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UCLA Daily Bruin 



Los Angeles, CA 



Summer 2000 



June 30-September 1, 2000 



MN # 03796 



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MEN'S RECRUITMENT 



Fraternity fecruitrhent is designed to make affiliating with an organization simple and easy! The IFC conducts 
official "rush" periods throughout the year. Take advantage of men's recruitment and find but what the fraternity '.^j., 
system has to offer to you! \.._^__ « ^- ':■-.--■../- ■■-^'^ 

JOIN A FRATERNITY IN 3 EASY STEPS ^^ 

REGISTER WITH THE INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 



Register now for Fall 2000 Recruitment! There is no cost or obligation and you will be mailed^ 
information over the summer.— - — 



LJE-mailifc@ucla.edu a Stop by 113 Men's Gym 

□ Register onlme at www.greeklife.ucla.edu/howtojoin.htm 
ATTEND IFC RECRUITMENT INFORMATION EVENT S 

IFC will hold a kick-off event and information forum during "0" Week. At these events, learn 

about the Recruitment process and each of UCLA's fraternities. 

ATTEND CHAPTER RECRUITMENT EVENTS ■■ -- -'''-^ '--> •--■^- -'-"'- "^^^ 




Each fraternity schedules a variety of events which include meals, speakers, activities, etc. This 

is the best opportunity to meet the brothers pf each chapter and evaluate each fraternity on a 
personal level. ' ' ' ■■;^■.■:■.^.•^..-^;■•. ■-/,••• '■:.■ ..._ •. ;..■■:••• :■'■:■■ •■;.-' r-r---^----:-^-- . ^ 



UCLA Interfraternity Council 
Fall 2000 Recruitment 

Monday, September 25 

^^ 12 -3 p.m. Kick-off Fair and BBQ 

Monday. September 25 

7 p.m. Chapter Events Begin 

(check fraternity schedule in Daily Bruin) 

Wednesday, October 6 

8 p.m. End of Official Rush 




Important Notes: 'r-:^--:' '::.'■:. ■■■■—' "■'■':■■' " ■• -^~-^ 

• Stop by the Fraternity Information Table at the Activities Fair on your first night of Orientation. 

• Register now to get on our summer mailing lists and receive more information. 

• Watch your mail for the Greek Life booklet that is mailed to all new students. 

Questions: Contact IFC at 825-7878 or ifc@ucia.edu 



WOMEN'S RECRUITMENT 



Great Women Go Greek! 

Panhellenic Sorority Recruitment Begins 



Tuesday, September 26' 

and ends 

Tuesday, October 3"* 




For questions & registration information 



r^siiitsnM»KliiiTgLgafWfgwsitit^TiTtltsfeWcEV»] 



name, summer address & phone no. 

or 
^all 310-206-1521 

Watch for our 2000 Greek Life booklet which 
will be mailed to all incoming students in July. 



(left) Lauren Kelly, Panhellenic 

President 

(right) Sandy Meinsen, Vice President 



CHECK IT OUT...GET INVOLVED! 

www.greeklifeMcla.edu 



Daily Bruin 



Campus Life on the Web 

See all this and more at the 
I Daily Bruin's 

• Website: ' 

• www.dailybruin.ucTa.edu 




Tally of underrepresentied students increases 



4ILASS: Outreach efforts 
credited; numbers don't 
reach those before SP-1 



By Neal Narahara 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 



After much deliberation, admis- 
sions officers sent out 10,703 open- 
ended letters of invitation to high 
school seniors saying that they were 
UCLA's first choices. In late June, the 
university got its answers, with 40 per- 
cent of those students declaring that 
the feeling was mutual. 

The number of statements of intent 
to register, which should almost exact- 
ly match the enrollment for the fall, 
shows a 10 percent increase in the 
number of underrepresented students 
over the number enrolled last year. 

In addition, underrepresented stu- 
dents - which includes Latina/os, 
African Ameripans and American 
Indians - will make up 17.2 percent of 
the incoming class, up from 16 per- 



cent. . 

"The UCLA community has 
worked extremely hard to recruit 
admitted students to UCLA, and we 
are delighted to see that a record pro- 
portion of (underrepresented) stu- 
dents has decided to enroll at the uni- 
versity," said Chancellor Albert 
Camesale in a statement. "Our contin- 
ued goal, however, is to intensify our 
outreach efforts so that more under- 
represented students are prepared for 
and admitted to the university." 

Recent outreach efforts have 
included partnerships with schools 
and districts in Los Angeles as well as 
tutoring and simply informing stu- 
dents about eligibility requirements to 
improve their chances of getting into 
UCLA. 

Of the 1,544 students admitted as 
freshmen from underrepresented 
minority groups, 723 have declared 
their intention to attend UCLA in the 
fall. 

According to figures from the uni- 
versity, statements of intent to register 
from Latina/o students increased by 



13 percent respectively this year, while 
those for Native American students 
increased by more than half. 
Statements of intent by African 
American students were the only ones 
to fall from last year - down 5 percent 
with a six student decrease. 

Representing more than 40 percent 
of the incoming freshman class, Asian 
Americans will be the largest minority 
group, followed by white students at 
almost 33 percent. 

Despite the increases over the previ- 
ous two years, the numbers of under- 
represented students who intend to 
register still remain below those of 
1997, the last year race could be used as 
a factor in admissions. 

"That's really sad and it's proof that 
institutional inequality exists," said 
Elias Enciso, the internal vice presi- 
dent of the Undergraduate Students 
Association Council and a member of 
Praxis, a political slate which supports 
the use of affirmative action. 

"It sends out the message that 

S«e FRESHMEN, page 17 




JESSE PORTER/Oaily Biuin Senior Staff 

The Democratic National Convention will take place at the Staples Center in Los Angeles during 
August 17- 20. The threat of mass protests has raised security concerns in Los Angeles. 

Staples Center to host convention 



POLITICS: Possible riots, 
police reaction threaten 
gathering of Democrats 



By Benjamin Park* 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

Eighty-four hotels, 250 buses on 
34 routes, an estimated 50,000 
guests and $132 million* pumped 
into the local economy - these are 
just some of the elements of a 
national political convention. - 

The Democratic National 
Convention will take place August 
14-17 in the Staples Center in down- 
town Los Angeles. *^^"' 

The city last hosted the 
Democratic Party's convention in 
1960, whtn John F. Kennedy was 
nominated for President. 
Democrats hope they can repeat 
such a successful launch of a presi- 
d e ntia l camp ai gn from Lo s A nge l e s 



this year, when Al Gore is officially 
named the party's candidate. 

"We believe that history's on our 
side," said Lydia Camarillo, who is 
chief executive officer of the con- 
vention. 

Camarillo said besides the nomi- 
nations that will take place, those 
who watch the event or participate 
as volunteers will witness "democ- 
racy at its best" as the party's plat- 
form is discussed. 

"The convention is going to be 
very exciting, so you will want to 
tune in or log on," said Camarillo. 
"We are going to bfi discussing 
issues important to everybot^ ^ 
including students." 

Organizers may be hoping to 
avoid the outcome of another 1960? 
Democratic convention - that of 
Chicago in 1968. Street protests 
fueled by outrage over the Vietnam 
War outside of that city's conven- 
tion were quelled under the direo- 
t io n o f l ege nda ry Chic a g o M a y o r 



Richard Daley. 

Commerce Secretary Bill Daley, 
the son of the former Chicago 
mayor, now heads Al Gore's presi- 
dential campaign. Tom Hayden 
was one of the famous "Chicago 
Seven" who faced trial for inciting a 
riot in the 1968 protests, and is now 
a state senator who represents the 
district that includes UCLA. He 
has been vocal about what he sees 
as a possible police overreaction to 
the protests being planned for this 
year's convention in Los Angeles. 

Hayden criticized a SI million 
state budget request for crowd con- 
trol that included equipment, such 
as pepper gas and gas launchers, 
for the Los Angeles Police 
Department. He said that the 
request - which was eventually 
rejected - was "hidden" within a 
state budget proposal for the 
California Highway Patrol, so that 



pay 1 



MORE UNDERREPRESENTED STUDENTS CHOOSE TO ATTBIDlJaJI 

The number of underrepresented students rose again since its initial drop in 1997, the last 

year the university used affinnative action. 

Note: Fi^urK before the year 2000 are for actual enroNment rather than stateflmits of tottm to re^ster. 




/Native American EnroHmcnt^ 


1997 


42 students 




1998 


IS students 




1999 


13 students 




^ 2000 


20 students 


J 



1997 



c 



1998 1999 

School Year 



2000 



G 



I I Other/ Unknown 
Caucasian 

lM««tt:UCU 



I Afiican American 
I Native American 



I Asian American / Pacific Islander 
I Latino 



D 



JACOB LIAO/Daily Bruin 



De Neve Plaza expected to 
be partially complete by fall 



BUILDING: Delays have 
led to increased costs for 
construction of facilities 



By Hasmik Badalian 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

On-campus housing students are 
expected to have a chance to live in 
the long-awaited De Neve Plaza this 
fall. ■ ' 

Begun in October of 1997, housing 
officials anticipate that parts of the 
new residence hall will open after 
several delays and increased expens- 
es. 

"i am optimistic that we will have 
two of the four hv/using buildings 
complete by fall quarter," said 
Bradley Erickson, director pf 
Campus Service Enterprises. 

"However, I am only guardedly 
optimistic that we will have all four 
of the housing buildings complete by 
the beginning of the school year," he 
added. 

The entire De Neve Plaza is 
expected to house at least 1,200 stu- 
dents upon completion. Two or three 
people will be assigned to each room, 
depending on the volume of students 
who need housing, Erickson said. 

Similar to rooms in Sunset 
Village, De Neve Plaza rooms will 
feature private bathrooms and air 
conditioning, according to the 
UCLA Housing Web site. 

Certain rooms in De Neve Plaza 
have already been assigned to stu- 
dents for fall quarter, since housing 
officials expect the rooms to be com- 
pleted and approved by inspectors 
by then. 

Apart from the main housing 
structures, the Podium, or Commons 
building, which includes the dining 
hall is slated to open early February 
2001. 

Because De Neve Plaza is located 
right next to Dykstra Hall, residents 
living there were inconvenienced by 
the I'unsiruciion. As a result, special 
mitigation .teams were formed to 



help provide compensatory services 
to Dykstra residents. 

Over the past few years, Dykstra 
residents received a free microfridge, 
monthly snacks, quarterly special 
dinners, monthly giveaways of movie 
tickets, and other items in compensa- 
tion. 

Dykstra residents had to deal with 
e^tra noise pollution and dust from 
the construction site. The dining hall 
and mailboxes were demolished 
early in the construction phase to 
make room for the Podium builcling, 
forcing Dykstra residents to walk to 
the other dining halls for meals and 
to check for mail at the front desk. 

Both housing officials and stu- 
dents said they are happy that De 
Neve Plaza will open soon. 

"I'm glad that they are (almost) 
done building a new housing com- 
plex because there are so many stu- 
dents who need a place to live," said 
Randy Tashdjiarv a second-year biol- 
ogy student and Dykstra resident. 

"At first, the construction was 
annoying, but throughout the year 
you get used to it," .Tashdjian said. 
"Plus, when you know it's for a 
greater good, you don't let it bother 
you that much." 

The housing buildings were first 
scheduled to be completed by fall 
quarter 1999 and the Podium build- 
ing by winter quarter 2000, but the 
project experienced several setbacks. 

"There were two principal reasons 
why th« project was delayed," 
Erickson said.' "One is that the con- 
struction documents turned out to be 
much less than perfect, and that 
resulted in the need for the architects 
to go back and revise many aspects 
of the plans. 

"Secondly, the contractor has had 
a lot of problems as they ended up fir- 
ing one of their biggest subcontrac- 
tors," Erickson added. "They also 
had problems with lack ol* productiv- 
ity and poor workmanship, which, 
when discovered by our inspectors, 
forced the contractor to re-work or 



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2 ' Orientation Issue 2000 



Daily Bruin Campus Life 



Officials seek to curb underage consumption 



T 



Daily Bruin Campus Life 



Orientation Issue 2000 3 



■1^ 



DRINKING: Administrators warn 
of clangers in hopes of preventing 
alcohol poisoning, emergencies 



By Barbara Ortutay . 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

Drinking at UCLA is not much difTcrent 
from other college campuses. In addition to 
Thursday night fraternity parties, students find 
places and occasions to drink and be merry in 
Westwood bars, apartments and even in the resi- 
dence halls. 

"It's always around," said third-year theater 
student Jason Liou of alcohol availability around 
campus. " " ' V 

Meanwhile, campus administrators and offi- 
cials seek ways to curb underage drinking and to 
prevent alcohol poisoning. 

"Any college town you go to you'll have 
underage drinking." said Peter Dell, manager of 
UCLA^s Emergency Medical Services. "A lot of 
the calls we get - 1 would say over half - are 
underage drinkers." 

EMS received 67 alcohol-related calls in the 
past "year, according to Dell - 21 of these were in 
the residence halls, 21 on city property, and the 
rest in various places on campus. 

For some students, college provides a new set 




they can't answer these four simple questions, we 
are obligated by law to take them to EMS." 

Once in the emergency room, patients are 
often put in bed to sober up, and an IV is com- 
monly used tore-hydrate them. ^ 

If the alcohol poisoning is severe, patients 
may have their stomach pumped. If they have 
stopped breathing, a tube is placed down their 
throat to aid breathinj^. 



KEITH ENRIOUEZ/Daily Brum Senior Staff 

Fernando Guayasamin takes another shot on his way to eight drinks for the night. 



of freedoms - including drinking. 

"It's (students') first time away from home, 
first time away from direct parental supervi- 
sion," Dell said. 

EMS receives calls for alcohol-related inci- 
dents ranging from nausea and vomiting, which 
is the most common, to people who are uncon- 
scious. 

Although not every drunk student will reach 
that point, alcohol poisoning is a concern for 
housing officials and university administrators. 

Last year, Chancellor Albert Carnesale was 
among 113 university presidents and chancellors 
who signed on to a national advertising cam- 
paign to curb binge drinking. 

But the efforts to keep drinking students safe 
do not end with the chancellor. 

"We want students to make healthy and 
responsible choices," said Amy Gershon, judi- 
cial affairs coordinator for the Office of 
Residential Life. 

In the residence halls, students are allowed to 



have alcohol "in the privacy of their own room," 
Gershon said 

"As soon as it's visible from the outside, it's a 
j^iolation of policy," she added. "Students can't 
have the door open. They can't be walking down 
the hallway with an open container." 

On-Campus Housing policy also prohibits 
residents from having "bulk alcohol," which can 
range from a keg to a large bottle of vodka, and 
if alcohol is present in a dorm room, no more 
than two guests per resident can be present in the 
room, Gershon said. 

Both Dell and Gershon agreed that what con- 
stitutes responsible drinking varies from one 
individual to another. Dell said it depends on 
family history, and a person's size, weight and 
alcohol tolerance. 

"Our definition of it would be not drinking to 
the point of getting transported to ER or getting 
sick in the bathroom," Gershon said. 

After passing the threshold from responsible 
xlrinking to getting sick, the next danger is alco- 
hol poisoning. 

Alcohol poisoning is a clinical term used by 
physicians to refer to someone who has so much 
alcohol in their system that it starts to affect their 



major organs. 

"It can shut down breathing and it can cause 
severe liver damage," Dell said. 

He urges students to call an ambulance if they 
suspects someone may be a victim of alcohol 
poisoning, even if they are in doubt about how 
serious the condition is. 

Contrary to popular belief, parents will not be 
notified if a student is taken to the emergency 
room for alcohol poisoning. 

"If you are over 18, there is something called 
patient confidentiality, and it's up to the patient 
whether they want to disclose it or not," Dell 
said. 

Although this may assuage some students' 
fears about calling an ambulance, there is still the 
bill to pay. 

"Insurance is another issue. Transportation 
on an ambulance is not cheap," Dell said. 

Once the ambulance arrives, four questions 
are used to determine whether a person will be 
transported to the emergency room. 

"We use four basic questions to determine 
level of consciousness: the person's name, where 
they are, approximately what time it is and if they 
know what happened to them," Dell said. "If 



Incidents of alcohol poisoning constitute only 
a fraction of students' experiences with alcohoL, 
Many students choose to limit their consump- 
tion or not to drink at all. — -- .v,-. ' ;.;•.• 

The most recent survey available about alco- 
hol use among UCLA students was conducted 
by Student Health Services in 1995. One-third of 
those who responded said they had engaged in 
binge drinking within the two weeks prior to the 
survey. 

Binge drinking is commonly defined as C6h- 
suming four or more drinks in a row for women, 
and five or more for men. The study also found 
that about 1/3 of students don't drink at all, 
despite stereotypes about the prevalence of alco- 
hol on university campuses. 

Nationwide, an ongoing Harvard survey of 
15,000 students at 140 college campuses found 
that California college students drink and binge 
drink less frequently than the rest of the nation. 
This may be due to the fact that college students 
in California are older, more likely to be married 
an^ live off campus, the study found. 

Nevertheless, UCLA students are often the 
primary patrons of the bars around campus. 

"Late Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights, 
most of our patrons are college kids," said Laura 
McLeod, manager of Westwood Brewing 
Company. 

To discourage underage drinking, Westwood 
Brewing Company checks the IDs of anyone 
entering the bar after 10 p.m. who looks under 
30, McLeod said. Those without a valid ID are 
not allowed in. During the day, bartenders and 
servers card those who order alcohol if they look 
under 30 as well. 

"Our policy is no underage drinking." 
McLeod said. *- 

Nonetheless, drinking - whether legal or 
underage - may be a quintessential part of the 
college experience. 

"It's a way for strangers to get to know each 
other and to get together and have a common 
bond," Liou said. 



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ROOEfliCK ROXAS 



For most students, living away 
adapt to a whole new dining 



from home means having to 
experience - nutritious or not 



By Cameron Zargar 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

During their first days at UCLA, most 
fi-eshmen, already feeling the pressure of 
adjusting to a major academic institution, 
also bear the discomfort of being away from 
the familiarity of home cooking. 

For Lisa Kingery, a fourth-year art history 
student, this adjustment has meant a growth 
in independence. 

"You get away from home, all night 
you're studying and eating pizza," Kingery 
said, referring to her freshman year. "After 
you pass the initial flip-out period, you real- 
ize that you're the one who takes care of 
yourself and that's what causes you to grow 
up." 

For a number of students, adapting to life 
away from home is less about growing up 
than about struggling to meet dietary reli- 
gious standards. 

Muslim students, who must only eat halal 
food permissible in Islam, Jewish students, 
who choose to keep kosher, and other stu- 
dents with specific needs, often find few 
choices in residence halls or in typical cam- 
pus restaurants. 

To accommodate their needs, these stu- 
dents who would normally eat an average 
amount of the specific meat and meat prod- 
ucts , now rely more on vegetarian dishes. 



Mohammad Mertaban, a second-year 
math and applied science student as well as a 
praaicing Muslim, said he felt the adjust- 
ments he made while living in the residence 
halls have improved his health, both physi- 
cally and spiritually. 

"It is beneficial to my health because i am 
forced to refrain from meat," Mertaban said. 
"I eat pasta, a lot of salad, breads and cere- 
als" ..:■_ ■■...x, -.;-•. -vv -.r-v-. 

Mertaban said he also felt the change has 
helped him in building his character. 

"The challenge has strengthened my 
faith," he added. 

According to Mertaban, UCLA should 
cater to students who choose to follow their 
religious teachings. 

"I would like to see the proud institution 
of UCLA make an effort to accommodate 
students with religious guidelines like 
myself," Mertaban said. 

While the residence dining services may 
not serve halal or kosher meat, the institu- 
tion does pride itself on quality dining, 
according to Charles Wilcots, Assistant 
Director of Dining Services. 

"There is a wide variety of various types 
of dishes for everybody from sushi to mush- 
room sandwiches," Wilcots said. "We want 
to treat our restaurants as restaurants. 

"UCLA has been recognized as one of the 
top ten colleges in terms of dining services," 



he continued. , 

While students generally do find a great 
variety of foods in the residence halls, some 
students often grow tired of the repetitive fla- 
vors of dorm food, according to Khoa 
Nguyen, a third-year biology student. 

Nguyen said that while, at first, he was 
enticed by the great variety and buffet-like 
atmosphere of the dorm cafeterias, the 
amusement has worn off. 

"The dorm food is good for the first two 
weeks," he said. "Then after a while the 
menu repeats itself." 

Nguyen, though, has avoided various 
food groups offered, choosing instead to rely 
on a mostly-meat, minimal-vegetable diet. 

"I eat a lot of meat, steak, mixing in fruit 
and vegetables just a little," he said. 

According to Nguyen, his own diet and 
the observations he has made on other stu- 
dents has indicated gender differences in eat- 
ing habits. 

"Girls eat much healthier - they're mostly 
vegetarians," he said. 

Fawnia Cantu, a third-year chemical engi- 
neering student, also noticed that while 
female students eat relatively light meals, 
consisting of fruits and vegetables, male stu- 
dents eat foods high in carbohydrates and 
protein. a v 

"Girls are so weight conscious. All they 
eat is salad," she said. "Guys are packing on 



the pounds with meat and bread." 

Not all female students fit the stereotypes 
associated with them. Brighid Dwyer, a 
fourth-year sociology student, said that "a lot 
of cookies and brownies" are a regular part 
ofherdiet. '; 

Regardless of eating preferences, the 
most common type of grocery shopping for 
students living in apartments consists of an 
outing to Breadstiks, a small grocery store 
located in Westwood. 

Employees at the store have noticed that 
numerous students pay little attention to 
health guidelines, such as those suggested in 
the food pyramid. ^ ■ 

Jonas Ball, a Breadsticjcs employee and 
UCLA alumnus, said that students mostly 
purchase spaghetti and boxed food, such as 
Top Ramen and cereal. 

Like the students. Ball said he too has 
noticed a distinction between male students 
and the female students. 

"Girls buy fruit and the ready-pack sal- 
ads," said Ball. "Guys buy a lot of eggs, cold 
cuts and yogurt - you know, the high-protein 
stuff." 

According to Ball, women appear more 
likely to adhere to nutritionists' advice than 
men. 

"(The men) probably don't have the 

—: — S«eRM)0,pag«1S 



Resident assistant outlines paths, pitfalls awaiting UCLA first-years 



Stephen Cheung, a resident assis- 
tant and former orientation coun- 
selor, answered questions incoming 
students may have about UCLA. 

Q: What arc stuJenLs must worried 
about when they come to UCLA and 
what advice do you give them? 

A: There are a lot of students who 
are worried about fitting in, about 
what clubs and organizations they 
could join, and about what they can 
do. 

They come to stay away from 
home and they usually don't come 
with a lot of friends. And if they do, 
they kind of know that they're going 
to separate from them so they want to 
know how to establish new connec- 
tions. 

So, a lot of them ask about frater- 
nities and sororities as well as other 
campus organizations. Basically, all 
we can do is refer them to these vari- 
ous organizations that they're inter- 
ested in and they have to learn about 
them by themselves. ~'-_ ~^ t" * ~ 

Q: What are students' reactions to 
their first quarter at UCLA? 

A: A lot of them actually think it's 
easief than they expected college to 
be. 

However, that's because a lot of 
Ttre — orientation — cuunsclois — arc- 



trained to set them up to have a rela- own rooms. 



tively easier course load than they 
could have. 

The classes could be easy, but at 
the same time you're not just dealing 
with classes - you're dealing with a 
whole new social environment where 
you have to meet new people and you 
have to do a lot of things with your 
new friends so you don't have as 
much time to study. So, it's usually 
better for them not to take a rigorous 
course load their very first quarter. 

That's why many students find 
that their first quarter taking three 
classes is kind of easy - especially 
with English, math and chemistry. 
But, as the year picks up, things are 
going to get harder so they're cool 
with it. 

Q: What advice can you give to stu- 
dents who are not used to sharing a 
room? , - 

A: Communication is the most 
important part of living with other 
people. When you first sit down, of 
course meet your roommates first, 
but also use a couple hours to sit 
down and set down some basic rules. 

A lot of the times they expect their 
roommates to do their laundry, or 
not leave stuff in their room, or not 
bring people in when they're study- 
ing, but ... a lot of the times, people 
are not used to living with other peo- 
pl c so they th in k uf i t as be i ng i fi tlie ii 



So, they do a lot of things that their 
roommates can't stand. So, you have 
to sit down the first week or so and set 
down basic rules like who's going to 
take out the trash, if you're studying 
what time you should go to sleep, 
how many guests can you bring over, 
if your boyfriend or girlfriend is com- 
ing over can they stay over, and other 
stuff like that. 

■ t - 

Q: What should students consider 
when choosing a meal plan? 

A: Consider the fact that, a lot of 
times, you'll be going out to eat. 
Dorm food is great and all, but after. a 
while it might get boring and they 
have to consider that sometimes 
they'll be studying, on campus or 
going out with their friends. 

They have to consider the fact that 
they won't be eating in the dorms all 
the time, so getting the 19-meal plan - 
unless you're planning to eat there ail 
the time - a lot of the time you won't 
use all your meals. 

^o, consider the premiere meal 
plan and know the fact that you can 
get meal coupons so that your meals 
won't.go to waste. 

Q: What can students do to avoid 
the freshman 15? 

A: Eat right, sleep right. It's just a 
myt t i. t li uugl i . T l ie f t wh t nan 1 3 d i d- 



lot of weight my first year as did a lot 
of my friends. 

I don't think it happens to every- 
one. It doesn't have to do with dorm 
food - dorm food is actually pretty 
healthy. I think it has to do more with 
all the little snacks you eat; so just 
control yourself and exercise. 

Q: What can students do to improve 
their study habits? 

A: Study habits are always a prob- 
lem. 

There's no sound advice that I can 
give them because it's up to them to 
plan what their study habits are. ^ 

The only thing I can say is, the first 
few weeks, the classes seem so easy 
that they don't feel like studying and 
they don't think they needi^o. But 
when that midterm comes, they're 
going to have to catch up a lot, and 
that's when everything falls to pieces. 

They need to keep up with their 
readings and kind of take their stud- 
ies seriously the first few weeks and 
then adjust to it. If you think you're 
studying a little bit too hard, then 
^arty a little bit more I guess, but it's 
always better to overstudy. 

Q: What one thing would you have 
wanted to know as an incoming stu- 
dent? 



A: I definitely would have liked lo 



n't happen for me - I actually lost a get an idea of how fast the quarter Staff. 



goes. This is a major problem that a 
lot of people have. Even after two or 
three quarters, people are still not 
adjusted to the fact that the quarters 
go so fast that by the first week you're 
still trying to finalize your classes and 
buy your books and stuff like that. 

Second and third -week - a lot of 
the times that's^when the midterms 
are - so people need to be prepared 
to be overwhelmed with a lot of work 
even though it might be busy work or 
just easy work it's still a lot of materi- 
al to cover in 10 weeks. 

I never really understood How fast 
the system went, especially when it 
came down to finals. 

A lot of the times the professors 
would cover a lot of material right 
after the midterm and you have like a 
week to cover the rest of the material 
and then it's finals. *"-. 

It would also have been nice to 
know when I should have been study- 
ing for what and how I should have 
been studying. You can find this out 
by just talking to your professors and 
getting to know the system like what 
he's planning to cover and what 
exactly would be on the test. 

Because a lot of professors will be 
willing to help you learn about what's 
going tQ be on the test in the future or 
what yoi/ should be studying. 

Compiled by Dharshani 

OharmawarUena, Dally Bruin Senior 









5^ * i- 

■Wi •• . i 



1 



I 



i 
1 



\ 






\ 



T ■ ■-'- 



Orientation Issue 2000 



Daily Bruin Campus Life 



V 



Daily Bruin Campus Life 



Orientation Issue 2000 



~iT-Tr 



Health services available to students 



PROGRAMS: Help ofTered 
at centers for managing 
stress, nutrition, illness 



BylinhTat 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 



At a lime when college sludenis are 
jnaluring physically and menially, 
Mdny fail to pay enough attehllolfTo 
their health. 

To help make students" lives easier, 
organizations like the Arthur Ashe 
Student HcaUli and WeMessXenter 
and Student Psychological Services 
provide physical and mental health 
services to UCLA students so they 
don'l suffer from inadequate nutri- 
tion, sleep deprivation or other stress- 
ful circumstances. 

Students commonly visit the Ashe 
Center seeking health information or 
treatment for injuries, colds, the flu, 
rash, acne or even to buy contracep- 
tives, said Michele Pearson, director 
of ancillary services at the center. 

Students have the option of sched- 
uling appointments, requesting pre- 
scription refills and asking E-nurses 
questions online by going to the cen- 
ter's Web site. 

"E-nurses is a way for UCLA stu- 
dents to ask questions ... and to avoid 
a face to face confrontation," Pearson 
said, 'it's well liked and well used. It's 
a good educational tool. 

"We're looking not only to help 
people but to inform them so they can 
have peace of mind," she continued. 

Though students may avoid a face 
to face encounter by writing to E-nurs- 
es, the service requires that students 
provide their name and JD number to 
verify that they are UCLA students. 

In addition, the center provides 



most services free since they receive 
funding through student registra- 
tion fees, Pearson said. 

"We have the luxury of totally 
gearing our services to the stu- 
dents," Pearson said. 

But, students must pay for immu- 
nization shots, medication, HIV 
4esljng and specialty clinics. 



Featuring its own laboratory, 
pharmacy and radiology unit, and 
providing phystcat" therapy and ^ 
acupuncture, the center ranks 
among the top 2 percent of health 
services on college campuses 
naliofiwldie, Pearson said. 

While Ashe Center programs 
address physical health issues, stu- 
dents can seek help for emotional 
stress from Student Psychological 
Services. v 

SPS offers individual and group 
counseling, a clinic that teaches stu- 
dents how to manage stress, and 
consultation about problems with 
roommates, parents or a loved one. 
It is also the parent organization of 
the Peer Helpline, a student volun- 
teer crisis hotline that takes anony- 
mous phone calls from students dur- 
ing the evening. 

Students most commonly seek 
help from SPS to discuss relation- 
ship and academic stress problems, 
said SPS Director Hal Pruett. 

SPS sees roughly seven percent of 
the entire student body, according to 
Pruett, who added that he is certain 
more students need these services but 
are not receiving them. 

"Sometimes students may not 
know (these services) are available," 
Pruett said. 

He also said students don't always 
seek counseling because they think 
asking for help is a sign that they are 
not in control of their own situations. 



CONTAa INFORMATION 



Arthur Ashe Student Health 

and WellnesiCenter 

Monday - Friday 
8 a.m. -6:30 p.m. 

-Arthur Ashe Building 
i310>825-4073 

Student Psychology Senrkes 

Monday - Friday 
8 a.m. -5 p.m. 

-Mid Campus Office 
4223 Math Sciences Building 
(310)825-0768 
-South Campus Office 
A3-062 Center for Health Sciences 
: (310)825-7985" : 

Peer Helpline 

Monday - Thursday 
5 p.m. - midnight 
Friday -Sunday 
8 p.m. - midnight 

(310)825-HELr " 

soma Arthur Ashe (H«w.Studwlhyctii)lo»>«tykw.f«flW>liie 



"'■>' 'm 



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i.»»«S>«i*«,-.i*--^*.,v 






MCOeLIAO/Oaily Bruin 

a stigma he hopes to help erase. 

Students who seek help visit SPS an 
average of four to six times to resolve 
each situation, Pruett said. 

Sometimes physical and emotional 
stress seem to go hand in hand, with 
one resulting from the other. 

For example, the Ashe Center pro- 
vides nutritional workshops to stu- 
dents who are afraid of gaining 
weight. 

While some students opt for a diet. 

See HEALTH, page 12 



BRAD MORIKAWA/Daily Bruin Staff 

Mary Cooke studies at the terrace food court where many other 
students choose to study at the places they eat. ~" 



-— • — r^ —^ 



UCLA study spaces copious; 
can determine GR/V success 

PLACES: From coffee houses to graduate libraries, 
Westwood offers many types of studying niches 



By David Orucker 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

With admission hurdles cleared, 
it's time to get ready for the major 
obstacle that stands between stu- 
dents and their degrees: studying, 
and lots of it. 

UCLA students, in an effort to 



lessen the blow of this collegiate 
right of passage, leave no comer of 
campus unturned in their quest for a 
higher-learning hangout. 

The trick, students tend to agree, 
is to determine the atmosphere that 
fits their individual studying per- 

See STUDY, page 14 



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Orientation Issue 2000 



DdUy Bruin Umpus Life 



Daily Bruin Campus Life 



Orientation Issue 2000 



fAowm 

Backed by a turbulent history, 
importing wateFintoX^ 



valley still creates waves of ccmtroyersy 




By Michael Falcone 

Dally Bruin Senior Staff 

Early on weekday mornings, 
someone walking around UCLA 
might notice something peculiar: 
grounds keepers with long pres- 
surized hoses spraying water - not 
onto plants, but on cement. 

According to UCLA Facilities 
Management Grounds 

Supervisor Rich Ohara, watering 
the grounds with power washers is 
one of the most elTective ways to 
keep dirt and dust down to a mini- 
mum and it's also environmentally 
sound. Unlike regular hoses, 
which use 12 to 14 gallons of water 
per minute, the power washers use 
only two gallons and can clean five 
limes the area, Ohara said. 

"We try not to wash down very 
often," he said. "'We do it mostly 
for health and safety reasons. " 

But Ohara recalled that during 
the early 1990s, when California 
was experiencing a major drought, 
washing down sidewalks along 
with any watering after 10 a.m. 
was strictly forbidden. 



The state's susceptibility to fre- 
quent drought has shaped the atti- 
tudes many Californians have 
about water use. Everywhere 
"conservation" is the operative 
word, and Los Angeles is no 
exception. 

Peeling away the layers of glitz 
and glamour - the Hollywood 
movie studios and the Beverly 
Hills mansions that personify Los 
Angeles - leaves land that is essen- 
tially an arid desert. 



The green grass and palm trees 
that line L.A. streets today are a 
fairly recent addition - and their 
growth is possible largely because 
of the vision of one man. 

Early in the 20th century, the 
first superintendent of the newly 
de-privatized L.A. water system, 
William Mulholland, realized that 
it was time to look for alternative 
sources of water for the rapidly 
growing city. 

Though water conservation 
was advocated by Mulholland and 
others who saw how quickly the 
city's population was increasing, 
the residents of Los Angeles were 



unresponsive. At the time, the 
only source of water for the city's 
inhabitants was the Los Angeles 
river, and it was quickly being 
depleted. 

But more than 200 miles north- 
east of the city in the expansive 
Owens Valley, water was plentiful. 
Runoff from the Sierra Nevada 
Mountains supplied the Owens 
River with a robust flow of water, 
and that water made the valley an 
4deal area for growing crops and 
raising livestock. 

Mulholland, along with former 
L.A. Mayor Fred Eaton, decided 
to tap the resources of the Owens 
River and divert water to Los 
Angeles via an aqueduct. 

Through clever land acquisi- 
tions, Eaton began buying up key 
parcels of land in the San 
Fernando Valley - land which the 
city of Los Angeles would later 
have to buy from Eaton and use 
for the construction of the aque- 
duct. ;^ ..-.-., 

Between 1908 and 1913, hun- 
dreds of workers constructed the 
233-mile aqueduct, which carries 



M/UQRftOtfiPTOF SYSTEMS SERVING SQUTHEhN CAUEQBSE! 

Two-thsxis of los Angeles' water supply comes from sources in the north via a system of 
aqueducts. The 233-mile Owens River Aqueduct was completed in 1913,and was 
considered a major engineering accomplishment at the time. - /j.'./;i":-.l'-^i^.-ji;:j .- 




StaeVkMpR^ 



Second lA Aqueduct r^ColomdoHim 



losAn9«t« 



CfrioradoRimAtiuediict 



SOt^fc jfltJw^ wwrtitXy wWff itiffDM 



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JACOB LIAO/Daily Bruin 



water from the Owens River 
through the Mojave Desert to the 
San Fernando reservoir. r ^ - 
In November 1913, in front of a 
crowd of tens of thousands of 
Angelinos, the first few drops of 



water poured out of the aqueduct 
into the reservoir. According to 
historical accounts, Mulholland 
responded to the event by saying, 

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Ohenwion Issue 2000 



Daily Bnik) Campus Lift 




COLUMNS: Your best bet 
to learn journalism is at 
UCLA's daily newspaper 



Terry Tang 

Daily Bruin Arts & Entertainment . 
Fifth-year, English and 
coniniunication studies- - ^^"--^ 



:.^-' 



Keith Enrjquez 

Daily Bruin Photography 




Third-year, math 

"Quality 
photojournal- 
ism is in 
demand now 
more than ever. 
In my journal- 
ism studies I've 
found that only 
12 percent of 
the people who 
pick up a newspaper check out the 
story on the front page when there is 
no photo with it. Add a photograph, 
and the readership of the story goes 
up to 40 percent and increasing the 
size of the picture raises readership 
even more. 

At the photo department of the 
Daily Bruin, photojournalists don't 
take pictures for the sake of pictures. 
We don't photograph for editors or 
for ourselves. Photogs take pictures 
for readers - photos that reveal the 
truth, make an impact, and capture 
a moment. 

On any given day our interns, 
contributors, and staff can photo- 
graph a speaker on gay rights, lake 
exciting concert photos of bands 
such as No Doubt and The Cure, 
record Jason Kiipono's three point 
shot from downtown, and document 
a student protest at Royce. 
Photojournalism lets us see, lets us 
be amazed and lets us understand. 
Journalism needs pictures, and 
photojournalists to take them." 




"Writing for 
A&E means 
reporting, not 
advertising. 



also like to watch out for each other. 

Copy is one of the few departs vi 
ments at The Bruin where you know 
everyone in your section. We have 
our own little commune in the mid- 
dle of the newsroom, and every 
night is a party at the copy desk. 

Come aboard matey!" 



about every 

thing big and 
small in the — 
world of enter- 
tainment. 
Readers don't 
ist want to hear about mainstream, 
big-name movies and musicians. We 
have a big readership out there that 
cares about local artists and events 
in the UCLA community. It's ;'-■';•■ 
important to remember that. 
Anyone with genuine enthusiasm for 
any aspect of arts & entertainment 
can lend an important voice to this 
section." ; 



Brian O'Camb 

Daily Bruin Copy ^ - ^. :- -::- .^ 
Fourth-year, English 

"To be hon- 
est, working for 
the copy desk is 
a thankless job. 
No one sees the 
mistakes that 
you catch, only 
the ones you 
miss. You write 
headlines and 
subheads that never quite please. If 
you screw up big time, the paper 
could be sued. 

But, if you're at all critical (and 
cynical) then you come to love 
watching out for everyone's stories 
and the quality of the paper. And we 



part of their 



lege of covering a myriad of sports 
ranging from volleyball tD track to the 
sport that our school is widely known 
for - basketball. I've been able to ■': 
forge unique relationships with the 
athletes as well as follow teams across 
the country during their regular sea- 
son and their exciting NCAA 
-Championship runs. Each day brings- 




outine 



local, state and national issues: 

Working in U section where writers 
express contrasting views often pro- 
motes readers to become more 
involved. So, tx>me spark discussion 
through writing!" 



KiyoshiTomoM^ 



YuWang ■;. , / 

T)aily Bruin Design * : ' - 

Fourth-year; biochemistry * 

"Working 
with the Design 
department, 
I've met lots of 
people who _^ - 
express thei r ,_ 
creativity - ^ 
through art, 
graphics and 
layout. Without 
visual aids and an enticing design for 
the newspaper, good stories would go 
unread. Join Art and Design so your 
efforts grab readers' attention." 




something unforeseen 
—^ Whether covering late-breaking : 
news such as the Bruins defeating top- 
ranked Stanford in basketball or 
learning the subtle art of column-writ- 
ing, the Daily Bruin defmitely makes 
my college experience better than my 
wildest dreams (and it can - and will - 
do the same for you)." 




Moin Salahuddin 

Daily Bruin Sports 
Fourth-year, psychobiology 

"When I first 
came to UCLA, 
I knew I wanted 
to be a part of 
the athletic 
excellence. So, 
in came the idea 
of joining the 
Daily Bruin and 
covering the 
amazing student-athletes that make 
up our university. 

Since joining the Sports depart- 
ment my first year, I've had the privj- 




AmyGolod 

Daily Bruin Viewpoint ': r 
Third-yeai; English : ''■'■ 

"A student 
visited the Daily 
Bruin Spring -v. « 
quarter to -^ , 
explain that r- 
picture did not 
accurately 
reflect a story 
because it por- 
trayed women 
as submissive. He believed strongly 
enough to visit the office and express 
his opinion. 

In Viewpoint, writers and readers 
do this daily. Columnists discuss cur- 
rent events or entertain by mocking 
campus issues. Readers respond with 
letters and submissions, creating an 
exchange of ideas. 

The Daily Bruin staff also express- 
es its opinion in Viewpoint through 
weekly editorials, explaining the 
effects on the UCLA community of 




l> .. ,.. .^...(■. 


rtriit# 











Daily Bruin News ■—-—--— r r^^ 
Third-year, biology _ ..-^ _ 

" "Countless 
hours and many 
late nights as 
one of the Daily 
Bruin's handful 
of news 
reporters has 
taught me a lot 
about people 
and even more 
about life. 

For a science major who studies 
more about cells and chemicals than 
communication, the Bruin has 
become both a diversion and a learri- 
ing opportunity. It's been the place 
where I have spent most of my time,' -.■; 
but also whcTC I've met some of the 
most genuine and hard-working peo- 
ple. 

Some of those very same friends , 
told me when I first came to UCLA'' 
that classes would not be the most 
important part of my education. The 
Bruin has shown me no less. 

Don't get me wrong. Being a news 
reporter, by nature, is one of the most 
stressful jobs around and by no means 
glamorous. In researching numerous 
stories I've had to learn a lot about 
how one of the largest universities in 
the United States operates. Along the 
way, though, I learned a little about 
myself as well. . . , ' ■ 
Join!" : . 

SeeWUIM^pagell 



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JENNIFER YUEN/Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

Construction is nearly completed at the De Neve construction site. 
Two of the housing buildings of De Neve Plaza may open in the fall. 



HOUSING 

From page 1 

improve many areas." ; ' 

Problems with the plans signifi- 
cantly affected the Podium building, 
where many of the mechanical and 
plumbing systems, specifically those 
serving the dining area, did not fit 
into the building that was initially 
drawn. 

"The architects were Torced to 
redesign the building to increase its 
height by about 18 inches to 2 feet to 
provide room to put all the pipes and 
ducts. This item alone resulted in 
some significant delay," Erickson 
said. 



Further delays resulted when the 
contractor fired the original framer 
of the buildings. Erickson declined 
to comment on the contraclof^iuia- 
tion. -"^"'^ ^^ 

The original construction con- 
tracts budget totaled approximately 
$55 million, but the latest estimated 
construction cost was set at $63 mil- 
lion. 

The delays and changes in con- 
struction plans contributed to this 
increase. The financial impact of the 
delays have yet to be fully assessed, 
but are expected to be significant due 
to lost reveniie and increased debt. 

"The increase in cost is a result of 
the problems that the job has experi- 
enced," Erickson said. 



CONVENTION 

From page 1 

the LAPD could avoid publicity over 
the purchase. 

Concerns over convention security 
have been amplified in the wake of the 
rioting around the Staples Center that 
erupted after the Lakers' N BA cham- 
pionship victory. But in an opinion 
piece, Hayden wrote that protesters 
don't necessarily want to shut down 
the convention. Lisa Fithian, of 
Direct Action Network, agrees. 

Her group, which took part in the 
recent protests in Seattle and 
Washington, DC, is now making 
preparations for the convention in 
Los Angeles, as well as the 
Republican National Convention in 
Philadelphia. 

"We want to deliver a message that 
wc want no more business as usual," 
said Fithian. She added that the pur- 
pose of the demonstrations is to 
"highlight critical issues locally and 
globally." 

Fithian said everyone she knows 
has been encouraging non-violence 
for the planned protests. She said that 
what she was concerned about was 
"state violence" - such as the use of 
painful holds and pepper spray by 
police, as well as preemptive strikes 
against protest groups. 

"I don't consider property destruc- 
tion violent," said Fithian in rgsponse 
to a hypothetical situation of smashed 
storefront windows - one of the by- 
products of the Seattle protests. 
"That doesn't mean I consider it an 
efTective tactic in terms of what our 
goals are. I don't advocate it." 

At UCLA, the Environmental 



coalition, atnong other groups, has 
sponsored meetings to plan for the 



demonstrations in August. 

Meanwhile, the Democrats are 
calling for 10,000 volunteers - includ- 
ing students - to work inside the walls 
of the Staples Center. Melanie Ho, of 
the Bruin Democrats, said that her 
group recruited volunteers through e- 
mail and from tables on Bruin Walk 
during the past quarter. 

"We've been in contact with the 
Democratic National Convention 
Committee and the Los Angeles host 
committee and the Democratic head- 
quarters in L.A., and they're all keep- 
ing us aware of opportunities as they 
come up," Ho said. Such volunteer 
jobs include driving officials around, 
helping at fund raising events, and 
doing tasks at the convention itself 

Though not technically a protest, a 
homeless convention will be held in a 
nearby area of transitional shelters. 
Also joining in the demonstrations 
may be some union locals. Even the 
police union, the Los Angeles Police 
Protective League, has applied for a 
demonstration permit, saying that 
they feel left out of negotiations with 
the federal government over police 
department reforms. 

In addition to protesting, there 
should be plenty of celebrating. On 
top of the events in the Staples 
Center, there will be private parties at 
various locations in the city. 

Such parties have come under crit- 
icism for the corporate sponsorship 
that is often lined up to pull them ofT. 
One party will be held in a location 
not too far from UCLA - the Playboy 
Mansion in nearby Holmby Hills. 

Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D-Garden 
Grove) is organizing a party at Hugh 
Hefner's mansion for Hispanic Unity 
USA - a national political organiza- 



Daily Bniin Campus Ue 



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HEAITH 

Frompage4 

Pam Viele, director of Student Health 
Education, said students need to be 
careful about how they lose weight. . 

"Especially in L.A., there's so 
much emphasis oh body image and so 
much pressure to conform to an ideal 
body type," Viele said. "There are 
many different bodies and shapes that 
are healthy and beautiful." 

Viele said students may jeopardize 
their health if they lack proper nutri- 
tion. ■■■ ■ '■ ■■■■■■ - ■■ '. . - 

"Many students haven't fmished 
growing," Viele said. "A lot of young 
women and young men have not 
reached their full weight, so gaining 
weight is not a bad thing at all.** ' 



Students (should) 
exercise regularly to 
help relieve tension . 



"It's not good to think of food as 
good food and bad food. It's impor- 
tant to get a well-balanced variety of 
food," she continued. 

Besides diets, specialists at the cen- 
ter work with students to prevent 
sleep deprivation, a problem many 
students face. 

"It has been estimated that more 
than half of all college students are 
sleep deprived," said Jo Ann 
Dawson, director of primary care. 
"Many try to get by on three to five 
hours of sleep." 

"For any adult body, sleep experts 
generally recommend iseven to eight 
hours and up to 12 hours a day," she 
continued. 

Dawson said she recommends stu- 
dents take short naps or even close 
their eyes if they don't sleep as a way 
to rest their bodies and mind. 

Common symptoms of a person 
who is sleep deprived include pain 
and respiratory cold conditions. 

"Some come in complaining they 
couldn't remember anything," 
Dawson said of students who visited 
the center during finals week. 

To stay awake.some students turn 
to various stimulants such as coffee or 
caffeine pills, Dawson said. 

"Those agent* may give a person a 
sense that they are more alert," she 
said. "But they may end up feeling a 
contradictory sense of feeling tired, of 
wanting to sleep and being unable 
to." 

Dawson said such stimulants may 
increase a person's heart rate and 
leave them nervous or jittery. 

"The only cure for sleep depriva- 
tion is really to get some sleep," she 
said. 

She added that students should 
stop working about 30 minutes before 
going to bed so they can unwind and 
rest their mind. She also suggested 
students exercise regularly to help 
relieve tension and give them better 
sleep. 

The Ashe Center offers additional 
services to students living on campus 
through the Student Health Advocate 
program, which trains student volun- 
teers in residence halls to provide 
basic medical information or aid. 

"We're taking services to where 
students live and learn," she said, 
adding that some students prefer 
going to a SHA because they feel their 
peers can better identify with them in 
many cases. 

To prevent illness in residence 
halls, students should take added 
measures to maintain good personal 
hygiene, Viele said. 

"In any living situation where a lot 
of people are living in close proximity, 
the most common thing to prevent an 
infection is handwadiing," she said. 
"Be careful of sharing utensils and 
cups. It would be a good idea to wear 
(slippers) to the bathroom and show- 
ers area to prevent tnuiimiuion of 



ir^ 



DMty Bruin CifflfNisLMt 



Onematioa Issue 2000 13 



HEAITH 

From page 12 

infection." 

. Viele said students should mini- 
mize stress by exercising, meditating 
or participating in some relaxation 
activity. 

"Learning time management skills 
to allow the person to maintain some 
sort of social balance, maintaining 
relationships and developing a strong 
social support is important," Viele 
said. 



For more information on the Ashe 
Center, visit www.saonet.ucla.edu/ 
health.htm. Information about SPS can 
be ^ found ^~^ at 

wvvw.saoneLucla.edu/sps.htm 



CONVENTION 

From page 10 



tion of which Sanchez is the chair. 
Her spokeswoman, Sarah Anderson, 
confirmed that the party will take 
place on August 15th. She would not 
release the names of its sponsors. 

"I'm going to keep that under my 
hat, too," said Sanchez, when also 
asked who would be in attendance at 
the party. She added that the event is 
"still in the planning stages." 

There have already been some sig- 
nificant developments for Los 
Angeles in association with conven- 
tion planning. "Roy Romer, the for- 
mer Colorado governor who was ini- 
tially chairman of the convention 
committee, was recently selected to 
be the new superintendent of the 
troubled Los Angeles Unified School 
District. . 

The city's host committee. 
L A2000, is trying to meet its commit- 
ment to raise $35 million for the con- 
vention. Mayor Richard Riordan 
and Democratic party officials had 
promised that no public funds would 
be needed for the undertaking, but 
the host committee recently asked the 
city council for $4 million to cover 
fund-raising shortfalls. 

Organizers are interested in show- 
casing the city at its best. Whether the 
Democratic National Convention in 
Los Angeles this August ends up 
looking more like the one the city 
held in 1960 - or the one Chicago 
held in 1968 - remains to be seen. 



BRUIN 

From page 8 




Robert Liu 

Dally Bruin Electronic Media 
Fourth-year, sociology. 

"In today's 
fast-paced 
world, online 
journalism is 
quickly becom- 
ing a pervasive 
means of getting 
the news. That's 
what the 
Electronic 
Media Department Is all about. The 
Daily Bruin Online is not just another 
medium; it's the future of journalism 
and the Daily Bruin. 

Whether it's from web program- 
ming to graphic designing or just 
plain old reporting and editing, EM 
has something for everyone. The 
Internet lets us connect to the entire 
world so that everyone can enjoy 
what the Daily Bruin has to offer. We 
bring you online journalism with the 
hopes of taking one more step toward 
the future of progress and change. 

Check out the Daily Bruin Online 
at www.dailybruin.ucta.edu and 
refresh the way you read the news." 



To find out how you can join the Daily 
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STUDY 

Frompdge4 

sona and to avoid those places that 
will tempt them to turn "study hour" 
into "social hour." . 

Ardy Kassakhian, a fifth-year 
political science student, said he 
found studying with others initially 
tended to encourage procrastination 
no matter where the group decided to 
study. 

"My first two years at UCLA, 
studying with friends meant sleeping 
in the library or goofing around," 
Kassakhian said. "That would basi- 
cally last until > c got hungry and left 
to go eat or play some pool." 

When students eventually think 
seriously about their grades, they real- 
ize that UCLA offers a variety of 
indoor and outdoor settings that can 
enrich their social experience without 
hampering the health of their GPA. 

Like many students, fourth-year 
psychology student Myoshi Hirano 
said she finds Kerckhoff Coffeehouse 
allows her to'put in hours for studying 
without feeling anti-social. 

"I enjoy studying in Kerckhoff and 
the other coffee houses on campus," 
she said. "There's enough going on so 
that I don't feel like I'm missing out 
on life even though I'm buried in my 
books." ^ ^ ' 

Hirano said that she enjoys stop- 
ping by any of UCLA's coffee hous- 
es, including Northern Lights on the 
north-end of campus, and Jimmy's on 
the northeast end near the Law 
School, as a way to jump-start one of 
her all-nighter study sessions. 

"Even if I decide to go home and 
study, the coffee houses are conve- 
nient places to pick-up good coiffee," 
she said. 

Hirano added that various restau- 
rants, like Cafe Roma at the 
Anderson School and The Bomb 
Shelter near the Medical School, are 
great places to grab a bite to eat in- 
between classes. 

"All the food I need is right there, 
so I 'm less~ likely to get distracted 
from studying when I get hungry," 
Hirano said.^ I 

Those who firtd four walls and a 
roof too stifling can take advantage of 
the university's wealth of natural sur- 
roundings. Loaded with trees, mani- 
cured green lawns and spread 
throughout the campus, these settings 
allow students to "tan and scan" while 
simultaneously absorbing 

Shakespeare, Aristotle, or atmos- 
pheric science. 

"There's something about the 
squirrels in the sculpture garden that 
creates a serene environment perfect 
for concentrating on your studies," 
psychology graduate student Artin 
Rebakale said. 

Rcbakale explained that he found 
out about the Franklin D. Murphy 
Sculpture Garden early in his college 
career because of his desire to take 
advantage of Southern California's 
usually mild and sunny climate. 

"How can you go to school in L.A. 
and spend most of your time^ 
indoors?" Rebakale asked. 

The majority of UCLA students, 
however, prefer the more traditional 
atmosphere of a library to study. With 
17 such buildings sprinkled about the 
campus, students cun find plenty of 
study space in an environment 
designed specifically for that pur- 
pose. 

"Hie place on campus that 1 prefer 
to study most is the Young Research 
Library," Kassakhian said. "Any desk 
you pick is relatively secluded from 
everyone else." 

Peiiiaps signaling a trend that 
finds serious students gravitating to 
those parts of campus meant for grad- 
uate students, Rebakale said that the 
Law School is a good place to spend 
nights studying when sleeping is not 
an option. 

"If it*s necessary, nothing beats an 
all nighter in the law lounge," 
Rebakale said. 



IS 



A;i>«;,'l5> 



■: a. 



■>■;, .» 



»'. 



FOOD 

From page 3 

■ ■ ■ i ■ 

whole diet plan down while the giris 
seem to have a better idea of the con- 
cept of a balanced meal plan," he 
said. 

Christine Hill, a fourth-year 
English student, theorized as to why 
the female students at UCLA eat 
healthier than their male counter- 
parts. 

Hill said that cooking together 
with her roommates at home instead 
of going to restaurants has con- 
tributed to her eating healthier food. 

"I coordinate what I eat with what 
my roommate^ eat," Hill said. "We 
cook together. X—- -—^-- — --^ 

"In the apartments, socially, girls 
eat together more," she continued. 
"Guys may tend toward the quick 
meal - fast food, or those frozen 
things," she continued. ^"~' 
; As in the apartments, eating 
together seems to provide a sense of 
community for those students in fra- 
ternities and sororities as well. 

While these institutions can often 
provide a feeling of kinship away 
from home, the food students choose 
to eat does not necessarily resemble 
home cooking, according to Aaron 
Kessler, who graduated this summer 
with a major in business economics. 

"I eat mostly sandwiches, turkey, 
peanut butter," Kessler, who lived in 
a fraternity house, said. "We cook for 
ourselves." X ' 

Like other -students, Kessler's eat- 
ing habits have changed from home, 
but Ihey still adhere to nutritional 
standards of some sort 

"1 try to stay away from fast food 
and foods high in carbs," Kessler 
said. . 



STUDY 

From page 14 ; 

Ironically, the College Library, 
UCLA's oldest library, housed in one 
of the school's original four buildings, 
has the reputation of being one of the 
worst places to study because of the 
socializing that occurs there. 

"If I was going to the library to get 
some phone numbers, then 1 would 
go to Powell," Kassakhian said. 

. Hirano also said that she prefers to 
avoid the College Library. 

"Even in 'Night Powell' - that part 
of the library that remains open night- 
ly until 2 a.m. - there's so much whis- 
pering going on," Hirano said. "Its 
easier to deal with loud music than it 
is with that." ^ 

In addition to these on-campus 
sites, Westwood Village also offers a 
number of comfortable study spots. 

"I like studying at Denny's," 
Kassakhian said. "The coffee is sub 
par, but I'm pretty much left alone 
around the clock as long as I buy a 
side of onion rings." 

Denny's Diner restaurant manag- 
er Roxanna Alamiri confirmed 
Kassakhian's experience. 

"I definitely don't mind that they 
study here," Alamiri said. "If you 
come in and don't order, then that's a 
problem. .-.■:- _ ;■. ; _._._ 

"But as long as you or^' some- 
thing, even just a side dish, then 
you're welcome to stay as long as you 
like," she continued. 

The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf, with 
two locations in the Westwood, could 
also accommodate students. 

"It used to bother us," manager 
Jim Nath said. "But at this time, we 
don't have a policy on time limit. 

"Students are welcome to stay here 
as long as they like," Nath added. 

Regardless of the location, there 
are still some students who want to 
study with a friend or two. Those that 
do said that this strategy is risky if not 
employed properly. 

"My word of advice to any incom- 
ing freshman is not to' study with 
friends unless your friends know 
more than you do and arc serious 



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WATER 

From page 6 



"There it is, take It." 

It was advice that the residents of 
Los Angeles followed without reserr 
vation even as the once lush Owens 
Valley began to dry up. 

Farmers and ranchers who used to 
thrive in the Owens Valley watched 
helplessly as water was systematically 
diverted from their land to the bur-- 



geoning metropolis. Up against the 
political and economic power of Los 
Angeles, residents of the valley decid- 
ed to reclaim their wat^ rights by 

force. They repeatedly^tried to take^^ 

control of the aqueduct gates and 
dynamite the pipeline. 

But in 1927, in an attempt to pro- 
tect his engineering masterpiece, 
Mulholland led a well-armed force of 
L.A. police officers into the valley 
and was largely successful in quelling 
the insurgent residents there. 

In 1928, the St. Francis Dam - an 
integral part of the aqueduct system 
built two years earlier - ruptured, and 
sent a 120-foot wall of water careen- 
ing toward the Pacific Ocean, deci- 
mating all of the natural resources in 
its path, and killing nearly 500 peo- 
ple. Mulholland's reputation was 
ruined and he was devastated. He 
accepted total responsibility for the 
disaster. ' - 

Years later, tests confirmed that 
geologic instability actually caused 
the dam break, pot an error by 
Mulholland. 

Though the history of Los 
Angeles' water system is now best 
known from its silver screen incarna- 
tion in the 1974 movie "Chinatown," 
starring Jack Nicholson and Faye 
Dunaway, Mulholland's legacy has 
left a permanent mark on Los 
Angeles, the Owens Valley and Mono 
Lake, which has been partially 
drained since the L.A. aqueduct was 
extended to tap its water. 



The aqueduct extension was com- 
pleted in 1941 and diverted water 
from the streams that feed Mono 
Lake, which is about 70 miles north 
of the Owens Valley. As a result, the 
lake level fell nearly 50 vertical feet, 
threatening the local ecosystem. 

In 1976, a group of student envi- 
ronmentalists led by David Gaines 
recognized the problem and formed 
the Mono Lake Committee to try to 
restore the lake to its original level 
and ecological conditions. Years of 
lobbying by the committee, which 
now has offices at both ends of the 
aqueduct, prompted Sacramento 
lawmakers to pass regulatory legisla- 
tion to protect Mono Lake. 

Mono Lake Committee education 
director Bartshe Miller said that the 
lake level, which is still more than 30 
feet lower than it was in 1941, will 
never return to its previous height. 
But many side effects of the watei 
diversion, like increased lake salinity 
and the elimination of bird habitats, 
have been significantly ameliorated. 

Miller also said that with less water 
being diverted from the Mono Basin, 
lake levels will continue to rise and 
the ecosystem will improve. 

"Currently the diversions are 15- 
20 percent of what they used to be," 
Miller said. "And water recycling will 
directly benefit Mono Lake." 

The Mono Lake Committee was 
the lead organization which asked the 
L.A. Department of Water and 
Power to investigate new water recy- 
cling projects aimed at decreasing the 
city's dependence on lake water. - 

L.A. city leaders are currently 
debating a proposal to convert sewage 
water to drinking water. The East 
Valley water project, an L.A. DWP 
reclamation plan, is ready to begin this 
summer, but the treated waste water 
would not enter the drinking water 
supply for another five years. 

Though the plan has been in the 
works for five years, several promt- ' 
neni LA. politicians, including City 
Councilman Joel Wachs (2nd dis- 



Sc«lllim,^aft17 




WATER 

From page 16 



trict) and State Senator Richard 
Alarcon (D-San Fernando Valley) 
are beginning to question the project. 
Both are calling for more informa- 
tion about the possible health risks of 
drinking treated sewage water. 

Ohara said UCLA has been trying 
to bring in reclaimed water for the 
past seven years, but has been unable 
due to the high costs involved. He 
^emphasized that reclaimed water 
would be just as safe as what comes 
out of the taps now and said its use is 
not new to other parts of the country. 

^People don't realize that the 
water you get in Louisiana has gone 
through five people by the time you 
drink it," Ohara said. 

The link between Los Angeles, its 
people and its water supply has been 
strong since the first drops trickled 
into the city from sources in the 
North, and as the city's growth con- 
tinues, the debate about its water is 
likely to continue. 

Miller and others at the Mono Lake 
Committee who are still dealing with 
the effects of the decisions made by 
L.A. city planners'early in the 20th cen- 
tury said that the water recycling pro- 
posals show that the city is attempting 
to balance the needs of its residents 
with the needs of the environment. 

"Water has a public trust value in 
the environment for scenic and eco- 
logical purposes, not just for drinking 
purposes," Miller said. 



FRESHMEN 

From page 1 

UCLA doesn't want people of color," 
he added. 

In 1995, the UC Board of Regents 
passed SP-I, a proposal to eliminate 
race and gender in admissions - the 
move was later reinforced by 
California voters with the passage of 
Proposition 209, which ended the use 
of affirmative action throughout pub- 
lic institutions in the state. 

When the restrictions went into 
effect with the freshman class of 1998, 
the number of admitted underrepre- 
sented minority students dropped off 
by nearly 30 percent at UCLA. 

Since the passage of SP-1, maintain- 
ing diversity has become an increas- 
ingly important issue. The university 
has placed increased funding into out- 
reach programs in an attempt to 
improve the quality of California's K- 
12 education and in turn, attract 
underrepresented minority students 
to the university by improving their eli- 
gibility. ' . 

The average SAT score for students 
planning to enroll is 1277, up two 
points over last year, and the average 
GPA is 4.05, down from 4.13 last fall. 

Incoming freshmen have taken an 
average of 14.7 honors and advanced 
placement courses, down from 15.9. 

System-wide, 29,000 students 
including 4,730 from underrepresent- 
ed groups have chosen to attend a UC 
school out of over 50,000 applicants. 

While the number of underrepre- 
sented minority students is greater 
than in 1997, they still represent a 
smaller percentage of incoming fresh- 
men due to higher enrollment num- 
bers. 

"There were slight increases across 
the board, but nothing glaring," said 
Terry Lightfoot, a spokesman for the 
UC. 

According to Lightfoot, there are 
no predetermined goals for the per- 
centage of admitted students the UC 
hopes will register in the fall, but he 
said he is positive about the increase in 
diversity over last year. 

"We hope it will continue in the 
future," Lightfoot said. "Wc think it 
does represent an improvement and 
hope to see the trend continue over the 
years." . 



With reports trom Melody wan^ uaily 
Bruin Contributor. - - ^ — — _ 



Daily Bniin( 



Orimtation Issue 2000 17 



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"Working 
with Student 
Council 
because I __ 
learned a lot 
more with 
them than in 
my classes." 




rew 



College isn't just about beer; there's Trojan-bashing too 



Welcome, new Bruins, to UCLA, the 
place where stuff happens. Yes, now 
you too can become an exciting part of 
this place and its stuff. Now 
slop saying "hella" and 
let's get on with it. 

You will note that in a 
campus of 35,000 stu- 
dents, the days of high 
school cliques are over and 
done with. It's time to stop 
wearing that varsity jacket 
and using phrases like, 
"Dude, I could so kick that 
guy's ass," as they no 
longer carry the weight 
with the ladies that they 
used to. This is college, so 
it's time to grow up to an entirely new level of 
immaturity. 

This is my mission: to help you transition 
smoothly into your new social life. Being a Daily 

Uef is a third-year psychology and English 
student who hasn't seen It all, but has gpt most of 
the good stuff on videotape. Contact him at 
dlief@ucla.edu. 




Bruin columnist, I don't happen to have a life 
myself, but I've read quite a few books on the 
subject, and I think my theories may shed a little 
light on just what goes on at this campus. 

By now you're probably wondering, "When 
is he gonna start talking about the beer?" or, "1 
want some beer!" or possibly, "Beer good! Fire 
bad!" Do not fret, man petit chou (French for 
"My little cabbage" - I'm not kidding). Here at 
college the ages of 17, 18, 19, and 20 are mere 
formalities, little stumbling blocks on your way 
to total plasteredness and bastardness. 

Because this is your first experience with col- 
lege, you are apt to act like kids in a candy store. 
Of course this isn't so much a candy store as it is 
Uncle Jack Daniels' Carnival of Shame. Yes, 
you and your fellow freshmen will make orienta- 
tion a social-ladder-climbing experience like 
those you remember from high school, where 
whoever needs a liver transplant first wins. Then 
you will come to a realization, an enlightenment 
- what the French call a fontbleauuux (okay, so I 
don't really know that much French). After that 
fontbleauuux, you'll probably opt to climb a dif- 
ferent ladder. 

Many of our greatest thinkers have come to 
enlightenment this way, and even more of our 
worst thinkers have wound up there. I'm not 



here to tell you not to drink, as my stomach has 
certainly met its share of chemicals, but I will tell 
you this much: make it a guide to having other 
fun, don't make the drinking itself the fun. 
Chicks don't dig vomit, and guys don't like hav- 
ing to help a girl fight gravity. 

I think the great Romantic poet John Keats 
said it best in his "Ode on a Grecian Pledge": 
With excess brewskies and the smoken weed. 
Thou, piece of arse, dost tease us out of pants, I 
wore Eternity: Cool Water! When hangovers 
shall leave an aftertaste, thou shalt remain in 
midst of other hoes than ours, "Just friends" 
with man, to whom dudes sayst, "Booty is truth, 
truth booty," - that is all I know on earth, 'cause 
I just drank the coolant out of my car, dude. 

That being said, eat, drink and be merry. 
Girls, beware the booze at the frat party. You 
will find there are two kinds of girls at UCLA: 
frat hoes, and non-fral hoes. Frat houses can be 
a dangerous place. If those walls could talk, 
they'd have to testify. But if you do choose to go, 
here is a short list of things you should never say 
at a frat party: 

1. I'm a freshman (you don't have to say it, 
believe me, they'll know). 

2. 1 can drink you under the table (this ain't 
like " Raiders of the Lost Ark "). 



3. Oh my God, you guys! No, seriously! (indi- 
cates you are dumb and therefore more vulnera- 
ble) 

4. 1 alway»get naked when 1 get drunk (you 
know who you are). - " Ij. ^ . : '^ " "'T: 

Girls, do be careful when swimming in the "*''.: 
shark tank. At orientation they will show you an 
informative back-to-school special that warns, 
"You are going to get date-raped! It's only a 
matter of time!" except with the optimism and 
pep of a young Tracey Gold. In addition to these 
programs, BearWear chastity belts are available 
for purchase in Ackerman in a variety of colors. 
The system contains a lock that is far too com- 
plicated for any drunk to undo, much like the 
hooks on your bra. ' 

But Bruin social life isn't all seedy backrooms 
and miscellaneous chemicals. There's plenty of 
good, clean fun to be had around here, like foot- 
ball games (tailgate parties), theater (cast par- 
ties), and Hillel (all the Manischewitz you can 
handle. L'chaim!). 

For those of you who are more politically 
active, there should be plenty of rallies and 
protests to keep you occupied. We have a long 
tradition here at UCLA of staging demonstra- 

See UEF, page 23 



^" Pav attention: 

0Bim smeiun 

Campus involveineiit can make you 
feel at heme, previde direction 



"The 
Stanford vs. 
UCLA bas- 
ketball game 
... the fact 
that we 
needed to 
win that 
game so 
badly and 
everybody told us we had no 
chance ... when we won, you basi- 
cally heard a loud shout from 
Westwood." * 



:•;■•_ 




. ( .■ .' 


Jemiia Gaston 


''.'•"■ 




Third-year 


\ '/•'.■/: " ■ ■' '' -' 




English 


. ■ ■. ,. -/ 


■ , " "; ^ 




■ ■'■:: y,^--,. 


^HHMI^H 


"When \ 


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walked into 


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^K^^^H 


my final and 


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no one was 


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there ... I 




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was lost, 


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■ ', : ': .:; 


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; ■ t 



ShereenSabet 

Campus visitor 



-*tHK^^^^<* 



Katie Younglowe, 

Third-year 
Communication studies 




"Dating 
my husband. 
It was just a 
really fun 
experience." 




Speak your mind: point your view in our direction 



VIEWPOINT: Expressing 
opinions in newspaper 
adds to UCLA education 

People often tell me that life is an 
educational experience. But they 
should not forget that college is a 
perfect time to 
accelerate that 
process of learn- 
ing. 

While the 
information you 
gel in the lecture 
hall shapes and 
hones yqur 
thought-process- 
ing skills and the 
way you view 
social and polili- 
~ca I problems, 
. the ideas you arc ' 
exposed to outside of the classroom 

Lalas is the 2000-2001 Viewpoint Editor. 
If you would like to submit a column or 
letter regarding an issue that strongly 




Jonah 
Lalas 



concerns you, please send it to 
viewpoint@media.ucla.edu. „ 



can contribute just as much, if not 
more, to your world views. The rallies 
you attend, the speakers you listen to, 
the student groups you approach, the 
events you witness, and the articles 
you read in the Daily Bruin all expose 
you to a diversity of ideas you may not 
otherwise get from a lecture where a 
professor blandly spits out facts. Too 
many limes, professors act as if stu- 
dents are faceless sponges, soaking up 
information and then squeezing out 
the facts during test time. It happens 
too often that the courses we take end 
up as a standardized exercise for how 
well wc can use our short-term memo- 
ries lo gel a good grade. Wc need to 
realize that the experiences and ideas 
that will influence and teach us new 
things maN' come from other sources. 
One of these sources is the / 

-Viewpoint scaiun-wftfiTDaTly brum. 
As one of the newspaper's integral sec- 
tions, Viewpoint aims to expose read- 
ers to a diversity of opinions from stu- 
dents, faculty, and other members of 
the UCLA and the local communities. 
Unlike most classes where students 
iri e i nu i i /e and i i ' gu r gitati' facts w i th — 



cussion, the Viewpoint section allows 
arguments lo flow back and forth ~~ 
between students. 



All of US feel Strongly 

about certain issues ... 

Silence will get you 

nowhere. 



This dialogical process makes it 
possible foi- students to examine more 

than one side of a particular topic. [ 

Moreover, the section becomes an 
open forum where students can 
engage in meaningful, passionate, 
angry, funny, and sarcastic debate. ~~: 

It is important to understand that 
we all have our opinions. All of us feel 
.strongly abput certain issues. 
Viewpoint allows you the opportunity 
lo share your thoughts with the com- 
munity at large. By doing so, it al«o- 
g i ves you the cha n ce to hea r what pc'o- 



your ability to argue forcefully and 
efPectively It is this process of 
exchanging ideas that makes UCLA 
such a great place for learning. 

Another great aspect of the 
Viewpoint section is that it allows for 
discussion on a myriad of topics. It is 
more than just a page where people 
can entrench themselves in serious 
political debate. It also allows for com- 
edy, satire and discussion of social life 
and issues that directly affect students. 

With that, I encourage each and 
every one of you to submit your opin- 
ions lo Viewpoint, either in the form 
of submissions or by applying to be a 
columnist. Silence will get you 
nowhere,. . _ • 

Speaking out is one of the most 
elTective ways lo communicate your 
ideas lo a mass audience. It remains 
one of the only ways thai you can ' 
reach out to students and have them 
see your point of view. By engaging in 
conversation with one another, stu- 
dents have the opportunity to think 
more critically about their views and 
reexamine the faults in their own argu- 
mcnis. And trust mc, a really well wrli- 



hardly enough time for significant dis- pie have to say against you and to test ten and passionate column will elicit take place. 



good responses, ' __ 

Finally, let me just say that no per- 
son on this campus lives on an island. 
We are social beings who communi- 
cate with each other. The policies and 
events that affect one student are 
bound to have an impact on many oth- 
ers. Unlike many other students in this 
country, we are attending a top-rate 
university that offers many opportuni- 
ties for leadership and experience. As 
part of this elite institution, we have 
the privilege to debate and discuss 
issues and policies that will greatly 
affect our families in the future. 

The Viewpoint section of the Daily 
Bruin challenges you to speak your 
mind and introduce your views to 
other students. We respect and print 
articles from all sides. I also encourage 
you to apply as columnists at the end^_ 
of every quarter. In addition lo being — 
able to write your OWN column every 
other week, you'll also gain the status 
of celebrity as your picture appears 
with your column on every copy of the 
paper. We are in the process of gaining 
an education. But only through dia- 
logue can the process of learning truly 




Two years ago, the summer 
before my first year at UCLA, I 
had a million different thoughts 
and emotions running amok inside my 
head. I felt ner- 
vous, inspired, 
ambitious, hope- 
ful, worried, 
happy and sure 
about only one 
thing: my undy- 
ing hatred for 

use. 

Since that 
chaotic time, I 
have come to 
realize that this 

campus is an 

amazing place 

where you can step outside yourself 
and grow, change and learn. But it is 
not always an easy process: my first 
two quarters at UCLA, I was oHen 
torn among feelings of enthusiastic 
excitement and feelings of loneliness, 
displacement, and a nagging fear that 
I would never figure out what I was 
supposed to be doing in college. It 
wasn't until after I became involved 
that I realized my feelings were nor- 

Ebadolahi is a third-year international 
development studies student. Eat a 
peach! E-mail comments to 
grover @ucla.eda 



Mitra 
Ebadolahi 



mal. More importantly, my involve- 
ment helped convince me that I had a 
real purpose here on this campus. 
Of course, going to parties and 
football games helped too. Meeting 
friends in the dorms and in classes, 
taking courses that would never have 
been offered in high school, and trying 
to figure out my major occupied a 
great deal of my time during my first 
months here. There were days when I 
felt like the only person that had not 
yet declared a major, the only student 
struggling to find Hershey Hall, and 
the only girl without a date for 
Saturday night. 



I am going to try to 

nnake life easier for you 

and reveal the secrets of 

involvement at UCLA. 



In spite of all these feelings, or per- 
haps because of them, I decided to 
really get involved in the spring of my 
freshman year. That decision has been 
the single most infiuential factor in my 
college career and has helped me to 
realize that I was never alone on this 



campus. As you prepare to enter this 
university, I am here asking you to 
make the same decision, for your own 
sake. 

But UCLA is full of paradoxes. On 
the one hand, it is an enormous upiver- 
sily, with over 30,000 students, 500 
student clubs and organizations, 
countless majors, and a million differ- 
ent op|:>ortunities for involvement. Yet 
somehow, when you look for a place 
to start your UCLA career, it seems as 
if there is nothing for you to do and . 
nowhere to go for guidance. 

As someone who has felt all of these 
things, I am going to try to make life 
easier for you and reveal the secrets of 
involvement at UCLA. First of all, 
start listening. In your time here at this 
university, listening to the students 
around you will be your greatest tool, 
teaching you more than you could 
ever learn by taking a test or reading a 
textbook. Students here are motivated, 
outspoken and dedicated, and by lis- 
tening to your peers you m\\ begin to 
understand some of the most pressing 
issues on our campus. 

Secondly, look around you with a 
critical eye. What do 1 mean? Here's 
an assignment: as you sit in your orien- 
tation sessions, look around and ask 
yourselves how many underrepresent- 

$f«BAP0UUI|,pigt24 



team together.' 



"Well Vtmy 
on the swim 
team and 
when we 
beat 

Stanford it 
was the best 
feeling ever. 
It really 
brought my 



Justin Lividc 

Fourth-year 

English 




"I remem- 
ber the first 
year in the 
dorms meet- 
ing all the 
new people 
who eventu- 
ally became 
some of my 
best 



Kenneth Ye 

Cal State Fullerton alumnus. 



V 



friends. 




"Failing 
my first 
class." 






f-. 



Lynn Hollenback 
Campus visitor 




"When 1 
met my wife 
in college 27 
years ago," 



TerriPoivell 

Campus visitor 



"The 
chemistry 
building got 
shut down 
because 
they left a 
can of picric 
acid out 
that became 
unstable, so 

they had to call in the bomb 

squad." 




Compiled by Cuauhtemoc Ortega and Amy Gokxi Daily Bruin Senior 
StafF. Photos by Keith Enriquez. Daily Bruin Senior Staff. 



t - ■ :i 



;1 



» 



. ..•- jH^^^-z ■'^•.^■. 



DAILY BRUIN 

118 Kerckhoff Hall 

30a Westwood Plaza 

Los Ar>9elM. CA 90024 

— ■^ (J 1 U) BJS-98 9 g 

httpy/www.daMybruin.ucl«.edu 



Unsigned editorials represent a majority opink>n of the 
Daily Bruin Editorial Board. Alt other columns, letters 
and artworii represent the opinions of their authors. 

All submitted material must bear the author's 
nanw, address, telephone numbcii registration num- 

held CMOcpl in cxtieme casei 



The Bruin complies with the Communication 
Board's poBcy prohibiting the publication of articles 
that perpetuate derogatory cultural or ethnic stereo- 
typei 

When muitipte authors submit nutcrial. some 

edtvilh- 



mitted material and to determine its placement in the 
paper AM submissions become the property of The 
Bruin. The Communications Board has a medto griev- 
ance proccduie for resoiving complaims against any of 
its publk a tton s > For a copy of the complete procedure 



c on tact I 



the maleflaL The Bruin reserves the ftghi to edk sub- 



rt 



20 Orientation Issue 2000 



Daily Bruin Viewpoint 



^t- 



Voice for change at L.A. convention 



DEMOCRATIC: Issues are 



hampered by agendas of 
party, problems ignored 

By Kevin Rudiger 



This summer, history will be 
jnade in the streets of Los Angeles 
and Philadelphia. Thousands will 
converge at both the Republican 
and Democratic National 
Conventions to protest both par- 
lies' continued pursuit of corpo- 
rate-dictated, racist agendas. These 
agendas serve the interests of the 
elite while the vast majority of peo- 
ple, both at home and abroad, are 
left impoverished and under the 
gun. 

Political conventions continue 
to be nothing more than high- 
priced commercials for the two 
corporate-dominated parties. The 
vast majority of Americans who 
can't aflord access to the $10,000- 
a-plate dinners and other high- 
priced events are left outside the 
process. This year, though, we will 
be in the streets. 

Late last year in the ground- 
breaking Seattle protests against 
the World Trade Organization, 
thousands took to the streets to 



The Democratic, National Convention 
will be held in Los Angeles from 
August 14-17. The UCLA 
Environmental Coalition is one of 
many organizations involved in plan- 
ning the protests. For more informa- 
tion contact the Environmental 
Coalition at theec@ucla.edu. 



demand an end to unaccountable, 
faceless cofpofationsrand instit 
lions, the erosion of our democra- 
cy, and increasing inequality on a 
national and international level. 
Those of us in the streets were 
treated to extraordinary displays of 
solidarity, including the now leg- 
endary "Teamster-Turtle" alliance 
of labor unions and environmental- 
ists. We also saw that when people 
do take to the streets, things can 
and do change. , ... , , ..^ 



The convention will be 

a chance to showcase 

only one side of LA 



Not only did the WTO meetings 
collapse in disarray, but President 
Clinton begrudgingly insisted that 
he "agreed with many of the con- 
cerns" raised by those in the streets 
and called for provisions that take 
environmental, labor and human 
rights issues into account. Now, 
this extraordinary and growing 
movement has an opportunity to 
bring this winning combination to 
Los Angeles. 

The corporate politicos who are 
organizing the convention have 
talked about using the convention 
as an opportunity to "showcase 
Los Angeles." The truth is, of 
course, that they will only be show- 
ing one side of our city. 

While convention delegates 
hobnob in the Staples Center sky- 



boxes, it will be easy for them to 
forget that one-third of children inr^ 
L.A. County live below the poverty 
line, or that 45 percent of full-time 
workers in the city still have no 
health insurance. While conven- 
tion-goers stay in swank hotels 
downtown and on the West Side, 
they can easily ignore the shameful 
disparities of wealth in Los 
Angeles, where 50 people control 
as much wealth as the poorest 2 
million Angelenos. 

This is the real Los Angeles, a 
city created largely by an ongoing 
attack on the poor, lack of afford- 
able housing and a separate and 
unequal education system in com- 
munities of color. One goal of the 
protests this August will be to 
ensure that this side of Los Angeles 
cannot be ignored and that both 
the Democrats and Republicans 
realize that communities which 
have been marginalized in the past 
refuse to remain so today. 

It is important to realize that 
this side of Los Angeles, which 
both parties want to pretend does 
not exist, is the direct result of the 
outright failure of both the 
Democrats and Republicans to 
address key issues which impact us 
all. Under the supposedly progres- 
sive leadership of President 
Clinton, Congress passed sweeping 
"welfare reform" legislation, which 
has moved thousands of needy 
families off welfare rolls, without 
providing them any real opportuni- 
ties to support themselves. At the 
same time. Democrats have once 

SeeRUDKiER,page22 



Make yourself useful by 
becoming active at school 



as 



COMMUNnT: Day to day 
routines dictate level of 
participation on campus 



ByMaishaElonai 



Rople succumtr lo^dangerousT 
mindset when they act as if their 
actions don't affect anything. It's not 
true. Individuals make significant 
impacts on their surroundings, and 
UCLA students have an even greater 
potential to do so. 

I say this as much for myself as for 
any reader. All too frequently in col- 
lege my life has felt useless, and 
apparently there are other students 
who feel the same way about them- 
selves. 

I hear students continually asking 
the question, "How can I make a dif- 
ference?" And it's usually not 
because they want something to do. 
More frequently, the question is a 
rhetorical way of saying "I don't 
count for anything, leave me alone." 

I heard it last spring, when stu- 
dents talked to campaign representa- 
tives during elections for the 
Undergraduate Students 

Association Council. I've heard it 
screamed by students fleeing 
CALPIRG representatives. I heard 
it during the March primaries. I've 
heard it during religious debates. 

There seems to be a prevailing 
attitude at UCLA - activism is for 
liberal newspapers and student gov- 
ernments. Students should sit down, 

Elonai is fifth-year English student 



shut up, and do their homework. 
Don't argue for anything that's divi- 
sive. Let other people manage their 
business, because even if they are suf- 
fering, your effort does relatively lit- 
tle for them. Party as much as you 
can and remember to wear surF 
screen. 

~ Ladies and gentvl'd4ike to stig- 
gest that this attitude is social cancer. 
We believe we're worthless, so we 
give up -on working toward our 
ideals. If we don't get to our ideals, 
we believe we're worthless even 
more. It's like the alcoholic in "The 
Little Prince" who drank because he 
was ashamed of his alcoholism. 

There are plenty of people like 
that alcoholic wandering around 
campus, satisfied with a drink or 
maybe getting laid. But for those of 
you who need more to be satisfied, 
there are easy ways to have a positive 
impact on our universal surround- 
ings. Here are a few: 

Make The Hunger Site your home 
page on the Internet. It can be found 
at http://www.thehungersite.com. 
Click on the button to donate food 
when you open your browser. You 
will send one and a half cups of food 
through the United Nations to a hun- 
gry person who might starve without 
your click. Since the donations are 
sponsored by advertisers, this comes 
at absolutely no charge to you, 
except for the energy expenditure it 
takes to move one finger a day. 

Vive la difference; 

If you're feeling really adventur- 
ous, you can follow the link to 



See ELONAI, page 21 




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ELONAI 

From page 20 



http,7/www. therainforestsite.com. 
Visit that site and you can save a happy 
tree and its inhabitants. 



lively easy. 

You can register to vote on Bruin 
Walk long before absentee ballots are 
due. The Daily Bruin offers news and 
opinion-based summaries of most 
issues the week before elections. Just 
pick up a paper, skim through the 



Of course,- there arc also non- — arguments, and voie^fbr your beliefs, 
internet-related activities that you can This is a quantifiable method to fight 



participate in, as well. Smile at people 
Eye contact is a rare occuKence in 
Southern California, and I have found 
that people are generally pleased to 
encounter a shining face. It may even 
make them feel beltet about them- 
selves. V :^— -.--—-■:■;—'--■-•• ■ 

Sign lip to give blood. This process 
takes less than 30 minutes, and could 
save a lif? in an emergency situation. 
You won't go unrewarded, either 



for your ideals. And when you're done, 
you can dump the Bruin in one of a 
growing number of recycling bins on 
campus. 

And if you're irritated with this old, 
hashed-over argument, write a retort 
to the Daily Bruin at 
viewpoint@media.ucla.edu. With a cir- 
culation averaging 18,000 daily, you're 
bound to sway someone to your point 
of view. Of course, 1 also encourage 



Donors can claim a range of rewards people to use this forum to introduce 



from free food to 
movie passes to 
four hours of work- 
er's compensation, 
depending on wha.t 
the Blood and 
Platelet Center has 
to offer. 

Go tutor one 
high schoolstudent 
once a week with 



The Bruin is always 

looking for fresh 
-^ meat.^^ ^^ 



new issues to the 
paper, too. The 
Bruin is always 
looking for fresh 
meat. 

These are only a 
few of the myriad 
ofactivitiesyoucan 
participate in to 
make some change 
in the global com- 



any one of the number of organiza- munity. If you don't have time to do 
tions promoting such social services at much you can start small with a smile 
UCLA. You will learn valuable people or a donation; those little efforts add 
skills, and be able to cite job experience up. Take it from a student graduating 
on your resume. Meanwhile, you may summa cum laude - it is possible to 
be helping to resolve the issue of dwin- have friends and a successful academic 
dling diversity on college campuses, career while still pushing toward your 
and you will definitely be helping one ideals. With such sharp minds and cut- 
particular student. Si, se puede. ting-edge technology at UCLA, we 
And ofcour^e, you can always take may even work miracles to improve 
the time to vote. Voting sounds com- the global quality of living. Of course, 
plicated, and the issues are frequently that takes a huge effort, but you and I 
complex, but at UCLA, getting regis- are nascent superheros. Don't let any- 
tered and finding information is rela- one tell you differently. 



-(-.-A 



Are you an 

entertainer, 

satirist or 

commentator? If 

so, apply to be a 

d'nt cartoonist' 

Applications will be avail- 
able the first week of Fall 

■ 9 

quarter at the Daily Bruin, 
118 Kerckhoff Hall. 



% 



J^Oflll^O/DHyftuin 




Daily Bnjin Viewpoint 



Orientation Issue 2000 21 



StcU inlomu^cl. 



DAILY BRtTTT^ 



tfite summ er. 



We ll help you celebrate your Jewish, 

9RTH)AY 

Ohel Menachem Mendel 
Chabad House at UCLA x 

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22 Orientation Issue 2000 



Daily Brum Viewpoint 



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ZETA BETA TAU FALL RUSH 2000 



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RUDIGER 

From page 20 : 



again made no effort to move toward 
a more progressive taxation system 
and have continued to endlessly 
debate over even the smallest of mini- 
mum wage increases. 

Bill Clinton and his Democratic 
friends in Congress have also vastly 
accelerated the war on the poor, 
youth and communities of color, by* 
enacting increasingly punitive crimi- 
nal legislation, increasing funding for 
the failed "war on drugs" and passing 
numerous pieces of anti-immigrant 
legislation. While violent crime has 
decreased for the last several years, 
the number of people in prison con- 
tinues to skyrocket as politicians 
jockey to see who can be toughest on 
crime. '■•■, ■ 

On an international level, our 
Democratic "leadership" has been 
equally dismal. Whether we are talk- 
ing about the Clinton administra- 
tion's aggressive campaign to fund 
military offensives in Colombia or 
the administration's continued sup- 
port for a war, both military and eco- 
nomic, against the people of Iraq, the 
Clinton administration has shown its 
true colors. When I asked an aide to 
Bill Bradley, who supposedly repre- 
sents the left wing of the Democratic 
Party, how many Iraqi children they 
were willing to sacrifice in pursuit of 
the US policy objectives, her immedi- 
ate response: "As many as it takes 
until the people of Iraq rise up." As 
many as it takes! 

For students, like those of us at 
UCLA, this is an important time for 
us to get involved. Lack of political 
leadership continues to further erode 
the foundation for public education 
in the United States. But self-interest 
aside, it is important to recognize the 
important role that students have 
played in social movements through- 
out history. 



This summer's protests 

are movements for 

global justice. 



Now, as one of the most important 
political events in decades comes to 
our own backyard, it is our responsi- 
bility to get involved and to help 
ensure that our voices are heard. 

Some argue that by protesting the 
Democrats, we are playing into the 
hands of the Republicans. For many, 
though, the bottom line is that we can 
no longer afford to fall into the trap 
of supporting the "lesser of two 
evils." 

Everyone agrees that theoretically, 
there is some point where choosing 
the lesser of two evils no longer 
makes sense. Today, at the start of 
the new millennium, thousands of 
people are insisting that the time is 
now, that the Democrats have 
crossed the line one too many times 
and that it is past the lime for those 
of us who believe in justice, fairness 
and in real democracy to take a 
stand. 

Despite efforts by the police and 
the mainstream media to suggest oth- 
erwise, the protests this summer at 
the Democratic and Republican con- 
ventions are shaping up to be a beau- 
tiful and powerful expression of a 
multiplicity of movements for global 
justice - race, gender, class, and eco- 
logical justice. 

As we have consistently done, we 
will focus on the substance of the 
issues. Some of these activists will 
make their point using the time-hon- 
ored tradition of nonviolent resis- 
tance and civil disobedience, while 



others will be writmg policy crltT- 
cisms, holding side conventions, or 
marching in the streets. All will speak 
out and stand up in the face of global 
exploitation. We hope that UCLA 



students will be there with us! 



Ddily Bniin ViewpMnt 



LIEF 

From page 18 



lions for causes that are not only 
impossible to have an effect on, but 
that are almost unheard of anywhere 
else. Forget civil rights or the death 
penalty, because there's a guy some- 
where in Uzbekistan who is writing 
an offensive chain letter that must be 
stopped. Don't just sit there and 
J>elieve that one person can't make a- 
difference, prove it! 

I'm also fairly certain that most of 
you miss the fun of sports back 
home, be it curling or cockfighting. 
Relax folks, this is UCLA, home of 
the Bruins, where our motto is, "No, 
you're thinking of the hockey team 
from Boston!" Soon you'll be doing 
the 8-clap and joining in a variety of 
other famous Bruin sporting tradi- 
tions, such as standing through the 
entire game for no apparent reason. 



Orientation Hwt 2000 23 



Every Stereotype that 
youVe heard about USC 
Is 100 percent accurate. 



At orientation you will also be 
introduced to what UCLA students 
hate most: Trojat^ (no, these aren't 
more frat party date-rape jokes, I'm 
talking about "USC). In the next cou- 
ple of days you will hear every anti- 
Trojan joke ever written, to which 
you will say, "Hey, I liked that joke 
better when it was about Polish peo- 
ple." Still, it is important to note that 
every stereotype you've heard about 
USC is 100 percent accurate. What 
do you expect from a school that is 
dumb enough to name its team after 
the people who lost the Trojan War? 
I mean, who names themselves after 
the losers? Notre Dame calls them- 
selves the Fighting Irish, not the 
Capitulating French. 

If you think Troy is a bad symbol 
for a school, it's even worse for a 
condom. After all, think about just 
how the Trojans lost the war. They 
lost because a giant stallion penetrat- 
ed their inner walls at night, under 
the guise of a gift, and just when they 
thought they were safe, the stallion 
burst open and thousands of little sol- 
diers rushed forth ruining every- 
thing. 



Ultimately, this place is 

like a little city, or 

perhaps a big one. 



But I digress. I should be telling 
you about UCLA social life. Perhaps 
the best place to meet people will be 
the floor of your dorm, unless you 
live in the Sunset Suites, which aren't 
as much dorms as they are dormant 
(so I say wake 'em up!). The dorms 
are your chance to meet a hundred 
other students, all from such diverse 
and fascinating places as Northridge 
and Anaheim. It's a place where 
embarrassing nicknames are forged, 
gossip is incubated, and boundless 
odors never fail to mystify. It'll be the 
lime of your life. 

Ultimately, ihis place is like a little 
city, or perhaps a big one depending 
on where you're from. You'll meet, 
you'll flirt, you'll go out for colTee, 
then probably go out for coffee 
again. You'll join, you'll work, you'll 
see your cash go bye-bye. You'll 
study, you'll stop going to class, 
you'll cram, you'll pray, you'll speak 
"eYpIetiv«,Bury6ii"Trsufviver 

Enjoy your stay at UCLA. I guar- 
antee it will be eventful, if nothing 
else. Welcome to the roller coaster to 
the highway to the edge of the future 
of tomorrow's brighter, shmier tar- 
m^ to something or other! 



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EBADOLAHI 

From page 19 _„__ 



cd students of color (including 
African Americans, Latino/as, 
Chicano/as and Filipinos) you see at ' 
UCLA. If you can't find many, don't 
be surprised. Despite its claims of 
being one of the most diverse universi- 
ties in the world, UCLA's entering 
class of 2000 includes a minuscule 
number of undcrrepresenled students. 
For example, of a total admitted pop- 
ulation of over 3,000 students, this 
fall's enterin^cliiss includes fewer 
than 30 African American men. 



When I first came to 
UCLA, I had only a - 
minimal understanding 

of how affirmative 
action affected college 

admissions and 
^£: demographics. 



I must be kidding, right? Wrong. 
On the contrary, the number of under- 
represented students of color at 
UCLA has dropped by over 50 per- 
cent over the past 5 years. How can 
this be? In 1995, the UC Board of 
Regents, the governing body of the . 
University of California system, 
passed Standing Policies 1 and 2 (SP-I 
and SP-2), which eradicated the use of 
affirmative action in university admis- 
sions and hirings. The following year, 
Califomian voters passed ballot mea- 
sure Proposition 209, and eliminated 
the use of affirmative action in 
California's public sector. Since then, 
diversity at UCLA has plummeted, 
and tensions and misunderstandings 
on campus have skyrocketed. 

When I first came to UCLA, I had 
only a minimal understanding of how 
affirmative action affected college 
admissions and demographics. I did 
not understand then that affirmative 
action was originally intended to be a 
partial solution to help bridge the gap 
between the opportunities availableto 
underprivileged students and the 
capacity of these students to excel. — ^ 
Not all students are given the same 
opportunities in their communities to 
take Advanced Placement or honors 
courses, pay for expensive SAT prepa- 
ration classes, or receive college-track 
counseling in high school. These dis- 
advantages directly affect a student's 
ability to enter competitive universi- ,, 
ties like UCLA, and are not in any 
way a reflection of individual intelli- 
gence or capacity. 



It is our opportunity (as 

students) to put the 

diversity of Los Angeles 

back into UCLA. 



How did I figure all this out? By 
asking questions. When I entered 
UCLA I thought I was continuing my 
education. When I started asking 
questions, I slowly came to realize that 
I was starting from square one. As a 
university student, there are two 
broad types of knowledge available to 
you. The first is the information you 
will receive inyour classes through 
lectures, notes, readings and assign- 
ments. The second is the awareness 
you can gain by asking questions, lis- 
.l^I}ing J? your peers, an d looking criti- 
cally at your surroundings. 

As an entering freshman, you have 
deep reserves of information. College 
is our chance to begin increasing our 
awareness. This is our opportunity to 



^^C^ K^P^V^^^^v^V^^W/ VV^^V A J 



^ 



■ rc 



EBAD OLAHI 

From page 24 ■■■■■■■■•■' • ^ ■ 

push ourselves beyond what we think 
we know, to learn to act in solidarity 
with the struggles of others, and to use 
our privileges as college students to 
better the communities surrounding 
us. It is our opportunity to put the 
diversity of Los Angeles back into 
UCLA. 



~ As you read this, I ask you to • — 
remember that many of the issues on 
this campus are painful and difficult. 
If, however, we push ourselves to 
become aw^re and arm ourselves with 



the truth no matter how hurtful of dis- 
^appointingitmay be, we can empow- 
er ourselves to take action and to alter 
reality to reflect our ideals. Our 
actions may manifest in hundreds of 
different wayiS, from protests to tutor- 
ing to art exhibits to teach-ins to writ- 
ing. The important thing^is that we do 
whatever we can to learn about and 
change UCLA's existing injustices. 

Margaret Mead once wrote, 
"Never doubt that a small group of 
thoughtful, comjnitted citizens can 
change the world. Indeed, it is the 
only thing that ever has." As you enter 
the college experience, look around, 
take a deep breath, and allow yourself 
to grow. Give yoursclQhe space lo ask 
questions about what you don't under- 
stand. Most importantly, get involved. 
Contact student organizations or one 
of the many offices of the 
Undergraduate Students Association 
Council, such as the External Vice 
President's office, the Cultural Affairs 
Commission, or the Academic Affairs 
Commission. Attend teach-ins and ral- 
lies. Take interesting classes that you 
don't "need" to get a degree. Engage 
in conversations with people different 
from yourself In these ways, we can 
change the world. Welcome to 
UCLA. 



Don't 
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Mann National Theatre 
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Mann Westwood Fourplex ' 
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Mann Plaza Theatre 
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^~^ * CA Sunburger Juice Bar 
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Baskin Robbins 
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21 City Bean Coffee 
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1 Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf 
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^ Mrs. Fields Cookies 
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Penguins 
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^ Jamba Juice 
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Juice Star 



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(310) 208-5505 v " 



Starbuck's 
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(310) 208-8252 



Village Yogurt 
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Don Antonio's Pizzaria 
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Euro Chow 
(310) 209-0066 

El Polio Loco 
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" Italian Express 
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*■ Jerry's Famous Deli 
(310) 208-DELI 



Jose Bernstein's 
(310)208-4992 



Native Foods 
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tt Noah's Bagels 
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Bangkok Ca|e 
(310) 208-1730 

Burger King ' 
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California Fresh 
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52 Califomia Pi2za Kitchen 
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21 Denny's 

(310) 443-7()^>() 



6 
19 
22 

8 
73 
32 



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Fatburger ^^ 
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First Szechuan Wok 
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The Gardens 
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Golden Gate Indian Tandori 
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Gypsy Cafe 

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Headlines 
4310)208-2424. 



Lamonicas NY Pizza 
(310) 208-8671 

La Salsa 

(310) 208-7083 

Madison's 
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•* Maloney's On Campus 
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Maui Beach Cafe 
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Me Gusta 
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Mongols BBQ 

^10^ 824-3a77, 



(310)208-0777 

The Olive Garden 
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Palomino Euro Bistro 
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Shakey's Pizza 
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Subway 

(310) 208-7774 

Sushi Isshin 



(310) 208-5224 

Tanino Ristorante Bar 
(310) 208-0444 



Piccolo Mondo 
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Roll-Inn 
(310) 208-2354 

Saigon Street 
(310) 824-2623 

Sak's Teriyaki 
(310) 208-2002 

58 Scallions Dim Sum Cafe 
(310)8240869 



IS 
3 



Tengu Sushi 
(310) 209-0071 

Thai House 
(310) 208-2676 

Thai Time 
(310) 209-3344 

Togos • 
(310) 208-4416 

Tommy's 
(310)824-4114 



Westwood Brewing Co. 
^^10)-209-BREW— 



*' 



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Hollywood Fries 
(310) 443-7776 



Moustache Caf6 
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Schlotzsky's Deli 
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illustration by JENNY YURSHANSKY/Daily Bruin • Design by JENNIFER YUEN/Daily Bruin Senior Staff 



Di Stefano's 1 
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Westwood Noodle Kitchen 
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Daily Bruin 




Orientation Issue 2000 





A&EontheWeb ^^-^ > 
J~^Se€ all this and more at the Daily Bruin's 
I Web site: www.dailybruin.ucla.edu 



ENTERIAINMENT 



Daily Bruin Arts & Entertainment 



Orientation Issue 2000 29 



Getting oriented with L.A. hot spots aucial to student life 




gazing 



Having"' 



UCLA is justr 
as much a part 
of campus life 

as attending 
classes 



By Terry Tang 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

Before, if Gregory Poirier wanted 
to film a movie in the College 
Library in Powell Hall, he couldn't 
make it past the double doors. Of 
course, that was back in the late '80s 
when he was a graduate student in 
the UCLA School of Theater. Film 
and Television, making student 
films. 

Though no longer a struggling stu- 
dent. Poirier is still very much a film- 
maker. With a script he penned, the 
aspiring director is helming his first 
feature movie. A romantic comedy 
set to open during the spring of next 
year, "Tomcats" boasts some rising 
stars in the guise of Jerry O'Connell 
("Mission to Mars," "Scream 2") 
and Shannon Elizabeth, who had 
male viewers wagging their tongues 
as the exchange student, Nadia, in 
last summer's "American Pie." 

Today, with all the resources of a 
film studio behind him, Poirier has 
the clout to bring an entire film crew 
as well as a barrage of equipment 
into Powell. Only a few weeks into 
filming, Poirier and his team need to 
shoot one scene in the school's 
library. 

"I called Richard Walter and said 
"You got to come by and sec me 
"Today." So, Tm looking for him to" 
show up," said" Poirier. referring to 
the chairman of the UCLA screen- 
writing program. "Its like a full-cir- 
cle kmd of a ihmg. It"sm> first direct- 
ing movie. .So. it's kind of neat to be 
back here." 

In the scene. Michael, a bachelor 
wilh a lot of debt (0"Connell). meets 
up with Natalie, a beautiful LAPD 
cup (l:li/abeth). at the city library, 
Though Michael is trying to set up 
.Natalie with his chauvini.stic friend 
m order to win a bet and its mone- 
tary ante, he ends up falling for her 
as well. 

In between the many takes, 
Poirier. who graduated with a 
screenwriting degree in '89, 
O'Connell and Elizabeth took time 
•out to chat. Though the three are 
working on one scene, they expect to 
spend most of the day in Powell. 
lifi- jjpub U PfiirJcr kaoiifi how 




BRAD MORIKAWA/Daily Brum 

Actor Jerry O'Connell participates in an interview on the set of "Tomcats" on Monday in the College Library. 



campus filmings are part of going to 
school at UCLA. From time to time, 
buildings and common campus 
routes will be closed off to students 
and stafT, Still. Ihcsc mnvlc rrnws 



don't infiltrate campus whenever 
they feel like it. A great deal of 
advance planning happens through 
the UCLA Events Office. 

As a liaison between the universi- 
ty and Tinseltown studios, the 
Events Office hands out film permits 
based on a number of factors. 
According to the office's official 
guidelines, it must approve the dates 
and locations desired, the parking 
plan and even the script. 

Many people are unaware of how 
often the Events Office is 
approached with requests by film 
studios. "Scream 2," "Threesome," 
"The X-Files" and "Buffy the 
Vampire Slayer" are just some of the 
many films and TV programs that 
have filmed at UCLA. But if outside 
movie crews had their way. they 
would be able to film during the first 
week of the quarter or finals week. 
So. one of the most crucial jobs of 
Events Office is making sure higher 
education doesn't take a back seat to 
film shoots 

While students do get star-struck 
when they unexpectedly cross paths 
with celebrities on their way to cla.ss, 
they're usually still concentrating on 
class The cameras, props and movie 
trailers are all part and parcel of the 
experience of going to school in 
Southern California. 

Meanwhile, O'Connell enjoys 
shooting at UCLA rather than 
- " ■s omcd i r l y .s tud io r The acto r c on - 
siders the campus a' regular hangout. 
An ardent (lag football player, he 
and his brother Charlie, also an 
actor, frequent the intramural field. 
He also do e s wee kl y Up s a t Dr ake 



Stadium. 

"I run all the lime at Drake 
Stadium. You can tell because I have 
my_ green truck out there," 
O'Connell said. "I've only gotten 
two tickets but I paid both of them." 

"In L.At, especially in 
Hollywood, you really miss the col-^ 
lege life," O'Connell continued. 
"You can literally come down to 
Westwood, go to In-N-Out and be 
right back, smack in the middle of 
it." 

Most of the filming will take place 
in Los Angeles for the next two 
months, with the exception of some 
scenes in Las Vegas. This schedule 
works fine for Elizabeth. Though 
some actors may relish in the 



prospect of traveling to different 
locations, the actor prefers to stay 
close to her LA. residence. 

More importantly, Elizabeth took 
the role of the jaded LAPD officer 
because it was a leap from the high 
school comedy, a genre in itself. 

"I liked that she was tough and 
she was a cop," said Elizabeth, while 
kicking back outside Schoenberg 
Hall. "She plays the tough girl and 
she plays the vulnerable girl. She just 
had a lot of colors to her and it 
seemed like it would be a bt of fun:" 

Though she's spending the entire 
day on a college campus, the actor 
never joined in university life.«^fter 
finishing high school, Elizabeth 
opted to model and act and never 




BRAD MORIKAWA/Daily Biuin 

A nnovie camera used in the filming of "Tomcats" sits on the 
t ec o n d f lo or of th e Co lle g e L i br a ry i n Pow ell Hal f. ■ -—^ 



. looked back. 

"[ was accepted to Texas A&M. I 
had a scholarship there and every- 
thing," Elizabeth said. "The oppor- 
tunity for me to work came along. So 
I wanted to take it while I had it." 

O'Connell, on the other hand, 
chose to go on to college. Since his . 
debut at 12 years of age in Rob 
Reiner's "Stand By Me," O'Connell 
mingled adolescence with acting. 
The actor, who graduated from 
NYU, credits film school for teach- 
ing him the differences between the- 
ater and movies. He is also grateful 
that his parents insisted that their son 
get a college education. 

"These are things that you and I 
think of as very normal but a lot of 
child actors never get to do because . 
their parents are pretty much mak- 
ing' a living on them," O'Connell 
said. "Their children are a source of 
inconie. That was not the ca.se with 
my parents. And also New York City 
is not Hollywood. It's a pretty cool 
place to grow up." 

Though there are a plethora of 
success stories of actors, directors 
and screenwriters who bypassed col- 
lege and went straight to Hollywood, 
Poirier found UCLA's film school 
very beneficial. Besides gaining a 
sense of how the industry worked, he 
met his first agent at film school and ~ 
learned how to whip up a script in 10 
weeks -just before the quarter's end. 

"Obvtotjsfy, thettegree^itselfdoes- — 
n't help you. But it helped me in the 
sense thi^t everything I know about 
writing, I learned here from Richard 
Walter and, Hal Ackerman and all 
ll i al gang." : 



THEATER: From shopping 
to dining, new Bruins can 
a^ways find fun activities 

By Barbara Mcfitnre 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 



^ los Angetes^is noterlous'fbf ilstack- 
adaisical lifestyle, its surfers, stars and 
wannabes. For its women (most of 
whom have had at least one thing 
changed on them by a plastic surgeon), 
its beautiful weather, and most of all, 
"Ibr its scandals with the i-lch and 
famous. Yes, Los Angeles definitely 
lives up to its stereotype of supreme 
superficiality. And in the middle of it 
all, nestled in the hills of Westwood, 
amid the high noses of Beverly Hills 
and Bel Air, and only a few short min- 
. utes from Hollywood, lies UCLA. 

UCLA students have the unique 
opportunity to explore all the hot and 
trendy spots surrounding the campus 
that every Los Angeles resident must 
familiarize themselves with. Places that 
are as notorious as the city, with a histo- 
ry just as rich, and locations that are full 
of the wacky and the wicked from the 
city of angels. 

First, the streets. Every city has its 
"streets." Just as San Francisco has 
Haight Street, Los Angeles packs a few 
of its own. 

Hoiiywood Boulevard . . ' '■' ■'-' : ■ ,, 




BRAD MORIKAWA/Daily Brum 

The Laugh Factory comedy club is one of many entertainment venues along the Sunset Strip. 



Quite possibly one of the most 
"touristy" streets, scores of out-of-state 
and out-of-country visitors can be 
found here year-round, complete with 
pocket guides and cameras. 
Hollywood Boulevard is known best 
for its Walk of Fame. Quite possibly the 
world's most famous sidewalk, the 
Walk of Fame is inlaid with stars 
adorned with the names of the men and 
women who have helped give 
Hollywood its "personality." 

The stars were first set in 1958 as a 
permanent tribute to those in the 
motion picture, television, radio, 
recording and live theatre industry, rec- 
ognizing their life-long contributions. 
Today, it is considered both a cultural 
and historical landmark. The Walk 
extends on both sides of the street from 
Gower to La Brea and continuing on to 
Vine Street where it r^ns from Yucca to 
Sunset Boulevard. > 

But Hollywood Boulevard is filled 
with many more reasons to visit other 



than the star-lined sidewalk. Mann's 
Chinese Theater with its beautiful 
architecture is also located on the 
street, playing host to various movie 
premieres. Outside of the theater are 
the exclusive footprints and hand- 
prints, personal messages and auto- 
graphs, of 175 chosen stars. Recent 
additions include Harrison Ford and 
Denzel Washington. 

In addition to these star-inspired 
monuments, Hollywood Boulevard 
also boasts a Ripley's Believe It or Not 
and Guinness Book of World's 
Records museum. 

Melrose Avenue 

No, this is not the street where that 
sex-centered television drama, 
"Melrose Place" occurred, but it is one 
of the best places to shop in Los 
Angeles. Melrose Avenue is located in 
Hollywood, just a few blocks north of 
Hollywood Boulevard. It is home to 
numerous specialty shops which line 
both sides of the street. Stores range 
from Red Balls, which caters to the 
rave subculture; to Retail Slut, which 
sells everything from exotic wigs to 
bondage gear. 

Originating as a thrift-shop venue 
with stores such as Wasteland, Melrose 
Avenue has gained popularity over the 



years, becoming a trendy location for 
shoppers due to its specialty shops. 

Special hint No. 1 : Melrose is noto- 
riously known as the place to hit when 
looking for rare shoes, as well as just 
shoes in general - practically every 
oth^r shop is a shoe store. 

Special hint No. 2: Many a star has 
been sighted browsing in the shops 
along Melrose. Rumor has it that 
Leonardo DiCaprio frequently drops 
by at Melrose's Noah's Bagels. 

Sunset Strip ,. _ 

Quite possibly the No. 1 place to 
party in Los Angeles at night. 
Countless bars, clubs and restaurants 
line the Sunset strip. But those who 
haven't reached the legal drinking age 
should not fear, since not everything is 
restricted to patrons 21 and over. 

The Coconut Teaszer, a club which 
often hosts various rock bands, is |8 
and over, although you must have an 
ID to access the full bar. Additionally, 
located on the bottom floor of the 
Coconut Teaszer is The Crooked Bar, 
which features more independent 
entertainment acts and even has an 
open mike night for those looking to 
make it "big." 

For the 21 and over group, there are 
several bars, such as the Good Bar, as 



well as numerous clubs. The Viper 
Room, for instance, co-owned by 
Johnny Depp and Sal Jenco, is a popu- 
lar spot. Yes, The Viper Room, in front 
of which River Phoenix over-dosed, 
really does exist and hosts various DJs, 
as well as surprise visits from big-name 
bands such as Stone Temple Pilots, 
Bruce Springsteen and Sheryl Crow. 
The interior is modeled after 



Harlem's jazz clubs of the 1920s, and 
though the club only has an intimate 
capacity of 250, entrance into the club . 
is not exclusive to well-known names - 
anyone can get in. 

There are also other well-known 
clubs and bars, such as The Roxy, 
where every rock band seems to play at 
least once in their career; The House of 
Blues, where big names play in a small 
house setting; and The Whisky, where 
The Doors once played regularly. 

In addition to all these musically; 
entertaining venues, various shops also 
line the strip. There is the loud and eas:_ 
ily visible Hustler store, whose win- 
dows are always filled with erotic and 
outrageous lingerie for both men and 
women There is also a Virgin 
Megastore that occasionally hosts freeT 
concerts with bands such as the 
Smashing Pumpkins. 

And finally, what would Hollywood^ 
be without its bodj^altering tattooing^ 
and piercing. Located on Sunset are 
famous tattoo shops such as Sunset 
Strip Tattoo Inc. which has tattooed 
such names as Billy Idol, Tupac 
Shakur, Pamela Lee, Lenny Kravitz 
and Axl Rose. 

Universal City Walk 

Though technically not a street upon 
which cars can drive. Universal City 
Walk, located next to Universal Studios 
Hollywood, bills itself as "the coolest 
street in America." Much like an out- 
See ACnvlTIES, page 31 




Eclectic eateries provide Hp hangouts for starving students 



RESTAURANTS: Many find 



accessible locales great 
for studying, meeting up 



ByMkhaelRosen-Moiina 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

A new crop of freshmen are arriving 
in the hallowed halls of UCLA and, like 
innumerable generations of their pre- 
decessors, one question no doubt 
looms large in their minds: Where do 
hip, happenin' college kids spend their 
time? Even worse, if you don't have a 
car, questions of major and finance will 
naturally be secondary concerns to 
how one is to find a new hangout. 
Luckily, especially for this car-less sub- 
set, the UCLA campus offers an eclec- 
tic mix of hip hangouts for the stranded 
student. One need not escape campus 
or Westwood to have a good time. 

Northern Lights ^__ 




PhojM by WITH ENWQOEZ/Dalty Bruin S«filof SMfT 

(Above) Steven Coerd reads and eats pizza in Northern Lights, 
a popular North Campus hangout. (Right) Jimmy's Coffeehouse 
is located in Lu Valle Commons, a cluster of food service estab- 
lishments located in the heart of North Campus. 




The artistic sect, trapped in the far 

reaches of North Can)pus, may find 

refuge at Northern Lights, located 

' between Rolfe Hall. Campbell Hall 



the building is also home to a dive>se 
food court that includes a pizza palace, 
a Mexican counter, and the oddly 
"named Flying Bagel DelT 

With a scenic view and a roaring fire, 
Northern Lights combines the cozy feel 
of home with modern architecture. 

"The layout and fixtures are very 



and Charles E. Young Research 
Library Besides its token coffeehouse. 



ine layout anu iiaiuick aic ' 

modem; they're only lour years oW. 

We've also got a fireplace and nice 



cushy chairs, and we always have 
music playing - modem, jazz, trans- 
electronic," said Northern Lights 
"Manager Gabor Fabian. "AH In all, the 
atmosphere is nice and relaxing." 

Northern Lights always gives 
patrons something beautiful to look at, 
which is appropriate given its kx:ation 
on the artistic side 6f campus. 

"We display a k)t of student art," 



Fabian said. "We rely on word of 
mouth to get students interested in dis- 
playing their work, but we also recruit 
from the Scliool of Art and the differ- 
ent departments." 

"We have photography, multime- 
dia, paintings, painted photos," he con- 
tinued. "Right now, we have a display 
of painted photographs." 

Northern Lights sees its biggest busi- 



ness between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m., and 
again betw een 9 pm'. andT2 a.m. For- 
the first set, the Coffeehouse is busy 
with the coffee crowd; and for the lat- 
ter, it is busy with the ice cream crowd. 

Lu Valle Commons 

North campus also boasts Lu Valle 
Commons, an eclectic mix of small 
restaurants located just north of Dodd 
Hall.. Pacific Rice and Noodle Traders 
specializes in Japanese cuisine with 
trademark teriyaki chicken and a dif- 
ferent special selection every day /^ 
submarine «andwich shop and a per- 
sonal pizza shop are also located here, 
as well as Jimmy's, Lu Valle's resident 
coffeehouse. 

"We're busiest between 9 and 1 1 :30 
a.m. during the normal school year," 
said Jimmy's} manager Amec Chung. 
"Over the summer, our business is 
more spread out. We have a special 
evening^extension for the extension stu- 
dents. M'any of them have late classes 
in Public Policy and Bunche, and thcy^ 
want to get a late snack aAerwards.** 

Perhaps because it is further south, 
Jimmy's is not as focused on student 
art as Northern Lights. 



*<i.* 



Sm 



31 



30 Orientation Issue 2000 






Daily Bruin Arts & Entertainnient 






Extras provide valuable hours, background scenery on sets 




FILM: Teen movie genre's 
growth creates work for 
youthful-looking actors 



By Brent Hopkins 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 



RODERICK ROXAS 



When audiences sit down to watch 
"Friends," they instantly recognize 
Matthew Perry and Jennifer Aniston. 
They certainly aren't the only actors 
on the show, however. 

The guy walking his dog, the 
woman ordering a latle and the kid 
running through the park - they make 
up the majority of the actors onTleir 
yet they rarely get their name on- 
screen. These are the background 
actops who make scenes seem more 
Realistic without even saying anything. 
While they may start out as unknowns, 
the extras can sometimes rise above 
the anonymous plateau. 

"There's a lot of actors who started 
out doing extra work, like Brad Pitt, 



Kevin Costner and Samuel L. 
Jackson," said Zane Lamprey, presi- 
dent and founder of ExtraCast, an 
online background actor casting ser- 
vice. "It reads like the who's-who list of 
Hollywood." 

When shooting a feature film or 
television series, directors don't just 
use props and special effects to make 
the scenes interesting. They rely on 
these background actors to fill each 
shot with authentic color. 

Unlike the main actors, who must 
fit specific profiles, most extras are just 
regular, everyday people. These actors 
also don't necessarily need to belong 
to the Screen Actors Guild. Though 



one chef, or whatever it is, and here are 
the sizes. '" 

Some roles require extras to wear 
special costumes, but many are shot 
with just everyday clothes that the 
actors provide themselves. Some 
enterprising extras even bring their 
own costumes, props and equipment. 

'Usually, extras bring their own 
wardrobes," Saxon said. "Some of 
them have their own LAPD uniforms, 
nurse outfits, or stenography 
machines. They get paid more for 
those. Some people bring their cars for 
freeway and traffic scenes.' 



most contracts^Tequire production^ 
companies to employ a minimum 
number of union actors! a casting 
director requests a wide variety of peo- 
ple to fill out the scene. 

"They call us every day and put in 
an order," said Jennifer Saxon, casting 
director for Central Casting. "They 
might say, 'We need 10 restaurant 
patrons, five bookstore people, and 



The ideal extra is both Hexible and 
able to take directions. Those who per- 



fbrm IheTr'Jol) well may^ awarded a^ 
minor line or be asked to perform a 
special task, such as play a sport or 
drive a car. 

"Follow the directions to the letter 
and you will do fine,"' said Cullen 
Chambers in his book ."Back to One: 
The Movie Extra's Guidebook." 

See EXTRAS, page 31 



/- 



Rock stars' personalities, attitudes more i 




MUSIC: Image, charisma 
remain important despite 
evolving genres of soiind 



By Judy Pak 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

The stability and thorny future of 
the rock star is uncertain. 

Sound, image, and sex. Year after 
year and minute by minute, the ele- 
ments of rock 'n' roll are changing. 
But as long as ther« are bedroom 
walls to poster and parents screaming 
to lower the volume, people will for- 
ever dream of being rock stars - gods 
among the mortals. 

The music that people love around 
their 2ps usually sticks with them for- 
ever; then they start whining about 
how good music used to be. 

This leads one to ask: so what is a 
rock star? If someone can be the 
image of the excess an audience feels, 
then they're a rock star. 

Sometimes stardom crushes them. 



Sometimes it just makes 
them dress weird. 

That's not the whole 
description of a rock star's 
job, though. As rock 
moves into its adulthood, 
what is most dramatically 
affixed to the duties of 
stardom is also what's 
changed most. 

Long ago, in a far-off 
land, the constitutive job 
of rock stars was to annoy 
parents, to push them 
away so teens could have 
some private space to be 
angry freaks, wreck things 
and to become "free." 

Rock stars were a social 
revolution, a way of separating the 
world into "Us and Them," the hip- 
sters and the squares. 

But everyone's a hipster now and, 
inevitably, the rock stars' role has 
changed. 

Whereas Elvis' groin was once 
banned from the airwaves, there are 
now entire channels dedicated to let- 




than the tunes 



as starry as anything injL As traditional rock tries to figure 
the rock heavens. '*— «tit what's real and what's fake, a 

' It was indie rock's whole new generation has filled the 
"We're Just Plain Folks" vacuum. No matter how wack hip 
hair and T-shirts that truly hoppers get, they still insist on the 
brought the concept to its classic virtues of keeping it real, stay- 
knees. As rock got old ing true to the game, and represent- 
enough to get its own ing for the fans. And then they get up 
jokes, ironic self-aware- on stage with oversized images like 
ness took over and cutting rock stars always have. 



Daily Bniin Arts A EnttrtaiiMMnt 



Orientation Issue 2000 31 



■^^- 



ROOfRlCK ROXAS 



yourself down to 
became all the rage. 

Meanwhile, out in the 
world, oppressing your- 
self never quite caught on. 
Garth Brooks turned out 
to be one of the biggest 
rock stars of the decade. 



The Notorious B.I.G.'s ability to 
rock in Versace while still maintain- 
ing his ghetto sensibility makes a per- 
fect parable of rock stardom . , • 

Of course, hip hop culture has 
always been the bedrock of realness 
in America - a convenient faith for 
kids trying to imagine their way out 



EXTRAS 

Frompage30 . v / 

Often, these directions are nothing 
more than "sit there" or "walk across the 
street." In these instances, actors must 
do their best to just blend in and not dis- 
tract the audience's attention from the 
main focus of the scene. 

"The No. I trick to background act- 
ing is to do whatever would be natural in 
that situation or circumstance for you," 
Chambers said in "Back to One." . 

Since the same level of talent is 
required for most extra roles, casting 
decisions are generally based on physi- 
cal attributes. Age is the first category - 
most 60-year-olds won't find work in 

-4)igh school scenes, and most teens 
won't be cast as doctors or cops. 

_ Following this, bo dy type, et hnicity, and 
appearance are all important. There is 

, no set type that's more in-demand than 

^Others, owing to the wide variety of parts 
required. Sometimes, it can be a broad 
call for 18-30 year olds of all races, but 

"depending on die role, the requirements 
can be extremely specific, r ^ r^ 
"For 'Nutty Professor I!,' they need- 
ed stand-ins for all the K lumps," 
Lamprey said. "They needed 300-pound 

-African American men and women.*^ 
Acting as a stand-in is another impor- 
tant part of the extra repertoire. When 
employed in this capacity, they walk 
through an actor's scene, allowing the 
crew to set up cameras and equipment 
to prepare for their scene. This way, the 
number of takes an actor must shoot is 
minimized. 

"An actor can do five minutes a day, 
with the stand-in doing ten hours of 
work," Lamprey said. *■ j. 

Stand-ins don't have to be exact dou- 
bles of the actor, but they must be similar 
in bo^ physical stature and skin tone to 
allow the equipment to be properly cali- 
brated. In this case, physical traits are 
extremely important, but for most roles, 
they are less important than age. 



Cufrentty. the trend is to hire young 
actors. 

"A lot of the shows are high school 
programs, so we always look for actors 
who are 18 but look 16," Saxon said. 
"The younger you look, the more you'll 
work on shows like 'Roswell' and 
'Popular.'" 

The same is true when casting films, 
Lamprey said. 

"Right now, what's hot are 18-27 
year-olds. Studios are just realizing after 
many years that their ticket sales are 
going to high school and college kidsT 
Instead of making movies for the 'main- 
stream,' they're trying to localize with 
their teen movies. 'American Pie' and 
'Can't Hardly Wait' set the whole thing 

off":', ■'-yyv-.-:. ;•:•->-.; ;-r----' 

While the roles might ru>t be as- 
demanding as a starring turn in a major 
studio p icture, be ing a b ackground 
actor is no easy task. They frequently 
don't know until the day of a shoot 
whether they'll be working. And unless 
they're upgraded to a more involving 
part, they may have to look for a new 



shoot every day. 

"It's hard to make a living being an 
extra, because there are so many people 
who want to do it," Saxon said. "There's 
not as many jobs as there are people, 
and you're competing against thousands 
of people." 

Though it may be a difficult road to 
stardom, the hard work can definitely 
pay ofT. While the chance of being dis- 
covered like Pitt or Jackson may be rare, 
just being on the scene provides an 
invaluable look at how things are done. 
According to Lamprey, there is nothing 
better. 

"1 always tell people that a hot set is 
the actor's classroom. You can read 
books until you're blue in the face, but 
you're not going to learn unless you're 
thrown into the action." 

HLM: For more information on becoming 
an extra, call Central Casting at (818) 562- 
2755 or visit www.extracastcom. 



ting Marilyn Manson prance around 
in his bikini. 

Punk music itself started out j>f an 
attempt to revise the rock star's job 
description, and punks were adorable 
with their tear-down-the-wall- 



with Sean "Puffy" Combs of suburban lives. Getting in on the 

chasing after him, because Oklahoma myth of realness worked for Elvis and 

and Harlem World never gave up on Mick Jagger, and it's still in effect for 

bigness. Korn and Limp Bizkit. earning them 

Their triumphs are a victory for an unconflicted fandom every rock 

their fans; country and hip hop fans star would be so lucky to have. 



CfoJit iJi 



know how to give love to stars with- 
between-fans-and-stars dogma. But Q^t ,,11 that super, clever irony, and 
the thmg is, they made great stars; the ^^e stars aren't required to hide their 
punk bonfire of self-destruction was mega-ambitions 




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From page 29 

door mall only with more to offer, 
City Walk is known as the perfect 
place to take a date. 

There are several places to eat, 
such as Gladstones, a seafood restau- 
rant; Hard Rock Cafe, which boasts 
a huge neon guitar in front; and 
Wolfgang Puck Cafe, a pizzeria. 
After eating, City Walk visitors often 
hit the Universal City Cinemas or the 
recently installed i MAX theater. 

For a more interesting evening. 
City Walk now has its own rock 'n' 
roll bowling alley, Jillians Hi Life 
Lanes, as well as Wizardz Magic 
Qub and Dinner Theatre which also 
has a spot on the street. At Wizardz 
you ca n d ine w hile being entertained 
by various magicians. Coming soon 
will be the Rumba Room, a multi- 
level Latin dance club where you can 
get your boogie on. 

Aside from the streets, Los 
Angeles has much to offer in terms of 
its beaches. Easily accessible by bus 
or car, the Santa Monica Beach is 
located about 15 minutes from 
UCLA (depending on the traffic), 
and offers just as many fun areas as 
Hollywood. ^^v , V 

Santa Monica Pier/Third Street 
Promenade 

Santa Monica Pier brings to mind 
the movie "The Lost Boys." 
Complete with its own amusement 
park. Pacific Park, the pier is a stan- 
dard, old-school family playground. 
There are 12 rides inside, such as a 
steel roller coaster and bumper cars. 
Nothing like Magic Mountain, but 
then again, it's located two steps 
from the beach, i - 

The Playland Arcade is located 
atop the pier, as is the carousel, with- 
out whidi the pier would be incom- 




KEtTH ENRlQUtZ/Oaily Brutn Senior «af^ 

The Third Street Promenade In Santa Monica ij a popular place 
for UCLA students to shop and dine out. 



plete. UCLA is also involved here, 
with the UCLA Ocean Discovery 
Center. Here students from nearby 
schools and everyday visitors come 
to learn about the Santa Monica Bay. 
Third Street Promenade is anoth- 
er prime shopping location with 
shops on the street as well as a regu- 
lar mall. Shops such as Guess, Urban 
Outfitters. Gap. J. Crew and more, 
line the pedestrian thoroughfare, 
providing something for everyone to 
enjoy. Street performers can always 
be expected, ranging from a violin 
playing cowgiri to street acrobats. 

Venice Beach 

For some "real" street perform- 
ers, the boardwalk at Venice Beach is 
the place to go. Located parallel to 



the beach, this strip of shops contains 
nothing ordinary. The street enter- 
tainers here are regulars - come back 
in a year and they will still be there, 
parading up and down the street 
hoping to generate a crowd of 
onlookers. 

One such regular is sometimes 
called by the name Harry Perry and 
can be recognized as a tall man on 
roller blades with a turban wrapped 
around his head. Harry Perry 
rollerblades up and down the strip 
singing and playing a guitar for shop- 
pers. Other performers range from 
hip hop break-dancers painted from 
head to toe in silver or gold to fire 
blowers and dangerous jugglers. 

Venice Beach is also known for its 

S«c /ICflVITliS, page 32 



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staff at UCLA get: 

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Open your account today! 



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Phone:(310)477-6628 



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32 Ortenlaiion Issue 2000 



Daily Bruin Arts & Entertainmerit 



^ 




Student Psychological Services 



Micl-tampiis: 
82r> ()7(>8 
1223 Math SciiMuos Blclq 

Soiith-C'ainpu«i: 

8257985 

A3-()62 Ct>ntt>r for the Ht-alth Sciences 



Student Psvcholoqical Services (SPS) provides confidential individual and group counseling through t*o campus locations it is staffed by psychologists, clinical arid serial 
loZi and psySs?^ra,e fa^ w.th the needs and interests of university students. We are open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. there .s a one t.me $40 
summer fee to currently registered UCLA students. 



SUMMER QUARTER 2000 



For information or an intake appointment for any of the Summer Groups, plesase stop by our offic es or can the location numtjer. 

DISSERTATION AND THESIS SUPPORT GROUP 
For Graduate Students 



Come to one of these groups if you arc a graduate student who would like a safe and 
supportive place to discuss issues and difficulties regarding the Thesis and Dissertation writing 
process Call for an intake appointment Three groups are being offered 

Tuesdays 3;00 p.m - 5:00 p.m. 825-0768 ;. ■' 

^^ Wednesdays ^ 300 p.m. -5:00 pm 825-0768 ~~ 

Fridays 1000 am - 12 noon 825-0768 . 

GRAPUATF AND RETURNING STUD ENT'S PSYCHO THERA PY 

GROUP 

A personal exploration group, providing an opportunity for graduate students to investigate a 
wide range of concerns Understanding yourself and others and important issues in personal 
-rdatronships will be emphasized Here you will find the support of kindred spirits who know 
first hand the tribulations of graduate school. Call for anaoiake apppintment . 

Mondays 2 00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. 825-0768 -; :-:r 

MAINTAINING HEALTHY UFESTYLES - Examine Strategies To 
Prevent Problematic Behaviors Due To Drugs And Alcohol 

Problems with drugs and alcohol can negatively effect one s performance and progress in 
school as well as other areas in ^e This group will focus on exploring how the use of drugs 
and alcohol have led to difficulties in one's life, how they influence our behavior and ways to 
prevent reoccurring problems (This group is a replacement for UCLA s Conduct Course and 
IS jointly sponsored by Student Psychological Services and Student Health Services ) 

To Be Arranged 825-0768 



MANAGING YOUR PANIC 

If you suffer from panic attacks or panicky feelings, this group is for you. This group is 
designed to help you reduce yodr anxiety, face your feared situations and manage your 
panic. Call for an intake appointment 

Thursdays 300 pm. 4:30 p.m. .,.V 825-0768 ; ; > .- 



The Stress Clinic offtis three and four session groups each focusing on different coping 
skills and strategies for reducing excessive stress and increasing performance 
1 effec tiveness The Str ess Cl i n i c group s chedul e s and other sign-up rnformatKJi 
obtained by calling 825-0768 or visiting the Mid Campus location at 4223 Math 
Sciences. Sign up for all the groups you think might be helpful, .. ^ 



COGNITIVE APPROACHES TO STRESS MANAGEMENT 
"^ Constructive Ways of Thinking 

The amount of stress a person experiences is often related to how he or she interprets 
events, not just the events themselves. This group will focus on identifying beliefs and 
self-talk that may intensify stress responses and on replacing them with more realistic 
and constructive ways of thinking. 

RELAXATION TRAINING AND BIOFEEDBACK 

This group is designed to help participants learn ways to remain calm dunng stressful 
situations A variety of tools, including biofeedback, imagery, relaxation and positive self- 
talk willbe introduced. 



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ROCK 

From page iO 

rock star; hooking up with the emo- 
tions of the oppressed adolescent 
and the street hip hop style, he reads 
as the rcalest thing on two legs. 

For rock stars, there's no contra- 
diction between fantasy and realness. 
The ability of rock stars to represent 
fans' sense of the surreal is exactly 
what makes them real; no matter 
how much they fake it onstage and in_ 
the studio, the capacity to embody 
the excess is the realest thing rock 
stars can do. 

M ark (McG rath will never be a 
rock star because deep down he's ter- 
rified ten million in sales makes him 
fake, and that fake is bad. So he goes- 
out of his way to be smaller than life, 
and wonders what it's like to be a 
superhero. . 



It may also be the case 

that hip hop produces 

relatively irony-free 

stars because rap 

is still young. 



Courtney Love might sell 1/10 as 
much as McGrath but no matter, she 
still dresses up and messes up like 
rock is the biggest story in the world, 
and that's the hallucination rockers 
are charged with maintaining. 

Consider Busla Rhymes, as fic- 
tion-strange a character as anybody 
could invent. Still, he's the very 
image of the feeling that street-cor- 
ner life could explode into something 
a million times grander. 

It may also be the case that hip 
hop produces relatively irony-free 
stars because rap is still young. 
Meanwhile, even younger styles are 
starling to throw up the next genera- 
tion of heroes, and, inevitably, as the 
music changes, so does the nature of 
stardom. , 

In some ways this tradition hasn't 
changed at all: the *N Syncs of the 
world will always be with us, safe 



See ROCK, page 33 




AQIVITIES 

From page 31 

endless array of tattoo shops and pierc- 
ing palaces. Not only can one find an 
unlimited amount of jewelry for their 
body here, there are also henna tattoos 
in addition to the real thing - though 
the "real thing" here is not recom- 
mended as the safest choice available. 

A bike path also runs between the 
beach and the stores, fun for a bicycle 
ride or roUer blading. Tliere is also a 
graffiti park, where skateboarders may 
frequently be found, that houses many 
beautiful murals. > 

So, that's everything Lbs Angeles 
has to offer. Yeah right, just kidding! 
Los Angeles is full of surprises that are 
always popping up here and there. 
These few locations are just the more 
trendy, touristy, well-known venues 
that everyone must get to know. Los 
Angeles has many more interesting 
places and streets to check out, making 
it the culturally diverse and rich city it 
is. For now, however, this should keep 
you busy. ' • 



ENTERTAINMENT: For info on what's 
happening at the Mann's Chinese the- 
atre, call (323) 461-3331. Universal City 
Walk can be contacted at (818) 622- 
4455 and their cinemas can be reached 
at (818) 508-0588. To get the lov»^-down 
at the Santa Monica Pier, call (310) 458- 
8900 as v^ell as the UCLA Ocean 
Discovery Center at (310) 393-6149. To 
check out on the crazy nights on 
Sunset, call The Coconut Tea«er at (818) 
353-6241, the Roxy at (310) 276-2222. 
Th e House of BhiW it (213) 6?< H)247 
and The Whisky at (310) 6$2-4202. 



f' 






Daily Bniin Arts & Entertaimnem 



Orientation Issue 2000 33 



ROCK 

From page 32 v ; 

teapots to contain the hormonal tem- 
pests of adolescents. 

But music's very relationship to 
bodies is also changing. As music 
moves further and further from 
organic, being the body that repre- 
sents the sound gets more difficult. 

Still, it's not as easy as New Styles 

equals New Stars. The world has 

diahgcd." """■ /--■ - :. ..•:-^;-' 

Indie rockers had a4)oint about 
bloated music; just as surely, girls 
have a point about the boy-centric 
nature of stardom, and the lameness 
of hotel-thrashing, groupie-banging, 
jet-set trash. 



The love fans give to rock stars is a 
weird love, and it makes any star who 
can liQkLiLhigger^ mylhic 



By the time he was 21, Elvis was 
everywhere. By the time he made 
Seattle a central rock locale, Kurt 
Cobain couldn't do anything but 
mortally wound himself down to size. 

For the moment, Lauryn Hill is 
exploding and bulletproof; and 
somewhere out in the boonies, the 
next bigjlhing is trying on some crazy 
outfits. 



RESTAURANTS 

From page 29 

, ; "The walls are lined with windows, 
so we don't have room for any sort of 
stiftient art exhibits," Chung said. "The 
windows give Jimmy's a good 
ambiance. It's a nice, bright place with 
great coffee - we serve the best coffee 
on campus." . 



u.^ -r i^ . 



The Bombshelter < 

In South Campus, The 
Bombshelter will be familiar to stu- 
dents who attended campus orienta- 
tion tours. Mischievous lour guides 
delight in convincing new students that 
the building was once a real bomb shel- 
ter. The station has another Pacific 
Rice and Noodle Trader and a 
Roadside Grill, in addition to a sand- 
wich shop. 

Cafe Synapse 

Cafe Synapse in the Gonda 
(Goldschmied) Neuroscience and 
Genetics Research Center goes for the 
more up-town, cosmopolitan look, 
serving sandwiches and pasta in an ele- 
gant setting. With spartan Bauhaus 
architecture and futuristic furniture, 
the Cafe appeals to those with more 
modern sensibilities, those that prefer 
the simplicity of modern aesthetics to 
the ornate retro look. 

Kerckhoff Coffeehouse 

-^Kerckhoff Coffeehouse sits 



ATTENTION ALL INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS! 

Why Pay More for Your Health Insurance? 



between the two extremes of north and 
south campus, equally accessible to 
both scientists and artists. With a 
quaint ambiance that is closer to the 
Bohemian roots of the coffeehouse 
than its northern counterparts, 
Kerckhoff is a popular spot for the stu- 
dious and playful alike. 

"Often there's some sort of enter- 
tainment going on. Thursday nights, 
there are free poetry readings. 
Sometimes there are cultural music 
performances on the stage. The latest 
performance was a celebration of 
Filipino music," said coffeehouse 
employee Huy Nghiem. 

The laid-back atmosphere is a recur- 
ring theme in on-campus eateries. 

"It's a kick-back, friendly environ- 
ment where students can come to 
study or just to meet people," Nghiem 
said. 

That kick-back, friendly atmos- 
phere is especially appreciated by new 
arrivals to UCLA. Campus restau- 
rants provide a forum for freshmen to 
meet their new academic colleagues 
and adjust to flow of college life. New 
students take liea i t - mcdn iii gful soc i al 
interaction is only a codec cup away. 



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Pays 100% for hospitalization( After $50 co-payment) 



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Medical evacuation coverage $50,000 max. , Home country coverage 

24 hours Emergency Referral Service with the largest selection of doctors and hospitals 

(UCLA Medical Center, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center) 



• Internet access for providers (www.beechstreet.com) or toll free number 1-800-937-2277 ext. 7490 

• Courteous Local Service Representatives \ 



Proof of coverage will waive the UCLA health insurance charges. 
(Within 48 hours, we will provide you with proof of insurance.) 

You may send your enrollment form by fax or mail to: 
Scholastic Insurance Services 
20501 Ventura Blvd. Suite 215 

Tel: (818) 610-0660 
Fax:(818)610-0662 



<^l^mmmfmifti»^mm 




\k^ Jbu and your friends are ahvaus invited to SftaSSat 
J* Services and for delicious SfuibSat meals every Friday 
^ night at sundown and every Saturday morning at 10:30. 
Odu can also Buy a mezuzafi and have it -put on the doorpost 
of your new summer roomi 



Chabad House at U.C.L.A. has a strong tradition of providing the resources 
for Bruins to help make this planet a better, kinder place for us all. v 

— Visiting tWelderly and the sick, providing aid to disaster victims, drug prevention 
education, and on a lighter note, building bridges for students of all backgrounds to 
meet, have fun and help each other through social and educational programs. 

Thinking globally and acting locally is getting a real Chai. 

{ChoX is Hebrew for ''Life*) : : . _ 



Here's some of our programs. •• 



High Holiday Services &. Meals* Shabbat Dinners at Chabad House every Friday @ Si4ndown 

• World of Good Campaign • Cbokie Bake for the Hungry • Hospital Visitation 

• Elderly Visitation • Daily Minyans • Women's Torah Academy • Classes in Jewish Mysticism, Hebrew 

and more • Anti-missionary Task Force • Succot on Campus • Holiday celebrations • Simchat Torah 

party • Mitzvah Campaigns, including Mezuzah, Charity, Teffilin, Shabbat Candle-lighting Campaigns and 

more • Jewish Birthday Celebrations • Kashrut $ Aid • Jewish Bookstore • Free Loans 

• Jewish Education • Tu B'shvat • Purim Bash • Passover Seders • Lag Ba'omer BBQ... and more! 



Chabad ftouse eit4f.€;tA.^74hGayley Aver 
(31 0) 208-751 1 • e-mail: Chabad@ucla.edu 



T>edicat e d to t f tt iov t and inspiration ofi A e LuBavitcfier !R§b6e, HjfiBBi !\(enacfiem fMendefSc/ineers enr 



\l 



34 Orienution Issue 2000 



Daily BniinOlympks 2000 







Daily Bruin Olympia 2000 



Orientation issue 2000 35 



Blue hope to add luster to their 



• 11 



OVERVIEW: ^st,^res< 

UCLA athletes prepare to 
compete in Sydney games 



By Dylan Hernandez 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

Since the modern Olympics began 
in 1896. UCLA has had unparalleled 
success at the Games. The school has 
sent 332 athletes to the Garner, with 
over half of them having won a medal. 
Of those medals, 95 have been gold. 

This summer, UCLA again 
expects to send its^share of current 
and former athletes to the Olympics 
in Sydney, Australia. For some ath- 
letes, it will be a return trip, either to 
maintain their position as the world's 
best or to undo previous disappoint- 
ments. For others, it will be their 
opportunity to reach a life-long 
dream. Then there is the group of 
those like Jess Strutzel, a track and 
field All-American at 800 meters. 

For Strutzd, who completed his 
fourth year of school this spring, the 
Olympic dream started just last year. 

As a high schooler at Huntington 
Beach, he was among the best in the 
CIF Southern Section, but nowhere 
near the level of Michael Granville of 
Bell Gardens. Granville ran 1:46.45 
to set a national record and qualify for 
the Olympic Trials. Strutzel, mean- 



lile, lagged back in the i:52s. — 

Yet, after a few ye4rs at UCLA, 
which both he and Granville attend- 
ed, Strutzel found himself to be the 
one closer to the Olympics. Granville 
was hampered by a string of injuries 
and Strutzel was competing in big 
meets without him. Strutzel's times 
were dropping and soon, he was 
among the best middle-distance run- 
ners in college. 



UCLA has sent 332 
athletes to the Games, 
with over half of them 
having won a medal - 

95 have been gold. 



Last summer, Strutzel qualified for 
the USA Track and Field champi- 
onships and made the finals. 
Although he fizzled out in the cham- 
pionship race, he knew he was close. 
If he could finish in the top three at 
the Olympic Trials in one year, he 
would go to Sydney. • 

M can do this," he told himself. 

Since then, Strutzel has been train- 
ing with the Olympics in mind, joining 
hordes of other Bruins doing so. 

Several of those UCLA stars will 



be playing on the softball team, which 
captured gold in the '96 Atlaiita 
Games. Five former Bruins, includ- 
ing current assistant coach Lisa 
Fernandez, are on the squad, along 
with current UCLA slugger Stacey 
Nuveman. 

UCLA's volleyball program 
should have a good showing, both 
indoors and out. Dan Laridry (1990- 
93), JeffNygaard (1992-95) and Tom 
Stillwell (1995-98) are all part of the 
current U.S. indoor national team. 
Also, fellow Bruin alum Kevin Wong 
-is considered to be one of the better 
players on the beach tour and will 
probably be chosen for the Olympics. 

For the women, Annette Davis 
(1991-94), Jenny Jordan (1992-95), 
Liz Masakayan (1982-85) and Elaine 
Youngs (1988-92) also have a good 
shot on the beach. 

While former Bruin Reggie Miller 
(1984-97) was not selected to be part 
of this year's basketball "Dream 
Team," UCLA will have a roundball 
entrant in Sydney, as American 
Basketball League's 1998 MVP 
Natalie Williams (1991-94) is current- 
ly on the national team roster. 

On the soccer field, Pete Vagenas 
(1996-99) and Sasha Victorine (1996- 
99), current teammates on the LA. 
Galaxy, are also likely to wear the 
American colors. Both are on the 



m YMPK fiO»^P Mg^AL STANDINGS 



The United States has consistently ranked In fe top three countries In terms of gold 
medals vwn.(hilteafewofthe gold medalAN«been1%U 
showthenumberofgoldmedate«»*^il^lAaWetes. 



1984 inl 



1988in$e«il 

1. Soviet Union 

2. East^rmany 

3. UnitedSt^fs 



55 
37 
36 



UCU itMttts : 17 qoM wedais | 





ilore than haKtf UCLA's 0^pi|»tiilete$ ha%»ned 
medals - the highest percentilelfong \iS* col^es. 



See OLYMPIC page 36 l^g mMmK^i^ttm^ 



■*'• '' •»*■■ 




UCU^ has sent 332 athktes to the Olyinpi^ai|es. omiein, 
95 have earned gold medals, 46 have eamii ^ver and 42 
have earned bronze. : 




JACOB LIAO/Daily Bruin 



Team exhibits style from paric to Sydney 



SOFTBALL: UCLA players 
lop National squad roster, 
represent school, nation 



By Greg Lewis 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

UCLA has an Olympic tradition 
unmatched by any other school, and 
this tradition extends to softball. 
where it is the dominant school with 
seven players on the 19-person roster. 

UCLA is as conspicuous in interna- 
tional competition as it is at the colle- 
giate level. The seven players on the 
national team had played in four of 
UCLA's nine national champi- 
onships. 

Bruins on the U.S. team roster are 
Stacey Nuveman (1997-present), 
Christie Ambrosi (class of 1999), 
Jennifer Brundage (1995), Lisa 
Fernandez (1993), Sheila Cornell- 
Douty (1984), Dot Richardson (1983) 
and alternate Amanda Freed (1999- 
present). Since alternates will not trav- 
el to Sydney, Nuveman is the team's 
only collegian. 

Tanya Harding (1995), Joanne 
Alchin (1993) and Kerry Dicnelt 
( 1991 ) will play in the 2(X)0 Games for 
Australia, which, along with China, is 
Team USA's main competition for the 
gold in Sydney. 
" For the three current Bruins - 
Nuveman, Freed, plus assistant coach 
Lisa Fernandez - the Olympics give 
them a chance not only to represent 
the United Stales in Sydney, but 



College World Series), we're playing 
for 32,000 plus millions. It's a lot more 
pressure," Fernandez said. 

There's also one huge difference for 
the Bruins, according to Fernandez. 
"The relationships change. At UCLA, 
I am their coach. Oji the national 
team, I am their teammate," she said. 
"It's so different - as a coach I can't 
really be their friend, but (on the 
national team I am their friend) as a 
player, it's great because I also realize 
that I can learn from them." 



"Ifyou work hard here, 

you have a wonderful 

opportunity to be 

recognized as an 

Olympian." 

Sue Enquist 

UCLA softball coach 



Team USA began its preOIympic 
"Central Park to Sydney" tour of exhi- 
bition games in June and is 18-0 
through Friday, June 23. 

So far, all seven Bruins have per- 
formed extremely well. 

On Friday, joining the team after 
completing finals at school. Freed 
pitched a perfect game in her debut, 
striking out 1 1 batters in five innings of 
a 19-0 win. Nuveman is the team's 
starting catcher and is second on the 



UCLA as well. 

"Instead of playing for 32,000 peo- 
ple like in Oklahoma (site of the 



team in o i hbas e pe r ce n tage, batting — 2 - 0. UCL A w as the o nly cnlle g e 



three games as a pitcher and is first in 
on-base percentage, and third in bat- 
ting. 

Cornell-Douty starts at first, 
Richardson starts at second base, 
Brundage at third and Ambrosi in left. 
"Training with the national team is 
different," Nuveman said. "It's much 
more self-motivated. When you're in 
college, every day is planned, the 
schedule is strict. With the national 
team, there is much more training on 
your own. A lot of the time you are 
away from the team, but you still have 
to do the individual workout." 

When not training in the Olympic 
facility in Chula Vista, Nuveman, 
Fernandez and Ambrosi work out in 
Los Angeles. Before the 2000 softball 
season, Ambrosi and Nuveman 
learned they would not be able to play 
for the UCLA and national teams at 
the same time. Ambrosi gave up her 
final year of eligibility at UCLA to 
play in the Olympics, Nuveman red- 
shirted the season, and Fernandez was 
forced to miss occasional games when 
her national team responsibilities 

called. 

The loss of UCLA's two best hitters 
was huge for the Bruini, but head 
coach Sue Enquist took it in stride. 
"Losing Christie Ambrosi and Stacey 
Nuveman to the Olympic team sends a 
great message to our current team. If 
you work hard here, you have a won- 
derful opportunity to be recognized as 
an Olympian," Enquist said. 

In March the Olympic team, play- 
ing with Fernandez and Nuvcnwin, 
defeated Freed and UCLA 3-0 and 
the only cnllege Team 





Daily Bfuin File Photo 

Coralie Simmons makes a play for the UCLA women's water polo team. 
She will play on the U.S. National team at the 2(XX) Olympics in Sydney. 




Four 




ippear in hew 




OLYMPICS: Team looks to 
popularize water polo for 
women at summer games 



By Pauline Vu ^~^ ~~~^^~~ 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

'y When Nicolle Payne hejrd the 
news over the phone, she walked back 
to the dining room where her family 
was eating dinner, smiled at them, and 
started screaming. 

When Robin Beauregard heard the 
news, she went to the nearest pay 
phone, called her parents, and again, 
there was more elated screaming. 

And when Catherine von Schwarz 
heard the news, she ... well, von 
Schwarz admitted with a sheepish 
smile, she doesn't remember what she 
did. -■:•'■'•: '■■■•■■.■ '■ ■■ ' . 

"She was so excited she forgot," 
Beauregard said with a laugh at a 
press conference at the National 
Aquatics Center in Los Alamitos, 
Calif. — — 

In October of 1997, after years of 
struggling, after years of watching one 
Olympics after another go by, 
women's water polo finally became an 
Olympic sport. 

"Every year an Olympics came' 
around, women's water polo got its 
hopes up and was disappointed," 
Payne said. "But our sport has gotten 



so popular. They couldn't deny us 
much longer." 

Not that the powers that be - the 
IOC and La Federation 
Internationale de Natation Amateur 
(FIN A), the international governing 
body for water sports - didn't try to 
keep it from happening. 

"They said it was too small, they 
said the sport wasn't developed 
enough. They gave every excuse," 
Coralie Simmons said. 



"(FINA) was not used to 

women being so 

aggressive. 



// 



Coralie Simmons 

UCLA playmaker 



When the players heard that 

women's water polo would actually be 

Hn the Olympics, it was even more 

uplifting because they were beginning 

to think the sport would never make it. 

"When the Olympics were in 
Atlanta - in our home country - we 
thought it was going to happen," von 
Schwarz said. "When it didn't we 
were bummed. It didn't seem like it 
would ever happen." 

It was rumored that FIN A also did- 



UCLA atNetes compete for shot at Olympics 



average and slugging average. 
Fernandez has yet to allow a nin in 



CMyBnjtnFHePtKXC 

Tfa ftniKfai; an assistant coach for the UCLA wo r nw i S suf t ba l l t e a m . 
5tt«nffttLir«titH will be playing on the U.S. Nationai team In the Olympics this sumnr>er. 



DailyBfuin File Photo 



TRACK: Upcoming trials 
wiU pit 12 Bruins against 
predecessors, NCAA stars 



ByOwistiiMTeler 

Dally Bruin Senior Staff 

A chance for Olympic dreams lies a 
couple hundred miles north of the 
UCLA campus. This locale is only fit- 
ting as the Bruin track program looks 
to send 12 of its finest to Sacramento 
to vie for one of the three coveted 
spots in each of their respective events. 

With the qualifying period stretch- 
ing from January 1999 through July 
2000, these dreams have been formu- 
lating long before the end of the school 
year. 

For many athletes in an Olympic 
sport, the games are their ultimate 
dream. 

"For most collegiate athletes, the 
Olympic trials are viewed as a stepping 
stone," distance coach Eric Peterson 
said. "Those who are fortunate 
enough to compete in the trials will be 
up against a much higher level of com- 
petition and the stakes are much high- 
er. 

"They'r'e up against people who 
have devoted their entire lives to being 
an Olympic champion," Peterson 
added. 

Following in the footsteps of many 
illustrious Bruins-tumcd^Mympians. 
the Bruin roster is young and hungry 
for valuable experience and personal 
records. 

"It's a good opportunity for UCLA 
ath l etes to go and cu i npetc at the ii cai 



Boldensaid. 

It is an athlete like Seilala Sua 
whose next step is this next level. 
Having just swept the NCAA champi- 
onships in both the discus and shot 
put, Sua is the sixth-ranked thrower in 
the world. 

"She has proven on an internation- 
al level that she can do it," throwing 
coach and men's head coach Art 
Venegas said. "She's already qualified 
for the Olympics, all she needs to do is 
get in the top three to make the team." 

Sua, the winningest athlete in 
UCLA track and field history and the 
first woman to win a single event at the 
NCAAs for four consecutive years, is 
humble about her success. She talks 
about preparing for the Olympic trials 
as a part of her regular training sched- 
ule. 

"I've really been working on getting 
my form down," she said. "I've been 
lifting weights and I have a few meets 
before the trials. After those, I'm just 
going to wait for the trials." 

Despite her taking care of business 
approach, she is excited. 

"I am expecting to win and make 
the Olympic team," Sua said. 

And rightly so. Sua has dedicated 
her life to track afl*^ field because it's 
what she loves to do most. After domi- 
nating NCAA competition through- 
out her collegiate career, she is ready 
to move on. 

Jess Strutzel, 2000 Indoor 800 
fl^er champion, is also looking 
beyond collegiate competition in the 
long run. Entered with his time of 
1 45.81, the current UCLA record, 
Strutzel sits behind eight men in the 
r a n k in gs. U p aga in st th e fa mi l i a r com- 



Wbmen ' s track staf Sel l i l a Sua compeH f b In th e d is c us a nd s ho t p u t . 

Sua Is looking to capture a spot In the 2000 Olympics this summer. level." women's head coach Jeanette petition of Johnny Gray of the Santa 



Monica Track and Field Club and 
Derrick Peterson of Missouri, both of 
whom he has defeated and been 
defeated by, his chances of making the 
Olympics is a matter of his perfor- 
mance on that given day. 

But the bulk of the Bruin hopefuls 
have a couple of years ahead of them 
to garner experience. Having just 
competed in the NCAA champi- 
onships at the beginning of June, the 
athletes got a small taste of what they 
will be up against in Sacramento. 

"At NCAAs, you'see a lot of people 
who go on to the Olympics," Bolden 
said. "To me, NCAAs are a prerequi- 
site to the next level of track and field 
because so many Olympians went 
through the NCAA system." 

Shekedia Jones, who completed her 
junior year this spring, faces arguably 
the toughest competition out on the 
track. Up against the likes of Marion 
Jones and Inger Miller in the 200m in 
addition to former Bruin Gail Devers 
in the 100m, Jones will face off against 
some of the world's finest. 

Similarly, high jumper Darnesha 
Griffith, niece of Bruin-turned 
Olympians Jackie Joyner-Kersee and 
the late Florence GriflTith Joyner, must 
vie againsr former Bruin and high 
jump extraordinaire Olympian Amy 
Acuff. 

"The approach for someone like 
Seilala, who has a legitimate chance 
for a spot, is different from the 
younger athletes," Peterson said. 
"Athletes like Darnesha Griffith, who 
are improving at a very fast rate, are 
going to the Trials for an opportunity 
to compete against some of the best 



n't like the idea of women playing a : 
contact sport. 

"They're not used to women being t 

so aggressive," Simmons said. 

But with the Olympics in Sydney ^ 
this year, the Australian National 
Team, an international powerhouse, -^ 
fought to get women's water polo Tn 
Uae 2000 Games - and were success- : 
ful. They even got the Australian jl_ 
Olympic Committee to build a brand 
new pool to host the women's games. - 

This year's Olympics will have six 
teams vying for the medals. Australia 
has an automatic berth by right of 
being the host nation; Kazakhstan will .: 
go as the Asian champion; the / 
Netherlands will go as the European ' 
champion; and Canada won the spot 
for the American continent. Thus the 
final two teams, Russia and the 
United States, had to place in the top 
two at the Olympic Qualifying tourna- 
ment to earn the remaining two spots. 

Russia did this by beating Italy and 
the United States did so by beating 
Hungary 6-5 4n the semifinals of the 
qualifying round; ■ — — — — 

The U.S. National team has 17 
members but will cut its roster to 1 3 by , 
July 3. At the moment, the team 
includes four Bruins - two current and 
two former - as well as coach Guy 
Baker, the head coach of both the 
UCLA men's water polo and 

See WHTEtfOlIt page 36 



Scc1IUKl,p«9«36 




).> 



% 



36 Orientation hsue 2000 



Daily BniinOtympks 2000 



OLYMPIC 

From page 34 

under-23 national team, which will 
compete at the Games. 

Steve McCain, a gymnast at 
UCLA between 1993 and 1994, has 
world championship experience and 
a solid shot at making the squad. 
Women's water polo has four players 
currently on the national team, while 
"Bruin Sean Kern (!997-presemTlrorf 
the men's national team. 

In track, Gail Devers (1985-88), 
the defending women's 100 meter 
champion, headlines the Bruin con- 
tingent. Men's world 200 meter 
champion Ato Boldon ( 1995-96), 
representing Trinidad and Tobago, 
and female shot-putter Seilala Sua 
(1997-2000) are also gold medal con- 



SOFTBALL 

Ff6fnpage34 

USA played. 

In addition to the seven Bruins on 
the national team, Natasha Watley, 
who just completed her freshman 
season as an National Fastpitch 
Coaches Association Ail-American, 
was the youngest player to make the 
final round of tryouts for the nation- 
al team. 

"Even though I didn't make it, 
going through the tryouts was a good 
thing. Next time around, I'll have an 
advantage over the new players 
because I will have gone through the 
experience already," Watley said. 

UCLA also placed four players on 
the 1996 U.S. Olympic Team, with 
Fernandez, Richardson and Cornell 
starting and Brundage making the 
team as an alternate. Janice Parks 
(1989) played for the Puerto Rican 
national team in the '96 games.- 

Through 18 games of the "Central 
Park to Sydney," the undefeated 



tenders. 

And of course, there is Strutzel. 

Although medal ing in Sydney is 
unlikely and his chances of making 
the Games are marginal. Strutzel has 
been at UCLA's Drake Stadium run- 
ning intervals on the track since the 
beginning of the summer. His girl- 
friend, Ali Villagra, looked on, hold- 
ing a stopwatch. 

"I'm a little nervous for him," 
Villagra said, referring to the 
Olympic Track Trials in iate h' 
have total confidence in him, 
though." 

Strutzel thinks training at Drake 
will give him the advantage he needs. 

"There's a power here," he said. 
"You feel it. Everyday, you see great 
athletes training here and you 
remember the ones that used to come 
here. It gives you strength." 

Team USA has outscored the oppo- 
sition by an overwhelming 133-1 
margin. The United States has domi- 
nated in international competition 
since winning the inaugural softball 
Olympic gold medal in 1996. It has 
won almost every prestigious tourna- 
ment, including the Canada Cup, the 
Pan-American Games and the 
International Softball Federation 
World Championships. 

Team USA will play approximate- 
ly one-third of its tour games against 
WPSL teams, where the squad will 
get its best pre-Sydney indication of 
how it is playing. So far, the national 
team has defeated the Akron Racers 
and the Florida Wahoos each by 
scores of 1-0. The low scoring games 
indicate to national team head coach 
Ralph Raymond tliat the pitching is 
right on track, but the hitters' timing 
is a bit off. 

The tour goes through 31 cities, 
before ending in Hawaii on Sept. 3. 
Olympic play begins Sunday Sept. 17 
against Canada. Every U.S. softball 
game will be televised by NBC. 



WATERPOLO 

From page 35 

women's water polo programs. 

The graduates are 2-metcr defend- 
er Catherine von Schwarz. the first 
female in UCLA history to graduate 
with four national championships, 
and Nicolle Payne, the national 
team's starting goalie. Playmaker 
Coralie Simmons and 2-meter 
efender Robin Beauregard have, 
respectively, one and three years left 
of college eligibility. They are among 
the leading scorers on the U.S. Team. 
As evidenced by its Olympic pres- 
ence, women's water polo has come 
a long way. Most of the members of 
the national team played on the boys* 
varsity teams in high school because 
their schools had no girls' teams. 

"No one knew what water polo 
was when I was growing up." said 
von Schwarz. who was raised in 



TRACK 

From page 35 



athletes in order to acquire as much 
experience as they can." 

One person who gained a tremen- 
dous amount of experience in a short 
period of time is sophomore pole- 
vaulter Tracy O'Hara. In only her 
third year competing in the sport, 
O'Hara claimed both the 2000 
indoor and outdoor national titles 
and would have clinched the world 
record in April had her arm not 
caught the bar at 1 5- 1. ; . : ■ 

"After she won the indoor champi- 
onship, we both knew right then that 
she has the capacity of making the 
Olympic team," pole vault coach 
Anthony Curran said. 

Entered with a mark of 14-7 1/4, 
and ranked fifth on the world list, 
O'Hara is ready to leap at the pre-" 
trial predictions. 



Maryland. "Now yoQ have eastern 
high school x:hampionships. It's 
amazing how fast it grew in 10 
years." 

When UCLA first had a women's 
water polo team in 1995, there were a 
total of four Division I programs. 
Now there are over 50, and next year 
the sport will be an NCAA sport. 

After the sport became an 
Olympic competition, the national 
team finally began getting serious 
funding to help U.S. women's water^ 
polo succeed. Before, players had to 
w6rk another job while training with 
the team. 

As soon as she heard it would be 
an Olympic sport, Beauregard decid- 
ed to go out for the national team. 
Before that, joining the team hadn't 
been an option. 5.: ; • 

"I was really focused on school,'* 
she said. "I didn't think there was 
anything in water polo then." 

Everyone is aware of the impact 

"Now she's in the top five in the 
world, and she's sitting pretty com- 
fortably going into the trials," Curran 
said. "She knows she'll have to per- 
form well. She's been one to rise to 
the occasion." 

Despite the enormity of the 
achievements made by track and 
field athletes, their world is not as 
vast as it appears, for they must face 
the same competition time and time 
again. This year's Bruin 12 will 
encounter a number of UCLA alums 
in the heat of Sacramento. Acuff, 
Devers, thrower John Godina and 
hurdler Joanna Hayes will be among 
them. 

"Going into the Olympic Trials, 
they automatically know what is at 
stake and what they're going to have 
to do," Bolden said. "They know the 
competition is going to be stiff and 
that they have to perform on that 
day." 

Anything, Bolden added, can hap- 



thcy could be making on the sport in 
the United States. 

"It could be huge," Baker said. "I 
think the U.S. making the Olympics 
is a big step. It's good for the sport, 
but if wc could medal, the growth 
potential is enormous." 

And with only six teams in the 
field, the United States has a 50 
percent chance of medaling. Not 
only that, but the team's potential 
impact on the future of women's 
water pblo only makes them hun- 



"grierfo wm7 

"The team is motivated by that," 
Baker said. "It's part of their legacy 
to have a big impact on the sport." 

They're motivated by that - and 
the fact they are simply playing in 
the Olympics itself. 

"It's been, obviously, a drearh 
forever," Simmons said with a 
smile. "To be able to experience it, 
to be able to finally go to the big 
event is so exciting." 



pen on any given day. 

"I've seen young people come out 
of nowhere and veterans who haven't 
been doing their best show more at 
the trials. You have to do it on that 
one day." 

A gold medalist herself, Bolden 
speaks from firsthand experience. A 
member of the first place 1984 
4x1 00m relay team, Bolden was both 
a Bruin and an Olympian. 

It's only fitting that an Olympian 
will lead her Bruins to the trials. 

"I just want them to get a taste of 
what it's like," Bolden said, "they'll 
be up against people who they've 
only seen on TV and have been in 
awe of. I want them to see that this is 
what it feels to be at the Olympic tri- 
als." 

With experience as their coach, 
the Bruins donH need to look very far 
for a source of inspiration as they 
head up north in hopes of ending up 
down under. 



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Sports on the Web Q q 

See all this and more at • 
__.. the Daily Bruin's 
v. Website: 

www.dailybruin.uda.edu 










Orientation Issue 2000 



UCLA athletics contihue Tegacy of excellenGe 




Daily Bruin File Pboto 

Women's gymnastics was one of many teams that won an NCAA championship last year for UCLA. 



TRAOmON: Four titles in 
1999, other top 10 sports 
reflect athletic prowess 



ByAJGKknan 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff ■ 

Many incoming freshmen can 
argue that much of their decision to 
attend UCLA is due to the school's 
rich academic success. But these 
freshmen would not be totally honest 
if the choice did not also come down 
to the bleeding of the Bruin blue and 
gold seen in the school's successes in 
the athletic 
arena. 

With 21 
intercollegiate 
sports and 
countless club 
sports gracing 
the fields of 
competition in 
Westwood, it is 
impossible to 
fmd another 
school that has " - 

continued to build upon its rich athlet- 
ic history the way UCLA has. 

The April 1997 Sports Illustrated 
issue named UCLA the No. I 'Jock' 
School in America, and the 1999-2000 
academic year only furthered that 
ideal as UCLA accumulated five 
more tides, totalling a nation-leading 
82 NCAA team championships (65 



NCAA PMSiOH 1 TITLf ^^iv^^^ ^ 


1.UCU 


82 


2. Stanford 


78 


3. use 


76 


4.0krahoiiiaSlat» 


43 


S. Arkansas 


36 


soma, sptitsk* 1 

jAcbfiLlAO/baUyBfum 



men's and 17 women's). 

The Sears' Directors Cup is the 
most accurate gauge of a collegiate 
athletic programs' yearly success. The 
honor recognizes the university with 
the best overall sports performance in 
an academic year and awards points 
based upon finishes in NCAA compe- 
tition. The Bruins placed runner-up 
for the first time since 1995-96, when 
UCLA won men's water polo and vol- 
leyball titles and finished in the top 1 1 
in 16 sports. 

This past year was the first time 
since 1983-84, which was athletic 
director Peter Dalis' first year at the 
helm, that the Bruins posted four 

NCAA champi- 
onships. The 
Bruins claimed 
the top position 
in men's water 
polo and volley- 
ball along with 
women's indoor 
track and gym- 
nastics, and also 
captured a 
women's water 
polo national 
title. The UCLA athletic program has 
placed in the top five in the Sears' 
Directors Cup in all seven years of the 
competition. 

Not only do the Bruins claim the 
team title in a variety of sports, but 
they also hold balance in the remain- 

See OMJNPIOIISHIP, page 41 



Bruin recruiters seek best in nation 



FRESHMEN: Process to 
select top athletes begins 
earlier than most think 



By Amanda needier 

Daily Bmin Senior Staff 

There is no question that UCLA 
has a great athletic tradition. Nearly 
every team the Bruins field is com- 
petitive in its conference and is a 
national title contender. Mudi of this 
has to do with incredible coaching 
and training, but behind these fac- 
tors lies the first step toward creating 
a winning team - reauiting. 

Recruiting is what brings young 
athletes full of potential to UCLA 
and allows them to become legends 
like Lew Alcindor, Marques 
Johnson, Gail Devers and Lisa 
Fernandez. 

UCLA spends between $500,000 
to SI million annually on its recruit- 
ing efforts. With the program's 82 
NCAA titles overall, it's easy to say 
that the money is well spent 
"^^ut how is the money spent? The 
recruiting process is long and com- 
plicated. Director of Recruiting 
Michael Sondheimer calls it "tin 
ongoing four-year process.** 

Coaches travel the country 
attending every major event in their 
respective sports. Baseball coaches 
go to the Area Code games, where 
they find many of their recruits. 
Tennis coaches attend the hardcore 
under-17 and under-I8 tournaments. 

And sometimes the coaching sUff 
just spots them. Men's volleyball 
found out about Kevin Morrow, an 
opposite, when he came lu watch his 



older brotfier Scott play midfdte 
blocker for the Bruins last season. 

"The dad kept bringing the 6-foot- 
9 kid to the matches," Bruin head 
coach Al Scates said. "It was kind of 
hard not to notice him." 

The UCLA athletic department 
also receives over 100 letters a week 
from high school students wanting to 
compete for UCLA. Often these let- 
ter are accompanied by highlight 
tapes. That's how men's basketball 
head coach Steve Lavin stumbled 
upon one of his top recruits. 

"They were watching the tape and 
the kid was really good," 
Sondheimer said. "It was one of 
those cases when everyone else 
missed on him." 

That was also how Scates came 
upon Jonathan Acosta, a 64bot-4 
outside hitter from Puerto Rico. "He 
sent us tape, and I was very 
impressed with him," Scates said. 

The men's volleyball team, with 
12 recruits, pulled in possibly their 
best recruiting dass ever. Most of the 
class also signed in the fall before the 
Bruins won their 18th title in May 

"I don't know why," Scates said. 
"Maybe because they want to play at 
UCLA and win national champi- 
onships and get a great education." 

The coaches and their staff only 
look at the top ninth- and lOth- 
graders in the country. They are 
tracked into the 1 Ith grade and offi- 
cial recruitment begins Sept. I of 
their junior year in high school. 

"Usually by the end of summer 
coaches know who they want," 
Sondheimer said. "We get letters 
from seniors in high school, but by 
1 2th grade it's 100 late" 
Po r mal r ec r u i t in g b e gin s July I of 



senior year. This is when athletes are 
invited to go on recruiting trips to 
UCLA. They are taken to a game or 
match, shown the dorms and the 
fields, and introduced to the team. 
This is where UCLA gets them. 

"We have a lot going for us," 
Sondheimer said. "Few schools can 
match us academically, athletically 
and socially." 

With its combination of great ath- 
letics, the sunny Southern California 
weather and the excitement of L.A., 
for many athletes seeing UCLA is 
love at first si^t. This is what hap- 
pened to Olympian Natalie Williams 
of the women's basketball team. 

Heavily recruited by USC, she 
was brought by the Trojans to 
UCLA to watch a game which pitted 
USC against the Bruins. Williams 
liked UCLA so much that she 
returned twice; once on a recruiting 
trip and then permanently to play 
basketbaN wearing the blue and gold. 

The youth sports camps that 
UCLA holds every summer are 
another way in whidi future Bruins 
are spotted. Volleyball first learned 
of outside hitter Gray Garret when 
he came to a summer camp. "Gray 
came to camp when he was a junior," 
Scates said. "He's gotten a lot 
stronger since then." 

Forward Maylana Martin, who 
starred for four years on the 
women's basketball team before 
graduating last year, also came to 
one such camp. It was there that she 
got to know the coaches and had a 
chance to showcase W talent, long 
before regular recruits could. 

So ahhou^ there are many ways 
to get noticed by UCLA coaches, 
only an elite few will hecnme Bruins. 



Prospects for UCLA career 
k good for new recruit 




DIARY: Softball player 
says UCLA is best place 
for athletics, academics 

Choosing which college to 
attend is probably one of the 
most difficult dedsions I 
have ever had to make. Not only is it 
stressful, but it is also very confus- 
ing. There are 
so many differ- 
ent colleges 
around that 
finding one 
that suited me 
best seemed 
impossible. 

While 
deciding which 
school 1 would 
attend, I had to 
ask myself 
many ques- , 

tionslike: '. v ^: •• 

Could I be happy here? Would I be 
able to get a good job with my 
degree? How would 1 adjust to the 
college life? Since I am an athlete, I 
also had to consider the athletic pro- 
gram and what it has to offer me as 
a student-athlete. 

When I took my recruiting trip to 
UCLA I was constantly observing 
my surroundings. I had taken three 
other recruiting trips but when I got 
on tfie UCLA campus I immediate- 
ly fdl in k>ve with it At that nK>ment%r 
I knew that UCLA was foe me. 

Althou^ I was on a recruiting 
trip for softbaH. I was also very conr — 




cemed about the academic aspect. I 
had already been previously 
informed about UCLA from my 
older sister, Seilala Sua, a shot-put- 
ter who will be in her fifth year at 
UCLA. When the opportunity 
arose to go to UCLA I decided it 
was too good to pass up. 

UCLA had fit the mold I had set 
for my college. It offers so many dif- 
ferent majors and getting a degree 
from UCLA says a lot about you. I 
just remember how comfortable I 
fdt when I was on campus. The 
campus was just beautiful and 
everything seemed to be located in a 
convenient place. 

Since I am coming all the way 
from Rorida I also had to consider 
the distance factor. I had many 
opportunities to go to a Florida 
school but I wanted to go away to 
school and be independent. Of 
course I would miss my family and 
it will probably be difficult for the 
first couple of months but that 
would have happened anywhere. 

My recruiting trip was so amaz- 
ing because I really got to know the 
softball team. 1 have to admit I was 
very intimidated by the whole 
"UCLA softball tradition," but after 
getting to know everyone I knew 
that I could not have chosen a better 
team to play for. The giris treated 
me as in were equal and not just a 
recruit, and the coadies are die best 
in the country. 

There are not a bt of universities 
that encompass both the academic 



41- 



38 Orientation Issue 2000 



Daly Brain Sports 



*tiisUt 




mm9 



H-*! 



Pauley Pavikw 
The home court for the men's and women's basketball and voHeybatl teams, as well as the women's gymnastics 
squad. Many students camp out in front of the legendary arena the night before key men's basketbaH games to 
ttteir prwrity passes and head coach Steve Lavin sometintes rewards such hardcore fans with free pizza. 



9«. 



kitramuralNctd. 

football, soccer and softbali are played throughout the year here, as well as club sports Kke lacrosse, uMmite 
frisbee and rugby. The annual 'Beat 'SC' bonfire and rally is abo usually hekl on the IM field. But all this wiH mean 
nothing conte fill when the fieM wHI be torn up to build, you guessed it another underground partdng complex . 



North AtMctkncW 



Named for its geographic locatiofl, the NAF MS once tile home field of tnenl and wonwfl'i soccH. Itb M 
honw fietd of the men's Ucrosse team. This year it wiH pose as a miniature intramural field. 



DrakeStadium - 
Newly refurbished Drake Stadium is where the championship Rien's and women's track and field make their 
rounds. Also, for the first x\mt, men's and women's soccer will play their home games In the new stadium. 

Men's Gym 

Ironically, though men's volley(>aU holds practice here, only women's sports teams like swimming and dhring 
and water polo hold events at Men's Gym. But it's still a good place to spot the occasional NBA player. 

———————»»— ^»-»——^»——— ———— « I . " — — — — — ~-— I I I I 

John Wooden Center 

The practice site for women's gymnastics and volleyball as well as home court for some men's voHeybaH games. If s 
also the hot spot for student sport and recreation with the offices for intramural and club sports, a full weight 
room, workout equipment a variety of aerobic classes including Tae-6o, basketball courts and a rock wall. 
Wooden offim 79 classes and vnH soon undergo construction to intlude men's and women's kKker rooms, a weight 
room three times the size of the current one and an outdoor recreation facility. 

I I . .M l ^ 

^ ' ' " ' ' ■ ' ■ N. 

John D. Morgan Center ^ 

The mecca of the UCLA athleticdepaitment It hoMs the offices of all coaches, sports information direaors, and 
recruiting, marketing and athlete tutoring personnel. In the midst of reconstruction (like every other buiMing on 
campus) the Morgan center should be completed in mid-August to September. The new HaH of Fame will open 
around January of 2001. ^ ' "■'^■'J. 



The Rose Bowl is the honie fieM for the UCIA football team, during the regular season anyway. As one of two UCLA sports venues focated off 
campus, rooter buses are provided on game days, though with LA traffic if s a good idea to go to the bathroom before you leave. 




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Daily Bniin Sports 



Orientation Issue 2000 39 



Freshmen can find niche in intramural, club 




• If 



teams 



COLUMN: Athletic groups 
make UCLA manageable 
while offering competition 

So, freshmen, you want to be a 
Bruin? Step one: figure out 
what it is that you like to do. 
— Not only does UCLA have seem- 
ingly millions 
of people and ' 
thousands of 
classes, there 
are just as 
many niches 
for you to 
chose from. 

I'm not say- 
ing you should 
join every orga- 
nization. I only 
suggest that if 
you have an 
interest, you 

should follow it. And one of the 
most rewarding experiences - 
assuming you have a penchant for 
athletics - is getting involved in the 
UCLA sports community. 

UCLA athletics stretch far 
beyond its 2 1 varsity teams: it 
includes everything from co-ed 
intramural volleyball to club hockey. 




Christina 
Teller 



If you weren't this year's hottest 
recruit, that's okay; there's still a 
vast variety of opportunities for you. 

"The best decision that I made 
during my second year was to join 
the club lacrosse team," third-year 
political science student Victoria 
Bohannon said. "Not only did I get 
in pretty good shape and learn a 
new sport, I made some great - . . 
friends. ...: •>:, 

" I was able to be a part of a team 
again, and I found people to look up 
to and to count on," she added. 

Because of the caliber of both 
academics and athletics, many col- 
lege students sacrifice varsity 
opportunities at other colleges in 
order to indulge their minds. At 
least that's what they tell their rela- 
tives. ;•,■,• ,.■■:•:.:■■';■'■ ^./ V 

At only the best universities is it 
common to hear that so-and-so 
"would be on the team if he went to 
another school." The ability and 
desire of many students is impres- 
sive. 

Don't believe me? Just check out 
next quarter's IM basketball league. 
On any given night you will find a 
multitude of both men's and 
women's teams battling it out oh the 
court, not for a national champi- 
onship or a chance to forego their 



last two years of eligibility, but sim- 
ply for the win. 

A high school varsity athlete 
myself, when I came to UCLA it 
was very clear that the only blue and 
gold jersey I would don would be 
the one I'd wear in the student sec- 
tion of Pauley Pavilion. In order to 
answer my craving for the competi- 
tion and team unity that had been a 
part of my life since I was five, I 
joined a group from my dorm floor 
and played IM volleyball. 



For those who aren't 
out for blood, there are 

levels that are mo/e 
- recreation based. 



I was playing my favorite sport 
with people who loved it as much as 
I did and who challenged me athleti- 
cally. A and B level UCLA IM 
sports are not your average recre- 
ational team. These people know 
how to play, and they want to win. 

For those who aren't out for 
blood, there are levels that are more 



recreation based. • 

"It was great to be able to get 
back into sports in a casual way with 
people who just wanted to have 
fun," said Cory Putman, a third- 
year psychology student. 

The best part about playing IM 
sports was that I was on a team with 
girls I had played against during my_ 
previous two club volleyball seasons. 
Through this experience, UCLA 
became a little smaller for me. 

Participation in IM or club sports 
drastically shrinks the size of the 
UCLA community. Meeting new 
people is so much better when you 
are doing something you enjoy , ^ 
together. 

"Through being involved in a 
club team, you develop a great sense 
of pride to know that you represent 
the University of California Los 
Angeles." third-year psychology stu- 
dent Nicole Everett said. "Being 
part of a club team also really makes 
the university feel a lot smaller. Our 
team feels like a really close group 
of friends, almost like a family." 

Maybe after participating in a 
sport here you will get to know your 
neighbor's best friend's $on's cousin 
Joe, next time you're asked. It 
broadens your circle and shrinks 
UCLA. 



1: Beyond the enjoyment of pursu- -^ 
ing one's own athletic ability is the ^ 
respect you develop from watching 
awesome talent recruited by UCLA 
..every year. 

From the seats of the Rose Bawl 
and Pauley Pavilion, history is made 
right in front of your eyes. If you're 
lucky enough, you'll even see J ohn 



Wooden at the home basketball 
games. '' 

The UCLA tradition of excel- 
lence is repeated year after yeac^ 
With five more championships 
accrued this year alone, UCLA 
padded its lead among colleges for 
most NCAA titles won. Even those 
who swear they aren't Bruin fans are 
roped into watching UCLA duke it 
out during March Madness. ^ 

Whether it's women's rugby or 
ultimate Frisbee, UCLA offers an 
athletic venture for your liking. 

Don't be intimidated by the size 
of the school. There's something 
here for everyone. - 

Still want to be a Bruin? Step two: 
pursue your interest and get 
involved. 

Teller is an assistant sports editor for 
the 2000-01 year who would love 
feedback if you feel so inclined. Write 
to her at cteller@media.ucla.edu. 



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40 Orientation issue 2000 



Daily Bniin Sports 



SUMMER ATHLETICS EVENTS AT UCLA 



Magic Johnson All-Star Charity 
Basketball Game 

WHEN: Aug. 6, 6 p.m. 

WHERE: Pauley Pavilion 

WHAT: The game will include 
current and former NBA stars 
Magic Johnson, Gary Payton, 
Cedric Ceballos. Shawn Kemp, 
Shareef Abdur-Rahim, Baron 
Davis, Vin Baker; Tracy McGrady 
and more. A slam-dunk contest 
wilVprecede the game. 

The event - part of the 
"Midsummer Night's Magic 
- W ee k e n d^ that includes a benefit 
concert at the Los Angeles Tennis 
Center and a Mardi Gras at 
Paramount Studios - is an annual 
fund-raiser hosted by the Magic 
Johnson Foundation, a non-profit 
organization aimed at helping 
those living in the inner city. 

The festivities will benefit the 
Magic Johnson Foundation 
Taylor Michaels Scholarship 
Fund. 

Tickets go on sale June 19. 
Those wishing to buy tickets 
should contact Ticketmaster or the 
Magic Johnson Foundation at 
(310) 338-8110. Prices range from 
$10 to $100. 



Mercedes-Benz Cup 

WWEN: July 24-30 7 
WHERE: L.A. Tennis Center 
WHAT: Among those making 
an appearance at the tournament 
will be two-time Los Angeles win- 
ner and former Wimbledon cham- 
pion Richard Krajicek; reigning 
U.S. and Australian Open champi- 
on Andre Agassi; 2000 ATP Tour 
Champions Race No. 1 Gustavo 
Kuerten; former L.A. winner 
Michael Chang; and Marcelo 
Rios, the first South American 
ranked No. 1 by the APT TouL. 



The event features a 32-player 
singles tournament and a 16-team 
doubles competition. 

Previous winners of the 
Mercedes-Benz Cup include 
Krajicek. Chang. Agassi, Pete 
Sampras, Jim Courier. John 
McEnroe, Jimmy Connors and 
Arthur Ashe. - 

The event will benefit the 
Southern California Tennis 
Association, which runs leagues, 
and programs for 300,000 juniors 
and 50.000 adults and seniors. 

For ticket information, call (310) 
824-1010, ext. 251, or (877) 
LaTENNIS. 




Bruins celebrate Lakers' 
victory witli m erriment 
mavhem in Wsstwoodr 



BASKETBALL Local police placed on 
tactical alert as team's fans wander 
streets, throw items at passing cars 



JESSE PORTER/Daily Brum Senior Staff 



Fans watch Kobe Bryant outside of Staples Center after 
the Lakers' NBA championship victory on )tjrW 1 9th. 



ByMoinSalahuddin 

Daily Bruin Staff . I ,, = i*., ; 

It took a long 12 years for Los Angeles to bring a 
major professional sports title back to the City of 
Angels. 

But it took seemingly only 12 milliseconds for the 
fans of the Los Angeles Lakers, including many UCLA 
students, to erupt in a fervor that hadn't been seen in 
Southern California for a long time. 

As the Lakers grabbed the lead late in the fourth 
quarter on June 19th against the Indiana Pacers in 
game six of the NBA Finals at the Staples Center, near- 
ly 20,000 fans standing just outside the arena and mil- 
lions of others citywide held their breath before break- 
ing out into celebration. 

"Three ... two ... one. The Lakers are the World 
Champions!" exclaimed Lakers broadcaster Chick 
Hearn as the Lakers prevailed, 1 16-1 11. 

As superstars Shaquille O'Neal and Kobe Bryant 
toasted their dramatic victory with champagne inside 



Oiiiy Bniin Sports 



Orimtation Issue 2000 41 



See LAKERS, page 42 



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CHAMPIONSHIP 

From page 37 

ing intercollegiate sports. The UCLA 
Softball squad Hnished second this 

=^year after losing to Oklahoma in the 
title game, while women's outdoor 
track and men's soccer both placed 
third. 

After an impressive run in the post- 
season, the Bruin women's volleyball 
team fmished fifth in the country 
along with both men's and women's 
tennis. UCLA flnished eighth in the 
country ,, in women's swimming, 
women's soccer and baseball held top 
10 national Tmishes at the end of their 
respective seasons. The men's basket- 

-bali team tied for ninth nationally after 
an amazing NCAA Tournament run 
that saw the Brains reach the Sweet 16 
for the third time in four years. 

For those keeping count, that's 14 
intercollegiate squads in the top 10. 
Only the likes of Stanford, a fellow 
constant in the Sears' Cup top three, 
can boast of similar success. -» 

With 103 total national champi- 
onships to the Bruins'^oigdit, UCLA 
has claimed at least one NCAA title in 
19 of the last 20 years and at least two 

-collegiate titles 23 times. 

On the men's side, UCLA trails 
only Southern Cal 70-65 while the 
women trail Stanford (25), Texas (20), 
LSU (20) and North Carolina (20). In 



the last 31 years, the Bruins have won a sign saying "Buckeyes will take the 

50 NCAA titles, nine more than Bririns in Hnals." After the Bruins 

Stanford and 28 more than third-place won, they returned to the restaurant 

use. With arguably the toughest con- with their trophy and took pictures 

ference to contend with, as evidenced with the waitresses in front of the sign, 

by the success of conference foes, the The manager was like, 'Oh, we 

Bruins are always prepared for and knew you guys were going to win all 

have high expectations of postseason along,'" Burnham said, 

success. In men's water polo, the Bruins 

With the university's national title claimed the title for the sixth time in 

success of last year; no one team has the team's history and the third time in 

consistently dominated their sport the last five years. UCLA has fmished 



other than 

UCLA men's 
volleyball. 
Boasting the pre- 
mier head coach 
in the collegiate 
ranks, Al Scates, 
the Bruins have — 
reached the title 
game in seven of 
the last eight ... 
years. With fouF - 
championships 
in the '90s, the 
program's 18 
titles is a single 

sport record. With the numerous All- 
Americans and Olympians, UCLA 
has now reached the Final Four a 
record 22 times in 31 years. 



Not only do the Bruins 

claim the team title in a 

variety of sports, but 



they also hold balance 

in the remaining 
intercollegiate sports. 



runner-up five 
times With co- 
head coach 
Adam Krikorian 
alongside head 
coach Baker, the 
men hope to con- 
tinue the winning 
streak that has 
seen the Bruins 
take a top five 
finish in 17 of the 
last 26 years. 

"All national 
championships 
are special," 



Baker said after the team won their 
1999 crown. "But the journey with this 
group was fantastic." 

In women's track and field, head 
Seth Burnham of the men's volley- coach Jeannette Bolden's third place 
ball team recalled the team's latest trip outdoor finish was built on the foun- 
to the NCAA. On their way to the title dation of the 1999-2000 NCAA 
match against Ohio State, the team Championship indoor track' team, 
passed a local restaurant which posted Behind the remarkable performances 



of thrower Seilala Sua, the most out- 
standing performer at both the indoor 
and outdoor NCAA Championships, 
the Bruins will continue the outstand- 
ing tradition of world-class Olytnpic, 
athletes from Westwood. 

"I've never been on a team that 
won a national championship," said 
Sua, a graduating senior. "I just want- 
ed to win and contribute to the team. 
Our team was looking for a lot of 
points, and I just wanted to give them 
those points." 

Finally, in women gymnastics, 
Valorie Kondos-Field's program won 
its second national title in four years. 
Five Bruins claimed All-American 
honors, including the Pac-10. 
Conference Gymnast of the Year 
Heidi Moneymaker, a 2000 NCAA™ 
individual champion. Gymnastics has 
won the last 14 conference champi- 
onships and seven of the last eight 
regional champions. 

"I'm ecstatic," junior Mohini 
Bhardwaj, the 2000 individual bars 
champion, said of UCLA's second 
national title. "All of my dreams have 
come true. If this is all I could have 
from my college gymnastics experi- 
ence, I'll take it " . * 

With star recruits from all over the 
country ready to supplement the 
already amazing success that UCLA 
has had athletically, the Bruins expect 
more of the same in the new 
millennium. 



DIARY 

From page 37 .. •• 

- and athletic aspeets^of^oUege^L_ 
also liked the dorms very much. 
Many of the colleges I had visit- 
ed only had one kind of dorm 
but UCLA offered many diffef-" 
ent types that could accommo- 
date anybody's personal needs. I 
also liked the student union 

.because ev^crything that you 
could possibly need is there. 

I have always liked L.A. 
because it is so diverse and you 
get to set so many different _^ 
things. There is always some- 
thing to do so you are never 

1>ofed. Althpugh L.A. is a littHr"" 
crowded I figure I would just :- 
have to get used to it. 

Everybody has different opin- 
ions on what they want most in 
a college but I know that UCLA 
was the best choice for me. I'm 
not saying that not going to 
UCLA is a bad thing, but for me 
there wasn't any reason why I 
shouldn't go to UCLA. 

Sua is an incoming freshman and 
a Softball recruit who pitches and 
plays first base. She is considered 
the No. 1 prospect in the South 
and is also probably the top 
utility player in the nation. 



Sla\ infornioci 



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Daily Bniin Sports 



LAKERS 

From page 40 

the lockeroom. bonfires erupted just 50 
feet from the walls of Staples Center. 

A peaceful celebration once charac- 
terized by the sound of honking horns 
soon turned into a lawless mess epito- 
mized by the sirens of police and fire- 
fighters. 

And while the streets surrounding 
the Staples Center grew more frisjuieas 
the excitement of winning grew; the 
bars, restaurants, apartments and dor- 
mitories of Westwood also felt much of 
that same fervor. ^ J^'^ --crst: . 

Screams of joy could be heard 
throughout campus as students, having 
jusl finished final exams, became even 
more relieved as their men in purple 
and gold won. 

"I love L.A.!" yelled the large Bruin 



crowd as they emptied out of the 
Westwood bars and restaurants and 
into the streets just seconds after the 
Lakers' win. 

An estimated 200 revelers roamed 
^he streets of Westwood late into the 
night, tossing garbage cans and bottles 
out into the street, nearly hitting sever- 
al vehicles. Many students taunted 
police, who were placed on a tactical 
alert as a melee broke out on Gayley 
Avenue. The activity, however, paled in 
comparison to that of downtown Los 
Angeles. 

But the focus of the night was cele- 
bration and UCLA students were a 
large part of that. With the likes of 
Magic Jo*hnson showing up on campus 
regularly throughout the year and 
Bryant enrolled in UCLA Italian class- 
es, many Bruins typically sway their 
affection toward the "Showtime" 
Lakers - both of the 1980s and of the 



present. <■'■.■■■■ -'> 

"Even though (Pacer guard) Reggie 
Miller is from UCLA, I still love my 
Lakers!" said junior Rebecca Jones. 



The overwhelming ~~ 
sentiment of UCLA and 
the city of Los Angeles, 

favored the Lakers. 



Not since 1995, when UCLA defeat- 
ed Arkansas in men's basketball for the 
NCAA Championship, had Westwood 
seen the crazy fanfare that occurred 
just moments after the Lakers won , 
their seventh NBA title. 

"It was unbelievable," graduate 



Stephanie Leonard said of the celebra- 
tion back in 1995. "This (party) isn't 
even dose to back then." 

But despite the jubilation of many, 
there were a few Bruins who weren't 
happy with the outcome - mainly 
Pacers fans. '■'..]:.., ■. ' '- . ' 

"The Pacers should have won," said 
senior Jake Cooper, an Indiana fan for 
over 10 years, "it's all part of a conspir- 
acy.'* 

Still, the overwhelming sentiment of 
UCLA and the city of Los Angeles, 
favored the Lakers. 
^ "I knew the Lakers were going to 
win the titled" Leonard said. "It was just 
a question of when." 

Others merely worried about how 
nniuch to celebrate the NBA W orld 
Championship. 

"I've been partying all week long," 
graduate Danny Ben-Moshe said. 

.While it seemed as though the 



Lakers were going to capture the title 
entering the playoffs, the squad was 
pushed to the limit by the Sacramento 
Kings and the Portland Trailblazers. In 
the decisive game seven against the 
Blazers, the Lakers overcame a 15- 
point fourth quarter deficit to make it 
to the NBA Finals. 

"The Lakers are incrediljle," Ben- 
Moshe said. "I wish our school could 
Create such excitement." 

While UCLA garnered five national 
titles last year, it seems the Bruins need 
to win a football or basketball title to 
have another excuse to party in the 
strcc. ^rWestwood. * 

But that shouldn't be a problem, 
according to current Bruin Jesse 
Smith. 

'TBonlOiink we'll have to worry 
about stuff to celebrate. With Kobe an^i 
Shaq, the Lakers will keep on winning 
and we'll keep on cheering." 




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D«iy8niin Sports 



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announcements 

1100-2600 



1100 

Campus Happenings 



JANE AUSTEN 

MOZART-BEETHOVEN 
SOMEWHERE IN TIME 

Annual Southern California Autumn Histori- 
cal CosturT>e Ball, Saturday, October 21 
7:30-midnight. Learn simple/elegant ball- 
room dances of the early 19thcentury. Less- 
ons 10am/2pm, Tea Time ©4pm. Costumes 
welcome/not necessary. Dinner included. 
213-384-6622. Details at www.regency- 
friends.org. Garpooling available, call BDC 
310-284-3636 12th Annual Victorian Grand 
Costume Ball November 25th. Contact 
laha@pacbell net Ragtime Costume 
Bain 0/1 4 Sherlock Holmes Bain 1/4 



1100 

Campus Happenings 



PERFORMING 
DANCE GROUP 

Meet at UCLA Ackerman Union room 2414. 
Mondays 6:15-6:55pm. Starting October 2. 
Demonstrate fun dances ©campus cultural 
events and future performing opportunities 
include darice festivals in Brazil (December). 
Mexico (March). New York (April), and Israel 
(July). Call 310-284-3636 or email university- 
danceclubs@usa.net. 

SUMMER LESSONS 

MONDAYS 6/26-8/28 

SWING/SALSA/TANGO 

BALLROOM DANCE CLUB AT UCLA. MON- 
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FAMOUS PARTNER/LINE DANCES 9PM. 
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2200 

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Alcoholics Anonymous 

Mon. Discussion, Fri. Slip Siudy, 3501 Adunnan 

Ihurs. Boole Siu^, 3508 Adnrmon 

M/T/Wibn.DOTtalA3-029 

Wad. Ibn. A3- 029 

Discussion, Al limM 1 2: 10 - 1 KM pm 

Forakohollc* or IndMdmIt mho hmm a *ttUngprobhm. 



niis paoi^ir tt^cyclii Uttr, paper »t?v;ycb U>i'> 







1100 

Cc'impiis Happenings 



13*k Annaal 
hallrooin@ucla.edu NEW STUDENT WELCOME hallroom@ucla.edu 
(FW ESHMEN-Jr. TltAN»y«»-OltADUAT»-tAW-«U«NKW-M«DiCAL «TUP«M T») 



Monday Oct. IB*" SWING/SALSA Lcasona 8 p.m 



followed by tho bo«t social ovont of tho yoar 
OUCU» Acfcorman Orand ■allfoowi (1" 1000 >tii<iif will Ho aamWted) 



LEARN FUN DANCES from AROUND the WORLD 
INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCE CLUB 



Mondaya 9 p.m. 10/2-12/4 CUBAN SALSA Lessons 10 p.m 



UniversityDanceClubs(a)usa.net CELEBRATING 55 TEARS 

20^** Romantic Danc« Lesson Scries o ucla Ackernan union rooa 2414 



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Join the Most Popular Club on Campus 

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WHERE GREAT ROMANCES BEGIN 



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DANCE LESSONS Mondays 7 & 10 p.m. w«*k« i-io 
e>UCLA Ackerman Union 2"^ Floor Lounga room 24i4 

baIlroom@uclaoed u (3i0) 284*3636 

'^^ Romantic Dance Lesson Series octa4>oc. 4 

STUDENTS-STAFF-FACULTY-ALUMNI 



E-mail for oddltieiial moMbor boncfits A i|iplicatiaii 



2200 

Research Subjects 



FREE 
DIABETES SCREENING 

Genetic study of Diat}etes recruits 

healthy volunteers (1 8-40 years old) for 

free diat>etes screening with standard 

oral glucose tolerance test (2.5 hours). 

Qualified subjects (who pass the oral 

glucose tolerarKe test and have nonmal 

blood pressure) wHI be invited to 

participate in a genetic study of 

diabetes. Sut>iects win be paid $1 50 

for participation. 

IMaik, caN Or.Cliiu (S10)-206-9664. 



2300 

Sperni / Egcj Donors 



EGG DONORS 
NEEDED 

If you are a woman between the ages 

of 21 and 35, the many eggs your 
body disposes of each montn can be 
useo by an infertile woman to have a 
baby Help an infertile couple realize 
their dreams, enter the gene pool and 
help advance knowledge of Hiunan 

Reproduction! Firiandal 

compensation, of course. Completely 

confidential. For more information, 

please call USC Reproductive 

Endocrinology at (213) 975-9990. 



2300 

Sperm/Efjg Donors 



EGG Donors Needed 

Healthy females ages 1 9-28 
wishing to help infertile couples. 
Generous Compensation 
^ CALL MIRNA (818) 832-1494 ^ 



3UOO 

Coniputers/Softw.-ire 



MAC POWER BOOK 190cs. Mint Condition. 
Fully loaded with MS Office, Word, Excel, 
PowerPoint. Only $395. Call (310) 451-1077 



4900 

Autos for Sale 



1994 ACURA INTEGRA. 60K miles, sporty, 
alpine system, mint condition, $6300. Sal- 
vage. Dario 310-478-8802. 

POLICE IMPOUNDS! Cars as low as $500 
for listings 1-800-319-3323 ext.A214. 



advertise 

825-2161 •825-2221 



2200 

Research Subjects 



summerbruin 



2200 

Research Subjects 



Qlr^ 



OiliyBniinClMsified 



OriefititioiibsueZOOO 45 



Caiiipiis R 



1300 



1300 

Campus Recriiilment 



1300 

Campus Recruiltnj.nl 



1300 

Campus Recruitmertl 




Are you an - - 

adult 



with ADHD 




"""^'^■■""mmitmiii'^i.. 



The UCLA ADHD Research Group is currently looking for adults aged 
18-55 to participate in a medication treatment study. If you have 
persistent problems with; 



INATTENTION 
HYPERAOIVITY 
IMPULSE CONTROL 



This research study requires weekly visits to UCLA for 6 wa'ks where you 
will receive either the study medication or placebo. Participants will 
receive free medication for 8 weeks following completion of the initial 6 
weeks and a free ADHD evaluation. 



For more information, call (310) 825-6587 



FOR HEALTHY 



Dr. Padma-Nathan's Office in Beverly Hills Is 
looking for healthy women to participate in a 
sexual health stuciy. This research study evaluates 
a new oral investigational drug for female sexual 
disorder. ^ ,. ^ 



Financial compensation is proved - up 
to $400.00 for patients who complete 
the 4 visits. 



-^»#;,"- 



If you're 18-49 years old without sexual problems, 
in good general health and not taking birth control 
pills or shots, we may need your help. 



For more information, please contact us 
^today. Enrollment is United! — — — — — 



.;-— --Mfr- 



If you qualify and enroll, you'll receive all study-> 
related care at no charge, Including doctor visits, 
laboratory services and in office use of the study 
medication. * 



JIarin Padma-Nathan, M .D. 

; 9100 WilshireBlvd, Suite 360 
i^ Beverly Hills, C A 90212 



1 1310) 858-4455 

Make the Call that Could Make a Difference® 



2200 

Research Subjects 



2200 

Research Subjects 



2200 

Research Subjects 



2200 

Research Subjects 



Is Your Child or Teenager _^ 

Suffering From Depression? 



Sad, tearful, irritable 
Diminished pleasure ^ 
in almost all activities 
Feelings of worthlessness 
Poor ability to concentrate 




— There is a clinical trial available for you child or teenager. Eligible 
patients 7 to 17 years of age will have routine physical evaluations and 
study medications-all provided at no cost. Financial compensation for 

those who qualify. 

For more Information, please call: 310-794-1600 
at the UCLA Medical Plaza 



57 oo 

Tfiivfl fickf.'ts 



BE FLEXIBLE...SAVE$$$ 



tvHopt- S249 (o/w > r.ix.,s) 

CHEAP FARES WORLDWIDE 

HAWAII $129 (o/w) 

Call. (3 10) 574 0090 

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AQUA TRAVEL INC 



WORLD WIDE LOWEST AIRFARES 
M^ YOUR OA/N /«^ CMl HOra 
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International Airfares :- 
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Hotel Accommodation^--' 
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AvatabMy may b« Imtted and Kxn* ti>rt c Won « may 

apply PKjircniM 

PHONE (310)441^680 

10650 mstmSiMB 434, WeshnodCfi 90024 




6000 

Insurance 



/iiistate 

IKmAw in good hands. 

Mike Azer Insurance Agency. Inc. 
(310)312-0202 

1281 WestNA/ood Blvd. 

C2 talks So. of >A/lisriire) 

24 Hours g Doy Service 



6200 

Health Services 



Jack H. Silvers, MD 

"Hm hatnt fonfottmn what If 9 
IHtm to bm m atuditf 

•Acne«Mole Renx)val*Warts«Rashes» 

•Laser Hair and Tattoo Rerrioval* 

•Lip Augmentation* 

•Laser Ablation of Red and Brown Spots • 

(310) 826-2051 

www,DiSlhfBn.Gom 



5680 

Travel n«?slm;jnoiis 



I SIS \€';i;is 

2 Night Packages 



MGM, Luxor, Excallbur & mom! 
from $199.00! 

»R/T non-stop air •2 nights hotel 
•Airport Transfers •Dining/show coupons 
•Sightseeing Tour •Coupons over $100! 

'Group discounts on four or nnore! 

p«r person, dbl occ, rMtriction* appty 

TRAVEL CONNECnOIX 

800-344-3977 



SUMMER 

TENTH WEEK 




ifCU 

FoonuuiPRBnew 




ON THE 



WE'RE 
ALWAYS 

CUTTING 

f 




6000 

insurance; 



6000 

liisnr.iiu.e 




Mercury Broker in W^twood. No Brokers Fees. Also other 
markets. Low Rates. Foreign Students and New Drivers OK. 
(31 0) 208-3548 1081 Westwood Blvd. Suite 221 



ThB Dally Bruin Ad Production Department 
— - -^-^ ' needs Paste-up Artists. v^-— ^ - 

If you are hardworking, detail-oriented, thrives on (Aatfllnes, 
can Juggle multiple tasks and know Macintosh programs - _ 



Cl.issifietls 



WE NEED YOU! 



Apply at 
ASUCLA HuiTian Resources. 2nd Floor, Kerckhoff Hall 



Display 
206-3060 



X 



-t- 



♦ « 



46 Oripntation Issue 2000 



Daily Bruin Classified 






•~(s 






7, 



Special Egg Dohor IVeeded 






Preferred Donor will meet the following criteria: 



' I ' l i 11 Ih l ]1 ' i'rt • iiU lI 1 1 II Vn >H|' • i l l i l l' • 



•Height Approximately 5'6" or TaUer •Caucasian •S.A.X 

Score around 1300 or High A.C.T. •CoUege Student or 

X^faduate Student Under 30 ♦No Genetic Medical Issues^ 




Compeiisatioii 




Paid to you and/or the charity of your 

choice. All related expenses will be paid 

in addition to your compensation. 

(Extra compensation available for someone who might be 
especially gifted in athletics, science/mathematics or music.) 



!»• 



< m 



For more information or to obtain an 
application please contact Michelle at the 

law OfiBce of Greg L. Eriksen 

(800) 808-5838 
or email EggDonorInfo@aol.cdm. 






■i » I Hill i ml II* I >ir m Am 



wt ^' ^m^' i imt^hi'mffimmttim^itm' Ui nt »■■■ ¥ * 



', '-■^r- 



*This ad is being placed for a particular client and is not soliciting eggs for a donor Imnk, 



\ 



Daily Bruin Classified 



-I — " • . . — •- 



Orientation Issue 2000 47 



'ijiQtMn'r'^-- '^•- - . " 



6200 

Health Services 



6200 

Health Services 



6200 

Health Services 



6700 

Professional Services 



67 OO 

Professional Service's 



DENTAL HEALTH CARE 

(Offic* or S. Sotoimanl, DOS) 

* > p C reate Oeauliful Smiles! 

• All Phases of Dentistry * 

• 24 Hour Emergency Service 

• Medi-Cal & AAost Insurance Plans Accepted 

'All Students & Faculty Members are walcome* 
First time introductory offer with this coupon 

Tel: (310) 475-5598 / Fax: (310) 475-^970 
Online: www.onvillage.eom/@/dentalhcalth 

1620 WeslwcKxl Blvd , West Los Angeles, Betwei^'n \^m flRP MB 
Wilshire tt Santa Monica (fret Parking in Rear) I^BI ■■■■ WW 



patient: Tcra Bonilla 
Coupon Expires 8/M/OO 




Angel visa center" 

310-478-2899 Fax: 310-477-6833 



• Full oral eumination • Or«l Cancrr Screening 

• Necessary X-Rays • Penodnntal Rxamirution 

• Cleaning A Polishing • X-Rays arc non-lransferrablc 



6300 

Legal Advice/Attorneys 



IMMIGRATION 



I Initial G>n»witati 
e WORK PERMITS e VISAS 
e GREEN CARDS e LABOR CERT, 
e IMMQRATION PROBLEMS 

^Attorney JENNIFER S. LIM 

1 23 S. Figueroa. Suite 220 Los Angeles. CA 90012 

Westside 310-837-8882 
Downtown 213-680-9332 



6^00 

Movers/Slornfje 



JERRY'S MOVING&DELIVERY. The careful 
movers Experienced, reliable, same-day de- 
livery. Packing, boxes available. Also, pick- 
up donations for American Cancer Society. 
Jerry 0310-391 -5657. 



6500 

Music Lessons 



DRUM LESSONS 

ALL LEVELS/STYLES with dedicated pro- 
fessional. At your home or WLA studio. 1st- 
lesson free. No drum set necessary. 
Ne« 323-654-8226 



IMMIGRATION 
Green Cards, Work 
Permits, Change of 
Status, Citizenship, 
Visa Extensions, 
Company Start- 
ups, and more... 




^ssmed^m^^ 



5680 

Travel Destinations 



Personal Statements, Papers, Theses, 

Dissertations, Books, & Proposals 

Comprehensive help by PhD From DC 

International Students Welcome 

(923) 665-8145 



5680 

Travel Destinations 



5700 

Travel Tickets 



5700 

Travel Tickets 





•Roundtrip Airfare 

Pkjs Tax. Inti Student ID required 

Restrictions apply. Call NOW!. 



Europe Bus-pass 

1 5 day pass to travel 
throughout 
Europe! 




II0-108-I55 



1 Westwood Blvd. in Westwood Village 

Travel 



Council 



www.counciltravel.com 



SOUTH AMERICA 

PACKAGES & CRUISES 

INCA TRAIL 5D/4N $490 

MACHU PICCHU 3D/2N from $365 

JUNGLE LODGES 3D/2N from $300 

AMAZON CRUISE 4D/3N from $595 

GALAPAGOS CRUISE 4D/3N from $7631 

R/T AIR FARES FROM 

BUENOS AIRES $430 CUZCO $566 

GUAYAQUIL/QUITO $620 LIMA $400 

SANTIAGO $499 SAO PAULO/RIO $619 

WNAAw.pro-travel . com 
PROFESSIONAL TRAVEL StERViCE 

South America Specialfsts 

> 

csmoiroaa-ia- 



) 



BRIGHT LIGHTS. 
BIG CITY 



And no dorm food. 



$99. 



The College Trip to Jewish New York for just 

Clft more out ol your summer vacation than a gmxJ tan Spend ten 

days louringjewish New Yi>rk with slops ai Olhs Island, the Statue 

of Liberty. Broadway and so muih more You'H bond with "^O other 

Jewish students and share experiences to last a lileiime So, you'll 

not only sec the sights and sounds ol the Big Apple, you'll gel closer V^ 

{o the core of your spirituality And all for less than 100 bucks *'^* 

Now, how's that lor a vacation? Call JAM today to lind out more September 111-19 



For more details please call JAM at 323.930.2034 or e-mail us at jamC^^^ucla.edu 



C^oMo 



J*N>.h Aocranatl Ma^arrani 



% 



uiaSSiiicuS 

825-2221 



Reasonable Rates 

Attorney Representation. 

Call For a 

t-ree Consultation. 



Total Confidentiality Guaranteed. 
Privately Owned and Operated. 

Member of the 
Better Business Bureau 




EXTENDED or DAHY 2 pr $59 *3Qh 

DISPOSABLES ^Mo/4B«es'69 

CHAIlGE BROWN EYES_.aT 79pr 

Hazsl, Grvon, BkM • 

CHANGE UGHT EYES b&l.^ ... J49rt 

BkM, Gre«n, Aqua 

BIFOCAL/MONOVISION add I "50 

ASTIGMATISM EXT *89r» 



EYE EXAM $1 5 



(310)360-9513 
UMGBEAOt 



LOSMGBfS/ 1(D8S.RotartMnMwd.,«1 

BwBrty Hills Ad) Vlfed3-5Fri11-1 

t»(2W.URnUA«e.,«6 

Wed 11-1. Fri 3-5 

4130 AlMleAvaL. #106 

TtHirs3-5.Sat2-4(ini 



B 



112Z7«*y ■«<.»» 

Thurs11-1|Mn.Sani:30-lpni 



Mo AQpoMmonl MooMnrWJuit WWk-fei 

VAUGHN E. DOBALlAIIL MJD 



HREL t:.iri' Kit va./J' 



A Guide to the Perplexed 

universitysecrets.com f 



httpZ/univer sitvsecretsco 



m 



BEAR'S RESEARCH, 
WRITING & EDITING 

Oomprahantive Oisawtation AacMano* 
Thases. Papers, af>d Parsonal Statamanta 

Proposals and Books 

imarrwtional Sludants Walcome. Since 1985 

SlMTon Bear, Ptt.0. (310) 470-MC2 



6700 

Profession.'d Son/icos 



A FREE SESSION 

PSYCHOTHERAPY/COUNSELING tor de- 
pression, anxiety, obsessions, post-traumat- 
ic stress,etc. Couples/Individuals. Crime vic- 
tims may t>e eligitile for free treatment. Call 
Liz Gould(MFC#32388)e310-578-5957 to 
sctiedule free consultation. 

MEDICAL SCHOOL 

PERSONAL STATEMENTS/APPLICA- 
TIONS. Expertise to present your t»est. Edit- 
ing. Dissertation formatting and finalizing. 
Personalized, professional assistance. Ace 
Words, etc. 310-820-6830 



7000 

Tiitorin(j Offered 



SUMMER TUTOR 

EXPERIENCED AND PERSONABLE TU- 
TOR tttat wiH get results. Catch up or get 
ahead tNs summer. Seven-years experi- 
ence. SAT/algebra/French/E3L/English/hte- 
tory. Call Will 310-701-8969. 

WRITING TUTOR 

KIND AND PATIENT Stanford graduate. 
Help with the English language— for stud- 
ents ol all ages/levels. 310-440-3118 



7100 

Tiilorint) Wnnted 



SAT TUTORS 

WANTED 

Need energetic people with 
high SAT scores to tutor, 
especially in W.L.A.. San 

Femando Valley. Pasadena, 
Palos Verdes. 

$l5-$20/hrRexible hours. 
Car needed. Call Joe 

(310) 4481744 



ni^nl^^u 



206-3060 






48 Orientation Issue 2000 



Daily Bruin Classified 



'♦. 






r 



u 



7100 

Tutoriruj Wanted 



EDUCATIONAL/STUDY 
SKILLS TUTOR 



Seeking bright, responsible 

individual with B.A./M.A. and/or 

experience in psychology or 

education. Work with children: 

learn difficulties, school anxiety, 

poor organization/study skills,' 

etc. Strong high school 

academic tutoring skills required. 

Call busy tutoring agency in 

Pacific Palisades^ 

(310)459-4125. 



7700 

Child Caro Wauled 



•ENERGETIC 

BABYSITTER 

NEEDED* 

Looking for responsible/caring/energetic 
person to serve as babysitter in after- 
noons M-F. Enormously bright/intelligent 
4-year-old who loves to play/have fun. 
Located in BelAir/Roscomare Valley. 
Call:3 1 0-889-01 1 9 . ■ - ■ ■ ■ ■ . — 



m 



7200 

Typing 



APPLICATIONS/ 
RESUMES 

Create, develop, or refine. Editing, word pro- 
cessing, application typing, dissertation for- 
matting, transcribing. Ace word s, etc . 310- 
820-8830. 



WORD PROCESSING specializing in thes- 
es, dissertations, transcription, resumes, fli- 
ers, brochures, mailing lists, reports. Santa 
iWlonica, 310-828-6939. Hollywood. 323-466- 
2888 



rsT 



BABYSITTER 

San Fernando Wiley $10/hour. 20hrs/week. 
Starting after 3pm. Person needs to have 
flexible hours. Starts 7/31. 818-905-1215. 

BABYSITTER WANTED 

Regular Friday/Saturday night, 2 kids. 
$10/hour References required. Suzy:452- 
2227. 

BABYSITTER/ 
DRIVER 

For two boys 8&12 3 afternoons 3-6 plus 
possible additional time. Mutholtand/Beverly 
Glen. Own car w/good driving record. Refer- 
ences:3l 0-470-2047. 

CHILDCARE WANTED for 6mo/okl picked 
up from daycare to babysit in your home 
from 5pm-8pm on MTW. Prefer UCLA Staff 
or Student with child care experience. Refer- 
ences/driving record required. 818-379-9598 



employment 

7400-8300 



7400 

Business Opportunities 



^ 

¥ 



♦ 



IK] 



recycle. 



7^00 

Business Opportunities 



Don't call your parents 
for extra cash. 

Call us. 



if you're male, in college or 
have a college degree, and 
would like a flexible job 
where you can earn up to 
$600 per month, call for 
details on our anonymous 
sperm donor program. 
You'll receive free 
comprehensive health 
screening . Plus you can 
help infertile couples 
realize their dream of 
becoming parents. So if 
you're looking for a great 
job and little extra cash, 
call us first. 




310-824-9941 

or e-mail us at 
donors@ccb.com 



WORK FROM HOME 

New internet company seeking motivated 
people Great support. 661-263-8903 



7500 

Career Opportunities 



BARTENDERS 




• Earn $iao-$200 a day 

• 2 week training ft Job 

Placefnent included 

• It's not a )ot> -It's a PARTY'!* 

National Bartenders School 



1 (800) 64ft - MIXX (fia«lQ) 



TEACHER ASSTNTS 

PRIVATE WLA School looking for capable 
and experienced teacher assistants to work 
with elementary level students, M-F, 8AM- 
1PM Begin September Please fax re- 
sume 310-471-1532 



7800 

Help Wanted 



*MOVIE EXTRA 
WORK* 

Beats all jobs. Start immediately. Great pay 
Fun/Easy No crazy fees Program for free 
medical Call-24/hrs 323-850-4417. 

ACTUARIAL ASSISTANT: PT-FT in account- 
ing-type office. Includes phones and general 
office duties. Must have computer ,ind basic 
math skills. $10/hr, Fax: 818-508-2(X)1. 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT for interna- 
tional business office in BevHills: Must know 
MS Office. Call 310-278-9338. E-mail 
resume aribussel© hotmail.com or fax 310- 
278-0038 

ASSISTANT NEEDED 

Assistant to psychologist/best-selling author 
Speed typist, filing, errands, car and insur- 
ance Call Dr Kassoria 310-205-0226. 



7800 

Help Wnntod 



MATH IVfAnF FA.SY1 



All Ages • All Levels 

Incredible Prices! 

CALL NOW! (310)500-8233 

(Please mention this ad wlien you call) 

*Art Classes Also A vailable 



BATIA & ALEEZA 



Are looking for a receptkxiisl P/T . Tueis-Sat 
in a beautiful salon in Beverly Hills. 310-657- 
4512. fax 310-777-2494. 

BEVERLY HILLS AUTO DETAIL shop needs 
hard-working, fast-paced, agressive people 
to handle top-notch cars. No experience re- 
quired. Flexible hours. Ozzie:3l 0-859-2870. 



M A N A G t R 



Receptionist/OfTice Manager wanted part time 
or full time for a busy dental office in West 
LA. Must know typing and Microsoft Word. 
Excellent salary and benefits. 

Please call (310) 826-7494 
or fax resume to (310) 826-9564 



Cantenese Speaking Babysiter is needed in 
Westwood. 8-5:30 $200/wk. (310) 470-7594 

BEVERLY HILLS 

INTERNATIONAL health/nutrition company 
in 10 countries seeks outgoing individuals for 
part time/full time Training available. 310- 
552-3244. 

COACHES NEEDED 

MIDDLE SCHOOL&HIGH SCHOOL. 2000- 
2001 school year. Girls Soccer Boys: Varsity 
Football. JV Football. Varsity and JV 
Lacrosse. Paid positions. 310-391-7127. 
Call Nate ext. 247 

DRIVING MISS DAISY. My recently widowed 
86yr-okJ mother shouldn't be driving your 
stress. Need patient, good driver. Flexible 
hours. 1 or 2 days/wk. Her car or yours. 
Claudette Shaw:949-721-8484. 



Looking for Business Education 
Major who wants to pick up extra 

money with new company. Big. 
opportunity for the right person. 
Excellent computer skills needed. 
Contact Roberta at 310-289-3312 



EVENING 
SUPERVISOR 

OF INTERVIEWING. The Gallup Organiza- 
tion— Irvine, CA. Email resume to: don_du- 
satkoegallup.com 9 49-474-7900 x.710. 

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT. Variety of Tasks, 
include computer/internet savy and general 
office experience. Also willing to do some 
driving in our car Flexible Hours Please fax 
© 310 474-1687 

FEMALE 
ATTENDANT 

12 hours a week/$lOhour 10 minutes from 
UCLA. Young woman wanted to assist disa- 
bled woman with errands/laundry/misc. 
chores. Must have car Call 310-828-4686. 

FEMALE FIGURE or life drawing nrKXJels 
wanted by photographer Call Peter at 3 10- 
558-4221. 



FITNESS & NUTRITION 
COORDINATOR 

Needed for community-based project in In- 
glewood. Innovative, responsible, profes- 
sional for public relations and project man- 
agement work. 20hrs/week, $5/hr. Spanish a 
plus. Call:31 0-722-8784. 

FRONT DESK HELP 

Pertect P/T position! Short shifts, weekend 
evenings in small exercise studio. Must be 
friendly, outgoing, computer literate. Approx. 
lOhrs/wk. Kim 310-393-6399. 



780U 

Help Wiinl(3(l 



Full time or part time 

backroom/sales job 

offered in small Brentwood 

retail store. 
Contact Diane 310-393-4875 



8200 

Tfinpotaiy EniployiiuMU 



RETAIL CLERKS 

Openings for clothing sales clerks at Mer- 
cedes-Benz LA Open Tennis Tournament 
July 23-Aug. 1st Call Harry O Creative 
Futures for details. 1-800-245-5423. 



FULL TIME SURGERY SCHEDULER with 
strong administrative and organizational 
skills Must have medical front office and sur- 
gery scheduling experience. PC and tele- 
phone skills required. Team player for a busy 
Westside office. Benefits and 401 K. Fax re- 
sume to 310-996-0223 

GIRLS wanted at exclusive social clubs in 
WLA. Conversation only. No atoohol. Flexi- 
ble hours. Eam top $$$. 323-441-0985 

HOUSEKEEPER/HOME-OFFICE ASSIS- 
TANT for busy doctor. Weekends. Laun- 
dry/cleaning, assist w/cooking, etc. No skills 
required. Great pay! Flexible schedule. 
leave message 310826-9811 



Receptionist 



Upbeat & cheerful receptionist 
needed for WLA optometry office. 
Fax res 310.828.3447 



LIBRARY CLERK 

PfT/ffT $l0-12/hr. Reliable, detail-orientated 
person to search library catalogues for docu- 
ment delivery company in Westwood. 
Fax:310-208-5971 Attn:Sal or email salOin- 
fotrieve.com. 

MODELS WANTED EARN $200-$1000 
vwrking for established photographer. Nudity 
required. Must be 18-t-, athletic, outgoing. No 
experience necessary. 323-377-7937. 



Are you a model. 

or twnnt to «j«-t stort«'rt' 



Looking for all types 
^nale/female modeis/acronr 
•Plus size •Children 




For print & non-union commercials 
No experience required. No Ices. 



8/iOO 

Apiirlmenls for R(;nt 



$625 AND UP APART- 



MODELS$$$. Catak>g studio seeks female 
nrKxJels for part-time modelirig and photo- 
test. $150-$350/day NO portfolio required. 
Agency leads and info. 323-464-3172. 

MOTHER'S HELPER 
WANTED 

Must drive, must have references, non- 
smoking, experience required, must speak 
English. Hours and salary flexible. 310-275- 
7813. 

MOTHER'S HELPER 
WANTED 

Must drive, must have references, non- 
smoking, experience required, must speak 
English. Hours and salary flexible. 310-278- 
4433. 

OFFICE ASSISTANT 

On UCLA campus. Bright, motivated, organ- 
ized & friendly Computer/accounting knowl- 
edge. Peachtree, Microsoft Outlook/Office a 
plus. Wori( with families in fast pace clinical 
setting. Responsibilities include scheduling 
appointments, communicating with patients, 
billing, receiving payments, typing corre- 
spondence/nwnuscripts, copying, faxing, tel- 
ecommunicating. 30hrs/week and up. Start- 
ing salary $10 and up, based on experience. 
Send resume to ADHD &CAPI. 100 UCLA 
Medical Plaza. Suite 430. LA.. CA 90095 or 
fax to 310-794-6583 or email adhdca- 
piOearthlink.net. 

PART TIME JOBS AVAILABLE Felteia Ma- 
hood Senior Citizar>s Center needs Activities 
Director. Front Office Clertt, Newsletter Pub- 
lisher/Administrative Clerk. Van Driver, and 
Case Manager. Van Driver needs Class B-P 
license. Others need solid computer skills. 
Gerontology majors encouraged to apply 
$9.4d1/hr starting. CALL 310-479-4119 or 
FAX resume t o 310-231-1060. 

RETAIL-SMALL RUNNING SHOP near 
beach MDR. Must be personable and have 
run or plan to run a marathon $8-9/hour pA- 
fA. 310-827-3035. 

SALES CLERK. $7/hr. Saturdays only No 
experience necessary. Cashiering, wortiing 
with patients. UCLA Hospital. 310-825-6069 

SALESPERSON Needed for Internet 
Service Provider, sell DSL and dial-up ser- 
vices. Make $75-$200/ day Part-time. Call 
Alan at 818-762-3467. 

SECRETARY 

Half-time (mornings) to RN at VA Medical 
Center West LA. $11/hr Some benefits. Fax 
resume to Susan Orrange 310-268-4404. 

STAR SEARCH 2000 

Japanese Graduates— Senior Leadership 
roles. Tokyo. Japan. Email resume: don_du- 
satkoegallup.com or call Don at 949-474- 
790 0x710. ^ 

SUMMER LIBRARY JOB shelving and other 
stacks duties. 12-19hrs/wk. $6.70/hr to start. 
Students only apply at Young Research Li- 
brary Rm11617 or call Antigone Kutay 310- 
825-1084. 



81 OO 

P(MS()iiiil Assistance 



ITALIAN-SP^AKING __^ 
STUDENT 

to accompany/hang out w/1 3-year-old boy. 
Teach Italian in relaxed atmosphere. Beach, 
games, movies, etc. Prepare for trip to Italy 
6hrs/day 4dys/wk. 6/24-7/21. Possible full- 
time in fall. Call:3 10-553-7595. $8/hr:Must 
have own car. 



MENT RENTALS CALL 

4 FREE LISTINGS 
AND SPECIALS 

BACHELORS/SINGLES— some w/utilities 
paid, pool, gated $625 and up. ibdrm $895 
and up many w/fireplaces, luxury and nr>ore. 
2bdrm $1495 and up many w/dishwashers, 
bakxjny, A/C and nrK)re. Call for free list- 
ing:31 0-278-8999. 

BRENTWOOD. $1525, 2bdmi/2bth, front. 
t>alcony, carpet/drapes, stove, refridgerator, 
parking, near UCLA, no pets. By appoint- 
ment only. 11728 MaytieW. 310-271-6811. 

FOR RENT: Furnished apartment in Santa 
Monica. From July 18 to Oct. 18. Utilities in- 
cluded: $600/month Call (310) 392-4240 

SHERMAN OAKS ADJ 

$795/mo. Newty reniodeled, 2bd. gated gar- 
den apartment, two entries, oak floors, ceil- 
ing fans, appliances, 1/2 bkx;k UCLA's 561 
bus, shopping, freeways, approx. 8mi 
UCLA.818-399-9610. 



Beautiful hardwood floors 

Very charming 1 bdrm 2nd floor 

165 S. Canon 

close to Rodeo & Wilshire 

$ 1450/nr>onth 

310-273-6639 



^^ 



GLENROCK 



• • 



APARTMENTS 

GLENROCK 

AND 
LEVERING 

Single, 1&2 
Bedroom Apartments 

I- 3 Blocks to Campus 

Rooftop Sundeck & 
Spa 

Fitness Room 

Study Lounge 

Laundry Facilities 

Gated Assigned 
Parking ^ 

Individual alarm 
systems 

MUCH, MUCH MORE! 

RESERVE YOUR 

APARTMENT NOW! 

SUMMER '00 

FALL 'OO-'Ol 



$600 1 ROOM FOR 2, Furnished Bunk Bed, 
closet, bathroom. July/Sept. At National/Se- 
pulveda by 405 & 10. 3241 Sepulveda. 310- 
397-0255 



WALK TO UCLA Beautiful hardwood floors 
/carpets. 2bdrm/1bth $1500. ibdrm/lbth 
$1050 and $1095. Stove, Fridge, Laundry 
room, Parking. T310) 824-2112 



WESTWOOD VILLAGE Small 1 bdmi-$975. 
Large Ibdrm-$1250. 10990 Strathmore Dr 
Parking, laundry. Available Sept No pets. 1- 
year lease. 310-471-7073. 



■■ "•«' ■••• 



-^^-^--r-. 



Daily Bniin Classified 



8ltOO 

Apjirlmonts for Ronl 



8800 

Gutistfiuuse for Riiiit 



Casablanca West I foruclamed 

I STUDENTS ONLY! 
Summer Special 



Bachelors $645 
Singles $965 ..ndup 



f' 




530 Veteran 
208-4394 



0= 



tL 



GAYLEY MANOR 

ARTS 

Super Big Super Clean 
Apartments! 

Singles and 1 bedrooms 

Across the Street from UCLA 

Walk to Village 

NearLeConte 

729 Gayley Ave. 

(31 0) 208-8798 . 



m 



LEVERING ARMS 

Large Sunny 

Singles & 1 Bedroom 

Apartments 

Walk to School and \nilage 

(310) 208-3215 

667-669 Levering Ave. 
Near Glenrock ■■' 



M 



BRENT MANOR 
APIS 

Avoid Westwood rents 

1 mile to UCLA 

Singles & Bachelor 

1&2 Bedrooms 
Pool, Near bus line 

1235 Federal Ave. 

Near Wilshire Blvd. 

(310) ^77-7237 J 



8500 

Apiirtnients Furnished 



SMALL PRIVATE FURNISHED attached 
guest unit close to UCLA, skylights and 
trees, quite student only please, one person. 
675/mo 310-358-9949. 



8600 

Condo/Townhouse for Rent 



UPSCALE 

PRIVATE ROOM and bath for rent. Private 
parking, waher/dryer. 1600 ft townfx>use, 
near Melrose and Crescent freights. Must not 
be allergic to cats. Extrerr^ly clean. Oetx>rah 
323-651-3382. 



8700 

Condo/Townhouse for Sale 



GREAT WESTWOOD 3BED. 2.5Bath town- 
house. AC, Sec. Syst. Rare small yard * ex- 
tra storage. Barbara Gardner, Broker 310- 
285-7505 



9000 

House for SnU; 



GREAT WESTWOOD 3 bed 2 1/2 
Bath Townhouse. AC. SEC Syst. 
Rare small yard •»- Extra Storage. 
Barbara Gardner, Broker (310) 
285-7505 



825-2221 



Display 
2UB-:i060 



9200 

Housing) Needed 



FEMALE INTERESTED in renting a guest 
room in a private home, long-term. Price 
range $460-ish. 310-395-0636 



nUq^ifipfl*; 
825 2221 



Are you a mature and 

responsible UCLA Medical 

Resident/Grad or Medical 

Student? If so, you can live in a 

private, fully-furnished guest 

apartment in UCLA Medical 

Family home. Separate entrance, 

all amenities, light housekeeping 

provided. In Bel-Air, 6 minutes to 

UCLA by car. Price reduced for 

immediate occupancy. Academic 

Year lease. 



310-472-4346 



9200 

Houslny Needed 



PROF SEEKS... 

Visiting UCLA Prof, from bacl< East seeks 
housesitting/prlvate furnished room. Quiet, 
non-smoker, excellent refererx:es. Dr. Snow 
(310)995-7669. 



9/fOO 

Room for Rent 



BEVERLY GLEN 
CANYON 

Room in a house. Mountain view, quiet, 
kitchen access, washer/dryer. 15min to 
Westwood. Studious, non-smoking male ten- 
ant. $400/mo. includes utilities. Jim:310- 
470-2142. 

DOG OKAY. Woman, nonsmoker. Private 
bedroom, living room, and kitchen included. 
Share bath. Utilities included. Near bus. 
$575/month. Call Marsha:310-390-9007. 

FURNISHED BEDROOM, WLA Private 
house. Male grad. student. Microwave, re- 
frigerator, A/C, weekly cleaning, near bus. 
$400/mo., yr. lease. 310-312-0669. 

HOUSE TO SHARE 

WLA 4mi/campus. Own room, share bath, 
backyard Quiet neighbortiood Female pre- 
ferred. Available 8/1 $500/mo, 1/3 utilities 
Bun.310-267-2878. 

SINGLE FOR RENT 

Furnished full-bath, full kitchen, close to 
UCLA. Walk to Westwood Blvd. Walk to 
Westskje Pavilk>n, bright, private, utilites 
pakl. $550/month. Megan:310-474-1749. 

WEST LA 

Single 600sq/ft $600, refrigerator and stove. 
11609 1/2 Washington Place. 310-450-8414 

WEST LA/PALMS 

AVAILABLE Clean. Private room, share bath, 
parking space, near bus. $42C/mo. includes 
utilites. No deposit required. 
310-559-4116. 

WESTWOOD 

Professional/student to share very large 
3bdrm/2 1/2 bath. Fireplace, patio, wash- 
er/dryer. $700/mo. Very large master bed- 
room, walk-in closet, $850/month 310-477- 
8922^ 

WESTWOOD. Elegant 2bdrm/1bth condo to 
share. Own room, phoneline, furnished, 
pool, Jacuzzi, gym. $800/month, $500depos- 
it, utilities included. Dario 310-478-8802. 

WESTWOOD. Walk to UCLA. Male-Only. 
Large, private furnished bdrm w/bath Kitch- 
en privileges, laundry, parking. $700/mo. 
Another room $600/mo. (7/1) 310-473-5769 



9500 

Roomniales-Priviite Room 



BRENTWOOD 

Female to share large 3bdrm. Parking. Near 
UCLA. Own master bdrm w/bath. 
$7604l/3utilities. 310-476-8811. 

BRENTWOOD 

Female to share large 3bdrm. Parking. Near 
UCLA. Own large bdrm $650-»^l/3utilities. 
3t0-476-8811. 

HANCOCK PARK 2bd/2ba. Avail 7/1 to 
share, $375/mb., 1/2 DWP & Gas, own 
phone line. Call John (310)497 -8038.See 
http://www.chaotigood.net/roomate.html 

' I ■■1 , 1 i :—^F^» ' 

PALMS- Own room. 2bd/1ba. apartment. 
Near Venice/Sepulveda. $465 ■•- deposit and 
utilities. Through Feb 2001 preferred. Call 
Peter (310)259-2227. . /■ 

West LA < 

Responsible female needed. Own bed- 
roorrVbathroom in 2bed/2bath apartment. 
Beautiful unit in security buikJing. Available 
asap. $637.50/month.31 0-442-7671. 



9600 

Roommates-Shared Room 



FEMALE ROOMATE TO SHARE room in 
spactous ibd/lbath apartment on Strath- 
more/Veteran. Rent $375/mo. Close to Cam- 
pus Express. Call 310-824-2911 ASAP 

FURNISHED, STUDIO LOFT, nfce view, ntoe 
pool, barbeque area, pool table, pingpong 
table, piano, rec. room, gated parking. Look- 
ing for female student, rK)n-smoking, quiet. 
$500/mo. Call now! (310) 569-8233. 

TWO OR THREE FEMALE ROOMMATES 
wanted for iixJrm/1 k>ft apartment on Veteran 
for July-Sept. Two parking spaces. $374- 
$500 per person. Contact Christine:909-592- 
0729. 

WESTWOOD 

1-2 person needed to share room in 
2txJmV2l)ath luxury condo on Wilshire. Park- 
ing. Low rent. Pool, Jacuzzi, Tennis courts. 
Erfc-31 0-475-341 3 pager: 310-915-2611. 



ADVERTISE 



9700 

Sublets 



543 LANDFAIR. 1-3 persons to share large 
Ibdrm/bth 1 block to campus. 3 parking 
spaces. July 1 -SeptenWf-i 5. Martfia 760- 
753-7050. 

AFFORDABLE 1 bdmVI bath apt. in Palms, 
$725, 15 min. drive to UCLA, security bklg., 
pool, laundry, lease up in September but 
renewable. Available now. 

LOOKING FOR A PLACE to Hve? www hou- 
sing10l.net. Your move off campus! Search 
for summer sublets. 

S.M. SUBLET 

SANTA MONICA— Furnished bedroom in 
large, bright, 2txJrm apt. $650/nrK)nth. Avail- 
able 8/1-10/1. Female nonsmokers only 
please. Call Laura 310-264-0503. 

SUMMER STUDIO 

ONE BLOCK TO UCLA. Looking for quiet 
student. Pool/)acuzzi/gym. Laundry. Parking. 
Yard. Available July l -August 25th. $1,600. 
310-208-1880 



9800 

V/acation Rentals 



BEAUTIFUL, SPACIOUS YOSEMITE 
HOME surrounded by tall pines. Close to 
everything. Fully Equipped. 5000' elevation 
sundeck, reasonable rates. 818-785-1028 
www.yosemite.i8toveiy.com. 



WE'RE ALWAYS 

ON THE 

CUTTING 




The Dally Bruin Ad Production Department 

needs Paste-up Artists. 

If you are hardworking, detall-orlented, thrives on 

deadlines, can Juggle multiple tasks and know 

Macintosh programs - 

WE NEED YOU! 

Apply at 
ASUCLA Humfiui Resources, 2nd Roor, 
Kerckhoff Hall 



Orjentation Isstie 2000 Af^ 



Student Health 
Care registerec 
students have 
already paid for 



No insurance needed 




FREE for most services 



uc a Ashe Center 



For more information, see a< 
on page C 



ACROSS 

1 Top cards 
5 Witch-hunt 

locale 
10 Area 

14 Bolivia's _1_ 
rwightxjr 

15 "Good-bye, 
Pierre" 

16 "Once — a 
midnight . . ." 

17 Lose one's 
footing 

18 Earth 

19 Auttror Ayn — 

20 And so on 
22 Grins 

24 Carnival 
attraction 

25 Actor Baldwin 

26 Spoke 
28 Forgo 

33 Imtate 

34 Pie i la — 

35 Mineral spring 

36 Den 

37 Musty 

39 Phonograph 
record ~^ 

40 Frequently 

41 Like — of bricks 

42 Streann 

43 Highway safety 
feature 

46 Injured 

47 chairperson 

48 Grad , 
50 Cooking in oil 
53 Arising (from) 

57 Temporary gift 

58 Rasp 

60 Level 

61 Norwegian 
city 

62 Soda buy 

63 — avis 

64 Potato parts 

65 Manicurist's 



PREVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVED 



Dso SQSS □Qmaa 

SQS QSCQCSB SODS 

□BUS QQQQ 
OBDSB ^SQS SOD 

SQSsamszziQmGiiDmiim 
sass macQSQ @QBia 



t)oard 
66 Winter weather 

DOWN 

1 Cattiedral part 

2 Gael 

3 Commentator 
Sevareid 

4 Part of HOMES 

5 Cut 

6 Worshipped 

7 Turkish coin 

8 Slippery one 

9 Avalanche of a 
sort 

1 Swiss city 

11 Octot)ergem 

12 Zero 

13 Terminates 
21 Shipshape 
23 With "out." 

distribute 

25 Gl tmant 

26 Foul-up 

27 Singer Bryant 



29 Muscat native 

30 Willow 

31 Disturb 

32 Fastener 

33 Slept like — 

37 Lag 

38 Common 
amphibian 

39 Starr and 
others 

41 Mideast gulf 

42 Buddy 

44 Homed 
animals 

45 Nearer to the 
end 

49 Suspicious 

50 Iceberg 

51 Optimistic 

52 Type of lock 

53 Overfeed 

54 He was terrible! 

55 Roman ruler 

56 Chew 

59 Wheet part 



r-r-rTT«g-g-?-rTT«TrTrTrTr 

His Hid 

|IP^ c IIP 


■hi wkk^ 

ip|EE-i"iEpp| 

Hb2 Hb3 
54 ^S - "^BS 



Display 
2Ub-3()bO 



50 Of ientation Issue 2000 



Daily Brum Classified 






\ 



:l>- 

^ ' 
\\\,_ 



¥ 



next 



ent with a Strong Community 

Modern, Fully Equipped 

^Koshor Kitchen^— ^—-^ 



and Regular Shabbat programs? 



Try the Westwood Bayit-a Jewish 

student cooperative on Landfair 

Avenue in the heart of Westwood. 



500 yards from campus 
Discounted rent 

A cooperative living environment 
Single and double rooms available 
Outdoor pool 



for applications call (310) 858-3059 or email isdev@ix.netcom.com 
Website: www.bayitproject.com 





We Have 
partment Homes 

Or Choice 
n Bruin Country. 



'' 



Pr^erties Professionally Managed By 

Sdby & Company, inc. 




El Greca 



'The Standard of Excellence. 



*f. 



.W. Selby & Company 

offers the most modern 

nd convenient housing 

near UCIA Campus and 

the Westwood Village. 

Moke your fall housing 

arrangements now! 





idvole Plaza I 

540 Midvale Avenue 
Singles, 1 &2 Bedrooms; 
Roortop Spa & Leisure Area 

Call (310) 208-0064 



1 030 Tiverton Avenue 
jSingle Units Only, Rooftop Sun Deck 
^& Leisure Area, Sauna, Outdoor Spa 

& Barbecue, Fitness Room 

Call (310) 824-0463 





ellworth I & II 



% 




1 0983 Wellworth Avenue 
1 &2 Bedrooms, Pool, 
Rooftop Spa & Leisure Area 

Call (310) 479-6205 



Roommate Seryice 
Furnished Apo 



Midvole Ptoza II — 

527 Midvale Avenue 
Singles, 1 &2 Bedrooms, Pool, 
Sauna, Spa, Study Lounge w/ 
Big Screen TV, Fitness Center 

Call (310) 208-4868 



Kelton Plaza 

430 Kelton Avenue 

1 &2 Bedrooms, Rooftop Spa 

& Leisure Area 

Call (310) 824-7409- 






Aslc About Our le^se Specials^ 



Daily Bruin CtasslfM 



Orientation Issue 2000 SI 
















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BRUINLIFE THE UCLA YEARBOOK SINCE 1919 



W W W . B R U 



NLIFE.COM 



COMING 



H I S 



FALL 




aroatns 

nt deals \J'. — 



nt-to-student deals 



absolutely FREE* some of the best deals in W«twood. Check weekly for updates so you don't miss out on great savings! 



Item 



Description 



Price 



Phone 



Item 



Description 



Price 



Phone 



BRIEFCASE 



leather with oomtx) 



$25 



310-798-0247 



MATTRESS 



new, fuii-size 



$100 



310-966-1511 



BUREAU 



wood, excell. oorxl. 



$75 



310-826-5961 



MICROWAVE 



alrTX)6t new, big 



$60 



310-20^^11 



CALCULATOR 



HP 48G graphic 



$75 



310-403-0536 



MONSTER CABLE 



DVD optical, 2m 



$40 



310^4-2697 



CELL PHONE 



new, Samsung 3500 



$80 



310-966-1511 



MOVING SALE 



misc. items 



N/A 



323-935-5895 



CHAIRS 



metal 



310-209^11 



NIGHT STAND 



w/drawers 



$ao 



310-826-5961 



CHAIRS 



wooder) 



^l^ 



310-209^1 V 



NIKKORLENS 



autofocLB 80mni 



|7D 



310^4-2697 



COMPUTER MOUSE 



IBM 



310-824-2697 



OTTOMAN 



310-20^^11 



DESK 


very large, walnut 


$60 


310-391-3172 


DINING SET 


Wack, contemporary 


$80 


310^1-3172 


DOGHOUSE 


new door, large 


$46 


310-20»€211 


ERICSONDH318 


cell phone, digilBl 


$60 


310-798^47 


FUTON BED 


frame, mattress, sheet 


$60 


310-575^11 


GMAT PREP BOOKS 


2books 


$10 


310-27M026 


QRE PREP 


CD rom ind. Kaplan 


$20 


310-276-8026 


GRE PSYCH BOOKS 


2booi(s,or1g.$30 


$10 


310-276-8026 


HP48SX 


SCIENTIFIC CALCULATOR 


$100 


310-79frO247. 


KEYBOARD 


computer 


$6 


310-824-2097 


LARGE DRESSER 


cream color 


$40 


323-935-5895 



PORTABLE STEREO CD tape, radio base 



$46 



310-57&O511 



SMALL WOOD DESK 3 ft long, 3 drawers 



FREE 



323-935-5895 



SONY NOTEBOOK 



unopened txw 



N/A 



310-209-1667 



TEXTBOOK/READER 



communications 10 



N/A 



310^312-2466 



TEXTBOOK/READER engli8h3 



N/A 



310-312-2465 



TEXTBOOK/READER 



women studies 10 



N/A 



310^12-2466 



TEXTBOOK/WORKBOOK managennent 1A 



N/A 



310-312-2466 



TWIN BED 



mattress and boxspring 



$80 



310<3ei^172 



WIRELESS PHONE 



black, good rarige 



$20 



310-57&O511 



WOODEN BUNK BED sturdy, w/mattresses 



N/A 



310-209-1667 



WORD PROCESSOR brother, electric 



$30 



310-745-0994 



LARGE IKEA DESK 



5fL long, black 



$60 



323-935-5895 



To place a 

ad in tlie Bruin 

Bargains, fill out 

information on the right 

and submit to the Daily 

Bruin Classifieds. 



• Item: _^^ 

(15 characters maximum, including spaces) 

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I (example $25, $74ea, FREE. Please round to the nearest dollar— NO OBO) 
I •Phone: ( ) - 

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I 
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• 

1 

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• Description: 

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• Price: y 



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*Ad must he submitted in pmon or bv' mail No phone orders allo\i«d DexJIine is 2 wnii d^iys prior to issue at 1 2pm All Bruin Bargains appear every Wednesday and Friday Limit of 4 free adi per aatomer per week Ik 
. n m rm th « nuh l to ww w i i r w jw t^ a rty a dwrt iw imt ' n l nm wrt i nn ihc rtnnd ii id s (rf tht ' D ailv B wm h : 



*•. - '• 




mm.mmimm 



m. wmt I p^-^ 



LI ■ 



52 



Orientation Issue 2000 



Daily Bruin Classified 



I*' 



IT'S NOT A STORY. IT'S A LEGEND. 






•< ■ 













^-:^-2.^ 












■.^^x^.> 






.3k&'MSf'^{»r^*- 





;■■■;■■:' .-■^-•.^■1 




^ ._. ,— . . M^^ '-'.tv'- n 



BRUINLIFE THE UCLA YEARBOOK SINCE 1919 



'.r;&^j;--^-^. 



• S' 1. 



— • - » 



enrs nave 



I 



wnitHnuii 



No insurance needed! 
FREE for most services 



'ul 



service 



medi 



ICQ Clinic 



► Professional staff of MDs and NPs 

► Pharmacy 

► Laboratory 

► Radiology 

► Physical Therapy 

► and Specialty Clinics 

3y appointment or Walk In 
Mid Campus Location 



'or more information, visit our web site, 
ittp://wv/w. saonet.ucla.edu/health. htm 
orcall 310 825-4073 



J -» 



ucia Ashe Center 



T^re you o new srudent, 1 8 years or younger? 



': {^Ldi 4i^2j^4i•.^ , ». i> ' c 



www 



« 



RESTORE 










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V 







' - - "i: -■■■■-"■■ ■ '■■(- 

Summer school spirals 

summer read short stories 

mer skill softmrare 

summer wear ucia shorts 

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Football linebacker is 
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Monday, June 26, 2000-Friday, June 30, 2000 



www.dailybruin.ucla.edu 



::Cbnference 



• If 



llcies in^xiuestion^ 




UNION: Workers express 
discontent with practice 
of 'casual employment' 



By David King 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

Pamphlets for the UCLA 
Conference Center at Lake 
Arrowhead paint it as peacerul and 
relaxing - but many of its employees 
describe it differently. 

Some employees, such as grounds 
keepers and kitchen staff, disagree 
with the university's discouragement 
of unionization and the practice of 
"casual employment," in which 
employees are fired for a small peri- 
od of time so the employer doesn't 
have to pay benefits a career employ- 
ee would receive. 

A housekeeper at the conference 



center who wished to remain anony- 
mous said despite working six days a 
week all year long, she has not yet 
received full-time or career employee 
status. 

"At this point, I've been here six 
years. Ldeserve to be full-time," she 
said. 

The center is used for various con- 
ferences and functions for UCLA 
staff. 

Nancy Noble, the director of the 
conference center, denied the work- 
er's allegations. 

"We don't have situations where 
we aren't following the policies that I 
know of," Noble said. "We treat all 
our employees equally. 

"Right here, we're isolated from 
campus, so we hope that we try and 
address every situation that the work- 
ers bring to us." 

Casual employment practices by 
the university are not uncommon, 



according to Jose Hernandez, an 
organizer for the American 
Federation of State, County, and 
Municipal Employees, the union that 
is working to organize workers at the 
facility. 

"The majority of people up there 
are casual employees," Hernandez 
said, referring to the roughly 80 ser- 
vice employees at Lake Arrowhead. 
"They are basically keeping people 
as casual to not give them benefits 
(and) vacation time." 

Noble denied allegations of 
improper employment practices at 
the conference center. She said con- 
fusion may arise because of the 
nature of employment, which has 
varying workloads during different 
seasons. 

"We are a little different here, 
because we are truly seasonal, so our 
people who work in grounds we hire 
from March to November," Noble 



said. "We do have some people who 
have been with us for a long time also 
working these sort of seasonal jobs." 

She added that seasonal employ- 
ees, particularly in the housekeeping 
department, work less in the summer 
months, not more. 

"They go down to between 20 to 
30 hours a week, and sometimes less 
than that," Noble said. 

But the housekeeper said she has 
worked more hours this summer 
because many departments have 
fewer employees. 

"We're understaffed, we're over- 
worked and we're tired," she said. 

As a casual employee, she said she 
is periodically fired and re-hired by 
the university, and expects to be fired 
for three days this September. 

Another housekeeper, who also 
wished to remain anonymous, said 
administrators recen^^ presented 
employees with an agreement in 



which they would agree to work 
every Saturday. 

Because she did not sign the agree- 
ment, the housekeeper said she will 
not receive her tip check - a portion 
of the total tips received at the center. 

But Noble said the paper was only 
a clarification of the employees' 
existing contract, and having them 
sign the agreement was simply a way 
to ensure that the workers were 
aware of the stipulations of their con- 
tract. 

The stipulation was made after 
several workers protested their work 
hours by saying they weren't aware 
they had to work Saturdays though it 
was in their contract. Noble said. 

"We go strictly by our hiring 
agreements," she said. "We just 
wanted to make sure they knew (this 
policy)." 

S«eEMPt0VUS,page5 



Council members dash 
In appointment process 



USAC President, committee's 
views conflict over selection of 
student appointees to boards 



ByMdodyWang 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

The Undergraduate Students Association 
Council has appointed the Budget Review 
Director and Finance Committee Chair for the 
upcoming year, but members still struggle to 
appoint one of two undergraduate representa- 
tives to the Associated Student s of UCLA 
Board of Directors. 

The Budget Review Director is responsible 
for allocating set funds to various student 
groups at the beginning of the year, while the 
Finance Committee Chair allocates funds for 
specific events throughout the year. 












;ESS£ POmiR/CMy Brum SeoKV Sijff 

Resident Eliiabcth Houston has faced 
criticism over her appointment decisions. 



ASUCLA's board of directors makes financial 
decisions involving the association. 

The council appointed Marykay Tsuji, a 
Jlflh-year political science and East Asian stuct 
ies student, and Janet Quindara, a third-year 
undeclared student, to the offices of Budget 
Review Director and Finance Committee 
Chair, respectively. 

Council members unanimously appointed 
Phyllis Feng, a fifth-year American Literature 
and Culture and Asian American studies stu- 
dent, as one of the ASUCLA Board representa- 
tives, but the council could not agree on who to 
appoint as the second representative. 

"(Feng's) interview was fabulous," said 
USAC President Elizabeth Houston. "She just 
blew everyone away." 

The USAC president is the only council 
member who can nominate applicants to be 
voted on by other council members. The appli- 
cant must receive a majority vote from the 
council to be appointed. 

The president is advised by the 
Appointments Review Committee, which is 
headed by Internal Vice President Elias Enciso 
and consists of General Representative Ryan 
Bulatao and Facilities Commissioner Steve 
Davey. 

At the June 9 USAC meeting, Houston nom- 
inated Joseph Manko, a fourth-year political 
science and history student for the ASUCLA 
board position, but the council voted him down. 
Manko noted leadership experience through 




BH>-_ :.•_- 



Madison's had to be closed down on June 16th, because of health code violations. It 
remained closed over the weekend and opened again on June 20. 



Madison's 




• II 



irily shut down 



Sm AffOINTMINn, page 4 



HEALTH: Violations force popular 
restaurant closed; sewage, roach 
problems cited by investigators 



By Dtiarshani Dharmawardcna 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

As UCLA graduates and sports fans prepared 
to celebrate in We stwood earlier this montb. the 
Department of Health Services and 
Environmental Health closed down Madison's 
Bar and Grill, a popular student locale on Broxton 
Avenue. . 

Health inspectors shut down the restaurant 
because of cockroach infestation and a sewer 
drainage problem, according to Adam Rocke, the 
West Area Environmental Services manager with- 
in the Bureau of District Environmental Services. 
The r es ta u r a nt h as si no r ^ opwwd. 



development," he said. 

The inspectors discovered the violations during 
an unannounced, routine examination of the facil- 
ity on June 16. 

**^We have basically a zero-tolerance policy 
when it comes to a vermih infestation," RckJcc 
said. "If we see live vermin in the facility in an 
amount that shows there is an infestation, we will 
close them down." 

According ta-1<ocke, inspectors determine 
whether an infestation is occurring within an- 
establishment if they sec significant amounts of 
vermin in the surroundings. 

Madison's manager, Leigh Slawner, agreed 
with Rocke's assessment for the closure, but want- 
ed to clarify the terms used in the reasoning. 



"Any kind of pipe that's damaged, no matter 
where it is, is called sewage," he said. "!f the pipe 
in the toilet leading to the bathrooms breaks 
down, you're talking about sewage. If the pipe is 



*There were cockroaches in varying stages of 



/ 



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2 Monday, June 26, 2000-Friday, June 30. 2000 



Daily Bniin News 



COMMUNITY BRIEFS 



UCLA hires 24-year-old 
professor 

UCLA mathematician Terence Tao, 24, will 
be promoted to full professor on July 1. 

Tao - who teaches freshman calculus and 
graduate courses - specializes in a theoretical 
field called harmonic analysis, an advanced 
form of calculus that us^s physics equations. He 
also deals with non-linear partial differential 
equations and algebraic geometry, an entirely 
xlilTer ent field from harmonic analysis. 

One of Tao's proofs of a problem in harmon- 
ic analysis consists of more than 50 pages. 
Along with two colleagues, Tao obtained the 
most precisely known estimate of the size of a 
particular geometric dimension in Euclidean 
space. - -^ _ — _ ,.^:___A_._. 

Tao, who was learning calculus and entering 
international mathematics competitions by age 
1 1, earned his Ph.D. from Princeton University 
at 21 and joined the UCLA's mathematics 
department the same year. 

He has received two national fellowships this 



past year - from the Packard 
Foundation and the Clay 
Mathematics Institute. 



Bruin Democrats hold 
fundraising event 

The Bruin Democrats held its First Annual 
Alumni and Friends Fundraising Reception on 
June 22 at the Brentwood home of UCLA alum- 
ni and professor Neal Kaufman . 
_ The event sought to encourage public service 
and bring together current and former 
Democrats at UCLA. 

More than 45 alumni attended, including 
Jane Harman, former Congresswoman and for- 
mer UCLA professor; Paul Koretz, 
Democratic nominee for State Assembly, and 
former Bruin Democrats President, and Gill 
Garcetti, L.A. District Attorney and UCLA 
Law Alumnus . 

Harman, Koretz and Garcetti spoke about 
the importance of student political participation 
and at)out their time at UCLA. 




Lane Sherman, the mother of 

U.S. Congressman Brad 

Sherman, also attended the event. 

Assemblymember Sheila Kuehl was 

honored with the Bruin Democrats' "First 

Annual Contributions to UCLA Award." Her 

staff accepted the award in her place. 

Westwoodl-shiil slore 
to close soon ~^^ 

T-shirt retailer Jazz'd is closing its doors after 
19 years of business in Westwood Village, with 
owner Tim Hall citing low sales and an econonv 
ic slump in the village as reasons for the closure. 

Jazz'd specializes mainly in novelty T-shirts, 
but devotes a section of the store to UCLA mer- 
chandise. Store employee Betty Mejia said stu- 
dents frequented the store to buy UCLA T- 
shirts that are sold for less than their counter- 
parts at the UCLA Store. 

"Many students think the store at UCLA is 
too expensive, so we offered them the same 
items at much cheaper prices," Mejia said. 



Hall offered some suggestions to the future 
tenants of the space at 1069 Broxton Avenue. 

"It would be nice if they opened a specialty 
bookstore," Hall said. "Overall, I am hopeful 
about the village, but I just want to concentrate 
on my other businesses." 

LGBT center director 
receives award ^~^ 

Ronni Sanlo, director of the Lesbian, Gay, 
Bisexual, Transgender Campus Resource 
Center was one of three people to receive the 
Chancellor's Fair and Open Academic 
Environment Award. 

The award, which is given every other year, is 
seldom given to someone involved in student 
affairaiT . . — ■ . -,- , . ; ■.;■ ■ . v ■- ■ ■ ■ 



Sanlo was nominated^for tfie award by the 
Lambda Student Graduate Network and 
Robert Naples, assistant vice chancellor of stu- 
dent affairs as well as campus organizations. 

Compiled from Daily Bruin staff and wire reports. 






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DAILY BRUIN 



Editor in Oiief : Christine Byrd 
Managing Editor Michael Utschi 

News Editor: Barbara Ortutay 

Assistant News Editors: Dharshani 

Dharmawardena, Michael Falcone, Timothy Kudo, 

UnhTat 

News Writers: Joy McMasters 

Viewpoint Editor: Jonah Lalas 
Assistant Viewpoint Editors: AmyGolod, 
Cuauhtelmoc Ortega 

A&E Editor: Angela Salazar 

Assistant A&E Editors: Emilia Hwang, Barbara 

McGuire, Michael Rosen-Molina, Judy Pak 

Sports Editor: Pauline Vu 

Assistant Sports Editors: Amanda Retcher, 

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Sports Writers: A.J.Cadman.MoinSalahuddin, 

Chris Umpierre 

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llustrators: Adam Brown, Casey Crowe, Danny 
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Designers: Elaine Chan, Johnson Hua, Janet Lee, 
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Photo Editor David Hill 

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Assistant Photo Editors: Keith Enriquez, Bridget 

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Photo Staff: Patil Armenian, Nicole Miller, Brad 

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Copy Editors: Marlsa Chiang, Metia Hong, 

Normalyn Nicolas, Dagmar Soehlke,Cynjs Zargar 

Electronic Media Director Robert Liu 
Assistant EM Directors: Monica KM^ong, Avishai 
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Business Manager: Guy Levy 
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Classified Line Manager: Michelle Tseng 
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Advertising Production Manager: Liz 

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Management Assistant: Tristan Hufalai 

Classified Supervisor: Grace Tomiiloso 

Ad Production Staff: Adrian Balanon.Kyle de 

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Media Director: Arvli Ward '^ 



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Communications Board. All rights are reserved. Reprinting of any material In this publication 
without the written permission of the Communications Board Is strictly prohibited. The ASUCLA 
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Daily ftvin News 



Monday, June 26, 2000~Friday, June 30, 2000 3 




JESSe PO«T€R/Daily Bruin SenJof Staff 



Facilities Management works to repair the damage caused by one of their workers. 

Error causes damage in Kinsey 

POWER: Computers, 
appliances fried by 
too much voltage 



manager of crafts and alter- 
ations for Facilities 
Management. He added that an 
investigation is under way. 



By Timothy Kudo 

Daily Bruin Sentor Staff 

More than one hundred com- 
puters and other electrical 
devices were damaged in 
Kinsey Hall on June 19 after a 
facilities maintenance worker 
made an error while replacing 
the building's transformers. 

As part of a campus-wide 
upgrade of the high-voltage dis- 
tribution system, workers were 
replacing an old transformer in 
Kinsey when wires were crossed 
and a 220-volt surge was sent 
through the building, which nor- 
mally takes 1 10 volts. 

"Somebody made a mis- 
take," said Ron Calloway, the 



"The great majority 

of machines... 

had their power 

supplies burnt." 

■[:'': p. RonCalloway ^ ;; 
Facilities Management 

Though professors and staff 
housed in Kinsey were told to 
turn off any electrical devices in 
preparation for scheduled 
repairs, nearly anything with a 
transformer that was plugged 
into an electrical socket at the 
time of the surge was damaged. 

"When power comes into a 



computer, the first thing it goes 
into is a transformer," Calloway 
said. "Even when it's shut off, 
you're still feeding voltage into a 
computer at a low drain, so 
when it got hit with the high volt- 
age, it was shorted." 

In addition to computers, the 
power surge fried everything 
from pencil sharpeners and 
copiers to surge protectors. 

Because the damage was so 
extensive, many of Kinsey's 
operations were shut down as 
professors and staff members 
brought in their personal lap- 
tops to try and do work. 

"It's basically brought the 
building to a standstill for pretty 
much the entire week," said 
Professor William 

Schniedewind, the acting chair 
of the near eastern languages 
and cultures department. 

Sc«11UNSHNIMa,|»a9c4 



ASUCLA plans major changes 
to resolve $1^ million defidt ; 



BUDGET: 44 positions to be 
eliminated; UCLA Store to rent 
mit^iioy ate space for retailers 



Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

The Associated Students of UCLA are hop- 
ing the whopping changes it has planned for 
the coming year - including eliminating 44 
positions - will return the troubled association 
to financial stability. 

ASUCLA lost an estimated $ 1.9 million dur- 
ing the 1999-2000 school year, falling well 
below their previously projected loss of 
$83,000. This, combined with severe losses 
over the past few years, caused association offi- 
cials to realize something drastic had to be 
done to patch up ASUCLA's finances. 

"This has been a difficult several months," 
said ASUCLA Executive Director Patricia 
Eastman at an open forum meeting for 
employees on June 13. 

"We were still working until the very last 
minute ... to minimize the impact of the lay- 
offs," she said. "Now, this week, we move on." 

As a result, officials unveiled a budget plan 
for the coming year that includes several signif- 
icant changes to the way ASUCLA does busi- 
ness, culminating in a projected surplus of $2 
million - a larger surplus than the association 
has had in 10 years. 

The most substantial change between this 
year's budget and last year's is the elimination 
of 44 of the association's 254 career positions, 
at a savings of $1.8 million. 

"These changes are painful, but necessary 
for us to continue to serve the UCLA commu- 
nity," Eastman said. 

According to Eastman, 19 employees were 
laid off, as some employees were shuffled 
around to other positions and some of the posi- 
tions eliminated were already vacant at the 
time of the restructuring. 

"We believe we can handle the changes with- 
out disrupting the operations critical to provid- 
ing the required level of service to the campus," 




said Rich Delia, ASUCLA's chief fiiuincial 
officer — "^"^ >"-'^~— — - • — ' '■■ ■ - ■ ■ ■' 

In addition to saving money through layoffs, 
ASUCLA looks to boos.t its bottom line with 
increased income from the ailing UCLA Store. 

BearWear sales were close to $1 million 
under projections this year, making it one of 
the main culprits in the association's monetary 
troubles. Next year, ASUCLA hopes to almost 
double its online BearWear sales and increase 
its in-store sales. 

"This year, sales grew 50 percent online," 
said Terence Hsiao, ASUCLA director of busi- 
ness development. 

"We can expect that to continue for a year 
or so," he said, adding that the association will 
begin to advertise the UCLA Store Web site 
more aggressively this year. 

Additionally, ASUCLA hopes to save 
money by restructuring the UCLA Store floor 
plan and leasing out excess space. 

In the new plan. Paper Cuts merchandise 
will be integrated into the Market and 
Essentials departments on the B level of 
Ackerman Union, leaving the l,660^uare- 
foot Paper Cuts location on A level availid>le to 
lease to an outside vendor. — 

Also, the Fast Track apparel department 
will be moved to where children's apparel is 
currently located, freeing up another 3,900 
square feet for lease. The magazine section will 
no longer be a separate section of the store, but 
will be integrated into the main BookZone 
area, opening up 1,500 square feet for lease. 

Some space in the back of the store current- 
ly being used for offices will be converted to 
retail space as well. 

~~, SMHIMIfCES,pa9e4 



Extension of IVIetro Rail system 
expands route, creates concern 



TRANSrT: Opening of three new 
subway stations will allow line 
to cover nearly 60 miles in L.A. 

ByCarofineWoon 

DaHy Bruin Contributor 

After 14 years and $6.1 billion, the Los Angeles 
Metropolitan Transportation Authority celebrat- 
ed the opening of its Metro Rail Red Line exten- 
sion Saturday, despite objections of a bus riders 
advocacy group that wanted a larger share of the 




money used to expand 
L.A.'s bus system. 

Three new subway sta- 
tions in North Hollywood, 
Universal City and at 
Hollywood Boulevard and 
Highland Avenue have 
been built along the 6.3-mile 
extension, expanding the 
Metro Rail system to neariy 
60 miles between the San 
Fernando Valley and L.A. 

"Commuters can get 
from the valley to down- 
town in less than a half an 
hour, rain or shine, no mat- 
ter what the traffic condi- 
tions are," said Marc 
Littman, public relations 
director of the MTA. "It's 
like building a 13- or 14-lane 
freeway in one of most con- 
gested corridors in the 
country. 

"The only thing that's 
going to get people out of 
their cars is public trans- 
portation that saves them time and money," he 
continued. "In this case, it saves them both 




Ptwto> by JESSe POtmrvCMy Bruir> Scmor Staff 

Passengers board the subway at the Universal City Metro Red Line Station on its opening day. This Is one of 
three new subway stations that opened on June 24, extending the route of the Metro Line system. 



crowded and dilapidated," she said. ally be the first step the MTA is taking toward 

Orosz added that the MTA's construction of addressing the prc^lem of inadequate bus ser- 

Though the longiwaited event is perceived by ^^^ ^°^* Hollywood segment of the Red Line vice, according to its proponents 



Over 100,000 riders used the North Holly- 
wood Metro Red Line station on June 24. 



some as a blessing for LA.'s commuters, the 
city's Bus Riders Union says the metro diverted 
much-needed funds from the Metro bus system. 

"For the last decade, the MTA has spent $4.5 
billion on a Red Line project that will serve no 
more than 1 5 percent of their customers, who are 
disproportionately white, upper-class and subur- 
ban," said Deborah Orosz, spokeswoman for the 
BRU, a multiracial civil rights organization. 

"In the meantime, buses that serve over 
400,000 r iUtri da il y — uveiwhelm in g l y low- 
irHX)me people of o(rfor -* iwt increasingly over- 



violates the provisions of a 1996 federal court Rapid buses - which run from Santa Monica 
order to implement a five-year plan for expanded to Montebello and from the Warner Center to the~ 
bus service that would link riders to jobs, schools Universal City Red Line station - are designed to 
and medical centers throughout the county provide speedier, more efficient transportation 
"In signing that document, the MTA agreed to by making fewer stops and using what is known 
make the bus system the first priority for fund- as the bus signal priority system, 
ing," she said. "But they have been spending 70 Each of the approximately 100 new Rapid 
percent of funding on rail projects, and the ques- buses is equipped with a loop-transponder detec- 
tion is whether they are creating a system that tor that will lengthen green signals up to 10 sec- 
goes a few miles for a few people, or a countywide onds, allowing them to continue through inter- 
mass transit ^ystemJhaLiian-caciyJialLajniliiQn ttTtinnt u/ithniit Qtrtppinj 



fl 
f 



people all over." 

But the new Metro Rapid Bus lines may actu- 



^^W ^HB W^V^ 9^^^^^ ^ 



*\ 



v> 



Monday, June 26, 200&-Fhday, June 30, 2000 



DaHy Bruin News 



APPOINTMENTS 

From page 1 

the Office of Residential Life and the 
UCLA Orientation Program on his 
application. 

- Houston said she believes a majority 
of council members did not vote for 
Manko because they had already decid- 
ed they wanted to appoint Merrick 
Pascual, a fiAh-year public policy and 
economics student who is also presi- 
dent of Samahang Filipino. 

"You're not supposed to vole some- 
-4)ne down because you have someone 
else in mind," Houston said. "It's not 
just me who thinks Joe's qualified. A lot 
of other people do too. I was disap- 
pointed." ^ ' 

Houston said she was unimpressed 
with PasCual during his interview and 
felt he could be biased because of his 
position in Samahang Filipino. 

Ramzi Ajami, one of Houston's 
heads of staff, said it would be less like- 
ly for Manko to be biased because he is 
not involved with a Student Advocacy 
Group. 

"(Involvement with a SAG) is a real- 
ly common thing to be concerned 
about," he said, adding that SAGs are 
directly affected by the actions of those 
appointed. 

"Even though you're involved with 



a SAG, it doesnt mean you won't get 
appointed, but if for some reason the 
president feels you will be biased, then 
it's a legitimate concern," Ajami said. 

But other council members dis- 
agreed and strongly supported Pascual. 

General Representative Elisa 
Sequeira said she hopes to appoint 
Pascual because he has shown both ini- 
tiative and interest in the p)osition by 
talking to current board of directors 
Vice Chair Kei Nagao about what it 
entails. 



'Idpiftseewhat 



(Pascual) could be 
^ biased about.*^ 



Elisa Sequeira 

USAC general representative 



Sequeira said serving on the ASU- 
CLA Communications Board during 
the 1999-2000 school year provided* 
Pascual with the necessary experience 
for the ASUCLA position, since the 
two boards are closely related. 

"I don't see how the fact that he's in 
Samahang Filipino makes him biased. I 
don't see what he could be biased 
about," Sequeira said. 



ASUCLA's Board of Directors 
does not make any decisions that 
directly affect funding for SAGs. Last 
year, Cori Shepherd, president of the 
African Student Union, was one of the 
undergraduate representatives on the 
board. ■': . '; ' '.■■ 

Enciso said the council has had diffi- 
culty appointing a second ASUCLA 
representative because Houston has 
been indecisive with her recommenda- 
tions for which candidates she feds the 
committee should interview. 

Disagreements over the interpreta- 
tion of^ the USAC bylaws arose 
between council members durinj^ Uie 
appointment process. ;*^ * 

Enciso said Houston changed her 
mind about who she wanted to inter- 
view for the positions. He said the day 
before the interview, he and Houston 
agreed to interview two candidates for 
each position, but the next day she 
changed her mind and only wanted to 
interview one person for each position. 

Enciso said he felt it was too late to 
cancel some of the interviews, so ARC 
interviewed two applicants for each 
position as planned. 

Houston could not be reached for 
comment, ----r- - - . 

Council members ' questioned 
whether or not the president was 
allowed to forward and then de-for- 
ward applicants. Because the bylaws do 



not specify if this can be done, Houston 
interpreted it so that she could change 
her mind. But council members over- 
turned her decision. 

Ajami said because this problem 
had never occurred before, the Judicial 
Board and the Constitution Review 
Committee should ^now clarify the 
bylaws. 

"I think from an objective stand- 
point it was fine, but it has to be cleared 
up," Ajami said. : 



As a compro mise, the^ 

cotiricll decided to 

send both Manko and 

Pascual to the ASUCLA^ 

retreat ...to be trained 

__ for the position. • 



Enciso said it is important for ARC 
to interview more than one person for 
each position since some people who 
appear qualified based on their applica- 
tion turn out to be unqualified during 
the interview. 

"I explained to Elizabeth that's why 
it was so important to interview more 
than one person," Enciso said. 



Sequeira said she wished Houston 
would nominate more than one candi- 
date to be voted on by council so that 
the council would not be forced to 
accept Houston's decision. 

"(Houston) pretty much just wants 
us to rubber-stamp her decision," 
Sequeira said. 

Because the council did not approve 
Manko for the position, Houston 
brought Eugene Kuong, a fifth-year 
psychology and math student, to the 
table to be voted on at the June 20 
meeting. 

Kuong, who has served as president 
of the Association of Chinese" 
Americans and as part of the Wooden 
Center Board of Governors, was also 
voted down by the council. 

As a compromise, the council decid- 
ed to send both Manko and Pascual to 
the ASUCLA retreat, held June 19-21, 
to be trained for the board of directors 
position. 

Houston said she will bring both 
candidates back to the table on July S, 
and council members will appoint one 
of them - adding she is confident she 
knows what the outcome will be. 

"Everybody knows what's going to 
happen; Joe will get voted down and 
Merrick will get voted in," Houston 
said. "This is not a compromise 
because a compromise (involves) two 
people. This is me compromising." 



TRANSFORMER 

From page 3 

He added that the extent of the damage, 
especially in terms of data loss, may take 
months to determine since many professors 
have already left for vacations or to do 
research. 

"Some faculty don't even know what's hap- 
pened to their computers," Schniedewind said. 

At the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and 
Transgender Campus Resource Center, four 
computers, two printers, three monitors, a 
microwave and a clock radio were damaged. 

"The only three things that didn't get hit 
were the TV and VCR because they weren't 
plugged in, and the fax machine because it's 
from hell," Slcvcn Lcider, the office manager 
at the center said jokingly. "It's brought every- 



thing to a screeching halt." 

Ronni Sanlo, director of the LGBT center, 
wasn't as worried about the articles saved on 
her computers as she was about the day-to-day 
material her office uses that hadn't been 
backed up for months. 

"To be honest, I can't even go there," Sanlo 
said. "It's not as throat-slitting as it feels, but i 
believe it's going to be OK." 

To help fix the problem, facilities mainte- 
nance called in an outside company. Call One, 
that specializes in computer service. 

"What we're finding is the great majority of 
machines that were damaged had their power 
supplies burnt," Calloway said. 

As of Monday, Calloway expected nearly all 
the repairs to be completed, but he added that 
the full extent of the damage would take more 
time to determine since many professors are 
gone for the summer. . 



FINANCES 

From page 3 

Also, plans are in the works 
to lease out a portion of the 
BookZone area to a CD retailer. 
According to Eastman, a CD 
store was rated the hi^est on 
the latest Student Union survey 
conducted in the spring. —*%■; 

ASUCLA ofTicials are hop- 
ing to get a new/userfCD retail- 
er into Ackerman Union to help 
bring foot traffic into the store. 
Leasing the space to an outside 
vendor is safer for the associa- 
tion since the vendor would be 
the one who must deal with com- 
petition from Westwood Village 



merchants and online Mp3 dis- 
tribution. 



"This has been a 

difficult several 

months." 

Patricia Eastman 

ASUCLA director 



Also, the association will 
move its distribution center 
from its off-campus location in 
Pico Rivera to an on-campus 
location, saving money in rent 
and transportation. 



"We had good results when 
we moved part of the distribu- 
tion center back to campus," 
said Keith Schoen, director of 
ASUCLA's distribution center. 
"The warehousing will remain 
off-campus, but we'll need to 
rent less space." 

Eastman emphasized that 
though the financial forecasts 
are rosy, the association will still 
have to weather some stormy 
conditions in the coming year. 

"We've got a lot of work to 
do in the next six months," 
Eastman said. - 

"We still have the same 
amount of output, but we have 
to get it done in a more efficient 
way," she said. 



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18 



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■:^.-'4 



Monday, June 26, 2000-Fnday, Jun« 30, 2000 



MADISON'S 

From page 1 

freshwater or tap water, that's also sewage." 

At Madison's, a pipe located under the bar 
area failed to drain properly, which caused 
inspectors to decide to close the facility. 

Slawner said the inspector failed to find cock- 
roaches in any food preparation areas. The prob- 
lem, Slawner said, remained isolated to an 
upstairs back area not associated with food. 

"There have never been any cockroaches in 
the kitchen or in the bar area," Slawner said. 
"She looked for cockroaches elsewhere and 
^uld not find any. " 

Restaurants closed for vermin infestation 
remain shut for 48 hours under departmental 
policy, after which an announced re-inspection 
occurs to see if the owners have rectified the 
problems, Rocke said. 

"That gives them some time for pest control to 
come in and any residue will have time to kill the 
remaining vermin," he said. « . : ... . ■ — — 



serve the natural archKecture of (the building)," 
Bambadji said. 

Because of the closure, Madison's lost rev- 
enue that would have been brought by fans com- 
ing to watch the Lakers game and the Oscar de la 
Hoya vs. Shane Mosley fight, as well as by cele- 
brating graduates. 

r- "That is the end of our year," Bambadji s^id: 
"Our big business year. That's where we take rev- 
enue from that weekend and really reinvest it 
into the business." 

Slawner, while unable to quantify the losSes, 
said the business had already invested S 1,500 in 
pay-per-view services for that weekend. 

Additionally, Slawner said the restaurant's 
workers went unpaid for that time. 



Even though the broken pipe drained proper- 
ly when inspectors returned to Madison's on 
June 18, they still found live cockroaches and 
decided that the facility was not suiti^yble for oper- 
ation, according to Rocke. ; 

After the facility reopened on June 20, it 
received a "C" from the Health Department. 
The department assigns letter grades to food 
establishments based on an inspection score 
ranging from 70-100 points. 

Slawner and co-manager Sacha Bambadji 
said they tried their best to prepare the building 
for reinspection, but because the closure 
occurred on a Friday evening, they had difficulty 
in finding a pest-control company. 

"(The inspector) found a few living stragglers 
after the main pest control people had come 
through," Slawner said. "When you have any 
kind of problem like this and you do pest control, 
a few of them survive and die out gradually." '/ 

Still emphasizing that structural problems 
rather than food preparation violations led to the 
closure, both Slawner and Bambadji attributed 
Madison's age and location with some of its 
problems and its 9 grade. 7^^ - 

"You're going to have some general mainte- 
nance problems, especially when we try to pre- 



"I've got a staff of 10 to 20 peopIC he said. 
"As a business, we will survive,obviously, but on 
the personal level, I've got bartenders, waitresses 
and security people here. All of us didn't work 
this weekend." 

"They lose in a weekend (two hundred) to 
three hundred dollars," Slawner continued. 
- Slawner and Bambadji both said they have 
taken steps to meet all the standards set by the 
health department, including hiring a new pest 
control company. 

"We've been given a lot more freedom 
because of our experience to run this business in 
a successful, yet ... safe, healthy and attractive 
way, and that's our goal," Bambadji said. 

"You have to remember that our grade is only 
temporarily a C," Slawner said. "We're confi- 
dent we're going back to a B." 

Slawner said.Madison's employees and health 
department officials have cooperated to reach a 
successful end. 

"It's not us versus the health department or 
sides," he said. "We work with them. The inspec- 
tors that came out have been very helpful in 
terms of not just pointing out a problem or rec- 
ommending to fix a problem, but have been over- 
all very supportive and nice people." 

Speaking from experience, Rocke said he did 
not expect Madison's to reopen with any new 
violations. 

"We find that facilities that are closed down 
have a tendency to dramatically improve, and for 
the most part, many of them maintain that level," 
he said. "We're not going to let them open unless 
they're in really good shape." 



EMPLOYEES 

From page 1 

She said the conference center is a good 
work environment for its employees. 

"We have a close working^environment, and 
we want everyone to feel appreciated," Noble 
said. 

But service employees disagree, and suggest 
some administration policies are racist towards 
the minorities employed. 

"If you don't speak the language, you don't 
get promoted," the first housekeeper said. "If 
you're white, they think you're educated and 
better qualified.''^ 



are," Noble said. 

She added that about three of the 1 2 supervi- 
sors at the center are non-whites. 

Employees such as Bennett also complained 
that union representation has been discouraged 
by the conference center management. 

Because of such discouragement, Bennett 
said she now holds union meetings at home, 
rather than at work during their off hours. 

Hernandez, who has made several trips to 
the conference center, agreed with Bennett. 

"They want to prevent the union from going 

there and talking to people," Hernandez said. 

"If they have the right (o talk about the football 

game the night before, they also have the right 

-to talk about the union ..? — -^-- 



*They know already who will be assistants or 
at the front desk," she continued. "We don't 
have hope for another step." 



Shirley Bennett, a member of the kitchen 
staff, concurred. > .' 

Regarding supervisor positions, Bennett 
said administrators usually hire people from 
outside the conference center, "rather than pro- 
mote someone who's here, someone who is 
more qualified." 

Noble said long-time employees are encour- 
aged to apply for promotions, but often don't. 
She denied that any discrimination occurs at 
the facility. - - ;: ; • 

"It just depends on who walks in the door 
that's qualified, never mind what color they 



"That's what they call interrupting things," 
he continued, referring to administrators. 

But Noble said union representatives are 
allowed to talk to employees, just not while they 
are working. * ; ; " : 

"Our only counsel to them was not to talk to 
our employees on their work time," Noble said. 
"I've had to tell them that repeatedly." 

"We've had a horrible time with the unions," 
she added. 

Despite such disapproval, Hernandez said* 
the union plans to continue pursuing efforts at 
the conference center, though he doesn't expect 
significant results anytime soon. 

"In the end, this is going to be a long labor 
struggle,'^ Hernandez said. , 



METRO 

From page 3 

According to MTA spokesman Ed Scannell, 
this new system could cut the travel time of com- 
muters across the valley and the L.A. basin by as 
much as 25 percent. 

"This project is designed to get people, espe- 
cially commuters, to their destinations faster," he 
said. 

The new Red Line stations are also located 
near popular tourist destinations including 
Mann's Chinese Theatre, the Hollywood Bowl, 
Universal City Walk and the North Hollywood 
Arts District 

"On this new extension, for instance, one of 



the stops is Universal City." Scannell said. 
"People can just walk right across the street to 
Universal Studios or City Walk, And the price is 
certainly right - it's only $1.35, compared to the 
$7 people would normally have to pay for park- 

But with the introduction of the Rapid buses 
the MTA will cut limited express bus service in 
the Wilshire/Whittier and Ventura corridors, and 
critics say these attempts to improve the existing 
bus system do not offer an effective solution. 

"We were initially very supportive of Rapid 
buses," Orosz said. "But the MTA has turned 
what was originally a 16-line project into a two- 
line system. (They are) only implementing a tiny 
little piece of an entire program that the Bus 
Riders Union wants to see." 




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Daily Bruin 



Bring out the dance 

Straight off Broadway/'Fosse" hits Los Angeles. 
Turn to A&E next week to get the first look at 
this Tony Award-winner. 

Monday, June 26, 2000-Friday, June 30, 2000 





ENTERTAINMENT 




A&E on the Web 

'^ See all this and more at 
the Daily Bruin's 



•Ui***|»V( 



«- -I-, 1:', 



a."*"-' 



• Website 



www.dailybruin.ucla.edu 

Monday, June 26, 2000-Friday, June 30, 2000 



-«.W!z;ri^'^^ 




ummer 




THEATER: Students can 
enjoy free concerts at 
Hammer Museum, Royce 



By Michael Rosen-Molina 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

The school year is over and many 
students are home for the summer, 
but UCLA never rests for long. The 
arts are as active as ever over the 
summer months, and those who are 
fortunate enough to remain have 
their choice of entertainment. 

Northern Lights 

For entertainment all summer 
long. Northern Lights Coffee House 
is planning a special series for those 
people who will be living, working 
and taking classes on and around 



campus. 

"We're planning a series of one- 
act student plays," said Northern 
Lights manager Gabor Fabian. 
"We're working together with the 
theater department to get student 
actors involved." 

Coordinating the event with 
Fabian is Associate Professor Gary 
Gardener of the theater depart- 
ment, who will organize departmen- 
tal involvement throughout the sea- 
son. Specifics are not yet available, 
but will be announced upon the 
series commencement. 

Royce Hall 

Royce hall is hosting a free con- 
cert series by the Henry Mancini 
Institute, the summer education 
program for the American Jazz 
Philharmonic. Beginning July 29 
and running until Aug. 19, the six 



productions feature 80 new musi- 
cians who have received full scholar- 
ships to attend the institute. 

Hailing from all around the 
globe, the college and post-college 
level recipients will perform along- 
side established musicians like trum- 
peter and film composer Terence 
Blanchard, conductor 'Bruce 
Broughton, Brazilian guitarist Dori 
Caymmi and pianist Mike Lang. 
KLON-FM Radio will host the 
series. 

On Sept. 5 at 7 p.m. will be the 
Placido Domingo's Operalia 2000 - 
The Eighth Annual World Opera 
Competition. This performance will 
be the final contest with the Los 
Angeles Chamber Orchestra con- 
ducted by the famous tenor. 

"Pearl from the East - One Night 
in the Spice Island^" premieres 

See SUMMER, page 8 




Loaded Weenie Roast 



lineup lacks substance 






MICHAEL SHAW 



Photo Courtesy of FOSSE National Toui 



(Top) 
The Company per- 
forms "Crunchy 
Granola Suite" from 
"Fosse" a musical 
celebrating director 
Bob Fosse. 
(Bottom) 
(left to right) 
Stephanie Erb, 
Darby Stanchfield 
and Terrilynn 
— Towns in "Much 
Ado About 
Nothing." 




Photo Courtesy of Shakespeare Festival 



THEATER: Indulge newfound 
tastes at several arts venues 



By Barbara Mcfiuire 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff ^ \-' ■,. 

College is all about growing up and find- 
ing that inner-adult. The transition from 
high school to college is somewhat paral- 
leled to a transition from the cinemas to the 
theatre. As one gets older, it seems as if sud- 
denly there is this unwarranted and shock- 
ing appreciation for things like the theatre 
and arts, that only meant boring with a cap- 
ital B in younger years. 

This summer is full of fun things to do to 
refine and cultivate the growing adult in all 
of us. 



The Getty Center 

The Getty Center, for instance, which 
has free parking for college students with a 
student ID, offers many intriguing artistic 
ventures for those who embrace their new 
found love of theiirts. 

Running through October 8 is a collec- 
tion of photos taken by Eugene Atget titled, 
"The Man in the Street: Eugene Atget in 
Paris." These photos were taken by Atget in 
1890 as a way to document the endangered 
aspects of Parisian life and history and now 
act as a picture guide to the city of romance. 

Also at the Getty, opening August 15 and 
showing through November 5, is the exhibi- 
tion, "The Queen of Angels." This exhibit 
centers on the depiction of the Virgin Mary 



in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. 
The work of many different artists, such as 
Gentile de Fabriano and Simon Bening, will 
be shown in 18 illuminated manuscript 
books and leaves. 

Another interesting exhibit at the Getty is 
"Making a Prince's Museum: Drawings for 
the Late- 18th-century Redecoration of the 
Villa Borghese in Rome." This exhibit runs 
through September 17 and features 34 orig- 
inal drawings by Antonio Asprucci, an 
architect who helped to renovate the 200- 
year-old Villa Borghese in Rome. The draw- 
ings are set up in a fashion that resembles 
the way the villa and its rooms actually exist 
in Italy. . . 

Shakespearian Theatre 



This summer, Shakespeare seems to be 
quite popular. "Shakespeare Feslival/LA" 
is having its 17th season from June 29 
through July 30 and will be showing its pro- 
duction of "Much Ado About Nothing." 
This version has taken the timeless piece up 
to modem day, while at the same time giving 
it a '30s and '40s comical twist. 

Another Shakespeare piece being per- 
formed this summer is "The Taming of the 
Shrew," showing through September 24 at 
the Theatricum Bontanicum Summer 
Repertory in Topanga. The play is being 
reenacted in the outdoor amphitheater on 
Sunday nights at 4 p.m. - a great idea for a 
beautiful summer evening. 



See BRIEFS, pag« 8 



Taper, Too' resumes after hiatus with double-billing 




ttKStoS (ourlesy (it Mark Iap<'' forurr, 



THEATER: Plays exploring trials of life, 
adolescence through Latina/o-Chicana/o 
eyes starts off season of new productions 



By Barbara McGuire 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff ^ - 

The game of life is filled with many surprises that can throw 
one off course, and sometimes a curve ball is even thrown in, 
making things even more difficult to deal with. Kor most peo- 
ple, these curve balls are nothing more than a broken heart or 
a speeding ticket, but for some, they are things like getting 
drafted into the Vietnam war or growing up shamefully as a 
Latino in a white community. 

"Black Butterfiy, Jaguar Girl, Pitiata Woman and Other 
Superhero Girls, Like Me" and 'Drive My Coche," two new 
plays on a double bill at The Actors' Gang in Hollywood, 
focus on such curve balls as well as everyday issues. Part of the 
Taper, Too" 2000 season, these plays are the first to be per- 
formed under the "Taper, Too" after its five-year hiatus. 

"Taper, Too" is a branch of the Mark T^per Forum which 
considers itself a testing grounds for new and somewhat 
experimental plays. "Taper, Too" productions allow for a 
more intimate setting and closer interaction between the audi- 
ence and the actors on-stage, with Just as interesting shows. 

The first play, "Black Butterfly," created and directed by 
Luis Alfaro, follows the "growing-up" years of five Latinc 
teenagers in East Los Angeles. Each faces various challenges, 
some dealing with their culture and nationality, some dealing 



story on the writings of East Los Angeles poets Alma 
Cervantes, Sandra C. Munoz and Marisela Norte. 

The teenagers' problems are intermixed with comical 
moments, such as the embarrassment of one of the girls when 
the most popular boy at school calls her and hears in the back- 
ground that her family is watching the Spanish channel. Other 
scenes that make the audience grin include one in which one 
of the teens is at a dance trying to get the boy she likes to 
notice how "great" of a dancer she is by attempting some 
obnoxious moves. Justina Muchado, Christina Malpero, 
Zilah Mendoza, Carla Jimenez and Cristina Frias play the 
five teenage girls. They all have their Latino culture in com- 
mon, though each exhibits a wide range of personalities. 

Such comical, yet realistic issues are brought up alongside 
more serious "curve balls." One of the teens, for instance, 
experiences the death of her father. Another deals with the 
reality of being slapped by her mother in the face and the 
strength that it takes for her to forgive her mother and under- 
stand what she was going through. 

For the most part, however, "Black Butterfly" is upbeat, 
with each girl beaming girl-power (not the Spice Girl kind), 
and realizing that she should be proud of who she is. As the 
girls grow up, for each year they are older they stop and shout 
out various phrases that teens at such an age would say such 
as. "I don't think so," and "Whatever!" Such transitional 
moments remain light-hearted and comical no matter what 
the prior scene absolves. 

"Drive My Coche," though taking place in the 70s, focuses 
on the stresses of adolescence as well. Written by Roy Conboy 
and directed by Diane Rodriguez, the play has an intriguing 
beatnik club teel to it. I he mam character. Bill, played by 




(left to right) Cristina Frias, Carla Jimenez, Justina Machado, Christina Malparo and Ziiah Mendoza star 
in the coming-of-age play "Black Butterfly, Jaguar Girl, Pinata Wonnan, and Other Superhero Girls Like Me." 

dealing with his first love. is multi-talented, taking on the roles of different characters in 
llic story is tol<J in flashback f^hion in which Bill "steps the play, magically changing his voice from a hardheaded mil- 
out ol present day life and into the 70s. In the present day he ilary officer, to a drugged-out Veteran. 
pociictljy icjis his story in front of a mic, singing, free-styling iCathy, played by Ara Celi, is the only other actor in the play 



anil liuncmg, while acting out various roles in his memories . 
Such ,i double-scene trade ofT keeps the play engaging. Bill 



MUSIC: GwenStefani 
lone woman as female 
acts underrepresented 



By Judy Pale 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff ^ 

The heat was on, the lineup was 
hot, the meat was cookin', the crowd 
was massive, but, surprisingly, the 
concert ended up cold. 

Yes, this year it was bigger, longer 
and louder. And with that under 
consideration the concert should 
have been a day-long, hulking, sun- 
drenched, beer-soaked, hormone- 
charged, rockin' heaven for rock 
fans. 

But it was just nowhere near that. 

Instead, KROQ's annual Weenie 
Roast offered 50,000 fans a numb- 
ing 12 hours of bleak modem rock at 
Anaheim's Edison International 
Field. 

Over the past eight years, the 
Weenie Roast has been known to be 
bigger and badder each time, but 
this year it was kinder and gentler 
than ever before, resembling Lilith 
Fair more than anything else. , 

It wasn't difficult for Third Eye 
Blind to sedate the audience with its 
complete lack of flair and aggres- 
siveness. Lead singer Jenkins does- 
n't have the greatest voice as is, and 
one too many times he slipped into 
an annoying whine that sent thirsty 
throngs out of their seats and made 
it increasingly difficult to navigate 
the concession area. 

Creed crooned too many sound- 
alike songs until even the band's fans 
got nauseated. But the fireworks 
compensated for the band's unex- 
plosive music. 

Ozzy Osbourne reached one of 
his lowest points for someone who 
had once played such an integral 
role in one of heavy rock's seminal 
bands. He lost the visceral and meta- 
physical elan he had helming Black 
Sabbath during those awesome peak 
years. 

Apparently, Ozzy rates his solo 
stuff much as we do, feeling com- 
pelled to irKiude a Black Sabbath 
reunion in his performance. 

From several key acts it seem's 
like if you've seen it once, you've 
seen it all. For example, if Cypress 
Hill is tired of rap or has simply lost 
the creative spirit for the music that 
brought them to the forefront, why 
beat the listeners to death by revisit- 
ing old territory with the same rou- 
tine over and over again? 

The Offspring, however, did 
deliver a solid performance but 
never really ascended the innovative 
plateau. Sure, they've still got the 
chops, but their mild sermonizing 
and positive messages, admirable as 
they may be, are beginning to sound 
a little, uh, parental. 

Godsmack's u'nbearable perfor- 
mance proved there -shouldn't be 
any more room for inspired imita- 
tors in metal. Anaheim's own Lit 
and opening act Incubus really did- 
n't offer anything memorable but its 
sets were still strong enough to make 
Third Eye Blind look like a sister 
group. 

In this day of pseudo-macho, 
kitcheiMink, smarmy acts dominat- 
ing the Weenie Roasi, ihe women 
were not forgotten. The huge video cert. 



screen's camera scanned the crowd 
encouraging the females to repre- _ 
sent with bare breasts. Finally, the 
crowd began to generate a raucou» ^ 
ambiance when No Doubt's Gwen 
Stefani, the lone woman on the bill, ___ 
whipped up a schizo, bouncy set of 
ska-inflected rock. With her unique 
riot girl-meets-fragile babe personal- 
ity, she displayed a broad palette of 
emotions, styles and sounds through 
her dynamic ballads, testosterone- 
fueled rock, diaphanous slow rock, 
and a dash of power pop. 

It also helped that Scott Weiland 
from Stone Temple Pilots was as 
eccentric and spontaneous as ever, 
appearing in a bight red wig and a 
tiny silver dress, making a point to 
the crowd that he wanted to show 
cohesion with underrepresented . 
women. < , 

Despite the singer*s much-publi- 
cized trials and tribulations with 
drugs, he and the band have not lost 
their ability to tantalize the crowd 
with clarity and vibrancy. ► ' 

The spell was been cast by the A 
undisputed leader of the night, 
Korn. Overloads of angst-ridden 
teens everywhere released their frus- 
tration and used their heavy music 
as a punching bag for their daily 
lives, a temporary antidote to their 
bitterness. 

Lead singer Jonathan Davis's 
pained vocals rode high above the 
quintet's creepy metallic grind, as it 
engendered a kind of narcotic 
mood, a condition seething with the 
vulgar frustration of the young and 
disillusioned. 

However, Korn didn't misplace 
its rage in a wash of complicated 

indulgences, and it hadn't forgotten 

the importance of humor in such 
bizarre and monstrous musical 
expression. 

On the other hand, Davis's good 
pal Fred Durst of Limp Bizkit was 
unable to initiate a lively response 
from the crowd in his attempts to 
recreate the pandemonium at last 
year's Woodstock. And, boy, did 
Durst try hard. He was as restless as 
a caged leopard, hyping the crowd 
to jump and "bum rush the stage" 
with his lame rendition of House of — 
Pain's "Jump Around." And during' 
"Nookie" he evoked fans to break 
through the security barricade. 

The crowd's reluctance to turn 
annihilative demonstrated that Fred 
has lost his trademark ability to 
incite a teeming horde to hostility 
like he did last summer. Maybe secu- 
rity was doing a better job, or maybe _. 
some people are sick of Durst's typi- 
cal anthem of anti-authoritarianism. 

As the eccentric card in this year's • 
lineup, Moby bore the challenging 
mantle of bring the only electronic 
act. His performance on^' proved 
that the entire genre's mettle and live 
viability was greeted with indiffer- 
ence of tens of thousands of kids. 
Moby lost the crowd's attention by 
running around and doing a little of 
everything and nothing, while his ' 
venomous comments about frat 
boys lowered the energy leveK 

All in all, the Weenie Roast did do 
a good j(^ of being an open-fhinded 
festival, providing a little something 
for anyone and nothing for every- 
body. It's just too bad the quality of 
music and atmosphere had to be sac- 
nficed for the immensity ofihe con- 



Ara Cdi and Jesse Borrego star as two lovers fighting to stay 
together in "Drive My Coche," a rock 'n' roll nnemory play. 



with problems any teenager could face. Alfaro based thi« Jesse Borrego, is an 18-year-old Chicano facing the draft and 



Monday, June 26, 2000-Friday, June 30, 2000 



Daily Bruin Arts & Entertainment 



COCHE 

From page 6 

and is Bill's first and tumultuous 
love who constantly plays mind 
games with him. Kathy serves as a 
fantasy world for Bill up until his 
draft status is altered to I A. 
Suddenly her character's attitude 
takes a sharp turn and presents 
Bill with the reality of war and life. 

"Drive My Coche" combines 
fun with serious issues just as^ 
"Black Butterfly" does. The game 
of love is examined, as well as the 
stresses of the Vietnam war and 
its effects on all the people 
involved. 

The double bill provides an 
intcrest^ng night. The differing 
stories of "Black Butterfly " and 
"Drive My Coche" provide some- 
thing for everyone, both to enjoy 
and resonate with while at the 
same time, not bombarding the 
audience with totally opposing 
themes. 

THEATER: The Taper Too will be 
releasing various innovative and 
experimental plays through July 1 7 
at The Actors' Gang in Hollywood. 
For information or tickets call the 
Center Theatre Group box office at 
(213) 628-2772 or check on-line at 
www.TaperAhmanson.com. 



SUMMER 

J ■ *. . ' ■ 

From page 6 

Sept. 9 at 6 pm. — 

The show presents tradi- 
tional dance, folk songs 
and fashions from Maluku, 
Indonesia. 

The Los Angeles 
Chamber Orchestra, also 
performs at Royce on Sept. 
23 at 8 p.m. 



Hammer Museum 

t 

An impressive selection 

of jazz artists will be visiting 
4lie^ UCLA Hammer 
Museum in Westwood. 
Every Friday evening for 
the month of July, a free, 
outdoor performance in the 
Hammer's garden court- 
yard will be provided for a 
fun relaxing evening, begin- 
ning at 6:30 p.m. and ending 



BRIEFS 

Frompage6 

Ahmanson 



ing through July 9. Dancers in "Fosse" are 
well-experienced and the show is of much 
acclaim, promising a spectacular and 
exciting night. 



LATC 

The Los Angeles Tennis 
Center at UCLA has iTs 
share of events as well. On 
Sept. 10 is the Acura Music 
Festival. Subtitled 

"Destination New 

Orleans," the performance 
features music greats John 
Fogerty, Dr. John, and Irma 
Thomas, as well as blues 
and jazz on a separate 
stage. . ■■- •'■■^ '• •..->■ 

Wave LA will present an 
eclectic mix of performers 
with R&B artist Eric Benet, 
jazz saxophonist Dave Koz, 
New Age musician Craig 
Chaquico, stand-up comedi- 
an and weatherman Fritz 
Coleman, ancj others on 
Sept. 16 at 7 pm. 



-at 8 p. m . : — 

From theater to music, 
summer is far from a dead 
time for on-campus arts. 
Away from the crowds of 
the regular year, summer 
studeh^ can relax, kick back 
and erftpy the art that may 
otherwise be hard to see. 

ART: Tickets for the Mancini 
Institute Concerts are avail- 
able at the Royce Hall Box 
Office beginning June 29. 
The Office can be reached at 
(310)825-2101. Tickets for 
other Royce events can be 
purchased at the Central 
Ticket Office, and non-Royce 
event tickets can be pur- 
chased through Ticketmaster 
(213)480-3232. For the infor- 
mation regarding events at 
the Hammer Museum call 
(310)443-7000. 



At the Ahmanson Theatre the final pro- 
duction of the season will be showing this 
summer, through September 3. "The Dead" 
is a musical play written by James Joyce and is 
the winner of a Lucille Lortel Award for Best 
New Musical. It is based on a classic Irish 
short story that Joyce wrote about a family 
-Christrnas celebratioirwith ^OfflFTffusic^lov- 
ing aunts. 



JSlark Taper Forum 



Comedy 

The Groundlings (located on Melrose 
Avenue) is releasing its new main stage show, 
"Groundlings vs. The State of California," for 
their 25th year. Presented will be talented and 
up-and-coming comedians from around Los 
Angeles. Somewhat like a theatrical Saturday 
Night Live, the Groundlings will be featuring^ 
all-new, original collections of sketches and 
improv skits. 



Daity Bruin Sports 



Monday. June 26, 2000-Frid4y, June 30, 2000 9 



REICHLE 

from page 12 



The Mark Taper Forum will be showing 
"King Hedley 11" by August Wilson this sum- 
mer, from September 14 through October 22. 
August is a Pulitzer Prize as well as Tony 
Award winning playwright. The play takes 
place in 1985, in the backyards of two homes 
located in the Hill District of Pittsburgh. 
Presented in the play are the successes and 
failures a community experiences when deal- 
ing with issues of family, unemployment and 
crime. 

Shubert Theatre 

The Shubert Theatre will also be busy this 
summer, hosting "Fosse," a Tony Award win- 
ner for Best Musical. "Fosse," choreo- 
graphed and directed by Bob Fosse, comes to 
California from Broadway and will be show- 



"Growing-up" may actually entail much 
more than just going to see and appreciate 
things like art and the theatre, but who cares, 
one can pretend. It's important to realize, 
however, no matter how you choose to inter- 
pret them, the arts are readily available and 
enjoyable. So get out there and lake in some 
of the finer things in life. 

ART: For information on art exhibits at the Getty 
Center call (310) 440-7300 or visit the Getty 
online at www.getty.edu. To get tickets to the 
Shakespeare Festival/LA call (^10) 377-4316. To 
check out the Theatricum Botanicum call (310) 
455-3723. For Groundlings Info and show times, 
call (323) 934-9700. The Ahmanson Theatre and 
its shows can be accessed at 
www.TaperAhmanson.com or by calling (213) 
628-2772. Tickets can be purchased for the musi- 
cal "Fosse" by calling Tele-Charge at (800) 447- 
7400 or at www.telecharge.com. 



■t 




then a freshman phenom at the College 
of the Sequoias, and when his sdiool 
and UCLA faced off, Hoffman almost 
sin^e-handedly destroyed the Bruins. 
After the game Reichle came up to him 
and said, "I want you to play for our 
team. 

Play for UCLA? It was Hoffman's 
dream come true. Just one problem. 

"I told him, M would love to play for 
UCLA - but I promised the coach here 
I would stay for two years,'" Hoffman 
said. 

Reidile was silent for a moment, 
and then said, "Son, I'm gonna save 
your scholarship." / ; - 

When Hoffman came to UCLA one 
year later, he found a scholarship wait- 
ing for him. "Art would always stand 
by you," he said. 

Reichle was tough as well. For many 
years he owned ranches and ran sum- 
mer camps for city kids to learn how to 
live in the forest and care for horses. 
Gary Anglen, a former pitcher and 
ranch worker, recalled one time when 
Reichle turned around on his horse to 
take a picture of those behind him 
when the horse budced and threw him 
off- hard. / - * ■ 

"Art didn't say a word, though we 
knew he was hurting. He just got back 
on his horse and rode on," Anglen said. 
'it turned out he broke three ribs. He 
spent two weeks in bed, even though it 
was supposed to be six, and ran his 
ranch from there." 

He was strong to the end. When 
Wooden heard Reichle was ill he gave 
him a phone call. 



"They told me he was too weak to 
talk. Then I heard a voice say. 'Who is 
JhalT^When they told him it was me, he 
laid, i'll Ulk. I want to talk to 
Johnny,'" Wooden said. "I got to share 
a few words with him before he left to 
go to a more wonderful place." 

And to his kids, Reichle was just the 
best father. 

'We've heard about the privilege of 
Art Reichle as a friend. Well, guess 
what. I get to talk about having him as 
a father," a tearful Richard Reichle 
said. "I bet you he was a better father 
than a friend. Actually, there's no bet 
Decision's been made. God knows he 
was an awesome father." 

That day, 75 people gathered and 
remembered the things that made Art 
Reichle memorable: his penchant for 
giving out nicknames; his desire to help 
children grow into good people; his 
habit of giving so much that he was 
known for trying to out-give others. 

And they remembered what Reichle 
believed in - loyalty to friends and hon- 
oring your word. They were values he 
both lived and taught, and his lessons 
are ones those he loved will never for- 
get. But maybe that's because Reichle 
never let them forget that he'd always 
be there for them. 

At the memorial, Anglen finished 
his tribute to his former coach and 
mentor by recalling something Reichle 
said to him before he died: 

"There'll always be a saddle, there'll 
always be a horse, and when you get to 
heaven, we'll finish that ride." . 

• • • 

Reichle is survived by his wife, 
Ruth, 82; son Art Sr., 54; daughter 
Denise Margarit, 49; son Ridiard, 47; 
and granddaughter Chanel Rachel, 2. 



KAPONO 

From page 12 



enrolled at UCLA during the Spring 
Quarter and took finals. He partici- 
pated in on-campus workouts for pro- 
fessional teams to allow scouts to 
gauge where his skills would put him 
on the draA charts. He did not attend 
the NBA Pre-DraA Camp in Chicago 
June 6-9, though former teammates 
Jerome Moiso and JaRon Rush, who 
remain in the draft, did. 

**I made an effort during the spring 
to continue my progress toward a 
degree and I'm going to summer 
school, too," Kapono said. "The bot- 
tom line is I want to come back and 
play for coach Lavin and do what I 
can to help us be a successful team this 
season." 

Kapono was one of only two 
Bruins, alongside co-captain Earl 
Watson, to start all 33 games last year. 
His 16 ppg scoring average was the 
highest by a freshman in the Pac-IO 
last season and was the second highest 
single-season mark in UCLA fresh- 
man history, behind Don MacLean's 
18.6 in 1988-89. 

"We had a lot of confidence that he 
was going in the first round, and I'm 
surprised he's not going, but it's 
Jason's choice," said his father, Joe 
Kapono. "He just wants some polish- 
mg. 

Other UCLA records set by the 
Lakewood, Calif, native induded the 
single-season three-point (made) 
record with 82, breaking the old 
school record of 78, set by Tracy 
Murray in 1992. His end of the season 
honors were capped by the CBS 



SportsLine National Freshman of the 
Year and the Pac-IO co-Freshman of 
Jhc Year awards. 

UCLA will now have three return- 
ing starters from last year's NCAA 
Sweet 16 squad - senior guard Eari 
Watson, junior center Dan Gadzuric 
and Kapono. 

"Of course we are very pleased to 
have Jason returning to our team," 
Bruin head coadi Steve Lavin said in 
a statement. — 



"Jasdn was very deliberate in his 
approach to exploring his future in 
basketball at the next level. Jason 
decided that even though he would be 
a first round draft choice, he wanted 
to come back to our UCLA family for 
another year of education and basket- 
ball," he said. 

Lavin was optimistic about the 
upcoming season. 

"As our leading scorer from last 
season, his return solidifies our 
chances of again being one of the 
nation's top teams for the coming sea- 
son," he said. 

• • • 

It was announced last Monday that 
the Bruin men's basketball program 
signed a third member to the 2000 
recruiting class. Ryan Walcott , a 6- 
foot-3 point guard from Shadow 
Mountain High in Phoenix, Ariz., 
signed a grant in aid contraa to play 
basketball at UCLA. 

While Walcott joins the team after 
the official signing period, the grant- 
in-aid serves the same purpose as a 
sdiolarship to play NCAA basketball. 

Last Fd>niary, Walcott helped lead 
Shadow Mountain to the Arizona 5A 
State Championship. A cousin to 
University of Arizona standout Mike 



Bibby, who is currently with the 
NBA's Vancouver Grizzli^, Walcott 
averaged 16.2 points and 5.4 assists 
per game last season as a senior. He 
shot 52 percent from the field, 40 per- 
cent from threeix>int range and 76 
percent from the foul line. 

"We arc thrilled to have Ryan 
Walcott join the UCLA basketball 
family," Lavin said. "Ryan comes 
from an elite high school program and 
-was well^chooled by his coach, Jerry 
Conner. Our staff believes Ryan's 
future is vei^ bright." 

For the last four seasons; Walcott 
has been the starting point guard. He 
helped lead the team to 21 victories in 
its last 22 games, including wins over 
three Top 10 teams to reach the 
Arizona State semi-finals. Shadow 
Mountain was 27-5 in 1999-2000. 

During Walcott's four-year (1997- 
2000) high school career. Shadow 
Mountain was 92-37 overall, includ- 
ing a 266 mark in 1999 and advanced 
to the Arizona State Tournament all 
four seasons. 

"This was Ryan's fourth year as 
our starting point guard," Conner 
said. "He not only has point guard 
skills as far as being able to push the 
ball and pass, but he possesses the off- 
guard's ability to shoot the basketball. 
He's really a complete player, who is 
very quick on defense." 

Walcott, who was also recruited by 
the likes of St. Louis and Arizona 
State, is UCLA's third incoming 
freshman recruit for the coming sea- 
son. He joins 6-foot-9T. J. Cummings, 
from Homewood-Rossmore High in 
Homewood, III. and 6^oot-8 Josiah 
Johnson, from Montclair Prep in Van 
Nuys. 




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— 10 Monday, June 26. 2000-Friday, June 30, 2000 



DaHy Bfuin Sports 



r^ 



NBA draft claims two from UCLA 



M.HOOPS: Moiso may go 
No. 8; Rushiess hopeful; 
Kapono decides to wait 



By AJ Cadman 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

The exodus of some of the nation's 
best basketball underclassmen from 
college to the pros begins Wednesday 
when the N BA holds its annual ama- 
teur draft at 4:30 p.m. at the Target 
Center in Minneapolis. 

While UCLA reclaimed one of its 
would-be draftees in freshman Jason 
Kapono last Monday, two other 
Bruins, 
sophomores 
J e r o m-e 
Moiso and 
JaRon Rush, 
arc attempt- 
ing to follow 
in the foot- 
steps of for- 
mer UCLA 
point guard 
Baron Davis, who left college for a 
professional basketball contract. 

"I think I have the potential to play 
in the NBA," Moiso said at a press 
conference held after he and Rush 
decided to enter their names in the 
draft. "|t will take a lot of hard work 
in the first year to make the transition 
from college basketball to the pros." 

UCLA has already had five first- 
round draft picks this decade, and 
will attempt to land two more in the 
first year of the new millennium. In a 
draft lacking immediate impact play- 
ers, two of Westwood's most high- 
profile athletes will try to land a spot 
on an NBA roster next season. 

Moiso, a 6-foot- 10 forward who 




JaRon Rush 



declared his intentions after many 
believed he might be a marginal pick 
from the lottery to the middle first 
round, has impressed professional 
scouts with his versatility and size. 
Through private workouts with sev- 
eral NBA squads, he has many bas- 
ketball analysts, including ESPN's 
Andy Kalz, saying that Moiso could 
go as high as No. 8 to the Cleveland 
Cavaliers. 

Moiso has all the necessary skills 
to develop into a solid NBA forward. 
The Guadeloupe, West Indies, native 
has a smooth midrange jumper and a 
soft touch, as well as a great leaping 
ability to rebound and shotblock at a 
professional level. 

Yet skeptics such as George 
Rodecker, a CBS sportsline.com 
analyst who has also written for pub- 
lications like College Hoops Insider 
and Basketball Times, have dubbed 
Moiso as inconsistent and as some- 
one who turns his energy on and off. 

Critics say he can dominate unlike 
any other in college basketball, but 
can also disappear while being the 
largest player on the court. With big- 
ger bodies and more physical contact 
m the NBA, Moiso must be able to 
pound in the paint. 

But his offensive prowess earned 
him AII-Pac-10 Honorable Mention. 
He averaged 12 points and seven 
rebounds per contest while shooting 
nearly 50 percent from the field. 

UCLA's other underclassmen 
looking to get drafted on Wednesday 
is Rush, a 6-7 forward^ He received 
much publicity last season for viola- 
tions of NCAA amateur rules and 
was suspended for much of the sea- 
son before returning for its final nine 
contests. 

But his playing in those games was 
crucial in helping UCLA reach the 



Sweet 16 for the third time in four 
years. 

Rush was instrurhental in his first 
game back from suspension. He 
scored 17 points, capped by a base- 
line jumper at the buzzer in overtime, 
to lead the Bruins to a 94-93 upset vic- 
tory over then top-ranked Stanford ai 
Maples Pavilion: — ■ . • 

While his statistics might make 
many NBA teams turn away, the 
Kansas City native's athleticism still 
has many teams examining his" draft 
possibilities. Rodecker has tabbed 
Rush as going anywhere from the late 
first-round to not being chosen at all. 
While the latter is not a likely sce- 
nario, the critics point to Rush's 
weaker ball- 
handling and 
perimeter 
shooting skills 
as reasons 
why he could 
slip down the 
draft board. 

But Rush 
improved in 
both of those 
areas last season, 

complementing that with a desire to 
play aggressively above the rim, as 
witnessed by his numerous alley-oop 
jams and rebounds against bigger 
players. His tenacity should help him 
survive an NBA season. 

"I think this is a great opportunity 
for me," Rush said at the press con- 
ference. "Coach has talked to the 
GMs and said I could go anywhere 
from 15 to 25 (in the first round) and 
might slip, at worse, into the second 
round. It really depends on how the 
individual team workouts go." 

Kapono's recent pullout has much 

SceOMFTrpagell 




Jerome Moiso 



Sears Cup standings name 
atNetic department No. 2 



TROPHY: UCLA awarded 
for excellence of program; 
Stanford takes No. 1 rank 



By Oirb Umpicrre 

Daily Bruin Staffs 



The UCLA athletic department 
provided some more evidence this past 
season that Sports Illustrated wasn't 
too far off when it tabbed UCLA as 
the No. 1 jock school in 1997. 

UCLA finished the 1999-2000 sea- 
son as the second best overall colle- 
giate athletic program in the nation, 
according to the ^ 

Sears Directors 
Cup standings. 
Spearheaded by 
five national 
titles, the Bruins 
scored 1 103.5 to 
finish 166 

points behind 
first place 
Stanford 
(1269.5). 

It was 

UCLA's sev- 
enth straight 

top five finish and best performance in 
the Sears Cup standings since the 
1995-1996 season. 

"1 thought we had a great overall 
year," UCLA Associate Athletic 
Director of recruiting Michael 
Sondheimer said. '* Finishing second is 
a major accomplishment for us. 

"UCLA has had a lot of great years 
but this was the best in a few years," he 
added. 



SEARS DIRpgpfr^ |11P SrillfiillG^ 1 


I.Stanford 


i;i69.5* 


2.UCU 


1,103.5* 


B.Midiigan 


965 


4.NoithCarotina 


908.5 


S.PennState 


859.5* 


* points from the College WMttf Series to be a<i(M. 


sowa spMtik* 


jAcO^ LIAO/Daily Bruin 



The Bruins won national titles this 
past season in men's water polo, 
women's indoor track and field, 
women's gymnastics, men's volleyball, 
and women's water polo. Since 
"women's water polo is not yet a 
NCAA sponsored sport, however, it 
was not taken into consideration. ^_ 
The five national titles was UCLA's 
highest total since the 1983-84 season. 
And if the Bruins received a timely 
hit, kicked the ball just right, or had 
been injury-free, several other UCLA 
sports could have brought more hard- 
ware to Westwood. 

The UCLA softball team lost the 
championship game to Oklahoma 3-1 

but had an 

excellent chance 

to win the game 

in the final 

inning. With 

runners at first 

and second with 

two outs, cen- 

terfielder Crissy 

Buck was caHed 

out for leaving 

early as she 

attempted to 

steal third base. 

The Bruin 

men's soccer team lost a four-overtime 

semifinal game 3-2 to eventual NCAA 

champion Indiana. 

The UCLA men's tennis team was 
picked by many to challenge for the 
NCAA title but their hopes were 
severely damaged when the Bruins' 
No. 2 singles and No. I doubles player 
Brandon Kramer fractured his right 

..... .,.; SeeSEAB^pageTT 



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r 



FAOA - 

From page 12 

varying accounts- on who was 
the aggressor of the fight on 
May 30. 

According to deputy district 
attorney Dana Garcetti and 
Wirth, who spoke to the detec- 
tive on the case and to several 
students who have come to visit 
DeZubiria, Faoa started th«- 
fight. 

"Asi was challenging people 
-to fight," Garcetti said. "Hc^ 
was asking something like, 'Do 
you want a piece of me?'" 

According to Wirth nobody 
would fight with Faoa, and so 
he hit a nearby student who hap- 
pened to be DeZubiria. 

"Rodrigo didn't even see the 
blow coming; he was totally 
blindsided and thrown down, 
striking his head on the con- 
crete," she said. "He was 
knocked unconscious." 

Faoa's lawyer, Milton 
Grimes, tells a different story. 

Grimes said DeZubiria was 
the aggressor, that he punched 
Asi in the eye and Faoa struck 
back once. 

"We don't know all that hap- 
pened. It seems Unlikely that 
Asi would provoke a fight. At 



Daily Bniin Spofts 



Monday, June 26, 200(>-Fri(by, June 30, 2000 11 



worst, he was defending him- 
self," he added. 

According to Garcetti and 
Wirth 's accounts, there was no 
evidence of anybody threaten- 
ing Faoa. 

"I know that Asi is claiming 
Rodrigo hit him first, but that is 
untrue," Wirth said. "The 
police report and witnesses to 
the incident say the attack was 
totally unprovoked." 
—But the defcnse'slstory is the 
opposite of this. 



Both DeZubiria and 

Faoa's fannilies feel 

the effects of the 

fight. 



"It appeared to be a reaction 
of self-defense on Asi's part," 
Grimes said. "It wasn't his 
fault." 

According to Kim Faoa, 
when her son came home a few 
days after the incident, his eye 
was black and bleeding from the 
hit it had taken. 

Should Faoa be found guilty, 
the prosecution has not yet 
decided what punishment it will 



seek for him. Garcetti said 
prison is an option, but added, 
"It depends on how facts come 
out at the preliminary hearing." 

Both DeZubiria and Faoa's 
families feel the effects of the 
fight. 

"The medical costs are quite 
high," Wirtfesaid of treatment 
for her son| "The insurance 
helps, butxloes not cover every- 
thing, and treatment will contin- 
ue for quite some time. 

"Rodrigo has also lost time 
from school and work. I have 
taken an unpaid leave from 
work to care for him so I am 
incurring wage loss as well," she 
added. 

Kim Faoa sees an injustice 
done against her son. The time 
between the fight and his arrest, 
Faoa had not been aware of the 
extent of DeZubiria's injuries, 
and had no idea that he might 
be in legal trouble. His June 16 
arrest at his dormitory was a 
complete shock to him. 

"Why was my son not ques- 
tioned by police officers in this 
matter? Tliey just showed up 
and arrested him," she said. 

"I just hope this whole ordeal 
doesn't afTect him, that he can 
go on with his education. 
Something like this can destroy 
somebody." 



SEARS 

From page 10 

wrist three days before tournament play. 

Despite the close calls, the UCLA athletic 
department is very proud of its finish in the 
Sears Cup. 

"Our finish in the Sears Cup shows the out- 
standing broad base athletic program we 
strive for every year at UCLA," UCLA 
spokesman Marc Dellins said. 
— Sondheimer added: "To have that kind of 
program where every sport does well nation- 
ally you need special coaches and special ath- 
letes. At UCLA, we have both." 
. Meanwhile, Stanford won its unpr^edent* 
ed sixth straight Sears Cup behind two nation- 
al tides in men's tennis and men's outdoor 
track and field and runner-up finishes in base- 
ball, women's tennis, women's golf, women's 
volleyball and men's water polo. 

"Eadi year Stanford's student athletes and 
the athletics department, strive to win the 
Sears Directors' Cup, the measuring stick for 



college athletics," Stanford Athletic Director 
Ted Ldand said. 

"Through the Sears Directors* Cup pro- 
gram, Stanford's student-athletes, coaphes 
and support staff are rewarded for their dedi- 
cation to excellence in all sports," he added. 

However, Sondheimer feels the tables are 
tilted more toward the Cardinal in the Sears 
Cup competition. 

"Stanford's got a great program but I 
think the format favors them," he said. 
"They've got more sports than we do." 

The Cardinal has 28 sports while UCLA" 
ha9^2l. The Sears Cup standings consider all 
of the NCAA sponsored sports a school has. 
— The Cup began during the 1993-94 season^ 
Prior to that season, USA Today conducted 
separate surveys for men's and women's pro- 
grams. It began its surveys for the best men's 
program in 1971 and for the best women's 
program in 1977. 

Under that format, UCLA was selected 
the No. I men's athletic program 1 1 times 
and the No. I women's athletic program 10 
times. 



DRAFT 

FrompagelO 

to do with creating a gauge of his current sta- 
tus. It should allow NBA scouts to examine 
his game more closely next season from its 
start. The Lakewood, Calif, native might then 
attempt the draft next year and work himself 
into the lottery. 

Should Moiso go in the first round 



Wednesday, it would mark the first time a 
Bruin has gone in the first round in back-to- 
back years since 1979-80. 

The last time two players from UCLA 
went in the first round in the same draft was 
1992, when Tracy Murray and Don 
MacLean went 18th and 19th, respectively. 
The last time a UCLA player cracked the first 
round while not garnering a first team All- 
Conference award was in 1995 when George 
Zidek was taken by the Charlotte Hornets. 



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12 

I Ifs draft day for the NBA 
This Wednesday UCLA men's bas- 
ketball sophomores Jerome 
Moiso and JaRon Rush find out 
where they might go in the NBA. 
See story inside. 

Monday, June 26, 2000-Friday, June iO, 2000 



Daily Bruin 




Sports on the Web 

, See all this and more at 

the Daily Bruin's 

' ■ . Website: 

www.dailybruin.ucla.edu 



n 






;.• > • 




FOOTBALL: Faoa pleads 



not giiilty; incident leaves 
victim with brain damage 



By Pauline Vu 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff . _^__J 

UCLA redshirt freshman line-, 
backer Asi Faoa was arresfed ^or hit- 
.ting another student who is now suf- 
fering from brain damage. 

Faoa, 19, was arrested on June 16 
and charged with one count each of 
mayhem and assault after a May 30 
altercation with third-year psycholo- 
gy student Rodrigo DeZubiria, 22. 

The incident occurred at a 
Lambda Chi block party on 
Strathmore and Gayley in celebra- 
tion of the Inter-sorority Volleyball 
Tournament. According to the 



police report, Faoa and DeZubiria 
^roltidedrepeatedly in^ moshptttrt — 
the party. Then Faoa struck 
DeZubiria with his elbow once. 
DeZubiria was said to have been 
intoxicated at the time. 

After he was struck, DeZubiria 
fell to the ground. Though the prose- 
cution says that the combination of 
Faoa's hit and the impact of hitting 
the ground caused DeZubiria's 
brain damage, the defense says it 
was solely the fall that put 
DeZubiria in his present state. 

DeZubiria is recuperating at his 
San Francisco hcune. The brain 
damage he received affected the part 
of his brain that controls speaking, 
reading, writing, comprehension 
and other areas of language. 

"I was very frightened for him, 
and upset that something like this 
could occur at a respected universi- 




Deborah WT 




' Spofts Information 

Freshman linebacker Asi Faoa 
was arrested on June 16. 

ty, and by someone who is supposed 
to represent that school in a positive 
way," said DeZubiria's mother, 



s affesn;:aTne^a$^ surpftse- 
to his family. 

"We were shocked," said Kim 
Faoa, Asi's mother. "Because that's 
not our son - Asi would not hit any- 
body. As parents, we were very hurt 
that somebody can do something 
like that, destroy our son like that. 
He's just not that person." 

Faoa, 19, has been indefinitely 
suspended from the football team. 

"The suspension is consistent 
with past precedent," UCLA 
Athletic Director Peter Dalis said in 
a statement. "We will investigate the 
situation beCpre making any other 
decisions." ^ 

At his arraignment on Monday, 
June 19, Faoa pled not guilty to both 
charges. His preliminary hearing.jt 
was set for July 10 and his bail, orig> 
inally set at $100,000 at the time of . 



his arrest, was lowered to $25,000. 
After the arraignment Faoa^ was 



taken to the Los Angeles County 
Jail. 

By midnight of Tuesday, however, 
his family had raised the money 
needed to post bail, with help from 
family members, friends, and the 
local community in Anaheim, 
Faoa's hometown. 

Also, when the Anaheim commu- 
nity learned of Faoa's arrest, many 
people came forward to offer them- 
selves as witnesses to his character. 

"There arc people here who love 
him and who believe in their hearts 
that our son is not the person that 
they said he was or accused him of 
being," Kim Faoa said. "The sup- 
port has been so marvelous." 

The prosecution and defense have 

SccM0A,page11 





man 




Photo courtesy of Richard Reichle 



To remember former UCLA 
baseball coach Art Reichle 

is to understand the 
— ^ meaning of loyalty - — 



Two memorial services were held for Art Reichle, former head 
coach for the UCLA baseball team, who passed away last month. 



By Pauline Vu 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

The UCLA record books mention that 
Art Reichle served as the Bruin head base- 
ball coach for 30 years; that he led the 
Bruins to their first College World Series 
appearance in 1969; that he compiled a 
747-582-12 overall record; that he was 
inducted into the UCLA Athletics Hall of 
Fame in 1998. 

But there was a lot more to Art Reichle 
than just stats. 

He was a man whose word was his 
bond. A friend who gave as much loyally 
as he inspired. A father who passed these 
values to his children. 

And though Arthur Eugene Reichle Jr., 
86, died May 23 of heart failure, those who 
showed up at The Church of the Way in 
Van Nuys the day before Father's Day did 
not come to mourn his death so much as to 
honor his life. 

"It's not within my vocabulary to ade- 
quately express how I feel about him." for-. 



mer UCLA men's basketball coach John 
Wooden said. "Art, we love )^u, we miss 
you, we'll never forget you." 
- Denny Crum, the head men's basket- 
ball coach in Louisville and a former 
UCLA assistant coach, was another 
speaker at the memorial. "You couldn't 
have a better friend than Art Reichle," he 
said. "And while we all certainly will miss 
Art, he could not be in better hands." 

An earlier memorial was held in 
Florida, where Reichle moved in 1989. 
The Van Nuys memorial was held by 
Reichle's son Richard and daughter 
Denise, who live in the Los Angeles area. 
Most of the approximately 75 people pre- 
sent were UCLA-related. They included 
Wooden, Crum, current baseball coach 
Gary Adams, former men's swimming 
and water polo coach Bob Horn (1963- 
1990), and a host of former players. 

Those present remembered the good 
times with Reichle. Wooden recalled his 
kindness toward him when Wooden first 
moved to California from the Midwest. 



"The big city frightened me. Art was 
one of two people to begin with who really 
befriended ma," he said. 

Wooden recounted that when he and 
his wife Nellie bought their house in Los 
Angeles, it cost them everything they had 
and they did not have enough money left 
to have someone set up their sprinkler sys- 
tem. Then one day out of the blue, Reichle 
showed up with several players to install 
the system for Wooden. 

A similar incident occurred later. 
Telling Wooden, "You ought to get a bas- 
ketball court," Reichle showed up one day 
and together. Wooden and Reichle built a 
concrete court for Wooden's kids. 

"He was a very giving person, and he 
had a heart as big as his body," Wooden 
said. "He'd help anyone, give anything." 

Others also recalled Reichle's loyalty. 

Ross Hoffman, a Bruin first baseman 
from 1967 to 1968, remembered the first 
time he spoke to Reichle. HofTman was 



Kapono withdraws 
name from draft 



M.HOOPS: Forward 
decides to return to 
UCLA next season 



ByAJCadman 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

UCLA freshman forward 
Jason Kapono announced 
on Friday of finals week that 
he would withdraw his name 
from consideration for this 
year's NBA draft on 
Wednesday and return to the 
Bruin basketball program. 

Submitting a formal letter 
to the NBA offices in New 
York five days before the 
pull-out deadline of June 21, 
Kapono is eligible to return 
to UCLA because he did not 
sign representation with an 
agent while a draft candidate. 

The Bruins' leading scorer 
last season with a 16 points 



per contest average,' Kapono 
had previously declared his 
intentions to "test the waters" 
of the NBA Draft on May 13. 

He stated in his letter to 
NBA deputy commissioner 
Russ Granik that "this letter 
shall serve as my notice to 
resume participation in inter- 
collegiate athletics at UCLA 
and withdraw my name as a 
candidate for the 2000 NBA. 
Draft." 

"I had a lot of things to 
consider," Kapono said. "I 
believe I would have been a 
first-round selection in this 
draft. The deciding factor for 
me was being able to come 
back to UCLA, be with my 
teammates, play for the 
Bruins and continue my col- 
lege experience and educa- 
tion." 

Kapono remained 

See KAPONO pagci 




JESSi PORTtfVDady Bru«n Senia Siaff 



Jas on Ka pono a ttempt s to g ua r d B a ll St a te 's Dua n* 
Clemens during the NCAA Tournament in March. 




Tomorrow 

Partly cloudy Partly doudy 
High 70' High 72' 

Low 59' Low 57' 



UCLA 




Serving tht UCLA community since 1919 



MoNDAYjULY 3, 2000-Frioay, JulyJ, 2000 



www.clailybruin.ucla.edu 



Construction in South Campus 



FACILITIES: Renovation 
to benefit all despite 
current noise, hassles 



By Melody Wang 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

Sounds of chain saws and bull- 
dozers echo through campus as 
summer school students attempt 
to pursue their studies. 

Constructipn of a new building 
near Knudsen Hall and replace- 
ment of the concrete walkway 
near Bunche Hall and the Public 
Policy Building began on June 26. 

"The obvious reason we're 
doing this work during the sum- 
mer is because August and 
September have the lowest levels 
of activity on campus," said John 
Sandbrook, assistant provost of 
the College of Letters and 
Science. 

Jack Powazek, assistant vice 
chancellor of - Facilities 
Management who oversees the 
project near Public Policy, said 
summer is the best time for con- 



struction because projects aren't 
delayed by bad weather. 
' Powazek said the walkway 
near Public Policy must be' 
replaced because of potentially 
hazardous cracks in the concrete. 
Worn out exterior lighting and 
underground irrigation systems 
will also be replaced. 

Powazek said once the con- 
crete is repaired, new shrubs and 
trees will be planted in the area. 

Though the project may bene- 
fit the campus, some students 
complain about the small path- 
ways set aside to allow entry into 
Public Policy. 

"Because of the construction, 
the whole area is blocked off so 
when everybody gets out of class, 
the pathway gets really crowded," 
said Francisco Crespo, an ethno- 
musicology graduate student. 

Others complain about noise 
pollution. 

"My only complaint is that I 
have a class in Public Policy, and 
it's a French class so you kind of 
need to be able to hear and some- 
times it's a little difTicult to hear 
with them banging out here," said 



Vincent Bidez, a fourth-year soci- 
ology student. "But I'm not too 
bitter about it." 

Powazek said the noisiest part 
of the construction, which 
involves tearing up the old con- 
crete, is almost over. 

Most of the project should be 
completed by October and will 
cost about $400,000 to $500,000. 

At the same time, work on con- 
structing a new Physics and 
Astronomy building has begun, 
but it won't be completed until 
spring 2003 and will cost 
$39,345,000. . 

Ron Enholm, principal project 
manager for Campus Capital 
Programs, which oversees the uni- 
versity's construction projects, 
said the actual construction of the 
building is scheduled for Spring 
2001, but workers will demolish 
the current Physics Research Lab 
and clear the area around it by 
October of this year. They will 
also excavate a space for a two- 
level basement. 

The new brick building will be 
connected to Knudsen Hall at 
every level except the ground 



floor, Enholm said. 

Marc Fisher, director of design 
services for Campus Capital 
Programs said the building will 
improve the campus's aesthetics. . 

"The building is designed to be 
compatible in scale and character 
with Powell Library and Moore 
Hall," Fisher said. 

To complete the project, 
Enholm said a temporary road for 
construction trucks will be built 
between Franz and Knudsen halls 
since campus roads are either too 
narrow or can only support 
10,000 pounds. The road will be 
removed at the end of 2001. 
- Like the Public Policy project, 
some are upset with the process of 
constructing thft Physics and 
Astronomy building. 

Christine Green, an adminis- 
trative specialist in the Physics 
and Astronomy Department who 
has been at UCLA for 22 years, 
said she is upset construction 
workers are cutting down about 
60 trees to clear the land. 

"It was really awful when I was 




JENNIf-ER YUEN/Oaily B<uin Senior Staff 

Trees near Knudsen Hall are cut down to make 



Se« BUILDIIIG, page 9 room for a new Physics and Astronomy building. 



<-- .-5ti 



■<St.<c~r- 




et to benefit California schools 



FUNDING: Added funds 
to aid graduate research, 
undergraduate education 



By Timothy Kudo 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff , 

Gov. Gray Davis signed next year's 
$99.4 billion l)udget June 30, with edu- 
cation at the top of the list of the 
biggest expenditures - totalling nearly 
halfofthe entire budget. 

"In my State of the Slate Address, I 
laid down a call to arms on behalf of 
our schools. This budget answers that 
call," Davis said in a statement. "In a 
budget with so many winners, by far 
the biggest winners arc our school chil- 
dren." - -; 

The budget gives $32 billion to K- 
12 education, a $4.2 billion increase 
from last year, and $ 10 billion for high- 
er education, including the UC. 
California State University System 
and Community College System. 

There is a $486 million, or 1 7.9 per-, 
cent increase to the UC's budget, 
which now totals $3.2 billion. 

"This budget allows us to maintain 
access to a high-quality, affordable 
education for all IJC-eligible students 
while also making strategic invest- 
ments in research, health care and out- 
reach to California's elementary and 
secondary schools," said UC 
President Richard Atkinson in a state- 
ment. 

Since a large portion of the 
University of California's budget is 
going to K-12 programs, UCLA's 
budg e t i nc r ease wo n 't approach the 



2000-2001STATE BUDGET BREAKDOWN 

The UC received a 17 percent increase induding Ending to reduce the cost of summer 
school, eliminate a fee hike, improve the quality of undergraduate education, and provide 
, raises for employees in Iw paid positions. 



Higher Education $10.8 



Education (K-12) 
$32.3 




SOOWt ?fl0fr/001Sljlfl)ud9f<indU(0f>kfofthfPtnidw< 



Other 



(OotUrsinBiiiions) 

Business, Transportation 
andHousir>g $7.;^. 



Tax Relief $4.4 

Local Cjov. 
Funding $3,7 

Youth & Adult 
Corrections $5.1 



Resources $4.5 

Environmental Protection $1.3 
State & Consumer Services $ 1 



Disclosure of drug past 
may affect financial aid 

CONVICnON: Some say provision curbs narcotics 
use; others cite discrimination of minority students 



By Christine Byrd 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

Get convicted of drug use and U)se 
your federal financial aid - that's the 
law. 

A provision to the Higher 
Education Act of 1998 instituted 
changes in the Federal Application 
for Financial Student Aid, including 
an additional question about whether 
a student has been convicted of a 
drug-related crime. Students convict- 
ed of such a crime are ineligible for 
financial aid. 

Although some see this as a deter- 



rent to drugHise, others say it discrim- 
inates against lower-income and 
minority students. 

Not only are previously-convicted 
students ineligible, but if a student is 
convicted while on financial aid, the 
aid will be cut for one year following 
the conviction. 

"My greatest concern is for the 
students to know about this law so 
that they can make informed choic- 
es," said Liz Kemper, director of 
Student Legal Services. 

"It has potential to disrupt acade- 

See FAFSA, page 6 



Olsen, vice chancellor of budget and 
finance. 

But Olsen added there would be a 
state-subsidized $400 increase per stu- 
dent next year as part of UCLA's $2.4 
billion budget that funds education, 
research as well as the hospital. 

In preparation for the children of 
the baby boomer generation, which 
will create an influx over the next 10 
years of about 60,000 students, the 
state has begun funding UC's summer 
school. 

University officials hope that by 
m ak in g su mmer as aff or dab le as the 



ADAM BROWN/Daily Brum 

encouraged to attend it and as a result, 
graduate earlier than four years and a 
quarter; the average time it takes stu- 
dents to complete their degree. 

Traditionally, taking the equivalent 
number of summer school classes has 
cost students more than if they took 
them during the year because the cost 
of instruction hasn't been subsidized 
by the state. The change is scheduled 
to take efl'ecl next year. 

The budget also provides for a 2 
percent 'raise plus additional money 
for merit raises, according to UC 



UC's 18 percent increase, said Sieve rest of the year, students will be 



SectUKCT^pageS 



Lawsuit over MicNgan grant 
raises concems in dlifornia 



SCHOLARSHIP: ACLU contends state's score-based 
award may be unfaii' for poorer, minority students 



By Linh Tat 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

Scholarships help students out, 
but they don't always help those 
who need it most. 

The American Civil Liberties 
Union slapped a lawsuit against the 



poor and minority students in its 
merit-based scholarship program, 
raising questions about the fairness 
of other states' award programs. 

The reason behind the lawsuit, 
according to Kary Moss, executive 
director of the ACLU in Michigan, 
is thai the state determined .scholar- 



statcL,of Michigan on June 27 for 
allegedly discriminating against 



^ACUI,p>9c7 



(. 



2 Monday, July 3, 2000 - Friday, July 7, 2000 



Daily Bruin News 



COMMUNITY BRIEFS 



Study looks at effects 
of HIV on children 

A study conducted by UCLA and the 
RAND corporation, published in the July edi- 
tion ofthe American Journal of Public Health, 
found that more than 120,000 children with 
HIV-infected parents face financial, social. 



For more inrormation about the 
study, go to www.rand.org/organi- 
zation/Health/hcsus/ 



Meningitis risk high 
for college freshmen 

A report by the Center for Disease 




Asian studies 
center releases r_ 
almanac 

The Asian American Studies center 
released the 2000-2001 edition ofthe National 
Asian Pacific American Political Almanac 



UCLA Performing Arts 
director appointed 

David Sefton, the current head of contem- 
porary culture at the Royal Festival Hall in 
London, was appointed as the director of 
UCLA Performing Arts, replacinj^ the former 
director Michael Blachly. 



medical a n d emot i o n al ha r dsh i 



lip s as a 
the disease. 

The study also showed that 12 percent of 
women^ surveyed had children after they were 
diagnosed with the disease and 14 percent of 
those children tested HIV-positive. 

"With the epidemic spreading at a faster 
rate among women than men and the life 
expectancy of HIV-infected individuals 
increasing, the number of children with at least 
one infected parent will continue to grow," 
said Dr. Mark Schuster, a UCLA professor 
and head of the study. "And since public pro- 
grams and private, nonprofit organizations 
often address the needs of these children, we 
must ... better understand those needs." 



re sult of — Co n t r ol 



? Adv i so i y Cuiniiiittee uir 

Immunization Practices found that College 
freshman, espec ially those livjng^in dormito^ 



includin g in fo r mat io n a b out A si an Ame ri can 
and Pacific Islander political figures, and local, 
state and national politics. 



ries, are at a "modestly" increased risk for 
cerebrospinal meningitis. :. 

The report, issued on June 30, also stated 
that getting vaccinated with the currently 
available qaudrivalent meningococcal polysac- 
charide vaccine will decrease the risk of getting 
the disease. Meningitis' symptoms include a 
high fever, headache, nausea, confusion, 
sleepiness, stiff neck and discomfort looking 
into bright lights. 

The symptoms can develop anywhere from 
several hours to one or to two days. 



The almanac was co-editedT)y~Pr6ffessDr 
Don Nakanishi, the director ofthe studies cen- 
ter, and James Lai, an assistant professor at 
Santa Clara University. 

"The Asian Pacific American population, 
which has grown rapidly during the past three 
decades to an estimated 1 1 million in 2000, is 
building a viable, multifaceted political infra- 
structure that will have an increasingly deci- 
sive impact on American politics throughout 
the 21st century," Nakanishi said; For more 
information call (310) 825-2968 or e-mail 
ku@ucla.edu. - 



- — "H i s i ni p i ess i ve ba c kg i ou i id a nd creative 
vision are ideally suited to his new role," said 
Chancellor Albert Carnesale in a statement. "I 

^(nowthathcAvttt enrich not only the untvefsi- 
ty's acclaimed performing arts program, but 
the Southern California cultural community as 
well." 

Sefton has been involved in the arts for 
nearly 20 years as an arts journalist, assistant 
director " at LiVfe.rpool, England's Unity 
Theatre and assistant director of London's 
Millfield Theatre. 

Compiled from Daily Bruin Staff and Wire 
reports. ■,■'■; ,; /■ - ."''■■ ; ^•■■\:-'.' '^^ ■•;.,.;-■-.•-' 



ACADEMIC ANNOUNCEMENTS 



July 4 

.Academic and Administrative 
Holiday 

Julys 

Orientation sessions for incoming 
freshmen begin 



July 7^ 

Last day to drop Session A classes 
for full refund of course fees 

Last day to add classes without a 
$100 fee 

Last day to return textbooks to :^^ 
UCLA Store for full refund 



For additional stones 
and breaking np^w^ - 



see tne jLPauy i>ruiD 



www.dailyhruin.ucla.edu 



CORRECTIONS 

In the June 12-16 issue, 
the Daily Bruin ran an arti- 
cle titled "Seniors recall 
their most unforgettable 
moments" that contained 
an error. A photo of 
Catherine von Schwarz 
should have accompanied 
her quote. 



In the June 26-30 issue, 
the Daily Bruin ran an arti- 
cle titled "UCLA athlete 
arrested, charged with 
assault" that contained an 
error. The statement that 
Asi Faoa and Rodrigo 
DeZubiria collided'repeat- 
edly in a mosh pit should 
have been attributed to 
defense lawyer Milton 
Grimes. 






AquickLQ^l€ \X 
St your Bruin 




Mondayjuly3,2000 

wvvw.dailybaiin . ucla .edu 






llDll'Ei*^ Page # 

Daily Bruin Classifieds 18-24 

V 

Crossword Puzzle 21 

Movie Guide 25 



/2 



Mercedes 

Cup 

Tennis 

Tournament 

July 24 



Deal of 
the Day! 



breadstiks 



^ DREAMERY. 

DimTs' Ice Cream 




REAaAERY 





See page 4 for details. 

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Editor in Chief : Christine Byrd • .•' ■ 
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News Editor: Barbara Ortutay 
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Daily Bruin News 



Monday, July 3, 2000-Friday, July 7, 2000 3 




Exchanging 



jone culture 
fbranotherv 

1^ - jH ||>1.W»»il—— ^— I I ' g^— *^i— I^M^I^iwJ— ^M M II W IIIIMM I 11— ^a«- J I II. J ■■■■■■ 

Students 
experience, 
learn about 
life at UCLA 




t(£ITH ENRIQUEZ/Oaily Bruin Senior Staff 

(Left to right) Maria Barco, Elva Rodriguez, Paula Andrew, Clara Perez and Nickolas Bohrer, all interna- 
tional students from Spain, head to LAX to find their lost luggage. .^ ^^^ '• . 



By Alice Su 

For The Daily Bruin 

The greatest shock Japanese stu- 
dents Aska Takahashi and Hiromi 
Murayama experienced in the 
United States was something most 
Americans take for granted: cars 
_ stopping for pedestrians. 

In Taiwan, where both students 
attend school during the year, cars 
have the right-of-way in all situa- 
tions. 

Traffic regulations, however, are 
just one difference for international 
students attending UCLA Summer 
Sessions. 

Playing host to a majority of 
these students during the summer, 
Rieber Hall boasts occupants from 
more then 30 different countries, as 
well as students from the United 
States. 

Among the numerous students 
attending the sessions, many have 
globe-trotted around the world. 

Like a number of other students, 
Mehdi Benfaida's father works for 
the Moroccan Embassy, which has 
allowed him to experience a variety 
of cultures and countries. He 
attends an American-run school in 
Paris during the academic year. 

Benfaida listed the academic 



rigor of a six-week summer session 
as one of the reasons he decided to 
come to UCLA, saying he believed 
the accelerated work-pace would 
prove more challenging. 

According to Benfaida, living in 
residence halls offer mostly positive 
experiences, although the small size 
ofthe bedrooms fostered an atmos- 
phere lacking in privacy. - 

On the other hand, he said the 
food served in residence halls recti- 
fied much ofthe living discomfort. 

Now that Benfaida has .experi- 
enced Westwood life, he said he can 
compare American life to that in 
France. Overall, Benfaida said 
things in the slates are less expen- 
sive to buy and easier to obtain. 

"A simple meal in France would 
have cost around $100," he said. 
"Whereas in the United States, $20 
dollars would have been more than 
sufficient. 

Because he attended an 
American school in Paris, Benfaida 
said he received advice and heard 
stereotypes about Los Angeles 
from friends who had visited the 
area. 

Some of the words of wisdom 
Benfaida's friends gave him 
warned him about false attitudes 
people here apparently exerted. 



Like Benfaida, Takahashi and 
Murayama have traveled all over 
the world with their families. 
Having visited such countries as 
New Zealand, Australia and 
Singapore in addition to the United 
States, both Takahashi and 
Murayama have experienced a 
variety of different cultures. 

The two, who also attended 
UCLA Summer Sessions last year, 
came to the campus this summer to 
prepare for college, similar to many 
American high-schoolers taking 
classes here. 

Murayama said although their 
parents sent the two friends to the 
United States because they believed 
living here would have a better 
influence over their daughters, they 
expect the young women to shed 
their newly-adopted lifestyles once 
they return home. For example, 
smoking among teenagers is a lot 
more prevalent in Taiwan. 

Takahasi said -one difference 
between American and Asian cul- 
tures includes eye contact, which in 
Japan and China is considered 
rude. 

"In American culture, lack of 
eye contact can mean guilt or 
unfriendliness," she said. 

While both Takahashi and 



Murayama came to UCLA to have 
fun and experience Los Angeles 
culture last year, this year they said 
they are focusing on academics. 

Because they want to attend col- 
lege in California, Takahashi and 
Murayama said they devote several 
hours during the day to academics 
and SAT preparation in addition to 
their summer sessions classes. 

Additionally, this year the two 
have friends from Taiwan living 
nearby. 

Although both said they missed 
their families back home, 
Takahashi and Murayama did not 
miss the often littered and dirty 
environment in their home towns. 

These days, the two remarked 
that they enjoy the seemingly inces- 
sant sunshine and warm weather of 
southern California, another differ- 
ence from Taiwan. 

While a majority of the students 
living in Rieber Hall during the 
summer are international students, 
some American students from vari- 
ous parts ofthe county are also part 
ofthe scene. 

Mardello Robinson, an incom- 
ing freshman, originally came from 
Chicago but he decided to attend 
UCLA because of its proximity to 
Hollywood. 



As an aspiring actor who had 
parts in the TV drama ER and tele- 
vision commercials, Robinson said 
the progression of his career 
depended on a move to California. 

"Jf I really wanted to make it, I 
had to come to LA," he said. 

Robinson said during the past 
week, he met various international 
students, but language barriers kept 
him from befriending many of 
them. 

Robinson said they understand- 
ably socialized with students from 
their own background. 

"You're going to stick with 
whomever you're going to under- 
stand better," Robinson said. 

On the other hand, he said that 
others, like his roommate from 
Korea, try to learn English from 
interacting with American stu- 
dents. 

"Every day, he teaches me a new 
Korean word," Robinson said. 

Despite the initial lack of com- 
munication among different 
groups of students, Robinson said 
he remains hopeful of future inter- 
action. 

"Not only am I hoping to learn 
something from them," he said. 
"But I hope they learn something 
from us too." 



Libertarians nominate Harry Browne for presidency 



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CONVENTIGN: Party 
aims for privatization, 
lessening government 



By Barbara Ortutay 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

Harry Browne wants voters to 
recognize his name when they go 
to the polls in November. For a 
third party candidate who is not a 
celebrity, this is seldom a small 
task. 

Browne received 
Libertarian Party's 
for president at the party's 
national convention in Anaheim 
last weekend, where amid the 
suits and ties, delegates also wore 



the 
nomination 



David B«rgland (on platform), chair of the Libertarian Pdrty, ipMkS dT his — half! ' and shin? ^nadf of the 
party's national convention In Anaheim, CA on Sunday. 

I T ■■ - .■II .-■■ »>.■ !■ I ■■*! ■ I .»». •- . • — 



port for self-government and per- 
sonal liberties. 

"We need to break the limita- 
tions of a small, marginal party 
and become important enough to 
have an impact on the outcome 
of this election/' Browne said 
during the July 2 presidential 
debate. He accepted his nomina- 
tion the next day. expressing 
pride to be part ofthe Libertarian 
Party. 

"I hope to see you all aboard." 
he said to the more than 1,000 
Libertarians gathered at the con- 
vention from across the country. 

Although the party claims to 
be the largest and most active 
third party in the United States, 
Browne finished fifth in the 1996 
elections,. behind Reform Party 
candidate Ross Pe r ot and G r iTn 



The party's slogan, "live and 
let live," also describes its plat- 
form, which includes the legaliza- 
tion of all drugs and the privatiza- 
tion of public schools. 

All five presidential nominees 
favored what they called the "sep- 
aration of school and state." 

"We want to be in a position 
where the state doesn't educate 
our children," said Don Gorman, 
a former Libertarian representa- 
tive in the New Hampshire state 
Senate who lost the party's presi- 
dential nomination. "If you take 
away government schools, that 
doesn't mean we raise a genera- 
tion of babbling idiots. The reali- 
ty is that people will educate their 
children." 

Paul Salvette, member of the 



American flag to show their sup- • Party candidate Ralph Nader. 



S«e UtamiHAN, page 6 



, I 



Monday, July 3, 2000-Fnday, iuly 7, 2000 



Daily Bruin News 



UC to lose some Los Alamos privileges Plans to reduce classroom size 



SECURITY: Problems lead 
Washington to demand 
changes in two contracts 



By H. Josef Hebert 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON After a siring 
of security lapses, the Energy 
department gave notice June 30 it 



to keep the university's "strong sci- 
ence and academic expertise" as part 
of the weapons program "so 
weapons scientists feel comfortable 
for their future." 

Negotiations will begin immedi- 
ately to start the process of splitting 
management responsibilities at both 
the Los Alamos National 
Laboratory in New. Mexico and the 
Lawrence Livermore , National 
Laboratory . in California, the 



The government contract with the 
University of California expires in 
2002. Department ofTicials said the 
contract is expected to be re-negoti- 
ated this year. 

"The department will immediate- 
lybegin negotiations with the univer- 
sity to bring into their operations 
specific seoiuljL^ndjTianagement 
expertise to implementTsecuriTy) 
improvements," the department 
said in a statement. 



hindered by teacher shortage 



intends to strip the University of 
California of its security and some 
management responsibilities involv- 
ing nuclear weapons programs at 
Los Alamos and another govern- 
meni research lab 

Energy Secretary Bill Richardson 
told t he u ni v ersity it^ t:€mtracls Tor - 
managing the Los Alamos and 
Lawrence Livermore labs "must be 
restructured ... to make much-need- 
ed improvements to security and 
other facility operations." 

Richardson said in an interview 
that the university "will still be 
actively involved" in scientific 
aspects of the nuclear weapons pro- 
grams, but some other management 
responsibilities, especially security., 
would be transferred elsewhere. 

The restructuring was expected to 
be worked out by September as part 
of a renegotiation of the govern- 
ment's contract wilh the university, 
Richardson said. He called the uni- 
versity's performance in managing 
security at the weapons labs unac- 
ceptable. 

"The university welcomes the 
opportunity to work with DOE in 
this effort and to create a path for- 
ward that meets all security needs," 
Richard Atkinson, the university's 
president, said in a statement. 

Richardson said it was important 



department said. 



The^new £hief of DQE'a nuclear^ 



"There's. Still a culture 
of lax security (at the 
-government labs);''— 



Bill Richardson 

Energy Secretary 



The university, which has man- 
aged the nuclear weapons program 
at Los Alamos since 1943 and tjie 
beginni^ng Manhattan Project, 
which exploded America's first 
nuclear device in the New Mexico 
desert, has come under sharp criti- 
cism for security lapses in recent 
years. 

The two-month disappearance of 
twovcomputer hard drives from a 
vault at the Los Alamos lab caused a 
growing number of lawmakers in 
Congress to question whether a uni- 
versity atmosphere can mix with 
security needs of the nudear 
weapons programs. 

"There's still a culture of lax secu- 
rity," Richardson said Friday, refer- 
ring to the government laboratories. 



weapons agency, Undersecretary 
John Gordon, former deputy CIA 
director, was charged with oversee- 
ing the contract renegotiating and 
addressing. with the university "the 
serious shortcomings ... at our 
-weapons l a b o ratories,'- the depar^- 
ment said. ; * 

Richardson has expressed out- 
rage over the disappearance of the 
two hard drives, containing nuclear 
secrets from a highly secured Los 
Alamos laboratory vault. He was 
even more incensed by not having 
learned of the security breach for 
nearly a month after it became 
known to some Los Alamos scien- 
tists. , — 

The incident prompted demands^ 
in Congress for his resignation. 

Last year, Richardson also was 
highly critical of the university's han- 
'dling of a sophisticated laser pro- 
gram at the Lawrence Livermore 
National Laboratory in California. 
After repeatedly assuring the $1 bil- 
lion laser program was on schedule 
and within budget, Richardson was 
told without warning there would be 
a $300 million cost overrun and sub- 
stantial delays. 

The University of California man- 
ages both Los Alamos and 
Lawrence Livermore. 



SCHOOLS: State officials 
expect 300,000 educators 
needed in next 10 years 



i^J(il«y(U»sel — 

The Associated Press 




-Cl ass - siz ^ reduction 
)ing well in Californt 
but are still shackled by the state's 
inability to hire enough qualified 
teachers to fill all the new clas.s- 
roorfis, according to a stale-commis- 
sioned report released last week. 

The state's $4.5 billion effort to 
"reduce Thenumb^r ot sludents^ TfT 
kindergarten-through-third-grade 
classes "continues to be marked by 
small, positive gains," according to a 
report released by the Class Size 
Reduction Research Consortium. 

The report, commissioned by the 
state's Department of Education, 
says that third grade students in 
classes of 20 or fewer performed bet- 
ter fhan students in larger classes 
last year, and they continued to do 
better as they moved on to the larger 
fourth grade classes. 

Also, since the effort began in 
1996, more than 92 percent of K-3 
students have been moved into 
smaller classes. 

"It's important to notice that the 
benefits are equal to all racial and 
ethnic groups who were placed 'in 
smaller classes^" said Brian Stecher, 
senior social scientist at the RAND 
Corp. and co-author of the report. 

Teachers in reduced-size classes 
reported spending more time work- 
ing one-on-one with students, work- 
ing with small groups and focusing 



on children with reading problems, 
according to the report. 

But due to class-size reduction 
and population increased, California 
has a shortage of qualified teachers 
— those who have completed all 
state rcqutremenls and have a state 
teaching credential. And the state is 
expected to need 300,000 more 
leacheriover th&next decade 

Fh€ f cport fottftd ^hat mor e 
underqualified teachers are being 
hired to fill the slate's increasing 
number of classrooms - and most of 
those teachers are being hired at 
schools serving low-income, minori- 
ty and non-English speaking stu- 
dents. 

"The more qualified candidates 
are taking the jobs in the suburbs 
and leaving the schools in the inner- 
cities to take candidates who are not 
fully prepared," Stecher said in a 
telephone interview ' from 
Sacramento where the report was 
released. 

"Students most in need are most 
likely to have teachers who aren't 
credentialed. It's unfortunate 
because one of the goals of class-size 
reduction was to close the gap in 
achievemer^l between minority and 
majority students," he said. 

The report is part of a $ 1.2 million 
four-year study of California's 
efforts at class-size reduction being 
put together by RAND, the 
AmQrican Institutes for Research, 
Policy Analysis for California 
Education, EdSource and WestEd. 

Observers of California's educa- 
tional system say the report contains 
no real surprises and call for contin- 
ued efforts to lure* more qualified 
teachers into the state. 



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Daily Bruin News 



Monday, July 3, 2000 Friday, July 7, 2000 5 



WORLD &( NATION 



Divisive issues rule 
Supreme Court year 



RECAP: Percentage of 
^ne-vote wiH^mteome^ 
highest in over a decade 



The loss for rape victims - in 
whi ch the c o urt s truck do wn a key 



'.▼•"., 



By Richard Carelli 

The Associated Press 



"^ WASHINGTON - The Supreme 
Court made its I999-200G term one 
of history's most consequential by 
tackling some of America's toughest 
legal and social issues. Decisions on 
abortion, school prayer, grandpar- 
ents' rights, states' rights, police tac- 
tics and gay Boy Scouts captured the 
nation's attention. 

"They're not ducking," said Mary 
Cheh, a George Washington 
University law professor. "The court 
showed a certain fearlessness in tak- 
ing on the cases it did." • 

The conservative court, which 
ended Wednesday the term it began 
in October, did not always reach con- 
servative conclusions. The justices 
upheld the famous Miranda warn- 
ings police must give criminal sus- 
pects before questioning them, 
banned group prayers at high school 
football games and struck down a 
state's "partial-birth abortion" law, 
perhaps dooming similar restrictions 
in 30 other states. 

"It was an amazing term that 
forces us to give a much more 
nuanced account of the Rehnquist 
court," said Erwin Chemerinsky, a 
University of Southern California 
law professor. "In some regards it is a 
very conservative and activist court, 
but it defmitely has its limits." 

The divisive issues were reflected 
in the court's votes - 20 of the term's 
73 signed decisions were reached by 
5-4 votes, the highest percentage of 
one-vote outcomes in more than a 
decade. 

Chief Justice William H. 
Rehnquist and the court's leading 
conservatives, Antonin Scalia and 
Clarence Thomas, were joined by 
centrists Sandra Day O'Connor and 
Anthony M. Kennedy in 13 of those 
20 cases. 

Among them were decisions that 
let the Boy Scouts ban homosexual 
troop leaders, prevented rape victims 
from suing their attackers in federal 
courts, and barred the federal Food 
and Drug Administration from regu- 
lating cigarettes as dangerous drugs. 



p rav i s i o n of th e f e de r al Violence 
Against Women Act - was a states' 
rights victory. Rehnquist wrote that it 
is up to the states, not Congress, to 
choose whether to protect women in 
that way. 

"It was a major defeat for 
Congress, showing that the court has 
a narrow view of congressional 
power under the constitutional 
amendments ratified after the Civil 
War," said Yale law professor Akhil 
Amar. Those amendments ensure 
civil rights for all citizens. 

O'Connor again loomed as the 
court's pivotal .majority-maker. She 
cast only four dissenting votes in the 
73 cases, compared wilh nine for 
Kennedy, 10 for Thomas, 13 for 
Rehnquist and 14 for Scalia. 

The court's four more liberal jus- 
tices found themselves in dissent 
more often. John Paul Stevens cast 
28 dissenting votes, Ruth Bader 
Ginsburg, 22; David H. Souter, 21; 
and Stephen G. Breyer, 18. 

O'Connor also limited the conser- 
vative thrust of an important church- 
state decision when she supplied a 
crucial vote for the majority but 
wrote separately to voice key differ- 
ences. 

In that case, the court significantly 
lowered the figurative wall of separa- 
tion between government and reli- 
gion by ruling that taxpayer money 
can be used to supply computers and 
other instructional materials for reli- 
gious schools. 

Although O'Connor agreed with 
that result, she refused to join an 
extraordinarily sweeping Thomas 
opinion that would have allowed vir- 
tually any government subsidy of reli- 
gious institutions as long as it is not 
intended to further the religious mis- 
sion. Rehnquist, Scalia and Kennedy 
signed on with . homas - one vote 
short of a majority. 

In one of its mosr closely watched 
decisions, the court split 6-3 to limit 
states' power to help grandparents 
and others with close ties to children 
win the right to see them regularly 
against parents' wishes. 

The court stopped short, however, 
of giving parents absolute veto power 
over who gets to visit their children 
and left unanswered many questions 
state courts face daily in visitation 
battles. 



WORLD & NATION BRIEFS 



Controverslat 
flag removed 
after continual 
NAACP debate 



CONFEDERATE: Protests 
persist as new banner 
raised near Statehouse 



By Jim Davenport 

The Associated Press 

COLUMBIA, S.C. - After decades 
of debate and mounting pressure from 
an NAACP boycott. South Carolina 
finally removed the Confederate flag 
from atop its Statehouse on July 1 in a 
somber ceremony that paid tribute to 
its Civil War roots. 

The flag, seen as a reminder of slav- 
ery for some and a tribute to Southern 
heritage for others, flew atop the 
Statehouse dome for 38 years. 

But protests over the flag continued 
even as it was being lowered. Civil War 
re-enactors raised another 
Confederate flag on Statehouse 
grounds, in front of a Confederate sol- 
dier's monument. 

The new location was part of the 
compromise reached by the 
Legislature in May. 

Hundreds of anti-Confederate flag 
demonstrators held bright yellow signs 
reading "Shame" and blew whistles as 
the flag was hoisted atop the flagpole. 




• The Asscxiated Press 

Protester Leonard T. Eddy carries a lynching effigy while walking 
in front of the South Carolina Statehouse June 30, in Columbia, S.C. 



Elian Gonzalez returns home to CXiba 



w^* 







^f\ i 



The Associated Press 



A boy waves a Cuban flag during 
a rally in Manzanillo on Saturciay. 



BOY: Officials may use 
case as guide for future 
child immigration issues 



By Laurie Asseo 
The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON -After seven 
months of bitter emotions and plenty 
of political heat, the case of Elian 
Gonzalez was finally resolved under 
long-standing rules on parents' rights 
and immigration law. 

"Ultimately what the Elian 
Gonzalez case stands for is the right of 
a parent to speak for and raise a child ... 
irrespective of the parent's nationality, 
ideology or economic status," said 
Bernard Perlmutter, director of the 



University of Miami's Children and 
Youth Law Clinic. 

"The worst that could be said about 
Juan Miguel Gonzalez was that he was 
Cuban and an adherent of the commu- 
nist ideology," but that was not enough 
to take the 6-year-old Elian from his 
father and give custody to relatives in 
Miami, Perlmutter added. 

Still, now that Gonzalez has taken 
his son back to Cuba, some experts in 
family and immigration law hope the 
controversy will lead to new ideas for 
handling the cases of children who 
arrive in the United States without a 
parent or close adult relative. 

"The real question is going to be 
whether those standards need chang- 
ing," said Neal Sonnett, a Miami 

See GONZALES, page 9 



Mexico elections seen 
as fairest in history 

MEXICO CITY - As voting neared a close 
Sunday in a historic presidential race, the party 
that has ruled Mexico for 71 years appeared to 
have suflcred crushing losses in three major 
regional races. 

Sunday's presidential vote was the first in 
more than a century in which the outcome was- 
n't clear beforehand. Despite hundreds of alle- 
gations of pressure and vote-buying - most per- 
petrated 1^ the ruling party - the elections were 
widely seen as Mexico's fairest ever. 

"It could be that we make history today," said 
Rebeca Meza Oliva, a 45-year-old housewife 
waiting in line to vote. 

Meza said she planned to vote for opposition 
candidate Vicente Fox of the conservative 
National Action Party, who is in a tight race with 
Francisco Liibastida of the Institutional 
Revolutionary Party, or PR I. 
— A s vot i ng booth ii c l o s e d in cen t r al Me xico, 



the PRI appeared to have lost the 
three key local races, according to 
exit polls by the two national television 
networks. 

According to the Tele visa network's 
poll, the leftist Democratic Revolution Party 
held onto Mexico City's mayorship as Andres 
Manuel Lopez Obrador won 40 percent of the 
vote, compared with 34 percent for Santiago 
Creel of National Action. It said the PRI's Jesus 
Silva Herzog finished third, with 22 percent. 

Walter Matthau comic 
actor, dead at 79 

SANTA MONICA Walter Matthau, the 
foghorn-voiced master of crotchety comedy 
who won an Oscar for "The Fortune Cookie" 
and cemented his stardom as the sloppy Oscar 
Madison in "The Odd Couple," died Saturday 
of a heart attack. He was 79. 

Matthau was pronounced dead at 1:42 a.m. 
at Si John's Health Center in Santa Monica. 




said hospital spokeswoman Lindi 
Funston. 
"I have lost someone I loved as a 
brother, as a closest friend and a 
remarkable human being," said frequent 
co-star Jack Lemmon. "We have also lost one of 
the best damn actors we'll ever see." 

Rowers were placed on Matthau 's star on the 
Hollywood Walk of Fame on Saturday. 

Often castcd as a would-be con man foiled by 
life's travails, Matthau bellowed complaints 
against his tormentors and moved his lean, 6- 
foot-3 frame in surprising ways. 

"Walter walks like a child's windup toy," 
Lemmon once said. 

Matthau's performance as Lemmon's shys- 
ter brother-in-law in "The Fortune Cookie," 
directed by Billy Wilder, won him the Academy 
Award as best supporting actor of 1966. He was 
twice nominated for best actor in 1971 as the 
cantankerous .oldster in "Kotch," (directed by 
Lemmon) and in 1975 as the feuding vaudeville 
partner of George Burns in "The Sunshine 
Boys". 



Americans say they 
value First Amendment 

WASHINGTON - Free Speech is a great 
American principle that should be protected - 
except when it protects the airing of views {peo- 
ple find offensive, a majority in a new poll says. 

On press freedom, half said U S. news media 
have too much freedom, while the other half said 
the press has about the right amount or not 
enough freedom, said the poll by the Freedom 
Forum's First Amendment Center. 

"It appears many Americans are having sec- 
ond thoughts about the First Amendment," said 
Kenneth Paulson, executive director of the cen- 
ter. "They treasure it as part of this nation's her- 
itage, but they become uncomfortable when it 
allows others to speak out in offensive ways." 

The survey, released June 30 to coincicie with 
the July 4 weekend, explores America's commit- 
ment to the 45-word First AmctKiment. 

Compiled from Daily Bruin wire reports. 



Monday, July 3, 2000-Friday, July 7, 2000 



Daily Bruin News 



FAFSA 

From page 1 

mic careers." she added. 

Any drug-related conviction, 
such as carrying less than an 
ounce of marijuana, can lead to 
ineligibility for one year; and 
convictions for selling drugs or 
possessing more than one at a 
time can lead to an extended peri- 
od of ineligibility. 

Although the question was on 
this year's FAFSA. students who 
did not answer it - and 20 per- 
cent chose not to - were still eligi- 



ble for aid. Kemper said. 

But next year, students w ill be 
required to answer the question 
to'get federal aid. Any student 
currently receiving <fid who is 
convicted of a drug-related crime 
after July 1 will have their finan- 
cial aid revoked. 

*■ For a student who depends on 
federal aid to afford higher edu- 
cation, this could be devastating. 

The American Civil Liberties 
Union calls this provision 
"unwise and discriminatory." 

"The provision discriminates 
on the basis of class by targeting 
students of lower income who 
depend on financial aid," said a 
brief on the ACLU Web site. 

Students convicted of a drug 
offense whose family can afford 
to pay for college will not be 
affected by the legislation. 

The ACLU also said the pro- 
vision is racially discriminatory. 

"Drug enforcement already 
focuses heavily on minority com- 
munities," said the ACLU Web 
site. 

Statistics recently released by 
the Department of Justice show 
that African Americans repre- 
sent 1 3 percent of drug offend- 
ers, but are 55 percent of the con- 



victions, the ACLU brief said. 

Of the approximately 20,000 
UCLA students receiving feder- 
al aid. Kemper agrees lower- 
income and minority students 
will be disproportionally aflect- 
ed. 

The prpvision does allow for 
students to receive financial aid 
again if they complete a drug- 
treatment program. 

Again, some say this favors 
higher-income students who can 
afford a program. 

Student Legal Services offi- 
cials are working with Student 
Psy chological Services to create 



a drug-treatment program, and 
are trying to educate students 
about the new l^ws by working 
with Office of Residential Life, 
the dean of students' office. 
Academic Advancement 

Program, Community Service 
Program and the UCPD. 

"It's a major change and 
we're very conscious of getting 
information out," said Gail 
Ishino, assistant director of the 
Financial Aid Office. 

Onicials said they are starting 
at the freshman level aad will 
provide workshops and 
brochures to inform continuing 
students of the changes to the 
law. 

"We're really trying to cover 
as many areas as possible," 
Kemper said, and she empha- 
sized the importance of getting 
the word out. 

"People just weren't hearing 
about it.'- she said. 

"If they are armed with the 
necessary information, hopefully 
they will choose not to jeopardize 
their financial aid," Kemper con- 
tinued. 

With reports from Caroline Woon, 
Daily Bruin Contributor. 



LIBERTARIAN 

From page 3 

Bruin Libertarians and third- 
year chemical engineering 
student, said he doesn't sup- 
port the public-school system 
and called ft socialist - 
despite attending UCLA. . 

"It's already here. My par- 
ents paid all these taxes for it, 
I may as well go to it," he 
said. 

In addition to abolishing 
the public education system 



lege campuses, anti-immigra- 
tion laws and affirmative 
action. In other words, they 
support very limited govern- 
ment. 

Many Libertarians are dis- 
satisfied with bureaucracy 
and what they see as too 
many laws infringing on peo- 
ple's rights. 

"I used to get absolutely 
infuriated over the bungling 
of bureaucracy," Gorman 
said. 

He said he used to stand in 
line outside the DMV in the 
and pr i vatizi n g everything ^ — €et44^ h o ur s to g et hi s r e gi s 
the Libertarian Party advo- tration. 



cates drastic reductions in the 
government's role in people's 
lives. 

"The Libertarian party 
believes in liberty and in very 
limited government," said 
Gail Lightfoot, U.S. senatori- 
al candidate for California. 
"We need few, simple, clear 
laws that everyone under- 
stands. 

"You have the right to live 
your life as long as you're 
peaceful and not hurting any- 
one," she continued. 

The Libertarian Party may 
be most famous for its stance 
on the drug war. While they 
don't oppose or favor drug 
use, they are for the legaliza- 
tion of ail drugs. In addition, 
many oppose age restrictions 
on alcohol and tobacco use. 

Many party members 
agree that the government's 
tentacles reach into too many 
aspects of people's personal 
lives and liberties. ■ 

The party is against wel- 
fare, social security, public 
health care, abortion laws- 
both for and against-as well 
as hate-speech codes on col- 



"I used to sit there and say 
to myself, 'What is this all 
about?' That's.when I started 
to take a really hard look at 
government," he continued. 
"One day I figured out that 
I've always been a 
Libertarian." 

Barry Hess, another 
unsuccessful presidential 
nominee, said the Libertarian 
Party represents the ideas 
America was founded on. 

"We are not a third party. 
We are the first party in 
America," he said. 

"In a Libertarian world, 
you can be a Democrat, but 
in a Democratic world, you 
can't be a Libertarian. 

Libertarians at the conven- 
tion expressed dissatisfaction 
with the current two-party 
system. 

"The Democrats and the 
Republicans are carbon 
copies of each other," 
Salvette said "The bi-parti- 
san system doesn't really care 
about you." 

Delegates voted to add 
their opposition to the death 
penalty to the party's plat- 




KFlTH ENRIQUEZ/ Daily Btuin Semof Staff 

Harry Browne was nominated as the Libertarian presi- 
dential candidate at the party's convention in Anaheim. 



form at the convention. 

"As life cannot be restored 
to a person who has been 
wrongfully executed, we 
oppose the death penalty in 
all cases," reads the party's 
new platform. 

Although, in general. 
Libertarians favor hands-off 
government and radical capi- 
talism, there are some dis- 
agreements among the 
party's members on issues of 
ownership, for example. 

"Who should own things 
that no one created?" asked 
Harold Kyriazi, a delegate 
from Pittsburgh. "The cur- 
rent position is the first users 
are the owners." 

"One thing is that we want 
the platform to stay clear of 
the principles of private prop- 
erty," he continued. 

Among those attending 



the convention was former 
Sex Pistols lead singer John 
Lydon - also known as 
Johnny Rotten. One of the 
band's most famous songs is 
"Anarchy in the U.K," which 
might explain Lydon's attrac- 
tion to the Libertarian Party's 
ideals. 

Entertaining a small 
crowd gathered around him, 
Lydon said the Libertarian 
Party offers a "viable alterna- 
tive" to America's two-party 
system. 

"The Reform Party is a 
joke; it's Ross Perot's tool," 
he said. "The Green Party 
has good will and no content. 
They don't understand that 
people are just nasty." 

With reports from Timothy 
Kudo and Linh Tat, Daily Bruin 
Senior Staff. 



SUMMER BRUIN 



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7 



ACLU 

From page 1 

ship recipients based solely on one 
test score, which she said was racially 
biased, and not designed to measure 
Individual student achievemen t but 
rather, school performance. 

Unlike Michigan, there am cur- 
rently no state merit-based scholar- 
ships in California, but Gov. Gray 
Davis has proposed two such pro- 
grams. 

At UCLA, the only two merit- 
based scholarships offered by the 
Financial Aid Office ai-e the Regents 
and Chancellor's Blue and Gold 
scholarships. Both consider students' 
SAT I and II test scores, GPA, 
extracurricular activities, and letters 
of recommendation, said Gail 
Ishino, assistant director of the 



Financial Aid Office. 

According to Edward Flores, a 
Student Affairs Officer in charge of 
the Blue and Gold Scholarship, the 
awards criteria do not hinder stu- 
dents coming from lower-tiered 
schools. . 

Ufjmylhing, it would be an advan- 



tage because the donors are request- 
ing that we select students from those 
schools," Flores said. 

Richard Diaz, a manager in the 
Standards and Assessment Office of 
the California Department of 
Education, said California is more 
fair than other states in awarding 
money to students, especially witfi^ 
Gov. Davis' proposed scholarship 
programs. 

One program, the Governor's 
Scholarship Program, would provide 
$1,000 scholarships based on the 
statewide Stanford 9 Test scores. The 



Stanford 9 is a standardized test that 
assesses student achievement in vari- 
ous subjects. 

Students ranking in the top 5 per- 
cent statewide and top 10 percent at 
each individual school woujd qualify 
for the award. 

The idea behind the governor's 
program is that students coming 
from higher-tiered schools will face 
more competition for the scholar- 
ships. Students from lower-tiered 
schools may receive lower scores, but 
there are fewer students who would 
be serious contenders for the award 
within their school, Diaz said. 

The percentage of students receiv- 
ing scholarships overall may be heav- 
ily weighted towards students com- 
ing from top schools, but the propos- 
al would still allow lower-tiered stu- 
dents to receive some of the awards, 
he added. 



"I'd be disingenuous in saying stu- 
dents from a lower-end school are 
going to have an equal chance of get- 
ting this," Diaz said. "By the very 
nature of some of the schools and his- 
tory of scoring at that school, you're 
not going to have, on a per capita 
basis, as many students from the 
lower end receiving scholarships." 

"But there is an effort to try and 
equalize this," he continued. 

The Governor's Distinguished 
Math and Science Scholarship, 
another proposed program, awards 
$2,500 to individual students who 
rank in the top 2 percent in the 
Golden State Exam or top 3 percent 
of Advanced Placement tests. 

If a school offers an AP program; 
students must take the AP test, which 
they must pay for, to qualify for the 
scholarship. Students may substitute 
scores from the free Golden State 



Exam - which is offered at every 
school - only if their schools do not 
ofTer an A P program. V 

This does not consider whether 
AP programs at all schools are of the 
same quality. 

But, with more than one way for 
students to qualify for these scholar- 
ships, Diaz said he does not think 
California will be facing a lawsuit 
similar to Michigan's. 

"We're on stronger grounds 
because we're making it more equi- 
table," he said. 

Many are concerned, however, 
Ihat students from poorer schooli, 
aren't as likely to receive high scores 
that would qualify them for the schol- 
arship. Christopher Calhoun, a 
spokesman for the Southern 
California chapter of ACLU, said 

$ceilCLU,page9 





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8 Monday, July 3, 2000-Friday, July 7, 2000 



Daily Brum News 



BUDGET 

From page 1 

spokesman Brad Hayward 

"The priority for ihat augrnenta- 
lion is compensation for lower paid 
staff employees," he said. . 

Money is also provided for a 
I percent raise for faculty to account 
for market competitiveness, Hayward 
added. 

According to Hayward, even mem- 
bers of the senior management group, 
which encompasses the highest-paid 
employees of the university like 
Atkinson and Chancellor Albert 



C'arnesalc. are only eligible for the 
same raises other VC employees may 
receive. 

Last year, aftej- the regents voted 
10-3 to give top-level DC employees 
pay. raises as large as S 5 percent, 
unions and many student;* reacted 
w i t . h 

outrage. 

As part of a program to improve 
the quality of undergraduate educa- 
tion, largely through the improvement 
of the student-to-facully ratio, the bud- 
get allocates $6 million to the universi- 
ty. The university^ plan is to increase 
that amount to S50 million per year. 
— The UC'&goal is to low -crihc~cpr-^ 



rent IS. 7-1 ratio to 17.6-1. 

Funding is also provided for gradu- 
ate students through research-related 
funding which totals about $60 mil- 
lion. 

For DC medical centers, there is a 
one-lime $75 million allocation for 
equipment purchases, $50 million for 
infrastructure needs, and $600 million 
in bond revenues for earthquake-safe- 
ty renovations. 

There is also $75 million for the cre- 
ation of three California Institutes for 
Science and Innovation that will allow 
students, faculty and industry scien- 
tists to do research important to 
"California's economyr— ^— 



VC campuses have submitted pro- 
posals to have an institute built on 
their campus but currently, a decision 
hasn't been made. 

UCLA's prof>osal, which was made 
in conjunction with UC Santa 
Barbara, calls for the creation of a 
nanoscicnce inslilute. 

"This is focused on the realm of the 
very small," Olsen said. 

About $300 million of the UC's 
budget will go toward K-12 outreach 
programs to improve the quality of the 
stale's public education and altracl 
underrepresented minority students 
to the university. 
~^Part of IhatanroutitTnchidcs^ihTjii- 

■• '■•-'■ ■■■:'■' ■■^t--- ■":-'■ - " '■' ■ ■■'■■■ 



lion that will go toward the develop- 
ment of courses that students can lake 
regardless of where Ihey are, and 
expansion of Advanced Placement 
test programs the UC offers. There is 
also $71 million being spent to 
impcove the quality of California 
teachers. " "^ .^^ .'.•.> ■,.;■' ■■■■ 

Davis credited this year's heflly bud- 
gel on the stale's booming economy 

"As Califomians, we are privileged 
to be living in a time and place of 
boundless prosperity," he said. "This 
budget will help to ensure that- 
California's prosperity is shared by 
the very people who created that suc- 



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Odil)r Bruin.N«ws 



Monday, July 3, 2000-Friday, July 7, 2000 



From page 1 



V 



counting tree trunks and there was a 
little squirrel and he was looking 
around going. ' Where *s my home?'" 
Green said. "It brought tears to my 

eyes."/'.:. ■ ':; '.':• > , 

She said she remembers workers 
boxing and transporting trees to other 
locations rather than cutting them 
down in previous construction pro- 
jects. .. -■ :,'• / ■ . • --> ■ : ■ ;,. - -.-. ■ 

"(The trees) could have gone to the 
botanical gardens. At least then they 
wotrfdhavebeen alive," Green said: — 



But Kisher said only certain types of 
trees are boxed because this process is 
expensive. * 

"We have found that the funds con- 
sumed by boxing trees can be spent to 
buy less expensive nursery grown 
trees." Fisher said. "The campus can 
therefore afford to purchase more 
trees for the same funds." 

Enholm said once construction is 
complete, new trees will be planted to 
replace those cut down. 

"What people unfortunately can't 
appreciate is that what is restored will 
be of very high quality and should ofT- 
set the impact of what is happening 
nlow," Enholm said. '^ 7""^ 



ACLU 

From page 7 /V 

those receiving top scores tradi- 
tionally come from wealthy fami- 
lies with less need for the scholar- 
ships. 

According to a 1997 report by 
the University of California 
Outreach Task Force, students 
from the bottom fifth of state 
schools, which predominantly con- 
sist of underrepresented minority 
students, receive an average SAT I 
jcore of^2i^iJ*^llil^-Ui5^5e fiom lop 
^hools receive a score of 1,007 on 



average. 

Also, at each economic level. 
African American and Latino stu- 
dents consistently receive the low- 
est test scores, the report found. 

Calhoun said such tests are 
biased. 

"The bottom line is that you cre- 
ate this assessment system that sort 
of rewards some students, but you 
don't supply an equal opportunity 
education to all," he said. 

"In California where this sort of 
standardized test is like a one size 
fits all, the test presumes a perfect 
world of equity^ that off er s 
education to all," he continued. 



GONZALES 

From page 5 

lawyer who chairs the American 
Bar Association's standing commit- 
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5,000 such children arrive in the 
United States each year, he said. 

Attorney General Janet Reno 
said last week that she and immi- 
gration officials will review whether 
the Gonzalez case demonstrates a- 
need for new procedures or regula- 
tions, such as a minimum age for 
children seeking asyhim on their- 
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Next week 

We pick apart the 
differences between 
Northern and Southern 
California students. 

Monday, July 3, 2000-Friday, July 7, 2000 




View on the We^^ 

See all this and • 

more at the Daily Bruin's • 

awesome Web site: J 

www.dailybruin.ucla.edu * 



viewpoint@media.ucla.edu 



Look for group unity wlien in alien nation 



EXCLUSION: Being American in 




Brian 
Fishman 



Japan brings same oslracization, 
'cliques' as for minorities in U.S. 

The sign said my plane was going to Japan 
and it did. But it also wound up landing 
me. a white American, on the opposite 
side of the social fence. This fence separates 
Japanese from a motley 
collaboration of anyone 
who is not native- 
Japanese. 

And it's starting to get 
on my nerves. 

I'm tired of people leer- 
ing at me out of the cor- 
ners of their eyes. Vm tired 
of catching the tail end of 
the word "gaijin" (a 
derogatory Japanese word 
for foreigner) as I walk 

down the street, given that 

there are many other ways 
to classify me. And I've only been here three 
months. What is a lifetime of subtle, and some- 
times not-so-subtle, social exclusion like? 

It's frustrating. 

People won't sit next to me on the train. All 
other seats will fill up and people will pass the 
seats next to me. They will stand rather than sit 
near me as if I'm contagious. 

And, though it makes my ride more comfort- 
able (which is no small condolence on the sub- 
way in Tokyo), it's annoying. I catch those side- 
ways glances and imagine what people are say- 
ing. 

"What's that 'gaijin' doing here?" 

"Don't get too close. You'll catch 'white- 
ness.'" 

In the long run, that kind of tacit discrimina- 
tion is more wounding than the more. rare and 
overt forms of racial intolerance. 

Have you heard of the "Japanese Only" bars 
that dot the landscape on the west side of tlie 
Pacific'^ I hadn't until one bartender raised my 
ire and her finger toward the door when a group 
of UC students walked into her establishment. 
In heavily accented but completely understand- 
able English, she blurted, "Japanese.Only!" 

Intolerance fiowed out with her words, but 
the disdain in her eyes was more telling. 

Though instances like these are dramatic, it ib 

Fishman misses LA. summer weather. "Remind him 
at bfishman@ucla.edu. 



the constant social exclusion that is most frus- 
trating. 

Before becoming a cultural minority, I did 
not understand the tacii sense of embattlement 
that can be seen among marginalized groups in 
the United States. For an American in Japan, 
there is something altogether comforting about 
speaking English, just as there is in comparing 
stories of discrimination. - 

One incident includes being watched in a toy 
store. I was not going to steal anything, but the 
hawk behind the counter would not believe that. 
At another time, while at the Post OlTice. a child 
derided a friend, calling him "hakudou" - white 
creature. 

I do not want to give a false impression of 
Japan. The vast majority of Japanese people I 
have run across are extraordinarily friendly and 
some are almost embarrassingly excited about 



the United States and its citizens. And. as in the 
United States, the young tend to hold more lib- 
eral ideas while the elderly hold the political 
power, the money, and the stagnating ideas 
about justice. 

For the most part, the dynamics of discrimi- 
nation are very similar on either side of the 
Pacific. The most important point to be made is 
that very few people in both the United States 
and Japan actively abhor those across the social 
fence. After spending time on both sides of this 
obstruction, it is easy to see that this barrier is 
built not of hate, but of misunderstanding. 

This misunderstanding is built on media 
images, historical misinterpretations and a lack 
of constructive cultural interaction. It breeds 
mistrust. 

Unfortunately, in addition to the basic levels 
of misunderstanding that evolve from different 



cultural practices, many of the methods by 
which cultural minorities face exclusion are mis- 
understood by mainstream America. 

After being an outsider for a while, you can't 
help but want to be on the inside of something; 
So we Americans clad in distinctive jerseys 
started to take the field in soccer tournaments 
and plan a month early for an Independence 
Day celebration. (I never considered the barbe- 
cue an important cultural symbol until now.) 
Strength and kinship were found through a 
derogatory word and plans for a public celebra- 
tion of unity among individuals whd feel they 
are on society's fringe. Sound familiar? 

Such jerseys and elaborate Independence 
Day celebrations are parallel to the African 
Student Union's "Endangered Species" shirts, 

. See FISHMAN, page 12 



Expose yourself to opportunities, careers 



INTERNSHIPS: Center lets 
Students explore avenues, 
gain personal experience 



By Dario Bravo 

I have been at the EXPO 

Internship and Study Abroad 
Services Office of the UCLA Career 
Center for some 15 years. During my 
time here 1 have seen a number of stu- 
dents lake advantage of internship 
and other experiential educational 
opportunities. I have, however, also 
encountered students who have decid- 
ed to lake part in these programs 
much too late or who have ignored 
them. 

Albert Schweitzer once said, "1 
don'l know what your destiny will be, 
but one thing I know : the only ones 
among you who will be really happy 
are those who will have sought and 

Bravo is manager of the EXPO Intern- 



found how to serve." I believe that it 
is essential that every student put to 
practical use their academic training 
received at UCLA. As a form of expe- 
riential learning, internships illow stu- 
dents an opportunity that classroom 
instruction cannot give them. 

Students can employ their class- 
room knovyledge as a probe to 
explore a challenging set of new expe- 
riences. 

(jaining significant work experi- 
ence, as well as ihc opportunity for 
self-evaluation, are some of the bene- 
fits of participating m internships. 
Opportunity stands out as the com- 
pelling force behind our baby steps 
and our giant leaps lorward.'Whether 
you choose to view your internship as 
a baby step or a giant leap is a person- 
al matter. But few can deny the per- 
sonal growth and opportunities that 
have arisen from the internship expe- 
rience. 

1 he internship experience at the 
very least provides insight into the 
working world In .some cases ii pro-" 



ship and Study Abroad Services Office. vides the opportunity to work in a 



large city or it can even lead to a full- 
,time position. A well-designed intern- 
ship nurtures a lifelong habit of turn- 
ing experience into learning through 
reflection. 



Passion is tlie l<ey 

word to describe 

former interns. They 

seethe world in a 

different light and 

lose inhibitions 
about theniselves. 



Not too long ago. I spoke with Dr. 
Fiijimoto. Director of the Office of 
Public AITairs at the Department o\' 
l:ducatioii. He spoke about a group 
of 12 UCLA interns who worked in 
his office during the suiiuiu-r of \^)^N 



in Wasfiinglon. D.Cs One ol their 



assignments was to produce a video 
for the Department of Education. 

The video, titled "D.C. Reads," 
was about a reading program within 
the inner-city schools of the District 
of Columbia. The UCLA interns 
wrote the script, picked the actors, 
video taped, selected the music, and 
edited the video. 

The video has received rave 
reviews from the Department of 
Education staff and is now beirl^ 
shown throughout various school dis- 
tricts and boards of education across 
the country. The 12 UCLA students 
not only profiled tremendously from 
their internship but also made a sig- 
nificant contribution to the 
Department of Education and to the 
schoolchildren of the District o\' 
Columbia. 

When students get back from their 
internships., they tend to be much 
' moi e.Jocused and willing to become 
involved. I have seen students gain a 
liemendous sense of confidence as 
llifii pi'isonal skilL llouri^h in a ieU — 



lenged. 

A successful internship ena'bles a 
student to develop skills for organiz- 
ing information and solving problems 
that are standard tooU for a practic- 
ing professional. 

I recently spoke with a student who 
is interning at the White House 
through our spring quarter program. 
She mentioned that when she first 
arrived there, she was somewhat inse- 
cure about her qualifications for her 
assigned position. She was deter- 
mined, however, to prove herself able. 
She took on the attitude of don't look 
now, but opportunity is knocking. She 
completed every task quickly and 
thoroughly. 

As a result of her desire to succeed, 
she has been offered a full-time stall' 
position through the end of the 
Clinton administration. She will 
return to UCLA in the winter quarter 
of 2001 to complete her degree. 
^ ^ Passion is the key word to describe 
former interns. Tliey see the world in 



Daily Bruin Viewpoint 



Monday, July 3, 2000-Friday, July 7, 2000 11 



Police need to contain violence 





Trisha 
Kirk 



STAPLES: With upcoming 
Democratic convention, 
LAPD must Step up plan 

There were two showdowns at 
the Staples Center the night 
__ the Lakers took the N BA title 
in Game 6. Watching Kobe Bryant 
take those final free throws, the 
crowd inside the Staples Center . 
Ichewll was sfll 
over for the 
Pacers. The 
Lakers barely 
beat Indiana 
116-1 II. The 
tense and 
sweaty battle on 
the court made 
the Lakers and 
all of Los 
Angeles victori- 
ous. 

But the other 

contest that 

night was a conclusive loss: Rioters 1, 
LAPD 0. When ecstatic Lakers fans 
got out of control after the game, 
police officers made the situation 
worse by not stopping the mayhem 
before it caused serious damage. 

After watching the finale on the 
Jumbo-Tron outside the center that 
broadcast the game to fans in the 
parking lot, revelers burned T-shirts 
and posters and lit bonfires in nearby 
streets. The 60 police officers on the 
scene wriggled into riot gear but the 
celebrating escalated. 

Two police cars were torched, 
businesses were vandalized and loot- 
ed, a bus was set ablaze and a fire 
hydrant was opened. An SUV, a UPS 
truck and two news vans were van- 
dalized and reporters were assaulted. 
And in the spreading commotion,li: 
dozen people were injured. 

What is worse than all this insanity 
is the fact that the LAPD was right 
there watching it. They watched a 
crowd of 6,000 bombard the streets 
and stop traffic. They watched fans 
tear branches from trees and use 
them to set police cruisers on fire. 
They watched people tear down 

Kirk is a fourth-year political science stu- 
dent who can form an opinion about 
anything, but always gives the other 
side a fighting chance. She looks for- 
ward to hearing your comments and 
opinions at trishakirk@hotmail.com. 



street signs, and it seemed they did 
next to nothing to stop or deter them. 
Eventually police did use rubber bul- 
lets and tear gas to slow the crowd, 
but made only 1 1 arrests. My 
thoughts echo a question thrown out 
by a news anchor during a live broad- 
cast of the riot: "Where were the 
policed ., ^ -:"\^ 

Clearly not dbihgllie jbF we pay" 
them to do. It is one thing for fans to 
celebrate a hometown win and quite 
"another lo^anTagepfoperfy, assaiitl 
bystanders and wreak havoc near a 
crowded sports arena and private 
homes. The revelers were celebrating 
with destruction and the police were 
allowing them to do it. ,: i 

Police Chief Bernard Parks and 
Mayor Richard Riordan praised the 
officers involved for controlling the 
crowd in a small area around Staples 
Center and maintaining a strong 
approach toward the violent offend- 
ers. But the crowd was not con- 
tained. Violence erupted in other 
places, including Westwood, where 
police reportedly used tear gas to 
fight a crowd outside Moloney's and 
one man was arrested for battery of a 
police officer. 



Protecting life is 
more important than 
trying to maintain a 

virtuous image. 



As for the tactics employed, some 
who watched the rioting on TV argue 
that the command stall directing the 
officers on the street was incompe- 
tent and officers should have been 
ordered to forcefully stop the crowd 
before it got out of hand. 

The police at the center were out- 
numbered, but did not call for back- 
up. Why didn't the LAPD call in 
more officers to stop the violence 
before their own cruisers were fried 
on the street and fans were injured? 

Officers may have been fearful of 
being cited for any retaliation against 
individuals in the crowd. Police 
might have also feared provoking the 
crowd further by asserting control. 
But when this type of violence and 
property damage occurs, measures 



need to be taken to stop it, even if 
they are violent ones. Protecting life 
is more important that trying to 
maintain a virtuous image. 

Fan violence isn't a new phenome- 
non. In 1990. seven people died and 
a hundred were injured in Detroit 
when the Pistons squashed the * 
^ Portland Trailblazers in the N B A _- 
Championships. When the Bulls beat 
the Blazers in Chicago two years 
later, two officers were shot. 61 
pottorcars were damaged and hOO^- 
rioters were arrested. And in 1996, 
revelers celebrating the Bruins' victo- 
ry at the NCAA Championships 
went on a destructive rampage in 

• Westwood. '^i ;■;:..■;-;'. r',v-,j;^^'.''^''v'/..^ 

These riots make the Lakers dis- 
turbance look like a disagreement at 
a tea party. Maybe rioting is a sports 
tradition. Maybe the Jumbo-Tron got 
everyone riled up, already drunk on 
their 3.2 percent-alcoholic sports 
arena beer. Nevertheless, this kind of 
violence should never be allowed to . • 
escalate syhen police have the means 
to control it. jn addition to the harm 
it caused, the Lakers riot just con- 
tributes to-Jhe bad image out-of- 
towners already have of this city and 
the people who live here. 

If this is what happens after a bas- 
ketball game, what may happen dur- 
ing the Democratic National 
Convention in August terrifies me. 
At a Lakers game, fans riot because 
they are pumped up and intoxicated 
by the game. But the thousands of 
protesters expected at the DNC have 
real reasons to disturb the peace that 
go beyond an impulsive emotional 
surge. The same coalition that invad- 
ed the World Trade Organization 
talks in Seattle and the International 
Monetary Fund meetings in 
Washington, D.C. may plan a protest 
strategy for Los Angeles. Unions will 
be marching and protesters from 
evsry organization that feels stepped 
on will be at the Staples Center 
protesting against wage inequality, 
multinational corporations, environ- 
mental catastrophe and corporate 
greed. They will wave signs, block 
entrances and make a real mess of 
things. Unless the LAPD gets its act 
together people and property are 
going to get hurt. 

Parks recently told the Los 
Angeles Business Journal that he 

See KIRK, page 13 




The. Supreme Court 
recently allowed the Boy 
Scouts to ban homosexual 
A*) troop leaders. 

V ^What do you think 

Cj about the decision? 

Send submissions to 



viewpoint @ media.ucia.edu 



IAlOB LIAU/Udlly Biuif) 



Speaks Out 



What characterizes Generation X? 



Alma Agulrre 

Fourth-year 




MalachI Davis 

Fourth-year 
:5ociology -^== 



"For 
females, - 
they're more 



career-ori- 
ented. In 
previous 
generations, 
even if a 
woman got a 
degree, they 
wouldn't utilize them. Today, 
there are more goals behind it." 



"Diversity. 
There's a lot 
of different 
cultures and 
races that are 
coming 
together, so 
we need to be 
open to that 
coming 

together. Racism and discrimina- 
tion has held us back in the past." 





Jesse Webb 

Fourth-year 
Psychology 

"Genera- 
tion X is 
younger and 
faster. 
Essentially, 
adulthood 
has to start 
when you're 
fourteen or 
fifteen since 
children are exposed to adult 
content at a younger age. You're 
forced into early social integra- 
tion." 




AHceLo \ 

Second-year 

Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology 

"Open- 
mindedness. 
They're able 
to open 
themselves 
to different 
ideas and 
views about 
things such 
as sex and 
social problems." 




EspenMoe 

Graduate Student -, ' 

Political Science 

"From 
where I" 
come from, 
it's more 
about plural- 
istic values 
and less 
about what 
your parents 
did. You're 

not constrained by traditional 

values." 



Elena Swanson 
Fourth-year 
Political Science 





"Their 
willingness 
not to follow 
society's 
rules. They 
make their 
own rules. 
They do 
things that 
haven't been 



done before.' 



Joanna Dragich 


%. 


Steve Shiu V 




Graduate Student 




Fourth-year 




Microbiology and Mol 


ecular Genetics 
"They're 


Political Science 




^^K^^ 


"Comput- 


.^^^^HH^ 


just a con- 




ers and cars 


^ ^H 


fused bunch. 




are more elfi- 


^^HBiwI 


difl'erent 




cient, quicker. 


^^^^Mr^V 


from other 




Internet speed 


^^HKjI^.M 


generations. 




is quicker. 


^^^HSfl 


Nothing 


^P* V.., ^^K. .J^r 


Everything is 


^^^HK|^H 


really 


J 


much more 


^^^^^^1 


defines 


v., J 


accessible for 




them." 




Generation 
X." 



Compiled by Cuauhtemoc Ortega, Daily Bruin Senior Staff. Photos by Mindy Ross, 
Daily Bruin Senior Staff. 



DAILY BRUIN 

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contact the Publications office at 1 18 Kerckhoff Hall. 



12 Monday, July 3, 2000-Friday, July 7, 2000 



Dally Bruin Viewpoint 



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FISHMAN f 

From page 10 * • r '; 

Cinco de Mayo celebrations and St. 
Patrick's Day and Gay Pride 
parades. All aim to celebrate culture. 
And all aim to show unity. And while 
some are more politically motivated 
than others, all are purposeful 
demonstrations of pride. 



•M-; 



At another tiine, a child 
derided a friend, calling 



hlm"Tiakud6u7^ 
(Japanese for) 
"white creature." 



But, I think such demonstrations 
oftentimes confuse those on the 
mainstream side of the fence. 
Certainly our jerseys attracted some 
strange looks. We were misunder- 
stood. Why, a Japanese friend of 
mine asked, did we Americans want 
to flaunt our "gaijin" status? (Though 
it's tough for a 6-foot-2-inch 
Caucasian to blend in, most of my 
teammates were Asian American and 
not as immediately noticeable.) My 
friend, like me before my visit to 
Asia, did not understand what subtle 
exclusion feels like. Hence, he did not 
understand the appeal of overt dis- 
plays of unity. 

In the United States these demon- 
strations are sometimes perceived as 
an overly confrontational flaunting 
of cultural unity - even superiority. 
But that's not the case. Bold displays 
of unity, from unifying jerseys to 
parades, are simply opportunities for 
the excluded to celebrate themselves 
when few else will. ; v* ^ 

And, though difficuU for some on 
the mainstream side of the fence to 
understand, that does not imply reci- 
procal exclusion by cultural minori- 
ties. And while reciprocal exclusion 
no doubt occurs, only the truly short- 
sighted practice such a blatantly 
destructive ritual. 



After being an outsider 

for a while, you can't 

help but want to be 

'^on the inside of 



something. 



Exclusion is about misunderstand- 
ing and miscommunication across 
the slowly shrinking social fence. 
Sometimes I am reminded of how 
low that fence can be. ' 

Last week I was walking alone 
through a street crowded with 
Japanese individuals. Suddenly, from 
nowhere, I hear someone speaking 
English. 

"What's up?" said an Afi-ican 
American man handing out flyers to 
passersby. 

1 paused, surprised. And then a 
look of understanding and cama- 
raderie passed between us. 

Shaking his outreached hand, I 
said, "Nx)t much, my friend," 
because that's what he was. 



BRAVO 

From page 10 

a different light and lose inhibitions 
about themselves. 1 believe that for- 
mer interns are more focused and 
more willing to become active partici- 
pants in both the public and private 
sectors. The internship system tradi- 
tionally does not produce clueless or 
disgruntled workers but instead pre- 
pures extremely qualified and focused 



' ,. .' *■ 



Daily Bruin Viewpoint 



BRAVO 

From page 12 .. 

careerists. 

Make the most of all of your expe- 
riences, whether they were from 
internships, community service, 
extracurricular activities or study 
abroad programs. There are many 
opportunities to become viable candi- 
dates for jobs or graduate and piofes- 
sional schools. 

Internships and fellowships can be 
prerequisites to landing good jobs. I 
urge you to take advantage of them. 
Try new things and in turn Icanr 



Monday, July 3, 2000-Friday. July 7, 2000 13 



much more about the workmg world. 
Do not expect opportunities to land 
in your lap. Take up the challenge 
and move ahead toward your goal in 
life. 

In conclusion I quote one my 
heroes, Don Quixote, to wish you 
success on your quest. "The past is 
present in us because we are the bear- 
ers of culture we ourselves have 
made. Many things are changing in 
the world; many others are surviving. 
By taking on the new challenge that is 
particularly yours; accept the diversi- 
ty and mutation of the world, while 
retaining the mind of power for anal- 
ogy and unity, so that this changing 
world does not become meaningless. 
it is not a question of sacrificing the 
past before you, maintaining, com- 
paring, and remembering the values 
you have created." v.- 



4& 



KIRK 

From page 1 1 



draws the line when protests inter- 
ftfte with procession of events or 
business. "We recognize the First 
Amendment rights of people to 
express their opinion, but those 
rights do not preclude others' rights. 
And there is no license to disrupt 
business in this city," he said. If this 
is truly the policy that Parks aims to 
follow, the LAPD needs to start 
practicing what it preaches before 
the DNC becomes a rerun of the 
Lakers riot. 

The convention this summer may 
go smoothly. Protesters could peace- 
fully make their points and police 
could have an easy time handling the 
crowd. But looking at the history of 
U.S. political conventions, this 
seems rather unlikely. When protest- 
ers unite behind a cause, a mob men- 
tality ensues. People get carried 
away, as they did after the Lakers 
victory, and that is a risk to life and 
property. 

A riotous atmosphere may arise at 
the DNC. Unless the LAPD and the 
other officials in charge are prepared 
to control the protests before real 
damage is done, then we can't expect 
much better than the Game 6 after- 
math: bonfires, vandalism, injury 
and an increasingly tarnished image 
of Los Angeles. 




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Take a tour of Paris through art 

Experience Paris without even leaving the 
country. A&E checks out photographer 
Eugene Aget's picture-perfect guide to Paris, 
on display now/ at the Getty Center. 

Monday, July 3, 2000-Frlday, July 7, 2000 




Photo courtesy of FOSSE National Touf 



Reva Rice performs 'Mein Herr' from 'Fosse,' a Tony Award-win- 
ning musical that celebrates the achievements of Bob Fosse, 
legendary choreographer and director. 



Smash musical celebrates 
legendary choreographer 



THEATER; Tiibute to Fosse 
includes talented dancers, 
brings stage-magic to L.A. 



By Barbara McGuire 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

Thirteen years after his death, 
award winning choreographer Bob 
Kosse has magically made waves on 
the Broadway scene once again. 

Director Richard Maltby Jr. and 
Ann Remking are bringing the style 
and spirit of Fosse to the stage - right 
down to his trademark hats and toe 
moves. The two are combining his 
various works from television to 
Broadway productions into a show 
simply titled, "Fosse." 

Running through July 9 at the 
Shubert Theatre in Los Angeles, the 
current company has been perform- 
ing 'Fosse" since September 1999 
when they started the tour in 
Chicago. 

Headlining the show is the multi- 
talented Reva Rice with her domi- 
neering stage presence and deep 
voice, lliough the show consists of 
various scenes from hosse's wide pal- 
let of work, each is seamlessly lied 
together in an overall connected 
show. Greats such as "Bye Bye 
Blackbird" and "Dancin* Man" arc 
included i<n the show, and though each 
has a completely different clement to 
it, they make sense together. 

Tlie night is. after all, a celebration 
of the choreographing wonder, Fosse, 
who is the first director in history to 
have won the Oscar, Tony and Emmy 
award in a a in gic y e a r fo r hi s fi l m v cr - 



musical "Pippin" and his television 
special "Liza with a Z." 

Fosse's credits don't rest here, 
though. He was the recipient of nine 
Tony Awards, as well as numerous 
other Emmys and Oscars, for his var- 
ious musical shows, in addition to his 
work on television and film. Fosse 
demonstrated his talents through act- 
ing and directing as much as he did 
through choreography. 

Although the two-hour long show 
does not fully acknowledge all of 
Fosse's talent, it does give viewers a 
good taste of it. The opening number, 
"Life is Just a Bowl of Cherries," sets 
the upbeat mood of the show and the 
dancers, ranging from classical/mod- 
ern trained to Broadway gypsies, 
truly seem to enjoy the performance. 

One of the numbers "Big 
Spender," features only women 
dancers in loudly styled and colored 
outfits comically attempting to entice 
a man to be a "big spender." This 
piece demonstrates the true talent of 
those on stage. Those involved with 
"Fosse" arc not just dancers, but 
singers as well as actors. With each 
scene they are required to take on 
new roles, from a prostitute to a Hap- 
per, which is in no way an easy task. 
Especially notable is the performance 
by Terace Jones, whose solo com- 
bines break-dance type moves with 
the grace of ballet. 

The concluding number, "Sing, 
Sing. Sing" from "Dancin'," no 
doubt leaves the crowd aching for 
more of I osse's remarkable style. A 
traditional style jazz quintet complete 
with drums, a piano, a trumpet, a clar- 
inet and a trombone is brought out 



ENT 





A&E on the Web 

See all this and more at 
the Daily Bruin's 
Website: .. .. / 

www.dairybruin.ucla.edu 

Monday, July 3, 2000-Friday, July 7, 2000 




Despite exorbitant prices 

and (Jot.com booths that 

contrad i ct p un k cJogma, 

anticipated acts quench 

fans' thirst for music at 

Van's Warped Tour 





,«*• 



Vocalist Jason 
Navarro excites 
the exhausted . 
crowd during the 
Suicide Machines' 
afternoon set. 



sum me r 




1-'-%..: 




By MarikoObrero 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

Heat and exhaustion were expected at the all-day 
summer festival of punk rock and skateboarding, but 
the exorbitant prices made the Warped Tour seem 
more focused on business than fun. 

This year's concert filled the Awowhead Pond's 
parking lot in Anaheim with bustling pre-teens and 
teenagers on Thursday, June 29. With that in mind, the 
$10 parking and other expenses should have been 
more controlled. 

Ticket prices averaged $25 and bottled water was 
priced at $3.50. This, along with the countless promo- 
tional dot. com booths contradicted the punk dogma of 
anti-corporation, dampening the atmosphere. 

Each band's set lasted 30 minutes and scheduling 
was closely monitored. 



There were moments when 

getting kicked in the head 

— actually became tolerable 

because fans were^o happy to 

see the much anticipated acts. 



But it was during this short amount of time that the 
bands brought out the best in their fans by thanking 
them and letting them fill in their lyrics as the sets pro- 
gressed. There were moments when getting kicked in 
the head actually became tolerable because fans were 
so happy to see the much anticipated acts. 

Good Riddance, TSOL, Lunachicks, and Snapcase 
played the early part of the festival which began at 
noon. Stages one and two, the main stages, were locat- 
ed adjacent to one another, but stage three was set up 
closer to the entrance causing a few inconveniences 
when trying to get back and forth between the perfor- 
mances. 

At 2:30 p.m.. The Suicide Machines assumed stage 
one and energy levels increased driven by its positive 
skacore and power riff style. 

Local Anaheim based Massengil showed up to play 
i>n unannouinced side set, bringing back old school 
hardcore punk which the band played years ago while 
skating when the venue used to be a trailer park. 

The group was thoughtful enough to pass out food 
and water at no cost to dehydrated fans. Additionally, 
ii couple of large tents with water mistef s were set up 



on the grounds to remedy the heat. 

Flogging Molly played its bagpipe influenced punk 
tunes and ijitroduced NOFX to the largest crowd of 
the day. The band assumed the stage in typical NOFX 
style with plastic bottles being thrown onstage and El 
Hefe and Fat Mike cracking jokes. Its set started with 
the slow and melodic intro of "Together on the Sand" 
which erupted into a chaotic mess of crowd surfers 
and mosh pits. 

Fans sang the entirety of the short tune "Murder 
the Government" and demanded an encore at the con- 
clusion of the band's performance. The crowd, howev- 
er, was disappointed because the schedule operated 
like clockwork, precluding any impromptu musical 
tangents. 

On the third stage, the politically conscious Anti- 
Flag greeted the crowd with a message of unity. The 
band encouraged everyone to take care of one another 
through positive anti-racism and anti-war sentiments, 
e%)ressed in songs such as "Got the Numbers" and 

See WARPED, page 17 



sion of "Cabaret," his Broadway 



SeeFOSSf,pa9«17 



MINDY HOSS/ D«ily Bfum S*n(0» Std'! 

(Above) Eric Melvin, one of NOFX's guitarists, grimaces during his performance at the Vans' 
Warped Tour last Thursday. 



(Right) Donna A. of the Donnas pleases the crowd with her rich vocals. 





,„ Photo courtesy of USA Films 

(left to right) Dan Hedaya and E. Emmet Walsh star in the 1985 Joel 
and Ethan Coen film 'Blood Simple', re-cut and re-released by USA Films. 

■ ■ . .. . . . ' ,.-••■ • . .-■> . . • ■ ■ . : 

Goen brothers come long way, 
return to directorial beginnings 

FILM: Fleshing out their the film while adding extras like a Four 

„„. . . 1 mi J c- 1 / Tops song, which wasn't affordable when 

unique style, 'Blood Simple' the film was first released. 

is being re-released, re-cut '"'" .f^^^ '^™^' '^'^ •^'"^ °^ ^^°^ ^"^ 

flabby," said elder brother Joel in a press 

interview. "With 15 years experience of 

cutting, we knew how to cut the movie, 
like with the perspective of sleeping and 
looking back at it. That's why we cut 
Blood Simple.'" 

But some things remain the same. 
While their storytelling and techniques 
may have evolved, their unique style was 
evident at the beginning of their career. 

. "We were shooting the scene where 
Steve Buscemi was pulling the body off 
the road in 'Fargo,'" Joel said, "and we're 
looking at it and we (knew) we'd done 
that before (in 'Blood Simple')." 

"It's the limits of imagination," he 
mused. ; : 

The critics and fans don't seem to 
think so. At seeing "Fargo" in March 
1996. late film critic Gene Siskel predict- 
ed he wouldn't see a better movie that 
year. He was right. Both Siskel and his 
then-partner Roger Ebert gave their cov- 
eted No. 1 movie of the year spot to 
"Fargo." 

Fans have also shown fascination with 
the Coens' films. According to a 1994 
Premiere magazine article, a student 
wrote his thesis on the Coens' 1990 film. 
"Miller's Crossing," and sent the the 
brothers a questionnaire on what the 
symbols and happenings really mean. 

Their fans' interest amuses them 
though. 

"You make these stupid movies," 
Ethan said in the article, "and then a year 
later you've got homework. It's really * 
kind of alarming." 

Even at the top of their game as direc- 
tors, producers and Academy-award win- 
ning screenwriters, the Coens are still 
somewhat of an anomaly in Hollywood. 
They are not given deadlines for their 
films nor do their films usually require big 
budgets, except in the case of "The 
Hudsucker Proxy" ($25 million). 

Faced with a dozen journalists at a 
Hollywood hotel, the Coens answer the 
questions tersely with few soundbite- 
friendly quotes. But they are able to talk 
at length about the filmmaking process, 
equipment and techniques that sound 
foreign to the average moviegoer. 
Dressed in well-worn plaid shirts and 
jeans, the Coens don't seem to have let 
fame or Hollywood affect them or their 
work. They're just thankful they don't 
need a second job. 



By Sandy Yang 

Daily Bruin Staff ^ 

In Joel and Ethan Coen's Oscar nomi- 
nated "Fargo," the bad guys shove dead 
bodies into a wood-chipping machine. 

In their 1994 film. "The Hudsucker 
Proxy." CEO and multi-millionaire. 
Waring Hudsucker, plunges 44 floors to 
his death. The bellboy cracks, "What do 
you call a sidewalk when it's fully 
dressed? Waring Hudsucker!" 

You wonder, "Is that funny? Is that 
disturbing? Should I laugh? What should 
I do?" 

Welcome. You are facing the typical 
dilemma of a Coen brothers movie. 

You'll find such moments in all their 
work from Nicolas Cage's baby-napping 
movie "Raising Arizona," to their most 
recent work, "The Big Lebowski," 
starring Jeff Bridges and John 
Goodman. 

And they're most skillful at walking 
that tightrope when they kill someone otT 

It may have started with their first film. 
I985's "Blood Simple," a crime thriller 
that explores just how many circum- 
stances and means to murder there really 
are. 

Starring Frances McDormand (1997 
best actress Academy Award winner for 
"Fargo") and Dan Hedaya, "Blood 
Simple" is being re-cut and re-released by 
USA Films Friday, July 7. 

The story takes place in Texas, in a 
worid of smoky bars, dusty roads, clunky 
Pontiac cars and guys who look like they 
stepped off "The Dukes of Hazard." 
With echoes of "Fargo," the plot sur- 
rounds bar owner Julian (Hedaya) who 
discovers his wife Abby's infidelity and 
hires a vulgar detective (M. Emmet 
Walsh) to kill her (McDormand) and her 
lover (John Getz). 

However, everyone has ideas of their 
own about who should get elixpinated. 
who murdered who, and what the best 
way to kill is. Burying someone alive and 
throwing corpses into an incinerator are 
just a couple of the ways used in the film. 
From the original version of this inde- 
pendent film IS years ago. '"Blood 
Simple" set the tone for the Coen broth- 
ers' future films and introduced audi- 
ences to their unique style. 

But, the brothers cringe when they 
recall those early efforts. So. when faced 



with releasing Blood Simple " as a DVD. 
the brothers opted to restore and n<ul 



FILM; 'Blood Simple' opens July 7 at 



selected theaters 



in New York and Los 



* # 



16 Monday, July 3, 2000-Friday, July 7, 2000 



Daily Bruin Arts & Entertainnoent 





OUND BnES 




THE MIGS 
"The MiGs" 



The MiGs 
"The MiGs" 
Self-Released 

Every young child who aspired to 
be a fighter pilot from the "Top 
Gun" era remembers MiGs to be the 
evil, shadowy airplanes llown by evil, 
shadowy Communists, an emblem of 
all things un-American and nasty. 
Thus, hstening to the self-titled album 
by this L.A. sextet is a little confus- 
ing. 

The name belies a tough, over- 
bearmg military force, but the music 
is as far removed from that image as 
possible. Frontman Bernard Yin's 
airy, enjoyable vocals dance around 
above deliciously cheesy synthesizers 
and dippy guitars to make for some 
killer tunes. ' 

This isn't the music of faceless, 
oppressive Soviets— it's corny fun at 
its best. On the eight-song album, the 
band crafts an odd blend of Beach 
Boys pop. They Might Be Giants 
eclecticism and. well, just about any- 
thing else that comes along. 

Though the MiGs steer clear of 
overtly serious territory, the band can 
definitely put together some interest- 
ing blends. " 1600 Armadillos" bor- 
rows Nashville country guitars, "Too 
Many People" kicks off in a funk 



groove and "Honolulu" could be 
come straight from your dentist's 
waiting room. 

Not too many groups can switch 
gears from hard rock to easy listening 
convincingly, butj[jese guys rise to — 
the task without too much trouble. 
Even the mariachi-esque excursion of 

— ^'Muchaeha #^"^omes across 

impressively, largely due to the addi- 
tion of DJ Bonebrake on marimba 
and JefT Veal on trumpet. ___ -^ 

So while the group may not live up 
to its tough-sounding name, it suc- 
ceeds in crafting some tasty tunes. 
Those looking to raise their con- 
sciousness may want to look else- 
where, but for folks just looking for a 
good time, the MiGs are your band. 

Brent Hopkins 
Rating:? 

Pitchshifter 
"Deviant" 
MCA Records 

Pitchshifter once played on 
MTV's Spring Break Special where 
lead singer Jonathan Clayden and 
company hit the stage and let it rip. 

But the dumbfounded looks in . 
the audience revealed that no one 
knew quite what to think or feel. 
After listening to their latest album, 
"Deviant," neither will you. 

Considering today's tonally-chal- 
lenged rock scene, it's somewhat of 
a miracle that Pitchshifter isn't a 
certified star. In a market saturated 
with abrasive guitar work and bar- 
baric drumming, the Nottingham. 
England outfit have quietly carved 
out a legion of fans based on the 



strength of industrial-sized guitar 
riffs and danceable breakbeats. 

"Deviant" builds on 
Pitchshifter's hook-friendly back 
catalogue with the' same emphasis 

~on solid pop-smithing, allthe white" 
staying true to the aggression and 
intensity that characterizes the 

— group "s ii YejihowSx Al time s. 

"Deviant" tend to be dominated by 
schizophrenia and chaos, leaving 
you feeling like one of those dazed 
spring-breakers. 

"Deviant" starts out heavy and 
powerful with "Condescension," a 
rock track with a throbbing dance 
pulse that represents some of 
Pitchshifter's strongest work to 
date. While the band could have 
easily remade "Genius," the smash- 
single from "www.pitchshifter.com" 
a dozen times over, tracks like 
"Condescension" and the menacing 
"Chump Change" show a renewed 
commitment to diversifying their 
potent industrial formula. 

"Dead Battery," a groove-heavy 
guitar track, and "As Seen on TV," 
a song that features Dead 
Kennedy's legend Jello Biafra, are 
also easy favorites for new fans. 

The album's bouts of schizophre- 
nia originate not so much from the 
music per se, but rather the produc- 
tion. "Deviant" runs so perfectly 
smoothly at times, you'll wish a gui- 
tar would slip out of tune for just 
for a second. 

In short, it's a rock album with 
electronica-precision production, 
and as a result, a lot of the rawness 
and visceral kick of Pitchshifter live 
isn't captured. Nevertheless, it's a 
reason to see the band in the flesh. 



and "Deviant" certainly won't dis- 
appoint hardcore fans. ' 

Anthony Camara 
Rating:? 

Sleater-Kinney 

"All Hands on the Bad One" 

Kill Rock Stars ' 

Sleater-Kinney's fifth album is 
filled with catchy melodies coupled 
with complex lyrics and vocal 
arrangements. Each of the 13 tracks 
carries with it a depth and richness 
that is rare to find nowadays. " iL 

"The Ballad of a Ladyman," the 
album's lead song, exhibits the band's 
expansiveness. The guitar introduc- 
tion is low and quiet, but the power- 
f^l'vocals, performed by all members 
of the trio, overlap each other while 
themes of breaking guitars and the 
life of a girl band are included. 

But Sleater-Kinney is not only lim- 
ited to being a girl band. It is full 
range of abilities and talent is evident 
in following tracks. 

"Youth Decay" holds a refiective 
tone and conveys a somber, melan- 
cholic mood reminding us of the con- 
flicting issue of a parent/child rela- 
tionship. 

It yields a very serious social com- 
.mentary through a song that is very 
easy to listen to. Also, its aggressive 
vocals immediately confront the lis- 
tener since there is no introduction. 

Additionally, "Was it a Lie?" 
retells the tragedy of a young girl's 
suicide. Slow tempos, overlapping 
vocals, profound lyrics, and building 
percussion sounds shape this track 
on multiple levels. 



Perhaps the catchiest and most 
memorable track is "You're No 
Rock 'n' Roll Fun" because of the 
simple guitar riffs and arrangements, 
as well as the harmonies. More good 
limes with a girl band are expressed^ 
here but the song has a well-crafted 
and finished sound of its own. 



A nother standout track is "Leave 
You Behind" a tune tharcbrnTorts tlie" 
listener over the emotions of break- 
ing up through beautifully sung har- ■ 
monies with lines such as: "Wonder 
how you looked the day you were 
erased/Did you disappear?/Were you 
just misplaced?/ Left behind with no '^ 
one else to blame/Are you letting 
go?/Somelhing lingers on...." 

More intensity and depth are com- 
municated in "#1 Must-Have" 
through calm melodies and heated ' 
lyrics, "Inspiration rests in between 
my beauty magazines and my credit .^. 
card bills." The chorus replies with, 
"No More!" and the second part 
leads with "Now is the time." 

Lastly, one of the concluding 
tracks on "All Hands on the Bad 
One" is the analogous and witty 
"Milk Shake n' Honey," an expan- 
sive track that contains experimental 
and innovative vocals. It is a perfect- 
ly solid ending track for an equally 
solid album. 



Mariko Obrero 
Rating: 8 




X)YCECHON/Da 



1 EIIKS9KIIIIIP9niinVIRIHRRDi^V«9B1 ^ 



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Daily Bruin Arts & Entertainment 



'Plums' delivers lightweight read 



FOSSE 

From page 14 



BOOKS: Southern-tinged 
novel entertains, but fails 
to locate serious themes 



By Sharon Hori 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 



Whenever it seems like there's 
nothing to do in Westwood, just be 
thankful your life isn't like the aver- 
age Joe's in southern Georgia, as 
"seen thTougF tlie Tyes oT authoT 
Bailey White. 

. Plant pathologist Roger 
Meadows becomes the talk of his 
southern Georgia town when he's 
pictured on the front page of 
Agrisearch, holding two peanut 
plants, one sick and one healthy. 
Apparently the photographer was 
supposed to take pictures of some 
red wattle hogs in Sam Martin's new 
automatic feeder pens, but couldn't 
get the doors open. A picture of 
Roger just had to sufTice. _ ~v v 

Now, this may seem a little dry for 
the average L.A. dweller, when in 
fact - well, it just is. But it's also the 
introduction to White's latest novel, 
"Quite a Year for Plums," in which 
the hero, Roger, manages to snag a 
front-page photo, as well as the 
attention of half the town's women. 

But no matter how much of a stud 
Roger may seem to be - White 
writes that "for some reason the pic- 
ture had come out amazingly good in 
every respect" - Roger's life is not in 
picture-perfect order. That's when 
White opens the doors to Roger's 
family, whose thrill-seeking lives lack 
good direction. 

The story kicks off like a minia- 
ture soap opera without the breath- 
taking scandals - or maybe they're 



just toned down a little to adjust to 
the setting. The characters have no 
difficulty identifying their struggles, 
but it's frustrating that they do noth- 
ing about them. 

Roger's ex-wife Ethel, a school 
teacher who left him for a "little gui- 
tar-strumming nincompoop from 
Nashville' with a goatee" later runs 
off with a man who finds a drooling 
fascination with electric fans. fYes, 
readers will chuckle at this fact until 
they find that White devotes an 
entire cKapterT "1914 General 
Electric Fan with Collar Oscillator," 
to this phenomenon, in which the 
fan man finds one more rotating 
wonder for his collection.) Ethel's 
mother, Louise, is a half-crazed 
believer in outer-space aliens who 
insists that little men painted her 
windows green. ;; /: , 

And that's where the novel loses 
its glow. White's hometown in south- 
ern Georgia is the setting where 
schoolteachers gossip, wives run 
away with a new man every year, and 
old mothers believe extraterrestrial 
life will invade their homes any day 
now. Oh, and once in a while some- 
one will host a library picnic or a live- 
stock convention - but until then, 
readers and townsfolk will find 
themselves twiddling their thumbs. 

The story does not delve deep into 
superfluous detail, nor does the plot 
float at the surface of a superficial, 
unfulfilling read. The light-weighted 
drama balances humor and conflict, 
tirelessly treading without suspense 
to weigh it down. 

And suspense is what the readers 
will crave. Not just the overexagger- 
ated action, such as when the fan 
man sneaks back into the restaurant 
to steal a collector's 1914 GE 940566 
(you daredevil, you!). Readers want 



BOOKREVIEVir 




Title: Quite a Year for Plums 

Author: Bailey White 
Publisher: Vintage Books 
Price: $12.00 Pages: 210 
Rating: 3 



... - -•. ■.. JACOB LlAO/Da!Iy Bru!n 

fire, passion, action - elements that 
White's novel lacks, leaving her 
unsatiated audiences hanging and 
feeling indifferent. 

Of course, the novel suggests 
some deeper underlying themes, 
such as the need for transience and 
perseverance, but the tale is lacking 
in substance. While we^can some- 
times relate to the characters' trou- 
bles (falling in love, suffering from 
painter's block, not having the elec- 
tric fan of your dreams), we are left 
alone with their troubles and their 
lack of initiative. :: - 

White, author of national best- 
sellers "Mama Makes Up Her 
Mind" and "Sleeping in the Starlite 
Motel," is also a commentator on 
National Public Radio. Her story- 
telling is simple and sweet, tame 
enough for a fourth-grader. 
Unfortunately, readers who look for 
anything more than that may have to 
move away from southern Georgia. 



for this conclusion. All the dancers 
take the stage demonstrating both 
standard swing moves as well as some 
new moved the swing era has never 
seen before. 

The finale is a much needed pick- 
me-up after slower numbers like "Mr. 
Bojangles" which is an intimate num- 
ber sung by Matt Loehr and featuring 
two dancers, Cassel Miles and Terace 
Jones. \yit^ the. final piece the 
dancers were having fun with the 
moves, letting loose and c reating 
them as they went, while at the same 
time, moving in sync. 

This is the scene where the dancers 
finally take off their hats, both literal- 
ly and^iguratively. As one of Fosse's 
signature pieces, in almost all scenes 
the dancers don some type of head 
decoration, ranging from cowboy 



WARPED 

From page 15 

"You've Got to Die for the 
Government." 

At 6p.m., Weezer brought fans 
back to the classics with "Undone-the 
Sweater Song" and "Buddy Holly." 
The crowd's presence and support for 
the band set the tone for the remain- 
der of the evening. 

Pop punk favorite MxPx took the 
stage performing the bass driven hit 
"Chick Magnet," "Cold and Alone,- 
and "Responsibility." 

Things got out of hand at 7 o'clock 
when legendary Green Day graced 
the stage with "Longview," "Hitching 
a Ride," "Basket Case," and "When I 
Come Around." To add to the mad- 
ness, during a cover of Operation 
Ivy's "Knowledge," a fan was invited 
onstage to play Billy Joe Armstrong's 



Monday, July 3. 2000-Friday, July 7, 2000 17 

hats to '50s style feathers, but for this 
last, well-done, scene, the hats come 
off. 

The truth of Fosse's talent is 
demonstrated through the wonder- 
ful reception that "Fosse" has 
received across the United States. 
The fact that his work and creative 
talents remain a potent force in the 
musical world today is a testament, 
to the lasting elTect his work wilP 
have on the dancing community at 
large and gives hop e to fans for 
another resurrection. 

THEATER: "Fosse" is showing at the 
Shubert Theatre in Los Angeles through 
July 9. Performances are scheduled 
Tuesday through Saturday at 8 p.m., and 
2 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Seat 
prices range from $40-$70. Tickets can 
be purchased by calling Telecharge at 
(800) 447-7400 or online at 
www.telecharge.com., as well as at the 
Shubert Theatre Box Office. 



guitar. 

Masses of people filled the venue 
in hopes of getting as close to the 
band as possible. The forceful crowd 
ended up knocking over side bara- 
cades, but fortunately no injuries 
resulted. 

Reggae artists Long Beach Dub 
Allstars followed soon after, calming 
the crowd with "Rosarito." "My Own 
Life," and the Sublime tune, "April 
29, 1992." 

The rap metal outfit Papa Roach 
earned the privilege of closing the 
show at 8 o'clock even though other 
bands on the bill had longer standing 
careers. 

Even though the bands dijlivered a 
sundry of musical flavors, the pre- 
dominating taste left by the lineup, 
prices, and venue set up were purely 
indicative of the fact that this year's 
Warped Tour was more a business 
deal than a music festival. 



Are you looking next year for a warm Jewish 

environment witii a Strong Community, 

ModOfn, nilly Equipped ^ 

Koslier Kitciien 

^ and Regular Sliabbat programs? w 



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Try the Westwood Bayit-a Jewish 

student cooperative on Landfair 

Avenue in the heart of Westwood. 



• 500 yards from campus 

• Discounted rent ' 

• A cooperative living environment 

• Single and doubie rooms available . 

• Outdoor pool V 

for applications call (310) 858-3059 or email isdev@ix.netcom.com 
Website: www.bayitprQJect . com — -^t"^^. : - ^ . . , - : — •— , 




Daily Bruin 




V*'. 



Monday, July 3, 2000-Friddy, July 7, 2000 



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►T^T^Thr^T^fl 



2200 

Research Subjects 



HAVE YOU BEEN diagnosed with BIPOLAR 
DISORDER? Participants saught for UCLA 
research study on life experiences. Those 
eligible will be paid for participation. 
Call:31 0-825-6085 



Sperm / Egg Donors 



'/i~~\ /""^ /""v /*~i f^ XZ^^^Si 



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1100-2600 



1100 

Campus Happenings 



Alcoholics Anonymous 

AAon. Discussion, Fri. Sttp Study, 3508 Ackannon 

Tltun. Rook Study, 3508 Adcarmon 

MA/W Rm. Omlal A3-029 

Wed. Rm. A3- 029 

Discussion, Al tinws 12:10- IKWpm 

For akohokct or Ind M dt mtt who <i« v a dhnUng probhm . 



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1300 

Campus Recruitment 



FREE 
DIABETES SCREENING 

Genetic study of Diat^etes recruits 

healthy volunteers (18-40 years old) for 

free diabetes screening with standard 

oral glucose tolerance test (2.5 hours). 

Qualified subjects (who p>ass the oral 

glucose tolerance test and have normal 

blood pressure) will be invited to 

participate in a genetic study of 

diat}etes. Subjects will be paid $1 50 

for participation. 

Details, call Dr.Chiu (310)-206-9664. 



1300 

Campus Recruitment 



EGG DONORS 
NEEDED 

If you are a woman between the ages 

of 21 and 35, the many eggs your 
body disposes of each monm can be 
usecl by an infertile woman to have a 
baby. Help an infertile couple realize 
their dreams, enter the gene pool and 
help advance knowledge of Human 

Reproduction! Financial 

compensation, of course. Completely 

confidential. For more information, 

please call USC Reproductive 

Endocrinology at (213) 975-9990. 



transportation 

4600-5500 



Egg Donors Needed 

Healthy females ages 19-28 
wishing to help infertile couples. 
Generous Compensation 



m. 



Call Mirna (818) 832-1494 



^700 

Auto Insurance 



AUTO INSURANCE. ...LOWEST Price. 
Same day SR22. Any driver, student dis- 
counts & good driver discounts. Call AAIA, 
free quote 1-800-225-9000. 



1300 

Campus Recruitment 



^900 

Autos for Sale 



POLICE IMPOUNDS! Cars as low as $500 
for listings 1-800-319-3323 ext.A214. 



1300 

Campus Recruitment 



tndex 





For Women with Acquired 
Female Sexual Disorder 



Dr. Padma-Nathan's Office in Beverly Hills 
is looking for women with sexual problems 
to participate in a sexual health study. This 
research study evaluates a new oral 
investigational drug for female sexual 
disorder. 

If you're 1 8-49 years old, in good general 
health and not taking birth control pill or 
shots, we may need your help. 

If you qualify and enroll, you'll receive all 
study-rielated care at no charge, including 
doctor visits, laboratory services and in ^ J 
office use of the study medication. , ; ■ 



Financial compensation is provided - up 
to $400.00 for patients who complete the 
4 visits. 

For more information, please contact us 
today. Enrollment is limited. 

Harin Padma-Nathan, M.D. 

9100 Wilshire Blvd, Suite 360 
Beverly Hills, C A 90212 

(310)858-4455 

Make the Call that Could Make a Difference 



Daily Bruin Classified 



Monday, July 3, 2000-Friday, July 7, 2000 19 



1300 

C;nn[)us l^ncriiitniont 



1300 

C.'inipiis R(M:ruitin(Mit 



5680 

Travel Destinations 



5680 

Travel Destinations 



@Wm fSMM 




STUDEMT TRAVEL 



UCLA Parking Services is iooldng for friendly, 

courteous people to assist our customers with 

tiieir parlcing and information needs, 

(Previous customer service and cash handling experience preferred*) 

For more information and an application, 

stop by the Parking Services office 

at 555 Westwood Plaza On Structure 8) 

or call (310) 825-1386 

'Must be a currently registered UCLA student 



U.S. 




Green Card 
Lottery 

Ke^istration Period 

October 2nd to 

November 1, 2000 



) U.S. Immigrant Visas 
to be Issued in 2002 ^m 

- \vaTlablc to foreign students and their families. 

For a free information package, call our 
Lottery Department at l-8()()-\ ISA-LAW 

Bernard P. Wolfsdorf 

A l*rol&sionall.iiu corporation j 
Jj^Mtiruia Sfalc IJai Ccun^d Spfiiiilist in lniniii<riiti«in \ N.itiAnjnt\ I lu 

17383 Sunset Blvd, Suite 120, Pacific Palisades. CA 90272 
(310) 5734242 • FAX (310) 573-S093 • visalawC^wolfsdorf.iom 



WVVW.VVOLFSDOKFXOM 



A 



dvertise in the 



s 



ummer 



5700 

Travel Tickets 



B 



ruin 



825-2161 Display - 
825-2221 Classified Display 




AQUA TRAVEL INC 



WORLD WIDE LOWEST AIRFARES 

MAKE VOURCWN AIR r/R HOTEL 

RFSEf?;ATiUNAT 

http://www.prismaweb. com/aquafravel 

2(iH0URSADAY 

Lowest Domestic and 

International Airfares 

Tour Packages 

Eurailpass 

Hotel Acconnmodations 

Car Rentals 

*Asia*Africa*Australia*Europe*Soutti 

AmeriCG*lndia*Canada*Mexico*Hnwaii* 

Special domestic i Intemolional Airiores Available 

PriCM a* iut)l»ct to cTong* wimout nof ice 

PHONE (3iq)441<3680 

10850 Wilshire, Suite 434. Westwood CA 90024 



• i 



Classifieds 
825-2221 



BE FLEXIBLE...SAVE$$$ 



Europe $249 (o/w + taxes) 

CHEAP FARES WORLDWIDE 

HAWAII $129 (o/w) 

Call;(310) 574 0090 

www.4cheapair.com 



p&ri$ rnexico c 



;m 




AMSTERDAM PRAGUE ^OMtl MADRID TEL AVIV QSLQ 
Sydney tokyo no de Janeiro nfiw yonc iondon 




JMEW YORK 

ocapuico cliibiin coloqni 




. ^ _^ _ _ VfENHA SEVILLA 

cologne hflloinki ball Cairo mltan 



Sydney $861 



los aiiAbios pe-u Jamaica bueno.s aires antwarp 
PUERTO VALLAKTA MF1.30URME FLORfcNCF. NFAVORLEANS 
taniti nong kong brazil bangkok 

PARIS $676 




6000 

Insurance 




Tlllstate 

'VbiAv in 0Dod hands. 

Mike Azer Insurance Agency, Inc. 
(310)312-0202 

1281 West\A/oocl Blvd. 

C2 l=>lks. So. of VV/ilsl-ilre> 

24 Hours o Doy Service 



31 0. U C LA. FLY wpve been there. 



920 Westwood Blvd. 

AN fares are roundtrip. Tax not included. Some restrictions appty.CST #101756060 



\A/\A/\A/. statravel.com 



6100 

Computer/ Internet 



$11.99/MONTH 

UNLIMITED INTERNET ACCESS for only 
$11 .99/month. No ads, no busy signals. Call 
818-762-3467 or visit www.bulldoghost- 
ing.com. 



5700 

Travel Tickets 



5700 

Travel Tickets 



A Guide to the Perplexed 

universitysecrets.com w 

http://universitysecrets.com 



SOUTHAMERICA 

PACKAGES & CRUISES 

INCA TRAIL 5D/4N $490 

MACHU PICCHU 3D/2N from $365 

JUNGLE LODGES 3D/2N from $300 

AMAZON CRUISE 4D/3N from $595 

GALAPAGOS CRUISE 4D/3N from $7^ 

R/TAIR FARES FROM 

BUENOS AIRES $430 CUZCO $566 

GUAYAQUIL/QUITO $620 LIMA $400 

SANTIAGO . $499 SAO PAUIO/RIO $619 

www.pro-travel.com 
PROFESSIONAL TRAVEL SERVICE 

South America Specialists 

CST#101 7039-10 



6200 

Health Services 






Jack H. Silvers, MD 

Beard CwtNtod dwnwlologlat. 

"H* hatnt forgotfn what It's 
llkm to be a stucfont" 

•Acne«Mole Removal •Warts»Rashes« 

•Laser Hair and Tattoo Removal* 

•Lip Augmentation* 

•Laser Ablation of Red and Brown Spots* 

(310) 826-2051 

www.DrSlhfer9.com 



6300 

Legal Advice/Attorneys 



•BANKRUPTCY* 

GET OUT OF DEBT NOW! Free Consulta- 
tion. Experienced attorneys, reasonable 
fees. (Cheryte M. White. UCLAW. "86") 800- 
420-9998. Pico/Overtand, WLA. 



IMMIGRATION 



I Initial ConsuN 

• WORK PERMITS •\ 

• QRONCARDSei 

• IMMGRAnONI 



icon. 



VICTORY TRAVEL 



LATIN AMERICA SPECIALISTS 



[Attorney JENNIFER S. LIM 

' 123 S.Fi9ueraa.Suite 220 Los AngalM.CA 90012 
Westside 31 0-837-8882 
Downtown 213-680-9332 



6^00 

Movers/Storage 



JERRY'S MOVING&DELIVERY. The careful 
movers. Expenenced. reliable, same-day de- 
livery. Packing, boxes available. Also, pick- 
up donations for American Cancer Society. 
Jerry 031 0-391 -5657. 



Mexico City 
Guadalajara 
Cabo San Lucas 
ElSotvador 
Hondufxit 
Costa Rica 
Nicaragua 
Guatemala 



LinM 

Buenos Aires 

S. De Chile 

Bogota 

QuHo 

Belize 

Caracas 



Forn «i »/m brndtn r/i purdww SuMn i* <<w»|t h»H W ''«M»i. OT#?0<;9tS-40 



Mexico Escapes 

$369 Cabo San Lucas ^^t 

$479 Cancun SO^ v\\ 

$369 Puerto Vailarta ^x^f^' 

f/f ooioccO nights - Air - Transfers) 



NEW YORK %59r/t| 



6500 

Music Lessons 



DRUM LESSONS 

ALL LEVELS/STYLES with dedicated pro- 
fessional. At your home or WLA studio. 1st- 
lesson free. No drum set necessary. 
Neil:323-654-8226. 



6700 

ProfessioiiitI Services 



Boston 
Chicaao 
PhilatMlphia 
San Francisco 



299 RA 
219 R/T 

229 RA 
82 RA 



w^ArMf.victorytravel.com 
(323) 277-4595 



BEAR'S RESEARCH, 
WRITING & EDITING 

Compret>ensive Dtuertation AasManoe 
Theses, Papers, and Personal Statements 

Proposals and Books 

Intemattortai Students Wekxxne. Smce 1965 

Stteron Bear. Pn.O. (310) 47»4M2 



^y^i/e^vt^^ classified lines ( 825-2221) 



Display 
206-30bU 



!• 



20 Monday, July 3, 2000-Friday, July 7, 2000 



Daily Bruin Classified 



5700 

Travel Tickets 



5700 

Travel Tickets 



South America 



EXCITING RIO 5 Nights 
Rio Cop-R/T Airfare 



$799 



MACHU-PICHU 3 Nights 
Libertador Cuzco-R/T 



TANGO CITY (Argentina) 5 Nights 
Ho«e»-City Tour- Trasf -Tango Stiow-R/T Av 



$999 




k PATAGONIA MOUNTAINS & LAKESI 
Fs Nighis La Cascada Hotel-Trasf »VT AirJ 



f|J.Q TROPICAL IGUAZU FALLS 
W*»?J 3 Nights Cataratas Hotel-R/T AirlareJ 

CUSTOM-MADE PACKAGES TO SOUTH 

AMERICA 

GREAT AIRFARES-ONLY 



Victory Travel Vacations, Inc. 

(323)857-6900 
argentinatravel@earthlink.net 

Pm-^s .Iff p |i DDL Occup R<-stru-1i,>ns .ippiv CST«;041CK185 40 



6000 

Insurance 



6000 

Insurance 



Auto In 




Mercury Broker in Westwood. No Brokers Fees. Also other 
markets. Low Rates. Foreign Students and New Drivers OK. 

(31 0) 208-3548 1 081 Westwood Blvd. Suite 221 



6200 

Health Services 



6200 

Health Services 



IDElSfTAL HEALTH CARE 




(Offlc* of S. Sotoimani, DOS) 

e C. reate jDeaotaiol omaies! 



patient: Tera Bonilla 
Coupon Expires 8/31 /OO 



• All Phases of Dentistry 

• 24 Hour Emergency Service 

• Medi-CoJ & Most Insurance Plans Accepted 

"All Students & Faculty Members are welcome' 
First time introductory offer with this coupon 

Tel: (310) 475-5598 / Fax: (31Q) 475-1970 
Online: wwrw.onvilIage.eom/@/dentalhealth 



1620 Westwood Blvd., West Los Angeles, Between ^S| I^RR MH 



Wilshirc & Santa Monica (Free Parking m Rear) 



7100 

Tutoring Wanted 



SAT TUTORS 
WANTED 

Need energetic people with 

high SAT .scores to tutor, 

especially in W.L.A., San 

Fernando Valley, Pasadena. 

Palos Verdes. 

$15-$20/hr. Flexible hours. 

Car needed. Call Joe 

(310)448-1744 

h www.tutorjobs.com ^ 



7200 

Typing 



APPLICATIONS/ 
RESUMES ^ 

Create, develop, or refine. Editing, word pro- 
cessing, application typing, dissertation for- 
matting, transcribing. Ace words, etc. 310- 
820-8830. 



6200 

Health Services 



I 
I 

I 

i. 



a I 

X 

Ii 




$98.'VArch<Heg.^/-. 

• ADA accepted • Based on 2 arches 



in-office whitening m just one 
50 minute visit 






I II Ml II 

$43 00 -^^ 



(Reg. $170) 



• Full or»l examination • Oral Canctr Screeniru! 

• Necessary X-Rays • Periodontal Examination 

» Cleaning & Polishing • X-Rays are non-transferrable 



6700 

Professional Services 



6700 

Professional Services 




NOEL VISA CENTER" 

78-2899 Fax: 310-477-6833 



7200 

Typing 



WORD PROCESSING specializing in thes- 
es, dissertations, transcription, resumes, fli- 
ers, brochures, mailing lists, reports. Santa 
l^onica, 310-828-6939. Hollywood, 323-466- 
2888. 



7300 

Writing Help 



IMMIGRATION 
Green Cards, Work 
Permits, Change of 
Status, Citizenship, 
Visa Extensions, 
Company Start- 
ups, and more... 



Reasonable Rates 

Attorney Representation. 

Call For a 

Free Consultation. 



Total Confidentiality Guaranteed. 
Privately Owned and Operated. 

Member of the 
Better Business Bureau 



ALL WmiHG i EDUm 

Personal Statements, Papers, Theses, 

Disifertotions, Books, & Proposals 

Comprehensive help by PhD from UC 

International Students Welcome 

(323) 665-8145 



CONTACTS 

NO HIDDEN CHARGES! 



EXTENDED or DAILY 2 prS59.. 


^1 


DjSpO|ABLES 6Mo/4Boxes%9 1 

CHANGE BROWN EYES ext *79pr 1 


Hazel. Green, Blue 


I 


CHANGE LIGHT EYES B&L 

Blue, Green, Aqua 


»49Pf 1 


BIFOCAL/MONOVISION 


..add'l ^ 1 


ASTIGMATISM EXT 


*89r,| 



EYE EXAM $15 



7000 

Tutoring Offered 



SUMMER TUTOR 

EXPERIENCED AND PERSONABLE TU- 
TOR tfiat will get results. Catcfi up or get 
ahead tfiis summer. Seven-years experi- 
ence. SAT/aigebra/FrencfVESL/English/his- 
tory. Call Will 310-701-8969. 

WRITING TUTOR 

KIND AND PATIENT Star,ford graduate 
Help with the English language — for stud- 
ents of all ages/levels 310-440-3118. 




employment 

7400-8300 



7400 

Business Opportunities 



w/ 


'CI f'u,tha%,- 


Beverty Hills Ad) 


1038 S.Robertson Blvd., »1 1 

Wed 3-5 Fm 1-1 ■ 


(310)360-9513 
UMGRFACH 


1842 W.Uflcoln Ave., «G | 

WedlM,Fri3-5 ■ 

4130 Atlantic Ave., «1 05 1 

Thur<; 3-5. Sat 2-4pm ■ 


B Monte 11227 Valley Blvd., ir2Q8 ■ 

Thufsn-1pm,Satn30-1pm ■ 

N(i Aaxxnttntnl NK«ury/Jusl Walk n H 


' FREF (:;ir« 


! Kit w/Piirclmsf? 



MATH MAOF. F.A.SYl 



All Ages • All Levels 

Incredible Prices! 

CALL NOW! (310)569-8233 

(Please mention this ad when you call) 

*Art Classes Also A vailabk 



A FREE SESSION 

PSYCHOTHERAPY/COUNSELING lor de- 
pression, anxiety, obsessions, post-traumat- 
ic stress.etc Couples/Individuals Crime vic- 
tims may be eligible for free treatment. Call 
Liz Gould(MFC#32388)© 31 0-578-5957 to 
schedule free consultation 

MEDICAL SCHOOL 

PERSONAL STATEMENTS/APPLICA 
TIONS Expertise to present your best Edit 
ing. Dissertation formatting and finalizing 
Personalized, professional assistance. Ace 
Words, etc 3^0-820-8830 



7100 

Tutoring Wanted 



SEEKING MATH TUTOR for 14 year old boy. 
Car need. UCLA undergrads only. Contact 
Paul at 310-285-9670 



ADVERTISE 



Ciassifif 
J06-306) 



YOUNG TEEN 
PRINCESSES 
(18+) needed for 
new adult site 
$300-$1000 

Your Choice! 
Lingerie Model 
Partial Nudity 
Full Nudity 
No Sex 
818-215-7836 



7500 

Career Opportunities 



ARCHITECT STUDENT NEEDED to help 
desitjn home addition Small pay in ex- 
change for design and portfolio opportunity. 
310-470-8595. 



Classifieds 
825-22^1 



7^00 

Business Oppoiiunities 



7^00 

Business Opportunities 



uni{(ue jab opffortunitif 





flexible hours 
niinimat'tinie 
cammitement 



$600 per month 



If you're male, in good health, in :i:; 
college or have a college degree, and 
would like a flexible job where you can 
earn up to $600 per month AND set 
your own hours, call 310-824-9941 
for information on our anonymous 
sperm donor program. Receive free 
health screening and help Infertile 
couples realize their dream of 
becoming parents. 



7500 

Career Opportunities 



Translation Company in 
Santa Monica n^ 



Project AAanager 

Truly bilingual in English and one major 

lai«gu«gc. Outstanding language, 
comiminication, computer C office skills. 



• Oetail-miiided 
'Conscientious 



* Organized 

* Versatile 



Unique Opportunity with 
possible Profit Share! 

INS Sponsorship Available 



Fa* resumt' ( ^lo.'; ^60-7705 
and call {310) 358-6(60 



TEACHER ASSTNTS 

PRIVATE WLA School looking for capable 
and experienced teacher assistants to work 
with elementary level students, M-F, 8AM- 
1PM. Begin September. Please fax re- 
sume:310-471-1532. 



7600 

Child Care Offered 



$$$ LOW PRICES $$$ 

WONDER YEARS PRESCHOOL run by 
UCLA grads. Ages2.5/6years. Two large 
play-yards. Open 7:30-5:30.Close to UCLA. 
310-473-0772 



7700 

Child Care Wanted 



^ENERGETIC 

BABYSITTER 

NEEDED* 

Looking for responsible/caring/energetic 
person to serve as babysitter in after- 
noons M-F. Enormously bright/intelligent 
4-year-old who loves to play/have fun. 
Located In BelAir/Roscomare Valley. 



Call:310-889-0119. 



BABYSITTER 

San Fernando Valley $10/tK)ur, 20hrs/week. 
starting after 3pm. Person needs to have 
flexible hours Starts 7/31. 818-905-1215. 

BABYSITTER/DOGSITTER Regular Satur- 
day night female babysitter wanted. Addition- 
al hours possible. Experience and referenc- 
es necessary. 310-470-4662. 

CHILDCARE for personable 7.5y/o girl. Pick- 
up school/camp. CDL, own car, insurance. 
N/S. M-F Approx 3-5 hours. Afternoons 
$9/hr-i-gas Laurie 310-440-6738. 

DRIVER/BABYSITTER, July 24-April 2001 
Afternoons approximately 15hrs/week, 
$8/hr-t- mileage. 2 teens 13&14. Need good 
car, driving record, and references. 310-470- 
8595. 



7800 

Help Wanted 



*MOVIE EXTRA 
WORK* 

Beats all jobs. Start immediately. Great pay. 
Fun/Easy. No crazy fees. Program for free 
medical Call-24/hrs 323-850-4417. 

ACTUARIAL ASSISTANT: PT-FT in account- 
ing-type office. Includes phones and general 
office duties. Must have computer and basic 
math skills. $10/hr. Fax resunie 818-508- 
2001. 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT for interna- 
tional business office in BevHills: Must krK)w 
MS Office. Call 310-278-9338. E-mail 
resume arit}ussel dhotmail.com or fax 310- 
278-0038. 

BEVERLY HILLS AUTO DETAIL shop needs 
hard-working, fast-paced, agressive people 
to handle top-notch cars. No experience re- 
quired. Flexible hours. Ozzie:310-859-2870. 

BEVERLY HILLS ^ 

INTERNATIONAL health/nutrition company 
in 10 countries seeks outgoing individuals for 
part time/full time Training available. 310- 
552-3244. 

CHAUFFEURS. Full-time, over 21, summer 
job and possibility to continue. Ex.driving 
record, must know LA. Quality company, 
great pay. 310-457-5051 . 

COACHES NEEDED 

MIDDLE SCHOOL&HIGH SCHOOL. 2000- 
2001 school year. Girls Soccer Boys: Varsity 
Football, JV Football. Varsity and JV 
Lacrosse. Paid positions. 310-391-7127. 
Call Nate ext. 247 

EVENING 
SUPERVISOR 

OF INTERVIEWING. The Gallup Organiza- 
tion — Irvine, CA. Email resume to: don_du- 
satkoegallup.com 949-474-7900 x.710. 

GIRLS wanted at exclusive social clubs in 
WLA. Conversation only. No alcofiol. Flexi- 
ble hours. Earn top $$$. 323-441-0985 



Are you a model. 



Looking for all types 
male/female models/actors 

•Plus size •Children 

For prim & non-union commercials 

No experience required. No lees 



..ii,'!-;'' u-.;y-;U-/ iitiv p/i!;*'' iv-. 



'■^■•■r- 






HOMEWORK SUPERVISOR/TUTOR for 
10th grader taking Spanish, Algebra, and ' 
Science. 2-hours per evening M-F, $9/hr 
310-476-4205. 

LIBRARY JOBS shelving and other stacks 
duties 12-19hrs/wk. $6.70/hr to start. STUD- 
ENTS ONLY apply at Young Research Li- 
brary Rm 11617 or call Antigone Kulay 310- 
825-1084. 

MODELS WANTED EARN $200-$1000 
working lor established photographer. Nudity 
required. Must be 18+, athletic, outgoing. No 
experience necessary. 323-377-7937. 

RECEPTIONIST— WANTED: a few good 
students to study while answering phones 
Flexible hours, close to campus. Cindy 310- 
839-4777. 



Display 
206-3060 



l.xtHiitive .Vssist.Mit 
w.uitcd iniiiu'diatcU 



Consulting psychologists in Ocean Park 

P/T or F/T available. 

Expert in MAC / MS Office 

Administration support / website design 

$12-$18 per hour 
Fax info: (310) 392-6043 



8000 

Internships 



INTERNSHIP POSITION 

POST-PRODUCTION Company offers op- 
portunity for permanent emplo^ent. Call 
Joel:31 0-8 28-2292. provideol ©earthlink.net 

SALES ASSISTANT/INTERN Make screen- 
ing calls, assistance. Flexible morning hours. 
Will train. Great for business major or MBA 
grad student. Pay $10-$12/hr Culver City. 
Val:310-998-0417. 



japcr r<jcv< io thii s,v3pi;rr'jcyciithirN 




» ^hvi, p;ib«r ivcyclv; U>)5 pS!;efKi;y<;it Ihi^, 
^ 'i'iy pr:bf:>' re-ycl- : ?hft papor rr-nycU.; Wm 



8^00 

Apartments for Rent 



K^ 



GLENROCK 



• f 



APARTMENTS 

GLENROCK 

AND 
LEVERING 

Single, 1&2 
Bedroom Apartments 

|~ 3 Blocks to Campus 

Rooftop Sundeck & 
Spa 

I- Fitness Room 

- Study Lounge 

~ Laundry Facilities 

|-« Gated Assigned 
Parking 

|~ Individual alarm 
systems 

MUCH, MUCH MORE! 
RESERVE YOUR 

APARTMENT NOW! 
SUMMER '00 
FALL 'OO-'Ol 



3BDRM 

WESTWOOD New, view, large, secured, 
alarm doors, washer/dryer inside unit, 
month-to-month, pets ok. $2600 avail July 
1st. 310-998-1501. 310-478-2251. 

1380 VETERAN- 2bdrm/2bath. $1595. Park 
view, rooftop pool/jacuui, intercom entry, 
gated parking, laundry, all appliances. Move- 
in ASAP. Cats considered. 310-477-5108. 



Casablanca West 

Summer Special 

Bachelors $645 
Singles $965 and up 



iaFafKi 

CilAiiiaiiii^ Dooi. iMndn. fufldeck. 

^^^^^^n^ w^^^^^^y r^^^Y ^w^w^^ip WW ^^^^w^fw^^^ 

wpM doMh. Ua SMMy D«p«iil 
Mil l#el to kCMN on Oitiibet M 

530 Veteran 
208-4394 



Classifieds 
825-2221 



Daily Bruin Classified 



7800 

Help Wanted 



STAR SEARCH 2000 

Japanese Graduates— Senior Leadership 
roles. Tokyo, Japan. Email resume: don_du- 
satkoegallup.com or call Don. at 949-474- 
7900x710. 

WANTED: Female singer, 19-26, w/great 
looks/style for alternative/pop bard a a Car- 
digans, Oasis, No Doubt. Major labe' inter- 
ests, serious inquirjes only. 818-508-8555. 



81*00 

Apartments for Rent 



O^kOO 

Apartments for R(mU 



WALK TO UCLA 

WWW. keltontowers. com 



** PALMS •• 



4BD, 3BA + LOFTTOWNHOME, FP, 
, CENTRAL AIR/HEAT. GATED GARAGE, 
SEC. ALARM, SUN DECK 

3670 MIDVALE AVE. $21 95/MO. 
r (310)391-1076 

2BD, 2BA. TOWNHOME, FP, GATED GARAGE, 
SEC. AMRM, CAT OK, CENTRAL AIR/HEAT 

3614 PARIS DR. $1295/MO. 
ON-SITE MGR. (310)837-0906 



MAR VISTA 



2BD, 2BA TOWNHOME, FP, CENTRAL AIR/HEAT, 
GATED GARAGE, SEC. ALARM, CAT OK 

' 11913 AVON WAY $1195/MO. 
11931 AVON WAY $11 95/MO. 
11748 COURTLEIGH DR. $1195/MO. 

(310)391-1076 
OPEN HOUSE MON-SAT 10-4PM 



BRENTWOOD ADJ. 



Upper bachelor $449/month. 
0021 



Call:310-575- 



PALMS 

Quiet, tower 2-«-2, t>akx>ny, air corKiitionir>g, 
fireplace, all amenities. 2 car gated parking. 
Laundry, bus connection UCLA. $1050/mo. 
310-390-5996 



Diamond Head 
Apartments 

Sinsle $950-$995 

Sinsle w/loft $1145 

1 BD $1195-1295 

2 BD $1495 

1 BD w/loft $1495 

2 BD w/ Loft $1815 

Intercom System & Gated Parkins 

Rec room, Sauna, Gym Room 

Fireplace, Jacuzzi, t>Hhwasher, 

Rcfrtseralor, Air Conditioner Laundry, 

Cathedral CciHnss, no pets 

Short Term Surrwncr Discounts Available 

660 Veteran 

\ 208-2251 X 



BRENT MANOR 
APTS 

Avoid Westwood rents 

i mile to UCLA 

Singles & Bachelor 

1&2 Bedrooms 
Pool, Near bus line 

1235 Federal Ave. 

Near Wilshire Blvd. 

. (310) 477-7257 . 

PALMS. Single apt from $575, $600deposit. 
1-year lease only. Stove, refrig., carpets, 
vert, blinds. 310-837-1502 leave message 
8am- 5pm only. * 



WESTWOOD VILLAGE. Small 1 bdrm-$975. 
Large 1bdrm-$1250. 10990 Strathmore Dr. 
Parking, laundry. Available Sept. No pet.s. 1- 
year lease. 310-471-7073 



w 



GAYLEY MANOR 
APTS 

Super Big Super Clean 
Apartments ! 



=0 



tL 



Singles and 1 bedrooms 
Across the Street from UCLA 
Walk to Village 
Near Le Conte • 

729 Gayley Ave. 

(310)208-8798 



M 



WALK TO UCLA 

WESTWOOD. Large singles and 1-bdmns, 2 
bdrms. Pool, Jacuzzi, walk-in ctosets. fire- 
place, full kitchen, balcony, gated garage, 
laundry room, gas&hot water paid, instant 
broadband avail, www.keltontowers.com. 



8600 

Condo/Townhoiise for Rent 



ARTIST RETREAT 

2 txl/2 bath townhouse near Bel-Aire hotel 

canyon view, backyard, hardwood floors, 

fireplace, view deck. Parking. $3250. 310- 

276-8505. 



8700 

Condo/Townhouse lot Sale 



CENTRAL BRENTWOOD garden view 
Ibed, 1 1/2 bath. Den/dining room. Patio, 
gym, pool, sunroof. 2car and guest parking! ' 
$215,000 310-471-2556 



$335,000 GREAT WESTWOOD 3BED. 

2.5bth townhouse w/rare small yard. AC, 
Sec. Syst. ■»- extra storage and side by 
side parking. $675,000 Charming updat- 
ed 3 bed fvxjse w/3 room guest house. 
Natural wood floors, AC. spacious 
rooms. Barbara Gardner, Broker 310- 
285-7505. 



IT 



LEVERING ARMS 

Large Sunny 

Singles & 1 Bedroom 

Apartments 

Walk to School and Village 

(510) 208-3215 

667-669 Levering Ave. 
Near Glenrock 



IMAGINE OWNING WILSHIRE Corridor/Hi- 
F^ise single, 1or2bdrm $90K-$150K. Walk to- 
UCLAA/illage, 24hr/security Spectacular 
views, pool, Jacuzzi, sauna, valet service. 
Agent-Bob, 31 0-478- 1835ext 109. 



9000 

House for Side 



PALISADES 

NEW HOME of your choice with this pack- 
age. Prime location! Walk to beach, cool, 
club house. Own your own space. AllowarKe 
for new mobile home included in price. 
$255K. Financing available. Call:Doug:310- 
453-8047. 



Monday, July 3, 2000- Friday, July 7, 2000 21 




Just between us 

Check out the Ashe Center 
Women's Clinic. 



Most routine services are free. It's absolutely confidential. 
It's not just for illness - whether you're ready for intimacy 
(or not), or just need to know you're ok, the Women's Clinic 
hos something for you. 



^ 



^^tever is on your mind about the miracle 
of being female . . . feef free to call us, 
make an appointment, talk it over. 

For information or on 
. appointment call 310 825-4073, 
or vist the Ashe wob site to 
request an appointment or 
ask a health related ques- 
tion /iffp;//%^ww.saonef. 
uda.edu/heaMt.hhn 



UC a Ashe Center 



TODAY'S 
CROSSWORD PUZZLE 



ACROSS 

1 Pulls 

5 Filers' aids 

9 Bathing need 

13 On the summit 

14 Drama awards 

16 — Minor 

17 Stagger 

18 Tweak 

1 9 Singer Diamond 

20 Guaranteed 
22 Muscle parts 

24 Gather leaves 

25 Motorist s org. 

26 Stain 

29 Gradually 

34 Assistants 

35 Johann 
Sebastian — 

36 Flank 

37 Beam 

38 Choir voices 

39 Last of a senes 

40 Singer Guthrie 

42 Cut of meat 

43 Immaculate 

45 Football position 

47 Foot, slangily 

48 Vat 

49 Actor Connery 

50 5 or 6 

54 1988 Olympics 
site 

58 Algerian port 

59 Chess turns 

61 Gourmet cheese 

62 Chills and fever 

63 Dress style , 

64 Actor Sharif 

65 Beneficiary 

66 Spike and 
Peggy 

67 — Disney 

DOWN 

1 Fictional home 

2 Colorado 
Indians 



PREVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVED 



SDOQ SiBQafi] QESISfEl 



lEITICIEITIEIRIAMSIMI I LIE 8 



gjQOQ sssinafaama 
BESDQ saanii lEDsa 

laBO □OBIS] SQCiSQ 



IGIUIAIRIDIRJAI I ILMHIUIRITI 



laiiQl!] □OfflC] 



^RIYI I INIGHSjTIEjMIMI I INIGi 



BBjais sQQos [lasm 



LOLSILIOHL I T E RHRIAIRJAI 



siaiis scaBQa sm^si 



3 Departs 

4 Spend like 
crazy 

5 Kansas capital 

6 Tolerate 

7 Com cnb 

8 Cult 

9 A month of — : 
long time 

10 Sandwich 
cookie 

1 1 "It's — to Tell a 
Lie" 

12 Chums 

1 5 Some dresses 
21 Sheep 
23 Seize 

26 Singer 
Vaughan 

27 Crown 

28 Romantic 
interlude 

29 Dyeing process 

30 Religious image 

31 "Camnen" 
composer 

r 



32 Thoughts 

33 Very small 
35 Alliance 

38 Montgomery's 

state 
41 More 

frequently 

43 Emt)er 

44 Robin Hood's 
weapon 

46 Pnckly 
seedcase 

47 Makes fun of 

49 Public , 
fuss 

50 Webster or 
Wyle 

51 Be persuasive 

52 Hawaiian 
island 

53 Laze (at)out) 

55 — mater 

56 Authentk: 

57 Mongol's 
tent 

60 Compete 

w 




Displav 
206-3060 



22 Monday, July 3, 2000-Friday, July 7, 2000 



DallxBruIn Clas$lfie< 




«. ■■ r- 



8800 

Guesthouse for Rent 



FOR UCLA MED 
STUDENTS ONLY! 



Are you a mature and 

responsible UCLA Medical 

Resident/Grad or Medical 

Student? If so, you can live in a 

private, fully-furnished guest 

apartment in UCLA Medical 

Family home. Separate entrance, 

all amenities, light housekeeping 

provided. In Bel-Air, 6 minutes to 

UCLA by car. Price reduced for 

immediate occupancy. Academic 

Year lease. 



310-472-4346 



9^00 

Room for Rent 



WEST LOS ANGELES-3 miles from UCLA. 
Upscale neighbortK)od. Serious, non-smok- 
er for a private, furnished room. 
$4(X)/month. $1,200 move-in. 310-202-8521 

WLA ADJACENT 

TO Santa Monica/Brentwood. Private room 
and bathroom in luxurious condo. Security 
building, parking available. $700/month utili- 
ties included. Available now. No less than 6 
months. Call Linda 310-442-5215. 



9500 

Roommates-Private Room 



ASIAN/QUIET/CLEAN. Bus in front house, 
Westwood/Pico. 3-mo. min stay. Requi'-ed 2 
good references. Private bedroom share- 
bath. $450/month, includes utilities. $40/day. 
310-475-8787. 



9500 

Roommates-Privnte Room 



OWN ROOM 

$325/month + $150 deposit. Washer/dryer, 
secure parking. Good neighbortiood. Saw- 
telle/Palms. Available August 1. Call;310- 
391-6303. 



UCLA 
JULY-AUG SUBLET 

NEED CLEAN considerate roomate(s). TO 
share beautiful 3bd Spanish duplex for Juty- 
Aug. Own room and bath. Hardwood floors, 
view, garden, laundry, walk to UCLA $775 
OBO. Call Ryan 310-206-1885. 



9700 

Sublets 



1-2 PEOPLE TO SHARE 2 bdrrTV2 bath on 
Midvale Ave. in Westwood. Large, bright, se- 
cure with laundry/Jacuzzi. July 12-Sept 1, 
Dates negotiable. Ami: 415-387-7331. 

LOOKING FOR A PLACE to live? www.hou- 
singl01.net... Your move off campus! Search 
for summer sublets. 

ROOMATE/SUBLETTER 
NEEDED NOW! 

July-September. Private bedroom and 
l/2t}ath, private phone line. Share big, spa- 
cious apartment, furnished. $700/month. 
Call Danielle:310-209-2100. Sophie:310- 
443-9539. 

S.M. SUBLET 

SANTA MONICA— Fymished bedroom in 
large, bright, 2bdrm apt. $650/nrK3nth. Avail- 
able 8/1-10/1. Female nonsmokers only 
please. Call Laura 310-264-0503. 

WESTWOOD- Studio Summer sublet 
Furnished on Landfair, August Available. Fits 
3 people. 2 parking space. $825/mo w/all 
utilities 310-208-6649 



SET ^Ollft I^ANOS ON A 

r^ STMDENTUMkN 

When it's time to choose, 
select University Credit Union: 

• Federal Stafford Loans 
^ J ederal PLUS Loons 

Wo offer more than 
fist a Stodeiit Look 

• On-Compus info center in 
Ackermon Union, A-Level 

• FREE Checking 

• Seven ATMs on the UCLA Campus 

• ATM access off-campus 

• Computer Purchose Loons 

Phone:(310)477-6628 
Web: www.ucu.org 

imnfERsmr creint union 

FiTumctoJ services for the UCLA commtinity 




^^T 

M 







^^^ 



^^^ 



recycle. 




8400 

Apartments for Rent 



9800 

Vacation Rentals 



BEAUTIFUL, SPACIOUS YOSEMITE 
HOME surrounded by tall pines. Close to 
everything. Fully Equipped, 5000' elevation 
sundeck, reasonable rates. 818-785-1028 
www.yosemite.islovely.com. 



8400 

Apartments for Rent 




The Daily Bruin 

Ad Production Department 

needs Paste-up Artists 



Knowledge of Pinotoshop and Quark a plus. 

Apply at: 

ASUCLA HUMAN RESOURCES 

1 1 8 Kerckhoff Hall, Job #30 



8400 

Apartments for Rent 



8400 

Apartments for Rent 



8400 

Apartments for Rent 



^ <C» .^•'^Dmti 





We Have > 
partment Homes 

Of Choice 
In Bruin Country. 






Properties Professionally Managed By 

R.W. Sclby & Company, Inc 

"The Standard of ExcellSnce " 

R.W. Selby & Company 

: offers the most modern 

-Bond convenient housing 

pear UCLA Campus and 

the Westwood Village. 

Make your fall housing 

^Arrangements now! 



El Greco 

1 030 Tiverton Avenue 
Single Units Only, Rooftop Sun Deck 
& Leisure Area, Sauna, Outdoor Spa 
& Barbecue, Fitness Room 

Call (310) 824-0463 



.>i»- 



.M> 



■ ;,: .l..v'5*!> 



Midyole Plaza I 

^540 Midvale Avenue 
Singles, 1&2 Bedrooms; 
Rooftop Spa & Leisure Area 

Call (310) 208-0064 - 

Midvale Plaza II 

V ;5p 527 Midvale Avenue 

'^ Singles, 1&2 Bedrooms, Pool, 

\ki II .jJ. I D II ' Sauna, Spa, Study Lounge w/ 

WellWOrth I & II Big Screen TV, Fitness Center 

l^I?o^py^"^°''^!:^r^""^ Coll (310) 208-4868 

45 1 &2 Bedrooms, Pool, 

|}0 Rooftop Spa & Leisure Area 

Call (310) 479-6205 - 



Roommate Service^ 

Furnished Apartments 
— Ask Abou t Ou 



Kelfon P l ozg 

i_, 430 Kelton Avenue 
" 1 &2 Bedrooms, Rooftop Spa 
& Leisure Area 

Call (310) 824-7409 



.\jk0ji 







V?^^ lis* 


'~ik 


, \ vv 


s^ 


3r^ 


^^ 




IK\\ 




'^ \ 



if Daily Bruin Classified 



Monday, July 3, 2(X)0-Friday, July 7, 2000 23 



WE ARE ALWAYS ON THE CUTTING EDGE! 

The Daily Bruin 

Ad Production Department 

needs Paste-up Artists 



Knowledge of Photoshop and Quark a plus. 

Apply at: 
ASUCLA HUMAN RESOURCES 
118 Kerckhoff Hall, Job # 30 





hamains 

Student deals \J . . ..,.,. ..-. 



absolutely FREE* some of the best deals in Westwood. Check weekly for updates so you don't miss out on great savings! 



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Daily Bruin Sports 



Monday, July 3, 2000-Friday, July 7, 2000 25 



CHAMPIONSHIPS 

From page 28 

Michelle Perry and former Bruin 
Joanna Hayes in Ihe 400m hurdles. 

Rounding out the Bruin rosier of 
both current and incoming athletes 
were five other competitors. Current 
Bruin women include freshmen Tiffany 
Burgess, who placed seventh in the 

~^800m; Julie Stevenson, who competed 
in the high jump; and Bridget Pearson, 

^ho competed in the pole vauHr 



^ 



On the men's side. Chuck Ryan com- 
peted in the lOOm hurdles and placed 
_rifth with a lifetime best of 14.01, while 
Kyle Erickson did not qualify for the 



finals in the 400m hurdles. 

The incoming women recruits at the 
meet placed well overall at the junior 
national. Jessica Cosby, the two-time 
L.A. City champion in tl^hot put, out 
of Grover Cleveland ^^ School in 
Reseda, placed second in the shot put 

with her persooal record throw of 50-3 

1/2. .-»*■:•■/:•:.„'•;■.:"•;■ ,^y. 

Lana Saye, two-time Nevada State 
champion in the shot put and discus, out 
of Silverado High School in Henderson, 
Nev., placed third in the discus also with 
her personal best of 166- 9 . ^ — ^ 

On the men's side, Ven^gas has 
recruited what looks to be an impressive 
class of athletes. In particular are sprint- 
ers Warren Rogers, Trevor Jones and 



Oliver Jackson. 

Rogers, of Serra High School in 
Gardena, is described by Venegas as 
"one of the most talented sprinters in 
the USA." Rogers is the state champion 
in the lOOrh dash. Jones, of Newport 
Harbor High School in Newport Beach, 
is the state champion in the 300m hur- 
dles and runner-up in the llOm high 
hurdles. Jacksoh is the state champion 
in the long jump and is ranked No: 5 on 
the U.S. prep list. " ' 

"These guys are really front-line, and 
xan help right aAvay," Venegas sard: — ^ 

Sporting an impressive roster of 
young talent, the UCLA track and field 
teams look to continue their tradition 
excellence throughout the summer. 



SHRINE ^ 

From page 26 

The field goal was reminw- 
cent of an earlier Kluwe kick 
that won the game. In a 
Southern section quarterfinal 
game against Loyola High, 
Kluwe kicked a 60-yard field 
goal to send the game into over- 
Time. Los Alamitos eVenluallyr 
won the game^in double-over- 
(Ifne. 

His 53-yard kick also broke 
the previous Shrine Game 
record, which was a 52-yard 
field goal by Armando Avina of 



East Union in 1991. 

Perry was named the 
California MVP. Not that it 
manered to him. 

"This is the team's MVP tro- 
phy," Perry told 
SchoolSports.com. "I couldn't 
have done it without them." 

Texas running back Vontez 
Duff, who rushed for a game- 
high 94 ya rds and a to uchdow n^ 
was named his team's MVP. 
Not that it mattered to him 



either "^ 

"Bottom line, we came here 
to win and we came up short," 
he said. "It's all a parr of foot- 
ball, but it still hurts to lose." 




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26 Monday, July 3, 2000 Friday, July 7, 2000 



Daily Bruin Sports 



'*i 



M.HOOPS 

From page 28 

guys." he said. "Were all so cool with 
each other because all of us are a lot alike. 
We get along with others. We don't think 
we're above anybody. We're just outgo- 
ing guys who are willing to sacrifice to 
win." 

rtre^^OOO-NfiA World -ehampioTT 
Lakers had one sole pick at No. 29 in the 
first round and waived forward A.C- 
Green earlier in the day. They look 
Stanford's Mark Madsen to fill that 
vacancy immedttrtely. Mad se n looks to 
be the defensive workhorse who should 
take the rebounding pressure off 
Shaquillc O'Neal. 

The Lakers then traded two future sec- 
ond round picks to the Spurs for the draft 
rights to Indian Hills (Iowa) Community 
College guard Corey Hightower. the 54th 
pick in the draft. 

The New Jersey Nets, with the top 
pick, landed Cincinnati power forward 
and National Player of the Year Kenyon 
Martin. The Vancouver Grizzlies took 
LSLJ forward Stromile Swit^ with the sec- 
ond pick before the Clippers selected 
Miles. 



RUSH 

Frompage28 

appeal, the suspension was reduced by 20 
games. / — - -^'^---^^— — -------r^,-- - 

In its moVt recent and final ruling 
regarding Rush, the NCAA could have 
ruled for UCLA to repay as much as 90 
percent of its earnings ($90,720) if it fell 

at the school knew Rtish^vasineHgible ; 
the time. 

"The precedent in these types of sUi 

tions is if the school did not know nor 
should have known about the studenl-alh- 
lete's-piirticipatioiv in activities that coulcL 
render the individual ineligible, the penalty 
is 45 percent," Jankowski said. "If the 
school knew or should have known, then it 
most likely would have been higher." 

The NCAA also found Texas Tech and 
Arizona guilty for using ineligible players 
and ruled for both of the schools to relurn 
money. 

Texas Tech must return $282,800 for 
using ineligible players during the 1996 
Tournament, while Arizona must relurn 
$45,321 because former Wildcat guard 
Jason Terry took more than SI 1,000 after 
his junior year in high school and as a 
senior, --r-r-:? ..-^ ■—— ^—^^--r^--'- v- 



SHRINE r 

From page 27 - r .- 

California squad with a 66-yard touchdown, 
and the ensuing extra point made Ihe score 7- 
0. Te^s tied the score, but later in that quar- 
ter California had two more touchdowns. 
Then early in the third quarter. Perry caught 
a 63-yard touchdown pass to increase the 
Hfomia lead to^6-7: ~ 



LETTER 



But Texas mounted an impressive 20-point 
iback in the second half behind three 
touchdown passes by quarterback Aaron 
Karas. After the last of these touchdowns, a 
pass from Karaslo Shirdonya M itchelj in the 
fourth quarter* with 17 seconds left on the 
clock, put Texas up 27-26, it looked like Texas 
would finally have its first Shrine Game vic- 
tory. 

But then California's Jason Wright 
returned the kickoff 30 yards to the 
California 43 yard-line, Texas was called for a 
personal-foul penalty That gave California an 
additional 15 yards, and Perry caught a six- 
yard pass to put the ball on the Texas 36 yard- 
line. 

And all tfiat, in the end, only set the scene 
for Kluwe's kick. 



Se« SHRINE, pag« 25 




Stanford unfairly 
criticize d 



In regards to your article "Sears Cup stand- 
ings name athletic department No. 2" (June 
26-June 30), I felt it was unfair to criticize the 
six-lime Sears Cup-winning Stanford athletics 
program for fielding more teams than UCLA. 

Stanford should be commended for its 
melding of athletic and academic excellence. 
The school's effort and success at oCfering its 
6,500 undergraduates a wide spectrum of 
opportunities for male and female student ath- 
letes should serve as a role model for all 
schools. Even UCLA, with its 20,000-plus 
undergraduate population. 

Magnus Giriston 
..■'- ■• '• ^- ^' ..*'' ' ■■■■ LosAngcles 

The Daily Bruin Sports Department welcomes all 
letters to the e^litor. Submissions can be sent to 
sports@media.ucla.edu. 



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Oaity Bruin Sports 



Monday, July 3, 2000-Frid4y, iuiy 7, 2000 27 



Team Bruin takes 1 9th at 
Santa Qara International 



RECAP; Participants use 
meet a s p reparation for 
upcoming Olympic trials 



ByPauRneVu 

Daily Bruin Senior Sta^ 



Against some of the nation's and 
world's top talent at the recent Santa 
Clara International Swim Meet, 
UCLA women's swimmers, compet- 
ing as a summer club called Team 
Bruin, garnered 97.5 team points to 
place 19th. 

"It was just another meet where 
we all learned things," Bruin senior 
Keiko Price said. "We just went to 
get experience." 

This experience should be crucial 
come Aug. 9 when the U.S. Olympic 
swim trials start. Several of the 
Bruins who participated in the Santa 
Clara Invite will be going to the tri- 
als. ■.: V: •'-^' . 

"These meets are just stepping- 
stones, just tuneups for Olympic tri- 
als," said UCLA head coach Cyndi 
Gallagher. *. 

The Bruins appear to be right on 
track. Price broke her personal 
record in the SO-meter freestyle with 
a time of 25.93 seconds, her fir§t 
time under the 26-second barrier. 

Her mark tied her with 1992 
Olympic gold medalist Ashley 
Tappin and placed her ahead of 1996 
Olympic gold medalist Catherine 
Fox. In that same race three-time 
Olympian Dana Torres set a new 
U.S. record with a time of 24.73. 

"It was good to race some of the 
people I'll be racing against at the tri- 



als," Price said. "I have to get used to 
it." 

Bruin sophomore Nicole Beck 

placed 10th in the 100m backstroke 
and 12th in the 100m butterfly with 
times of 1:05.81 and 1:03.06, respec- 
tively. Like Price, Beck set a new per- 
sonal record in the 100m fly. 

"I came in not thinking t was 
going to do very welj, so I wasn't ner- 
vous. I didn't feel a lot of pressure," 
Beck said, explaining her success. 
"I'm happy with how I did." 

Beck is also preparing for 
Olympic tryouts. "After that meet, I 
gained a lot more confidence. For 
now it's just perfecting your tech- 
nique and staying quick," she said. 

Junior Beth Goodwin, who will 
also be at Olympic trials, placed 10th 
in the 200m fly at 2:17.50. 

"I came close to my fastest 200 fly 
(long course) record, which was real- 
ly inspiring because 1 thought I could 
never go that fast again," Goodwin 
said. ,' ■■.•.•■--:■,•.■•■..■• 

Fifteen countries were represent- 
ed at Santa Clara, including the 
entire Japanese National Team, as 
well as other strong college pro- 
grams like Stanford. 

Team Bruin will next compete at 
the Janet Evans Invite on July 14-16 
at use. Following that meet will be 
Olympic tryouts. ^ - . 

The Bruins say they'll be pre- 
pared. 

"It looks like I'm going to come 
close to my best time, if not do better. 
We put in a lot of time this summer," 
Goodwin said. "We're all swimming 
really, really well." 

Added Price: "I think, I'll be ready 
by the time 1 go to Olympic trials." 




California all-stars pull clutch win 



RECRUrrS: Volatile game 
leaves Texas high school 
champs behind by a kick 



By Pauline Vu 

Dally Bruin Senior Staff 

California kicker Chris Kluwe had 
already missed an extra point and a 
50-yard field goal in the first half of 
the high school Shrine All-Star foot- 
ball game between California and 
Texas on June 24 at Cerritos College. 

But in the waning moments of the 
game, with 3.6 seconds left on the 
clock and his team down 27-26, 
Kluwe put his mistakes behind him 
and made the 53-yard field goal to lift 
California to a 29-27 victory. — . 



"That's what the kicker lives for," 
the Los Alamitos and UCLA-bound 
kicker told the Los Angeles Times. 

When he went on the field for the 
final play of the game, Kluwe pushed 
his earlier misses out of his mind. 



Shrine Aii-Star Classic 

Calif ornfa 29 

Texas 27 



"If I had allowed myself to think 
about that, there was no way I could 
make it," he added. "When I don't 
think, I kick a tot better." " 

If Kluwe had missed, Texas would 
have had its first Shrine Game victory 



over California ever, since the 
California-Texas format was adopted 
in 1995. Instead, the locals made it six 
ina row over Texas. r-rr^: 



It was the second straight scare 
California had of losing to Texas. Last 
year the Golden State boys also man- 
aged a last-second victory when Los 
Alamitos wide receiver Keenan 
Howry (now at Oregon) caught a 
Hail Mary pass to give California a 
28-25 victory. 

Kluwe was not the only incoming 
Bruin who shined in the Shrine. Wide 
receiver Tab Perry of Milpitas ended 
the game with two touchdowns and 
five catches for 166 yards. 

With 5:39 left in the second quar- 
ter. Perry scored first for the 

~~~~~~~ SeeSHIUIIE,page26 




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Dilly Bruin 



Lone Star State blues 

UCLA football recruits helped lead 
California to a thrilling 29-27 victory 
over Texas in the All-Star Shrine Game 
Classic. See story, page 27. 

Monday, July 3. 2000-Friday, July 7, 2000 "^^ 




Sports on the Web Q }) 

See all this and nfiore at ; 

the Daily Bruin's : 

rockin' Web site: • 

www.dailybruin.ucla.edu I 



JM 




NBA 




DRAFT: Moiso goeshigh, 
Rush doesn't go; Clippers 
revamp, Lakers pick low 



ByAJCadman 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 



mind was on the N BA. The y were includi ng the likes of E SPN.com 



Daily Bruin File Ptwto 



Jerome Moiso, shown here challenging a Washington defender 
in a ganne last year, was the 1 1th overall pick in the NBA draft. 



Judging by the college program 
Jerome M6iso has played for and the 
professional program he will play for, 
one would have to acknowledge his 
passion for teams with legacies. 

After two seasons in Weslwood 
with the most storied basketball 
school in NCAA history, the former 
Bruin will soon pack his bags for 
Boston to play for another storied 
program. On June 28 in Minneapolis, 
the Celtics selected Moiso with the 
11th pick overall in the 2000 NBA 
Draft. The West Indies native will pro- 
vide a plug at any of Boston's ffont- 
court positions. 

"Depending on what my role is 
going to be on the team, I know that 
when I get on the court, I will pro- 
duce," Moiso said. "I'm pretty sure I 
have the talent and the skills, and I 
know where I'm going now." 

Adjustment/rom the college game 
to the professional level, combined 
with the move to the East Coast, does 
not shake the Bruin sophomore's con- 
fidence. ,. : - 

"I got the experience I needed," 
Moiso said. "The coaches pushed me 
all the way through. They knew my 



behind me and I had their support, so 
that was good." 

Another UCLA sophomore with 
NBA hoop dreams, JaRon Rush, did 
not hear his name called from the 
podium. Rush is now a free agent who 
-has permission to sign with any NBA 
ballclub. Through his agent Raymond 
Brothers, Rush has announced his 
intention to participate in the Boston 
Celtics summer league team starting 
July 17. This does not constitute a 
guaranteed contract nor an invitation 
to training camp, but Rush will have a 
forum to showcase his open court 
game, speed and leaping ability. 
-^ Should the Kansas City native fail 
to find any JslBA suitors, he still has 
several options. Rush may choose to 
test the waters of the Continental 
Basketball Association, which could 
soon be sold to the NBA players 
union by former Detroit Piston point 
guard Isiah Thomas. Or he could join 
the newly formed American 
Basketball Association, which will use 
a red, white and blue ball like the orig- 
inal ABA, which existed from 1967 to 
1976. He could also pursue a guaran- 
teed contract overseas. 

On the Lcfs Angeles scene, the 
once-botlom-feeding Clippers took 
one night to revamp their roster and 
bring new life to a team that had been 
the laughingstock of professional 
sports. With the third pick overall, 
general manager Elgin Baylor select- 
ed East St. Louis prepster Darius 
Miles. Many basketball experts. 



senior writer Andy Katz and former 
Georgetown coach and current TNT 
television analyst John Thompson, 
compare Miles' game to that of 
Minnesota Timberwolves forward 
Kevin Garnett, who also made the 
leap from high school to the pros. 

"Kevin Garnett is my idol," Miles 
said. "He and Chris Webber are my 
two favorite players. I look at KG a lit- 
tle more because he was in the same 
situation as me, and he went through 
the same things. He's a great man and 
a great player. Hopefully, I can be a lot 
like him." 

The Clippers then acquired the 
draft rights to Missouri point guard 
Keyon Dooling at the 10th spot. They - 
also picked up' Corey Maggette, 
Derek Strong and cash for a future 
first-round pick. 

The team once known as "the other^ 
L.A. team" then took DePaul swing- 
man Quentin Richardson at No. 18. 
The Clippers finished their draft by 
taking European guard Marko Jaric 
at No. 30 - the first selection in the 
second and final round. 

"I feel good," Miles said. "I think 
the Clippers are a good, young team. I 
feel we can develop as the years go on, 
and hopefully we'll be a playoff con- 
tending team." 

At a news conference at the Staples 
Center last Thursday, Richardson 
echoed Miles' optimism. 

"I'm so happy to be with these 

T~~~~:- SeeM.HOOPS,page26 



Investigation of Rush's ineligibility ends in sanction 



.^CAA: Ruling says UCLA must 
return percentage of earnings, 
delete record of performance 



By Chris Umpierre 

Daily Bruin Staff 

The saga i:s over. 

More Ihan seven months after the NCAA 
began its investigation, the doors have closed on 
former. Bruin forward JaRon Rush's student- 
athlete reinstatement case. 

In the last step of the case, the NCAA ruled 
that because UCLA-4jsed Rush, an ineligible 



player, during the 1999 
NCAA Tournament, the 
school must return 45 per- 
cent (S45,32l) of its earn- 
ings from its participation 
.in the Tournament, in 
which the Bruins sulTered 
a first round loss to Detroit 
Mercy. In addition, 
UCLA's performance in 
the 1999 Tournament is ^^^~~~~~^~" 
deleted. 

"We were aware that this was the last step of 
the JaRon Rush case and that we would have to 
return a portion of our share from the 1999 
NCAA Tournament," said UCLA Athletic 



"We now have closure 

on the matter and 

can nnove on." 

Peter Dalis 

UCLA Athletic Director 



Director Peter Dalis in a 
statement. "The university 
had no knowledge of 
JaRon's actions which 
caused him to be ineligible, 
and the cabinet agreed, 
requiring us to return just 
45 percent of the money 
we received by participat- 
ing in the 1999 

Tournament. 

"We now have closure 

on the matter and can move on," he added. 
Because of the Family Educational Rights 

and Privacy Act, which protects the privacy of 

student-athletes, NCAA spokesman Jane 



Jankowski was prohibited from discussing 
Rush's case, but she did state that she sees no 
more sanctions for UCLA in the future. 

"We don't expect further penalties for the 
university," she said. 

The NCAA began investigating Rush on 
Dec. 10, 1999 when UCLA suspended him for 
possible NCAA violations. 

Rush has since decided to forgo his final two 
years of eligibility and enter the 2000 N BA draft. 

Then on Feb. 1, Rush was suspended for 44 
games by the NCAA after its discovery that the 
forward took $6,125 from his summer league 
coach during high school. After a UCLA 

See RUSH, page 26 



UCLASs talented young squad masters nationals 



TRACK: Soong, Ames win 
Hrst place; Bruin rosier 
should fare well in future 



By Christina Teller 

Dally Bruin Senior Staff 

The youth of the UCLA track and 
Held team showed their'strcngth last 
weekend at the U.S. Junidr Track 
and Field Championships in Denton, 
Texas from June 2.V24. 

Two of UCLA's young guns, 
freshmen Dan Ames and Cari 
Soong, powered through the champi- 
onship weekend, clinching two titles. 
Ames fought his way to the di.scus 
title and was second place in the shot 
put. 

Soong was head and shoulders 



she claimed the hammer throw with 
her loss of 194-10, a new national 
junior meet record. 

"She was in position to do very 
well, and she did," throwing coach 
and men's head coach Art Vencgas 
said "She did it the Bruin way. in fol- 
lowing through with her potential." 

Soong had the competition nailed 
from the beginning. "^~^^ 

"It wasn't even close. She could 
have won it on about every throw." 
Vencgas added. 

Soong won the hammer throw by 
14 feet. The second place matJ< was 
182-06 by Katherinc Johnston, of the 
Warwick Veteran Memorial team. 

"I'd been training with a lot of 
those girls last summer, and I knew 
that they wouldn't be able to pull a 
big throw," Soong said. — - 



"Last sumnier I didn't do as Well. 



coaches that I wanted to come back 
and win. It's been a goal of mine," 
she said. 

With her ability blossoming over 
the past year, Soong fulfilled that 
goal. 

"She cornperedjust great as a true 
freshman." women's head coach 
Jcanette Bolden said. "She's a big- 
time meet performer. When it comes 
time to perform at the higher-level 
meets, Pac-lOs and nationals, she 
comes through." 

Ames represented the Bruin men 
very well as he managed not only to 
win the discus with his throw of 189- 
8, but also lo' clinch second in the 
shot put battle. 

Ames ended- with a mark of 58-8 
1/2 in the shot, (short of the first place 
mark 59-10 l/4set by JcffChakouian 
ofthcSeckonk Warriors 



of their way, Soong and Ames will 
continue onto a slew of international 
competitions. Soong will compete in 
Canada from July 17-23, in Mexico 
from August 3-5, and at the World 
Junior Championships from October 
17-22. Ames will also compete in the 
World Junior Championships. 

Though not yet on the Bruin ros- 
ter, incoming freshman Shcena 
Johnson from Garfield High School 
m Dale City, Va. won the 400-meter 
hurdles and qualified for Olympic tri- 
als with her time of 56 minutes, 82 
seconds. Johnson is regarded as the 
top prep female hurdler and jumper 
in the nation. 

She will continue her summer 
competition in the Olympic trials 
held in Sacramento from July 14-23. 
Johnson will face current Bruin 



Check out 
these stories 
online at 

WHrw.dailyliriiin.wcto.wiit; 



• Jess Strutzel competes 
in his final races before 
Olympic trials this 
month. Find out how 
he did at the recent 
Golden JSpike . in 
Stanford 
i ♦ The Loyola Marymount 
men's volleyball pro- 
gram, an up-and-com- 
ing one in the MPSF 
conference, has been 
canc e ll e d 






r 



1 





Serving the UCLA community since 1919 



MoNOAYjuiY 10,2000-FRiDAY,Juiy 14,2000 



www.ddilybnjin.ucla.edu 



Protest draws thousands to Westwood 



IRAN: Event commemorates 
student movement; many 
call for democratic reforms 



By Timothy Kudo 

Dally Bruin Senior Staff 

Thousands of people, some of them 
refugees of a country embroiled in the tur- 
moil of a 21 -year revolution, gathered 
peacefully in front of the Federal Building 
July 8, in support of a 
student movement 
calling for democrat- 
ic reforms in Iran. 

Under a sky daz- 
zled with the red, 
white, blue and green 
of American and 
Iranian fiags, the 
group came together 
on the one-year 
anniversary of a police raid on a college 
dormitory that left one student dead in 
Tehran. 

Across the globe, Iranian students out- 
side Tehran University joined their 
Westwood counterparts to commemorate 



Rioters, 
police 
clash In 
Iran. See 
page 5. 



the somber. day. But unlike the peaceful 
protest here, demonstrations abroad 
turned bloody as pro-democracy protest- 
ers fought with right-wing extremists. 
- -^?We are here to tell the people, the 
American people, that our students are in 
jail in Iran," said Steve Nejat, one of the 
demonstrators. 

Nejat left Iran during the Islamic revo- 
lution of 1979 when right-wing religious 
extremists, backed by many Iranians, over- 
threw the monarchy. 

At the time, Nejat was working at a fac- 
tory, but he said when the government 
changed, so did the way he was treated. 

"They asked me to come to the office 
and they said, 'You are Jewish. You did 
this. You did that,' he said. "And they laid 
me off" - 

Afterward, he sold everything he 
owned in order to buy his way out of the 
country. He then traveled over the moun- 
tains to Pakistan. 

"They thought it would change and get 
better," Nejat recollected about' the atti- 
tude people had toward the revolution. 
"It's changed - but it's getting worse." 

Eijan al-Andd also described the cur- 

~~ See DEMONSTRATION, page 9 




BRAO MOnKAWA/Oaity Brum 

Thousands of non-violent demonstrators shut down Westwood streets July 8, commemorating 
the anniversary of last year's student uprising in Iran and calling for democratic reforms. 



UCLA hospital 
named best In 
West, fifth for 
nation overall 

RATING: Doctors' survey 
lifts Med Center's position 
in some specialty areas 



By Bartiara Ortutay 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

Sick people from across the 
country - and even the globe - visit 
the renowned UCLA Medical 
Center seeking treatment for life- 
threatening diseases when their local 
hospitals are simply not enough. 

For the 1 Ith consecutive year, the 
UCLA Medical Center ranked as the 
best hospital in the Western United 
States in a U.S. News & World 
Report survey of 2,550 physicians 
across the country. 

"Chances are you'll never need 
these rankings - but if you do, they 
could save your life," reads the U.S. 
News Web site as it explains reason 
behind the survey. 

The^ Medical Center was rated as 
the fifth best hospital in the nation, 
moving up one notch from last year. 

"We have extraordinary physi- 
cians and nurses who have developed 
some of the best programs in the 
country." said Dr. Gerald Levey, 
provost of the Medical Sciences and 
dean of the School of Medicine. 

The ranking is available in this 
yeAr\ i^&i»» of "Americas Best 



HOURS QF WORK IN ENGLISH CLASSES 




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Gass credits adjusted 
due in part to survey 



JACOB UAO/D<ily Bruin 



ENGLISH: Department 
says workload unequal 
to designated four-units 



By Timothy Kudo 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

Citing a recent survey of English 
classes showing a higher workload 
than the 12 hours per week pre- 
scribed in a four-unit class, the 
English department has changed 
many of its classes to five units. 

The classes to be changed starting 
Fall 2000 are English 80. 85, 90, 
MI0IA-MI07C and 133-199. They 
will join the lower division English 10 
series which was changed to five 
units several years ago. 



"We ask our students to read 
6,000 pages of fiction in six weeks," 
said Thomas Wortham, chair of the 
English department. "I'm not sure 
someone would be reading that 
much material iii another depart- 
ment." 

The survey of English classes 
found that students spent anywhere 
from 12.8 hours per week, including 
class-time, to 19.3 hours per week on 
each class with an average time of 
about 16.9 hours a week. 

Additionally, many students who 
were asked to compare their classes 
with others said English classes 
required more work. ^ 

"Surveys of our students were 
showing they were spending 15 or so 

See UNITS, page 6 



Hiring practices questioned by union organizers 



CASUALS: Employee status root of 
conflict; senate bill addresses issue 



By David Drucker 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

UCLA's employment of long-term casual work- 
ers has come under fire this year by the American 
Federation of State, County and Municipal 
Employees union. 

AFSCME alleges that UCLA intentionally fires 
and rehires the same employees approximately 
every 1 1 months. According to union olTicials. 



"What happens is before a year is up. UCLA 
will fire casual workers, then r^ire them three or 
four days or a week later." 
said AFSCME organizer 
Grant Lindsay. 

"The reason they're 
doing this is that the collec- 
tive bargaining agreement 
we have with them says that 
an>one working more than 
12 months is a career-posi- 
tion employee that is enti- 
tled to full benefits and the 
salary that goes along with that." Lindsay contin- 



Ppliticians 
took into 
tabor 

issues. See 
page 4/ 



Resources Ruie Arnett denied the allegation, and 
said UCLA employed casual workers long before 
the current collective bargaining agreement with 
AFSCME. signed in 1995, was in place. 

Arnett said UCLA has not used casual workers 
on a long-term basis to sidestep the university's 
contract with AFSCME. 

" Wc discourage departments from doing that,'^ 
she said. 

Arnett explairied that personnel decisions are 
more complex than the union admits. 

"We're a very decentralized environment ... 
What happens is, a department requests 'X' dol- 
lars for permanent employees. " Arnett said. "Then 




above the rest of the competition as at this competition, and I told my With the US junior nationals out 



See OUMPIONSIIIPS, pa9e 2S 






some workers have been employed in this manner 
for nu>re than 10 years. 



ued. 



But Assistant Vice Chancellor of Human 



See UNION, page 6 



-><« 



Monday, July 10, 2000-Friday, July 14, 2000 



Daily Bruin News 



COMMUNITY BRIEFS 



Protesters demonstrate New ambulance 
free speech on July 4 for UCLA campus 




Protesters with opposing views on immigra- 
tion clashed July 4 outside the Westwood 
Federal Building, but no injuries or arrests were 
reported, authorities said. 

The Voices of Citizens Together, an organiza- 
tion that opposes lenient immigration laws, 
began its protest peacefully at 10 a.m., but the 
demonstration grew more violent when another 
group gathered on the other side of the street, 
said Lt. Ken Leffl^r. ' 

Some 200 people gathered near Wilshire 
Boulevard, and officials had to put on their riot 
gear at one point. ' 

Leffler said there was one "minor skirmish" 
where oHlcers had to break apart members of 
the opposing groups. 

The Los Angeles County Sheriffs 
Department, the Los Angeles Police 
Department, the federal police and the 
California Highway Patrol were at the scene to 
monitor the event. 



The UCLA Emergency Medical Services 
received a new ambulance July 7 to replace 
another ambulance that is a decade old. 

The new ambulance, purchased by the 
'UCLA Medical Center Auxiliary volunteer 
organization which funds medical equipment 
and other programs, is equipped with a state-of- 
the-art cardiac defibrillator. ,. 

The EMS, which runs year-round, is part of 
the campus police department that serves tlie 
campus and Westwood area, it is staffed by 
undergraduate and graduate students that have 
undergone a state-certified training program. 

Professor honored as 
creative entrepreneur 

Alfred Osborne Jr., founder and director of 
The Anderson School at UCLA's Price Center 
for Entrepreneurial Studies and an associate 



professor, was chosen as one of 1 4 
innovative Los Angeles-area 
entrepreneurs in Ernst & Young's 
annual competition. 
The center organizes all faculty research, stu- 
dent activities, and curricula related to entrepre- 
neurship and new business development at 
Anderson. 

He has created several nonprofit outreach 
programs through the center, particularly in the 
areas of child care arid youlh education. He also 
developed a curriculum model that applies the 
same concepts of opportunity recognition and 
strategic development to nonprofits, schools, 
churches and governments. 

Osborne has served on corporate boards, 
municipal committees, and advisory groups. 



UC studiehts travel 
abroad for internship 



studying pollution, and working with social ser- 
vice agencies through the Education Abroad 
Program. 

In future years, the EOP will focus on devel- 
oping internship opportunities with business, 
despite high unemployment and economic 
recession conditions in Chile. 

Brenda Muftoz, a sociology and women's 
studies student at the University of California 
in Santa Barbara, is working with a nonprofit 
organization and conducting field reseafctilo~ 
assess the role of working women. 
Mufioz said the growing Chilean economy 



In and around-Santiago, Chile, University of 
California students are teaching in public 
schools, working with abandoned children. 



has increased the importance of women's work 
to the point where Chilean families can no 
longer depend on a single income. She is study- 
ing how women view their jobs and whether 
they see it as an option or an obligation. 

She plans to present the results of her 
research at a meeting of the American 
Sociological Association after her return to 
UCSB. .-.-v,;.;.' ■•■.■.>:; 

Compiled from Daily Bruin Staff and wire 
reports. 



.».< ' ' ' 



Daily Bruin News 



Mondayjuiy 10, 2000-FridayJuly 14,2000 3 



For additional StOTJCS 



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Daily Bruin Classifieds.,.,.. 21-27 

Crossword. Puzzte 24 

Movie Guide „ 20 



Deal of 
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DAILY BRUIN 



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UCLA America Reads and Jumpst^rt Los Angeles work^ 



♦'* 



to bring the advantage of literaq^ to disadvantaged children 



By Dharshani Dharmawardena 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff < 

Seeing that 70 percent of children fell 
below proficient levels of reading on the 
National Assessment of Educational 
Progress, President Clinton proposed the 
America Reads Challenge in 1994. 

The program aims for children to read 
adequately by the third grade. 

"For any kind of achievement, people 
need to learn how to read before they go 
through any learning experience," said 
Celia Cudiamat, program director of 
UCLA BruinCorps. 

An umbrella organization for commu- 
nity service on campus, BruinCorps over- 
sees- both UCLA America Reads, 
UCLA's response to President Clinton's 
challenge, and Jumpstart Los Angeles, 
part of a national literacy program focus- 
ing on preschoolers. 

Class of 2000 graduate and Jumpstart 
program coordinator Joyce Liou worked 
with BruinCorps for two years, tutoring 
at Western Elementary School in South 
Central Los Angeles. 

Having heard about America Reads in 
her Education 197 class, Liou decided to 
apply for a tutoring position because it 
seemed both challenging and fun. 

"It was an ideal job," she said. "It pro- 
vided a chance to test and build skills'and 
best of all; I'd get to work with children." 

BruinCorps pays student tutors 
through funds from AmeriCorps, a group 
of national programs addressing various 
community-based issues, and through 
Federal Work Study. 

Student tutors also receive educational 
awards depending on the amount^ of 
hours they serve. 



America Reads at UCLA, which 
began in 1997, initially focused on tutor- 
ing children in kindergarten through 
third grade. 

"Research shows that if you can't 
read by the third grade, you're already 
behind," Cudiamat said. 

Sixty students from the UCLA 
America Reads program served at 12 
elementary schools and three communi- 
ty-based organizations in Los Angeles 
during its first year. 

Today, America Reads helps older chil- 
dren as well. It expanded to include addi- 
tional schools, organizations and stu- 
dents during the 1998-1999 school 
year. 

Unlike America Reads, 
Jumpstart Los Angeles focuses 
on younger children. V 

It became part of 
BruinCorps in 1998 because 
program organizers wanted 
to extend the America Reads 
Challenge to preschoolers. 

It attempts to build language 
development and social skills 
needed for a future first- 
grader to learn how to 
read, Cudiamat said. 

"Since they arc so 
young, the program is 
totally different from K 
to 3," Cudiamat said. 
"In preschool, it is deal- 
ing with the really emer- 
gent kinds of skills." 

Both America 
Reads and 

Jumpstart members 



*'" " -•' ". 



See UTERACy, page t 




JENNY YURSHANSKY/0*ly Brum 



Fewer women apply, enroll at The Anderson School 



MBA: Program remains 
popular; some admitted 
possess doctoral degrees 



By Linh Tat 

Dally Bruin Senior Staff 



The Anderson School at UCLA is 
attracting more diverse applicants, 
but it still seems less appealing to 
women. 

Students entering the Masters in 
Business Administration program 
this fall were up against the second- 
highest applicant pool in the school's 
history. 

For (he 330 available spots, 4,S63 
people applied to the program, down 
from last year's 4,926 applicants. But 
with a 15.1 percent acceptance rate. 
The Anderson School is still consid- 
ered one of the most selective busi- 
progi'ikms in (he nailon, Khool 



"There are several reasons we 
think applications have increased 
over time," said Bill Broesamie, asso- 
ciate dean of the M.B.A. program. 
"This school is seen as well-connect- 
ed to the high-tech and biotechnolog- 
ical field in addition to the media, 
entertainment, and communication." 
- He said many applicants are 
attracted to the school because of its 
location in Southern California, 
which is blooming with such 
businesses. 

Though the number of applicants 
are rising, they are stillpredominant- 
ly men. Only 29 percent of the origi- 
nal applicants and 30 percent of 
admitted students this year were 
women, said Linda Baldwin, director 
of admissions to the M.B.A. pro- 
gram. 

Broesamie said that in 1985. the 
percentage of women at The 
Anderson School peaked at 38 per- 
c e nt. By 1 99 5, wom en c o m p ris ed 30 



ofTicials said. 



percent of the program. 



"Other professional fields like 
medicine and law have about an 
equal proportion of women and men. 
That is hot true in business school. 
We don't know why," Broesamie 
said. 

"Certainly our women graduates 
do extremely well, so it's not a matter 
of women finding less opportunities 
when they graduate," he said. 

Some women may be deterred 
from enrolling because most students 
enroll in business programs in their 
late '20s, which coincides with the 
time many women consider starting a 
family, said Lynn Lipinski. a spokes- 
woman for The Anderson School. 

The average grade point average 
of admitted students the past two 
years was 3.6. Also, applicants this 
year averaged 702 out of a possible 
score of 800 on the Graduate 
Management Admission Test - up 12 
points from last year, placing those 
stu den ts in t he 9 7t h percentiic . 



dents hold a medical or law degree, 
and seven have doctorate degrees. 

"People are going to be very cre- 
dentialed in the next, few decades, 
marrying the business degree with 
other degrees," Baldwin said. 

Additionally, 24 percent of last 
year's entering students held an 
undergraduate degree in business. 
Economics and engineering students 
followed suit, with both disciplines 
making up another 21 percent each 
of the overall admittance pool. 

"You will see increasingly the per- 
centage of people coming from other 
areas rather than simply business," 
Baldwin said. "You'll find people 
with technical backgrounds who 
want to be in the policy- and decision- 
making world. Engineers find this is 
their vehicle to participate in the new 
economy or to be owners and entre- 
preneurs." 

While some applicants think fewer 
students a re Mcc e pt ed to a giaJuat e 



which they earned their undergradu- 
ate degree, Baldwin said the admis- 
sions office does accept UCLA stu- 
dents. — ;—- '-r-- ~ — T- 

But, she added, the school receives 
more applications from UC Berkeley 
and Stanford students. 

"You see a lot of reversed north- 
south trend," Baldwin said. "People" 
who went to schools in Northern 
California apply to schools in 
Southern California. They already 
know what it's like in the north. 
They're interested in seeing a differ- 
ent environment." 

Thf average age of entering stu- 
dents this year is 27.6, but admissions 
officers look more at the applicants' 
experience than age, Baldwin said. 

"Too oHen most college studtnts 
think it's the age number, but it's 
never tfie number," she said. "It's 
always » much mofe qualitative ttung 
called the experience and the focus 



This year. 15 of the admitted stu- school on the same campus from experience. 



,\'. 



Monday, July 10, 2000-Friday, July 14, 2000 



Odily Bruin N«w$ 



Assemblywomen investigate charges of unfair labor 



TOUR: Romero, Havice 
visit UCLA to look into 
efnployment practices 



By Todd Belie 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

California Assemblywomen 

Gloria Romero and Sally Havice 
came to campus July 7 to examine the 



working conditions of casual employ- 
ees at UCLA at the request of orga- 
nizers from two unions representing 
university employees. 

In addition to visiting Covel 
Commons and the Neuropsychiatric 
Institute, the state representatives 
received an overview of problems 



allegedly facing casual employees. 

It is alleged that casual employees 
work, often full-time, for the universi- 
ty but are fired after a period so the 
university can avoid hiring mandates 
that would allow the employees to 
beconte full-time and receive benefits. 

Job security, lack of full medical 
coverage and retirement funding 
were outlined as major issues of con- 
cern by Jose Hernandez, an organiz- 
er with the American Federation of 
State, County and Municipal 
Employees. 

"We have a big problem," said 
Hernandez, "(Administrators) are 
abusing the system, undermining ser- 
vice, and are keeping people scared 
by threatening to fire them if they 
speak out." 



Anthony Campagnoni, an associ- 
ate director at NPI, briefly met with 
the group, which was touring campus 
under the auspices of looking at new 
research. He disputed claims that 
casual workers were being treated 
unfairly. 

"Policy is done on a case by case 
basis, many casuals come here as a 
transition job out of school, but come 
to like the work and don't want to go" 
Campagnoni saidr 



tion to further discuss the issue of 
casual workers because of time con- 
straints. :..■:",.'■:.. 



University administrators could 
not be reached for comment late 
Friday afternoon. 

The tour group, consisting of the 
assemblywomen, disgruntled 

employees, and labor officials, was 
shuttled to Covel Commons where 
they interviewed workers in the cafe- 



" We don't mistreat casual employ- 
ees," Campagnoni said. "They are 
simply too valuable to us." 

The informal and impromptu 
meeting in the halls of the NPI gave 
labor officials and Havice a chance to 
voice their concerns. The group, how- 
ever, declined Campagnoni's invita- 



^tcmr — — ■ 

While discussing conditions with a 
small group of workers, the assembly- 
women were confronted by Michael 
Foraker, director of the Housing 
Administration's Business and 
Financial Service, who informed the 
assemblywomen that it was improper 
to disturb employees while they were 



working. 

After a brief discussion with 
Foraker, the assemblywomen moved 
on to the Covel dining area, where 
both spoke in Spanish about working 
conditions with several off-duty 
employees. 

As they departed from Covel , their 
conversation with the workcrsHel 
one of the employees in tears. 

"This is an issue of fairness," 
Havice said. "With no c1i»nce of 



moving up and no benefits, these part 
time employees are stuck here forev- 
er. This shouldn't happen in a state 
university supported by the public." 

Romero also gave her reaction to 
employee concerns. 

~ ~ SeePOLITKIAN,page10 



Village's Community Service Center moves to new location 







BRAD MOfilKAWA/D*«ly Bru(n Seniof StaH 



University Police Chief Clarence Chapman speaks about the role of police in the 
community at the opening of the new Community Service Center on Broxton Avenue. 



WESTWOOD: Crime prevention, 
other programs continue; police 
to patrol area on rotating basis 



By Barbara Ortutay 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

In Westwood, the jurisdictions of campus 
police and the LAPD overlap, resulting in a 
unique relationship 

between the two police •^^^~"— ^~" 
departments. 

Serving as a "home 
base" for both agencies, 
the Police Community 
Service Center on Broxton 
Avenue celebrated its 
opening July 7. The center 
moved after four years at 
its original location, on 
Westwood Boulevard near "'" 
RiteAid. 

"We had a vision to bring the community 
center to the heart of Westwood," said Robert 
Walsh, executive director of the Westwood 
Village Community Alliance, a group of local 



(According to officers) 
the main reason for the 

move ...was to bring 
the center closer to the 

heart of Westwood. 



business- and home-owners seeking to promote 



business in the area. 

"Westwood has always been safe, but there 
was always a sense that it needed to-be safer for 
residents and to attract costumers," he contin- 
ued. 

The center, which focuses on community 
policing, is staffed by Community Service 
Officers from UCLA, and managed by UCPD 
Crime Prevention Officer Ricardo Bolafios. 

In addition, four UCPD officers and four 
LAPD officers rotate in and oyt of the center, 
sharing responsibilities 
" and patrolling Westwood. 

"We do crime preven- 
tion, alcohol and car safe- 
ty, women's safety, a lost- 
and-found service, as well 
as KidCare ID program," 
said University Chief of 
Police Clarence Chapman. 
A service to parents in 
the area, the KidCare pro- 

gram fingerprints and 

identifies children in case 
they get lost. 
The center was created in February 1996. At 
that time its goal was to become an integral part 

. $e« POLICE, page 11 



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D«ily Bruin News 



Monday, iuiy 10, 2000-Fridiy, July 14. 2000 



WORLD & NATION 



Some experts worry AIDS may be dn an upswing 

CONFERENCE: Study says ly since their peak in the 1980s, public . . Americans still act recklessly, the instance, condom use has increased 

. . . . . - - _ health nfTirinU u/nrrv that mmnlu. -,: /-ta/^ i i r:_j; c ■ l . .• •, . .^~_ 



CONFERENCE: Study says 
dgh-risk sex._ dnigJiabks 
are starting to resurface 



By Oanld Q. HaiMy 

The Associated Press *; 

DURBAN, South Africa - 
Rou^ly 5 million Americans have 
sex and drug habits that put them at a 
high risk of catching AIDS, accord- 
ing to new U.S. figures, and experts 
fear an upsurge of the disease after a 
decade of stability. - 

While AIDS infections in the 
United States have fallen dramatical- 



ly since their peak in the 1980s, public 
health officials worry that compla- 
cency about the disease has caused 
backsliding - especially among 
young gay men - that could bring 
AIDS roaring back 1 

"I'm scared by the trends we are 
starting to see," said Dr. Helene 
Gayle, AIDS chief at the U.S. 
Centers for disease Control and 
Prevention. 

Gayle presented the latest data 
Saturday at a briefing hosted by the 
American Medical Association on 
the eve of the 13th International 
Conference on AIDS. 

Currently, about 40,000 
Americans contract HIV each year. 



Slow change comes from many events 




Over the fast decade, 

infection rates among 

^y men have remained 

stable at between 1 

percent and 4 percent. 



down from the 100,000 new infec- 
tions annually during the mid-'80s. 
The improvement is attributed large- 
ly to safer sex habits and avoiding 
dirty needles. 

In an attempt to see how many 



Americans still act -recklessly, the 
CDC analyzed findings from several 
large-scale surveys. Their conclusion: 
Between 2 percent and 4 percent of 
the adult population - 4 million to S 
million people - still put themselves^ 
at high risk. This includes having six 
or more sexual partners annually, 
having sex with someone known to be 
infected with HIV, engaging in prosti- 
tution for drugs or money, having 
male homosexual contact, using 
crack cocaine or injecting Hni£« 

Gayle said jhe study did not 
attempt to learn whether this level of 
risky behavior is increasing or 
decreasing, although there seems to 
be evidence on both sides. For 



instance, condom use has increased 
substantially since the 1980s, 
although only about 40 percent of 
unmarried people and 23 percent of 
drug users report using them. 

Ovei" the last decade, infection- 
rates among gay men have remained 
stable at between I percent and 4 per- 
cent. However, said Gayle. "We have 
seen troubling signs/over the past 
year that we fear could signal a resur- 
gence of the epidemic among gay 



men. 



Last week, the San Francisco 
Department of Public Health report- 
ed a sharp increase in new HlV^nfeO' 

See AIDS, page 8 



The Associaied Press 

Wearing boots with his name embroidered on them, Mexico's 
President-elect Vkent« Fox speaks during an interview on July 3. 



HISTORY: Party's legacy 
finally unlocks door to 
Vicente Fox's presidency 



By John Rice 

The Assodated Press '■■■: - 

MEXICO CITY - Hundreds of 
police and soldiers guarded Mexico's 
Congress "3ne summer day 12 years 
ago as the ruling-party majority pre- 
pared to certify the scandal-marred 
election of Carlos Salinas de Gortari. 

A freshman congressman named 
Vicente Fox - fraudulent ballots hung 
on his ears to mock the large-eared 
Salinas - rose to the podium and pre- 
tended to speak as the president- 
elect, expressing sorrow that he 
would have to rule "against the will of 
the people." 

Watching the ceremony on televi- 
sion, Salinas reportedly turned to 
aides to ask: "And this one - who 
does he think he is?" 

As it turned out. Fox was the man 
who would end the seven-decade 
reign of Salinas' party - a victory that 
had its roots in long struggles over 
frauds such as Salinas' in 1988 and in 
a slow, silent transformation of 
Mexican society. 

"The Mexican case is unique 
because it has been very slow, very 
gradual," said Sergio Aguayo, a polit- 
ical scientist at the elite College of 
Mexico. 

Many experts believe that no 
opposition party candidate could 
have had a victory accepted before at 




The Associated Press 

Iranian students carry a man who was attacked and wounded by 
hard-liners at Enqelab square In Iran during a demonstration. 

Melee breaks out in Iran 
between 




CLASH: Violence disrupts 
peaceful student protests; 
hard-liners back officers 



By Hassan Saibakhshian 

The Assodated Press , . '' 

TEHRAN. Iran - Police fired bul- 
lets and tear gas at rioters who smashed 
bus windows and shouted slogans 
against Iran's Islamic government in 
the latest outburst of political unrest 
July 8. 

Screaming "death to the clerical gov- 
ernment," the rioters burned bundles 
of hard-line newspapers, shattered 



shop windows and damaged the shut- 
ters on downtown businesses. 

Witnesses and authorities blamed 
the eruption on hooligans trying to stir 
up trouble aAer clashes between sup- 
porters and opponents of democratic 
reforms. At least a dozen people were 
injured and scores were 
arrested. 

The violence started outside Tehran 
University during demonstrations 
marking the first anniversary of a 
bloody police raid on a university dor- 
mitory. It overshadowed student 
groups' peaceful commemorations of 
the July 9, 1999, pre^lawn raid that left 

See MAIt |»ige 10 



WORLD & NATION BRIEFS 



Four injured in Spain's President ponders 
Fermin Fiesta bull runs failed missile test 



PAMPLONA, Spain — Four men were 
injure(land several others suffered cuts and 
bruises Trom stampeding bulls July 9 - the 
third day of Spain's immensely popular San 
Fermin Fiesta bull runs in Pamplona. 

Six bulls trotted through Pamplona^s 
crowded cobblestone streets in a three- 
minute dash to the arena where they later 
faced bullfighters. 

The run was far more crowded than in pre- 
vious days, increasing the danger to the run- 
ners. About 1.6 million people are expected 
to visit Pamplona during the eight days of the 
San Fermin Fiesta. The event started July 7. 

Overcrowding has made the runs extreme- 
ly dangerous. Since record-keeping began in 
1924, 13 runners have been killed and more 
than 200 have been injured. The last fatality 
was an American in 1995, the first death 
a ino e 19 8 0. 



WASHINGTON - Qinton administra- 
tion officials said July 9 they expect the president 
will decide whether to go ahead with the next 
phase of a national missile defense system and 
not leave it up to his successor. 

Senators raised concerns about spending bil- 
lions on the proposed system, which failed an 
important test early Saturday, and some suggest- 
ed the United States faced more potential 
threats from terrorists on the ground than mis- 
siles in the air. 

Secretary of State Madeleine Albright said it 
would be "irresponsible" for the administration 
to put off the decision, as suggested by Sen. 
Chuck Hagel, R-Neb. Such a delay, she said on 
ABC's "This Week." would give countries such 
as North Korea and Iran more time to develop 
missiles that could threaten the United States. 

"I think the president will be making his deci- 
s i o n lat er th ia wi mnw." dw s aid, bm e d on -ree- 




ommendations from her. Defense 
Secretary William Cohen and Sandy 
Berger, the national security adviser. 
"There are four criteria that the pres- 
ident is going to be looking at: the threat, 
the technology, the cost and what it does to over- 
all American security," Albright said. 

Protestants march 
against British army 

PORTADOWN, Northern Ireland - 
Offering bitter words but no violence, an esti- 
mated 3,000 Protestant hard-liners marched 
July 9 to a British army barricade that pre- 
vented them from parading through the mpin 
Catholic district of this fiercely Protestant 
town. 

Compounding intercommunal tensions, a 
car bomb planted by Irish Republican Army 
dissidents detpnated in front of a police sta- 
tion in Stewartstown, 10 miles north of 
Portadown. Th e b l ast wo un d fd a p o li te -^ 



woman in the leg and demonstrated that 
extremists on both ^des want to tear apart 
Northern Ireland's 1998 peace accord. 

In Portadown, leaders of the Orange 
Order, Northern Ireland's major Protestant 
fraternal group, promised they would even- 
tually get their way and march down disput- 
ed Garvaghy Road by wearing down British 
authorities through mass civil disobedience. 

Standing on a podium in front of the 20- 
foot-high steel wall blocking their intended 
path, Portadown's senior Orangeman, 
Harold Gracey, denied responsibility for 
encouraging the Protestant riots of recent 
days - then in the same breath called for even 
more intense demonstrations starting July 
10. 

The car bomb attack in Stewartstown 
heightened many Protestants' belief that the 
IRA itself remained committed to the aboli- 
tion of Northern Ireland as a Protestant- 
majority state linked with Britain. 



C o m piled fr o w i Daily B t uin win r tpof t i. 



Monday, July 10, 2000-Friday, July 14, 2000 



Daily Bruin News 



UNION 

From page 1 



.„■"—«, 



we review the budget and counter witlTwhai we 
have available lot/ permanent employees, and 
what we have available for temporary' 
employees." t . ' 

Arnett added that Associate Vice C^jifccellor 
of Business and Finance Sam Morabito' recently 
changed (he Housing Administration's polic\ on 
the hiring of casual workers to allow onl\ one 
rehire per employee, also calling for a 30-day 
break between appointments as a way to stem 
the long-term cycle of fire-and-rehirc. 

UCLA Employee Relations Consultant 
Michael Beasley. though, neither confirmed nor 
"dtmied the allefatrorr * 

"I can't say that (it is happening), but if it is. 
then we're real concerned about it." he said. 
"We plan on looking into it." 

The issue flared up on campus last month 
when AFSCME led 15 food-service and janitori- 
al workers in a march on the offices of Housing 
Administration Director Mike Foraker and 
Covel Commons Principal Dining Manager 
Brandon T. Williams to demand an end to long- 
term casual employment and other* alfeged mis- 
treatment. 

"They think I'm a problem because I'm a 
member of the union." said senior food service 
worker Hiliria Pena, who added that she's been 
turned down for a promotion to assistant cook 
twice. f 

"I've been working 12 years in the same posi- 
tion, and they said that I don't have the experi* 
ence," Pena said. 

Williams declined to comment, citing depart- 
ment protocol. But Foraker said AFSCME's 
allegations are unfounded. 

"I don't think they will hold up under any 




"As a customer of the dorms, and as a taxpay- 
er, I don't want my money to pitch in to these 
unfair working conditions," Doan said. "We're_ 
a prestigious university, and we Jihould be a pres- 
tigious employer." 

But Osborne responded that this philosophy 
is, in efTect, backward. 

^ *'0h, so the taxpayers should pay more?*' 
asked Osborne. "UCLA, as a public institution, 
has to be especially judicious with its money if it 
is going to survive and prosper. .,., -.; -^ ,, ■ . ;■ , 

AFSCME, however, has its own opinion of 
what UCLA's priorities should be. 

"Management is making decisions based on 
just budget," said Lead Organizer JR 
Hernandez. They're making decisions without 
Jaking into account working condition s." 



BRAD MORlKAWA/D.ii;, o 

JR Hernandez speaks to union members about the hiring practices at UCLA that AFSCME 
alleges are illegal. University officials hav^ said the uniyn charges are unfounded. • , 

kind of scrutiny, so I don't think there's any need "If one chooses to be hired as a casual worker, 

to defend them," said Foraker, who added he ihat'sa voluntary action." said Anderson School 

finds the union's charges offavoritism and other /Associate Professor Alfred E. Osborne, Jr. 
abuses personally offensive. y--^here are those that like casual employment." 

When asked to explain employee complaints, But Lindsay disagreed. 

Foraker blamed AFSCME. "It's not a choice if the university forces work- 

"These are outside organizers using tactics of ers to take these jobs," Lindsay said, 
an old era to create trouble," Foraker said. UCLA class of 2000 graduate Luu Doan, an 

Although some university officials were hesi- AFSCME volunteer and participant in the 



tant to comment on the issue one way or the 
other, not everyone at UCLA has a problem 
with casual workers. 



recent Housing Department protest, said 
UCLA has a moral responsibility that super- 
sedes budgetary concerns. 



But Foraker said the union is overstating the 
situation. 

"I think they're taking the particular situation 
of casual workers and painting it with a broad 
brush," explained Foraker. "Have there been 
abuses? Yes. Is it ongoing and routine? 
Absolutely not." 

Nonetheless, AFSCME officials insist that 
the trend of recycling workers in casual positions 
is a problem, and one that stretches beyond 
UCLA to encompass the entire UC system. To 
combat this, AFSCME has pushed the 
California legislatui^ to pass SB 1857. which 
would make such actions illegal. 

•^It says that the UC can no longer keep a 
casual work force in place for five, Idi, or 15 
years without making them permanent employ- 
ees," said AFSCME Political and Legislative 
Director Willie L. Pelote. -..< * 

Pelote expects the bill to pass when legislators 
take it up in August. 

"1 never move a bill without being eternally 
optimistic that the governor will hear what we're 
saying and sign it," Pelote said. • . ,- . 



UNITS 

From page 1 

hours on English classes," Wortham 
said. "Allowing for exaggeration, it still 
seemed that 15 was close to the num- 
ber that students were spending." 

But the change doesn't mean the 
English major is more difficult than 
other ones, said Karen Rowe, an 
English professor and chair of the 
Faculty Executive Committee, which 
along with the Undergraduate Council 
of the Academic Senate approved the 
change. 

"The student taking clinical psy- 
chology who spends time working 



interactively, or doing observational 
studies, may be spending hours that 
are equivalent in difficulty to the four 
hours that an English student spends 
reading chapters in a novel," Rowe 
said. 

According to Judith Smith, vice 
provost for the College of Letters and 
Science, one unit equates to four hours 
of time spept on a class. So, a four unit 
class woula require 12 hours of study 
and class time a week. 

Since the classes required more 
than 12 hours of work, students were 
being "paid" less units than they 
should have. Wortham said. 

Smith also said a major is defined as 
60 upper division units or. if classes are 



Many Students who 

were asked to 
compare their classes 

with others said 
— English classes ~ 



required more work. 



four units, 15 classes. Currently the 
English major is 12 classes but with the 
increase it will now meet the unit 
requirement set by the college. 



Though the English department is 
one of the first to make so many of its 
classes five units, other departments 
may consider such a change in order to 
graduate their students faster. 

"It's a response to the enrollment 
plans that need to go in place to meet 
the Tidal Wave of new students that 
will come to the campus over the next 
10 years." Rowe said about the influx 
of around 60,000 students expected to 
enter the UC in the next 10 years, nick- 
named Tidal Wave 2. 

Currently, the average UC student 
graduates in just over four years, 
according to officials. 

The university's goal is to graduate 
students in four years so there is a high- 



er turnover and campus populations 
will be somewhat smaller. 

Since many students only take three 
classes, or 12 units, the unit change will 
force students to take about 15 units a 
quarter, Rowe said. Over four years, 
students will have taken the 180 units 
required for a degree. 

Though taking more than 18 units 
requires petitioning the college, Rowe 
said she didn't think the unit increase 
would affect most students in that 
respect, because many don't take more 
than three classes. 

She added it's rare for students to be 
denied taking more than 18 units, but 
her committee may re-examine the 
issue at a later time. 



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8 Monday, July 10, 2000-Friday, July 14, 2000 



Daily Bruin News 



HOSPITAL 

From page 1 



10 by 



Hospitals," published July 
U.S. News & World Report. 

While the rankings were wel- 
comed by nurses and physicians at 
the Medical Center. Levey said the 
biggest benefit is for the patients 
"who come here and and take great 
comfort in the fact that the hospital 
is ranked one of the best in the 
world." 

UCLA has receivetl the best hos- 
pital in the West title each year in 
4h€ «uf vey's 44 • — — 



m 



year history. To 
rank the hospi- 
tals, the maga- 
zine surveyed 
6.247 centers. 
QDJy., 173 of 
which made the 
final cut. 

The U.S. 
News Honor 
Roll. which 
ranks the lop 
hospitals in the 

nation, rates 

-them based on 

scores in at least 

six of 17 specialty areas 

"America's Best Hospitals." 

The specialties include areas such 
as cancer, geriatrics, pediatrics, psy- 
chiatry and kidney disease - a cate- 
gory added this year. 

To rate the programs, the maga- 
zine asked 150 board-certified 
physicians in each specialty - 2,550 
in all - to pick the top five hospitals 
in their area, ignoring cost and loca- 
tion. 

UCLA received 21 points in FT 
specialties. In first place was Johns 
Hopkins Hospital, receiving 31 
points in 16 specialties. 

There is a high concentration of 
older people living in the west side 



"When people are 

diagnosed with 

xancer, they come 

here." 

Judy Gasson 

Jonsson Cancer Center 
director 



of Los Angeles, according to 
Medical Center spokesman David 
Lagness. Many of them may benefit 
from UCLA's geriatrics program, 
which received the highest ranking 
in the nation. 

"We have been right on the top 
for the past seven or eight years," 
said David Reuben, director of the 
division of geriatrics. "We have 
great faculty, good support. We love 
caring for older persons." 

The Jonsson Comprehensive 
Cancer Center ranked eighth in the 
"nation - jumping up five places 
from last year. 

— ^ - Thi s i s thc ^ 

" highest of any 
cancer center in 
the West;'5iiid 
Judy Gasson, 
director of the 
center. 
_ Shr cited 
excellen"2e "in 
patient care, 
outstanding 
research pro- 
grams in basic 
science, clinical 

research and 

cancer preven- 
tion as some of 
the reasons for the high ranking. 

"I think it will be helpful to us 
when we're recruiting," Gasson 
continued. "When people are diag- 
nosed with cancer, they come here." 
Other highly ranked programs at 
the Medical Center include gynecol- 
ogy, which was fourth in the nation, 
and psychiatry, which ranked sixth. 
The Center's digestive disorders 
program, which includes treating 
ulcers, was also ranked as the sixth 
best in the nation. 

"We are committed to excel- 
lence, and appreciate being recog- 
nized for it," said Dr. Michael 
Karpf. director of the Medical 
Center, in a statement. 



LITERACY 

From page 3 

serve disadvantaged communities, 
which lack educational services for 
elementary school-aged children, 
Cudiamat said. 

Such unfavorable circumstances 
may eventually hinder their chances 
of attending a good college, she 
added. 

"They don't have those kinds of 
advantages to prepare them to be 
competitive," she said. "We want to 
give them a foundation of skills to 
build on." ^ 

Tutors working with students one- 
on-one can help these students move 
ahe ad. C udiamat said . - . 

From her experience. Liou said 
many of these children face dilTicul- 
ties at home in addition to the disad- 
vantages they find at school. *„ . ,^ 

"Many of the parents don't know 
how they can help their child succeed ■ 
in school because the areas we work 
at consist of a large population of 
immigrant families, where the parents 
don't necessarily speak English and 
cannot read or write it," she said. 

Although many parents may want 
to participate in their children's edu- 



AIDS 

From page 5 /■!^ 

tions between 1997 and 1999. Also, 
gonorrhea and other sexually spread 
diseases have risen recently in several 
cities among HIV-infected gay men. 

Experts worry that complacency 
about getting AIDS, fueled in part by 
the availability of effective HIV treat- 
ments, may be behind a return to 
risky sexual behavior. 

One of the most impressive victo- 
ries over HIV in industrialized coun- 



cations more, circumstances out of 
their reach prevent such interaction, 
Liou said. 

"There are parents who never got 
past a certain level of education," she 
said. "There are parents who work all 
the time and when they get home, 
they look at their children and realize 
that their kids are strangers to them 
and that Ihey don't know how to 
engage their children in conversation. 

"And of course, there are parents 
who are completely with the program 
and make sure the child does their 
homework and really work with the 
children." she continued. 

Even^though some families e x pert -' 
ence hardships. Liou said she found 
most parents cared deeply about their 
children's futures. . • , 



"It's rare to find a parent who isn't 
appreciative of all your work." she 
said. 

- JThrojUi^h tutoring, BruinCorps 
members try to help youngsters over- 
come many of the disadvantages they 
face, Liou said. Working with them, 
however, requires imagination. 

"All my literacy and math activities 
had to be fun, because ideally, that's 
the best way to learn and spark inter- 
est in learning for the sake of knowl- 
edge, not for the sake of the grade," 



tries has been the use of AZT and 
other drugs to prevent the spread of 
the virus from infected mothers to 
their babies during birth. In the 
United States, only a few hundred 
babies now get the infection this way 
each year. 

Many hope the same approach 
will slow the spread of HI V to babies 
where this tragedy is common, espe- 
cially in sub-Saharan Africa. 

On Friday, Boehringer Ingelheim 
said it would offer its AIDS drug 
nevirapine free to developing coun- 
tries to help stop mother-to-child 



she said. 

For example, Liou said she used 
the game Memory to help students 
with their spelling. Whenever a child 
found a matching pair, they needed to 
spell the name correctly in order to 
win. 

Despite her attempts to create a 
fun environment, Liou said some of 
the students were uncooperative, 
forcing her to change her lesson plan 
and make things more relaxing for 
them. 

"If a group or individual was hav^ 
ing a bad day or was tired, we took it 
easier," she said. "But we always 
involved readtng in our relaxation 
days, which is one of the goals of our 
program - to promote literacy as 
.something fu n." _; _ 

The children Liou tutored are not 
the only ones who learned. She said 
she gained a different perspective on 
life working with her students. 

"You may be stressed about your 
own grades and tests, but the 
moment you walk into the class and 
you get a hug from your tutee, you 
realize your troubles are so minute in 
the grand scheme of things," Liou 
said. 

"You realize how privileged you 
are to be where you're at," she added. 



spread of HIV. However, a study 
scheduled to be released later at the 
meeting suggests this approach may 
not have a big impact, because 
infected women can still spread the 
virus to their babies through breast 
feeding. 

A study of 1,797 pregnancies 
found that a combination of the 
drugs AZT and 3TC cut the risk of 
transmission to newborns by more 
than half. However, as babies caught 
the virus through breast milk, the 
difference was nearly wiped q^ut 
within 18 months. 



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^ • • I , > I > • 



Daily Bniin News 



Monday, Juiy 10, 2000-FrMay, July 14, 2000 



'\r- 



DEMONSTRATION 

From page 1 

rent state of oil-rich Iran, in which 
food and water are lacking in parts of 
the country. 

"No economy, no jobs, nothing," 
al-Andd said. "Everything is going 
down." 

Al-Andd said he left before the rev- 
olution but went back for a short time 
only to rea lize that there >wa$ no 
future there. - 

Some demonstrators brought lawn 
chairs or sat in wheelchairs with their^ 
"chMren and^ grandchildrenrwho 
smiled while they carried flags and 
candles alongside the marchers. 
«.Many protesters exchanged hugs and 
greetings with friends and relatives. ; 

After speeches by Iranian scholars 
and community members, the 
demonstrators began marching to 
UCLA, shutting down Westwood's 
major streets. -^ 

The sea of thousands snaked from 
the federal building to (our blocks 
away at the intersection of Le Conte 
Avenue and Westwood Boulevard. 



As they walked, many protesters 
thanked the Los Angeles Police 
Department officers who directed the 
crowd using megaphones. 



One man, Charles 
Sedghl,said maybe 
the lackluster media 
^ presence (at the 



protest) was because 

America didn't want 

to get involved. 



^:. Cries for help from the crowd's 
chant of "United Nations, pay more 
attention." and banners saying, "Stop 
executing students in Iran," were 
shadowed by more sinister slogans 
like "Death lathe Islamic Republic." 
In the midst of the march, a toddler 
walking uneasily waved a miniature 
Iranian flag over his head while his 
mother scrambled to keep up. 



As the crowd gathered in the mid- 
dle of their march, they began singing 
the Iranian national anthem before 
turning and heading back to the 
Federal Building. 

Some protesters gave money to a 
homeless man who was w^ttching the 
event. 

The event didn't make the evening 
news on many stations, though an 
anti-immigration protest with far 
fewer people at the Federal Building 
on July 4 drew several local new*-, 
vans. 

One man, Charles Sedghi, said 
maybe the lackluster media 4}res 
was because America didn't want to 
get involved. 

"It would be another Iraq,** he 
said. ' ' ^■- ■ • ^ ^ - ' — — ^ 



As the protest wound down, the 
demonstrators placed the candles 
they had been carrying on the con- 
crete posts that dot the outskirts of 
the federal building forming. 

By the time the demonstration was 
over, the sky had faded into darkness 
but the stars dotting the night were 
surpassed by the thousands of burn- 
ing flames lit below. 



MEXKO 

From page 5 

least 1994. And until this year, all 
presidential elections were tilted 
heavily in favor of the ruling 
Institutional Revolutionary Party, 
orPRI. 

A few of the milestones on the 
path to an opposition victory: 

• THE NEW PARTY: In 1939, a 
small group launched the center- 
right National Action Party, or 
PAN. It would elect a few congress- 

\ and nwyors over the years, but 
it did not even try to field a presi- . 
dential candidate until 1952. 

• CRACKS IN THE SYSTEM: 
The PRI's all-embracing network of 
farm, labor and urban organiza- 
tions routinely crushed rivals. But a 
strike by dissident railway workers 
was brutally suppressed by the gov- 
ernment in 1958 - one of several 
events that began to weaken PRI 
labor unions. 

• THE MASSACRE: The army's 
massacre of student demonstrators 
in Mexico City in 1968 turned a gen- 



eration of intellectuals - and later 
their students - against the ruling 
party. The hostility it created also 
made later generations of soldiers 
wary of being used for political ends 
as they had been in the past. 

• THE ECONOMY: President 
Jose Lopez Portillo used booming 
oil revenues and soaring debt to 
patch up problems in the state-dom- 
inated economy. When oil prices 
fell, the resulting crisis alienated mil- 
lions of middle-class voters . — — 

• FREE TRADE: President 
Miguel de la Madrid led Mexico 

' toward private enterprise and free 
trade, entering the international 
General Agreement on Tariffs and 
Trade in 1986. He began selling off 
the state companies the PR] had 
used for decades as sources of jobs 
for supporters. 

• REVOLT AT THE POLLS: In 
1986. the PRI used fraud to keep 
National Action's Francisco Barrio 
from winning the governor's race in 
Chihuahua state along the U.S. bor- 
der. Tens of thousands demonstrat- 
ed, uniting for the first time intellec- 
tuals of the right and of the left. 



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10 Monday, July 10, 2000-Ffklay, July 14, 2000 



Daily Bruin News 



>^ 



POLITICIAN 

From page 4 

"I'm concerned about the basic 
practice of abuse." Romero said. 
"When people are working five or 10 
years and only getting the benefits of 
a 13-month part-time job, there's a 
clear problem." 

While leading part of the tour Cliff 
Fried, executive vice president of 
University Professional and 
Technical Employees discussed the 
need for policy meetings to resolve 
problems among casual employees. 

"The hardest part is ge tting^the 
administration to dance, and they 
don't seem to Want to dance,"said 
Fried. 

Campagnoni and the assembly- 
women both said they wanted to 
meet again in the future to discuss the 
issues further. 




BRAD MORIKAWA/Ddily Biuin 

California assembly members Gloria Romero and Sally Havlce speak 
with UCLA Dining Services employees in Covel Comrnons on July 7. 



IRAN 

From page 5 

one student dead and triggered 
the widest unrest since the 1979 
Islamic revolution. 

The Office for Fostering 
Unity, the largest pro-reform stu- 
dent group, was quick to dis- 
avow the rioters. 

"T he demonstrators were not 
students," the group said in a 
statement. "(Students) had noth- 
ing to do with this incident." ^^ 

The trouble followed months 
of tension between pro-cfcmocra- 
cy supporters of President 
Mohammad Khatami and rival 
hard-liners who have closed 
Sown pro-reform newspapers 
and arrested presidential allies in 
a bid to roll back the immensely 
popular reforms. Students are 



among Khatami's strongest sup- 
porters. 

Saturday began with nonvio- 
lent gestures commemorating 
last year's raid. Representatives 
of the Office for Fostering Unity 
visited the homes of leading 
jailed reformers, writers and 
political activists and gave their 
families flowers as a gesture of 
solidarity, said group member 
Nima Fateh 



"Our response to violence is 
offering flowers. We seek to pro- 
mote the culture of tolerance and 
respect for opposing views in our 
society," he said. 



But police arrested a number 
of students at a demonstration 
outside the dormitory, saying the 
gathering took place without 
Interior Ministry permission, the 



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IRAN 

From page 10 A 

official Islamic Republic News Agency 
reported. It gave no other details. 

Also, vigilantes attacked an earlier 
demonstration by students chanting slo- 
gans in support of reform and political 
freedoms. 

The situation degenerated later in the 
day. Hundreds of people, raany wroed 



with rocks and chanting "death to dicta 
tors." fought a vicious battle against 
dozens of hard-line vigilantes armed with 
rocks and chains. The vigilantes were 
chanting sloga ns support i rig hard-line 



supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. 

It was unclear how many people were 
injured in fighting between the two 
groups, but at least a dozen people were 
seen being driven away in private cars, 
most with head injuries. 

Bystanders fled the scene after police 
moved in and fired tear gas. but some 
5,000 people soon gathered to watch the 
brawl from balconies, pedestrian bridges 
and sidewalks. Police fired into the crowd 
when rioters turned on them: 



POLICE 



Amid the tumult outside the Tehran 
University campus in the capital's down^ 
town district, it was not clear if police were 
firing live ammunition or rubber bullets or 
whether anyone was hurt, 



I 
.1 

-4- 



41 «^ 



Transit ;. 
Servioss 

W^ Keep UCLA Moving! 




From page 4 " : 

"• #» \ ': . .'■:■' ■ ■■■ ■': - . ':..■■ " 

of the business district in Westwood, according to 

Chapman. 

"We have established ourselves as a flagship for 
these kinds of programs," he said. 

Along with local businesses, the Westwood 
Village Community Alliance and the city of Los 
Angeles, UCLA administrators also supported the 
move. ^iT^^ ^ 

il*^^ provide police officer and crime prevention 
support to the center as our commitment to the 
Westwood community." said Allen Solomon, associ- 
ate vice chancellor of administrative services. 

— - We are pleased that our efforts have contributed 



Monday, hriy 10, 2000-FfkUy, July 14, 2000 11 

to the health of the Westwood community, which has 
in turn contributed to the health of UCLA." he con- 
tinued. 

The main reason for the move, according to offi- 
cers at the ceremony, was to bring the center closer 
to the heart of Westwood. At 900 square feet and 
with more windows, the new location is larger and 
brighter than the previous one. Chapman said the 
old olTice was dark and hard to get to. 

KNBC weatherman Fritz Coleman MC'd the 
opening ceremony, which was also attended by Fifth- 
District Councilman Michael Feuer and Capt, 
Wallace Graves from LAPD's West L.A, division. — 



The center is located at 1036-B Broxton Ave. It is open 
Monday-Thursday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Friday from 9 
a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday TO a.m. to 7 p.m. 



The Daily Bruin 



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Next week 

Recent Supreme Court 
decision highlights the 
lacl( of protection 
for gays. 

Monday, July 10, 2000-Friday, July 14, 2000 




View on the Web 

See all this and 

more at the Daily Bruin's 

Website 

www.dailybruin.ucla.edu 



!^„ 



<• • 



viewpoint@media . ucia edu 



Daily Bruin Viewpoint 



Monday, July 10, 2000-Friday, July 14, 2000 13 



Culture shock is a state of mind 



^ - 

Women's jright to 




• . . 1 ■ 



unreo 



• It 




SHAVING: Skewed ideals, 

—Western culture demand 

unnatural female beauty 

Ah, summer is here again - the 
time when women start bar- 
ing their midriffs, legs and 
arms, and donning bikinis, tank tops 
and shorts. And, for me, it's also the 
time when peo- 
ple start staring 
at my body, 
whispering 
about me 
behind my back, 
and asking me if 
I'm European. 

While it 
could be for a 
variety of rea- 
sons, I usually 
attribute these 
reactions to the 
fact that I don't 
shave my legs or underarms. ! 
stopped doing so about four years 
ago, when I came to the realization 
that this custom is completely arbi- 
trary, sexist and without any logical 
basis. While it's not a very realistic 
hope, I wish that more women would 
recognize this and reject the idea of 
shaving their bodies. More impor- 
tantly, though, I wish society would 
not make it so difficult for them to 
stop doing so in the first place. 

Most Americans who can't imag- 
ine a world in which women do not 
shave might be surprised to learn that 
the majority of women in the rest of 
the world do not do so. Word has it 
that the time-honored American tra- 
dition of women shaving began very 
recently, in the 20th century. It has 
been traced back to the 1910s and 
'20s, when, for the first time, armpits 




CAUFORNIANS: Contrast 
in areas redefines attitude, 
can create identity crisis 

s I begin my third yearaL 



Nicole 
Seymour 



Seymour is a fourth-year American liter- 
ature and culture and women's studies 
student. She loves reruns of''90210''on 
FX and hates physical exertion. Please e- 
mail comments to 

saintblue@hotmail.com. 



and legs were visible with the advent 
of the sleeveless dress and high hems. 
Apparently, some genius over at— 
Gillette figured that if women were 

presented with yet another way in 

which they could alter their body in 
conformity to current fashions, they 
would flock to it. And, it seems, they 
were right. Currently, shaving is a 
multi-billion dollar industry that is ~ 
overwhelmingly supported and per- 
petuated by our society. 

There are many ways in which this 
social and cultural reinforcement of 
female shaving is carried out. Try to 
think of the last female actress, singer 
or television personality you saw with 
hairy legs or underarms. I can count 
such women on one hand. One of 
them is Julia Roberts, who showed 
up to the premiere of "Notting Hill" 
in a sleeveless dress, sporting 
unshaven underarms. This event was 
covered extensively in the media, 
with pundits and fashion critics dis- 
cussing the crowd's reaction and 
debating why Robert's hadn't shaved. 
Media hysteria of this type - in fact, 
any type of media coverage at all - 
sends the message to women that it is 
scandalous, astonishing, bizarre for 
us not to shave. 

In fact, when attempting to do 
research on unshaven women for this 
column, the only Web sites I could 
find were porno sites that classify 
hairy women a freaky fetish, along- 
side other supposed curiosities like 
"shemales" and naked pregnant 
women. ;• ^ ; ■< 

Usually, the basis upon which most 
people argue that unshaven women 
deserve this freak status is that men 
and women are difTerent and should 
therefore dress, act and appear differ- 
ently. Obviously, men and women are 
biologically different, but hairiness is 
not one of those differences. All 
women, having passed the age of 
puberty, naturally have hair in all the 
same places as men. (The one and 
only difference is that, usually, men 
have thicker and darker hair in those 

See SEYMOUR, page 14 



h ^'/^ 




Column misplaces blame for 'War 



LEGALIZATION: Criminalization 
of lower classes brought on by 
prohibition, tough regulations 

By Peter Gitroux 

After reading the article, "Legalization will 
not stop problems addiction cause" by Andy 
Jones (Viewpoint, June 8, 2000), I just had to 
respond. 

First of all, Jones starts out correctly when he 
says that the change in the Drug War has been 
influenced by President Clinton, who has created 
so many new prisoners for the prison system that 
the United States now has more prisoners per 
capita than any other country The worid is now 
in a state of war against the people who use 
"Drugs". 

Since the temperance movement of the I9th 
century there have been people fighting to limit 
which drugs people consume, how they are con- 
sumed, or for what reasons they are consumed. 
What it comes down to, though, is that people 
are just afraid of things that are different from 
themselves or their "norms." It is more a ques- 
tion of intolerance for others than anything else. 

G itf ouit it 9 w tide nt o f Quebec Ca n ada . 



Jones goes on to simply say "Don't use drugs. 
Yes, it's as simple as that! The Man won't have 
any cause to lock you up." Sure, at the same time 
don't drink coffee, eat sugar, chocolate, Viagra 
and all other drugs that provide relief in some 
way Even aspirin is a drug. Even food and water 
would meet the requirements of drugs, and eat- 
ing and drinking as addictions. Think about it. 

The column continues, 

"Ifa community feels it is 

being targeted by drug laws, 
the one sure way to avoid 
being mistreated by our 
'unjust' criminal system is 
to obey the law." Maybe 
Jones once again looks too 
simplistically at what the 
legalizers are doing. They 
are trying to repair the 
social fabric that has been 
torn by this 



It is prohibition that is 

killing communities 

and separating people, 

creating paranoia 

and snitches. 



jWar: 

They are trying to stop the 
prison industry from housing our family mem- 
bers for using 4 plant. They are trying to divert 
money from prisons to education and hospitals. 
When Jones goes on to say that "Tough-on- 
crime laws would no longer be a problem if • , 
minority communities chose to avoid drugs and 
the violence that comes with them," he implies 
inugh-nn-cf ime laws would no longer be a prob- 



lem if these communities just gave up their rights. 
The violence associated with this crime comes 
with the loss of the right of equal justice. "But 
that's a difficult idea for activists, because it 
requires thinking of people as independent 
befrtgs, capable of avoiding what a higher power 
has deemed illegal," Jones writes. Unfortunately, 
his thinking of an independent being is different 
than mine if he thinks that 
^,«.,_^._ government is our higher 
power. 

"There is an especially 
damaging counterpoint to 
this simplification: many 
people who are in prison 
for drug offenses are in fact 
innocent. The police cor- 
ruption which leads to such 
undeserved imprisonment 
__ is the real 'war on our peo- 

ple,'" Jones says. However, 
it is not that we are inno- 
cent ofdrug charges, but the fact that we haven't 
committed any crime. Many of them are there 
for no more than possession or being an activist. 

Though the violence related to drugs is cer- 
tainly sad, it would be better if legal disputes 
could be handled in a court rather than the street. 
Prohibition, not legalization, is the cause for the 
corruption. Ihc market wi ll a l ways be tlicie, 



there will always be a buyer and a seller, just like 
any other business in the worid. 

It is prohibition that is killing communities 
and separating people, creating paranoia and 
snitches. That must surely be the way to create a 
trusting, whole community. There are people 
serving longer sentences in prisons for drug 
crimes than other serve for murder, robbery, 
rape or many other crimes. Soon we will have to 
pay the consequences of letting our government 
take away our rights to be free, independent 
^beings that are trying to group into a society. 

Tobacco kills 400,000 people each and every 
year, but deaths from Cannabis are far fewer. 
Jones is probably correct about it decreasing 
your quality of life -just knowing that 20 armed 
SWAT team members can come into your home 
at any time to harass you can do that. 

The drug problem is not as simple as Jones' 
column. Telling families that they should lock up- 
their kids for their own good is also not the 
answer. We are moving into a new millennium 
and it is time to end the harm that is prohibition 
and work on creating a society for everyone. 
There are no new frontiers any more, so now it is 
time to learn tolerance of our fellow humans and 
all their foibles too. We can offer help if they will 
take it. but forcing it is against our rights as inde- 
pendent human beings. We need to work togeth- 
cr in order 10 create a new soclwy for everyone. — 




Megan 
Roush 



As 
UCLA, I find myself experi- 
encing what I'd like to call a 
„ipid-college identity crisis. Although I 
.4 was born and raised in Northern 
C alifornia, I have been living in 
»^^*Westwood for two years during 
which my attitude, my dress, my 
s peech, and 
even my hair 
have undergone 
a metamorpho- 
sis. 
^*'~ The changes 
have been such 
that I find it dif- 
ficult to solely 
identify myself 
as someone 
from "NorCal." 
I still have a 

fondness (or as ^^ 

my Southern 

Californian friends would say, a nos- 
talgia that borders on romanticism) 
for my native region, and it is strong 
enough for me to wince at the idea of 
completely abdicating my NorCal 
identity. 

This predicament has been partic- 
ulariy glaring during the past few 
weeks since I am writing from my 7 
home base in the East Bay Area. 
Recently I find that even in my most 
familiar surroundings, I feel some- 
what like an outsider as I struggle to 
understand the behavior of individu- 
als and of a culture that I used to 
know very well. 

1 feel I've lost the qualities that 
were once innate just by living in the 
Bay Area, such as the ability to relax 
and appreciate the sedate settings. 
Being a stereotypical laid back 
NorCal giri doesn't come as easily 
for me as it used to. For example, my 
driving, which teamed with calmness 
and patience when I still lived in 
Northern California, has taken on 
the stereotypical characteristics of 
aggressive Los Angeles driving. 
Being accustomed to the indifference 
of strangers in Los Angeles, I am 
(pleasantly) surprised to encounter a 
friendly stranger at home, 

I can no longer tap into NorCal 
culture without analyzing the hell out 
of it. The relaxed, friendly social cul- 
ture that I used to take for granted 
now seems strange to me. 

If I had to cite one main reason 
that Northern California differs from 
Southern California, it would be that 
Southern California culture is very 
much based on "keeping up with the 
Jones," that is, paying attention to 



what others have and do and striving 
to obtain and do the same. L.A. cul- 
ture is based on looking, observing 
and copying others. 

While 1 don't want to completely 
bash L.A. culture, I find that people 
-from Northern California as a whole 
tend to be less concerned about what 
others are doing, unless they work in 
Silicon Valley, where survival 
depends on staying ahead of com- 
^titors. People in L.A. seem to be 
concerned with maintaining a social 
hierarchy, which seems to be sup- 
ported by the conventions of intense 
social observation and consciousness 
as well as visual wealth found in 
Southern California. 

In Los Angeles, it is particularly 
important to display wealth through 
visual symbols since many individu- 
als define success and social status by 
what they have. The wealth that I 
have witnessed in the UCLA com- 
munity may be influenced by the 
proximity of Hollywood, Bel Air and 
Beveriy Hills to our campus, even 
though symbols of wealth appear to 
be a unifying characteristic of most 
of Southern California. 



Southern Californians 

have an obvious 

disdain for Northern 

California lifestyle. 



deny these conventions exist; these 
kinds of hyper social consciousness 
are so internalized they're thought to 
be normal 

My mother, for example, always 
remarks how she forgets she's still in 
California when she visits LA., since- 
everything is so foreign to her. Her 
observation signifies that the 



Southern California lifestyle is not 
necessarily "normal," as its natives 
would like to think. It is just one way 
of life that has developed in response 
to extreme economic competition, 
the images of Hollywood, and even — 
SbCal weather. 

The French philosopher 
Montaigne wrote an essay on canni- 
bals that tries to demonstrate why no 
culture can adequately judge another 
or say that one is "better" than 
another. What we can conclude from 
Montaigne's essay is that certain 
social conventions that work in one 
culture don't necessarily work in oth- 
ers. The same ideas apply I believe, 
when looking at Northern and 
Southern California cultures. 



Speaks Out 



If you could change UCLA in any way, what would you do? 



Andrea Chung 
Fourth-year ^ 
Psychology 



Dana KnickeriMKker 

Fourth-year 

Sociology 




"The^nly 
thing I 
would sug- 
gest chang- 
ing is plac- 
ing more 
emphasis in 
recognizing 
students that 
come back 
to school after leaving for awhile. 
There doesn't seem tjp be any pro- 
gram to suppori working adults 
conning back to school." 




"ifr - 

could 

change one 
thing it ^~ 
would be the 
availability 
of classes. 
I'm in the 
honors pro- 
gram but I 




still don't get all the classes t 



want. They need to hire more 
instructors or schedule more 
classes."' 



.;S^:::^^ 



Roush is a third-year American literature 
and culture and French student who 
loves to hear from readers. E-mail her at 
meegan@ucla.edu. 



By living in L.A., I have picked up 
the habit of observing others' images 
and paying close attention to the 
image I project in return. While 
materialism is not unique to Los 
Angeles, Northern California lacks 
the Southern California habits of 
such close observation. During the 
past two years, my consciousness of 
images has been dramatically 
heightened. 

Having the extreme consciousness 
of social situations and symbols that 
comes from living in L.A., and trying 
to use that consciousness in 
Northern California, where it's com- 
pletely inapplicable has become a 
problem. My NorCal friends don't 
even know what I'm talking about 
when I bring up the idea of height- 
ened social consciousness. They tell 
me to quit analyzing everything j)eo- 
ple do and just "kick back." 

One adjustment I had to make 
when I cafne to UCLA was learning 
the social codes of Southern 
California - and believe me, they do 
exist. I didn't understand why I had 
to dress up to go into Westwood at 
night, or why people didn't freely 
associate with one another in social 
situations. Slowly I began to under- 
stand these conventions and why 
they exist. What's funny is that some 
Southern Californians will blatantly 



Southern Californians have an 
obvious disdain for Northern 
California lifestyle. I know this 
because I have experienced it first 
hand. Somehow because NorCal 
lacks the glitz of SoCal its residence 
are judged as hippies or stuck in the 
past. The stereotypes are hard to 
fight off: :: V K : , , v: - ., 

I've heard countless individuals at 
UCLA try to convince me that they 
can "tell" who is from NorCal based 
on their clothes. Some people still try 
to persuade me how rainy and cold 
the weather is in NorCal when I 
know that it's been more than 90 
freakin' degrees everyday since I 
came home for summer. 

NorCal residents also have a dis- 
dain for SoCal life, preferring the 
relaxation and simplicity of the Bay 
to the smog and traffic of the Basin. I 
have also experienced this kind of 
disdain first hand; you wouldn't 
believe the hell I catch for coming 
home with a suntan, blonde high- 
lights in my hair, and using the word 
"dope" instead of the traditional 
"helld." Some of my friends' criti- 
cism, which reflects the changes they 
see in me, implies that I have "sold 
out" to the Southern Californian , 
conventions. God forbid I should 
forget to take off my sunglasses when 
I come indoors, or I might lose all my 
friends from the Bay Area. 

I think it's important to analyze 
why I've changed since coming to the 
Los Angeles area. Maybe it's a sur- 
vival tactic. After all, L.A. is proba- 
bly one »f the laffeest supporters of 
Social Darwinism. Simply put, in 
L.A. you eat or you get eaten. In 
order to be taken seriously (at least 
socially), I have to alter my appear- 
ance and attitude. I suppose 1 have 
some shame in doing so. but unfortu- 



AndrewWu -^- , ■ ;" ;r:^_ ■_ 

Fourth-year 

Computer science and engineering 

"Add 
more aes- 
thetic stuff 
such as flow- 
ers ... that 
would make 
the campus 
a little bet- 
ter. I think 
the buildings 
in South Campus are not as nice 
as those of North Campus. South 
Campus is not as exciting, it's 
more bland." 




Marissa Miyazaki 

Third-year 
Neuroscience 



"I would 
say eliminate 
the lack of 
campus 
unity It's 
such a huge 
campus and 
there's no 
center. 
' There is a 

wide array of student groups; we 
should constantly encourage stu- 
dent groups to f<^rm ... people 
should get involved with things." 




Thomas Murray 

Third-year 

Electrical engineering . •■ ■ " . 

"I would 
improve the 
food. 

There's only 
really one 
place to go 
that has 
good food 
and that's 
Ackerman. 
Everyone pretty much has the 
same thing, it gets kind of dull; 
you just want to go off campus." 




Robert Battles 

Fourth-year ";;• ":.. ^.-:' ':: V,.- 

African Anrjerlcan studies - 

"I would 
change how 
much money 
the school 
makes from 
the students 
and how 
much they 
don't really 
take respon- 
sibility for the money they're 
making. We in turn have to pay a 
lot more for our education in 
regards to parking fees, housing 
fees and enhancemeru fees for 
classes that have Web sites that 
you hardly ever use or can't use." 




SeeR0USN,page15 



Compiled by Cuauhtemoc Ortega/Dally Bruin Senior StafTPhotos by Keith 
Enriquez/Oaily Bruin Senior Staff. 



What do y ou think? 

For the first time in over 70 years, Mexico has elected a president from a 
party other than the PRI. How do you think this will affect the nation? 
: ;\- ■'■;■ ^ S end s ubmissions in to viewpo int@media.ucla.edu :: 



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DINER & PRESS CLUB 
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I 




SEYMOUR 

From page 12 

places.) 

But while the overwhelming 
majority of men leave their legs and 
underarms in this natural state, 
women shave, laser or burn this hair 
ofT. Women that do not do so are 
then called unfeminine. or told that it 
looks "weird " or "manly." Well. 



guess what? I'm a woman - by 
nature. I have two X chromosomesr 



breasts and hips - and, by nature, I 
have hajr on my legs and under my 
arras. What could be more feminine 
than that? 

Don't get me wrong, I don't think 

that altering your appearance or 

wearing traditionally feminine 
clothes is inherently self-hating or ' 
conformist. lalact, I myself wear 
makeup almost every day, own 1 1 



dresses and three skirts, and, gasp, 
pluck my eyebrows. Those are my r '• 
choices. Not shaving is also a choice. 

Deep down, what 1 really want is 
not for all women immediately to 
throw down their razors or bottles of 
Nair (although my heart leaps at the 
thought), or for women never to 
change their bodies or appearances 
in any way. Simply, I would like 
women's choices about their bodies 
and their natural attributes to receive 
respect and support. 

Not shaving (for women) is not a 
choice that is respected or supported, 
and this has always been readily obvi- 
ous to me. On day^ that I don't wear 
makeup, I am never asked why I am 
not. On days that I don't wear a 
dress, I am never asked why I am 
not. When I skip plucking my eye- 
brows, I do not have people offer to 
show me how, because they asstfme I 
don't know. And when I do not put 
on my jewelry, my parents do not tell 
me that I am not allowed to leave the 
house until I do. All of these things 
have happened to me when it comes 
to shaving. 



I wonder if a single one 

of these wohrien tells 

her boyfriend how 

disgusting she thinks 

his hairy legs are. 



My choice not to do so has always 
been questioned? criticized, and 
ridiculed. Even some feminists speak 
of not shaving disparagingly, such as 
when they criticize the "outdated" 
image of feminists as bra-burning, 
hairy-legged, angry women. It's 
funny that people consider a natural 
aspect of women's bodies a passe 
trend. 

I might sound bitter or like an iso- 
lationist, but I feel strongly about this 
subject because I see the significant 
implications it has for women's lives. 
I want women to feel they can make 
choices about their bodies and their 
lives based on reasons other than 
what they are pressured or expected 
to do. or what fits in with the status 
quo ideals. But, unfortunately, that 
seems to be the reasoning behind 
many women's choices to shave. A 
lot of women have told me, "I don't 
think there's anything wrong with 
not shaving, but I just like to shave," 
or, "I just like the way it looks." Such 
statements seem very disingenuous 
to me, and suggest that most women 
comply with this custom without real- 
ly questioning if it really is their own 
will. 

Had shaving not been introduced, 
pushed and mainstreamed by the 
fashion and shaving industries, I 
highly doubt that the overwhelming 
majority of women would shave, as 
they do now. As if, eventually, one 
day, it would simply just have 



SEYMOUR 

From page 14 ,.; - 

occQrred to the female masses that, 
hey. we really need to waste 10 min- 
utes of our daily lives, an average of 
$ 10 a week on razors, gels, waxes, 
and/or creams, and risk cutting and 
burning our skin, just because! 
I suspect that the reason women 
_say they like how shaven legs and 
armpits look is that they've never, or 
very rarely, seen anything else. And I 
also suspect that the reason why they 
"just like it" is that their act of shav- 
ing allows them to fit comfortably 
into society's narrow definition of 
what a woman looks like. 

I have heard other women be a lot 
more blunt in regards to how they 
feel about shaving. Many have told 
me that they shave simply because 
hairy women are "disgusting" and 
"ugly." As pejorative as such opin- 
ions are, I have to say they amuse me 
the most. 

I wonder if a single one of these 
women tells her boyfriend how dis- 
gusting and ugly she thinks his hairy 
legs are, if she asks him not to wear 
sleeveless shirts because she thinks it 
is disgusting and ugly, or if she tries 
not to look at him naked because she 
finds it disgusting and ugly. I doubt 

it.; ::'.■■..■■■ 



It Still nfiakes me 

nervous when I want 

to raise nny hand in 

class in a tanktop. 



Obviously, what the United States 
and other Western countries have 
succeeded in doing is creating the 
notion within people that men's bod- 
ies are fine, acceptable and attractive 
the way they are. but that women's 
bodies are not - they require mainte- 
nance, alteration, and conformity to 
one specific standard. 

Honestly, it's sometimes very diffi- 
cult not to conform to such stan- 
dards, even if not shaving seems like 
a simple thing. After years of people 
in my high school gossiping about me 
because I didn't, of having my father 
force me to do so before he would let 
me out of the house, and having (for- 
mer) friends say they are embar- 
rassed to go out in public with me 
when my legs or underarms are visi- 
ble. I guess I've developed a small 
complex about it. 

It still makes me nervous when I 
want to do something as mundane as 
raise my hand in class when I'm 
wearing a tanktop. 

What that has taught me is that 
beauty and behavioral standards for 
women in our society are constantly 
indoctrinated and strictly enforced, 
leaving little room for us to act and 
appear as we really want. So if I can 
challenge that fact in any way. I guess 
it's worth feeling a little self-con- 
scious about my body every time 
summer rolls around. 



ROUSH 

From page 13 



nately outward appearances are sim 
ply too important lo over look in 
L.A. 

While I dont think fve sold out 
or abdicated the core of my identity. 
I think I've made the appropriate 
adjustments in lifestyle so that I 
don't get lost or taken advantage of 
in the shulTle of thousands of people, 
cars, and fashion trends. I feel I've 
found a good mix of both cultures 
that's worked best for me. I may get 
blonder during the second half of my 
college career, but I will try to heed 
the wise advice of my NorCal buds 



Se« SEYMOUR, pa9« 15 



tojust "kick back." 



OattyBnrin Viewpoint 



Monday, July 10, 2000-Ffktoy, July 14, 2000 15 






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The doctor is in '■" - ■ ' - -' 
The Pasadena Playhouse comes talife 
with its latest production of "The Good 
Doctor." Check out A&E next week for 
all the info on this new play. 

Monday, July 10, 2000-Friday, July 14, 2000 





ENTERTAINMENT 




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See all this and more at 
the Daily Bruin's 
cool Web site: 
www.dailybruin.ucla.edu 

- Monday, July 10, 2000-Friday, July 14, 2000 



cSS-V" 



(Right) Summer concertgoers 
enjoy a jazz trio performance 
at the Garden Courtyard of 
"^ the UCLA Armand Hammer 
Museum, Every Friday evening 
of July will feature an intro- 
spective performance at the 
museum. (Below) Jazz pianist 
Alan Pasqua plays for the 
Westwood crowd. (Opposite 
page) Dave Carpenter pro- 
vides the bass as part 
of the jazz trio. 





The UCLA Armand 
Hammer museum features 




various jazz artists every 
Friday evening in July in 
its fifth anntud festival 

By Angela Salazar 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

The eclectic style and talents of jazz 
music are now at your fingertips. 

The fifth annual Westwood Jazz at 
the Hammer series is back with an 
impressive lineup of renowned perform- 
ers. The festival is free and perfor- 
mances are at 6:30 p.m. every Friday in 
July in the courtyard of the UCLA 
Hammer Museum. 

"We always have a really impressive 
selection of jazz artists from around the 
country and around the world," said 
Jennifer Barry, a spokeswoman for the 
Westwood Business Improvement 
District (BID), who is part of the mar- 
keting committee for the festival. This 
year's artists cover everything from clas- 
sic jazz to blues-style jazz to 
Brazilian/Latin jazz. 

Last Friday's concert featured the tal- 
ents of the Peter Erskine, Alan Pasqua 
and Dave Carpenter Trio. 

"They're a very modern, hip, pro- 
gressive, traditional jazz trio. They have 
sort of the young contemporary side to 
appeal to that type of jazz following," 
said Todd Later, a member of the mar- 
keting committee for the Westwood 
BID that developed the concept for the 
series. 



This Friday, legendary clarinet and 
saxophone player Teddy Edwards, wiH 
' perform. 

"I have a group of wonderful musi- 
cians. I have Art Hillery playing piano, 
and I have Wendall Williams playing 
bass and Gerryck King playing the 
drums and lastly I'm going to play the 
tenor saxophone," Edwards said in a 
recent interview. "We have in mind to 
do a very wonderful evening of music 
and hope we have plenty of people from 
Westwood and from UCLA and many 
other parts to come out and ))ear us 
play." -.•^-■c-. .■.-^'...v.y^-^'^-.^- 
Edwards and his accompanying 
artists will perform a variety of jazz 
music styles. 

"We'll play some straight-ahead 
swing, we'll play some blues and we'll 
play some ballads and we'll play some 
Latin music because we do a variety of 
things and we hope to satisfy most of the 
people that might attend." Edwards 
said. 

Since he began performing in 1936, 
Edwards has done several recordings 
and worked with many well-known 
artists. 

"I've recorded with so many people, 
from Ray Charles to Benny Goodman 
to Sarah Vaughn to Gerald Wilson to 
Benny Carter. The list goes on and on, 
plus doing my own thing," Edwards 
said. 

"This is my 64th year of playing pro- 
fessionally and I'm not a has-been either^ 
I have plenty of energy and I have plen- 
ty left to play," he said. 

On July 21 Mayuto and Samba Pack 
will perform Latin-style jazz. Mayuto is 



often noted as one of the world's best 
conga players. 

"They are a sort of Latin/Brazilian 
pop and R&B sound with a real Latin 
element," Later said. 

Finally, on July 28, Barbara 
Morrison will perform. Morrison's 25- 
year career in jazz includes recording in 
genres ranging from blues to gospel to 
pop. She is fiimous for her ability to per- 
form soul-stirring blues vocals. 

In addition to the music, local restau- 
rants are presenting a selection of com- 
plimentary hors d'oeuvres before each 
concert. This year's restaurants include 
Palomino, Tengu, Maui Beach Cafe and 
Westwood Brewing Company. 

"It's sort ofa community gesture and 
a sampling of what the local restaurants 
have to offer." Barry said. During the 
concert, for the warm summer evenings. 
Black Tie Catering provides a bar where 
drinks can be purchased. 

The museum also stays open an hour 
later than the usual closing time of 7 
p.m. with tree entrance for visitors that 
evening. 

According to Later, the concert usu- 
ally attracts between 800 and 1,000 peo- 
ple. 

"What we've tried to create here is 
not only a great venue for listening to 
jazz but also a nice location for happy- 
hour networking," Later said. 

' The concept for the series began sev- 
eral years ag^>. 

"(In) the niid-'90s efforts were made 

on behalf ot the merchants in Westwood 
in conjunction with the office building 

S«e JAZZ, page 20 



Getty displays photos of moments in city's past 




ART: Giving an eye-to-eye 
view of life on the streets of 
Paris, Atget depicts realism 



By Megan Dickerson 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 



A'greait contrast is made in three pho- 
tographs, placed relatively close to one 
anothet m the Getty exhibit. 

One leatures the Au B^be Bon Marchc, 
a toy slore, which offers a dazzling array 



For the photographer Eugine Atget. 
Paris was a living organism. 
The groundbreaking photographer 



remains the star of the show 

Atget's Paris is not the Paris of sly bur- 
lesque and berets. On the contrary, Atget's 
_ . Paris is gritty and real, much like the 

knew that Paris, like any other municipali- American cities Walker Evans later por- 
ty at the turn of the 19lh century, lived and trayed during the Great Depression. After 
breathed a dichotomy of existence; bounti- all. Atget came from hearty but artistic 
ful storefronts bordered the carts of lonely roots - an actor and a seaman, he stayed in 
ragpickers, while children's dolls sold at a touch with the people. He became known 
premium. for combing the streets of Paris, unwieldy 

At a new exhibit at the J. Paul Getty camera in tow, and became a tolerated fix- 
Musetim^, Atget's photos show the careful- tureofthe city scene, 
ly decorated homes of the poor, as well as Before there was a "Man with a Movie 
the daunting expanses of the city's tall Camera," there was a man with two bags 
buildings. of heavy plate glass and 



. - % - 
Atget's contemporaries) makes a legend surrealism of daily life? ' 

out ofa man who, though largely unrecog- Atget's street-walking produced an 

nized during his lifetime, laid the ground- everyman's view of an exciting Paris. He 

work for photographers such as Man Ray brings 21 st century viewers into a fleeting 

and Walker Evans. moment, whether it be the ghost of a man „ .^^ ...v.. v/..^.^ a ua^...^ axxa^ 

But, despite the show's labeled accent entering a store with a wheelbarrow, or a of adoptable dolls, arms outstretched to 

on Atget's biography and technique, in the little girl standing by a staircase. Nearly all passcrsby. Another photograph shows a 

end it is Paris - the city Atget loved - that his photographs are from street level, as if prostitute leaning in a store doorway, her 

we, the viewers, are the ragpickers he pho- skirt dangerously high for the time, 
tographs wandering through the narrow Finafly. a third, cleverly executed pho- 

strcets. tograpH shows a group of female man- 

Atget thus gives us the city moments we nequins in a clothing store, with the win- 
all take for granted. His work reminds dow rejecting trees from across the street, 
viewers that every city has a unique heart- Together, they convey a quiet critique 
beat, something incredibly relevant and 
often taken for granted in a place like Los 
Angeles. 

It also inspires thoughts of contempo- 
rary counterparts. How would Atget see, 
for instance, a place like a Southern 
California shopping mall? ~^ ^ ~ 
Sometimes Atget's work seems to show 
only the shells of human existence, with 



. . _ an awkward ...^ _. >,..„.>..^^, „.... 

Storefront windows cast longing photo camera. The results ofhis labors are storefronts outnumbering people. Here is 



Courtesy o( J Paul Getty Museum 

Eugene Atget's "Store Window, avenue des 



Gobelins' (19-^5, mane albumen) is on view from of a legendary city 

June 20 to October 8 at the Getty. - .,. t ' The exhibit (and a concurrent display of 



glances at a world galvanized and degrad- quietly stunning 
ed by new technology Atget took the chance to capture Paris 

"The Man in the Street: Eugene Atget from the casual stroller's viewpoint, much 

in Paris" explores the lively world of Atget. like his Impressionist counterparts. Some 

emphasizing his ability to capture not just historians insist on labeling Atget a surre- 

a moment in time but also the movements alist, though his work bears the mark of a 



of everj/thing a culture sells, from inani- 
mate cl*ils lo living women. 

Yet Atget's work still keeps the emo- 
tional ^stance of a true documentarian. 
He enlbrccs no overt message upon his 
viewerl making the comparisons, con- 
trasts, i>nd .liometime-'iievelations pro- 
duced I y his work personal to the viewer. 
Atgci li Jnds us raw material, and we pro- 
vide tlif connections. Af^er all, isn't that 



W I I — -.w. . ...v* MIS, •%t% 

where Atget again treats Paris as a living what a ity itself is supposed to do? 



organism, with storefronts acting as the 
city's eyes, staring at passersby with vis- 
ages either vacant or bountiful. 

Moreover, the storefront windows 
reflect the people of a city both literally 



Like a real-life sparring partner, a liv- 
ing, bnathing city challenges its inhabi 
tanls It translate its streets to metaphor. 
allovMii ! them to leave the city boundaries 
with nt- V ideas 




To av oid concert injuries. 



Photos by KEITH ENWOUEZ/Oaily B»utn Seniof Staff 



use some common sense 



MUSIC: M OShing etiquette ^^" *^a'^s. if you stop in the middle of 
,1 - L 1 .1 a mosh pit you're going down where 

usually gets pushed aside death is. 

by need, drive of violence ^°^f *^y°"'''! '^^"^" ^"^ ^^"'^ s^^ 

up, make sure to draw some attention 
and raise your hand. There are a few 
good men out there who will help you 
up and if you happen to knock some- 
one down, help them up. Usually 
what goes around comes around. 

Rule No. 3: Check out the crowd 
before jumping in. Moshing tech- 
niques vary from place to place. 

Rule No. 4: Blend in. If someone is 
going frantic by himself in the middle 
of the pit, stay away. 

Plus, avoid striking musclemen 
because you're going to regret it 
when they hit you back. Keep your 
eyes on the little guys too. They have 
something to prove and they're 
angry. 

Rule No. 5: Discard anything 
loose from yourself. Beware of ear- 
rings, necklaces, long hair and cloth- 
ing getting yanked off. 

Rule No. 6: Open your eyes before 
you jump. Too many kids go soaring 



ByJudyPak 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

They're liquored up, their testos- 
terone is flowing, and they want to 
inflict pain. Masses of teenage and 
20-something-year-old guys flail their 
arms, slam into 
one another and 
pass each other 
around over- 
head. rV 

It might be 
just mindless 
fun and games, 
but when some- 
one's life is in 
danger, it's not 
fun anymore. 

Just two 
weeks ago, at 
least eight 




young fans slipped or fell in front of in the air only to end up on their 
the stage and were trampled to death backs, sweeping the slippery floor. ^ 
during a Pearl Jam concert at the 
annual Roskilde Festival in 
Denmark. 

Less than four days later, a 21- 
year-old fan fell 80 feet to his death 
during the Fourth of July perfor- 
mance of the Summer Sanitarium 
festival in Baltimore. 

It doesn't make any sense why it's 



Rule No. 7: Keep your body loose. 

I once lear^ned that when you're 

Whitewater rafting and you faH off, 

don't stiffen up and resist unless you 

want to be inserted into the rocks. 

Keep your body loose and flowing 

and you will just glide over the rocks. 

I digress. Anyhow, some might 

choose to drink a lot of beer and/or 

so easy to imagine such a terrible see- smoke a lot of weed before joining a 

nario at a place of musical festivity. mosh pit. But please remember that 

This barbaric, voluntary activity is not everyone is looking for a physi- 

called moshing and it has become cally brutal kind of good time. 



>«^ 7 




increasingly pop- 
ular at live 
music, rock and 
rap concerts 
everywhere. 

This form of 
energy release 
has been going 
on for a couple 
of decades. In its 
infancy in the 
early to mid- 
1980s, moshing 
was known most- 
ly as slam danc- 

ing in New York 

and West Coast punk music clubs. 

But it was probably the Nirvana 
video, "Smells Like Teen Spirit," 
which introduced moshing to an 
extensive, mainstream youth audi- 



Now I don't profess 

to beany sort of a 

moshing expert, but 

at least I do know the 

difference between 

moshing and street 

fighting. 



Many times 
I've found 

myself discon- 
tent, annoyed, 
flustered (the 
list can go on) 
from the lack of 
miO s h i n g 
etiquette. 

The source of 
my frustration 
begins from the 
parties and con- 
certs where 

__ there is always 

plenty of music 

and alcohol. When the music starts 

playing, I'll start grooving and hav- 

ing^a good time. 

After a while, a fast song by a punk 

rock band will start playing, and soon 



ence. Not to say that massive mosh- enough, a little pit will form and the 



ing began at this moment of Nirvana 
in 1991, but this may be the point in 
history that moshing became so well 
publicized that there was no turning 
back. • 

The mosh pit concept proves once 
again that young suburbanites are the 



moshing begins. They'll run around, 
banging into each other and knock- 
ing each other down. 

I'll smile at them and after the 
song is over, I'll start passively danc- 
ing again. Unfortunately, some peo- 
ple in the pit will continue to mosh- 



silliest people on the planet. Injuries without any regard to the tempo or 

are like little badges of honor and a type of song playing and the people 

sign that they've had the experience. around. 

Uncontrolled moshing might be Now, normally I'd say, "Hey, it's 

fun and some might even consider it just good fun, let them dance." But 

an art of dance. But the potential for when these same people are ramming 

injuries are so great that the risks are into me while a song by the 

often not worth taking. Cranberries is playing, I am forced to 

Therefore, concertgoers should reconsider, 
keep in mind some essential moshing My good nature quickly turns sour 

survival tips that will keep them out when a cup full of beer is poured on 



Courtesy 0< i Paul (jetty Muieum 



Eugene Atget's (1857-1927) albumen print titled "Staircase, Montmartre' 



of the emergency room. Here are 
seven golden rules. 

Rule No. I: Go with the flow. You 
don't want to be the guppy swimming 
against the big fishes. 

Rule No. 2: Don't make any sud- 



me because some drunk dork is 
swinging his hands to a rock ballad. 

It would be one thing if these peo- 
ple knew how to mosh, but all they do 



r'-^ 



realistic documentarian. But what better 
tool than the camera lo show the skewed 



and figuratively What wares we choose lo 
highlight says something about our values. 



(1 924). This is Of)e of many Atget photos on display at the J. Paul Getty 

Set AVKT, paft 19 Museum from June 20 to October 8. 



*•• ^^^B^f pi^v I" 




18 Monday, July 10, 2000-Friday, July 14, 2000 



Daily Bfuin Arts & Entertainment 



"^mmmm^^si^ 



^toc*^^y 'j3|s/T^'2i 



r^O'-irnik / <* 






www.sputnik7.com 



Sputnik 7 
www.sputrfflky.corrr 



Sputnik7.com, an entertainment-based Web 
site, has so much to offer that one can easily b^ 
lost within the site, constantly discovering new 
and more interesting links to check out. 

With an opening page featuring some , 

sperm who are supposedly "too slow" at 
attempting to fertilize an egg, sputnik7.com is 
quite an eye-catcher. 

This site has a theme that screams the 
underdog status of the Internet - providing a 
medium to distribute independent, under- 
ground and less mainstream content. It is 
noted as the world's first real-time audio/video 
online entertainment provider. 

Visitors can basically find anything dealing 
with the entertainment industry on this site. 
Independent film and music programming is 
available through the presentation of various 



shorts and films, and through tfie sponsoring 
of playlist-free Web radio stations. 

Everything is presented on the site as vari- 
ous "stations." of which there are many, each 
with its own unique theme. Upon entering 
■'Video Stations," viewers are presented with 
four additional "stations" to look at. 

One exanhple is "Alt/Electronic," which 
hosts indie-type music ranging from California 
ska to heavy metal. There is also a Film/Anime 
4ink which offers showings of award-winning 
shorts as well as anime features. 

More than 50 short films will be available 
this summer on sputnik7.com. Recently pre- 
miered is "Horned Gramma," a short which 
was an official selection at the 2000 Spike & 
Mike Festival of Animation and the 1998 
Chicago Underground Film Festival. 

With accredited chairman Chris Blackwell, 
founder of Island Records and Palm Pictures, 
it's no wonder that sputnik7.com has encoun- 
tered much success. In December 1999, the 
Web site was one of the first to win an ASCAP 
(The American Society of Composers, 
Authors and Publishers) Deems Taylor Award 
for outstanding music-related content and cre- 
ative excellence. Especially notable was the 
fact that this was the first year that the ASCAP 
offered awards to Internet organizations. 

Sputnik7.com has a lot to offer. Ranging 
from videos to music, basically anything deal- 



ing with the entertainment media, this site isn't 
trying to sell viewers anything but a good time. 



Barbara McGuire 
Rating: 8 



Ato mic Livi 



ing, underground music from across the globe 
is one such provider. .■...■■'..., 

Other content providers whose uniqueness 
help bring much-needed definition to the site 
are womengamers.com, a site dedicated to 
electronic gaming lovers, and sonicnet.com, a 
-division of the MTV interactive branch that 



www.atomicliving.com 

With plenty of Web sites out there geared 
toward the 18-24 demographic ol' college stu- 
dents, sometimes it can be hard to differenti- 
ate between what isrworth looking at and what 
isn't. 

Even though atomicliving.com boasts the 
same features as many college-based Web 
sites, they are not focused solely on merchant 
dising but have also recently launched a con- 
tent portion to their site. This area will feature 
entertaining stories written by content 
providers as well as online viewers themselves. 

Additionally, atomicliving.com offers more 
than just fashionable clothing items for trendy 
online shoppers. Also oflered for sale on the 
site are electronics and housewares, basically ^ 
anything anyone moving out of their parent's 
house for the first time may need. . 

The content providers of the site promise 
further interesting discourse as well on the 
site. Spikeradio.com, a 24-hour Internet radio 
"station" which focuses on new, up-and-com- 



offers many entertainment links and informa- 
tion. . 

Atomicliving.com also features something 
for the adrenaline rushing side of college stu- 
dents and young adults. Centerseat.com, also 
a content provider, provides online viewers 
with a look at various pop cultural elements 
such as extreme sports and top-of-the-Iine ani- 
mation. 

One of the more notable aspects of the 
atomicliving.com site is its user-friendliness. " 
Designed most definitely after its name, the 
site and its links are set up like an atomic 
chart. Rm stands for room on their site and Te 
represents tech (as in technology), making 

~~ $eeNnSCAPES,page20 




X>YCECHON/D««(y Bruin 



BOOK REVIEW 




, ■ * " ■ * 

Star Trek actor's novel expands on fictional universe 



Title: A Stitdi in fime 
Author Andrew Robinson 
Publishen Pocket Books 
Price: $6.50 Pages: 393 

JACOB LIAO/Daily Bruiri 



BOOK: In Asimov style, 
Andrew Robinson gives 
touch of reality to sci-fi 



By Howard Ho 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

Before Isaac Asimov, the science 
fiction genre was similar to the horror 
genre, providing a chilling vision of 
something that might exist. After 
Asimov, however, science fiction writ- 
ers became more like historians, docu- 



menting a future consistent with itself 
Asimov's own history of the future 
spanned from 1-996, a time that he pre- 
dicted would see the invention of 
human-like robots, to tens of millennia 
later when the Galactic Empire would 
come under the power of the 
Foundation. 

Perhaps the only other future histo- 
ry more daunting than Asimov's is 
Gene Roddenberry's. Star Trek has 
created a universe so complete that 
Klingon is considered a real language. 
In this tradition comes Andrew 
Robinson's "A Stitch in Time," a novel 



about Elim Garak's coming-of-age. 
Robinson, who played Garak on the 
TV series "'Star Trek: Deep Space 
Nine," provides insight into alien cul- 
ture and helps further clarify the minu- 
tiae that define the Star Trek universe. 
Garak is known to most casual Star 
Trek fans as the tailor on DS9. But as 
later episodes reveal, Garak was an 
instrumental figure in the Obsidian 
Order, the Cardassian version of the 
CIA. Garak, exiled on DS9, returns to 
a fallen Cardassia where he constructs 
a memoir for Dr. Julian Bashir, an 
esteemed cohort from DS9. 



"A Stitch in Time" is Garak's story, 
told in three converging narratives. 
The first is the present Garak, trying to 
make sense of the ruins of Cardassia. 
The second is the Garak prior to 
Cardassia's liberation from the 
Dominion. The third, and most com- 
pelling, is the young Garak, trying to 
make his mark in society. 

As expected, Robinson lays out 
many details of Cardassian infrastruc- 
ture. Cardassia itself consists of a capi- 
tol surrounded by six "spokes" of vary- 

See ROBINSON, page 19 




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Daily Bruin Arts & Entertainment 



Monday, July 10, 2000-Friday, July 14, 2000 19 




_^ New Light in«e»l<*«nTX'nt 

Ksyan and Lauren Abedinl star as Sam and Sara, two children strand- 
ed on the streets of Los Angeles In the movie "Surviving Paradise." 

Tale of lost kids is relief 
from formulaic flood 



FILM: Indie movie's take 
on diversity stereotypical, 
still outdoes mainstream 



By Emilia Hwang 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

Welcome to the summer block- 
buster. This year's l)ig-budget 
Hollywood production would like to 
introduce you to a company of actors 
who appear purely for your aesthetic 
pleasure; more water than you'd need 
to float an ark; and a plot with vital sta- 
tistics that flatline. 

Thanks to your patronage, the 
untamable forces of "The Perfect 
Storm" have clearly washed out the 
competition for this summer's box 
office returns. 

Enter an independent film. Director 
Kamshad Kooshan cannot compete at 
the box office with Wolfgang 



Peterson's unbeatable equation (o^k- 
success. - ' .'■' 

Without the formulaic elements of 
big names, mind-numbing special 
effects and overly simplistic story lines, 
Kooshan's "Surviving Paradise" can- 
not draw large audiences in its first 
weeks in limited release. Nevertheless, 
the independent film is a force to be 
reckoned with, offering summer audi- 
ences a refreshing break from ritualis- 
tic blockbuster brain damage. 

In the movie, Pari (Shohreh 
Agdashloo) is kidnapped from the air- 
port upon her arrival in America, and 
her two children are forced to navigate 
the streets of Los Angeles alone. Ten- 
year-old Sam (Keyan Arman Abedini) 
and his younger sister Sara (Lauren 
Parissa Abedini) encounter potentially 
dangerous characters as they attempt 
to find their only relative in town. ' 

But the gangsters, prostitutes and 

SecnUUUHSE,pa9e20 



ROBINSON 

From page 18 

ing purposes. Garak b^ns life' 
among the farmers of T^ak. the 
administrative spoke of Cardassia. 

The "Cardassian mosaic" consists 
of little social mobility, but when 
Garak gains entrance to the presti- 
gious school of Bamarren, he finds 
access to power and a future in the 
government. Bamarren's ruthless^ 
training techniques make college 
seem like a walk through the Mandara 
Valley on Tohvun III. It is here that 
Garak finds friendship, love, betrayal, 
and, most importantly, himself 

Robinson borrows much from 
popular literature. The account of 
Garak's trek through the Mekar 
Wilderness reminds one of Frank 
Herbert's brand of spiritual disci- 
pline, especially when he starts to 



learn the stealthy ways of a regnar 
lizard. The truth behind how Garak 
was able to attend Bamarren despite 
his social standing recalls Dickens' 
Pip in "Great Expectations." 
Robinson's Shakespearean plot line 
even garners irony from Garak's own 
description of Shakespeare as "politi- 
cally misguided" and not making 
much sense. 

Robijison uses these literary allu- 
sions to evoke classic themes in a new 
jetting. Indeed, the charm of the novel 
comes from its settings deep within 
Cardassia, a place that is light years 
away from Shakespeare's England. 
While much of the Star Trek universe 
is Federation-centric, Robinson deliv- 
ers a world where humans are care- 
less, good-intentioned meddlers, and 
Cardassians are the characters the 
reader must identify with. 

The conflicts between the 
Federation and Cardassia reflect 



those of our worid. While Cardassians 
are superior to humans psychological- 
ly, they have yet to learn about the 
virtues of democracy. Similarly, many 
countries today struggle to find 
democracy after centuries of dictator- 
ship. ' '.-- ''■••■': ''■■■■:■' ■••■.-• 

In the tradition of the Star Trek 
that deats with issues of today, 
Robinson challenges readers to 
understand different cultures and 
ways of thinking. Though Rojbinson's 
book is essentially a novelized version 
of a TV episode, it is not an episode of 
special elTects or outlandish romanti- 
cism, but of genuine spirit and s tri ng 
characters. 

Despite obscure references to char- 
acters and events in the TV series that 
appeals to diehard fans, "A Stitch in 
Time" proves that Star Trek is, and 
always has been, about bridging the 
gap between peoples in a universe of 
infinite possibilities. =^ - 



MOSH 

From page 17 

is push and hit each other. Now I 
don't profess to be any sort of a 
moshing expert, but at least 1 do 
know the difference between 
moshing and street fightings 

On an even higher level of 
annoyance is the whole "crowd 
surfing" phenomenon. Again, 
there's nothing wrong with a little 
floating here and there, but when 
that 380-pound big boy decides he 
wants to be passed over your 
head, you know that things have 
gone a little too far. 

The same goes for the guy with 
his studded belt, necklace, rings, 
and steel toed boots who decides 
that he's a kickboxer when his feet 
are two inches from your face. 

This is not WWF, and there is 
no championship belt to be won. 



It's about flowing to the music 
and grooving to the beat. 

If that weren't enough, there 
are always those perverts who 
decide they can fondle and grope 
any and all females who pass 
above their heads. 

To all guilty parties involved, 
here is some advice: 1) if you 
don't know how and when to 
mosh, stay out of the pit; 2) just 
because a girl is floating over your 
head doesn't mean she is coming 
on to you; and 3) remember the 
Cranberries are not hardcore. 

I'm not trying be the party ref- 
eree. Just use your common sense 
in having fun and remember what 
your kindergarten teacher taught 
you about common courtesy. 

Judy is a fourth-year English stu- 
dent and mosh pits make her feel 
old and tired. E-mail any comments 
to Judee525@aol.com. 



ATGET 

From page 16 

Atget's city, as seen through the 
Getty exhibit, does just that. With 
Atget as a guide, we see a Paris with a 
mournful soul. Grimy, dark and 
abandoned at times, Paris comes off 
as achingly beautiful. Like the old say- 
ing goes, a picture is worth a thou- 
sand words. In this case, it might be 
true. -.-'-■■■■■■- ■''■-/■'■ ■'■ 

ART: "The Man in the Street: Eugene 
Atget in Paris' runs at the Getty 
Museum through October 8. The 
museum is open Tuesday and 
Wednesday from 1 1 a.m. to 7 p.m., 
Thursday and Friday from 1 1 a.m. to 9 
p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 
1 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission is free, and 
parking reservations are unnecessary 
for college students with ID. For more 
information, call (310) 440-7300. 



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20 Monday, July 10, 2000-Friddy, July 14, 2000 



Daily Bruin Arts & Entertainment 



PARADISE 

From page 19 

transients in this movie turn out to be a 
soufce of empowerment rather than a 
fountain of vice. 

"Surviving Paradise" ofTers a refresh- 
ing view of diversity in Southern 
California. Instead of a paradise lost to 
these outsiders caught in violent negotia- 
tions. Los Angeles is a paradise where 
unity is found in celebrating diversity. 

For the Iranian American children, 
who must navigate through a rainbow of 
ethnic neighborhoods, hope and help 
come in all colors, ranging from African 
Americans to Asian Americans to 
Mexican Americans. 

Diversity is power to Kooshan. The 
Iranian-born writer, director and pro- 
ducer attempts to reconcile race rela- 
tions in a "salad mix" metaphor. 

The film offers some beautiful 
episodes of idealistic equality that bridge 
class and culture, including a homeless 
man who gives his blanket to the children 
asleep on a park bench and a gangster 
u ho gives Sam his pager number (which 
is usually reserved exclusively for "cus- 
tomers"). 

Even the bad guys aren't your typical 
\illains. They are actually incompetent 
gophers for a boss who only exists in con- 
versation. 

Since the kidnappers do not appear to 
be inspired by inherent evil, motivation 
remains ambiguous. 

The driving force behind the villain. ' 
Mr. F. is especially equivocal, as the 
short story writer-turned-hit man is left 
to ponder the effects of his present occu- 
pation. His multi-faceted character solic- 
its deeper inspection, much like the other 



disenfranchised characters of the film. . j 

Disappointingly, however, where 
"Surviving Paradise" succeeds by pre- 
senting alternative portraits of charac- 
ters often stereotyped by mainstream ' 
Hollywood, it fails to keep itself from 
falling into those same stereotypes. i 

Ethnic caricatures become the by- 
product of Kooshan's treatment of eth- 
nic diversity. The volatile subject of 
immigration explodes into one racial 
stereotype after another. 

The ow ner of the Chinese restaurant 
can only speak with an exaggerated 
accent and the Mexican drug dealer 

makes a hetoic exit iiLadrive by shoot- 

ing. The story's theme of tolerance is 
counterproductive as ethnic caricatures 
perpetrate the stereotypes they seek to 
negate. 

Furthermore, by trying to present an 
odysseN through every ethnic ghetto in 
Los Angeles, potentially eOective frag- 
ments prove abortive in a loosely con--^ 
structed story. Short-lived roles are only 
slim slices of the rich characters that ! 
could have developed 

The film exhibits good intentions of 
representing diversity in Los Angeles. ' 
But by attempting to cover too many 
groups. Kooshan only touches on the • 
complexity of race relations and the 
result is an over-simplistic microcosm. 

Though "Surviving Paradise" may 
not be the perfect summer flick, it olTers 
choice in a barrage of big-budget sum- 
mer movies. In the honorable tradition 
of independent films. Kooshan's feature 
debut offers an alternative to the larger- : 
than-life "Storm" and proves that you I 
don't need a deluge to tell a story. I 

FILM: "Surviving Paradise" is in theaters ■ 
now in limited release. 



JAZZ 

From page 16 

owners to really advance the revital- 
ization of Westwood Village." Later 
said. From there, the Westwood 
BID was established and money 
was allocated to create programs 
that would brmg renewed interest in 
Westwoocf Village. 

"One of the ideas we had was for 
a jazz series, and that was on the 
basis that we could find the right 
venue in Westwood to provide a 
jort of self-contained environment 
that could accommodate 1.000 to 
1.200 people with good sound, good 
acoustics and a good ambiance,' 
Later said. ' ^ ■"■'■■ 

"We approached the people at 
the Armand Hammer Museum 



(which is) a very successful museum 
but we wanted to give them the 
opportunity to expand their expo- 
sure." he said. 

Since then, the Westwood Jazz 
festival has developed and grown. 

"We've worked with UCLA and 
the Armand Hammer and they've 
helped us with really reducing our 
costs for the venue and putting on 
the production at the Hammer," 
Later continued. 

The primary sponsors of the fes- 
tival are Arden Realty and GTE, 
but a small portion of funds also 
come from the Westwood Village 
Community Alliance. The 
Westwood BID works with Festival 
Productions, a well-established jazz 
production company, to develop the 
lineup f6r the festival. 

"They are very effective in 



putting together, the right mix for 
our audience," Later said. 

The four concerts in this year's 
festival provide a variety of differ- 
ent jazz styles along with an enjoy- 
able ttmosphere for attendees. 
Later hopes that this combination 
will bring new people into 
Westwood as well as entice business 
people to stay after work for the 
concerts before heading home. 

"We encourage people to come 
out and start their weekend in 
Westwood," Later said. 

JAZZ: The Westwood Jazz at the 
Hammer series Is every Friday in July 
from 6:30 to 8 p.m. In the courtyard 
of the UCLA Armand Hammer 
Museum at 10899 Wilshire Blvd. The 
concerts are free to all who attend. 
For information call (310) 443-7000. 



NETSCAPES 

From page 18 . 

things easy to find. 

Planning to reach more than 15 
million young adults by the end of 
this year, atomicliving.com hopes 
to stay true to its viewers. 
Sponsoring various events such^s 
the Warped Tour and special 
advanced screenings of movies 
such as "High Fidelity" at various 
campuses, they will have no trou- 
ble. 

Barbara McGuire 
Rating:? 
Salon 
www.salon.com 



It may sound like a beauty par- 
lor, but it's nothing of the sort. 

From politics to sex, this online 
magazine has something to offer 
everyone. The comprehensive 
Web site is easy to navigate and 
full of fun and useful information. 

Clink on a link such as 
"Mothers Who Think" and find 
articles dealing with topics such as 
single parenthood, marital prob- 
lems, abortion, homosexuality and 
feminism. 

Go to the politics section to 
find provocative articles on presi- 
dential candidates, the role of reli- 
gion in politics and even the "Lie : 
of the week." There is also a politi- 
cal calender for the current month 



with important dates and informa- 
tion. ■'-';:. ' 

For lighter reading, check out 
the various comics, movie reviews 
and book reviews or go to the 
health section to get information 
on healing methods and eating 
right. 

To be an active part of 
salon.com, you can participate in 
forums or write in letters voicing 
your opinion. So whether you are 
looking to read what others have 
to say, get current news and enter- 
tainment or just say your piece, 
you can do it all at saIon.com. 



Angela Salazar 
Rating: 8 





i4irif£ {W) pain 

3TmHngs 
$9,95 - DmhreryOnly 



r^ 



^ 



Lunch specials from $3.99 • Complete dinners from $4.99 • Come in and by our new menu items • Free delivery • (310) 209-1422 



feM 



MANN 



Westwood 



VILLAGE The Perttct Stonn (PG-13) 

961 Broxton THX - Dolby Digital 

208-5576 Mon-Thu (12:20 3:40) 7:00 10:20 



BRUIN Mt, Mynll ft IreM (R) 

948 Broxton THX - Dolby Digital 

239-MANN Mon (11:00 1:45 4:30) 7:30 10:30 



NATIONAL Sliall (R) 

1 0925 Lindbrook THX - Dolby Digital 

208-4366 Mon-Thu (12:00 2:30 5:00) 7:30 10:00 



MANN 



Santa Monica 



CRrrERION 



Com In 60 Saconds (PG-13) 

THX - Dolby Digital 
Mon-Thu (1:30 4:30) 7:45 10:45 



FESTIVAL 

10887 Lindbrook 
208-4575 



MissiM: ImMStiM* 2 (PG-13) 

THX - Dolby Dtgitai 
Mon-Thu (12:45 3.45) 7 00 9.45 



REGENT CroMiir (NR) 

1045 Broxton Dolby Digital 

208-3259 Mon-Thu ( 1 2:00 2:30 5:00) 7:30 10:00 



PLAZA GMiaiw (R) 

1067 Glendon Dolby Digital 

208-3097 Mon-Thu ( 1 2:00 3:30) 7:()0 1 0:30 



CRrrERION Big Momma's House (PG-13) 

THX - Dolby Digital 
Mon- Thu (12:15 2:45 5:15) 8 00 1015 



PACIFIC 



Westwood 



LAEMMLE 



West Hollywood 



8000 SMSot (>l Cresceal HaigMs) Frae Parkia« 
(323)S4I-35M- 



SUNSET 1 Groova (R) 

Mon-Thu (1:00) 3:10 5:20 7:30 9:45 



SUNSET 2 Small fima Crooks (PG) 

Mon-Thu (1:00) 320 5 40 8:00 10:15 



SUNSET 3 H's The Raoa (R) 

Mon-Thu (12:00) 2:25 4:50 7.15 9:40 



SUNSCT4 Jn«t'So«(R) 

Mon-Thu (12:00) 2:30 5:00 7:35 10:1(5 



UNITED ARTISTS IgenERAL CINEMA 



Westwood 



UA WESTWOOD Scary Movie (R) 

10889 Wellwodh Digital 

475 9441 ' No VIPs Uatil 7/17 

Mon-Thu 12:00 2:00 4:30 7:30 10:15 



Beverly Hills 



BEVERLY CONNECTION 

La Cienega at Beverly 6M. 

(310)659-5911 

4 hours validated parlting $1 at Box OtfKe 



UA WESTWOOD 

10889 Wellwonh 
475-9441 



The Patriot (R) 
THX - Digital 
Oa 2 aeraeas 

Mon-Thu 12:15 4 15 8:00 
11:30 3:00 7:0010:40 



BEVERLY CONNECTION 



Scary Mo»(t (R) 
Oa2SciaaM 

Presented in THX Digital Sound 

10 301130 12:301:30 2:40 3:40 

4:45 5:45 7«) 8:00 9:15 10:15 



BEVERLY CONNECTION 



SUNSET 5 



CREST 

1262 Wesrwood iM 

(S ofWilShirti 

474-7866 or 
777-FILM (#025) . 



Disaay's TkeiCid (PG) 

THX - Digital 

Mon-Thu (12:00 2 40 5 15) 

7.50 10:20 



Triiit(R) 

Mon-Thu (1:30) 4:15 7:00 9:4(5 



Santa Monica 



WESTWOOD 1 

1050 Gayley 
208-7664 



Boys aad Girls (PG-13) 

Dolby Digital 

Mon-Thu 7:20 9:40 

Titaa A.E. (PG) 

Dology Digital 
Mon-Thu (12:10 2:40 5:00) 



WESTWOOD 2 Small Time Crooks (PG) 

1050 Gayley DTS Digital 

208-7664 Mon-Thu (12 00 2:30 4:50) 7:10 9:30 



WESTWOOD 3 Road Trip (R) 

1050 Gayley Dolby SRI 

208-7664 Mon-Thu (12:20 2.50 5:10) 7 30 10 00 



LAEMMLE 



www.lMinmle.com 



WLA/Beverly Hills 

BarpalB Shows ( ) For All Tkaatrai 



MONICA 1 

1322 2nd St. 
(310)394-9741 



Mon-Thu ^j)0) 



SaasMaa (R) 

"4:45 8:30 



GENERAL CINEMA 



Westwood 



AVCO CINEMA 

10840 WiKhire Blvd 
1 BIk E ot Westwood 
(310) 777-FILM #330 



TlMNrfaaiStofnlP6-13) 
OaaSciaoas 

Presented in THX DigKal Sound 

11:152155:158:15 11:00 

Presented in Digital Sound 

10:30 1 30 3:00 4:30 6:00 7:30 9:00 10:30 



BEVBUY CONNECTION 



aa(P6] 

Presented m Digital Sound 
11:001:15 3:30 5 45 8:0010:15 



BEVEfHY CONNECTION 



Boys aM Qifia (P6-13) 

Presented in Oigita) Sound 

11:001:00 

OfOM in*: X-MEN (PQ-IS) 



MONICA 2 Tha Virgin Siiictdes(NR) 

Mon-Thu (3 00) 5 20 7 40 10:0(5 



MONICA 3 Small Timo Craoks (R) 

Mon-Thu (1 15)3 35 5:55 8 15 10 3(5 



MONICA 4 



Faalaaia 2000 (G) 

Mon-Thu (1:15) 



WESTWOOD 4 

1050 Gayley 
208 7664 



r^ 



Fra^MRcy (PG-13) 

" lySR 



Dolby I 
Mon-Thu (12.30 3 15) 7 00 9:50 



ROYAL East-Wast (PCI 

1 1523 Santa Monica Blvd Mon-Thu (2:()^5:00 8:0(5 
(310)477-5581 



MONICA ( 



Triiia (G) 

Mon-Thu (2 00) 4 40 7 20 10:00 



Santa Monica 



MUSIC HALL 1 

9036 Wilshire 
274-6869 



MUSIC HALL 2 

9036 Wilshire 
274-6869 



CRITERION 

1313 3fdSt 
Promenade 
395-1599 



CRITERION 



Tha Partact Storm (PG-13) 
On 3 Screaas 

THX - Dolby Oigilal 



Mon-Thu (1230 1:15 3:45 4:15) 
7 00 7 30 8:00 10.00 10:30 IKW 



MUSIC HALL 3 

9036 Wilshire 
274-6869 



Sarviving Paradise (NR) 

Mon-Thu (5 30) 7 45 100(5 



L'Humanila (PG-13) 
Mon-Thu (5:15) 8:3(5 



BiriNfHff I v] 
Mon-Thu (5.10) 7:30* 



visit our vt/ebsite: www.laemmle.com 



AVCO CINEMA 


Aivtfttoiit of 
Rocky 1, Ballwiakia (P6) 

Presented m Digital Sound 
11:201:50 4:30 7 10 9:50 


AVCO ONEMA 


CMckaa Rm (0) 

Presented m THX Digital Sound 
11:001:05 3:20 5.358:0010:30 


AVCO CINEMA 


Goaa in Sixty Seconds (PG-13) 

Presented m THX Digital Sound 
11:151:55 4 45 7 25 10:15 


AVCO CINEMA 


Fantasia 2000 (G) 

Presented in Digital Sound 
11402 10420 



f 



CMcfttn Raa (G) 

THX - Dolby Otgilal 

Mon-Thu (11 45 12 30 2 15 3:00 

4 45 5:30)7:15 945 




AVCO CINEMA 



Shanghai Noon (PG-13) 

Presented in Digital Sound 

7 40 10 20 

Opens 7/14 X-Man (PG-13) 



Enjoy the 
Movies!!! 



\ 



To advertise 

in the 



\ 



-iri^ 



Bruin 

Movie 
Guide, 



call 
310.825.2161 




Daily Bruin 



>.. 




Mondiy. Mf 10, 2000-Fnday, July 14, 2000 



announcements 



Campus Happ«ning« 
Campus Organizations 
Campus RacruHmem 
Campus Services 
Birthdays 
Legal notices 
Lost A Found 
Miscellane6us 
Personal Messages 
Personals 
Pregnancy 

Rei^eatloruri Activities 
Research Subjects 
Sperm / Egg Donors 
Tickets Offered 
Tickets Wanted 
Wanted 



2(10(1 
2()'il) 
21l;(! 
22(){) 
2, ((1(1 

2f)()0 
2«.(i(1 



forTsaie 



2700 
2H(»() 
2!)f)n 
3001. 
3100 
3200 
3300 
3/400 
3500 
3600 
3700 
3800 
3000 
^000 
4100 
4200 
4300 
4400 
4500 



I Appliances 

Art / Paintings 

Bicycles / Skates 

Books 
I Calling Cards 

Cameras / Camcorders 

Collectibles 

Computers / Software 

Furniture 

Garage / YSard Sales 
I Health IVockicts 

Miscellaneous 

Musical Instruments 
I Office Equipment 
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Rentals 

Sports Equipment 

Stereos / TVs / Radios 
I liable Sports 



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308 Westwood Plaza 
Los Angeles. CA 90024 



E-Mail: dassifiedsC 
Web: http://www.c 



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Classified Une: (310) 825-2221 

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Fax: (310} 506-0528 



Mon-Thu: 9:00am-3:00pm 
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One issue, up to 20 words S8.30 

...each additional word 0.60 

Weeldy, up to 20 words 28.00 

...each additional word 2.00 

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...each additional word 5.60 



For Classified Display ads. 

please see our rate card ' 

for variable rate information 



Classified Une Ads: 

1 working day before printing, 
at 12 noon. ■' • ,; 

Classified Display Ads: 

2 working days before pnnting. 
at 12 noon. 

There are no cancellations after 
noon of the day before printing. 



• Start your ad vwrth the ~r^- 
merchandise you are selling. 
This makes it easier for readers to 
quickly scan the ads and locate 
your Items. 

• Always indude the pnce of your 
item. Many classified readers 
simply do not respond to ads 
without prices. 

• Avoid abbreviations— make your 
ad easy for readers to understand. 

• Place yourself in the reader's 
position, ask what you would like 
to know about the merchandise, 
and tndude that in the ad. Inckide 
such information as brand names, 
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I descriptions. 

The ASUCLA Communications board fuNy supports th« University o« CaWomifs policy on nondlscriminalion. No mediuni shall accept adveftlsoments wtwcti present persons of any origin, race, sex. or sexual orientation in a 
demeanirig iway or imply that tfiey are limited to positions, capat)l«les. ro»e», or status in society. Neither the Daily Bruin nor the ASUCIA Communications Board has investigated »iy of the services advertised or the 
advertisements represented in this issue. Any person t)elieving that an advertisement in this issue violated the Board's policy on nondiscriminatioo stated herein should communicate complaints in (writing to the Business Manager 
Dally Bnjin, 118 Kerckholf Hall, 308 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90084. For assistance with housing discnmmation problems, call the UCLA Housing Office at piO) 825-4271 or call the Wtestside Fair Housing Office at (310) 
475-9671 CtassMed ads also appear on-line at http://www.dallybruin.ucia.edu. Ptaceoient on-line Is offered as a complimentary service for customers and is not guaranteed. The Daily Bruin is responsible for the first Incorr 
insertion only. Mfciortypographicil errors are not elglble for refuTKte. For any falunAtfwDalhr Bruin Clasaried Departed f>5t d«y <X publication by noon. 



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payment 



Please make checks payable to 
"The UCLA Daily Bruin." Wte 
accept Visa. MasterCard, and 
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working days for mail payments. 



WtF^t^t^t^ 



trans portation 



^ImIO 
A7()() 

A5M)() 
5U00 
SI 00 

5300 
.'i^OO 

s5no 



Auto Accessories 
Auto Insurance 
Auto Repair 
Autos for Sale 
Boats for Sale 
Motorcycles for Sale 
Paifcing 

Scooter / Cyde Repair 
Scooters for Sale 
Vehicles for Rent 



travel 



Resorts / Hotels 
Rides Offorad 
Rides Wanted 
liud / Stumle Service 
liavel Destinations 
Ihivel Tldtets 
Vacation Packages 



services 



IWMHI 



1-900 numbers 
Financial Aid 
Insurance 

Computer / Internet 
Foreion Languages 
Health / Beauty Services 
Legal Advice / Attorneys 
Movers / Storage 
Music Lessons 
Personal Services 
Professional Services 
Resumes 

Telecommunications 
lUtorlng Offorad 
Tutoring Wanted 
Typing 

Writing Help 



1100 

C.'Hnpus Hiippf.Miiiujs 



1100 

Campus Hnppeiimys 



announcements 

1100-2600 



1100 

Campus Happenings 



ANTARCTICA 
ADVENTURE 

-ANTARCTICA AND PATAGONIA", A slide 
program on their travel and hiking experienc- 
es. wHt be presented by Ron and Pat Her- 
son, at tt\e monthly meeting of the Sierra 
Club on Wed. July 12 at 7:30 PM in Helms 
Hall of the Westwood United Methodist 
Church. 10497 WHshire Blvd. at Wamer Ave. 
Entrance on Wamer, Elevator to tfiird floor. 
Free. 323-653-9589. 

SUMMER LESSONS 
SWING-SALSA-TANGO 

BALLROOM DANCE CLUB AT UCLA. MON- 
DAYS 7-10PM ACKERMAN 2408. LEARN 
FAMOUS PARTNER/UNE DANCES 9PM 
BECOME A MEMBER! 310-284-3636. ball- 
roomOucIa edu 



JOB FAIR 



Friday, July 14, 2000 
9:30 am-3:00 pm 

FOR MORE INFO CALL AAEDE 
62 6-5 72-702 1/www. aaede.org 



1300 

Campus Recruitniunt 



HEALTHY RESEARCH SUBJECTS, ages 
18-59, male/female, are needed for a study 
by investigators at the UCLA Brain Center in- 
volving magnetic stimulation of brain. Volun- 
teers will be paid $2S/hr plus parking. Study 
duratk>n up to 4 hours. Call 310-794-4964 or 
email koskiOk>ni.ucla.edu. 



2200 

Research Subjects 



2200 

Research Subjects 



HAVE YOU BEEN diagnosed with BIPOLAR 
DISORDER? Participants saught for UCLA 
research study on life experiences. Those 
eligible will be paid for participation. 
Ca«:gi0-825-«085 



wamn 



fUillO 
JtlOO 
1<,2U0 

n JAW) 



Business OpportunMes 
Career Opportunities 
Child Care Offerad 
Child CaraVltanlod 
HelpWMited 
Houaeaitlino 
Internship 

Personal Assistance 
Dimporary Employment 
Volunteer 



r^ijgj 



H'.OO 

in. 00 
»;()o 

HHOO 
H'HtO 

ftooo 



Apartments for Rent 
Apartments Furnished 
Condo / lownhouse for Rent 
Condo / lownhouse for Sale 
Guesthouse for Rent 
House for Rent 
House for sale 
Houseboats for Rent / Sale 



Alcoholics Anonymous 



im, Fri Slip Ste^,3S0l 

IvMR^h ^^^VK ^^^NiTj v^R^V 



MAAVl!rbMyAM29 
AltiMa 12:10 -1:00 1 



sc 



■ftiM 



advc^rtise 



DIABETES SCREENING 

Qsnetic study of Diabatas rscnilts 

haaRfiy voiuntsan (18-40 years old) for 

frsa diabetes scraaning wNh st a ndard 

oral ghioota tolsranca test (2.5 hour^. 

QuiMlad subfacts (who pass the oral 

ghioosa tdaranca test and have nomial 

Mood prassurs) wM tie invited to 

partidpalaln aganottc study of 

dtabMes. SubioctswHbopaid$150 

for pVOCipSBOn. 

IMalB,cal OkCMs (S10h2l»4l64. 



8Z5-ZU 



2300 

Sperm / E(j() Donors 



1300 



Campus Rf.'i: 



•r.'oo 
i);i(io 

<|/»IIO 
9MI0 
'H.OO 
<I70(I 



Housing 
Roomfoi 



Needed 



summerbruin 



1300 

Campus Fti.'Cf iiitmeiK 



U.S. Gree n Card 

^otlerv 

,\<>\«*Mil)i» I. ^\.)\m 



nnrnmsmi 



to be Issued in 2002 



V,.jilal)li' to t(>iei;^n slu(li"nt> .uid Iheir laniili* ^ 

For a TrcH- int'ornKition piirkii^t\ cull oin 
Lo((iM\ Dcparlment .1! l-SOOVISV I \\\ 




EGG IX>NORS 
NEEDED 

If you are a woman between the ages 

of 21 ai\d 35, the numy eggs your 
bod V dispoBts of each monm cait b« 
uaea by an infertila woman to have a 
baby. Help an infertile couple realize 
their dreams, enter the gene pool and 
help advance Icnowleage of Human 

Reproduction! PbuHidal 

comperuftian, of course. Completely 

cormdential. For mofc information, 

please call USC Rapiodactivc 
Endocrinology at (21)) 975-9990. 



Roommates - Prt« 
Roommates - Shi 
Sublets 
Vacation Rentals 



index 



1738;$ Sunsel IJIvtI. Stiitt- 120, l»a<ifir I'alisados. CA ^OJ/J 

(3J0) .^.7:^-4242 • FAX (310) 373.3093 • visalawCnvolMoit.n.m 



Egg Donors Needed 

Healthy females ages 1 9-28 
wishing to help infertile couples. 
Generous Compensation 
u Call MIRNA (818) 832-1494 4 



A A##I4pIAE^ 




ttansportauon 



1900 

Personal Messages 



HAPPY BIRTHDAY! 



Do you like pina coladas? 

and getting caught in the rain? 

If you're not into yoga? 

and if you have half a brain 

Do you like making love at 

midnight, 

in the dunes of the cape? 

the I'm the love that you've 

looked for ' 

write to me and escape. .' ' 

Yes, I like drinking pina 

coladas 

and getting caught in the rain 

I'm not much intocii^lth food, 

I am into champagne, 

I've got to meet you by noon 

tomorrow 

cut through all this red tape. 

at a bar called O'Malley's 

where we'll plan our escape 

Do you like chocolate truffles? 
and basking warm in the sun? 
If you're not into taxes 
and if your IQ in high Hon 
Do you like making love at 
midnight 

while kissing my nape? 
the I'm the love that you've 
been looking for 
write to me and escape 

Yes, I like eating chocolate 

truffles 

and lounging by the pool 

I'm broke from paying taxes 

and valedictorian of school 

I've got to meet you by noon 

tomorrow 

cut through all this red tape 

at a bar called Maloney's 

where we'll plan our escape 



^700 

Aulo Insurance 



AUTO INSURANCE... LOWEST Price. 
Same day $R22. Any driver, student dis- 
counts & good driver discounts. Call AAIA. 
tree quote 1-800-225-9000. 



^900 

Autos lor Sale 



ACURA LEGEND 

2-door. good-condiion. fuHy-kMided. power- 
aafiar iniartor, automatic, cham- 
lootef tl.100. 21»412»900a. 



22 Monday, July 10, 2000-Friday, July 14, 2000 



Daily Bruin Gassified 



/ • 



1300 

Campus Recruitment 



1300 

Campus Recruitment 



5700 

Travel Tickets 



5700 

Ti'avt;! Tirkots 






VICTORY TRAVEL 



LATIN AMfEl?lCA Sr^EClALlSTS 




Mexico City 
Guadalajara 
Cabo San Lucas 
El Salvador 
Honduras 
Costa Rica — — 
Nicaragua 
Guatentalo 



•l«/M« Pawl* 
Lima 

Buanos Airw 
S. De Chile 
Bogota 

ChMte 

Belize 
Carocos 



^59 



5800 

1-900 Numbers 



FOR SPORTS AND 
ENTERTAINMENT FUN 

CALL 1-900-226-3188 ext 9033. $2 99 per 
mirV18 yrs older. Procall co number 602-954- 
7420. It's all the same fun without leaving 
home. 



6000 

Insuratice 



FoMflita/wttwJwi/l puidwst. Sub|«(i lo diomt Tom not indudtd. (IT#70(79tS-40. 



Mexif o Escapes 

$369 Cobo Son Lucas . -ot 
$479 Cancun So^ v W 

$369 Puerto Vdlarta \x^' 

j/p Doiocc (3 nights - Air - Transfers) 



NEW YORK^59Rn1 



Boston 
Chicoao 
Philoaelphio 
Son Francisco 



299 RA 

219 RA 

229 RA 

82 R A 



/iiistaie 



IfouiVe in ffDod huMkr 



Mtke Azer lr^urar»ce Agency. Inc. 
(310)312-0202 

1281 WosfwoocJ Blvd. 

C2 t>lks. So. of Wllsrilr») 

24 Hours o Doy Service 



Mrwvf.vicforyfraveLcom 
(323) 277-4595 



5700 

Travel Tickets 



AQUA TRAVEL INC 



UCLA Parking Services is looldng for friendly, 

courteous people to assist our customers with 

their parking and information needs. 

(Previous customer service and cash handling experience preferred*) 

For more information and an application, 

stop by the Parking Services office 

at 555 Westwood Plaza (in Structure 8) 

or call (310) 825-1386 

'Must be a currently registered UCLA student _ 



WORLD WIDE LOWEST AIRFARES 

MAKE YCXJR OWN AIR GAR HOTEL 

RESERVATION AT 

htp://www.prismoweb. com/oquotravel 

24HOURSADAY 

Lowest Domestic and 

International Airfares 

Tour Packages 

Eurailpass 

Hotel Accommodations * 

Car Rentals 

*Asia*Africa*Auslralla*Europe*South 

America*lndia*Canoda*Mexico*Hawaii* " 

5^/0/ domestic & Inlmotionol Airfares Avoiloble 

Prices ore suDiect to crxjnge without notice 

AvortabWiy may t5e limited and sotw reftnr^ion! mov 

opply Ptos Taxes 

PHONE (31C!)441-0680 

10850 WUshife, Swte 434, Westwood CA 90024 



/k900 

Autos for Sale 



1993 TOYOTA 
CELICA GT 

63K, white, automatic, fully-loaded, excellent 
condition, dealer-pampered, 60K dealer- 
service done $7,600. 310-476-8267/949- 
609-4471. 

LAND ROVER LS 

1998 w/1 3,800 mi. Like new, radio w/cas- 
sette, leather seats, air cond.. sunroof, au- 
tomatic. $29,500. 

MUST SEE 

1990 LEXUS ES250 loaded, sunroof, orig 
owner, all records, extra clean, very good 
condition, $6500 OBO. Pnvate party 310- 
820-4145. 

POLICE It^POUNDS! Cars as low as $500 
(or listings 1-800-319-3323 ext.A214 



5680 

Travel Destinations 



5680 

Travel Destinations 



STUDENT TRAVEL 



london $624 

PRAGUF BOMti fvlADRlD TF.L AViV OSIC 



pans mexicg r;;rv 

AMSTERDAM Ph^^^p:.. , , ,.._ 

sycney tokyo no de Janeiro new yoric ion 



psi 

cfori 



NEW YORK $303 

puico clublin cologne halsinki bai' 

Sydney $861 

ALLAHTA MtLBOUHNE Fl.OKfc'NCi 
tahiti hong konq brazil bHnc}*.^ 

PARIS $676 



, u^ ^- .-. — VIENNA SEVILLA 

acapuico clublm cologne nalsmki bail cairo milan 



Ids aiiTOics pc'^v; jaWi^jica buenos aires antwaro 
PlJcHTO VALLAHTA MtLBOUHNE Fl.OKfcNCK NfcW ORLFANS 
tahiti hong koncj brazil bangkok 



SOUTH AMERICA 

PACKAGES & CRUISES 

INCA TRAIL 5D/4N $490 

MACHU PICCHU 3D/2N from $365 

JUNGLE LODGES 3D/2N from $300 

AMAZON CRUISE 4D/3N from $595 

GALAPAGOS CRUISE 4D/3N from $703 



R/TAIR FARES FROM 

BUENOS AIRES $430 CUZCO 

GUAYAQUIL/QUITO $620 LIMA 
SANTIAGO $499 SAO PAULO/RIO 



$566 
$400 
$^9 



www.pro-travel.com 
PROFESSIONAL TRAVEL SERVICE 

South America SpeciaHsts 



C$T#1017039-10 



6000 

Insurance 



6000 

Insurance 




^AutQ \n\ 



^zea2g(lfefe-T^--> 



Mercury Broker in Westwood. No Brokers Fees. Also other 
markets. Low Rates. Foreign Students and New Drivers OK. 

(310)208-3548 1 081 Westwood Blvd. Suite 221 



TRAVEL 



5620 

Rides Offered 



OFFERING RIDE to East Coast Looking for 
college student to share expenses. Leaving 
near July 20th. E-mail matthew: maf9n@vir- 
ginia.edu 



310.UCLA.FLY weve been there. 

920 Westwood Blvd. 

AJI fares are rxxjrxitrip. Tax not incJuded Some restrictions appty.CST #101756060 



\A/\A/w. statravRl . com 



61 OO 

Computer/Internet 



$11.99/MONTH 

UNLIMITED INTERNET ACCESS for only 
$il.99/month. No ads, no busy signals. Call 
818-762-3467 or visit www.bulldoghost- 
ing.com. 

WEB DESIGN FIRM 

YOUNG. HIP, Web Design Firm seeks the 
following: Administrative Assistant, Software 
engineer, Artist/Designer. Email resume to: 
twood 9 lunamedium.com 



6100 

Computer / Internet 



A Guide to the Perplexed 

universitysecreLs.com w 

htlp //university Secrets com 



6200 

Henlth Services 




TRAVEL AGENCY 

INTERN NEEDED, 20hrs/wk, Studio City 
area, flexible, unpaid but get one free trip to 
Western U.S. every 4 wks, along with train- 
ing and experience in the travel business. 
Call 818-907-6740 and leave msg 



5700 

Travel Tickets 



5700 

Travel Tickets 




South America 



5700 

Travel Tickets 



EXCrriNG RIO 5 Nights 
Rto Cop-R/T Airfare 



BE FLEXIBLE...SAVE$$$ 



Europe $249 (o/vv + taxes) 

CHEAP FARES WORLDWIDE 

HAWAII $129 (o/w) 

Call:(310) 574 0090 

wwrw.4cheapair.com 



S799 



MACHU-PICHU 3 Nights 
Libertador Cuzco-R/T 



$QQQ1'ANG0 CITY (Argentina) 5 Nigtits ] 



[04 /\TQP*'^*GONiA MOu^frAlNS4 lakes 1 

\^ I V ( 9s Nt(^«s La C«ac«da Hotat-Trai( FVT mJ 

f ^1 nAQ"'"'^P'CAL IGUAZU FALLS^ 
^ I Vf 57 3 Nights Cataratas Hoiel-R/T AMawJ 

CUSTOM-MADE PACKAGES TO SOUTH 

AMERICA 

OREAT AIRFARES-ONLY 



Jack H. Silvers, MD 

Bo«nd CMlNtod dmitwtolegM. 

"M* /lAsnf forgottmn what H'9 
llkm tobmm atudmmt." 

•Acne»Mole Removal*Warts*Rashes« 

•Laser Hair and Tattoo Removal* 

•Lip Augmentation • 

►Laser Ablation of Red and Brown Spots* 

(310) 826-2051 

www.DtSlhfet8.com 



Victory Travel Vacations. Inc 

(323)857-6900 
argentinatraveKo'earthlink.net 



.ir.' () p DHL 0< : l;| fl. \<r 



,il»l"» CST«;'04i -'rt' s- 



(jiJlA^e/dA^ Classified lines i 825-2221) 



6300 

Leyal Advice/Attorneys 



♦BANKRUPTCY* 

GET OUT OF DEBT NOW! Free Consulta- 
tion. Experienced attorneys, reasonable 
tees. (Cheryle M. WNte. UCLAW. "86') SCO- 
420-9998 Pico/OvertarKJ. WLA. 



nig^SifipHc 
825-222T 



kjtKifj% 



Daily Bruin Classified 



2300 

Spertn / t(](] Donors 



2300 

Sp<?rnt / Efin l)«>nors 



2300 

Snf rrn / E()() Donors 



2300 

Sp(.'rin / E(}{j Doiirjrs 



-&.. 



Special Egg Donor Meeded 



■ a - jiiy t S- - 1 «m4J»ji. - 



Preferred Donor will meet the following criteria: 



•Height Approximately 5'6" or Taller •Caucasian •S.A.T. 
Score around 1300 or High A.C.T. •CoUege Student or 
Graduate Student Under 30 •No Genetic Medical Issues 





lOIi 



Paid to you and/or the charity of yoiir choice. 
All related expenses will be paid in addition 
^ to your compensation. 

(Extra compensation available for someone who might be 
especially gined in athletics, science/madiematics or music.) 



«r? 






mmmm 



9 



For more information or to obtain an application please 
contact Michelle at the Law Office of Greg 1. Eri^n 

(800) 808-5838 
or email Eg^onQrInfo@aoLc<nn. 




*This ad is being placed for a particular client and is not soliciting eggs for a donor bank. 



6200 

Hoalth Servictis 



6200 

Hoiilth Services 



6200 

Health Services 



67 OO 

Professional Services 



Monday, July 10, 2000-Ffiday, July 14, 2000 23 



6700 

Professional S( > "iri s 



CONTACTS 

NO HIDDi N (;HAM(.I S' 



EXTENDED Of DMLY 2 pr $59.. ^ 

DjSfqi^LES ^Mo/4B«es<G9 

CHAiIge brown eyes. B(T *79pr 

Hnal, Graan. BIim ^ 

CHANGE UGHT EYES B4L-.,-™.«49Pt 

BhM, Gre«n, Aqua 

BIR)CALyMONOVISiON .addi '50 

ASTIGMATISM EXT *89rt 



EYE EXAM SI C5 



w C L fur I hit i 



UKNCBB/ 

BavBrtyHMaAdj 



P10|3e(V9513 
lOKBEACN 



10»S.RotaftMnaM,i1 

«lfed^5Frill-l 
1M2W.Unc<iinAwi.,lG 

Wed 11-1. Fri 3-5 

4130 AlaiiicAvt.. #106 

Ttwrs 3-5. Sat 2-4|ini 

n227ValiyBM,f20l 

ThurslM|)(n,SaM130-lpni 



VAU5m E. DOBALIML MA. 



I MLI <;,in- Kit w/l'iiic;l»;is€' 



ADULT ADOPTEE 
GROUPS FORMING 

Explore all aspects of being an adoptee with 
ottier adoptees Facilitated by Dianne Riv- 
ers, MA. Marriage and Family Therapist in- 
tern (*35018), an adoptee specializing in 
'doption counseling. Space limited. 
Call:310-704-3611. 

MEDICAL SCHOOL 

PERSONAL STATEMENTS/APPLICA- 

TIONS. Expertise to present your best. Edit- 
ing. Dissertation formatting arxj finalizing. 
Personalized, professior^l assistance. Ace 
Words, etc. 310-820-883P. 

Since 1970 - PROFESSIONAL WRIT- 
ING/EDITING. Papers, reports, statistics, re- 
views, proposals, studies, theses, disserta- 
tions, graduate application essays. Any 
style/requirement. 323-871-1333. 



7000 

Tutoring Offered 



(800)90-TUTOR 

www.mV-tutor.com 

MATH/PHY SICS/STATISTICS/Er»glish/He- 

brew/chemistry/biology/astronomy. Compu- 
terized statistical analysis availabie.Tutoring 
service. Call anytime. 

FRENCH TUTORING 

Need native speaker to learn or practice 
Ffer>ch. Contact Sami:310-824-5869 

SUMMER TUTOR 

EXPERIENCED AND PERSONABLE TU- 
TOR that will gel results. Catch up or get 
ahead this summer. Seven-years experi- 
ence. SAT/algebra/French/ESL/EnglistVhis- 
tory. Call Will 310-701-8969. 

TOEFL PREP/ACTING 

Free advanced ESL instruction. M-TH. From 
10AM. Stoner Part<. 1835 Stoner Ave. In 
small gym above swimming pool. 



MATH MAnr. FASYI 



All Ages • All Levels 

Incredible Prices! 

CALL NOW! (310)560-8233 

(Please mention this ad when you call) 

*Art Classes Also A vailable 



67 OO 

Professional Seivices 




DET^AL HEALTH CARE 

(OMe* of S. talalwwil, DM) 

We Create Beautiful Smiles! 

• AM Pttoses of Denlitlry 

• 24 Hour Emorgoncy Sorvice 

• MocU-Col & Most Insurance Plons Accepted 

'AH Students & Focuky Me m bers ore welcome' 
First time introductory offer wifh this coupon 

Tel: (310) 475-5598 / Fax: (310) 475-1970 
Online: www.onvillage.com/O/dcntalhealth 



$ gS.'^V Arch n»eg.*«v-.l 

^^ADAacapU^^M^on2»rche$ 




)fftccwiitcningtn|t 
50 minute visit 



patient: Tera BonlUa 

Couptifi K»pii»» 8/^1/00 



1620 Westwood Blvd., Wrct Lw Angde*. Between 
Wilshire k Santa Monica {Trtf Parking in Rear) 



• (tug. $170) 
Pull oral cxwninition • Or«l Cancer Scrtening 
Ntccsury X-Rayt • PtfiodoMal Eumirutioci 
ClMnin| & Ppliihing « X-Rayiirt non->f«m/eiTit>l« | 



I 

I 

I 

§1 

1 1 
cl 

ll 
I 
I 
I 




A 



NGEL VISA QNTER" 

310-478-2899 Fax: 310-477-6833 




IMMIGRATION 



I Inili^ Contu 

• WOMKPmHTSe VISAS 
«<WMirCARM • lABOn CEHT 
e IMMQMnOM PNOaUMS 

Attorney JENNIFER 8. LIM 

123 S FiguSrM. Suits 220 L« AMMlM, CA 9001 2 

Westside 310-837-8882 
Downtown 213-680-9332 



6AOO 



JERRY'S MOVING4DEUVERY. The Oifoful 
movers. Experienced, reliable, same-day de- 
livery Packing, boxes available Also, pick- 
up donations lor American Cancer Society 
JenfyO310-391-5657. 



6500 

Music Lessons 



m 




lecyc©! 



DRUM LESSONS 

ALL LEVELS/STYLES with dedicated pro- 
fessional At your home or WLA studio 1st- 
lesson tree. No drum set necessary 
Neii:323-654-8226. 



nfznn 



VOICE. RANO LESSONS by professional 
singefllpianist, Juiiliard Sctiooi. MM. All levels 
welcome, 310-544-1240. 



6700 

riolt.'ssioii.ii SciA/ictJS 



A FREE SESSION 

PSYCHOTHERAPY/CCXINSELING lor de- 
pression, anxiety, obsessions, post-traumat- 
ic stress,etc. Couples/Individuals Crime vic- 
tims may t>e eligible for free treatment. Call 
Liz Gould(MFCi32388) ©310-578-5557 to 
schedule tree oonsuNalion. 



IMMIGRATION 
Green Cards, Work 
Permits, Change of 
Status, Citizenship, 

I 

^ipany Sta 
i.jjb, and more7 



Reasonable Rates 



oiitalion. 



Consultatioi^. 



r^.-ftrr 



BEAR'S RESEARCH, 
WRITiNG & EDITING 



ThMM, Papart. and Par*onal SislamenM 

PrepOMlB and Boolia 

Imwnattonat Sludinia YKatecima Sinos 1966 

•ar. MiO. (S1i| * 



7000 

TiiturliU) Oflured 



WRITING TUTOR 

KIND AND PATIENT Stanford graduate 
Help wMTi Ilie Engllkh languege-for stud- 
ant* of al aoaa/level*. 310-440-3116 



?06-3060 




/^ 



'tidii 



24 Monday, July 10, 2000-Friday, July 14, 2000 



r 



-3t 



Daily Bruin Classified 




Men's 



Hedlti 
Clinic 



Evaluation and treatment of oil issues 
related to sexual and reproductive health 

^ non-symptomatic sexually 
tronsmittecf dflseases ^STDs) 

Diagnosis and treatment of symptomatic 
STDs 




Counseling to assist in nooinfenance of 
sexual health and to reduce risk of STDs 



Counseling and support for concerns 




relating to sexual function, performance 
or orientation 

Ultra confidential or confidential HIV testing* 

For information or on appointment call 
310 825-4073, or visit the Ashe web 
site to request an appointment or ask a 
health related question: 
http://www.saonel.ud^eciu/health.htm 

* Please call the Ashe (^nhr for definitions. 

ucia Ashe Center 



TODAY'S 
CROSSWORD PUZZLE 



ACROSS 

1 Use a rod 

and a reel 
5 Execs 
9 Neigtiborot 

Mex. 

12 Novelist Puzo i. 

13 Brainstorm 

14 Cairo's river 

16 Fragrances 

17 Karate rank 

19 Corral 

20 Chirp 

22 Keyboard 
instrument 

23 Low necklines 

24 Singer Easton 

25 Act like a police 
officer 

28 Eucalyptus eater 
'30 Slants 

31 "Cat on — Tin 
Roof 

32 Fuzzy fruit 

36 Single thiing 

37 Vineyard 
product 

38 Mine entrance 

39 Restaurant 
offenng 

40 Hardwoods 

41 Residence 

42 Synagogue 
leader 

44 Not as bright 

45 Naps 

48 Baseballer 
Canseco 

49 Minister's 
residence 

50 Emulate Dali 
52 SctKK)l of 

whales 
55 Adequate 
57 Poet Dickinson 

59 Wheat — 

60 Norwegian king 

61 Gamut 

62 Soap ingredient 

63 Agile 



PREVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVEQ, 



DQISS DOSS 

□DSB SEDDSS QIQSQ 




Qoras DQEa 


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64 Singer James 

DOWN 

1 Dim 

2 Pressing need 

3 Walter 
Raleigh's title 

4 Party thrower 

5 Aura: slang 

6 Not working 

7 — moss 

8 Pouch 

9 Like plastic 
glassware 

10 Attack on, a 
castle 

1 1 Director Dwan 

12 Swabbers 
need 

1 5 Sicilian volcano 
18 Eye makeup 
21 Drenched 

23 Bold 

24 Overfeed 

25 Grad 

26 Director Clair 

27 Pour 



28 Light brown 

29 "Sorry!' 

31 Sheik, for one 

33 Matinee man 

34 Roomy 

35 Caesar s road 
37 Heaps 

41 Having no 
adornment 

43 Jungle animals 

44 Football coach 
Shula 

45 Self-satisfied 

46 Pan of a 
jacket 

47 Admission 

48 In a — : quickly 

50 Paper-mill's 
commodity 

51 At a distance 

52 Two cups 

53 Gymnast 
Korbut 

54 Pigment 
56 Negative 

votes 
58 Tumblers pad 




7100 

Tutoring WjiUed 



SAT TUTORS 
\\'ANTED 

Need energetic people witti 
high SAT scores lo tutor, 
especially in W.L.A., San 

Fernando Valley, Pasadena, 
Palos Verdes. 

$ l 5-$ 2 a/hr. H exib l e hours T^ 



Car needed. Call Joe 

(310) 448-1744 

h www.iutorjobs.cora 



SEEKING MATH TUDOR for 14 year old 
boy. Car need UCLA undergrads only Con- 
tact Paul at 310-285-9670 



7200 

Typing 



APPLICAHONS/ 
RESUMES 

Create, develop, or refine. Editing, word pro- 
cessing, application typing, dissertation lor- 
mattirig, transcribing. Ace words, etc. 310- 
820-8830. 

TYPING/SECRETARIAL services. Typing 
$2.50/page. Photocopying, answering ser- 
vice, $50/month. Personal mailbox, 
$50/month. Car garage. Personal answering 
service also provided. 310-475-8787. 

WORD PROCESSING specializing in thes- 
es, dissertations, transcriptk)n. resumes, fli- 
ers, brochures, mailing lists, reports. Santa 
Monica. 310-828-6939. Hollywood, 323-466- 
2888. 






# 



W] 



req^cle. 



7400 

Business Opportunities 



EXPERT 
INTERNET SURFER 

Live on the web? Have we got the job for 
you! Need well-rounded, friendly fast typist 
who really knows the internet. Night/Day 
shifts, fT/PT I0-l2hrs+comp. benefits pack- 
age including 401 K. If it seems like we've 
created this ad just for you, please visit 
www.inetnow.com/home/jobs_web_surf- 
er.asp 

INTERNET DOLLARS! 

Looking for the perfect Internet Business? 
www. homebusiness. to/jet 



YOUNG TEEN 
PRINCESSES 
(18+) needed for 
new adult site 
$300-$1000 

Your Choice! 
Lingerie Model 
Partial Nudity __ . 
Full Nudity . 

No Sex 
818-215-7836 



7500 

Career Opportunities 



ARCHITECT STUDENT NEEDED to help 
design home addition. Small pay in ex- 
change for design arxl portfolio opportunity. 
310-470-8595. 

FEMALE I^DELS WANTED: For foot mod- 
eling. Flexible hours. $20/hr. 818-501-3959 

TEACHER ASSTNTS 

PRIVATE WLA School looking lor capable 
and experienced teacher assistants to work 
with elementary level students, M-F. 8AM- 
1PM. Begin September. Please lax re- 
sume:310-471-1532. 



Classifieds 
825-2221 



7600 

Cliild Care Offered 



$$$ LOW PRICES $$$ 

WONDER YEARS PRESCHOOL run by 
UCLA grads. Ages2.5/6years Two large 
play-yards Open 7:30-530. Close to UCLA 
310-473-0772 

MOTHERS HELPER Excellent with chiW- 
ren Great driving, errands Local reference. 
310-274-5963. 



74 OO 

Businf?ss Oppoilunities 



7400 

Business Oppurtiimties 



unique job opportuniti^ 





ftexibie hours 
minimal-time 
commitement 



$oOQ per month 



If you're male, in good health, in ^ : 
college or have a college degree, and 
would like a flexible job where you can 
earn up to $600 per month AND set 
your own hours, call 310-824-9941 
for information on our anonymous 
sperm donor program. Receive free 
health screening and help infertile 
couples realize their dream of 
becoming parents. ; 



7700 

Child Care Wanted 



♦ENERGETIC 

BABYSITTER 

NEEDED* 

Looking for responsible/caring/energetic 
person to serve as babysitter in after- 
noons M-F. Enormously bright/intelligent 
4-year-old who loves to play/have fun. 
Located in BelAir/Roscomare Valley. 
Call:31 0-889-01 19. 



BABYSITTER 
NEEDED!!! 

For two sweet girls. 3 and 1.5 yrs. 9am to 
2pm. two-three days plus occasional even- 
ings. Please be experienced, energetic, fun, 
loving, flexible. Mid-Wilshire area. Must 
dnve/provide refererKes. 323-936-8856 

BABYSITTER NEEDED 

WEEKEND BABYSITTING SERVICES re- 
quired. 2 children ages 4 1/2 and 2 1/2. Pa- 
cific Palisades area References required. 
310-459-9071. 

BABYSITTER 

San Fernando Valley. $10/hourr20hrs/week. 
Starting after 3pm. Person needs to have 
flexible hours. Starts 7/31. 818-905-1215. 

BABYSITTER WANTED 

Regular Friday/Saturday night. 2 kids. 
$10/hour References required. Suzy:452- 
2227 

BABYSITTER/ 
DRIVER - 

For two boys 8&12 3 afternoons 3-6 plus 
possible additional time Mulholland/Beverly 
Glen. Own car w/good driving record. Refer- 
ences : 3 1 0-470-2047 . 

BABYSITTER/DOGSITTER Regular Satur- 
day night female babysitter wanted Addition- 
al hours possible. ExperierKe and referenc- 
es necessary. 310-470-4662. 

BABYSITTER/DRIVER 

July 10-August 15. Pickup 8 & 11 y/o from 
school/canf)p. M-F 12 through 6pm. Pacific 
Palisades. Refs. required. Call: 213-841- 
0792/310-454-4366 

CHILDCARE (or personable 7.5y/o girl. Pick- 
up school/camp. CDL. own car. insurance. 
N/S. M-F. Approx 3-5 hours. AfterrKX)ns 
$9/hr+gas. Laurie 310-440-6738. 

DRIVER/BABYSITTER. July 24-April 2001 
Afternoons approximately I5hrs/week, 
$8/hr-t- mileage. 2 teens 13& 14. Need good 
car. driving record, and references. 310-470- 
8595. 

LOVING CHILD CARE 
. NEEDED 

Pn CHILD CARE needed in nearby West 
wood/Century City home. Referer>ces and 
experience required Please call:310-5&l- 
2036 

CANTONESE SPEAKING BABYSITTER is 
needed in Westwood. 8-5 30 S200/wk 310- 
470-7594 



7700 

Child Care Wanted 



VERY SPECIAL SITTER 

Bright, happy, energetic person needed for 
lOyr-old girt. Help w/homework. keep room 
orgar)ized. Afternoons. Dea Shandera:310- 
260-1557. 310-449-3745. 

WLA CHILDCARE 

FOR A DELIGHTFUL very personable 11 yr 
old girl, pick-up after school, driVe to activi- 
ties, supen/ise homework, Mon-Thurs. 3:30- 
7:30PM. Begins 9/11. $10/hr. Call Dr. Alan 
Yasser 310-277-2796. Summer work possi- 
ble. 



7800 

Help Wanted 



*MOVIE EXTRA 
WORK* 

Beats all jobs. Start inrvnediately. Great pay. 
Fun/Easy. No crazy fees. Program for free 
medical Call-24/hrs 323-850-44 17.. 



ACTUARIAL ASSISTANT PT-FT in account- 
ing-type offk:e. Includes phones and general 
office duties. Must have computer and basic 
math skills. $10/hr. Fax resume 818-508- 
2001. 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT for interna- 
tiorial business office in BevHills: Must krK>w 
MS Office. Call 310-278-9338. E-mail 
resume aribussel@hotmail.com of fax 310- 
278-0038. 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASST 

RESEARCH Assistant needed tor flex-lime 
pos4tk>n at westside research institute. FAX 
resume including availability and phone 
number to:3 10-398-6651. 



AdmimstratiiJe 
Assistant 



P/T Positicxi. 20 hrs/wook 
(4hrs/clay). National leader, 
an accredited reproductive 
tissue bank seeks exp'd 
person to assist in all new 
client account activities. 
Must type min. 50 wpm & 
have good computer j . 
keyboard experience. 
Candidate siiould have a 
positive attitude, good 
communication skills and 
attention to detail. Must be 
bilingual in Spanish/English 
l£u-iguage. Please faoc 
resume at (310) 208-8477, 
Attn: LaTrice Allpn or email 
to laJlen@nrvohfl.nkr.nm 
Visit our website: , 

www. crvQbank . com — - . ^ 



Daily Bruin Classified 



Monday, July 10, 2000-Friday, July 14, 2000 2S 



7800 

Help Wanted 



NEW FACES WANTED 



International Talfnt Croup in n<iw 

Ittoking^ for n<rw facrM & new talrnt for 

TplRVMion, Film, CiHninftrcials, Music 

Videwii, Print & Modeling. 

AU agrs, all typ««. 

NO RXPF.RIF.NCK NM.ESSAKYNp tKES 

Ai]i)nioNiN(;Now(8 1 8) 3 79-7070 



ASSISTANT OFFICE WORK POSITION- 
Enthusiastic responsible individual with 
great phone voice needed for fun txjsy office. 
PT or FT. $8.50 to start, weekend hours also 
available. Century City and Santa Monica ar- 
eas. Can: 323-822-9209. f^ 

B.H. HEALTH CLUB 

Seeking friendly, motivated, responsible per- 
son for front desk position. Monday thru Fri- 
day 5:30 AM-1 1 :30 AM. Free club member- 
ship. Health Benefits. Call Chris 310-659- 
5002. 

BEVERLY HILLS AUTO DETAIL shop needs 
hard-working, fast-paced, agressive people 
to handle top-notch cars. No experience re- 
quired. Flexible hours. Ozzie:31 0-859-2870. 

BEVERLY HILLS 

INTERNATIONAL health/nutrition company 
in 10 countries seeks outgoing individuals for 
part time/full time Training available. 310- 
552-3244. 

BOOKSTORE CLERK 

CONSTRUCTION TECHNICAL Bookstore 
has opening for retail sales clerk. Ideal for 
part time students. $7/hour. Call 
Michelle:310-474-7771. 

CAMP COUNSELORS 
DAY/OVERNIGHT 

Pali Camp now hiring enthusiastic coun- 
selors! Summer fun includes:jet skiing, 
amusement parks, tjeach days, paintball arxl 
morel 18 and up. Call Heather:31 0-477-2700 

CHAUFFEURS. Full-time, over 21. summer 
job and possibility to continue. Ex.dnving 
record, must know LA. Quality company, 
great pay. 310-457-5051. 

CLERICAU 
CUSTOMER SERVICE 

Full-time, permanent, good English skills, 
well-organized. West Los Angeles, $9- 
9.50/hour. 310-826-3759 ex.229. 

CLERK NEEDED 

UCLA- Opthamalogy. General offk;e assis- 
tance: filing, faxing, data entry. Must have 
good communk:atk)n skills, MS Word/Excel. 
Send resumes to Lori/Debbie 310-206-8015. 

CLERK TYPIST/RECEPTIONIST Manage 
small medical research group. Good conv 
municationywriting skills, word-processing, 
Windows 95, Up to 20/hours, weekday- 
momings. Starting-$8.00/hr. Westwood. 310- 
826-0679. 

COACHES NEEDED 

MIDDLE SCHOOL&HIGH SCHOOL 2000- 
2001 school year. Giris Soccer Boys: Varsity 
Football, JV Football, Varsity and JV La- 
crosse Paid positions. 310-391-7127 Call 
Nate ext. 24^ A 

CUSTOMER SERVICE 

P/T positions A\ University Credit Unkjn. 
Start during the summer. Excellent pay. 
hours, environment. Go to 

www.ucu.org/jobs.htm, Ackerman A-level 
Service Center or fax resume or letter of in- 
terest lo 310-477-2566. 



^' 



uir.DKiv 
206-3060 



DISABLED WOMAN WHO LIVES near San- 
ta Monica and Barrington, needs help 6 
nights/wk. No Saturday Nights 10pm- 11pm. 
$60/wk Call Homa ASAP 310-479-0180. 

DRIVER WANTED 

COMMISSION ONLY $8-15/HOUR. Flex 
schedule, p/t-f/t. no delivery, must have 
car/ins. 323-822-9209. 

EARN 
$300-$1000 WEEKLY 

NEED PEOPLE NOW Retire in 2-4 years 
working PH". Lifetime residual income. Sim- 
ple concept. 562-428-4910. Recorded mes- 
sage:800- 31 3-3526 ext. 207. 

ELEMENTARY TA 

COLLEGE STUDENT WANTED as TA in 5th 
grade classroom Sepi-June. 3 morning 
hours daily. Fax resume:31 0-472-7856 or 
call:310-476-4632. 

ENTERTAINMENT 
MARKETING 

INSIDE SALES PROMOTIONS REPRE- 
SENTATIVE. Film advertising. Call retail 
stores tor upcoming releases Coordinate 
store visits. P/T-F/T-8am-12pm or 12:30pm- 
4:30pm-flex $10mr-t4)onu8. 310-333-1985. 

EVENING 
SUPERVISOR 

OF INTERVIEWING. The QaNup Organlza-" 
tion— Irvine. CA. Email resume to: don.du- 
satkoegallup com 949-474-7900 x.710. 



r.i.msitlPfK 
825-2221 



7800 

Hfilp Wiinled 



F/T GENERAL OFRCE 

WESTWOOD Entertainment law firm seeks 
F/T office clerk to do copying, faxing, and 
mail processing. Must have clerical office ex- 
perience. Salary doe+benefits. Fax resume 
to E.Kfaft:31 0-44 1-8010. 

FEMALE ATTENDANT 

12 hours a week/$lOhour. 10 minutes from 
UCLA. Young woman wanted to assist disa- 
bled woman with errands/laundry/misc. 
chores. Must have car. Call 310-828-4686 

FEMALE FIGURE 

Or life drawing models wanted by photogra- 
pher. Call Peter at 310-558-4221. 

FILE/OFFICE CLERK. Law fimi has P/T po- 
sition at $6.50/hr, minimum 20hrs/wk Mon- 
day-Friday afternoons. Fax resume to 310- 
274-2798 or mail to Lurie & Zepeda. 9107 
Wilshire Blvd. Suite 800 Beveriy Hills, 90210. 
No phone calls please. 

FINE DINING 

Santa Monica restaurant seeks host- 
ess/cocktail waitress 2-3 nights per week. 
Fax resume 310-450-4868. 

FULL TIME SURGERY SCHEDULER with 
strong administrative and organizational 
skills. Must have medical front office and sur- 
gery scheduling experience. PC and tele- 
phone skills required. Team player for a busy 
Westside office. Benefits and 401 K. Fax re- 
sume to 310-996-0223 

GIRLS wanted at exclusive social clubs in 
WLA. Conversation only. No ateohol. Flexi- 
ble hours. Earn top $$$. 323-441-0985 

GORGEOUS GIRLS 
AND GUYS 

Needed for urxJerwear modeling. $50/hour. 
All races. Please send full-length bathing suit 
photo to michelle.london.cpa@world- 
net.att.net 

HELP WANTED 

ASSISTANT for up-5cale optometric prac- 
trce. F/T or P/T. High-energy, articulate, ex- 
cellent communication skills. Computer Liter- 
ate. Leave message:310-418-2020 and fax 
resume:31 0-271 -3959. 

HELP WANTED 

MARKETING STUDENT NEEDED to market 
and promote an up-scale optometric prac- 
tice. Leave message at 310-418-2020 and 
fax resume to 310-271-3959. 

HOME CLEANERS 

P/T-F/T, $9-$12/hr and up. To clean in West- 
side areas. Must t>e dependable and have 
car. 310-471-6212, April. 

HOMEWORK SUPERVISOR/TUTOR for 
10th grader takir^g Spanish, Algebra, and 
Science. 2-hours per evening M-F, $9/hr 
310-476-4205. 



Are you a model. 

or wvnnt to yt-t -.tortetlT 



Looking for all types 
male/female models/actors 

•Plus size •Children 

F«ir pnni & nun-unnm coinmcrdal.% 

N») experience required No fees 



jsasL 



INTERNATIONAL FILM 
ACQUISITIONS 

ASST NEEDED. Must be dedicated, aggres- 
sive, self-starter, very organized, detail ori- 
ented, computer literate. Languages a plus. 
Please fax resume and cover letter to Valer- 
ie:323-935-5102. 

LIBRARY JOBS shelving and other stacks 
duties. 12-19hr8/wk. $6 70/hrto start. STUD- 
ENTS ONLY apply at Young Research Li- 
brary Rm.116l7 or call Antigone Kutay 310- 
825-1084. 

LOOKING FOR A 
SUMMER JOB? 

Must know computers, data-entry, basic -der- 
k:al skills Flexible hours available for part- 
time/day-time. Fax: 310-277-2687. Phone: 
3 10-282-8060. 

LOOKING FOR... 

Male/female singers 18-26 For new 
rava/dance/R&B/freestyle groups. Also need 
dancers/songwriters/and other musteally ori- 
ented people. For more information please 
call 310-208-0785 or 310-612-7873 or e-mail 
surtriderentOaol.com. 

MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST F/T and P/T for 
medical offk:e in Westwood. Please fax: 310- 
208-4457 



MODELS WANTED EARN $200-$1000 
working for established photographer Nudity 
required Must be 18>, athletic, outgoing. No 
experience necessary. 3 23-377-7937. 

NURSING STUDENT 

WANTED for help 1-2 ovemlghts/week with 
twin Infants Must be responsible Call Lau- 
ra:31 0-478-2434. 



7800 

Hflp Wanted 



OFFICE ASSISTANT 

On UCLA campus. Bright, motivated, organ- 
ized & friendly. Computer/accountirig knowl- 
edge. Peachtree, Microsoft Outlook/Office a 
plus. Work with families in fast pace clinical 
settir^g. Responsibilities include scheduling 
appointments, communicating with patients, 
billing, receiving payments, typing corre- 
spondence/manuscripts, copying, faxir>g, tel- 
ecommunicating. 30hrs/week and up. Start- 
ing salary $10 and up, based on experience. 
Send resume to ADHD &CAPI, 100 UCLA 
Medteal Plaza, Suite 430. L.A., CA 90095 or 
fax to 310-794-6583 or email adhdca- 
piOearthlink.net. 

RECEPTIONIST— WANTED: a few good 
students to study while answenng phones. 
Flexible hours, close to campus. Cindy 310- 
839-4777. 

RETAIL/PUREBEAUTY 

The new name in merchandise focus salon. 
We're looking for managers, asst.. manag- 
ers, and sales clerks with experience in the 
retail environment to worit in our stores in the 
LA area. Excellent pay/benefits and a gen- 
erous employee discount. Call for inter- 
view:310-474-4080.ext208. 

SALES Now hiring FT/PT at Rufcut, used 
and vintage Levis, in WLA. Retail experi- 
ence preferred. Bob:310-473-LEVI for ap- 
pointment. 

SALESPERSON Needed for Internet 
Sennce Provider, sell DSL and dial-up ser- 
vices. Make $75-$200/ day. Part-time. Call 
Alan at 818-762-3467. 

STAR SEARCH 2000 

Japanese Graduates — Senior Leadership 
roles. Tokyo, Japan. Email resume: don_du- 
satkoegallup.com or call Don at 949-474- 
7900 x.710. 



SURF THE WEB FOR 

CASH!!! ^ 
GET PAID TO SURF 
THE WEB!!! 

Join All Advantage today. 

Go to: www.alladvantage.conrVgo.asp? 

refid=TBJ262 



TEACHER/ASSISTANT 

ENERGETIC. WARM, nursery school teach- 
er/assistant sought. 8:30-12:30. M-F 
Wilshire Boulevard Temple. West LA. Fax 
resume:310-445-1283. Betsy:31 0-445-1 280. 

TYPIST/TRANSCRIBER 

ENTERTAINMENT LAW FIRM seeks full 
time legal typist/transcriber. Must be fast and 
accurate 9:30-6:30. Fax resume and salary 
requirement to E. Kraft 310-441-8010. 

WANTED:Female singer,19-26, w/great 
looks/style for alternative/pop band a la Car- 
digans. Oasis, No Doubt. Major label inter- 
ests, serious inquiries only. 818-508-8555. 

WEEKEND LIVE IN COMPANION to vital 90 
yr/old woman. Westwood Condo, Walk to 
campus. 310-472-9945 

WORK BY THE BEACH 

OFFICE CLERK NEEDED The Lobster 
Restaurant in Santa Monica. P/T Flexible, 
competitive pay, great k>cation. Laurel:3l0- 
458-9294 or fax:310-458-9654. 



8000 

Internships 



FILM/PR/ADVERTISING 

ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING COMPANY 
woriting with the entertainment industry sec- 
tor se^ks high energy interns with superior 
English skills, some also with foreign lan- 
guage fluency skills to add to our staff. Pay, 
intern credit, cjose to UCLA, pan-time/flexi- 
ble, plus some benefits. Ideal candkjate is 
dynamic with entertainmertt and PR? Adver- 
tising industry aspiratk>ns, detailed oriented 
and has accurate typing skills. Please send 
fax to 310-91 5-9188 or email in text format to 
anamariaOeiol.com. 

INTERNSHIP POSITION 

POST-PRODUCTION Company offers op- 
portunity for permanent empk>yment. Call 
Joel:310-82B-2292. provideol Oearthtink.net 

SALES ASSISTANT/INTERN. Make screen- 
ing calls, assistance. Flexible morning hours. 
Will train. Great for business major or MBA 
grad student. Pay $10-$12/hr. Culver City. 
Val:3 10-998-041 7. ; ^ 



81 OO 

Persoiuil Assistiipct! 



ELDERLY UCLA ALUM 

Needs help and compank>nship. Seeks n>a- 
ture, responsible, Er^lish-speaker. good- 
driver to do errands arxl light chores. 310- 
270-4290. 



pEcrcj^E 



81 OO 

F'<;rsonal Assisl;iiu;e 



PERSONAL ASSISTANT 

ADULT RESPONSIBLE MALE. For personal 
care for disatiled man. Morxlay-Friday one 
hr/day and alternate weekends. Will train. 
Strong References. Near UCLA. $300/mo. 
310-475-5209. 



8200 

Tf-mpomry Employment 



RETAIL CLERKS 

Openings for clothing sales cler1<s at Mer- 
cedes-Benz LA Open Tennis Tournament 
July 23-Aug. 1st Call Harry O Creative 
Futures for details. 1-800-245-5423. 



housing 

8400-9800 

k.^ ^^ 



Apartments for Rent 



3BDRM 

WESTWOOD New, view, large, secured, 
alarm doors, washer/dryer inside unit, 
month-to-month, pets ok. $2600 avail July 
1st. 310-998-1501. 310-478-2251. 

$525 BACHELOR APT. Fumished, near bus 
and UCLA, 1601 Beloit Ave, west of 405. 
north of Santa Monica Blvd. 310-575-8987. 

•WESTWOOD VILLAGE, MIDVALE N. OF 
LEVERING. LARGE 1&2-B0RM APT. EX- 
CELLENT VIEW, DINING ROOM, UNIQUE, 
CHARM, GARDEN APTS. 310-839-6294.* 

1 BLOCK TO CAMPUS 

1bdrm/1bath. $1050. Hardwood . private pa- 
tk), telephone entry, walk to UCLA. 10966 
Roebling Ave. 310-824-2595 or 310-208- 
4253. 

1 MIN TO UCLA. WESTWOOD. Ibdrm. Fur- 
nished. Carpeted. $lOOO/nfK)nth. Gated conf^ 
plex. Quiet. Pool. Laundry. Telephone entry, 
lyr lease. 310-824-1830. 

1380 VETERAN- 2bdrm/2bath. $1595. Park 
view, rooftop pool/jacuzzi. intercom entry, 
gated pari<ing, laundry, all appliances. Move- 
in ASAP. Cats considered. 310-477-5108. 









GLENROCK 1 


■ J 


APARTMENTS 


P^ GLENROCK 


■ •J AND 


^il LEVERING 


^L ^A Bedroom Apartments 


^^^^■~ 3 Blocks to Campus 


■ ^ k I ~ Rooftop Sundeck & 


^^Vfl- Fitness Room 


^^^^■- Study Lounge 


^kkfl- Laundry Facilities 


^^^J- Gated Assigned 
■ \ Bv Parking 


^kBl> Individual alarm 


^r^^B systems 


■ ••I MUCH, MUCH MORE! 


m^ RESERVE YOUR 


1 


APARTMENT NOW! 


1 


SUMMER '00 


^^M PALL 'OO-'Ol 



437 GAYLEY AVENUE 

Large, fully fumished bedroom, available for 
summer sublet Share with one male. $475. 
Includes parting spot. 310-208-5187. 

BEVERLY HILLS ADJ. 1 .2.43BEDROOM 
$8954UP. LARGE UNUSUAL CHARM. 
SOME SPANISH STYLE* W/HAROWOOD 
FLOORS. ONLY 1/2 BLOCK TO PICO BUS 
310-839-6294. 

BRENTWOOD APT 2+2. catok, bakxjny. 
pool, tandem parking. $1,595. 310-395- 
RENT tow agent fee. Visit us at «vww.wMt- 
siderenlals.oom 



84 OO 

Apartments (or in ut 



Casablanca West 

Summer Special 

Bachelors $645 
Singles $965 ndup 



ftiiiK ttAiM iftinftMannftffflhiftit 

530 Veteran 
208-4394 



BRENTWOOD APT. w/large ctosets. laundry, 
quiet. $685. 310-395-RENT low agent fee. 
Visit us at www.westsiderentals.com 

BRENTWOOD GUEST COTTAGE STUDIO. 
Ibath, R&S. Must See! $625. 310-39^- 
RENT low agent fee. Free search at 
www.westsiderentals.com 

HUGE SINGLES $775-$825. 1bdmr»$1075- 
$1125. Half a block from UCLA. Security 
building, quiet, spacious, furnished, parking 
available. Rent irH:ludes gas and water. 650 
Landfair. Call Uuren 310-824-03191. 

MANHATTAN BEACH DUPLEX. 2-^1 plus 
eat in kit. sunny, patk). garage. $1 ,275. 310- 
395-RENT tow agent fee. Free search at 
www westskjerental.com 



^ Diamond Head 
AfMirtincnts 

single $950- $995 

Sinsle w/loft $1145 

1 BD $1195-1295 

2 BO $1495 

1 BD w/loft $1495 

2 BOw/l^ft $1815 

Intercom System ft Gated PartUng 



Rec room, SaurM, Gym Roo 
Fireplace, Jacuzzi. Dtahwaihar, 
Rcfrtserator, Air Condttloncr LaiMtdry, 
Cathedral Ceilings, no pets 

Short Term Summer Discounts Available 

660 Veteran 
208-2251 



MARINA DEL REY ADJ. HOUSE. 2+1 h/w 
floors, w/d hkups, w/c car garage. $1,500. 
310-395-RENT fee. Free search at 
www.westskjerentals.com 

OWN ROOM in 3bdrm. ApaiXmenl $500/mo 
Available July 1 -August. Call ASAP!! 310- 
209-5073 

PALMS 

Quiet, lower 2-t-2, balcony, air conditioning, — 
fireplace, all amenities. 2 car gated parking. 
Laundry, bus connection UCLA. $1050/mo. 
310-390-5996 

PALMS TOWNHOUSE 2bdrms/1bth, catok. 
patio, laundry, parking. $975. 310-395-RENT 
low agent fee. Free search at www.westsid- 
erentals.com 

PALMS. Single apt from $575, $600deposit. 
1-year lease only. Stove, refrig.. carpets, 
vert, blinds. 310-837-1502 leave message 
8am- 5pm only. 

PRIME SANTA MONICA APT 2+1 In 6 unit 
buikjing. laundry, parking. $1,400. 310-395- 
RENT low agent fee. Free search at 
www.westsklerentals.com 

PRIME SANTA MONICA APT w/ltMfh, R&S. 
laundry, great locatkKi! $675. 310-38S-RENT 
tow agent fee. Free search at www.westsid- 
erentals.com 

REDONDO BEACH APT 2+1 dsm»shr, laun- i 
dry, ckjse to beach $895. 3lO-3e5-RENT 
k>w agent fee. Free search at www.westsid- 
erentals.com 

SANTA MONICA APT 2+1, baloony. Lg" 
ck>sets. pool, yard. $1,400. 310-395-RENT 
tow agent fee. Free search at www.westskj- 
erentals.com 

SANTA MONICA APT. 2+2, w/C pet, lg. Clos- 
ets, laundry $1,595. 310-398-RENT. Free ^ 
search at www.westskjerentals.com 

&ANTA MONICA APT. w/ R&S, in garden '* 
setting $750. 310-395-RENT tow agent fee. 
Free search at www.westsklerentals.com 

SANTA MONICA APT w/walk-ins. laurtdry, 
full kit. new paint. $775. 310-395-RENT tow 
agent fee. Free search at www.westskjeren- 
tals.com 

SANTA MONICA CANYON TRIPLEX, 
w/ocean view, walk to beach. $695. 310-395- 
RENT tow agent fee. Free search at J! 
www.westsklerentals.com 

SANTA MONICA DUPLEX. 2+1. conl. K^ 
cess, laundry, yard. $1,195. 310-395-RENT 
low agent fee. Free search at www.weetskl- 
erentaia.oont 



Display 



26 Monday, July 10, 2000-Friday, July 14, 2000 



Daily Bruin Classlfif d 



I 
i 
) 
1 



Apartments for Rent 



8^00 ■ 8600 

Apnftments for Rent H Coiulo/Townlioiise for Rent 



WALK TO UCLA 

www.keltontowers.com 



WALK TO UCLA 

Beautiful hardwood floors /carpets. 
2bdrm/lbth $1500. Ibdrm/lbth $1050 and 
$1095. Stove, Fridge, Laurxlry room, Park- 
ingaatO) 824-2112. 

WALK TO UCLA 

WESTWCXDD. Large singles and 1-bdrms, 2 
bdrms. Pool, jacuzzi, walk-in closets, fire- 
place, full kitchien, balcony, gated garage, 
laundry room, gas&hot water paid, instant 
broadband avail, www.keltontowers.com. 

WEST LA Cool person needed ASAP to 
share good location 2bed 2bath apt. 
w/female and cat. $480/mo + utilit. 310-820- 
2749. 



WESTWOOD VILLAGE 
TOP LOCATION 

1-lxJrm. junior. $l000/mo. All utilities and 
one parking included. Days 310-475-7533. 
evenings 310-659-4834; • ^ 



ir 



BRENT MANOR-' 
APTS 

Avoid Westwood rents 

1 mile to UCLA 

Singles & Bachel6r 

1&2 Bedrooms 
Pool, Near bus line 

1235 Federal Ave. 

Near Wiishire Blvd. 

(310) 477-7257 . 



■» 



WESTWD. WALK UCLA 

Lovely 2bedroom/1bath, $1500 and 
ibed/lbath $1050 and $1090. Small 
2bed/1bath $1250. Beautiful hardwood 
floors-carpets. 310-824-2112. 

WESTWOOD APT. BACHELOR. Ibath, 
patio, laundry, parking included. $695. 310- 
395-RENT low agent fee. Free search at 
www.westsiderentals.com 



LEVERING ARNS 

Large Sunny 

Singles & 1 Bedroom 

Apartments 

Walk to School and Village 

(310) 208-5215 

667-669 Levering Ave. 
Near Glenrock 



WESTWOOD VILLAGE. Small 1 bdrm-$975. 
Large 1bdrm-$1250. 10990 Strathmore Dr. 
Parking, laundry. Available 5ept. No pets. 1 - 
year lease. 310-471-7073. 

WESTWOOD. 2BPRM/2BATH. $1325 AND 
UP TILE KITCHEN, STEPDOWN LIVING 
ROOM, HIGH CEILING. CHARM. 1 MILE 
SOUTH OF WILSHIRE. 310-839-6294. 

YOUR OWN bedroom and bathroom in a 
four bedroom apartment. $589/month. 
Call:323-460-4560. Your own bedroom in a 
four bedroom townhouse. $499/month. 
Call:310-575-0021. 

BEV HILLS ADJ. APT 2+2, modem, bal- 
cony, blinds, large closets. $1,250. 310-395- 
RENT low agent fee. Free search at 
www.westsiderentals.com 



A 



dvertise in the 



s 



ummer 



B 



ruin 



825-2161 Display 
825-2221 Classified Display 




W 



iL 



QAYLEY MANOR 
APTS 

Super Big Super Clean 
Apartments! 

Singles and 1 bedroonris 

Across the Street from UCLA 

Walk to Village 

NearLeConte 

729 Gayley Ave. 

(310)208-8798 . 



"n 



8500 

Apartments Furnished 



BEVERLY HILLS 
GUESTHOUSE 

STUDIO One person, furnished. New ap- 
pliances, wapher/dryer access, private en- 
trance, garden-view. Beautiful. lOmins. from 
UCLA. $995 including utilities. 310-858- 
6031. 



8600 

Condo/Townhouse for Rent 



- ARTIST RETREAT 

2bdrm/2bth townhouse near Bel-Aire hotel 
canyon view, backyard, hardwood floors, 
fireplace, view deck. Parking $3250. 310- 
276-8505 



SPACIOUS 
WESTWOOD CONDO 

SPACIOUS WESTWOOD 2bed/2 bath con- 
do. Security, pool. Jacuzzi, near park and 
UCLA Great closets and storage. 
$1900/month. Call:310-234-2690 



8700 

Condo/Townti()iiS(' for SiiU* 



$335,000 GREAT WESTWOOD 3BED. 
2.5bth townhouse w/rare small yard. AC, 
Sec. Syst. * extra storage arxl side by 
side parking. $675,000 Charmmg updat- 
ed 3 t>ed house w/3 room guest house. 
Natural wood floors, A.C. spacious 
rooms. Barbara Gardner. Broker 310- 
285-7505. 



CENTRAL BRENTWOOD garden view. 
Ibed, 1 1/2 bath. Den/dining room. Patio, 
gym, pool, sunroof. 2car and guest parking. 
$215,000. 310-471-2556. 

II^AGINE OWNING WILSHIRE Corridor/Hi- 
Rise singlefpor2bdnn $90K-$150K. Walk to- 
UCLA/Village, 24hr/security. Spectacular 
views, pool. Jacuzzi, sauna, valet service. 
Agent-Bob, 310-478-1835 ext. 109. 



8800 

Guesthouse for Rent 



WEST LOS ANGELES 

FURNISHED Guesthouse available August 
1st. Utilities included. 6-miles from UCLA. 
One quiet, non-smoking female preferred. 
$750. 310-390-1032. 



8900 

House for Rent 



BEL AIR HILLS 

2bd/2ba bungalow with patio hardwood 
floors, fireplace, central A/C, parking, laun- 
dry, and minutes to campus. $2450. 310- 
276-8505. 

N. OF WILSHIRE 

SANTA MONICA RENTAL 2bdrm, 2ba, den. 
Spacious, fireplace, wet bar. Avail Aug 1st. 
$1900. 310-273-0784. 

SANTA MONICA APT Ibath, h/w floors, 
laundry. $750. 310-395-RENT low agent fee. 
Free search at www.westsiderentals.com. 

VENICE APT STUDIO. Ibath, w/c pet. h/w 
floors. Walk-in closets, UTPD. $500. 310- 
395-RENT low agent fee. Free search at 
www.westsiderentals.com 

WESTCHESTER DUPLEX. 2+1. laundry, 
Lg. kit. Must See! $890. 310-395-RENT low 
agent fee. Free search at www.westsideren- 
tals.com 



.7 



9000 

House for Sale 



PALISADES 

NEW HOME of your choice with this pack- 
age. Prime location! Walk to t)each, cool, 
club house. Own your own space. Allowance 
for new mobile home included in price. 
$255K. Financing available. Call:Doug:3lO- 
453-8047. 



9200 

Housinc) Needed 



DOCTORAL 

CANDIDATE W/ HOME 

REPAIR SKILLS 
AND TOOLS 

ROOI^ W/BATH, Kitchen priveliges, in quiet 
Westside/SM neighborhood. For mature, 
non-smoking, male doctoral candidate 
w/home repair skils Call:31 0-529-7776. 



9400 

Room (or Rent 



BEVERLY GLEN 



CANYON 



Room in a house. Mountain view, quiet, 
kitchen access, washer/dryer. I5min to 
Westwood Studious, non-smoking male ten- 
ant. $400/nK). includes utilities. Jim:310- 
470-2142. - 

* BEVERLY HILLS 

Furnished room in large house. Grad stud- 
ents preferred. Kitchen privileges, pool, 
washer/dryer, utilities/included. Need car. 
$400(very small). Abby;310-275-3831/818- 
783-5151 

DOG OKAY. Woman, nonsmoker. Private 
bedroom, livirtg room, arxj kitchen itKluded. 
Share bath. Utilities included. Near bus. 
$575/month. Call Marsha:3l 0-390-9007. 

FEMALE NEEDED to share beautiful large 2 
bd/2ba WLA apt. New everything, full amen- 
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27 Monday, Jiily 10, 2000-Friday, July 14, 2000 



OaHy Bruin Sports 



TOLSON 

.♦ ■ ■ " '■ ■-?■■•'■■, 
From page 28 ■ 7; v. • 

"She knows that no time is being 
wasted. All the growing pains that 
athletes go through, she went through 

■ at Northridge," Bolden said. 

"She knows that she's on center 
stage now, and when it comes to prac- 
tice and competing, she turns it on," 

_ Bolden added. 

It's this seasoned quality that has 
carried Tolson through her season of 
ups and downs, and will help maintain 
her focus in one of the biggest meets 

—of her life. 

Struggles like being named Pac-IO 

- athlete of the week after the Mt. Sac 

^Relays, where she qualified for the tri- 
als with her throw of 56-10 3/4, but 

" then not placing as high as she would 
have liked at the NCAA meet have 
given Tolson a level head. :^ 



—J 

Her discipline gives her what it 
Hakes to succeed in the shot put. 

"This event is really hard. With the 
discus and the javelin throw, the wind 
can help you, but here you've really 
got to muscle it out." Venegas 
explained. 

Competing in not only the shot put 
but the hammer throw as well, Tolson 
is up against the best throwers in the 
world for two days of competition in 
the stifling Sacramento heat. 

Despite her success in the hammer 
throw throughout the 2000 outdoor 
season, including the 2000 Pac-IO title 
after her 208-5 launch, Tolson insists 
that the shot put is where her chances- 
are best. 

"I've got a better chance in the 
shot," Tolson said. "Coach says-there 
are places open." 

Her lifetime best, currently at 56- 
1 1, is just inches away Trom where she 
needs to be to do well, according to 



Venegas, 

But because of Tolson's hard work, 
and because she is an "explosive" per- 
former, she's got a shot, according to 
Venegas. "She's very driven; she just 
doesn't quit. One bad meet won't take 
her out of it." 



"She just doesn't quit. 

One bad nneet won't 

take her out of it." 



Art Venegas 

— Co ach 



ing the ability of these two. 

"Their marks haven't really been 
very high this year," Venegas said. 
"Even at 56-11. the top girls aren't 
going to be very scared about it. but I 
think that if they really catch fire, they 
can both PR and get a lifetime best. " 

Competing in the Olympic Trials 
means accomplishing a lifelong 
dream for Christina Tolson since she 
started competing iri track and field. 

"It was a dream, but I didn't think 
it would be a reality," Tolson said. 'I 
always wanted to go to the Olympics, 
I just didn't know that it would come 
so soon though. I'm just trying to 
mak e it." 



With Tolson' and teammate 
Chaniqua Ross ready to storm 
through the shot put event, the com- 
petition may have been underestimat- 



"I'm excited. I need to relax right 
now because I'm overwhelmed. I 
can't believe I've actually made it to 
the trials," Tolson added. 

This is the mind-set that she com- 
petes with. She knows what she wants, 
she knows what she has to do. and she 



is ready to give it everything she has. 

"I'm going for the mark to make it 
there. If anything, fR-ing and doing 
the best that I've done this year is 
what I'm hoping for," Tolson added. 

With her teammates and coach 
looking and cheering her on, Tolson 
spins again to launch another awe- 
some throw. 

"There it is, that's it, that's the 
form right there. With this form, you 
can throw better with more pressure. 
Now with more pressure, the better 
you'll throw, and that's what you 
need," Venegas explains. - ; 

In Sacramento she will bcin a sim- 
ilar throwing circle to the one at 
Drake Stadium, with her shot put 
confidently clutched in her right 
hand. The difference will be that 
depending upon where the ball lands. 
Tolson will be rewarded not only by 
the praise of her coach, but possibly 
with a spot in Sydney. 





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Monday. July 10. 200(V4nday. July 14. 2000 



Daily Bruin Sports 



TOLSON 

From page 32 



helped with 
technique," 



eight-year career as a shot- 
putter, and has also carried 
her through transferring to 
UCLA during her third year 
of college. 

Competing for two years 
at Cal State Northridge, 
Tolson got collegiate and 
NCAA meet ....__^ 
experience 
there. It was 
when her for 



throwers, it 
learning 
Venegas said. 

And at UCLA, Tolson's 
character immediately 
made an impact on her 
Bruin teammates. 

'*She sets a good example 
by doing all of her work," 
freshman teammate Cari 
Soong said. "She does it all 
with as much effort as she 
_______ can. It 



mer 



makes us all 

"Whether she's up » 'i»ie bit 
coac h, or down, she he lps -we aii 

n 



Candy 

Roberts, 

decided to 

join the 

Orangemen 

in Syracuse 

that Tolson 

chose to ^———— 

become a 

Bruin. 

"I always wanted to 
come here," Tolson said. "I 
just didn't know that it 
would actually happen." 

Because Roberts was 
also coached by Venegas at 
UCLA, Tolson's transition 
was even easier. 

"I have my own style, 
and because she was 
coached by one of my ex- 



out In any way 
she can." 

Seilala Sua 

Teammate 



have our 

ups and 
downs and 
whether 
she's up or 
down, it's 
all the same, 

she helps 

out in any 
way she can," teammate 
Seilala Sua said. 

While Tolson's presence 
alone motivates her team- 
mates, she has the advan- 
tage of competing for two 
years before coming to 
UCLA. 

And she came ready to 
compete. 

See TOLSON, page 27 



W.VOLLEYBALL r 

From page 30 ^ . L _ 

away from us and our serve needs to 
be tougher," Hanley said. 

Minus Hanley, the other three 
Bruins who competed this weekend 
will be attempting to qualify for the 
Olympics throughout the summer. 

Though only international competi- 
tions count as Olympic qualifying 
matches, this tournament was a good 
gauge of who will end up on the sand in 
Sydney. 

While Jordan and Davis are the top 
U.S. team, both McPeak and May, and 
"Srce^ahd Fontana are strong coiF 
tenders for the two positions available. 

"Every weekend someone else is 
winning," Jordon said. "But right now 
Holly and Misty are probably the most 
consistent." 

With five more international tour- 
naments left for the teams to qualify, 
including stops in Germany, France, 
Portugal, Japan and finally China, the 
players give it their best in spite of the 
extensive travel schedule, which will 
wrap up on Aug. 13. 

There are four top teams, but only 
the two with the eight best finishes con- 
tinue on to Sydney. 

"We haven't even thought about 
that (the Olympics) yet," said Jordan. 
"We have to focus on making it first." 

This weekend's matches will air on 
Fox Sports Net Aug. 12 at 12:30 pm. 



AVENGERS 

From page Z9 

yard kickofT return, but he was unsatisfied 
afier the game. His disappointment, however, 
didn't stem so much from the fact the 
Avengers are out of the running for a postsea- 
son berth as from the fact Rice lost to his for- 
mer team. 

"There^s bad blood there," said Rice, who 
was a SaberCat just last year. 



W.HOOPS 

'From page 31 ^~~ 



Los Angeles, the last-place team in the 
Western division, felt they earned respect 
from the leading team in the conference. 

"Tonight we showed them, we're just a cou- 
ple of plays away from you guys," 
Semptiphelter said. 

The Avengers have no postseason plans, 
but they do have one game lefi on the schedule 
- the Buffalo Destroyers, who need to win to 
make the AFL playoffs. 

"We got to play for pride now," Rice said. 
"We're playing spoiler." 



gether," Jackson said. "I wasn't thinking of 
leaving Stanford, but things happen for a 
reason. I'm a firm believer 
in that." — ^^-^^ 

As first assistant, 
Jackson will fill a key role 
on UCLA's coaching staff. 

"Tia will really help in a 
lot of areas and she will 
bring new ideas," Olivier 
said. But Jackson's main 
focus will be on recruiting. 

"Everyone's number 

one job is recruiting, and I 

will excel at that," Jackson 
said. 

Carrier, a former assistant coach at 
Cypress Junior College, will also play an 
important role for next year's team. Olivier 



says Carrier will bring enthusiasm and 
excitemen ' the program. 

"I've always wanted to get into women's 

basketball," Carrier said. "I can't think of 
any other place in the country I'd rather be 
than here." 

Getting two new coaches in addition to 
__^_^_^^^_^^^^^__^_____^ the loss of Pac-10 

Player of the Year 
Maylana Martin and 
starting guard Erica 
Gomez will make next 
year a more challeng- 
ing one for the drasti- 
cally altered Bruin 
squad. 

"Any time you have 
________^______ two people leaving and 

only four on staff you 
definitely have a transition year," Olivier 
said. "But it's a positive situation and we 
will make sure we work as a team and show 
the players how a team operates." 



"Everyone's number 

one job is recruiting, 

and I will excel at that." 

Tia Jackson 

Assistant basketball coach 




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Monday, iuty 10, 2000-Ffiday, July 14, 2000 29 



AVENGERS 

Frompage31 

Former Bruin and SaberCat kicker Chris 
Sailer made all but one extra point attempt, 
and also made field goals of 45 and 25 yards. 
His 62-yard attempt in the third quarter was 
blocked, though. 

The Avengers were plagued by injuries. 
Starting quarterback Todd Marinovich left 
the game in the first quarter with a rib injury, 
Tray Crayton left in the second with a sprained 
left foot, and Victor Hall left the game on a 
stretcher in the third. 



Los Angeles ...felt they 
earned respect from the 
leading team in the 
conference..--: 



J Los Angeles still produced spectacular 
Iriays, like Damien Groce's touchdown pass in 
the third. As Groce caught the ball in the end 
lone he was smacked in mid-air by two 
SaberCats, both of whom landed on him. But 
when they got off, Groce had the ball safely 
tucked in his arms. 

After Marinovich was taken out, 
Semptiphelter stepped in. Though he hadn't 
played in four weeks, he completed 18 of 31 
passes for 346 yards and hit seven touchdown 
passes. His only regrets were the two intercep- 
tions he threw,^"I wish I could have those 
throws back," Semptiphelter said. 

Wide receiver and defensive back Anthony 
Rice had three touchdowns, including a 55- 



See AVENGERS, page 28 



TRACK 

From page 32 

mark of 72-3. He is ranked sec- 
ond on the trials list with his 
mark of 226-6. 

Godina has dominated the 
shot put competition recently, 
and won World outdoor titles in 
1997 and 1995. 

He raked in NCAA shot put 
titles in his final two years as a 
Bruin in 1994 and 1995. Having 
already won a silver medal in 
the shot put in the 1996 Atlanta 
Olympic Games, Godina enters 
the trials with valuable experi- 
ence under his belt. 

Also competing in the throw- 
ing circle is Seilala Sua, the ath- 
lete with the most wins in 
UCLA track and field history, a 
four-time outdoor discus cham- 
pion and both the 2000 indoor 
and outdoor shot put champi- 
on. 

Sua is currently sixth in the 
world in the discus and enters 
the trials in third with a mark of 
212-3. She is behind second- 
place Powell's throw of 214-3. 

"I'm excited," Sua said. "My 
training is starting to come on, 
so it's making things more fun, 
and I'm feeling a lot better." 

Coming on strong in the shot 
put will be junior Christina 
Tolson and Chaniqua Ross. 

Tolson, who will compete in 
both the shot put and hammer 
throw, has had a season of ups 
and downs, but with her 2000 
Pac-10 hammer throw crown 
and her second-place finish in 



the shot put, Tolion will be 
ready to perform in the face of 
pressure. 

"They're ready, to throw. 
They're not in this late season 
slump," said Venegas. 

"They're throwing better 
than ever. 

"Nobody feels that they're 
winding down. They're picking 
up the steam. There's so much 
energy, I can feel it," he contin- 
ued. 

Tracy O'Hara, currently fifth 
in the world, has a shot at the 
pole vault team. Barely missing 
the world record of 15-1 earlier 
in the season, O'Hara has a 
chance to be the first UCLA 
member of the USA women's 
pole vault squad. As the 2000 
Indoor and Outdoor champion, 
she has been training hard for 
over half a year. 

**It's been a very long season, 
and I know that they're looking 
to get this meet out of the way," 
pole vault coach Anthony 
Curran said. 

"They're all fired up, though, 
and it depends on that day." 

Track and field is decided in 
a single race, or throw, or jump. 
Anything can happen. It leaves 
an element of surprise with 
each and every event. 

The trials offer athletes, both 
veteran and rookie, a ticket to 
the next level. Highlighted by 
performances of a lifetime and 
painful defeats, the Olympic tri- 
als is the next step in the career 
for some, and a dream come 
true for everyone who makes it 
that far. ; : 




MICHAEL ROSS WACHT/DaiV Brum Senor Staff 

Michelle Perry, shown here at the NCAA championships, will compete 
in the 100 and 400m hurdles in the Olympic trials starting July 14. 




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30 Monday, July 10, 2000-Friday, July 14, 2000 



Daily Bruin Sports 



\^.-j 



Bruin alumnae compete in volleyball semifinals 



BEACH: McPeak, May 
dominate tournament, 
reflect Olympic hopes 



By Amanda Fletcher 

Dally ^ruin Senior Staff 

SEAL BEACH, Calif. - Four 
former UCLA women's volleyball 
players hit the sand for the semifi- 
nals of the Beach Volleyball 
America tournament held this past 
weekend al Seal Beach, Calif. 

Backdropped by a stadium full 
of tan skin 

and wide- . > 

brimmed 
hats, the 
No. 2-seed- 
ed team of 

former 

Bruin Holly 

McPeak 

( 1990) and Misty May (Long Beach 

State) defeated the No. 3 team of 

Lisa Arce and Barbara Fontana 15- 

4. 

Both teams had a "never say die" 
attitude as they dove and stretched 
to keep every ball in play. 

A Fontana ace put her team in 
the early 2-1 lead, but a lucky point 
like that was something McPeak 



BVA-Seal Beach Title 

May/McPeak d. Arce/Fontana 
1 5-4 



wind," McPeak said. "You must 
score points on the bad side to win 
and we were able to do that." 

Add in some crucial hitting 
errors by Fontana, and her team 
never had a chance. In the last play 
of the game Arce hit the ball wide to 
the right to give May and McPeak 
their ISth point. 

"They played great and were 
really hustling," Arce said. "When 
you see that, and you're struggling 
it makes it tough." 

To get to the gold mediil game, 
McPeak and May blew away 
Nancy Reno and Leanne 

Schuster in 
— — ^— ■ a 15-4 tri- 
umph in 
the semifi- 
nal. 

Ahead 
by as many 
as JO points 
throughout 
the match, McPeak and May com- 
bined hustle and sheer power in a 
win that advanced them to the final 
round. 

"Our defense was awesome in 
the semifinal round, which is what 
we needed to do," May said. 

The No. 1-seeded team of former 
Bruins Jenny Johnson Jordan 
(1992-1995) and Annett Davis 



and May made a habit of answering (1992-1994) battled Nancy Reno 



with some tough serves of their 
own, which put them ahead 6-4. 

"We got them in trouble with our 
serve," McPeak said. "If we can get 
them in trouble we're quick enough 
to pass and get off good hits." 



(Stanford) and Leanne Schuster 
(Arizona State) for third place after 
4osing to Arce and Fontana in the 
semifinal. . • ' > . 

Coming out with the early lead 
Jordan and Davis bulldozed their 




Despite a strong wind that rose opponents and finished 15-4 to win 

just in time for the final match, the bronze. 
McPeak and May were able to keep Against Arce and Fontana in the 

up their killer serving. semifinal, Jordan and Davis got the 

"It was very challenging with the lead early but fell 10-15. 



JESSE PORTER/Oaily Bfuin Seniof Staff 

Bruin alumna Linda Hanley dives for the ball during a match 
Saturday in the Beach Volleyball America Tour at Seal Beach. 

"We were up 5-2 and we were (Hawaii), but was eliminated in the 
playing well," Jordan said. "I made quarterfinals by Arce and Fontana 
a lot of hitting errors in the begin- 15-9. 
ning and brought them back into 
it." • .: ■ 

Bruin Linda Hanley (1978-1981) 
teamed up with Carrie Poppinga 



"We did pretty well but we let 
some scoring opportunities get 

See W.VOUEYBALL, page 28 



FOOTBALL BRIEFS 



Farmer signs with 
Steelers 

Former UCLA wide receiver Danny 
Farmer signed a three-year, $1.1 million con- 
tract with the Pittsburgh Steelers July 6. He 
also received a $300,000 signing bonus. 

"Now I'm just looking to fit in," Farmer 
told the Orange County Register. "I'm going 
to do what I can to add to the great receivers 
we already have." 

Farmer was the only Bruin selected in the 
2000 draft in April, when Pittsburgh took 
him in the fourth round. He set the UCLA 
career receiving record with 3,020 yards. 

Having recovered from his recent bout 
with injuries. Farmer will report to traiiyng 
camp in Latrobe, Pa., on July 16. 

"I'm healthy, and I feel -good," Farmer 
said. "I'm ready." » 



Missouri cancels series 

The University of Missouri is nixing the 
series that was scheduled against UCLA for 
the 2001 and 2002 seasons. 

Deciding that their 2001 season was chal- 
lenging enough with teams like Texas and 
Nebraska already on the schedule, Missouri 
proposed moving the dates of the contests. 

Talks over several months between the two 
schools have yet to resolve the matter. 

"UCLA was at least agreeable to let 
Missouri find an acceptable substitute for the 
series," Missouri associate athletic director 
Gene McArtor said in a statement. "We 
found other schools to play in pur place, but 
none of those were acceptable to UCLA, 
which is their prerogative." 

Since the two schools had a contract, 
UCLA may take legal action, citing as much 
as $500,000 in losses in television, ijevenue 
that the games could generate. 

Notes compiled by Christina Teller, Daily Bruin 
Senior Staff. 




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OaUy Bruin Sports 



Monday,iuty 10, 2000-Friday, July 14,2000 31 



UCLA Nres new coaches 
for women's basketball 

W.HOOPS: Carrier, Jackson join staff; team looks to 
recruit, rebuild aflBr loss of top players to graduation 



By Amanda Fletcher 

Dally Bruin Senior Staff 

UCLA women's basketball head 
coach Kathy Olivier announced two 
new additions to her coaching staff 
last Thursday. 

Tia Jackson takes on the first assis- 
tant coach role, 

replacing «..^_^_«_i_ 
WilletteWhite.a 
seven-year mem- 
ber of the 
UCLA staff 
Thcon Carrier 
replaces Molly 
Tutler as the 
third assistant. 
" The desire to 
become a head 
coach drove 
White to pursue -^^— ^— ^ 
other avenues, 

while Tutler is now the second assis- 
tant coach at UC Irvine, according to 
Olivier. 

"They were just ready to move 
on," she said. 

But Jackson and Carrier are ready 
to assume their new roles as Bruin 
coaches. 

A former WNBA player and assis- 



tant coach at Stanford, Jackson wit! 
bring her extensive basketball knowl- 
edge and recruiting experience to the 
Bruin squad. 



"I can't think of any 

other place in the 

country I'd rather be 

than here." 

Theon Carrier 

Assistant basketball coach 



"She was highly recommended by 
several people in the profession," 
Olivier said. And it's not hard to see 
why. Jackson attended the University 
of Iowa, where 
. she led her team 

to four Top 25 
finishes, includ- 
ing a Final Four 
berth her junior 
year. Drafted in 
the first round as 
the ninth overall 
pick, she played 
all but two 
games for the 
Phoenix 
, Mercury in its 

first season. And 
while she was an assistant coach at 
Stanford, the Cardinal tied for sec- 
ond in the Pac-10 last season.^ 

But leaving Stanford didn't even 
cross Jackson's mind until she got a 
call from Olivier. 

"It was an appealing offer alto- 

SeeWJIOOPS,page28 





UPDATE 



Hearing date to 
be set for Faoa 
on July 10 

A meeting to set the prelimi- 
nary hearing for UCLA line- 
backer Asi Faoa is scheduled for 
July 10 at 8:30 a.m. Faoa. his 
lawyer Milton Grimes and 
deputy district attorney Dana 
Garcetti are scheduled to meet at 
the Los Angeles Municipal 
Court. > 

Faoa was arrested on June 16 
on one count each of mayhem 
and assault, six weeks after an 
altercation at a fraternity party 
that left third-year psychology 
student Rodrigo DeZubiria with 
brain damage. 

Faoa pled not guilty at his 
arraignment on June 19. A pre- 
liminary hearing date could not 
be set at that time, however, 
because Grimes was not present. 
At the arraignment, attorney 
MaryEtta Marks represented 
Faoa in Grimes' stead. 

At the hearing, witnesses from 
both sides will testify, and the 
judge will decide if there is suffi- 
cient evidence for the case to go 
to a jury trial. 

Notes compiled by Pauline Vu, 
Dally Bruin Senior Staff. 



JESSE PORTER/Oaily Brum Senior Staff 

Wide receiver Anthony Rice tries to break a tackle for the Los 
Angeles Avengers. , . _ 

Avengers lose to rival SaberCats 



ARENA: Game ends in J"^V^ ^^^ points short of upsetting the 

conference-leading SaberCat^ (11-2) 
heartbreak for L. A. after Saturday night at staples Center, with 
J o . . c I a final score 75-72. 

narrow defeat in San Jose 



their 
of try- 



BRAD MOWKAWAA5aily Bfuio 



Head coach Kathy Oliver, has hired Theon Carrier and Tia Jackson 
(not shown) as assistant coaches for the women's basketball teani. 



"I HATE HIDDEN COSTS!" 

—DR. ROSS J. SOMERS, OPTOMETRIST, (UCLA Alumni) 



By Pauline Vu 

Dally Bruin Senior Staff 

They failed to live up#p 
name, but it wasn't from lack ( 
ing. 

Facing the same San Jose 
SaberCats who gave them their worst 
loss of the season, a 78-25 beating in 
May. the Los Angeles Avengers (3-10) 
of the Arena Football League came 



SaberCats 75 
Avengers 72 



Stilt, as Avengers head coach Stan 
Brock told his team aAer the game, 
they should keep their heads held 
high. 

"We played our hearts out," said 
backup quarterback Scott 



Semptiphelter. "We just made one too 
many mistakes." 

Consistently trailing the SaberCats 
by about 20 points throughout the 
game, the Avengers pulled it together 
in the final seconds. Down 75-58 with 
46 seconds left in the game, quarter- 
back Semptiphelter threw two touch- 
down passes to bring his team within 
75-72. 

But then, with 37 seconds left, kick- 
er Kyle Pooler's onside kick attempt 
went out-of-bounds and San Jose ran 
down the clock for the win. 



See AVENGERS, page 29 




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Daily Bruin 



New coaches on staff - . 

Tia Jackson and Theon Carrier recently 
joined the women's basketball staff as 
assistant coaches. 
See page 31 for the story. 

Monday, July 10, 2000-Friday, July 14, 2000 



S P O RTS 



Sports on the Web Q q 

See all this and more at | 

the Daily Bruin's : 

Website: • 

www.dailybruin.ucla.edu I 



Rembert pleas no contest to theft charge 



W.BASKETBALL Forward 
suspended, likely to serve 
three months of jail time 



By Christina Teller and Pauline Vu 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

Ayesha Rembert, a junior forward 
on the UCLA women's basketball 
team, pleaded no contest to three 
burglary and theft charges on July 6. 

According to the charges, she stole 
several items, including a laptop com- 
puter, diamond earrings and a cellu- 
lar phone, worth about $3,000, from 
TifTiny Walls, a third-year history stu- 
dent, in the early morning hours of 
Dec. 27. 

Rembert entered her no contest 
plea just as jury selection was about 
to begin for her Superior Court trial. 

"I'm happy that it's finally come to 
an end," Walls said. "1 definitely feel 



that she got off a little bit easy by 
being able to plead no contest and 
basically get out of what she had done 
without openly admitting it." 

The day following her arrest after 
a basketball practice in Pauley 
Pavilion, Rembert, a transfer from 
Marquette, was indefinitely suspend- 
ed from the team for what assistant 
director of sports information Steve 
Rourke called "a violation of team 
rules." Athletic department officials 
have not commented on whether or 
not the suspension had anything to 
do with the arrest. 

After she discovered the items 
were missing, Walls, who had been 
Rembert's friend for nearly a year, 
confronted Rembert, who denied any 
wrongdoing. Walls then filed a report 
with the LAPD on Dec. 27. 

On Jan. 14, Walls found a package 
on her doorstep that had no return 
address but included several of the 
missing items, including the earrings 



and the phone. Walls later received a 
Federal Express package that held 
the jacket and the laptop, though the 
laptop was partially damaged. 

LAPD Detective John Eum, the 
lead detective on the case, traced the 
second package to a business on 
Santa Monica Boulevard. A clerk at 
the store then identified Rembert out 
of an eight-person lineup as the per- 
son who sent the package. 

On the day of her arrest, Rembert 
signed a written confession in which 
she admitted to stealing several items^ 
from Walls, according to Eum. 

"She did write out a confession." 
Eum said at the time. "I asked her 
why she did it. At first she didn't want 
to give me an answer, but later stated 
that she had done something stupid." 

Eum said that Rembert told him 
her athletic scholarship did not give 
her enough money to survive. 

According to Eum, Rembert used 
Wall's spare keys, which she took on 




Dec. 25, to enter Walls' residence. 
She then took Walls' belongings on 
Dec. 27 while Walls was sleeping. 

Weelcs after her confession, 
Rembert pleaded innocent at her 
Feb. 9 arraignment. Sh? has been 
granted several continuances since 
then. 

The latest step in the case was her 
no contest plea. Rembert's sentenc- 
ing has been scheduled for Aug. 18. 

According to Deputy District 
Attorney Alyson Messenger, 
Rembert will likely receive three 
months in county jail, a suspended 
state prison term and three years pro- 
bation, along with paying restitution 
and undergoing counseling. 

The incident upset Walls in a way 
she has not been able to fully recover 
from. 

"It's just something you can't for- 
get about. It hurt me a lot. She was 
supposed to be my friend, and I take 
friendship seriously," Walls said. 



V 





U C 1. A 




Ayesha Rembert 

"I hope she has learned a lesson," 
Walls added. "I know I learned a 
valuable lesson about who you can 
trust and who you can let into your 
life." ■■, ^ : - •- 

With contributions from Daily Bruin 
wire reports. 



Watch the field to keep 
track of all those Bruins 



Despite rough roads, 
this shot-putter strives 
to throw one in Sydney 







By Christina Teller 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

With the shot put firmly gripped in her right hand, 
she confidently walks toward the throwing circle. 
One foot in front of the other, her eyes focused on the 
cement inlay, Christina Tolson mechanically eases 
into her throwing position. 

Within the blink of an eye, 
her body has rotated 360 
degrees and the ironball has 
been launched 58 feet in the 
air, all because of her finely 
tuned physical mechanics. 

"See how much height you 
can give it with the legs, there 
like that! That was close to 58 
feet. That would be a big throw 
at the trials," UCLA throwing 
coach Art Venegas says as he 
watches Tolson during practice. 

The key elements to a good thrower are skill, bal- 
ance and strength, especially in the legs. 

"It's hard to be a thrower," Venegas explains. 
"You have to be a good lifter, as well as a good throw- 
er." 

"(Christina) works hard at all facets, that's what I 
think makes her so solid as a thrower." 

With the Olympic trials just around the corner. 
Tolson is as focused as ever and ready to show the 
nations best what she's really capable of.. 

With a frustrating meet at the NCAA champi- 
onships in early June behind her. she is looking to 
avenge disappointment caused by her fifth place fin- 
ish III the shot put and the hammer throw. 

Going into that meet. Tolson sat atop the lists of 
shot-putters, but fell short when it came time to com- 
pete, placing fifth with her mark of 52-9 1/2. 

"Ijieed to be more focused than I was at 
NCAAs." Tolson said. "Something happened at 







TRIALS: The heat is on for 
several Olympic hopefuls 
seeking a bid dow^n under 



By Christina Teller 
Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

Under the hot Sacramento sun, 
Bruins, both graduated and current, 
will take the UCLA tradition to the 
next level. The Olympic trials, start- 
ing this week from July 14-23, repre- 
sent a culmination of a lifetime of 
hard work. - ■- — , 

With nine current Bruins and as 
many as 17 alums vying for a spot, 
the blue and gold will be well repre- 
sented against the nation's best. 

"The trials bring out the best and 
worst performances," said women's 
track and field head coach Jeanette 
Bolden. "I'm glad that our athletes 
are getting a chance to compete at a 
higher level." 

Like the 2000 Bruin squads, 
UCLA is predominantly represent- 
ed in field events. They will compete 
in nine field events: men's and 
women's discus, men's and women's 
shot put, women's pole vault, 
women's high jump, women's ham- 
mer throw, women's triple jump and 
men's javelin. Bruins will also com- 
plete in seven running events: the 



men's 100 meters, men's and 
women's 200m, men's 10,000m, 
men's 800m, women's 100m, 
women's 100m hurdles, and 
women's 400m hucdies. Each event 
will take only the top three in the 
U.S. 

A handful of the events will fea- 
ture face-offs between different gen- 
erations of Bruins. In the 100m 
dash, senior Shekedia Jones will 
face alum Gail Devefs. 

Jones, who placed fifth in the 
NCAA championships despite suf- 
fering from a strained hamstring, is 
entered as No. 14 for the trials with 
her time of 1 1.23 seconds which she 
ran at the NCAA meet. 

Devers, who entered 2000 ranked 
fifth in the world in the lOOm, is 
third in the nation with a time of 
10.94. Devers has been at the top of 
world competition through the '90s 
and earned the World Outdoor title 
in the lOOm in 1993 and the lOOm 
hurdles in 1993, 1995 and 1999. 

Most of the alumni throwers who 
will be competing at the trials, are 
members of the Reebok Bruin track 
club coached by Art Venegas, the 
throwing coach and men's head 
coach. 

John Godina, who graduated in 
'95, is atop the shot put list with his 

Sec TMOC page 29 



KflTH fcNRKX/tZ/Da.ly Brum Semcx SlaH 

Christina Tolson hopes to keep her momentum 
on her road to Sydney for the 2000 Olympics. 

NCAAs, and I need to change whatever it was." 

She looks to the trials as another chance to redeem 
herseir. 

"Thiits something 1 need to put behind because I 
need to go on." Tolson said. "I want to show them 
what I can do." 

To watch her compete and practice is to observe 
the embodiment of intcn.sc locus. 

"She is a very focused and very serious person." 
women's head coach Jcancttc BoldtMi said. "She's 
been to the big meets, and she knows what she 
wants." 

It is this intcnsit\ that has carried her through an 



i* 



BRUIN QUAUFIERS FOR TRACK AND FIELD TRIALS 

Current and former UCLA athletes to compete in 2000 Olympic Trials, hdd fn Sacramento 
from July 14-23. %. 



I 



See TOLSON, page 28 



1 



Amy Acuff (1997) - High Jump ^ 

Aridrea Anderson ( 1 999) - 400m 
Gentry Bradley (1996) - 200m 
Sheila Burrell (1995) - Heptathalon 
Gail Devers (1988)- 100m, lOOmH 
Dave Dumble (1997) -Dicsus 
Dawn Dumble (1995) - Shot Put, Discus 
John Godina (1995) - Shot Put, Discus 
Darnesha Griffith (Sophomore) - High Jump 
Joanna Hayes ( 1 999) - 400mH , ;. . 
Erica Hoernig (Junior) Pole Vault .-'• - 
JoshJohnson (1998) Javelin 
Shakedia Jones (Junior) - 100m, 200m 



Mebrahtom Keflezighi (1998) - lO^OOOm 

Midiael Marsh (1989)-^ 100m 

Tracy O'Hara (Sophomore) - Pole Vault 

Mid»elle Perry (Junior) - 100mH,400mH 

Su/y Powell (1998) - Discus 

Chaniqua Ross (Sophomore) - Shot Put Discus 

Heather Sickler (Sophomore) - Pole Vault 

Deana Simmons (Sophomore) -Triple Jump 

Scott Slover (1998) -Pole Vault 

Jess Strut2el(2000) -800m 

Seilala Sua (2000) - Discus 

Luke Sullivan (1999) - Discus 

Christina Tolson (Junior) - Shot Put Hanwter Throw 



Serving the UCLA community since 1919 



Monday, Juiy 17,20O0-FrioayJuly21,200O 



www.ddilybruin.ucld.edu 



Campus may face 




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BRAD MOFOKAWA/Daily B»uin 

Recent graduate Jamie Lawson prepares food at the Bombshelter, one of the 
on-campus restaurants plagued by a record low number of student applicants. 



ASUCLA: Better-paying 
jobs, internships cut in 
on potential work force 



By David King 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

"Help Wanted" signs may be 
in many Associated Students of 
OCLA establishments come 
September, following a shortage 
of student employees for the asso- 
ciation. 

On-campus restaurants and 
the UCLA Store suffered record 
low numbers of student appli- 
cants during spring quarter, leav- 
ing many jobs vacant. 

In response, ASUCLA offi- 
cials formed a summer-long task 
force early in July to develop and 
propose a plan to resolve the 
issue. 

though the association laid ofT 
19 career employees in mid-June, 
officials said there are no plans to 
lay off student employees. 

The lack of stuiient applicants 



is mainly caused by the changing 
campus population, said Bob 
Williams, director of food ser- 
vices for ASUCLA and also the 
head of the task force. 

"The general feeling is that stu- 
dents today are more focused on 
school," he said. 

Williams also said college stu- 
dents generally have options 
other than on-qimpus employ- 
ment. 

"They are very sought-after 
employees, so it's a competitive 
market when trying to get stu- 
dents," he said. 

The task force is considering 
raising wages of specific student 
positic)ns, an idea Dario Bravo, 
assistant director of Internship 
and Study Abroad Services, said 
is a must. 

Most wages for starting posi- 
tions currently displayed on the 
association's employment bul- 
letin board fall between $6 and $7 
hourly. 

"On-campus jobs are going to 
iTave to pay more," Bravo said. 
"They may have to be more com- 



petitive to get the students they 
want." 

Bravo also said students turn 
to internships or career-oriented 
jobs instead because they offer 
higher wages and workplace 
experience. He added many are 
willing to intern without pay sim- 
ply to gain experience. 

"(Internships) expose them to 
fields they'd like to explore," 
Bravo said. "Plus, a lot of the 
employers will take these students 
as potential employees." 

With such competition in the 
job market, informing and 
attracting more potential employ- 
ees is the task force's primary 
goal, Williams said. 

"We're looking at what we 
think are the positive parts of the 
job that we can point out to the 
students," he said. "We want to 
market better so that students are 
aware of all these positives." 

Such incentives include a 20 
percent UCLA Store discount for 
ASUCLA employees, flexible 

SceBMP10VEES,page8 



^ ■ ' 



More students means more professors 



ami ifom wtpciiMnon 



CONNir WU/0«ilv Bfutn Smtot SuW 



JOBS: Projected uptick 
in enrollment creates 
need for faculty hiring 

\ 

ByMaryHoang 

Daily Bruin Contributor 

In the upcoming decade, 
approximately 7,000 new faculty 
members need to be hired to 
accommodate the influx of students 
entering the University of 
Califomia system as the result of 
Tidal Wave II. 

An additional' 3,000 faculty 
members would supplement the 
current faculty pool throughout the 
UC system, and 4,000 will be need- 
ed to replace retirees, according to 
UC spokesman Brad Hayward. 

"Systemwide, there is going to 
be a 60,000-student increase," 
Hayward said. "The hiring of new 
faculty is occurring on an ongoing 
basis." 

He sa'id the systemwide break- 
down of the student enrollment is 
expected to be 80 percent under- 
graduate and 2C^percent graduate. 

Alongside the UC's projected 
employment growth, state and 
nationwide increases are also antic- 
ipated by state and feder^tl agen- 
cies. 

The California Employment 
Development Office, a state agency 
that projects labor change statistics 
for the future, estimates an employ- 
ment increase for all occupations at 
23.6 percent statewide. 

But the increases for all post-sec- 
nndary fac ulty exceeds the entire 



as high as 66.7 percent for comput- 
er science teachers and 31.8 percent 
for philosophy, religion and physi- 
cal science. 

There is also an expected 
increase of 35.7 percent for chem- 
istry teachers in the upcoming 
decade. 

"In order to determine projec- 
tions we were conservative. The 
estimates may be larger than the 
expected in the end," said Karl 
Hedlind, projection unit manager 
at the California Employment 
Development Office. 



On a nationwide 

basis there will be a 

22.6 percent increase 

in university and 

college faculty. 



"All occurring projects are a ref- 
erence to the industry, staffing pat- 
terns and school age population." 

According to the Bureau of 
Labor Statistics, there will be a 22.6 
percent increase in university and 
college faculty on a nationwide 
basis. The only other occupation to 
surpass university and college fac- 
ulty is special education teachers. 

Hayward said faculty hiring has 
been steady in recent years. For the 
1997-1998 and 1998-1999 fiscal 
years, 362 tenure-track faculty were 
hired throughout the UC system. 

"We do know that these num- 



coming years to allow UC to 
accommodate all the additional stu- 
dents who will be heading our way," 
he said. 

The projected increase in the 
UC system's student population 
has led the university to pursue new 
strategies to meet the enrollment 
demand. 

The university plans to do this 
"with a focus on creative solutions 
tailored to the needs of individual 
campuses and their surrounding 
communities," according to a UC 
Web site dedicated to Tidal Wave 

•L : -- ■ 

The first Tidal Wave occurred in 
the 1960s, with the baby boomer 
generation. The UC opened three 
new campuses to absorb the influx. 

This increase in the number of 
incoming students is expected to 
last longer than the original 
increase, according to the Web site. 

But only one new university - 
UC Merced, opening in 2005 - is 
being built to accommodate the 
increase. 

A variety of other possible solu- 
tions to contend with incoming chil- 
dren of the baby boom generation 
include: increasing summer session 
enrollment by expanding course 
offerings; enrolling more students 
in off-campus locations; and cut- 
ting the average graduation time 
from 1 3 quarters to 12. 

"UC campus growth, along with 
needed renovation and seismic pro- 
jects, will require $500 million per 
year in capital funding," according 
the Tidal Wave II Web site. But the 
Web site does not indicate the spe- 
cific amount that will be allocated 



STUDENTS RECEIVI 

The nurnfaiytf students awarded 




AOAM BK>WNA)aHy Brum 



Proposed bill may give 
grants to all qualified 



work force avemge- with estimates bers will need to increase in the for the hiring of new faculty. 



AID: Supporters hope to 
make gains before start 
of Tidal Wave IFinHux 



By Michael Fakonc 

Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

Legislation currently sitting on 
Gov. Gray Davis's desk could guar- 
antee Cal Grants to all qualified 
applicants in the state by 2006, but 
speculation persists about whether 
the governor will sign or veto the bill. 

If enacted. Senate Bill 1644, spon- 
sored by Deborah Ortiz (D- 
Sacramento) would increase the 
number of Cal Grant recipients to 
100 percent of those who qualify - a 
marked increase from the 18 percent 
of eligible applicants who received 
grants for the upcoming school year. 



"We're creating a promise, art 
assurance, and an entitlement to stu- 



dents who have come from poor fam- 
ilies that financial assistance wilfnot 
be an obstacle to.attending a universi* 
ty or community college," Ortiz said. 

Cal Grants are a form of renew- 
able need-based financial aid distrib- 
uted by the California Student Aid 
Commission to students attending 
public institutions of higher educa- 
tion in California. 

Between 7,500 to 8,000 UCLA stu- 
dents have received Cal Grants each 
year, and that number has been ris- 
ing. 

Eligibility for Cal Grants fluctu- 
ates from year to year and is based on 
a number of factors, most important- 
ly a student's financial situation and 
grade point average. 

Based on the amount of money the 
program gets from the state budget, 
the CSAC sets certain GPA criteria 
for each type of Cal Grant. SB 1644 



9W VH^^Wl^^ ^^^^m W 



'^^ 



2 Monday,Julyl7,2000 — fridayjuly21,2000 • 



Daily Bruin News 



COMMUNITY BRIEFS 



Survey finds UC lab 
has positive image 

A January 2000 survey by the Charlton 
Research Company found that the Lawrence 
Livermore National Laboratory is seen as well- 
managed, protective of its national secrets, safe 
and an important economic resource to the 
local community. 

The survey excluded people who worked for 
the lab. the Department of Energy and the 
University of California. 

"TTiet-ab is seen as a^ood neight)or and rtfe 
community holds the Laboratory in high 
regard.'" said Natasha Stein of the research 
company. 

Recently the UC's operation of the DOE 
owned labs, which includes the Los Alamos 
National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley 
National Laboratory, has come under fire in 
Congress after it was revealed that two hard dri- 
ves containing nuclear weapons disarmament 
information were misplaced. 

Last year, the labs came under scrutiny after 



Los Alamos scientist Wen Ho Lee 
was arrested for allegedly mishan- 
dling sensitive nuclear information. 



Study shows Medicaid 
poorly controls STDs 

A UCLA study released last week concluded 
that current managed-care policies lead to inad- 
equate control of non-viral sexually transmitted 
diseases among Medicaid patients, which 
include a high proportion of at-risk individuals. 

The study, doiie by the Center foT Health 
Policy Research, was the first to examine STD 
policies and practices among Medicaid 
patients. Medicaid is a state and federal pro- 
gram providing health care to approximately 
35 million individuals and families. '' 

"The managed care system often cites eco- 
nomics, legal liabilities, physician autonomy, 
and even religion as reasons for failing to 
require adequate STD clinical practices and 
treatment guidelines - but low organizational 
priority seems to be the biggest culprit," said 




Professor E. Richard Brown, 

director of the center. 

For example, less than half of the 

managed care providers shared patient 

information with the local health department to 

curb the spread of STDs, the study said. 

Medicaid subscribers are mostly low-income 
women and children, including large propor- 
tions of individuals who are considered at a 
higher risk for STDs. 

Researchers examined policies and practices 
of managed-care organizations in seven large 
cities whose populations have high numbers of 
STD c^ses^nd large percentages of Medicaid 
beneficiaries. ..■-.:■.- . •; • - - 

Time magazine honors 
architecture professor 

Time magazine selected UCLA Professor 
Greg Lynn as one of seven people changing the 
face of design in its new series, "Innovators, 
Time 100: The Next Wave." Lynn is featured in 
the magazines July 17 issue. 



The series is the culmination of 18 months of 
work looking into tomorrow's leaders in the 
fields of design, religion, sports, politics, health, 
technology and finance. 



"Greg Lynn is one of our school's many dis- 
tinguished faculty, in the Department of 
Architecture and Urban Design whose creative 
vision is helping to shape the artists and design- 
ers of tomorrow," said Daniel Neuman, dean of 
the School of Arts and Architecture. "We are 
gratified to see him receive such prominent 
recognition for his work." 

Lynn, who owns the architectural firm Greg 
Lynn FORM, abandoned many traditional 
architectural methods about eight years ago in 
favor of computers. 

He and 10 UCLA students in his 
Embryological Housing seminar are represent- 
ing the United States, along with Columbia 
University, at the seventh International 
Architecture Biennale in Venice, Italy, one of 
the most prestigious forums for exhibiting 
architecture internationally. 

Compiled from Daily Bruin staff and wire reports. 



For additional StOTJCS 

^^^ breaking news 



Web site at 



www.dailybruin.ucla.edu 



Monday,Julyl7,2000 

www.aailybnjin.ucla.edu 




A quick L^&k 
at your Bruin 



Page # 



Daily Bruin Classifieds 27-27 



Crossword Puzzle 25 



Movie Guide 9 



Deal of 
the Day! 



^eP&^t^! 




Mercedes 

Cup 

Tennis 

Tournament 

Next week~ 



BREAKFAST SPECIALS 



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browns and toast 



3.00 



+ tax 



See page 4for detsals. 

Advertise in the Bruin 



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eiatsNMMsplay: 310.206.3060 



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DAILY BRUIN 



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Daily Bruin News 



Monday, Juty 17, 2000-Friday, July 21, 2000 $ 




Orientation sessions seek to ease transition to 
college; some say focus is too academic 



KEITH ENRIQUEZ/[3aily Bruin Senior '.taff 

An orientation group takes a rest after finding everything 
on their list for the nighttime scavenger hunt. 



By Dharshani Dharmawardena 
Daily Bruin Senior Staff 

When incoming freshmen arrivec] 
early for their orientation to UCLA, 
some of the counselors took them to 
Westwood Village and told them to 
find their way back to campus. 
. "They took us to Diddy Riese and 
said 'This is Diddy Riese,'" said 
Monique Evans, an incoming math 
student. "They didn't even take us 
home and we ended up coming back 
the long way." 

For their part, some orientation 

counselors who conduct this intro- 

ductioato UCLA said the trip to the 

village was meant as a traditional rite 

' of passage for early arrival students. 

"You have to find your way 
back," said Brenclan Raher, an ori- 
entation counselor and third-year 
African American studies student. 
"The students work as a team and 
make friends, and they get used to 
getting around a college campus." 

Because attending a large school 
can seem daunting to college fresh- 
men, coming to one of the 1 2 sum- 
mer orientation sessions makes the 
transition easier, said Nichol Davis, 
an orientation counselor and third- 
year mathematics and economics 
student. 

"We're here to h^ ^students get 
adjusted to coming to college both 
academically and socially," she said. 
"We're here to answer any questions 
that may come up for students and 
to let them know what UCLA is like 
in a general sense." 

The orientation counselors, who 
live in Sproul Hall with the students, 
began training during the first week 
of spring quarter. 

From their training, the coun- 
selors learn the specific rules, regula- 
tions and requirements for the 
School of Letters and Sciences. Each 
counselor focuses on a specific 
major area and the student groups 
are arranged according to major. 
Undeclared students are placed in 
groups in the area they indicated on 
their application, such as life sci- 
ences or humanities. 

As part of their job, counselors 




WITH EN^ , 8fu.n Senwr Staff 

Incoming students Nina Hides, Jessica Cosby and David Kincaide examine their scavenger hunt list during Carpe Noctem at orientation. 



inform a student about his or her 
specific academic program. Some of 
this advice includes referring incom- 
ing students to departmental advi- 
sors and helping them to create bal- 
anced class schedules for the first 
quarter. 

For Davis, who advises math and 
atmospheric science students, bal- 
ance means taking a math class with 
two other classes that satisfy general 
education requirements. Enrolling, 
in a difilcult class and two easier 
classes will make their first quarter 
easier, she said. 

Some students said they found 
planning their fall quarter the most 
difficult part of orientation. 

"I've been working on my sched- 



ule for hours," said Judith Spiro, an 
incoming freshman. 
'^ Nicole Yamada, who also plans to 
attend UCLA in the fall, said she 
never anticipated that counselors 
would spend so much time on acade- 
mic planning. 

"The OCs were very helpful in 
organizing everyone to plan their 
schedules," she said. "I just didn't 
expect them to focus entirely on 
classes. 

Although Yamada met people in 
her group, she said she did not feel 
the program was as social as it could 
have been. 

**l would have more activities 
where students could interact on a 
broader spectrum," she said. "1 



don't think you really get to branch 
out and meet other people the way 
the program is set up." 

Davis, on the other hand, said ori- 
entation introduces students to both 
social and academic aspects of 
UCLA. 

She added it lets each student find 
out more information about campus 
through various workshops and the 
traditional barbecue. 

"On the first day, they start off 
with a presentation by a professor 
and by the dean," Davis said. "Then 
where they take workshops - then 
they can pick and choose what they 
want. 

"They have to have two meetings 
individually with their OC," she 



added. "One on social, one on acad- 
emics." 

A panel of students also talks 
about their college experience to 
help the students, Davis said. 

Tye Elliott, an incoming biology 
student, expected all the academic 
advice and information that orienta- 
tion counselors provided for her. 

"I was happy that they focused 
more on all the academic aspects," 
she said. "That is what college is real- 
ly for " 

Raher said although orientation is 
structured well, the groups could be 
smaller. 

"I think it might help if they had 

S««0ldCNrATMN,pa9c9 




donor 



COMMISSION: Changes 
in pension fund may be 
effort to oust treasurer 

The Associated Press 

SAN FRANCISCO The 

University of California regent who 
heads George W. Bush's California 
campaign helped an investment firm 
win a no-bid UC contract after its pres- 
ident gave $80,000 to a Republican 
fund, the San Francisco Examiner 
reported July 16. 

Regent Gerald Parsky. a Los 
Angeles financier appointed to the UC 



Republican Gov. Pete Wilson, told the 
newspaper he was unaware of political 
donations made to Bush and the GOP 
by executives of the firm, Wilshire 
Associates, also of Los Angeles. 

Citing UC records and unnamed 
"informed sources," the newspaper 
said Parsky pushed for a restructuring 
of the university's $59 billion pension 
fund, urging an overhaul of investment 
strategies and sparking a move to oust 
longtime UC treasurer Patricia Small. 

Parsky then persuaded UC to give a 
series of consulting contracts to 
Wilshire Associates, culminating with a 
$350,000 no-bid contract in May to 
carry out much of the restructuring. 

Parsky downplayed his role in 



followed UC procedures and was 
made on merits. He also denied wanti- 
ng to get rid of treasurer Small. 

Federal election records show that 
on May 1 1, one week before the UC 
vote to hire the investment firm, 
Wilshire president Dennis Tito donat- 
ed $80,000 to a Republican Party soft 
money committee raising money to 
support Bush. 

California law says appointees to 
state boards and commissions cannot 
"accept, solicit or direct" political 
donations of more than $250 from 
prospective contractors, except when 
the contracts are awarded after com- 
petitive bidding. 



Board of Regents by former Wilshire's hiring, saying the decision 



Tito said the donation had nothing 
to do with the UC contract and Panicy 



was not involved. He said the money 
was solicited by his friend Bradford 
Freeman, a Los Angeles investment 
banker who is Bush's California fund- 
raising chairman. 

Parsky said he was unaware of the 
donation. "I have never had any con- 
tact with Mr. Tito about making contri- 
butions to the Bush campaign," he said. 

The regent said he does not play a 
significant fund-raising role in the Bush 
campaign, explaining his main job is to 
direct Bush's political strategy in the 
state. His company, Aurora Capital 
Partners, is one of the state's most 
active Republican fund^•aisers. 

After Parsky became a regent, he 



was named to head a UC committee 
that oversees the university's pension 



fund. He began urging regents to scru- 
tinize Small's investment strategies and 
her job performance. 

Critics question the move to oust 
UC treasurer Small, who has long man- 
aged UC's pension fund. 

Small "is an excellent treasurer," 
said former Regent Glenn Campbell, a 
scholar at Stanford's Hoover 
Institution. "Her rate of return has 
been outstanding. Higher than almost 
any other university." 

In a 1999 report, the treasurer's 

office said the fund had outperformed 

comparable funds and had an annual 

return of 16 percent over the past 20 

JffiUL 



Sm 



•^ . 



4 Monday, July 17, 2000-Fnday, July 21, 2000 



Daity Brain News 




Petty theft 

Eleven parking permits or proxy cards 
and about $3,392 in wallets or cellular 
phones were stolen in Ae past four weeks. 

Someone stole wheels and a bicycle 
seat worth a tQtal of $7S from ttie 
Neuropsychiatric Institute July 2. 
■ An office desk, video camera^ coi 
disk and watch worth a total of $7 
stolen from various locations 
in June. 

Several car break-ins. in 
incurred a total loss of S 



Grand theft 

A black 1998 Dod 
1986 Chevy Nova u 
stolen from lots 1 ani 

Three laptop com 

Source: Ufliversity Police Oept Log 




rested a niMiqj^^Hppasing 
tickets at ttic^^fljcrage in 
lan Union. That same day, a man 
'seen allegedly peeping into the 
of the Men's Gym locker room. 



Someone accessed a woman*t' ATM' 
account without her permission and with- 
drew $260 July 6. She suspects the culprit 
was a store salesman, according to police. 
A man between the age of 60 to 70 
appeared disoriented and reportedly told 
someone he "Uked to watch girls" before 
fleeing towards the soccer field in a police 

report; 

A Q^^^^M attempted to kill anoth- 
er pe^^^^^Bied to Hnd his victim at 
the (^^^^^Balth Sciences to "conih 
plete tlfl^^BPe,'' accor(Hi^s to a June 
28ref 

A mat^tempted to cut his victim with 
a box culflon die 500 blodc of Glenrock 
ne22. 

anager attempted to remove 

n apartment building on the 

Landfair Avenue on June 19 

andlord and tenant had gotten 

mto a dispute. Police received the report 

as an "attempted burglary. ** 

Compiled from UCPD media reports 
between June 19 and July 14 t)y Linh Tat 
Daily Bruin Senior Staff. 




Egypt's progress towards 




FREEDOMS: Government 
labels journalists as part 
of Muslim extremists 



By Mae Ghalwash 

The Associated Press 

CA I RO, Egypt — Egyptian journal- 
ist Adel Hussein has a lot to say but 
nowhere to say it. 

His opposition newspaper, AI- 
Shaab, has been suspended after the 
government accused it of causing riots 
because of its articles about an alleged- 
ly blasphemous novel. Other papers 
treat Hussein like a pariah. His Labor 
Party, tagged as too cozy with Muslim 
fundamentalists, has been ordered to 
suspend activities. 

Human rights groups say Hussein's 
is among the latest voices of dissent to 
be silenced in a country that claims to 
be democratic. 

"What happened to us ... kills the 
amount of freedom in the press that 
we had achieved. This freedom was 
the only democratic progress we had 
made," Hussein said. 

Egypt's efforts to join the global 
economy have not been matched by 
moves to meet international standards 
on political rights: freedom of expres- 
sion, freedom of assembly and free 
and fair elections. 

The veering between greater and 




slowed by dominant party 



The Associated Press 

Hassan Khalifa, a mennber of the Islamic militant group al-Gamaa al- 
Islamiya, is handcuffed to his wheelchair by police. 



lesser democracy may be attributed to 
President Hosni Mubarak's caution, 
his choice to move his people along a 
path slowly. 

Mustafa el-Fikky, a top Foreign 
Ministry spokesman and former 
adviser to Mubarak, insists the govern- 
ment's ultimate goal is a more open 
Egypt. 

"People criticize Mubarak for mov- 
ing slowly. But this (pace) is good. 
Egypt is a very difficult country to con* 
trol," El-Fikky said at a recent event. 



Soon after succeeding Anwar Sadat 
to the presidency in 1981, Mubarak 
freed scores of political prisoners. 
Opposition parties and their newspa- 
pers flourished. Human rights groups 
were founded. 

But in the early 1990s, the govern- 
ment unleashed a tough crackdown on 
a violent insurgency launched by 
Muslim extremists. Thousands have 
been jailed and 96'have been executed 
since 1992. , . ■ ■.;" 

Once the militants were crushed. 



officials tumed to other voices of dis- 
sent, like journalists and human rights 
activists. 

Critics say politicians who have 
held onto their seats too long have 
become intolerant of challenges and 
unused to any checks on their power. 
Some Cabinet members have held 
their positions for at least a decade. 

Opposition journalist Gamal 
Fahmy, who was barred from writing 
for just over a year, believes that his 
fate was sealed not when he wrote in 
Al-Arabi newspaper against the re- 
nomination of Mubarak for a fourth 
term, but for a piece critical of former 
Prime Minister Kamal el-Ganzoury. 

Mubarak "is more tolerant than his 
ministers " Fahmy said. The ministers 
"behave^ if the country was their 
mother's farm." 

Since the passing of a tough press 
law in 1995, several journalists have 
been barred from writing for varying 
periods. At least six have been jailed 
on libel charges. Three independent 
newspapers have been shut down. 

Hafez Abu Saada, secretary gener- 
al of the Egyptian Organization for 
Human Rights, was ordered into court 
in February after a newspaper alleged 
that he accepted a $25,000 check from 
a British parliamentary committee in 
return for writing a report that 
accused police of abusing some 400 
Coptic Christians in southern Egypt in 
1998. 



Under pressure from local and 
international activists, the government 
eventually accepted that Abu Saada 
had received the money for a women's 
legal aid project. The. trial was called 
ofl-. 

Abu Saada went on to act as lawyer 
for liberal sociologist Saad Eddin 
Ibrahim, whom police arrested June 
30 on charges that included preparing 
a documentary film on Egypt's elec- 
tions that harmed the country's image. 

"Rigging has become a way of life 
for (Mubarak's National Democratic 
Party), although they could win hon- 
estly," Ibrahim said in an interview 
with The Associated Press days before 
his arrest. The government strongly 
denies fixing elections. 

Ibrahim said that Mubarak's 
promises of free and fair votes could 
be undermined by "people around the 
president who have a stake in rigging 
the elections." 

The N DP controls 97 percent of the 
seats in the 444-member parliament. ' 
In the early days of Mubarak's presi- 
dency, elections were considered 
cleaner, as demonstrated by NDP vic- 
tories of just two-thirds of /the seats. 
New parliamentary elections are due 
in November. 

Many of the restrictions on free- 
dom are laid out in an emergency law 
that has been in effect since Sadat's 
1981 assassination by Muslim extrem- 
ists. . 





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Monday, July 17, 2000-Frktay, Ji4y 21, 2000 5 



WORLD &^ NATION 




The Associated Press 



Circuit court Judge Robert Paul Kaye reads aloud the $145 billion 
verdict the jury awarded in the Florida smokers' trial July 14 in Miami. 

Punitive award could 
bankrupt Big Tobacco 



FLORIDA: Plaintiffs may 
not see any seUlement 
money after appeals 



By Catherine Wikon 

The Associated Press 

MIAMI — Hundreds of thousands 
of sick smokers slated to receive a share 
of the colossal $145 billion punitive 
damage award levied against the tobac- 
co industry may die before ever getting 
a penny from the tobacco companies. 

Moments after Friday's devastating 
verdict, tobacco companies promised 
to appeal. 

The companies had sought a verdict 
of less than $400 million and claim the 
historic damage award would put their 
industry out of business. They also say 
no final order can be signed for 
decades until all smokers have their 
individual compensation claims heard. 

Although the two-year-old trial offi- 
cially concluded with the damage 
award, lawyers get only a weekend 
break* before returning to court 
Monday to discuss the next steps. 
Attorneys representing the 300,000 to 
700,000 sick Rorida smokers plan to 
request a speedy process once the 
industry appeals. 

Meanwhile, some officials who 



negotiated the states' $257 billion 
national settlement with the industry 
expressed concerns that Friday's jury 
award could threaten their ability to 
collect on that settlement 

Louisiana state Treasurer John 
Kennedy fears the jury decision could 
effect annual payments on the state's 
$4.6 billion share of the settlement, and 
he wants to build security for the pro- 
grams the settlement money is financ- 
ing by selling bonds. The Florida 
Legislature set up bonding mechanism 
for its $13 billion share last spring, with 
the bonds to be paid off as the tobacco 
settlement payments come in. 

"This-is just another reason why we 
can't afford to gamble with money ded- 
icated to health care and education on 
the future of the tobacco industry," 
Kennedy said. Among other things, the 
state uses those payments to fund col- 
lege scholarships and make up budget 
shortfalls in the Department of Health 
and Hospitals, which administers 
Medicaid. 

But other attorneys general who 
negotiated the national tobacco deal 
show less concern about the flow of 
funds. , . ^ 

"I don't think it will have any effect 
on it, at least at this point," said 
Mississippi Attorney General Mike 
Moore, a leader in the efforts by stale 
to sue to tobacco industry. 



WORLD & NATION BRIEFS 



Palestinian peace talks show optimism 



MIDEAST: Lack of time 
pushes groups to reach 
accord during summit 



By Laura King 

The Associated Press 

THURMONT, Md. 
Palestinian delegation sources from 
the Camp David talks signaled opti- 
mism July 16 about reaching an 
accord, but Israeli officials said no 
breakthrough was in the offing. 

A White House spokesman said 
the pace of talks was picking up, 
with only three full days remaining 
before President Clinton is to leave 
for Japan. 

"I think everyone understands 
the calendar. ... They understand 
that an intense effort is needed," 
spokesman Joe Lockhart told 
reporters on Sunday^ the summit's 
sixth day. •■ 

He described the atmosphere in 
recent days as tense at times despite 
the informal setting. "These issues 
are difficult," he said. 

The previous night, Clinton met 
separately with Prime Minister 



Ehud Barak and Palestinian leader 
Yasser Arafat, then ate dinner with 
the two seated on either side of him. 
While declining to say what they 
talked about, Lockhsjrt said, "The 
dinners have always had a positive 
feel to them." 

The president attended Sunday 
services at Camp David's 
Evergreen Chapel and then met 
with his negotiating team. 



"It is hard at this point 

to give some kind 

of impression of 

optimism." 

YossiBeilin 

Israeli justice minister 



Palestinian delegation sources, 
speaking on condition of anonymi- 
ty, cited progress on some of the 
issues on the table. Until now, the 
Palestinians, who came reluctantly 
to the talks, had been largely pes- 



simistic in their assessmer)ts. 

But several Israeli Cabinet min- 
isters who had spoken by telephone 
to Barak said there was no basis for 
a claim of progress. Foreign 
Minister David Levy, who chose 
not to accompany Barak to the 
talks, was especially downbeat. 

"I am worried," Levy told 
reporters in Jerusalem. "The situa- 
tion there is far from an easy one, 
and there is no sign that the gaps 
are narrowing." T 

The main points of dispute are 
the boundaries of a future 
Palestinian state, the fate of several 
million Palestinian refugees and the 
status of Jerusalem, which both 
sides claim as their capital. 

Israeli Justice Minister Yossi 
Beilin, an architect of the landmark 
Oslo accords, told Israel's army 
radio that the talks were at a cross- 
roads. 

"It is hard at this point to give 
some kind of impression of opti- 
mism more than yesterday or the 
day before yesterday, because there 
has not been a breakthrough," 
Beilin said. 

See SUMMIT, pagelO 



CAMPAIGN: Top priority 
is still abortion; Nader 
defends election decision 



By Brigitte Greenberg 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON - George W. 
Bush said July 16 his vice presidential 
selection would be based on factors 
other than the candidates' views on 
abortion, despite the urging of con- 
servative Christians that he pick an 
anti-abortion running mate. 

Bush was responding to James 
Dobson, the president of Focus on 
the Family, who recently said the like- 
ly Republican nominee, "cannot and 
will not" be elected president if he 
"does not energize his base" of con- 
servative Christians by picking a per- 
son who opposes abortion. The Texas 
governor said he gets "all kinds of 
interesting advice." 

"I'm going to pick somebody who 
can be president of the United States 
and somebody with whom I can get 



Speculation continues over Bush V.P pick 




The Associated Press 

Republican candidate Texas Gov. George W. Bush gets primped dur- 
ing a break in the live broadcast of ABC's This Week' on Sunday. 



along," he told ABC's "This Week" 
in a rare talk show appearance. "I'm 
going to take a lot of factors into con- 
sideration: obviously issues matter, a 
person's voting record matters. 



•where they're from matters and their 
gender matters." 

Bush said he had not yet decided if 

See ELECTIONS, page 11 



Internet group to use 
new domain names 

YOKOHAMA, Japan - The private corpo- 
ration overseeing changes on the Internet 
approved the creation July 16 of the first new 
top-level domain names on the computer net- 
work since the 1980s. - 

The decision, made at a conference in 
Japan by the Internet Corporation for 
Assigned Names and Numbers, will bring 
additions to existing Web site suffixes such as 
"com" and "org." But how many more suffix- 
es or how they will be used remains to be 
worked out. 

The resolution, passed unanimously by 
ICANN 's 19-member board, was praised by 
some as a boon to companies that register and 
sell the Internet labels. 

"It's beautiful. It's a major step," said 
Steinar Grotterod, of Active ISP, an Internet 
service provider in Oslo, Norway 
— B ut th e move wa s cr i t i c is e d b y so me - 



including members of the ICANN 
board itself - for failing to set clear 
guidelines for the number of new 
names to be introduced or how they 
will be phased into use. 



Gay rights supporters 
want better Census 

WASHINGTON - They could have called 
themselves "roommates" or "boarders." Even 
"otjier non-relative" would have been appro- 
priate. 

Instead, on* his Census 200&-f<<rm, Ronald 
Nelson checked off the box next to the words 
he felt best symbolized his long-standing and 
committed relationship with the man he's lived 
with the last five years - "unmarried partner." 
. Gay and lesbian rights groups encouraged 
other couples to do the same this year, hoping 
it would provide the most comprehensive sta- 
tistical look ever at the size of America's same- 
s c x- c ou p l c pop u l a tion. Th e fir s t C e nsus 




Bureau results are scheduled to be 
released early next year. 
Gay groups believe homosexuals 
should volunteer this information, 
which technically can only be inferred 
from the responses to the "unmarried partner" 
box on the Census form. The government does 
not directly ask people their sexual prefer- 
ences. 

"In the same way that the government 
wants to know how many, say, Samoans, there 
are in the United States, they need to know 
there is a gay and lesbian population," said 
Nelson, who lives in the nation's capital. "We 
don't have little pink triangles near our names 
in the telephone book, and this is a way to get 
some hard numbers." 

Because no question on the Census form 
specifically asks about sexuality, there is no 
official count of the number of homosexuals in 
America. Approximately 150,000 households 
included same-sex unmarried partners in 1990, 
the first year the Census forms contained that 
«p(iei»: 



Gay rights advocates contend updated 
numbers could influence policy decisions at 
the federal, state and local level. 

Reagan's condition 
deteriorating 

WASHINGTON - Former President 
Ronald Reagan's daughter Maureen says her 
father is doing as well as someone with 
Alzheimer's disease can, but that the disease 
"just gets worse every day." 

"He makes it ve^y easy for us," Maureen 
Reagan said Sunday on CNN's "Late 
Edition." "He goes for walks and does all the 
things that we encourage him to do. 

"But the disease just gets worse every day. 
And it is just that it never gets better. So ... 
when I say (his condition is) not so good, 
Alzheimer's families know what I'm talking 
about." 



Com p i led fro m Dai ly Dr u ii i w rtit ifpm is. 



»1 
^1 






■t 1% 



Monday, July 1 7, 2000-f riday, July 21, 2000 



Datiy Bruin News 



STATE h LOCAL 




•■•■• '■". ■■ ''■'■ ...■ ■'■''-■ The Associated Press 

Haley Barbour opens the 1996 GOP Convention in San Diego. Both parties' conventions this year sport 
nnany corporate sponsors, pronnpting some to say corporations have too much influence in politics. 

Company names shine with good will 

DONORS: Corporations help pay for political party 
conventions, say motive is to advance democracy 



By Jonathan D. Salant 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON - From AT&T 
to General Motors, several compa- 
nies hoping to save their federal 
subsidies from budget cuts are 
helping to pay for cocktail recep- 
tions, posh dinners and other glitz 



at both political parties' conven- 
tions. 

Some of the donors have anted 
up as much as $1 million each to 
the Republican and Democjatic 
host committees that are arranging 
the entertainment and transporta- 
tion at the quadrennial events. 

The donations allow them to sow 



good will among the federal, state 
and local officials who will attend 
the GOP event in Philadelphia 
later this month and the 
Democrats' bash in Los Angeles in 
August. 

The companies' good deeds will 
not go unnoticed. Their names will 
be proudly displayed as "primary 
partners," "platinum and gold 
benefactors" and "trustees" in the 

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San Francisco's companies 
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SPACE: Rates of vacancy 
near 1 percent; mergers, 
closures free some spots 

The Associated Press 

SAN FRANCISCO - In San 
Francisco, where commercial real 
estate vacancy rates hover around I 
percent, scanning the papers to see 
which dot-coms have been the latest 
to go out of business can help start-up 
companies find a place to call home. , 

And following the Nasdaq com- 
posite index's dive in April, a number 
of dot-coms have gone under or 
decided to downsize, increasing the 
amount of vacant commercial spaces 
in the past few months. 

One commercial real estate bro- 
kerage firm has kept possible tenants 
abreast of potential availabilities by 
sending out a list of office spaces that 
could open up through mergers or 
consolidation, the San Francisco 
Examiner reported. 



Space is becoming 
available with many 
companies merging. 



More space is also becoming avail- 
able with many companies downsiz- 
ing, merging or consolidating. 

Some companies had leased more 
space than they needed to accommo- 
date future growth, but with many 
opting to stay the size they are or even 



to shriftk, they are reconsidering that 
practice. 

For those that have leased more 
space than they need, some say sub- 
leasing is the answer. 

Often landlords prefer to rent to a 
single tenant, so companies must 
lease more space than they can use. 
They can, in turn, rent out what they 
do not use. ... 



What landlords cati get 

for commercial space 

doubled in the last year. 



Although some brokers say they 
have seen their supply of available 
spaces double or triple since a year 
ago, the demand still exceeds the sup- 
ply - about a I percent vacancy rate. 

"With that low vacancy rate, there 
aren't many winners," said Mark 
Walker, president of Walker Pacific 
Commercial Real Estate Services in 
San Francisco. "There is this illusion 
that brokers are making all kinds of 
money, but if you're a store and you 
have three tubes of toothpaste and 
100 customers, you're not making 
much money." 

Brokers say fewer people are com- 
peting for the spaces, and some com- 
panies have even backed out of leases. 
That has not posed much of a prob- 
lem, as the amount that landlords can 
get for commercial space has 
increased considerably in the last 
year. It doubled from about $45 a 
square foot to about S90 a square 
foot. 



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8 Monday, July 1 7, 2000-Friday, July 21, 2000 



Daily Bruin News 



EMPLOYEES 

From page 1 



scheduling and food coupons for 
restaurant employees, said 
Patricia Eastman, executive direc- 
tor of ASUCLA. 

In addition to a greater market- 
ing campaign, Eastman said 
bonuses for referring other stu- 
dents for employment, early 
access to textbooks and addition- 
al employee discounts are some 
features the task force is consider- 
ing. 

Despite the benefits of work- 
ing for ASUCLA. some student 
employees like Saul Villcda, a sec- 
ond-year biology student, said 
they only plan to work there a few 
months until they find another 
job. 

"TKere's so many belter jobs I 
could get," said Villeda, who 
started working in the UCLA 
Store stock room three weeks 
ago. "I want to find something 
related to the medical profession, 
for my post-graduate studies." 

Villeda said he enjoys working 
at the store, but feels it does not 
otTer the experience he needs for a 
future career. 

But according to ASUCLA 
officials, many of its positions 
offer managerial training and 
experiences comparable to those 
found off campus. 

"What many people don't real- 
ize is that the vast majority of our 
students are at some supervisor 
level, where they arc gaining valu- 
able supervisor experience," 



Williams said. 

The task force is expected to 
propose new benefits to the asso- 
ciation's executive management 
group by the end of the summer, 
Eastman said. . *" 

Meanwhile, ASUCLA restau- 
rants have enough workers 
because fewer are needed during 
the summer, Williams said. But he 
remains concerned about filling 
student positions for fall quarter. 

"For the summer we're in pret- 
ty good shape, but during the 
school year we'd like 100 more," 
he said. 

. According to Williams, cam- 
^T restaurants sucti as the ' 
Bombshelter and Northern 
Lights had roughly 100 vacant 
student positions during spring 
quarter. 

As in the past, these vacancies 
were eventually filled by workers 
of an independent employment 
agency. v, i "". ' 

Hiring non-student workers 
costs the association more money 
due to fees paid out to the agency 
in addition to paying employee 
wages, Williams said. 

The UCLA Store was also 
short-staffed during the spring 
and was forced to hire outside 
help for student positions for the 
first time in its history, Eastman 
said. 

"Spring is always a difficult 
lime to staff with students," she 
said, explaining students are more 
focused on their studies by then. 

"As the end of the school year 
approaches, academic demands 
are more significant," she said. 



GRANTS 

From page 1 

would set unchanging GPA standards, 
not based on state funding. 

But the legislation comes with a sub- 
stantial price tag, and the governor and 
the bill's supporters are at odds about 
the long-term financial impact of one of 
the bill's major provisions, the "Cal 
Grant Guarantee Program." 

The State Department of Finance 
estimates predict the cost of the grant 
guarantee program will top $2 billion 
each year by the fourth year, but sup- 
porters say that number is act,ually 
around $321 million. 

Proponents of expanding the Cal 
Grant program are also asking for 
more money following the state Student 
Aid Commission's July 10 report of a 41 
percent increase in the number of new 
Cal Grant awards for 2000-20Q1. 

Cathy Staples, Cal Grant coordina- 
tor and a senior analyst at the UCLA 
Office of Financial Aid, said while the 
number of UCLA students receiving 
Cal Grants next year is not known - 
since students have not yet released 
financial aid information to the univer- 
sity - she is anticipating an upward 
trend in the number of grants awarded. 

"I'm hoping that we see a large per- 
centage increase as the state projected," 
Staples ..aid. 

In a statement, the CSAC attributes 
the statewide spike in new grants to 
increased budget allocations for the 
program. This year, Cal Grant funding 
inched closer to the state-mandated 
goal of providing grants to 25 percent 
of eligible applicants. 

"This is the first year we have even 



come close to the statutory budget 2S 
percent number," s^ id Steve Arena, a 
CSAC spokesman. 

"If you can never reach that figure, 
and if it's a moving target, you get con- 
cerned that you are going to get further 
behind if the (applicant) pool mush- 
rooms," he added. 

While Arena acknowledged that 
state budget provisions for the Cal 
Grant program show a commitment by 
the governor and state legislature to 
help some of California's poorest stu- 
dents with their higher education costs, 
he said more steps need to be taken 
since "Tidal Wave II looms on the hori- 
zon. " ___-_—_^— ^^ . .:—- -r-'-^^T-^^-*— ^ 

The term Tidal Wave FI signifies the 
influx of tens of thousands of new stu- 
dents - the children of the baby boomer 
generation - by 2010, ' > 

Ortiz said the funds.Gov. Davis pro- 
vided in his current state budget is just a 
drop in the bucket compared to the real 
financial commitment it will take to 
achieve the 100 percent goal her legisla- 
tion would mandate. 

"The governor sees the 25 percent 
number as a ceiling, we see it as a Hoor," 
Ortiz said. "It still does not begin to 
address the huge need." ■:-■ ;V' ■■■■ 

The governor has until the end of the 
month to take action on the bill, but 
even in the event of the veto, there is a 
chance the Cal Grant Guarantee could 
be enacted by a rare veto override, 
which takes a two-thirds vote of both 
houses of the legislature. 

Ortiz would not comment specifical- 
ly on the chances of a veto override 
before Davis has taken action on the 
bill, but said SB 1644 passed the State 
Assembly and the Senate by unanimous 
votes. 



REGENTS 



From page 3 

Small declined to be inter- 
viewed, but documents she wrote 
indicate she became alarmed as 
Parsky and Wilshire pushed for 
what she saw as abrupt, major 
changes in the fund's successful 
asset n, iX and its performance 
benchmarks. . ,. , 

Last year, a commission chaired 
by Parsky set up to oversee the 
treasurer's office hired Wilshire 
Associates with a $97,000 consult- 
- ing contract. Parsky said Wilshire • 
competed to win the contract. 

In July 1999, a few weeks after 
Tito and other Wilshire executives 
and their wives donated a com- 
bined $10,000 to Bush's campaign, 
the regents authorized hiring con- 
sultants to analyze the portfolio's 
mix of investments. 

Records show Parsky's com- 
mission gave a no-bid, $250,000 
contract to Wilshire. Meeting min- 
utes show Parsky saying no other 
bids were solicited because the new 
contract was seen as an extension 
of the first. 

By early this year, according to 
documents and sources, Parsky 
and Wilshire consultants said 
UC's pension fund should be over- 
hauled because its mix of invest- 
ments was too risky. 

In March, regents adopted 
Wilshire's recommendations - 
changing the mix, hiring money 
managers to run about 30 percent 
of the portfolio and hiring a gener- 
al consultant. 



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ORIENTATION 

From page 3 

more sessions with fewer stu- 
dents," he said. "Or they could 

: hire more counselors to decrease 

- the size of the groups." 

Whether or not they enjoyed 
everything about orientation, 
most students agreed the experi- 
ence helped them meet students 
they would never have met in high 
school. 

Elliott said that during orienta- 
tion, she met people from ail over 

_the West Coast with a variety of 
backgrounds, unlike during high 
school. 



CONVENTION 

From page 6 



To help stu- 
dents meet peo- 
ple and foster 
school spirit, the 
orientation 
counselors orga- 
nize Carpe 
Noctem, a night 
scavenger hunt, 
and Cabaret 
Night. 

Though many .<v 
students take part in these activi- 
ties, others choose to participate in 
off-campus activities instead. 

Emily Richards, a third-year 
pol^ical science student who 



"The students work 
as a team and 
make friends." 

Brendan Rahcr 

Orientation Counselor 



dents go out 
instead of join- 
ing the sched- 
uled activities, a 
marked differ- 
ence from her 
own experience. 
"They're 
clubbing or at a 
water polo 
party," she said. 
■^ '"I think they're 

all about meeting other people 

right now." 

Davis said that although she did 

not know specific information 



about Carpe Noctem, attendance 
works at the Sproul front desk, at Cabaret, a variety show put on 
noticed that these days, more stu- by the counselors, has declined. 



Just as orientation can create 
new friendships through its activi- 
ties, it can often mean breaking 
old lies for some students. 

The parent-son/daughter rela- 
tionship is underestimated," 
Raher said. "We have parents fol- 
low us on tour because this is the 
first time their children have been 
away from them." 

Raher emphasized that during 
orientation, some counselors try 
to get students to realize that going 
to college should be their own 
decision, not their parents'. 

"It's hard for students to get out 
of that," he said. "A majority are 
still nervous about leaving their 
home situation." 




KEITH ENRKXJEZ/Datly Brum Senwf Staff 



Nattida Samanukom outruns the corDpetition 
in hopes of getting the prize for Carpe Noctem. 



convention programs and on the lit- 
erature and placards on display at 
the events whaj^ executives can hob- 
nob with Wasmngton's elite. 

The companies say their motive is 
simply to_ advance democracy and 
help defray the cost of staging the 
massive events. 

"We support the democratic 
process," said>- Lockheed Martin 
spokesman James Fetig. 

Others locked in the battle to cut 
what they see as wasteful federal 
subsidies to wealthy companies - the 
critics call it "corporate welfare" - 
suspect another motive. 

"One has got to be a moron and 
extremely naive to believe that the 
wealthy corporations are contribut- 



ing hundreds of millions of dollars 
just for the fun of it," said Rep. 
Bernard Sanders, an independent 
from Vermont who has led the battle 
against the subsidies. 

The Democratic and Republican 
parties each get $13.5 million in tax 
dollars to pay for their conventions. 

But the government allows corpo- 
rations, unions and individuals to 
donate unlimited amounts - and get 
a tax deduction - to convention host 
committees. 

Eight of the 15 companies that 
have donated to both conventions' 
host committees benefit from the 
federal programs that some lawmak- 
ers are trying to kill. They also have 
substantial other business pending 
with the government, ranging from 
contracts to regulatory issues. 

GM and DaimlerChrysler have 
made sizable donations at a time 



when they are fighting efforts to trim 
programs that fund their research 
and development. ■ : ^ f * 

Last month, the House voted 214- 
211 ^to cut $126.5 million, or about 
half the budget, from the 
Partnership for a New Generation 
of Vehicles, a joint venture between 
the government and the automakers 
to develop a car that gets 80 miles 
per gallon. The Senate has not decid- 
ed yet whether to go along with the 
legislation. 

GM, which has received $8.7 mil- 
lion under the program, contributed 
more than $1 million to each con- 
vention's host committee. 
DaimlerChrysler, which has gotten 
$19.7 million, is supporting each to 
the tune of $250,000. 

Both car companies also have 
received millions of dollars under 
the Commerce Department's 



Advanced Technology Program, 
which uses federal and private dol- 
lars to develop new products and is 
another target of the budget cutters. 

GM donated 400 cars to each 
convention. "We consider that a 
marketing opportunity, making our 
vehicles available to an important 
group of people," said spokesman 
William Noack. 

Several other beneficiaries of the 
Commerce program also are big 
givers to bOih conventions, includ- 
ing communications giants AT&T, 
which has given $1 million to both 
conventions, and Verizon Wireless, 
the former Bell Atlantic, which has 
contributed $1 million for 
Philadelphia and $100,000 for Los 
Angeles. 

Another target of the corporate 
subsidy cutters is the Overseas 
Private Investment Corporation, 



which provides loans and insurance 
for companies doing business in 
developing countries. One OPIC 
customer is McDonald's, which has 
contributed $50,000 to the 
Philadelphia convention and 
$25,000 for Los Angeles. 

Another is insurance giant 
American International Group, 
which gave $500,000 for 
Philadelphia. AIG and a subsidiary, 
SunAmerica, also gave $1 million 
each for Los Angeles. 

Keith Ashdown, a spokesman for 
Taxpayers for Common Sense, an 
advocacy group that supports cut- 
ting corporate subsidies, worries 
about the effect of such donations. 

"It is no secret that money that 
goes to grease the wheels of these 
political conventions makes it diffi- 
cult to stop the corporate welfare 
machine," Ashdown said. 




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10 Monday, July 1 7, 2000-Fhday,Ju(y 21, 2000 



DaHy Bruin News 



SUMMIT 

From page 5 

Asked about the Israeli minis- 
ters' comment, Lockharl said: 
■'I'm not going to get into handi- 
capping the comments of those 
who aren't here" 

Also, on July 15 diplomatic 
sources said Barak telephoned 
Vice President Al Gore and 
Republican Gov. George W. 
Bush of Texas, the likely candi- 
dates to succeed Clinton in 
January. 

- "Governor Bush said it was a 
friendly, brief call and that Prime 
Minister Barak let him know 
they were working hard but had 
reached no breakthrough at that 
point," campaign spokeswoman 
Mindy Tucker said Sunday. A 
spokesman for the Gore cam- 



paign did not immediately return 
calls Sunday. __ 

Fn addition to the formal nego- 
tiating teams secluded at Camp 
David, Israeli, Palestinian and 
D.S. delegations staying at near- 
by Emmitsburg, Md., are talking 
about secondary issues. The 
Americans met separately with 
both sides and then all three dele- 
gates talked Sunday morning 
before breaking up into small 
groups, Lockhart said. 

Since the three leaders first sat 
down together on Tuesday, 
Clinton has shuttled between the 
two sides in talks described as 
contentious and difficult. 

Summit participants have 
agreed to disclose nothing of the 
substance of the negotiations. 
U.S. olTicials briefing reporters 
have repeatedly used words like 
"grappling" and "struggling" to 



characterize the efforts. At one 
point, Lockhart described the 
issues as "intractable." 

Clinton is set to leave 
Wednesday for a summit in 
Japan of the world's industrial 
powers and Russia, and U.S. otTi- 
cials have said that should not be 
considered a deadline for wrap- 
ping up the peace talks. 

"It is still our desire to see an 
agreement ... before the presi- 
dent leaves for Tokyo," White 
House spokesman P.J. Crowley 
told reporters on Saturday. 

Barak left home July 10 amid 
a political crisis triggered by the 
collapse of his governing coali- 
tion. Israeli spokesman Gadi 
Baltiansky told Israel radio that it 
would be difficult for the prime 
minister to remain away from 
Israel for much more than a total 
of two weeks. 




The Associated Press 

President Clinton, left, and Palestinian President Yasser Arafat discuss details of 
a potential mideast accord at a working dinner held at Camp David, Md 



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ELEaiONS I i^ 

From pages 7 V^- 

■ ■ ••'-. • ; -, ■■■■' '.'-■-/ '■'■', *^'y.' 

he would announce his running mate 
decision before or during the party 
convention in Philadelphia starting 
July 31. -—— — 

Vice President AI Gore, his 
Democratic opponent, repeated his 
belief on NBC's "Meet The Press" that 
Bush would take away a woman's right 
to choose whether to get an abortion. 

"I will protect a woman's right to 
choose. Governor Bush has sworn to 
take away a woman's right to choose," 
Gore said. "He has told (evangelists) 



Jerry Falwell and Pat Robertson that 
he will make appointments that will be 
very pleasing to them. That's not difTh 
cult to interpret." 

Gore said he opposes parental noti- 
fication, which would require 
teenagers to get a parent or guardian's 
permission before getting an abortion. 

The Democrat brushed aside ques- 
tions about whether consumer advo*- 
cate Ralph Nader, nominee of the 
Green Party, is cutting into his sup- 
port, saying voters eventually will want 
to pick "between two stark choices" - 
Gore or Bush. 

"I think in the final analysis, it is 
likely that most people will see this as a 



two-person contest and cast their vote 
on that," Gore said. Recent polls have 
suggested Nader could hurt Gore in 
important states like Michigan and 
Pennsylvania. 

Nader said Sunday on CBS' "Face 
the Nation" that he was not concerned 
what effect he mij^t have on other 
candidates. 

» "I wouldn't be running if I were 
worried about taking votes away from 
Al Gore or George W. Bush," he said. 
"Nobody is entitled to votes. They 
have to earn them." 

On other issues: 

• Republican Gov. George Ryan 
made a wise decision in calling for a 



moratorium after errors were found in 
that state. 

• On Social Security, Gore said he 
would encourage people to invest 
retirement savings in the stock market 
in addition to a core Social Security 
fund that lawmakers could not touch. 
Bush said people should have the 
option to invest their Social Security 
funds in the stock market. 

* Bush said he would expand 
research on an anti-ballistic missile sys- 
tem. Gore was more cautious, saying 
the decision was still President 
Clinton's, but that, "It's only responsi- 
ble to investigate whether or not it's 
possible." 



T 

* Responding to criticism that his 
administration mishandled S33 mil- 
lion in federal school lunch money. 
Bush said that, in fact, Texas was 
"higher than the national average^ in 
signing up poor children for subsi- 
dized meals. 

• Gore defended his administra- 
tion's 1996 campaign funo-raising tac- 
tics, saying he still believes a California 
event he attended at a Buddhist temple 
was not a fund-raiser "There was no 
request for funds. No money changed 
hands," he said. Gore has denied 
knowing anything about the $60,000 
in illegal donations that followed his 
appearance at the temple. 




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1/2 Price Pitchers of Beer 

Monday-Friday, 4-7pnfi 

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Next week 

Read about the 
United States' role in 
the 6-8 Sumnfiit at 
Okinawa. 

Monday, July 17, 2000-Friday, July 21 2000 




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Daily erutrtVfewrpohrt 



Monday, July 17, 2000-Friday, July 21, 2000 13 





Take the plots of 

other films and mix 

thoroughly to 

create your very 

own action movie 

Hollywood is known to many 
as "the dream factory." It is a 
place where the impossible 
--becomes possible, where larger-than- 
life is manldatory, and where Kevin 

Costner inex- 
plicably still has 

a job. Counting 

from "Mission: 

Impossible 2", 

Hollywood is 

set to release 

134 movies this 

summer. Many 

will suck, most 

will suck even 

worse, but that 

is no reason why 

you can't get in 

on the action. 

Were you to see all of those 

movies, even at the matinee price, it 
would set you back $670. Hollywood 
knows that only a professional pro- 
ducer would be stupid enough to 
spend that kind of money on movies 
this bad. This means that in a market 
where quantity is favorable over 
quality, many craptacular films will 
see the light of day, even though they 
should be kept in a vault at the 
Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention with the last strain of 
smallpox. 

So why shouldn't you write one 
yoursein 

UCLA offers several classes on 
screenwriting, but 1 think I can 
bypass them all with this column. 
After all, most of the screenwriters 
out there have taken such classes, 
and it certainly didn't do much for 
the brainstems behind "The 

Lief is a third-year psychology and 
English student who wants his ei^ht 
bucks back. Contact him at 
dlief@ucla.edu. 



-summeF 







Flintstones in Viva Rock Vegas." 
Your m