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o 


Adlai FarAhead as Con 


| The Weather 


Today — Some cloudiness with high 
Probable scattered showers 
at night. Sunday's temperatures: High. 
1:55 p. m.: 
(For further details see 


near 88. 


RA degrees at 
6:45 a. m. 
Page 20.) 


low, 71 at 


Times Herald 


‘ 


vention 


he Washington Post FINAL 


Opens 


~*y 


79th Year — No. 25 


Coprriaht 1954 
The Washington Post Company 


Phone RE. 7-1234 


MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 1956 


WTOP Radio 


(1500) TV (Ch, 9) 


FIVE CENTS 


NASSER REJECTS 


7 


Adlai Leads 


' 
i 


Harriman in 


Convention 


Start Today 


2 Top Candidates 
Spent Day Battling | 
For Support After | 


Truman Bombshell 


(Program on Page 2.) 
By Edward T. Folliard =| 
@iaff Reporter | 

CHICAGO, Aug. The 
Democratic National ‘Con- 
vention of 1956 opens here! 
Monday, and it promises to 
be a humdinger. 

A furious battle for the 
presidential nomination was 
under way on this Sabbath Day 
Adiai E. Stevenson 
and Gov. Averell Harriman of 
New York. as the two men 
fiitted from delegation to dele 
gation trying to line up sup 
port. The competition between 
them will continue right into 
the balloting on Thursday 
night in the International Am- 
phitheater in Chicago's stock- 


yards. ' 
Twenty-four hours after 
former President Harry § Tru- 
man’s dramatic pronouncement 
in favor of Governor Harriman, 
this appeared to be the situa- 
tion in this seething city: 
Stevenson continued to be 
far. far ahead of all other candi- 
dates, although shért of the 
@A6\%- ito win. His campaign 
managers said he had lost only 
a few delegates It 
parent, however, that h 
wagon had iost its 
momentum. 


Wait-And-See Altitude 


Harriman’s hopes were soar- 
ing, thanks to Mr. Truman's 
blessing, but there was no sign 
of a stampede in his direction 
He remained what some had 
been calling him earlier—the 
“rich underdog.” 

Favorite-son candidates, who 
a few days ago were expected 
to release their delegates 
quickly to a likely winner, were 
holding off and waiting to see 
what is going to happen 

A wait-and-see attitude also 
was noted in state delegations 
that came here uncommitted 
to any 
sas delegation, for 
listened to appeals by both 
Stevenson and Harriman. but 
decided to remain on the fence 
for the time being 


12- 


between 


earlier 


example, 


Symington Arrives 


Sen. Stuart Symington, fa- 
vorite son of Missouri, arrived 
im Chicago and said he was not 
an active candidate for the 
presidential nomination. How 
éVer, he said he would accept 
the prize if it came to him 

“I am not a candidate for 
enything,” he told reporters at 
the Midway Airport 

He was told that Eleanor 
Roosevelt at a press conference 
had suggested that Mr. Tru- 
man's strategy was to bring 
shout ® stalemate and so put 
him (Symington) over for the 
pomination 


mn 
“I am surprised to hear that,” , 


Symington said 

He added. however, that he 
was not surprised that Mr 
Truman had come out for Har- 
riman 

Symington, at 
ference iater in 
Hilton. exploded the report 
that Mr. Truman had sum 


Bee DEMOCRATS, Pg. 2, Col. 1 


a press con 
the Conrad 


be 


Ad Finds 
25 Buyers For 
1 Cadillac 


“1 received 25 calle from my 
want ed. The Cadillae sold 
immediately at the price I! 
wanted.” reported Mr. L. W. 
Lewis, 1627 AK wt. mw. 


Gell anything faster—used car 
er haby crib-threuch The 
Washington Post end Times 
Herald—reaching 342,000 fame 
lies daily. over 127,008 more 
families than any other paper 
Simply phone 


254 


m torn 


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candidate. The Arkan-| 


>. Fa _* 
em » a” Go \ 
~~ : ~~ ‘ » 


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Ns 


Adlai Stevenson holds Eleanor Roosevelt's | 
hand at a reception which he gave in Chi- | 
eago yesterday in honor of the widow of 


Mrs. 


the late President Franklin D. Roosevelt. 
Roosevelt called Stevenson “the best 
nominee for this campaign.” 


WU. S. Ladies 
Hear Dulles 
Canal Plan 


Supervision, Not 
Operation of Suez 
By International 


Board to Be Aim 


(See Text on Page 6.) 
By Chalmers M.. Roberts 


Staff Reporter 

Twenty-two Democratic 
and Republican congres- 
sional leaders yesterday dis- 
cussed the Suez crisis at an 
extraordinary 80-minute 
White House conference 
with President Eisenhower 
and 14 other Administration 
officials. 

The leaders afterward agreed 
that, as Senate Majority Leader 
Lyndon Johnson (D-Tex.) put it 
to newsmen: “No commitments 
were asked and none was giv en 
No decisions were made.” 

A White House statement 
said the President and Secre- 
tary of State John Foster 
Dulles, who did most of the 
talking, had stressed “the con 
tinuing gravity of the situa- 
tion,” yet were “hopeful” that 
the 22-nation London Confer- 


Tnited Pre«s 


FDR Widow 


Grateful to Harriman 


‘the crisis. 
‘Tre Majer Aspects 


Takes Issue 
With Trum 


She Stands Firm 
For Stevenson, Savs By. Alfred 
- " er; Maneacing Editor, The 
He's a Fighter, Too 


By Christine Sadler Coe 


Apecial Correspondent 


CHICAGO, Aug. 2 
the preface that she, too, 
loves a fighter and has no in- 
tention of yielding her own 
considerable claim to that 
title, Eleanor Roosevelt today 
launched a dramatic open 
battle with former President 
Harry S. Truman 

The issue is his preference 
for Averell Harriman and hers 
for Adlai Stevenson as the 
Democratic nominee for Presi- 
dent 

It has occurred to her she 
told a press conference called 
to open the breach, that the 
former President has a favorite 
son up his sleeve in case his 
support for the New York Gov- 
ernor should pull the nomina- 
tion away from Adlai Steven- 
son 

“IT have no 


oe 


and drive the South to dissi- 
dent fury—and all in behalf of 
a near-hopeless longshot? 


Next to the outcome itself, 
this is Chicago's most absorb- 
ing question today. 

This is the answer. It is com- 
pounded in roughly equal parts 
of Mr. Truman's inability to be 
a trimmer, the steadily increas- 
ed chilling of his political love- 
affair with Adlai Stevenson, his 
mounting anger at what he 
deemed was Stevenson's gross 
rejection of his advice and help, 
and his firm conviction that 
Harriman is the better quali- 
fied man 

The story goes back a long 
way—back, in fact, to 1952 
when, for a period of many 
months the President sought 
to press the nominatoin, on 
Stevenson. The Illinois gover- 
nor demurred, saying he had 
declared himself in the race 
for another term. 

Mr. Truman argued that an 
early declaration for the presi- 
dential nomination would make’ 
for a breeze in the convention. 
He offered the assurance of 
full support and 
amounted to a virtually non- 
contested nomination. He of-' 
fered it several times. 

Stevenson did not agree to 


second choice.” 
she declared. “I am here only 
because I believe that Adlai 
Stevenson would be the best 
nominee for this campaign.” 
Mrs. Roosevelt said Steven 
con was better qualified for 
the White House than Mr. Tru- 
man was when Franklin Roose- 
velt's death plunged Mr. Tru- 
man into the Presidency. 
The sharp «eference was Mr. 
TPuman’'s statement of Satur- 
day that Harriman, an old 
hand in the Federal Govern- 
ent, was the only candidate 
ho would not have to gO 
through a “trial and error 
period before he could put a 
firm hand to the Nation's helm 
Also, she emphasized, if it's 
a question about who is the 
better fighter, Stevenson's rec- 
ord is superior to that of Gov 
Harriman. Her barbed com- 
ment was: “After all, the Demo- 


See ADLAI, Page 2, Col. 3 


Vice President, Alben Barkley, 
lost his bid for the nomination 
Mr. Truman was delighted 
that Stevenson finally came 
through. 

But as the campaign wore on, 
it looked more and more as if 
Stevenson was giving the re- 
tiring President the brass 
knuckle treatment. 
were Stevenson remarks which 


Civil Rights Coming Up Last 
‘Desperate’ Moves Made 
To Agree on Platform 


| By Robert C. Albright 
Staff Reporter 


CHICAGO, Aug. 12—A last\W. | 
desperate effort to find a com-while, called his 16-member) 
promise solution of the party- platform drafting group to’ 
splitting civil rights issue be- gether to start writing out for- 
gan today outside the orbit of eign and domestie planks on 
the formal Democratie plat- which the party is essentially 
form drafting group..- united. 

Representatives of both \“McCormack postponed any 
Adiai Stevenson and Sen. action on the civil rights issue 
Lyndon B. Johnson (Tex.) met Until the last item of:-business. 
with -key Southerners at the His subcommittee may not even 
Palmer House in an effort to talk about it until Tuesday. || 
agree on language that would) “We are going to be very 
not ey oke a Convention floor- practical about this and get out 
fig ‘those planks we can agree: on 


Resoietions Chairman John See PLATFORM, Pg. 11, Col. ‘ 


a \ 


McCormack (Mass), mean- 


; -_ 
Anger at Adlai’s Snubs 
“3 Led Truman to Switcl 


Washington Post 


CHICAGO, August 12—Why did he do it? 

Why did Harry S. Truman, grand champion of party 
unity and past master at calculating political odds, make 
With a move that could throw the Democrats into bitter discord 


noisians 


There . 


policy were disclosed: 


French idea of a new interna- 
tional agency to run the canal. 
Instead, Dulles will 


Friendly 


cA a a ‘body be created to hear 
‘peals on § 
rates, 
provisions for expanding the 


for ships of all nations; 


—-— - = 


reached Mr. Truman's earsihalf of all 


about 
ton.” 
Even so, Mr. 
still all oyt for Stevenson as London by two Senators, 
the 1956 candidate. Announce! Democrat 
it early, the Missouri fox kept But preliminary agreement on 
telling him. 
fellows out. 
Again, in response to severa 
Truman appeals throughout 
the spring and summer of 1955, 
Stevenson refused to commit 
himself. 
he take the plunge. last night, no 
As this year’s convention sight. 
time approached, Mr. Truman 
determined to remain neutral Executive Problem 
and made several public state- The Democrats 
ments to this effect. 
New Yorkers that if 
one of them, he would vote'the lead and bear the respon- 
for Harriman, 
that vote coming conference. 
for Stevenson. told newsmen that the 
Then he got.word that Ste- dent was the Nation's * 


H.. Alexander Smith 
fell 
Mansfield, 


and 
NJ.) 
when who 


Democratic leaders, reported’ 


he would 


support was no asset to him. the United States.” He added: 


That, probably more than any 


led to the decision 
Throughout this 

‘meanwhile, Mr. 

‘being subjected to the heaviest Executive takes. We recognize. 


run until midway through the Sort of argument from Harri- however, and very strongly 
1952 convention, after the late man and from Harriman’s top (that) it is an executive respon- tornado swept through south- 


See TRUMAN, Page 2, Col. 5 | See IKE, Page 6, Col. 3 


The Day’s Politics 


Furious battle for delegates under way between Adlai 
Stevenson and Gov. Averell Harriman, with Stevenson 
far ahead at present. Page 1. 


A last desperate effort to find compromise in the 


party-splitting civil rights issue is begun outside Demo- | 


cratic platform committee. Page 1. 

Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt launches dramatic open battle 
with former President Truman over latter's indorse- 
ment of Harriman. Page 1. 


Anger at snubs by Stevenson are revealed as a lead- | 


ing factor in causing Mr. Truman to come out for Harri- 
man for the presidential nomination. Page 1. 
- Roscoe Drummond raises the question whether Mr. 

Truman can dominate the convention. Page 17. 

Joseph and Stewart Alsop write on why the former 
President took his action. Page 17. 

Maryland delegates hold up decision on ertstéentia! 
choice. Page 2. 

Senator Byrd reported urging first-ballot vote by Vir- 
ginia delegation for Senator Johnson. Page 3. 

District and territory delegations try to form 30-vote 
convention bloc. Page 3. 

tn ae dar seb 
tern « sentiment, " Page 3. 


; 
' 
' 


ence opening Thursday would ©#"¢ 
ireach a peaceful solution of Puerto Rico today, killing one 


: 
| 


SUEZ PARLEY BID 


Tierenteine 


Total War 


*] 


United Press 


House Speaker Sam Rayburn (left) and House Republican 
Leader Joseph Martin Jr. are shown yesterday as they 
left the White House conference on Middle East st problems. 


ee 


Storm Causes 
Heavy Loss 
In Puerto Rico 


One Dead Reported 
As Hurricane Betsy 
Heads for Mainland 


wm—Hurri 
into 


12 
slammed 


MIAMI, Aug 
Betsy 


person and causing several mil- 


jiien dollars worth of damage. 


propose knocked down 
that Egypt alone run the canal fionded beaches with 
and that a new international! Sect ahaw 


ch matters as toll st 
management efficiency, trees. 


Not until Octobe that for personal reasons he held 
r did could not make the trip. As of meeting to plan the rehabilita- 
substitute was in tion of stricken areas. Officials 


Elsewhere, these two impor-/ Winds ranged up to 115 miles 
tant aspects of Administration an 


hour. The storm then 
veered back over the ocean on 


® The United States at Lon- an uncertain course toward the 
don will not back the British-;) 44 states mainland. 


homes, 

lines, 
tides 5 
e normal and de- 
royed thousands of banana 


tumbled 
power 


The storm 


Weathermen said it was still 


canal and unhindered passage|too early to predict whether 
in the hurricane, 
short, to see that the canal is blown tropical gale of the sea- 
run equitably and fairly in be- son, 
maritime nations States, nearly 1000 miles north- 
“the mess in Washing- rather than actually to run it. |west. The storm roared along a 

©The Administration hopes path from Maunabo on the 
Truman was to have Dulles. accompanied to|southeastern shores of Puerto 
a Rico out to the Atlantic Ocean 


and a Republican. through Arecibo. 


the first full- 


would hit the United 


One man was killed when he 


Keep the other Sens. Mike Mansfield (D-Mont.) was blown from a roof. There 
(R--were no other reports of cas 
through yesterday/ualties, but hospital officials in 
h ad'San Juan appealed for aid from 
agreed to go after approval by'Civil Defense doctors. 


Puerto Rico President Munoz 
an emergency cabinet 


said that banana and coffee 
plantations suffered $1 million 


lin losses and estimated an ad- 


yesterday ditional! $1 
He told'made it clear that the Republi-|along public roads and high- 
he were can Administration must take ways. 


|istruck Elkhart, 


million in damage 


The hurricane forced at least 


and told Iilli- sibility for the outcome of the 200 families to be evacuated 
Johnson from 
Presi-| Thousands 
‘spokes-'dents flocked to inland points. 
venson thought Mr. Truman's man” for the “foreign policy of 


the coast 


resi- 


southeast 
more coastal! 


Last year 11 hurricanes took 
at least 1578 lives and caused 


“Politics steps at the water's property damage estimated at 
of what other single act in the drama, edge when the future of our $25 billion. 

country is at stake, though we 
period, might have differences of opin- Tornado, Hail Hit 
Truman was ion on the course of action the 


In Des Moines Area 
DES MOINES, Aug. 12 (#—A 


eastern lowa .Jate this after- 
noon, causing extensive prop- 
erty damage. No injuries were 
reported. An area about 50 
miles east of Des Moines was 
reported hit. 


A violent hail and windstorm train at the Randolph crossing, Editoria's 

10 miles north near Rockville. A pair of white Events Today 
of Des Moines. The storm un-|shoes, side by side, and a pack-| Federal Diary 19 
‘leashed hailstones described asage of cigarettes were found Financia! 


“the size of baseballs.” 


Police Foil 


2 Hangings 
In Cells Here 


Prisoners Cut Down, 
Sent to Hospital 
For Observation 


Two men jailed on drunk 
charges Saturday night were 
found hanging in their cells, 
police reported yesterday. 

Henry Smith, 40, was found 
hanging from a Second Pre- 
cinct cell bar by a cuff nipped 
from his trousers, police re- 
ported. Station Clerk John Can- 
non said he discovered Smith 
before the prisoner was in- 
jured. Smith was admitted to 
D. CC. General Hospital for 
mental observation. 

Smith gave his. permanent 
address as the District Work- 
house, Occoquan, Va., police 
said, explaining he spent much 
of his time there. 

Before this hanging incident, 
Cannon said, he heard a “ter- 
rific crash” in Smith's cell and 
found the cell-toilet in pieces 
on the floor. Cannon described 
Smith as “an habitual cell-block 
commode ripper.” 

Richard T. Walters, 32, of 
Fayetteville, N. C.. was found 
hanging from a cell bar by his 
shoe laces in the Third Pre- 
cinct, police reported. He was 
admitted to D. C. General Hos- 
pital for mental observation. 

Pyt. Rudolph Tarlosky said 
he found Walters, a salesman, 
Sagging semi-conscious against 
the bars. Tarlosky said Wal- 
ters revived quickly and tried 
to bang his head against the 
bars 


Prisoner Sets Fire 
To His Clothing 


Albert Evans, 48, of no fixed 
address, locked in the 13th 
Precinct cell block Friday night 
on a drunkenness charge, set 
fire to his clothes and hurled 
the cell toilet against the cell 
bars, police reparted 

Evans was admitted to D. C 
General Hospital for mental 
observation, charged with de- 
stroying District property. Po- 
lice said he was not burned. 


Express Train 
Kills Woman 


An unidentified woman was 
killed last night when she was 
struck by a St. Louis-bound 
Baltimore and Ohio express 


‘alongside the track. 


If Opposed 
By Force 


Proposes to Call 
Own Meeting for 
Revising Pact on 
Canal Control 


stg 7.) 
By Peter Webb 


CAIRO, Aug. 12 WP) 
President Gamal Abdel Nas- 
ser flatly rejected the West- 
ern Big Three invitation to 
the London conference on 
the Suez Canal today and 
warned Britain and France 
“it will be total war” if they 
try to force their decisions 
on Egypt. 

Turning down the Western 
to internationalize the 
canal, Nasser proposed instead 
the convening of a conference 
sponsored by Egypt to discuss 
guranteed of passage through 
the vital waterway. 

He said the London confer- 
ence starting Thursday would 


{Nasser's Text 


plan 


Britain Airlifting 
Troops to Mideast 


Britain ite airlift of 
troops te the Mediterranean 
crisis area as the govern- 
ment announced the Sues 
eonference will open on 
Thursday as scheduled de- 
spite Egypt President Nas 
ser’s objections. Page &. 

Premier Dom Mintoff yes 
terday cut the  British-1i- 
censed Malta radio off the 
air in a dispute over Suez 
policy. Page 6. 


be “incompetent to make deci 
sions.” 

He insisted the canal “is and 
will remain” Egypt's and “if 
Britain and France attack it 
will be total war.” 

“We know the British and 
French are stronger than us,” 
Nasser said 

“We know we are a smal! 
country. But we have to de- 
fend our rights and our dignity 
and we would fight to the last 
drop of our blood.” 

i“In war nobody knows who 
will win,” the Associated Press 
quoted him 

“If we lose this struggle it 
wi'l mean that no small na- 
tions are free. It will mean 
that any time smal! nations act 
against the wishes of big na- 
tions there will be mobilization 
threats and economic pressure 
This is not Egypt's case alone 
but the case of all small coun- 
tries everywhere. We are 

See CAIRO, Page 5, Col. 1 


| Today’s Index | 


Page 
Alsons 17 
Amusements .30 
City Life 19 
Classified .24-29 
Comics 3 
Crossword 
District Line 
Dixon 


Herblock 
Horoscope 
Keeping Well 3 
Kiigeallen 
Movie Guide 
Night Clubs 
Obituaries 
Pearson 
Picture Page 
Sokolsky 
Sports 
TV-Radio 
Weather 
Women $ 


1] 


A 
34 | 21 


Goren . 


a ee 


‘Peacemaker’ Wife 


Comes in for Cut 


Neighbors Swinging Bull Whips Wage 
15-Minute Duel in Dallas Back Yard 


man to stop popping at hisistepped between the pair to 


DALLAS, Aug. 12 #—Two 


men battled with bull whips 


yesterday until police halted 
the back-yard duel that left 
both men smarting with welts. 
It all started when a 30-year- 
old warehouseman came home 
with a four-foot cattle driver's 
lash given him by a pal in the 
rodeo ss. He took 
whip into the back yard to 


eS ONS, See a ae 


leaves off a fruit 
39-ye 


pears. 
He ‘leaned across the fence,' 


hit the whip handler with his 
fist and got a stripe across the 
shoulder for his 


Patrolmen M. R. Robinson 
and GC. C. Lewis said the cabi- 


the |netmaker then ran into his ga- 


se grabbed a a seven-foot bull 
\Poubar» — -” 
swinging. 


“halt the nonsense.” 

Then the whip due! started 
in earnest. if lasted 15 furious 
‘minutes, witnesses said. 

When police arrived and 

the fury, man 
with the long whip had his 
epponent retreating. But doc- 
tors at ogg one who ex- 


’ 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
ee Monday, August 13, 1956 


@eee 


Maryland’s Delegation Holds Up 


om—e—— 


Adlai, Harriman 


DEMOCRATS—?Fr. FP. I 


moned him to Chicago. He said 
it was “bunk.” 

What actually happened, he 
said, was that Mr 


be happy to sce him when he 
came to Chicage 


Truman’ 
sent word to him that he would! 


~~ 


orces 


TRUMAN—fFr. Page I 


‘Adlai Snubs 


Line Up 


‘ 


—_ 


Naming Its Presidential Choice 


By Richard L. Lyons 
@aff Reporter 

| CHICAGO, Aug. 12—Mary- 
|land delegates to the Demo- 
cratic National Convention de- 
cided today to hold onto their 
18 presidential votes until they 
are satisfied they have spotted’ 
the winning bandwagon. 


jnational committeeman untili\saying the real trouble was 
after the convention, told him'there weren't enough tickets 
there would be only 17 visitors’|but that he would spend the 
passes available to Marylandirest of the day trying to find 
on Wednesday and Thursday| some 
when the excitement is ex- . o ; 
pected. D’Alesandro, a Tydings Kentucky Gov. A. B. Happy’ 
man and no friend of Mahoney,|Chandler, an active presiden- 
tial candidate, called on the 


agreed to give half the tickets 
'to the delegation and keep half| delegation and made a bid far 


/ 
Symington. tanned from ei 
vacation at Nantucket. eaid he’ 


made plans to come bere three 
weeks ago 

The Truman bombshell. what. 
ever tis ultimate effect. had 
transformed the pre-convention 
scene into one surmounted by 
a huge question mark 

“Whatta y» think?” dele 
gaies were y each other 

“Well.” the reply might be. 
“T still think Adiai can get it. 
hut now I think hes gotia 
trade.” 

The idea was that Stevenson. 
whe once seemed toe have a 
clear road te the nomination. 
maybe on the first roll call, now 
would have to bargain for dele 
gates by making deals on oa 
civil rights plank in the pilet- 


form and on the vice presiden- 


tia, nomination 

Sen. Lendon B. Johnson of 
Texas, Democratic leader of the 
Senate and » favorite son of 
the Lone Star state. was be 
heved to hold the strongest 
hand of anybody at the conven 
thon when it comes to driving 
a bargain 

Johnson not only has the 
huge Texas delegation behind 
h he also has strengih and 
influence in other Southern 
felegations. He has been re 
carded as a Sievenson man. lie 
ix still so regarded. bet thoce 
who know him believe he will 
esk for a pr 

insiders were predicting he 
would cal! on Stevenson to back 
amid civil rights plank in 
platform e that 
could accept 

Saturday night. after 
Trumans announcement 
son met « and 
at Harriman’s request, with the 
New York Governor. The na 
ture of their discussion has not 
heen disclosed 

There are some here who be 
lieve Johnson may in the end 
conclude that he has a real 
chance to get the presidential 
nomination himself. and go 
after it in a bie way 

He suffered a heart attack 
last summer. before President 
Eisenhower was stricken but 
he was boasting westerday that 
he has beer workin 
hours a day. 
mate 

The dust raised by Mr. Tru 
mans blast has al! but obscured 
the contest for the vice presi 
dential nomination 

However, lieutenants of Sen. 
Estes Kefauver were saying to 
day that Mr. Truman's move 
has strengthened the Tennes 
seeans chances of getting the 
No. 2 place on the ticket. They 
reported that Kefauver was 
mcking up considerable back- 
ing for that nomination. includ 
ing the support of the once 
hostile Paul Ziffron. who beads 
the big California delezation 
,- Stevenson appeared remark 
piv calm to those who called 

him in hic hotel «uite today 
“ne group was surprised when 
he ignored political doz 
fight altogether and talked for 
about 15 minutes about the 
Suez crisis 

Hie was up early and started 
his delegate hunt by having 
breakfast with members of the 
Arkansas delegation. Appropos 
of Mr. Truman's declaration for 
Harriman, he told them 

“What has transpired here 
has not in any way disheart 
ened me.” 
-_ Stevenson said be has re 
iaeived “hundreds” of telegram: 
.~* 


ry) 


- 


the 


on at Ss 


Vir 
John 


th Stevenson 


oo 


= 


te 


The 36-man delegation was 
pbound to Estes Kefauver by the 
state primary. When he re- 
‘leased it two weeks ago, it was 


Led Truman 


himself,, Birmingham said. 


D’Alesan 


dro, who is also a 


delegate, didn’t show up at the 
imecting of the predominately 
pro-Mahoney delegation. There|Leader Lyndon B. Johnsons 


its support. He had a feelin 
and give the South a chance fo 
elect a President. 

Asked how Senate Majority 


' rrrTeTse « 


15 and 16 v 


To Switeh 


| political brain-truster, former 
Judge Sam Rosenman, fabied 
ighost writer of Franklin D. 
Roosevelt. He had served 
FDR. as counsel and, for a 
brief time, in the same role for 
Mr. Truman. 
They persuaded their listen- 
er that he had the power to 
‘mame the king: if he said the 
magic word the convention 
‘would give the crown to Harri 
hmoctet Pree §€6©6©man. This sort of talk did noth- 


of New York (left panel) and Adial Steven- ing to injure Mr. Truman's pic- 
eon (right) conferred resterday with Mer- ture of himself. 

per | Arrived in Chicago, he was 
\“on Cloud Ten,” as one of his 
\aides put—the result of the 
| sensational welcome he had en 
joyed throughout Europe for 
one glorious, blood-tingling day 
after another. But in Chicago. 
Mr. Truman found what seemed 
to him only a chilly reception 
from the Stevenson crowd and 
the Democratic 


Mrs. Rooseveit Takes 
eae dssue With Truman Se. 
breakfast earlier. Harriman at Newer a man to suffer snubs 


tacked the Eisenhower Admin-cratic way of fighting for aaf flowers, she by no means g)adiy, and always a man to 
cemdidate «aid primaries Our candidate o14 ~ 7 Truman determined to make a 
The mammoth corporations has done that . There ©25 Her fingernails were , Harriman indorsement and 
amd the monopolies are grow-rather a conspicucus lack of iced » bright pink and her make it a rip-snorter. 
bus nessman that kind of hgmting on the p@ll eray hair tucked up at the 
farmer are sul of others : ; back with bobby pins. showed word of his steadily firming 
iy aE ene Does this make — differ. signs of a very light rinse. tention reached Stevenson sup- 
sum ' iTumansence in your personal er mgs Mrs. Roosevelt was prompted porter®rs, aides of the 1952 nomi- 
old political associates opened for Mr. Truman?” a reporter ts voice her feelings about civi] Bee began to make pilgrimages 
a separate pro Harriman head asked rights br questions on the claim t© Mr. Truman. Chief among 
rer the ( onrad Hulton Of course it does not, Mrs. that “whereas Governor Ste them was.Oscar Chapman, Mr. 
ptel today. Among those be-Roosewelt declared [ am . Truman's Secretary of the In- 
. : a venson stands for something 
i nd he Move were California hoping to have lunch with Wr. weak called “moderation.” Govw- A 
man | But Chapman and the others 


oiiman Ed Pauley. former Tru ernor Harriman is the legiti- 
White House aide Donald Daw- Promptly, she converted mate thebe to the New Deal Sot nowhere. Mr. Truman 


son, and Frank McK inoey, for- hone to action. She crossed the ssband ” found himself congenit un- 
the Demo street and met the former sage ta sear 5 . able to accede lon > aon 
Caspenittan iment gel A. : Asserting that although Mr. 
. President at 2 smal! front table Stey —and “I he ugr | last fervent appeal—to tone 
‘m’for two in the grill and bar of ,, oe stemde $ —n cown the statement and at 
the Blackstone Hotel While 2 ~—“ancs —. least throw Stevenson a good 
nundreds of light bulbs flashed ‘ pies that underlay New Deal word or two. 
and other lunchers wished vam mre, Recgevelt ¢e could not or would not trim. 
they were wired for sound, the ** And, in the k his mi 
laiked rapidly "The probiems of today ca) were two = og * “9 
jously for more than/®°t be met as the problems of; +. gre: was the memory 
As they left, still talk- *®e New Deal days were metiie werriman as & pillar of 
ng. a burst of cheering—start-- “Ow, % has been said DY strength to him during the hard 
ed by Eda Brannan. wife of the several pgrople that Mr. Stevet\ sows of the Marshall Plan and 
Truman Secretary of Agricul- 5" stood for moderation, and the hard years of fore 
Blackstone. He received an un-ture—brought several tables of i think setae have seemed to policy fights that followed. 
ending procesion of politicians. applauding lunchers to their ‘26 ‘moderation’ as a bad word _| 
Harriman supperters. Steven- feet “I understand the feeling of ion that the Democratic 
som supporters and persons who Mrs Roosevelt was escorted *™e of the colored leaders ust be the liberal 
were onthe fence le the press conference by Mr who think it must mean that succeed, the bold, forw 
David MacDonald, president and Mrs. Edison Dick. personal FOU will do nothing .. ing rout-cutting actionists 
of the Steelworkers Union, was friends of Adiai Stewenton, and ~** 4 matter of fact. ‘mod- Harriman stood for ' 
one of Mr. Truman's callers by Anna Rosenberg, who re ¢tation is 2 wise word. it does'.. weson 
Leaving the suite. be teld re pe ated reporters’ questions for not meen that you stand stil, 
sorters. “What's good enough the former first lady. Mrs 27d I would be very sorry ff, 
for Truman is good enough for Roosevelt admits to being “ter- im your public life, we did 
the steclworkers.~ ribly deaf” have tion 
MacDonald, a delegate from i'm old, too, of course.” Mrs 
Penn<ewivenia. came bere as Roosevelt said. “Mr. Truman is 
Harriman supporter. He said ™uch younger, bul we two are 
41 other members of his wor orebeaniy the people who re 
are here in varvous delezations ™emorr furtherest back Just 
and that he will try te persuade fer this wery reason, I think 
sll of them to wote for the Neu We must make a special effort 
York Governor to think Gf the future 
Harriman later told MacDon “We canmet meet the prob 
aid he was sure that “what's '©™s of today. or of the future. 
sood enough for MacDonald ic ©'h ‘traditions of the past 


coed eZ stee] aione— 
——w Ch a eet ‘en These references to her age Of the day; and then you de be loses } 


Gov. Orval Faubas of Arkan 27¢ Ser stirring “lecture” on Ode, when you ‘know what you! He 
sas. another who called on Mr CY" ‘cahts—made after re- have SS 
Truman. quoted the former ' 
President as saying: “We are * 
going te have seme fun at this 
comvention. it woeulda't be am 


: 
: 
: 
’ 


Ger. Rebert B. Merner of New Jersey will 
be «2 kev figure te bis state's Geicgation, 
which has 36 votes te give to a presidential 
hepefel. Thats ehr Ger. Averell Harriman 


—_— 


since Mr. Truman's pronmounce- ADUAL—F reas Pege I 
ment. He took time out from 
politicking to attend il am 
services at the Fourth Presby- 
terian Church. 

Harriman attended 19 a. mm 
services at St. James Episcopal 
Cathedra? 


in 


- 


National 
Stevenson replaced 


crt 
whom 
1852 
The President. Harriman de 
clared, is an expertat “the old 
2! game of taking 
’ nee go 


t of when things ar 


credit 


™yY 


crt aT iw niesiants 


are er - 
am hour 
_ 


; 
- 
 e | 


Truman spent most of 
the dav in his fifth -floeor 
Presidential Salte”’ m the 


many ways.” Md 


“What moderation really 


realities of a situation: you ™ore worthy candidate. 


limelight. He 

that he made 
of Chicago. 

He loves to stir up the animals, 

cubiect had done it with a king- 

the New Deal”—movwed to tears Preme Courts deris . 

some of the reporters who have School desegregation into the’ 


The motion to slay 
For 10 days before, cog 4 mitted for the time be 


Mr. Truman Timan 


The second was the convic- 
to leadership as to who we should 
ard-mov- *¥Pport.” 


that;) 
talked “moderation.” | 


not became rationalizations for the 
we route on which Mr. Truman's 
would find ourselves in a great/¢™otions led him. The ration- 
deal of trouble very quickly in — grow stronger by the 


Thus. Mr. Truman now has 
means is that you face all the 9° dowbt that his is the better, 
He 


D’Alesandro, who stays on as 


will do that with the problems to have made the fight even if 


was a heated suggestion that a|(Tex.) active candidacy affected 
committe wait on the Mayor his own, Chandler said: “Not 
and ask him how come hea bit. Take a good look at me. 
couldn't get more tickets and'I’m a real healthy candidate.” 
come to a meeting once in a Johnson suffered a heart at- 
while. tack last year, but no oo would 

have known it watching him 
Off on Ticket Hunt ‘run the Senate this year. > 
Mahoney calmed them down,’ the convention would deadlock 


expected that under the unit 
rule a majority would swing 
the 18 votes to Adlai Steven- 
son. 

There is strong Stevenson 
sentiment in the group, and 
many Maryland observers think 
that is where they will eventu- 
ally go. But former President' ie 
Harry S. Truman's backing of |i 
Averell Harriman, has halted) 
the gnove at least temporarily. 
| At its first caucus in the La- 
Salle hotel, the delegation ac-j 
cepted this advice from incom-} 
‘ing National Committeeman| 
Michael J. Birmingham: 
| “Things are getting more 
confusing by the minute. It 
looks like anyone's race. Our 
18 votes could be important. 
We don’t want to jump on one) 
bandwagon now and have to) 
jum on another when we! 

' down the stretch.” 
Second Place Not Mentioned 


Birmingham told the group it 
‘could wait until Wednesday, 
lor even until nomination day, | 
‘Thursday, before committing 
itself to a presidential candi- 
‘date. The question of Vice Pres- 
ident, which looked like the 
horse race two days ago, wasn't// 
even mentioned at the meeting. | 
uncom, | 
ing was || 


A Hickey-Freeman suit is recognizable 
at a glance. And many are the glances— 
admiring glances—that it receives! 


i 


7 


We Are Sole Agents for Hickey- 
carried unanimously. It was|} ' 
backed by the delegation — 
man, J. Millard Tawes, State 
‘Comptroller and a guberna-|j ‘ 
torial hopeful for 1958, and A 
George P. Mahoney, who lost 
‘the Senate primary race to 
‘Millard E. Tydings but won 
‘control of the party machine. 
M was reportedly 
working hard for Harriman. 
‘He told reporters he was “neu- 
tral.” But several delegates 
said he had been pushing Har- 
since Truman indorsed | 


Freeman Clothes in Washington 


: 


Agent for Cavanagh Hats and Bronzini Neckwear 


GOLDHEIMS 


1409 H STREET 


m. j 
Philip Dorsey, a top Mahoney fie 

lieutenant and platform com-|——— 
mittee member may have tip- 
ped Mahoney's hand with this 
comment: : 

| “— think we should follow 
i\President Truman on this 
i\thing and if we do we'll come 
‘out with a winner. We should 


SALTZ F id STREET 
look to George Mahoney for : \¥ 


Here’s 
why 


SALTZ F STREET IS 


SELLING OUT 


ENTIRE SUMMER STOCK 


It’s the established policy of Saltz F Street never 
fo carry over merchandise from one season to 
another. We are therefore selling out our entire 


‘Little Enthasiasm 


This evoked little apparent 
enthusiasm and Mahoney 
quickly suggested the group do 
‘nothing for the moment. 

Mahoney said he was much) 
‘more worried just now about 
how to get enough convention| 
hall tickets for Maryland visi- 
tors crowding into Chicago. 

Birmingham reported that 
‘Baltimore Mayor Thomas 


Promotion Approved : 


. Reuters 

AMMAN, Jordan, Aug. 12 
‘The Jordanian government has 
approved a Syrian proposal to 
\promote Syria's Minister to Jor- 
dan, Fuad Kadamani, to Ambas- 
sador and to raise his legation 
to embassy status. 


good uniess we did.” 


stock of summer merchandise at drastically re- 


covered Mrs. Roosevelt and Democratic platf . 
made others murmur: ~That Quite saiisfied. 


duced prices ... the lowest of the season. You'd 


| Convention Program 


‘ CHICAGO, Aug. 12 "#—Here 
‘s Mondays program ihe 
Democratic Nationa! 
tion 
.*¢All times are Eastern 
light.) 


for 
_onven 


Day 


FIRST SESSION 

| Opens 1 p. m 

- Invocation 

* Star Spangled Banner 
>, Opening remarks by Pau! M 
Butler, Democratic National 

_ hairman. 

‘Call for convention —Mrs 
Dorothy Vredenburch. Secre 
tary of National Committee. 

7 .Presentation of gavel—Gov 
Marvin Griffin of Georgia 

-~ Address of welcome—Mavyor 
“michard J. Daley of Chicas 

_» Address—Sen. Paul H. Doug 
Ses of Ulinois 

_~ Address— Jacob Mi 
-Ajiincig National 
“man 


Arvey. 


_* Address—James T. 
“Chairman of 
‘Committee. 
‘Resolution of thank. 
Mayor Daley and Host 
MRittee 
*_ Tribute te memory of the 
mete Athen W Rarkley and 
‘@hber Democrats who have ded 
“mance 1952 convent 
Report on temporary conven 
fion officers by Mrs. Vreden 
Durgh 
-, Address — Sen 
Hmathe:s of Fiori 


O Keefe 
Chicago Host 


toe 
Com- 


ve 


George A 
da, Chairman 


*2 


{ ommittee- | 


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woman still is the greatest.” Mrs. Roosevelt said she rated 
, was nothing tearful Adlai Stevenson's understand- 
about Mrs. Roosevelt herself, ing of foreign affairs ahead of 
however. Weertme two white that of Governor Harriman— 
orchids and a small hat made especialiy his “knowledge of 
f rows of fiwe different colors India and Africa.” 


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of Democratic Senatorial Cam 
paign Commitee 

Address— Reo Michact J 
Kirwan of Ohio. Cheirman of 
Democratic Congressional Cam 
paign Committee 
Appointment of chaplains 
Appointment of committees 

SECOND SESSION 

Opens 9 f m 
Invocation 
Presentation of colors. 
Star Spangled Banner 
Report of Democratic Nea 
nal Chairmen Butler 
Keynote film—Narrated by 
Sen. John F. Kennedy of Mas 
sachusetts 

Keynote address >y the tem- 
porary chairmen, Gov. Frank 
G. Clement of Tennessee. 


th 


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SHORT-SLEEVE SPORT SHIRTS, Were 
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BATISTE SHIRTS, Were $5.95 & $8.95.NOW 4.65 
BROADCLOTH PAJAMAS, Were $6.95. .NOW 4.95 
ENGLISH LISLE HOSE, Were $2...-..... NOW 8&8 
UNDER-SHORTS, Were $2.50 
BOXER SHORTS, Were $2.50 
COMBED COTTON T-SHIRTS, Were $!.50.NOW 99¢ 
WALKING SHORTS, Were $10 & 10.95.NOW 6.95 
SWIM TRUNKS, Were $10 
STRAW HATS 
NYLON MESH & CALFSKIN SHOES, 
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D.C., Territories Seek — 
To Form 30-Vote Grou 


Be & Stat Reporter ° 
CHICAGO, Aug. ating, ae rs 
trict and territorial Democratic : . 
Convention delegations met 
today to try to agree on candi- 
dates and issues and weld them- 
selves into a. 30-vote bloc. 

The idea is strength in num- 
bers. None of the six non- 
‘states represented here figures 
to have much bargaining power 
alone, with their three to six 
votes each. But if they could 
go into the convention hall as 
a 30-vote unit, they might ex- 
pect more recognition and a’ 
better chance for sharp home) 
rule and statehood platform) 
planks vet 

Delegates from the District,) | 
Alaska, Hawaii and the Virgin 
Islands met this noon at the 
Morrison Hotel and named an 
executive committee to seek 
agreement on candidates and 
issues. Delegates from Puerto 
Rico and the Panama Canal 
Zcne had not arrived, but 
were to be invited in when 
they did. 

J. C. Turner, chairman of 
the District delegation, sug- 
gested they limit their objec] 
tives to candidates for Presi- 
dent and platform issues of 
District home rule, statehood 
for the territories and civil 
rights 

‘We shouldn't be too ambi- 
tious or we may end up with 
nothing,” cautioned Turner.) 
Herbert P. Leeman, District) 
delegate, suggested the execu-| 
tive committee also think about | 
vice presidential candidates. | 

It may take some doing to 
get the six groups together. 
The District, Alaska, and Ha- 
waii with six votes each are all 
for Adlai Stevenson for the 
Number One spot. But Virgin 
Islands spokesmen said they 


Byrd Reported Urging 


before they commit scooting Joh mson Ori Ist Ballot 


to anything. No one knew who! 
Puerto Rico and the Canal| By Robert E. Baker 
Zone want. gaff Reporter 
An attempt to form such 8 CHICAGO, Aug. 12 — Vir-(tion from the Virginia delega- 
a ee eet! sinia’s delegation to the Demo-| tion.” 


far ) 
‘cratic National Convention ar-| Despite the pressure to give 
District delegates want & ck: te on 


, initial 
strong home rule indorsement'rived today amid reports of top 
in the’ platform. Alaska and|pressure to support Sen. Lyn- omy — ng ~~ tog oe Fee 
Hawaii want statehood. Theyidon Johnson (Texas) on the Hesew Trumen’s eutriaht in. 
would back each other on these ars convention ballot | derenment of New werk _— 
requests | It is understood , and report-|,4. 
= Tine District group also wants ed by several elegates, that enea'aievenaon's hecion wih 
@ strong civil rights platform Sen Harry F. Byrd (Va.) is the Vir inia delumation 
plank. District platform com-|making an effort in behalf of a & 
mittee members Belford V.'Johnson by telephone conver- Perhaps the most infivential 
Lawson and Pauline E. Shackle-sations with delegates i 
ton have been plugging for one! Washington. Byrd has been un- former Gov. John S. Battle. 
all week lable to attend the convention !t Was he who said Tru- 
District delegates will hold| because of his wife's illness. (™#"5 indorsement of Harriman 
their first caucus at 10 a m/ Resistance to a vote forperenatnense the possibility 
Monday in the Palmer House/Johnson is prevalent among |that the delegation would sup- 
suite of Charles E. Ford. dean/many Spe. honsens. As | Pallet Stevenson on the first 
, le ca n. LGwar reeden of . 
of Washington's criminal law Norfolk said: “We should show| This view was shared by dele- 
all the strength we can for@#tes Melvin Shreves of Ac- 
This is no time for/comack, Hale Collins of Cov- 
us to be backing dark horses." etn — John A. remy 
- trong|_The Virginia delegates—64/0 ingdon among the early 
hearings and decide how ‘with a half vote mm plus 44 4rrivals. Delegate Landon 


a stand to take on civil rights) iternates—will caucus at 10 Wyatt of Danville said Steven- 
end other issues. a. m. Monday to talk over 50m was helped, but “not neces- 
~ Turner indicated the delega!:rategy It is unlikely they Sarily on the first ballot.” He 
tion would delay backing @ vic€' yin) decide on a candidate at\favored a first-ballot indorse- 
presidential nominee until'y,5:° time More probably,|ment of Johnson. 

after the presidential nominee they will decide to hold off un-| These delegates point out 
is chosen. They will stick with +i) later in the week, pending that Harriman is considered 
Adlai Stevenson until he iS further developments, especi- ¢xtreme in his views indorsing 
nominated or releases them ally the civil rights plank in the Supreme Court's desegre- 
and would accept his vice presi- the platform. gation decision and Stevenson 
dential choice if he hasone. | One delegate, Thomas Broy- moderate, despite the latter's 
hill of Arlington, said he would | “Unqualified” support of the 
|propose at Monday's caucus decision last week 

‘that Virginia immediately go| ‘us, many delegates, pre 
lon record in support of Steven-\Viously lukewarm on Steven- 
‘son. son, now are willing to throw 

“Any other course will only t®eir support to him as a 
‘succeed in breaking up the|“Stop-Harriman” move. 
|Democratic party in Virginia) ‘!t is estimated by some in- 
‘and let the Republicans make fluential Virginia delegaté@s that 
headway. We should not fool|29 of the state's 64 “half votes” 
around with any dark horses.|4t the convention support Stev- 
\It's Stevenson or Harriman, |enson wholeheartedly at this 
‘and we had better get Steven-- moment. 

‘som in there as quick as pos- 
sible.” 

Gov. Thomas B. Stanley ar- 
rived this afternoon to lead the 
Old Dominion’s delegation, and 
immediately called the caucus. 
The Governor said: “If John- 
son is a serious candidate, he 
will receive serious considera- 


Internationa! News 


Sen. Stuart Symington (D-Me.) waves to well-wishers as 
he arrives at a Chicago hotel te attend a caucus meeting. 


They will get a re 
Lawson and Mrs. 
on the platform committee 


&. _—_—_------ 


‘HOT 
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Choice of Appetizer 


POT ROAST 
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Lemon 


Europeans Find 
Convention Dul 


LONDON, Aug 
liminaries of the 
Party Convention 
stirred up only a small ripple 
of interest today among ordi- 
nary Europeans 

There was not much about it 
in the newspapers and little 
discussion of Amergan politics 
among citizens. 


12 #—Pre- 


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We Serve DO. C.. Marylend 
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She's wearing the new, Seno. 
tone ‘7% hearing cid entirely at the car! 
@ Ne cord down her neck @ Nothing in her 
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Te discover the 


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enevet muse... 

be inconspicuous with @ %s-cunce 
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SONOTONE yee ee 

s ue | S417 Genrgie Ave, Steer Sprig ~ Siniew S008 


from Virginian in the delegation is 


Democratic _ 
in Chicago 


| THE 
oon 


WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Monday, August 13, 1956 3 


ia 


By Staff Reporters and News ServicesiCommitteeman Tracy S. Me- Harriman strengthened Steven. | 
CHICAGO, Aug. 12—The big Cracken explained that he had son.” | 
question today in rumor-roar-/suggested two delegates vote’ California: 68 votes. As the 
ing Chicago was the effect on|/for Stevenson instead of Harri- California dele gation reaf- 
state delegation votes of for--man because the Illinoisian ‘firmed “enthusiastic, loyal and. 
mer President Harry T. Tru-/might be the nominee and “I unanimous support” for Steven- 
man’s indorsement of Gov./don't want our state to be in'son, delegation leaders main- 
Averell Harriman for the Dem- 4 bad position.” Had the votes tained that Truman’s indorse- 
ocratie presidential nomina- been cast to conform to dele-/ment of Harriman may have’ 
tion. | eee te hee teeel weeny bag a helped — -— hurt Steven-; 
n or Harriman, or son's chances. “It removes an’ 

ne deer pattern ‘had emerged Stevenson. onus,” said Rep. John E. Moss, | 
| Lewisiana: 24 votes. The “that Stevenson was the former | 


—no band-wagon jump to the! : | 
iso L@uisiana delegation voted to President's choice—a fact which; 
New York gyno out that cast its unit support to Adlaijcould have hurt him in some} 


¢|Stevenson on the first ballot.|party circles.” 
. enson’s 
front-runner Adiat aoe as his Governor Earl K. Long said) Pennsylvania: 74 votes. 
support was 88 roc after the vote that any candi-\Go 
supporters would want. y vernor George M. Leader. 
date for Vice President would!who heads the second largest’ 

Such public action and com-|he acceptable to him exceptidelegation at the convention, 
ments as were available aré'sen Hubert Humphrey (D-jremains firmly convinced that’ 
listed below: Minn.) and Gov, G. Mennenithe Pennsylvania delegation’ 

Arkansas: 26 votes. After a Williams of Michigan. will be united in support of 
caucus featuring talks by both Colerade: 20 votes. The Stevenson. This runs counter 
Adlai Stevenson and GOV. Colorado delegation will cau-|to reports that some Philadel- 
Averell Harriman, Arkansas’ cus at 11 a. m. Monday, but|phia delegates are anxious to 
delegation remained in the un-jreports following an informal make a break toward Harri- 
i\decided and uncommitted cate- buffet today indicated that)man. 
gory. Gov. Orval Faubo, chair-Adiai Stevenson had about’ Wisconsin: 28 votes. Though 
man and chief spokesman of| 12% to 15 of the state’s votes. isubjected to personal pleas by 
the delegation, told the mem-| piorids: 28 votes. The Flor-- candidates or their chief con- 
bers “to get out and talk tO iq, delegation delayed its vention representatives, a 
the people and make up YOUr -sycus until 9 a. m. Monday/sharply divided Wisconsin dele- 
own mind. |pecause of late arrivals. Of gation voted to remain uncom- 

District of Columbia: 6 votes. the state’s total votes, 22 will mitted for either Stevenson or 
The delegation, committed to go to Adlai Stevenson because! Harriman. 
Stevenson, met with delegates of the preferential primary.) Towa: 24 votes. Like neigh- 
of five territories and posses-|The other six votes were origi- boring Wisconsin, a badly split 
sions in an attempt to seek &inaily bound to Sen. Estes Ke- lowa delegation holding its 
solid front of 30 votes on candi-\fayver and one observer said first caucus, avoided any test 


no convincing 


——— 


period before delegates com- 
mit themselves for strategic 
reasons. | 

Wyoming. 14 votes. In an in- 
formal, and thus nonbinding 
ballot, Harriman received 8% 
and Stevenson 5% votes, but! 
the figure did not reflect Har- 
riman’'s full potential. National 


dates and platform. (Full de- «four or five” of these were of strength between Stevenson 
tails in Column 1.) ‘leaning toward Stevenson. and Harriman. Present esti- 
scheduled for tonight was post-/cyijjen. Indiana Democratic of five votes over Harriman, 
poned until Monday because .nsirman. said he would not With the key to the outcome 
Tench, Secretary of the dele-aav but predicted Adlai Ste- Votes. 
gation, said “there is no more! vanson Bu) pe % of the Oklahoma: 28 votes. A caucus 
than before Mr. Truman's en-|¢,-.,er President Truman’s in- *¥PPport of Governor Harriman 
dorsement of the New Yorker.| 4,-<ement of Averell Harriman 'T the presidential nomination 
will go to Stevenson as a re- Indiana’s votes votes of the delegates to Har- 
' : riman’s 44, und 
sult of the state's presidential Missouri: 38 votes. Delegates an’s 44, under the unit rule, 
originally bound to Sen. Estes 4i ¢ Senat block to Harriman. 
Kefauver, but Tench said “at Vorite son candidacy of Senator) washington: 26 votes. Steven- 
Stuart Symington, welcome the 
itely | i y ‘ . | : se their delega 
a 7 REGS COwere Sven ernor Harriman. The theory in nal Acocieetan p> nny & 
5 the delegation is that this ; 
Griffin said he felt Mr. Tru-' and increases the prospect that a ag. og) acter and 
|man’s indorsement of Harriman) other “favorite son candidates ) "1. 4 thos howe an eee 
other” on the thinking of the 26 votes. 
Georgia delegation. This was| New Jersey: 36 votes. Though 
9 " . 
there was no wavering in the Jones ion fe a aa k arley and Adlai 
delegation’s liking for Steven-°° ae Ss ee % 
; ite son candidacy of Gov. 
‘pressed by one of Stevenson’s|¥°™° : 
itop political managers. Robert B. Meyner. One dele) ciicaGo, Aug. 12 (INS) 
| SB aneoven yng Be » : re hi Wine, previously pledged x James A. Farley, Democratic 
* Senator Estes Kefauver, has...” held a secret. hour-long 
|National Committeeman Jacob' stevenson. conference with Adlai E. Stev 
|Arvey, are firmly in the saddle. | : 
; J © saddle. Mississippi: 22 votes. Dele- he would throw his still-power- 
to impose the unit rule or to 
casas 7 agreed unanimously at &@ CAU-| dential nominee 
have a preconvention pol! on cus to withhold their vote for! Yattew ts ao siemuber ef te 
dent down state leader, put his 
anti-Stevenson ivenatie an be. r* civil rights plank of the National Conventon and has 
platform is agreed to. Governor) neon expected to go along with 
Mayor Daly describes thi , | 
“too high oe 2 * * the civil rights stand will CArry|tempt to wrest the nomination 
“great weight” with his dele-|+.., stevenson. 
gation decided in a caucus to) nosware: 10 votes. Dele|his 1 
"| | ong huddle with Steven- 
sixted Unth they nc, uncom gates, binding themselves to the! son, he told newsmen: “I'm un- 
iwinner. George P. Mahoney, in- ; 
ifluential heure in the d eo. |Support to Adlai Stevenson.|my mind... You'll know 
’ al Committeeman and chairman)is ripe to announce it.” 
ve ae 9 As emt of the delegation, voiced his’ so 
but one of North Carolina's waited “until the last minute 
delegates will vote for Steven- ... throw his harpoon at Steven 
a Beg be ne —— of view, Potter said, “I think’ 
? ee ruma®Mr. Truman's statement on) 
News and Observer. The lone 
dissident, Daniels quipped, is Mebe Driving In 
with Harriman when he arrived 
In Chicago, KAR KOMFORT 
Dominion’s delegation is sched- 
uled to caucus at 10 a. m. Mon- Auto Air 
sentiment for Adlai Stevenson 
among delegation members, LOWEST PRICE QUALITY 
NI HE MARKET 
sure from leaders to support wate dh tees rer 
Sen. Lyndon Johnson (D-Tex. 
outcome will be a waiting 
plus installation 
NO MONEY DOWN 
The AUTO CENTER 
12th & K Ste. N.W. ST. 3-4255 


Florida: 28 votes. A caucUS) [ndiana: 26 votes. Charles ™ates give Stevenson a margin 
of late arrivals. Ben mont ,oj) his delegation until Thurs- ‘Ying in three uncommitted 
of an Averell Harriman boom”) tj ,.<jer state’s votes. He said °f delegates made official its 
Twenty-two of Florida's votes|.. 14g have little influence on /20USh Stevenson received 11 
primary. The other six were bound by a unit rule to the fe the state's vote will go as a 
least four or five” were defi- Seumsan tedanseanens of Gee, son backers threatened to de- 

la: 32 votes. Marvin' «breaks up the Stevenson bloc’ said the delegation was evenly 
‘had “no effect one way or the may swing behind Symington.” claimed they have 20 of the 
taken as an_ indication that |Senerally counted is the Stev- 
son. A similar view was ex- 35% votes pledged to the Confer for Hour 
gate with a half vote, Irwin Le 
kingmaker in the New Deal’ 
cagos Mayor Richard Daly andijndicated he will now vote for 
enson today and stirred reports’ 
a caucus of delegates voted not gates led by Gov. J. P. Coleman|¢,,) support to the 1952 presi- 
delegates. Paul Powell, a dissi- any particular candidate until)... Yerk Gelemation to’ the 
tween 10 and 14 delegates.\~oieman made it plain thatiGoy. Averell Harriman’s at-| 

Maryland: 18 votes. The dele-| gation. But when he emerged from 
UNOS BAKE they con. spe *'unit rule, pledged their fullicommitted. 1 haven't made up| 
tion, is reportedly trying to ¥- S. Potter, Delaware Nation-ichoice whén I think the time 

resentment that Mr. Truman 
son, according to Jonathan ” From a Delaware point! 
and now editor of the Raleigh 
a young fellow who had lunch Washington « Pleasure 

Virginia, 32 votes. The Old 
day. Although there is a strong Cc onditioner 
there is also considerable pres- 
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Hecht stores and a sizable staff 
would eontinue- be mairt- 


Total of Banks Washington iar Closes Store’ 
Total of Banks | = Silene _ Bhat Rae Tea W ncn 
In U = Drops u S ] nh e ~ S ‘n On nights New York and Sate il fe 2 


branches have been built in 368 ACRES 
thse areas in recent years. 7 iq rapidly growing saletent 
one under construction will be] County, Virginia, 13 Mi. from 
opened this fall and plans for sais oat aot . 1956 

an additional suburban branch By order Jha W. Denn. Jomes 


Levi emphasized that’ this, have been announced. '] Simmonds & LeRoy £. Batchelor, 
Levi tndicated that a num- 


— ~e — — oe ber of the store personnel 

company’s “Abramson’s” store! .ou1g be transferred to other 

numerary income that is pow-|in Flushing, L. 1, which has 

erful, but it is difficult © been operated as an independ. 

measure, because we have — lent wnit 

MODOrnUrnetary Yncome tefter| Levi added that-the 14th st. 
store no longer fitted in with’ 


price adjustment) has been as 
substantial and as broadly dis-|the company’s merchandising| 
and expansion pattern and the 


tributed as it is today. Many 
other conditions are different capital investment will be ré 
invested in new stores more 


now from those in the 1920s. 
Most dispassionate business 
analysts will agree that “there |closely related in character to 
its main stores in the Wash- 
ington and Baltimore trading 


the Hecht Co., announced here 
‘that Hecht’s 14th st., New York 
store closed Saturday after 56- 
years of operation. 


United Prese > > 

The Federal Deposit Imsur-| Of the 14,284 banks open in V oo 
ance Corp. reported yesterday| 1955, 13,457 had their deposits conomic lew ee Mae ee a ee By Harold B Dorsey 
that the number of banks in insured uP to pg with the | 
the United States declined in Federal Deposit Insurance 4 . 
1955 for the eighth straight Corp. last year, the report said evidence of Strain Noted | 
year The agency, set up —— : rage - 

Sinc " line the New Deal to protect bank} “NEVE efore in history 
Bagg x tr a ga a deposits in case of bank fail-- have so many treasury chiefs 
has been reduced 3.2 per cent\UTes or other losses, paid out} and central bank governors 
to 14.284 The drop was due $6.8 million to depositors in| so often predicted impending 
chiefly to mergers five banks last year to cover) catastrophe 

However, the number of Pies the agency was or- BiB vy ry 

r ic < 1946 * J « ' eee 
—\ecmegg ln mongy = Mend d in 1934, it has paid out) with so few of 


there were 4220 branches, in |#4nize | 
cluding banking facilities main-/°F arranged for others to pay! their own peo- 
ples and poll- 


tained at military installations \a total of $337.9 million to de-| , 
ticians paying 


last year there were 7391. an positors in 429 banks for losses 
increase of 75.1 per cent. About|for various causes. By the end) so little atten- 


four out of five of the 475 banks|Of 1955 it had recovered $305) tion to m 
which have gone out of exis million of this, largely through)... as is the 
tence since 1946 were convert-|S¢lling assets of the affected case in West- 
ed to branches of other banks.|>anks. It expects to collect an| ern Europe 
other $13.1 million, leaving it since mid-1955. 
with a net loss of $19.7 million) «fyery ‘over- Dorsey 
for its 21 years of Operation, joaded’ national economy 
he report said is being strained beyond its 
productive. capacity Every 
gevernment from Finland to 
Italy is trying to stem the in- 
flationary tide. That is why a 
financial crisis is developing 
underneath the boom. The 
curious thing is that it may 
be brought about deliberate- 
ly by credit controls and 
other restraints ... It is safe 
to expect a further tighten- 
ing of the European credit 
reins...” (Dr. Meichoir Palyi, 
The Commercial and Finan- 
cial Chronicle, July 12, 1956). 

“Inflation is veiling a fact: 
that America is living beyond 
its means ... Now you will 
doubtless ask me: Is a crisis 
| unavoidable? Under the given 
circumstances: Yes! 

“It could be avoided on one 
indispensable condition: That 


request to A 
Aucts., 006 E Gt. NW. Wash 
D. .C. 


phasis on technological devel- 
opments and population 
, that were so promi- 
nent in the late 1920s. It is 
also a fact that the economies 
of the industrially important 
nations of the world (includ- 
ing the United States) are 
“over-loaded,” insofar as debt- 
stimulated—and government- 
stimulated—demand for goods 
and services has been strain- 
ing the available supply. The 
continued rounds of wage- 
price increases would seem to 
prove it. 

Yet, there is another side of 
the story. Although popula- 
tions have been growing since 
Adam and Eve, the amplitude 
of the postwar trend has been 
in excess of long-term normal. 
Technological progress was 
being made im the 1920s, but 
here again progress has prob- 
ably been more rapid in re- 
cent years than the long-term 
experience. There can be little 
doubt that the acquisitive in- 
stincts of people throughout 
the world have been much 
more dynamic sirice the end 
of World War II than they 
were before. 

eos 
estate prices 
become inflated, and these 
inflated values have been 
mortgaged to obtain current 
spending power. Consumers’ 


automobiles and _ television 
sets are also rather heavily 


A Very Few Minutes 


is much to be said on th 
sides.” As I see it; the vulnar- 
abilities in the world-wide 
economic situation —some of | 4T¢45- 

which have been noted by Drs.| He explained that Hecht's) 
Somary and Palyi—should be |j;4th st. sales volume had be-| 
recognized. Th wage-price gun to decline and that! 
spiral does continue: a notice Ichanges in operations had not 


able part of our business ac- 
tivity is dependent upon debt |averted an operating loss. At) 
‘the same time, the company | 


expansion; loans have become 

a larger proportion of the|has greatly expanded its 
backing for our money sup-'Baitimore and Washington op- 
ply; there has been consider- ‘erations. 

able anticipatory purchasing| Three large suburban 
of consumers and producers 
durable goods; and there has | 

been a return of the “new , 

era” complacency which tends Construction Contract 
to encourage the kind of ex- . 

cesses that subsequently have Awards Down in July 


to be corrected. 
To the degree that these | NEW YORK, Aug. 12 @ 
ces Construction contract awards 
fundamental vulnerabilities in 
the economy have increased, %¢clined in July compared with 
ee |@ year ago, but still set a record 


underlying business and in- |‘ 
in this year’s seven-month total, 
vestment risks have increased. W. Dodge Corp. reported 


But neither Dr. Somary nor 
Dr. Palyi had anything to say today. 

about timing. They indicate| By the end of July. awards in 
that a maladjustment is stil] 1956 totaled $15,347,518,000, or 


is all it will take to pay your 

monthly household bills, 

once you open a checking 

account. YouTl simply write , 
checks at home, and aS 
safely mail them! 


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She won't get a medal. Nor «il! 
the thousands of others who are 
giving their time and energy to 
the coming election. They should 
all get a medal—every one of 
them, the registration and election 
clerks, the precinct workers, and 
all the others— your neighbors who 
are making it so easy for you to 
protect your rights by voting. 
But all their work is for nothing 


the government renounces its 
fear of the public and finds 
the courage to express and act 
upon its convictions. This, in 
the democracies of our time, 
seems to me no longer pos- 
sible . The governments 
are but obedient slaves of the 
‘inflationists’;: at each 


' step they call out, just like a 


nursemaid to the baby: ‘Only 


new -« 


mortgaged. But real purchas- 
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siderably above the purchas- 
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in the process of creation. 8 per cent more than the same 
which is just another way of Seven months of last year. New 
saying that the inflationary records were set in all major 
trends persist. That is impor- construction categories for the 
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— eee 


|}once more and that’s all.’” 
| (Felix Somary; Doctor of Law 
| and Political Economy, Zur- 
ich, Switzerland: from the 
|Commercial and Financial 
Chronicle of July 26). 


DR. SOMARY indicated he 
was inspired to state his 
iviews by an article written 

Fedo Ce | by Prof. Sumner Slichter in 
: * | December, 1955, in which the 


, latter is reputed to have said: 
Fall Up! 


“The days when this country 
@ 


unless you do protect your rights 

unless you regwter in time and 
vote on election day. Be sure 
you're registered, keep your voice 
in government, and help make 
this November the biggest vote | 
producer in history. 


U.S. to Have Displays 


In 12 Overseas Fairs 


By Bernard D. Nossiter 
Staff Reporter 

Bay yn ere = will also exhibit at Izmir, Tur- 
chines and “do-it-yourself” - 
working tools from the United key; mane Afghanistan; Stock- 
States wili go to Zagreb, Yugo- holm, Sweden; Damascus, Sy- 
slavia, next month when the ria; Salonika, Greece; Bari, 
Government for the first time Italy; Vienna, Austria; Bogota, 
takes space -in a Communist Colombia: Bangkok, Thailand: 
nation’s international trade Ghent, Belgium, nad Tunis, Tu- 
fair nisia. 

The Commerce Department; Other Government agencies 
‘yesterday also listed 11 other have taken space at London's 
fairs in Europe, Asia and/Food Fair and Berlin's indus- 
South America where it will |trial show. 
sponsor exhibits this year. | Last year, Commerce spent 

No green light has yet been nearly 65 per cent of its funds 
given to Government displays in the Middle East and Far East 
at Soviet bloc trade shows. Of- and expects a big concentration 
ficials studying this question, there again this year. In Asia, 
however, have concluded that Officials say, the Communist ex- 
the United States should show hibits offer us our stiffest com- 
her wares behind the Iron Cur- petition 
tain. The Chinese Communists, es- 

Last May, Harrison T. Mc- pecially, have staged elaborate 
Clung, the new Director of displays, leasing more than 
Commerce's Office of Interna- three times the space Com- 
tional Trade Fairs, said the merce took at Jakarta, Indone- 
Government would be showing Sia, and Karachi, Pakistan. 
at Soviet bloc fairs next year.| While sales are of secondary 
Commerce Secretary Sinclair interest to Government exhibi- 
Weeks promptly sat on him, tors, business isn't completely 
and has insisted since that the overlooked. One coup was the 
matter is still under study. $100,000 worth of pressure 

There is much unéertainty pumps sold in three days to the 
over whecher American busi- Japanese at Osaka. | 
nessmen will set up their own in Europe, where business 
booths at Soviet fairs. Unlike generally has better market 
the Government-sponsored prospects, private exhibits are 
shows which aim chiefly at dis- tied into the Government dis- 
playing a rosy picture of Amer-|play’s theme. 
ican life, the businessmen want| At Zagreb, this will be 
primarily to sell goods. “America at Home.” It will in- 

Communist Party Secretary clude a United States Informa- 
Nikita Khrushchev recently|tion Agency exhibit showing 
told the touring Sen. Allen the life of a steel worker and 
Eliender (D-La.), that the Rus-|his family. Singer sewing ma- 
| TT IS A fact that one hears sians stood by an earlier offer chines, a Chevrolet and a 
‘today the same reassuring of space if the businessmen |power lawn mower will also be 
| phrases, and the same em- would come. in the American pavilion. 

The Commerce trade fair pro-| In a statement, Weeks called 
gram has $3,650,000 to spend'this year’s trade fair program 
through next June, more than|“the largest and most effective” 
$1 million more than last year’s'ever. | 

'“@ appropriation and the biggest; Since the program began in’ 
bankroll it has had since the 1954, an estimated’20 million 
project began two years ago. persons in 20 countries have 

With products borrowed from visited the Government's dis 
private industry, Commerce plays. 


Never a 


BETTER CAR— 


Never a 


Published as a public serv- 
ice in cooperation with The 
Advertising Council and 
the Newspaper Advertw- 
ang Executwes Association. 


can experience anything 
worse than moderate or pos- 
sibly mild depressions are 
gone forever.” 

To quote further from Dr. 
Somary’s article: “Shortly 
after the (1929) crash, Frederic 
| Lewis Allen humorously de- 
| scribed this boom: “The Amer- 
‘ican envisioned an America 
| set free from poverty and 
toil. He saw a magical order 
built on the new science and 
the new prosperity, airplanes 
darkening the skies — and 
smartiy dressed men and 
women, spending, spending 
with the money they had won 
by being farsighted enough to 
foresee, way back in 1929, 
what was going to happen. 
The everlasting reiterated 
phrase of the day was: Condi- 
tions are fundamentally 
sound.’ 

“All of this sounds so fa- 
miliar ... Crises come pre- 
cisely when—and because— 
the mass of men will not be 
lieve in them ” 

The foregoing views are 
the subject of serious discus- 
sions among business anatysts 
today. It is quite evident from 
their arguments that Drs 
Somary and Palyi believe 
quite emphatically that the 
inflationary trends through- 
| out the world have built up, 
and are continuing to build 
up, a serious maladjustment. 


ee ee ae 


a 
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Autumn is no longer the end of the transat- 
lantic tourist season. It’s now the beginning of 
a special travel season— perfect for an un- 
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experienced vacationists prefer to go. As 
proof of it you'll be interested to know that 
\ugust-through-October travel to Europe has 
increased two and a half times during the past 
six years. Cunard alone offers 39,698 choice 
accommodations during these Autumn Thrift 
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4 ° fe wow bn B 
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Suez Parley Bid 


struggling to help them keep Union would come to Egypt's 
their. dignity, rights and 2id in case of war. 


‘ This morning a flotilla of 
sovereignty. Soviet-built warships flying the 
Egyptian flag arrived in ar 
andria harbor, apparently as 
result of the arms deal Set 
signed with the 
bloc earlier this year. The area 
was sealed off to newsmen. 

At the same time, the 10,000 
strong General Congress of 


[Nasser was asked how many 
troops Egypt now has. He re- 
plied: 

(“We are preparing for war 
in case we are attacked. There- 
fore I cannot give you any 
figures.” 

[Western experta estimate 
Egypt has 100,000 regulars plus 
50,000 national guardsmen and 
some thousands of “liberation 
army” volunteers.) 

Nasser read a 12-page speech 
te 300 foreign correspondents 
in the defunct Lower House of 
Parliament. It was one of the 
mildest he has given since he 
nationalized the Suez Canal 
But his words were blunt when 


newsmen questioned him after- 


ward 

His proposal for an Eeyptian- 
sponsored Suez conference was 
a significant concession to the 
West. He said he made it in 
the interest of “preserving 


Nasser Says He Barred 


Billion to Aid Canal 


CAIRO, Egypt, Aug. 12 
President Nasser told the 
Egyptian people in a radio 
apeech tonight the World 
Bank had offered Egypt a 
billion dollar loan to enlarge 
the Suez Canal but he re- 
jected it. He said he was 
offered the money “even to 
build a new canal.” 

He rejected the offer, he 
said deciaring, “we have 
enough troubles with the 
eanal we have.” 

Nasser said World Bank 
President Eugene Black made 
the offer. 

{In Washington, a spokes. 
man for the World Bank said 
there Was no comment on 
Nasser’s statement.) 


international peace.” He sug- 
gested no specific time or place 
for such a meeting. 

His rejection of the London 
invitation means the confer- 
ence will open Thursday with 
representatives from 22 na- 
tions, including India and 
Russia. Greece was the only 
other nation to reject an invi- 
tation. 

“The Egyptian Government 
cannot consider the proposed 
conference with all the attend 
ant circumstances as an inter 
national conference competent 
to take decisions,” Nasser said 

He refused to answer a ques. 
tion on whether the Saviet 


Sudanese organizations in 
Cairo called for formation of a) 


Sudanese volunteer contingent 
for Egypt's new national “lib- 
eration army.” 

Nasser said the London con- 
ference “has no right whatso- 
ever to discuss any matter fall- 
ing within the jurisdiction of 
Egypt or relating to its sov 
ereignty over any part of its 
territory.” 

_/Nasser’s attack contained 
many points similar to an at- 
tack on the conference by Rus- 
sia, although Soviet 


Communist 


Foreign | 


S es 


United Press 


Bright Outlook 


Iva Synek, 22-year-old singer 
from the Paris Opera, arrived 
in New York aboard the Tle 
de France with a smile on her 
lips. Told it would take five 


Minister D. T. Shepilov will) years before she could be- 


attend the talks. 


France of 
national peace and security” 
with their military prepara- 
tions. He said they were a 
threat to force Egypt to give 
up part of its territory. 

“The Egyptian government 
is willing to sponsor with other 
governments signatory to the 
Constantinople Convention of 
1888 a conference to which 
would be invited other govern. 
ments whose ships pass through 
the Suez Canal for the purpose 
of reviewing the Constantinople 
Convention and considering the 
conclusion of an agreement be- 
tween all these governments re 
affirming and guaranteeing 
freedom of navigation through 
the Suez Canal,” he said 

“That agreement would be 
registered with the Secretariat 
of the United Nations and pub- 
lished by it. 


“The door would be left open 
for the adherence of other gov- 
ernments to that agreement 
whenever required.” 

The 1888 Convention, signed 
by nine nations, guaranteed 
passage of ships of all nations 
through the canal in peace or 
war. 

Most of Nasser’s declaration 
was a detailed legal attack on 
the communique of Britain, 
France and the United States 
which convened the London 
conference 

He condemned the Anglo 
French contention that the 
Suez was an international wa- 
terway while under control of 


Russia pro 
posed a 46-nation conference. | 

Nasser accused Britain and 
“endangering inter- 
the nominationally private Suez 


come a citizen, Iva vowed te | 


do it in three. 


— -_-—— 


Canal Co. 

He said the Western eco- 
nomic and military moves 
since the nationalization of the 
10i-mile canal amounted to 
“collective colonialism.” 

He denied Egypt would press 
for .“internationalization” of 
Western oi] resources in the 
Arab world in retaliation for 
the Western moves 

But he accused Britain and 
France of “planned conspiracy 
aimed at starving and threaten 
ing the Egyptian people.” 

The speech climaxed a hectic 
week for Nasser. He met with 
his cabinet in several extraor 
dinary sessions and conferred 
almost constantly with diplo- 
mats of other nations, particu- 
lariy the.- Soviet .and Indian 
ambassadors. 

Just before the news confer- 
ence today he talked with V. K 
Krishna Menon, India’s roving 
trouble-shooter who stopped 
en route to the London confer. 
ence. 

He went into the conference 
with the full support of the 
Arab League's political com- 
mittee. Delegates of eight Arab 
states announced a resolution 
expressing “full backing for 
(Egypt) in every measure she 
has taken” in’ th® canal dis 
pute 

Nasser, nattily dressed in a 
blue lounge suit, smiled broad 
ly and spoke softly into the 
battery of microphones. 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
fh ee 


’ 


Monday, August 13, 19546 ‘ 


— 


IKE—From Page I 


sibility, an executive decision, 
and when those decisions are 
pmade, we want to support them 
if we can in conviction and con-| 
science. Until they are made, 
we don’t speculate on them.” 

The American position at 
London, as described here, ap- 
peared to have been sketched 
only lightly at the White House 
conference. It clearly is less; 
than the British and French: 
are seeking but is closer to 
what several of the British) 
Commonwealth members and 
other nations to be represented 
at London would like to see.) 
On the basis of Egyptian Presi- 
dent Gamal Abdel Nasser'’s re- 
marks in Cairo yesterday it 
may offer a way to bridge the 
gap and prevent a war. 


Points to Difficulty | 


This American proposal 
would be in line with the White! 
Howse statement which said) 
that President Eisenhower and. 
Dulles had “made clear that 
the United States” would seek 
a solution “with the objective) 
of safeguarding the interests of 
those dependent on the canal 
as well as recognizing the legit- 
imate interests of Egypt.” 

The statement pointed out, 
however, “the difficulty § in 
achieving a constructive solu. — 
tion” during the London con- 
ference, expected to last about 
a week. 

There was discussion yester- 
day around the Cabinet table 
of the United Nations to which 
the Dulles proposal, if accept- 
ed, presumably would be tied 

Sen. Styles Bridges (R-N. H.) 


a, 
be 


Se nen no 
a PR ern ee EI BS es Ve 
———_ 


- — 7 >» 
ae 
= ake 


In Row Over 


said the Administration was’) VALLETTA, Malta, Aug. 12 
“going to the conference to ex- q—Socialist Premier Dom Min- 
plore every way possible at toff forcibly cut the British-li- 
the conference table and censed Malta radio off the air 
through the method of the today in a dispute over Suez 
United Nations to seek a rea-| policy with the Island's British 
sonable solution.” He said that Governor General. 
if there was no peaceful solu-. The Premier ordered men to 
tion, “we'll have to take sterner cut all the lines distributing 
measures — or someone will|/Malta radio broadcasts after 
have to take sterner measures.” the station refused to broadcast 
But those who attended |a statement from him. 
agreed that there had been no| The action was a major chal- 
talk of calling a special session lenge to British control of its 
of Congress. Bridges, however,|second most important base in 
said, if the situation grew more, the Mediterranean. Only Cy- 
serious. “I could well conceive prus outranks it in strategic im- 
of it.” portance. ) 
Of the nine Democrats on) Later tonight, however, Min- 
hand at the White House yes-toff conferred with the British | 
terday, six had been flown in on Governor and called off his 1- 
a special Air Force plane from/™4n rebellion. He announced 
Chicago where they were gath- that all arrangements a 
ered for the Democratic Nation- "ected wig oe 0 oy 
al Convention opening today oye og full sodpataiion “ 
,They returned to Chicago ON|the Maltese government 
the same plane immediately The dispute concerned Brit- 
after gp merge. ore, ag ish préparations for using this 
ar Res abiie ony = © island as a major base in the 
a military buildup brought about 
Rayburn Upset by Egypts nationalization of 
. the Suez Canal, and the evacu- 
Speaker Sam Rayburn (D-\ ation of Britons from the 
Tex.), asked on arrival what he |» -oubled area: 
theuget about being called’ Mintoff’s action today stem- 
here from Chicago, refused to! med frem Governor General 


Uni Press 
House Speaker Sam Rayburn (left) and Senate Majority 
Leader Lynden B. Johnson are shown yesterday as they 
left Washington National Airport te attend a White House 
conference on matters involving the Sues Canal. 


Malta Radio Cut Off Air 


comment. Then he shot ‘back: | 
“You wouldn't print it if I did 
tell you.” He said he was in 
“an awful hurry—lI've got to 
get back to Chicago.” 

Rayburn was reported to 
have repeated the same theme 
in a somewhat more joculer 


Most 


Sir Robert Laycock’'s order that 


that connection. No Democrat 
did, he said. 


Gets 
Mr. Eisenhower had received 


Nasser’s Answer 


*\ 


U.S. Leaders Hear Dulles|Suez Talk Statement 
Outline Plan for Suez 


Statement by the White 
, | House on the President's talk 
| with congressional leaders: 

; : 

| The President expressed his 
‘appreciation for the attend- 
ance, at considerable incon- 
venience, of the members of) 
Congress p t. He said 
he considered attendance 
as important in view of 
London Conference on 
Suez matter, scheduled to be 
convened on Aug. 16th with 
the United States as a partici- 
pant. 

The President and the Sec- 
retary of Statae then reviewed 
the situation and the actions 
taken thus far by the United 
States to deal with it, and the 
preparations for the London | 
Conference. Mr. g 
described the bearing of pos- 
‘sible events in the Middle 


East upon the petroleum situa. __ 


tion. 
The President and the Sec- 
retary of States pointed out 


Morocco Ousts 
French Police 


Reuters | 

RABAT, Morocco, Aug 12. 
Notices were delivered this 
weekend to 247 French police-| 
men in the Moroccan police! 
force giving them 48 hours to 
hand in their arms and their | 
police cards and to leave 
Morocco by Sept. 1. 

Moroccan police authorities | 
said economy reasons prompted | 
their action. More than 
French police remained in the 
force when it was transferred 
to Moroccan control after the 
grant of Moroccan independ- 
ence earlier this year. 


Suez Policy 


all harbors be cleared where 
fiying boats stop over on flights 
from the Suez Canal zone to 


Britain. The planes are evacu- 
ating British women and chil- The Moroccan decision is the 


dren. first measure of a collective 

Mintoff called the action a "4ture directed against pre-in- 
violation of fishermen’s rights. dependence French services in 
But Rediffusion Service, which Morocco. Talks have opened 
broadcasts to the islands under Detween the French Embassy 
license from the imperial gov- 294 the Rabat government on 
ernment, refused to carry his the dismissals. 
declaration. 

The Premier met with his 
Cabinet during the night and 
today ordered Rediffusion’s fa-' Reuters 
cilities cut. Men with clippers) HONGKONG, Aug. 12—An. 
ae Se poles and official delegation of former 
sever e lines. | 

Mintoff declared that “Malta '8"-ranking Japanese military 
must be consulted” in the Suez Officers arrived in Peiping to- 
crisis, particularly at a time day for a short visit to Commu- 
when Britain could “lose its nist China at the invitation of 
head.” the Chinese People’s Institute 

The Malta government car- of Foreign , Affairs, Peiping 
ried its defiance of the Gover- radio reported. 
nor General further by order- 
ing its central Office of InfOr~| peegernnee 
mation not to handle publica- jee 
tion oft he British order warn- F 
ing boats away fromt he land-** 
ing areas. e 

Mintoff has been leader of a P= 
campaign to gain additional? =~ ~~. 4 = # 
rights for the island colony by|*> | i 
incorporating it with Britain {8 
with rights of representation in Gy 
the London Parliament. te 


' 
: 


Japanese Visit China 


vited Democrats did not come. 

Sen. Thomas C. Hennings Jr. 

(Mo.) and Reps. McCormack 

(Mass) and Carl Vinsen (Ga.). Get fast, seething relief 
Also present were Central frem peintul sunburn 


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tone as the conference began. 
He appeared to be somewhat word shortly before the meet- 
mollified, however, on leaving ing began of Nasser’s Cairo 
for he commented, when asked statement rejecting an invita-/Secretary Gordon Gray, State > Mong tires a 
if it had been worth coming tion to the London meeting. He|Department Legal Adviser Wisatiicie’ Gar golesa 
to Washington: referred to it in his opening|Herman Phieger and several)... sites, tes. 

“They thought it was—and I remarks. The tone of the Nas- White House aides including) » TReasuas 
guess it was.” iser statement seemed to lower Snyder. | VOOR NOVSENCL 

' 


Intelligence Agency chief Al- with Arm & Hammer Bak- 


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frequent 


The President opened the!the tension somewhat. 
conference by thanking the; psy Dewey Short (R-Mo.) . : 
‘Senators and Representatives|ommented Nasser “has yield- Indonesia and Soviet 
for coming to Washington “atl ad a bit.” Sen. Alexander Wiley 


7 Sign Trade Agreement 
I considerable inconvenience.” | ¢R wisc.) said the outcome at gz AS | 
eee | After some preliminary re|London depends in part on| Reuters 


Bethesda © Rockville © Wheaton © Silver Spring © Northwest © Southeas! 


if We're 90-Day Wonders! 
| Cay Sears taens Se, i tarps mEMTCS. stare 
marks, he turned the con|whether Nasser’s “Hitler com-| JAKARTA, Indonesia, Aug.! ah. 4. 

ference over to Dulles who/plex” changes. If not, he added, 12—Indonesia and Russia today | 

sketched the general back-|“we may have a lot of trouble. signed a trade agreement but| 


ground of the Suez crisis grow-|. w id one Congressman 
ing out of Nasser’s nationaliza- ley said on gre details were not immediately 


‘had asked what would happen 


disclosed. 


tion of the Suez Canal Co. On i¢ there was no agreement at 
July 26. Dulles next outlined; ondon. He said the answer 


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ithe American objectives at Lon-| was that “we will have to wait 
don and spoke of what Johnson’ developments.” 

described as “the possible ef-| wurray Snyder, 
fect of the developments,”|white House press 
especially “on this Nation.” 


Soviet mission head—I. F. Se-' 
assistant michasnov, vice minister for 
oe thane te oe stame for |oretan trade—and Dr. Suban-' 
sai re were o—secreta eneral of th 
Johnson declined to go be-'any further similar meetings. ae Pavel rehire r 
yond that when asked if there Snyder said Dulles did most of 
was discussion of the “possi-¢he talking with the President 
bility of hostilities” breaking interrupting from time to time. 
out. The meeting lasted from 12:04 
, to 1:24 p. m. 
[Radforé, Flemming Attend The President and Vice Pres- 
| Adm. Arthur )W. Radford,| ident Nixon sat in their usual 
chairman of the Joint Chiefs\ places at the Cabinet table. 
of Staff, was present but was| Dulles, Flemming and these) 
reported only to have answered congressional leaders also 
a few questions of “minor” im- were at the table: Johnson, 
portance. Rayburn, George, Bridges, 

Defense Mobilizer Arthur) Wiley, Short, Smith, Sens 
Flemming with the aid of/Farle C. Clements (D-Ky.), 
charts, described the possible/Theodore F. Green (D-R.L), 
effect of loss Middle East oil to|/Richard B. Russell (D-Ga.), 
the West and the alternate| William F. Knowland (D-Calif), 
sources of supply, chiefly -in' Eugene D. Millikin (RColo.)| 
the United States, Canada and and Léverett Saltonstall (R-| 
Venezuela, for which con-|Mass.) and Reps. Carl Albert 
tingency some plans have been | (D-Okla.), Thomas E. Morgan’) 
made. \(D-Pa.), A. S. J, Carnahan (D-| 

Senate Foreign Relations| Mo.), Joseph W. Martin Jr. (R- 
\Committee Chairman Walter F.|Mass.), Charles A. Halleck (R- 
George (D-Ga.) said there was/Ind.), Leslie C Arends (R-IIL), 
‘no talk of American military Leo E. Allen (R-II1.), Robert B. 
disposition in the Mediterra- Chiperfield (R-IIL) and John 
nean. He commented that “I'm M. Vorys (R-Ohio). Three in-' 
satisfied we are moving in the 
iright direction. I consider the, 
situation a grave one, but not 
necessarily hopeless.” He said 
the Democrats were not asked 
te indieate whether they sup-| 
ported Dulles’ position at Lon-’ 
don. 

But another participant, who 
asked to remain anonymous,’ 
said “they gave us plenty of 
opportunity to speak up” in 


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Partial Text of Reply 


Reuters 
LONDON, Aug. 12—Follow- 
ing is a partial text of Egyp- 
tian President Gamal Abdel 
Nasser’s statement rejecting 
the invitation to the London 


| THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD- 


by Nasser on Suez | cn = de wnt 7 


Egypti interna- but by all the f qroene SS ae ie ee ee 
an Egyptian company rna- but Dy all the free peopie an ereignty of any of her part. 
tional status clearly shows that those nations who rid them-'rherefore the invitation te eee to join © 
the three governments who selves of colonial rule after @\.u-% » conference cannot be 
issued the tripartite statement long struggle and those who arejaccepted by Egypt. : 


intend to deprive Egypt of one struggling for a guarantee of| Egypt believes that it is es 
sential to do everything within 


any issue concerning the sov- Nations Secretariat 
which would publish 
\fact and defended this view leave it open for the rest 
‘before the mixed courts in 
this country. 

The British government in a 
power of attorney submitted by, 
its representatives to the Mixed 


conference on the Suez Canal, 
as later broadcast by Cairo 
radio in Arabic, monitored 
and translated in London: 


A communique of the Egypt- 
lan Government concerning the 
Egyptian Government's reply 
on the Suez Canal: 

On July 26, the Egyptian 
Government announced the na- 
tidnalization of the Suez Canal 
Company and in accordance 
with this a special law was is- 


sued under which the share- 


holders of the canal were pro- 


Court of Cessation in Alexan- 
‘dria in 1939 said the Suez Canal 
Company is a legal body rec- 
ognized by Egyptian internal 
law and cannot be otherwise, 
and it is definitely subject to 
Egyptian laws. 

It is true that this company 
was established under the name) 
of Universal Suez Canal Mari-' 
time Company, but wha’ is the 
legal effect of this title? The 
fact remains that this name 
cannot deprive the company of 
its Egyptian nationality, as it 
is Egyptian, according to the 


of her essential rights and her their independence and sover-) 


sovereignty. eignty. . 

The proposal,.made to the Guaraniece Stressed 
Egyptian Government on be- When the Egyptian Govern- 
half of these three powers, to ment announced its decision to 
establish an international gov- nationalize the Suez Canal 
erning body for the Suez Canal Company, it stressed once 
aims at entrustifg the adminis- ™ore its intention to guarantee 


freedom of navigation 
tration of the \panal and the|through the canal and nation- 


guarantee of free navigation alization did not in any way 
through it to this body. \affect the freedom of faviga- 

It also aims at compensating| 0m through this waterway. A 
the Suez Canal Company. This\clear proof of this was the 
proposal shows that the object|P#ss4ge of 766 ships through 


her power to ensure world 
peace and respect for her 


the United Nations 


dung conference, which recom 


mended that all international | 


‘problems should be solved by 
jpeaceful means, and therefore 


(is ready to cooperate with .— 


the other governments signa 
tories of the . Constantinople 


at a conference to which other 
governments whose ships use 
the canal would be invited to 


: 


jobligations in accordance with | 
charter ; 
and the resolutions of the Ban- ° 


agreement.of 1888 to meet us | 


Moke sede »>.. ‘omy 


Sods rew- 
irairzes eneme! -eoting 
ocds, cleers thoroughly, 
PO’ eroroteaily Are & 
Homrer Betirg Sode a 
fvre Da horse of sade 


vided with compensation in ac- seathooudur 
cordance with the Paris bourse 
quotations of the previous day. 

On the. same day a special 
governing body for the canal, 


of the London conference is|the canal during the past twojreconsider the Contantinople 
open interference in Egypt's weeks. jagreement and reach an agree 
internal affairs which do not’ As regards the invitation to|\ment confirming and guaran 
concern those who called the'the conference, the Egyptian'teeing freedom of navigation 
conference. ‘Government is most surprised through the Suez Canal 


principles of Egyptian law, the 
principles of international law, 
and the foundation charter of 
the company. It is an Egyptian 


International News 


Egyptian President Gamal Nasser is pictured in Cairo as 


fully independent, with a sep- 
arate budget, took over the ad- 
ministration of the canal. This 
new governing body was pro-' 
vided with all the necessary au-| 
thority without being restricted 
by the laws and regulations of 
the government. 


Memorandum Received 


On Aug. 6, the Foreign Af.- 
fairs Ministry received from 
the British Emassy in Cairo a 
memorandum from the British 
Government, which contained 
the text of the communique is- 
sued by the governments of the 
United States, the United King- 
dom and France on the na- 
tionalization by Egypt of the 
Canal Company 

In addition to this memo- 
randum, the Egyptian Govern- 
ment received an invitation to 
attend the conference which is 
to take place in London on 
Aug: 16, 1956 

The Egyptian Government 
does not agree with the .con- 
tents of the three Western 
Foreign Ministers’ statement 
concerning the Suez Canal 
Company, as this statement 
attempted to use every pos- 
sible means to impart to the 
Suez Canal Company a status 
which it does not possess, 
simply in order to create rea- 
sons which will help in inter- 
fering with issues regarded as 
the essence of Egypt's sov- 
ereignty. 

The first paragraph of this 
statement said the Suez Canal 
Company had always had in- 
ternational status . The Egyp- 
tian Governmént regrets to 
say that this is unfounded 
The Suez Canal Company is 
an Egyptian limited company 
(societe anonyme), its conces- 
sion having been granted by 
the Egyptian government for 
a duration of 99 years 


Agreement is Cited 


Paragraph 16 of the Egyp- 
tian. Government Suez Canal 
Company agreement reached 
in 1866 said that the Suez 
Cafal Company is an Ezgyp-' 
tian company subject to the 
country’s laws and customs. 
Moreover, the British Govern- 
ment itself recognized this 


i 


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company because it has been 
granted a concession within 
Egyptian territory ... 


Statement Questioned 


The same paragraph of this 
statement said that in 1888 all 
the big powers concerned 
agreed to protect the interna- 
tional status of the canal and 
the freedom of navigation 
through it, irrespective of the 
nationality of the ships pass- 
ing through it, and signed the 
Constantinople agreement in 
order to protect the interests 
the whole world 

It said this agreement clear- 
ly provided that the interna- 
tional status of the canal be 
maintained permanently. ir. 
respective of the Canal*Com.- 
pany s concession 

The Egyptian Government 
regrets to say that the state 
ment of the Foreign Ministers 
of the three powers distorts 
the facts and gives a picture 
far removed from reality by 
alleging that the canal has 
international status 


The preamble of the 1888 
agreement concerning the free 
use of the Suez Canal aims at 
its free use by all countries. 
in accordance with Paragraph 
1 of the canal agreement, which 
said that the canal should re- 
main open and free, whether 
in peace or war, for every com- 
mercial ship or warship, irre- 
spective of its nationality 

As for Paragraph 16 of the 
1888 agreement, it clearly 
stated that none of the obliza- 
tions in this agreement in any 
way affects the sovereign rights 
of the Egyptian Government 


Relation Denied 


Paragraph 14 of the agree- 
ment clearly shows that there 
is no relation whatsoever be 
tween the 1888 agreement and 
the Suez Canal Company, as it 
shows that the obligations 
arising from the present agree- 
ment 
period for which the conces 
sion granted to the Suez Canal 
Company runs. 
| This would have been ter- 
minated in 12 years and thus 
the Egyptian Government takes 


he rejected an invitation to the London conference. 


J 


the place of the Canal Company 
administration. 

The Egyptian Government 
also regrets that the statement 
issued by the three Foreign 
Ministers had mentioned some 
facts and omitted the rest 
which prove our right. This is 
further proof of the way used 
to interfere in Egypt's internal 
affairs 

Paragraph 1 of the statement 
said that Egypt by her agree- 
ment with Britain in 1954 ad- 
mitted in Paragraph 8 that the 
Suez Canal is a waterway of 
international importance from 
the economic, commercial and 
strategic point of view. 

The same statement omitted 
the first part of Paragraph & 
which clearly said the the canal 
is an inseparable part of Egypt 


Confiscation Alleged 


The three Governments in 
Paragraph 2 of the statement 
recognize the right of Egypt as 
an independent sovereign state 
to nationalize its property but 
deny Egypt the right to nation- 
alize the Egyptian Suez Canal, 
alleging that it was a unilateral 
confiscation by one state of an 
international agency responsi- 
ble for the administration and 
maintenance of the Suez Canal, 
which the signatories of the 
1868 agreement are using as an 
international waterway on 
which the economy, trade and 
safety of most countries of the 
world depend ... 


Paragraph 3 of the statement 
said that the step taken by the 
Egyptian government in the 
present circumstances jeop- 
ardizes the freedom of the 
canal and its safety. which was 
laid down in the 1888 agree- 
ment. This statement is untrue 
and unfounded, as there is no 
relation whatsoever between 
the Egyptian Suez Canal Co 


are not bound by the and the 1888 agreement con- 


cerning the freedom of naviga- 
tion through the canal. 
Paragraph 14 of this agree- 
ment stated that obligations 
arising from the present agree- 
ment are not binding in the pe- 


Conspiracy Charged 
ried-of the concession awarded The three powers’ statement 
to the Suez Canal Co. 

Every attempt. to link the 
Suez Canal Co. with freedom of 
navigation through the canal ers 
gives rise to suspicion, as the had 
Suez Canal Co. has never been their 
at any time responsibie for and funds 
freedom of navigation through : 


the canal, and the 1888 agree-, By this they have violated 
ment alone provides for free- international agreements and 


dom of navigation through the the United Nations charter in 
canal, the Egyptian Govern- that they used pressure against 
ment guarantees freedom of the Egyptian people, whose 
navigation through the canal in 120,000 sons dug the canal, and 
accordance with its sovereignty funds paid for its construction. 
over its own territory, through| Great Britain and France 
which the canal passes and soon afterwards announced the 
which is regarded as an in- mobilization of their reserves 
separable part of Egypt... and officially announced that 

According to Paragraph 4 of|their troops and fleets were on 
the statement, the three powers 
find it essential to undertake 
measures to establish an ad- 
ministration under interna- 
tional supervision to guarantee 
the waterway permanently in 
accordance with the agreement 
of October 29, 1888, taking into 
consideration the lawful rights 
of Egypt 

This paragraph clearly shows 
why the governments which 
made the tripartite statement 
attempted to give the Suez 
Canal Company an. interna 
tional status in disregard of all 
the agreements and laws. 

The statement is - simply 
directed against Egypt's clear 
right. to deprive her of her 
sovereignty over the Suez 
Canal, regarded as an insepara- 
ble part of Egypt. 


international 


banks Egyptian assets 


ernment strongly deplores 
these measures and regards 
them as a threat to the Egyp- 
tian people to make them sur- 
render part of their territory 
and sovereignty to an interna- 
tional body, which in actual 
fact is international colonial- 
ism. The Governments of Great 
Britain and France by adopting 
these measures are threaten- 
ing world peace and order 
This is contrary to the United 
Nations charter, 
promised to respect. 
These measures 
threaten ail small nations are 
deplored not by Egypt alone, 


<a 
ACHING BACK 


Now ' You can get the fast relief you 
from nagging backache, headache and mus- 
cular aches and pains that often cause rest- 
less nights and miserable tired-out feelings. 


Continuity Seen 


The 1888 agreement itself 
clearly shows the continuity of 
its provisions, whether during 
the period of the concession or 
after the termination of the 
concession and transfer of the 
canal administration to the 
Egyptian Government. 

The Egyptian Government 
regards the establishment of 
an international body as noth- 
ing Dut a polite form of what 
might be called international 
colonization 

This proposal, based on mis- 
leading statements to give 


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was followed by a large-scale| 


the move. The Egyptian Gov- 


which both’ 


which | 


When these discomforts come on with over- | 


that Britain decided to call a| The new agreement would 
iconference in order to discuss be registered with thhe United 
‘tthe Suez Canal. which is an 


YOUR HOUSEHOLD TREASURE 


‘inseparable part of Egypt.) 


ernments to attend this con- 
ference, fully aware that 45 
countries used the canal during 
1955. 


Therefore the Egyptian Gov- 
ernment is convinced that this 
conference and the circum- 
stances in which it was called 
cannot be regarded in any 
way as international and it is 
not entitled to take decisions 

This conference has no 
right in any way to discuss 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIVES HERALD 
x Monday, August 13, 1956 ery 


British O 


“ 
a 


“" <2 TODAY! MONDAY! 'Til 9 P.M. 
AT BOTH LOCATIONS! 


Suc Aint Te 
yy 


* * > >. . ° . . | ~~ RB, 
| 


pen 


LONDON, Atig. 12—Troop- Se , ss | io on 
laden civil airliners, trailed by * ee ee : if | 
flying freighters, took off for| 
the Mediterrenean area from! 
two Southern England air bases 
today—first stage of a week-| 
long army airlift triggered by! 
the Suez Canal crisis. | 

At the same time, debate 
raged about how the West 
should answer Egypt's nation- 
alization of the Suez Canal and! 
British newspapers discussed 
the London Suez conference’ 
opening next Thursday. 

Big BOAC Britannias, each 
capable of carrying 100. men.) 
flew from Hurn Airport while! 
several Hermes took off from’ 
nearby Blackbush 

Truck-convoys troops— 
mainly infantrymen—trolled in- 
to the airfields early today and 
moved to assembly points at 
temporary tent camps on the 
outfields 


Other Preparations 


(The United Press reported 
two large fiying boats of the 


Britavia Ajirline set out for 
Egypt to start bringing back 
British women and children 
from Fanara Lake. the former 
Royal Air Force flying boat 
base midway down the canal 
Other planes will leave tomor 
row to aid the exodus of 
Britons attached to the Suez 
Contractors’ Service Company 
(The first arms brought back , 
from NATO duty in Germany AHMEDABAD. India. Aug 
to meet the Suez crisis reached 12 (UP)—The two top Officials 
Tilbury today of this riot-ttorn Gujerati city 
The Empire Baltic docked resigned protest 
with more than 100 Army ve re 
hicles recalled from Britain's central govern 
Army of the Rhine. Within ™e™'s of the bi 
four hours the ship had -un- lingual state of Bombay 
loaded and headed back to Mayor Chinubhai Chimanlal 
= Belgium, for another Sheth and Deputy Mayor 
[Another British cargo ship. Chhotal Ghandi announced 
the Graigur. sailed from Til. their resignations in letters to 
bury for the Mediterranean'the Gujerati congress commit- 
packed with Army vehicles and tee as violence continued in 
supplies. The Graigur is one 
of an undisclosed number of the city and nearby areas 
commercial steamers drafted) The riots were touched Off 
under Britain's emergency mo- last week when the central gov 
bilization order. ernment announced in New 


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Top City Officials Quit 


In Bombay State Protest 


Amer and blamed 
authorities for not taking steps 
to deal with this trend 


Mine Rescue Blocked 


MARCINELLE. 
Aug. 12—Rescue workers try- 
ing to reach 252 miners en- 
tombed here since last Wednes- 
day were halted today by col 
lapsed earth in an escape 
gallery 3000 feet below the 
surface 

Jan van den Heuvel, director 
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NICOSIA, Cyprus, Aug. 12 
Two masked men marched 
into a coffee shop outside 
Nicosia today, singled out one 
of the customers, and shot him 
dead as spectators looked on. 

The victim was a Greek 
Cypriot. So far police have not 
tracked down the gunmen, who 
managed to get away. ) 

Another Greek Cypriot sit-' 
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village of Kithrea was shot by 
masked gunmen tonight. He 
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(The troopships Empire Ken 
and Dunera sailed from Sout 
hampton with infantrymen and 
anti-aircraft troops.) 


Predict Support 


Diplomatic. observers here 
predict that more than half of 
the conference delegations will 
support Britain, France and the 
United States for a proposed 
two-tiered international organi- 
ration which would remove po- 
litical and physical control of 
the canal from Egyptian hands. 

But Russia, whose delegation 
will be led by Foreign Minister 
Dmitri Shepliov, has an- 
nounced the conference is not 
azompetent to make a decision 
on the future status of the 
Suez. The Indian government 
has taken a similar line 

(Diplomatic sources in Mos- 
cow reported today that United 
States Ambassador to Russia, 
Charles E. Bohlen, will fly to 
Lundon tomorrow to join the 
American delegation to the 
conference.) 

‘The weight of press and un- 
efficial opinion expressed in 
Britain is against any attempt 
by Britain and France to en- 
force the proposed Western 
solution, if it is rejected 


British Get Ready 


The British government has 
declared its aim of settling the 
crisis peaceably, but has not 
denied widespread reports that 
it will resort to force if it 
should prove impossible to 
reach agreement with Egypt 

Alfred Robens, British Labor 
Party foreign affairs spokes 
man. has declared “neither the 
threat of force nor the use of 
force will solve the problem.” 

Rut he left open justification 
for the use of force if Egypt 
“denies ships the use of the 
canal.” 

Morgan Phillips, secretary of 
the Labor Party, said today 
the best solution to the Suez 
dispute lies in the creation of 
a United Nations agency re 
sponsible for the canal 

The Sunday newspaper, the 
Observer, today argued in fa- 
vor of international control of 
the canal but urged Britain to 
open the London conference 
with a declaration that she will 
not use force against Egypt 

Reports from many world 
centers today stimulated more 
controversy, adding fuel to the 
erguments which have raged 
ever since Egypt nationalized 
the canal on July 26. 


Communists Amazed 
In Stockholm. the Swedish 


Delhi it would create one large 
state of Bombay instead of 
separate Guijerati and Mahara 
strian states 

Police announced that 550 
persons have been arrested for 
defiance of a curfew order im 
posed under martial law 

A check at hospitals showed 
15 persons were admitted yes 
terday with bullet wounds and 
acid burns as a result of the 
‘rioting in Ahmedabad 

In North Bujerat, demonstra 
tors damaged railway tracks 
and stoned trains. Police rushed 
reinforcements from Bombay 
to all stations from Baroda to 
Ahmedabad and posted armed 
escorts on trains. 

In Nadiad, 25 miles from 
Ahmedabad, police killed twe 
and seriously wounded six per- 
sons when they fired on a mob 
of 2000 rioters. A curfew was 
immediately clamped on the 
town. 

Press reports said 14 police- 
men were injured at Baroda 
by a mob defying a curfew. 
The demonstrators dragged 
furniture from police stations 


peratures and 100 per cent air 
humidity. A pipe was being 
fixed to get water to the spol 

The entombed miners have 
been trapped by fire in the 
mine. Nine men are known to 
have been killed by the blaze 
and their bodies have been 
brought to the surface ’ 

A mining engineer said yes- 
terday if the air where the men 
were trapped was breathable, 
they could hold out for adout 
10 days 


Jordan Attack Reperted 


JERUSALEM. Israel, Aug. 12 
(UP)—An Israeli army spokes- 
man today charged that infil 
trators from Jordan opened 
fire on an Israeli patrol in the 
Lachish area yesterday. No 
casualties were reported 

The spokesman said a search 


Elsewhere, a time bomb ex- z 


ploded beneath a British serv- eg 


iceman’s car parked in a down- 3 
town Limassol street. 
was burned out but no one was 5 
injured. A second time bomb 
placed in a nearby car failed 
to explode. 

In Larnaca, East Cyprus! 
two young men on bicycles 
opened fire ith automatic 
weapons on a group of men 
sitting outside a coffee shop. 
No one was injured and the 
youths escaped. 

In the Paphos district of 
western Cyprus, the body of a 3 
man who had been shot was 3 
found. He is believed to be 
19-year-old Andreas Kypria- 
nides, who was reported killed 
in an ambush Thursday night 


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of the area revealed a prepared 
ambush 
empty cartridges of British and 
Egyptian make 

The spokesman also said the 
Egyptian forces fired at Kib- 
butz Erez, near the Gaza bor- 
der, 
morning and Saturday noon. 


and burned it on the streets, ~ 


the reports said 

Students from Sadir Valla- 
bhai University spread 
throughout country areas to- 
day in.an effort to persuade 
Congress leaders and police 
officers to resign their posts in 
protest against the govern- 
ment’'s refusal to create a sepa- 
rate state of Gujerat. 


Ryukyu U. Apologizes 


TOKYO, Aug. 12 (INS)}—Ryu- 
kyu University on Okinawa to- 
day said it regrets the partici- 
pation of its students in an anti- 
American demonstration re- 
cently and that disciplinary ac- 
tion will be taken against guilty 
students 

The university statement. re- 
ported by Kyodo News Service. 
followed the announcement 
Friday by the university's foun- 
dation that financial aid would 
be withdrawn because of the 
anti-American activities of 
some of its students 

The foundation charged the 
students of.the university were 
becoming . increasingly anti- 


posed .by Nasser. “We must 
wait and see what comes out of 
the London conference,” he 
commented. 

ITALY: Diplomatic obsegv- 
ers here considered Nasser's 
proposal for a new Suez con- 
ference as a conciliatory ges- 


Ambassador to Britain, Gunnar ; 6 showing his apparent de- 


Haeggloef, today told reporters 
he believes Sweden will bac 


Britain 
The Soviet news agency, 


Tass, reported today Romania international 


sire to leave a door open for a 
settlement while safeguarding 
his prestige. 

The Italian view that only 
management of 


has joined other Communist the canal can guarantee com- 


bloc countries in indorsing the pjete 
Suez was reaffirmed by Foreign 


nationalization of the 


freedom of navigation 


Canal as “the lawful right Of g)ndersecretary Vittorio Badini- 
Egypt.” Romania also protest- Confalonieri, in an article pub 
ed at not. being invited to the lished in several Italian news- 


London conference 


papers today. He declined an 


Two other countries which international guarantee would 


Russia proposed 


should be not 
asked to the London talks— eignty. 
Yugoslavia and Hungary—»both 


sover- 


rejected 


weaken Egypt's 


Britain yesterday 


expressed disappointment yes-the Russian proposal that 22 


terday that they had not been additional row 


invited. 


West German Chancellor 


ies should be 
invited to the don talks. 
Reports from Baghdad indi- 


Konrad Adenhauer is expected cate Iraq has assured Syria's 


to discuss Nasser 


statement Premier Sabri El Assali that 


with his vice-chancellor, Franz kraq is willing to contact other 


Bluecher, at a conference in Bag 
his Black Forest vacation re- will attend the 


treat tomorrow. 
Other 


Other reactions tg the Nasser that Ara 
#tatement: 
THE NETHERLANDS: A 


would be 


hdad Pact members who) 
ez 
‘conference — Britain, Turkey, 
Iran and Pakistan—to ensure 
views are heard at 


the conférence. 


of the type pro Sues 


+ 


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4 


’ China Makes 
Progress in 
Hinterlands 


David Chipp, Reuters staff 
correspondent in Communist 
China, has just completed «a 
5000-mile round trip from 
Peiping te the Northwest of 
China. He was with the first 
Ss of outsiders to visit the 

umen oilfields region since 
1949. 


By David Chipp 
Reuters 

LANCHOW, Northwest 
China—China is opening up 
her northwest territories with 
the speed and planning of a 
military operation and much of 
the fervor of a crusade. 

After a two-week trip cover- 
Ing more than 3000 miles in 
Kansu and Sinkiang provinces,| 
the main impressions gained 
are of the importance and jin- 
vestment being placed by the 
Chinese government in this 
area which is rich in mifieral 
wealth. Great material ad- 
vances already have been 
made, and even greater pro- 
gress is planned for the future. 


Op 
Waly we “aa 7 , 
av 
c a 
oS gas . 
- Ome ie “a 
ee page: Pape wa ae eS 
na Lon aT 2: nn 
5 - - - 
i bx : 
. - 


4 
7 7 Ae 
ager 7 
to : bs Sup oa fix OR ae 
Fond a mn es ah My - BoB aie 
a 7 : Se 


Canadian officials and members of the | 
Throughout the region, which Bell family will dedicate the Alexander 
, whic 
stretches up to the Soviet bor- Graham Bell Museum Aug. 18 at Baddeck, 


der, there are Russian advisers | 
and experts and plenty of Rus- 
sian machinery, but the over- | 
riding impression is that China 
is in complete charge. | 

Peiping’s orders stretch into 
the remotest villages, where 
the ever-present cadres and Pe OS | 
party members are kept in con-| et ae — | | 
stant touch with the capital)  _—_ A ) 
through the provincial commit- -— i | 
tees. | bm : 

It is rapidly becoming a land. ~ 4 ! 
for young people. Thousands of % ro 
them are moving west daily for 
construction work on oil fields. 
roads and railroads and for 
Suilding new towns and facto- 
ries. 

It is a movement that may 
develop into the largest mass 
migration in history, as China 
fills up this sparsely populated 
borderland of deserts and’ 
mountains under plans to turn 
it into one of its most import- 
ant economic areas. 

Immigrants have come most-) 
ly from the eastern part of the) 
country and if any of the thov-| 
sands who stream through Lan-' 


; 
: 


chow daily are being forced to) 


go against their will they give 
no sign of it 

The vast majority come after 
being persuaded by party mem- 
bers and officials who are adept 
in mass psychology and who 
hold out the twin inducement 
of “patriotism” and rewards 

Chinese officials maintain 
that in an area as economically 
vital as this, unwilling labor 
would be a drawback rather 
than an asset. 

And there are rewards. In the 
northwest wages are much 
higher than in other parts of 
China: some workers are cet- 
ting almost double wivat they 
would get elsewhere, and wel. 
fare conditions are better 

A vast amount of equipment 
heing sent into the area, show- 
ing the great extent of the in- 
vestment which the govern- 
ment is making 

‘In Lanchow, a rapidly-grow- 
ing railroad junction whic 
serves the whole northwest, 
there are acres of construction 
materials ranging from wicker 
baskets and shovels to oil-drill. 
| machinery 

he roads from the present 
railhead at Yumen, some 500 
miles to the northwest, to the 
reportedly rich new oilfields in 
the Tsaidam Basin in Chinghai 
Province (bordering on Tibet) 
and in North Sinkieng (border- 
ing on the Soviet Union) are 
continually busy with streams 
of heavily laden trucks 

The immense construction 
and maintenance gangs on the 
railroads and roads work at a 
apeed which seems to be 
brought about more by their 
numbers than by the efforts of 
individual workers 

Some of the work is slapdash 
giving the appearance that the 
workers had hardly time to 
finish one job before they hur 
ried on to the next 


403 Killed in Blast 
Identified at Cali 


BOGOTA, Colombia, Aug. 12 
Officials in the town of Cali 
today said the bodies of 403 
persons killed in last Tues. 
day's explosion of eight dyna- 
mite trucks have so far been 
identified. 

An official count of the vic- 
tims showed that 14 other per- 
sons were killed or disap 
peared and that 873 wounded 
are being treated in hospitals. 

Eight city blocks were de 
stroyed by the _ explosion. 
Government officials said on 
Wednesday that the dynamtie 
was detonated purposely — 
and possibly with a political 
motive. 

* 


-belated Medal 


Inventor's Portrait 


National Geésgranhic Society Photos 


This portrait of Alexander Graham Bell, painted Im 1919 


by J. W. L. 


“Hil? Slow in Allowing 


Forster, hangs now in the home of Dr. Bell's 
daughter, Mrs. Gilbert Grosvenor, in Bethesda, Md. 


Foreign-Medal Display 


By 


Murrey 


Marder 


Stat? Reogrier 


It takes far more influence 
to get to wear a foreign medal 
than it does to be awarded one, 
several Congressmen sadly 
learned when Congress ad- 
journed 

Left in the files of the State 
Department's protocol office 
when Congress quilt were 
batch of foreign decorations 
which might otherwise festoon 
preud congressional breasts 

It takes an Act of Congress 
to accept officially, and to dis- 
play, a foreign medal. But the 
viewing-with-alarm which in- 
spired the general constitu- 
tional ban on such honors is 
still so great that—unless you 
are a Rayburn or a Knowland 
—the odds are against even 
any Congressmen succeeding. 

In power plays on the House 
and Senate floors, Speaker 
Sam Rayburn (D-Tex.), in 
April got permission to keep 
and wear the Order of Sika- 
tuna, Lakan Class, bestowed 
by the Philippine Republic. 

Senate GOP Leader William 
F. Knowland (R-Calif.) got his 

-~the Greek government's 
Cross of Grand Commander of 
the Royal Order of the 
Phoenix—the week before Con- 
gress adjourned 

In both cases the authorizing 
legislation whipped through 
bypassing the committees con- 
cerned, with the direct guid- 
ance of Senate. Majority 
Leader Lyndon B. Johnson 
(D-Tex.) and House Majority 
Leader John W. McCormack 
(D-Mass.) 

The only other medal-bar- 
rier breaker of the 84th Con- 
gress, Senate records indicate, 
was an award winner in a dif- 
ferent kind of category, Rep. 
Barratt O'Hare (D-Ill) 

He received, through more 
usual channels, and with tre- 
mendous pushing by Sen. Paul 
H. Douglas (D-Ill) a slightly- 
for Distin- 


—_——- er —e ———- 


——— 


Japan Halts Pact Talks 


Until After Suez Parley 


Reuters 


MOSCOW, Aug. 12 — Japa- 


efforts to obtain a peace treaty 


the Suez Canal. 
His decision to postpone the 


News 


southern Kuriles.) 


Service reported. The 
nese Foreign Minister Mamoru action was taken by the Cabinet 
Shigemitsu today postponed his in emergency session. The Cabi- 
net, however, instructed Shige- 
from the Soviet Union until mitsu to continue the talks and 
after the London conference on push the Japanese demand for 
the return of two islands in the 


in 
in 
the 


guished Military Service 
the Spanish-American War 
which O'Hara served at 
age of 16 

Douglas had been presiding 
officer when Johnson had 
sped the Knmowland award 
through, when Douglas 
pleasantly needled Knowland 
with congratulatiqns and the 
hope that his Royal Order of 
Phoenix award would, “like 
the proverbial bird ... enable 
him to rise from the ashes...” 

But identical Greek awards 
did remain in the ashes for 
four members of Congress of 
somewhat lesser influence: 
Reps. Wayne L. Hays (D-Ohio), 
Walter H. Judd (R-Minn.,), 
John J. Rooney (D-N. Y.), and 


John Taber (R-N. Y.). 


Bills to let them keep and 
display their awards passed 
the House. but died in the 
Senate Foreign Relations Com 
mittee on the general theory 
that it is not a good policy to 
have American officers accept 
such medals usually given in 
the name of the recipient's 
“sympathy” and “understand- 
ing” for a foreign country. 

In similar. fashion, Ambas 
sador Henry Cabot Lodge and 
Reps. William A. Barrett (D- 
Pa.) and James G. Fulton (R- 
Pa.) were bereft of orders of 
Al Merito della Repubblica 
Italiana, bestowed by § the 
Italian government. 

The Constitution bars any 
office holder, “without the} 
consent -of the “Congress,” 
from accepting any foreign. 
present, title or award. An| 
1881 statute even makes it) 
illegal for anyone but the De- 
partment of State to receive 
such an award. but that is 
often breached technically, 
and the award is then de-) 
posited with the Department.’ 

There are an estimated 4000 
to 5000 foreign awards long 
filed at the State Department 
awaiting special legislation, 
death of the recipients, or their 
complete separation from the 
Federal payroll, to permit de- 
livery of the awards to the 
recipients—or their heirs. 

Except where it provided 
general medal-acceptance legis- 
lation for such combat as World 
Wars I and Il, the Berlin Air- 
lift, and the Korean conflict, 
Congress generally has been 
chary about giving its permis- 


sion to wear foreign decora- 


tions and it sometimes sets up 


quite a political yell about the: 
idea—as it did in the case of) 


Maj. Gen. Harry H. Vaughan, 
Army aide to President Tru- 


talks, which have already lasted Sources close to Shigemitzu ™#"- 


12 days, was made in the face said he has decided that Japan | 

to agree Pharmacist Sentenced 
This would 

up Japanese For Selling Fake Pills 

on TAIPEH, Formosa, Aug. 12 

in the Kurile group,\m#—Tung Ming-Tsai, manager 


of a Soviet ultimatum to sign 
a treaty Monday or break off 
the talks until after the London 
conference, which begins on 
Thursday and is expected to 
last about a week. 

Both.he and Soviet Foreign 
Minister Dmitri Shepilov will 
depart for London within the 
next few days. 


yo 


a. 


government rejected state of war between the 
“take it or leave it” countries offi 
peace treaty, the International a elose. 


has no alternative but to 
to Soviet terms. 
mean giving 

claims for the time being 
two islands 


Kunashiri and Iturup, which'of one of ‘aipch's veer 


Russia seized after the war. 
Ownersh 


said to be the 


‘ 


cially brought 


) for which he received the 
1 caulvalen of Ole, were made 
‘principally of starch. 


‘pharmacies, has been sen 
ip of the islands is to five years in prison for sell- 
only obstacle left ing fake sulfa tablets to the 
to be solved before a treaty can Chinese Nationalist armed 
{Meanwhile, in Tokyo, the be signed and. the. 11-year-old forces. Authorities said the tab- 
two 


Alexander Graham Bell Museum 


Nova Scotia, summer home of the inventor 
of the telephone. It will house a collection 
of records ahd working models. 


The Canadian Government 
will open Saturday a mu- 
seum devoted to Alexander 
Graham Bell, who, among other 


things, installed Washington's 
first air-conditioning system. 
Bell's wide-ranging scientific 


\imagination. carried him far 
ibeyond his 


invention of the 
telephone. 

He sent the first wireless 
message in history, using the 
top of Franklin School, 13th 


and K sts. nw., for the originat- 
ing point. 

He invented the photophone. 
which carried words over a 
beam of light, and in 1893 


Canadian Bell Museum to Open 


‘Electronic Slaves’ Speed | | 
* Seventh Army’s Supplies Elephant Cutup Meets 


Reuters 


| STUTTGART, West Ger- 
many, Aug. 12—American 7th 
Army mechanics who need 
spare parts lying in depots 
thousands of milés away in the 
United States can call on “elec- 


tronic slaves” for help. 

The slaves, electronic ma- 
chines recently put in opera- 
tion here as a world preview 
of a new Army supply system, 
relegate the old-time quarter- 
‘master system to history. 
| If a mechanic finds his own 
‘unit has not the clutch he 
needs for a repair job on an 
Army truck, then it is time to 
leall the first slave. 
| This is an electronic “trans- 
ceiver,” a combined transmit- 
ter and receiver of messages in 
accounting-machine language. 
The message calling for a 
clutch is “written” by punching 
‘a card with a certain pattern 
of holes. Thé ecard is run 
through the machine. 

The message is first received, 
by land line, at the 7th Army’s 
istock-<control center near here. 
Business machines there work- 
ing round the clock do in 


> 
* 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
138 . Monday, August 18, 1956 


— 


British Court’ 


The punchedcard message KAMPALA, Uganda, Aug. 12 panying the magistrate, moved 
calling for the clutch is elec- —This is the sad, story ne Th. feohent ak Wa 
pee hd ~—" seg - of a playful elephant with Bioones’ ob ae game bw Baw 
punched-car e of all the The w , 
parts on hand in the whole of half og oe ae shew fell dead. ached 
the 7th Army area. He used to roam happily put he didn’t die without 
, The electronics computer through the African bush coun- ponor A report filed here 
that does this job gives its try playing practical jokes. ONC yesterday by the warden of 
answer on paper in a few s€C- man told of being acc iN Queen Elizabeth National Park 
onds. If it indicates there IS his canoe and topped @$ he caid the elephant with a half 
no clutch available on this side ¢.,.4 in a ‘ 


hallow river. Four , 1 tnade leaal 
of the Atlantic, the same mes- 7 Giakew obit a tail made legal history. 
sage is flashed by radiotrans- re ty htc Ph bene Cee Up He was the first elephant ever, 


ceiver to the U.S. Army's Over- lage ms Chels native Hr tried by. @ British colonia) 


, court 
vam supply agency in New ‘Then the district magistrate 
‘Me bi _ , Strolled into the village the 
ore machines there find por day, the chief called for 
‘the needed part at the nearest justice Nobody could rest 
supply depot, and if urgent, it easily, the chief insisted. 
is flown to Europe. The magistrate consulted his 
The new system is designed ),,., of rules and set up a 
to get needed repair parts Formal Court of Summary 
from United States’ depots! jurisdiction behind the chief's 
within 20 days. But the first), The whole village as- 
plane load, which was ordered .embled and gave testimony. 
recently, arrived in six days. The defendant just grazed 
The speed-up means the units peacefully. 
‘in Germany can stock far few- The magistrate folnd him 
er supplies and release valu- suilty and sentenced him to 
able space and manpower. The Gaath 
The elephant got the idea 


hours what a larger number Doom in 


of men used to take weeks to 
do by using manual methods. 


FOR YOUR 
Surprise Liquor Bargain 
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sketched a model rocket plane 

Papers and diagrams relating 
to these and other creations of 
Bell will go on display in the 
museum at Baddeck, Nova Sco- 
tia, the National Geographic 
Society reported yesterday. 

The striking modern mu- 
seum is located near the place 
where Bell lived during the 
summers from 1893 until his 
death in 1922. 

His air conditioning was an 
earlier solution to Washing- 
ton's heat. He installed an ice- 
box in the attic of his home at 
1331 Connecticut ave. nw. He 
filled it with ice blocks covered 
with salt 


when a game warden, accom- 


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An asbestos-covered duct 
carried cold air down to his 
study, which was sealed near 
the floor to keep the coolness 
in. His windows were opened 
at the top to allow warmer air 
to escape. 

The wireless transmission 
was made in 1880 on the photo- 
phone, using light beams in- 
stead of radio waves. 

Mrs. Gilbert Grosvenor, the 
daughter of Bell and wife of 
the former longtime president 
of the National Geographic So- 
ciety, will attend the opening 
of the.museum. Bell was one of 
the founders and second presi 
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? 

Ass a00¢ Press ext interas*seal Bess 
The big show opens today in Chicago. And the Democratic National Conrention will play to 
a pecked house. Colorful characters will jam the huge amphitheater (above) and be scen 
by millions of TV viewers. Young Democrats like Sherman Merrill (left) of Baltimore, 
Md_. stand ready with the glad hand to welcome those attending the premiere. The show 
promises to be « tense drama full of fast and furious action. Members of the cast are inter- 
nationally knoun—tike former President Harry S. Truman (right)—bat the program 
doesn't spell out xkat reles they ll play. The big question: Who'll be the leading man? 

’ 


oOw— 


te ee ee ee 


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| 
| 


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== ‘ alld 
later” 


% International inde 
Gov. Averell Harriman of New York received a major beost in his drive te win the party's presidential Adlai Stevenson, whe has been rated the ing contender for the nomination, also found numerous en- 
nomination when Harry S. Truman gave him. unqualified on Saterday. Harriman (pictured thusiastic backers in Chicage. Prettiest were Alli Matsner (left) and Margo Walker of New York City. 
Stevenson still wore his confident smile after Truman's declaration for Harriman. The former Illinois 


was surrounded last week by vociferous admirers im the 
a strong civil rights stand. : gevernor has said he favers “moderation.” 


T 
tie 


ae 
i 


Bob Addie’s 


Column 


THE MORE I DEAL with sports the more | become 
convinced that some adults should be muzzled. Three 
items. completely unrelated at the time, came to my 
attention over the weekend 
firing of Aone Martindale, assistant super- 
visor of sports and the tennis director 
Recreation De- 


One was the 


of Arlington County 
partment. At the moment, the sum- 
mary dismissal of Miss Martindale 


has the Arlington people in an up- 
roar because no reason was given for 
firing her except the statement by 
Frank Allston, supervisor of sports 
ior 
mended that she be dismissed “be- 
cause the program had deteriorated 
e last two years.” 

The statement astounding be- 
cause it was brought out by Bob Al 


in tn 
is 


Arlington County, who recom- | 


BASEBALL 
Ore Tiers Bera RACING 
“porte cour 
| MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 1956 il 


fen. our 


Addie lington County tennis program has 
won national recognition for participational and junior devel- 
opment 

In 1955. the Arlington tournament had a total of 438 en- 


trants. topping the record 325 who participated in 1954. The 
sAriington tourne’ in the nation both years. 
Miss Martindale is alleged to have stepped on the toes of 


was the largest 


some of the sensitive males in Arlington, some of whom felt 
that the precious Little League activities were being ignored. 
Miss Martindale accomplished something else which has 
evaded other recreation directors who were either too lazy 
or reluctant to tnitiate it—that was a “pigtail league’ for 
girls 


EVERYBODY has gone overboard for the little boys but it 
remained for Miss Martindale to get the girls interested 
in activities such as tennis and softball 

Anyway, 
a letter from Mr. Everett H 
Mr. Woodward would “show 
ington Area Tennis Patrons 


Woodward, of Silver. Spring. 
up” the efforts off the Wash- 
Foundation, calling the organi- 


zation “just a lot of talk, talk, talk 

Mr. Woodward's complaint seems to be that there arent 
enough tennis facilities for the children. Apparently. in his 
section. there has been no Anne Martindale and even if there 
had been, look at what happened to her for trying to do a 
job 

Air. Woodward has a good point when he says that the 


lack of opportunity to play and practice applies to all sports, 
not only tennis 

He points out that dont find many good players 
taking the time to help out the kids.” He urges us to “cut 
out the sweet talk and stop giving lip service to these pseudo- 
sportsminded groups which create only false hopes for 
thousands of children who will never have the opportunity to 
practice what they hear , 


you 


~~ 


MR. WOODWARD forgets that everything has to have a 
beginning. The people behind the Tennis Patrons’ Foun- 
dation have only started. Thev dont claim to have licked 
the problem yet but there must be a start somewhere and 
nas worked diligently and has accomplished a 
great deal in the few short months of its existence 

\ few years ago a group came to me and asked ny help in 
geiting Little League plans publicized. I did what 
little | could and the dream became a realization. However, 
the amazing thing was that a couple of other gentlemen 
called me anonymously and said the original group I was 
hoosting consisted of a bunch of phonies. The two gentle- 
men were irked because they werent getting credit for the 
idea. Never mind what good the program would accomplish, 
make sure you give the credit! 

Now, the third item concerned a 15-year-old boy I drove 
bome one night to Maryland. Listen to him: 

“I played Litlite League ball and it was wonderful. Now 
I'm 15 and there are no leagues for me anymore. Sure, we 
have games scheduled every once in a while but most of the 
time nobody pays any attention. There is no adult super- 
vision and the fields arent kept up at all. It’s a lot differ- 
ent from the Little Leagues where everything was done for 
us.” 


the group 


thet 


IN CONNECTION with this, a friend sent me a clipping 
from the Baltimore Sun quoting Hubert I. Snyder, Baltimore 
County Recreation Director Mr. Snyder was concerned 
about mounting teen-age delinquency and his observation 
was that the older teen-agers are “a forgotten group.” 


tennis writer, that the Ar- 


the second item which came to my attention was 


folded under the pressure of 14th triumph 


Kroll hammered out his fourth|Lawrence retired in the third’ 


Rr Charies Del Vecchic. Staff Photographe 
Baseman. Pete Runnels in first inning of game at Griffith 
Stadium yesterday. Throw came from Eddie Yost. Umpire 
is John Stevens. No. 3 2 is Besox Coach Del Baker. 


WALKING ON AIR—Bosteon infielder Billy Goodman ap. 
pears to be taking a ciant step twe feet from the ground 
as he bounces off first base safe on an error by Nats First 


-——— 


Kroll Captures World Golf, 273 


41.074 See Burdette Win 


Ted Pockets Dodgers Maul 
$50,000 With Braves Pour It on Reds Roberts, 7-3; * 
Closing 66 Second Day in Row, 8-2 Furillo Hits 2 


CHICAGO, Aug. 13 P— BROOKLYN, Aug 12 
Stocky Ted Kroll overcame his! MILWAUKEE, Aug. 12 (®—The league-leading Braves turned Carl Furillo slammed 
bridesmaid role in tournament back the challenging Cincinnati Redlegs for the second straight home runs and Pee Wee Reese 
golf with a flourish today,'day, winning the third game of the series, 82, behind Lew and Randy Jackson hit one 
threading his way through the Burdette and before another capacity crowd of 41,07 each as the Brooklyn Dodgers’ 
traffic of an estimated 61,000/ The Braves retained their 1%-game lead over the second. overpowered Robin Roberts 
fans to score a closing 66 for|place Brooklyn Dodgers and increased their advantage over 47d the Philadelphia Phillies, ' 
(273 and cart off $50,000 as Tam the third-place Redlegs to three full games. 7-3, today to cling to the heels 
O’Shanter's “world” champion Burdette gave up five hits, including Wally Post's 21st home of the National League-leading 


While other frontrunners run of the year in the seventh. It was the veteran righthander’s Milwaukee Braves. 
Brooklyn was outhit, 10 to 


nine, but seven of the tame 
hits were for extra bases. 
with this team trailine 66 addition to the circuit Sait | 
a The Braves made only two now has 14 hits in his last 29 Gil Hodges hit a triples and 
The Monev Winners doubles and six singles but took times up Billy Bruton, Bobby Junior and Dixie 


we 


Rrooks Lawrence of the Redlegs was charged with the de. 
his fifth in’ 21 decisions and his third in the last five 


trying for golf's most fabulous! 
jackpot, the steady 36-vear-old feat. 


“Public energies,” he said, “are directed to the younger mm 4’ Del Rice each Gilliam 
elements with such solidly backed activities as Little res ron 62 69 11 66-272 gno.ene 20Vantage of 10 bases on balls 4 omson roa eh pr a Howell doubled 
Le s, Boy Scouts and Y. MC \ . Freq Hawkins 73 686863-276 10.000 issued by five pitchers rove in two of the winners ‘Roberts was the victim of 
agues, Boy Scouts al iC. A. When youngsters out- J" $.tacen. — 40%ec: 45.231 | sos0 1] two hits runs 
row these activities. theres no follow-th h I bi Petes Ppl ele ay. Desay ty -snaen go twe.= three of Brooklyn's home runs 
s , ee blame if eme 167166 73-286 2.909 .0¢4 » walk for the Braves and Saturday might. the Braves pefore leaving for a pinch hit- 
public and parental! disinterest for the aimless, confused hot- eve Cooper HT a Te eins Sse defeated Cincy before 45,000;.. in the eighth 
rod generation with no outlets except the automobile or the 4 ,-+ & ob ae te +3-281 i300 fans, 6-3. PHILADELPHIA BROOBLYS 
road-houses Cary Middiccomt G6 ao 53 31-281 es Federal Slorage, mune TT ee TTT ee ie eee Sth 
The same point was made here before and brought down Bgany  BRugia 'e eee, $i) pont.” ihti beet S93 Rees Ht 
the wrath of the Little League adherents. Again, I'm not BS er... © $3943 4aca: oss 2 New Orleans Bee ty tid Mukews 3133 vee rh | 064818 Game cd «68666 
against Little Leagues but some of the emphasis should be hy ~~ =F 65 70 36 71-282 ; Post rf 41@0 Adcock Ib 2661 Jones % 4113 Puriile rf 4220 
® Pp ou OS Se iota ley « 4i71 Torre ih 1036 Hamner ss 4123 Robinson 2 2118 
shifted to the teen- age groups. And when we get somebody {olive ” SB ieiiisis § § Play Tonight ‘fete, = iets Bruton * 3728 thenus 10690 Jeckson me % 4t33 
like Anne Martindale in the area, we should keep her. } a | +B Be leurenee 8 iebt | OS PEL RB Sree - Bee ee 
And, begging Mr. Woodward's pardon, the more groups We Jimmy" "Demaret! $873 11 S1-288 ie Federal Storage plays NORD- sommes, 4395 cGremar® 1188 Labine > 910 
ean encourage to help youngsters of all the ages, the better . “eoaper Bee Tz 68 6s toon uM La Rocca, defending All-Amer- Agee > ett ae, oe Se «(Fee 
chance we will have somé day of licking’ the juvenile wll e843 i67i-28¢ 344 ican Amateur Baseball Asso- Feiss” = SHAT ‘Totals es 718 c—Bingled ior ‘ewes i oh 
problem .aee .. ig a3 is joins 42 Ciation tournament champion » Filed out for Gross sth —— i a 
Don't forget, when you pan for gold, there's an awful lot 725 Berke 72 7071 7)-284 8 =6344 from New Orleans at Griffith -—=* ‘ oe is 1 et x7 
of silt before you get the real stuff Dees Fore’... uh 426338204 344 aoe aoe ne Muwaskee ‘ 98 08 COx—5 , R- Biaylock, Jones. F pn 
eas ea nee eams wi , 2 ' R ~ Ennis. Nn. 
Shirl . for the u in DALBA toum rr iy ¥ 4 i 4) Shurile 2 Nema 2. Cae. 
rley Povich is on vacation. His column will be resumed sub-par round, 32, 34, for a 72 sou agg Bern Pa get ; Mathews, Bruton 2 Greengrass, 2B-Gillism. | Newell, 3B— 
upon his return hole total of 273—15 unden reg: saiah beanie Wednesday ‘ _ Bost. + Me . B—Logan 2 OP. $B Robinson staat Len | 
eae ; ———____—________—__——_ | wlation. 0 tem >’ £2 Niiweukes “10 BB 2 Greis Flowers | 
It matched the lowest win- Tickets. for. tonight s oe cSrerence 4, Gross 2 Fowler 3. fae 1, Craig 4 ye 1. Flowers 2 
. , } may be purchased at the sta- Burdette 3 $0 -Lawrence, 3. oe lint Cros © 8. inh) 
Norfolk Colonels H t P ning tally in the “world” ¢X-aium All tickets are 7T5c, with Fore 1 i k 1 Burdetie 3 Labine 1 in 1. BER 64, Plow 
, I Bes e t Ben H k 40 Lawrence 5 in 223, Lawrence 64, ers 11, Craig 33: Labine 04. WP Craig 
ravaganza, Ben (oean taking children under 12 admitted Gross 04 Fowler 24. Acker 64 Bleck W Crate (11-7) L—Roberts (lela). U 
. A oe it. with 273 in 1951. free. 64. Burdette 22. W Burdette (167). L~ Depatelll. Gorman, Pinelllt T- 
Again Defeat wisi. srk tot fon 102 tas “ah, Peter Thomson, Australia. Lawrence : ; 
. than te K 40 and Walter Burkemo, Franklin. 
Area Polo Team i." Es att 3 i illthe thvpaamarter mark cooled M S . 
o: ast a8 
B® 301 a1 today. Thomson 
Col. Billy West scored three NeDeur 00 oes * is for 278. a oe 4 iy aj or League tan ings 
goals as the Norfolk Colonels rc me tee a, 508 


at Barnsley Field, ; 
Oinev. Md.. vesterday. It was 
the second defeat of the season 
for Washington, both adminis- ea i. 

tered by -the Colonels. Wash- piayer > i =e 


ington has wor 14. on” os 
Lt. Col. Art. Dern, Col. P. Q. Mesias "a Toute” 
Ee Sc 


McDonaid, Col. Brooks Wilson, 
eatfened 
Serene 


and Col‘ Harry Wilson each 
Scored one for the winters. 
Weekend Pro 
coe woe a game for ootball 
enthusiasts who can- F Results 


aptain Don - Bradley scored 
:= the trip to si ae Servis Stare 
4  Peletetghin | 


goals to lead pbeemr nae — 3 


gee Keeler scored the Aécost- 


aes Sunday, the Washington 
Polo Club will play Warrenton 
Warrenton. The Maryland “* 

Club will meet the Diplo- 
team at Barnsley Field in 


tention on the final round the i 


Kroll, who was in the con- AMERICAN LEAGUE © 


NE 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 


tI Ee tse: ug dal Be | 
— qumer * CLUBS 5 3 = CLUBS (se*Ppudgais | 
sshing- first major triumph in 18 years R H 226 gh isizi- | 
| a ZOS CE SES WIL| Pet GB Se CELE Ze WiL| Pet! GB 
New York —10, 8\11| 8 8/1414:73/38,.658... Milwaukee —'10| 8 6 612 91465 :42).607,. 

winner of World War ll Cleveland | 8—| 7 4 71412116345.583 8% Brooklyn 8— 71310 712 76444 .593) 1's 
zounds of 67, 69, 71, Boston la 9— 11/11 12, 4116247.5691¢ Cincinnati 1410— d 813 8116346 .578 3 | 

Pa Chicago =—_« 6 10 6 —| T11 9 75650 .528'14% St. Louis 6 5| 6— 9 9 812555450511 

Detroit 10 6 7 5— 510 952'58'.473.20%, Phila. 9 FT $10— 2 8 85255 48613 
5 3 3 712— 5134862.436 24", Pittsburgh 6 5 5 7 8— 9 8486144018 | 
has WASH. 25 9 8 7 1— 7456441327 Chicago 645 410 9— 64462 41520's 
Kan. City «3,2 7 4 6 510—3772.34035 New York | 3\ 37 5 4% 8—3966.37125 | 
Lost 38 45,47 50 58 62 64 12) ot Sant 42 44 46 54 55 61 62 66 | 


YESTERDAY'S RESULTS YESTERDAY'S RESULTS 


WASHINGTON, 8 Bester 2. ) | am New ¥ 9-8. : 
New York, 6-4: Baltimere, 2-2. . oat tt cola Et 


Detrett, &: Thicece. 5% . 
Clevetan4. %: Reneese Cite 8 


TODAY'S GAMES 
(He games scheduled.) 


‘at bat. 
eighth and scored Boston's sec. 
‘ond Run. 
1 se one each got ae hits. 


two° 


Griffs Grab | 


‘Ninth in 


| 13 Games 
With Boston 


' By Bob Addie 
@talf Reporter 
| Jim Lemon, the poor mans 
version of Mickey Mantle, rap 
‘ped his fourth homer in the 
last three games as the Nats 
regretfully said farewell to the 
Boston Red Sox yesterday. 
| The Nats whipped their fa- 
vorite “people, 82, before a 
Griffith Stadium crowd of 
8717 and took the series, two 
out of three. It was Washing. 


ton'’s ninth victory in 13 games 


against the Red Sox 

Lemon smashed his 20th 
homer of the year with one on 
in the third with Bob Porter. 
field, one of our alumni, in the 
box. The victory went to Bud 
Byerly, the 35-year-old right 
hander who was notching his 
first triumph in hte American 
League. 


Byerly Stops "Em 


Byerly relieved a faltering 
Dean Stone in the first when 
the latter couldn't get anybody 
out. Big Bud inherited a situa- 
tion in which the Red Sox had 
the bases full and nobody out 
Byerly prevented a score and 
went on from there until the 
sixth when he needed assist- 
ance from Camilo Pascual. 

Willard Nixon started for 
Boston and also couldn't get 
anybody out. The “Dump 
Nixon” movement started early 
and Will was rapped for a pair 
of runs before Porterfield cut 
off that particular rally. 


Porterfield gave up two runs: ¥ 


then Tommy Hurd gave up 
four more. The Nats got 14 
hits while the Red Sox had to 
content themselves with seven. 


Williams Doubles 


Ted Williams managed to get 
one hit in three official times 
He doubled in the 


Ted Lepcio and Jim 
Stone's troubles i 


man’s grounder. 
Lepcio and Willigms filled the 
bases and Byerly was rushed 
to the rescue. He got Dick, 
Gernert to pop up while Jackie ® 


Jensen grounded into a double 


play 

Nixon wasn't as fortunate. 
‘He walked Yost to start the 
Nats’ first when Whitey Herzog 
tripled and came in on Pete 
Runnels’ single, the first 
three hits for the 
first-baseman. When Roy Siev- 
ers, who also got three hits, 


See NATS, Page 13, Col. 3. 


Lemon Hits Another Homer as Nats Win, 8-2; 
Mantle Smashes No. 41, Yankees Take Two More 


=a sdeea 


Hever Orieles 
Yogi Berra’s 
Triple | Wins 


SecondGame 
re 


——— 


- # 


NEW YORK, Aug. 12 | 
Mickey Mantle socked his 41 
home run in the first game a 
Yori Berra drove in two rul 
with a triple in the seco 


game as the American Lea 
leading New York Ya nkees 
swept both ends of a double 
header from Baltimore, 6-2, and 
4-2. today. 

Mantle’s homer, in his club's 
lllith game, put him 13 games 
ahead of the pace set by Babe 
Ruth when he slammed his 
record 60 home runs in 1927. 

The double victory enabled 
the Yankees to boost their first- 
place margin to 842 games over 
Cleveland, which defeated Kan- 
sas City in a single game. 

Mantile’s homer came in the 
first inning,-off southpaw Den 
Ferrarese. with a funner on 
base to bighlight a three-run 
outburst. Don Larsen went all 
the way in the opener, scatter- 


ing six hits, to register his sev- 
enth triumph : 
Berra’s triple came io the 


third inning of the nighte 
off Lefty Bill Wight and con 
Billy Hunter and Hank Ba 
to give the Yankees a 24 
lead 

The Yankees added ano 
run in the fourth on singles 
Mantle and Bill Skowron 
make it 3 to 0. Baltimore, h 
scoreless although it put ft 
men on base in each of the fi 


See YANKEES, Page 13, Cale 
a 


The Nats 
Box Score 


BOSTON 
(,ecdman. *b 
5 


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-ernert. | 
Jensen. rf 
Terese. ef 


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n 


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WASHINGTON 
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DOUBLE PLAYS— 
Runnels *: Piews, ¥ 
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BASE ON 
receenee 1, Byer’ ys? 
ot recent «HITS *. ve 


Herd ‘- ‘. Derism | 6- 4. Ste 
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a -2?. So (6-5). 


D. J. Kaufman's 
59th Annual 


Advance 


Fall 


EAGLE Suits 


Outercoats 


§85 to 79.50 


Advance Fall Sale savings 
on selected Eagle suits. . 

long wearing worsteds and 
sharkskins in new Fall and 
Winter colors and patterns. 


445 Eagle Sport Coats et: 
69.50 Eagle. Outercoats ... 


V4 Sept. 


OPEN A CHARGE 


Domestic & 
Imported Eagle Suits 


9.75 


37.75 
58.75 


Y% Nov. 


ACCOUNT TAKE 4 
' MONTHS TO PAY 


Y% Oct. 


Y% Dec.} 


1005 PENNA. AVE Ei EVE STS. as 


> 


12 THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 9 Sowder, Augee ii, 196 


7 


— 


Herb Score Strikes Out 14 as Cleveland Again Downs A’s, 6-3 


_ — snasenmeetntnenpreceneinenians — a —~y 


——— _ 


Colavito. Sat Says Kace Is on Mend Hollin Hills District Amateur Golf Entries Close Friday 


. - . . Entries for the District ama-| The championship will be 
“oe Me Eddie LeBaron Still Limping _|Pecteats Manor ect et ctannannin cow ginea 8 Grny Cue cm 
. . ‘Frid A 17, € Al 2 Bobby B ll of 
Ay ila, Smith cat In Tennis. 4.3 enarbee mast he ion ‘to Sher the hoch cle bo the ‘Gelenting 
, Chase Club, * \champion. 
Hollin Hills, Va., Tennis Club 


. 
Hit Homers 7 oe <Timmmage to weeks age st Sex Frasciers and the LeBaron is taking heat and defeated Manor Country Club, 

om = a Bears a Lottie Reck Ark whirlpool treatments and ex- 43, yesterday in a Men's Inter- 

I os \ s rs = q - 4 ? -_ : fll 2 . . 

y - LOS ANGEL —_— = pouever. | fe o tng = ereumg the knee with club C League match at Manor. SALES REPRESENTATIVE 
KANSAS CITY. Aug. i2 ' A mewoomer ta the Redskin gceosemest ject ie the bet met for we weights SINGLES—Dick Sherman (Menor) Aged 25 to 40. Good personality and background 
Herb Score struck out 14 Bal- training cemp bere at Oors foun dass lLeGarce cold — . y “The aches and bruises Gefented Beverty Bewte (8.8.). 6—4. Preferably married. Ambitious, energetic. willing 
ee oe ee ee ae to solicit to create prospects and sales of new 


ters today and was backed up dental College has ome big The Bece GeGcite’s & bes ws! : arent bed.” LeBaron sighed. vers isener). 6—1. 6—#: Peter Keir 
| "bet voure in trouble when «t&.) defeated Jerry MeFerres (Man- Ford cars, trucks and used units. 


be an eight-htt attack that ™- question ™, sreager aed — Geek = 
eluded three home runs as the Hows EAdee LeBaron’ =“ come aleeg a right isi! vou _ banged on the knee ath’ phieaaan "Gen tie A real opportunity for a hard worker te make 
ox elbow joints good earnings and create a permanent, profitable 


rer ' ioe [=e m=eit cegple of weras . 
Cleveland Indians defeated the Tae septy ype \Mewer), @—t 6? ) 
coming from LeBaron f= is cemce of giayaeg & . > “Bat I feel I'll be all right DOURLES—Gherman conf Bil Me career. Good working conditions, liberal pay 


Kansas City Athietics, 63, to ae ){ Fr ruGay *£°(t “a ™mPum sper | came bere im top shape and ferren (tener) defeated Beverty Bowie scale, new car furnished, vacation ray, hospital 


compiete a sweep of the three Walking arress camp wouldet seed much running **4 Welt HR) 24 6-4. 8-42. and sickness benefits. life insurance. ete 
defen: Retr and Al Martin (8.8.) Ge 


les breakiam.. be bec 2 percep * - te regen & That and a 
hp up seven hits and tihile tmp—en cuiwaeré re | mt. - ortunstety couple of games should be Sehee eomaes ae 6 tot oe Be ro CALL FOR APPOINTMENT 
‘ minder of the left keer & : [ sulicient for the start of the ye pens etvnesex (Maner) sfesies MR. ROY PORTER JU. 5-7800 
walked three at he gained Rit ture he eu®eredt ie the Sret league season a ro Se - 228 tohard : . 
12th victory of the year against! oe 
seven losses. The 14 strikeouts 
added up to his second high for 
the season. His best effort thi 
vear was 15 against Washing 
ton. Nine of Score’s strikeouts 
were registered in the first four 
innings today 
Colavite Slams 12th 
The Cleveland homers were 


by Bob Avila, Rocky Colevite 
and Al Smith 

Colavito smashed his i2th 
hemer of the season im the 
eighth inning to break a 33 tie 
Smith homered with Gene 
Weodling on base in the ninth 
ta provide a cushion for Score 


... than 12 other leading premium gasolines 


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Renesas (Cltr 
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Bues Drop 


Giants Twice 


PITTSBURGH. Aus. 12 @ 
The Pittsburgh Pirates pound. 
ed out 17 hits today to trounce 
the last-place New York Giants, 
- 31-3, in the second game of s 
doubleheader after defeating 
the Giants. 3-2. in the first 
game behind the six-hit pite?- 
ing of righthander Vernes 
Law 
In the opener, the Pirates 
got ali their runs in the second 
intfing when Bill Mazeroski 
singled home a runner from 
second and Bill Virdon tripled 
off the right field screen to 
score *wo more runs 
Frank Thomas singled four 
times to drive in two runs for 
the Pirates in the nightcap 
Diek Groat and Fred Waters 
tripled and Roberto Clemente e 
Hank Foiles and Dale Long 
each doubled. Willie Mave hit 
his 19th homer-for the Giants ~< 
> 


(Piret 
Pitt eB “* — 


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“09 O-+GQG0e0RP 


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od 


-— 


oe ji Phage 3 


On $3.99 worth of Blee Sameco. test cars were driven till ther ran dry. Retracing the exact route. they couldn't ret back on $3.00 worth of any of the other 
premoum gaselunes tested Bloe Sunoco averaged 23.0 miles farther | Tests were sanctioned, supervised and certified by the American Automobile Association. 


a a: . aseet 
S-- Sue 4OoNMvwe®e 
Sesuee #.26we® 

%o S8ee#e@* 


eso. 


These tests were conducted by the 
American Automobile Association in The gasoline that meets today’s 
6 cities under normal city-country R : 

higher premium octane standards 


driving conditions using typical driv- ‘ 
ers in late model high-compression and sells at regular gas price 


a | : : cars whose manufacturers recom- 

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: ’ Results of tests confirm, once again, 
the fact that Blue Sunoco is America’s 
greatest gasoline value. Why not take 
advantage of it—get more miles for 
your gasoline dollar? ? Stop in at your 
neighborhood Sunoco dealer’s today, 

and try a tankful of Blue Sunoco. 


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‘ THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD Mondey, August 13,196 °° = 44. 


Tigers Defeat Pierce, Chisox, 5 | MARKET TIRE ( WASHINGTON'S LARGEST DISCOUNT TIRE CHAIR 


* BETHESDA e@ S.E. @ WE. @ ARL.-ALEX 


a 


trikes Head on Low Bridge—— [DD : 2 | ) ' | 
Hvdreplare Driser Dies in Crash] Poulin Hits | Riggs ALL 4 STORES OPEN DAILY 8 A.M. to 9 P.M. 


Cards, 6-2 Double and 
BAY CITY. Mich, Aug. 12 @—An i8-yeareold Detroit oe 
8, 9 youth was killed teday when he struck his head on a low ou é al 
| bridge following the collision of two hydroplanes in an 
nt American Powerboat Association race on the Saginaw River. 
Pp lay 0-0 Tie Police said Walter Gwiazda’s boat shot into the air when Home Run 
it collided with one driven by James Benson of Grand B S riste 
. r 
cone des 12 OTs Rapids. Gwiarda struck his head on a railredd bridge DETROIT, Aug. 12 #—Frank nee eB ; ) 
St. Louis Cardinals and Chi ‘Bolling blasted a three-run ~ . ‘ 
cago Cubs played to a scoreless YANKEES—From P. II NATS—From Page I I ‘homer and a double that en- major tire compa- 
tie in nine mnings of a second A abled Billy Hoeft and the De- nies have boosted 


game of 2 doubleheader before Mantle Clouts LemonPovwers troit Tigers to defeat Chicago's, prices on retailer's 


26.567 today after the Cubs | | ag gieerters 5-2 today in a bat- current tire pur- 

won the opener, 62 y k 0 d e southpaws. _ | : , , | 
The second game, called on No. 41. anks Nats ver It was only — Fong ~ a chases. Despite a gy 

account of darkness after two arate hing oe i aemnae) price increase ae ° 

hours and 22 mintes, was 4 f- i B ‘ : . KET TIRE O gv | 
’ ; \¢ ’ o tops in the American League. | . 

ne See SS Se in Tw Ice OS0X, 5 2 Bolling’s home run, his! WILL HOLD THE 


. Ww 
— -— eee ge gy | fourth, camé in the fourth in-| LINE ; 
2 Stan | > ia -s oa four innings. finally finished off singled, Porterfield came in ning behind a walk to Al Ka- ay Ramage 
iene boos bats by doubline in Rigs Colman when Tito Fran-itg stop the rally. line and a single by Ray Boone. grade and first line 
: cona opened the fifth with 2 54, save up a single tot pulled the Tigers from a 2-1| tires AS LONG AS 
' 


the opener double. Tommy Byrne took 
PRESENT STOCKS 


Musical’s recordtying smash',.er but he too. was relieved Runnels in the third before’ 
was a long liner to rightfield. sr.er giving up a single to Bob|Lemon busted a long ball into 
Mine and save before 
prices go up! 


od oe 1 tt? Te A 


-eoag 
“~Snenconer 


doubled. It was Musial’s No. $1 'Triandos and Jim Pyburn. Nats made it 50 in the fifth! Mince’ i 


run-batied-in of the year , 
One of Baltimore's first-game|.nen Runnels walked and Brote 1 


Tire Geme 1b 
runs was furnished by , M Ph'ps rf 
anal no aR Nieman, who homered in the /Sored on singles by Sievers) Hatfield a 


eighth inning to set a new club and Lou Berberet. | Frere » 

record, breaking Gus Triandos’| Boston got its first run in|LaPaime » 

mark of 12, established last'the sixth when Lepcio singled, 7 Sh <x out Totals 
moved up on a walk and/>—Called out on strikes for Hatfield m 


pager Pa, asia mec! M100 LEVEL, FIRST LINE, GRADE A ; 
But the Nats stormed back Boone, Belins 2. = —Mene. I Deby. Exact Grade and Quality as New Car Equipment CHECK THE INDUSTRY'S 


with three runs in their half ae Minoseo, J. D. Philli ‘ 


ott Hurd Be tpets, Sa Ree eater GOODYEAR ‘TIRE. 1956 OFFICIAL TIRE CHART! 


Pagcual tripled over Jem-\and Dropo; Kuenn. | 
sen’s head to the rightfield|/ {pis Polling. Kuens Sol? SB-. Super Cushion De Luxe 


. ‘ lease (6 ‘ . ; you the official tive chart that indi 
bullpen and scored on Yost's|Pierce 5, LaPalme 1. # 2 ° Goo ' & U , ' indicates 
single. Runnels singled Eddie . yr ‘ = 3 R-ER- Ple DRI H T BE i MARKET. waren tires. Don't take » chance 

around to third and Sievers’|}*Fgime 00, Moot 22 vier hice Safety Liner id PREMIUM GRADE tires ot — you FIRST LINE and 

» «FETS cserifice fly brought in Yost her. Summers. T-20. k om FIRESTONE 6.70x15 Don't buy tires by nome-eaiyt | pe ny le rn city. 
= ase ne-2 While Pete went to second saicatenl Uebe “le this a first line or premium me fey Anas 
bee York meee-6A single by Herb Pilews De Luxe Champion te see the 1956 official tire chert as 


R_Garteer Wamsan Saver. Mart. scored Runnels and made it Demas, Norris eek? el | 6 eT 1 Se 


Larser 
. Mantle 3. &1 Sine 
74. Liddle 5 & 2. Kenetanty 2 Mart’= 


Rize cs - 
- - - — an -i > ge 22.88 
ER-Bieyieck 44. McDaniel 64. Liddle Niemen. Mastic SB Gardner. Skovren Gernert Singles W in Doubles -7.VOx1S | $32.35 | 17.88 —8.00x15 J $39.45 | Th No Money Down! 
. anty 64 Bos 24. W Rast oF se DP Coleman. (unae 7.60x15 $34.45 19.88 8.20x15 | $40.90 | 22. . 
EEE Mo tee Tat mee cee ea ae | eee CHARGE ITI 
. 


; the eighth. Williams tico Marines and Marjorie Nor- 
 EBP-By =e ** doubled with one away and ris scored two victories by iden- © No Extra Cost! 
oe Terrarese, Tues. vr jogged home on Gerner’'s long tical scores yesterday and won| ® No Interest Charge! 


single to center. Pascual then|the annual Washington Golf| 
and Country Club Invitation 


Nd © Neo Carrying Charge! 
got Jensen to hit into a double ®™ FIRST LINE, 4 
particular|mixed doubles tennis champion- 0 LEVEL, | Phone Your Credit Apolicati 
z ps FISK DE LUXE sel py «ears 


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play to end that 
Now—OL. 6-5 


threat. | SELL. | | 
With one out in the ninth, Demas and Miss Norris,| GRADE A 

Sammy White singled and|Seeded No. 1, defeated fourth 

Don Buddin grounded to Joe Seeded Tom Reel and Charlotte Ti 

Valdivielso who booted the|Vecker, 6—3, 6—3, for the title. A 1 Tebes 

ball. But Mickey Vernon, . Demas, Middle Atlantic Heavy-Duty Buty 


i batting for Dorish, grounded|*imgies champion, and Miss eae 
out to Runnele while Plews|Norris gained the final round , BB ; FREE’ FREE? 
teassed out Goodman to end by stopping third seeded Ralph ¢§ e 
E List $30.10 


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SIDEBARS — Only twice In. yesterday's other semi- and TUB 5,000 miles with every set 


“ before have the Nats had two final match, Reel and Miss 3 
Dunningston men on the same club with 20 [Decker ousted unseeded Col.) 2 BLACKWALL : of tires . ..~ for life of tires. 
a * : homers each or better ... Nick Powel and Eleanore 2 ne oe | “, @® FLATS FIXED FREE fer lite 
Ti f Fj ' “| The Arst time was in 1938 Shaw, 3—6, 6—1, 6—2Z. ; TIRE SIZE a Tube Free | _~—"aee 
tes i10r irs ' || when Zeke Bonura hit 22 and | iz at 29 10 3.88 _. of tires, 
:| Al Simmons 21 . . . . Starr Wins Race mm @ 6.70x15 30.10 15.66 v0) SF @ WHEEL ALIGNMENT INSPEC- 


‘| Rey Sievers hit : adie 
| Mickey Vernon 20... Sievers | VISTA, Md. Aug. 12—Malt- 3 —~———— owl TION. Hete. “Special” below 
| e 7.10x15 33.10'14.88 if work is necessary. 


46.70a15 


baronet Soe (el Bs ar se tae 

|, 20, t ees P rom San o, Calif., won : 1 pean ager rma 

| are setting really interested |15-lap p ars race here to- _ ° 7 60x15 36.20,16.88 43.50, 19. wf 
Dunnington and Henry in Mickey Mantle’s home run |day before 2000 fans at New! 3 | SO | ——— ] 88 

Lauterbach of Norfolk, Va. < | production .. . When it was Vista Speedway. Sut Jackson @ ae 15 40 45 18 ae 48.30 2 . 1% ; 2 oo 

were both timed in 72.75 miles rankel Takes announced over the loud- of Baltimore was second, # i 8.00x ootag OD —_———— wt 7 

per hour, a fast pace over the speaker that Mickey had hit James Brent of Washington: a 8. 20x15 4] 90 19.88 50.05 22.88 a f 2 FAMOUS BRANDS! 120 LEVEL! 


rough course today. Art Me 350-La Race his 4ist, the crowd really (third and track champion Billy = Sent 
Dougall of Silver Spring. Md.. * P roared ... The beer-drinkers Tyler of Stafford; Va. ran 34 10 16 88 sete The tires with the 100 000 Du me 
> ’ 7 po 
Ps Nylon Cord Body twie - 
a e as st 


was third in the 48 Hydro class weaRLBORO. A 12. in left field got some sun- (fourth. : oS ee > é 8 

with an average speed of 56 Harold Frankel of Paterson, shine with their schnapps * ad 6.40x15 28.59 13.8 : | aE os rong 

miles per hour SJ. driving 2 1955 Chevrolet | yesterday, thereby warming ? Ss OD ahaa 6.27 4013 88 3275.1 6.88 Baa #2? Conventional tires, virtually eliminat- 
7 6.00x1 meee eee = % mee '"g blowouts. Buy at Market Tire & Save! 


captured the 350-lap late model) the inner and outer mar... . L@V j NG ; ee 3 
| d 2 Years 


Mariboro Byerly was performing some- 


. stock car race at ) | zm a sats ° 
The Minors Speedway here this afternoon.’ thing of a marathon stint yes- Cc HEVR@LET a Cearee FREE : ‘ 2 p Fr te id. , ui mn 


Frankel toured the 350 laps meng ane oy he one Ke 
PACIFIC COAST LACUS in 1 hour, 564 seconds. He was gone ore was ree in- | . 
oe as es te <a ses driving a car belonging to nings ... He pitched 5% yes- | Announces s AtAll 4 Market Tire Stores m 
#7 :. 4** Pappy Hough, also of Paterson.’ terday . . . Lemon had a four- ; ; s. ho 
4% Hough finished second in a game homer streak earlier in a “ Ri a 
1956 Chevrolet. Wes Morgan’ the year ...He has a three- | ep ae ts 
| of Alexandria, Va, was third in| game string at the moment | i TUBELESS or 


. Sse Preaciees ©3'— Hudson Hornet. There were ... The Nats are off today | by Fo Ts Amazing Value! At All 4 Stores! 


‘s 
Sa ne accidents and then take off for Balti- | i ales 
Bwues a ee | co. TIRE & TUBE § TIRE ona TUBE 
7 : . ’ row ni | : | 
>| Who's This Mantle? | | Ite anteed 6 Full Months GUARANTEED 2 ¥ 
SHREVEPORT. La. Aug 12 we a : All Sizes Are One Price ' EARS 
P—Ken Guettler, Shreveport (id Dominion | . . 88 C aae: | OR 30,000 MILES 
outfielder, broke the Texas! | 3 -_ - ” 


today when he blasted his) Ted" rps ; sae 1 : | 4, : 

ififty-sixth in the fourth inni | onnme | . ecient * 

ceieet ‘oenten “S) ‘The Virginia White Sox and| se ges! ve Tube } 

| The old record was 55 set by|MeLean A. C. teams were with-| 011.0 Genartment selling baths ye we ei eneeahis Bachanes Ae 

(Clarence Kraft of Fort Worthidrawn from the Old Dominion) new Chevrolets, trucks and reg the , ry 


iin 1924. Guettier tied the| used cars Me Lonning ex- 
irecord last night Baseball League yesterday by tends a cordial invitation to = BLACKWALL WHITEWALL 


d er President 
es Ss eague esiden his old customers and friends $12.95 WHITE RUBBER a TIRE 4 TUBE & TIRE AND TURE 


\Floyd Tuthill of Arlington.) to visit Loving Chevrolet ana | 100 Level, First Line List ) Sale plist Sale 
Price Price rice Price 


: ’ LS ‘The t , ble t says | , : 
Fis Week's [its tom teens ter remaining! "Yet low dike nion TUBELESS SIDE WALLS 6.70x15 | 35.35 | 18.889 42.50 | 21.88 
Fights on TV “The White Sox forfeited Pee orgy gear tay nar poo | Re Sg 
| TIRES 7.60x15 | 42.55 | 21.88951.10 | 25.88 


yesterdays game to the Fair-| ice, combined with unusual Re adh ll 
TONIGHT—At New York {ax Legion. With the Vienna| courtesy at the lowest cost.” 8.00115 | 47.40 | 23.888 56.80 | 27.88 


‘team having finished its sea-) ; Lifetime Guaran Siiee a. 7 
som, the league is left with ’ . 7 MOUNTED FREE At All Stere 
five teams fighting to make) LOVING Goaremmanship ond mater r 


fas, foe pure: poe col CHEVROLET IO 3 8s 
Atchison-Keller, Jack Pry and'] [East-West Hwy. at Colesville 9 ese ne | 5-75 bosses 200 Level 
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WED Fairfax are the teams battling Rd., Silver Spring, Md. L 
to make the playoffs which be- JU. 9-8000 : , 7 
ee of ee gin Aug. 26. : Mare TW “ hac : | BLACKWALL TUBELESS | a t. —— , ta Yy i o BS 
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Beauty Queen Called : >. . tront-ond geometry 840x135 _| 56.55 | 25.95 — 
Most Glamorous Rs . : cagebaher, Nash, Hudson. ord _8.70x15 | 59.85 |" 29.93 
| Z } are 81.96 additional. _7.W0x15_ | 70.05 | 37.95— 
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uowuntes=""* (Richardson Routs Fraser for Eastern Grass Title 


Around The Track 


Horses and People|Miss Gibson | West Upsets Donald Floyd, 


. Ann Gray Lose in: 
By Walter Haight— ; 
ATLANTIC rivegs 12—While there was some question 6-1, 6-3 Victor Kehoe in Ca valier Finals 


after President Eisenhower's stomach ache, as to his status in | 
the political race, there seems to be no doubt that Nashua will Co hithide: | - | VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. Aug. 
run again, even at this early date Pes. ee ee to ia De 12 Wade Herren of Birm- 
| visited Mr. Millionaire this morn- ¢ a ver rou fee i Ae : Bs . . ennis ingham, Ala., displaying bril- 
ing, my second call within - — | Par: eee. , ‘“* Gig Oy liant form, won his second sue- 
and he looked like the proverbial mil ca 2 — state 5 a be ah is . 
lion dollars Se oom SOUTH ORANGE, N. J., Aug. _ j | Mee ae ce ie Lt. Tom West = yesterday — veiremnial’ eats Tt 
He appeared to be fully recovered ee. se - |12 M®—Ham Richardson , a Ag rs 6 ai ae ies 2 3 jscored a major upset in the downing Donald Floyd of Ar- 
from the attack of gastric colic that so eee whipped Neale Fraser of Aus ee ines ie Tae. — men's singles division of the lington, Va., 6—3, 2—6,6—4. .. 
dramatically forced his withdrawal * | PO ne ee - 3s . r ' 
from yesterday's $100,000 Atlantic #2 5 tralia, 6-4, 6-3, 6—2, today) Boge ee | ‘ia se a annual District of Columbia, Herren is a 29-year-old busi- 
City Handicap. : in the finals of the Eastern! a eh ae’ tennis championships at East "¢*s form salesman who won 
| | , ; | : ma: ee rae mt the national boys’ champion 
If the 4-year-old was suffering, it | — grass court championships for && “mre $ i ae Potomac. ship in 1941 and the public 
Rob a ogee! 4 ry Mm ; his fourth straight victory over LF dee ol yy ,= 2 ee West stunned No, 7 seeded parks title in 1951. Floyd is 42 
e iad : yuG ; a ‘ 4 . ES _ : 
ort ee we revenied bow Nashua had “4 the Aussie tennis tourists | . Cutie’. he, | 4 se aioe | Lindy Kehoe, 6—3, 1—6, 7—5, and won the 1955 Virginia state 
heen giving the “when do we eat?” wht | Althea Gibson of New York, (Fo ae bid g ms a , - |in a second round match. crown 
signal since 4 a. m. when stable help who won 18 tournaments in Ta on a ee Pe " ae ae We ii : No. 8 seeded Rob Davis French beauty Mrs. Ray- 
nearby began rattling the feed Asia and Europe this year, _ | | Wi | ai < sey ., monde Jones of Ft. Monroe, 
wee & Z easily defeated Louise Brough . a 2° Fe : Fit ¢ ie halted giant-killer Larry Mid-..6 the No. 1 ranking woman 
Robertson, under orders, had lim- Haicht of Beverly Hills, Calif. 6—1, 2 3 és =e? Re delkamp, 6—3, 3—6, 6—2. Intennis star in France, stroked 
ited Nashua to hay-nibbling until the . 6—3 for the women’s title and previous rounds, -Middlekamp her way te the women's singles 
arriva of veterinarian George- Palmer Jr. when the colt's "€T second American grass oo % | ; | . Fae ‘ ‘had surprised Clay Ross and title by beating Mrs. Ann Gray 
temperature showed normal and he otherwise passed muster, COUT tournament ogy om % i ; ' PRE eS ee ' . |Earle Brown. of Washington, 6—1, 6—0. Mrs. 
eign tour. me t 2 ‘. ol ES SS eam } |has won this tournament twice 8¢¢¢e¢ entry. 


limited quantities 

Hence, Robertson meas in winning the title for the) | BD, ee a ¥ a i Ee IRE GS OK sai ‘in the past four years, 1 ary 
ured out a single quart of | “You know, this could have .-§rst time, Richardson mowed > - ep wr he 2 FL | a) « s|mated Hal Freeman, 6—4, 4. Hoad, P U 
grain instead of the usual | happened in the paddock, or |40wn_ Aussies Roy Emerson,) 7&9 _ wits, , ‘ * a. |Phil Neff, seeded No. 3, ead xe ay Upecs 
three. Nashua made short | on the way to the post, and Sen Rosewall and Ashley Coo-| a OO ist “ ae | |Edgar Lee, 8—6, 7—5. MUNICH, Germany, Aug. 12°! 
work of the skimpy ration, | might have been mistaken |Pér prior to his straight-set tri; gy" 07 0) ee ae it, A 4 Other seeded players, mere "—Sweden’s Sven Davidsson 
nosed the empty feed tub, | for nervousness or some- U™ph over Fraser. Co iS a : . BE mepngenil ‘Royal, No. 5; Leif Beck, | 6,and Chile's Luis Ayala teamed 
stuck his head over the half- | thing. Then there's no tell- Richardson, the No. 7 rank-| oe A eee ee \- @ ai ia re land Al Talkin, No, 4, hong ad up today to win a surprise vie 
door and gave out with a | ing what would have hap- i9& American, thus moved up) | ee | gl BE oh. vanced. tory over Australia’s Lew Hoad - 
“heated” stare pened - the chief United States Davis; } ane | ils WL ae at | Play shifts today to the Rock and Budge Patty of New York . 
DUSK TO DAWN d guess you can say we ,-” hope in the upcoming in- ' ~~ bi a. (Creek courts at 16th and Ken-|#7d Paris in the finals of the 

S , mase © were lucky to make a good terzone final with Italy and the ested a oe od “<< HOW ps nedy sts. nw., beginning at 5:30 men's doubles at the Bavarian 
whole lot of a difference in § aster Everybody concerned ath the Aattdees te hae ma Dp. m International tennis champion- 
Nashua’s appearance At 8 iano a pay-day, but we're laide. Australia Dec 26-28 | Associated Press Phote | YESTERDAY'S RESULTS whips. iia 
p. m. last night, the colt ap ron nl = the way its Richardson, Westfield, N. J.) $50,000 SMILE—Georce S. May, left, hands; day. Kroll carded a final 66, 273 and won riIRsrT RO ait ahs 60 a 
peared to be dog tired. His "LTE ae ost his service only once to! «» check for $50,000 to Ted Kroll after he by three strokes over Fred Hawkins. Be- or SIMONIZ SPECIAL! 
eves drooped rhe fall effects iggy 2 ar ogg i Bs el ag Brag -nye nema oa teok first prize in the Tam. O’Shanter sides the $50,000 Kroll signed with Mays 
of the administered wonder ~ bh. ’ ie 1000 each. te 1—¢ Beck defeat eter Ford, Pym. Piym., 
druss had not worn off crew and smiled, “You can (of the firset set after Richard- World golf tournament at Chicago yester- | for 50 exhibitions at § More, 6 + — a ra Poem of $@- ‘95 4 tug 

4t ®R a.m. this morning. he tell the people he’s okay now. {son snapped Fraser's opening Bol a eee. + me <n “thi 9s 
seemed to he his old self im going to look for a |service. Ham broke again in the | \aet , armenia Yes 4 chee! 


’ 


detested a Ay Mida Bm Necessary —All Work 


et af ad ofl , church—won't miss for the ffth game to run out the set GOLF—From Page It () | —2; Al Tatkin defested Austin 
erect " hea ciear of eve 0 u e Stan ol Vy ey ; ame —. . MIRACLE CAR WASH 


’ 
and ‘apparently interested in world—and then I'm hitting After that, the fourth-seeded a po , enneee 
aes aw Teacee SIMONI? STATION 


the road for home. See yo PRE! fs 
every noise and movement see you | American player in the tourney | I] W | | tm 
| at Saratoga.” ’ e O ‘on detentea Mickey Bete. MAINE AVE. & H ST. S.W. 
around him B. played almost fauitiess tennis f| ( Kk ro Wi Lis rit Seve aine T ai | eres t, > « Orale ae: (BETWEEN HOGATE'S and NAYLOR’S) 
The night watehman re- | ‘he Nation's No. 2 stom as Fraser repeatedly put him- « feated Eddie Rea 2" . risen, MOTORS STEAM CLEANED $3.50 
<6: LA. = won ona Dick WHILE YOU WAIT 
bite _Satpates “iek “Barton and Rack Phone MF. &-3554 


S8seo 


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. : 
had planned to leave after ern Foc ; ic. Weepe: 113 Lad ock | 
the race Py up; cime Weddine Rine 1141 ; » it In addition to the $50,000 in 
a RR to - Chk ~~~ ft ‘:4 Cash, Kroll also signed a con- 


- 
° 


V@e@esi vee 


an hour or so after midnight. letin-by-bulletin news story, Fraser and Rosewall tery 
; T R20U nD—Phit Nef and Asére| 
“like a bull” . , im ie . Pos =% vid ena 
4 partition away from SARATOGA ENTRIES Seixas. a new home ast inter at Fort a 10-foot birdie three putt on Stan Ogilvey and John Swaine jin = a6 Bove Bats 
Nashua, John Fitzsimmons, ORI - £ Lauderdale, Fla the last hole. Jr. both of the Tred Avon 206, Berner Welsh Gotented 
. he or ore maid; cing Fred Hawkins of El Paso, Although winning the Tucson) ye-nt Club, each won a pair Bee tL Il} defes 
ys 
the colt, slept on a blanket antic lideMercia Park 
; ed much of the crowd as an ‘uck player by his colleagues!igogay on the Choptank and Getentes Os deck MeCarihy and _ Bil 
was not that he feared for ‘Nane Fiving Cross earlier finisher and crashed W"0 today were elated with)treq Avon rivers. Thaler defeated John Howe <e Al instle 
s My ! —!. 6—# Reddy) 
in this beach-happy area. He Lawren tr waeet y ad sabbline ok 114 $10,000. —- the National Thomas Lipton trophy bY SCOT- jisewits. 
knocked out in the finals of the! finiched runner-up to Ogilvey TODAY'S SCHEDULE | POST TIME my 
the latter another assistant p 
each for 50 exhibition miatches Third place in the “world”! Henry ‘Dees ve. Ren pesee: o: Bee. BUSES DIRECT TO TRACK 
rirumbabe the battle for the J. Graham f. "fem ~— va 


he said the colt had snored if you know what I mean. for a 6—4, 8— —D, 12 regca ie ae! 
son of trainer Sunny Jim ret Bt Lil Key Lady 111 ATL ANTIC CITY ENTRIES 
here to saddle 2", Us LileMiss Catesby .11) mpeg ors Tex.. trailing Kroll 209 to 207 and Houston Opens this year.) ,» trophies as the three-day! Sloat and Perio Brown de oes Bin 
106 Alison Ritz 
et Tara tre 
Nashua. but because he had pThan rir LSaSteadr Lady through to second place with his victory. | Ogilvey, defending champion \dair rand Pred rd Reed defeated West and 
eventually settling for a share ing 82 points in the three-race and Arneld Kets = gy ae | RACES 
Robertso ale th Fitz . Soy J , . + oy: et. " ecth 
[Lone ry meg ad , ‘int x + / . ‘ Dr ri ooth : r * gh Ath ! 103 tract with promoter (,eorge S National PG 4 by Jack Rurke MEN'S SINGLES Cee ) pe 
. e-7es 5 in today’s final race, was sec- mt ge SP 2:15 P.M. apt. 
frainer was elated at the Th kK 1- 2 ; =’ Fle a Nick F 
« vs : 
. ; In deucing the two short treasure hunt went to Roberto 9 oe aS eed} San 
money-winning champion : in owner ~~ it 
a 136 Billing lecting two more birdies ¢™® Roberto, always a hot pon Johnson Trophy, which is 4 mes rl ont Tt and meek ‘ 
track | aS 


Pe ee ee et be et ee 


ported that Nashua slept and ach ache, I'm pleased to re- self in trouble with errors 
rested well. For a period of port, has ceased to he a bul. In the men’s doubles final olf: Ha Ww kin 8 Sec mynd Regatt itles 6—9. vakel 
( . ( a | ILiecs defeated Geral “Detleck and John Rich. 
oe 
Finest RO 
victory over Seteelh ab ‘and | OXFORD, Md. Aug i» Peel Coles, | 
Fitzsimmons 108 
, hie: e! n 
tty oa 118 entering the last round, avoid- Kroll was regarded as a hard-| oy¢ord Regatta came to a close Wer Ane ee oe inenine 
covered locker. However, iH aour 1) 13 Better Marks 
been unable to obtain a room 1 aes 34, 33—67 for 276. It was worth He blew a Bere Ma take! in the Star Class, won the Sir nanCOND | RO ROUND — MeCarthy and 
\ 
pen tnis year Thaler defeated Pehwortemen, and Re tp 
of fourth place, and he WAS) series for stars. Bill Myers, who — oe See DAILY 
simmons and Rart Sweeney 
May guaranteeing him $1000 after being 3-up at one stage. ond with 77 points. Fred Reed vs. Bevis 
quick recovery of the world's , r¢ 4-year -olds vs 4-Pa oes vineer: 
1i¢ holes on the front nine and col-/ nevincenzo of Mexico C ons-Moore winner, 
The long green van in Bear 
ao awarded to the point leader ve 


. 
“ria: ne A t ti rt _ ~- 8 . 131 . 
which “Mr Long Green,” : 3500, 3-year-old maidens Pr c try ; route to his 32, Kroll got & tender in the tourney, welded: 
had all gone well, would have aGunner ‘Res ise % eden --128| asin Gravat 113 thadie start on one of the finest the best closing round of the!” the final nae a “a ote ve WeCarthy am 
been already enroute to |bord Admiral j20aHigh Tot sa it Wink | ~~ )3 streaks in the meet's history. day with 32, 33—65 for 277 | Ogilvey beat out Myers, 2g, Meine {Bader 4 
ours La m aor on i Starting with the 624 hole, and $5000. | Swaine captured the Gaetina 
112 “Dector Lee Trophy by winning today’s final | 


Saratoga was parked nearby. aWhitner entry ‘ birdi A « 
he strung out four Dirdtes. teal 
If the colt is deemed fit to es 4 The South American finished race in the Comet Class and 


Rae v8 


a 
o 


were 1.5 


.,Winner im here 
The contender 


35 328 


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Last ¢« 
On the im 
Hae clases 
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ere 
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Not here 
Clockers recommend 


Reiampigo 
Lil's Dream ; 

Oal (Oreen) Par back recentiy 
ils Best (Green: Par beck recentiy 
‘4 Deena Pair ‘noe boy) Past; steps badly 


sor hg RACE—Puree $1500; S-veer-elde:; eleaiming: 


COO CSW were 


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$—% tt 
ral ii > 116% . ‘ 
travel after a visit from the | Geom ital + AS ag sigs, *giming. . foot putt gave him a two on the far ahead of Kroll with a score ; 
insurance company veteri- & 114 Pet ' Sp0 Cameo + 259-yard 62d. He reached the\that provided. quite a target.|'ne es = in aeenke NOW AT OUR NEW LOCATION! 
narian later today, he will be | bBonnie Busher 118 520-yard 63d in two shots for Roberto. third in the British ‘*** o , 
Gomes Pr He d " ; for the top performance in the, 
Saratoga - bound tomorrow (Nm Game 13 bBlue Again an early birdie 4. e did the Open this year, capped his ef- three-race series AUT REPAI t 
r mibreath rds rm entr »~y t j . ! . 
morning , eGaloreath Dar Den Fa , same on the 475-yard 64th. Then fort with a 6-foot eagle 3 putt eran CLASS (ite Themas hom = 
RORERTSON who discov 2. 10-foot utt on d : < ‘ A ‘ - é 
) enrietta L P om the 150-yard next after being trapped, then ff""9" gt . 
eved Nashua's plight some reeucrec 122 Amar 122 Qala ri? Call Me Pat.. 112 gxen two successive birdie 3s on 15- Tred Aver Ya. Club (4-5- a. 8. AUTHORIZED DODGE-PLYMOUTH 
oar frr . 2 For Pathom LZ nol! table-Rosiy Par ° ‘ ; 12-4, ‘ 
avo hours before post time Be ns gE oer Daspeme 16 anie eiernatiass Hooking his tee shot into os foot putts. Pima 73) Trews REPAIRS ON ALL MAKES OF 
for the big race. said, “we n ® 122 Uewal Fines 1 , 4-year-olds up; allow trees on the 67th, Kroll settle Thomson, winner of the Brit-'.. series )—t, Plame (2-1 53): 
ould have lost this horse “ 10Nn Hi! | wi BS an Se Fs 4 , + a ee ‘pee rey « Ngee 4 os Sn eta gre = paeee ae gine “Ehons orton © cht Club CARS AND TRUCKS 
He explatned, that to the pag? Ay we tN enanees.| fk tan 156 Kinds feart’ ij4 84!ne t back with another folded on the last nine as he|N 4. (10-3. 47) oy 
mer. it . 7 105 Prompt Impulse 100 two-putt birdie 4 on the 515- did a year ago when he was qarmt ‘we tes, Joke Awsine Jr. 
serious and continued, “colle | Sarat the . fies ia i iat ee " He was sh he 215-yard in 33 then shot a 38 Yaem % oes ia TY 
in humans is one thing and a Whritne a oan Gelene 114 Penman is e was short on the 2i5-yard was out in en snot a (3-1 ; te O 
in horses is another. When an LS: = 100 r -olds w ° is + Boe . (14 next hole and made his second for 71 and 278. He captured pene 2 ts. ae asap) wt UR SPECIAL 
the ordinary person thinks of | ‘Border fon ..} 12 it n 114 bogey. Then he parred the 71st $3000.for fourth place. 4 Trophy. eae & 
Dena + Sete we eens . 22 &es d th ill |. Rurke shared the 280 t mend Gibeon, rea Aven Yack OVER 2 ACRES DEVOTED TO EVERY SERVICE FACILITY 
Spans oO? Br 129 with 4 and gave the milling ga rkemo end ae R YOUR C 
with a habyv. So you burp him : cing anes apprentice “allowance Golden, Pear + a af lery a final thrill with holing with Pete Cooper, Jack Fleck,’ PENGUINS Bin, A, war te re FO AR OR TRUCK 
a couple of times and get } and Ed Furgol each with clos- Corvin River tocht Clad is ‘ne + 
some remedy from the medi- - pr yer ty : , ing 70s. vee Le! =, Met tere. - fait on: 
i e | Denfending “World” Cham- ra Leighton- a -Hermen. Glen Mar & 
Rut not so with a horse. | ) S ‘pion Julius Boros finished far PENGUING veo Tiss 
Le Pa § ae AS = oy 
rye auacr means spose | Paddock Picks at Charles Town  irn'theine 230 waite Fay, eB 
strangulation of the intes cu ( ( C Ward Wettlaufer, 20-year-old achest, Beste Lewis 
tines. There must be “quick teria aie at. ‘ : ~ P fee Hamilton College golf captain 
POST TIMt—2? F M. (DST) + 1900: 4-rveer-elds and ep: ctaiming! “ . 0 
action or a man loses a horse FIRST RACE—Parse, $1200: S-renr-olde: claiming 4, ‘Palumpe: Best effort needed a cL seg Rams Trade Backs 
ses U IGELES, Aug. 12 # . 
mire! that way Very fast; coud no with a 200. He fired a closing LOS ANGELES 
“We were lucky Nashua's ....Qm the improve 74 and beat out Martin Stano- a Lae Ane Se — 18th &2 New Yerk Ave. N.E. 
attack came when and where Third recent start vich. Niles, Ill, by seven /ommy ic 
it did. There were plenty of ae strokes. ive halfback, and Ed Hughes, LA. 6-2877 
a defensive back, to the New 
insurance policy, I couldn't 
give him medicine. However, Wettlaefer, N. Y. ¥8 4a 4 + sm draft choice McCormick joined 
if there wasn't a vet within sir et times ' 39 34 74 71-498 the Rams in 1952. Hughes has 
calling distance, I'd have had a A 2$ 3% 28 15-38" been with the Rams since 1954. 
SECOND RAC puree, £1000; 4-year-clds and up; ciniains 
regardless.” Juesbu (Christ son Needs only ride Won last; contender 
‘Pindell) Im light; contender Route partes dangerous 
Robertson pushed his fin- Dangerous with these ' Was ver better 
gers through his thinning Pisures with these Clockers rcommend 
dark hair and continued, 


16-—304 
*—307' WASHINGTON ENTRIES 
A dae 4 furlenes 


sea 


v7oo 


ine oe 110 — anette 
collected his third deuce with @ on the 49th, a bogey 4 on the 
ee Eltonhead, Riverten Yacht Cheb 
layman. colic didn't sound too Mans Fa he , 132 ' inett — 2 BODY AND FENDER WORK 
Revetion 4 aft iF ne Hill Parm entry yard 69th in contention. The 26-year-old|! 
enolic. it invariably has to do Ouite Haoeer AS ees 
cine cabinet . ae 
: fertens ; 
We Inst a 2-vear-old, The Ad- 1-2 “world” men’s amateur title 
Closer if starts 
vets around. Because of the MEN'S AMATEUR PIviIston : 
(Per: 7 72 72 T2—2a8) York Giants today for a fourth IMMEDIATE SERVICE 
to have taken my best hold, about 7 furions Given the edee 
Can't be overlooked 


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aoe “Meinihe lt, ! 
races 


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“SEVENTH RACE —Parse, S1500: S-veer-clds end opi allew- 
ance: Cha Tewn Course 


Se ee 


OD we me oe ee ee 
prperreprerter 


Melford First ‘ne bor 


Hagerstown +; Beets (Pires a Last Wee bac 
Longshot Daily Double 

Race Meet Opens | DOUBLE SPIKES and MOOLU 

On Wednesday KS Ne 5 eleggepdgesem ctor head mg « 


Prankentine (Green) pa Win another - 

m Bike (Pord) The contender 

Au jrawarus (Franciotti) Alwars right there 

: Ime in Rompers (Servis) Ready: 0 well 

® Tara's Pinkie ‘Palumbo: Richt there recently 

ed ‘no boy) Last good: chance 
Greek Venture .‘Krate!... Chance with 

Some good races 

-_ 3 the improve 

ud wou help 


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CONSENSUS 


Ceprricht. 1954. == vetenge 
Publications. 


: 
: 


FITZ MIST 
0 Fir2geRALD 


d 3 


5) —Pewne 


Ted's f) p 

_Bugene Boy ir races Ohio I 

| ae 3-vear-olde ond epward: AT ATLANTIC crry 

atmie Dilse (Clark) Win another 5 9| od Gigsie 21, Aware 7, Why Net 4. 

Vaitise aedan to beat =? Wedding Bine 1h Smeeth Stride See ns 
Lien Will be 10. rs Weever Rtone 
3—F ancy 4% 14. Preemeter 14. ulyeote 

Dat: 


Disarmed 7 
ei —Bive Rhapsody 21. Albers 13,\xD°. 


19, Powder Cas ee 


Jane Gees 4&6. ale 
1. 4, $8000, 8 
xa Monk 


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Oe we ne ot pe ee 
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HAGERSTOWN, Md... 
12—The 12-day Hagerstown 
race meeting opens Wednesday, 
Aug. 15, and runs until Tues 
day. Aug. 28 

Hardiy the one 


— r ' 
Dr. Robert C. Snavely. gen- Crank Handle (Snyder | MM 0 Buddy Acres (Re be 


@ral manager of the Hagers- sv) ; . : about! 2 Eivie H. (Palum ee me oe 20-1 me 4. ii i Te 
town Fair Association, an. ,", . Day's best bet NINTH Satl—Besen $1000; 4-year-clds and epward; ciaim-S°rer™! Jer 6. 
nounced today that a total of a) Wo 


5-2) imei Ihe miles | 
$108,000 will be distributed in 4- Speedman (f (Russo Seems best here | AT SARATOA 
purse money y Awe the meet 


é- | i tre (Servis Needed jast: dan erous 
rail, 
Post time for the first race 


19- of "Gold (Green) Geo well here 
(Clark } .. Threw out ‘as race 
Right there recentiy 
each dav has been set for 2:15 
mp. m. (EDST). Daily double * 


mutuel windows will close at Vee ‘Christison) 
, il reenn s Rev (Snyder 
2:95 p.m daily. ; ver Riew (Baranelic: 


+ 


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i—Miss Catesby 19, Nancy Suse 12, Mamma 


|Our Lyric 17, Some Vame 14.) bow ~ 
pen 11, Flaming Comet 1°, 
[| See Me Chem -- A 
“Best Bet—NO SURRENDER ~~ 1 Thin Ire 8 Four ne Pye summer favorite of real Bourbon 
: : " 18, Ferption 9, at - ohm. : 7 ae connoisseurs! Here's oe 
Racing Selebiions at Charles Town ites pe  ercter ie 
, _ L—Dunam 16, Spike's Pride 1, neral To <es +e pose hart epee 


PADDOCK RAILBIRD CLOCKERS BENNINGS _. CONSENSUS intheowtms 19, Juccbe 16. Just) 
a ntine 17, Tirewares 18, 


nh a feiea’ he” Me Gaited  . | Spikes Pride | inde Eve | 

purer ee . nes Dunam we Bram i @ Hh 11, Nebene 1% Ne Sur- 

r Panting Intheswim (ERRY MAESTRO |; eames ae, 15, Jeopetress 1s, 
} > Bn 

atte : 4 posrty ; rege’. 11, Corny Mise 18, Sir 


orie u ; 


aty 
areas Pinkie in are's Pinkie Bike TRring Grove 14, Olay 14, Pet 
warts Neat hey ag 1%. Fish Dividend 16. 


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og ew | coms se — 4 ere : 10 | | WHILE-U-WAIT 


Catydier 
ims Pal 


Creve 
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cite. tae oe ee eee 


Kantuchy right Bourbon Whshay + Ahwoys Bettod in Bond + 100 Pros 
_ ABlltasl-Walles Distillery « Ustabiebed Loundiia, ty GA 


Ne Lien . 
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Marlene Hagge Wins Tam Golf 


|S 


Jameson 
Runnerup 


With 299 


CHICAGO, Aug. 12 #—Mar- 
lene Bauer Hagge out-nerved 
seasoned Betty Jameson with 
a closing 74, two under wom- 
en's par, to capture the $6000 
first prize in the women’s pro 
“World” golf tourney today. 

Mrs. Hagge, the year’s cur-! ; 
rent money-winning  leade 
from Grossinger’s, N. Y., 
wrapped together rounds of 78,) | 
71, 75, 74 for a 298 total, one 
better than Miss Jameson, sil-| 
ver-haired shooter from San) 
«-ntonio, Tex. Second place was 
worth $2000 | 

Miss Jameson, playing in the! > - 
saime twosome with Marlene,’ 
had a charice to gain at least’ 

a tie on the last hole, but! 


By Maury 

Francis (Buddy) Sharkey, f 
championship yesterday with 
of 139. 

The 


for his 


Road c 


from 


Nick 
pion, ¢ 


The Money 


Fitzgerald The 


Beers, 159; while Dr. T. L. 
| with 160. 


Pelatat & 
“wrt 
ere 


i 


Tullar, 174, and F. J. O'Hara, 
Craig, 188; won in class D. 

Blind bogey winners: D. R. 
Edge, 94—17—77: E. H. 
Holmes, 83—6—77; E. B. 
Frank, %97—20—77. J . 
Clark, 84—7—77. 
COLUMBIA—Francis Mur- 
ray Jr. posted a card of 
72—7—65 to take net honors 
in a Jim Gibbons tourna- 
ment. James T. Gardella took 
gross with 71. Don Jones and 
Ray Swearingen tied for sec- 
ond with 72s 


See Beir 42K —-wWESG, 
WM m8 8 Oot 06 oF Pot 0g wo 
. : 


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BR we AAG Bt Veuv Ba 


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‘ane 80 60«Garrett 

Shirter Sperk 

Vennie Colby 


A ——S.: 
85 78 85 81379 


chipped poorly from the edge. 
ran nine feet past the cup and 
missed the putt to take a clos- 
ing 77 and a 299 total 

Third at an even 300 was 
Patty Berg. seeking her fourth 
straight title. The veteran red- 
head shot a last-round 77 

Mrs. Hagge’s triumph raised 
her 1956 earnings to $18,007. 
This was her sixth outright vic- 
tory this season. She shared an-| 
other first-on the tourney trail.| 

Mrs. Hagge’s closing 38, 36) 
round included five birdies. 
She went over par twice. ; 

Annie Richardson, tall, Co-| 
lumbus, Ohio, player, finished| 
as sire started with a 79 today! 
to capture the women’s ama-' 
teur “World” golf tourney by) 
10 strokes. Miss Richardson, | 
who had rounds of 79, 70, 81, 79, 
posted a 72-hole total of 309, 
five over women’s par for the 
distance. 
Anne Richards. Ohie 79 7 
Gee feet | 
et aa Little 


WOODMONT Everett 
Steinem won the weekly 
sweepstakes with a net of 
67. Steinem posted a gross 
round of 76 and used a nine 
stroke handicap to arrive at 
the winning figure 

John England, 77—8—469, 
and Ellis Barron, 84—15—69, 
tied for second. 


BELLE HAVEN — Club 
champion Joe Salle had 73 
and Paul Green, 74 to be 
gross winners in a Jim Gib- 
bons event. Net went to 
Frank Daniels, 84—13—461. 

George Simpson, Robert 
Beal, W. G. Erhardt and Rob- | 
ert May collaborated in a 
net best-ball of 30—29—59 to 
be low team in a Breakfast 
Club foursome event 

M. F. Leslie and Jack Wil- 
son teamed to report a win- 
-—333| ning net of 75—17—68 in a 

44’ two-man medal play event. 
LaSalle and Frank Mann had 
69 to tie Ralph Kneeland and 
Eddie Edwards for gross. 


Leone. 
Nan cry. tl 


~ - . 
Carolinas Win 
Over Virginia| 


HOT SPRINGS, Va., Aug. 12 
(~—The Carolinas golf team| 
retained possession of the cap-' 
tain’s silver putter today with) 
@ 33-27 victory over Virginia 
despite a rally by the Old Do- 
minion team Chester Ciomei and Bob 

The Virginians won 18 of 30} Pahler, 33, and Art 
points today. | Frank and Harold Protho, 33, 

Yesterday the Carolinas golf-| 30—63. 
ers built up a commanding 21-9 
lead. 

The two-day match between) 
the states was played over the 
Homestead’s 6740-yard, par 7) 
Cascades lavout 

Today's victory was the sec 


PRINCE GEORGES — Gil 
Willett and Frank O'Connor | 
had 30, 31—61 to tie for first | 
with Doug Mattison and Bill | 
Pilson, 31, 30—61, in a pro-am 
tournament. | 

Willet and Bill Harms took | 
second with 31, 31—62. Third 
place ended in a tie between 


WASHINGTON—Bil!l Hol- 
ter had 71 for gross and Carl 
Courtney, 71—6—65, for net 
in thé class A division of a 
medal play handicap event. 
Jack Trible, 77, and R. B. 
end straight for the Carolinas| Swanson, 80—15—65, were 
this vear over Virginia. Last! the class B winners. L. A 

April, they scored a 3642-23% | Heatherman, 84, and E. R. 
triumph at Pinehurst. N. C. Hitehcock, 91—18—73, won 

Wayne Jackson of Hampton.) in C 
the Virginia amateur champion! 
from Hampton, had today’s low 
est medal score, a par 71. Yes- 
terday, George Fulton Jr. of! 
Roanoke, Va., fired a course! 
record-shattering 62 

The summaries 
one? Pt po Oy 2 Jackson Berd 

tte. Pto~-he; aries Ts 
am Wallace (Virginia) split 

aeser an rnham Unier 


n C. 

F. M. Thompson defeated 
Jack Sronce, 2 and 1, in the 
final of the Birney Cup. L. R. 
Anton routed Jack Garrett, 7 
and 6. in the Horton Cup 
final and Dr. J. L. Humphries 
defeated Bob Johnson, 3 and 
2. in the last round of the 
Miller Cup. The Birney 
Cup was for players with 
handicaps of 18 and over, the 
an4| Horton, 12 to 17 and the Mil- | 

, ler, 6 to 11 


CHEVY CHASE — Eugene | 
Carusi scored his second | 
hole-in-one yesterday, sinking 

**| » 6-iron shot on the 150-yard 
fourth hole. Carusi, whose 
ace helped him get a 39 on 
the front nine, was playing 
with Bolivian Ambassador 
Victor Andrade, J. E. Heurte- 
matti and Admiral O. B. Har- 
idson. 


(Vir- 
nk Edwards and Ress 
Fergersen 


a 


re 
( Virginia) 


. tten 
ees Fulten > we weet, 


Blalock Sets 


Eastern Record 


MANASSAS, Va., Aug. 12 
Bill Blalock of Silver Spring,) 
Md., established a new East-' 
ern motorcycle record today at 
the Old Dominion Speedway 
in winning the over-all speed 
award of the day in the fast 
time of 12.77. 

The Police Officers event 
was taken by James R. Blohm. 
of Washington, D. C. The un-. 
limited title went to John’ 
Dunnegan of Silver Spring. A’ 


INDIAN SPRING —Pres 
Burrows fired a 70 to win the 
qualifying medal in the min- 
jature club champion. 
Dan Arnold was second low 
with 72. 

Mrs. Nathan Alperstein 
and Mrs. Rubin Rudder de- 
feated Mrs. William Weitzen 
and Mrs. Richard Schattman, 
3 and 2, in the final of the 
women’s four ball champion- 
ship. 

Marvin Singman won the 


In C division the winners were: Ray Briscuso, 171: L 
174. F. J. Lucid, 186, and L. F. 


> 


| 6; 
| berg defeated Danny Keller, 


Area Golf Roundup 


harkey Wins Class A 


Tourney at Kenwood 


ee Tn? Bae 


ormer Georgetown University 
varsity golf captain, put together rounds of 70 and 69 to 
capture Kenwood Golf and Country Club’s.first annual class 


a one-under par 36-hole score 


husky former Kenwood Club 


champion posted a round of 36, 34—70 


Opening round on Saturday. 


Yesterday he was 35, 34—69 in the | 
final round to win the new River 


lub fixture by six strokes. 


Second in the upper half of the A 
division for players with handicaps 
scratch 
Murphy with 73, 72—145. 


to five was Julian 
Hollander, senior club cham. 


arried off top honors in the 


lower half of A division for players 
with handicaps from 6 to 10. with 74, 
71—145. Second in that division was 
A. H. Y 
on a draw from Max Bost, 77, 75—152. 


ounguist, 77, 75—152, who won 


class B title went to R. W. 


Hagan took runner-up honors 


ed Howard Kahn, 2 and 1; sec- 
ond flight, Billy Rosensky de- 
feated Larry Bennett, 7 and 
third flight, Gary Rosen- 


2 and 1; fourth flight, Kevin 
O’Brien defeated Larry 
Reighgut, 1-up. 

MANOR — George Thorn 
ton advanced to the final of 
the club handicap champion 
ship, defeating Tommy Mudd. 
2 and 1. The other semifinal 
match between A. W. Bra- 
den and G. C. Whelan was 
postponed until Wednesday. 

In the second flight, L. D. 
Connor defeated E. B. Hei- 


| mer, 2-up; and Dr. J. G. Reilly 


defeated John King, 1-up. 


COURT HOUSE—Col. Jack 
Dobson captured the annual 
President John W. Rust Tro- 
phy, defeating Odell Gantt in 
the 36-hole final, 3 and 2. Col. 
Dobson was one-under par 
for the 33 holes played and 
fired a four-under par 32 on 


| the back nine in the morning 


round to set a non-competi- 
tive mark for that side of the 
course 

Bart Fugler, 34—4—30, won 
the class A division of an odd 
hole tournament. Larry Bur- 
dick was second with 


| 37—6—31. 


In class B three teams tied. 
They were Walt Goodrich, 
37—6—31; 
398-31, and Nick Perina, 
39—8—31. 


BETHESDA — Claude Rip- 


py and Joe Tait had a net: 
| best ball of 30, 29—59 in win- 
| ming the annual Joe Virga 


pro-am tournament. 

Three teams finished with 
10-under-par 60s to tie for 
second. They were Del Be- 
man and George Saxon, 32, 
28—60; Bill Dudley and Faris 
Mirage, 31, 29 — 60, 
George McGehee and Bill 
McGehee, 30, 30-——60. 

In the women's event, Mrs. 
Frank Law and Mrs 
Hamm tied Mrs. Herb Rudd 
and Mrs. Jack Wilton with 
identical 33, 32—65 scores. 


BROOKE MANOR — The 
father and son team of Har- 
old and Carl 
vanced to the semifinals of 
the two-man team champion- 
ship, defeating Paul Harrison 
and John Coffman, 2 and 1. 
In other matches Al Shorb- 
Les Huntt defeated Doc Jew- 
Paul Hook, l-up; Bill and 
Jim King eliminated Dick 
Gravely-Charies Benjamin, 1- 
up; Guy Chamberlain - Mat 
Patkus defeated Tom McLar- 
ney-Harry Brewer, 1-up 

W EST BRIAR — Buddy 
Wattwood fired a 78 and used 


| a 7-stroke handicap to finish 


a winning net of 71 in the 
3d Anniversary tournament. 
Low gross went to Bobby 
Schullery with 35, 41—76. 


CONGRESSIONAL—Three 
players finished with 36-hole 
net scores of 133 to force a 
playoff for the annual Treas- 
urer’s Cup tournament. Com- 
peting in next Sunday's play- 
off for the trophy will be 
J. J. Graham, 147—14—133; 
E. T. Greenstreet, 163—30-— 
133; and W. A. Ziegler, 169— 
36— 133. 


Se PROSPECT HIL L—John | 


Dorsey, 99-27-72, and Law- 
rence Maynard, 102—30—72, 
were the winners in a men's 
blind bogey event. Mrs. Don- 
ald Shetler won the women’s 
event with 134—62—72. 

Low gross ended in a tie at 
84 between Staley Wilson and 
Lt. Col. E. Black. 


club junior title, defeating 
Jack O’Brien in the final, 7 | 
and 5 Other results: first | 
flight, Richard Becker defeat- 


crowd of more than 2000 at-' 
tended the races in which more 
than 105 motorcyclists com- 
peted 


FOR RENT BOAT SLIPS 


SEARS BOAT YARD 
211 Eastern Avenue 


|) NORBECE — A 
_ field, former Catholic 


ARGYLE — In a pro-am 
tournament in which the 
feminine members of the 


| club were cast in the role of 
| professionals, 


Mrs. Frank 
Cush, Maryland state ama- 
teur champion, and Roger 


Martino won gross with a 


both had individual gross 


scores of 74, Mrs. Cush win- 


ming the women’s net with 
74—4—70. Individual gross in 


the men’s side of the novel 
“Wolf” tournament —~ to 
T 


Kotvan teamed with Mrs. | 
_ Catherine 


Thomason to post 
a net 60 and be tied for that 


} honor by Helen Molnar and | 
¥ 


Prada. 


be Rosen- 
Univer- 


sity coach, 
| the 36hole lead in the 5+ 


M. | 


Fred Stone, | 
ichairman of this year’s Presi- 


and |% 


Mann | 


Lohren ad- | 


Judy Arnold 
Takes Two 


Swim Titles 


By Mark Hannan 


The 1956 President's Cup 
Regatta Swimming and Diving 
championships ended a three- 
day run yesterday at the East 
‘Potomac Park pool with swim- 
‘mers from the Walter Reed 
‘Swim Club dominating the 
‘Senior division 

Three Walter Reed swimmers 
scored double victories with 14- 
year-old Judy Arnold leading! 
ithe club with two wins and a 
second 

The former North Bethesda 
‘school miss won the 100-meter! 
|breaststroke in 1:37.8 and came 
back a few minutes later to 
|win the 100-meter backstroke 
| A former Ambassador .Swim 
Club protege of Bill Armstrong, 
Judy also finished strong to 
‘take second in the 
| Individual Medley. 
Sister Wins, Too 
Her younger sister, Susie, now 
\12, looked promising in win-/ A Falls Church man, who 
ning the 100-meter butterfly|lost his job when he took time 
and placing third in the 100-off to auditidn for an amateur 
meter freestyle. show, sang on the show last 
| Nineteen-year-old Lyman night and got an offer of an- 
‘Morris of Walter Reed scored other job. 

\firsts in the 100-meter freestyle) Carol Warburton, 36, of Idyl- 
‘and 100-meter butterfly to lead wood rd., a cabinetmaker and 
‘the men's division. A Bell Vo- jack-of-all-trades, appeared on 
‘cational graduate; the power-the Ted Mack our over 
fully built swimmer hopes to WMAL-TV For a while, 
enroll at:-Oklahoma University though, it didn’t look as though 
this fall and continue his swim- Warburton would make it 

ming on the powerful Sooner’ Warburton was fired from his 
Big Seven championship team. job when he took time off last 

Fifteen-vear-old Brenda Dietz Monday to go to New York for 
gave a fine exhibition in win- an audition. He was asked to 
ning the grueling 200-meter In- return the next day for a sec 
dividual Medley in the excel- ond audition 
lent time of 3:029. The Mont Warburton’'s 
gomery-Blair junior also won Out, but rather than miss fis 
the 100-meter freestyle earlier big chance, he walked the 
in the evening streets of New York all Monday 


, night and napped in Central 

Borris Beeps nite Park the next day. He'd heard 

Joe Morris of Walter Reed, that New York tramps would 
a sophomore at the University 
of Florida, successfully de- 
fended his 100-meter breast- 
stroke title while another de- 
‘fending champion, the Balti- 
more Knights of Columbus 
Orchard 400-meter relay team 
won that event for the third 
Successive time 

The Baltimore team of Ken 
Freimuth. Karl Huffiman 
Henry Steingass and Harr. 
Bioom outdistanced the com 
petition. winning with ease in 
the good time of 5:02.2 

The men’s 100-meter back 
stroke went to a Brooklyn boy, 
20 year old Robert Schiuter, 
iwho shaded Win Pendleton of 
the Ambassador Swim Club by 
a few seconds. 

Henry F. Burroughs, general 


CAROL WA 
. with a son 


money had run 


e looking last night 


with a 


Poli ° Wei! 
for a housebreake bit- 
ten finger 

Georgia J. Clark. 50, listed at 
3221 16th st. nw., told police she 
was awakened by footsteps in 
her apartment early yesterday 
imorning and saw a man stand 
ing by her bed. 

Miss Clark said when she got 
up the man grabbed her and 
threw her to the floor. She 
screamed, she said, and he put 
his hand over her mouth. She 
told police she bit one of his 
fingers and he ran out of the 
door 


dent’s Cup Regatta presented 
ithe trophies and medals to the 
winners in a ceremony offi- 
cially closing the swimming 
jand diving phase of the 
‘Regatta 

MEN'S 100 METER BRE AsTS! 

} , : : ’ i ’ 
Morris: *. Jobn ite A lookout was broadcast for 
ey: Hr Velmt! a Negro, 20-25 years old, 5 feet 
&  BREAST-'§ or 7 inches, 140-150 pounds, 

rneld; 7. Lynn Hew- 
s 4. Jody Panneton; wearing a white shirt and dark 
TER PREESTYLE—1 
Bicem: %. Paul 
Fedi; 5, William 


' me. 1:09.7 

| WOMEN'S 100-METER FREESTYLE 
it. Bremda Diets: 2. Sesan Hills: 3. Susie 
by gg 4. Rite Dern; 5. Jean Leate. 
Tis 1:13.4 


EN’S 100-METER BACKSTROKE — 
. Rebert Schiuter: f. 


22 Negroes 
I: Bane Ssiather, 4. an From D.C. Get 


WOMEN'S 100-METER BACKSTROKE, 

Ii. Judy Arnold; f. athy Sheppics 
Rita Der Ju 1S } | :} ° 
ocnoiars lps 


oa nm; 5. 
r The National Scholarship 
Cathy Sheppech: 4. J 


\Johnsen. Ti 


Pendieten: 
Heffman; 
ok 


lock. Time. 1:12.06. 
WOMEN'S 100-METER BUTTERFL 
Sandy Miller; 


—t, Susie Arnold; 2. 
udy Panneton: 


5. i 
Wiil 

ME 

5.|Service and Fund for Negro 

|Hallie Blake. aver 1:30 
ier. roe a ms pg net oy , 85 
: u s . 8 Receivin a- 
tien; 3, Tehema Swim Cieb: 4, Ambas-| Pentary financial grants to 
jsader Swim Club. me, 5:07.° 
TR EVENT, 200-ME | 
ee ete kh WOMEN—1-/ dents, including 22 from the 


TROPHY EVENT. 100-METER RE-|Students has awarded supple- 
: , | , 

TROPHY 200-METER inpr.| Outstanding Negro college stu- 
Brenda Diets: Judy Arnold: 

| pees 4, ivee eowaerd: 5. Carel Briges. District, it was announced yes- 


| terday. | 


The NSSFNS was organized 
o increase educational oppor- 
‘tunities for underprivileged 


Front Royal Bows) 
To Court House 
Negro children 


GREENBRIER, W. Va. Aug.| The awards announced yes 
12—-Court House Country Club) terday totaled $27,500. They 
of Fairfax, Va., defeated Front|Will supplement $46,850 which 
‘Royal, 12-6, today over the Old tlie 85 students received in aid 
'White course to win the annual from their own colleges All the 
\Tri-state playoffs students are attending inter- 
| Martinsburg, W. Va. took|racial colleges. 
ithird place, defeating Purcel-| Washington recipients are: 
iville and Winchester. Odell) , ccercon “University of icago 
‘Gantt of Court House posted a ard Augustine. ite 
70 to be the low individual garet fhes 
scorer. P. L. Baumgartner of|©psries Davis 
‘Purcelville was named presi-|8 tty Bvene. Alleebeny Colle 
dent of the Tri-state Golf Asso-'5"" ar Goeriin, Coleg Ra 
ciation for 1957 and Omar J. fersity of Pennayivanta, Eleanor Mo 
i\Carey of Court House, secre- sit7 of Pennsyivania: Raymon 
itary-treasurer, at a meeting fol-Rocktord Colieee, David 
lowing the matches. University: John h : 

niversity | 

: ity Co ~e! e* 
ee Wiieme Hacle Gniversity 


Kee Named Head: 
Of W. Va. Society | 


James Kee of 4702 8th st. 
ne.. son of Rep. Elizabeth Kee 
(D-W. Va). has been elected 
president of the West Virginia 
Society of the District of Co 
ilumbia. He succeeds Attorney) 
‘Joseph G. Weeda, who became) 
vice president from the First 
Congressional District. 

Kee named Charlies Jules 
Rose, also a Washington at- 
torney, as executive vice 
president. . 

Other vice sidents are 
Maj. Garland E. Taylor, Sec- 
ond District; “4 Cleveland 
M. Bailey, Third District; Rep. 
M. G. Burnside, Fourth Dis- 
trict; Gwinn Miller, Fifth 
District, and Robert Kilgore, 
‘son of the late Sen. Harvey 
‘Kilgore, Sixth trict. 


hole medal play handicap 
tournament for the Board of 
Governors’ trophy. Rosen- 
field had an opening round 
of 94—18—66 and a second 
round of 91—28—463. 
| $i Sandler and Charles . 
| Fishman are tied for second | 
with 135s. Mel Berman and 
| Bobby Brenner are next in 
' line with 140s. 


EAST POTOMAC — Ruth 
Smith and George Stupar 
won a proam in which the 
women played as the pros 
| with 32, 33-65. 

B division of the tourna- 
ment went to Mary Nether- 
cott and Bob Hays, .34, 33 
—67. Mrs. Mary Brown and 
Fred Giachino were the C 
class winners with 32, 37—69. 


GOOSE CREEK—Jim Dou- 
kas took the first round lead 
in the club championship 
with a 75. Second in the 36- 
hole trials is John Alderman, 
' 77. Blind bogey: James Ro- 
meo, 102—29—73. 


Fired tor Audition, He 
“Gets a Job for Son 


important. 


Police Seek Intruder 
With a Bitten Finger 


~ and underwent two operations. 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
tL see - Me dav, Auguet 18, 1954 ° 


15: 


ere 


~~ < ‘s 
se Sais 


By Carroll 


Secretary of Commerce Sin- 
clair Weeks will go to San 
Francisco this week armed 
with what he considers to be 


conclusive =» 
economie argu- © 4 
ments against . tai ” 
the Democratic Fh i 
charge that the ie ee 
Nation is enjoy- — 


ie os 
rox, 


’ 


jcians hard at 
i\work gather- 
& ‘ing campaign 
material on the 

By Joe Meiberger, Staff Photosrapher (state of today’s economy and 
RBURTON how it compares with the situa- 
¢ in his heart tion a year ago and four vears 

ago. In the main, noteworthy 
gains are shown in every field 
‘except agriculture. 

Farm income, dows about 20 
per cent in the past four years, 
will be the chief point of the 
Democratic attack, as former 
7 ‘President Truman demonstrat- 
= ed Thursday when he said 

\American farmers “are just 
“steal the shoes off your feet,” about ruined” by the Elisen- 
so he slept on top of his music.,hower Administration farm 

Warburton sang “Is It True policies 
What They Say About Dixie?”| Next week the Commerce 
in his best Al Jolson style On| Department will announce its 
the program. The audience tele- 
phoned in 381 votes for him,|national product for the sec- 
but a single phone call from ond quarter of 1956—the total 


preliminary estimate of gross, 


Weeks to Reply to Attack 
On ‘Phony Prosperity’ 


Kilpatrick 


Siaf Reporter 


bly by the Federal Reserve 
action, it is said that the Admin- 
istration is chiefly interested in 
persuading the Board that fur. 
ther credit tightening is wun- 
necessary. The present “creep- 


\ing inflation” is played down by 


Administration economisis as 
only a minor threat. 

With the steel strike settled 
ang the expected summer de- 
cline not materializing, Weeks 
is downright bullish. He is con- 
vinced that 1956 will be the best 
year in history by any yard. 
stick 

Gross national product last 
year was $391 billion, compared 
with $346 billion in 1952. At an 
annual rate. the gross national 
product in the first half of 1955 
was $2 billion and in the first 
half of 1956 an estimated $405 
or $406 billion 

Per capita disposable in- 
come in the first half of 1956 
is up about 4 or 5 per cent over 
the same period in 1955. 


"SLR 


LUXURY LINER 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE 


presents 


Arlington, Va., was the mostiof ali goods and services pro- 


duced. Th 

Warburton had told the tele- to oe at . on = age 
vision audience he had lost his|ahout $408 billion, the highest 
job. An Arlington man called far any three-month period in 
and asked Warburton to see history. 
ro gets: 0 ween be gee Earlier this year some Dem 
ac ocrats thought the 

Warburton has been a car. have a real eeniaaie’ tadne tel 
penter, machinist, draftsman, the campaign. Arthur FOR 
construction superintendent, chairman of th c 2 ad 
srFoemaker and salesman. He Economic Fh — - 
has wanted to be a professional) wine to nog Sosaued he 
singer ever since he was 6 tesred that Federal Reserve 
years old and his kindergarten 'posrq action in tightening 
oaeher task wr nd ng P ageg credit might help tip the scales 
lw os Be ae ~ shildren jcowewere. How Burns is said| 

* jte much more optimistic.) 

Two or three months ago’ 
‘Burns was described as uneasy 
over the outlook. Trouble was’ 
developing in the automobile) 
industry, and there was an in-| 
crease in business failures. a) 
decline in housing starts, and a 
threatening steel strike that 
could have been crippling 

When the Federal Reserve be 
gan to tighten its credit regula- 
tions, Secretary of the Treas- 
ury George M. Humphrey, Sec. 
retary of Labor James P. Mit 
chell and Weeks and Burns 
were highly critical 

Now that the economy has 
not been weakened demonstra- 


pants. Police have been chéck- 
ing hospitals for a man report- 
ing a human bite 


Man Dies of Injuries. 
Homicide Charged 


Harley Shipman, 34, listed at 
1314 Rhode Island ave. nw., 
was charged with homicide 
early yesterday after John A 
James, 52, listed at 11098 P at 
nw., died of head injuries suf- 
fered in a fight July 16 

Shipman was questioned af- 
ter James was injured but later 
was released. 

The victim was first taken 
to Garfield Hospital for treat- 
meot. He was taken to D. C 
General Hospita] on July 30 


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Home Spraying Slated 


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homes against malarial mosqui 
toes will begin next month un- 
der a $20 million program of 
the government, World Health 
Organization and VU. N. Chil- 
dren's Fund. The work will be 
concentrated in regions | 
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AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER 7, 


MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 1956 PAGE 16 


The Democratic Pros pects 


(From Chicago) 

If Mr. Truman's plug for Governor Harriman did 
nothing else, it insured that the. Democratic con- 
vention will be a lively affair. There are many 
reasons to think, however, that the former Presi- 
dent's hold on the convention is more one of per- 
sonal affection than political dominance. His 
scrappiness and boldness compel admiration from 
those who like a fight, and obviously Mr. Truman is 
enjoying his role immensely. But the influence of 
any former Chief Executive on the younger ele- 
ments of his party tends to wane when he is out of 
office, and it is doubtful whether Mr. Truman is 
able to produce Jovian bolts that will automatically 
disintegrate those in his disfavor. 

Indeed, Mrs. Roosevelt's strong indorsement of 
Adlai Stevenson yesterday tended to reduce the 
proportions of the Truman move, especially in 
light of her implicit rebuke to Mr. Truman as an 
oldster like herself and a figure from the past. Mrs. 
Roosevelt not only discounted the foreign policy 
qualifications which Mr. Truman had ascribed to 
Harriman, she also gave a sensible and convincing 
definition of Stevenson's moderation. 

It remains hard to take Harriman seriously. Mr. 
Truman did not think enough of Harriman’s for- 
eign affairs experience to indorse him in 1952, 
although the presidential sanction for Stevenson 
then clearly was reluctant. There is grumbling 
here that Harriman’s concern with civil rights, and 
even his championship of the New Deal, are new- 
found interests. Harriman does, however, exhibit 
strong determination, and his supporters are basing 
their hopes on a deadlock that will enable the New 
York Governor to win the nomination without the 
South. 

The betting still is on Stevenson, though he now 
will have to fight harder for the nomination. 
Whether the Truman move actually cost Stevenson 
any votes is questionable. Instead, it appears to 
have strengthened Stevenson's position among 
some Southerners who had begun to waver_after 
his statement on the Supreme Court. Mr. Truman 
did, however, increase greatly the bargaining 
power of Majority Leader Lyndon Johnson, who 
controls the Texas vote and who insists that he 
himself is a serious candidate for the nomination. 
Senator Johnson is not unfriendly to Stevenson, 
but he now is in a position to exact concessions, 
most probably by way of a civil rights plank that 
will satisfy the South. If Johnson is dissatisfied 
and if his own chances do not loom large after the 
initial balloting, he may be able to place his in- 
fluence behind a dark horse—by no means in- 
conceivably Sen. Stuart Symington, to whom John- 
son has been close in the past. 

Thus a good bit will depend upon what kind of 
platform emerges. It is not impossible that Steven- 
son, in his statement the other day on civil rights, 
foresaw the necessity of getting on the record 
with a strong personal affirmation because the 
platform would represent a compromise with the 
South. If a bridge can be found on the civil rights 
question, there is an opportunity for the Demo- 
crats to develop planks that will emphasize their 
sharp differences with the Republicans on farm 
and. resources policy, foreign affairs, military 
strategy and atomic power. 

Mr. Eisenhower remains the man to beat, and 
the Suez crisis may even strengthen his appeal. 
There is nothing here to suggest that the Demo- 
crats are confident of finding an issue to offset 
his influence. But there is far less defeatism than 
when the delegates began to arrive. Mr. Stevenson 
is now free of any obligation to Mr. Truman, who 
handicapped him in 1952, and can make his appeal 
for the nomination in his own way. Certainly it 
will be good for the country to have as -vigorous 
a contest, and as clear a definition of the issues 
as the Democrats can provide. | 


Courageous Veto 


The ire that has been aroused by President 
Eisenhower's vetd of the $1,600,000,000 rivers and 
harbors authorization bill has a strong political 
tinge. In effect, the President has snatched out of 
the hands of many Congressmen ammunition which 
they hoped would contribute to their reelection. 
For some who make a practice of loading rivers 
and harbors bills with favors for their home dis- 
tricts this may be a critical blow. But it is difficult 
to see wherein the veto militates against the public 
interest, and it may result in substantial savings 
when a less electioneering-minded Congress re 
views the situation next year. 

The President wielded his veto in this strange 
fashion because 32 of the projects authorized in 
the bill at a cost of more than $530 million had not 
been reviewed as required by law. He also com- 
plained that too little local participation was pro- 
vided for. Undoubtedly the bill contains many 
desirable projects, but it should not be supposed 
that the work of saving the country from floods will 
be stalled until the new Congress can pass another 
measure. Congress had not appropriated funds to 
commence work on any of these projects, and it is 
estimated that, at the present rate of spending, 22 
years will be necessary to build the flood control 
works already authorized and awaiting appropria- 
tions. 


Burn-Out in Kansas 


Politicians as well as plain voters rubbed their 
eyes incredulously when they read that the attractive 
and liberal Governor of Kansas, Fred Hall, had 
gone down to defeat at the hands of a little-known 
state legislator in the Republican primary. Two 
years ago Governor Hall won a striking victory 
over the old guard of his own party and easily 
swamped his Democratic opponent. He was often 
hailed as a new spokesman for the liberal elements 
in the farm belt. Handsome, still young at 40, and 
bubbling over with self-confidence, he seemed to 
be riding a political crest that might-carry him a 
long way. 

As we get the story from some of his friends and 
eritics alike, Governor Hall tripped on his ambition 
and overconfidence. Having beaten the old guard, 
he assumed that he could continue to ride to power 
without a political organization. He showed little 
disposition to work with the people around him 
and bluntly informed some potential supporters 
that he could get along without their help. As a 
friend of organized labor, he vetoed a so-called 
‘right-to-work bill which had a great deal of support 
in Kansas. Apparently he expected organized labor 


to reward him at the polls for that eourageous act, 
but its response was meager. 

One other factor that may have militated against 
Governor Hall was the gutter-scraping character of 
the campaign. Some observers say that it was 
the worst campaign in Kansas in a generation. 
While State Rep. Warren W. Shaw, the successful 
Republican nominee, appears to have kept pace 
with Mr. Hall im this respect, voters may have 
concluded that the Governor had a greater obliga- 
tion to campaign on a level of decency. In any 
event, the political career of the bright young man 
at Topeka appears to have burned out as spectacu- 
larly as it fared up two years ago, and behind-the- 
scene reports leave no doubt that the Governor 
himself contributed much to the extinguishment. 


Monarch From the Past 


The reappearance in the news of Henry Pu Yi 
brings back to mind the waning days of the great 
and glorious reign of the Manchu dynasty of China. 
Pu Yi was the last of the line which included such 
illustrious monarchs as Chien Lung and Kang Hsi. 
His own dynastic name was Hsuan Tung, and he 
ruled briefly as the infant emperor until the 
dynasty was toppled in 1911 by the Republic, the 
father of which was Sun Yat-sen. 

Under an abdication agreement the Chinese with 
traditional courtesy allowed the child all the 
appurtenances of an emperor in the heart of Peking, 
called “The Forbidden City.” There was even a 
Court Circular. In course of time the child 
emperor became the boy emperor, and he was 
tutored in foreign ways and languages by an Eng- 
lishman, Sir Reginald Johnston. In the ‘20s the 
so-called Christiam general Feng Yu-hsiang repu- 
diated the abdication agreement, taking possession 
of the forbidden palace, and disposing of the price- 
less treasures of the Manchu court. Henry Pu Yi, 
as he had come to be called, had to flee, and he 
sought sanctuary with the Japanese, who kept him 
on ice, as it were, until they had had their reckon- 
ing with the Chinese in Manchuria. 

It was in 1934 that Henry Pu Yi was trotted 
out as the puppet ruler of his forbears’ old home- 
land which was renamed Manchukuo. His “reign” 
lasted until the end of the war in the Pacific. Ap- 
parently Pu Yi turned out to be far from grateful 
to his Japanese bosses, judging from his evidence 
in the Chinese courts in war crimes trials which 
seem to be going on at the present time. No doubt 
his views have been altered by Communist indoctri- 
nation. He has been in either Russian or Chinese 
jails off and on since he was captured when the 
Russians “liberated” Manchuria in 1945. The news- 
paper correspondents who sought him out found 
him in a Chinese jail. His story is that for a time 
the Russians kept him in Siberia and treated him 
well, and then sent him back to Manchuria in 
Chinese custody. There he is now, and the news- 
men found him playing cricket in the prison yard— 
a throwback to the glittering days in the Forbidden 
City of Peking when he had an English tutor. A 


strange story! 


Crack in the Door 


The conditions attached to Colonel Nasser’s re 
jection of the invitation to the London conference 
on the Suex Canal indicate that the force of world 
opinion already is operating. Few persons had 
really expected Egypt to accept the British bid. 
Nasser could, however, have turned down fiat in a 
violent tirade any suggestion of international in- 
terest in the canal; he could also have broken 
relations with Britain and France. Instead, he 
modified his rejection with a proposal for another 
conference to review the Constantinople conven- 
tion and work out guarantees. 

Essentially this is a vindication for the restrained 
approach taken by Secretary Dulles. Mr. Dulles has 
understood that if there is a chance of bringing 
about a satisfactory solution, it lies in calming the 
furor over nationalization and focusing world 
opinion on the all-important question of inter- 
national guarantees of the waterway. The fact that 
Nasser acknowledges the desirability of guaran- 
tees leaves the door open for the London confer- 
ence to propose the outlines of a program that 
would assure unhindered access to the canal while 
respecting Egypt's sovereignty. There is room for 
compromise on details to take account of what 
Prime Minister Nehru and others have to say. It 
might be possible to work out an arrangement for 
international supervision, standards and account- 
ability without actual international operation. 

Let no one assume that Nasser’s seeming defer- 
ence to world opinion means that the Egyptian 
dictator has forsworn his aims. His book, Egypt's 
Libefation: The Philosophy of the Revolution, 
makes clear his determination to use Middle East 
oil resources (and, by implication, Egypt's geo- 
graphical position athwart the Suez Canal) as the 
keystone of his plans for Arab dominion. 

It has become more and more evident that the 
military action at first envisaged by Britain and 
France would be a dead-end in present circum- 
stances. A case might have been made for such 
action on grounds of practical politics, although 
not of morality, if it had been taken immediately 
(in the game way that Mr. Nehru confronted the 
world with a “fait accompli” in Hyderabad.) The 
beld action which has given Nasser his success 
and acclaim might itself have been countered by 
bold action. But the international consequences of 
such a course would at best have been unpredict- 
able, and the fact is that it was not taken. Nasser 
has not given the west, so far, any legal pretext 
to*justify intervention. 

None of this means that the extraordinary ses- 
sion with congressional leaders yesterday at the 
White House was not necessary. The possibility of 
a war situation is still on the horizon, and President 
Eisenhower, after the precedent of his request for 
standby powers respecting Formosa, would have 
been in trouble if he had failed to alert congres- 
sional leaders to the danger. In point of fact, this 
confirmation of the seriousness with which the 
Administration views the problem may well increase 
American influence with Britain and France, which 
might have been tempted to a course of desperation 
if they had felt that the United States was letting 
them down. The White House meeting may serve 
another. useful purpose in demonstrating to\the 
Russians, who are in a position to counsel restraint 


will be kept open to the shipping of al) nations with 
flexibility and broad consultation as @ the precise 


“Step Aside, Everybody. Let's Keep Things Open Here” 


2 Bi ec 


@e<ere tee we wee Perr ce 


Letters to the Editor 


Catholie Vote Study 


The Congressional Quarterly 
release which you covered in 
your Aug. 8 issue under the 
heading “Catholic Vote Ana- 
lyzed by Two Senators’ Back- 
ers,” calls for a comment in 
the interes* of giving proper 
credit. 

The confidential memo re- 
ferred to as being circulated 
by “Louis Bean in behalf of” 
should actually have been cred- 
ited as a study undertaken by 
a group of social scientists and 
made available by Dr. Ralph 
Goldman and Dr. John Romani, 
who provided the professional 
guidance to the study. 

Their study is a criticism of 
the anonymous report which 
one may now reac in the Aug. 10 
U. S$. News and World Report 


port in ns issue finding 
that the conclusions were not 
borne out by the data it con- 
tained nor by my own 
studies of the 1952 election, I 
prepared a brief communication 
to the U. S. News and World 
Report. My communication, and 
the Goldman-Romani memoran- 
dum, I expect, will apear in the 
next issue of the U. S. News and 
World Report.” 
LOUIS BEAN. 
Washington. 


Georgetown Zoning 


Silken curtained garage<ioor 
windows is the new motif in 
Georgetown architecture re- 
sulting from the arbitrary de- 
cree that a garage must be 
built into every new house. The 
euphemism “off-street parking” 
is a delusion; but painfully real 
is the sacrifice of beautiful and 
interesting architectural de- 
tails, light, air, space and trees 
in Georgetown to a dreary eye- 
patch effect on a monotonous 
three-story structure. 

In addition to destroying 
architectural beauty, the off- 
street parking requirement in 
Georgetown has increased 
space on the street in 


— 
ront of 
such “garage.” 


The penalty is $5 for using 
the street in front of the “ga- 
rage” in these new three-story 


garage eliminates a 


Cruelty to Animals 
In this community a serious 


other rare acts of sadism that 
so horrify those of us who are 
humane-minded. I refer to the 


i 
in 


Es 


or by the best city pounds. In 
many places the slaughter of 
these unfortunate dogs and cats 
is done with lead pipes, clubs, 
poison or shotguns. Many peo- 
ple, finding it impossible to 
find homes for the animals they 
permitted te be born but are 
unwilling to keep, resort to 
drowning, abandonment and 
other inhumane acts. 

The cruel death that awaits 
the vast majority of surplus 
animals is the final step in the 
awful suffering they know in 
the course of their tragic lives 
The gnawing pains of hunger, 
penetrating cold in winter or 
thirst in soaring temperatures, 
mutilating injuries, the agony 
of severe illnesses, the sheer 
exhaustion of trying and failing 
to escape the many and dread. 
ful forms of anguish that pur- 
sue them—this is what animal 
owners inflict on dogs and cats 
while they continue to breed an 
— 

The ational Humane So- 
ciety, of which I am a member, 
publishes a leaflet that ex- 
plains this constantly increas- 
ing cruelty and the need for 
having female animals spayed 
to prevent the generations of 
homeless, helpless and hopeless 
animals that are foredoomed to 
suffering. I urge animal owners 
of this area, as well as others 
who wish to see the problem in 
its true light, to write for the 
free leaflet. 


MARY E. ATKINSON. 
Washington. 


“Let Him Go Hunting” 


I live 2000 miles from the 
scene of the recent House Gov- 
ernment Operations Committee 
hearings on the extracurricu- 
lar activities of the ubiquitous 
Gen. Joseph M. Swing, on 
which you editorialized in your 
issue of July 31. But not too 
far to appreciate the harm the 
general has done the Immigra- 
tion Service by his careless an- 
tics, or his stubborn disregard 
for the morale and welfare of 
the many faithful and capable 
field employes who are brow- 
beaten, transferred, subordi- 
nated, or maligned without ap- 
parent reason. 

Having lived in this north 
Montana community nearly 40 
years, I have had frequent 
contacts with Immigration offi- 
cers. Many of them have been 
stationed in our city. The mo- 
rale and efficiency of these men 
was high until Swing started 
swinging his rank and military 
(not Immigration) training at 
these civilian employes. 

Men were indiscriminately 
moved to distant points; others 
from far off places were sent 
to replace them. Economic 
losses to some were tragic. On 
top of that the new Commis 
sioner passed over the compe- 
tent, loyal and faithful career 
employes in his own service 
and went to the roster of re- 
tired generals to pick his prin- 
cipal assistants. 

This, coupled with congres- 
sional approval of full Immi- 


i retirement pay, makes the 
lowly Immigration inspector or 
patrolman quite sad indeed 


Yes, I agree with you, “Let him 
go hunting” full time. 
In addi 


: 
Hh 

; 

E 
sydidaiss| 


4 
, i 
nM 


Z 


g 
| 


Stadium Site 


The growing support for a 
local “big-league” stadium is 
great news. Until today, I had 
assumed the National Training 
School for Boys was an agreed 
site. I see now that alternate 
locations are being suggested, 
such as Potomac Park by Mr. 
Griffith and Senator Case. 

The great fear is that this 
thing will get out of hand and 
we will see another revolting 
display of opinion, prejudice, 
small-mindedness and  petti- 
fogging such as accompanied 
the tortuous years of effort to 
get approval for the Constitu-. 
tion avenue bridge. For this 
reason I have some misgivings 
about making the following pro 
posal, hoping only that it will 
meet with reasonable considera. 
tion. 

By far the most favorable 
location for the new stadium 
would be Columbia Island, 
across the Potomac River be- 


1. The site is very nearly ex- 
actly in the center of popula- 
tion of the greater W 
area, and thus closer to more 
people than other areas. The 
National Training School loca- 
tion is on the fringe of the 
populated area. (Further, in def- 
erence to Mr. Griffith and 
others, the island is located in 
Washington, D. C., although 
on the Virginia side of the 
Potomac channel.) 

2. Columbia Island offers 
probably the easiest and best 
routes of access in all direc- 
tions of any potential stadium 
site in the D. C. area. A six- 
lane north-south freeway tra- 
verses the island connecting di- 
rectly with Key, Memorial, and 
Highway bridges leading to the 
District proper. There is also 
direct access to Route 1, Shir- 
ley highway, Columbia pike, 
and Arlington boulevard ee 
ing south and west. The Na 
tional Training School site of- 
fers real ease of access only to 
those approaching it from the 
direction of Baltimore. Poto- 
mac Park traffic is clogged by 
=e alone on a nice week- 
end. 

3. There is ample space on 
Columbia Island for extensive 
parking facilities. In addition, 
a pedestrian ramp could be con- 
structed to the Pentagon's 
huge north parking area, which 
has its own separate network 
of quick egress and in 
routes. ° R. J. B. 


foot of Egypt's area, whether 
that area contains a Suez 
Canal, an Aswan Dam, a Pyra- 
mid or a Sphinx. And the dif- 
ference between the British 


Bt 


Bg 


Suez a Reminder 
Of African Ferment 
By Malvina Lindsay 


FOREIGN trouble has elbowed in again 
on Americans in their favorite holiday 
month, and just as they are immersed 
in their quadrennial tribal festivities. 

Many a citizen is anx- 
ious and resentful. He 9 
knows he cannot escape | 
the shadow of Suez, even | 
when gliding along in his 
two-color car, or when — 
watching on the TV 
screen the antics at Chi- © 
cago and San Francisco. 

The old isolationist 
longing rises, as he asks, 
“Why don't we keep out Miss Lindsay 
of this?” 

Even yet many Americans do not realize 
how any international flare-up anywhere 
threatens their own peace. A far greater 
number are unaware of how dependent is 
even their possession of two-color cars, and 
the gasoline to run them, on what happens 
to the Suez Canal. 

For even if a shooting war does not re 
sult from the Middle East situation, a de- 
pression could. The Nation's economy does 
not stop at the water's edge. 

A great part of the world’s supply of oil 
is in a region where an almost paranoie 
nationalism is rampant, and where its flow 
is subject to action by unstable, erratic 
governments. 

Yet oil is basic to all Western economies. 
Automobiles, airplanes, railway engines, 
transportation of most kinds, depend on it. 
If Western Europe were shut off from the 
Middle East supply of oil, industry would 
suffer there (and here as well);-unemploy- 
ment would rise, social crises develop, de 
pression spread. 

eos 


HINDSIGHT strategists are saying that 
this country has not been looking beyond 
its nose in regard to the Middle East. Why, 
they ask, haven't new pipelines been built, 
action started toward a new canal less yvul- 
nerable than Suez? Why was the Aswan 
Dam cancellation handled so clumsily? 
Why wasn't there better understanding of 
the present Arab state of mind? 

The pre-Suez mistakes are past. But 
there’s still a chance for foresight eoncern- 
ing the whole emerging and explosive 
African Continent. 

Premier Nehru of India, in his recent 
speech at Bonn, Germany, urged the West 
to cease its preoccupation with its own 
past, its own culture, its own concerns, and 
seek more knowledge and understanding 
of Africa, which he predicted would loom 
large in the affairs of tomorrow. 

The need for this foresight has again 
been emphasized by a report to the House 
Committee on Foreign Affairs by Rep. 
Frances Bolton of Ohio. 

Mrs. Bolton has done memorable pio 
neering in preparing this country for its 
growing relations with emergent African 
nations. Traveling at her own expense 
and accompanied by three specialists, she 
spent three months in Africa last fell 
Since her return she has spoken widely on 
her experiences and now has submitted « 
comprehensive and illuminating report on 
the 24 areas she visited. | 

Parts of this are prophetic of the Suez 
crisis. Writing of the need of this country 
to have friendly relations with the powers 
in Africa, she mentions 16 ports that would 
be valuable “in the event that the Suez 
Canal might be closed.” 


ow 

EGYPT, she found, was looked upon by 
the Arab peoples of North Africa as an 
example of a nation that had “thrown off 
the shackles of European influence.” .. . 
“Presently Arab Africa looks to Egypt as 
the strongest nation in Africa, and hence 
seems to follow her leadership.” 

Mrs. Bolton's report also emphasizes how 
relations with Africa affect the economie 
life of the average American. Strategie 
raw materials for industry, such as uranium, 
cobalt, industrial diamonds, manganese, 
copper, and asbestos come from Africa. 
So do such foods as coffee, tea and cocos. 

But Africa needs many American prod- 
ucts and an increasing trade with it is 
important to this country’s future. From 
a defense standpoint Africa is needed for 
strategic bases. 

Mrs. Bolton emphasizes the need to help 
improve health and educational conditions 
in Africa. Trade relations should be culti- 
vated, technical assistance given when de 
sired, every effort be made to help the new 
African nations develop peacefully. 

“We should make it clear to the African,” 
she says, “that we are sympathetic with his 


Matter of Fact... By joseph and Stewart Alop 
: Why Truman Did It | 


THESE REPORTERS are 
not among those who count 
themselves smarter about pol- 
ities than Harry S. Truman. 

This modest disclaimer is 
now in order because Mr. 
Truman's briskly firm indorse- 
ment of Averell Harriman 


seems to have persuaded half 
‘athe participants in the Demo- 
cratic convention that they 
have a lot more political savvy 
than the greatest old pro of 
them all. “Why did Truman 
do it?” they keep asking in a 
tone of superior wonder, 
sounding not angry but only 
& little sick at heart 
Well. surely the answer is 
that Mr. Truman did it be- 
cause he wants to see Harri- 
*" man nominated and thinks 
* that, with his help, Harriman 
has a chance—maybe a nar- 
row chance but still a chance 
—Oof getting the nomination. 
Tt will be a tdugh, rough fight, 
but no one revels in carnage 
more than Harry S. Truman. 
It is a very long-shot bet, but 
Harry Truman has won long- 
shot bets before this. So he 
vielded to the temptation to 
do what he wanted to do all 
along 
Rather early, the former 
President decided he wanted 
the New York Governor in 
the Democratic race this year 
He helped to persuade Harri- 
man to declare himself in 
which was perhaps not dread- 
fully difficult to do. Many 
weeks ago, he told Harriman 
in plain terms that he was 
“for” him, in the sense that 
Harriman was his preferred 
candidate, better in his opin- 
ion even than Adlai Steven- 
son, whom Truman had also 


Washington Scene . ~~ by George Dixon 
A Cold Time in the Old Town Tonight 


WE ARE committed to pre 
Berve peace everywhere in the 
world except Chicago and 


San Francisco. But we are de- 
termined 
those twos 
areas of un-@ 
rest shall be - 
more unrest- © 
ful, even if we 
have to trade ° 
Czech arms 

to the Demo- 
crats and na- 
tionalize the 
alimentary ca- 
nal of the 
Grand Old 
Party. 

We have turned Chicago 
and San Francisco into battle- 
fields by shipping them all 
our belligerents. But it has 

* deft Washington unbearably 
peaceful. One can plod the 
dead halls for hours and not 
see a single throat cut or back 
stabbed 

The Sénators are gone, the 
Representatives are gone, 
even the top buretucrats are 
gone. The latter, of course, 
are too dedicatedly nonparti- 
san to sully themselves in par- 


Dixon 


>. 
od 


These Days 


“Die of Your A nger! 


1 DO NOT know much about 
* the stylistic nature of Arabic 
broadcasting nor who Ahmed 
Said is. But the “Voice of the 
Arabs,” out of ra 
Cairo, gives to 


——— eee 


‘ 


? 
, ° 4 


4 


encouraged jo make the con- 
test. hed 

Thereafter, the question be- 
tween Harriman and Mr. Tru- 
man did not concern Mr. Tru- 
man’s preference. The ques- 
tion was whether Mr. Truman 
would make a public fight for 
Harriman, or would stop at 
telling those who asked him 
that he liked Harriman bet- 
ter than any of the others. 
In a phrase of Harriman’s al- 
ready quoted in this space, the 
question was “whether Tru- 
man would take his coat all 
the way off or only half off.” 

coe 


THE HARRIMAN camp 
were well aware that they 
needed all the help Mr. Tru- 
man could possibly give them. 
They worked over him at 
every opportunity, hardly 
leaving him time to drink a 
toast in peace when he went to 
New York to meet his daugh- 
ter’s fiance, for example. 
But even on the eve of the 
convention. neither Averell 
Harriman himself nor any of 
those around him actually ex- 
pected Mr. Truman's active, 
open indorsement, with all its 
far-reaching, dissension-mak- 
ing consequences. 

In the week before coming 
to Chicago, Mr. Truman told 
the Missouri National Com- 
mitteman, Mark Holloran, and 
other Missouri delegates that 
he was indeed for Harriman. 
He said he would be pleased 
if the Missourians stuck to fa- 
vorite-son Stuart Symington 
for at least two ballots, to 
give the Stevenson bandwagon 
a chance to be stopped. But 
even on the train to Chicago, 
Mr. Truman told his personal 
entourage that he intended to 
maintain a public neutrality. 


That was his 
tention, in fact, 
the opening of his 
press conference, at which he 
first promised to reveal his 
choice. It is a fair bet that 
the last straw of persuasion 
was laid on the sometimes 
yielding camel's back of Tru- 
man's prudence 
Samuel Rosenwan, an ardent 
Harrimanite, with whom Mr. 
Truman conferred just before 
the press conference began. 

After that, the problem was 
not what Mr. Truman would 
do, but how he would do it. 
Streams of Harriman sup- 
porters urged a werful 
statement. Streams of Steven- 
son admirers sought to avoid 


parent in- 
almost until 


famous 


by Judge | 


the worst, whick would have | 


been a statement hinting that 
Stevenson was not a “fighting 
candidate.” 

cos 


IN HIS OWN SUITE, just 


‘Can Truman Dominate? . 


Former President Seen Risking Prestige and Power_ 


~j 7 
. - 


seme 


<i 


THE. WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERA D 


: 


CHICAGO—Every day and 


'every hour of the day that 


former President Harry Tru< 
man has been here in Chicago 
he has been . 
dominating 
the headlines 
the news- 
paper head- 
lines, the TV 
and radio 


gs 


_—_—_ 


_ headlines 


half an hour before giving it | 
to the public, Mr. Truman | 
gave his statement for Harri- | 
.«« And if health be an issue, gentlemen, I shall 
“wage, if nominated, nor only a clean, hut n 
sterile campaign as well! ...” 


tisan politics, but they go to 
the convention cities as “ob- 
servers.” The trouble is they 
“observe” things the ordinary 
eye can't detect. 

Naturally, they do nothing 
unethical, or In violation of 
the Hatch Act, forbidding po- 
litical activity to Federal em- 
ployes. However, they indulge 
in chit-chat with people who 
vote, and they feel they have 
a right to express an opinion, 
like any other freeborn Amer- 
ican, but they never «try to 
apply political pressure upon 
an underling. In fact, they al- 
ways make a point of reassur- 
ing a subordinate: “You are 
under no obligation to follow 
my example, unless you want 
to keep your job.” 


THE LOBBYISTS have 
gone too, like fleas following 
the dogs, if they will excuse 


my fulsome flattery. The “leg- 


islative consultants” have 
taken their large smiles and 
expense accounts to both Chi- 
cago and San Francisco be- 
cause they are the greatest 
bet-coverers on the face of the 
earth. They'd be found to 
have hedged their bets enough 


man a trial run among his | 
special intimates suchas Les 
lie Biffle, Charles Murphy and 
Donald Dawson. He was de 
lighted, visibly exulting over 
the thing he was about to do. 
At least half the members (PLATFORM—-Fr. P. I 
of the Truman circle were not | 
delighted. They feared the [4 9 
trouble ahead. They thought dD fe T M de 
Stevenson would get the nomi- espera ' ry a 
nation anyway or at any rate | 
believed that Harriman could TF W ° PI f 
not nominated. This con- te | 
viction is increasingly wide- O rt a cl ori 
spread in Chicago. But when 
Harry Truman makes a gam- first.” said McCormack. “We'record as favoring “unqual? 
ble, it is always wiser to defer |will consider civil rights sep- fied approval of the Court's de-| 
judgment until you find out arately, and last.” cision” in the body of the plat-| 
how the bets are paid off in| The informal search for a form. 
the end ‘compromise made no tangible} Having taken that position, 
Comeriant. vine, Ine "4 | progress today, butt the talkssome of his supporters sug- 
‘will continue. Former Demo-|gested that Stevenson himself 
cratie National Chairman Ste-\is in the clear, even if the 
iphen A. Mitchell represented|Resolutions Committee brings 
Stevenson in today’s discus- OUt something less 
sions. and Vann M. Kennedy The new and most interest 
oat in for Lyndon B. Johnson. ing factor in the search for a 
Southerners present were for- party unity” civil rights plank 
mer Gov. John S. Battle of Vir- “45 the enhanced bargaining 
“ee , «power of Senate Majority 
ginia, Sen. Sam Ervin Jr. (N. C.) pre BEA he th 
for a cash-in if the election and Gov. James P. Coleman of - vo pone edn es g babe: 
, «oF | his own presidential hat.in the 
went to the Poujadists. Mississippi. saa a a< Ting. Johnson has a Capitol 
Without the legislators, the | Battle descr! m _** reputation for working miracles 
lobbyists and the “observers,” |“just a little group of meni,’ pinging opposed segments 
the Nation's Capital is not it-|trying to work something out."|.¢ 1. party together on thorny 
self. The exodus has done| The former Virginia gover-);...< 
terrible things to our social nor said he is “about 75 per) {jntil former President Tru-| 
life, our night life, and our §_ ——————«'mans indorsement of Gov 
economy. f - ‘Averell Harriman assured a 
The taxicab drivers are) Adlai Tops 500 Mark sharper than expected candi- 
among the major sufferers. dateclash, some Resolutions 
Their big trade is hauling peo- In AP Delegate Poll Committee members thought! 
ple to and from Capitol Hill. CHICAGO, Aug 12 ‘® ‘they were near a solution. 
They are down now to people Adlai E. Stevenson tonight Qne proposal was to affirm 
who use their own money. forged past the 500-mark in the Supreme Court's authority 
The cocktail circuit has vir-| the Associated Press tabula- jin a separate plank. without 
tually closed up. Capital host-| tion of indicated first-ballot specific reference to the school 
esses don't give parties un- strength for the Democratic decision. The rest of the plat 
less they can get political ce-| presidential nomination. form would then pretty much 
lebrities. They do not care| Averell Harriman went over follow,Jhe lines of the 1948 and 
to waste whisky upon just| 200 for the first time. The 1952 party civil rights declara 
people. tabulation was based on state Lions. | 
There are no receptions, no| caucuses here as well as pre- | Northern members now are 
dinners. This, in itself, 1| viously disclosed pledges and saying that would not be strong 
could have endured. But I de-| preferences. enough—that the school opin- 
cided it was high time to head | The tally showed Steven- 'on must be approved by spe- 
west for Chicago and then San| son at 509%, Harriman at cific reference 
Francisco when the loneliness | 201, ethers 280, and uncom- | Key Southern members have 
and monotony drove my bride | mitted or undecided 331%. informally agreed to accept the 
the other night into dragging} It takes 686% te win. following language, but “pri 
me to a barge party on the ——— oa Ariag say they will go no 
Chesa - 
alien — Sig 7 ge nth cent hopeful” that a successful! “Every American child. ir- 
mo compromise will be worked OUt. | respective of race or national 
Stevenson himself was Te€-|origin economic status or place 


| , ’ 
ported optimistic about a solu-\of regidence, has full rights 
‘tion after a talk with Battle. under the law without discrimi- 


Coprrient. 1954 x! 
Peatures Ayncicate 4 


Es 


“Things are shaping up fine,"\nation to having educational 
Stevenson told another V J— opportunity to develop poten 
delegate, who asked not to tialities in accordance with the 


{ identified. c* stit t . 
By George Sokolsky Semen members @f the ae ion of the United 


‘  |platform-trafting ee ee The last nine words, “in ac 
jued to be gloomy about the cordance with the Constitution. 


Fine! There ts nothing bet- 
ter than freedom and inde- 


pendence and let them surge 


forward, if they so desire and 
can do it. It has been a long 
time since Egypt has been an 
independent nation. After an- 
other “Die of Your Anger,” 


+ Ahmed. says: 


aforesaid Ah- 
med Said, ev- — 
ery paragraph 
of which 
starts with the 
phrase, “Die 
of your an 
ger” 
Of course. 
_. he wants the United States to 
die of its anger, because the 
American Government has de 
clined to throw millions of 
dollars of the American tax- 
payers’ earnings into Nassers 
high dam. Ahmed Said starts 
“Imperialists, both British 
and American, die of your 
anger, for Egypt and all Arabs 
will extend their hand to the 
free people of the world to 
fight imperialism. Die of your 
anger, for Egypt will not be 
frightened and intimidated 
and the Arab nation will 
never succumb to defeatism 
and despondency. We shall al! 
surge forward toward the ob- 
jectives of freedom and inde- 
pendence.” 


Sokolsky 


> 


— ee — —_— -_-—-——~ 


- -— 


Floor Fight Looming on Rights Plank 


CHICAGO Ill, Aug. 12—-Lib- Pledges to make a conven- Democratic Party “must 
eral Democratic leaders sound- tion floor fight if necessary for cide whether to embrace the 
ed a warring tonight of a - the morality of men like Senator 
the 
platform committee Supreme Court school decision 
fails to recommend a strong came from Rep. William Green'can't be all things to all peo-_ 


De a strona plank, the north-C re, of Philedelphia, Rep.iple. 
be te , . “Le s D Mich.), De- Sen. 
ern labor and big city political Charles Digges (D-Mich Sen 

figures said they particularly 
“meant a clear indorsement of 


ee a eeregregation in pub. Said Digges: “Those who are 


worried about the Southernersion all Federal Court appoint- 
walking out ought to be con-| ments. 

ed about what liberal ele-| 
ments would do if a strong of the delegates favor a forth- 


vention floor fight if 


Party s 


eivil rights plank 


outlawing segregation in pu 
Hie schools. 


The pleas for a hard-hitting 
&U Pp porting 
citizens 


party statement 


equal rights for all 
were 


at a meeti 
called by the Leadership con could not return to Michigan R euther. 


“... For the Egyptian econ- 


, omy is strong, vigorous, and 
' steadily developing. It is ca- 


pable of meeting the cost of 
the high dam project, as was 
emphasized by the director 


of the International Bank in 


his document to Egypt. He 
said that the revenue from the 
electric power alone which 
would be generated at the site 
would be more than enough to 
repay the expenses of the 
project.” 


IF THE Egyptian economy 
is strong and vigorous, why 
does Nasser want our money? 
Americans will be happy to 
know that Egyptian economy 
is strong and vigorous, he- 
cause then Nasser can row his 
own boat and does not need 
to bother us to help him. 
Americans prefer that the 
economy of every country 
should be strong and vigorous, 
for then we should he able to 
reduce taxes and perhaps also 


— oe 


| prospects. ete.” strengthen slightly the 
| Liberal members say they are ...:.: 
reduce our national debt determined to file a minority pe on armed pg ge 5 
without all the time worrying jreport and carry their fight to\ 44 <ubstitute for  enanitin wot! 
about the weak and backward |the Convention floor if the 108- erence of thn Caurt on 
countries that are always |member full Committee fails to) 4+ » two-hour ee Ee ee 
looking for a handout. affirm specifically the Supreme sriernoon McCormack’s plat. 
ame tte aoe ee Court school-integration opin- form-drafting group renertediy 
er: tion. 
paragraphs and then he says: | Southern members say they nao Sore See 
Die of your anger, for even |are bound to file a minority re- domestic policies and alleging 
Sudan, on whose land part of |port themselves and to make that promises were broken on 
the great reservoir will be |, gght of it if the Court ruling many fronts 
situated, criticized, through |i, mentioned. Also celeaioted was & hemes 
the words of her Premier, the | Threats ofya fight on the wejfare plank lauding the Dem. | 
United States statementiggoor, meanwhile, began tO oeratic record ne agg Toare say 
which attempted to incite Su-|hreak out in some of the dele- oyrity, 
dan against Egypt and to cre igation caucuses. ve 
ate dissension between the | Rep. William J. Greene Jr., 
two neighbors. The Sudanese Philadelphia City Democratic 
Premier said that the Nile wa-|\-hairman, told a Philadelphia 
ter ts an Egyptian-Sudanese delegation meeting: “We must 
question and no other state support a strong civil rights 
has the right to interfere with plank, naming the Supreme 
me Court decision; and if the rec. 
ommended plank does not sat 
isfy us, we will put up a strong 
fight on the floor.” 
. Greene said he spoke for him 
self and for Philadelphia May 
‘or Richardson Dilworth and) 
former Mayor Joseph S&S. Clark 
Stevenson is already 


ee eee 


tonight. McCormack said the!| 
first item taken up was “free! 
enterprise.” He said other’ 
planks would be considered in 
this order: Agriculture, Labor, ' 
Natural Resources, Atomic En- 
sergy, Fiscal Policy and Govern- 
ment Operations. 


The President's 
Appointment List 


In A WV Ben William F. Knowlend 
On «m-calit) 


THAT OUGHT to be aatis- 
factory, except that the Suez 
Canal happens to be an inter- 
national body of water, im- 
portant to the shipping of all! 
the world, built by foreign 
capital, designed and  con- 
structed by a French engineer, | 
and if Egypt, or Egypt and | 
Sudan, or anybody else wants 
to close that road, there is 
enough police power left in 
the world to keep it open. 


pT les, ME, 


—— 


- _<— - 


specific indorsement of 


troit, and Robert Short, chair-Miss), leader of pro-segrega- 
man of the Minnesota delega-tion forces 
; »~W 


oern 


plank were not included. 


ee 


de 


Lehman or the immorality of 


men like Senator Eastland. It Passport to campus 


or executive desk... 


James Eastland (D.- chalk striped wool, 


in Congress, is its midriff one soft 
chairman of the Senate Judi- 


ciary Committee, which passes drape of jersey. Black 
and white. $39.99 


“An overwhelming majority) 


liright civil rights plank,” said/ 
“The candidates 


in 
headlines 


The sessions were resumed _ 


But the 
question asstill 
unanswered in 
the calmer 
aftermath of 
his slashing, Drummond 
anti - Stevenson-I-want - Harri- 
man declaration is whether 
he can also dominate the con- 
vention 
. The question now is whether 
addition to making the 
Mr. Truman can 
make this Democratic conven- 
tion accept his will and there- 
by dump the man who had 


/earned more than 500 dele-' 
gates, mostly as the result of 
‘contested primaries and ac- 


cept Gov. Averell Harriman 


'who has not publicly tested 
| his presidential candidacy. 


Mr. Truman has unexpect- 


| edly, bbldly and, 1 would say, | 
| characteristically 


risked his 


prestige, his political 


fessional politician in the 


premises that he can pull it | 


off. 

But he has done more than 
that. Certainly in the judg. 
ment ef many Democratic po 
litical leaders, not merely 
those backing Adlai Stever 
son, Mr. Truman has 


the convention and the party 
by putting his own position 
and his own leadership in the 
scales of one candidate 

It should not be questioned, 
I think, that Mr. Truman is 
acting from earnest convic- 
tion, that 
siders Averell Harriman to be 
a better Democratic nominee 
this year than Stevenson 

Mr. Truman has acted hon- 
estly, and almost to a man- 
and 40 a woman—the 4307 


delegates and alternates here | 


will agree to that. What many 
perhaps most do not agree to 
is that Mr. Truman has acted 
wisely, or that he has put his 
party above his personal feel. 
ing for Harriman 

Those who deeply question 
the wisdom of Mr. Trumans 
course raise these points 

hat Mr. Truman is throw 
ing this convention into the 
clutches of conflict, turmoil 
and possibly fatal stalemate. 


That there Is no such thing | 
as private citizen Truman or | 


Democrat Tru- 
he simply can't 


rank-and-file 
man. that 


speak as an individual since | 
his influence is not as an indi- | 


vidual but as.a former Presi- 
dent: 

That as former President, 
Mr. Truman is using his posi- 
lien not 
ences at this convention but 
to create them. 


That Mr. Truman, in a des- | 
perate éffort to put over Har- | 


riman, has even been willing 
to give aid and comfort to the 


enemy, that is, to the Repub- | 
licans: that he has done this | 


by solemniy advancing the 
argument that if Stevenson 


were the nominee, it would be | 
to | 
elect him because of the pe- | 
costly and previous | 


taking an awesome risk 


riod of 


“trial and error’ which the 


Government would have to go | 
learning | 


through while he was 
the job. 
Perhaps this appraisal 


more confident of his lack of 
influence over this convention 
than those who fee! that he is 
heading it toward a doubtful, | 
dubious, desperate Donney- 
brook with much more pros- 


’ 


pect of dissipating the vigor | 


of this re-invigorated 1956 | 


. 


f 


: 


Democratic Party than of unit- 
ing it behind anybody, 

If 1 may, I counsel you not 
to believe anybody who starts 
by writing or saying over the 
air. that he knows what is 
going to happen during the 
next few days. Anyway, ! 
don’t know, but I do venture 
to offer these judgments as to 
the present shape of the con- 
vention in the wake of Mr. 
Truman's welltimed maneu- 
vers: 

®A good deal of careful 
delegate-checking is in prog- 
ress, I find no immediate ‘evi- 
dence that Mr. Truman has 
started any mass movement 
of delegates to the Harriman 
emp. My information is that 
Stevenson's above -500. dele- 
gates are holding firm and if 


Monday, ‘Anguat 13, 1956 


By Roscoe Drummond 


here that Stevenson will be 
nominated. 

* Spearheaded by Mr. Tru- 
man, a stop-Stevenson move 
could be successful, partiev- 
larly if the southern delegates 
think a stalemate would open 
the way for either Sen. Lyn- 
don Johnson of Texas or Sen 
Stuart Symington of Missouri. 

.® But it wil be easier for 
Mr. Truman and others to pre- 
vent the nomination of Steven- 
son than to produce the nomi 
nation. of Harriman. One 
doésn't automatically follow 
the other. 

°©if Adlai Stevenson is 
stopped, the nomination of 
Mr. X—Johnson, Symington 
or some other less mentioned 
dark horse—seems to me more 
probable, than the nomination 


of Harriman. 

If it’s true that the Demo 
crats just naturally like to 
fight. they're going. to love 
this one from here out. 


they continue to do so it is 
entirely possible that Steven- 
son will be nominated on the 
second or third ballot. It is 
still the dominant judgment 


Lewis & 


power | 
and his reputation as a pro-| 


reck- | 
lessly risked disrupting both | 


he sincerely con- | 


to reconcile differ. | 


is | 
wrong at one critical point, | 
namely, that Mr. Truman is | 

: 


. 


1409 G 


a) ae) 


Thos Saltz 5 


yt 


Smart pickers go where 
berries are sweetest 


AND ‘THE SAME shrewd instinct brings crowds of 
wise shoppers to our store during this time of 
annual clearance. 


These.are men who are not confused by conven- 
tional sales arithmetic. They know that values 
are based on the quality and uniqueness of met- 


chandise . . . not on price alone. 


And they are attracted by the knowledge that no 
other store in Washington . . . and few, indeed, 
in the entire nation . . . has such a collection of 
the world’s best merchandise as Lewis & Thos. 
Salez. 


Now is the time to see us for some of the richest 
savings and most exciting bargains in many years. 
Facts: we ‘hold only two sales a year». . all 
merchandise is grouped from our regular stock 

.. many of the items offered are exclusive and 
can be found nowhere else. 


Selected groups of: Men’s Summer Svits: Fall 
& Winter-weight Suits; Sports Jackets & 
Slacks; Imported English Gabardine Top- 
coats. White & Fancy Shirts; Sportsweeor) 
Sport Shirts; Imported English Poplin Rain- 
coats; Hosiery; Pajamas; Undershirts & 
Undershorts. French Shriner Summer & Year- 
Round Shoes; Felt Hats, Panamas, Caps. 
Misses’ Summer Suits & Dresses; Fall and 
Winter Suits and Coats; Coordinated Sepa- 
rates; Imported English Raincoats. 


Ey” Ra 


LEWIS & TH°S. SALTZ 
1409 G Street, N. W. 


e 


EXecutive 3-4543 
e 


— ee ee 


’ 


FOREWARNED OF SUEZ 


From a Buffalo Courier-Express editorial July 31: 


“Egyptian Dictator Nasser’s seizure of the Suez Canal 
came as so great a surprise to the Western world that 
there has been an unprecedented dearth of ‘I told you 
so’ comment. But there is a seasoned and perspicacious 
observer of the international scene who has a right to 
shout: ‘I told you so!’ We are referring to Clarence 
K. Streit, editor of the magazine, Freedom & Union, 
In an article in the current issue—which, abviously, 
had gone to press some time before Nasser’s seizure 
of the canal—Mr., Streit wrote .. .” 


Read How Freedom & Union Again Called the 


Turn and Proposed Preventive Action 


on caveat abil chest eaten nastnrcln athe tindeidicsianienetatiainnaouidiisaandi’ 


Freedam & Union 
27060 Ontario Rd. NW., Washington 3, D.C. 


Our Suez forecast 
went to Dulles and 
White House July 3. 


Get now—free— 


what they got then 


and campaign for the national'want it, the people want it. 
ticket if we don’t have strong So what's the problem?” 
* by about 300 persons, mostly civil rights plank. __ The only problem, said Reu- 
delegates Sen. Herbert Lehman (D-\ther, is thtat “little men out 
Roy Wilkins, executive secre- N.Y.), leader of the Senate's of step with the times” may try 
« fary of the National Associa- small pro-civil rights bloc, said to soft-pedal civil rights for 
’ tion for the Advancement of the platform must call for im- the sake of party unity 
“Colored People, presided. He plementation of the Supreme “Their " said Reuther, 
said the purpose of the meet- Court decision and also must “is: Don't Rock the Democratic 
ing was to establish “liaison” pledge support for anti-lynch- | boat. Stmk the damn thing.” 
on a civil rights plank with the ing and. anti-poll tax legisla- Reuther warned that, with- | 
4, gtate delezations.”” He asked tion and a change in Senate outa re rights yt. 
‘delegates to work in their state rules to curb filbusters. a would find it 
groups for support of a strong’) Walter Reuther, vice preai- ¢ to work hard for the 
civil rights plank. dent of the AFL-CIO, said the’ party during the fall campaign. 


Please send me a free reprint ef your Suez article 
which the Buffalo Courter-Express cited, and also 
what you wrote Secretary Dulles in sending it to 
him 3 weeks before the crisis began. 


ference on Civil Rights at the 


- Morrison Hotel and attended Jelletf’s French Room 


Second Floor, F Street 
- Shirlington, Conn. Ave, 
Silver Soring 


=f 


cr WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HBRALD 


Monday, 


August 13, 1956 


Ase | FSCRQS DS HP® B—-- 


at 


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REFRIGERATORS 
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ad OMIOMIOMIOLrI0 


! 
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ae Af 2 


AS 


Lack of Funds Snags 
CSC Absorption of 
Insurance Groups 


CIVIL SERVICE 


heneficial (insurance) 


members 


It has ne money te operate 
them. Congress cut sharply its 
request for funds te take over 


and operate the life insurance 
groups. 

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mental appropriation from Con- 
gress next year to finance the 
work. Under the law, CSC has 
only until Aug. 11, 1957, to take 
over the associations. Sixteen 
groups with 44.224 members 
and upwards of $5 million in 
assets already have turned over 
their operations to CSC. 

The largest of all groups has 
agreed to have CSC take them 
over but money-short CSC can't 
afford to do it. They include 
the Navy Beneficial Association 
with 28,000 members and $5.- 
300,000 in assets: War Beneficial 
Association with 21,000 mem- 
bers and $3,600,000 in assets: 
Treasury Beneficial Association 
with 18.900 members and $2. 
400.000 in assets: Philadelphia 
Navy Yard Group Life Insur 
ance Association with 9770 
members and $456,000 in assets. 
Washington Metropolitan Po- 
lice Relief Association, 3280 
members and $910,000 in assets 
and the Interior group with 


gma ray and $2°4.000 in 
ass ts 


A year age Congr ap. 
proved a iaw to the 
groups to turn over their assets 
te CSC and for the Government 
te underwrite their liabilities. 
The beneficial groups were un- 
able to compete with the Gev- 
ernment’s own low-cost em- 
ploye life insurance program. 

The Government, through 
CSC, guarantees to pay off the 
insurance policies on which pre- 


miums are paid up by the em-| $26 


ploye and former employe hold- 
ers. CSC hasn't the money to 
finance the required record- 
keeping on the many thousands 
of policies. 


SICK LEAVE & PAY? Navy's 
Supplies & Accounts here has 
made a study which indicates 
a tie-up between sick leave and 
pay days. The study covered 
the records of the groups of 
120 employes and it showed: 

More hours of sick leave are 


COMMIS. 
SION has suspended its plans 
to take over a dozen employe 
groups 
that have more than 100,000 


Ue Washington 


Timéts Berald 


“ity Life 


C 


AREA NEWS 
WOMEN'S. NEWS 
C 


TV-RADIO 
AMUSEMENTS 


wo Escape — 
D.C. General 
Ward; Soon ~ 


LASSIFIED 
OMICS 


MONDAY, AUGUST 13, 1956 


Alert Police 
Nab 8 in 
2 Yokings 


Youth in Band 
Of 3 Arrested: 
7 Men Held 

_ In 2d Robbery 


’ 


| oe 
Police patrol cars were at 

the right place at the right 

time twice early Sunday.| 

They broke up two robberies 

and arrested seven young 

men on the spot, another 


later. | =p 

The first incident happened! 
shortly after midnight in the 
1600 block of G st. se. Paul F. 
Cahill, 41, of 1218 33d place se.. 
told police he was jumped by 
three youths whe beat him 
about the face and struggled 
with him. 

Cahill. who is 6 feet 2 and’ 
weighs 220 pounds, lost the} | 
struggle, his sport shirt and| 
the left side of his pants. That! 
side held his wallei, which con-| 
tained $495. 

At that moment, Pvts. Meivin 
C. Griffin and Vernon L. Hen-| 
dricks happened by in Wagon 5.) 
The youths ran and threw the) 
pants leg into an alley. There 
police recovered all the money 
They also captured one suspect 
who was listed as 17 years old. 
charged with robbery. and 
turmed over to the juvenile 
squad. 

Five hours later. Senford 
Hoover, 39, and his wife, Pearl. 
were leaving their car in front 
of their home at 1622 H st. ne. 
‘They told police seven men 
jumped them and took Mrs 
Hoover's billfold containing 


By Liz Hillenbrand 
Bat Repor'er 
Part of one of the oldest and 


| Pvt. Louis Blancato of the 


‘Ninth Precinct happened by in 
a scout car at that moment. most fascinating Federal insti- 
The men fied, but with the aid sion. soon may disappear 
of a police cruiser, Blancato ¢,.., the shadow of the Capitol 
caught six of them. A seventh Congress recently authorized 
was picked up later demolition of eight green 

All were charged with rob- pouses and old structures used 
bery although they denied it. for storage, part of the Botanic 
Their names and addresses as Garden and the building of 
listed by police are: Frederick new ones at the Garden's Pop 
J. MeCray, 19, 1426 K st. se.; lar Point Nursery near the S 
Albert McCray, 21, his brother,’ Capitol st. bridge in Anacostia. 


used on the Friday follewing|**™me address; Lee W. Harris, Demise of the 75-year-old struc- 
pay day and féwer hours are|!8, 716 8th st. ne; Virgil J. tures awaits appropriation of 


taken on p a4 day 
ether day during the 
pay period. The trend applied 
te all employes regardiess of 
grade level. 

The agency asks these ques) 
tions of its employes: Is it that! 
pay days make us feel good and 

y Friday we have spent all our) 
money and are sick over it? Is 
it a coincidence? What does it 
all mean? 


PROMOTIONS are on the 
upswing at Labor. Secretary 
James Mitchell has informed 
his employes that there were 
787 promotions during the 1955 
ealendar year compared to 579 


than any 
two-week 


in only six months of this year.’ 


Mitchell promised to see that 
special consideration for pro- 
motion is given employes who 
are at the tops of their grades 


NO GAG: Post Office has re- 


written in clear, simple and di-' 


rect words that part of its man- 
wal dealing with changes in 
the mail service. 

As revised, the manual mere- 
ty states that postal employes 
in active status are forbidden 
te engage in-campaigns to 
change mail service. Then, to 
prevent any possible misinter- 
pretation of it, a second sen 
tence states that the directive 
will not deny any employe any 
right under the Licyd-LaFol- 
lettte Act of 1912 te petition 
Congress. 

In 1949. a new rule was in- 
serted in the manual which 
placed restrictions on cam- 

igns for mail service changes 
ty postal transportation em- 
ployes. The restriction was 
made applicable to all postal 
workers when the manual was 
revised several months ago. 

Postal employes and their 
leaders immediately charged 
“gag rule” and that the depart- 
ment was attempting to take 


. 


away rights to petition Con-) 


gress as laid down in the 1912 
Act. Postal officials denied the 
charges but they confessed the 
wording was unfortunate and 
that’s why it was revised. 


A 


Peeping Tom? | 
f 


| Georges County will begin in 


, 


| awarded by the commission, all 


Coley, 1617 Trinidad ave. ne-/the $587.000 authorized for the 
LeRoy Herron, 20, 65 New York project. 

ave. ne.; and a 17-year-old juve The homely, worn old build- 
nile. jings, located Im a square 
_A seventh man was arrested bounded by Independence and 
later by Pvt. J. J. Paul and also M@tyland aves. and 2d and 34 


The greenhouses at left and right are among eight Botanic | 
Garden structures demolition of which has been authorized 


y Me Pm, 
“A 


‘a 


By Joe Heiberger, Staff Photorcrapher 


by Congress. Visible in center is an arched glass dome of 
the main conservatory which will remain. 


Old Botanic Greenhouses Butler Record 
To Vanish From Scene 


Is Belittled 


By Sothoron 
Praise by Ike Irks 


Democratic Chairman 
Of Prince Georges 


Expedition returned from the 
South Seas with a collection 
which needed housing 

A few years later Congress 
authorized an extension to the 
present office building, and in 
1850 the garden had to move 
again. this time back to the 
west end of the Capitol 
grounds, near its first location 

Im 1933, the year the con 
servatory was completed, the 
greenhouses were moved across 
the street to their present loca 
tion to make way for the Union 
Square Park Development. 

The newest move is one that 


hall in an almost perpetual 
blaze of blooms from the fall 
through Easter will remain to 
delight flower lovers 

Besides the garden's famous 
orchid collection. the eight 
greenhouses contain miscelia 
neous plants and paims, and 
budding stock for the outdoor 
grounds. (,eorge Stewart. 
architect of the Capitol and 
acting director of the garden. 
says he feels the greenhouses 
should be located at me nurs- 
ery, as their main function of 
growing new plants is more in 
keeping with the location. 
Some of the orchids will re- 
main behind to add their 
blooms to the conservatory. 

“Tourists won't miss it,” says 
Stewart, “and the growers, who 
are interested in new methods 
of growing, can go down to the 
Poplar Point Nursery.” Many 
of the blooms used in these ex- 
hibits will be transported back 
to the conservatory for shows 

Actually, it won't be the first 
move for the 136-year-old gar- 
den. Founded in 1820 near its 
present site by the Columbia 
Institute for the Promotion of 
Arts and Sciences, the garden 
was abandoned from 1837 to 
1842. Then it moved to an old 
lot behind the present office in 
1842 when a VU. S. Exploring 


L. Harold Sothoron charged 
yesterday that President Eisen- 
hower's advisers had not kept 
the Chief Executive “very well 
informed” about the voting rec- 
ord of Sen. John Marshall But- 
ler (R-Md.). 

Sothoron, chairman of the 
»Democratic State Central Com- 
; itte f Pri 
those concerned with the Bo- Conean noted eat the Presi. 
tanic Garden deem ag mors dent had thanked Butler for 
The old greenhouses, ides his “effective work .. . in help- 
being a hazard, are conside ‘ing enact into law so many 
by many to be an eyesore, mar- 
ring the view of the Capitol 
area. 

But many who may look one 
day on the park which is 
planned near the conservatory 
will remember the days when 
to enter the worn old green- 
houses was to enter another 
world—full of the breathtaking 
beauty of rare flowers. 


of this Administration.” 
Sothoron said his Committee 
feels it should “clear up” the 
statement attributed to Mr. Ei- 
senhower in indorsing Butler 
for reelection 

Sothoron charged that But- 
ler’'s voting record “does not 
in the _ slightest reflect the 
President's political philosophy 
nor that 
. . : 2 bers of the Republican Party.” 
Today s Chuckle Without “implying indorse- 
Let’s cross electric blankets ment of this Administration's 
with toasters, and pop people policies,” Sothoron pointed to 
out of bed. \several instances where his 


Father ef Il Cellege Graduates 


identified by Mr. and Mrs. Hoo-/*ts- #¥., are most famous as the 
ver. He also was charged with Dome of the Botanie Garden's 
robbery. He was described as 1 abulous collection of orchids 
, ; lis had several bad cracks 
New York ave. ne., reported on we . 
his way from Ft. Jackson, S. C.. og td ny we me hanes 
to Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo. tourists. 
| The main conservatory of 
—_ 
Tra nsit Labor arched glass domes, bizarre 
tropical plants from all over 
N ti ti the world amid pleasant man- 
ti made streams and pools, will 
cf0 1ations remain. And the flower shows 
The principals in the District 
transit labor negotiations took 
a day off, yesterday in prep 
aration for the home stretch 
of the contract talks. 
Holden went fishing. Walter 
J. Bierwagen, union president,/ 
went for a drive with his wife 
O. Roy Chalk, whe will be the 
new transit chief, said he 
The negotiations are sched- 
uled to resume at 11:15 a.m. 
today. The present Capital 
Transit Co. will go out of busi- 
ness at midnight Tuesday, and 
with the union will expire. 
Progress was réported at the 
last 3%-hour negotiating ses 
sion on Saturday. Chalk wants) 
to extend the present contract 
union wants immediate arbi- 
‘tration if an agreement is not 
lreached by the time the CTC 
‘contract expires. 


Pvt. James Rivens, 19, of 69 DUt_ with advancing age the 
the Botanic Garden, with its 
| there, which keep the exhibit 
ResumeToday 
Federal Mediator James A 
‘spent the day “very quietly.” 
at the same time its contract 
while talks ¢ontinue. The 
| 
Start Slated 


On WSSC 


‘Water Tank 
| Work on a milliongalion we 
‘ter storage tank to serve the 
‘Camp Springs area of Prince 


about three weeks, the Wash- 
ington Suburban Sanitary Com- 
mission announced yesterday. 

The WSSC. said the new ele 
wated tank will assure ade. 
quate pressure and continued 
'water service for the area. Con-' 
‘tract for the project was 
‘awarded to the Pittsburgh-Des 
\Moines Steel Co. on a low bid 
‘of $176,380. 

Other construction contracts 


By James E. Clayton 


sph a Ee Ra ewes 
¥ . -“ 
Se an a ee eee 


¢ te Tete gt ee nee Ge 


for water and sewer mains and nate thinking 
house connections, were: 
Birchwood City Subdivision 
work to J. J. Smarge Co., Col- 
lege Park, for $19,048; Green- 
brier Knolls to M & L Com 
struction Co., Hyattsville, for 
$15,779, and Carroll Knolls to 
Ventresca Bros. Construction 
Inc., Silver Spring, for 


yesterday for his service 
rural youth. 


tin came true last 
w 


for $8734; 
Cairn terr., Massach 
nue Forest, to Taylor 
tion Co. Bethesda, 
Kensington Heights, to Taylor own family 
Construction Co., for $2792, and 
Cc to Lopez Construc- youth.” 
ne., Edmonston, for Martin's sward 


‘resthaven, 
tion Co, I | 
$2609. \four presented et the 


~ 


s 


| 4-H Honors Negro County Agent 


While members of his family look on, Louis H. Martin, 
Maryland's first Negre County Agent, displays a citation 
he received yesterday from the 4-H Clubs of the Southern 

From right, Yvonne Dashiell, 3; Clarence Dashiell, 
5; Clarell Dashiell, 6, all grandchildren; Irene, his wife; Con- 
inna Miltem, 12, a grandchild; Thelma Martin, daughter.in- | 


Maryland's first Negro versity. 
County Agent, who battled qovinern 
through a lifetime to educate 
his 12 children, was honored 
to Martin wen 


The dream of Louis H. Mar- Hampton Institute, Hampton, nois and from Michigan State 
spring Va., with only a bride, a Model to Elizabeth City State Teach- first 
he saw his llth child T Ford and an ambition. It had ers College in North Carolina. Agent, 
Knolls to V. Nacea- walk with a college graduating been a tough fight to get that 
class. He was cited yesterday by far. He had spent 12 years in here 
' usetst. Ave. the 4H Club of the Southern 
ion “for the practical dem- 
for $2793. onstration he .gave through his later, though, 
im the successful his ambition was to 
and educating ofchildren. Last 


was one of 


| 
7 


' 


“4 H 


t.. 


Jim McNamare. Steff Photographer 
law; Justelma Briggs, daughter; Lourene Martin, daughter, 
Elbert Martin, son; Elois Martin, 15, grandchild; Oswald 
Martin, son, and Charles Briggs, son-in-law. The award was 
presented at the close of the ninth annual Regional 4-H 
Club camp. 


| 


the 9th Annual Regional 4H bition was fulfilled. Eleven of. The others cited by the 4H 
Club camp at Howerd Uni- his 12 children held college de- Clubs were: 
Delegates from 17 ¢rees. The other had chosen 


states participated not to. 


The whose 


im the ceremony. il, 


Shor® of Mar¢iand in 1916 from schools from Columbia to Illi- ‘mterest in all youth...” 


Negro 


ther honored for his 38 years for 40 years.” 


an 
®Dr. Lawrence A. Davis 


orphanage. 
The toughest fight came as a County Agent. With them 
because 


_credit, now live in retirement he gives to boys and girls every 


Grant 
near where as a young college 
| "| ministrator WS ; 


parts of the legislative program 
' 


of responsible mem- — 


®* Mrs. Phyllis Stancil O’Kel- 
ly, superintendent of the Jane Indians at Little Falls. 
ages now Porter Barrett School for Girls, 
to the Eastern range from 22 to 36, attended Peakes, Va. “for her genuine) slides will be projected on a 


°*M. M. Hubert, Mississippi's: 
Demonstration will be a photograph of the 
“for his untiring efforts actual site where the historic 
Four of the children were Of organizing and promoting incident took . place. 

esterday to see their fa- 4H Club work in Mississippi 


a part of came five of his 17 grandchil- president of Arkansas A. M. & rege ine prints and slides 
sets. 


educate his dren. Martin and his wife, Irene \. College at Pine Bluff, Ark., made 
spring, the te whom he gives much of the since 1937, “for the inspiration Other scenes include the 


ad- Robert 
| Mary 


*—Recaptured 


Pair Indicted 

In Murder and 
Theft Cases Were 
Under Observation 


prisoners 
cused of murder, the other 
of staging more than 75 


housebreakings, escaped 


Youth Caught 


3 Escape 
Hospital 
Via Tunnel 


a ee 


Police early today were 


searching for two of three D.C. °. 
General Hospital patients who P14! early yesterday. Both 


escaped through a tunnel under\"eT® back im cistiedy by 
the East Building after over acca. 


powering = lone guard on # john” White 21. of F 


ward usually used to confine\burg Wa. the 
alcoholics. suspect, broke bis ankle when 
It was-the second escape in he fell 15 feet from a rope made 


r. 


“Lite 


less than 24 hours. 

One of the fugitives, a 15-' 
yearold boy being held for, 
mental observation, was picked 
up in the 1300 block of A at 
se. shortly after the break was 
staged at 10:50 p. m. 

Police identified the two 
men still at large as David 
Saunders, 34, of 642 E «st. se.| 
and Thomas Hawkins, 31. 4104 
Falls Terrace se. Saunders was 

ing held for mental observa 
tion, while Hawkins was under 


treatment for he 
police reposted. addition, © bed sheets. He fel 


Hospital authorities to] 4 ©f00 trench briow the second 


| police the trio seized the un. 800T window of the ward 


larmed guard, George Trahe The other prisoner, Wi Ar 
65, of 2800 16th SL ne. tied tik. 37, listed at 1663 Mentelio 


him up with his suspenders and #*¢. "*.. ¥#* charged wrth hom: 


bound him to a chair with his “@e last May 

belt. , Both men were committed te 
| Dr. Phillip A. Stebbing. hos. ‘»e Sospital for mental obarr- 
pital superintendent. said that Y@U0n by District Court erder 
because of an “overflow” there Dr. Philip A. Stebbing, hospital 
were about 40 patients in the *UPeTimtendent, said. Artis: was 
second-floor ward. He said the !>dicted May 22, White on June 
escapees used the guard's keys ¥ 
to open doors leading to con- Police apprehended W hite 
necting tunnels under the East “Umkering with a car af 19% st 
Building. and Pennsylvania ave. 

They said White was éubbed 


White 
... back ip costedr 


TvT? fh 3 


tracted attendants io 
herne’s aid, police reported. 


VFW Council 


* 2 4 Artis, who was charged with 
Bac ks McKeon shooting to death his gir! friend “ 
Juanita ler ] 
DALLAS, Tex., Aug. 12 & ne weniger a te = 
The National Council of the der a bed at $21 T?th = ne Pe 
Veterans of Foreign Wars to- lice «aid they received a tip be 
day asked the Navy and Marine was there 
review board to show leniency Dr. Stebbing «eid ‘the pal 
toward Marine Staff Sgt. Mat- pried off a “specially desiened 
thew McKeon, convicted of neg- safety screen” on the inside of 
ligent homicide after six of his their bedroom window 
‘men died on a night march into There were two guards om 
South Carolina swamps. the locked ward. Stebtnung 
The resolution passed by the They discovered 
ouncil will be placed before ®>out 1-30 a. m. 
ithe full convention of the VFW, gg 
w official! ts under 
Monday. — wad were = 
Vice President Richard WM. ame 
Nixon will address one of the harged with 
early sessions. United Nations 
Delegate Henry Cabot Lodge 
will be a featured speaker Mon- 
day night, and Secretary of De- 
fense Charlies Wilson will ad. 
— the encampment Wednes 
ay. 


239 
38, both of 
and Ted Bynum, 31. 
1255 Penn st. ne. 
The two men were jailed i= 
the Central Cell Werk Wire 


Committee contends Butler dp- 
posed “major parts” of the 
President's legislative program 

Sothoron charged Butler was 
,On Opposite sides of the fence 
io the Natural Gas Bill, a 
| 1952 multi-billion dollar foreign 
aid bill, the Bricker Amend- 
ment issue and a 1954 recipro- 
cal trade measure. 

The Prince Georges Demo- 
crat also noted Butler had sup- 
ported the late Sen. Robert A 
Taft (R-Ohio) in 1952 and had 
jvoted against censure of Sen. 
‘Joseph R. McCarthy (R-Wis.) 
when several “responsible Re- 
publican Senators” sided with 
Democratic Senators in sup- 
|porting the censure 

Sothoron'’s statement said it 
would be “more logical” for 
Mr. Eisenhower to indorse 
‘Butler's Democratic opponent, 
‘Millard Tydings, “because Tyd- 
|ings at least is a question mark, 
‘whereas Butler's position—di- 
rectly beside Senator McCarthy 
\_—is unequivocal.” ) 


. 


Milestones of Arlington 
To Be Shown in Pageant 


| The third annual pageant beauty of 1899. The pageant 
portraying historica) highlights “#5 written by Eien Ander 
of Arlington County will be prey". ane Pryuuces =e 
sented Thursday and Friday in ; ’ 
the County's Lubber Run Park ar on _-- 
‘amphitheater. 

| Both performances will be- 
gin at 8:30 p. m. on the outdoor 
stage. The show is sponsored 
by the County Recreation De- 
partment and there will be no 
admission charge. 

The cast, all members of the 
Children’s Theater of Ariing- 
ton, will be directed by Mrs 
jirene Fox. 
| This year’s pageant will em- 
brace 16 incidénts in the history 
of the county, gery Mey 
1608 with the meeting of Capt. 
John Smith and the Nescotin 


ni 


| Instead of using elaborate | 
‘sets for each - scene 


background screen. 
Whenever possible the slide 


Where the site has changed 
miniature sets were 


old photo 


jwith time, 
reproduced from 


1 


- famous Clay-Randoiph 
. Fy. Lee's marriage 
Custis and 


A M. On a pee 
jal. a ame -¥ ANTELS cme - 
i) 
Trant st-ow.. wife of John ' seate. 
mother Pauline D. Wycehe John 
R r. and srandmo 
Michele Dianne Wrehe. Friends mar 
call at the Prasier Puneral Home. 


Prayer for Today 


O God, our refuge and 
strength, a present help 
in time of trouble, grant us 
grace to be a tower of 
strength to someone else to- 
day. Where trouble abounds, 
may we bring help. May Thy” 
Divine Presence shine 
through ws to family, 
friends, and strangers. Turn 
our thoughts much to Thee, 
often to others, little to self; 
in Jesus name. Amen. 
—Russell 5S. Hutchison, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. minister, 
First United Presbyterian 
ype of Wilkinsburg. 


vrieht 1954 be the Division 
on ristian uration Nationa) 
pounss Py the 


| DANIELS, EDN 


aura H. Martin 


Dies After Fire 


Laura Hatch Martin. 72. of; 
14460 Foxhall rd. aw. died Seat-) 
urday in Damariscotta, Me. of) 
injuries and burns she suffered) 

when escaping 
from her blaez 
ing summer 
co‘taze 

Mrs. Martin. 
wife of the late 
Col. Lawrence 
Martin. noted 
geographer and 
former chief of 
the map div 
sion of the Li 


m 
Martin's Catholic 
' Taterment Moun Olivet 


Cemetery. 


DI BELLA. PRANCESCA 
August 11, 1956. 
3501 Hishwood wR. -. FRANC 

DI BELLA beloved mother of 
~ pa ee and «randmother) 
of Josep Chirteleison and Jane 

Purbush pies from the Simmons« 

Bros. Funeral Home. 1661 Good 

rd , = — August 

30 St. Fre 
Xavier ‘catholic “Chureh. where mae 
will be offered at 8 a. mm or the 
repose of her soul. Rosary will he! 
maid Monday night. Aucust 13. at 
8:30. Interment Mount livel. Ceme- NEFLY GRACE On Saturday. 
ess GWACE ANNA We emuy of 4628 Brandy: 

_ y- 


,@ . 
WILLIAM Apres ®. 19 Neely Ros of. 
Classes N sy = sister ws 
of Geo orth. Ka 
Wilmington Frien@e may call at - Lacemie. 
Gawiers Chapel. 17356 Pennsvivania| MeKittricy . 
ave. mw. ‘courtees parking Mar call Geawler's 
Pennervivaenta ave 
Parking opportte: efter 7 © r) 
Cay. Ausust 1) Services will be held 
in the Metropolitan Memorial Meth- 
odist Chaerch. 
ry age y aves. oe. 
‘da M4. at3np m= Interment 
«28 PEARSON. THOMA Fr. 
GAL- Saturdar ay il 
residence. Indian Head 
and father of § ved 
nor 


ay 
Relatives anc f 
On Set Saturday. Fort Lincoin 


ne.. 


ee ee - ee ee 


Active in Church 


M rs. Carroll 
Dies: Native 
Of District 


Julte Carroll, & = District 
native and long active im the 
affairs of St. Jaseph's Catholic : 
Cherch. died yesterday of a _— 
heart silment at [She heat 
lniversity Heepital She had 
heen il a week 

Mrs. Carroll attended Visita 

ve Convent and Business High 


’. : } 
Interment ort Pe 


ANNA. 
" 
urches of Christ ; 


Card of Thanks 


aoceNTaab JACK. The family of the 
late J ROSENTHAL wishes to 
Hh ‘in acknowledgement of and! 
gratitude for the messages of sym- 
and condolences expressed by) 
friende reletives. neighbors and busi- 
nese asceociate 


MRS. MOLLIE 8. ROSENTHAL 
AND FAMILY. 


; Pp 
Interment ona) eme 
tery Tn )ieuw of flowers = family 

tributions be sent: to the 
ancer 


requests 
Amersesa Society tio 18th 


GALLAGHER. | wi Liam 2. 
: » 


’ 


/ Stall Photos 


in Memoriam 


weer MARY 


: ta 
on Tuesday. August 14. at 10 ~* 
. + St. Pauls Cemetery 
Point. Md 


ture she holds), looks in her mirror and re- 
members the 1926 contest. 


Mee. Carl EF. Scherrer of 613 Slice ave. 
Silver Spring (third from left in the pic- 


— 
Piner 
si Ye DAVID epee. 


aah 
She hed waeced a week-long 


battle for her life fallewing the In Jnemors 


Ay- 
& ana s Goa Church. 
nd Yum at 


sconsin ave 
requiem mace will “he etered 


ef A ——' 


age 


School. She lived at 458 Nich 
ower =. ae 
Survivors 
Rernard ; JOR P «fair rd 
Rethesda. 2 corporal m the 
Vetrooolitan Police Depart 
men? and George D.. 
Quinweed st Langie. 
Vd three daughters 


inciede ten sons 


Misses Dorothy A. and Patricia - 


VW. Carroll. = whom she 
liwed. and Beatrice Borger. 6924 
Pairfax rd. Bethesda. a Sroth 
er. Daniel Lix. 835 Fairview 
ave. Hvatteville. and 12 grand 


in 


masse will be said 
Wednesday at St. Jo 

24 and © sts Burial 
Veunt Olrwet Ceme 
-_ay after 
the James T Rvan 
317 Pennsy!wania 


ne 
“mends< =<)? 
> hi 
THe 


Carl Teacher 
From Virginia: 


Dies of Polio 


cia) 
_—_ 


Patricia D. Clark. of 
zshington, who taught science 
and mathematics at McLean 
(va) High School, died of 
bulbar polic 
Friday im Ee 

gene. Ore. 
where 
Tara, (on 

witht 
teacher 
hospita! 
had heen 

a week 
Mies €C ark 
was graduated 
2 year ago im 
lune from Mount St. Agnes 
College in Baltimore. She had 
won a 4-year scholarship to the 
crOliege when she was at Trin- 
fty High School in Washingtor 
She lived with ber family on 
Cedar lane sear Falls Church 
Miss Clark was chairman of 
fhe liturgy commission of the 
National Federation of Catholic 
Colleges of America and a 
member of St. Leos Church in 

Fairfax 

Resides ber father. Douglas 
4 Clark. 2 Washington lawyer. 
end her mother. Catherine F 
Clark. she is survived by her 
grandfather. F. Alonzo Clark. 
Wilsen. Va: a bother. Denni«x 
Clark, of the home address. and 
6 sister. Wre Albert (. Lowe 
Jr. of 117 N. Wayne st.. Ariing 


GW Singers 
Trip Delayed 
By ‘Betsy’ 


4 fving visit to Kindley Air 
Force Base and the U. S. Naval 
Base in Bermuda bv the George 
Washington University Travel- 
fee Troubadours was postponed 
from yesterday te teday be- 
cause of hurricane warning: 

The 34-member croup was to 
leave Andrews Air Force Base 
est neon westerday to entertain 
servicemen bat the Air Force 
Gecided to delay the takeoff 
opti! il a m. teday. A hurr 
tane is rumbling near Puerto 

ro 

The mixed chorus is to spend 
S week in Bermuda 

Since fs organization 
3959. the chorus has made an- 
Geel summer and Christmas 
Seurs of United States basts in 
fhe North Atlantic and Pacific 

* The group ts directed 
Rebert H. Harmon. 3133 
Conmnetticut ave. nu 

Members of the group de- 

parting today include 


wary A. ___" —_ J 


née 
another 
She 
twee 
n ine 


fire which 


arau ted 


>. 
under almost 


“ae a< 


swept her coastal 
Maine cottage about 4 a. m. on 
Sug 5 
Trapped flames« 
second fieor bhedraeom. Mr« 
climbed ecross the 
reof and sim about 
feet down a drain pipe before 
falling to the ground 
Although she suffered 
broken ankles and severe burns 
on her body. Mrs Martin 
about 2 feet te a 
corner of the burning cottage. 
where she was found by volun- 
leer firemen 
Her sister 
Ro ton 
rca Brown 
_ ame 62S 
suffered minor bur 
smoke :nha)ation 
Left June 15 
Wire. Martin. whose hushand 
died here If months age. had 
left Washington on June 15 to 
spend and summer in Maine 
A native of (Chicago ahe 
head made her home in Wash 
— smce her marriage mn 
She had met husbend-to 
be a before World War |! 
disastrous circum 
stances while beth were on 2 
geological field trip to study 
Alaskan glaciers 
Their ship was stuck for 
several hours on an uncharted 
» bay which Mrs 
Martm often iaughiingly re 
called was supposed to have 
mapped byw her husband 
he was prefessoer at the 
Wi<scortcr. 
graduate the 
earned her masters and doc 
tor degrees at the University 
of Chicago She attended 
seven college- and unrversities 
ac 8 student or teacher. in 
cluding Bryn Mawr. Wellesiey. 
Smith. Barnard and the Uni 
versity of Oregon. 
Assested Hux<band 
After her marriage. she as 
sisted her husband when he 
was geographer at the Insti 
tute of Politics. Williamstown, 
Mass. She conducted «4 sym 
posium there on the s0¥ 
ereignty of the polar regions 
in the summer of I 
Some of Mrs. Martin's most 
vivid memories were of World 
War |. She volunteered: with 
the YMCA and sailed for 
France in June. 1918. afier ob 
taiming a three-vear leave from 
her teaching post at Smith 
College 
She arrived in Pari at the 
time the famed “taxicalh army” 
was holding back the enemy at 
the Marne and underwent sev 
eral bombings while serving in 
Paris 
After coming to Washington. 
Mrs. Martin became keenly in 
terested in local civic affairs 
and parent-teacher association 
work She was named president 
of the Twentieth Century Club 
in 1940 and was a member of 
the Georgetown Garden Ciab 
She also was active in the So 
ciety of Women Geographers 
the Washington Club and the 
Eistophes Club. a small group 
of women scienirsts 
She is survived by three 
daughters. Helen F. Martin of 
the Foxhal!l rd..adddress. Mrs 
Radford Mobiey. Chicago. and 
Mrs. Rebert C. Storey, Boston 
and twe sisters. Grace Hatch 
Childs and Alice Hatch Nelson 
Boston. Funeral arrangements 
have not been completed. 


hy i her 


Mrs. James Ne! 
and personal maid 
453) 4ist st 
fied the blaze 
as and from 


Sal 


; ” 


n 
when 
L niwersst 

‘ \ assar 


y of 


> 


David Perry 
Dies, Realty 
Developer 


David Rouse Perry. 8. 
tired real estate developer in 
the south and southwest United 
States, died Friday at Leiand 
Memorial Hospital after a long 
illness 

Mr. Perry had lived in Wash 
ington from 1939. when he re- 


re 


Ber tired. te 1948. when. he moved 
: @ to Gambrilis, Md 


ee 
= tone singing. he also played the - 


- 


Evelyn Bryley Gordon, 77, 
widow of District Court Judge 
Pevton Gordon who Gied in 
1946. died Saturday night at 
ber home. 2009 Wyoming are. 
aw. of a heart ailment. 

Mfrs. Gordon was the daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. William 
‘Brviey and was born ip Cam- 
“midge. Md. She lived im the 
— since her marriage in 


atte ts Survived by her doughs 


Born in Saratoga Spring: 
N. ¥.. he was a member of a 
- popular college quartet which 
toured several states, and aise 


Three Beauty Contenders M. Costello, 


[Of 1926 Plan Reunion Loudoun 


of the 1926 bathing had a different name for the Farmer, Dead 


Another 
beauties pictured in The Wash- 
ington Post and Times Herald 
Wednesday turned up yester 
day with still another version 
. 
of what the contest was shout 

Mrs. Carl EF. Scherrer of 613 
Slice ave. Silver Soring (third 
from left im the 1926 picture 
said the contest was for “Miss 
DC. Pael” 

Twn other contestant« in the 
oe of 10 unidentified hath 
heautie<c identified them 
Friday. but they each 


meet 
> 

: ind 
re 
cel re 


Gen. Roland Walsh’s 


Notable Career Ends 


Roland 


‘ 
ormer 


Brig Gen Walsh 
USA ret H4 com 
manding general of the Phila 
deiphia Quartermaster Depot 
and staff mem 
ber of the 
United States 
Soldiers Home 
here, died yes 
terday at Wal 
ter Reed Hos 
p> ittal. He 
retired in 
1946 because of 
cancer. 

Gen Walsh. 
a native of 
Ch arlie ston, 
S. C.. was graduated from The 
Citadel in 1912, and received 
his commission in 1913. He 
served om the Mexican border 
and in the Philippines before 
Wortd War I. and went to 
France during the war in com 
mand of the 7th Machine Gun 
Battalion, 3d Division 
_ He commanded that battalion 
im the battles of Saint Mihiel. 
the Arfonne. the Aisne-Marne. 
Chateau Thierry and the 
Champagne-Marne. 

After the war he transferred 
te the Quartermaster Corps, 
where he remained until his 
retirement 

He served two hitches at the 
Office of the Quartermaster 
General here. from 1927 to 1930 
in the water transportation di 
vision, and from 1936 to 1940 
im the War Plans Department 
He also was graduated from 
the War College here in 1931. 

He was commanding officer 
of the Hawaiian Quartermaster 
Depot at Ft. Armstrong in 1941 
when Peart Harbor Was 
bombed. and saw his men drop 
their work and man machine 
guns against low-flying planes 
during the attack. 

Besides the War College. he 
was a graduate of the Quarter- 


Today's 


Events 


Fwents scheduled for today 
asterisks denote events open 
to public): 


Gen. Walsh 


MEETING 
Sis 10th at 


omee Coun - 
ew 
a ef Southern 
ay. Ss co m@. Prince Georges 
Ceenty Courthecuse. Upver Maribore 
LISNCREON 
Executive Aseociation 


Hete. Washington 
SPECTAL. EVENTS 
t cruise. sponsored by Wash 
=~ Umiem Late. Counc 8. > 
—\ st. wharves 

*Gevare Cancing. Themsen Recreation 
a - sos 

rg ae Sixt 7’ Club for these 60 

2 A, m. Mount Piess- 


-- 


Knights of 
sis rf 
tnter-Community Coun 


West rece 
72s S 

a . 
ad 


7 
_ 


sb Chere. ' roan. So =. Thom- 


som Center 
w Dasketball taurn 
| plarygreundc 


amen’. 
16th end Le- 


CONVE 
Grand Tuilted Order of Odd Pellowes 
Verment Avense Baptist Church 
threugkh Thersdays ; 


August ’ 
Where the gov and the blue fer each 
mornin 
Are hidden “ttl time te aove 
And siory ts erewn for each ‘conan 
Tll find you. . Mother dear 
GEORGE. EUGENE AND HOWARD. 


Ment Holy Cross 
Pa 


others. Panediene 


GALLAGHER. WILLiaw P Members eo! 
pe Holy Name 


Pumphrey Punera! 


usband o 
mbera 


on Tuesday 
yo 


August 
14. at & Me m Interment vate 


of 
Piorence Hare He also is survived bs 


5 


contest = 
Mrs. Samuel Simon of 1210 LEESBURG, Ya. Aug. 12 


Tewkesbury pl. nw., “yo (Special)—Marion Bernard Cos- 
it “Miss Scapa Flow,” Mrs. Gil-\:,15 g9 Loudoun County. 
bert G. LaGorce, 4400 47th st.) ee 4 
nw.. said she was sure it was a armer, teacner an rmer 
Miss Washington” contest. member of the school 
The three women. who have died today of a heart ailment 
not seen each other since their in Loudoun County Hospital 
bathing-beauty days in what- after an illness of several 
ever contest it was, are plan- vaemtinn 
ning a reunion. They said they 
honed any of the seven others Born 
still Waachington will be Mr. Costello lived from 1909 to 
able to join them 1954 on his 300-acre farm, Rose 
in Lueketts community 


near Upperville, Va.. 


7. 


_— —_——— —————- '-«sCTFIO Nt, 


After selling the farm, he lived BOwYER. 


in Leesburg 
Mr. Costello was the son of 
Thomas H. and Dinah Fleming 
Costello. He attended Loudoun 
County schools, the College of 
| William and Mary and the Uni- 
master School. and the Infan versity of Virginia. 
try School. His last command) A teacher for 24 years, Mr 
post before his retirement was Costello held posts at Moun- 
at Philadelphia ate tain Gap and Limestone ele-| 
He returned to Washington mentary schools, and Aldie 


when he retired. and from 1947 
to 1952 was on the staff of the and Hillsboro high schools.' 


Soldiers Home here. He lived, Three years after retiring in 
at 3901 Connecticut ave. nw 1925 he became a member of} 
He is survived by his wife, the Loudoun County school 


the former Dorothy Johnson, o 
Washington: a daughter, Mrs board, a position he held un- 
til about 1943. ; 


William T. Glidden, of Man- 
chester. Mass.: three sisters. Mr. Costello began teaching) 
Mrs. Edward Gaffney of in Sunday school when he was 
Charleston. Mrs. John Gaffney|19 and taught continuously un-| 
of San Diego, and Mrs. James til he was 72. He was a mem-| 
B. Ford of Chicago; and two ber of Christ Episcopal Church, 
grandchildren, William T. Glid- Lucketts. He also belonged to) 
den Jr. and Roland W. Glidden.|the Leesburg Masonic lodge. 
Graveside services will be me. is Pipe? oad by ~ he vs 
held at 1 p. m. Tuesday at Ar argare ranklin ostelio; 
lington Cemetery. In leu of two brothers, J. Wilbur, Lees-| 
flowers contributions may be ye and Virgil M., 1220 V) 
made to the Cancer Detection * 
Clinie at Garfield Memorial | 


‘Funeral services will be setal 
Hospital. : 


setae Episcopal Church, Lees- 
burg. The Rev. Frank H. Moss) 


Jr. will officiate. Burial will! 
! be will be in Union Cemetery. | 


R. C. Wells, 
pent Life 


In Fairfax 


Godfrey D. Homan 


Godfrey D. Homan, 52, 
printer for the Washington 
Post for 26 years, died of a 
heart attack yesterday in his 
home at 1420 Rhode Island ave 
nw S 

Mr. Homan had an attack a, 
year ago, but had returned ft 
work after three months’ iil. 
ness. He worked Saturday, wr 
left early because he was | 
feeling well. Robert C. Wells. 8&5. =| & 

Mr. Homan began his career Vienna, Va.. a life-long resi- 
in his native Elizabeth City, dent of Fairfax County, died'© 
N. C.. with the Elizabeth City Saturday in Arlington Hospital 
Advance. agg he ey to after an illness of two weeks. 
Washington and worked on 
the United States Daily before fe. ——— ee odleg aay at 
coming to The Post in 1930. He any years before he retired in| 
was a member of Columbia'i94; He lived with his son,| 
Typographical Union No. 101. (Robert G. Wells, in Viennc. 

He is survived by his wife.) jae is survived by his wife,| 
Dorothy; two brothers, Law- Nancy C. Wells: three daugh- 
rence P. Homan of 218 5th st ters. Mrs. Louis J. 
ne. and Ellsworth D. Homan of ,..4 Mrs. Frank Goroum, both 
2914 © st. se., and a sister, Mrs. 4¢ washington, and Mrs. Wil- 
Norman Vaughn of Richmond. jjam B. Sloan, of Pittsburgh: 
two sons, Arvine A. Wells, of 
Fairfax, and Robert G. Wells,| 
of Vienna; a sister, Emma) 


Sylvania to Open 
’ Lightfoot, of Silver Spring; two) 
brothers, Clayborn and Samuel) 


Alexandria Office , both of Fairfax; six 


NEW YORK, Aug. 12—A dis-\ grandchildren and five great 
trict office to handle direct grandchildren. 
sales of Sylvania television, Pyneral services will be held| 
radio and high fidelity phono-|st 2 p. m. Tuesday at Baker 
graphs to dealers in the Wash- snd Sons Funeral Home. ! 
ington area will be opened wanassas, with burial in Manas-| 
Monday, it was announced to- sas Cemetery. 
day by Robert L. Shaw, presi- 


anes. eee NITA. On Pridar 


board, sri... 
956 


BREIGHNER, Iv .* I. JR. On Saturday. 
1956, Seas 


BULLOCK, COL 


“xueust trae ° seek 


a. m. Wednesday at St.\ctarx, PATRICIA D. On Friday, Au- 


CLARKE, 
I 19 


Paulette. COSTELLO, MARION ery On 
Sunday 


CUKELA. MINNIE &. On Prideg.. Ae- 


© 7557 Wisconsin ave 

thesda. Md. on Monday 

Bird usust 13. at @ op mm. for 
recitation of-the rosary for William 4. 
Galla es 


other re) pone 


August) pachige jot opposite). Notice 


ARTIN A. COOK. passions | 
. at the Bethesda Naval. Hos- 
+h aARY NITA ARPS of 2617 | JERRY CONNOLLY. Secretary 
dee ra. Arlington. Va beloved GIANCOLL 
wite of Mervin W. Arps. captain. USN August 132. 
etired; mother of Jaqueline N. and! G 
Mervin W. Arps Jr. ne. rine! 
and sister of Mra. Leo Olancoit. Patricia Ann 
Mrs. Harold Batterson rv r of Peter Gian- 
lees and interment aheate. Please! coll. Notice of services later 


omit lowers 
mit filo GRAHAM, MARGARET FE. On Saturday ! 
956. 


August 
the late ROTHWELL... 
remem: aunt of Net 
ae Wis and 
or ef Philadelphia. Pa | 
he Dea! 


of serv! w - 


‘ROPGERS. MARY 
GEORGE On Sunday 

1956. at er ay Hospital. | 
oS GIAN 7 yant 


3 y ms a 
On Friday. Aw ‘Interment Richards ville. Va 
RICBARD Rn. On Satur- 


bast r 
the Kensington 


ust 10 
ens 
Nursing 
YF 
Kensington 


im mothe 
OG. Bell and Mrs. Nellie. Bel! Brown of| 
Kensington. Md_ «ister of Mre. Mayme 
Embrey of Alexandria. Va. Cham 
Charlies Hoge 
gran imother 
Accok eek Mad 
Funeral 
were services yt ll be held on \ OF wa 
13 9.45 nterment 
Ce Hill Cemetery 


EDNA CARR. On Saturday 

SDWA CARR ROW Ae 09 '9428, Con- | Notice of funeraf later. 
ut wife of the late flowers 

mother of Jesse GRIFFITH. RAC we ARELE. On fun- 

Ernestine wy yA 1956 


the residence | 
may call at the Lee FPunera! 
, oe Dg ave | 
onde 


y. where 
held Tuesday. Aus 
Interment 


ay. gus ‘m 
ment iSence Mill ‘Cameos 


7, 


D. C. and Ida Rothwell of Roth 
ford. WN rot 


Bundayr r 
Payne end Robert 
$ 


residence 
LIAM 


services 
veed August 14 
. e or Interment Cedar Hill Cemeterr 
rother of mits - SERRA. THERESA (mee Fesetene). On 
f Pittsbureh. Pe | Thursday. August $ 1996. et her resi. 
oy onmrit) . . 


ar 
mington son 

William #H Grohem. 
th T raha ° 


r 
wi) ° 
30 


be 


ggrvices, 
Dp. m. 


private 


SHERMAN. CYRUS W On 
August il. = of 3% 
beloved 


N 
Seerman aod “aries 

Scie and brother of Winifr 
Elizabeth Sherma of Fr 


11 at Mana 
BREIGHNER JR. of 2112 N 
Oakland st.. Arlington. Va. beloved 
husband of Margaret Breighmer and 
father of Karen Lynne and Sharon 
Lee Breighner. He 
By ae * parents. Mr 
inmer; a brother. 
a ee and a sister. Mre. Patay 
ter. all of Gettysbure. Pa 
may call at the Ives Funeral) 
2847 Arlington 
will 


Louden Park Ceme- 
Me 


Ray Kenneth 


y ~~ SIMMONS, EARLE M. Sudd 
urdey. A i}. 

en Ma 

RLE 

nd of Mea 
of Carol 
Mra tds 


: m 
Ipterment Parkiawn Ceme-' 


HAGGERTY, JON be AS On (Ret) 
we 


= formerly @ of Chase 
Rocked "ot Juan- 
i and father of Capt 
pe lil. Rebert G 
Neathen Cc ‘ 
Mrs 
th ines Co Punere Home. 7901 
dMarie hanes Remains at Cham- La sneral Tater actiities). Ne- 
1400 Chapin et nere 
+e — 


2.8 fune 
Ausust 4 «ot STOK mepsmay, OP 
38 «a. 1956 - 


Mass. urdays ust ae 
Meret, a™ at 10 «. ey ox HARTMAN STOKY 
Arlington National Cemetery. 


em. Interment Evergreen Cemetery ay, 
Gettyaburs, Pa sacilitess) 
PRANe WELsn 
unday. August 
pane Hospitel, COT 4 NK 
Manor. 

husband 

aveside services 


by H 


Massachusetts ave. se. nervy 
will be held on Monday, Aucust~43 
at 12 noon. Interment Addisom Chapel Katherin 

Semete nd ie 

Friends may call at ‘Gawiers “Ronin 
nayivenia ave (courtesy 

opposite). Notice of services 


On 


10. 1966. ter a short aan 
Sacred Heart Hoepital. Pape 
Ore. PATRICIA D. CLARE of C 


Lane. ngerrispend. Va. 
° 


gust 
+ 


Thurs- 


. and Dennis Clark of tf steric 
Puneral arrangements ili 
omnannesd later by Hreones Funeral 
Home 


GRACE. On Friday. 4s ust call the 6_H 
at ; day Home ater $. m.. on Satur- 
ay Shove ee 
home. 2901 ath “et a &, ay. 
August 13. at 1 BD. m (parkine ge, fact ' 
ities}. Entombment Cedar Hill : 
ry 


WILLIAM PRESTON. 


Cemetery. Oakton. ¥ 
VAN KINSBERGEN. BOSA « 


ei New ark Citys s om eit, Vis 


Joseph Hn 
at ~ lee mepes, 
assa- ay. Aus 


pm nte 
on Tuesday. August i4 at 


. 
. RONALD a oat Bethany Tuesday. August 14. at 2 & mm 


ime facilities). Intermen 
Cemetery 


Md. a 
August . p.m rvices 
Hy “Carat Charen. The as :. at 
: 2:3 m. interment ow ceme- 
tienal Memo Gn 
—. the family 
tributions be sent 
emorial. care of Fi 
Church, Palle Church. 
ments by Arlington Funeral 


ace 7s. 

Due — 

cones. LAURA. On Saturday. August) 

, 1956, at the Whitehall Senitertum. WALKER. 
LAURA ONES. beloved mother ‘| Gay. 


J 
Mre Madeline Reed of Arlington. ve 
Priends may call at the 


August 12. at the) 
youseus County Meepital, Leesburg. | 
Va... ION BERNARD Ca. | 
beloved hus a4 of Margaret F. Cos- 


nd o 
" womne. 2847 Wilson bivd.. 
tello and arothner of yueh M Comet Lo | rein Goneeel saediene 
ure. “vs 


held on Monday. August 13. at 1:30 
pestina a tne “G Colonial Funeral Home| ©. m. Interment Bare Wis 
of Mu Reed. Leesbu Va. JONES, PAUL B. On Friday, August 10.) 
Bervices 56 AUL R./ 
et il «a 
Episcopa! 
Cemetery, Leesbure. 


a 

m 

Interment Unien 
Va. 


H ~~ 
| 

friends invited mnterment 
fon National Cemetery. 


A 
= rat terment “Artine. 


10 
ton National Comete David and me 


+ twe brothers, 
Bor! 


lwer one | \waass. ROSERT C 


dent of Sylvania Sales Corp. | 
Arthur Moyer has been ap-) 
pointed to manage the sales of- 
fice, which will be located at! 
existmg Sylvania facilities in| 
Alexandria, Va. Moyer former-|- 
ly was eastern district repre-| 
serttative for Gibson r- 
ation Co. and was in the appli- 
ance distribution field in Wash- 
ington. | 


oe ate | 


ave 


a "7 
eile Ae 


You can save $194 on « 3694 


nie 


National W eather Summary | 


Wesekhiegtes eed Sree: Tooter 


attended Peabody Conservatory “ 


in Baltimore. Besides his beari- 


harp and the organ 
About 1908. when he was con 


nected with the Vanadium Stee! _ *=s™ 
oe 
-eign countries to get 


he was sent to many for 


for the company’s product. 


Mr. Perry was a member of 


Bahai and a 324 degree Mason 
He belonged to the Methodist 
Church. 

He is survived by his wife. 
Lily A. Perry 
wil] be held at 8 p. m. Tuesday 
at Chambers funeral 
Riverdale. Md. Burial will be 
private. 


Crash Victim Dies 
BALTIMORE. A 12 #—A 

‘Myearold man 

2 miversity 


the 
victim of @ beoten 


‘rather —— 
ele Maxtmum 
mime 44 af 2 © 
evieed: Teodar—Partiy cieudcy enc 
sewers. BF right Tweeday 
-.g 


fale 


patents tr 


=oety 28 @ the eastern portion. 
Lewer Petemae end Chesapeake Bar: 


) funeral—with casket shown, use 
| | of hearse and limousine, and 
the famous 60 services for $500. 
There are no restrictions as to 
are, health or insurance status 
to take a Chambers prepey- 
ment plan. Be sensible, Call. 
Chambers. 


ehifting wie becoming 
mostiy southerly. 10 to 15 miles @n hour 
Mostly fair exeent fer chance of acai 
tered showers at night) Visibility mostly 
e00c 


Toecey vere 


Winds..Southeriy af 10 to 15 miles 
an nour 
Visibility Mostly eqe4. 

Temperature ene sear ago High. a0 
Geerers Tl degree 


y. 
a of Bagines 


Temperatures and rain for 24 hours eps 7 p.m. Sunday. 


Adi ere 

A 3eny 
services (a= 
SETVICES sivens 
AMar ec 
acnchorese 


.e2te 
Adance ery 


SUSVWSAVSS AMS AVSKelssE8Suzsse 


SSASVOASS 1COssse se WwAVeFestar 


3 


L. Pree. | 
74 
as 
7 


L. Pree. | a. 
i\Menteomers 
Montreal i) 
Nashville “8 
New Orleans 93 
New York Cy 89 
90 
102 
aa 


; 


@ Other complete funerals $95 to $2000 
© Complete grove opened and closed —$69 


In Case of Deoth Call CO. 5.0432 


3 P-9-45- 
hh ee 


\D FOR FUNERALS NOWDAYS 


Gall "Netiatsky Serv- 
< oe ldbers & 
2 st2iom 
vid Memorial Ger- 
ee mates 
_ Pamily requests. in Leu 
contributions be made {eo 
Pund 


On Friday 


ged 


TO KNOW HOW 
MANY PEOPLE PLAN 


Samuel Wells of Peirfax. Va. He 
te survived be 
rea 


gens 
ome ae 


pA? feet ‘nian 7 itane 


“a. 
S4th 


Times: ‘Berala 


ny rand aboit WOMEN 


MONDAY, 


AUGUST 13, 


1956 


_ 


Thayer's Tell-A-Scope 


Nancy Stevenson Shares Spotlight 


By Mary V. R. Thayer 

CHICAGO, Aug. 12—Adlai 
Stevenson's most valuable as- 
set is his 21-year-old daughter- 
in-law Nancy, wife of Adlai Jr. 


Nancy, who'll 
become a@ 
mama almost @ 
precisely on | 
election’ day, 
shook hands 
with thou- 7 
sands at the 
mammoth re- 
ception at 
which candi- 
date Steven- 
son honored Mrs. Thayer 
Mrs. Eleanor 

Roosevelt yesterday. Finally, 
when her husband coaxed 
her to take a breather, the 
petite, honey blonde com 
plained, “I'm overprotected.” 

Nancy, daughter of the 
Warwick Andersons of Louis- 
ville, Ky., has a warm, mag- 
netic personality. She met 
Adiai Jr.. a very serious 
young man, when he was do- 
ing his military stint at Fort 
Knox. It was practically love 
at first sight. “I remember 
when I began to like Adlai— 
it was at a frog-jigging party 
given by Wilson Wyatt.” 

Adiai served overseas for 
seven or eight months before 
they announced their engage- 
ment. They were married 
last summer just after her 
graduation from Smith Col- 
lege. The reception was a big 
one because her father is one 
of the outstanding advertis- 
Ing men in the South. 

The Stevensons honey- 
mooned by car with a tent- 
toting trailer. Nancy did the 
cooking. “It was wonderful 
practice,” she said, “because 
when anything turned out 
wrong, I just opened the flap 
and tossed it out.” This past 


winter, living in a three room 
apartment in Cambridge 
where Adlai is studying law, 
Nancy did the. cooking, too. 

“She has to fix up a great 
many leftovers,” remarks her 
husband, “she's wonderful at 
that. But her real specialty is 
chicken livers cooked in sour 
cream.” 

Nancy has become so adept 
at leftovers because the 
young Stevensons won't take 

money from either side of 
the family. They live on his 
GI grant and that's that. 
Their apartment is furnished 
with furniture lent by rela- 
tives. 

Next spring after ~ Adiai 
graduates, he'll practice law, 
of course, but it won't neces- 
sarily be in Chicago. The 
United States is his oyster, so 
to speak, and he'll hang his 
shingle wherever the work is 
most interesting. 

At Smith, Nancy headed 
the student body, majored in 
English, but “didn’t have 
time to figure out what I 
wanted to do” before she met 
Adiai. She's a real sport, but 
until she visited her father- 
in-law in Libertyville had 
never lived on a farm. “I'm 
crazy about it,” she said. 

She scarcely knows Chi- 
cago and the skyscrapers get 
her down. “They look as if 
they'd fall over on me.” 

What she likes best is peo- 
ple—and politics. As for Ad- 
lai Stevenson's first grand- 
child, she doesn’t care wheth- 
er it’s a boy or a girl. 

Nancy and Mrs. Timothy 
Ives, daughter in law of Mrs. 
Ernest Ives, Stevenson's sis- 
ter, made a nice pair. Mrs. 
Ives who's young, dark and 
pretty, is going to have a 
baby a week after Nancy. 
Both wore black PF se 0) 
frocks and carried identical 


< 
ee Oe ee 


ALL SMILES—Looking cheerful over the day's develop- 
ments in Chicago are Democratic presidential aspirant, 
Adiai Stevenson and members of his family. Reading en- 
couraging telegrams with Stevenson are his sons, Adlai Jr. 


Victorian nosegays given to 
them by Mrs. Kahn, who did 
the catering for the recep- 
tion. 


NANCY KEFAUVER made 
her first Chicago appearance 
at the Stevenson reception 
for Mrs. Roosevelt. Much 
thinner, lovely looking in a 
highneck black gown with 
a swirl jabot-collar of stiff- 
ened white lace, she con- 
fessed “it’s the only coverup 
dress I own.” 

Estes Kefauver’s admirers 
have queued outside Kefau- 
ver headquarters carrying 
signs reading, “Keep Estes.” 
Scores of them snarl the al- 
ready snaried traffic by car- 
rying white umbrellas print- 
ed with the slogan, “Keep 
Estes.” 


LOVE THAT LYNDON: 


MOST HECTIC SPOT in 
the Conrad Hilton is Suite 
2300 where “Love that Lyn- 
don” admirers are having 
themselves a folksy roundup. 

A coffee urn is kept bub- 
bling, delegates drop in to 
sign the register, Rep. Pat- 
man and other Lone Star 
legislators stand around gos- 
siping and the lobby overfiow 
is clotted with cattle men, 
oil men, and Texas promi- 
nents like former Ambassa- 
dor to Turkey George Me- 
Ghee. Everyone is lapelled 
with a red satin ribbon with 
“Love That Lyndon” spelled 
out in gold lettering. 

To keep him company dur- 
ing the fray which might 
shoot the Senate Majority 
Leader to top spot on the 
Democratic ticket, Lyndon 
Johnson has brought along 
most of his family. The head- 
quarters is run by his three 
sisters, all tall, lean and 
tanned. 

Mrs. Sam Johnson, the 
Senator’s mother, is having 


ee to Oe 
4 *, 
ed So tun a 
a 4 


herself a ball and spent most 
of today sightseeing and 
lunching with her daughter- 
inlaw Ladybird Johnson. The 
Johnson children have been 
left at home much to the dis- 
tress of Texan ladies in at- 
tendance. So far Ladybird 
Johnson hasn't given a 
press conference but she has 
promised to meet the press 
when and if her husband is 
propelled to prominence. 


TIME CHANGE: 

THE White House confer- 
ence on Suez, to which all 
congressional leaders were 
bidden, was changed from 
4 p.m. to noon so that “Mr. 
Sam” Rayburn wouldn't miss 
his Chicago party. Or so 
those hereabouts suspect. 
The affair honoring the 
Speaker was a Sunday five- 
to-seven reception given by 
New Jersey Delegate and 
Mrs. Charles Engelhard. 


IN THE BACKGROUND: 


BACK IN 1952 Adlai Ste- 
venson’s former wife, Ellen 
Borden Stevenson, broadcast 
some mean cracks about him. 
This time Mrs. Stevenson will 
make no headlines or even 
sub-headlines. Her three sons 
have her “under control” and 
she is rusticating in the near- 
by suburbs. However, her 
mother, Mrs. John Alden 
Carpenter, is returning from 
New England today. She's all 
for her ex-son-in-law and he 
reciprocates. 


LOOK ALIKES: 

LOOK ALIKES here are 
Philadelphia's Mayor Rich- 
ardson Dilworth and Mar- 
garet Truman’s bridegroom, 
Cliff Daniel, though the 
mayor is a good six inches 
taller. Both Dickie Dilworth 
and his wife show no ill ef- 


See THAYER, Page 22 


Associated Presse Photos 


(left), John Feld and Mrs. Adlai Stevenson Jr. Mrs. Steven- 
son is expecting a baby—the former Governor's first grand- 


child, around election dav. 


Evie Says He’s 


Not a Candidate 


Red Carpet Out for Symington 


By Mary V. R. Thayer 


CHICAGO, Aug. 12—"Stu- 
art is not a candidate and no 
campaign has been planned,” 
said Mrs. Stuart Symington. 

But Evie Symington was 
amazed as well as impressed 
with the. airport reception 

“A red carpet was run out 
to the plane steps. We rode 
into Chicago in a cavalcade 
of 35 cars led by three motor- 
cycle policemen with sirens 
screaming all the way. We 


sat in the front car with the 


top down. The wind was so 
strong I had to keep my eyes 
closed the whole way,” she 
said. 

Mr. Truman's indors ement 
of Governor Harriman and 
the possibility of Senator 
Symington claiming second 
or even first place on the 
Democratic ticket hadn't 
changed their convention 
plans. Their tickets were 
reserved weeks ago. The Sym- 
ingtons left Nantucket Fri 


JUDITH DREW 
~ JAMES WILKINSON IT! 


The United States Ambassa- 
dor to Bolivia and Mrs. Ger- 
ald Augustin Drew announce 
the engagement of their 
ee, Judith Mary, to 

Wilkinson 


James 
ie Se a 


Pennsylvania. He served 


we 


iingagements 


with the United States Air 
Force during World War I! 


Hopkins University in Silver 
Spring, Md. 


of New York City, and the 
_— Canada Canagata. Miss 


day, spent Saturday night in 
New York and plan to return 
to Nantucket by the week 
end. Their son Jimmy joined 
them here while Stuart Jr., 


his wife and two children . 
have remained in the Nan- 


tucket house. 
EVIE SYMINGTON, who 


is blond and beautiful, wore | 


a printed green and blue cot- 


ton dress on her arrival and | 
changed into what she calls | 


“a moke”™ hat. In other words | 


“T'll stick with 
the delegation,” she said. 
“and every morning I'll be 


THREE-WAY HANDSHAKE—Democratic presidential can- 
didates, Adlai Stevenson (left), Averell Harriman (right), 


and leader Lyndon Johnson met at a 


reception yesterday 


at the Conrad Hilton Hotel for Speaker Sam Rayburn, who 


Associated Press Wirepho'e 


will be the permanent chairman of the Democratic N# 


tional Convention. 


Alongside the Senate majority leader 


is his mother, Mrs. Sam Johnson. 


By 6000 Cheering Delegates and Tourists 


Adlai Nominated ‘Host With the Most’ 


CHICAGO, IL, Aug. 12 ® 
Adlai EF. Stevenson was nomi- 
nated as “The Host with the 
Most” by some 6000 cheering 
delegates and tourists who at- 
tended his reception for Mrs. 
Eleanor Roosevelt 

For more than two hours 
the ever-smiling candidate 
shook hands, whispered confi- 
dences, and even donned a 
Hawaiian lei at the mammoth 
affair. 

Party stalwart James A. 
Farley was among those 
packed into the blocks-long 


receiving line. Me greeted 
Stevenson with the crack, 
“I'm an wuninstructed dele- 
gate from New York.” 


SENATORS Albert Gore 
(D-Tenn.), Hubert H. Hum- 
phrey (D-Minn.), and John 
Kennedy (D- Mass.)—all men- 
tioned as vice presidential 
candidates, waited in line to 
pay their respects. soe did 
Frank Sinatra, who is sched. 
uled to sing at the opening of 
the Democratie Convention to- 
morrow. 

Sinatra said he thinks 
Stevenson is a “shooin.” 


At one point. the perspiring 
candidate, with police at. 
tempting to clear a path for 
him and Mrs. Roosevelt, broke 
away from the receiving line 
to welcome Stevenson fans 
whe had been unable to gei 
inside. They worked their 
way to the lobby of the Pru- 
dential Building plaza. site of 
the party, only to run into the 
Chicago's Swedish Glee Club. 
which was singing “Gotta Be, 
Gotta Be, Believe in Steven- 
son...” 


STEVENSON’S two sons. 
Adiai Jr. and John Fell, 


At Chicago Dinner 


1500 Women Cheer for Jenny 


By Maxine Cheshire 


CHICAGO, Aug. 12—A Iiot 
of Averell Harriman sup- 
porters fouhd themselves 
cheering Adiai Stevenson 
last might just because they 
felt so good they wanted to 
shout. 

The Illinois presidential 
hopeful picked a psychologi- 
cal moment to put in an ap- 
pearance before 1500 women 
Democrats. They had been 
having the time of their lives 
yesterday on an overlapping 
l2hour social timetable. By 
the time they wound up the 
day and had sat down to sup- 
per as guests of the women's 
division of the Chicago host 
committee, they were just 
looking for a reason to cele- 
brate. 

It was a nonpartisan get- 
together and both Harriman 
and Stevenson were expected 
to arrive on the scene. Harri- 
man didn’t show up, but Ste- 
venson did. He made a dra- 
matic entrance, bright white 
spot lights picked him out as 
he strode onto a balcony 
overlooking the tables. The 
orchestra boomed the peppy 
song, Illinois, and the women 
were on their feet, cheering 
wildly, before he raised his 
hand to wave. Even some 
opposition supporters could 
be seen around the room, ris- 
ing to the occasion. 

The program was tailor- 
made for a pre-convention 
pep rally. The script closely 
followed the performance giv- 


en in Washington, which sat- 
irized a political convention 
from the standpoint of what 
would happen if a woman 
were to be nominated for the 
presidency. There was the ex- 
citement of band music, bal- 
loting, nominations, and dem- 
onstrating in the aisles. 

The Mock Cenventieon 
unanimously nominated 
“Jenny Donke.” Mrs. Oscar 
Chapman was cast in the role 
which she played originally 
after winning the honor in a 
popularity contest polled 
among members of the Wom- 
an’s National Democratic 
Club. 

This “Ladies’ Night” gave 
the partys women workers 
a chance to see almost every 
top feminine personality in 
the democratic ranks. 

Eleanor Roosevelt 
along for the chicken dinner, 
but left before the show 
She sat with Adlai Steven- 
son's sister, Mrs. Ernest (Buf- 
fie) Ives. Bess Truman sent 
regrets. She had a sore 
throat. She had just seen 
daughter Margaret off on 
the train for San Francisco 
where her husband, newsman 
Clifton Daniel, will be cover- 
ne the Republican conven- 
tion. 


MRS. AVERELL HARRI- 
MAN sat at a table surround- 
ed by members of her “kitch- 
en cabinet”—which is her 
name for wives of ber hus- 
band’s Albany staff. 

Two wives of vice presi- 


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dential contenders, Mrs. Hu- 
bert Humphrey and Mrs. Al- 
bert Gore, took part in the 
mock parade of state flags. 

The dark-haired wife of 
Massachusetts’ Senator, Mrs. 
Jack Kennedy, shared a table 
with members of her family, 
former Ambassador to Den- 
mark Eugene Anderson and 
Katie Louchheim, Democrat- 
ie Women’s Activities Direc- 
tor. 

With a baby due in Septem- 
ber, Mrs. Kennedy was draw- 
ing compliments on a chic 
one-piece black maternity 
dress. Asked if a favorite de- 
signer had fashioned a spe- 
cial secret-concealing ward. 


robe for this week, the young 
lawmaker’s wife laughed. She 
said she had just bought her 
dresses off a rack. 


took turns standing in line 
with their father, Mrs. Roose- 
velt and the candidate's sis 
ter, Mra. Ernest Ives. Both 
Mrs. Ives’ daughter-in-law, 
Mrs. Timothy Ives, and 
young Adlai'’s wife, Nancy, 
also were on hand. : 
An earlier affair, as party 
ing got into full swing on 
the eve of the convention, 
was a liadies’-only “brunch 
given by India Edwards for- 
mer Women's Bureau Chief 
of the Democratic Party for 
Mrs. Averell Harriman. 
Mra. Edwards had asked 
all 600 or so of the women 
convention delegates an 
Sagpee me and—as 
be expected—the hotel soon 
ran ont ce at tables. 


Candidates 
Thrive on 
Slim Diets 


CHICAGO, Ill, Aug. WU 
Presidential contenders Adlai 
Stevenson and Averell Harri- 
man are so full of energy and 
bounce that aides say they are 
having difficulty in keeping 
up with them. 

How do they do it’ 

“On a diet of milk, crackers 
and peanuts.” says Harri- 
man’s daughter, Mrs. Shirley 
Fisk, “and our main worry is 
to keep enough of them at 
hand—day and night.” 

From the Stevenson suite 
comes the news, “The boss’ 
appetite has never been bet- 
ter. He demolished a huge 
bacon and eggs breakfast.” 
Throughout the day he relies 
on drafts of coffee and an 
odd sandwich, and tucks into 
a “hefty” dinner at night. 


C—O eee ee ee er ee ee oe OS 
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One wonderful thing about Stauffer is that the me it takes 
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consultants will analyze your figure . . 


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112 lots and garages mar | 
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' Gov. 


DEMOCRATIC STALWARTS—Mrs. Aver- 
ell Harriman, wife of the New York Gow 
ernor, chats with his cousin by marriage, 
Mrs. J. Borden Harriman, former minister 


. . ne i ees 
Aaa! r a . er oe aa 
& af : -~s a ae ” 2 4 4 
Co Slt RFR. 4. i ig 


| At Breakfast for Mrs. Harriman 


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: +" oe “ 
eye 


to Norway and District national committee 
woman for many years, at the brunch given 
yesterday at the Blackstone Hotel in honor 
of the Governor's wife. 


Averell Delights Ladies 


12—"He 
said 
Mrs. Averell! Harriman at her 


CHICAGO, Aug 


press conference yesterday 


Harriman certainly 
looked the suntanned picture 
of health this noon as he 
made an informal talk to 
some three hundred and 


twenty ladies all brunching 
at the Blackstone 

National committeewo- 
men, delegates, alternates, 
governors’ wives, dressed in 
their fanciest with a lavish 
sprinkle of rhinestones and 
corsaged with gardenias 
sat down to an elaborate, 
high caloried breakfast in 
honor of Mrs. Harriman. 

After the ladies had 
downed orange juice, Danish 
pastry, coffee, Gov. Harriman 
was led in triumphantly by 
Mrs. India Edwards. 

Mrs. Louise Nice. vice 
chairman of the New York 
Democratic committee made 
a highly complimentary in- 
troduction and the guests 
cheered in quite unladylike 
fashion. “I have a special in- 
terest in all you ladies to 
day,” said “Averell Harriman 
in his low voice, “especially 
those who are delegates.” 
The audience obviously 
thrilled as well as amused, 
laughed ‘happily. 

Among those whom Gover- 
nor Harriman greeted before 
he commenced his talk, was 
his cousin by marriage, 86- 
year-old Mrs. J. Borden Harri- 
man, former Minister to Nor- 
way and Washington Demo- 
cratic national committee- 
woman for many years. Mrs. 
Harriman who looked a re- 


member-firms displayingm 
this sign. | 


When you make your pur- 


Looking 


with Luke: 


chase”, ask the clerk to place & 
a free one-hour parking 
Stamp on your 

ticket ... 


If you shop more than one 
hour, ask another store for a 


laxed 50. wore a black and 
white print dress, her favor- 
ite pale blue velvet bowed 
straw hat. 


DAISY HARRIMAN, who 


champions Stevenson, was 
accompanied by her step- 


great - granddaughter. She 
posed smilingly at the en- 
trance with Mrs. Averell 
Harriman who, hatiless, 
looked extremely chic in 
white polka dotted dress, 
blue cotton swished into cas 
cading side drapery. 


-_——- 


Perle Solves Problem 
As Guest List Grows 


THAYER, from Page 21 


fects of their rescue from the 
Andrea Doria. The black eye 
and other bruises which dis 
figured Mrs. Dilworth’s pret- 
ty face have entirely disap- 
peared. 


OLD FAMILIARS: 
FORMER PRESIDENT 

TRUMAN wrote his plug for 

Gov. Averell Harriman on a 

plain scratch pad. Never 

crossed out a atin 

word either. 

At his elbow, 

80 - to - speak, 

were such old 

familiares as 7 


eo 


rently con- 
vention  ser- 


Dawson, a former Truman 
aide; William Hillman, who 
authored the President's au- 
tobiography. 


PERLE CRASHES: 


“WHAT NEWSPAPER do 
you represent,” bawled sev- 
eral newslads. “Any that'll 
have me,” shouted the Host- 

tess With 
The Mostest 
right bac k. 
Mrs. Perle 
Mesta, and a 
friend who 
trailed along, 
were almost 
the only non 
press to run 
the gauntlet 
of police, de- 
tectives and 
Senate ga'l- 
lery boss Joe Wills, into 
the Truman tell-all confer- 
ence. The former Minister to 
Luxembourg crashed simply 
by saying “I'm Perle Mesta,” 
and no one could deny it. 


“4 learned this 


ON THE PARTY FRONT 
Perle Mesta is already run- 
ning into trouble be 
cause she cannot keep the 
guest list for her Aug. 14 
buffet-supper to a maximum 
of 400. “The number in- 
creases hourly,” she says, 
“but I have given up worry- 
ing and decided to stagger 
things instead.” 

Acceptances to date are 
close onto 500. “I'm afraid I 
didn’t count on everybody 
being able to come,” Mrs. 
Mesta points out. “There has 
not been one letter of re 
gret.” 

Guests who received invita- 
tions yesterday found them 
marked for midnight — 90 
minutes after the party is 
due to commence. Warns the 
hostess: “I'm telling the door- 
man to be strict about en- 
forci this—I don’t want 
any y to suffocate.” 


CHEESECAKE: 

THE CHEESECAKE has 
been bucolic until Happy 
Chandler’s backers stepped 
into the picture. Both Steven- 
son and Harriman forces 
have squads of Powers mod- 
el-type giris dispensing but- 
tons and such. Harriman gals 
wear cotton dresses covered 
with red aprons punctu- 
ated by a Harriman button. 
The Stevenson girls look very 
Mainbocher, in pale blue 
sailor suit frocks and high 
crowned, straw sailor hats 
banded with ribbons sten- 
ciled with Adlai. Prettiest of 
all in this getup is New York 
Stevenson-backed, Mrs. Ron- 
ald Tree. But the Chandler 
gals, oh, oh, they wear form- 
fitting black cotton, split to 
the left hip and extra decol- 
lete. A Happy Chandler but- 
ton tops the hip split, another 
is pinned precisely rear cen- 
ter. 


Women Set 


ae ee eee 


2f . : 
+ Be. 


Doctors 
Honored 
At Party 


° 


‘* 
ay 


sador’s “favorite” nurses 
“thank you” 


Mrs. Romulo—wearing 4 
beautiful Philippine terno 
of embroidered, sheer pina 
cloth—was showing Mrs. 
Sherman Adams and Senora 
de Castro, the wife of the 
Ambassador of El Salvador, 
her new oil painting. While 
the Ambassador was in Wal- 
ter Reed, Mrs. Romulo start- 
ed painting. The floral print 
—now framed and hanging 
on the dining room wall—is 
her first work. Incidentally, 
Senora de Castro and Mrs. 
Adams are also painters and 
studied under the same 
teacher. 

Seated in a corner, having 
a lovely conversation about 
“cats,” were Mme. Hearne, 
the wife of the Irish Ambas- 
sador, and Mrs. Bartholomew 
Hogan, whose husband is 
Surgeon General of the Navy 
Adm. Hogan. The Hearnes 
have “so many cats” she 
hates to tell the number (she 


_ did admit to more than 20) 


and Mrs. Hogan owns a first- 
in-sshow winner Persian. 


AFTER the 530 or more 
guests had helped themselves 


ama and that he plans to go 
fishing after the Republican 
convention. 

The host had an amusing 
story to tell hig former col- 
league in Congress, Sherman 
Adams. When President Ei- 
Senhower made his frst 
“State of the Union” message 
to Congress, Ambassador 
Romulo didn’t want to sit 
with the Am , he 
wanted to “show off” and 
sit with the Congressmen (a 
privilege granted to all for- 
mer members of Congress). 
When the doorman wouldn't 
let him in, the Ambassador 
called an old-timer to iden- 
tify him. As the doorman was 
leading former Representa- 
tive Romulo to his seat, he 
said, “I'm sorry sir, I thought 


you were Chinese. 


also at the party as were Am- 
bassador of Ceylon and Mme. 
Gunewardene. 


the Jefferson Hotel. The paid- 


up membership cocktadl 
j is scheduled for Octo- 
14 at the Sheraton-P 
‘ Hotel. A general 


the branch will be held at. 
Hotel 2400 October 10. 


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CHICAGO, Aug. 12—A ree- | 
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body tissues as ZONITE. 
MEALTHFUL! ronrTE completely 
deodorizes, promptly washes 
and odor-causing 


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For stationery 
shoes 
nurses 


or any other product == 
or service for the home or 
business, always {look first 
in the YELLOW PAGES 


ee < - - ~ 


(mma 
DOWNTOWN 
PARK-SHOP 


You, too, can have the 


Find It Fast i oF ae ee 


in The 
‘Yellow Pages’ 


4 yeu peid $30 you could not get « 
Through LOUIS efficiency and 

loveliest known permanents 
sell at $106-——$1 


Most all Downtown Park & Shop stores are OPEN 
ALL DAY SATURDAY During July and August. 


+ . 
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"ite mrtmi Se sea gwuy 


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) 171@ EYE ST. N.W. 
Call RE. 17-1234, ask for Circulation, and order The Wash- AIR COOLED 


ington Post and Times Herald guaranteed home delivery, 


: 


3 Weddings 


MRS. BURTRAM P. CLOUSE 
—PAUL GOODMAN 

Maj. Gen. James R. Pierce, 
USA, and Mrs. Pierce of Ft. 
Meade, Md. announce the 
marriage of their daughter, 
Mrs. Burtram Pierce Clouse. 
to Maj. Paul Goodman, USA, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Nathan 
Goodman of Philadelphia, 
Pa.. on Aug. 11 at Ft. Meade. 
The bride attended the Uni- 
versity of Alabama. The 
bridegroom was graduated 
from Temple University and 
received his M. A. degree 
from Columbia University 
He is a graduate of the Ar- 
tillery Officers’ Candidate 


ee ee Ce 


FPEERESERES TALE % 
Paula 
WN 


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, ut 


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d 
AJ 
«j 


sft 
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af 


#3 
ji aerate 


School and the Advanced 
Course for Officers of the 
Tank Destroyer School and 
served with the U. S. Army 
during World War II and the 
Korean War. The couple will 
reside in Ft. Leavenworth, 
Kan., where Maj. Goodman 
will attend the Command and 
General Staff School, 


SUE ANN SCOTT 
~—JOHN B. STOCKTON 


Mr. and Mrs. Robert William 
Scott announce the marriage 
of their daughter, Sue Ann, 
to Ens. John Bone Stockton, 
USN, son of Mrs. Ernest L. 
Stockton and the late Dr. 
Stockton, on Aug. 8 at Christ 


| Church, Alexandria, Va. Both 
| the bride and bridegroom are 


graduates of George Wash- 
ington University. The couple 


will reside in Washington. 


ELEANOR C. DAVIS 
—ANDREW J. COOK 


Mrs. Michael Donald Davis 
of Arlington, Va.. announces 
the marriage of her datigh- 
ter, Eleanor Catherine, to 
Andrew John Cook, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Andrew J. Cook 


of Hazleton, Pa.. on Aug. 11 
at St. Thomas More's Church. 
Arlington. The bride is the 


| daughter of the late Michae! 


Davis. The couple will reside 
in Arlington. 


DIANE KEESE 


_ ROBERT M. BRIDEN 


| Presbyterian 


J 


E Picture- Booklet 

REDUCE SIZE 
. TUMMY, ete. Neo enct. 
tion. Seat im PLAIN envelope. 


$421CC 


—--— ee eK UY 


Mr. and Mrs. Leonard F 
Keese announce the marriage 
of their daughter, Diane, to 
Robert M. Briden. son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Osborne W. Briden 
of Kensington, Md., on Aug 
ll at the River Road United 
Church. The 
bride attended American Uni- 
versity. Her husband is at- 
tending the University of 
Maryland. 


HELEN CERISE 


— EDGAR GORRELL 
Mr. and Mrs. Mumbert 


| Cerise of Carbondale, Colo., 
| announce 
their 


the marriage of 
daughter, Helen De 
lores, to Edgar Staley Gor- 
rell, formerly of Lake Forest, 
Til. and Washington, son of 
the late Col. and Mrs. Edgar 
S. Gorrell, on Aug 5 at 
Carbondale. The bride is a 
graduate of Mesa College. 
Grand Junction, Colo. The 
bridegroom attended Culver 
Military Academy, Culver, 
Ind. Colorado A & M, Ft 
Collins, and is a graduate of 
Mesa College. 

The couple will reside at 
Albuquerque, New Mexico, 
where the bridegrom will 
attend the graduate school 
of the University of New 
Mexico. 


FLAG PINNING: Anne 


Anne's Trading Post 


Gerline of the 
Belgian Embassy staff, pins an American 
flag on Larry Eichorn, USAF reserves, dur- 
ing the Reunion Ball Friday at the Officers’ 
Service Club. Eichorn is a past president 
of the club which held its 12th annual 


By Dick Dareer. Staff Phetocrapher 


dance commemorating the end of World 
War Il. It is always held on the Friday 
before Aug. 15, the day the armistice was 
signed ending the war in Europe. Guests 
included officers and former officers in the 
area and daughters of service families. 


THE WASHINGTON POST ond TIMES HERALD 
eee Monday, August 13, 1956 23... 


, oN 


Plan Preschoolers’ Parties 


SMARTY, smarty gave a 


party—carefully planning 
program and refreshments in 
advance. Here's a mother 
who won't be taken unawares 
by a group of preschoolers 
in a party mood. Let's give 
her some advice. 

“Could Anne readers give 
me any suggestions for 
games, amusements, etc., for 
a party for a boy who will 
be 4. The children. who will 
attend his birthday party 
range from 3 to 5 years. It 


will be a smal! group. 
Mrs. E. M. S. 


SHOWER SUGGESTION 
Which item would a bride 
find more useful—a toaster, 
electric hand beater or a 
blender’? Two friends and I 
want to go in on a gift for 


| another friend who will be 


| getting 


married soon. We 


_ have considered all the above 


items but can't agree. We 
also thought of an electric 
frying pan. Any suggestions 
will be appreciated 

Always a Bridesmaid 


PLAYERS 
The Arlington Players are 


_ the adult drama group of the 


| Arlington 


Depart. 
and 


County 


ment of Recreation 


Parks. Membership is open 
to anyone interested in thea. 


ter arts. 

For those who desire only 
to attend plays we have a 
season ticket membership; 
for those who desire more 
active participation in acting, 
directing, staging or promo 
tion we have a reguiar mem 
bership. Dues are $3 for both 
types of membership. Season 
ticket members are not not 
tified of tryouts or called on 
for production work 

Further information may 
be obtained by calling me at 
the Recreation Department, 
Jackson 7-8888. 

Sally Taylor. 

Thanks also to a Hagers- 
town Reader who has en- 
joyed the Players’ recent 
productions. 


BOSTON BOUND 
Help! We are moving to 
Roston in a few weeks and 
can use any information con- 
cerning locales, schools and 
housing. How could I get ad 
vance information on good 
house and apartment rentals 
M.K 


PEACH STAIN 
I have a problem that ! 
hope Anne readers can an- 


swer. I have an orchid col- 
ored dacron dress with a per- 
manently pleated skirt. A 
short time ago I got a peach 
stain on the skirt. Is there 
any way I can remove the 
stain without injury to the 
dress’ | would like te re 


move the stain before I take | 


my vacation next month. 
T. S., Indian Head, Md. 


GENEALOGY 


Genealogy is a very inter. | 


esting hobby which can lead 
to work as a private gene- 
alogist after experience. I 
have accomplished this after 
15. years. 


The Everton Publishing | 


Co.. Logan, Utah, offers a 
hook called “A Handy Guide 
for Genealogists” which 
costs a little over a dollar. 
This book answers many of 
the beginners’ questions. 
They also publish a helpful 
magazine 

| start by going to the 
Court House of the county 
seat where the persons | am 
interested in lived. First, I 
look up old wills. Old church 
records also contain valuable 
information. Your county 
historical society should also 
be able to help. 


Weedwardl Lethup 


Where courtesy end auatity ere traditional 


our exciting once-a-year event 
Blue Grass and June Geranium 


SHOP LATE TONIGHT 


Washington Store, Open 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. 
Chevy Chase and Alexandria Stores, 9:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m, | 


Where courtesy and quality are traditional 


Vives eV ee Seyveree IEP OP OCCSDE Hees + Ee 


ot 


how pretty you look greeting fall in ou 


FESTIVE TAFFETAS: 


by Lady Petite 


rae 


22% 


Admiring glances follow you < 
while the crisp swish of acetate 
taffeta makes you a standout ihe 
these show-stopping “Cracker. 
So perfect for special oc 
casions or just to wear because 
you love to look pretty Designed» 
especially for the petite woman), 


with figure flattery in line. - 
. 


tafs.’ 


Featured stunnning theatre suite 
dress accented by scroll effect ands 
agiitter with rhinestones in just 
Sofft” 
shimmering shades of blue. toast» 
navy. Sizes 14% to 22%. 22.9% 


the right amount of detail 


Lower rignt one - piece dre 
boasting intricate detailing. Keyg 
hole neckline, sparkling rhines 
stone pin. Blue or mauve. Size¢ 
14% to 244% 538 to 44. 22. 


~Wormen’s Dresses, 3rd Floor 


also Chevy Chase and Alexandria 


wél 


“'oerrye vw 


it a 


at 


> 


HOW OLD IS SHE? Gray. streaked, mousey hair 
makes von look older than you are. Now .. . you can 
léok young again. Simply use Herbold Pomade as 
your regular hair dressing and conditioner. 


ELIZABETH ARDEN 
SOAP SALE 


2.25 hand soap, 
box of 3 


Amazing Creamy Pomade 


Tones Down Grayness 
Hair Looks Young Again 


MW the years have stolen the 
one and natural oils from your 
+p tg nw lin Aa dle Se, when your first gray hair 

grey. simply use creamy appears, or if you are completely 
Herboid od vont hait wil look | $2; if your hair has bees 
dressing and your hair will look Gved start using Herbold Pom 
and lovely. Gradually, ade today, and your hair will 
slowly, subtly it blends in the alwavs look voung without a sign 
wight color for you. so perfectly of sravness. A wonderful hair | 
vour hair will look like it did jonditioner too. its special Lano- | 
lim and fine oils is exactly what | 

gray, dry, lifeless hair needs, to 


keep ®t soft, hustrous, heautitully | 


3.50 hand soap, 
of 3 


im shades. just one creamy pom- 
ade is right for your hair. 

A once-a-year wonderful op- 
portunity to stock up on your 
favorite Blue Grass and June 
Geranium soaps. Excellent 
cream base perfumed to sachet 
strengths, milled to a fine, 
lasting hardness. Lovely shades 
of pink and blue to enhance 
your bath decor. Hand and 
bath soap, both in boxes of 3. 


get from Herbold Pomade can- 

not harden wor features. of snd. groomed 
Dont wait’! It's later than vou | 

think’ Get started todav.. Con | W4L—Cosmetics, ist Floor 

vinee vourself YOU CAN’LOOK. . +» also Chevy Chase and Alexandria 

te your hair—wonderfully flatter. YOUNGER. Get Herbold 

ing. You ll look more like you did 


you were years younger 
Best of all—no “touch-ups” ever 


ol a Be te OM VP ee Be we te 


< 


On Sale 
At All 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD ARTICLES FOR SALE : : 
a ae Monday, August 13, 195% ne Pwagied for eur store, Den} Mone | , : rDi. 
~ 5 Se sa x °Camme seh ~ Se | n INSTRUMENT 


re 


Me WASHINGTON Post” win ¥ rece. | oo =~ pee | | 904 MAKERS 


TIMES HERALD | Bieoting. block work JO. oe aes $919 ep ie xe | ENGINEERS 


EAT o ag ae | cotee ene TOOL MAKERS 
se Local Rates [BEAGLE puppy. eg par: 18 PIECES is ce ~ | Sra ES ny 7 of your cht -_ 


ee an Prints ie vie royh , . ; 
wine 86, gales ihe saga atiboiD Taae a — New Furniture ¢ =e va, professional give and take with| e. nf vis bat 
progressi 


1a “7 ‘er 40° —e of Cosiem oa oe Ave : : oul ; . | top men in the field of elec- 
“a on acs or irregu b j rs. ; rr ‘ . mS s? : 
ingertions Minimum ad te two gmoney ete. Lib, reward. MA. 2-075 cS DiNerTe stp Es 14" ; a. © le mend | ' - . tro mechanical design and 
The following raves are tor een- ceasisea. perp ener ane 3 Wy can eZ +S _ Butler, Pevelopment, OPENINGS ON DAY AND. 
secutive insertions + M 7307 NO MONEY DOWN : af | Ny SHIFT 
pa * CA EASY PAYMENTS | " i= —’ sat ’ You will perform studies re- IGHT 
PER time tines umes oe: ‘| gaa . lated to the.latest types of 


Lives 0° S4e Wash 4 a  £5.¢ tse HOLLYWOOD BEDS $29 re Oe ’ , 7} L lit ft ith the ob- 
; a . ! rey : OC pee military aircraft wi ERCO DIVISION 


i 3 -19, ‘ , 
Wo: ae Lines time times times ans ; __ Blackie — W Sok ‘ ;  ) seal ORE LEE | ject of determining réquire- 
; Bo +36 18 08 : ParkB.ver Spring Re- SAM BRO N’ > le kai / is 1". . bors .... ments, feasibility, performance AFC Industries, Ine. 
20 > 40 , . , A _* - vere . twee ebe sbeebs and specifications of compu- 
RAT , “ney¥on RETAIL Paz, emale. heave Le ay nite: 7 Anaco ta sf pa “Lp = ae ig ; : . v's , 4 hoes nid exer-olt ove fer Riverdale, Maryland 
G? -§973. 4-2 en : ta t 97 DIFFERENT “I & SF a" : ° ss ; 
(38 mile recom of Washingtoms an ra ‘type N., fires ab. —_ _ 3 » ey ; oF , ry * ap simulation of their operating WA. 7.4444 
er Line . 5-019) , . 


(Minimum 3 times Wheaton. LQ 2- 2%, vag 2B. +9922 _ » ae M . _ and performance characteris. . 
to 


* @w/ten spots ’ ” 
4ict e a . rt # : ' | | tics 


3 ne oo r ak ; ™ " , » A. _ : 
PRONE RE. 70205 | meee eats FURNITURE = ae | Lhe sO no 
DEADLINES: wart eS cwerd 5 U J \ee> %" saad | or—with equivalent in experi must be exper! - 
euynar Eorrion PM (REDE area 4 booae 7 OR ce in required Advenced (PAPE Aa Ma BE 


TION a _feturn papers: personal va. , . : . . te z “ 
“ewcetinn ar fects x Pa FOR ONLY, SNe res ge Cees Sry. Bill Adama. 3919 Minn. 9, Be 
~ 415,000 Tarte Cony $245 yp A Seimari est, 8-5| For Interview Appointment = MACHINIST 


- Reward 


Sunday , ot a M-321. NO MONEY DOWN 7 : 4" : | With Our Senior Engineers 
Te Easy Tertns—free Delivery 


Circulation WA SWANK FURN. ‘ me Fee Call WA, 7-4444 


means oquicKker sales results " rs “ : " 
for Washineton Post and “ATOM ladies: June 9; LU. 1-1673 Abs H < NE. | mor. a Technical Personnel Section 
Times Herald classified ad- PERSONALS "1 Ll. 3-8700 7 | Mise Ben 8. cor. 12th * :a* 

~ x | ment. 
vertisers. To place your ad Si@onon YOUR. TROUMLE? Let ~A, tT eott eae ARTHUR y | hiand or Send Resume | ees 
fae Sumdex canbe 2 rou me Sanity Se lon bie. ATLANTIC RESEARCH CORP. 
Phone iacees ‘Whit Day | il 24 Jay- rebdullt like Dew “Gear ss an . ; : J be ’ . oe : 901 N. Colurnbia St., Alex., Ve. 


REpublic 7-1234 | seiweRiie” deste mete ts Gears ace iw Tossa ‘ , : | aes b--adteptia-seedngaaten 


ronMaé 81-20 8 pee applicat ib <: be ies. uted Sueven- _ | - IVI ION . 
ete, | DRAFTSMEN | ERCO DIVISION |) ce 
Experienced 


- GES __ Rew 
(WILL NOT be reoponslsle Ter 553 |_ | i What oe, 7 \S CHOON cswance uaNeRstry MECHANICAL . ACF Industries, Inc. 
With Small Mechenisme 


PFiret class with intmam of 
experience 


debts ; " rre ~ : y 8 FATHER OF . 
m . . Layout Men and Detailers Riverdale, Maryland 
ae PLE. ak Gee TCHS 4 SUCCESSIVE | 
{ WiLL not be responsible for any DO om . -— MAYORS OF 


pment 
for advancement ny - 'ENGINEERS 


and 


debts incurred by an me, tens. Ja LIMERICK | 
tha | r = REN - . Cre bg eee bee ee 
. Aol: ce SE ° ‘ ; ploye benefits Capable of Working te Close 
Articles Wanted , pW 9 Retin bersrviie At = hase -'72 HELP. MEN  *<*SiMELP, MEN té“‘(‘COCOCOC‘éR#S#:«C MAL auighhtliisn "Research Corp Tolerance 
Articles for Sole eREANCE a veh children 73, lee. fam $12: green) teen Ona eee L — : 1424 K St. NW. ST. 3-0986 Physicists 
vA in well-equipped, Bursing rd day le thi. 4 TWS—TABLE MODEL. 713 50 6~ACCOUNTANTS - BOOK Pens 
} ~— urs ms ¢ core, core! ce , Le : $10, en Bide fk. ° a ~$125 am up pe oe ee ATTORNEY DRAFTSMEN— a a Chemists Well Equipped Shop Facilities 
MANUEL Rest Hon ; ing pads 82: blankets 91. medicine ‘ebie< ypist- Mruct. ar vr at 
beautif a cart, 6- mon enoa EL. im gov ral years’ j- ae 
Benkruptcy Notices Sbie, Call Hilltbore, ¥ Tit. place ‘set. 50 a0, gar petri, Hi: Ben"Wakps. "Eee 9-3333 NO ue. Mise i A 8-230. dence in 1 ine Wash ashington met ee eer (LOYD’S EMPL. & Aerodynamicists | Wages Commensurate With 
Bids and Prepesals ......... a ¥. N.W., 23 5 la canned foods $30 JE VENETIAN tips tn ie Ky a Eicome) ' aE hele ih" the. mortgage Joan “408 3920_N. Y. Ave. NW = ger 7 Ability 
Beats, Sports Section ar WEDDING X ; ME a 5 CLT ITs ig 3 pee Tt (356: WASHES — Kenmore | 3 , ACCTS (AUDITOR) ‘ Hine Raom DRIVER P | 
ee gas, 7-54 DE DL Tis brs JA, $5245 ORGANS AND PIANOS —Grent re. Cond: $25 "JA. 4-15 rensokn te Wee ee ee Permanent position fe Capitel Aero-Physics | Many Company Benefits 
ikcan fae | ¢ MOTOR TRAVEL 1A must de ¢ ered. Organs and pian — “a gimme we Fe Slaanath 201-2798. 
es SAN FRANCISCO or Loe Anaeles, }4 . 7 al “ c rt ¥ nnette ateiman porentice. . 
Construction Equipment .. os , Be a Kat. COGEAP, ‘Pn RE £9212 ——a | ol n i. capacity. 235 Woodward Bidg RE 71-4414 ASSISTANT week, ae & “call, G core pas GEN FRAL Apply in Person 
Child Cere sees . ponses leaving Aus. 14. 6 TE jumbia hi-f! c 4 WATER nt aTer e ~~ ids _Aot ._ NW. at # = | weekdays. 7:30 40. R. D . ae o Pama? 
Poastes ae CAR avant to 20 to Los Anaeles ampi Seau oe at sell a ~ 2 f snereses Kenmore; 40-cal. C GC FOOD Porter - . FLECTRIC S MOND THR eo 
$160. sell $95 se A.M. to 4 P.M, 
— ’ EARLY AMER An: ry st A COU NT] N 8 A. 
Forms ARTICLES FOR SALE 12 PHOTOGRAPH equip | 5 | 
fe 9 ARTICLES Fn SAL Ger hPa Meese $8 ana a CR ADIATE. | SUPERVISOR | ELECTRONICS |__ Laboratory 
~scteadie wr yon ACCORDION Stra 120 bass. PANGS FoR RENT leona ies MISCELLANEOUS Wanted Research Prog ram 
' bBIKG MACHINES TYPECRM. guring our creat REMODELIN _ > ienced & Equi t MELPA | . 
Finoncial rns $28 : ALE Floors mast be < ——- SEDEOOM ciao, . ot Nation-Wide Corporation reterably one experienc mn Systems quipmen On ; 
Found a week : ho oc _oreans st sacrifice ie a gerator : ae Ls 
call WARD iM. 3-9535 NO Gees. KITTS. 1330 G wt. 8 Offer 
Rages Aik. CONDITIONERS — - Commercial! hax a —- = 70513 “RA. 6- 2977 FOUNTAIN ENGI NEERS GU DED MISS! LES ot} BT EAA, 
tay ER seus * = ‘el. x GHOP 1788 Pean- Detailed Junior Execu- OPERATION 
Meuses for Rent .. Shari e -6698 T p Ope Philadel! tS Geuheu. i” 
, : e R &- eal money on ail types of ' = | removal for tive raining rogram : nings wy Nacel- ~ 
Annes marquetrie chairs. 2 arm. ies > ,- - PIANO pines. goes . TY an tek: ‘ett Outstanding opportunity For experimental and phia for Ph.Ds or nold 2-7 bus from 1ith 
Instructions new each. sacrifice $8! . ~ ; rie ‘ PORNITURE EXCHANGE to progress in manage- Ca able of development p ro | equivalent experienced i | n@. te plent entranes.) 
broadlioem ri self « “ , . 
cameo parma ae a io Any 4 day. $10 6. saz rary ee. (dust above the ed for our store, Dont Mak: ment work ” peop! grams in sonar, radar, | in the following fields: 
o ’ ymery , ~ . : ore . ‘ 
i BABY CRIBS. 5: carriages, PYANOS FOR RENT —New and used Sieve ou Calling Smith's. (Good working conditions supervising pie. and Sg or agrees 
q ‘ a4: spinets so] up- 2-7 . mm | = | 
hots 92 high chairs “7 95 vl nee mod FTRN. WANTED —Any  Sitount APPLY systems, bot “ . PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 
Machinery ond Tools ....... ze all DISCOUNTS nthly sowtt . t oe. meee ree ater Ss gas He Requirements are tory and field assign- | MACH N ISTS 
Motor Trove! Center. 131! ‘ ie. LI. 3-6697 ne t) ste ‘Phone GOLD 7, EMPLOYMENT ments. High Temperature Chemistry 
, : . 3-9 00d appearance and 
Maeving and Siereye 5} pring seats. chrome jess liver Spring (Phone JUS. +, Bring your dental gold pi G aa OFFICE Chemical Kinetics 
Officral Notices i. 965 TA 9-1559 5 ‘ discarded jewelry ¢ pay ca personality Thermodynamic & Transport TURRET LATHE 
Office Space : Evip-siee: .-* est like new os bene ae a) _Suberten A KAHN, IN Ability to work with and 3RD FLOOR These are permanent Properties 
Personols ' BED liywood. $20. Small chest, Downtown store closed “Seterdays 64 YEARS AT 935 P <1_**. h positions with excel- MACHINISTS 
Seemenel ieaes .... 0A st — 4 es LI. 3-1360, - unt) Sept. "4 OLD? ASMIONED pecture frames handle peopie wit Latssurs = . ) 
. D. sclid mabos. twin. heavy call $s jeed small modern *-0c%s. ome LO_ “- ~~ ease WA lent career opportunt- YSICS 
Poultry, Rabbits sores. in nersere mati.. $30 compl frands, $195. §225 ‘end "924 4S: ST antiques. etc. cast. - : ti f . rs cap- PH 
Real Estate fer Sele fireless 5 lee renee $00; dremer| s 3-6300 PIANO MART. 101 13 7th PIs << —- for your College degree im <ac- Tth. Sth and E Ots. KW es Tor enginee p a dia 
Real Esete Leons cs; oh THURS ede pet counting able of assuming re- Atomic & Molecular | Some ——- Frnel word 
7: preras Willingness to relocate jogo pope Amb PAINT MAN. ey 4 and work- emi —_ vod werkt tronv thannetate, 
, g00d ¢ LF eee ee ae tee - too _ condi) ing wi minimum with 
' 87-88 BICYC i peti. : : oral) LANEEE AOCTIONER Py) reply to Sis a6 etate age, 1 ) -| supervision. ack ows ye mag then ; caster rete 
Trailers 6) bee. 336 mi. trade for pl clubs. good = aie Montgomery rd elteville. education, height, weight, and : - Ly *| Shoc aves ® growing : 
Trust Notes DS or Sang offer “lesa, 2185 be- os ST 3-6 = "t-sesa' solery expected sage sorsie 3° -* Sorine. Upper Atmospheric | pany. 
CLE: grade. -ins OPEN S veg  co@cition 2-982 Box M-314 Post-TH. AUTO GLASS MAN—-White exper. f. 14. 4a 
To place your ad SPOR coukal’ PAR CXS, urdays until Sept ee sober. Call ox see Mr. Hendler « or in mation ar rrange- 
flop 2902 Unis INSTRUCTION 14 NINGS ON DAY OR 
; . i SPS of tor” 2208 Un z Pian poe yale tent iaglag. INSTRUCTIONS m Ve ave. Be. LA 6006” West. ments for Interview, please call.GAS DYNAMICS OPE og 
Call RE. 77-1234 800K OF roger Blue 198i seneal spine! plane for trie AIRLINES acCcoU NTANTS 4 BOOKKEEPERS 4uTOMOBILE MECHANIC — &x- £ Molecular Flow 
; uacel_ cond, 840 458 | ‘-. ie AIR TRAVEL AGENCIES ari adacey 1420 Br nse Mw | Detienced. for used cer reoatd!- ree u 
oe El ay ta 7 is ‘E> ATLAS AGCY., 1420 N.Y. Ave. NW. tioning. must be relisble: Guares- JU. 5-7200 Real Gas Flow 
OFFICIAL NOTICES 2 — , > att ee A ei ss NEED , ACCOUNTANTS 80x. LOVING CHEVROLET, Inc. | (Viscous and inviscid) ERCO DIVISION 
THE BOARD OF ACCOUNTANC Tr -- ; fiente ~ on 7. seers ep and women for stound sre r. and Jr 8200 Grorgia ave ver Spring Flow——Material Interaction 
mand for the Distric of oun m- Reels a SAWS toe Go'su, steel Wath bs cleared. Don't mi: "S fight: opportunities e ig * ) To a > 3 BM ted Personnel Department ACF industries, Inc. 
nee pies 1 8 a men RM SUITE—Also porch furn. *acrifice eres. trTs. 1330 G # : a r. 4 vt 
pplicamts seeking EM _— eal Pta! RE AUTO MECHANICS - All interviews Confidential | ) Riverdale, 
“child i desk. roll-top We hee: PIANOS AND 0: nt ae re have © Hapeee sumer of even. Write im Cuntidence te | WA. 7-4444 
7 “t316 must be cleared. Pianos ena or ~ 7 isth s. NW. Cc ee ce for = mecha eice @. our . 


n rT rsh sear & clean. E 
must be made on FENCE YPES. CHAIN LINK, 2: SACRIFICE PRICES Krtre CIVIL SERVICE Courses ING exp vat teniat me. A SPECIAL DEFENS 
d ; f $10, | 
"han Mon sept 03, ha "instal an. eee ae PIANOS We Bes ves a Aan. pee ect. Ln it  Mectromic. ener etek piens benea in 4a, Siete et VI RO | Mp aes 
ening appointment. 


ii 
ter 
: 
of Account- oO; JONG cui any sha s $1 ployer ps $19.000 es] ter ev 
Sceupations & OAM CUS _— aw x > Acroson' a Dee -— $ ungs ox re) yee OBRIEN” + — ~ oe 3.41 


sions. 17 Mass. Ave w A 3-9400 BOYD 4 : . Re 7.7300 MR. NORCROSS | 
Pao t oo i tea riaxo * ateabors lan BOWER CORNTAME ith “experience =) = CALL CARL, INC. LABORATORIES GENERAL 
=) 6 = payroll wor xpense report ’ VISION 
= expense distribution le to po 1250 24th ST. NW. 
SEALED BIDS FOR CHEST X-i stv rel chest-t7pe, cost S600 a fn prices Messhamesiy Benes INDUSTRY end balance or. and VITRO CORP. OF AMERICA ELECTRIC ea} 
: c FRIGIDAIRE: Btw «Deir - now and save. KITT s io. inetatl : strong iocal ereemisstion” wed, AUTO MECHANIC — Bover. ., must | 3198 CHESTNUT STREET OFFICE MACHINE 
"all tke new} pon axe, no parking - problem | for Bree Book “arnins’ Pa wi ssot4scolan cranked ante) eer. Wan. A ee Ry dg sgn PHILADELPHIA 4, PA. Me es iategtion wants a 


«” 
ft tee box! ‘alexandrie ‘Store) 
rep Ww re. nw Md 
Utilities Diesel Training give full information about educa- =| Silver Spring, . 
t- e rte Men- wre. ae as 


ond then hod 
me ter. 4629 SING |: it ) I. o piladinnanniing 
fa Son turned. from rental Fo semere te) for yg ~= : ~ ;  vacanct -~~ ©. Box D roll "EMPL EXCHANGE 
c Group leaders. bors’ sch. $3200 
“a ELECTRONICS 


Pron bed. ; trainin la<ses 
Commissionet bookcase, 86; 4 $159 AMPRELL MUSIC cO. 1108 YN Beacry COLLEGE. $472, Washington. D | 
set toe 2 ‘=  phanatadls 71-1762. 
TECHNICIANS- 


— 


rs. Central Ser- 
dn tration er-to 44 1 15; roll- 
mg “pIst OF COL.” pm len: = "bed. 15. — bed.” Bs: Printing Equipment | Ee es Glamour "and 5 . ADMIN. ASSISTANT 
dz . BY 


bed. 

1956 kitchen table $3; bedroom Women 
$10; innmerspr ~~ Type Capsmete wooden oat b= ’ Youne man 7271-30 fr an dédmin- 
beds, $5. We do up-) c@ses. 870 each: lever on -| istrative position in the treasurer's 

» sofa end cpair, $69 in. Priced to 8 -y hs re ey sreauired § . depertment of x . ing life 

labor and material; slip- € T™ se sed of ere Ee Bos Maes — insurance ; dearee 


p. | 

covered, $48 up: refinishing. cad- A 17x22 aire . , , 
inet work. furn. repaired. drap- wooden developing ministration YF = ficoud ny Technical schooling, civilian 
UPHO STERERS. RL whirter 130 Maiti NURS ES. NEEDED ight "is B this field having ‘proc eweescens DELS of military, plus at least 6 
lectit Procurement of- SW co. 3-51 Reuat —> 100 women wanted 17-65. to learn <=" 4t Dish washers 835 months’ experience in’ the 
aes ete, Migrrete | Oe ean Checraet ae Th Pink John H. Burke & Co, Inc nursing. Waite or colored for con- Mer —paae,| Brey, sit ait nssl Tosser Ton ction of elacvonic eauin 
a ae bO10 i L 617 mn 5.30 5. mor 123, © Monteomers st Ralto ze) vat sh Pay Day -evening. some office expe : pent Doctes ; 9s ¥ OTHERS ALL TYPES § ment. Familiarity with stend- 


Business Snvict catalina Renan a aay vervice bat ps ST 23-4130 9 ard test equipment essential FURNISHINGS a 
eC IRNITURE ree Li. 7-6226 = Ee a ALSO INFANT NURSING ANALYTICAL CHEMIST | AUTO PARTS | KAN 


“fauls_ prefer te aD “jah ENROLL FOR SEPT CLASSES | Exper GMC trucks. See Mr Bing. Salary in Accordance with 
TW ne by Ph! 


A 
a pre emicien TW 
mical.  efficien' : g ; ‘ 
3 COMPLETE ROOMS eatire ce for one learning Por free pooklet vis write. phone Experienced tn non-routine analy. aman "Grane ‘st. Alexan Experience Level 


tiona see 

Light eile at meresies BEDROOM RANGE —iec- Potpetat puto. i Vieter bole eo a ew 9 yy ge resgaren BAKER . URNITURE ALESMEN 
porebea veree, rooms mys. dormers. © LIVING ROOM reinforced Conereters RADIO AND TV ANNOUNCING Went Va \ ~ momanent poet posit em 40-Hour Week whe are net 58 
iE. REEFER CO Since 1921 DINETTE REFRIGERATORS Dect, RET. finder 137 lithe ne ME. 8-5255 he sradu chemist = re, etter only. full} t i particulary 'C aa | 
EDITION “AEC ams carsors, TERMS—$5 PER WEEK | Ai, 31.28, per weet, Pree nome “WOMEN ALL AGES Le : tal! Annapatie AKER te. 


. fr under ane ellent Working Conditions | three 
Y N . 

Mi yay a aggd you REFRIGERATOR SALE | — m Mon MON warn | fae solery ote Serre & Please Apply 9 A.M. to 3 P.M mem aie 
brand-new. top-aualily’ furniture} $5 Down ——— Delivers ae ae yping | refoca'e oft fault dete . ox- 
Spee ee rg Pa re cere Sea Vs SS eR THe suns vorcins| Eas 
Siar nataentn es Sorin ames. CIN SIX WEEKS | & cei na ‘Tia erie Mg | = UNIVERSITY 
. rkinNG o— ,. ree 
GO | “neue SAM te SP mm oge BE SF Giada ti silane GENERAL CLERK! 


. fing. gutterin 
Pres est 5-680 has s tab e and ‘ matching chetrs: zs oom Saad ST. 3-2086 sire wt nay Se TORY 

‘ ’ ANG -| your choice of colors. Immed ealin ase Washington’ s Onis ean jacce “balls ~~ eee? * LABORA 
ousies. . ‘tB- — daliy 3-6" Thursday” sizes: rebgilt: teed | Speedwriting 2 D, a tewer Barber 
te 60 mos. SECO 6A U Aauire Secretarial School 
BA y. lst ; 
Pata | person Cross sae 8621 Georgia re 


& peinting THE CROWN CO. eEPRIGERATORS Uae 115. _—s—s«*d'.406 G St. NW F ema weg mr ~sdhe 


exp. mech. Reas. price. Af 5 4 a27 TTH OT NW oe * ‘tvs : - CIC AE MixgeD | 


FURNITURE REFRIGERATORS MECHANICA Poe MEN DESIGNERS Soe eae JU. 9-7790 


Recondi*ioned—Guaranteed 1 Year 
MECHAN IC 


ey Seem With Background in | ae tian A gl nies ENGINEER | In'ucconcinoned ft 

3 raed "S COMPLETE ROOMS. hit tet Fae PROCESS PIPING | paziiz, Seretgy uy eck a See a Sheed wieauen pias 

ie dae eet rereet erence cae “RCO pte BAMA SHS se ENGINEERS | “SETS 
itt Mit ke NO MONEY DOWN fae Genie meses! ~=© MECHANICAL men, ey ot es) ENGINEERS | °*™"?"™ 

silted on Deirveny — i ever assets “es tg uG hast 171 Fields of Interest YD'S—Cor. 12h & S PRODUCT DESIGNERS The: Wochingien Spt 


. ray and brah Te : STSTESCTORS TE SSS | sty Bose, 
eto or apts: exper a: Living Room MAYFAIR ~ e+e See ABBEY First IF Y-O-U SEEK — lebby tien Bids. & : 1S1S L STREET NW. 


; f faretie ; 
alate Ress. pris RA. 3-393 2: Ee ecasopal¢ ash aftand 2 sewING MACHINES — Fariale. 1338 Bre St NW. ST 3-0190 AAs. 0m. 
ond (to. ae , ‘cae for CPA 


stitch. Special $199 AB. or SEEpr. for sseee =. « OPPORTUNITY BUDGET FINANCE PLAN 
Fitting nig 20. 3-2 <= Keamere -typises 2 $30 permanent oo top 
Bedroom consoles, ect cond. ~$0 
Teaien,| Beatie! modern 2-ptone sot: pe ae ae Secrs “snd sitnoe - + » SECURITY 
a with - Treomy sed } 850-840 
‘ 3940 Minne fate — cnences PY 4 
. 


of raw ~size bed. net 
villows. ete . VALUABLE CO. oippanes, expenses Apply Product and 
BENEFITS | ‘ oy 


tis 


wos 
with their 
wae ir 


Position available in news- 


Dinette 
A modern dinette set. ) Ps 
Deal Direct With Pat Regal (OVE Ges. Grand: 7 eT 3uese | ~ « « AIR-CONDITIONED 
No Finance or Loan ott &. COMFORT 
Companies Involved , 
WE CATER TO SERVICEMEN . 


You Get Immediate Credit 
Approval and Delivery 


; $2121 
Seneure~ REGAL 


ales ia Pree esu- Clothing & Furniture Co 
Boo) Auto Cliy. ae Open een Dally TH 6 


. a? 


HELP, MEN 


REGIONAL MANAGER . 


i presently aot was 
management end mjnimum vears 


mj 
establiahed pergonedity. 
ame di- mathemat 
portunity for 
advancement in ion 
inane r 


qrer 


1341 r) 


SALESMEN. DECORATORS 


“ 
” vores ek wants 


ment opportunities nd fu 


com 
Cotter. & Ral timore. MU 
HONE Leave neme and ohone 
request Mr. Kennedy mot 
sessions. Per- 
peremee de- 


ten very fibers +. 
Ex 


manent Bdejtien, 
pie Call 
2 


ROUTE " SALESMAN ” for ~ '. eat 
fn, and.dry cleaning route 
ou can soe AI = your person- 
elity ae 7 
route 

rity plus ms 


4. 
A — 


SALESMEN 
SUPERVISOR-TRAINEE 
IN MANAGEMENT 
reaiires potions ta tellty 
desirin 


She thelr eal hn 
. & ceil lent imeome while trainin 
Under pessenes . Bow of 82 


eorgia ‘Ave. 


SAFETY ENGINEER, with ” indus. 

trial experience and <oqeasrine 
education, or the eauvivalent. 
casual 


Ws 
r4 s 


refer ar an 
erences essential Por persone 

nterview phone Mr. Btene &- r 
Rent 10 to 4 3. Mm A 7-35.36 


SALESMEN 
COLORED—LOOK'"'!! 


”* we have 6 brand pew deal 
"> selle for @ dollar down 


font y & NW. Wash. DC 


SALES ENGINEER 


Who! a" esting and air cond!- 
ome sesurec 


te write 

a cay we Day You 

en every order f vou ere wid 

awake ambitious m. dependable 
; 0 


SALES TRAINEE 
$7 


UP 
Wante feasonab!r 
en ith sgo00d 
Interview by 630 
nt . ~2336. experience or not, 
by sae ow, wth 
SALES TRAINEE ” sae 
ioe ae jor C 
Nateinal organizatio as 6 ing SALESMEN _ pong ee printers 
alert young man tween 7 ont 


phetegraphers and si 
sales training progre dad sure pale service to 
e sales experience Sosae. 


have a 2 AL M N 
$5000 PER YEAR TO START 


RITYPLUS EXTRA C 
BON 


and 


National 


” apely 
+ PM only 


i enter lines 


ent 
ain pies. C Mr Lyan po. 


7.5) 
SALESMAN 
ullder division bein established 


growing distributor AY 


MAN NAOER 
air conditioning and BENEFIT 


TOU, CAN BARS 


ees 


TRAININ 


202. P 


SALESMAN, $450 | 


Industrial. with car. Sal. & comm 
ring. resume. Gee Miss Bell ‘NA 


f $fo, 
O's, cor. 12th & G 
whe faa 


SHOE DEPART- 
re Bled: ee re 


SUPERVISORY 
ENGINEER 


For project leadership in advanced dig- 
ital computer application This man 
should have a thorough knowledge of in- 
put and output devices, computer cir- 
cuitry, IAgical design, and the ability to 
direct others in new project work areas 
For additional information about this key 
position write, call or visit... 


AVION DIVISION 


ACF Industries, 


524 North Pitt Street 
Alexandria, Virginie 
Kl 8.4900 


ont 


— 


AR RBQUIRED. ” 


iD OP. 
NE FOR 
. 8. 2- 


SELLING 
FERRED. C 


INVESTIGATE 
INITY 

PERSONAL IN 

1800. 

National Memorial Park 
Falls Church, Va. 


r— : 


rd ne 


| MELPAR INC. 


Inc. 


ENGINEERS 


Electroni¢ AND Mechanical 


PHYSICISTS: 
Top Grade Openings 
At -Melpar—Leader in 


Electronic Research 
and Development 


Due to our continuing expansion program, a 
number of top grade openings exist in our 
laboratories in Falls Church. We urge you to 
consider the following: 


1—At Melpar the engineer is not tied to a 
pre-arranged schedule of advancement. _in- 
stead, promotion and advancement are based 
on individual recognition, where skill and 
ability are the paramount factors of deter- 
mination. 


2—Melpar has doubled in size every 18 
months for the past' 10 years. New openings 
eccut constantly. This enables the engineer 
to advance to a position of increased responsi- 
bility as soon as he is ready. 


3—Our unique “PROJECT TEAM” basis of 
organization gives the engineer an opportunity 
to participate in entire problems from concep- 
tion to completion of Prototype, and thus 
experience the “OVBRALL” approach to en- 
ineeri problems necessary to eventual 
Siretters ip responsibility. 
4—Our Air-conditioned laboratories encom- 
pass over 285,000 square feet and offer com- 
plete facilities for creative research and design. 
In addition to our central mode! shop, supple- 
mentary facilities, personnel and test equip- 
ment are available for immediate use within 
each project group. 


Top Grade Openings 
Exist in these fields: 


Network theory — Systems Evaluation — 
Microwaye Technique — UHF, VHF, or SHF 
Receivers —- Analog Computers — rom, sar 
Tape Handling — ~* Digital Computers-Radar 
and Counter Measures — Packaging Elec- 
tronic Equipment — Pulse Circuitry — Micro- 
wave Filters — Flight Simulators — Servo 
Mechanism — Subminiaturization — Electro 
Mechanical Design — Small Mechanisms — 
Quality Control and Test Engineering. 


POSITIONS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE 
FOR INEXPERIENCED 


ENGINEERS 


Interested in the above-mentioned fields. 


Far Additional information cal! our 
Technical Personne! Representative 
at JE. 4.6000, Ext. 212 
or Visit our Laboratory 
wo 3000 Arlington Bivd., Fatis Church, vi 


Me!par, Inc. 


| 


: Sun eS a2 SALESMEN LOKI 


tion 
eat 


that 
ite @ear 
three orders to five Vo “a 


makers 


—— 


ta Y pe 


| 
. 


" WEL?, MEN 


a aH 
AS, Sees tect, “he 


eerie: §=»§ WORKERS 


| riveting of aircraft structures 
and skins. Military re@etalsrmith 
training desirable. 


$30-$60 A DAY 


OPENINGS ON DAY OR 
NIGHT SHIFT 


# ERCO DIVISION | 


ACF Industries, Inc, 
Riverdale, Md 
WA, 7-4444 


nie 


“every. "Terk 
: . ba ® 


in : 
ay ch 
ipyest nie" 


SALES ae _ TRAINEE 


| Youne saeeressive arried man to 


"SHEET ROCKERS: 
TAPERS 
4 
SPACKLERS 


(Machine Men) 


Things will 
o man's “ability Your first vear 

ould brip 1 
Upon completion “ot training pro- 
sram you will be ola 


terview ca 
bet wee een 10 


SEAT COVER INSTALL — Exper 
colored, for ompter ene in eute 


‘ 
Vi ATION 
SHIFT MAN 

a have D C. refer 


ue commission te 
start wh Service 
a¥nv—* Star ave 
A. attend, hate. wht i 


te make 8250 W 
Apoiy at once 


ECKERT & FRAZER 
CONSTROUCTTON 


us Seve , t 
ruck driver. exp top Bay 


Ge es nies 


SHOE SALESMAN 
cnn deer s0ekeh pe tooNas 


i 


Livineston Ra just over the 
Dd. cc. line at 


SHOE MANAGER ~ 
Tnusual eopertaatsy for agaressiv 

young men 1 ‘ shor 

“ope tin our “new . ven Sar 


age a 
‘ third floor, Ron4 Efe! thes. 1335 F 
plete oaty Airing. 8S NaN 

ity preferr 

PS. 8. 


vif smb r abil st 
524 F SOUND RADIO A Vv 
TECHNICIAN 
Sheet ‘Sane Men 


Excellent pay. working cond)- 

nd sermanent career is 
Should have basic knowledge of and most 
meta! working machinery Positions distributor 
offered « it arge research n 
end development laboratory located 


n cA 
experienced wit 
im Falls Chu t 


adios televisions 
aster “anteane overeme. 
ard for aopointm 


TEMPO ELECTRONICS, we 


MUZAK.- STROMBERG = ee 


1341 L St 
ed 


inside Work 
45.-Hour Work Week 
Air Conditioned Facilities 
Many Employee Benefits 
APPLY IN PERSON 


MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 
8 AM. TO 4 P.M. 


t be experience 


apply. Call J 


, 400 MO. — 


Under 30 ree estate ange 
round seel tee BELL. N 


BOYD'S, Cor. 12th & G 


or general super 
gales an and operation on 7 
in Wheato 


salary. Mus 
: ere need 


pape, of 
ry ser wr 


3000 ARLINGTON BLVD. 
FALLS CHURCH, VA. 


and other company benefits 
s. ahaa tor 1 interview 


fg 


SALESMEN 


WHAT ARE YOU LOOKING FOR? 


Merchandise vou can be proud to sell? 
A company which takes an interest in YOU? Deminant ad- 
vertising? Top-rated company benefits? <A lecation out of 
vertising? Top-rated company benefits? A location out of the 
downtown? area? An anpoortunity for advancement? A dy 
namic, proven selling program? 


Excellent Earnings? 


SEARS has openings for commission salesmen in the follow- 
ing departments 
APPLIANCES 
PLUMBING & HEATING 
BUILDING MATERIALS 
RUGS 
FURNITURE 
VENETIAN BLINDS AND AWNINGS 
| HOME DECORATING 
| These inside-outside jobs, which require « car, are excellent 
opeertunhities for the 146. men who qualify. 


Aooly in pereen at Gur few store 
from 16 AM te 8 P.M. Monday. Tuesdar. Wednesdar 
August 1% 14. 18, 16. 


SEARS ROEBUCK & CO. 


Alabama Ave. & Navier R4 88. 


Thureday 


| 


rm 


Experimental Machinists 


Experimental machine shop of 
guided missile development or- 
ganization has several openings 
for qualified experimental ma- 
chinists. 

8 to 10 years’ experience in close tolerance work as « 


model maker, too! maker, etc., is required; stable em- 
ployment record and goed references are essential. 


SHEET METAL |1i 


i] loushby’ as Eeso vy 
n® i 


BIRCHWOOD CITY | 


Porter A too pay 


tper 


| Assembly to 


and 


~~ SUPERVISOR 
ar LEANING Soy 


Experienced in assembly and x 


oi Ran 


. tC] 
tos +R ee ‘trem a 


fae Stara re : 


"Teaching Career 
Ww 
| Arthur Murray 
| Ba ey 
ree 


Age 22 16 32 
<ailese backsround er eaquiy- 


3 Enter» ested in pose 
opportunities for peveanes- 


TECHNICAL 
WRITERS 


Experience in preparation 
of instruction books, hand- 
books, Operating and main- 
tenance manuals for elec. 
tromic equipment Strong 
electronic background nec- 
essary. 


fer ballroom 
orming and giv- 
whe eualify 


n 
leaching pours ae 1G) Cees Phore WA. 7-4444 


ave ne 


Technical Personne! 
Section 


TAILORS 
FULL TIME 


SxPER: cer AL BATION 
MEN 8 CLOTHIN 


FOR THE NEW 


ROBERT HALL | 
SALESROOM 
OPENING SOON AT | 

2010 UN 


iEnerty LANE 

ay! rk oO 
AR qe R 

I woo Rug ‘ 


2820 RICHMOND HIGHWAT 
Alexandria, eet ae 


To arrange an interview 
at your convenience 


ACF Industries; Inc. 
Riverdale, Maryland 


TECHNICAL | 
WRITERS 


11501 
Rockville wi te ary Rt 


ETAL, CLOTHING ChAT 
wonm,. A oot a) NEAR 


OwnN 
WR OFFER: 


~— food Salary 

—Paid vacations 

—Paid Holidays . 

~—Paid Sick Leave 

—tenerous Emplere Misceunte 

—Free Growe Life Insurance | 
APPLY TO 


STORE MANAGER 


at any of the asheve a¢@r@ecee 


~ MELPAR, INC. 


A Subsidiary of Westinghouse 
Air Brake Company 


ration of tnetruction manu- 
electronic equipmen 

Education In electronics and previ- 
ous technica) 


Interesting 


sign ont 
Por full in 


aod chaliengi 
diversified problems 
ormation 


APPLY IN PERSON 


MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 
BA.M.TO4P. M. 


Technicians 
Electronic 


Ability to read wiring dia- 
grams or blueprints. 


Falls Church, Va. 


experimental 
electronic equipment. Previ- 


| ous industriel or military serv- 


ice experience necessary. 


APPLY IN PERSON 
BA. M. t8 4 PLM 
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 


MELPAR INC. 


ute GHtRe HA 
BA Wwe plans entrance) 


TITT South Fern Se 
Arlington, Va. 


INSTALLER —  Ex- 
enced in Wiring. trouble shoot. 
and installation. Tepe par 
addy work - 


tv SERVICEMAN x st - peneh 


an* outside exper. 
eaigak gul te 
men e perience 


piy in person Life 651 
v . 


A, &. in 
on con a 
leon «=Biwd 


ra 
te 


; a - Be. "Gonea 
ts Top salary. pera. 
Pred Wal lker. 2605 ri 
@aton 
area Genera! werd in Ww 
sere Jor in srithmeete' right 
r 


uture 
porte rtation t age 
per week start 
urra s at in 
a ‘o 


‘Tak 


travel: tr 
can 


r s 


| "Oo chy A FoSRe BART Engineering assignments | 


ERCO DIVISION | 


Prepe 
als and installation procedures on 


@ritine experience) 


3000 Arlington Bivd. 


i Mr. Ward, RE 


ville Attiebo 


“th . 


HERALD 
25 


HELP, MEN 


WELDERS 


Experience with gas and arc! 
preferred. Must be able to 
work from blueprints, 


THE FIELD 
ENGINEERING 
FORCE 
of : 
Western Electric Co. 


'ERCO DIVISION | 
ACF Industries, Inc. | 
Riverdale, Md. 
WA. 7.4444 


OPENINGS ON DAY 
AND NIGHT SHIFTS 


Now has immediate 
openings 


for 


ELECTRONIC 
ENGINEERS 
PHYSICS 


YOU NG MAN 
2 


l 
Te sesiet manager or 

MATH MAJORS 

"Ekckancowe 


for 


ll te learn. 
abie t converse ance. willing, 


MINIMIM ION SCHOO, | 
FEDUCATION 


| 
| 
| 


ABBOCIATED WITH | 


| Guided Missiles 
| Control Radar 
| Sonar 


s\THE WASHINGTON POST end TIM 
Circulation 
| vertisers. To place your ad 
NEW 
far 
| $160 Wk. to Start | | 
YEAR ‘ROUND 


Be 
Monday, August 13, 1956 
18) 
382, 000 
Daily 
| 
| means quicker sales resulte 
| tor Washington Post and 
| Times Herald classified o4- 
Phone 
REpublic 7-1234 
HELP, WOMEN. STB 
FOOD TOWN 
VIENNA, VA. 
Immediate Openings 
Meat Cutters 
Produce Clerks 
Grocery Clerks 
YOUNG MAN 
Good Salary, Paid Vacations 
Group Hosp., 
All Fringe Benefits 


5 ] 
Lepte y ) a CAL , 


Mr. T. Sperry 
EX. 3-5035 


MONDAY, 
TUESDAY OR 


xpert deta have typing 
abil! ty and must te able to even 


Experience Helpful 
But Not Necessary 


On the Job Training 
WEDNESDAY Excellent Advancement 
OR Opportunities with the 


| Write Mr. C. W. Bigelow | Area's Fastest Growing 
Chain 


APPLY IN PERSON 


FOOD TOWN 
| MAPLE AVE. 
VIENNA, VA. 


MON ’-TUES.-WED. 
10 am. to 2 pm. 


WANTED: 
8 MEN 


npc 
With care (oni er. 271 t 38 veers 


S590. ‘h "te oat a ai? 


business eid ; 
you can qua aty call for 8 ber- 
cena! Appein tment Mr Davis 


“ 


YOUNG MEN, 21 TO 28 


ity as train with 
or anteatien. 


A- 
ooleoanl fenaes ex 
y comp on 7. 


cellent benefits Western Electric Co. | 
Chatham Road, 
Winston-Salem, 


Bilver Aprine North Carolina | 


plus 


| 7910 Ceoraia Ave. 
Mea 


tet —E — 
- —— 


Young Men. je hy 
THE | 

CHESAPEAKE & POTOMAC | 

TELEPHONE COMPANY... 


PART TIME 
6-9:30 P. M. 


“uehi ing young men 
welie relations depart} 
ent of large netienal concern 
ite ly rvicemen end col- 
| students ye ~y* aifie er 
evening those whe Por 


pont Cir “Slates 


Kougsy Ciréle. 
eeasey ae dia! nu 
” o's ye ip 


ARCADE EMPLOYMENT 
ee $3! 


8 neat 
work in 


Otters excellent career on- 
portunities for qualified — 
young men seeking regu- 
lar employment. Positions 
are available in Washing- 

ton and nearby Virginia 

An interest in mechanics 

or electronics is desirable 

Must be high school grad- 
verte. 


$) 

1 
ck iver (wh or col) wate 
eriies 


jerenenee mee 
oc * i? og 
ork’ clerk (meat cutting) y 8 
rocery clerk = *) asa ss 
, gta. att or ¢o).) u 
Mans others to Choose from “ 
7 30 M.- 


NEEDED (5) MEN 
(VIRGINIA AREA) 


With care (white). ne canvessine 
experience net nee 
$590 per month te start. Call JA. 
AN iMMI 
Little knowledse 


EMPLOYMENT OFFICE 
725 13th St. NW 

andi icepped preferred 

nea 1 bicycle 

Aoply Monday Thru Friday iv fae 


8:30 A. M. to 4:00 P.M. 
cany vassing 


nd iL «a at tpemee a ig” 
= ey g NEED 5 MEN (dese =r 


te work : ~ me Pte, Ts record 


Siete sett ca, al jeer 
in 
ick 
quer on 2 
Grivers. porters rmen. 
tA Ril “e part-time. 915 rm ave. aw res 


(a) phone 


$20.00 DAILY—Sell Lum 
Pla a A Reeves. 
Mass Pree 


| Need 
® PART TIMERS 


PRODUCT EVALUATION 
SPECIALIST 


Personnel needed to assist in planning, testing and 
analyzing new computer peripheral equioment for 
large Midwestern manufacturer. interesting work 
with @ future and rapidly expending electronic com- 
puter field. Must heave technical and/or applice- 
tien experience in punched card or other. similar 


dats processing equipment.” 


Send complete resume to 
Box M-293 Post-T.H. 


DESIGN 


Those who qualify will be offered continuous employ 
ment on 40-hour week besis with benefits, including 
vacation end sick leave, voluntary retirement end in- 
surance plan and group hospitalization. 


PERIODIC INCREASES BASED ON MERIT 
EXCELLENT WORKING CODNITIONS 


Machune shop will be relocated within @ year te our 
Howard County building on new Route 29, approxi- 
mately 25 minutes from Silver Spring by car. 


PLEASE APPLY 
9 AM. TO 3 P.M. 


The Johns Hopkins University 


APPLIED PHYSICS LABORATORY 
8621 Georgia Ave., Silver Spring, Md. 
JU. 9-7700 


EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION 


RESEARCH 
CONSULTANT 


In 


SERVO-MECHANISMS 


| 
| 


ENGINEERS 


Openings in long-range projects on the 
weapons of the future with 


VITRO 


The challenge of « new technological field . . . can be 
yours with the expendihg VITRO LABORATORY in 
Silver Spring. Here you will find career oppertunities 
in the new mechanical engineering fie'd. 


Guided Missile Launching Systems 


The following positions are evailebie: 
SYSTEMS ENGINEERS 


Openings for Mechanical’ Engineers with four to ten 
years of engineering experience; must be capable of 
recognizing the simple prectical approach te complex 
problems; experience with @ manufacturing concern 
in design, plenning and control of @ product would 
be helpful. 


MECHANICAL DESIGN ENGINEERS 


Openings fer Mechanical Engineers with four te ten 


and 
MAGNETIC AMPLIFIER 


Design Development 
and Application 


A highly qualified mar? whe wants « steff consult- 
ant position with well-defined promotions! possibi!)- 
thes and remuneration that is cormmensurate with the 
advanced nature of the sssignment, should write, 
call or visit... ? 


AVION DIVISION 


ACF Industries, Inc. 


years of engineering design experience; background 
in one or more of the following preferred: Automatic 
Machinery,.High Speed Mechanisms, Material Han- 
dling Devices, etc. Ability in cam, linkage and gearing 
dynamics desirable. 


For complete information shout the project, educa- 
tional assistance and other employee benefits please 
rrere 


JU. 5-7200 
Personne! Department 


TQ ARRANGE FOR SATURDAY INTERVIEWS 
PLEASE CALL NOT LATER THAN 3 P.M. FRIDAY 


Vitro Laboratories 


Division of Vitro Corporation of America 
962 Wayne Avenue, Silver Spring, Md. 


* - 


Guided Missile Launching Systems | 


A 5 inc young 
_ Or Woman to sell in large 
and t store in Bethesda. 


eee see if odin ie iene al weeks sell 
UNUSUAL  =eenee 


Read this Thoroughly 
Metropolitan Ve. Only 


OF ad Sb tactn 
os 

i vert 7 aw le of 
earning & week and more. 
° fing invoivea. If your bili 


e of the oldest end 
ndscape soe musees 
ucts maaliy will rating = 


largest caver, ceramics maker 


| 
kind of « crafteman? 

' 

PLEASE DO NOT PHONE 


ed 
ew acco uate 


have one of the 
positions 


ae 
3-4 


| Permanen 


ae 

\— “+ le oo 

to thogra al enéeline. “Lane 
lettering and inking 

con aition stu 


TLDING NG SUPERINTENDENT — we 
oul aes Ot 
New 
be abdle to 
an 
men well ever 810.000 
fente of epoertnany ole for 
doen 


mencooment a < — 
ontrecting “lor Spring delivery, 


raonteomery oe 
experience 
ot Go tt Geo 


andscape gar aeeen or laborers 
Applicants shou 


p.. —— mere car. 
Bode me « 
= ' | GEN. OFFICE WORKER 


¢ Peucations! Assoc 
estate experienced reson 


esdey. : ‘a 


1910 9TH ST. WW. AD. 4-23761 


SALESMEN 


FULL OR PART TIME 
MEN’S CLOTHING EXPERIENCE 
PREFERRED 


ine suburban ‘ros Sane 


expe ust Dave Car and 
| he Sle te work ‘all time 


| et 5402 Maribore free” 4 ral ie 


| Md. or call Mr 
YOUNG MEN 
ND 
YOUNG WOMEN 


For Counter Work 


STW LT SRNR 


WHITE TOWER OFFICE 
| wh 2. oT 


pare. ie 
geass pe eas 


Work conveniently near your own home in one of the 


ae NEW 
ROBERT HALL 
SALESROOMS 


OPENING SOON AT 


2829 RICHMOND HWY 
ALEXANDRIA, VA 


tts py. ST. 3-0 


bkkpr. oate : 
| Basser ec. ave. & ters .. 
orm ep 
| serosa, 


0094 


2010 UNIVERSITY LANE 
LANGLEY PARK, MD. 


S02 ARLINGTON BLVD 1150 ROCKVILLE PIKE 
FALLS CHURCH, VA. ROCKVILLE, MO 


_—Fine Progressive Wage Scale—Paid Holidays 


| JOIN AMERICA’S LARGEST RETAIL CLOTHING CHAIN | 


WE OFFER: 


~ Paid Sick Leave 

— Free Group Life insurance 

—Generous Employee 
Discounts 


APPLY TO: 
STORE MANAGER 


at any of the above addresses 


—Liberal Sales incentive 
earnings pian 

—Blue Cross Coverage 

—Paid Vacations 


CALCULATOR OPERATORS 
CLERK-TYPISTS 
FILE CLERKS 
RECEPTIONISTS 


e 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD Wale, WOMEN 16 HELP, WOMEN 


26. 


Moandev. August 15, 13, ene 


415,000 
Sunday 
Circulation 


means quicker sales results 
for Washington Post and 
Times Herald classified ad 
vertisers 
for Sunday. 


Phone 
REpublic 7-1234 


wo 


ALLEN O'BRIEN 
Pgh 


rel. ofe cecees: 
s 

te 975 
350-870 we 
$290 rm 


ist dentiets ofc. 
T sii 


ry 
4 CAPETERI: 4 WORKERS, 


M- . 
rs.) Oreee 12th and G ae 
a 


D.C EMPL EXCHANGE 
WHITE & COLORED 

@uit finisher 

Watt resses. wht 


‘19 sai'- 


count Lain eirts 


Sobee domestic 
Laundry workers. « 
oie prez by operators 


ett o OTHERS A’ 
os 12 oth Bt NY 
2-1! a 


min. Enis to $ 


i i ac APiT ry P 


CONN ie APPICES 
CLERK. TYPISTS, Many to $70 


S crads (man 


GAN) OTABRS 
odie": ng interesting fields 

Annette D. Tatelman 
205 ph a sa a le RE S oes 7 | 


‘ADMIN. SECY. $4800 


Srvail office of trade assoc. Some 
pub contact. recoro keeping. Down- 


town icc. Air-cond. office 
SECY -BKKPR —$5200 
j office Deub.e- 
.—— ekills 


dy —$3600 


prominent professiona, 


iaid x t 
private foundation. § days. Down- 


"PERSONNEL CLERK 


Por nat. publication 
ehility to handle corres 

"rusting and handling of sentiien 
tial records esi 9 m- Under 30 
years Start »s 


SECY. no "shhd Embass¥) * 


het wet A i Fe ag Seme os 


"CLK “TYPIST ~$260 


Por sa\es ore Busy Beene. A» io. 
work 
we 43909 in "90 anne 


xX CLERK 


t oA aD Duse bo Na 
typing Above- ~average apoen: ‘ance 


ILLUSPRATION CLERK 


Por as publication Sere collese 
Wom. Downtown. Beauti- 


PAYROLL CLK —$3300 
trace assoc 35-hour wees 


rown 
AGENCY. FE + 7808 
7il 14h NW! 


°**” 


eraton Bigs 


VL 
ADVERTISING CLERK 


Clerical position available in 
classitied advertising depart 
ment for young woman who 
likes to keep records and is 
neat and accurate with figures 
Five-day, 40-hour week. 


APPLY PERSONNEL DEPT. 
9am.to2 p.m 


The Washington Post 
& Times Herald 


15i5 Lt Se 


VAS 


G 
a trping hrs. 
po ‘A perso 
207 “Bou 


obr ad under instructions. 
AVIATION TRA 
1 a NW 
urgently 
capped bDreferrec. Sorting of c! 
ay pe of x pecbe 
y ror. 2 
gel hecawit” tadustries 1 
. a © poene ca) ; 
cher ee 


Sil ion. Beth. Rockvl. 
Tak. Park, NW. Wash. 


tis 4 877 


5 
. 
tsville 5 
. Myratisviie 
. near 4, Renton 


O18 Elewor. 


Giscuss j0>b opecT 
"Our "rr is air 
on -Fri. 9:30 we 


Petes EMPL. 
SILVER SPRING 


we U up 


MEL, woman 
BOOKKEEPING 


To place your ad Excellent Working Conditions 


: 


tist . £ 
Day. ppiy FPedera 
, © v 


oc = lady in 
arse a) f-condit loned i. rai otfide 
the Sing hine Co B: 


IC RELA-| ¢ 
, w,, 


Mu ~w nave CLERKS. ~ part time time 


" 


) Bs ‘e BS 


oh) | 
stn Washington | s ) 


: 


/BOOKKEEPER-TYP IST 


ac- 


te opening for 6 rons 4 “y 


i ypist. uncer 


n| For 


434. for appointment. 


‘ NATIONAL 
GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY 


16TH & M STS. WW., 


TOP SALARIES 
Top PEOPLE 


Positions available in person- 
nel, insurance and accounting 
branch. All have a future—All 
have excellent Promotion pos 
sibilities. 5-day week and al! 
company benefits 

Apply Monday & Tuesday 

August 13-14 

Between 9 & 2:30 P.M. 


HOT SHOPPES, INC 


1441 GC BT. NW - 


MACHINE 
OPERATOR 


Expenenced 
eo 


NATIONAL 
SAVINGS AND 
TRUST CO. 


—_—— —— ee 


CLERK. TYPIST 


Must type at least 40 words 
per minute, accurate’ Exce! 
lent working conditions 


NATIONAL 
SAVINGS AND 
TRUST CO. 


BRANCH STORE 
CLERKS 


— 


reve severe: openings nF 
sranch sores .ocatec in 
Vireinie ana nearty seer: ane 
TA ce. oy oe 7 
Ar plingt on 


for com 
Bis 


a nearey “Searvlands aree, 
ations With . 

os are other” emetepe ‘bene 
. 


APPLY IN PERSON 


ELITE LAUNDRY 
2119 (4th St. NW, 


. CLERK-TYPIST 


ma lacy for perm nent position 
"loca con 
Good 
carting salar? 
hes st*-conditonea 
for per 


ar. pate 
| CLERK-TYPISTS 
CLERKS 


Positions available in an ex- 
panding research orgarwzation 
pportunity for advancement 


a ite: 

“up girls; nest ena re- 

slesi 5. uniforms. ineurance 

id eee. Apply in per- 
4 a? 


r. 
R-< ck 
experience 


ver 
ket. 


Large furniture. stere: Sa 
apply Nationa! 
7th and N wv. 


rmanent 
ure Co 


CASHIERS 
HOSTESSES 
SALES CLERKS 


Bakery-Pantry House: 


Canvermment suburben 
location 


Permanent resudent of 


Excellent starting salary Day 
thes area preferred 


or mont hours available. choice 
of tecations, unitorms and 
meals turmished 
Earrnt While You Learn 
We Will Train You 


4s Hour W ee« 
s 


th RU IDAT 
0 400 PM 


c MELPAR, INC. 


200 


APPLY 
¥os Da ta 


APPL \ 
HOT SHOPPES, 
iIMi G ST. NW 


IN 
RM 


noeidiare 
OU6E Air 


Ve 


x v 


= Neg 
¢ 


cowrtowr 
5 20-9. m. $1 hr 
30 e 


a’ 
wEaTNs -Brake Co 


(Orr sete 


3000 Arlington Bivd 
Falis Church, Va. 


te wore * 
of tr Sewing : rT.) 


vacation when eu 
reson ony 


lver ring we. le blocks from 
G Als sk 


CLERK-TYPIST 
STENOGRAPHER 


position Jer persion my 
=e B. — good tr 

sired anaed 

: edurat iona! Dacksrouns 

uncer 40 ¥ of age 

re. “Bon be 


Nifignae CAPITAL BANK 
typing. 


Permanent 


posi’ 

previews experience 

years see ust Be accurate end 
ersen. r typist 38-hour Hees. 


=F 
BR. Hanger 


ATOR 
with knowledae of camp- 
operations aise 8  clerx- 
. Capadle of 40 words per » 
. Ages between 25 ana 48i- cond office 
rated , comeany benefits: .Sk* Jor. 8900)n) 
-ho excellent 
: Foun .3in girs. col. 


= ia 


exp 
$30-835 +t: ‘Bs 
Sie 7 ath NY 
= tine 
tom s@) 
se we 
SERVICE. 
—! 


Sears. Roe- 
si “niadensbu re rad. CONWAY 


C LER KS 
High School Graduates 


Experienced or inexperienced 


G 
ezp 
wn 


oir Pres. ome EMP"! 
ee Oe. sve. pe. 


DIETITIAN 


NA NAL GEOGRAPRIC So. 
crz mas an atiractive posit 

in ome ore one eria for one wi oh 

' home economics or 

experience to assist 

age 25 serve 1 

a? wees. annual end 

rave ooh 3 a Cen 

! - Cmee M ats 

Rs 3330 ant “ot for ae- 


w airesses 


Te train for Manus 
accounting Work Immediate per- 
manent ob “areey oper ey 
with reliable concern. No wee 
S-dar week: Aours 9-5 tar 
pay ncreaees.-s carers end "retire. 
ment semerits. Ages 18-25 


FOR APPOINTMENT 
Call 
NA. 4-9900, Ext 


GAd machine 


Executive Assistant 


286 


‘Dry cleaning 
afternoon anc Ga’ 
Call Ar 


ana trping. wht 
ep aew-erese €00« ee 


Permanent career pestsiee 
es:.. late executive sasistent ia 
res ident pref raion 

on 
pubdlishing organizations in 
educational fields 


salary $5000 
Bus girls, dichwashers 

Srirt ores epers.. exp 
Maicas 


we ROBOLITAR 


ert AGENCY. INC. NA 4&- 
$06 ios Bt. NW. Near N Y Ave 


CLERK-TYPIST 
SOME SHORTHAND 
Under 35, fer aevestione gessase® 


cepartment of national n rata 
Shoulda enioy working Be. 


re’ orl : 
benefits including 
cation 


experien 
, a office activ! sites ang — 
cling certesponden to 
ravei to Sonvention. cities *o «as- 
aise im mansegement of three na- 
conferences year: 


ning and 
stenographie 
with minut 
sasbees be the 
. whom « hard working staff of 12 
persons will fell immediately in 
love 


You will) werk directiy with the 
executive director of 
tion. and will became 
ly a ker member of the ma 
Tf? rou think 
ents x. 


ben Cc 
be ween S and 


dept of ocal . 
sood st; 


ter hy tea mh pe 
Jon 


is 38. 
sesziticlg o omen duties i 
Hours Q te 5.30 xk @ir- 

ond office Please”. welne cante © Siete reply “a * 
a — Pos ot -TH 


. ; r 
‘.; knowl typing. Wiben , 
. nw. - 


rea preferred 
ened building. 
=. 


| Would you like te build « 
food onan business in 
Cc ¥ expan 


fr 
a own 
food 
sales- 
oT «4 
. Powell 10s. m.- 


“typing & 
7, aiken +e 


Re BE Waters 


ear 


ijn @& & 


TO $70 PER WEEK [ 
: . Xmas 


5. ,* . ee an 
earnings. Ase . ors a 
PART TIME 


++ ay 


| Office experience, PBX 
relief. Pleasant working 
conditions, opportunit 
for a ve lan ny prs ed IBM KEY PUNCH OPERATOR 
benefits and discount’ —— — 

Apply 4th floor. Reiiapility Research 


L. FRANK CO. 
1220 F St. NW. 


requires eumeniane: ether is Ben! 
ginning position. Permanen: 


+ a 
wee re it 


© benefits. FE. 


Start PSE 


ineur. 


id CLERK-TYPISTS | 


NCR OPERATOR—$300 


| Washington Post 


NURSERY 


sv 


ion. finance emis. 


* POLICY WKIT 


re 8s 
work. Apply i 


You y should ws Le “en PRIVATE SECY $3900 


BOYD’ Ker. 
. REL. 


board ~ 2 
kind ef doll wath 


7444 Wiscensia Ave. 


, 
J 
28. 


Seine LAB. ASSISTANT 


: 


FOR ALL SHIFTS 
MATH ASSISTANTS MEDICAL SECRETAR 
_MED. REC'D LIBRARIAN # 


TECHNICAL AIDES = HADLEY HOSPITAL 
<_Nienols_Ave, SF. i 


College-level training in 
math necessary. Recent 
training or work experi- 


New apt 
typing an 
ence desirable : 


Pte 
Been nw an 
‘RESIDENT mae eae 


‘’ 


Continuous employment, 
excellent pay, 5-day week, 
retirement and insurance 
plan, vacation and sick 
leave benefit ae 
| oe pestery and Po ay 4 dep’ 
Please Aoply Yoon. » ited> A st. Se 
Wilsen_D 


4124 

9AM 3PM | 
Weehiuve eAGy 

FURS 


fer salesladr 
stead> pesition. excellent 
+ a fer proper party. See 


“BRESLAT. 814 12m NY. 


The Johns Hopkins 
University 


APPLIED PHYSICS 
LABORATORY 


842! Georgia Avenue 
Silver Soring, Mad 
JUnmper 9-7700 


SALESWOMAN 


With ready-to-wear experience 
Excellent soportunity 
young woman who is interested 
m learrung to sell better mer 
cnandse 


ror 


ABBOTT EMPL... 1307 B NW 


APPLY 


NEWSPAPER CLERK 


Clerical position in Promotion 


Department for alert young EMPLOYMENT 
woman who would like to start | 
her business a i The OFFICE | 


A good 
3RD FLOOR 


knowledge of typing is neces- 
sary, together with an ability 
to adapt to varied clerical du 
LANSBURGH’S 
WASHINGTON 
STORE 


ties. Five-day. 40-hour week 

paid vaactions, sich leave 

group insurance benefits, air 

conditioned office 

APPLY PERSONNEL DEPT 7m, Oth SE Ses. NW. 
9am.to2 p.m 


The Washington Post 
& Times Herald 


SALESWOMEN 


HIGHEST SHOE SELL? 
COMMISSIONS 
WITH MANY 

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS 
inchucng Paid Vacations 

Benefits 

Weekiv Settlements 
5-DAY WEEK 

Permanent Employment 


or 
i | 


NURSES 


ret ae ATE OPENTE G8 ? 


~Cr 


5-der 
quali 
$i; 


SCHOOL, ASST 
wri e tul exper. and 
. preier live in. Box 


ws 
~atior 


Post Apply Manager Any 


HAHN SHOE STORES 


STAMSTRESS—Clerx. a. 
eo Co} ame Valet. 3316 ‘Colum- 


>is Pi) i 


SECRETARIES 
(20-30) 


nY AME TRAINTES 12. 
mont certified que care train- 
ing course. Li ve Room board 
and a eenes 16-2 

ears Childrens Ceonval escent 
Home ali 31 unker Hill rd ne 


Payroll Clerks 


Previous experience in Daevro!! ¢e- ‘ 
Immedafe vacancies with 
research development firm 
m Alexandria Must be 
alert and dependabie. Ac- 
curate shorthand and tvp- 
ing required. 5-day, 40- 
hour week Liberal com- 
pany benefits Excellent 
working conditions. Salary 
commensurate with ability 
and expenence. 


mp.ove denefits ‘Convenien: 
ouburban location 


APPLY IN PERSON 
MONDAY-FRIDAY 
8A. M. TO 4 P.M. 


MELPAR. Inc. 


A Subsidiary of 
Westinghouse Air-Brake Co. 
900 Arlington Boulevard 
FALLS CHURCH, VA, 


Bus trom 


to F.C 


FOR APPOINTMENT 
Cali KI. 9.7500, Ext. 106 


Take Arnold V.-2 
lith and E sts. nw. 


Plant Entrance 


ATLANTIC 
RESEARCH CORP. 


90) North Columbus $f 
Alexandria, Virgirme 


Secretary, $3900 


bene ore 


Bovor ta" 12th & G 


SECRETARY 
TO $75 PER WEEK 


pias nos) alization sone 


PBX TYPIST—$60 WK 
Under 35. suteomotive, perm 
Opr -Typist in 6F 


OPERATORS 
PROOF PASSERS: 


Salar and. om missions 
e 


Highest 
r “ON 4-2 tos. weekaays 
-v 


Mrs. Pish 
5-10 a mm * 
insur . 
ance agenc?. experionesa "de red 
20-40. 5-day week. 9-5 ond 
ce sroup insurance ana other 
cmp ove benefits. permangat pas: 
BALE wv E& CO. 1308 

- 7. 

. Bieady 
med. Col ‘um bi a Va- 
+, : ree ‘Columbia Pike. Ariingion when 

Guerant eed acvencement for er 
with ability. Need proven tep fi! 
worker With expe 
Groupe Cal, for appe.nt ® 


 - SECYS.-TYPISTS 
th &S See ABBEY First | 


25; under 30 
mo — 1308 Eye 8s. ww “eT 3-01 
or 5 
in ae #3 


< ™ 
Many benefits. Protestant organ 7- 


iuenes opening. Miss Grant. NA 


Ss 
YounG at Si2- 


PERSON NEL. 1323 G st. aw. NA 


A 
an epergetic sales person. 


need 
full ~ a 2 


rr od 
sential xcellen 


EE ee eter 


Attractive young lady 
oes, Cae im modern sir- 


ay 
HOUSEHOLD 
FINANCE CORP. 


Be‘hesde 


CLERKS 
Drug—Cigar—Candy—Fountain 
FULL TIME 
Permanent Positions 
18 years or over 
Pleasant and Interesting 
Working Conditions 
Many Employee Benefits 


sz 4 ns Cay and fio Paid Traini Pp farm 
APPLY aT OOR Mpa sons NEw DpOWWTOrY 
2n lith and é‘ trance om iith @t. Over Bile 


PEOPLES DRUG STORE 


8:30 A.M. to 4 P.M. Monday through Friday 
HO. 2-1234 


SALES CAREER OPPORTUNITY 
AGED 24-38 


er '?" St Store 
candy 


Training will start 'mmreditelr at 
for Steffing our beautiful modern steres Opening 


soon at Geven Corners 


844.00 olus 63.60 bonus t« the beginning rate for « 8 dar 
46 hour week Wage tmcressees. paid vacation. seven 
hetidaye including your birthée?. 

other benefits #8 
Tou wiil enijer 
well as 


ether phases Store cperation. 


pF Sea ee ES 
RUSSELL STOVER CANDIES 


RUSSELL STOVER CANDIES «as 
Display. “Gite Wrap end 


min. ros 
s| feos 


| Posi 
ecuti 


some an aoe ye Hae ¥ b> 
° salary comm 


| Diy in person 
"| spa M St Vw 


THE WASHINGTON- POST 


wk. 
c Larse serongutical 


| LLOY ny STENOGRAPH ER 


Five ate at “cers 2 te! 
Ba So 


ro 
PEXZA 
Teachi 


Career 
Ww 
Arthur Murray 


Pall training clase 
inetruc’ ing 
free to ~s whe qualify. 


around, eof 


LST o-Gas. @-Dour wes 
leg BH yA 


or 
SECRETARY 


toa open fe Or secretary to ex. 
v 


experience 
atte clu 
pension plan xeellent working 
conditions in air ‘2 ne eq 
$16 Ring Bidg.. 1 3 Interested In people 
Opportunities for advance- 


adue te —e 
Ariingten, Alexandr’ ‘3 iVeasi 
esda and. Washington 

incom ous for 36 


SECRETARIES 


Dersor 
ly Apply conakoten 


Immediate vacancies with 
established engineering |ab- 
oratory for experienced 
secretaries with ability to 
meet the public 


S-day, 40-hour week, paid 
vacation, hospitalization, 
retirement and other em- 
ploye benefits. 


canvasser. white. re- 

siding nw or Mon ounty 

— from home: unlimi 
vired. Ca 
ow nm 


TELEPHONE 
OPERATORS 


Part-Time 


ME. &8-2234, 8 30- 


PLEASE CALL 
PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 


JU. 5-7200 
VITRO LABORATORIES 


Pésitions avalleble tm classified 
advertising deps ons for 
fTomen fhe Want part-time work 
DIVISION OF Telephone experience “desirable 


VITRO CORP. OF AMERICA 


942 Wayne Ave. 
Silver Spring, Md 


APPLY PERSONNEL DEPT. 
9am. to 2 p.m. 


The Washington Post 
& Times Herald 


SNACK BAR ATTENDANT 


permanent epening 


Immed 
3 must se aultk 


SiS t ST. NW. 
sy)hCUunit in ve 
No weekend work 


et 


GOVERNMENT SErviceé. Inc 1338 


1335 2is' 8 NW 


ne 
Eve s 


Telephone icitors 
experienced tee 
re to operate ‘rom 
Commi sen * us cen beonvue 
7 POWFLL OT 4-250 


TELLER 


$50. ew Personne., 


STATISTICAL CLERKS 


L ‘oar / 
m4s 


Excellent Working Conditions 


NATIONAL 
SAVINGS AND 
TRUST CO. 


PLEASE CONTACT 
MR. Cc. P. SONNEBORN 


PERSONNEL MAXSOER AT 
STENOGRAPHERS LL 


Exper: enced young 
Laree eeronaut'ca / COMmMunica: LOR s 


L 


lady. for tags 


: ‘Across {rom Mayflower Hote! 
T¥PistTs—all kings open 


today « 


typing ‘(30 
iss Evese at 
7. NA. &-2349 
Weirome. Viai 


STs. 
Opre with 
r M 


ot o 
SELECT Peer fons. 
+ irat iS toda 


Jel leff's 
SALESWOMEN 


for 


GOATS-SUITS 
SPORTSWEAR 


Misses Better Dresses 
Other Positions to Be Filled 
Cashiers-Clericals 
PBX Operators 
Excellent working conditions, good Sal- 
aries ahd all the additional benefits that 
are included with employment at 


JELLEFF’S 


Apply Personne! Office 
F ST. STORE 
CONN. AVE. STORE 
SHIRLINGTON, VA 
SILVER SPRING, MD 


SECRETARY 


(Newspaper) 


Secretarial. position to company officer available for 
experienced young woman with good stenographic 
skills and the ability to handle more than the usual! 
amount of responability. Many company benefits in- 
cluding liberal vacation plan. 


Apply 
PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 
9AM TO2?.M 


Ww 
“| A 


Co 
od phone) and 


penings. 25 
k. Inter wore 
t PERSON 


openings 
BOYD # 


Pai 
WOMEN 
FOR 
SURVEY WORK 
MARYLAND 
gor mnie VIRGINIA 


leasant 
Ne selling: & hours per dar 
‘tree tion pr 


Pe eo a ae culate 
ix 22s P orma ea. se 
, informs on 4-080) 


BETWEEN 9 30 AM. AND 12 NOON 


2 Sip ibs trom 


TYPISTS 


TYPIST 
| 


fer research b sicaea! in 


ment: salary open "call - 
Ee. 106. for appointm xt 7 


® FOOD TOWN 
VIENNA, VA. 


Immediate Openings 
for 
Cashiers 
Meat Wrappers 
Scale Clerks 


YEAR “ROUND . 


Good Salary 
Paid Vacations 
Group Hospitalization 
All Fringe Benefits 


for ballroom 
arm 


ATLANTIC RESEARCH-CORP 
Alexandria, Virginia 


<eeping and yo destrapie 
-s. By paid vacation.’ profi: 


na 
fits Apply 
Lo. 15h & 


TYPIST 


Under 38 Should have Geant 
Lying speed. minim ah 


w B's de. 
4] Man 
"2900 


ween 9 and $ 


© Wa itresses and Hostesses 


Day and night 
N UNE ROOM 
nw 


~ WATTRESS 


EXPERIENCED 
ning opening o ge ie. 


| Even 
aire ee “in pers = 
FOR COUNTER. ESSES to & 
Highest wages 

MR RUM MSEY. | HOWARD 
Excellent Advancement 
Opportunities with the 
Area’s Fastest Growing 

Chain 


APPLY IN PERSON 


FOOD TOWN 
MAPLE AVE. 
VIENNA, VA. 


MON.-TUES -WED 
10 am. to 2 p.m. 


ur Ber 
Mr Si Cm 
E Sts 


Experience Helpful 
But Not Necessary 


On the Job Training 


ite 
tabie. day or night. 


825-30 ¢ 
i 


v ection 
fomiper with Siiver “Boring are 
Seutly ay. car ins Lo 


os m te 
WRAPPER INSPECTOR 
Experienced, excellent salary 
S.day week, permanent posi- 
tion, liberal employee discount 
HAHN SHOE STORES CHRISTMAE PRO now un- 
wary to select and ‘ain oe 


men 
‘ in AVON Barn $309- 
$500 before Chris:mas 1 DI 71-0821. 


$ ATTENTION HOUSEWIVES $ 


or 


Alexandria, Arlington, Rosslyn, Willston 
Vacation Time Is Almost Over! 


With Johnny going back to school, why not turn your 
spare hours into money? Help pay for that new TV set. 
or that new fall outfit, and remember Christmas i« just 
around the corner. Here's the chance to werk close to 
home, where day or night hours are available and even 
some part time 


WHY NOT BECOME A HOT SHOPPE WAITRESS? 


where you can REALLY 
if no experience we will 


3113 14th Bt. NW. 


Positions available immediately, 
supolement the tamily income 
train you 


A REPRESENTATIVE OF THE HOT SHOPPE PERSONNEL 
OFFICE WILL BE INTERVIEWING AT THE VA. STATE 
EMPLOYMENT SERVICES IN ARLINGTON AND ALEX- 
ANDRIA ON THE DAYS LISTED BELOW. DROP IN AND 
TALK OVER JOB POSSIBILITIES FOR BOTH PERMANENT 
AND PART-TIME WORK NOW AND AFTER SCHOOL 
STARTS. 


ALEXANDRIA, 30! 
9 TO 12:30 


ARLINGTON 
9 TO 12.30. 


KING ST. MON. AUGUST 13TH 


2420 WILSON BLVD. TUES... AUG. 14TH. 


CAPITAL AIRLINES 


Has Immediate Openings 


for 


VARITYPE OPERATORS 


Applicants must be between 21-35 and 
have | or more years’ experience on the 
Varitype machine. Starting salary $275 


or more dependent on experience. 


40-hour week, insurance bene- 


retirement plan, and airline priv- 


Five-day, 
fits, 


ileges 
_ APPLY 
Personnel Department 
Hangar No. 3 
WASHINGTON NATIQNAL AIRPORT 


—— a 


SALESLADIES 


FULL OR PART TIME 
READY-TO-WEAR EXPERIENCE 
PREFERRED 


CASHIERS 


& Times Herald 
1515 L Street NW. 


FULL OR PART TIME 
WE WILL TRAIN 


YOUNG WOMEN 


Who are interested in attractive positions 
with a growing and exciting industry 
should ehratdor | the Telephone Company. 


work conveniently near your own home in one of the 


4 NEW. 
ROBERT HALL 
SALESROOMS 


It’s a real thrill to say that you are a part 
of our country’s great communications 
system. You receive excellent starting 
pay with early and regular increases. r 
girls have many opportunities for pro- 
motion. There are lots of other benefits. 
Unexcelled business training is given in 
pleasant surroundings among friendly 
people. Don’t put it off. Visit our em- 

ployment office now before these desir- 
able openings are filled. 


725 13th Street NW 
8.30 am. to 4:30 om. 


The C. & P. Telephone Co. 


| opening soon at: f 


| 9610 UNIVERSITY LANE ‘$02 ARLINGTON BLVO 
LANGLEY PARK. MARYLAND FALLS CHURCH, VIRGINIA 
2829 RICHMOND HIGHWAY 11501. ROCKVILLE PIKE 


ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 
JOIN AMERICA’S LARGEST RETAIL CLOTHING CHAIN 
WE OFFER: 
a Wace Scale Paid Holidays 
incentive earnings Paid Sick Leave 
Generous 
Discounts 
Free Group Life insurance 
APPLY TO: 


STORE MANAGER 


< 


at any of the above sddresses 
ee eer ee a - — : 


— 
. 


7 


FURNISHED 
és , — 
water. 
v at, M 
ee 


ROC 
as 
; rum. 
— 


h 750 wk. 
624—iitghly bef: 
bath J or 2 sen 
¢ 7-4770 


able: semipvt. 
m™ ©, 


» * 


< 


(dry cleaner’. exp.. 
saers idry cleaner) 
rees ‘a —fi6 = EE 


. ot 


ar ip 50 ea 


for ledies gents A 


or ou 4) 
aundry workers ‘ail kind) 
Beams! ress 


{ce next to be natal 
r4 Wal : ‘downtown DECATUR a ww 
* r 


WESLEY HOTEL wi ost 


2131 O ST. NW. 


NEAR DUPONT CIRCLE 


Motern, Comfortable 
Living That You Enjoy 


$60 SINGLE PER ‘MONTH 


HO. 2-9100 


DOWNTOWN. 510 Sth St.—Le 
m. 24 fir. can be Weed Gs 
r Mving quarters S10 week 
t BLS. To GEORGETOWS Untv 
cely furn.. bright and spacious 
C all eves YP ose 
ne 


mig Lynbrook, 


frt 
Ott! - 


LAU Bey Ww ORKERS 
5 JORS 
UNIVERSAL EMPL. SER. 
1910 9TH ST.NW. AD. 4-276) 
OPPORTUNITY GIRL 
VIRGINIA AREA 


personable Fou ing 


- 


Pleasant 
“a? wie 
4459 


rm 
prefer 


5 


after 


attractive 
to work - 


lae 
girl 


FILE, TELEPHONE CLERK 


Permanent 
te] 


— 
auiet 

a 

Pieute stele 


ae 


phen: 
247 Warren &1. NE.; dbl 
$16 wk Li. 3- 48 


Cather! ne st 
home priv 


i221 G st 
Immediate Openings 


MILLINERY 


SALESWOMEN 
Full 


«* 
my AD. 
dec. front rms 
child: home 
child care 


hey sean to 


. oes. 
or Part Time oe Re: te : 
770- se. Cbnte par 


: Be 6465 
bath 
737 


NE. 


KANN’S 
PERSONNEL OFFICE. <TH 
th, 8th & Pa. Ave. NW 


rm 


INVESTMENT | 
COMPANY 


aILVER SPRING AREA Clerical 
ed¢te : yD tin 


avi 
™ en ‘ oref, 


intere 


surrou nes. COL 
fi yermanent posi- Cowdi 
interview PHONE JU.col 


. b; lock Monroe 
Lt. SUGi9 MR: privis 
713 D ST. NE 


I 
me privis 


Pleasan ca 
Phone Di COL. aad aT ae Pai rmon 


2453.2 to 1 Pp = -” 
EURO PEAN IMMIGRANT 9 
With car. Little knowledae of Ene- $10 
Tish necessary te represen large COL. rm 
manufa corperstion . = hom 
Canvass! ne y between 
Pleasant st Be. ROOMS. UNFURNISHED 
RE RS— Earn $500 1 
nd Ch = : 
AYON co 
i. gon 


“Aiirag. 
81 c 

Wins 
ing Prt 


App 


l 


26 


> CONN AVE. VIC 

adie ™m with j 

Fatnuon CO. 5- 3025 
“ : AIRMONT sT. NW. 
HELP, DOMESTIC 18) tm, ist 9. i8x20 
iomestic help iive 
db Cc satorenep and, 
ex. 3-73 
c—_Tive in S557 mo.' 
ANGE 924. 29th 


ollywood bed 
hot plate serv, 
ppacs oy car 


nihiy at 423 
G a" aT phi $2 i? tm 
a “ESR - am, » Sant 


: reir 
6 


$- 74 


4 ' 
¢ i's A hey — 


, bersiee 
fe, 


out). 2 ye 
health cards 


2 
live i $ : 
recen" ca j 
rm and bat h + 40 : 
25 20 she 22 
r-cheaufeur and 10 
r guest hou e $240 moO 
S15 wk Ref. AD. 2-929 
. and cocks, live in or ot 
“ ] _To & 5 


BR ne 


'" 


4 


ROOMS WITH 
‘|e - ame als 
bas. 


i coutMnin Rb. Nw 
air-cond av 


BOARD 


101 


aa e! 
HOU SEKEEPER n —atrenes i: 
NW ion 0 yrs 
help ’ : $i; wk... youn er 
¥ tel ligent and h MS > 
F PU - ONT TOWERS. 
sare EM dist tive } 
necessary 


$30 ele 
ive in. Fond of 

 £-943 1, Call aft 

af chiltren 

hile paren 


aonale 
T 


‘chi dren sae 


A 
"> ~# 4 FH 


rm 
table 


Wi eat yf 


: ‘ re re x 
yoo TV: exe food: trarsp. D 
WOULD inKK Baipocss siti. pre: THE MAR-LE RTA. 132 
ttle house, $150 7 rms 
304 
SITUATIONS, MEN 
EX-ARMY Staff Officer. 27. 
versatile seeks responsible 
ning position JO. 3-¢ 
MAN. colored, with ex: des 
ror . o any kind relerenedt 
FAINTER Exper 
7 rs +o grives 


PART: rive WORK. 
r Spring ‘WH 


ne ene MAN 
éto3np m 


TOWN Air-<« 
19 MANC HESTER 
omple rede 
ively 
vidua 
tiled bat r 
home-c 
au j 


col 
eve- 


"urn 
air. 


esires 
JE 


reas 
Call 


ret 
pri 
a eis ime. ” CLOsE- 1. 


Park-like estate 
White House 
: roor 2 
pret —F spilt 


Bis 


‘HARTNETT HALL 
= 1426 21st St. NW. 


Sis: UATIONS, —— 20 EXCELLENT 
ya Sa gg FOODS! ROOMS! SERVICES! 


$14 PER WEEK & UP 


HU. 3-5432 


CLUB MASON 
1726 New Hamp. Ave. NW. 


ivng 


cot ORED 


oT «a 


car 
chauffeur 
to 5 


4cn 


Nearby * ary! tend 
GIRL ‘col.) desires wal 
fice work. Li. 3-0472 


ress or of - 


ork and 
expe ri- 
390 


engi yee or ; 
with I 


years coll a 
endabdie. 
exp 
iar 
so =e. 
Silver Sprin 
iv. 8 “O064 
Ww afievator opr 
a) lterationist RA 
to GIL Reliable _ res child 
care work: 5-d LU. 2-9496 CHILD CARE 


SITUATIONS ) MESTiC Zi ; 


ne ee 
Hn. Ss GIRL desires cafet er’ 
- : bh 7 


asters — for working 
re f * icen 
Reas LA LA 
TOL. “aDAY CARE AND WEBKENT > 
A (CH (weexend ri.- 
My 


a 


day 6-26 


:dows good ironer. ME 


PART “TIME. morn! ne “or 
opt mantry he JO 


evening mmi 
2.7918 VICE 


uP ‘SER 
APTS. FURN. or UNFURN. 33 
ToL ~l-rm, apt. kit.. sh. bath; nr 
Ga. ave LA 66343 


-1968 
€0LORED GIRL wants full-time job APTS., FURNISHED 
oF eer s work. City references. NO. A 


ciency 
COLORED Gre _DESTRES_ WORK ae 
BY-SITT 
tor: : 


Li. 7-1106 
—} i. day work | ADAMS MILL RD, NW. 
083 comp!. turn 


ROOMS ne 


ARL for 
ate Ap - officer 
rm 


gir) des: res part time to. 


o- os 
meiner . helper. or cing, EX #9) 
fesires 


job working 
for. em ployed parents. Rel 
34 
. NW Lee effi- 
tust decorated ‘new 
=. mo. or 380 on 


equip- 
iease 
$4605—%. 
no chi! 


ou 
pvt. 


_EM. <7 9215 


} air rm 
t bein: free parking: $125 mo 
7 " §-3122. after 6 p 
ARL.—Near Pentagon. 
r we. fr 
ti -M 
bi rm 
ample par 
Oo per week 
Glass enciosed 
bath & kit 


' oie me rs Family apts 
shite tobias’ worn 
ae Al-conf4itioned 
r ermanenis We.come 
; 1431—Fi en 3 
week” Ani 


VIVIAN H ete 


home.) ike Ech lob TV 
2 ev.; ong “hates : 
<i dbl: ARL 


’ 
1812 , 
rooms. ing: Dus at door 
_ OT. 4-9452 
liv 
Prt 


rm... bed- 
ent. 870 
sore 

us, sch! 
Mexe Pant 
h ; 


brk. bide. indy. 
$24, JA. 8-58R0 
avail about 
kitchen and 


bdr. 
shops 
aton: 


94 nt 
Mall. e125 incl 


ss. ; Lave wily fur ie. 1-bdr.. $09 50- 

rooms, new turn; maid service guib-sigs 
ase. AVE. SW. 1234—Ctean attr. 
Lig $14 we) | eg 

r, linens, dishes. express bus to nn 


8) 
bath U 
oreham ict 3% 
. v 


aus tye efficiency. 0 
a ih { apt. knotty pin it 
: ge Fee 


ucerne ave 
otins & 


avely rms 
, gpeeses maid se 
‘emall, 
oer 

ren. water 


swt & dbl MAND AVE. XW amily hom 


Ran ta nas to 


bik of 16th: det. home. ; ‘ 
: privis.; bus at door. RA 


teat Ais ascaten 


* 
A decorated witche 


d rm 
] ohne ok ané bath, oye, and 


G s SF... 
! ew! , decorated 


GEORGE HOWN 


man clei 


t 
util 
(RVING 


ee 
“after x 


| fet 

24 AL. aX. oR 
KEN 
p h. 
LANIER by 
iristian w Tr XW. 


De 

MARYLAND ivi NE ~—a le 
a em 

‘ra S6204 aT 

WY 


°. NEW TON A 
J” rm Try 


PAIK a 
PARK RDN. ¥ 


ROCK 


si ST 
fAKOMA- 


TAKOMA PARK 
nice furn ge 


29 VERMONT AVE: NW. 


« FIRST. ST AA 


k b ric mo 


cori 
TH - PENN A. 


Cc 


i- 


ArT 


pA 
. 


———- OONYV 
apts 
- Dow 


we ma LA SALLE APT. ROTEL & a, 


spec 
“SE b hotel 
ma 
ai service 


mi stir turn. pee BOs) nes, 
pi. vi. pedrmm Wied beth, * sphatil 
arden; mo. Ld. 4-5537 er 


; 
: 
¢ 
- 


4 


or 
S107, 

~Air- cond. “pmall. ine.| Briley fe 
bide. studio apt, hew y COL. 

en. dinett 
Site bath; utilis. 1 man f 
9:30 D.m. 2014 Kalorama rd ay. 


~ CONN. AVE. APT. BLDG. 


room, liv diftiine foyer 


peach raid bet ‘path 


: ys ie 


thea 
HU 


pd an ts 
ks OP meuire 


COL.—R 


, 


tlevato al) utils a” frcency 
~ [48th lean 
liv bedrm. # kit 
ransportation 


ro Re 5" Ce — Atte 7 


avai ] 
uti'« t é. 
, | COL. NE. “Nigely, Turn rm... kit. 
; = 


: ae 
om... oe d housekeeping 
$9. CL “a ‘room apt nicely pom EX. 3-7335 

s a ee a 
accept 1 ri* +. SOnD  APTS., HOUSES “TO SHARE 35) 


~ 1010—New ly furn 
bedrms.. liv x! 
» re uttis 3 or 
r aNw | bdr. 
GE twin man: pk « 
tra’ 
"RA 


chile 


lon, Cp) 
AVE 
c ONGRESSION 
x rare ves 


onabie. JA. _ 


L secy. wishes 


thei. 
&. 


Seder ei t : T3P 
GIRL 

,erT © 
2. ‘bedrm cei 


. 


rm . 
$120 -t 
a JO. 2-8265 af 
‘ » to . hate Reise oath 
V ’ 


git Pri fe acdree 
KE 7 0440 after 6 e m kdvs 

GIki wil share — apt 
th another 3+2625 bef. 2 om 


APTS., UNFURNISHED 36 
ALEXANDRIA 


BELLE VIEW 


BEAUTIFUL erat VER 
BLVD. SCHOOL LAYGROU 
COMPLETE SHOPPING CEN 
ALL ON PREMISES 


io > 
2| 


>. 


ON ON 
NDS 


TER | 


si] i. 
ooh 


WADING POOL 
EXCLUSIVE FOR 
AT NO ADDITIONAL Coot 


me 
NW. 

1 mus AD, 
1813 —J rm 


. ip eo 
routh ‘ 

cowntown Cc 

avy and 10 min 


Alez.: 20 min 
Pentagon 
to Fort 


— 


540 
AVE NE 


- ‘te : 

441) ) atmosphere on spacious 

~T135—A r nés in country club grea with 

bath conveniences Off-street 

ng owest rent including 
PLVASANT- ove features im entire area 


eT 


. 
3 BEDAM 


Abt U 
Renta! Office 
Open “eu ly through At ar al 9-9 
Sa 9-s. Su “ti m. 

f PHONE gO 


PLEASANT $85 
ys $95-$99 


PT 
tities INCLUDED” 
TS. ALSO AVAIL. 


~ 


enn us 


iat 
mb 


at 
stud * 


+ 
Kk 


; ; 
£55 mo 


iT i? < 
mocjernisti 
’ ’ &-98 ) 


° 
"e- 8000 and 4. "R001 
ALEXANDRIA 


NW. 193) I iv. rm AIR-CONDITIONED 
wy om Pr nt nee BROOKVILLE 
bathe. Utils DUPLEX APTS 
newly 2 AND 3 BEDROOMS 
a8 1% BATHS 


l beara 
Gra es. NA 
2 


$95 in 
88-3120 
ea 
alt Y 


an 
CHEEK AREX- Spec 


ROCK "CREEK 


in MEY. BLDG atp Ba Baa tere 
EFFICIENCY —$110 
2-BEDROOM—$175 
NEW MODERN VRN 
2412 19th ST. NW. 


MOR OFFICE. APT. 8 


FURNISHED 
OR UNFURNISHED 


FROM pie. 20 . 
Open Sat ] 
Renta] Sires” ck sed Bundave 


Try F : 


SE 
ane nh. oni 
5 TA 


FOR FREE BROCHURE CALL 
FL. 4-9400 


NEW SWIMMING POOL, 
CONSTRUC 
PROPERTY 


DIR 
Sh 


ry? 
bat dren 
4 ny 


FARK 


hd err 
weicome 
13 

- ’ 
re he. 


7 
sp rte tion $120 UNDER 
iffer TION ADJACENT TO 
rn kit ‘ m5 
Across 14th St. Bridge to 
nw follow Shirley hwy 
turn left and 
signs to mode! 


‘ . 2 bedr. oo Pa dD 
16 1.8606 


Cl 


nd 
2 


ac 
THOMAS 
‘ rou 


to Semin 
“ 


exit 
Le 


ary ra 
Hrooavi 


. is é 
102i "ely 


: 4359 RL 
]- BEDROOM 
arge corner apts. 
parquet 
se neg 
® mi 


rt $77: 50 

- ec = n “spt. 

ra fo t A ist 

roeh ire 

‘ki rk w 004 Rees 31 
AP 


on — uest 
Ni rh 

2335 “hau its: en- 
yh bedrm 
2 ‘6051 for appt 


E 
AND x H 
2 BEDROOM aad f 
Inc] andry facilities 
ss, = shopping me busline 


15 
D nd Pentacon 
"M a Broyhill & Sons 
4610 Lee Hes JA. 4-1300 
ARLINGTON NO 
vie WASH. BLVD. & GLEBE RD 
bedrm. apt = incl utils kit 
lip range | refri frator : 
washer and ‘oP yer in laundry. 
M BO HILL , SONS 
4610 Lee He 4-1300 


ne 


ARLINGTON 
LGE,, 2 BEDROOM 
to public and parochial 
schools and shopping 
“Tops” in Convenience 
CALL POR APPT 
A. #-6660 


apt ’ AR BLING TON—4002 Wilson Blvd 4 
tien’ rn ath r2 children wel- 


3 — § 


RD rae 
Ave NW Large 
Aliso 2 bedrms 
B52 


Elficlency 
om. $55 mo 
. SE masee 
H.ft 


is 
sT 
it 


: 
fi 


serenned 
porch bo” tt 2. » Walk 
L CARIDGE ‘HOTEL. 

iv bed 


H 

acious 1- 
hing rm... 
a... sets. 
fortable 
APT... 


or 


rm. 

co for | 

RM orhood 

week — od Arledon Real "Estate Corp. 
’ 2533 Wilson Bivd.. Arlington 
77-4448: eves. JE 3-1663 
N.—1l and be re ig . 82D 

nette Walking dist rl. Hall and i 


St ay 
$40 in< 
Excel 


No fre 


Ck NAY YARD 116 “i2tl 
Be h fi 


~ 
: J, | 
ua 2 


p 

6-203 

at NEING made “easy! 
i} : D 

call MANDEL 


me, 


? 
400 


ROCK CREEK 
GARDENS 


1 AND 2-BEDROOM APTS. 
UTILIDIES INCLUDED 


SHOPPING yes IN DEVELO 
MENT co 


, NI 2 NT 
SCHOOLS AND TRANS 

RENTAL Cree ON PREMISES 
83 GRUBB — 


IVER SPRIN 
5-40 


- 
BOL ik of EL B- 


SLEY 


56d pe prtiand St 
drm bath 
— Key at 


i CAPITOL HILL Op 
ave. «e. s. of b 


eD : 
Micgnetn ; 
vo all-white 


COC PL * ayo rm 


bed 
NO 0 iio 
(DELIGHTFULLY oe Lo 
versi a ant, . tnel. 


linen, COLLEGE PARK — Newly dec 
ocat and 


30 


2-bedrm. apts 

. schools, churches, U. of Md 

and storage facilities 

AP. 7-3405 

—At- 

CONGR. I 4 3-bedrm apts 
Teasonabie rent. JO 2.015! 

DISTRICI HEIGHT- .D 


LOWEST RENT 


__—— | BEDRM.—$63.25 Up 

Lidren,: Rice cou. 2 BEDRMS.—$75.00 

ak fake FURN APTS., $81 30 U 
$89 5 INCLUDED 


ALL 


SY ser at Meridian Park 
“Al R-COND. 
h Aw Individual Control 
CK i 
1.1t es auto 
secretarial sé@rv- 
See 16 appreciate 


TRANS == 
reas; 
references 


“3. 3-BED 

myo rie 
Completely Furnished 
JEFFERSON VILLAGE | 


1734 ARL BLY p.. pA ayes 
DAILY 9 TO 5 UN. 12 TO 


‘JE. 2-5500 


to 
schools and shoppin 


CALL RE. 5.8000 
FOR BROCHURE AND 
FURTHER INFORMATION 


DISTRICT HEIGHTS APTS. 
BEN.AL OFP'CE 

7812 District Heights Pkwy. 

Dati- 


eom pi 
shoppin 
S65 Der mo 
to imspect. 


2—5-RM. apts 
cl inae to schools 
wane ¥ 
loca on Call 
5- 408% anytime. 


Sodes | 
size ter nal 3 gerside. ae Re 

™ BUPO SUPONT "CIRCL ‘AREA 
i rooms. sme. dares it: ti 


stapes Wir 
BS mo. inel. “. 


be. 
ent 
| Excellent 

| mer. Mr 
ye. or call SHANNON 


; 


“Gethi-pvt bath.| fay % 
;_ MAN- BRA 


2 
os ase employed, 
“bide +h Us a. NW.) ose 


ouse with 2 otnet| shopping renter. 
172) til 


to share no ise vith finest AR 
2. - 


SWIMMING POOL. |e: fe 


joer UNUSUAL and attractive 2 


601 Belleview Riva WooDRIDGESLving rm 


P COLORADO AVE. NW... 


2 
rH OR WITHOUT BASEMENTS ~GN 


GYR. 
Ja 


| 


Open Dally Mon. Thru Fri. 9-8:30) oniy” 
. t 


Re serator pounder 
) bsmt, STEUA T Bac 
’ Dt 7.24 4 art 


blocks > 


© ious 


scent 


1008 CONNECTICUT, AVE. 


43 DUPONT CIRCLE AREA 


om ons. Me mes. 


EMBASSY 3; ION 
THE WARWICK 
aaa 3051 IDAHO AVE. NW. 


pum mer rates: 
“uo av 
id service ‘ond | inens fare 
24-ho elev. r 4 eudaanbaand 
im the heart of downtown 


FON 
BE 8-216! 


SHIPLEY “PARK 


ur 


a nae. 


ft! 


for 
DONNA .LEE 


Walk to Public and 
Parochial Schools 
And to Large Shop Center! 
BUS AT YOUR DOOR 
LARGE 2 BEDROOMS 
PETS PERMITTED 
CLOSETS GALORE 
Conv. to Pentagon Navy Annex, 
Ft. Belvoir 
Furnished Available , 
gee NOW! 
CA Te TM MPSON 


SOC NG AND NAVY 


975) 

UpEep | 
rated, sep. dinette. 

shopping. — trantiep. at door 


Apply Apt 
"10. 2.7085 or JO. 2-4154 
Attractive 


GLOVER PARK 


e-bedroom apt 
i aA $76 incl. utils 
neighbo 
ende oe EM. 1808. 
& LocHs. 724) 
yp st, nw.. NA. 8-2345. 


ST. a. a Ray a x ie } convenient 
| Toast Kit. pai. 


n " 
Aw 


LANGLEY wh “Ty 2 bedrm. 

xe apts.; dishwasher, gardvace : 

oval, ail utils _ Lexinaton| see. SR. 0s. 
ona 


i af.) churches and shopping; $89 
p one ae. 4-1742 | utils.. incinerater on eac in f) 
uf -rm. 4 se iY a¢.; Apt. 


150 MACS AVE 


COMPLETELY 
AIR-CONDITIONED 


ATION 


© eftic. apt. 


RAINTER—3-rm. apt. bath: 
neo with Wa. T- ren. day sare 


rm > = itches. beth a ra rear 
2, 815,00. 


acréened 


bath. u ' d| 556 Byeat 
bik car and bus: $125. switchboard 
eritr. over Funeral all-electric kitchenettes with As 
ill. 


Gemmil 01 sun deck. valet shop. 
WA it room. maid service avail table. 
¢ Car sara 5 goeva tors en 
fomene ae Sth st..” 16th st. and 


MMEDI ATE OCCU | fe 
yA aS $87.50 UP 
BEDRM. APTS —6i120 UP 
Also newiy furnished apts. with 
maid and linen service 
Manager's Office 
Call AD. 4-3640 


Th. ‘elevator bide.) 
Ra NW. Co : 


ha Gi nett, 


ciate 


stl VER aPRING. ka 


7 & 
Bres. JU 
§& Pos ™c 


UvNIv ERart? ‘OF MD. (2 Bilks) 


CALVERT ¢ 


‘RNWOOD AP 
1458 ColumDia 


ba A st. nw 


a Manor Gardens 


In Beautiful Silver Spring 
ALT DR. comtece PK| Completely Ajir-Cond. 


3 BEDRMS.—1% BATHS 
$133.50 MONTH 


va HOT we ATER. 


14th 


drm. duplex ees patio 


and parking: 
women wishing to share $125 
] ls Co, 55-3739 for 


= VIDRICH. COURT ~ 
ge. Rooms, Huge Closets 
Parquet Floors—Play Area 
Convenient SE. Location 
CLOSE TO NEW EASTOVER 
SHOPPING CENTER 
EXPRESS BUS AT DOOR 
| BEDRM. $73.50 
UTILS INCL 
_— -y depermdeirens RD. 6E 
45 JO. 353-4634 
bedrm 


pvt. entr.: window fan 
$55. AD. 2-2215 or DU 06 EYE ST NW 
NEWLY REMODEL = P+ ILDING 
a 


S741 —Mod Desirable effi 50 or 661 
i 


hy CL Ones 
C 
16 


Mrs Guy, 2512 Holman Ave. 


Phone JU. 8-1297 


GEORGIA AVE. PAST por we 
ier oy Yoni Pee 


RIGHT i 
GLEN N 


eB 


ut 8 


yo 
-4975 


with — oon %. Caretaker 

&-4818 
HOURS CORP 
St. 


bidg on 
roo 


WisHINOTO 
—Sdd 


dinette 
ba incl. utils Bee 
janitor n nry ——— 
Robb. Inc 


CONN A veo NW- 


Ag: 


7 Vermont ave. nw 
es 


PARKWAY TERRACE 


Ek ATTEN 
R. ANDREWS F ELD 


PERSONNEL 

hg 4 attractive, | 2 

bedrm urh. and unfurn 

to ti the “e . of al} military 

rsonnel Borderin iS a Ps 

uresque Suitiand ly 

minutes from Anarses SAY go. 

erate rentals srem $80 include 

‘| Qheetrigity. hea nd hot er 

| Added adventanes of cocina | erecs 

ventilation end playground for 
c 


d 
. MAY BE SEEN A 
By Cat 
IO. 8- 


ms 
this 
om- 


2 bedr 
bath in 


s oO m 
GGAMAN- BRAWN 
and 


m. he 
55. Bee janitress ‘ 
gre... seas Vermont ave. nw. DI 


eT. . NW... T448—T Foom. 
ie nn té. : as inc 
$4 7 


i 
S-family bide. ideal 
$53 for per kit 
incl. heat. h v. a gy ee ¥ = 


ens. IN 
“8 

—~Mod a. 
and | bath 


kitchen. 
in rent; 


At 
LIN 
55 


ANY TIME 
te 
00 


n 
orth 15th and 


Bates & Spririger 
MANAGERS 


for $53 50. Also looker and 


T BR 
B LUXURY DUPLEX APARTMENTS 


ee New ‘TYLER GARDENS 


. 
$6 
ftkvvisin. A a2 i—Beaut In Hea of FPalls Church 
“corner bidg.. 2 nice lige. rms... kit INDIVIDU AL 2. 3-BEDRM. HO 

ba eat. h-w.ancd large kitchens—amoile - a. 
r phone ty 'F pvt. front and rear entrances 

. DL. 77-2434 walk to schoo 

Comp iete. redecorated —3 A ors 


Key * 24 AF He set J. 


bid 


A 
liv. rm... kit 4 bath. apt 
tine App 


an 
Wash ig $67.50. util 
3-5247 


2-BEDRMS.—$89 
3 BEORMS.—-$105 


" room. kite bgt UB, phPos, aft car 
ern eth: wh 399 west Broad ae 


4 E 
Pleasant & Daily. Sat. Sun -“s 38 . m 


EE ROSEMARY 


bath. utils. 986 and $60. 
Apartments 
OFFERS 
Suburban Living 
At Its Finest 
-,.2-, 3-BEDRM. APTS. 
LIMITED NO. AVAIL. 


FPURNISHED APTS ALSO AVAIL 
Make Your Selection Today 


Large be livin 
large closets Lecsbure Pike 
JE 281 

‘Bee i* 


ine) 

-r™ 

envir.; d. bids 
el wil show ant 


resident 


i3TH-I4TH & CLIPTON STS 
CLIFTON TERRACE ° 


out te ake this, 
buy in the are 
. new Tecrigesetese, 
atmospher hr 
ice enerved park- 
Beautifully spndoqenes- con- 
in-town locati 7 
with baloonies Rents 
° 


mer 


NW 


we ve gone ail 


congenial 
switchboard sery 
in 


Vacation At Home 
in Our 


86%, SWIMMING AND , 
em WADING POOLS 


NOW OPEN 


&\. 


J 
newly “earn ae in elevator 
, 8h mo. & See elevator opr. for Private Bus Service to Capital 


Robb oe 
Vermont are cA ‘i Transit & Silver Spring Shopping 


DI. 7-6 
16TH OCS eo De rable 
apts. in MOL eae a sora All Avail. to Our Residents Only 
i SP a ate 

sWitc 
opr for insp. Henry J IDEAL FOR CHILDREN 
Inc.. 1024 Vermont ave. ow 
TMEIA 5 Ro Sw —2 Numerous play areas, basket- 
t As“ a $60 
apts. sd Sa kit apd bath path a4 ball courts, indoor playrooms, 
ater pe avail. im Hest and picnic tables, barbecue pits 


8- wre 


CAPTT: 
127. C ST 

— ald from $59.50 t 
Red apt.. $87.50 ‘ocd. 
I ™ choice nevi renovated 
sveil. now in this mod. elev 
facing Senate ce 
¢ Janitor or H. VEY 


ALL 


ie BR Ves EE ins 


PRIVATE 


Ble 


For year-round comfort. A 1 
newly decorated, at 


| tu ne 
evlichboard 


/ ROCK CREEK 
GARDENS 


1 AND 2-BEDROOM -APTS. 
UTILITIES INCLUDED 


Corrine Sa 


OXON PARK 
OXON TERRACE, MD 


ONE BEDROOM 

includes wtilities 

bidg eas 

Bollin A ° 

Research Census ‘and 

new Sears Roebuck rt 
" ’ 


“at 7 weekcays./ 
‘ONES a va 


SHIPLEY BRK" 


Redon or i LOCATION 


1-Bedrm., from $68.50 
2- Bedrms., from $80. 00 


UTILITIES INCLUD 
Large eons paste decor. 
a ag = closets 


a - n. Ja cils oe toe in pro) 
3400 25TH ST. SE. 


0 2 she shops. 
JO 3-6 


peters 
storage 


Bi 


Trenton Vartacs Apts 


1-2 Bedrooms 
ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED 
Laree 
modern md. voarki 
laundry room ‘App! ; ott 
Oth ol = Mississiovi 


r call Ae ~ 
& 2k DROME FURNISHED 
AND UP 


jee, corner 
ave. se 
a) 


$a7 50 


HIGH-POINT 


APARTMENTS 
BOLLING FIELD PERSONNEL 


Apartments deal ened 

ated to fit the need 

tary ofS Eatin and their | 
bed 


f 


A ee, * 
playground on ro 
steps § awe 
Landscaped 

72.50 inelu 


rom 


. 
. Read eg and aes 
: ry the 
| Hon." a cooling cross ventile.. 
ion 


MAY BE By At ANY TIME 
BY LING 


ater 


Bates & Springer 


MANAGERS 


; PRE SIDEN TEAL 
to 


schools he 


iy 
per sonn Oo and nee 
2 and 3 yp A ( ‘ 
' ‘Vernon ane eee rd. 
; »-44 


la. TE 


GREENWAY 


A OAFRITZ DEVELOPMENT 
Minn. Ave. and A St. SE. 


LESS THAN J j 
Pio TEA" 2° MLR URTON 
Beautifully Decorated 
1-BEDROOM APT. FROM 
$64 
2-BEDRM. APT. 


FFICE Cok RAuyY 


asst BRON 5 : G fo 
ages TNO STON 


CLOSE TO SHOPPING & TRANSP 
DU PLEX APT. 


large rm 
acreened 
- 8» 7.50. "iter m Apt 1. 
; HENRY SALUS. CO 5-1988 

CONN. AVE. APT. 


Remodeled and redecorated: 
1} 


Orr 


rit 
"ae 


: 
* 


eva 
electr icity ‘eres 


2-6574 

“8308 y FLOWER AVE 
T OMA PARK. MD. 

stor’ =e woe eae shop 


carpeted halis 
Parking. _ uu 80 


lose se 


7 
pis6 Oo ST. NW 
i ROOM ae Paty AND BATH 
ar ont rcié, Please 
ue 1 to inspect 


CO). ail rin < at $3 
ENTING 
New Duplex Sunshine 
Apts 
5700 BLK. 2D oT NE 
: kit 


» baseboard 


shopping center and Wh. 
1 bik. west from So Dakota 


and Rigss Rd. NE 
EUGENE H. PHIFER 
ST, 3-8711 


408 TOWER BLDG 
Wheeler Terrace, Inc. — 
1217 VALLEY AVE SE. 

3 Bedroom—$70 and Up 

Bedrooms—-$82.50 and Up 
incipge atipics: 5 liv rm 4 
‘Aa play yar 
pol - er 
len! to 
cnurcnes 


~~ MODERN LIVING _ 
Convenience 
dled ae cope! 


downtewn at 
nw. Ail ts 


Ave 


Luxury, Comfort, 


ca. 
pletely 


oe 
ce 


ry PU 
MEN Ts AVAL 
unt mn 
12° eo 
4th ’ 
C6. ~—lith &s Sts NW. Bamt api 
ms kit. bath. £655 inci 


nly painted, 


new “Venetian Pinas’ RA _3-6365 


,HOUSES 


OR 


l4th st. fw. 
or Workin cn 


GRACIOUS LIVING 
in an Atmosphere 
Found Only at 


E 
WOODNER 
pacing hogy CREEK Pane 


ow Available 
from $86.50 
fr. $139.50, 
2-Bedroom Apts. | 


First Floor: Large Livin 
Second Fioor: 2 or 3 


and Trash Removal, Gas, 
and Repairs Provided Free. 


2 Bedrooms, 


_Air- ett ge _| JE. 2-5500 Daily, 9 to 5; Sat., 


DUPLEX APARTMENTS 


Room, Dining Room & Kitchen. 
edrooms and Bath. 

Each House Mas Front and Back Yards, Lawn Care, Garhage 
Water, 


Heat, Laundry Facilities 


| SCHOOLS AND SHOPPING CENTER ON SITE | a8. tA, 3335 —— 
$93—3 Bedroom’, from $109.50 


ALSO A FEW FURNISHED APTs. 


_- JEFFERSON VILLAGE 
1734 ARL. BLVD., FALLS CHURCH, VA. 


9 to 1; Sum. 12 to 4 


—— anq 
od 
HU. "3-4400 


are only 
ency bat 


Weinberg & 


PARK SHIRLINGTON APTS. 
‘ a ne. inc. |Only a Few 2-Bedroom Apts. Lote sl 


From $134.50 


‘ALL UTILITIES AND 


Private Swimming 
Completely Ai 


SERVICES INCLUDED) 


and Wading Pools 
r Conditioned 


= 


Extra Ige. rodms, with Ige. closets, garbece disposal, 


freezer top Westinghouse refrigerator, plenty of private 
parking, tiled. corridors and many other features. 


CONVENIENT TO PENTAGON, SHOPPING, CHURCHES & SCHOOLS 


OPEN 10 AM. ‘TIL 9 P.M. DAILY 
DIRECTIONS: Directly out Shirley hwy. to Shirlington shopping 


cemter. throvsh Shirlingtem entrance past 


Hot » dear jeft 


on Sist st. Bovth. continue Jist st. t Park Shirlington Apts 
PHONE OR WRITE FOR FREE BROCHURE 


KI. 8- 


4503 31st St. 


“— 


1900 


EVELOP.- 
ENT TO 


ad). ne®, 
southern C 


-$72.70-$81.80 An," 


ooms. completely (OL. —1025 4ath Bt 
™ Onc’ 6556 50 


Alex- 


apt: 


ap 
air 
on 


‘ 


$ THE _WASHINGTON post: and TIMES BERART 
Monday,; Auayst J 43, 1956 oF - 


a UNCURTERED ; m.. , 382,000 


1423 R ST.NW. Daily 
MOD, DOWNTOWN, ELEV. BLDO 
2 LOE nti? Fs, 4 AND BATH Circulation 


DETA 
FA JANITOR Rr 
CALL } HENRY SALUS. CO. ! 


COLO rp 

iis SE NW 

RSwLY REMODEL ET -— By 
£446 $s all 


cept electricity. 
py 


, 
f: 
: - 


means quicker sajes results, 
for, Washington Post ~a 

Times Herald classified ad- 
vertisers. Tp plate your ad, 


Phone 
REpublic 7-1234 


STORAGE 


LDING 
ta 


£903 eve an 
Ww ASHINGTON 
NA. 829815 
OL ‘ORED. 

. 


s1ou R & 


or 
BA. 3-343) 


SOLORED.. 1708 Sth Ot. PW:-—Pine act ' 
“eiite bates co ~~ me $60 
oc oon or pets a owner ich : : 

resent asia, °° or hour. Packing = AD 2- “a248 

COL.. 4081 Minnesota ave. ne. ar C160 dat oe sen 
Benning rd moe “bedroem apt.; 
875 cl, utils rest Pease it 
or call’ TRACY. co. HV. 3-6 


COL... NE.—3 rms... kit... bath in ~_ 
| ho me, 1 «whild accepted. $60 mo 
utilities thciuded. LA. 6-4507 
ernon ss 


on 


kit., 


ne “ort my 
Pct bak ent 
vd 


Open an 
eae NS ca Mrs 
: A 
Ta 
3-82 


fm. apis 
rent 
NE. 2 ige 
Kev Apt. 103, of 
ast ew Vermon 


Les 1178 Morse ‘St. NE 7 
» bath. Jan 


INC 


~a- & S- 
Bethesda; reas 


in 
enry 


Coro 


4 RO 


One ry? 
A Soni? 


5 Piori s ave 
0 at Dries —* ING 
raeon 


HOUSES FURNISHED 
nat 


ie 


= 


ec, Bit ve Dp in 
. om washer, 
fenced yard 
1; #d@ultegZ 


ah 5 ‘Atirac. U-bedim 
stores, ec tools bas,” 


~6 

rambler » 
17-Noev 

Golf and Country Cte 

—Alr-ond ; 

ho sf rm 

a led ‘¥ath. ems) 

o Li. .4-5557 or 

‘Joca tion 


103 CHASE — lial 


y >: 
Watkin “e DUNLOP. 
CO. §-0222 
som mY 17th bw -bedrm 
Hare bath. hes gantian 
abs Columbia, rd sal 2 rms 
nin ~- co 
i espe Ts 
COLORED 
1029 48TH: ST. NE. 
% Bik. Off of 48th & Sheriff Rd. 
NEW DET. BLDG 
bmw ney KIT. AND BATH. %69.50 
udes all utilities. KEYAN APT 
_’.- CALL 
HENRY SALUS. CO. 5-1988 
‘ Benning Hehts.. Apts... 
i Sts SE - sv: 2 
8- ~ dally. . 


rms 


oe 
$77 


Saturday 
COLE DRED 


COLORED. | 


(2 FOXHA A. ares 
a 


A 3 
7 hs at. n 2-hedro om CR IRCHTOWN 
CO. 5- 666. ; 
“as New Wark ive NW 
it 


utils “incl 
UU. 2-322 


5. Tarnished coumtry home. 
: rent by Poreicn Service Of 


ti century house completeis * 
a equipped. crounds seperate ane a) 
stove, refrig 
Quaries St 
RENTAL 
NW 


x —_ rife jr; Be hour: 
“apts. § 


on, a 
50 m 
HA. pated * HOUSES, UNFURNISHED re 
rms 
bath. $74.50 ALEX <3 | bedrans fenced 
sn Pentagor 
R. si ne ‘>. S977 after 3 
Janitor. wrt 2123. 
a ees AVE NE 
au 


I G 
ou, Liat d 


oL— 
COG ic. 
TOL... 4 ult Pi. } 
iv. tm : _ dinette hy Cer 
” -87 j 5 ner ex- 
Lf: rae ; ove w , 
$42. pees 
<a oR ALFXANDRI 
BUCKNELL 


AREA 
oe ANOR 


Immediate Possession © 
3 TIN -SIZ 
2 is ernkeeee 
Phe ship R YARD 
ONLY “. ui 


Sark Prot 
bs 


Swimming Pool” 
and Elementary School on... 


Adjoining 20-Acre Wooded Sites. “ 
$120-$125 
CALL $0. 5-1900 


$68 and $70 WEEKDAYS AND SAT. 9-5 


4 ROOMS MONROS DEVELOPMENT CORPY. 
2 . > 


$81.75 and $84.50 was 


—— —, 
AlA. UTILITIES INCLUDED 


New 


PARKLANDS | 
MEN, QUIMTG BEMRLOpyeT 
“BEST BUY IN TOWN” 

SINGLE FARE BUS 


% ROOMS 


3 
»” 


Wick VILLAGE: 


3-bedrm. hemes $115 mo Indived= » 
hm 
Ping center and 


Nurser’ schoo! 
em al projec 


. schoo! Seondenaat 

Lawns olavereunds 
pu parochial 

pr > 


| town 
es 8 ally 
Vernon Ave &é 
4. > 


: ot hn Be Sg JO. 2.«2990 
Tei 
COLOREO_—ew and SE: 
1, 2 AND 3 BEDROOMS 
APTS. AND. FLATS 
FROM $57.50 


AVAILABLE 
gg . mys 4 +g 


~COLORE D, 355" 


Neas Ez. Capitol and Benning ra 
LA r Bit. = 
path J.-H 


m ’ ‘ 
Redec Refrie yt! 
EM 2 ty A 
Apt 


ota Evenings. , 
a Rath 


llé Cc St. 
Rime 


op 
adjoiwr 
9 ’ 
Mg 
set. —3 bedrms.. hi 


co mm. e 


5. Vit —Coloela 
new saipbdlers. $25.4100 LI 
ANDREWS FIFLD AREA —Nic 


e 
hbedrm ck, meer Suitland. ue 


a Sauer BAN REALTY 
' twin in a. 


ABt == ous 
arms ee ™ comb, 
breakfast space 


nalt’ 
new. 5 min. to Pemta- 
$115 mo 


gon — non 
HO D BROCK C JR TAL 
ARE wane 5. High ce 2% 
rm ‘semidet Scr. porch 
a "4 Pentagon OPEN . 
cal JA. 5-1470,. 7-9 oe 


Colonial | 7 bed-. 
th ftjrep 


3 
a2 
luplex. 2 | 
tv. -a r 
ae axe ett... 


a. 
weik 


2-bedrm ». MEM 


COLORED 
NOW RENTING 
WEBSTER APTS 
4403 \4th ST. NW 


ro. kit. beth 


, 


. 


‘ _ ¥. 
gifs a. Brick 
RI. vin rm 
separat e dint 
$3 See Pianos | 

— *j mo a £0) Sh _T« 
COL 320 Harvard St. NW, sat is eodrm . r. schoo 


bedrm. liv mm. kit.” bath: ih . nom 
bide Lut in 


ans $72.50, incl s.; $105, rhs 75-$1 
A U 
D rc 


. +" 50. Sea fa 6 "Sanit or 


ms 3-62 pchugg | 


6237. or 


ROGERS REALTY CO 


NA #8-0% oF 
COLORED 1? ee 
Bea siful 3 


ults 
_§-3450 + rable 
i+, 6E 
rooms, kit 


; ys ile. furn Reas Cait on 6. P 


4-1897. 
Lge F-bed- 
lus 


ae ot des) 
CHASE. “up <. BF 
. + 330 ood 1 St NE. a, : Ter rr rm, 


Liv 3 bedrms 
2, rm. cit: garage 
_g- & De OP, Inc. 

13th St. NE 
room, kit. bath ag nell Fal - 


yard, 
: HYATTSV IL vr MD 


; Tro 
yard 


‘Tui 64 PM 
a re a a toda 
tely 


133 
N 


gard. dis 


— Newly 
r 4. 
attrac. 


cunewes 
menthiv J 
APARTMENT VALUES 
1401) Teware Qve. se. 2-bedtm sot . 
$87 50 *( vis 
0 


K with mer at Apt 
~ of FALTER 


kit. eed be 
, bearm.. 


3 rms : ; 
3-3 
Rs: 


OWLAND co 
and GEORGE TOW W_. 1568 
rn, wer" Aer 
eT tm 
full bath. 


mo. Inepection 
Sreaninse? 2, 


kit 


ine. Ca powd 
rms.. 


rote y 
nt and pi 


a 
sagt ay View R! oe. vedrm.. lv 

Rn: "A. slat SONS bath. love vy 

i - 

2-story Colonial 

fis oipnie 

ren! wo 

nae ae 

2T Vw ia — ae. 

bath , OF beet garage Reule dece- 


uty, iat ae 


brick. 
es(ad. 


= 


' Detached 
redex oratet 
quiet 


a thes heat: 
siidPeon LEALTY CO. Iagae 
create PARK ~~. 


4 blocks north of hew Providente * 
ms. kifchen.| Hospital, 5014 fith sf. ne. semi- 
des Sponth. mente ti oeey | brick: 


‘ sth thse fu) ie 
ih Be SNC oe 
-24 se 


, 
jo ta why net) -£ reo. rm Oe 


enya te Hi ae 
° Gem ora. Be at rm on 


of'"* . Cin 

A9. 50. a Hi Lor. INC. 
STUDIO APARTMENT i’. @ CHEEK FALiSK DES —i 
ba 3 we oe a s Bi 


PE OE 


Apt 
m= Apt 45 
t see fenite? om oreaiises 


HU 
A. HUMPHRIES & SONS 
REALTORS 


Lares omfortable 2- hed: : 
moders bids. 896 Jacl 

~ # Api or 
HANNON A focus. ‘ov 


E 
7323. 12th ot. se 
bath. apt. bide. 


“pi, one 


i Ls = tw TTD 
3 rms. dinette kit. ‘path: apt. ete 


The Velda 


22164 TH ST 
Eves “eal 


Effic 
bedr 


o Mm 


; 


: 


CONVENIENCE 
COMFORT 
PRIDE 


Loturiout Living at @ minf- 


7 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD SALE, D. C., HOUSES 64 SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67MD_ SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67D. SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67VA. SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67V LAND, SALE 


” y 
28 Monday, a se ines oh 555 eh UXURY HOME 
USINESS OPPORTUNITIES x w 
415,000 AARBER SHOP S barbers. in new u  Prastifa nore mer — 3 


M4. shopping center ttohens —_- 
Sunday | Seine over $900" weekly Ar ee peren. m iarge lovely vara det = . —e 7 ut-™ | 
Circulation Bi ee mea ss o fr | a ee 
Capito! st iy before f - COLORED—$150 DOWN : — | io cning rm mete a SMALL FAMILY would love barn. t ere) anteed trucks at the st 
SERVICE STATION SEMIDET. MODERN Sumacing | 7 od. sis pet RiclibznoX* Tp 


means quicker sales results, ofl company hes moder . ; . : . 
C . — $2 COR. 13-7f. aiu- 


4 
tor Washington Post and ice stat ion for leas © om heavily elem: ; . : 
T a y : tied trave! ad 6 Gevsiepes section ~ ’ . fall *] : van, side-door. perfect can- 
wes Meraid clessitied ad- sirfax County. Call JA. 5-8055 metry? Modern , s: i | 1.7") Gition. 81295 or best offer. Ra. 
vertisers. To place your ad TWO BAY STATIONS AVA. im- on. st = 3 and 3- LO._5- 3886 
far Sund ; excel. neighberhosd Seautifr sompecenthed Gree a | . s £5 mo. “buts for $5500 —s 6. . 
or ound. y tomtial loes ted Caoitol tieirhts ars old «it Bah ta w ROSERTSOS. “Ss , ' and bath: 55 UN 
' cing business. 62% i. © eee x ’ Ber. BE. 8-5350 Se ome ' , 

. both. in 


. : ™ > oy : ‘ 
cas ired A. 9-6500, ask +, exce ext conétier “ne : 7 = ; a irr ) ' os 
Phone for MMe eo - —— - ferime of the ; i the ec = porting condition "and running. 


a. — : tod a 
ATTENTION’ ; S-bric reat ’ “a. #3089 : 
REpublic 7-1234 Space available for discount and : ocean 2 j - temedt t how nent e, FOND — i945 — pane ; good 
canceligtio andwe. Cheap - . rermnet porch 1 .- : - . ao «7 ines. tires; 20d a motor. 

rent. Pree pr: " ‘ . '-t2 ; 2: @-< vw : = : : wh: ‘ pond Build <-| $185. Call i= 2: 1293 
r : . : . > ae , cellent condit | for persons aa pickup. weed 
ee me Charlottesville area. FE. only as trans tation Like new. 
wr $395. KIR SoToR CO.. 4000 Ga. 


——————————————_—— 
HOUSES UNFURNISHED 41 
ave. ne 


mod 
rp. & & ! Derr { 2 s = . . —— ——— 
Contineed Frem Preceding Pace AD. 2-7200 porch Price $14 reo. , : —w pe Cane tres! tule YOU ar _- ~s mY a te 
WESTMORELAND HILLS = eat ESTATE LOANS SOLORED— NR er ae te Ladd ot . = Tare oh bengtial ones just “© min- FORB— 1095 F-100 V-0 Teton DICK. 
roe ; the vall - - meee -. — : - - up. comipietely reconditioned and 
a Seeroems. 3% Some, fa ‘BONAFIDE BARGAIN ou ‘ —_ pal — SE — h Lee tdiiy. equipped. Extremely good 
Sem” 1. for one ree $700 mont ist "PD TR LOANS PURCHASED . chee Pe - £ORZ "= © 288 os rom THE her. Lovely colonial name with, condit D 
RURR N. JOHNSON JR. & CO ihe chance of e' lifetime. 13.958 peat re 4-81.11 ot : : : , * : _ te 4 Bedrooms. 2°) baths. t-reem ndition. Don't miss this bargain. 
; Realtors NW ay ae 2495 ae ae pe & es . > bee Gross : replace | tement house Fine b.ue ores farm EDA 
4002 Wisconsin Ave EM — at av —: 2 = ’ , ; st — & ‘ g coed er er em: ee : entrance puer enc perch. =. ot Rte ’, 198 acres ou RANI SMALL JR., Ine. 
: ; , 5 hall : ’ - . rm ‘*orning ? - ; oo ope Ra 
Waeeeon—Coav. trans. D. © rest joeme __Cah BX 2-3 - - > fie — == it Sen2ee. bas Gresinen on pareh 188 ie, 2 homes with ' * Be 
, eeaerel ; ' sec ~ee >. / a= fae ay . > ee | pt ‘ew Fs ‘ her bedrooms. — — ‘ ns. ae 
month. 10. 5-123 We will buy 24 Grest notes. DC. Sinimg cee lee, Bums pe Coe Sa: ." eentio fy co. oc ee tenes, Mannas Rity., JE. 2. 3110) Se be he $3 WILLYS 
- va. as ~~ ’ —_ ss : - ll a, 7-55 . ° T , 
c r . Va a Ay -_ ~~ ea Rm — = < @eecr he 3 bedroe . HOUSE BEAUTIFUL | Ground level $72.50 Panel @elivery ruck. . 
2836 30TH ST N E. wwN Y eS 100 Ree & todar . wrLAL eo ao Si oees “2 ’ ; ; . ; Ae acres bg : ; inside | 2 The 
2 ; : > | = o 3-3 ma ‘he There oe . ain t que we is in tipt unni 4 
ert Cam be shows ride tm landscaped , oe oy Se bo brand mew dark bine 
paint job. This is @ strict no-prafit 


Bieden surg ra -Modern d?- “TRUST ——— COLORED. ,AN xEz Z ; 
’ y DOWN an mea: . 3 - : "ROUTH "ROBBINS ca “or . TF ps ay ae | see L balte transaction for us. Which means 6 


ome 3 gas aut 
* tren 4 ds - z 

. ne ont and be ‘dent, or BMAVE CLIENTS with unlimitec om Moder ve role seemiget ta ; a ; . ~ . Lee ' om? lar ton. ne fa i a 
for purchase of second-trust note pric uM — 4 elent bee mete REAL ESTATE CORP. | 2 : & Sages a y Laie Sa $A e698 
ALUS CO. 5.1988 Por quick and courteous services » » i . meters Grime ree : we ; fe. >» 68 DN. $100 mo. Burs for $16.060 ; aaa tal 
: im bath cal RORSCHACH REALTY, INC. kit ss . fe ey See — Saas 1 = » hacker ‘once a Dring vear- = stately home and 4% acres § » _ —_ gs = 

JE_ 2-3706 basemen ; * 3 - WivEeyY SIs Gi erythine price) Big chicken ho Bus line 78 

btm: Cc She 4. tr cEvERaL 2d trust 5 tes averaging be ‘p-lep Surpriee : <-- ; ‘ Rested 68- ;; tefies - 4 south 5 c. TE 6- 4131 ~~ Cee - 
m 500 Jen ute oe L ; .s _— ap - : tase. 3 ght. ¥ vith ® $17.100 Gl wan, which can 4156 DN. £75 month buys for $4990 AUTOMOBILE LOANS 90 
Cert Segtes REAL be med DONT DELAY. 655 — m = _ case Ree ~ as ee om all 


eae 7 ~ — her — =a - — > = t : 2a So Ss Te 
‘33. Mod. 4-year-old brick - es aos <-> Erab Orchard” KLARE & HUXTABLE i31 UNION. ‘AUTO “CREDIT 


in ry - Part 7 
6-rm, howse.\4 veal 3a fFusta notes for eale only $10 850. De hb tL. tile beth natal . ©. Comes 5 . Ae. 4-4998 73 1430 Fin. Av. ME Ll 4-4884 
- : : 4- 


.: ly ya vik Dus wit> > years recourse Call TA full Derr” wat 3 -- —_—_—— 
$84 50 DIXIE REALTY 8-6806_ throughout | Daly $5750 per a aes , STONE ~ 4 BR. PLUS DEN — PERSONAL LOANS 90A 


- te ts 2 
LORFD ~ g¢R&Usi MOTES WANTED 6TA tn Ss =m DU t-e000 ACCOKEFK—\ acre ~ $650: i acre 7 
740 Queer S. ace NW, r. very at- ; CY O8ED— 57 2 FULL BATHS $1130. 10% tte. Jay H. Supper, Lees under Smell Loan 


' aspre of 3 4 - 
tractive &-room row ck ex- MR aie 5) eee — sw , : : : - a shed 
cellent condition $125 monthly — . i, Fs , x» . - : ' ~ Freeway 
ve. 2-5215 COLORED riMR. JAMES —D1_ /-1693 - * Le a” >; oe ‘$ , .- oe 7 Case — ving : oe ¢ a BRK RAMBLER. u bull pomter | sites, "81000 ~ , *Se 
) HOUSES TO BUILD 63 Z a —y My @ -|,-* } - LP 6-200 
WOE VALVES rT EDRM : : " ; Coleus. = SUPER . » be " gh os 3% base. heme 3 hb = nook. Laree wooded lots wide I> 
re sT . 2 ~€ rms bath ez Fa 64- : 4‘-B ae ee — Lee . r o-7 s c on > - Lal -~ 2 very arse ded ave . " bemt. scr porch New ‘ 
:. YY rms. 2 0Gtas —— : . : 5 =* = = ce To i 7 7 : . - : Terms ee custom 
8" MYRTLE ST. NE—7 rms a Bg en oe 5500 A bene , . . parent 983 99 -- Se — wa | - c M Hailey JE. 2-7944 built PYiEs REALTY CO. JO @ Quick-Confidential 
ec ave 72.530 © your : oper’ U mo - rome pies ful : 14 , . cA ei of en* 
R.A. HUMPHRIES & SONS | 5:22! Gry burt. Big beck ‘rare ond ‘a . men ae eutras inetd » DESIRABLE LOCATION eae os ae =6=6LOANS 
COLORED 2. 7 rs BA . 3g sALc, BU. &.. AOUSES iXDLER P ra > om . _ = gn er oe Se DETIC THROUG iT nd rage. large detached . ga- COL brio ti Sienwood Park 3 MARYLAND CASH LOAN 
uu a 72 OLO yp + EB y ma > So conenth —* — i. TILED BATHS. ee! tending pew red 7898 Georgia Ave 


k smi.. newls 4 ; a C6719 : : j ; , 
we ee eee | wal 2 peiris. samee end Gibwnsies§ . an Ores Bm: ‘tos! Siterts. etty woter. tp 

xs _ = >» , J 

j 


me ao} Nowe 
Arthur - Walters, Inc. | 190n1s0 $19 — 

: - siz rms. 2 th ¢ , PERSONALIZED SERVICE anes . In NDEN 3 

; —— Magn! —_ fast os scrn yt oe Pee Po: ’ =. « . oo Sandeep? st Giete Mannas Rity . JE. 2-3110 | term STORCH, Developer 

bedrms.. 5 beths. librar . ra ; . P , mo * ; C . : ; . . a7 Ja. 7-508 a = ——> SP 4.4500 
solgrium. s¢ quarters. J C . . tee Gee this te 5 base ot heoa Toe o> << — - = = yp eo : ies stuart sont | HICKS REALTY CO ‘'b—7 boa Silful wooded lets ceo 
SHATEL HU. 35-3356 0 u ; - = ‘ in — rr i. at? o : " —_ -. : : - —- - ¥ ' ~ . : - T°. 2 - } WHEN puring or —~ ye ange “a $700 $100 dewn,. $20 — -. r 
WANTED To RENT “ : ms M —— ast ys ce ‘co $. “én . - Snes o—_ 5 iad) Te =e Part be oe is 8"! . a “4 ui Ix anem ORCH. De nw Reece . 

: ut ai- tf @ — _— so . Too-- : ae. 3 REALTY velaper. SP. 35-4500 
_ : ‘ane Wet rom of =i rear pian. GEO. - — VIRGINIA 


VA.-—-Need unturnisheg houses. POX FF ey A ge F - HOUSES WANTED. te BUY 65 ¥, SIDE RES <> ar ; 
. spark! Livin _ te BUY «6 : ~s -€ = cO 4 4.1460 
REALTY. JA 8230. JA 17-1836 — _-3 ae ins see , dinias 5 akowa Fi Loe bene = os SSS Fee xia beeen is LAKE BARCROFT 
PROPERTY MANAGEM * 444 \aree becrooms an th. daylivht : : ‘mat COLOBT AL SEaLty  . t 1508 Half Moom Road 
ha ut. lon rd ~4 : : ocati 
re 


UN, 45172 


Large waterfromt lot. 145-ft. water 


ma. 7-#318 = oo on Roseme ma 
Las . ; ee trees: situated on 
Takoma Park Rambler “SPLI iT RANCH — te nee, Fg RM t. Jook > and down the 


, Di $) 150 : — 
Virginia Property Owners RPI. +y =~ Se ee | cath jor you Seale & - ™ pe sald, Overs invited 
‘ . : : a b 
mM 2-011 . . - ' —., 8 situated ¥ rm. separste Ww. REID ’ 


blige ee DANS 
+ Yt 6 Stree : ; 
¢ 3. a = | ~ar- a oes : " : . 7 A i. - 4 t : ---During.. or After Vecetiont 
vit te st : : rm. 3 : ' ¢ BRICK RAMBLER r att Priced to sei! at = only $13,900 Swill lors : : > Get cach f 
PE 3 -#4 ; ; , tes =» - TRADES CONSIDERED $78. 950 consider GI All utils, $3 ea. Go te top 7 your vocation is 
CLEVET AND PARK NOeTe —New | oF sear . , tore . om? es — _ INC Art R it. “te = 4900) 3 high pill 
ACBAKER' ‘k SON. ‘INC Colonial. & bearooms. Gen] 6 Mare, substantial cash Mrs Gee | ae ral at ax eaity, " 
singte Alex. Va ~4 dining i - a oe ™ . SDSEY Z MENS & CO 7 —- >. 5 se ’ ao ; 
a Pp OP a ie et Peng ma? camps Ss fa tt 
7 - Con : & , < . ‘ . £ r 
Gatacts, SALE OR RENT 45 REALTY “00. EM 5-2 000 tik eg ’ " 2400._AP_ ‘Setenne ; 2 _-* ee ree : -— . e- . your first visit al off.ce, cine 
"FAIRLAWN xtra “5 00 Cash i Pad Abowe « " 4 oe ¥ Lae a = —<“ én 7 . bedrm . si - Va. er come in today! 
OWs rr arene ARS. PI Top Dollar for D. C. Homes ; — = ‘ =~ _ ore teaches y ” nase 
er mo. per space Wal FIRST OFFERING sure and ot - 7 Y EXTRAS Pricea be! ~ FARMETTES | pats S85 to Se 
nc. 4 —_— % ase this beautl wan 3-bet Ds ARCO INVEST. CO. © ai = wis . ' ‘th : 3 ’ i. 4-662 S aéres or more stream. on avel 
+? : jecations rot post mare : +? a an tT ; yn . . 26 a my . ; BEAU UL HOME ON 2% 7 Just ah L, oe _ 
t > —-= o na > re e atl - 2 . ~2 - ~ = 7 - : few 4 
will buy a ao See ? Rem he etrEzE Tote ACRES —$26 250 $2100. Ter 
: : : 7 specious lawn and maple ADERHOLDT REALTY CO. 


furnish preper setting for 


We need nice 2-. 3- and 4-bed- , Nr Sulsra: , 
re this . 


M 
, Pros a & >; Ser 4 __ —— Gignified white house with 

a ———— | erty since 1946 Our reference - : REALTOR Geoe , een shutter 
nef GEORGET: Own ener leaving aay title company JOSEPH KIN. So) Sime Mrs : => THE PemaY SOSSE. r  Sirepl ge shutters 
. Ang ST * or . - bed . _ > 


secre. Mr. Tr j 


" Ave DF a-t 
MILLICENT CHATE! a wal -* 
GEORGETOWN iz Lt rr Git A = | a breutttn - bot cas , sls throughout piste Z Gitte ber OCEAN cry. —_. 


Exclusive Agent ~— aaes- 
, tis 
6 BEDROOMS Annendale. ¥a Phene CL — So ss wo ront 
Ciese¢ Sundays oe 


<< . FOR THE BEst IN HOME BUYS VACATION PLACES 7s¢ 
+ a QUICK "ACTION eee <a THE Mn BARRY ong FENWICK DTAND, DELAWAEE—| ON YOUR SIGNATURE 
WO. 4-442 Cash at Once ue rimes (ana che a , , aE, Dawe. => a 
i ~* Spot Cash for ° Ta a I ’ — mei rE“ 3. — m1 Retishie Office __ new thru Lil. 7-0866 ONLY 
ce or Wash SHEPHERD PARK t Cash for YourHome ae ~ BI 1 : CALL di 6 iceeaiaiteis 
Recls Box M- ' - — ~~ » enter Scie SUSUR HOUSES 4TVA, es raneet wee enor ie - AD. : — eae ’ : 
: , BiRECT FROM OWNER i'at Sci et aes SALE SteUmR OUEES OF ee acon gee ee ae oe (COMPARED SAVE 


2. .) ’ ‘ 

BUSINESS PROP. RENT . IMpieddsd? fie “St Beence  Miehest enibs tor Sederee leeai fer as ae ” VIRGINIA “ADD TO | NCOME = ens ‘DOGS, PETS, KENNELS Cash 

ne t(win-gire bedrm ; : ORG 73 . 4544 [PS—Good 

"seu "ideal for ‘6 ste. store se ! h ys - 7 = : rain : K: aene & = ‘3a a8 ” CPeastct serrine so weet! Merc : se =e ‘orectagaliy ner. = RED HO A ! ae eee Bessive 

heary om ~ aaned ic. of anlar reception all en no “4 . . » Te Awe —s oe : oor 4-5026 _ S80 

eM or 2 arr. fie Vik "SStpceatincts’ Sew SARE SUBURB. HOUSES 67D. Frviarms coer teens, vmoree OFF RUSSELL RD J. Wesley Buchanan, gy a  -  - 

Ee ze, JA. 4 1155 Spe oer 

" furna h-@ heat ne v 2 = x : : . _ . ’ pu pies, 

BUSINESS PROP SALE 48, font : Me ; ov 3 MNentgomery County — . - : o : > . On. ail  . ; —— ~ peoomee —— champ.: oriced to sell 
> seam and ste ¢ atkN PC tig es 


fA 2 iiw > TA ALTA VIS ed 
BETMESDA Valuable property WALKER & D = = Se vc : — a = at > * ‘ = cs J aa temper shots and 
aa light manufacturing Realtors Uptown Office. EM. 2-6715 , romecrer- tor is- wormed 


65 ft. en 2 floors. air-condi- —. eo We ys : 7 Ctan . : xt = r 
nome Ready to move im. Call Mr TAKROMA DC -s16. 56 aa ct , bier and « uf aPrROTED ’ : a5ac 5". _ eth of the unpeid 
nd oa VA appra’sta > ch le ao y, 


YVYORTHW EST ar TY ol 4 £g67 oder a er 2 bec rms dbrk 5° . : . — ’ a : crs : : i. ¢.a =z =. ~ . , Nine 
SETEENDA AREA Commeraiel Sten St, or vase | ears ESTEE TSE eee tase eenaeee Pree Fee ings Seine room tia “pampomattzen BERvice’ “cig ois: pare eted teem PHONE JAckson 5-885 
da? frontage; over 2 in FOR SALE BY OWNER —}-bedrm permaspa —— ~1 living Us a end eamand oe HEAVENLY _~ —_, se a. 7-5200 cockin sPikreL. PCRS Dam ‘ today! 
NOR <a a ory —— ; On Ma Hie " Leaving ¢ towr 0 i 2 oe ; : = wn ot « Priced ef wey g sant: ; [> tet fa! basemen: a Bt Rneage. Shots. wormed. Also oper aor 
OSSHWEST REALTY. OL 4-s067 St aa — Xe — ee : = 5 New Homes Er ar ee es 
‘ ores rz . — These wet fz ;, . ser ; a alter am 7 - 
; Cal FREDERICK W. BERENS oem aemeee fm “a " aNCHARI : : act ACHSHUND PUPS—Adatched pair. 
For Sale or Lease SALES INC NA 8-509 | Gi + ey a i same Ta 9 ne oo ROBB 3- and 4-Bedrm. Ramblers “mre. AKC. fed lone Imired. CR FAMILY 
office , mee anc SALFS DL -_ —? = ae san a *? : a « 5 pe) iy — = on . a: : 4 3- And Split Levels 5 ARCH ws = Finance Corp. of Arlington 
OPPORTUNITY Se _$- = ALLIED BEATS eeneten Custer a Soca te 657.558 Gl contrac oe ra need 2% BATHS. 2 FIREPLACES. GE) Sired Bencalia’s Brett, black enc 2907 Wil Bivd 
, SEURREDS— vet. apereved 4-te¢- bus — ¢utence te 6 “an a KITCHEN MANY EXTRA PEA x ab 4-7400. 09 HSOR ve. 
oom. 2-Be pe Coc. ail-br na a a . irm IN aired 


lineage .. ai -pacoiee!| Arlington, Va. 


; ar ustomer, § | — ~- , > recs ; good * . 6 
fader SE "BULLOCH & CO. & Side selection of choies homes i PER REALTY a 4 . ~ ae of 
aa ; - oh mad F : y Jocatias 2 Cc . «Races ' . : - , Z = : —, : ORSCHACH wu ~ . 
ras : ts nd nh Co- —Parkweod. $14 556. 3- r ut rane . . ——- m2 
eniale Bric _ Tea te. | 7 a. ant - s ont -_ SSsrc 7. 23-3706 — e : ropped. mee oot immunized 
SEER RENT $s c i WO. 6-1 - i t > tec. rm. 0-cies CONVENIENT ore r a= : 950 S85. Phone on 30. 8-8159 
OROZCO & BALLIF KORZENDORFER REALTY. INC. Three betrosm sautter Put % —t Seaattte! See x : [ E . Antique brick. 3 bedrms.. like ay a 
one Prederick W Berens Sales. Inc. ase to em bedre. S-bauk case r. eeete els = hese ws ooo t lusi 
arge cisplay indows, i t full bent —- = 
Mthin half bl 1722. "Nw. NA 85000 | te schools, trans. sherpone ox: Cen vensnmt ——- ARLINGTON Rent Be ’ 
office, restaurants IMMFDIATE CABH A SERVICE churches : [| Say: owner : o—— ew 3D " ft aters: 
CALL FRED EHRLICH il. KORZEA. 7. = - REALTY Cc “e 
inberg. & Bush, Inc. | 1012 14th St NW. _—sST__3-9450 - Ship ___ = “rent-free aveune™ pay- Radio Bids. Ari _ JA. 7-8108 | ome 
H st 8-5 COLORED—Gi APPROVED ™ ihe s toe on wet Fe mente saiy S71, incinding tenes chm — ae WOMEN’S LOANS 
SHOUSE SPACE, _ 50 74 YOU ST. NW. ss ee . << eo -alencw expe. POMPON lO” Snes Mist Our Specialty! 
D: Vis HW 1509 bik. —1809 goes, Lore. _ nS CAPITOL ST Near pub.: re : : = ar > 8 womdéertu: a ae xen ups airs avis rm. ae c = Si. 2 lh 
et st ric : OoR ‘sk > 7 ws » a a , "7 
7 . iso 1800 : 4) "Ned “a | bemt. Tol : scEs- = i iSal Te Rtechen we — SR Presents mo oid. Also ; WweE CAN MAKE 
overhead doors ; YOU A LOAN IN 


—————— : : “i - . large ~ ar 7, ~: on ” 
7-1655. Eve 3-9403 - = ma | - A am ae = 7 
ESE SPACE Wanted 204 wm. CALOMIRIS. INV CORP. 75100 S103 5m oe eer % wee. piece cag ~ {2 Hrs aoe 
WE NEED ———“;OLORED— VACANT eeTue: +74 + ried ? ape am .: “© tie tami. 2893. Fai ° 
See from 3000 to/ $1500 Dn., 2 Apts. - p— a — 4 crm: 30. 5-sea uver 3 ee Slow Poke’ ognaa . ONLY ONE TRIP iil 
Suburban ner tat Co. 


‘ cliente reacy 
: on A : pet : : a2 J Zz st : . - 
4 ai adie oe . ‘8 Ls Trades Accepted cries. aeeperacus . , ws : “ : ace = , >— P RAMBLER! G cma .— . 
‘ is lovely home or Sth Cc Ol t —20n + = r< ° ~~ . : f : — an reo J " ° | = ee : . fine — oa All wel - 4608 East-West Bf 
+. : : . 7 wat . we ts oe ' ' . Dalethor 


: nveried : Maar *S0 
| Sts Be is not @ converie mael © > . . — carer . etlers edultt 
inberg ‘’ Bush, Inc pullt for 2 apts Beaut iful rec. rm SDA — }-dbedrs , re: a os - omiiie ond = - . _ - - a on s0e8 Geom Ave. 5- $202 
N 8-5500 te. beat. Ideal for home and in- - aly — Pel te! ealoods >i on ——yw om bes tm urther' > i e- isi. Ave. tw. 4-7208 
. Teored wit cher «tH ~ py oman a o 26% . . sertelse and 
“>? + +. * D — oe Te — apooin : 
oe “ST 3-3426 THLL 9 P.M BOGLEY OF M Is L. 6-Teee 4 EDROOM fecers? — Cosa with fireplace. eomanetty webrosen MARYLAND Cash Loan 
. . THR Georgia Ave 


COLORED— HOMES sf “ - . ans doubie com . 
GOOD SECTIONS : : ; Smee Ss gee © as hace ety ave. ON. 2-5192 


; Kalavritinos Realty £x 3-n440 A $16 " es . mm. & punt. Sneed see ase 61) eo every(hine ane beths 
I Stores ughesviile ‘> on 34 0: 06-8 Ee cm - AN | ie a reds to “tor anes bare enies 
on COL., $100 per mo. ie 6 x | " . Hixrmarees ; LO. 53006 : 

PAR ViCE 81 esidents’ Finance 
aa ave atts & Lave. ar. “yo 


a PROFITABLE BUSINESS IN| Upper, northwest: semide- 
WKLIN COUNTY. PE eat 

APPEAR’ DAILY IN THE 

SPORTS SECTION 


itt 
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néin tunite for a 

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y-aavery od 


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housemto.4 
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sporting g OLORED or ANACOSTIA — ~ £2. 70. = 9 , | | 
semidet im ; r | 
+ . full SINGTON—We have requests fer 

homes in these areas. If you p&p 


Pnone : 

the. 7800 Western Auto As- te sell pour home 

e Store owners now profiting LO. io. allo unt 3 > > m= Jim a pS. 7 i. a 

nods. Ot ond RED—Twe complete apis tor Ged with a a 

$25.000 needed only $395 Gown; compl. redec. 2 : ro. . | 

‘ ) ~~ 2 Daths 2 uncigsed pche : ' RAID: , >, rt “ns 

; Excelent . ; , 4 - 

phone or write now fer full 

ation 

7 


WESTERN AUTO and ‘yd: | Ny ag 2c | : 
SUPPLY CO. AN Li 2-7948. = . 5 ~_ 
F COLORED — GET 4G —-~ a ay s * REaLTORS | $25, $100, $200 
Leeds ave Arvetus 168 pees ae Very attr a . - =. . . 3 up te $1200 
. | . for any worthwhile 
pur pose. 


[pat DI iS ait, - EF |  s : | ! < be Pinta eer © Ce your enue only . . « 
exo. and know- so wants back- : x REALT , , . : — } . om Rowte Di. fs or other plans. . . | day. 
eee Covoneo—sresbown Be eee ne Soper om My Si 6560 " AMERICAN 5 ee al 

AtET ree ora‘ guarantees SACRIFICE—$12.950 | Seas precat. whi e. Sremines ef 812.608 . | TOP VALUE to 20 months to repay. | 
aWOP This fine brick home om Allison ented ah . Seer. pa 
: nit Bea Sat ot ae Saat = cesert. <—x-s | it-L evels MOBILE HOMES 
¥ 598 a. “i ; verands ‘fects = lovely view 'S4 SPARTAN 
ee is es “IST NATL REALTY | for'id mies aa bow. be seukie Be 
iY 5 vie. Resp. party es built-in American ene. 
m6-2483,_ RE 7- 3531 UN. 4-3422 | Sipe Slewme vais Se pict ot 
z ~ tchen. and e ——- wth city 
=F “Tule crossed HP BUN cALOW $7 ~$750 DN. 


for 
P Do not apeir P anes . 


J 


x > 
--- - - - - -- 


‘+ 
“ 


iS cas 
oO ; om! * 
ear 14th ang © You sts 
tunity for 


; f , . ee. s. Por 9 turthe % j 
na son ce 7 ‘ ne ame : 4 

at t) > . an ; . ; ' 

ice Station For Lease 10 7 “apg ro area 

» Growing Community | : | ait iets comp ne 
ae and Cligtoa,| Lovely 8. - aes ome wee community , — - 10180 Balto. Boulevard 

| my GR ay ——— tad Ready to nti perch. | . Pak: 
Shou d be a responsible Cau gh i ie ; % [ALIZED SERVIC WE. 5-5035 


. 


callable “wen 
nm, hotel. fer — 
atriine office of 
‘Phone Mr. 


, 1 Mo or 
oe. ME 8-2556 
c= STATION ¥a0 
ae. WOLFE MOTORS 
ne. Fe. 2-304) 


Wil tas Up To: 


a “ai 
aa 4221 Connecticut Ave “Su bree 
ac? — wy 


AUTOMOBEES Sait 


ALFA ROMEO 


FDER” Cancertiie 
¥ nt-D Dp Wotres 
pe ang 7 


4e090 Coer 2 werk te Prnm a 


Pevs More for Clean Cars 
Any wpe Re oe CL addlecs 


PENNY MOTOR SALES 


c¥% bse 
mie pov ‘: 
ralrrat ase ao Pale gisrer 


arg: 
= i- = Capetol Cadillac-Olds Co 


St }-mOe 


GACH FOR CARS = 


Any Make 
. BILL DENTS. INC 
s060 @is ave 


ESS SAR PAID 


for clean care 2 =eGee ane 


“SECURITY MOTORS 


MO 


x E 

CASH I FOR CARS 
WAKE OF 

BROWN MOTORS 

" WO 4-cope 
for c= 

— Sone == 

AKERS OLDS-CADII 
Pairingten Shopp-t 
esenGris VT 


vom S te 5 

—- 
rar 

53% ia, > 


ac cy fiecio and hest 
Se ann Fs Oe 
— 3 &ur hart-7e 
oO . eee «= -o. Gren eo-tome finish 
TAKOMA FORD 
a 7 Purr —_., e- 
s-1 
(mat beak? a = rane “ie = 
Pree pide ¥ero 


‘55 BUICK 
$1495—$195 DN 


Reeeres bert cer Ter eee 
; Fe Par cetn eprere. ah. 
BLAS S$ & CLARK i —— 


Caprtol cs Hlac-Otds Co 


Cuemlae ses 7 pessenaer 
aoe. fay 
-uso0m -— hyde 


r we 
inspection — sive and jvery finish 
ercomatic. -w. tires. A es 
Be. ful car omen on approved 
and’ credit. Call or come in_for k 
credit approve! A 


finis r & 
in. well- kep 

| terms. No 
Dp. $100 Wis 


55 Monterey 4-dr 
low-mileage. one-own- 
a with radio. aaaees 
tranem iss 
eaters 


WHEELER, 


TNC. 
YSLER-PI MOUTH- ™ 
CEST WASHINGTON DEALER 
Wisconsin NW EM. 3-4 


‘54 
MERCURY 


MONTEREY 
$95 DOWN 


Hardtop. radic Bester, all power 
ne bine finish 
, —* Por credit 


“4-2396 


Mi “te MOTOR CO. 


316 Pieridae Ave. NE 
MG-A’s 
BRAND-NEW 1956 


$2195 


fastest. safest MO ever 
engineer =. ompletely new sports 
desien ance 


DAMEDIATE DELIVERY 


outstandin 
er car. eau 


(ee>rin sad =F 
——ee | besdtepe Realiy 
AKERS OLDS CADILLAC CO. 


Ptr’ —|_ Bhopeping Center 
OV. 3-6359 


eater ————_ ec. A i-ow 
ieege car in Pan ~ 
—_ 5 condition hat gt a & mos 
FRANK SMALL “TR INC. 
1736 Geed Hape Ra ar 
11-9647 
use “Fa 


rune and 
ms. $2 


ce 


iene 


= _ a . & 


and . ae. 
956 eriass ictoria he hard- 


or best offer 


re eerie 
55 FORD MAINLINE 


Redie end heater. new plaid Smartest 


BRAND-NEW 1956 


AUSTIN HEALEY 


Delivered Complete 


$2985 


Le Man’‘s Models—$3275 


——- — -—'\- oe. NY ERY 


lusive 


Manhattan “Auto 


Sales & Service Imported and 
American Cars Est 1914 
7TH AND R STS. NW. 

Brand-New 1956 JAGUARS for 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 


FPATRFAX BRANCH: Beteren heb 


seam L955 Sua! mer convertible 
hive sod white Snieh. radio. heat- 
a — i. ry 4 L ~ fhe and 


"MONROE FORD CO. 
sio0 6UwWiS Ave “Ww " 


6 > 


- 


2. 


CONVERTIBLE 
$85 DOWN 


rasy ~pebed .. yaya TS 
pe me ~ lv 
enurppe Pros ; ae ith 


Ll. 4.2396 


MILLER MOTOR CO. 


164 Ferlds Ave 


“32 FORD 
REPOSSESSED 
$449 50 TOTAL PF mMOBILE—i95¢ All mode 


DS . 
Fuser D-tene finish V-S engine CONGRESSIONAL. MOTORS. INC 
50 down and take up 500 > ogg > _ Airport _ Lane 
eniy $28.54 per month. Rockville 7-71 
pee faet eredis aporersl cail Di sMOBILE 1955 


" 


safety-tested 
stan 82 - 


raniee 
PAUL BROS OLDs 


= quail 
ead com. SECURITY MOTORS § — ped: powers 


AKERS Los CADELAL “@ 


rar 


ae Meer —s 


— mT. 
3510 Rhode telond Avernsve” 


$303 Boltimore Averwe”. 
(Neet e Ne he beenee) 


7912 Georgie Avenve” 
8513 Geergee Aven” 


4503 Saoa Bead”. .. 
(4- ens ew The Me! Seoewe! 


150 MN. 3 Notched Seed” 
Faus 


GAC. FINANCE 


coRPORATION 


3317 Bhode kblend Avene” 
MYATISVGLE 


528 West Brood &. sar spe 


ASR elatttatid 


Rf 


5 


Wi 


a 


Tel APpletee 7 2803 
Tol #Obet 2.5928 


i" 
i 
i 


Tel Utioe 42708 


. 
} 


i 
r 


Tol. JUnige 7-900 
Tol. Mnger 93566 


. Tel Oiee £6058 


Tal. Groot Mile B74 


_ Sees Qed eqgee eo 


f 


4th amd N_ Y swe NW. Capitol Cadillac- Olds Co. 


A. new. . popu - 


AKERS OLDS. CADI HLLAC co 


Pair me or Shoepving Center 
is ov 


-* Matic. 


AK ERS OLDS_-CADILLAC co. 


+ -- F Bhopping oan 
Alexandria. OV. 3-03958_ 


ne nGTan DEALER COAST-IN PONTIAC 
teak ok SE cast pet 407 Fla. Ave. WELL 67200 
Completely medified sand Tolle 

equipped. Sieck with red leathe 

interior. very low milrace. ! 

late conpdities. Call A 

ater 5 > = 


MILITARY 
PERSONNEL 


ATTENTION 


Tee 5 crades ond officers anr- 
where financed with ne down 
Applications taken 


SO DOWN FAY WENT 
Thi speliee te tst three 
sredere snd officers 

For Further farormeatiosn 

Cell 


. “6” custom with ee drive, 


Full Price 


No Money Down 


inemadiate delivery tp a aqliiinsy parsennet, 
First 3 Graders & Up. . 


For Credit a 


LI 6-2626} 
DICK WILLIAMS 


1731 Bladensburg Rd. NE. oe 
Open 8:30 ‘Til 10 P.M. 


H as te 


Wheelmebile 


‘AUTOMOBILES, SALE 


sel SV Al MOTORS 


on (CHES. ER- ora = IMPERIAL. 
4100 Ga. Ave NW. TA. 9-2900 


Saanentnas-aaee 
—— -- Charcoai 
todos COCO 


+. 
“ 
“Capitol "Cadillac. saint Co. 
1222 224 St. NW ST. 3-2600. | 
‘S52 PACKARD SEDAN 


Smooth Hydra-Matic transmission, 
luxury-tone radio. ter. white- 


i Hy dramatic. beautiful black 
Uy: and white finish with black ‘and 
white interior. One owner. Very 
low mileage. Only $45 down on 
approved credit. Call or come in 
or atick credit approve 

UTO y 2th and K «ets 


"S60" Gate elina 
‘and bimek 
radio @nd heater, Hyde Satie: 


s a tires; new ear , condition 


“MONROE FORD CO. 


5100 Wis. AVE ay 


95 
R ONT 5-3 
Tt con verth 


me Om 
White finish. b 
4 = Hyd uM 


low for auick ae 


yw us 
Bet Wy 


5 «ly till 9 
“156 


Plymouth 
BELVEDERE 


i 9 


leather interior. 
atic. 


$2! 
: ne ll or 
credit approval 
TER. 629 


wer brakes. 
ARCADE” "PONTIAC 
us hs, rw ha PS, 


ing 
fab 


PONTIAC - 908" ‘Btation Wagon + 
$ ] 95 DOWN door. &passenger . redie aod. heater, 
meARCADY finis $1 


Hardtop. power steering. 
+ — Bb * eoulpoed 


power 


DE PONTIAC. 


Polo white NW 


MONTHL $937 Irvine St 


FAS 
PAYMENTS. For credit approval! 


LI. 4-2396 


MILLER MOTOR CO, 


316 FPioridsa Ave. NE. 
PLYMOUTH 51 2-dr.; extra clean 
inside and eut. Very low mileace 
R tires. A Wonderful 
aey. 810 Sone on approved credit 


Y 
Pr 


0 — i Rn. &- 
Reciin! seats Exce reek cond 
Wh. 6-9017 

PORSCHE 


unusual value. PULL 


We Onance at bank 
MANHATTAN AUTO, INC. 
(Bist. 1914) .- 


Tie at BR St. N.W. HObart 2-7000. 


PRE ce bzive 


"53 PLYMOUTH CRANBROOK 
Ciub coupe. Spotless it 
Rrand new 
Sedan: V-% 
Equipped and priced 
te sell at ence. 


R BPG. JU 


Cash, 
Trade, 
Terms 


COAST-IN PONTIAC 


NE. LU 6-720¢ 


Convertible 
Hydra-Matic, white-wall 
enra ve and white finish. black 


“fc ARCADE PONTIAC 


bio Irving St A500 
9 340 14th St. NW RA “3-387 
49 4.dr_ sedan 407 Fle. Ave. 


PONTIAC— 1958 
heater 
tires 


bie sare 


Ac — 54 


tres. Pamily car 
Repossessed 


4 4 f 
cond $195 or best offer aperteci 


AKERS CADILLAC. OLDS CO. 


iriington Shopping Center 
Va OV 


Pa 
Alex }-0350 


z3 _———- — - 
 Starchiel convert 
“98” 4.de., beautiful 2-tone green 


Hydra-Matic 
Bronre f nis : 
Traded on new Cadiliac 

ond white finish: redic, heoter, 
Hydre-Matic, power steering. Ex 
cellent condition. 


’S4 FORD 
Convertible 


- _* s Ferdematic. 
tires, metallic 
Nke new, 


new 
blue 
ene ewner 


"$145 DOWN 


en sppreved credit Terme te 
seit yeuer budget 


Carr Discount 


3345 > ieee -¥ N.E. 
Lt. 1-12 


Fintan, 


*AS 


DOWN 
Call New Fer 
Credit Appreoral 


Ask About Our 90-Day 
Guarantee. 


ME. 8-2674 


Military personnel and ovt- 
of-towners financed. 


Andy Kelly 


129 K St. N.W. 


BENDALL’S 
Pontiac Brakes Special 
includes ¢ 
ond now broke 910.15 
Limited Time Only 


BENDALL PONTIAC 
1675 ogy 4 ss. 
Ales 
OVerieek ;:! “i600 


Month'ir 


Oldsmobile 4-Dr. 
Ford 2-De. 
Oldsmobile * 
Consul 4-Dr. 
Buick 4-Dr. 
Chrysler 4-Dr. 
Ford “V8 2-Dr. 
Nash Rambler Convertible 
Willys Wagon; metal body 
Hudson 4-Dr. 
Lincoln Cosmopolitan 4- Dr. 
Nash 4-Dr. 
Plymouth Convertible 
Studebaker Convertible 
imperial ““V8"; Powersteering 
Pontiac Wagon; metal body 
Ford “V8 2-Dr. 
Mercury 4-Dr. 

4-Dr 


Buick Custom Convertible 895 
74 Others—Open Daily, 9 ‘til 9 


Raines Motor Co. 


1840 Wilson Bivd. Arlington, Va. 


ALL CARS 
GUARANTEED 


For 30 Days, Plus Ne Cost’ 
D. C. Inspection Guerantes. 


DOWN 


‘52 Ford 


Vieteria “6.” 


‘ST Chrys. "$5.99 
‘49 Buick #39 


Proce. 2. & 


‘53 Chev. %9:'7 


4-dr. Poewergtiide. 
PER WEEK 


‘50 Merc. *4*7 


S-ér. B. & 


‘AD Pont. 


S-ér. Hvdrea. 


‘51 Nash 


4-ér. 1-tone. 


‘S1 Olds 


ren Week 
$6°' | 

4-ér. Like new. 
PER WEEK 


“51 Lincoln *5'? 


4-dr. Brdra. 


For Credit Approval, Call 


FE. 3-5540 
Circle Motors 


2401 PENN. AVE, N.W. 
Open 9 ‘Til 9 


Like new. 


ren WEEK 


$3.89 


$3.76 


ren WEEK 


‘51 Merc. *5-%5 


‘51 Ford 4% 
‘51 Buick $7-12 


Riviera t-ér. 


. 
+ 
. 
+ 
* 
* 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
* 
+ 
* 
+ 
* 
* 
* 
* 
+ 
+ 
* 
* 
+ 
* 
+ 
* 
+ 
+ 
* 
6 
+ 
© 
+ 
+ 
* 
»*+ 
+ 
* 
t 
+ 
+ 
+ 
hod 


\ 
S7/THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


Monday, oe 13, 1956 
te RUTOMOWILES, Sale 
- 382, 000° 


#333 Daily 
Circulation 


means quicker sales results, 
for Washington Post and 
Times Herald classified ad- 
vertisers. To place your ad 
Phone 

REpublic 7-1234 
AUTOMOBILES, SALE 7 


MO SIMCA French sport conv. "50 
Oo 


1500 Super 
hae radia, 


obey 10 PRY, LTD. 


stributor for Mercedes-Bens 
PO KE. ALFA EO 


R 
MMEDIA DELIV Very 
ded AD. _4-3004 
7 er discounts 
all 


e 
a ~ BURROWS ® MO R, 


STUDEBAKER—1 954 4- = Cham - 
. radi 
y $195 


modeis 
900 Mi 


CHRYSLER -PLYMOUTH-IMPERIAL 
4109 Os. Ave, NW. TA. 9-2900 


$5 DOWN 


DODGE 4-DR $39 
ORRYSLER CL. CPE. $39 


"52 

"51 dy, “33 custom ene #4500 "car 
"51 PACKARD 4-DR $32 MO} 16.000 mi. Great buy at 

"50 CHRYSLER CL. CPE. $32 . ee 5- 


‘50 ope 4-D 
q <peue AC — i 2M Ol ate bear wick. pe 1538 baie 


CHEVROLET 4-DR. | £26 div -—¥ riington, 
49-OLDS 4-DR $20 of the ae deals on 


ret Oo 
ar cana | 18S PRE 


INSPRCTION GUAR Eee 


L STREET MOTORS 954 


224 and L. Sts. NW _ NA. &-3274 
35 || CHEV. 
Bel Air 2-dr. Sedan, fully 


=| CHEV. equipped, excellent condi- 


tien, white ever bive. 
2-de. 


heater. 


OF THE CLEA 
In TOWN, 


"4," 2-tene paint, 
Seld as is 


Full 


+38 5 Price 
$5 DOWN 


With Geed Credit 


Call New for Credit 
Approval 


ANDY ADAMS 


3720 Georgia Ave. N.W. 
TU. 2-3515 Andy Kelly 
K St. N.W. 


aasiaaanaaaaaaia 


SALE | 


Full Price 


56 Ford *1,175 


Tudor 6" sedan. Sold as is 


On Approved Credit 
Ask About Our 90-Day 
Guarentee. 


ME. 8-2674 


Military personnel and 
out-of-towners financed. 


Full Price 


53 Plym. “419% 


. Sold as is 


Full Price 


"54 Chev. °475 


Sedan. Sold as is 


Financing Arranged for Military Personnel 


FOR CREDIT APPROVAL 
CALL 


IRV MARTIN ; 
NA. 8-4455 


12th & K Sts. N.W. 
Open 9 ‘Til 9 


REKKKKKKKKKEEEKEEETE 


1955 
Ford 


2-Deer "6" Sedan. Car #2178; 30-day money back 
guarantee. 


AKI III IIH K KK KIKIAKI AIRE ERIE ERA REA 


a 


*685 


Full .Price 

No Cash Needed 
immediate delivery. Ne money down on approved 
credit. Military personnel, all grades, financed. 


For Credit Approval 
Call 


TU. 2-4200 
Bill Ross 


7400 GEORGIA AVE, N.W. 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


_. 30 


Monday, August 14, 1956 


eee 


The Music Boex— 


Amaya to Bring 


Flash 


One of the great dancers 
of the world, and a sensation 
on the stage, is coming to the 
Carter Barron Amphitheater 
this week. 

Carmen Amaya, with a fine 
Spanish company, will open a 
5-might run at the Amphithea- 
tef Thursday night, the night 
after the National Ballet of 
Canada leaves our city 

Miss Amaya was seen dur 
the past winter at the Lisner 
Auditorium. Announced 
there only two days ahead 
of the date she was to appear, 
she turned out to be the most 
sensational Spanish dancer, 
in the best use of the word, 
that I have ever seen. She is 
a brilliant, fiery dencer, 
ablaze with the temperament 
and style of great Spanish 
dance 

It will be a rare oppor- 
tunity to watch and be elec- 
trified by her on the open air 
stage 

Tuesday, the 2ist, brings 
Danny Kaye beck to the Am- 
phitheater stage, where he 
broke all previous records for 
attendance in his earlier ap- 
pearances this summer. T ick- 
ets for both Amaya and Kaye 
aré now on sale 

The Canadian ballet, with 
three nights left in its cur- 
rent Washington run, lists 
Caeppelia, and Offenbach in 
the Underworld for tonight, 
their complete Swan Lake, 
and Nutcracker for tomorrow 
and Wednesday 


MILDRED MILLERS song 
recital Friday night for the 
Sigma Alpha Iota annual con- 
véntion at the Shoreham 
Hotel, is open to those who 
contribute to the Fraternity 
Foundation. Gifts may be 
sent in advance to Mrs. Sid 
néy K. Shear, 603 28th st N., 
Arlington, or taken to a 
bdéoth at the hotel on Aug 
16-17. 


By 


and Fire 


Paul Hume 


ee 


' Haydn, Purcell, 
Wolf. Faure. Poulenc, Hinde- 
mith, Copland, De Gastyne, 
and Elwell, and arias by Mo 
gart and Rossini. Theodore 
Schaefer will be her ac 
companist, as usual 


TWO OUTDOOR evening 
concerts are announced for 
the first summer of the 
Glenele Music Festival to 
be given at Glenelg Manor, 
near Clarksville, Md. The 
first concert on Aug. 25, at 
7 p. m., will present the Festi- 
val Quartet, composed of 
Werner Lywen and Barbara 
Sorlien, violins, Richard 
Parnas. viola anc John Mar- 
tin, cello Joseph Lade- 
route tenor and George 
Manos, pianist, will appear 
with the quartet 

The concert will include 
quartets by Haydn and Men- 
delssohn and Vaughan Wil- 
liams’ song cycle, “On Wen- 
lock Edge.” for teno:,, 
and quartet. At the second 
program on Sept. 1, the quar- 
tet. At the second program 
on Sept. 1, the quartet will 
play the D Minor > aoe y: of 
Mozart. Dvorak’s “American” 
Quartet, and the Schumann 
Piano Quintet 

In the Schumann, Agi Jam- 
bor will be the guest artist. 
Tickets for the corcert are 
on sale at the Talbert Ticket 
Agency in the Willard Hotel. 
On the back of every ticket 
appears a map locating Glen- 
elg Manor, which lies be- 
tween Routes 29 and 32. 
about halfway from here to 
Baltimore 


IF THE BASSOON sec- 
tion of the National Sym.- 
phony Orchestra is signaled 
out for special praise during 
the coming season, do not be 
surprised. Its newest mem- 
ber. Stanley Petrulis, comes 
from La Grange, Ill. So does 
the music critic for The 
Washington Post and Times 
Herald. 


by Bach. 


piano, | 


ore #0 A ols at 


Benefit Recital 


Mildred Miller, leading mezzo 
Soprano of the Metropolitan 
Opera, a resident of Arlington 
and an honorary member of 
Sigma Alpha Iota, will sing 
that Fraternity’s annual bene- 
fit recital for its scholarship 


“fund on Friday at the Shore- 


ham Hotel. 


Show Times 
ForM onday 


STAGE 
oa | National Bail gf thee 
10 


Canada - 
NAZION AL—' Pajama Game 
OLNEY—No performances 
Much Ado About Nothin 


Gay at 8:40 


SCREEN 
Satelit 
1:20, 5 


ART CINEMA "Cl 
tO. 


= Age os 


CAPITOL The ‘Kine and |! 
™S oH eis. ¢ 


Wa. b w.. Pineis t+ 8:3 
col ONT , Naked Amazon 
5-10 
coll unt a th 
Sa @uc . at , 
é ] it ‘Wer ‘wolf 
3 1 6 O05. © 
Dt Sgt 738, Pr qd ar 
}. 30 


ve 
m 


c the meat: 
. 15 74 
9 40 
wa iy S$ Pardners at 7 
5 Se 59 
Were Not 
4m rhe yy, ! 
From «a Stranger 
oO 


MacARTHUR— Simmon and I 
55 


oe TROPOL cahaaae, Satellite mn the 
Sky at 11:40 «@ m 1:40 3:40, 
5°45. 7:45. 9:50 
onranre- +e Proud and Profane 
10 5:25. 7:30. 9:40 
PAL Ace Away Al 


Boats 
2:15. 4:45, 7:16 


5:05. 6:55. 8:40. 10:25 


oe Kilgallen: | 


In Exchange 


6 Teachers 


NEW YORK, Aug. 12. 
Martha Raye's ex-husband 
and present manager, Nick 
Condos, suffered a seizure— 


From Here 
___j apparently a heart attack—in 


Go Abroad 
Miami Beach, 


Six Washington area teach- fracturing his 
ers are among the more than|nose and other 
500 partictpating in the 1956-57/Dones_ in his 

_ ‘ hi face when he 
program oO oreign eacning fell to the pave- 
and seminar study under’ the ‘ment. Dgetors 
United States Office of Edu-'fear he will 
cation. need consider- 

whis able plastic 

Iwo of the six will be re- surgery when 
placed here by teachers from he recovers. 
the school to which they are|\When Judy 

M 
assigned. John G. Frank, a Ful- ne hadgh bo got ie Kgl 
e good news that she was 
i gig eon. Duteeasien, slated to play the Palace again 


she registered her joy by iv 
will go to Austria to teach Eng-| 
lish and American literature JU mping into the New Fron- 


itier pool with all her clothes 
and language courses. Frank's 
replacement here will be :nge- ©" The Palace was the scene 


bord Hanisch from the heal-% ,2¥4y's most sensational — 
gymnasium fur Madchen. and most emotional—triumph. 


we his chums say . 


Judy Jumped (Into Pool) for Joy 


man in “The Best Things in, gambling tables... Peter Law-' 
Life Are Free.” ford has reservations in Chi- 
Joe DiMaggio is edging closer cago for the duration of the 


to that post as partner in an’ Democratic National Conven-, 


Atlantic City hotel venture,'tion, but may not be able to 
. Staid Bos- get there. The second Law- 


tonians are aghast at the con-|ford baby is expected—in Cali-|) 
‘test being conducted by Norm fornia—any moment now. Sen. | 


‘Prescott on station WBZ radio|John Kennedy, a Veep pros-| 

and TV — but it’s brought in! pect, a Gen Meo —_ Suet. 
7an saither is ying to 

more than 19,000 letters. Pres-| tollywood to. sign Patricia’ 

cott is offering seven strands 

of hair from Elvis Presley*s'n.: -one Gingold) in “Our Royal 


‘sideburns to the fan sending|Past.” Patricia was the only 
‘in “the most ridiculous reason actress to win the unanimous 
for wanting it.” approval of authors Sandy Wil-| 
ONE OF Frank Sinatra's: Loos, although almost 50 stars’ 
chief reasons for his brief|were suggested for the role. 
risit to the West Coast: He 
wanted to see pal Boneteey 
Bogart, who is so ill . Vit-| 


Coprright Kine Features Syndicate 


Morrison as co-star (with Her-| 


LAST 15 TIMES! | 


AIR CONDITIONED 
J 


NATIONAL 


“AMERICA’S FIRST THEA 
Tonite 4:20; Matinee Saturdaye 


|] 7 > SHOW, SUN. AUG. | 


LARRY BETTY BUSTER 
| DOUGLAS O’NEIL WEST 


Box Office Open 10 A.M. to 9:30 P.M. 


culation, and order The 


‘son, Cecil Beaton and Anita\— 


Call RE. 7. 1234, ask for | Cir 
Wash- 


ington Post and Times Herald 
guaranteed home delivery. 


torio DeSica has been losing, 
a mint at the Monte Carlo) 


Mary F. Roscoe will swap United States designers are 
_ gr Street ag ee 6 beaming over Princess Grace's 
School post in Falls Church); ] th 
with Sadie E. B. Smeltzer’s at we 7s ° AgOrICeR oon 
the Joseph Howe School in fashion. Every time she was 
Halifax City, Nova Scotia. photographed in Paris she was 

Three from the area will re. wearing something from her| 
new assignments made last/American trousseau, wusually 
year. Louis Rubin. dramatic| her Ben Zucherman suits and 
adviser at Montgomery Blair|Sydney Wragge’s linen dress 
Senior High, will continue|/With the band of abstract de- 
teaching English and dramatics Sign down the side. 
at Athens and Mytilene. Greece. | 
Also staying in Greece for an-' ERNEST Borgnine, who won 
other year is Howard Univer-|his Academy Award playing 
sity’s Osborn T. Smallwood,ja shy butcher, hasn't been 

into the usual Holly- 


who is at Anatolia College in slapped 
wood mold. He does an amaz- 


Salonika. 
ing job as a song and dance 


Lawrence S. James Sr 
HELD OVER 


Cardoza will continue teaching 
The first fell length 


ee 


ceived an assignment to Cam- 


THE WASHINGTON 
INTERNATIONAL THEATER 


F. Hugh Herbert's 


On The 
Woodner Garden Roof 
3636 16th St. N.W. 
Starts Tomorrow 


All Seats $1.75 
Curtain 8:30 p.m. 


TICKETS 


Now! 
Dr. Sitkini’s 


5 
SPOOK 


SHOW |¢ 


—ON STAGE~ 


BETTE 


in Burma for a second year and/| 
Vincent H. Cephas of Terrell! 

comedy feéture meade 
entirely in o 


Junior High School has re-| 
bodia. 
sruatwau) NATURE COLONY 
coos ort™ . 


The announcement of assign- 
ments was made by Education 
Commissioner S. M. Brownell, 
in the Department of Health, 
Education and Welfare. 


LOUELLA PARSONS it 
on vacation. Her column will 
resume on her return. 


THE RAGE OF NEW YORK 


“BROADWAY BURLESK” 


ti es . 


° 


| \ es cine 


? 


» Away All Boats! 


5 posal meee is s | 
Be tt 


starring Bt BORAK KERR - YUL BRYWNER 


COHOF be 
rivet 


PALACE: = ) 


~ 


‘ 


JEFF CHANDLER - GEORGE NADER 


eae JUUE ADAMS - LEX BARKER 


Leew's Capitel 
Fri, Awe. 17th 
MIDNIGHT 


lists songs 


‘Her 


-— —_— 


rogram 
prog ri AYHOU SE—"'Storm 


k 10, 10 
PLAZA—"'1964." at 12 noon, 
3°30. 5:15. 7. #45. 10:16 
he | 


Land of ‘Moderates’ Seen "3!3.0-& es.2m 
By Republic Fund Officer — 


Secre- was not restricted to the South 


1.45, 


Holiday.” at 


AIR CONDITIONED 


APEX 4013 mess. Ave, WO. 6.4600 


James Stewart. yer Day in Alfred 
Hitchcock's “THE MAN WHO KNEW 
TOO MUCH” Flechalestor, at 1:00, 
3:05; 5:15. 7:25 and 9:40 p. m 


LANGLEY N. H. Ave. & Univ. Lene 


HE. 4.5700 
James » Bewart, yer Peg in Alfred 
Hitch “THE WHO KNEW 
TOO at ICH (Technicolor) . 1-00, 
3:10, 5:20, _7:30 and ad 9:40 p 
~ 9725 Flower i? 

Free Parking. JU. 8-1666 the 14 
Gienn Ferd. anne Crain in “THE 
ASTEST GUN ALIVE” at 6:30. 8:10 
and 9 53 p 


Ager 
oe gg Sm Ma 
ames Steward Day 


THE MAN WHO 


KNEW TOO MUCH” 
(Technicolor). #8:40.. “PUSH OVER” 
|11:07. Carteon 10:40 


AIRPORT DRIVE-IN 


MAN WHO ae ot 
an | Reet 


ALL — -y- st. Ww 


STANLEY WARNER THEATERS | 
ARE AIR CONDITIONED 


18th & Col 
co 


LITTLE THEATRE 


Sth St. at F N.W OPEN 1 P.M. 
Air Cenditioned 
“PHONE CALL FROM 
A STRANGER” 
with Gary Merrill and Bette Davis 


“WE'RE NOT MARRIED” 


David Wayne and Marilyre Meares 


Ra 
N 5-594 
“BATELLITE IN THE SKY.” Outer Space! 
730.3 . CimnemaScope, 1:20. 3:20, 5:25 


WO. 62600. 


Ave. W wv, 
~ \cock’s “THE AN WH 
| ot gal James Stewart. 


SPECIAL SUMMER £°*! 
VACATION TREAT! BEVERLY te —"s 35908, 
| MOTHERS, PARENTS, Bring Children | TOO MUCH.” James Stewart Doris Day. | 
| te Theredey Mets. «ef 2 PF. M. Dur- fietd 8.00 ; 


ing August Specie! Children’s Prices! CALVERT Pree Parking. FE. 3-6054 
) (th Mets. Ont 00 | “THE MAN W bw 
seen we yh 98 TOO MUCH.” James Stewart, Bor EE | 


gE. 5 oes Dalle, Piva, iY. 8. 1), . 

rom o ren Pree 

Adam Yarmolinsky, James Doris Day “THE 
NEW MUCH.” 


tary of the Fund for the Repub- and that the Fund had granted 
lic, said yesterday the Fund is Money for research into dis- 
“egneerned about the disap- crimination in the North. 
pearance” of persons who will Yarmolinsky also discussed 
take a stand on major issues— the Federal security program. 
as race relations. 

Yarmolinsky appeared on the 
wTop.-Tv panel program 
“City-side.” He said the United 
States is turning into a Nation 
of “moderates”. He said it was 
group, such as Negroes, to 
“wait for their rights.” 
diffcult. to get a minority 

He said racial discrimination 


Stewart, 
MAN WHO K 
Technicolor 
ares na 


" ARLINGTON - 


5612 Conn 
a. “oon? = 


Alfre Hitch- 
ry TOO! 
Doris . 6246.) 


iT NES- 
ARTNER.” Technicolor at 


“THE 
(Color) 
bis ADO Pig 
onery at 19 5 Cartoon. 
my on 
Bt. Sisdee 


JU. 9-3322 
Gienn Ford. Jeanne 
Crain “THE FASTEST GUN ALIVE” 
at 7:15. 9:30 


BETHESDA smco tices, BRANCH DRIVE-IN 
Day im Alfred Hiteheock's 
KNEW TOO 


Er ~o6e6. 6°) mi QD ine 
MAN WHO MUCH. Ale. | Ave. $6. via Branch ave Se" ie Re 
ers Rangers in 


Teenhnieo! lor at 7. 9:30. ) . 2-4000 5 "Children alway 
= oun 
\5A Color, P10." ‘Victor ie in. 


Spencer Tracy 
5 soa SATURDAY,” Color, 


RICHARD L. COE Is wae 
ON VACATION. HIs COL “THE 
UMN WILL BE RESUMED 


UPON HIS RETURN. 


16:50, 9:25 


Nr Parking ME. ear | 


| PICNIC.” William Hol. y UN, 4-0 
} ‘ a . "tesa. "Jeanne UCH”™ (Technicolor) at 1:40. 
ek as hte e wee OO. “SIN-1 1 Crain “THE PASFEST GUN ALIVE,’ - 4 = on 


IMPORTED 


oe RA. 6-<600 “THE MAN pyr gre ee OCKVILLE DRIVE 

be HYATTSVILLE TI || iy 7 

MUCH,” James a Dor Wendell Cor- ‘ : 40-— Roc . 

16:00, 9:50 ‘DESTT } BL.” | ey. Mickey y “THE BOLD AND ar : 4 h- om, 

Richard Widmart, 8-20 THE BRAV ry a 30, 8: 10, S: 50 

| Pree Paskion, 44. 9-000 WA. 71-8899. James “AMES STEW ART | 

One Perf. Today | :: 30 P. M. ‘PENN “THE MAN WHO ty TOO KAYWOOD Seowset, Doris aot. and Doris Day in Alfred Hitchecock's | | 
PHONE RESERVATIONS MUCH,” James Stewart Doris Day, 1:00,| | in aured Hitchcock's ““THE “THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO 
y Ba vy MA ows . yf BE WwHo NEW TOO MUCH.” Ry MUCH (Technicolor) at 
; ’ 


ACCEPTED ME. 8-4495 é 9: 
3:45 Plus Randolph THUNDER 


@r\ee ved staTs whe Ow Sait at 11:25 p. m 
man OROTES FULIO PROmPTC YT Extra! Cartoon Carnival at 8:40 p.m 
oor oreece OFF au @5 4:4 Om 


CMARGE IT-—We Merer Alli Meer 
Gerve're o7¢@ Av Travel Charqee cards 
We Are oa TRIP CHARGE member 


Fri.. Sat.. Bun. IN P Ni “Wize 
ARDs OF THE AIR.” Defying {ne 
[i feet in the air. Plus Big Bonus 


TYRONE POWER | 
KIM 


EM Lows 


"Weshingten’ s First Drive-in 


color at 7. 9:30. wee Mise 
wi. 6-7800 . Spen- 
cer Tracy, Robert 
: asso 9:50 pl a. 
plus Gree- 
e Wrman “THE YEAR. 
Teehnicolor at 7:40 


Arlington-Falls Church, Va 
JA 7 4266 Aim CONDITIONED 
Wash.-Lee . Canter 
Opp. fort Myer JA. 7-1733 


Adults Only 
“UNMARRIED MOTHERS” 

7-20, 9:15 te 
STATE 


Last Times Fontan 
“MAN WHO ENEW TOO 
Doris Day 


rt. 
Vista, Vision 
1730 Wilson _ on 
JA. 7-480 


“MAN WHO ENEW TOO MUCH” 
dames Stewart. Doris Day 


uglas ott in 
Ss” 


Liquor Raiders Nab 
16 in Maryland 


CAMBRIDGE, Md.., 
i — Sixteen persons, 
them migrant workers from 
camps near Cambridge and 
Vienna. were arrested early 
today in a series of liquor 
raids by county, state and Fed- 


5 } 
SAVOY ° kine i, 1A 


SCARLET COAT." Cornel Wilde, 


SHERINAN RA. 6-2400, “THE “ae 


WHO ae hy, et 
MUCH.” James Stewart s Da 

9°45 ea work SKIRTS. 
Tom Ewell. 


Youngs “NOR 
Technicolor 
ory Peck. J 


LING,” 


sitio lit 
STORY 


AB DRIVE-IN 7 577355 


tO. 7-25355 

C38 hs eddies Pree, Car- 
toon. at 8: 7. ie Reyer Hits! 
James Alfred 


He iben 4 ba MAN ‘AS "“bsahr 


Aug. 12 
most of 


soe er Dusk. 
ee iracie _Playsround 


i: 
‘SUNSET DRIVE-IN s>72 "= 


|At Batley's Cross Roads bet we os » eas 
‘Bers and Shirley Hey 1 mile West of 
Alexandria dies Free 

‘UNTAM 


—, ‘ aScope and Cojes). 
one 
AY “SilioMET"'n 
BA + 


Kiddies "pies 


Air Cenditioned 


WARNER 


WORLD'S MOST GUARDED 
SECRET REVEALED! 


The First Big Drama of the 
Man-Made Satellite that 
Could Rule the World! 


“SATELLITE IN| 
THE SKY” 


prow Warner Bros. i» WARNERCOLOR 


ane CinemaScoPE ‘ ~ BEST THEATRES , | 


Fat 10m « BE 7.051) « Geen 11 o @ 


File a! 
Sic NW 


Ce eee” se 
REX THOMPSON + JAMES WHITMORE 
=~ SHEPPERO STRUOWICK 


sooveme VICTORIA SHAW 
' th ‘ Ciwen.SecOPE « ene Tecemeneos 
eral authorities. 

Howard M. Smith Jr., investi: TRANS-LUX be om 
gator for the state’s attorney's; open 11 AM.—AIR CONDITIONED 
office, said all will be charged z 
with violating alcoholic bev- 
erage laws. Bond was set at 
$1000 each. No hearing date 
was set. 


Parking JU. 9-5500. | 


SILVER | Pree Park Hitchcock's 
“THE MAN WHO KNEW sss 
TOO MUCH” | 


James Stewart. Doris Day. 1:20. 4:05.' 
6 45. 9:30 


one 


| Susan 
- FS a 
0:20 


ts 30. 8-7266 | | 
| 


Tuesday 


$$ 


OMA "2,2; Parking RA. 2 +319 
Wilh Hol- 


bh 7:55 ORE” in M MY GORN | 
Audie Murphy. _6 15, 9:4 _ | 


Mu & CO. 35-1800. Alfred Hiteh-| 
“Sib 


“THE MAN 


Sse 
— Ee 


miles weet of Pa 
Church America's most beautif 
Drive-In. Located between 7 Corners 

and Pairfax Circle via either Ariing- 
_ Bivd. (turning at Gallows Rd. 
or Lee Hwy.—World's Largest 8c 


4TH SPECTACULAR DAY! 

LAST oe TO SEF! ' 

JA MES STEWART. DORIS DA 

“MAN WHO KNEW 
TOO MUCH” 


.. tcheock's a At again 
s 20 aad 12 


Scope. ha ai | : 
— —- 
7, Micke jock 
we m= Rooney a 
<a BRAY 
0 Sts ea, “REMIND 
i HIGH WALL” at 
2533 ‘Po. Ave. “$4. 


iu. 4.7311 
penal in in “THE 
“ 7% Ss r 
TLANTIC *" Capito! at At- 
bee ay JO. 3.3000 
err 


GRESS 7?) Nichols Ane. 5 


bad. 
my onan Free Parking 
James Keyl) Deorts Day in Alfred 
itehcock's “THE MAN WHO 
TOO MUCH.” Technivoler, 

tA UREL 9:10 ° 


‘7TH ANO CO. ROAD Nw ; 


Peramount presents 


ILLIAM HOLDEN 
DEBORAH KERR 


PEA. BLRAG-SLATON PRODUCT O% 


The Proud 


and Profa ne 


wo. 68400. Near eas 


Alfred Hitchcock's 
MAN WHO KNEW TOO MU 
stewart Doris Day 


_EANADIAN 
_Schenley 


Jgmes | 
0. | 


PATRICK HAYES 2:10. 4:40, 7:1 


CONCERTS 


GALA 1956-57 SEASON 
IN CONSTITUTION HALL 


SERIES A 
Berlin Phitharmeniec ye eg Vien- 


T 


Color- - Vista v 


Color, 


NOL 3- 

caster 
Antneny Quinn in 
WAIT.’ 


ACANEMY 
THE wore 
lor —_ 
LEAOU oo 
SENATAPEE. 
WHO KNEW oO MU ” ; 
PET in “23 PACES TO BAKER 
ATI. AS © , on $-3200 Tony Cu wiibe 
TAR SER? men 


RA. 84977. I Rock | Hudson 


Gary Coo — in 
“THE NAT “Eine 
BTORY 


se 


9. Bur ‘Lap- 


PAC HE : “AUTUMN LEAV 
THE 


IMPORTED CANADIAN WHISKY, A BLIND, 86.8 PROOF 
SCREMLEY | DISTHLLERS cs, N.Y. 6. 


ATOLL. 


‘Bebe 
TOM 


FROM 


ne 7 


and | . TLARTIC 

Be os y a. prdacy Sos tn 

ay BIRDS BEES : Gin ALIVE” ck 
a ai ' ' “OUTSIDE THE 


LAW 


ubliiMe? 


\ 


we 
Dedeit ‘Serkie. Binging 


Reyes of Norway. 


SERIES B 


Berlin Phitharmentc Orchestra. Vien- 

na Phitharmenic Orchestra, Rebert 

Casadesus, Isaac Stern, Vienns 

Academy Cheres. Reberta Peters. 
Rubinstein. an 


40. toyer. 

BROTHERS WERE VALIA AANT.” 2 > 
-. 38-5155. Geo. Palmer 
wre. 
or Landover Rad 


Ew Foo Satin as 
Kelly. “TO CA o 


| A aaadiaehondiaad 
| TATORS” 


CARVER 203 Nichole Ave. Ta 
ie a ye med TAETERT, oy 


a 


STANTON © the Time na 
ow CAPITOL iL AN SMAI en 
LAST TWO DAYS 

“GARBO” 


cpetpatns ,Pagrereaey or 


BYE.” 
CRUZ.” 
COLE 


starring KAY KENDALL 


Cotor by It CHNICOLOR $B 


~ Grant Leuvrel, 
- 9852. PA. S203 13 


ei SETS 


CAPITOL =", "<2"; “2 
Tran fey aves. er, Pk 


y 


chestra conducted by Richard Ba 


Pidgeon in “ : 
(Coier). George Monteomery, “ 
| BERS’ ROOST * «Color) 


s $24. a. ow. 


ok Bem Cooper in 
Wwid- 
—" } 


——— ee 

SERIES PRICES 
$9.50. £11.50, $13.75. 817.00. $21.00 
Fer either series of eight ~~ 
Mail aed Phene oe « I Accep 


- 
A 
GETTY Pat GE Leg Sm 


NQ 
Ped ro wy IRVING KLAW mart in “BACKLASH” 


ROTH = 
SILVER SPRING "7 $2," ea 


art mnt 


ecks pave 
“Haves Concert Bures 
Phene er Write fer Seasen + 


BEST SEATS NOW! 
Box Office Now Open 


ee ee 
pares CONCERT BUREAU 
‘la C beill's) mA OG OM. NW. 
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in COLOR 


** 
Most 


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At i ¢ 00. a Tavcolor) 
oF 


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a 


45. 


Bari 
‘Cail IL te? 


magnificen' 


_ NEVER WAS” 


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1 Bik. off Ala. Ave. yy 


Piatt hit Plus 


Anne 
Alr Conditioned 


a 35 
ueval. i 
; “CAMILA. 
at the Stanton is ~ 


an actress Nelly wees ; 
Harry MacArthur ashington Star 
PLUS 
JOHN FORD 
World's Directing Gentus 
JOHN WAYNE 
BARRY FITZGERALD 


Tana 
“THE LO 
VOYAGE OME” 
5. 10:36 


BAL- 


a9 
HISER-BETHESDA ”4:¢ “....* 
ATE BOT Ait 
“KARTOON KARNIVAL” 


2:30. 4:40, 6:50 and 9:06 


, Thure, Only. ur. neve 


SWAN. LAKE | 
(Complete 4 Acts) « 


Wed 


sxinte~ also 


. 


> <*% Ate 


a2 


‘Seancerown 5 
3.5535 


speeraine Pe oo ons no 
The Wor 
San 


“ON PE Pe 


) Peatures at 6:15, 6:05. 9:56 


(Leet tom ! 
} ve 


> ; = 
“ae 


(= . 2p. " _ 
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J st $3 se w a 
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Ne CireemaicorE + Print by TECHNICOLOR: Released thru United Artists | 
¥ STARTS. FRI. at Cool LOEW’S CAPITOL 
ait al oe Fas" i. ee STOR SB A VA he 


se 
‘* 
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> 


: 
oe 
— 


THE NEWS that the 
Mickey Mouse Club will cov- 
er the conventions at Chi- 
cago and San “Francisco 
pretty weli 
completes 
the roster. 

Tommy Kirk, 
aged 15, and 
Judy Harriet, 


that has been 
left markedly uncovered 
prior conventions. 

That plugs the last loop- 
hole. Everyone else is in 
Chicago—J. Fred Muggs, the 
chimpanzee; Pogo, the car- 
toon character; Lee Meri- 
weather, the beauty contest 
winner; Betty Furness, the 
sales girl—each bringing his 
or her special point of view 
to your TV screen. Every- 
body's there except Con- 
stance Bennett, who pleaded 
prior commitments. She'll be 
at San Francisco, though, 
presenting her point of view 
on the Republican Conven- 
tion over the Mutual Broad- 
casting System. 


OF COURSE, along with 
the point of view, there will 
. be the working stiffs—Mur- 
row, Daly, Cronkite, Seva- 
reid, Trout and the rest of 
the veterans who have been 
covering these clambakes for 
many years. Their task will 
be simply to tell what hap 
pens in the most possible 
words, to split the hairs as 
thinly as possible, to fill six- 
teen hours a day with rumor, 
conjecture, and occasionally 
a stray fact when there's go- 
ing to be precious little of 
all of them. 

This is a mass media year 
with a vengeance. Eric Seva- 
reid has pointed out of the 
"82 conventions: “Eisenhower 
was popular and appealing, 
but he still would never have 
beaten Taft without the most 
een and extreme use of 


in 


Radice and Television 


Mass Media Go All Out! 


On Party Conventions 


By John Crosby 


mass media techniques. Taft 


had organized the nomination 
for years. Most party lead- 
ers wanted him. He worked in 
the traditional style, sewing 
up state leaders everywhere 
he could, placing his men in 
absolute command of the con- 
vention machinery. This 
painstakingly constructed 
fortress was blown down by 
the Eisenhower money and 
understanding of mass media 
techniques and the Eisen- 
hower personality.” 

Even more than ‘52, this is 
going to be the year of the 
mass media techniques—yet 
with nothing like the Eisen- 
hower-Taft tussle in sight for 
either convention. In tee ab- 
sence of issue, technique is 
going to be all over the place. 
Candidates have already 
been advised not to use ex- 
treme contrasts in colors, 
white shirts, bold patterns in 
ties, to be careful of their 
beards, and to curb personal 
mannerisms: they've been 
told everything, in,fact, but 
what to Say. 

7 ° 

THIS AVOIDANCE of bold 
patterns and picturesque 
mannerisms will be recorded 
on the most overwhelming 
array of electronic equip- 
ment ever assembled—creep- 
lepeepies, sub-miniature 
cameras weighing 10 ounces, 
five-way split screens, tele- 
scopic lenses, and transceiv- 
ers. A CBS helicopter will 
fly exposed film from conven- 
tion headquarters to a spot 
in Chicago to be processed. 

NBC also has a helicopter. 


In addition, they boast-that | 
since they managed to put a | 


camera on a ferris-whee! dur- 
ing “Wide, Wide World,” they 
feel much better equipped 
to handle delégates — God 
knows why. 

The smoke-filled room is 
gone, possibly forever, to be 
replaced by the electronic liv- 
ing room full of 120,000,000 
people. Naturally, no more 
cigars, no more open-necked 
shirts, avoid the bold pat- 
terns and watch those man- 
nerisms. Well, the smoke- 


filled room was a deplorable | 


_— institution, but at 


\Monday TV Preview 


- Democratic National Con- 
vention: 
WTOP-TYV 1 p. m.3 p. m.; 
9: ie m.-11:30 p. m 
CTV 1 p. m3 p. m.; 
9:30 p. m.-1 a. m. 
WMAL-TV 1 p. m.4 p. ™.; 


——— —» 


—_—-——— 


9:30 p m. 

5 Z ane ty. Matinee 
Theater: Gene Nelson, Mur- 
vyn Vye and Betty Lynn star 
in “Fiddlin’ Man,” a drama 
about a frontier medicine 
man. 

7:30 p. m—WTTG. I Spy: 


| An officer trumps up charges 


least it was filled with human | 


beings. who smoked and 
chawed and spoke their 
minds. 
. . ° 

THERE WERE some 
cussed individuals in them, 
but they were colorful. 
that the mass media experts 
have taken over, we can 
hardly expect horny-handed 


individuality. After they get | 


the bold patterns out of the 
ties, the next step is to get 


the bold patterns out of the | 


phrases and out of the ideas. 
The perfect candidate will 
look just like somebody out 
of a Chrysler ad—well-bred, 
well-shaved, and thoroughly 
antiseptic. 

This is the year when the 
production men really move 
in and see that the lights are 


perfect, the candidates’ man- 
nerisms well curbed. And all 


this will be photographed by | 


the creepie-peepies, flown to 
the processing plant by helli- 
copter, and shown on the 
five-way split screen. 

It all reminds me of a song 
by Cole Porter from “Silk 
Stockings.” A movie star was 
being queried by reporters 
about her new picture, “War 
and Peace,” and she sang 
back at them that she 
couldn't remember the plot, 
but it was in wide screen, 
with Technicolor and stereo- 
phonic yrsaae 


prright 19864 
New Tork “Herald Tribune Ine.) 


against a member of the 
French General Staff in “The 
Man Who Hated Dreyfus.” 

7:30 p. m.—WTOP-TV. Rob- 
in Hood: The Sheriff. of Not- 
tingham’s tender feet stir up 
a rivalry among bootmakers 


Now tbat-eventually implicates the 


men of Sherwood Forest. 
7:30 m. — WMAL-TV. 
Bold Journey: A California 


businessman telis the story | 


of his adventures as a “spot- 


| ter pilot” for a tuna clipper. 


| Peruvian vocalist Yma 
| mac and actor Boris Karloff. 


8 p. m—WRC-TV. Ernie 
Kovacs Show: Guests ere 
Su- 


8 p. m—WTOP-TV. Burns 
and Allen: George thinks he 
has discovered an acting 
genius in his family when he 


| mistakes Jose Ferrers re- 


| i is ‘s. 
just right, the acoustics are | corded voice for his son's 


38 p.m. — WMAL-TV. 
Voice of Firestone: Tenor 
Brian Sullivan is guest. 

9 p. m—WTOP-TYV. The 
Charlie Farrell Show: Char- 
lie resorts to trickery to 
keep his chef when Pierre is 


| threatened by romance. 


m.—WTTG., Boxing: 
Jerry Luedee vs. Willie Troy, 
ten rounds. 
16:45 p. m—WTTG. Base- 
ball Hall of Fame: The Hank 
Bauer Story. 


WALTER WINCHELL is 
on vacation. His column wil! 
resume on his return. 


FM Stations 


WRC-FM (93.9 me.)—5:90 a. 
. - 
wTtor.Fu 

. = 
sat ag “ela ‘o7.. me.)— @ a. 
al 
wou. ru 
ght 
wran (100 


(94.7 me.)—T 


3 m.)— 


s 4 
WRNC (96.5 me)—¢ «. mm “73 “aidatene. 


a. . 
(94.3 me.)—6:20 «. =. te 2 WGOMS-FM 
midn 
m. te 16 WARL- 


=m. te 1) WwDCc-rM (101.1 me.)—T a. mm. te 8 


(168.5 me.)—6:50 «. m@ 


own, net « & 
12:38 


OTHER STANDARD STATIONS 


p70 ke—S o. . & 


ec —Da Only 
wtUsT—tite ke. ~Dectians Oniy.® > 
waa 78 ke.—Dea ar Only 
WWDC—i1260 ke. 


midnight. 


worm tees eS o. mm. te 


is. = 
6 ke——6 o. m=. te il a. oe 
‘ =. te midnight. 

t Only.* 

ht Onty.* 


xX—~1600 ke.—<6 «. m. te midnight. 


. 
*Autherized te coerete —s.. te ‘cundoue. 
Programs printed here conform to information 
bathers —— stations at time of eee: 


te 
M (105.1 me.)—6:80 «. m. to 2 
s. m. te mid- wist-rm (106.8 me.)—T:80 

~ what rm 


te ® 


te 


Rep. Ashley 
Reveals His 


Marriage 


THE WASHINGTON POST pa TIMES HERALD 
Monday, August 13, 1956 oS 


Government Drops Horwatt Suit- 


Government has decided during the crucial years ofithe issue in doubt Tae eat 


The 
Rep. Thomas L. Ashley (D- to drop attempts to take away| 1930-31 when Horwatt had ap-‘cannot find that he was a party 


Ohio) revealed yesterday that the citizenship of Saul H. Hor- plied for citizenship. 


married Margaret Mary watt. 


he 
Sherman in a “simple family | 


An 
Va., 


ceremony” 
Manassas, 
last week. ger. 

The 33-year-@ 
iold Congress 
man of Water- 
ville, Ohio, said 
his bride is the 
daughter of 
‘Mr. and Mrs. 
‘William T. 
| Sherman, ‘ for- 
merly of To- 
edo and now Ashley 
of Silver Spring, Md. 


rope, and was elected to Con- 


gress last year. He is the great- 
grandson of James Ashley, first 
governor of the Northwest Ter- 
iritory. He lives in Washington 


at 308 Constitution ave. ne. 


Funk Leaves Prison 
For Hospital Tests 


Reuters 


BERLIN, Aug. 
Funk, a 


pital today for a 
examination. 

Funk, who will 
Saturday, was Hitler's 
nomics minister. 


12 — Walter 
major war criminal 
now serving a life sentence in 
‘the four-power Spandau Prison 
here, was admitted to a hos- 
medical 


be 66 next 
eco- 
A British was said to be generally bad. 


Horwatt, a Polish-born elec. recollection of him, 
trical contractor now living in! 
Falls Church, was charged with 
fraudelently obtaining his citi- 


‘member in the critical year, 
Judge Bryan said: “Their 1930 and 1931.” wt, 
when flatly Justice Department a 

ldenied by Horwatt is hardly decided there were not 
evidence which does not leave ient grounds for apepal « - 


zenship in 1931 by withholding) 
information that he had been! 
a member of the Communit 


Party. 
When the trial came 


in connection with union act 
\ivities but broke with the Com- 
| Ashley is a lawyer and for-/ Munists in 1938. He said he had 


mer official of Radio Free Eu- "¢Ver urged the overthrow of, 
the Government. 


ever see 4 


TRANSCEIVER? 


Judge Albert V. Bryan dis- 


missed the case, sayin 
not find any evidence th 
watt “ever comprehended the 
reality that one of the Party's 
jaims was the overthrow” of the 
\Government. The opinion also! 


he did 
at Har- 


a special two-way communicator 


one of the exclusive NBC 


rejected testimony of so-called 


“turncoat Reds.” | 
Two former Communists tes- 


features designed to bring you 


tified they had known Horwatt, | 


then Horwitz, as a Communist 


the best coverage of the 


spokesman said Funk was ad-| | 
mitted to the British army 


pital at Spandau, the my bow 


Allied hospital to the grim red-| 5 
brick prison which now houses) 


OCRATIC 


only five top Nazi war crim-' 


inals 


Funk's state of health 


ATIONAL 


Highlights on Radio 


| Democratic National Con- 
| yention- 
WTOP. 1 p. m.-2:30 p. m. 
9:30 p. m.-12 midnight. 
WRC. 1 p. m.3 p. m. 
9:30 p. m.-1 a. m. 
WMAL. 1 p. m.4 p. m. 
9:30 p. m.<nidnight. 
WGMS. 12:38 p. m.4 p. m. 
9:30 p. m.-midnight. 
2:05 m.—WGMS-FM. 
Symphonic Matinee: Rossini, 
Overture to “The Heir Pre- 
| sumptive”; Beethoven, Piano 
| Concerto Neo. 5 (Emperor); 
Janacek, Suite for Strings. 


3 p. m—WRC. Five Star | 


CORVENTION 


9 p. m—WEC. Telephone 


Hour: 
9:38 p. m.1 a. m. 

16:38 pp. m—WGMS-FM. 
Opera 
Richard Strauss's 

| Rosenkavalier.” 


Merzzo-soprano§ _~ Mil- | 


TODAY 
EVERY DAY 


Box: Scenes from 


“Der : 


the station 
to watch 
WRC-TV 


Matinee: Faith Baldwin's | 
Monday y Radio o Programs “The White Elephant” is a 
| Story of a beautiful Persian 
WTOP (CBS) | box dnd the part it played in s 
a marriage. 
8:15 p. m.— WRC. Berkshire | 
Festival: Pierre Monteux con- 
| ducts the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra in Bela Bartok's | 
“Concerto for Orchestra” 
8:38 p. m—WWDC. Miss 
Washington Finals: Jack 
| Rowzie emcees the talent 
| routines of the nine finalists. | 


“= Monday Television ‘Programs — 


Siem |; Oo |: = Tr 
WTTG 5 WMAL-TV 7 WTOP.TYV 9 AM 570 - 
6:35 Meditations 6 00—« -25. Jim Gibbons 
‘7-8 Masic. Sporte 6-9 
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Renestec 


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_Robert_ Py *Hurletet 


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Ast e's 5 MeNetll 


* News fe ies 
5 Art 
g: 30 em ‘shop J a 
45 Vocal Paverites; ———___- 


108 Music so A Story 


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on Thoush! ark ‘Brans 
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Get The One 
and ONLY 


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Arthur 4s epseonens ‘Meio’ 


~  iiirthur Godfrey 
ur God 
8 


trey 
t Rich 
trike t Rich 


ivaliant Ledy 

ve of Life 

earch for Tom'w 
Guiding Light 


DAY OF NIGHT 


TV REPAIRS 


trike 


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Howard Miller 


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Backstage Wi ’ 


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Willie ror ° 
Hall Fame 


Have You Heard ? 


EDDIE 
FISHER 


is one of the many 


Mutual Stars 


_tommg te you ow on 
WGMS, the Mutual network 
station for Washington. Now, 
the finest in drama, voriety, 
comedy, news ond comment... 
plue good music, too. Die! first 
te WGMS—first on your diel. 


Latea te Eddie Fisher 
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103.5 WGMS-FM 


wey tty a — 


Journey 
old Journey 
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NewsMilton @. Ford 


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For news of the convention delegates from the 


WTOP-TV Area, keep 


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6:30 5 


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> \ 


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to fill your mornings 


Ben Gross, of the 
N. Y. Daily News called: 


: 


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Dick “Mr. Music’’ Haymes interviews 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
mie Monday, August 12, 1956 2 


How to 


ACROSS 


coco® 32 Part of a 
‘Rut meat. cornfield. 
€Christmas 33 Most amuse 
- al aaa ing. 
, 85 Military 

$8 Broadway's storehouse. 
Cronyn. : 

14 Pertaining 39 Religious 
to a specific devotions 
space. 40 Enfeebled. 

18 TV morning 42 Sunflower 

ow state (abbr.) 

16 English 43 Flurry 
College 

17 Unselfish 

10 Hindu 45 Group of 
queen. eight 

Lily from Army post 
France Si Tree group 

91 Politician’s 53 Highway 
concern (abbr) 

93 Herringlike 54Small goby 
fish 54 Cool again. 

93 Fermented 56 Common 
drink purple 

S4State flower seaweed 
of New 57 Sharp 
Hampshire. 58 Easy 

25 Zoo per 60 Correct 
former &1 Goatee 

94 Mr. Tebbetts 62 Hair groom 

28 Rit of corre. er 
spondence. 63 Angular 

$0 Joes and 44 Otherwise 
Janes. 85 Rose oil. 


DOWN 
1 Man's name. 5 Completely 
& Underworld 


7 Santa's 
workshop 


& Pemmer. 


Solution to Saturday's Pussie 


“i SiO -)) = he iaeici ae 


44 African tree. 


i” 


ad Kad ad 


a GOeaGaaga 


> 


WN 


9 Palette 36 Blushing 
group 37 Reporter's 

10 Daughter of dream. 
Cecrops 38 Loyal. 


| 


' 
; 


: 


Keep Well 


By Dr. Theodore R. Van Dellen 


To the limit of space, questions) 
pertaining to the prevention of 
disease will be answered. Per- 
sonal replies will be made when 
return stamped envelope is in 
closed. Telephone inquiries not 
accepted. Dr. Van Dellen will 
not make diagnoses or prescribe 
for individual diseases. 

FOOD SPOILAGE 

FOOD POISONING is rife 
at this time of the year. Hot 
weather is a seasonal hazard 
especially for those who run/ 


|cafeterias and plan picnics and! 


receptions. Every summer we! 
hear about someone who de-| 
velops “ptomaine poisoning.”| 


11 Broadway 41 Government This term, handed down from 


actress revenue 
12 “La Gio source. 


conda. 46 Pearl of 


13 Wife of great luster 
47 Daughter of 


Geraint 
18 Inscription 


(Cyrus 
24 Poorest yrus. 


2% Fabrice edge. 48 More com- 


27 Unpleasant pact. 
counte 50 Actor 
nance McDowall 

29 Assumed 52 Resinous 
control of Mexican 
(2 words) pine 

31 Sault— 54 “Auntie 
Marie " 


34 Cater to a 55 Network. 


borrower 56 Incision. 


35 Feminine 59 Part of a 


name. refrain. 


i 


| 


—= 
== 


| 


: 
: 


one generation to another, has 
become synonymous with food 
poisoning. 

Ptomaines are poisons that 
form in spoiled meat or other 
protein substances. They are 
products of decomposition in 
contrast to the bacterial inva 
sion of food, the common cause 
of food poisoning. Not all 
spoiled food is toxic. Limburger 
cheese is an example and Eski- 
mos consider putrefied seal) 
meat a delicacy. On the other! 
hand, a deteriorated stéak or’ 
flounder may cause genuine 


iptomaine poisoning. 


| The majority of summer out-| 


| jereamed dishes, and cold 


breaks of poisoning are due 
jto staphylococci, These germs 
‘look like clusters of grapes 
‘under the microscope and mul- 
itiply rapidly in food left ex-| 
posed on a hot day. They pre-| 
fer cream or custard filled pas- 
tries, meat and potato salads, 
leftover poultry, salad dress- 
ings, cold egg mixtures, 


meats. 

| It is surprising that poison- 
ing does not occur more often, 
‘considering the lax way we) 
‘handle these products. Most/ 
picnic lunches are prepared! 
the night before. The ingredi-| 
ents may remain on the kitch- 
en table for several hours un 


til mixed and placed in suitable 


containers. 


| During this time they are 


contaminated with staphylo- 


cocci which are in the air and. 


on the cook's hands. The more 
insanitary the kitchen, the 
more likely the contamination. 
| These illnesses are kept down 
through cleanliness in the 
kitchen, proper dish-washing, 
and a minimum of handling. 
Perishable foods must be kept 
in the refrigerator whenever 
possible. This will not kill the 
organifms but prevents their 
multiplication. For picnics, 
packing the meal in a well in- 
sulated bag or dry ice decreases 
the possibility of spoilage. 


| TOMORROW: Trafie vio- 


lators. 


—s | (Coprright, 1964, Chieage Tribune) 


“PICNIC wit Pu.s.' 
U.S. GOVERNMENT z7spected be uf 
Frying Chickens 


—the nnd & SAFEWAY) 


WINY 


ABOUT MAPLE FORREST-- 

iF SHE MERELY RECEIVED 
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MORNING, MRS.WORTH! 


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L THOUGHT, BEFORE I GOTO / ror a DRIVE,GUY! 
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ag. 13 

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BIKES and TRIKES 


3 SPEED 
FIRST! Never before has this famous 


is vivid stories of the Chicago and San Francisco 
. Pace WY. ve 
and backstage maneuvers appear exclusively | 
The Washington Post and Times Herald 


phome REpublic 7-1234 for home delivery 


aa WASHINGTON POST end TIMES 


; 


HERALD 
eee 


Monday, August 13, 1956 


T he DISTRICT LINE iy Bill Gold : 


Some of Our Best 
Friends Are 


Human 
DISTRICT Liners seem to 
“agree with my radical theory 
. that Government workers 
‘are human, even as you and 
; sn" . and that 
their virtues 
and vices 
pretty well 
parallel our 
own. Readers 
have been 
sending me 
reports 
of their re 
cent encoun- 
ters with rep- 
resentativ es 
Bill Geld ot Mr. Whisk- 


ers, and you might find some 


>. 
Oe 
> > 
*? 7,5 #4 


FT ee ee ) * 
*,%o%%, 9" s%9%oe*0"s%e* Me? “9° e*."e . 


: — -. . 
RO ae “* *s 
. 
** 


eee? 
+_@ 
a 


x Ta eee ee 


| standing 


ee 
OO anaes oe 


_ 7 ,* 
Oe PO We ie 


+, 
. * 6°." x) SAA ° a ae ae he . 


of the evidence of interest. 
For example, an elderly gen- 
tleman who wishes to remain 
anonymous writes: 

“I will soon be 72 years old, 
so | went around to the So- 
cia] Security office to file my 
application. [t was some 
thing I dreaded doing, be- 
cause I had visions of being 
shunted from one snippy 
clerk to another 

“Instead, I feund the 
staff courteous and effi. 

. My business was 
transacted with a dispatch 
which some private busi- 
ness firms would de well te 
emulate.” 

George Walker, president 
of Interstate Auto Supply. 
Inc. has a less flattering re- 
port to make. From a com 
pany in Sioux City, George 
ordered some special mer- 
chandise for one of his cus- 
tomers. The order was ac- 
knowledged, but several 
weeks passed withowl any 
sign of the goods. When the 
package finally arrived, the 
reason for the delay was selif- 
evident 

Stamped on the ship 
ping label was a postal ne- 
tation: “Missent te Manila, 
Philippines.” 

“Fortunately.” George re- 
ports. “our customer was a 
model of patience and under- 
He realizes that 


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such things can and do hap 
pen in the handling of moun- 
tains of parcel post, despite 
the best efforts of postal 
workers to avoid such errors. 
He accepted the merchandise 
and we didn't lose the sale.” 


Margaret M. Stabler of San- | 


dy Spring, Md.. tells me that 
her husband found himself in 


a mixup with the tax collector | 


similar to the incident re- 
ported here recently. Her 
husband is a contractor, and 
each quarter he pays the 
Government his share of the 


Social Security taxes on his 


his quarterly payment as re- } 
quired by law. Immediately @ 


he dug out his canceled 
check. and sent it off to the 
tax collectors, together with 


a letter explaining that he | 
had, too, paid the tax so j 


would they kindly call off 


Kurt Rosenwald of 2828 | 
Hartford st. se. puts the en- | 


tire dis 


into proper 
perspective, Think, with this 


report 
As he was 


Walking past 


| Naylor rd. and/30th st. se. 


he saw a letter/carrier open- 
ing the maj’ box at that 
corner. 

“Oh, reminds me.” 
said Kurt. “I was supposed 
to mail this letter. Add this 
to your pile, please.” 

letter 


Government workers 
be something less than per- 
fect. but I like them anyhow 


| They remind me so much of 


non-Government workers. 


cos 

TODAY'S BIRTHDAYS 
Greetings to Bob Wiesiler, 

Bert Lahr, Ned Brooks, June 
Isherwood, Hugo C. Johnson 
and Brig. Gen 
Funk 

eos 
GIVE-AWAYTS 


Friendly, black. long-haired | 


kittens (Jackson 20004). Will 


deliver house-broken kittens | 


—— CS 


P) 


es Veda va Spthuop. ; 


Mr. Noodle and }lemrieffa 


coming Thursday, 


to our Young 4th Floors 
exciting back-to-school 


=~ 


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a 


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MARK TRAIL 


» By Ed Dodd 


, 1 HAD A TOUGH L 
TE WITH youre 
BOSS WHILE you 
WEE GONE, MARK 
HES GETTING SERIOUS 

AND, BOY | MEAN 


ON A FISHING TRIP 
MARK TRAILS EM- 
PLOVER, WHO [IS 
PUBLISHER OF 
"WOODS & WILDLIFE” 
MAGAIINE, HAS 
BECOME GREATLY 
INTERESTED IN 


RIP KIRBY 


F SOC, YOu SAY 
" —— OU 
KEY TO HETTIE HILTONS 
” IN THAT BOX? o-- 


MOON MULLINS 3} © 


— gee aN 
4 " 


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YOU WANT ME P NO, PLL FIND 


TO TELL Him SOME TACTFUL 


ABOUT US 7 way 


yr Ae *s 
te ae 


ie By Alex Raymond 


’ 
| 
‘ ’ 


HAVE TOGO 
\— 


2 | 
aa. 


(The Washington Merry-Go-Round | THE WASHINGTON POST and 


A Lot of History 


. By Drew 


CHICAGO ~— 
ean look back on a lot of things 


‘in Chicago this week .°. 


= i\Twelve years ago, he, a rela- 


‘tively obscure 
Senator from "ll 
Missouri, was” 
isitting on as 
‘Coca Colag® 
lcrate in an@® 
‘outer corridor 2 
lof the Chicago 
/amp hitheater 
munching a 
thot dog. Sud- 
idenly he was 
itold he was 
nominated for 
Vice President. ... He had come 
ito Chicago to nominate Jimmie 


Pearson 


Byrnes of South Carolina, No... . 
12 man of the Roosevelt admin-'Texas . . 


Harry Truman the 


HST Can Recal 


f 


Pearson 


balloting between Mis-| 
souri's Truman and lowa's| 
Wallace ...‘How the vote’ 
stood 429% for Wallace. How 


} Dave Stern of the Philadelphia | 


Record and Harold Ickes, the 


. Secretary of Interior, started! 
¢ out to swing 
oa from Pennsylvania and Illinois 
meee over to Wallace... 


How Ed 
Pauley, the big oil man camped 
in a little room under the 
rostrum, sent out for Texas 
delegates, urging them to go 
Truman. How Gene Casey 
buzzed around Maryland dele- 
gates urging them to switch 
. They did switch. So did 
. Truman wasin.. 


listration. Byrnes was the big Truman let the chips fall in a 


wheel, the Assistant President. 


late prober. He had a speech in 
this pocket all written out, 
lauding Byrnes . .. He lunched 
‘with Sidney Hillman, head of 
ithe Amalgamated Clothing 
|'Workers, a potent influence in 
‘war production councils. After 
‘that he threw the speech ‘away 
.,, Jimmie Byrnes went back 
‘to South Carolina in a towering 
rage. Arthur Krock coined the 
phrase, “Clear it with Sidney.” 
.. «. One year later momentous 
‘events had transpired. Byrnes 


‘Truman was just a tough Sen- 


Strange way after that.’ As 
President, he appointed Ed 
Pauley Under Secretary of the 
Navy only to have him de 
feated by the opposition of 
Harold Ickes, who had bucked 
Pauley on the convention 
floor. Ickes resigned as Secre- 
tary of Interior as a result of 
that fight. The issue was Navy 
ou... The other man who led 
the switch to Truman, Gene 
Casey, went to jail for income 
tax evasion. He had given heav- 
ily, too heavily, to the Demo 
cratic Party and had taken 


more delegates) 


a% 


a © @ 


TIMES HERALD 


Monday, August 13, 1956 35 


Open Tonite ‘til 9 
Open Monday, Thursday and 
Friday Nites ‘til 9 


OTHER DAYS OPEN ’til 6:00 
STORES OPEN AT 9:00 A.M. 


Hechinger's- 
has everything for. 


PLAYTIME FUN 


At Discount Prices 


was back in Washington as part of it out of Uncle Sam's 
| Secretary of State in the Cabi-\share ... Truman did not in- 
net of the man who had been tervene. 
7: ee him but DRAGOONING ADLAI--Yes. 
' there's a lot of history Harry 
SAVED BY A GAVEL—Yes, Truman can look back on—the 


, , 1952 convention when he was 
Harry Truman, who believes in| *™ 
till P 
history, can look back on a lot * resident and wanted to be 


19 — Count ‘em — 19 Plays 
a President-maker. It was hi« ALL DESIGNED FOR EXTRA SAFETY 

of momentous events, some turn to sit in the e room 

the publie never knew about, ait 


isnder the rostrum télling dele- [he 106” top bar is made of 16-ga. steel tube. . . legs 
some that even he didn’t know 84tes how to switch. His man, are 93” long. The extra-heavy 2” tubing used thrudut 
shout .. . There was a bic ee ater ~~ is connected with one-piece, 16-ga. steel sockets. The 
Henry Wallace rally Wednes-|Estes Kefeucer yl woe. sealed ball-bearing swings are suspended on 1,000-Ib. 
oon test chain and have non-tilt, self-leveling steel seats. 

day night calculated to roll Wal- man hated, was sidetracked, not ; ; 

lace into renomination for Vice only for President, but Vice All bolt ends are capped to prevent cutting hands arid 
erm There was nor resident ... Harry then found| tearing off clothes . . . all hardware is cadmium plated 
President . . . his man reluctant on other —body is finished in baked enamel just like your cat. 
balloting for President. FDR things. He was reluctant to 

was renominated by acclama-have the President of the 

tion. But the balloting for Vice United States campaign for him 19 BIG FUN PLAYS 
‘4 ... The President did campaign) * 3 Trapeze Bars 
| ident was echeduled for <a paig 

Pres anyway—in the way he had| * 3 Play Steel Monkey Bars 
‘that night, and Wallace cohorts jong found most effective. He| * 3 Sets of Flying Rings 
had banners ready for a mighty|can look back on that long) * 2 Play Ladder and 8 Slide 
‘surge through the convention whistle-stop trip across the Stands free and away from 
swings for safety. 
1 Basketball Backboard 


| United States and back—with 
jhall. They staged their surge, .-.onal satisfaction, but that) * 
a convincing show of strength is al). Truman had his old fire. and Net 
by the man who already sat as — old give-em-hell. But it was * 4 a Shower for 
rs hey were sad, in a way. The crowds ot Days 
V on “apr tgear a + tel surge weren't there. The newspapers °* 2 Play, Welded Top “Air 
ready in tne didn't listen . . . He gave his Glide” 
2 Super-Safe Swings 
2 Steel Chinning Bars 


to vote for Vice President ..-\most devastating attack on ° 
Rut the party bosses who Eisenhower, the man who had * 

Also Other 
Gym Sets 


A Complete Playground 


By Saunders and Overgard 


f WWEN I WAS PACKING Away 
WIG JACKET, THIS FPELLED 
OUT OF HIG POCKETS. UL 
ae 


Reatede 


ANYHOW, | BETCHA MIKE }- 
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14 46 
yy 


YEAH! MURPHY WAS TALKING ) 
TO HIM AT THE RAILROAD 
STATION THIS MORNING! THE 


PuIL HAS GONE UP 
TO THE CAPITAL 


ME —AND IT’S VERY 
IMPORTANT { 
a 


wanted Wallace out and Tru- a See his —— of Staff, 
man in, ruled differently. Sen.|) 0718 ohowing how he wes 
Sam Jackson of Indiana, the -ommander-in-chief in Potsdam 
convention chairman, gaveled when the lopsided deals with 
the meeting to a close. The vot- the —- were put across 
ing, he yelled above the shouts|,")* 01 dhip.  Elseuhower 
of “No! No! No!” would begin » 4. .- spoke to him after that, 
on Thursday ... It was ee qi Wouldn't get out of the car to 
cial event in history .. .- hy U greet him as they drove to the 
hadn't happened 7 Set hee Capitol on Inauguration Day, 
different history might haveinscn% ever invited him back to 
been; Wallace as Vice Presi-\+1. white House... and the 
dent, then President. Our rela powenaners buried that speech 
tions with Russia? What would! ., Potsdam in the inside pages 
they have been | Harry Truman in Chicago 


| ‘TALL CORN DIDN'T GROW. |today is no longer king-maker 
‘Yes, Harry Truman can look| Me's a power, pat not king- 
hings .. ./™aker. He cant make presi- 
a lig Fig ay SF q dents. He can't stop the reluc- Comes in easy-te-essemble sec- 
Chicago cop up to guard the ‘nt candidate he nominated in gens Measures $ feet wide, 4 
Convention organist next day| 52. the man who shrank from 
‘to make sure he didn’t play|WDistle-stopping. For the man feet deep, $V feet high. 
“towa—That'’s Where the Tall h¢ dragged into the presi- 
ICorn Grows” at the height of dential limelight in "52 is now 


| a power in his own right. . 

||— But though he can't make or P 

_ unmake presidents, he can @ Fence, 6° Section 
. T ‘look back over a lot of history, , 

———— More Police Urged [some of it unwritten, in which © Rustic Chair 

UM-ER, WELL, > | ve : he, an unknown, unobtrusive 

SURE To Fight Delinquency little Senator munching a hot- © Rustic Table 
The Nation's Capital needs|dog, played a vital part... 

more policemen to combat|)Harry Truman is a man who) 

juvenile delinquency, Carl|studies history, a man who be-) 

Perian, research director of a/lieves in history, including that 

Senate Subcommittee investi-|which he himself makes 

gating the problem, said Satur-|'Coprrieht. 1956. Bell Syndicate. Inc.) 


day night. 4 seen ——ee 
Perian, speaking on ; 
TV's “Four Corners” newscast, sare cc 
said that while “juvenile vici- inekeenianne tnetieenion 
ousness is relatively nonexist- Increase your ebi!ity 
ent” here, Washington's juve. Apply new FREE night course 
nile crime rate is higher than SCIENTOLOGY 
other cities of comparable size SCHOOL OF LIFE 
AD. 2-6296 


Dan’! Boone 
Log Cabin 
Playhouse 


WINNIE WINKLE 
ALL RIGHT, NOW... 
PAY ATTENTION 
TO THE GAME _. 
TS YOUR MOVE / 


GOLUY, MOM...1TS 
BEEN RAINING FOR 
Ailey | COM= AGAIN 
ANOTHER DAY. 5 


Furniture & Fence to Match 
$2.69 


THAT JOCKEY TINY TOM 
'S ACCUSED OF BEING 
CROOKED. I KEAD 


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Big Dan’! Boone Cabin 
my Ty Rg Re 59-5 


wide. 7 %. deen. 6 
igh. Hae shetters and deer. 


Pay Only $6 Down, $5 Menth 


/ Arlington Rabies Shots 


Dr. Ralph G. Beachley, Ar- LEARN TO DRIVE 


lington County health officer, 

‘reminded dog owners yester- P ahem oes Pad (+ ne 
‘day that the County's rabies Standard and Automatic — 
‘immunization program will af A - for You-—D. © me. * ve 
continue this week at the Clar- , 


‘endon Fire House daily from AADTA DRIVING SCHOOL 


2 to 4 p.m. 


10-183 and 10-159 ep 


| De Luxe, Lightweight 
x, Imported, Fully Equipped 
Bicycle 


TAKE-WITH 
NOW 


> 
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a © , 
y ae a yee 
a vi - * re 
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creme oe 
Ym. > ee 2A ‘ 
, pi Tt Dea ee 


- 
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4 
y 


oe a oe eS 


yy 


CONVENTION 


} Keep your eye on CBS Television for a vivia ana 
exciting picture of the political drama as it unfolds 
this week, in Chicago, brought to you by the brilliant 
staff of CBS News correspondents and cameramen. 


a 


- f) R i ‘ g) - if, "4 {; 
i Hi4} ot AN i thy} 
diate n pass bas et 


| THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
36 - Monday, August 13, 1956 ; 


_— 
——_ 


F PRO RR BRON > OE 


ees « 2 3 ee 


C 


. 


poe Se Pty ORE 
back-to-schoo 


a tee 4 


at EIR 
Psd sae 


‘ - 
Wig oo 


e POLS Soo” alee 
2 Wath Be aime 
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> 


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REVOLVING 
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A New Hecht Co. Service Teo 
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 Popetherness is how MeCalls magasine Geseribes interests shared with family and comavenity. 


2 


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You Can Buy Up te ........ $100 $150 $200 
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xX yo, 
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([) Please open « regular 30-day Shopping Plate Account for me. [) Please open my Revolving Charge Account. | have circled here 


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2