than not, on New Year's Day, the New Or- 
leans people could claim, with justification, that they 
had a better football attraction than the Rese Bowl. It 
won't be like that any more. 

Over the weekend, three colleges 
announced they were pulling out of 
the Sugar Bow! Week festivities. Notre 
Dame, Dayton and St. Louis Univer- 
sity served notice their basketball 
teams wouldn't play in the next Sugar 
Bowl tournament. It is a forerunner 
of what will happen when football 
teams are invited to New Orleans 

The rub is that new lew they have 
Im Louisiana, the one the Legislature 
recently passed that said athletic con- 
tests between Negroes and whites will 
henceforth be illegal When Gov 
Earl Long signed it, he doomed the 
Sugar Bowl to second-rate importance, made of Hs annual 
football game a provincial thing without impact. 

Notre Dame, Dayton and St. Louis stated simply thei ree 
sons for quitting the Sugar Bowl Louisiana's new lew, they 
said, “denies students regularly enrolled and eligible under 
intercollegiate @ules, the opportunity te represent then 
schools.” They were talking, of course, about ther Segre 
students, against whom they were not going to discruminate 
no matter what the Louisiana philosophy might be 

THE SUGAR BOWL must give up any idcas ft has of mam 
taining its national importance. Navy's appearance at New 
Orleans two years ago, a spectacular feather in the caps of 
the New Orleans people, can't happen again. The Acegem 
pointing to Negroes in its corps, has made thal plam. Netiner 
¢an the Sugar Bowl entice any other major coliege feothall 
team that isn't labeled a Dixie product 

For the Sugar Bowl, the upshot is that & will be knees 
henceforth merely as a scctional contest to settle some kind 
of a Dixie championship only. The Legisisture, in effect, 
limited the New Orleans game to an affair between members 
of the Southeast Conference. The Rose Bow! and the Orange 
Bowl, unimpeded by intolerance, can only flourish the ferter 
while the Sugar Bowl withers on its vine of bigetrs 

The University of Kentucky, the fourth team tmvited te 
compete in the Sugar Bow! basketball tournament, has not 
withdrawn but there scant consolation for the Louisiana 
racists in that fact. Kentucky, although a member of tbe 
Southeastern Conference, mn accepting the imvitatien spelied 
out its willingness to play against Negroes, if there were 
Negroes on the scene 


1s 


DURING THOSE dozen years when Joe Louis held the 
world heavyweight title, there was no Gemand. as m@ the 
Jack Johnson era. for a “white hope” te return Nord 
supremacy to the prize ring. The horrendous consequenctr: 
pictured. if a colored man were to hold the tithe. newer came 
to pass. In contrast, when Rocky Marciane batiered Leut 
senseless that nicht in Madison Square Garden. there war 
& sort of national sadness 

Before Louis demonstrated that Americans could rail 
around a colored champion, Jesse Owens was already s ne 
tional hero with his triumphs in treck and field. More than 
any other Negroes, Louis and Owens lighted the way tor 
youths of their race to find fame im athiectics, until in 1967 
Jackie Robinson came along to demonstrate thet a Negre 
eould play in the major leagues 

There had been skilled Negro boxers before Louis but 
they got no title fights. They were shunned by promoters 
as bad box-office. Usually they served only as trie! herees 
and when colored fighters were matched agamst cach other 
it usually was dull. There was little point te winning, emp 
way. The winner wasnt going to be promoted 

Goldie Ahearn, who used to promote in Washingten, dé 
spaired when he had two Negro fighters in the tTymg. “They 
don't put.out,” he said, “because they don't have anything 
to win. Maybe they've never seen each other before, bul 
they get an understanding. They talk te cach other wath 
their eyes, I think.” 


ALL OF WHICH was changed when Louts came along & 
prove that Negro fighters could be drawing<cards. And 
when Jackie Robinson emerged as a big leaguer WO years 
ago, the effect on Negro youth was magical. The same leds 
who, with Louis as their hero, had been striking boxing 
poses and using their footwork im the alleys and on the 
streets, were now out there with gloves and bats emulating 
Robinson 

In this enlightened age, the Negro baseball player is moe 
longer a novelty. He isn't signed by majer league clubs 
simply because he can be exploited as a gate sttraction fer 
colored fans. He is assessed by the same measurement« 
scouts use on white players: Can he throw’ Will the hit” 
How's his speed? Will he be a big leaguer’ 

With the fans, performance, not complexion. seems 
count. The pity ts that in Louisiana the question was not 
left to the Sugar Bow! fans who buy the tickets. but te the 
State iegisiature where demagoguery is se apt te flourish 
Just what kind of a service the legislaters performed, except 
self-service, is unclear. It will be brought inte better focus 
perhaps, when the Sugar Bow! is shunned as unpalatable to 
the thinking of colleges with a conscience 


Nats Games 


The Box Scores 


‘FIRST GAME) 
WASHINGTON AB 


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PLY—Beone Bo. 
4 Detroit 
tif_se..e'7's + Virginia Beats 


on wi. <= Maryland Stars 


| o4 WINNER 
(4-4) 
Renee. 
Blind Golf Champion American Legion Juntos all- 
CHICAGO, July 29 @ Stars defeated | Southern 
Charles Boswell of Birming- Maryland district 
ham, Ala. today won his eighth 53, yesterday at 
blind golfers tournament title dur. 
in 12 tries with a 97 over the It was 
last 18 holes to set a record 187 victory 
total for 36 holes. The 187 total started 
broke Boswell’s own previous Virginia team. 
mark of 203 set last year. Joe Jimmy H 
‘Lazaro of Waltham, Mass. had two 
wound up second with 195. ing star 


TWO-BASE HI 
Ken ’. 
SAC 


has 


Stone Earns Split for Nats, 4-1 


Dean Hurls 
4-Hitter; . 

9 Tigers Take 
=> First, 6-0 


By Bob Addie 
Sta® Reporter 

DETROIT, July 2 — Dean 
Stone aimost accomplished a 
miracle shutout in the second 
game on a double - header 
against the Tigers today 

He had te be content with a 
41 victory after Billy Hoeft 
had blanked the Nats, 64. in 
the opener. A crowd of 18.793 
saw the twin bill which alse 
gave the Nats a split in the 
four-game series 

Dean literally wes “a Stone's 
throw” from a shutout which 
would have been the first for 
the Nats in 98 games this sea 
son and the first in 114 games 
since Ted Abernathy white- 
washed these same Tigers, 1-4, 
last Sept. it. 
Third Fer Stene 


Stone breezed through the 
first two men to face him in the 
ninth and had a 22 count on 
Bob Kennedy when the latter 
lined a long drive into the Ieft- 
field seats for 2 homer 

Stene won his third came 
of the year, setting down the 
Tigers with four hits as he 
struck out six 

Jim Bunning. rookie 
hander recalled from Charie= 
ton, yielded three of the Nat< 
four runs while Rob Miller gave 
up the oteer. Steve Grome« 
got by with no damage in the 
one inning he pitched 

Herb ews again distin 

——- euished himself after a lonc 
tenure on the bench and 
smacked out four straight hits. 
three singles and a doubic, m 

~— the 10-hit attack. 


te Six-Hitter for Hoeft 


=2 The frst game was a differ- 
—. ent cup of tea as Lefty Billy 
=** Hoeft “zeroed in” on the Nats 
255 nine times. Billy gave up only 
— six Khif« in winning his i2th of 
- the year and his third victory 
over the Nats. Two have been 
shutouts 
Bunky Stewart absorbed the 
loss in the opener. vielding 
nine of the Tigers’ 10 hits 
@ Ot diarvey Kuenn belted a sole 
. s homer and Red Wilson smash- 
> $2, C2 One with two aboard to give 
7 £206 the Tigers more than enough 
=, runs 
“= The second game was 6 
"\. Blwerewst i C= makeup for the rained-out tie 
<= <3. = on June 726 
The Tigers took a lead they 


See NATS. Page 16. Col 1 


Cubs Snap 
Brooklyn 
Streak After 
Losing, 1-0 


orts 


MWOSDAYT. JTL Be. 1956 


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TtUSE~G € P—Member: of the Coliegr Al Stan wees oD 
at thew tramemc camp a2. Serthewestetr Tomrvevst ‘br ite 
area game with the prele<wens featnal chante tre 


] threng® ts kegs fer a 


Shut aut with tee Site the 
De@gers sufdemy sect =o the 


Tertey Wies Pirwt Stere Jade € 
Lew? whe reoret the sate at 


oe = Yanks Whip A’s Again, 
“ _ Skowron Hits 2 Homers 


Neewer be Wie Lich 
Jim 


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On Triple, 5-2 

HTT WELPUIA. July D FP 
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eEth sone Woe up a 
ome ant gave the Phy 
Pwillies «a Z vietary 
eague-ieading Wil 
sawakeer FJraves octav 
sae Seneies 
: trees saggrr of ‘le game 


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Saeeren «siammed 2 soln home 
ciemaue@ a three-run fifth 
Slee tally when bee boreres 
with ¥Yo@ Berra or 
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wasem tela iS 

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Find your size ... and 
you've found a buy because 
D.J.K. saves you 
up to $28.25! 


===| 62 Mens 
====| Summer Suits 


3.6” 


it was tie seventh of the 
WHILE THEY LAST 


Eee 2st «x defeats 
es it Sean f 
=—vem and = tird m 
Sat until fe eighth = 
VERY FAMOUS MAKES, INCLUDING 
li”. DACRONS ... DACRON WASH. 
WEAR AND MOHAIR MIXTURES 
[ See 35 36 37 38 39 40 42 44 | 46 


| Requisr 2 F 
Sherr 


the 
game mn the @fth on vet 
wan forty Pafko = th major 
eague “Tomerun Wearres 
$oa!tn. wo toek Ms eighth de- 
fat op WW Gecistions scored 
Wf Patko 
The Pils, sweeping the twe 
\c Game eres (to increase (their 
wment ¢ etue over the leaders 
nt aut «= fent «on snuge 
Tu? 2 Te ipeming .nmings 
any Hummer singied 


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three-game series and five homer «.,. Gta © 
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were $4950 
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6 were $35.9 
2 were $35.00 


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Cleveland 


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5 4— 6% ee oor 


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1gtem Pele Club coasted w a 


At 1005 Pennsylvania Ave. Store Only 


Lovie Park Free Anywhere Downtown 


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i 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
end TIMES HERALD 
Vande lal>y 38. FO4 


11-2 and 6-3 


Doby Leads Lawr CHE 
Chisox Over | Wins 15th 
Bosox Twice | Qy 4-Hitter 


s double 
« 


Lor wrs 


thse 


- 


—_ -eie< 


rm [hat ends temeorres 
] ’ P33 


: = TTR 
Hatfield had Third Victery in Ninth 


- 


a oe > “S(T ™ it _ <7) mareaes | 


rth of the seaeor " 
pitched a 
White 
nA 


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-* the 


ted the wt 


(™ rms 


Five Marks Set in Final« 


Nine AAU Recerds Broken 


In 3-Day Swimming Meet 


mer ‘a5 toe * 
m Detroit seat week 
°« 2° ney J Na’ .ora 
‘eo! Bere toclas 


rerores were 


ne ned to Wiggins 

or from 

’ Sault >ern 

rnia. st 2 meet recerd of 

© MOmeter Oreast 

Larver this year be set 

& mark = the 16¢-sard 

: r m4 at Las 


- 


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L(ngele- 
New Haven m « 
“am the @ymeter med 
relay mm 4265. OBreaking ts 


; he Ss 4b 
"“?@am 


- 


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[yx iaure 
defeated three Hzawauans— Bul 
Woolsey Fora Keoune and 
George Onakea 
Yorryk fimished as the meets 
anding individual siar wma 
two firsts and 
place He set am 
oroke records in the 2)-meter 
butterfly and established a new 
0 meter mediey record eariier 
nthe mee fore winning the 
meter butterfly preliminary 
record time toda; 


a 


Beat Directory 


'O.eM £1888 « “Set ’ SOS "=e gseaTt 
— a 7 “5 7 


‘rer 1416 —.* 
Ne 1 

= 
Sac Sree Soo 
ne suerte 
. 
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> 
art4en‘rs 


TrrtrT 
"VrrT 


‘ne game 


Cincinnati Sweeps D 


Tribe Lefties Are Stingy 


Score. Hank A guurre 


Blank Orioles, 3-0, 4-0 


T'. 
. : tc 


Score and 


Indians two 
Hank Agcuirre—huried a 
Orioles today. Score 
30. Aguirre followed 


leveland 


th. whe had walked 

5 at dat 

petcners homer 

“ian total to 758 

The Indians added a run in the cighth 

en singles by Chico Carrasque! and Jim 

Bushy. and a wild throw by Second 
Baseman Billy Gardner 

Aguirre. recalled recently from the 

- _— 7 . ir 

lecians farm ciub at ; Indiana poli«< Herb Score 
ocsted hes second major league victory 

against oo losses. He scored his first « in relief 
The @¢-sea"-cld southpew allowed one hit in every 
het the ' ninth bet only one was for extra 
able Gy Hal Smut w fifth inning 

leading strikeout 

16 Gectsions 

the 

Eg oy « 

added two 


tirnes 
the 


ri 


inning 
bases. 


eventh 
total to 149 
im the first game 

hfth inning off starter 
(arrasquel, Jim 


in 
ur in 
nico 
more 


rs 


a double by Avila and a single 


(,ame 


CLE 


*eceed 


S41. TIMOR 


(4 
CLEVELASP ™ 
sa > @ « 


ELAND 
. 


shee 
: }? 


nh 
s - 


. 
nm the eighth of 


ee 
Se ee 


Cards Win Conrad,Cabell 
In Tenth on Steep Races 


NORFOLA. Va 2 YP 
Norfolk Yacht and Country 
Club skippers scored a clean 
sweep in the Hampton One 
Design and Moth classes of the 
Virginia Sailing Association 
Regatta held here Saturday 
and toda: 

George Conrad of the Nor 
folk Yacht and Country Club 
took over-all first place honors 
wiln a 
Conrad 
but 
could garner only a second to 
dav as his Go-Girl finished be 
hind Jeff Robinson 
Hap 

Sonny Cabell sailed his Billy 
Brat to its second victory in 
today's race to take top honors 
for the Norfolk Club in the 
Moth class. Cabell and Charlies 
McCoy. NYCC, were tied for 
the lead after Saturday, but 
, Cabell’s first in the final race 
gav> him the advantage. Mc 

Coy scored a second today and 

a second for the entire Regatta 

in Siclla 

Ted Causey of the Hampton 

Yacht Club won the final race 

to take first p’ace in the Pen- 

gu ass. Causey had two 

' firsts and a second for a total 
2 of 30.7 points 


July 


NEW YORK 
Stan Musial’s 
Non Bidsingame for a 32 St 
the Néw 
York Giants in the 10th inning 
at Al Dark led the attack on 
his old mates with four hits 

Dark. former Giant short 
had three singles and a 
double among the Cards 10 
hits off Johnny Antonelli, Marv 
Grissom and loser Hoyt Wil 
helm 

After Blasingame beat out 
a hit to short with one out in 
the tenth, Dark reached up to 
hit a high pitch behind second 
base for a single. Musial then 
singled to right, his first hit of 
the day, scoring Blasingame. 
sy. Loum 


29°C‘ 
scored 


July 
single 
Louis 


victory over 


the Hampton ciass 
of 42.7 points 


two races Saturday 


in 


otal 
stop. tota 


won 


in Miss 


Blas ame 


‘wee 


‘eon &OESGoO SC Owe @ 


ry " 


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oubleheader from Pirates, 6-1, 3-2 


Relax—and enjoy the easy -to-fix 
summer favorite of real Bourbou 
connossseurs! Here's how: 

Fill old-fashioned glass 34 full of 
crashed ice. Add 2 ot. of Use Prez 
and twist of lemon peel. label the 
cool musty bow7yurt as you Pp 


your key to 
summertime 


Kentucky Straght Bourbor Wheskey - Always Bottiet = Bead . 19 Pracf 


SUtrc!- Weller Distillery - Established Louswille, Ay. 1545 44 


Call RE. 7-1234,. ask fer Circulation, and order The Wash 
ington Pest and Times Herald guaranteed home delivery. 


— 


—— _ 


oe 


Washington, B.C. 


on ry 


The undérsigned Certify in the name off the 


that 


ee, 


MILEAGE TESTS CONDUCTED BY THE AMERICAN AUTOMOBILE ASSOCIATION 


THAN 12 OTHER PREMIUM CASOLINES . 


> 
MANUFACTURER, BEING USED AS THE TEST VEHICLES. 


- 


Sanction Ne 
seme 


American Automobile Assuriation 


<j CERTIFICATE OF PERFORMANCE 


Contest Gorin, Alicante: Adaihtt li cattiiaes > 2 


IN 6 CITIES PROVED BLUE SUNOCO DELIVERED MORE MILES PER DOLLAR 


THESE TESTS WERE CONDUCTED UNDER NORMAL CITY-COUNTRY DRIVING 
CONDITIONS, WITH TYPICAL CAR OWNERS SERVING AS THE DRIVERS, 
AND WITH REPRESENTATIVE LATE MODEL HIGH-COMPRESSION CARS, 


FOR WHICH PREMIUM QUALITY FUELS ARE RECOMMENDED BY THE 


in the above test, on the average, Blue Sunoco went 23.0 miles 
farther on $3.00 worth of gasoline than the others. 


. 


Blue Sunoco is the gasoline that meets the new higher 
premium octane standards and sells at regular gas price 


Arnold Palmer Wins Eastern Open, 277 


———— 


Cullinane, 


By Maury 


Area Golf Roundup 


Reach Semifinals 


Gonella 


Fitzgerald 


Perky Cullinane and John Gonella collaborated in a four- 


under par best-bal. 
Hugh McLaughlin, 5 and 4, i 


n the semi-finals of Bethesda 


Country Club’s two-man team championship 


Cullinane and Gornella meet 


Rudd and Dick Sughrue in the 
the scratch event. 


Rudd and Sughrue advanced at the 


expense of Bob Goggins and 
Devidson, 5 and 4 
COURT HOUSE—Levi 


> 
, er 
‘> 


Herb s 
final of 


7 
Se 
4 


Wilson , 


Yoder cap- 


tured the qualifying medal in the club 


championship with a one-over 
score of 145. The former 


par 36- : : 
profes. . . + : 


sional had an opening round of 75 and. 
then broke the course mark with a two- | . 


under par 70 
Dea L. 
with 76, 71—147 at 


ey. 72—77, 
4. 
The class B championship qu 


medal was taken by James F. 


TT, 4—.161. 


Smith finished second low 
ins) «6(were: 
and Odell Gantt, 76 


Joe 


alifying 


Fitzgerald 
Jones, 


WOODMONT—Alvin Miller played the clubs rugged Iron 


Duke in a one-over par 28 to w 


Iron Duke championship. Dr. Je 
course which had nine par - 
three holes last year but will 
not defend. 

Dr. Harry Douglas broke 
80 for the first time and was 
rewarded handsomely for his 
feat. Armed with a 15-stroke 
handicap, Dr. Douglas fired 
a 43, 35—78 to win the week- 
ly sweepstakes with 65 

Joe Sharlin was second 
with 84—15—69 and Cabot 
Feldman finished third with 
78—6—70 


KENWOOD—L. T. Davis, 

, and Jack Schoo, 

75—10-—65. tied for the an- 

nual Board of Governors 

Trophy and will decide the 
winner in a pilayof. 

J. A. Snider, 81—14—67, 
Paul Courtney, 83—16—467, 
and Maury Fitzgeraid, 74— 
7—67, tied for third. 

Blind bogey: E. H. Holmes, 
79—8—71: J. A. Barbeau, 
81—10—71; Sam Del Vecchio, 
81—10—71; Frank Poulter, 
92—21—71. 


WESTBRIAR—H. S. White 
and FE. D. Bell played the | 
back nine in 27 after getting 
out in 33 to finish in a tie 
with Bob Rion and Tom Kite, 
30—30—60, in a two-man 
team net best-ball event. 


ARMY NAVY — Three 
teams advanced to the semi- 
finals of the club handicap 
championship for the New- 
man Cup. The fourth match 
was delayed until today. 
Col. William F. Steele sur- | 
vived by eliminating Col. H. 
E. Michelet, 5 and 4. Col. Dan | 
Hunt ousted Cmdr. William | 
R. Wakeland. 7 and 6, and | 
Cmdr. Harold H. Blackman | 
defeated Capt. B. J. Moyna- 
han, 4 and 2 


CONGRESSIONAL — Yel 
Cowherd carried off top 
honors in a 12 selective holes 
event with 49—15—s4. Six 
players finished in a tie for 
second with nets of 37. They 
were: G. W. Franceaux, 49-— 
12—-37; C. B. Yarley, 49—12 
~— 87: Dr. B. F. Dean, 50—13 
— 37; H. M. Seavey, 50—13— 
37; Vernon Briggs, 43-—6—37; 
J. P. MeClure, 47—10—37. 


PROSPECT HILL—Staley 
Wilson was both gross and 
net in a medal play handicap 
event with 76—6—70. Lynn 
Weidman, 9%1—19—-72. was 
second net and Donald Shel- 
ter, 91—-18—73. third 

In the womens event, Mrs 
Lee Ryan was the winner 
with 144—74—70. 


BELLE HAVEN~The 
Country Club of Virginia's 
B team defeated Belle Ha- 
ven's B squad, 11—7 . 

Robert Stricklin amassed 
® total of 25 points in win- 
ning a points tournament | 
and posted a card of 92— 
48-43 to tie with Fred 
Tropp, 76—20—43: in a 
throwout tournament in 
which each contestant was 
silowed to add his three 
worst holes to his handicap 
and deduct the total. 

Admiral. John Hal! and 
Frank Youry collected 22 
points apiece to tie for sec- 
ond in the points event. 


MANOR— Dr. Andy Retz 
knocked a 4wood shot into 
the cup on the 178 yard 17th 
hole for a hole-in-one. He 
was playing with T. N. Mac- 
Kay. Ray Soderberg and 
Jim Lowe. 


WASHINGTON—Quantico 
deteated Washington in a 
team match, 1614. In the 
feature foursome, host club 
pre Clare Emery said John 
Connolly won all three 


_ — — ee 


rath. 


in the qualifying medal in the 
rry Footer won the title on the 


pro 
George 


points from Quantico 
Allan Smith and Lt. 
Wislar. 

Emery had the low individ- 
ual round with 37, 31 

W. A. Price accumulated 
25 points and Bob Hutchison 
was gros* with 73 in the class 
4 division of a points tourna- 
ment. In B the winners were: 
J. E. Reed, 20 points, and 
Fred Lynch, 76. 

In C, A. J. Towhberman 
amassed 15 points and H. 
McGowan had 92 for gross. 


PRINCE GEORGES — Gil 
Willett and Allen McAlwee 
had a best ball of 32, 33—65 


to earn a tie with Joe Dyson 
and Sterling Donahue, 33, 
32—65 in a two-man team 
best-ball event. Five teams 


| tled for third with 68s. 


Joe WellsJack 
35—68: Mike | 
Hamilton, 


They were: 
Slickis, 33, 
Jankowski-Bill 


33. 35—68: Frank Sherman- \Erat 


J. R. McGuinness, 35, 33—68: 
Art FrankJoe Balestri, 34, | 
34—-68: Doug Mattison-Don 
Porter, 35, 33-——68. 


INDIAN SPRING—MTr. and 
Mrs. Richard Schattman won 
gross with an 80 and Mr. and 
Mrs. Milton Rallins net with 
81—14—-67 in the annual 
Husband and Wife Scotch 
foursome championship. 

In a Calloway sweepstakes, 
Elliott Spicer was gross with 
72 and Bert Ansell, Pres. 
Burrows, Dr. Alan Weisberg | 
and Dr. Vincent Young had 
742 to tie for second. Sol | 
Amanuvel had 76—6—70 for 
net. Tying for second net 
were: Dam Arnold, 77—6—71: 
Irv Levine, 81—10—71, and 
Leon Rosin, 74—3—?7}. 


NORBECK — Mrs. Samuel 
Gordon and Max Mudrick 
won net in a mixed Scotch 
foursome with 86—16—70. 
Gross went to Mr. and Mrs. 
Max Gershen with 84. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell 
Sklar, 95—23%—7l'4, took 
second net and Mrs. Myer 
Gildenhorn and Myron Ger- 
ber were third with 88—16— 
72 

Blind bogey: Walter New- 
99.2079: Leo Hef.- 
fier, 1098—30—79: Moe Mar- 
cus, 109-—30—79 


: 


ARGYLE—Mr. and Mrs. Al- 
lan Sherier won both gross 
and net im a husband and 
wife tournament but elected 
to take the net with 147. Mrs. 
Sherier had 82—9—73 and 
Mr. Sherier, 81—7—74. 
Gross went to Mr. and Mrs. 
W. E. Howard with 80, 88— 
168 


EAST POTOMAC—Milon 
Logan, a professional, was 
the winner of the Class A 
division of the President's 
Cup with a one-under-par 71. 
Logan was out in 36 and back 
in 35 to beat Sam Carter, 
37, 35-72, by a shot. 

George Danaway, 38, 38— 
76; and Tom Maffeo, 37. 41— 
78: were the B Class winners. 
In Class C. Herbert Mullins 
won with 36, 42—78, and Jim 
Richardson was second with 
39, 42-81. 

Nick Kaptain, 45, 45-90; 
won in Class D and Merle 
Pickett, 44, 46—90. was drawn 
into second place. 


‘a seven-foot putt 


Finsterwald 


Closes In, 
Then Falters 


BALTIMORE, July 29 & 


yesterday to eliminate John Goeller and Arnold Palmer of Latrobe. Pa. 


struggled to equal Mount 
Pleasant’s par 72 today, but it 
was good enough the 
Eastern Open by two strokes 


to win 


from a threatening Dow Fin 


sterwald who faltered in the 
stretch 

The final round par, first time 
in four tries that Palmer had 
failed to beat it, gave him a 
total of 277 

Finsterwald, Redford Heights. 
Ohio, had a three-stroke edge 
on par in the first five holes 
and was only one behind Palm- 
er who had started the last 
round with a four-stroke lead. 

But Finsterwald couldn't get 
another birdie until the last 
hole. And in between he took 
two straight bogey fives on the 
15th and 16th holes by three 
pulting. 
Secend Prize $2150 

Finsterwald’s final 70 gave 
him .. 279 total and second prize 
money of $2150 which restored 
him as second leading earner 
with $23,821 Palmer's first 
prize was $3800, boosting his 
golf earnings this year to $12,- 


co 
‘ 


Bob Rosburg of San Francis-° 


co and Jerry. Kesselring of To- 
ronto matehed Finsterwald's 
70 on their last round to tie 
for third place at total 281 
Bud Holscher of Apple Valey 


Money Winners: 


Palmer. Pa. 
0 


ree 
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ft DPD l ~- 


es Pr Ne ol 
SN s Besse AUsSBSUBs3—F 


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VO — 16 Om mee 
> 


Sura 
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sereeri tri ttd ori ti ttt 
_ : a : 7 : ‘ 7 ‘ . : . : : : : . : : ‘« 


pete 


Williams. Als 


Calif.. and Jay Hebert of San 
ford, Fla. shared sixth place 
at 282, the latter pulled up 
with a final 68 

Palmer, winning his second 
tournament on the United 
States circuit this year, couldn't 
break par until the 10th hole 
where he dropped «a six-footer, 
“The only putt I made all day.” 
|But par got even with him on 
‘the 12th as he took three shots 
to get down from the edge of 
‘the areen for a bogey five. 
Otherwise, he played par golf. 


Three Birdies 


Finsterwald made a strong 
early run to overtake Palmer 
He birdied the first hole with 
and made 
12-footers on the third and fifth 
for two more 

His 15th and 16th bogeys 


put him practically a hopeless 


three down although he fin- 
ished with a flourishing birdie 
putt of eight feet on the last 
hole. 

Palmer, Amateur champion 
in 1954, was taking no chances 


,on the second nine which was 


played mostly in the rain. On 
the 395-yard 13th he drove with 
an iron to be sure to get a 
good fairway line since he had 
gone astray there yesterday 
with a driver. 

His 277 total was 11 strokes 
under par for the 72 holes on 
the 6895-yard course. 

Here are the scores of the 
Middle Atlantic area 


eT. Mehr. Chase 78 
sk Smith. Hagerst's 


"vee 


OF BOF Ok oP ak ad FOF He Bad ot oF 


Onn 


OF Bak oF oP ak 98 ob od OF oe 


ew vee eK eH we 
Pah ot Pad od oP oe 


sDenetes amateur 


Nye Wins Race 
ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, 
N. J., July 29 @—Harry Nye of 
the Southern Lake Michigan 
fleet from Chicago won the 
second race of 
States Olympic sailing trials 
for the Star Class today and 
gained a one-point lead in the 
series, which has three races to 


go in Sandy Hook Bay 


Chinese Win Soccer | 

SINGAPORE, July 29 7—' 
The South China soccer team 
of Hong Kong beat the Sino 
Malays, 6-2, in their fifth match 
in Colony Sunday. 


ul 


Lagard Takes Thistle Title 


Peters, Sunny Smith Clean Up 
In Chester River Regatta 


CHESTERTOWN, Md. July 29 


”—Jack Peters of the Miles 


River Yacht Club and Sunny Smith of the Annapolis Yacht 
Club completed clean sweeps in their respective classes today 
to win titles in the 28th annual Chester River Yacht Club 


Regatta. 

Peters won the Comet class"~ 
championship by sailing his 
Kite to victory in all three 
heats of today and yesterday. 
Smith duplicated the feat in 
the Hampton class with his 
Uh-Oh IT. 

Closest finish in the ~y 
regatta was in the Thistle ciass 
@where Cutty, skippered by? 
Howe Lagard Jr. of Tred Avon 
Club, nosed out Ed Walsh of . 
Cooper River Yacht Club, N. J., 
and his Dane Boy 
_ QGutty scored 10% points by 
winning two races and finish- 
_—s third im today’s final race. 

Dane Boy won the last race 
after twice being runnerup. 

The summaries (heat finishes 


and total points in parenthe- 
sis): 
PENGUING—1, 


Welter Lawson. 
sociation 
Led 


| 
| 
enny Dam | 


. £311. 
. (4-5-8. 66). 


oh, es 
Aimen An 


rc . 
Sere & me ° 
Bs. . mens ee ee 

vy. €. (8-8-8. 8.) 
TLEs—1. © “ 
ms ree Avena i 


cok Set 
"neck pag ¥. ¢ 
peece my ti- i ' 


se SEES fori a ra 


y ¥.!| 
Monte 


ENJOY THE 


(PHILLIES 


ALL 


fm 


san where 
; again missed the green. 
: last two holes were halved in 


eo7 dragster 
se FOOkes of Arlington, V2., 
see runner-up, driving in Class MA 


the United aan 


Melntire Leses in Playoff 


Cornelius Takes Open 
Title by Seven Strokes 


DULUTH, Minn.. 
Lake Worth, Fia.. 
smothering pressure 
McIntire by seven strokes in 


July 29 


jA— 
used her chipping iron as an instrument of 
today and defeated amateur Barbara 


Petite Mrs. Kathy Cornelius of 


a scatter shot playoff for the 


Women's National Open golf championship. 


Mrs. Cornelius, deadliy’* 
around the greens, fired a one- 
over-par 75 over the Northland 
Country Club's socalled “Jun- 
ior Alps” while the 21-year-old 
Miss McIntire, a pretty college 
coed from Toledo, Ohio, saw 


her fine golf game go to shreds’ 


in almost every department for 
a wild score of 82. 

It was a heart-breaking come- 
down from her spectacular fin- 
ishing surge yesterday when 
she shot a three-under-par 71 to 
tie Mrs. Cornelius for the title 
with a 72-hole score of 302. 


Just a Bad Day 


In today’s pressurized 18- 
hole playoff, under a sun which 
baked the green to concrete 
hardness, the brown-eyed bru- 
nette from Ohio constantly 
overshot the greens, pitched 


poorly and failed to make im- 
: 


portant putts. 

On the other hand, Mrs. Cor- 
nelius, 23-vearold wife of a 
professional and mother of a 
2vearold daughter. played 
brilliantly after a shaky start 
On one stretch of holes on the 
back nine, the Lith through the 
15th, she one-putted five 
straight greens, a tribute to her 
chipping finesse. All but one of 
these putts was under four 
feet—the exception being a 25 
foot sidehill roller for a three 
on the 15th. 

This was the stroke which 
cracked the spirit of the other 
wise calm and deliberate Miss 
Mclintire. Coming to this hole 
four strokes behind, she her- 
self three-putted for a five 
which sent her away trailing 
by six, 

Mrs. Cornelius picked up a 
seventh stroke on the 16th hole 
the shaken Barbara 
The 


par with the demure Florida 
professional, almost as if on 
purpose, graciously three. 
putted the final green after 
reaching the par five hole in 
two biows 

The new champion is a 
slightly built, attractive young 
woman with a short hairdo 
an unorthodox swing and a de 
liberate unsmiling approach to 
the game. 


Smiles—at last 


She smiled for the first time 
in the tournament when two 
of her golfing companions, 
Beverly Hanson and Joyce 


Ziske, lofted her to their shoul- 


ders and carried her from the 
course after her victory 

This was the first National 
Open for Mrs. Cornelius, a pro- 
fessional of less than two years 
who was little known until the 
last few months. Her outstand- 
ing performances to date have 
been a victory in the St. Peters- 
burg Open and another in the 
Hot Springs, Ark., four-ball as 
a partner of Miss Hanson. 

She has a two-piece, rather 
jerky swing which seems to 
freeze at the top of its arch 
Nevertheless, she comes down 
into the ball with tremendous 
power and is able to generate 
unusual accuracy. 


Bill Ellis Wins 
In Drag Racing 


MANASSAS, Va., July 29 
Bill Ellis of Bethesda, Md., had 
the best time for the quarter- 
mile straightaway, 13.1 seconds, 
on today’s drag racing program 
at Old Dominion Speedway. 

Ellis competed in Class D 
division. ‘Harold 
was 


for motorcycles, with a time of 


13.2 seconds 
CLASS | eo Pbqanee. Washing - 


mph 
AS r—Dick Sweeker, Siagnten. 
Thendervira. '} 16 seconds, 54 moh 
8G——Willieam Overten. Cot 
Md... 1955 Chevretet. 154.1. 


dria, Va... 


c 

Md... 

boee Ferd. 18 seconds. 

CLASS 8ST.Den Ferguses. 
C.. 1955 Aeestin-Healy. 

mph. CLASS G—ha Y 

tensville. 

CLASS ott 

eede. wa 
wetes). 


ere 
ta me RSA. 13.2. 97 mek. 


* Solo Polo Club of Chica 


Birthday Party 


Stengel, 66, 
Sheds Tears 
As Fans Sing} 


KANSAS CITY, July 29 
Casey Stengel stood at home 
plate and wiped away a 
couple or more tears today 
while digni- 
taries from 
two states 
heaped hon- 
ors upon him. 

Steng«ael, 
who was 
born in Kan- 
sas City 66 
years ago to- 
morrow, was 
honored in 
ceremonies 
prior to the 
third and final game of the 
current series between his 
New York Yankees and the 
Kansas City Athletics. The 
Yankees swept the series. 

Old Case didn't have any- 
thing to say. While a crowd 
of 30.257 looked on, he just 

wiped away the tears as these 
developments came about 

Gov. Vie Anderson of Ne- 
braska commissioned him as 
an admiral in the “Great 
Navy of Nebraska.” (Casey 
made a rowing sign). 

H. Roe Bartle, the portly 
mayor of Kansas City, pre- 
sented him with a key to the 
city and made him a lifetime 
citizen “tax-free.” 

The mayor of Omaha, John 
Rosenbladt, also was intro. 
duced and spoke kindly of 
Casey. It was Nebraska Day 
as well as Casey's birthday 
party, and an estimated 2000 
Cornhuskers were in the 
stands. ’ 


AND MOST likely it was 
the first time a partisan 
crowd ever joined in singing 
of “Happy Birthday” to the 
manager of a rival team. 

There was a slice of Casey's 
birthday cake for all who en- 
tered Municipal Stadium. 
Huge cakes simost formed 
roadblocks in both the lower 
and upper decks of the sta 
dium. 

Gov. Anderson made the 
first pitch. Billy Martin, Yan- 
kee second baseman, politely 
swung and missed it although 
it was down the middle 

The Nebraska governor 
drew a roar of laughter from 
the big crowd when he said: 

“I hope Stengel and (Low) 
Roudreau never fretire to 
politics in Nebraska because 
I know either of the gentile 
men could be elected gover- 
nor.” 

Roudreau, the Athietics’ 
manager, also was commis- 
sioned into the Nebraska 
Navy. 


THE THREE-GAME series 
with the Yanks was some 


Stengel 


| what of a celebration for the 


Athletics’ box office, too. To- 
tal attendance was a whop- 
ping 92.622 for the three 
games, bringing the A's home 
attendance of 45 dates to 
697.712 for the season. The 
figure was about 150,000 un. 
der attendance for a similar 
period last year 

Today's party was the sec 
ond in two days for the 
Yankee manager in Kansas 
City. Yesterday, several class- 
mates of Stengel at Central 
High School here 5O years 
ago honored him at a lunch- 
eon and reception. His team 
will be traveling tomorrow. 


5 = Solo Takes Pole 


CHICAGO, July 29 ‘*—The 
o and 


Santa Barbara, Calif., ay de 


- feated Healy Farms of Hins 
Ce- dale, 
- round of the central! intra-cir- 


i... 75, in the second 


cuit tournament at the Oak 


*" brook Polo Club. 


‘Y 


IMPORTED AN D HAVANA FPILLER 
TUNE (N “MMGET THE CHAMPIONS” WITH JACK LESCOULIE SATURDAY SAE PM 8 6WRE-TY CHANNEL 4 


‘ 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


Monday, July 39, 


1954 


11 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
i Monday, July 30,1956 


Around The Tracks 


Horses and People 


Ry Walter Haight 


IE PINDELD rode Buster 
at Charles Town last week, 
record hooke as the second 
Virginia track. 

racks 


\TIMORE'S 
at a 3409 mutue! 


wont anu 


WHEN BAIT 
Bell to victory 
the longshot 
largest price evel 

The highest 
histor, a’ 
fret week of 
nlant back ir 
named Zombi 
mn line and 
off for 

Howe" 
who was ¢ 


" 


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ff 


noug 
' 


im 


on 


4 


eithe: 
filly nan 
early 
And 
hegan 


mer? 


Haight 


the combination 


the 


paid 


im cover 


money Was 


nme 
= 


toda’ 
Saratoga 


start 
for 

will assume his du- 
lechase racing 
Pat Kelly 
Kentucky that 
Rloodstock 

1s 
in 


steep 


Lexington 
ine sire Piet 
Son00 each : 
iwshington Jake 

er excited he. 
gured one of 
ree Jake 
sell. 


ry 
That 
and 
a Hialeah 
the colt was 
shadow 
other 
course, Was 
triple 
alert 
letter 
ih. cir 
follows 

») race 

he Nation 
nts are idle 
each 
SPALLING Cca- 
more and 
eas contain 20 
re of level 
have complete 
parking, serving 
wise accommo- 
crowds: we at 
wed host to 
i to 40.000 


ih foregoing 


, ™M 


mn «he 
raugnt by 
an as 
own 
Jakes 
.f 
mnNous 


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miico « 
ory? 


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part of 
aft 


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Frank Whitely ; 
saddie chan 


of mu 


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years 
work ng nor Les 


s3agaf s7 ™ : . ! - - r a Tr 


possible so 
present 
suitable 
Molly 
are the 
ip and 
stamps?” 


us 


of 


Tr) 


a) 


This Week's 
Fights on TV 


TONIGHT—At New Vork 
(St. Nichelas Arena), Carlos 
Ortiz, New York, vs. Tommy 
Salem. Cleveland. licht- 
weichts, 109 rounds, WTTG 
Channe! 5), 10 p. m 

WEDNESDAY At 
cuse, N. ¥ Rob Satterfield 
Chicago, vs. Harold Carter, 
Linden. WN. J.. hefwyvweichts, 
19 reueds,. WMAL.TV (Chan 
nel 7). 16 p. Mm 

FRIDAY At 
(Madison Square 
Joev Giambra. Buffalo 


Lew Hoad Gains 
Fourth Round 


HAMBURG 
i. \ucetra 
ndered a 


ff 


(,ermany, 
as Lew 
cor 


2 
5uTrTTe 
Heim (;ermany 
lead 

intn 


ts 
tee 

the 

champion 


svra 


riris 
. 

6 6—2 
is top-seeded 


vere 2 
ti ee oad 

New Tork O1 : xed Rudge Patt 

Garden), " and 

N. 3 Vierlo of Italy 
vs. Rocky Castellani, Cleve ‘. reund wes 
land, middlieweig hts, 10 dean af Guved 
rounds, WRC-TV (Channel ished Lothar Bud 
#, 10 p.m 6—1, 6—2, 6—4 


Paddock Picks 


vi 


a “oe 


sated 


t (serman'’ 


, PIP TH RACE 


(DST) 
and « 


P 
s.vear 
cs 1a 


POST TIME 
lar be waft P._._. Puree e<roace 


st feur and ene bell furten 


= 


: “~, 


McKee! Some « 
liegereaid) Piashed speed ijast 
SIXTH RACE—Perse 81000; 
* 


} High 
‘’ 


out 7 
7 


7 


ear-old« aed ge ci 
ia 


nA Puersce 81008: 4 


SECOND 
: and ene half ferienes 


hewt faur 


SEVENTH 


Tre 


Longshot Daily Double 
SILVER GLOW and IRISMARK 


tear-elde, claimmine . 


THIRD RACE—Puree S1708: 7 
. feuer and ene nae furienes ; and ene eighth 
Bull Nose 


5 eee ong John 


July 
Hoad 
to Werner 
today 
crushed him 
the 
the 
(,erman 


y of 
third 


—Purse 
feur and ene half furlienes 


RACV—Pourse 
‘ moped Teen Course (??) 
5 | Hew!) 


Palumo@ 


tT. tzeereld) 
MeIvo 


EIGHTH RACE—Perse. £1000, 
Pindell: 


S, Defeats Canada in Davis Cup Semifinals, 4-1 


Mac Kay 
Beaten in 
Four Sets 


Ry 
VICTORIA, B. C. July 29 
Canada salvaged a final singles 
match of the Davis Cup Ameri 
Can zone semifinals today as 
Paul Willey of Vancouvre, B. C.., 
trounced BRarry MacKay of the 
University of Michigan, 14—16, 


6—4, 6—3 and &—6 

The United States 
semifinals and a berth 
American zone finals 
Mexico. 4-1 

Willev's victory gave Canada 
a split in the final day's round 
Ham Richardson took the 
fourth straight victory for the 
Yankees with a 6—4, 6-4, 
13—-11 triumph over Bob Be 
dard of Sherbrooke, Que., in 
the next-to-final match 

Willey, making his first ap- 
pearance in the Davis Cup play. 
fought grimly to take his young 
opponent to task after MacKay 
had won a marathon first set 
16—14 

The last set was on the point 
of decision either way several 
times, with both players rally 
ing gamely to hold it off 

The Bedard Richardson 
match was one of the best of 
the three days’ play and the 
lanky United States Rhodes 
scholar was pushed to the limit 
to dispose of the Quebec 
player. 


Kotz. Kehoe 


Advance 


Arnold Kotz. seeded No. 1. 
advanced to the quarterfinals 
of the annual Government Em 
ployees Tennis Championships 
yesterday on the East Potomac 
courts 

Kotz defeated Howard Coffin 
6—0, 6—1. Lindy Kehoe, seeded 
No. 2 joined Kotz by defeating 
Bill Duggan, 6—1, 6—0. Play 
resumes tonight at 6 p,m 

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS 
MEN'S SINGLES— pears S sound: Are Areela 


Rete def. Heward Co 
, ay pater Fits 
def 


Jack Hewins 


won the 
in the 
against 


mo :. 
Den Sehweiteer 
hon Spire — 


Reale def. Reb Marrk 


Lt 
7 a 


a am dr 
die 


Jackson Yanes 

— 

SINGLES —Qearter -final« 
Frances ,* oEptas def. Patth Laewef. 6—2 
i" Shet | > een det Lynn 
wh —4 

MEN'S DOTRI ER vis een Frank 

Shere-Den Rent de Pr 
Merrie Kanect« 


~ a Ir 
+: Den Sehweiteer- oS. 
Yens gt, Cari Hanash. Den Moerrisen 


AAU Junior Olympics 


At Brookville Today 

The 
AAU 
ming Championships start_to- 
night at the new Brookville 
(Va.) Swim Club at 6 p. m. En- 
tries from Maryland, Virginia 
and Washington will compete. 

To reach the Brookville poo!, 
go Shirley Highway 
Seminary road and then folloy 
the Brookville signs. 


District of Columbia 


Junior Olympics Swim 


out to 


at Charles Town 


51708, S-pear-elda; claiming about 


Days 
Wes never 


peat bet 
Deter 


’ 


Yoon PR Fun 


aces 
time 
5-pear-elds end ep) 


May be right there 
The contender 


OF ee et et Ot et eet ee ee ee OD 


Chance off best 
Needed recent 

Some good 
beck iaat 

Show 


_. 


S¥NOSSC ST ReeUe 


oo 


Par 


. 


S15@8: 3-vear- claiming: 


Needs only repeat lest 
a’ . Won two in row 
Waease never better 
Pieures very close 
Good form lately 


~ * "| a 
WO RPDOMAeyWe 


_ » 
et 8) OO oe oe oe ee 
FI FOoOwv-inwy 


..Closer if starts 
Not here 
time 


claiming ; 


Nothing last 
8. veer-etde; 


mile (9%) 


ood form lately 
dancerous here 


: is 
De ok ee) 


—_— 


Seventh Tithe at Merion 


Seixas Routs Larsen 
! n.Pennsylvania Final 


Julv 29 WF 


Vie Seixas warmed up for 
next week's Davis Cup matches against Mexico with a straight 
s@t victory today over Art Larsen, San Leandro, Calif., to win 
his seventh Pennsylvania State lawn tennis championship at 
the Merion Cricket Club 
The 32-vear-old Seixas played some of 
the finest tennis of his career, smashing 
through the former national champion 
7—§ §—1. §6—4 
Actually. this was a battle between 
America’s two top amateur tennis play 
Seixas ranked second and Lar- 
sen third nationally. Tony Trabert was 
rated first 1955 rankings but since 
has turned professional 
Thus, Seixa Phi 
firmed his to the 
amateur in Nation and appeared 
ready to battle hard to retain his singles 
role on the United States Davis Cup 
team 
Seixas, who 
sen in previous compet 
pressure on the Californian 
placements brought repeated 
which jammed the center court 
Seixas, top seeded in what 


PHILADELPHIA 


is 


ers 
in 
mt 


adeciphia, reaf 


right title of No, ] 


— 


the 


over Lar- 
kept the 


holds an edge 


Vie Seixas 
throughout. The Philadelphian’s 
applause from a crowd of 2800 
at the suburban Haverford club 
has beeome his favorite tourna- 
ment, was off to a fast start 
lie led, 4—1, on a variety of 
shots that had Larsen talking 
imself and waving his 
aloft in disgust 
The deciding game in the first 
was won 4 points to 2 by! 
SCIKAS 
rhe 
led 


ition, 


JAMAICA ENTRIES 


in ) 


racquet 
srt 


second set was all Seixas. | 
+—0, cracking Larsen’s 
service in the second game. The 
Si-vear-old Larsen managed to 
salvage his serve in the fourth 
game to make it 1—3 but Seixas 
returned to the attack to run 
at 6—1. 
Seixas, who dropped only two 
sets all week in advancing to 
the final round. continued his 
into the third of the 
set match He 
efly at 1—0O and 2—41. 
through in the fAfth 
for a 32 edge, a double- 
fault contributing to the Calli- 
fornians loss of the game. 
Larsen made a last-gasp ef.- 
fort in the eighth game, taking 
Seixas service, but lost his 
brief reprieve in the next game 
Seixas won with a spectacular 
passing shot of an overhand) 
drive 
In the women’s doubles fnal.| 
Louise Brough of Beverly Hills. 
Calif. and Mrs. William du 
Pont of Wilmington. Del. de. 
ited Wire Francis Vosters. 
Wilmington. and RBar- 
of Beverly Hills 


’ 
Ile 


Oi) 


’ ne nia 
hest-of-five 
led bri 

s* 


nul DroKke 


tral 


game 


r 


CONSENSUS 


AT CHARLES TOWN 
l— frank Handle 16. Reddest Red- 
bird &. Staeckawar 
-—Saper Meese 74. Belment Belle 1%. 
Iriemark 
Al ®% Bellin’ 


: “Jedidan tt. Admiral 
1%, 


1s. Hieh Visteon 


Mise 17%. 


Geom 
, 


14 fern Lenee- 


Copate’e Girt 18 Sere Tease 148, 
Lark«p 
7.—PFPEN sive SONG 76. Catedier &. Ale 
Menarch 
s —Hopalong John 14. Hivalla 5. Sime. 
plicit 
5 Ris Des 22 


me 5 


Piace Pigalle 11. Pent. 
AT JAMAWA 
1 Disarmed 16 Seeret Seasion 
Sasouer 
First Fault 9. Galea’ & row coe 7 
.—Th hrust eadweed '6 
Giew 159. tt , - * 


ar 


So. Beany BReeher 
Ha 


.” 


6&.—Untamed ?! 

7 Deen Rreath 
Phantom 6 

& CONTY Set 7. Bright Plemes 4. 
Micheels Angel 

T wONMOD 

1 —Raseal You t° 
thetic 

; Rehan 1%. Rembdre & Den Dende 


,——HOPLITE 9, 

Turkish Geld 4 
‘ veninge Time Tt! 

ates wets " 
rmead Over 

scheaen ‘ 
6 —Respen 
Wecon Pritt 
~—Het « ahes 17 


. tee 4. Wetnklet 
6 . Lawless 9%. G 
Boleros Hi" ) 
Bloods Warrier it! 
Fr 


0 
Game CY Hearts +r 


aa a’Trentan Yeene Celene 16 
an 
Acreen ia sos mad Kir Wil¢r 9 


Levelr 
Tm. Bie Finale &. 
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Girt Creer 15. Black 


hain Joy 


18 Rattle 14. 


Reunt, 


Potts 


1954. by Trien@e Publications. | 
ne ' 


TH 
Cever Rise 16 Per-| 


, MeNair 
Win Doubles 


LA. Steve Potts and Fred Me 
Nair yesterday captured the 
championship of the fourth an 
nual Washington Golf and 
Country Club Invitation men's 
doubles tennis tournament 

Potts and McNair, seeded No 
1. defeated Lt. Tom Bradford 
and LA. Bill Demas of the Quan. 
tico Marines, 6—3, 7, 6—4, 
6—3. 

Bradford and Demas, seeded 
No. 5, upset the fourth seeded 
team of Col. Robin Hippen- 
steil and Col. Nick Powel, 3 
6—2, 6—2, in a morning semi 
final 

Bradford. former Wilson 
High and University of North 
Carolina star, and Demas were 
playing together for the first 
time 

Potts and McNair, who 
romped to the Middle Atlantic 
doubles championship in their 
first appearance together as a 
team. routed No. 3 seeded 
Ralph (Buddy) Adair and Hnery 
Barclay, 6—3, 6—1, in the other 
morning semifinal. 

McNair, local insurance ex 
ecutive, won his third area 
doubles title in four tourneys 
this season. Fred 
with Ted Rogers to 
Woodmont Invitation doubles 


combined 
take the 


For Hall of Fame 


Ten Jockeys Nominated 


(‘Pbe elected for a@ permanent 
niche in-the gallery on this 
allot. 

The three active jockeys have 
a combined total of 69 racing 
years behind them and each 
has passed the 3000 mark in 
winners. Longden, at 41, is ap- 
proaching the 5000 figure. 

In 1955 voting, Eddie Arcaro, 
Far! Sande and George Woolf 
were elected to the Hall of 
Fame. 


BALTIMORE, July 29 
Ten jockeys, three of them 
still active, have been nomi- 
nated to the Jockéys Hall of 
Fame at Pimlico by a 32-man 
committee of horse racing ex- 
perts. 

National voting by 1200 
sportswriters and broadcasters 


will pick three of the 10 for 
permanent places in the Hall 
of Fame during Pimlico’s fall 


‘ meeting. 


On the ballot will be Johnny 
Adams, Ted Atkinson, Johnny 
Longden, Isaac Murphy, Tod 
Sloan, Laverne Fator, Ray- 
mond Workman, Walter Mil 
ler. Edward Garrison and Mack 
(;sarner 

Longden, Atkinson and 
Adams are still active and ac 
cording to Hall of Fame rules 
only one will be permitted to 


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Lockheed 


diversification In action... 


Below: engineers and scientists work on some of the 44 major commercial 
and military projects in progress at Lockheed 


Operations Research ducun oa 


on passenger traniport + 


Operations Research openings 
Flectronics Specialists 


Fire Contro! and Guidance 


Aerodynamics Engineers 


Physicists 


Electronic Systems 


re hs LI RF he FO 


Aeradynam:« mee!ng oe 


bi gh peed highler 


Aerodynamics openings 
Aerodynamics Engineers 


Aecrodynamicists 


Dynamics Engineers 
Wind Tunnel Test Engineers 


Design riucy on hyde omwlee 
requrement: of nee hroripor 
Design openings 
Design positions are open at all 
levels im controls, electrical, hydraulics, 
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ever 


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Plight Test Engineers 
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Other openings include: 


Electronic Systems Engineers in areas of countermeasures, 
navigation, fire control, communications and antenna design. 


Maeutecturing « Structures + Weight Engineering 


: 
&.—Twinight ff. LSertet & Loe Effres 


4 
4T WASHINGTO 
—ir somes 1S. Mieter 
Gla Han 
; — 1 Measr 
Sal 
Gen 


Bue 
Reval Rive 
‘ Metsrathians 14. 
Rebby | 
—. 


Fob is. My 

Pecan 14. Bericht 

14 Pecket Baler 14, 

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14. Fever 

Present 4 

{RECTAN AYR Tt. Game O Hearts 


oe 1%. De 
A 


Silwer 
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2 year 4s 
] raag 
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: 
i 


: . aan 
116 De 


| Jus 


Heapdedoant } Me 


ovals Fim tt. Jer-0-Lee 9. Velities 
Ocean City Entries 
OCEAN CITY, MD. 

rreaT RACE—1 mile 


1). Chasse 2 
‘Horse and Driver 


(pace); 
Stimulant 


tesa 
Best 
$s) 


~ 
- 


General (A Aud: 
Pan Frost ‘() Matthew: 
Jarretiown Jane 


Heays 
3—I1 is 
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4eaz7-—- 


@-Ineveo- 
= 
** . . : : : 
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" 44, Mite-(C. Creok) 
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* 
> 


| 
2 Joe Boxwood 
3} Tracer Prin 


Wilewtts) 
ver) 
niev (J Melntyre) . 
r Rocky Castle (P. Chap 


' 


Why Lockheed 


offers Engineers 


pqeee 5. 


There are four 
1. More op 


ne 


better careers 


main reasons : 
portunity for promotion 


because there are more supervisory positions to be filled with 44 major 
projects underway, including 13 models of aircraft on assembly lines. 


2. More career security 
because Lockheed activities cover vertualty the entire spectrum 
of aeronautical endeavor. 


3. Life in Southern California 


o”ow 3638 


Scenic beauty, unmatched climate, wide recreational opportunities 
enhance life in the San Fernando Valley. Moreover, Lockheed pays 
virtually all moving expenses to Burbank for you and your family. 


4. Advanced Education Programs for Engineers 
enable you to expand your technical knowledge and achieve advanced 
degrees through a wide range of Lockheed-sponsored university 
programs that cost you little or nothing. 


The 
Chance with 
cwies Not 


et OO ee ee OP 
i) 
o 
_ 
: 
te mt teeter 


ePrororre 


‘2 
=) 
’ 


(Krats: 


NINTH RACE—Purse siene, "” -year- ~olds ana Bp; 
ene and ene sixteenth miles 
pape 


= 
? 


ok 
mile (trot); ou 
cs Mecintere) 
ay iJ ae te) 


claiming: 


~ 
* 
, 


833538: 


i 


on) 
B-vear-olds: claiming: about Beaten eesie: 


RTH RACT—Purce $1000 
coven rawene ied 


a > 
a 
P~Peeove 
7 > : 


-_- 
2% 
a 


ce mile (pace) : 


33555 
02 09 eo © ee 
PPT eV Preys 
4 

. - . 

TPT? 


? : 
Pe tt et et et et ee ee et De OD 


ee ee te) areee 
me oe 


ne 
> 


Oreen' 


Rest Bet—RUN, 5th Race 


12 New _ Gine 


ieee 


ahenie 
ce claimed 


| 


To Engineers who lack aircraft experience 
Aircraft experience is not necessary to jom Lockheed. It's your engineering training 
and experience that count. Lockheed trains you for aircraft engineering—ai full pay. 


> *ty 
alee ' ee oe lc (EB. Adams). 
& My xle Lone: 12- 

r HB RACE) mile (trot); puree | 
700: CO classified 


Juntor Mitewyn ‘C. Carter) ... 4-1 
Ho: nestretc nh Deode A Jones) 
ot nal 


Chuck (W. Hy 
anover (P Chappell) ad 
Lyanhavean iJ U 
; Bravawy 


5 Paee or Wah « 


4 Beaus Arros 


Racing Selections at Charles Town 


DRS 


an eo ale 


Bluff Mal 


For interview in Washington 


Phone Lockheed Representatives John Hare and Louis Berge at District.7-2580 ia 
Washington, Monday, July 30 through Tuesday, July 31, betwee 9 a.m. and § p.m. 


BENNINGS 


rank | le 
Sistre Pare 
ace "Tandem 


Tare’ s Relle 


Belen 


CONSENSUS 
edbird 
andie 


PADDOCK RAILBIRD 
Har 
Rech ind 
Tandem 


Moose 
* 


Merry Maestre Reddst 
Reddst Redbird Crank 
Race Tandem Rare Tandem 


rane 
acst 
Race 


Biuf Bal 
Redest Redbird 
Race Tandem 
Reenrd Trio 

3 per Miose 
Reimont Relle 


2 pore Pap 
“no 
tein 


Jedi da uh 
No Burrender 
Admiral A 


Bw teh 
Be mont 
Sun Bike 
Mo Surrender 
Palling Rock 
Admiral A. 


Rock Gem 
gee lef 
wey 
Philly Babr 
Life Gene On 
i, 7: ise 
COUNTERPARTY _ 


kepur 
Hien frathe 


Kin Preverd 
at 
Bal ee 
Hooeicee sche 
John 

7A 

Bive 

‘ig 


uper 
Relle 


Super Moose 
Re ont Belie 
No Surrender 
Jedidah 
Wartaw 


Stacked Deck 
Case Lae 


ont Belle Ar 


LOCKHEED aircrarr corPORATION 
California Division + BURBANK CALIFORNIA 


PS. 


RS CORNY MISS 
Rus 
Engineers’ setaries have just been raised 6% at Lockheed. More 
Gran, atten empfayee hanatiy Cena on fine lnswanep end setteement 
plans) bawe abso been moreased 


ure Tose 
uchess Aumar 
Gey Larkspur 
pensive Sens 
ree > ae 
Hopalong Jona 
Simplicity A 
Bul) soar 


ee re 


a 


Due! chess : Aumar 
Attend Sir 
bay I ‘arkspur Sure Teas 
Pens ie 
A'r Momarcr 
L.ittie Seawants 


Koane 
Hope: ore Jona 
Miyala 


air Monarch 
atydier 
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Prmpuetty A 
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SIMPLICITY A 
40. A 

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Mpon Mater 
Piece Pisale 

f 7 Der 


ee 


Lecy Dorlp 


: 
Mare a cae 


' 


Oioanourkw'n— 


Scots Capture 24-Hour Le Mans 


‘ 
o 


Race in Jaguar 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIVES HERALD 
— Monday, July 30, 1956 3 


ee - ~~ a  - - _ - 


y 
VATS—fm. pg. 9 


Doctors Call Injury ‘Mild’ 


Fourteen 
Cars Finish: LeBaron on Crutches | 


One Killed After Twisting Knee 


2 
Ry 


‘Stone Earns 
Nats Split 


W ith Tigers 
never relinquished in the first a 


game when they scored two LE MANS, 


runs in the opening inning \ British Jaguar, 
With one out, Phillips. Max. Scotsmen Ron Flockhart and 


(al Whorton 
Loe Ange.es rimes 
29 LOS ANGELES, July 29—Eddie LeBaron, veteran Redskin 
hy Quarterback who suffered a knee injury in scrimmage here 
yesterday at Occidental College, was hobbling around campus 
this afternoon on crutches after having spent the morning 
well and Kaline singled in suc- “'"/an Sanderson, won the undergoing examinations at Hollywood 
cesion producing one run, gruelling 24hour Le Mans Presbyterian Hospital 
Boone's sacrifice fly brought in sports car race today Injury to LeBaron 5 : 
Maxwell with the other It was one of 14 cars to finish described as “mild” by Dr. John W. 
In the third, Kuenn homered oy; of 49 starters More than Perry. team physician, and Dr. d 
— . ay rhe rigers pultwothirds of the field either Vernon Luck, Los Angeles surgeon and 
© —-e touches on the crashed, retired or were elim bone speciaist 
at enero here apg inated—partly because of heavy é gh nad: " 
Wilson Hits H rein squalls Curing the Right.’ oust :0rT ording to the 
Kaline + ge ji ' Second place also went to through tomorrow ay r 2 on 
starte I ' , . tor . 7: 
with @ walk ed alien ees pn Britain. Grand Prix aces Stir oo eee ” eo = P - 
attempting to steal. Boone sin ling Moss and Peter Collins aatetd * nome A a om the weakened 
gled and took second on Ken drove an Aston Martin, entered os 
nedy’s infield out Bolling oy British Works ehind — Examining doctors reported the kriee 
Walked and Wilson unloaded "8S" line close behind the ... produced little swelling, practi- 
his homer into the leftfield ¥'™mer cally no fluid and no serious tearing 
I Doctors said there was definitely no 


ers 
France. Jul’ 
driven 


left knee was 


160-pound signal caller 


to remain on crutches 


LeBaron 


LeBaron would be 


a 


in 
dav 
a A 
race wae a Wrable 
earl 


nig 


" an 

Fi x r) 
io Ka 
doubled Sievers 


ret 
W Tot) ; 
Ane! 
and 


after Rat 
ne 


ti fefen e i< 


skull injurie ! rast at least 


according to 


io wea} ie 


week Dr ry 


fifth 


Aas 


six-year 


of a 


crimmage Doctore 
uere 

British ork «entered 
Ferrari codriven 
Trintignant of France T} 


of Re! 


D ac ngs lat 


“A 


condition as a on 
cartilage 
has 


ordered to forego contact work 


hy tush Ne ) , 
cit 


2o0-pou! der neen 


In the first inning they got a ¢Mtered by the Ecurie Ecoss hypertension sprain of the knee 
and walk in the second inning Flockhart, 32, an Edinburgh 41), to resume practice in two’ 
Pignth Dut was left along with They won a prize of 4,000,000 LeBaron similar 
the same 
with a World Record 
ase took off his helmet and waived Rob Wrabley. 195 - pound 
with a single and Berberet ereq 2,507.25 miles at an aver yesterday's scrimmage, '0-record for Class E service run- 
scored or ase i} 
d on a passed bal offensive Bickford, who's been racing 
the plate his Panhard overturned Pe; wn his Skip-E to better the old 
Ss) ~ . - 
ngle and scored on Runnels’ was trapped beneath his Aston) Boston College who substained course on the big lake created 
Valdi and Yost walked to fill finger and cuts and abrasions last night today in the final sessions of 
grounder Glockler broke an ankle when Scheerer, Chattanooga, Tenn 
He said he “heard a popping °.,_ , ce ; 
and Lemon hit a soaring triple Other Doug Creech. Cha te WN 
P 
nedy powdered one into the and Oliver Gendebian 


Stand« to make it 60 ‘he winning car was a 344 
cartilage separation 

‘ingie by FitzGerald, and a the Scottish sports car racing ;.i5+” the doctors said LeBaron had full motion of the joint 
Waik but couldn't capitalize stable except when he brings his leg back 
and still another hit and walk engineer, and Sanderson, a 31- . .4ne Al Dorow. will take over 
am the sixth year-old Glasgow company dt 4. coach Joe Kuharich’s No. 1 Bicktord Sets 
Sie, ers who had drawn a pass. francs (about $11,200 injury to knee in 
Valdivielso opened the ninth Sanderson. who wa< Griving| 959 against the 49ers in San 

Ru : f ' r ‘ , « : 

cS .. oe yr bounced for twO\to the wildly-cheering crowds rookie fullback from. St CLA‘.-SVILLE, Va.. July 29 

© second inning of the as he crossed the finish iine. Vincents College and Univer- i — Har-y Bickford of Hamp- 
walked. Siever t ar ‘les 

hit yy Te _ speed of 10446 miles an had his left ankle encased abouts here today as the third 

ame y cast. The 24-year-old annual Buggs Island Lake Re 
Valdiviels ' 
- bm 9 “a tched over seven years, churned up the un 
expected usually rough waters of the 
In the third. the Nats boosted her . 

: ' urst igto liames on the \ le 584067 moh.” 
their margin to 3-0. Yost walked, ), Miller Breaks Nose parent gee es phew ie he ge ae 
sacrifice fly Mart ; 

’ in when it overturned in ' 
a broken nose in the rugged by the John Kerr Dam 
Bunning was knocked out in'driving rain early this morning nan nme new Southeastern re 
— bases with two out. Millerion the head and back Harry Ulinski Red- the regatta. They are Doug 
relieved Bunning and got Olson, Driver Breaks Ankle skin veteran center, com- Earhart, Charlotte, N.C., Class 
The Nats boosted their mar- his Porsche caught dire after Class B racing hydroplanes 

gin to 4-0 im the seventh when colliding with another car last enund during wecter d aws + H Starnes ‘Hickory \ Q 

desribed 

to left 7 A 

Stone was only one out away Italian oe he ay ~~ ¢ oaheiaeed 
reect . Tf met LOT 
leftfield seats for a homer gium 

Dean struck out Bolling toend 4 


The Nats had few chances. ©-©.D.type Jagua privately 
Describing the injury aft a 
They wasted another single Won $11,200 Dr Perry said it was conceivable tha 
f ' 7c « ' ’ } . > bs hy ‘ 
zGeraid doubled in the rector, alternated at the wheel quarterback 
meres lass E Runab 
Class E Runabout 
with a double but never got to the winning car at the finish, Francisco 
second me nr . rn a ; 
se Lemon opened) The winning Jaguar had cov sity of Pittsburgh, also injured ton, Va.. set a new world speed 
singled in Lemo lerhere! 
- nm aA qd ) r ‘A hn eracked hic gatta came tn a close 
reat thro t 
. us a received four lake at a speed of 59.729 m Pp h 
moved to third on Herzog’'s British driver Peter Walke John Miller, rookie end from runs over the measured 1-mile 
the third. Plew oubl n , opening scrimmage, had it set 
s doubled andibut he escaped with a broken! °P* . gional champions were crowned 
batting for Herzog. o s) : ith 
g for g. on an eas’ German driver Wilhelm sided (eden “ih injury. A racing hydroplanes; Billy 
Runnelse singled with tw out ) 
“ > OUTS night Class C racing hvdroplanes. and 
from his shutout when Ken- Maurice 
racing champion 
the game 


for 10 days 


Heart Attack 

EAST ORANGE. WN. J., July 
20 w—Harry Mendel. 63, vet- 
eran publicity man for the In- 
ternational Boxing Club of 
New York. was in serious con- 
dition today at St. Mary's 
Hospital after suffering a heart 
attack 


4 Belgianentered Jaguar 
driven by Jacques Sweters and Kuharich Praises Personne! 
Roger Laurent Coach Joe Kuharich, who 
5. A German Porsche. driven 
by Frankenberg and Von Trips huddled with his assistants 
"6. A British’ Jaguar works ™°%*t of today while players 
car, driven by Mike Hawthorn *™Jovyed a day off, admitted 
and Ivor Bueb. he was faced with a tough job 
Hawthorn and Bueb. who ®Utng down personnel ‘oO the 
won the Le Mans race in a Jag- © ™an _dimit before the Sept 
uar last vear. when a car 29 deadline 
vurtied off the track and . ~!he boys thus far have per 


killed 82 spectators, did wel] formed just about as we ex 
to take sixth place rrquble pected them to,” Kuharich said 


with a fuel pipe left them in “No one in camp is so shabby 
last place at one stage, but 48 to warrant dropping at this 
they later made up lost time. This year's overall talent 
ground, helped by the fastest is much better than the players 
lap of the race in camp last season.” 

Front Royal finished second A French 747C.C.C.B..driven Kuharich is undecided about 
with 381 points; Winchester jointly by G. Laureau and P. scrimmage drills this week 
third with 341%. Purecilleville Armagnac of France won the “We may stage a couple,” he 
took fourth with 268% points index performance, calculated said, “but they probably won 
and Martinsburg finished in by relating a car's showing to all out scrimmages such as 
the cellar, 268', its engine capacit' e had vesterday.” 


Court House 
Easily Takes 
Tri-State Title 


Court House Country Club 
*uccessfully defended its Tri. 
State golf title yesterday at 
Purcelville, f! shing with 
52C'+ points 

One hundred eleven of those 
points were accumulated in 
yesterday s final matches 


Old Dominion League 


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Gas Light Post Gallione Wins 
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The Washingion Post 


Qn 


AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER 


a - * 


MONDAY, JULY 30, 1956 


Record of the Eighty-Fourth 


Now that the center of debate over national 
policy has been shifted from Capitol Hill to the 
political stump, many members of the Eighty-fourth 
Congress will probably be on the defensive. The 
volume of legislative business they left unfinished 
is enormous, and some of the rejected measures 
ere so clearly in the public interest that legisiators 
may be expected to have a good deal of difficulty 
with their explanations back héme. Yet the two 
sessions of the Eighty-fourth Cofgress have pro- 
duced a substantial amount of good legislation. If 
that Congress is judged by what it did rather than 
by what it failed to do, its record is very largely 
favorable 

Certainly it was not a donothing Congress 
Despite the discard of many important bills, Con- 
gress turned out an enormous volume of legislation 
touching many different phases of domestic and 
international policy - fact that it approved 103 
requests of the President (while rejecting or 
ignoring 121 other White House recommendations) 
is itself indicative of its volume of work. Some of 
these requests involved major policy decisions. One 
has only to read a list of the more important bills 
passed te understand the immense pressure under 
which Congress works. 

One other factor that weighs heavily in favor of 
the present Congress is that it has not been in- 
tensely partisan. Even in this election year, the 
Democratic leadership seemed to evaluate many 
recommendations of the Republican President on 
their merits. Of course, there was a great deal of 
political sputtering and maneuvering on both sides, 
but a sensible regard for the public interest kept 
obstructionism for the sake of political advantage 
at a rather low level 

Even the hot fight over farm policy finally sub- 
sided after the President vetoed the mandatory 90- 
per cent parity bill, thus making it possible to 
create the soil bank which both parties favored 
Likewise the great battle over foreign aid was 
compromised on a basis that will permit the Ad- 
ministration to carry out most of its programs. The 
anticipated partisan struggle over tax reduction 
was averted, and such major Administration bills 
as those authorizing a gigantic highways construc- 
tion effort, the Upper Colorado River project, and 
executive pay raises were passed in acceptable form. 
In dealing with many of the items in the Presi- 
dent's legislative program Democratic legislators 
gave him more support than members of his own 
party. The record would be far better than it is 
if the Right Wing Republicans had had the good 
judgment or the party discipline to follow the 
President's lead. Incidentally. it is interesting to 
note that Congress accepted more of the Presi- 
dent's program than it did of the program outlined 
by Senate Majority Leader Johnson 

In many respects the worst performance of the 
1956 session was the scuttling of the President's 
modest proposal for Federal aid in school construc- 
tion. The device used to kill the bill was the Powell 
rider injecting the segregation issue inte what 
should have been the simple question of using 
Federal funds to meet the present educational 
emergency. That rider was attached by the votes 
of 148 Republicans and 77 Democrats. On the 
other hand, it was Southern Democratic control of 
the Senate Judiciary Committee and the threat of 
a Democratic filibuster which killed the Administra- 
tion’s civil rights bill 

The failure to pass the clean-elettions bill was 
also a major error that is difficult to explain. Public 
indignation over the attempt to influence Senator 
Case's vote on the gas bill through a $2500 con- 
tribution to his campaign lined up 85 senatorial 
indorsements for this bill. By failing to take 
advantage of this momentum to push through a 
limited reform Senators Johnson and Knowland 
missed a rare opportunity. 

There is much disappointment also over the 
death of the immigration bill after it had been 
accepted by the Senate ang of the postal rates in- 
crease after it had been approved by the House. 
The Administration must take the blame for killing 
the bill authorizing a $400 million experiment in 
the development of atomic power for governmental 
use. In retaliation the Democratic Congress dis- 
carded two bills designed to encourage the develop- 
ment of private atomic power projects. The net 
result is to retard the advent of the atomic age in 
the United States at a time when other countries 
are making rapid progress in harnessing the atom 
for commercial use. With a little more cooperation 
and statesmanship, all of these blunders could have 
been avoided 

In appraising the work of the Eighty-fourth Con- 
gress, however, specific shortcomings must be 
weighed along with the broad general achieve 
ments. The record as a whole is on the constructive 
side. Considering the political split between the 
Presidegt and Congress, there is ground for gratifi- 
cation that the record is as good as it is 


Civilian Civil -Defense 


Though the experience gained in Operation 
Alert 1956 is yet to be appraised, one shift in 
policy which the test brought to light is certainly 
a net gain. Instead of proclaiming a hypothetical 
“limited martial law,” as he did during the 1955 
alert, the President gave extraordinary powers 
to Civil Defense Administrator Val Peterson. The 
President's primary reliance on military control 
to save the country from chaos in case of a hydro- 
gen-bomb attack was much criticized last year. 
He properly responded by upgrading the Civil 
Defense organization. 

Of course, the military would be relied upon to 
aid Civil Defense whenever necessary, and in such 
cases it would remain under military command 
The President also authorized the Secretary of 
Defense to “establish whatever areas may be re- 
quired in performing any mission assigned to the 
armed forces.” Presumably this means that, if 
the bombs should fall, martial law would be 
proclaimed where civilian law and order had 
broken down. The use of troops to aid and pro 
tect the civilian population in such circumstances 
would become a national necessity. But they ought 
to remain firmly under civilian direction. — 

As the arrangement now stands, it might lead 
to a clash between the Federal Civil Defense Ad- 
ministration and the Defense Department. Defense 
would remain the judge of how much aid it could 
give to FCDA without interfering with its primary 
task of defending the country against outside 
enemies. In case of conflict between the two, it 
would have to be ironed out by the President. A 
Government Operations Subcommittee of >> Mouse 


has recommended the creation of a 
of civilian defense to enhance the prestige 
FCDA’s operations, and the President has moved 
in that direction by inviting Administrator Peter- 
son to attend Cabinet meetings. Already he par- 
ticipates in National Security Council meetings 
when civil defense matters are on the agenda. 
How far the upgrading of the FCDA should go 
will depend in large measure upon the type of 
civilian defense program that is adopted. There 
seems to be no controversy, however, over keeping 
its direction at the top in civilian hands. That is 
basic. Though much of the extraordinary power 
that would be exercised in case of nuclear attack 
would be in the hands of Governors of states and 
other local officials, a sort of temporary czar 
responsible only to the President ought to be 
available to provide relief and maintain law and 
order in case local governments broke down. We 
should not strain the sound tradition of civilian 
control by letting such vast emergency powers 
slip into the hands of the military. 


Congress and the Bridge 


Perhaps never has the inherent inability of Con- 
gress to provide sustained, knowledgeable direction 
of District alairs been better illustrated than by 
the comedy of indecision over the Constitution 
avenue bridge. Two years ago, in the closing hours 
of the Eighty-third Congress, it was proclaimed that 
the long-argued question had been “settled” by 
authorization of a new Potomac span at the foot 
of Constitution avenue. But those who preferred 
a new bridge farther south near Roaches Run. or 
who thought a tunnel was the answer, did not give 
up so easily. In an effort to accommodate all views 
as thoroughly as possible. the Commissioners de- 
layed the project even after receiving appropria- 
tions for it, and eventually won agreement among 
the various agencies concerned on a new site for 
the bridge north of the authorized location 

The Senate ratified the change a year ago, but 
the bill languished in the House until last month. 
Finally. Chairman Howard W. Smith of the House 
Rules Committee agreed to let it pass after a re- 
quirement for a draw span—opposed by the Com- 
missioners as an unjustified expense—was in- 
cluded. But to this, in the closing hours of this 
Congress, the Senate could not agree: Sen. Albert 
H. Gore threatened to talk at length against it, at 
a time when a 15-minute speech was enough to kill 
most anything. The new site died with the draw 
span 

Thanks to Representative Smith's insistence on 
8 movable span to save money for an oi] firm and 
a sand and gravel company. the Commissioners 
now are in the unhappy position of being ordered 
to build a bridge on a site opposed by the Commis- 
sion of Fine Arts and the Theodore Roosevelt Asso- 
ciation and contrary to plans approved by the 
National Capital Planning Commission. Quite 
probably they may decide to wait upon Congress’ 
further pleasure in the matter, since the funds that 
have been appropriated for the project were given 
on assurances that agreement had been reached 
on the location. This newspaper long ago urged an 
end to draw spans, but we felt the time had come 
when getting on with the bridge was more impor- 
tant. Representative Smith's actions seem indefen- 
sible, Senator Gore's perhaps needlessly unbending 
in light of the overriding need for traffic relief. 
All in all, it has been a sorry performance for 
which an elé local government would pay 
heavily at the 


Flight From Chaos 


Under the pressure of impending chaos, the 
Montgomery County Council has at last moved 
toward systematic rezoning of the agricultural! areas 
about to be swallowed up by commercial and resi- 
dential development incident to construction of 
the mew headquarters of the Atomic Energy Com- 
mission at Germantown and the National Bureau 
of Standards at Gaithersburg. For this slight bow 
to the realities of 1956. however belated it may be, 
the Council is to be commended. It would be a 
crime against present and future generations to 
permit the transformation in store for these two 
areas to proceed without planning. The inconven- 
ience and delay resulting from the present rezoning 
efforts will be as nothing compared to the confusion 
and waste of community values that would come 
from an unrestrained and undirected real estate 
boom 

The pity is that this planning must be under- 
taken on an emergency basis. area-of the Na- 
tional Capital now includes Montgomery and Prince 
Georges Counties in Maryland and Arlington and 
Fairfax Counties in Virginia. It ought to have a 
master plan on which satellite communities appro- 
priate for the location of Government buildings 
would be already designated. This would permit 
advance zoning and give some assurance of orderly 


im their midst. In the absence of such a plan, the 
least the county authorities can do is to call in the 
experts to direct the transformation after it begins. 


Waiting on Tragedy 


It is hard to see what the Senators who are 
going to make yet another study of the Burke 
airport proposal will be able to contribute to pres- 
ent knowledge on the subject. They will, doubt- 
less, have little trouble eliciting further press- 
agentry on behalf of Baltimore's Friendship Air- 
port as a second facility for Washington. They 
will have no difficulty rehashing complaints of 
the property owners near Burke who quite nat- 
urally will be troubled by such a development 
there. 

But it scarcely will be possible for them to 
disprove the Capital's critical need for this facility 
as quickly as i can be built—just as the Com- 
merce Department itself finally was forced to ad- 
mit before it sent a belated request for funds to 
the Hill two weeks ago. Exhaustive study has 
demonstrated that Friendship is too far from down 
town Washington. that the military wil! not abandon 


Andrews field to civilian use and that various 
other makeshift 


at best can alleviate for 
only a ‘short the congéstion at National Air- 
port which is an invitation to air tragedies. Ap 
parently we must have a serieus accident to break 
this senseless legislative te an in- 


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Letters to the Editor 


“In a Canyon” 


Your editorial of July 21 on 
Hells Canyon correctly states 
that among the issues in the 
Senate debate “the first and 
most important was whether 
the choicest power site on the 
North American continent 
should be safeguarded for max- 
imum development.” 

You are so right that the de- 
liberate sacrifice of this maxi- 
mum development is “an alto- 
gether proper issue for debate 
im the political campaign”! 

For the opposing side, you 
state the question whether it 
would be proper to deny the al- 
ternative, smaller, private de- 
velopment “when the chance 
for approval of a Federal un- 

is all but gone.” 


Co.'s smaller project can hardly 
make use of this argument. The 
Administration had no _ dif- 
ficulty winning congressional 
approval this year of over $1 
billion in Federal projects in 
the Rocky Mountain area, and 
it could effortiessly have won 
authorization of the Hells 
Canyon project. Far from hav- 
ing no chance of approval, 
Hells Canyon showed its un- 
equaled merit by winning ap- 
proval of both Senate and 
House Interior Committees 
and gaining 41 votes in the 
Senate, in the face of what you 
yourself have recognized as ex- 
treme adverse pressure from 
the Administration. 

The Administration's studied 
and calculated give-away of the 
irreplaceable Hells Canyon site 
will haunt thé Republican 
Party. not as a regional, but as 
a national issue for years to 


come. 
RLCHARD L. NEU BERGER, 
United States Gemator from Oregon 


Washington. 


Judge Cockrill 


For some time now your 
paper has been carrying arti- 
cles and news items on the 
Juvenile Court of the District 
of Columbia and its present 
incumbent, Judge Edith H 
Cockrill. Generally speaking, I 
feel that your coverage of the 
Juvenile Court has been fair 
to the judge, the bar and the 
public. 

There is a feeling among 
many people, and it is evident 
from the Letters to the Editor, 
that the Juvenile Court is a 
second-rate court and that the 


to dispel this feeling. 

A large portion of my life 
has been spent in association 
with judges and attorneys. My 
first position, upon graduation 
from law school, was with the 
Administrative Office of the 
United States courts. From 
there, I spent two years as law 
clerk to a United States dis- 
trict judge. I “hung out sa 
shingle” for about six months 
in Washington and spent my 


Th 
ai 


Me 
ay 


trying to point out is that 
Washington has a hard work- 
ing, forceful and intelligent 
judge on its Juvenile Court 
and that it would be a shame 
to replace her with unproven 
unknowns of uncertain qualifi- 
cations. 
HENRY B. VANCE. 
Buena Vista, Va. 


Visiting Scouts 

This letter is written to wel- 
come the English Boy Scouts 
to Washington, D. C., and to 
express the hope that they may 
carry away many happy mem- 
ories of this beautiful city. It 
is also written to suggest that 
the Boy Scouts from Germany, 
France, Sweden, and Scotland, 
who arrived at the same time 
and are now in other regions 
of the United States, may be 
routed through the Capital on 
their way back to New York. 
They all want to come. Let 
them come. 

I am quite sure that the 
American Exchange Scouts 
will be invited to visit London, 
Edinburgh, or Paris, while in 
the countries of which those 
cities are the capitals. To bring 
the Scouts to Washington 
would foster the spirit of in- 
ternational brotherhood and 
understanding. 

ANNA CHRISTIE. 

Arlington. 


-“Somebody Up There Doesn’t Like Me” 


Coprright. 1954. The Pulitser Publish 
= Ss: re - Post-Dispatch _ 


Wasted Talent 


The article “More Invest- 
ment in People Needed” was 
very worth while and more 
should be said and done on the 
subject. Respect for the human 
element in all of life's functions 
is what makes us different 
from the Communists and ts 
our greatest potential power. 
One need not go very far to 
find the reasons for the indif- 
ference, the sense of tutility 
and bitter injustice that many 
draftees of the armed services 
feel when plucked out of a 
responsible, well-paying, highly 
respected position in private 
industry and put in a mediocre 
job in the service which is far 
below their standard of intelli- 
gence, training, and capability. 

These men hate the service 
and after discharge would 
never voluntarily return to the 
service. The men or women 
responsible for the allocation 
of personnel throughout the 
armed services, or the civil 
service, should be well paid 
and highly trained and capable 
not only in personnel adminis 
tration, but in sogiology, psy- 
chology or any other subject 
that would help turn the tide 
of this “automation of offices” 
and complete lack of regard 
for individual potentiality. 

ELEANOR J. CADELL. 

Arlington. 


“Confiscated Assets” 


Your July 22 editorial on 
confiscated German and Japa- 
nese assets seems to under- 
estimate the human side of the 
problem. 

Consider what was taken 
The list of goods wrested from 
their owners includes house- 
hold furnishings, jewelry, 
books, radios, cameras, dolls, 
dresses, and toy ukuleles. 
Someone missed them. 

The list of things taken also 
includes 50,000 patents, 650,000 
copyrights and trademarks, and 
36 million feet of moving pic- 
ture film, including some of 
the classics with such stars as 
Emil Jannings and Marlene 
Dietrich. There were 469 large 
and small businesses; oil wells 
and orange groves; stocks and 
bonds; and 1300 parcels of real 
estate. Much of this latter cate- 
gory represents invested capi- 
tal. 


During the war this was 


was confiscated by our Govern- 
ment. 

This policy of confiscation 
was not enunciated during the 
war. It was enunciated only 
after all American property 
vested in Germany had been 
returned to its American own- 
ers, and after victory had made 
it clear that we had an un- 
challenged right to determine 
the conditions of peace. 

During the general ruin that 


immediately sald because of 
technicalities, nested in lucra- 
tive spots. 

These people are opposing 
return of the property. They 
are receiving able and power- 
ful assistance from a group of 
short-sighted economic na- 
tionalists who say that foreign 
ownership of property in Amer- 
ica is too much competition for 
American business. They also 
parade a bogeyman of national 
defense, implying that foreign 
businessmen in America are 
potential spies and saboteurs. 
Far-fetched as they seem, these 
are actual arguments which 
were advanced in recent Sen- 
ate hearings before the Judi- 
ciliary Subcommittee on con- 
fiscated property, headed by 
Sen. Olin D. Johnston. 

This country, which has been 
so anxious to get a “clean” 
bomb that can be used on milli- 


Wills of the Shaws 
Gain in Pertinence 
By Malvina Lindasy 


GEORGE BERNARD SHAW and his 
wife made what many people of conven- 
tional thought consider eccentric wills. 
But today’s world problems and trends in- 
dicate the Shaws may 
both have been ahead of 
their time. 

Current celebration of 
the one hundredth an- 
niversary of Shaw's birth 


for a project to reform 
the English language. 

Mrs. Shaw in her will 
left a bequest of $263,000 “™is® Lindsay 
for a project to be established in freland 
to teach the arts of social conduct, with 
emphasis on good manners and oral com. 
munication of ideas. 

The pertinency of Shaw's often ridiculed 
language enterprise was recently impressed 
on this writer at a cultural conference i» 
which visiting foreign leaders participated 
“What this planet needs js a common ian 
guage!” exclaimed an American who hed 
been futilely trying te communicate vis 
textbook French. 

“It will get it—in time,” said a Pakicte- 
professor. 

“You mean something like Esperan:.”” 
he was asked. 

“No, nothing artificial,” he replied. “The 
world language of the future will grow 
naturally, and this will take centurie: 


er 


LATER an Indian scholar predicted that 
English—modified and influenced by ius 
foreign contacts—would eventually become 
the global language. He cited the ramd 
increase of its use throughout the world 
and its teaching in the schools of many 
nations. 


Shaw also believed that English was be- 
coming a universal language, says an ar- 
ticle on the great dramatist’s will in « re 
cent issue of UNESCO Features. Because 
of this, he saw the English language os 
having obligations different from these of 
a purely national language. One of these 
was to be easily learnable. He felt the 
learnability of English could be improved. 

“Shaw's dramatic artifice in drafting the 
will,” says the article, by Guy Wint, “was 
to make this point to the world in the most 
vivid way in which he was capable and 
that was by being dramatic.” 

Shaw left an estate of about $650,000 
after taxes. The bulk of this was to be 
spent for an investigation into the spelling 
and use of the English language end « 
study of what gains in time (computed in 
terms of currency to impress a commercia! 
race, he said) could be made by substitut- 
ing an alphabet of 40 letters for the official 
one of 26. The British Ministry of Educe- 
tion was to carry out the project. 


oor 


FOR SIX YEARS, since the will was 
published, there has been wide debate over 
his proposed language reform. Last March 
the British Museum, one of the residuary 
legatees of the Shaw estate, filed cuit 
against the will on grounds the proposal 
“would not benefit the community.” 

Recently the Shaw estate became more 
commercially important. It is now reodiv- 
ing @ weekly contribution, estimated st 
$2000, from the hit musical, “My Pair 
Lady.” The musical is based on Shaw's 
play “Pygmalion,” which reflects its on- 
thor’s concern with phonetics. 

At the same time there is growing feeling 
that Shaw may not have been so mad as 
he seemed in his will—or at least thet 
there was method in his madness—end that 
his project might well be given some “ad- 
vertisement” im the way he sought for it. 

Fewer still today on this crowded, con- 
tracting planet, where getting on with peo 
ple has become so important, are inclined 
to ridicule Mrs. Shaw's bequest to further 
good manners. The wisdom af what she 
wrote in her will gains more timeliness 
daily. She observed, she said. “in the 
course of a long life” that dangerous “so- 
cial friction and grave pathological result«” 


TH 


: 


ie 
i 


1 week 
i month 


este tate ae et 
Tene Ee ieee 
sin REESE” vem 
fg Sets |e tg 


Rates cutsice U. © A furnished upon request 


ee 


nos oS ae aera oS 


ea | OTe ee 


spark a 


could 


Canal Middle Eastern or even a gen- 


or 
situation there are 
action, all hideously unattrac- 
help finamce the Aswan tive. One is to waffle—to pro- 
me Repo dcueten eaten tot OF test, to denounce, but to do 


to bear on the Brit- 
And it was Secretary of eral war. 
to Nasser’s act of de nothing 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
a the 


it 
Rat 


tian Presidest Gamal brought 


: Matter of Fact . . «By Jeccph and Stewart Alsop 


| To Waffle or Not to Waffle 


~~ -- 


+ 


TUE 
Tit 


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My outa 


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1a but 
ty! 
ANKE 
Eth: Th - 
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1956 Hopefuls . . . o-« a 
ph at ees i 


i 


al 


Egypt's 


maxi- 
sterling accounts have already 


Another is to bring 
mum economic and politic 


pressure on Nasser. 


. because 


It has been said that Dulles’ 
decision was a triumphant 


1H 


Hes Ht He i TOR 
uit til fiat 


a T 


i 


by ini 


i. 
a 


T 
He 


Soviet For- 


is to 


alternative 


economic measures can 
also be taken, like undercut- 
send the British parachute and 


ting Egypt in the world cot- 


A third 


been frozen, and other puni- 
where to turn but to Moscow, 
which is precisely what Mos- 


cow wants. 
Royal Marine detachments on 


Cyprus to the 


tive 
e unpleasant smell to the world, 


* and it would leave Nasser no- 


ome withdraws. the other 
ae SS SS eee oe 


indifference 
ited has clearty been to 


make certain 


Soviet 


The 
that Nasser. 


goes to Moscow next 


will arrive hat in hand 


72s 


is: ie 
F ith 
Hit 
tule 


ea a Hl a 
ag he: bee eee yee when he 


Gimarily bitter and irrational, eonth 


Canal Zone, 


bargaining 


¥ 
¥ 


AP 
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Hille 


nett 
Ht! 


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Roman? 


and back them up with the 


nth [ 


ahead 


But 


American Sixth Fleet. 
the Egyptian army, such as it 


7 
VE 


and war would result. 
This ts an elec- 


Much of the world would re 


war with Egypt might 
lead on to ultimate horrors. 


real 
The British probably will 


not use force without Ameri- 


can backing. 


is, would almost surely fre- 
tion year. Thus the betting 
Coprrizght 1934 New York Hereld 


is about ten to one on a policy 
of waffling, and the grumbling 


acceptance of another major 


West. 


sest 
the 
small 


Ss seizure 
for example, 
“preventive 


cos 
THERE ARE other dangers. 


aA 


sieater of the abdiile ast 


¢ be added to the dangers 


Israelis, 
very ceuant Nasser their most for- 


pA ge mB wr BR 


om his list. The Israeli 


then take 


ii 
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in Chicage two weeks from to 
day, presumably will have the 


ee A a 


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THE WASHINGTON POST ond TIMES HERALD 


———— | THE HECHT CO. 


Lincoln Probably ‘Dumped’ His Vice President wee ane remverene (LEASE 


REGS AND FURVITUCRE CLEANED 
By Carrol] Kiipstrick vention. Neeh Breck: 3 eews cemvenian OTe | [Peeidiert eo te Io, oelj hie mewements Sor Ge ety Se tte & ooo © 
Oar Renee paper correspemder coleet ot gugrteet me” SieClire wore Wher Wesley later encused O@mimener of Jebeeor es ft Seutiers wee ent » Wer Den Chemi-Foam*-(leaned tn Your Home 
The first Republican Vice President Lanreie a the aontg tree oe thetreet) Wit lure of misstating the-faets ©2% 2 Ss Sudgmer «neces ore” end Readg fer Use the Same Deg 
President, like the present one. House ant sounded bs . | 
was the object of e “Gums” © Ge Vee Pree@ens = 


Movement, and the effort to. . + Set eusien, | . nie ?, . 
“Gump” him - a 2 ’ : 
, = : >a certamiy TengmMmIingiucr o 7 = " Ss 


nivance of the @as craftily anc 1 
firet Republ- comm 2 
can President. Se 


ee 


delegates would renommate Lame one of Lancers cheer 
Abraham Lincoln of Mines @eeciets «=<“‘See S Tee 
and Hannibal Hamlin of Lamcein rele peels oe 
Maine There hed been com 82 @f seme Wer Tees 
siderable speculation earlier carat © ge Ser 
as to whether Lincoln would See SP eS. = 
he renominated—but very in- ¥Tote 
tle speculation about Hamm | ’ Lm ‘ as ma. i 5 ideale pare 
Early in the year, Lincoln . A ; &-s168. 5307 row 
had asked Vice President Ham oh Meme Series experts wl come te year heme o¢ cffien 
lin to help line up the “ee 
England delegation. Toung 
Congressman James G. Blame 
of Maine wes cheseen te or 
ganize for the Lincoln-Hamim 
ticket. There Was [Oe Serious 
criticiem of Hamim &@ an 
quarter. He was amishlie and 
well liked. but Lincein seem 
to have thought he was oat 
a strong leader 
After Lincoln's Tene! 
tion. the Baltimore convertion 
turned to selecting hr runing 
mate. Several names were pall 
forward. On the Gret ballet the 
results, wrote Carl Sandburg. 
were “shocking and aknuect a 
believable to the Hamim men” 


Then Came a Stampede 


Andrew Johnson of Tenmues 
see had 200 votes. Daniel & 
Dickinson of New York 358. 
end Hamlin 199. Qeotucks | 
threw its vote from e fevreritte 
son to Johnson. The stampede 
was on. The result wee Jobe 
son 494. Dickinsern 27 and 
Hamlin 9 

Nowhere is there enurthing 
in Lincoln's han@geritiimg Te 
garding the selection of ie 
second-term running mate. Te 
some delezates who called on 
him before or at the time of 
the convention he insisted that 
he was keeping hands of and 
that the convention wes itee 
to make its own Choice 

Even so intrmate an associate 
es John G. Nicoler, Linco 
secretary. was sure that Lip 
colin had not intervened. Sand- 
burg and J. G. Randall. tee 
of the foremest Lincein biae 
raphers. concluded that La 
coln manipulated the conve 
tien from behund the soemes 
—and very skilifulls 

Hamlin seems never to heave 
been clear as to whet Lip 
coins role was—and their rele- 
tions continued to be cordial. 

Aiexander K. MeoCloe. «@ 
Pennsylvania delegate closes te 
Lincoln, said the Presi@ent 
was guided “by the single pur 

se of making success a5 near- 
y certam es possible” Frank- 
lin D. Roosewelt is said te heve 
mace almost the same com 
ment when asked In 1964 why 
he favored Harry S&S. Treen 
as his running mete instead 
of Henry A. Wallace 


“He Was New emeaittel” 
The night before the oom 


a —_—- = —_—_—_—_£_£_—=—_—_— 


The ’56 Ford is the car that was built to make driving fun! 


ranslates miles into peasant memories . 


Witr pestommon-e tna moee: torr 

the world's largest-selimg ¥-8' 

For automobiles: Ford's Thunderhead T-2's—sangg 

air conditioning | #2 blaring 5 bp ey poe: 

; | jie hills im an effortless gine. Wart a 

laundries pass’ A bt is enougr for thew bathe: 

n° any other praduct . You l meet exey driving situate writ 
rT confidence of POWS_IP 

rece | mes = 

bird could hove inspred! Tress & 

specal ond cof prue wit 

owning the Thundebrt “look gT m7 


eae 


—_____—_By Paul Mame 


New Set of Richard Dirksen Canons 
Is Given by His Choir at Cathedral — 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
Monday, July D8, 2% 7 


° ee 


ToreGetT 2 


“=e es Peer Teese” 


foe £20 Meters Sete 2 1 


BES as 


Rog. 5. Sag 12 & fog 1 


«PEAT to sending 


THE 
American “jazz bands, bal 
lets and dance groups and 


similer activities” sbroad. 
which was raised last week 
by the Senate Appropria 
Committee. bas. been 
ay 

Through the action of the 
Jam Conference Commitice 
of both houses of Congress 
twe restrictive language of 
“as killed and an 
appropriation of SRO 
was r .aried for the cultural 
exchange program 

Known as the Presidents 
Soecial International Pro 
gram. it is this exchange that 
has assisted in sending Over 
seas) sr’ Amerwan mus 
clams and entertainers as Du 
Zy Gillespie. Ballet Theater 


Martha Graham and her 
cance group. and many 
oO hers 

Another piece of icgisie 


len was also passed by (Com 
gress on July 23. under wtuch 
the National Music Council 
"as incorporated wnoder a 
"ongressional charter. The 
council. organized in 1940. 
directed, among other things. 
u~der the terms of Ne new 
‘Carter. “le speek WED One 

ce for music whenever an 
Suiberitaiive expression & 
Gesirable”™ It is made up of 
SS representatives of various 
aspects of the music world 
im (his country 

HOW LING do we heve to 
Tat... apd how wet must ve 
get before the Carter Barron 


Amp@ithesier gets itself a 
cover” 

Here Washington finally 
has a magnificet' pert Seyr 


great summer emiertamment 
and 4&4 management tn the 


“- eubtle virtues of BM Peter Rath- 


i tse meter -cl- 


Feld trothers. Irvin and Je 
racl, thet is willing end alice 
to book the world's outstand 
ing attractions at a cost thet 
i well over hall «2 million 
Goliars fer this summer 
alene. So what hanpens” 

After they bulld up a large 
and loval sudlience. Ghee 
sands of whom have demon 
strated ther enthusiasm phy 
sitting im the ram. stantimg 
for hours hoping for an ent 
te the rain. oF making the 
trip te the Amphithester im 
the rain In the hope thal = 
wil] step. the Felds trun tte 
five mghts out of which ther 
can presetit @ shew only one 
and a hall times 


~~? 


ANY OWE of eeveral gilere 
could be successfully atiort 
they heve been De 
eaualiy large or terger om 
phitheaters Tan giewoad* 
Shed holds G00 people. Re 
vima Park. north of Chicage 
recently rebuilt. hol@s nears 
PLL 

would be interesie#i 7 
anyone can produce a amgir 
good reason why we shout 
continue te jeoperame «au 
hopes for fine summer e Titer 
tainmmernt,. pot to mertition the 
disappointment of those whp 
buy tickets only to heave 
get ram checks and make all 
their arrangemetiis twice or 
three tomes to see 2 Show 
oner Perharn we snowit 
get Congress out to the Am 
phithesier on & Tain, Gem 
and build a figg. not only 
Gry them oul bul ts get 2 
cover inte the works. The 
matter is up to \ational Cap 
tel Parke. | belewe ond 
surely they do not need per 
suading 
Let's get started 


ec as 


LILT KRAUS. for wears @ 
Viennese pianist ueietd Tar 
ber plervring of Mozart and 
Havdn. will epend Webnee 
Gay. Aug m Barker Mal 
of the YWCA. In the more 
ing she gives * seminar op 
piano masters from Bach tt 
Bartok The afternecn goce 


|@ ae@vanced students and 


teachers In the evening Wiis 


| Kraus will pley «2 cecital of 


Bech, Mozart. ° 
Schumm 2nd 


Senuber, 


ez 


By Paul Hume 
New canons were fred off in 
Washington Cathedral yester- 


im the summer services in the 
Cathedral. Yesterday after 
neen the men sang the newest 


“Kies fn Ghee Shecciloees %**. * Gove Proverbdial Canons 


te verses from the Proverbs of 


Ste Wee & eture® we] Cong Sciamon 
oom. aull Geetke Biron Ge 


Segregation 


tie the mite of Imitation 

which, Gy definition. must re 

man 
Mrksen 


weking sucressfu! 


a 


ime «one of 


MADAME 


piano recital. wath the one 
by Willem Messeios [rem 
the moat ob 
sorbing events of many years 
At Catholic Uniwersitys Wie 


RUTTERFLY 


THCKETS SOW OF SAE 
<UreR WUSE CITY BO OFFICE 
1 7 NST S20 or OF. oes 
Gece Bally 998 4 5S 
CARTER S4m3O% 


QMPErTEEATER BOROFFICE— TT 
Gece Dalle 10 OM te 08 FM Senders oS ee oF 


. ly t Gnd the Inmmer spirit of 
End im 4-H ie prey 304 


i p to South Show Times 
einai For Menday 

a7 Agomhoe Department - 

fie!) earl yestercty that re. 

Cll eagregetiton im the 68 cin . ee oe 

peagrem fer cura youths willl “SS 

cottimue aati! Sautttern Sates 


= = Ter Dee.” 

+ ‘- = 

fernitie an emt — Tr hlUChrEee - 
a ms tree 

The stittenent feo. Dr FE eo 


W. Aten thee @vertnent’s 6x “SS. tS 
program @icexter. came as the COlOr™ = << 

Bimuuticet ‘iat Cole wEte—~Come 
mee Gh 22 cumanding fa ~*~ 
Negre 42 memiers fom I7 ee ae nee.” 
Seuthect ait tercter cates will Sarrers— ~Dery x 
anee bee Sas € fer Weir = fo Se ose 


= ~ 


= Sh, s . 
1.3 oa. ©15 & 
Alten eailfl the chile witlh « a sie 
meniberdiiitp of 25 million Gers! ge ee See 
. ; 


es is “SS 
> 


a Geetr befewtip expen SS © 2 see 
ave met bw Peters gant. Taare LE S—“The Bate 
D thee Petes . eg les 


Worry ; 
[s Te. Se 
aief Gp fee tegeetion of SS Cees meee 
metiings auf atiter i artiv- 


Sen. Seatiters chtfees woulll 


the opening Preverb im praise come out with the fullest clar- 


of the gracie¢us women: ity, there is no reason to think 
Strength im describing the rich & would not in ancther week 
man’s wealth: and deep bar or two of rehearsal. 

monic obscurity the limes. Out of the twelve canons in 


in 
“Whose curseth his father and the set_I found five eminently 
put 


® package suspected of § sagey SETTY ‘susTER 


THE 


PASAMA 


UMN WILL BE RESUMED 


RICHARD Lt. COE & 
ON VACATION. His COL 
UPON HIS RETURN. See Offs Ocoee DAM ee OM Pe 


fhe Well-Bread 
Sandiuich 


The Ear! of Sendench sewer dreemed 
bust wmove" ot ~ou/d come *o such 
perfechoe os The Moyfower Che! s 
Sentech Teco -g Munste Scion 
Sesi on toorted French Breod 
och bute —resrored gor 
o or a—str *gbears 

rr og ee on lettuce — 
beveroge As eprcurec? 

tovo te o« The Lounge or 


P-esderrc’ Deieg Poon. 


° Mosc for luwockheor, Cocktails 
Muse for Dercang 


* 


form 7 PM «The lowrge 
Ceeererecece Pesce eesereeeseesesesees 
She Mayflower 


PLEASANTLY ABCORD TIONED 
Coenechcet Ave end DeSele S¢ - Distr? 7-3600 


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Bt Beker aot Cems “ROE 4 eS 
Ts cace Tik'sr Ma"ere. Last 


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uu 42a 


2 CORTITIONEL 


LADIES NIGHT 
TONIGHT—EACH 
LADY ACCOMPANIED 
BY AGENTLEMAN 
ADMITTED FREE 
SUSAN HAYWARD 
= ier goeeree Tt oe 
“TLL CRY 
TOMORROV” 


=. 9 3 


os GR Tus 
FREE VALUABLE GIFT 
TO THE FIRST 1600 LADIES 
PLASTIC RAIN BONNET 
THAT FITS NEATLY INTO 
THE PURSE 
EXTRA ADDED ATTRAC 
TION DAVEY OBRIEN 


im 
“MAN ABOUT THE 
HOUSE” 
NARRATED AND 
PRODUCED BY A 
SMITH NAMED PETE 
rat. aeT. aoe 
3 DATS OuLT 
ROBERT TATLO® - GRETA GsRBO 


“CAMILLE” 
sPRAW EMEST 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
iat Monday, July 30, 1956 


Pyle Calls For Action on New Airport 


i 7 
The problems of building athe Senate killed a $13 million crowding at National Airport. (was devoted to a discussion of cent midair collision over. the 
| second Washington airport at allocation to begin work on the| But he opposed joint occu-|Nation-wide air safety prob|Grand Canyon had drama- 
‘| Burke Va. have been “studied facility. It decided to study the pamcy of the military base by lems. He said it would 4 Ma mc need for improved 
death official proposal more ) ic” + re-' measures. 
%) the Civil Aeronautics Adminis Pyle said the agency has no planes, and said its commercial | ' 


aS Sie ie» eae pen oe seer toa YOUR ENGLISH 
HOLDING YOU BACK? 


| get on with #.” Assistant Ad- porters. Pyle said Andrews Air Joint use of the field on an) 
think. 


McLean Seeks 
. of Va. Branch 


A McLean. Va.. group came/ger, met yesterday with Col 
forward with a last-minute pro- Rudolph G Seeley, manager of 
posal yesterday for the ldcation the estate and son-in-law of the | 
of the Northern Virginia Ulfelders 
branch of the University of Vir- Seeley said the property bh 


—____] ministrater James T. Pyle de- Force Base would be an “ex-\interim basis has been con- 
TOOC | clared om the WTOP “City cellent™ sfte for a second Wash- sidered. | 


“Many intelligent men and The more you learn shout 


ginia at the historic Maplewood 
estate of Dr. and Mrs. Sidney 
U lfelde: 

They also suggested that the 
proposed Fairfax County Hos 
pital be located on the prop 
erty 

The 500-acre estate, which in- 
cludes a 24rToom mansion 
which at one 
mer home/of Woodrow Wilson, 


sell for $2500 an acre, they 


time was the sum 


will 
said 

lwo other Fairfax County 
sites Ravensworth Farm on 
Rraddock rd. and the Bowman 
tract in Herndon, have been 
suggested for the University. 

Owners of Ravensworth have 
offered 75 acres free, plus iy 
500 for immediate construction 
costs. Donors of the Bowman 
have offered 150 acres 
$120.000. or 


tract 
pius 


divided into two tracts, a 3437 
acre piece surrounding the 
mansion and about 140 acres 
on the other side of Chain 
Bridge rd 

Trammell a dairy farmer 
and Alden, a newspaperman 
claim wide support for Maple 
wood as the site for the uni 
versity as well as for the 
hospital 

They Say they 
majority of the Counts 
of Supervisors 
wood over the 
property) 

The matter s now in the 
hands of a three-man site com 
mittee appointed by the univer 


feel @ 
Board 
Maple 
worn 


also 


fax ors 


Raver 


that is needed te get work um 


Side” television program. Ali ington air field te ) relieve over- Much of Pyles appearance 


der way is money. be stated 
Map shows prepesed jecation Before adjourning last week. 
of a branch of University of -—_—_——- 


Virginia. 


sity’s Board of Visiters. They 


are Alexandria Federal (ourt 
Judge Albert V. Bryan, chair 
man, Henry McWane of Lynch 7 
bure and Dewell Howard of 
Richmond super 
intendent 

The committee met July Zi te 
hear Citizens of the area. Those 
at the hearing Were 20005 
evenly divided between Ra 
entworth and Rewman 


state school 


YOuR 


FOR 
Surprise Liquor Bargaie 


CALL ST. 3-751? 


TING's remartabie funcicida) 
action destrors Athietes Foot 


women are held back in their jobs 
‘and social lives because they use 
poor English or cant speak and 
write effectively,” says Don Bo- 


‘ander. director of English at Ca- 


reer Institute, Chicago. : 
“adults who realize that their 


- English is holding them back use 


our new home method to stop 
making embarrassing mistakes 1n 
English, t© improve their writing, 
to increase their vocabularies, to 
speed up their reading, to acquire 
the techniques of fluent conversa- 
tion. But the use of effective Eng- 
lish pays off in unexpected ways, 
savs Bolander., “because language 
is a tool of thought as well as a 


tool of expression. 


“You uz words with which to 


words and how to arrange them to 
express your ideas, the better your 
thinking becomes. The improve- 
ment of your Foglish—ncluding 
your thinking—<can lead to amaz- 
ing personal achievements.” 

Write today for free 42-page 
hookler,. Your English and Your 
Career. It explains the importance 
of English in your personal, so- 
cial and business life. It shows 
how the new Career Institute 
Method can help you achieve your 
special goals quickly in your spare 
ome at home. Address a card or 
letter to Don Bolander, Dept. WT- 
22. Career Institute, 25 East Jack- 
son Bivd.. Chicago 4, Illinom. the 
hooklet will be mailed ( you 
promptly. 


an aiternate | 


qonawvion of 250 acres and $25, 


cnn 


The McLean group, made up! 


of French Trammell. Robert A 
Alden and ©. | Brandenbur 


Davidow 
To Head Sale 
Of TB Seals 


larry Vi. Dav 
vice oresident of the 
c< will head the 
Christmas Seal 


tive 
Hecht 
50th annual 
in Wash 
ington this 
veal 
Davidows 
appointment 
by the direc- 
® tors of the Dis 
, trict of Colum- 
bia Tubercule 
i 6Sis Association 
54 was announced 
= by Dr. James 
J. Feffer, presi- 
dent. Hailing 


ow. exes 


Sale 


Davidow 


Bavidow. he noted that tuber- 
eulosis cases and deaths here 
showed an ihcrease last. year. 

In accepting the chairman- 
ship. Davidow said he would 
work for a goal of $200,000 

he lheve he declared. 
at successful Seal Sales 
throughout the country can 
contribute greatly toward mak- 
ing tuberculosis a medical rar- 
ity 

Davidow. who serves as Maf- 
aging director of Hecht’'s three 
stores in the metropolitan area, 
lives at 2500 © st. nw. As sales 
chairman he succeeds the late 
William E. Leahy. 


*, 


> --- 


Contract Let 


On County 
Sewer Job 


VM ork on 5 


project to serve the Lanham- 
Seabrook area of Prince 
Ceorges County will begin im- 
mediately. it was announced 
vesterday by the Washington 
Suburban Sanitary Commis 
gi 

The contract was awarded to 
Cal Bros.. inc. on a low bid 
of $199,088. It was the fifth 
large contract for sewer con- 
struction let by the 
sion in the past five weeks 

Other construction contracts 
awarded to low bidders by the 
Commission were 

For storm drains to serve the 
Lewisdale area of Prince 
Georges County. to the Prince- 
mont Construction Corp. Sil 
ver Spring. for $54,527 

For watef and sewer mains 
and house connections in New 
Hampshire ave. to James Per- 
reco & Son, Washington, for 
$14,440 

For water and 
and house connections to serve 
21 properties in Westchester, 
Montgomery County, to Canova 
for $10,135 

For sewer mains and house 
eonnections to serve St. Jude's 
Church and School on Viers 
Mill rd.. to Canova, for $7600 


——— 


major sewerage 


sewer mains 


~~ - — -—---- — — ~ — 


Quebec Town Unveils 


Statue of McCormick 
BAIE COMEAU, Que. July 
29 P—aA life-size statue of Col 
Robert R McCormick. late 
publisher of the Chicago Trib- 
une, was unveiled today by his 
widow at this Quebec indus 
trial town he helped develop 
The brief ceremony, which 
revealed the bronze figure of 
the Colonel paddling a canoe 
was attended by representa 
tives of the town, the province 
of Quebec and the McCormick 
publication and newsprint em 


pire 


ti Advertisement 


--— -- —_——-—— 


Does your 
bedroom invite 


you to relax? 


guage’. August Aerrer Homes 4 
Gardens pictures two wonderful 
wavs for bedrooms: to look... 
one a warm blend of old and 
new. the other with « flaw of 
boldness. Get August Berrer 
. Homes & Gardens today whes- 
ever magamnes are sold! 


7. 


t 


: 
; 
: - 
: 
: 


the choice of! 


. 


Commis 


No Reason to Wait Any Longer ! 


> 


There’s not much question about what this man 
and his young son have on their minds. 


They re 


how wonderful it would be to have one in their 


own driveway ! 


And because dreams of a Cadillac are hard to 
put aside, we suspect that it won't be too long 


We will explain, for instance, that it is now 
possible to become the proud and happy owner of 
a 1956 Cadillac for little more than the cost of 
far lesser cars—and certainly for a great deal less 
than they’ would expect to pay for the “car of cars’. 


‘We will tell them how economical a Cadillac 
is to operate—and how extraordinarily free it 1s 
from the needs of service. 


thinking about Cadillac—and about 


now before we'll have an opportunity to give them 


the facts about Cadillac ownership. 


And when that time arrives, they'll find that 
we have some wonderful news for them about how 


And we will show them how, at resale time, 
Cadillac returns a greater share of its owner's 
original investment than any other motor car. 


But the best news will be yet to come. For then 
CAPITOL GADILLAC-OLDSMOBILE COMPANY 


STerfing 32600 


co 


— 


. 
SUBURBAN CADILLAC-OLDSMOBILE COMPANY 


Oliver 6-7700 


rediey Shopping Center, Bethesda, Md. 


we will talk about the generous allowance we can 
give them on their present car—and how short 
the waiting period is on the Cadillac of their choice. 


They will find, we feel certain, that they have 
lost their last logical reason for waiting any 
longer to enjoy a new Cadillac. 


Incidentally, have you considered how wonder- 
ful a Cadillac would look in your driveway? If you 
have, then we sincerely urge you to come in soon 


and get the facts. 


We'll be waiting for you with the car and the 
keys—and a story too wonderful to resist! 


1222 Zand St. NW. 


AKERS OLDSMOBILE-CADILLAC COMPANY 
Fairlington Shopping Center, Alex., Va. 
Virginia License 796 


OVericek 3.0350 


The 


Federal 
Dia ry 


Bw Jerry 


Aluttz 


New Retirement 
Law Has Boosted 
Aid to Survivors 


(‘Thie «sc the second of «a4 
series on H. R. 7619, the dill 
approved by Congress to boost 
Federal employe retirement. 
survivor benefit« an additional 
$345 million a year. The first 


erticle appeared Sunday.) 


SURVIVOR BENEFITS will 
be increased substantially. by 
H. R. 7619 which will be effec- 
tive Nov. 1 when the President 
Signs it into law. Instances 

A former employe who re 
tires on a deferred annuity at 
age G2 after 5 years of 
‘Service will be given the right 
te elect survivor benefits 
Presently, he can retire at that 
time, but 15 years of service is 
required provide survivor 
benefits 

A widow or dependent 
widower will be eligible for 
benefits at any age, and as a 
general rule the payments will 
be half of the employe's earned 

The provision in the 
present which requires a 
childless widow to be at least 
59 to be paid benefits has been 
knocked out 

A retiree who elects te pre 
vide for his possible surviver 
must now have his annuity re. 
@uced by *% of 1 per cent for 
each year his wife is under 
age 66. H. KR. 7619 abolishes 
that penalty, and makes the 
survivor eligible for benefits 
regardiess of ace. The new pre- 
vision alse applies te a de 
pendent widower. 

Benefits paid to an eligible 
surviving spouse will be 50 per 
cent of the employe'’s earned 
annuity in every case except 
where a retiree elects to set 
aside a part of his annuity for 
that purpose 

At’ present the retiree who 
makes the survivor election 
mist have his entire annuity 
discounted by 5 per cent on the 
first $1500 and 10 per cent of 
any excess 
Under H. R. 7619 the penalty 
‘s only 2% per cent on the first 
$2400 and 10 per cent on any 
remainder In addition, the 
retiree has the option of apply- 
ing the discount either to all 
or part of his annuity. 

Let's say a retiree will have 


an earned annuity of $3000. and 
he concludes his widew could 
get along on $1000 a year. He 
would then take the 2's per 
cent deduction on the frst 
$2000. or only $50 a year, and 
he'd be paid the remaining 
$1000 in full, or a total of $2958. 
His widew would be paid half 
ef $2000. or $1000. By the way. 
this election would have te be 
made at the time the empleye 
retires and his decision would 
be irrevocable. 

Benefits to surviving spouses 
would continue until death or 
remarriage, or upon widowers 
becoming capable of self«up 
port. No minimum amounts are 
guaranteed them 

In the Federal service are 
numerous husband-wife teams 
The surviving member i« eligi 
ble for both retirement and 
survivor benefits 


SURVIVING CHILDREN wi 
he paid benefits averaging 150 
per cent more than those now 
available 

However, Congress tightened 
up the law te require that «a 
surviving child must have re 
ceived “more than a half of 
his support” from the dead em 
pleve, either his father or his 
mother, te be eligible fer pay 
ments. 

) a case where either a wid 
or widower survives, de 
pendent children will be paid 
smaller of: $600 per child 
per cent of the employes 
‘rage salary divided by the 
nber of children: or $1800 
ded by the number of chil 


only 


to 


annuity. 
law 


fa 


‘ 


no parent survives, the de 
dent children will be paid 
e leaser of: 50 per cent of the 
ploye’s salary divided by the 
nber of children: $720: or 
60 divided by the number of 
dren 
‘avments to dependent chil 
dren will be made until they 
reach 18 unless they are in 
capable of self-support; become 


| 


The Washington Post 


aN 


ity Life 


AREA NEWS 


CLASSIFIED 
cOoMICS 
TV-RADIO 


MONDAY, 


JULY 


38, 1936 


re 


* - 


sat 


—- 2" 


f 


‘3 


By Prenk Bor. @teff Photographer 


A PONTIFICAL MASS ACCORDING TO THE BYZANTINE RITE IS CELEBRATED AT ST. GREGORY'S 


GroupF ormed 
To Promote 
Integration 


Virginia Council 
Chapter Started 
In Charlottesville 


CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. 
July 2 (Special)—Abandon- 
ment of “the policy of evasion” 
of the Supreme Court's school 
segregation decisions has been 
urged by an organization 
formed here last week 

The new Chariettesville 
chapter of the Virginia Coun 
cil on Human Relations de 
scribes itself as “a rallying) 
point for these who wish to up 
hold the Supreme Court ruling 
that we move in the diree- 
tion of the desegregation of 
schools.” 

Fifty-six persons attended 
the chapter's first meeting is 
the Thomas Jefferson Memoria! 
Unitarian (burch Sara Pat 
ton Boyle. second vice presi 
dent of the state organization 
appointed Charles FE. Moran 
Jr. as temporary president of 
the group 

Mrs. Boyle said the forme 
tion of the new unit “doesnt 
mean that we ali favor total im 
tegration at an early date.” 

It does mean, she continued 
that they feel the “policy of 
evasion” of the Supreme Court 
decision should be abandoned 
and that people should work 
toward solving “problems im 
volved in the first steps toward 
compliance .~ 

Federal Circuit Judge John 
Paul recently ordered city 
school officials te desegregate 
schoois at the beginning of the 
fall semester 

Following the decision. more 
than 1000 persons attended «a 
mass meeting supporting the 
taking of all possible iegal 
measures to avoid integration 

The Virginia Council on He- 
man Relations is a state affiliate 
of the Southern Regional Coun- 
cil, an organization which—in 
Mrs. Bovie’s words—believes 
‘Southerners can. and will. 
solve their own intergroup 
problems through cooperative 
action.” The Council imcludes 
some Negroes 

In addition to Moran, tem. 
porary officers of the new unit 
are: Mrs. Morris Brown, vice 
president: Dr. Lambert Moly- 
neaux, secretary; Mrs. B. A 
Makieiski, treasurer, and Mrs 
Terrance Allen, membership 
chairman 


capable of selfsupport after 

age 18: marry or die 
Finally. in case of death of 
the surviving parent, benefits 
te surviving children will be 
recemputed and paid at the 
higher rate. Also, as a child be 
comes ineligible fer the payr- 
ments. the benefits for any 
; wil be 


DISABILITY BENEFITS «i | 
be boosted sizably by H. R. 7619 
An employe with at least 5 
years of service who is disabied 
could be retired at any age on 
the lesser of either 40 per cent 
of his average salary, or the 
annuity he would have been 
paid had he worked until age 
60. However, this liberal pro 
vision couldn't be used to in- 
crease the benefit paid t a 


A recovered employe who 
isn't reemployed by Uncle Sam 
would be made eligible to re- 
tire under the involuntary pro. 
visions of the law which are 25 
years of service at any age and 
20 years at age 


| (Te be contineed Teesdari 


a 
’ 


Befere the mass. the Mest Bev. Fulton J. Sheen (ieft) is 
pictured with the Eev. Edward V. Besack. charch pester. 


By Bishop Sheen 


Byzantine Mass Held 
Here for ‘First Time 


[ st 


By 


- 
oTUes OG i 


Kenneth 


5¢ 


Doe 


Sat Fepeor we 


Mi Rev. Fultes 
vesierday Genned 
miler the Byrantine Eate 
and said he hoped semeday “te 
have the privilege of celeorsa 
ing 2 Byzantine mess in Mos 
cor 

Bishop Sheen. Auxiliary 
hop of New York and Director 
of the National Seciety for ‘he 
Propagation of the Fah, cele 
brated the fir<t pontifical mass 
according to the Byzantime rite 
that has taken place m@ Dash 
ington 

The mass was offered im the 


The 1 x J 


Sneen tae 


of 


Exuceot fer the consecration 
of the Blessed Sacrament, the 
entire tweDeur service was 
conducted ie English Bishop 
Sheen used Old Slevenian for 
ibe comsecTsiicon 

He explsined that when the 
Apesties of Christ went abroad 
they used the language of the 
people. The Apostiies Paul and 
Peter. who went to Rome. spoke 
Latin. Other Aposties said the 
mess in Aramaic: Greek, Old 
Slow en.an 

Thes pesterday's mass. with 
the wermaecular. wes celebrated 
im the traditiens! way M&M has 
been celebrated for centumes.” 


gregatlicn of the aewly-orgam ne 


ed St. Gregory's By rantine 
Catholic Church. Assistimg the 
Bishop was the Rev. Edward 


Mest of his sermon dealt with 
schism which gave birth to the 


Desegregation 
Hearing Set 
For Today 


Arlington Court 
Te Weigh Motions 
In School Case 


‘ hearing’ on the merit of 
the Arlington school desecre 
gation case is scheduled for 10 
a. m. today in Federal! District 
Court at Alexandria 

Judge Albert V. Bryan is 
scheduled te hear a series of 
motions, among them a plea by 
attorneys for the Arlington 
Ceunty School Board to dis 
miss the action fled May 17 
by the National Association for 
the Advancement of Colored 
People. Sup. T. Edward Rutter 
is a co-defendant. 

He alse is expected to rule 
om whether 20 white persons 
should be permitted to join as 
plaintiffs. The original suit was 
brought on behalf of 22 chil- 
tren and 14 parents, mostly 
Negro Sut some white. 

Bringing of the case to trial 
hinges om Judge Bryan's deci- 
sions today 


It was at just such a session 
as the one scheduled for today 
that Federal Judge John Paul 
ruled on @ similar integration 
case in Charlottesville. 


On July 12, Judge Paul swept | 


asige motions to dismiss the 
case and to drop the local super- 
imtendent as a defendant. and 
announced his decision—that a 
Start should be made on de- 
segregation with the opening 
of the school term in Septem- 
ber 


Entry of a decree in the 
Chartottesville case was de- 
layed until opposing attorneys 
could make their recommenda- 
thems fo the court. 

Last Thursday, Judge Bryan 
dented a request by Falls 


Chureh Attorney John G. Epam- 


inenda who wanted the Arling- 
tom suit dismissed. He claimed 
the NAACP. as a corporation, 
has mo right to engage in the 
practice of law 

A study by 


the Arlington 


V. Rosack, paster of the church. pyrzantine Rite. It resulted, he School Board seven months ago 


His appearance ai the saass, 
Bishop Sheep said. would re 
weal te the world <hat though 


Russ: 

The Shrine of the Sacred 
Heart. 16th st. and Park rd 
nw. where the mess was beled 
wes crowded 
standing mm the asiles 


said. when the Catholics of Con- 
santineslie deciared their 


Bat the clergy of the Bran 
tine Rite still are priests of the 
Catholic Church. he empesized 


they were schiemetics~ 


showed that integration would 
result in only @ Negro pupils 
attending present white schools 
im the county. 

Gev. Thomas B. Stanley last 
week called a special session 
of the General Assembly for 
Aug. 77 and said he would ask 
legal authority to withhold state 
school funds from any com- 


schools. 


ll Sh 


Total May Reach 
Several Thousand 
Under New Plan, 
Official Believes 


(See Questions on Page 20.) 


I 


By Wes Barthelmes 
Staff Reporter 


wares...D. C. Tax Withholding 


ow Delinquents 


“Several thousand” delin-| * 


quent taxpayers may be dis- 
covered when the District 
switches its collection of in- 
dividual income taxes to a 
payroll withholding system 
on Oct. I | 

This is the estimate of R. J 
Dunham. administrator of the 
income and franchise tax divi 
*s10nN 

“Undoubtedly there are sev 
eral thousand who owe the 
District money but have failed 
to tile returns,” he said yes- 
terday. 

Dunham said he was unable 
te give a more specific esti- 
inate 

However. he said his office 
had assessed an average of $90 
from delinquent taxpayers 
rounded up last year. If only 
2000 delinquents are uncovered 
in the switchover to payroll 
withholding. this would mean 
an additional $180,000 for the 
revenue-hungry District Gov 
ernment. 

The average income tax paid 
by District residents in 1955 
was $117. 

There are estimated thou- 
sands of persons living in the 
District who consider them- 
selves residents of other states 
and therefore not subject to 
local income taxes. Now, with 
withholding, they will be 
obliged to prove this to the 
District Government 

The shift to a “pay-as-you 
go” method of obtaining local 
income taxes already has 
brought results. Dunham said 
the law authorizng withholdin 
was scarcely enacted last March 
when many delinquents were 
flushed out. About 10,000 resi- 
dents filed returns for the first 


time by April 15. Had it not! 
been for withholding, said Dun-' 


ham, they probably never 
would have filed. 

in the opinon of District tax 
officials it was necessary 
establish a payroll withholding 
method because of a major 
change in the basic tax exemp- 
tion. The basic individual ex- 
emption was lowered substan- 
tially from $4000 to $1000 for 
single persons and to $2000 for 
married persons and heads of 
families. 
not been adopted, about 30,000 
te 40,000 residents, who would 
be obliged to file returns un- 
der these lowered exemptions, 
might not have done so, Dun- 
ham estimated. 

The withholding method wil! 
spotlight delinquents, he said 
It has the advantage that once 
a District resident is on rec- 
ord as having filed even one 
return for a tax year, he is 
thereafter “in the District's 
eye.” 

Under withholding, an esti- 
mated 25,000 private employ- 
ers in the District will supply 
the city tax office with names 
of their employes who are Dis- 

residents. In addition. | 
those employes who claim to 
be non-residents will have to 
fill out a form certifying this 
Employers will keep these 
forms on file and available for 
inspection by tax enforcement 
agents 
Federal employes who both 
live and work regularly in the 
District will have District as 
well as Federal income taxes 
deducted from their pay- 
checks. Federal employes who 
reside in the District but reg- 
ularly work outside the Dis. 
trict will not have District in- 
come taxes withheld. However, 
they are still obliged to pay 
any due taxes. 

There is some inconsistency 
in this. Non-District private 
employers who nevertheless 
do business in Washington will 
be considered obliged to with- 
hold District income taxes of 
their employes who are Dis- 
trict residents. 

District residents who work 
for the District Government 
will have their local income 
taxes deducted no matter where 
they work. 

No District income taxes will 
be deducted from pay envelopes 
of persons who reside outside 
the District. 

Under the former basic ex- 
emption about 85,000 returns 
were filed annually. Under the 
new lower exemption a total 
of between 225,000 and 250.000 


with persons “Fer they were not heretics, munity which desegregates its returns are expected to come 


inte the income tax division 


Leon E. Dostert, Director of 


Languages and Linguistics at 


Georgetown University, stands in front of a chart showing 
how Russian scientific articles will be translated inte Eng- 


lish by mechanical means. 


GU Werks 


By Jame 


Device to Translate 
Foreign Science Data 


on Machine 


s Clayton 


Staf Reporter 


The day is not far distant 
when, in a twinkling of an eye. 
an scientific articles will 
be translated into English by 
mechanical means. Prof. Leon 
E. Dostert, Director of Lan- 
guages and Linguistics at 
Georgetown University, said 
yes crday that a $100,000 grant 
from the National Science 
Foundation brings the day into 
the foreseeable future. 

But the work on mechanical 
translation so exper? 
mental. Dostert stressed, that 
he feels like the Wright brath 
ers must have felt after Kitty 
Hawk. The theory works and 
the possibilities are breath 


is still 


if withholding had'taxing but practical perform- 
ance is in the future and skep 


tics still laugh. 


The money from the grant, 
which was announced last 


week, will be spent for study 
of the theory behind mechani- 
cal translation and for con 
struction of grammatical rules 
for a future machine to use 
Dostert said that, perhaps in 
18 months he could start plan- 
ning a new electronic machine 
designed specifically for trans 
lating. 

Announced in 1954 


The first announcement of 
mechanical transiation was 
made in January, 1954, when 
the Internationa! Business Ma- 
chine Corp.s 701 computer 
demonstrated it could translate 
Russian sentences into English 
within a narrow vocabulary 
range. 

Since that time, advance- 
ment has been slow, hindered, 
Dostert said. by the lack of 
funds. Last week's grant will 
enable Dostert to put more 
than 20 linguists, lexicogra- 
phers, and assistants at work 
on the project. 

Dostert’s aim for the year is 
to complete sufficient work so 
that a new mechanical trans- 
later can have a vocabulary of 
6000 words — 3000 of them 
everyday words and 3000 saci- 
entific. . 

The biggest linguistic prob 
lem to be conquered is that 
words do not always mean the 
same thing. The English word 
“char.” for instance, can mean 
something to sit in, one who 
presides at a meeting, or the 
act ef presiding in addition 
to some technical meanings. 
Dostert's problem is to teach 
the machine to chose the 
proper meaning from its vo 
cabulary 


Through Key Rules 


This teaching is done through 


a series of key rules which 


are fed into the machine's 
mechanical memory. When it 


\ oo aa 


— Ee 


S'3@¢ = s,2 


Ancient Cars Run A 


gain 


7 ¥ 


By Vic Casamento. taf! 


. 
“* 


Pootograane: 


sees “chair.” its memory tells 


it to look at the other words 
in the sentence to see what 
meaning “chair” has in this 
particular context. 

No machine, Dostert pointed 
out, can know more than it is 
‘told by human minds. His next 
project is to determine what 
rules must be. taught to the 
machine so that it can deter 
mine the precise meaning of 
each word it encounters 

At present, mechanical trans 
lating is done on normal IBM 
machines using standard punch 
cards. In the future, Dostert 
predicts that a machine will 
read printed text with an elec- 
tric eye-type device and trans- 
late directly from print. 

A machine of that type would 
be able to translate in a few 
minutes material which would 
take a human translator thou 
ands of hours. The job for 
translators in the future. Dos- 
tert explained, will be as editors 
to sharpen and ciean up the 
output of the machines 

The impact a translating ma- 
chine would have upon the 
world is tremendous, Dostert 
said. if a machine can be per- 
fected to handle Russian- 
English translation, the type 
of study now involved, it would 
be relatively simple to estab 
lish rules for other languages. 


Could Be Informed Quickly 


In the scientific world, this 
would mean that the great 
backlog of scientific writings 
which have accumulated could 
be translated quickly. It would 
mean, Dostert said, that scien- 
tists in one nation could be 
informed almost immediately 
about .writings in other lan- 
guages—something which now 
often takes months or years. 

Perhaps of even more im 
portance, Dostert thinks, is 
the impact upon underdevel. 
oped areas of the world.. It 
would become possible for 
those nations to obtain for 
their libraries translations of 
the great quantities of refer 
ence material now available 
only in English, German or 
French. 

This would 
necessity for engineers and 
scientists to spend years in 
language study before they he- 
come of actual value to their 
homeland 

The work at Georgetown was 
begun years ago by Dostert and 
Paul Garvin. Similar projects 
are under way at the Univer. 
sity of Washington, University 
of Michigan, and Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. 

In addition, Dostert said lin- 
guists In England and Russia 
are working on similar systems 


Today’s Chuckle 


Now the morticians have 
gotten into the credit business 
“Use our layeway plan. Pay 
now; go later.” 


eliminate the 


Deuble pedestsl Osk desk. 
Painted green or brown. Used, 
but in excellent condition. 


METAL STORAGE 


s 


N. FRANK 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES BERA 
” ‘Mendex, Jule 30, 79% 


ye 
1) 


ore 


Explanation of Changes 


In District Income Tax 


Q. What are these income tax 
changes? 


S400) exe™p 
or hi wife 
ea S00) 
S2000 


rer rT 


ryeT Ss 7) 


© Are there any changes @ 
the inceme tax rates’ 

s taxable 

$20 000 

income 

to and m 

be taxed 

instead of the 

That por 


nrcorre Cru Pr 


7 ong 
tnan 
of taxadiw 


oT 


more 


cent 


-° 


a 


ry* 


taxed rar 


* per 


a 


instead 


©. What will that changer 
the basic TPT Eilen sean 
taxparers im dollars” 

4 VA ie 


art 


Q. Hew much additional rev 
enue will this bring te the Dus 
trict Government” 

~ F will producer 
ated $3.4 milhbon morr 
the current fiscal year 

June 30. In each 
rhnanges 
$53 mil 


6 


ane 


0. Hew will Wachineten res 
idente pat the’r Th<trict ind) 
trédual imceme tave<* 


0° Hee il withholding 
work as far as private emmpler 
ers im the District are com 
cerned” 

4 Beginning with 
raviment of wages on or after 
Ot. 1. emplovers the Dis 
trict will withhold the amount 
que the District Government 
ww pay of emploves Wix 
are residents of Washington 


he frst 


in 


‘TOM *> 


Q Will private employers 
the District withheld tzurs 
frem employes uheo reside out 
side Washingten” 

{ No. There will be no TD 
hniding the pay enve 
ones of an ressdent em 
ploye whether he be employed 
mn Washington by a private em 
ploser. 1 inetrict Govern 
ment of Federal (,overn 
ment 

o Wl private emptlerers 
based outside the District be 
ebliicated te withheld teamrs 
from emplere« whe are Wash 
ingten resident<* 

4. If tive 
ness im ti 
*. armpit 
fr faning 
ver Sprin 
ing tt) customers 
trict. Such empiovers 
pected to comply to avoid 
sible litigation 

Oo. Will the Federal Gevers 
ment withhold District imceme 
taxes from empleres whe re 
side im the Destrict’ 

, Ve or Those 

' —e regular 
the 
apps 
regulars 

lator outside 
The <tetee of the 


not Dpeen Grit 


from 
non 
> 


- 


ne 


the 


. by <i 
For 
a ars 
hment in & 

delivers cjoth 
the 

are 


mpluver doet 
District 
ihe owner 
establ: 


7h 


a ‘es 


of 
at 
1s 

rt 


Ty ya 
vs 


in 


Federa 
place 


errr *. .< Tex 


ry 
_ 


t 


treet it rf 


ry" 


r oe 


ernie ’ 


‘fe 
- « ¢ eral 
’ Ihestruct 
Pentagon 
mined 

©. Will the District Gever= 
ment withheld taxes from Ms 
resident empleves” 

4 Yes. ne meatier 
they work 


©. Arent there some ¢ 
emotions fer these whe ner 
malir weuld be subject te 
= ithheiding* 

4 Yes prumarily btar 
personne! ang wgiisiive em 
pioves 

©. Exactly bew docs with 
hbelding work" 

S Private employers an 
estimated 25.900 in the District 
—will be furnished with «@ 
table comparabie te that toer 


r 


has 


sthere 


m 


. 25 On 


use when withholdeng Federal 
noome tax. snenes. A Senet 
of’ reguistier:s bee eee gee 
pared and will te Live trarmefis 
of emplorvers befare (hr 1 

tat emcee, wal be oe 
eereg 2 wttthei@ine send 
feation gcumber Be will te 
furnished «@ form es wich & 
suppla the Dietriket Geeere 
ment with the geme and ad 
Gree Of tee fom. geeber of 
cmpores, trpe of Busnes er 

Four teees 2 weer. be wil 
turn in te the Dretroct Gee cee 
7 ethos @uerag Ge we 
ceeaGmme tare’ nein 
mener withheld 
Nowember oenp@ Terecnies of 
ims vear must be tered op 
Jan sS- 

ihe mene. 
- arompenet FF a 
District) 3 ferm. semiler 
Feaeral Gorernment uz 
form. At the end of the Sout 
quarners af earth calenmtia’ pear 
emopiervers wil. sulenilt te tie 
District Gevernmennt D2? form 
comraratic te the (ceets 
ments WZ ferm. tei oor 
soem enmuierwrs rear 

ngs and tele 

walnhelé Sar @ 

2Oc flint 


——_— 


iT 


turned us if 


T 


: 


r 


sf 


© Whe ceneilfieties « cee 
Gent of the Deetrert™” 
XA AG v Te 
resident addrest rm tte 
This would techn 
autho ov ——— 


mm Terr wrt rer 


ry? 


“1T) v 
hoTre 


Trytrt 


. am 

eased ® 
nae 

tau 


- Lt} 


ouned or 
Dist 
Lae 


year 


©. Rew oil the either 
™=etbed werk fer as emgiere” 

A. Take an emuplose who will 
owe the District S83) on bss DH 
imoeme. First. the Dietract will 
“Torgive this taxnperer Ser ene 
half of this tax Gur 
v only owe S30. But SP of 
thes has ahreae@s bere gad 
—— j~ 


rect ter mere 


curren 


ao 


Arutz 


The te 


-* Tyt¥ Cc Ts 7 
rf We 
a a 


i. 


re 
* 


leo ease 
Lak paver 


7 


ime RuTeetT 
ae ma «wll 
still face the follewung ebiigs 
uons Geaptie the fergoeeme<s 
A (azpever whe chee bw per 
196 rmoceme mm tes. & 
Salments wil] tizve . pes Ite 
fmai tesiaiieest & ; 
1956. Thee by meat 
Geadiine. he will eur the DD 
rect thal poertees of Tes TE on 
16 mocome thet bes eet bee 
Leargiven and as net Been pat 
by weiinbeidmg And al Gy 


ae ad 


- 


timer. be @ peepee tee ae he 
carremt 1937 socom bs etl 
noiding 

@ Most a texpeerr costere 
te Gie «2 oetere cork Agel TA 
even theugh he moem tax Ra 
been wethbeid Gurang Gee pee 
vieus rear” 

A. Ves, just as Gempeers Ge 
2 rete Ss CoE So 
Federa! income tage: that ibe 
wise are withheld Ths of te 
rauee the amon waite & 
freauent! ot the ears 
ee ee es ee ee 
an oeeTreaeT. «se UTE US CO 
uUnoer pay eet 


; 


pa’ nent” 


a if the amour te ce 


funded is more than SL then Sows aod Socmer church editer home of a heart attack 


the Destrict wall sue Ole ce 


wer for Tits return orust 
w evrumoa@nied &y a payment 
io 2 aeupent tat gee on this 
mrcrne 
siftiem be must file « 
tev arzoen of estimated mrome 
wit «(mater ‘as due on what 
be Selieves be will receive in 
Ss Tee amt te seco 
jecuet O a east one quarter 
wo (le anevait estumated as due 
le ja@75 om @quarteriy mstall)- 
Term ws sarweet periods will 
a aay Ge Ot 


nS 


7 


“ iGoru 


2st 


= Wet © © shesiciae o= 
gieee «2 secretary whe is « Die 
\ Me ouast withheld mroeme 
een ery wages and report 
tre my other empleyer 


4m 


°** 


~ 


[come for 2 calendar 
cueeds S102 single 
Tartmedt? Sut separated 

gess Mrcome euiceeds 
Se ¢ marmet and |iving te 
petie,r 

[= & goeee sales or 
“er? “cate er gQusiress evrrceed« 
Sve -egactie<s of *ne amour’ 
ff -s ewe 

— ££ te comiieed 
~~ fuer’ and wife ivirg te 
ewrets S08 im aggre 
renfemet? gro=s <sale< 
fer ad *rarte 
Trees etreet=s GW re 
rw tes gross in 


errr 


x Seed 
wae 
rr » 4 


¢ 


"er errpr:< 


neoame 


ze" °°; 

ey” 

"ww TT s ove 
fF 

\* 


at Brrvev grr’ oe 


Maj. Vaughn 
Dies: Retired 


=“From Marines 


7 


Pure al services will be heid 


Zo om Teese af ives 
un {rington 
a Va Sars G Sau 
[TS cet) SS whe ded Fri 
én on Be*vesda ‘aval Hox<prta! 

ten 1961 
Vaugtae was assistant ¢d 

of 


os 


*‘guieT? mnme 


* roe” re?¢ r 


-¢* 
1.8 
Warire Reserve 


= i ara le 


7 


ant ra 


6 
'~® . . nA 
& = the Marines 

Werli War L serving 

aiuart 'warwus +i p+. lef! 
the serve after @ Ditch mw te 
sae d@egertuest at Warine 
Heatpiar’ers here and worked 
ber sears i so Washington 


He 


the Carpe 
car’ment 


te received his com 
free Get tour of 
Later te wae par officer 
ie Dh Maree Division 


oan 


YT. *Sissr? 
ours 
v —— 


er. er 


i = et ty his wile 
te Heien L. Burdette 
oom Eebert G Vaeugio. Forest 
Seas, Wet. am tecdeetrea! arts 
warner CUelhCUC oe CUCU 
Steet @« deaghter. Laura £. 
ou of the Rome address 
erorcer. G Howard 
Sucre Palle WY 
and Pertect © Vaeucte. Lewie 
om * anual “wo grandrhi! 
tirwa 


“ae pr 


: 


- 


[| Tae Alaa en 
efinar ef the Washiogten Daily 


4 


a The Washington Post. died 


John Fisenharc Phote 


Two for One 


Fart Frith. Leesburg feed company manager, shows what 
te de when vou have twe thirsty raccoons and enly one 
bottle. Frith found the little fellews on the readside sev- 


Robert T. Mitchell, 


Spanish War Veteran 


T . of remained until he retired in 
19G1. “ince 1940; when his wife, 
who was Lessie FE. Mitchell, 
c 4. he had resided with a 
daughter, Ida Mae Fraser. He 
was a nember of the Anacostia 
Methodist Church 

Besides Mrs. Fraser. he ts 
survived by three sons, Robert 
T. and Raymond G.. both of 
708 W. Bradock rd. Alexam 
dria. and John R. 4611 East- 
ern ave. North Woodridge. 
Md: two other daughters. 
Blanche FE. Scruggs. 19 S. Park 
dr. Arlington, and Dorothy 
L.. Laverine, 1380 Fort Stevens 
dr nw: two sisters. three 
brothers, 12 grandchildren and 
three great-grandchildren 

Funeral services wil be held 
at 11 a m. Tuesday at Lees 
funeral home. with Durial in 
Cedar Hill Cemetery. 


Mitchell 
a longtime resi 
ngton and veteran 
American War. 


Robert 
3 T ol. se 

af Vash 
f the Danish 
died Saturday 
2 nome 
_ snort 


-_ 


nr. 


‘er 2 


o untv . 
Mitchell 
wounded 

» the Cuban 

eampaign dur 

the Span 

{merican 


- 


was 


Mr. Mitchell 


member of the 
Cameo of United 
War Veterans 

Washington in 
to work at the 
where he 


2 


ue « 


'* 
ana went 


Factory 


Arthur J. Diggs 

Funeral services for Arthur 
J. Diggs. 71. of 2408 14th at 
nw.. who died Thursday in New 
Providence Hospital, will be 
held at 1 p. m. 
today at Mount 
Zion Methodist 
Church, 1324 
7h ost nw. 
Burial will be 
in Woodlawn 
Cemetery 

Mr. Diggs had 
been retired 
since he suffer- 
ed a heart at- 
tack in 1950. He 
worked for 40 Mr. Diggs 
years at the Haskins Informa 
tion Service at 1200 I st. nw 
first as a chauffeur and later 
as a cierk 

He was a 32d Degree Mason. 
Dorie Lodge 19. and was a 
member of the Mit Zion 
(Church, where wes an 
ushe! 

Besides his wife. Lillian. Mr 
Diggs is survived by four sis- 
ters anc three brothers 


Eimer W. Lusk. 47, a budget 
analyst with the Internationa! 
Ceoveration Adm i nistration 
died of a heart attack Satur 
dav when visiting in Miami 
Fla He twed at 4501 KN. Va 
‘ation lane. Arlington 

Vr. Lask came.te Washing- 
ton im 1908 to work for the 
Sell Conservation Service. He 
hed been with ICA and pre 
decessor agenoeies since 1942. 

Born in Cleveland. Mr. Lusk 
was graduated from Western 
Reserve University He was 
am accomplished pianist. and 
belonged to the Dayton, Ohio, 
Musicians Union 

His wife. Catherine BR. Lusk. 
s home economics teacher at 
Anacostia High School, sur- 
vives Tm 

Funeral services and burial! 
will be in Lakewood, Onio. 


ne 


Edward G. Gavin 


CHICAGO. July 2 #—Ed 
ward G. Gavin. 38 editor of 
building industry pulications 
and the founder of National 


Home Week, died today at his Grover C. Long 


Since 1945 Mr. Gavin had Grover C. Long. @ of 1322 


fund witheat eur metece Goem Sesterier af Westchester, Pe. been editor of The American Corbin pl. ne.. a consulting en- 


the taxperer. Bat @ the oves 
nave ss OE Oe 
the tamper wa 
for the refunc 

© Gee sbheat Peeteet cow 
Gents whe are get eulborrt Ge 
= °° 


* 


— 
pus 


v 
on iped 
rome ta? 


rT) |. 
iJ 


° --« 


wréis ; 
ar 


aor 
~~ Te Pua 
wiws 
Tre they are 
nolding 


© Dhe & Set eubpeert & 
efemp met wwe 


: wore 
the Federal Gooermmet 2 a! 
insialigties autfietie the De 
rut of Ca@iumbe such a tie 
National Institeies of Healt 
m Bethesda 
@. Gew ders be per bie i 
come tax te (he Deere” 


. Be wil fie 22 soe 


wi fhe 2a 2 


 _. i> 

Seales 
©. Gee will Ghee be Gore” 
& This tndeeoeG@es seat fie 

a retewrs ep be 18 ooreee & 


- 


kes guarte 


- ——— -—— — ee 


National 


> gr ® 


— * 


or 
resterase*— 


Temperatures and rainfall fer 24 bears endeg 73) p = 


SIBVERIALe 
i 


4 o 


ingeuss 


SRORTE- 


| 


PaMy Pee ee ose e aeAeReRee 


i 


k 


eT 
wan 
L 


54 
ty 


CeTEPrs 
wit 
‘k 


: 


ChE Gel ME eC oe TT Gtr ht) ey 


Pe PEt) Perm iae re) Pick. aki! ig 


i 


wer 2 coer 
@utew of Andrew Tate Allan 
am [ae Te Ttormer 
SStliliedas. Sie bad 
entews il 


ative 2 | 


r Ton 


Builder. monthly magazine of gineer who specialized in elec- 
the home building trade. Prior tronics, died Saturday. He 
te that he was A of Amer- suffered the first of three 
an Lumberman and Construc- strokes three weeks ago 
News A Washington resident 2 
tact wear he received a cita- years. Mr. Long maintained 
tiem fram the National Associa- offices in the Union Trust 


STUART, Va. July DD @& 
State Sen. Frank P. Burton, 6. 


’ 
; 
’ 
| 
: 
: 


District of Patrick, H 
‘Pittsylvania Counties 
‘cities of Martinsville and 
ville. 

He was a member of 
Privileges and Elections Com- 


Washington and Lee University 
in 1912. He served as mayor of 
Stuart for five years. In 1873 
he was elected Patrick Counts 
commonwealth attormer. and 
was named again in 1931. And 
continued in office wntil he 
went to the Senate 

Surviving are two sons, Law- 
rence and Frank PF. Jr. and @ 
daughter Frances, who tit @ 
Stete Department employe ir 
Washington. 


Mamie Baum 


Mamie Baum. 72. Washington 
native and widew of 
Baum Sr. founder of the Gen 
eral Equipment Co. at 733 Sth 
st. nw. died yesterder at the 
Hebrew Home for the Aged 
She had been in the Home 
since suffering a stroke two 


field dr. 


and Julia Bird of Washingion 

Funeral services wil! be con 
ducted by Rabbi Balfour Brick 
ner at 10:30 a. m. Twesdey at 
Gawiers Funeral Home. Buria! 
will be private 


Earl E. Hindatan 


Earl E. Hindman. 66. who re- 
tired three years ago as chief 
clerk of the typists’ section of 
the Post Office Departments 
Bureau of Registered Mail. 
died Saturday of a heart at 
tack. 

Mr. Hindman was stricken 
at the home of a brother. Le 
Roy H. Hindman, 3214 Chillam 
rd. Mt. Rainier, Md. with 
whom he lived A mative of 
Ripley. Ohio, be came ww 
Washington in 1917. 
| Other survivors incilede « 
sister, Mrs. A. L. Cardwell, Le 
tonia. Ky.. and « brother, Har- 
ry L. Hindman, Zephyrhilis, 
Fila 

The funeral will be at 9 a m 
Tuesday “at the Episcopal 
Church of Owr Savieur, tb 
and Irving st. ne. with burial 
im Ft Lincein Cemetery 


Church teen of Home Builders for his Building until going inte semi- Friends may cali at S. H. Himes 


werk as a writer and speaker retirement. He -worked on 


Co. 2301 Mih st. oe 


actude tee other in furthering the construction minedetector projects for the 


a 


( sateswille 
View’ Fiz 
gut [Se aeorh: dren. Marvy and 
tjeeGjet® Allee of Wontreal 
F ameral wrtvices will be heid 
zs wwa m 


f 


€ 
- 


Teurs@ay at the 
fumeral home 


Twe Area Encinecers 
Recene Fellowships 
Twe Wasitumgtenm area engi 
~S @e ameag | Gusset 
mum Fellows gs ierted to carry 
ow atvance wort m fight tech 
ey Tee year 
bem ©. Jones, 3 Jerh of 
ant Leonart € 


° 


i fad 


industry Navy during World War Ii 
Seme years ago be launched Survivors include a son, Gro 
National Heme Week. observed wer C. Long Jr 
annually im September as ason, Grover C 
means of stimulating public iIn- Melbourne, Fila 
terest in building and refova Friends may at Hy- 
ven song's, 1300 N st. nw. today 
The funeral will be in Florida. 


Parade to Honor 


Three Generals. | "TAKE ADVANTAGE 


Three generals. retiring after 
= total of 95 years service, will 
be honored with a farewell 
parade by the Third infantry 
Regiment at 4 p. m. Tuesday at 
Pt. Myer. 

Maj. Gen. Claude B. Miche! 


Bric. Gen. George W. Gardes. 
whe is retirng with 27 years 
service. has just returned from 
a tour as Judge Advocate, U.S 
Army im Europe. He served 


: during World War I! as com 


manding officer of the 36th 


ile 


— FE 
: 


S 


UNIQUE PLAN 


rt. wate 
Beutdewr. Mr 


Be 
-- 


z 
“© 


oe our S. Ge Petes 
. ss 2 Goes Foe 
Camere «o L™ 


= 
—. 


corres 
Pe ON 


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WARDROBES FOR RENT by 
mothers include garments like this black 
and white silk party dress and corduroy 


lounging outfit 


parents is sponsoring the vé@nture, with 35 


An organization of young 


expectant 


Inc. Mra 
George S 


Rr Charis De 
cents per month their top rates 
here are two members of Parent & Child 
Basi! 
Rader. 


Veechie Staff Photegraper 
Modeling 
and Mrs. 


Leather, ieft. 


Jor and about WOMEN 


MONDAY, 


JULY 309, 


1956 


Party Time: 


Menzies Sparks Social Whirl 


By Muriel Bowen 


WHEN Australian Prime 
Minister Robert Menzies ar 
rives on an wnhofficial visit 
Tuesday. a well-flied four 
day schedule will be await- 
ing him. 

Secretary of State Dulles 
will be at MATS terminal at 
3 op. m. to greet the Prime 
Minister and Dame Pattie 
Menzies when they arrive 
from Chicago. In the eve 
ning a formal dinner party 
will be given in honor of the 
visitors by the Australian 
Ambassador and Lady Spen- 
der at the Austraiian Embas 
sy on Cleveland ave.. where 
the Menzies will stay during 
their visit 

On Aug. 1 while Mr. Men 
gies is lunching at Blair 
House as guest of Secretary 
of State Dulles. Dame Pattie 
will be guest of Mrs. Dulles 
st the Dulles home. 27 
Thirty-second st. On Thurs 
day the Prime Minister wil! 
be guest of the Nationa! 
Press Club at lunch and 
afterwards he will make an 
official call on Mr. Dulles at 
the Department of State. 


THE MENZIES have re 
quested that Thursday and 
Friday evenings be kept free 
ao they can dine with old 
friends such as the president 
of the International Bank 
and Mrs Fugene Black 

Sir Percy and Lady Spen. 
der have sent out invitations 
for a reception at the Austra- 
lian Embassy. Aug. 4 

On Sunday the Prime Min 
fster and Dame Pattie fly to 
San Francisco en route for 
Japan. Mr. Menzies is taking 
np a long-standing invitation 
fream the Emperor to visit 
lapan. It will be his first visit 
a« Prime Minister 


Farewell: 
THE DRAWING ROOM of 
the Pakistan FEmbascy, which 


has covering 
of patterned gold silk, pre- 
sented an animcted appear- 
the 
the farewell party 
the Ambassador 
and the Begum Ali for the 
Naval Attache and Mrs. S&S 
M. Ahsan 

Wives of members of the 
embassy staff spiced 
white saris with gold-edged 
shawis of vivie scariet, bive 


exquisite wall 


ance Saturday on occa 


sion of 
given by 


their 


or vellow. Naval Attaches 


came in crisply - starched 
white uniforms 

“Just as well we dont have 
ton wear these things every 
day”, said Capt. T. K. Morr 
son. Australian Naval At 
tache. “because we would 
have one terrible job trying 
to keep ourselves ciean . 


AFTER JUST OVER a 
year in Washington, (apt. 
and Mrs. Ahsan and -treir 
two sons Osman (5) and 
Omar (3%) leave Aug. 1 for 
England where he is to take 
command of Pakistan's first 
cruiser, HMS Diadem. “It's a 
tremendous _ thrill getting 
this command”, the Captain 
says. “but we are going to 
miss Washington—never 
have we mace so many 
friends in so short a time.’ 

The more than 100 guests 
included Rear Adm. and Mrs 
R. A. Currie, Rear Adm. and 
Mrs. Laurence H. Frost. J 
Jefferson Jones Ill. Mr. and 
Mrs. Nicholas Thatcher. Mr 
and Mrs. Frank Collins and 
Capt. Awtrey. They stroll 
through the suite of reception 
reoms admiring autographed 
photographs of world figures 
4 picture of the Indian Prime 
Minister, Pandit Nehru. 
taken by the ambasasdor, was 
particularly admired 

The deputy speaker of the 
Pakistan National Assembly, 


Fortune Savs 


Women Make 60 Per Cent 


Of Consumer 


NEW YORK. July 30 
About 60 per cent of last 
year s $252 billion U. S. con. 
sumer expenditures were 
made by women reports For- 
tune Fditor Gilber Burck in 
the magazine's August issue 
eut tomorrow 

Fortune labela as 8 “per: 
sistent myth” the widely held 
belief that women contro! &5 
cents of very dollar spent by 
American families. 

Consumer expenditures in 
which womens buying pow- 
er predominates according 
te Fortune include: food 
($50 billion); personal care 
($2.8 billion); clothing, acces 
sories and jewelry ($24.5 bil)- 
lien): household operations 
($30.8 billion); medical care 
(S118 billion). “Though they 
would rather not, women ac- 
count for 63 per cent of medi- 

] expenses,” says Fortune 

figures given are for 
7954. the last vear for which 
@ breakdown is available 

Men predominate in the 
purchase of transportation 
($27 billion): personal busi- 
mess services ($114 billien) 
and in education. religion. 
are and foreign travel 

6 billion). As an aside the 
notes that most per- 


Expenditures 


fume is bought not by wom- 
en, but by men 

Housing ($294 billion) is 
probably the most nearly 
“joint” purchase of hushand 
and wife. “Presumably most 
husbands exercise most pow- 


er on price, wives on plans, | 


location, etc... . “Recreation 
($122 billion) is another area 
in which women buyers 
“probably hold their own.” 

Aside from their own 
spending, says Fortune, “wom- 
en aiso influence the spending 
done by men and by other 
women. Practicaily every one 
of the 42,834,000 family units 
in the U. S. (accounting for 
04 per cent of the population) 
contains a woman, either as 
wife, head of family or house 
keeper. 


Classes Announced 
Applications to the Han 
nah Harrison School for vo 


_cational training are being 


tact 


accepted by the director at 
4470 MacArthur bivd. There 
will be-two classes a years 
ene in September, the other 
in February. Applicants must 
be between the ages of 20 
and 55 and must have need 
to earn wages. 


: 


Cecil F. Gibbon. found him- 
self explaining his irish name 
his father came from County 
Cork) and his Scotch accent 

“I've got some Scotch all 
right. it dates from the 
1600s." he said. “But when I 
went to Scotland expecting 
to hear wonderful things of 
the Gibbons. over a giass of 
good Scotch whisky. all I 
could find were gravevards 
full of Gibbons—all!l hung for 
treason.” 

The deputy speaker has 
heen on six weeks tour of 
Lnited States state lecisia 
tures. “I've been studving 
now te help diverse commu 
nities in having More savy in 
local affairs—when I return 
to Pakistan I shall make rec 
ommendations to the govern 
ment 


Auxiliary Entertains: 

SECRETARY OF LABOR 
and Mrs. James P. Mitchell 
were among the guests at a 
reception given by the De- 
partment of Labor Unit of 
the American L#gion Auwux- 
iliary vesterday at the Citi 
zens Bank Building. Langley 
Park 

Mrs. Sherman 
Hodge was hostess 
party which was to honor 
Mrs. William H. Heagerty 
National Vice President of 
the American Legion Aux 
iliary. Mra. Heagerty ts the 
first member from the Dis 
trict to have been elected to 
that office 

Another guest was the Na 
tional Commander of the 
American Legion, J. Addison 
Wagner, who came to Wash- 
ington especially for the 
party. 


Weslev 
at the 


Expecting an Heir? 


Lady-in-Waiting Wardrobe Can Be Rented 


Second of a fwe-peart series 


By Maxine Cheshire 


DON'T BE SURPRISED to 
hear that that good-looking 
maternity dress you admired 
at a party last week cost its 
wearer less than the pair of 
nylons she was wearing 

Could be she rented it! 
There's a non-profit organi 
vation in Washington now 
that has a lending library ar- 
rangement with clothes for 
budget-conscious expectant 
mothers. You can take home 
cocktail dresses and suits for 
35 cents a month. Sports 
clothes — shorts, terreador 
pants and bathing suits—are 
tagged at 25 cents. So are 
separate skirts and jackets 

There's no catch, and no 
wealthy philanthropist is f 
nancing the venture. It's all 
the brainchild of some 500 
other young mothers and 


fathers, who less than a year 
ago organized Parent and 
Child, Ine. 
plains the interests 
drew them together. Thev 
want to learn more about 
raising a family, and pro 
ceeds from the rental serv- 
ice go into the treasury. 

The idea for renting lady 
in-waiting wardrobes began 
after member mothers start 
ed passing around among 
themselves garments not cur 
rentiy in use. The practice 
grew into a commercial ven- 
ture when it became obvious 
that here was a way to raise 
money. 


IF YOU'RE having a baby. 
and you don't have to keep 
track of the balance in your 
checkbook, this service may 
not interest you. But if rent- 
ing solves your budget prob- 
lems, don't fear you won't 
be in good company. Three 
of the best-looking costumes 


that 


Predicts Harriman Victorv 


India on the Phone 
Pitching for Averell 


A 


By Virginia Kachan 


CHICAGO. July 9 (INS)}— 
India Edwards is pitching for 
Averell Harriman as the 
Democratic choice for Presi- 
dent with a woman's favorite 
weapon—the telephone 

The former Democratic na 
tional vicechairman is on the 
teleohone so much, in fact. 
that even her husband. Her- 
bert. drops into campaign 
headquarters oersonally to 
make appointments with her 
for dinner 

Since Mrs. Edwards estab 
lished the Harriman head- 
quarters in Chicago July & 
she estimated yesterday she 
has been making “at least 30 
and sometimes 50 long dis 
tance calls a day.” 

“Tll keep on telephoning 
as long as my voice holds 
out.” she said, adding with a 
broad smile: 

“I know thousands of Dem- 
ocTrats.” 


ALCTHOUGH she ts con 
centrating on uncommitted 
delegates to the Democratic 
convention which opens Aug 
13, Mrs. Edwards is “also get 
ting In touch with any Demo 
crats who might be coming to 
the convention. 

Thus far the response has 
been “encouraging.” she said 
And she is confident that the 
New York Governor will be 
nominated. But the nomina 
tion probably will take “four 
or five ballots.” she admit 
ted 

Te delegates over the tele 
phone, Mrs. Edwards details 
Gov. Harriman’s record, but 
she also makes a point of 


mentioning his wife, Marie 
She said 

“Mrs. Harriman has done 
an excellent job in the role 
of New York state's first lady 

#0 much so she is well qual- 
ified to assume a similar role 
in the White House. 


TT IS MRS. FDWARDS’ 
view that “a man who doesn't 
have a wife is at a disadvan- 
tage in the presidency.” She 
contended 

“With all the burdens a 
President has, only a wife can 
make him siow down when 
his health requires it and 
take the major brunt of meet- 


ing visitors off his shoulders.” — 


Mrs. Edwards rose to be- 
come the top woman Demo- 
crat during the sdministra- 
tion of former President 
Harry S. Truman and she 
cited Mrs. Truman as an ex- 
ample. She said 

“Bess Truman shook hands 
with twice as Many visitors to 
the presidential home—thou- 
sands of them—as her hus 
band.” 

Mre Fawards conceded 
that an “official hostess” in 
the White House could re- 
lieve the President from 
meeting groups of visitors 
escorted daily through the 
presidential mansion. How- 
ever, she declared: 

“It's net quite the same 
shaking hands with an ‘offi- 
cial’ hostess as it is with a 
President's wife.” 

P. S.—Adiai Stevenson. 
Harriman’s chief contender 
for the Democratic presiden- 
tial nomination, doesn't have 
a wife.” 


VFW Auxiliary Turns Eyes to Texas 


DALLAS, Tex. is where 
the Ladies Auxiliary to the 
Veterans of Foreign Wars is 
heading for its August 12 to 
17 National Encampment at 
the Adolphus Hotel. 

Delegates from the 48 
states. Canal Zone, Alaska 
and Hawaii will .hear ad 
dresses by United States 
Treasurer, Ivy Baker Priest, 


the Governor of Texas. Allan 
Shivers and Gen. Ulysses S 
Grant Ill 

A special citation will he 
given the auxiliary for its 
works with VA hospitals by 
Harvey W. Higley, Adminis- 
trator of Veterans Affairs. 
On August 17 winners in the 
annual nationwide high 
school essay contest will be 
announced. 


The Important 
Loden Coat 
For a “Young Cosmopolitan’s 
schedule .. . our furry all 
wool fleece coat with polished 
hamboo buttons, adjustable 
hood collar, quilted lining. 
Oxford gray, camel, red, 


nude or navy. 


Also Black Watch, gray 
or brown tweed mixtures. 


Sizes 7 to 15. 


25.00 


Scene savie the tn: dipeco-lmed 


cormon popfin 


black or whire. 17.95 


Mad ond prose ocers bled 
‘ 


Their tithe ex- 


1732 Eye St. WLW. 
3520 Conn. Ave, 


in the pool—a set of mix- 
and-match party separates— 
are currently in the posses 
sion of a young doctor's wife 
So far. all the clothes came 
from the closets of members 
Some are outright donations 
Others earn 15 per cent of 
the rental fee for their own 
ers 
Mrs 
Strathmore 
ton, Md., 


Donald Mader. 4913 

ave. Kensing 
is chairman. But 
potential customers dont 
phone her ishes a. new 
mother herself), she phones 
them. A postcard will get an 
answer. 


IF YOU'RE already plan 
ning to BUY maternity 
clothes. think twice before 
you change your mind. Actu 
ally. if you're planning a 
family and have the funds. 
the experts consider it a 
wise decision to invest in one 
coordinated and  ~versatile 
collection that will still he 
seeing service when you're 
awaiting brothers and sisters 
for your first born. 

American women will spend 
more than two hundred mil 
lion dollars on maternity 
clothes this year. Your share 
can be a little or a lot 

To help you get your 
money's worth. we made an 
unofficial survey of depart- 
ment store buyers and 
clothes conscious mothers, 


-~—yz-—— 


FLORIDA BOUND.—Looking over a trave! 
folder of Miami, Fla., is Ellen Wyvill, secre- 
tary to Sen. H. Alexander Wiley (R-Wis.) 
She will be among the 609 or so congres- 
sional secretaries who will vacation in Flor- 
ida, August 24-31, on a visit planned by the 


— 


2 and 4 
Stop aft Door 


NW, 


\ 


EM. 2-2746 


who have learned by 
ence what makes a mater 
nity dress a good buy. Here 
are some things to keep in 
mind 

® ()ne-piece dresses are he 
coming less and less popular 
because “it's harder to get 
a good fit”. “not as flat- 

not a« comfort. 
.. "bess versatile than 

separates.” 

®Shrewd shoppers watch 
sale ads and start going 
around bargain - hunting 
months before their secret 
shows 

® Refore you buy anything. 
go through what vou already 
own to determine what 
things might still be worn 
You'll be surprised how 
many blouses. «sweaters. and 
loose jackets have room for 
two 

® One girl we know took al! 
her full skirts. removed the 
zippers to make one armhole 
ripped the seam six inches 
on the right side, and wore 
them four months as tops 

® Another took several two 
piece dresses, fastened the 
skirt opening with wide elas- 
tic, and covered her ingenu 
ity with sleeveléss, scoop 
necked tops. If the dress is 
old anyway, you might just 
have the skirt cut out in the 
“Kangaroo” style most ma- 
ternity dresses feature now 

* It's money thrown away if 


exper! 


Fla.) 


you settle for anything But 
sit-proof, wrinkle - proof ma- 
terial that will still hold it’s 
shape when this baby is in 
kindergarten 

®* To get a good fit with a 
two-piece dress, be sure your 
fist can slide easily between 
your body and the section of 
the skirt just below the cut- 
out. Have twins in mind when 
you gauge the room for ex- 
pansion in the jacket he- 
cause too many manufarct- 
urers skimp in cutting. Be 
sure, also, that the jacket 
comes at least three inches 
below the cutout 

°*If you're making your 
own clothes, or having them 
made, borrow an idea from 
your husband. With the 
straighter-cut boxed suit 
jackets that aren't obviously 
cut to conceal - something. 
have two skirts made. One 
outcut to wear now and one 
to wear after the haby comes 

* Use your imagination 
One simple black velveteen 
was converted into 12 differ- 
ent outfits when worn with 
other items already in the 
owner's closet 

®* When you buy undergar- 
ments, don't ask anybody's 
advice but your doctor's 
nurse. A bad choice will only 
cost you unnecessary money 
and may actually damage 
your figure. 


TUESDAY: Buying for a baby.) 


By Dick Darcey. Staff Photoerapher 


Congressional Secretaries Club. Acting as 
hosts for the upcoming parties will be the 
Junior Chamber of Commerce 
the parties will be a group of eligible young 
men picked by Rep, Dante B. Fascell (D- 
(Story on Page 22.) 


Attending 


o 1956. Steufter Ledoreterieg 


again: 
dramatic proof 


MRS. ELEANOR SMITH of Santa Monica, California, is 
a typical Stauffer success story! In only two and a half 
months she reduced from 160 to 132 pounds. Here is « 
record of her inch loss: 614” from abdomen, ¢” from 
hips, 4” from waist, 214” from each thigh, 3” under arms! 


Mrs. Smith says, “I am thrilled with the resules Stauffer 
System has given me, and I have loved the visits! As the 


mother of a 17-year-old son, I never thought it would be 


nosstble for me to attain such wonderful new proportions.” 


FREE TRIAL. Stauffer offers wonderful bencfits for you, 
too—a shimmer figuse, more beautiful proportions, fang of 
posture, muscle firming. And in such pleasant surroundings! 
You'll relax completely. Your farst visit is absolutely free. 
Call now for free figure analysis and courtesy demonstration. 


210 
WORLD-WIDE 
SALONS 


Stauffer 
SG 


HOURS: 9 AM. to 9 P.M. 


RE. 1-1339 - 4309 Wilson Bivd., Ari. Va. JA. 17-2256 
246 W. Broad St. ro chr, ve JE, 43078 


* 


112 $. Fairfax St, Alexandria, Va. TE. 6-7663 f 


ue WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


i ri ” 
e 4 
99 Monday, July 30, 1956 vr 
ee - —_———_ — ~ — ees a _— — 
F V . . . ° 
or Vacationing Secretaries 
ee a 
- . 
oe > 
a 
Ortadd fF romtses ' 
izible Men 
Ry Vuriel Bowen 
FLORIDA. forever flaun with her colleagues said 
ing its sunshine, its surf and its so nice ta meet people 
‘ . ‘ t« r ae o rT = 
its speedboats is putting ve when one travels—getting 
hal propaganda around Capi introductions makes a waca- 
tol Hill which also mentions tion a lot more interesting 
“eligible young men And Elizabeth Ann Burris. sec 
that extra tag has helped to retary to Rep. Row (R-Ohbhie 
make Florida top talking it sounds marvelous’ The 
point among Congressional minute I heard about the ar. 
serretaries rangemenis | wanted toa go , 
About 60 of them—iudg — 4 
f'HE LIKELIHOOD of the 
ion a | recent hook! . 
ng by prese WOKING iW ganizers—the Congression 
will take the Florida vaca ai Secretaries ©Club—having 
tion planned by the Congres to face irate Congressmen 
sional Serretanres [" ub Aug wae lose mess secretaries 
pe ‘ \nrougn marriage nas not 
24-51 been Mcially considered.” 
lias hl \ ung mer whe “ 
Pligidbie young men ihere is always a time 
are friends of Rep Dante RB 4 hefore such develop 
Faccell (D-Fla.) will greet ments according to Lacey ; 
the girls with orchids and (. Sharp of Texas. the club's 
gardenias on their arrival in chairman of entertainments 
Miami. The Junior Chamber We don't expect any serious ' 
of Commerce will act as consequences before the ! 
hosts for a spate of partie election 
The trip ene Of three 
ACCORDING John planned by the Club thi« 
Ruckley, who describes him year. It costs S108. The other 
> ’ .* 
self as Rep. Fascell's buf vacations planned are in 
. rT) ‘rr ; S16 = 
fe (administrative assist- Mexico, $350), and Hawaii 
, . --” : 
ant), all the poune men con S573). The Hawaii trip takes : ' 
cerned are: Aged 21-35. Very place a week after the elec 
eligibie. and very enthusias tion 
° ’ , ' - 
tic about the trip We are Marw Whithard secretar 
ty rm ar - . " ; 
ying to arrange —— ° to Rep. Bonner (D-N. C.) and ' 
he girls spend as little as Retty Prezisio. a secretary to 
.> ‘> rc * - ." e ; 
nar sle of Heir own noney the \orw ulture { ommittee . 
: ina th r «=f - " " 
uf ~ % le : ay he added ne the House ‘“ | se among : i 
\ | a , ’ ry on 
we do the secretarie about 50 secretaries spending 
think of the arrangement ‘ * ' 
- wo weeks In Mexico 
} men W vy i] serrTretary is . . 
anes : Rut this biggestever vaca 
Sen. Wilew ik Sounds , 
: on schedule arranged h 
an abdbsoiutely ideal situation , , 
ane e Club has a pleased 
to me—I like to 1 | have 
‘er wr 
err P fant She : > e 2 
7. tne 79 
read 
Ma yy , . Margaret Roch 
ta | < a : ryrr on ar Rep. Edna Ke 
ary to en ouglias . " . ; , 
ugia DN. ¥ wit thew have vet CORVERTIBLE DRESS—tThis button-sheath, of “cotton 
who is traveling independent — —— an 
ly but intends joining up © PUt.OF 4 D to the Lakes cashmere.” has a removable linen dickes rhe straight 
. FI ; J : _ ~ “> f 
of Killarnes line is softened by a flatter ag shawl collar. At Phi lipsborn 
> \ Re T ‘ 1; w P es 
nnes trading Post 


+ 


LA SALLE Du 
JE and ( Vi 


“Restaurant Elegant” 
RE. 7-112 


, 
Srre;nrs 


Rots 


“Married — with 


peace 


of mind!’ 


Peace of mind 
oniv came to Mre 
Nellie k oom 
al when she learned 
_~_ the mmportance of 
‘ the proper method 
~~ on “ne FY 5 
a Fountain syringe, 

yung an enective ot esle aol 
t)-wrr xe TeONITS ‘Te an ef 
fective antiseptic-germicide that 


wasnes away germs and oier- 
cauemg waste and ts harmiess to 
Renefit from Mre« 
Rioorm's expenence, and hecome 


one of today 


tiea "2 


Ss morrTn wives & ho 


welcome the assurance and darn- 
tiness ZJONITE gives them alter 
monthly pers de and other times 
If any abnormal condition ex . 
we wins Cow lor ' - FONTTE as 
cirerter as often ac neerted’ ( oete 
pennies per mr we 
% Advertisement 


Now! Get rid of dark facial hair! 


She Looks for Lost Recipe 


WHO HASN'T 
clipped a bricht 
newspaper or 
io mispiace i 
on. Turn the lost 
for this reader 

Several! vears 
clipped an articie 
magazine and have 
if it told how to make at- 
tractive glasses from wine 
bottles Have any Anne 
readers ever tried this” 

l have some pretty 
bottles that would 
lovely glasses 


Mrs. C. B. K.. 


carefu 
dea from @ 
magazine. ony 

The search is 
found 


= 


mtn 


ace | 
from a 


misiaia 


giass 
make 


Falis Church 


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anyone give 


(an 


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Stop fast bristly regrowth! 


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Remeves underarm hair with. 
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Spectal Offer! Get beautiful 
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75¢ or $1.25 size’ plus $1 to Imra, 
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have relied on Nozzema for years. 
Se don't suffer with peinfu!l 
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¥ 


recipe for a vie made with 
cream cheese and sour 
cream” | know it has a 
granmam cracker crust. Thank 
Miss C. L.. Hyattsville 
CONCRETE FAINT 
TO THE READER who 


wished to paint the concrete 
floors of her basement and 
porch: There is a rubber base 
floor paint especially for con 
crete floors. It is the most 
expensive of concrete paints 
and hardens to a semi-gloss 
it works best on bare con- 
crete but can be used over 
old paint 

The floor should be drv. If 

i soapy or olly or has a 
very siooth surface it should 
be etched. Muriatic acid is 
the common acid used for 
this purpose but Bowlene. 
Sani-Flush and similar prod- 
ucts may be used. Wet the 


floor water, then 
sprinkie on the crystais. One 


can will do 70 square feet 
Mop and scrub a little. Leave 
on for 15 minutes. Then 
rinse 

Allow two days to dry 


Rubber base paint may be 
sprayed or brushed on. The 
paint dries to touch in 2 to 4 
hours but 24 hours should 
elapse before a second coat 
is added Otherwise the 
second coat will pick up the 


first coat. Good luck 
Do-it-yourselfer 
RELAX 
Would you faithful readers 


please give me the pro and 
con on a hand machine which 
relaxes the muscles. It has a 
trade name. I would love to 
have one but before I invest 
the money would like to 
know what results to expect 
Thank you Mrs. M. C. 


HARRIET GOLDBERG 
— MASON CHARAK 
Mrs. Louis Benjamin Gold. 
berg of Little Rock. Ark. an 
the engagement of 
daughter. Harriet Ra- 
to Mason Thomas 
(harak, son of Mr. and Mrs 
Harry Joseph Charak of 
Cambridge. Mass. Miss Gold. 
berg. daughter of the late 
Louw Benjamin Goldberg. is 
a graduate of Little Rock 
Junior College. She is pres 


nounces 


her 


melie 


entiy a member of the staff 
of Sen. John L. MeClellan 
The bridegroom-elerct at 
temded the Massachusetts 


Institute of Technology and 
ss a graduate of Harvard Uni- 


versity He i employed by 
the National Advisory Com- 
mittee for Aeronautics. The 
wedding is planned“ for 
Oct. 14. 

MICHAEL BREWER 
—RKENNETH HARRIS 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Ross 
Brewer of Arlington. Va. 


announce the engagement of 
their daughter. Michae! 
Bonnwell, to Kenneth Nelson 
Harris, son of Mr. and Mrs 
William Roger Harris. 


SHIRLEY A. HOLLAR 
BRADFORD DRAWBAUGH 

Announcement is made of 
the engagement of Shirley 
Ann Hollar to Bradford Heh! 
Drawbaugh. son of Mrs. Mary 
E. Cogan. A September wed. 
ding is planned 


VIRGINIA FAWSETT 
THOMAS MORAN 

Mr. and Mrs. William G. Faw- 
sett of Oxon Hill. Md. an 
nounce the engage nent of 
their daughter. Virginia Eliz- 
abeth, to Thomas. Francis 


ikngagements 


Moran. son of Mrs. Thomas 
F. Moran and the late Mr. 
Moran of Mount Savage, Md 
The wedding will take place 
in August. 


SHEILA BORDEAU 
—SSTU ART DAVIS 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert J 
deau of Chicago, Iil., an- 
nounce the engagement of 
their daughter, Sheila Rae. to 
Stuart E. Davis, son of Mr. 
and VMirs. B.S. Davis of Silver 
Spring. Md. Miss Bordeau is 
a graduate of the National 
College of Education, Evans- 
ton. Ill. The bridegroom-elect 
is a graduate of American 
University. A late December 
wedding is planned 


JUDITH SPENCER 
—BPULANE L. HEISINGER 
Mrs. M@&bel S. Spencer of 
West Hyattsville, Md. an- 
nounces the engagement of 
her daughter, Judith Elaine, 
to Ensign Duane Lawrence 
Heisinger, USN, son of Mrs. 
Grace Heisinger of Fresno, 
Calif. Miss Spencer attends 
the University of Maryland. 
Ensign Heisinger was gradu- 
ated from the U. S. Naval 
Academy in June. A spring 
wedding is planned. 


CAROLYN R. KAMMAOLZ 
~— JOHN ARTHUR SMITH 
Mr. and Mrs. T. C. Kamm- 
holz announces the engage- 
ment of their daughter, Caro- 
lyn Ruth, to John Arthur 
Smith, son of the late Mr. 
and Mrs. Louis A. Smith of 
Cleveland Heights. Ohio. 
Miss Sotith is attending the 
School of Speech at North- 
western University. Her 
fiance ts also at Northwest. 
ern. No date has been set for 
the wedding. 


Bor 


—- —— — —_ ee ere — 


“| ALMOST HATED MY HUSBAND!” 


Mrs. L. L.. Beverty Hills, California 


“When George and I began to 


him look, well. . . sart of distin- 


‘But my gray hair looked dul! 
and lifeless, George was middle. 
aged and handsome .. . while it 
seetned | was more un 
attractive. It's silly, I know, but 

grav hair made me aimos' 
hate my hushand' 

“Then I heard shout Silver 
Cast . the home permanen: 
that's custom-made for gray and 
white bair. I was desperate 
enough. to dve my hair, but I'm 
so lucky | chose Silver Cari in- 


stead. Now, like George, gray hair 
is my most attractive feature!” 


fASyY TO BO! Even if you've 

never had a 

you can have a Silver Curl with 

ease. Silver Curl is self-neutral- 

zing... no extra steps. You 

me apply waving lotion— wind 
curls—rinse and |ét dry 
t's all! 


$000 wews! Silver Curl by 

Tom now has Fresh Air Waving 

Lotion .. . odor-free as a wave 

can be! And it gives « r 

lasting wave than any ot 
permanent! 


SAVANNAH TUNNELL 
JULIUS W. WALKER JR. 


Mrs. Lenore Tunnell of Lub- 
bock, Tex., announced the 


marriage of her daughter, 
Savannah, to Julius Waring 
Walker Jr., son of Mr. and 
Mrs. J. W. Walker of Plain- 
view, Tex., on July 29 at the 
Mt. Vernon Place Methodist 
Church in Washington. The 
bride is a graduate of Texas 
Technological College and is 
now secretary to Rep. George 
Mahon of Texas. The bride- 
groom is a graduate of the 
University of Texas and is 
now a foreign service offi- 
cer in the News Division of 
the State Department. The 
couple will reside in Wash 
ington. 


BETTY COLLIER 
—DANIEL TONER 

Mrs. Marguerite H. Collier of 
Silver Spring, Md., announces 
the marriage of her daughter, 
to Daniel F. 


Betty Gene, 


~- ie 


NEWS IN BLACK AND BRIGHT 


Wedding Announcements 


Toner, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Harold J. Toner of Silver 
Spring on July 29 at St. Mi- 
chael’s Church. The bride, 
daughter of the late Frank 
Eugene Collier, is a graduate 
of the University of Mary- 


land. The bridegroom is a 
graduate of the University of 
Oklahoma. 


FRANCES WOLF 
—IRVING GENDELMAN 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Wolf an- 
nounce the marriage of their 
daughter, Frances Barbara, 
to Irving Gendelman, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Gendelman of 
Buffalo, N. Y., on July 29. 


JANICE CHREITZBERG 
—ARTHUR HENNE 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur M 
Chreitzberg announce the 
marriage of their daughter, 
Janice Aneik to Arthur 
Charles Henne, son of Mrs 
Sadie Henne and the iate 
Arthur Henne, on July 25 at 
All Souls Church, Unitarian 


: 
_—— os 


‘\ 


~ 


Here is black Persian 


lamb in a short straight jacket made newly youthful look- 


ing by a plaid lining. 


cuffs on the new narrower sieeve 


To be noted. 


too—the turn-back 
At Zirkins 


Trio of Writers 
Break Into Print 


By Winzola McLendon 


HAITIAN Armed Forces 
Day will be celebrated in 
Washington Wednesday with 
a 7 to 9 p. m. reception in 
the Sheraton- 
Park suite of 
4 m bassador 
and Mme. 
Zephirin. The 
Military, Na- 
val and Air 
Attache and 
Mme. Timol- 
eon Paret, 


who are 

hosts at the By 

affair. have 

asked some Mrs. McLendon 
400 foreign attaches and 
United States officers and 


their ladies for the celebra 
tion 


HERE AND THERE 

BILL DuPREE of the Air 
Force Singing Sergeants, is 
spending his leave at Carter 
Barron Amphitheater sing- 
ing the role of Joe in “Car- 
men Jones” . In the “long 
gray line of gentlemen” in 
the August Ladies Home 
Journal, Peggy McEvoy 
writes about the social con- 
duct and military courtesy 
taught at West Point. Some 
of the items covered in the 
required nine-hour course in- 
clude “Fork and knife are not 
to be used for pointing.” 
“Don't slather a whole piece 
of bread at once,” and “Don't 
talk about anything that will 
give your host indigestion” 
... Portuguese General Hum- 
berto Delgado has just fin- 
ished another book, “The 
Azores, .the Lake between 
England and the United 
States.” . And speaking of 
books, Navy Captain Bill 
Lederer (now PIO with Ad- 
miral Felix Stump in Ha- 
waii), who authored “All the 
Ships at Sea” and many 
other books and articles, has 
a new tome at his publishers. 
Scheduled for release in the 


fall, the new book will—like 


Bed Wetting 
Stop 
® No More Punishment 
@ No More Scolding 


You can steo your ehild's 
Available 


a ggg A gy Fy 
character 
Phone Mrs. Baker 
RE. 7-4696 


412 Albeo Bidg., Weshington, 8. 


Ships at Sea—be a collection 
of sea tales. 


‘ ton, Va., on July 27 at Laurel, 


—RICHARD L. PELZMAN | Shows you how 
‘Mr. and Mrs. David H. Plaw | to RE UCE 

of Canada announce the mar- || size of hips, 

riage of their daughter, | waist, abdomen, 
Danya B., to Richard Lee | thighs. Com- 
Pelzman, son of the late Mr. || pletely new, set 
and Mrs. Frederick M. Pelz- || entific way. Ef- 


Traditional and 
houses will be shown during 
the “Tour 


BARBARA STUART 
—JAMES SWISHER 


Mr. and Mrs. Roger W. Stuart 
of Laurel, Md., announce the 
marriage of their daughter, 


Barbara Lynn, to James E. 
Swisher, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Donald L. Swisher of Arling- 


N.C. The fourth annual tour 
featuring ecight houses will 
be held October 10 and li 
from 10 a. m. to 5 p. m. 


A 


bride and bride- | | 


' 


Md. The 
groom are both graduates of | 
George Washington Univer | 
sity. 


DANYA B. PLAW | 


Write TODAY for FREE 
illustrated FOLDER. 


fortless. No diet. 
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man of Washington, D. C., 
on July 29 in New York C ity. 


Mrs. Pelzman gph abate like magic while 
Queens University and was 
graduated from the Cam- | ¥® REST. Save 


time and money. 
De it at HOME. 
Reduce with Relax- 
A-cizor—the method 
that Mademoiselle, 


bridge School of Design and 
the School of the Museum of 
Fine Arts, Boston, Mass. Her 
husband is a graduate of the 
University of Pennsylvania 


and is vice president and 

sales manager of ~— 5 el. nn Pave 4 

P , New York. 2 

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A ruined taxi lies on its 


jumped the curb at N. Capitol st. and Fort 
dr. and crashed into a wooden light pole, 


snapping it off at the base. 


struck another vehicle before turning over. 
Parezo, 


Cab driver George 


2 Alexandria 
Girls Missing o: 


2 Men Held 


Two Alexandria teenage girls 
were reported missing yester- 
day from their homes in 
Temple Trailer Village. They 
were last talking to 
boys at a nearby custard stand 
Saturday night 

Alexandria police 
are holding two men, one a 
former convict, who were 
found in the trailer camp at 
a.m. yesterday. The men said 
they had picked up the girls 
Judy Lindsey, 15. and Margaret 
Maines, 13. Saturday night, 
drove them to Fredericksburg 
and then brought them back to 
the camp at 3:50 a. m 

Judy's father William C 
Lindsey, a carpenter, awoke at 
about 4 a. m. and discovered his 
daughter had not come home 
another daughter. Mrs. Louise 
Shelton, said last night 

Lindsey went outside and saw 
8 car driving around the camp 
He stopped it and asked the 
occupants if they had seen the 
girls. They said they had and 
related the story of the drive 
s#ying they let the girls out at 
the camp 

Mrs. Shelton said both girls 
Were planning to go to a 
vacation Bible camp near 
Waynesbor) this morning 
They are regular churchgoers 

camps community 


seen two 


said they 


said Judy left home 
with 20 cents in her pocket 
“If she had been planning to 
run away.’ Mrs. Shelton said, 
“she would have taken the $21 
she had saved.” 

Alexandria and Virginia State 
Police combed the area, aided 
by residents of the trailer 
camp. The family also called 
friends and relatives in the 
former home, Farmville. Va 
in hope of locating the girls 

Judy is described as 5-foot-5 
with short curly black hair and 
brown eyes. She was wearing 
a white dress with a pink rose 
Police said Margaret, 5-foot-7, 
about 107 pounds, wears her 
brown hair in a duck cut. She 
was wearing a black and white 
striped dress, and white shoes 
and belt 


Little Leaguers 
Tops in Parade 


A team of gquick-stepping 
Little League baseball players 
edged out an Arlington VFW 

st to win first prize for 
marching in the McLean (Va.) 
Firemen's Carnival 
Saturday. The youngsters were 
from Chesterbrook 

Other first prize awards to 
grea wnits announced yester 
day include Best-appearing 
fire company, Falls Church 
bestappearing 750-gallon 
pumper, Franconia; best- 
appearing 500-gallon pumper, 
: efferson; best-appearing-and- 
equipped ambulance, Falls 
Church; and best-appearing 
rescue squad, Silver Spring. 

\lso best-appearing brush 
tr ick, Cabin John; best-appear- 

zg ladies’ auxiliary, Arlington 
f vunty Company No. 1: and 
hest majorettes, Hillwood 
Three area fire officials served 
as judges. 


Truck Recovered, 
Driver, $500 Missing 


Police recovered a dry-clean- 
ing truck vesterday which had 
disappeared along with its 
driver Saturday after sevéM#! 
clothing deliveries had heen 
made and about $500 collected 

Police said they found no 
trace of the driver, Hobart C 
Green, 40. of 5427 Oth st. nw., 
or of the $500. 


parade on “ 


roof after it 


The taxi then have charged 


46. of 232 


Adams st. ne.. 
injuries to his knee and ear. 
fair condition at Casualty Hospital. 


"Be Alen ©. Bonuses 
suffered a concussion and 
He is in 
Police 
him with driving while drunk, 


unreasonable speed and colliding. 


Driver Helps to Trap 
’ Area Hit-Run Suspect 


4 St. Marys County (d.) 
motorist who whipped his car 
around to follow a hit-and-run 
suspect was credited by police 
with causing the arrest yester 
lay of a Virginia driver who is 
charged with killing a Holly 
wood (Md.) pedestrian 

Marvyviand State Police said 
that Stanley Williams 4r., 24, of 
Charlotte Hall, was going north 
on Route 235 outside of Holly 
wood at 12:30 a. m. Sunday 
when he saw a southbound 
motorist knock down a pedes 
trian 

The pedestrian. Charles Som 
erville, 65, a laborer, was pro- 
nounced dead of multiple in 
jluries shortly after the acci 
dent 

Williams, 


police said. turned 


’ 

to chase the driver on the rain- 
slick and foggy road. He spot- 
ted the license number and re- 
ported it to police 

Within half an hour, Trooper 
David Laugher arrested 
Charles A. Adkins, 40, of Ann- 
andale, at Mechanicsville. He 
was charged with manslaughter 
by motor vehicle, reckless driv- 
ing and failing to stop after an 
accident 

Police said Adkins, a carpen- 
ter. swore he did nat know he 
had struck a pedestrian but 
thought that his car had hit a 
dog. The hood of Adkins’ car 
had been damaged by the im 
pact, police said 

Adkins is being held on $1500 
bond pending a hearing Friday 
in Leonardtown, 


House Unit Refused Files 


On A. T.XT. 


Settlement 


Associated Press 


Justice Department has 
to furnish a congres- 


The 
refused 
sional committee files relating 
to settlement of its antitrust 
the American 
Telegraph Co 
Western 


case against 
Telephone A&A 
and its subsidiary, 
Electrie Co 

Chairman Emanuel Celler (D- 
N. Y¥.) of the House Judiciary 
Committee said yesterday he 
requested the files because a 
Subcommittee study “indicates 
that further and more detailed 
inquiry into all the circum- 
stances surrounding the settie- 
ment of this case is appro- 
priate.” 

Celler made public a letter 
from Deputy Attorney General 
William FP. Rogers declining 
the request on the grounds of 
“presidential privilege” and 
the claim that to release the 
files “would violate the confi- 
dential nature of settlement 
negotiations.” Rogers said it 
also would “discourage defend- 
ants, present and future, from 
entering into such negotia- 
tions. 


Policy Called Strange 


Department policy, Rogers 
said, “does not permit disclos 
ure of staff memoranda or rec- 
ommendations.” 

Commenting on Rogers’ posi 
tion. Celler said it was “strange 
indeed” that the White House 
freely supplies confidential 
information to a journalist who 


is neither elected nor appointed 


to office 

This reference apparently 
was to a recently published 
hook written by a New York 
reporter who was given access 
to White House files 

Celler said the ATAT-West 
ern Electric case settlement 
“fails to accomplish the princi- 
pal objectives of the Govern 
ment when it filed suit seven 
years ago, namely, the separa- 
tion of AT&T and Western 
Electric.” 

“Congressional examination 
is essential,” he said, “to de- 
termine among other things, 
whether AT&T and its subsid- 
iary, Western Electric, were 
given preferential treatment in 
this case by the Dapertnam of 
Justice.” 


Took Consent Decree 


The Government's suit sought 
separation of A. T. & T. and 
ite wholly owned 
tion of Western Electric 
three separate manu 


Flectric 


subsidiary, 
Western Electric. and dissolu- 
into 
acturing 
concerns on the ground it was 
arr illegal monopoly. Western 
is the major manu- 


McKeon Drinking Mate 


To Open tor Detense 


PARRIS ISLAND, &S. C.. 
29 »—S/Sat. 


Keon's lawyer said today the 


former drill 
testify in his 


July establish through Scarborough 
Matthew C. Mc. that McKeon did not habitually 


keep liquor in his barracks. 
McKeon, himself, 


is to take 
instructor will the witness stand early in the 
own defense week. 


facturer of all telephone equip- 
ment sold in this country 

The Government dropped 
original demand, and A. T. & T 
consented in a settlement de 
cree issued last January to com- 
ply with certain other Govern. 
ment demands 

The decree permitted West- 
ern Electric to continue as part 
of the A. T. & T. system, but 
with the promise that it make 
its patents available rovalty 
free to competitors and set up 
accepted accounting methods 
which would permit regulatory 
scrutiny by the Government 

In a House speech last April 
16. Rep. James Roosevelt (D 
Calif... who headed a small 
business subcommittee investi. 
gation of the case, said A. T 
& T. had been given “favored 
and special treatment” by the 
Eisenhower Administration. 


Back Mission 
Movement. 


Men Urged 


Americans should try to sat. 
isfy the world craving for God 
by stepping up their missionary 
efforts, a leadine Presbyterian 
said yesterday 

“The world needs God— 
Americans can bring Him to 
the world,” said the Rev. Dr 
Louis H. Evans, minister-at 
large of the Presbyterian 
Church, in a sermon at the Na 
tional Presbyterian Church 

An African chief told him 
four years ago, he related, that 
“if you send enough mis- 
sionaries you can make four- 
fifths of Africa Christian. But 
if you don't love us enough for 
this, the Communists will win 
Africa in five years.” 

Although praising American 
women for their missionary ef- 
forts, Dr. Evans declared, “It's 
time for you men to put trou- 
sers on the foreign missionary 
movement.” 

He said Christianity has bet- 
ter missionary prospects than 
any other form of religion be- 
cause it gives more “personal 
power,” it is “raceless,” regard- 
ing all races equal; it is “sex- 
less,” and it “inevitably leads 
to peace and prosperity.” 


Two at Hospital 
Get Jobs Back 


Two partially deaf teachers 
of lip reading at Walter Reed 


Army Hospital have been re- 
stored to their jobs by the Civil 
Service Commission because 
they were wrongfully dismissed 
under reduction-in-force pro- 
cedures. 

Mae Fisher and M. Fvaline 
Rae, who live at 3636 16th st. 
nw., were ordered back to the 
positons from which they were 
relieved under a notice of Jan. 


“early in our case.” Thus far, McKeon’s own story 
Attorney Emile Zola Berman of the tragedy has come only 25, 1956, according to a letter 
told a reporter he will open through a statement he made received by their attorney, 
his case Monday with testimony to a Marine investigator imme- Charles F. O'Neal. 
from T/Set. Elwyn’ Sear- diately after his arrest. The Their dismissal under RIF 
borough, who shared drinks prosecution introduced it he- procedure had been upheld by 
with McKeon a2 few hours fore closing its case last week. the CSC Board of Appeals and 
before the defendant marched The defense says the statement Review even though the board 
latoon 71 into Ribbon Creek is not complete found there had been no actual 
April & Six young Marine Maj. Charles B. Sevier, the reduction in force. The Com- 
recruits died on the night prosecutor, has said he pre-missionérs reversed that deci- 
march and McKeon is under- pared his case on assumption s a, ruling that RIF proce- 
going court martial for their og 31-year-old McKeon would 
deaths. Py 
, Berman said he will try to fense. 


| Aid-to-Industry | 


Group Planned 

“Representatives from Alex- 
andria, Arlington, Fairfax, 
Prince William and Loudoun 
County Chambers of Com- 
merce Pill meet at 8 tonight at 
400 S. Washington st., Alexan- 
dria, to plan organization of a 
Northern Virginia Industria! 
Foundation. 

Aim of the proposed founda- 
tion is to encourage and assist 
industries locating in this area 
of Virginia. David C. Book. 
executive vice president of the 
Alexandria group, said that 
industrial development in any 
one area will benefit. all juris 
dictions. 

Chamber representatives 
‘meeting tonight will act as a 
steering committee in the or- 
ganizational work. 


Aportments 
Articles tor Sole 
Articles Wanted 


Bankruptcy Notices 

Bids and Preposols 

Boats Sports Section 
Business Oppeortun:tres $5-5S6A 
Business Property 

Business Service 

Construction Equipment 

Child Cere 

Cenvolescent Homes . 

Dogs ond Pets 

Farms 

Form Machinery 

Form and Garden 

Financial 

Found 

Help Wanted 

Merses, Livestock 


Houses to Build 
Instructions 
Investment Property 
Legal Notices 

Lest 

Lets 

Machinery and Tools 
Motor Travel 

Moving and Sterege 
Official Notices 
Office Speoce 
Personals 

Personal loons 
Poultry, Rabbits 
Real Esate loons 
Real Estate for Sole 
Rooms for Rent 
Situations Wented 
Stores for Rent 
Traslers 

Trust Notes 
Vacation Pleces 
Warehouses 
Waterfront Properties .. 


| To place your 


Catt RE. 7-12 


LEGAL NOTICES 
UNITED STATES TREASURY DE- 
PARTMEN 


Regiona! 


7SA-758 


was seized 
Mary 
the Intern al 
Revenue Laws to wit: Section «J 
Reven s¢@ Code Register ed 
and Mae Lucy Ha 
Lanham ud An 
an ay ere 
° cia 


in 
‘8 


} ad disposed accoraing 
law LOUIS DE C ARLO Assistan 
Regional Commissioner 


AUCTION SALES 8 
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN THAT 
1956 at 10:00 a 


on 
l ao biac 
an ss 1¢JKB-4i878 ne 
lonaine to ther 4D Ward will 
be sold at public auction at 54158 

to 

onal Fin 
Ave 


BUSINESS SERVICE 


PIPELINE CLEANERS [or 
sinks Grain aoe, 
2nor nical eftficie 
Br 0082 


4. & 
clogged fee *- 
equipmen 

"4-hour service 
A ORPENDAGLE ren: 


Rif houses restored 
vo Lome pro 
re ree on. 


contractor 
” ourchase 


ay Behe on aene 
ce 19 
he as F ar. eos 


A RECREATION | ROOM »bullt _ as 
low as $495 ‘inciucing 4 tree 
Breezewavs ‘or porches 


with jaiousies for as iow as & 
, : 


Se sen pay} ment. 
itimat U - 
REMODELING. 

. Eiemens Ss moder 


Kitchen 
restige of our 
ounded upon — C 
pres estimate fin 
MERIC AN HOME. IMPROV! :. 
, 


remod 


TONS porches 
shelving. roofing. guttering. 
Free estirmates 

RPENTE 


” Rarulions, 
fences 


pering. — toe | 

is Terms. RA. 
dits. 
upbemployment. 


K—Small je ; 
* res scien 


1 jobs } 
at &@ CEMENT WORK ~omall 
jobs a specialt y. AD 


CAR PENTRY. 
ng. | 


i 
terly returns 
0 Li aK 


plastering = 


ov 
larce jobs Pree 


~~ Fepaira. 
plaster g uf 5 HO. 2-5677 
CARP rR. gor jobs or laree: 
hourly rate or fres estimates. Refs. 

Bicep 
WORK 


ONCRETE 


NG 
repair. work i mee 


= 
E 


Cb rea a 
ALLE HOtip tie RoventeNT Co 


indow Wash- 


FLOOR WAXING— 

pI en. housecies J 

AOE ress sinish Gu ; 

Sie £ a eht “RB 

ing and “RA. 8-6799, rates. 
andead & finished 

floors made like new: auick reli- 

oe epervigs Tayler Ficer: Serv- 

ce 


GE HAULING—leaning and 
oe of al) types. 14 ae 1 


ri Aon ut . 


oe 


nog a exterior and 
A. 9-2488 K Leake 
fleor sanding cabinet 
e rates. call anytime 
Re OR ARP 
NTING. oxi t.; 
r 


@ dest 
Free estimate. 80 B-4738 


ra. re- 


oF 256 


BUSINESS SERVICE 


wate Are 
all seraniar tree eat 
mates un “4-7439 LI 7-905 


work guar. HO. 2-324 
PLUMBING and heating. new vat 
ton Ly g 24-hr ores no 


RECA IN 


ste guar. $6.50 for 670x115 Ex 
~ las ves. & Sun. DE 2-2. 0 
ATR. , 


ra ate 
Roof 


Pst 
‘oF _ HO. 97125 
cializing in 
4 


: spe- 
‘for ei ‘en car seks ice 
-B' -2420. 
walks et tc 
Jerry. LU. 3 Lis We 7 Vee 
WINDOW. wall. floor. clean. 
2 in -0 . 


Rit and white 
3293 
oid. ;,male he 
t ast 
Pines and Eas! Ri ver ‘a > 
va 


A : 
Woodley 
taxicab. 

. 


a - 


aturday. Reward 
TH 


7-15. eres 
ame Peter, rew ‘WH 


ack curly haired 
anconia ré. area 
7. 


. yellow 
2-8730 


or Be: hesda. ; 
turn wallet. Of -5372 


2 diamond rings 


ll az 


int erected 


- On!) si 
each iin ted individuals. please 
sPCOVERS, made 
fab. EM. 3-189 


,e&c 


Tue MANGE Rest Home. Toudoun 
a ben + spot Rea sor 
“Cail Hil ro, Ve ji) 

DING ASNOUN NCEMENTS AND 


$2 50_ L 
Sar 7 


“MOTOR TRAVEL 
W ANTED—Re ladle 


usta ‘8: ix, 6 30 i 
9 


ARTICLES FOR SALE 
AC ‘ ‘ D ~ 


popren 
a 


rae ° 


be oe bre ome em 
AIR-CONDI! TIONIERS 
OvVERI BAe ae FR RELOW 
i A~] Puan 
~ OV. er 


BABY cr RIBS — $10.95: carri ages. 


BABIES’ DISCOUNT 
PARADISE 


Inpainted 

Sym Sandbores. NOTH 

ING EV ER SOLD AT LIST PRIC® 

HiS If THE WORLD'S LAROFST 
Children’s Supermart 

Sth and K STS. WwW 
Mar “2 or 


The 
AMPL E PARKING 
REDRM —Twin beds 


os 1471 


"Like 


ioe 


zo04 
qouste 
.s. 


rm 


oleum cov ered 
Oo 1365 


‘Supermar- 


Asn REGISTERS 
651 
Rental 


new 
CHAIN 
’ . a ' ot 9.43 
ROOM _FURNITLU RE 
0. 7258 
Mod jernf 


$190 § 
OL. 2-482 


DINING. (7004 

Mon. f 
no — ‘whit £ 
nigh ft 


Oris. pri se 


“e A’ i 
5 and ‘56 yearoooks TE 3.9077 
FIREPLACE Eat i. Cas or ee 
ETOVE.. hae NAS 


FLOORING 


Oak Elana ne in Pertec-t 


Candition 


$70 PER 1000 BF 


Ace Wrecking Co. 


e NE ‘TT 4.0800 
2-9211 


4907 Minn At 
Recktville Branch 


FORM MATTER BSS. extra tone 
145 F ow EX 35-6635 


FRIGIDATRE J cu. f excel cond 


OS. etver ST 
a oe white fox. reas. 
brand-new 3-8784 5 
& enhaire: 
7-7419 
town. 4 rms. Turn 
‘eal t JE. 4-0922 


table. oak 
Lo 


or &s 


eds) 6 
gir\'s cress ne 
9-847 


FURNITURE 


Your Signature Is Worth 


3 COMPLETE ROQMS 
FOR ONLY ? 


$219.95 


NO MONEY DOWN 


Easy Terms, Free Delivery 
HERE'S WHAT YOU GET 


Living Room 
if odern sofarette «om- 
* occasional chair us 3 
les. matching cocktal ‘able 
2 besutiful decorator lamps. 
Redroom 
Reautiful modern }-piece se are 
dreaser with mirror. reomy chest 
ef drawers. doubile-size bed. pilus 
pillows. ete 
Dinette 
A modern S-piece dinette set 


Dea! Direct With Pat Regal 
No Finance or Loan 
Companies involved 

Ee CATER . *FPRVICEVEN 


You Get immediate Credit 
Approval and Delivery 


REGAL 


Clothing & Fi &, Furniture Co. 
¥ 


LUCKY 
‘FORNITORE— 
Look What You Can Get For 


$219 


18 PIECES 
or 
Brand-New Furniture 
6. 
$-Pe Be Wig: 


NO MONEY ,DOWN 
EASY PAYMENTS 


SAM BROWN’S 


te we ee 


ARTICLES FOR SALE 


FURN —-Simmons bed frame. dréss- 
ir ith mirror; reas. JA. 7-591). 


“FURNITURE 


3 COMPLETE ROOMS 
BEDROOM 
LIVING ROOM 
DINETTE 
TERMS—$5 PER WEEK 
NO MONEY DOWN 


Only once in a Bi ue ~~ do "on 
furnitu re 
suite ®! th 

f.and ™ ate hine chair 
step tables and cock'tal!! 
ece room 

eprine and. ba tony 

dreaser «1 


Park Pree 
THE CROWN CO. 
4827 TTH ST. NW 
Gas “RANGES, also electri - ranges. 


od rts, 
\ Jj a st a8 


good eondit jon 

rom. premises 

ORGANS AND 
: ° 


com = 


3021 
PIANOS 


Oeorgia ave 


Returned 


woDELT tN a 
5 FoR REST Wits 
+B. OT. 
RT ints . 
bove the ibrary 


+ we 


Mtaic £0. 
reine problem 
ibe aig buble: “Ret re 
er ovings 
ne 


” ne, 2 


Recoandilioned oO ierent een 


, PEERLI EBs “BALE 


REFRIGERATORS 


EASY “TERMS 


- gr °e 
LARGES T SEL ECTION 
LOWEST PRICES 

ARANTEED 24 MO 
URCHASED FROM APTS 


REFRIGS. ss es $e 
emul Da 
_suar ‘Wetiin metris 


REFR IGERATOR SALE 


UNIVERSAL 
4200 GEOROL 
ROTO. Wry ve For "RENT — Res) tal 
uipn 
Rr aa 
a. 4 


SEWING MAC at rs 
Basement Clearance 


af * ic 


ow? | “> 


ar 
—— —Meai 

J bos teh box 
2 ales. Coca-Cola box 


deste New 1957 modes if 
you as. cash 28 4 want an newess 
last PARA! ¢ 

CO. 2202 Ga ave. Bw. Prep fone 

per 

Ei es 
f FS Ma MODEL 4 ee 
651 PENNSYLVANIA SE 
rv. me all size i“ eatial 

¥) PIRE- 

Hope ra se 

Indian Head 


sar 629. 

61 ONE 320 Good 

L, 4- 7500 4920 
7-2105 


sl) retread,. guar 
’ 6 70215 
87.75—~vour 
“SERVI Cc CE 
, ’ Be ‘ ry, 
ri ‘PEWRITE RS. standar 
S25 Up — chaise eal 31 
a week ate demonstration 
_ t ! ay ; 2535. now’ 
Vac. CLEANER Beet ro uz with 
=_ = good cond 16. LA. 6-€988 
a ASHE R—vne: —— 
Ox | wee green ree. 
d in -4 
WEDDING GOWN. a: 9 


onc... t7a:0. RA 


ay hin NEW 


FURNITURE 


3 ROOMS 
FOR ONLY 


$245 


NO MONEY DOWN 


Easy Terms—Free Delivery 


SWANK FURN. 
1115 H ST. NE. 
3-8700 
of 2-bdedrm 


me ire as 
cemetery in Was 
Ww : 


Wites. office 


ala reir) van 5 
ou 7. 08) . 3—RA: 6-2977 


uantity 
n- 


—Pa 
r Culmen. 
RE 7-2434 
—Any amount alse 
~~. refrigerators eas apace ane 
piapo. Mr Gray, NA. 8-267 si 


PURNITURE WANTED 
EM. 2-6677 
ABBOTT & LANDON 
GOLD 


—— oe 


Bring rour dente! say pia! 
Giscarcead jewelry We oay cash 


KATIN, 


AIRLINES 
AIR TRAVEL AGENCIES 
NEED 


’ eroand and 
everywhere 
ereeas Fr 


low-cost 
interfere 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
23 


INSTRUCTIONS 


5 
vately by hRighiv sf tied. ie 


eatanta 

; and orush-up 
mall groups, ra ~ progress. 

res oe. J o 

MODERN TRA 
pure all subjects taught 
GOL training: dav. eve. classes 
" SRPLYNN a tt “ LEGE. 


NURSES NEEDED 


100 women wanted. 17-66. to learn 
white or colored for con- 
- qocters and + ori- 

Das even! ne 


beanaad 
Mrs 


NING in beauty cul- 
approved 


ANWOUNGT 
Job gt et Path 
‘., ve 


KeRTION RECTAL 


$2] DANCE COURSE 
Ww! TH $2 MEMBERSHIP 


4 | : 
FRED AS TAIRE DANC 
STU DIO 
pst Wi o% 
‘WOMEN. ACL “AG 
Get a Better Jot 
FARN MORE MONTY LFARN 
Shorthand and Typing 


Ar ~Aare “as 
PEENWRIT ’ 


977 
cS 


, 


Dees ARC's 120 Werds per Minute 
Jobe Waiting— Free Piacement 
inquire 9 A. M 5s 9 
Phone ST. 3-2086 
Washington s« Only 
Speedwriting 


AS MI ) ' 


See "ABBEY First 


"ACCOUNTANT—$500 
1400 1 eh es ” eases 


ACCOU NTANT 


5.41.40 


-ACCOU NTANTS & BOOKKEEPERS 
: 7 


sitio 
ave. oF 


ie 


ATLAS AGCY. 1420 N.Y 
Accountants, $0 $100 


$100 
ta 5” 500 
re soce! i oe 
: : BA000 
D Tateiman 
7.4414 


Annette 
2735 Yootvere Rides RE 

7 15th ot NW. at 

ACCO — Sg te —w es 
Ju Exper 


: 
e. 


ry PPIs ra. 3 
SE! 


Adivesstiareah Oper ator 
” i 
yy a4 served 

te start 


"WASHINGTON ma Apel 
LIGHT CO 
PERSONNEL ner EPARTMENS 

i] 29TH 
NO PHONE wT tis 


ADM. ASST oo. uncer M Fe 
6 WILSON PER 


ANE CONDI Tl ONING” 


poeition 


A ry 7 
‘Kk Wat MOrORS co 
ee WAWN—WVust 
D ook 


rienced have oper a'ore 
perm! S\%-day salary oF 
e mmission | Aopiy ORT . AvrrTo 
GLASS Geotsia eve ae 
TV 74. 


be f- 


tit ) MECHANICS 


tor e —F Ly appeil jumen 

MR. NORCROSS 
CALL CARL, INC. 

1250 24th ST. NW 


GM experience 
workifie cop - 


_Chevralet. 7 


IT AND COLOR 
EMPL EXCHANGE 
ody and fender men . Open 
enhite Oper 
ea4 
ip 
T n* 


AUTO MECHANIC 
exce) apt 

plenty of 
wienwer 
Pr 


ner ; a’ ww he 
Chefs and 24 cocks 
Car washers 


1512 Sth st. 

my. 2-1572 

AUTO PARTS MAN-—G i. exper! 
ence preferred. Contect Mr. Sise- 


a ore. OL 
ATTYS nite cect "Vord exper ence 


preferred. Ge per Rian Apoiy 
sax LAN MOTO 6 wn 
{ CALLA’ oF 4 Boner "nO PHONE 


AUTO TITLE E TAG 


Clerk start 870 wk 
a! & Bten nos oqea: nee 
ROUTE SALEEM ea) 


drive tbc 


PERSONNEL 


pols 
=® &. ae 


cimire: 4407 Bo Capitol 
casn. Call Mr. Heath. 


YY AND FENDER” 
. MAN 


_ ww. OT. 3-4 


Monday, July 30, 1986 


Circulation 

quicker sales result 
Washington Past and 
Times Herald clasified ad. 
vertisers. To plate your ad 
for Sunday. 


Phone 
REpublic 7-1234 


HELP, MEN 
BIBLE SALESMEN 


e ies week 
wv room 307 
AKKPR acc 


Counselors 


Plumber 


means 


tar 


top salary 
trailer drivers 


white 
. 20D 


AGENCY oi 
8 


Ap n per- 
Glecemenns 
Glassmenor. Md 


BUTCHER 


siete char vse af sar ve 
G gals 
PAR 


CAB DRIVERS 


“fe oot have an identifira- 
ve ae vou fer 
ent or women 
e 
S STUDI O 
Sth St NE ! 


31-5199 


CARPET LAYER 
AND HELPER 
POCKHARE ih net 
esca M4 


CARETAKER 
apartment et 


Ann’? n Rerson. 
teurant. 247 16th 
cit _ ENGINEER. Eradent ° exe 
: arer b} con- 

etru mn. Rox 30. Post- TH ’ 


COLLECTION men with finance ex 
perience Ten ealar 


fits Fiseman s a 
”) 


“~F ~~ m4 


CONC eae 7 YORERAS experienced 
rn a | 


wy aaa ar 
ene) ee 
=? ~ 


FMPI 
Fait NER WEN. 


A 4. we , 


ere 


| to 
CONW st S&S Empl Sere 


ater 7 Wea ee 


Purnitu re 


~ Warehse- 


pRAPYs MAN Mees ani teal 
ss n 


Letcher ,_ en 
er $3" reste Ce AP 


~“BRAFTSMEN 
MECHANICAL 
La ' Men and Detailers 
Work th engineers ond sri. 


. Interesting projects 
in Ges sn and develonment af 


Res earch Corn 
NW ST ; 0986 


Engineers: 


Representatives 


fram 


Lockheed 


in 


California 


are in 


Washington 


fe'tas ar tek Laeckheec . 
range Geveiopment enc pro- 
4 yet on proerem cen eévence 
career 


ay - 


We invite rou *e e006 our eavere 
the 


sports page 
of todays paper 


Lockheed 


A rrrar? 
CALIFORN 
Burbank. 


Carporation 
A DIVISION 
California 


rx@crerrve 


SALESMAN 
Stock "BROKERAGE. Firm 


(No Experience) 


Expansion 
openings for men wit 
pec xkgrounds in any 6 


—— Reietions -—— Schoa 


program hes creajed 
puccess! 
the fallew- 


’ 
of ” Wholesae 
tel. or Treve!l 


. weno} : 
; cet fase Oat ias1Obem 
>. 
. ACCOUNTS BY PHONE 
we. @ee 

fharecter’ \nvestisat ‘aun 
caparity te earn im @€ 

145 


815.000 YEARLY 
Fx" ensive hb ar pe cE aus! ify vou 
wr ener: ve 


es f4 


CONTACT 
PRIVY 


Tee eth, dl 


FIELD SERVICE 
ENGINEERS 


Recent graduates im Electrical 
Engineering or men with voca- 
tional school certificates plus 
experience im trouble shah. 
ing, testing and maintenance, 
im guch fields #6 radar, com. 
puters, television, etc, are 
needed. A good knowledge 
of electronic theory is neces- 
Bary. . 


INTERVIEWS 
Monday thru Friday 


Saturday by Apot. 


ERCO DIVISION. 


ACF INDUSTRIES, INC. 


RIVERDALE, MD. 
WA. 7-4444 


Renee we Vilieving Fae 


i senses S82. 


THE WASMINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 4a? MEN 
ae Monday, July 34, 1 1956 


382.000 : ws pee "sucess fene 


ROUTE 
Daily a ete ae = MACHINISTS a OS ee Ft Stet was 
Circulation Si. x -.--- : Aol ber | ae 8 age 25-45. otk Pram” wacbuvtar, e LIGHT CO. 
lectrical ng ae = Carroll’s Laundry, Inc, | sex’ "lr "rea prefer, ee ‘ait tar’ selcomen, oe aries | 51000 ve 
es results . one se : Sartacms With Srel Mecheuere ry, * | B sslary until rou take cr tee over. Wil & nay 1390 
TREES GUNCKOr SES reeu _ ae £32 ; pr ae = | need spproximateiy ‘working 16 Write Bow Fh ie 


f6e Washington Post and - at Wack oo C1 rar. rm 600. 1605 = fon “bas opening ROUTE MAN capita Aes TM ; 
mes Mersid classified ad FOOD CLERKS— years oven ws or evuivale,; er see hte Pay tee padi aust ns tage Gi ] 
esl To place ga ad | j VJ A LOOKING ae in patent ore cee Bergmann ie es fori as Sey. CH , EF DRAF SMEN ” 


NW SECTION Well Earoved Shop Facilites Shete me 4 aa _ od an int erview vi so y arranged 


Phone - S Coe oe ont Lae *® -xpetience imelnding salary ¢x- oe. seat) Challengi ioe work on 


pected :o employment supervisor , 
— ence aecowere . Y, Co mertur With —~—_~> 
REpublic J « | 234 have . The edu av on and Gestee *0 ete: — Abelrty agg = ate. © Rs . ert SHELL DEVELOPMENT WHAT HAVE FLEET BALLISTIC MISSILE SYSTEM 
eee io pene brtoees 25 ant a wok 4 MPANY Should have experience with Ships struc- 
MeL? omen Many Company Benefits Sw aie ccile | Brae tures and cargo loading devices or Naval 
$47-$80 PER “WEEK OFFICE USOT a Missile Impact Prediction | Five Contial 
dies PERMANENT EMPLOYMENT Asoly i Person aJer. Bs , penses. ca’ QUALIFICATIONS 
ll « meee caer scien atemaan ilies VICTOR ADDING MACHING com- fy fae es « Geriatrics Extensive experience in drafting practices 
OVANCEME D ; c : requ'res ° mechanic A ~ ness ox t ' ve 
DRAFTSMEN, TO $6000 PAID VACATION SAM 4PM me mach cae mechanic. Aare gi exD Jobbing ics Mathematical Model Building pram at of draftsmen. in large 
Struct ar OUP INSURANCE . co : _ 4 Mbeval _ os —— no he'p- . , , 
ee: ~ 4 t " 
Ber METAL MAN 54200 MANY ADDITIONAL benef seine am. it Power Distribution | Wide experience as pertains to draftsmen 
Bese ‘5 EMPL. SERV. aii MELPAR, INC. « state faicuawie =e ee . in design of ships structures, py arn 
20 3 These opens ‘. on depen sabe Paid’ We pleas satis Sis Dloeiée Ave Personnel Testing structures, ships components, electrica 
ELECTRICIAN. mEover and Oe ; oe poctins copeiiens SW. ts ; equipment and heavy machinery. 
AND HELPER on 3 hts as ~x ° ch Climatology | Extensive knowledge of Navy Department 
: Bureau of Ordnance Standards and spec- 
ficati k th de- 
class: new les | ep" ~ Tene - a4 my ~ vem ’ eae i oe ian ossiour @5 Ga aera oe S vale 
oe 5 ely Nats IN COMMON? 


ain mits ses, SAFEWAY = ss 
haa to phy Pp senate DRAF TSMEN 
a STORES, INC. “Sess sere, ome mee 1 SR: | a VEC HAICRE. 


EMPLOYMENT OFFICE far 


Mies Bis ives ~ | MN sammoron arene APPLIED MATHEMATICS | big SP af 
eA von 330 ~ FOOD Pi FANS ALESMEN — Semi-Professrona! H U G H E S | | r 
pase dA rah ik de ELECTRONIC COMPUTERS | *iPboerd Installation Experience 


. , 904 STARTING SALARY ' 
Engineers “SPS "Scae"i © $86 50-125. WEEKLY 5 paca Extended overtime Cost of Living Pay 
LO 5-08 ; Tre Rewarch & Development Laboratories. located in Syn They have furnished recént problems available Anresl improv . 
With ER degrees— eve Perma en? Career Southern Ca formia, have Many interesting openings tar oe the consulting services of our These positions offer increases 
CF. OR CEulvsiest experien GUARDS Pad Trarung Period Washington Applied Science Repre- High Salaries 
I-terect n5— Org tod ELECTRONIC ENGINEERS sentatives and/or the computing serv- Health and Life Management Develop 
Stimulating eo ©x-Ser n Wim | — — a MECHANICAL ENGINEERS | : of our Washington § Scientific Insurance ment Program 
cant ~~ oer : <td Glen 2 Qi Ot omputing Center. These are pérmanent positions in subur- 
ban Detroit, Michigan. Interview and re 
location expenses paid. To arrange Wasi 
ington interviews call 


: ® ; ‘ — ¥ ~ 
APPLY RSIS SE” paeevee tor wamnenenes wae 5 + and scores of ther areas 


ror Fraepeons. Stee [NGENITIOU 


hallen in a Say om Preis paore 
. SING im aninetion Tag JO. 8-3315 
wTrtevIret RAGS mathematics, physics, or engifeering? Are you interested 
fy Creative nM : om 330° Mw im B0vENCcINgG as rapidly as you ere capable? A O. Kartinen 
COlumbia 5-2000 


The most edvarced develooments in electronics are being 
made = the sphere of aurborre reader and related ground Monday Jul 30 
Opportunities va 2 ality neha deren 
Dp ERCO DIVISION otters because of htary emphasis WRITE, Giving Qualifications, or TELEPHONE Tuesday, July 31 


ACF industries lire cece mbiy , 
Precision Assembly Further ecolcatons for electro-mecharwcal techniques in Dr. Liston Tatum, Manager, Applied Science bh yer in gd Baye ne 


re Oftered ~ . 
A : Ay adi , Trainees T~ece forthe ore creatwrwqW Trew openness mm he Syctemes 
Diwemen of the Hughes Research A Develooment Labora- on 2 PM.-5 PM 


Federal Telephone _ REE Seen Seat ye a 
Mr. Stanley G. Reed, Manager. / or write 


&. Radio Co : ¥ nee nel h ' y f Oe gow — Enp>ree-s 2Po ewe Germrorstratec -_ - niv and mventrve 9 
CUR JOB st Patusrn: Instite Prewous expertence eorhing S0iety well fired miferest m areas of work that call for de- Scientific Computing Center CH RYSLER CORPORATION 
In washens Te. a fe c > Die nant nat uted. sear woth ome reraug he'otul veng merwtacturadle, rehable. mamtamabie designs tor 
coe seat. Ser © yee - preason equipment developed at Hughes. MISSILE OPERATIONS 
The as | MER BN Gone eeecees co on meet ee ce AS ay a ) | | , PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 
on— Mer tem le p Vea ’ vos" nal — ° s pment, m actur ughes, : 
F ae, = Tle aes —— '~- mekers ore preterrec rw wes alles Boer electro-mecharcal, electronic, muicro- nternational Business Machines s P 0 BOX 2628, DETROIT 31, MICHIGAN 
Parkway to rowe 173 Deve 2 . oper ~ weve. and computing problems. Design asiso requires the 1111 Connecticut Av NW. RE 7.3705 a 
NEW IDEAS i of ree — ings Sa pause ens use of such advanced techreques as submimiturization and ; px, 


Spar aext lax ——— do rot meet the above ; 
NEW eee ers - D Gente = wwtized “plug in construction, with emphasis on design OO — 
Concentrated on | nt s a tor wohwre produchon 


designs & new develop- “INSTALLERS 
ments in the aeronautical Experiences water epee = APPLY IN PERSON Promote yourself to Hughes ' Our representative. Mr 
“Tt conmaucterg W ashengton mtrerviews And 


tield d other phases of “= A pers _ 7 : 4 | > | 
cecione age MeN ee ===! Engineers 
= - f-ntay thems t..~gy WrEReD SP re . 
a Pani a oan ; y ' SUPPORTING PERSONNEL 


> 
Are you « bachelor's, master’s, or PhD. graduate in 
PACKAGING 


investment “Compary_ 


.< * 
o- 
Jw © you preter, mal your resume te 


Y elect romie exten high school ' 
eve'ems Orieimea: sats = are and ei SS , SCIENTIFIC STAFF RELATIONS rT An engineer with above average ability, a Ve design and manufacture Bangg ok = 
. Biee wane dusioms We aise meinen thes equipmen 


HIGH SALARIES are & pier.) : a Subecherw of we ae a” | = UJ G 4 EF S accordance with his ability and a need for Because we do a complete job, enportunities 


a ° a- we ~ 
based on performance & _ _ a stimulating environment to perform at oe GRC® embesce chant quaee Geibnied ame 
potential. Opportunities sx. sree: | "ve : Pip, Pee his best should consider the positions nory, There is © Gerticieh ceed ot geauant ter 
are unlimited. There is 43.50 nt > = uarterr ome wee + a“ RESEARCH A DEVELOPMENT listed below thaf are presently available at several semor engineers 
. ° AN’ FLING imGN > Lu ™ 
always room on too— LZ ith «ae LABORATORIES MELPAR 


you GROW with a grow- 4 sais 00.4. x cone _ eg tng ‘wah ULVER CITY. CALIFDRNIA | Positions are available for... 
ing international organi- 1217 Valery ave. se. Apt Bi South 15th Se — > ern 
465 SENIOR SENIOR E. E 


zation i <ITox co. for maintenance 
: . - ; ELECTRONIC Several veers’ experience COMPUTER ENGINEERS 


‘etects © involve Deslen on an ——-or' = 2p aon ENGINEER wn design of Re Amoli- 


Pull time net pec 


velopment through Production att and bath agi, ; 
Must be x fiers, |. F. Strips or mic- MECHANICAL DRAFTSMEN 


sober and relabie Background in digital 


Must be eligible for security. clear . : 
the tellowing reouirements, SANTOR Make way for tomorrow ... computer circuitry, date ‘mare components. | In TEST ENGINEERS 


(A). With current expe- 325505." ‘ , eiaaeen + ar responsibility this posi- 


rience in aircraft power ire aa e ; smalh repairs CHRYSLER MISSILE OPERATIONS challenges the future with today’s volves supervising the ac- met he ong Ralean with FIELD SERVICE ENGINEERS 


supplies peek sa. “ony G Senliber greatest engineering opportunities. You will find at Chrysler Missile tities of engineers, jun- 
(6). With electronic gp x. : ae e- «completely different work atmosphere; one that is geared to new ideas ar engmesrs ang tech- DIGITAL PROGRAMMERS 
equipment design & de- re Fone = ye sa om oo and in which you set the pace to advance as rapidly as your ability and ean SENIOR INEERS 
gs ge ee " : - desire permits. You will enjoy the congeniality and the many benefits | “cau ELECTRONIC ENG 
ith special exper ee be etzerience necessary Ce thet can only ne derrved trom working with today s leading Missile Ni R | ' 
ence in packaging and LANDSCAPE experts wm EE Seacet vane’ eimestence MECHANICAL ENGINEERS 


cooling as in relation to PLAN DRAWING Experienced in design of —s, sging : 
aircratt power supplies "> teen oe We imvite you to challenge the future with Chrysler Missile and take video circuitry for radar ints cola =. went MECHANICAL DESIGNERS 


is desirable your place now m the industry of tomorrow or «wmiler equipment cordance with Geven CATALOGERS—SPARE PARTS 


(D) Experience im traf ra ; "Oe008 per tien ves paar te re re- ment specifications (Chas- 
dase tn rot'Se Bente Seas }~=©MECHANICAL AND AERONAUTICAL | 7" sees TECHNICAL WRITERS 


desirable but not es- Ewell. | EC - 
sential ' SENIOR £. E MECHANICAL | 
(E) Knowledae of mili ~ Se age teh ENGINEERS | Cullen teen ee DESIGN ENGINEER | INTERVIEWS 8 AM to 3:30 PM 


tary specifications for rou A Le | 
éuri —— ~ requenc laude and De * emall mechan- RIDAY 

airborne equipment 4p ~ a + - 9 Aerobal iistics Smal! Mechanisms ria amt a af se - yam ons MONDAY THROUGH F 

plications oly Mr Lubbes. 5 eee Aircraft Structures Rocket Propulsion ; noise communication ical devices or sircraft SATURDAY 8Y APPOINTMENT 


7 axBaTTan COMPa x "i 
bs ee Ph | systems structures. 
ee pela # PENS: ion Zz as : me "4 cts oe 7 Dynamic Analysis ysicists 
ie Accigamt Meakin Insurance [Sey tr cores dn Po ae | POSITIONS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE 


| 
rie, “ahi. "Aak tt ‘ie "Leterme ELECTRONIC AND ELECTRICAL FOR INEXPERIENCED | ERCO DIVISION 
| ACF INDUSTRIES, INCORP 


—_ cake 28 gin Yoru Gur ei wbosteead ENGINEERS | ENGINEERS | Riverdale, Md. | 3 WA. 7-4444 


: Interested in the above-mentioned fields. 
econ ny Electro-mechanical Weapons Systems | aE PPR tga | wre. 
nterviews AMERI Components Analysts Technical Personne! Representative LIFE INSURANCE 
TUESDAY JULY 32 CAN Circuit Analysis Servomechanisms =? oak: Rahee ex ton 
: INSTRUMENT CO Navigation Systems Computers PP RL TE 


R. J. CONNINGTON ; 
PAR, J. CON nenneraan 8030 Georgie Ave Fire Control Systems Operational Analysis at 3000 Arlington’ Bivd., Falls Church, Va. 


HOME OFFICE SALES MANAGER 


Siver Spring, Md Instrumentation Radar Systems ae ee ed yelhene amet eae 
. e , 


EX. 3-5039 senemantneins — : rete dabertarent successtul 
| * aoenc ome 
These are key positions in design, analysis and development of Chrysier ordinary hfe agent pone Must have potential tor 


Fedica ‘askin "Biecrtam’ MAACHINIST | Coe re ne cent a Reletone leniter ond Flent Dallicec Miceite Melpar Inc creating sales promotional material for direct mal 
Federal Telephone Systems } . distribution. 


— 
Numerous positions also open for development and design engineers G Here is an unusual opportunity for a capable yours 
. 


ana. 4 ime — erie 
and Radio Co. aicitanee or osper = | ah Citeatha too Gen: diane ae man with creative abilities to assume immedcsste stature 
— with a young dynaryc company fully established and 


Setornationsl tat. A. Care : eae KL eee tor These are permanent positions in suburban Detro:t, Michigan. Interview | | | recognized as a leader in its treld. Compensation com. 
‘a ont Cheeaiey Sans ASSEMBLER MECHANICS =| fiesa‘san'at"wrna'se» chrecur'ss opm 
100 Kingsland Rd, ATLANTIC RESEARCH CORP To arrange Washington interviews, call ote ; 
; light metal and sircratt construction as | GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES INSURANKS co 
cl fton, N J. Alexandria, Vege A Oo KARTINEN sembly. Must be able to work from blueprints | WASHINGTON 5. D. e. T. 3.4609 
be TORRES SE ee ae gag COlumbia 5-2000 INSTRUMENT MAKERS ¥. 
Junior A tant i cee a Faction work—experimantal and proton DISPLAY ASSISTANT 
unior Accountan si Ze Malpas 
FOR CREDIT OFFICE : WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 1 TOOL MAKERS YOUNG MAN 
: | 9 AM-12 tr quality craftsmen required for experimental | with 
| 2 PM.-5 P.M. . , 
Excellent Opportunities for Advancement ee ee WELDERS Fashion Display Experience 
. . errranen aith splendid opport tor 
MUST BE GRADUATE OF ? . desene ats th urihes for advancement, 
AN ACCREDITED SCHOOL OF ACCOUNTING 7 wine Apply 
APPLY IN fag 8-3.30 


pet AD | CHRYSLER CORPORATION enter Son eee JELLEFF’S 
JELLEFF’S ; MISSILE OPERATIONS | ‘i : Personnel Office, 


PERSONNEL OFFICE | PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT ; | DIV] ION 7 Sixth Floor | 
SIXTH FLOOR P. ©. BOX 2628, DETROIT 31, MICHIGAN | ERCO DIV! SI | — STREET STORE 
F ST. STORE ; | Riverdale, Maryland Senet es — — 15 1 Raeaa ws RE 


aa 


i 
mal 


Permanent Position With 


1S HELP, MEN 6 WOMEN 954 SLP. wow MS THE WASHINGTON POST and TIVES BERALD 
_— 


15 HELP, MEN 1S HELP. MEN 38 HELP, MEN 
TECHNICIANS C2) : 
ELECTRONICS LAB 
SALESMEN | SALESMAN | priee.cm'e S20 


teuranis “and insthations ‘for 
u § 5 
| think | have the prop- an extsbtithed distributer. 


— ——~osition you're looking for.| ExCeL. OPPORTUNITY Circulation 


: e — ‘ ava tn on rr nas © OCR : 37a quiche sec trea 
cranes Call AD. 4 3648 GOUD SAL. AND BONUS | Technicians time or part time Call TU. gh education ar recrestions! Sera ; iy -? . =p tor Wadhington Post and 
ae geariy weexiy a . . 2-2121 for appointment worker traurer «xin pe y : t= ) ! Temes erat’ cies? ed at 
mathir Reply Box M-219, P.TH ; dergarie: nd —- r . , moe woe , 2s ; o 

os ping. Only. oipe ton | eae ee aes Electronic = the ginamiemant ania ‘a ox = Sao. 

Si, Mr. Bee) st LA. | 6-2666 ' SALESMAN Yours ; we a. oo a Catied- 
SALESMEN __ Experienced in sales work x ores - - Ability.to reed wiring dié- greméve printing and ithoerahine 

Exceptionally fine opportun-| Se oulk “i pore al inter $ grams Or Diveprints. - ork 

ty m new and used office ie be 

equipment Age, 30 to 45 ; oO 210.0008 Assembly to experimental 


mt youn 
ss000- hes @& cGesire te onter “the 
Experience not essential. Good “see como Sion slaced in a Gosi- @HeCctronmic equipment Previ- | pr inting field. Should be good wit » Coe | ABBEY First 
salary References required a : we “50 x ous wrvdustrial or mulitary serv- o6 Bex 71 “pot = ie fe oh Ne 
Report for interview Mr. «A 3 Oras t se extpernence necessary a. ae aaaenane 
sales management !} u! ' PART-TIME woRK 


Kressin, 639 New York ave 
Vr, J terview. call Mr Base ; . 
; ony | PSON Erenines 859 ger week. 39 bre 
nw between 19 6. @& ' . APPL N PERSO Apps & @ m aheare. Suite 7 
RA MM. to 3333 Conn are. ae : 


SALES REPRESENTATIVE SALESMEN 21 TO 28) wyonnay THR 


YOUNG AGGRESSIVE 
SALES DEPT OF HNATL. COR _o whet ngten’s 
GOOD EDUCATION AND | CAR om « : Need 


PENSATION. Cai as 1 Smee tat  & ite MMELPAR INC. 
EF lalla » 6 PART TIMERS 


tern 4 “2 On ' .» — . 
SALESMEN—OPPORTUNITY 7? AR ING row Bi vD 
RELIABILITY Married men with core exper 


ARE YOU A HIGH CALIRER 
SALESMAN? 


; Take Arne 2-¥ bas from iit 
. a4 = Sts NU © pien* entrance -~ are willine \ werk fren 
S . S nings D4 = he sal . 
SYSTEMS FVALUAT ON : : = to to wm ivime werk 
. > : ona! e ope " , yeh caren SF L organization expand 
» Va 
VWeendarT Housekeeper 
. ¥ : : Re 


- M D ™ , —_ 7 — . Cnatur te 
oot he . - . 


“s - —ineice Wore ; “ti - - | : 
epee OD, Mt nest Gove wo Tes SALESMEN LOOK! Mood salary aba sped work: Bil ft. me a. . aa oO 
*.. hes available respon hit oF rieictins 
—— neers Farn $30 to $40 - Dav . we y a . >» =x C ‘ L U M Bi A 
net treicel aneivsic and evaluation mn & o new predect | =- rilivisioe x RADIO SERVICE PLEASE DO WOT PHONE DARTiA 
They are concerned with " n nmited, SS isnt J for bench and cutei¢e wort 2 


consteney requirms the gee of the + pet a Px eriemeed Marke: 71-3387 a » | RAV ROOK KEP 
~ S prasgm and’ Sis WAITEESS. over 2 Ru EL AND EARN ROOK ERP 


type of positions vou would 
»roed phases of svetems anelrects 
all, be reapenmeitie for com 
ae tronics component and eauip 
e. s.6hOUTWTlCUM ere | opereonne! 
or? "¢ ate rred Dp- » 
henid ‘ sbiic .. . ; 
n you lke te diecuse these positions lecated ach ork ee Suring © WOOL SPOTTER. 550 wk. tos 
\ ‘her : . ‘s aad - - = 
mine wits me menegers of oF Research = = ‘ soett ~. iets. $213 Ge. are Spr: ios 


etect Mr C PF. Seneebern. Personne! 

oie : Chance : 

YOUR POSITION eee, | YOUNGS ON Wank SrCRrT ARES 
gh IE 18 TO 28 ought COLUMBIA Em 


van - te sales promo- $125 Per Week OF More Airc raft : “ 


' a io " D , 
Desirable cus Uficats ons. ACCOUNTANT Seas we ' on ° ick = 
Needs e oe ae a ue @ . _ 2 Ting Room Mors MEL PAR | 
itud ) : ; ry : 2 AS > 3 nc. 
- ‘Tb Mm} : ‘ . ' ; : : Cer ton os TR in ‘ , = a . 
ate oN a coey's ESSO NO EXPERIENCE NECES SARY Experienced pe me “a . “ar i = $/3 PER WEEK 

om be eli Moca WET TOUATOU ENGINEERS ~ =e 


can PoRnD 


Technical Recruiting = a _ 2 a} ' - Call AAR NORMAN 
Specialist e's Pes 


| opportunity - fe SHEET METAL high!» su ns = 
hark oro ma arad/nr We weer a? 56 : YOUNG MAN . . - . aie & i 
- Atle \ ° A he ~ _ , i. 


— mierviewing ex BOYD'S” cor Bov a veune men bah 
SHOE SALESMAN 


De soer?’ im mtlerview Exper enced Permanent po«itiog# - & elec" poe 

ashes commissioms and com .eny ; . , = - : f ‘ e ‘ . - c DAPIT x . 

sene P - — > . Any FOUUC ATT ’ MRARS TI 
_ + 2e b >a ‘ ; Se. V 

corfacting managers On manpower needs, fol- MIL ay SHOE STORE rancemen i >. portyun iti vel itt in OO iat. oF : 

Inw up err : CL ERK rT. >) _ 


mg enomeering apohcant rouTiIng resumes 


: Abad man whe +—_ll qos 
. West be Fie ; earn good business 
Other half of duties « or t teld re the beat entire! ture in long-established progres: 7 = AERODYNAMICS 
cruvtng trios pilus contact rg employment . - - . | = ‘te : peas P. eX : ~+ Ln 


aoencies. attending techruc - . Des:en. , od Tun > _ , oa = , . . 
tending technical socie : : . a sn << eee 


y¥ meetings —— — oe - -“ at 1¢ , $ = ' , . - 7 - ave 
mia ne - Sel Stability. Com aE ne sherthant a uate an —y > cs openin rice Exrer Sas ax oe 
. - 4 - . - wr? 


ete . eo @ @. 53 7roOf more fhan few dave dura 
7 4 


tion. Location: Philadelghva el ee A 
: | IRFRAME 
| , TIMEKEEPERS >= i BTW Ss SE DE CICN 
BAVE AN OPT: In AS EX 
INTERVIEWS ote r : : HELPPUL BU (Pusclase. Wine @o¢ Te 
a Previous Timekeeping ¥0T SARY OPENIN 5 
. s xperi Tis PINal WORK 
| a 3 ay y- t 1 Experience Requ red GOOD SALARY’ To RIGHT MAN MECHANICAL 
ro P.M APPLY CEMENT (Tract 
Call Mr. W. A Billingsley 
at District 7-2852 ERCO DIVISION 
ACF industries, inc ___ eke aw and Armament 
RIVERDALE, MD 


evasnes, sande ‘Snaeiees DEPT “ | ’ taunt for | ifettam "c ,« - ELECTRONICS 


General Electric Co. COR PRTENIEN ial Ses | =pitin.stiater, Weer SYSTEMS DESIGN 


re 
BIW Cheeter wt ot - = ~ ard of 6s7 ; Advanced G@yatema Develop 
Philedeiphise «4 Pe ackvile Pike. Rock —2 : - |. Bebad ty até Packacing 


: ‘ vite. 648. : Fae YOUNG MEN (7) : fi, mos b2BD um Le oh 
TRAINEES Work for rae nae poem , 7 - ane : 
. : fier op ten PROPULSION Aan ‘ - , _ —_ -_ ee , | ’ ‘ ae ee ’ 


7 - =; ms e 


c yrs _ _ee = "4 Lhe ; J _ o poe -— | - : i My 
ENGINEERS ; MISTS ae Ie ides ae tte ta et ANALYSIS an 4 ' — we “Em e e . oe 
130 ert s - 3 me ave ° ; renert ne - an “ ~_ 


Pre -Tlrearv 


Or send resume im confidence to 


Insta le Bre 
Transfer. Duct 


Philadelphia Location Se i 


GENERAL eee 

ELECTRIC SYSTEMS PRB ~~ on oo Cres 
As 4 part of the planned expansion af its Development and Pra)luatior a or) ‘ ave donee — oth a 1 
advanced mussile weapons systems re- en | 
search and development program, Spe- | CHESAPEAKE & poromac STRUCTURES 


cial Defense Projects Department an- TELEPHONE COMPANY DESIGN 
nounces openings on its professional Srresq Analysis. Materials, Weight, ReCerT typist. 
staff in the following fields Offers excellent career o0- “— 

Por ide ae? 


ORDNANCE CONTROL portuuhes for quenied ~ 
Beton ik Misti ENGINEERING atenolol FLIGHT TEST os “tisttes rs <a * : . 
3 , 7 ar employment inter- ENGINEERING | ing telephone Bilk «x % a tam matte i. wee rNETARY— 


y TEST EQUIPMENT Design & est in mechanics or elec- | Tpisne Test ansivale, Testing, RECEPT TYP ST—$250 =" eee 
oe , A bes Development of trormucs is Gesirabie. Must end Instrumentation = ; Weica, srr ar rcuns 7; -—< 
ssermbly area or Ne 5 pe . - . 
" J TRO be high sx saat graduate. Subctanticliy increased saleriet ™ . 1 . ~ -———ary Bes 
Eva uation Launchung area Ae Ry = - effec siua seie © aaa ae a. hentve aN + i 
_— a YSTEMS A insurance retire- -—_ -: Raat " - . Sf = 
a Compone EMPLOYMENT OFFICE t pian. sick leave and een PDS AOCy EK Tose STENOGRAPHERS tome “Y-y ERVICE 
COMPONENT DEVELOPMENT : tae See. Se a AIRLINES Sac, Sa | 
” mUC TURE A DES GN ec : - a : LAr 2 Parr - wet 
t 'ectro-mecharvcal W hj an TRAE AGENC IEF omg re 2 aS. “KC ~ v - “ * ; 
Flectranie TECHNICAL WRITING Apply Monday Thru Friday as ington See our ac under sous all a ATE —— 
Inert al - - “ GUIDANCE SYSTEMS 8:30 A. M. to 4:00 P.M : oc) it S Nw ms . a > eaenmeen - 
A — AN 5 NC PT . - 
CED CONCEPTS AND COMPONENTS . nterviews RTIST 
mare Gveros TOUNG MEN. whi ie A. 
— Weshisgton + } s 
“ Accelerometers and compe h CONTACT HIGH FASH On 
r ac atoorn Stable Plattorms lege graduates interested im «a —_ wR Cc Ff SELON 


; ™ v1 _ ins ™ 
Servo Susters manen: sales ation ‘trai Positions Encineering Personne! : hed ood yes! = se 
are avalleadle sfier trainin Representative preven -nish Tesh 


i P taiht sa) furni- 
cr M Ed yr." Ca Mr J. rt 5% ; aT ‘1 Mm an onpertal 
: : : a o; McCormick. Manager : n- -f tiveness , . «? r 


Arm rg & Fur ng Control Ens neenng an = : Ate : " y , - . -— treat - : eran a : REACT 9g ; . eo Wie ; ’ 2 : 4 
41 ir 13: , in- ’ A uM TO 70 . : um Qewar . vA” 2 oe oe oo ork 7 COG! Comtor* 
submit 


OTHER AREAS (UNG WEN over’ Th Onening ta EXGINEERING PERSON NEL SALARY OPE a ‘ : of Own Home 


THE 


. 7 a 


— 


tn err e 


Operations Analysis Advanced Mathematics i ath ies e 
on . 405 Ww nenaian nat ° ; - 
Cemputer System Design Thermodynamics mm. 402. 1908 ee Se, | 4 HOURS PER DAY 


Aerophys cs Astrophysics yao 5 dee Equipment Design CHANCE Woodward z Lothrap a wt — a Tee GOOD SALARY We tere 2 excelie-v “op om 


. a «aw + PP a cal — mn 
soe -WANTED vVouGHT eoed & Leateop — SP tbe eS 
Microwave alesis M ON I ee a ; - vf Wa 75 YEAR x «a =~ °*2 / are? Os oites 

: oe) ir *) * 


; on 
Data a : . = ' +. = , - = - ee arnt a al ine Ore “a” ~—o 
Field Vest systems Vest | AIRCRAFT Assistant Bookkeeper aa Sew arcond. office ae Ht PLEASANT VOIC perpe Thee 2? postions oe 
7 : ur - ° 32 cor . Ss «= : “ _ 

a " " . " — ~? > , }s re - = o- 

Call Mr W. A. Billingsley, Manager 8 EN incorpo = se wating, om 

‘ o rated ork pany penefits Amp» Wi — —_ _ - . . ro 

Protessional Personne! of anon) eee nee eure toe ie = CALL AD. 4.3648 ot crallenge Seley com 
MD pc vA Fire insurance Co mereutate att ability and 
Positions exis? af the juror, interme- —— or D « 

With cars ‘white’. 71 +30 


i a! 38 
diate, and senior levels ‘ of age Ne canvassing 
he month te start. Call 


"A ww 417 


Positions are available in such area as 
research, component design, systems de- INTER | 
vers TV programs ; nes . br al 
sign, analysis, and development for per- | PART TIME | Bork to be done at home "ASSEMBLY PERSONNEL 
. : training st our expense ; | ile 
sons with degrees nm any of the follow- : 6-9 30 p M is : initiative ability to WIRING agiuet ing aut °* SECRETARY 
° : ervatim poter college beck - ewctronit ; na we = - 
ing fields , eiranie Please send re- Super stierres %-fe ; ‘ 
. ppes oe men 3 references to Bo 


Electrical Engyreer: rg 
Mecharuca! Engineering 
Aeronautical Engmeerng 8 a i ated tw ko mmt 

Physics view ' . 218 Ds _ ra ° ‘Ann a6. 
Chemistry —{ Circle Balidine 4 4-530 30 Dp KITCHEN HELPERS \ SEE EE EE 
londey and Fuesdar or dal BU Bus Boys & Girls 


Mathematics 
¥ 
. attractive “ion Excellent coporfunities exist 
ioe Etehtger Tor are tmterested m@ goed pe 


iste <ALE  PROPLE—Por 
- ° Write Bities. Rt. 10. Bax 


Aerodynamcs 


Salary and responsibility are directly re- neve goed pereenelity ~* appear- steagy Bo and ond — re 
lated to experience and to an individual's Speen oxen Gass avaliable Mes "ane uniforms fus- , stg FRC CO DIY! SION 


contribution to the program are 
| ( } — TESS fc 
HOT _SHOPPES, INC B KKEEPING Cvernae it mm T44ee 


te and 
baring For ’ 
WASHINGTON INTERVIEWS Seger Deron TERY or bee 30” nme =. MACHINE ee a 
July 30, 31 & August |! Sx ee, ‘iz: YOUNG MEN OPERATOR Sout, £2" wintione ‘sla. “s Do You Want Good Pay? 
Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday es oe "teen Se YOUNG WOMEN Experienced—Linder 35 << + ae oo wo Tou art Good Pay 


Exoglient Working Condrtors 


ll th M rs at : ‘ere , round hier engine wn sg T = | T 
Ca it Se crtig meng f For Counter Work ; NATIONAL =. ft , — TRY TELEPHONE OPERA ; ING 
Between | P.M. and és P_M. y vee grew saute agains <- “BEF are oas - | SAVINGS AND Compttamer ; m the growing communications mdustry 
if you orefer, write in confidence to Shane witrenue de ode t. ” WHITE TOWER OFFICE we cxceliert stating 44 ay 
Mr. W. A. Billingsley HELP, MEN & Ww WOMEN 15A oe Pas Fn aces Ta Wis m.. | ‘Four raises first year 


SPECIAL DEFENSE PROJECTS DEPT : “ARCADE EMPLOYMENT AGENCY ae ——s = | Ean while you leer | 
White or Colored aa 3 a ; 


GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. seater ere Bate Te eRe aE T C&P. Telephone Company 


3198 Chestnut Street Philadelphia 4, Pa. ‘ . : 
or Cali Collect to EVergreen 2-6613 ee, Fm. Fe wan) sa 2 * TES a Set, Hw 


ry 


4 = _ 
Many others te cheese from. 400 3 Tae OF OT Gaee 
: are ‘ 


oe . * —— — 


= WASHINGTON POST and TIMES BERALD coe Soe 
-G Se SS oe 


* 2 ee 


382,000 
Daily 


Circulation 


rerrdinctie! Sat ffic... . .. . from $86.50 
err 3|1-Bedroom. . fr. $139.50 


2-Bedroom OFFERS 


ees Se a sumes Sea 

| FURNISHED | . | eee hat SSEDRA APTS: 
Phone OR UNFURNISHED | Ase HU. 1 as ‘ w. 3- 3-4400) Lannie NO. _AVAR. 
REpublic 7-1734 FROM $102.50 UP =~ EMBASSY SECTION 9 = "VEEYESocnes Toder 


Sosta"Baice’ Cleset ‘eundess THE WARWICK 


— ’ a _ a mL Vv At Home 
. : ur : , ; — = : very sttractively Oven Dally Mon. Thru Fri. §-$:30 JOS 1h porch. 3051 IDAHO AVE. Nw. acation 
See SS OS SE TS Se re maan snccnons cot a Lie A a — 
< ‘tate rr a ‘ sikite. 97950. 30 . oF. 
: 7 ae Terre 28 = ee FL. 4-9400 gece ‘ST. se. 8901—Laree Wy.) near x good. transper SWIMMING AND 


———— 


SECRE  ARY din... bedrm . aS oe. 
,' RO? SST Eth me ¥eETYROL| WADING POOLS 
Se pee ae N ADJACENT RO 
~ «£2 eet — Pees go NOW- OPEN 
er et oer owt, ie OTR: Acros Utils. sere a 
<n fee Gant oa a | Shirler hey. > 7 Bhiriy hey, ot TT st 
ae at + ; fenlow ‘Breskviiie signs te mode! Berm. liv. dt. “dinette. ey 
otate fr <cck Meee seer gers = ®p: reened porch. $85 plus gills, Dis a Private Bus Service Go Capital 
or << cep eg bs ee _—— — p 
5 TONE . TRAW Comp ALEXANDRIA 0714 . 21 8 Fie a Se Transit & Siiwer Spring Snapper 
new soscunes® Our Resiterts 
= sa Fe BELLE Vi EW — Bin *actrae. § is te ree away from trafic aeons: AR Awell. % Onily 
raster Dw tr  Well-mannered laree living room, separs 
en ey 2 Eee et ies me BEAUTIFUL MT VERNON Cie vindews: oom ses IDEAL “FOR CHILDREN 
- a rip le ventija fo with guest 
* . ot 
Pe Ss wrk — aie vD TY ’ 16-ft. picture ——— 
Say te Doe oe: Baws % . I i 
e- =e st = £2. oe ON | 5 ¢ on 
— Saas | Sater eee? Fe oor eet Ee” 1. & 2-BEDRM AP ‘ ball courts, mdnor Diavrodee 
bev meraet a W MM LSO FURNISHED APTS 
fe oe r yt . “pos. sis S I ING POOL A pames eae Setens Pre 
. ' _ = — Out Columbia Pike 
Se en ee Ee Sass - ly eo coRve, ros naweh fh nee 
”* Ter"? ad = = = ~~. 7 - 7 , eo 
+ — _,— i., = = = = oe reine > ae Se oe = ~~ eae — Seow | ime, brochurr . ra 
a — ™ = —— o> = é "equest Kirt wood . v 
Lemma é Serrereg@s ft a> ~ armen ee - = = ™ — bo - divine rm A >-7336 
rvs -—- ‘is ee Set pe eft ss eos — a Se Algs.: 30 min —#. 
“=> er ra - — es === = oo wee ee ee = vant ss ileal . own D. C.. Pents a 
a se sort —_—<* —— nwoe =e “sil ——- we As, . Se hme Co ee Pal ;_ et — " =. end i198 mit. Pert SOURI AVE. NW.. 1214~2 ‘GERALDINE APTS. 
ne ~ ~ -—- _—- ~ ” 3° a2 —_ o- : _ - “wre . == voir MIS rms. 
=@ af. +. > Al Tome ous es .— =. 4 — 3 a + ?>-~e — Se ee cee cet Set ee oy ~ kitehen, bath; apt. bidg.; 865 mo 1. B.-A yt ee floor. ‘Se on 0 ope A 
> > orcwnt — _ “ris Sa Ts 2 ae Oe eee ee 
= s =~ © = esi - ae eunéesr - os (ma = a Te. ee Dee | = 7 Resort etmosphere on specious F freshiy xm Aeérm. ant. sail Geeer Se cut 
- = th .*—- » se eet Be — —_ 7 ; Stounds im country club area with 3231 D st. se? rms. kitchen, “Keele “ion 2- , 
Es ws > —- 6.50 cee cectere «Beers a 422 __ om. Redrm. pvt. Beth: wll at city conveniences Off-street bath. utils. incl; apt. bidg.; $65 mo tenant a t be om. onmr 
.-- — = —— = ee = - _ —= cure par iy. har 5 ; ' MAIL fs iid welcome ae 3-982 parti + t tmelud ————_ we = spect; coe  schee 
i. > -— « ~ _s « @ se tes = an ™* HARTN “> ren ine . Kit. beth se7 _- ot sheovine GS. Ie 
—~ = 2 eS tt fee Ser 2S see a a ~ =5 - 4 — My above betures im eplure ares URCIOLO RALTY. co... 8- view of hy i. ot a oe: a. oo 
Gn TG eee eee ————— a 14276 21st St. NW. — a arr ot Rey es. Biev. bide. OSD" 50. 9-004 . 
>i = — 3 -_-_-_---_--: : se 
Se >*2 fa (SS S = SS ce SS cee eee eee eee hee a iBebaM 4 A CAPRITZ DEVELOPMEFT 
See ABBEY First == Saas Ss ae ree ee EXE sg ap, De oe Pies ign aig age PARKGLEN 
ieee oe SS a oS 2s " SOGDS! ROOMS! SERWICES! : AGER TERRACE 
a na =) ss war ts «ts ce WEEK & UP TE... nent Belleview Bivé. i |-Bedroom Apts. —$81.59 
~~. (ier Chace 7 — = - come er. oem wer Oe 5 4 * c= - .  adiaite, a) see - . coe EP > OSes = 
- :. = s- =p 2S sees ou ee eS os raw. === =... ot 3 5432 Open silg. througn Fi i. = ° “ied: mn att Bee (Web Sun Deck) ura 
os Some & Tee dns anbernheme =. 4 he 7 "a | nee 0-508 ana e-toni_| $25 sane ant . : LOWEST RENT IN AREA 
PT RPS ee ae >? ve ——____—_— Sanne =~ wer er eae a - . , 
Drape ae = a ee eet ow Oe - SS. ere ” Po -- wt” 
oc —¥. Gent cr Gee Come ver wore Slt CMEETMG creo. quiet conven- is pore Metco ho _ path, 69S mo. Ose Jeniter 
ecaoer (Se “ oo . — Lan o_ en ‘br 2 Bension - Me hwy tor : 7 EDROOM—3$69 SD 
Cw. ext om ia 6 YOUNG LADY i — = cw with . a. APT. .$95 menos 8 
— ose oo oa ade. 4 Se 20S. Pos as 2 BEDROOMS—381.00 
ons —_—— =e ————S ———_ sO 75 se nunter aie: i : To Qui Cok 
eee Soe St Gee Te =k M _¢ } an a — Le Serres 5 > — n 
~ —— ee Ct -_ . — = cae © « = ms — “= 5 c—anp Cees =| ee Tot ot ST)» NW. NA. | Ot right QL Utilitees Inmrlucet 
ae ees - Sere ser A ed cs ‘Eee! <« a a a: a ee en 6 . ’ . *Ses ront Broyhill & Sens ? sr. SE. 1643—Bedrm., liv. Sites tet Orr ELEMENTARY SCHCKL 
eS Oe oe Ee ee acs, ceaens Pats Fl Bos STOP aT PROJECT 
coo — tor > - « _— — 2 aoe - —— — = ot shett Jeremie te = Rems wit JID. - Ree Wer 270)4 Oerethr’pe v« 
—» - ? Loa iar oe Ge : -_ ext ev ve Ds = os - ~ ae *_—_— = ao Ghar terTRe —aierirer = = I BEDROOM. . $68 4 $77. 50 A r ne 4 from Eastern = Mf rca) 
is << eumgeer wee we fee 6 ees Ce Es - . se & = tS os’ . _-SES | Loree corner apts. cool and sulet:| 2 bedrm new bids: nr ove © Age ee a Oe 
Pere ° aioe ea = ss Seay see _— = om See se eS = ee TAM ® S- ee Ne Park rd. care feors closets: ample ; “bd sont Open. al!’ = = 
a —s 6 a ie ——— Te. me See com CF Fe ___ = a bedrm. kit ond beth parking 1 bik . a shee. , conten sc: redue “ Parkway Terrace 3025 Ontario Rd NW. 
el > —> (EMS CE cass Gee ok = GEES SL oe eter» De met ut BA 6-2036 Pentagon - 3006 PARKWAY TERRACE 5. 2 SATHS 
= eS. soe ST oe er eet ee EO ee oe ee, oa st SW Sublet Aus & Sep. Séults. JA 5- Shad “alter office own tee, lee. opt. Lée. rm.. bed- SUITLAND, MD. 2 BEDRMS. 2 > 
. — > =) ae oe meee = Diesel“. ; 7 ; 2-0 ge | FM. ” eit ‘end bath in imter-racia! Newly decorated. iarsr etivartive 
M ) erick st.) rimey be A ~ad -— ae > tod a ~ ~ butiding with aun Gect carecunt — 
’ an ha lis - =p er confttt 
< by maénwid mt: 6 oo ee 


Janiter nr all # oS. Sere? 


pare wet flee 


Se ie ROCK CREEK GARDENS 


= 
i — AY BE GEEN ANYTIME ished Lntucn smed 
- to" : MAY BY CALLING Foam or 
ox = Tes — JO. 8-5500 1 and 2 BEDRM APTS 
ca = ant =r mee C . eas  — —— we ot ~s note — 33 oo e saa $49 0 . UTILITIES INCLUDED 
oo Ger «fice e- <7 Deeper er SD Se Pe—er ser 9. “s inap eh 4 io t : & Spri er 
—_——e 2S. Eee. ° more ee Om nrma emt oT = weet eer eee Caeterm 2 in . mm. 2 a es Ing Shonen Certer = 
;_ = os <- S----na= Row — = o hk Fouer tran wavons aa > paew apt mce- ce Ante N j = 43 ’ ¢hine Sever. an MAXAGEPS , 
HAGSS _ Ey ol —_— oa — > — -- e 4 ow — “5. oh - b— . — — os beaut Sew ee ey rms. with vee. tn tn ise elevator — - — > | 
"a ves opens we! a @— 2 = = wat = = ine 3 ous = tt a cloggts pe view SO mo ye ke a P| AND wit me 1 
“ Y~ 3 al == met : fee at TE 23 ? , aoa SS — 
Hint peessens — WWE GIVE SN eS cee a en Sn sho SOTOOS SLETAN DEA Para ore as mains wektrat “EMBASSY SECTION U T ranaportation 
, © am a — OS SLSR 2 o> BS yet oe Dt —» Fw x one 4s THE WARWICK APRITZ DEVELOPMENT 
Met cee of per Ge certs TUNITY FOR Gnd a a = “a ee 12 8m ie i> m. oy * Pe Renta! Office on Premvacs at 
= UNLIMITED INCOME aax “ae = * SS ar. eee See GEORGES ANE — Brant ee ats Sie ‘averosiing: Pouans:| 3091 IDAHO AVE. NW. .. 8327 GRUBB RD 
7, 5 . < Cows — = = seaeerst . one seth: salt i or ts. quiet. cool. wooded ares chil-| (BET yAss AND CATH. AVES) 12 MIN TO DOWRTOWE SILVER SPRING 
~ a ef Ou ison bivd. Oak st =e zit beth. elev. bide: sir air “2 Biocks Prom Wave! Research Lab 2 
| ease’ £ = a“. . ; : ave 
_ ae - - git - > e Worth | cooled halls. en service: “the Prom Bofling Pieia jU. 535-4030 
MANDEL. AD ; a. im. = ia BOSE 
- bath. Newly) S08_sRe snesping _ Eat 3% Large Rms. $72.50 , ang 
sealyn on Lee my Large Rms. $8450 Trenton Terrace ce As 
1500 MASS. AVE. NW. ‘ 1-2 Bedroorns, $72 70-$8! BD 
LL OTns. ct. ath OTUsTIES Ici 
tous }- COMPLETELY AFD TY ANT IC om 
, 4 5 AIR-CONDITIONED i? ‘Capitol st. JO 3-s808 modern Pusgrounc, saakins Sm 
siisties WIDRICH COURT tan pi. ant Seni! aoe on 
, DOWNTOWN LOCATION 30 5-018 . 
oo & or owt weet ett bedrm. large liv In the Center of Business. Loe Rooms, Huge Closet i BEDROOMS FORAGE 
ciarg =k =e - + oem . auth, 620 Conn. a¥¢. om dining area, kitchen and bath Shopping and Hotel Areas $87 50 AND UP ; 
— = fe oes Cal ee — rm. bedrm. dinette. ample 9 storage and laundry facili- 396 Units M-hour desk and Parquet Floors—Play Ares ———$_—_—_ ——— 
— & . 7 a-& x —. na a aa ~ met and beth: also effic; utils.. tehboard secretarial service Convenient SE. Location SEA0TH NS Jette ee Oe 
—__—— - Come a and ters ta COE ee Sh oe a ond weather ‘pene maid serv inc! eee Arledge Real Estate Corp. al “electric Eitcheneticn with Gin) NEW uasroven | Came Rot Cut Fe Doous 
ae a | 4 ”™ ale - : : ; conv |, - posa sun » Fv shop. t ° very raebse o Inc iuties 
Tr. _ [oe we tne yes ee =f oes ao fn — a - > ages Seas No cniidren. Bice cole. Refs 2333 Wilson Bivd.. Arlington dry foom. ma rvice evel SHOPPING i utilities: CD 5-37. 
STENOGRAPHERS ~orened eth he pets SE Se a er Rien | me 5 girs or BA 65105 JA 71-4448: eves 3-166 able. 200-car garage. $ Slevators EXPRESS BUS AT DOOR —#28 15th st . = =. 
’ Gon effaced. tates ou VIVIAN HOTEL — SS me emai Deel utile entrances on 1 BEDRM. $73.50 beth utils turn timer 
Gudent poune os «2 es ne - ou natin : — $i DEMAND ITEM ew ay he 33 an ro . OCCUPANCY CTLs INCL octe > 
Se = = lbeng te pee ee = ee Pe ee. ee, eee eH gt = DONNA LEE w & DUNLOP $8750 UP 8 LIVINGETON HD. SF 190 Waréer Gt Sw ot 8 
SS ee mF of be oeee @ 2 O88 Oe ES = dancin — hy —> - verte 1-BEDRM. APTS.-9i20 UP J0 2-311... JO. 3-638 ™—. ivy om. Eh ent Seth 
. - ae = : 2s = = = wre . ain - he: 
= se a = _. SS. oe foe. ST Se ont pn RA nae Suburban Living With fa. bs The apt. all utile. - Also, newly furnished ante with Wheeler Terrace, inc. a preminss Sous 
sees after ~ = owe — == > i = _ Se cae Je wie.) _- City Convermence maid and linen service 1217 VALLEY AVE SE i 72 
— see eee et eee DON'T DELAY 2 = te _— 2c ef terns coungiotaly —_ care | , 2 Bedrms. BLING FIELD —~TREA ay — = = es Senet 
ry ses 7 = -—. ee c ~ 50 'T NOW Sa = _ — Pe lurrt. oe “~tierec Fire 5 ge Laree Attractive *. rm Apts Manager 5 Otfice | Bedroom— $70 and Up het ~~ fore Gee Jantiter aut 
- a om os 2 i tien, ; Schools, Shopping . Mod. Kits Call AD. 4-3640 2 Bedrooms—$82.50 and Up mo 
<- 2)» = eae ee Ce _— 7 Si = Specious Closets a 
rwesceorarn = HOT SHOPPES, INC SS a CL DREN nye agn puoewmomade Laundry MARLEWOOR- 4) gy Be large closets, Ee 
-®? . | sm — G3 4 eet . = ? ¥ 
-— —— ~—s re oa co = Room IB -— SD et co BOLLING FELD AREA CLOSETS GALORE Cone 9, Sehoain, Bhaps and’ Transe cious 1-2-bedrm. apts “sot, whe tnclosed | oh 7 yard. finer’ tonvep- Gl én on me ST ee a 
- Seems Mecoae Ce Peomaenet - —-. « == —_~ BEDROOM — $59 54 : cx wy Aven. jumee Maple 8. eat 6 ee b chil eccep.rems Wa 
a Se Sere er ast —_ —— = PETS PERMITTED ME xW ? Sich. Churches , a Bi COL — S85) Foose at. ae 
ie 7 = = — See Sates SSE we Ce Apply Res. Mer . = eee 2 jo 3-477 | By) om. din petem. 
ae ; = s- ow Cm = == — ra ee <a at esl Ser aaees ae . c U n 646 Chesapeake Bk So 1-1610 —_— eee 
ats += ______ "a at Or i a. & - rr.- furn. . Sipe. ae 
pe &; Ss ee ee Un BRIGHTWOOD =) SHIPLEY PARK HIGH POINT “38 ti5 35a 
as ise Siew eres <t ae x mm «(WAYNE TERRACE APTS. RESERVE NOW! 


CONCORD GARDENS 


| 
i 
‘ 
7 
ag, 
’ 
‘ 


LOCATION 

a TE | som: pres re 1-Bedrm., from $68.50 
= = Sy TSE he 4 "he te 2-Bedrms., trom $80.00 
—_ 6.3356 . rooms. pas‘el picture 
= “Pit BE qo fac stop in pro Sollins 

be Cone. 3108 Det oF 

gt ow 20. 2-0135 

Li, 3-2913 
or Duplex api 


ata a) sae eeal ga" ae == Bates & Springer wath sess 


= aS PVUER CARBERS — = 


Sa IeDivi CAL 2 3 sebale Woks "PRIVATE HOUSES 
atl 6altremederm § facilities outs tt Ses  «: a R.. — — __ on 
= ——«" at Gee (0 appreciate ‘Rent laun xr-y _ hare —~ ittes | Reale aerate DUPLEX APARTMENTS 
:- Ph 2 “kone tractive 1. 2. and 93- rain. “ "| steal rans ae = ) 
BEDRM. APTS. DRM | 
2, » ee DISTRICT HEIGHTS: «AD 2-BEDRMS.—$89 First Floor: Large Living Room, Dining Room & Kiltchen. 


, 


ur 3 BEORMS.—$105 Second Floor: 2 or 3 Bedrooms and Bath 
pm Ry Furnished LOWEST RENT PR 


Se eat = real tr ar Avaftanes Each House Has Front and Back Yerds, Lawn Care, Ger 
5y— +~-*+—- -~ — , 399 West * age and Trash Remowsl, Ges, Water, Hest, Launty 
Poa a Se “ner aT beORM $63.25 Up euler o 

CSS EREs Sw stvebosment - - : : . 2 BEDRMS.—$75.00 Up 2. achitees and Repeirs ided Free. 

Poe oe = ; cabanas pe cra $81.50 Up ——DEMAND ITEM SCHOOLS AND SHOPPING CENTER ON SITE 
= er K. Sifts eel DONNA LEE 2 Bedrooms, $93——-3 Bedrooms, from $109.50 

ar Sek Hate Suburban Living With ALSO PEW FURNISHED aPTS. 
TRANSLATORS a) summer day como City Convenience | 
a gotens RE 5-8000 Extra Large 2 Bedrms. JEFFERSON VILLAGE ‘ 

Contest patente ces oo CGS Se ee — eae FOR BROCHURE AND | 84s, Schools, Shopping 1734 ARL. BLVD. FALLS CHURCH, VA 
Se we Ge Terese Semmes = we ete Gers tor FURTHER INFORMATION ‘ Children Welcome 

ee ag eee —a< = oo oF Closets Galore = * JE. 2-S500 Daily, 9 to 5; Set. 9 to 1; Sum, 12 we 
@egee 2 Meo Leceuner «° aakarul 7s ¥:= = == newt, Sur. . oor oo DISTRICT HEIGHTS | APTS. Soundproof, Fireproot ad 

< per emer —aec ss See Te. Pee 

Saas See ee = at? Cee EEE yy | PETS PERMITTED 

ny a BP a ee = me 22 Sone seme. | Furn.-Unfurn. PARK SHIRLINGTON APTS. 
——<sss= —— ae cit seman wg RESERVE NOW! 

RE =» end at ae tonal om - OS ee: | beh | ue 1) = ? Bedroom Apts. from $1279.50 
=e nuns men. © “Glen Manor Gardens MLL UTILITIES AND SERVICES INCLUDED) 

= to e- am car In Beautiful Silver Soring IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY 
— — le eae Completely Air-Cond. 

oy eS 3 BEORMS.—!% BATHS Completely Air Conditioned 
- dime $133.50 MONTH Free Private Swimming Poo! 


Res ie Wading Pool for Children 
LS ae Spacious roorns with an aboundance of closet and cabret 
Roomy kitchens with gerbege Gupmek, exheut 


- spece. 
BAD R| Mrs. Guy, wate Metoniiiee. tan, 9.1-cu.-tt. freezer-top Westinghouse etrigewtor, sap- 
Phone JU. 8-1297 arate broom closet. 


“OXON TERRACE, MD. MASTER TV \ANTENINA 
ome Ee BP PRIVATE PARKING ACCOMMODATIONS 
— =< = = Ge ge : ~ rw TILED CORRIDORS AND MANY OTHER FEATURES 
ok eos Monnet = es 2 a wm | : “foytnern wea Bg cea CONVENIENT un > 2. 
aoe " rs a» : : ~~ ae : MODEL APT FURNISHED BY M«4ZOR MASTERFIECES 


OPEN FROM 10 AM. TILL 9 PM. DAILY 


-— Oe oe ee | 


ee oa 
PHONE OR WRITE FOR FREE SROCHTRS 


KI. 8-1900 ; 
4503 31st St. South, Arlington, Wa [ 
Sy Contact os omens bos 


Ajit 


is 


Wh: i 5 ee 
rat ge Satan v ep 
Poets calls as a si 
i u 1 are tit i = . ret Lt 
+ ft niente , Bir it f sl i cin BE Oia Ht it of iM g iit 6 Oh ay 
Bin ig ae if aii fl th a Sine a CE (int ae rt 
Bae 6 ie ira cima i ak nega a) i aeerset ha: fia Le a 
od iin & Ae rail iC f i ee wi mn on rah (ar Lage Sy i viet a) it gt hihi ~ tk 
| cM 2 h i Hy | ie ty Mi ‘hil coe “ir A+ i a mh Hie ( ie Wee Eg np tea a (teat eisile a nf i 
i SeRERSE Hees: gt oe i AM 2E lip oo i A eau Ep SH ie > 
ae | uit iMtaeDials eae ; :t : ; : anh Fh a i i 28 hi iy salts ial in| r o tae ike Hh pal a | 458 2 rik ia 
ae Mh Tall lt ps y Tite snk ij. mil a ni . ak ind Bi - pet pel oa he | re tan a |<. atn.. 
Vs Eiht 9 ib le fgeh AL he 2 dpit phi Ha ainda 1 pram 1) HL 2S oly | te ie lee te he: - ; Hill gi 
i | { FReb sp Loiaee 2 a, Tl fit EB Ty Hie sll / #] yep ty a. Sette it bp mt ue ie Ma tt i » te § 
Faw ie * it Ze . 4 his LT: -- “ ots .4 in sult, . <i ” , : is 
Hd a ie ip th sl = 5 Ait § eI il ' ~ Mi Wei e F Hl at DRT ll pix focth ; BL i he ie His “fi Hh di : 
fli Sat ets | § ig), BE Hae iat ite <3] BE 24 iipay Soha, sll i i ela ites, (a il i iE pag i 
fuitnheat & eae sbi he tn irae 5, Mise g Pon 8 Nee “tli , ily litt 23 His i a a 
: ee he & ite i le , Eel Ponte Bite Pet, 5| feet roa felt ; tt A Ag (ie 3 it HS igi aa 
: See Py aay SLE seg Pa ut ea thst be aston isl ae dydiciiatts cia M i z 8 iy 
ie hae a Pa es fe eee ym tt ti i sa Me elit © his , i ae i 
MRE it. cP eee a al wl - ii aia =| "i ssh if te atl it ag iy ns rf ‘lett ik ba i ina 
| piidtack "? 4. § i : he ~ $80 mT) 4 he vv 2 5 j " 
ial a i 5 gi, Ease i } Hh aft St is BR dt ‘nl ti eae “eat be a 8 Ni HS i i at 
hE “af Ay arid [ria pope ant 2 y TURE Its ~ ‘pl I ri it * i a jal A; fat mets 1 
_ Meret a els H+ Ure vent itt ©), ai Me i wit ee afl ale ‘nt = _ i eh 
: ‘. vate i fie rr mg r ull : a uy eh . : SG utig if : ut 1 a nk i - uf . oe set at 
tof i i aa r if ; ‘a a th Mi : i ! na : ee a Mi 
pit tits hi c Att -. i" + oe f 4 ‘ HB A iy: "eit } i* af lifsat aT Vee rr : nl t rh j mM 1's ( ct t T 
Uh es a HL Hse fs cl Hh le Math ce lt. it Mj a i sy 
* | ae } , te ad ta 4 , AnH? r Tt pl! tog ate f bay il HALA 
iE iE ; Hl “lq oii! 2 ’ oT. a a} yé dé ih rh if B hs i War 1 is nt ul , yi § it ‘a 3 ali i Hii 
2 ee: it ra A Ent its ‘i iat yee “| hi s i ne Hat gin Le HHT tit is ji! i oN H ret 
Pont a “wer ee ay a i bot i Ht La Fi in MR nuit He nas ; d thik Tae. ‘i 1} ii 
ce te ee a Me pe amb uEL Eels rE 
‘ al de Hh " il r big ‘ if F lglte : , 
tye al cite ni iL ah a iol ith nae Mh : i iyi hi Alt tj 
bine tt ie iat? ie Tt ye Ma et : it i hu ii wal | ‘ ise ‘tif HE ¥ li ihe ia eat a ' 
Ae Hai = ul Uh itl Wbiole ER i i it i ssatlogs ty Be r ee ii oe ae a tial a iti 
ih ia alti i litt Py ie mba Aly Ulett Uh Mt aa tai th rh filet | i iyi $i 
* alt ill tt r ae ‘hae Hs 3 ue 4 A hh Nica i Ht ai i a Lis ote et iy fH ayy yl ihe leat / 
ra mS i : Ae ath ual ie sth ib at at A al hog i oe Hanae 4s abit 
ano Hiv J Hy LP aa stl is 4 it at AT fhe: iidgisdi, ry: < i at s 
ae Int babatalg| | ae a t Pash Hue alan tie Se the is fe Tha i 
ne ‘< vata 7 if ve i Bes dais bgt tt re i a no a i ine ei: a 
ah it ale Ine : ii tet lua" He ight ion pk oe 4 rh 88 
iy" yoke i! gt Pll iil a m te : he moe {Sea ib ait te ehh i § bo mai] 
iM befiy. He Lid , cea ' i. B a8. i +]. ve te : see i 
fs MY Ur g at a sa i : S69 
aytte “at of a" opr ot Ao oF i,3° “ewe 
he at 33 i. 33 + iS SA 
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pp eae eel 
ey 
. 3 


— 


i Me 


a 


Terms "448 
Se ar an a rs Auto, 1 
. oe, (een 
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2 


‘our. 
own. r. & 
ary 

| and 


~ t y h 
Tr . | 
‘i , tires, 


FIN ANCE 


G. A.C 


> 


— 


Ta. Nianteer “2 
Jel. TE meer 8 


Tel. € Meee §°R 


tEXINGTON PARK 
Tel. Greet Wile T) 


‘55 CADILLAC 
Convertible 


REPOSSESSED 
$3295 Total 


$e Geet ent 


BLASS & CLARK 


Cop soc Pa 


=. & ate 


33% Bere oot a> 
=e Geicten, 

Cot) 

2 


4.Dr. Caste= 
“v8 Car Me. 2171 


Andy Kelly 


129 K St. N.W. 


eseyreryeserssseresss 


BILL ROSS 


1400 —_ Ave. WLW. 


TENEMENT S EEE TS MERELY LF 


: . & 
“148s Krew : h 
382 000 waetisee “nacre €4558 Prete ork We Y, treads mt mander V 
_“ eCRes—Nesr wu fee we ce we =e —<—-— ter 7 = *s.. JACK PR pe ’ 4- ‘ y- —— hy 
~ ——_ soe at mon. Seocale 4 . <2 Sere (RET eotey—ie05 Bel Ale S-crl 4 Cre Orie lack few covers ve 
Dai ly “ar + oe, Brearr FA 2-554 sae 5 be 224 FLOOD PONTIAC were harties coe, Seas 2- Lach St NW. __AD. 4 hed $495. $5 dn. $32 Pie a “AS | aes wae Nts 
Tc owte 1 . ; pate: eemtresting interior tf as 3 L st "MOTORS. 2204 & Lm NW. 
— oe... SO sere Se ST Al “ ve 4221 Connecticut Ave a = -* a many ether erces- — Bh x —-? rans very 69 iaMa fey a. we . 
Circulation > acres Tere crete Soe eee Be ee sae AEC inwen JUNE CARS GSETED—Pagme op ae ee ste pessaty = ILIAMS BUICK. sth & RI | CS 
ques ery rt. seer io = a -_— ' > AP 7 eee ; on “1 R lete selection ‘ 9! 
23 =e © : : : ss EEE n. Low as $395 fom von o nr 
wat sh oo i SS Feta Sere Raeeerrs = ee wast ter aoe Sek oor r NK it j inc "50 ‘LINCOLN, $5 ON. ‘56 OLDS “88” Re best feat vMelell. Gee us to i ‘ 
weet caecker seet recul ‘ae « Bert of ge _ = =. a.” Bex: afe- [= wot cor we fost ¢ ores reel iT Geog Rove a Coeme. R.. bh. Hyrére. © -o the t deal Bote ei) us to- I 
‘ “ ne om TE 6 ety Sl) ven" ce «ef -eur car o. s oee — l cond autiiul car. $39 HOLIDAY COUPE : day McNEIL C, 7320 Wis —-—— 
a Cite See anf -~ —~_- ; et MOSSES LIVESTOCK PosD. ae es. ae 2a month. L ST. MOTORS. 2ind & ie aman BETHESDA” GET A Mee = AR-Bu 
; £ . o tr a @ L ww : at Stewart Buick, , 
Times Mersid GeeciGed of —— sous * 7. BORE -BON WARE ec? omal PENNY ENC — ae nen tel “a  Con- $195 DOWN pod i y P Catelins. Pr _bivd.. Arlington. Va. JA. Loa 
- od ms Cal Bt Me Pave More for Clean Cars rer eae = tap Goepeons aeons _ Fee. Bave 138 an. INES ma R nee OLDS BTA BC LA 
Ver? -#- ~ ace ms _- -.* ae - ae” u : . 
Gar by be Wh bos ee Goats PARTS Stevie OT Oe Po Coady goger cinering, .Drnkes._ WinGZE: $1800, immediate. etivery™ Ber’ pa cet gover) COMFURER paeaailr “AR 
> 2 = Se : BOAT AS Te fords er, Ww. tires. Take over) credi | call atic, power ster a Luxury equipped with radio heat- 
Phore easy Vmcrxts atl J S monthly, payments $199 ie credit apprevsl cal AD radio. heater, §21 er whitecwell tires, power brakes. 
—— PENNY MOTOR SALES ;Pefeait aperor -9882 DE ent: i 5 Psi ane 
Fos a ee be 9 BLASS & CLARK irda dee. AREA Se agar, 
—- . aa an hing Caspian crea 
St SSn~ (ems—erarsos Bag. Se. Ue oe Comey oss oe |. A. 3 6  PONTIA ss dy. new ite to Ro He 
~ ure =o ; Troaa. *2* Cor. MW. Cap. and Fis. Ave. NE TBO PO NTIAC Romshte | ee 2 , 
~ = 7 se eM 5406 Chevy Chase Chevrolet MILLER MOTOR CO | ont Oe t e market Hr 
“* TTS Wiecemsie Ace OF :' 
= CASH "FOR CARS. rei] 16 Florida Ave. 2 $195 FULL PRICE Monson font: Tit Sash west 
— Ww - 16 - G SIL “ner! *t 
Cm tin aed Fee Precedte re Pare ve aa EXCHANGE bd . aft . “55 ee er “iat &Y 1343 Monterey coupe OLDSMOBILE joan ~Buper oe ; Ne ée@n sayment on approved at) He F 4 4 PELL he 
_ > 3 -— a @ a TRARLESS. SALE 8? Arw* Make pieck and . es in we ad” aS hard a OE, . & yO ig FF eredit: nice green finish. 
AP ax .— -* on emeed : - = SIL DEN! mN Prades res: a ns gpte ~ Senet 4 brakes | HzG@ra-Matic. sun shade moskeant: 
Srv _ be ~- 5 4 * a men - AN nee 6 -L — = S. a CONVERT! BLE Port sito © =. © : —— ‘2000 7 wow. tires. 8 os 4 aove “Ver credit << a Repossess 
gun a“ ; “ el — 7 _ - - Ty | 
SAVE $3000 OZCO AND BALI 3 VALUE Sarre some eral heer $145 DOWN ss steerer Te a a” power The Auto Center / 
t + - Makiia®*” ~~ - ee eect 5. Shere corel eed frecy Sele’ th Mi -com 2 or. bi ° n ‘Oo % theast Location) 
ae eo ee ee ee OT [OP RAR PAD PasaSs See Ese ss eee Ee e20 JP ME ul 64800 
e B. —_ -- e~. st '| = ’ & owe ‘* evinces. pre -— cred an eS model “R' “e705” 4. 
one ~ . > + aoe Fae rs : Age oo —— es «© eae eat == res §=Ansoumecy sain MILLER MOTOR CO. door otqsign waaen: light ereen 
~~ — « ‘at. Sle Me , + DITY TORS ny = "Ge aso 378! 316 Florida Ave NE ; fully equ! bed , incluging 
- ~- _ - ‘ rarer e geet re i ; 4 . e ‘ ‘ MAS + t tor 6ipewonie — 1s a” livdra. power sveermeg &n rakes niv 
CM Male, Jt 2.7944 pe Oy a , # tied —- —— rr - = sapeeens ba mb MILLER MOTOR CO. | terms SiS down La. mao His> AKERS OLDS-CADILLAC CO. | "88" 4dr, beautiful 2-tone green 
= | = ; ay *- = ; RAIkES MOOT eG = Soe 2 ‘=< Li +-40m LER gerd vs Auto. 18th & Fi LAE Fairiington Shopping Center | & white finish, radio, heater, My. 
= > ~ * . a ° . . ?2 °4 — ™ - °° -— Sr'.g ve oO «" -” s RR } - ed ; : 4 
_ : ss . . o) Ms <x Chea watres a Ss _.-—" See une MERCURY. 56 Monterey Merce Coupe: Spivegower’ brebes. ver? = convert! le: vel low Gra-Matic, PRwer seerINS Excel 
a 3 < — . = ~- _— : ba -— ret BF sR TO cCKPCK athe -£ ow m Onty $2320 clean low mnileag sP black top. ood cond snow lent condition 
“— Tae Sitcr ot eer ec rs SY @@SER Geutred> - : >. —  &o9 = = Dip lor s° eavtine country EM —— . : “a iooed | ah and h.: 400 HO. 2- on after ¢ 
=. ee 2c : : 1 Y . Ss ase _ oe st 2G oer rr > 0 dean; equi ii, PONTIAC—1954 meres ef converti- 
ze = & Sane 7ar. - : rss ore" - vom ~ # : . a —_ 'OGAn 4 — Kenyon. Peck Chevrol et Seeccet— Si Wontercs 4-daer Pad ai and R. 1 ble: radio heater Seare- Matic 
a emg = . =." oh - 2 sae —se ees Stet Arliegion We sedan r ond > Mercomatic. ten are = — A pA tires cream with ereen 
™ oe - T<.7s _—+ ~ aon 2 pul Rif miv rar 7 a oO r} —1985 ¥ ‘oliday a 
POS Tees are OF TSE £4 SOR ROT —eee fer eck . cCasvectsr 6 See are, No. 128-8 Trade and terms. Mom- "couse: turquols hite wer- ARCADE PONTIAC 
¢ = _ “ : - . bas | ed £ wet ~ — . isc . wo . 
. A. — = some = = ma + A ' — s 4 -- « Ww Nil q Pay Up To: - we . a paces ~~ as ear" ; > ~~ s ave steering: power a4. $2298 ccc 1437 4450 14th nw 40 3-000 
- = = *. on: - _ : ? as 7? = ren‘? * one ze. = - 3 a : ~ — 4 Bt a 
: » — 9 - "CRD MEXSS ar < <TEscTER Pst hae » “- + -- oe = gov “5 a < ~~ Mon rse aoe — a A, a. a Capitol Cadillac- Olds Co. PONTIAC— 54 4-door Light areen 3 
<< o- s pa me a : —o = i «a. — 3 o. S04 om unpaid bal 1222 22n -2600| with black top: eauipped: custom 
BEAUTIFUL HOME ON 255 i=Ge me Geckos © AMERICAN TRAILER ie “=: $y oon 0s 5M. Baiutts’ MOTOR Cb. "M00 Bis packann—vea getan radio. beat-| Honey, <kice gclees car Loe 
2 owe 2an ve —- om, nil ler ertTs * =r - > @tvriee - Const ra A 74 ; » dra- tic. - tir 
~~ > Fs. ear Merptert = > PIED — = ——S _ mt ~~ ed weecrTey—<s 2-teme eood con Sreccatching canary veliow finish weeer BAST LIN PONTIA . WN 
_ = - Tr. _ “uiF RY co «6- « . . b is ia 29°S Ff F216 with black too rade d term Ss C 
=a grep . LOTS WANTED “ . . arts Cc ~~ —wy Se meee oe SLD OL 2-418 ___ No. 524-A $495. MONROE POR I. 6-7 Call New Fer 
= henified white . 4 on wai yeaa & —. om S46 SS Le 2  SERCUBY-"S Montclair Convert, 1237 pee t-West hwy.. Silver Spring. a tL Ln 
a — - soon teal “ta, “oat —_— s ace : - - ences ~_™ . a - on Simneet o Pull pewer Automatic _AAAAAAASA Credit Apprera!l 
—- - ow ‘ we - = 64 , x : -- : a & ca grr »ar at 
——-- _. - . - =« sa Ty Cc _—. £6 —— BLASS z CLARK = - > “ = - Santen "for — Sale ‘price STF DA XCKARD, $5 BN- $ L ki 4 Ask About Our 90-Day 
owes. + wate Sal amt Se WATERFRONT, SALE = TSA race = ond Fin Ave we CHEVROGET—3¢ Bei ar cater, TO PeS Gace ie wwe te 0 RDU Ultramatic. Oris, ¢ ooking fora > reeling: 
font ait Gherte- ba - ho SOETHERS STEER OF Fa _—. pa , 3 coc Tare pani aks eee GS fester A chres. wel-eest car. Bo 2S = ar $39 month al MOTORS. 2 Used Rambler? $ 
— a - &- age -— > - s = - lo = —— — - =e © oe = s1°™ “MoOsROoe PFroeD NG-—Mr neecs & goed home. 2304 & nw. aie 4 
nt ASON o>. Ty ~ . fete : —=—— ae « - . - = sates i— = oo «ove SO. 63000 - om wervine O26 Dus ‘ a 7. Looks a runs , . me Rave © shates of 
“ . ecreeg? se=t balt os “> =. . — > = petintely. $600. KI. 68-9681 before like new: sacrifice. $185 _Terms 4 53's, 'S4's. & 's6's ; . os 
i os Se SS oe SS (eet — tee Bei Air Sore Cee | A laa? Ce Me ef 
> ———— = : eg ee MG-A‘s ee ee | ppaae & L-owner cars Gj Mittory Penennel and 
’ tens YORTH BEACH Ma la- : : BRAND NEW 1956 53 $ Terms or Trade P 4 Out-of-Towners Financed 
ca ja. -* Deere ak ET : | 
SHA , CONV , —_t - — = = a. Ve > = =f. <% CHEVROL Wes’ etc oe sperts car ef the | $ FAIRFAX NASH 2 
Pe rs — ~~ ae Ma _ = — : ew oe ports Ges gn ° ‘ 
ated UNV eee eee, ee ees CONVERTIBLE ==: $2195 PLYM. « ati atte An y ée y 
—_— e ° « = (ht « WATERFRONT ett rss 4 WN 4 10 minutes from Pentacan 
>? - >. > z = : ; ao —- . . = sat 
® ee @ . $ 2C 1956 $395 p JE. 33000 Open ‘til 94 129 K ST. WLW. 
-— -- a” —S . ‘ < ~. = ? 4 - = . > 
_ TREES al pa —¥ Lr aT ROC <s of ag . AUSTIN HEALEY wvvvvvwVTwy 
Fall Church Area cee) Bode Bees > . - rered Compie’e FULL PRICE 
: Prenensom Coot 2 — ea¥ — cor _ rs : v7 a ‘Auto Center| >2985 45 DOWN "55 : 
7 3° 3.500 a. _ — AUTOMOBILE LOANS 8 Sa Pe Lesh: ; ——s e Man's Mode! >+—$3275 $ ; 
Moe a o — ~ ™ “o ‘ VACATION PLACES 73c - 4-a@ Oaus rl tT [i> _ — =. —— mu ae 5k 8 ~ s: aos wave =With Take over qusy monthiy payments 
= — . +—ér - 
SG:1 ESTATE WANTED o'=== aes Sas & Co UNION AUTO CREDIT See Oe aeengees © SOGEE 310. perfect condition. wisd “Manhattan Auto BEL AIR . 
--s - — ae bated 74 7 ~ : ™ iy _ r . . . : —s. ee “ss ys a ~~ = = ta 2° ar vrv're Impert wl an 4 "MILLER MOTOR Co. 
WL BUY PROPERTY See —- store a —a Get Ss toe? ris AND BR ST Wy a ee Ree ae eee 
Dect we Sere write ont Sock PETS Matis "7s PERSONAL LOANS La ‘mouler sports ears aes’ ¢ ee NA DR NW scaieal Gites. gaia Se 
"nen : _ — ¥. . " . sme - ——o : 8 -and New ¥ 26 A AR fo = finish. Perfect in every war. BR. 
ae - - > - “<4 -. rvrTe « e . . ~ e ‘ - —_— — a ‘ r 
—_—_—_— : ne sieee >. TTs4, _ * «aS — Sarrea*’. G2 MME ATE DELIVERY & bh. Pewerstide. =. tres. 
PERSONA. LOANS ea The Men Ca Pues ~ cr MINE MANHATTAN are eae NC FAIRFAX BRANCH Between Falls PLYMOE ore 30. S275 cash or © 100% guarantee. 
: is . = «4 o : : . Churct as ton <a or Lee highwey st - . - 
re ~ss oe x CER YSLZR PLYMOUTH. (MPERIA 140 : 
2 (OCasR ow AF nik : y . - - 4 . AUTO PEST SASRINOTON VEALER 1: ex BR ASCH 210 ‘cine . vote steering ae Re. sadie 2-dr. “6”, 2-tone paint, 
—— a _— ee o mer nt oot ee ee ee Aes. Va, Bing 055 muaculsic oneowner Wheeimo- | heater. Seld as is 
. : . = : ' . s . - 4.4ner sedan c : r heelmo . 8. 
“Sent Sealne Dem ARC Lowe TRUCKS. SALE 93 pat R Ses NW. = Mack ew ieee eueet NOSES ioe nlrase iow price Doe tree wairante. S189 
ne pe 5S. § 4 (@EVEOurT -  warevee eh —— ote ep «ex a CO. SS es WHEELER, INC. 
CocEER PUrs ASC —> 2-20 <=Y . =o - me Mia —  Seasiits k¢ WAS — 5) Sviendid cond Mydre CURYSLER-PLyMoO OTH} MERIAL 
- = |= Ns : “ at ‘ , + . Mert ir 4 ee st } al Ta . 708 ' ones " ; ute or . Terms 820 @own LA &6- : ee wh WG pat 0 7OR a Down 
—_——— *- ‘ . T7@n Reoer Aate. 160h end RK. I 
. nl . a J re ~~ a SSVEee ey rr a- o . : se is Eee « teat 4 be. . 7 -- r 
- -s — . : . > : : : - ’ $525 — ne - .asn— 4 ustom 4-4 . R ler y : 
~otat av sv? — P at Amy N MEAI Y | Li! 2. == = tation " vsnen Ff ; e Glacier SERV ICEMEN No Small Lean Needed, 
TURE one —Ee Ji . > S ; - ~ - scept.on c)tan o , ’ 
A at _ > ~ . . ™ 9<< ———, coe? 7 = a) $1295 Monroe Ford. 1237 mt DOWN age yy $ Full Subject te 
: = — . ad J - } . >? Leo wy. Stiver Soe JU s . 
WOMEN’S LOANS ree * —_ > , . -_ _ — AUTO CASS TRUCKS Mee oS ; = 81 ae — sere — . == = . > ee . - sraders and officers 885 Price Credit Appreral 
Specialt . ITED t ‘ recta—s : " ACK PRY LTD he 7 as < ans =» “= Holder “Palace c For Further Information 
Our “ ; 2d . ' — -¢ . : “5r 5 Tne every V¥SLaD.e : 
. 9 ; ~~. DASE P A nd a ie —— . . . : — =e a> ¢ yom OF STS... 5) erger rec eater. extra. Lis ae w > Sale Coll SALES $5 DOWN Call Now 
' = :7 . . . —— + | Out Bees * ‘ares een ree Te * errs rviee ET . 
WE CAN MAKE ~_ x es swt  AUTOMOSHES WANTED %% crater = ot -—— & - = } ee Mico en Mnanc ed "EIRK MOTOR CO J Ren ct.gr mare , 
you A LOAN IN i ge CASH FOR CARS HORNER'’S CORNE — =— s [ae a oP — — Sw tA sere ~ #: Ll 4.2300 With Good Credit. TU 9.4200 
: . cat aw £ : — “~ tice Se «* > aw 5? . enue ond 
os eS, Fh r kt a ee eee 53 3720 -Georgia Ave. N.W. .% 
7 Hrs. " rear eo a >t: ROA Wee C —T a? : ‘_— - SS oe _ Personnel and 
. «a * - . ~ J $ > re a {ac - - Sr s > . eae 
= >. “Ses .. 2-52 : i ao = « ss oe EYATIStLig S_ XE ss — ~~ * 28 -~?> , Call Now for Credit Military :: 
ant ss 22 sa =x cx Stas 4mD> ot ocr | HIGHEST SOIC BAIN : ~ = aa . “ss scx im ory Approval Out-of-Towners Financed : 
i « , a2 ~° a 7 -— > « an > . 7 : T . cy we: art ; 
Comtewerd == ee! tees Por Qo, Sieke eet Core el Ge —_ J = oer oe AD 4-375 Ask About Our 3-Day Trial 
Suburban Finance Ce. } [oa Loans 9A KEE PONTIA 2 Sf = + ae ae iSSi | Wastarer portent RELIABLE 
, ie a 2 e755 06 of beet .- ~ oe $799 
—=—8 Fat Sen Ber ~~ ; i eT eh «a ‘2. Sap ar . welt pee - “SS Fecriece —= Getee TF PARTIES 
“ae Geercte — 7 reat oad — (eeGeert er ost coé¢emee . ‘ Pur 2 Clue ooer Brit reeer . are | ss PR CE 
tow “ — oS +i PERSONAL 7 Te oem a a eS 8 SS OE vam FM fo take over unpaid bal- TU 2 
@wict:. 4 enfidewiral . 7. eo —y 4 > wos x! wor. = Ge Ave > = 5 
MARYLAND Cash Loan §¢ - a _=@ «x,t 2 oes wore ance om repossessed cars, 
“2 Gercia ove 850. o-cere® LOANS ° STWR — i965 Century Riviere 2-¢ 7 see Coupe: power stese- includes aes and in- 7400 Georgia Ave. N.W. 
TT” Dieeede - 3 ; 2 ~ 20a @7 rss" os , — 5 > rR es - f ‘a sure ° —— 
whe . MARYLAND CASH LOAN . JUST OPENED — —~ trie ant Graken JOS GiPhome MOTORS wc me. be acer pers Ma sic create, mee charges = . 2 —— - 
Wheaten Fimance ©t. 56 = sese Geercis Ave. *| A MEW LOAN OFFICE ——,- * a Smee Ps . ek nice var Sold “as i Take 55 Ford Customline 
? ‘ - . vg ry T - . rT ¢ha7 Mon wiy seyments f ‘ . ; 
cee — ie : sU. 9-832 : RESmENTS France comp. | A Ae CONTA O_o es me: * Th EE oe co 55 Cadillac Conv. 
oro 4 = -* .-, e , 
Residents’ finance Core ne &. 8 Bos } PADnE? Le Sr = AD 2-oe = my na Ph 54 Mercury Conv. EX TRA—SPECI AL 
let | re . a — $3 -— -~_n - " . on - 7 , 
Ea ft See ar 2 LOAWSs if 2 HRS. > - x —= power .— — . a > .« is hm Pont. Chief. Conv. 
_ - = — ——— - . - specizh ze 2 (ap ~ C ack lac Oids Co AZ ERS \A./> o,' . 54 Buick Riviera 0 
-~ Pace 22 Geos —* 2 ‘ . 
__ loons to women os — = sv tee on , =— Raiders 53 Ford Victoria 
> Riedie Sele See ss «© -~— * «fee = & =z ’ oa ya - rcoe! 4 . ll ulp- ‘S$? Buick $ Riv 
— & ar --*? « . a —e ome rf colare << >= | = wet cnn ~- 8? aa oe , uper . DOWN 
: ~ , (ec «oe | ao ; _ "oe ; 
-_— — SS “Tow GAC ‘Se mumer asus OTHO WiltlaMs Capito! Cadiliac "Sik. Co 51 Buick Super 4-dr. ON APPROVED CREDIT 
—— eer EM STE Jee aot & or ee | mt }-2 5! ‘98’ ida 
CONFIDENTIAL 2 P(e = ne sbeaes an & Olds "9S Holiday 
A nee : fem Z ’ =. : for credit approval, 
ae et a BS oF teen ON ANY CAR ON OUR LOT. 
LOANS BY PHONE erste Seerse 2: _f— oe s Ferd "S52 Chevrolet KE. 7-1522 
SOA SER mala ._- ree se) 7 
On Your Siguatare Ontyt SPS OS® 8) ee © fees ss oe BAINES Genver=: sadie. Santee 
.MAY BE A SENSIBLE SOLUTION : == > i lemnendiadiies E—~a e ea Bi NO 60-DAY 
$s t ‘ Fi kes “So <——— Rr rib -<o r —— fiat. Can't 7 nc. R T 
mance Ce . " marc ls : . | . = see. 
For paving bile. medical expenses or mary > Geeete fn -— eens — ——- est . Omar s (oa ss -s of b Perée- $95 Down 6008 Wiss. Ave. H.W. ED APE WARRANTY 
ether money probiems. Apply for any amount ia wet Bev tS Oe ete teed G:008 HAINES NO IMMEDIATE 
1000 § ™ « See.) Seer 6 tee 0 MOTOR CO. dete Bieteacbers ce CARR DISCOUNT 
at ewe Ores . cond >. WT 7 a 7 
pk ase Bee ae Smnrixe-GEll shen Gesee 08 AS AITING FINANCING 
ts =s— wf — Sule: : ez¢ ‘c= om a6 oc beet eater ; 
ee ee scat atom tw. 1-1236 FULL 100% D. C. OR VIRGINIA INSPECTION 
TOR etensbarg 24. "Ses pert ‘Sh neces ieee te nate 
Shee er oe a oe Lo i as immediate Delivery on Approved Credit! 
- is . * 3 * 228 
> Sime te green ant pels Sf telvet as ce Sp ck PAPPT S 67 CARS TO CHOOSE FROM 
. - a ~ae - spros. 153) 3 bed Pi 
79-8 6. * foae—.5 T oa & i 
"ieee | ee UTO 7. +6024 CENTE 
SL & 2396 at sedan “6. A rl 
i a . ; “ge ‘ 
=. =<. =| MERC gst, ‘cold oo tas cor Me 12th and K Sts., N.W 
rote ant Beaver <tigective wood ’ ’ . . 
MILLER MOTOR CO. fetrma tea Se oe © tiv. pee 
. — -_ —t fir Se S)-4. Gnlr 81195 
wt 3 co —— on T-are an¢_ceres Moemrer Fort | Menterey Hardtop. Beautiful OPEN SUNDAYS, 10 te 6 
ral ee peter slerring en¢ Srekes a Pa -Sen ber S.icer Gorm 2-tene fonish Fully equip Pre. .c>... 
wo" coe scenes eoTon *SeS— 5 a an aie ERAKAHAKIKIAIAIAI RIA TS 
* ? 
= — _ : = —— *s . 2 
pg I I a * 
incr 50° Se maces coun OTM Gicasae ae SO. +808 ti 
WTULLIAMS SUICK Deb aed BI sg; >» 
aoe oe SD $3) ; iomline ‘The eco * 
c * Caprertte ¢-r & temere <7 ieeer Seater sever | 
eg i ee oh rg ‘45 a oe 
. © = > = SA fe) Moore 
é Se a a se ee NO CASH NEEDED : 
a . — = - ae ie. J. 5 oes ~- es _— DOWN 
or? Tea "* 7 Mo ; 
AKERS Gude CAOMTAC CB ‘S2 FORD Subject te. Credit Approval * 
. — Seoseee Cre -- RE SSESSED Call fer Credit Approval { x 
7... Fs. z PC) Ask about 
‘= aie a lowe \ 3 trial rea x 
= .. ) * 7 
Suet aoe ees $449.50 TOTAL] ME. 8-2674 day trial an 
Eee aes, goa SO te Goch 8-S engine 2 day money back « 
Suburban C ach! ac . & S63 goer ene eke GP OS. Wilitery Personnel rantee 
~—-. 2m SRIPP SS i > ee — = ey 6 oer Boos gua 
; enol cECURI MOTORS Bierce Call Now 2-dr. coupe. 2-day money back guarantees 
Ty Financed » 
ems Lares ten een oe ewan ie fer es ergs 4th and N.Y. Ave NW Ask About » TU. 2-4200 
2 SS a @ Sn. 2 90-Day 
oa 
al IO Te 8 iii Pe TS A ES ST — a « . 
— — > on we antnery perscanel and ouvt- : 
- = a roe Mag ween 


“he 


™ 


. 


¥ 


tecteictciedctetete tlie te 


1275 


Full Price 


" Servicemen all grades financed. 


FOR CREDIT APPROVAL 
CALL 


IRV MARTIN 
NA. 8-4455 


12th & K Sts,N.W. 
Open 9 ‘Til 9 sai 


YOU HAD to get up ver 
@arly to watch Jayne Mans 
field play Cleopatra in 
George Bernard Shaws 
“Caesar and 
Cleopatra” 
on “Today” 
last week 
By very 
early | mean 
8:15 a. m. or 
so. if you 
planned to 
get break 


Crosby 


watch Mise Mansfield pla: 
Cleopatra on an empty 
Stomach, would you” 

occasion was the hun 
dredth anniversary of Shaw s 
birth and it was good of Miss 
Mansfield to crowd a memo 
rial to the testyv old Irishman 
into her busy schedule. Nor 
mally, she's opening super 
Markets or appealing ac Miss 
Subways or some such thing 
She ix one of the 
Gefatigable appearers at 
movie premieres, though. of 
fourse she never get. 
8round to seeing the movies 
because she’s in a play. “Wil 
Success Spoil Rock Hunter 
whieh. unfortunately. coe 
om just about the time the 
movies start 


STILL snes neve 
hesitant about praising a 
movie she hasnt seen to the 
TV cameras. or anythi 
*lse that happens 
around. Just as a cues 
say her acquaintance 


most 


Tyerr ry 


By John Croshy 


——_——Radio and Television—___, 
Mansfield ‘Cleopatra’ 
A Thing to Remember 


shoulders. Shave would pre> 
ably have loved &. tee (tee 
patra probabir spam im her 
grave @ but not Shee He 
vas a clown mm hE oun 
rights and. tke Mies Mame 
field. he would go te almost 
any length te Sttrect aties- 
thon. When Siew made fee 
roundthewerld trip in 1852 
ihe iat (arence Dear. au 
fhoar of Lite with Father 

"whe “as cropped wrth ar 
thriti« une aed hee 
‘ yt he 


27 6 


hy " and hot >jewd 


fe) 
"= 
- a oe a 


La 


miw ae=-s< 
.276 r 

Lirmmced 

make a ~ a 

the carprTas 
-kipming arewnd the 
of the shup Mike @ goat 


‘rent ryt 
he Ged 
deck 


SHAT HAT 
a. our eiperet 
nad some 


rast of : 


many jokes 
but we have 
Vet the 
« the fect that 
oped inte ene 
ot popular 
mene bP 
ow torres 
ied wrvimme 
piavs. | ; ce : iTw 


om Tae 
yrs 
Shaw hac dewe 
af telecteses sc 
PiayVrignis oat 
crTtaini: id 


Ww hen ° - 7 


ferences. he com 
being a “popular 
accoraGing te hr 
ures thet sean! 
img an audience of trem 
000 to 100.000 play corrs— 
mapetennt} om af om 
. ~ause ~~ rad 
' popular art me 
poPpealeer Heras 
in pepwiar rengen 
pC puiar 
Shaws levee 
veer enermeousir pop 


nia nr 


Television 


na am — WELTY 


Premerp Jame< 
C Petrie grestéect of th 
Amencar Federator: of We 
wriams. ieads 32 greap ef to 
mame naniseaders 22 @ ert 
lew of ther meet pepe 
Late 
3p m—BMALTV. ther 
neon File Festrral Bax. 
Radierd and Susare Saee 


whe pries ta ore ber ite 
“we p= n—BTTG. | Soo 


_ Feders aT es 2 eae 


128 » m—aATOr TY The 
(ciemures oe Reazam Fwwt 
\ woung eerf ewrape fren hs 


comple "etrare explorer Star 
mis trea tCireug? eguztier 2 


Tee ===fers gO 
te esire rx? 
—. The be Se 


Se =m —BTOPTT. Bere 


ar * > ” ind aw or? <r < Bt 


Highlights 


an Easters> feeeress &@ of 
“tieceet te seeet am Iedaee 
sa 2 = — BMAL-TV 
The Veice @f Firestone 
Gewest eoioast= ate Rebert 
Reprer tile ant Heté: Arail 
Ss we—BWERC TV. Wed: 
Wultiele wxierosns «x the som 


met of “TE Temerrew Be 


os =< —_WMAL-TY Pyle 
rar Ceci Parter stars @ 
Tea” Dei 


ae Larry Steerer? 


we =m—BTOP TV. Seo 


jie Oee Saumeper Thester- ‘A 
“sartarz s*aliad 


<« the +» ©2> 
se 2 belles wert for resem 


own 2 *aced ranrvead édetertrne 


at x orn" * 


> The Balled 


fed” darricg EB WecGure 


Hem Mergacn « gue<t 
(; are comedian 


Resell Lymee< 


ramagi~mg eitec of Mar pers 
Wagrercin 


 p m—WEC. Bandstand 
(Premiere “New live music 
show features the Nations 
eutstendiag same bands 
with Bert Perks a< emere 
‘echestras spotlighted this 
week are Gor Lombardo. the 
Dersey Brothers. Wayne Kinz 
and Preddy Martin 

Ls pnp mB. 
Pirke A new album. 
Voures of Patti Page ™ 

[sp m—WOCMS. 
pkemic Matinee: Bach. 
cata and Fugue. Beethoven 
Svmoheny Ne. 5 in C minor 
J. Straus: Jr. Motor Waltz 

wh p =—WMAL. Milton 
© Perd Wilt returns to bic 
recerd show.  Richerd ‘the 
carret cements on thei 
New York trip 

> mn m—WERC. Five Star 
Watinee Actor Daved Warne 
= th. bosf en 2 new pro 
gam of dramatied stories 
be eutstigndieg women 25 
thers , 

é p> m—WDON and WASH 
FM. Io the concert Hall: Ber 
ee. “Hareld im taly > 
Sauce “Eile Meidenieven 


hts on Radio 


Prokefief. Classical Sym. 


shire Festival: 


Srahm:s 
> Majer. 


Voice of Firestone 


Heidi Krall 


5’ p m—WRC. Teiephone 
Hoer: Violinist Zine Frances 


catth ts guest 


5 »p m—WGMS. Com 
“Tt Masterpieces: Haydn, 

te Orfeo: Elgar. 
Debussy, 


Concerto 
Children's games 


1238 p m—WWDC. Troe 


Detective: A quiet commu 
nity ic disturbed by the dis 
cowery of a recluse whe has 
wen killed in a desolate 
~Eentry hor +e 

46 lca oe — WRC. Com 
set in Music. Howard Han 
con conducts the Eastman 
Rochester Symphony Orches 
tra in a performance of his 
“Paine Concerte in G Majer.” 


> G % Im 


sCCORDING te Vin Gallas 
seer the seers 
toen is between two pommts— 
the Kine Cole Room and We 
Chez Framcers 
both lecated im 
th Claridge 
Hote! 
Gallagher. 
she keeps 4 
proprietary eve 
= tetr the 
restaurant and 
“<ktall Meunge 
72> (ee on 
aes en the 


rules the 


cots 
hand 
from pouring 


dining room 


clesed 


Lenmcheons and dimmers are 
new served at Chez Franmcets 
from 2 completely French 
menu. Trpical of the wait- 


ress stall ix Marguerite San- 


k- 
The Baston 
Symphony Orchestra plays 
Symphony No. 2 in 


a pp m—WMAL. The 
Guests 
are Robert Rounseville and 


new establishment— 
dictance in the aforementioned Chef Fran 
Rut Francots has a heavy 
im the restaurant affairs 
the Tavel M 
Chapoutier te selecting art and 
decorations for the remodeled 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD * 


eeee 


Wander, 


July 38, 1994 


- 


3 of Each 4 


U.S. Homes 


Have TV Survey Shows 


The Census Bureau said yes 
terday a February survey 
showed three out of four Amer- 
can households« have television 
sets. .1t estimated about 4 
per cent of the 4428 million 
households had two sets or 
more 

The percentage of house 
holds with TV sets. was a six- 
point gain over a similar sur 
vey made in June. 1955. when 
67 per cent had sets 

The major gain was in rural 
areas. Fortyiwe per cent of 
these households had sets last 
vear and now SO per cent have 
them. Metropolitan areas rose 
only from 61 toe &4 per cent 

The South still has the lowest 


percentage of households with 
TV—@2 per cent—duat mm re 
corded the largest gain in the 
period—nine points. The North- 
east. the leading TV area, rose 
from 80 to 82 per cent 

It was found that 78 per cent 
of homeowners had sets com 
pared with 6 per cent for 
those renting homes or aper 
ments 


Japan Has Heat Wave 


KAMAKURA, Japan. July 2 
> — Sizzling, 993 degree 
weather, equalling the high for 
the vear. sent 670.000 people— 
by police estimate—to Jape 
nese beaches today. Trains car 
ried double normal capacity. 


——» — 


iM PERSON—TONITE THRU SUN. 


w 


MuES” 6 “ROCK W ROLL 


WITw THES SMASH SEVEN-STA® SHOW 


PASTiNg *oe , ; . , ain : « 
oo as atter? last 
a ax Be Jerce Carr 
seek Gemoee- 
strated the fact that walking 
ali ever tewn fer feed and 
™ ” frolic is 2 pure waste of time 
ae shee leather 
- rr : a ent - et 
Led > hod ~~ * _ wr + ad Sire? cons rs oO ne : — - " . -* - 
~o- Riee Cole Room he produced mang Cste Reem see ES “ 
warts bald and blended to be °2C* for 2 return engagemen 
gm his evening A short 160 —Ome that will ‘provebiy jas 
_ : for nv month< 
STRESS STe*Peee craereese secon awar Chef Franmcers was ‘Or ms ‘F mt . 
uaces ~ gious, | Lanoneste In SO Jovee wart & Dowwe @ 
. , - -» * < : "= + . 
- a _ ‘a - - . af 
ore ~<ed duck ngonthe-oar \ pe 
but you showld hear 
She he< 2» lot of nee 
and with the help of 
nr > 
— > 


Catt ot Oe Bakes 


Shaw is about equal to 
knowledge of those mo 
She hasnt seen. It wae 
a fragment of Cleopatra 
it was richly rewarding 
those students who 
watched Vivian Leich. ‘ 
Bloom and other le«se: 
tresses struggle » 
role 

On. | lowed it. | 
ft she said afterwards Y some Ga 
Jack Lescoulie. who 
Caesar with a laure! 
On his head and a mi 
phone draped around 


dele Barst. whe was bern 
Beiciam, speaks French Se 
entiy and knows « Gee wine 
when she serves i. 

more or less of 
2 permanent fixture at the 


avpdiences< of 


Three Shows Nitely: 8:45—10:45—12:45 
Price Policy: $1.50 All Seats 


Onty $2 Men -meer tor ‘eed end be-~eroge: Sunder 
One Ademrsece A Mumemem oem: you te roman fer afl 2 thee: otehy 
RPA RR fink Weathers 


Josce Carr, 
Sper al PD rman t co low Perr: 


5 aad 2 = & eee 


poe "Manche - ~ — 
we er’ 
the “sett 
<nging 
eT ere 
materia! 
pianist Dick Koons 
fine performance at 
ting 


‘oe 26 vim ane 
ing 

After 
aga0n we ie 
Tome ‘oo “ear 
"Z5.y wang 


ng —~p  - hax x 
cerkta:! lounge in 
the new and more 
‘ ef bar-<:tter Jowce 
Monday Radio Programs Coser Set @ Giiitest wasted 
alinati —— met 2 simele cab fare 
Baws. = Wee ze wre? <ED ~ ont 
Gallaghers extraordinary 
Same me ree ee ee _am Ve AM 1308 Fl 96.3 2 Warr, is @ calculated move 
orumarily aumed at promoting 
the pew Chee Franmcets. tact 
epersted under the longer title 
of Tree WMoux<quetaire. 
Onn'y ore Te <aqe* 


‘urns 


rLery 


cor 

Litas NOoTes 
Mona Carroll, ABC-Paramoun' 
singer and a beauty. is the 
headliner this week at the Le 
The mew revue is pre 


(Dy Ment) ae 
Sits ' 


ABC) 
5 WMAL-TY 


Today—erery day—listen to this new kind of 
radio show! Four top-name bands play your 
favorite music 2 hours a day, all week long. 
Celebrities, like Oscar Hammerstein I, 
terviewed by ““Mr. Music.” Johnny Mercer. 
Spend your mornings with LIVE music on 
NBC BANDSTAND! 


tus 
sented three times nightiy .. 
its rock roll at the Casine 
Reval with = good half dozen 
advecates of thus type of enter 
taimment highlighted im the 
Sherry Britten. sage 
the strip. bas been 
at the Old New Or 
Hans Lichtenstein 
the Old Europe Restzu 
returned from Eurone 
yesterday ieagded with new 
wines and recipes fer thie Ger 
man resl_auran’ 


in- 


Filty Teen-A gers 
To Compete Here + 
In Roadeo Test 


Pity teenage drivers—one 
trem: each state and from Ha 
wan and the Dustrnct—etl! com 

" pete Sere Aue 6 through 9 m 
the Fifth Lanual \ational Teen 
\ze Reacteo 

The competities ix hbeid 
roeeer the ‘\atien ss safest 

ap Sung Griver. He and the other 


the new 


ta 


Jumuer Chamber of Commerce | 
m ceepersticn with the Amer 
* cam Trucking Associations. Inc 
the Carysier Corp and the Li> 

, erty Mutual Insurance Co 
The District entrent = Kea 
oeaet A. Piamumer. I7. of 128 
“> of oe. Maryland will reo 
=o; resented by John BR. Halistrom 
Jc. of Baltimore. and Virginia 
by Deegias B. Lee. 15. of Hope 


wel! 


"Tneat erCcin ’ 
News Me. ody Ranc; 7 
Great Baderdiasvelies bh 
Willard Watermar Jor: 


oe - Coutte, 
vr Al 

a none 
Da’? 


“es grening Sherk Fam Petr 
Movie. Nees 
mv So-ine 
*TR Bo Boxing 
re 


4* ben Pa. 
° Khalt The Ruse ee 
erne? igen” Ba! Pame Tbe Ros: - 
* Sore New PeaturamaXers Rex: 
P'l\Peacurame =. 
Peaturars 
ot ke2 Peaturams 
Sign off 


PENN TY co. 


|-Meur Service 

Sets fixed in your heme 
All Werk Guaranteed 
Servicing 0. C. and Md 


TV REPAIRS 


ln Jew 
Ome 
cous * 9 
ARIAL TY 


Heme 
iw lLerer 
ant Perw 


267 1 & AW 


10 AM to 12 NOON, MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 


=NBC BANDSTAND 
—— ___, WRC 980 


for full afternoons of great listening! 


_'3500-3:30 FIVE STAR MATINEE-—Todar. “NIGHT ~* 
OF THE EXECUTION” BY FANNY HURST. 
DAVID WAYNE. your host, introduces live dramas 
based on stories by famous author: like: Faith 
Baldwin ; Kathleen Norris; Edna Ferber: Adela 
Rogers St. Johns’ 
3-30-3:45 HILLTOP HOUSE 
3:45-4:00 PEPPER YOUNG'S FAMILY 
4:00-4:15 WOMAN IN MY HOUSE 


CONNIE WEBBER ~ 


Be Cover @ Se Nininem 
wc Annapolis 


nae. Areapehs 


eg 


Donna Douglas 


2414 14ST.N._W. § tecton Pest ana Tiers Beret 
Tusrastoed beams Grirvery. ad 

Yeur choice of 

any drink listed 


Starring sh OW 


GALE STORM 
CHARLES FARRELL 


TV's rollicking fun fest . .. 

The laugh-a-minute show! 
‘ 5:00 pm 
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 


5 AM. te 6 PM. long-time, 
all-tame 
favorite 


senais! 


Traverse or Side Draperies! 


Have them custom-made by experts’ 

Call NAtional 6-9600, Extension 444 
anc a” eaperece? Grae eg oerrsseeoe &  o wee 
Yor "Orme nee oe wee eens eT oes ae 


oniers and. help wou with your seiectors Ne ettdecer! Geg 
ror~wen er eevee 


NEW TIME 


Tw hes 3 


a Ss 


Weshegtes, Th. Oh. and E Se 
Leagiey Perk. tid New Momgshee Ann and Ueewenty Loe 


wtor.-tTv 


" @t Breeeces “owe 
@gececeo 


Ld 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD | | 
39 Monder, July 30, 19%4 . | 


How Lo Keep Well wv rectoe x va rene | 


PILLS FOR LIGHT gists hope to prevent diseases ducing a tan before going ovt 

TT NOW is possible to create that are produced or affected of doors 
& chemical barrier beneath the by light. The filtering product +4. barrier ig manufactured 
Skis te screen out the revs of alco will help those whe are through the use of antics 


the sun. In this way. dermatolo ti to ultraviolet by pro | 
—— = = on none seen, Focnanent larial drugs. This side effect of 


ACROSS Selutiod te Saturday's Purzie these products was discovered 
I Formal wear 29 Pennant« apr isis SISMESIP iE: by accident several years ago 
i ejait . ren to a person 

GArmy beds 40Commandea Whit : 4 : ‘ts Atabrine was given to a 
10 Change 41 Longing ™ sh 
residence rollog ; Jian Teo the limit of spece. ques 
14 Use 42 Serer 'ty L tions periaiming to the preves 
1S Woodein . fron of disease will be on 
16 Rene - = Be So t sHered. Personal reploecr will be 
: #4 Herring | $ mode when reture stamped en 
, sauce ; eelope w iaclosed. Telephone 
45 Robbed mquirves sot eccepted. Dr. Veu 
47 Freight | Detlicn will not make diegecers 


or prescribe for indivridud!l dj 


SS © =o 

52 Fireside ++ 

M4 Rend A ——— - 

suffering from e@ skin disorder 

aggravated by light. the patient 

acquired a yellowish tinge but 

the dermatitis failed to appear 
© Buzzers when he was exposed te the 
‘2 Story line sun 
43 Takes The physicien. inowisitive 

ur®brage about thic reaction. gave addi- 

44 Consented Uonal tests with related anti 
44 Son of Jacob ™ilariais (aralen and plaque 
6? Macticates nil) and similar results were 
2 Flevate © tained. Later it was deter- 
51 Cereal mined that all three used in 
53 Uinlate combination will preve more 

' <a ; $5 Singing effective than one 
8 Measure ~~ =aien The rationale behind this 

ong . r s6 Thin hoard chemical barrier has been es 
9 Places ST Auld Lang tablished. The energy of light 
Indulge in fl rm i inversely proportional to its 

oIract a 50 River: Sp. ‘ve length. The shorter the 

[Leaves out 3 ' §1 Potnt wave length. the greater the 
energy. Ultraviolet has a short 

> > = ie wave length and when ab 
sorbed by the skin creates 
enough energy to stimulate 
certain enzymes which are re 
sponsible for the toxic sub 
stances that aggravate or pre. 
cipttate certain skin diseases 

When tablets containing the 
antimalarials are swallowed 
daily. a sufficient emount of 
the chemicals reaches the skin. 
forming a chemical filter. These 
products change ultraviolet to Fiz. 7 
fuorescent light which has & —ao 
longer wave length. This modi. MARY WORTH 
fed sunilicght.is toe weak te in 
duce the undersirable chemical >. Py, 
reactions. 

The anti-nalariais will have TH MISGIVINGS, 
many uses in the Geld of der. 
matoiogy. They will help not 
only those whe are sensitive 
to light but wictims of ercne. 
ecrema, hives, pityriesis, lupus 
erythematosus. and other forms 
of dermatitis aggravated by old 
Sol 

This new syndrome (ight 
sensitive seborrheid) was noted 
originally in persons whe de 
veloped an eruption following 
exposure te sum and shou 
giare. A few broke out after 
sitting under a fvorescent 
light 

The sebaceous glands on the 
face are involved primarily 
and the lesions usually lest 10 
to 2) days. Improvement was 
noted in 86 of 92 cases when plying pressure or through 
the three antimalarial prep- massage. Exercise may 
arations were incorporated in strengthen the ebdominal mus 
to a salve and applied te the cles. which eliminates the sag 
affected parts 

TOMORROW: Our weter de 


monde 


frase? 


4 


K. W. writes: Is there any- all the time’ 

thing te spot reducing? REPLY 

REPLY | Ne The normal limits of the 
This method is advocated by thecal metabolism test run from 
slimming salons but physicians minus 15 to plus 15. There must 
are skeptical because they be ancther cause for your 
have mo proof that & works. fetigue 
noe Sees net melt ewer 67 SP" _ccpeyes ws. Ooee Ree 


BEACH and COUNTRY 


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located on Chesapeske Bay 


will actep? «@ j Pee Ter 
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of applications | MONTHS 
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A Nuewber of Smell Craft Awelleble t+ Menmbes pus 
43.F¢. Deen See Cruteer—Privete Pier 
SWIMMING—HUNTING—FISHING 
CRABBING—DINING—DANCING 
PRIVATE DUCK BLINDS 


1s elles om Gey with becwtifel White Send Seeches 


AW 


iY 
: iM 
PiPidaas 


| 


$2.50 A WEEK GIVES 
YOU THIS AMF DeWALT 


DON'T GIVE UP THE TRIP! At HFC you can ber- 
row up te $1999 te complete your vacation plans. 
You get friendly one-day service . .. variety of re- 

Your HPC man. DeW alt Atterhments 
arrange your Vaca- 
thon Loan today on 
terme thet you ap- 
prove. Loans also 
made to pay bills. 
repairs, shopping 
expenses, or any 
good reason. 


RADIAL SAW 
Te wo VER 


METAL CUTTER 
TILTING =e 
rl : 
—— 
GRINDER 


5 a 


Be we emcee et f oom 9 fre cont we beted @ 608. lew eg 
ow eT me re me fees i EO ame "2 enter aly om one coer 


a 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
nl Monday, July 30, 1956 aL. 


By Harold Gray 


- : - complete tr nt erteer : . 
; inatine : ttlen tee much JUNE De TO JTLT BD Dencers Tete «rt 
7 — ; : r + > =. ¢ HM.M 
seen he bh Gain Let a 7 GOT QUITE 
om the treat in i : oo «= ’ . 
your work relen eas In pursuft rue Teckir GiRi 
_ APRIL 22 TO MAY 21 (Teurus)—Pat vemen: wae : —’ “4 
, ; “ 


off things pou should ¢e now migh AUG 7 ‘Lee\}— Take 
> im lees of valuable (ime. prestiee “8T* “Ot Creams of fome and = 
reck vou Trom 


en interest in unfamiliar matters. BO" Cont sidet 
wnusuaiiy handy “SS Persenmsl worth end merit T 
rth of hard “ Beteriety 
_ . seche) get ers. ete 
™ TT) : 


Rewe : 

Take some tine (iar @ sapertani 
oy, Der Gevisw trem tir 

fhe verm treet’ 


Lina 22 To JUNE 71 Gem'n Tou corer 


*, 


A Knowledge of Life 
Means the Difference 
Bet C ce. manne ss | 
sen ~ anh ' [rk © + « —_— Baie tte _ Pe Weer ne | . | 
Success and Failure! seady and commendable action @ate- a —_— sa i : 
° been s tT Some 7 . 
. Teattr sre - 
Scientology : | 


telligence 
mends homes, holds jobs. 


"SCIENTOLOGY AS 
- KNOWS... mom se 


- ila co METROPOLITAN 
SCRGOL of LIFE PAINT COMPANY 


™ Free Evening Classes 


el 


roreases n- cneenempemeeunattittiaasnaensiimeninn —_ ——EE 
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and ability. 


SDR aT HES STILL NOT THERE 
\ ie! ‘LL MAVE TIME TO 


O 
o Oo 
oO 


. . A 
SRtt PARKING AT All 3 S° Reet : 


By Al Capp 
rsTHaT Y 6RROANNN/S 


OAD LADY. | THEN I'VE LOST THE 
SHE'S TWO MILLION |} 
TAKING JUST MADE”? — 
2. NOw IF WE HAD 
MINUTES A REAL 


BLAST YOUR POINTED MEAD. 
MILTON — My TIME’S WORTH A 


MILLION A MINUTES’ — 


HIGH'S |= o=+ 


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‘VE JUST MADE 2 MILLION /. [- 


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CAPITAL SUPPLY CO. Call LI. 6-7100 


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CALL. TONIGHT “il 9 P.™. 


AN INNOCENT REMARK THAT STARTS A 
GAIASTLY MOEA BOULINMG WV FHIAT GRIZZLED MEAD. 


By Wilson McCoy 


| 


| 


Li. 7-1359 Li. 7-1360 
1506 BENNING RD., N.E. 


Neat te Corner at lSch & H See. WE. 


Best Way to Kill Roaches and Ants 


SOPEN TONIGHT ‘TIL 9 P.M. $ === = 


kill these pests wi? Jensen b 
Super Xe React. : 


NoReact » a wihie cercus > 
substance wrict tea aroly wilt 
a hush Fhe ganas FT 
_ @res to farm 2 colores offer 
=< 


= ~ 
12 if BAW 


+] 59 95 = comtact ineertirnie that & -* _—_ ma 4A 
: Stars effectue fer merit : $ ase 


* € wlonate 


7s 4? . 4 Cycle 
Cheten Eng--o 


—— —_— — 


By Jimmie Hatle 


‘THEIR HOMES COULD BURN 'Y- 
COWN AND THEY WOULDN'T 
ONE HIGH FOOT~NO RAIL MIND IT AS MUCH ~++ 
TO PUT IT ON =+- < 


THEY'LL DO IT EVERY TIME 


bugs and other crawling in 
eects. 


Portraits 
By James J. Metcalfe 
Protect Us. Ged 


tnniy “\eoReaerh we cupoeart 
seis. Reeth gee ool 


a an¢ cabinets uT Cemmean Sense UV av 


_ whereveT PEL see Cee Uae ms wi you use 
Iehusten’s Super NeHoeech, 


sus 
= Deut, KioRearh areund table vou dont have to move dishes. 
= apes \3 sets and pans Simeoly seoply 
a. iegs ané courier Oe STU" \. Beach just where you want 
_— aii nea eee mame nil oo i the invisible coating stays 
1956 BRAND NEW IN FACTORY 4 wae = Fs fee ov > in effective for months. 
Guart agenst crawling in 


20’ G.E. * eat Eatin eCrctive sects this commen sense No 


Nefeat & aie 


WINDOW FAN > agains! rewstant teecees soe Beart) way. 3 ounce 80e, pint 


. $59.95 7 Gers, sleertfish, water, bed 1S quart 19% 
eg 


WO ree ere, « Peer, Nort® Bia mg 


~~ Se Wee 


“Weedwaid Ath tip, 


“ese aot “A exarcre 


SAVE ON 1956 FANS 


GE Utiirty Fan S$ 553 
Kitchen Fan ee | 


ro i ya 
x S235 a "wes | = 
Spence " | 54.95 16” GE Oscillating. $22.22 
| S@9S GE-Twin Reversible $35.95 I> 


* fora...| ine 


: 


¢ 


TOO Ok i ok kk 


akkkke 


* 
10” GE Oacilisting $20.09 
seams emt WOTE| C4SEWAY FRYER” 


We thank you for our 
weather. God ... What- 
ever it may be ... But we 
implore protection from 
~s« The storm of tragedy 
-«« Let not the wind be 
furious . . Beyond our 
strength to meet .. 
Until our homes are 
nething more... Than 
rubble im the street... 
Let mot the rain become 
a flood ... That washes 
us eway ... And drowns 
eur hope for happiness 
... Phat means so much 
today ... We thank You 
for the sunshine and ... 
For every rainbow bright 
... Amd gmow and sieect 
and hail and fog . . . What- 
ever day or night .. . But, 
oh, dear God, protect us 
in ... Our peaceful at- 

. « . Against 
these sudden elements ... 
That can be too severe. 


Coerriaht=. 1954. Pield Epter- 
orieee, Ine. All rights reserved 


“4 


a EO FEATURES OT eDers th. YORLD RiceTs 


p 


RBs eit bee 
“It's the only good picture of Cousin Jason his ma 
could find!” — 


; 


THE MOUNTAIN BOYS 


f 


7-30 


“THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
Monder, Jule 30. 196 


82 
The D 
Have A Heart. Gents; 
This Is Torture 


THE man who has to stay 
at home and work during a 
hot Washington summer 
should be ected by law 


iad the 


hack tantalir- 
ing picture 
postcards 
from some 
lush vacation 
spot. On my 
desk at this 
moment are 
the following 
Rill Geld - censived 
in the same day's mail: A 
eard from Charlie Campbell 
postmarked in London telling 
me that Brita.n i« delightful 
at thie time of the year. «a 
ecard from Yardbird WC 
13507256 postmarked Paris 
stating that the French cap? 
tal is ditto in any season: a 
letter from Alec Henderson, 
vacationing in Norway. whe 
says he sympathizes with me 
and is therefore sending 
along a joke I can use te ease 
my labors in turning owl the 
eolumn 


rubbernecking at the scenery 
somewhere between here and 
California. also sent me a 
disgustingly inviting coler 
postcard. but he at least had 
the decency to put his tem 
in plain English Harry 
wrote 

“Stopped for gas in Gas 
Kansas. te &)] our gas tank. 
and almost got stranded. It 


turned out thet there 
gas station in Gas. Joe bere 
ly mtade ff te the erat teem 


Service” ” 

Thanks leeds for « 
lovely picture poertcerds— 
you sadrsts 


cc? 


TOPATS BIRTHPATS 
Greetmgs tn Sewer ary 
Denald A. Queries and Per 
fesser Casey Stenger) 
ow 


GIVEAWATS 

Reautiful welltremed 2" 
(Randolph 3 10 CLIT err 
3758. between 8 am and 5 
p.m). Will deliver cate Werk 
kitten (Adams 24557). Beew 
ifal kittees. tee oF Thee 
pure white (Lmien 635665 
Aesorted kittens. aff peetite 
spate] pupmes Hemierk ¢ 
3087). Adgerabice kttiems and 
or fme male cats (Metreape 
tain 85285). Mother cet and 
or kittens (Hudeon 3407 
Pretty dog (Taesier 945% 
(tm earch of tedar's Gree 4 er 
letters. 2 Geller aor tee wor 
inclesed for Children’s Bee 
pital.) 


throw 


cor 


SIGN LANG AGT 
Te adwise meter 
emergency park ee 
thems, the Destrict were Oren 
porary tcar@beerd) sigs 
They read: “Eeeergeecs ‘Yo 
Parking Afier™ A biaentk 
space % previGed ae thet of- 
fietals can spel) out when and 
for how leng the restrectioe 
is in force 
Thev used to pos’ the sogrs 
wh the DRiank seere Tt 
blank Mens seeterieie oot 
tickets because they Geen? 
understand these con’ reong 
signs. This Gepertement com 
plained. Se oeficiels DSeges 
filling in the blenks 
Last week. on Comerrtioret 
was beer 
tickets & « 


at 


rr 


c*¢ 


“After 73a. m— + op ma” 
Tan mean any la & Pee 
man chooers ET te secen. Lo 
less a Gefintie date and tom 


New you can eriny the modern convenmence of an ec COROC IONE © Wn 
hore ef lect cost ther room en conditioners. You fey meer 
cott: pecause a Gibsor home ar conddeoner hoot up woh your Sore 
A Gidson imsures complete cooling @ every room you te «6 


| on a 
reqister 


— 


an beget err? 


: 


ISTRICT LINE byBitlGold 


are clearly stated, it is unfair 
trapped by 


trkvts lost week. but 
give pou eae iittie tip 
i get ome several rears 
age fer porting co «2 Wow 
i—- & s spet pested: 
“Teerrecece “Ne Parking 
After Teesder.” The judge 
oi “1 wealtd alee beve 
_eueeed © meant ‘leomer- 
rem” rather than ‘Six days 
soe” Cease d@ieeeieeed.” 
cos 


Alpe Stir 
Wes P 32 
EBoct tr ZIer 


Hanley of Tit 
cire'ie, Falis 
ram ie this ete if 
Reare whole ber busband was 


there with the Air 


* 77 @& 
ac aoe d 


the &vear- 
eur dipie 
talhan capital. 
for ae one 
took off the 
ne glasses he 


* ’ ad 
of 


screere. “Tee Mek eulte 
HiGerest te =e toe. with 
eet =r csieeees.” 
ces 
THESE WOovrkNs 


ee Warhoeest 


TIMES 
published 
Assoct> 
enm- 


ee "-"*errariora 


s/7 W ac hint: 


"™. 
— 
“These Gere. etter «& 
hee asad weite have 
anemd@s: that rem in the same 
Ceeeeti—ee tee trier 
ee ot.” 
ee? 


VAGRANT THOUGHT 

Was be weether fore- 
coaster eaght te ask te te 
‘tremsferred te another city 
The doesnt 
= Dee. 


- 
mJ 


wT? # rere 


te agree wit 


Rep. Williams’ 
Talk Scored 


By Colleague 


, ‘oo Jereew € oneresseman 
hes ta400 2 Southern colleague 
- tak f “eg «4asntigue 
SMurrYsS 7 2 speerh 

Reo. Frank Thearpeon, 
DN J) qewestioned the sourres 
usevt Rep Be! | 
beers «(> Wass m @ Heuse 
serch last Wareh. Williams 
ousted an artele frem the 
Eeryriegedia Brittanua which 
seat that mentally the Negro 
3 onfevrwe te the white 

lm bes speec’t Friday. Themp 
wr et that (he ecfrtion 
~~ the eaevetiepedia Willems 
eutt@ed wan pablisted im I9T! 
the basi= of the article 
soe @ book written in [304 

"le the vear in white that 
hook wee poblicied. J564. less 


” 
7 


J - 


5 sorR 


pounce omt 


> aad °e- 


 teee S eer ceet of the Ameri 


Secrees could read and 
aries.” Theempeem said. 

Tiearngeen quoted the latest 
e@tme of the Brittanica, which 
sae¢@ there « me marked differ 
ccuee = temete intellectual 
sewer between Negroes and 
or re 


(eT 


Don’t Wait For Higher Prices 


RE-UPHOLSTER NOW 
AT BIG SAVINGS! 


W as $29.95 


Now £19.95 


=e you thie offer be 
omee wher ard meferie 
1S" ee Mrearemng fo 
comer 


Sm. wile tHe offer ic ofl! 
7 eer? wiv cor act tow 
Re Geert’, wour Porrifure 
ee * Oe aoe weer 


Twat Fre Tee WOOT we 
oor art atin @ few 
Tet We emir 

“ett, wed 

a ee | 


CALL NOW LA. 6-2616 


i 
3 
: 
a 


wi * 


‘ 


JUDGE PARKER 


WANT 


HIM SAY HE DIDN'T 


TO GO HOME / 


& 


By Milt Car Me 


- JOE PALOOKA 


isi“ A aE 


oe 


wyrieM= 
. 
¢ ON BRIDGE 


BRIDGE QUIZ 
Q 1—As South you hold: 
SK43 WIFE @Kie7T 410964 
The bidding has proceeded 
Nerth 


Fast Seuth West 
Pass 


4 


| heart Pace 1 me treme 
> 


Pace 
What do you bid now? 
Q 2—As South you hold: 


LEEMY IS BEING COACHED 
BY PREECH ROWN, THE 


YER 


BATTER WITH TH STUFF 
YOU'VE SHOWN, JERRY... 


FAST BALL AIN'T |, 


MR. LEEMY, GRAMPS... | HIMSELF, JACKIE, 
DON'T DRIVE HIM TOO / HONEY... AIN'T 


~ FERD’NAND 


#10975 WIS @AQS 41953 | 


The bidding has proceeded 


Woe Nerth Seuth 


mond Deable * ? 
What do you bid’ 
Q3—As South you hold: ° 
4K VAIOST €¢AS6 SAAKROIO? 

The bidding has proceeded 
Seath « Nerth 


| spade 
3 hearts 


1 elue 

2 hearts 
What do you bid now” 
Q4—As South you hold: 

42 PVR I4 @AKRJ IORS2 AFG 
The bidding has proceeded: 

| Seuth 


Nerth 
wade 
' spades Pace 

What do you bid now? 

ANSWERS 

1—Three hearts. Take a 
great big demestt for a pass 
Partner has more hearts than 
spades. otherwise he would 


have bid spades first. Further-' 


more, be must have a fine hand 
simce you are forced to show 
a heart preference at the three 
level. Therefore. your bid 
shows mo very great values. 
7—One spade. With nine 
pomts you -have distinctly 
enough to offer a free bid even 
jtheugh your suit is very shab- 
by. If you don't take action 
immediately it may be difficult 
te make up for it later and an 
opportunity to score might be 
missed 
3.—-Four diamonds. A slam 
try is im order at this point, 
but it should be made below 
the game level in the form of 
a cue bid. If partner returns 
,to four hearts your duties wil! 
have heen discharged. 
| 4—We recommend the 
slightly fancy bid of three 
hearts at this point. It may 
indwee partner to bid three no 
trump if he has clubs pro 
tected and if worst comes to 
worst and he raises hearts. we 
can always go back toe dia- 
monds which was our alterna- 
tive contract anyway 


Cow Found Perched 


Atep Control Tower 


SWANSEA, Wales, July 29 
™—The grass appeared green- 
er wpstairs for a cow here last 


*mght. 


Pairweed Airport officials 
found a cow perched atop their 
“feet control tower. Appar- 
ently, she had wandered up via 
a three-foot wide spiral stair- 


WATER HEATERS 
< 


50 Years “JUST” Service 
MOOO DUT EVERYTHING 


Res 


~ GRANDMA 


Rebel Guerilla Leader 


TUNIS, July 29 #—Taieb 
Zalleg, a guerrilla leader who 
refused to lay down his arms 
when Tunisia got recognition 
of its sovereignty from France, 
was hanged in secret yester- 
day. Zalleg had been aiding 
Algerian rebels: 


Hanged in Tunisia 

It seemed likely the hanging 
would result in cooler relations 
between Premier Habib Bour- 
giba and Algerian Nationalists 
with whom he has expressed 
sympathy despite his treaty 
with France. 


| PENNY 


How MILK Can Help You 


LOSE WEIGHT 


Milk provides the high protewm that makes 


reducing diets both 
inate 


but feel better—when 
with the help of milk! 


2012 14th Street N.W. 
DEcatur 2-2700 


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you reduce sensibly— 


—_ 


Ne x? 


By Ed Dodd |The Washington Merry-Go-Round | HE WASHINGTON POST ‘and TIMES wttAe 


we N J ; 
At 5 : jie Not Jubilant OPEN TONITE ‘TIL 9 
@ a Over Congress wm OTHER DAYS OPEN "Td 6:00". 


OPEN EVERY DAY AT 9 | 


MEET ME OVER 
BY THE LAKE....! 
NEED TO MAKE - 
CONVERGATION 
WITH YOU 


By Drew Pearson | 


| oO 4 z. | ° | y | 
= es | In his last meeting withGOP HIGHWAY BILL. — Costing 
fumes leaders just before Congress $37 billion, it was put across by 
‘aes adjourned, the President said the truckers, the auto and tire : 
VV he was “satisfied” with the leg- companies, the gasoline com op 
EE *t islative record .. aus panies, and the Teamsters Un f di . — 
By Alex Raymond if the 84th lon. I’s » good bill, but « TOR GISCOUNt prices ony 


Congress, [=a wouldn't have passed, at least 


-~ 


»though not ex- $ ee at this session, without lob 


? end G | 7 | 
\é actly jubilant # Soe byist support 

about the box- ieee §©=©6©6SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION : 

score of ac- a ae BILL.—Far more important . 

\ , complishment. ea € 


** 
. 
al 
. 


v © than highways, the school bill 

‘44 The boxscore , ® had no lobbies behind it. The 

BF a0 been pre- me : teachers are not effective 

pared on charts be School children don't know 

by some of how to lobby. The White House Largest Selection of 
Madison didn’t lift its voice audibly Power Mowers in the city 

; while the school debate was on Priced up te $289.95 

visers, and our a1 mig —_ The bill did not pass. WON 

ing over Ike's shoulders, cou’) HELLS CANYON.—A big | | . 

see in separate columns the Federal dam on the last bis : | ‘ | A ew 


. - 
om 
." major bills that had: (1) passed damsite remaining in the Unit- > a 
Cas ] the House, (2) passed the Sem 04 states was blocked by pri- y—. ] 9 5 6 
(+: 


, 


ee ee Che FES vate utility lobbies and power- yy 
— petals .. ful White House lobbyists who Ce 
By Willard Scanning these a Eisen -amped out on Capitol Hill and & © Models 

pac Bn ng: Seem pm ot oon button-holed wavering Sena- 

tors. 
for all you did to get our pro- : 
‘gram through the Congress. It FARM BILL.—It was passed, 
‘was a tough job, and I appre. after much hassling, because) 
\clete your efforts. Of course, I of the farm lobbyists, among 
didn’t get everything I hoped ““¢ most potent in the Nation 
for. But on the whole I am OLD AGE PENSIONS.—The aeeoij 
satisfied with the record. pension age for women wes). 
“We're in pretty good shape,” jowered and disability pay." 

he added, apparently meaning eonpe ty ve baste Bown } mira 
that the Republican Party nant aed Pemgyene tgs goto 90-Day 2 WE SERVICE 
could confidently face the com- Ww 
ing campaign. However, he ex- Sure from labor and oldster arranty WHAT WE SELL! 
pressed disappointment over S°OUPS. } 
the Senate's restriction of for. MINIMUM WAGES.—Mini- 


eign aid funds, also the scut-™um was increased from 75 
tling of the civil rights bill. (cents to one dollar at the in- - n C (j S 0 | a r 
There were laughs as he re- ‘istence of liberal Democrats 


ferred to the foreign aid battle 22d labor unions. The Admin- 


By Saunders and Overgard in which Senate GOP leader Dedee had title tonaak conte, . 
we was A Oe cheb aft THING'S | Mes" De a PCE CPP FT WORKED ME COLO William Knowland helped de- 8 ain from | 1 
vow disappeared "The (1 OUT A BULLET IH WS CHEST PAPA ?- } feat the President’s urgent re- Pushing the bill because most | ve e 2- naine 
for ied Ime ROPER /~ AT PONT BLANK quest for aid to Yugoslavia. f their members get higher f 7 
“ Knowland himself managed to "ages. But aod wanted to — 
_the general buyin wer : 
muster a erin when Ike, lookiDe fencn, vie Pe All the Latest Engineering and Safety Features 
“No, I can’t say that I am) CLEAN ELECTIONS BILL. 
satisfied with the Senate ac- —It had no lobbyists behind it. © lifetime all-stes! unbreckable housing, «eee mmMechinger’s Price 
tion.” Philip Graham, publisher of ° / 


Knowland reported that the The Washington Post and Times | 7 j 
“practical difficulties of the Herald, and Sen. Thomas C.| % te climinating heed © $ 9 5 
threatened filibuster” dashed Hennings of Missouri pushed it’. Tio*pazoe cose on both vides. tes . . 


‘any hope of Senate action on relentlessly, but any Senate, eliminating tedious hand-trimming efter 
‘the civil rights bill, already ap- leaders who are in a position to — Come within Vo" of trees, 
'proved by the House. get big money from big busi- « Ewe — veer wheels with 194° 

“Well, I certainly hope some- "€ss or big oi] are loath to) semipnewmctic, puncture-proef rubber 


thing ean be done in the next mes up campaign contribu-| Gres make it easy te push and turn the CO WPL E TE WitH 


” the President re- “Ons. . 
s _ “We cannot abandon INVESTIGATION OF LOB-| designed : | LEAF MULCHER 
By Lank Leonafd the responsibility of protecting BYING-—Obviously there were  jrcnotic governes gives your proper 
the rights of minorities. It is "0 lobbyists standing in line to — engine speed PAY 3 DOWN 
FICAN HEAR FTHEM | \ SURE I REALIZE, GE = not an extreme bill. In fact, it push an investigation of them- oe ee ee ethno F ONLY MONTH - 
VERY PLAIN NOW. PHL! mS BUTI ‘is a very moderate one in my selves. So this investigation has @ Seber stec! bleds therpesed on fow 
T-THEY —AHiL! D-DOWT) ALSO REALIZE WHATLL lopini I ‘'t understand all been scraping slowly through ‘00, * meting it reversible and = © 
YOU REALIZE WHAT /® WHEN THEY ee eee, Se eee rere, er a 4 we | doubling ite lite Phone Orders LI. 7.9400 
Tit SAvia'? the fuss about it. the Washington summer With- © 90.dey free Warranty egoinst menu | 
| Summarizing the work of out even revealing its most sen- ‘exturing defects TEP TORT tnd 
Congress from a newsman’s sational information—a $5000 
‘sideline, I would say that the check from Howard Keck of 
84th Congress was more than Superior Oil to the Eisen- Power Reverse and Separate 
usually representative of the hower dinner right in the . Clutch for Blades 
‘people. When the people raise middie of the Senate gas de- — 
cain with Congress, the Con- bate. Superior Oil has now teen 
gress listens. When the people indicted but in connection with 
jare apathetic, Congress listens the $2500 which Senator Case 
\to the lobbyists. rejected, not the $5000 which’ 
__ This Congress more than the Ike committee kept. i 
most I have watched listened Note—Only important meas-, 
(Aged By agra — ure which passed without lob | 
By Branner | But if you look over the record) -7,°%, /UPPOrt was the foreign) 
aid bill, and it had the most’ 
of the 84th Congress you see’ egective voice in the Nation—| 


NG 
THEM ANY MINUTE NOW! 


. few bills passed without the W se—be-| 
YOU _YOU SAY THERE IS DESPERATELY TO m ‘ A x urging of lobbyists. Here is the ne! y me Wane Eee val 
SOMEONE ELSE WITH WHOM ¢ j ‘ b scorecard: __ <(Copyright, 1956, Bell Syd 


YOURE IN LOVE ,WINNIE ? 
Sale! 


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OFFERS WAYS TO BE 
SURE YOU'RE CHOOSING 
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1 CHECK THE QUALITY OF THE FOOD 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
34 Monday, July 30, 1956 ie 


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