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The Weather 


Today—Mostly sunny with moderate 
southerly winds and the high around 


90. Wednesday—Partly 


quite warm. Monday's temperatures: 
High, 84 degrees at 4:30 p. m.; low, 65 
at 6:10 a. m. (For details see Page 18.) 


cloudy and 


The Was 


} 


ngfon Post FINAL 


Times Herald 


79th Year —— No. 190 


ss 


Phone RE. 7-1234 


ht 31956 


Post Company 


TUESDAY, JUNE 12, 1956 WTOP Radio (1500) TV (Ch. 9) 


Coor 
The Wash 


FIVE CENTS 


K’ FIRINGS 


House Votes 
Stiffer Drug 
Control Bill 
For District 


Measure Allows 
For Quarantine 
Provision for 
Confirmed Addicts 


Wes Bartheimes 
Stat Repor 
The House without discus- 
sion passed by voice vote 
yesterday an amended Dill 
to give more and stronger 
tools to local law enforce- 
ment and health officials 
combating drug addiction 


The measure came 
House floor with amendments 
designed to meet objections, in- 
cluding a major one by drug- 
gists who protested language 
permitting casual inspection 
of their prescription records by 
Federal Food and Drug Admin 
istration agents as well as by 
local police 

A public hearing on the bill 
recentiy brought over- 
whelming indorsement {rom 
police and health officials and 
the District Medical Society 

The bill to 
Senate where a loca! 
control bill has been reported 
favorably by a Senate District 


By 


er 


to the 


out 


now goes the 


narcotic 


_ — 


Pending Measures 

For Dope Control Hit 
American Psychiatric As 

sociation calls bills for con- 

trol of narcotics a “backward 

approach” to addiction prob- 

lem. Page 16. 


-- — _ 


public 
Com- 
the 
now 
the 
urged by 


after 
awaits 


subcommittee 
hearing. It 
mittee action 
Senate version 
stands, does not 
amendments strongly 
the drug trade groups on the 
House side . 

The House bil] would 

® Enable so-called, habitual 
addicts to be tried on charges 
of vagrancy which carries a 
maximum sentence of one year 
This is a quarantine provision, 
as proponents view it 

®Insure control and 
prompt commitment of all nar- 
eotic addicts, including juve- 
niles for the first time, who 
show promise of benefiting from 
hospital and 6 sub- 
. sequent through 
counseling and psychiatric treat- 
ment. 

®Enable police to 
search warrants if they 
show probable cause if an es- 
tablishment illegally houses 
narcotics. Now “proof of pos- 
itivity” must be shown 

® Enable the Government to 
appeal from a District Court 
order granting a defendant's 
motion to suppress evidence in 
narcotic violation cases 

® Regulate and contro! for 
the first time possession use of 
barbiturates and am 
phetamines 


a 

full 

However, 
as it 
contain 


over 


treatment 


rehabilitation 


obtain 
can 


SAVE MONEY ON 
HOUSEHOLD 
NEEDS 


You can take advantage of 
huge savings on all kinds 
of household items — every- 
thing from rugs to ranges, 
chests to china to pots and 
pans—offered in Articles For 
Sale Ads in the Want Ad 
Section of The Washington 
Post and Times Herald. 


Turn now to today’s Want 
Ad Section for a quick solu- 
tion, to all your household 
needs. 


> 


COURT LIMITS ‘RI 


2d H-Bomb Test | 
Indicated by AEC 


International News Service 


The Atomic Energy Com- 
mission indicated yesterday 
thot the United States has 
exploded at least one more 
H-bomb in the current se- 
ries of nuclear testd being 
conducted in the Pacific. 

Commission said 
the task force con- 
America’s third 
experiment with hydrogen 
weapons has “made good 
progress with the detona- 
tion schedule established 
for the series”. 

The AEC comment did 
not specifically say wheth- 
er one or more explosions 
have been set off since the 
multi-megaton blast wit- 
nessed by newsmen May 
21. but the statement made 
it strongly apparent that at 
least once additional H- 
bomb had been detonated. 


—_—— - 


DuPont Wins | 


In Cellophane 
Monopoly Suit 


Supreme Court Says 
Material Is One of 
Many Such Available 


International News Service 


The Supreme Court cleared 
E. | duPont de Nemours and) 
Co. yesterday of Government| 
charges that it has illegally 
monopolized the Nation's multi- 
million-dollar cellophane  in- 
dustry 

By a vote of 4 to 3, the tri-| 
bunal upheld a lower court rul-' 
ing to the effect that cellophane 
is only one of many “flexible 
packaging materials” frerly 
available to manufacturers and 
the consumer. 

The ruling markec & major) 
Government defeat and may 
set precedents in the field of 
antitrust law. DuPont vigor 
ously denied charges that its 
75 per cent of the United States 
cellophane market constituted | 
monopoly. 

The case has no direct bear- 
ing on a larger antitrust suit 
brought against duPont on 
charges that it has engaged in 
a conspiracy to violate anti-| 
trust laws in combination with | 
General Motors, U. S. Rubber 
and others 

The Government lost this 
ease when it was tried in Ch. 
cago and the decision has been 
appealed to the Supreme Court. 
where arguments are expected 
to be scheduled for next fall. 

In the cellophane case, United 
States District Judge Paul) 
Leahy of Delaware held that 
cellophane is only one of nu- 
rerous “flexible packaging ma-| 
terials.” 

He ruled that the company’s | 
success with this product was 
due to “research, business skili 
and competitive activity” rather | 
than unfair practices. 

Justice Department attorneys 
charged that duPont .was able 
to control prices and exclude 
competitors from the industry 
through « patent manipulation 
and the interchange of techni- 
cal information with foreign 
companies. 

Yesterday's majojrity opin- 
ion, written by Justice Stanley 
Reed, said: “It seems to us that 
duPont should not be found to 
monopolize cellophane when 
that product has the competi. 
tion and interchangeability with 
other wrappings that this rec- 
ord shows.” 

Those dissenting from this 
opinién were Chief Justice Farl 
Warren and Associate Justices 
Hugo Black and William O 
Douglas. Justices Tom Clark 
and John M. Harlan did not par- 
ticipate in the decision 


’ 


‘Postal Bulletin Ruli 


7 


. Ruling Holds 


Ike Takes House Votes Law Applies 


Helm, Rules $3.8 Billion | f= 

On Red Visit Foreign Aid :. ae 
Administration ... € 

Seeks Senate Action | 


To Restore Some | 
Of $1.1-Billion Cut | 


By Robert C. Albright 
Stat Reporter 

The House yesterday ap- 
proved a foreign aid bill cut 
to $3.8-billion, by a rolicall 
vote of 273 to 122, as the 
Administration opened a 
Senate action to restore at 
least part of the slash. 

Senate Democratic and Re- 
publican leaders, and top mem- 
bers of the Foreign Relations. 
Armed Services and Appropria- 
tions Committees were invited 
to the White House this morn- 
ing, to confer on the $1.1 bil- 
lion House slash. 


Presidential Press Secretary 
James C. Hagerty announced 
plans for the 8:30 a. m. confer- 
ence. In other quarters it was) 
said Administration officials 
will ask the Senate to restore | 
at least half of the cut. 


Senators invited to the White 
House conference said they) 
were not advised who would) 
preside in Mr. Eisenhower's 
absence. 


In one competent quarter it 
was said that no one would take 
ee chair—that the 
conference would follow the 

Col. Edemsky had sought usual foreign-aid briefing pat-| 
earlier to determine how the tern, with Secretary of State 
United States would react to John Foster Dulles and Foreign 
an invitation to all four mem-| Aig Chief John B. Hollister 
bers of the Joint Chiefs of Staff probably leading off the discus 
to visit Russia. sion. 

The President's condition) Adm. Arthur Redford, chair-| 
after his operation Saturday|man of the Joint Chiefs of 
for removal of an intestinal ob~ Staff, also will participate in 
struction, was described fh a the conference. 
morning bulletin as “excel-/ The President's $4.9-billion 
lent.” A 5:30 p. m. bulletin de- foreign-aid request was whit- 
— it ~ satisfactory. tied down to $3.8 billion by the’ 

ite House Press Secre-| House in tentative voting last' x 
tary James C. Hagerty said week. s! anes Adenauer flew ithe Talos anti-aircraft guided 
there was no significance in the! Despite appeals from Presi- yes ington yesterday afte) missile adopted by the Air 
change of wording. He ex-\dent Eisenhower and leaders sounding a warning that the'Force is a “better weapon” 
plained that the doctors be-| of both parties for more funds,|new Russian policy is “gore than the Army's Nike. 
lieved the President's condition s majority of the votes for pas-|\dangerous than the former ag-| Therefore, Chavez told re- 
to be as good in the afternoon sage came from the Democratic gressive conduct since it plays porters, the Appropriations 
as in the morning, but just! cide of the aisle. Committee may recommend 
wanted to word the bulletin’ tere is how the House dj-\UP0"™ ‘he longing for peace;that only the Navy-developed 
differently. vided: For passage—162 Demo- which lives in all men.” Talos be purchased in the fu- 
Walks Twice in Day crats and 111 Republicans.) The 80-year-old statesman(ture. Since the Committee 
. Against—70 Republicans and 52 came here for two days of talks| holds the purse strings on milli- 

The Chief Executive tried Democrats - about such problems as German tary spending, its recommenda- 
out his legs twice in the course; «4 motion by Rep. Lawrence reunification, strengthening of|tion would have the effect of 
of the day. walking to a chair, cmith (R-Wis.) to recommit the North Atlantic Treaty Or-|cutting off funds for Nike 
resting awhile, and then walk-(.54 thus kill) the bill failed,|g@mization, disarmament and) The rival missile programs 
ing back to his bed 52 to 147. on a standing vote,|Semeral Western policy in light|/have been the source of a bit- 

In laying down conditions No request was made for a rol] of the new Soviet moves ter feud between the Army and 
under which the American call Secretary of State John Fos- Air Force 
Chiefs of Staff might accept) As passed by the House, the ‘eT Dulles welcomed Adenauer| The Subcommittee .ques 
a Russian invitation, President|pjli actually authorizes $3,568,-\2t the National Airport tioned the Army, Navy and Air 
Eisenhower sent word to the 475.000 for next year. But carry- Adenauer said it was “very! Force Chiefs of Staff at a secret 
Soviet government that it See AID, Page 6. Col. 5 painful” for him to have heard | hearing. Chavez said that all 
would be “impracticable” for ’ , . of President Eisenhower's ill-i\three military leaders, includ- 
the United States to give a hr “y —- but, “I amling Gen. Maxwell D. Taylor, 
favorable reply to such an in- ete gia e is making such speedy|Army Chief of Staff, “think 
vitation at this time. I our Arre ste d “oy ts Talos is the best.” This view 

He also let the Russians know oN n further remarks Adenauer|was not shared by the Army 
that whether an invitation will In Bomb Scare said he ~~ Dulles are “in| previously 
be accepted in the future will a agreement On many matters; While Nike will continue to 
depend upon circumstances ex- Police investigating the blast and I believe that our talksibe used for “present opera- 

See IKE, Page 6, Col. 3 


To Sensitive ' 


Jobs Only 


Administration's 


President Reported = 
In Fine Shape as 
He Sets Basis for 


Exchanging Tours 


Security System 
Suffers Setback: 


Edward T. Folliard Overhaul Forecast 


Staff Reporter 

President Eisenhower, as- 
suming leadership again 
from his hospital bed, yester- 
day laid down two conditions 
under which the chiefs of 
staff of America’s Armed 
Forces might accept an in- 
vitation to visit Russia later 
on. 

They were: 
| No more than two of the 

Chiefs of Staff could go to 

Russia at any one time. 
2 They would only go if the 

* Soviet government agreed 
that they could spend a maxi- 
mum of time outside Moscow 
in order to see activities of in- 
terest to their own services. 
Replies te Attache te 

President Eisenhower made 
the decision in his suite at 
Walter Reed Army Hospital, 
and it was relayed to Col. 
Sergei A. Edemsky, acting milli- 
tary attache of the Soviet Em- 


bassy here, for transmission to 
his government. 


By 


By Murrey Marder 


Stafl Reporter 

The Supreme Court struck 
at the heart of the Eisenhow- 
er Administration's security 
risk system yesterday by rul- 
ing the program cannot be 
applied to “nonsensitive” 
jobs. 

By a 6to-3 decision, the High 
Court decided that the law on 
which the Federal Employes 
Security Program rests is lim- 
ited to jobs “directly concerned 
with the Nation's safety.” 

When President Eisenhower 
junked the “loyalty” program 
in 1953 and created the present 
|“security” program, he ex 
tended to all Government agen- 
cies the dismissal powers which 
Congress set up to protect “the 
National security.” 

This, the majority said ves. 
terday, in an opinion written 
by Justice John M. Harlan. went 


: 


. Associated Press 
West German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer | Secretary of State John Foster Dulles. At 
is welcomed to Washington last night by | center is Heinz Weber, interpreter. 


‘Better Weapon,’ Says Chavez 


Air Force’s Talos Seen 
Re placing Army’s Ni 


Adenauer 
Flies Here 
For Talks 


Chancellor Warns 
New Soviet Policy 
Is More Dangerous 


Aliens Denied Right 


ke To Face Accusers 


The Supreme Court, in a 
5-te-4 decision, yesterday up- 
| hel the Government's right 
te use “confidential informa- 
tion” without letting an ac- 
cused alien face his accusers 
in suspension of deportation 

| cases. Page 8. 


| Pra 
| Sen. Dennis Chavez said yesterday that Congress may 
stop production of the Army’s Nike anti-aircraft missile in 
By Chalmers M. Roberts (favor of a new Air Force missile. 

Bia! Reporter The New Mexico Democrat, Chairman 


West German Chancellor|Appropriations Subcommittee,° —_——- 
into said it appears at this point that! 


of the Military 


$3.8 Billion 
More Asked 
For Bombers 


United Press 

Gen. Curtis E. LeMay yester- 
day urged Congress to give the 
Air Force an extra $3.8 billion 
to increase B-52 jet bomber 
production and otherwise ex 
pand his Strategic Air Com 
mand 

After hearing LeMay’'s secret 
testimony, Chairman Dennis 
Chavez (D-N. M.) of the Senate 
Military Appropriations Sub- 
committee said there is a “fair’ 
chance his request will be ap- 
proved 

Chavez said LeMay, an ex- 
pert on long-range bombing, 
mand be given about $8 billion 
a year for the next four to five 
years. 

The defense budget next year 
provides about $5 billion for 
SAC out of $16.9 billion in re- 
quested Air Force appropria- 
tions. Adoption of LeMay’s pro- 
posal would fly in the face of 
President Eisenhower's recom- 
mendations and probably scut- 
tle hopes for balancing the 
budget. 


beyond the intended scope of 
the security law 

Joining Harlan were 
Justice Earl Warren and 
tices Hugo L. Black, 
Frankfurter, William O 
las and Harold H 
Justice Tom Clark wrote a 
stinging dissent. in which he 
was joined by Justices Stanley 
F. Reed and Sherman Minton. 
Clark said 
strikes down the 
order” and with 
effective weapon 
versive 


Chief 
Jus- 
Felix 
Doug- 
Burton 


the majority 


President's 
~ it the most 
Against sub- 
activity available toe 
the Government.” 

“It is not realistic,” he said, 
“tO Say that the Government 
can be protected merely by ap- 
plying the Act to sensitive jobs. 
One never knows just which 
job is The janitor 
might prove be in as im- 
portant a spot security-wise as 
the top employe in the build- 
ing.” 

Federal officials were at a 
loss yesterday te evaluate im- 
mediately exactly what the de- 
cision does to the program, but 
it clearly means a major over- 
haul of it 

Figures released in 1955 
showed more than half the 
persons then counted as ousted 
“security risks” were in “non- 
sensitive” jobs. But as a practi- 
cal matter, most of those were 
fired under routine Civil Serv- 
ice procedure 

It was clear, however. that 
the decision itself, deals 


See SECURITY, Page 9. Col. 1 


_—_ 


sensitive 


. th 
of 3 home-made bomb at €'here within the next few daysitions,.” Chavez said, Talos has to 


beg eth ae gy ale will strengthen the ties between!|the advantage of longer range. 
who weree rounded up yester- the Republic of Germany and which he listed at about 50 

day to appear at a corporation the United States and in this) miles. 
counsel's hearing at 10 a. m. way we may make a contribu- Before making a final deci 
oday, tion to the strengthening of! sion, Chavez said, the Commit- 
The young men—20 to 23 Peace in the world tee will ask the Defense De- 
Whether Adenauer will be partment to stage a showdown 


years qid—were arrested {ol- able to see President Eisen- dye! be h | 
lowing two mysterious explo- . : Se) due tween the two missiles 
R 4 P hower, with whom he originally 


sions shortly after 11 p. m. Sun- . 
day in the 1700 block of New "4d a Wednesday luncheon ap- 
Hampshire ave. nw., police re- pointment at the White House. 
ported was unsettled last night. At 

Eighth Precinct police ques- most, Adenauer may have a 
tioned them about their move- short chat’ with the President 


the at Walter Reed Hospital : , 
rar: Pay M se be 04 Administration officials con CAIRO, Egypt, June il 


ee ‘tend that Secretary of State A" Official Egyptian source an- 
Sunday night explosions. They pe. i. fully able to discuss nvuneced today new naval units 
were released pending the ; 


roblems with Adenauer as 44 arrived at Alezandria to | 
hearing today. oon as to talk with Canadian **rengthen the Egyptian navy Saigon government, was sen- 


External Affairs Minister Les-. _1h¢ numbers, types or origin tenced to death today by a Viet 
ter B. Pearson. who was here! the vessels were not given. namese tribunal, 


yesterday as one of the three 
NATO foreign ministers desig 


| Today's Index 


Page | 
28 
12 


Page 
36 
37 
28 


Horoscope 
Keeping Well 
Kiigalien 
Lippmann 
Movie Guide 
Music 2 
Obituaries 
Parsons 
Pearson 

Picture Page 
Sokolsky 
Sports 
TV-Radio 


Women's 


Amusements 
Childs 

City Life 
Classified 
Comics 36-39 
Crossword 36 
District Line 34 
Dixon 13 
Editorials 12 
Events Today |8 
Federal Diary 17 
Financial 19.2) 
Goren 37 
Herblock 12 


17 


29.35 Death Is Decreed 


For Gen. Ba Cut 


CANTHO, South Vietnam. 
June 11 #—Gen. Ba Cut. the 
daring freebooter who led the 
Hoa Hao religious sect army in 
an abortive revolt against the 


New Naval Units 
Arrive in Egypt 


hs 


ng Misund erstood 


————— —_ 


Comic Books Banned on Newsstands 


At Post Offices, U. S. Buildings in Va. 


The Virginia State Commis- 
sion for the Visually Handi- 
capped said yesterday it had 
banned sale of comic books in 
Post Offices throughout the 
state in compliance with a Post 
Office Department order. 

The Commission also said it 
had banned similar sales at 
newsstands operated under its 
auspices in all other Federal 
buildings in Virginia. 

This was disclosed in Rich- 
mond by L. L. Watts, executive 
secretary of the Commission, 
who said if comic books “aren't 
good enough for the Post Of- 
fices, they aren't good enough 
for other Federal buildings.” 

News of the blanket ban took 


terpreted and m 


é 


nated to work up plans to Preferred the Very Young 


Paris Told Stalin Was Sex Maniac. 
Police Reeruited His Underage Harem 


But any major change in 
American policy toward NATO 
in general or Germany in par- 
ticular could not be made with- 
out the President's approval 
Thus far there has been a good 
See ADENAUER, Pg. 13, Col. 6 
net ’ ‘if PARIS. June 11 \(®—Nikita S.| 20th Soviet een may > Party| —sex madness—and to have re- 
| ‘ - . y ‘o .| Congress in February denounc-| lated some “particularly odious 
L S. ;. ans Fi th Rarusnenev, Ruenae ener y ‘ing Stalin as the murderer of | details” of sexual cruelty to the 
: . . nist Party leader, was quoted ‘o| hundreds of faithful Commu-| girls. 
Base in Spain day by a French newspaper as! nists. | There has been a number of 
an objectionable, subversive or labeling Josef Stalin a sex ma-| The newspaper did not quote| reports on the fate of Stalin's 
controversial nature which may| MADRID, June 11 #—Official niac whose police recruited for| directly from this latest report second wife, Nadezhda Serge- 
subject the Post Office Depart United States sources said to- i harem of underage girls of Stalin's past. It said, how-|yevna Alliluyeva, mother of 
ment to public criticism.” day the United States plans to m= ° se 6 ~ lever, there could be no doubt! Vassily, who rose to be an air 
Earlier, Watts had confirmed build a fifth air base in Spain| The newspaper France Soir,| shout the report's authenticity, force lieutenant general, and a 
igned by G. L. Joyner, place- “ letter had been sent out on for joint operation with the in a dispatch from Vienna, said|explaining Khrushchev deliver- daughter, Svetlana. The daugh- 
ao 7 aes ; the Com- April 3 under Joyner’s signa-' Spanish air force. Khrushchev also confirmed ajed it to a small group of Soviet ter now lives in Leningrad. The 
mens Superviesr © ture banning sale of eight maga-| Maj. Gen. August W. Kissner, suspicion widely held in the! leaders to answer doubts about son has disappeared 
mission. aba zines “on the stand or from chief of the American military West that Stalin killed his sec- his original denunciations. The date of Alliluyeva's death 
Puzzled Postal officials under the counter.” The publi-| mission to Spain, said he under- ond wife. | Khrushchev, said France Soir, is recorded as Nov. 8, 1932—a 
‘combed files here and decided cations listed were Confidential, | stood Congress had been asked| Khrushchev was quoted as reported Stalin assigned Po-|day after the 15th anniversary 
the action was prompted by a Exposed, Whisper, Cabaret, Un- for funds for the additional suggesting Stalin's crimes! lice Chief Lavrenty P. Beria to| of the Bolshevik revolution. 
March 8 Postal Bulletin order. censored, Escapade, Creative|base. He said two alternative|were so heinous he should be recruit a harem of’ teen-age) Khrushchev, the France Soir 
Tt read: ' r, and Prize-Win-|sites have been considered for tried posthumously. Stalin died girls, some of whom disap- account said, reported Stalin 
“The licensed vending stand ning phe}. la fifth air base; Reus, an impor- three years ago. /peared later. Khrushchev is re-\shot Alliluyeva in “an excess 
operators and the state li-| Post Office Department | tant rail junction southwest of France Soir was the first|ported to have explained that of blind fury” in the quarrel 
censing BL pevees shall use dill- | spokesmen said they d@id.not|Barcelona, and Albacete, 200 newspaper to obtain the text in his later years Stalin was|over collectivization, and then 
gence exercise good judg-'know anything about that letter. miles southeast of Madrid. ‘of Khrushchev's speech to the subject to a sort of erotomania strangled her. . 


f > i - 


ment and cooperate with the 
postal authorities in prevent- 
ing the keeping on the. prem- 
ises for disposal to the “public 
by sale, or otherwise, any so 
called comic books or any other 
printed or written material of 


ruling in a recent Postal Bul. 
letin,” a Department spokes- 
man said. “We will get in 
touch Tuesday with State agen- 
cy officials and postmasters in- 
volved to review the matter 
with them.” 

| Watts couldn't recall the 
wording of the order. He mere- 
ly confirmed a letter forbidding 
sale of comic books in Post Of- 
fices had been sent out June 5, 


res WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HER ALD 


yl Tuesday, 


o—_ 


June 12, 1936 


Democrats Set Up Group 
To Press Resources Issue ay 


—_— 


Associated Press 


New Grandniece for Ike 


Anne Eisenhower. a new crandniece of President Eisen- 
hower, makes her camera debut in the arms of her mother 


at Franklin Hospital, 


San Francisco. The 


baby’s father, 


Lierd Eisenhower, an attorney, is a son of the late Roy Eis- 
enhower, a brother of the President. The baby was born 


Saturday night. 


~_— - 


Udall Asks Senate to Act 
On ‘Honest Elections Bill’ 


Rep. Stewart L. Udall 
Ariz.), author of a House com- 
panion measure to the Senate's 
so-called 
yesterday called for action this 
session on the proposed amend 
ments to the antiquated Cor 
rupt Practices Act. 

Citing reports that the elec 
tion bill is considered “dead” 
for the session, Udal! appealed 
for passage by the Senate of 
et least a “compromise” meas 
ure plugging loopholes in the 
law. He predicted the House 
would follow the Senate's lead 

“The House is looking to the 
Senate for leadership on this 
legislation, just as the Senate 
is awaiting initial action by our 


“honest elections bill,’ 


Today's @ lo Carte 


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SPECIAL! 


Home Style 


CHICKEN SALAD 


Herd Boiled Egg, Quarter 
Tomato, Crisp Lettuce 
and Mayonnaise 


1.70 


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Served from 4:30 te 9:30 PM 
Including 

FREE DINNER PARKING 


From 6:00 P.M. to 1 A.M. 


4: Capital Garage opposite 
Longchamps 


Also large a la Carte Menu 


NGCHAMDS 


14% S$. ot Mew York MPS NW. 
PERFECTLY AIR-CONDITIONED 


a Washington ‘s Only Slacks 


(T). 


body on the school aid bili,” 
Udall told the House in a 1- 
minute speech 

Udall said he found 
ficult the legisia- 
tion view of its 
near unanimous Senate spon- 
sorship and earlier 
of quick passage 

In an unprecedented move 
85 Senators had signed up as 
o-sponsors.” Udall told the 
House. “The Majority Leader 
Lyndon B. Johnson) had is 
sued a statement: ‘We are go- 
ing _have a strong election 
bill is session’: and the 
Minority Leader (William F 
Knowland) with equal candor 
was quoted as saying: ‘I would 
like to see something accom- 
plished before the 1956 elec- 
piamne 
“Now. 90 days later—with 
adjournment scarcely . more 
than a month away—the whole 
atter rests in status quo 
ante. Nothing has been done 
further this gislation, and 
recent press notices assert it 
lis considered ‘dead’.” 
| Udall said the bill's near 
lunanimous Senate sponsorship 
“indicates a consensus that 
action should be taken now— 
action which will be a ringing 
retort the ugly questions 
raised by the disclosures made 
earlier this yeas by the Sen- 
tor from South Dakota (Fran- 
cis Case).” He said differences 
have arisen over such 
questions whether state 
primaries be included 
or down in 


it dif- 
to believe 


is “dead” in 


Oo 


‘ , 
0 i¢ 


to 


whicn 
as 
should 
voted up 
old tradition.” 
Said Udall: “I fear that if 
we do not act we will give new 
strength to the false myth— 
too widely -mistaken for truth 
intry—that politics is 
business’ and politi- 
desire to have it 


mm our coi 
a ‘dirty 
ians have no 
otherwise.” 


SPECIAL NOTICES 


THE STADIL™M sgos REPAtR ts +4 
located at TH17 eorcia at aw 
having claims sacainet business 
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Associated Presse 


The Democratic National 
Committee announced yéster 
day a special group to press 
Democratic charges that the 
| Eisenhower Administration is 
“giving away” the Nation's 
jnatural resources. 
| .National Chairman Paul But. 
jler said a special advisory com- 
jmittee headed by Oscar Chap-| 
iman, former Secretary of the! 
\Interior, will draft the Party's 


election year strategy on the re-! 


sources issue 


Butler said In a statement’ 


that the committee “will devise| 


means by which the issue—the 


Eisenhower Republican record | 
be | 


of anti-conservation — will 
carried to the Nation's voters.” 

He described 
composed of “Outstanding ex- 
perts in the fields of land, water) 
and energy 


In his statement. Butler re-| 


the group as! 


newed the Democratic attack on’ 


the Administration's resources 
policy. He said the Administra. 
tion is “dominated and directed | 
by the privately-owned power 
companies of America and big 
business.” 


Dixie Revolt Unlikely, 


Says Democratic Chie}s 


| United Press 


: 


’ 
Democratic leaders said yes-| 


terday there is little chance of 
a Southern Democratic revolt 


this year—uniless an all-out civ-| 


il rights advocate is nominated 
for President. 


Highly placed party strate 


\gists said a state-by-state sur. 


vey of the South shows a strong 
inclination toward party “regu- 
larity” at present. 

They conceded capture of the 
nomination at the C hicago con- 
vention by a strong “liberal’ 
on racial issues could spell trou-| 
ble. The platform, they said,| 
poses less of a problem 

John Sammons Bell. 
Democratic State 
has just about 


Chairman 
ruled out 


crats would accept Gov 
Harriman of New York or Sen 
Estes Kefauver (D-Tenn.). Sev- 
eral other prominent Dixie 


Democrats have labeled Kefau-| speech 


ver and Harriman unacceptable 

Adiai Ff the 
Democratic candidate 
to be the front runner 
Southern delegates at the mo 
ment. He has considerable sup 
port—pledged or 
most Southern st 
been terme 


Stevenson. 


for 


ates. He has 
acceptable by Gov 
Herman-~Jgimadge of Georgia 

Senate Democratic Leader 
Lyndon B. Johnson. who will be 
Texas’ “favorite son” nominee 
at the convention, has strong 
backing among Southerners but 


indicated—in | 


the dent Eisenhower, 
possibility that Georgia Demo-ison. Sen 
Averell] Gov 


1952 for Democratic 
appears Lawrence College. 


has said he is not a candidate! 


outside the Texas bloc. Sen 


: 


Stuart Symington (D-Mo.) al«o! 


might draw some Southern sup 


port as a compromise candidate | 


in event of a deadlock. 


Arrangements Com mittee | 


To Plan GOP C onvention 


Aas 


Republican 
man Leonard Hall 
yesterday that the 
ments Committee for the GOP 
National Convention will meet 
in Washington June 22 to ap. 
prove final plans for the nomli- 
ating session 

Hall said matters to be de. 
¢ided include recommendations 
for a speaker 1 to Keynote the 
convention, which opens in San 
Francisco Aug °0 

The recommendations will be 
acted on by the full GOP Na. 
tional Committee, which is ex- 
pected to meet in San Fran- 
about Aug. 15 


is tad Press 
Chair 
announced 


National 


Cisco 


Harriman to Fly West 


For 11-State Rally 


ait = 


ALBANY. 
(INS)}—Presidential hopeful! 
Averell Harrisan will fly to 
Denver this week to address an 
li-state rally on Saturday 

The gathering 
a report from 
bany office 
ganize “wides 
and delegate 
ists for 
a 


a a 


Harriman’s Al 
pread 
support 
Harriman’'s 
hara-hitting 


that ex 
candidacy 
into organiza 
tion.” 

The rally 


was arranged by 


Milton Wilenmann of Sait Lake! 


City, Utah. 


Ady ertising Club 
To Hear Hagerty 


White House Press Secretary | 
take | 


James C, Hagerty 
time off from _his 
President Eisenhower: 
Walter Reed Army 
ota to appear at an Adver- 
tising Club luncheon today at 
12:30 p..m. In the Willard Ho. 
tel 

It will be the first time since 
the President became ill Fri. 
day that Hagerty has attended 
any outside function He has 
remained at the hospital except 
for a few hours at home for 
sleep. 


will 
duties at 
Ss side at 
Medical 


Officers Elected 
By Israel Men’s Club 


The 450-member Adas Israel 
Men's Club has elected Stanley 
W. Korman, 3307 Fessenden 
st. nw. president for ra we 

Other officers include: on 
vice president, J. C. Lis! 
on vice president, 
Levy: treasurer, 
nik, and secretary, Max Gold- 
berg. 


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* 


BSiall Phote 


Change in Guard at Arlington 


In a ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in 
Arlington Cemetery yesterday Col. Fielder P. Greer (left 
rear), commanding officer of the 3d Infantry Regiment, and 
Capt. Walter F. Adams, commanding officer of Ceremonial 
Co. A, look on as M. Set. Woodrow Mangum (front left) 
turns over duties as sergeant of the cuard at the Tomb to 
Set. First Class Kenneth R. Cochran. Mangun had the 
assignment for the past 11 months. 


ADA Puts Civil Rights 
‘Up to Ike, 3 Democrats 


YONKERS. N. Y., June 11 # 
national chairman of 


er been greater than it is to- 
day to force a breakthrough in 
Congress and get some action 
on civil rights before adjourn- 
ment.” 
“There are 
at least four 


(ADA) said today Presi 
Adiai Steven 
Estes Kefauver and 
Averell Harriman must 
share responsibility for pushing 
civil rights legislation. 

Joseph Rauh 
prepared for the na 
convention of Students 
Action at Sarah 
said 
. The opportunity has nev- 


tion 


I Armily believe 
men on whom this 
responsibility must rest.” he 
added. He named Wr. Eileen 
hower, \Stevenson, the 
see Senator and the New York 
Governor—the latter three all 
active candidates for the Dem 
ocratic presidential nomination. 


Jr. m &@ 


la 


tional 


Tennes- 


‘British Newspapers See Ike’s 


2d-Term Chances Rather Dim 


From News Dispatches 


| Correspondents ef most na- 
tionally circulated British news 
papers told their readers yes. 
terday that the American peo 
ple are increasingly dubious of 
President Eisenhower's physi- 
cal fitness for re-election. 

| “Growing U. & View He 
Should Quit Fight.” headlined 
the Conservative Daily Mail. 

| “There is deep disquiet in 
the United States today over 
President Eisenhower's health 
despite the optimistic and al. 
most ebullient statements of 
the doctors,” the Mail said. It 
‘added: 
| “The Americal public would 
be less pérturbed if even one 
of the 13 or more doctors who 
‘attended the President had 
counseled caution or restraint 
or even said, ‘Let us see how 
the President gets along—let 
us not rush things’.” 


Sees Confidence Shaken 


The pro-Labor Party Daily 
Mirror, which claims the 
world’s biggest weekday circu- 
lation of more than 4.5 million. 
declared bluntly: 

“Public confidence 
medical opinions has been 
shaken by Saturday's opera 
tion, and it will take much 
more than publicity about Ike's 
golfing prowess to convince 
them that he is fit enough for 
another term.” 

The independent Times said 
the “political implications of 
his present illness have pos- 
sibly assumed a greater insist- 
ence than the fears inspired 
by his heart attack last year.” 

The middle-of-the-road News 
Chronicle asserted that “nei- 
ther America nor the world 
would forget it if the politi- 
cians were to urge the Presi- 
dent to work beyond his physi- 
cal endurance.” 

The conservative Daily Tele 
graph said the optimistic med- 
ical reports after the opera- 
tion were “seized upon with 
shouts of joy by the profes 
sional Republican politicians.” 


Politicians Criticized 


“Disinterested observers 
here.” the Telegraph com 
mented, “cannot help feeling 
that some of them sometimes 
show a remarkable and brutal 
ruthlessness in their approach 
to matters that may be of life 
ar” death 
i} The La 


in the 


borite Daily Herald 


isaid millions of American vot- 


“feel a little sickened, 
if they feel, or know 
[Ike's @xpectation of life i 
sacrificed on the altar 
Republican Party ma: 


ers may 
perhaps, 
that 
bein 
e 
chine.” 
Conservative Daily 
reported there are 
in Washington “that 
running mate, Richard 
would’ be ‘big. enough 
job’ if the President 
quit during another 


Sketch 
doubts 
Ike's 

Nixon, 
for the 
had to 
term.” 

Queen 
President 


Elizabeth has sent 
Eisenhower a per 
sonal message wishing him a 
speedy recovery, a British 
spokesman disclosed in Wash- 
ington. 

The message was delivered 
to the White House over the 
weekend by Sir Roger Makins 
British Ambassador. The text 
was not made public 


Pravda Publishes Note 


Pravda, Russia's 
Party newspaper, 
published a “get-well’’ message 
sent Sunday night from Rus 
sian leaders to President Ff 
senhower, according Tass 

The message. signed by 
President Klementi Voroshilo\ 
Premier Nikolai Bulgan 
Communist Party Sex 
Nikita Khrushchev, said 
all our people we express 
conviction that in the near fi 
ture your health »« 
stored and you will be able | 
assume your duties.” 


Communist 
yesterday 


Lo 


he 


High Court Bars 
Contempt Case 


The Supreme Court rejected 
a petition of Washington attor 
ney Dorsey K. Offutt yesterday 
to have contempt of court 
charges against him dismissed 

Offutt had petitioned the Su 
preme Court for a writ of certi 
orari in an effort to have the 
charges dismissed a 
judgment of acqu out 
a retrial. The petition 
nied 

In February, the | 
States Court of Appeals 
the contempt conviction 
futt. which resulted from his de 
fense of Dr. Henry | Peck 
ham trial 


or 
ttal w 
was ae 


gain 


fe tT 


’ ited 
ups | 


ofr ti 


in a 1952 abortion 
The Appeals Court sent the con 
tempt case back to the District 


Halfway around the world, 
the Melbourne (Australia) 
rgus said the President “must 
now face the fact he is physi- 
cally incapable of holding 
down the world’s toughest job.” 

In France and Germany, 
papers took a more moderate 
approach. Paris’ Daily Aurore 
printed a color photograph of 
Ike, the paper’s-first color pie- 
ture, and reported: “Eisenhow- 
er: Operation Successful.” 

In East Berlin, East German 
Deputy Premier Otto Nuschke 
wrote in his Christian Demo- 
cratic Party newspaper, Neue 
Zeit: “We hope his health will 
soon be back to normal.” 


Message From Japan 


Japan's Prime Minister Ichiro 
Hatoyama sent a message to 
President Eisenhower yester 
day expressing hope for the 
American leader's “early re- 
covery and return to the effairs 
of state.” 

“I was deeply upset by the 
news of your sudden itilness 
but very relieved to learn that 
your operation was most suc- 
cessful.” H at oyvama cabled 
President Eisenhower 

In Seoul, the South Korean 
government announced that 
President Syngman Rhee also 
ad cabled to Washington his 
vis for a “full recovery” of 
the LS. Chief Executive 

Our wholehearted prayers 
Kihee told Mr. 


ies 


with vou 


senhnower 


Wall Street Gets 
Russian Wishes 


NEW YORK, June 11 @® 
Eight touring Russian church 
leaders rubbed shoulders with 
corporation lawyers and finan- 
clers at a lunch in a plush 
restaurant atop the National 
City Bank building in the Wall 
Street district, favorite whip- 
ping boy of Red propaganda 
You are the representatives 
the financial world of Amer- 
ca and we wish you success 
and prosperity in your efforts.” 
said Metropolitan Nicolai. sec- 
ond ranking primate of the 
Russian Orthodox Church 

The Russians. who arrived 
ere from Washington this 
morning toured the financial 
listrict before attending the 
lunch, 


. 


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“Cabaret Nights’ Crackdown | - 
Brings Charges f 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


rena Tuesday, June 12, 1956 


or Ten 


- 
y 


Police have begun a erack- 
down on so<called “cabaret 
nights,” described as a return 
of the outlawed after-hours bot- 
tle clubs under a new guise. 

| One of the first two raids 
conducted on this.type of oper-| 
ation, it was disclosed yester- 
day, occurred early Sunday| 
morning in a building only a 
few doors away from the 13th 
|'Precinct headquarters. ) 
| Last month, Chief Corpora- 
tion Counsel Clark F. King 
‘called in operators of the “cab. 
-aret nights” events and, 
_warned them that their act 
ities were illegal. Police 4 
ithe operators of the two raided 
places were among those 
| warned, ‘ 
The “cabaret nights” involve 


. 


— f....7 


ZPanrnanearee 
Pe ind Ad 
ae 
Frady gen si Mgt ls a ie 


Stal! Phote 


Seven Held | | a 


In Attack on 
Young Widow 


Seven District men, charged 
with raping a 26-year-old widow 
early Friday. were held for 
action of the Prince Georges 
County grand jury yesterday 
by Trial Magistrate Nita S 
Hinman Crane 

The men, ranging in age from 


18 to 23, have been held with-| 


out bond 
jail 
day. 

Police identified them as 
John W. Robertson Jr., 23, 3339 
Brothers pl. se.; Robert Edward 
Richards, 18, 1341 4th st. sw.: 
George Stanley Breeden, 21. 
613 I st. sw.; Robert W. Single- 
ton, 19, 411 6th st. sw.: his 
brother, John B., 18, 459 I st 
sw.; Ronald Gene Byroads, 21. 
479 N st. sw.. and Joseph 
Charlies Frady, 20, 459 I st. sw 

The attractive stenographer 
and mother of one child testi- 
fied in court that she saw the 
men in a tavern at Nichols ave 
and Lebaum st. se 

She said she left the tavern 
and one of the men drove by 
in a car and offered her a ride 
She ignored him, she testified. 
but another of the group 
pushed her into the car 

She said they took her out 
near Ft. Foote in Prince 
Georges County and six of the 
seven assaulted her. She identi- 
fied Robert Singleton as the 
one who did not rape her 

District police rounded up 
all seven Saturday after Breed- 
ens sister, Mrs. Jessie Bren- 
singer, ‘told her employer in a 
Washington store that the news- 
paper account of the attack 
was true. The store manager 
called police. 


in Upper Marlboro 
Since their arrest Satur. 


Parade Truck Kills 3 | 


PONTA DELGADA, Azores, 
June 11 W—A truck pulling a 
cannon in a military parade 
swerved into the watching 
crowd here yesterday and killed 
three persons. Eleven others 
were hurt. 


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Connelly Adi 


mena 
.- 
(- . ope 
J. Singleton 
. held for grand jury action in attack on stenographer 


Robert Singleton 


nits Getting 


Coat From Schwimmer 


ST. LOUIS, June 11 (®»—Mat- 
thew J. Connelly, White House 
appointments secretary to for- 
mer President Truman, testi- 
fied today he received a top- 
coat from a tax-dodger's lawyer, 
but said the “gift had nothing 
to do with any case.” 

Connelly testified he got the 
coat from Harry I. Schwimmer, 
an attorney, while he was at 
the Muehlebach Hotel in Kan- 
sas City the day before the 
presidentia! election in Novem- 
ber, 1952 

The former aide said “every- 
thing was confused and people 
were streaming in and out of 
Truman's headquarters” at the 
hotel 

“Schwimmer’s gift had noth- 
ing to do with any case,” Con- 
nelly testified. “Sachs meant 
nothing to me.” 

His reference was to Irving 
Sachs, St. Louis shoe manufac 
turer who was represented by 
Schwimmer 

Connelly also testified that 
the White House staff was “del- 
| uged with gifts,” saying it was 
“embecrrasing to accept them” 
Lin many instances. | 

Connelly and T. Lamar Caw 
die, former head of the Justice | 
Department's Tax Division, are 
accused of conspiring to de- 
fraud the Government by side- 
tracking criminal prosecution 
of Sachs 

Connelly was recalled to the 
witness stana by the defense 
after the Government, in re- 
buttal testimony, called Rocco 
Pedicini. a Kansas City tailor, 
as a witness. 

Pedicini said Schwimmer 
called him in July, 1952, to the 
Kansas City hotel, where he 
measured Connelly for two 
suits costing $315. These suits 
were then sent to Connelly in 
Washington, he said ; 

Pedicini said later in 1952 
he again went to the hotel and 
measured Connelly for a top- 
coat. He said the coat this 
time was only $110 since 
Schwimmer supplied the ma- 
terial. 

The case against 
men is expected to go to a 
Federal Jury Tuesday or 
Wednesday. Each side has been 
allowed four hours for closing 
arguments. The defense rested | 
its case Friday on the 23d day | 
of the trial. ) 


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Sach pleaded guilty and was 
fined £40,000 in 1951 for income 
tax evasion He escaped a 
prison term on health grounds. 
The Government charges 
Schwimmer gave oil royalties 
to Connelly and Caudle for 
using their influence in the 
case 

United States District Judge 
Rubey M. Hulen last Friday 
struck out all of the indictment 
except the part charging the 
two iormer officials conspired 
to defraud the Government of 
their services. He also said he 
would order stricken from the 
record all reference concerning 
only Schwir-mer, who original- 
ly was a defendant but became 
ill anc was granted a mistrial. 
Defense attorneys considered 
this a majeur victory. 


——jting consumption of liquor on 


rental of night spots by private 
groups, which in turn charge 
admission to rsons entering 
and carrying ir own bottles 
“Set-up” or soft drinks, to be 
used as mixers, are sold. 

The old bottle clubs permit- 
ted members to keep their bot- 
tles on the shelves and n- 
sume thejr contents, for a se 
‘ice and “set-up” charge, after 
the legal 2 a.m. closing. 

The Sunday raid occurred 
‘after 2 a.m. at 920 U st. nw.. 
near precinct headquarters at 
910 U st. Police said the place 
had been rented for the night 
by Casino Ballroom, Inc., to 
the 1200 Club. 

Those charged with permit- 


3-Year-Old 
Abducted at 
Jr. Village 


A 3-vear-old boy was abducted 
Sunday from Junior Village by 
a couple who refused to divulge 
the birthplace or identity of 
the child when they appeared 
in Juvenile Court June 1. 

At the court hearing, the 
Welfare Department had 
sought removal of the young- 
ster from the counple’s home 
because, it was alleged, they 
were unfit to care for the child 

A 10-year-old, who had lived 
with the couple, was committed 
to the Welfare Department in 
April after it was learned he 
had not been in school for a 
year. That child earned the 
nickname of “Cricket Boy” be- 
cause he showed Juvenile Court 
Judge Edith H. Cockrill how 
he could chirp like a cricket. 

The court hearing on the 3- 
yearold was continued until 
this Wednesday because the 
couple had asked that an at- 
torney represent them. 

In the protective custody of 
the Welfare Department at 
Junior Village, the 3-year-old 
was removed from that institu- 
tion shortly after visiting hours 
ended at 3:30 p. m. Sunday. 


unlicensed premises were list 
ied 7 fo) as Freeman Mur- 
ray. 422 Ingraham st nw 
~~ »” the building: James 

R. Howard. 35. of 1202 T st. nw 
bh James FE. Hardy. 39. 
1423 Buchanan st. nw., business 
agent of the 1200 Club: Clar.- 
ence Briscoe, 43, of 433 Warner 
st nw. president of the club: 
Julius Hadley, 36, 1617 12th et 
nw.. a ticket seller. end Donald 
E. Burley, 26, 1626 E st. se.. a 
waiter. Those charged with 
running an unlicensed restan- 
rant were ‘isted as Arthur §S 
Rohirison. 79. 915 Evart st. ne., 
and Ben Howell, 36, 1722 P st 
nw 

All are free under $500 bond 
each pending a July 12 hearing 
in Municipal Court. 

The first arrests. on May 26 
were at a night spot formerly 
known as the Club Caverns, 
2001 lith st. nw. Police say 
the place was rented for the 
night by the Entertainment 
Guild. Charged with permit- 
ting consumption on unlicensed 
premises were Hulon Jones, 41, 
of 621 Otis st. nw., the operator, 
and John R. Jackson, 32, listed 
at 1148 Oates st., a ticket seller 


Surgeon’s Wife 
Arrested on 
Narcotics C sharge 


ane OSSINING a 
3 Saved in Boat Sinking * |u-The socialite wile of one 
By Man’s 9-Mile Swim 


KEY WEST, Flia., June 11 # 
A 36-yearold man staggered 
ashore here today after an 8'.- 
hour swim through choppy seas 
to send Coast Guard craft to 
the rescue of three other sur- 
vivors of a wrecked fishing boat. 

Ray Wraymond, 36, told offi- 
cers at the Boca Chica Naval 
Air Base that he swam 9 miles 
after the charter boat Golden 
K went down during a squall. 

A Navy helicopter spotted 
the boat's three other occupants 
clinging to the wreckage and a 
Coast Guard boat picked them 


Wraymond was admitted to 
a hospital along with Dorothy 
Snell. 35, and Winford Ben- 
nett, 39. The other survivor, 
Frank Young, did not require 
medical treatment. All are 
from Marathon, Fla. 

The Golden K, 
captained by Bennett, 


submerged island at Pelican 


N. ¥ 


alite wife 


june 11 
of one 


was arrested today on a charge 
\of stealing her husband's pre- 
iscription blanks to obtain nar- 
p@etics to appease her growing 
addiction 

Mrs. Helen Reilly, 48, mother 
of five children, was arrested 
at her home by local police 
and Federal narcotics agents 

Also involved in the charge 
of violation of Federal nar- 
cotics laws. police said, were a 
local druggist, Joseph Napoli, 
and his wife, and his assistant. 
James H. Preuss 

Police said the case came to 
light during a six-week investi- 
gation of a purported burglary 
of Napoli’s drugstore. Authori- 
ties said the burglary was 
staged by Napoli to cover up 
the illegal drug transactions 
with Mrs. Reilly. 


20 minutes later and reached 
shore at 1:20 a. m. after a 9 
mile struggle through waters 
heavily infested with barra- 
cuda.*He started with a life 
preserver but it came apart 
during the swim. 

“I almost gave up a couple 
of times and thought of trying 
to drown myself,” Wraymond 
said 

Wraymond, Bennett and Miss 
Snell were suffering from burns 
from gasoline that spilled out 
of the boat's ripped tanks. Miss 
Snell also was treated for an 
injured knée and abrasions. 


Take your wife with you at 2 fare 


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struck a) 


. 


Shoals southeast of Key West 


at noon yesterday and sank at 
4:30 p. m 
Wraymond started his swim 


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_ THIS IS THE STANDARD BRANDS. YEAST PLANT HERE WHICH WILL BE CLOSED AFTER SUNDAY, 


D. C.’s Only. Yeast Plant Closing 
Many Workers to Be Out of fake 


’ 
the company for 44 years, said 
the union also feels that the 
increased use of automation in 
other company plants through- 
out the country had a bearing 
on the closing 

Yesterday the employes didn't 
fee! like talking as they punched 
their time cards before going 
home What are we going to 
do” was the most-asked ques- 
won 

The plat is 
being the first 
make and sell 
ior use 


plant manager. A few key su- 
oervisors will be transferred 
later to other cities, Shaw said 
‘We are trying.to relocate 
as many of our employes as 
possible.” Shaw saic. They will 
get “some financial relief,” he 
added, from severance pay and 
a company-sponsored plan 
Shaw said he could give no 
reason for the plant's closing 
But a spokesman for the union 
Local No. 48, Brewers, Yeast 
‘and Soft Drink Workers, had a 
lew answers 
Officers of the Internationa! 
union contacted Standard 
Brands New York office, accord 
ing to Martin A. Dunn, union 
secretary. ard were told that 
the W ashingt on plant was “ob 
so.ete 
Dunn, 


By M. D. Rosenberg 
Staff Reporter 

The familiar and pungent 
smell of fermenting yeast will 
hover over 26th and Bladens 
burg rd. ne. for the last time 
Sunday. And when a breeze 
‘blows away the odor, it sill 
leave behind regrets. 

More than 100 employes of 
Standard Brands, Inc. are fac 
ing a bleak summer with the 
closing of Washington's only 
yeast-manufacturing plant 
They will be out of jobs Sunday 
afternoon when the last yeast 
cakes are cut and wrapped 

About 25 senior employes will 
work in the vinegar-manufac 
turning section of the plant. 
which will continue to operate. 
according to William D. Shaw. 


pom RALEIGH HABERDASHER, WASHINGTON AND CHEVY CHASE 


credited with 
in America to 
a cultivated yeast 
n bread manufacture, 
It was ration for many 
years before sala, to the 
Fieischmann Yeast Co. in 1919. 
The firm, comprising some 10 
buildings covering about 7 
acres, was taken over by 
Standard Brands in 1929 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


Tuesday, June 12, 19546 


It's “the” 
Informal 
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Around the World 


Reuters 


‘Crown Prince of Yemen, first 
\Arab leader to visit Russia, ar- 
‘rived here today for a three- 


‘week visit. ue 
The Prince, P Fone 
‘Emir Seif el | 


‘Islam el Badr, 


Affairs and De- 
fense Minister. 
He was met 
at the airport 
today by For- 
eign Minister 
‘Dmitri Shepi- Seif el Islam 
lov and First Deputy Prime 
Minister Mikhail Pevukhin. 
The prince, who wore. a 


isash, a white fez and a gold. 


airport: 

“I pray to Allah to give me 
strength that this mission may 
help in developing relations be- 


perity of the whole world.” 
The Communist Party news- 
paper Pravda today said Russia 
did not want any special bene- 
fits or privileges in the Middle 
East. | 
But it declared to the people 
of Yemen that Russia was their 
“stanch and reliable friend 
and ally” in their struggle 


against “colonialism.” 

Pravda said the talks be- 
tween the crown prince and 
Russian leaders would “further 
consolidate relations between 


and strengthen peace in the 


MOSCOW, June 11 — The pandied scimitar, said at the Near East and in the world in 


general.” 


Egyptian Travel Curbed 
CAIRO, June 11 #—An In- 


jtween all peoples and the pros- terior Ministry spokesman an- 


nouncefl today Egyptians will 
not be allowed to travel abroad 
this summer. The ban is in- 
tended to eonserve foreign 
exchange. He said exceptions 
would be made in case of travel 
to other Arab states, religious 
pilgrimages or travel for medi- 
cal treatment or business, 


SEATO Effort Urged 


SINGAPORE, June ll ® 


Philippine Brig. Gen. P. A. Cruz 
called today for “redoubled col- 


flowing black robe with a white the Soviet Union and Yemen lective efforts” by members of 
: 


Dad would like a day 
like this every day 


An ottredive Pothers 
Day carton of twenty- 
five mellow-rich Dutch 
Masters Cigers...con- 
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proof peckoges of five 
cigars eoch . for con- 
venience in corry'ng in 
his cor or coot pocket. 


A gift wrapped box of 
fifty Dutch Masters te 
prolong his Fether’s 
Ocy pleasure for mony 


The special gift to 
make him truly 
proud... twenty-five 
luxurious Dutch Masters 
Crowns in their 
handsome glass 
humidor to keep 
them clwoys fresh, of 
home or in the office. 


opr. 1954, Caenirdstes Cigar Seles Co. Inq 


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the Southeast Asia Pact to re- 
lieve the threat of Communist 
aggression in Southeast Asia 
and adjacent areas. 

Cruz reported at the opening 
session of a military planners’ 
meeting here that his country 
is increasingly impatient about 
the Paect’s failure to achieve 
anything worthwhile. 

“We who live in potential 
areas of aggression feel and see 
the threat to our way of life 
.. . Craz said. “We see the 
urgency, therefore, of a strong 
’ - 


ee 


Yemen’s Crown Prince Visits Russia: 


SEATO stand against this 
threat.” 


Emigration Body Banned 
Revers 

* CASABLANCA, Morocco, 

June til—The Moroccan govern 

ment today banned the “Cadi- 

ma” organization, which ar 


ranges the emigration of Mo 
roecan Jews to Israel with the 
backing of the Israeli govern 
ment 

The decision follows several 
days deliberations by ministers, 


" EE 


| " 


Sahara Captives Saved 


- y French Copter Force 


Reuters 


ALGIERS, Algeria, June 1! 
Heliecopter-»orne French 
troeps landed today on the sun- 
‘scorched sands of the north 
ern Sahara and rescued 50 to 
(62 kidnaped soldiers. 

The soldiers, all Al 

gerians, had been captured yes 
terday when rebel forces seized 
an isolated French post at 
Ainhrich, about 4 miles south 
of Bou Sanda. A French officer 
‘in charge of native affairs and 
‘his young wife were slain. 
) French forces, lifted by hell 
‘copter, located all but 12 of the 
captured Moslem soldiers and 
gave chase to the rebels 

The desert incident occurred 


native 


jas Fretich military authorities. 


claimed a nearrecord “bag” 
lof 240 slain insurgents during 
‘fighting Saturday and Sunday 
jin the Kabylie, Oranie and Con- 
stantine areas 

| An 18yearold French school 
igirl today told officials 


irebel hideout after a bus am 
‘bush in a mountain pass near 
Nemours 

Micheline Gomez limped 
into an outpost yesterday with 
bleeding feet and torn clothing 
after being freed by her cap- 
ltors 
| “The rebels did not mistreat 
ime,” she said, “but I was so 
i frightened.” 
| Two other passengers on the 


Rich Peronist 
Is Arrested as 
Revolt Leader 


BUENOS AIRES, June 11 @ 
Multimillionaire hatmaker Rau! 


| Lagomarsino was arrested after = 
a nation-wide search today as = 


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the civilian leader of Argen 
|tina’s abortive weekend revolt. 

One of Argentina's wealth 
‘lest industrialists, Lagomarsino 
'was officially accused of lead 
(ing the 12-hour uprising along 
with two cashiered Peronist 
army generals 

President Pedro F. Aram 
‘buru charged earlier that the 
irebel leaders had planned to 
kill him and other members of 
the government and to put to 
the torch newspapers, churches 
and foreign news agencies 

More than 50 persons, Aram 
iburu said, were on a special 
list of those marked for execu- 
tion 

He said that ousted Dictator 
Juan D. Peron was informed 
| fully of the plans and had been 
iasked by the rebels to set the 
| date for the revoiution from his 
exile Aramburu 
isaid most of the money for the 
revolt came from Panama and 
ithe remainder from Chile 
Uruguay 

The 


rebel emissary 


i been arrested, he said 

| Aramburu made his disclos 
(ures at a news conference, 
ifirst to be held since his gov- 
ernment quashed the 
irevolt which provided its sever 
lest test to date. 

| He said others on the 
be slain were Vice 
‘Isaac Rojas and all 
of the cabinet 

Forty-three persons 
| been executed and more 
| 1000 arrested for their 
iin the uprising. 

A national dragnet 
| spread for the military 
‘pins of the insurrection. 
iwere identified as Gen 
Jose Valie and Gen Raul Tanco 


Of the 41 known dead in the : 


irevolt, 38 were military and 
civilian leaders who were ex 
lecuted before firing 
\after being convicted 
| mary court-martials 

‘others died in action. 


in sum 


— 


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Reports tonight from Tin 
douf near the south Moroccan 
border said rebel bands 
equipped with trucks and ma 
chine guns have encircled dug. 
in French Foreign Legion 
naires. 

The Legionnaires 
trenches and erected 
wire defenses outside Tindouf 
after a vicious rebel attack 
last month. Tindouf is an im 
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as a land and air link between 
southwest Algeria and French 
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STALINGRAD, June 11 (** 


Communist Party Chief Nikita ~~ 


Khrushchev, touring this re- 
gion with President Tito of Yu- 
goslavia, told a crowd of wildly 
cheering thousands today that 
the United States is the richest 
~tountry now “but tomorrow | 
we will be richer.” 

He spoke at the Stalingrad 
hydroelectric station. 

“We have our troubles, but 
we know them and are con- 
Guering them with our own 


might,” Khrushchev said. “We 


Will not ask the capitalists for! 
help because if you give them. 


a finger they'll bite off your! 


hand.” 


The Soviet leader said some 
people abroad “sometimes say | 


that maybe things in the Soviet 
Union will reach such a pass 
that it will be possible to re- 
place Soviet authority with 
capitalism.” 

Khrushchev continued: “This 
will never be. Let them run 
their bwn affairs. This is our 


reply: We'll wait until the crab 
will whistle... 


“We tell the capitalists to let 


us live in peace, for that is co- 
existence. We won't meddle in 
their affairs but let them not 
meddie in ours.” 

Khruschey and Tito visited 
the hydroelectric station on the 
Volga-Don Canal after a tumul- 
tous day in Stalingrad where 
@n estimated 200,000 persons 
mobbed them on arrival this 
morning. 

In a brief address at the 
power station, Tito wished the 
station workers syccess and 
promised to return when the 
project was completed. 

(A Moscow Radio broaodcast 
heard in London quoted Tito as 
Saying that “in. pease as in war 
Yugoslavia must march shoul- 
der to shoulder with the Soviet 
Union toward the gaal of the 
victory of socialism.) 


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|LibyaCurbed 


TRIPOLI, Libya, June 11 7 
The Libyan Government im-' 
posed restrictions on the opera-| 
tions of United States and other 
forei gn information services| 
‘here today in the wake of an) 
intensive Soviet propaganda| 
campaign int this North African’ 
‘country. 
| The Libyan Foreign Office re- 
quested all foreign cultural and| 
information centers to stop dis. 
| tributing material outside their 
own premises. 
| Jt also told the foreign een-| 
ters to refrain from advertising 
lectures and to show no films 
| outside their premises. Both the 
United States and British in-| 
formation centers operate mo- | 
bile film units. 
| The government order affects | 
mainly the United States, Brit- 
‘ain and Egypt. But the motiv- 
ating factor appeared to be the 
recent Soviet Embassy action 
in flooding Libya with propa- 
ganda pamphlets and maga 
izines 
' The United States and Britain 


Re Bob Burchette. Staff Photographer have operated information cen- 


Capt. Richard H. Case meets up with an old but stouter ters here for six years. Egypt 
friend, Schuyler W. Jackson, who was a sergeant in the (recently opened large cultural 
same World War II outfit in which Case was a private. (cemters here and in Benghazi, 


2 Battered at Bastogne 
Meet Here on Movie Job 


This is a story about a fub- tivation of the 10\st 
licity stunt that hit the jackpot.| Division at Fort Campbell, Ky. Satt-Anss TASLETS WITH CHancoas | 


It involves a surprise reunion 
yesterday of two men who, as 
paratroopers of the 10ist Alir- 
borne Division, last saw each 
other in the enemy-surrounded 
Belgian town of Bastogne in 


‘December 1945. 


One was Set. Schuyler W 
Jackson, who won a. Silver Star 
in the action. The other was a 
member of his platoon, Pic 
Richard H. Case, who was so 
badly wounded that he was not 
expected to live after being car- 
ried off the battlefield. 

Former Pic. Case, who sur 
vived the wounds and served 
again as an offiicer in Korea, 
was assigned by the Army some 
months ago as technical adviser | 


for “Screaming Eagles,” a mo-' 


tion picture about the 101st. 
The 34-year-old captain came 

to Washington yesterday from| 

Fort Bragg, N. C., to take part 


‘in publicity activities in con- 


nection with the movie's first | 


local showings. ' 


The. film company, wanting 
a local man to take part, pluck- 
ed Jackson's name off a list 
of veterans living in this area.| 
Jackson, 37, a Bethesda service 
station operator, who lives at 
5208 Marlyn dr., Glen Mar Park. 


meeting who his day's com- 
panion was to be. But Case) 
hadn't been told. 

Their reunion came on the 
steps of the WTOP studio build-| 
ing. 

it wasn't until late yesterday 
that they got time to talk about 
the old days—what had hap-| 


pened to members of their unit| 


| 


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rt Tuesdey, June 12, 1956 5 


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Nights Unbearable 
‘Itching Skin? 


‘fitness of American youth at: rritat 
Annapolis, Md., June 18-19. The | ; 
scheduled speech by the Presi- 
dent on the second day had to 
be canceled. 

_*@A luncheon will be held 
Wednesday at Blair House in 
honor of West German Chan- 
cellor Konrad Adenauer. Vice 
President Nixon will serve as 
host and Secretary of State 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
6 Tuesday, June 12, 1956 


Ike Rules on Chiefs’ Visit to Russia 


IKE—From Page I 


isting at the time, and also on 


| Navy chief, accompany Gen. hate passed it on to Col?* 
Twining. Edemsky. 
Hagerty said that ~ go gm ge yo > officer. 
: Colonel Edemsky talked last said that the ie xecutive | 
meng - a cot mye Friday to Col. Robert M. Brew-\acted after Sherman Adams, 
ornen vane. er | or, foreign liaison officer of the the Assistant to the President, 
Staff of the Air Force, after’ Department of the Army, and had conferred with him in his 
his return from Russia. said he would like to get the hospital suite. He said that 
General Twining, with the “Unofficial oe ~ the oe a Feng — = 
Pentagon in case of a Russian| 0U e 0 e reply 
President's approval, is going i itation to all members of the) When a reporter wanted to | 
to Russia for Soviet Aviation Joint Chiefs of Staff. The Rus- know whether President Eisen- 4 John Foster Dulles will attend. 
Day, June 24. sian officer said that if the re- bower merely gave his approval ans A large chunk of White 
Press Secretary Hagerty dis- action were favorable, a for-to the outline or staff paper’ House atmosphere (and per- 
‘closed yesterday how Russia mal invitation would follow. me yee out by Adm Radford sonnel) was transferred to Wal- 
sounded out the United States| Hagerty said that Admiral *%@ others, Hagerty got worked ter Reed Hospital yesterday. 
‘to see how it would react to Radford notified him of the ee . 4 f the P A special office was set up 
‘an invitation to have the three Russian “feeler” about 4:30) ,. . bee gh ye oo in a lounge near the President's | 
other members of the Joint|p. m. Friday, and that fhe in eee eee neat have ee oo DOD SSS eewener 
‘Chiefs of Staf_—Adm. Arthur turn told President Eisenhower * att waa “tan cee desks, three telephones con- 
|W. Radford, the chairman; Gen. about it in his hospital room paper work to back up what nected with the White House, 
Maxwell D. Taylor, Army chief, Hagerty said that, after Bey pose Celis = wag A mses my An be te —— 
: , is office wi n charge 
and Adm. Arleigh A. Burke,'the President's decision, Col. and you know it... The deci. of Col. Robert L. Schulz, + 
sion is the President's.” _ President's military aide, who 
The President's condition has been at Walter Reed since | 
that no more than two chiefs his boss was taken there. It 
of staff could visit Russia at will be used for conference or | 
one time was obviously to pro. work by Assistant Adams and 
itect the United State against other staff members 
being stripped of all of its lead- Press Secretary Hayerty has) 
ing strategists in the event of an office on the first floor. and 
an enemy blitz. ‘two of his White House cssis-| 
| His other condition—that the tants—Miss Mary Caffery and | 
\chiefs would only go to Russia Miss Betty Allen—have taken 
if they could get outside of over desks to h Ip him 


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White House Press Secretary 
James Hagerty, who has 
worked virtually around the 
clock since President Eisen. 
hewer entered Walter Reed 
Hospital Friday, wearily 
mops his brow during a press 
conference at the hospital 
yesterday. 


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Moscow and see Military, naval 
and air installations—was in 
effect a notice to the Soviet 
government that he saw no 
value in a merely ceremonial 
visit to Moscow 

Also, it could be a hint to 
the Soviet leaders that he 
would be disappointed if Gen 


of interest to them, high-rank- 
ing Russian officers would be 
granted the same privilege in 
this country. 

The visit of Sherman Adams 
to the President's hospital 
room yesterday also resulted 
in these announcements 

®* Vice President Richard M 


Senate Expresses Hope 
For Speedy Recovery 
United Press 


The Semate unanimously 
passed a resolution yesterday 
expressing hope that President 


in Washington 
3.27280 of We 
“Ww o we 


phere 
‘ direct fer 
your Trewel 


STerti ng 
Foider 
Agent 


One block trem the CIVIC CENTER 


Nixon will presiGe at Thurs 
day's meeting of the National 
Security Council, playing the 
same pinch-hitting role he did 
for some time after the Presi 
dent's heart attack last Sep 
tember. 

®* The Vice President also 
will preside at a conference on 


Eisenhower “may have a com-| 
plete and speedy recovery.” ) 
The resolution was offered by 
Sen. Wayne L. Morse (D-Ore.), 
who said there is “common con- 
cern” in both political parties 
over the President's illness. A|- 
copy of the resolution will .be 
sent to the President, la 


Twining were not allowed to 
see Red air force installations 
outside of Moscow. 

In a news conference before 
he went to the hospital, Presi- 
dent Eisenhower said that any 
exchange of visits would be on 
a strictly reciprocal basis. It 
was assumed, therefore, that 
if the American chiefs of staff 
were allowed to travel outside 
of Moscow to see installations 


Call RE. 7-1234, ask for Circe 
tion, and order The Washing 
ton _ Post and Times Herald 


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$3.8 Billion 
Aid Is Voted 


over authorizations and appro- 
priations from previous years | } 
bring the total to $3,861,275,000 | 
—$1,104,000,000 under the Presi- 
dent's request. Two billion of 
the total would be for military 
aid and approximately $1.8 bil 
lion would be for economic aid 
to some 54 free nations in the 
next fiscal year. 


Omitted from the bill is the 
Administration request for 
long-term authority for specific 
foreign development projects. 
In its place is a statement that 
U. S. overseas aid should con- 
tinue as long as there is an 
international Communist men- 
ace 

Wide lattitude is left to Mr 
Eisenhower in administering 
the program He alone would 
determine, for example, wheth- 
er aid to Yugoslavia would be 
continued, or shut off 

The Senate Foreign Relations 
Committee will meet Wednes- 
day morning to “mark up” the 
Senate version of the measure. 
Today's White House “brief- 
ing” is plainly in anticipation 
of that event 

In listing those who will at- 
tend the briefing Presidential | 
Press Secretary Haggerty did| 
inot .mention Vice President 
‘Richard M. Nixon 


| A reporter asked why Nixon 7 > ae 
- |was not included. Hagerty said ee tha Fo 
. \Nixon was left off the list at “hae . ie i r 
a | his own request. Since he (Nix- — , ne | a >» 


/on) presides over the Senate.| Miltion-mile stewardess! Nancy Gregory is one of the team that makes you a apecial guest when you fly North- 
‘the body that must pass on the n Operations before departure, she has flown NWA from New York to Tyo. 
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(D-Ga.) has opposed the billion 
/ part of the amount 
Sen. H. Alexander Smith (R 
N. J.), im a letter sent to all 
oe 
The bill nonetheless faces! e roi al 
Harry Flood Byrd (D-Va.) out 


a authorization, he felt it was travel, likes people. (People like Aer, too!) 
. inot proper for him to attend 
the meeting, Hagerty added 
| Senate Foreign Relations ‘Ss f f i 
dollar cut voted by the House 
as “too deep” and will urge 
other Senators, has similarly 
‘urged “bipartisan support” of 
rough going in the Senate, with’ 
influential Senators like Sens. | 
- 7 
inneapolis - 
St.Paul 


Chairman Walter F. George 
. * - 
| lI ) () Senate restoration of at least 1 f 
the President in this matter 
Richard B. Russell (D-Ga.) and'! 


to cut the authorization back 
to last year's re 7 appropriation 
level, or even deeper 
Russell yesterday told news- 
men he is “exploring the idea” | 
of recommending that the en- 
tire $3.8 billion the House 
voted for foreign aid be divert-| 
ed to construction of B-52 
bombers, and other advanced 
aircraft construction. Russell 
suggested this might be one 
way of providing the $3.8 bil 
lion Gen. Curtis E. LeMay has 
said is needed for new aircraft 
The Senate Armed Services 
ic hairman said some $6.8 bil- 
lion in unexpended foreign aid 
balances should be sufficis 


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OLD VIRGINIA PURE 


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John W. McCormack (Mass.) 
said yesterday he has not ruled 
out the “possibility” of a tax 
cut this year, rerticularly for 
medium and low-income groups 
Speaker Sam Rayburn (Tex.) 
has termed a tax cut a “possi- 
bility but not a probability.” 
McCormack’s remarks came 
as reports circulated in Con- 
gress that the budget surplus 
for the fiscal year ending June 
30 is likely to be far bigger than 
the Administration’s revised 
figure of $1.8 billion made three 
\weeks ago. | 
| President Eisenhower has 
ruled out any tax cut on the 
basis of the Treasury's $1.8 bil- 
lion forecast. He has said that . 
thete must be no: reduction 
until “we have made some little 
start ‘on reducing the national) 
debt.” | 


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2 GroupsHelped G6. 1 eee 
Reds, Pole Says ‘a , CRE 


United Press .~ : ? | 
A former Polish propagandist) collaboration” between the Po- . : + ; 
Said yesterday the Communists| lish truce team and the Com- | ; 


use information prepared by munist Party in North Korea. , 
» American organizations s9°-Tné] Polish team “is doing hs ec m 9 
ug the basis for everything to cover” the mili- i . e 1 a O 
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Bialer also discussed current 
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The money, he said, is used| pped 
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a i THE WASHINGTON 
~ Tuesday, June 12, 1956 


Qt 


POST and TIMES HERALD 


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IN WASHINGTON AND VICINITY 


OPEN ‘TIL 9 P.M. 


Monday thru Saturday 


By. Karl R. Bauman 
Associated Press . 


The Supreme Court ruled 
yesterday that civilian depend- 
ents—wives, mothers and chil-) 
dren—who accompany military > 
personnel over- 
seas are sub- 
ject to military 
trial for crimes 
committed 
| while there. 


dashed 
—— of free-Pay 
for Mrs.= 

Dorethy Krue-% o> 

ger Smith, | 

ego of Mrs. Smith 
. Waker Krueger, and simi- 

| terty upset the hopes of another 

husband slayer of escaping a 

second military trial. 

Separate opinions in the two 
cases were written by Justice 
Tom C. Clark 

The Court upheld the right 
of military tribunals to try 
Mrs. Krueger for slaying her 
——s Army Col. Aubrey D. 

mith, 45, by plunging a knife 
into him as he slept in their 
Tokyo home Oct. 4, 1952, and 
to try Mrs. Clarice B. Covert, 
formerly of Augusta, Ga,, for 
the ax slaying of her husband, 
Air Force Sat. Edward E 
Covert, in England» 

In comment on the Covert 
case, Justice Clark said it was 
“clearly distinguishable” from 
that of former Air Force Sgt 
Robert Toth of Pittsburgh. 

In the —. case, the Court 
ruled Nov. 7, 1955, that he could 
not be tried by court-martial 
, because he was a civilian. 

Chief Justice Earl Warren 
wrote a brief dissenting opinion 
in which Justices Hugo Black 
and William O. Douglas joined 
Justice Felix Frankfurter ab- 
stained from voting. 


Linbility Act's Scape 
Broadened by Rulings 


Press 

opinions, the 
yesterday 
Federal Em 


Associaied 
split 
Court 
tne 


In two 
Supreme 
broadened 


Court Rules Aliens Have 
a o Right to F 


° By | 
In a 5-to-4 split, the Si ipreme 
Court yesterday uphe! d the 
Government's right to use “con- 
fidential information” without 
‘letting an accused alien face 
his accusers in suspension of 
deportation cases 
| The Government 
}such alien cases is 
igrace’” and “not 
sight,” said Justice Stanley 
Reed for the majority 


s action in 
“a matter of 
a matter of 


F. 


This decision drew four sepa- 


‘rate dissents, assailing the use 
‘of secret evidence as a denial 
of fair play even in alien cases 

The vigor of the dissents and 
"the closeness of the vote in- 


'tensified speculation about the: : . 


| future outcome of such a show- 
aoa on “confrontation” where 
American citizens’ rights are at 
issue in loyalty-security cases 
So far, the Supreme Court has 
inot ruled directly on that issue 
| Yesterday's case concerned 
‘Cecil Reginald Jay, a @-year- 
old native of England who came 
to the United States in 1921 
and lived here without acquir- 
ing citizenship 

in 1952. Jay was ordered de- 
ported because he was a mem- 
iber of the Communist Party of 
ithe United States between 
1835 and 1940 

The law provides for depor- 
itation for any alien who was a 
Communist Party member 
upon entering the United 
States or “at any time there- 
after.: The Attorney General, 
however, is given authority to 
suspend deportation in harda- 
iship cases for persons of good 
moral characte! 
| A hearing officer found Jay 
met the “statutory  prere- 
| quisites” for relief of deporta- 
tion, but he did not “warrant 
‘favorable action” in view of 
‘confidential information 
against him 

Justice Reed, in the majority 
opinion sustaining that, said 
that law does not require “full 
disclosure the considera- 
tions entering into a decision.” 

He said, . suspension of 
deportation is not given to de 
portable aliens as a right, and. 
by congressional direction, it is 
dispensed according to the un 
fettered discretion of the Aft 
torney General. 

Chief Justice Earl Warren 
one of the four dissenters, said 
that decision “sacrifices to 
form too much of the Ameri- 
can spirit of fair play in both 
our judicial and administra- 
tive processes.” 

“Such a hearing.” said War- 
ren, “is not an administrative 
hearing in the American sense 
of the term. It is no hearing.” 

Warren said after 40 years’ 
residence, “we are tearing peti- 
tioner from his relatives and 
friends and from the country 
he fought to sustain (in World 
War I, serving in Cafadian 
armed forces) when the record 
shows *he has not offended 
against our laws, bears a good 
reputation, and would suffer 
great hardships if deported.” 
Eisenhower Quoted 

Justices Willian O. Douglas 
‘and Felix Frankfurter, in their 
dissents, cited President Eisen- 
hower’s statement to a B'nai 
| B'rith dinner here in 1953: “In 
ithis country, if someone dis- 
likes you, or accuses you, he 
must come up in front. He can- 
'not hide behind the shadow...” 

Douglas also quoted former 
Rep ublican Sen. Harry P 
Cain's attacks on denial of con- 
frontation. Douglas said, “A 
| hearing is not a hearing in the 
Tin. ° i ° + ## i_> = —ee,, 


of 


sare, new, easy way STOP 


TT 


_|mnew cars and car wheels and 


Military Trial Upheld for Kin of GIs™ 


| plo — “Liability Act to cover 

jad itional railroad workers, in- 

cluding women file clerks. 

| In one case, decided 7-2, the 

tribunal held that employes in- 
juréd in the manufacture of 


in the construction of a new 
‘freight yard may sue for dam- 
ages under the law making 
railroads engaging in interstate 
commerce liable for damages 
for injuries suffered by em- 
ployes while engaged in such 
commerce. 

This case concerned an ap- 
peal by the Southern Pacific 
‘Railroad after several of its 
‘employes won awards for in- 
_juries in suits heard in Califor- 
nia state courts. 

In a second case decided 5-4. 
the tribunal] held the Liability 
Act applied to Martha C. Reed. 
who was injured when a wind 


and hail storm blew in a win-/' 


dow of a Pennsylvania Railroad 
Station in Philadelphia. 


Louisiana Rebuf fed 
In Oil Lease Ruling 


Associated Preas - 

The Supreme Court yester- 
day voided a restraining order 
issued by a Louisiana state 
court to block leasing’ of oil- 


rich submerged lands in the 
Gulf of Mexico. 

The action was announced 
in an 60 order which said the 
Attorney General of Louisiana 
and other state officials -“are 
enjoined from further prose- 
cuting or taking any proceed 
ings” in the case filed in the! 
state court 

The tribtmal at the same 
time told both Louisiana and 
the United States not to lease 
or .begin the drilling of new 
wells “in the disputed Tide- 
lands area pending further or- 
ders of this Court unless by 
agreement of the parties filed 
here” (with the Supreme 
Court) ) 

In other actions, the Su- 
preme Court: ) 

® Denied a new trial to David! 
Darcy. who was sentenced to! 
death for a 1947 holdup murder'| 


— — —_— — — 


ace Accuser 


¢ Associated Press 


American sense If faceless In- 
formers or confidential! informa- 
tion may be used to deprive a 
man of his liberty.” 

Justice Frankfurter said, “We 


jthey waged a 30-month legal 
battle to keep him. 


‘near Doylestown, Pa. Darcy,;Texas political: boss, against! James Skeadas of Lynn, Mass., 
30-year-old Philadelphian, was ne put on trial in Federal custody of James Michael 
convicted in Bucks “weed urt in Austin on income tax Skeadas, 4%. The child has 
‘(Pa.) court June 14, 1948. sion charges. ' lived: with Mr. and Mrs. Sam- 

® Rejected 54 protests iol ® Refused.to interfere with uel Sklaroff of Providence, R 
George B, Parr, stormy south an order giving Mr. and Mrs.'I1., since he was 3 days old and 


comfort. 
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can take judicial natice of a 


fact that in conspicuous in- 
stances, not negligible in num-'| 
ber, such ‘confidential informa- 
tion’ has turned out to be either 
baseless or false.” | 
Justice Hugo L. Black said 
this case shows how far we 
have departed from the care- 
fully ¢onceived plan to safe-. 
guard individual liberty.” He 
said the majority only “pays| 
lip service to judicial review! 
’ in its ruling. Black said, 
“No amount of legal reason- 
ing... can disguise the fact 
that the use of anonymous in- 
formation to banish people is} 
not consistent with the prin- | 
ciples of a free country.” 


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J 


Supreme Court Limits 
Ike’s Security Program 


SECURIT Y—Fr. Pg. I 


only with nonsensitive jobs. 
The original law in question—| 
which was unaffected by the de- 
cision — still gives “unreview-' 


able dismissal powers’ to the! the complaint. The Court of of an immediate threat of harm 


heads of 11 of the large Gov- Appeals, 
ernment departments. They in-| Henry W. Edgerton dissenting, normal dismissal 


clude Defense, State, Com- 
merce, Justice, Treasury, 
Atomic Energy Commission. 


In the same issue, the Court 
struck down the dismissal, in) 
1954, of Kendrick M. Cole, who! 
held a “nonsenstitive, non- 
policy-making” job as a Food 
and Drug inspector in New 
York for the Department of 
Health, Education and Welfare. 


Cole was charged with having 


“close association with individ- 
uals reliably reported to be 
Communists,” having “a con- 
tinued and sympathetic associa- 
tion with the Nature Friends of 
America”—which is on the At- 
torney General's “subversive 
list”—and also aiding that 
group. 

He has publicly denied any 
knowing association with Com- 
munists, said he refused to join 
the Nature Friends, and said 
his relations with that group 
were casual, and for outdoor 
recreation. 

In his answer to the charges, 
Cole declined even to deal with 
the issues in the charges. He 
challenged the legality of the 
action against him, saying he 
would not discuss “associations 
which I carry on as part of my 
private, informal social life.” 

Cole, in January, 1954, was 
fired on grounds his employ- 
ment was “not clearly consis 
tent with the interests of na- 
tional security.” 

He appealed, claiming his 
procedural rights under the 
Veterans’ Preference Act and 
the Lioyd-LaFollette Act had 
been violated. The Civil Serv- 
ice Commission held it had no 
right to consider his appeal. 

The case, with the American 
Civil Liberties Union backing 


and 


Oe 


Cole, and Washington Attorney | loyalty program was still in ef- 

James H. Heller among the law-' fect. 

yers for Cole, moved through) Even now, he said, there are 

the courts as a test of the secu- many other laws to dismiss 

rity program. The United States, Federal employes “on loyalty 
istrict Court here dismissed | | grounds,” and,' “in the absence 


the 
procedures 
affirmed. | arog 2 yy ” * (Hear- 
Justice Harlan, aking for ings before a Senate Subcom- 
‘the majority yesterday in the Mittee last January showed that 
‘opinion handed down on the |#Dout 90 per cent of all em- 
last day of the Court's present ployes then counted as fired 
‘term, said it involved the “security risks” were actually 
meaning of the term “national OUsted under routine proce- 
security” used in the 1950 law | dures.) 7 | 
in dispute. The majority, said Harlan, 
In that law, Congress gave had to make certain “infer- 


ences” about the meaning of 
the “summary suspension” and, 
ouster powers to agencies he Executive Order. He said 


| ” 
specified, and it is in “awkward form” and 


“such other de-| , 
“its failure to state explicit! 
artments and agencies of the . 05 was meant is the fault m 


with Chief Judge'to the ‘national security,’ 


overnment as the President 
may, from time to time, deem — Government, and “any| 
guities should therefore| 
necessary in the best interests he resolve” against the Govern- 
of national securtty. ment. . “ | 
Harlan said: | Justice Clark, for the minor-| 
“That determination requires ity, said the Court “should not! 
an evaluation of the risk of in-| strike down the President's Ex- 
jury to the ‘national security’ ecutive Order” by an admitted 
that the employe’s retention “chain of inferences.” 
would create, which in turn, He said the majority “flies | 
would seem necessarily to be directly in the face” of the law’s| 
a function not only of the char- language and history. Clark! 
acter of the employe and the said, “The Court would require} 
likelihood of his misconducting not only a finding that a par-| 
himself, but also of the nature ticular person is subversive, but | 
of the position he occupies and also that he occupies a sensi- | 
its relationship to the ‘wational|tive job. Obviously this might! 
security.’ leave the Government honey-| 
The majority, said Harlan, combed with subversives.” | 
concluded that the term “na-| In addition, said Clark, the! 
tional security” is “used in the majority “raises a question as. 
Act in a definite and limited to the constitutional power of 
sense and relates only to those the President” to oust em- 
activities which are directly ployes. The majority main-| 
concerned with the Nation's tained that the President's basic 
safety, as distinguished from powers were not in issue, but 


was made that Cole's position | 
missal therefore violated the | Doors; Screen Wire; Everything 
tion, Public Law 733, 


the general welfare . . Clark said, “We cannot agree. 
It foufd no determination — 
was “affected with the ‘na-! SCREEN NEEDS | 
tional .security’” and his dis- | 
Veterans Preference Act. 
At the time the law in ques- | RUCKER LUMBER 
passed, Harlan noted, the old | 3 von Bivd. JAckson 4-123 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Tuesday, June 12, 1956 


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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD ~ 
10 ; Tuesday, June 12, 1956 eens 
4 


’s Treatment 


Of Religton Hit 


A Congregational minister|TV station owner suggested 


told Congress yesterday that|Congress crack down on two) 
. =~ Ane agg sp etwork practices: “option’ 
gious arene should pay their time” which requires affiliated 
own way, “just like soap manu-| Stations to set aside certain 
f{acturers.” hours for network programs; 
The Rev. Everett C. Perker| "4 “must - buy” contracts) 
ot New York City, director of Which require an advertiser to 
the Congregational Christian|>¥y time on all of the net- 
Churches’ office of communica- W°Tk's “basic affiliates. 
‘tion declared the treatment of | In a bill introduced last year, 
religion “is illustrative of the| Bricker seeks to empower the 
p t attitude of networks to- Federal Communications Com- 
waré their public service obli-; Mission to limit a network's 
gations.” Size to 25 per cent of the coun- 
Parker appeared before the ‘ry’s population and limit the 
Senate Interstate and Foreign @™tenna height and _ signal 
‘Commerce Committee which is|Power of affiliated stations 
iresuming hearings begun last| Which may be sapping viewers 
March on what Chairman John @way from neighboring com- 
“Ww. Bricker (R-Ohio) charges is ™unities. — 
‘@ TV “network” monopoly by| The hearing resumes at 10 
‘the National Broadcasting Co.|4 ™m. today in Room G-16 of 


United Press 


Back in Gotham 


Former Mayor William 
O'Dwyer of New York is 
shown as he arrived in Man- 
hattan from Mexice City te 
appear before the United 
States Tax Court today to 
present his appeal from a 
Government claim for about 
$10,000 in Federal income 
taxes. He has asked the court 
to throw out the claim on 
grounds that he spent $22.. 
390 in performing his duties 
as Ambassador te Mexice and 


’ 


Money Bill for Justice, 
State, Courts, USIA Passed 


Congress passed and sent to'\for money to build two new 
the White House yesterday a prisons was cut to $250,000 to 


plan’ the maximum custody 
$548.9 million bill to run the penitentiary and the youth 


State and Justice Departments, | center which would go some- 
Federal Courts and United | place in the West. The Depart- 
States Information Agency Ment was ordered to get Con- 
next year. png approval before it 
The final compromise figure 5¢!©C's sites. 
poms out by a eg Senate 
Conference Committee was $50 ‘ s 
million less than the President Czechs Seize Spy 
‘had requested. Biggest cut was) VIENNA, Tune 11 (®—Czech- 
— in -¥" bapa pa nena oslovak newspapers today re- 
which go million instea a ) 
‘of the $135 million requested. ported me chp of an Amert-| 
USLA. also got a flat turn. ©" SPY, identified as Lubomir 
‘down on its plan to convert Juza, a Czech deserter, who) 
,an aircraft carrier to a floating fell into the hands of Czech’ 
m@vie house for world-wide security authorities after cross- 
showing of Cinerama. ing the German-Czech border! 
The bill provides the full $20 on a mission for the American’ 
million requested for the State intelligeuce service in Germany,.| 
| Department's educational ex-  _— | 
change program. 


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, voted to Protestant Christian- 
ity.” 


conducted by Sen. Sam J. Ervin 
Jr. N. C.) and William R 
*Partell (R-Conn.). 
'madio Aid Better 

Parker testified the radio net- 
works have never been “overly 
génerous” toward religion but 
at least they have made a better 
core than the TV networks, 
itemized. 

*Of the 4860 minutes. of 
jnetwork TV which NBC origi- 
‘nates each week, 30 minutes, 
jor $2 per cent, is devoted to 
religion. And this time has to 
be divided among Protestants, 
tonly network which considers 
religion a “public service obli- 
gation” and demands no pay- 
ment for what little time it 
does allocate to religious mat- 
| ters. ’ 
; All of the networks, the 
. ter deciared, use ¢m- 

s unscholled in theology 

¢é maintain a veto over church- 
prepared programs—and “they 
dp not hesitate” to “ise it. 
Bricker Charges 
1 {Senator Bricker, in a com- - 4 ‘ . 
,Maittee report issued April 30, | rT | 
charged CBS and NBC with | ——— “ a 
{ maintaining “an unprecedented | ) — -—_ ee sae. 3 : ine | 
pb oeeey stranglehold on the; F..) Sse" 4555 oT Ri xe. ee 
; ; 


_ — 
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Catholics and Jews to such a 
tion’s television industry.” Gea Se a 
‘= Raed ia 


fine point that “during 24 weeks 
in the year, not a single min-| 
lute on the NBC network is de-| 
*The two networks, he said, 
“arcounted for 41.08 per cent of 
‘the quarter-billion-dollar rev- 
enue taken in by the TV in- 
in 1954. 

' -The Senator declared: “The 
atwo major networks have a 
first and binding call on the 
i Dest time of most of the choice 
TV outlets in the country; they 
\egntrol a very substantial pro- 
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N d - d. D C Se THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES Babar: 
T June 12, 1956 
Ike Won’t Need Secon ration, Dr. Crohn Says pili, vt 
By Nate Haseltine dent's operation Saturday was|matory disease of the small in-|most frequently discussed in such reinfections necessarily re-| SMOKEY PICNIC GRILL 
Stat Reporter only preliminary to further|testine in 1932, said that the lay circles, gained some cre- quire another operation. 
‘The discoverer of iletis yes-| surgery. joperation performed on the! dence yesterday when a special-| Tleitis is a stubborn inflam| 
| President is “the classical, and 
terday scouted contentions by; Dr. Burrill Bernard Crohn,|:ne gnal operation” for the con- ist in abdominal surgery here matory disease of unknown ; . 
some doctors that the Presi- jwho first described the inflam- dition. questioned the faith of the origin that attacks the terminal « 


FOR JUST ONE FILLED ; 
-" Told that some doctors were) ‘President's doctors in saying end of the ileum, small intes 


KING KORN* 
claiming it would be negessary the operation was a final one. ‘tine, where it enters the large SAVER BOOK! 
to cut into the President again) Unnamed because his advice hemel (he esfon). Where we 
to remove the afflicted part of was sought by newsmen rather 


Announcing 
Something Special for Dad 


the intestine, 
still-practicing specialist § re- 
to : 

“Tell them to read 
(medical) literature.” 

Dr. Crohn, reached at Mount 
Sinai Hospital, New York, con- 
ceded that.“some clinics” in 
this country do schedule follow- 
up operations to cut out the 
diseased part 

Such surgical practice, he 
said, is the exception to the 
general rule that the by passing 
yperation is complete in itself. 
Dr. Crohn said the surgeons 
who operated on the President 
were “undoubtedly right” when 
they told the public they did 
not expect to have to perform 
any more surgery on their fa- 
mous patient. 

The secondg surgery question, 


their 


gap 
‘performed, he 


the 72-yearold, than volunteered, he had told & 


reporters that conventionally © 
the by passing operation is stop- 
surgery. Whenever it is 
said, the gur- 
geons then and there plan to 
re-operate later to remove that 
part of the intestine they have 
surgeally by passed 

He said the President's doc- 
tors had given the press,and the 
public “a bum stephen they 
said they didn't plan to do the 
follow-up surgery later. Until 
this second surgery is  per- 
formed, he said, the diseased 
part remains a constant re- 
infection source for other parts 
of the intestine. 

Dr. Crohn conceded that in 
any operation for ileitis there 
is always the possibility that 
now healthy parts of the in- 
testine would later develop the 
infection, and inflammation. It 


her cut out the diseased 
length, and sew its healthy end 
to the entrance to the colon, 
or they perform the by passing 
operation 

To bypass the diseased por- 
tion, the surgeons simply cut 
a hole in the small intestine, 
above its diseased part, cut a 
similar-size hole in the nearby 
part of the colon, and stitch 
the two canals together at the 
edges of the holes. This is the 
operation the President's sur- 
geons performed on him Sat- 
urday morning. 

Maj. Gen. Leonard D. Heat- 
on, surgeon and commandant 


at Walter Reed Army Hos-' 
who performed the sur-| 


pital, 
gery, later told newsmen a 
expected that the 


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TUESDAY, JUNE 12, 1956 PAGE 12 


Order Before the Court 


When the Supreme Court use e phrase “all 
deliberate speed” in its school desegregation order 
last June, it acknowledged that a great deal of 
flexibility is,needed in bringing about good faith 
compliance. The most serious danger to orderly 
accomplishment of school desegregation is that this 
principle of flexibility will be lost sight of. 

There is no logical reason why the Court's deci- 
sion should be applied first and most ebruptly to 
the areas where racial tensions are the most in- 
flamed and the problems of adjustment the most 
severe. Yet this is altogether likely to happen 
(witness the suit in Prince Edward County, Va., 
set for hearing July 9) if the application of the law 
is left to chance and is determined by sporadic 
litigation. The compelling need is to remove the 
matter of timing from the rigid extremes posed on 
the one side by the National Association for the 
Advancement of Colored People (whose good 
motives are not in question) and on the other by 
the White Citizens’ Councils (whose determined 
defiance cannot be douDted). 

Here we think @he vast prestige of President 
Eisenhower, who is trusted in the South ag well as 
the North, could be an ameliorating factor of great 
importance. The Supreme Court has interpreted 
the law of the land, and it has left to the Federal 
district courts the determination of what is reason- 
able application of ‘the Jaw. But the courts 
frequently seek the advice of the Attorney General 
when the Federal interest is involved. If the Presi- 
dent were to announce the appointment of a 
special assistant to the Attorney General to consult 
with officials in various localities affected by the 
Supreme Court decision and recommend standards 
of judgment to the lower Federal courts, he might 
help to dissolve the patterns of statewide rigidity 
and pave the way for far more moderate reactions 
in the South than some of the extremist statements 
would now contemplate 

cw 

Although the courts themselves must retain the 
power of decision, they have already acknowledged 
the national interest in individual desegregation 
cases by inviting the Attorney General to submit his 
views. An invitation to the Attorney General to 
associate himself with a case as a friend of the 
court is a recognition of what is implicit in all con- 
stitutional cases—that far more than an individual 
lawsuit is at stake. In suits involving school de- 
segregation the Attorney General should be in a 
position to advise whether the particular case before 
the court meets the criterion of “deliberate speed.” 
The broad responsibility of his office is to urge the 
courts (in view of the discretionary powers which 
they enjoy when sitting as courts of equity) to de- 
cide such cases in the way most calculated to bring 
about compliance on a national scale. 

In this the essential question is what constitutes 
justice in differing situations, and what the in- 
dividual plaintiffs are entitled to. Obviously, the 
Attorney Genera! could not and shoyld not prevent 
the filing of suits involving school segregation 
wherever they might arise. But he could properly 
advise the court as to what would constitute justice 
in the circumstances. The Supreme Court has not 
said that full desegregation is required in Alabama 
tomorrow morning. What it has said is that action 
toward desegregation should proceed simultane- 
ously, but with differing criteria of immediacy. It 
would be fitting for the Attorney General or his 
representative to suggest that individual lower 
courts view particular cases from the standpoint 


of what is happening in other areas, keeping in 
mind the successful handling of suits in the border 
states. “All deliberate speed’ ought to take ail 
such factors into account. 

It is obvious that if the first principal application 
of the desegregation order were in an area of Mis- 
sissippi or South Carolina where Negro students 
far outnumber white students, the problems of 
adjustment there and elsewhere would be magni- 
fied. Emotions would be strained and resistance 
whetted. Logically the full application of the de- 
segregation order ought to be a progressive 
process, starting in the areas where compliance is 
the easiest and moving gradually to the areas 
where adjustment is more difficult.. In broad 
measure the full application ought to seep south- 
ward. 

This does not mean that there are not communi- 
ties in the Deep South where full school desegrega- 
tion should proceed promptly. That such a process 
is possible has already been demonstrated in 
sectors of Texas. There are other areas where it 
might be feasible to begin desegrégation now at 
the first-grade level, or to place boys and girls in 
different schools. What the concept of progressive 
application means is that the Attorney General 
could reasonably ask the courts to decide the finer 
points of cases from, say, Delaware and southern 
Ohio before they rule with finality on cases from 
Georgia. It means that the issue ought to be 


pressed in Arlington County, where integration | 


would pose no real problem, before it is pressed in 
Prince Edward County, which is the seat of the 
most intensive resistance in Virginia. 


cos 

A presidentially appointed assistant to the At- 
torney General, clothed in Mr. Eisenhower's 
prestige and working at his direction, could be of 
material help in providing the courts with suitable 
criteria. He and his staff could consult with local 
officials; they also could survey the geographical, 
population composition and density, and school 
facility factors that will influence the application 
of desegregation. He could recommend orders of 
priorities on a regional basis, not with the idea of 
holding back desegregation elsewhere, but for the 
purpose of encouraging the moderates and stimulat- 
ing the easiest and least disruptive pattern of ad- 
justment. 

There is no more agonizing problem before the 
country than this adjustment to the school desegre- 
gation decision. The manner in which the United 
States solves this problem—and it assuredly will 
solve it—will have a profound effect on its foreign 
relations (just as the Southern Manifesto denounc- 
ing the decision, having among its signers men of 
stature in foreign affairs, already has held the 
country up to critical scrutiny in sensitive areas 
of the world). 

The appointment of a special assistant to advise 
the courts would not automatically dispel the many 
obstacles that will arise; and certainly other meas- 
ures, such as the Federal aid to education bill still 
stuck in the House, are imperative to facilitate 
adjustments and minimize racial tensions. But an 
appeal by the President to men of good will to co- 
operate in a national effort to ease the transition 
could be a significant influence in soothing and 
unifying the country at a time when the forces of 
disruption and division are riding rampant. And 
thg determination of a sensible, selective timetable 
on desegregation could remove the adjustment from 
the realm of chance and help make of it the 
methodical and deliberate affair it should be. 


Varnishing Injustice 


Senator Cain's guarded and ,tactful comments 
after his interview on Thursday with President 
Eisenhower left an impression that he still believes 
what he said some time ago, that the President's 
advisers “have fed him only varnish” about the 
Federal security program. He depicted the Presi- 
dent as “surprised” and “indignant” at learning 
how the program has operated in certain specific 
cases. Mr. Eisenhower, he said, is determined “to 
find the roots of injustice as imposed upon indi- 
viduals and to get rid of same.” But one was left, 
nevertheless, with a feeling that Mr. Cain believed 
the President to be unfamiliar with the actual work- 
ings of the procedures which his own executive 
order had established 

Certainly the security program is grossly at 
variance with certain general observations which 
President Eisenhower has made about individual 
rights in the United States—for example, the his- 
toric right of Americans to face their accusers. This 
is a right which the program, in its reliance on 
information from unidentified sources, wholly 
ignores—and ignores in many cases altogether need- 
lessly. If Mr. Cain has succeeded in giving the 
President a livelier awareness of the shocking con- 
flict between the security program and American 
traditions of fair play, he has rendered a gost 
valuable service to his country. We share Mr. 
Cain’s confidence that the President is deeply con- 
cerned about and devoted to the preservation of 
individual rights. 


What Is Neutralism? 


If anyone has a precise definition of the AMminis- 
tration’s position on neutralism, the field is wide 
open for comment. Evidently the President went 
too far for some of his colleagues the other day in 
expressing his understanding of the refusal of 
young countries to join military alliances. But then 
some of the protests took hold and a statement 
was issued noting Mr. Eisenhower's belief in col- 
lective security and his feeling that the only risk 
to young countries is in alliance with the Soviet 
Union. Now Secretary Dulles, in his Ames speech 


to which Mr. Eisenhower called attention in ad- 


yance, has extolled the collective security system 
and added that the neutrality which implies indiffer- 
ence to the fate of others is, in other than “very 
exceptional” circumstances, “immoral and short- 
sighted.” The result is another of those babels of 
conflicting official voices similar to the confusing 
. statements on the Soviet arms cut.. 

It is evident enough what Mr. Eisenhower meant 
to-say, and this newspaper agrees with him. There 


a 


are situations, especially in Asia, in which alliances 
seem risky apd might invite counteraction, and in 
which the main American interest ought to be in 
helping the countries concerned strengthen their 
independence. There is a difference between 
understanding neutralism and encouraging it. On 
the other hand, Mr. Dulles is properly concerned 
about the effect on existing alliances of any biess- 
ing to neutralism. Collective security is perhaps 
the most basic of all international concepts. If 
members. of NATO should get the idea that they 
could profit from essays in neutrality, the Western 
world would be in danger. 

Perhaps the distinction is one of degree and is 
best expressed in actions rather than in semantic 
debates. Successful alliances depend upon a funda- 
mental like-emindedness and agreement on the 
existence of a common threat. This has been the 
case in NATO, whose membership consists of coun- 
tries with similar traditions in the face of a clear 
danger of aggression. It is less the case with 
SEATO and. the Baghdad Pact, whose far more 
disparate members face for the most part a differ- 
ent kind of challenge. Moreover, experience has 
generally shown that it is a mistake in alliances to 
disregard the feelings of neighboring countries. 
Can anyone honestly say that it was wise to con- 
sider the arming of Pakistan in a vacuum? This 
more jhan anything else has been responsible for 
the strained relations with India. 

It is going to be difficult to retain the sense of 
community in NATO in light of the changed Soviet 
tactics. Retention and expansion of this sense 
of community will require not only more emphasis 
on political consultations, but also the reexamina- 
tion of basic NATO strategy and the relation to 
German unification. On this point the United 
States is entitled to expect that its European allies 
will take a sophisticated view and will recognize that 
the change in Soviet tactics has stemmed in part 
from the strength of NATO. But it is important 
not to confuse neutralism which in Western Europe 
could only be woolly-minded with neutralism in Asia 
where the individual situations are very different 


On Buying Allies 


What we should seek to create in our relations 
with the underdeveloped areas of the world is 
independence not dependence. If we operate on 
the concept that the independent nations must 
either be with us or against us, we will in fact be 
creating satellites, not independent states, and a 
satellite has no strength of its own. If we condi- 
tion assistance to these areas on the basis that 
they must be with us in opposition to something, 
we are in effect trying to buy mercenaries. Any 
state that can be bought is, in my opinion, not 
worth buying.—Sen. Mike Mansfield in his bacca- 
laureate address, Montana State University, June 


“What's Your Prognosis for November, Doctor?” 


++ em BO c & 


© -ere Te warevered Per ce. 


Letters to the Editor 


Good Will Ambassadors 


A recent article in your news- 
paper revealed that the Presi- 
dent was scheduling a White 
House conference for distin- 
guished leaders in various 
fields for the purpose of offer- 
ing suggestions how Americans 
traveling abroad might better 
serve their country as “good- 
will envoys.” 

This is a very important step 
in the direction of winning the 
cold war, for consciously, or un- 
consciously, each United States 
citizen, when he travels to a 
foreign country, serves as an 
“unofficial ambassador” and 
lends either good or bad to the 
name of his country by his 
every word and deed. 

Feelings of mutual respect 
are the bases for hgrmonious 
international relations, It is re- 
ported that many people abroad 
do not respect us because they 
erroneously believe that we are 
concerned with material things, 
only. Another accusation, in- 
spired by communistic propa- 
ganda, is that we lack “culture.” 

These false ideas are being 
cleared effectively by the 
United States Information 
Agency, the Department of 
State's exchange of persons pro- 
gram and by the President, 
who through his emergency 
fund for cultural exchange is 
rendering a great service to the 
Nation by makiagg known 
abroad. our high dramatic, mu- 
sical and other cultural attain- 
ments. 

However, in spite of these 
gains, experts returning from 
visits to foreign countries say 
that the sincerity of our atti- 
tudes concerning world peace 
and friendliness toward peo- 
ples of other races is doubted. 
This implies a serious psycho- 
logical impasse in the cold war, 
and President Eisenhower is 
moving wisely to enlist the co- 
operation of learned individuals 
and private agencies to combat 
it by means of a “people-to-peo- 
ple” program. 

JOHN E. ME RKLE 


Bxec uti ve Di rector 


nec 
W ashington. 


JR. 


ia AmM- 


Little Leagues 


The current squabble, pro 
and con, concerning the Little 
Leagues has evinced the in- 
terest of the D. C. Recreation 
Department and prompts us to 
comment on the matter. In 
Washington the Recreation De- 
partment presents what we feel 
is an effective system of af- 
fording baseball experience to 
juniors. We believe our pro- 
gram corrects some of the 
shortcomings of the Ihittle 
Leagues 

This summer more than 2000 
hbovs between the ages of 10 
and 14 will play baseball on 
135 teams in two age groups 
Formed in the Walter Johnson 
Baseball Leagues, boys 12 and 
under will be in the Minor 
League, and those 14 and under 
in the Major League. Competi- 
tion is divided into 9 regional 
contests during the regular sea- 
son. Regional winners meet to- 
gether for western and eastern 
division championships and 
these winners compete for the 
city-wide title. 

The purpose is to provide op 
portunity to become a member 
of a team for every boy who de- 
sires to do so. As additional 
boys become interested, new 
teams are formed and sched 
ules expanded. The poorer play- 
ers improve with good coach- 
ing. Those who develop skills 
slowly need not worry about be- 
ing dropped from the team 
There are teams enough for 
everyone, and everyone makes 
the team. 

Teams are organized on a 
neighborhood basis with all 
members required to live in 
the vicinity of the playground 
at which they play. Last year 
teams were organized at 74 dif- 
ferent playgrounds scattered 
throughout the city. Thus, there 
was an organized team within 
easy walk g, distance of any 
child in the city. 

The idea for these leagues 


‘was conceived in 1947 By Bus 


Ham, Sports Editor of the then 
Washington Post. The Junior 


4 


Chamber of Commerce and the 
Recreation Department were 
willing supporters of the idea 
and agreed to accept the major 
responsibility of organizing the 
leagues. 

The Junior Chamber of Com- 
merce has enlisted the support 
of its membership and business 
organizations as sponsors of the 
teams, and the Recreation De- 
partment has. provided the lead- 
ership, coaches, ball diamonds 
and additional equipment. 
Coaches are professional lead- 
ers, former sandlot or semi-pro 
players or college varsity stars 
well trained in teaching skills 
and techniques. All coaches are 
either employes of the Recrea- 
tion Department or volunteers 
under their direct supervision 

We may not yet have a per- 
fect organization. There aren't 
always enough ball diamonds or 
coaches to meet the need. We 
do believe, though, that we are 
on a tirm foundation for future 
growtm. In 1954 national recog- 
nition was attained when the 
United States Junior Chamber 
of Commerce announced that 
the Walter Johnson Baseball 
League had won first place na- 
tionally in conipetition seeking 
the outstanding continuous jun- 
ior baseball program at the 
playground level. The local jay- 
cees and the Recreation Depart- 
ment are justly proud of this 
award and look forward to an 
everexpanding program in the 
years to come 

MIL O F. CHRISTI ANSEN, 

C. Reereation Departmen 
W ashington 


Virginia ‘Firsts’ 

As a daily reader of your 
great paper I have observed 
with considerable interest the 
fine ad of the Hecht Co. that 
appeared in your issue of Mon- 
day, June 4 This ad paid 
tribute to the historical state 
of Virginia. and to the .many 
“Firsts” for which the Common- 
weaith is noted 

Congratulations to all con- 
cerned who prepared this ad. 
The artist has done a most 
splendid job The characters 
as portrayed have action, and 
a keen sense of humor flows 
from the pen of the creator. 

As an artist who has a regis- 
tered series of Famous Firsts 
in History, I have drawn sev 
eral “Firsts” on the state of 
Virginia. To my mind and to 
the thinking of some native 
Virginians, we believe that a 
most important “First” has been 
overlooked, viz: Virginia—First 
and only state in the Nation to 
have furnished eight “native 
sons’ who served as Presidents 
of the United States. However, 
it is mentioned in the type that 
there must be countless more. 
sO we can assume this one has 
been included 

l am sure the many Virgin- 
lans are indeed happy over this 
“Salute” to their historic past, 
and to the part their great state 
has played in the history of 
our Nation 

V.“WESLEY CARMACK. 

Arlington 


Report-Card Revision 


In a news article in your June 
4 issue, Alice Elam, the head 
of the committee which is 
studying report-card revision 
in the D. C. elementary schools, 
is reportea as saying that, under 
a change to be “9% ©: 
reportcard grades of A, B, 
etc. will not mean that a hid 
is achieving under some set 
standard, but that they will be 
a report on how well a child 
achieves in terms of his own 
capacity. The article further 
states that the system which 
was started last fall. in which 
a child’s accomplishments are 
measured against a citywide 
standard for his gradé, is being 
abandoned because it has been 
criticized by parents who com 
plain that they don't know what 
the grades mean 

What do reportcard grades 
mean? Not only are parents 
confused, but teachers who 
issue and read grades are even 
more confused 

Here ‘s cn A student and here 
an F (let us say in mathematics 
Does this mean that the A stu 
dent knows a great deal of the 
mathematics appropriate for 
his age anc grade level and that 
the F student knows very little’ 
Not under the proposed rev! 
sion, nor even under the present 
practices 

The A student may be men 
ally retarded. He may be in 
the fifth grade and*is doing 
mathematics appropriate to the 
first grade—but he is “work 
ing up to his capacity.” Again 
the F student may be doing 
quite good work in the fifth 
grade in which he is placed, 
but if he is of high mentality 
and, in the opinion Of the 
teacher, not “working up to 
his capacity” he fails or re- 
ceives a low mark. 

Who determines if a child is 
doing satisfactory work accord 
ing to his ability and how is this 
decision made’ Does the teach- 
er depend on I. Q. tests? These 
are notoriowgly unreliable. 
How does a teacher determine 
whether an . ncooperative child 
is that way because of mental 
difficulties or because of emo- 
tional and/or economic diliffi- 
culties. 

How can a parent interpret 
such a mark? The basis on 
which the teacher judges that 
a child is working up to his 
abilities is never revealed to 
the parent, especially if the 
teacher thinks that the child is 
of low mental ability. A teach- 
er' seldom, if ever, says to’ a 
parent, “Mr. Jones, 1 think 
your child ts academicall 
stupid but he seems to try hard. 


I am giving him an A 
in arithmetic, not because he 
knows any arithmetic, but be- 
cause | think he is incapable of 
learning it.” 

As a result of 
marking we find 
children coming to the high 
school with fantastic Ideas of 
the academic careers for which 
the children are heading. Chil- 
dren with I. Q's of 80, retarded 
in both mathematics and read- 
ing, ‘ell you with confidence 
that they are going to become 
reasearch physicists—and the 
aioate of such children insist 
that they must pass academic 
high school because 
"my boy is Zong to a good col. 
lege and will become a doctor 

Of course parents do not 
know what grades mean be 
cause, in spite of our various 
committees, grades have not 
been uniform for the same sub 
lect courses. On the record, a 
child may have an A in math 
ematics. If the child has been 
in a slow group. this means that 
ne is a good or better than his 
group—but still may be worse 
than the D student in an ad 
vanced gruup. The record does 
not show the grouping—all it 
shows is the merk. 

if a child is to be marked 
according to his ability” and 
not with reference to his accom 
plishment, then the records 
should show, and parents 
should be informed, as to what 
that ability is. Teachers and 
administrators who read rec. 
ords for the sake of guiding the 
child must interpret them as 
accomplishment reports—there 
is no other way to interpret 
them. If these marks do not in- 
dicate accomplishment they are 
meaningless and had best be 
scrapped 

In the lack of some absolute 
measure of capacity and a lack 
of agreement as to what is 
meant by “eapacity” grades, re- 
ports based on this tenuous 
foundation are meaningless 

Parents and teachers alike 
can interpret grades that say 
“an A in this course means that 
the child is doing superior work 
at his grade level, a C means 
average vork for his grade 
level, etc.” A report<card grade 
which implies that an A means 
not that the student is doing 
superior work, or even fair 
work, but that he is doing the 
best he can (even though the 


grade 


such “effort” 
parents and 


subject . 


‘work is of failing grade) is de- 


liberately misleading. Such 
grades are nothing but ego 
builders for parert and child. 
TEACHER. 
Washington. 


, 


Ike’s Illness Revives 
Health Controversy 


By Marquis Childs 


NOT THE LEAST of the unhappy con- 
sequences of President Eisenhower's sec- 
ond serious illness in less than nine months 
is that_it has revived the will-heor-won't- 
he, showtild - he - or- 
shouldn’t-he debate. This 
tends to mute or obscure 
discussion of vital prob- 
lems at home and 
abroad, putting all the 
stress on the personality 
and the physique of one 
individual. 

Since only the Presi- 
dent can decide whether 
the second ilimess has Childs 
altered his previous decision to seek a sec- 
ond term and with only two months before 
the nominating conventions, the pressure 
on him will be strong for an early response, 
In the view of the associates closest to him, 
this will almost certainly be affirmative. 

While the will-heor-won't-he guessing 
contest was on following the September 
heart attack, rumors were current in Wash- 
ington that members of the President's 
family strongly opposed his risking his 
health in another four years in the most 
difficult and demanding office in the 
world. 

But the President in early January sup- 
plied perhaps the best reason why he 
should not run for another term. Shortly 
before he ended a vacation at Key West, 
Fla., he met with reporters for the first 
time in five months and told them that his 
mind had not been made up to the extent 
that it could not be changed. He cited the 
“critical,” the “rather startling” and “un- 
toward effects” of a change in the Presi- 
dency in mid-term 

oo 

ARGUMENT has been rein. 
forced by the consequences of the Presi- 
dent's second illness. The stock market 
reacted with a sharp drop. But far more 
important, the President's illness and the 
convalescence which must follow cut 
across major foreign policy negotiations 
with leading figures from a half dozen 
countries in the weeks just ahead. 

A further element of delay and uncer- 
tainty is added at a critical moment when 
many have been saying that a reapprais- 
al of foreign policy looking to a new and 
constructive approach is essential The 
President had appeared at his last press 
conference to be seeking that approach 
in his discussion of the place of neutral»na- 
tions and the importance for America to 
respect their neutrality. 

The Republicans who led the chorus in 
appealing for a second term regardless 
of the September heart attack will repeat 
that performance From Leonard Hall 
on down, top Republicans have based 
the entire campaign on the Eisenhower 
personality. 

A decision by the President to retire 
would throw his party inte the most pain- 
ful confusion 4 bitter struggle for the 
nomination would follow he most likely 
candidate is Vice President Richard M. 
Nixon, whose popularity in the party, 
omitting certain strongly anti-Nixon fac- 
tions in his own California, is undeniab'e 

Nixon is far better known than any Re 
publican on the national horizon. but the 
polis have shown him running behind 
Adlai Stevenson. 


THAT 


ow 

THE HEALTH issue will now inevi- 
tably come to the fore. Even though it 
is not directly exploited by the opposi- 
tion, and Democrats have shown a tend- 
ency in recent weeks to avoid direct ref- 
erence to it, concern over the President's 
well-being will be uppermost in the pub 
lic consciousness 

Recently President Eisenhower has 
given every indication that he considered 
himself to be fully recovered and enjoy- 
ing his normal vigor. But the factor of 
tension and strain has been ever present. 

The incident is being recalled here of 
the remark attributed to the President 
by Merriman Smith, White House corre- 
spondent for the United Press. In his week. 
ly column Smith reported shortly after 
the Eisenhower decision to seek a sec 
ond term that the President had said to 
a friend as he lef? the White House office: 
“They told me I had to run afain because 
there wasn't time to build up another can- 
didate.” 

Before 
print 


this 
it Was oO 


quotation could appear in 
rdered killed by the United 
some papers disregarded the in 
struction and ran it anyway. At a subse- 
quent press conference Eisenhower was 
asked whether he had made such a re 
mark. He replied that he could not re 
member having done so and that if he had 
ne had not meant it to be taken serious!» 

The dilemma confronting the President 
$s even more acute today than it was in 
January and February He must run to 
save his party, or so he will be told again 
and again as soon as his condition permits 
him -to talk with the politicians 


The Washington ost 


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The Washington Post Company 


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Today and Tomor rOW . « By Walter Lipa 
The President and Mr. Dulles | 


THERE IS ONLY one gub- 
ject of public interest and that 
is the rate and the clhiaracter 
of the President's recovery. 


On that his. 
doctors alone 
are qualified 
to speak, and 
they have 


deed in enthu- 
siastic terms. 
Later on, how- 
ever, after he 
is out of the 
hospital and 
has had time to try himself 
out. it will be the turn of the 
President himself to speak 
Until then, the country must 
once again resign itself to a 
period of uncertainty. 


HAD THE President not 
been stricken, there would be 
many subjects of great public 
interest. One of them is the 
sharp conflict on neutrality 
between what the President 
tried to say in his press con- 
ference on * Wednesday. and 
what Mr. Dulles said in his 
speech at Iowa State College 
on Saturday. This conflict ts 
all the more surprising in view 
of the fact that at the preas 
conference the President 
promised that Mr. Dulles 
would make it all very clear 
“so that we can all understand 
what it is we are tfying to do 
in waging the peace.” What 
Mr. Dulles made clear is that 
he and the President do not 
think alike. or perhaps wé 
should say that tRey do not 
feel alike. on fhe subject of 
the nations which refuse to 
join our military alliances. 

For the President, who 
members our own history as 
a neutral in respect the 
alliances of Furone, it does not 
seem immoral, necessarily 


Lippmann 


re- 
in 


or 


- 


Washington 


Prep School for the Senate 


WHEN a man becomes Sec- 
retary of Agriculture he seems 
either to want to get into the 
Senate keep previous Sec- 
retaries of Ag 
riculture out @ 
of the Senate 
He apparently 
h 
sessed 
lesire 
his farmin 
the Senate 
fino let ws 
look at the 
line-up 

i nere are 
only four ex- 

Secretaries of Agriculture 
still living. Henry A. Wallace 
became Vice ‘resident, ofr 
presiding officer of the Sen- 
ate; Clinton P. Andérson be- 
came Senator from New Mex- 
ico: and this year Charles F 
“Baidy” Brannan and Claude 
R ckard are campaigning 
to become Senators ffom Colo 
rado and Indiana 

jut the only living Secre- 
tary f Agri ure Uf you 
can deadly job 
“living’’), : hehnting with 
everything he has to ke: 
Brannan and Wicxard fro: 
getting into the Senate. Ezra 
Taft Benson plans to stump 
{olorado and Indiana  »be- 
seeching the voters to black 
ball Baldy and Claudy from 
that exclusive club 


I AM 
td later 
hle 


OT 


atte | 


<cCOoOmMmes 


Dixon 


respective 


practically a slavish 
of Ez. and 

infal 
anout 


unwise, if a nation prefers not 
to align itself in a military 
pact. For him, such neutrality 
does not mean indifference “as 
between right and wrong, or 
decency and indecency.” 

But for Mr. Dulles, who is 
in one of his sternest and most 
righteous moods, neutrality 
among military alliances is 
“except under very exceptional 
circumstances ... an immoral 
and shortsighted conception.” 
This is a rather sweeping gen- 
eralization in view of the fact 
that in Eurepe it covers 
Sweden, Switzeriand, Ireland. 
not to speak of Austria and 
Finland: and in Asia it covers 
India, Burma, Ceylon and In- 
donesia: that in the Middle 
Fast it covers all the Arab 
states except Iraq: and that if 
one looks into the fact it would 
cover a lot of Latin America. 


WHAT HAS brought about 
the Eisenhower-Dulles muddle 
is that apparently 
lablé itch in high quarters to 
utter resounding generaliza 
tions. Why was it necessary 
for the President to discuss 
neutrality*in general and ab- 
stract terms? Why was it: nec- 
essary for the Secretary of 
State to speak on the subject 
as if from a mountain top’? Do 
other heads of state and other 
for éign ministers anywhere 
feel that they must generalize 
and declare moral judgments 
about the policies of other gov- 
ernments? Why then must we 
suffer this recurrent affliction 
in Washington’ 

The essence of the problem 
of neutrality and alliances is 
that it is the problem of each 
sovereign state, and that there 
is no general rule. What is 
best for some states is not 
necessarily best for all states 
The vice of the Dulles posi 
tion is that it presumes to 
judge and condemn on. gen 


uncontrol- 


eral grounds the policy of 
many states with whom w 
have no quarrel, who hav 
done us no injury, who have 
as much right as we have to 
join or to refuse to join par- 
ticular alliances. Mr. Dulles 
should know that his sweep- 
ing moral judgments will win 
him no allies but can alienate 
many friends. 


THE OCCASION for these 
untimely and dangerous utter- 
ances is that/certain of the 
new military{ alliances—par- 
ticularly the utheast Asia 
Treaty and the "Baghdad Pact 
—are causing so.much trouble 


that a reappraisal has become | 
President's | 
friendly remarks on neutrality | 


necessary. The 


et of this re 
ich he has ul 


reflect one as 
appraisal in w 


doubtedly been participating. | 


Mr. Dulles’s harsh remarks re- 
tlect another side of the re- 
appraisal. They reflect the 
fear that if any concessions, 
like the President's, are made 
to neutrality, the whole frag- 
ile structure of the alliances 
will crumble. 

The crux of the problem is 
to find ways of reducing the 
military character of these al- 
liances and of transforming | 
them 


nomic cooperation. The Ad 


ministration has not yet how- | 


GRIN AND BEAR IT 


*. 


: 
: 
: 


By Liehty 


i 


. Not to belittle other branches of the armed forces 


Colonel, but OUR file system is the ONL) one suited to 


the de fense of the Nation! 


— a 


The Day in 


) 


into agencies of eco | 


’ 


ever succeeded in formulating | 


such a solution of the prob- 
lem. Fearing that the existing 
system of alliances will 
solve before a new 
cooperation can be worked 
out. Mr. Dulles is for public 
purposes—tlet us hope for pub 
lic purposes only—grimly 
standing pat on the pretense 
that the whole policy 
and is in no need of 
revision. 


serious 


1956. New York Hera 


TY Pune 


Coprricht 


-_- 


Scene « « « eBy George Dixon 


ture, but I wish he would lay 
off Baldy Brannan. | want B 
B. and his eroded noggin back 
Washington. He was my 
day” man. When every 
body else in Washington was 
behaving sensibly. and I 
couldn't find anything to write 
about, I could always rely on 
dear old Baldy to do or say 
something funny 
Claude Wickard 
uproariou but when he was 
Rural Flectrifi Admin- 
istrator he used to slip methe 
most. fascinating statistics 
about the number of farmers 
who had electric dishwashers 
in their houses but no plumb- 
ing 
If he defeats the Republican 
incumbent /Alomer Capehart, 
he can return with alk manner 
of esoteric information to 
which he is privy 
It doe« not take too much 
imagination of course. to 
figure why a man who has been 
Secretary of Agriculture's 
yearns to be a Senator. The 
kechetary of Agriculture's 
at is the hottest in the land 
and much of the heat comes 
from the Senate. Every time 
the Secretary is called to Capi- 
tol Hill for a roasting he cries 
inwardly 
| could only change 
th these fiends. I'd let 
it feels to be 


was not so 


ation 


LOW 


. 


ntare mt 


the 


IN ADDITT 
' A ore 


ttest ser 
> 


These Days ...:. 


The Engineering Shortage 


MESSRS. Eli 
ward A. Fitzpatrick 
A. Meyerhoff and E. M 

ilischer, professors and spe 
cial 
ious 
have 
together to 
study the hu 
man resources 
tnis un 
WILD 
obiect 
lating it to the 
national se 
curity neir 


monogr: 1on 


(,inzberg 


sts in var 
fields. 
joined 


ol 
ry 
o! 


Sokoltsky 


making 
correct 
nt “a | 
top-flight 
beautiful 
supply, 

are 
could 
than irre 
snorlag good 
enginecrs’ 

That is just the 
ly competent, skilled 
native, thinking pel 
rare no matter what 
of activity or interest 
United States, even 30 years 
ago, a B.A. or a B.S. degre 
meant something that gained 
a person fespect and )por- 
tunity. Today. these bacca 
laureate degrees are a dime 
a dozen. like high-school 
diplomas. To move out of the 
proletariat into the learned 
professions, one needs a 
Ph. D., which does not really 
mean that the person knows 
more or has a better mind; 
it only means that he has nar- 
rowed his field of learning to 
a minute specialty and that 
in that narrow area he has 
gained an intense proficiency. 
It hardly seems worth while 
to do all that work and to 
delay marriage and having a 
family for a job that brings 


Pp ers 
tiow 
Then, 
be a 
tist 


i? 
that 
of 
and 
Real 


imag 


nNnoini 


‘)) 


sticks up for the Secretary of 
Agriculture? 

When the Secretary loses his 
jgb, he’s homeless. But the 
Senate is a home to which old 
eg can always return 
Harry Truman has visited his 
old Ra seat many times 
but he hasn't been permitted 
to revisit the White House 

1 asked Sen. Anderson why 
ex-Secretaries of Agriculture 
develop such a yen for the 
Senate. He denied was e@f- 
tirely a desire for massive 
retaliation 

“Actually.” he said, “It is a 
logical succession. The Secre- 
tary of Agriculture is the only 
member of the Cabinet who 
gets close to people, and when 
you get close to the people 
you re in politics whether you 
admit it or Moreover, the 
farm situation usually bad, 
which means you're always in 
the middie of a big political 
issue. 

“To recapitulate: Other Cab 
inet, officers deal with prob 
lems, The Secretary of Agricul- 
ture deals with people. There 
is no finer prep course for the 
Senate.” 

“Then you think Secretary 
Benson should run for the Sen- 
ate, too””’ 

“Let us not go overboard,” 
replied the Democratic solon 
“When I was on the Senate 
Agriculture Committee, I was 
often the only mémber whe 
looked upon poor Ezra with 
sympathy—but that does not 
mean I'm maudlin 

Hes a Republican 


not 


is 


Copyright. 19564. K 
Ryne ate 


7 Pea ires 
Ine 


Y 


George Sokolsky 


MAN 


deep 
the | liza 
ti time left 
education 


and 


ior an 
an they confer abou t 
have some 
ing special 
difficulty 
maj 
science is 
a load 


ommittes 


’ f " 
studis » 


7 
irs 


et 
strencti e 


powel 


IT 


resouil 
NEEDS ft 
bered that mass education 
Soviet Russia onl, 

ey? thy 1017 


4) 
that advantages 


o be remen 


onal 

for Soviet 

for the United 
t entirely u 
scientists un- 

more than me 


PCcul 
Russia 
Sf 


nor 
ates can res 
engineers and 
less these are 
chanics 


pon 


What no country has 
yet been able to accomplish is 
to insure that highly compe 
tent people rise to the top in 
every of life. There 
vere scientists in 
but that did 
Hitler from com- 
To reduce all 
of national se- 
curity and welfare to ec n 
le number of scientists 
qd engineers would the 
nkeat tyne oT nat rij ry) 


woul ' is] 


sector 
manv 
(,ermanyv in 


good 
1933 
t prevent 
ng into power! 
considerations 
mcel 
over |! 


he 


withdraw 
ctual Magi 


dis- 
system of | 


MARY CHESS 


Rainbow Soap Box 
(regular perce 5 fw) 

Or fragrances 
Hand soap Box 


(regular price 4.00) 
n the 


assorted 


fraerance 
or assorted 


Mail or Phone Orders 
MARY CHESS 
' Perfumes and Cosmetics 


826 Connecticut Avenue 
REpublic 7-0375 


He 


TODAY 


Senate 
In recess until noon Wednesdar 
Coemmittees: 
Acricuttare Sebcomte . 
S 44. aocn 
ay Pp oath by elected 
thee y hear Fe 
ture Benson and USDA 


10 ™ 
tration 


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| Hearings 


Arch N 


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Tye 1. eonmet ruction bi anways 


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Coal TY pia 


tien Subceomte 


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soereeran 


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ohh este againgt 
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PDIC S ies of 
foller of the arr enecy. Room 


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Commerce “Bubeomte. 10 « 
on auto 


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attorney «eeneral 
roposed civil rigits 
424 OB 
Feonomie- 


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Acticulture _Badcomte en Sell 
ec coe 


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Foreign =~ ; 
b $5 


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tee busine 


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m Open 


To hear 


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Stabilira- 
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YESTER DAY 


Senate 


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operati ons. 


S2aine\ oF 


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Advertisement 


Public Service 


Over 133 
That's how 
been donated by | 

to Public Serv 
and programs 


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much 
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TELEVISION AGE 


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cc oro te | Ty 


if you a ested 
aspect ol it wa 

read this rFELEVI- 
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ption. $8.00 per 


0} 


‘yf 


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dealer ‘ wi 
VISION AGI 
Avenue. New 
York. Su 
year 


”*% 


Ww rid 


wy Will 
ommittee 


death of 
Ride 


. m Bx¢c Pull 
te consider rTrepert «of Join 
n 


Commit- 


mprom 'se 
hy z. ~ 


and 


Srak: 4 Sallff- 


» nm 


Wear a cocktail 
dress to work 


Why 


if 


at eo 
‘ 


irse. if 

S$ as nicely camou- 
A hare 

beautifully draped 


tlaged as this 


lock neck! 


rive oc ne 
tucked under a terse 
littie 
Black 


in bi ended Or 


rib-size jacket 


on and 


and at Shirl 


THE WASHINGTON 


Tuesday, Jane 17, 


POST end TIMES HERALD 


1956 


se 


Adenauer Flies Here for Conferences; 


Calls New Red Line More Dangerous 


ADENAUER—Fr. Pg. I 


deal of lower level discussion 
‘here on both problems, prob- 


lems which are essentially in-|- 


‘tertwined, but there is no in-| 
‘dication of any firm decisions 
‘by the Administration. Even 
prior to Mr. Eisenhower's re- 
cent illness, the inclination 
there was to sit the problems 
out until after the November 
ipresidential election as‘far as 
| possible. 

| Adenauer, in a speech yester 
day at Yale University, where 
he received an honorary doc 
tor of laws degree, declared 
the danger of a hot war is “not 
at present acute because the 
Kremlin hopes to achieve world 
domination through the slow 
jundermining of the West. The 
inew task is now to prevent this 
‘break-up of the West. For this 
purpose, too, NATO—further 
developed—is the proper in 
istrument. 


‘Twin Aspects of Problem 


At the same time, Adenauer 
'@eclared Europe “can survive 
the “difficult and protracted pe 
riod needed to achieve unifica 
tion “only if the United States 
of American continues to main 
tain its strong protection of the 
old continent.” 

The twin 
NATO-German 
these 

® The rapid development of 
many types of nuclear weapons, 
the Soviet cuts in armed forces 
manpower, the delay in West 
(;erman rearmament, the gen 
eral relaxation of 1] 


aspects of the 


problem 


tension al 
are forcing a Western re ap 
prisal~ of NATO manpower 
needs There is increasing 
talk of a switch to the “plat 
giass window theory of de 
ferise—a relatively thin line of 
ground forces, not enough | 
stop a Soviet land attack but 
enough to deter the Russians 
since they would know that il 
the “window” were broken wal 
with the Western alliance 
would be a certainty nder 
such a policy, withdrawal of 
some of the nearly six Ameri 
can divisions now in Western 
Europe probably would or 
dered But there no sign 
now of any such an American 
decision 

® The solid Soviet resistance 
to German reunification 
mented upon bitterly by 
auer yesterday 
Chancellor's government n 
political peril at home The 
United States has solidls 
backed Adenauer in the stand 
that West Germany must 
main in NATO. though a united 
Germany would have a choice 
While there is no sign in 
Washington of a change in th 
policy. some Westetrn diplo- 
mats feel that events may 


{) 


he 


is 


rorm 
Aden 


has put Live 


re 


are 


force a switch. One idea is a 
unified Germany protected by 
NATO twit without German 
forces actually part of the 
NATO military machine. 

The closest thing toe possible 
‘future agreement ia the idea of 
having each of the 15 NATO 
members assign a sort of vice- 
foreign minister to 
manent NATO Council under 
an agreement that each nation 
would consult the others in ad 
vance on political decisions but 
without any commitment to be 
bound by the stand of othe 
nations 

But even this limited move 
would be likely to raise com- 
plaints that it meant a delega 
tion of American sovereignty 
President Eisenhower probably 
could win general agreement 
for such a move. diplomats 
here feel, but only he could do 
- 


Dulles to Be Questioned 
Anot VA est 


man the shifting Ameri 


er point of Cer 


alarm 
can attitude 


on 


neutrai 
at the moment 
kisenhoweér told 
ference last 


nose 


his press 
week that nat 
neutral ty were do 
respect attact 

military alliances” not 
hetween “right and 
decency ndecency 
Yet in h 


con 


with to 


wrong 


. ay &) ; ’ 
s iowa speech last 


Senate Votes 


Medical Lib 


terda to estandii 
\t Th 


s So 


Library of 
the two | 
uns 
stitul 


utes 


appro’ 
A 


ry? 7 se 


today 
« iat) 
iru 


ant 


cot ceiion 


nre-Tes<is 
> 
near Washi 


ite 


rion to NoUuse 1 
oust ' 


: s - rT) ned Hu 


al ature now 
run-iown 


ipied 


~ 


mem! 


In 
ands 
Doug! 
Everett 
WAS 


their bipart 
LD 


as 


mocrat 
and 


Dirk 


the per- 


Saturday, Dulles declared that 
neutrality was an “increasing 
obsolete conception an 
except under very exceptional 
circumstances, it is an immoral 
and shortsighted’ conception.” 
Dulles is expected to be ques- 
tioned abot these statements 
aj his press conference today. 
Adenauer told the Yale audi, . 
ence Moscow's “more dexteér-. 
ous leadership” today is éin* 
working for “the old objec. 
tives.” there are “no signs” of 
a basic change and the new" 
tactics are “more dangerous’¢ 
because they play on the gen- 
eral longing for peace 
The Chancellor said theé 
Kremlin wants “to lull the vig: 
ilance of the free world,” abovee 
all to “smash first the mighty 
protective eld of NAT 
and “to drive the United States * 
m Europe so that Europe, 
fall like a ri fruit into 
Soviet lap.’ ' 
irst of all 


a> 
o- 


sn 


pe 


Adenauer said, 
West “must no account 
relax even ; mament in our 
gilance,” though he conceded _ 
the cohesion of the West , 
d there arev«e 
of a lack of; , 
ts foreign pol- 
‘hat Ht is ive 
an agreed 
thout hav+s 
me maximum 
ty in foreign polic¥ 
regat rd to Russia 


on 


ne 


~* | . 
faaerned al 
qr) lications 
Lon in 
lie added 
bie to pursue 
‘Ty policy “ 
7? Sal 


a f 


to Locate 
ary Here 


Chicago 


1) said 
ire had 

ears and the bill” 

’ provide the 

ng and cataloging. 

tlon coat placed at 
million One avail. 
the ground of. 
Medical Center, Be- 


is 


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‘Crving Shame’ Leaves 


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NVIEW. Tex. lk 

i? was given @ 

rday after she 

parking space - 


iw CA 


June 


ng officer? 
ame that 
ind not 
" . 
uld see me 
tter than J 
omice c Wass 


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\ 


THE WASHINGTON. POST and TIMES HERALD 


14 Tuesday, June 12, 1956 


eo_ 


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Tubeless 
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14th and S$ Streets N.W. HO. 2-9565 


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13th and K Streets N.W NA. 8-3323 
SYD FOLLIN TEXACO 
Wis. Ave. and Q St. N.W. HO. 2-3779 
J. J. FREEMAN TEXACO 
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KENNEDY SERVICE STATION 
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1836 W. Braddock Road Ki. 9-2929 


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AMERICAN SERVICE CENTER 
585 N. Glebe Road JA. 7-7722 


ANDERSON & TEW SUNOCO 
5501 Lee Highway JE. 2-9610 


FIRESTONE STORES 
4043 28th Street South (Shirlington) KI. 8-6840 


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1100 N. Highland Street (Clarendon) JA. 4-119! 
HECHT CO. 
Wilson Bivd. and Glebe Road NA. 8-5100 
BURR HEISHMAN’S 
1503 Lee Highway JA. 70012 
HOUSTON & POLAND SERVICE 
2300 Columbia Pike JA. 2-6630 
RAY WELCH TEXACO 
5101 Lee Highway JE. 2-5550 


” CENTERVILLE, VA. 


CATON’S ESSO SERVICE 
Browning 8-9698 


FAIRFAX, VA. 


ESSO CLINIC 
Fairfax Circle aR 


FALLS CHURCH, VA. 


BURR HEISHMAN’S 
Seven Corners JE. 2-2177 


3-2992 


MANASSAS, VA. 
MERCHANT'S FIRESTONE 


216 Center Street 


MARYLAND 


BETHESDA, MD. 
SKY’S SHELL SERVICE 


7545 Wisconsin Ave. 


RIVERDALE, MD. 
FANNING TEXACO SERVICE 


46238 Baltimore Bivd. 


ROCKVILLE, MD. 
AL'S TEXACO SERVICE 


806 E. Mont. Ave. (Rockville Pike) PO. 2.4428 


SILVER SPRING, MD. 


BOBINGER’S TEXACO 
Georgia Ave. & Wayne Ave. 


‘ 


Manassas 255 


OL. 49816 


WA. 7-9899 


JU. 9-9689 


FIRESTONE STORES 
852) Georgia Ave jU. 5-2334 


KING’S TEXACO SERVICE 
East-West Highway & Colesville Rd. JU. 9-1198 


SILVER SPRING TIRE CORP. 
8000 Georgia Ave. JU. 9-7738 


TAKOMA PARK, MD. 


QUIMBY’S TEXACO SERVICE 
7724 Carroll Ave. JU. 9-5200 
TAKOMA PARK SHELL SERVICE 
7301 Carroll Ave JU. 9-9575 

WEST HYATTSVILLE, MD. 

WADDLE’S TEXACO SERVICE 
Ager Road & Hamilton Street WA. 7-9615 

WHEATON, MD. 


WHEATON FIRESTONE STORE 
11307 Georgie Ave. LO. 5-3322 


WHEATON TEXACO SERVICE 
11241 Georgia Ave. LO. 4.6700 


fl 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


eee Tuesday, June 17, 1956 15 


——— 


In Burglaries 


Robin Hood, 
Little John — 


3 Fairfax Towns to Elect 


- Voters of three Fairfax Coun-' council seats are: 


1 Slum Case Homeowner’ 


Fights Appeal by U.S. 


: : A 
oppose five incumbent board Elgin, mayor; W. Edward Det- 
ty’ towns will go to the polls! ,,lmr Devas, Gee “members in the town of Clifton.|wiler, Richard R. Buckley, John 
today to elect jown councilmen eo Tram Charlies Robert Buckley. H. Gunther, Virginia E. Sweeney 


Ranead: and vatrencs, Wintlet | Te | -W.s d Lorena R. Selb 
gr te ethie 't candidate will} The incumbents are: W. Swem an rena R. Selby. 
About 1000 are eligible to Bas ; 


A single new 
vote in both Fairfax and Vi- 


: 


By Robert C. Albrook 
Stall Reporter award for the Riley house since 

The attorney for Mayme J. it left her owing $1900 on the 

Riley yesterday filed a brief Property. 
Opposing a rehearing by the full) The Government later asked 
Ufiited States Court of Appeals for a rehearing by the full Ap- 
on how much the Governnient pellate bench, charging «that 
should pay for her home, taken the May 17 ruling was an im- 
in a Southwest Washington proper invasion of the condem- 
slum clearance project. nation jury's functions. 

He said Mrs. Riley could se-|_ Mrs. Riley's lawyer, John J. 
cure justice only through the Spriggs Jr., argued in his brief 
further lower court proceed. ‘hat rehearing by the full Court 
ings ordered by the Appeals should be “sparingly exercised 
Court in a 2-1 decision May 17, 4nd said “mere divisions of 


In that decision, the Court set Pinions” in the earlier ruling 
was no reason for a full court 


review. 

Spriggs charged that the Gov- 
ernment “is apparently con- 
vinced of the merits of the old 
medieval concept “that the 
king can do no wrong.” But, 
he asserted, the Constitutional 
requirement for “just compen- 
sation” when the Government 
condems land is “an inherent 
and fundamental right.” 

“No Government agency 
should be in the business of try- 
ing to pay a home-cowner lew 
than just compensation merely 
because a higher condemnation 
award might boost the cost of 


aA 


FOR YOUR 
Surprise Liquer Bargain 
CALL ST. 3-75$17 


grad uates 
gl ve 


aside as too low a $7000 jury some redevelopment program,” 


he said. 

Spriggs said the only ques 
‘tion in the lower court was 
what weight should be given 
testimony by Government ap- 
praisers who set the fair value 
of the Riley house at between 
| and $6800. (The jury 
awarded $7000. Mrs. Riley paid 
$9950 for the house in 1951.) 

His brief said the appraisers 
“admitted” it would cost $9355 
to reproduce the Riley house, 
built in 1900. 

Spriggs said the Appeals 
Court was not in error in ask- 
ing why the appraisal was so 
far below Mrs. Riley's purchase 
price. ; 

He also argued that the law 
“tends to make jury verdicts in 
condemnation cases advisory 
only,” leaving the Court with 
full power to modify the awards 
if it chooses. 

Spriggs rejected the Govern- 
ments contention that the Ap 
peals Court ruling had cast 
aspersions on the conduct of 
the lower court trial or’on the 
presentation of the ‘Govern. 
‘ments case. 

He said a full court rehear- 
ing would be “a needless waste 
of this Court's time,” especial- 
ly since the Government. he 
said, suffers no injury from 
the May 17 decision. 

This decision, Spriggs argued. 
“did not in any way close the 
door” on the Government's 
rights, since a further consid. 
eration of the case by the low. 


Are I ndicted 


A man described by police as. 


the “Robin Hood” of a burglary 
gang was indicted, along with 
an accomplice, by a District 
grand jury yesterday. 

Named in the 10-count indict- 
ments are Joseph Franklin 
“Robin Hood” Wright, 25, listed 
at 9115 Adelphi rd, West 
Hyattsville, Md.. and Bernard 
C. “Little John” White, 21, of 
Fredericksburg, Va. Both 
charged with five counts each 
of housebreaking and larceny, 
totaling $908 in cash and prop- 
erty. 

After their arrest last month, 
police said most of the loot had 
been pawned but much given 
away to prostitutes, derelicts 
and friends—hence the nick- 
names 

The jury also indicted Rupert 
C. Green, 31, listed at 743 
Girard st charges of 


nw. on 


manslaughter in the fatal stab * 


bing May 19 of Peariene Pat 
terson, 35, listed at- 1210 4th st 
nw. Police said the stabbing 
took place at the Girard st. ad- 
dress during an argument in 
which Green was cut on the 
arm. 

The jury ignored charges of 
homicide and assault with a 
deadly weapon brought by 
police against Herman Wil- 
liams, 43. listed at 4223 Edson 
pil. ne., in connection with the 
fatal stabbing March 17 of 
James Crawford, 29, of 5007 
Benning rd. se. 


| 6:30 a. m. to 7:30 p. m 


enna, and 50 are eligible im 
Clifton. Voting hours are from 


Polling places are: The old 
courtroom in Fairfax Court 
House for the town of Fairfax 
and the Fire Departments in 
both Vienna and Clifton. 

In Vienna, 11 candidates 
have filed for five council 
seats. Three are candidates for 
mayor. All will serve for two- 
year terms 

Major candidates are: 

Louis VM 


are ter 


struct 
ministration. — 
Council incumbents are: 
Noa | Dove Carter T i(baon 
Raiph NN. Haeemann,. and Bernard G 
Upham 
New candidates 


Bennet 


include: 


ran : . 
and James B. Trout 
In the town of Fairfax three 
are candidates for mayor: 
Incurm be Jonr Wood 
Ancersor and irvin H. Ma 
Council incumbents 
reelection are 
_ M = arke 
Orahar 
Richard 


seeking Fairfax 


seeking 


Fred Mt 
Thomas #H 


Everly 
John 


Newcomers 


Se ———— 


Home Ties Severed 


POITIERS, France, June 11 
Police today said Louis Vuil- 
lenier found a quick solution 
for freeing himself of a 32-room 
chateau that he couldn't sell 
because of the high cost of 
repairs and taxes. He blew it 
up with 130 sticks of dynamite 


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7] Mail and Phone Orders Filled—District 7-4454 


er court would give the Gov 
ernment a chance to defend 
the $7000 award. 

The Government contends 
that the $9950 price paid by 
Mrs. Riley was higher than 
market value because it was 
principally a credit transac 
tien. Mrs. Riley paid $300 down 
and $72.50 a month on three 
mortgages. 


Doctor Given 
Service Award 


4 professor of Medicine at 
George Washington University 
yesterday was given a citation 
by the District Commissioners’ 
Committee for . 
the Employ. ; 
ment of the 
Physically 
H and icapped 
for “outstand- 
ing service.” 

Dr. Thomas 
MePherson 
Brown, first 
holder of the 
Eugene Meyer (# 
Chair of Medi- 
cine at the Df. Brown 
University, was honored for 
‘hig “outstanding efforts ex- 
pended in promoting equal op- 

ity in employment for 
| Physically handicapped in 
\the District of Columbia,” the 
| Citation read. 
| Dr. Brown has established 
‘clinics and laboratories and 
| guidance facilities for victims 
of arthritis at hospitals in the 
‘area. The citation places his 
name on the list from which a 
National Physician of the Year 
will be chosen by a Presi- 
dential committee. 


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Jury Holds Husband 
In Stabbing of Wife 


A coroner's jury yesterday 
ordered Robert Starr Jr., 37, 
of 1371 Ist st. sw.. held for 
grand jury action on a charge 
of homicide in connection with Serer 
the death of his 25-year-old 
wife, Louvenia. 

Police said Mrs. Starr was 
stabbed to death about 2 a. m 
iyesterday following an argu 
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~~ —_—_——_ 


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? 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERAL 
16 Tuesday, June 12, 1956 ° 


Bills to Control 
Dope Traffic Hit 


The American Psychiatric As-\easier for police to obtain 
g0ciation attacked pending na- search warrants to raid suspect: 
tional and District narcotics ed dope centers. | 
legislation yesterday asa “back-- This measure was approved 
ward” approach to meeting the yesterday by the House after 
drug addiction probiem. ‘it was amended to meet ob- 

“The bills discourage or abol-jections of the drug trade. A 
ish previous flexible provisions similar version, without the 
for parole, probation and: as-\amendments, has been ap 
signment of drug addicts to proved by a Senate District sub- 
Federal hospitals, and thus will) committee. 
impede medical progress that’ The APA also fired away at 
has been initiated under exist- the national narcotics control 
ing legislation,” the APA said. pill fathered by Sen. Price 

Furthermore. the APA de- Daniel (D-Texas). His bill, which’ 
elared. the bills are “based on passed the Senate and is await 


misconception of the nature of ing House action, would per- - 


drug addiction as a psychiatric mit the death penalty of thrice- 
fliness” and “proceed mistaken- convicted sellers of dope. 
ly on the assumption that drug The third measure, criticized 
addicts are especially respon-| by APA, is the Boggs bill which 
sible for a substantial number would give broader power to 
of crimes of violence.” law enforcement officials, dou- 
The APA referred to three ble the number of Federal nar- 
bills. including a local measure cotics agents, authorize prison 
which would Tecilitate removal sentences up to 40 years, and 
of incurable addicts from pub- forbid sugpended sentences or 


lie circulation and make it parole for violators. 
| “The bills tend to substitute 


extreme punishment and police 
power for a constructive medi. 
eal program for treatment and 
rehabilitation of drug addicts 
that has slowly developed over 
the years in the Federal hos. 
pitals at Fort Worth, Tex., 
and Lexington, Ky. and also 
in state and city hospitals,” the 
APA stated 

New legislation, the APA 
statements continued, should be 
directed toward expanding the 
medica] program for treating 
the addict and toward taking 


AMA Cenvention 


Salk Shots 
Called Sate, 
Ettective 


Ghicaee Dally Mews Service 


CHICAGO, June 11—A ring. 

vindication of the Salk 

je vaccine opened the ecien- 

tifle sessions of the 105th Amer- 

fean Medical Association eon- 
vention today. 

In contrast te a year . 
when a safety breakdown 
clouded the vaccine with doubts 
and anxiety, the Nation's doc- 
tors heard Dr. Leonard A 
Scheele, Public Health chief. 
say: 

“Unquestionably, we sew 
have a vaccine which is stand- 
ing up under the most carefal 
scrutiny with respect to safety 
and effectiveness.” 

Dr. Jonas FE. Salk, é4lear 
old developer of the veeetne. 
was heartily applauded as he 
followed Dr. Scheele to the 
rostrum. 

"Tt is now clear.” he eatd. 
“the vaccine procedure does 
not possess an inherent risk.” 

The confidence expressed by 
Dr. Salk and others on a penel 
left little doubt among the 
doctors gathered in the huge 
gymnasium at Navy Pier that 
polio is not only on the way 
out, but rapidly so 

The pane! was the oer 
magnet for many of the 
ey ng and 13,000 
ere for the five-day exchange 
of medica) knowledge. 

They will hear more than 300 
papers and view 325 exhibits 

The pier has been converted 
into the world’s largest medical 
exhibit ball, with pharmecew- 
tical houses, hospital Pp 
ment companies and 
showing their wares. 

At the pier, Dr. § 
surgeon-general of the Gane’ 
States Public Health Service, 
cited statistics eh that 
the Salk vaccine reduced pare- 
lytic polio among vaccinated 
children at least 75 per eent 
last year 

There was particularly 
lowering smong 7 and 
olds, for whom the vaceine was 
used almost exclusively under 
the National Foundation for 
Infantile Paralysis program. 

Dr. Salk, who is er me | 
concerned with the task of 
ing the best techniques for us 
ing the vaccine, said his studies 
confirm the original dosage 
timetable. 

The second shot should be 
given about two weeks after 
the frst, except where there is 
little polio in the ‘ 
Tt then may be extended to 
four or six weeks. 

While the third shot hes been 
waived this year became of 
shortage, Dr. Salk made it dears 
it is necessary and should be 
resumed. 

It continues to eppear i> 
creasingly likely that « series 
of three shots may be 
for lifelong immunity, Da. 
indicated, but studies on this 
point will continue. 

Actually, Dr. Salk the 
drop in polio cases will 
be greater than might be es 
pected on the basis of numbers 
vaccinated. 

The reason is the 
eatting down on the 
of virus excreted by carriers, 


Created by 


R. J. Reynolds 
fobacco Company, 


makers of America’s 


most popular 


cigarettes 


Chlorpromazine Seen 
Effective With Children 


Chieage Daily Bewe Garvice 


CHICAGO, June 1 
the Fr 
, ful in e€ 
and vi 


mentally-retarded ehildren. 
The application of the 

was described to the A 

Medical Association convention 

in a scientific exhibit by 

Dr. Judith H. Rettig of Colum 

bus State School, Columbus, 


io 

The children had failed 
benefit previously from 
urates, electroshock or ether 
techniques. 

Among 27 children gun the 

s over a six-month period, 
results in eight children were 
excellent. They no longer were 
destructive. They developed 
cheerful dispositions and nov- 
mal sleeping habits. The need 
for supervisjon crouped off. 

Results in 11 children 
goed: in 4, fair; in 2, poor, 

others, there was ho 
change. 

“The hospital units have wz 
dergone marked c 
introduction of Ch 
zine,” said Dr. Rettig. 

n for isqlation and 
is virtually eliminated. 

"Some of the personnel who 
have been released from bm 
timeconsuming duty of 
eiplining overactive 
ean be emploved more 
= im recreation and train- 

iy 


| Association of 


NORFOLK, June 11 (A—Dis- have jurisdiction in this action! decisions by the U. S. Supreme “OM*TS 
missal of a suit seeking desegre- 


| Sation of the. Newport News 
| Public schools was sought today 
° jon grounds the state has not 


given its consent to be sued 


and lack of court jurisdiction. 
Newport News City Attorney 
Harry L. Nachman filed the 
reply in Federal District Court 
here on behalf of the city school 
board and its school superin- 
tendent, Dr. R. O. Nelson. 
The board and Nelson are 
named defendants in the suit 
filed on 
Negro parems and children. 
Attorneys for the National 


Golden Year 


Mr. and Mrs. Harvey A. Mor- 
rison, 7817 Flower ave., Ta- 
koma Park, marked their 
Golden Wedding anniversary 
with a reception for friends 
and business associates. The 
Morrisons have lived in Ta- 
koma Park for 34 years. He is’ 
general manager of the Ke- 
view and Herald Publishing 
Washington 
and before that was an edu- 
cational secretary of the Gen. | 
eral Conference of the Sev- 
enth-day Adventists. 


ment of Colored People entered 
the suit, seeking an injunction 
preventing the city from con- 
tinuing to operate segregated 
schools. 

Nachman's reply said “defend. 
ants alleged the court does not 


| 

the profits out of the illicit drug | 
trade. | 

Drug addiction, the APA’ 
maintained, is due to a psychi-| 
atric iliness. Drug addicts,| @ 
estimated at 60.000 in this 
country, have about the same 
mental characteristics as alco-' 
helices of which there are 8 
million 

“The notion that a drug 
addict is in fact a criminal is 
false.” the APA said ) 

Legisiation, which discour- 
ages further treatment for the’ 
addicts, will “worsen the situa- 
tion” and is “not in the public 
interest.” the APA said 

“Many proposals for making 
possible the prescribing of 
drugs for addicts under medi 
cally controlled conditions have 
been considered and recom- 
mended in medical circles.” the 
APA said 


Smirnoff in orange juice . . 
it leaves you breethiess | 


THE GREATEST MAME Ie 


=." VODKA 
a 


fromeretn Ste Pierre 
Mewbiom), Hertford. Conn. 0.5 A 


behalf of some 80 the school 


SMIRNOFF. 


because the complaint does not 
state a case or controversy upon 
which relief can be granted.” 

Today's reply by Newpert 
News closely parallels one filed 
Friday by Charlottesville in 
the Federal District Court divi- 
sion there. 

Charottesville, Newport 
News, Norfolk, and Arlington 
face similar injunction pro- 
ceedings. Norfolk and Arlington 
have yet to reply. 

The Newport News reply said 
board is an arm 
of the state and the state has 
not given its consent to be 


Association for the Advance- sued. 


In addition, Newport News’ 
reply disassociates its suit from 
previous school segregation 


o 


. 


Court. It says evidence will be 
disclosed that such decisiofis 
are not binding on its ?. 


The defendants ‘contend the 
state policy of segregated 
schools does not violate the 
U. S. Gonstitution but is within 
the police powers of the state. 

The reply asks that the suit! 
against Nelson be dismissed) 
for failure to state a claim 
upon which relief can be) 
granted. The suit “should be 
dismissed on grounds of lack of. 
jurisdiction and assert that this 
proceeding involves no case or 
controversy upon which relief 
can be granted.” 

It categorically denied the’ 
allegation of the complainants | 
that segregated schools deny | 


Direct Commuter Service 


5 Daily Flights 


Roanoke, Va. 


Lynchburg, Va. 


Call District 7-1800 


Agent For Reservations, information 


or Your Travel 


ab 


“PIEDMONT 


All the smoking ease 
of the finest filter 


ve 


)due process of law and equal) qualifications and satisfy all 


Newport News Answers School Suit | 


protection of the law to Negro requirements for admission 
children. But the reply calls for thereto.” 

“strict proof” the infant peti. The suit says “defendants 
are Newport News deny they are pursuing or will 
residents, eligible to attend pursue a policy. in denial of 
publie schools, and “possess all the rights of the plaintiffs. 


| Mt 


BRAVEST 
WHITE 
MAN ! 


They call him the South's bravest white man. Why did he 

the N.A.A.C.P. and crusade through the South dema ing 
_oe integration’? How has it affected his persona! life 
Read the sensational story of Joho Bolt Calbertsoa of Green- 
ville, South Carolina, “The South's Bravest Whire Man” in the 
exciting, new, fearure-packed July issue of FRONY oT 
now on your cewsstand. Or, mail the coupon today the 
eext 5 big issues of EBONY for only $1. 


A new idea has come to smoking 


_take a Duff... its Spr ngtime |! 


ws 
\ ; 


- 
# 


Prevatte | 
Ruled Sane, | 
To Be Tried 
For Murder | 


Md. Doctors Say 
Billy Ray Was Not 
Psychotic at Time 


Of School Shooting 


CSC Staff Unveils 
New Job Rating 
Plan for Agencies 


ws § 
YOUR AGENCY would have! 
broad authority to “evaluate”! 
your work under a proposed! 
new job rating plan which has! 
been unveiled by the staff. of 


the Civil Service Commission. 

deral personne! 
were told that the plan 
ance” and that it would replace 
the present performance rating 
system. 

Each agency would have the 
authority to pattern the “evalu. 
ation” system to its particular 
needs. It could have one set of 
ratings for file clerks and a 
diferent one for supervisors. 
It wouldn't be necessary to 
make job evaluations annually. 
New employes, however, would 
be given frequent ratings un- 
til they become established. 

Iastead of specific and for- 
mal ratings such as satisfactory 
the.CSC staff proposes that the 
a keep in close touch 
with the work and job prob- 
lems Of each employe under 
him. The general idea is to 
keep the employe informed at 
all times where he stands and 
how he's doing. 


MAJOR MEDICAL: 
are looking up for its enact- 
ment into law this year. The 
House Post Office & Civil Serv- 
ice Committee could approve it 
after its Onfe-day hearing on 
Thursday. 

The average Federal employe 
is simply unable te understand 
the opposition to the Presi- 
dent’s proposal to give him 
and his family free insurance 
against heavy medical costs. 
He recognizes that a basic 
health plan would cover his 
erdinary medical costs and he 
appears confident this prob- 
lem will be worked out even 
tually. 

Once modern pasroll machin 
ery is installed throughout Gov 
ernment, it won't be a probiem 
to withhold from employe pay- 
checks the employe cost of a 
basic, low-cost health plan. Of 
ficials are confident the check 
off could start as of July 1 of 
next year 


DEFENSE has promise to re 
tain its employes. who are dis- 
placed by automation and other 
mechanical devices, for other 
jobs 


THE SENATE Armed Serv 
ices Committee has approved 
H. H. 3744, the bill. passed by 
the House to grant military 
leave with pay to substitute 


Hopes 


directors 
is 
called “evaluation of perform- 


Prince Georges County of- 
ficials have been informed 
by Spring Grove Hospital 
psychiatrists that Billy ‘Ray 
Prevatte is sane and able to 
stand trial. 


The 14yearold youth was 
charged with murder and as-| 
sault after he shot one teacher. | 
Frazer Cameron, 32, to death 
and wounded two others, Fran- 
cis D. Wagner, 23, and Robert! 
Hicks, 31, in the Maryland Park 
Junior High School on May 4. 

Blair H. Smith, Princ’ 
Georges County State's At-| 
torney, said yesterday Prevatte | 
will be tried in October after 
a formal indictment is returned 
by the grand jury in July. ° 

Dr. Isadore Tuerk, director | 
of the hospital, said in a letter | 
to Circuit Court Judge John R 
Fletcher that the boy was not 
psychotic at the time of the 
alleged crime and is not psy- 
chotic. He also. 83s reported 
staff psychiatrists believe he is 
capable of participating in his 
own defense at a trial 

Prevatte was labelled by the 
doctors as having a passive- 
aggressive personality, aggres- 
sive type. They determined he 
had an average level of intel- 
ligence with an L. Q. of 97. 

The boy has been in the hos- 
pital since May 11 undergoing 
mental tests 

His attorney, 
Pyles, said he is having the 
youths mental condition 
checked by a private psychia- 
trist. 


Wilmer D 


Fire Damages 
Union Station 
Concourse 


Firemen scrambled to the 
curving roof of the Union Sta 
tion concourse last night to put 
out a fire that caused an esti 
mated $5000 damage 

The fire burned out a section 
of wooden flooring between the 
double roof over the concourse 
Firemen had to strip off to a 
20x30-foot layer of copper to 
get at the blaze. They ran up 
three ladders some 75 feet to 


postal workers. Whe “Admints'rea@eh the roof. 


tion is split on*fhe bill; De- 


The fire was concentrated at 


fense approves it and Post Of-\the east end of the roof, and 


fice opposes it. 


DOWNGRADING: The dcwn- 
grading bill is one of the few 
measures which the President 
must act on. The President is 
expected to allow it to become 
law despite the opposition of 
some @f bis advisors. 

IN 
is having ‘better lack with Con- 
gress 6n its budget. Its budget, 
as voted by the Senate, would 
give igall the money requested. 
The S@nate voted an additional 
$269. 588 for its Bureau of 
Motor:Carriers and $36,000 for 
travel, 


VA* had $10 million of its 
funds earmarked by the Sen- 
ate for medical research. The 
number of employes who could 
engage in public relations work 
was increased from 15.to 22. 


ROUNDUP: Jehn Armstead 
and William Zeliner have been 
given. 20-year service awards 
for Andrews AFB... John P. 
Galvin has been given a su- 
perior service award, plus $200 
in cash, by the Army Map Serv- 
ice , Arthur A. Gladstone 
will Read-up FCC's new domes 
tic radio facilities division .. . 
S. 3583, the employe union rec- 
ognition ill, is being rewrit- 
ten. «The Senate Post Office 
& Civil Service Committee is 
expedtted to approve a modified 
version of it but the bill's 
changes of enactment into law 
this. year arent go = 
NAVY's David Taylor Mode! 
Basin. has given . awards to 

’. FH Mayer, Blanche Spore, 
Chalice Baker, 3. M. Ehrman. 
traut, N. G. Mattheis, N. H. Pie- 
gari, & LL. MeéCauley, V. H. 
Ricks, G, L. Thomas and W. F 
Wittnebert . . . Albertina Gru- 
nisch is retiring from 
time... Lucy D, Marime of Air 
Foree, was given & $200 cash 
award for superior, work . . 
Walter Reed Medical Center 
has given awards to Adelaide 


7 , 
McGovern, Betty Unterseher, heen there for two weeks. 


Pat Charnock and G. E. Rey 
nolds. 


— — 


ES 


— 


> 


—— — 


Start success 
early 


BSTATE COMMERCE 


‘iturned and deposited 


‘reported on 


did not break through the ceil- 
ing of the concourse. 

Hundreds of the persons in 
the station. were unaware of 
the fire. Trains continued to 
enter and leave the station 
normally. Outside, a crowd of 
several hundred gathered. 

Cause of the fire was unde- 
termined. Firemen said work- 
men had been working on the 
roof during the afternoon 

On the concourse floor direct- 
ly below the spot where the 
roof burned is a medel of a 
Nike guided missile aimed at 
the ceiling. 


2 Groups Named 
Chest Members 


The Salvation Army and the 
Children’s Home Society of Vir- 
ginia have been admitted to 
membership in the Fairfax 
County-Falls Church Commu- 
nity Chest 

The action was taken last 
night at a joint meeting of the 
executive committee and board 
of trustees of the chest at the 
Fairfax County Courthouse. 


Overturned Kayak 
Spurs River Search 


David Gunlock, 17, of 4332 
East-West hwy. was uninjured 
when his kayak overturned in 
the Potomac yesterday, but he 
set off a two-hour search. 

Police and firemen searched 
above Chain Bridge after hear- 
ing that a canoe had over- 
its oc- 
cupant in the river. They found 
Gunlock pulling his craft to 
shore but left on another fu- 
tile hunt when a canoe was 
the rocks in the 
river. The search ended when 
it,was learned the canoe had 


Pender Man Held 


Che Washinaton 


City 


cieciaes 
PICTURE PAGE 
FINANCIAL 


coor TUESDAY, JUNE 12, 1 


Life 


= 


956 


ie 


Qe NEMA er dl» ita, on i ite : 


< a 
> . 


+ 


eg 


uN 


- 


Donald S. Jennings relaxes with a book before graduation from Chamberlain High School 


FallsChurch 73 Days Flat 
Names2to On Back Can't 
School Board Stop Graduate 


Bad luck isn't preventing 
Donald 8S. Jennings from col- 
lecting his diploma tonight at 
Chamberlain Vocational High 
School. 

Critically injured Jan. 23 in 


Lewis and Pierce 
Chosen by Council 
For 3-Year Terms 


The Falls Church City Coun- 
cil last night appointed two : 
new members of the city echoo!l “ head-on collision on Suitland 
+ to serve three-year terms. 'Pk¥y., Dotiall, 18, is now “do 

hey are Thomas H. Lewis, ing just fine” with a hip-to-toe 
gtr $ eee of rt leg brace and crutches. He suf. 

. L©@wis an Son construction 
Arm. and William R. Pierce, 408 fered a compound Secture of 
Jackson st.. an attorney the left thigh and was released 

Lewis is a graduate of Vir- from Casualty Hospital June 6 
ginia Polytechnic Institute and Stewart E. Jennings, 32, Don- 
Pierce is a former member of ajqd’s brother. who was driving 
the Falls Church Planning Com- him to school. died as a result 
mission. 

In other actions, the Council of the accident. 

Amended the city’s fire pre-; “I was unconscious for 
vention code to prevent the week and on my back for 
sale or discharge of fireworks 
within the city. The amend- 
ment becomes effective July 6. 

Appointed Samuel Epstein, 
207 N. Van Buren st., @ consulit- 
ing engineer, to the Falls 
Church Planning Commission 
He will fill out the term of 
William J. Driver, which ex 
pires Dec. 31. 


31 Schools to Hold 


Commencements 


urban area junior and senior 
high schools will hold grad- 
uation ceremonies today. 
They are 

District (list includes sched- 
uled speakers): Americaniza- 
tion School, Mrs. Frank 5S. 
Phillips, Anacostia High 
School, John M. Ricks; Arm- 
strong High School, Richard 
R. Foster; Bell Vocational 
High, West A. Hamilton; 
Burdick Vocational, Mrs. 
Manson.Pettit: Cardoza, Boise 
L. Bristor; Chamberlain Vo- 
cational, and Francis Greg- 
ory; Coolidge, Walter N. 


On Ra pe Charge 


A 20-year-old Pender, Va.., 
man was jailed early yesterday 
in Fairfax County on a charge 
of raping a 16-year-old gir! 

Paul Dean Stokely, a service 
station attendant, is in jail in 
lieu of $500@ bond. Preliminary 
hearing is scheduled for June 
15 

County detectives said the 
gir] agreed to go out with Stoke- 
ly last Saturday afternoon.) _*’. 
Police quoted her as saying) /°>riner. 

Stokely parked on a road off Eastern (Senior), Carl F. 
Arlington blvd. and forcibly at-| Hansen; Eastern (Junior), 
tacked her. He then drove her), Francis Gregory; Eliot Junior, 
home and let her out of the! Norman J. Nelson; Jefferson 
car, they said. | Junior, Wesley S. Wiliams; 

Detectives said an examina-| Langley, {rene Hypps; M. M. 
tion showed she had been) Washington Vocational (at 
raped. Cook’s School), Hobart N. 
| Corning: Roosevelt - High, 
| Roland F. Kirks; Past, Rich- 
Marker Promoted ard Foster; Terrell Junior, 

George J. Marker, formerly, Edith A. Lyons. 
public information assistant for|. Prince Georges County— 
the Military District of Wash-| Riadensburg, Douglass, 
ington, has been appointed) Gwynn Park, Laurel, Oxon 
MDW public information of-) ji} and Suitland 


ficer. | Montgomery County—Da- 


Legislation Urged 


A group of Prince Georges 
County civic leaders met yes- 
terday and agreed to back legis- 
‘lation creating a separate 
juvenile court for the County. 
| The meeting was held in the 
‘Upper Marlboro law office of 
Wilmer D. Pyles, head of a 
jeounty bar association com- 
mittee studying the court pro- 

posal. 

The bar group is scheduled 
to take a stand on the proposal 
/at_ its me gay. | today. | 
Present at the meeting were: 
Mrs. Howard Hunt, Family and 
Child Welfare Committee of 
the Community Chest ‘and 
Planni Council; Mrs. Wells 
Harrington, County Council of 
P-TAs; Elizabeth Goldfadden,| 
Social Service League; Muriel | 
Stelzer, American Association | 
of University Women; and 
Marion Ament and Mrs. Mau- 
rice Bender of the League of 
Women Voters. hy 


a 


Prince Georges Leaders 


To Back Juvenile Court 


' mascus, Colesville and Sher- 

| wood 

| Arlington County — Wash- 

ington-Lee. 

Fairfax County—Annandale, 

Herndon and Falls Church 
Alexandria—Parker-Gray. 


days,” Donald says. After 100 

days he walked about 25 feet 

of the The Community Chest-affili 

Council: ated Hospital Service Agency 

has pitched in with more than 
to help 


Also Frank Rooney 
Community Chest 
Elizabeth Hamilton of the Busi- 
ness and Professional Women’s| Friends and Hospital Service 
Clubs; Mary dane Kinzer of the Agency representatives brought 
Family and Child Service Com-|school assignments and tests to 
mittee; Mrs. William Wood, Di-|Donald’s bedside. Donald, who 
rector of the Social Service lives with his widowed mother, 
League and the Rev. W. Curtis Margaret Jennings, at 1835 3d 
Draper of the Juvenile Court st. ne., was “very happy” to 
Advisory Committee. learn yesterday morning that 

They agreed the judge of the he would graduate. 
court should be appointed and) Donald has worked part-time 
have the same powers as atrial throughout high school and 
magistrate but should serve aihopes to be a “studio photog. 
longer term) than two years to rapher.” 
enable him “to become familiar; The Community Chest Fed- 
with juvenile delinquency.” eration announced-.that Donald 

Pyles said the annual cost'will be an honored guest at the 
of about $90,000. would be off-\Federation’s'. annual meeting 
set by savings through keeping /|Friday in the Statler, where he 
children under supervision in will be interviewed on televi- 
their homes rather, than com. sion. ) 
mitting them to the Maryland) He hopes to “be on my own 
Training School. ‘pins” within a year. 


> ] 
gS 


Thirty-one District and sub-*| 


House Passes 
Long List of 
D. C. Bills 


Measure Backing 
Gas Station Wins 
Over Controversy 


The House quickly passed a 
fistful of Digtrict bills yester- 
day, inchutifng one {0 permit 
renovation of a gasoline filling 
station at Wisconsin and Massa- 
chusetts ave. nw. 

Congress passed a similar 
measure two years ago, but it 
war cut down by a presidential 
veto. 

The gasoline station. built be- 
fore there was a zoning ordi- 
nance in Washington, continues 
as a non-conforming use in a 
residential neighborhood. Op- 
ponents, including the District 
Commissioners, say permitting 
extensive alterations would 
give it a more permanent status 
of spot-zoning and open the way 
to scores of requests from busi- 
ness establishments in a sim 
lar status. 

Other bills passed would 

® Permit transfer of civil 
cases with an anticipated judg- 
ment of not more than $3000 
from District Court to Munici- 
pal Court 

® Exempt motorists who 
buy defective cars from being 
obliged to pay a full excise tax 
on the replacement vehicles 

® Exempt from licensing two 
wheeled rental trailers if li 
censed in the home state of the 
owner. 


®Extend unemployment 
compensation coverage to an 
éstimated 1959 District govern- 
ment employes not now covered 
beause they work in institu- 
‘ions oustide the District. 

© Exempt the American 
Institute of -Architects from 
paying yearly property taxes 
‘on its headquarters, historical 
Octagon House on New York 
ave. nw., near 18th st., that once 
served as a temporary White 
House. 

All the above have yet to be 
approved by the Senate 

®A Senate-passed bill au- 
thorizing the Commissioners to 
fix rates of compensation to 
members of certain examining 
and licensing boards. 

Withdrawn at the last minute 
for House action were a bill to 
permit and license pawnbrokers 
and to give police power to cer 
tain emploves in District insti 
tutions outside the District 

A bill to permit chain. store 
outlets to receive beer and light 
wine selling licenses was not 
called up as expected. 


Patent Group 


Elects Officers 


Joseph W. Barker, president 
of Research Corp., New York 
City, has been reelected -chair- 
man of the Advisory Council of 
George Washington University's 
Patent, Trade-Mark and, Copy- 
right Foundation. 

The Foundation promotes bet- 
ter understanding between in- 
ventors, scientists, authors and 
businessmen in the patent, 
trade-mark and copyright field 

Lawrence Hafstad, a General 
Motors vice president, was 
mamed vice chairman Of the 
Council, Council Executive 
Committee me m bers include: 
Mervin J.. Kelly, president of 
Bell Telephone Laboratories; 
Edward R. Weidlein, president 
of Mellon Institute of Industrial 
AResearch, and William T. Wood- 
son of Woodson, Pattishall & 
‘Garner, Chicago. 


Bell Sees Progress, 
Definite 
t Parley 


But Nothing 
After Transi 


Banker and CTC 
Head Talk Hour 
On Purchase Plan; 


Rift in Montgomery 


Union Chiefs Meet 
By Richard L. Lyons 


Stam Reporter 

| Efforts to solve the Dis- 
trict’s transit problems con- 
tinued yesterday at closed 
and apparently inconclusive 
talks in the office of Capital 
Transit’s president, J. A. B 
Broadwater. 

Daniel W. Bell. president of 
American Security & Trust Co., 
discussed with Broadwater the 
banker's plan for Capital Tran- 
sit Co. to buy out the contro! 
‘ling interest of Louis E. Wolf 
son. 

Congressional transit confer 
(ees have mdicated that if the 
icontroversial Wolfson contro! 
were ended they would recom 
imend that Congress restore the 
‘CTC franchise which under 
‘present law expires August 14 

After the 1%-hour meeting 
Bell said he thought there had 
been “a little progress, but 
nothing definite.” 

Bell said his scheduled meet 
ing with the District Commis 
sioners this morning might be 
postponed because he wasn't 
sure they would have anything 
new to talk about. He said his 
group probably will meet again 
soon with Broadwater 

The House-Senate conferees 
want Bell's plan put in the 
form of a “firm proposal 
They also want agreement be 
tween the Commissioners and 
Bell on terms of a franchise 
to be given a Capital 
Co. without Wolfson 

The Commissioners have 
agreed to some concessions in 
the House bill restoring 
franchise to Wolfson 
missioner Robert F. McLaugh 
lin said he thought the Com 
missioners’ position was “gen 
erous.” CTC'’s position has 
been that would take back 
the franchise on terms pro 
vided in the House bill. 

Bell's group discussed fran 
chise terms with the Commis 
sioners last week and then 
broke off the District Building 
talks to discuss the city’s posi 
‘tion with CTC. Postponement 
of Bells meeting with the 
Commissioners today could 
mean CTC won't budge on its 
franchise position—at least 
not until the Wolfson group 
is bought out 

Bell has insisted all along 
there can be no “firm pro- 
posal” until the franchise is 
restored because money to buy 
out Wolfson cannot be raised 
until there is assurance the 
company isn't dead 

The Bell group seems to be 
trying to move as close as pos 
sible toward a firm proposal! 
in hopes that a “good faith” 
effort will convince Congress 
to restore the franchise before 
final papers are signed. ¢ 

The executive board of Cap 
ital Transit’s operators union 
met for nearly three hours ves 
terday going over new contract 
demands they will present to 
the company this week. Union 
President Walter J. Bierwagen 
said the board ordered some 
redrafting to clarify language 
which may take a day or two. 

The union's contract expires 
Aug. 14 with the company’s 
franchise. One of the first jobs 
of the new management would 
be to negotiate a new contract 
Bierwagen said Bell's group has 
‘not talked to him about the 
unions posftion 


(om 


Five Injured 
In Gang Fight 


Five Maryland men were 
treated early yesterday for in 
juries suffered in a gang fight 
with three carloads of men 
and women from the District 
Prince Georges County police 
reported. 

The men told police they 
were on their way home from 
a dance at Wayson’s Corners 
Md., when the three cars forced 
their car off Largo rd. two miles 
south of Central ave 

The five were identified as 
Ernest Sweeney, 19, of Upper 
Marlboro, Howard Lewis, 19, of 
Upper Marlboro, Leonard 
Windsor, 20. of Forestville, Gil- 
bert Rife, 26. and Leroy Mar 
shall, 22, both of Upper 
Marlboro. 


In Gaithersburg Are 


ltt 


County Officials 
Row on Budget 


An open rift in the Montgom 
ery County Welfare Board over 
assistance 

night at 


spending of public 
funds developed 
a hearing on the County's pro 
posed $45.7 million budget for 
1956-7 
Richard 
ville. a men 
Board for the past 
cited three cases which he said 
indicate a need 
ment the 
the Welfare Depart: 
We have asked 
$700,000 for next 
said. “This entire an 
he dispensed by tr 
workers 
Their question 
we spend it,” he said 
like to hear one perso! 
“vy should we spend 1 
Jarineyv's views wet! cont 
ed by William E. Rover, Cs 
Direetor of Weitare 
Gregg Evergreen, ci 
the Welfare Board 
Rover said 
budget has 
slowly ove! 


last 


Rrooke- 
e Welfgre 


Janney of 


ber of ti 


four years 


for improve 


, 


in administration ol 


vea 


Worl 


‘iether count 


Transit + 


the : 


to accept the $12.000 cul 

that the eounty manager. M.'! 
Reese, had recommended in 
their budget request of $751,684 
Most on the 
$2.1 mill ks budg 
el was property 


a 
~ 


of the hearin 
on public wor 
laken up Dy 


Familiar Obstacle 


nartments 


a ne q sin ei / 


owners speaking for or against 
mdividual street improvements, 
Representatives from 12 
county organizations concerned 
with health urged the Council 
to restore the $51,000 Reese 
recommended be cut from the 
Health Department $718,288. 
hearings also were 
last night on tHe pro 
posed Health Department budg- 
$667,904 and the Civil 
fense budget of $26,600. 
\ public hearing on the pro- 
posed Board of Education budg- 
et is set for Thursday at 7:30 
mp. m. in the Richard Montgom- 
ery High School auditorium at 
Rockville and on all other de- 
Wednesday at,7:30 
the County Building 


: 
Fr. 
Lift 


, Z 5 


Ly 


mm iff 


, 7 
4 mock, 


| County Group Fights 
School Budget Cuts 


The Montgomery County 
vic Federation adopted a res- 
night opposing 
budget cuts advised by 
Manager M. L. Reese. 
mmended that the 


Education requests be 


( 
ULIO! last 

cc hn 

{f oun! 

rhe 

Board « 


re 


also urged the 
lucation to take the 
ng an area-wide 
problems of teach- 
nt and pay scales, 
done, they said, 
ng an interjurisdiction- 

ai ' TTaET Lie 
Officers were elected for the 
ne vear. They are Jerome 
|. Harrin. president: Dr. Robert 
S. Marvin, first vice president: 
luliue 1 Hoke, second vice 
dent; Mrs. Gerald J. Davis, 
secretary: Jessie F. 
corresponding secre 
and Philip Thorson, treas 


ie 


Cron 


ust 


no 


record “ 


Nicholson 
tars 
ure! 
Hickerson, Dean J. 
Hugh F. Rivers and 
Weinberg were 
the executive com- 


Hienrw PB 
| oc ke. Mrs 
Joseph H 
elected to 
mittee 


More Daylight Time Here 
Meets Old Foe—O’Hara 


The Senate-passed bill lettin 
District 
saving 


the on daylight 


extra month 
through October ran yesterday 


stay 


time an 


into an cld familiar House ob 


stacle—Rep. Joseph P. O'Hara 
R-Minn 

O'Hara. whose rurai constitu 
ents don't like fast time, is still 
convalescing from a heart at 
tack and missed vyesterday's 
hearing before a House District 
Subcommittee. But he sent a 
5-page list of questions 

His question appeared aimed 
at showing that the radio and 
television networks would profit 
from the time change 

When Carleton D. Smith, vice 
president of the National Broad 
casting Co. and general man 
ager of Station WRC. and WR‘ 
TV here, could not answer a 
the dollars-and-cents questions 
Rep. Oren H arris (D-Ark 
schedule4 a second hearing 
next Monday when Smith and 
officials of other stations will be 
asked to provide the informa- 
tion O'Hara also Wants answers 
from WTOP-TV, WMAL-TY, the 
Columbia Broadcasting System 
and the American Broadcasting 
Lo 

Smith urged passage of the 
bill to put the District in step 
with New York and Chicago 
two major origin points of net 
work shows. Failure to do 
would create the same “topsy 
turvy” schedules this October 
as last year with network shov 
coming On an hour ae than 
usual. he said 

Similar testimony came m 
the Air Transport Association 
and the Association of Ameri 
can Railroads which face the 
same scheduling problem 
| The District Commissioners 


Sf) 


Approval Sought on “Hill 


For New Weather Center 


House and Public 
Works Committees were asked 
yesterday to approve construc- 
tion of a four-building head 


quarters in suburban Washing- 
ton for the Weather Bureau 
and the Coast and Geodetic 
Survey. 

The $30,990,000 project, ap- 
proved earlier by the Bureau of 
the Budget and the General 
Services Administration, will 
be located near the site of the 
proposed new Bureau of Stand. 
ards building in the Gaithers- 
burg area. 

When the new buildings are 
completed, the two agencies 
will move out of present quar- 
ters in the District. They will 
be turned over to other agen- 
cies now housed in temporary 
buildings so that the “tempos” 
may be razed. 


. 


Senate 


The buildings are part of a 
10-year program aimed at 
eliminating all of Washi 
war-built tempos and prov 
for permanent office needs of 
the Government in this area 

The new buildings will in 
clude a multistored air-condl- 
tioned main structure, a garage 
an observatory and an archive 
storage and shops building 

The buildings will be ¢ 
under the lease-purchase 
so that the Government ma’ 
pay for them like rent over a 
period of years. No further 
Congressional approval beyond 
that of the two Public: Works 
Committees is required. When 
this is obtaifed, the General 
Services . Administration will 
acquire the site, hire architects 
and take bids on the financing 
jand construction of the facility. 


” 


ngion s 


dine 
. ‘- 


cy 


> 


and the Washington Board of 
lrade indorsed the bill 

Harris said he wanted to de 
velop a “full record” on the 
subject because of “very tense 
feelings” by some House mem- 
bers on the time question 

\ similar bill was killed by 
the House Committee last year. 


Bill to Limit Taxis 


Seems About to Die 


The perennial bill to limit the 
number of taxicabs on District 
streets apparently will be per- 
mitted to die again and come 
up in the next Congress. 

The Associated Taxicab Oper- 
ators, Inc.. chief backer of the 
bill, has asked a House District 
Subcommittee which is consid- 
ering it to set the bill aside and 
make own investigation of 
need for limitation. The or- 
nization said opposition which 
appeared at three hearings has 
caused “confusion” that can be 
dispéelied only by an impartial 
committee study 

Subcommittee Chairman Rep. 
Oren Harris (D-Ark.) said the 
ubcommittee has not acted on 
the request but that it is cus 
tomary not to push a bill when 
its chief backer withdraws his 
support. Three more independ- 
ent cah drivers testified yester- 
day that the limitation bill as 
written was bound to result in 
control of the industry by a few 
companies 


, 
; _ 
+> ‘ 


Oo 


large 


Todays Chuckle 


The small boy on the phone 
asked Information for the num- 
per of the movie house 

“You'll find that in the diree 
torv,’ she said 

“] know,” he answered, “but 
I'm standing on it.” 


Tif 
a ian 


* RE-ROOFING * 
* ROOF REPAIRS * 
* GUTTERING ® 
*® INSULATION ® 
* ASBESTOS SIDING # 
* ALUMINUM SIDING ® 
‘® STORM WINDOWS ® 
* JALOUSIES ® 
* PORCH ENCLOSURES ® 
* ATTIC & RECREATION 
ROOMS FINISHED ® 
* AWNINGS * 
* FENCING ® 


FREE ESTIMATES 
HU. 3-6400 


Monthly Payments 


Over 25,000 Satistied Customers 
1834 Wisconsin Ave. N.W. 


—— 


— 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HER. ALD 


18 


. Teesdey, June 12, 1956 


rs. Beale, 75: 


ostess, Author 


Mrs. 
hostess, and last resident of 
Lafayette Square's histaric De- 
catur House, died yesterday in 
Zurich, Switzerland, at the age 
of 75 


She became seriously ill with 
leukemia last week while on a 
tcur of Europe, and entered a 
hospital in Zurich. 

ale, once one of Wash- 
ington’s leading hostesses, often 
entertained diplomatic society 
in her historic home at 748 
Jackson pl. nw. Newspaper ac- 
counts frequently mentioned 
parties given inghe house, “still 
lighted with candles. through. 


out, wiiose flickering glow cast 


shadows on the soft patina of 
rare old furnishings.” 

In 1954, Mrs. Beale, wife of 
the former diplomat and writ- 
er, wrote a book, “Decatur 
House; and Its Inhabitants.” 

The house, the first to be 
built facing Lafayette Square 
was constructed in 1818 for 
naval hero Stephen Decatur 
Decatur was killed in a due! 
in the library with Commodore 
James Barron. It was designed 
by British-born Benjamin La.- 
trobe, invited here by Thomas 
Jefferson in 1804 to be architect 
of the Capitol. 

The house was subsequently 
occupied by Henry Clay, Mar 
tin Van Buren and Edvard 
Livingston during their terms 
as Secretary of State 

In 1870 the house was bought 
by Edward Fitzgerald Beale 
Truxtun Beale’'s father 

Mrs. Beale has bequeathed 
the house to the National Trust 
for Historic Preservation, with 
an endowment for its upkeep 
and has also provided for con 
tinuation of the Truxtun-De-. 
catur Naval Museum. The mu- 
seum is now situated in the 
former stables of the house 
‘loaned to the Naval Historical 
VFoundation by Mrs. Beale 

A diplomat in her own right, 
Mrs. Beale was asked by the 
State Department to aid ir 
promotion of good will between 
the Americas during World 
War II. She was decorated by 
several South American coun 
tries, and by King George of 
Greece for her work as head 
of the Washington Committee 
for Greek Relief 

In 195]. Mrs. Beale was 
made an honorary citizen of 
Venice, Italy, for her work to 
ward the restoration of St 


Today’ 
Events 


Events scheduled for today 
(asterisk indicates those open 
to the public) 

erecta 


~Marviagé Cent 
= Mar yiand 


Heception by Panhellenic 
of Washifigten and Women 
fatien honoring 

apes States citi 

Lawyerr | 

rihes se. room 4435 

osmo elt tan Club of Was? 
me et olumbdi Country 
Nationa! | Copferen ce of Chr 
12 ot ar 


neon 


SVENTS 


persen bo-persen 
MEETINGS 
District Dental Society 
ct election 
Greendelt Conaumer 
Greenbelt Theater. Greene 
meet ’ 
eights Busin mens As 
An . Geers an c 
30277 1 » of 4 n a 
yde (R-Ma (speaker 
Washingt ay Chants 
‘ Actor 


Siig 
all 


Ame ans 
" P 


a 
Btan' on and A abama 


ners 

Rese ecistion of | 
ja. 8. Grand Bal) 
ual meeting 


CONVENTIONS 


Truxtun Beale. author.* 


MRS. TRUATUN BEALE 


During World 
the first 
Air 


Mark's Basilica 
War II she conducted 
benefit for the British 
Force 

Born in California. she was 
the former Marie Oge. One of 
her forebears was Bishop Phi- 
lander Chase, of the Anglican 
Episcopal Church, who was 
sent to establish the church in 
the then western states of Ohio 
and [illinois 

She married 
in 1903 


Truxtun Beale 


Bradbury Heights 


Mrs. Murphy 
Dies; Taught 
For 19 Years 


Angela Bi gham Murphy 
56. a Prince Georges County 
schoolteachér for 19 years, died 
at the home of her 
brother A. Birmingham 
1401 Abingdon drive, Alexan- 
dria She lived at 3640 Minne- 
sola ave. se 

Mrs. Murphy 


r rr) rn 


vesterday 
John 


was thé widow 
of Dr. John Murphy of Fair- 
mont, W. Va She was the 
daughter of the late William 
P. and Mary Conway Birming- 
ham of Cumberland, Md 

Mrs. Murphy was born in 
Frostburg, Md. and attended 
Frostburg State Teachers Col 
lege and the University of 
Maryland. For the last 18 
years, until her recent illness,’ 
she had taught at Bradbury 
Heights Elementary School. 

Besides John Birmingham, 
she is survived by three other 
brothers, Francis D. Birming- 
ham. 1336 New Hampshire ave 
now.: James V. Birmingham, 
Anchorage, Alaska, and Thomas 
D. Birmingham, Eagleville, Pa 

Requiem mass will be offered 
at 9 a. m. -Wednesday at Our 
Lady of Victory Church 
MacArthur bivd. ‘nw 
will be in Frostburg Cemetery 


Fatal Shooting 
Called Suicide 


A certificate of suicide was 
esued yesterday by Coroner A 
Magruder MacDonald in the 
fatal shooting of Rozier R. Rec 
tor. 64. of 516 A st. ne., whose 
pody was found in his apart- 
ment late Sunday by his wife, 
Lelia 

Mrs. Rector said her husband 
had complaiped of being ill. A 
revolver was found near, his 
body. He was a dispatcher for 
the Marlowe Coal Co., 8ll E 
st. nw, 


‘Donaghy. 


that 
lerusades of old and exhorted 


\which 


‘Go F orward, GU Graduates Told H.G. Gibson, 


In Address 


(Picture on Page 22.) 
The Very Rev. William A 
president of Holy 
Cross College, told Georgetown 
University graduates yesterday 
life was like the religious 


them: “In God's Name, go for 


ward.” 

Father Donaghy devoted most 
of his commencement address 
to reciting the glories of the 


crusades and the knights who 
trekked to foreign parts to fight 
for their religion 

“One of the heroic figures 
was a casualty of the 
prejudiced approach to history 
is the knight, the crusader,— 
generally scoffed at and lam 
pooned when not actually mis- 
represented,” he said 

“The crusader, as I have de 
scribed him and as we find him 
in the reputable and ancient 
sources, was a man from whom 
no objective observer could 
withhold his admiration,” he 
continued 

“To anyone who falls into the 
error of reading history 
backwards, that is of endowing 
past generations with the men 


ee 


Tr ooper Dies, d Injured Taxi Drivers | 
As Car Hits Wreck Seene "0 Honor 


ALTA VISTA. Va. June 1! 
>A State Trooper was killed 
and three men injured early 
yesterday when a car careened 
into a fare- 
marked wreck 
scene on UU. & 
29 two miles 
north of here 

The Trooper. 
Henry Murray 
Brooks, 29. of 
Gretna. died in 
Lynchburg 
General Hos 
pital several 
hours after the 
accident 

Injured 


Brooks 


John 
of Mam 


seriously was 
William Botts. 46, 
moth, W. Va. the victim of a 
hit-and-run accident “which 
Brooks was investigating 

Minor injuries were suffered 
by Melvin Reece McDaniel, 22 


of Gretna... driver of the hit 


Mate Found Dead. 
Wife to Hospital 


The body of 69-year-old Wil 
liam Lee, dead at least 12 hours 
was found yesterday on the 
kitchen floor of his apartment 
at 301 Delafield pl. nw. His wile 
Helen. 50. was incoherent, po- 
llice said, and later was hos- 


pitalized. 

Capt. Richard Felber, head 
of the homicide squad, said po- 
lice were called by a laundry 
deliveryman, John Culp, 56, 
who had made his regular call 
at the apartment of the retired 
Agriculture Department °¢m- 
ployee. When Mrs. Lee opened 
the door. he said, he could see 
her husband's body. 

Police said an empty whiskey 
bottle Was found in the kitchen 
There were no marks of vio- 
lence on Lee's body, they 
added. Police and the coroner's 
office are investigating 


VFW Names Kubacki 
As Aide-de-Camp 


J. Kubacki, 1364 Rit 
has bee 


Walter 
tenhouse s' 
pointed a national aide-de-camp 
by the Veterans Foreign 
Wars for recruiting more than 
50 new members 
The announcement 4vas made 

VFW Commander Timothy 
Murphy at the organization's 
headquarters in Kan- 
Mo, 


nw.. 


of 


by 
J 

national 
\sas City, 


RE a ae 


If you will plan for and select your 


family-memorial plot now, 
derful 


investing in the won 


mind that security alone can bring 


When no advance 
made, the agonizing 


selecting a bur 


grief-stricken family mem 


friend of the family. 


Write for lilustrated Folder, 


tasx orf 


ial spot often falls 


be 


neace of 


you will 


mii 
ii 


How 


memorial site 


SIONS e your 


hast 


one 


pro\ ar 


the plot that 
requ! 


to rements, 


ber or tO a 


h better it j 


loved ones 


exactly meets + 


over a perio : 


to choose vour 
calm consultation with 


You 


in 


can now seicect 


MY TAMilV S$ 


and you can pay for i? 


of 5 years, if you preter 


No need to deplete vital estate funds 


4000 Suitland Road, S.E., W ashington 23, D.C. or phone ]Ordan 8-4000, 


Ce dar Hill, is not expensive ...is not sold out... 


eee ‘ashin gton's Most Beautiful Cemetery 


— 


nm ap- 


Baking Co. | 


Supervisor 


Funeral services for H. Gor 
don Gibson, 61, a. traveling su- 
pervisor for the General Baking 
Co., will be held at 2 p. m. today 

at the Trans 

figuration Epis 

copal Church 

14th and Galle 

tin sts. nw. Bur 

jal will be in 

Ingersoll, On 

tario, Canada 

Mr. Gibson 

who lived at 

1508 @Gallatin 

st. nw., died of 

a heart attack 

near his home 

on Saturday. He had been a 

resident of Washington about 

2% years and had been with the 

General Baking Co. the same 
length of time. 

Prior to: becoming traveling 
supervisor, Mr. Gibson was gen 
e manager of the company 
k for many years. During the 

.orean conflict he served in 
the baking division of the Of 
fice of Price Stabilization 

Mr. Gibson was born in Can 
and was educated at the Uni 
versity of Toronto. He served 
in Europe in World War I with 
Canadian forces 
| Surviving are his wife 
|Audrey; a foster son, Robert 
Dinsmore, North Miami. Fla.: 
and his mother, Mrs. David 
Gibson, of the home address. 


on Crusade Knights 


shite of the present, knight- 
hood can be a misty, unrealistic 
and latghable phase of man’s 
development. an aberration 
which would appeal only to 
the Miniver Cheevys of today 
But the true knight, the real 
crusader, was as realistic as 
his sword: he simply dealt in‘ 
realities which the typically 
modern mind can not appreci- 
ate.” Father Donaghy said. stitution, was awarded the 
“We, too, live in a day of Georgetown Medal of Merit. 
ferment, of revolution, of.con- Outstanding graduates  in- 
flicting horn-locked and stale- cluded Josephin Louise Walko- 
mated ideologies, of philoso- wicz, public administration. who 
phies at war. There are none had the highest scholastic aver- 
of the ordinary rubrics of revo- age of any girl ever to graduate 
lujion; no barricades in the from the Foreign Service| 
streets, no bandages on men's Sehool—91.9. She is a full time 
heads, the barricades, unfortu-'secretary-research assistant for 
nately, are in the hearts of men; the Rand Corp. in Washington. 
the bandages on their souls,” Drs. John Francis and Marcella 
he said Pecora O'Neill are one of the 
“That is the situation which few husband and wife teams to 
you face, he told the grad- receive medical degrees from 
uates GU 
Georgetown awarded 1062 de-. Dr. Hellene Gilliaert Werner. 
grees at this, its 157th annual 902 Ottawa st. se. received a 
commencement, held on Healy Doctor of Medicine degree. She 
Lawn is the mothe? three children, 
Father Donaghy and Bolton aged 8.7 and 5 
Sullivan, president of the Skil’ The Most Reverend Patric 
Corp. in Chicago, received hon- A Boyle Archbishop of 
orary Doctor of Humane Let- Washington, presided at the ' 
ters degrees. Sullivan's son. ceremonies 


John W. Sullivan, received an 
A.B. degree 

Thomas C. Egan of Philadel- 
phia, former national president 
of the GU Alumni Association, 
received an honorary Doctor of 
Laws Degree. 

J. Raymond Trainor, who re- 
tired this year as secretary of 
the GU School of Foreign Serv 
ice after 30 years with the in- 


_ Tour of City 


Two Washington taxicab driv- Floyd L. Stafford 
holiday' A fretired Navy Chief War 
rant Officer, Floyd Lewis Staf 
They went on a tour of Wash- ford, 56, died following a 
ington. stroke Sunday at Bethesda Na 
Since the tour was for 31 out- val Hospital. 
of-town hackers it was an honor He lived at 
for them. The 33 men had been 4624 Rosedale 
designated as the Nation's ave.. Bethesda. 
safest taxicab drivers. Mr. Stafford 
The entire group combined entered the 
has put in 834 years and 22 mil- Navy in 1920 
lion miles of driving without an and retired on 
accident disability in 
The Washingtonians are Rob 1947 He was 
ert Green, 12123 Bluehill rd. a native of Rol- 
silver Spring, a Diamond Cablga Mo. and 
driver with 32 . ident-free came here to 
A Government teletype oper- Years; and Raymond J. Morgan, live about 1927 Mr. Stafford 
ator who said his conscience ry Soy ret peg Be we curves Eniaaes week ot 
4 | ow Cab driver with a 16-year the Naval Hospital in San Di 
bothered him turned himself in safety record ' 
ego, Calif.. the Navy Medical 
to Alexandria police yesterday Yesterday's School here and sea duty 
and told of his a hit 7 "Pyle a Presidential aboard several ships. He wa 
and-run accident Assistant who is particularly assigned to the Public Health 
Russell B. Bushong. 73. and !"terested in safety, and a visit Service in Haiti prior to World 
his wife Nell 63 at the Capitol with Vice Presi- War If, and served during part 
Nellie; 63, narrowly dent Richard Ms Nixon of the war with the Fleet Ma 
escaped death in the accident rine Force, stationed at Guad 
at 11 p. m, Saturday on Shirley ¢Ts departed in a chartered air- 


Last night 32 of the 33 driv- 
alcanal. 

Highway at Shirlinet , liner for Detroit, where fortwo After the war, he served at 
~ ty at Shirlington Circle, days they will be the guests the Naval Air Stations at Pa 
Alexandria. of the Plymouth Division of tuxent and Anacostia. He also 
Police said Sylvester J Ho ag med ZerP, speneet s the worked at the Naval Hospital! 
, a awars 1 os river, a* uarntico 
White, 30, of 3501 Stanton rd Green, left aboard a train , 
se., Washington. 
his car collided with the car 


and run car which had struc 
Botts’ vehicle about three sitios 
south of Alta Vista a few min 
utes earlier and Raiph James ®™S *0oK @ busman's 
Grubb, 24, also of Gretna. who yesterday 
was a passenger in MacDaniel's 
cal 

car driven by 
Spicey Martin, 19, 
Gretna, approached the scene 
bounced off one vehicle of a 
passer by, veered about 175 
feet down the road and plowed 
into the four men. Martin was 
charged today with involuntary 
manslaughter 


Hit-Run Driver 


Surrenders to Police 


itinerary includ- 


House talk with 


part in 


Erich W. Schnabel 


Erich W. Schnabel, 52, a me- 
chanic at McKee Pontiac Sales 
and Service for 23 years, died 
Saturday in George Washing 
ton University Hospital after 
a long illness 

Mr. Schnabel, who lived at 
232 Varnum st. nw., came here 
from Florida in 1932. While in 
Florida, his native state, he had 
built racing cars. For a few 
months prior to his illness. Mr 
Schnabel had worked at Arcade 
Pontiac Co He was a car- 
buretor and ignition specialist 

He survived by his wife 


Anthony 37 
Springs, engi- 
sentenced yesterday ‘ 


Russell. 


Ohio. with Benny 


sali Catan that Mr. Stafford is survived hs 
which the Bushongs of 232 N " 

KANSAS CITY, June 11 # # Funeral services will be held 
White said he kept on driv- 

‘ lapsed and died inside a hospi. 

charges of reckless driving and way home from work and had 

and his wife was treated for man Orchestra, which he joined 

H 

ouse Contempt tha period 

a 

own orchestra before joining 

plaved 

neer, 


his wife, Kathleen F. Stafford. 
I" Frank Trumbauer and a son, William T. Stafford, 
Edgewood st., Arlington, were Frank 7 n at 1 Wednesd ‘ F 
: Fas ran rum! : . m. Wednesday 
riding. The two were pinned in - umbauer, 56 _— pees Myer Chapel with ts ~ ! y* 
sidered one of jazzdom’'s out- ** ure. in 
ing because “he was scared - 
according to police. He was re- ‘@! d00r tonight 
hit-and-run. gone to St. Mary’s Hospital. 
Bushong was treated at Ar- He achieved fame during 
body bruises. in 1927. He was featured in the 
oe Hall concerts the 
rumbauer lived in St. Louis 
Brings Sentence (25:4 bey’ and entered profes 
\ ¥rto ; 
NOrtOn Whiteman 
lie also 
Lo 


N. 534 Newcomb st. se. 
their car when it turned over Arlington Cemetery. 
standing saxophonists, col. ‘ 
leased on $1000 bond to face Trumbauer became il! on his 
lington Hospital for leg euts nine years with the Paul White- 
VYhiteman Orchestra gave in 
sional music in 1921. He had his 
a Yellow 
was Goodman, Artie Shaw, Jimmy 


. ‘ . T ; > J kK Is 
serve 30 days impriso Dorsey, Tommy Dorsey, Jac : 
; sonment Tea gar ad en Bi x Biederbecke Doris B Schnabel: a son, Rich- 
pay a $500 fine for and other leading jazz musi- ard, and daughter Marjorie 
tempt of the House Un-Amer-/cians. Trumbauer played forthe both of Knoxville, Tenn; ‘a 
can Activities Committee in major recording companies and brother. George G, Schnabel 
November, 1954. was featured as soloist with sev- — ee sk. Nw., two sisters, 
dal” cate “itt ae Oe mphony orchestras largaret mv mage Tampa, Fia., 
District Court Judge | His mother, Gertrude Steven-/2"¢ Gertrude Sample, Van 
rt Judge A. Sher- ‘egentnn , Nuys, Calif 
man Christiensen. He was son, is recuperating from a +‘ )>*, P , 
: ted ) Shee © Was COM heart attack in the same hos- Funeral services wil] be held 
cte month on ree »ital where he died at 10 a. m. Wednesday at the 
charges of contempt in refusing ' ; ner 2 
' : pt in refusing Hines funeral home, 2901 14th 
lo answer questicns asked by st. nw. Burial will be in Na- 


the House investigators Rubles for Holidavs tional Memorial Cemetery 
Russell did not claim the - 
LONDON, June 11—Russ 


Fifth Amendment privilege 

against possible self-incrimina- labor unions will contribute 600 
tion but based his refusal to million rubles (about $155 mil. 
answer on the First Amend- lion) to give 2.5 million Soviet 
ment right of freedom of'childrén holidays this year, a 
speech cording to Moscow radio 


and con 


iast 


Deaths Elsewhere 


56. Italian 
in Rome 


Corrado Alvaro, 
journalist and author: 
Leo Buckley, 57, international! 
president of the Stereotypers 
and Electrotypers Union; in 
New York 

Marie Laurencin. 
French painter; in Paris 


70 


National W eather Summary 


Deflcier 


cegrees 
® Gegrees 4 imu 
f Pp . ay : 
Deficiency 


Washington and Area: 7 : ; ' 2 Of 
“ =. Ge Fd-ar Stilson Jennings, 56 
retired National Guard Briga 
High. 79 dier general and former warden 
rises 8-42 At Auburn, N. Y., State prison; 

“s )° in St. Petersburg, Fla 
Rudoiph L. Sauerhering. 90 
retired language professor! 
taught at Oshkosh (Wis 
State College, Purdue Univer 
sity, the University of New 
Hampshire and other college 
in Mayville, Wis 

Peter von Brentano, 64-yea 
old brother of West Germany's 
Foreign Minister, Heinrich von 
Brentano; at Nuernberg 

Cecil Benton Thomas, 61, vice 
president and director 
Chrysier Corp. and presi 
f the companys export 
sion 1942; in Detroit 


40 nel 


Temperature one year 
eg’ 

mot one “Fides 

a7 : 


V istbdility 0 
Departeres from wnermal vesterday.. (6 
muisted deficiency f temperature ne« 


ea Paiis 


4 
who 


Temperatures and rain for 23 hours ending Monday: 


i L. Pree " | 
4 
an 


Pree lL. Pree 
\) , 68 


ani 
ce ni 
divi 


Sar on) 
tr 


Washington 


Three to Retire 
At American U. 


W imingten 


Walter F. Shenton, a charter 
member of the American Uni- 
versity undergraduate school 
faculty, is retiring after 31 years 
of service. 

A mathematics and pbysics 
professor, Shenton has been 
marshal for 12 commencements. 
He. completes the longest term 
ever filled by a retiring profes- 
sor at American University. 


~The Hunt Electrical Co. 


will be closed Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, 
June 11, 12 and 13 


due to the death of 
Mr. William Hunt's beloved . mother, 


Mrs, Margaret Hunt 


Bush, professor of government 
and public administration, and 
Fritz Karl Mann, professor of 
‘economics. 


. 


KEENAN, 
| g@une ij 


Also retiring are: George P.| 


Prayer for Today 


Eternal God, our Father, 
we thank thee for thy gra- 
cious goodness, which is ever 
about us. Forgive our rough- 
ness of manner, our thought. 
lessness in speech, and our 
carelessness in act. Save us 
by reflection @pon the win 
somenegs Of Christ. Guide us 
to be more cheerful of coun 
tenance, more restrained in 
‘speech, and more humble tm 
deed. We pray in the name 
of the Master of life, Jesus 
Christ. our Lord. Amen 

W. Ralph Ward Jr., Pitt 
burgh. Pa. minister, Mt. 
Lebanon Methodist Church 

Division 


Louis Grau | 


Louis Grau. 81, former New 
York businessman, died June 
7 at hie residence in New Ro 
chellie. N. ¥. He was the father 
of Addie Blau. 4700 Connecticut 
ave. nw. and Gloria Dalton 
"480 16th st nw 

Mr. Grau was a native of New 
York and was in the braid and 
trimming business there for 30 
He retired in 1929 
Mrs. Blau and Mrs 
ic survived by his 
Pauline Kap 


vear©rs 

Besides 
Daiton. he 
wife. the tormer 
lean: three other daughters 
Vivian Liebmann, Ossining 
N. Y.: Berniece Friedman, High 
land Park. N. J.: and Ethel 
Nathanson. New York; a broth 
Michael. New York 
hildren and five 
ldren 


five 
great 


er, 
grandc 
grandchi 


in Memoriam 


FULTON ARTHUR ? In 1 
> ome and 


GRIMES. DANTEL— ir 
loa . - Na 


LITCHPIFLD. SHANNON 


MOT SSEAT TOSEPH 
4 > me ' 


e 
SEPH 


ADAMS. HARRY 


. 4 

4 Cemeter 

agt LLINO,. JOSEPH. On 
193% JOSEP 


au 
mere ; “ 


ry 
| BARGFREDE. . ons iB —. 


. Che enly ed 


gior . 
CANMILL. FRANK ¥ 
, _ Ae 


PRANK 


ROBLEAT CLAY 


: 
4 
DARNELI 
‘ ; ROBERT 


DeLACY, BENJAMIN J 
June | BENJA 


Int ent Ce Hi 
ECALOF?. ARTHUR 
,95 ARTHUR We 


‘ e War 

Home, 6434 
Spring ay 
‘A 


: ec 
Interr ent 


EC KLOFF ARTHUR 


ade : 
GATES ratt 
he . ; 


me gt Natior ‘ 
GAYNOR. ANNE FP DOLLY 
a =. ’ A 


me : ANN 


RE'L. GEORGE RB Saturday 
’ r 
, a 4 > ' 


HIT DGINS a a “ore ,On Sa’ 
fat nis a % 


rl and Gar! at d 
are } i te 
4a- Chevy — Pu- 


, papers please 


GEORGE HH. On onday 

1956. GEORGE H al oa 

New Hompen! re ave be 
. 


- 
4fi° Georg! a ave. ae 
ices late 


a 


Notice of serv-| 


Bird 


LANEBARY PAVIP JAMES 
Gynday. June if 

etbacd "y Hospt 

JAMES LANEHART 7” 

: ~ : nd 


Artina’ on Nationaei 


se oe 3 way a Sunday 


Cemetery. 
ROBERYV MALCOLM, On Sundar 
; J at Cc 


m 
itermeyg Gien wood 


LOWG 
June 


Amert 


’ : 
ke Vol 


Bo 


MARCEY 
; * 109 


Heart Hesartment. 
AFRMAYW LEE. On oun rdar, 
1986. at his 


inleer 


: Interment Coium- 

re Cemet 

MATKOVCIK THOMAS pS Be ks UBA 

se ec On nda 1984. 

a Ws a 

THOMAS J Tired 

N ' Ariington 
i of Mar erve - 

: , Ri. 


aare 


net my ‘Seat ional 


SUNSET. MYRTLE 4 


MTR Ti “4 A. ‘tes BYS 
Br 


aele 
NALLEY IRENE M 
} 56 


RTHCHILD. PATRICK nN .” 
a a 
Lows NI 
{ New! 
la’ Tune 
n Nationa ™ 
5 to eesembie at 
oo Dp 
On Sat 
sicence 
aibten 
* Rovand st Mert ( 
lan ° : 
“Willis Bumete hei 


ane oom r of OlK. 


GEORGE 
a’ 
GEORO ' 


rt TIT, urday 
126 St 
ed 


a 


REC TOR rt = 


wee nif 


at 
Cemetery, 


ria 
RF YWNOLDS BAROLD RICHARD On 
Pr : ; i. 


al 
LD Ric HARD 
No Persh 


. a ' . 
National Cemetery 

,_ ERIC H w“ On wae 
a* George on 
q UW “hem AED 


> : 
ington 


SC HN ABEL 
June @ : 
ER! 


er nt ’ 
Cemetery 


ry “hh 
Park 
SCHUBERT. “Axnte cE On 
{> 


is. at 16 
Viemar : 
Oh Ve Fails 
lune 9 


1954, 


Mausole —¥ 


ST AFFORD fLore LEWIS. On Sundar 
ne } at ¢ etbesda Naval 


Arlineton Nationa! Ceme- 


, Migs GRACE. On Mo 
5 C 


- 
Miss “Ohate 4 
Rebecca LeFevre 


nday, 


"—DEATHS— 


Anneuncement of 
Services by Chambers 
Rareer Jean W, Chambers Ce 
Taliaferre Chambers Ce, 
W. Chambers Ce 


W. Chambers Ce. 


“ 
we 


Lavenreth 
Herman H 
Sesh. Herman 


Funeral Designs 
George C. 


Chambers Ce. 
Chambers Ce. 


Shaffer, Inc 
EBupress've floral ributes ‘ode 
prices Oven daily. Sundays . 
vuene order . - $0 secont A 
. 90 lat _NA 68-9106 


Funeral Directors — Soe 
J. WILLIAM LEE’S SONS CO. 
FUNERAL HOME 
CREMATORIUM 


4TH AND M /VE NP 
Li 5-800 


4 


Capital Commerce 


56 Held‘Boom Year’ 
For Building in D. C. 


This is a “boom year” for Washin 


fact that area housin 
according to George 


ton building, despite the 


activity is below what it was in 1955, 
ine Smith, vice president and economist 


of the F. W. Dodge Corp., New York City. Smith, who formerly 
was economist and manager of* a 


the finance department of the 
U. &. Chamber of Commerce 
re, addressed the Washington 
Building Congress at the May- 
flower Hotel yesterday on 
“Construction Prospects in 
Mid-1956.” 
ares “substantial drop” 
in building permit and contract 
figures is caused by the fact 
that 1955 was a freak year in 
which figures were boosted far 
above normal by the $20 mil- 
lion Senate Office Building and 
$14 million Shrine of the Im- 
maculate Conception, Smith 
said. This year’s contract 
awards for the area are 41 per 
cent above 1954, he pointed out. 
“There's nothing wrong with 
Washington housing that good 
weather and easier money 
won't cure,” he said, noting 
that this year's area contract 
awards for housing are “below 
last year’s peak but still a 
healthy 44 per cent ahead of 
1954." He said Washington's 
longtange construction pros- 
$s are excellent because it 
it “a pleasant place to live” and 
a mecca for groups attracted 
the presence of the Federal 
overnment here. 
Honors announced at yester 
day's meeting included Leon 
Chatelain, Jr.. new president of 
The American Institute of 
Architects: Julian E. Berla and 
Slocum Kingsbury, mew Fel- 
lows of the AIA: Theodore 
Irving Coe, winner of the AIA 
Edward C. Kemper Award; 
Charlies H. Tompkins, to be 
honored June 20 by George 
Washington University with the 
dedication of a vault in the 
new Tompkins Hall of Endi- 
neering: Grosvenor Chapman, 
{new president of the Washing 
ton-Metropolitan Chapter of 
the AIA, and Harold M. Sy!l- 
vester, appointed yesterday as 
special arsistant for mainte 
nance in the office of the As. 
sistant Secret*ry of Defense for 
Properties and Installations 


Crand Union Sales Rise 


Sales of the Grand Union Co 
in the quarter ended June 2 
amounted to $86,748,685, an in- 
crease of 35.1 per cent over 
‘the $64,204,668 in the same pe 
riod a year ago. The 350-storé 
eastern food cham reported 
sales for the five weeks ended 
June 2 totaled $36,286,356, an 
increase of 42.9 per cent over 
the $25.386.827 in the compa 
rable period of 1955. Included in 
the chain are the Food Fair 
Super Markets of the Wash- 
ington area. 


Vitro Names Spragins 

H. Hughes Spragins has been 
named administrative assistant 
of the Silver Spring laboratory 
of the Vitro Corp. of America. 
Spragins the Vitro staff 
in 1952 and has served in the 
laboratory's personne!l, techni- 
cal information and contracts 
negotiations offices before ap- 
pointment to his present post. A 
graduate of Mississippi State 
College and of Georgetown Law 
School, he was admitted to the 
Maryland bar in 1955. Spragins 
is a veteran of World War II 
and of the Korean War. He 
lives with his wife and two sons 
at 125 Eastmoor dr., Silver 
Spring. 


Who's News 

Reynolds Metals Co. has ap- 
pointed Edd H. Hyde, adminis- 
trative assistant to Sen. John 
J. Sparkman (D. Ala.), to an ex- 


ecutive post in its Washington y 


office. On July 1 he will become 
an assistant to Maxwell Caskie, 


assistant vice president of Rey- » 


~ 


nolds who represents the com- 
pany with the Government. He 
joined Sparkman’s staff after 
wartime service as a majur... 
John G. Macfarlan has been ap- 
jointed special representative. 
executive department, Railway 
Express Agency with headquar- 
ters in Washington... Bankers 
Life Insurance Co. of Nebraska 
has appointed Walter Kemetick 
general agent in its Washington 
office. 


Commerce Dept. Aide 


Leonard T. Willison, assistant 
general sales manager of Jones 
& Laughlin Steel Corp., has 
been named head of the iron 
and steel division of the Busi- 
ness and Defense Serviees Ad- 
ministration of the Department 
of Commerce. He will serve for 
six months without pay and 
then become part of the reserve 
manpower pool available for 
assignment in case of a na 
tional emergency 


Omission 


For the second successive 
year the Chamber of Com- 
merce of Myrtle Beach. S. C.. 
has placed its account with the 
Alvin Epstein Advertising 
Agency. In an article reporting 
this fact in the issue of June 9 
the name of the agency was in 
complete. The Washington Post 
and Times Herald regrets the 
error 


New Member 


Mrs. Margaret FE. Powers. 
assistant cashier of the Citizens 
Bank of Maryland in River- 
@ale, has been elected a mem 
ber of the National Association 
of Bank Women. whose mem 
bership consists of women ex- 
ecutives in national, state and 
savings banks and trust com 
panies. It is the only organiza. 
tion made up exclusively of 
women bank executives 


S&L Institute 


Achievement awards were 
presented to 16 students, seven 
received standard diplomas and 
graduate diplomas were award 
ed to three Saturday evening 
at the dinner meeting of the 
Washington Chapter of 
American Savings & Loan In- 
stitute. The meeting was held 
at the Shoreham Hotel 
three groups were 
ment award: Roy M 


achieve- 
lexand.- 


eg, Mary E. Clemmons, Joseph ; 


L. Gahan, Frederick S. Genau 
Mahlon L. Hetrick, R. Lamond 
Jones, Richard S. Lawton, Dora 
I. Marlar, Mary Louise McDon- 
ald. Eleanor D. Peel. 
Robinson, John J. Sheehan. 
John W. Stadtler. 
enson. William J. 
Loring E. Tilton: 
ploma: Joseph L. Gahan, E 
Marshall Grinder, Edwin N. 
Lewis Jr., Woodrow W. Long. 
James P. Spelman, John W 
Stadtier and William S. Wren 
graduate diplomas: Margaret 
4. Duva. Cornelius G 
Jr., and Mary Jane Ogilvie. 


Talbott 
standard di 


and 


New York Cotton 


NEW YORK. Jene 11 W—Cottes futures 
clesed enchanged cests « bale lower 
than the previeus 

0 Clese Wet 
1 


°° 
a 


pee 

M $2 
32.45 
32.5) 
32.63 
32.58 
87 


ct _ 
Midding teet 
| 


ee 


Uech 


"6 
TON wp 5. Nominal. 8 


Wade Steph. ; 


Harrell 
¢ 


Times Beraid 


The Washington 


Post 


usiness 


= 


*Tructrain’ 


New Service 
By Pennsy 
Starts Today 


PHILADELPHIA, June 11 # 
The Pennsylvania Railroad to- 
day announced daily all+ail 
“tructrain” service between 
points on the PRR and major 
distribution centers in the 
Southwest will be launched 
with publication of the first 
such through “piggyback” rates, 
effective Tuesday. 

The railroad said the all-rail 
service involves flatcar move- 
ment of the railroad’s own 
truck-trailers, at rates competi- 
tive with those of other car- 
riers 

Cc. S. van Gunten, manager 
of the PRR’'s truc-train sales 
department, said the new serv- 
ice will permit through service 
in both directions between 
Pittsburgh, Mingo Junction, 
Columbus and Dayton, in the 
East, and Little Rock, Pine 
Bluff, Tulsa, Oklahoma City, 
Shreveport, Lake Charles, Dal- 
las, Fort Worth, Houston, San 
Antonio, El Paso and other 
cities in the Southwest. 

Under the new through rates, 
tratiers will be interchanged 
between the Pennsylvania and 
four southwestern connections 
the Missouri-Kansas-Texas, 
the St. Louis-San Francisco, the 
St. Louis Southwestern, and 
Santa Fe. 

Through rates for piggyback 
shipments between New York 
and Philadelphia and the same 
sOuthwestern points will be 
published later, van Gunthen 
said 


TUESDAY, 


9 


a, A 


> 


JUNE. I 


922 Million 
Su. Wheat 


Crop Seen 


Associated Press 

The Agriculture Department 
yesterday forecast this year's 
government-restricted wheat 
crop at 922,672,000 Bushels. 

This is the first estimate for 
the full crop and compares with 
938,159,000 produced last year 
and 1,146,547,000 for the 10-year 
(1945-54) average. 

The winter wheat crop was 
forecast at 670,375,000 bushels 
compared with 681,432,000 indi- 
cated a month ago. Production 
last year was 705,372,000 bush- 
els and the l@year average 
872,635,000. 

The forecast for the spring 
wheat crop—the first of the 
season— was 252,297,000 bush- 
els compared with 232,787,000 
produced last year and 273,912,- 
000 for the 10-year average 

The wheat crop, like those of 
the previous two years, is be- 
ing grown under rigid govern- 
ment marketing quotas de- 
signed to produce not more 
than about 900 million bushels 

The acre yield of winter 
wheat was forecast at an aver- 
age of 18.7 bushels compared 
with 20.9 bushels last year and 
18.3 for the 10-year average 

The condition of the spring 
wheat crop on May I was re- 
ported at 88 per cent of nor- 
mal compared with 86 per cent 
a year ago and 83 per cent for 
the 10-year May 1 average. The 
condition of durum wheat was 
put at 88 per cent compared 
with 75 per cent a year ago 
and 82 per cent for the 10-year 
average. 


Mutual Fund Prices 


1 
iat.) 


new 
Securities 


yor« June 
Dealers, 


(AP) —(Mat! 


Affilcated 


the | 


The : 


823 
23°22 


de Verh Met fea 
Delaware 

Owers 

Orwers 


— —-— f 
o 
— 


—_—_ ere 


Founters 
Fundamental 


—_— —_ 


5 
6 
? 
’ 
2 
’ 
2 
‘ 
? 
C 
‘ 
‘ 
} 
7 
8 
; 
4 


S2e22S2 VS se 58 


, States they eo 
; tual 


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quoted 


levestmeant 
lavest Tr 
wohastes M 
Keystone 
Keystone 
Keystone 
Keystoee 
Keystone 
heystone 
heystone 
Feystone 
Keystone 
Keystone 


— 


Cn” ee ee oe | 


1.91 


Tonight, discover why it’s called 


“The Best In The House” 
In 87 lands..: 


Wy this whisky’s 


worldwide popularity? ... 


ony Coareadlian Clu’ 


has a distinctive flavor that captures in one great whisky the lightness 
of scotch, the richness of rye, the smooth satisfaction of bourbon. That’s 
why no other whisky in all the world tastes quite like it. You can stay 


with it all evening long. ... in short ones before dinner, tall ones after. 
“The Best In The House” in 87 lands. .. . 6 years old. + 90.4 proof. 


Imported from Canada. 


Imported in bottle from Canada by Hiram Walker Importers Inc, Detrit, Mich. Blended Canadian Whishy. | 


SB 4 


a 


a § 
. . 


Keystone fa 
Knrckerbecker 


— J 
+ 
32 


J 
od 


“+P rt Pe 

ovweoee- -— == 

Ti ittiit ttt. 
ad 


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232s 


Science | 
Fé 
Line 
Lime 


=Z 2st 


Wellington 
Whitehall 


Guetatiens 
stiien (oof 


Fa 


fursished ty Nations! Asseci- 
Securities Desiers inc. which 
eet secessarily reflect a 
tramsactions «of firm bids oF offers 
shouted § 8 imdicate sperenimrte 80 prices 
w'ess§4 6etherwise «6s wedicated we 6OU 
by the spencers of issuers 


bot 


“ | 
Addressograph Net 

? > > ‘ 

' Rises in 12 Months 


Addressograph Multigranh 
Corp. reported for 12 months 
ended April 30 that it had net 
income of $7,056.939 S8.07 a 
share, compared with $6,118, 
643, or $7 a share, for the previ 
ous 12 months 

| Orvher earnings 


Jerreia Plectrenics Corp 
Feb 2 


of 


reporta follow 
i2 months 
’ 
enced 
' Osa 
$169 422 
= t 


. , 
iS centea i 


1955 
149.777 


cents 


Net tnceome 
iA ehare 


Kaiser Steel Core... nine months ended 
arcn > 


$169 


‘te 


87.226.000 
$i 
eer Oss 
Red 
¢ Ap 
et mM me 
ahare 


dia Pivweed Ceres. Six months end- 
, rii 30 
. 80 210 


” $645,455 
95 cents ] 


A 81 cent 
Wiisen 4&4 Ce. Ime. Six months ended 
pr 28 


Ne rY $4.603.379 
A snare 1S? 21 cents 


| Covernment Bonds 


NEW YORK, june 1! 
|the counter U. S. G@verement Treasury bends, 
bi, ached, set chanee and yield. 

25 


4 
> 
- 


+ 


mee se Be es ee 8 8 ee ee OO 


kn 
 P—> 4 
oe 


Prices 
seconds 
eet ts 


ane 
taxes 


dollars 
te tederal 
tares. 


thorty 


7 —Swebsect but 


State | mcome 


GENERAL TIME 
CORPORATION 


Dividend 


The Board of Directors has de- 
clared the following dividend: 


COMMON STOCK 


A dividend of 50 cents per 
share payable July 2, 1956 to 
shareholders of record June 18, 
1966. 
Joan H. Scumipr 

Secretary 


Jane 6, 1954. 


WESTCLOK + BIG BEN 

' SETH THOMAS 

STROMBERG RECORDERS 
HAYDON MOTORS 


—_-——-® 


SF98.890 Ma 
a 7 4 


SSSSSsSsstsse-—sSrsz2asse83" 


Sere 
Pete “U \ 
© fit «+ 


956 19 


| Loophole Ping 
House Votes 
Tighter Law 
On Prices 


Associated Press 
The House yesterday voted to 
tighten provisions of the anti- 
trust law that restrict a busi- 
ness from making different 
prices to different customers. 
A vote of 3933 passed and 
sent to the Senate a bill de- 
signed to overcome the efitect 
of a 1951 Supreme Court deci 
sion which some criticized as 
opening a loophole in the rro- 
visions 
Present law permits price dif. 
ferentials made in good faith 
to meet competition. The Court 
held in a case involving the 
Standard Oil Co. of Indiana 
and the Federal Trade Commis- 
sion that a showing of such 
good faith is a complete de 
fense to a charge of discrimina 
tion 
The amendment voted by the 
House would provide that such 
defense is complete only if the 
seller can show that his price 
differentials do not “substantial- 
ly lessen competition or 
tend to create a monopoly.’ 


N. Y. Bond Prices 


A 


sociated Press 
Total sales $3,600,000: 

ago $5,352,000. 

(000) “wigh Lew Clete Cie 


53 167% 167% 167+ 
s w 87+ 

137 131% 138% 131% 
5 


year 


AlemCan =) 875570 


, 
bY 


1? 88% 


1637s 183%.+ 

167% 183%+ * 
69'» 
62% 


C ‘ 6pere 
Crest 3.675c7) 
Chi t8h 4089 


> . 
CMSPP 552055 + ' 


* this 


World of Finance 
American 


To Cheek 


CHICAGO, June 11 


‘?—The American Can Co 


Can Plans 


Cost Rise 


today an- 


nounced plans for installation of $27 million worth of new 


facHities to combat rising tin a 


nd steel plate costs. 


William C. Stolk, president of the container firm, said Ameri- 
can Can will install the equip-* , 


ment to proctss tin and steel 
plate from continuous strips 
rather than from the pre-cut 
sheets used now. 

The equipment will allow 
‘American Can to take its plate 
in coils befgre it has been in- 
spected, chemically treated or 
cut into sheets, Stolk said. “We 
will perform these operations 
in our own plants instead of 
having the steel mills perform 
them at their cost plus a profit,” 
he said. 

Among the first steps in the 
two-year program, Stolk said, 
will be the construction of a 
plate processing plant in the 
Chicago area. 

Additions for the processing 
equipment will be built at the 
firm's plants in Oakland, Calif., 
and Tampa, Fla. Other facili- 
ties will be added in the New 
York metropolitan area, Balti 
more, Los Angeles, Texas and 
other locations, Stolk said 

Stolk said that the price of 
tin plate has risen 91 per cei 
since 1946. while American 
Can’s price for the most com- 
mon size of container has gone 
up only 75 per cent. 

“The steel industry appar- 
ently fails to realizé that its 
basic material is in the strong- 
est sort of competition with 
many other types of packing 
materials,” Stolk said 


CBS Raises Payment 


NEW YORK (#—The CBS ra- 
lio network announced that 
starting Aug. 25 it will increase 
payments to affiliated stations 
by 6% per cent. The network 
said there will be no accom- 


panying rise in costs to adver- 
: 


tisers. Under an agreement 
made last year, payment rates 
to stations here reduced 20 per 
cent. The new rate, which will 
become effective after the pres 
ent agreement expires, will re 
store five percentage points of 
curtailment, CBS officials 


said 
, 


118% 118%4 
ws Wa 
105%, 105% 

™ 136)4 13+ ' 
147% 148 | 


> chemicals 


Allied Chemical Aides 


Two appointments in the New 
rk office of Solvay Process 
Division, Allied Chemical & 
Dye Corp. were announced 
yesterday by L. B. Gordon vice 
president. H. W. MeNulty 


Y 


is 


, appointed technical assistant to 


the of the organic 
section, and T. W 
Reed becomes technical assist- 
ant to the director of product 


development 


manager 


> Indian Report on Oil 


CALCUTTA (”) — Well-in- 
fermed sources said here that 
the Indian Government is ap- 
pointing a top-ranking techni 
cal officer to report on the prog 


, ress of oil exploration, includ- 


9%, 118 + 

SeCaltd 3.25078 114% 114%—4 
Severe 64.507) 
Sefec 4.5068 
SeGeill 2.75085 
StaOied 3.125082 
Texas Cp 3065 
Tad Ave Sete 
Third Ave 4068 
UadiiCal 3675 
Vanaé 3.125089 
WestPenP 3.5088 
Wheel St! 3.7575 

FOREIGN BONDS 
Aestratia § 3.275062 
Belgium 4554 
Chile 358) 
Deamart 


1 100% 100% 100% 4+ ' 
Germany , 


Greg a) 4.125579 3% % 
Maryland Tobacco 
UPPER MARLBORO. M 

oO«' better graces 5° & 


$0 40°° n 


vea 


l4 et pow 
average of $54 0 
° at this ; 


(AP)—Clesiag ever : 


tron 
y+-Cror 


NEW COMFORT 
for the RUPTURED 


HANSEM-NEW “Split-Frome” 
TRUSSES 


A 


Auxiliary 
Side 


ped ‘for 
to Well 


Dummy 
* Suppert 


A 
B 


* Truss to Give Under Strain 
Withewt Disiedging Mernie 
Pods. 


“Contslip™” Beck Pods Keer 
* the Truss Where it Belongs 
Will Met Silie 


Approved by 
The Medical Profession 
CONSULT YOUR DOCTOR 


Thoroughly Experienced 
Graduate Fitters 


Private Fitting Rooms 
Advance Appointments Advisable 


NA. 8-6566 


*+KLOMAN 


Instrument Co. 
Opposite Doctors Hospital 
1822 EYE ST. N.W. 


Virginia Store: 4257 Wilson Bivd. 


Cc 


Arlingtosy Va. JAckson 2-1428 


‘7%4— “% 


ing that of the U.S 
Standard-Vacuum Oil 
West Bengal. 


owned 
Co. in 


CU. I. T. Celebrating 
C. I. T. Financial Corp. is cur- 
rently celebrating two mile 


stones—the financing of its 15 
millionth motor vehicle (at re- 
tail) and the completion of its 
40th year of providing whole- 
sale and retail automobile sales 
financing for dealers. Founded 
in 1908, the corporation began 
financing automobiles for the 
first time on a national basis 
in 1916 when it began offering 
an instalment sales financing 
service to car dealers. 


Penhey Sales Gain 


NEW YORK (”"—J. C. Penney 
Co., which operates a chain of 
1677 dry goods stores, reported 
record May sales of $100.268.546, 
up 12 per cent from the $389, 
428.204 in the same month last 
year. Sales for the five-month 
period ended May 31 totaled 
$433, 473,702 against $398, 176,104 
in the same period of 1955, a 
gain of 8.86 per cent 


General Instrument 


ELIZABETH, N. J r 
Shareholders of General Instru- 
ment Corp. at their annual 
meeting ratified the acquisition 
for $2,490.000 of Micamold Flec- 
tronics Manufacturing Corp 
The acquisition gives General 
Instrument additional manu 
facturing facilities at Brooklyn 
N. Y., and Tazewell, Va 


. . 
Chicago Grain 
CHICAGO. tune 11 @—Rapid expansion of 
the wheat bervest i@ the Southwest sent breed 
ram prices Gewe asroune 2 cents on the 
oord of Trade today 
There wes sever sey Geebt sbeut 
treed ia wheat. ft started out fewer 
maimed enter the previews ciese a! 
Final prices, Sewever, were ap substantially 
from the Gay's jews 
Price changes i ether cerests were set 
mech weperteece tel @ mayerity of these 
ber contracts ended higher 
Wheat closed "% te 7% ‘ower, core “% lower 
te “ higher, ests “ te “SS fighter, rye ‘> te 
1% Digher, seybeoes ‘a te t'> Bigher ane 
joerg 3 «6cents «jewer te 7 cents & tendred 
pounds bigher 


ef 
et 


wheat 
ly 


See 
Dec 
Wor 
Coen 

’ 
Ses 
Dec 
Mar 
oars 
ily 
Sep 
Dec 

¢ 


Ses 
ec 
Mar 
SOYBEANS 
bly 
Sep 
Nev 
lan 
Mar 
Laee 
lly 
Ses 
Oct 
12.25 


Nev . 
13.32 


Dec 13.38 13.27 
GRAIN 
CHICAGO 
core Ne. 1 
1.57%; ests We 
exe femry white 
white T?\% 


Seybeas 


Rone 
yellow 
Ne. 1 
heavy 


Ne. 2 
1 heavy white 77% 
17%; Ne. 2 entra 


6! 14° @- 14%e: seybdean meal 


peminal 138 


1.08-1.18. 


malting 8 cheice 


ariey 
1.48; teed 


‘Cash Dividends 
Increase 15% 
Over 1955 Period 


_ United Press 

The Commerce Department 
reported yesterday that cdr- 
paid out $3.7 billion in cash 
porations issuing public reperts 
dividends the first five months 
of. this year—a 15 per cent in- 
crease over the same period of 
1955 

Payments by manufacturing 
corporations were up per 
cent, the report said, an in- 
crease of almost twice the aver- 
age for nonmanufacturing in- 
dustries 

Cash dividend payments for 
als industries were up about 
automobile and nonferrous 
metals industries were up about 
half from last year. Transporta- 
tion equipment makers showed 
a slight decline reflecting lower 
extra dividend payments the 
early part of this year, the re- 
port said 


C&NW to Build Shop 


CHICAGO \®—The Chicago 
and North Western Railway an- 
nounced it will build one of the 
most modern railroad freight 
car repair shops in the country 
at Clinton. lowa. 


| es a 


BENJAMIN 
) FRANKLIN 
: 


. 


side!phia’s Largest Hotel 


Air Conditioned Rooms 


BENJAMIN 
FRANKLIN 


Heart of The 
nad Shopping 
h Hotel Garage 
» from $7.00 


in CENTER L 
PHILADELPHIA 


Chestnut at Ninth 


For Reservatons 
P j » A.AAT!T ar PRY.443 


Money Wanted 


PUT YOUR MONEY 
WHERE THE PEOPLE 
ARE cue cy in 


Dupont Cirele 


$200,000 at 10°% interest and, 
interest in brand new $2,000,000 
8-story, air conditioned, twin ele- 
vator apartment house. 170 units, 
location: 20th Street and New 
Hampshire Avenue N.W. 1 block 
west of Connecticut Ave. and 2 
blocks from Mayflower Hotel. 
Write to Box M-195, The Wash- 
ington Post. 


Vw -—--— 


"We're staying home 


this year” 


AS THE HAPPY 


HOST TO THE 


LIBERTY LIFE CONVENTION 


Usually 


we have the honor of 


attending our company’s agency 


conventions in a distant 


resort 


city or 


But this year Liberty Life 


has further honored us by 


bringing to Washington 


its entire 


convention group—some 500 


strong, inc luding representatives, 


the 
officials. Proudly, 
we welcome and wish th 


pieasant stay 


this week 


| 


Full Elastic Beck Allows the 


r wives. and Home Office 


as their host, 


ema 


in our home city 


LIBERTY LIFE 


INSURANCE COMPANY 


Home Office 


GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA 


WASHINGTON BRANCH OFFICE 


| 3408 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W. 


R. N. Deese 
D. R. Lawrence 
J. P. Murray 


| . L. Atwell, Jr., Manager 


Representatives: 
Richard Roberts 


R. T. Russell 


W. D. Scully, Associate Manager 


J. M. Sigillite 


J. B. Tornill# 


Stocks Rally on News of Ike’s Progress "== 


ra aes et —— re ee 915 Million Hilton Unit 


Associated Press +* . . . 
Total sales shares: 

2,000,000 ; Nor M Ges 278 «677 42% 42 «642+ % % +t 

NeNGes pfS.50 rite 110% 110% 11819— Mh ¥ a nN 40 otte+ % 

s+ 


: Closing Prices Near Peak 72:72. ® 32's, i 22 Ein Piusburgh Planned 


: a 
ws Wet Ww 


o- 3 6 78:8 Oe @ 6 0.2 2 oe 2 eee 


, — " Twe 23% " " 
NEW YORK, June 11 (®#—The stock market | at 29 and hit a low of 28%. Pressure on the mm." Se Me ne fe fee aeee o. PITTSBURGH, June 11 #—Hilton Hotels Cogp., the Nation s 
today regained more than two-thirds of the | stock followed destruction of its Niagara rey Ty ’ 7 mf % biggest hotel chain, today announced it will build a new $15 
severe loss suffered Friday on news of Presi Falls hydroelectric plant by a rock slide. Chie € 51% ' *% 32+ % million hotel in Pittsburgh's redeveloped gatewry center. 
' , —— TXL Oil was second up % at 32%, one of s = | The Pittsburgh unit will bring to 39 the number of Hilton 
a pos sanenen howe nagil iol diieiitha: ails Ps oil stocks in the list of 15 most active | Onis oi tte » “tee “Teal Gl Geterne ee : m2 hetele eperening of Snder coe 
c show o e marke ay sucs. struc ; yt F : . : . 
was very much like the improvement in the duPont advanced 2% at 205. After the close + cae atine + % | are located in the United States. lanta, San Francisco, New Or- 
President's condition which was described as the Supreme Court held that the company ’ 1 =e = pe Conrad N. Hilton, president leans and Baltimore, but added 
stect used is aver “excellent.” doesn't have a monopoly on cellophane. Rich- ‘ d Charlies “It's all in the discussion stage 
1 tedustriais, 213.408; railvends, 52,700; , . of the corporation, an arles t] 
ut liities, 100.108, total, oa BE By a shen ue toda be yal a up 5% at 81 on rumors of an W. Dow, president of the Equi- and any one might fall through 
: . be- oils | ; - 
came ill, but his progress over the weekend North American Aviation was up 3 at 87 ' m c 2 table Life Assurance Society |#* Say Ume. 
(108) Hoge reassured the finaneial district. orra proposed two-for-one split and announce- A. See Sit Me Oe Ar Le of the United States, made a 
: | The Associated Press average of 60 stocks ment of plans to sell additional stock to stock- = SOS re joint announcement of the 
Friday dropped $3.00, sharpest decline in eight | holders. American Hawaiian Steamship added y ot ans ale project. 
months, while today the average regained | 3 at 117 when the Maritime Administration Coast 1:80 261 2 . Equitable will lease to Hilton 
$2.20. in Washington tentatively approved plans to [°* f* 2 jaa = _— we the land on which the hotel! will 
Today the market started higher with a rush | build 10 new rollon-roll-off ships. Twin City ‘pac ute 2 . ae Bus be built. The lease is for 32 
that put the ticker behind briefly at the open- | Rapid Transit was up % at 17% as directors years, with three renewal op- 
ing. It turned quiet after that, but prices kept | raised the quarterly dividend to 45 cents from tions of 15 years each 
To be called the Pittsburgh 
Hilton, the new hotel will face 


on climbing and were around their best lev- | 40 cents previously paid. 
els at the finish. Ali divisions were up with Bellanca Corp. on the American Stock Ex- 
gains of 1 to 3 points quite frequent. Losses | change, which lost 5% Friday, opened today (Param Pict Point State Park whose 36 
were small. on 90,000 shares off 3 at 6. It was unable to )™ me 'em 68 “9 acres are part of a huge rede- 
With the AP gverage up $2.20 at $179.20, | open until near the end of the first hour, and us ; : om velopment project. It is with. 
the industrial component advanced $4.30, rail- | the dealings were suspended for a time after $ 2 in 200 yards of the spot where . L} 
roads were up $1.80, and utilities were ahead | that until orderly trading could be reestah- ; = a the Allegheny and Mononga- in 
30 cents. lished. The stock closed off 15% at 7% with ‘3s ms & hela Rivers flow together to 
The market wasn’t very broad with 1122 | 345,200 shares changing hands Brokers ex: : ; form the Ohio River. Your HOME ee 
individual issues traded. Volume came to § pressed several theories as to the cause of ) : _ Hilton previously announced 
2,000,000 shares as compared with 3,630,000 the heavy selling but they were unable to o  —1 (it was planning to build other AHUMPHR 
shares traded Friday, pinpoint the reason. new hotels in Detroit and Kan- atte 
Niagara Mohawk Power dropped % at 295. The American Stock Exchange was gener- sas City EALTOR 
today as the session's most active issue on ally tigher. Corporate bontis were mixed, rah Vera 187% t87%S. te ~ “a a ane he corpo 5 Mase, Sve, BW. BA, OOGee 
_71,100 shares. The stock opened on 9000 shares | and U. S. Governments were higher. it 100% 188%) 180% u t 6 oy Reg AE ee agg 


$ os 
— — — - —_— _ 7 , : 
(108) Wigh Lew Close che . (108) Wigh Lew Close Che ; = Cleveland, Portland, Ore., At 


a a RESEARCH MEMO 


U 
a Cie Mil 1 . , , . 'e+1\ be] 
ties fan om mag By omg A me se L es tne “8 m INVESTMENT FACTS 
al} 


—_ 


* 
;- 


>> > 
228 
sZt 


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Su. 8 ~FSSuue 


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ew if Th 


pessarch Spending 1956 ve 38 0 + i Phils Gi 1 oe ; : jou & a * A MUST for Investors—compiled by the New York 
Percen in : , ‘ ' ‘ . ‘’) 
cott ts 118 108ia Teete Tenet fa tae PRL 278 ar Stock Exchange—lIndicates over 291 Listed Stocks 
in nm 2 : which have paid cash dividends every year for 25 to 
105 years 
Philp Mer 3 


Pei! Pet } ” ree ar 
Pillshy Mills 2.58 : Call of Write for } Con 


ae . ® OPEN SATURDAYS @ EVENINGS UNTIL 9 P.M. 
$ 8 


Jones, Kreecer « Hewitt 


VWembers \ Y Stock E xe hange and Other Leading Eve hanges 


-< os - ~ 
er oF ee ee ee hv hd OU 


Cafritz Building—1625 Eye St. N.W. Di. 7-5700 


-—< 
~~ @eena 


oe 
— sw 
= 


Geo. Mason Motel, Alex., Va. Lake Wales, Flerids 


Lew Close Che 


344 1-32 1-32-1464 
oh 8 — % : 


S in = Mens rc : om. & 2" 9 = | : Se —~ | 
Mackall & Coe 


freept ‘Set 3 ; 
r 7? 83% 
Sy Tra 1.408 123 32% 
Members 


on 
~~ Pe a 


3u 38-53-82. 
a a 6S 


~ 


ust Gots, 1 § 32% 37% B2%4+ % 
ok St «ON U2 5 3i% 31% J1% —“ West We Tel . . ™ 
— Wests N t « wy 
a ie ew York Stock Exchange 
, Wheel 
Wheel 
wenn New York Gorrespondent—Clark, Dodee & Company 


white , 626 Wordward Building REpublic 7-1133 
" el sf vy ‘ 


: 2% 32'9+ ys WilseoniCe 
* 7? 77 


, o> “ ’ 
‘ 
“a 6" 


~ 
— 
-% 
-_- ns 
= 


~SS Seno Su SSS— SR 


73 
i+ “ 

Levi Mash 

Lewensteis 1.508 

Lekees Sti ts 17% 


ly —M— 
Miu We Je 


M4 
Macheaaf Soe , 4% 
Mack Trt 


~) 
eww ~ we @ oO 


™ 
7 
Crescent Ce %) §3"% 


nm eT eee Gee eee = 8 How to learn more 


15 Most Active Stocks a 2 vole & Tew 158 19 20% 
NEW YORK. lone 11 @—Soles, cles Cen - 

prices ond set chenges of the 15 most , Gen 
active stecks teday ¢ 
71.100 Nieg Meh Pow 

41.900 Tx! Oi 

78.300 Curtis Put 

277.108 General 


- 
~~ 


? 
Mu 
? 
‘ 
m™ 
5 
1 
1 
1 
‘ 
46 
at 


27 


=i»  @bout investments 


, cenith Red 1500 812 18 
Z—Uet of trading ten shares 
full 


a 
ve@won- 


Gree Mig 
Aves MW of 235 


ee 


~ 
———? ) ee Se 
= o 


pee Retes of dividends w the feregeing table 
f Rotary €' § te uM uu are)06 apmee! §«6disbersements§ base on 0 the The best way to le irl) about 
Teta! issees a Royse! Dut 268ie 25 167% 11% ‘* last quarterly of semi-annes! declaration . 


Reval McB 0e = 1) 31% 31" ' ; , : —— 
18. Pee tperr™ Rane ” Rew 1906 lone TT gh ggg | MeROTOd 1.080” 18-32% BN SIN41% Grigeets ore eet eee investments is to have some. When 
18.9% Seuthere Pred 3 —-S-- a—Alse extra of extras. S—Annual rate : ea : 
12.900 Tex Gulf Sw'ph $s & - Safeway St 2.48 17 Si%% S2¥~ S27%e+ ty plus stock dividend. G—Declared or paid, you decide to inv est, you will study 
Hy Beoing > — . . ol : 4 ‘ oe os pe o4de 11s «6115 rt] a ng = a —— oe, , Ww 
12, inclawr Gi sedric MayDSt 3.75 : t : ow paid se far ‘S year... '—Payable of seC 
12 -- ee : ' - ¢ 7 : t%) Steck phn F 1935, estimate cash value urities in earnest. c wil gladly 
12 . rail 3 ®  on-di wt dots. £- of : : 
— . Paid lat | yo gS opie other help you with informat ion and service 
stec widens of split up. t—Deciared or , 
paid this year, a” accumuiative at every step. To begin with, send 
cwitends m arrears - | - | 4 
, + J ~~ — ey ot - 1 today for our famous little pamphlet, 
McKessaR ' clares or pau i 7 plus stock Dividend PT ' 7 
MeLell Str 1.20" 22, 28% t—Payabie im stock Guring 1986, estimated Opening an Account.”’ Just use the 
WeGQuay er \% —t, Cash value = Ss + ow en-distrite | 
"7 ten = s Gate —lrquida , 
a, , coupon below. 
distr Bution 
. 2a ‘ ' ' 1 warrants . 
1874+ 2% — da : “% “ % : “s 3 ——— wi—Whee issued. o¢—Next F . 
31 8 3 ; 2 lwer 
err Cortics Wr A 2? ’ — % 9? M mam ft 5 “% 3 . ate <n ow recewership of bem rancis I. duPont & Co. 
‘s D 4 . ; reer wed cer th Bankrupt Act, f 
on . - : ne securities sommnet by aor companies. ' Members New York Stock Exchange and Pprincipa! security 


. and commodity exc hanges » 69 offices from enaet tn coaet 
47%+ \ B / Vi k 
aitimore Markets 
a+ Ns : , . : 
+ A og ne paeae bose “On my Chee Wyatt Building, Washington 5, D.C. 
eee “Dp REPUBLIC 7-4000 


50 pe 
— 


+ 
Decca Rec 
at ty Deere 1250 » Mall 
Hallibertes 2 
Please send me your pamphlet entitled 


: Te+-1%5 * . . . A , — ' “< , 
Sere ceattiae oiler. Trading on fed steers moderatel) Opening an Account.” 


ww 5 


i dd a 


= 
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. 


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a 


4... ———— 


The STRONGEST 


oak was once an acorn 


- 


-~—-—8 & | @ ae ~~ hw 
— 


- 
~~ 


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ss = = & 
Qe 


st 
Hersh Ch pf2.12 
az 1 


rag | 

44%g-1%4 — a _* 

few medium 550-577 
( Al VES Receipts 

veniers, 2400025 06. Yes, and if you apply the same’ reasoning 

to stocks, you'll have to admit that the bie 

blue chips of today were once smal! them 


; t amt tne ‘ 7 " 78 Bt of» in 20s. | rr vs and gilts pre selves. 
Byers 7. det . ¥ ° 'y M84 We BO straight “lot Nos 1 and. 2. dered Which is another way of saying that many 
Gal Pack 1.000 STat1%e p ' — = ote GRE ~ cents lower on barrows. its, ows of the small companies that are now in the 
an 2 IVa "4 Wer & 26 181% 180-230-b. butchers, 18.50618.75" ter early stages of growth may well be the 

25+ i : 0 Nashy CASL " , 140-10 iO: 8 is ot giants—the new blue chips of tomorrow. 
1evn+1 eee Ce ‘ . ‘of Ft i a F  eh  S It isn’t easy to pick such companies from 
" M+ M , : : | . . Sté My ‘ 00 ibs. 12.25@12.75; 600 ibs. up, 22. the thousands of small and medium size 

° J N stae War . I pouTtry: Market very auiet ; . 5 a ‘ 

%5+1% Starrett me Market very aul corporations whose stock is traded over the 


Eigin Watch ' \dche Pw Oe s¢ } ri ther 
2+ va FIRM on : nan ™| - ~ Ya 4-26 cents. Some carried heavy typ counter. But we feel that we have unearthed 
some situations of special promise. 


? 
7? 
~ oe 4.eef 285 rie 


~ 

— 
-— — — — 333 ~ 
ee zet.2 


For information on he over-the-counter securities 
that we consider especially. attractive at the present 
time, just fill in and mail the coupon oelow. 


Tota! receipts heavy 
full ample for the generally 
deman 

an $8" t paid by first receivers 
\ Fue ’ , ’ Baitimore cases incl . ; : 
=9 -_ iat - a “ : ig Whites Br. & Mi Mail to Mr. Sherley Colbert 

re s ; p 

. 3 pet. A it 1%. Vee 
4t%+ \“% Ex-Cell-O 2 5 , , e . ’ 
‘ Wary ! 1 50e Mediums. min, 60 Washington Representative 
mee Me .25¢ ' Pe 


Sio+ Ve Fart Mer 
611 Warner Bidg., Wash. 4, D.C. © REpublic 7-3589 


‘ j irtons ~ 5.os ’ | ~ -~ . . 
Sym Gould 50 8918 10% 108 radin eranpeandlc ryiang = eas- M ( | ' t 
pete T— "| Wesdipis: Rees, 810 cases by trek, NMebrath securities 
18% 19 + % 


. . 
a, Hy rr . 12\e+ ve Commodity Index ) CORPORATION 
4 8 ya NEW YORK, june 11—The Associated Press 
1§ 


G3 62%) 641% POMC Wholesale pr inde s com 


S, week age 177.99, meeth 70 Wall Street, N. Y.5, N. Y. © WH. 40175 

age 181.32, year age 171.65 
ao el ee, oe) } ee OP . ; 

41% ions ou+ ‘y High 182.97 177.14 175.48 181.79 Please send me infermetion en growth stock 

% 8% 8+ % oF 173.79 168.25 166.56 178.55 

38% 28% +1, (1928 average equals 198.) 

ds 


Foreign Exchange 


NEW YORK, luse 11 &—Forei Exchange 3. 
tates follew: Canadian dollar ~s 


open 
P ne ~ Shr Je ws idewat, 7 + 1 s conts 
+1 ‘Me Am Ay de 1.) @ | , crest Srteme (pound) $2.687/16, off 1/32 of 
| ‘ 


TS\a+ “a Fenestra 
Members American Mock Exachance Assan 


Bus.-08-~ 


— 
ww ~N se 


~ 
$5.¥..cce.i28ute~. 


17%. Food M 


D. Cc. Produce THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 


Tuesday, June 12, 1956 1 


eat t. Secarity] Prices 


1. 


American Stock Market 


Associated Press 
Total sales 940,000 shares: a 
Gear ago 1,1 1,107 000. 


(198) High 


Yesterday's wholesale produce prices 
‘for leose-than- carjoed lots in Washineto ’ 
as r rt by the Beeartment © . 
Asriceltere. — cinia. Domestic Roygnd > bushel 

carton, including some epac ke locally 
1.76842 00 bushel bask 
—Hew Jersey GARROTS—C aslifornia ‘te pound 
sacks, 3.2503 .50 Nay erates. 48 i- 
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THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD © 
Tuesdey, June 12, 1956 


es sieiae 


s . 


— ean 


Two brothers and a sister 
were among the graduates 
at Georgetown University's 
157th commencement yes- 
terday. Robert E. MeCul- 
lough (left), 24, received a 
doctor of medicine degree; 
Joan Mary McCullough, 
21, was graduated with a 
nursing degree and John 
L. MeCullough, 30, was 
given a master of laws de- 
gree. They live at 4709 
Hunt ave., Chevy Chase, 
Md. 


Other recipients of degrees 
were (from left) Thomas C. 
Egan of Philadelphia, doc- 
tor of Laws; Bolton Sulli- 
van, president of the Skil 
Corp., Chicago, Doctor of 
humane letters, and the 
latter’s son, John W. Sulli- 
van, bachelor of arts. 


By Charles Del Vecchio 
Staff Photographer 
4 


Staff Photos by Arthur Ellis 
Texas oil “money” of generous denominations was 
being flaunted about at the Statler yesterday on 
behalf of Janis Knox, 17, of Breckenridge, Texas, 
(who's shown with some of it), a candidate for national 
president of the Future Business Leaders of America. 
Janis, a senior at Breckenridge High School, is Texas 
state president of the FBLA. 


usiness Leaders 


in Spelling Bee 


Virginia's delegation to the Future Business Leaders of America convention here in- 


cluded these high school students from Christiansburg. From left they are Joyce 


Boyd, chapter president; 


\ GROUP of the Nat 
4 Zz " " 


iture business jieaqcer 


held a spelling bee yester- 


day and promptivy misspelicd 
some of the words they wil 


deal with in the future. 


The bee alle ia National 


Spelling Relay—was a fea 
ture 


ryonic leaders are 
ing in the Statler Hote! 
Three of the first four words 
they missed were “financie! 
“grievance” and “quotient.” 
The fourth was t prosaic 
“prairie 
The Maryland team—com- 
posed entirely of Sally Fergu- 
son of Milford Mill High 


Joan Reed, and Darla Hodge, state president. 


ITED) three-way ¢ 


executive 
the (name 
of the 
speak to 


Photo by Julian Wasser 


Lined up to confer congratulations on daddy, who's just had a Master of Arts.degree conferred on him by Georgetown University, is the 
family of Col. Louis Mendez, 1319 Stoney Brae drive, Falls Church. Mendez, a West Point graduate, did post-graduate work in international 
relations and received his degree yesterday. The children are Richard, 1 (held by his mother), Jonathan Paul, 2; Gregory, 4; eee 
6; Celeste, 7; Christine, 9; Louis, 12; Judith, 13; and Pamela, 14. The ecuple expects a tenth child in October. 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
. Tuesday, June 12, 19% 23 
Dévertisement 


: ‘ | oe 7 
Why Does the World Hate America? 
A Blunt Statement of the French Viewpoint by Raymond Cartier, Executive 

Director of the Magazine ‘Paris-Match’, Paris, France 


(From National Review May 2, 1956) 


Republished as a public service by 


The New Bedford (Mass.) Standard-Times 


BASIL BREWER, Publisher 


If his arrival was not clandestine the word 
has no meaning. The only crowd was the 
police, closely guarding the Palam Airport. 


Pandit Nehru had disdained to come, on 
the pretext that he was not only foreign min- 
ister but Head of State. 


And in the absence of an Indian foreign 
minister, Mr. John Foster Dulles, Secretary 
of State of the great Republic of the United 
States, was received at New Dethi by a func- 
tionary so minor that the American press 
agencies were ashamed to mention him. 


They preferred to dwell on the fact that 
the Secretary of State had been gratified by 
a special and unusual favor—the authoriza- 
tion’to fly over the Taj Mahal, in spite of the 
risk from vibrating motors to its fragile 
architecture. 


A few weeks earlier Messrs. Bulganin and 
Khrushchev had arrived at this same Palam 
Airport amid the mobilized enthusiasm of the 
capital and the whole nation. 


Delhi had been as red as a cock’s comb— 
red with pleasure—under a grand array of 
waving flags which the police themselves had 
distributed to the people. A million persons, 
cheering the jovial Khrushchev and the deb- 
onair Bulganim, had lined the route along 
which the closed limousine of Mr. Dulles sped 
as swiftly as an American hearse. 


“The warmth of our reception of the Soviet 
leaders simply conforms to our national 
tradition,” a slightly embarrassed Indian of- 
ficial had explained. “The Queen of England, 
or. Mr. Dulles, arriving tomorrow, would be 
received with the same cordiality.” Mr. Dulles 
arrived. He saw. 


Dulles Roams the Globe 
In Quest of Friends 


It is not always easy to understand the 
case of Mr. Dulles. : a 


Why, for example, did he choose to expose 
himself, and his country with him, to inevi- 
table comparison in a Jakarta still vibrat- 
ing with last year’s acclamation of the Chi- 
nese President of Council, Chou En-lai? 
Nothing essential, said official Washington, 
nothing very important, motivated his con- 
versations in Indonesia. 


Mr. Dulles is already, by a wide margin, 
the record-holder in mileage for his category. 
If he added to that mileage; if he visited 
capitals which no longer have any touristic 
attraction for him; if he incurred a supple 
mentary and superfluous fatigue; he no doubt 
hoped to improve his contacts, to reduce mis- 
understandings, to rewarm atmospheres. 


In a word, to make himself liked—the very 
symbol of the aim whieh America has been 
pursuing desperately and disastrously for 10 
years. 


The case of India, alongside that of Mr. 
Dulles, is edifying. 


America powerfully helped India to gain 
its independence. In the very midst of the 
war, President Roosevelt pressured Winston 
Churchill to grant complete political liberty 
to a country whose sympathies were almost 
entirely with Japan. 


Liberated India became one of America’s 
darlings—the great spiritually enlightened 
democracy which would follow arm-in-arm 
with America the bright road of progress, 
Material aid was not omitted, even though the 
Delhi Government always refused to under- 
take the slightest political obligation. 


The U. 3S. subscribed twenty million dol- 
lars to the last five-year-plan of the Indian 
Republic, and the total of its gifts is some 
$454 million. When the chronic Indian famine 
threatened to become tragic three years ago, 
America threw into the bottomless pit 
2,000,000 tons of wheat, part of which was 
lost through inefficiency. 


Private aid—the phenomenal American 
private aid—has been added to this govern- 
ment effort, representing for the year 1955 
alone nearly 25,000,000 pounds of foodstuffs 
with a value of $18,326,000. 

American Point 4 teams, and those of 


several large charitable organizations are at — 


work in every part of the Peninsula, helping 
the Indians to try not to die—while Russia 
has never offered to Indian distress the alms 
of a single sunflower seed. 


Vast American Aid Funds 
Bring Only Distrust and Hate 


The dividends of these two policies are 
illustrated by the contrast between the re- 
ception of Mr. Dulles and that of Bulganin- 
Khrushchev. 


There is certainly not a country in the 
world where America is more suspect as a 
nation, and the American more despised as 
an individual, than in India. 


Nehru has never ceased to ob¢truct every 
American effort to organize the defense of 
Asia, but Nehru in this case merely interprets 
the distrust and animosity of his people. 


When the Communists circulated the fable 
of American bacteriological war in Korea, 
probably not one Indian in a hundred thou- 
sand refused to believe it—just as not oné in 
a hundred thousand doubted that the Amer- 
icans were the aggressors. 


The same quasi-unanimity admits as an 
absolute fact that the Americans dropped the 
first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, instead of a 
German city, because the Japanese are Asiatic 
and colored. 


America could spend billions—and never 
succeed in effacing from the Indian mind the 
conviction that, more than any other nation, 
it represents the white man’s privilege of cg- 
gressiveness and imperialism ... while Rus- 
sia, whose colonial conquests cover half of 
Asia. and reach to India’s very gates, is synon- 
ymous with racial equality and emancipation. 


Take even England. Theoretically she op 
pressed India for two centuries, fattened on 
its substance, built on its misery the insolent 
fortunes of Belgravia and Mayfair, shed 
Indian blood in cruel repressions. 


Nevertheless today the Englishman—the 
hard, indifferent Englishman—compared 
with the American is to Indians a friend and 
brother. 


No lesser person than Gamal Abdel Nasser 
told me recently that he had learned in con- 
versation with Nehru this enormous differ- 
ence in the degree of unpopularity of the two 
nations. 


But when I asked Nasser what he himself 
thought of the Americans he thrust out his 
chin and answered only: “I like their films.” 


What applies to India applies to all Asia. 
America in 1948 literally tore Indonesia from 
the Dutch—and in his Jakarta press confer- 
ence John Foster Dulles was reduced to plead- 
ing the cause of his country before accusers. 


Japan, guilty and beaten, was coddled by 
America like a newborn babe, re-educated 
with immense care in democracy and the cult 
of baseball, presented with two and a half 
billion dollars in accordance with the Amer- 
ican system of reverse payment of war dam- 
ages. 


All of which resulted in the neutralist 
Hatoyama Government, Tokyo crowds burn- 
ing American vehicles, Japanese horror films 
on the atomization of Hiroshima—as if the 
Japanese were tender'—and the immense, 
bitter resentment of defeat slowly fermenting 
in this profound people. 


Asian Nations’ Only Common Interest 
Is Dislike for VU. S. 


South Vietnam, Korea and Formosa are 
border cgses; they owe their every breath to 
America, yet even this does not always suffice 
to restrain the violence and impatiénce of 
their anti-American sentiment. 


One could continue this world tour. It is 
the same everywhere. 


Anti-Americanism is often the sole common 
interest of violently antagonistic nations or 
groups, as in South Africa where the whites 
curse America for its anti-colonialism and the 
blacks blame it for its segregation. 


Or in the Near East where the Arabs 
abominate it while the Jews accuse:it of ego- 
ism and meanness. Latin-America has not a 
single country where the anti-Yankee spirit 
does not preponderate. 


The single fact that U. S. citizens have 
practically usurped the name of Americans 


causes a gnashing of teeth all the way to. 


Canada, where, a foreign minister has said, 


‘, ' 


- is for others to change.” 
e aaioriae 


“The time of automatically easy relations 


with our southern neighbor is ended, I believe, 
forever.” 


In Washington the accounts are kept. They 
are enormous. Since the war America has 
distributed to the world $52,287,000,000, of 
which $45,107,000,000 were gifts pure and 
simple. With this sum it could have rebuilt 
every road in the country, or created a super- 
aviation far beyond Russia’s ability to com- 
pete. 


Moreover, what was given away was not 
merely money but wealth, particularly raw 
materials of which America, with its intense 
activity, does not have unlimited reserves. 


Strictly speaking, say the economists, for- 
eign aid is national impoverishment. It is 
acceptable if it buys political advantages. 


Otherwise, it is lunacy. 


Western Europe always heads the list. It 
has received two-thirds of the 52 billion dis- 
tributed since the war by the U. S. Govern- 
ment. England leads with six billion in eco 
nomic aid, followed by France with five and 
a half billion, Germany witha little under 
four billion, and Italy with two billion eight 
hundred million. 


Countries small in size but deeply shaken 
by the war, such as Holland, Austria, Greece, 
have cost the U. S. more than a billion each. 


What is more extraordinary is that 11 
years after the end of hostilities, when 
Europe is completely restored, private Ameri- 
can generosity continues to feed a large num- 
ber of Europeans. 


France, an agricultural paradise, still re 
ceives from 14 philanthropic organigstions 
almost 4,400 tons of foodstuffs, which is 
nothing compared with 66,000 to Italy and 
33,000 to a Germany bathed in prosperity. 
The dollars which paid for these gifts, esti- 
mated at 160 million in 1955 for the whole 
world, are collected from individuals of whom 
many are mere wage-earners. 


Prosperous France, Jealous Britain 
Vie in Antipathy for U. S. 


These public billions and. private millions 
have not made Western Europe a much more 
favorable milieu (environment) for the 
United States than South America or Asia. 


It is hard to say whether anti-American 
sentiment is stronger in England or in 
France. In. France it is aggravated by Com- 
munist influence and at present overexcited 
by the events in North Africa; but in England 
it is fed by the intense frustration of a nation 
recently supplanted in its world role. 


In any case, it crosses social barriers in the 
two Western countries nearest to America. 


The U. S. logically should have the sym- 
pathy of thé working classes because of the 
condition of its own workers, and of the 
property-owning classes which it is protecting 
from annihilation by Communism. 


Yet more often it meets on the one side 
only principled opposition and on the other 
only misunderstanding, flippancy, often dis- 


dain. 


Germany is not, for Washington, the con- 
solation many Frenchmen imagine it to be. 


There were those early days when the GI's 
felt less foreign in the conquered nation than 
anywhere else in Europe, But like Japan, 
Germany restored does not have the unctuous 
humility of Germany in collapse. 


The “Go home” campaign began there, and 
the movement which is alienating. the Bonn 
Government from American policy expresses 
the dominant attitude of the German people. 


The idea of an exclusive alliance with an 
ideologically conquered Germany is no longer 
one of the variants in American planning. 


It is curious to interview American officials 
on the universal anti-Americanism. In gen- 
eral they act as if the matter were not very 


- important. “We hold,” they say, “too much 


of a place in the world,.and we are too rich, 
for American unpopularity not to be inevi- 
table. No matter what we do we shall be 
criticized. We are making the best of it—it 


But this defensive attitude masks a great 
perplexity and a serious disillusion. The State 
Department files are full of studies of the 
phenomenon and reports on remedial means, 
In the center of a powerful continental sys- 
tem, surrounded by armies al! ready to march, 
Napoleon could allow himself the illusion of 
despising with impunity the opinion of for- 
eign peoples. America, in spite of its wealth 
and power, is not in the same situation. 


In Europe, the response to American wealth 
is an attitude of intellectual hauteur. Outside 
Europe, it is more simply a burning reaction 
of antipathy and envy. 


America’s desperate efforts to dissociate 
iteelf from colonial or ex-colonial Europeans, 
masters of yesterday's world, are in vain. 


One: Americans are white; two: they are 
rich; three: they are the richest of the white 
peoples—three indelible facts which insure 
them, no matter what they do, the unfavor- 
able prejudice of a majority of the world’s 
inhabitants. 


Americans do not “share” the resentment 
left by white imperialism; they take it more 
and more exclusively on their own shoulders, 
Their disinterestedness, even if sincere, does 
not exempt them from it. 


Besides, a people fighting on a world field 
of battle cannot be disinterested. The Amer- 
icans make themselves think they are, by con- 
sidering the purity of their intentions and 
the quantity of good money which they throw 
after bad. But on this point the Arabs and 
Hindus are more perspicacious. 


Foreign Aid Calamitous 
For Helped as Well as Helper 


Unfortunately there is little chance that 
America will change its aftitude in the fore 
seeable future. Urgent voices are heard de- 
manding that it stiffen its anti-colonial atti- 
tude and increase a foreign aid which, it is 
becoming clear, is calamitous for the helped 
as well as the helper. 


“Whether we are criticized or not,” said one 
Washington official, “we cannot let Iranian 
children die of hunger.” A boundless ideal- 
ism; a “do-good” conception of foreign policy; 
a conviction that all peoples should be free and 
all men electors; these ideas still reign firmly 
in Washington. 


In the burning affair of North Africa, the 
State Department energetically eschews the 
slightest anti-French intervention, but official 
as well as public sentiment is categorically 
declared in favor of total independence for 
Algeria, Tunisia and Morocce. 


The precedents of the past 10 years; the 
decline of every liberated country into Com- 
munism or neutralism; the dizzy growth. of 
anti-Americanism in decolonialized Asia; the 
fact that liberated North Africa will join an 
Arab League which is practically Moscow- 
orjented: the further fact that the loss of 
North Africa will push France itself—humi- 
iated and desperate—into the Soviet system: 


These realistic arguments, these indisput- 
able truths, are unavailing against a senti- 
mental enthusiasm that comes from a misin- 
terpretation of history: the United States was 
born of a colonial rebellion (which is a false 
notion), and consequently all colonial rebel- 
lions deserve its sympathy. 


U. S. Foreign Policy Should Be Dictated 
By Realistic Self-Interest 


It is terribly difficult to be the dominant 
power of an epoch. The Washington officials 
are not wrong in saying that anti-American- 
ism will exist, no matter what America does, 
so long as the U. S. holds its present rank. 
But anti-Americanism is also maintained by 
faults in judgment and by grave and avoid- 
able errors. One of the most frequent is 
America’s incapacity for taking sides. Its 
most general mistake is obedience to ideology, 
or more exactly to an intellectual confusion 
in which ideolbgy and egoism blend and 
obscure one another. — : 


There would be less anti-Americanism in 
the world if America abandoned its. philan- 
threpic aspirations, its vocation of Santa 
Claus, its transcendental morality, all its 
missionary trappings, all its boy-scout gear, 
and if, at last, it followed openly and intelli- 
gently the policy of its own interest. 

» 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HER ALD 


ae 


Tuesday, June 12, 1956 


Bid for 


‘Big Surprise’ 


* A Takoma 


Postlude 


Music Played 
As in Earlier 
Centuries 


By Paul Hume 

Twe Saturday Consort is a 
friendly group of people from 
Pittsburgh who enjoy making 
music in the manner of the 18th 
and earlier centuries. 

Playing recorders, virginal 
lute, spinal, viola da gamba 
and various types of drums and 
other percussion instruments 
appropriate in performing sim 
ple love songs and dances of 
those musica! days, these agree 
able souls gave a concert last 
night in the Phillips Gallery 
where a capacity audience ee 
frequent evidence of its delight 
in their activities 

Directed by Colin Sterne 
who plays the lute and record. 
er. and Homer Wickline, whose 
instruments include the spinet 
and percussions, the ensemble 
of six includes two ladies: Ro- 
berta Sterne, heard on the vir- 
ginals and recorders, and Patty 
Grossman, recorder and per 
cussion. Conrad Seaman, in ad- 
dition to the recorders, takes 
on the pleasant duties of sing- 
ing the luxuriant melodies of 
those earlier days. And very 
well he sings them, too 

Karl Neumann, by profession 
a cellist with the Pittsburgh 
Symphony. plays a viola da 
gamba with the Consort, thus 
constituting himself something 
of a specialist on the cello's 
forerunner as well as the mod- 
ern form 

The riches, major and minor 
of four centuries before Sebas- 
tian Bach were heard during 
the concert. Frivolous music 
from Italian frottoles, from a 
Couperin Rigaudon, and a 
sparkling concerto for recorder 
by one Robert Woodcock min 
gied with the. grave expressive- 
ness of William Byrd's noble 
threnody on the passing of his 
fountryman and fellow artist 
Thomas Tallis. The genius of 
Orlando Gibbons is hardly re 
membered today, though he 
Was a giant in his time, and 
great enough to stand with any 
man who has come after him 

The members of the Consort 
took terns at explaining and 
commenting on the music and 
the instruments heard during 
the evening. We coufd have 
done without being told that 
the harpsichord has become 
widely known through the ef.- 
forts of Rosemary Clooney and 
Mitch Miller, since we have 
just finished a cycle of four 
concerts of music for harpsi- 
chord and violin by one Mozart 
in this same gallery. But there 
often seems to be the tempta- 
tion to pep up the little run 


ning commentary in ways that: 


might appeal to the 12-vear-olds 
one can be sure are not .pres- 
ent 

Aside from this bit of wn.- 
nessarv chatter, in other words 
while the music was going on, 
things were first rate. The 
more music | hear, the more |] 
think it says everything that 
needs to be said on the subject 


Damascus C. of C. 
Elects Officers 


Damascus (Md.) Chamber of 
Commerce officers. elected for 
the coming year. are Jerry 
Cook, president: B. M Wood- 
field, vice president: Henry §S 
Heine, treasurer, and Herbert 
L. Cain, secretary manager 

New members of the board of 
directors, elected to three-year 
terms, are Willis Campbell, 
B. D. Gladhill, and Henry S. 
Heine. 


Grand Jury Clears § 
Purcellville Officer 


LEESBURG. Va., June iil 
(Spl.)—The L oudoun County 
grand jury today refused to in- 
dict a suspended Purcellville 
policeman on a charge of in- 
voluntary manslaughter 

W. Jack Garrison had been 
charged in the death of Linden 
Mc Washington, 67, a cab driver 
McWashington died May 19, 
four days after his cab was hit 
by Garrison's car on Route 7 
near Purcellville. Garrison was 
off duty at the time of the acci.- 
dent. 


| come out of a tax sale. 


Island 


Park teal estate 
man yesterday bid $1.3 million 
for a submerged island in the 
Potomac River, offered at the 
Montgomery County tax sale 
for $20.24 in back taxes. 

County finance officials said 
they were “astounded” at the 
amount bid, which they said 
was the highest figure ever to 


‘The purchaser, Arthur J. Wil- 
liams, refused to say why he 
wanted the 2l1l-acre island—all 
but four acres of which are un- 
der water—or whether he will 
go through with the procedure 
which could end with his actu-| 
ally putting up the $1.3 million’ 
for a title to the property. | 

All it has cost him so far is 
the $20.24. 

Margaret Jones, chief of the| 
county's revenue and disburse- 
ment division, explained that 
the owner of the property can 
keep it by paying off the tax 
and interest any time in the 
coming year. After that, Wil- 


liams could petition the Circuit — 


Court for a title but would have 


to pay the owner the difference listed for sale ras taxes due 
the) ines. 


between the xes and 


‘ amount bid 
The unheard of bidding sent land 


surprised county officials to 
their records. to learn more! 
about the island. They could) 
find nothing to indicate Nw it 
would be worth so much 

The tract, located near Glen | 
Echo. was bought in 19298 for 
$10 by Mary Wheeldon. now 
listed as living in Falmouth. 
N. C. Assessed at $400. it was 


— 


Defamation 


Suit Won by 
Fulton Lewis 


A District Court jury found 
in favor of Fulton*Léwis Jr 
yesterday in a $215,000 defama- 
tion suit brought against the 
radio commentator by Sadie 
Weiner Waranch of Baltimore 
and St. Marys County, Md. 

The jury returned its ver- 
dict to Judge Alexander Holtz 
off. Other defendants in the 
case were the Mutual Broad- 
casting System, Inc., Radio Sta 
tion WWDC, Inc., and Léonard 
Harrelson, a private detective 

Lewis broadcast on Dec. 7 
1953, that Mrs. Waranch owned 
and operated a tavern in St 
Marys County. He said one of 
the waitresses was a minor and 
that beer had been served to 
juveniles. 

Mrs. Waranch.said she owned 
the building but did not oper- 
ate the tavern. 

The defense was based on 
truth. Attorneys Roger Robb 
and Kenneth W. Parkinson rep- 
resented the defendants. | 


23 Graduate 
At Capitol Page 
High School 


Twenty-three boys who are 
pages in Congress or the Swu- 
preme Court were graduated 
from the Capitol Page High 
School in the Ways and Means 
Committee room of the new 
House office building last night 

It was the eighth commence- 
ment of the school since it 
came under the jurisdiction of 
the District of Columbia in 
1948 


John D. Dingell (D- 
Mich.), the Nation's youngest 
Congressman at 29 and a for- 
mer page, delivered the com- 
mencement address 
The boys, who attend school 
on thé third floor of the. Library 
of Congress at odd hours dur 
ing the day when not serving 
members of Congress in 
Capitol, received diplomas from 
Carl F. Hansen, assistant super- 
intendent of the District) 
schools. 


.49-Year-Old Mother 
Gets Fairfax Diploma | 


A 40-year-old McLean wife! 
and mother marched down the 
aisle last night at Fairfax High 
School to receive her diploma 
with 161 other graduates. 

Elizabeth Hamm, whose 15 
year-old daughter, Barbara, is 
in the ninth grade at McLean| 
High School, said she returned 
to school in the fifth grade 
when her child entered the 
first grade. She is married to 
\Paul E. Hamm, a carpenter. 


2 Nixons Meet on Hill, 


Exchange Compliments 


Two Nixons — one a high 
school valedictorian, the other 
Vice President of the United 
States—exchanged compliments 


yesterday on 
Capitol Hill. 
Suzanne 
Nixon, 18-year- 
old scholastic 
wizard at 
W ashin gton- 
Lee High 
School in Ar- 
lington, met 
Vice President 
Richard M. 
Nixon at his 
Capitol office. 
Suzanne's 


Miss Nixon 
breathless 


it was a thrill to meet him!” 


The Vice President's equally free as a community service, 
“That's. one|will be held Tuesday, Wednes-| 


pleased reaction: 
of the smarter Nixons!” 


reac- date on the newest medical dis- 
tion: “He was very charming— coveries. 


four-year scholarship to Amer 
ican University, which she will 
start using this fall to study 
teaching. 

Suzanne, daughter of Mr.' 
and Mrs. Jessco C,. Nixon of 
3063 N. Pollard st., Arlington.) 
will give her valedictory ad- 
dress at 8 tonight at Washing: | 
ton-Lee'’s commencement. | 


Prince Georges Nurses | 


Get Refresher Course 


The Prince Georges. ae 
}Hospital will begin a two-week | 
me a today to give inactive | 
‘nurses a chance to get up to) 


| The 36hour course, offered 


day and Thurdsay this week 


Medal of Gratitude 


Vice President James T. Nicholson (left) of the American 
Red Cross receives from Dr. Feliciano K. Cruz, manager 
of the Philippine Red Cross, one of five medals awarded 
yesterday in appreciation of American aid. Other recipients 
were Elisworth Bunker, president; E. Roland Harriman, 
chairman: Livingston L. Blair, national director, Junior 
Red Cross, and Gaile Galub, former assistant director of 
Red Cross international activities. 


Washington began with jum 
last July of $10, 
Ae Williams 


eer a R. Hardesty. ofiat $1.2 million. 


Faults Seen 
In Suburban 
Church Life 


By Kenneth Dole 


Btaf’ Reporter 


: 
: 
: 
| 
- 


then $100 and finally 
$100,000. Hardesty dropped out - 


FREDERICK, Md. June 11 
Conformity and group thinking 
—two spiritual faults prevalent 
in American church life—come 
to a head in the suburbs, an 
Episcopal minister said here to- 
day. 
| The way to attack these 
‘felts, according to the Rev. 
D.. George West Barrett,.is to 
‘convince suburbanites that 
their way of, life is being 
weighed by a God who is also 
a Judge. 
ference of the Episcopal Prov- 
ince of Washington, Dr. Bar- 
rett pointed out tha‘ the subur- 
‘ban church is “probably the 
most strategically placed” of 
any church in America. A su- 
iburban minister himself—of 
Christ's Church, Bronxville, 
N. Y.—he said those in his pos- 
ition must be “as wise as ser- 
pents” and “harmless as doves.” 

Dr. Barrett declared the 
American way, 
can become to object of idola- 
iry 

Excessive worship of w«rthy 
things is 1 danger a religious 
« age, such as the present, is sub- 
ject to, he said in his lecture 
“Ministering to a Religious 
Age.” 


In a talk at the annual con-' 


“a good way.” 


'Child’s Will Not in Seat of Pants, Adventists Told 


aa June 11 th 
will of a child is not spea 


located in the seat of its pants,” 


William J. Harris, child guid- ‘Methodists Open 
Virginia Parley 


ance authority, advised today 
at the: annual Summer Bible 
Conference of the Seventh Day 
Adventist Church. 

Harris told delegates parents 
too often confuse “won't” and 
“want” with “will” power in 
children. 

“Some parents are afraid of 
crushing the will while train- 
ing the child,” he said in advo- 
cating an occasional restrained 
spanking. . 

Most of the wrongdoing by 
children is not deliberate, but 


SMIRNOFF. 


TWE GREATEST NAME IN VOD) A 


RO Proof Distilled fram grain Ste Pierre Smirnnt? 
Fis. Div. of Heubiein), Hertford. Conn.. U.S.A, 


. 


less and impulsive, the) from throughout the state were 
from headquarters in on hand today as the 174th an- 
continued. jaual Virginia Methodist Confer- 
ence opened here. 

__ As the. first item on the four- 
day agenda, Bishop Paul Neff 
Garber called the ministers, 
HARRISONBURG, June 11 # chureh officials and lay leaders 


An estimated 1200 Methodists'to worship at 2 p. m* 


a 


That’s SOME home the Smiths bought! 


Everybody's talking about the Smiths’ new home— 
and the Smiths are talking about Oriental’s Direct 
Reduction Loan! After years of “planning to buy” 
at last they found a plan to finance their dream thal 
is both economical and sound. They came in, talked 
their problems over with us, and went away happy. 
Visit us soon—we'll try to help you, too. 


Opnentat Bonnie Associanion 


Washington's Oldest Savings and Loan Assoictaion 


600 F St. N.W. ESTABLISHED 1861 NA. 8-7300 


the .. 


Suzanne has been awarded a\and next from 10 a. m. to 3 p. m. 


/ 


Q to l8&h acceleration 
advantage recorded hy Radar 


WITHOUT TCP This car, driven about 3000 miles on 


a competitive premium gasoline, 


has lost some of its original 


power. Harmful deposits short-circuited spark plugs, caused the 


engine to “miss.” 


Here, radar checks the car's acceleration. 


of Shel Py rem 


a a ree . is # ae : — > ~ wy . : 2s ¥ 
; WITH TCP Afeer the came car was run on a few tankfuls 


pr krup— BS sir 


stopped spark plug 


im with ICP*, 
repeated In rns and similar tests 


e sien that ICP additi ve 


the radar acceleration check was 


most cars got 6 to 18% faster 
had overcome deposss, 


snort-circuiting. 


5 CRT TE 


Shell Premium with TCP 


leaves competitive gasolines beh 


Axnybody who thinks that all premium gaso- 
liries are the same should have been: at the 
testing grounds recently where Shell Premium 
with TCP was tested against competitive 


gasolines, 


That's where Shell Premium with TCP gave 


up to 18% better acceleration. 


There’s a good reason why you can get 


Power loss is inevitable. 


Even a new car can quickly develop harm- 
ful deposits that either pre-fire the gasoline, 
or tause spark plug short-circuiting—some- 
times both. 


But Shell Premium has TCP. And TCP 


additive neutralizes these harmful deposits 


. «. Stops pre-firing and spark ple ug © “‘miss.’» 


this extra power which even the most care- 


ful driver sometimes needs. 


The Octane-Rich Gasoline 


The Most Powerful Gasoline Your Car Can Use! 


Switch to Shell and feel the difference. 


It restores lost power. 


7 y y 


*Shell’s Trademark for this ogee gasoline additive 


developed by Shell Research. 


The Gasoline with TCP 


atent applied for. 


PREMIUM 


FELINE FELICITY—A 


bobtailed Manx 


cat, “Killer” 


makes a neckpiece for his 16-year-old mistress, Judy Har- 


They Are Going to Be Sure: 


Photos by Jim McNamare. Staff Photographer 


ris, a student at Western High School. Judy plans to study 
in the YWCA Career Workshop this summer. 


These Teen-Agers Will Study Careers 


By Evelyn Hayes 


IN A world that is unsure, 
at an age characterized by 
insecurity, forty-five  teen- 
agers (mostly 16 and 17) are 
going to have an opportunity 
to be more certain about the 
careers that will make up 
their future 

These .yaungsters are the 
enes chosen from six public 
high schools to participate in 
the “Career Workshops for 
Teen-agers.” the brand yew 
summer plan for high school 
students sponsored by the 
YWCA. 

Questioned by the YWCA's 
Teen-Age Department in an 
éndeavor to find a construc- 
tive summer program for this 
age group, many senior high 
boys and girls indicated that 
they wanted a summer pro- 
gram that would help them 
plan their futures and would 
permit them time to earn 
money during vacation. 


TWO-WEEK ‘career work 
shops that start next Mon- 
day, June 18, and conclude 
June 30 seem to fit the 
bill. Because they indicated 
specific interest in these 
fields, the workshops wil! be 
in Science, Social Work, Pre- 
Medical and Pre-Nursing, 
and Communications 

Principals and guidance 
counselors of Roosevelt, Mc- 
Kinley, Western, Montgom- 
ery Blair. Wakefield and 
Western High Schools sug- 
gested the names of students 
whom they thought would 
most profit by the opportu- 
nity to partcipate in the 
program 

Interestingly enough, ap- 
proximately two-thirds of the 
group are girls 

“Il want to make sure” is 
the tenor of most of the 
youngsters’ answers to the 
question, “Why did you 
choose to participate in the 
course?” 

A few seemed quite sure of 
what they wanted to do, but 
wanted to take this oppor- 
tunity to gain a little experi- 
ence in their chosen field 


SIX BOYS and three girls 
ecnstitute the Pre-Medical 
‘raining Group. Their pro- 
gram will include some time 
at the National Institutes of 
Health, at George Washing- 
ton University Hospital and 
at the Bethesda Naval Hos- 
pital, (he: e learning from the 
staff about opportunities for 
a medical career in the 
Navy). 

John Powell, 17, chairman 
of the Future Doctors and 
Nurses Club of Montgomery 
Blair High School, is one of 
the group. “I'm pretty sure 


I'd like to be a doctor,” says 


a 


“CORRECTION 


The incorrect 
peared in our ad on Sunday, 
June 10. The correct informa- 
tion follows: 


GROUP of MODEL HATS 
; On Sale Now 


$5 and §$7°° 


‘MME. REISS MODES 
3526 Prospect Ave. HO. 2-0204 


Pree Parking 


information ap- 


John, “but I thoucht this 
would be an excellent oppor- 
tunity to find out if this is the 
field I'd really like to be in.” 

John says he has always 
admired doctors and liked 
the work they do, but thinks 
he got the idea of medicine 
as a future from an uncle 
who is a doctor. Speaking 


, with great maturity and as- 


surance, he looks forward to 
getting “right into the hos- 
pitals, seeing operations and 
what goes on there.” Then, 
by way of proving he is just 
17, he adds, “I think it would 
be fun to ride an ambulance, 
too!” 


THE DAUGHTER of a 
chiropractor, Judy Harris, 16, 
of Western High, is one of 
the three girls in this group. 

“I've been interested in 
both chiropractics and medi- 
cine ever since [ can re- 
member,” she says. A young- 
ster who knows exactly what 
she wants and how she's go- 
ing to get it, Judy says she 
hopes to be a chiropractic 
surgeon missionary. 

So dedicated is Judy that 
she always carries first aid 
kits when she goes on hikes, 
and walks, “but nobody ever 
gets hurt when I'm around— 
and i'm always prepared.” 


IN THE all-female pre 
nursing group, Janette Vass. 
16, of Roosevelt High School, 


says she chose to study in 
this group because she wants 
to be a nurse after she grad- 
uates from college and thinks 
“this sort of workshop would 
show you various fields of 
nursing and help you decide 
on a career.” 

Melinda Fox of Montgom- 
ery-Biair, says, “I'm pretty 
sure I want to be a nurse 
and this seems like a good 
opportunity to make certain.” 
So sure, however, is Melinda 
that after the course is over, 
she plans to work at George- 
town University Hospital as a 
nurse’s aide for the rest of 
the summer. 


GEORGE Robinson Jr. of 
Woodrow Wilson, who will 
be 17 in July, could probably 
speak for the eight boys and 
two girls in the Science 
Group. 

“I've always been 
ested in science,” he says. 
“I intend to make engineer- 
ing my career and I'd like to 
study as much as I can to 
decide which field I'd like to 
go into.” 

Vice president of the 
Washington Junior Academy 
of Science, George was win- 
ner of the first prize awarded 
at the Science Fair at Amer- 
ican University 

Sweet sixteen of today 
often chooses science, too 
Susan Dembitz of Western 
High was 16 yesterday, is one 


inter- 


of the two girls in the Scl- 
ence Group 

Right now she’s interested 
in zoology, atomic energy 
and oceanography, she says. 
The course affords her a 
chance to learn more about 
oceanography; perhaps will 
help her make sure of which 
aspect she'd like to follow 
for her future. 


THE COMMUNICATIONS 
Workship in which three 
boys and four girls will par- 
ticipate will give the young- 
sters a look-see into news- 
papers, radio, television and 
the telephone business. 

Judith Eckerson, a Roose- 
velt High School junior, and 
winner of the Evening Star's 
Scholastic Writing Awards 
Contest this year, has been 
writing since she was 6, she 
says, and wants to make a 
career of free lance writing. 


THE SOCIAL Work Work- 
shop will operate at the 
Qeorgetown Neighborhood 
House where the seven girls 
in the group will divide their 
time between the business 
office, the day camp and the 
nursery and playground. 

Betsy Hurley of Montgom- 
ery-Blair, who will be 16 next 
week, says, “I hope to make 
social work my career, but I 
have to have some experience 
to make up my mind which 
phase I want to specialize in.” 


or and about WOMEN | 


AMUSEMENTS 
CLASSIFIED 
COMICS 


TUESDAY, JUNE 12, 


1956 


ox 


ee 


s | 
{ss 


SCIENCE 


TAKES ON SAND—A 16-year- 
old Wilson High School student is current- 
ly interested in science, but he hopes to 
make engineering his career. The picture 


science fair 


Tea-Time Talk at Mrs. Humphrey's 


shows him explaining his “study of the ac- 
tion of stratified sand under varying pres- 
sures,” an exhibit he prepared for his school 


GOP Ladies Certain Ike Will Run 


THE VIEW of the Potomac 
bridges from the terrace of 
her home on Foxhall rd. com- 
peted for attention with the 
recently finished three-quar 
ter length portrait of the 
hostess at Mrs. George 
Humphrey's tea yesterday for 
the Morning Study Group, 
League of Republican Wom- 
en 

There was a strong show. 
ing of “Ike” pins and a unani- 
mous answer of “certainly” 
to the question: Do you think 
the President will still run? 

Some 100 women who had 
attended regularly the meet- 
ings of the group turned out 
for the tea. 


TAKING turns at the tea 
and coffee urns were Mrs 
Arthur Summerfield, wife of 
the Postmaster General_Mrs 


True D. Morse. wife of the 
Undersecretary of Agricul- 
ture: Mrs. Daniel Reed, wife 
of Representative Reed: Mrs 
Carroll Kearns, wife of Rep- 
resentative Kearns: Bertha 
Adkins, assistant to chairman 
Leonard Hall of the Republi- 
can National Committee; and 
Mrs. Howard Coffin, Republi- 
can national committeewom- 
an from the District of Co 
lumbia. 

The receiving line included 
Mrs. Paul Hatch, director of 
the Morning Study Group. 


MRS. SUMMERFIELD was 
being greeted by numbers of 
friends who have missed her 
at Capital functions in recent 
weeks. She was explaining 
that she has been ill but ex- 
pects te be staying in Wash- 


ington to be with her hus 
band for some weeks to come. 


Mrs. Kearns said she ex- 
pects pressure of work to 
keep her at her desk in Wash- 
ington through most of the 
summer except for speaking 
forays into Pennsylvania and 
the convention in San Fran- 
cisco which she'll attend in 
her capacity as president of 
the National Federation ‘of 
Republican Women. 

Mrs. Roy E. James was be- 
ing congratuiated on her ap- 
pointment to the beard of the 
D. C. League and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Burdick was lining up 
members for a two-day the- 
ater and United Nations trip 
on June 19. 


Doing Nicely 
What 
About 
Hagerty? 


By Mary V. R. Thayer 

EVERYONE'S been worry- 
mg about the President. 

ut who's been worrying 
about his press secretary, 
Jim Hagerty, for the second 
time keyman and liaison with 
the whole world in an Eisen- 
howér illness. 

Well, for one, 
Margo, though 
he thrives on excitement. 
“Though not exactly this 
kind!” she hastily amended. 

When the President fell 
ill last week, the former 
pressman worked twice 
around the clock without 
even a catnap, setting up 
press headquarters in Wal- 
ter Reed Hospital, learning 
everything but almost every- 
thing about every phase of 
the President's operation. — 

In a Turkish-bath tempera- 
tured room, at a long table 
clotted with reporters, half 
blinded by a torrid TV re. 
fiector lamp, Hagerty faced a 
phalanx of monster cameras 
as he read bulletins which 
were to circle the globe in 
seconds. Without raising his 
voice (which, curiously, never 
grows hoarse) he answered 
endless questions posed by 
150 insistant newspeople, 
kept cool looking, unrumpled. 

How did he do it? Well, the 
Hagerty house is just 10 min- 
utes away from Walter Reed 
and three times during that 
first night he went home, 
showered, changed clothes, 
NEVER forgetting to transfer 
a gold “IKE” button to ech 
lapel. 


THE SECOND night. the 
crisis under control, and dead 
he went home rolled 


his wife, 
she admits 


turn once” he 
told his wifé at 7 a. m. the 
next morning as she fixed 
him a breakfast of orange 
juice, toast, milk and creamed 
beef. He drinks very little 
coffee. Margo none at ail. 
“I should keep a cow im the 
back yard,” she quips, “we 
drink so much milk.” 
Hagerty keeps up his vim 
with vitamins administered 
at the White House, and by 
resting his nearsighted eyes 
by switching from plain to 
dark glasses, both made with 
a similar lens prescription. 
His feet, indispensable in his 
active job, are fine 
“Probably due to the work- 


See THAYER, Page 26 


eA ace 
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4 


THE WASHINGTON POST ©& 
and TIMES HERALD 
Tuesday, June 12, 1956 


6 een 


| Weddings 


VITA STRACHWITZ 
LASZLO HADIK 


Announcement is made of the 
marriage of Vita Strachwitz 
to Laszio Hadik on June il 
at Berg-em-Laim, Munich, 
Germany. The bride, the 
daughter of Count Ludwig 
Adam Strachwitz of Caracas, 
Venuzuela, and Countess 
Edith Strachwitz-Lyncker of 
Munich, Germany, has at- 
tended schools in Europe. The 
bridgroom, the son of Count 
and Countess Bela Hadik of 
Chester, N. H., is a graduate 
of Brooks School, North And- 
over, Mass., and of George- 
town University. 


CARMEN NEDRA LOVRE 
—MAURICE O. RYAN JR. 


Representative Harold O. 
Lovre and Mrs. Levre of 
Watertown, S. D. and 
Silver Spring, Md., announce 
the marriage of their daugh- 
ter, Carmen Nedra, to Mau- 
rice Orton Ryan Jr., son of 
Mr. and Mrs. M. O. Ryan Sr. 
of Silver Spring on June 9 
at St. Luke's Lutheran 
Church in Silver Spring. The 
bride attended Cornell Uni- 
versity and Cornell Univer- 
sity School of Nursing in New 
York City. The bridegroom is 
a graduate of Cornel! Univer- 
sity and is now serving as @ 
first lieutenant in the United 
States Army at Ft. Belvior, 
Va. The couple will reside in 
New York City. 


RUTH SOMSEN 

—PAUL ANDERSON 

Mr. and Mrs. Laren A. Som- 
sen of Murray, Utah, an- 


MRS. B. LOWNDES JACKSON JR. 


~«. new “Citizens” cochairman 


nounce the marriage of their 
daughter. Ruth Elaine, to 
Ensign Paul Nerland Ander- 
son. USN, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Andrew  W. Anderson, on 
June 5 in Salt Lake City. The 
bride and bridegroom were 
graduated from the Univer- 
sity of Utah. They will make 
their home in Pensacola, Fia., 
where Ensign Anderson will 
be stationed. 


PATRICIA J. FLYNN 
—ROBERT W. RIEGEL 
Capt. Joseph E. Fiynn, USN, 
and Mrs. Fiynn of Boston, 
Mass., announce the mar- IN 
riage of their daughter, Patri- 
cia Jane. to 2nd Lt. Robert Eisenhower's latest illness, 
Witherspoon Riegel, USAF, he should reappraise his 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Morton physical capacity to carry on 
E. Riegel of Lexington Park, ‘" : 
Md. on June 10 in the Univer- s , a Deomecines 
members of Congress Rep. 


sity of Maryland Chapel. ; 

Roth the bride and bridee Don Magnuson of Washing- 
room are graduates of the ton and Rep. Lee Metcalf of 
Montana 


niversity of Maryland 
The two Congfessmen 


FAYE JONES : 
' one aEN ; made the statement in the 
~JOSEPH TUCKER Ii! course of a program at the 


Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Jones of woman's National Democrat 
Big Stone Gap, \ &.,announce § ic Club yesterday. They were 
the marriage of thelr daugh- interrogated by a two-woman 
ter, Faye, to Pvt. Joseph - panel composed of ~ their 
Tucker iil, USMC n 

ucker _ USMC, sonof Mr. wives. June Magnuson is a 
and Mrs Joseph fucker /f. former Seattle newspaper- 
of Ripley, Tenn., on June 9 woman and Mrs. Metcalf ma- 


at the Post Chapel, Quantico § jored in journalism at L- 
Marine Base. The couple will loan. : . ne 


reside in Washington. , 

BOTH Congressmen saw 
SALLY JUNE SMITH what they described as “the 
MICHAEL M. HERCHER give-away policies” of the 
Mr. and Mrs. George Peter Ejsenhower Administration 
* Smith of Scottsville, N. Y. and farm supports as the prin- 
announce the marriage Of cipal campaign issue in the 
their daughter, Sally Western states. 
to Michael McCarthy Representative 
‘cher, son of Mr. and declared 
Wilmot W. Hercher of power 
thesda, Md., on June 11 at West.” He added that Hell's 
the Colgate Rochester Divini- Canyon had become a svm 
ty School Chapel. Both are bol of the public versus pri- 
graduates of the University vate power controversy 
of Rochester. The bridegroom Representative Metcalf em 
is commissioned Ensign in phasizing the give-away” 
the Naval Reserve Officers’ said: “It’s your land 
Training Corps the land of all the people of 
CAROL United States, that we 
JOHN HAWLEY OAKES are irying to prevent bis Ad 
Brig. Gen. Thomas W. Dunn . ” “ —— from Siving 

col : " awa’ 

USA, anc Mrs. Dunn of Car- 0 RPS Sy ee ) 
lisle Barracks, Pa. announce «7... Ay , amg sald 
the marriage of their daugh- Mont ne that =r leg ~ = 
ter, Carol Virginia, to LI vontana tat could have been 


John Hawley Oakes LSA. 


Democrats Speak: 


VIEW of President 


June, 
Her- Magnuson 
“We face a serious 
shortage by 1960 out 


tneme. 


VIRGINIA DUNN the 


are | 


Ike Reappraisal 
Of Capacity Asked 


By Eileen Summers 


staved off in part by main- 
taining a high degree of par- 
ity. 


ASKED to comment on 
the significance of the Sen 
ate race in Washington be- 
tween Morse and former Sec- 
retary of the Interior Doug- 
las McKay, Representative 
Magnuson said that Morse 
“personifies the fight to con- 
serve the natural resources 
of this country for all the 
people. McKay personifies 
the give-away policy .« 
Morse therefore has a per- 
fect target for his campaign.” 

Magnuson added that the 
Washington State contest will 
“serve to focus national at- 
tention on the give-away 
issue.” 


On Today's Calendar 


Embassy wives will be 
among the guests when wom- 
en members of the Washing- 
ton press corps are’ honored 
at a luncheon of the Pan 
American Liaison Committee 
of Women’s Organizations in 
the grand ballroom of the 
Mayflower Hotel ... Mrs 
Thomas Burke 
president, will introduce as 
speaker, Columnis Doris 
Fleeson ... ‘igh 
s lun 


committee 


Wade 
ASSISL- 
Parker West : 
by the Potomac 
andbe!l] Ringers 
Poore Tufts 


- rmen 


eon chairman 
7 


iTS 


_ ini iude 
VicGoodwin. re 
and Mrs. Rene J 


de< Ol ati ms. 


Mrs. P 
cenoiion 
Taylor, 


reston 


Ike Leader Says: 


‘Citizens’ 
Geared 
For Work 


By Ruth Wagner 


“THE PRESIDENT'S ill- 
ness means we'll all have to 
work even harder than be- 
fore, and take as much of the 
load as possible off Mr. Eisen- 
hower,” Mrs. B. Lowndes 
Jackson Jr.. new cochairman 
of the D. C. Citizens for 
Eisenhower, declared yester- 
day. 

“We're more enthusiastic 
than ever,” Mrs. Jackson said 
for herself and other mem- 
bers of the D. C. Committee, 
of which Edward Burling Jr. 
is chairman. She is sure the 
President's illness won't have 
any effect on his plans to run 
again. 

The energetic, blue-eyed 
grandmother of five has just 
been elected to her co-chair- 
man post by unanimous vote 
of the board of directors 

She lost no time in bustling 
down to the Committee's of- 
fices at 1612 K st. nw. a 
building which owner Jerome 
Murray is letting the Citizens 
use ren‘-free until he finds 
a buyer for it.) All this week 
Helen Jackson has been busy 
checking lists, maps and di- 
rectories as preparation to or- 
ganizing a corps of wonen 
volunteers to help her with 
her projects. 


AT THIS time of year lots 
of people pack up picnic sup- 
pers and head for the coun- 
try or hold barbecues in the 
back yard. Mrs. Jackson 
plans to do this too, but her 
picnics will be for friends and 
backers of Eisenhower, and 
the barbecue menus will fea 
ture Ike's own Tecipe for beef 
stew. 

Beside the neighborhood 
picnics, the Citizens will have 
lots of other activities—the 
main one being a dinner, to 
take place in the fall, at which 
it is hoped the President will 
be present. 

The new cochairman 
worked with the Committee 
during the 1952 and 2954 cam- 
paigns, but says this is the 
first time she has had an 
office of her own, and she's 
enjoying the big second-hand 
desk to the fullest. 


SHE IS a lifelong Wash- 
ingtonian, born Helen Blair 
of the Blair family which has 
been famous in this area for 
two centuries. and so can't 
vote come this November or 
any other November so far. 

Her husband's business, she 
says, takes up too time 
to let him do much active 
campaign work. “But he 
helps me with good advice. 
and I couldn't possibly swing 
anything without his consent 
and support,” she declares. 


FROM NEW YORK comes 
work af another lady cam- 
paigner for Eisenhower. 

She is Helen Hayes. 
has accepted the women's 
National Finance committee 
chairmanship of Citizens for 
Eisenhower saying, “Of all 
the roles I have taken over 
the 50 years, none has given 
me a greater feeling of grat- 
itude, enthusiasm and dedi 
cation 

Miss Hayes’ cochairman is 
Mrs. W. EE. Dunkle of Wa 
ington, former member 
board of directors of t 
Citizens. She gave th 
work with Miss Hayes in Ne 


York 


who 


son of Maj. Gen. John C 
Oakes, USA, and Mrs. Oakes 
oft Heidelburg, Germany on 
dune 11 at the Post Chapel, 
Carlisle Sa. reks. The bride 
attended William and Mary 
College. Lt. Oakes attended 
the Hotchkiss School and is a 
graduate of the United States 
Military Academy; 


FOR SOME folks 
den 
eral indoor planters. lf your - 
house 


the gar- 


i> a window box and afy- 
plants are 
your 


thriving, 

share experience with 
R. W, 

Hunt Ball Friday “a know 


about house plants 


want to more 


SCARLET tail coats will be 
worn, and hunting tunes 
played at the first of the sum- 
mer hunt balis, Friday June 
15, when the Marlborough 
Hunt Club holds its semi- 
annual event. Hunt president, 
Raymond Ruppert and his with 
wife head a list of members is now in 
who are bringipg part riche 
the ball at the I. What’ piants 
Mrs. James Buchme the shade? Ivy 
chairman of the special gonia” 
rangements committee “Will the plant called ‘hen 


“I have a pliant which came 
from Florida and don't know 
its name. It leaves, 
green on 
underneath. It 


has iong 
and 
has two little 


top purplish 


blooms It 
Does it need 


white 
sand. 


" 
stil 


cups 


do better in 
coleus or be- 


Annes Trading 


and chickens’ or ‘cat and kit 
tens live indoors in winte! 


Mrs. R. W.. 


APPLE QUERY 
I AM looking for a 
but unusual apple dish 
for home demonstration. |! 
am particularly looking for 
recipes using canned apples 
I find most of classic 
apple dishes too heavy 
summer use. | would 
light, summery ideas 
E. S., Mitchells, Va 


Leesburg. 


good 
ae use 


, ne 
for 


like 


BULBS 

TO THE READER wi! 
jonquils failed to bloom 
should have placed bonemea! 
under each bulb when she 
planted them After the 
period, more 


os.e 
she 


piooming one 


Post 


handful of bonemea!l 
be worked into | 
around each bulb. Th 
next year's 
works a goodly 
hbonemeal in 
should have beautiful th 


next year, 


biocm 
amo 


this Veal 


ETIQUETTE 
WOULD Si 
er describe 
are 
I've 
wondertul ftood con 
on tfoot-iong 
never see 
tures Surel' 
he eaten wit 
when sizzling 


. 


pre. 


MI 
now 
supposed to 


Sec; rial 


Super-No-Roach hills Re 
PT ie oe wer 


\s st 
Me ‘2 


oe 5 


*- 


sistant Roaches | 


tn 
. = ’ 
° e w 


i 


wor Da , | 
A new, improved formula makes SUPER-NO-ROACH one of the 
most effective roach and ant killers available. Brushed just 
where you want it, the colorless, odorless coating kills these 
pests, and stays effective for months. Easy te use .. . there's 
no need to move dishes, pots and pans while applying. SUPER. 
NO-ROACH is so effective, and se economical. 

8 ounces, 89c; pint, 1.69; quart, 2.98 


WAL—Housewares, /st North Building 
« «+ also Chevy Chase and Alexandria 


dared they 


5 iOoFT 


Engagements 


SYLVIA WHI 
RUBERT ORRIS BLAKE 
Mr. and Mrs. Sheidon White 
house of Newport, R.I1., and 
New York City announce the 
engagement of their daugh 
ter, Sylvia, to Robert Orris 
Blake. son of Mr. and Mrs 
Frank O. Blake of Whittier, 
Calif. Miss Whitehouse at 
tended the Spence School and 
Foxcroft School and was 
graduated from Barnard Col 
lege. Her fiance is a gradu 
ate of Stanford and received 
his Master's Degree at the 
School of Advanced Interna- 
tional Studies at Johns Hop- 
kins University He has 
served with the United States 
Navy, anil is at present in 
charge of the affairs of the 
Soviet Union in the State 

Department. 


DONA HUTSLER 
—ROBERT G. WAGNER 

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce B. Hut 
sler of Falls Church, Va., 
announce the engagement of 
their daughter, Dona, to the 
Rev. Robert G. Wagner, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Walter F. 
Wagner Sr. of Riverside, 
Connecticutt. Miss Hutsler is 


} 


- 


TEHOUSE 


a graduate of the Am« 
L'niversity and received fl 
M.A. degree from Columbia 
University. She is_ presently 
employed as a research ana 
lyst by the Office of Commu 
nication of the Congregation 
al Christian Churches in New 
York City. The Rev. Wagner 
is a graduate of American 
University and of the Gen- 
eral Theological Seminary in 
New York. He was recently 
ordained as a deacon of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church 
In September he will be as- 
sistant at the Church of the 
Holy Communion, South 
Orange, N. J. A January wed- 
ding is planned 


SHIRLEY ANN MOSS 

—W. FRANK GIBBS 

Mrs. Blanclie A. Moss of 
Takoma Park, Md., announces 
the engagement of her daugh- 
ter, Shirley Ann, to W. 
Frank Gibbs, son of Mrs. W. 
Frank Gibbs and the late Mr. 
Gibbs. Miss Moss is a gradu- 
ate of Montgomery Blair 
High School, Her fiance is at- 


tending Benjamin Franklin ' 


University. A fall wedding is 
planned. “ 


ma 
oes ee 


IN THE GRANDSTAND — Matthew 


MackaySmith of 


White Post, 
Winkie Eddy of Annapolis were two of the 
interested spectators at the Upperville 


Va.. and 


By Wally McNamee. Stall Photocrapher 
Horse Show Saturday. Winkie dresses up 
her fedora with a perky brush—while Mat- 
thew admires the style. 


Mary Haworth’s Mail 


Can Man Love |’wo Women? 


DEAR MARY HAWORTH: 
I hope you will answer this 
quickly, for | must settle 
things soon. Ive heard it 
wasnt pos- 
siblé, but | re y 
am in love 
with two 
women and 
must make a 
choice be 
tween them, 
and I really 
dont know 
what to do 

(One is my 
wife of eight 
vears Janie 
is older than I! 
derful person 


Mary Haworth 


and a won- 
Our marriage 


Adenauer s 
Schedule Is 
(uiet One 


Washington society will 
little of the Capital's 
visiting VIP this week 

Chancellor of the German 
Federal Republic, Dr. Konrad 
Adenauer, in town for infor- 
mal talks with State Depart- 
ment officials, has a busy 
schedule before him and only 
two full days to accommodate 
it 


see 


top 


Chancellor is 
this trip by two of 
his seven children—his son, 
Konrad. and the youngest of 
his three married daughters, 
Libeth Adenauer Werhahn 
For Mrs. Werhahn. this brief 
visit is her first to the United 
states 


> 


The 
panied 


accoyg)- 


FIRST on the social agenda 
for the Chancellor is Secre- 
tary of State Dulles’ stag din- 
ner tonight. to be held at 
Dulles Georgetown resi 

President's 
.nnowers had 
lite House lunch- 

‘nauer on Weadanes- 

White louse an 
yesterday that Vice 
President and Mrs Nixon 
will entertain for the Chan 
cellor at Blair House, instead 

At 5 p. m. Wednesday, the 
Chancellor will be guest of 
honor at a reception at the 
Statier Hotel to be given by 
the Joint Committee of Pres 
Radio and Television Corre- 
spondents and News Pho- 
tographers. A dinner at the 
German Embassy on #oxhall 
Road will follow at 8 p. m 
Ambassador and Mme. Kreke- 

+’ have arranged for some 
32 guests at the seated alfat 
and have invited 18 guests 
to join the party at 10 p.m 

The Adenauer tan ily. alter 

last night, 
went rect the German 
Ambdassi 


+) 


‘1 he 
nounced 


Lneirop. m. arriva 


residence 
until 


\ ere guests 


Thursday 


a 

at 

hac 

nea itor 

Werhahn's 

Mme 

consult wilh 

sched 

nec limited 
excursions 


ann bdeiore 
sarily 


signtseeing 


is dull, however, and we 
don't have children. The 
other woman is younger, very 
vivacious and beautiful, and 
so much fun to be with. We 
are together almost all the 
time. 

My wife has known of the 
affair for four months and 
says she will not release me; 
but will forgive me and we 
can begin anew if I will prom- 
ise never to see the other 
woman again. 

Both women say they love 
me: and the younger is will- 
ing to wait for me until my 
wife gives in. But with the 
way I feel, how can I promise 
never to see her again? She 
in process of divorce 
and has a child); and 
were to ask me next month to 
to her, how could I 


is nOW 


if she 


return 
refuse’ 


I KNOW that 
power is my real problem; 
but 1 don’t want to promise 
my wife one thing and do an- 
other, as I am feeling badly 
enough about this already. 
It isn't possible to move 
away, as my work is here; 
but even my job is suffering. 
as | am torn between the two 
women and what is right to 


lack of will 


‘do for everyone concerned 


Don't think I am “psycho” 
about this. I never thought 
anyone could get so mixed- 
up, and feel genuine emotion 
towards two different women. 
I really could use some dis- 
interested counsel Natural- 
ly our friends think | should 
give up Eve (the other wom- 
an): but she is wonderful. too. 
And what about MY future? 

G.§ 


DEAR G. SS. It seems to 
me this isn't so much a case 
of your really loving two 
women, as it is a matter of 
your giving free rein to a 
personally selfish (and on 
the one hand corrupt) depend- 
ency upon their flattering 
attentiveness to you. 

Love (as you may, or may 
not know) is the desire to 
give fullness of life to an- 
other. Or as a pioneering 
analyst has said, love is that 
state in which the satisfac- 
tion and security of another 
person has become as impor- 
tant to one as the satisfac- 
tion of his own needs of well- 
being 

In the triangle you report 
it is probable that your wife 
is a more nearly loving per- 
son than you andor Eve. 
By which | mean that she 
probably has some capacity 
to care competently and loy- 
ally for a mate in adult 
fashion: whereas you and Eve 
are as yet pretty callously 
self-engrossed, in catering to 
your whims and appetites, 


FEELING as vou do about 
Eve, no doubt you take for 
granted that here is an in- 
stance of overwhelming mu- 
tual attraction in which 
sympathetic regard for each 
other operates But the 
probable truth of the tangle 
is that each is blindly grati- 
fying an appetite at the 
other's expense (morally end 
socially). Each is infatuated 
with his own experience of 


ably); and is almost entirely 
ignorant of, and indifferent 
to, the other's real self and 
literal life situation 

Actually, your involvement 
with Eve makes about the 
same sense, when weighed 
against vour marriage, as 
would a night's dream of em- 
bracing an houri. The reason 
you are:so terribly mixed up, 
isnt due to “loving 
women,” as you think. Rather 
it ig due to your trying to 
make something “worthy” of 
an escapade 


UNTIL PEOPLE learn bet- 
ter, they tend to suppose 
that the godly command 
ments — the classic “thou 
shaits’” and “thou shalt nots” 
of Christian ethics — are 
designed to make life grimiy 
sacrificial in this vale of 
tears.” But as moral philoso 
phers have discerned, these 
are the ground rules of per- 
fect freedom.,—fredom from 
the pitfalls and guil 
anxieties that rob men 
peace of soul 

You have violated the rules 
and are punished automati- 
cally; this is the significance 
of your confusion and pain 
Thus the only healing course 
is to do right for its own 
sake — without regard to 
whether it happens to please 
you at present. In 
put your marriage first: and 
let Eve save herself M. H 


two 


snort, put 


Haworth 


her ‘nolun 


Mary 
throug! 
mail or personal interfieu 
Write to her meat T 
\ ae ’ 7f0 Post ay ; T 


Hera! 


Busiest 


Place. 
In D.C. 


THAYER, From Page 25 
out they get on the golf 
course,” comments Mrs. H. 
He should, by rights, be rid- 
died with ulcers. But no... 
“He's always on the verge 


but never gets ‘em. 


THE HAGERTYS are some- 
what protected from the curi- 
ous public by a private tele- 
phone number. But enough 
characters know it to Keep 
Jim Hagerty jumping when 
he is supposed to be relax- 
ing. 

“His private telephone 
rings so often,” sighs Marge, 
“that he’s never sat down at 
the table long enough to fin- 
a forkful of food. Life 

re.” she adds, “is just one 
big campaign.” 

“The Hagertys, who went 
to school tagether, have been 
married a long time. So Mrs. 
Hagerty is quite reconciled 
to his ways. “I just sit help- 
leasly.” she smiles, “answer- 
ing the telephone. Theres 
nothing much | can do to 
help except just to be here.” 

“But several times a day 
Jim Hagerty takes time out 
from his multitudinous 
chores to telephone his wife 
and update her on the news, 
If there wasnt any news, 
good. bad or indifferent, both 
the Hagertys would be bored 
to death. 


UP AT Walter Reed Hos 
pital, where Army, Air Force 
lads and their dependents are 
cared for, President Eisen- 
hower is paying officer's sub 
sistence, in other words, $1.05 
daily for the food he—wont 
be eating for several days. 

Why does the President of 
the United States pay an of- 
Yicer’s subsistence’? Because 
he’s Commander-inChief of 
the United States Armed 
Forces 

As a dependent of an of- 
ficer, the First Lady pays $1.55 
for her three meals. She can 
order what she wants. All 
but specialties are prepared 
in the main kitchen with fin- 
touches added in the 
private kitchen of the Execu- 
tive Suite. There's a dietician 
on hand. too. The dieticians, 
all feminine, all Second Lieut- 
enants. do a years interne- 
ship, and rotate throughout 
various hospital posts 


by 
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THERE'S smart housekeep- 
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~DONELSON C. GLASSIE JR. 


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SANDRA L WYNKOOP 
—JOE P. BRUMBLES 


Mrs. Alvin Leigh Wynkoop 
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Whom Will She Marry? 


Margaret Can’t Find Prince Charming 


Second of three articles. 


By Fred Doerflinger 

LONDON (INS.)}—Princess 
Margaret Rose of Windsor 
has become a sort of reverse 
Cinderella, unable to find her 

rince among her  blue- 

looded, wealthy and socially 
acceptable squires, or to Gaim 
him if he isn't. . 

But now the Princess, in 
her new-won independence 
and freedom, has more op- 
portunity to .«ee her squires 
privately, at friends’ apart- 
ments and country homes. 

It was eight years ago that 
King George promised his 
youngest daughter — liveliest 
and loveliest -voman of Brit- 
ish royalty since Mary, Queen 
of Scots — that she could 
marry the man cf her choice. 
But Margaret fell in love with 
a divorced commoner, RAF 
war hero Peter Townsend. 

The end of Margaret's ro- 
mance with Townsend showed 
her the very definite limita- 
tions of her father’s promise. 
Yet she is still as determined 
to live, as she was when 
Queen Elizabeth wed Prince 
Philip. Then she told her fam- 
ily she wanted to marry for 
love, “like Lilibet.” 

Although the remaining 
group of aristocrats and 
moneyed eligibles is narrow 
in number, the range in per- 
sonalities is wide —from her 
old friend devi'-may-<care but 
admittedly none-too-hand- 
some Billy Wallace to hand- 
some, devout-yet-merry Rev. 
Simon Phipps 

Recently, Margaret was 
chided for not taking great 


| care in selecting her friends, 
| @ sure sign that she has been 


widening the “set.” She week- 
ends with old friends like 
the Marquess of Abergavenny 
and his wife, and attends 
such parties as the recent one 
in honor of Lord Porchester 
and his new bride from 
Wyoming, the former Jean 
Wallop. 

Romance does not bloom 
in public, as she and Peter 


| Townsend found. Only when 


riding, driving, or behind pri- 


| vate party doors or estate 
| gates can the princess ever 
| let onyone call her anything 


but “ma-am” or “Your Royal 
Highness.” The suitor who 


| Makes a mistake in public is 


| quickly banished. 


ff 


» & romance. 


As soon as Margaret at- 
tends a function with a new 
“possible,” rumor fabricates 
Last month she 
went with a party of a dozen. 


dard Athen 


save '; on this beauty set 


to keep your skin youthful 


FLUID GOLD VIACEL 
BEAUTY SPECIAL 


by John Robert Powers 


including Prince Christian of 
Hanover, te a charity cabaret 
show in Londoh. Headlines 
around the world reported 
the rumor she was about to 
become engaged to the 36 
year-old. German. 

That was publicly denied 
by Margaret—the first time 
any member of the royal fam- 
ily has done such a thing. 


BILLY WALLACE, Mar- 
garet has told friends, “is 
ood for me when I want to 

ick up my heels.” William 
E. Wallace has no title. He 
himself doesn’t “much like 
my face.” What he has is 
nearly $3 million, staying 
power—he's been a steady 
escort sipce 1948—a delight- 
ful sense of humor, just 
enough disregard of protocol 
and a “charm that pops like 
a champagne cork.” 

The Rev. Simon Phipps, 
one of Margaret's favorite 
young men, is a merry, danc- 
ing Anglican minister and 
World War II hero. The prin- 
cess, too, is merry and yet 
deeply religious. She turned 
to the chureh for comfort 
when she lost “Dear Papa,” 
and obeyed her religion when 
she decided “not to marry 
Group Capt. Peter Town- 
send.” 

Phipps has known the royal 


| ~ “=e 


family fo- 20 of his 34 years. 
For many months now pic- 
tures of the Princess have 
lightened the gloomy vestry 
of the old parish church in 
Huddersfield. Explaining 
them, Phipps has said of Mar- 
garet, she is a “very devout 
person and so lovely.” 

Lord Plunkett, handsome 

ssessor of a title that goes 

ack .129 years, who has n 
“going out a lot” with Mar- 
garet. The 32-year-old guards- 
man serves — perhaps pro- 
phetically—in much the same 
job as did Peter Townsend 
and is always available to 
squire the Princess. She has 
been taking. obvious pleasure 
in his availability since a night- 
club date just nine days after 
the historic end of the Town- 
send romance. 

Of the Earl of Wilton, Mar- 
garet herself has said, “Our 
steps match very well.” The 
35-yearold earl, tall and 
blond, has blue blood and a 
million or more in the bank, 
and the rising young farmer- 
politician — how to en- 
tertain. It was he and Judy 
Montagu who threw the party 
that Margaret called “the 
party of the year.” 

ceo 
STYLE CONSCIOUS since 
she was six—when she asked 


' 
: 


her grandmother, “Everybody 
will be looking at me, won't 
they?”"—she has demonstra- 
eda new freedom in dress. 
At 18, she modeled a Chris- 
tian Dior dress that the 
King and Queen foun “too 
wicked.” A few years ago 


she told her sister, who had 
— out against open-toed 
5 . “You look after your 
empire—and let me look .aft- 
er my clothes.” 

The decolletage once 
thought “wicked” has long 
been outmoded by rtrapless 
gowns and sweeping, daring 
necklines on sophisticated 
gowns. The British press has 
been raving about her suc- 
cess of new hair styles: the 
bombe, the earphone look, 
the Malenkov curl. 

Her shoes have become 
seantier and more  spike- 
heeled. And last January, the 
New York Dress Institute 
listed her second on its an- 
nual list of the world’s best- 
dressed women. 

But perhaps most indica- 


tive of her new independence | 


and determination to be free 
was the stunning outfit she 
wore to the races at Hurst 
Park. Only a mature, sophis- 
ticated woman, sure of her 


taste, could wear an outfit | 


that she knew would both in- 
trigue and shock the experts 
and bring forth this kind of 
criticism: 

“Charming but... you can't 
mix suede shoes and suede 
handbag with pigskin gloves 

.. the coat is too short for 
an ordinary coat, too long for 
a short one.” 


Wednesday: 
builds new solo career. 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES HERALD 
> Tuesday, June 12, 1956 


27 


Elinor Lee’s Recipe Box 


% cup ripe olives 
4 cup chcpped onion 


2 slightly beaten eggs 
2 tsps. salt 

\% tsps. pepper 

% tsps. dry mustard 
% cup cracker crumbs 


serole. 


Cut olives into large pieces. 
green pepper in butter until tender. Mix with olives, 
corn, eggs and seasonings. 
Top with crumbs. 
(350 degrees F.) for 45 minutes. Serves 6. 


Olive Corn Pudding 


\% cup chopped green sweet pepper 
1 tbsp. butter or margarine 
2% cups cream style corn (No. 2 can) 


Simmer onion and 


Pour into greased cas- 
Bake in moderate oven 


dn 


Advertisement ' 


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Margaret. 


“| ALMOST HATED MY HUSBAND!” 


Mre. L. L., Bewerly Hills, California 


“When George and I began to 
get on in years, his hair turned 
gray and made 

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that’s custom-made for gray and 
white hair. I was desperate 
enough to dye my hair, but I'm 
so lucky I chose Silver Cur! in- 
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to Toni Lipstick, Box 3191, 
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Thue bargain offer expires June 
30. 1956, so send in today! 


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WINDBLOWN—Great Britain's Princess Margaret appeared 
windblown but unruffled as she attended a “point-to-point” 
meeting of the West Norfolk Hunt at Sorle near Sandring- 
ham, England, recently. 


Today's Lvents 


THE INSTALLATION 
BANQUET of the L’Enfant 
Business and Professional 
Women’s Club takes place 
7:30 p.m. at the Woodner 
Hotel Apartments ... The 
Connecticut State Society 
will meet in the Community 
Room of the Washington 
Post and Times Herald at 
8:30 p.m... . The Suburban- 
ites of Silver Spring will 
hold their first installation 
luncheon at the Casino Royal, 
12:30 p.m 


Pearl McIver of the World 
Health Organization will 
speak on “Nursing at the 
WHO” at a joint meeting of 
the D. C. Graduate Nurses 
Association and the League 
for Nursing, 2025 E st. nw., 
at 8 p.m... . Election of offi- 
cers will be the main busi- 
ness when the Eleanor Roose- 
velt Navy Wives Club No. 37 
holds it's June meeting at the 
Clubhouse, 325 Beyer rd., 
southwest, Bellevue, 8:30 p.m 
... A Duteh-treat dinner at 
6:45 p.m. at Tilden Gardens 
will wind up the meeting 
year for the President Mon- 
roe Chapter, DAR. 

Mrs. Henry G. Holch, Mrs. 
J. DeWitt Leech and Mrs 
Frederick O. Smith will be 
the hostesses at the Phyllis 
Lyman Colony National So- 
ciety of New England Wom- 
en’s luncheon meeting, 12:30 
p.m. at 3818 Inverness dr., 
Chevy Chase, Md. 


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THE WASHINGTON POST: end TIMES HERALD 
28 


Tuesday, > June 1, 


, 1956 


One On the Aisle 


In Families 


By 
BOUT THE TOWN 


Igor Youskevitch., 


Richard L. Coe 


the Olympic athiete 


who. became one of the world’s great dancers is doubly in 


the news... 


He's here with Alicia Alonso as guest star with 


Ballet Russe in Rock Creek Park and Wednesday morning the 


Playhouse opens “Invitation to the Dance.” 


the Gene Kelly 


novelty in which Youskevitch (Yoos-KAY-vitch) dances as fine 


a sequence as ever I've seen on film .. 
most forgotten about the picture,” 


diffident manner 


around to releasing it. 


“You know. I've 4)- 


says Igor in his quietly 


“We made it four years ago and for those 
reasons which I never understand. 


the studio is just getting 


Already some people have told me they'd 


like to see another picture like it, but it probably will be years 


before someone decides to risk such a novelty.” . 


dancing, 
and fishing 


The first is a vice he says he can't very well 


.. Besides his 


Igor is famous in ballet circles for his poker-playing 


“give 


up and remain a gentleman. I've got to give everyone a chance 


f win his money back.” 
over the 
still. 
fish, lysing them to the bait.” 
so. natch, after Pearl 
he joined the Navy 
esteem for his 
Gaughter is added 
for fishing. too .. 
everywhere with 
comforts mean nothing to 
her Little. Maria, whose 
mother is a nonfishing former 
dancer, is coming along fine 
as an embryo ballerina and 
her famed papa must nurture 
high hopes for her “You 
know who partners her some 
times’ Massine’s son. He's 11” 
Could be that a decade 
those two famous 
will be programmed to 
What a kick for the 
band of balleto 
would be! 


. To his 
10-year-old 
her zest 
She goes 
me and dis 


hence 
names 
gether 
evergrowing 

manes THAT 


MISS ALONSO, Cuba's 
most honored lady, is as voca- 
tive as art is evocative... 
Her ride, of course 
is the school the Cuban govern 
ment sponsors for her in Ha- 
vana Being of another cul 
ture than her own, she accepts 
the phil hy that government 
take an active cultural role 
“but even then, there is never 
enough money to do what 
needs doing . She defends 
the right of the dancer over 
the ballet conductor. . .“We all 
do the same things differently, 
in different tempi,” she ex 
plains, “and once again ballet’s 
constant plague, lack of money 
faces us. More rehearsal time 


hp 
ne} 


SO] 


Show Times 
For Tuesda y 


STAGE 


ARTER-BARRON amprarrags rR — 
. Ballet Russe €¢ Mon a at 
& WO ; 


WATIONAL—“The Teahouse of the 
Aus t Moon at & 70 
SCREEN 
AMBASSADOR The Searchers.” et 
+ 3-08. 5.10. 7:20. 9°30 
ART-CINEMA Dance Hall Racket.” 
a’ . 30 8:30 Rock n “y . Foi- 
lies,” at 1:30, 4:15, 7:05 
CAPITo!l j inet on, at 
11:15 «@ 5.35 - 40 


6:15 


~Bhewrani 
r 1:26. 3 


9 50 | 
COLONT—The Ladykillers.” at 
COLL MBIA— 

; Fal . . 


The Rawhide Years at 
; : > -45 45 
4 34 


‘ 
DUPONT Tobacco Road ati 
ir 2.25 


apes of Wrath.” at 
: 
KEITH > 
LITTLE. 
: 
Mac ARTHI R 


Poreten Imtrieue.” at 11:40 
> 55. A 0:05 


METKOROE ‘TAN The 
a 4 40. 7 
ONT ARIO The Mas md 


a : 
PAl ww D-Day t 
- m.. 1:03 


> 


e Bixth of Ju a 


> 4s 

rix Peek ‘ Be 

ri AYHot SE 
0 

PLAZA 


VM“ ry 
. € 7 
TRANS LU x— 


behind 
HITLER’S 
LAST FLAMING 

DAYS! 


STARTS TOMORROW 


TRANS-LUX PLAZA 
N.Y. AVE. at 14 OPEN 12 NOON 
Last Dar. “WOMAN OF ROME” 


‘partner, 


.» On fishing, lgor becomes indignant 
idea that it takes patience to sit still. 
A good fisherman is always moving around, finding the 


“You dont sit 


. Deepsea fishing'’s his delight 


Harbor* 


with the orchestras is any tour 
ing ballet companys most 
pressing need” Like het 
the slim. svelte Alonso 
loses several pounds each pe 
formance. looks at food with 
only one idea in min@: eating 
same. 


IN BRIEF: Friday mat 
for “Cinerama Holiday” 
future be at 2. thus setting | 
whole Wednesdav.Stindayv mat 
nee schedule at 2. There'll be 
three showings (2 and 8:30 
on the Fourth of Ju Head 
ing the cast of Oln “Tiger 
at the Gates,” wil! Laurence 
iugo and Geraldine Brooks 
Hiugo was last in “Stalag 17 
and Miss Brooks’ most recent 
film was “Summertime.” The 
Uiney season opens the 


wil 


« 


5 
ly 
: 


ne 


26th 

. The University of Mary 
land's Summer Theater Work 
shop tonight at 7:30 holds open 
tryouts for “Arms and 
Man” in Central Auditorium 
on the campus The Crip 
pled Children's Society benefits 


In Annual Masonic Revue 


The Three Tuckers, Mary, Ray 


and Don, will be doing their 


trampoline tricks as one of the features of¢he 19th annual 


“Night of Thrills” Friday nigh 
fitting the Masonic and Easter 


Louctiia Parsons: 


(pur 
Ekberg 

don with 
Tnhat 
hered to 
diet that 
lost 

liope 


the ' 


‘7 
FF 


HOLLYWOOD. June INS 


Swedish glamor gir! 
honeymooning 
Anthony Steel, 
she Has 80 

ad 

her : 
she's 
10 pounds j ; 
.ne 


mn Ton. \ 


Writes 


rbetiy 


aoes- 


and Cubby 3 


> 
roceoli have 
Miss Parsons . 


Anita as 


friends 


Huston came back 


t at Griffith Stadium, bene- 
n Star heme. 


MYRNA 
red as 
Villiam 


LOY, with her hair 
t was when she was 
Powell's perfect wife 
The Thin Man.” has been 
aving a great time seeing old 
and relatives in Cali 


rn 


OTrTnia 
Myrna stopped bw my house 
0 say au revoir before she re- 


turned to New York. She has 
promised Norman 
she'll 
Sir’ 


Krasna that 
available for “Kind 
he makes it. 


38 HOURS in the air 
surprising that John 
to Beverly 
such a bad throat 


he 
when 
APTER 
ta not 
fills 


with 


he can hardiv talk 


poned 


from both performances of the |! 


Congressional Secretaries’ an 
nual revue, “Revisin’ & Extend 
in’,” to be given Wednesday 
and Thursday nights at 8 in the 
Agriculture Dept. Auditorium 
reservations in the Willard and 
Congressional Hotels’ 


CE of the MATION'S CaPrT al 


BOW Open 10:45 


MGM's LUSTY, ROMANTIC 
SPECTACLE! 


Ava GARDNER 
Stewart GRANGER | 


Bill TRAVERS 


Abrat am SOFAER 


D-DAY 
THE SIXTH 
OF JUNE 


CHO wy OF — j 
COLUMBI 


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COLLEEN MILLER 


OmzZO<$}|;+oH-OZOO 72->} 


TONIGHT 


Giselle (2 Acts) 
Pas de Trois Classique 
Le Beau Danube 


TOMORROW 

Swan Lake 

Pas de Trois Classique 
The Nutcracker (2 Acts) 
Scheherazade 


Prices $1.25—~1.75—~2.50-—3.00 


Comvig DANNY KAYE 


TICKETS 
1350 F ST. NW 
ST. 3-304. 


In the 


AFL ORDERS FILLED: 

aw b. with cheek or 

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Now a SALE AT SUPER 
National Press Bids 
Box Office Open Daily, 9:36 am. to 5.00 


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"ITS DELIGHTFUL ENTERTAIN. 


I had heard that he had post 
“Typee” in Tahiti be 
ause it's the rainy season and 
yecause of the transportation 
difficulties in getting his people 


now in its1Oth | 
fabulous month 


One Perl. Today 8:30 P.M. 
PHONE PESTER VATIONS 
ACCEPTED ME. 8-4495 


S'WAvid Watt HOw On sai ‘ 
wa OF OFTEL FALE Fe Omer 
ns iM 16 ane 10 O18 Pee 
CwMaRGoEt 17 — wie Mener All Maar 
gerelire and Air Travel Charge cards 
We Are « TRI? CHARGE member. 


Air Conditioned 


WAR NER: Lagh 


3rd Week! 
DO WILL SAY IT’S GREAT 


JOHN WAYNE 
SEARCHERS” 


JEFFREY WOMTER VERA MILES 
sapraed BOND — eee 


ay 


- wane wre -» JOMM FORD 


visTaVisiom | 


Te ComCm Of 


ther, N. Y. Times 


fF 


MENT, BRILLIANTLY CREATED, 
STAGED AND PHOTOGRAPHED 


IN LUSH TECHNICOLOR 


. 


WN. Y. Jowrnel-Amer 


“A LAVISH SPREE. . 


M-G-M 


aM, ¥ Werld Tel. 


 Syuitetion G hd 


the Done 


TecHNICOLOR 


pb 


Gene Keuy 


Tamara TOUMANOVA 


Icor YousKEVviTCH 
Dire 


tion and Ch 


by & 


STARTS 


oreography 


NE Keuy 


THE 


TOoMW PLA 


YHOUSE 


Dorothy Kilgallen: 


TV Beckons to Margaret’s Groom 


NEW YORK, June 11—Grace 
‘Kelly's friends on this ‘side of 
the Atlantic are happy to hear 
—from Her Serene Highness— 
that she plans 
to visit her: 
homeland early 
in the fall . 
Maria Riva has 
collapsed from 
exhaustion 
and on doctor's 
advice is cat 
celing her 
summer tour 
with \"Tea and 
5 Aa 
Bors ;¥.” Miss Kilgatlen 
weeks ago Marlene’s beautiful 
daughter was bedded with 
measles 

Sammy Davis Jr.Jjs trving to 
break his contract with Rullets 
Durgom, but it’s going to take 
a lot of legal brains to locate 
the loopholes in their agree. 
ment. Bullets is a phenomena! 
show business character who 
zoomed from band boy (for 
| Tommy Lorsey) to persona! 
manager for some mighty at 
tractions, including Jackie Glea 
son... CBS is waving a con 
tract at Clifton Daniel Jr. and 
NBC would like to renew with 
his bride, Margaret Truman 


Swedish Glamor Girl Sheds Pounds 


there. John said that he hadn't 
Gecided what to do 


‘Coprright, 1994, be 


Internationa!) News Bervice) 


-* © ereee~—@ 


Rosaunp 
Russsu 


ae O80 --28 


OPP 10:45 AM 
14th at H N.W 


TRANS-LUX 


P fome 


STANLEY WARNER 
THEATRES 


STANLEY WA ER _— 


ARF AIRk- CONDITION 
Poo 
Warne e[- 


1:06, 3:05 


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AMBASSADOR .‘/" 

i MBey ee Woes. 
10 0 

, 4.2600. B62 Conn 


Retur D. Fneae 
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AVALON 3° 


Guinness, 6 y 
Free Parkin ul. 8-2200 
st ME IN LAS 


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CALVERT fis": 

MEST 
VEGAS.” Cyd Charisse. 6.06 
SCARLZAT COAT,” ‘Corneil 
on. 


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IN | 
Wilde 
| Near Raa 
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Bing Crosby 


"1" ' 
COCK! ae HEROES Jose 
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Pr: Parking 
i 69.4400 
“MEET ME IN LAS VEGAS” 
Cra Charisse 1 30 4°10 ‘ 35 
“WEDDING IN MONACO” 
In Cel rf Grose K ly-Prince Rainier 


1 006, 40 
FOR A FREE GIFT 
5.0062 


CALL JU 
Pree Parking BRA. %-4281° 
™ SEREN ADE Mario Lal 


6:35 
TIVOLI | . 1800 — MF IN 
I re ;AS ym Dailey 
"yd Char 6 0 eae 
LN MY CORNER Audie oa 4:1 
wo 6 5400 Near 
COCKLERB RELI 
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AP 4813 Meum. Ave. WO. 64600 
FREE PARK ING 

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NAYLOR 


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78th and Ala. Awe. $F 
‘Sees Parting 2.4000 


WEDDING an .— ‘) ; 


al 25 an 


ROCKVILLE DRIVE. IN 


VISIT YOUR... 


THE BRASS at an important 
national magazine killed a big 
layout on T. C. Jones, the fe. 
male impersonator featured in 
“New Faces”... The an- 
n-uneed wedding of Yvonne 
King and Del Courtney seems 
to have his @ shag. Now they 
Say they'll tie the knot next 
month. “Vonnie” was tue lit 
tlest, blondest of the King Sis 
ters and Del is the bandleader. 
tu.-ned-dise jockey 

The Broadway bovs think the 
Palace will return to the two 
a-lay in the falk (What, again 

The Russell Stonehams are 
knitting tiny garments for a 
December arrival. Mama-to-be 
is Jo Carroll Denison, ex-wife 
of Phil Silvers _ Hollwwood 
insiders report that 21 top off 
clals of a major movie company 
have siagned a “resi@nation 
pact.” If the company £o0es 
through with its plans to sell 
ite old films to TY. the execu 
tives will all quit the day the 
deal is announced 


MARTHA RAYE, who has 
had her share of trouble re 
cently, keeps suffering more 
emotional! setbacks. Two of her 
prize bulldogs died. and her 
rare white Pekingese. a gift 
from boy friend Al Riddle, is 


missing. Martha is so upset by 
everything she's canceled her 
European trip, to which she'd 
beén looking forward for a 
whole year. 


-A-BOg 
ots BURLESQUE Y 
“A New Picture’’—1st Time Shown 


+4 Teen Gow bed et 


PLUS: “DANCE HALL RACKET GiRis” 


Atr Conditioned 


NATIONAL 


“America’s Firet Theatr?’ 


Pres, 8:90-—Matse, Wed. & oat, 
Rex Office Opera ie AM. tw? 


EU GENE 
WALLACH BLAKELY 


7:30 
PM 


Moonlight Dancing 
8 PM Nightly 

10 am. 

2pm. 

S. S. MOUNT VERNON 


NA. 8.24640 


mount VIRwON - Mantua 
WALL AMUSEMLAT Pate 


————— ee 


i ' 
' — 


TOMORROW 


Open 10 S 


» UENING, 


SIMNEY LUST THEATRES 


Pree Parking nditiened 


BELTSVILLE DRIVE- oll 


we 5 ance Balto f 
$ min. A. m U of Me ‘ Sh id 
Dan | n 

ME iN (LAB ve 3AS 

oy : 


“fh ,r ae 9 ' . 
rt ES Gra ch 
BETHESDA °: vi AS 


CHEVERLY $11" 


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aYATTSVILLE. or 


RAY to 


KAYWOOD 
VIERS MILL 


YF 


Wa 


ANNE 
_ 


NEIGHBORHOOD 
THEATRES—ARLINGTON. 
FALLS CHURCH, VA. 
STATE pa ou y 


a "eX ANT Tue iREAT 
Te 


CinemaScope 


‘open * i) 
WILSON 
Rict ? BP 


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1730 Witleen Bivd, 
iA. 67.1480 
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7.2099 


ARLINGTON Colu 


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2130 Ne. Glebe Rd. 
7 4? 


“Lag ‘VEG "Aa 
JEFFERSON *,;* 5 


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BYRD CINEMA * worn a 


BEST THEATRES 
SYLVAN : 


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ACADEMY 


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rw : 


SENATOR: near 
ATLAS 


Lt! 6&-a200 


’ KEL LY'S 
sLUES” 
yA ae at 635 ana 
“ESC APE TO 
BURMA” 


at 8:10 # 
Barbara Stanwyck and 


CARVER 


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Pp sh? 


2405 Wichele Ave 
Ai : we ond 

rey RACK 
or BILLY Fat Rib” 


135) : 
GEORGETOWN *" : i 


——_— estes ; manent yr 


GINA. LOL | OBRIGIDA 


“BREAD, LOVE AND 
DREAMS” 


Some >> 
“Earth xy “ted, funny comtte Mas 
eatures at w oe 
ee r ay a ilke 
Wiese Ee 


eck 


ROTH THEATRES 
SILVER SPRING "2%. 4 
AVA G. & HUMPHREY B 

“THE BAREFOOT! 

CONTESSTA 


Color 4 } > 45 Piu at & } 
ALFRED HITCHCOCK S 
THE LADY VANISH 


J 


” Sevannoh ot Ith St. S.£ 
1 Bh = Ale Ave. od 2. A 
ae xi ’ 


EXCLUSIVE 
SE Washington & ring 
SUSAN HAYWARD 
“T'LL CRY TOMORROW” 
2 Shows Nishtiy at 7:00 ang 9:25 


FAIRFAX 


Den Dailer & 
t MEET ME IN 


ae 
i. 


SSE TATTOO 
Marts I rro@ 


P 


Ample 


Foirfax, Va. 


Agnes vee 
LAS VEGAS.” 


} 


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SOREL x 


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| WOMAN, 


Hacks! 


HIGH IN DOUBLE cmt =o 


Wehtmars 
sUikes from 
the teptns 


of the 
$22 ' 


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LVicatttey AIR-CONDITIONED for 


MEIGHBORHOOD THEATER 


HOWARD , 


LINCOLN 


DISTRICT THEATRES 


REPUBLIC , oanft we 


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- 
. 


~~ 


ROOKER T.. 


Pen Se OW 
17.30 PM 


Vv . 


| , 
| LANGSTON 22° « ® 


| WINELAND THEATRES 
| ABC DRIVE-IN ’'” ind. Hd. Hy. | 


| tie, $0.74 


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| 
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THEATRES 


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& s Thur. Fri. & Sat i | 
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HISER- BETHESDA “OL 2 ius ° 
GREAT” 
CARVER- ALEXANDBIA , ,, oaie 


Richa 
THE 
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§ SAT VIDN ont 
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POREIGN 
INTRIGUE 


DRIVE-IN THEATERS 
AIRPORT DRIVE-IN * 


QUEENS CHAPEL *\: 


BRANCH DRIVE-IN 
MT. VERNON OPEN-AIR 
A fton's First Orive m. 1 So of 


SUPER CRIET 


LPLNT ¥¢ 
“hi AR : } 


LEE HWY.-APL. BLVD. 
DRIVE-IN THEATRE 


ALEX.-ARLINGTON, VA. 


VIRGINIA 


"T'? 


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eraScope a 
THE MA 
rLA “ye 
Cyreeory rece 
Peatures 


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SHIRLINGTON ag yt 
Crate ov ’ 2500 
Cinemaheanpe anc C 
wirvr Bl " ; 


Jane Russe Corne Wiide 


2105 Pennwivania Ave. WW, 
RE. 7.0184 
a evor Howerd 


HEROFS" 


7:35. 9 50 


3 


Jose, wyrrer 


hniceleor! et 6.00, 


Takoma Park 


Adopts Budget 


* The Takoma Park City Coun- 


’ 


Associated Press 


New CAB Member 


G. Joseph Minetti (above) of 
Brooklyn, N. Y., was sworn in 
yesterday at the White House 
as a member of the Civil 
Aeronautics Board. The omth 
was administered by Frank 
K. Sanderson, White House 
administrative officer. 


cil kept its tax rates at $1 per 
$100 of assessed valuation on 
real estate last night and also 
adopted a $446,452 budget for 
the )fiscal year beginning July 
1. The budget shows an in- 
crease of about $20,000 over 
the last fiscal year 

Councilman Clayton Forshee, 
finance chairman, recommend- 
ed that the Council consider 
issuing no more than $100,000 
in certificates of indebtedness 
and use half of a 10 per cent 
budget reserve fund to help 
carry out general city improve- 
ments, at an estimated cost of 
| $140,000 
| The Joint Citizens Committee 
of the Prince Georges Civic As- 
sociation asked in a letter to 
Mayor George Miller and the 
Council that the 10 per cent 
reserve fund required by the 
city charter be used only for 
“extraordinary or unanticipated 
expenditures.” 

The lett asked tha? any 
bond issue to be put to a refer 
endum before the Council votes 
on it 

The Joint Committee also 
said it believed the police and 
fire departments were too large 
for. the city. Miller said on the 
other hand he had received 
many requests from residents 
for more policemen and that 

rate would have to be 


= tax 
Sa —~—«—«—=- “Snereased if the force were en 


Rockville Gets 
Improvement 


Plan Details 


Rockville City Manager John 
H. Markland defendea his esti- 
mates for capital improvements 
in fiscal 1957 last night before 
the City Council 

In the second of three pub 
lic hearings on the proposed 
$925,350 budget 
year, Markland explained de 
tails of his plans for Rockville'’s 


for the coming 


capital 
program. The final hear 
sduled tonight 


new five-year improve 


ment 
ing is sche in City 
Hall 

Proposed for the first years 
share of the program is an ex 
penditure of $241,900 of which 
$100.000 would be financed 
through short-term loans. The 
monev would be earmarked for 
streets. sidewalks, water and 
sewer facilties 

Councilman A. J. Greene said 
he would propose adding $50.- 
000 to the public indebtedness 
He said would make more 
funds immediately available for 
more improvements 

In another action, the Coun 
cil expressed agreement wit 
Markiand’s proposal to defer 
larger outlays for storm ‘sewer 
construction, pending a study 
of consulting engineers’ reports. 
The proposed budget calls for 
spending $10,000 on storm sew- 
ers. an increase of $3000 over 
the current budgs 


Builders to Hold 


Conference Day 


Tnis 


land 
hold 
Conference Day 
Indian 


eo Subur Mary 


will 


ban 


iders Association 
its third annual 
Wednesday at 
Country Club, Old Bladensburg 
rd. and Colesville rd 

Designed to pl 
between bui 
Federal g0\ 
the all-day 
noted by Dr. John R. Steelman 
nsultant and 


, 
lisher 


Spring 


mote liaison 
and loca! 
ernment 


session will be key 


lers and 


agencies 


public relations c: 
Montg 


(,ove 


omery County pub 
rnmentail agency repre- 
sentatives inclu Willard A, 
Morris. Wasn Suburban 
Sanita Commission: Frank J 
Lastner, Prince Georges County 
Counc! Charies H. Jamison 
Montgomery County Council 
Fred C. Hasselbring. Veterans 
Administration and Thomas © 
Barringer, Federal Housing Ad 
ministration. Registration is at 
ll a. m 


" : 
Fionn 


lleana Wins Senate 


Approval on Residence 
United Press 

The Senate passed a bill yes 

terday to grant permanent 

the United States to 


lleana of Romania 


resi 
dence in 
and 
The 
to th 
effect 


on orders 


Prince 


two of her daughters 


measure, which now goes 


House for action. in 
would cance! deportat 
against lleana and het 


te! 


daugh 


ine prince a daughter 
Queen Mark married to a 
permanent resident, Dr. Steffan 
Iissarescu, and living in New 
Four of her chil 
been granted perma 
residence 


larged 

Concerning city expendi- 
tures, the Mayor said the city 
is paying higher wages to city 
employes but — Public Works 
Department “for the first time” 
kept within its a 4. He said 
the 1955-56 audit, recently com 
pleted, showed an increase of 
6.5 per cent in revenue but ex- 
penditures decreased by 9.84 
per cent. 7 


Draws $500 Fine, 


Jail Sentence 


United Press 


Norton Anthony Russell, 37- 
year-old Yellow Springs, Ohio, 
engineer, yesterday was fined 
$500 and sentenced to 30 days 
in jail for contempt 
gress 

Federal Judge A. Sherman 
Christensen, who imposed sen 
tence, allowed Russell to go 
free-on $1000 bond pending an 
appeal 

Russell was convicted here 
last month of unlawfully refus- 
ing in 1954 to answer questions 
about communism before the 
House Committee on Un-Amer- 
ican Activities 

He did not invoke the Fifth 
Amendment against possible 
self-incrimination but refused 
to answer on grounds the ques- 
tions violated the First Amend- 
ments guarantee of free speech 

Russell, the father of two 
children, is a 1942 graduate of 
Antioch College 


Hearing Set 
On Fairfax Dam 


The Loudoun Counts 
Court will hear 
Monday on the 
tion of the town of Fairfax to 
build a dam on ‘reek 
as part of a $4.5 million town 
owned water system 

ihe court threw out the orig 
inai petition on April 30 be- 
cause of insufficient informa 
tion. The town filed an amend 
ed petition May 1! 

The Loudoun County board 
of supervisors have instructed 
Commonwealth's attorney Stir 
ling M. Harrison to represent 
them at the hearing. Attorney 
Wilbur C. Hall filed an objec. 
tion yesterday stating that Vir 
ginia law does not allow the 
town to Dulld a reservoir ina 
county other than its own 


of Con 


Circuit 
motions next 
amended peti 


‘,00s8e ( 


: . 


OSI to Revise Policy 
To Speed Flow of News 


Erwin Seago director of 1 


Office of Strategic Informa 

told the Hous® Government I: 
formation Subcommittee yes 
terday that plans are under way 


to revise OSI's basic policy o1 
der 

Chairman John F 
Calif.) has charged 
an order written for OSI, the 
Commerce Department aft 
tempted to give that agency 
Federal-wide power to “estab 
lish policy’—which was never 
intended 

Seago 


Moss (D 
that under 


said at a hearing yes 
terday that power was never 
used by OSI. The agency was 
created to provide “guidance” 
on the publication of unclassi- 
fied Government information 
of possible value to an enemy 
“We're just not engaged in 
censorship and never have 
been.” Seago said. He said he 
has been planning a revision of 
its disputed policy statement 
Committee Counsel John J 
Mitchell noted that Seago sev 
eral times has said, much 
nformation has been released 
which is of no benef! oul 
country, but whic! 
mendous value 
nents 
That 


Loo 


q ioltation 


Night of Thrills 
oe Set F riday 


Night of 
tne 
r Home 

ave 


19th annual 
Thrills benetit snow Idol 
Masonic and Eastern Sta 
at 6000 New Hamopsnh 
ne. will be held Friday 
fith Stadium 

The four-hour show 
sored by the Association ol 
Masonic Masters and the Order 
of the Eastern Star, will be 
introduced by a parade with 
nearly 100 marching units ft 
the District, Virginia 
Maryland 

\ lv-act variets snow de 
scribed by General Chair 
Harry B. Savage as an 
professional show headline 
some of the acts in t 
entertainment will 
follow 


| nie 


spon 


“om 


and 


pest 
business 


Senate Passes Bill 
To Let Orloy Stay 


’ 


ea Press 
The yveste 
and the 
granting permanent United 
States residence to Alexander 
Orlov, writer and former Soviet 
diplomat, and Maria 
The couple, former employes 
of the Soviet Government, fied 
to the United States in~1938 
In recommending approval! 
ill the Senate Judici 
aid both have 
government 
agencies. Orlov is the author 
of several magazine articles 
and a book entitled “The Secret 
History of Stalins Crimes. 


Senate 
sent to 


rday passed 
House a bill 


his wife 


tee 


ated with 


ary Commilil 


cCooDde! 


Universal Buildings 


Bustin’ Out All Over 


If you've.ever doubted that 
“there's nothing new under the 
sun.” Washington offers fresh 
proof. 

On the northwest 
16th and K sts. nw., a large 
black sign with light letters 
prociaims the site as the home 
of the soon-to-be-erected Uni- 
versal Building 

Near the corner of Connecti- 
cut and Florida aves. nw., 
a large white sigt. with dark 
letters proclaims the site as 
thé home of 
erected Universal Building. 

The K st. Universal Building 


8 


corner of 


the soon-to-be-. 


will house the $3-million nation 
al headquarters of the AFL 
Bakers Union. Officials of the 
union could not be reached for 
comment last nizht. 

The “onnec cticut avg. Univer- 
sal Building, a project of build. 
ers Charles H. Tompkins and 
Morris Cafritz, will be an $8- 
million “park-< -your-desk” of- 
fice building. 
executive vice president of the 
Cafritz Co., said last night 
that his company had _in- 
corporated the name “Univer-| 
sal Building” three years ago) 
and has “no intention” of chang-| 
ing it. 


, DD: 


Irwin Altman.: 


| 


, 


a lout®e 


withholdmg 
irom the 
press and publi 
Seago maintained his 
is engaged in “an 
rease the 
and attain better uni 
in ciassification and declassifi 
cation’ of Government secrets 
Moss asked if that was not 
a turnadout from the original 
poll \ 7 
headed at 
by R. Karl 
it is change of « 
I do not think 
about,” said Seago 
, ng you the bene 


countered 


agency 
effort to ir 
fiow of intormation 
formis 


[>i 
Hionaman 


doubt 


puzzied 
OSi|—the 


THOS. J. OWEN & SON 
Auctioneers 


1131 F Nerthwest 
‘ ran ; EIV 


BIDS AND PROPOSALS 


Gov? OF. “+ OF Ci 


Se ALE ) PROPOSA: 
Pe 
D : un ; 
1o%4 and 
read f 
Sewer 


‘TENDER NOTICE “POR BHAKRA 
D Sealed Tenders are 
“Government of 

25.000 LF 

“inal de Glame- 


length and the bidders 
may quote for li et pieces in 
these or multiple lengths. Bidders 
should include in their quotation 
unjt prices, delivery dates an 
ment terms uotations te 


ch tts nw 
D e Setore Jane 1, 


‘ 


7 


Contempt Charge’ 


BIDS AND PROPOSALS ‘4 


NOTI +4 SALE. WASKHI 
oa Pe ein 


torn “we 


\ : « 
000.000 Water Supply Bonds. 
aturing annually ecember | 
ie ° im each of the 
lusive and 000 
the veare 1962 t. 1995 


maturing 
$15.000 ia 
to 1978, In- 
each of the 


dra nage 

mn Subdu 
ric’ an otner 
500 000 (he 


ipon bonds 
pa aione 
oy the Slate 


eg 


» 4A CO @ al’ 


” 


> Ze 
+ 

ap O 

*. 

~ 

: 


: WANE 
[AWN | 
AaMFs 


BUSINESS SERVICE 


A DEPENDABLE ox 


| ADDITIONS 


| PAINTING 
™ Pr nate 
eT « rn \ , A 
A A. PIPELINE CLEANE 
ewer nk ra 
. Y . rr a 
' Ss] 08 
ADDITIONS REMODELING 
i , 
ADDITIONS 
s 
ADDITIONS—At? 
: ‘PaA 
MARICK. ( 5 
APPLIANCE SERV 


sa . 
ALTO INTERIORS 
$} 
4 n TA 


arc ote! & CEMENT WORK. 


7 


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aca a 
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UT URPENTRY 
ne ay . 


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CONCRETE Pir 
9 ail 
CONTRA 

IAL Fe 
WORK—I!icensed 


and 
Georges Co. AP 7-404) 
WAXING— Window 
y or nig ©. 2-9 


PLECTRICAI 
. at Ds 
PLOOR wash 

- as 


LAWN MOWERS 
fe e 7 


ERSA! 
ice Ant 
PAINTING—L« 
nD iree « 
PAINTING BY 
ra rs Rea 
PAINTING—1 
"a paperir 
A.) 
PAINTING nter 
remoce¢ z. c& 
R Wear ¢ 
PAINTING 
. fentia 


EXTERIOR a dea oy 
fri wo guar 
U. 4-68097 “alt er 6, 
PAINTING and repair work: reas 
rate free " mate Li 3 939 
PAINTING, int ext 
free est. H Da’ 
PAINTINGs Ext 4 
5953 TA 


9 1389 


repair wore 
PO. 2-459 


PAINTING— Inter 
we paper: ne ; 
a “ All work guar 
PAPERING houses. low 

mech 

FAPERMANG ING 

+, dU, > 
waterproo 
all scraping 

mates Ll 4-7 


free esti- 
439: Li 77-9087 
md eee 
Sma 


painting and carpen- 
ar ree jobs. Free es- 


wy — walls; 
& fin white mech. LA 
ROOF REPAIRS—Lowest * rices: 


pee Hew ee HO. 2 7127 
5 low as 


“taping 
6-213" 


5 
te City, specia)- 


om Ha 
Cones in ¥ ails ‘ steps, 
walks, Call 


wide. 11 ff. 
4-hr. min 
, ay, might 
ealls pairs is wy home’ Reas 
J tes eT 
‘as al .. co he tw AD. : yi 
otk : inevitable 
tild 


———— —— — 
nd wh. With eeutian 
“Ghesterbrook KE. &8-2389 
; Bleck. small cyst on top 
of head. Last. Wed. around Silver 
Spring. Answers to name Booby. * 
Can JU 58088 | 
etropeliten rea. Mary 
1 platinum ock ri 4 
T amonds, approx : } 
piatinum —e ring. 4 Ly J, 
“tar me 


. ATI 
”" Call 
une 7th 


J 
lex Reward 


ellow and chartreuse 


Prank in NE. Generous reward. HL 


SIA WEST CAY Lost in vie. of 1200 
Cali CU 15 iJ 


boxer N 
children 


tan. looks like 
Pond of 


tail 


Pairhaven ave 
home Ki. 9-3969. 
ight blue Dreest 
\s green = —y * rer wings 
face wv) - . > 


AADTA Dri vine © S 
rn riy 
cURTAL is ay launder 


Wee eGR Ads 
PHOTOCOPIES 


8.4955 fer fast service 


order 


ME 


reasonadie prices 
GTALIVUED TO TUTOR in F 
English ond Latin. EM. 3-535 


FVPNC ee = 7)! 
webb: isitehi | AND 
vie ta 24-hr 
nw. Di 434. Eves 
MOTOR T WEAVE 


—_— EE 
DRIVING to 
mas 


San Diese 
to share expens 


ders share expenses ‘ 
0 and 4p. m HO 


ARTICLES FOR SALE 


is — New 
| w oer wa 


and 
from 


TRAL. 2019 14th St. NW 
ave CONDITIONER S—i1 n 
ang wes 
MOUNT 
n 4300 “Pree. 
ASPHALT mix) 
Greene pr 
ea 
~ CRIBS. 
ttresses 


: $4.95) .| 
DISCOUNTS } 
scHtl ‘ewe | \ 


6.95: carriages 
$395. GUAR 
LOWEST PRICES 
HAVE REA VALUE 
BAI — W AREHOU SE, 


BF: FURNITU RE 


7 


aby 


end tov 
effec! 


MAN ‘SLEEP ‘SHOP 
Shop “ 
Lf 


BEDROOM SUrre. 
AND MAHOGANY 
— rn rm aree nest a 


da beds $14) rf rec 
SLEEP 
8! A . 


NEW BLORT ) 


= ash 
ver SANDMAN 
Triangle ri 
Wheaton. Ma "to 4 
BOOK oF ASTROLOG Y—i 
Da he 


Bior 


‘od - ncevycioped 


Kr ig 
, S45 
7 BUILDING MATER! A 
vie wane NO co 
- | 
Oni REGISTERS Look 


T , @ 
“REGISTER. SALES AND 
tre OLS 14th Si 


pIREPL AC a Eat iP 


VE. h 
Lit BRER— 


ANTTURE 


BEGINNERS. 


DON’T GO OVERBOARD 
: YOUR 2 “AA 


I 
FOAM 


“7 


IMMEDIATE FREE 
4 . wr ; 


we Core sEaVicnsnn 
STATE FL RI NITUR E CO 


“FURNITURE 
3 ROOMS 
BRAND-NEW 
FOR ONLY 


$245 


NO WONEY DOWN 


SWANK FURN 


arrn<¢ 


FURN. Twin 
5 
iw cinette . ve 


PURNITURE. 


oe 


VV nat 


"$219 


18 PIECES 


OF 
Brand-New Furniture 
6-PC. B LM SUITE 

an e : TE 

7-PC. LIV ING RM BU ITs 
NO MONEY DOWN 
EASY PAYMENTS 


SAM BROWN’S 


FURNITURE CENTER 
206 Good Hop 


2447 18th st. nw 


GAS RANGES—New. 
ro ; perte, 


used; gua 
sepeire Acme Stove. 


ARTICLES FOR SALE 12 


Sollee 
MECHANICAL drawing instruments 


&E. 31 pieces, finest. New 


airbrush compressor, 

PE. lL, ME. 68-1216. 

ck electric, 

fully automatic with slip sheeter. 


orking condition. solid 
will * 6200. Centra! 


riect. 
new 
2019 


A 
suitable for play 
red lie he 
woorene condition 
ation 5705 altimore 
tavilie, 


OFFICE FURNI! URE 
ECIAL PURCHASE 


°5 ROOMS OF USED EXECUTIVE 

OFFICE al aH RE FROM 1HE 

FPORD MOTOR 

Executive >: By 
tion. Orie. cost 
b 


like-new con 1! 

8) 50 50 avail 

45 0 

re con par’ . 

ost new 8175 ) ’ 

f England Bwivel Cheire si5 
Legal and Let [ 


' "pastare chal 
77.50 


fireproof 


er File 


insulated 
Cabinets 
Bookcases 
savings 
to 75% 
rer ARE PORN BRERE AND 
Ww 


ERE 
PREF DEL IVERY "AND PARKING 
Manhattan Office Fouip. Co 
639 N. Y. Ave. NW 
; Electronic er net organ 
/ extr 
Tt 8 1330 


“Weed Wurlitser spine. 
) Mrs 
JORDAN . 
th , St« 
OUTRO xD, MOTOR Pisin mn. 2 he 
7) 


AN a have va.ues 
i. largest 


Ariingten. Va 
nd 9332 


i615} «67th ' sat 
the library OPEN THURS 


Used bionde spinet. made 
CO. il 
PIANOS FOR 
usec & 


wey 


uprti ~ A. 


PLANO: 
ri ANOS 
a? P 


appearar 


"2464 
Pring —_Re 
4) Nee t 
“AMPBELL 
ne yy 
‘PIANO—Gro 
$250 or & 
Alter 6 »5 
PIANOS 
uD ne 


OPEN. THURS “EVES. 
PORCH Le Pee} 


“-15. 
sa 


Ss EERICERT ORE? 
$5 DOWN DELIVERS 


leading dealers for 
cad re'ri@era’t rs 
AE NEW wuaeran- 


RE FRIGE na tons. 
rar 


neton s 
rade 


FRSAL CO 
n00 UPSHUR ‘ST W. TU 
REFRIGERATORS —> o all 
sere rebuilt j 


2-8888 


makes 


gts ERATOR 


REFRIC ER ATORS—Use 
Cor ave eM 


mt G ‘ 


STOVI 
3. 
‘4 
TAPPAN GAS RAVGE 
TELEVISION ‘ 
; AM -F 
4 


T\'s 
. 


TIRF SALI 
5 
$4 
. Tein a 
TYPEWRITER 
‘ y fee r . 
aA Lhd + pee 
YYPEWRITERS 
‘a 


entra 2 " 
CxtD and antiqu 
VAC'S ELECTROLUX 
ac ’ . ne 
Kenny D 

y 7 . 


“ ASHE aes 


Ww. ASHER 


4 a 
Wak WER Lat 
Ww \SHERS 


. . A &-J i 
ne 
oan. 78” OLDS BGs di! 
r-ed | r M 
ENG Ne 
ea 


ar 
OLDS 

ter & ‘Oarace 
| @-1642 


1950 “RA 
Ser or 
- 


ARTICLES WANTED 
ANTIQUES —Purn.. bri¢ 


Cas) Mt TRRAY. 
BEDROOM 


DU. 7-0513. al -¥% 6- -2977 


BOOKS “BOUGHT —Any cuantity 
A 4, te i BOOK SHOP 1768 Penn- 
ave as a . a9) 
c AMERAS- ~Mo 
qua ig cost “tho. $500). 
H D s ow. RE 
c As PArD— mimel_remov 
} ' : rv {rs 
‘Gosed Monda 
"SE. Pe RNITO RE EXCH ANGE 
210 SE LI 


FURS. ee eat 
eces or household JU. §-03) 


RNITURE WANTED 


FU 
EM. 2-6677 


GOV. _ WINTHROP siant top 4 


es 
or conc. vunimportent 


COLD 


veur dental 
lewelry 


Brine 
discarded 


‘ 
styles. JU 


maTROCTT SNE 


ap er 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


eeen 

INSTRUCTIONS 14 
AIRLIN 

AIR TRAVEL AGENCIES 
NEED ° 


with present 
geemey._ Call in person 
7 ane 
where 
Soon 03 
R ; 

ag ag Tn, 
_ ith &. NW 
ELECTRONICS ‘Radio-TV! — FC 
Heense in 12 wks. day class June 


Li night class June i ranthem 
&&<¢ hoot ‘B21 19th st. oe or s-yela 
HAIRDRESSERS — Enjev « proft- 
able and exciting career; men and 
women. lov ye al . a! ae 
dpc pequry Academ Wy 

nw. ST. 53-1037, (Air y onaiones } 
MODERN cheamiee in beauty cul- 
ture: all subjects teugat: aes 


for Gi trainin batty" COL ‘3 
T1783... 


ME. 
TODAY. Send name. 
age and phone number 


WARFLYNN 
1210 G st. ow. Di 
ss ze starting now—TY?P- 
nd . 


best positions 
, fest. 42 yre.). PA 
65) 


100 women wanted 
nursing: white or » oad 


Por free book let Visit 
| Institute of Nursing 
909 PL. a. 


671 


WOMEN-——ALL AGES 
Get a Better Job 

ARN MORE MONEY — LEARN 

Shorthand and Typing 
SPEED WR TING 


“IN: 1X "WEEKS - 


ig? % acement 
quire + Pr 
Phone aa 3. 2086 
Washington's Only 
Speedwriting 
Secretarial Schodl 
1406 G St. NW 


ASS STARTING IMMED. IN 
LABORATORY TECH 


LABORATOS. t 


wna S 


x 


%2s0O3- 
~gOd 
zoe 


3 


Men women to tram es ennounc- 


nt -Ra ‘a? Civil 
shorthand ooes 
& Re Ne 


wir 
HOOL 

*& © 
‘ OL 2Ss> 


LEARN TYPING 


HELP, MEM 


ABSTRACTORS (MD $3900 


See ABBEY First 


= a h—- te 


Counterm 


COL LOR ED ‘BRANCH " 


4 cl. or 6! : "end Bth cl 

te 82780 
cw 
$50 
$40 


downtown 
nee man 
heuer store 


ACCOUNTANT 
FOR CONTROLLER'S OFFICS 
set man 35-40. Must 


om me in 


equirec 
COLUMBIA 
EMPL OTMEN) SER\ 
1341 uite 224 W 
at c ov NTANT—805.- $90 
o 


ATLAS Agcy., ‘ RE 


14° XN 

KCCOU STANTS 
AT Li "EMPLOY MENT 
. 


Consider These 
Advantages 


mn From W 
Supervision and 

rn a 

ng & 
Vacations and 


nin 


nations 
Pa ; 
Regular Merit Ratings Assure 


yeck Leave 


Steady Progress 


APPLY 


HOT SHOPPES 
EMPLOYMENT OFFICE 
1341 G St, NW., Rm. 200 


ACCTS. (CARIBBEAN, 3506 -~ 
NATIONAL 
EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 


Washington's Largest Agency 
r . 
LES 


PARTIAI LISTINGS ONLY 
' $10 


Claims PROF 
PROFESSIONAL 


ener. Exp. sales liaison 
8: 


represehiative 


5) 
OFFICE 


overseas. 


full che. ¢ 


a 
va te 82 
board optional $300 


pr 
Collection mer 


inside exp. ta $398 
¥. good opptr 
Pield rep. trainee, 


no fee 3 
car +8310 
SE .. 8280 
clk. car nee $310 


r $275 
traffic clk 
MISCELLANEOUS 


Sheet metal estimator 


Airline 


exp. no lic. nec Apt. + 
ENGINEERING DIVISION 
Bee our dverti ent der 


ENG 
FATIONAL SERV 
1108 16t é PW. at L. EX. 3-7270 


ei Ny 


Tuesday, June 12, 1956 
HELP, 


ae | 


MEN 1s 
A&E MECHANICS 


License not req.: man with former 
acceptabdie. starting 

Ol hr. pilus co. bene- 
opportunity te edtein 


* BREIPIONS 
1334 Mass. Ave_at Thomes Circle 
- Di 217 


“ACCOUNTANTS. BOOKEFEPERS 
AND OTHERS 

we have orders ——s ne AiR erode 

8 TO. 

~ ob Pa ttt aaa 

Ca ABTC ERPe SERV, 


1341 G St. Suite 224 ME 8.2629 


ADVERTISING 
COPYWRITER 


lf you can produce vicorsus 
selling copy if you have had 
retail department store exneri- 
ence An immediete perma- 
nent job is available to you. 
5-day, 40-hour week, 20% 
discount on purchases Aooly 
with samples of your work to 


Advertising Office, 4th Floor 


LANSBURGH’S 
WASHINGTON STORE 
ASST 


BEKPE EP 
$300. POTOMAC EMP 7 
$08 Dd! vd . Ar . 2000 


ATTENDANTS _ 


Por new 500-ca *arace 
J LS: white or colored 


ationa 
124 Ww 


4th and Pior ida Ave 
MECHANIC for 
LER: 5% day weer alary 
and percentage experienced 
automatic transmiss or 


avty, | een COLORED 
D. aS EMPL. EXCHANGE 


op salary 
$4 


7! . 
S¥oe ov 


a a 


> > 
Oe -@ 
~ & 


=>. 


T 
TYPES 
HO a 


am \ ng SALESMAN— Mu: t be. 
hone n etl 


; ur bene! . 
CRAWFORD. BETHESDA Mi 
TORS INC OL 4.1000 ms 
AUTO SALESMEN used We 
hap te the need 


me ine tremend 
tomer : ‘a ary ) 
sy portation furnish 


AUTO" SALESMAN 
NEEDED 
sal 1. APPLY 
RANTING ’ SONS 
MOTORS, INC 
DODGE-PLYMOUTH 
more Ave. Hyatis 
AUTOMOBILE 
SALESMEN 


need | sa lfame 
‘ 


g00 


MANAG rR 
Uppor 


PAT RFAX 
hear nig r 


il 


Mus 

: 6 . 

See MR 
and a 


} ce hU6U©@n 


| > 
att wR KER O OPERATOR 
PAIRFAX FORD 
h Or 


Oeor gia 


BARBER “Pet ra aner 


anc comm! aston 5557 & 


BEGINNERS 


The continued 


Meinar has 


Positions for youns 


- 


row th 

created seve 

ren 

interested in learn , 
A TRADE 


ASSEMBL 
SHEFT META! TRA WEES 


. “ar 
’ } 
K.reERS 


Pers n" 
Di 


r 


8B AM. TO 4PM 


MELPAR, INC. 


A Subsidiary of Westingt 


Air Brake C 
1311 SOUTH FERN ST 
ARLINGTON, VA 


7US8@ 


(1 bik 
Route |, 


ott Jetterson Davy . Hwy 


at South | 5th St.) 


~ BOOKKEEPER. ASSISTANT 
OFFICE MANAGER 


Por office of large downtown suto- 
mobile dealership 


-7878 for eppoint- 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
Tuesday, June 12, 1956 


BoOTMLAcy. berner x 


pi 


Terred 
t. Ver- 


18 end over: sum- 
ooo or iat time work. aoe experi- 


oe ar ke he array. ‘4 fs 
BOYS—BOYS 


TRAVEL 


Coast to coest 
eunired ' 


No experience re- 


farole 

aFollette 

oom 5 
pm airo Hote’ 

. Bal i entneeeeninn wits 

BULIDOFER onverator for 

joacer. Must have car 

, $-8533 

CARPENTERS, 
ra. spencers, 


hist wages: sheath 
bomen facial men 
Inquire carpen'r) 

inch wood City Dev elop 
ees a0 on Rd. Oxon Hill 


r. Fram 


CARPENTER 
Perm. position in | 
concern Car ne 
_ Ply 1424 K Si 


CARPENTERS 


non-union, Arst-class me- 

only Year-round em ploy 

00d wages With as sality 
Report 7 30 we 


To WePae’ Out ae. 
ave a, mile bevyon 


7 
block 


W.C & A N. MILLER 
EVELOPMENT COMPANY 
1eers an Developers of 

~Weslt? His. Sumner Spring Valier 

: CASHIER | 
WH J: 
PRON OPPICE— 


achine expe 


y 
on Westpath to job in 52700 


<p y Pl PERSON NMEL, OFPICR 
MAY FLOWER HOTEL 


CONN. AVE & DE SALES sT NW 


CASHIERS 


OR FRONT OFFICE laree 


ashingto Hote experienced 
pitiotes. WRITE Box 62). Post-Th 
CASHIERS 


PROWT 
“ + rai 
Y MPI OYME 


“SHERATON. "PARK 
HOTEL 


CHAUFFEURS 


af 


FOR 
da aise 


OF? CE cashiering 


AIRPORT TRANSPORT 


W ashington Nat ral A rport 


' be experienced 


-BURROUGHS 


i 


HOTE! 
*i tro 


x 
APPLY PERSONNEL OFF 
MAY FLOWER HOTEL | 
CONN. AVS & DE SALES ST. NW 
CLERKS 
Gry « leaning plant | 
, > to 
3400 
teresting | 
>f ad ee 
mn TiTm aa 
mo 0 : MAN AOEMENT 
CONST’ LTANTS In Bu 
mo G NW wy 
Collection Nisaass 
Immediate larce rea! 
some 


me c 
pA co 142 ‘4 


COLLECTION MAN | 


With sma tl loan experience 
inside W 
Ady 
Company Benefits 
Excellent Fut 


rk, Good Pay 


ancemen?t 


ure Tor 
- 
KIiane Aar 

» Ma 


Old Established F 
JU 9.4529 


Collection Manager 


cal Pinar 
st be exper 
ancilu 


Company 
lenced anc 


— SORT ROLLER 


OR CONTROLLER ASPIRANT | 
wy bar are GU AE APIED for & bet 
o railing 


COLUMBIA 


EMPI oY MEN" T SER 
Su NI 


n eedy gor 
Evans. EL » on or ay 
der te "Way- 
502 Rhode lsiand 
up: snother 
enarg 
a 


to 


App Michel's 
atter 7 2 Db. 


Se erciers 


position in 
A nan nor 
experienced i 


summer 
nlesse placed 
BS. 100 12 


cain 
1 Mis 
| Cor. a 4 


= 


ew 
¥ 
settled man | 
0 Vermont Av 


emp! ben 
UNI TED SERVIC 
LIFE INSURANCE 
1425 Eve St. NW 


CORRESPONDENT 


To dictate 
collection 
tice 


and 
of 


informational 
letters. handie 
routines and detai!, and 
head his own team a ing this 
work He results 
minded, problems as 2 
challenge be ready to 
work fo make a career for 
himself. He should be wel! 
balanced, energetic, have good 
persona! habits, and get along 
with people Experience in 
making adjustments, handling 
complaints, etc., helpful. 

If you are under 25 or owt 
35 it will be difficult to fit 
you into our program. We wil! 
waive a college degree for in. | 
telligence and strong persona! 
qualifications. To such a man| 
we offer security plus the 
chance to learn and grow in a 
local organization holding a 
leading place in our industry 
Please make your letter of ap- 
plication both specific as to 
your education, experience and 
personal ‘circumstances, and 
persuasive—make it sel! your- 
self. 


P.O. Box 6472 
Washington, D. C. 


must: de 
tace 


ana 


ELECTRIC CO. 


HELP, MEN 15 


«a 
Man 


boys... 


D SHWASHERS bus 
ters. stock bors 
s exp.. he 


ls. 
benefits after months’ employ- 
ment. 


Feige oma ealary “expected 
MAN 


‘WHITE: 

2 bo 
To were, tn th SHOP and) 
m 


ake deliver! o. ae have D.C 
know the 


after 3 
Pavel Ow 


i roy si FOTEL 


MARKETING TRAINEE | 


APPLY 
17TH ST. EMPLO ENT O cs 
=i HOTEL 
guyres.onms, ym 


u 

Cooks. short order. resort : — 
and board DRIVER-SALESMEN — men. white, 
Dish washer- yard men. col., live 2: now employed | 
} 635 | themselves. 
reference, abdie. 
ay. good work- 
ater training — 


Cc. 


pe 
deliv Miss | 
i2th. Cor 


h 


in 
Dishwashers. co! $30-835 | 

PEE LL WORRIDO | he ré worhes 
5.) ing conditions 


Experience 
3 te il m oc 
_Ale Co. 215 7th St. 


DRIVERS 


he Reser ready ee were 


FB al rash rou 
Bros Imes i341 *iaalt ply 


DRIVERS and china packers. Exp 
oniy. CURTIS MOVING & STOR- 


6:30 @ 


ghayne Ooportunities for several 


coliere-trained men interested 
& s&ies and narketing career © 
maior oj] company in thie Mar) 
land and Southeastern States area 
These openings provide @ min 
lary °o 8375 


ne 

in 

Diner * 1100 

Ave 

OARI-RAR Prosen Custards “Es 

peri enced reson after 4| AGE. 5514 Dorsey 

m DARI. yt 1302 Conan | O —— 

. Pe AMS $5 reécrEiciuN— iat Good 
Wages. Licensed for Fairfax and 
Ariimeten. Call e398. 9 end 5 
m : 3 


lane. Bethesda 


are elas ly. an excellent training pro- 

stam. employee benefits and a pro- | 
pplicants should ap- | 
giving description of | 
education physica! 
military experience. | 

and previous Work e@x- 


‘ ite 
Film inepec. and printers 
Round cooks. helpe 
Mechanics wht 
Grease rack man whi 

“ 


qualifications 
‘at ake : : if any. age 
per ence 


BOX M-252, POST-TH | 
ILIGGETT’S. Eb. C4 ae serheibcisiettomsints 
nibh as et oan a 


DRAFTSMEN 


re ww ~? Turneces av 
s license HOLLA ND 
deta! at of Reinforcin FURNACE C6 4016 Biadensdurs 
ponene 4ows. ete , Es on 
en preset red, Gas © Ks MECHANICS. auto truck 
ed ae Wadenemant men only, vacation. and hoi dere | 
alified o Tru Pay. Contre 0 we Alex. Va ve 
nd ' enad . & , uc ronoco st. 
ime _hospitalisat, on and OV. 3-1500. See Garver 
JIneurance plans aid vaca- MEN—Excellent openings for - 
Location Richmon Virginia full time, also 1 part "time 
ried men preferred, full “time can 
average over $100 per 
established 
vassing. famous aK, 
sities assure steady. high es. 
No sales exper. necessary. but m 
ne 


| 
Al truck 


tions bo $20.000 
i@g.. 1346 Conn. Ave 
or general contractor 
— man Only ys 
nee a 

employees are aware o 

Box M-232.| VEtteement. Reply siving 
— experience and salary desired 
M ost T -H preen Co. 911 Nationa! 


or phone DI 
J 4471 oF = 


SALES MANAGERS 
Opportunity Knocks 


A $30.000.000 netional concern 

has opened a new division direct 

to consumer field—we need pen | 

“door ° deor knowhewr™ et 

will pay salesmen | 

1) eommission fer 

the same work ther are now doing 
on COMMISSION oniy 


ELECTRONIC 
Technicians 


Also 
recruil- | 


override 


Te p! 
id trainers and 


rae 
paid to fir 
ers. otc ) 
$15.- 


positions of 


OUTSTANDING 
CAREER 
OPPORTUNITIES 


in the Work shop. 


SAGE SYSTEM ea Wer 


Furniture tee 


Management 
on > are aise open. | 
L. TAKE THIS) 
OPPOR. 
N THE 


Hoover 
Rexair 
Excellent _opport ity for exer 
7 _ 


This is a ground floor opportunity 
Local interviews now . 


being held to select 

qualitied persors to at- 

tend company training 

program. Classes sched- manu ip the coun. 

uled to start in June,| Gmetete _citice  Syrnisnmes , one 
ly, August and Sept 


We © 
empwover 


not cont your present 


For ‘appoint ment. please 


‘aoe 


osition new 
anufacturing | 
Men sei jected | 

appearing and fur 
paid| 
: ‘canvass! ne. | 

tor nt st aw 

7 me 

t 7 part- time 


posit! 

dee Spare or full _ime 
shift to i or 

905 Eve «' ny. 


CORP. 


MILITARY FIELD 
SERVICE DIV 


average. 


¥y fr-.. 6235 GOs. ave. a@ a +d 


GUARDS 


Ex Sery 
| Extensive Travel- USA ruistary 
Training at Full Salary | esrec | 
es beral mployee Benefits - or Shine Ari, Fr -oround work | 
| PHYSICAL EXAMINATION able man need apply. Phone Mr 

uit. JA $5555 Bi: 
REQUIRED pairs es an | 


new pn H 3-! or i 
apply 1321 irmont 8t Ast 
497 % ) 
PAINTERS | 


EXPERIENCED ONLY 
oye JAFFE 


PRINTERC 


as 
oniy: report ready ¢ 


. ADB 
METAL MECHAN! Ics & ROOPERS 


wor & Me Good | 
ta > 350 MANASBAS 
SIGHT CHEF with jocal exper. and 
ood / 
emen with recent 


pounce experence 


Requirements: Technica! 
institute training and/or: 
equivalent practical ex- 
perience; or military 
training in radar, sonar 
and similar electronic 
equipmer't, 


INTERVIEWS DAILY 
8 — 3:30 


whit lecns 
Appointment ite me 


ERCO DIVISION 


ACF Industries, 
g yve@eraa +. Md WA 


in 
sign 
" stion Co ‘ 
PAINTERS —> 
COLORED - Permanent positions 


opened for exper. men in large apt 
development in &F > 


‘ower 
Inc 
].4444 


WASHINGTON 
INTERVIEWS 


Wed., June 13 and pany benefits 


Ott “? ‘ag. ie 
Thurs., June 14 Rm 
12 NOON TO 7 P.M GUARDS 
TEMPORARY 


ELLE 
ON 


DISTRICT 7-2759 


OR WRITD 


App! 
co. 1424 


PARKING Lot gy . a or 
ay 1405 e St N 

PATENT MPTORNEY 

fuate at th degree 

? 7 Te 


CAL _ MR JAMES LAY torney © 
” ical 
CALL FOR 


SUMMER MONTHS 


“, 


|, BURROUGHS | = 
Corporation 


S11 N. Broad Street 
Philadelphia 232, Pa 


‘ nor require previous 
ence hut 


phys 


APPLY IN PERSON 
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 
8B A.M. TO 4 P. M 


MELPAR, INC. # 


A Subs 
Avs 


jara 46 exper 


stringent 


must 


cal exam 


“BATENT “SEARCHER 


th mechanical background 
pa ent aw om ce Te'enohone for 
intmen NA 8-1369 
PLUMBER ~Exp ober 
for eman Call 
wy 


FORTER 
ha 


for 


adie 
“ja 
nt a. ivery 

no 

NOR 7 in 

Hills Pharmecy. 
"il ver 


aot NIGHT 


Hrs. 6 m. to i] m. Must be 
porese>® y 4 Sas presently em- 
j 4 


Westinghouse pend | 


la saline 
.Ornmpany 


4 arv 


Brake ek 


| 
| 3000 ARLINGTON BLVD 
| FALLS CHURCH, VA. 


HAIR STYLIST—A! around beau 
~ an -da week Gua! ranteed 


lary and coment ssion. No 
MRS. S8CH 


: ENGINEERS 


‘| General Electric’s “BEATING MECHANIC 
Smal! Aircraft Mochenle fer warm oir bee 


PORTERS 
Engine Department el 


r TRNACB co 
, sion SCHOOL BOY e— Writ - Tor for 
Interviews 
Washington 


In in interview ‘work. hws | 

leted interv! FALLS CHURCH LABORATORY 
TUESDAY 

JUNE 12 


Immediate Ope 


PRELIMINARY AND 
MECHANICAL DES IGN 


on 
onal ne 


401 . Bladensburg | 


Falls Church residents pre- 
ferred. Permanent posi- 
tions in Falls Church. Re- 
ferences required Many 
employe benefits 


ror 


wor Covering 


x — A Alexandria. y as 


MACHINISTS 


Experienced 


APPLY IN PERSON 
J a nad 

engines 

caesign 


and sA M. TO4 P.M 


compeonen | 


CONTROLS 


ee cnt 
pment 


COMPRESSOR DESIGN 


4 tiow heat 
oration stu 


DESIGN ANALYSIS 


ign eri 
heat t ranaber 


MONDAY THR® FRIDAY 


MELPAR. INC. 


VD 
VA 


‘ 
oe. 
— 


atreas 


Py With Small Mechanisms 


3000 ARLINGTON B&B 
PaLta. CHt TRCH 


Capable of Working to Close 
ake Arnold 2 bus from iith 
Tolerance 


brat ion an ¥ E ots. nw. to plant entrance 


dynamics 
AFTERBURNER DESIGN 


Norzie and combustor designs 
and analysis 


reas 
thermo- 


PRESSER—Thorou iw a; exper 


Well Equipped Shop Facilities 3 
Wisconsin 


fully exper. 


Wages Cemmensurate With 00] 
vacation with pay 
1700 


For Appointment Call Ability 


Mr. Ted Woerz 

Tuesday, June 12 
9 A.M. to 5 P. M 
at EXective 3-5034 


Stone cleaners 
xa 


Many Company Benefits ™ us 


9 
! Por a RES cleanin plant 
Apply in Person Steady iob)§6]«6>Gooed pay Excellent 


working conditions. Straight time 
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY for piece work rates Apply Cen- 
: r 7 


; 4 PM, Bal en 
8 AM. to | ines for 2 exp xcel 
) plan PLUS snienaies edvertising | 
sure-fir opportunities for | 


MELPAR, INC. | igiicsiins SRSA 
By RT, | ok 


3000 BLYD.. i roo rep rs. 68 eugene ae J 


PA 
fr 
aheat ' Se ot 
: rk Hotel. 
, 


SMALI Mn tries ENGINE DEPT 


GENERAL 


1000 Western 


venue 
West Lynn, 


acs. and maeintenance 


t. Miss Morgan at | 


Arnel 3- 


and & ss sts. DY, te p ‘ Feabies =| 
af Bstiglh wee 


. . 
We operate on an incentive 


plan—substantial guarantee— 
5-day week. To qualify, 

Mr. Jones or Mr. Hall atter| 
2:00 P.M. OLD COLONY 
LAUNDRY, 6820 Blair Road, 
NW 


| 1420 


| nished 


for youpne man. Apply 
| r. apply | 
Ea CESMEN 


ROUTE SALESMAN 


Rxuperienced or will train. We ha 

openings on several established 
routes for men between 23 and 45) 
years of age who are looking for a | 
permanent an uture, Guar- | 
anteed salary training 


APPLY PERSONNEL OFFICE 


ile 


ARCADE-SUNSHINE 
713 Lamont St. NW 


. ROUTE 
SALESMEN 


ESTABLISHED 
PERMANENT ROUTE 


5-day week, paid vaca- 
tion, group insurance, 
sick leave. Apply ir 
person, 8 A. M.-4 P.M 


| 7. Up Bottling 


| = Co. of Alex. Inc. 


807 N. ROYAL ST,, 
ALEX., VA. 


SALES COUNSELORS 


| addit) oneal counselors 


We have no competition in 19) 
Our job le to counsel 

chose fami 3 on the many bene- 
ve by buying today 


; 

of highest integrity with @ desire 
to render service 
ilies. Car ensential 
necessary 

trained by experts 


Experience not 
, : 


rs 
piy 9:30 te 4:30 © 


PARK LAWN 
a0 , ile Pix 
val a, ot, Be 


SALES ENGR —$7500 |. 
LLOYDS EMPL. sett 


000 rr 


7} 
EXEC BcOrsvE Y BLACEMEN: BUR 
St..2-1122. 


- SALES a cilemeaaast 


—PHARMACEUTICAL— 
AND MEDICAL DETAILING 


din ethica! pharmeceu' 
— —— turer desires oua hea 
representative for Washington. D 
C. and Arlington ares 


College 
biclogr cher 
eciences reauired 


backeround in oharmercr 
jatr or a lied 


car fur 
intensive 
desirabie 


Salary. expenses. bonusts 
if desired. pilus 
training Experience 
but mot essen ia.. 


TION. agg cosron*- 
TIO Bos i212 Post-Ti 

tall Lie yor Store 
23 to 35 ors. of pee Good sai ary 
_ocal business references requir 
; leyerd Liquors. 2106 E St. NW 


? 
downtown ‘service ane. = & 


oF 


Excellent epportunity. Experience 
preferred, But Wi 
man who is willing te learn. Appir 
W.R 


Winslow Ce. 822 New York 
Ave. NW 
SALES REPRESENTATIVE | 


We will employ 
with sufficient 
surance and «a burning desire to 


to these fam-| : 


National Memoria! Park 


15)HELP, MEN 
| SERVICE STATION 


+ ae have loca ( 
te superv 
rt eo 


SERVICE STA. ATTENDANT 
ust be exper. D.C. ref permit 
top ssiary & comm oy ghby 
Beso Service, 4244 W ave. aw, 
SHOE SALESMAN 


Experience permanent position 
Highest ‘commission and companar 


mere MILLER 


1222 PF ST 
1139 ‘Conn ym yw 


~ SHOE REPAIRMAN _ 
For NE area. good hours 
lent pay eeeeerey —- 
dave paid and u 
vacat! on poly 
nesotea Ave. NS. 
SHOE SALESMEN — Full-time, ex- 
pesveness in family- type shoe seii- 


PREFERABLY OVER 45 


by nat’) organization to call on in-! 
ustriai or commercial 


ouate training. inewrance and 6 & 
benefits. High commission. rts and 
bonus arrangements Car essential 
Phone N. H. Skipper FA. 8-1672 
Wednesday, 9-5 


ALEAHEN “te sel CUSTOM BUILT 
HOMES. Unlimited leads. Inter- 
esting work, No license needed No 
traveling 
PLAY 

H 


4134 
‘Wilson, bis 


TECHNICAL 
AIDES 


we Onockvil . 
Pike. Rockville 


SALESMEN 


T ; 
Career opportunities leading to ad- 
c nd professional! re fa 

shor 


choice connection on one of 


sonahie appearance 
eualification Pieasa 
conditions. = air- —~—~ 
pect client 


a) and appr ox! ima * ly 
years experts ance im one of 
following fie 


GUIDED MISSILES 
RADAR 


FIRE CONTROL 


APPLY ran BHIPLEY 
Lewis & Thomas Saltz 


1408 CO Bt. NW 


consider young 


earn upward to $7200, immediately | 


Excelent company benefits. ME 


nalneers, 
Juniors 
000 


7 


Technica) | 


| 


kinds posit eae apewre in "pergon 
700 cor NA | 


witty 
8.2540 


SALESMEN 


if you want a selling oppor 


tunity far above average, are 


aggressive, have #® good ap- 


pearance and a picasing per- 


sonality it will pay you to 


investigate what we have to 


otter: 


Salary while training 


Liberal 
bonus 


COMMISSION P'u 


Protected ter 


Life, 
surance 


rtory 


family, hospital 


Opportunity for advance- 
ment 


(6) Heavy national and toca! 


advertising 


Previous Sales Experience 
Helpful But Not 
Entirely Essential 


Car Necessary 


FOR APPOINTMENT 
Call Mr. 
9 a ' 1] 


Presgraves 


p m 


3-8153 


SALESMEN 
(2) 
SALARY 
COMMISSION 
BONUS 
High caliber salesmen needed 


immediately to fill gy es 
created by promotions 


pointment selling only. me | 


fied prospects. No canvassing 
Over 25 years of age. Own a 
car. Must have proven saies 
record. 


Apply in Person 
To Mr. Rice 
Sales Office, 2nd Floor 
9A. M. TO 8 P. M. 


CUSTOM UPHOLSTERY | seattic 
CARPET CO. 


& 


501 Rhode Island Ave.’ NE. 


J 


' 


| 
| 
: 


SONAR 
TORPEDO SYSTEMS 
Purther 


Piease Call 
Personnei 


SALESMEN 


Pa orma! 
When you 5-7 


take the time 
. it 


sevart ment 


VITRO LABORATORIES 
DIVISION OF 

Vitro Coro. of America 

242 warne Ave. Silver Bor! 


TECH. 
WRITERS 


working for 


RENAIRE 
101 EYE ST. SE 


CORNER OF N. J. AVE. AND EYE 


3173 NWN. Was 
Across From Pos 


SALESMEN 
$5000 PER YEAR TO START 
CURITY—PLUS EXTRA com 
T 


Bivd 
Office 


instruction mant 


ppeperoien af wu 
procecures on 


installation 
: ectronic equipment 
tien in electronics and prev! 
writing experience 


Interesting and cha 
on diversified 
information 


lenging sesign 
probiems 


BENEFITS 
you 


ar 


CAN 


APPLY IN PERSON 


EXPERIENCE 


PRE 
AR REQUIRED 


SELLING 

FERRED Cc 
TIGATE THis 
UTE Y. 


MONDAY THRILL i 


$ A.M. TO4P.M, 


MELPAR, INC. 


SOLID OF 
TELEPHONE FOR 
INTERVIEW JE 


a. : oar Va 


ERE NIN iz) 7" * 
‘Er ss MARKER 


Por established trucking co re" 


A Subsidiary of Westinghouse 
Air Brake Company 

mensurate a th adi 

in epiy Box M-251 

i. 


ATTENDANT I 
mmoenent 


wanted ¥ White} Ref. | 3000 Arlington Bivd 
SERVICE STATION 
ERIENCED 


1000 . adenaber - 


SHOE SALESMEN 


Best earning opportuni 
ties for selling shoes full 
or part time salesmen 
Highest commissions 
Weekly drawing ac 
count. 5-day week per 
manent job with many 
employee benefits. 


Falls Church, Va 


TOOL MAKERS 
MACHINISTS 
MACHINE OPERATORS 

For Electronie 


Manufacturing Plant 


Apply Manager 


HAHN’S 


1207 F ST. NW 
3113 14TH ST. NW 
4483 CONN. AVE. NW. 
B40! GEORGIA AVE 


SILVER SPRING, MD. 


APPLY 


Monday thru Friday 


9am 


NEMS CLARKE 


919 Jesuo Blair Drive 
S iver Sor ng, MAA 


E-N-G-I-N-E-E-R-S 


Boeing Airplane Company 


Seattle—W Wichita 


INTERVIEWS 


TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY 
June 12-13 


Design, Research and Product 
opportunities in the following 
tields: 


AERODYNAMICS 
MECHANISMS 
ELECTRONICS 
PNEUMATIC SYSTEMS 
HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS 
METHODS ENGINEERING 
SERVICE ENGINEERING 
STRUCTURES 
ELECTRICAL POWER 


to 4o.m 


w) career 


related) 


als 


 —— s ~s 
, 


PROPULSION 


For Appointment Telephone 


HUdson 3-602! 


Ask for Mr. Al Rogers 


June 12-43 


yme to Deot. No. W.1-A-46-12 
Second Avenue, Seattle Wash 


Or send res 
1301 


5. nn 
Boeing 


ington 


WEAPONS SYSTEMS 
OPERATIONAL ANALYIST 


Boeing Airplane mpany 


‘a engineer ns a | -” 


tor key scientist o ntegration 


of surtace-to-air missile with air Getense system 


Ahilitv to make recommendations 
ational characteristics of weapons 
important function of this position 


atte hing oper 


ystems also 


Applicant must he familiar with techn: al 
at air detense planning and have exper ence mn 
operational use and pians of air detense weapons 


Salary Open 


WASHINGTON INTERVIEWS 


TUESDAY. AND WEDNESDAY 
June 12-13 
TELEPHONE HUdson 3-602! 
Dupont Plaza Hotel 


“@'a is 


Please ask for Mr. Al Rogers 
BOEING AIRPLANE COMPANY 


Wichita Boston 


13) HELP, MEN 


P wee pai 
Offeial Cleaners 


| 
& ELECTRICAL | 


ne. M4) 


| 


15, HELP, MEN 


| aoa 


in fittine men's clothes 


= mma ee 


| WATCHMAKER With cales pee: 
| Seod-sal posit with future 


| WATERFRONT D CTOR — For 
| Summer camp ~ Pe 2 and 
ub Cross water sa 
* &; | YOUNG MAN — Under 25, must 
‘us| typist. oppert earn 
and casualt 
pl Nort 
ward BF 


be 
fire 
, BAK business. 
western Natl. #812 


Co work from 
rT 
ment 


i2 noon t 


t 
emplovee benefit RE ~-7001 Sateeen % an 


Melpar’s expansion 
has created new 
positions for men experienced 
in the following fields 


Sheet Metal Layout 
Machine Parts Inspection 
Electro Mechanical Inspection 


Precision Assembly 


MELPAR INC. 


1311 South Fern St. 
Arlington, Va. 


(1 blk. off Jefferson Davis Hwy 


Route | at South 15th St) 


Jobs Open At 


RCO 


oe Engineering 


AERODYNAMICISTS 
DESIGNERS 

DESIGN CHECKERS 
DIGITAL PROGRAMMERS 
ELECTRONIC ENGINEERS 
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS 
TECHNICAL WRITERS 
TEST ENGINEERS 


| 
Professional 


/ 


Melbourne, Fila | 


TOOL DESIGNER 


| 
Office 


PERSONNEL CLERK 
SECRETARIES 


hop 
COMBINATION FIREMAN 
and FIRE INSPECTOR 


<? he thars ob 


j 
A ug 


y familiar with fire fight ng equip 


ment used in large industrial organizations 


SPRAY PAINTERS 


INTERVIEWS 


Mondav—F ridav 
8—3:30 P.M 


Saturday by Appointment 


ERCO DIVISION 


ACF INDUSTRIES, INCORP 


Riverdale, Md WA 7.4444 


DESIGN ENGINEERS 
DRAFTSMEN 


Excellent opportunity perma 
nent positions with a top firm which 
iS rapidly expanding in the progres- 
sive pulp and paper industry 
tion 


for 


Loca- 


in mountain area of western 


Virginia 


DESIGN ENGINEERS—M.E., C.E., 


or equivalent education with three 


Ar 


more years experience, not nec- 
essarily paper mill, tor piping, struc- 
layout, and design 


tural, plant 


DRAFTSMEN — College degree 
not required but must have at least 
three years experience, nof neces- 
sarily paper mill 


Complete resume including educa- 
tion, experience, present salary, and 
late photograph if available should 

fde sent to 


HAROLD E. MILLER 


Technical Director 


West Virginia Pulp and Paper Company 
Covington, Virginia 


Continued en Following Pose. Continued on Following Pare. 


, 


— PPP ORD FE Oe OO 


16/THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES AERALD 
ini: Tuesday, June 12, 1956 31 
HELP, WOMEN ‘ 16) HELP. WOMEN 
Fora MECEPPTONTET for optica cal office L Y 
fie EP cae please TO SELL DRESSES & COATS 
Good o 
RECEPTIONISTS, PBX Oversiors.| mantn\ portion, App Apo H ABRAM. 


Sas 
. 12th. cor- SEAMS 


16 HELP, WOMEN HELP. WOM 


sworth 


ADVERTISING 
COPYWRITER 


if you can produce vigorous 
selling copy. if you have had) 
retail departrnent store experi-| 
ence. An inmumnediate perma- 
nent job is available to you. 
5-day, 40-hour week, 20% 
discount on purchases. Apply | 
with samples of your work to 


HELP, MEN HELP, a ikP, WOMEN 


15 HELP, MEN 15 HELP, MEN & WOMEN 15A 
; permanent 


CHURCH ORGANIST — Frown 
Sot 


Cail Mrs Sues. 


18 


peiet with gen. qe. work. 

mee fn 

ary in are 
re. 


14 
1404 New Yor 


YOUNG MAN 


18-28 
(WHITE) 


netovcouse orean wetien a 


ey gg A . 


for electronic 
manufacturing ; 
plan.. “toe wk. Mon. thru Pri. 


&° CARKE, INC. 


919 Jesup Blair drive, 


L 


largest Lincoln-M 
Ss neat. a¢ 


of is 


— 
oe ree 
tarial and personal qua a 
* 


as- 
ton i, a quickly 2 Irvin, 


}- 
reon at =. 
~ mally "rues. in — one? Acre. 


ear Motors, Inc. 
tie’ off” Balary ae crag 
r 


verino 


Ephee 
On ETT sooo 


NO EXPER. NEC. 


Call Mr. Ames 
EX. 3-4467 


1100 PER WEEK TO START 
YOUNG MAN 


oor & young men 
eppertunity <f.—. romics 


ome « 
pany which is outstanding 
ita ie tela Send resume. statin co 
al 


openines for 


women. Say, hour weet ‘nen? 
ae m_. 


women 
purchases. App.y 


sa ah HECHT .CO. 
oe etait 
Mae EMP 911 


CLERK-TYPIST 


oniy 
ot | "olives POSITIONS — Housewives. person 10 & 
college students. pe be fall. 7 part- 


time omer ss in 7:30 


m. = through 
ri ve per hr Must | be able t to 
Pass (ypine test at 40 wom. net 


To poets: subdmit Fa lowi tnfor 
4 + M2178, post - na 
sane Zist. 19 ro include} 
num- 


ra , 

TYPISTS. 68. Beth | $250 Aye. 
feat dictaphone, Beth. $250 SECRETARY —20-2 2 
aE te 63 retary to 
BKKPRS [Wheaton | 283 | 


tei : " 
rina ans wee | Herbie 


ie! 
SILVER SPG "ROCKY ET 
PLOYMENT AGENCY SECR ARY 
413"@s.. Ave JU. 39-4446 | Laree property manazem 
RECEPTIONIST-TYPIST — General) feauired b-cae yt he 
free hospitalisation eo 
insurance bonu 
perseane, 


Washington 
Interviews 
Wednesday 
June 13th 


GENERAL 
ELECTRIC 
In Cincinnati, 
Ohio 
NEEDS MEN 
TO BUILD 
A NUCLEAR 
REACTOR for’ 
p.0. BOX 472 | | AIRCRAFT 
WABNSTON, 8, 5 PROPULSION 


ITION 
PERMANENT POS | GENERAL ELECTRIC 


n “Ie o- 
meals. ore 
CONSULTA 


3 — 
ge chein 


Sg Pleasant public. se 

= now during Coon te coast. Ne experience re- 
for wired. We train you 

tien furnished 

Dense . 


Advertising Office, 4th Floor 


LANSBURGH’S 
| WASHINGTON.STORE 


Tt. Sth end EB Sts. NW. 


AIRLINES 
compicte If | 4 tg t ~~ 
_ eaivid. | AVIATION TRAINING 
scheduled for in , 48-40. Distribu- 
$60 oN R 
NT CONSULT- 


sense. é con- 


thand 


ment 
shor 


re- 
oune man, ace 
grad ate, car 


unt 
i ited 
or right 


ofr ft 
wires service 
— _ 


my wave 
lent future 


office, 


Mrs. Woronoff, 
“ip k 


‘aes ars 
phone. West “En 


Le store. 
3:| steady =job, 00d pas. Apply 62 


amen cel- airo Hotel. 16th and 
. Box 


| Must be of « lent character and | 
be able te to quality on physical ex- 
mina 
°o reeeive consideration above in- 


OPENING AVAILABLE [{ 
ly attractive young bane Co 
raduate efer In motion pic- 
Typing essential. short- 
artinge Fg 
LI. 6-8822 for 


CAPT. FILM STUDIO 


U 
OPPORTUNITY 
FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 
AND TEACHERS 


EARN $1000 THIS SUMMER 


Panricway LAL Bom: 
ot tak i ata 


FULL TRAINING SUPPLIED 
Call Mr. Smith 
EX. 3-4467 


BEFORE NOON 


industrious, aon 
pay. ie. ae 


lient 


We Must be excellent stenograp 
Sve aptitude for fAgures 


nent position ie ~ ty maneee- 
and build oh im new 


ment 


its te Sullding 


ys and 
ho tests 


art 
ffice. 5 da 
NAG 


" es - 
an wear speciaity shop; 
exD.. “day wos, Salary open iv 
Phone “trie. WA for i 
en vie. ‘Sa08. ’ Hamiltos | VAVERL 
2500 Wiscons 
—_ For retail ees | Lae “STENOG. 
E. oned. i-¢ 
A | 
Catholic and Protesta 
bibles mous average 235 


your peng on ne ba a 


considered. you m 
iaished your ghee ® oat arse 
clud ons & physics an 


YOUNG MEN 
ND 
YOUNG WOMEN 


For Courter Work 


EXPERIENCE NOT NECESSARY. 
DAY—AFTERN OON—EVENING 
SHIFTS 


ALSO OPENINGS | ae 
omer) (Be Bieet 


varied | 
“pee ih 


or arm and m | 
school for teenagers and 
~y? age and ex 


~ ] pertenes. fe. " ul 
REYPUNCH Es te mice ~~ wk eS yp time caly 9 
OPERATORS 
Experienced Remington ie . * SALESLADIES 
posit 


we ore work 
aA AME). Experienced Permanent 
2604 beusheres in attractive and piesa 
A) roundines: excellent op 
= at : 


perienced 

uties iectudine Crpine 
oT appointment cai 
t a 


fs 


ective wae r has 


rs dea 
rienced title 
amiliar 
Md. and 


work tare 
ability, ~ iA 
ther compefi 


an ’ 
le -| elin 
acdu 


nent position, “ploneant 


portunity for capable young Wom. 
o 7 


ists 
See ABBEY rirst 


1338 Eve St. NW 
sec 


raft exempt 
your ase, education. and te 
Bumoder 


"ue me 


mo; 
soc —" up 
n- | 
| ly room 410. 724 * ages i$ "oft 
bonus “isvty oom ; 
| Yrs. 700 inte. con st., Bt | 
eget for HOURS WHITE TOWER OFFICE| #306" ist <i°vtans)' ST 
| os TE st. ew | 3 
: Stamp ' . 
erepat employ high celber 265 | y | Mme am’ bs turned roo _ BAKERY SALESGIRL 
n OFFERS MAN parchecks of $30-840-$50. Send & HELP, WOMEN TY . a ' , 
COMPANY . xperienc or work ta fetes be dake 


joey card with your name, address 
RY hat 
ADVANTAGES: ost: 1s ABSTRACTORS (MD). 65900 | ply in ron. HI RIDAN BAKER 
. . | See ABBEY First KEEPERS: 
r ’ R fit de| COOK : To f 1338 ve so. NW. &8T. ite AN K 
—tEmpiovee enevits mciu 2 COOKS $65| Pile cler | Sutsenahe ee h-a~ 
Pension, Health. Life Insur- Clerk, seed’ with Agures .. ~ cotatess: rience Dreterred put 
‘ . ete 
ence, Savings Plan and er ) Fife tm Wa ae 
others Ari MUNSEY 
ompany-sponsored Educa- 
yours? We train 
te 85 per hr 


_Woogwe ide... 15t ste 


RK-T YP! 


o work = small TYP IS’ 
hance for Sea 


“LERK 


+. dry cleaning store, experienced | 
Work nm are conditioned | 
axduve Excellent pay. good 
x Rn — oe 
Pp 


white. for. 
Bhort ho re 


Becy ency 


ott 


G FOR 
| pleasant « "outside ¢ work, | AND PART-TIME EM 
° 


"‘Saflerenn Davis 
adrian 6S 


LADIES 


y Britt Cusners, 1008 «| [NY MAARYLAND | 
*““CLERKGENERAL WHEATON—SILVER SPRING | 
woman whe has the pbility | Ambitious Women 
Just What You've 
Beer Looking For 
Earn Extra Money 
‘Working from Your Home 
Must Have Pleasant 

| Telephone Voice 
dune Opportunity for 
et A typist we Alert Women 
Call Mr. Talbert 
AD. 4-0800 
10-12 


air condition 
it person only, 


AL, 
por ary plus commission. Paid va) 
ati Also have openings for out-| 
side eemce pply hm person 
ineer « Center, O1i1) 


Several 


. Georaviows 
Clerk-typist. good with figs, 
Bx pe 


8200 

$240 

. 850-860 
2! 

81690 

shorthand 


Cearaie ave. oF 
SALESLADIES — 


- 


ad the 


% ~ poaltlona| = ~ ical typist 
lareesi | 
Beca 


spor air cond. ofe 

aes sae aire ARY—24.40 

salary “y an ene a’ tracti ve Conn. ave 
ofc - ips for a appt 


aaa SECRETARY- CLERK 


asic Ge- 

“thereuah | be excellent stenographer 
Bee 

1330 re 


“sulte 
ss be 


expanston Dr 4 

Gram men are needed for the fol | 

DISTRICT MANAGERS | 

SERVICE MANAGERS 
SALESMEN 


Merchants Green Trading Stamps) 
re one stamp beine merchan nd ised 
be Lane Stores and thou- 


| DESIGNERS 


Three or more years of design 
layout on control systems; 
electro-mechanica!, wy crauile | 
and pneumatic devices; air- 
craft structures and power 
plant systems; welded stiuc- 
tures, pressure vessels, scien-| 
tific laboratory equipment and 
test equipment. 


DETAILERS 


Three years’ experience detai! 
ing sheet metal parts, welded 
parts, welded structures, pre- 
cision machinery and electro- 
mechan Fa 
miliar with shop practices, tol- 
erances, engineering and draft 
ing practices Aircratt struc- 
tures and power plaAt experi- 
ence desirabdie Dut not essen- 
tial. 


r an 
_ Soperteatt tor the 
met necessary 
we bo tos oy Air-conditioned | 
| Office. 5-d ar A Appiy Mr. Espey 
| Areade Sun 


= pee | ARCADE. SUNSHINE 
dt LAMONT ST. 


fu wk Exper one apply 
$60 of hie 14th ast 


oe 


ex 
— 


5 sheet 
have 

music 

| usic Ce. 

: , 

ps Realm ; 

coats ana 

thoroughiv 


w= 


»- a. must 


RUST 


rtment 
ATTEND qeceteep - “. 
j 


L PRESSERS eS, re) 


$50 | 
PEN! Clerk. . some bkkps. 
W—AD. 2-8100 | ' ik -typist, Georgetown 
G iarce elt oe. from Teller trainee. — -loan 
tional Opportunities 70 to 140 wholesale units Opening Posting mach 
in Arlington- Alenanario 1 if zou aan Personne! 
maintain headauarters and arn’) Asst 
direct sales force. Offers enmare| 
tunity for earnings as hi 
000 or more. Experienc 


dreases 
accessories 
Sepertenece 
; Stee 
5 a 

poly im person only 


Bt Est ABy is tor ceree 


shop 


: 
: 
| | net make it 
1 | re earn «2683 


CLERK-TYPIST 


pao od 


’ 
oul 
a 


falon 2491 14th etn ne EX. 3- _Beouy| © i 
eauty Uperators 
Hair Stylists 


Apprentice Operators — 


Immediate ae — gl i day. 40-hr. | 
wv 
at ontice 


chases and 
ae HECHT CO. 


—Periodic Job Evaluation Dis- 
Kkpr.. 

| permeation Pehphons 

| “CO mach oprs.. 5 days 


COLORED BRA xc 


Burroughs rtuntty fer 


“~~ Mae ey v my LOR. 
SECRETARY 
Experienced 


office 


ein “vor spe opportun - 
ny to learn dicteaphone transcrip- 
tion 5-day hour weer Alr~| 
conditioning: annual leave and sick 
leave: emplore cafeteria Apply in 
person belween 9 &. Mm. and 4D. m 


NATIONAL 
GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY 


benefits Apply 
IRD & F STS. NE | Day Nes or evening hours te suft 
a) rien Must 
> srEinc 6TH &@ Me sTS. Nw | you expe ce necessary 8 
ee 


be willing worker, Average 61.69 
for 
rent estate oftice, S-dar week at-| ___ CLERK-TYPIOT 


hour. Di. 71-4400 
cellent workin Meta 
Interesting opening for 


BUYER 
EXPEDITER B REALTY Co Darwin eens stat LADIES 
or advancement. apely x0 Woos-| IN VIRGINIA 


| ? yun tal . gS epg : .| for edvescemes 6 »d 
: of Sa ty Big ate ha. 
TELEPHONE 
CANVASSERS 


INC 
mn will vide vou nw 
ample merchandise. Write for | 
terview. Rawieigh Co.. DEPT. DC 
10-WD 
ie 
oe 


$-2292. 


PURCHASING | 


* drapery —_ 
ton 

Q0od — Must be exp en | 
OMAN = tneroushiy exp 


“oTfs Soom 


S part time ¢ wo ; ' 
21-29. Car nee White wo Waitresses, 

aires sees, 
Grill girls 


Nurse maid 
ACO C EMPL 


C. EMPL. EXCHANGE | 


HITE & COLORED 
eencenene :, 


. = wear 
Casual Corner, 
49 


cowntown 
ive mm .. 


interesting end Ge 
| oa 


Ex SFE 


mer 


LADIES—PART-TIME 


SALESWOMEN 


FULL OR PART TIME 


"Pheee Will 
eerK 


"SUPERVISOR 


Te menage voune staff plus work 
7 An} 8 4 an Co jese 3 BL aay 


SECY.., NO SHHO. "$300 


Will compore 
surroundings 


TR EDIT ASST. 


Ooenines for ezperienced 
women or we Will tra voune 
women tnterested in m™ * se! 
| ipa thetr career. Many interesting 
openings 


5-DAY. 40-HOUR WEEK 
DISCOUNT ON PURCHAS 
Many Other Company Bene 


aalee 


neurance company 
curroyedings and 
oe 


Good dane . 


IBM 


rs 
a a | 
Sdetde dom 
Laundry weohere 
nr 


Previous purchasing experi- _ omer 
ence desirable. Good knowl- 
edge of electronic 
nents and military specifica 
tions. Some travel involved 


| ba EMP. | 918 EKlisworth dr 


aT —18-40. 6 _,ulatand 

do ntown busin fice 

Ideal working conditions. with con 

genia! associates ww 4 premew 2: 
a! eppertuntt ‘ 


5 
Res Pre MANAGEMENT 
SULTANTS 
ia 


to 
un all types 
comme 1° press operators 
MANY OTHERS 
1512 Sth St 
HO. 32-1572 


ACCOUNTING CLERKS 


New al r-con ditioned offices. with 
ated 


OFFERS YOU A CAREER 


APPLY 
irls EMPLOYMENT OFFICE 


THE HECHT CO,| 7 
ne a 


CLERIC TYPISTS | 
SECRETARIES | 


mings for Beginners 
LIST—35 ; 
AGE 17 


ral equ omenrt 


"CON- 
1406 


SERVICING THE WORLD'S 


Inc. Suite 600 
Many 
PARTIA 


fram 


Salary 


your own 


4 hours @ 


Calling 
hame 
Gay. 


FOR FULL INFORMATION 
CALL JE. 4-6000, Ext. 220 


OR APPLY IN PERSON 
| 3000 Ari. Blvd 


FINEST TYPEWRITERS CLERK. TYPIST 


White. 22-40 years of ace 


49 
chance for advancement 


APPLY 


Falls Church, Va HOT SHOPPES 
ty hg OFFICE 


Melpar, Inc. 
1341 G St. NW., Rm. 200) 


ASHIER. real est 
(STUDENTS —(WHITE) ACCOUNTANTS, BOOK | CASE WORKER, educ. 
18 or over. Full time commer, 7 AND Mie oe | 


| Blorme ent Earnings s -$90 
| Seen aopty + : @-| We have orders coverin hundreds | 
of positions in many fields at var 
salary levels 

assistance in solving 

Trevis Our offices are coun + 


‘COLUMBIA EMP. SERV. "Os He 


1341 G Bt. Suite 224. ME 8-3629 | 


ACCOUNTIN $260 
BEGINNERS 


feat Pleasant voice and wil 


to work 


fits ng 
. Starting salar 
ry ee AL, 


GRO or Rhode lsiand ‘aa 


CULAR WTh 
CTR TYPEWRITER PDIvi- 
_ HAS CREATED D 
NO OPPORTUNITY 
‘OUNG MAN WHO 
IN CUSTOMER 
EEZRING 


TELEPHONE OUR REPRE- 
SENTATIVE FOR AN AP 
POINTMENT TO ODJ!ISCUSS 
THE ABOVE POSITION YOU 
ARE INTERESTED IN. 


ee REC 
OP cada June 13th | 
| 1 P. M. to 8 P.M. 


Telephone EX. 3- 5031) 


if unable to come in for an| 
interview, please send a writ- 


WAITRESSES 
CAR HOPS 


HOT SHOPPES 


WILL GUARANTEE YOU. 
AFTER ONLY 2 WEEKS 
TRAINING, A MINIMUM 


OF $50 PER 
$ WEEK $ 


ALSO 


—FREE MEALS 

—FREE UNIFORMS 
—WORK CLOSE TO HOME 
—MANY DOLLARS IN TIPS 


APPLY 


HOT SHOPPES 


EMPLOYMENT OFFICE 


: 34 


FOR APPOINTMENT 


CALL JA. 7-5959 
ASK FOR MISS HENTZ 


11 A.M. te 1 PLM, 


ENGI- 


| CLERK-TYPISTS 


and 


RESEA ARCH TECH. BS dee 
Chem. biolog 

PT. Amer 
type, speak Span 


WASHINOTON' 


A TEN- were Positions available in an ex- 
panding research organization. 


Opportunity for advancement. 


LOWING 


PAY oOuU'LL 
Ore gee ee 


T 
Ic TY PEWRITERS. 
HE FIEI YOUR Frronts 
AND YOUR ENOW 
E REWARDED BY A SUCCESS. | 
UL CAREER. 


>rer Write, LADIES. white, Opportunity Knocks 


, Enel 
VICE-PRESIDENT LARG 
in Charges of Sales CoPvenient 


location. 


Permanent resident of 
this area preterred. 


suburban 

Por empodlishes Dn ee — 

lar 

ten resume regarding the par- com ang, We need someone with 
sient experience to operate at 


ticular position above you are) ten. level but also willing to travel! 
and do everything necessary eat ai) ETER 

interested in. f he field organization— | ori ICE uaa BAN TAT inkke 

' interviewing hiring and training. | a) ‘3 rience Nec 34 


Bard . pr 45 and retull FEDS EMPL. SER 


ae le vo our 
. pos __ 930 i « st. nw 


AW & 5-DA $4 
servation clk. 5-day 
le clerk. 5-day 


ATI ONAL 
| Piet ot ows tex Ls 


1106 beth “a nw. at 
BRAPER.—Will train HS 
ERV 50 | slag *§, ~ a ah aaa mir 
OKKEEPING 
MACHINE OPERATOR 
i. | Permesen position 
ccounting ory 
Clérks | 
tn gecounMag! 7 Fountain Girl . 
Bales! 
Brectical: Nu 


scroo! 
pines 
NICAL 


w8: HIG 
Beet = 


19 TO 26. 


Birioun Win 
GRO APPLY IN PERSOW 


MONDAY THRU. FRIDAY 
6:00 A. M. TO 4:00 P. M. 


MELPAR, INC. )}; 


A Subsidiary of 
WESTINGHOUSE Air-Brake Ca, 


ABT. son 


Address as Follows: 


MR. JOHN R. COWAN 
PERSONNEL SECTION 


Aircraft Nuclear 
Propulsion Dept. 


GENERAL 
ELECTRIC 


PO. Box 132 
Cincinnati 15, Ohio 


i ' .* 
. i-girl ofe 


PE teacher ‘33 
O'BRIEN Personnel. 
ye. 1-72 


-cessful exper! ence im the direct | 
Family Fosptta! ~~ benefi's f full particulars | 
*Group We ineuren H 


*Retirement Income 


6G : 
— guest “house pear Conn ave 
o>) —— 


__ References. AD. 


MATHEMATICIAN 


HANGERS 


ARVERS 
refs. req 


oot wk 

74 
seb 
5 0 1311 SOUTH FERN &@T 
plus 2-bedr oun apt (Orr JEFF. DAVIS HWY.) 


ARLINGTON, VA. 


beral emp thi NR ts 
evious experience 
For Appointment Phone opportunities for Hotel Maids 


WM N & CO. 
, * e‘lent employee’ Char women 


fe & yk rw... 
ARCADE EMPLOYMENT 
at. suburban Waitresses »~ 
Beauty peatde 


$59 te=| 3 Applied 
$40 
.. 40 


4 T NW. 
TRASH L TRUCK DRIVER 1341 @ STREET 


REE Vy EXP 
JANITOR wi QTRS 


$1 
WHITE 

SERV STAT. ATT 

pty tye EMPL 


"76 1 


eeane  pearsenets COND. HELP, MEN & WOMEN 15A HELP, oe ;: WOMEN m7 MELPAR, Inc. | 


ILLUSTRATORS A, Subir, 


Miss Patricia Rosette 


$45 
. +P4 3000 ARLINGTON BLVD. 
#40 PALLS CHURCH. VA. 


“’ 
84 
PAS 1M Mine 
CLERK. -TYPIST—Bermanent posal. 


pos! 
Por front -AS of larce Washine.| Mon. A pty SS a .—* puivece 
to Rees "Ps, apes ces preferred. Hist 


ASHIER- TER-CLER 


Sapomessye experience helpful 
must type 
~ endilane 


mee ent 
mathemat 
seduction 
for 


grecens te Os wilt} 


APPLY IN PERSON 
MONDAY-FRIDAY 
8 A. M. TO 4 P. M. 


25 me 


She wt 
cE KV 


INTERNATIONAL 


or ganizat ion 

physics or D 
wor rking know) odes of Cesk eale. 
lator 4 desirable Ability 
work accurately. neatly and rapid. 
ly are prerequisite 


The 
CHESAPEAKE & POTOMAC 
Telephone Co. 


CLERK-TYPIST 


For Economic Research Divi- 

sion of a well-known Weekly 

News Magazine. Varied duties 
opportunity to learn statistical 
work. Same general office ex- 
perience required. Should type 
minimum of 50 wom., and like 
working with figures. Many 
company benefits. Air-condi- 
tioned building. Call 


DI. 


Has Immediate Openings For 


Telephone Operators 
Clerk-Typists 
Service Representatives 


SEND RESUME OR PHON 
Westinghouse Air-Brake Co. ‘ 


heel 
3000 Arlington Boulevard | Technical Personne! 


Bast-West Hw Bilver 
FALLS CHURCH, VA. | 


Okc HIER-CHECKER 


Take Arnold V-2 Bus from! FULL OR PART TIME 
lith and E sts. nw. to F. C.| pun time—-40-hour week—or aia 
' time 3 hours during lunch period 
Plant Entrance, | Monday through Friday. Work in 
Government ulldin Cafeteria 
| Must be auick at mente] addition | 
ase 618 (6[te 640 
GOVERNMENT SeVices. — 
1135 2ist ST 


CASHIERS 


ai Doar We, rr, ore 
HOTEL 


CLERICAL 


PERMANENT POSIT! 
COST CLERK 


. Wo ‘ ts ‘ 
CLERK. TYPISTS, ACES. 6 wes p-.  H “guential ° ane Colum, Os 


Cap. Hil : TENOGRAPHER 
Challenging positions with, excellent oppor- BECYS. pub relations .. ts $4200 ieee porns but 
tunities are available in one of the Nation's fae” (est. Fep.) .... - $85/ take competent beginner 
largest corporations in central New York State ' _> ‘stig oy ReaD A 
Work involves all phases of commercial maga- “paid vacation. 8 hel: 
zine advertising, brochure publishing, visual idays. sick leave, rest periods. hos- 
aids and extensive illustration. Extremely imag- 3 
inative and talented artist and layout idea men oot isactier 
are needed | Dishwashers and bus girls $30 1D 


| STONE PAPER TU 
CO. 


900 FRANKLIN ST. NE 
cor 


ME FROBOTIPRN 


ATLANTIC 
RESEARCH CORP. 


Alexandria, Va 
Ki. 9-7500 


1220 19TH ST. N.W 


COMMERCIAL 
LAYOUT ARTISTS 


Some Jobs Require Ne Experienee 
Full Pay While Learning 
Good Working Conditions 

Opportunities for Promotion 
Friendly Associates 
And Many Other Benefits 


ME. 8-6208 


ADDRESSOGRAPH AND 
GRAPHOTYPE OPERATOR 


White 


MEDICAL recept 
Re vy. 


7.2900, Ext..263 | B& 


BETWEEN 8 AND & 


t., lit. jab (88) 8390 


some experience or 
typist ‘who would like to learn 
dressographs and sraphotypes. 
ition, 5-da a 
vacation leave 
cash bonuses. air-cond. “bide 
personnel dept 


HO. 2-2476 
Admin. Secys., to $6000 


positions in PURE zo er) 
ITOL 


APPLY 


EMPLOYMENT OFFICE 
725 13th St. N.W 


PRESENTATION 
SPECIALISTS 


ME. 8-2992 
Pe Tremnicl cian to work in 
rer: Sai offic Good salary. TU 


BOEING 
AIRPLANE 
COMPANY 


Builder of the Nation's first 
Jet Transport, Guided Mis- 
siles, B-52 Stratofort 


| SL ERK TYPiIsT—i8-30. tor ineur- 

ance office: experience not neces- 

sary: 5-day wk.. all emplove bene- 
- rT. 


: 


} summer ¢ camp. Y in- 
- ‘er ‘ested a ten DU “T7373 


tis PAYROLL CLERK 


fading Weekly News Magarine 
opening for tndividuel experi- 
aw-Wal ker system and 

ould 


OPEN 
Monday Thru 
8:30 AM. 


te 
Plea 
mY 


position. 5-day weak, 
round) eat ew 


LERK- K-TYPIST 


now savalliadle 


opovell lo F ridav 


to 5 P.M. 


ql 


ONS 


THIS SATURDAY 
9 AM. to 4:30 PM, 


will mortgage bankin 
ca deal wor 
excellen' saiary 

im t [ ‘Prevent (CK 


work. 5-day week 
vie 4th and R. i 
Phone 


ae pen me 


kin 
tioned “Sutld 


Call DI 7.2900 Ext. 263) 


BETWEEN 9AM & S&P M 


needs Ww 
qualified 
Electronics 


Technicians 


$50 
$32 Average apeed 
a5 auired da 


bers 


ative L 
neral office 
45-5. air-cond 

ave ne Salary open 


* 
~ 


300 


PAX RECPT COUR z Amories ona 


Bees KRY EOS 


Ain ot ete 


JUNE GRADUATES 


Career jobs in competitive adver- 


Openings are at Boeing's 
Seattle plant and its Moses | 
Lake B-52 Flight Test Center | 
in-Central Washington state. | 
You and your family wil! 
enjoy year around hunting, 
fishing, skiing. in the heart 
of the Puget Sound or) 
Columbia River Basin coun- 
try. Ample housing, EXCEL- 
LENT SCHOOLS. 


Qualified men will receive 
travel allowance, good wages, 
PAID VACATIONS and other 
benefits. 


Electronics Technicians must 
have experience in installa- 
tion, operation, testing and 
inspection of airplane or mis- 
sile, radio, radar, electronic | 
fire control and electrical 


8 0 
0 up 


ovevoe 


‘= noose 


LIGGET : ‘5 Fp SERV | 
1404 N.Y. Ave. NW ST. 3-3634 | 
POSTING CLA Know! pete No 
typing Asi Blvd $40 OTOM AC 

PL 34 Wilson iva. Ar 
ja 5. 2000 


oO! 
= FPOUNT 


3 $50 to ~ 
GH eCHOOL srads. (many) 10 can 


AL HELPER wi handle 
cash Ph eed Sey swil wer _e Call i 
‘MANY OTHE 


RS : ~139 
Various and interesting Gelds nk iene a + ek - a “Tpply | Emi. Agency NA 
select offices. . = person, 7332 cov ore poly | 90 10th St NW. Near N Y Ave 


Annette D Tatelman CLERK “FRONT OFFICE COOKS Lol a 3- 3 omnes a 
235 Woodward Bids . isha HX NW q@home hotel and typing experience 
Correspondent || 


RE 7-446 necessary. Under 40 year 
wr > m till midnight 
~ ADMIN. SECY —$85_ salary. employee benefits 
We have an attractive position in 
our home office r & woman not 


ditioned 1! 
Por we repr How bidg Call manager 
vs over 40 yrs. of age, experienced ; 


Recy tractor lintel BU. 3-4 ) —1 quT c. 
ft n | house area. 35 hrs 
gees - come dictap one ore Dupo t aza ares CS ove. 6 Sas Cee ont a, 38 bre. 068. POT 
work. Must have knowledge of life 


ofc. equip CLERK RECE Ora: telephone operator 
. 435- 


co 
for Sabaces 
layout and do highly stylized interpretations of wk. 875| Experienced. Permanent Ouse, air cond. 485-unit 
$250 mo | attractive and sconsin 

$7 


2 im ' r : 
military equipment (missiles, radar) with figures 6 | Rite o ond agen 
and landscape surroundings. BKKPRS. AND ASSISTANTS | sir con loned wa ben 
: cond estate up| typing Appiy i 

. 865-87 2. me 


Seamstress. 
in stores 


LAYOUT ARTIST and idea man who fan work 
with writers,. salesmen, scientist and engineers 
and do comorehensive layout of brochure and 
magazine ads. Must know production and be ~e 
skilled artist. we 


tising field for June graduates. 


$70 wk. up. Young 278. < ov 
tacts hy One- 

G RACE D NN. 1311 ry Bt 
NA. 8-21 


7 
air-con - 


Good telephone voice and knowl- 
edge of typing required for posi- 
tions in classified telephone room 


. 875 
$75 | 
$75-880 
$250 mo 
75 / 


ILLUSTRATOR who can follow comprehensive 


advancement 
air-conditioned office. 5- Gay) 
liberal employe benefits, 
ED SERVICES 
LIFE INSURANCE CO 
625 Eve St. NW Sth Floor | 
Wht 10, open 
Good tip : | 


“$19 6th Nw . 


of Washington’s largest circula- 
tion newspaper. On the job ffain- 
conditioned building. 
Many employe benefits including 


liberal vacation policy. Apply 9 


Appiy 1637 ? 


CLERK | 


adv : A iW CUSTARD S— 
Young | to train in per- Experienced Call in person after 
sonnel and payroll office.| * Pm DARI-BAR. 1302 Conn. 
Must be able to type and 


ing. Aijr 


PRESENTATION MEN who can visualize and 
execute highly commercial chart presentation, 
design convention booths, and other visual aids 
Must be eble to do chart illustration and know 
lettering and impact presentation method. 


days or nigh 
way’ & &mp ‘ery 


in 

co 
THER OFFICE POSITIONS 

Flectromatic typist. no fee 


Research and 


assoc 


systems. 
WASHINGTON INTERVIEWS 
June 11-13 


intment telephone 
Por OE PDeON 3-602! 


Please ask for Mr. AL ROGERS | 
sphece, # gr to Depart-) 


W-1-A-6-12 
BOEING AIRPLANE 


COMPANY 
* 1301 Second Avenue 
Seattle 1, Washington 


Good salary ranges and company benefits sec- 

ond to none; includes pension plan insurance, 
medical insurance, etc. All personnel must be 

American citizens and able to obtain security 

| clearances. Send resume to Box M-238 Post 

_T-H. Give telephone numbers as applicants 
will be cated between June 13 and 16 for in- 
terviews in Washington, D. 


dental ofc 
3) . 


65’ have good handwriting. Per- 
0| manent position. Good salary. | 


5-Day Week | 
— = Apply Miss Crone 


--$30-$8s, HUB FURNITURE CO. | 
“gbas| 
N ; 44 
ATLAS Agcy. RE. 7.5767 
1420 NY. Ave. NW, Room 506 
ADVERTISING PUBLICITY 
CO-ORDINATOR 


. HOTEL 


Department Heads 
wi some college 
md retall experience 


Youne women 
background 4 
to train for merchandising careers 


THE ‘HECHT Co. 
GTON. LINGTON 
DICTAPHONE OPERATOR 


bee sa uhder vale 


Conn. Ave. & De Gales & NW. 


\ 


fer position in ‘Tepldis 
Sieve tutaitet wed” ware 


Statistical Clerk 


Under 35 for Advertising re-' 


search Dept. of Natienpal News 
Magazine. Know! basic 
statistics, some college math. 
Practical experience in field 
preferred. Some typing 
quired. Many company bene 
fits. Call 


DI. 7-2900, Ext. 263 


BETWEEN @ AM. AMD 6 PM 


a.m. to 2 p. m. Personne! Depart- 
ment. 


THE WASHINGTON POST 


and Times Herald 
1515 L Street NW. 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD SITUATIONS, WOMEN 
32 Tuesday, June 12, 1956 


SECY —RESEARCH 
Pr . Peipred. Good shind 


AJOR 179600 
Qesuers . Many benefits. Excel 


JOBS INC. : 


SECRETARY—HOTEL | 


is desired | 

orthand typing gna 
tien requ x- 
ale «@ many 
eply to 
immediate 


ent 
t- for 


SECRETARY —W-!)-known 


‘teld. x r 
tant 
(A 


SECRETARY 


eerine and research firm ih 
aria Gogires an silert ane 
sonable gir) a6 secretary enc 
istant ‘5 pare 3... oon 

° r = yy . 
Pees "Balas open rn I 


r week 
"ler on tment 
asst 


ore. in 
ot im- 


Resins 


Sect — Personnel alge. Soe 
Ae 9-3093,. 
SECYS.—$75-$85 


TLoYps EMPL. SERV. 


YDS 


i600 N.Y. ave. pw, ST. 3-2207 


JUNE GRADUATES |, 


are 
SILK 
Pye oa 


SNACK BAR 
ATTENDANT 


YARDS & DOCKS 
ARLINGTON, VA. 


Permanent position for buser units 
in yg tw ~ Ddbullding. No week- 
end work. Age i868 te 3 

GOVERN 


tog sh" SERVICES Inc 
1135 218T ST. NW 


“ STENOGRAPHER-CLK 
Bat Feare of sues Sean, aocb 
eg — Soe and 
VIRGINIA’ ELECTRIC 
AND POWER COMPANY 
007 W. Giebe Ba. Alezandris. Va. 


STENOGRAPHERS (10) 


epoortunity fer eual! 
term 
odiate 
ino wrek 


ME. &-3320 


Apoly 
Prankilin 


Service Representative 
intelligent 
itted ; oe 
fear "woman ~1412. 9:30 te 
peta na 
INISH 
atte we pay. King Kerley Drv 
Cleaner ashineton at 
¥ R—ist class Wo 
Peopies Valet Servic 
experienced 
ners. 7th & 


OURTESY ASSOCIATES has 
epening for an 
1-28 years 
salary for quality work: 
4 
ah west s). Pals 
“FINISHERS 


18. 
wk 
re 


onderfu! 
stenographers 


ences Or evenings) 


—hAirpert sah. 
ll Kime eat. 


A.ex 


urch. | 


HELP, WOMEN 


n enseyers % NU 


art EP JIE: tlds Bs 


CREDIT BUREAU POSITIONS | SITUATIONS, 


ATTENT! 

ome Products hat cpentnes: 
x. 

rier $100 

°.777 ter 

00 SALAD 
| : 


’ 
Nan, ht 


STENOGRAPHER | 


Immediate position available 
in contract administration and 
sales department. Person with 
Government contracts experi- | 
ence and previous security 
clearance desired. Permanent 
position, 5-day week, vaca 
tion, hospitalization, life 
surance and profit sharing 
bonus plan; pleasant surround. 
ings and working conditions 


in- 


APPLY IN PERSON, 9 TO 3 


MARYLAND 
ELECTRONICS 


MANUFACTURING CORP 


5009 Calvert Rd 
College Park, Md. 


WA. 7-9200 


“STORE CLERK 


ARLINGTON 


White 

cleaning 

ence necessary 
ny 4 pcs leave hs = aggre 
surance, hospitalization 

Pasuras Call JA. 2-8688 {for ap 

pein’ me , 

MANHATTAN COMPANT 

0 Colum . 


et 


-4400, 
summer or 
101 


No exper 
om 


ranch office 
40-hour week 


A 
operate monitor 
uired Will 
apital 
J 


OUARASY Ai 4 
ex ™* iy 
Lime. A Rack —E-| 


Part 
erearten. & sig 
ayy mw yaen id Ar JA. 
ee as 


600 mo. A 


Gipestqnese. good telephone vo 


Age 18-45. For laundry-éry 


life 
sureice! 


| 


: 


' 


' 
' 


| 


Dign . 
acne earni . ear 
i wo. 6- ‘ between 


MA 


PART-TIME WORK 
No Can ne. Ne rpg 


IDENT desires 
aittine LU. 1-4798 | 


Sa SS 


of wear- 


ae 


white. aed 
aaa ag alts faSexar' “teler ra 


20, ROOMS WITH BOARD 


‘fooms . 


: 


That's HARTNETT HALL’S| 
claim bated on good food. . .| one 
good service ... . pleasant) 

.« and lots of enter~s 
tainment ahd companionship | 

si4 & UP 
HARTNETT HALL 
1426 21st ST. NW. 
HU. 3-5432 


a m.. 


| Bs at sss" 
_iween erry 


| ae pee desires job as presse 
rel oe cafe- 


uly 35 5 Ye, 5 a. in Jaunéry. 
ia: | PRIVATE ony poe. Grad bees 


be-| nurse es yr 2 
ork Colonial 
“giter 
“Woman Scpites 
home Li 2623 


hoe ex 
* annapolis 
= = ' 
‘te ao at 


DOMESTIC 21 


workers. 
EMPL. 


ay 


girls for interesting tele- | 


5-day. A-t 


Several ete 
on 


.. Re 
ARC 


he gu any SITTER Collen |e sor. | 


Nenefits Tue c IT B 
1421.9. 4. BP. 


ee 


om 
Rie 


CALL A-1 e- good ams help. | 
ois wonx for Tues. and Wed 
Pi gi 783 


SILVER SPRING 
WHEATON 
BETHESDA 

TAKOMA PARK 


Fandiing customer service 
ag Many F, = 3 earn you 


exper 


oa] _ day wo 

aA Bch. o 
12-15 Arts 
$20 and 
prompt 


gusenold 


+ Ome, morn 


ORLAND Part, time gu 
-840 ° 
Oo. 6-b981 time. 


Housewives etanies| 
part- 


loyal. 


on — 
children: 
x. call 


MANNING'S EMPL. Ne. 
“OiR 

GIRis $35 
. $28 AND TIPS 
LAUNDRY WORKERS $35 


MAIDS. 
Hw LIVE IN OR OUT 
010 STE ST. NW .--AD 


. ’ xper 
refs... reliable desires job with 
i of invalid patient. NO 

You weep asire 

housew ork “00k 

. Dabs -sitters 

6Us, aw. NO 
Yousa- MOT desires take care 
of children for hale | potters 
Li. 4-615 


$9 | 
tS gs09” 


. lady aentren “ms a ays 
. $30; carfare; ref. LI irs 
Gesirés Gay work for 
Mon. Tues. & Pri. Li. 35-0117 
— | Mes women exp day 
Mo eds 7-7 


* ROOMS. FURNISHED 


ADAMS i. aD 

rm. suite; pvt. home 
| phone iransp 
—Attractive clean 


The Washington «Post Ce 


‘ 
and Times Herald | sleepin - . 
1S1S L Street NW. | | double ire ’ 
: 2 -07 


des work 


ey 


emees. libera) vecation . 
m. te 2 ersonne) 


partment. 


A 
SLIu 


FAT OR THIN? ° TALL . OR 
arn extre income in 
AVON cosmetics are 
Earnings average 63 to 

h ri-time hr 7-022) 


BE YOU dbie 


rm ony 
rs. 4-way transp HO ? 
OoD., 


| ioeater 


| : 
. we fre 24 fil.. semipvt. bth 
4 212 5¢t . Nice rm 
ig@. closet. $6.50 we ‘ui 4-23534 
THEDRAL AVE & 79th Bt Ne = 
serene am Hote rm 
. 


ALERT WOMEN 
NEEDED 
FOR SALES POSITIONS 


IN HOT SHOPPE 
PANTRY HOUSES 
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE 
APPLY DIRECTLY TO 


HOT SHOPPE 


MD 


ANY 


LANGLEY PARK. 


Ga 


7980 
Silver Spring, 


Ave 
we AN” HOTEL 


a home-like 
r 


Y. Ave 
Bladensburg R. 


Ww Va 


ston, 
Shirlington, Va 


OR APPLY 
EMPLOYMENT OFFICE 


1341 G ST. NW. RM. 200 


menian.’ ’ Newly Seow sgie. rooms 
. . 


EARLY EVE. HOURS 


Your spare time 


Clean. ogi, rms Run. un waves 
service u 9 8 

ARK KD. d 
7, me Sci. 825-430 mo. HO 


if urn. 
rent 


DUE TO EXPANSION 


MONTGOMERY | 3 
WARD) 


Looking For 


~ 
incl 


Nice. 
_- 
-164 
; ifes “Bik 
-~ 2-3 sir 
Ae ~2947 


a peer front 


Catalogue Store Personne! : 
abi 10 min drain L 
I Hie ST. NW. i688 
women Se! e. and bie 
y Ru gmod. di 
5 


Following Positions are Open 


Manager Trainees iL 
Credit Clerks 
Sales Clerks 
Full and Part Time) 
Telephone Sales Clerks 
(Full and Part Time) 


sem | pvt, 


bath 
“GEORGIAN WOTEL- 


Aptitude, ability to meet 
public, desire to get ahead, 
and willingness to work are 
mmportant tran ex 
Positions 
starting 


privi sues 


‘poUer 


more rivileges 
perience 
excellent 
5-day week, al employee 
benefits, inclua@ing dis 
count on purchases 


PER SON 


MONTGOMERY WARD 
714 13th St. NW 


reus i "S HAG 
918 Ei eeorth dr 
‘COLORED — ee f 
Pountain Giris 
Cc 


pr 
oA 


home 
rn a, 


otter err r 
TAY + 
HAWTHORNE “HOTEL 

134 G ST. NW., RE 77-4027 


AC 
Why? Because we have 
; Dean attractive 


s4iary 


IN 


APPLY 
$12. 50 WEEK UP 


Double rms $2 per Cay per perso 


‘aye pe 


ice | OW 


ork trom Gewntown office. 5-day | 


Bxcellent opportunit 
raduates Large local 
on. excellent starting 


SITIONS 


1334 I ave. at 


oe Ab 


— 


INC. 


Faia 


mplov 


openings 
typists under 
a sctentific 


on) ” App! 
NW 


no 


ex) 
EAsks Hiner 
on 7 
Maen 1a it work 


most desirable position for girl “al 


research Of- 
wk 


Thomas Circle | 


24 days HELP, 
“cal CarLD CARE, 5 days 
$35 


, 


| anpearance whose et enc? 


meet 
ndeve 


App! 
Astor Restaurant, 1813 


te 
sai. 820 $4 tip 
Apply Bh! fin ston Ae Bes 
t r ene 
ass — site iss 
9°87 


Rosmar Grill. 
ingto v 


te ) 
ex need 


App 


COUNTER Days 
Apply Manager 
BONS Eastover 


FOR 
yon! ‘ FOWA 
ome 
ter 
xperienc 
— neat appearances: 
in person. 
eataurent. 


— BED. good hres. 
ays. Olivia's Patlo Leounee. 


“time: oqrsene! interview. no 


ence 


77 a Seris 19th 
iy in person to the 
M si. nw co 


mathe 

* over - Dply 
3506 Columbia pike 
pull 9 or part: 


highest 
ARD 


ay or night 
Creseent 
1338 New York ave 


te ull 
lew. no phone! 
$i9 


STS Ese: 


y for youne HS 


) PA 
WraRIne. APPAREL PRESS 
RESS OPRS 


bas 


eoukr ee 
fy 9 0 up 


oe 
LAUN. WORKERS. ali types, $38 up 
NTE 


., 2D 
CARERS, 
$30 up 
$30 or egie. Call attier 6 
152 xi New ” Fampeh 
Bingies and doubles. $7 
lenty s bains 
HO 2 94° 


na 
925 eulet 
SERV 


2nd Fleer 
18 


$30. Gi. 
Agency 424% 


WAITRESS 
NATIONAL EMPL 
719 llth st. NW 


DOMESTIC 


tipe 
26th able 


a hs 
with privis.; 
peyton TA $-9351. or “co. = 


— se. rms 
Empl. seni lem en. 
NW 


d oore 5 
Y ou at 
COOK. «hw. Live lov 
Guarters co + Aw 
] opp for com- 
’ 7*6212 
ROUSEKEEPFR. 10 through 
dinner. 5 dys. L ADEs Exuchsg 
NW. NA. §@-438) 
Janitor- chaufleur” 
uest house 


3-9996 Apt. Svell 16 wk 
live in. refs ait 


it 
new hn s00d 


La 
coo 
. 4 
one 
Ret. HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS 27 
kl. 


“Asa £ 
FAIRMONT NW. Pld tsa ae 
Refri 


hw 


ily of 3. priv. rm compl kit 
s , son 


h 
wants . fond home. Smal) salary - 
7 salria. JA. 825308 | 


wt pes rms., 


syssertenced cook -he 
keeper for twe adults. 


home = 


stove 


Shopping | 


rm., next bath: refrig.. hot plate 
to, 7- 


: : ,OTC DMA or 
i tn 4Nn. fY¥ ms. and apts 
$180 me. Von Bhise tes. Burris. 


tiens. Sec 
unfurn 


tL. spare bat 
' 61 


WRAPPER INSPECTOR | 


(Exper 


ealary. 


ienced) 


Exeelient 5- 


ay wee. 


rar feemitl o STORES 


CHILO CARE 


acres 
renee furh ”" . and Girls. 


. $15 r 

~1) to u & m. or 7 to 9 

, ay wk., care for two 5-yr.- 
CONVA 


ash < cy 
oe te 2-0820 a | Sette Le or 
aC 


—%*% 
Pt Belvoir ; 7a. “bath br 
T 


adi Bk ag 
fone one work. A 
"LL 4-6 Pik 


ARL 


c lose sy ) A. and 


AMP edrm ty rin dining | COL pes 
N. Rhodes ba 5 mo cn ok 


cut pt PLEX Liv. 


baie PtEts AEES Newly 


ToL Uwal 
+ 


rode” wre 
oy + 


DUPONT Ci 


ub 


MINNE 


T pthis aw 


af 
es. "rare “108 ~ 


NEW JERSEY ‘E. 
cre TON sf NW. 


NA 8.294 
nd sWeiEA TON. PARK Hot tel 
be 


ty a thas | 
Batt ah | — 


4 ool Nursery 


. nm eRe 


EX | hee nw. mothe ’s lhe day 


in Md. HO ro | 

© Bchoo) Open. 

lun TA 
m 


or mel 


T ES 32 


ome for the Aged 
v 00). | 
food 


- 


er 

tel —- da week ae 

gtr he or 

5 12h, oe ens 

iE * vy | rederick st — 

Seontital and specious. Heing-sin- 

: nation, = and 2 bed- 

ue ‘loo yenesan 
xpos ilities Tn.) 

Por information. ree: yt 3070 


oor i. ao nr 
Pets 


ait? @ 
vy REAL ESTATE. : 
Westover ; a, 
tne, “ai KE. 68-2389 
—Supl et from June 25 to Sept 
rma newly forn., ver 
ey Bridge 


oe 


xq 
1310, 3 


st. JA. §-O760 oF 
rm. bath. bed. 
it. Sereen 


Working cple 


es 


Cot. —it La} OR 


Saat ‘ 


fu rden 
ene 86 lease 


apt 
ca) Mrs 


“=. med 55 - 
"Robertes 
CAPITOL HILL 


Congressional Library 
decoraied 
TU LI 


2? rms 


3 
beaut 
onv 
}- 
— a 


furn 


furn 
ri ; 4 to 
everything Pvt 
A RD. 
x fe) 

CO _5-1226 
AREA Avalh able 
od 3 


hiv rm 


id bath: ail wtils.: ite 
ard and slevater HO. 2-6574 

A 80- 

2-926 
dr 


™ 


~ CAPITOL : 
, rm sarbage ois: 


shopping anc 


AFORGETOWN— 3435 R st.: 
rn kit tlle Dat 


foyer 


ba: ih S75 mo 
1o1s—Com bed - 


ath. shower, 


-195 
AVE. SE 


rm tch- : 
comfortable, 
” efile 
7649 
«& 2 
3-4807 
3232—3 


Liter 
774—Nice 


_ on 


nw + 
OTA ie a) 


bec rm 


agene J a vt 

4-217 

th at 
nv 

frans “ad tult oni 


i 


reysonabie 
lez Complete 
55 


ath 


ae URN —o rm Re ns ae, 
7 ' ne 


~ — 
p! trans. at dr 7 : 
‘SHOREHAM Maal ladies or 
: - hedr " ae bat n 
r ne te sun cec« 
DE 


$106 * me 23-1726, 


59.50 SCOTT CIRCLE AREA— Unusually 


ful ly turn. ept. See manager 


; » tae | be rm. | 
utilis. incl. $67.50. See 
5 


2. 
—Ratire 3d floor: | 
“ios. and 


: SE 
" oste furn bemt 
y 


118 


sem bath. eute. 
ti) -2 


rm combinatio 
kitchen ane bath 


f 
disposal; 


ist { fl. ige 
locati on vilis 
li 4 
Very attrac- 
bath 
5- 3903 
16—Liv- 
ait 


} gar “Yd 
pre vad Li ¢ » - 8067 
3 or Rom 118- 
——e bat! 
i? pect from 
lf TH ‘. Re Ww 
ta 7 ait 
$89 Jo 
itl es. N Ww. ei 
in pari or 
"HO “rt 
131 5 Ones: 
ivine-bed 


aie. 


en- 


, aeee. suet 
nw dr 
h. poreh: all ut tis, 


9 3-BEDRM pre 
HOUSE TYPE 
Completely Furnished 
JEFFERSON VILLAGE 


ARL. BLVD AL CHUOR 
AILY § TO 5 on 4 o 


JE. 2-5500 
"SHIPLEY PARK 


| l- AND a BEDRM. APTS 

16 min. to Countewa ashington 
| Abtractivels furn and tedec 
laund. 


2-BEDRM. APT.--$105 
1-BEDRM. APT.—$95 

#| BACHELOR APT.—$70 
INCLUD fi. 9 : 


29 APTS., FURNISHED 


(ith est WA 17618 ——_— 
APT. BUNTING mae 
tedere all ie x4 


EFFICIENCY APT.—$75 


~ 
| ~©OLOSETS GALORE 


A 


win-) 


> 


34) APTS., UNFURNISHED 
Ssese to 
> CONGRESS nGTS.— 
rm. dinette, ei a? 
CONGRESS assests AREA — At- 
tractive 1,.2 “teactive 1.2 ang. J.dedrm. apts.; 


CONGRESS WT BtO.~~Asttree , -bed 
fr, sb bu util 


OWN, ‘Te “" 
_Gentiemen ony 


and 
val 
shown abies babar ine 
1707. ww lb NA. '}- 5309 
DUPONT CIRCLE AREA | 
Lerge apt wee.’ yy ly decor 1 
bedrm.. liv di nette. bath 
et aie. efic_ RE 1-§299 
EMBASSY AREA 
email elevater bids one 
end one 1-dedrm 
Redecora‘ed 
Oe Inc 
4-123 or EM 3-4 24 


EMBASSY SECTION. 
THE WARWICK 
1-BEORM. APT.—$110 | 3051 IDAHO AVE. NW 


INCLUDES ALL UTILITIES 
Ex: sliontie joca ted ee mati (BET MASS. AND CATH AVES 
p,. i. blié¢e 
ow car stop at entrance: ap 
desk © or CALL MRS. ROGERS, CO 


At Do nna. Lee Lee | 


os s Everything! 
—LOE. 2 BEDROOME. 
—BUS. SCHOOLS. SHOPPING. 
~WE LOVE CHILDREN 


Newly core otetenee = a 
bide. mb. i 
petie, ti. 


5 


v eee 
tile ‘balk sith wanier | bet. K and 

s ets ae ert 
cle v4 per 
mont 


lifton Manor Ants. | 

Attractive in laree vids. 
automatic gleveior 4-hr. ow 
led tub showers. parauet | 


RAT oh to 


5 te 867 ~ 

Excel slegee Spac > 
j ~ ant 
Cal 


In 


W AMSTERD 


NE 
2701 14th S 


A 


7 “NW 


tion ang p —— age Avell July 1 
VERY Nice FPF. 
PIC 
ba’ 
WA 
ri 


1 \ oat . 7 


& 
prt 
: — 4 
bedrms., 
—EVERY CONVENIENCE. 
-~PETS WELCOME 
—FURNISHED—UNFURN ISHED. 
~IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY 
, MR OMPSON 
by . 


rm b 
“ expost es 


ye WAT TSVT I F 
negecorat ed ‘1 hedrm val 
$73. AP 7 44th 
ranch - F'ower ave 
2 bedrms.. sen. a 


; cont LS 


Tr 

in 

lee liv. rm 

- t st Nicely a8 

1 btarm liv. tm — 

and bath 870 mo. plus wits 
a" 


"mel, 


furn 
kit. 


bedrin 
cKitcnen 


' 
and 


cup Zar 
n 3 rms.. kit. 


ne 


n 
bath, utils 
le ‘ ath 
; ivi ne 


rm 
bath 

ARMS wae sually 
ap’ vm« pepares 


L 


~-hper : . titchen and 


living rm kitchen . 
losed-in back porch. $895 RCOM 
irm 


Attractive urt apa. 
ne. & mo up Inquire 


Cc 
xi chen ahd ba‘ 

5 
et 


or. 


Le Ul amoete e losets 


facilities 
Arledgs F Real Estate Corp 
-44 a 


 Te- 


“2357 
thy git 
Ty 


. 

rm. 
ys single 
KR «st. ne 


apt 
1006 


leon Bivd.. A 
Ey e< It >. ‘&a% 
MD. 3824 “ete eT 
large livin room 
kitchen A 
-in back por a 
a iot of lose 


bs . 

ecora 
ates | 

rooms 


. cpl. or ’ ‘adies 


Bias” 


ene avi 
Nice 
large 
screened 
entrance 
pa SP dbus jin 
ee “A 


bea 
Neatly. tera . 


, untin 1st floor -t 
25 share apt bik. to Dus 
0 


S aa — —"* 
to share ellic. BW. vie. ar 
trans. 25-30 yrs. CO 400 


vy By : quis, rae 

.. UNFURNISHED 
ALEXANDRIA 

AIR-CONDITION 


BROOKVILL 
DUPLEX APTS 
2 AND 3 BEDROOMS 
1% BATHS 


WITH OR WITHOUT BASEMENTS 5 
sc 


FURNISHED 
OR UNFURNISHED 


FROM $102.50 UP 


en Sat 2°84 mm tells mm. 
ental Office Closed Sundave 


OXON PARK 
OXON- TERRACE, 


ONE ee uM 
includ 


MD 


ae" 


BARNABY s 


Open Daile Mon Thru Pri. 9-5:30 


POR FREE BROCHURE CALL 
FL. 4-9400 


NEW SWIMMING POOL UNDER N | 
CONSTRUCTION ADJACENT TO aC natal = 
newly ce ae ed near er? 
| 1000 
5330 " * 


LO 

DIR: Across path ~— Brides 0 COLORADO ive, NW 
he nwy 

erated 


=) Be thy saih, i cura "ne neta ¢ entiden 
BELLE VIEW. F 


AD 
VERNON Sita: 7 hi CHB. 


MT 

SHOPPING CENTER 

PLETE SHOPPING CEN ER. NIN. AVE. APT. 
pomesenes fa vedeces ated 


ful din 
° Jovety shy shaded awn a 
McKENZ 4 ¥ 


ha $5451 or HA 


~ 
a* 


cious . bedrm 


724 14th 


COM 
ALL ON PREM 


WADING POOL 


EXCLUSIVE RESIDENTS 
AT HO ADO ONAL, COST 


mile south of Ale 
from downtown D 
main Navy end i9 min 
Belvoir. 


s© ttebbe r 

lso efficiencies 
DELAFIELD Pi 
rms. living rm 


ae 


tor GINKIN is ‘CO. ft 
at mosphere | on speci ous FORT STEVENS ‘DRIVE NW 
in country club @r with sedr 
convenience: Ort. ‘street 
est re ent 
feat he ~ in ent 


Revers, 


kit + 


above 


iv 
ine Te 


N. APTS. 


Office. €01 
> uae 4a 


A 
FU 
Renta! 
Open cai. 


LUDED 
ALSO AVAIL n PR : 
Ty al Ay ww: ~ ddo- 


Relleview Biv j ey be 
= . 


OE 
aT 


Ban 

WOODRI 
€ APITOL 

7S ave 

REAL "ESTA 
ARLINGTON 
1-BEDROOM—$73 
EFFICIENCY —$65 
apt cool and 
cosets, 
2 
after offic ice 


auie' 
ample 
Center 


AP. 7-440] oF 
RD ST. NW 

e 
Aine 


te bat As = 
a. and sD AND ska TON NE. —?2 


2 BEDROOM APT 


tils.. facilities; es 


sr at Center F 
SHANNON A 
4th sat nw NA 


Pentagon. Navy Anne Ft. 
9064 


Aurora Hills 


APARTMENTS 
LUXE GARDEN TYPE 


location fer personnel of 
Nationa] Airport 
10 minha. to Cc 

$100 


park 


DE 
Choice 
Pentagon bide 


ate aT sr. 
edrm 
‘s 


aeoa Fe ik 
Ma 


ocker 
In 


storage 
Inspect any time 
inia 


DANIEL E. RAGALIE 
“¢ 0 ee Wr OI 
7 5S. Arlington 
1 and 2 bedrm ‘ 
™m : space ba’ 
and rear screened por 
$30 MUEL E 
Ol Ps 
BOL LING FIELD VIC... 


iv 580 
a hl LONGFELLOW &T Ry 


ch. 857 


50 
BOGLE) INC 


+ pORREST 


hnearm 


bath br 


§ M WI LUs 


910 Inver 
APTS. with 


Overlook INg Suitland Pkwy 
in GOOD HOPE HILLS 
West of Naylor Road at 
30th St. SE.. and Vicinity 


a 


acl arT ea: age 
: z 
ha . 


453 Newcomb 


& SONS 


t Bidg 


PORCHES 


me 
pe) 


ist-Hoor 
bemt.. 
o\s 
SIE V 


eves 


Kraibaai” HEIGHTS: 
hen ~ h. 
eo poy “abil, 


| ail 9. AP 


| a WES Pemy, 

IN THE AREA 
1 BEORM. . .$63.25 Up 
2 BEDRMS. $75.00 Up 
FURN. APTS., $81.50 Up 


bedrm. & porch—@7l te #85 50 
bedrms & porch—$61 to 


} 
2 


Detached 


4- family 
buildings ik 


mospnere 
. 


: nd bb 
all utilities except electricity 


RENTAL OFFICE 
2900 30th St. SE. at Naylor Rd 
APT. 1. LUDLOW 1-3300. 


2 | BEDROOMS —Hilicrest 
wow 3 y redecorated le 
cy 


modern FS and bath 
ools and shopping ares 


A 
CALL RE. 5-8000 
FOR BROCHURE AND 
FURTHER INFORMATION 


DISTRICT HEIGHTS APTS. 
RENTAL OFFICE 
» 7812 District Heights Pkwy. 


feights 


$94.50 


and 6-family 


APTS.. UNFURNISHED 


At Donna Lee 
There’s Everything! 
—LOR 2 BEDROOM. 
—BUS. BCHOOLA, SHOPPING. 


~WE LOVE CHILDREN 
—CLOSETS GALORE 

—EVERY CONVENIENCE. 
PETS WELCOME 

—PURN ISHED—UNPFURNISHED 
—IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY. 


AL! “e jpomeser 


NOW 


~PARKGLEN- 


1. Bedroorn Apts —oet 590 
th Bun Dec 
2-Bec droom Apts.- 
es inch 


WE AL 23, HAVE A “Siw 


RES Mok’ 
“8 


i FYTER "GARDEN® 


of ti = Chu 


and ——* en'‘rances 
ools 


4 =" B, edrm mat $8 
2 Bedrms.—$89 
3 Bedrms —$105 


Nia UR MOD 
the BED 4 
ad 


he 
Dal 


bat 


— 7 


-_ 
Trenton |errace Apts 


oe & & 
n 


+f ay ‘$8 80 


ar 


&. 
I 


G 


a 
‘ 1O 
: BE 
AND 


YTHING FPINER 


REENWAY | 


DEVELOPMENT 
& > 


CAPRIT? 


Decorated 


- 
y * 
- = 


SRM ADT 


$64 


ORM. APT 


$82 


OPEN 


FROM 


~ - 
-— > 
ee 


Tere 
: 


DAILY 
M PM 


CONDI T ONED- 
CARIL LON HOUS 


NJ A\ 4 » 


: 


5 } 
| " : P 


“ 


Tops in Living 
ASPEN PARK ,APTS 


“CANGLEY 
PARK 


PARTMENTS 


Hampshire Ave 


: 
rh 
an vin 


a r ~ 64 rar 


@ nents 


36 Aba UNFURNISHED 


TL. APT 

AVATLABLE 

St. Leesbure Pike 
JE 22-2810 


te 


D nGous FURNISHED 


E 


_- 


A 


_ 


36 APTS." UNFURNISHED _3% 
ain rm. | MONROE 


ef 98 NELSON 


ALEXANDRIA’S 
LARGEST 
3-BEDROOM APTS. 
ONLY $129.50 PER MO 


schools, 
center; 


— tiland 


‘Tedecorated. | Lae uv. Fe. 
an 


a 
schools "ae shopp: ne “area 


>-BDRM. HOMES 
$68-$73.50 | 


Beautiful Hillcrest He: ghts, Md. | 


ties Included: near 
buses, shopping 
loca tion 


BEST LOCATION 
| LASALLE APT. HOTEL 


CONN 

1 Rm., Pull. Kit. & Bath, $75 

| Living Rhom. Dinette Redroorm 

| ~ tcrhen & Bath, $) oe & <) 
: rT UDED 

* PHONI 4% 


Sou! h a ue 

~ ° 
DON MawaGBaast € 
a. KI 


$55 “MONTH 

and Goed Hope 
Screened 
ast 


0 na 


le 
perch. Apt. 


"RIGGS PLAZA 


NEW CAPRITZ DEVELOPMENT 
os cota ave. and Hamilten at. Be. 


CLAREMONT eprenpchectpes ci) 


Walter Read Dr. Ar! = Ricos PARK ~ 
St. )—JA. 2-5003 

Best Value 
2-br. apts., $89.50 


Weekcarys. 9-8. Bat bs 


Buckingham 


3I3N 


al 
TILES INCI : 
_ME. 3-3 ya 


‘Guckinefer Ownership 


’ 


BEDROOM APTS.—$77.50 
EDROOM APTS.—$102.00 


es Oaes 
Hot Water 


OFF! ce OPEN DAILY 
in 3h. NE. RA. 3-0495.. 
~ LLOYDS APTS. 

OFF SHIRLEY HIGHWAY 

Bedroom from $73.50 
~ Redr yom trom $87 50 


~ 


7 


In Heat snd 


‘TAT 


9 Sen 11-5 5) 00 


Glebe Rad 
J A 


Available 
l-br. apts., $75 up 


9-8 Sun. il 


Bus 
oITry 


4500 SOUTH C/ ‘Cc 
Bedrm , $69 35 Covoren. 


ngton 


7 


5 CAP 
4-SIU4 


; hops 
2 * thr “ough 


Weekdays Ba 9.5 5 


ew 


> ~ 
a ‘ 


1 
: mn arts 


4 


> rms ; . 
aicons emp adults 


| PARKLANDS 
abame Ave ant Baas ESE 
“BEST BUY IN TOWN” 
3% ROOMS 
$68 and $70 
42 ROOMS 
$81.75 and $84.50 


ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED 
snopping certer end 


pro 
» cue 


~ THE DOREEN 


Over sok! ina Ro 
Creek Par 


COOL AND 
GREEN HERE 


. 
7 


Nursery echao! 
' s& at 


OFFICE, JO 
4 3A 
a . 


*) 


: 
COULORI 


; 
>» 
cot 
: 


ROSEMARY 
Apartments 


‘LIMITED NO 
PTRNISHED APTS 
Make Select 


Vacation At Home 


SWIMMING AND 
WADING POOLS 


NOW OPEN 


- ; 

re TO = ts 
aAnmman S eels =) 
. - yh + a 


Jents Only 
FOR CHILDREN 


¥ 


COLORED 
. 7 . 
 Fesponsible: 


* rms cit. 
1860 i8tA Bi 


” : ° 
COLORED 
> 


COPORED 
Lad : 


Serv 


ver . 


Private R ; 
Transit & Si 
All Avail. to Our Re 


IDEAL 


. 


ed rm.—$/73.50 


R ’ 
i : 


rms £ ears $83 


PREMISES 


co 


‘SHIPLEY PARK 


LOCATION 


from $68 50 
from $80. 00 


2- Bedrms. 
TILITIES INCc1 

Lar ce rooms 
oF amt 
> 


7 ‘ 
rms ” 
Cony are 


3400. 25TH gree 


Pri SIDE NTIAL 


¢E. 


2S 
- ARDENS 


aor 
‘sf 


PRIVATE 


ROSEMARY 
Apartments 


2-, 3-BEDRM. APTS 


a 
RNIs [ED APTS at arr 


F' 


SWIMMING AND 
WADING POOLS 


Private Bus Serv 
Transit & ‘ c 
IDEAL FOR CH DRE? 
19299 FAST-Wrs or 
> SLVER SPR! 
CALL 


PH OR 
POR 21 BR 


HOUSES 


a 
yer 5 
' 
Vv 


aT 
/ 


OR 


DUPLEX APARTMENTS 


ving Raom 


3 Be 


“ae 


and Back 


va 


3 P 
LS AND 
$93- 


Al 


BO FEW F' 


Dir ng Panne - Kircher 
Bath 


7s 


Y ae 


Gas, Vater, 


ted Free 


SHOPPING CEP 
—~3 Bedrooms, 


+, 


RNISHED APTS 


JEFFERSON VILLAGE 
BLVD., 


9 to 


. 


FA 


‘ 


vy 


CHUR 


at., 9 to 


BRENTWOOD VILLAGE 


131] 


RHODE ISLAND AVE 


GARDEN APARTMENTS 
AVAILABLE 


NLE 


20 Minutes to Downtown 
Direct Single Fare Route 


| BEDROOM 
2 BEDROOMS 


FROM $62.50 
FROM $80.00 


ALSO FURNISHED APTS. 


Newly decorated, cross ventilation: 
facilities and parquet floors 
shopping center and theater, 


sforage 


schools, churches, 


Open Monday thru Friday ‘til 8; Saturday, 9-5; Sunday, 


undry 
near 


ample closets, 'a 


P| 0 at, 
ay areas, k. b. ae #4 50 

ts) isa sth pi. KW 
go, 8 


ap! i 


af ny 
a 


10-5 APARTMENTS WANTED. 


DE. 2-3202 


. APTS., SALE 


i “Uy. om: den. 
ie 
this alecely comditionss 
" ; . r 
iT | weh 
cas 
charges 49.13 


5 bedrm.. 2 bathe. lee | 
rm antry. | 
Wired for air 


[R x" 
eweh bide Bolendid 


fer redecorations 


"Tete one ay 
: ener. 
res. ya608 A AD . iste ee | 


37 HOUSES, UNFURNISHED 


th * ovileaks| 


a iz7th st v 
bedrme. itv din. rm 
my gas heat. full bamt.. 

L INE REALTY 
$12 stn at 

COL.—1111 

pos, rec. 


_ nw 
~ Abbey pl ne 
end garace. 


t. NE.—6 rms... 
month. Do not pes 


Bio 


£00¢G cond. 8&7 5 +O 


39 | Sao SIN AVE. 


7 


to arm 
Frags. saison 
e ay 
CuASE—S pedrms. ‘e : 
oom. ady : block 
wal distance 
— 


taste- 
x er alleb) June 
ates 


| 
furnished Jog ate . 


well ! 
for. ciploma: os be seen from 1! 


POTOMAC PALISADES. MacAr\ hur 
bivd. area. overlooking river, Cor- 
bedroom and bath 


of 
a AJ 


% sich 


» she —wW 
at ac. Wi furn 


$125 
ten. DIXIE REALTY CO 
evy ‘Ghase Md. Besutifal 


NA 
heme Wit for Sie mo. June tars! 
GHFURNTSNED 


ye K VILLAGE 


3- rm. homes, $115 mo. Individ- 
en : 


“— - 
d’town by on 9 to 
daily. inci oats Sunday 
Mt. 


Vernon Ave. & Kennedy 
T ‘. 


.—8 
, fully owe kit r 
amestown hool area 


ces 4 : 
Adults. no pets. $79.50. JA 


CHURCH Several de- 
3.. 3, 4 room houses 
| JA. 8-1252 


eelly settrective 
et contains 3 bedrms 
aree. Cen. 2-car earace end pony 
unusus| features. Built on 8 iar 
rner jot $325 8 month 4) ot 
If ne snhewer 


~ 
NS 


OL 


— 


bed 
30} 4 ALBEMARLE ST 
nw sins Call JAMES E. SCHWAB 
$800 


VILLAGE—An excel 4- 
th house rm 
mod 
r-cond 
770 

orches 


—3. 
rick rambler. full bem 
ot. $} 75 mo. EB. A Hern- 


Rent or “Tenge | 
an attractive Cape © d. 
ba 


rms. and ow 
e 
Udren 
Lak me NORTHWEST REALTY. | 
a ca bedrm brick Colonial 
reb 


$125 Immed 


onv 

& Andr rews. Modern 

- brick S %,, 3 bedrm.. study 
iv. Tm. With picture window 
r Patio w 3 barbec ue 


te 
T< 


,’ 
close- -in; July 
ATON. 2-bedrm 
bier. vacant. $100 m 
PAR 


ial 


—_ » bedrm ~ Brick 
§90 


= 
rated $125 JU. 6-1] 
: ~i-bedrm. sem! Netached 
mmeciate possession Call 
_ JA. 5-402 

be v rm in re ; 2} 


ork. sem) ‘det : 


25th st 
house. Excel cond.. 
REALTY CoO. 

DI, 7- ees 


rececor.. 
Jy 8- 
nw 
$89.50 
412 Sth 


— 


HOME VALUES 
15 BN. CAPITOL &T bedrms 
aT he rab, Silt en bath. 
eT Si rms... kitches 
a a SE come. ; 
A. HUMPHREYS & SONS 
& Meee Ave NA. 8-8020 
\ qe 


bed 
rm 175 p 
REAL ESTATE . 
AL A 
Wise. Ave. NW. WO. 6-292) 
— Pirst offering 
remodeled. L secluded 
Toles r. of Con- 
Lis bedrm . 
: " : en 
LI. 6-45 
4 


| ee? MO. 


DET BRE BDRM BATH, 


. 
wi 


ee 
HOUSES a or = 42 


ay 


rm 
ec rm fenced 


RNISHE 20 yale 

baie’ R : Sc PROPERTY MANAGEM’T 44A 
5 78 
a 


VIRGINIA PROPERTIES 
WANTED 


TO MANAGE 


anc capadie manage- 


“BAKER A 


N Washingten st 


cry 
Ww AJ 


CONN. A j Ex 
lus secretary-reception 
urnished 

2 Avail lable 


spac . 

onditioned build 

immediately DI 

pint CIRCLE Doe: tor Or BaF. 
trist; A ’ syit 

boon cases. 


a 
retar ‘el anc 


SAIR-CO 


Down! own 


reasonad| . 
telephone ser 


NDI TIONED - 


per Or 
wiree floors 


heat es than $2.50 


WEINBERG. & BUSH, Inc 


KIR- CONDITIONED 


LASALLE 
1028 CONN. AVE 


4-ROOM OPPFICES 
ATE! 


CENTURY BOICD NG 
AIR -CONDIT! ONED 


Reasonabie rer 
. ¢ Re ae e co. 
DI 
ston Me Tor 
C canect sear ave ie 
abou’ 1100 ft 0 
rooms. oon a be used as ctore $255 
Martin — 


Oo 

at “9557 T larateem Tet 
= air ‘cond! tionin $55 Re < 

rd MO . 
LOUTS FR E 0 
BUSINESS PF 


Very 
TINE REALTY co. 


‘DI 
SPRING DB. Vi.—ton 
in shopping cent er 


wear and shoes 


WEAVER BRO 


REA 
vw ASH! \ 
. D 


DY NAMIC LOCAT| ON 


ORT 
. 30C 


DG 


WEINBERG & BUSH 


GARE Cte SPACE, Rent 50 
CHOICE WAREHOUSES 


Inc 


fire A, ~ sow 
a 


enient 


an 


loading " cone 


ond 
lees ine! ate Read. Sheu at ‘Bent 
44) 2 ft 
warehouse ready 
ease a6 & Unit 


moderr 
ale 
or S a 


new 
Can 
~ inte 8.000 


WEINBERG | a BUSH. Inc 
1707 NW N 

ST AREROUTE ~_ 

5 L J 
storage 


triel, co 
erations 


LDIN arehouses 
space expanding 


clear spans ri 
proof Riy erected. Box 1020 
Alezandria. Va KI 9.7630 


cneeetimemeenemnenenent 
INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY 


LL LTT 

INDUSTRIAL property wanted in 
vic. of Rockville. Will trade equity 
im duplex house Loc. in SE. Call 
OL 494 


COMMERCIAL SITES 


$2 


$3 


8500 
"BONAN 


ermes mus acrift 
bargain. JA. 2-1 977 
recur A re sTAX 
in buss Market 
es ss. TU. 2. 
e TATRANY 
14th at 
$3500 apm 6- 9663 
SERVICE ION for 
by major oil company. We de 
sire capadie person who can 
work hard and desires own 
business Mechanical adility 
heliotul but not necessary. Ex- 
cellent rental terms. Call Mr 
Graves, TA. 9-8500 


Choice location. Completely set u 
and vend? ta £0 ,acluding lights 
PLA S771 


D. lon 
equi 
Bar seal . A 


7 
eA 
Tat 


ipper 
reese 


lal 


bus 


lease 


wa and a oe shop com- 

binat: oD S unit P ony nership 
UNUSUAL. “OPPOR. 

+. lease. Gervice station, located 

n U. 8. No. 1. so. of Alex. Modern 

oe bay station. excellent location. 


bus. commitments. Capital r 
$3500. Exp. heipfu 
r. Prank at 

r 


| FOR THE MAN WHO 


WANTS TO MAKE 
A DOLLAR 


te own retell 


oure 
as y ter ow 
fenced 7. or 
n ° 


BUS. A 
TRAVEL AGENCY 


in Wastrington or New York City 


approved by Domestic Air Lines 
conference Wanted 


ovided incorporated 

turnover immaterial but 
reputation essentia! 
consider toning over staff 


pplz a" writine 
2. Le 75 Miami 
Bea c h Branch 
To 


REAL ESTATE 60 


s 
. c 
tes 


MO} N ECON T 
We will buy 2d a ~ notes. 
earby Ma 


NAT Reacher eae © & 
NW NA. 


ts; 
dD 
, RR. and ww" ; 
all application: x Reality Co 
ME. 8.2049. 905 Y. Ave. NW 


R. E. LOANS WANTED 60A 


nh. 8 PURCHASED 
CO. Rea) tors. 


2 
sh 


‘BARTOW REA 


TRUST NOTES 61 


GET more money on your 24 trusts 
Quick reliable service. Day phone 
TE es het ves 5- 
L BAKER & , ae jee. | 
as orf ° -. 
NY FLL OR PLACE IND ~ 
Trusts FAS ST cal Hy T 
NOT CHANGE 


ml 


PhovsHt 


nN‘ PA 
NNT E REST 
POR 63275 


$2500 SECOND TRUST NOTE 
PAYABLE 818 MO. 6% INTERES? 
Wits 5 YR. DVE AND PAYABLE 
CL A ,se CAN BE BOUGHT FOR 
$1 


ABLE 
CAN B 


$4000 | SBCOND 


Aga HT FOR 
1400 
BAKER AND SON 
508 N A ex 
TRUST NOTES Aalaadd 61A 
WILL vA OR & trus 


MR. JAMES—DI. 7.1655) | 


SALE, INVEST. PROPERTY 62 


ALEXANDRIA 
A happy future is predicted 
you this very good 
a of 2 
apis Annus 
ing %851-EF Te 
L BAKER & SON, 
‘308 N. Washington Alex, ¥ 
APARTMENT HOUSE 
4 APARTMENTS 
CONGRESS HEIGHTS, 


SELF CONTAINED 


er’y mal 
2-dedra 
$3450 


nl 


= 


SE 


CALL NOW AN 


IGGS & CO., HU. 3-3316 
SALE, D. C., HOUSES 64 


AMERICAN 
UN IVERS| TY PARK 


— Co 
1¢5 radie . 
7 m & 


nr 


yA SIN ITIMENT 


FF 
be 


eG 
and fin 
por 

: 

» ~ 
EM 


ER 


ams 


2-3875 

W Cc. & A. N. MILL 

Oey EL OPME wT ‘ . wT" 
Mass Ave NW 


AMERIC AN U. PARK 
in tt 


ay on SE = Mnoet ynus 


tive dune 


screened porch, 
fenced i6t. One of 
in Chevy Chase to 
LEY REALTY co 
eves Oo 6.39450 
CHEVY CHASE —3 
rooms 7\e pDatha 
near 
: ne 
_ TY 
“CHEVY CHASE 
$24 950 


bet 


balanc 
| CHASE 


cvever. Np PARK—Sps 


reny aaahes > 


Aaenia 


er 
garace 
the 7 


for dal anc . 
A "HS 


‘anh ab . 
CLEVELAND PARK nD. € 
‘ar'ne s bd ae a spacio 

' ader 


nr 
reasonable te: 
itePaces 525 600 


nse ALES 
All-brick, 3-bedrm., 2-bath'~ 
rambier Modern kit. full 
ana maid's with 
bath. Between Conn. ave. and 
Rock Creek Park. Priced right 
Call today 


LEGUM & GERBER 


oti 1S b AY 
FO: WALL. “at eRVOIR RD 
: tin tow! use 


Call 


bsmft., 


rn 


Nw 
AREA 


a 
eves 
NEW CISTINGS 


O KOLB A 
-2100 


GETOW) 


‘bed 
ive 


GEORG 
REA 


TOWN 


E 
ALTOR 
GEOR 
th and 


o 

o- 

n 

A i> 

an pa 

- n inwe 
Kava: NA - 
Abe _ 
CE IRGETOWN 
NEW EXCL IVE 

fk Laces living 

ning or 7 terrace 

andscape¢ garcen Mod- 

dinime room. 3 bedroom 


ore 


na deen 


Wi<e 
ueA RTH * BLVD vw 
th ho Le 


“RIGGS PARK 


DOW 
AN HONEST. STATEMENT -The 
this af om 


priced far below original cos 0 
"RIBNE call NA. 66-6440 ‘til $ p.m 
YY Pian N 


ING VALLEY 


immaculate English-type ¢colo- 
den an attractive lieve 

priced in the 20s. Large living 
room with fireplace. separate din 

room with rench doors to 

patio lenty of, all-electric kitchen 
with plenty o re and din- 
coms and bath 

wpactous stornes 

sees of 


Metn 
hes 


ne 


Annapolis 


a 


41 BUSINESS haa Delhi 55 SALE, 


: 


1-8535 ti) 2 
| Slay tet ia BRICK 


Si "$65. 81 MO. 


D. C. HOUSES 64 SALE, D. C. HOUSES 


oner on roperties 


: conn. 
| i r. Delle, do aes | 


AN 
EHRLICH SPECIAL 
724 a FARRAGUT ST. NW. | 


k. 7 y poeme, full seme t. | 
yard. eas 


> EHRLICH 
100 ier 620% M. DU. 1-s 


gt Sol —Fiome Plus income 
Nr. Howard U. & Freedmen’s 4 
12 rooms a — “yene 2 bathe. rec 
rm. oll 4m dea? location for 
roomin mak or fraternal ergan- 
ization © ine tllent Th ae 

ROG 


6906 18TH AVE. Er ROGERS REALTY. CO. 


COLORED — | 
Lh, rrp Hey SHAKE, RAT ee AND BOLLS 


OF R ses 7? 
6. year-old detached brick. 6 roomae | YES. YOU_C ROM. Pe te I 


in Pe eh eas heat. fenced-in iro ONE 
LC 5 DOWN 


LOUIS BRESSLER $395 
TU. £9999 CARS bon DOTY TO? mek Cup. 
OPEN FOR INSPECTION 
LI. 3-5305—L!. 3-5307 


Custom brick : 
OFFICE a ST. 
1412 OkeaToR iy NW Ser 
6407 TT nw. 


‘ eR 


Qs 


jal brick home with center 
ie. rm.. dig ms 


eves. and 


N PA 


NON-.VETS 
Lovely modern }3-bedr asbestos 
shinale rambler fenced yard: lige 


weskonas. 


—e 
m 
sot 7 


oc 
oom, 3- ‘bath 
fenced yard 
low down parment 
Can m 


a 
with «a 
be I till 8 p 


P hi 


) = HESD 


: 8 
10TH rr NE —2 1 
1410 ORREN ST. BS 


wr 


tach ed br breeneway 
pelpsmens 


coe 


sell vou these 
homes for 6395 down They are o- 
m k- Thev look good 
Beautifwh 7. papered, es 
ni hardwood 


90 one else 
JAX “LD Son A brick patio in 
soem = ck N TP 
ti ; brick Cape 
ile y tor room 
KORZENDOR? 


an 
“INVEST ‘ee 
O colored 

you sT. Nw 
SEMI-DETACHED 2-story bric 
arge rooms and Dath: 4 iare 
rooms. full Ha nt ow 


$90 MONTHLY 
MR JAMES. DI 1656. 


Cc ALOMTRIS INVESTMENT 


oe Sa 


LINCOLN RD. NE 


Trades. Accept ed. 
Approved 


#' - 
Ww OODRIDGE- WHITE - COL SOL 
Owner transferred 
Uarge room home 
ven ent ares. Pull bs 
n.-% 2 stoves 


heated sun 
a es 

4 
‘wM 
inancing 


BRAND NEW BRICK 
OPEN. TO 7 
semidet brick 
front porch 
fw . 


— [Lo 
iced = «jbelow 
whers muaet 

Center hail 
pad ae 
ree 


Lae 

> I 

comfort On y 817.950 

Out 3 N ue Hamre. ave qn 
ght Bo 


Dakota 


inYy 
me = “er 
se 3-rm "}-bath 
right to Hamilton «tt eft + purchaser 
and sample house Poll ALL. 


Cat rite signs 
DI 90R0 Bvese RA 13-2190 


HOME AND INCOME 


Capi : jel, mil bo  aneek a. } apts 

LEO M. BERN STE N CO 
CO. 35-3533 - 

GL—ONLY 


the 


USSEL MAN. REAI TY CO 
seus PT. DUPONT_ PARE 


Attention, Gls 


Facing Government Park 
Only $500 On., $69.60 Per Mo 


2. 


6-rm posses 


cant 
equi P 


rec 
kit 
24, 


Bio Call Mr x fatoah ; 
RED A. SMITH CO 
COLORED— VACANT coLoNE-- Brightwood. | 
Detached Bungalow 
$395 Dn —3$99.50 Mo 


No spring 


4th AND DELAFIEL D NW. 
ONLY 8750 DOWN 
c } e in BRAND NEW 


leonced . 4 
OWNER MURRAY Levi NE AD 4 3737 


COLORED 41606 BDOWW 
Fashionable NW sectio 


OLORED BARGAINS 
MODERN HOMES 
19> On— $95 Per 
Ht 
brick 


Mo 
Tull 
"$90 Per 


Dase- 


Mo 


* 
BETHESDA 
Dbemt 13 O80 


Mo 


" 
Vlas 


$99 Per 


Lovely. 


we 
sos H.-W 
$295 ws S$) 00 Per Mo 


ste 
ered at a bath 
SINDLER REA! TY 
COLORED on WHITE—4609 |X 
an tol. Modern - ~ me, 


- = 

wo 6.11 Ex 
COLORED—VACANT 

2329 \1STH PLACE SE 


g, dat! 150m 
nance diey 
ny 


2< 


osm se 


saa 


INC 
TA. 77 


ASSERMAN. 


Good Eves Eves 


‘PRESS REALTY CORP 
Rt NW. _ST 


COLORED—VETERANS 
SEMIDETACHED 
ABOVE BROOKLAND 


terms 


COLORED — rt Dupont Hills 
400—-6250 & 
rs 


becrmes $12 
oe mo M Townse 
056 COA & CO fn 


St REDS —W'DRIDCE 
DETACHED—$950 ON. 


6 rms 
ar 


927 15th 1.9918 


Betac ~ 
fr AD 
“DAN EL Di ENER 
~ COl ORED—$295 DOWN 


ira and Mi ssourl ave. nw 
m or 


AA, ACTIVE 2 


Only Sees down 
r ARMIN 
CHARM! ti Ra. 


ond A 81 per 


FRED A. SMITH CO 
COLORED—VACAM 
FARRAGUT ST. N 
FARRAGUT ST 

9 FARRAGUT 


= 


" 


ONLY ‘$995 DOWN - 


_ oe ws under marae 


“RALPH 'D. COHN 
TU. 2-9200 


COLORED— VACANT 


$495 DN —$90 MO 


CHOTCE x, 


$500 TO $750. DOWN 


3.12% 


SINDLER REALTY CO. HO 2-1 
COLORED—VACANT | : 
635 Powhatan PI. NW. | 2:4 


mn 
Ehrlich Wonder House ‘cd ORED—.4995 


LUXU RY HOME 


Bemidet Colonial trick ” 
one 


6-23 
JONES & CO 
CHEVY 


“Ze 

in 

chestnut 
itramod a 


ferraces Mt. | 
on. priced ancer 
ei Sp oa. CO 
COLORS Pe 
Ehrlich’s Boll House 


LES"M. BERNSTEIN CO 
821 MARIETTA PL. NW 
Row brick. 6 rme pode ern. 2 enc! 


ou CO. 53-3633. 9 "Ty 9 

COLORED—$11-950 
MOD. 2-BEDRM. BRICK) ber 4Ottet® 2; | ome “LELAND 
1008 LAMONT 81 [is one. tiae Salt’ home room. 3-bath 
ee on FRED EHRLICH tor 


ith ot NW }-0450 
Aber 6.30 P.M. DY T9585 — { 


COLORED—-DETACHED—NnE~"T 


ERED "PHRLICH - 
Atos 6.3 N M.. Du 7-9 rbos 0450 
“OL CORED” RECT RM., $12,500 


Semidet. wrk 2 bedrms 2m 


012 


si? 
4056 


nhs 


ev 


and automatic 
: ai 
Lime in the ‘be 
Bethesda-Chevy 
OF . > 


mie NE 
BUNGALOW. $405 5 Dn 


It 


~~ be nome wit 
y ‘ 
irep! ac 

~- ened por rehes 
rms fireplace sor oy ' 
i] basement tl heat 
8500 dn. Call owner. TA 


c SCORED VACANT 


oTH 
$495 DOWN : 


o v1 
thermopane »* 


h n 
vegetable sarcen ar 4 fru 
qf I neishbo: 
Re + at ’ 
SINDLER REALTY "CO HO 
‘ ‘ol ORE D— Assume 
porch 
toil ~! 
4 Llerme ME a 465 ves 
135 


GonDox seco cat ec CHASE. 


sEMDETACPED BRICK 


$750 
VACANT. a right wt Bemice. 
2 full bath ill 
back yal 4 ~—% rete 
act 


= $295 ON. | i fae’ Nese Se 


Near he > 
pin yee sc hoois 

RICK. REC. Ri siNDLRR REALTY CO 

~REDECORAT! RED 


HO. 2-1257 
$395 BOW RC ADVE IN 
3rd & Rhode Is. Ave. NE 


beautiful rececorated 
A 


oTrick «gar 
eves O} 


COLORED FULTON R 


3 BEDRMS 


ave and 


CHEV 


One must er it 
room Coilen 
~ ae ousness 


away | 
} nas the 


ie et 


re et a NTs 


WATAN 


hance to save yourse!f some OMPLETE 
Cal weet NA 8-116 4 trans 


MARC iAR 


rtat 
J 


ad 


Detached colonial brick nome near 
Reed ace 8 must 
for oniy ts ss). 3 
odern Hollywood bath 
spacious entrance 


q converted 
D 
“OUSES WANTED, to BUY 65 
A CASH BU R OR 
vi n neach Pa 


Spot Cash for Your Home 
a 


om all buses. First Spocione 4 ek 
ever advertis 
BATLEMAN AND CO 


71-6432 
COLORED—PETW ORTH 
00 block Jefferson at 
eS - bric 
romt po 
rms 
yard: det 
re 
© sett 


OUNKIN «& 


Homes, notes, secreag 


Mé.. 
m c. ~3818. A, “Realty 


a FROM OWNER 
pees om 
\ 


IN 


nage — | 


tise te 
( 


| eee ix LU. 
8592 


CHEVY CHASE | 


laree 1 ay 


$18,950. Brick 


BETHESDA — Attractive 
“Od 


$6. 
PFA! 26 _ ok 


2 woaprt is 


Moon rami ~ on peauti ful 


ee th is today 

EDW 

CHEV 
ROLLINGWOOD 


a 


FREEMAN'S. g 


a 

signed 

ond er scien us en ear’ 4 iT 
hind 


au 
or Ma 
1-T278, 


for sa | 


oe envi 


3 dat 


*SUICK ACTION 


Cash at Once 


a 
Cox. mk 
A 


SALE SU oe B. Outs siub. 
~~. MARYLAND ND 


ery Count 


HE 
th spilt 
room 


fireplace, 's-acre yard, - 


Cape 


Pu »s 
rear. By oe ner 


2-dbedroom 
finished 


Eh Ol 


Off 


ve 
VA 
move 


NATUR LOVER: 


sa ior K 


4S 
3 bedrm HO 


lense 


a : , 

lo. sas 7 = ipped kitchen 
led 

K ORZENDORPER 


A aPLIT i ever 


-drick and the very 


study 


£36 Sah 
es (hime 


2-bedrm 


oedr 


>a > EI 
inc cnevy 


CHASE. Wh 


gar nee and 
lot . 
‘Call 
IONES & 
7 Chase 


Dp. ¢ 
‘yy CHASE 
TERRACE 


"tt a new 4 
contemporary 
ano a age 
anes of 
AMER! 
aet- 
jusive 

All 


hed. 


m @ 
art 
’ 


au’ 
the 


of 
Chase 


> 
ex 
a 


* waa 
ral 
ne 


and 
fran 


roor 
inaow wal 


[rT MAN 
‘ 
har vA HAM 
eve 


batns 
club 


"Y CHASE 
OWNER REDUCES PRICE 
TO 837.500 


ovely %S-bed- 


PPreciate tne 
dq hor 
for family 
: 

rees 
traction of 
Rosemary 
a Jr. and BCC 
ze ki ne é ~s an’ 


daca at 


10 
DUNK KLEY. Realtor 
' 


location, with yey ini 
irep) ace 


GRAHA M<éa&” 


RNERS 


Coloma) 


CO. Realtor 


ck 
~ bam 
~ “ ~ $20.000. OL 


‘ 


1. 2.9400 
tu. 2-| ‘os 


Kw and 
pu ys . brick 
Perfect condition a. Drapes 
40 


, ~ 
sa2 «6 
a Large level 
an c 

uPsox co Realtors 
ENGIN TON 


$10, 950-$84 MO. 


Inc & INSURANCE 


: 


TAX : 
GI APPROVED-—$550 DOWN 


Expand. attic, nice size 1%-Sstory 
detached shingle home 


full 

ction. 
a.um 
Cony 

Cail 


acum 
® constru 


and doors 
anep. and shops 


"R ee HUMPHRIES 
2 Mass. Ave Realtors. NWA. &-5020 
KENSINGTON. MD —lune %-Sept 
ist c.ous -bed 


storm windows 
Lo _——, 


qoINs a Waka. 
Bea. 


NON 


NO DOWN. PAY MENT 


. om 5 e* 

KORZENDORF 

. 

IN BROOK 
he Cape 

PROPERTIES 


8 KVILLE. Tw 
s« o 


AG RBAN 


‘ “SD 
AS. COR A o0. 
f5CKVILLE 
r 4 arr - 
9-1 457 
1915. 
ana §) 
; Suys this 
v Aeme + ore 's 
f tape. Mr. Frank 
SF RInG—) 
S| 


SIDE REALT ¥ 
STL VER SPRANG 


~~ e 

> oar 

a ae 
46-[ 
ine -¢ 


om Tam 


shvEK ~ SPRING 

tive ome . 
neti 

a 


Aad OPEN : 
SPRING 


‘ 


Vv 
BEAUTIF 


SPLIT-LEV 


Amn eted and 
an 


.* 
re 


a 
ra 
fromt and 
. ; 
ma’ . 
WESLEY 
re 


TAKOWA PARK 
2-family' with se 


ne 
PY 


as anc # ec metera A tea 
cer $15,000. Low down paymer 
e& 8 RAMBL ER Cort er brick 
me iar¢ee trust ' Owne er ‘ann is 
se Price sh c ‘* Mies 
L.. 7.99 . N ™ 
ZAGAMI REAL 
init! VL AGE 
ry 4 $. 


2 


CAN 
~ _ 


708. PRESS REAI TY 
3. 9316 


Mo . 
bedrm Py . 
BUPURMAN PROP RIES 


2688 
WOOD } ACRES 


asemer ’ 
LA. § 


Be 

a 
Wood Acres Constr 4 
Ol 4 E 


WOOD MOOR 


i ariva 


Oj 


TOOR 
Pr! 


. VEN 
s rN 
Realtors F 
WOODSIDE Fike 
nia hea ’ 
j . sce 
; alr a 
farace. | 
. CHEST 
R 
! “RADNOR 2 


IROER REY ti HILLS 


Two beds oo m rambler. large 
Drep.lace exce 


4 BEDROOMS 
anc Cape 


, 


pret? A 
aitior hasce™me 


hk. ‘RAMBLER 
THAT IS DIFFERENT 


- . 4s.) 
On a deau j 
-aamne - o 


re red 
atns ee 
m Df a 
cle 


a 
o 
gr 
ecres room A 
gara Exce.) 


Graham & Co. JU. 5-6010 


“RELAX” 
WHY KILL YOURSELF? 


in beautiful Manor 
can set 
; oe h night efter 

* oT c our backyard 
NO Ini TIATION FEE 


se ent 


Country 


Live 
c im 9 oF 


Only 8 mi. from pe Di phn 8 tine 
straight out Ge sul an 
way nearly ne "was 7 
of golf, luxurious clubhouse 
ming end weeding pool. Pr 
ranges tennls rts. «6 
rounded by luxuriow hon es. 


> ea 
sw ™- 
actice 


aur- 


4-bedrm. New Orleans Coio- . 
, 5 
. brick rambler 
4- brick rambier.... 
ies brick Cape Cod 
plit leve, 


5 
a), 250 


eeer 


= Tht array oer. Be 
ni2 iy 


. whade Abt swings. enc! 
deal for yvounasters, 1 dik “ 


8! Berna : 
$15.950 GI “a356 

“Gl. assume 612 
ViCcToO DICKEY. AP 


A custom - finished 
> 


“yecre 


KESSINGER “* oO 
). “ises 
It _ ACRES $14.950— 
ti ingailo 


techen you ve 
tual vert 


newly 


BRAND NE wv 


ree 
ington 


“. 


4s 


MARYLAND. 
Near Indian He : wy. 


Prince Geerges County 
- ADELPHI—#12 500. easy terms. 3- 
weadrm. rambier with fn. re ra 
- . . . 

sume “ 
née 


morteaces. < . 
Eves a. 
W. LEwis 


to everyvt! & 
4.-45.399% HE L500 
ADELPHI KNOLLS 
new bedru 
. ’ Reasohe 
as 
r Be bon tar 
BERKSHIRE — Cho: 
amor. | Damt 
rag fence 
s . Chur an < 
cre Pile $271 500. By appt 
7 ROFSS RE 6-5 
RRANDYWINE 


-&8ma 


rs » de 
CALVARY WEIGHTS 


diary ’ 


st aces D 


- 
UN 
. = 


— 


43-3429 
veraee 


Walker & Dunlop, 


5 St. NW 
CLINTON AREA—it 0 


Radi ‘Stat j " = 
REALLY ¢ 
COLLEGE PARR “PROPER 


_ ate 


> ine 
Inc. 
5.0222 
vA mes 
Ch 


i» ' 


was 
sipped \ 
“AP "7 
ne 


$11.95 Au 
® > " 
REY 
—M 


Vic] 
COLLEG# 
. 


.s 
: 


PARK 


: ‘ 4 
EAST PINES 
3 rne pc’ 
~ 
r¢ i 
1[OREST HOTS 
ae, bec 


. 


FORESTVILLE 
$13.950 Brick 


Pri rw Y : 
— L vv woop 
. . a 


a refiae 
¥ TY Y DICKEY 
HYATTSVILLE Br 
rins iULd n 5eD 
peat. ge. pcm. $500 dr 
fu A 
TOR DICKEY 

ay ATTSVILER 2 t 
a 4 : . or Fr vIN 

vA 

LANGLEY” PARK 
rar 
Modern 


n every 
Gs 7 er t'* 


’ 


; +e 
LAt REI 


: - © 4 
LEWISDALE AREA 


+ 7 
- en 


ar . 
pos: ee4,0T 


SHAM 


THE PERRY BOSWELL 
WA Rea 


co 


vwors 


71-4500 
LEASANT,. MD. 
“Ea? 8 ) MON rv DOWN 

idetached brick 
washer. lf you 
t you can owt 
Di 7-8333 “til 9 
exon HILL AREA—Only #) 
brk 3- bedrm 
: livin 


oar 
ie 


FAT Dp 


gar 
nave 
this 
7950 
ram>.er l ty 
ne rm with 
Tm 

Mr 

7900 till 9 
Ores, 4 REAI TY 


PARKLAWN 
9750 Dn., $150 Mo 


We are jookine for offers » ti 
charm ne j-bedrm ick Colonia! 
king 4} istance 

st ne 
Assume ige 


thin wal 


Ly schoo! ny 
erat 4 


trapsportals 
2 


me. o1ee lots evel 63 $3000 up cIG g, RC EEUED 


E. J BLANCHARD. Realtor 
TT. 8-8600 Till 9 P 


se 


A 


REALTORS * INSURANCE 
. a.77"4 


64| HOUSES WANTED, to BUY 65 SALE SUBURS. HOUSES 67MD. THE WASHINGTON POST ond TIMES HERALD 
Tuesday, June 12, 1956 


Masonry forme Bio 


wor ° 
iscaped. white fen 
iot. 10 mi. south ’ 


i] mm. 
ly lands 

garden 

ine. § 

$108.98 mo. wi 


- 
Aderholdt Realy Ca 
: °) 5-36 


-$2 
SON vere. a Se, oe. 00d take oe 
pave all. 


with full 
| or fen 


Liv 
large owes ipped ki itehen” a. 
ne ree 


TRANS 


"tor on y 
~y, 
xO - 1 aakE 
a' mare can 700 as 
on pp 


approved 
§° * fast 
2 an 
VACANT 
i. 
ah 
ran ; : oe 
t od m = | . 
for 
AMES SSN & od Ar. 2am 


CLEAN—6em 
Te -" 


BETTER vie RENT 


an Tn y hur 

368 per ee le shopotne 
iS per me 

RBAN REALTY CO 


ar.boro Pike &.F IO 8.8300 


VISIT 
SPLENDID BUY! 


ve 


i™ 4,08 
center 


~ 


oA 
5402 Mw 


Here's « modern itehen for 


°- a ut et ieapes 


LOHR 


~ 


wv i »wetting you ia 


We ’ 000 Now 


HOMES 
ROBERT E LOHR 


HE ‘ +o RA 380A 
? ‘eealk . oe 


HUN TING? 


7 
HOUSE 
e her 

4 r 2 


_ 


AMES NLS 
sis HOS 


erick bu ungalow 


se R a 
eeutPean 
aa - & ignti y more te 


R _ GEORGES PROPERT Ea 
GT APPROVED 
* ‘rT. oe 


, 


$1 4538 WN Celleee 
A : 


‘ WA ade 
BARGAIN <Pek ee ers 500 
; ; attrac. hors 


ra re 
RINC?E 


RAMBLE! RS 


LEA 
ew 
u A NL 


PRINCI FORGES 
41> a 


Tene ¢@ 


PRS BRR PRS. 


(Losi 


SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67VA. 


__ VIRGINIA 
ALEXANDRIA 
Lincolnia Hills 
Open Daily, 10 to Dark 


commu 
rs 
rs 


id nv 
ry possess) 


ad Shir ey 
n eeu 


a and 


ALA eg 
gard 


oon. 


7 « 


4é . 


(TEX (NORIA 
a's Py 


VA. £0. 3-785 °° 
ALEXAWDARTA 


Brick Split-Levels 
Off Janney’s Lane 


In one Alexandria's 


3 
00 areperee, wall ‘snd Ce 
ture @ ty Be. an! block 
Lo ‘clementary and 
close ¢ ch 
Lo a acon «6 
nventi — 
sda 500 “Open 4 
and i323 Pies 
° duntes D 


‘S14 “JANNEY’ S LANE 


Sex b op. Shirley hwy. 
eft te Jafiner'’s lane. 


GORDIN: MENSH 
| CALL 
Contineed on Followine Page. 


i 


.. 


c 
WS 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HE RALD 
Tuesday, June 12, 1956 

SALE SUBURB. HOUSES 67VA. 

ea 


FALLS CHURCH. VA 
NO MONEY DOWN 
3-B RANCH-TYPS 


EXTRA- DO BATH 
Exci iting sew pee of better-built 
eae ve ter-designed homes 


req ti th- 
rooms lish ih daylight base. base - 
ment. cacpert. 
atmospher 
Priced From 819.738 
GI APPROVED 
Agent on Premises Daily 
Directions Out Lee Hey. to Broad 
(Route 7) in Pale Church, 
right on Broad St. to West &t.. left | 
to Parker St. left 1 block to fur- 
nished Model Home at $10 Parker 


cae Inc. 


J 


asonr 

~~ ~4 at Bit 
for 

cook newly ree 

‘ 


ofa bowen you get » Deaati 
ae #1 _-* include 
AL B/ 


INC. 


.&™3 


Keer 8 son INC. | Ft. Myer Special 


$10,300—Gi APPROVED 
S-rm. brick semidet sitpates with.-/| 
in walking distance of & = 
abd me center freshly 
rat inside and out: 
an asy yments. 
Vitant. - OCCU- 
Pane . 4 Neate 
ARLINGTON’ REALTY | 
the | 2212 Wilson Blvd. JA. 7-9300 "til 9.| 
: Distin aT gesian com. | 
unity e ontemporary esien 
| 50 min Db. c oy vt n | 


bivd VAT, rambier, 
liv. rm. with fireplace. dising 
\e-ecre wood- 


edec 
iittle aan 


7 


ie for children ill 
or conventional. | 

riced at 930.560 BT. C. DA 

EBNPORT, REAL ESTATE 

5-56200. weekends 80. 


excellent 
ou 


nrues « r eboart | 
j tat te vet-| 
oan for on TERN 
N.L ct CO. 
14m ON Unie. a ER & CO 8a 
“ikea 


ing 


Sa 


7 i | 
ie @ real buy. Somebody is ew 3-bedroom brick rambler 
Naval of- : 
pou. , A. 4? - oo anie recreation room and 
home. availabdie. Big fire- Nott 
a separe fitemsbur 


‘neh 
wih Xe 


v 
plete information 
10G6. Realtor. 


vray 


Tuckahoe elementary 
tion, GI. appraised $19.- 


GE H. RUCKER CO. 


2.6 it 
th bri. Ce- 
> aa Feerea. 

o . orc are . 
Somamenity of ee Y ais fi } ell-| 
e roperties et etal rom 

Sw RAS BRIGGS 
at Glebe ra. J 


LOR 
LANE 


3 rey TO THE = 
ND TO DOW 


———irrki hs — 
SOUTHERN COLONIAL 
YW = oS -~" ' 

be 


| 


. sep 


lovely corner 
and cond Bs onv 

Army- Navy Cc 

82 Y 988 No 


5 BEST B&B 
bh gt 
TENT FIN ANCING 


POR ADDITIO 
Deeper AND APPOINTMENT TO 


COMMONWEALTH 
PROPERTIES, INC. 


JA. §-8968 78 NO. GLEBE RD 


~ MADISON MANOR 


VETS-NOW VETS $1900 DN 


LY TH 
by 
LY 
5. 


1% «fireplace 
rm, full basement 
rec’. Tm, screened pore® 
rear rose. vere cony. ioecation 
jon end reasonable terms 


Arledge Real Estate Corp. 
Wilson Bivd. Ar 
Byes. RFs. 8- 6300 
all-brick 


nicest jocetions 

livrm. family sized dinrm 

kitchen and 3 lovely bedrms.. 1 

—— = r Plus sa tree 
with summer patio 

Sinn Dave, possession. Price 417,- 


THOS. J. FISHER & CO. 
JA. &-23661 3-6 pom 
Mishts ¢ J -2667 
yw 


3BEDRM., |! ee -BATH 
RAMB 


ean you ~~ a 3-9r.-o 
bier 


lington within 


_— Colonel 


WAY 


ee ag th 
Pire 


laced living rm ave wo 

“45 separate din m, trees 
—— lot Colonel s trans- 

fe al low 


fer makes — un usu 


GEORGE H. RUCKER CO. 


a 
ST.. ANN'S 


dust eround the corner from 
jong brick 


rear porch 
t} jalousies 
iY extras an‘ ' 


Of oe or fuk d & Y neal 
ORTH ARLINGTON 


$1500 DOWN 


Dav this 2-BATH Cape Cod: tte 
at im the — lent heart 
rt ington as ement. 
screened perch ena attract! ve io 
this real val Le 
dining room | 
VACANT 


OVE Ric 
"ARLINGTON REALTY 
2212 Wilson Bivd. JA. 7-9300 ‘wl 9 
—}{-bedrm. brick ramble 


‘i9)| uf 
a lington Forest E: sists REAL road 
Se tas cones écEEBY HOLLOW 


ear, ee. ocr. rear porch & and¢ 
. i poreh, full Brand- new, center-hall, 3-bedrm 
brick : 


ip inci 
rice This Le truly a, and ¢ 
eras. tree-sha 


ee are JA. U ae } perer ie pet dming 
uRe ROWELL. & a 


2160 N. Glebe Ra JA _§-07 07 


“Por quick 
SPRINGFIELD ” ‘Bever! Pores't 
ont wait ‘on this Custom ode rick rambier on * 


a Lee: aeehire as. 
ott pitse rd 
— te 


Very Large! 


~e that wae originally 
ving 


@ o adition 
rm. in be 
2-acr 


500 
7 


ar, LOCATION! 
__gerachis co. 


J-w 
; 


. 
t 


and breakfast ar are bed - 
rms. beth; full davits t basement | 
with fireplace and roughed-in 2nd 
eer at pecans gerage $2500 
anyo price. $17,950 


Exolusive, ‘GORDIN. v MENG H REAL- 
at_CORP, BO. 3-6 


down | 
‘old fas e-* 


FOR SALE BY OWNER 


My transfer makes the tmmedi- 


t I m 
lace and woodbox, dining 
en, equip with G8 range, 
dish washer. Sepese!- 

er ‘.. 


“ton sir cond)- 
we in the pase bedrm There 
is « wow tite the Dowden 
ae COMM Unrry sw gad 
POOL AVAILABLE tw & 

rice, sy $08 ash | 
4-3206 


f 
List 
i OER ion WOODS 
gamer, is, Mets, re 
PS . 


Gesirabie 
proval 


chaser. Askin 
requirement 


’ —Ii5 minutes 
List rr} i 


| 3 


Bl. 8-4220 
D—i-yr -old | 
rambier; din . ; 


py 
79at 


H 


ler with DSasement. | 
wien fireplace. sepa- | 
ak te high | 


x. 


Soos at Vernon 


TAKE ‘ann LOAN 
WITH 32350 CASH AND 99) MO | 
PAYMENTS. Om over - 


tractive 5-rm 

with fireplace. sefeened porch and 

beautiful new kitchen. thoroughly 
i To tnepect ca! 


ARLINGTON REALTY | 


2212 ' Wilson Bivd. JA 7-9300 ‘til 9 


ARDMORE 


“You won't believe it ‘til you see it” 


ONLY $10,490 


To Qualified Veterans 


wimmine . 


pool 


Sota 
$14. 950 
Contracts 
“TD. 3110) 


MANNAS REALTY. 


No money down 


$400 MOVES YOU IN 
Non-vets! Attractive Financing Available! 


$67 LOW MO. PAYMENTS 

include Principal, Interest, Taxes & insurance 

A Few Available 

For Immediate ey 
ROO ARATE DINt IN is N he 
yt BATH PLUS 
mirth ey 
Plas Gumerous extras including city water and sewer. cas and electricity 
CR. 53-0485 


JESSE JOHNSON INC. 
Builders & Developers 


SALES OFFICE 932 MAPLE ST. 
TOWN OF FAIRFAX 


- 


'2-Famil 


—¥ orivileges. | 876 
to schools. | 


AS- Parker, 


SALE susurs. HOUSES 67VA. 
ee 


Home| 's: 


INVESTMENT 
TRADE YOUR HOUSE eB 
—OR YOUR VACANT LOT 
AS YOUR DOWN PAYMENT | 9-» 
LIVE IN ONE—-RENT ONE > 
—INCONME PAYS EXPENSES 
Aa 
baths. basemen 
ise. sacet * location. Sloe 
ntago i¢ 
“OPEN FOR sa mine, 8 
DANIEL E. RAGALIE 


OT. 4-0410 REALTOR os 4-9410 
. r r 


GiI—$21,250 


saye sell this lovely pres 
nv 


trees. 


Lynn Realty, JE, 2-9400 


S700 DOWN GI and you can own 
rambler 


Aving rm. 
k ~y * A 
tive a fret’ an tor saree 
e| Four etn ack para will Rew 
this tail summer, 8 = : 
breeze. ly Tk 
BEDRMS. 


LARGE 


oes. 
n, " area within 
ey a pins. 


dD 
Fertess ie for . yyee an at rel" 
& Call 


— DOWN ~— Brick = 
rambler. completely redeco- 


3- 


ret ; Dear fuse ine and «shops 
Move right $12. Cal 
RORSCHACH REALTY JE 2-3708.. 
| AMAZING 3. ++ et my brick ened 
near every 

Assume UGE 

be 


MONTH—3,bed room 
ost awe 


ram- 
me Satpe A} 
12. ono 


FYB EY — —And & pe 


bier, vate 
oan 
tte: 


ek 3 in 


: rea. low 
price for this 6-Tm rembisrette on 
» acre fenced lot, Separate nies 
tm.. equipped Kitchen and wait ‘til 
ek see this yar Not «a nicer 
anywhere for ow by 950 
Terms or GL. JE. 3-2093. . 


Mrs Wm. M Yau shin. Realtor 


cLean-La Prope rties 
ARFAX nite 


edrooms—basement 
REC. RON GAs 


RED HOT vAthe't this wen 
brick rambler in cholic orth 
ton neighbor hood ‘Titehen with 
dish stairs to 
PINE- 
M. FHA appraisal 
in hand, excellent terme 


Smith .. Donnan 
JA. 12-6161 2 
“Contemporary onan 


an «@r- 
trance. 
a 


divided off 
room or den. Upper eval: 


av for appointm 
o. Mason 


Green Co. 


electric snaps, petio. 
Close transporte 
ork RE & HUXTABLE 


vauncey Realty Cor 


Ct 
BE LLE HAVEN 


Ac 
fortabie. iting _™ ees 
ne 


eapinen 
separe te dining _™ bedrms. 
sree FRR sroppe 
$12,700 


S. G. Gerachis Co. 
JE. 2-231)4 prety 
CALL 
s 3- ALI v room 
ek ee Cape Cod eS 
conv. to oping. schools. trans 
This \~4-. has . ol aporelses of 


$16.250. and will so this 
W. McC Tre. 


OLLUM, 
348 + ee 


Pairfax 
34900” 
25 TREES a: & swim. pool ar round 
the corner will make your sumens - 
rtect e ul 3 
i Be her i 


ey 


market 
con. maces "Must be seen 


CLOSE- iN “IN | 


“On Big Tree-Shaded| 
Corner” 


pieasant and popular 
h 


tin th a 


arger than average 

ample closet space. screened 

In rfectiv immaculate condition 
= T ted perms are no 
call 


ASSIC 


CONTEMPORARY 


Charm -packed 

LEVEL on 

landscaped 

room with ' 

lofty beamed ceiling and magnifi- 
cent window well opening onte 
secluded sundeck. large dining ell. 
scientifically planned kitchen with 
plenty of cabinets. 2 double bed- 
rooms afd bath on ist level, ree- 


oy family reom with 
huge bedroom 


distinction $21.9 n 
assume huge PHA ,o-. with mod- 


will hecome a habit with vou when 
you settie cown to enjoy this e 
li¢htful contemporary rancher in 
a beautifvlly wooded setting of vei- | 
vet ereen lewns and tall shade| 
trees. Decorative brick «t 
fireplace in | 
with entire window wall opening 
onto delightful breesze-swept patio 
bie dining ell. de luxe equipped 
kitchen, 3 sunny bedrooms ‘or 2 
a den) osee hed. carport; 
completely laundry 
Many. many eeetions and handy 
extras and in an extremely pleas- 
ant 
homes 
250 is your wo ~ 1 & won- 
derful buy: so call 


STOP 


Lookin’ 


“THIS I6 IT!’ Here's @ truly at- 
tractive contemporary brick ram- 


refri rator. 


JA-"7-5200 


Be kit tom bg 


Btrle +~ g & end durabd 
7 e_{ransiaied inte ter en 
Y S . and 


ventions! 8: 
buy fe” ever 
A Little Cash 


te be 


screened porch. Monthiy payment 
leas nm rent. $23 per © 

taxzes)60 6nd = oifeurance Veterans 
=: .wurry while the ewher is 
willin 


Weighing Values? 


Looking for your money's worth? 


. fruit. trees and 
flowers. After all our hunting we 
found this top vwaelue at 614.960 
OL contracts sccep 


Picturesque 


en setching—it's the prize 


at 5 
tas . with $1300 down, Whe 


YEONAS REALTY 


r ct 
A 


Near Reston | iage 
A REAL BARGAIN. 


13,960-—$6145 

beak Tht IKE - A 
ome. new cond! 

2-car garage. gas 
h.-#. h. seeee fenced-in lot. 
spect any time 

DANIEL E. RAGALIE 
OT. 4-04160 REALTOR o*. 


“TITTLE D 


ASSUME GOOD LOAN 


. practically new: 
nial home with side screened 
( ground-level 


“7:-/ 


| 


“ARLINGTON R 
_2212 Wilson Bivd.. JA. 7-9300 "til 9. 


TARA COUNTRY 


An cannot int & more 
beau frat picture 
y driv 


fin a 
ower beds. graci 
and brick barbecue inyiti 


v 
with ‘eatin 
with FIN 


Parker, Smith & Donnell 
ee 


7-618} JA. 7-8817 
Immediate 
Occupancy 


This FHA approved large brick 

rambler will “delight you with its! 

3 very spacious bedrms. i's sore ) 
et Se © WALEOU 

A 

A short distance to new elemen- | 

tary school and % bieck te bus 

Excellent terms 


$19,950 
g. gerachis co. 
r 2-2 cai ; Pace bes 1 


Seren feare and Cinéewe, 
that 


can be 

aren of or third bedrm.: mice yard or 

the children and rou are 

swimming poo 4d ome ‘within 

waiking distance to 

otal price $11.850 Por further _ 
, u T R 4. 


OY 4 
TRUE Lv xtaY—wih ant 
you and your fami 
boarme on the ist 

on the 24 Soeor 

dining +1 and kitchen, ful 
ned h. Hea 

Priced menidions | 

PHA or oe | 


ly one 
oe: 


} base | 
rch. 
Atlinston., for 
sale. Military. 


' FOR $19,650 


3-year-old brick rambler, 3 tbdrms.. 
5 ; 


_M. Hailey 


leavine town and he 
house cone before he Ay 
Pp ents vel, ree 
lace ip living rm.. perm 
ex ible upe 5 4 i rs 


REAL 


prick rambier with 3 bedrms 
w/outeide entr Nice 

lovely wane Close-tm Ar 
nr, keGela High 


F. sibs "Malcolm, JA. 7- 3024 
4 FINE HOMES | 


lot "vine. - 
stairway 
J-W 


full 
ot | 
with ont; | 


to 


All. Broyhill Built | 


BROYHILL PARK | 
3-bedrm ali orick rambler. large 
ot, 1%» baths 
year | 
Only 
‘ im - 
mediately | 
BROYHILL CREST 
all brick bier 3 bed-| 
lot. full base- 
convenient 


| achools and shopping. VA approved 


at $18.1 
BROYHILL CREST 


All brick 45-ft. rambler 3% gre 


or PHA financing. A steal at 619.- 
BROYHILL CREST 


2-level all —_ brick homer! 


ree 
Living and dining area. kitchen, | 
bed 


“Chicken-Hearted Price 


for a home of this t Brick 
Cod near country club.. is 


wes 


wae 


tes My.) 


* 
L 
.|9 
24 


Sah il a 


sectirnnes POOL 
Bin Bee ee clove in in 


sighvornoas 8 
the Kids. 
a 


lo- 
= 
ed jot on) 


333 aw aeal cal play area | 
luxe kit. wi eed | 
at wit sie ) 


odest. terme 


mith & Donnell 


Tene 


ig sheinaty 
Presents 


WOW 


K (ices 
ang Ae 
om a 


lit-levelsa. every inch 
ILT with 23-ft ce | 
r 


Large Vg | tn 
| Vision of fine he 


try closet 


end separate Bias ontrepes. | 


“2 
Only $1073 down GL Jd 


WATCH YOUR 


WIFE 


Mer ores wi lieht we when you 
show this 


California ranch 
hou 
beart. 
ee 
hoed 


. 


full of charm and 

located in the 
rt s Krun 
lovely 


‘\omes im a al 


WILL BUY PROPERTY 
Paice RS) SO SUS 
ae —s 


OREGON AVE. ah ria ieee: 
190-0 y Lett depth 
— and Western 


mem MASON HIRST 
to sell Priced at aioe. A pine lo- 


Annandale, Va. * Cl. 6-2200 
ne lo- ——— 
cation for ay A 
THOMAS L. er ven see ese urece 
= ae. 


ION 
rontage 


PHILLIPS. W WO. 6-7900 
MABTLAND 


CCOKERK—<4 acres. & 
woods. hillside sits down. $28 ~ 
3. M. Gupper. Broker. FA. 2 


tales 

acres 2 oft front x. 
alten dee On Maribe re | 3 
. 8.) miles & of M rivere. "20 min- 
water. tes $1 erms Agen : 
. &U | Om Dremises every ks D to 


AC 
ay. acre lots. wi Price. $2750 pe 


Por details call 
. Realtor 


th choes 2 pone trees | 


8 
Ng ‘s cash, wi 
Co. 1 
each: price 


ress 
INC. 
$2000 Wash. Bi ‘em L. 7-8300 
2. cash: will subordinate a a a 
WEAVER BROS., INC. ) 
beautiful Porest Wills 
. M. LEO STORCH. 


asi, BESSIOBL 1.20 oo__| Fut 
vilders—Attention | 22 


$2300 
SP. 3- 


WATERFRONT, SALE 7SA 


NORTH END SHORES 


WHITE SANDS ON THE 
RAPPAHANNOCK IN 


Middlesex Ccunty, 
Breakwater Protected Beach 
Growing Every Year 
No Washing Problems Here 


Unlike anything you've ever 


AUTOMOBILES WANTED % 
‘49’s—'S0’s—'S 1's 
WANTED 
.| Takes or model cleat ony i | 


100 cars this week 
U 6 


es 

s | se UNT é: 

th BENNING RD. NE. 
WE WILL PAY | 


TOP DOLLAR 
FROM ‘49s to ‘5és 


seen before and the ful'fill- 
fillment of your cherished 
dreams. 


Take Va. State Rewte Ne. 631 

porth from Ageers ieh 
Route 33 
from Deltavi 

follow let signs to 


AD 
Va 


ge 


pr opert "Lars 
lots ere avaliable on “o_o front. 117 
6 


also +, * State Route No 
ing to be and overlooking fr -- « 
water The lote are really 


left. so com 


. Beastiful fund Over 150 Acres Close In| 


Paved 
qurveundes by subdivision and 
Deing = to sewer, water. buses nnd 


Ea) ™ MASON HIRST 
wp terete pire A rene samee>, Va. Phone & ©-3500) 


spot Per yous future SORCRT SALE 


2 


lex... Va 


home. 82 
sponsible , - ee 
Listing 850- — 


«] 


AL BAKER & SON, IN 


N. Washington St. Lat. Phone 
n 
PERSONAL LOANS POA PERSONAL LOANS 


ree se. | 
¢ —— ome. 5 bedrms. A 
provements: nicely pure ; = 
c Tusive section. $6500. He | 
yi j ey Neptune 
Dn 


GOA 


room like the Club Madrid 
gsarace § and oarpen 
$29,680 wit 


WORDS 
FAIL US 


Wwe see just ~ och all p 1 _nemes 
arket ood 


31.215 with 


a Ananet 


Pomponio 


2222 WILSON BLYD 


JA. 7-6660 


-— OUT-OF.TOWN 


—_— N A - 
, —§ rooms 
biack-top roed 
well. outbuildings 
all Convenseness Locat 


pot: $200 


h. Owner 
= 398 


FARMS, LAND, = 


down 
oO 
tedericksbure Va 


76 


Re i 


4 naan for 


. DN a MO. sT9"0 
163 acres; sprin state rd. 76 mi 
Fairfax 3 Estate 

57 


52 
home 
. 


Ww et 
rm and 2 tenant mousse: 
$15.000 down. Shown 
clusively by 


MASON HIRST 
Annandale Va Phone CL. €-2200 
CLOSED SUNDAYS 
Between Warrenton 
and Bealeton 


orese farm. nice home 


|] 400 


yd el 


‘Barn or Farm 


| 
: 


WANTED TO RENT OR BUY 

rill msider purchase | res 
Pe eter “with buliding for inside rab- 
bit ches: buildi as must have oe- 
ment floor water. ete 


2 
ft under 45 les nw. 
rom Bethesda Mr. VINCENT. OL 


Pe NAL LOANS 904 


tcens unger aws 


~OGn 


Quick—C onfidential 


LOANS 


MARYLAND CASH LOAN 
(93337 Rl. Ave. UN. 45172 
$7898 Georgia Ave. JU. 9-28526 
seoooe 


$ CONFIDENTIAL : 
; LOANS BY PHONE ; 
On Your Signature Only} 
; Swparten Fi Finance Co.? 


Cor Wal ier, : E48SS 3 


x: &thees 


> 
> 
> 
> 


= = a —— 


9 3339 


to consolidate bills at Berwfaial 


* Take long es 20 months te 
repay. We like to say “Yee” to 

employed men and women, mar- 
ried or single. Phone, write, 


come in 


FINANCE CO. 


of bdexrendie 


706 KING STREET 
2nd Fleer «+ Alexandria 
Phone: King 8-5858 


Open Friday “til 8 P.M. 


PHONE 


ON YOUR SIG- 
NATURE ALONE 


WOMEN’S LOANS 
Our Specialty 
WE CAN MAKE 
YOU A LOAN IN 


9 Hrs. Phone 


Now 
ONLY ONE TRIP NECESSARY 


MARYLAND Cash Loan 
| a 


Wheaten Finance Co. 


Suburban Finance ) Co. 


3399 Rhode tcl. Ave. UN. 


a Patres 
oL 2 


i608 Basi" West iw 
Resident's Finance 


S288 Rhode Is. Ave. AP. 


Licensed under Small Loan Laws Licensed ander Small Loan Lows 


LOANS 


UP TO $600 


$155.42; $10.00 
279.66; 18.00 
391.40; 25.00 
Above rotes include interest end The interest rote te 


prone pol 
2% per month on he wmpod Dolonce up te $300, ond |K® 
em the Dolonce « exces of $300 te $6 400. 


Phone JAckson 5-8885 
for your cash today! 


FAMILY 


FINANCE CORPORATION 
of Arlington — ,. 


2907 Wilson Boulevard - ee JAckson 5-8065: 


—  =_—_—-— - 


: 


ee — -_—_ - _ 


Your ae 
$48.33 
$34.44 


You can get 

$850.00 
$600.00 
$350.00 $20.34 
$250.00 $16.09 


* Above loans under $300 are on 
e D)-month plen under Va. lew 
“hich iinits small joans 
Sa). Interest charges are 2°45" 
monthiy on unpaid belances of 
53) or less and iw ® on the 
remamder 


VACATION LOANS on Just Your Own Signature ! 


STATE LOAN COMPANY 


INDIAN HEAD (festever Md ) tOgen 77-1300 
aes MARLBORO PIKE mS (Cored tellin, 6nd. ) JOrden &-9220 
3300 RHODE ISLAND AVE. (Mt. Rainier; Md.) Ofcetwr 232-5553 
7892 GEORGIA AVE. (Silwer Spring, Md.) JUniper 99-5600 
113 S$. COLUMBUS ST. ( Alexendria, Ve.) King 91714 
1200 LEE HIGHWAY (Resslyn, Ve.) TAckson 2-3224 
* Above loans over $300 are made under Md. Industrial Finance Law. 


Open till 8 P.M. Friday—CLOSED SATURDAY 


9 


Go New ! 
Pay Leter! 


Toke vou 


Vacoter ’ 


yeor en he 
wtte ment 


pias ’ 


ti ——— — —— _ 


FOR ALL L PURPOSES ) 


+ SMALL PAYMENTS 
~ EVERYTHING IS PRIVATE 
~ UNUSUAL FLEXIBILITY 


G.ACIFINANCE 


CORPORATION 


MT. RAINIER 
(3317 Rhode Islond Avenve**.. . , 


3510 Rhode Island Avenue” . - Tel. APpleton 7-2800 
. . Tel. HObert 2.5028 


Tel. UNion 4-8200 


7912 Georgie Avenue’. 
8513 Georgia Avenve** 


COLLEGE PARK 


~seeneee~Tel. JUniper 7-6900 
Tel. JUniper 9-3566 


hie 


Tel. UNibe 40058 


4503 Knox Rood" . 
(Acree from The Het Sheseeh : 
LEXINGTON PARK 
150 N. 3 Notched Read’ Tel. Greet Mille 3471 
FALLS CHURCH, VA. 
,128 West Brood &. (Up to $600.). . Te!. JEferson 2-4643 
thermer'y Generel Accaptance Corp. **Fermerly Consumers Credit Service, tne. 


—_—_—— 


"4 | 
... MAY BE A SENSIBLE SOLUTION 


For paying bills, medical expenses or many 
other money pane. Apply for any amount 
up to $1000 for any 
good purpose. |The 


* requirement 
fer oan at HFC is 
your ability to repay 


in regular monthly 
instalments. 


ALL DRESSED U? 
AND 
NO CASH 


TO GO? 
There’s an HFC office 


-~ « 
@ LIFE INSURANCE ON ALL HFC 
LOANS WITHOUT EXTRA COST TO YOU 


HONE: UNion 4-674 


CLARENDON-ARL! T 
rt iar HONE: Oliver 67400 S153 Wie Bivd. 2nd ~’ om 
 dAeksen 


SILVER SPRING 


eheice — will be highly et 
ed. On . 

dav te make ur choice Priendiy 
agents will be there to aid 
every wary 


naming cont 
wil 


uild- 

Richmond 
-§} or ett 
Amburg. | 
postoffice. 


CLAUD REALTY CO. 
1900 WEST BROAD ST. 
RICHMOND 20, VIRGINIA 


Cc Da: 3 rivate bea 
sana t tn tig month ¢ ~ 
peason, TU ban 
OCEAN crry, MD.—2- — "brick | 
om ocean front: pvt. beach 

ho 


~Rms. 625 
hake rms a8. park! ne. game 
pr. be 


“4 and 2-bedrm 
reasonabie 


feckdays 


ece*an 
and 


beautifully furn.. new cot- 
~— y 21 te Aue. 4. $300 NO 

AND UP for fine Ls sages 
at Woodland Beach of 
the-Bay—Only 
' | sali-wat 
t Ww 


BUNGALO ; pecrm: . 
kitehen: located 100 ; 
Pa. & = from lige lake 


ves = nn 76 


st} r 
electric 
D Cc. in 


— mo 
groomed. LO. 4-6355 
soxtk — Female, fa 
papers. all shpts 
cropped. 13 wks. old. Must go thi . 
week. $45 of beat ~~ HE. 4-5833 
CoC BER PUrs— Adorable buff, end 
- 650 
315 
WA. | 


~A at 
some hou sebroke: 
» Byatts _ 


ree 


sis 


4 
Ds oa 
3-8235 


champ 


Phene OO! 


r 


AKC register ed 


id“teo—pers— 


wre ARC 
shot *. wormed. 


Ch sire Reas PF 


MA! 
Tin Lip 


ahevherd Duds. . ike Bin 
206 
Bk Bk RETKIFVERS Bia ; 


9 weeks: championsh » bleed iis 
: 
ven KifrENe = ther white 


ropptis—w ete silver p ips 
stock. AD 4-828) 
lampion— sired, 8 wks 

+3400, _ ext 

wi xed oreed, reason- 
—Ltrey 
oped house magners Needs 
RIAN huskie. AKC. family bet. 
gonderiy Cepoditics male 


Rg mos 
shots. “housebroken SP. 4-718 
th fox terrier dose AK 
$95 Am yes Dr xere Pups 
; 4 or arm size. 87 and 
Rr 6-817 : : 
WANTED — Yor young miniature 


schnauser: minor treatment neces- 


4 


rd 
Sf A49n Mowers 
| condition. RE. 6-6330 
MOTORCYCLES, ETC. 


LA! TTA — Top cond! ition. on 
| _— yA 
wher pos overseas $240 
JA. 8-865 = 


is ... —— 

TRAILERS, SALE 8&7 
Loo KING FOR AR cAL VALUE? 
56 Nas al 


86 


BI 13 Mon! Le oe MES CO. 
hite Pia 5. ia Pi 
i north mo? La Piste on Re 


AUTOMOBILE LOANS 
CASH LOANS ED—On 


akes. Private sae ar 
UNION AUTO. CREDIT 
LI 4-48n4 


1430 Pia. Ave. NE 
PERSONAL LOANS GOA 
Licensed ender Small Loan Lawe 
WHEN aN NEED OF MONEY 
NEED MONEY? —— 
all raft Lo JU 
TRUCKS, SALE 


—_—_—_—_——— 
Caen Peace-ct- 
eed trucks 


301 


90 


93 


nad guar- 
at the went price 
is 


TINE 
e710 


WA 


CHEVROLET 
Hyattsville 
‘Onn. 
wanes 
ve a 
Gtiones out 
Silver Sprir Sm | 
AUTOMOBILES WANTED 96 
CADITLAC— Ss coupe, cash deal 


0 be. ¥en 
pa 5 


NK CARS wanted 


a 
"Reduce ed to 
7a04 *t 


r fs) 
a d 
' 410-8! Por 


| 


RD 
100 


Will, Pay Up "Tes 


of POR "$6 fovea 
50- 2 vf “ADILLA 900 
50-5 


BLASS & reel 
ICASH FOR CARS! 


Anv Make 
BILL DENIS. INC 
4940 Wis AVE NW KF 
HIGHEST CASH r i 
FOR LATE MODEL 


*" “HERSON’ S 
Bth & fom stor 470 


NY hag OR_MO 
PENNY MOTO 


N 


by 
oe. 


ORS 


s.°° 


: ¢ WA? Baad 
Cadillacs Wanted | 
PENNY MOTORS 
31820 BR. i Ave. NE LA §6-2300 
WANTED 


any 
a 


S64, pene 


145 F ore 


= 


AUTOR ‘& pick- trucks wanted 


Will pay highest cash Price for 

clean cars ust buy this week 

for Southern outiet. KIRK MO- 
©. TA. 9-266) 


WILL PAY 
TOP DOLLAR 


ANDY ADAMS 
eo 0 ky fen ow 
' and cold cach 


up 


351 


pa . 
Jett Stee 
4th st. Bw. CO. 5-9811 


"| 
| 


| 

ns | = 
| 

/ 

sas. | 
aya 


c 
doors ‘nd eonver' ible 
rs 


a 
budd seal 


ae 


Any make or model car including 

station wagons. foreign Our 

oeves will come to edi- 
cash settlement. 


you. 


DICK WILLIAMS 


i on! 


und 6-314] 


3] ea Rd. NE. 


RICASH FOR CARS. 


BROWN: MOTORS 
meWILL PAY HICH 


“<r te’ SD PO for any NTC” 


‘za ees Ave 


WE 


es, oy S PJ neo ne | a 


onae 
wy PLN nal RENT AKERS "OLDS. CADI| LAC “CO. 


FAIR* INGTON SHOP CENTER 


, } to buy any make an? 

model car. See we fret if rou realise 

want to sell your car. PARKW 
RD ss ne 


AY 
BUYING!!! 


Fighest posers paid 
cars. Brim ear «& 
” og of our two 


"EMERSON & ORME 


oun 


ih 2 M Sts. NW. 
616 Bhede fctena Ave. 


pod LE 

ANGLIA bon 

rior = y $395 URRO 
900 M = 


FOR Co 


for used 
tite 
i¢ ca 


Ss 
ord). Su- 


WS MO- 

Li. ¢< 

Pes Paws - Dephyr. 
UMPHS TR 


JOFRN OIFPORD MOTORS. INC, 
2601 Colurmbis Pike Ariing ton 


Consul, 


overdrive 4- 
and omer extras 
Hea Avastin. 
MO- Manette. 


~ 
Delivered Complete 


BRAND.- EW 
1956 MG-A 
$2195 


IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 
Liberal allowance on American car 
trade-ins and PREMIUM ellowance 
on your pports ae 


MANHATTAN, "AUTO 

Saies & Service. Imported 
American cars. Est. 3914 
7TH AND R STS. 


7.2700 


NO 
Alex eg we! 1810 ‘line st.. Alex. 


Chi 
' erritte eld 1 


= 


7 
ats 


MEANS McKEF” 
a. ST 3-7 71 | 97 


x a Bohan. Se 


| FORRER 2 CO 
oe 


Pia. Ave. NE. at 6th L 
Lill 14th (Downtown) 7~390903 
Bt 1CKh—i1955. BR. M. Riviera HT. 


4 12 extra. Power 


2- 
, ; : new Pas nt 
to appreciate 
McKEE P 
“PONTIAC 
5335 Wis 


' 
| 


suvIere hard- 
Pull? 
ner 


- 1655 Super 

RP . 
ing. we 

uarantee 


Capitol a1 Cadillac. Bide Co. 


’ ‘ 
“y Oc -_ hank 


. then SON . ORME 
M sts. nw | : 
t~. 


Bt i - ‘ 
narGd ; 


- MEANS McK EF” 
Ave ST. 3-7107 
tury convertib 

w <. tires 
mir er. Bi 

: “ “AR st ER PLYMOUTH 
tC ES WASH DE ALER . 


~-Gay written 


283) cin: L Ac 


ia 


sip é ae 
t rakes On tetanding 
guarantee 


Olds Co. 


, - . + 
Capitol Cadi lac- 
~ ST. 3-2600_ 


NW 


‘94 CADILLACS 
aa DOWN - 


"BLAS S & “CLARR 


(he Car 


CADILLAC 62 4-ar 
power 


se 7 
; $2 
NORTH W EBT MOTORS 
} . NW 


' 
con 


re 


‘tion threugheu t Special 


“McKEE PONTIAC 

PO Mins MEANS McKEF” 
$33 5 VA Ave 3-7107 
CADILLAC 1936 sedan. Dark 
ped. feet gteer- 
84395. Ccoo 


| Gapital Cadillac-Olds Co. 
$5 car iad: bee 


sacK 
. 


6?" 


Seakes 


r "os 

owner } 4420 “Whi thier st. 

1. 7 9-04) 

é ADILt AC — 04 convertible, , attrac 
fin > tye y equip 

—. $3395 

Cadillac-Olds 


ee rtd SHOPPING on Soe 


Mdé 
etnias ee 
Bice iy a 

eneh r 
pitt te ts 


CRY TRO 


ike new 


Lt hee H 


de. 
less thas 2008 m 


1955 Convertible 
~4 $1 —— 


Roser Bove Revrolet 
Rd ong ColumMia Pi 


“ner — 


a EVROLET, 


a AUTOMOBILES, SALE __97|AUTOMOBILES, SALE 97 AUTOMOBILES, SALE _—97, AUTOMOBILES, SALE___97/ AUTOMOBILES, SALE__97 AUTOMOBILES, SAL@ «97 THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD. 


: &f ) -~ ; ; ~ = een 
ay 4 _ LJ rH Bt Ps ors per. eon with accessories * gn ee tin fan'extra convertidie. R. & -—" tires. con verti i on c heater. “870° 4-dr., . tone gree tae uip a Tuesday, June 12, 1956 di 35 
es — AUTOMOBILES, SALE ~~ 97 AUTOMOBILES, SALE 


lent condition throushot.| Hy ’dra-Matie, Very _ = car| H. Hygre-Matic ie nw sc, i roe a best offer. m trade. | 
or tee “tions | McKEE PONTIAC _McKEE PONTIAC | fotliyen erie ey "ike D— 49 champ, cong, wood Fea 
ey Bey BL ie trace {Withee rah cone seta 535 Whee ete S07] S335 Whe Aa che ToT 107| « Spomrruac MBANG. NewS Seties 2S) MERCURY SALE TODAY'S 
Kenyon eck hevroler” FRANK SMALL JR., INC. | gactitiee same: ape BS are, om 5. es  Pomrnar— ase V5 Wxichat Coe -_ ; $335 Wis Ave. ST. 3- Fon "ean ag yor. a ) 

Bivd.. Arlington. va. ' iis Rt v2 : > ‘53 ; tarchief Cata- s. e. "153 Pak ive 8 BARGAINS GALORE SPECIALS 


lina sedan and heater. \PONTIAC1956 V-8 club seden,| 
. . fio wINons— transmission.  ieathe equipped ~ 
2 L?'s. ob. L must sell “Bet yt and convertibles. Sat Senee tants h ae tee Ll. bod MERCURY $395 
runs ire s swell: low termes - 72088. . a on our new imported ‘ a le ar- r car sedan, BR. & H. £1675-8 —~ @- 
Nw - nancing. M RIL ” -B. 
4401 he : Ho. 8-068 | 52 FORD hon. vBxcelient second car. Pre PLYM Low a¢ $495 down. McNEIL| 700 Wis. Ave. OL. 4-8000 is We Mave Them! ‘$3 MERCURY $1295 he's, res, ie 
coats te b 7 le A i . 4-8000 “In the Heart of Beth: | She Heart of Bethesda” By Monterey Mardton. BR. a Ht. , 
Pict titer Sis freee) _ KEPOSSESSED  iiinea tiger eioapenete $495 tert bee Ee PACKARDS 9p irs 23, s0 > S01) 53 Plymouth. . $008 
; 7 r . uly equip u wer 
: steering an es. its « SERVICEMEN . M R Cranbresk Cred Coupe, 2-tone 
Chevy Chase Chevrolet $449. 50 TOTAL | ) M. 52. ' CURY .$995 biue and ere New t ba 


pequstsel butone green and white » From “8s te ‘G48. All bedy 
7725 Wisconsin Ave OL. 4-6100 suger 2-tone finish. V-8 engine FULL PRICE finish ns me afives Very low NO DOWN PAYMENT! styies. One-owner cars! Hardtep. R. SSercomatio % & 8 Exceptions 


NC 

R ,. NOrth 

.| 18700. Ale h 0 K : mi lenge. warranty This « te ist three erades ‘Black with S. tep. 21680- throughout. 

eek ie, BR -§ a . Vi, King 6-552 : Bontisc’s finest gt only aa298 and © COVINGTON MOTORS XB. ' 

shes at y 828.56 per month : evr ef. 

3 Por fast credit approval, call Di.) ana Pai on tae Hiamear bt! Pohanka Oldsmobile - For Further information 7301 w ‘B54. MERCURY $1495 Section te tans tneek Couve. 
Merrifield, "ve JE. 4-3302. 2-door ecuipped. green finish Take | Washington's Oldest Olds Dealershio Celt is. Ave. . Menterey sedan | ~ te ~ Ae matte 


= ts » KR. & i. Mer- Aeht biee finish. aut 
| SECURITY MOTORS re MINOR... 54: 8600 Exce! am TER UBtoR CO. ‘Sng 22 he a 1.1003, JET oes OR SALES Be andes A " . —. Bact with Snow Shee trams . Rooter and, other cation h 
= ——- a } pred with Hrd ~ 

ae" natn — ss Sr te sued “drive, converts inte bed ys 5 si0| An FLORIDA AVE. NE bie Woe, , Thre 2-tone ie | — | MONROE FORD LOGAN (Ford) 
| 5] FORD Fo cewe. x ‘hae Wie noe A warranty Oniy 82098 a So ne mr ae ~ . a .- 17373 ote F Her. a Ape 3340 1 4th Se. nN. vw 

| lim 'Pas ” “ son lv LI. A. 2396 |" Pohanka Oldsmobile Open evenings er ’ PM TU. 2-4100 

| 01 j . ides: ¢ 
VICTORIA COUPE *: stig wytatingagn Olden: Olds Dealer YOU GET A 
TOR | 900 M ei 8 


ao. 2 tone finish it For doma tic , rt yy , $2 Cranbrook sedan. —66 Vv ; Sta Stier on Wagon 


ea Wewccer title om BETTER USED CAR 


/ per monith fal price $298. Por ht rttb! na mroe Pord $100 Wisconsin ave ann TR ge ‘ 
credit approv 1) >.tone | _WO 2000 pen ‘ti, 9 pom is on | : + 
54 CHEV. meme MOTORS. oy lue ane white, many other PLY wot Te Hr at. Spec de luxe & terms to ! our at BARGAINS GALORE 
enneyivania Ave Ww’ sires: £000) Gr 4.8000. “in the Heart © 
$395 Total RE 7.1664 2 St OLDSMOBILE seein | ee rar STEWART 
™I HOLIDAY COU PE pomet a$0e- %8 $600 “ar. $500 5. r c ih “.. tie BUICK ‘48 Packard ‘Ss! Pontiac 
NO CASH NEEDED r FORD $1 4dr 


a 98," 2-tone black and eee. oto" Special. dat $750 | cond! aa 95. : . * ah =. aa om | 2$ 
ON APPROVED CREDIT $428 17 TOTAL aris hb wn, only he | Ribeasd ive. Gn6 ls Be “McKEE PONTIAC ars yy lie $99 i vets @ ” 495 
ordomati radio |= ah = 2 . ON ¢ ‘ 
ton, white-wall t . - etait spororal MOTORS PLYMOUTH—'49 de luxe sedan. + 5335 ag ge at : 52 Pontiac 35 Pontiac 
TRIO "MOTORS p splendid sacrifice $298; term 


Catall 
_or ficers 


‘quired. Por ow = ae 500s’ ae en 74 aa 664 | mrs wt gee _ iF YOUR $375 COMPANY OFFICIAL CARS, gel” nec tule cavie $695 lent Nive and = $1695 


CARR DISCOUNT) vb hts CAR Is A CHOICE OF SEVERAL. 5S Chevrolet |? eens 


LU. ] ] 23 ON one | ey vate = his OLDSMOBILE— 1958 wn a sorune te * my ehh BE We can deliver to you « SUBSTANTIAL SAVINGS, ts aon $] 95 - “36 Pontiac 
- . ‘ ra, 12. 7 at , : 1 | 


Power sicering. power PONTIAC i t y °. aes: 


i Ww AY | . . ithe new, driv- $ 
Capitol Cadillac-Olds Co. | 000 sa Heart of Behond ‘56 Plymouth IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. en only 5800 miles 2195 


Com- 


> 
er. Two ‘ lete selectio 7 as own , - : : oa . 
3345 BENNING RD NE. | nroe Pord $190 wi scons! . ave abe a +4 sade luse | bet a ced Caan tgs ; FOR ONLY ‘49 ON THE SPOT FIN ANCING. Tudor : ar Ford STATION WAGONS 
Be Bi Bea | tel eerie praca te mate] iar. MeNRTL fowtiAc. foe wie (PER MO.) se re $1005 | su 
| = . " = tet ince pe: } buy of | week’ sot iHea tested SANE CEnanCINe oh Continental wheet 
4. 3 5900 


. 
| Saree o eee Cree | Men erste eo hee EEDA MOTORS Bargains Galore! * LOW DOWN PAYMENTS 
DAMO A.) w"4-deer. | 1437 Irving St AD 4-8500 OL. 4-1000 ‘53 Lincoln 51 pana : . a pate : : ~ 


uses [-—»" seat covers. | <se_ 460 1th Big Nw. Ra. 3-b0r0 2 Mere re OR C gemensintgn eatin *: he $ * BANK FINANCING—TRADES ACCEPTED 
low mileace one owner! _ 1295 black ath: ‘nee 295 


rrteet: s. mepection 
w ite Bs CHRYSLER 8 Os TH 


a — 2 ) 
_|eerd : , 3 * ' . . . ’ AR 5 r e 7 
a ee er Lon i ill Balas y 8 COAST-IN PONTIAC 
Cmsysot eT— 55 4-4 . ga). JA. 8-080 afte ‘ 0 Ds “ 4 ir ’ bleck ; DOWN Convertit le : 


I od = Herne }¢.; 22 coun 
— —— a ss-A 7 “rad nd " ti NA 8.3274 pac niset Gasettetn de luxe 
5 —. 4 .o ~- =, = otBs wont F mt ead oned : ee = , 
BOYLE MOTOR Sn Thro eT 8 at. “saad oat STS, *995 | CIPCO ores 7 CARS 
5 54 quip. Superior) Aech 4 ine 4 " paces . stan 
sone py i? oe ae a .- WA. > 4 s- ON APPROVED CREDIT tranem tene finish; t-dr.. W-8: heater 


nu , , new 7 inspection an efres te 

eee fie Tesnah ass” eont-eeeanerenenman disdieh 4° cond’ Almas Low Weekly or Monthly Payments | $2 have New “Va. inspec: $795 
480-A MONROE FORD 1237 Bast-| con ly $295 26 mo.| gun 614 mo Me Romer La a ) ’ , ’ : r: new Ve a" 

saat hey a . = ne. JV A L ST. Motors 2700. 3 ROPER MTR : 7 TERMS TO SL IT } OU | inspection . $995 53 PONTIAC 


: a — 
saan. leaker, Basclient esad. 00 ditebehcin soe are OLDE WORTLE— 1986 per detaxe 


Hol Catalina 
cauvelbh — 1984" Wwe: 000M st gE Lt -800 x Bg A eh ‘SS Oldsmobile . $95 D@ | ‘53 Buick $45 Dn. ‘SO STUDEBAKER Hyére- Sy 195 
Yorker hardtes . xe Rie 


ee de ‘$3 PONTIAC =| Lae Sr $1 345 407 Florida Ave. . 6-7200 


PIRI DAI IIA IIA AAAI 


1953 
Plymouth 


. sedan. A good buy. Sold as is. 


New fAG atan XK —146 MC Roadster. SS nove inne gg Super “S8" 4-deer sedan. Te- ion. 0.400 Matte 
mi. §2 #00. EM. 3-262) palr nd « t adjuster. tone red and ivery. Fully a, ~ light eray finish: $995 finish. sew Va. inspection. 


: ag ; be wer ket aE Mer . Vii ‘Si. S38 and ; Of p i” anity s j .o cial seertioce ne a 4 ogucess = ace Va. tmapec- ‘Ss4 MERCURY 
JA K PRY. LTD term : evroiet 95 Dn. Is , onterer « 
Capitol Cadi illac Ol ds Co C l4th St, } Bel Air Tutone areen fully | ’S1 Pontiac $5 Dn. ao Vyymoute coupe’. and $] 595 
io NW ST. 2-200 : 218 Conn ' riim et Ding mt - Powers lide. feet Chieftaic Hydra. ‘-4r. 2.428 $ h. Mere a. 
H 


setrthutar _ i nd rt . . P ; 
nO mm ‘es 7 Distrib for wexancria. Ys Cr « h ires: lew mile foonne n « wr ead rens ta twe-teome finish! sew Va. 
¢ ' 0 - 7 ian. tr. & end runs like « perfect inspection 


ifau "Piles $1495 ‘a7 T , ‘ 
54 Ford $45 Dn. | ‘51 -Chevrolet . $5 Dn. sis canter dea 48 Kaiser 


Custemiine V-8 4-deer sedan. ish. 4-dr. VS. heater 
Tutene Dbieck and white fully a a A ey —— $59 A 5 new $95 
) Box 6242 n a1 } drives tthe «a dream Va. Inepection. 
ten, D . ] ing i) RA _ tube! whit : rans perfect. . 
ea “MERC. AOS oF best oer, JU, B-3707. 6-30 53 Mercury . | “51 Ford $5 Dn. : 
, t-deor, Leaded. eu {-deor Sedan Custemline V-8 50 Others Equally As Clean and Priced Correspondingly io 
lo Mercomatic. w.-w. tires. Leoks R A steal aft 


MONTEREY es pile seen SERVICEMEN WELCOME STEWART BUICK 
he be? ‘sass: $195 DOWN ar RM. | w mile cage. $12 100° call | Many others te cheese from. 1525 WILSON BLYD.. ARLINGTON 


viel CH Pa ER-PLYMOUTH | fini? Toes no oes ~ | JA. 5-7350 Closed Sund JA. 5-7351 
a Wee eo Be == 1955 == | LISH-KEEFE MOTORS, INC. | | Raleassotceriuneenerenen 
: + 310 Florida Ave. N.E. Li. 40601 

Open Daily 9-9, Suan. 10 A.M. te 5 P.M. i" 


Cc 
no ver s' ee 


. Bi ak acs | MILLER MOTOR Co. thease. 


wilemEn “cunyst a SE 0TH | | A. 2376 All Bedy Styles 
e708 


oat * — { f 

| New bers | ton dr Sess NESEY — SS S-de “6 oa “rt Mode 
: “GI + 

P! ymoyth 53 cony. $900 gvecsEsye. radio eater. an Ly linder 


Bu ic« 52> - tar : ; 

Sa te Eb eee eee Auto City, Inc 

nh p 4- Cadillac BOY. MOT rs 

‘ . 50. Palis TOR "SALES *a4 f ° 

~ i ; Doors 
h De nouth a : L7)7 Bf : HO. 2-0008 
wood Ave bod Lee Ke? 35. 32-2300 | wry © Convertibles 
_* 

: . 


——- 


= 


— 


rr 


= “= Ss Se 


SOBGE— Sport Coupes 
An - Largest "TD's Town! it Station Wagons 
ADE P nif TM c Official | 
ARC ibe On se TF 1250 d oo ‘Sold yo =~ Complete Service Department. Station wagon 
nn Rw RA. 3 nan on warranty and new car fi- woodwork and refinishing our specialty 
me nae 1500 Models nancing— 
~ Just traded in u ew MG~- ‘ 
Ls z B. Ls ars Heal *) vs. Mo st one-|\f Tf you are looking for a ' 


Real Deal for a next-to-new * | We Pay Top Price for 
cor, be sure to see these | Your Foreign Car 


priced from 


$1495 1] 'S6 Ford ‘62 Lincoln ... $996 


D. Ww Cc Vieteria. fully eauioped Capri i-deer 
olumpeia Pike Arlington LOW DOWN PAYMENTS 
A 


, , , 12te & K Sts. N.W. 
Balance Fay CMAC Terma|}} ‘36 Ponting, - $1906 'S2 Cadillac ....$1396 


ie OPEN 9 ‘TIL 9 
‘54 M 1495 '55 Austin Healey $2295 
wap yg Poy eg 4 BA me OE ets age SI IIIA II III III AA IAIN. 


ims 0, 2-750Qamel || 4.Fere..;- - ‘55 Triumph .. $2095 OI IO tk 


4-deer custemiline, TR ? Excellent Fondition. 


7 


Authorized Foreign Car Dealer 


= 


- ~~ 


Ne Cash Needed 
On Approved Credit 


For Credit Approval Call 


IRV MARTIN 
NA, 8-4455 


eee ee ee 
nt teeeatitas nanndiidieniaeieeninemall 


Lal 


en 


*) poze : 7 F aE Sats 
BS “FORD bea aiid 655 Hilten'n Husky $995 No Cash Needed With Good Credit 


Servicemen Vietorte aoe adhe 
CONVERTIBLE oe ail 
$199 DOWN 1955 Special ‘53 Plymouth .. ‘OS Jaguar $1695 Financing sesume tor Tetianes Personnel 


6-Geer aden Ceoune. excetient cenditien. and Out-of-Towners. 


CHEV. 1954 "63 Chevrolet . ‘51 Consul . $695 For Credit Approval Call 


7, 
if 


equip. with 
tic. 100 


Finance 
Company 


‘54 Merc. 
Monterey 


Hardtop, Mercomatic, “8”. Sold as is. Car No. 1986 
A great value 


Belair hardtes. 


er ver easy month "pan meni For 
ae ee on a-dr, “6 6", Arctic white, * 4-deor. Fully eauipped cellent condition. ° 
ul. 4- 2396 op 


and tubeless tires. Monterey hard top, fully 


Sold as is. equipped. Sold as is. 
P > 9451 Georgia Ave. *,.””" BILL ROSS 


7400 Georgia Ave. N.W. 


Open Daily 9 ‘til 9 
TPP TT TTT TTT TTT TTT — SSS 


1953 1955 
FORD Ford 


r. "6", A good buy. Sold as is. 2-Dr. Sedan "6". Sold As Is. Stock No. 1775. 


aA 


FULL 
$7850 fe >875 rice 
Price NO CASH NEEDED 
$S DOWN with good credit. Call now 
for credit approval. 
with good credit. Call now Military Personnel and 
for credit approval. Out-of-Towners Financed. 
Neo cars to dealers. 


AndyAdams|| Andy Kelly 


ea Es 1438 toial price. | 9720 GEORGIA AVE. N.W. 129 K ST. ¥.W. 
SYLE MOTOR SALES.S 
jaune oe ses| TU. 2-3515 || ME, 8-2674 


cond } ew res 
of 7-85 fier § 


SERVICEMEN DEPENDABLE 
SPECIAL 


1954 
Chevrolet 


2-Door "6" Sedan. Sold as is 


$875 Total 


NO CASH NEEDED 


Subject to Credit Approval 


USED CARS 


Fer many rears, as Washington's eldest Chevrolet Dealer. we 
have been headquarters fer fine quality, guaranteed used care 


Take Over Payments 
ATTENTION: 


Financing arranged for Military Personnel 
and out-of-towners 


For credit approval call 


TU. 2-4200 
Dick Williams |: BILL ROSS 


1731 Bladensburg Rd. N.E. 7400 Georgia Ave. N.W. 


Open Daily 9 ’til 9 Open Daily 9 ‘til 9 
— | EA KKKKKKKEKKKEKKKKKK 


No Cash Needed Subject to Credit Approval 
ATTENTION 


Financing arranged for Military Personnel 
and Out-of-Towners. 


—We give you Connectiont Ave. quality ot Sebuerban Prices 


‘SS Mercury ..$2195| ‘SS Mercury.. $1895 
$375 FULC Montclair sates OM) Lod red, 2-doer, a 7 $8 b.. 

PRICE Ome of cur finest OK used cars. | maculate throughout. 
Car Ne, 352. 


Ne Cash Needed ‘53 Buick ... .$1295 
With Geed Credit ‘53 Chevrolet . $795 se . Riviers Hardtep; crer 


CALL NOW FOR oo pee oe bh 2. r yeu ‘as , wee at L~] bey. 


CREDIT APPROV ) A. MR Ee -® 8 


‘ k 95 
MES 82674 (14 35 Ferd... $1695 52. Studeba ae ee 
° bine: ‘ae Tudor: ivory x. arives tammacniate Renter” ove ist- 
Military Personnel and low *. Pee ean buy tpis 1004 . contiien | througnest 
Out-of-Lewners Financed 383. with confidence. Car Ne. buyer. Car Ne. 387. 
ne aes ip Camere 1130 CONN. AVE. N.W. 
(Opposite Mayflower Hotel) 
A y Ke y Visit Our Two Used Car Lots: 18th St. Between L and M 
Fisy GMAC Terms 
129 K ST. H.W. RE. 7-7887 “Open TH PM. 


+ _ 


Ne Cash Needed 
On Appreved Credit 
For Credit Approval Call 


IRV MARTIN 
NA. 8-4455 


12th & K Sts. N.W. 
OPEN 9 ‘TIL 9 


lalate lalalalolelelalelolelale 


WEA A OO OO a OOO Ok 


For credit approval call 


LI. 6-3141 


* 


Wh a OE 


’ 


PAIK IIIA KIKI KIKI IEEE |; 


Serer rere 
PPI IIIA AAAI IAAI IIIA AAA AIA AAP AAA AAAAADS 


tkkkk 


‘ 


P. ik 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
ae Tuesday, June 12, 1956 


DICK TRACY 


The DISTRICT LINE By Bill Gold 


All in a Day’s Work 


For a Bus Jockey 


“OUR BUS was on its way 
down H st. ne. during the 
rush hour this morning,” 
wrstes aSargeret FE. Wormser 

of 2730 74th 
ave. Kent 
Village. “At 
one intersec- 
tion, when 
we pulled 
into the bus 
stop, we 
were behind 
a big soft- 
drink truck 
that appar- 


least that was what our driv- 
er thought. 

“But when the light 
changed and everybody 
else began to move for- 
ward, the soft drihk truck 
remained stationary. It was 
parked there. Our driver 
looked behind him; . an- 
other bus had pulled in 
a scant foot behind us. We 
were trapped. 

“It's ne easy matter to ma- 
neuver a huge bus out of a 
spot like that, especially’ in 
heavy traffic. But our driver 
finally got a chance to edge 
into the adjoining lane, and 


THE FUTILITY OF A LIFE OF 


BAND. 
CRIME gt BE ey NOW 
OBVIOUS TO 


soft-drink touch, purpose. | 
fully extracted a bottle of | 
soda pop from a case, re- 
turned to the bus, plopped 
the bottle down in front of 
him like a captured trophy, 
and drove off with a con- 
tented smile on his face—to 
the accompanime nt of 
laughter and applause from 
his passengers.” 

The truck driver was guilty 
of something more than 


STUCK IN LOOPS 
INSIDE HIS PANTS 


By Chester Gould 


“thoughtlessness.” The law REX 


states very plainly that “no 
person shall stop, stand or 
park a vehicle other than a | 
bus in. a bus stop.” 

I have seen the regulation 
violated hundreds of times, 


——J I THINK YOURE 
A PRACTICAL MAN 
MZ. BARKER / 
YOU WOULON'T 
LIKE THE 


4 NEIL is RESPONSIBLE cok 
MY BEING BLIND! PES TEND 
YOU WERE ON THE JURY --- AND 
YOU HEARD ME TELL THE COvuRT 
THAT MY HUSBAND LEFT ME 


SUPPOSE I REFUSE \ 


TO PAY YOU OFF LILA? rs 


somehow managed to extri- 
cate his vehicle from the 
trap. 
“It was obvious that he was 
seething at the truck driver's 
* thoughtlessness, but ne said 
| nothing. 
| “As we pulled alongside 
the truck, the light was 
green, and I thought we'd go 
on through. But our driver 
stopped abreast of the truck. 
“Let me out, please,” he 
said to the standees up front. 
They fell back and made a 
path for him, and an expect 
ant hush fell over the pas 
sengers. Somebody, they sus- 
pected, was about to get 
punched in the nose. 
“Our driver got out of 
his bus, strode over to the 


Bill ia ently was in 
Gs the right- 


hand lane preparatory to 
making a right turn. Or at 


PUBLICITY / 


ALONE --- WHILE HE 
ESCORTED MISS GALE --- Jf) 


but I have never seen a 
trucker get a ticket for violat- 
ing it. 

Similarly, trucks are per 
mitted to stop in “loading | 
zones” only during the length | 
of time required for the “ex- | 
peditious” unloading and de- 
livery of materials, or the 
pickup and loading of same. | 
And when no loading zone 
is available, trucks may park 
abreast (double) only while >. 
“actually engaged” in load- | _— PF 
ing or unloading freight: “de- — — 
livery” is not included in this | MARY WORTH © 
privilege. — ‘Ss ' 

Yet it is common practice | 
for truckers to use loading 
zones as private berthing 
spaces, and to be absent 
from their double-parked 
vehicles for long periods 
while deliveries are being 
made, orders written and in- 
voices checked. 

I do not know whether such 
practices are reasonable and | 
necessary in the public inter- 
est, and whether the law 
ought to be changed to legal- 
ize them. I do not know that | 
| In the existing regulations we | 
| have another example of laws 
| which do not mean what they | 
| Say, and apparently are -not | 
| Meant to be enforced 


cos 
| TODAY'S BIRTHDAYS 


Greetings to Prime Min. 
ister Anthony Eden, Allen V. 
| Astin, James J Wadsworth. 
George Harris, Gen. John R 
| Hodge. Arthur 8. Flemming. 
Rep. John W. Byrnes and 
Rep. Robert E. Jones Jr 
cos 
GIVE-AWAYS 
Attractive kittens, used to 

| Outdoors and living with a 
~ $5 inclosed for Chil- 
dren's Hospital (Kenmore 
8-7081). Healthy, playful pup- 

| ples: $1 inclosed for Chil- 
dren’s Hospital (Lockwood 
40546). Housebroken black 
ee pup; $1 inciosed for 
Children’s Hospital (Oliver 
| 20915). Affectionate, part- | 
Siamese kitten; $1 inclosed 
| cot Children’s Hospital (Lin- 
coln 44939). Cute, lively kit- 
tens; $1 inclosed for Chil- 
dren's Hospital (Juniper | 
5-3860). Attractive kittens: $1 | 
inclosed for Children’s Hos- | 
| pital (Jackson 8-0426). Female | 
| Puppies; $1 inclosed for 
| Children’s Hospital (Olympic 
| 70306). Part-Persian calico 
kittens: $1 inclosed for Chil- 
dren’s Hospital (Union 4-2992, 
evenings). Healthy puppies; 
| $1 inclosed for Children’s 
| Hospital (Kellogg  7-1791) 
Pure white female cat 
(Olympic 9-8709). Darling 
kittens (Lincoln 3-9127). 


_— 


ees 
“Hoven ey 


ey. Bet 


’ 


-— 
* 
a 


° NGF 
a 


y Yi YL 


a; 
+ ad 
4 A 


— 
| 


| [LM AFRAID SKYE DID 
‘FIND JENNINGS perry 
Out L++- THOUGH SHE 
‘SAID SHE W ig 
HAPPY! 1s 


E MAN SHE WAS | os 
i WAS A STRANG 


*+ TALL ° TANN _ . 


VING 


JUST WHAT DID YOU ) « 


OMETHING ABOUT 
IMEAR MY WIFE SAY, 


F - NG FED UP WITH 
THIS TOWN, MARTY+-ANOD 


\ WANT NG TOGEF BACK 


we ROADWAY - 


: 


a 
I 


S 
S 


———— 


| LONG SAM By Al Capp and Bob Lubbers — 


NOTICE SHES GOT HEROWN ) 


CORSAGE, KID. NO PROBLEM 
THERE. AN HERES FIVE BUCKS 
FOR HER SHARE O' TH’ CAB 
FARE. NO PROBLEM 

THERE ernec 27 


/ 1 -(CWOLE I) - STUFFED HER ) 
WITH SUCH A FINE DINNER — 
SHE WONT WANT NOTHIN’ 

TO GAT FOR A WEEK I 


PRACTICAL LAB COURSES 
TEEN-AGE DAY CLASSES 
EVENING CLASSES FOR ADULTS 
ALSO TYPING FOR TEENAGERS AND ADULTS. ABC 
SHORTHAND. 6 WKS. DAY, 12 WKS. EVE. GREGG SHORT. 


HAND, & WKS. DAY, 16 WKS. EVE. MACHINE SHORTHAND, 
1 YEAR COURSE 


TEMPLE SCHOOL 


1358 se dle NAS - "32558 | 


‘7 Be ° 
> > 
PP ad 


mm « 


RAS Uae 


JACK 


SMILIN’ 
— 


Why ONLY MET MR, 
SMILIN’ JACK MARTIN 
YESTERDAY... WHAT i6 ALL 
wis? YoU LOOK LIKE 
SMILIN' JACK, Too | 


l— AM SMILIN' JACK 
WS Guy iS AN MPosToR- 
A HOT CHECK ARTIGT-- 


Se é 
° - A! 


stenctypists earn 30% 


a avr 
STENOTYDE 
<I% 

more than mort office 
workers. Tuition $5 wkly. 


TEMPLE SCHOOL 


1338 G ST. MW WA. 8-3258 


AT PLANET APPLIANCES « 
MAKE PLANET YOUR “BUY” WORD FOR SAVINGS! 


LOWEST PRICE EVER 1956 7.5 AMP. 16 6 


AIR CONDITIONER 
Reg. $399.95 1956 Casement 7.5 Amp. 
$188 } 


1 TON AIR HRYSLER A 
CONDITIONER an conpmonat +219 
ADMIRAL % H.P. FLUSH MOUNT $ 

AIR CONDITIONER 147 


TOP BRAND $88 21 oe TV $129 


20 ~ TV 
TABLE MODEL 


AlL WOOO CONSOLE 
TERRIFIC VALUE! FAMOUS WAKESQQ 
21” TV TABLE MODELS. 


v7-inch TV *77 
= 
$139, 
Retrigerator +126 Refrigerator 
DON'T MISS THIS! REGULAR * $239.95 
10 Cu. Ft. Refrigerator 


139 


UPRIGHT FREEZER 159 
GAS AND ELECTRIC RANGES 


BELOW WHOLESALE COST! 


NEW IN CRATES! Tour 
WHIRLPOOL SUPREME © NORGE © MAYTAG 


AUTOMATIC WASHERS 1Q9 
aside 967| wiiie £99 
NEW, TERRIFIC BARGAIN. +96 


WASHER 
NORGE ELECTRIC DRYER 
$36, 5 


LEARN TO DRIVE 


IN A WEEK 
Full Pewer er Conventional 
I Block from Traffic Bureau 


AADTA DRIVING SCHOOL 
We Cali for YouD. C.. Mé. and Vea 
Phene § AM.—9 F.M. Any Day 


> ME. 8-1050 <—— 


By Dale Messick 


SO, COMIN’ BACK FROM THE ney MAY I HELP YOU'RE NOT KIDOIN: Sister! 

HOSPITAL I DECIDED TO LOOK ( i667) I'LL SURE NEED IT TO GET 

AROUND IN SOME OF THEM Ni THIS HERE MESS 

SWELL STORES ON ’ 
THE AVENUE 


Today’s Crossword Puzzle 
ACROSS 


1England’s 45 Agtress 
Austen Munson 
| 5Chief seat of 46 Blue-pencil 


culture 49 Sterne’s 
SPECIAL INDOOR TELEVISION 
ANTENNA 


I AINT DUMB. SEE? 
WHEN MY OWN BROTHER 
GOES ALL SOUPY OVER 

A FRILLY LITTLE NURSE 

L GET THE TIP RIGHT OFF -- 


Solution te Yesterday's Purzzia 


Fi. ad 
Mi 0 
U 
- 


' 
c 
[ 
Reg. $399.95 


PHILCO 21” 


CONSOLE 


10 Ex-champ Tristram 


51 French 
14 Religious 


' school 
picture 53 Little bite 
15 Strict 


55 Follows 
16 Fairy-tale orders 
villian 


56 Son of Noah 
17 Courage 


38 Truth- 
18 Bordered 


stretchers 
60 Ruined city, 
19 Russ. river Asia Minor 
20 Pressed coast 
together 64 Elaine's 
22 Medieval home 
maiden 68 Fragrance 
24 Muddle 
26 Long Island 


Reg. $228.95 


EMERSON 21° 


Swivel Base Console 


FREE with purchase of any TV 


299 


13 Cu. 


ADMIRAL Reg. $529.95 - 1955 


~ DIXIE DUGAN 


| } a / me 
OUR SUDDEN f-} LTTLS Boy's ;, 


meee OF H E WAS SAVED ! 4 


—ANO MEBBE BUT WITH ME AND 


TH KIO’S FATHER 


7 Chicken’s 
contribution 
8 Roped 
9Old Norse 
classics 
10 Ital. wniver- 
sity city. 
11 Time 
periods 
12Sea bird 
13 Tangible 
21 Visionary 
, 23 A periodi- 
cal: abbr. 
25 Implicate 
27 To urge 
28 Lacking 
lucre 
29 Grotesque 
— 31 Seed 
ee covering 
33 Minus 
company 
34 Chicago 
adjective 


5 rr 
- 


35 Hinders 

37 Cut off 

39 Man's 
nickname 

43 Coffee re 
ceptable 

44 Rich, as 
pastry 

47 Site or 1943 
conference 

50 Release 

52 Take food 

54 Grands and 
uprights 

57 Fine 

59 Resource 

60 Biblical 
country 

61 Unused 

62 Ore deposit 

63 Rise up 

65 Safaritarget | 

66 Among 

67 Spreads hay 

70 Some 


69 Monies 
advanced 

71 Base for 
summer 
drink 

72 Soprano 
from Down 
Under 

73 Water 
traverser 

74 Emptiness 

75 A “has 

76 Appoint- 
ment 

77 Termini 


, 30 Josephine's 
title abbr. 

32 Nibbles 

36 Pert. to 
thought 

38 Hair deco- 
ration 

40 Came down 

41 Parakeet or 
kitten 

42 Shrine site 


DOWN 
4 Contest 
ticipant 
5 Belief 


6 Tricky 
question 


BARNEY GOOGLE 


FIDDLE-DEE-DEE- | 

I SEALED IT BACK | 
UP SO’S HE'LL 
NEVER IN THIS 

WIDE WORLD KNOW 
TH’ DIFFER’NCE 


1 Merry 
dances 

2 Land 
measure 

3 Black: Fr. 


| HOWDY, PIERRE-- 
A LETTER COME 
FER YE 


PAW # YE OUGHT 
TO BE ‘SHAMED OF 
YORESELF -- READIN’ 
PIERRE LOVAIR’S 


— 


, $] 4 49 |*? 95 EUREKA 


pyres 
“SPECIAL PURCHASE 


+ 5-PIECE DINETTE SET 


No Money Down! 


Yeur eld TY or appliance may 
exceed the dewn payment. 
U te me 


Park in Our Own Building! 


Planet pays your first 
hour's parking on 
purchases of $1.00 
or more. 


iL 


> 


Horoscope 


. %- ms & 
lable. st Jl ‘ 
. 

Look im the sect ion in which your is 7 he 

’ birthday comes and find what your out- y 
look is. according te Se stars, G . . 
Tuesday, June 1% on : 
. : ., ‘ : nd , . ’ to APRII 20 Ar ion)... en 

* So d we have little —\ ee in vday 

ing deal. Mo t is AUG 
0 
—_ rate wilt 


valuable met! he confidence 


0Gs and “e 
_ Saas © manage 


new and rity lest you 
terials ave in your 


Re ax » 
' EC 


2 to JULY 23 ‘Cancer)— | * Sasitter 
© and creative ability should ar 


py * 


"St goin a hurry... 
te Ge- 

pain stops ftasti! 
* Dr. Scholl's Zine-pade 
~ mot only stop pain is 


im- @ jiffy... fommove 
corns one of the 


: an 
ough Les : tention 


JAN 20 (Capricorn )<-Be- 
1@L 0 Pits <= 
cheer 
as operat ive where you should 
ou ogress your ove 
ar. teres In ee time, 
JAN 21 to FEB i9 Kevartus) 
: sty e important r r 
tent ion. you Wii 


a a bul 
your over 
humor a willing 
th ™ aa aw 


too comane ae. 
others. Today needs 


i\WAii mm: a na N.W.A 


| ONE BLOCK 


ticularly 


artistic talents will 
pecially favorable period for sma 


APRIL ar to MAY 21 (Taurus)~-This i eement, original ideas. menta! 
SEPT. 24 to 


m 
work 
and productive See inen) Ge ful 
tasks with as much con. , Fe 


after difficul 


ch 
= ‘fine covabiil itiees full scope 
AY 22 lt 21 (Gemini—Just 
or 


oe ‘tay to ex your ouick wit and 
unusual talen sa) wr on ad- 
vertising end’ promoting sound 


fo 
” | aponsore ab 

‘ae orpio\— You | sible ac 

be your “soauteiters and progressiy¢ | (Coperi gh “4. King Features 

now but be careful not to gexec _ Syndicate, Inc.) 


bly careful, 
FROM THE AA WER HOTE?! OCT. 24 


= 
ae 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 

oes esdas wne i? - . 7 

TABLE-PADS:> | {ow to | Sees nae : 
| Rf K W nh ORPHAN ANNIE By Harold Gray 


I.) SEs BUT JUST 
By Dr. Theodore R. Van Dellen THE GIG BOY WAS SORE TH’ SAME, COLLAR JOHN« 

To the limit of space, ques. AT VIC KNEW AS MUCH Vic iD FEEL LOTS BETTER 
tions pertaining to the preven- | AS VIC WANTED YOU IF “IF YOU'D WALK SURE, 
tron of disease will be anewered. +t DEAD, ‘Tao « FOR aA PRICE -- HOME WITH ME —= JUNIOR = 
Personal replies will be made . - 
when return stamped envelope HAROLD ay 
is inclosed. Telephone inquiries —— a GRAYs / 
not accepted. Dr. Van Dellen Ds : : , 


c. 
will not make diagnosis or pre- 


WORKMANSHIP 


Smartly scribe for individual diseases. 


Heat and waterproof. Mirror Centerpiece ’ 2 Gf ab ww 
95 westuislii Gand wih every Tile CORONARY THROMBOSIS - Xx | 
uP grain or Pad order. GOOD REPORTS continue . | 4 
| a h 


tla, s/ . 
al desians to appear in medical journals 


Phone or write. Our representative will coll with semples ond on the new blood test for trans- 
measure your table free of charge. Phone calls taken dey or eve aminase. The test was known 
ning wp te 10 P.M. We make calls within 20 miles of Weshingten 


~ 
. 


fe, 


| 
} | 
=e 


more than 10 years ago. but “BLONDIE San =. 
UNITED TABLE PAD (77SSsIC Tit ‘ was so complicated it was not 


practical. Recently the pro . — DAGWOOD, PLEAS zr . RETEND YOU RE 


oo a cedure was simplified and is) |——-7 7 | AME “AS BEING RUDE | | CANS twiHe HaNosOMe 
i | (_1HEAR = 
422 Washington Bidg. . rapidly becoming a routine) | | ( —J) REAR | : : IM THE | 

| " : , , test for coronary thrombosis | ( THE SHIPPIP | 


4G 
and hepatitis. ROOM 
5 iT ie, ll | 


Es —eee 


| Transaminase is widely dis 
itributed in the heart and other , ro. co 
muscles and in the brain. liver. 


REPLACE THAT SLOW | and kidneys. When these tis 


sues are injured or die as a 
WATER HEATER result of inflammation or lack 
WITH A NEW FAST of circulation, a large amount 
of the enzyme is liberated into 
the blood 
The enzyme is measured in 
units and the normal range 
varies from five to 40. with an — 
ALCOA® ALLOY => average of 20. Following coro- LI'L ABNER 
AUTOMATIC GAS WATER HEATER nary thrombosis, the level in .<« 
the blood increases two to 20 (“AH PROMISED 49" Aid HATES 
SOLID a Seene from 100 to i AMiM MAA AHA/O, THIS LINGERIN & 
units ; ; , 
aan ~~ Some In 117 proved cases of coro (~WO SENSE TELLIN’ JHET AN HE'S GOMWA G-GOT ; 
TA sere thrombosis. the tant wal SWEET O“LD COOT AA? HAVE /7. RAIN ; ANYTHING STUFF TO 
Gait Comme Ged Gott thes positive in all but one patient MAINT GONNA DIE ZL OR SHINES?) THOSE X-RAYS OF T’MAKE IT QUICK -STIFFEN 
A a went @ in 82 per cent the readings HOWDY *" YOU | SAw Fr ‘ WHALES — 
mye aaa - were abnormally high. In an HERE ‘Tiss’ /* 
‘ other study of 207 coron ; tn 
Priced comparably to ordinary victims the siamenententn aaah 
Lined Steel Tank type. 


was above normal in all but 
10-year Warranty four. The test also 


may be 
Meir ’ ’ . » ty 7 

Easy Terms helpful in predicting the out 
come. One group of investiga 


inre helievesc that reaciings 
above 200 indicate an unfavor 


able outcome 
PLUMBING AND HEATING | She seeder ‘wenctiy rantiies 
ts peak hi 2 10 s atte 
2400 WISCONSIN AVE. N.W. © WO. 6-8501 |p. ak Within 24 hours after 


of pain in coronary 
Poole : naan. spnee — thrombosis, which means it 
MAN ee i “ ae must be done at the appropri , 
> x. ate timetgo be useful it will . eae, oF —an 


a oa not show. for example, that a J : 
7 ‘ a? a person had suffered a heart at THE PHANTOM 
y oneycu 4S , > m tack the year before never overlook an additional! 
<I ‘ 
id 


The test is not positive in chance for his contract, how TALLEST MAN \ |JUST WHAT | GAID THERES 


ay : TLE WOR! DF c TeeMil (ION 
2 angina pectoris In this condi ever remote sucn a contingency : > 7 IN THE WORLD! MONEY iN fi] M ut he 
1 ~ > ar ig tion the blood supply ‘so the may he That half 2 " vat : j NOW.WHAT © MAYBE? BUT fT TAKES 
. ii ' ‘ igi iVai is - y : iwi 7... 
2 7 m2 heart muscle is reduced during 1 ALLTHIS NERVE. HAVE YOU GO 
~~ e », i7 


het tae +h " > ' ‘ 
exertion and excitement. But ®t than nore $s a good 


re fm the old ticker is not damaged ®™°¥8" agage to carry through 
1 : “* : ’ +. _ ‘; . 
> Dy this temporarv decrease in 0 the lower fractions But a 
i, ) a circulation hence , point s sometimes reached 
>. - S _ 
, >, 


ine enzyme ' , 
. 7. ‘hy ’ > < ry? 
not released inta the blood where © iracuon so smali 


~ ] %3 On the other hand it ic not as to be equal, for practical 
always easy to tell the differ. PUTPOSes, to zero. One such 
. : oe ence between an anginal attack Case we presented to declarer 
’ = and a minor coronary throm. '" ‘@ay's hand. In an effort to 
: ~ 4  - 7 hy = ve ery »? . ; . 
Ruy Now — Sare Non , ; tS bos slight rise in ¢ "7 nerease fh pro pects Dy a hair 
7 : le nis problem ne’ LorTrew away oy om ee 
‘}* > nnd - . or the contract le contrac 
“+ =| . > u cates damage 
Drape 5 7 ‘ np ove I ae heart muscle . was reasonable enough 
* Al ’ . . 
. < In thie respect the tect ic North opened with one dia 
l pholstery Fabric a valuable means of determin ae and mast under the lim 
° ~ ing whether actual muscle dam- ° ~ ‘wo ewe 4 with ys 
, , nly overcatliec with one 
. age has occurred, calling for * 
Marke ith Original Price | : é eel ' ce Ree 
Every Yard M rk d W ’ £ “gr je bed rest. When the blood level "“* South refrained from 
... Deduct '4 ... See Yeur Savings! Every & of the enzyme i« not elevated ay an immediate jump 
‘ : : 1 f : temporizing 
— * Ee this type of treatment is not “""* ™ ‘#vor of a 
Yard Ist Quality From Famous Mills! — at : ee pmageelhs Raee se gy om 
or of : ior t¢ ’ ~ ti Y 
DRAPERY SLIPCOVER UPHOLSTERY : The use of the transaminase o oy » we ae re 
FARRIC © Nylon | cussed in a future article a cue bid of three clubs. Where- 
Fortisan © Highlight © Nylon Tapestry ex : upon North showed the ace of 
Highlight ® Linen Prints © Metallics | (COBPriams. TESS, Chicaso Tribu hearts. This was all that South 
. + 
Prints * Linen Tweed 
: . 
Plains Prints Tapestry ss West opéned the deuce of 
Textured * Plains Damask ae . at 
. : 
. 
. 


4 
: 


ra 


Linen & Linen na TOMORROW: Early therap) wanted to hear for the*purpose 
Tweed | fo emeeekh detects of getting to slam 
' ; : ‘. 


hearts eclarer i 
Solids Solids Boucle eal and to declarer it ap 


. . , , Matelasse 2 A ca peared inat reliance would 
Antique Satins Antique Satins Nubby & SS . (yeh — ~*~? have to be placed on an even 


Linens Stripes Textured break of the outstanding dia 


ae i Price @ON BRIDGE) eas discard for his. small 
FREE HOME ESTIMATES 


club 
in MD., VA. & DOD. C. 
Call Special Low Prices 
DE oS) 237) Custom Fitted 4& Made 
ee DRAPERIES 
All Fabrics Now ‘2 Pricel s1IPCOVERS 
You Must Save! UPHOLSTERING 


; North-South vulnerable Besson ot he had ant 
. ‘ 5 wig tnat n na 10 ' — 
North deals L.2g ~ : ‘ 7 d : A f . " abe GEE so 2 
iose piayt bOV ron . 
NORTH jummy on the “one chance in By Jimmie Hatle 
+1) " ‘ . hie ver ° ‘““ _— _ 
S milion that East bed ovel Portraits , , “MOTOR SOUNDS LIKE A CONCRETE 
called with a jack zh suit arm ‘ = - 
: g MIXER-REAR END RUMBLES L! ut 
that West was leading from the > x & KUMBLES LIKE 


: ° ING LLe — * cess 
king, but East won with the By James J. Metcalfe | \ uae 0 LS IN REVERS rg 


} 


reer teer oo te ie | ool eae 


ae 


—" ....." 
2 


sk. eS SS SS De DS 


; na ; ‘ + “ > a ’ amond HAVE 1° GO UP HILLS IN REVERSE ~- 
KIT mM i} lie I ; ~- “lll ae a ha ’ 
and just sat.it out until he took | Dreamer MANAGER OF BUNGLE SSO URTER DOU AS We 


U : | \ = SLIP AWFELIL @AD>-- 
pholsterers the setting trick in clubs. M # BRAKES y 
A dreamer is a person ITORS, HEARS NOTHING ; 


’ % : 9! | 
’ and Be ’ When declarer took the “one . oe in * BUT TALES OF WwoE ! —<- , 
Orel Cu ~ see chance in a million.” he gave who... is wishing in his + lore cA! 
Decorators o lup a very good ¢ hance to n mind... For some success ALL DAY LONG-++> : lh VAgtry 
e - a ‘raner techniaue | Or happiness... That he é 2 Ge eS Lom 
1954 Calvert St., N.W., DEcatur 2-8371 we wn ogee . ge Eines nee: would like to find... He EA ; a 
Open ‘til 9 PM. Tuesday, Thursday & Friday ‘ui 9 PM, ea oe yo. coe pb 7 he ‘dia may be one who dissipates : 
Saturday “ul 6 PA ea an rs ‘ ns lia. 
we 1m # om “s monds are then tried and when ye eaten anes te ob 
East shows out on the third ae. . that . The wind will 
rdund the last diamond is 29 
MEN OF LIBERTY—N 1. Yr ~ Fruffed by deciarer. The queen rn ones wh ne ae may Vt, : be 
- ant a - i—~ —— + of hearts gives the lead to East , Reflect intense ambi- O26 EO GLAD 
| who must commit suicide as he tien To serve him as te ~ YOURE HOME~THE UPSTAIRS 
Opening lead Tw 0 of hearts. leads from the king of clubs, + stimulant _« « IW seek- And WHEN HE FINALLY > Lond te Ruane nin Gate 
The resourceful player will| copyrient, 1956, Chicago Tribune : Th GOES HOME “TO HIS Fy , S RAIS 
) ing recognition .. ere 1 WE WATER HEATERS LEAKING 
is the wealthy dreamer LITTLE HONEYGBUN, | 5 \ SUNIOR RAN Away AGAIN-MY 
who... Has nothin else WHAT DOES HE HEARP F ; v4 SCIATICA IS WORSE LAN 
.. » And who is 
B& PER. time YOU GUESSED IT.’ MORE | 6 «| 2) SEVER AND MY MOTHER'S Aut 
ais | ‘ j Ci Jen, BEEN EVICTEO:--- 
In search of something WOE ALL THROUGH : - | Bae 


i Let 


6 spades 


STEEL BUILDINGS WHICH MEET YOUR NEED. few... And then there | THE NIGHT+++ 


COMMERCIAL OR RESIDENTIAL Gu hooey wae Spots. . | 
AT A PRICE YOU CAN AFFORD Who soneet Dew a ¢ 
Karhome cause he is in love 24)\ 


wishful dreams Ay” 
Copyr ent. 1936. F 


prise : 4 ants fr ed ae , d r zx : J Ry. = 
any sire with or : * tee. ENO FEATURES SYWOICATE. 


iain 


nuithout room 
att x hed 


: hit ah | THE MOUNTAIN BOYS 
Prices of Complete ie : 


Units Starting at 


Ohey Were Having aB alll THE BEACH potiaas 


You Have Always Wanted . 
In 1777, George Rogers Clark led a handful of men through the ee, 


backwoods wilderness of Illinois to capture the English outpost 

of Fort Kaskaskia. Clark and his men gained entrance to the s GARAGES & WORKSHOPS 
fort by means of a captured soldier and a back gate. The English a“ 

were enjoying @ gala bahat the time, wholly unaware that the 
Americans were so close at hand. Within a matter of minutes, the 
fort, the garrison and the British Commander were captured 
without a shot being fired! An unexpected emergency may be just 
around the corner for almost anyone, anytime. Prepare now for . 
financial emergencies by opening a savings account at Liberty MULTIPLE COMMERCIAL 
Building Association, where your deposits earn attractive twice- FARM cy UTILITY BLDG. BUILDINGS 


yearly dividends and your account is insured up to $10,000 


#% VERSATILE, available in any size % ATTRACTIVE 
all steel clapboard effect % PERMANENT, no main- 


é iL LI BE RTY tenance, cracking, rusting or peeling. 
o,- ~¢ Erection can be arranged if desired 
BUILDING ASSOCIATION (iim: Je agro acon pec. 6-12 


eo : MANUFACTURING ~ ma ns 5, eee: Soe 
A SAVINGS INSTITUTION <a PIEDMON AND SUPPLY CO. \\S ed —— 


| _ Plant Located in Arlington Did en HEAR ; j e “4h don’ : be 4 sins ihe caine 
© $7. 3-2200 DAY NIGHT or DAY, “Did you ever even of a cowboy sleepin Ah dont reckon you can turn down goin to thy , 
gh pei: eee frie lt OT. 4-9486 in pajamas? Huh? Did you? Huh?” boys, seein” it's a formal invitation : 
, & 


: : me rT ’ 
ro ay ere yet ne entrees tie Toney rte Oe hl ah gee Tae eee eee tees? RP Repe Raging gy 


1) | 


THE WASHINGTON POST end TIMES. HERALD 1, 
7 aR Twesder, June 12, 1956 ene 
JUDGE PARKER | rs 


By Paul Nichols __ 
WE'LL BE BACK IN THE 


ae wl Vy. AI? PRONE VES. 

¥ THANKS FOR EVERY. OP WATTS ‘TELL Wu ) me ROSTER?! 
CITY TOMORROW MRS. FOSTER’ ING, TU "f | TO GET OVER HERE 

CALL WE IE THERES ANYTHING / ...AN IMMEDIATELY “ 


In. Greater Washington... 


By Milt Caniff ~ 


More people enjoy ee 
Seales ae than any = = Tag, bamaceo, muawes panac, apsar | | > Rat tt OSTERS UST ND weet ene 


, |S @or We CANOPY UKAMaMeD’ F RectoNse faam 

N BECROWSE = ic. PW HITTING THE BUTTON’ THE OTHER PLOT 

, : A@ 6 AIRPLANE 

t it se [OR SS 


DOWN - DOWN - 
CPOWN... 


JOE PALOOKA | 


7 
Mh . : FOKY DONT 


C'MON FOXY - CIRCLE 


STAND A TO “SG LEFT... 


EEN MEEOS IS MANAGER'S PLEAS 
AND MOVES "DO STEVES LEFT... AND 
CHANCE... Me Te wim UP RUNS SMACK INTO A DEVASTATING 
OION'T TRAIN “OLD On * r 2 

T'eraeT A y) onl 


am porn rn 


it 


eee 
AFL 
“van? 


and right now 
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an ae a+ a a a | . | 
wwe time owmew s teaeet 4) OOP High Command Sper tender, Yhersday ‘end 


WE DON’T WANT ANYTHING AQ FIRST WATCH! | | 
Age 


rons Late DATE’? Jie A NLS ° | tes ‘ti 
1 + Examines Stra tegy BS Opin 6:00 


By Drew Pearson STORES OPEN AT 9:00 A.M. 
The Republican high com-|years.” But he told New Eng’ 

‘mand has been doing some no f eaaes tl cae ae al » y 
worried overhauling of strat-/SO™ prociet te lide epen of ¢ 
| ; heart patient. 
egy as a result of the Presi- ec inger S 
dent's sudden ges Hectic Day 
iliness.. What @ | 


Sip KIRBY -_— fie” edieen | Another point emphasized by 


; an} . Dr. Levine was that any excite- : 
’ ’ l] is dif. m 
| Sars hh vey Ri By F . aeutt to. os a ment which causes a speed-up | leadqual fel S fo! 
, say. : 
5 . | . I DONT REMEMBER (TH See 


The Washington Merry-Go-Round | THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES aces 


Tuesdey, June 12, 1956 


; 
| 
Lt MIDE THAT BLIND 

COLT TONIGHT, MISS LEEDS, 

AND 1 PROMISE YOU NO 

ONE WILL FIND HIM IN 
TREMBLING Swamp’ 

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ly possible : > \damaging.” 


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\ amas r36ere It happens that the day the Do-lt-You rself 


politicians, President suffered his latest at- 


| tack was especially nerve-rack- 
iz ‘ing. In it he was forced literally 
_ pledge _ Pearson to eat his own words about ar Wa re 
reexamine his health and/neutralism made at a press con- 
| ’ i OBR wy, 
~~ 


withdraw from the race before) ference the day before. . 
the San Francisco rer Ike’s off-the-cuff statement = 
Also important is a move Dy | ? . 
party strategists to drop Vice | S¥™pathizing ‘with other na- | 
President Nixon. Despite the | tions which failed to join in alli- * 
‘White House blessing given|ances with big military powers 
. en ee vas Few _. |Nixon last month, some — (such as the United States) | 
ee AAA ing By Willard top command have not en , 
MOON MULLINS y ‘hoppy about it, still feel that)°Towght amazed queries andj 
STEP ON IT, UNCLE WILLIE! | | the Vice Presidential candidate frenzied protests from such’) 
KNOW HOW CRANKY will be almost.as important as|stanch allies as Pakistan afd); 
1 GETS WHEN WETE | the candidate for President. ithe Philippines, plus word that 


While it r~ nine 4, 11¥ it might completely end the ef-\' 
hushed up in the White Mouse, 'r.-tiveness of the Adenauer 
the President suffered another regime in Germany. ; ) 


attack, though not a long one, : 

‘at a stag dinner in early}, 35 State Bosadenan pte ed 

March, immediately after he ) heeti pent 

announced he would run again. |°*¥et#! hectic hours Grafting s 
Attacks of acute indigestion sagem a he pce i 

ee . br S possidie sai e President 

a yong ing datine! the United States hadn't, | : me 
ower fof some time, meant what he actually said. It S g Bo F 

‘ : back to 1949 when he had to was a humiliating statement to’ n e w encin 

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“4 tee «2 

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“a J suit of inflammation of the but the alternative was to lose 4 Look At These Low, Low Prices! 
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en a ——_———— |occurred immediately after he On top of this came word 3 

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_. |'mara of the Providence (R. |! 
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| Om the same night that Dr 
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VES \ | a 


iy WASHINGTON POST ond TIMES HERALD 


Tuesday, June 12,1956. » 


ee 


DR. FRANK N. D. BUCHMAN 


Dr. Frank N. D. Buchman one yeor ago from Washington launched the Moral Re-Armament World Mission with 
the ideological play “The Vanishing Island” to thirty countries of Asia, Africa and Evrope. 

He himself has just visited Japan, Taiwan, The Philippines, Vietnam, Thailand and Burma at the invitation of 
the heads of government of those countries: Within the past month the Foreign Minister of Japan hes decoroted 
Dr. Buchman with the Order of the Rising Sun, in Taiwan he has been honored with the Grand Cordon of the Bril- 
liant Star of the Republic of China, in Thailand the Prime Minister on behalf of His Majesty the King has conferred 
on him the Knighthood of the Grand Cross of the Most Noble Order of the Crown of Thailand, in The Philip- 
pines President Magsaysay has awarded him the Legion of Honor and Gold Medal. This world broadcast on the 
occasion of Dr. Buchman's seventy-eighth birthday hes been carried widely by press and radio to notions on all 


five continents. 


TRANGE things are happening in the land. A new per> 

spective is being revealed. Old concepts are breaking 
down. Democracy is on the defensive. Armaments no longer 
guarantee security. Pacts lose their purpose as new forces 
arise. Old loyalties break down in the face of new emergen- 
cies. The new alignment in the world is between the nations 
who think and the nations that will not think. 


Thé united thought of a nation with a purpose is the great- 
est force in history. An idea invades without the formality of 
declaring war. It makes men prisoner without firing a shot 
and captures countries while parliaments are still debating. 
It cannot be stopped by weapons alone. It cangot be deflected 
merely by economic aid. It can be redirected only by a better 
idea, a stronger purpose and more dedicated living by leaders 
and by led. 


Plans alone are not enough. The trouble with many of the 

is they do not think adequately. They think of plans 

not of what is essential if a bond is to be built between 

East and West, between black and white, between rich nations 

and poor. They do not think of thanging the motives of men; 

or changing the purposes for which men and nations live. It 
takes an ideology to do that. 


A Norwegian trade union leader told political and indus- 
trial leaders of his nation recently, “Moral Re-Armament's 
job is to arm statesmen and peoples with an ideology that 
makes it possible for them to see what is Pappening in the 
world. Democracies are faltering because they do not have 
the ideological fuel they need. Many of our statesmen are 
suffering from a very advanced stage of ideolagical under- 


That is why nations without an ideology are being out- 
thought by those with one, and why men who have « superior 
ideology are succeeding where both Communism and non- 
Communism fail. A superior ideology is multiplying a new 
type of man with new motives—men who are solving the 
difficulties. 


One of the largest newspapers in Japan wrote of my 
visit that I had arrived in Tokyo at a critical time. The 
was in a turmoil of deadlock and seemingly irreconcila 
division. Each member took endless time to walk up 
cast his ballot. They called it the ‘cow's walk.” It frusera 
and infuriated. Sleep and tempers were short. A new factor 
was needed. Leaders of Government and Opposition arrang- 
ed a lunch id the Diet for me and the friends with me, men 
and women who live an ideology that unites, Said members 
of the Government and Opposition afterwards, “It was a 
miracle. You brought sanity where there was insanity. A 
solution was found. There was no riot. We found a way to 
solve our problem not on the basis of a party's will, but on 
what was right.” 


Now: it wasn't me. I didn’t do it. It was the power of an 
ideology to change the thinking of men and women of the 
Diet. At the root of our problems are people. With a superior 
ideology people can be changed. 


Says a leading banker, a recent Japanese Ambassador in 
Washington, “Moral Re-Armament is the greatest force in 
the moral and spiritual reconstruction of postwar Japan.” 
And the Prime Minister wrote in the press, “As I face the 
scene in the Diet I cannot but long that the spirit of Moral 
Re-Armament would permeate the lives of every single mem- 
ber of the Diet. When the people of Japan and of the world 
live the spirit of MRA, real peace will come.” 


When I landed in Manila I was greeted by a large group 
men, workers from the docks with huge placards, ‘“Wel- 
ame Moral Re-Armament. Workers Unite the World.” It 
was an unempected welcome, but it was the vital voice of 
those workers who contro! the lifeline of nations from Ma- 
pila to London, from Hamburg to Sydney, from New York 
Yokohama, — | 


The next morning one of their leaders breakfasted with 

us at the President's table. President Magsaysay has the su- 

art of knowing men and of keeping the human touch. 

¢ said to us, “Most people load me down with problems. 
You briag answers.” 


Everywhere Communist and non-Comatunist, East and 
“West respond to then who have the thinking and living of 
2 superior ideology. 


A British miner who has worked for thirty years at the 
coal face says, “Moral Re-Armament is to the heart of man 
what coal is to a furnace. It gives it power. If we want more 
coal we must have more Moral Re-Armament.” 


On the eve of the Italian elections | passed through Milan. 
On the station platform to meet me was a cross-section of the 
nation—industrialists, the manager of a large plant with « 
member of his work's council, the national secretary of one 
of the great unions, and men and womeh from “Little Stalin- 
grad” where Communism holds sway. One of the men, a 
Communist leader of the 12,000 tramway workers of Milan, 
was there. His sister, a bitter Communist, had changed. She 
became a new type of revolutionary woman. Her brother had 
been captured by her freedom from bitterness and her power 
to create unity. He was seriously ill but said he must come 
to the station to tell me his determination to fight at my side. 
“I only want to live for my children’s future and the new 
world of Moral Re-Armament,” he said. 


Also on that platform was the brother of the Communist 
newspaper editor. The editor, like the tramway worker, had 
found this superior ideology. He told the whole city about 
it in a ten-page supplement to his paper. He now carries this 
answer to the political leaders of Europe. His wife, his 
brother, his friends and former enemies follow his lead. He 
faced the years of bitterness against his Church and put it 
right. He has begun to live a revolutionary faith. He has 
accepted the discipline of meditation to find the direction of 
God instead of following the drive of human passions and 
materialism. 


No wonder Gabriel Marcel, the great Catholic philosopher, 
writes in Le Figaro, “Moral Re-Armament is a hope—perhaps 
even the hope.” 


A European statesman who was chairman of NATO said, 
“We will certainly commit a very great error if we think 
that Communism is the only problem and that the answer is 
a negative opposition to Communism. A materialistic phil- 
osophy is now rooted in democracy. Even if there were no 
Communism, Moral Re-Armament would still be essential 
to the future of humanity.” 


Chancellor Adenauer and Members of his Cabinet in their 
invitation to the Moral Re-Armament World Mission to 
come to Germany said, “In this time of confusion we need an 
ideology which can bring clarity and a moral force to shape 
international relations as well as our own national life.” 


Western Germany by her energy and genius has recreated 
the industry of a nation. She has secured prosperity. But her 
leaders now face the fact that prosperity alone can never cure 
bitterness, build unity or create an answer to Communism. 


Nations who will tiot think shed blood and money, and 
breed bitterness and disaster. But men who think have a 


‘superior statesmanship. I have just heard from Mohammed 


i : A 
A : 


Masmoudi, Minister of Scate in the Tunisian Governmems. 
He says, “But for Moral Re-Armament our country would 
be involved in a war without mercy.” 


Take Morocco. The unexpected happened. One fiery young 
leader spoke of his great enemy as the Devil iduunate, A 
man skilled in meeting the needs of his fellowmen talked 
with this young leader. He decided to listen, not to the voice 
of hate or of prejudice but to the still small voice that said, 
“You are as near to God as you are to the man from whom 
you feel most divided.” He went in trepidation and met the 
old statesman he called the Devil. He apologized not for 
his convictions but for his hatred. Even the right convictions 
can become a negative force when they are employed by 
prejudiced minds or by men or nations who do not think. 
The old man wrapped him round in his arms in affettion and 
forgiveness and two days later publicly changed his policy 
and united the nation on a new course. Today Morocco is 
independent and finding her direction. 


Who are the men in France who will apply this new effec- 
tive way to Algeria before it is too late? 


I was received in Vietnam by that man of destiny, President 
Diem. He said, “We welcome Moral Re-Armament. It per- 
fectly responds to the longing in the heart of Asia for « 
change of heart in the West.” 


In Thailand Field Marsha! Pibulsonggram took the excep- 
tional action of inviting the Buddhist leaders to ateend the 
ideological play “The Vanishing Island.” Their verdict was 
unanimous. “The ability of Mora! Re-Armament to change 
men is proof that it has the power to ufite the world.” 


In Taiwan I met an old friend, General Ho Ying-chia, 
who is a close advisor to President Chiang Kai-shek. General 
Ho said, “If we leaders of China had had the unity of Moral 
Re-Armament, the history of our country would have been 
different."’ President Chiang Kai-shek said, “This is the moet 
valuable form of aid we could have been sent.” 


Premier U Nu of Burma has expressed his gratitude for 
the new direction given by this ideology to the students of 
Burma. The Rector of the University said, “Moral Re-Armea- 
ment is a magic word in Rangoon University.” U Nu spoke 
to me of the universal message that the world needs that can 
disarm the suspicions of the East and re-arm the moral in- 
tegrity of the West. . 


The New Times of Burma commented, “Moral Re-Arma- 
ment is in fact the only practicable way out of the morass ia 
which man has landed himself.” 


Men like U Nu and the other Asian statesmen | have con- 
ferred with in recent weeks realize more clearly than many 
Western leaders the need today to give priority to ideology 
in the affairs of their nations. 


Says a distinguished American scientist, “I have seen 
enough of what we call ‘high level staff’ in Washington to 
know that the ideological answer is not going to come from 
a paper prepared by a planning staff in a government 
ment or any place else. It is not going to come from an execu- 
tive order. It is going to come from human beings individ- 
ually, from your heart and mine. The fault is with us and the 
answer will not come unless we are different.” 


Communist and non-Communist have one fundamental 
weakness in common. They are not creating a new of 
man. Consequently both lack the one essential for | + 
new world. But there is a superior ideology which is giving 
men new motives, new character. It works! It is a new 
thinking forged by living absolute moral standards—abeo- 
lute honesty, pufity, unselfishness, love. With this ideol- 
ogy nations will begin to think. They will solve all their 
problems. Families will be united. Youth will find a purpose 
more dynamic and compelling than. lawlessness. 


This is the new statesmanship, a life commitment adequate 
to change the thinking, living and daring of the whole world. 
For everyone everywhere this is the future. This is noemel 
living. 


Moral Re-Armament is incor porated in the State of New York 
as a non-profit corporation, It is supported by voluntary, un- 
solicited gifts. All its workers serve without salary, If y 
wish more information write to: Moral Re-Armament, Shore- 
ham Hotel, Washington, D. C., or Caux-sur-Montreuz, Swit- 
serland, 


This page is contributed by 2 group of patriotic citizens in the interests of national service. % 


Moral Re-Armament * Shoreham Hotel * AD. 4-0700 


, 


This 


Morning... 


| With Shirley Povich 


THE OTHER DAY in the Yankees’ dugout, Casey 
Stengel took a quick mental count of the covey of base- 
ball writers within earshot, was satisfied that he had a 
quorum worthy of his oratory; and began to talk. 

It may be well to mention that Stengel almost never talks 
to one reporter because he does not 
like a limited audience. So he always 
counts the house, and performs ac- 
cordingly. If he can glimpse from the 
tail of his eye a flashing notebook or 
two, and pencils poised, he is prac- 
tically unstoppable. 

. Now you fellas see we have 
been leading the league every way it 
can be led.” said Stengel who, inci- } 
dentally, is the only man alive who 
cah commence a sentence in the 
middie of it. 

“Tt’s like this. We got out in front 
after the season opened with only two 
guys on our club hitting That's 
Mantle and Berra. Then pretty soon our fielding went awful 
bad and we still were leading the league. Now we're doing 
our best trick. We're leading the league without pitching.” 

The Yankees. indeed, have had their share of travail this 
season, although you couldn't tell it by the league standings 
which as recently as last week showed them six games in 
front and creating talk of a run-away. 


Povich 


STENGEL talks of the Yankees and another pennant but 
there is apprehension in Casey's manner and certainly there 
is an awareness now that this one is not one of the Yankee 
super-teams. in fact, it is crying to get beaten out of the 
pennant by the first solid club to pop up in the American 
League 

The Yankees are thrice blessed this season by (1) Mickey 
Mantle and (2) Yogi Berra and (3) the fact that there is no 
rival team better than moderately good. The legend of Yankee 
invincibility has been pretty thoroughly shredded by what 
has been happening thus far. 

In 16 games with the Indians and Tigers, thé Y ankees have 
won only six. That has helped to generate a general under- 
standing that the Yankees can be had. The Yanks are limping 
aioe with one of their regular outfielders, Hank Bauer, 
hitting .200. with their worst pitching in years and the defense 
at second and third base still problems for Stengel! to solve. 

Never did a ball club owe so much to two men. It is obvious 
that Mantle and Berra have been keeping the Yanks up there 
with their strong-arm stuff with their bats. 

WHITEY FORD was the only pitcher at whom Stengel 
could poiht with pride, and some of the shine has come off 
him in his last two starts. Johnny Kucks is the only other 
Yankee pitcher of even modest merit, Don Larsen, Bob 
Turley and Mickey McDermott have been giving away runs 
faster than even the Yanks can knock ‘em in. 

At this point, you'd have to say the Yankees have taken a 
beating on their big deal with Baltimore last year in which 
‘Purley was the key figure. Gus Triandos, who went to the 
Orioles as one of the host in the trade, is doing a big job for 
the Baltimore team at both first base and catching, and 
swinging a telling bat. 

Another thing about the Yankees is their relief pitching, 
which isn’t good. It used to be that the Yankee managers 
could use a big stick on the opposition when they called for 
a relief man. But this ‘year no Joe Page or Johnny Sain or 
Jim Konstanty comes trudging in from the bullpen. Yankee 
relief pitchers this year have pitched simply like guys who 
couldn't make it as starters 


1T MAY BE significant, too, that Mickey Mantle has hit 
only one home run in the five games since Lod -Boudreau 
devised the new Mantle shift against him. That is far behind 
the Mantle gait and if Boudreau’s scheme has not actually 
frustrated any Mantle blow, it may have given Mantle an 
upsetting concern which serves the same purpose. 

Oleveland still recommends itself as the team best equipped 
to battle it out with the Yankees and perhaps beat them. 
The Indians have been aptly described by Sports Illustrated 
as “an island of pitching in a sea of mediocrity.” Nobody 
excent the pitchers is playing good ball for Cleveland, but 
from that fact Cleveland fans can, paradoxically, take comfort. 

If the Indians had gotten out of Al Smith the same kind 
ing he gave them last year, they would be now leading 
the league. Unlike the Yankees, the Indians are far fram the 
limit of their potential. Bobby Avila, experiencing his worst 
year at bat, | has time to recayer. There are signs that 
Al Rosen is whipping the bat again as he did in his good 
years. And every club could yearn for Cleveland's kind of 
pitching 


of hitt 


«ti! 


-Nats Games 


The Box Scores 


SFCOND GAME 
KANSAS CITY AB HRARILO 
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Los Angeles Starts 


$8 Million Arena 


LOS ANGELES, June il |? 
Ground was broken today for 
an $8 million Los Angeles 
sports arena scheduled to be 
| completed late in 1957. 

The arena, 
indoor sports, conventions and 
trade shows, 
34.000 persons. It 
financed through 
bonds and will be erected 


ar. Al ’ TIME 


Robin Freeman, 
Ohio State Star, 


Loses 2 Fingers 


CINCINNATI, June 11 
Robin Freeman, phenomenal 
Ohio State basketball guard, 
lost parts of the middle and 
index fingers on his left hand 
in a woodchopping accident 
yesterday. 

The slender guard, whose 
“miracle hands” helped him 
break a flock of scoring 
records, underwent surgery 
at Good Samaritan Hospital 
here after the incident. Hos- 
pital aides said he was in 

“good” condition. 

His father, Robin Free- 
man Sr... said that the two 
fingers were lost down * ‘about 
to the second joint” but that 
his son “will have partial mo- 
bility in the remaining finger | 
section. 

A 


will 


morial Coliseum, 
outdoor stadium. 


The Minors 


AMERICAN ASSOCEATION 
Omaha 2 Chariesten 
—— LEAGUE 
Rincham o Albany 
Willlameport 5 Reading 
_INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE 
Columbus 1.. : Terente 
Mentreal 1% Richmend 

SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION 
Little Reck & 
Mebile 4 
Memphis 7 

Stile ‘ 


| ~ ATLANTIC’ LEAGUE 
Jackeo 
TEXAS LEAGUE 


-.» Ment 
Charlotte 
Oklahoma ‘ 


Taltas 


Tons 
100—a 


&- 
—— 


long needed for 


is designed to seat 
be 
revenue 
in 
Exposition Park near the Me- 
103,000-seat 


es When FitzGerald 
9 relay go through for an error,.. 


| Finigan 


- Walked to fill 


ianother homer with 


ipiteh 


Nats Beat A’s, Then Lose, 6-3 


Paula Hits 
3-Run Pinch 
Homer in 


4-3 Victory 


By Bob Addie 


Stat Reporter 


of three straight victories after 


The Washington 


Times Berald 


Pag orts 


BASEBALL 
RACING 
TV-RADILO 


TUESDAY, JUNE 


9 
“+ 


l 1956 


—_— 


The Nats had a nice string' 


: 


| yesterday's twilight part of a: 


double-header with Kansas City 


‘and then lapsed into their old 
_ habits in the second game. 


| Carlos Paula's 


three-run | 


‘pinch homer in the eighth en-' 


\abled the Nats to take 


opener, 


the | 
43, but the Athletics’ 


came back to take the nightcap, | 


63, behind the seven-hit pitch-| 
ing of Alex Kellner. A crowd) 
of 5870 saw the twin bill. 


Paula actually saved the Nats | 
from descending into the cel- 


lar because the A’s were lead- 
ing, 3-1, before the 
Clouter” went in to bat for 
Clint Courtney with 


“Cuban | 


: 


two on! 


and got a perfect mark for the! 


course. 
‘Shantz Tagged 


| 
The blow came off Bobby! 


Shantz, who had relieved Lou 
Kretlow after the latter had 


| 


' 


started the eighth by — 


Whitey Herzog 

Johnny Groth, an ex-employe,| 
wreaked what personal damage 
he could in the first game by 
smacking two successive hom- 
ers off 
Groth drove in all 
for the A's 


three runs 
Pete Ramos, who 
took over from Grob in the 
eighth, got the victory 

The home run parade corn 
tinued in the second game as 
Mike Baxes ‘and Vic Power hit 
one each off Hal Griggs. Lyle 


starter Connie Grob.' 


Luttrell connected off Kellner. | 


| Dean Stone started but was 
'shelled after yielding four runs 
in the second inning. He was 
the loser. Griggs came in and 
gave up the final two runs on 
jhomers. Pascual blanked the 
A’s for the last two innings 

The A’s got 10 hits in all and 
after their four+un outburst in 
the second inning were never 
headed. 

The Nats broke through for 
the first run in the fourth in. 
ining of the opener when Court- 
ney doubled and Lemon singled 
him home. 


Kretlow Yanked 


Kansas City took the lead in 
the fifth when Ginsberg walked 
and Groth smacked his first 


‘homer into the left field seats. 


Groth was the villain again 
in the seventh when he smashed 
two out 
ahd nobody on. That made it 
+1. 

When Krelton walked Herzog 
to start the eighth, he was 
yanked and Shantz came in to 
to Runnels. The latter 
promptly singled to right, send 
ing Herzog to second. Sievers 
flied deep to Simpson, Herzog 
taking third after the catch 

Then came Dressen's inspira 
tion. Paula was sent in to bat 
for Courtney and lined a drive 
into the left field bleachers 
scoring Herzog and Runnels 
ahead and putting the Nats in 
front, 4-3. . 

Ramos, who had come in to 
pitch in the eighth, gave up a 
two-out single to Thompson in 
the ninth but disposed of Gins- 
berg to win the game. 


Stone Rocked 


The A's fell on Stone for four 
runs in the second inning of 
the nightcap 
by a pitch with one out and 
Groth walked. Thom pson 
forced Groth then Baxes 
walked to fill the bases. Kellner 
singled in Finigan and Thomp 
son while Baxes took third 
let Olson's 
advanced to 


Kellner second 


® Power doubled in both men 


The Nats got one run back 


ein the third. FitzGerald walked 
Lopez © 


and Yost grounded to 
who threw to Finigan for 
intended force at second 
failed to touch 
bag and was charged with an 
error. Then he threw wild to 


the 


first for a second error a Fitz ye 
on | Gen! 


wound up on third and Yost 
second. Runrels grounded out 
as FitzGerald scored 

Baxes’ homer off Griggs in 
the fourth made it 5-1. The 
Nats got that run back in their 
half. Sievers doubled, Lemon 
scratched a single and Olson 
the bases. Lwut- 
into a double 


trell grounded 


:\|play as Sievers scored 


Power homered off Griggs 
the seventh and Luttrell re 
turned the compliment with 
one off Kellner in the bottom 
half to make the sco, e 63. That 
is the way it ended 


in 


SIDEBARS—Groth has hit 
all four of his homers a®ainst 
‘the Nats this year The 
Nats yesterday received per- 
mission to put Jerry Snyder 
on the disabled list ... Sny- 
der, who suffered a broken 
right wrist Sunday when hit 
by one of Virgil Trucks’ 
pitches, thus will be inellgible 
for 30 days ... Doctors say 
he'll be out at least six weeks 

. « The N@ probably will 
call up Joe Valdivielso, now 
with Louisville There 
seems to be no possibility of 
a trade before the deadline 
Friday midnight ... Lemon 
has now hit safely in 12 
straight games—only 45 to 
go to break Joe DiMaggio's 
record The Nats now 
have beaten every team in 
the league at least once at 
home ... On the road, they 


| must still catch up with the 


Yanks,«Tigers and A's... 
Yost ran his string of “get- 


| on-base” to 37 straight games 


. He has had either a: hit or 


r " walk in.each game in the 


streak. 
> 


Finigan was hit * 


But |; . ‘ 
the ; 


HERO COMES HOME—Nats Manager Charlie Dressen 

gambled on the long ball in the eighth inning of first game 

against Kansas City at Griffith Stadium yesterday and Car- 

los Paula certainly gave it te him with a pinch-hit 3-run 
a 


Phillies Drop 
Braves Into 


Fifth, 6-2 


MILWAUKEE, June 11 @# 
The last-place Philadelphia 
Phillies scored on singles, dou- 
bles and a double steal tonight 
as they trounced the Milwau- 
kee Braves, 62, and dropped 
the Braves into fifth place in 
the National League. 

The Braves got nine hits, but 


couldn't lick their most persist-' 
ent tormentor, Stu Miller, who)! 


now has beaten the Braves 
A times in 10 decisions as a 
pitcher for the Cardinals and 
the Phillies. 

Miller struck out only one 
batter, but gave up three walks 
as he frustrated the Braves. 

Thel oser was Gene Conley, 
who faced only 12 men in the 
first four innings before the 
Phillies solved his pitching in 
the fifth when they scored three 
runs on singles by Willie Jones 
and Jim Greengrass, a double 
by Granny Hamner, and a sin- 
gie by Ted Kasansky. 
PHILADELPHIA MILWAUKEE 

BH AB 


2900990900 0W-> 


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1 o 

0 
1 Oo 


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a-Grounded tnto dowble play for Logen 


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Philadelphia 08 O81 2964 
Milwaukee 190 1 . 


~Asbburn. Lopat Jones. Oreen - 


T 


Majors 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 


New York ... 
Cleveland 
Chicago 
Boston be 
Baltimore .. 
Detroit 
Washington 
Kansas City 


| YESTERDAY'S RESULTS 


Washington, 4.3; 
3-6. 

Cleveland, 4-1; Boston, 

Baltimore, 5; Detroit, 4. 


TODAY'S GAMES 


Kansas City at Washington 
(night) & p. m.—Santiago (0-1) 
vs. Pascual (2-7) or Stewart (2-1). 

Detroit at Baltimore (night)— 
Hoeft (6-2) ws. Wight (3-5). 

Chicage at New York (night) 
—Donovan (3-1) ws. Ford (7-3). 

Cleveland at Boston (night) 
—Wynn (6-2) vs. Sullivan (4-3). 
add National i league 


32 


1-5. 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 


Pct. G.B. 
583 
574 
569 
553 
537 
Al3 


Cincinnati 
Pittsburgh 
St. Louis 
Brooklyn 
Milwaukee . 
New York 
Chicago 400 RM 
Philadelphia 382 10%, 


YESTERDAY'S RESULTS 


Brokliyn, 8; St. Louis, 6. 
Philadelphia, 6; Milwaukee, 2 


(Only games scheduled.) 
TODAY'S GAMES 


Pittsburgh at Cincinnati ' 


(night)}—Friend (16-3) vs. Nux- 


Ka. hall (3-5). 


Philadelphia at Milwaukee 


o~ (night)}—Haddix (3-2) vs. Crone 
oean | (are) = 
New York at Chicago—Worth. ¢,,; 
y 2 ington (2-5) vs. Minner (1-5). --- 


Brooklyn at St. Louis (night) 


Kansas City,” 


* a RBI, 


. Be Char 
homer to beat the A’s 4-3. Here Paula, a .175 


es Del Vecchio. Stall Pi grapher 


bitter, sent in 


to bat for the .324 hitting Clint Courtney, is greeted at home 
by Pete Runnels (left) and Whitey Herzog who scored ahead 


of him. The catcher is Joe Ginsburg. 


Indians, Bosox 


Split; Brewer 


‘Wins Ninth 


BOSTON, June 11 (‘®#—Tom 
Brewer handcuffed Cleveland 
on three hits for his ninth vic- 
tory of the season tonight as 
the Boston Red Sox defeated 
the Indians, 5-1, for a split in 
a day-night double-header. 

The Indians, although limit 
ed to four hits by Bob Porter- 


field and Tommy Hurd, won the! 


afternoon game, 4-1, on homers 
by Chico Carresquel, Al Rosen 
and Al Smith 

Porterfield, who al. last year 
with the Washington Nats gave 
up only four home runs, now 
has given up 10 this year. He 
was losing his fifth game 
against two victories. 

The 23-year-old Brewer gave 
up arun on a walk and singles 
by Rocky Colavito and Jim 
Busby in thé second. Vie Wertz 
double off Ted Williams’ glove 
in the fourth was the only other 
Cleveland hit off 
ace, who has allowed just’23 
earned runs in 86 2/3 innings 

Brewer with two singles and 
Williams with a pair of 
doubles, and Jackie Jensen with 
his sixth homer led the Boston 
attack. 


(‘Day Game) 
CLEVELAND 
A 


[20 9° ve2090))-- 


Tetals 32 


aS 
aS! 


Cleveland .. 
Beston 


ruck out far Porter 


: 7 . 
ruck out for rterfieid | 


600 601 000.1 


—RKoufax (1-6) or Erskine (2-6) Ne 


ws. Dickson (3-5). 


It’s , Official- 


Use This Ballot, Vote Now 
For All-Star Game Players 


THE NATION'S baseball! fans will choose the starting 


line- 


ups for the Major League All-Star Game to be played at Grif- 


fith Stadium Tuesday, July 10 
This is the official ballot 
Voting continues until June 22 


AMERICAN LEAGUE 
First 


decoeevces be cesccess Shortstop 


Left 


Submitted by ... 


Ae 


Vote as many times as you wish 


NATIONAL LEAGUE 


Base 


id 20 yey 193 


Field 


IN. ¥: 


Ortega Decisions 
Gene Poirier 
' 


Mexico's 


‘NIGHT GAME) 
CLEVELAND BOSTON 
AR ROA 

4 0 Piersa! 


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Pelier.p 
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CLEVELAND 


Totals 


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arr atin 

18 O88 000-1 
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———— 


NEW YORK. 


Gaspar 


June i! 
Ortega and 


Gene Poirier of Niagara Falls. 


traded punches without 


‘letup for 10 rounds tonight with 
- |Ortega gaining the Split deci- 


ision in 
_, St 
weighed 151 pounds 


Vote for only eight positions. Rival managers will select | 


pitchers. 


_ Mail ballet te “All-Star Game,” The Washington Post and | 
: or Washington 5, D. C. 


the television bout at 
Nicholas Arena. Each 


Referee Ray Miller (5-5-3) 


and Judge Joe Eppy (6-4) voted 
‘for Ortega. Judge Nick Gam-| 
‘poli called it a draw, awardin ing | 
each five rounds and five points.| 


The AP card had Poirier ahead,’ 
5-4-1. 


’ 


Fi 


Dell Advances 


In Eastern Tennis 


RYE, N. Y., June 11 #—Don- 
aid Dell of Landon School. in 
Bethesda, Md., won second and 
third round matches 
Eastern Séholastic 
championships here today. 

Dell drew a bve in ti 
round, and defeated Sam Weav 
er of Middlesex, N. \ 6—0 
6, in the second 
round matc 
Hubbard, Loom 

l. 


in tne 


hy 


he defeated Pet 


, Conn. 6—] 


las 
Snider’s Two 


Homers Lead 


Dodgers, 3-6, 
Over Cards 


ST. LOUIS, June 11 ®—The 
Louis Cardinals kicked two 
eighth-inning déuble-play 
grounders and a chance to take 
the National League lead to- 
night, giving up three decisive 
unearned runs to Brooklyn in 
a game wen by the Dodgers, 
8-6 

Duke Snider homered twice 
for the World Champions and 
Newcombe gained his 
victory 


St 


Don 
ninth 

As a result of successive St. 
Don Blasin- 
Hatton in the 
needed only 


Louis miscues by 
game and Grady 
Brooklyn 


eighth, 


,two hits to score four times and 


drop the Redbirds into third 
place behind idle Pittsburgh 
The Dodgers, now in fourth 
place because of Milwaukee's 
to Philadelphia, are only 
and one-half behind 
league-leading Cincinnati. 
Although Newcombe failed in 
a bid is fifth consecutive 
complete game, he allowed 10 
included home runs 
Moon and Hank 
1¢ Dodgers pinned a 
Straight defeat on Po- 


, 
ioOss 


a game 


for h 


that 
Wally 


ler. T) 


hits 


5 
fourth 
holsky 

\ crowd of 26.075 saw Snider 
keep the Dodgers in the ball 
game and then pul) them even 
with a per “S-for3” per 
rmance that included two in- 
tentional passes and a run-scor- 
single as well as his 12th 
lsth home! 


RROOALYWS 
AR AOA 
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Yes, when it's FLEISCHMANN’ 5 GIN, 


it’s so smooth you Il like it straight! 


—— —— 
— 
— 


ii 


MY Hy} 


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i} i 


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WIN 


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MAAN 


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And gin that smooth makes 
a perfect Gin & Tonic every time! 


‘DISTILLED FROM AMERICAN GRAIN © DISTILLED DRY GIN « 90 PROOF 
THE FLEISCHMANN DISTILLING CORPORATION, NEW YORK CITY 


A 


. 


. 


RB -PADN OCH — 


THE FINEST OF SEAFOOD 
COOKED TO ORDER 


‘> 


~~ 
tt Wheel) 


The President, a real sports fan, surprised everyone by his 


2-1 ow = 
SSS3SES5 


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— 


- DP DW 0% 9 Hee 


. . 
_ |Nieman Trotting Charts at Laurel Carriage Trade . . 
$1300 € #,. - cheon 
QUITE UNEXPECTEDLY the other day, at President % ne games Hr sadiaay’s ane yee tn ‘Wall's Mistorle Gas-Licht Atmosphere 
BALTIMORE, June 11 WP Wehittn aGim 
coursg, has been kic king around in the them for Baltimore mem ag as ab R Whippet’ 1 Georee . Kins stor. f. : " Si Winner. Bete at oak Pati 1.0 ee . STEAKS ° CHOPS ° CHICKEN 


Since 1885 
Courrieht. 1986. by Raceway Services. Ine. xBrote stride ‘Parked oat. ‘Pulled wo dni-Did not 
* «= Drive , - 4 Whine” fas F) y Sisters Son—Toscla s 
; —* 4% . 3 ? 7 i itssnttcndiiilimaeeds 4 SUE THE ORIGINAL BAR A} 
Eisenhower's news conference before he was stricken, ¥ igers Lose Bon MeEtien Jones! 3 4 oe Sister Whipoet (Cam ren or 1 Ett THE ORIGINAL BAR AND DEwtng pod 
x 
Bob Neiman and Gus Triandos SBroke stride ah +) x! 
fertile minds of civic leaders for more ‘the Orioles beat Detroit, a waneter— icin bite br Vols 


THE WASHINGTON POST and _TIMES HERALD a s . | 
. Ae CREE Orioles Win, Move Into Fifth). psec gy 
: | | HALL’S RESTAURANT?" Ew: 
Bob Addie’ | t = 
i Specializing in 
Homers as viner hac Soo a on € Sia: BREWER. $16.40. 9640. $4.00; CHEERIO PICK 3 LARGE MAINE LOBSTERS 
gt at-8:31. Winder but Mfernew ab < (10; bY Volomite— 
: } 
someone brought up the perennial question of getting a Boy of Mine . || iuppard: a a : Worthy “Brucita “« * 
i 
knocked in all the runs between +6 ROR. % ee ee $400 be 80 } WORY wRud al tmeepeeweseve Upstairs Dining Reem fer Private Parties 
. . athe b . 
than 30 years. and displaced the Tigers Saw . valyarn® + rwatles, “@ ; e @ ig eat wibes — en Pe Sqn ~n le 


. . ; 
Serving Washington's 
Column ene 
Ruth Svencer b _Spen : Time, 2 2 08? “ .* RA £—One mile trot Class 
municipal stadium for Washington. » - wel rm! ) 34 4 | Gastie, Kes 
enthusiasm for the project which, of 
SEC one. & ACE—One a (pace). Purse seco foes cc 
; ; MW | " 
There has been many blueprints | percentage point in fifth place FAis*vi,y ‘Bei ate” ‘ken ht. Mre. Freak c cE. §-8159 ME. s-a580 


. 
ae el 


~ ; 
drawn, some completely out of pro- in the American League. jomestrevch saney Trix , ’ ottish Chief 


nitwre Hanover | , 
Nieman drove in one run with per G} nosy Knieht ‘ ford 


‘Bull - + ; 
portion like the one which would nave a single and Triandos two for Gini Pirect = + i ‘Snde_ anover (Walters) 2 3 4 
had a stadium seating 200,000. That the Orioles in the first inning Broke stride. (Bs Re aay eh bas ithe a Be tes MITE. | 
could be slightly high, say, for a base- |Nieman also socked his fifth poe Pay $530 $3.80. 63°00; MAJESTY HAL. $5.60, $9.00 | NEED A TRUCK FOR 
Nats and homer of the season with a man ; nt fet 
hall game iny oly ng the on base in the Afth. DAILY DOUBLE (1-7) PAID $11.20 mS. 10:36. Win _~ eaisks Voces | ANY REASON? 
Athletics anee | \ yo te 4! Revnoids Tim 4 


That gave the Orioles a 5-1\"gusen sace—one mile (pace). Purse. $800. Class 23 
Other more sensible plans would (py, jead which they barely Qt at 9:20 ge tet Mamas Clase 23. auee GF, Knient (Battord) 


> 
have scaled the municipal stadium to | protected as the Tigers slugged onaid Truax—Penny Barnes by Peter ue =o S 2-07 

approximately 60,000, which is a nice, 14 hits to 12 for Baitimore. i ow 
round figure, anyway. But as long as ened, < * 
Addie the stadium could be a realization for ttle.cf . 
60,000, it would only be stretching the 

bond issues and indebtedness a bit more to seat 90,000 

The President said emphatically that he thought such a 
stadium was needed in Washington, merely echoing the long- 
forgotten voices which have been only whispers in the wind. 


a 
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indian Dale Dannir (Fy) x10 ii 11 11 
: ' QUEEN'S FONT. 88.4 40. ait 00, 63.40; ASH WALNUT , 
> : , , \ i . , 
SParked out oo. $400, 42.40: VERNON DALE aE. 3 | Spee Now youcankeepdeliveries in 4%, 1%, or 2-ton sizes 

oO. $266 Thine ALL $2.2 ACE —One | mile sop ‘om Pyrse. 9900. Clas moving or move your- with van, panel or stake 
FOURTH RACE— c ure ® eK Stl =? —~ on , 
=m ge A Rr (TE it 8 Sr Birect |* ateyeuy by Agile Time. 2°05% a self... with the truck you bodies. Hertz furnishes 
re . m. 7, MM c : . . ool, P ‘ . ‘ ‘ 
we - : = Boy ee | need justaphonecallaway' everything but the driver: 
Always call Hertz anytime low rate includes all gaso- 
- . “oc . . + . ’ ’ Oo ’* | uli 
THE MECHANICS of the stadium plan, of course, were Setain O04 00 1 Setete Of - f > . ; | ¥ oo heegee te ag3 7 pe a “ dan — 
‘ ” otals Pau : rt s 4 - | Gol - D om ‘7 os — whether its for an roper amage, Firea 
stilt hazy at the news conference. Mr. Eisenhower thought rounded eut for Phillies im 6th Aitle Dipt uit ; : : pland Turlin , k . ruc perty g 
+ th . _ 


. ~y . tes or ia Tt 85.40, $5.60. $440; BANNERS BRIDE 94 60 our. y or longer. Rent-~- Theft Insurance plus $100 
the Government could help the city. That's a nice thought, | + 4 aw Mac Forbes : | 80 93 Oo Matinee trrre ek ‘ hour, day or long p $ 


indeed, but it’s always seemed to Washington natives oo 


ie Pv eS 
sea 
BS  §'D 4OWho~ 
~ 
-e-- 
=> >» 
jo ot ee 
-- - FO BBROO Mm 


-OWww-Oo°o°o-- 
~~-OnOo---O--Oer 
5 nn 


1 3 
0 
, 


sut for Masterson in ing’s quick 'n easy: all you deductible collision protec- 


Detroit 000 O11 200—4 need is a proper driver's tion. Typical Rate Example: 
, r Wa t * heart in it when they (| Beltimere 300 676 001 —5 , ; 
the legislators don’t really have their hea ’ = license and identification. A 12-ft. van body truck 


‘ i strict of C R Ka! ne. Bo!! ing orgeson. aus W W -. . ’ - ‘ 
rian ‘Lar Boll: / 


Washington always has been and will remain a unique city. win ether sturdy Herts trucks ile trip in 3 hours 
Some people have been “passing through” for 50 years and %).., ® Maxwell me: : “pine ~ EIGHTH NIGHT OF 24-NIGHT MEET 6 Undertaker ‘No Driver) 


still don't regard this city as their home. There is an un- Goriner ana Hale. Lett—Detront 3 POST TIME—8:30 P. M. i Ea aot eal “1-5 Tough company ..is HERTZ TRUCK RENTAL 


' ; tim " Lar 2 w Martyr ‘Lone . " tio 
natural lack of civic pride here and it's hard to explain away, >**\yer* B _ . Ay | FIRST RACE—One mile (trot). Purse, 6800. Class 28 5 Maenus Hanover (Baldwin) > & 


even with the pat phrase: “So many people are from out of 
town.” 

One need only remember that visitors to Paris embrace 
the colorful French capital as their own. The same is true of seams. Triagées). Wi 
Rome, London, Vienna, Brussels, Berlin and the other great | ice Summers. McKinley, Flaherty Thurma: 
capitals which seem to belong to the world. Washington Algo eligible PIES 


certainly qualifies as an international city but, more im- O’Day Is Leader SECOND RACE—One mile (pace). Purse seve. C Class 25 


portant, it should be a typical American city fiiphtr ‘bud Le Wathen! 


Come in ond pick up @ copy of your FREE ‘How to Move’ bookie? 
201 Que Street, N. W.; phone: NOrth 7-3311 


— 


IrTl MPach Risa! mie (peace). Purse £200 
id 


3° 
_ 
a 
+e 


eres & river, 


ovrvo@ve 
) malting 
, : , : ; 
= PIO 


(Soves te 
~~ oa (Prey) een back 
“Grattan (Scott) Been trailing 


RACE—t)ne mile (pace). Purse. 8800. Claes cc 
‘Wile'te: 6- 


—. es 


Not mu bh last 


- Zo > > Ge 
: : : : ; 
ar 


> 


Warren) 


- 


sot oe hor 8) 


What is more French than Paris or more Italian than Rome? I Ol : . 
The idea is that ‘these cities don't lose their national identity, i y im ptc 
even if they do belong to the world 


' , 
Man or Chimes “lito Driv’r) * 
Willie Napoleon (Grenier) 
on : 


‘3 i, OF ‘ . ' ‘| : - No ) iat ; 
_ li . +e anor Belot o-3-% Oo real eduity . olo Ei ‘Smith) ° Threat if OK 
nen Sailing Trials i Ses deere im first stat are 
> on ' : caiteie ve —_ VEN hn 
YOU WILL NOTE that many of these famous cities have MARION. Mass. June 11 iF Maiors Ring Pianagan). 2 
‘ , ‘ . _ : ‘ : : | OT d ott 
their own stadiums. Berlin, London and Paris have their George O’Day of Dover, genet Longshot Daily Double Chuck Rosecrot {Stokiey) 
:  ™ 7 " | we . y , ’ ; ¥ 6 
own Olympic Stadiums. Rome and Brussels have what would (41) rated the Nation's chief PRUDENCE DARNLEY and MR. F. G. aly oat 
wt ; Ti ’ 
correspond to our municipal stadiums. It seems to have been exponent of railing planing THIRD RACE—One mile (pace) Purse. $800. Class 25 
9 fantastic oversich' Waeshiosten. eanaciaiie ia peeve type dinghies, today breezed/: sanc ght ( i-3-4 ¥ here 
© oversignt in SEUNSLON, Especially i & COUNLTY ‘into the United States Olympic emp" “ ri-, oe Bis one 
as sports-minded as ours. Monotype finals 


The President said the other day that he thought the prol}- With six of the seven races é& } ixie (Lol 4. 

’ th = ; fot , ¥ j Beer 

ect could be carried out through urban redevelopment. This of the eastern eliminations Pousles 9 rd +728 * Not t 
, compie ) i] 

means a variety of things such as slum clearance, moderniza- |C°™P!ete, O'Day, who sails 


) ) em both under the colors of the , 
tion of buildings, new parking lots, super markets, more rec- host Beverly Yacht Club and ro od be RACE One mile (iret). Purse, 88000, Sykesville 
. . 


@SPVWN-O~lg 
a | 


DP 2@ -ie SNe 
OCO@T7 &&ey 
; , : ’ 


oo 


Could be tough 
‘Perse oe « lass CC 
. . 


ot) 909 
Pe Pree te 
: : 


STUDEBAKER-PACKARD 


ages MOTOR CARS 
"Purse + Cen 6 Factory-Trained Mechanics with over 80 
Definive, Years Studebaker-Packard Experience 


> Gre 
, 


(Matthews) 


7. 


; | , . : ; 
i“ a 4 Iwewwn? 


Ma eli 
Trixy — ‘'Watltersa) 
a vee mile (pace 


bed --iee 


3 


ee ee 


1-8 
10 
5 


~~ 


Sw. C2Ge Ae F 
" " : : 


— -, 


Need« *xnperten 


, 
ed Pre -1ow 9? 2 
a 
Se ee 


a : ond : i8-i Front End Alignment 


reationa! areas. eic Ma blehead Ss Frost bite Sail ~, _— 4 - i? tn . . 

ailing |s hat Manover ‘Thomas 1-1 Good spee 1) D (Walters). fin ..conee Ot Brake Relining @ Motor Tune U 
There are slums in Washington as there are in every large Ciub, has a total of 125% ? 3 pecaey ‘Cen » : foe Ger ... 3 indicates two or more starts this year 9 Pp 

— 


> Pawn -! 


Hom: estret Har’ + 4 ‘a 
city. New York and Chic ago. to name only two cities. have points 0’ Day would thus easily 4 Homestretch Gees ‘ 2-2 on't : seed Rei Best Bet—SANDY 5 KNIGHT (3rd race) Complete Overhaul 


‘ qualify fi eC nit St 5 — 

made remarkable progress in urban redevelopment, Not far esl Gena f ~ aon és ca : if Like Th iT 0 a 
_ . . . ! I ‘ ‘ Ste rT : ” ’ : »o/ . 

from Yankee Stadium in New York. on upper Park Avenue, ji, ; a. . e Treat Cars Like e) ere vurs 


in tomorrow's final race . . 
far above the swanky neighborhood, there was one of the Coast Guard Cmdr Leonard Redskins Select Arizona, Bradley Results G & St € | 
biggest eyesores in the city Penso, a member of the Poto- — - . | NCAA BASEBALL CHAMPIONSHIPS “vA AgLLZ arage orage 0., nc. 
This has undergone the “urban redevelopment” touch. Now — Dee omy i ee Rockv ille Motel W in in Playoffs | ad ae Bee e 
theré are modern apartment buildings, recreational areas and | }¢:) and oth "tn toa e fon ] | | ae yD New Mampshired 1126 21st St. NW. EX. 3-4674 
the restful, bucolic background of grass and trees, trans- races to boost his point “wo | For Area Dril § OMAHA, sune 2 em ASIEORS “a ot ada et ba ag a PARKING: Day-Week-Month Live-STORAGE-Dead 
planted into the one-time asphalt jungle to 54%. squeezed home a run on Glen double stimtan tion's one 68 


The Redskins picked N€W Pestin’s perfect bunt in the & a 24-HOUR SERN ICE 


, on : regame sleepin uarters yes- ' 
THE WASHINGTON ball club has a big stake in a municl- Gore Will Shift we | en te A motel with Dinth inning to beat New Hamp- , * 
pal stadium. The Nats own their Griffith Stadium property . ~ ‘football field attached shire, 10, in the NCAA college 
outright, without even a mortgage. The stadium covers ap- To Late Vodel General manager Dick Mc- baseball World Series tonight 


proximately eight acres and the book value is believed to be a said nye ——e —_ and knocked New Hampshire 
; . 0 ~< l . D- 

around $1 million. At present, the ball club pays about $28,000 Car Saturda y am a one ie ~ the mote] OUt of the double elimination 

4 A ‘ nat : A} ; , 


a year taxes Of course, the rent in a municipal stadium site at Rockville in nearby series 
probably will be more. . Even at $1000 a game. which is a low MANASSAS., Va., June 11 Maryland Bradley eliminated Wyoming 
figure, the Nats would pay more than twice what they pay now Wally Gore of Arlington, Va; Sam Eig, the motel operator, ¢-om the tournament this after- 
for taxes will make his debut in a late-/equipped the place for such 
Jn model stock car race S »/ purposes. Besides the field to 

But there are other considerations The Washington club e aturday P P 


' night .at the Old Dominion work out on, the Redskins wil! 12-8. 

wouldn't have to pay for -maintenance. an important item. Speedway here have facilities to watch game Artzens os Se ah 2 
' ; , ’ ; . wo ; ia New Hampshire im ‘ On ? 

Too, they could initiate a little urban redevelopment of their _ Wally will be driving a 1955 movies on the Saturday nights Oosterveen and Festin®; Kasare ané 

own. The Griffith Stadium property would cut up into ex- |+ 0rd in the 150-ldp Circuit of preceding their home contests. Deste 


cellent sites for parkirg lots, shopping centers and office Pee? race, starting at 8:30 


noon, downing the Cowboys, 


W veming "18 100 190 & 12 4 
> 


| I . _ 4 : ’ , ; : 
buildings. Whichever way you ooK at it. the club could un- » 7 wo Americans (,aln Bradle O16 Sil SOx—15 | 


load the pro t d Two drivers representing the Fisher t can (ore 7" Gettihned” | 2 
rtyv , in set ‘ OT y i ‘4 ~ = . r . sher 208 I s 7 , r ~ 
Fowewe ts SRS TUNVER MS MOPeY IB Valliplayers Cirtuit of Speed which operates In English Tennis f 

Thus, a municipa) stadium would be doing all of us a favor from Buffalo N Y.. Lennie 
" - , - oT ah "a ’ yo a I v 
as far as our major league franchise is concerneg. Then, too, 7USt4, 1956 Packard, and Ken BECKENHAM, ngland Trots Selections perfect Vv 

’ ' % g ’ ‘7 5 . | . (Pree 1 ry 
maybe we'd get an occasional Army-Navy football game pleweno ay in a 1956 : — June lil 7 aS —oo vt rhe nets 
convertible have entered. Other younger players, hiugh Stewart 
| | div Oul ' ’ * : ° ..% 

The Redskins und ud x would play in the municipal local drivers will compete of San Marino, Calif., and Ron , CARA HANOVER. Fite’s Lad. & lear Hf 
stadium, too, just as the Colts do in Baltimore. We'd get a someenery of Brooklyn, ad- “. 4.4, Adios, —— ¢ 08 i 
lot more attractions for Washington and. who knows. we pon ; need to the second round of Mishty Duche 

" . Ff 7 . — —4«, ’ s wy ™ 
could even be host to the Olympic Games in some far off year I< are | akes k rene h the Kent lawn tennis champion- namoten Louise as 
Let's hope this plan gets out of the drawing board stage and Trotting Classic “— ~ we def . a oe nna sue 

r ] . . . ari eteate 
becomes a reality Washington has always been inthe posi- swes peg , Knight Alert. Bed Jey. Jimmy 

i } } 
t f a dutiful t] ie} , rts PARIS, June 11 #—Icare 1v, Hughes of Wales 6—4, 6—4° Lynn 
ion Of a Gutiful son with a rich and eccentric father who owned and trained by Henri Holmberg eliminated Arthur , G—Red Prince, Bisse MeBllen, Worthy 
. yr ti ‘ ~~ L. = ; ‘ 7 f : . = . . ; - 1; ee elstadt 
a his money { 1¢ other kids but never for his own Levesque and driven by F Marshall of Australia 6—4, 7—5 To Roral meee hich fescenalt 
mily. Brehier, today won the 2800 ' asers Eins 
meter classic trotting Prix du Musial Not Trading wate, 
President de la Republique in , : 
2.29 © rept. \ ‘ y Saves CLOCKER | 
Clowns, Black Yankees Doug Ford. Grei “ Pai the Vincennes track, Material, Lane Sa Mone ar 
e ¢ — ° ~ ‘ ‘ Sen 
. 4 » \ ner woes aris ST. LOUIS, June 11 #—Gen- “Sita, Adios Patrical Captain. Eé- 
The favored Idumee with 


. se . 7 ~<a) ans a. . e i 
Play Here Sunday Tie in Tourney, 68 owner R. Ceran-Maillard drive ee anaser Frank Lane of |S °s,NDY's KNIGHT, Nerth Hemp. 


: “% ones . ‘t¥- the St. Louis Cardinals enrpha- on ss > 

The Indianapolis Clowns! LOCUST VALLEY. N. y.. 8 ¥% second in 3:57.3 sized Yoday that star Stan, ... anever 

barnstorming baseball team june 11 W) — National PGA ° Musial is not trading material. ,.>—* + Attes Powe. April 

meets the New York Black Pneenninn the Ford of K S , TV. Radi Lane said he made the state- Vole Elkingsten, Biase MeEllen 

Yankees at Griffith Stadium'~"” *~’ us “ . “= Jports on ’ 410 ment because Ke has received . Major's Kins. Aubrey Vo Ger, Deon 

Sunday in a doubleheader be- esha Lake, N. Y. and Otto RADIO several phone calls from per Edés 

7 Greiner of Union Cit, vy J M A slain ‘ ; &—Fle Schuyler, Rhythm Creed, Parme 

Zimnning at < p.m : : BASEBALL—Kansas (City sons who wanted to know if Sanever ie 

shared the top money today in ooh be ° rw Musial was going to another ma Cs 
vs. Washington, WWDC (1260 — CONSENSUS 


o the annual ‘Piping Rock Club's a ub 
Edmonton Signs Scott benefit for the Glen Cove Com ke.), 7:55 p. m. - Betas Loa ee — 


. . 
EDMONTON, June 11 munity Hospital with three TELEVISION ‘amen’s« C a G =< d | 
The Edmonton Eskimos Nay inder par 68s Doug and Otto RASEBALL—Kansgas Cite W omen s Golf \—Sandy's Kaicht. Ger Leaise. Nerth- 1n} an = Q nic 
signed center Berl Scott, for- split $2,657.44 vs. Washington, WTTG-TV INDIAN SPRING—Mrs: Ed . Ada Hanover 

meriy of the University of Ne Claude Harmon of Mamaro sill n 


' | o« ever 
. (Channel 5), 7:45 p. m. silis won a& match play Knicht Alert. Red 
braska. to a contract for the neck, N Y.. former Masters Against par tournament aw Red Prince. Blase MeElien. Worthy S S 
1956 season the Western Inter- champion, tied for third at : 4 Using a 16 handicap and | Velsted 
provincial Football Union club 70 with Dow Finsterwald of 7 oda ys k vents shooting an 89 she was two- |rgen “NS Revel Bitty, Des 
: . ‘ > 
announced today Athens, Ohio, . up. Mrs. Henry Gichner and 2 Tie Schariee King Cases. . Chet 
: . — si ——. ogee ng Mrs. Ben Frauwirth were |— 
ee | — - = es ae : a liver Hill vs. Jack Pry. Weet Ellinse next. one-down. 


bey Ls ri¢ ' lear, bri 
; m is HOW “DRY” WAS ne ENS og 
nN A 74 : PRES: Gibson Shoots 68 to W trv) Bh your necteic suave siti cea chakras diac compa w: 
a THIS MORNING? uncolored was the ein that 


¥ " 
> . . > . > . 
Relined 4 Wheels Complete Hagerstou il Pro Su eepstake Ss Wet? Sticky? Uncomfortable? | naturally drv, crvstal-clear. 
Beat summer shaving 
FINEST OUALITY LINING 2 HAGERSTOWN, Md. June 11—Andy Gibson of the Country miseries with Kleen-Cut, | and the richt proof Please 


‘ Club of Maryland won the pro-sweepstakes, with a 34, 34—68 the amazing bew pre- \ 
BUICK SPECIAL Thru 51 over the par 71 Fountain Head Country Club course here today electric shave lotion | y lf with “Gilbev’s Ple “ \\ LONDON DRY 
! Jack Dirvin of Woodmont and Ray Heins of Swan Creek Coun- containing miracle silicones. YOUTSCH Wi sUuDCy § fF icase 
PONTIAC-6 & 45 re try Club tied for second with 70s Kieen-Cut removes excess 
ZL | i Harry Griesmer and Mrs.°"~ skin oils and perspiration 


£ ms , Re —so whiskers stand erect 
OLDSMOBILE 6 % Other Cars W. C, mead) of Be thesda wou Harry Grieemer, Bethesda ere? for close, easy cropping. 
Equally Low the pro-ladies championship Ted MeCendish, Areyvie . Tests. under actual steam 


PRO-LADIES 


with a 64. Cos Tiso and Mrs ae gy room conditions, prove 
QUICK, EFFICIENT FREE BRAKE » Herb Cohen of Bonnie View Read . pn mage Cee a Kleen-Cut gives closer, 
Service by Experts ADJUSTMENTS ,, tied with Lloyd Kelly of Manor , L-, 4 rw aod talkin | quicker more comfortable ) 
*\and Mrs. Leonard Mathias of 6, 65; Andy Gibson and shaves every tume—with 


. . oa 
Rivetless Bonded Linings = the club for second place, with Marviand. 66 “tibeon, "sed Mi Pas any make 


urphy Feantain 


Latest Pressure Bonded Lining Equipment |e, caller tester ef Akee- tae te te Oe ee ahover. THE WORLD AGREES 


and Mrs. Charlies MokKee., Fountain 


Duplicate D. e. Testing Machine > deen Proving Grounds won the Sead, 66 | “GILBEY’S PLEASE” 


net prize in the Ladies Sweep- LADIES 4 aaa 
ENFRAL BR 4 ’ stakes with a 99—34—65 Mrs ure Nancy Mustier “. deen 9%~235—65 
: r , . y. Bethesda #)—15—7? 
A 3 SERVICE G. W Bibby of Cumberland Mre. Robert Fridinger 278 &4—1 72 
Country Club won gross with Mrs. Leonard Mathias, Foun- 


77 tain Head erates = GILBEY’S DISTILLED LONDON DRY GIN. 90 PROOF. 100% GRAIN 


PRO SWEEPSTAKES Mis. GW. Bibby. Cumbertand C. C a" a J NEUTRAL SPIRITS. W. & A. GILBEY, LTD., CINCINNATI, OHIO 


pot + Gibson Mis. George Nebdie. 
: 1” “Mies Mary An 
»f 50 “Mies Joan ded 
resek. Mi "Plencont Mrs. Allan Sherier. Araric 


Y é 7 * 


Gilbev’s brilliant clarity is vour certa 


promise of the best Gin-and- Toni 


Movies Plan Against Moore Despite Bad Hand THE WASHINGTON “POST and TIMES HERALD 


| | : Ey Tuesday, June 12, 1956 45 | 
EN HUNDLEY. [dempsey story © Patterson Plans on Se ptember Fight 


One of the s Largest Tire Dealers jor Over 34 Years 
Our Only Store Open Friday Night til 9 PM. | NEW YORK, June it Hoean (alls 

3446 14th St. H.W TUckerman 2-5100 Jack Dempsey's life story will) new YORK, June 11 (had youth and good health onjheavyweight title,” he said. “If = 
wee be made into a movie with the Floyd Patterson's managef said his side and those factors may somebody isn’t ready in Sep 


former heavyweight champion a, bring about a more rapid heal- tember I'll-post official claims : . 
PM Mei) im if¢ee 1 lie acting in an advisory capacity today he was going ahead with in¢6 They said they'll watch as and ask to be recognized by all a | an 


to coach the actor who will play|plans for a heavyweight title the calcium forms then, at some 


| the Boxing Commissions.” 
BLUE RIBBON TIRES & TUBES his part. | fight with Archie Moore in given time, will be able to give’ Moore has other plans before 
cll : leclude T | Dempsey’s-famous fights will September despite Patterson's me 4 definite answer on when September. He is very much meee 
5 oats an 1S “s 50x be re-enacted, — — “a. on — he.will be ready interested in a proposed match uas\ ourse | 
. .00x . Luis Firpo bout, the Jess Wil-| “I'm operating on the theory) wri... 4 ;, “ith J s J. Park f Barri . | 
. , y do say the average is with James J. Parker of BDatrie, , | 
5.50x16 6.50x15 ‘ lard match and the Gene Tun- we'll fight in September until about two or three months for |Ont., at Toronto or Montreal. . | | 
° ney fights...Dempsey said hel get medical authority to the a broken bone to heal but each Dave Rush, a Toronto mining By Will Grimsley . 
6.40x15 would get a guarantee of $200,- contrary,” said. Manager Gus”... is different. It-all depends executive and fight manager, ROCHESTER, N. Y., June 11 YYA 
6.70x15 §-70x16 000 for the film with a percent- D'Amato ne individual.” seid he te trying te make the 
; , age of the picture. | “The doctors told me Floyd = : 2 aes — match for Toronto in July and »—Stoical Ben Hogan con } ] 
7.10x15 7.60x15 ° cd eee D'Amato said he was not in is ready to put up $200.000. founded listeners today by cal)- 


rT Wt wo” r favor of an operation at the ny ' 
$5 99 VACATION SPECIALS! || present time. - ing Oak Hill ao of the pee 

| , RELINED WHILE YOU WATT Furth x. ; ill be tak i a Open courses ive ever p aye 
= BRAKES we Mies: "$15.50 pf rother Xrars will be taken Tulsa Scene 


Thursday to determine how the and in the next breath adding: oe Oy 

é. * Ply © $7.95 Other Sizes at Guaranteed 20,000 miles . . . (also riveted) break in the knuckle bone of Of 1958 0 en “I'm playing pretty potion. 
6.00x16 H. Conv. © 6-Ply * $7.95 «. : the right hand is healing Unless I improve, my chances 
6.50x16 H. Duty Conv. * 6-Ply © $8.95 ges: | gst gee ALIGN FRONT WHEELS ... $4.45 & $7.50 | Moore’s manager, Charlie a tee _ P don't look very good.” | ‘ 

IDEAL FOR JEEPS, PICKUPS, FARM ” sy Ahoy: MOTOR TUNE-UP 6-cyl. Johnston, ruled out any idea of NEW YORK, June 11 @ party arrivals for the 56th an- 

WAGONS, TRACTORS, PASSENGER sel ci ie Poe gue Mm . Moore boxing Hurricane Jack- The 1958 National Open golf ...5) National Open golf cham- 

CARS, TRAILERS — e cite t 8-cyl. son in case Patterson wasn't championships =~ Rag eto pionship, beginning Thursday, (Od Time 
WHITEWALL TIRE & TUBE | 2%. ‘exvired All prices MUFFLERS INSTALLED FREE ... $7.00 up f/ready.. “We're not interested,” the Southern tits oT; immediately accused the Texas 


include tex. said Johnston. “He just got Club, Tulsa, Okla, June 12-13 master of launching a campaign 
640n15 $6.95 7.60x16 $7.95) cusoanreen 6 Months OPEN SAT. 7:45 AM.) P.M. & ST. ONLY) licked. We're only interested in 14, the United States Golf As o¢ “confusion warfare.” re 
6.70x15 $6.95 8.20x15 $8.95 7 fighters that win.” sociation announced today ines F s etitain | Tennessee i bhiske T 
7.10x15 $7.95 8.20x15 $8.95 FREE PARKING > BRAKE STEERING AND Moore sat in Johnston's office The 1959 championship tour. *"*«> oug s 
. ¢ ' . and talked about his successful nament will be held at the “That's Ben,” dourly said one 
Mail Orders Promptly Filled CHARGE IT ELECTRICAL SERVICE defense of the light heavy- Winged Foot Golf Club, Ma of his longtime rivals. “He's 
Send check or order. Ne C.0.0.s weight title against Yolande maroneck, N. Y., the USGA 4lso talking about how easy Me 
money AT NO EXTRA COST 1909 M St. NW. ST. 3-2066 Pompey in London last week annbunced. This year’s Open course is so they'll toughen it 
‘ie 611 Md. Ave. S.W. ME. 8-6232 and his future plans starts Thursday at the Oak Hill He knows he has a better 
Call RE. 17-1234, ask for Circulation, and order The Wash- at 6th and Independence Ave. “I've already claimed the Country Club, Rochester, N. Y. chance on a tougher course.” 
ington Post and Times Herald guaranteed home delivery. Poe, eM a eieiito “Don't let him kid you about| 
‘ te tl | . 4 his golf.” added another con-| Si) rare 
: tender. “On Thursday, Ben will see 
be 2 to 1 the best golfer in the 
field.” 
Hogan. looking a mite thinner 
and more tired than when he 
was beaten by Jack Fleck at 
San Francisco last year in his 


* ‘ 
bid for an unprecedented fifth . ‘ 
Open championship, predicted S() | erent 
~ ql 7 the tournament would be won eee 
i 


by one of the lowest scores 
ever 


Predicts Low Score 


3 a a “Do you think your record 
. score of 276 set at Riviera in 
uto Enginee 2 ao 
was asked ) eres no 
“Well, I don’t know,” Ben re- f 


plied. “I won't say that. I be- 
. lieve we'll have a very low 
iscore.” 
Hogan said he believed the 
fairways were 10 to 15 yards 
wider than in recent Open 
tournaments, offering a bigger 
hitting area, and that the rough 9 
was far less tenacious 1) eC] 
“You can reach the green out 
of the rough.” Ben added. “It's 
not tall at all and it won't get 
much taller by Thursday. The 
greens putt well. You putt one! 
and you putt them all . 


‘Course Piays Easy’ . . 
| “The course plays very easy | p if 
—asy, that is, for everbody ex- 


cept me. I'm playing pretty 
rotten.” 
Asked what part of his game 
was giving him trouble, Hogan 
said, “All of it.” 
The four-time champion, here’ * 
since last Thursday probing , ] 
every area of the 6902-yard, par an i) e] p 
70 layout, has had two rounds , pe 


of 73 and one of 74. 
FBI Defeats 


Again and again surveys show: ceca 


| Federal Bureau of Investiga- 
tion defeated Federal Storage,| 
'4 to 3, in the opening second! 
half game in the Washington! 
Post and Times Herald Indus-| 
itrial League on the West El 
lipse yesterday | 

This was the first league 


game for Federal Storage,| 
which did not field a team in'| 
the first half 
FED STORAGE 
An i 
Smit 1 2 Promen.se ii §g 
Sa.2t 1 2 2 @Miller.ss 1 oi ii} 
Strauch! 21 Cockrille.rf 40 
rkert 1101 Natoll.if 4021 
v, , - ' . . c 
eine 12090 J 5 0 
Wetes vf ; > Oo fT nN 4 5 7 
* - - i ’ oLt.7 . 
ero! 3 i i 5 1} 


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, 


R—Labda. Smith. Weiss. Carroll. Pro<' 
im b uce. E—Jasineki. Treon 


. 
u Conover i r 
2. Treon. HBP—Baker | 1 iS e 
Conov 278—Treon. 3B— 4 ) 
SP—Natoll a fis 


than all other premiums combined =. Gum 


VIC GAUZZA LEAGUES 
710 ene@ 006.8 . > 


Premio — |iellowed 
The only gasoline that meets new COMPARISON CHART Favorite Gains 


mar aie th | Semifinals in drop by 
. ° is is what automotive engineers reported after comparing New 3 rat ; 
higher premium octane standards "56 Blue Sunoco with premium-priced gasolines in their own cars Recreation I ennis 


. | Zdenka Dalecka, favorite in drop 
and sells at regular gas price . the women’s singles, gained the 
° say Bive Sunece matches say Blue Sunoce matches semifinals of the D. C. Recre- 
or excels premium-priced or excels premium priced ation Department Tennis ‘Tour- 


’ . 

, “ray , , brands fo i ‘ nament yesterday at 16th and h { “> ‘ 
We recently invited a large group of automotive engineers to try oe oS Ags brands for power and Kennedy with a 4—8, 6-1, 6—1| Pore aging 

- - ‘ , , . . saheeinnuaes pick-up victory over Nancy Gates. ) . . 
New 1956 Blue Sunoco, boosted in octane, in their own cars and "The tourney continues today 
ess : —— ; | Yesterday's results: 
give us their reactions. The results of this survey, compiled by an MEN'S DOURLES_4ECOND ocx | Hae’ gi ook all 
. . . , ! rnest Ingram an eer efes ba ‘ 
independent firm of certified public accountants, make New Blue say Blue Sunece matches say Bive Suaoce matches |} Rernie Dennison ond Frank Shere, 4—4, Tennessee Whiskey. 
Sunoco the favorite. 


ii, @—i; Jackson Yank ond Peter Le 
or excels premium-priced or excels premium-priced defeated Prank Magrader and Nelson Rich, full-bodied, 
i, 


brands for anti-knock brands for miles “Teed “ES real whiskey ;;. but 
performance per gallon i Bob Ds _ ae sted - Bensinger | smoother because of 
43% already are users of Blue Sunoco Sed ap Recetde ted, seeareaesl| fam the oalawe “Cher: 
Of the 1,166 engineers who reported on ’56 Blue Sunoco, 43% told OMENS SiNGLES—THIRD ROUND process weed in its 
: : —_- , ' ’ making. Iry this su- 
us they were already users of our gasoline. This was a far greater 2 panes Sagecee op serertma | perb whiskey. You'll 
number than reported using all other premium gasolines combined fetented, Berge —S Saeee) a LE 3 foves 
—perhaps the greatest testimonial any gasoline ever had! a . — 
Blue Sunoco is recommended for the newest high-compression Nats vs. Kan. City 
cars when owners’ manuals specify a premium gasoline. | Tonight, 8 P.M. TENNESSEE WHISKEY 
. 90 Proof by Choice 

> a . 

Premium octane at regular gas price F Distilled and Bottled by 


JACK DANIEL DISTILLERY | 
Lynchburg (Pop. 399), Tenn 


Blue Sunoco is premium in every way, still sells at regular gas 
price, gives many more miles per dollar. Follow the lead of auto- aapio News 


motive engineers. Make your own 10-gallon test today. am on Conneny _tenece 3.S0er Extra 


GRIFFITH STADIUM | \ 


Advance Ticket sales at ©), 
8 AAA Lecations 


Hi-Test...Premium Octane.,.Regular Gas Price...More Miles per Dollar | “=70 2" 


THE WASHINGTON POST «nd TIMES HERALD 
44 Tuesday, June Lal 1956 


Around The Tracks 


Horses and P 


By Walter Haight— 


art i 


HORSE RACING has its sharesof chiselers but the first 
horse chiselers probably were the Egyptians who chiseled the 
equine into their hieroglyphics and thus could have been 


the stone age originators of ° 
In the style of the Nile, 


Jack's Little Green Card.” 
the Egyp- 


tians could have begun the horse art, 


although the Greeks may have 
for me writing it. But, at 
horses have been an art subje« 
through centuries. 


any 


a word 
rate. 
t down 


So far, no horse ever has qualified 


as an art expert, 
the Mule” 


although 
indeed is a 


possibility 


“Francis. 


How 


ever, a horse rider has been brought 


to light who knows his art 

backward and currently is 

strating it—for the money 
Of course, he's Jockey Billy 


forward 
demon- 


$64 000) 


Pearson and he's being rooted every 
step of his TV way by horse players— 
and many 6f us couldn't tell the dif- 


ference between 
and “Mona Lisa.” 


the quality of canvas 


Horse players have been known 


“Whistier’s Mother” 
much less, identify 


Haight 


to paint the town after 


making a killing, give the brush-off to a loser. get well oiled 
and most of them know the colors— stable, that is 


} 


Caste Takes... 


Steeplechase 
At Delaware 


By Walter Haight 
Stam Reporter 

STANTON, Dela. June 1 
Arcadia Stable’s Caste, making 
every landing a happy one for 
rider Patrick Smithwick, won 
the Tom Roby steeplechase as 
the jumping sport was added to 
the Delaware Park activities to- 
day 

The 8-year-old son of Sir Gal- 
lahad 3rd reached the finish 
line four lengths in advance of 
Brookmeade Stable'’s Flaming 
Comet whicl. took the place by 
a nose photo over Liangollen 
Farm's The Proff 

The race, named for Tom 
Roby who has been in a handi- 
capped condition since a 1942 
spill at Belmont Park, was 
marked by one mishap but no 
injuries. Melvin fFerral be 
came separated frora Robert J 
Van Horn’s Ring O’ Roses after | 
covering half the distance 

Caste. who took down $7030 
of a purse that grossed $10,590 
was clocked in 3.42 for the 
about two miles, a creditable 
showing with the course slight- 
ly dulled by last night's rain 
The record of 3.40 2/5 is the 
property o. Crooning Wind who 
carried 130 pounds. Caste toted 
147 

There were only two defi 
nite leaders in the race. Mor 
ris Dixon's Pine Shot went to 
the front early and was fol 
lowed by Flaming Comet, Hv 
vania; Songai and Caste for 
most of the first swing of the 
course. 

However, Smithwick released 
some of the pressure he held 
on Caste approaching the sev- 
enth jump and the ancient geld- 
ing responded to fairly fly into 
the lead; never to be htaded. 


BELMONT RESULTS 


1—?7 fertones: $3000 
~ +e Cason 


‘OBrien 
Sweet a Wendy G ‘petana) 
Market ape. * B ch 


Piop en Bla 
aint Piy. fPriendly Ace Mais n ” ‘speaker 
Heqnd ’ goo and fBonosicur 


1:25 
20.20 1.90 7.68 
b7.00 11.10 

3.36 
jeket Se. A 


3-6 furlongs: $9500; 1°11% 
Eee yrie (Serenson) 16 “% 
itt Track (Guerin) 

(Sch wizer ) 
Darling 
Vernal and Hootsie 

_ DAILY DOUBLE PAID £171.00 


Serene: & 3,700 


4.20 


Aagusta 
Simple 


Betty's Pet 


58 
7.10 4.30 4.90 
‘J 


(Perratecte) 
Killer. Ardan 
rffen. Presented. Dave 
6 fur) ngs. 


87700 
A iene (Balley 
tAtkineon) 
Valles. (Reland) 
Rosetta Lea. Drusi!! 
er Tor Jet's War 
rown "hedge Pogo Stick 
“ile Gas and Giladdes' 
5—5 furlongs 
b—Lealleah € 
Getssamer 
estene (Andersen) 
b—Lebkuchen, Enheim. 4—U 


Prince 


cia 

Mise seroni mo 
Years 

57% 

4.20 7.70 7.40 

15.98 3.00 

7.30 

Tree 


Pp. 


IT’S ENOUGH 
good old Washington Jake. 
bless his soul, turn over in 
his grave but it is true the 
Laure] race track has come 
up with an art competition— 
three subjects: (1) general 
racing at Laurel (2) behind 
the scenes racing activity and 
(3) the Washington D. C. In- 
ternational race. 

Fortunately, eligibility is 
not confined to horse players 
Competition is open to all 
artists residing within a 50. 
mile radius of Washington or 
Baltimore 

The painting can be done 
in oll, egg tempera, polymer 
tempera or encaustic—so that 
let's out all us “Kilroy Was 
Here” pencil guys, if you 
know what I mean 

Among other awards are 
some cash prizes. So grab 
your brush and paint yourself 
even. Bill Yeager is taking 
Baltimore entries at No. 2 
Commerce St. and Emanuel 
Levin is taking Washington 
entries at 1341 G st. nw. 

I asked Molly Mutuel the 
difference between gouache 
and casein and she _ said, 
“darned if I Know, but, if I 
were you, I'd parlay ‘em.” 


to make 


BETWEEN RACES — The 
big switch between Delaware 
Park and Belmont is on— 
Ricci Tavi and the colt he 
beat, Fabius. are Belmont 
bound for the Belmont Stakes 
while Level and the fillies 
Princess Turia and Beyond, 
at Delawdre bound for the 
Oaks Trainer Jimmy 
Jones said Fabius came out 
of last weekend's race in good 
shape. He was not dismayed 
by the colt’s effort and be- 
leves he will make amends 
against Needles Delaware 
Park stages its first hurdle 
race since 1950 on the Tues- 
day program . I wnder- 
stand Eddie Arcaro will get 
the Fabius mount in the Bel- 
mont which was lost to Willie 
Hartack when he was sus- 
pended John and Lawr- 
ence Roby, brothers of former 
steeplechase rider Tom Roby 
for whom yesterday's feature 
was named, were guests of 
the track. As usual, Dela- 
ware Park will send movies 
of the race to the Long Island 
hospital where Roby has been 
a patient since his near-fatal 
accident in 1942. 


ry 
Nyal 


Fish. Magic 


| Miss 
‘0 d—Quite 


' Comet 
b—Polarcy 
Asbury-Clag-Brent entry 

Miller-Pine Qone Parm ent 
$4500: 1:43% 
Desery) 5.80 


Sunny 8u 
ine 


miles 
Pivine Vrapese f 


Passage 


& furlongs: $5000 

Red Hennicae (Areare) 

Semmer Tan (Goeertn) 
Hilarious (Atkineon ) 

Cett Jéck,. Ch 


cnarca 


a6 3.08 7.606 
2.58 7.90 
5.18 
iffenard and Prince 
rR 
81. 1:44's 
Principle 7.40 
vescauaaee! 
(Weedheuse) 
weet Chariot 
aOtrikser-Pields 


mn Ce 


Valea : ent ry 


—— = — ———$_—— ee _--— 


Surprising 
Russians 


Near Top 


| 


| STOCKHOLM, June ll 
|The superb horsemanship of 
riders from five nations turned 
‘the opéning event of the Eques- 
trian Olympic Games today 
‘into 2 colorful and tense 11- 
‘hour drama in Stockholm Sta- 
dium under Scandinavia's hot- 
test sun since last summer 
| Horses and riders from Ger- 
many, Britain, Switzerland, 
Finland and Russia went 
through the intricate and 
usualiv unspectacular dressage 
i\moves in near perfect preci- 
l sion to take the lead in the 
Three Day Trials 

The two United States\riders 
fared poorly 
| Horsemen the world over ex- 
‘pected Germany and Britain 
to take the lead, but seeing the 
Russians up there in such high- 
class horse company must rank 
as one of the big shocks in 
sports 

Just other 
triple 
to- 


they have in 
sports the Russians in 
time have moved straight 
ward the too 

As the Russians 
the Americans and 
other nations with great 
traditions slurrped 


as 


moved wp. 
sey eral 
horse 


German Leads 


After the first 30 riders in 
the three-day dressage had fin 
ished their 12-minute perform- 
ances today. Otto Rothe of 
Germany was in the lead with 
98.4 penalty points 

Points will remain unofficial 
until one hour after tomor- 
row’'s final dressage ride. If no 
protests have been filed by 
then all results will become 
officicl. 

Maj. Leurence Rook, the 
British rider who became the 
unfortunate goat of the 1952 
Olympic Games at Helsinki 
where he fell and was dis 
qualified, was -in second place 
with 101.6. Kiaus Wagner of 
Germany was third with 102.4 

The fewer penalty points a 
rider and horse receive the 
better their position will be 
when the remainder of the 
events on the three-day trial 
program—endurance and jump- 
ing—are run off Wednesday 
and Thursday. 


Two Americans 


the 30 riders today 
were Americe’s Maj. Jonathan 
Burton of Berwyn, Ill, with 
155.6 in 27th place and Frank 
Duffy of Birmingham, Mich., 
with 162.4 in 28th place 

The Equestrian Olympics 
also include the Grand Prix 
the great prize) jumping Sun- 
day and Grand Prix Dressage 7 
Friday and Saturday. 

The remaining 27 competitors 
in the three-day event perform 5 
their dressage tests tomorrow 
i\'Those who took part in dress- 
‘age tests today are free until 
Wednesday. 

Riders and mounts round- 
‘ing out the top six today were: 
Fourth—Roland Perret, Swit- 
zerland, 105.6: fifth—K. O. E 
Tolvanen, Finland, 107.6: sixth 
'—Valerian Kouibychev;.Russia, 
110.8 

Dressage events can 
dreary and dul: to watch 

Today a crowd of 10,000 
turned out in the stadium 
where in 1912 Equestrian 
Olympic events first were held 

Dressage are exercises in 
movements, paces, timing, co- 
Ordination and suppleness per- 
formed at a walk, trot or 
canter. 't all goes toa prove a 
horse's obedience 

Today's dressage generally 
was very good—that is except 
for the Americans, Argenti- 
nians, Spaniards and Irishmen 


Among 


be 


Railbird Longshot 
WATCH AIR 
Seventh Race, Delaware 


ota. Charts at Delaware 


(Copsright. 1956 br Trianele Pub 
a CLEAR—TRACK 


—One yo. ti 

. at 

ace same Winne er rs un 
oxy Irish bY Pilate. Trained by R . v 
Joe key Wet 


rinsT 


Por 4-ye oon an ma 
* past at 2 "63 y “Oh or 


= 


o-AIoVUReanwt . 


Aurenne 
ae RNE $11.20 
NICE 20 
aa reached con 
wear down “ies 
asaumec ct 


7.80 
$7 


Race Ad e rallied an 5 | ’ 


ica’ 


one- eintn mi 
7 
g£00c 


RUSSEL 


mi sCF 
Was et e' 
one nt 
sround 


ons. Inc.) 
Soce popese 


4) by " occuby— Por 4- tart 
ovelmat lochan Stables 
H 


_Trained _ i J M 


R&R BO 
18.10 
2.20 


s2.80; "OR, 


80 


anc ntinued her winner for 
atter fol PP. Amber Fox 
clear op 
r Rernice 


For maiden 
Off at 2:3 


Odda 
2 RO 


60 
jrand 


ENO CAP 


20. $3.60 


(2) TERNE 
(5) MARLOW 


Double 


$123.20 


THIR RACE—6:x 


ta 
is’ 'b ’ 
. Trained by H 


rmosa if 
ar Biscuit (Sneliines) 
‘Root’ 


oble _Warrior ‘Vincent: |! 


ary CHANCE $4 9 20. pie 60 


A-Chanc 


we BH - PFD) - 


.1 
$i) 


ul 
la . ed su 


ey urlones ‘iehute 
les Went to 
Won 


i Pagriay atti vadaen out 
weista a. traindd bs by ; i tee. Tim 


~ 

agg 

ere ee ee 
- 


w2Ve Qo 


aamore! 
vy ‘Lane 


20 


raced on tnto defeat 


$2500 Por 
-o OTT at 


»-Rine Oo Roses 


a-Mrs 


tence well an 
lamine Com 
The Proff 


~ 
evr0?--om 


ADVICE. 886.80. on we) 
to attain @ clear isids: allowances 

e tmrroved Start aeee wy 
the Byrne's 

Sweep Trained ‘ey 


menace 


ATO 8? 60 $4.60 KING CHALILA 
Baits 


vw) 
= 


“A oa — | 


rapiciy estebdiisahed 6 
‘ 


“e broke 
ress lacked 


rirta ‘nan E—About 
year-olds and up 
va 


“JOLT $9 40. 65.20. $4.00 
$4.50 


se! 8h 
Graohen l 


s4 
SUNDAY PIT 


hotter 
(Perra 

P Denckia- S 
Van Horn- Arcad} a Btables entry 


pesespes ac + 


FIGHTS SAE — Gite er! 
ent 


down Bia: mal Yo Per 


com ma 
wnwue 


~ Aa, se 
Puree 
até 
ame 


W ish metuck 
; 


$3500 
16 606 «6h Oft 
Winner 


by 


$4.50, $3.60; AMBER 


the na . and ehoo 


LARCHALI 


le setting 


mace up cround 
pn ete RACE—One a 


a one-eighth 

al) wan on 

w ine 
Rosemont 


Cama: co 
Time si‘ 


ane 


reg 


Rm wo & vr - 


_ 
530000008 Oo 


ae & eee eee ~ 
2 ~1-+)-4 -BOt ot 


; ; 
>» De! 


Mr S&S May entre b-R J 
¢-M. HH Dixon-Mrse. W. C 
2.40: FLAMING COMET. 69.20 

the course to 
advantage while 

Was ways formidable and 
_a- do ~ Pine Shot 
ones Purse 
to post 


fepsne 2 
be 
= coon 


$4 3-vear- 


1? e 
M 
Bo 


000. Fo 
Of at 
ya Wi 


by 
M 


ily inmer 
Jo rery » Breen by 
Time 


v 


ODP DP & tow -18 - 
- “6 


> 
_— 


IR &eon-r-o'9 
- 


#3 $6 
‘7 
F' 
; 
§ 


2-3I90V0000°C. 


len 


“$8.00 


a der restraint. moved 


eet me 


fa and was ed. wel 
Na tle a aah | 


German Rider Leads as Equestrian Games Open 


Racing Selections at Delaware Park 


PADDOCK 
Beguiie 
pone 
urnpike 
Intuition 
piog all 
ridal Wreath 
Pairshot 


Apache Chief 
Briny 
Norrsken 


' 


Bad Conduct 


Flower Picture 
Wedding Rine 
Roots 


rate | All, 


Tom 
yladdie Cs ri 


 [aNew Ren 


RAILBIRD 
ftly 
eguile 
Bililes 
Bridayr 


Diogha!! 
Intuition 


Beam 


Wreat rh 


ee d Pigeon 
eabir 
Cain “Raiser 


SMART 


eC 
Bad Conduct 


Watch —-! 
Sal's Bao 
Wedding Hine 
Pour 
Riogha!! 
Colony Dame 


Jacks 


Piower 
Sa) 


OLD BONES 
lillies Beam 
ule 
Denny 
Briday Wr reath 


CLOCKERS RENNINGS 

Kapador 

8 ise J 

tion 

Chord 

Third-C 
hot 


Int 
Lost 
Corktage 
Pairshot 

rriwsa 

old Pigeon Mowleesnha 
Malieabie Malleabie [ i Pieeon 
Mowleesha Ma! lead! e 
Bea hk Apac he Chief 
Briny Dee Dar Trust 
Apache Chief cke 
TENOC( 
Kinda @mart 
Reimont Breese 
Dark 


rkacge 


Adache ch ef 
Norreke Rerr 
Peno 
Ris 4a 8m ar 

abu rm « ah 


FI ows. Bas TURE 
Dar* 
Sails ‘ 


Pour 
R ran 


. @ 
Pictur 
ws 


Rieghal) 
York 


Jacks 
~” - 
Colany Dame 


Tem 
; 


Joy 


Kapador 
Bee uile 


Dios 
in cuithe 


Phil 


Mowlersha 
Joan 
8 8 
Apache Chief 

ur 


Los 


Retty 
Kinda Smart 
Coburn 's 


Not 


A ae + ne 
Sa Boot 


RIOGMANL ~ | Riek 


Cee 


AP “ 
maker 


CONSENSUS As 
Beculle 
Bilies Beam 
Boft!y 
In Quition 


pognats 
ridal 


Wreath 
Pairshot 


pelt 


lis Carol 


Cold Pigecn 
Malleabie 


E. I 
Dieddah _— s Mowileesha 


ov 
t Hotidagy 
Barr 
Bad Conduct 
Piower A poate 
Part 


Wish 
forfree 


al 
Jacks 


r Jack Four 
— Y 


Paddock 


FIRST RACE—Paree. &: 
ene and oene- statoonte 
aBecuile (‘Cutcha 

nny ‘No Boy 
Turnpike ‘Servis) 


“a 


2 eet eet 


~— FP RBewY VvRowUew Ow -ror 


, & 
"eattic H Ol 
SECOND RACE—Puree 
2 wtnas (16) 
aint on (S8huk) 
aDi oahal 
ride! 


Cc Macleod Ir 


Picks 


t-vear-elde and Ge: 
miles (16) 
Oo 


BIHee year-olds; 


Pails to figure 
Must show something 
t improve 
Out Ger in this 
pointment 
Has worked wel) 
Dull race rece ’ 
> 


claiming 


claiming 


"Em at Delaware 


FOURTH RACE—Perse £9000; é-rear-clde and ep 


six ferlengs (7) 
§.2 R-rved 
yet saea 


5 
} owleesha 


FIFTH RACE—Peree, 82500 t-year-old maidens: 
weichts: five furlemes (*) 


*1 Apache Chief 


6202 —bpe- 
IFO CCOSCOCOSOVOuUT e& 


Je 
ind 
~_ 


Ho _ n 

SIXTH RACE—Peree. 84000 
six fertemes (*) 

& Penoc« 


cay 


‘-vear-olds end Ge 


SEVENTH RACE—Paree 
and ene-sixteenth miles 


S3508: S-pear-olds: claiming 
‘%> 


Longshot Daily Double 
KING POMP and LAVISH 


: pot 
aka: ara M he 


en 


THIRD RACE—Poeree 
Gallant’: allowances 


Park 


» nN 
Lamontague-F. H 


SA500: 
aheou 


i-vear en and ap 
+1 


Bontecou entry 


LIGHTR ax oy eres BR500, 4-vear-clds ond es 
. 


Best Bet—RIOGH. <I ‘th race) 


claiming 


special 


allewance 


20-1 


claiming 


SUFFOLK ENTRIES 


a 
oes pee-& | 


Fae 


-year-o: 


*cKe 


a 
< 
a 


J + pe eo me wt pe ee 


- > DBE sane’ 
| 


Roya! 


ear-o) 


POWDY Ow wD! ws 
-.* » : t 


Lady Priam 


} and 4-year-olds 
iZ Easy Siam 


ta) 


Jageld ( Fairbe 


Autumn 
Lecky B 
Light 


~~ OO \e- . 
6203@ -1-~IWe tv 


145° 


andy 
Better Pilate 

Addie ; 
5" m rads et 
. Tach 


te 


a RADIOS 


iA ma! idens 


Sary (Behen 
Odd Trick 
Game in 
“AX Al 
etit . 


+—1.. @ 
Overpriced 
Lady Cea 
Little Leeks 


BALMORAL 


Pe@im 


Gs up 


*Senor Gr 


AP Selections 


AP AT SUPFOLEA 
1—Appeonaueg., 
Blank ¢ 
Al 

3—Mar 


Whirt, Clean 


> 
i—Sir Country. Saddle 


ert 

5——ZIPPER. Peepcha 

6—Individuate 

j—Dr Jekrvil 
Grindeve 

-_ 


Aldenson, Besten Sir 


o—Melpet. BRrewn 


Saucer 


Easy Sie 
ql. Cousin 


Brendeonwood 
Indian 


Bantam. 


DOWNS 
Julia 


m Mae 
Geerge 


Black 
Dennis 


Tramp. Sheer 


Quick Stream 
Stace 
Led. Sener , 
Rases loaded 
Stene 


AP AT BALMOpAI 


1—Bertie 
°*.-Heir Apparent 
ne 
\.—Tees Les Temps. 
F—Delvers Led. Revrat 
Cobble 
$—-Deris Mart 
— ns 


Ambiguous 
Adame OF Ox. Site 


i—PFor Free 


Drname Dave 
Thunderbird 


Narihe 


Miranda 
Ask 


Valence 
s Pepper, Irish 


, pitter te. Chicalan! 
MIRAL red 


Reval 


Breakers 


St : rt wy 1 s) 


Whisties Bre (Parent) 
Giow 
Trained 
and Easy Tom 
Ll mile 
: > 

Dartide (Gress) 
Bandit ‘Zebr) 


Babe 
In Harmon) 
Imprevu 
DAILY DOUBLE PAID 
6 furlong 
eur Sidney (Parent) 
(Grees) 


Hand 
eo mane 


1.¢8 
‘Ce 
nha 


SUFFOLK 


15 
ib se ‘= 
2 Be 


RESULTS 

idren. Cellini 
nish Game, Aris Kringle 
ry Party Special. Alle 


yt fur) - 2800 
nate ir a ee} 


Kays Polilme 
7.80 Bteppu 
mks) 7.76 
1“ 
Ravio! 
Pac 


Pree Sun 
'y Step Rockei 
nad 70 yards $2500 

6—-6 furlongs 
emfeolery 
kin aver 
seqveots 


$2600: 1:13 
(White) 5.00 | 
Corintiana 
One Star Powe 
By Herself 


Good ‘ n Pun 


$40.40 

12% 

14.40 7.20 
So 


r.ongs 
Bis Pred (Gensales) 
Pen = Fanner (Pairbanks) 
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By Aubrey Graves 
Outdoors Editor 


CAPE 


HATTERAS, N. C.—“All 
beauties, pry those eyelids open! 
stretching over quickly ... We're almost there!” 


right, you slumbering 
Get your yawning and 
It was the 


voice of Bob Ryan, himself seemingly as sleepless and tire- 


less as a windmill. 


He was summoning us 


to early morning breakfast at Nags Head, 
N. C., after an early morning bus ride from 


Washington. 


All 37 of us were either members of the 


Ski Club of Washington or their guests. 


Ryan, who combines the finest talents of 
Bob Hope and George Gobel, is the group's 
special activities director. 

Trip Leader Bob Luntey (National Park 
Service) pulled up behind us in his station 
wagon. He had brought along three other 
members for whom there was no room on 


Graves 


the chartered bus 


We were at last on the lonely Outerbanks of North Caro- 
lina—a thin ribbon of land sometimes only a few hundred 


ards wide which stretches for 


rom Kitty Hawk 

BREAKFAST OVER, some 
of the widest awake members 
of the party climbed up a 
vast sand dune, more than 
60 feet in height, which the 
sea and the wind cooperative- 
ly had piled up 100 yards or 
so from the highway 

From this elevation we 
looked down on scattered 
dwellings along t shore 
where the “Bankers’\ias the 
early residents were \alled) 
got the it.spiration which 
brought about the name, 
Nag's Head 

A lantern, legend has it, 
was tied around the neck of 
an old and gentile horse. Then 
this old “nag” was led slowly 
up and down the tallest of 
the sand dunes (now known 
as Jockey's Ridge) so that 
the light shone out to sea 

As a captain gaw this gently 
bobbing light. it seemed to 
be from. a ship riding at 
anchor if a sheltered harbor. 
But, when he tried to put into 
this harbor, his ship piled up 
on treacherous shoals. Land 
pirates then made the crew 
walk the plank and looted and 
burned the ship. 

WE MADE the 16car ferry 
at Oregon Inlet at high tide 
—the only time when there 
fs enough water at the slip 
to float so heavy a vehicle as 
a bus. Farther out in the in- 
let (created when high seas 
during a hurricane breached 
the Outerbanks) the water is 
so deep there'll probably 
never be a bridge across it 

Come June, this area is a 
mecca for devotees of heavy 
tackle. Fishermen come here 
from long distances to boat 
some of the big beauties 


REACHING Bodie Island 
we stopped off at headquar 
ters of the Cape Hatteras 
Nationa! Seashore Recreation 
Area, where Chief Naturalist 
Verde Watson showed colored 
slides of the flora and fauna 


of the area, eventually to be 
dedicated as a national park. 
The preserve contains 28,500 
acres of beach land, divided 
into three islands: Bodie 
(pronounced “Body”), Hat- 
teras and Ocracoke 

Because of its limited ac- 
cessibility (by small ferries 
only) there are no great 
crowds here. Within the 
boundaries of the area are 
only eight villages, sitting 
like lonely seagulls on the 
sand dunes. 


SATURDAY afternoon we 
climbed 268 stairsteps to the 
top of famous Cape Hatteras 
lighthouse. We could see 
clearly the white foaming 
waters swirling around Dia- 
mond Shoals, where (since 


The faces of Ada Kimsey 
(left) and Mildred Litchfield 
reflect the fun of members 
of the Ski Club of Washing- 
ton during their outing at 
Cape Hatteras. 


the beginning of local! record- 
ed history, in 1526) 2264 ships 
have met disaster 

Here the warm Gulf Stream 
collides with colder currents 
from the North. They pile up 
huge shoals of sand and 
create violent weather dis- 
turbances. Ships driven upon 
the shoals find them as deadly 
as hidden reefs 

Later we bathed and re- 
laxed on a clean, sandy beach 
At night, led by Ryan and 


—— ee 


SHAVE YOUR WHISKERS 
..NOT YOUR FACE! 


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Surf Substitutes for Snow 


Versatile D. C. Ski Clubbers 
Invade Lonely Cape Hatteras 


more than 100 miles Southward 
} sna “ So tet mein 


wrt teat Outdoors 


TUESDAY, 


JUNE 


12, 1956 


his accordion, we sang folk 
songs around a _ chill-dispel- 
ling campfire 


— 


BELONGING to this ski 
club is a lot like patronizing 
a modern drug store. While 
skiing is the dominant inter- 
est from December 1 to April 
1, you can get a lot of other 
recreational values for your 
money throughout the rest of 
the year 

On recent weekends the 
ski boys and girls have 
camped and hiked up Old Rag 
Mountain in Shenandoah Na- 
tional Park, and enjoyed a 
“gray water” canoe trip down 
the Potomac. Next, there'll be 
a square dance at the Dunn 
Loring, Va., firehouse. * 

Other summer events will 
include a moonlight cruise 
down the Potomac, a day of 
rock climbing near Mouth of 
Seneca, W. Va., a week-end at 
Rehoboth Beach, and the an- 
nual “work trip” to put the 
club’s slope near Davis, 
W. Va., in readiness for ski- 
ing, come winters snow 


ON THIS Hatteras trip 
(besides Ryan and Luntey) 
were Kosalind Bates, Doro- 
thy Pratt, Ernie Huber, Carol 
Pollock, Patricia Walters, 
Sally Gwinn, Norman Hitch- 
man, Ralph Hills, Dorothy 
and Margaret Mills, Charlotte 
Meyer, Bridget Maginn. 
Helen Crossley, Arnold 
Mason, Ada Kimsey. Millie 
Litchfield and Marvin 
Stephens 

Also along were Louise 
Grotlisch, Phyllis Reid, Joan 
Mertz, Bob Thompson. Jean 
Dubendorf, Bobbie Allen, 
Eleanor Beaird, John Phelps, 
Al Neumann, Paul Cheatham. 
R. F. Barnack, Margaret Mce- 
Adams, Ron Fett, Marge Kim- 
ber, Ralph Tenus (president), 
Alice Trudgeon, Albert Wil- 
goos, Jewell and Phyllis 
Blankenship, Mac Chrysler 
and Phil Townsend, who 
drove our bus 


_s * 


By Frank Hoy. Stal! Photographer 


Heavy Traffic on Potomac 


Cathy Deegan and Skippy White, Georgetown University 
coeds in boat 7, “harden up” to the windward at the start 
of a race for the Potomac River Women's Championship off 
Buzzard Point. In the background Boat 4, on a port tack, 
seems to be caught in the path of another boat. 


Tempest on the Potomac 


Skipper Retains Her Crown 


By Peggy Reynolds 

A TEMPEST dinghy, popu- 
lar vehicle for college sailing. 
an old-fashioned 
bathtub, but minus the legs, 
and with the 
water on the 
other } _ 
most 
time 

As though 
riding a float- 
ing log. skip- 
per and crew 
are in con- 
stant motion. 
On the wind, 
they are ei- 
ther over the Reynolds 
rail or scrambling back to 
keep the boat from rolling 
on top of them. Downwind, 
the little craft careens along, 
responding instantly to each 
wind variation and to every 
ripple on the water 

To be ready for anything, 
Tempest sailors cultivate a 
stance known as the “dinghy 
crouch.” For those of college 
age, this method of sailing 
probably works off energy 
which might otherwise 
turned into panty raids 
for older folk, the Tempest 
pulls some long-forgotten 
muscles 


resembles 


Despite its fragile appear 
ance, the Tempest is a tough 
little craft, durable that 
the George Washington Uni 
versity Sailing Club lent six 
of them for the Potomac 
River Women's championship 
contest off Buzzards Point 
The boats came through with- 
out major damage. but they 
thoroughiv exhausted six 
teams in a round-robin con- 
test 


so 


WINNER WAS former 
Chesapeake Bay Women's 
Champion Linda Youngs of 
Old Dominion Boat Club. with 
her sister, Eula. as crew 
Linda became Potomac 
women’s champion when she 
was 18, the minimum age for 
eligibility, and she has held 
the title, for the straight five 
years since. Saturday she left 
the fleet well behind, taking 
four first places and two sec. 
onds, for a total of 34 points 

Linda will represent the 
Potomac area at the Bay con 
test June 28th at the Naval 
Academy. The winner will 
move to the Mid-Atlantics in 
July, from whence the victor 


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enters a national champion- 
ship event 

Mary Jolly, of GW, and 
crew Ann Campbell, were 
second, with 26. GW's Helen 
Ropes, with crew Diane Wil 
was. third with 21 

Trailing the field were this 
writer, with Marg es??orn- 
blower as crew, 18: Tee Jew- 
with Barbara Brown, 16; 
White, a George 


son 


ett 
and Skippy 
town Sailing team crew mem- 
ber sailing her first race at 
the helm, 10. Skippy’s crew, 
Cathy Deegan, slid into the 
river midway in the contest, 
but was able to climb aboard 
and carry on 

George Collins of GW con- 
ducted the races, assisted by 
Paul Parramore as score- 
keeper. Hal Boericke, trophy 
chairman extempore, pre- 
sented as prizes a teddy bear 
for first, a panda for second, 
with a promise of commem- 
orative brass plates to fol 
low 


FIVE BRITISH services 
fielded a sailing squad with 
depth, trouncing the U. §S 
Marine Corps School 91.4 to 
76.9 in a contest held Sunday 
off Quantice@, Va. in the 
Marine's Lightning and Rebel 
class boats 

The British 


Army, * Royal 


Marina Opens 
On Patuxent 


GOOD NEWS for boa: own- 
ers is the recent expansion 
of area docking facilities 
with the opening of Cape St 
Marys Marina on the Pa- 
tuxent River between Bene- 
dict and Solomons, Md 

Jimmy Hines, the proprie- 
tor, says he already has 98 
slips, and can take boats up 
to 48 feet in length. Power 
is necessary to negotiate the 
channel into sheltered Big 
Cat Creek, where the marina 
is. located. Presently, maxi- 
mum channel depth at low 
tide is 6 feet 

In addition to marine ne- 
cessities such as electricity, 
gasoline, launching ramp, 
and ice. the operators . are 
providing free electric bail- 
ing, 24-hour watchman serv- 
ice, a pier for fishing and 
crabbing, and a bathing 
beach. A fleet of 14-foot alu- 
minum boats are for rent 
by the dav. and snack bar 
and restaurant are on the 
property 


Dredging to Create 
New Fishing Hole 


A DREDGE is deepening 
the Anacostia River channel 
near the Baltimore-Washing- 
ton Parkway, as part of the 
United States Army Engi- 
neers’ flood control program 
for the Peace Cross area. 
When this work is completed, 
this new deep water channel 
should divert sonie of the 
fish migrations from the up 
per Potomac tidewater and 
create a new fishing hole in 
the Northeast area 


i 


Navy, Royal Air Force, Royal 
Marines, and the Ministry of 
Supply each tossed in three 
teams of three men, and in 
some cases women and chil 
dren. When they 
sailing, the families 
Marine Corps landing craft 
around the course, and the 
cheering and clapping pro- 
vided a refreshing change 
from the usual silent sailboat 
contest 

“All in all, we got 45 British 
out in sailboats, and at least 
60 out on the water.” said 
British Lt.Col. Robert- Brit- 
ten, one of the originators 
of the eve..*. “That, after all, 
was the purpose of the af- 
fair; they were pleased. to 
win. too. of course 

While the U. S. Marine 
teams, for the most part 
sailed all three races, the 
British put in fresh crews for 
each race. This led to a bit 
of jolly confusion when, im 
mediately prior to the final 
contest, one boat was ieft 
sailing by itself in mid-river 

U. S. “larine Capt. A. E 
“Monty” Montrief, the other 
originator, invited the visitors 
to return in 1956 for another 
tussle. The founders hope the 
races will become an annual 
affair 


were not 
rode 


Large-Mouth Bass 


Biting in Carolina 
KILBURN CASTELL of 
Arlington, Va... says ree | 
mouth. bass are biting at 
Coinjock, N. C.. on Currituck | 
Sound. He says he stays at| 
Waterlily Hunting and Fish 
ing Camp. ($6.50°a day for 
room and board.) Boat. mo 
tor and guide cost him $15 
a day | 
Castell recently returned 
from catching striped mal! 
lin swordfish in Mexico. He 
angled from a 1i12-foot row 
boat with outboard moto! 
and says he caught marlin 
larger than the rowboat 
His smallest, which weighed | 
250 pounds, towed the boat 
around and was hard to han 
dle without a fighting chair 


14th & U N.W., NO. 


: ae 
DAD DESERVES 


PRices 
BEGIN AT 


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T me Poyments 
Avejlabvie 


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7-6300 


’ 


In Wake of Northeaster 


Fish Prove Fickle at Choptank 


By Don Carpenter 
A DRY Northeaster on the 
Chesapeake kept many an- 
glers at the docks Friday and 
Saturday. Those who ven- 
tured out 
Saturday 
evening had 
a little. luck. 
Sunday aft- 
ernoon 
came off 
fair in the 
weather de- 
partment 
but the fish- 
ing could 
only be 
termed poor 
An example of how fickle 
the finny tribe can be is 
shown by the case of four 
Nimrods who drove to the 
Eastern Shore from Wash 
ington Saturday and in a 
very short time. near the 
mouth of the Choptank Riv 
caught 62 large hara 
and 18 big Norfolk 
spot. (We saw the fish.) The 
same two couples went back 
to the same place Sunday 
and did not get a bite. How 
ever, catches in the Chop 
tank this week exceeded al! 
other fishing points that w 
know of 
The Wildgrounds near Pop- 
lar Island is loaded with 
shmoos Or sea squab 
got nearly 60 of these de! 
cious fish there Sunday mort 
ing. but did not catch an: 
other kinds of fish except 
some toadfish. Les Marshal! 
headed the party of seven 
shmoo fishermen, which co! 
tained a couple of “Doubtin 
Thomases.” 
To remedy 
we quickly dropped 
shmoos in a hot skillet o 
board our Happyway I! 
soon evervhbody was freal'' 
trying to catch these famou 
bait-stealers 
WE SAW Captalil Erni 
Clayton out on his boat 
Corkey II with a party Sun 
day from t in West 


Carpenter 


this situatior 
seve! 


mic mre 


We 


and 


, ; , 
mh is evar? ,? 


River. Skipper Clayton said 
he caught a nice mess of 
hardheads at No. 27 buoy in 
the upper bay on Saturday 
Jesse Page on his boat the 
Eagle caught a bushel of 
croakers Saturday night. 
yet he waited for hours with 
out a single bite. When the 
fun started he got both hard 
heagis and large spot 

Apparently it is very im 
portant now to get the right 
tide and right time in the 
tide and the right place to 
catch croakers. The commer 
cial nets are still full of fish. 
which proves they are around 
in numbers. We think water 
temperatures will have to be 
raised by hot weather before 
Bay fishing will be really 
good 

Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Shaw 
daughter Linda and five 
other FBI couples fishing at 
South River Saturday eve 
ning caught seven varicties of 
fish Lius some crabs, yet the 
total catch was only some two 
dozen fish. In the headwaters 
South River creeks cat- 
and perch are plentiful 
for those who angle with live 
grass shrimp 

The Cha‘n bridge area of 
the Potomac: is full of shad 
rolling” on top. Casters are 
cetting “whites” 
two to three pounds a 
copy. Rockfish of pan size, 
about a pound, are still being 
eaught there. along with lots 
f catfish weighing from two 

hree pounds each 


of 
Hach 


from 


THE Annual Chesa 
eake Bay Fishing Fair will 
e held at Tilghman, Md., 


7. 18 and 19 


2181 


The Corps of Engineers. 
Lmted States Army, fas an 
nounced that United States 
’ Ordnance Lab 
ng underwater explosive 
the waters of the 

River between 
Island and Point 

tience, Md. Explosions take 
place in daytime and vessels 
engaged in tests display red 


2VAi is ©€OT) 
duct 


[eats in 


weighing | 


flags. All watercraft are re- 
quested to not approach or re- 
main near the vessels which 
display a red flag. 

Last week Capt. Louis 
Bean of Ridge, Md., gaffed a 
40-pound black drifm on the 
Southwest Middle grounds 
that Billie Warren had fought 
for a half hour. This past 
week two anglers fishing near 
Thomas Point in shallow 
water had heavy strikes and 
lost their whole lines to large 
fish, apparently black drum. 
June is a likely time to catch 
these large oyster eaters. 
Several years ago we saw a 
number of red drum or chan- 
nel bass caught during June 
near Bloody Point at the 
south end of Kent Island—the 
farthest point up the bay we 
ever saw “puppy drum.” 


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FOAM RUBBER — A 
Gilliland f nw 


a 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 


Tuesday, June 12, 1956 


Released Lists, 


Associated Presse 


Draft Aide Says f 


A draft official said yesterday 
he authorized release of pro- 


spective inductees’ names and 
addresses to a Texas mayor be- 
cause he thought they were 
wanted for patriotic purposes. 

Lt. Col. R. B. Hall Jrv of the 
Texas Selective Service head- 


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quarters said he later learned 
the names were being useg for 
insurance solicitation. He said 


the authorization to release 
them was then canceled. 

Hall told the House Armed 
Service Investigating Subcom- 
mittee he authorized giving the 
information to Kenneth Sim- 
mons who he said had tele- 
phoned and identified him-| 
self as mayor of Avinger, Tex. 

Since the inquiry came from 
“the mayor of a small city,” Hall 
said, “I thought the informa- 
tion would not be used for any 
purpose other than patriotic.” 

The Subcommittee at earlier 
hearings received testimony 
that Simmons obtained lists of 
men scheduled for early induc 
tion and sought out insurance 
purchase prospects among 
them 

Simmons, no longer mayor of 


New Way Without Surgery 


Science Finds Healing Substance That Does Both — 
Relieves Pain—Shrinks Hemorrhoids 


New York, N. Y¥. (Special) — 
For the first time science has 
found a new healing substance 
with the astonishing ability to 
shrink hemorrhoids and to relieve 
pain—without surgery. 

In one hemorrhoid case after 
another, “very striking improve- 
ment” was reported and verified 
by doctors’ observations. 

Pain was relieved promptly. 
And, while gently relieving pain, 
actual reduction or retraction 
(shrinking) took place. 

And most amazing of all—this 
improvement was maintained in 
cases where doctors’ observations 
were continued over a period of 
many months! 

In fact, resulta were so thor- 
ough that sufferers were able to 
make such astonishing statements 
as ‘Piles have ceased to be a 


' 


problem!” And among these suf- 
ferers were a very wide variety 
of hemorrhoid conditions, some of 
10 to 20 years’ standing. 

All this, without the use of 
narcotics, anesthetics or astrin- 
gents of any -kind. The secret is 
a ne@-henlity’ e0betance ( Bio- 
Dyne*® ) —the discovery of a world- 
famous research institution. Al- 
ready, Bio-Dyne is in wide use 
for healing injured tissue on al! 
parts of the body. : 

This new healing substance is 
offered in suppository or ointment 
form called Preparation H.* Ask 
for individually sealed convenient 
Preparation H suppositories or 
Preparation H ointment with epe- 
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sold at all drugstores. Satisfaction 
guaranteed or money refunded. 

"Ree. U.S. Pat. OF 


United Press Photo 


LT. COL. R. B. HALL 
. » released draftee list 


Avinger, is a candidate in the 
forthcaming Texas Democratic 
primary for the congressional 
seat occupied by Rep. Wright 
Patman 

Hall said authority to give out 
the names was contained in a 
letter he wrote Oct. 15, 1954, to 
Selective Service Boartl No. 117 
at Mount Pleasant, Tex. He said 
his letter was based on an in- 
terpretation he later learned 
was “too broad” on Selective 
Service regulations as to which 
records were open to the public 

Ha]l said there was no men- 
tion irl the telephone conversa- 
tion with Simmons of the use 
to which the list was to be put, 
and that if he had known it was 
to be used commercially he 


would not have authorized its 4 


release 

Within about a month, he 
testified, State Selective Service 
headquarters leaned of the com- 
mercial use of the inductees’ 
names. He said the state di 
rector also had questioned the 
release of the names and asked 
National headquarters for a dul- 
ing. In November, he said, the 
authority was revoked by 
another letter. 


Beirut Invites Shepilov 
Reuters 
BEIRUT, Lebanon, June 11 


Dmitri Shepilov, Soviet Foreign 
Minister. has been invited to 


visit Lebanon for talks on the! 


Middle East situation, particu. 
lariy in relation to Palestine 
Premier Abdalla el Yafi said 
tonight 


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PERSPIRAM 
See 


Charles i — 


Court Rules 'Colleges Honor Washington Area Residents 


In Deathbed 
Will Dispute 


The deathbed will of Frank 
C. Anderson of Arlington, who 
died from traffic injuries, was 
upheld yesterday aftet two and 
one-half days of court testimony 
in which two noted hand writ- 
ing experts battled over the 
validity of the handwritten doc 
ument. 

Arlington Circuit Court 
Judge Emery N. Hosmer upheld 
the will, written on a hospital 
memo pad, which left Ander- 
son's estate of less than $10,000 
to his mother-in-law, Mrs. Nora 
M. Hallock of 767 23d st. S.., 
Arlington. 

Anderson died in Arlington 
Hospital last September, four 
weeks after he was injured in 
a traffic accident which killed 
his wife Ruth. Anderson's par- 
ents, retired Rear Admiral and 
Mrs. Anton B. Anderson of San 
Diego, Calif., contended that 
their son had not written the 
will. 

The document was dated Aug 
31, 1955. less than three weeks 
before Anderson's death. Mrs 
Hallock said she discovered the 
will among Anderson's belong- 
four months after his 


Under Virginia law, the es 
tates of persons who die with- 
out leaving a will revert. to 
blood relatives. 

Two handwriting experts, 
Charles A. Appel Jr. and Wil- 
mer Souder—both of whom 
worked on the Lindbergh kid- 
naping case which resulted in 
the conviction of Bruno Haupt- 
mann—were at odds on the va- 
lidity of the handwriting in An- 
derson’s will. Appel told the 
court that the writing was not 
Anderson's. Souder said that 
Anderson had written the will. 


Louis C. Hunter, 14 West-' 
wood dr., Westmoreland Hills, 


received the Knox Alumni) 


Achievement award from Knox 
College in Galesburg, LL, yes- 
terday. 

Hunter is associate editor of 
the Journal of Economic His- 
tory 

Other area residents hon- 
ored at graduation ceremonies 
Charles L. T. Edwards, Falis 
Church, retired iron and steel 
consultant, Alumni Association 
award from Lehigh University 

Arthur R. Burns, Chaifman 
of the Council of Economic 
Advisers, honorary Doctor of 
Laws degree from Dartmouth 
College. 

Hazel Hutchins Wilson, 
George Washington University 
lecturer, honorary Master of 
Arts degree from Bates Col- 
lege 

William Haller, resident 
scholar at the Folger Library 
here, honorary Doctor of Hu- 
mane Letters degree from the 
University of Chicago 

Treasury Secretary George 
Humphrey, honorary Doctor of 
Laws, from Bates College. 

Gen. Carlos P. Romulo, Phil 
ippines Ambassador, received 
Doctor of Civil Law Degree 
from Bucknell University and 


The AUDUBON BIRD-CALL 
VE? £ 
ga 


--. GR @maring little de- 
vice thet reelly ettrects 
birds. Twit  .. Lo 
voriety of wld songbirds 
ontwer! Mondmade of 
pewter ond birch, sim- 
ple te vse, ts © perfect 
summer compoerion for 
chiidren end grown ups. 
Used in Evrope for cen- 
turres. Ask for it ef your 
feverite book, gift, or 
gorden shop... or send 
$1.50 te 

Reger Eddy 

Newington 13, Conn, 


Mailed postpaid with instructions. 


‘ : 
— owe 


e m-eoerre & 


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tet SOhG s Lorene! ener 


Accomodetion: by Hilton Herels 


delivered the commencement 
address. 

Kinmont T. Hoitsma, 3701 
Connecticut ave. nw. Todd Har- 
ris Princeton Fencing medal, 
Princeton University, 


Maryland Halts 
Parley on Aged 


The first state-wide Maryland 
Conference on Aging, sched- 
uled to open today at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, has been 
called off because of lack of 
interest. 

Dorothy F. Deach, chairman 
of the faculty committee for 
the three-day conference, said 
she’s “quite a bit puzzled” by 
the lack of enrollment. 

Last week, Gov. Theodore R. 
McKeldin’s office sent out a re- 
lease lauding the proposed con- 
ference 

The program, 
than 4000 persons, said the goal 
of the conference was to “cre- 
ate an awareness among the 
citizenry of Maryland and its 
government agencies” of the 
growing social problem of de- 
veloping and carrying out a 
program for the aging. 


it leaves you breathless! 


SMIRNOFF. 


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RO Proof Distilled fromgrain Ste Plerre Smirnof? 
Fis. (iv. of Heublein), Hartford, Conn., U.S.A 


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| @essery—jest fer 


lease lauding the proposed con- 
ference. 

Charles F. Obrecht, Mt. Vista 
Farm, Glenarm, Md., John Ed- 
wards Higginbotham Lacrosse 
Memorial Trophy, Princeton 
University 

Sidney F. Brinckerhoff, 1813 
24th st. nw., the David F. Bow- 
ers prize in Amefican Civiliza- 
tion, Princeton University. 

Martin C. Dillon, 900 Long. 
fellow st. nw. four-year Naval 
Reserve Officers training corps: 
scholarship. He plans to attend 


the University of Virginia. His 
grandfather, Joseph S. Wal- 
smith, has been an employe of 
the. Washington Post Co, fdr 
52 years in the composing room, 

Jack Allen -Bruce, 32, Lee 
ave.. Takoma Park, Wise Prize 
for an essay in philosophy, Wes- 
leyan University. 

Ronald D. Palmer, 1906 Filor- 
ida ave. nw. John Hay Whitney 
Foundation Opportunity Fel- 
lowship for international 
studies, at Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. 


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personal documentary of an American girl serving her country 


i ina city of contrasts . .. where East meets West. 


at 9:00 pm from Broadcast House, WTOP-TYV 


MY OLD PAL, Richard the 
Parrot, has become a record- 
ing star. is the ‘singing 
star of a Cadence Record 
release, “The 
Pirate Bird.” 

In case 
youve been 
living in a cave 
for the past 10 
years, Richard 
is the on-the- 
air companion 
of Milton 
@. Ford of 
WMAL radio 
and TY. Rich- 

Laurent ard was chos- 
en to perform on the record 
by Archie Bleyer, onetime 
conductor for Arthur God- 
freéy, and the big boss of 
Cadence Records 

Richard, in addition to his 
work in Washington, has ap- 
peared or New York radio 
and TV shows with Milton 
Q. Ford. 

A couple of years ago, ! 
went to interview Richard 
There had been charges that 
he was strictly for the birds 


By Lawrence Laurent 


Radio and Television —__ 
Television’s Pet Parrot 
Isa Singing Star Now 


1 p. m—WTOP-TV. Thea- 
ter of Stars: Peggy Ann Gar- 
ner and Francis L. Sullivan 
star in “Mr. Thayer.” 


3 p. m—WRC-TV. Matinee 


| 
| 


the fastest on 
any of television's cowboys. 


Cindy wired a challenge. | 


She claim? she’s much faster. 


PERRY COMO closed out 
an exciting season of pro- 
grams Saturday night. . The 
clésing show had one imper- 
fection 
Novak forgot her lines and 
couldn't think of a thing to 
say. She had to resort to the 


teleprompter and she sounded | 


like a second grade child. I 
suppose we can expect noth- 
ing more from a lovely gir! 


who may someday be an | 


actress. 


TELEGRAM came Monday 
morning: “Since 1948 and 
over 250 shows, this is the 
first time I've ever hit a role 
that Im excited enough 
about to ask 

“On Thursday (NBC-TY, 10 
p.m.), I'm playing the role of 
Vincent Giel in “A House of 
His Own.” This is the open- 
ing show ee yey Lux Video 
Theater summer preview 
series. Aside from the fact 


|| Theater 


the draw of | 


Blank-faced Kim | 


you to watch. | 


(Color): In “The 
| Serpent's Tooth,” two young 
boys try to give neighbors 
| the impression that their 
father is a cruel tyrant. 

7 p. m—WTTG. Steve Don- 
ovan: Donovan and his part- 
ner open a U. S. marshal’s 
office in a law'ess frontier 
town. 

7:30 . m— WMAL-TV. 
Warner Brothers Presents: 
Cheyenne runs into bilack- 
mail and a savage beating in 
“The Outlander.” Clint Walk- 
| er and Doris Dowling star. 

7:40 p. m—WTTG. Dugout 
Chatter: Bob Wolff inter- 
views baseball players from 
the playing field. 

7:55 p. m—WTTG. Base- 
| ball: Washington vs. Kanses 
City. 

8 p. m—WTOP.-TV. You'll 
Never Get Rich: Sgt. Bilko 
arranges a bet in a post eat- 
ing competition when he 
learns that a member of his 
platoon is a former champion 
| in such contests. 

8 p. m—WRC-TV. Project 
| 20: Repeat telecast of “The 
| Twisted Cross.” document 


portrays a spoiled young dcb. 
utante who runs down a 
small boy with her car. She 
tries to use her wealth to 
free herself of the conse- 
quences. 

9:30 «6p.lCOUm. — WMAL’TV. 
Cavalcade Theater: “Stay 
On, Stranger” is a story of 
the founding of the Caney 
Creek School in the Ken- 
tucky hills. 

9:30 p. m—WTOP.-TV. The 
Red Skelton Show: Red gets 
a job in a factory and gums 
up the machinery 

9:30 p. m.—WRC.-TV. Circle 
Theater: “H. R. 8438" is the 


title of a bill pending in the | 


House of Representatives 
which, W@ passed, will allow 
Anton Steigerwald to stay in 
America. The presentation 
is the story of how he was 
separated from his Américan 
mother during the war and 
brought to the United States 
on the chance of finding her. 


10:30 p. m—WTOP TV: 


Celebrity Playhouse. A young | 


school teacher learns to for- 
get unhappy memories in a 
small French Canadian 
town 
Diane Foster’ ‘star 
Secret of thé Bells.” 
11:10 p. m—WTTG. Fea- 
turama: Milt Grant intro- 
duces short film features, in 


in “The 


Louis .Jourdan and | 


Tuesday TV Preview Highlights | 


On Radio 


11:15 a. m—WRC. Week- 
day: Guest is Actress-Direc- 
tor Margaret Webster. 

12:30 p. m—WMAL. Your 
Happy Holiday: Film .Star 
Martha Vickers is a guest at 
Disneyland Park. 

1:15 p. m—WWDC. A new 
album by Organist Lenny 
Dee is featured. 


1:38 p. m.—WGMS. Adver- | 


tising Luncheon: James Hag- 
erty, press secretary to Presi- 
dent Eisenhower, receives an 
award and makes an accept- 
ance speech. 

6 p. m.—WDON and WASH. 
FM. In the Concert Hall. Of- 
fenbach, “La Belle Helene”: 
Chausson, Poeme,; Beethoven, 
Symphony No. 8 

7:05 p. m.—WGMS. Howard 
Mitchell: Delius, “A Song of 
Summer’; Dvorak, Cello Con- 


| certo 


7:55 p 
ball 
City. 

8 p. m.—WTOP. 
son Show: Carson and the 
cast discuss the trials and 
tribulations of singers trying 
tc make the grade 

$:05 p. m.— WGMS. Sym- 
phony Hall: Saint Saens, 
Overture to “The Yellow 


Washington vs. Kansas 


Jack Car- 


m—VWDC. Base- | 


dio Pictures, Inc. 


RKO-Teleradio is the parent 
company of the Mutual Broad- 
casting System radio network. 

The petiion against the sale 
was filed by Lawrence M. C. 
Smith of Philadelphia. He owns 
five shares (16 and 2/3 per cent) 
of the 30 shares of stock out- 
standing in WGMS. The other 
bert 


shares are owned>by M. Ro 


FCC Asked to Halt Sale 
Of 2 WGMS Stations 


| The Federal Communications ‘tion can be sold for a higher 
Commission was petitioned yes-| 
terday to stop the sale of Wash- 
‘ington radio stations WGMS 
and WGMS-FM to RKO-Telera- 


THE WASHINGTON POST 
and TIMES HERALD 


Tuesday, June. 12, 1956 


47 


Advertisement 


price to Nathan Straus presi- 
dent of New York radio station | 
WMCA Smith also objected to 
a five-year employment con- 
tract that RKO has offered to! 
Mr. and Mrs. Rogers. 

Rogers said yesterday that a 
counter-petition is being filed 
with the FCC, claiming that 
Smith fears competition to his 
wholly owned Philadelphia FM 
station, WFLN, from the pro- 
posed Mutual FM good music 
inetwork. 


Rogers (12% shares, or 41 end| 


2/3 per cent) and by Pierson Reds 


Underwood (12% shares). 
Smith charged that the st 


Speed Color TV 
a. BERLIN, June 11 #—Russia, 
Czechoslovakia and East Ger- 


eeeen Red to Run 
Reuters 


LEEDS, England, June 
Bert Ramelson, 46-yearo 


British Communist now vaca-|Oslovakia on transmitters and 
‘tioning in Russia, will uppose ‘East Germany on color equip 
Labor Party leader Hugh Gait-| ment. 

skell for the South Leeds con-| 


stituency 
ele *tion, 
day. 


in 


the next general ~ 
it was announced to- 


‘many are pooling research o 
speed the development of color 
television behind the Iron Cur- 
tain. East German papers say 
11\Russia will work on camera 
ld|and studio equipment. Czech- 


_— 


Jayne Mansfield 
kind), 
champagne. 

“Champagne is only grapes.” 

The 22-year-old beauty queen 
displays her ample charms in 
July Esquire, now on sale at all 
newsstands. 


JAYNE 
CALLED 
PLAINI 


New York, June 7— Talented, 
voluptuous Jayne Mansfield likes 
her men with hair on their chest, 
white teeth, hard muscle and 


charcoal-grey 
hair. 

Miss Mans- 
field, who posed 
for a special 

icture port- 
olio in the cur- 
rent issue of 
Esquire Maga- 
zine, reveals 
she has a great 
affection for 
minke (an 
pink convertibles an 


ary of the rise and fall of 
Adolf Hatler. 

8:30 . m—WMAL-TYV. 
Wyatt Earp’ Wyatt saves an 
innocent man from a lynch- 
ing mob. 

8 p. m—WMAL-TV. Dan- 
ny Tifomas: Danny learns the 
evils of fixing traffic tickets. 

5 p. m—WTOP.TV, Assign. 
ment Istanbul: The personal 
documentary of a secretary 
in the U. S. Foreign Service, 
Aimed in Istanbul, Turkey, 

This is a personal document- , | by a WTOP-TV reporter-cam- 

ary on the career of Mary Escape Blaze in Home era team. 

Catherine Thompson. a sec- -_ . 5 . m—WRC-TV. Fire- 

retary in the U.S. Consulate |. “=S?PORT, Conn, June 11) gig, ‘Pheater: Jane Wyman 

in Istanbul. The filmed docu. |\"—Fire caused an estimated on 

mentary will show her at $1000 damage to the home of FM STATIONS 

work and at play as she serves actress Martha Raye today. Miss wee- FM (93.9 me.)—5:50 « te 1/WWDC-FM (101.1 me)—7 «. @. te 2 

her country at one of the Rave. her daughter, Melody, 13, ¥ FM (96.5 me.)—5:90 «. me te 2 wims-re (108.5 me)—6:30 o mm. to 

crossroads« of the world a irs ‘ov. =e) «2 =. te 10 wiht ta (106.1 me.)—8:30 «a m. te * 
and two servants escaped un-|*4* 


Eddie Gallaher will be the ann Gnd centece & mm ts Gta tennie: ests entheee o. & © : — — ow 
narrator. nerméee with 11003 mc.)—Darytlight enly * ‘whtal-r (107.3 me.)—6 « te 12 39 | ° 4 | 
One of the first policemen to i, em. nalts fu On WM 
OTHER STANDARD STATIONS YOU 
a. . midnight Wook 1940 te—S «2 @ te } ° = | 
=: KD nly.” tS eaert $e Ee—6 . a | 


INDY LO DAH the 
es it * ro has y %. r’ Sttive was Robert O'Shea, chief |, 
figure in a $50,000 alienation-of- wOL- ~~ gp . midnight 
whOn thee \ —Daviabt only ; 
oy i erbug 
ee 


telegram to Hugh O'Brien ore 
He's the guy who plays (affections suit filed against the ine Sone ahaa hne pe—ereens gals 
actress by O'’Shea’s wife, Bar- Ae is0 on —Daviie! WINX—1600 ke.—Darlight enly.* 
fj ANY. Si 
Sving 


The interview didn't last very 
long. I discovered that Ford 
Was using the radio and tele- 
vision page of The Washing 
ton Post and Times Herald 
40 cover the bottom of Rich- 
ard’s cage 

“I don't want to talk 
him,” said Richard 
splits his infinitives.” 


REMINDER: Every govern 
ment girl will be interested 
n “Assignment: Istanbul” to- 
night on WTOP-TYV (9-9:30) 


Bring Your Next 
Prescription to 


WALTER WINCHELL ap 
pears in The Washington 
Post and Times Herald on 
Monday, Wednesday, Thurs 
day, Saturday and Sunday. 


cluding “Working Dollars.” 
1:15 p m—WTOP.-TY. 
The Late Show “Pink 
String and Sealing Wax” 
stars Mervyn Johns and Gor- 
don Jackson A murderess 
attempts to shift the blame 
of homicide to a young boy. 
11:20 p. m—WMAL.-TV. 
The Night Show: “Strange 
Woman” stars Hedy Lamarr 
A woman married to an eld- 
erly man wrecks the lives 
of his sons and his friends 
11:30 p. m—WRC-TV. To 
night: The dance team of 
Priest and Fosse and vocal- 
ist Jimmy Vale are guests. 


Princess”: Mozart, Flute Con- 
certo No. 1 in G: Britten. 
Young Person's Guide to the 
Orchestra 

8:35 p. m.—WRC. 
ne: People on the planet 
Moklin decide to duplicate 
human beings 

9 p. m—WRC: Traffic 
Court: (The “Biography in 
Sound” repeat of its program 
on Thomas Wolfe has been 
postponed to Thursday at 
8:30 p. m.) 

9:05 p. m.—WTOP. My Son 
Jeep: The family don party 
clothes and formal manners 
in honor of Peggy's first 
beau ‘ 

10:30 p. wygeet ee - Treas- | 
ury Agent: Immigrants are 
led astray by “The Refugee 
Ruler.” 


that I age considerably for 
the role and go completely | 
against type casting, I think 
the most important thing | 
about the show is the mature | 
kind of writing we've been 
looking for in TV.” 

The telegram is signed by 
Richard Boone, the quiet fel- 
low who plays Dr. Konrad | 
Styner on “Medic.” 


X Minus 


YOU CAN FINISH 


HIGH SCHOOL 
AT HOME 


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“Wyatt Earp” on television 
. . a 
Cindy saw a story in one of bara Ann O'Shea. Firemen said) “~*“™™ mp = a ated » — oe dita RaDadienibie 
; : mm ’ 
the fire apparently was caused FOGTEMS PTUNTES NETE CONJOTM nJOTMatLON 


the magazine supplements 
which said that O'Brien was by a lighted cigarette furnished by stations at time of dconeta cen 


Tuesday Radio Programs 


WMAL | WRC (NBO) WWDC (MBS) | WTOP (CBS) 
9AM 630 FM 107.3|AM 980 FM 93.9| AM 1260 (AM 1500 FM 96.3 


} >’ Mahoney. §& 30 
Mark Evans 
Mahoney, 7 
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" Be Ment) 
TG 


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S\WMAL-TY _—'7_- WTOP-.TV 


Chanticleer. 8°30 (Art Brown. 6-10; 

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and 


‘ } ! 
‘Brows ——— CNS N's af_Anterica ) 
~_ Brown wn |Opes How oe ea Ss if 
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: seus Bars g ym Sher OANCE PARTIES“ E PARTIES rn KK i 
ANNIVERSARY OFFER SOON EXPIRES | 5 

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7 is. & 


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GUARANTEE 
On Ail Pi ture 
Tubes installed 


her 


copies PT vhs Chic ase 


.. 10.95 | 17-inch 17.95 | 
12.95 | 21-inch ......21.95) 


each. ; 
METAL AND El ECTROSTATIC $2.00 MO 


2414 14th ST. 4.W. EST. 1943 one ith ST. NW. | 


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Enroll All This Week-Ilam fo - - 
lO pm. Hurry! Dont Be left Out! bom Sop 


MARTINI “: 


aainow 


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Fred Pi ske Aunt af eed 


OPP. WARNER 
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“4444 


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—— 


BESuSE: 


Parker | Pick Temi z 
Kit Carson 


OKUKE 


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Mu eoper Youn 
Woman In House 
r Nad Ty ines 
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we 
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len| peers 


"" Mra 
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lve tried em all, man... 
IM BACK TO CASCADE... 
its REAL BOURBON! 


SSipovseous| 
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nm 


—ilon 


ington |. 


, Kansas City) ) 
ater Baseba 
t : * ‘ 
ater Based ee 
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$64.000 Question 
Theater Baseba aa rom imore | $64.000 ,Gugstion 
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hrs. 9:30—9:00 P.M. 


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He MOST SETS REPAIRED IN HOME 
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Uri niversity 


2 Summer Sessions 


JUNE 14—JULY 25 


Daily 9 to 6, Thurs. $ to 9 
JULY 30—SEPTEMBER 7 


Father's Day and 


PRE-VACATION 


CAMERA SALE 


Register 


Today and Tomorrow 
12:30-7 P.M. 


DOWNTOWN CENTER @ 


On Cameras, Photo 
Movie Equip., Supplies, Tape 
Recorders, Binoculars, etc. 


All brand sew. some ke new 
er used 


UPTOWN CAMPUS @ Mass 


COLLEGE OF LAW @ 2000 G Street, N.W TASTES MELLOW AS MOONLIGHT! 
and i'm back with Cascade... 
for keeps! Sure —there are plenty of good Kentucky 
bourbons. But there isn’t one that can match the 


Cascade formula that George Dicke!l created back in 


1870, from the life and vigor of the grain! it's REAL 


Easy Terms ® Lay-Away “I've tried ‘em all... BOURBON, man —full six years old —the smoothest, 
° Yr. Guar. 
BUY ALL YOUR 


SUMMER NEEDS NOW 


Brenner Photo Co. 


“The Complete Photo Dept. Store” 


933 Penn. Ave. N.W. 


Air Cond. @ ‘S464 Catalogue Free 
@ Park Free @ Free instractions 


Direct Kedek Color Film Processing 


For complete schedule and course descriptions bone 
WOodley 66803 or write or visit the Oflice vt the 
Assistant to the President, Mass. & Nebraska Aves... NU 


drinkingest bourbon you could ever hope to taste. Go 
ahead and treat yourself!" 
GEO. A. DICKEL DIST. CO., LOUISVILLE, KY. + 86 PROOF 


CASCADE 6 


Viasat 


YEAR OLD 
KENTUCKY STRAIGHT 


BOURBON 


THE WASHINGTON POST and TIMES HERALD 
48 Tuesday, June 12, 1956 ° 


comennn,__Y@ PRICE! $2 DOROTHY GRAY 
Bok COLOGNE IN 6 FRAGRANCES 


> 


er Th. oz. size $I plus tes N O 


a. 
A generous dash of your favorite cologne 
fragrance and you feel fike a ‘new woman 


} \- | . 
, HOT WEATHER B whatever the temperature. Dorothy Gray of- 


Daly | tyne - frankly efcourage you to splurge VACATI © N 


ae Gerry 7° omee 
* 


- ~ 
~ «ere 


FROM 


HARRIET HUBBARD AYER | REAUTY 


DEODORANTS NOW ‘2 PRICE 


reguler SI sise now 2 tor¥ J ’ 

ples tex 

Do you prefer the cream deodorant with its oe 

extra anti-perspirant protection or the wonder- “you go when you take 

fully convenient push-up stick type? No need cosmetics and - travel 
to worry over a decision. Simply buy both— ahs trem Whe . 
and get them for the price of one during this om Hecht 

annual special event. Ce.’s huge selection. 


it follows wherever 


aens AWwO BQCUTENS Mw, Ong 
pe 


Piel ee FOR A CARE-FREE VACATION 
TAKE MATTHEW'S TRAVEL AIDS 


WOK ee we em 


a 


FROM FRANCE! RIVIERA Fa Fah taps 
HAIR ORNAMENTS each *J 


“I ane ‘2 | 3 There's no need to lug boxes and jars when 
Jewelled pieces plus tas : \ / you travel with Matthew's. Four indispensable 
holder 43 | travel aids—Foam-Rich for laundry; Nylonets 

| for synthetics; Shampoo-ets for hair; Holiday, 
a germicidal mouthwash—come in one-use 
disposable capsules. No breaking, no spilling, 


is just a sample of these : 4 


sories. Combs, berettes, 
head bands, too, in plastic, 
gold and silver metals, 
jeweled or plain, P 


The pony tail 
shown that can be used 
as a bracelet or a bun ring 


DUSHARME WAVE CREAM KEEPS 
HAIR LUSTROUS ALL SUMMER 


regular size sy 


plus tas 


Econemy Size, 1.65 


Let’s face it, girls . . . sun and water are 
divine, but your poor hair takes a terrible beat- 
HAIR-SHEEN , ing from them. If you want to avoid that “hay 
WAVE -creme head” look, Dusharme Hair-Sheen Wave 
Cream helps keep your hair from drying out, 
makes it lustrous and manageable 


NEW QUICK ACTION TONI 
HOME PERMANENTS COME 
IN 3 DIFFERENT STRENGTHS 


HANDY TOTE BRUSH 
HOLDS TOOTHBRUSH 
$2 AND PASTE 


plus tes 


*] 


Ever had to wrap a wet tooth- 
brush in a tissue to pack it? 
All that’s a thing of the past 
with Tote Brush, compact 
plastic holder that. keeps 
collapsible toothbrush and 
paste neat and sanitary, |n 
choice of pastels, 


The basis of every lovely summer hair style is 
a soft, natural looking permanent that gives 
body to your hair, helps it hold a wave. Now 
Toni Home Permanent is quicker and easier 
to use than ever. . . comes in three strengths 
for your specific type of hair—very gentle for 

» fine hair, regular, and super for hard-to-wave 
hair. Start your summer beauty course with a 
mew Toni home permanent 


Cosmetics and Toiletries, Street Fl. Washington, 
Silver Spring and PARA ingtoe 


SERVING THE NATIONS CAPITAL te 
With THE GEST BRANDS OF THE LANDG@ 


= " 


ue 


PAP Be nrnre ee LOE OD <r We, —_:-